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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028304/00958
 Material Information
Title: Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title: Sunday Floridan
Portion of title: Floridan
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Jackson County Floridan
Publisher: Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Marianna Fla
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates: 30.776389 x -85.238056 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note: "Independent."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID: UF00028304:01010
 Related Items
Preceded by: Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by: Marianna Floridan

Full Text
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S Iniolbrming more than 17,000 renders daily in print and online







FLORIDAN


Vol.90 No.33


Friday morning blaze


destroys Bascom home


BYANGIE COOK
acook@jcfloridan.com

On a crisp, sunny Friday morning in
Bascom, shortly after 9 a.m., Gregory
Herring was driving to his parents' home
when he passed a man coming int6 the
roadway.
Herring, who works in the circulation
department of the Jackson County Flori-
dan, said he didn't know what to make of
the person trying to wave him down on a
rural road.
"I thought something might be off,
but something told me to turn around,"


Herring said.
That's when he saw the fire.
As flames engulfed the double-wide
trailer at 5914 Neals Landing Road, Her-
ring placed a call to 911 and tried to
communicate with the person in need of
assistance.
The man, who had not been identified
as of press time, was able to communi-
cate that he had gotten everyone out of
the burning building, but to Herring he
seemed incoherent. He also appeared
injured.
See BLAZE, Page 9A


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Firefighters from Malone and Jackson County Fire Rescue were working to extinguish a home
that was ablaze in Bascom Friday morning.


CHAMBER OF COMMERCE POWER BREAKHST



Public voices concerns at meeting


Gaetz vows


to stand


his ground

BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com

Although the majority of the discus-
sion at the Jackson County Chamber of
Commerce First Friday Breakfast cen-
tered on insurance, special guests Flori-
da Rep. Marti Coley and Sen. Don Gaetz
also tackled other topics,
including gun control and
the controversial "Stand
Your Ground law, which
came under increasing
criticism after a teenager
was shot and killed by a
Gaetz civilian neighborhood
watch team member who
was armed and following the teenager
before a confrontation that resulted in
the young man's death.
Gaetz made it clear that he plans to
fight any attempt to repeal the law out-
right.or to weaken it significantly; and
he has the power to do it. As Senate
President he can prevent a repeal mea-
sure from ever coming to the floor for a
vote. He said he'd invoke that power if
necessary.
Coley said she, too, supports the law
and would fight to keep it intact.. She
also said she is against enacting other
laws that would hamper gun owner-
ship rights enjoyed by law-abiding citi-
zens, adding that she felt that general
gun prohibitions would put innocent
citizens at greater risk of harm with no
protection against criminals who would
See GAETZ, Page 9A


MARKSKINNER/FLORIDAN
Senator Don Gaetz talks to Jackson County Health Department Administrator William Long after the First Friday Power Breakfast.


Insurance a hot topic at First Friday


BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com

Two Florida legislators spend the better
part of an hour fielding questions about
everything from federal health care re-
form to state gun control laws at the Jack-
son County Chamber of Commerce First
Friday Power Breakfast.
Senate President Don Gaetz and Speak-
er Pro Tempore Marti Coley were keynote
speakers at the session, and spent almost


all their time taking questions from the
crowd.
One man expressed his displeasure
with President Barack Obama's health-
care reform package and asked the leg-
islators what gives him the authority
to make such changes to Medicaid and
other programs.
Gaetz didn't try to explain the process
by which the reform plan came to be,
instead summarizing the ways in which
state legislators can have an impact if


the reforms do survive to be fully imple-
mented by 2014, as he predicts they will
under the current democratic-majority
Congress.
For instance, he said, the state has an
option about how the insurance ex-
change aspect of the plan will be run.
He explained the exchange is essentially
a system in which insurance companies
can list the products they offer which
See FRIDAY, Page 9A


Lawmakers field questions on schools and more


BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com


People are concerned about many
matters as the Florida Legislature
prepares to convene in March for
its annual session, and they shared
their worries with the speakers of the
day, Rep.. Marti Coley and Sen. Don
Gaetz.
They answered questions about
the budget, for instance. One per-
son asked whether permanent raises
will ever be in the future for state


workers, particularly teachers. It has
been six years since state employees
have had on-going raises, receiv-
ing one-time bonuses, instead, for
. several of those years as the state
attempted to trim its budget closer
to the bone. Gov. Rick Scott has
proposed a $2,500 bonus for teach-
ers this year and a $1,500 bonus for
other state workers.
Gaetz said he sympathized with
the workers, and said he feels they
deserve raises and had waited long
enough but that budget realities and


unknowns at both the state and fed-
eral level make it impossible for him
to make promises that raises will be
on the horizon anytime soon.
Coley said she also believes raises
should be embedded in base salaries,
but she, like Gaetz, acknowledged
that state leaders are constitutional-
ly require to balance the budget and
that raises will be difficult, although
supported by many others in the
Legislature.
See MORE, Page 9A


Florida
Representative
Marti Coley
answers a
question from
the crowd as
Florida Senator
Don Gaetz
looks on during
the First
Friday Power
Breakfast.


MARK SKINNERLK/ULOIAN


)CLASSIFIEDS...6B


) ENTERTAINMENT...3B


) JC LIFE...3A


) OBITUARIES...9A


) OPINION...6A


) SPORTS...1B


> BUSINESS...7A


This Newspaper
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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Weather Outlook


kE.VN


High 650
Low -420


Monday
Sunny & Mild.


High 69
Low -46


Wednesday
Partly Cloudy & Mild.


- High 70
I. Low 46


Tuesday
Mostly Cloudy.
Possible shower.


High 70
Low- 450


Thursday
Mostly Cloudy.
Possible Shower.


2 ,, LoHigi 35
, ,, ,
*'.* H"l-^*,, ,, ',b -


24 hours
Month to date
Normal MTD
TIDES
Panama City
Apalachicola
Port St. Joe
Destin
Pensacola


0.00"
0.00"
0.37"


H. Iligh: 65 L .W MLI i-I al "
-Lo : 35 High: 65
S- Lov: 36

S Ilfigh: 66 . .
-'. Lo : 36 -. ,

' 4 -L ',* 1 ,.i- ^ , 61 .
: ll: 7 : ,35
i ow-, : "-


Year to drae 2 I-
Nornml 'TD 5 )1"
Normal for year 59.26"


ULTRAVIOLET INDEX


Low
Low
Low
Low
Low


RIVER READINGS
Woodruff
Blountstown
Marianna
Caryville


12:55 AM
1:26 AM
1:00 AM
2:11 AM
2:45 AM


High
High
High
High
High


Reading
40.95 ft.
2.90 ft.
6.25 ft.
5.30 ft.


2:56
8:12
3:29
4:02
4:35


Flood Stage
66.0 ft.
15.0 ft.
19.0 ft.
12.0 ft.


P-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8-10 Very High, 11+ Extreme

0 1 2 3 4 ^*B


THE SUN AND MOON
Sunrise 6:31 AM
Sunset 5:19 PM
Moonrise 11:56 PM
Moonset 10:58 AM


Feb. Feb. Feb. Feb.
10 17 25 3


FLORIDA'S RSI

PANHANDLE COUNr

MEDIA PARTNERS WJAQ o00.9 "


..... ... ... .


JACKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN
Publisher Valeria Roberts
vroberts@jcfloridan.com

Circulation Manager Dena Oberski
doberski@jcfloridan.com

CONTACT US
Telephone: 850-526-3614
FAX: 850-482-4478
Email: editorial@jcfloridan.com
Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447
Street Address:
4403 Constitution Lane
Marianna, FL 32446
Office Hours:
Weekdays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

MISS YOUR PAPER?
You should receive your newspaper no later
than 6 a.m. If it does not arrive, call Circula-
tion between 6 a.m. and noon, Tuesday to
Friday, and 7 a.m. to 11,a.m. on Sunday. The
Jackson County Floridan (USPS 271-840)
is published Tuesday through Friday and
Sunday mornings. Periodical postage paid
at Marianna, FL.


SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Home delivery: $11.23 per month; $32.83
for three months; $62.05 for six months;
and $123.45 for one year. All prices include
applicable state and local taxes. Mail
subscriptions must be paid in advance. Mail
subscriptions are: $46.12 for three months;
$92.24 for six months; and $184.47 for one
year.

ADVERTISING
The advertiser agrees that the publisher.
shall not be liable for damages arising
out of errors and advertisements beyond
the amount paid for the space actually
occupied by that portion of the advertise-
ments in which the error occurred, whether
such error is due to the negligence of the
publisher's employees or otherwise, and
there shall be not liability for non-inser-
tion of any advertisement beyond the
amount paid for such advertisement. This
newspaper will not knowingly accept or
publish illegal material of any kind. Advertis-
ing which expresses preference based on
legally protected personal characteristics is
not acceptable.

HOWTO GETYOUR
NEWS PUBLISHED
The Jackson County Floridan will publish
news of general interest free of charge.
Submit your news or Community Calendar
events via email, fax, mail, or hand delivery.
Fees may apply for wedding, engagement,
anniversary and birth announcements.
Forms are available at the Floridan offices.
Photographs must be of good quality and
suitable for print. The Floridan reserves the
right to edit all submissions.

GETTING IT RIGHT
The Jackson County Floridan's policy
is to correct mistakes promptly. To
report an error, please call 526-3614
Monday-Friday.


/ "\



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SJ cFLOR IDAN -C i M


ComuRRnity Calendar


TODAY
> Alcoholics Anonymous Closed Discussion
6:30 p.m.at 4349 W. Lafayette St. in Marianna
(in one-story building behind 4351 W. Lafayette St.).
Attendance limited to persons with a desire to stop
drinking.
n Alcoholics Anonymous Meeting 8 p.m. in
the board room of Campbellton-Graceville Hospital,
5429 College Drive, Graceville.

MONDAY, FEB. 4
Career Fair Hosted by Chipola College School
of Health Sciences 8:30 a.m. to noon at
Chipola College in the lobby of the School of Health
Sciences. Representatives from numerous area
hospitals and health care facilities are scheduled
to attend. College officials are expected to make
an announcement regarding Chipola's candidacy
status for National Accreditation with the National
League for Nursing Accrediting Commission.
) Employability Workshop, Common Job Search
Mistakes to Avoid 2:30 p.m. at Marianna One
Stop Career Center. Call 718-0326.
) Reception and Program Honoring Jackson
County Teacher of the Year, Rookie Teacher of
the Year and School Related Employee of the
Year 4:15 p.m. at Marianna High School. Recep-
tion will begin at 4:15 p.m. followed by the Program
at 5 p.m. Call 482-1200 ext. 276.
n Jackson County Quilter's Guild Meeting
- 5:30-7:30 p.m. at Ascension Lutheran Church,
3975 U.S. 90 West, Marianna. Business meetings
are fourth Mondays; other Mondays are for projects,
lessons, help. All quilters welcome. Call 209-7638.
) Central Jackson Relay for Life Committee
Meeting 6 p.m. at Milk & Honey Frozen Yogurt,
4767 U.S. 90 in Marianna. Meetings are planned
for the first Monday of each month prior to
the April event. Volunteers needed. Contact
angelaparker30@gmail.com or 573-5353.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 8-9
p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St., Marianna.

TUESDAY, FEB. 5
St. Anne Thrift Store Hours 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Tuesday and Thursdays at 4285 Second Ave. in
Marianna. Toys/clothing sale: Buy one; get one
(same or lesser value) for free. Call 482-3734.
) East Jackson County Economic Development
Council Meeting 9:30 EST at 8 South Main St.
in Chattahoochee. Dick D'Alemberte Realty will be
recognized as Business of the Month for February.
The public is encouraged to attend.
D Optimist Club of Jackson County Meeting
- Noon at Jim"s Buffet & Grill in Marianna.
n Orientation Noon to 3 p.m. at Goodwill Career
Training Center, 4742 U.S. 90, Marianna. Learn
about and register for free services. Call 526-0139.
) Sewing Circle 1 p.m. at Jackson County Senior
Citizens, 2931 Optimist Drive in Marianna. Call
482-5028.


) Employability Workshop, Using Labor Market
Information 2:30 p.m. at Marianna One Stop
Career Center. Call 718-0326.
) Chipola College Community Chorus 6-7:30
p.m. in the Center for the Arts at Chipola College.
Singers, aged high school and above are welcome to
sing with the Community Chorus and will perform
on the April 16 Chipola Ensemble Concert. Call 718-
2376 or email heidebrechtd@chipola.edu.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 8-M
p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 6
Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting Noon
to 1 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.
Small business seminar "Business Plans"
- 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at Chipola College in
Room M-108of the Business and Technology
building. The seminar will help participants discover
which business type is best suited for their person-
ality, and how to create a working business model to
obtain financing and create a successful business.
Call 718-2441 or email seversone@chipola.edu.

THURSDAY, FEB. 7
n Alabama-Florida Peanut Trade Show 8:30
a.m. at the National Peanut Festival Fairgrounds
Dothan, Ala. This event will offer farmers the oppor-
tunity to view products and services of more than
70 exhibitors. Call 526-2590.
) International Chat n' Sip 8:30-10 a.m.at the
Jackson County Public Library Learning Center,
Marianna branch. The public is invited to join a
relaxed environment for the exchange of language,
culture and ideas among local and international-
communities. Light refreshments will be served.
Call 482-9124.
) Job Club Noon to 3 p.m. at the Goodwill Career
Training Center, 4742 U.S. 90, Marianna. Learn job
seeking/retention skills; get job search assistance.
Call 526-0139.
) Marianna Kiwanis Club Meeting Noon at
Jim's Buffet & Grill, 4329 Lafayette St., Marianna.
Call 482-2290.
) Employability Workshop, What Employers are
Looking For 2:30 p.m. at Marianna One Stop
Career Center. Call 718-0326.
) Bullying Inservice for Parents 3:30 p.m. at
Marianna High School Auditorium, for all interested
parents of students attending Malone, Marianna
Middle, Marianna High and Jackson Alternative
Schools. Babysitting will be provided. Call 482-
9605.
n VFW & Ladies Auxiliary Meeting 6 p.m. at
2830 Wynn St. in Marianna. Covered-dish supper
followed by a 7 p.m. business meeting. Call 372-
2500.
) The William Dunaway Chapter, Florida Soci-
ety, Sons of the American Revolution 6:30
p.m. at Jim's Buffet and Grill. Dutch treat meal.


Beverly Mount-Douds, author, historian and gene-
alogist will present the program, "The Restoration
of the Cape San Bias Lighthouse by the St. Joseph
Historical Society" and possibly moving the light-
house to the St. Joe area. Call 594-6664.
) Davis and Dow Jazz Quartet 7 p.m. at the
Chipola Center for the Arts. Tickets are $14 for
adults and $10 for children under 18. Tickets for
Chipola students and employees are $5 the day
of the show. Tickets are available online at www.
chipola.edu or call 718-2257
Alcoholics Anonymous Closed discussion,
8-9 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901 Cale-
donia St., Marianna, in the AA room. Attendance
limited to persons with a desire to stop drinking;
papers will not be signed.

FRIDAY, FEB. 8
Knitters Nook 10 a.m. at the Jackson County
Public Library, Marianna Branch. New and experi-
enced knitters are welcomed. Call 482-9631.
n Money Sense, Financial Literacy Noon to 4
p.m. at Goodwill Career Traaining Center, 4742 U.S.
90, Marianna. Money Sense is a class that covers
different topics in money management to empower
people to take charge of their finances and create
their own wealth. CalL 526-0139.
) Better Breathers 2-3 p.m. at Jackson Hospital
in the Hudnall Building Community Room. The
program, presented by Michael Black is "Durable
Medical Equipment & How It Works for You" from
Gulf medical. Light refreshments will be served. Call
718-2849.
) Jackson County Chamber of Commerce
Annual Banquet 5:30 p.m. (opening reception)
at the National Guard Armory, U.S. 90, Marianna.
Dinner at 6:45 p.m. Program (7:45 p.m.) features
speaker Allan Bense and a tribute to Rep. Marti
Coley. Awards will be presented and the gravel will
be passed to new chamber chairman. Individual
tickets: $49.
) Celebrate Recovery 7 p.m. at Evangel Worship
Center, 2645 Pebble Hill Road in Marianna. Adult,
teen meetings to "overcome hurts, habits and hang-
ups." Dinner: 6 p.m. Call 209-7856 or 573-1131.
> Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 8-9
p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.

SATURDAY, FEB. 9
n Partners For Pets Adoption Booth 9 a.m. to
2 p.m. at Tractor Supply in Marianna. There will be a
booth set up with puppies to adopt as well as a Hot
Dog booth. There will be other vendors including:
Dixieland Outfitters T-Shirts, Warrior Gurl's Beads
and Things, Shirley's Quilting and Embroidery and
pony rides for the kids.
) 13th annual Miss Tri-City Pageant 2 p.m. in
the Blountstown Middle School Auditorium (former
high school). Admission fee is $5.Benefitting
Special Olympics of Florida/Jackson County. Call
850-762-4561 or 850-209-0641, or email
misstricity@yahoo.com.


The submission deadline for this calendar is two days before publication. Submit to: Community Calendar, Jackson County Floridan, P 0. Box 520, Marianna, FL32447,
email editorial@jcfloridan.com, fax 850-482-4478 or bring items to 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.


Police Roundup


Marianna Police
Department
The Marianna Police De-
partment listed the following
incidents for Jan. 31, the latest
available report: One accident
with no injury, two suspicious
persons, one funeral escort,
one highway obstruction, two
physical disturbances, one
verbal disturbance, one drug
offense, one burglary alarm,
12 traffic stops, one criminal
mischief report, four dog-relat-
ed complaints, one fraud, one
retail theft/shoplifting and one
call to assist another agency.

Jackson County
Sheriff's Office
The Jackson County Sheriff's
Office and county fire/rescue
reported the following incidents


for Jan. 31, the latest available
report: One armed/dangerous,
one drunk pedestrian, one hit-
and-run vehicle, two accidents


I -

CR IME
*4


with no injury,
one stolen tag,
one abandoned
vehicle, four
suspicious vehi-
cles, one suspi-
cious incident,


four suspicious persons, three
information calls, two funeral
escorts, one highway obstruc-
tion, three burglaries, two
physical disturbances, four ver-
bal disturbances, one woodland
fire, two drug offenses, 13 medi-
cal calls, two traffic crashes,
two burglary alarms, 19 traffic
stops, one larceny, one criminal
mischief, one serving papers/ex
parte, one civil dispute, one
assault, one attempted suicide,


one noise disturbance, four
dog-related complaints, one
fraud, one retail theft/shoplift-
ing, one call to assist another
agency, four public service calls,
five fingerprinting, two welfare
checks, three transports, one
Baker Act/transport and three
reports of threats/harassment.

Jackson County
Correctional Facility
The following persons were
booked into the county jail dur-
ing the latest reporting periods:
) Fredrick Bishop, 58, 4160
Midges Lane, Marianna; deliv-
ery of a controlled substance.
) Daniel Rodriguez, 31, 805
Wynn Hollow Trace, Norcross,
Ga.; possession of marijuana
less than 20 grams, possession
of drug paraphernalia.


) Thomas Grissett, 53, 2525
Third Ave., Alford; hold for
Calhoun County.
> Richard Adomat, 36, 5150
Spring Court, Unit 4, Flowery
Branch, Ga.; possession of mar-
ijuana less than 20 grams, pos-
session of drug paraphernalia.
) Joan McCue, 27, 2497 Third
Ave., Alford; petit theft, resisting
arrest without violence.
> Michael Whittington, 50,
1979 Hunter Drive, Sneads;
hold for Bay County.
) Adam Smith, 36, 7884
Sneads Drive, Sneads; hold for
Gadsden County.

Jail Population: 208


To report a crime, call CrimieStoppers
at 526-5000 ora local law enforcement
agency. To report a wildlife violation, call
1-888-404-FWCC (3922).


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PRECIPITATION


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72A SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2013"


WAICE-UP CHU


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So many promises,


but do they mean


anything anymore?


Over the years
we've watched
our leaders give
speech after speech
filled with promises to
us citizens. Knowing that
we live in such a power-
ful country leads many
of us to the belief that
what we are hearing has
a good chance of becom-
ing a reality. Promises,
promises, promises. Are
we becoming the "land
of promises" that may or
may not ever come true?
Some of our politicians,
and leaders of the past
such as John E Kennedy
and Martin Luther King
Jr., were two outstand-
ing orators who made
speeches filled with hope
and promise, but neither
*of them lived to see if
some of their hopes and
promises would become
realities.
Many important
speeches are given by
honest people with
positive intentions; but at
times it seems that prom-
ises being made aren't
done with a sincere heart.
Some of our politicians
have perfected their craft
so well that during their
speeches they can sound
like preachers and pres-
ent themselves as some
of our top actors would.
In other words, they can
be very convincing. There
are time citizens have
become so confused that
they have threatened not
to vote for anyone. What-
ever we do, we can't stop
voting for the candidates
we feel are most suited
for certain positions.
Men are guilty of mak-
ing promises to women
that can expand from


On the menu
Feb.4-8
Breakfast and lunch
menus for Jackson
County schools.

Monday
a Breakfast: Egg frittata
and toast, sausage bis-
cuit, assorted cereal and
buttered toast. Choose
up to 2: chilled peaches,
chilled pears.
) Lunch: Beef nachos,
ham and cheese on bun,
assorted salads. Choose
up.to 4 sides: refried
beans, steamed corn,
fresh assorted fruit and
chilled mixed fruit.

Tuesday


small to big. Ladies, at
times, a man will prom-
ise you an
engage-
ment ring,
financial
security and
a happy life;
as long as
Thomas you cooper-
Vincent ate with his
Murphy program.
If a man is
unemployed, discourte-
ous and disrespectful,
a wise woman should
consider his promises
"hot air."
Some of our most sa-
cred ceremonies, such as
marriage, don't seem to
carry the sacred impact
for some of us as it did in
the past. Many married
people that made the
promise "till death do us
part," are divorced, alive
and looking for another
mate that they can make
that same promise to.
Promises that don't
come to fruition can
cause disappointment,
hurt and pain, fol-
lowed by a lack of trust
and respect toward the
perpetrator. One of the
most hurtful things we as
adults can do is continu-
ously disappoint a child
by not standing up to our
promises. Most children
take promises seriously.
Having to apologize to
them often for not keep-
ing our promises will
soon lead them to having
no faith in us.
Why not consider this:
When we aren't absolute-
ly sure we can keep our
word, eliminate promises
from our conversations
until we can stand sure
on our promises.


waffles, oatmeal and
toast, assorted cereal and
buttered toast. Choose
up to 2: raisins, assorted
100% juice.
) Lunch: turkey and
gcavy over rice, cold cut
on bun, assorted salads.
Choose up to 4 sides:
red beans, sweet potato
wedges, fresh assorted
fruit and assorted 100%
juice.

Thursday
SBreakfast: Breakfast
pizza bagel, buttery
grits and toast, assorted
cereal and buttered toast.
Choose up to 2: chilled
mixed fruit, fresh as-
sorted fruit.
) Lunch-Early Release:
Corndog. Choose up to 3


SBreakfast: Cinnamon sides: carrot sticks, (
roll, ultimate breakfast sticks and fresh app
round, banana muf-
fin loaf. Choose up to 2: Friday
pineapple tidbits, fresh
assorted fruit. ) Breakfast: Mini
) Lunch: Sweet and sour pancakes, assorted
pork over rice, chicken and cinnamon toast
nuggets and breadstick, meal and toast. Cho
assorted salads. Choose up to 2: applesauce,
up to 4 sides: broccoli assorted fruit.
and cheese, fresh carrot ) Lunch: Hotdog o
sticks, fresh assorted fruit bun, cheese pizza, t
and pineapple tidbits. and cheese sandwich
Choose up to 4 sides
Wednesday steamed peas, collar
greens, fresh assorted
) Breakfast: Mini fruit and chilled pea





5vorft ar k ^r

Superbowl Party
February 3, 2013
5:00pmr- l0:00ptr
$30.00 per peroh
$50.00 per couple
Includes
First Pitcher Free .
Buy One get One Draft: .., ,
2796 Jefferson St. ish
SMarianna, FL 32448 8CIO
BB8 ( 8501)482-4800' $6 .9
*IK^^ Im n FPI IIK 6.9


celery
le.


cereal
:, oat-
ose
fresh

n
turkey
h.
S:
rd
ed
irs.


Births


Gavin Vaan Wing was
born Jan. 23 at Jackson
Hospital. He weighed 6
pounds, 11.2 ounces and
was 18 /4 inches long at
birth. His parents are Cas-
sandra and Daniel Wing.
His paternal grandpar-
ent is Patricia Young of
Cottondale and maternal
Laila Yvette Donald-
son was born Jan. 16 at
University of Alabama
at Birmingham Hospi-
tal in Birmingham, Ala.
She weighed 2 pounds,
8 ounces and was 14 /
inches long at birth. Her
parents are Temeka and
Fredrick Donaldson, Jr.
She has one sibling, Takia
Herring. Her grandparents
are Lisa Clay of


,' '

,



grandparent Norris Fears
of Marianna.
.................... ...... ...........


Marianna and Sheryl
White of Greenwood.


AnnMarie Judith Rogers :.,,,
was born Jan. 25 at Jack-
son Hospital. She weighed
8 pounds, 2 ounces and
was 20 '/2 inches long at
birth. Her parents are
Beatrice and Darin Rog-
ers. Her grandparents are
Allen and Sandy Rogers of and Joseph Johnson of
Wausau, Melissa Johnson Portsmouth, Ohio and
of Bonifay, Judith Michael Wilbur Michel.
Annlea Alyse Jeter was
born Nov. 8, 2012 at
Southeast Alabama Medi-
cal Center in Dothan, Ala.
She weighed 7 pounds, 2
ounces and was 21 inches
long at birth. Her parents
are Todd and Leah Jeter.
She has one sister, Ashtyn
Jeter. Her grandparents are
JR and Genice Moneyham
and Ted and Judy Jeter.


Engagements


Adcock, Young


Mr. and Mrs. Robert
Adcock of Lititz, Pa., proudly
announce the engagement of
their daughter, Ms. Ashley
Adcock, to Mr. Christopher
Young, Esq.. son of Mr. and
Mrs. Charlie Young of Marian-
na, Fla.
Ms. Adcock is a 2005 gradu-
ate of Manheim Central High
School and a 2008 graduate of
the Art Institute where she
earned a degree in Interior De-
sign.
She is currently employed


by Adcock Brothers Inc.
Mr. Young is a 1995 gradu-
ate of Grand Ridge High
School, a 1997 graduate of
Chipola College, a 1999 gradu-
ate of Florida State University
and a 2003 graduate of Loui-
siana State University Law
Center.
Mr. Young is a senior part-
ner at Perry .& Young Law
Firm in Panama City, Fla.
The couple plans to marry
September 7, 2013 at The
Grand Hotel in Sandestin, Fla.


Robinson, Josey


Shannon M. Robinson of
Marianna and Charles Ken-
neth Josey of Climax, Ga.
wish to announce their engage-
ment.
The wedding was set for 5


p.m., Feb. 23, 2013 at Citizen
Lodge with a reception to fol-
low. No local invitations are
being sent. Those wishing to
attend please RSVP to 850-
693-5800.


p


BEN SAUNDERS, D.M.D.
PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY
4711 Highway 90 East Marianna, FL
(Between Burger King & Big Lots) 526-SPIT


Scurlock, Burnett


Eddie & Iris Scurlock of
Cottondale are pleased to an-
nounce the engagement of
their daughter Holly Michelle,
to Jordan Wayne Burett, son
of Bill & Gail Burnett of
Alford.
Holly is the granddaughter
of Claude & Bertie McGill of
Kinard; and Arvin Scurlock
and the late Nell Scurlock of
Cottondale.
She is a 2006 graduate of
Cottondale High School and re-
ceived a BS in exercise sci-
ence from Florida State Univer-
sity in 2010. She will graduate
from Florida A&M University


in early May with a doctorate
in physical therapy.
Jordan is the grandson of
the late Curtis & Lula Kent of
Alford; and the late Otis Bur-
nett of West Palm Beach and
the late Evelyn Burnett of
Alford.
He is also a 2006 graduate
of Cottondale High School. In
2011, he received a BS in civil
engineering from Florida State
University. He is currently em-
ployed at Alday-Howell Engi-
neering, Inc. in Marianna.
A beach wedding in Cape
San Blas, FL is planned for
May 18, 2013.


Birthday


10th Birthday
Tra'Kaya' D. Holden of
Greenwood celebrated
her 10th birthday on Jan.
3. She is the daughter
of Racquel Dunston of
Greenwood. A party was
held on Jan. 5 at Chuck
E. Cheese's with family
and friends. Her family
also met at the Fortune


Cookie for dinner and a
birthday get-together.


Does Cupid Need Cash?
Sell your old gold at...




JEWELERS

Paid on Site
4432 Lafayette Street 526-5488 www.smithandsmithonline.com









WHERE IS YOUR EMERGENCY FUND?
One thing you can anticipate: unanticipated expenses
will turn up. That's why everyone-married, single, at
any stage of life-ought to have an emergency fund to
cover them. The fund should be able to cover three to six
month's worth of living expenses.
This is not investment money. This is grab-it-fast-in-an-
emergency cash. Where do you keep it? There are some
safe choices.
A regular bank savings account is safe and liquid,
assuming you stay within the FDIC limits. Yes, current
yields are very low. One alternative is a bank certificate
of deposit, also FDIC-insured, which pays a little more,
though you stand to lose money on penalties if you must
withdraw early. Best bet for emergency funds: CDs with
terms of six months or a year.
Almost as safe, just as liquid, are money market funds
run by reputable financial institutions. Most keep their
$1-a-share value. They generally pay a little more.
Every financial plan should include ani emergency fund.
Talk to us about it at

CARR RIGGS & INGRAM, LLC
4267 Lafayette St., Marianna, FL 32446
(850) 526-3207
L


Do you have'Cute Kids'?
Email yor 'Cute Kids*' photos to editorial@jcfloridan.com, mail
them to P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447 or bring them by our
offices at 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.
"12years or under, with Jackson County ties. Include child's full
name, parents' names) and city of residence This is a free service
All entries subject to editing.


JK C Y R
,I~AJ1:~ PAGE 3AYl


B








JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


1 .II Pal NG ()UT AT THE'SOUPER BOWL'

Kristian Sullivan, Alexis Blount and Jameika Lee
box up some of the 950 cans of food collected
during a three-week "Souper Bowl of Caring" drive
at Cottondale High School. Most of the food and
cash collected will be donated to the "Weekend
. .:~ Backpack" program operated by the Jackson County
School Board. Michael Kilts, supervisor of federal
programs and homeless liaison for the JCSB, said the
program sends backpacks filled with food home with
students who have been identified as showing signs
. of hunger by their teachers. It currently helps nearly
70 students in the county, he added. The remaining
S. food will be donated to an area church food bank. The
CHS "Souper Bowl of Caring" drive started in Sue
Petty's classroom with her seventh- and eighth-grade
students. It expanded after her fellow teacher, Heather
Braxton, learned about it. Braxton, who is Cottondale
High School's Fellowship of Christian Athletes sponsor
and senior class advisor, said she thought the food
drive was a great idea and asked Petty's permission
to have the whole school participate. The larger drive
was organized by the school's Fellowship of Christian
Athletes chapter. Each grade had a classroom
designated as a collection point and some grades
had a contest to see who could collect the most
sip, food, Braxton said. While there had been food drives
' at Christmas and Thanksgiving in the past, this was
the first time CHS took part in the "Souper Bowl:'
The nationwide effort, which occurs annually around
Super Bowl weekend, encourages youth to collect food
or money for those in need. Braxton called the CHS
drive a success. She thinks the school will be doing it
MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN again next year.


Birthday _________ /


Fourth Birthday
Zade Tyus of Sneads
celebrated his fourth
birthday on Dec. 15, 2012.
He is the son of Timmy
and Keli Tyus of Sneads.
Grandparents are Deb-
bie and Michael Shaw of
Chattahoochee, Beth and
Keith Tyus of Grand Ridge
and Steve Harrison of Tal-
lahassee. Great


grandmothers are June
Harrison and Ida Wagner
of Sneads. A party was
held on Dec. 15 at Milk
and Honey in Marianna,
'where his guests, enjoyed
yogurt. Zade had a Mario-
themed party complete
with Yoshi eggs, Luigi
limeade, Mario and Luigi
goody bags and a two-
Slayer Mario world cake.


Pets on Parade


SUBMITTED PHOTOS
Cherokee is a five-year-old Spotted Appaloosa gelding that
needs a loving home as a companion horse. He is unable to be
ridden, but has lots of love to give to a family who will love him
back. If your family has room in their hearts to help a needy
horse, please call Hidden Springs Horse Rescue at 850-526-
223. Their website is www.FloridaHorseRescue.com.


Taco is a two-year-old
male Chihuahua. If
you are interested
in adopting him, the
shelter is at 4011
Maintenance Dr. in
Marianna. Shelter
hours are 10 a.m.
to 3 p.m., Monday-
Friday, and 10 a.m. to
1p.m. on Saturday.
The shelter's phone
number is 482-4570;
the website is www.
partnersforpets.
petfinder.com.


Florida Lottery
CASH PLA4 FATASY


(M) U /7 3-9-1-9
(E); 1/29 8-8-0 0-4-4-3 ,2-3-5-17-24
(M) 8-4-9 4-8-5-7


(E) 2/1 3-5-9 7-8-7-3 1'i 15-32 35


(M) 4.0-6 0-6-5-0
(E) 2/2 7-4-5 8-9-3-8
(M) 3-4-1 4-6-0-8
(E) 1/27 5-2-0 '6-5-2-7
(M) 0-4-9 2-8-9-6
E = Evening drawing, M = Midday drawing


2/2 Not available
1/30 14-16-32-47-52


We want to thank

Jackson County for

our warm welcome to

Marianna!



My wife, Maria, and I !

moved here recently and

it is the best move we

could have made. God

has really blessed us.



We hope you have

enjoyed our restaurant as

much as we have enjoyed

serving you. ,


Spicy Shrimp $6.49
a' moa r.: ss-.- O. jcisa ntrharf *a<3: e
Fried Pickles $4.49
Fried Green Tomato $4.49


Greek Salad $5.99
'IW'ae Lcrvtw 1.1 F oyya
'A. Bar'oK 'coav w rc-o-
.A n:Th7h C.? i *flo Clre3.(
Adoa Stiwe 0 CEu*en to S2 50
Side Greek Salad $2.75
Caesar Salad $5.99
..".-S'* TW 3O,-scv. k' s
AOC R OMChrcotn ki $2.50.



Choose between Greek. Cranb
Salads plus your choke
Top with Shrimp o


Mediterranean Mahl Mahl Tacos

Bala Shrimp Tacos
iC'FYrm-T.r-.Len rr-ii r:.-,a
Wharf Shrimp Tacos



All Pro-oys ore servne wih snreedaed
and your cnoace o
Grouper $9.99
Shrimp $7.99


Bacon Wrapped Shrmp $6.99
Blue Crab Claws $6.49
Gumbo Bo.. $5.49 cup $2.99
Soup of Day boi $5.49 Cup $2.99

U-
Cranberry Pecan $5.99
Spinach Salad
3 2 sa'r'C-c. 6-81 i An.Cr dW
Add SriurporCcken t r 2 50
Black & Bleu Salad $8.49
;<-.<.'L ,_'.y-Mi -7 5 i_ -: I >:, .)-'
..'.. ,: IY r1R r j: r..' ..


]jS -only $8.49-
eny Pecan Spinach or Caesar
ce ola bowl ot soup.
o Chicken $9.99


$8.99

$8.99
-I
$9.49



lenruce tomatoes slIcy sauce
I one idde Iem
Oyster $8.99
Mahl Mahl $8.99


N [ 1All f of our dressings and sauces are homemade daily








A ^- CX.. 'a -'GA iit ..41 1( F R E


-Ilam 4pm Dally-
All Lunch Baskers are served winh French Fnes HushDuppDes and Apple Pie
Shrimp $7.99 Tllapla $7.49
Crab Cake $7.99 Mahl Mahl Fingers $8.99
Catfish $7.99 Oysters $8.99


All Entrees Are Served Broiled' Blackened" or Fried
.*a6: .-.C 50W for drcm-W ae Ba:o -la ne


Oysters
Shrimp
Crab Cakes
Mullet
Grouper
Fried Grouper Fingers


$10.99
$9.99
$9.99
$9.99
$14.99
$12.99


Blue Crab Claws
Tllapla
Mahl Mahl
Catfish
Bacon Wrapped Shrimp
Whole Bone-in Flounder


$9.99
$8.99
$11.99
$9.99
$9.99
$12.99


Comblnatibn of Any 2 of the Above Entrees' $10.99
*l'C'.f.da ror, ., rL :



SOur Chicken Tenders Are Served Fried Broiled or Blackened
Jumbo Chicken Tenders $7.99
-le.:r, ,-nr .li;.r, ',,,. j; 4 "J3 n, B.J f ,. i ,',*2 3_l'ir I, rr,:- .r '. *1 0.,
Chicken Po-Boy $6.99
Check out our tacos and salads for more delicious chicken choices


Wee Platter $11.99
Yirr I'kll'j C',atL.' -
Panacea Platter $13.99
J/-,,,T. "'-l.-. C, ,.~j3. ^ fl_,.A
Grouper Platter $14.99
C,.,:-, Ic. -:'. I I -. o 0o. .'.3: i t2,; r S2 50)''rru
PjO sur' u ,nrIrIn c., -r.jfi -,
*M '.h u i* (. lip'. *n.. rt


Fish & Fries $6.49, I -


l^VA Lj


i" Shrin
t Fish


np


$4.99 Chicken
$4.99 Mini Comdogs
Sn a 0r1. ^ c-u s--1. jCr..


Cheese Grits $1.75
French Fries $1.75
SGarlic Green Beans $1.75
r '

Loaded Grits
aio,.u:-ie 'X C'no-r n''Salad *-.
House Salad


SCole Slaw
SRice Pilaf
SHushpupples
Extra Sauce


Upgrade the side that con
with meal for only $S .99
or order a premium sdi
by tselfor $2.75


Substiute Premium Salad foi any side tor lust $1.99.
Spinach Greek Casar



Call or visit our website
www.thewharfexpress.com
to check for days and hours per location


3111 Mahan Drive
(Puoli. Snopping Centel)
668-1966 or 668-1968
745 Apalachee Parkway
next to Cniil 1
656-1688
3813 North Monroe Street
(Loae Jackson Wlnn Dilie Pioza)
329-7491


110 Merchants Row
(Soulnwooa)
402-0533
2910 Kerry Forest Parkwa
(Nrcnrhampton Shopping Cen
727-7767
Marlanna Location
4767 Hwy. 90, Suite A
850-526-1955


I
$4.99
$4.99



I
$1.75
$1.75
$1.75
$ .35



D













ay
te)


Saturday 2/2
Wednesday 1/30


7-9-10-42-45-49


S For lottery information, call 850-487-7777 or 900-737-7777


Mon.
Mon.
,Tue.
*Tue.
Wed.
Wed.
Thurs,
Thurs.
Fri.
Fri.
Sat.
Sat.
Sun.
Sun.


1/30 5-5-1
4-8-1
1/31 9-1-7
2-4-6


8-6-8-3
8-2-1-3
0-9-5-1
0-3-7-7


12:13-14-2 36

3-15-16-29-33


Not available

4-5-7-19-24


Saturday
Wednesday


l I I


xtra x
xtra 3


~' e ,


i -- --- --- d7hli-W666 .


l4A SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2013


JC LIFE & LOCAL


I


) E( 1/28 0 0 2


1- I65 215-16 2- 31 J


I ,.., ..,.; , 1: .1: ,.. -' .' "







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Chipola Science Ed majors



present at FAST conference


Special to the Floridan

Chipola College Science
Education majors Travis
Moore and Joshua Jeffery
presented a hands-on in-
teractive lesson for teach-
ers to use forensic technol-
ogy in the classroom at the
recent Florida Association
of Science Teachers (FAST)
in St. Petersburg.
Chipola Science fac-
ulty Denise Freeman, Dr.
Jocelyn Wahlgren and Dr.
Santine Cuccio, science
education facilitator, ac-
companied the students
to the conference where
educators from Florida
and other states conferred,
planned lessons and
networked.
Students met with


Shown (from left): Dr. Jocelyn Wahlgren. Assistant Professor
of Natural Science, Science Education majors Travis Moore
and Joshua Jeffery, and Denise Freeman, Natural Science
instructor.
veteran teachers and at- ecology. Participating stu-
tended demonstrations dents stated that both their
and lectures on chemis- content knowledge and
try, magnetism, genetics, pedagogy were reinforced
energy conservation and and extended.


Conference vendors
provided the students
with sample textbooks, in-
structional materials, CDs
and DVDS to use in their
classrooms.
This marks the seventh
year that Chipola Col-
lege has promoted the
professional develop-
ment of students enrolled
in bachelor's programs
by attending the FAST
Conference.
Students who attended
the conference shared
some of the teaching strat-
egies at the Chipola Future
Educator's Club Teacher
Workshop on Saturday.
The conference held
on the Chipola campus
was free to all district
educators.


Chipola DAR learn about heart health


Special to the Floridan

At their January meeting, mem-
bers of Chipola Chapter, Na-
ti6nal Society Daughters of The
American Revolution, learned
the latest about women's heart
health from Dr. Robin Albritton,
who talked about risk factors
and focused on preventive mea-
sures, such as lifestyle changes,
for better heart health. Ten in-
terested guests were in atten-
dance, including one member of
SAR and two members of CA.R.
Blue Springs Society, N.S.CA.R..
president gave the CA.R. annual


report and Florida State Organiz-
ing Secretary Carly Miller dis-
tributed a Blue Springs Society
pamphlet showing things the lo-
cal society has learned about the
2012 national theme, "The Battle
of Saratoga: The Turning Point."
The next DAR meeting will
be Feb. 18 at 11 a.m. at Beef'O'
Brady's. Chris Moore will speak
about the Navy Coastal Systems
Lab. All interested persons are
invited. Reservations are not re-
quired for the Iutch treat lunch.
For information, contact Vice
Regent Carolyn Jordan at cdjor
dan@bellsouth.net or 638-1947.


SUBMITTEDPHOTO
From left, Dr. Robin Albritton is welcomed to
the January DAR meeting by Regent Sharon
Wilkerson.


Sneads High School releases honor rolls


Special to the Floridan

Sneads High School
honor rolls for the first
semester:
9th Grade
H A Honor Roll Mallory
Beauchamp, Logan Mc-
Cord, Kaylee Messer and
Amber Taylor.
) A/B Honor Roll Mar-
garet Aaron, Dakota
Baggett, Haley Barbee,
Allison Brown, Herschell
Brown, Alexandria Bryant,
Allison Cort, Orion Dou-
thit, Nina Durden, Court-
ney Edenfield, Emily Edge,
Elizabeth English, Jakob
Farmer, Chloe Gilbert, Lo-
gan Gilley, Tristan Gosnell,
Djimon Gray, Casey Gro-
ver, Blake Johnson, Alyssa
Johnson, Brianna Mc-
Donald, Madison Pickens,
Cara Pyke, Ashlyn Roberts,
Joseph Scott, Kaylib Shaf-
fer, Amanda Smith, San-
dra Smith, Jeffery Tye and
Patrick Wilkinson.
10th Grade
A Honor Roll Dono-
van Hamilton, Arthur
Johnson, Brianna McCaf-
frey and Jeremy Wert.
) A/B Honor Roll Jack-
son Basford, Ulysses Bun-
ting, Jordan Cain, Caitlin
Chason, Violet Collier,
Gavin Davis, Lydia Dick-
erson, Mikayla Fotenot,
Austin Goff, Gerri Hardin,


Dylan Johns, Mary Jordan,
Sierra Kinsinger, Chasity
McGriff, Shelby Moulton,
Hunter Powell, Alek Rog-
ers, Macey Searcy, Savan-
nah Thompson, Brandi
Walden and Kelsey
Walters.
11th Grade
) A Honor Roll Kristal
Cooley, Ryne Danford, Kai-
tlin Dennison, Andy Faria,
Logan Neel, Jenna Poole,
Taylor Reed, Ryan Rogers,
Ashleigh Tharpe, Alaynah
Weiss and Melissa Wray.
n A/B Honqr Roll Mad-
ison Baker, Chelsey Brown,
Jacob Brown, Shelbi Byler,
Kyle Coy, Destinee Dou-
thit, Morgan Gainer, Taylor
Green, Craig Grice, Deon
Griffin, Bianca Hernan-
dez, Daphne Humphries,
Kelsey Jenkins, Mallory
Myhill, Marissa Neel, Jus-
tice Ozburn, Mary Pin-
tado, Katelynn Roberts,
Charlis Wilkes and Darius
Williams.
12th Grade
) A Honor Roll Caleb
Alexander, Alston Burch,
Christin Fowler, Court-
ney Fowler, Tezlyn Henry,
Hayley Johns, Shelby Law-
rence, Lindsey Locke, Tay-
lor Logan, Sarah Lowen-
thal, Georgia Pevy, Ashley
Rogers, Jenna Sneads,
Brandy Strickland and
WhitneyThomas.


HATTON HOUSE


) A/B Honor Roll Jas-
mine Bowers, Cambraige
Chason, Tyler Cook, Dallas
Goff, Nicholas Goodwin,
Victoria Harrell, Devin
Hayes, Marah Johnson,
Delantre Keys, Corey


Knight, Ashley Lawson,
Austin Lombardo, Alex-
anderia Maphis, Savanna
Owens, Christa Robison,
Hailey Stephens, Jared
Watts, Leah Williams 'and
EmilyWray.


HAPPY


BIRTHDAY!


MARKSKINNER/FLORIDAN

Barbara Thompson, a retired Jackson
County educator, put on her
birthday party hat to go watch the
men's basketball game between Cottondale
and Marianna Thursday night.
-- .


S Highest Quality Construction
Hardie Board Siding
S26 Gauge Concealed Fastener Metal Roof


*Spray Foam Insulation
Oak Cabinets
STile & Carpet Flooring
2 & 3 BEDROOM MODELS
AVAILABLE
$80,000- $120,000 Price Range


V I s I -


U
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Utilities included in rent
Ample off-street parking Clubhouse
Indoor pool Fitness room
Laundry facilities New Management
Monthly Resident activities & events
Income guidelines apply.
yrj r^' '" ', . , ,, r ,- ,
|EIPODAY ABOUT AT SPEC -

2045 3rd Avenue I Sneads, Florida 32460
hatton-house-apartments.com .


Complete the form below; then submit it, with your grandchild's photo & $18 per submission to:
Valentine Grandchildren, C/O Jackson County Floridan, PO. Box 520, Marianna, Florida 32447
or drop them off atour office at 4403 Constitution Lane.
Deadline is 5:00PM on February 8, 2013

Child's Name
Grandparent Name(s)
Daytime Phone Number_
Submitted By
L


-- -;- - -----


LOCAL


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2013 5A F


"I














Publisher
VALERIA ROBERTS

Florida Voices


State should stop


using flawed


aquifer science


Trhe first step in
protecting the state's
environment is
getting the science right.
Yet Florida uses a flawed
model for assessing how
groundwater pumping
affects the surrounding
landscape. It's irresponsi-
ble, and state water man-
agers need to correct it.
Tampa Bay Times staff
writer Craig Pittman re-
ported recently that state
water officials base all
their permitting decisions
on computer models that
rely on a false assumption.
The models assume the
underground area known
as the aquifer flows at a
steady rate through layers
of sand and gravel. In
reality, the land beneath
is composed ofkarst, a
more porous limestone
that is full of holes, both
big and small. The differ-
ence means that water
can travel at a much faster
rate than the computer
models imply, according
to current and former
State water officials. The
net effect is that pollution
can be carried much more
quickly into the drinking
water supply, and state
officials have an inac-
curate picture of what
pumping may do to
regions across the state.
An experiment by a
team of scientists in 2010
illustrates the depth of
the problem. The team
dropped fluorescent dye
into wells and sinkholes
at Silver Springs. Under
the state's model, the dye
would move toward the
springs in cycles ranging


from two to 100 years. But
the dye dropped by the
team rocketed through the
aquifer, crossing half the
100-year distance in only
six months. The models
are so off-base, said David
Still, the former director of
the Suwannee River Water
Management District, that
"they shouldn't be used to
make decisions."
Yet the regional water
management districts rely
on the models in decid-
ing how much pumping
to allow and assessing the
impact on nearby springs,
lakes and Wetlands. The
state also uses the mod-
els as part of its effort to
track nitrate pollution
that comes from septic
tanks and upland runoff.
Officials say they can ,
"tweak" the models to take
into account any obvious
signs of environmental
degradation. But that is
no substitute for a model
that accurately measures
the flow rates in Florida's
distinct water basins..
The water districts
should work with Florida's
Department of Environ-
mental Protection to up-
date the Florida models.
The process may involve
some time and expense,
and any final model may
be imperfect to some
degree given the nature of
measuring hollow areas
in the ground. But these
models must be more
precise to provide better
protection of both the
aquifer and surface water.

From Tampa Bay Times,
St. Petersburg


Contact representatives
Florida Legislature
Rep. Marti Coley, R-District 7
Marti.Coley@myfloridahouse.gov
Building A, Room 186 Chipola College
3094 Indian Circle
Marianna, FL 32446-1701

Rep. Brad Drake, R-District 5
Brad.Drake@myfloridahouse.gov
NWFL State-Chautauqua Campus #205
908 U.S. Highway 90 West
DeFuniak'Springs, FL 32433-1436

Sen. Bill Montford. D-District 6
208 Senate Office Building
404 South Monroe St.
Tallahassee, FL 32399-1100
montford.bill.web@ flsenate.gov

U.S. Congress
Rep. Steve Southerland, R-2nd District
,1229 Longworth HOB
Washington, DC 20515
Phone: (202) 225-5235
Fax: (202) 225-5615

Sen. Bill Nelson (D)
Washington office
United States Senate
716 Senate Hart Office Building
Washington, DC 20510
(202) 224-5274

Sen. Marco Rubio (R)
Washington office
United States Senate
B40A Dirksen Senate Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20510
(202) 224-3041


Could Obama be the marriage president?


resident Barack Obama made
history and gladdened many
hearts when he endorsed
gay rights and gay marriage in his
second inaugural address.
Just think what additional good
he could have done had he also
endorsed marriage generally.
I know. The tired phrase "mar-
riage between one man and one
woman" has become a wholly
owned subsidiary of the political
and religious right. But that need
not scare the president or anyone
else from talking about its benefits
to individuals and society. Married
people live longer, healthier, more
prosperous lives than singletons,
studies show.
And you don't have to be Rick
Santorum to know that marriage
is a grand anti-poverty program.
Many studies have shown that If
people marry before they start
families, the children fare far bet-
ter. This isn't a news flash.
In 1965, an obscure assistant
secretary of Labor named Daniel
Patrick Moynihan wrote a report
for President Lyndon Johnson
about the breakdown of the black
family. Moynihan warned that the
crumbling family structure left
many households headed by single
women and these were more likely
to be stuck in poverty. He hoped
the report would be the impetus
for a national strategy to break the
cycle of poverty.
But Moynihan's report was leaked
to the press, causing an uproar.
Any hope of a national conversa-
tion was lost as critics lambasted
Moynihan for blaming the victims
of poverty, insulting single moms
and ignoring supports in the black
community. His controversial
report notwithstanding, Moynihan
went on to serve 24 years in the


MarshaMercer


U.S. Senate. He died in 2003.
The problem of the collapsing
American family has only gotten
worse since the Moynihan report.
"Nearly 50 years later, the picture
is even more grim and the
statistics can no longer be orga-
nized neatly by race," says Isabel
V Sawhill, a budget expert and
scholar at the Brookings Institu-
tion. "Moynihan's bracing profile of
the collapsing black family in the
1960s looks remarkably similar to a
profile of the average white family
today."
Sawhill writes in the latest Wash-
ington Monthly: "White house-
holds have similar or worse
- statistics of divorce, unwed
childbearing, and single mother-
hood as the black households cited
by Moynihan in his report.
"In 2000, the percentage of white
children living with a single parent
was identical to the percentage of
black children living with a single
parent in 1960; 22 percent," she
says.
While Moynihan saw family
formation as a racial divide, Sawhill
says it's increasingly a class issue.
"Because the breakdown of the
traditional family is overwhelm-
ingly occurring among working-
class Americans of all races, these
trends threaten to make the U.S.
a much more class-based society
over time," she writes.
When educated, middle-class


couples form two-parent families,
they're able to give their children
"time and resources that lower-
and working-class single mothers,
however impressive their efforts
to be both good parents and good
breadwinners, simply do not have,"
Sawhill says.
In his autobiography, "The
Audacity of Hope," Sen. Barack
.Obama writes that liberal policy
makers and civil rights leaders,
in their urgency to avoid blaming
the victims of historical racism,
wrongly labeled Moynihan a racist
and "tended to downplay or ignore
evidence that entrenched behav-
ioral patterns among the black
poor really were contributing to
intergenerational poverty."
As president, Obama has ap-
proached making families stronger
by focusing on the responsibili-
ties of fatherhood, usually around
Fathers Day. In June 2010, he
announced a nationwide Father-
hood and Mentoring Initiative,
but he conceded that it's hard for
government to change attitudes or
behavior.
"Now, I can't legislate fatherhood
- I can't force anybody to love a
child. But what we can do is send
a clear message to our fathers that
there is no excuse for failing to
meet their obligations," he said.
That may be sound social policy,
but it doesn't make anyone's heart
sing.
As Obama and other leaders
promote the value of gay marriage,
they shouldn't be silent on the
value of marriage between a man
and woman. It's not either-or. Both
are good.

Marsha Mercer writes from Washington.
You may contact her at
marsha.mercer@yahoo.com.


Do we want to segregate poor from society?


MARK O'BRIEN
Florida Voices
people keep saying the United
States is being torn apart by
angry words and escalat-
ing divisions that will destroy the
nation.
I'm undecided.
On the one hand, remember
1861-65, the Civil War, bloodshed
and killing galore?
We're not there yet, although this
time the target may be poor people
and folks who can't get jobs, and
the weapons may be laws and
politically inspired bureaucracy.
The rich have always been
demonized by some, but the
current bashing of the poor and
unemployed seems to be gaining
steam among people looking for
someone anyone to blame.
Still, we're not as divided as we
were only 60 years ago, when
segregation was mandatory in 17
states and the District of Columbia.
It didn't have to be that way, of
course. After the Civil War, blacks
in the South played significant
parts in the economy and politics
for a while.
But by 1890 whites had
established Jim Crow laws that
subjugated blacks to separate
and unequal lives. It wasn't just a
"Southern thing," either. Jim Crow
laws started in the North in the
1840s, when politicians ordered
the railroads segregated, as histo-
rian C. Vann Woodward pointed
out in The Strange Career of Jim
Crow.
But Jim Crow prospered


especially in the South, where
race was a great tool for the ruling
class. It would "keep the Southern
masses divided and Southern labor
cheapest in the land," as Dr. Martin
Luther King Jr. noted.
Meanwhile, manySouthern
blacks fled to the North, where they
formed potent voting blocs after
World War II and got some respect.
As Woodward notes, there also was
a sea-change in public opinion
beginning about 1960, with public
attitudes on race gradually
changing nationwide. Courts
began to see through the "separate
but equal" charade.
Florida was one of the last eight
states to desegregate, just a few
behind Mississippi.
Some things endure. The South
still has the cheapest labor in the
land also the least educated and
most unhealthy, according to many
studies.
The South keeps clinging to
"conservative values" against
minorities, women, immigrants
and gays, to name a few scape-
goats. Even now, the red state-blue
state divide is largely geographic, a
South out of step with most of the
country.
But if we can't pick on minorities,
women, immigrants and gays, who
can we pick on?
The poor. After all, they're poor
because they want to be poor.
Everyone knows that.
To people with this mindset,
poverty is a moral failing, and pay
no attention to circumstances like
families, schools, public safety, the


increasingly costly "War on Drugs"
and an economic recovery that has
been much better for some than
for most.
It's not just the poor. The middle
class is shrinking; many of us are
holding on by our finger tips as
property values stagnate and wag-
es drop. No new cars, no vacations,
maybe even no health insurance.
Check out the job market, such
as it is. Many Baby Boomers are
overqualified and unwanted for the
mediocre jobs to be found in this
state, where tourism rules. Tourism
is good, but it produces little in the
wyay of high-skill, high-paying jobs.
In my hometown, the school
board is advertising a job as a
teacher's assistant for less than $9
an hour. It spells out lots of quali-
fications required for the job, and
rightfully so. But it even requires
the successful applicant to pay the
$55 cost of a criminal background
check. That's your first day's pay
gone.
And the Republican "solution" is
to cut some more, on the misguid-
ed concept that less government
spending and fewer services will
make life better for the majority.
Oh, it will make life better, but only
for a few.
Meanwhile, the middle class and
the low-income crowds can fight
each other for the scraps. Welcome
Sto "The New South."
Formerly a columnist for the Pensacola News
Journal, Mark O'Brien is a writer in Pensacola,
and the author of "Pensacola on My Mind"
and "Sand in My Shoes." He can be reached at
markobrienusa@gmail.com.


.








JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.corn


Dothan site of Alabama-Florida Peanut Trade Show


Special to the Floridan

The Alabama-Florida
Peanut Trade Show will be
held Thursday, Feb. 7 at
the National Peanut Fes-
tival Fairgrounds located
on Highway 231 South of
Dothan, AL.
Sponsored by the Ala-


bama Peanut Producers
Association and the Flori-
da Peanut Producers Asso-
ciation, the one-day event
offers farmers the oppor-
tunity to view the products
and services of nore than
70 exhibitors. The show
opens at 8:30 am CST fol-
lowed by a catered lunch


at noon. The afternoon's
events include a seed and
production seminar as well
as a legislative update.
"We invite and encour-
age all peanut farmers to
attend this year's Peanut
Trade Show," says Ken
Barton, executive direc-
tor of the Florida Peanut


Producers Association.
"It's a great opportunity for
farmers to see the latest,
most up-to-date advances
in peanut production and
harvesting equipment and
visit with vendors that pro-
vide products and services
to peanut farmers. The
afternoon seminars will


provide current informa-
tion that will be helpful
as you make plans for the
2013 production year."
Thousands of dollars in
door prizes will be offered
such as cash prizes, gift
cards, peanut seed, a shot-
gun and many more. KMC
will offer the grand door


prize which is one season's
use of a 4 or 6-row KMC
peanut combine with the
option to purchase at a re-
duced price at the end of
the harvest season.
For more information
please contact the Florida
Peanut Producers Associa-
tion office at 526-2590.


You need to allow customers


to evaluate your products


S have been up
Against tough
competition all
my life. I wouldn't know
how to get along without
it." -Walt Disney
I was helping an es-
tablished bakery named
Tasty Pastry in Tallahassee
that had been operating
in the community for
many years. The bak-
ery was very successful,
but sales had gone flat
because of the economy
and because so much
new competition had
been introduced into the
market.
Over the years, a large
part of their sales had
come from supplying
fresh breads to local
restaurants, but this
business had begun to
dry up as franchised
restaurants started to
have a larger presence in
the area. These franchises
were supplied by their
own bakeries in other
cities.
Given that their bread
sales were declining,
they had to exist primar-
ily on walk-in business
and counter sales. As I
observed their customers,
I noted that they typically
came in for one or two
things and very infre-
quently strayed from their
planned purchases.
When walking into the
bakery, it looks very neat
and organized. Bakery
items, from breads and
bagels to cakes, are art-
fully arranged in glass


windowed display cabi-
nets. Everything always


Jo-

Jeryn
Osteryoung


looks so
appetizing
in this neat
bakery that
it makes
me hungry
every time I
go in there.
1 have to
fight to


keep myself from buying
one of their special pies.
With so many delicious
baked goods in plain
view, we had to ask why
customers were not con-
sidering other purchases,
and the answer was three-
fold. Firstly, the custom-
ers were so habit-driven
that they just were not
looking at anything else.
Secondly, though the
display is very appeal-
ing, they never really
changed up where items
were located. And finally,
the customers had never
tasted anything else and
did not want to risk trying
something new.
Based on my observa-
tions, I recommended a
couple of simple things
they could do to improve
their sales. For one thing,
I suggested the bakery
could move the items
'around in the display
cabinets every two weeks.
I also encouraged the
bakery to feature a prod-
uct every day and give out
samples for customers to
taste and give a discount
on those sampled prod-
ucts if purchased on the


day sampled.
- The results of the
tasting have been
amazing. Sales are now
up by 10 percent and
continue to expand as
customers delight in
tasting the new products.
Point being, whether
your business sells to
customers or to other
businesses, you really
need to provide an
opportunity for custom-
ers to test your products
and services. There is just
too much uncertainty for
customers to risk trying
out new products or
services without being
able to sample them
before they buy.
If you are selling a
service, you can offer a
no-cost (I do not like
the word "free" as it has
so many negative
connotations) evaluation.
For example, if you are in
the IT business, give your
potential customers a
no-cost assessment of
their IT functions. The
more you can reduce
the risk to the customer
of trying your products
or services, the more
successful your business
will be.
Now go out and make
sure that you have a way
for potential customers
to sample your products
and services.
You can do this!

Jerry Osteryoung is a consultant
to businesses he has directly
assisted more than 3.000 firms.


DEAR BRUCE: My
boyfriend has been in
business for himself for
the last seven years as a
contractor/handyman.
He does not pay himself
on a weekly basis; he pays
himself when the job itself
pays. We never know what
we are going to have for
money. My income is the
only income that credi-
tors are accepting, due to
the fact that he has zero
dollars on his tax returns.
Plus creditors are giving us
high interest rates.
We want to get mar-
ried-and buy a home
together. We seem to be
falling deeper and deeper
financially. We do not get
any financial assistance
through the state or town.
I have tried, and we do not
qualify.
Do you know of any


resources that can help us
stay on our feet?
--VIA
EMAIL

V DEAR
READER: I
think the
Bruce first thing
Wllams you two
have to
ask your-
selves is whether your
boyfriend's business is
worthwhile. If he never
knows how much money
is going to come in, that
can be a serious problem.
He should pay himself
a salary every two weeks.
When he has extra money,
it should go into a fund to
cover those periods when
there is no income.


Send questions to
bruce@brucewilliams.com.


Latest TV sets are bigger,


better, smarter,


By the editors of Consumer Reports

Americans who are in
the market for a new TV
- perhaps in time for the
biggest football game of
the year will find mod-
els that are bigger, better,
smarter and cheaper, ac-
cording to the latest Con-
sumer Reports TV tests.
"If you're thinking about
upgrading your TV, or if
you're one of the holdouts
planning to buy your first
flat-panel TV, you'll find
plenty of great models in
our latest ratings many
at prices that will put a
smile on your face," said
Jim Willcox, senior editor
for .electronics.
Consumers should be
heartened to know that TV
prices are usually lowest
in February and March,
when manufacturers start
shipping new models and
retailers cut prices to sell
off the old ones. Com-
pelling new features on
mainstream 2013 models
aren't expected, so con-
sumers shouldn't pass up
great deals on top-rated
2012 sets.
However, some TV bar-
gains can be risky. Su-
per-low priced sets, espe-
cially from lesser-known
brands, aren't always the
best deals. Some of the
lowest-scoring sets in CR's
Ratings include TVs from
Coby, Element, Haler,
TCL and Westinghouse.
LCD TVs from LG, Paha-
sonic, Samsung and Sony
have consistently been


among the best perform-
ers in the Consumer Re-
ports ratings. Plasma sets
from Panasonic have been
at the top, followed closely
by Samsung and LG.
The Consumer Reports
ratings include more
smart TVs, or TVs that can
connect to the Internet to
stream video from vari-
ous online services, put-
ting on-demand movies
and TV shows at viewers'
fingertips. All tested TVs
with this capability offer
Netflix, but the availability
of other services like Hulu
Plus, Amazon Instant
Video and Vudu varies by
brand. A growing num-
ber have full browsers for
surfing the Web, built-in
Wi-Fi and access to an
apps market.
Buying a new TV is a big
investment for many con-
sumers. Here are four ba-
sic questions to consider
when shopping for that
new set:
) What screen size? Don't


cheaper

think small and regret it
for the life of the TV If you
sit 6 to 8 feet from the TV
get at least a 40-inch set,
but consider a 46- to 50-
incher to get a more im-
mersive experience.
) Plasma or LCD? Many
of the! highest-scoring
models in our ratings are
plasma TVs. Plasmas,
which come in 42-inch
and larger sizes, tend to
cost a bit less than com-
parably sized LCDs, es-
pecially those using LED
backlights.
) 1080p or 720p resolu-
tion? Most new TVs have.
1080p (full HD) resolu-
tion, but some smaller
sets and low-priced 42-
and 50-inch plasmas still
have 720p.
a 3D or not? 3D capabil-
ity is simply a feature on a
regular HDTV not a new
kind of TV Even if you
don't plan to watch 3D
in the near future, don't
rule out a TV that has that
feature.


JACKSON COUNTY


FLORIDAN


Business owner should pay

himself regular salary


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NOTICE OF PUBLIC WORKSHOP

PUBLIC WORKSHOP FOR THE
JACKSON COUNTY LAND
DEVELOPMENT CODE

Jackson County Community Development will hold a
public workshop to review the proposed Jackson County
Land Development Code. The public workshop will be
held on Tuesday, February 12, 2013 from 6 p.m. until
8 p.m. in the Conference Room of the Jackson County
Annex Building, 4487 Lafayette Street, Marianna,
Florida. The proposed Land Development Code draft
may be inspected online at www.jacksoncountvfl.
net/community-development. Interested parties are
encouraged to .appear at the public workshop and
provide any comments regarding the draft Land
Development Code.
In accorhtm c i n, i lrt th i ',cr with Di.habi, h cs A Icrs s needing c In I ur int'i c tion
to .ortr....... tht in gI I Phould conta I th gSe Pl ....i... S .r.tar c t Ja (o C .o...o...r t "
Shmc 11,11 Sr h 5 i h -, n i gr t, Thehn 7,, Pin,nosmins-,crel ,,nv l n t e he o w1 i 4487
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BUSINESS


SUNDAY, FEBRUAIRY3, 2013 7AF







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Healthier schools: Goodbye candy and greasy snacks


The Associated Press

WASHINGTON Good-
bye candy bars and sugary
cookies. Hello baked chips
and diet sodas.
The government for the
first time is proposing
broad new standards to
make sure all foods sold in.
schools are more health-
.ful, a change that would
ban the sale of almost all
candy, high-calorie sports
drinks and greasy foods on
campus.
Under new rules the De-
partment of Agriculture
proposed Friday, school
vending machines would
start selling water, lower-
calorie sports drinks, diet
sodas and baked chips
instead. Lunchrooms that
now sell fatty "a la carte"
items like mozzarella sticks
and nachos would,have to
switch to healthier pizzas,
low-fat hamburgers, fruit
cups and yogurt.
The rules, required un-
der a child nutrition law
passed by Congress in
2010, are part of the gov-
ernment's effort to combat
childhood obesity. While
many schools already
have made improvements
in their lunch menus and
vending machine choices,
others still are selling high-
fat, high-calorie foods.
Under the proposal, the
Agriculture Department
would set fat, calorie,
sugar and sodium limits
on almost all foods sold in
schools. Current standards
already regulate the nu-
tritional content of school
breakfasts and lunches that
are subsidized by the fed-
eral government, but most
lunch rooms also have
"a la carte" lines that sell
other foods. And food sold
through vending machines
and in other ways outside


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Side salads, apple sauce and plums await the students of Eastside Elementary School in
Clinton, Miss. The government for the first time is proposing broad new standards to make
school snacks healthier, a move that would ban the sale of almost all candy, high-calorie sports


drinks and greasy foods on car
the lunchroom has not
been federally regulated.
"Parents and teachers
work hard to instill healthy
eating habits in our kids,
and these efforts should be
supported when kids walk
through the schoolhouse
door," said Agriculture Sec-
retary Tom Vilsack.
Most snacks sold in
school would have to have
less than 200 calories.
Elementary and middle
schools could sell only
water, low-fat milk or 100
percent fruit or vegetable
juice. High schools could
sell some sports drinks,
diet sodas and iced teas,
but the calories would be
limited. Drinks would be
limited to 12-ounce por-
tions in middle schools,
and 8-ounce portions in
elementary schools.
The standards will cover
vending machines, the "a
la carte" lunch lines, snack
bars and any other foods
regularly sold around


school. They would not ap-
ply to in-school fundrais-
ers or bake sales, though
states have the power to
regulate them. The new
guidelines also would not
apply to after-school con-
cessions at school games
or theater events, goodies
brought from home, for
classroom celebrations, or
anything students bring
for their own personal
consumption.
The new rules are the lat-
est in a long list of changes
designed to make foods
served in schools more
healthful and accessible.
Nutritional guidelines for
the subsidized lunches
were revised last year and
put in place last fall. The
2010 child nutrition law
also provided more money
for schools to serve free and
'reduced-cost lunches and
required more meals to be
served to hungry kids.
Iowa Sen. Tom Harkin, a
Democrat, has been work-


ing for two decades to take
junk foods out of schools.
He calls the availability of
unhealthful foods around
campus a "loophole" that
undermines the taxpayer
money that helps pay for
the healthier subsidized
lunches.
"USDA's proposed nutri-
tion standards are a critical
step in closing that loop-
hole and in ensuring that
our schools are places that
nurture not just the minds
of American children but
their bodies as well," Har-
kin said.
Last year's rules faced
criticism from some con-
servatives, including some
Republicans in Congress,
who said the government
shouldn't be telling kids
what to eat. Mindful of that
backlash, the Agriculture
Department exempted in-
school fundraisers from
federal regulation and pro-
posed different options
for some parts of the rule,


including the calorie limits
for drinks in high schools,
which would be limited
to either 60 calories or
75 calories in a 12-ounce
portion.
The department also
has shown a willingness
to work with schools to re-
solve complaints that some
new requirements are hard
to meet. Last year, for ex-
ample, the government re-
laxed some limits on meats
and grains in subsidized
lunches after school nutri-
tionists said they weren't
working.
Schools, the food indus-
try, interest groups and
other critics or supporters
of the new proposal will
have 60 days to comment
and suggest changes. A fi-
nal rule could be in place
as soon as the 2014 school
year.
Margo Wootan, a nutri-
tion lobbyist for the Center
for Science in the Public
Interest, says surveys done
by her organization show
that most parents want
changes in the lunchroom.
"Parents aren't going to
have to worry that kids are
using their lunch money to
buy candy bars and a Ga-
torade instead of a healthy
school lunch," she said.
The food industry has


been onboard with many
of the changes, and several
companies worked with
Congress on the child nu-
trition law two years ago.
Major beverage companies
have already agreed to take
the most caloric sodas out
of schools. But those same
companies, also sell many
of the non-soda options,
like sports drinks, and have
lobbied to keep them in
vending machines.

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Cattle ranching m(


WICHITA, Kansas -
The severe drought that
scorched pastures across
the Southern Plains last
summer helped shrink the
nation's herd to its smallest
size in more than six de-
cades and encouraged the
movement of animals to
lusher fields in the north-
ern and western parts
of the U.S., a new report
shows.
The National Agricultural
Statistics Service reported
Friday that the U.S. inven-
tory of cattle and calves to-
taled 89.3 million animals
as of Jan. 1. That was down
by 1.5 million cattle, or 2
percent, compared with
this time a year ago.
The agency says this is
the lowest January cattle
inventory since 1952. It
does two counts per year,
in January and July. The
January report had been
anxiously awaited because
it shows the impact of the
drought as it spread across
the nation last summer and
provides a state-by-state
breakdown documenting
the shift of animals north.
Texas, the nation's larg-
est cattle producing state,
saw its herd shrink 5 per-
cent to 11.3 million head
amid a multi-year drought.
Nebraska's herd shrunk
2 percent to 6.3 million
animals as the drought
spread north this summer.


In Kansas, another hard hit
state, the number of cattle
shrunk 4 percent to 5.8 mil-
lion animals as ranchers
sold off animals as pastures
dried up and the price of
hay skyrocketed.
By contrast, North Da-
kota ranchers expanded
their herds by 6 percent
to nearly 1.8 million head,
while South Dakota's cattle
numbers grew 5 percent to
3.8 million head. Montana,
Idaho and Washington also
boosted the size of their
herds.
Glenn Tonsor, an Exten-
sion livestock specialist at
Kansas State University,
said the shift away from
drought-stricken areas
only makes sense.
"It doesn't surprise me
that the southern Plains
continue to have a pullback
in the number of cows, and
it doesn't surprise me that
the Northern Plains has
been increasing," he said.
The growth in the north
didn't make up for losses
elsewhere, and the reper-
cussions are being felt in
the meatpacking indus-
try. Cargill Beef, one of the
nation's largest processors,
announced in January that
it will idle its slaughter-
house in Plainview, Texas,
and lay off all 2,000 workers
because there's less work.
For consumers, fewer
cows will mean less beef


oves amid drought
and 'higher prices down feed readily available, what
the. line, particularly as is available costs too much


demand from overseas in-
creases, Tonsor said.
As "the United States and
global population contin-
ues to increase ... There.is
less beef around for them
to argue over, bid for," he
said.
Among those already
feeling the pain is Kansas
rancher Nathan Pike, who
has sold off 600 cows over
the past couple of years.
With just 130 pregnant
cows left, he considered
trying to buy back a few
animals this winter .in the
hopes of better weather
next spring, but cows cost
more now than when he
sold his animals because
there are fewer left.
"We are gambling," said
Pike, 80. "We are just trying
to figure out a way to make
a living."
In New Mexico, cattle
numbers are down for the
third straight year and the
number of ranchers look-
ing to sell off their herds
and get out of the business
continues to grow. The
overall herd is down to 1.3
million animals, the fewest
since 1991.
"It's trite, but it is the
perfect storm," said Caren
Cowan, executive director
of the New Mexico Cattle
Growers' Association. "We
have no rain,, there's no


and the cost of transporta-
tion has increased. We're
just in a bad place."


Pete Comerford Owner & Operator
593-6828 1-800-369-6828
comerfordvaultmemorial@hotmail.com
Hwy. 90 W Sneads, FL


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NOTICE OF ELECTION
FOR
THE TOWN OF SNEADS
Sneads City Election Voter Registration Deadline
There is an election scheduled for the Town of Sneads, Florida on
Tuesday, April 9, 2013.
The purpose of the election is to elect THREE members of the City Council.
The seats to be filled are Groups III, IV and V, and are for two-year terms each.
City residents wishing to vote in this election must be registered to vote by
Monday, March 11, 2013. Voter registration applications are available at Sneads
City Hall or at the Jackson County Supervisor of Elections Office.
Candidate Qualifying Dates
Qualifying for the Sneads City Election Groups III, IV and V will begin Monday,
February 18, 2013, at 7:00 am and end on Friday, February 22, 2013, at 12:00 noon.
Anyone wishing to run in the Election must be a qualified voter and live in the City
limits of Sneads. Those wishing to qualify must pay a qualifying fee equal to 5%
of the annual expense account of the office and must file the necessary qualifying
papers. You may do so at the Sneads City Hall located at 2028 Third Avenue.
For more information please call 593-6636.


--1 T~~~T~T 1'~L~is


18A SUNDAY, FEBRUARY'3, 2013


I


-


NATION








JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN # www.jcfloridan.corm


James & Sikes
Funeral Home
Maddox Chapel
4278 Lafayette Street
Marianna, FL 32446
850-482-2332
\\Ivw t IesI ulIsikeslfunerallt meis.conl

Vickie Childs

Vickie Childs, 50, A for-
mer resident of Round
Lake, died Thursday, Janu-
ary 31, 2013, in Buna,
Texas.
Born in Jackson County,
Ms. Childs was a former
employee of Malloy Gladi-
olus Flower Farm and had
resided in Buna, Texas
since 1997.
She was preceded in
death by her parents Curtis
and Doris Stephens
Benefield; two brothers,
Larry and Robert Benefield;
one sister, Mildred For-
tune.
Survivors include her
companion of 15 years,
Scott Sterrett of Buna,
Texas; one daughter, Crys-
tal Childs and husband
Clint Pettis of Minot ND;
two brothers, Carroll
Benefield and wife Linda of
Cottondale, Sammy
Benefield and wife Louise
of Palm Court, FL; five sis-
ters, Ida Colley and hus-
band Jim of Round Lake,
Mary Bailey and husband
Virgil of Chipley, Dot and
Frank Harrell of Compass
Lake, Brenda Osborne of
Round Lake and Cathy
McRoy.
.Graveside funeral serv-
ices will be at 2 p.m. Mon-
day, February 4, 2013 at
Round Lake Cemetery with
Rev. Robert Tharp officiat-
ing with James & Sikes Fu-
neral Home directing.
Expression of Sympathy
may be made online at
mwwv.jamesandsikesfuneralhoimen.com
James & Sikes
Funeral Home
Maddox Chapel
4278 Lafayette Street
Marianna, FL 32446
850-482-2332

Clara Evelyn
Owens Grant

Clara Evelyn Owens
Grant, 79, of Marianna, was
called home to be with the
Lord on Friday morning,
February 1, 2013. She died
peacefully at Capital Re-
gional Medical Center in
Tallahassee.
Evelyn was the second
oldest of seven children of
Frances and Owen Owens
of Marianna. She was pre-


ceded in death by her pa-
rents, husband, Ronald
Eudon Grant, and two
sisters-Betty Thomley of
Lake City and Janice
Woodard of Jacksonville.
Evelyn graduated from
Marianna High School in
1951 and later attended
Chipola Junior College. She
and Don, the love of her
life, were married January
7, 1953, and at the time of
his death in 2005 had been
married 52 years. They
were active members of
Marvin Chapel Free Will
Baptist Church for over
twenty-five years.
Affectionately known as
"The Little General,"
Evelyn had an illustrious
banking career of 22 years,
rising from a teller and
bookkeeper, ultimately to
become Vice President of
South Trust Bank at the
time of her retirement,
Dec. 31, 1995. She received
Marianna's coveted "Wom-
an of Achievement Award"
in October 1995, presented
by The Business & Profes-
sional Women's Club.
Mrs. Grant is survived by
two daughters who live in
Tallahassee, Carole Ann
Grant Bevis and Donna
Marie Grant Jodge, one
son, Ronald "Ronnie"
Eudoft Grant, Jr., of Ma-
rianna, three sisters-Patsy
Owens of Jacksonville;
Nancy Beall of Pelham, GA;
Sue Bolton of Grenada, MS;
and one brother, Steve
Owens of Keystone
Heights, FL. Her surviving
grandchildren are William
Hinson Bevis III and Laura
Sidney Bevis of Tallahas-
see; Jessica Lodge
Foundoukis of Topeka, KS;
Ronald Eludon Grant III
(Tripp) of Marianna; Laura
Marie Grant pf Tallahassee;
and two great-grandchild-
ren, Thomas Vasili
Foundoukis of Topeka, KS
and Quincy Hinson Moss
of Tallahassee.
The family will receive
friends at Marvin Chapel
Free Will Baptist Church at
10:00 a.m. on Monday,
February 4, 2013, until the
funeral at 11:00 a.m. with
Rev. Irvin Jennison and
Rev. Ed Hutchinson offi-
ciating. Interment will fol-
low at the church cemetery
with James & Sikes Funeral
Home Maddox Chapel di-
recting.
The church is located at
2041 Hope School Road,
Marianna.
In lieu of flowers the fami-
ly requests that donations
be made to St. Jude's Chil-
dren Hospital in Memphis.


Midland City Hostage Crisis


DANNYTINDELL/DOTHAN EAGLE
Attendees participate in a vigil on the town square in Midland City Saturday afternoon.


Prayers for driver, abductor, child


BY EBONY HORTON
ehorton@dothaneagle.com
MIDLAND CITY, Ala.
- The brown eyes of 6-
year-old Ryan Haywood
gleamed against the.sun-
light Saturday as he lis-
tened to his mother recap
the moments he and 5-
year-old Ethan would sit
together on their school
bus and play.
But Ryan quickly closed
his eyes and turned his
head when the conversa-
tion changed to why he,
his sisters and mom came
in support of Ethan at a
candlelight vigil Satur-
day in the Midland City
town square. The family
was among several that


Blaze
From Page 1A

In describing the scene by phone
Friday, Herring said he thought
he could see smoke or soot
on the body of the bleeding, shirt-
less man. He said he saw two
children and an elderly woman
nearby, but couldn't be sure if they


attended the vigil and
prayed for Ethan's safe
return after he was ab-
ducted from his school
busTuesday and held hos-
tage in an underground
bunker by 65-year-old
Jimmy Lee Dykes.
Prayers were also sent
for the family of Dale
County Schools bus driv-
er Charles "Chuck" Po-
land and for the redemp-
tion and change of heart
of Dykes, who authorities
said shot and killed Po-
land before abducting the
child.
A visitation service
for Poland was held Sat-
urday at Sorrells Funeral
Home in Slocomb, while


his funeral is set for 2 p.m.
today at the Ozark Civic
Center.
Saturday's vigil was
at least the third held
in the town square and
organized by Dale County
residents and students
since the hostage crisis
began. Another is sched-
uled for 6 p.m. today.
"The number five in
the Bible is the number
for grace, and this is the
fifth day," attendee Libby
Walden said when the
vigil began.
"God's grace is suffi-
cient. We believe Ethan
will come home. Our
prayers also continue for
Mr. Poland's.family."


were occupants of the home.
As emergency responders' ar-
rived on the scene and Herring saw
the situation was in the hands of
professionals, he took his leave.
But the fire raged on, billow-
ing white and gray smoke rose
high into the blue sky over
Bascom.
Just after 10 a.m., a helicop-
ter departed from a nearby field.
The Jackson County Sheriff's Of-


Haywood said her chil-
dren had just switched
from Poland's bus about
two weeks ago.
"They cared for him so
much, said he was a good
bus driver," she said.
"I can't imagine what
any of the families right
now are going through."
Dewayne Watson,
pastor of Mount Sinai Ho-
liness Church in Napier
Field, said he was out of
state Tuesday but wanted
to show his support for
the families at the vigil.
Twelve-year-old Brant-
ley Riley agreed.
"I came to pray about
little Ethan and show sup-
port," he said.


fice confirmed that an adult male
was on board, being transported to
Tallahassee Memorial Hospital.
Jackson County Fire Rescue
Chief Tony Wesley, still assist-
ing firefighters on the scene at
midday, was able to confirm that the
double-wide was a total loss.
A JCSO spokesperson said JCSO
and the fire marshal's office will be
working to determine the origin of
the fire.


More
From Page 1A

That discussion led into
conversation about the
state's attempt to continue
whittling down the unem-
ployment rate in Florida,
an effort propelled in part
by tax incentives and oth-
er enticements to bring
more businesses and jobs
here. She said economic
growth teams, like Enter-
prise Florida, Workforce
Florida and tourism offi-
cials are trying to market
Florida as the "business
state" and that their ef-
forts are paying off.
Many fellow legisla-
tors and Scott are also
supportive of efforts
to reduce unnecessary
regulations that hamper
growth 27,000 regula-
tions were eliminated in
the last 18 months or so
- and agencies are fund-
ing educational programs
that provide high school


Gaetz
From Page 1A
find their way around the
law to obtain weapons.
In the House, she said,
there appears to be "no
appetite for more gun
control."
In light of the deadly
shootings at an elemen-
tary school in Newtown,
Conn., several weeks ago
and the' ongoing child
kidnapping case in Mid-


and exiting students with
training in high-tech and
other in-demand jobs.
Money has also been al-
located for improving key
roads that lie between
neighboring Washington
. County and Bay County
to the south, a move that
could provide further in-
centive for businesses to
locate here for an easy
access route to and from
the airports in Panama
City and the port in Port
St. Joe.
School funding was
also a topic of discussion
Friday. When someone
questioned the legislators
about the continuing cuts
to mainstream schools,
while more funding is
being allocated to char-
ter schools, Gaetz em-
phasized that the charter
schools are public schools
and must be funded in
equal measure, although
he acknowledged they
haven't always been so
treated in the past.


land City, Ala., where the
abducted child's school
bus driver was shot and
killed by the kidnapper,
Coley acknowledged
at the same time that
school safety needs to be
addressed. Legislators
are already meeting with
parents, school officials,
and law enforcement
officials around the
statetofindwaystotighten
security or otherwise
further safeguard
schools.


Friday
From Page 1A

meet the federal guidelines
for inclusion in a central
listing for Americans to
consider as they begin to
comply with the reform's
mandate to purchase
heath care insurance.
Each state can let the fed-
eral government establish
it or can opt to create its
own. It will ultimately be
controlled by the federal
government under either
option, Gaetz said, but
states creating their own
exchange may be able to
specify some guidelines.
Gaetz said he doesn't
know how he feels about
the wisdom of either
option and that he thinks
Florida should wait on its
decision until other states
go through the process
so Florida can learn from
their experiences.
Some Florida
legislators are also con-
sidering whether to allow
,insurance providers from
other states to offer health
insurance programs here,
whether or not they pro-
vide other types of insur-
ance in Florida. They be-
lieve this could increase
competition and poten-
tially lower insurance
rates.
Florida will also be able
to decide whether it will
expand the Medicaid pro-
gram to add about a mil-
lion people to the program
who fall within certain


George Farr asks legislators a question about health care
insurance reform at Friday's Jackson County Chamber of
Commerce Power Breakfast in Marianna.


poverty line parameters.
The state will also have
to undertake a massive re-
write of its insurance code
in order to complywith the
federal insurance code, he
said, a complicated pro-
cess that will require care-
ful thought.
The legislators also were
asked what they intend to
do about the state's contro-


versial Citizens Insurance
pool, described by some
critics as a subsidized safe-
ty net for wealthy coastal
property owners which
thrives at the expense
of tax payers. Originally
designed as a program
for Florida homeowners
who could not indepen-
dently convince an insur-
ance company to provide


insurance, it was to be
a last-resort option. But
Gaetz said he, like some
of the people at the meet-
ing, believes it got out of
hand. He said he believes
that many property own-
ers voluntarily signed
on, for the advantage of
lower premiums, when
they could have obtained
private coverage on their
own.
Gaetz and Coley both
said the legislative insur-
ance committee is work-
ing to reform the Citizens
Insurance program, Gaetz
describing it in part as an
effort to "depopulate" the
pool.
In another insurance-
related matter, legislators
were asked whether they're
doing anything to ease the
insurance requirements
that farm owners face
when they try to develop
agritourism opportunities
on their property. Even if
they plan to design a corn
maze, for instance, far
away from dangerous farm
equipment on their land,
their attempt to create
the added-value aspect to
their operation is thwarted
by the cost of their insur-
ance; it's charged at the
same rate as the rest of the
land where farm equip-
ment is used.
Coley said there could
be some positive news on
that front in the legisla-
tive session which begins
this March. She said a fel-
low legislator is preparing
a potential bill to address
the issue.


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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY, 2013 9AF


FROM THE FRONT & REGION







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Turkey: US Embassy bomber had terror conviction


ANKARA, Turkey The
suicide bomber who
struck the U.S. Embassy in
Ankara spent several years
in prison on terrorism
charges but was released
on probation after being
diagnosed with a hunger
strmce-related brain disor-
der, officials said Saturday.
The bomber, identified
as 40-year-old leftist mili-
tant Ecevit Sanli, killed
himself and a Turkish se-
curity guard on Friday, in
what U.S. officials said was
a terrorist attack. Sanli was
armed with enough TNT
to blow up a two-story
building' and also deto-
nated a hand grenade, of-
ficials said.
Turkish Prime Minister
Recep Tayyip Erdogan said
Friday that police believe
the bomber was connect-
ed his nation's outlawed
leftist militant group
Revolutionary People's
Liberation Party-Front,
or DHKP-C. And on Sat-
urday DHKP-C claimed
responsibility for the at-


Briefs
French president visit
to Mali draws cheers
TIMBUKTU, Mali-
French President Francois
Hollande bathed in the
cheers and accolades of
the thousands of people of
this embattled city on Sat-
urday, making a stop six
days after French forces
parachuted into Timbuktu
to liberate the fabled city
from the radical Islamists
occupying it.
His arrival comes three
weeks after France unilat-
erally launched a military
intervention in order to
stem the advance of the
al-Qaida-linked fighters,
and since then French
troops have succeeded in
ousting the rebels from
the three main northern
cities they occupied,
including Timbuktu.
"Alongside the Mali-
ans and the Africans, we
have liberated this town.
Today Timbuktu. Tomor-
row Kidal. And others are
still to come," Hollande
told the French troops
who stood at attention
on the tarmac of the city's
airport.

Men plead not guilty
in India gang rape
NEW DELHI Five men
pleaded not guilty Satur-
day after being formally
indicted in a special court
on 13 charges, includ-
ing rape and murder, in
the fatal gang rape of a
woman in a New Delhi
bus, a lawyer said.
The men signed state-
ments in the fast-track
court saying they were in-
nocent of all charges, said
one of the men's lawyers.
The men were indicted
on 13 counts, including
rape, murder, destroying
evidence and kidnapping.
A sixth suspect, who
is 17, will be tried in a
juvenile court and could
face a maximum sentence
of three years in a reform
facility if convicted.

Egypt 'guards' take
stand against assault
CAIRO With bright
neon vests and hard-
hats gleaming at dusk,.a
dozen Egyptian volunteers
fanned out through Cairo's
crowded Tahrir Square.
Their project: End a surge
in sexual assaults on
women that activists say
has become the darkest
stain on the country's op-
position street movement.
The men and women
have joined Tahrir Body-
guard one of several


groups that have arisen
to protect female dem-
onstrators after women
were stripped, groped
and assaulted in a string
of attacks this past year.
Over the past week alone,
while mass protests filled
city squares around the
country, more than two
dozen sexual attacks have
been reported.
J From wire reports


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
An embassy security guard asks for help minutes after a
suicide bomber detonated an explosive device at the entrance
of the U.S. Embassy in the Turkish capital of Ankara on Friday.


tack in a statement posted
on a website linked to the
group. It said Sanli car-
ried out the act of "self-
sacrifice" on behalf of the
group.
The authenticity of the
website was confirmed by
a government terrorism
expert who spoke on con-


k A


edition of anonymity in line
with rules that bar gov-
ernment employees from
speaking to reporters with-
out prior authorization.
Turkey's private NTV
television, meanwhile,
said police detained three
people on Saturday who
may be connected to the


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U.S. Embassy attack dur-
ing operations in Ankara
and Istanbul. Two of the
suspects were being ques-
tioned by police in Ankara,
while the third was taken
into custody in Istanbul
and was being brought to
Ankara.
NTV citing unidentified
security sources, said one
of the suspects is a man
whose identity Sanli alleg-
edly used to enter Turkey
illegally, while the second
was suspected of forging
identity papers. There was
no information about the
third suspect.
Earlier, Turkish Interior
Minister Muammer Guler
said Sanli had fled Turkey
after he was released from
jail in 2001, but managed
to return to the country
"illegally," using a fake ID.
It was not clear how long
before the attack he had
returned to Turkey.
NTV said he is believed
to have come to Turkey
from Germany, crossing
into Turkey from Greece.'


Police officials in Ankara
could not immediately be
reached for comment.
DHKP-C has claimed
responsibility for assas-
sinations and bombings
since the 1970s, but it has
been relatively quiet in re-
cent years. Compared to
al-Qaida, it has not been
seen as a strong terrorist
threat.
Sanli's motives remained
unclear. But some Turkish
government officials have
linked the attack to the ar-
rest last month of dozens
of suspected members of
the DHKP-C group in ,a
nationwide sweep.
Speculation also has
abounded that the bomb-
ing was related to the
perceived support of the
U.S. for Turkey's harsh
criticism of the regime in
Syria, whose brutal civil
war has forced tens of
thousands of Syrian refu-
gees to seek shelter in Tur-
key. But Prime Minister Er-
dogan has denied that.
Officials said Sanli was


arrested in 1997 for alleged
involvement in attacks on
Istanbul's police head-
quarters and a military
guesthouse, and jailed on
charges of membership in
the DHKP-C group.
While in prison await-
ing trial, he took part in a
major hunger strike that
led to the deaths of dozens
of inmates, according to
a statement from the An-
kara governor's office. The
protesters opposed a max-
imum-security system in
which prisoners were held
in small cells instead of
large wards.
Sanli was diagnosed
with Wernicke-Korsakoff
syndrome and released
on probation in 2001,
following the introduction
of legislation that allowed
hunger strikers with the
disorder to get appropriate
treatment. The syndrome
is a malnutrition-related
brain illness that affects
vision, muscle coordina-
tion and memory, and that
can cause hallucinations.


Sa Y it with jewelry!

I love thee-I love thee,
,--, ,Tis all that I can say
.y, -.
..... It Is my vision in the night,
SMy dreaming In the day.
-Thomas Hood
81 facets
The Forever After Diamond





0O n
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CONTES


-110A SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2013


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Malone Basketball


Tigers finish perfect in county again


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

SNEADS For the second
straight season, the Malone
Tigers have gone undefeated
against Jackson County oppo-
nents thanks to a 65-44 victory
over the Sneads Pirates on Fri-
day night.
Ty Baker scored 20 points and
Antwain Johnson added 16 for
the Tigers, who have now won 14
games in a row against county


foes, dating back to last season.
It's an accomplishment Malo-
ne coach Steven Welch said his
players would remember for a
long time.
"It's huge for us to do that two
years in a row," he said. "It's the
first time we've done that since
I've been here. I'm just proud of
the kids. It's about them. They've
earned it. They work really hard.
I'm very proud of my team."
It was the eighth win against
county teams this year and the


seventh by 20 or more points,
but this one wasn't quite as em-
phatic as many previous.
The Tigers appeared in the ear-
ly going to be feeling the effect
of a long road trip to Pensacola
on Thursday to play Pensacola
High, and had a tough time get-
ting much separation from the
Pirates.
A Darius Williams basket got
Sneads within seven at 22-15
midway through the second
quarter, but a three-point play


and a three by Chai Baker pushed
the lead back to 12.
The margin was 10 at halftime,
but consecutive baskets by Wil-
liams cut the lead to 29-23.
Malone's answer came with
six straight points by Ty Baker,
whose two-handed put-back
jam made it 35-23 with five min-
utes left in the third.
. A three-pointer by John-
son made it 40-27 Tigers, and

See TIGERS, Page 4B


MARKSKINNER/FLORIDAN
Malone's Chai Baker goes for two as
Sneads' Jeremy Wert tries for the
block Friday night.


GRACEVILLI SOFTBALL



Time to make the jump?


MARK SKINER/FLORIDAN
Varsity catcher Angela Clark tags junior varsity player Ann Marie Peters as she runs by during a Graceville softball practice Thursday.

Lady Tigers hoping to take leap forward this season


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

With a new coach and a large returning
core of players from last year, the Gracev-
ille Lady Tigers will look to take a. leap
forward this season and compete with
Sneads for district supremacy.
The Lady Tigers were 6-15 last season,
but they came on strong at the end of last
season and advanced to the District 3-
1A championship game, losing a heart-
breaker 5-4 to the Lady Pirates.
But Graceville returns five of its top six
hitters from last year's team, as well as its
top two starting pitchers in Taylor Mc-
Daniel and Erin Rosa, so the bar will be
raised this season according to first-year
coach Butch Burrell.
"I feel real good about district play. I
think when we start our district games,
we should be as good as anybody," he


said. "It's about the experience we've
got with (seniors) Taylor and Kaylee
(Vaughn) and Caitlin (Miller). But those
seniors have got to lead us because we've
got a lot of young girls as well. The expe-
rience of those seniors is what we need.
They have to help bring these young girls
along."
Outfielder Jossie Barfield gives Gracev-
ille a fourth senior starter, with sopho-
more utility players Madison McDaniel
and Alexis. Philpotts just getting back
from the basketball team, as well as fresh-
man centerfielder Dominique Robinson.
Junior Angels Clark will handle the
catching duties when Taylor McDaniel is


pitching, with Taylor McDaniel catching
for Rosa, while the corner infield spots
are still up for grabs, with shortstop and
second base still helmed by Vaughn and
Miller.
Offensively, Vaughn and Miller were
both over .400 from the plate and fin-
ished 1-2 in batting average and hits for\
Graceville last season, while Clark batted
just a shade under .400 at .396, and Rob-
inson batted .368 and stole 21 bases as an
eighth grader.
But it was Taylor McDaniel who led
Graceville in both hitting arid pitching

.See LEAP, Page lB


Marianna Basketball


Baker leads Bulldogs by Hornets


MARKSKINNER/FLORIDAN
Marianna's Keyman Borders shoots
for three against Cottondale
Thursday night.


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

COTTONDALE The Mari-
anna Bulldogs got 20 points
from sophomore point guard
Shaquarious Baker and used
a big third-quarter run to pull
away late for a 72-58 road vic-
tory over the Cottondale Hor-
nets on Thursday night.
The win moved Marianna to
15-10 on the season, while the
Hornets dropped their eighth
straight to fall to 10-14.
It was the regular season fi-.
nale for both teams, who will
now turn their attention to this
week's district tournaments.


Cottondale looked to have a
shot at snapping their losing
skid in the third quarter after
starting the period on a 9-0
run to cut an 11-point halftime
deficit to two at 35-33 midway
through the quarter.
But the Bulldogs stormed
back with a 16-2 run to close
the period, with Baker capping
the run with a driving layup in
the waning seconds to make it
51-35.
The lead was 18 early in the
fourth, but the Hornets fought
back thanks to seven quick
points from Jerodd Blount to
cut it to 55-44 with 5:09 to play.
Baker answered with another


driving bucket, and a dunk by
Trey Clemons later in the quar-
ter made it 63-46 to cap an 8-2
spurt.
Clemons finished with 11
points, while Keyman Borders
had 14, and Jamel Johnson
nine.
Blount led the Hornets with
25 points, with DJ Roulhac
contributing nine, and Sheldon
Vann eight.
The Hornets will play host to
the District 3-1A tournament
starting Tuesday when they
take on Vernon at 7:30 p.m.,
with the winner of that game

See BAKER, Page 4B


Prep Basketbal


Forrest,



McCrary



spark


Chipley

BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Chipley Tigers closed the
regular season Friday night at
home with a 78-59 victory over
the rival Graceville Tigers.
Freshman guard Trent Forrest
scored 27 points to lead Chipley,
with Kobe McCrary adding 24
points and Tyrome Sharpe 11, as
the Tigers ended the regular sea-
son with a 21-4 record.
Chipley led throughout, ex-
tending a four-point first quar-
ter lead to 12 at halftime, and
keeping the margin at or around
double figures throughout the
second half before pulling away
in the fourth quarter.
Marquis White had 14 points
to lead Graceville, with Rasheed
Campbell and Devonte Merritt
adding 11 each.
The loss dropped GHS to 15-10
on the season, with coach Matt
Anderson attributing much of
the responsibility for this de-
feat to one Chipley player in
particular.
"I thought Kobe hurt us on the
glass a lot. We couldn't keep him
off the boards," he said. "Trent
and Tyrome did their normal
thing, but Kobe was the big dif-
ference I felt like. He had 24
points, which is more than he
usually gets, but it wasn't a fluke.
He earned all of them."

See CHIPLEY, Page 4B


Lady Hornets

stun Sneads
BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Sneads Lady Pirates came
into Friday night's District 3-
1A tournamentsemifinal game
against Cottondale riding 'an
eight-game district winning
streak, with their last loss against
a league opponent coming way
back on Nov. 30 at home.
That loss was against the Lady
Hornets, and on Friday night in
Ponce de Leon, it was the Cot-
tondale girls who again proved
too much for Sneads, taking a 59-
48 win to advance to Saturday's
championship game against
host PDL and ending the Lady
Pirates' season in the process.
KhadejahWardscored20 points
and added 11 steals for the Lady
Hornets, who controlled the
game from start to finish, leading
by seven after one quarter, 10 at
halftime, and taking a 43-30 lead
through three quarters.
Sneads was never able to get
the margin back into single digits
in the fourth quarter.

See HORNETS, Page 4B


il: BuU'Y~i.r: ~2:X'2. .. 0 -F . . :I.; .v. ,.! : .: .
COLLEGE BASKETBALL i :I r ."
Johnson's tip-in leads Miami ::
to victory in Raleigh. 2B


"Ifee real good about district play. I think when we start our district games,
we should be as good as anybody."
Butch Burrell,
Graceville head coach


1 1_~1_1________1___ll _i_ _1__1
--- ~~~~--~~~~-______~1--~111---~.---_


-_11______1_111_I___- 1__ _~_111~~___ ___11_____11_1


. . . . . . .


"" ~~i
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1L .-
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l-2B SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2013


SPORTS


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


College Basketbal


No. 14 Miami edges |


No. 19 NC State I


The Associated Press

RALEIGH, N.C. Reg-
gie Johnson tipped in a
missed shot with 0.8 sec-
onds left to help No. 14
Miami edge No. 19 North
Carolina State 79-78 on
Saturday.
Johnson's left-handed
tip in traffic off a miss by
Shane Larkin capped a
back-and-forth second
half and kept the Hur-
ricanes (17-3, 8-0 Atlan-
tic Coast Conference)
unbeaten in the league.
Johnson finished with 15
points in his best game
since 'returning from a
thumb injury four games
earlier.
Durand Scott led Miami
with 18 points and Julian
Gamble added 16 to help
the Hurricanes win their
ninth straight game.
C.J. Leslie had 18 points
and 12 rebounds to lead
the Wolfpack (16-6, 5-4),
who played without start-
ing point guard Lorenzo
Brown due to an ankle
injury. N.C. State nearly
topped Johnson's tip
when freshman Rodney
Purvis launched a heave
from beyond halfcourt at
the horn, a shot that hit
the rim and rattled out to
end it.
The Hurricanes were
only the ninth team to


start 7-0 in ACC play since
the 1996-97 season and
first since Duke started
10-0 five years ago, ac-
cording to STATS LLC.
Miami certainly earned
its latest league win, fight-
ing off a determined Wolf-
pack team that got strong
performances from Purvis
and fellow freshman Tyler
Lewis in place of its miss-
ing floor leader.
Lewis, who hadn't
scored more than six in a
game all season, finished
with 16 points and five
assists in 36 minutes. But
he missed a contested
jumper with about 13
seconds left, and Miami
grabbed the rebound and
called timeout with 10.9
seconds remaining to set
up the final play.
Larkin's shot on the
right side bounced off the
rim, but Johnson tipped
the ball up and in to stun
the home crowd that had
been as loud as it was for
rivalry wins against Duke
and North Carolina this
month. It was the first
home loss in 13 games
for the Wolfpack, the pre-
season ACC favorite.
Miami led by nine in the
first half and N.C. State
led by 10 midway through
the second half, while the'
Wolfpack shot 54 percent
for the game.


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Miami's Reggie Johnson (right) is congratulated by teammates Julian Gamble (left) Rion Brown and Kenny Kadji after making the
game-winning shot to defeat North Carolina State in the second half of a game in Raleigh, N.C., on Saturday.


MONDAY NIGHT ROLLERS
1/28/13
Team Standings W-L
1) Adam's Funeral Home 29-19
2) 1 Don't Know 29-19
3) Marianna Office Supply 27.5-20.5
4) Mary's Day Care 21-27
5) Monday Nite Special 20.5-27.5
6) 2 Men &A Lady 17-29
High Team Game I Don't Know: 698
High Tem Series-I Don't Know: 2048
High Game Female Bettie G: 184
High Game Male Jason T: 276
High Series Female- Bettie G: 516
High Series Male Jason T: 713
TUESDAY MORNING COFFEE LEAGUE
1/29/13
Team Standings W-L
1) Kindel Awards 52-36
2) Down Home Dental Center 48-40
3) Family Dentistry 48-40
4) Champion Tile 47-41
5) Jim's Buffet & Grill 47-41
6) Marianna Animal Hospital 38-49
7) Perfect Nails 38-49
8) James & Sikes 34-54,
High Team Series: Family Dentistry: 947
High Team Game: James & Sikes: 2719
High Game Female: Clezie Stephens: 197
High Game Male: Bruce Lheureux: 244
High Series Female: Hellen Stanley: 559
High Series Man: Preston C. & Ted A.: 584


S TUESDAY NIGHT MIXED LEAGUE
1/29/13
Team Standings W-L
1) Kindel Pro Shop 60-28
2) We're Back Again 53.5-34.5
3) X-Men 51-37
4) All Day 50.5-37.5
5) Lu's Crew 50.5-37.5
6) Shelton Trucking 43.5-44.5
7) D and D 41-47
8) James Gang 39-49
9) Oak Creek Honey 38.5-49.5
10) Backwoods Bowlers 36.5-51.5
11) Marianna Metal 36-52
11) El-Rio 23-65
High Game Hdcp: Shelton Trucking: 937
High Series Hdcp: Shelton Trucking: 2755
High Game Men: Jack Townsell: 279
High Game Women: LuAnn K: 213
High Series Men: Jack Townsell: 791
High Series Women: LuAnn K: 556
WEDNESDAY NIGHT MIXED
1/30/13


Team Standings
1) Big Lots
2) Marianna Metal
3) Fireballs
4) Adventure Drive
5) Try Hards
6) Perfections Detailing
7) Hollis Body Shop
8) 2 Pair of Nuts
9) Harley's Hawgs


W-L
56-32
52-36
51-37
50-38
48-40
46-42
44-44
43-45
39-49


10) Smith's Supermarket 38-50
11) El Sound Machine 33-55
- 12) Mr. Bingo 28-60
High Team Hdcp Game: Hollis Body Shop: 984
High Team Hdcp Series: Mr. Bingo: 2738
High Game Female: Cassandra Holland: 203
High Game Male: Jason Kindelspire: 300
High Series Female: Ashlee Walker: 519
High Series Male: Jason K: 761
Congrats to Jason Kindelspire on your perfect 300
Game!!"
CHIPOLA MEN'S LEAGUE
1/31/2013
Team Standings W-L
1) Kindel Lanes 2 13-3
2) Perfections Detailing 12-4
3) Remedials 10-6
4) X Men 9-7
5) 3 Aces & a Deuce 9-7
- 6) Ouzts Again 8-8
7) Man On 7-9
8) The Possee 7-9
9) Ricoh 6-10
10) The Wolf Pack 1-15
High Team Game: Perfections Detail: 987
High Team Series: Perfections Detail: 2822
High Man Game: Jason K.: 279
High Man Series: Jason K.: 752


Sponsored by JACKSON COUNTY


MCCOY'S a3 FLORIDAN



Big Buck Contest

INCLUDES ARCHERY, GENERAL GUN AND MUZZLE LOADING SEASONS!


Hoyt Compound Bow and

Trophy Mount from

L.J.'s Taxidermy


2nd Place Prize Hoyt Compound Bow ($900 Value) 3rd Place Prize Your Choice of Costa or Oakley Sunglasses ($250 Value)
4th Place Prize $100 McCoy's Gift Card

Priz draing fro allenties 7W Mc~y's iftCard for$20,00 ach


Contest Rules
* Entry must be a Florida Whitetail Deer. Deadline for entries is February 25, 2013.
* The whole deer must be brought to McCoy's to qualify for the contest. All FBR score sheets must be submitted to McCoy's by March 10, 2013.
* The highest grossed scored deer will determine the winner. No entry fee required.
* Each entry is required to provide an official signed FBR score sheet.
Winners will be announced on March 17, 2013 and be published in the Jackson County Floridan on March 24, 2013.


Weekly entries will run in the Jackson County Floridan or go to www.jcfloridan.com to see all entries
Each photo will be placed on our braggin' board located at McCoy's.

Enter at McCoy's 2823 Jefferson St. Hours 5:00am 7:30pm

WEEKLY ENTRIES~I ~


BLAKE ANGERBRANDT 7 POINT


JASON JORDAN 8 POINT


JESSE HARRIS 8 POINT


MARY CATHERINE PITTMAN 10 POINT


STEVE TANNER 8 POINT


MIKE I I 1 IN ROBER RAY__ '.7 POINT.SKYLER...S.ETAR -8POINT....


0


BOWLING_


- I n ~--~a~i~i~P ~9LB~- ----- -. ~'----"I ---~L---


II II -


'f G *


I


*


ROBERT RAY 7 POINT SKYLER SINGLETARY 8 POINT


MIKE CREWS 10 POINT








JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Dear Annie: My family wants to move
to another state. The only reason we
haven't is because of my dad's job. He
has worked for the same company for
18 years and doesn't want to lose his
retirement benefits. I understand how
important the job is, but the company
could easily allow a transfer to another
branch. "
Whenever we try to talk to Dad about
moving, he gets angry and yells at us or
leaves the room in frustration. It's caus-
ing a lot of tension at home. We feel stuck
and unhappy here, and that makes me
upset with my father for not putting any
effort into moving. He has told us many
times that he wants to go somewhere
else, yet he doesn't do anything to make
it happen.
Dad was looking at real estate prices
in a city we vacationed in this year, but
seems to have.forgotten about it. How
do we help him see that moving is best
for all of us? There is no downside. Other
branches of the company pay better than
the one he works at now, and there's also
the possibility that he could find a job
with an entirely different company that's
even better for him.
I think Dad is worried about selling the
house, but how will he know whether he
can sell it if he doesn't try? He is so resis-
tant to change. How can we help him?
-HIS DAUGHTER

Dear Daughter Moving away may seem
like a simple thing to you, but for your
father, it is fraught with uncertainty.
You don't know that his company would
offer to transfer him. You don't know
that he could find a better, or even an
adequate, job somewhere else and start
from scratch to support his family. You
don't know that he could sell the house
for enough to buy another one. All of
these things weigh on his mind, and your
constant pressure adds to his unhappi-
ness and stress.


Here's how you can help Dad: Tell him
you love him and you know he is do-
ing what he thinks is best for the family.
Don't bring up the subject again. He
knows how you feel. Decide to make the
best of the situation you have, and if you
don't move away, you have the option
of leaving on your own when you are an
adult.

Dear Annie: My wife of 54 years passed
away five years ago. This past year, I
remarried. Here is my problem:
My granddaughter is getting married
this summer and has indicated that she
would like a picture of her grandmother
for the wedding. I assume she plans to
display the picture.
I have told my daughter that it is time
for the both of them to get over it. I also
told her that it is incorrect to display a
picture of a dead person at a wedding.
Correct me if I'm wrong.
CONCERNED

Dear Concerned: You're wrong. Your
granddaughter wishes to honor her
grandmother, who did not live long
enough to see her walk down the aisle.
And while it would be inappropriate to
make the entire wedding about Grand-
ma, a small tribute would be lovely. You
may have finished grieving for your late
wife, but your daughter and her child still
wish to remember her on this occasion.
Please don't stand in their way.

Dear Annie: This is for "Not Anti-Social
or Addicted to the Internet," the 56-year-
old man who is looking to make new
friends. I suggest taking up the game of
tennis, where the players on the local
courts are always looking for people to
play and socialize with. Local tennis
clubs are a great place to have fun and
meet terrific people. Tennis also is a
fantastic form of exercise.
--JIM


Bridge

Sun Tzu, an ancient Chinese general and strategist, wrote, "To win 100 victories in
100 battles is not the acme of skill. To subdue the enemy without fighting is the acme
of skill."
At the bridge table, sometimes your judgment of the opponents' skill will influ-
ence your play as in this deal. South is in four North 02-02-13
hearts. West leads the diamond 10. East takes 4 J 7 4
the first two tricks in the suit, then shifts to the V J 8 7 3 2
club six Declarer wins on the board and plays 7 2
a trump to his king. West takes the trick and re- 4 Q 10 9
turns a diamond. How should South continue? West East
North's transfer bid followed by three no- 48 2 4 K 10 9 5
trump showed five hearts and game values. A 9 6 4 v5
South starts with three top losers and only *10 9 8 6 + AK 5 4 3
nine winners (one spade, four hearts and four 8 7 3 So 6 52
clubs). He seems to need the spade finesse to 4 A Q 6 3
work. However, after West's diamond lead at V K Q 10
trick five, if hearts are splitting 3-2, declarer Q j
could discard a spade from the dummy, ruff A K J 4
in his hand, cash his last trump, cross to dum-
my with a club, draw trumps and claim. Note, Dealer: South
though, that this fails here because West gains a Vulnerable: Both
second trump trick. South West North East
IfWest is a beginner, South must guess what to 2 NT Pass 3 Pass
do. But if East andWest are experts, West cannot I Pass Pass Pass
have the spade king. If he did, he would have
dropped the diamond nine at trick two as a suit- Opening lead: + 10
preference signal and East would have shifted
to spades, subduing the contract.
West's defense strongly suggests that hearts are 4-1. Declarer should ruff on the
board, cash his two top hearts, return to dummy with a club, draw the last trump, and
take the spade finesse.




CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in 4he cipher stands for another.

"WA AWY XYRGGF SRWLD LA RCKEL


LMYF RXY GAWYGF ... E MRZY OYGL


GAWYGF KRWF LEKYD EW KF GEOY."

PEGG KIXXRF



Previous Solution: "It is a funny thing about life; if you refuse to accept anything
but the best, you very often get it." W. Somerset Maugham

TODAY'SCLUE: a slenbe
2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 2-2



CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands'for another.


"ZAX VZAMCXR FHI


HTWXKVHM FWXZ."


BZIC H CXAW


- GXWIKSWMC


ZNHTH ZM TWSHB ZIL FZMZX


XWVKGKWMC IWM. SHMKWB E.


KMZARW


Previous Solution: "No one really wants to admit they are lonely ... I have felt
lonely many times in my life." Bill Murray

TODAY'S CLUE: j slenba 7

2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 2-4


Annie's Mailbox


World
Almanac
Today is the 34th day of
2012 and the 45th day of
winter.
In 1913, the federal in-
come tax was authorized
with ratification of the
16th Amendment to the
Constitution.
In 1959, rock pioneers
Buddy Holly, Ritchie Va-
lens and J.P. "Big Bop-
per" Richardson died in
a plane crash near Clear
Lake, Iowa.
In 1962, President John
Kennedy banned trade
with Cuba.
TODAY'S BIRTHDAYS:
Felix Mendelssohn (1809-
1847), composer; Horace
Greeley (1811-1872) activ-
ist/newspaper editor; Ger-
trude Stein (1874-1946),
writer; Norman Rockwell
(1894-1978), artist/illus-
trator; James Michener
(1907-1997), novelist;
Blythe Danner (1943- ),
actress; Morgan Fairchild
(1950- ), actress; Nathan
Lane (1956-), actor; Maura
Tierney (1965-), actress.
TODAY'S FACT: Norman
Rockwell's body of work
is estimated at more than
4,000 original pieces.


16

18
20
21
22
24
27
30
31

32

34
35


Horoscopes

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) Don't kid yourself
about goals you'd like to
achieve. If you do, there's
a chance you'll estab-
lish targets beyond your
abilities.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) The one thing you
definitely don't want to be
is your own worst enemy.
When your judgment tells
you not to do something,
you should take heed.
ARIES (March 21-April
19) Avoid putting your- A
self in the position of 1,
being obligated to an-
other. You could agree
to do something that's 7
counterproductive. 11
TAURUS (April 20-May
20) Be careful not to 121
make a promise that you 13
won't want to keep, such
as agreeing to share with a 141
16.
friend some rewards that 17
you have coming to you.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) 18
- You need to be selec-
tive about who you ask to 20
help you complete a task. 21
Avoid anybody who has a 24
tendency of telling every- 27
body else what to do. 28
CANCER (June21-July22) 30
- If you're not careful, you 32
could easily make your- 36
self vulnerable by placing 37
39
your faith in someone 41
who doesn't warrant it.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) 42
- If you hope to maintain 43
harmony on the home
front, both you and your
mate must be prepared to
make concessions. Sacri-
fice mustn't be one-sided.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)1
- You're the type of per-4
son who goes out of your
way to be helpful. Today
you might reverse that
and select pals for what
they can do for you.
LIBRA (Sept 23-Oct2
23) If you're not bud-
get-conscious, you fail to
manage your resources
wisely. Avoid spending
money you know you'll
need later.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.4
22) Be careful not to
treat subordinates in an
arrogant manner. If you
do, it'll make them eager
to even the score. 2-2
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-
Dec. 21) You're usually A
tolerant of anybody who 1
isn't in accord with your 4
thinking. Today you might
have to be more under- 8
standing than usual. 11
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) Don't let yourself be
pressured by friends into 14
making a commitment 15
that you can't afford.


ACROSS
Jay-Z's
genre
One, in
combos
Viking
name
Morn's
counterpart
Hightailed
It
Juan's
home
Feud
Sketch
Nasty
laugh
Inflates
Sunshine
st.
Taro
product
- Carlo
Actress
Hepburn
Be in debt
Mounties
Did laps
Jai -
Genuine
Blunder
Motto
Rakes In
Lab or
boxer
Cosmo
or GQ
Latch onto


45 Use
48 Hang
around
49 Intermission
52 Perry's
creator
53 Outward
appearance
54 Kind of
system
55 Did Easter
eggs
56 "Master-
piece"
channel
57 Starry vista

DOWN
1 Step on
the gas
2 Roman
greetings
3 Quaker
colonist
4 UHF part
5 Volleyball
need
6 Ms. Lupino
7 Bakery
treats
8 Plunder
9 Belief
systems
10 Colo.
neighbor
12 Antenna
15 Adroit


Answer to Previous Puzzle
B LjT M U jG Fj I IT
L O1AE I ISLIA JO SH









18 Okra 33 Like table
morsel salt
P L FERIEIDE S T U N









20 Immature 35 Yeast
butterfly 38 Swabbie




21 Extinct 40 Culture
bird dish goo
22 Night 42Tarzan and
flyers Jane
23 "Hd" 43 Indiana





Oscar town
winner 44 Annoy
ACME EK S PEJAI
PI R SATE II I









24Word from 46Currier's
1the pews partner
morsel25 Jug 47 Shortage
201mmature 35Yeast




26 Kntter's 48 Marry
need dis49 goBrattykid
22 Night 42Tarzan and
23 "Hud" 43Indiana
Oscar town
winner 44Annoy
24Word from 46Currier's
the pews partner
25Jug 47Shortage
26 Knitter's 48 Marry
need 49 Bratty kid
29 Rocky 50 Pen part
ledge 51 Actress
31 "- Myrna -
Doubtfire"


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuilDriverBooks.com


ACROSS
Roast beef
au -
Adds
sound
Appalachian
st
Monsieur's
airport
Nobel Prize
city
Garment
edge
Great Wall
locale
Phone
service
(2 wds.)
Messy
meal must
Elevator
pioneer
Mr, Kyser
Winter bug
Roused
Van Gogh
painting
"If - a
Hammer"
Seafood
choice
- cit.
(footnote
abbr.)
Explosive
Inits.
Latin 101
word


02

36 Pump, e.g.
37 Lots
39 High
as -
40 Dell loaf
41 Soar
42Slender
woodwind
45 Cheerful
49Snubbed
53 Ramada
rival
54 Horde
member
55 Chinese
dynasty
56 Wolverine's
group
(hyph.)
57 Noah's boat
58 Earned
59 Dazzle
DOWN
1 Comedian
Rivers
2 Major
3 Faux pas
4 Like fluff
5 "Born In
the -"
6 Club kin
7 Coast
Guard alert
8 Scintilla
9 -, vidl, vlci
10"Rag Mop"
brothers


013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS

Answer to Previous Puzzle


RAP U
EVEFLU
VENDET
F LA

A L AI MR
OWEl R
S LO GA
DOGGR
WA I T I
E R LE M
D YE D P
12 Rambled
on and on


NI EnRIKg













36 Luxury
38 Remnant



43Cloud
PADS
POI
AUDRERY




46 Mrs. PeelWAM
N EARNS
MAG
AVAI L
lEN ECO
BS SKY
33 Decent
grade
35England's
isle of -
36Luxury
seating
38 Remnant
39 Climber's
challenge
42Worker's
safety org.
43 Cloud
44Hog sound
46 Mrs. Peel
47 Once again
s 48Antlerprong
50 "Let's see"
51 Maria
52 Finish


2013 UFS, DIst. by Universal Uclick for UFS


ALLEY OOP BY JACK AND CAROLE BENDER
YOU'LL SEE IT WILL *-' \, Y'STILL THINK
BE WORTH THE WAIT, WE SHOULDN'T
ONCE WIZER HAS HI HO CHECK ON
HEAD ON STRAI1HT/I t. ,Z l brF WIZER? 4


Entertainment Brief

Jude Law shares Super Bowl plans
NEW YORK British actor Jude Law said he'll be
taking part in a time-honored American tradition
'this weekend: Super Bowl Sunday.
"I follow most sports, so of course I'm aware of it
and I'll probably watch it, but I live in London and
so I don't follow it that closely. It's more than just
a game here, though, right? It's like have a party.
Have a dip. Drink some beer," said Law.
When asked if he'll be participating in any tail-
gate parties when the Baltimore Ravens face off
against the San Francisco 49ers, Law admitted he
had no clue what "tailgating" meant.


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2013 3BF


ENTERTAINMlENT







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


thll.eire, m .%li,;tutg P, l. ,

Malone takes hard-fought win over Pensacola

BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com I was veny prmd oftle fact that we didn't shoot it well and
didn't score a ton of points, ibt we wevr able to play ugly and
The Malone Tigers made the get a tough win. We just lad to make a couple ofplas and
long trip to Pensacola on Thurs- t to bo
day night and came back withwe t had to bow up.
a 54-30 victory in hand after Steven Welch,
topping the Pensacola High Ti- Malone head coach
gers for their 21st victory of the


season.
Chai Baker had 14 points and
12 rebounds to lead Malone,
with Ty Baker also adding a dou-
ble-double with 12 points and
11, boards, followed by Anthony
Speights' 11 points, and Austin
Williams' eight points, six re-
bounds, and six assists.
Malone led by just two after
one quarter, but pushed ahead
24-16 at halftime and got the
margin up to 15 points head-
ing into the fourth. Tigers coach
Steven Welch said it was the


most physical game his team
has played in all season.
"It was a wrestling match," he
said. "There were people on the
floor basically after every pos-
session. There was a lot.of con-
tact. It wasn't a pretty game at
all, but we need to be in some of
those. I was good with it."
Malone has been lighting up
scoreboards all year and rou-
tinely topping 80 and some-
times 90 points, but winning a
low-scoring grind-out game like
Thursday's was a good thing,


Welch said.
"I was very proud of the fact
that we didn't shoot it well and
didn't score a ton of points, but
we were able to play ugly and get
a tough win," he said. "We just
had to make a couple of plays
and we just had to bow up. That
means a lot to me when you're
not able to play your style and
still get a win. I was very proud
of the guys. It was a great experi-
ence to go over there on a long
trip and bond together. It was a
good night."


Tigers
From Page 1B
another triple by Anthony Spei-
ghts helped Malone go up 47-33
going into the fourth quarter.
The lead was 51-39 with 5:30
left in the game, with a free throw
by Johnson, a basket by Speights
following a steal by Johnson, an-
other bucket by Chai Baker, and a
steal and dunk.by Johnson mak-
ing it 58-39 Malone and essen-
tially icing the game.
Chai Baker finished with 13
points and Speights added 12,
while Jeremy Wert led Sneads
with 15 points, and Williams
added 12.
It was the fifth straight win for
Malone to finish the regular sea-
son 22-2, but Welch said it was
far from a vintage performance
by his team.
"We were tired and worn out
and flat," he said. "We had to bat-
tle (Thursday night) and tonight.
But it's a great sign to not play


your best and still come away
with wins. It's a good way to close
the season."
For the Pirates, the loss drops
them to 12-12.
Despite the loss, Sneads coach
Kelvin Johnson said he wasn't
that disappointed in his team's
effort.
"I thought we matched up pret-
ty well with (Malone)," he said. "I
think our size helped in trying to
contest shots at the basket. But
they just have so many weap-
ons that it's hard to stop them.
We played well in spurts, but we
were too careless with the ball
and they got some easy baskets
off of some of our turnovers."
Sneads will next conipete in the
District 3-1A tournament in Cot-
tondale on Tuesday, facing Ponce
de Leon at 6 p.m.
Malone will also be on the
road in the District 1-1A tourney
at Central, and will play Friday
against the winner of Tuesday
night's first round game between
Central and Poplar Springs.


Hornets
From Page 1B
"It was a good win for the
kids. They came out with
great intensity and played
with a lot of heart," Cotton-
dale coach Shan Pittman
said after the game. "I was
very proud of the effort. It
was a complete game for
us tonight. We played very
well. The girls did a good
job."
Jakeena Borders added
12 points and six rebounds
for CHS, with Brooklyne
Brown posting a double-
double with 10 points and
10 rebounds.
Tasherica McMillon led
Sneads with 21 points, with
Chasity McGriff adding 10.
But top post player Lo-
gan Neel was unable to
replicate her last perfor-
mance against the Lady
Hornets when she scored
20 points in a 51-46 vic-
tory in Cottondale on Jan.
11, finishing Friday's game
scoreless.
Pittman said slowing
down the 6-foot Lady


Chipley
From Page 1B
Graceville will next com-
pete in the District 3-1A
tournament in Cottondale,
playing Friday against the
winner of Tuesday's quar-
terfinal game between Cot-
tondale and Vernon.
Anderson said that if his
team is going to be suc-
cessful in district and be-
yond, it will need a more
consistent effort than was
there Friday.
"I think we see some ar-
eas we've absolutely got to
work and improve on, but
there were other bright
spots as well," he said. "I
felt we played well at cer-
tain times, but we've got to
be able to sustain that if we
want to make any kind of
run in the playoffs at all."
In the District 2-1A tour-
nament, Chipley will play
Friday against the winner
of Tuesday's game between
Jay and Baker.

Graceville JV finishes
unbeaten
The Graceville junior
varsity team took a 53-34
victory over Chipley on
Friday night to complete
a perfect 19-0 season, an
accomplishment that drew
praise from Anderson after
the game.
"It's great because those
kids work hard and prac-
tice right alongside the
varsity every day," he said.
"And that's an eighth grad-
er, three freshmen, and a
sophomore in the start-
ing five, so it wasn't just a
bunch of sophomores."



Baker
From Page 1B
to face top seed Graceville
in the semifinals Friday.
Marianna will travel to
Pensacola Catholic on Fri-
day to take on the Walton
Braves in the semifinal of
the District 1-4A tourna-
ment, with the winner of
that game to play Pensaco-
la Catholic in the title game
JSaturday.


Pirates center was a point
of emphasis for her team
in preparing for the game.
"Defensively, we were
able to play very well in
the post. We worked at that
all week," the coach said.
"Last game we played them
Logan had a career high
against us, so we made
some adjustments and the
girls did a good job of exe-
cuting and knowing where
she was at on the floor."
The Lady Hornets im-
proved to 13-12 with the
win and clinched a playoff
berth.
For Sneads, who came
into the tournament as the
No. 2 seed, it was a disap-
pointing finish to what
was otherwise a successful
turnaround season.


Lady Pirates coach Andy
Ward said it was a bitter
end to the year, but that
Friday's loss takes nothing
away from the season his
team had.
"It's tough. You hate it for
the girls," he said. "I told
them after the game that
it's going to hurt a little
bit because they worked
so hard and improved so
much. To go from the be-
ginning of the year when
no one gave you much of
a chance to do much of
anything to get to the dis-
trict tournament, and feel
like you have a chance, it's
tough., But you can't take
away from the fact that we
finished 17-4 and nobody
thought that was possible
when the season started.


"We made a' lot of im- better as the year went on. Cottondale played better
provements over the We just had a bad game. We than us. They were the bet-
course of the year and got didn't play very well and ter team tonight."
r\


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___


I


I


14B SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3; 2013


SPOiTS








JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Leap
From Page 1B
last season, batting .509 with
a team-high 18 RBI, while also
posting a team-best 4.26 Earned
Run Average, three wins, and a
save in 49 1/3 innings.
She'll be asked to again carry a
heavy burden for the Lady Tigers


SPORTS


this season.
"I'm looking at Taylor hav-
ing a phenomenal season this
year," Burrell said. "With all the
conditioning that she's had, she
came in and worked very hard.
She didn't play basketball this
year so she could concentrate
on softball. I'm really looking for
her to step up and lead this team
and her being able to play any


position really helps us."
Graceville will need help in
the circle from Rosa, who also
won three games last year as a
sophomore starter and finished
with a 7.95 ERA and a team-best
49 strikeouts. The Lady Tigers
have a good mix of experienced
and young players, and Burrell
said that getting both groups
on the same page will be an


important factor in his team's
success.
"We have alot of young players,
so the key to this team is keep-
ing them together and working
as a family. That's the No. 1 hur-
dle we'll have to cross this year,
keeping these girls together and
working as a team," he said. "If
we can do that, then I think we'll
make a run in the district. That's


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY3,2013 5BO

our goal, to send these seniors
out with a winning record and to
be district champs.
"We have a long road ahead to
do that, but I'm confident that
we have the talent and that we'll
be a whole lot better team than
we showed last year."
Graceville will open the season
Feb. 15 at home against Arnold
at 6 pm.


Slb4r'l,4 Uxrieills


High School
Boys Basketball
District Tournaments begin
this week, with Cottondale High
School hosting the District 3-1A
tournament.
The tourney starts Tuesday,
withWewahitchka facing Altha at
4:30 p.m.. followed by Snead- vs.
Ponce de Leon at 6, and Cotton-
dale vs. Vernon at 7:30. .
The semifinals will be Friday,
with the winner of Wewahitchka
vs. Altha facing the winner of
Sneads vs. Ponce de Leon at 6
p.m., and Graceville taking on the
winner of Cottondale vs. Vernon
at 7:30.
The championship game will be
Saturday at 7 p.m.
In the three-team District 1-4A
tournament hosted by Pensacola
Catholic, Marianna will take on
Walton in the semifinal Friday at
7 p.m., with the winner taking on
Pensacola Catholic on Saturday
at 7 p.m.
The District 1-1A tournament
will be hosted by Central, with
first round games taking place
Tuesday.
Laurel Hill will play Bethlehem,
with the winner to take on Paxton
in Friday's semifinals at 6 p.m.,
and the winner ofTuesday's game
between Central and Poplar
Springs will play Malone on Fri-
day at 7:30 p.m.
The championship game will be
Saturday at 7 p.m.

Chipola Basketball
The Chipola men's and women's
basketball teams will have a
pair of road games this week,
first hosting Gulf Coast State on
Tuesday, and then Tallahassee on
Saturday.
The women's games will tip at
5:30 p.m., followed by the men


at 7:30 p.m.

Chipola Alumni
Baseball Weekend
Chipola baseball will have its
annual Alumni Weekend Feb. 8-
10, with two-time Major League
Baseball home run champion
Jose Bautista in attendance, as
well as dozens of other former
Chipola players.
A pro baseball autograph ses-
sion, home run derby, alumni
game, and VIP dinner are set
for Feb. 9. Country singer Billy .
Dean, of Quincy, is scheduled to
perform at the events.
The "Night of Champions"
Chipola baseball celebrity dinner
will be Feb. 9 at Citizens Lodge in
Marianna, with social hour at 6
p.m., and dinner at 7.
Cost is $100 per person. For
tickets or more information, call
Chipola coach Jeff Johnson at
850-718-2237.

Malone Youth Baseball
The Malone Dixie Youth
Baseball Organization will have
registration for the 2013 season
on Feb. 9 from 8 a.m. to noon at
Malone City Hall.
Registration is open to boys
and girls ages 5-12, with a fee of
$40 for all ages due at sign-up. A
group rate will apply if you have
three or more children in the
same family playing. New players
should bring a copy of their birth
certificate to sign-up.

Marianna Youth
Baseball-Softball
Marianna Recreation Depart-
ment will hold registration for
baseball and softball for the 2013
season through Feb. 28 from 8
a.m. to 4 p.m. for boys and girls


ages 5-15 at the Marianna Educa-
tional and Recreational Expo in
Marianna.'
Registration fee is $40, except
for Machine Pitch Baseball and
8U girls softball, which is $35
each.
For more information, call
850-482-6228.

Panhandle Seminole Club
Golf Tournament
The 2013 Panhandle Seminole
Club's Annual Scholarship Golf
Tournament will be held April
5 at Indian Springs Golf Club
in Marianna. This tournament,
along with another fundraiser,
has,helped provide $40,000 over
the past 10 years to deserving
local students and helped further
Their education.
Registration and warm-up will
begin at noon with the shotgun
start at 1 p.m. for this four-man
scramble event, Cash prizes will
be awarded to the first, second,
and third place teams. Additional
prizes will be given for longest
drive, straightest drive, closest to
the pin, and so on.
The greens fee contribution of
$65 will entitle each golfer to a
fantastic afternoon of golf on a
championship course (to help a
very worthy cause), followed by a
great meal.
Scholarship (hole) and prize
sponsorships are also available
for this event. For more informa-
tion, call Roy Baker at 850-526-
4005 or 209-1326, or George
Sweeney at 850-482-5526.

Sports Re
Send all sports items to editorial@cflondan
com. or fax them to 850-482-4478. The mail-
ing address for the paper is Jackson County
Flordan PO Box 520 Mananna. FL32447.


Badcock Home Furniture and
More of Graceville
Barnes & Noble Bookstore
Dr. Larry Cook
Florida Public Utilities
Jackson Hospital
Marianna Inn
Coyle Mayo Insurance Agency


Follow us on

Twitter


@JCFSports


Melvin Engineering
Paul A. Donofro & Associates,
Architects
Rahal-Miller Chevrolet
State Farm Insurance
Tyndall Federal Credit Union
Wal-Mart


Follow us on
Facebook


Jackson County
Floridan


CREEK













0Sthgryh 0und races fo P
MOR TAC S CMN ON








ig





COMe P:Y.'OKE


Just like healthy eating can boost your
energy every day, making a few small
changes at home can save you energy
every month.

Start by skipping the heated dry cycle
on your dishwasher. Then call FPU at
888.220.9356 and learn more ways to
save energy with ourfree energy check-up,
including our free weatherization kit.


CHIPOLA VS.
GULF COAST
Tuesday, February 5
Women 5:30 p.m. Men 7:30 p.m.
Milton Johnson Health Center
Soecial Thanks to Chioola's Soonsors


FLORIDA PUBLIC
u I I L I I E
1,. "* ,, 't ........


~wrrrp*rrnn*oii,rai~6 ~Ib-)i--l --((1 ii (( ( ) ~ --- ~-i







6 B Sundav. February 3. 2013 Jackson County Floridan


CLASSIFIED


www.JCFLORIDAN.com


WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED



ARKETPLA


BY PHONE: (850) 526-3614 or (800) 779-2557
BY FAX: (850) 482-4478 or (334) 712-7975
ONLINE: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM


BY MAIL: WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE
P.O. BOX 520, MARIANNA, FL 32447
IN PERSON: 4403 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA


Publcallonr Policy Errors and Omissions Advertrisem. should chach lIer ea the f rs.i ay Tnri publlcallon shall rol be able for failure to publish an ad or for a typographic error or errors in publication except to the extent jf the cost or Ira 3 for Ihe firs dav''
Iraserton Audustmrent fr emois is Ilmited to Ins com of tnil ponrton of the ad wherein nea eiror occurred Tne aduarlsaer agrees that the publisher shall not be liable for damages arising out of errors In advertisements b.yr..n-l rth amount pad lior tie space.
actually occupied by thal portion of me dvertlasement in which the errol occurred, whether ucn error s due to negligence o f the publisher's employees or otherwise and there shall be no liability for non-insertion of any advertisement beyond the amount paid for
such advertissmenl. Display Ads are nol guaranteed posilon All advertising is sutljarI I ai iroval Right is reserved to edit, reject, cancel or classify all ads under the appropriate classification.

Fo dedlns al ol.-rS r iitwwecfordn So


I "o '."
Cemetery Plots: (2) Plnecrest Memory Gardens
2 outer burial containers, 24x12 bronze plaque,
and vase included. $3,500. Call 772-224-9098 or
850-322-0155
GEERL SEIA NTIE


Wedding Dress two for one, Strapless with
full skirt can be turned into short reception
dress. Soft white color with beaded detail.Slze
12 extra long but has had some alterations.
$350 including veil. Contact me for more pic-
tures at 850-718-6304, or ash8795@yahoo.com

Coin Collections Wanted!! Paying Top
Dollar $$$$ Call Mathew 985-516-0379


FIREWOOD (all split oak)
Delivery available 4 TRUCK LOAD $70. 4
CALL MARK 334-701-4967 or 334-791-6704 I


Wanted: Old Coins, Gold,
Diamonds, Guns, And Tools
West Main Jewelry & Loan 334-671-1440.

*-1- NEW 2 DOOR GLASS FLOWER COOLER ON
CASTERS TRUE MODEL# GDM-61FC-
$2,500.00
1- NEW 2 DOOR COMMERICAL GLASS DOOR
COOLER MASTERBILT
MODEL# GR48S --- $1.995.
1- NEW 1 DOOR COMMERICAL KITCHEN
FREEZER ON CASTERS, STAINLESS STEEL
MASTERBILT MODEL# F23-S $1,995.00
I PLEASE CALL 678-8894 IF INTERESTED.

Bowflex Extreme 2 great condition with ac-
cessories. Must sell. $300, 850-573-4700



Free Kittens American Shorthair, 12 week old
Tabby Kitters to good home. 2 Orange Male, 2
Gray Female. Have 1st Yrs Shots. Negative for
Feline Leukemia. Parasite Free. Very Pretty and
Playful. Call (334) 702-3408 or 798-0686

CKC Reg. Golden Retriever 2-M, 4-F, 8 wks
old, S/W, Parents on site $350.
Call 334-648-1287 or 334-791-9831.
Found Dog: M/lemon walker hound. Compass
Lake in the Hills. Call 850-209-8500.
FREE: Lab mix puppies 2/M & 2/F. 850-209-7047


CaselH 70 XT Loader: 79HP,
448 hours, reg. bucket and
grapple bucket. Must see to
appreciate the condition.
$19,500.00 Call 334-894-2315

E, H P.R O E








VineRpe Tomatoes |

Home Grown Greens
Other Fresh Vegetables!!
All Farm Fresh!
220 W. Hy 52 Malvern



A Large rolls of Hay for Sale
Bahia & Coastal
Daytime 334-585-3039,
after 5pm & weekends 585-5418
Wrapped Peanut Hay For Sale.
Never been rained on. Call 229-254-0854
WANED- FRM& ARE


Wanted to Rent: Farm Land or Pasture in Ma-
rianna or West of Marianna; Call 850-718-1859


[l tt PLOYMENT

Assistant Ulties Operator
Must be high school
graduate with some
experience in operating
heavy equipment. Prefer
experience with
water/wastewater systems. Must have a
valid class B CDL issued by the state of
Florida. Salary $20,591.00/yr
Equipment Operator IV
Must be high school graduate with 1 to 3
yrs experience in the safe operation of
heavy motorized equipment
(Motorgrader). Must have valid FL class
A CDL prior to employment.
Salary: $20,591.00/yr
Submit Jackson County employment
application to: Human Resources Dept,
2864 Madison St, Marianna, FL 32448.
PHONE (850) 482-9633.
Web site www.jacksoncountyfl.net
Closing date is 02-18-2013
Drug-Free Workplace/EOE/V.Pref/ADA/AA

Aeed a M w (lom? Check out the Claifieds



25 Drivers

Trainees
NEEDED NOW!
Learn to drive for
Werner Enterprises
Earn $800 per week!
No experience needed!
Local CDL Training
job ready in 15 days!
1-888-368-2198


SThe Dove
Academy
(for At Risk Girls)
Dove Girls Academy is currently
acae tOng glicationsfor
Minimum requirements:
Bachelor's degree/ 5 years experience
in Juvenile Justice.
Please contact Cheryl Elligson
at (850) 263-7550
or fax resume to (850) 263-7685


RETIREMENT IS JUST
AROUND THE
CORNER.
Are you worried about your
retirement savings?
Or perhaps you have always wanted
to retire early, but just couldn't
figure out how?
Newspaper routes are a great source
of supplemental income.
Just a small investment each morning can
make a big investment in your retirement.
JACKSON COUNTY
FLORIDAN
Come By And Inquire Today
4403 Constitution Lane Marianna, FL 32446


Sudoku


7 5

3 1 97 6

9 42 67

2 8_

78 64 9
- - ----
2 94 3 1

1 9

S8
2013 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reser


level Fl2F
Complete the grid so each row, column and
3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit
1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku,
visit www.sudoku.org.uk.
Solution to last Sunday's puzzle
9 47 8 6 5 1 23


2835 16 9 3 7246978 514
654791238
.1 2 3 6 4 8 5 7 9
123648579
7892534161
5 7 2 4 1 9 3 8 6
4 6 8 3 7 2 9 -1 5
391546 837296 7 4 2


2/3/13


ved.


Find jobs


fast and


easy!


JACKSON COUNTY


FLORIDANIg
jcfloridan.com


monster

FIND LOCAL JOBS AT: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM/JOBS


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CLASSIFIED


Jackson County Floridan *


Sunday, February 3, 2013- 7 B


(m


EDUCATION
& INSTRUCTION


Classes Forming Now
for Medical Assisting,
lRTI S Electrical Trades and
FORTS 1Morel
COLLEGE Call Fortis College
Today! 888-202-4813 or
visit www.fortiscollege.edu. For consumer
Information visit www.fortis.edu

RESIDENTIAL
REAL ESTATE FOR RENT


GIBB MARIANNA VILLAGE
Now taking applications for people with
disabilities & who have very low incomes.
1 & 2 bedroom apartments,
Wide doorways, lower counters, roll-in
showers. Accessible for wheelchairs &
other mobility aids HUD subsidized rent.

2933 Milton Ave, Marianna,
FL Call 850-482-4663

0Q ltwOUMOO')1U Sl


Clinton St. Furn room + kitchen, all utilities Incl
$395; other furn. rooms for $375 727-433-RENT
0 l..Ca '.ll850l4J8513'4I.1



Orchard Pointe Apartments
Now accepting applications for 1 BR Apts.
Call or come by to pick up
application
4445 Orchard Pointe Dr.
Marianna. Call 850-482-4259 -


1 & 2BR Houses & Apts ALSO
2 & 3BR Mobile Homes Rent to Own
Lot rent included. For details
4 850-557-3432 or 850-814-6515 4
2BR 1BA House for rent, 3043 Noland St.
Safe neighborhood, $500/mo + dep.
850-482-8196/209-1301
2BR/1BA House on Burke St.
Grand Ridge $425. Mo. + $425. Dep.
Call 850-592-5571
2BR/1BA w/office in Grand Ridge, Rent to own,
very nice, $1000 down $650/mo. 850-997-
2464/850-274-9896
Austin Tyler & Associates *
Quality Homes & Apartments
)* 850- 526-3355 4m
"Property Management Is Our ONLY Business"


2 & 3 bedroom mobile Homes in Cottondale.
$500 and up. 120, garbage, sewer included.
http:// www.charloscountryliving.com.
850-209-8847 4
2 & 3BR Mobile Homes in Cottondale.
NO PETS CH&A $325- $500/Month
Roomate situation also available.
850-258-1594 Leave Message
2BR 1.5BA at Millpond $495 + dep. very nice,
water/sewer/lawn maintenance included,
access to pond, No pets' 850-209-3970
S2BR 1BA MH i Dellwood water/sewer
Included o, own lot, 350.+ $350. dep

3BR 2BA, DW, No Pets, Private Lot in nice
Neighborhood $595./mo. + dep. 850-638-7822
* Marianna 2/1water, seer, deck. d4an
'. No Pets.S400. mo. + depl 85.482-8333.


.Quiet, well maintained Park, Water/sewer/
garbage/lawn included. Available Now
3/2 DW $625 & 3/2 $475 & 2/1 $425
4) Joyce Riley RE 850-209-7825 4
Spacious 2BR 2BA Plus Office, Family of 3
$450-$550 Plus deposit. Clean and Quiet,
No smokers, No pets 850-718-8158

y( COMMERCIAL
__ REAL ESTATE FOR !iNT


For Lease: 6,000 sq. ft. Daycare on 2.58 acres.
Licensed for 93 children. Room for expansion.
Call 850-718-6541.
RESIDENTIAL
REAL ESTATE FOR SALE


Very Private
1,600 sq. ft, 2 bedrooms 1 bath with a loft,
and a screened in back porch. House is 60%
complete. Septic system complete, temporary
power pole on 3+ acres. You will love it when
you see it!! $39,000. Call Allison at 850-381-0720

... For Sale By Owner: 41
Briar Hills Drive, Dothan
3 bedroom, 2 bath on 1
acre of land. 1300 square
feet. Built in 2008. All stain-
less steel appliances in kitchen stay. Hard-
wood, tile and carpet floors. Screened in patio.
2 car attached carport. Covered front porch.
Country setting 10 minutes from Southside
Walmart or SAMC. Asking $113,500. For more
information call 334-701-5889.
Graceville: Recently renovated 3 BR, 1.5 baths
1350 sq. ft. Great neighborhood and huge back-
yard, $89,999. Call 850-658-4081.
Very well maintained
5 bedroom, 2 bath, older
home. Includes 2 carports,
yard completely fenced
(privacy) and a shed.
Close to schools. Room for
a family to grow! Call today for your personal
viewing. 850-263-2755.

-i,--. i, One of a kind home
on the Apalachicola River
in Wewahitchka, Florida.
3BR. 2B modular home.
Outdoor kitchen, shop,
greenhouse and boat
house. Beautiful fenced yard on nice high
riverbank. Large lot is also zoned commercial.
Reduced to sell. $129,000. Call 850-819-0401

.. '


Honda 2007 Foreman ATV ; 2-wheel & 4-wheel
Drive. Electric wench, 190 hours on it; $4800
Firm; 334-596-9966


14 ft. Alum. Boat, stick drive, 2 swivel seats,
1997 Suzuki 25 hp motor, all new parts in
motor $1200. 850-592-1934 or 850-693-5812


371 1999 Tiffin Alegro
Diesel Pusher. Only 64,000
miles w/Cummings diesel
engine and Freightliner
chassis, highly polished
hardwood floors in living
area kitchen & bath. Lots of storage inside &
out, no smokers. $45,999.
334-296-2989 ask for Brian.

f a r: T t.,,
AN TIU-&CASI EHCE


Spyder 1979 Flat 2000 Classic Italian Sports
Car,Restored, Asking $13,479, Serious inquiries
only, 850-526-4394


(G) TRANSPORtATION



$0 Down/ist Payment, Tax, Tag & Title
DO YOU NEED A VEHICLE? GOT BAD CREDIT?
Repos, Slow Credit, Past Bankruptcy OK!
SPush, Pull or Drag, Will Trade Anything!
BRING IN YOUR W2 OR LAST PAY STUB!!
RIDE TODAY! Steve Pope 334-803-9550
L...."JJ......................... J
BMW 2012 X5: X drive 3.5d. 11000 miles. All
wheel drive sports package twin turbo diesel,
30 mpg on road, double sunroof, all options,
five passenger bladk with cinnamon interior.
Transferable warranty to 50k, & maintenance
included. $55,000. Call 229-220-1537
'-' -Cadillac 2000 Deville like new
S cond. runs great red in color,
new tiresP. SK original miles
.28mpg. $6399. OBO
334-886-2199.

Chevrolet 2004 Impala,
$4999.00 Call.334-714-
2700.


Ford 2000 Mustang, New
paint sharp car.
$5999.00. Call 334-714-
2700.


Honda 2000 Accord,
$4999.00 Call
334-714-2700.


Silver, very low miles,
64k miles highway, door
sedan', V6 engine, clean
title, good tires, immacu-
late interior, great gas mileage, one owner.
Retail $8,995. Selling $6,000. OBO. 646-456-2807
Infinity 135 2003 excellent
condition, new tires, 132K
miles, bronze/beige in
color, $5500. OBO
850-766-7668
Lincoln 1997 Towncar -
125,000 mi., runs great, in-
terior & exterior clean,
rust free; good tires.
$2,450, 334-797-2422
Mercedes Benz 1981380 SL,
silver & blue convertible
with hard top, V8 engine,
75K low miles, garage kept,
runs in exc. cond. must see to believe it,
$15,000. OBO 786-417-1355 or 334-538-7475.
Nissan 2004 Altima, Low
Miles, NADA Retail:
H $8950.00, $7999.00. Call
334-714-2700.


Toyota 2000 Camry,
Clean vehicle, $4999.00.
Call 334-714-2700.


Toyota 2011 Camry SE (Sport Edition), 4dr.,
auto, power pkg., White, 9,000 miles, show
room condition, ext. warranty,. $19,500. 850-
569-2215, 850-718-5461, 850-717-7105.


2003 Harley Davidson Ultra Classic, blue,
comes with extras $6,999. Great condition
850-573-1695 or 850-263-1678
SPORT UTLeJdITY&'


Ford 2002 Explorer.
Recently painted. Tinted
windows. CD player. New
tires. Needs motor and
transmission work.
Title in hand. $1,000. 334-701-0107 after 5PM,


2005 Silverado 1500
ext. cab, tool box,
bed liner, tinted windows,
I- 1-owner, non-smoker,
excellent condition.
$10,250. OBO 334-671-8200 or 796-9606.
Dodge 1998 Dakota Ext Cab: power steering,
cold AC, 160k miles, blue, $2,500. OBO
Call 334-798-1768 or 334-691-7111
Ford 2003 Ranger P/U XLT 6 cyl. 26K actual
miles, extra clean $8000. 334-897-5648.
GMC 2003 2500 HD SLT Turbo Diesel 140K
mileage, V8, Good condition with only one pre-
vious owner, well kept maintenance records.
5th wheel attachment and equipment with
trailer brakes. Call for all other accessories
such as heated seats, leather, tinted windows,
etc. $15,200, 334-718-8225
Volvo 1996-DIESEL TRUCK, Good Condition
Asking price $10,000 OBO 334-695-1954

"-t3:n Pontiac 2003 Montana Ext Mini-Van
jilf Seats 8! White 102K mi 20/25 MPG
Runs Great, Auto trans, alloy
wheels, Frt-Rear A/C Power Windows Locks,
Mirrs & Drvr Seat, Cruise Ctrl, Remote Keyless
Ent. Roof Rack, Clean, serviced every 3K mi
New tires 2011 garage kept
$5700 (334) 618-4645


1ST PLACE TO CALL FOR ALL OF
YOUR TOWING NEEDS!
'are "s24 H 6 0wg-
AUTO BODY & RECYCLING
PAYING TOP DOLLAR FOR JUNK CARS
Contact Jason Harger at 334-791-2624


CALL FOR TOP PRICE
FOR JUNK VEHICLES


I ALSO SELL USED PARTS
24 HOUR TOWING 4 334-792-8664

CASH Guaranteed
Highest prices paid for Junk,
old Farming Equipment,
Tractors, Semi Junk Cars
Nothing to big,
nothing to small
So call a Cash Cow Now!
r- ---


*-5 100 0O

4 334-435-5015 or 334- 596-9270
We pay finders fee of $25. & up
For your Convience FREE Pick up!
ROLL TIDE !!!!
E ........ ......... .; ;oa......r 1
Got a Clunker
We'll be your Junker!
SWe buy wrecked cars
and Farm Equip. at a
fair and honest price!
$325 & CompleteCars
CALL 334-702-4323 OR 334-714-6285
--------- ----- r ......-......
a We buy Wrecked Vehicles
Running or not !
L-_- 334794M 96 or 344-791-4714


A-D-V-E-R-T-I-S-I-N-G
(a r idc

IJ SI I|I|E SS & ,Your guide to great local'

businesses & services,,
BUSINE SS.&




SERVICE DIRECTORY


[ call 5264,1 t4,p4lio -your. .


Clay O'Neal's ".M.
Land Clearing, Inc. muRv,
ALTHA, PL ANWMM~
850-762-9402 SB SN
Cell 850-832-5055 ZoYIFSWBIOM



For General House or
Office Cleaning
Call Debra
Bonded References Available
850-526-2336


B&B Professional Auto Detailing
Now offering mobile wash inside
and outside, oil change & vacuum
Detailing now for the low price of $50.
(850) 573-5509
SJust give L s a c ll cl d11 we'll colle to you!
,. All services perlornned on site.


"'Beautification of Your Home"
Carpentry/Painting Installations
Furniture Repair & Refinishing
General Repairs Insured




Ground Works Lawn Care
Pressure Washina Bush Hoaaina


PHOTOG RA P-I H
FOR ANY OCCASION!I
UNBEATABLE PRICES I "
', hA,,t,,,, l sfline\,L Gabriell
nllcn i vhhilhlc llI i
fret Ihll.,,r,-J,%ill.,,f.I.


ThaT'S ClassifiEd

SELF STORA


Dependable Full Time Service
Residential & Commercial
Licensed & Insured Now serving Jackson Co. W
4 334-798-0687 0 PORTABLE BUILDINGS
LaRisI MaNurFAcglu i oF Prtea:L BUILitsiN aN NORTH FLORIDA
WE
0 HAVEl
RI DIFFERENT SIZES!
7M Grooming by 'O YOU CAN CHOOSE
Appointment Only COLOR & STYLE!
Groomere/Styllet'
L sa Shorese &Tammy Martabano BUILT ESI
.s in o d .,. ,,,,,,,,, 3614 Hwy. 90 Marlannai FL 850-82-8682
rl,3614rHw.obllyourI. np)lnl 'tod/l


I


lac a Fast, easy, no press
l ce an A d 24 hours a day, 7 d
Get live previews of your classified ads, receive price quotes
and make secure online payments.

www.jcfloridan.com


ire
iys a week!


SELF STORAGE

101UE s(5)52-77


This Month's Special

$319500
35 Years in Business
= Wi MonPoiiuBlumas.J


Disabled? Denied
Social Security?
Then let the experts help. Retired Social FNl I)
Security Administration Hearing Office
Dlrdctor Jerry Glover knows the law and
wants to help you.
Call today for your FREE Consultation
(850) 762-2266 or (850) 557-6251


~


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I------------ ---~-- -


#4.









8 Sundayi. February 3. 2013 .Ilckson County Floridain


LEGALS


LF160021
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR WATER
USE PERMIT
Notice is hereby given that pursuant to Chap-
ter 373, Florida Statutes, the following applica-
tion for a water use
permit has been received by the Northwest
Florida Water Management District:
Application number I 07367 filed 01/25/2013
Jeffery C. Pittman, 6429 Lovedale Road,
Bascom, FL 32423
Requesting a maximum withdrawal of
1,125,000 gallons per day from the Floridan
Aquifer
System for Agricultural Irrigation use by an
existing facility.
General withdrawal locations) in Jackson
County: T05N, R09W, Sec. 7,8C; T05N, R9W,
Sec. 5B
Interested persons may submit written
comments/objection or submit a written re-
quest for the notice of proposed agency action
(NOPAA) regarding the application by writing
to: Division of Resource Regulation, Northwest
Florida Water Management District, attn: Terri
Peterson, 152 Water Management Drive, Hava-
na, Florida 32333. A NOPAA will be mailed only
to persons who have filed such requests. A
NOPAA must be requested in order to
be advised of further proceedings and any pub-
lic hearing date. Written comments/objection
or NOPAA requests must be received by 5:00
p.m. eastern time on February 20, 2013.
No further public notice will be provided re-
garding this application. Publication of this no-
tice constitutes constructive notice of the per-
Smit application to all substantially affected
persons.
LF160022
Request for Proposals for Food Service
Management Company
The Jackson County School Board is requesting
proposals for a Food Service Management
Company. A copy of the Request for Proposal
and Contract Document may be obtained by
contacting H. Larry Moore, Deputy Superin-
tendent at larry.moore@jcsb.org or call 850-
482-1200. Proposals are due no later than 10:00
AM March 5, 2013.
LF160023
The Housing Authority of the City of Marianna,
Florida will hold a Public Hearing to receive
comments concerning the Annual Plan, and up-
coming Events for the Housing Authority. The
meeting will be held in the Conference Room at
Harrison Park, 2912 Albert Street, Marianna, FL
at 9:00 a.m. on Tuesday, March 12, 2013.


CLASSIFIED


Clean Out Your Garage


and Turn the Items You've


Forgotten Into Cash.


That old collection of clutter might not mean much to you

anymore, but chances are someone out there would love it. By

using the Classifieds, you'll make it easier for them to find,

and easier for you to sell. So try it today!




JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN

(850) 526-3614 or (800) 779-2557


Get it fast






Right here, right now,

\ all of the time.


www..ICFLORIDAN.com


I-[HOMES FOR SALE


SUNNY SOUTH PROPERTIES
4630 Hwy. 90 Marianna, FL 32446
(850) 526-2891
Each Office I Independently Owned and Operated
SMARTER. BOLDER. FASTER

Oudia Morris
S REALTOR
Broker/Owner
850-209-4705

CHIPLEY- Brick home
in town with newer metal roof.
This will make on excellent ientol
time homebuyer.
MS 247959 $42,000
MARIANNA- Very
spacious home in lovely Compass
Lake in the Hils.. Nice stone
fireplace, kitchen with stainless

MLS247964 $134,900


privacy fencing and an attached

MIS 247919 $34,000.
K MARIANNA- Lovry
updated 2 story house in town.
Has a chain link fenced back yard.
Home with loads of chapter and
is priced right!
MLS 247931 $74,500.
,MARIANNA-
Modular home in the country
on large lot Home has nice
features with 4 bedrooms
ned 8 2 bats.
MLS 247913 $109,500
'N L MARIANNA- Great
house in great location!
Kidney shaped in ground
pool, large fenced back yard
and a yard building.
MLS 247970 $149,900.
I- MARIANNA- Brkk
ho,,,en in very convenient
,otr r, Large kitchen/dining
ar'i a Th built-ins. Large back
arid ord shaded front yard.
MIS 247898 $104,900.
RDCDMARIANNA-
BIG PRICE REDUCTION!!
Nice 4 bedroom, 3
both home with recent
updates/ renovations.
MIS 247583 $94,500.

Ed McCoy, Realtor'
Cell.(850) 573-6198
i www.emccoyrealty.com
emccoy02@yahoo.com

SNEADS- Two
bediciri home with lots
off updart; located on
o:,iiie lc and ready for

MIS 240893 REDUCED $79,000.
S MARIANNA- Very
Ile,- ,, l"II maintained 3
be1lu,,i, time located close
M a niL .ur r.,,,ryTfii w, ol EdM Coy,
... q. k('i 98 today!!
MLS247592 ? $109,000
MARIANNA- This
411 o ,,-s. I pe. ,l . like no
,rht, i p,-..ir, ,r .. r funded by
w..,,j tal '.llr,, ,j o I stores.

MLS247794 $85,000.
ALFORD- LlnilrqP
i l, l }' LI'I l'lli ll II. I." IIA l I"



MIS 47202 $139,500.
GRAND RIDGE-
i.n .n ...l Il,,,,hing in the
(riy lIn II: wtl access from
rn,, rr n: Flect location

MLS247948 $28,900.
iSNEADS- Quiet
country living in this 3
bedroom home located on
3 acres. Property has so
much to offer.
MLS 247911 $123,000.
COTTONDALE-
Will bi;lt ,r;.il lore I;,ilted

tl, .,,1ril [,,I, 1 l,,,ll 1, t1l1
MIS 247876 $135,000.
MSNEADS- l2,797l,,70.



MIS247937 $175,000 '


II ___~~~_~~_1__ ~~1~1__~_ ____________ __~_~~~~i _~~~~~~~ __ __
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CLASSIFIED


wwwJCFLORIDANcom


Jackson Couinty Floridan *


Sunday, February 3, 2013- 9 B
Sunday, FebrNuary 3, 2013- 9 B


, t% .r


3/3 Gulf Front PC
w/2 car garage.
00r M I
A Booking Nowd
_o 334-790-2115n

















SUNNY SOUTH PROPERTIES
4630 Hwy. 90 Marianna, FL 32446
(850) 526-2891
Each Office Is Independently Owned and Operated

SMARTER. BOLDER. FASTER

Pat Furr
Realtor
8- 50.209.8071
ftrrl9@msn.com


i-L dinq iwulo. buWlt

I......... ..I..
I : 1,.. ,i ,-. T
,,-I .. .. nl ,
shnd, bolreleo l hied siomn pod w/
ol around pmoy fleN ing. The homin ofeli sil JIOomi darsgn, IeuiOl d o open hir 0 n w/plltnd dr chway, opn
bktlhe. ipcousiosmm /woin uoets tiloaLul siage re. MLIS24734 S$289,000

Ie /38el h R olh hoe ao 5 68./
w ouded ar yed eis aky lo oped
& buopd oIm e eood h oin ila per
W0 llo l I be d*m, ir hoae ioes I
o ime l bedomm cw/Oo we in oir ,S
malerboheoe e rbor, el, ad w lob
otd led i & y. l asre d s en= mi
wr jl e wofa t riam laen Pffa i
ee ad m ibedonsw/nooedd sei anod d i Ohdst g.e 1.I247 4, *$1249,900
trac n a los f oa r ia this hetifl
Hok I*no her iY d



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hrnd v ri bi an ,, n md









icio*is a0 .me l to d no
endfgaim ina, fo d W ioe epHrie








Ellen Marsh, CRS w
uektr d igra SOI iwi.Ineol remi. ebai MnB o r eo l Mt247865* 522 RW










850.209.1090 ll w
ayEllen @ h /2bi
EducatedRealEstat e.net
S onerlead bth. i e rd e. 4 oo
0 se 0I w e ho~c" ,eatM &mW


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Ellen@












asks0Au I bon A poe oweci toA o
2 e an t olac rs omeN N ( b od troi

bay aiI o r ireou d w ayt In bo d he Cr ndeol w
Thcded rupaa L l 2 1 2r4S1
No Rol 1!re)m M bebdincpof
a ohoarrinrlinbM 860 0od "ri
leads 1 4iSIRam: lA nca, nr

,lnooeecdaee60ifaenceenw. reea d a tboot _;Ie

Fall aehadri A rt C f bee9a, e'


w97 e w cab rww0 e el ne

-arII a o b a bee
lcralre~ceiheooce eanob hoo,.log leenrr lorcyedlnenuece di,.
oRwhlel ledaAll~t 21597 *10006 0 274 '119,90


REDCE


hk Reduced. Reilly ornsucted
cotoe syle hoae. Conoemenlhy hoed
to everying. (omer llo. PePfedt fo the
invest. Hone is unendy rented so o
soire of inKome is reoady M ow ble.
BRING ALOFFERS!
Mt 247669 984 2d Av $44,900


Debbie Roney Smith,
Realtor
850-209-8039
debbieroneysmith@
embarqmail.com
High Dry wooded acreage.
Wded w/nice ok& pine. 1Socr.
Lorated on paved ro. m
o 100 acre to ka MKozie a clor o
w public iUbmry, public pao, Shall
Hub ia o io al
rwilloeeroe a krimcnra hobltr
23 00S219 a S 10,00B
rComfortable 4/2 family homn
I omold mpnloatlcdid. LbMofl
.pdoi indude winidor, meal rec.
vinyl ldinrg, ol H/AC unil, played
iolia nic,/ w pm'p, ne cared.
lonad i 1 a p Mod d. PLUS MORE
Rmf 2t152911 $10O,00

Attention Investorsl New
listing in Marianno. Block house
with vin sidinginl[ownhrt w
has had updates. New point, new
fooring, new appliances, and
new window coverings.
Corner Location.
ML# 247975* $54,500
NOW IS THE TIME TO INVEST IN VACANT LAND
I0aoiWeWdpoadvd A3baoeo2e&drebHe2&
MHlS 2478771 $39,900 Hy231 xpo]imrd. Pob
16N1w.M/3n YWk MLS#247604
MLS 4776,000AC re llyn ol o d$2500l 0 l S itocrnilg
WocJdrlpoedredd 0b Bl25Operwam,
,iRHhlGdlr. I nMacta ,ldil dodwbkHy167
MLSI 147813 $6,)0 MLSI 143039, $3,000


GRACEVILLE Beautiful
updaotd home with 5 bedrooms
loalted in ho criy limits. Coil
Bovoely, 850-209-5211 for your
viewing oppointment.
MLS# 247494
$130,000.

R CALFORD Booutiful Oak
treos surround tIhis cute from
home in the country where you
can enjoy peace ond quiet. Coill
fol yourlppointmeln.
MLS# 247411
REDUCEDPRICE $69,900.

deal describes this well
maintloined homo on 2.5 acres,
ton(ed and cross lancod. Coll
today and get il the dotoils.
MLS# 245904
$75,900.
MARIANNA Fabulous
country home with obove ground
pool locoled on 2.5 ocs er nd not
for from lown, Appolnlmonl needed
so oill Oevely, 850-209.5211 or
Corice, 850-573 1572.
MLS# 247928 $135,000.


A- *-V-I-I- RT-G
an idea that SELLS.




MS lO SALE






N',. oR' A:, llwa::]v] e ;, T here. 5o f


Ora Mock, GRI
Broker Associate

(850) 526-9516

oramock@yahoo.com


Call Ora for appointment

Marianna MUST SEE this recently renovated, like new,
move in ready home. Tray ceiling in dining living area. Nice
chandelier & ceiling fan. New stain-master carpet. Kitchen
has new refrigerator, custom maple cabinets, dish washer
stove and microwave. Concrete drive on paved street.
Would qualify for USDA financing$79,900. MLS# 247456


Well maintained 2-BR, 2 BA mobile home in a country
setting. Master bedroom has a walk-in closet. All
Appliances included. Most of property is Chain-link
fenced, .7 ac lot is cross fenced with large garden space.
Open shed 18x15, storage bldg. 12x8. Front and back
porch. $39,900. MIS # 247915.


Marianna Approximately /2 ac lot with 149' on north
Jefferson zoned mixed used. Could be residential,
apartments/duplex or business. Two bedroom, old house
being sold "AS IS". $67,500 MLS# 247182


Altradive, well maintained, brick, 4 BR/2 BA home on 1
landscaped acre. Eat in kitchen and separate dining room.
Enclosed porch, storage building, 1 car carport. Want
a horse? Additional 3 acres (has possible pond site)
could be purchased. Must See! Call Ora today. $147,500.
MLS#247968


Hammond Organ Console $500, 850-693-0521
Jeff Gordon Collection. $5.+up. 850-557-0778
LOST, female cat (Noel) black, white & brown
South Side Apartments. 850-573-4512. or text.


I OMES FORSA


MI..IllEm I'[


(rellio m1 1 nil nil m,, lr hI.r, krrrvi rrt r~rrrI n l ,l ,,r,, Ier, lr mle m.'el... lllr
KIIlICIEN BATHROOM, ELECTRICITY PLENTY OF WILDLIFE GREAT LOCATION FOR A BEAUTIFUL
HOME AND IF SECLUSION IS IMPORTANT THEN THIS IS WHAT YOUR LOOKING FOR I QUIET AND
PEACEFUL !!r MAKE AN APPOINTMENT TODAY MLS # LF24/935A $216,000

Mini farm n6.34 acre tract
on Hwy. 90 wthl a 3 BR, 2 5
BA, 2 story home with master
bedroom oin the first floor,
fireplace, updated kitchen,
living room, 2 bedrooms
upstairs, very nice detached Mother-N-Law Suite next door, above ground
pool, detached covered and enclosed hot tub next to the pool, large 40x60
shop building with roll up doors and heavy duty car lilt. Room for horses and a
partially built horse stalls, natural stocked fish pond that is private. This is a
must see. Make an appointment today! MLS # R0247871A $335,000

~ gg ; s I ..."..-. l i .., dead-
-, i -1 !, ... a 4 BR,
I "1 B r,,.-.... ,,-- acre in
d, ,,,n, ir lis home
S. ... , ,,:er roof,
room, family room, spacious
laundry, nicely painted, clean and attractive, with a big deck for entertaining.
It has a Ig. yard with outside building and concrete driveway. Seller will allow
$2000 toward buyers closing costs, or upgrades. Home comes with an assumable
Termite Bond. Make your appointment today!! MLS # 247570 $114,900

WalWhy rent when you can own ii
Adorahe home located on a
S paved canopy street, crnher
lot. Split bedroom design
with 30BR/1.5BA. large living
room, newer appliances,
Walk-ru closets. New paint. 5 year old metal root Detached storage building,
Fenced and gated back yard Central1 leat and Air heat pump. Terrninx Termite
Bond asstri able. A grant buy at only $44,000. MLS 245375


Nice 5.82 acre tract lust


a power line easement
through part ot the property but still plenty of good land for a home site.
Unrestricted. MLS# LV247853A. $12,500


Are you budget minded?
H,, is a 3 BR, 2 BA brick
,tr. on a comer lot in
Io~,-rl Heights. Large
.-1 I-s on 2 acres with
S,, e l.de storage building
into that 4lh bedroom you've always wished you had or office space. Located
very conveniently to the new High School, Florida Caverns, going, etc Make an
appointment today and owners ar ready for an offer. $89,000. MLS #24778


Waterfront Property on
oChipola Riveir Beautiful
3.5 acres with a cedar

an open kitchen, bar,
fireplace, large master bedroom, rec. room, in ground pool with
newer liner, and pump, and newer roof. Beautiful frontage on
Chipola River. Home does not require flood insurance.
MLS # RD247704A $159,000

Colgemw Cstre I3 acoes all ece
fome hs L BR. 3 B wrth omffi
Ofif hcs bea lin k srhebrs large
tkchen c ith custom made cablnels,
rsplill BR design, Mr has a Ig walk in
cldse. M'haLs Ig lacinllub, se:ru
system buli in aulvoun safer Storm shelter. uin in generate o rtieml nreitd n tiled pioh, Gun
range, all nooed pmro lty. 0 pond& a hunlb paradise, Plenty of rim. f hoes irstaod m-gromund
imaton 10 em. Ig stl ame, rlin a or ndmig oralls Make a appoinlment to see Ihis one ol a kend
property Bnnl all offers MLS t Re247922A $319. 0

WOW Here is a deal. t11
crs that was once a golf
course (9 hole) Par 3, needs
sonmeflC. Property comes
with a 2-3 bedroom, 1-2
bath home with some TLC.
Approx. 972 SF in the house and 3215 SF under roof. Some repair needed. Large
outside deck for entertaining. Their is great potential with this listing. It is
certainly a must see. Bring all voters. MLS # RD247834A. $141,900

Close to Chipola College is
this great and clean 3 BR
rental home. Sitting on a
corner ot,conmes with a nice
backyarnd, with a storage
building. Good rental history. Conveniently located to shopping, schools and
hospital. Make an oppoirtmenlt today!! Note house is leased and buyer will have
to honor the lease until it expires. MLS # R0D247571 A $59,900

. ,. ....,....


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H vanity of Marian.a. Make an appointment today!
l, ,I n ........ In .I i I

.'3, Great

par I,,


of space. Currently being used as a warehouse for Habitat for
Humanity of Marianna. Make an appointment today!
MLS # CC247736A. $70,000






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ho rnre ote, horse reil, cattle, etc. H 90 frontage and Si onvenient to
Cottondelel 1p01 r, prI-Inr othand, ALelrr ard Pilna Caitoy, FL Bringb H ll
tl.it. ut bt 11.. 1 1. ll l u s t
I,,,,i. I' .I ,U ,I. ,11...
t, ,ll IF ,, i,,,h ,11 I nl. l i ,,, ,,

with roll u) doors attelly moo nd rill on 7 aloowith Ecellntdd iiolh loln m a iY ey
ope nt 14t+ aos Palmaty hals idllrchus Inunltle l toarianeas Co1l0ned mrake n







oonvtnient tn I1.10 Pnnnmn Cdty Moll, and beaches, nolnaestolI Mmainnnn. $174.900 MLS #24742"0


Lost: Walking Stick Winn-Dixie parking lot. 850-
579-2263
Mirror w/shelves: $50. 850-693-3260.
Singer Sewing Machine $75, 850-693-0521
Wedding gown, new, sz 16, $300 850-693-3260.
Winch, 2K Ib Cap. Master lock $65 850-579-4082
Window 29 1/2 x 30 1/4. $100, 850-482-2636
Windows 2 transom, 14x73 $45, 850-482-2636


IOM ESFORS[ I


INCOME PRODUCING
Located at 2350 Hwy
73 South, this is
currently a day care.
The building is 1430
sq ft and is great
hwy frontage. CALL
CRESH HARRISON
850-482-1700

BRICK HOME IN
MARIANNA This
house is just waiting
for you to call it your
home!! 3BR1.5BA
Approl 1100 sf.
Located on 1.15
-ae acres, Large oak
S trees in the yard,
relax on the front
porch with plenty of space for kids in the yard! Large open kitchen and
1 car attached carport. This home is new on the market to call today
for the price. CALL CRESH HARRISON OR STACY BORGES
WATERFRONT home
located on Merits Mill
Pond!!! Cozy 2BRI BA
home with 1080 sq
overlooking lake! Large
backyard with deck
perfect for relaxing!
Kitchen and baths have
had some updates!
Living room and Master
bedroom overlook the
SELL and will not last long! ont miss out on this groat opportuni! Call today
for your personal showing! MLS#243509. CALL CRESH 850-573-1990
WOWI WHAT AN
OPPORTrUNnim Act Now!
53 BEAUTIFUL secluded
acres nestled between
Indian OSprlngs Golf
Course and Blue Spnngs
Recratioal Area. Located
on the MemnVs Mill Pond
wl h appmx 3000 feet ot
Wateirfont! MLSf24816,
CALL CRESH HARRISON
850482-1700

I GREAT

OFFICE

SPACE
CALL CRESH
HARRISON at
850-482-1700
PRICED WAY BELOW
MARKET VALUEII Now
is the Perfect time to
take advantage of this
GREAT opportunity and
own your own home in
NorthOaks Subdivision.
Nice 3 bedroom 2 bath
with an office or 4th
,. bedroom with over
1700 sq fi Enjoy the
summer days in the below ground pool with plenty rom left in the privacy
fenced backyard! 2 Car garage, LARGE utility mom with storage cabinets Enjoy
a cup of coco relaxing in front ofthe wood burning replace. Call today because
this home isoin to SELL fast. CALL STACY 80RGES or CRESH HARRISON
MaOCIME IcRO


MALONE0WMHOON 10 ACRES
Beautiul 112.5 with Officel
NuI! riMagni cent bICh
w! center ind Covered feet
poCh Ci aditMal deck area
to esltertarni, .eg ed 2
ar arpMo a s0b, mere
is also a 2 SWMH In good
condilion with screened
a rge srt pW eltm CALL
STOCY BORGESs S573a.199I

GREAT HOME IN GREElNW00
withl ohso poleoliai 3
beldroon sbeb)rwth 0uean
Iue 10si pW1 car toc he dlorah
2" 1r,*i brnbed Cetera
Beautiful IFarmnd behind
t N har Homwneedso a Rl
64'. i.. .. ....

FanMORleRt U I aO llO t
CALLING ALL INHESTORSI
This home ld nak le~at lh t
reo lAnllaiycr COOLLI 01E
3 h 1Xtrr b aIt0 harrel w,
ut uie 1o o it. Loated
igh o n d steel om Sheso
and Shopring and Chtporr
t~tll Large bmithn k uae
brlding in lened tcb-+rdl
Th1s loe, r not U leng
CALL rndWl CALL CRESH
HARRION tn S rCY eBOR O
FOMORE t cIFORMTeeON!
GREAT PLACE FIR YOUR
HOME O OFFICE Greatl
bedroamn S baths th lust
under 1400 sq IIn LOated
right across fro olson
Elemenary sand next door
to Ihe Cancer Center In
haenos. took houos reede
nome updates but an bea
ie perlect place fr y1ou01
CALL CRESH HARRISON OR
STACY BORES FOR MaRE
IHNFOMATIOHi


LOOKING FOR HE PERFECT
rceoY HOME rr wi Wod
rm ou r i ,o en as tihu

0r0 a pA"r 'ric Large "An

0n "rtroWe mC no btE N
.... ... 7 HiUlSrSOi onR S01A t ORlES FOR
ANDIORSA E i T I I


,ZONED MIX USE

1 1 S1


Alternator for 2003 $20. 850-352-4181.
Battery charger 2/40/200, $100, 850-482-2636
Bed: full, mattress and rails. $150. 850-693-3260


camera: olympus SP6 5


Crossbow w/7 Bolts $250 850-579-4082


Uallowl. _. r__ __ _P- u u__ I


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---JUN








10B SUNDAY, FEBRUARY3,2013


SPORTS


MALONE TO THE FINALS


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
M alone's Tessa Shack heads to the hoop against Central
during the district tournament in Poplar Springs Thursday
night. The Lady Tigers took a 54-38 win over Central in the
District 1-1A tournament semifinals in Poplar Springs on Thursday
night. Briana Dallas scored 22 points for Malone, and Curteeona
Brelove added 21.


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Fishing


LAKE SEMINOLE Bass fishing con-
tinues to be fair. Largemouth activity
overall is said to be sporadic. The fish
are awaiting a consistent warm-up from
average water temperatures. Warmer
water should usher in a flurry of bass
activity. Right now, flipping jigs in mat-
ted vegetation can produce some pretty
fair catches. Rat-L-Traps fished along the
edges of grass lines is a good pattern, as
are Carolina-rigs and drop-shots along
creek channels.
Crappies are reasonably active at mid-
range depths and there is increased ac-
tivity among the. schools that remain
deep. Sizable recent catches have been
reported and the individual fish have
been of very good size. Minnows are the
best bait offerings.
Catfish have gotten slightly more ac-
tive of late, while other species continue
slow.

LAKE EUFAULA Bass fishing is fair
and water level at present dictates tar-
geting the banks and fishing the shore-
line vegetation. Simply find inundated
grass and work these flooded areas with
floating worms, lip-less crankbaits,
small shallow-running crankbaits and
spinnerbaits. "Swimming" jigs tipped
with plastic worms has paid off for some
in these areas as well. If you worm-fish
here, stay with a Texas-rig presentation.
Dark-colored jigs and worms are best.
For largemouths that continue to hold
hard on the ledges, fish jigging spoons
on heavy line.
The hybrids are still on the deeper


ledges, but for now are suspended and
slow to bite.
Crappies remain deep and have slowed
down. For now, continue fishing min-
nows and tipped jigs around deep struc-
ture. Shallow up as the water warms.
Bream and catfish remain very slow for
now.

LAKE ANDREWS/CHATTAHOOCHEE RIV-
ER The largemouths will be congregat-
ing on the main river ledges, where it is
possible to catch one occasionally on
jigging spoons and jig-and-pig combos.
Fishing will be slow, as the bass will not
be very active over the next few days. On
a positive note, the few fish taken right
now are likely to be quality individuals.
Return to the creek mouths with crank-
baits and Texas-rigs when the water
warms.
Catfish will be slow, but now is the time
to look forward to a warm-up and expect
the larger channel cats, blues, and flat-
heads to become more active in the tail-
waters soon.
Crappies are still slow and will remain
so for awhile. As on the reservoirs, they
are due to become more active with
warmer weather.
Hybrids and bream continue on the
slow side.
Generation schedules, pool levels, and other such
information for area waterways may be obtained by
calling toll-free 1-888-771-4601. Follow the recorded
instructions and access the touch-tone for the Apala-
chicola River System.


Commentary


Sometimes it's all about the catching


've preached the
sermon for years.
The outdoor experi-
ence is not about catch-
ing and killing. It's far
more important just to
"be there," experienc-
ing nature, honing one's
outdoor skills,observing,
becoming one with your
surroundings. Full string-
ers and fat game bags are
secondary things.
Usually.
Not today, though. Today
I want that fish, the one I
know for certain lurks just
below the surface beneath
the shade of the lily pads.
She's there, no doubt
about it. A big old large-
mouth. I've seen her roll
a half dozen times since
daybreak. Ten pounds?
Maybe twelve? Doesn't re-
ally matter. I want her.
I want to toss a weird-
looking something into
her lair. I want to anger
her. I want her to suck
my lure into her gaping
mouth and make the
water explode with geyser-
like ferocity. I want to set
the hook at just the right
instant. I want, for a frac-
tion of a second, to feel a
solid, immovable weight
at the end of my line.
Then, as my rod bends
and the drag system on
my reel goes into action,
I want to feel her move,
want to sense her power,
want to say aloud, "Fooled
you, old gal. Gotcha!
Today I want ignore the
eerie, beautiful mist that


Boblornegay
AP Columnist
shrouds the blackwater
slough. I don't want to art-
fully or aesthetically con-
sider the stately cypresses,
the lovely bejeweled drag-
onflies, the purple blooms
of the pickerelweed, or the
deliberate patient wait-
ing game played by the
great blue heron on the
opposite bank. Today I am
in pure-angler mode. This
morning I am a bass fish-
erman, not a naturalist.
I want that fish.
I don't know why. I just
do. Catching her is of ut-
most importance today.
Let's see, now. The
Devil's Horse? No. It'll snag
in the pads. Bang-O-Lure?
Uh'uh. Same problem,
Buzzbait? I think not; I
believe a slower presenta-
tion is in order. Something
weedless, and quieter. No
rattles. A bit more finesse
is called for, I think.
Ah, yes. The Moss
Mouse. But what color?
SGray? Green? Gray, I think.
Yeah, that's the one.
I tie on the lure. Looks
real. Now to make it act
that way. I cast. Wonder of
wonders, it lands precisely
where I want it, right there
in that small open pocket


in the middle of the pad
patch. Not too fast, now.
Be patient. Let the ripples
disperse. Okay, now.
Twitch it once, ever so
slightly.
Nothing.
Again.
Nothing.
Dadgummit! I just knew
she'd be right there, ready
to...
Whoa! There she is!
Almost jerked my arm
off. Barely time to set the
hook.
Big fish that she is, she
doesn't bother with silly,
frenetic leaping and danc-
ing. She turns nose down
and bores straight into the
lily pad stems. I get a brief
glimpse of her. She's as big
as I thought she was. Got
to get her out of the cover.
If I don't, she'll foul me for
sure. Why on earth didn't
I spool up with braided
line?
I take a second to feel
proud of myself as I horse
the venerable old matri-
arch bass from the tangled
vegetation. There, old
gal. Gotcha out in open
water now. Come to Papa.
Can't wait to kiss you on
your big old head before I
release you. Won't be long
now. Thirty feet. Twenty.
Now...
Now, nothing.
The line goes slack. The
Moss Mouse, still looking
for all the world like a real
baby rat, rises to the sur-
face. There's naught but
a swirl to mark the spot


where she ejected the lure.
The rapid beating of my
heart subsides, in marked
contrast with my rapidly
increasing disappoint-
ment. I raise my bowed
head and look around
me. The mist still shrouds
the slough. The cypresses
remain stately. The drag-
onflies flit back and forth
from one pickerelweed
frond to another. The
blue heron continues his
patient vigil. The scene is
beautiful, pristine.
But today I don't care.
I wanted that fish.
I really did.


Oroe ry Specials
Mufflers & Exhaust


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Songs by'the likes of,
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