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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028304/00958
 Material Information
Title: Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title: Sunday Floridan
Portion of title: Floridan
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Jackson County Floridan
Publisher: Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Marianna Fla
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates: 30.776389 x -85.238056 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note: "Independent."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID: UF00028304:01005
 Related Items
Preceded by: Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by: Marianna Floridan

Full Text


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:,IV Informing more than 17,000 readers
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daily in print and online


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Former Marianna mayor, bush
BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER the business. said. "I remember going there
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan Milton Pittman and later his with mydaddyto buysomewhen
J.D. Swearingen was the pri- son, Jeff, were fre- I was nine or 10 years old."
mary tractor and equipment quent customers. Bill Hodges worked 42 years for
man for generations of farmers "He was a good, Swearingen as a sales represen-
in Jackson County and the sur- smart business- tative, having left his post just
rounding area. man who knew a few months after Swearingen
At one point he and fam- the ropes in farm warned him that he was getting
ily members held the regional equipment," the ready to close up shop.
franchises for Massey Ferguson, Swearingen elder Pittman Hodges remembers his old
John Deere and Ford tractors. n said. boss as someone who expected
For many, many years, his name But Swearingen didn't start a lot of his employees but who
was linked to the very notion of out selling tractors. He was gave much back in return.
'tractor' in these parts. around when animals provided "He expected a lot, but he paid
His passing Saturday morn- all the "horsepower" available to good for what you did," Hodges
ing at the age of 86 came a little farmers. said. "I think he missed the mule
more than a year after he folded "I remember him from back business very much, and he al-
up his dealership and retired when I was boy, when he sold ways had horses and cows at
with more than a half-century in mules for R.L Hinson." Pittman home. He was the number one


iessman, dies at 86


Massey Ferguson seller for two
years; I'm talking about in the
whole world. We. sold a lot of
tractors."
Hodges came to work for
Swearingen in 1969 and left in
November of 2010. Swearingen
sent for him, he said, when his
old boss in Pensacola closed his
tractor dealership. Hodges had
been recommended by a Massey
Ferguson representative who
knew the two men and felt they
would work together well.
He said his ensuing career with
Swearingen Was a rewarding
one.
"I'always had a lot of respect
for him. He expected you to work


hard, but he worked hard, too,"
Hodges said.
Former Jackson County Exten-
sion Director Ed Jowers remem-
bers Swearingen as a store owner
who believed in the classic busi-
ness appearance and manner.
"He was always dressed in a
suit and tie, and he met you at
the door. He always greeted his
customers when they came in
and made them feel welcome.
I always found him to be a real
gentleman," Jowers said. "I've
bought tractors from him and so
did my father. In fact, I still drive
one of the Massey Fergusons he
See ICON, Page 5A


CYPRESS POST OFFICE


Walter and Dorothy Brown pick up their mail at the Cypress Post Office Monday.


LocalUSPS staying open, cutting hours


BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com
The Cypress Post Office
will remain open but. with
shorter staff hours beginning
Feb. 23. That's a better result
than some people in.the com-
munity expected when word
came down more than a year
ago that the U.S. Postal Ser-
vice planned to shutter some
post office in a cost-saving
measure.
The decision was handed
down earlier this month. The
post office will still be staffed


five days a week, Monday
through Friday, but only be-,
tween the hours of 10 a.m. and
noon. The exterior door will
be open 24-7 as it has always
been, so people can pick up
their mail any time they want.
Until Feb. 23, the post office
will be staffed from 9 a.m. until
3p.m.
"Walter and Dorothy Brown,
who helped campaign to
keep the post office open,
said they were grateful to all
the public entities and the
private citizens who joined in


that effort, specifically men-
tioning the Jackson County
Commission, the Jackson
County Chamber of Com-
merce, the Spanish Trail Lum-
ber Company and the general
population of Cypress. He
said he also appreciates the
U.S. Postal Service for keep-
ing an open mind and listen-
ing to what the community
had to say at public meeting
on the issue earlier this
month.
Marcie Shaw, who runs the
counter at the post office, said


she understands that several
people have already cancelled
their post office boxes in an-
ticipation that the building
would be shut down. Some
took boxes in Grand Ridge or
Marianna. They can re-open
their Cypress boxes if they
wish, she said.
She did not immediately,
know the exact cost of doing
so because some new postal
service rates went into effect
Monday and she did not have
a list of the changes close at
hand.


Grand Ridge


Man


charged


with child


neglect

Says he was sleeping when
tots took off for the park
Staff report
On Friday, Jan. 25, the Jackson
County Sheriff's Office received a
call about two small children who
were found unattended at a park
in Grand Ridge. A check of all resi-
dences in the im-
mediate area re-
vealed ho one who
knew the children.
After approxi-
mately30 minutes,
the investigating
Braxton officer located a
Lincoln Avenue
address where the children were
supposedto be.
Contact was made with Taylor
Braxton, who admitted he was
the person responsible for watch-
ing the children. When asked if
he knew where the children were,
JCSO reports Braxton replied, "No,
I was sleeping."
During the course of the investi-
gation, the officer discovered that
one child is 3%and the other is 2.
Taylor R. Braxton, 21, of 2010
Lincoln Ave. in Grand Ridge, was
arrested and charged with child
neglect. He was lodged in the Jack-
son County Correctional Facility to
await first appearance.
JCSO says the Florida Depart-
ment of Children and Family Ser-
vices responded to the scene and
assisted with returning the chil-
dren to responsible guardians.


Corrections company celebrates 30 year milestone


Staff Report
The Corrections Corporation
of America has been privately
managing prisons for 30 years
and, to celebrate that milestone
anniversary, the company held
a modest celebration Monday at'
the Graceville Correctional Insti-
tution where it took over man-
agement in 2010.
Local community leaders and
students from an area county
school were special guests for
the day.
The staff competed against
Cottondale High School stu-
dents in a basketball shootout


and a 30-yard dash. A "30-ingre-
dient cook-off" was also held as
part of the festivities.
GCI. opened in 2007 under
the original management of the
GEO Group. It houses 1,884 male
inmates. The prisoners have sev-
eral education programs avail-,
able to them, including GED
preparation, Adult Basic Educa-
tion coursework in landscaping
and horticulture, computer sci-
ence and workforce readiness.
The prison also offers faith-
based programs, the Auburn dog
training program and addiction
treatment.


Bobby Lee lines up his shot as
the staff from the Graceville
Correctional Institution squared
off against Cottondale High School
Monday during a Corrections
Corporation of America anniversary
celebration.


SCLASSIFIEDS...4B


> ENTERTAINMENT...3B


> LOCAL...3A


OBITUARIES...5A > STATE...4A


.. ..


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Is Printed On,
Recycled Newsprint




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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Weather Outlook
Mostly Cloudy & Very Warm.
Today Justin Kiefer / WMBB


High 799
Low 630


'C High-76
Low -430

Wednesday
Warm and windy. Storms
likely.


4*


High 63
Low 36


Friday
Sunny & Mild.


SHigh 630
Low 330

Thursday
Clearing & Breezy. Cooler.



;.h High 63
S .Low 398


Saturday
Sunny & Mild.


TIDES ULTRAVIOLET INDEX
Panama City Low 6:46 AM High 10:44 PM
Apalachicola Low 11:18 AM High 4:20 AM 0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8-10 Very High, 11+ Extreme
Port St. Joe Low 7:10AM High 11:17 PM
Destin Low 8:21 AM High 11:50 PM 0 1
Pensacola Low 8:55 AM High 12:23 PM


RIVER READINGS
Woodruff
Blountstown
Marianna
Caryyille


Reading
41.04 ft.
1.5 ft.
6.06 ft.
3.6 ft.


Flood Stage
66.0 ft.
15.0 ft.
19.0 ft.
12.0 ft.


THE SUN AND MOON 1
Sunrise 6:34 AM
Sunset 5:15 PM
Moonrise 7:54 PM ,Feb.
Moonset 8:19 AM 10


Feb. Jan. Feb.
17 27 3


FLORIDA'S HEAL

PANHANDLE cOlmu

MEDIA PARTNERS WJAQ 100.9om
LISTEN FOR HOURLYWEAHERUDATES


JACKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN
Publisher Valeria Roberts
vroberts@jcfloridan.com

Circulation Manager Dena Oberski
doberski@jcfloridan.com

CONTACT US
Telephone: 850-526-3614
FAX: 850-482-4478
Email: editorial@jcfloridan.com
Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447
Street Address:
4403 Constitution Lane
Marianria, FL 32446
Office Hours:
Weekdays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

MISS YOUR PAPER?
You should receive your newspaper no later
than 6 a.m. If it does not arrive, call Circula-
tion between 6 a.m, and noon, Tuesday to
Friday, and 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. on Sunday. The
Jackson County Floridan (USPS 271-840)
is published Tuesday through Friday and
Sunday mornings. Periodical postage paid
at Marianna, FL.


SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Home delivery: $11.23 per month; $32.83
for three months; $62.05 for six months;
and $123.45 for one year. All prices include
applicable state and local taxes. Mail
subscriptions must be paid in advance. Mail
subscriptions are: $46.12 for three months;
$92.24 for six months; and $184.47 for one
year.

ADVERTISING
The advertiser agrees that the publisher
shall not be liable for damages arising
out of errors and advertisements beyond
the amount paid for the space actually
occupied by that portion of the advertise-
ments in which the error occurred, whether
such error is due to the negligence of the
publisher's employees or otherwise, and
there shall be not liability for non-inser-
tion of any advertisement beyond the
amount paid for such advertisement. This
newspaper will not knowingly accept or
publish illegal material of any kind. Advertis-
ing which expresses preference based on
legally protected personal characteristics is
not acceptable.

HOWTOGET YOUR
NEWS PUBLISHED
The Jackson County Floridan will publish
news of general interest free of charge.
Submit your news or Community Calendar
events via e-mail, fax, mail, or hand delivery.
Fees may apply for wedding, engagement,
anniversary and birth announcements.
Forms are available at the Floridan offices.
Photographs must be of good quality and
suitable for print. The Floridan reserves the
right to edit all submissions.
GETTING IT RIGHT
The Jackson County Floridan's policy
is to correct mistakes promptly. To
report an error, please call 526-3614
Monday-Friday.


Community Calendar


TODAY
St. Anne Thrift Store Hours 9
a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday and Thursdays
at 4285 Second Ave. in Marianna.
Toys/clothing sale: Buy one, get one
(same or lesser value) free. Call 482-
3734.,
The Jackson Hospital Board of
Trustees Building and Grounds
Committee meeting noon in the
Hudnall Building conference room.
Call 718-2629.
) Orientation Noon-3 p.m. at
Goodwill Career Training Center,
4742 U.S. 90, Marianna. Learn about
and register for free services. Call
526-0139.
) Sewing Circle 1 p.m. at Jackson
County Senior Citizens, 2931 Optimist
Drive in Marianna. Call 482-5028.
) Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission public
meeting on deer management
- 6:30-8:30 p.m. at Jackson County
Agricultural Conference Center.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open
Meeting 8-9 p.m. in the AA room of
First United Methodist Church, 2901
Caledonia St. in Marianna.

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 30
n Alcoholics Anonymous Open
Meeting Noon-1 p.m. in the AA
room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in
Marianna.
) Internet/Email Basic Computer
Class, Part 1- Noon-3 p.m. at the
Goodwill Career Training Center, 4742
Highway 90, Marianna. Learn basic
use of the internet, how to send and
receive emails and how to protect
your computer. Call 526-0139.
) The Jackson Hospital Board of
Trustees' Physician Recruitment
Committee meeting 5:30 p.m. in
the classroom. Call 718-2629.


THURSDAY, JAN.31
) St. Anne Thrift Store Hours 9
a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday and Thursdays
at 4285 Second Ave. in Marianna.
Toys/clothing sale: Buy one, get one
(same orlesser value) free. Call 482-
3734.
) Tools to Quit Class -11 a.m.-1
p.m. in the Community Room of the
Jackson Hospital Hudnall Building.
Curriculum is written by ex-smokers;
free patches, gum and/or lozenges
available. Call 482-6500.
a Marianna Kiwanis Club Meeting
- Noon at Jim's Buffet & Grill, 4329
Lafayette St., Marianna. Call 482-
2290.
) Job Club Noon-3 p.m. at the
Goodwill Career Training Center, 4742
U.S. 90, Marianna. Learn job seeking
and retention skills; get job search
assistance. Call 526-0139.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Closed
discussion, 8-9 p.m., First United
Methodist Church, 2901 Caledonia
St., Marianna, in the AA room.
Attendance limited to persons with a
desire to stop drinking: papers will not
be signed.

FRIDAY, FEB. 1
a Jackson County Chamber of
Commerce First Friday Power
Breakfast 7-9:30 a.m. at the
Jackson County Agriculture
Conference Center. Guest Speakers:
House Speaker Pro Tempore Marti
Coley and Senate President Don
Gaetz. This will be an interactive Q&A
forum. Call 482-8060.
SInternet/Email Basic Computer
Class, Part 2 Noon-3 p.m. at the
Goodwill Career Training Center, 4742
U.S. 90, Marianna. Learn basic use of
the internet, how to send and receive
emails and how to protect your
computer. Call 5?6-0139.
) Celebrate Recovery 7 p.m.


at Evangel Worship Center, 2645
Pebble Hill Road in Marianna. Adult,
teen meetings to "overcome hurts,
habits and hang-ups." Dinner: 6 p.m.
Child care available. Call 209-7856 or
573-1131.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open
Meeting 8-9 p.m. in the AA room of
First United Methodist Church, 2901
Caledonia St. in Marianna.

SATURDAY, FEB. 2
a Sixth annual Chipola College
Future Educators Club Teacher
Workshop 8a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in
the Literature/Language (Building
Z), Chipola College, Marianna. Those
interested in a career in education
are invited. RSVP to Casey Bush at
bushc@chipola.edu or 718-2449.
) Alford.Community Health Clinic
Hours 10 a.m. until last patient is
seen; 1770 Carolina St. in Alford. The-
free clinic for income-eligible patients
without medical insurance treats
short-term illnesses and chrinlic
conditions. Appointments available by
calling 263-7106 or 209-5501; walk-
ins welcome. Sign in before noon.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open
Meeting 4:30-5:30 p.m;,in the
AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in
Marianna.
) "Sweet Sensations: A Red Carpet
Affair" 6 p.m. at the Jackson
County Agricultural Center. This is
a fashion show sponsored by the
Marianna Alumnae Chapter of Delta
Sigma. Hospitality hour begins at 6
p.m. followed by the fashion show at 7
p.m. Donations are $15. Call 718-3315.

SUNDAY, FEB. 3
Alcoholics Anonymous Closed
Discussion 6:30 p.m. at 4349 W.
Lafayette St. in Marianna (in one-story
building behind 4351W. Lafayette St.).


Attendance limited to persons with a
desire to stop drinking.
a Alcoholics Anonymous Meeting
- 8 p.m. in the board room of
Campbellton-Graceville Hospital,
5429 College Drive, Graceville.

MONDAY, FEB. 4
Employability Workshop:
Common Job Search Mistakes to
Avoid 2:30 p.m. at Marianna One
Stop Career Center. Call 718-0326.
) Reception and Program Honoring
Jackson County Teacher of the
Year, Rookie Teacher of the Year
and School-related Employee of
the Year 4:15 p.m. at Marianna
High School. Reception will begin at
4:15 p.m. followed by the program at 5
p.m. Call 482-1200, ext. 276.
) Jackson County Quilter's Guild
meeting 5:30-7:30 p.m. at
Ascension Lutheran Church, 3975
U.S. 90 West, Marianna. Business
meetings are fourth Mondays; other
Monday are for projects, lessons
and help.'Al quilters welcome. Call
209-7638. '
) Central Jackson Relay for Life
Committee meeting 6 p.m. at Milk
& Honey Frozen Yogurt, 4767 U.S. 90
in Marianna. Meetings are planned for
the first Monday of each month before
the April event. Volunteers needed.
Email angelaparker30@gmail.com or
call 573-5353.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open
Meeting 8-9 p.m. in the AA room of
First United Methodist,Church, 2901
Caledonia St., Marianna.

TUESDAY, FEB. 5
East Jackson County Economic
Development Council meeting
9:30 EST at 8 South Main St. in
Chattahoochee. Dick DAlemberte
Realty is Business of the Month for
'February. The public is invited.


The submission deadline for this calendar is two days before publication. Submit to Community Calendar, Jackson County Floridan, P O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447,
Semail editorial@jcfloridan.com, fax 850-482-4478 or bring items to 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.


Marianna Police Department
The Marianna Police Department listed
the following incidents for Jan. 27, the lat-
est available report: One drunk driver, one
reckless driver, two suspicious vehicles,
four suspicious persons, three verbal dis-
turbances, three burglar alarris, eight traf-
fic stops, one follow-up investigation, two
noise disturbances, one animal complaint,
one assist of another agency and one unse-
cured building.

Jackson County Sheriff's Office
The Jackson County Sheriff's Office and
county fire/rescue reported the following
incidents for Jan. 27, One hospice death,
one abandoned vehicle, one suspicious
vehicle, one suspicious incident, two suspi-
cious persons, five verbal disturbance calls,
one woodland fire call, 20 medical calls,
two burglar alarms, one panic alarm, three
fire alarms, 16 traffic stops, two civil dis-
putes, one trespass complaint, one found
or abandoned property report, two noise
disturbances, one assist of a motorist or
pedestrian, three assists of other agencies,
two public service calls, one welfare check,
one patrol request and two 911 hang-ups.

Jackson County
Correctional Facility
The following persons were booked into
the county jail during the latest reporting
periods:
) Richard Willis, 35, 353 Highway 73
South, Marianna, possession of meth, pos-
*session of drug paraphernalia, possession
of marijuana-less than 20 grams.


Police Roundup
n Harry Dubose, 31, 109 Lake Talquin
Lake Resort, Quincy, trespassing after
warning.
) Kelly Ramsey, 31, 108 View Drive, Al-
ford, battery-domestic violence.
S'TylerWoodham, 21, 7463
GJ: -_ Stanley Circle, Milton,
r .-- violation of conditional
R ME release.
) KristaWoodham, 20,
7463 Stanley Circle, Milton,
violation of conditional release.
a Janea Williamson, 22, 2936 Harley
Drive, Marianna, driving while license
suspended.
. Mason Hunter, 22, 107 Red Wing Road,
Ashford, Ala., hold for Madison Co.
) James Stephenson, 33, 2933 Milton Ave.,
Marianna, uttering a forged instrument.
) Paul Mikell, 35, 2055 Stone Lane,
Sneads, violation of probation.
S)Brandice Bernales, 29, 3651 Kynesville
Road, Marianna, fraudulent use of credit
card-two counts.
) Mark Blackmon, 37, 914 Murfreeboro
Road, Lebanon, Tenn., driving while license
suspended or revoked, driving under the
influence.
) Kayla Shumate, 21,106 Oak Grove
Road, Dothan, Ala., driving under the
influence.
) Kimberly Blount, 36, 3070 (Apt. C-11),
Carters Mill Road, Marianna, possession of
marijuana with intent to sell.
n Lynwood Garrett, 55, 631 Blue Springs '
Highway, Greenwood, sale of cocaine.
) Victoria Hinson, 22, 7604 Old Span-
ish Trail, Sneads, dispensing medication
without a license.
)) Jimmy Wilburn, 39, 4392 Deering St.,


Marianna, grand theft auto, fraudulent use
of a credit card, grand theft.
) DanielValenzuela, 23, 2940 Green
St., (Apt. A), Marianna, trespassing after
warning.
a Maxwell Wester, 27, 3246 Highway 71
North, Mariarma, child abuse, battery do-
mestic violence, criminal mischief.
n Taylor Braxton, 21, 5806 Hansford Road,
Marianna, child neglect.
a FrankWhite, 28, 3612 Sylvania Planta-
tion Road, Greenwood, aggravated battery,
robbery, petit theft.
SAndreaYoung, 30, 877 West 8th Ave.,
Graceville, sale of marijuana.
SLatrenda Washington, 18, 2650 Lot 2,
Lovewood Road, Cottondale, violation of
pretrial intervention.
a Anthony Jenkins, 45, 4052 Old Cotton-
dale Road, Marianna, driving while license
suspended or revoked.
) Joseph Jackson, 41, 4247 Woodrest
Road, Cottondale, violation of state
probation.
) Brandy Kutchey, 26, 6349B Highway 90,
Grand Ridge, violation of state probation.
) Jacquelin English,.45, 3223 Carters Mill
Road, Marianna, felony retail theft, trespass
after warning.
n Burden Hunter, 49, 3114 Carters Mill
Road, Marianna, possession of drug
paraphernalia.
) Michael O'Bryan, 41, 20289 State Road
71, Blountstown, stalking.

Jail Population: 214
To report a crime, call CrimeStoppers at 526-5000
or a local law enforcement agency.
To report a wildlife violation, call 1-888-404-FWCC (3922).


--


-II----------,-----------------


12A + TUESDAY, JANUARY 29, 2013


Wake-up Call


V


-11 1 -1.






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Golson Elementary School employees of the year are (from left) Tqacher of the Year Sallie Mathis, Rookie of the Year Tenisha
Henderson and Vivian Ford School-related Employee of the Year Becky Bogart.


Golson 2013-14 honorees named


Special to the Floridan

Diane Long, principal of
E M. Golson Elementary
School, has announced
the 2013-14 Teacher of the
Year, Rookie of the Year
and Vivian Ford School-re-
lated Employee of the Year
honorees.
Becky Bogart is the Viv-
ian Ford School-related
Employee of the Year. Bo-
gart works as a custodian
and has been at Golson for
sixyears.
Long said, "Working
at Golson Elementary is


more than a job for Becky
Bogart, it's part of her life."
Tenisha Henderson is
the Rookie of the Year. She
is a graduate of Cottondale
High School and Chipola
College with a bachelor of
science degree in elemen-
tary education.
Henderson teaches Sec-
ond Step Program on the
wheel where students are
actively engaged in lessons
and activities that develop
positive character traits.
Henderson is active in
her community, where she
serves as youth and dance


Coordinator of the New
Beginning Outreach Min-
istries Church.
She is the daughter of
pastor Dr. Marvin and
Irene Henderson.
Longsaid, "Ihave enjoyed
witnessing the growth of
Tenisha as a teacher and
enjoy watching her inter-
act with her students."
Sallie Mathis is the
Teacher of the Year at E M.
Golson Elementary. Mathis
teaches second grade and
is in her 39th year teach-
ing in the Jackson County
School District.


She is the grade chairper-
son, lead teacher for Com-
mon Core training, school
advisory member, P.T.O.
and many other positions.
Mathis' students de-
scribe her as kind, joyful,
helpful, generous, excit-
ing, fun and loving. Staff
and faculty say it is a joy to
work with Mathis and she
always is so very helpful.
Mathis is retiring in June.
Long said, "She is an inte-
gral part of the Golson staff
and an excellent exam-
ple of what all educators
should strive to become."


COTTONDALE MASONIC LODGE


SUBMITTED PHOTOS
C ottondale Masonic Lodge No. 206, which is celebrating its 100th.year of charter,
installed its new officers for 2013. Wesley King, of Chipley Lodge, conducted the
installation. Pictured are (front row, from left) Dewayne Brown, senior warden; Burt
Gainer, senior deacon; Worshipful Master Ray Lawrence; Wallace Roland, junior warden;
Rex Corbin, junior deacon; Matt Strader, chaplain; (back row) Wesley King; Chester Perdue,
senior steward; secretary and Past District Deputy Grand Mastei of Florida Dennis Sloan; and
Harold Pate, past chaplain. Not shown is Ken Ramsey, junior steward.


F our-year
Worshipful
Master Wes
P0"lston hands
the gavel to
incoming master
Ray Lawrence.


VIarianna High
School Honor Rolls


Marianna High School
has released its honor
rolls for the second nine-
week term. They are as
follows:
Ninth Grade
A Honor Roll Evan
Barber, Jenna Cartwright,
Jameeyah Cody, Madalyn
Daniels, Katie Everett,
Binny Gocool, Sydney
Holland, Lea Marlowe,
Garrison Melzer, Alexis
Parish, Kaitlyn Renegar,
Madison Schrenker,
Steven Spence, Kayleith
Temples and Quaid
VanHuss
A/B Honor Roll
- Logan Baxley, Yasmine
Bellamy, Hannah Blount,
Khyla Bodie, Kiley
Bryan, Madison Daniels,
Jonathan Franklin,
Sheltof Gilbert, Jared
Hendrix, Jaquainna
Hughes, Crystal Kolmetz,
Marissa Lane, Jarrod
Love-McFrederick,
Sadie Mayo, Christian
McIntire, Briana
McKeen, Karlee
Milton, Natalee Milton,
Catherine Monteagudo,
Haley Montellands,
Lesley Myrick, Vivian
Pollocks, Alexis Pueschel,
Carylee Sapp, Megan
Schrenker, Natera Sims,
Angela Smith, A'Dajah
Swiley, Alysia Temple,
Cole Tipton, Zachary
Trotman, SaraWallace,
Carlee Wilson and Robert
Zeledon

10th Grade
A Honor Roll Lexie.
Basford, Jeb Bruner,
Hannah Jackson,
Matthew Jones, Sophia
Pereda, Joshua Roberts,
Natasha Smith, Darbey
Sweeney and Elizabet
Varnum
A/B Honor Roll
- Carley Allen, Emily
Anderson, Shaquarious
Baker, Cameron Braxton,
William Braxton,
Annalise Brockner,
TIrent Charles, Cindel
Cobb, Destiny Combs,
Kristin Cumbie, Jake
Daffin, Kiandra Decree,
Sheridan Dryden,
Nathan Furches,
Lawrence Glover, Noah
Green, Sharon Hardy,
Cianna Harris, Cailee
Heinemann, Allie
Hinson, Shelbie Johnson,
Hampton Jordan, Alexis
Kendall, Alyssa Klotz,
Kaulder Kressman,
Tyler McAllister, Colleen
Mears, Anatasia Mitchell,
Chelsey Pettis, Shamari.
Pittman, Augustus
Reddoch, Hudson
Roberts, Lacey Roberts,'
Morgan Seay, Jordan
Smith, Jared Standiford,
Dustyn Sweeney, Kayce
Ward, Shawn Wells,
Garrett Williams and
MaxwellWilliams

Uth Grade,
A Honor Roll Zakerie
Blank, Levi Cobb,
Vallen Driggers, Jackson
Gilmore, Brianna
Granberry, Chelsea


Kuhajda, Jacob Leff,
Christina McKeen,
Katrina Milliser, Kaitlyn
Moss, Jasmine Mount,
Trenton Nobles, Dakota
Raines, Caroline
Rogers, Anne Marie
Sapp, Elynora Sapp,
Kelly Scott, Gabrielle
Simpson, Riby Stephens,
Megan Tillman, Landon
Turnmire and Mariya
Yaroshenko
A/B Honor Roll
Brittany Adams,
Jessie Baker, Colin
Barrentine, Jason
Barwick, Devan Baxley,
Joshua Blackburn,
Latonya Brunson, Kody
Bryan, Caitlyn Carpenter,
Iman Coleman, Madelyn
Craven, Brein Curry,
Ashley Delameter,
Demontray Edwards,
Ryan Flowers, Brianna
Godwin, Nicholas
Helms, Karissa Hollis,
Hayden Hurst, Jordan
Hussey, Alexus Jones,
Shanna Letner, Leanna
Lipford, Reid Long,
Kendall Lowery, Kate
Mayo, Randyn McMillan,
Keionna Mitchell, Faith
Moore, Betty Ni,Reagan
Oliver, Marcus Pender,
Tori Porter, Erika Smith,
Timothy Snyder, Hailey
* Tew, ShayliTharp,
Cheyenne Welch, Britney
Williams, Rebecca
Williams, BrennaWillis
and Morgan Willis

12th Grade
A Honor Roll Linsey
Basford, Blake Benton,
Amy Christmas,
Adam DeWitt, Emily
Fuqua, William Glover,
Madison Harrell, Jason
Helms, Bria Mathews,
Jamie McCoy, Bradley
Middleton, Irene Muniz,
Cassandra Pereda,
Zachary Perkins, Tamera
Pope, Rachel Redfern,
Christopher.Roberts,
MaryLu Sanchez,
Michaela Sanchez,
Tiffany Stephens,
Clayton Touchton, Lori
Tucker, Connor Ward,
David White, Karionda
Wilkerson and Jeremy
Wilson
A/B Honor Roll
Taylor Adkins,
Christopher Allen,
SEdward Arroyo, Alliyah
Baker, Zackary Brockner,
Tensia Clark, William
Daniels, Desiray
Declouet, Shawna
Donofro, Taylor Downs,
Kayla Dunaway, Jeffrey
Gardner, Jeffrey Gulapa,
Tiffany Hansford,
Elizabeth Hester,.
Dreanna Holden,
Megan Holloway, Joseph
Johnson, Elizabeth
Jones, Delmar Jones-
Decree, Kaitlyn Kosciw,
Faith Kpandee, Cassie
Lentzsch, Katie Long,
Precious Manning,
Mason Melvin, Jayde
Millis, Silvestre Morales,
Brianna Moss, James
Partin, Charles Reiff,
Brittany Shcarlach, Kolen
Sims, Siera Sylvester and
Ophiela Wooden
Special to the Floridan


40Ij H 9t.a Y.- I FlLe324.w






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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Severe weather possible Wednesday


Cold front might
bring high winds,
thunderstorms
Staff report

A sharp cold front will
move across the region
during the day on Wednes-
day, according to the Jack-
son County Emergency
Management Agency..
Strong winds in the lower
and middle levels of the
atmosphere will combine
with a relatively warm
and moist- air mass at the
surface, which should al-
low for the development
of a line of showers and
thunderstorms.
Depending on how
much instability can de-
velop ahead of the front,
this could support; some
severe thunderstorms
with chances of damag-
ing winds and possibly a
tornado or two during the
day on Wednesday into
Wednesday evening.
The possibility of seeing
a severe, thunderstorm is
a bit higher over Alabama
and Florida Panhandle
counties, but cannot be
ruled out for any county in
the region Wednesday and
into Wednesday night.


4011






MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Two-year-old Jasmine Gayman talked mom Margaret Owens into taking her to the park in Graceville to play in the warm weather Monday. The unseasonably
warm weather in our area is expected to change after Wednesday with a high of 54 and a low of 39 forecast for Thursday. Temperatures are expected to stay low
in the 60s during the daytime and in the high 30s at night for the rest of the week.


Local
Briefs

Alabama man killed
in one-car crash
A New Brockton, Ala.,
man died Sunday morning
when his vehicle hit a tree'
and caught fire, according
to information from the
Florida Highway Patrol.
James S. Wilson, 49,
was southbound on State
Route 81, approximately
20 miles north of Ponce
de Leon, when the 1993
Chevrolet Astro Van
he was driving left the
roadway, traveling onto
the west shoulder. FHP
reports Wilson took no
evasive action, such as
steering or braking, before
his van struck a large tree
and was subsequently
engulfed in flames. He
was unable to escape and
lost his life to the fire and
.collision. Wilson's seatbelt
was in use.
According to witnesses,
based on his actions be-
fore the collision, Wilson
"may have experienced a
medical condition."
Wilson's body was taken
to the medical examiner's
office in Panama City. His
next of kin was notified by
the New Brockton Police
Department.
Temporary lane
closures today
Florida Department of
Transportation District
Three advises drivers of
work being done in the
area today.
Motorists traveling State
Route 77, between County
Road 279 and Sunny Hills
in Washington County, will
encotinter temporary lane
closures from 8 a.m. until
noon.
In Jackson County, lane
closures will take place
near the intersection of
U.S. 90 and State Route 71
(by Hopkins Motor Cars)
from noon until 4 p.m.
An FDOT geotechnical
crew will perform pave-
ment coring and evalua-
tions on the roadway.
All maintenance ac-
tivities may be delayed or
rescheduled in the event
of inclement weather.
FDOT reminds motor-
ists to pay attention and
use-caution when driving
through the work zone.
Staff reports


Former inmate pleads guilty to tax, mail fraud


Staff Report

A former inmate at
Apalachee Correctional
Institution in Sneads has
pleaded guilty to 41 counts
of tax-related charges
which were leveled against
him last July when he was
accused of filing for and
obtaining undue refunds
in the names of several
fellowprisoners, according


to a press release from the
U.S. Attorney's Office in
Panama City.
Michael William
Joseph III, 53, pleaded to
conspiracy to defraud the
government, conspiracy
to commit mail fraud, 24
counts of filing false claims
and 15 countsof theft from
the government.
He admitted to
conspiring to file false


claims for refunds in the
names of other inmates
during a four-year period
that stretched from
February of 2008 to July
of 2012, according to the
release.
Most of the refunds he
obtained were sent to a
bank account under his
control or were sent in
checks to his mother's
residence, later to be


cashed.
Joseph's sentencing is set
for March 20.
He could draw various
terms for the charges, time
that could add up to well
over 300 years if imposed
as consecutive terms.
The case against Joseph
was a collaborative
investigative effort
by the IRS Criminal
Investigation, the U.S.


Drug charges levied on man parked in clay pit


Staff report

Jackson County Sher-.
iff's Office patrol and K-9
deputies, while making
rounds through the south-
ern part of the county on
Saturday night, noticed
a suspicious vehicle in a
clay pit area.
At the location, privately
owned property north of

The "Its Only Another'Beer"
Black and Tan


Chason Road and north-
east of Maddox Road, dep-
uties say
they con-
ducted a
consensual
encounter
with the ve-
hicle's only
occupant,
Willis driver Rich-
ard Willis.


During the encounter,
which took place at ap-
proximately 10:20 p.m.
Saturday, Willis revealed
to officers that he was in
possession of marijuana.
While executing a prob-
able-cause. search of the
vehicle, deputies found
what they described as
suspected marijuana,
methamphetamines and


drug paraphernalia.
Willis was arrested and
charged with possession
of methamphetamine,
possession of marijuana
not more than 20 grams,
and possession of drug
paraphernalia.
He was taken to the Jack-
son County Correctional
Facility to await first ap-
pearance in court.


Postal Inspection Service,
the Florida Department
of Law Enforcement, the
State Attorney's Office
for the 14th Judicial
Circuit of Florida, and the
Florida Department of
Corrections, according to
the release.
It is being handled in
court by Assistant United
States Attorney Tiffany H.
Eggers.

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14A TUESDAY, JANUARY 29, 2013


LOCAL


I







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Police push

for checks

on gun

purchases

The Associated Press

WASHINGTON Law
enforcement leaders who
met with President Barack
Obama are urging him to
improve the mental health
system and strengthen
background checks, but
did not unify on more
controversial gun control
measures.
Leaders of the Major
County Sheriffs' Associa-
tion said they told the pres-
ident Monday to focus on
the mental health system.
Philadelphia Police Com-
missioner Charles Ramsey
says there was broad agree-
ment on the need to re-
quire stronger background
checks for gun purchases.
Ramsey is president of the
Major Cities Chiefs Asso-
ciation, which backs an as-
sault weapons ban.
The message reflects the
political reality in Congress
that the assault weapons
Sban Obama is pushing is
likely to have a hard time
winning broad support.
But the president may have
more hope for getting uni-
versal background checks.


Obituary

Marianna Chapel
Funeral Home
3960 Lafayette St.
Marianna, FL 32446
850-526-5059
www.mariannachapelfh.com

Nell G.
Conrad

Nell G. Conrad age 88 of
Kansas City formerly of
Marianna passed away Sat-
urday, January 26, 2013 in
the North Kansas City Hos-
pital.
Arrangements are incom-
plete and will be an-
nounced later by Marianna
Chapel Funeral Home.
Marianna Chapel Funer-
al Home is in charge of ar-
rangements.



Icon
From Page 1A
bought there. He was
definitely an asset to the
farmers in this area and the
loss of that place was a real
shame."
And Swearingen put
in some time as a pub-
lic servant for little com-
pensation, another tra-
dition in most business
communities.
He served on the Mari-
anna City Commission
back in the 1970s and early
1980s, spending eight of
his 12 years on the board
as mayor.
Swearingen was con-
sidered to be in excellent
health for his age, but
died Saturday morning as
the result of post-surgical
complications from a rare
condition called arteriove-
nous malformation.


Follow us on

Twitter

. .. o \
q


twitter.com/
jcfloridannews


Immigration overhaul? Senators vow action


The Associated Press

WASHINGTON Side
by side, leading Demo-
cratic and Republican
senators pledged Mon-
day to propel far-reach-
ing immigration legisla-'
tion through the Senate
by summer providing a
possible path to citizen-
ship for an estimated 11
million people now in the
U.S. illegally.
The senators acknowl-
edged pitfalls that have
doomed such efforts in the
past, but they suggested
that November's elections
- with Hispaniqs vot-
ing heavily for President
Barack Obama and other
Democrats could make
this time different.
Passage of the emotion-
ally charged legislation
by the Democratic-con-
trolled Senate is far from
assured, and a taller hur-
dle could come later in
the House, which is domi-
nated by conservative Re-
publicans who've shown
little interest in immigra-
tion overhaul. Obama will
lay out his own proposals
Tuesday, most of which
mirror the Senate plans.


A bipartisan group of leading senators announce that they have reached agreement on the
principles of sweeping legislation to rewrite the nation's Immigration laws, during a news
conference at the Capitol in Washington, Monday, Jan. 28, 2013. From left: are Sen. John Mc-
Cain, R-Ariz., Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., and Sen. Robert Menen-
dez, D-N.J.


Besides the citizenship
provision, including new
qualifications, the Senate
measure would increase
border security, allow
more temporary workers
to stay and crack down
on employers who would
hire illegal immigrants.
The plans are still short on
detail, and all the senators
conceded that months
of tedious and politically
treacherous negotiations


lie ahead.
But with a re-elected
Obama pledging his com-
mitment, the lawmakers
argued that six years after
the last sustained con-
gressional effort at an im-
migration overhaul came
up short in the Senate,
chances for approval this
year are much better.
"Other bipartisan groups
of senators have stood
in the same spot before,


trumpeting similar pro-
posals," said Sen. Charles
Schumer, D-N.Y. "But we
believe this will be the year
Congress finally gets it
done. The politics on this
issue have been turned
upside down," Schumer
said, arguing that polls
show more support than
ever for immigration
changes and political risk
in opposing it.
"Elections. Elections,"


said Sen. John. McCain,
R-Ariz. "The Republican
Party is losing the support
of our Hispanic citizens.
And we realize that there
are many issues on which
we think we are in agree-
ment with our Hispanic
citizens, but this is a pre-
eminent issue with those
citizens."
Obama got 71 percent of
the Latino vote in Novem-
ber compared to 27 per-
cent for Republican Mitt
Romney.
The president will en-
dorse the Senate process
during an event in Las Ve-
gas Tuesday, administra-
tion officials said. He will
outline a similar vision for
overhauling the nation's
immigration laws, draw-
ing on the immigration
"blueprint" he first re-
leased in 2011.
The blueprint focuses on
four key areas: a pathway
to citizenship for the 11
million illegal immigrants
in the U.S., improved bor-
der security, an overhaul
of the legal immigration
system and making it
easier for businesses to
verify the legal status of
workers.


Soldier who lost limbs has double-arm transplant


The Associated Press

On Facebook, he de-
scribes himself as a
"wounded warrior...very
wounded."
Brendan Marrocco was
the first soldier to survive
losing all four limbs in the
Iraq War, and doctors re-
vealed Monday that he's
received a double-arm
transplant.
Those new arms "al-
ready move a little," he
tweeted a month after the
operation.
Marrocco, a 26-year-old
NewYorker, was injured.by
a roadside bomb in 2009.
He had the transplant
Dec. 18 at Johns Hopkins
Hospital in Baltimore, his
father said Monday.
Alex Marrocco said his
son does not want to talk
with reporters until a news
conference Tuesday at the
hospital,' but the younger
Marrocco has repeatedly
mentioned the transplant
on Twitter and posted
photos.
"Ohh yeah today has
been one month since my
surgery and they already
move a little," Brendan
Marrocco tweeted Jan. 18.
Responding to a tweet
from NASCAR driver Brad
Keselowski, he wrote:
"dude I can't tell you how
exciting this is for me. I
feel like I finally get to start
over."
The infantryman also


In this 2012 photo, Army Sgt. Brendan Marrocco of Staten
Island, N.Y., wearing a prosthetic arm,'poses for a picture at
the 9/11 Memorial in New York.


received bone marrow
from the same dead do-
nor who supplied his
new arms. That novel ap-
proach is aimed at helping
his body accept the new
limbs with minimal
medication to prevent
rejection.
The military sponsors
operations like these to
help wounded troops.
About 300 have lost
arms or hands in Iraq or
Afghanistan.
Unlike a life-saving heart
or liver transplant, fnmb
transplants are aimed at
improving quality of life,
not extending it. Qual-
ity of life is a key concern
for people missing arms
and hands prosthetics
for those limbs are not as
advanced as those for feet
and legs.


"He was the first quad
amputee to survive," and
there have been four oth-
ers since then, Alex Mar-
rocco said.
The Marroccos want to
thank the donor's family
for "making a selfless de-
cision ... making a differ-
ence in Brendan's life," the
father said.
Brendan Marrocco has
been in public many
times. During a July
4 visit last year to the
Sept. 11 Memorial with
other disabled sol-
diers, he said he had no
regrets about his military
service.
"I wouldn't change it in
anyway.... I feel great. I'm
still the same person," he
said.
The 13-hour operation
was led by Dr. W.P. Andrew


Lee, plastic surgery chief
at Johns Hopkins. It was
the seventh double-hand
or double-arm transplant
done in the United States.
Lee led three of those
earlier operations when
he worked at the Univer-
sity of Pittsbirgh, includ-
ing the only above-elbow
transplant that had been
'done at the time, in 2010.
Marrocco's "was the
most complicated one" so
far, Lee said in an inter-
view Monday. It will take
more than a year to know
how fully Marrocco will be
able to use the new arms.
"The maximum speed
is an inch a month for
nerve regeneration" he
explained. "We're easily
looking at a couple years"
until the full extent of re-
covery is known.
While at Pittsburgh,
Lee pioneered the im-
mune-suppression ap-
proach used for Marrocco.
The surgeon led hand-
transplant operations
on five patients, giving
them marrow from their
donors in addition to the
new limbs. All five re-
cipients have done well,
and four have been able
to take just one anti-re-
jection drug instead of
combination treatments
most transplant patients
receive.
Minimizing anti-rejec-
tion drugs is important
because they have side ef-


fects and raise the risk of
cancer over the long term.
Those risks have limited
the willingness of sur-
geons and patients to do
more hand, arm and even
face transplants.
Lee has received fund-
ing for his work from'
AFIRM, the Armed Forces
Institute of Regenerative
Medicine, a cooperative
research network of top
hospitals and universities
around the country that
the government formed
about five years ago. With
government money, he
and several other plas-
tic surgeons around the
country are preparing to
do more face transplants,
possibly using the new
immune-suppression
approach.
Marrocco expects to
spend three to fourmonths
at Hopkins, then return to
a military hospital to con-
tinue physical therapy,
his father said. Before
the operation, he had been
fitted with prosthetic legs
and had learned to walk
on his own.
He had been living
with his older brother
in a specially equipped
home on New York's Stat-
en Island that had been
built with the help of
several charities. Shortly
after moving in, he said it
was "a relief to not have
to rely on other people so
much."


Scouts considering retreat from no-gays policy
The Associated Press However, Southern Bap- uled meeting on Feb. 6. Young CEO James Turley dren who've been exclud-
tist leaders who con- The meeting will be closed and AT&T CEO Randall ed from scouting and "for
NEW YORK The. Boy sider homosexuality a sin to the public. Stephenson indicated those who are in Scouts
Scouts of America may were furious about the The BSA, which celebrat- they would try to work and hiding who they are."
soon give sponsors of possible change and said edits 100th anniversary in from within to change the "For me it's notjust about
troops the authority to its approval might en- 2010, has long excluded membership policy, which the Boy Scouts of America,
decide whether to accept courage Southern Baptist both gays and. atheists. stood in contrast to their it's about equality," she
gays as scouts and leaders churches to support other Smith said a change in own companies' non-dis- told The Associated Press.
- a potentially dramatic boys' organizations in- the policy toward atheists crimination policies. "This is a step toward
retreat from a nation- stead of the BSA. was not being considered, Amid petition cam- equality in all aspects."
wide no-gays policy that Monday's announce- and that the BSA con- paigns, shipping giant Many. of the protest
has provoked relentless ment of the possible tinued to view "Duty to UPS Inc. and drug-manu- campaigns, including
protests, change comes after years God" as one of its basic facturerMerck announced one seeking Tyrrell's
Under the change now of protests over the no- principles, that they were halting do- reinstatement, had
being discussed, the dif- gays policy including Protests over the no-gays nations from their charita- been waged with help
ferent religious and civic petition campaigns that policy gained momentum ble foundations to the Boy from the Gay & Les-
groups that sponsor Scout have prompted some in 2000, when the U.S. Su- Scouts as long as the no- bian Alliance Against ,
units would be able to de- corporations to suspend preme Court upheld the gays policy was in force. Defamation.
cide for themselves how to donations to the Boy BSA's right to exclude gays. Also, local Scout of- "The Boy Scouts of
address the issue either Scouts. Scout units lost sponsor- ficials drew widespread America have heard from
maintaining an exclusion Under, the proposed ships by public schools criticism in recent months scouts, corporations and
of gays, as is now required change, said BSA spokes- and other entities that ad- for ousting Jennifer Tyr- millions of Americans that
of all units, or opening up man Deron Smith, "the hered to nondiscrimina- rell, a lesbian mom, as a discriminating against gay
their membership. Boy Scouts would not, tion policies, and several den leaderofherson's Cub scouts and scout lead-
Gay-rights activists were under any circumstances, local Scout councils made Scout pack in Ohio and for ers is wrong," said Hern-
elated at the prospect of dictate a position to units, public their displeasure refusing to approve an don Graddick, GLAAD's
change, sensing another members, or parents." with the policy. Eagle Scout application by president. "Scouting is a
milestone to go along with Smith said the change More recently, pressure Ryan Andresen, a Califor- valuable institution, and
recent advances for same- could be announced as surfaced on the Scouts' nia teen who came out as this change will only
sex marriage and the end early as next week, after own national executive gay last fall. strengthen its core prin-
of the ban on gays serving BSA's national board con- board. Two high-pow- Tyrrell said she's thrilled ciples of fairness and
openly in the military. cludes a regularly sched- ered members Ernst & for parents and their chil- respect."


I-,$TCLLG


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Come Visit us at our NEW LOCATION
3424 West Highway 90 (Wo mile west rom our previous location)
I 8680482.5041 'I,.


TUESDAY, JANUARY 29, 2013 SA r-


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NATION






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


-16A TUESDAY, JANUARY29, 2013


No alarm, only 1 exit in Brazil nightclub fire


The Associated Press

SANTA MARIA, Brazil -
The nightclub Kiss was hot,
steamy from the press of
beer-fueled bodies danc-
ing close. The Brazilian
country band on stage was
whipping the young crowd
into a frenzy, launching
into another fast-paced,
accordion-driven tune
and lighting flares that
spewed silver sparks into
the air.
It was another Saturday
night in Santa Maria, a
university town of about
260,000 on Brazil's south-
ernmost tip.
Then, in the pre-dawn
hours of Sunday, it turned
into a scene of indescrib-
able horror as sparks lit a
fire in the soundproofing
material above the stage,
churning out black, toxic
smoke as flames raced
through the former beer
warehouse, killing 231
people.
"I was- right there, so
even though I was far from
the door, at leask I realized
something was wrong,"
said Rodrigo Rizzi, a first-
year nursing student who


THEASSOCIATED PRESS
People gather to honor the victims of a fatal fire at Kiss
nightclub in a plaza on the surroundings'of the club in Santa
Maria, Brazil, Monday, Jan. 28.


was next to the stage when
the fire broke out and
watched the tragedy un-
fold, horror-stricken and
helpless.
"Others, who couldn't
see the stage, never had a
chance. They never saw it
coming."
A security guard said af-
terward that the club was
at its estimated maximum
capacity of between 1,000
and 2,000 people.
There was no fire alarm,
no sprinklers, no fire es-
cape. In violation of state


safety codes, fire extin-
guishers were not spaced
every 1,500 square feet,
and there was only one
exit. As the city buried
its young Monday, ques-
tions were raised about
whether Brazil is up to the
task of ensuring the safety
in venues for the World
.Cup next year, and the
Olympics in 2016. Four
people were arrested
for questioning, includ-
ing two band members
and the nightclub's
co-owner.


Mali military enters the


fabled town of Timbuktu


The Associated Press

SEVARE, Mali Backed
by French helicopters and
paratroopers, Malian sol-
diers entered the fabled
city of Timbuktu on Mon-
day after al-Qaida-linked
militants who ruled the
outpost by fear for nearly
10 months fled into the
desert, setting fire to a li-
brary that held thousands
of manuscripts dating to
the Middle Ages.
French Col. Thierry
Burkhard, chief military
spokesman in Paris, said
that there had been no
combat with the Islamists
but that the French and
Malian forces did not yet
control the town.
Still, there was celebra-
tion among the thousands
of Timbuktu residents who
fled the city rather than
live under strict and piti-
less Islamic rule and the
dire poverty that worsened
after the tourist industry
was destroyed.
"In the heart of people
-from northern Mali, it's
a relief freedom fi-
nally," said Cheick Sor-
moye, a Timbuktu resident
who fled to Bamako, the
capital.
Timbuktu, a city of
mud-walled buildings and
50,000 people, was for
centuries a seat of Islamic


learning and a major trad-
ing center along the North
African caravan routes that
carried slaves, gold and
salt. In Europe, legend had
it that it was-a city of gold.
Today, its name is synony-
mous to many with the
ends of the earth.
It has been home to
some 20,000, irreplaceable
manuscripts, some dating.
to the 12th century. It was
not immediately known
how many were destroyed
in the blaze that was set
in recent days in an act of
vengeance by the Islamists
before they withdrew.
Michael Covitt,- chair-
man of the Malian Manu-
script Foundation, called
the arson a "desecration to
humanity."
"These manuscripts are
irreplaceable. They have
the wisdom of the ages
and it's the most impor-
tant find since the Dead
Sea Scrolls," he said.
The militants seized
Timbuktu last April and
began imposing a strict
Islamic version of Shariah,
or religious law, across
northern Mali, carry-
ing out amputations and
public executions. Women
could be whipped for go-
ing out in public without
wearing veils, while men
could be lashed for having
cigarettes.


Just over two weeks after
the French began their mil-
itary intervention in Mali,
French and Malian forces
arrived in Timbuktu over-
night, the French military
spokesman said Monday.
"The helicopters have
been decisive," Burkhard
said,'describing how they
aided the ground forces
who came from the south
as French paratroopers
landed north of the city .
But the French have said
Mali's military must finish
the job of securing Tim-
buktu. And the Malians
have generally fared poorly
in combat, often retreating
in panic in the face of well-
armed, battle-hardened
Islamists.
During their rule in
Timbuktu, the militants
systematically destroyed
cultural sites, including
the ancient tombs of Sufi
saints, which they de-
nounced as contrary to Is-
lam because they encour-
aged Muslims to venerate
saints instead of God.
The mayor said the Is-
lamists burned his office
as well as the Ahmed Baba
institute, a library rich in
historical documents.
"It's truly alarming that
this has happened," Mayor
Ousmane Halle told The
Associated Press by tele-
phone from Bamako.


Rizzihadn't even planned
on going out that night.
He was talked into it by
friends and knew dozens
at the club. He said the
first sign of a problem was
insulation dripping above
the stage.
The flames at that point
were barely noticeable, just
tiny tongues lapping at the
flammable material. The
band's singer, Marcelo dos
Santos, noticed it and tried
to put out the smoldering
embers by squirting water
from a bottle.
The show kept going.
Then, as the ceiling con-


tinued to ooze hot molten
foam, dos Santos grabbed
the drummer's water bot-
tle and aimed it at the fire.
That didn't work either,
Rizzi said. A security guard
handed the band leader
a fire extinguisher. He
aimed, but nothing came
out; the extinguisher didn't
work.
At that point, Rizzi said,
the singer motioned to
the band to get out. Rizzi
calmly made his way to
the door the club's only
exit still thinking it was
a small fire that would
quickly be controlled.


The cavernous building
was divided into several
sections, including a pub
and a VIP lounge and
hundreds of the college
students and teenagers
crammed in couldn't see
the stage. They contin-
ued to drink and dance,
unaware of the danger
spreading above them.
Then, the place became
an inferno.
The band members who
headed straight for the
door lived. One, Danilo
Brauner, went back to get
his- accordion, and never
made it out.


Iran says it successfully

sent a monkey into space


The Associated Press

TEHRAN, Iran A gray-
tufted monkey strapped
in a pod resembling an in-
fant's car seat rode an Ira-
nian rocket into spice and
returned safely, officials
said Monday in what was
described as a step toward
STehran's goal of a manned
space flight.
The mission also touched
on concerns that advances
in Iran's rocket expertise
could be channeled into
military use for long-range
weapons that might one
day carry nuclear war-
heads. Iran says it does not
seek atomic weapons.
Launching a live animal
into space as the U.S.
and the Soviet Union did
more than a half-century
ago in the infancy of their
programs may boost
a country's stature. But
John Logsden, a space
policy professor emeri-
tus at George Washing-
ton University, said Iran's.
achievement should draw
no concern.
"A slight monkey on a
suborbital flight is nothing
to get too excited about,"
Jhe said. "They already had


the capability to launch
warheads in their region."
U.S. State Department
spokeswoman Victoria
Nuland said the U.S. had
no way to confirm the
monkey's voyage, but that
it was concerned by the re-
ports because "any space
'launch vehicle capable of
placing an object in orbit is
directly relevant to the de-
velopment of long- range
ballistic missiles."' ;
The U.N. Security Coun-
cil has expressly forbidden
Iran from such ballistic
missile activity, Nualand
added.,
In June 2010, the Secu-
rity Council banned Iran
from pursuing "any activ-
ity related to ballistic mis-
siles capable of delivering
nuclear weapons."
With its ambitious aero-
space program, Iran has
said it wants to become a
technological leader for
the Islamic world.
It's not the first time
Iran has announced it had
rocketed a live creature out
of the Earth's atmosphere.
The country sent a mouse,
a turtle and spme worms
into space in 2010, officials
said.


MIS


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Valentine Grandchildren, C/O Jackson County Floridan, P.O. Box 520, Marianna, Florida 32447
or drop them off at our office at 4403 Constitution Lane.
Deadline is 5:00PM on February 8, 2013

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Daytime Phone Number
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Sports Briefs

High School boys basketball
Tuesday Cottondale at Chi-
pley, 5:30 and 7 p.m.; Rehobeth at
Graceville, 5:30 and 7 p.m.; Mari-
anna at Bay, 5:30 and 7 p.m.
Thursday Marianna at Cot-
tondale, 5:30 and 7 p.m.; Malone at
Pensacola, 5:30 and 7 p.m.
Riday- Malone at Sneads, 5:30
and 7 p.m.; Graceville at Chipley,
S5:30 and 7 p.m.

Chipola basketball
The Chipola men's and women's
basketball teams will go on the road
Saturday to play Pensacola State.
The women's game will tip at 5:30
p.m., followed by the men's game at
7:30 p.m.

Marlanna baseball
skills camp
Marianna baseball will hold a
skills camp for kids aged 4-14 on
Saturday at the Marlanna High
School baseball field from 9 a.m. to
noon.
Cost is-$25 and registration begins
at 8 a.m. Campers will receive' -
instruction from players, coaches,
and alumni from the college and
high school levels. .
Baseball pants,cleats, glove and a
bat is required.

SChipol Alunl Baseball
.Weeke ,d ''
Chipola baseball will have its
annual AlumniWeekend Feb.
8-10, with two-time Major League
SBaseball home run champion Jose
Bautista'in attendance, as well as'
dozens of other former Chipola
players.
A pro baseball autograph session,
home run derby,-alumni game, and.
VIP dinner are set for Feb. 9. (oun-
try singer Billy Dean of Quincy is
scheduled to perform it the events.
The "Night of Champions", .
* Chipola baseball celebrity dinner
will be Feb. 9 at Citizens Lodge' in
Mariannawrith social houiat,6'
p.m., and dinner atp 7pm.
- Cost is $100 per person. For
Tickets or moae'information, call '
Chipola' cdah eff Johnson at
850-718-2237.

Maone youth baseball
The Malone Dixie Youth Baseball
Organization will have registra-
tion forthe 2013 season on Feb. :
and Feb. from 8 a.m. to noon at
Malone Cfiy Hall.
Registration is open to boys and
girls ages 5-12, with a fee of $40 for
all ages due at sign-up. A group rate
will aiplifybu'haive three'or more .
children in the same fairly playing.
New players should bring a copy of
their birth certificate to sign-up;

MarialnayoUth *
basebalsoftball


Marianna Recreation Department..
will hold registratiorifor baseball
and softball for the 2013 season Feb.
1-28 from 8 a.m .to 4 p.m.. fr boys
and girls ages 5-15 at the Marianha
Educational and Recreational Expb
inMarianna.'
Registration fee is $40.except for
Machiae Pitch Baseball arid 8U,girls
softball, which is 9$5, Sech'. .
For more information, cal
850-482-6228. .

Panhandle Seminole Club
glf tournament
The 2013 Panhandle Seminole
Clu6's annual scholarship golf ,
Stoumamerit will be heldApril 5at
Indian Springs Golf Clubiif. ,
anna. This tournament, along fith
another fundraiser, Has help.ij pro-
vide $40,000 over the past 10 years
to deserving local students and
helped further their education.
Registration and warmitp will be-
gin at noon with the shotgun start
at 1 p.m. for this four-mafh.scranble
event. Cash prizes will be awarded -
to the first, second,. and third place
teams. Additional prizes will be '
given for longest drive, straightest
drive, closest to the pin, and''o on.
The greens fee contribution of $65
will entitle each golfer to a fantastic
afternoon of golf on a champion-.
ship course (to help:a very worthy'
cause), followed by a great meal.
Scholarship (hole) and prize
sponsorships also are available for
this event. For more information,
call Roy Baker at 850-526-4005 or
209-1326, or George Sweeney at
850-482-5526.

Sports items
Send all sports Items to editorlal@jcflorldan.
com. or fax them to 850-482-4478. The mailing
address for the paper is Jackson County Florl.
dan P.O. Box 520 Marianna. FL 32447.


Chipola Men's Basketball


Indians rally past Raiders


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com


The No. 12 Chipola Indians got their
biggest win of the season Saturday
night at home, rallying from an eight-
point second half deficit to beat the
No. 4 Northwest Florida State Raiders
82-79.
With the win, the Indians (21-2 overall,
4-2 in the Panhandle Conference) pulled
to within a game of the first-place Raiders
(19-2, 5-1) in the league standings and got
a measure of revenge for an 80-65 loss in
the first meetingJan. 9 in Niceville.
"It's a big win for us," Indians coach Pat-
rick Blake said. "I was proud of our guys.
They played hard for 40 minutes. We got
down in the second half, but our motto
all week was to wear them down, and we
were able to do that and get some turn-
overs and easy baskets down the stretch."
The Raiders led 69-61 with 6:17 remain-


ing following a three-point play by Tevin
Glass, but a three by Demetrious Floyd
on the next Chipola possession sparked a
decisive 15-2 Indians run to take control
of the game.
Floyd's triple was followed by consecu-
tive steals that led to layups by Floyd
and Carlos Morris, who knocked down a
jumper after another Northwest turnover
to give Chipola a 70-69 lead.
Kruize Pinkins scored for the Indians
moments later, with a scoop shot by Chris
Thomas and a bucket inside by Cinmeon
Bowers pushing the Chipola advantage'to
76-71 with 2:35 to play.
A triple by Chris Jones brought the Raid-
ers back to within a point with just under
two minutes to play, and the margin was
still one in Chipola's favor when Bow-
ers went to the free throw line with 57.5,
seconds remaining.

See INDIANS, Page 2B


MARKSKINNER/FLORIDAN


Lady Hornets

to lean on

senior pitching

BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

After three straight losing
seasons, the Cottondale
Lady Hornets will look to
turn things around this
year on the strength of a
talented senior pitcher-
catcher duo in Kelsey
Obert and Haley Boggs.
However, the Lady Hor-
nets possess little in the
way of experience every-
where else on the ros-
ter, and new coach Mike
Melvin will have a chal-
lenging job to get the
Lady Hornets back into
postseason contention.
Despite the fact that Cot-
tondale graduated just one
seniorfrom last year's team
in Valerie D'Ambrosio, the
Lady Hornets have just
three seniors on this year's
team outfielder Lillie
Festa the other and only
one junior.
Melvin said it's a major
challenge to try to win at a
high level with so many un-
derclassmen, though sev-
eral of the team's younger
players have multiple years
of varsity experience.
"It's tough. Three seniors
is not a very big class," he
said. "It'stough when you
get classes with only one or
two (players) at each grade
level.. But our younger
players have played a lot
of varsity softball. And the

See YOUTH, Page 2B


Chipola Women's Basketball


Brance, Brookspush Chipola past Northwest


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The No. 8 Chipola Lady Indians
snapped back at the No. 5 North-
west Florida State Lady Raiders on
Saturday night at home, answer-
ing a 62-61 loss earlier this season
with a 61-58 victory to pull into a
three-way tie for first place in the
Panhandle Conference.
Chipola (19-3 overall, 4-2 in
conference) is now even with
Northwest and Gulf Coast State
atop the league standings thanks
to, a huge second-half effort to
erase a 13-point Lady Raiders
lead.
The Lady Raiders finished the
, first half on a921-8 run to take a
34-21 halftime edge, but the Lady
Indians stormed back with an
elevated defensive intensity and
some timely3-pointers from Kris-
tine Brance and Rayven Brooks.
Brance scored 15 of her game-
high 23 points in the second half
and knocked down three triples
after the break.
Her third trey of the second


half tied the game at 43-43, with
a Brooks three-pointer moments
later putting Chipola ahead and
capping a 17-2 Lady Indians run.
Northwest Florida State an-
swered back to move ahead 51-
48 with 5:41 to play, but Brance
made four straight free throws,
and Brooks nailed another long
range shot to make it55-52 Lady
Indians with 3:44 left.
But the Lady Raiders scored six
straight, with a banker by Jatoria
Carter giving them the lead at 58-
57 with 1:45 to play.
A jumper by Rahni Bell put the
Lady Indians back on top, and
Jade Givens made tvo free throws
with 6.8 seconds left for the final
margin. .
The Lady Raiders had one last
chance at the tie, but a top of the
key three by Carter rimmed off as
time expired.
. "It was a very good win for us
for the fact that our kids never
gave up and just kept fighting,"
Chipola coach Greg Franklin said.


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN


See CHIPOLA, Page 2B Jade Givens calls a play for the Lady Indians.


MARK KINNEWK/nLUNIUAN
Demetrious Floyd handles the ball during a
recent Chipola game.


COTTONDALE SOFTBALL PREVIEW




Roster full of youth


Connor Melvin makes a catch during Cottondale softball practice Monday.


i _ ____ ___


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. . . .. .. .. ............. a 11 J ll !






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Youth
From Page 1B
one thing about it is it all
comes down to the circle. If
you have the better pitcher,
you have a chance."
The Lady Hornets cer-
tainly have a quality hurler
in Obert, who has been
pitching for the varsity
since the ninth grade, but
had a breakout season as
a junior in leading Jackson
County in strikeouts and
making the All-County
team.
She teams with her long-
time catcher Boggs to
form one of the most ex-
perienced batteries in the
area.
"Kelsey and Haley are.
both huge pieces to the
puzzle," Melvin said.
"They've been throwing
and catching with each
Other for a long time.
Kelsey is probably in the
best she she's been in since
she started playing. She
has worked really hard to
get herself in shape and to
be a leader.
"This is her senior year
and she wants to have
some success. She's been
more vocal this year than
I've ever heard her. She's
stepping up and taking
that leadership role, her
and Boggs both."
The coach said he isn't
shy about heaping respon-
sibility on his two most ex-
perienced players, and ex-
pects big years from both
of them.
"I expect them to carry
this for us," Melvin said.
"I put a lot of pressure on
them every day. I tell them,
'you don't have time to
mess around. This is your
senior year and it can be as
good as you want it to be.'"
However, even if Obert
has another good year in
the circle, the Lady Hornets
will need to find a way to
score runs to win games.
That .task proved ex-
tremely difficult at times
last season, but with eight
returning starters, an im-
provement at the plate
should be expected and
will be necessary for Cot-
tondale to have a success-
ful year.
"We're spending a lot of
time in the (batting) cage,"
Melvin said. "We did strug-


gle last year at the plate
and it's hard to win if you
can't score runs. We try to
get a bunch of swings in
every day and make them
productive swings. We're
not out there just hacking
at the ball. We're really em-
phasizing being mentally
tough and focused and
making sure everything
you do counts. We don't
want to waste a rep in
anything."
The coach said he has
been impressed with the
work ethic and demeanor
of his players thus far, and
insists that they are com-
mitted to turning things
around in 2013.
"I'm really impressed
with how hard they work.
These'girls are really work-
ing hard and responding to
a different style of coach-
ing," he said. "I'm a little
more vocal than they're
probably used to, but I re-
ally couldn't, be happier
with how they've worked.
They show up every day
ready to work."
Also returning for Cot-
tondale is middle infield-
er Cameron McKinney,
first baseman Connor
Melvin, outfielders Kayla
Latham and Festa, and
utility players Kourtnie
Richardson and Cheyenne
Corbin.
Melvin said he also ex-
pects sophomore new-
comer Katie McBride to
have an impact while play-
ing third base, outfield and
some catcher.
"She has a motor and she
hustles from the time she
starts to the time it's over,"
the coach said.
Cottondale will not play
any preseason games and
will open the regular sea-
son on Feb. 12.
In the meantime, Melvin
said the focus is continuing
to use practice time to get
stronger and more sound
in all areas of the game.
"We're really working a
lot of fundamentals," he
said. "We're still trying to
figure out who needs to
go where and where they
can do the best for us, but
we've got some players
who can move around and
do some things. I feel good
about the direction we're'
going, but we still have
got a long way to go to get
there."


PGA



Woods wins at Torrey Pines


The Associated Press

SAN DIEGO Tiger Woods is a
winner again at Torrey Pines, and
the only question Monday was how
long it would take him to finish.
Woods stretched his lead to eight
shots in the Farmers Insurance
Open before losing his focus and
his patience during a painfully slow
finish by the group ahead.
Despite dropping four shots over
the last five holes, he still managed
an even-par 72 for a four-shot vic-
tory on the course where he has
won more than any other in his pro
career.
He won the tournament for the
seventh time, one behind the re-
cord held by Sam Snead, who won
the Greater Greensboro Open
eight times. It was the eighth time
Woods won at Torrey Pines, which
includes his playoff win in the 2008
U.S Open.
This one was never close.
Woods built a six-shot lead with 11
holes to play when the final round
of the fog-delayed tournament was
suspended Sunday by darkness. He
returned Monday a late morning
restart because CBS Sports wanted
to show it in the afternoon on the
East Coast and looked stronger
than ever until the tournament
dragged to a conclusion.
Having to wait on every tee and
from every fairway or the rough,
in his case Woods made bo-
gey from the bunker on the 14th,
hooked a tee shot on the 15th that
went off the trees and into a patch
of ice plant and led to double bo-
gey, and then popped up his'tee
shot on the 17th on his way to an-
other bogey.
All that affected was the score. It
kept him from another big margin
of victory, though the message was
clear about his game long before
that.
One week after he missed the cut
in Abu Dhabi, he ruled at Torrey
Pines.
It was his 75th career win, seven
short of the Snead's all-time tour
record.
"It got a little ugly toward the
end," Woods said. "I started losing
patience a little bit with the slow
play. I lost my concentration a little
bit."
He rallied with a two-putt par on
the 18th hole to win by four shots
over defending champion Brandt
Snedeker and Josh Teater, who had
the best finish of his career. ,


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Tiger Woods hits out of a bunker on the 1th hole during the fourth round of the
Farmers Insurance Open at the Torrey Pines Golf Course on Monday in San Diego.
Woods won the tournament.


Like so many of his big wins, the
only drama was for second place.
Brad Fritsch, the rookie from Can-
ada, birdied his last two holes for a
75. That put him into a tie for ninth,
however, making him eligible for
the Phoenix Open next week.
Fritsch had been entered in the
Monday qualifier that he had to
abandon when the Farmers Insur-
ance Open lost Saturday to a fog
delay.
Woods effectively won this tour-
nament in the final two hours Sun-
day, when he stretched his lead to
six shots with only 11 holes to play.
Nick Watney made a 10-foot birdie
putt on the par-5 ninth when play
resumed to get. within five shots,
only to drop three shots on the next
five holes. '
Everyone else started too far be-
hind, and Woods wasn't about to


of the day with his legs near the
edge of a bunker some 75 feet to the
left of the llth green, he blasted out
to the top shelf and watched the
ball take dead aim until it stopped
a foot short.
He failed to save par from a bun-
ker on the 14th, and be hooked his
tee shot so badly on the 15th hole
that it traveled only about 225 yards
before it was gobbled ,up by the
ice plant. He had to take a penalty
drop and wound up making double
bogey.
More than his 75th career win,
it was a strong opening statement
for what could be a fascinating
2013.
Before anyone projects a monster
year for Woods based on one week
- especially when that week is at
Torrey Pines remember that he
just missed the cut last week in Abu


come back to them. Dhabi.
Even so, the red shirt seemed to Woods said he wasn't playing
put him on edge. It didn't help that much differently, and woull have
as he settled over his tee shot on the liked two more rounds in the Mid-
par-5 ninth, he backed off when he die East. Instead, a two-shot pen-
heard a man behind the ropes take alty for a bad drop sent him home.
his picture. Still, in healthier and happier
Woods rarely hits the fairway after times he usually was sharp coming
an encounter with a camera shut- after a long layoff. Throw out the
ter, and this was no different it trip to the Arabian Gulf, and he is.
went so far right that it landed on Was this a statement?
the other side of a fence enclosing a Woods was eight shots ahead with
corporate hospitality area. five holes to play when he stumbled
Woods tookhis free drop, punched his way to the finish line, perhaps
out below the trees into the fairway from having to kill time waiting on
and then showed more irritation the group ahead. Erik Compton,
when his wedge nicked the flag Steve Marino and Fritsch had an
after one hop and spun down the entire par 5 open ahead of them at
slope 30 feet away instead of stop- the end of the round.
ping next to the hole. Still, Woods played a different
He didn't show much reaction on, game than everyone else at Torrey
perhaps his most memorable shot Pines.


Chipola
From Page 1B
"We shot horribly in the first half, we
couldn't make layups, and had some
bad turnovers. You've just got to play
through that stuff. I thought we showed
a lot of heart and never quit. They
showed the character that they have.
"Kristine made some big shots. She
stepped up and made some big threes
and so did Rayven, and Jade made some
nice plays and some timely passes after
being sick all week. Everyone made a
contribution to the win."
Bell added 10 points for Chipola, with
Brooks finishing with eight points, 13
rebounds, and four assists.
Kiani Parker led Northwest with 13
points, with Carla Batchelor adding 11
and Carter and Shae'Ana Nelson scor-
ing eight each.
Chipola will next travel to Pensacola
to face the Lady Pirates on Saturday
night, while Northwest also will take on
Pensacola State on Wednesday on the
road.


Chipola Baseball


Chipola finishes opening weekend strong


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

After a slow start, the Chipo-
la Indians baseball team ral-
lied to win its final two games
of the season's opening week-
end in St. Petersburg to even
its record at 2-2.
The Indians opened up Fri-
day with Calhoun Communi-
ty College and suffered a 4-1
loss in a sloppy performance
all around, and followed that
up with an 11-3 loss Saturday
to State College of Florida,
which busted open a 2-2 game
in the sixth inning to tak6 the
lopsided victory.
But Chipola turned things
around .in Saturday's sec-,
dnd game with a 4-3 victory


over Palm Beach State, going
ahead with two runs in the
eighth inning and holding on
in the ninth.
The trip was capped Sun-
day with an 11-6 win over
the host team St. Peters-
burg, and Indians coach Jeff
Johnson said he was glad to
see his team' salvage some-
thing positive from a week-
end that started off pretty
shaky.
"I wouldn't say I'm happy
overall with how we played,
but I guess after being 0-2, I
was happy to end up 2-2," he
,said. "But we just saw how far
away we are right now. The
good news is we saw some
pleasant surprises with some
guys along with some disap-


pointments. We just have to
keep growing and learning
what you have to do to be
successful."
The Indians are an espe-
cially young team this year,
returning just two players
from last year's team and
sporting a roster with 19
freshmen.
.Johnson said he wasn't
surprised to see his team's
performance a bit uneven to
start.
"The first game or two just
showed our youth and in-
experience," he said. "We
seemed to play a little tight.
We didn't throw strikes like
we're supposed to or field it
like we're supposed to, and
it looked like the bats were a


little heavy. It wasn't pretty.
"But we came back in the
second game Saturday against
Palm Beach, who was if not
the best team there then one
of the top two, and took some
good swings, played some
good defense, and for the first
time resembled a good base-
ball team. I was proud of them
because we got down 2-0 to
probably the best team there
and'We showed some heart to
come back from behind. I was
proud of that."
* Chipola will next play Fri-
day in Adalusia, Ala., against
Marion Military Institute
and Lurleen Wallace, and
then again Saturday against
Alabama Southern and
Meridian.


Indians
From Page 1B
Bowers missed both of
the foul shots, but the sec-
ond miss kicked out for a
long rebound for Thom-
as, who was fouled and
knocked down two free
throws to make it 80-77
Indians.
Morris made 2-of-2 from
the charity stripe with 10.8
seconds on the clock, and
the Raiders were unable
to tie the game on a pair
of three-point attempts by
Lamin Fulton and Jones as
time expired.
Morris finished with 24
points on 8-of-17 shooting
to lead the Indians, with
Floyd adding 17 points,
Bowers 14 and Pinkins 11.
Sophomore point guard
Terel Hall also had a team-
high eight assists with no
turnovers in, 32 minutes
for the Indians.
Jones and Elgin Cook had
_19 points each for North-


west, with
17.


Glass adding


"We had the game where
we wanted it," Raiders
coach Steve Forbes said.
"We just lost our com-
posure against the press.
Give them credit. They
played the way they had
to play and we gave it to
them at the end. This is a
tough league. You're prob-
ably not going to go unde-
feated. But we can't lose
our composure and win'
games on the road like
that."
Blake said that the game
had a postseasbn feel to it,
which isn't surprising giv-
erg the ambitions that each
team has and the long-
standing rivalry between
the two programs.
"(The Raiders) are No. 1
in the Panhandle Confer-
ence and that's what we're
shooting for," the first-year
Chipola coach said. "Our
guys had a better mental
approach this time. I didn't
know if we were mature


enough two weeks ago to guys are coming on and
be down like that late and buying into what we're
come back to win, but doing."
we've done that two games The Indians also came
in a row now. It shows the back from a seven-point


second half deficit in a 77-
74 road win over Tallahas-
see last week.
Chipola will next trav-
el to Pensacola to take


on the Pirates on Satur-
day, while the Raiders
will also face the Pirates
on Wednesday night in
Pensacola.


I


-2B TUESDAY, JANUARY 29,2013


SPORTS






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


PEANUTS BY CHARLES SCHULTZ
YOURE ALWAYS CRABBY!
HO'S U YOU'REE CRABBY INTHE
CRABBY? YOU RE MORNING, YOU'RE CRABBY
SAT NOON AND YOU'RE
CWA YR M CRABBY AT NI6HT


:- I


U


CAN I HELP IT IF I
W)A6 BORN WITH
CRABBY 6ENES ?E

"' ~~ y "


BORN LOSER BYARTAND CHIP SANSOM
P' SUV E5TOURVEe kLLIOml1 ER( WELL.COUL~D ON5EUK EAk-Y TPSTE 5TOP OUT A'
IN CREAM SAUCE. FOR$29.9s. ELIGTEN AE AOUT RS ABOUT FITEEN BUCKS,

T H soURNs BIT

?\MT RSTE5. R 7


GRIZZWELLS BY BILL SCHORR


ALLEY OOP BY JACK AND CAROLE BENDER


ALLEY OOP BYJACKAND CAROLE BENDER'


KIT'N' CARLYLE BY LARRY WRIGHT


The-2

B\goo


HERMAN BY JIM UNGER


"There's a limit of one per customer."


ACROSS
1 Plastic
piping
4 Give
autographs
8 Urban woe
12 Half of VI
13 MI. branch
14 Aesop's
also-ran
15"--Tikl"
16"Miami
Vice" cop
17Sudden
impulse
18Chooses
20 Luxurious
fabric
22 Far from
shore
23Information
25 Principles
29 Rollover
subj.
31 Specks
34 Half of hex-
35Chimney
dirt
36- fixe
37Arith. term
38Small
change
39Gibson or
Torme
40"Seinfeld"
role
42 Thick slice
44 Loosen


47 Popcorn
buys
49Whiten
51 Starring
role
53 Lanolin
source
55 Charge
56Sanskrit
relative
57 Actress
Hathaway
58 Rower's
need
59 Dele
canceler
60 Parade
feature
61 Finish

DOWN
1 Long spear
2 String
quartet
member
3 Theaters
4 Extra levy
5 Wife of
Osiris
6 Truck mfr.
7PFC
superiors
8 NFL coach
Don
9 Watch the
clock,
maybe
(2 wds.)


Answer to Previous Puzzle

O 1 INESIKI I R O0BE











10URL suffix 43 Check for
11 Golly! fraud





19 Stop 45 "Platoon"
21 Carder's actor
demands 46 Pacific,
S24 MakeC e.g.






for it 48 Mop
26- cost 49 German
you! city
27 Killer 50 Rustler's
whale target
28Calf-iength 51 CD
30 Legal rep. prCheceders





31 Shady 52 Pig out
32 Lyric 54- -
11 Golly! fraudget
19 Stop 45"Platoon"










33 Poe's "The
- Heart"- e.g.
for it 48 Mop




26 -35 Landscapcost 49German
you! city



40 Wane 50Rustler's



41 Canceled
28 Calf-length 51CD
'30 Legal rep. preceders
31 Shady 52 Pig out
32 Lyric 54- -
poems budget
33 Poe's "The
Heart"
351Landscape
40 Wane
41 Canceled


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QulllDrlverBooks.com


1-29 02013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrty Cher cryptograms are createdtrom quotations by famous people, past and presenL
Each letter in the cper stands for another.
"MCJZ MW CJNW YFKW WFIYBWT MW
KJF FWNWX VYDW. JVV ZCJZ MW VYNW
TWWHVB SWKYRWD J HJXZ YL AD."
CWVWF EWVVWx


Previous Solution: "There's no tragedy in life like the death of a child. Things
never get back to the way they were." Dwight D. Eisenhower
TODAY'S CLUE: g slenbe
S2013 by NEA. Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 1-29


Horoscope

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) An involvement
where you share a mu-
tual interest with another
should work out quite
smoothly today.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) The timing could be
unusually good for you to
make a request of some-
one who doesn't readily
grant favors.
ARIES (March 21-April
19) By cleaning out the
basement, attic or garage,
you might discover some
gems that you put aside in
the past and forgot about.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20) A social gathering
could pair you with some-
one whom you've been
very eager to approach.
GEMINI (May 21-June
20) Certai financial or
commercial matters can
be successfully concluded
to your satisfaction if
you're willing to take the
time and effort to do so.
CANCER (June 21-July
22) Someone older or
more experienced might
point out a new direction
for you.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
-You're in a favorable
cycle for profiting from
situations initiated by
someone else.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22) Even if some of
your present expecta-,
tions seem to be a bit
outlandish to some of your
friends, they really aren't
that far-fetched from your
perspective.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
- Something extremely
constructive could de-
velop through the efforts
of another.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) -You're likelyto get
an opportunity to cultivate
a new friendship. This
could be the start of some-
thing beautiful.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-
Dec. 21) -A little extra
effort where your career is
concerned could put you
out in front of the pack.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) If you allow a past
educational experience
to guide you, everything
should work out quite
beautifully in your deal-
ings with someone
who is very difficult to
please.


Annie's Mailbox


Dear Annie: I am an associate in a law
firm with two offices. Each office has'
three associate attorneys and is managed
by a partner.
During my first year, I was the only
associate in my office, and I received a
Christmas bonus. The second year, we
hired two additional associates. I was
devastated when all of the staff but
none of the associates received a bo-
nus that year, as I'd planned to'use the
money to buy gifts for my family. I wasn't
surprised last month when, once again,
the associates received nothing. I did
discover, however, that all of the associ-
ates in
the other law office received bonuses.
I understand that a Christmas bonus
is not something I am entitled to receive,
and if I bring it up to my boss, it would
make me sound selfish and greedy. We
do get extra money each month if we ex-
ceed a specific number of billable hours.
However, that is a part of my compensa-
tion agreement and a variable portion of


Bridge

At the bridge table, we try to use the knowledge
gleaned from the bidding and the play (as it progress-
es) to make informed decisions. How should the play
go in this three-no-trump contract after West leads
the spade queen? What is the key piece of knowledge
declarer wants and East must keep hidden?
South starts with seven top tricks: two spades, one
heart, three diamonds and one club. He could attack
either hearts or clubs, but the minor suit offers much
better chances for three tricks.
Declarer ducks the first trick, takes the second spade
with his king, plays a diamond to dummy's queen,
and leads a club to his nine. West wins this with, say,
the queen (he should.vary his play in this situation)
and continues with another spade to dummy's ace.
Now comes dummy's last club. What happens next?
If East carelessly plays his eight, South should put up
his ace, dropping West's king and collecting 11 tricks.
Why should he drop the king?
Given that East is known to have the club 10 from
the first round of the suit, when East plays the club
eight second, he started with 10-8-5 or K-10-8-5. In
the second case, the contract is unmakable.
However, on the second round of clubs, East should
follow thie excellent principle of playing the card he
is known to hold. If he puts up the 10, declarer will
place him with K-10-5, finesse his club jack, and go
down three.


my salary, not a bonus. I also think my
boss has decided that the office staff,
most of whom are single parents,
need the bonus more than the associ-
ates do. But my law degree came with six
figures of student loan debt.
This is less about the money than it is
about the disparate treatment, especially
between the two law offices. Is there any
way to bring this up to my boss for next
season without sounding like a spoiled-
child?
STRUGGLING YOUNG
PROFESSIONAL
Dear Struggling:We understand
why this seems unfair, but unless a
yearly bonus is part of your compensa-
tion package, such money is given at
the discretion of the managing partner.
You could ask what you can
do to increase the likelihood that you
will merit additional pay at the end of
the year, or whether something about
your performance has been disappoint-
ing. Beyond that, you're out of luck.


North 01-29-13
4 A72
VAJ542
*AKQ
443
West East
SQJ1098 4 65 3
SK7 VQ1098
*7642 *J95
4KQ 41085
South
K4
063
+ 108-3
#AJ9762

Dealer: North
Vulnerable: East-West
South West North East
1 Pass
1NT Pass 3NT Allpass

Opening lead: 4Q


TUESDAY, JANUARY 29, 2013 3BF


1.20


CLu.( ..* .k.tnan ..i r, Ull U"'l I U.l. C Ufa, iO'l


ENTERTAINMENT






4 B Tuesday. January 29. 2013 Jackson County Floridan


CLASSIFIED


www..CFLORIDAN.com


WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED




ARKETPLA


BY PHONE: (850) 526-3614 or (800) 779-2557
BY FAX: (850) 482-4478 or (334) 712-7975
ONLINE: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM


BY MAIL: WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE
P.O. BOX 520, MARIANNA, FL 32447
IN PERSON: 4403 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA


Publication Policy Errors and Omssons Advertisers should check their th me first day This puDlicallon shall not be liable for failure to publish an ad or for a typographic error or errors in publicalon except to the extent of the cost of Ine ad for the first day's
insertion Adjustment Ibr enors Is limited to the cost of that portion of the ad wherein the error occurred The advertiser agrees that the publisner Shall rot be Ilatle for damage anaing Out o errors in adverisements beyond me amount paid for the space
actually occupied by that portion of the advertisement in which Ine error occurred, whether such error is due to negligence ro the publisher a employees or olrneraise and there shall De no iablity for non insertion of any advertisement beyond the amount paid for
such advertisement. Display Ads are not guaranteed position All advertising is subject to approval Rignt is reserved to edit. reject cancel or classify all ads under the appropriate classification
Fac te a e!ie cl o --ristw wjfoda cm


Professional Piano & Organ Teacher
I teach private piano and organ lessons in my"
home in the Highlands. 30 years experience
teaching private lessons and in schools.
Great Gift For All Ages!
334446-4226











BUSINES SOPO IESS




Own your own business!
Franchises needed In Dothan and
surrounding areas NOW!
Training, equipment and guaranteed initial
customer base with all franchise plans.
Call now to schedule your appointment
1-800-375-5264




FIREWOOD (all split oak)
Delivry avalablel TRUCK LOAD $70. -
CALL MARK 334-701-4967 or 334-791-6704


Wanted: Old Coins, Gold,
Diamonds, Guns, And Tools
West Main Jewelry & Loan 334-671-1440.

* 1- NEW 2 DOOR GLASS [LOWER COOLER ON
CASTERS TRUE MODEL# GDM-61FC-
$2.500.00
1- NEW 2 DOOR COMMERICAL GLASS DOOR
COOLER MASTERBILT
MODEL# GR48S --- $1.995.
1- NEW 1 DOOR COMMERICAL KITCHEN
FREEZER ON CASTERS, STAINLESS STEEL
MASTERBILT MODEL# F23-S $1.995.00
PLEASE CALL 678-8894 IF INTERESTED.


sOf
CKC Reg.Golden Retrever 3-M,4-F S/W $350.
334-648-1287 or 334-791-9831. Parents on site
FREE: Lab mix puppies 2/M & 2/F. 850-209-7047


Free Rescued Dogs to GOOD homes ONLY.
Many breeds,S/W, Call 334-791-73121
Mini Daschund Puppies: CKC(3) chocolate/ tan,
silver dapple, fawn/tan dapple. Long/ short
hair unknown yet. Born Jan. 6. Available 8-10
weeks later. $500. 334-4Q3-8376 for inquiries.



CaselH 70 XT Loader: 79HP,
448 hours, reg. bucket and
grapple bucket. Must see to
appreciate the condition.
$19,500.00 Call 334-894-2315


Wrapped Peanut Hay For Sale.
Never been rained on. Call 229-254-0854


I ANTE ARM& ARDN


CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
Your source for selling and buying!

Wanted to Rent: Farm Land or Pasture In Ma-
rianna or West of Marlanna; Call 850-718-1859





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Looking for mature business-
minded newspaper carriers with
dependable transportation,
minimum liability insurance and a
valid driver's license.
GREAT RETIREMENT JOB

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Monthly Average Earned after Expenses

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ASK ABOUT THE $300.
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Jackson County Floridan,
4403 Constitution Lane,
Marianna, FL


- The Dove
Academy
(for At Risk Girls)
Dove Girls Academy is currently
acce tin Alications for
Pro ram Director


Minimum requirements:
Bachelo's degree/ 5 years experience
in Juvenile Justice.

Please contact Cheryl Elligson
at (850) 263-7550
or fax resume to (850) 263-7685


IT'S AS EASY AS 1 2 3
1. c. 2. PLACE YOUR A 3.ETRESULTS


SWe are GROWING!
IDRIVERS- CLASS A


HOME WEEKLY
NO TOUCH
$1000 SIGN ON BONUS


TRANSPORT /Nl


Backup Alarms ECCO (2) $25 ea.850-272-2572
Banj. Copeley, in case $400 850-272-2572
Bed: full, mattress and rails. $150. 850-693-3260


Bedroom suite: chest & 8


canaleSonydigital $3 5


Camera: Olympus SP600 $149 850-482-7665
CD player, Ploneerw/remote $50 850-443-6806.
Computer laptop 14" new in box $400. 477-4513
Dining table: 4 chairs/bench $150. 850-482-5198
Dolls Porcelain dressed $10/ea 850-482-7665
End Table, Glass Top $35 239-272-8236
End Tables, new $25. ea. 334-477-4513
.Fiberglass Tonneau: Ford 250 $475. 381-4833
Freezer 20.1cu ft.upright $350. 850-526-4237
Gold rope chain mens 20" $300. 334-477-4513.
Infant Car Seat $30 850-693-3260


GN AEP Y IN


Ingram Barge Company, the leader in the
inland marine community has openings for:
DECKHANDS CULINARY COOKS
VESSEL ENGINEERS
* TOWBOAT PILOTS (FLEET & LINE HAUL)
Candidates must possess a current valid
Driver's License and High School Diploma/
GED. Generous wages, bonus plan and
advancement opportunities, along with a
comprehensive benefit package, [paid
retirement, 401K, medical, life & AD&D, etc.]
Interested candidates must
apply on-line at
www.ingrambarge.com
EOE, M/F/V


PAPER TRANSPORT seeks
16 Class A Drivers
to Travel in Surrounding States
for our Dedicated Account.
COMPETITIVE PAY PACKAGE,
BONUSES & BENEFITS
18 Months Exp & Class A Required


Caluat-55-P OS


Jeff Gordon Collection: 12 pc.$100. 850-557-0778
Jeff Gordon Collection. $5.+up. 850-557-0778
Leather jacket,Lg, Brown, mens $125; 477-4513
Luggage set (4) Protacol $50. 334-477-4513.
Mirror w/shelves: $50.850-693-3260.
Playpen,Winnie The Pooh,Plnk$50 850-394-6876
Power pole: 200 amp ground rod,$150.718-7748
Sleeper Sofa: Queen $250. Call 239-272-8236
Steak Plates,80,heavy duty $75 all 850-272-2572
Steel door: 32x80 LH.No rust, $50. 850-482-2636
Table Lamp: $30 Call 239-272-8236
Watch; mens Invicta swiss $100. 334-477-4513.
Wedding gown, new, sz 16, $300 850-693-3260.
Window: dbl pane, 29%x30A4 $100. 850-482-2636
Windows 2 transom, 14x73 $45, 850-482-2636


Sudoku


2013 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.


level: [-2] 3
Complete the grid so each row, column and
3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit
1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku,
visit www.sudoku.org.uk.

Solution to Friday's puzzle
1 7 8 35 2 4 9 6
4 9 3 6 1 7 2 8 5
625498731

214 859134672 9 8 5
241769853
7.3 6 2 8 5 1 4 9
562873914
984521367
317946528


1/29/13


Fast, easy, no pressure
Place an A .d 24 hours a day, 7 days a week!
Get live previews of your classified ads, receive price quotes
and make secure online payments.

www.jcfloridan.com


1-


- -----
_1 43 5

8 7 4

5/

3 6 9.8 4

9 8

1 3 7 4 6
13746

-~ -

9 2 8

3 7 2 1


n


y:IRIaBRL~


..................... T"- .............'----


. ......v ,







www.JCFLORIDAN.com


Classes Forming Now
for Medical Assisting,
FOR TIS ,Electrical Trades and
COLLEGE Call Fortis College
Today! 888-202-4813 or
visit www.fortlscollege.edu. For consumer
information visit www.fortls.edu





GIBB MARIANNA VILLAGE
Now taking applications for people with
disabilities & who have very low incomes.
1 & 2 bedroom apartments.
Wide doorways, lower counters, roll-in
showers. Accessible for wheelchairs &
other mobility aids HUD subsidized rent.

2933 Milton Ave, Marianna,
FL Call 850-482-4663





1 & 2 BR Apartments available in town near
Chipola. Water/garbage/sewer included.
No pets. 850-526-8392 or 850-209-5620










1 & 2BR Houses & Apts ALSO
2 & 3BR Mobile Homes Rent to Own
Lot rent included. For details
850-557-3432 or 850-814-6515 4
2BR 1BA House for rent, 3043 Noland St.
Safe neighborhood, $500/mo + dep.
850-482-8196/209-1301
2BR/1BA House on Burke St.
Grand Ridge $425. Mo. + $425. Dep.
Call 850-592-5571
2BR/1BA w/offce in Grand Ridge, Rent to own,
very nice, $1000 down $650/mo. 850-997-
2464/850-274-9896
S Austin Tyler& Associates *
Quality Homes & Apartments
*, 850- 526-3355 4m
"Property Management IsOur ONLY Business"

2 & 3 bedroom mobile Homes In Cottondale.
$500 and up. H20, garbage, sewer Included.
http://www.charloscountrylMng.com.
4 850-209-8847 4
2 & 3BR Mobile Homes in Cottondale.
NO PETS CH&A $325- $500/Month
Roomate situation also available.
850-258-1594 Leave Message
2BR 1.5BA at Milpond $495 + dep. very nice, '
water/sewer/lawn maintenance included,
"-race +_.n nnn k.l_ __c Rfn _,Al rI-tn


3BR 2BA MH in Marianna $500/mo. $500 dep.
w/no pets, Or $750 dep. with small pets
850-573-6307 or 850-482-5449 ,
3BR 2BA MH in Sneads $500/mo. No Pets
850-573-0911/850-593-5251
Mobile Homes for Rent 2/1 Located
between Grand Ridge & Sneads
includes water & garbage. $350/month
S850-573-0308 4
Quiet, well maintained Park, Water/sewer/
garbage/lawn included. Available Now
3/2 DW $625 & 3/2 $475 & 2/1 $425
Joyce Riley RE 850-209-7825 4
Spacious 2BR 2BA Plus Office, Family of 3
$450-$550 Plus deposit. Clean and Quiet,
SNo smokers, No pets 850-718-8158


U
For Lease: 6,000 sq. ft. Daycare on 2.58 acres.
Licensed for 93 children. Room for expansion.
Call 850-718-6541.




Very Private
1,600 sq. ft, 2 bedrooms 1 bath with a loft,
and a screened in.iback porch. House is 60%
complete. Septic system complete, temporary
power pole on 3+ acres. You will love it when
you see it!! $39,000. Call Allison at 850-381-0720

-- For Sale By Owner: 41
Briar Hills Drive, Dothan
3 bedroom, 2 bath on 1
acre of land. 1300 square
feet. Built in 2008. Allstain-
less steel appliances in kitchen stay. Hard-
wood, tile and carpet floors. Screened In patio.
2 car attached carport. Covered front porch.
Country setting 10 minutes from Southside
Walmart or SAMC. Asking $113,500. For more
information call 334-701-5889.
Graceville: Recently renovated 3 BR, 1.5 baths
1350 sq. ft. Great neighborhood and huge back-
yard, $89,999. Call 850-658-4081.


Plm Very well maintained
5 bedroom, 2 bath, older
home. Includes 2 carports,
yard completely fenced
(privacy) and a shed.
Close to schools. Room for
a family to growl Call today for your personal
viewing. 850-263-2755.

' One of a kind home
- S n Wewahltchka, Florida.
3BR, 2B modular home.
Outdoor kitchen, shop,
greenhouse and boat
house. Beautiful fenced yard on nice high
riverbank. Large lot is also zoned commercial.
Reduced to sell. $129,000. Call 850-819-0401
'



14 ft. Alum. Boat, stick drive, 2 swivel seats,
1997 Suzuki 25 hp motor, all new parts in
motor $1200. 850-592-1934 or 850-693-5812
Bass Tracker 2002: 18Ft, 90HP Mercury, black
and gray, Garmin GPS fish finder, front fish
finder, AM/FM/CD Radio, Excellent Condition
$6,500. Call 850-774-6230

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37 1999 Tffin Alegro
Diesel Pusher. Only 64,000
miles w/Cummings diesel
engine and Freightliner
chassis, highly polished
hardwood floors in living
area kitchen & bath. Lots of storage inside &
out, no smokers. $45,999.
334-296-2989 ask for Brian.


r -. .............. .................
$0 Down/lst Payment, Tax, Tag & ie
SDO YOU NEED A VEHICLE? GOT BAD CREDIT?
Repos, Slow Credit, Past Bankruptcy bK!
Push, Pull or Drag, Will Trade Anything!
BRING IN YOUR W2 OR LAST PAY STUBlI
SRIDE TODAYI Steve Pope 3344-803-9550
..e........ u-.................j
BMW 2012 X5: X drive 3.5d. 11000 miles. All
wheel drive sports package twin turbo diesel,
30 mpg on road, double sunroof, all options,
five passenger black with brown interior.
Transferable warranty to 50k, & maintenance
included. Call 229-220-1537
Bulck 2002 Rendezvous ;
$1195 down with 0%
Interest. Daylight Auto.
Financing 850-215-1769
9AM-9PM
Cadillac 2000 Deville like new cond. runs great
red in color, new tires, 48K original miles,
28mpg, $7000. OBO 334-886-2199.


Jackson County Floridan *


Chevrolet HHR 2009 LS,
silver 62K miles, $9500.
334-798-5669.

Hyundai12004 Sonata:'
Slver, very low miles,
64k miles highway, 4 door
sedan, V6 engine, clean
title, good tires, immacu-
late Interior, great gas mileage, one owner.
Retail $8.995. Selling $6,000. OBO. 646-456-2807
Mercedes Benz 1981380 SL,
silver & blue convertible.
with hard top, V8 engine,
75K low miles, garage kept,
runs in exc. cond. must see to believe it,
$15,000. OBO 786-417-1355 or 334-538-7475.
Pontiac 2000 Grand Prix;
$695 down with 0%
Interest. Daylight Auto
Financing 850-215-1769
9AM-9PM

Toyota 2011 Camry SE (Sport Edition), 4dr.,
auto, power pkg., White, 9,000 miles, show
room condition, ext. warranty,. $19,500. 850-
569-2215,8504718-5461,850-717-7105.

2003 Harley Divldson UltrasClasslc, blue,
comes with extras $6,999. Great condition
850-573-1695 or 850-263-1678
HARLEY DAVIDSON 2012 UL-
TRA GLIDE LIMITED, 1500
MILES, CHROME WHEELS,
ABS BRAKES, CD,CB,AM/FM
RADIO,HEATED HAND GRIPS,
PYTHON PIPES, CRUISE CON-
TROL, RIDERS BACK REST,
PLUS MORE EXTRAS, NO TIME TO ENJOY, CALL
334-268-3900, ASKING $19,900

Dodge 2001 Durango; $695
down with 0% Interest.
Daylight Auto Financing
850-215-1769
9AM-9PM

S-ord 200 Explorer.
Recently painted. Tinted
windows. CD player. New
tires. Needs motor andB
4 transmission work.
Title in hand. 1.000. 334-701-0107 after 5PM.
Jeep 2003 Uberty; $1095
down with 0% Interest.
Daylight Auto Financing
850-215-1769
9AM-9PM



2005 Sllverado 1500
ext. cab, tool box, bed liner,
tinted windows, 1-owner,
black non-smoker,
ext. cond. $10,250. OBO
334-671-8200 or 796-9606.
Chevrolet 2001 Slverado;
$1495 down with 0%
Interest. Daylight Auto
Financing 850-215-1769
9AM-9PM
SDodge 2004 Ram; 4-Door
Crew Cab; $1895 down
with 0% Interest. Daylight
Auto Financing 850-215-
1769; 9AM-9PM


Tuesday, January 29, 2013- 5 B


GMC 2003 2500 HD SLT Turbo Diesel 140K
mileage, V8, Good condition with only one pre-
vious owner, well kept maintenance records.
5th wheel attachment and equipment with
trailer brakes. Call for all other accessories
such as heated seats, leather, tinted windows,
etc. $15,200, 334-718-8225

Pon Poqtlac 2003 Montana Ext Mini-Van
i Seats 8 White 102K mi 20/25 MPG
Runs Great, Auto trans, alloy
wheels, Frt-Rear A/C Power Windows Locks,
Mirrs & Drvr Seat, Cruise Ctrl, Remote Keyless
Ent. Roof Rack, Clean, serviced every 3K mi
New tires 2011 garage kept
$5700 (334) 618-4645 *

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NFIL


A Baltimore Ravens cheerleader performs a stunt during a send-off rally for the team on
Monday in Baltimore. The team left for New Orleans to face the San Francisco 49ers in the
Super Bowl.


Baltimore hosts Ravens


send off at nner Harbor


The Associated Press

BALTIMORE Retiring
Baltimore Ravens line-
backer Ray Lewis made a
promise Monday to the
thousands of fans who
turned out in the Inner
Harbor to send their team
to the Super Bowl.
"We did this, we did this
in 2000, and we are not
going to New Orleans for
nothing else but to bring
back another ring back
to Baltimore, where it be-
longs," Lewis said, refer-
ring to the team's first Su-
per Bowl championship.
"We love you, we love you,
we love you, Baltimore. We
are going to bring every-
thing we got."
Lewis,'coach John Har-
baugh and safety Ed Reed
were among the Ravens
who spoke to the crowd


before the team got on
buses and headed to the
airport to fly to New Or-
leans. The Ravens take on
the San Francisco 49ers in
Sunday's game.
Harbaugh told the crowd
that turned out in a freez-
ing rain that the Ravens
have the best fans in the
world.
"The wall of purple, can't
wait to see all the fans that
are going to be down in
New Orleans," Harbaugh
said.
Cole Sichette, 17, and
his friend Nick Holland,
17, were among those
that braved the weather.
The Pasadena teenagers
were able to go because
they didn't have school
Monday.
"Even if we had school,
I'd be skipping for this,"
Sichette said, adding he


was looking forward to a
victory rally. "If we win the
Super Bowl, I'm going to
skip for that."
Tracy Yeager was at the
Inner Harbor with her
three children, Mason, 14,
Carley, 10, and Cassidy, 6,
struggling to get a view of
the stage. The mother said
all four were hardcore Ra-
vens fans, and the weather
didn't matter.
"Absolutely not," Yeager
said. "It just makes us big-
ger fans. Even if we can't
see anything."


JOFLORIONDAOOM


College Basketball


Michigan moves to No. 1


The Associated Press

Michigan is No. 1 in The
Associated Press' college
basketball poll for the first
time since its Fab Five
days 20 years ago.
For the second straight
week the No. 1 team lost.
This time it was Duke,
which was routed 90-63
by Miami in the third-
worst defeat by a top-
ranked team.
Michigan received 51
first-place votes from the
65-member national me-
dia panel Monday. Kansas
moved up one spot to No.
2 and had 13 first-place
votes. They are the only
one-loss teams in the poll.
Indiana, Florida, which
drew the other first-place
vote, and Duke complete


the top five.
The Wolverines ad-
vanced from No. 2 to be-
come No. 1 for the fourth
time. They were at the
top for 10 weeks in 1964-
65, eight weeks in 1976-
77 and three weeks at
the start of 1992-93, the
Fab Five's second season
together.
That season, Chris Web-
ber, Juwan Howard, Jalen
Rose, Jimmy King arid
Ray Jackson made it to
the national champion-
ship game for the second
straight year.
Michigan is the second
Big Ten team to be No. 1
this season. Indiana was
the preseason No. 1 and
stayed there for the first
five weeks. Duke moved
in for four weeks before


Aresco says Big East

looking to add 12th school


The Associated Press

CROMWELL, Conn.
- Big East commission-
er Mike Aresco says the
conference is looking to
add,another school, and
may sign a TV deal with
multiple networks.
Aresco spoke at a local
chamber of commerce
breakfast in Middletown
on Monday, and talked to


me


reporters afterward.
Aresco says the Big East
wants to keep its name
as it rebrands, and wants
to add one more school
to give it 12 playing both
football and basket-
ball after Navy joins the
league in 2015.
He says he believes
conference realignment
picture may be settling
down,


Louisville and the Blue
Devils both held it for one
week.
Rounding out the top
10 are No. 6 Syracuse, fol-
lowed by Gonzaga, Ari-
zona, Butler and Oregon.
Miami rode its win over
Duke to a 13-place jump
in the poll, from 25th to
14th.
Fourteen ranked teams,
including half the top 10,
-lost at least one game
last week. Four teams, in-
cluding Louisville, which
dropped from fifth to
12th, lost twice last week.
San Diego State and
Marquette returned to
the rankings this week,
replacing Virginia Com-
monwealth, which was
19th, and Notre Dame,
which was 24th.

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Frld.iy & SalSimlby, VMarch 15 & 16

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NBA

Obama honors NBA

Champion Miami Heat


The Associated Press

WASHINGTON Presi-
dent Barack Obama hon-
ored the Miami Heat for
.winning the 2012 NBA
Championship title after
falling short just a year
before.
"Everybody doing their
part, is what finally put the
Heat over the top," Obama
said, as he welcomed the
team to the White House
Monday to celebrate their
victory.
The Heat defeated the
Oklahoma City Thunder
in five games in the NBA
Finals last lune.
The president also rec-
ognized the franchise's
work off the. court. He
thanked them for sup-


porting military service
members at Walter Reed
National Mlitary Medical
Center. Obama said one
of the things he's proud-
est of is that many of the
team members includ-
ing LeBron lames, Chris
Bosh and Dwvane Wade
- "take their roles as
fathers seriously."
lames, who presented
Obama with an auto-
graphed basketball, said
the team including mem-
bers that hall from Illinois.
Texas, Michigan, Ohio and
South Dakota were hon-
ored to be in the executive
mansion.
"We're in the White
House right now, which is
like, like'mama I made it,'"
lames said.


i,",i '.





SILVER
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.; ..' : O ' I

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(ACS. O JACKON





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House Movers, Inc.
Focus Credit Union
Oceanside Title, Inc.
One South Bank
* Wiregrass Federal Credit Union
Wright's Recycling

OTHER:

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4403 Constitution Lane, Marianna, FL 32448
850-526-3614 www.JCFloridan.com


- = . -. . .- : : : .. .. 'l" ' ."i"l . . -
113 1, 1


-16B TUESDAY, JANUARY 29, 2013


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