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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028304/00958
 Material Information
Title: Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title: Sunday Floridan
Portion of title: Floridan
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Jackson County Floridan
Publisher: Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Marianna Fla
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates: 30.776389 x -85.238056 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note: "Independent."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID: UF00028304:01000
 Related Items
Preceded by: Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by: Marianna Floridan

Full Text
















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kson County



Drug Task Force nets 5 arrests


From ilatf reports

The lackson County Drug
Task Force arrested five people
on Wednesday, Jan. 16, during
a street enforcement operation;
charges included violation of
state probation, driving while


license suspended, possession
of listed chemicals and posses-
sion of drug paraphernalia.
According to a JCDTF press
release, one instance involved
a traffic stop on a vehicle on
Highway 71 South, near the
Interstate 10 interchange. The


passenger, Aurora Deotono
Cutchins (Cervantes) of Alford,
was discovered to have ab-
sconded from her drug offend-
er probation and was wanted.
She was arrested on an active
See ARRESTS. Page 9A


"Clements Morris


Lent Cutchins


PARADING LITERACY


Students in the second-
and third-grade classes
at Graceville Elementary
wrapped up their literacy week
activities in style Friday morning
with a vocabulary word costume
parade. During the week, students
were visited by guest readers and
took part in reading activities like
the million minute read. ABOVE:
"Physician" Davion Giles leads the
way for his classmates during the
vocabulary word costume parade.
RIGHT: Chandler King came as a
clown to illustrate hilarious and
Madison Isaak went with Snow
White for her vocabilarjr word,
poisonous, See more photos on
page 5A.


Health and


Wellness


Fair set


for Jan. 24
From static report
On Thursday, Jan. 24, the food.
service department of the Jack-
son County school system will
host a Health and Wellness Fair
for the community. It will be held
from 3-6 p.m.
'Thewpurpose at the Jackson
'Thde prpoe County Health
I air


ly UICJMIr
is to open
up some
new enues


Department
in partnership
with that entity
and others.


forpeople Jack Noonan,
Food Service
to wa Director for the
opportunities school lunch
are available .p r o g r a m.
for them in which is run by
tryingto take his employer,
good cReof Sodexo, said
the event is
their expected to be
andoveral the first in a se-
we/ness." ries of annual
Jack Noonan, programs of its
Food Service kind.
Director for the "The purpose
school lunch of the fair is to
program open up some
new venues for
people to see what opportunities
are available for them in trying
to take good care of their health
and overall wellness," Noonan
said. "This will be in two confer-
ence rooms of the health depart-
ment. We'll have tables with peo-
ple displaying their wares and
information. We'll have a health
department dentist there, a So-
dexo chef manager will be there
doing some display cooking and
handling out samples, and the
blood mobile will be here. We'll
have some diabetes information
and a device to measure airflow
through lungs. We'll have blood
pressure checks, and a smoking
cessation person will be there.
"There's a lot more; we have
about 15 booths, and there's
See FAIR, Page 9A


Rep. Coley keynote speaker for Sunland's 50th anniversary celebration


Community invited
to Jan. 25 event
BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbucdhalter''jcflordari corn

Sunland Ceniter has a' big
festival every fall, and it brings
out a large crowd every year as
a premier event that brings the
Sunland at its larger surround-
ing community together in a
special way. But this year, they
are also having a winter celebra-
tion of a different kind.


On )an. 25, the center cel-
ebrates its 50th anniversary of
serving the devel-
opmentally dis-
abled citizens who C
live, work and grow
there. As a major
employer it had
800 workers on the
payroll Sunland
is recognized as a
major component
in the region's 1
economic engine
as well.
As it does for the fall festival,


is$


Sunland is inviting the public to
join in the observation of this
milestone year.
LAA special recog-
k c nition ceremony
v will be held that
day in the Sunland
auditorium at I
p.m. Rep. Marti
Coley and officials
from the Agency
for Persons with
0W1 Disabilities will
speak at the event.
Before and after the speeches,
those who attend will also


have an opportunity to view a
number of historical displays
depicting the center's history.
, Afer the auditorium presenta-
tion, a reception will be held in
Sunland's Leisure Center.
The day also provides an op-
portunity to meet Sunland's new
leader, Superintendent Merlin
Roulhac.
She's hoping for a big com-
munity turnout and is especially
hoping to see many Sunland
retirees there, envisioning a day
of reminiscing and fellowship
for those veterans of the center,


as well as conversations with
current employees.
Sunland is home to more
than 300 individuals and
specializes in areas of autism,
care of geriatric and medically
fragile individuals, dually
diagnosed and profound or
severely developmentally
disabled.
It also runs the Pathways
Program on campus, a 34-bed.
secure facility for male crimi-
nal defendants who have been
See SUNLAND. Page 9A


, CLASSIFIED .6B


, ENTERTAINMEnIT. 3B


This tHe*spaper
Is Printed On
Pec)cled Ijewv print




7 I65 1 61 80100 1


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SJC LIFE.. 3A


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


12A SUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 2013


Weather Outlook


High 66'
Low 35*

Monday
Partly Cloudy & Mild,


High -570
Low -340


SWednesday
SCool & Sunny.


High 550
Low 300

Tuesday
Sunny & Colder.


High 640
Low 400


Thursday
Mostly Sunny & Mild.


TIDES ULTRA VIOLET INDEX


Panama City Low -
Apalachicola Low -
Port St. Joe Low -
Destin Low -
Pensacola Low -

RIVER READINGS
Woodruff
Blountstown
Marianna.
Caryville


2:59 AM High
5:38 AM High
3:04 AM High
4:15 AM High
4:49 PM High


Reading
40.41. ft.
0.44 ft.
6.38 ft.
6.15 ft.


4:18 PM
9:31 PM
4:51 PM
5:24 PM
5:57 PM


Flood Stage
66.0 ft.
15.0 ft.
19.0 ft.
12.0 ft.


0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8-10 Very High, 11+ Extreme
0 1


THE SUN AND MOON


Sunrise
Sunset
Moonrise
Moonset


6:38 AM
5:07 PM
12:06 PM
2:04 AM (Mon.)


Jan. Jan. Feb. Feb.
18 27 3 10


FLORIDA'S e
PANHANDLE JS
MEDIA PBRTNERSw: 10oo0.


I lJ.ISTENII llllRHOU lYJWE 1ATHRUD


reta 0 er fexeine
Trust tis Team
~Tlh~'11(s~lllll11Justin Kiefer1


JACKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN
Publisher Valeria Roberts
vroberts@jcfloridan.com
Circulation Manager Dena Oberski
doberski@jcfloridan.com

CONTACT US
Telephone: 850-526-3614
FAX: 850-482-4478
Email: editorial@jcfloridan.com
MalingAddress:
RO.Box 520, Marianna, FL32447
Street Address:
4403 ConstitutionLane
MariannaFL32446
Office Ho :
Weekdays' 8a.m. to 5 p.m.

MISS YOUR PAPER?
You should receive your newspaper no later
than 6a.m. If it does not arrive, call Circula-
tion between 6 a.m. and noon, Tuesday to
Friday, and 7 a.m. to 11a.m. on Sunday. The
Jackson County Floridan (USPS 271-840)
is published Tuesday through Friday and
'Sunday mornings. Periodical postage paid
at Marianna, FL.


SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Home delivTy: $11.23 per month; $32.83
forthree months; $62.05 for six months;
and $123.45 for one year. All prices include
applicable state and local taxes. Mail
subscriptions must be paid in advance. Mail
subscriptions are: $46.12 for three months;
$92.24 forsix months; and $184.47 fr one
year.

ADVERTISING
The advertiser agrees that the publisher
shall not be liable for damages arising
out of errors and advertisements beyond
the amount paid for the space actually
occupied by that.portion of the advertise-
ments in which the error occurred, whether
such error is due to the negligence of the
publisher's employeesor otherwise, and
there shall be not liability for non-inser-
tion of any advertisement beyond the
amount paid.for such advertisement. This
newspaper will not knowingly accept or
publish illegal material of any kind, Advertis-
ing.whlch expresses preference based on
legally protected personal characteristics is
not acceptable.

HOWTOGETYIOUR
NEWS PUBLISHED
TheJackson County Floridan will publish
News of general interest free of charge,
Submit your news or Community Calendar
events via email, fax, mall or hand delivery,
Fees may apply for wedding, engagement,
Anniversary and birth announcements.
Forms are available at the Floridan offices.
Photographs must be of goodquality and
suitable for print. The Floridan reserves the
right to edit all submissions.

GETTING IT RIGHT
The Jackson.County Floridan's policy
is to correct mistakes'prdmptly. To
report an error, please call 526-3614
jMonday-Friday.


SCommunity Calendar
SUNDAY, JAN.20 director with the Tenth Amend- Eldercare Services at 4297 Liddon St., milestone; guest speakers Rep. Marti
SJackson Coutity huth ouncll ment Center, will discuss, "Our Last Marianna will be giving out USDA and Coley, Agency for Persons with Dis-
4 p.n. atthe McLane Center, Or- Hope-Rediscovering the Lost Road brown bags food. Call 482-3220. : .; abilities officials. Historical presenta-
ange St. President, William McFarlarid to Liberty:' focusing on the relation- Basic Computer Class, Part2 tions will be on display. A reception
willdiscuss the group's participation in ship between states and the federal noon to 3 p.m at theGoodwill Ca- follows in the Leisure Center.
the Martin Luther King Jr. Day Parade. government. Public welcome. Free reer Training Center, 4742 Highway 90, a Book Signing 2-4 p.mat Chipola
SFne Arts Seria Concert Lopez admission. Marianna. Learn basic components River Book & Tea, 4402 Lafayette
Tabor Duo-4 p.m.atSt. Luke'sEpis- AlffordCommunity Orana- and use of a computer. Call 5260139. St., Marianna. Local authorof poetry, -
copal Church in downtown Marianna, tion Meeting- 6 p.m. in the Alford Aloholics Anonymous Open Chrissy Jordan will be signing copies
featuringVenezuelan violinistAlfonso Community Center. New members Meeting noon to p.m.inthe of her newest book, "Desceot into
Lopez and pianist Michelle Tabor. Meet from Aford, surrounding communitiesAA room of First United Mth Madness
the artists at a reception following the invited to join. Call 579448638- ist Church, 2901Caledbnia Skr a Senior Singles GtTogether- 6
concert. Public welcome. Donations 4900 or 9-5173. Marianna. p.m. at Gazebo Coffee Shoppe & Deli.
accepted for the arts series. aConcerned American Patriots aHosp1taBoardof 'la downtown arianna. Single seniors
, Alohoi,,iAn'doa u CUis d Meeting 6 p.m. at the Jacksorn C i m _mte age 50 and older are encouraged to
Discussion 6:30 p.m. at 4349 W County Agriculture Center on U.S. p. in the Jackson Hospital Conm- get acquainted, form friendships.
S S. in the Jackson Hospital Com- .
Lafayette St. in Marianna (in one-story 90 West (next to the Na.tioal Gual munit~yoom, Hudnall Building, Games, food, pnzes and a guest
building behind4351 W. Lafayette St.) Armory .ana mmun Spea tionkr Marianna. Call 718-2629. speaker are plann, No charge
Attendance limited to persons with. Maharrey, national communications, .. donations accepted (proceeds fund -
desir sto drinki.director with theTenthAmend- .charitable endeavors of Marianna's
desire to stop dnking. ment Center, will discuss,"Our L st THURSDAY, AN.24 .atherngPlace Foundaton).Call
a Alcoholics Anoymous Meet- Hope-Rediscoverig theLost Road ,.iSbj TM Stl Hol s- 526-456L .
ing- 8p.m. inthe board room of to Liberty,:foc don the relation "'am.toL;.m. Tuesday uot s s 26-456.CelebrateReover "
o Liberty ,"foc onthe 1 t.. lit onthe raafkiu a'. -o _' T)KThursda.ys 7 p
Campbellton-Graceville Hospital, 5429 shiptpbetweenTsta esdayan T s Das Celebrate Recovery -'7 p.m.
ll Gracevilleship between steps and the federal. at cond Ave. in Marianna. at Evangel Worship Center, 2645
College Drive.Graceville. government. Puic welcome. Free Toys c sale: Buyone; get one Pebble Hill Road inMarianna.AdUlt,
admission. (same oileser value) for 50 cents. teen meetings to "overcome hurts, '.
MONDAYi JAN.21 a Alcoholics Anomios Open Call 482334. habits and hang-ups. Dinner 6 p.m.
a Martin Luther King Jr. D Bieak- Meeting -8-9 p.m. in theAA room of a Miar1nn Klwanis Club Meeting Child care available. Call209-7856,
fast 7 a.m:at the Saint James First United Methodist Church. 2901 Noon at Jim's Buffet & Grill, 4329 573-1131.
A.M.E. Church, 2891 Orange St, Mari- Caledonia St., Marianna. Lafayette St., Marianna. Call 482- a Alcoholic* Anonymous Open
anna. Free event. Call 693-3055. 2290. Meeting 8-9 p.min the AA room of
a Martin Luther King Jr. Day Parade TUESDAY, JAN. 22 a Job Club- noon to 3 p.m. at the First United Methodist Church, 2901
-10 a.m. beginning at Borden St., St.Anne 1 ft Storellours 9 Goodwill.Career Training Center, 4742 Caledonia St. in Marianna.
ending at Madison St. in Marianna. a.m. to 1p.m. Tuesday and Thursdays Highway 90, Marianna. Learn job
Call693-3055. at 4285 Second Ave. in Marianna. seekingretention skills; get job search SATURDAY, JAN. 26
a Chipola Chapter, NSDAR Meeting Toys/clothing sale: Buy one; get one assistance. Call 526-0139. Atha Homecoming Race- Altha
-11a.m. in the Hudnall Building (same or lesser value) for 50 cents. aWellness ir 3-6 p.m. at the Project Graduation is having a 5k and,1
Community Room, Marianna. Dr. Ray Call 482-3734. Jackson County Health Department, mile fun run at Altha Recreational Park
Marling will discuss "Women's Heart Covenant Hospice Orientation 499 Healthy Way, Marianna. Call on Oglesby Road. Call 859-557-1027
Health:' Reservations required for the forNewVol~ teers-10 a.m..12 p.m., 526-2412; or 850'557-1026.
luncheon count ic Regent Carolyn 4215Kelson Ave SuiteE. Seeking lics An mous- Closed Aford Community Health Clinic
bel th et cdjordan individuals interested in provid- discussion, 8-9 p.m.; First United Hours -10 a.m. until last patient is
bellsouth.net. ing administrative, development or Methodist Church,2901 Caledonia St., seen, at 1770 Carolina St. in Alford. The
Jackson County Quilter's Guild outreach support for the organization. Mariannal. ntheAAroom. Attendance \freeclinic for ihcome-eligible patients
Meting 5:30-7:30 p.m. at Ascen- No costs and refreshments provided. limited to persons with a desire to stop without medical insurance treats
sionLutheran Church, 975 U.S. 90 Call 482-8520. drinking: papers will not be signed, short-term illnesses and chronic
West, Marianna. Business meetings Orientation- noon to3 p.m. at ... conditions. Appointments available
are fourth Mondays; other Mondays Goodwill Career Training Center, 4742 FRIDYJAN 25 (call 263-7106 or 209-5501); walk-ins
are for projects lessons, help. All Highway 90, Marianna. Learn about welcome. Sign in before noon.
quilters welcome. Call 209-7638. and register for free services. Call Bep ment Meetings -11 a.m.
SCapt. Luke Lott's Calhoun 526-0139. at Emerald Coist Hospice offices in Alcoholics Anonymous Open Mee-
Guards, Camp 2212, Sons of Con- a Sewing Crcle -1p.m. at Jackson Marianid(4374 Highway 90) and ing 4:30-5:30 p.m. in the AA room
Duar m o n. Sewing Circle -1p.m. at Jackson of First United Methodist Church,
federate Veterans Monthly Meeting CountySenior Citizens, 2931 Optimist Chipley $outhBlvd.).Public f First United Methodist Church,
t nMothM n'Blun.ani r.P ublmc 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.
-.6 p.m. at the Altha Diner, 25563 Drive in.Marianna. Call 482-5028. welcornii Eduction and bereavement 2901CaledoniaSt. in Marianna.
North Main St.; Altha (Highway 71 l supportoffered to any, individual in
downtown). w Alcoho lic Anonymous Open the community suffering a loss. Call SUNDAY, JAN. 27
Concerned American Patriots 8-mint AA roomof ahead:526-3577 (Marianna) or 850- Alcoholics Anonymnous Closed
C Concerned American Paffiots FirstUnited Methodist Church, 2901 638-8787 (Chipley). Discussion 6:30 p.m. at 4349 W.
Meeting 6p.m. at the Jackson Caledonia St. In Marianna. Discussion6:30 p.m.at 4349W.
County Agriculture Center on-U.S. a Sunland 50th Anniversary Lafayette St. in Marianna (in one-story
90 West (next to the National Guard Celebration -1p.m5 in the audito- Wiilding behind 4351 W. Lafayette St.).
Armory), Marianna. Speaker Mike WEDNESDAY, JAN. 23 rium of Sunland Center, Marianna, a Attendance limited to persons with a
Maharrey, national communications a USDA Food Distribution-8 a.m., recognition ceremony will mark the desire to stop drinking.
The submission deadline for this calendar is two days before publication. Submit to: Community Calendar, Jackson County Floridai, P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 2447,-
email editorial@jcfloridan.com, fax 850-482-4478 or bring items to 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna,

Police Roundup


MARIANNA POLICE
DEPARTMENT,
The Marianna Police De-
partment listed the following
incidents for Jan. 17, the
latest available report: iTwo
accidents, two suspicious
vehicles, one suspicious person,
one report of mental illness,
two burglaries, one burglar
alarm, 13 traffic stops, one
follow-up investigation, one
assist of another agency, one
patrol request and one unse-
cured building discovered on
patrol.

JACKSON COUNTY
SHERIFFS OFFICE
The Jackson County Sheriff's
Office and county fire/rescue
.reported the following incidents
for Jan. 17, the latest available
report. (Some of these calls
might be related to after-hours
calls taken on behalf of Gracev-


ille and Cottondale police
departments): Two abandoned
vehicles, two
suspicious
vehicles, one
suspicious
person, one
highway ob-
struction,
one report of'mental illness
with violence, one burglary,
one verbal disturbance, one
ire with police response,
One prowler, two residential
fire calls, one drug offense,
19 medical calls, four burglar
alarms, one panic alarm, one
robbery alarm, 16 traffic stops,
one larceny complaint, two
criminal mischief complaints,
one assault, one suicide at-
tempt, one assist of a motorist
or pedestrian, four assists of
other agencies, two transports,
one Baker Act transport, one
threat/harassment complaint,
and one 911'hang-up.


JACKSON COUNTY
CORRECTIONAL FACILITY
The following persons were
booked into the county jail dur-
ing the latest reporting periods:
Rqbin Brunson, 33, P.O. Box
881, Sneads, possession of
cocaine, possession of drug
paraphernalia, possession of
prescription drugs without a
prescription.'
Terrius Gainer, 37, 7009 East
10th St., Panama City, posses-
sion of cocaine, possession of
prescription drugs without a
prescription, tampering with
evidence.
Joseph Barnes, 26, 5150 Pecan
Shadow Drive, Youngstown,
possession of meth, possession
of drug paraphernalia.
Joshua Quesenberry, 26, 3981
Highway 90, Marianna, viola-
tion of state probation.
Wesley Stephens, 23, 2367
Corbin Road, Cottondale,
possession of prescription


drugs without a prescription-
two counts, violation of state
probation.
Bruce Smith, 40, 7997 McK-
eowri Mill Road, Sneads, theft.
Darren Lewis, 46, 7877 High-
way 90, Sneads, theft.
ScottyWilliams, 33, 3791
Highway 69, Grand Ridge, non-
child support.
Kenny Johnson, 28, 645
Pearson St., Chipley, non-child
support, violation of state
probation.
Megan Gardner, 25,2406
Mayberry Lane, Marianna, hold
for court/hold for DOC.,
Wenzell Hearns, 53,4754
River Road, Bascom, burglary.

JAIL POPULATION: 214
To report 'dcrirme, call
CrimeStoppers at 526-5000
or a local law enforcement
agency.
To report a wildlife violation,
call 1-888-404-FWCC (3922).


1 1 ~~~..~~.~~..~ ~........ 1. .. .I.-. --. ~-L------~


i,


I


Wake-up Call







JACKSONCONYLRIA
e County]Lifie PfAGEiid !3A ________.


On the menu
Jan. 21-25
Breakfast and lunch
menus for Jackson County
schools.

Monday
v Martin Luther King Jr.
Day (no school).

Tuesday
V Breakfast: Open-Faced '
Egg Muffin, Assorted Cere-
al & Cinnamon Toast, But-
tery Grits & Toast, Choose
up to 2 Sides: Pineapple
Tidbits, Chilled Pears.
L Lunch: Breakfast for
Lunch: Hamburger on
Bun, Egg Frittata & Biscuit,
French Toast Sticks & Sau-
sage; Choose up to 4 Sides:
Tater Tots, Sweet Potato
Tots, Fresh Assorted Fruit,
Chilled Mixed Fruit.

Wednesday
a Breakfast: Cinnamon
Roll, Ultimate Breakfast
Round, Banana Muffin
Loaf; Choose up to 2 Sides:
Raisins; Fresh Assorted
Fruit.
Lunch: ChickenNug-
gets & Bieadstick; Cold
Cut on Bun, Assorted Sal-
ads; Choose up to 4 Sides:
Baked Beans, Sweet Potato
Wedges, Fresh Assorted
Fruit, Chilled Peaches.

Thursday
SBreakfst: Sausage Bis-
cuit, Buttejy Grits &Toast,
Assorted Cereal & Cinna-
mon Toast; Choose up to 2
Sdes: Chilled Mixed Fruit,
Fresh Assorted Fruit.
SLuncle Baked Ziti &
Garlic BreadsticksTurkey
& Cheese on Bun;,Assorted
Salads; Choose up to 4
Sides: Steamed Broccoli,
Celery Sticks, Fresh As-
sorted Fruit, ChilledPears.

Friday
I Breakfast:Yogurt &
Fruit Parfait, Oatmeal &
Toast, Assorted Cereal &
Buttered Toast; Choose up
to 2 Sdes: Applesauc,,
Assorted 100% Juice.
Lunch Chill con Queso
Quesadilla, Cheese Pizza,
Hotdog on Bun; Choose up
to 4 Sides: Steamed Corn,
Steamed Green Beans,
Fresh Assorted Fruit, Pine-
Sapple Tidbits.













Jace Everett Cauley was
born Dec. 13, 2012, atTal-
lahassee Memorial Hospi-
tal. He weighed 10 pounds.
SParents are Patricia.
Williams Cauley and John
Cauley Jr. dfAltha. Grand-
parents are Wesley and
Linda Williams of Altha,
Sheila Cauley of Altha, and
John Cauley Sr. of Bristol.
Great-grandparents are Al-
ice Logue of Dothan, Ala.,
Lester and Helen Williams
:: of Marianna, Artie Giy ,
of White City, and Agnes
Cauley of Clewiston.


First birthday
Jonathan afton cel-
ebrated his first birthday
on Saturday, Nov. 10, 2012,
with a party at his home in
Tallahassee.
Upon entering the party
area, guests were greeted.
by large clusters of "Dr.
Seuss" balloons, "truf-
fula trees" and Jonathan's
"Happy Birthday to You"
book, which the guests
were asked to sign.
The backyard was
decorated in a "Dr. Seuss"
theme. Two large wooden
"Cat in the Hat" charac-
ters holdingclusters of
balloons and a "Dr. Seuss"
banner that read "Happy
First Birthday Jonathan"
welcomed the guests as
they arrived.
The children enjoyed
playing on the gym set


Country needs more positive leaders


ife in our country is
changing at a steady
rate. If we don't pay
close attention to what's
taking place right in front
of our eyes, we will lose
track of what's going on
within the structure of
our country.
Of course modern tech-
nology is responsible for
many changes. Imagine
the impact the speeches
of past leaders like Martin
Luther King Jr would
have on our world today
with thp ability to reach
billions of people through
today's media outlets.
It's true that there will
always be a newer, better
product being advertised,
because of the increase of
knowledge in our world.


But what about the
changes that are taking
place in the
attitudes,
activities
and the ,
overall toler-
ance level
that we are
Thomas experienc-
Vincent ing in the
Murphy country that
was built on
a trust in'God? Attimes
it seems that many of us
have forgotten about the
foundation this country
was said to have been
built on. Thank God for
people like Martin Luther
King Jr. and those of all
nationalities that worked
hard with him to fight
discrimination, so that


many of our minority
citizens could possibly
live a comfortable life in
our country. What a dif-
ference in the world since
Martin Luther King Jr.
died on April 4, 1968.
During one of his
speeches he spoke these
words; "I have a dream
that my four little chil-
dren will one day live in
a nation where they will
not be judged by the cblor
of their skin but by the
content of their charac-
ter." It's interesting that
he used a word "char-
acter" about 45 years
ago that is so important
in today's world.
Some of the things'that
were taboo years ago
are now being accepted


as part of everyday life.
There is no doubt about
it; our morals are going
in the wrong direction.
Have you noticed that
"having fun" or "feeling
distraught" both seem
to be intertwined with
the drinking of alcohol?
Alcohol abuse is a serious
problem in our country.
Lately, many of the sit-
coms, especially "reality
shows" are full of scenes
where alcohol is involved;
whether the atmosphere
is happy or sad. Why? The
message that is being
sent-loud and clear-to
our young people is that
alcohol should be avail-
able no matter what.
How can something like
alcohol that can be so


Cast announced for Chipola's


Special to the Roridan

Chipola College Theatre
director Charles Sirmon
has selected a cast of 48 for
the hit, "Hairspray," which
opens March 13.
Cast members are: Odra
Chapman as Tracy Turn-
blad, Trey McKay as Corny.
Collins, Kayla Todd- as
Amber Von Tussle, Aaron
Black as Brad Dancer,
Gracie Wallace as Tammy
Dancer, Austin Pettis as
Fender Dancer, Piper Wil-
liams as Brenda Dancer,
Terrence Shanks as Sketch
Dancer, Cayce Griffin as
Shelley Dancer, Jeremy
Bailey as IQ Dancer, Shayli


Tharp as Lou Ann Dancer,
Colton Day as Link Larkin,
Meredith Moreau as Prudy
Pingleton, Charles Sirmon
as Edna Trnblad, Mer-
edith Sanders as Penny
Pingleton, Meghan Bas-
ford as Velma Von Tussle,


Chris Manasco as Wilbur
Tumblad, Nick Melvin as
Seaweed J. Stubbs, Or-
lando Riley as Duane,
Clyde Declonet as Gil-
bert, Brienne Beechum
as Lorraine, Matt West as
Mr. Pinky, Evie Saliba as


OPTIMISTS MAKE DONATIONS

Minna Opthnist Clul
pfsimdt LoU Center
S(center) is show hue
malnkt a donation to.
Mike VanHuss (left) for.
the Mwiuanna High School
baseball m d to
County B itebll bavel
Ball Team. VanHuss was
a guest recently at a
m etlnof the club while
Byrd in a club member.



Births


Hael JayanneLee Adams
was bom at 12:36 a.m. on
Jan. 8,2013, at Jackson
Hospital in Marianna. She
weighed 6 pounds, 14.6
ounces and was 19 inches
long at birth. Her parents
are Cassandra Sellers and
Donald Adams II. Maternal
grandparents are William
A. Sellers of Bonifay, and
Bertha Dilmore of Chipley.
Paternal grandparents are
Noiman and MayAnder-
son of Bonifay and Donald
Adams Sr. of Chipley.


and with the toys and
balloons that had been
placed throughout the
party area. They especially
liked the "Dr. Seuss" tent
filled with books and
riding on Jonathan's big
sister's pink Cadillac.
After playing outside,


SUBMITTED PHOTOS
Robert Parer Elah Bur-
gess was born at 7:05 p.m.
on Jan. 11, 2013, at Jackson
Hospital in Marianna.
He weighed 6 pounds, 15
ounces and was 19 inches
long at birth. His parents
are Sarah and Robert
Burgess. Grandparents are
Ed and Joann Burgess of
Ft. Pierce, and Davie and
Christine Hill of Port St.
Lucie.


guests were invited into
the house where multi-
colored streamers and
"Dr. Seuss" quotes hung
from the ceiling and a
video of Jonathan's first
year played. The birthday
menu included hot dogs,
.red and white "Cat in the
Hat" marshmallow pops,
"Green Eggs and Ham"
pretzel sticks, rainbow fish
shaped crackers, "Lorax"
cookies, green deviled
eggs, blue Jell-O with fish
inside, popcorn with M&M
and cinnamon toppings,
and green "Seuss Juice."
The dining table held
Jonathan's three tiered
"One Fish, Two Fish, Red
Fish, Blue Fish" birthday
cake. After everyone sang
"Happy Birthday" to the
honoree and helped
him blow out his candle,
he was given his own


Jum Awan Conad Jr.
was born at 8:41 p.m. on
Jan. 13, 2013, at Jackson
Hospital in Marianna.
He weighed 7 pounds, 8
ounces and was 20 inches
long at birth. His parents
are Jessica Hosey and James
Conrad. Grandparents are
Jimmy and Christina Con-
rad of Bascom, Robbin and
Andy Calloway of Malone,
Sheela and'Itacy Johnson
of Grand Ridge, and Wen-
dell and Michelle Hosey of
Chattahoochee.


miniature cake.
A highlight of the party
was an appearance by
"The Cat in the Hat," who
visited with the children,
posed for pictures, and
read them several "Dr.
Seuss" books.
Upon leaving the party,
guests were given treat
bags filled with "Dr. Seuss"
sandwich containers, "Dr.
Seuss" plates, candy and
balloons. Approximately
50 guests helped the hon-
oree celebrate his special
day.
Jonathan is the little
brother of Madison, and
the son of Josh and Nicole
Trafton, the grandson
of Sherry Faircloth and
Bubba Faircloth of Sneads,
and the late Mark and Fran
Trafton of Tllahassee,
and the great-grandson of
Johnnie Daniels of Sneads.


Little Inez, Cou
as Gym teach
West as Mattro
Holmes as MI
Maybelle
mother'and Na
as Guard. The
Female singin
"Welcome to t
eludes Patrea (
jah Swilley an
Henderson.
Citizens of
include: Elyn
Wells, Amberl
Amber Saye, Ki
son, Alden Ro
Wester, Olivia
Faith Long, De
ley, Shelby Jain
Stone, Maddie (


detrimental to our health,
attitudes, and when we
drink and drive be so
highly promoted? The
changes in the many
lifestyles of our citizens
should be a serious
concern.
Martin Luther King Jr.
wasn't perfect; but he
was a leader that gave his
life while trying to make
a positive difference in
the world. We need more
leaders no matter what
your nationality or gender
- to stand up, and work
toward more positive ac-
tivities through the media
and other events; so that
our children can have
more positive examples
to observe early in their
lives.


'Hairspray'

rtney Bass naish Tookes, Felicia Gib-
er, Rachel son and RolliBarteles.
n, Brittney "Hairspray," written
otormouth by Mark O'Donnell and
Seaweed's Thomas Meehan, with
ddine Long music by Marc Shaiman
Dynamites and Lyrics by Scott Witt-
g trio in man and Marc Shaiman,
ie 60's" in- is the winner of eight Tony
Clark, Ada- Awards including ,Best
d Melanie Musical.
Tickets go on sale two
Baltimore weeks prior to the perfor-
Sapp, Julje mance, and will be avail-
y Corbin, able online with box office
iara Samp- hours to be announced.
llis, Grace For more informa-
a' Wester, tion contactCharles Sir-
eanna Bai- mon, director of Theatre
er,'Rhonda sirmonc@chipola.edu or
Craven, Ta- 718-2277.


SJeannie Brooks

ugust 29, 1955 ~ January, 13, 202
r eS
were a wonderful wife, mother, grandmother,

e for everyone during your 40 years in
-. You always had a hug and kiss for al
u amil, even when you were tired and very
sdom sic. Your thoughts were always of oths.
more than yourself. .*
You always had such a loving, gentle, giving, :
sweet soul and as this year haspssed I still '
SIuestion why God? These tears are selfish on W,
part. I miss you and Love you. I look forward to
I seeing your smile agin and hearing you laug \
like you always did no matter how tired you were.
SGod blessed me with 35 years with you. I thank ,
him for those years and I know he had a tpason
for taking you back at such a young age. I wish
could have had many, many more years together

You always put your family, friends and
eecially your job before yourself I just hope the
pony you worked for realizes what they have'
Sots I know what I have lost. Even the day you
k you still worked half a day before you
gave in to go to the doc.r.

until the daywe are all together againand
This time we all willhave the chance to ,
Syou first. You arvehik in your family and
friends' hedrs and thoughts.

iove You a m iss V ic
'', L \ ... \ , ?
c A ""'v "


Santa Got Your Cash?
Sell your old gold at...



JEWELERS

Paid on Site
443 LafaytteStret 526-5488 wwwa nlnmihontnecoi


I _











Publisher
VALERIA ROBERTS


Florida Voices



Pension ruling a


win for taxpayers

r wo years ago, facing a $3.6 billion shortfall,
; | Florida lawmakers made the eminently sensible
.:5 decision to require state employees to contribute
3 percent of their salaries to the state pension fund.
Unlike virtually every worker in the private sector,
state workers did not have to contribute a dime to their
retirement plan.
This is precisely the kind of financial largess that
government needs to check, so it was gratifying to see
the Florida Supreme Court on Thursday uphold the 3
percent requirement adopted by the Legislature and
signed by GoV. Rick Scott.
The unions had claimed the change violated their.
contracts, and a lower court overturned the law, holding
lawmakers did not have the authority to "create a new
form of a pension plan."
But the higher court, in a 4-3 vote, affirmed the law
did not "bind future Legislatures from prospectively
altering benefits for future service performed" by
members of the Florida Retirement System.
SAnd since the law did not affect any benefits earned
before it took effect, the majority ruled its provisions
were indeed prospective and entirely within the
Legislature'sauthority.
It is a thoughtful ruling and one that brings some
fiscal sanit to state government. Taxpayers should be
relieved. Had the unions won, the state would have had
to repay, with interest, state employees who had been
contributing the 3 percent.
This highlights a larger issue: Government canMot
continue to provide employee benefits npt found in the
business world.
Indeed, Florida House Speaker WilWeatherford
correctly wants to phase out pensions and transition
state workers 401(1k retirement plans like most
companies offer.
The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports in 2011 that
only 10 percent of all private businesses offered
pensions.
The SupremeCourt's finding should give Weatherford
and lawmakers reason to keep working to bring
pension costs under control
This editorial was published in the Tampa Tribune on Friday. Jan. 18


Contact representatives



> Rep. MartiColey,.R-Dlstrict 7
MartLColey@myfloridahouse.gov
BuildingA, Room 186 Chipola College
3094 Indian Circle
arianna, FL 32446-1701 ,
Rep.Brad Drake, R-District 5
Brad.Drake@myfloridahquse.gov.,
SNWFL State-ChautauquaCampiis #205
908U.S. Highway 90West .
DeFuniakSprings, FL 32433-1436

S.Sen Bill Mdntford. D-District6 .
208 Senate OfficeBuilding
404 South Monroe St.
'Talal asseeFL 32399- 100 .
nmoritford.bilLweb@ flsenate.gov .:
!. , : . ... ,.


Thank George firstinwar,



peace and inaugurations


T he Constitution Irquires
only the 35-word oath of
office.
All the rest in our presidential
inaugurations the address,
poetry, prayers, marching bands
and balls is gravy.
Before we get swept up in the
pomp and pageantry lobster
and bison luncheon in the U.S.
Capitol! Native Americans in their
regalia! Unicyclists from Maine! -
let's take a moment to remember
that George Washington was first
in the hearts of his countrymen
and first to invent a
presidential inauguration.
The father of our country had
to decide not only what to wear
and what to say but how big the
buttons on his coat should be and
whether to say anything at all. He
had to decide where he wanted
to stay. The nation's capital and
first inauguration were then in
New York, a long way from Mount
Vernon.
Washington was aware he was
Setting precedent, and, although
not everything he did stuck,it's
instructive to see where we started.
In the weeks before his swearing
in as the firstpresident on April
30,1789, Washington wrote letters
(yes, by hand) praising the locally
made "cloth and buttons" his
friend and future Secretary of War
Henry Knox had sent him and
asked Knox for "six more of the
large (engraved) button to trim the
coat in the manner I wish it to be.".
*He was determined to stay only
in "hired rooms" or inns, and not
in private homes whenhe made
the trip from Mouit Vernon. "am
not desirous of being placed early
in a situation for entertaining," he,
wrote James Madison.
Washington worried about the
"oceans of difficulties" awaiting


MarshaMercer


him as the first Congress had
failed to begin its business, and
he lamented his lack of political
skill. In fact, Washington's war
service had given him excellent
political skills, says Jim Zeender, a
longtime registrar in the Exhibits
Division of the National Archives,
whose excellent blog posts about
early letters of the founders I draw
from here. Zeender's posts can be
found on th6 National Archives'.
Prologue: Pieces of History blog.
The Library of Congress and
Joint Congressional Committee
on Inaugural Ceremonies also
have robust web pages on
' inaugurations.
Ir 1789, Washington took the
oath on the balcony of Federal
Hall on Wall Street before a
joint session of Congress and
addressed the crowd below:
"Fellow citizens of the Senate
and House of Representatives,
among the vicissitudes incident
Sto life no event could have filled
me with greater anxieties" than
the notification of his election
as president. His flowery speech
Continued for 1,400 words.
And later that day, another
tradition of critiquing the
president's inaugural perforjnance
-was born.
U.S. Sen. Wiliam Maclay of
Pennsylvania wrote in his diary
thatWashington "read off his
address in the plainest manner,
without even taking his eyes from


Sthe paper, for I felt hurt that he
was not first in everything. He was
dressed in deep brown, with metal
buttons, with an eagle on them,
ihite stockings, a bag aid sword."
For his second inauguration in
Philadelphia, Washington wore
a black velvet suit with black
stockings. He was weary and his
speech was just 135 words.Maclay
'had lost his re-election bid; so we
dQn't have his review.
Inaugurations have taken place
in various locations. The first in
the new'capital city ofWashington
was Thomas Jefferson's second.
inauguration in 1801. He walked
over from his boarding house.
Social butterfly Dolley Madison
came up with the first inaugural
ball in 1809, but her husband the
president was not impressed. "I'd
rather be in bed," he reportedly
confided.
We've now come to the 57th
inauguration. Expectations are
low foi President Barack Obama's
second act.
Washington Post reporter
SMonica Hesselikenied second
inaugurations to the renewal of
wedding vows "the ceremony
might be great, but you can't
ignore what you already know
-about the groom: He snores, he
sniffles and he forgot to pay the
electric bill last month."
While almost nothing could
equal the pure joy and excitement
of four years ago, this inauguration
is a time to look at our history and
our future with hope.
An inauguration gives us a day to
celebrate us. Let's enjoy it We don't
need GeorgeWashington's big
eagle buttons. We have apps.

Marsha Mercer writes from Washington.
You may contact her at"
marsha.mercer@yahoo.com


Small solutions for big problems


BY JESSE PHILLIPS
Florida Voices
/
I have a distinct childhood
memory of the day our
house nearly burned down. A
neighborhood friend had come
into our house and said, "Your
trash can is on fire outside"
Some ashes from our fireplace
had been prematurely thrown
into the trash can while still
smoldering.
My brother, thinking the fire
must be just a small flicker on
a few pieces of trash, grabbed a
glass of water and walked outside
Sto put the fire out. When he
encountered an inferno that had
already charred part of our house's
exterior, he realized that the glass
of water in his hand was useless.
He pushed the trash can away
from the house, toppled it over
and worked with the neighbor to
extinguish the fire with the garden
hose.
I have been reminded of
this story during the fiscal cliff
negotiations. The problems our
country faces are much bigger
than the solutions being offered.
Our national debt is an inferno
that will eventually consume
our house. Yet, it's being doused
with small glasses of water by


politicians who either don't realize
or refuse to acknowledge the
severity of our problem.
Our national debtis $16 trillion
and counting. Our total unfunded,
liabilities our debt if you
include our future obligations
and promises are estimated to
be between $85 trillion and $100
trillion. This is a fire raging in our
trash can.
Leadership in Washington
claimed to have struck a deal to
avoid the fiscal cliff, raising taxes
by $620 billion and cutting $15
billion in spending. Even if you
could tax your way out of debt,
this minuscule number represents
less than 4 percent of our current
debt, and less than 1 percent of our
unfunded liabilities.
At best it's a small solution for a
big problem.
There are a handful of people
in Washington who seem to
understand. Florida U.S. Sen.
Marco Rubio pointed out what is
obvious to everyone our leaders
just kicked the can further down
the curb and have done nothing
but worsen our crisis.
"I ran for office because I wanted
to be part of solving big problems,"
Rubio said, "and time and again
we're faced with options here-that
don't really do that. The real fiscal


cliff is the one that awaits us."
Washington has been utterly
incapable of providing big
solutions to solve our problems.
Since the ratio of tax hikes to
spending cuts is 41 to 1, it seems
the only thing big in Washington
are the tax bills we pay for our
leader's spending habits.
The Congressional Budget Office
reported that the fiscal cliff deal
would actually increase the deficit
by $4 trillion over the next decade..
It seems this deal might actually
hasten the fiscal cliff, rather than
diverting it.
Every generation encounters big
problems. We are measured by
whether our solutions are as big as
those problems. By that standard,
our current leadership is a case
study in how small-minded people
failed to rise to the challenge of
their time.
Instead of getting the house in
order, they doused the fire with a
small glass of water, congratulated
themselves for having tried, and
pointed fingers at each other as the
house burned down around them.
Jesse Phillips is a grassroots leader who
leads Restore Justice, educating voters of the
records of judicial candidates. He Is also the
director of IT for one of the largest '
independent medical practices in Orlando. He
can be reached at me@jessephilllps.net.


, vnrwva sal Ui 1/19
@2013 Jeff Stahler/Dist. by Universal UClick for UFS


)r, I 1\


I





JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


PARADING LITERACY


PHOTOS Bf MARK. IlKINLN F LORIOAN
HAYL-E the Robot, actually Hayleigh Rattin, peers Into the crowd of
kids gathering for the costume parade Friday morning at Gracevllle
Elementary School.


MARIANNA MIDDLE SCHOOL STUDENTS OF THE MONTH

U


SUBMIrTED PHOTO
1 iured are the Marianna Middle School students of the month for November/Decem-
| iacer. These students were chosen by their teachers for their overall good behavior and
. the effort in which they put forth to their studies. The students (from left) are (front
row) Kaitlin Conder, Natalie Sims, Gavin Calloway andTradeja Speights; and (back row)
MyKayla Prioe, Cody Capps, Ryan Reed, Hannah Barfield and Riley Torbett.


Susan Burgan gets her class organized before the start
of the vocabulary word costume parade. She came as a
surgeon.

LOOKING FOR MORE NEWS? VISIT
WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM


HATTON HOUSE


Sthilflidihncluded in rent
Ample off-streef, paring *Clubhouse
SIndro :pool Fitness rood i '
.Laundiyfaililies New Management
Monthly Ii4sident avies& events
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2045 3rd Avenue I Sneads, Florida 32460
hatton-house-apartments.com t&


DOTHAN CIVIC CENTER
Friday & Saturday, March 15 & 16
Landscaping
Floor Covering
Kitchen & Bath Makeovers
Window, Doors & Siding
Decorating
Home Products & Services
Other Great Products
For Your Home


Boot.SpaceAva^iable. Ca llTod ay 334-702-2600orisitOur
ia wwwI.dohahme.shIo.com I-


RETIREMENT MAY COST MORE THAN YOU THINK
Many people look forward to retirement as a period in life
when they will have time to do all the things they've wanted
to, travel, Lake courses. etc. But will you be able to afford
It?
Among the financial challenges facing retirees, the biggest
Is probably health care. Even Medicare Is not truly free: a
Part B premium is deducted from Social Security benefits
(higher for those with higher incomes). Then there Is private
Medlgap coverage, and Part D prescription coverage Maybe
long-term care.
The taxes you didn't pay on your retirement-fund
contributions will come due now, payable at your full
ordinary-income rate. Even most of your Social Security
benefits may be taxable, depending on your other income.
And benefits and pension may drop precipitously when
one spouse dies. And all those things you wanted to do.
like travel? You may find you're spending more than you
expected.
Plari now for your future. We can help at
CARR RIGGS & INGRAM, LLC
4267 Lafayette St., Maranna, FL 32446
(850) 526-3207


Complete the forFm elrw; then submit it, with your grandchild's photo & $18 per submission to:
Valentine ti~id6hildren, C/O Jackson County Floridan, RO. Box 520, Marianna, Florid' 32447
S or drop them off at our office at 4403 Constitution Lane.
', Deadline is 5:00PM on February 8, 2013


Child's Name
'Grandparent Name(s)
Daytime Phone Number
`Submitted By
----------


Isaiah Jackson,was one of several GES students who
picked "money" as their vocabulary word.


mIVe
nuivi


L


_ IC----~~-~-- ~"~"~""~~W;UQ~Pl~ae~"a~"~":j~T~~ ~~~h~u~~~!~f~;i~S~,~-~YhP~~OB(B~WUP~3~B


SUNDAY. JANUARY 20.2013 5AF


LOCfRIL





16A- SUNDAY, JANUARY 20,2013

Pets on Parade


SUBMII IEcurnUi
Mellow Is a 7-year-old female miniature horse. She Is very shy,
but Is also sweet, gentle & curious. If you are Interested In
adopting her or one of the other rescue horses, Hidden Springs
Horse Rescue can be reached at 526-2231 or horserescue@
live.com. Their wbbslte is www.FlorldaHorseRescue.com.
Amadea and Q are
part of aijeight-week-
old trio of doxie/blue
heeler puppies. #
you are Interested
In adopting one of
them, the shelter Is
at 4011OU Maintenance
Drive in Maranna.
Shelter hours are
10 a.m.to 3 pLm.
andr10 am.stopI

~ Iuber is 482-4570;
.thewehistiswww.
:petfinderEcom.


CRUZ NAMED TOP

,CHIPOIAEMPLOYEE


-


SsumTEr PHOTO
ElIsa Cruz (center) is Chipbla College's Career Employee for
December. She serves as a departmental staff assistant In the
Social and Behavioral Sciences Department and has worked at,
the college since 2005. Here, Cruz Is cdngratulatedby Chipola
president Dr.Gene Prough (left) and Dr.Willle Splre, assoClate
dean of Social and Behavioral Sciences.

SNtADS FFA HELPS OUT

LOCAL PRE-K PROGRAM


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


ALTRUSA WELCOMES NEW MEMBER


SUBMITTED PHOTO.
Pictured (from left} are Jay James, sponsor; Kerry Skipper, new member; Nina Good-
son, Membership chair and Carolyn Glass, President. Altrusa International of Marian-
na had the pleasure of inducting Kerry Skipper into their organization at the January ,
business meeting at Jim's Buffet & Grill. Skipper's sponsor was Jay James. Altrusa welcomes
Skipper to the club and looks forward to working with her on our upcoming projects.



JCSB Transportationstaffselects


school related employee of the year
-l .*. v *** a. *


Fred Carpenter, a school
bus driver has been select-
ed bytheJCSBTransporta-
tion staff as school related
employee of te year,
1Tansportation Admin-
istrator, Phyllis T. Danels
says "M Carpenter was
one of the first full-time
non-route drivers in our
county. He drove all over
the county with great en-
thtslasm. Mr. Carpenter
later transferred to a spe-
cial needs bus, where he
transported students with


- ,' II WJ '


a wide array of exception-
alities. ansporting spe-
cal needs students creates
challenges, butMr.Carpen-
ter has always embraced
these challenges and re-
sponsibilites with great
vigor. Mr. Carpenter is one
*of our oldest drivers but I
would rather have ten ML
Carpentesthan oneoyoung
driver with no compassion
and commitment."
Carpenter has driven a
school bus for six years.
He is married to Dorothy
Carpenter and they reside
in Marianna.


SUBMITTEDPHOTO
JCSB Tansportation School Related Employee of.the Year
Red Carpenter


I 'BEN SAUNDERS, D.M.D.
PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY
4711 Highway 90 East Marianna, FL
(Between Burger King & Big Lots) 526-SPIT


SUBMlITTrED PHOTO
Recently, members of the Sneads FFA Chapter put together
bean kits for the Early Childhood Headstart program. The,
preschoolers were starting a Iteracy initiative unit on Jack and
the Bean Stalk, and asked the FA members to help out. Over
200 kits were made. The Sqe'ds FFA Chapter has been helping
the Early Childhood HeadIta program by doing projects for
a couple of years now, and they also help with the "Tiny Tots
Olympics" each year. Pictured (from left) are Georgia Pevy,
Gder Hardin, Lindsey Locke Tayilor Reed, Leah Williams, Cole
Hamilton and Orion Doutlit.'


_JACKSON COUNTY


FLORIDAN


LOCAL





JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE PHOTOS
In this Jan. 35 photobarlos Malsonet, 73, reacts as Dr. Eva Berrlos-Colon, a professor at Touro College of Pharmacy, injects him
with flu vaccine during a visit to the faculty practice center at Brooklyn Hospital In New York.


Flu 'bad one for the elderly; CDC says


The Associated Press
The number of older.
people, hospitalized with
the flu has risen sharply,
prompting federal officials
to take unusual steps to
make more flu medicnes
available and to urge wid-
er use of them as soon as
symptoms appear.
The U.S. is about halfway
through this ;flu season,
and "its shaping up to be
a worse-than-average sea-
son" and a bad one for the
elderly, said Dr. Thomas
Frieden,, director of the
Centers for'Disease Con-
trol and Preventiop.
It's not too late to get
a flu shot;, and "if you
have symptoms, please
stay home from work,'
keep: your children home
from school" and don't
spread the virus, he
said. .
,New 'figures from: the
CDC'show widespread flu
activity in all'states but
Tennessee and Hawaii.
Some parts of the country
are seeing an increase in
flu activity "While overall
activity is beginning to
go down,"' Frieden said.
Flu activity is high in. 30
states and New York City,
up from 24 the previous
week.
Nine more children or
teens' have died of the flu,'
bringing the nation's total
this flu season to 29. That's
close to the 34 pediatric
"deaths reported during
all of the 'last flu season,
although that one was un-
usually light. In a typical
season, about 100 children
die of the flu and-officials
said there is n0 .way to
know whether deaths this
season will be higher or
lowerthan usual.
The government doesn't
keep a running tally of
adult deaths from the flu,
but estimates that it kills
about 24,000 people most
years.
So far, half bf cOnfirmed
flu cases are in people 65
and older. Lab-confirmed
flu hospitalizations totaled
19 for every 100,000 in the
population, but 82 per
100,000 among those 65
and older, "which is really
quite a high rate," Frieden,
said.
"We expect to see both
the number and the rates
of both hospitalizations
and deaths rise further in
the next week or so as the
flu: epidemic progresses,'"
so prompt treatment is key
to preventing deaths, he
said.
About 90' percent of flu
deaths are in the elderly;
the very young and people
with other health prob-
lems such as diabetes are
also at higher risk.
If you're worried about
how sick .you are and
are in one of these risk
groups, see a doctor, Frie-
den urged. One third to
Sone half of people are not
getting prompt treatment
with antiviral medicines,
he said.
Two drugs Tamiflu
and Relenza can cut the
severity and risk of death
from the flu but must be
started within 48 hours of
first symptoms to do much
good. Tamiflu is available


In this Jan. 9 photo, Damien Dancy puts masks on hs chidn Damaya 3 (left), and Damien,
7, at Sentara Princess Anne Hospital in Vigni Beach Va, as hospitals n Hampton Roads are
urging patients andvisitors to wear a mask at their facilities to help stop the spread of the
flu.
in a liquid form for use produced, "twice the sup- for strains that are going
in children under 1, and ply that was available only around.
pharmacists can reform- several years ago," Ham-
late capsules into a liquid burg said.
if supplies are short in an About 129 million doses
area, said Dr. Margaret have been distributed al-
Hamburg, head of the Food ready, and a million doses
and Drug Administration. are given each day, Frie-
To help avoid a shortage, den said. The vaccine is
the FDAis letting Tmi's not perfect but "it's by
maker, Genentech, distrib- far the best tool we have
ute 2 million additional to prevent influenza," he
doses of capsules that have said.-
an older version of pack- Carlos Maisonet, 73, got a IIm ATE
age insert. a flu shot this week at New
"It is fully approved,'it is York's Brooklyn Hospital
not outdated," just lacks Center at the urging of his M
information for pharma- wife, who was vaccinated
cists onhowto mix it into a inAugust.
liquid if needed for young "This is his first time get-
children, she said. ting the flu shot," said his
This year's flu season wife,ZulmaRamons.
started about a month ear- Last week, the CDC said
lier than normal and the the flu again surpassed I
dominant flu strain is one an "epidemic" thresh-'
that tends to make people old, based on monitoring'
sicker. Vaccinitions are of deaths from flu and a -
recommended for anyone frequent complication, ;
6 months.or older. There's pneumonia. The flu epi-
stilJplenty of vaccine an demic happens every year
:update' shows that 145 and officials say this year's
million doses. have been vaccine is a good match
' 1


FREE
Skin Cancer Screening
Saturday, January 26th
9 am -12 noon

To make an'appointment, call
1-877-231 DERM (3376).
Free screenings are for new patients


Autopsy conducted

on body of Illinois

lottery winner


The Associated Press
CHICAGO-Authorities
on Friday exhumed the
Body of a Chicago man
who was poisoned with
cyanideafter winning the
lottery and conducted an
autopsy in the hope it will
help solve the mystery of
hiisdeath.
The body of Urooj Khan
was exhumed from a
cemetery Friday morning
and placed inside a black
hearse, which was escort-
ed by four police cars to
the Cook Cbunty Medical
Examiner's Office.
Pathologists collected
samples of hair, nails and
most major body organs,
as well as contents of the
stomach, Medical Exam-
iner Stephen Cina said.
Tests might determine
whether Khan swallowed,
inhaled or was injected
with poison, Cina said.
Khan, 46, died in July as
he was about to collect a
$425,000 lottery winning.


His death initially was
ruled of natural causes.
But a relative whose iden-
tity remains a mystery
asked for further tests re-
vealing in November that
he had been poisoned.'
, Khan was given a reli-
gious burial and his body
was not embalmed. The
body was wrapped in a
shroud and placed inside
a wooden box with a Sty-
rofoam lid that was itself
inside a concrete vault.
Cina said the body had
not come into contact
with soil from the grave.
"The body was in a state
' of advanced decomposi-
tion, but we were able to
identify the major organs
and take samples of each
of these for toxicological
analysis," Cina said.
Given the length of time
Khan's body was in the
Ground, Cina said it was
not certain investigators
would be able to deter-
mine exactly how he in-
gested the poison.


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Algerian army takes hard line in militant battle


The Associated Press
ALGIERS, Algeria The
militants had filled five
jeeps with hostages and
Begun to move when Al-
gerian government attack
helicopters opened up
on them, leaving four in
, smoking ruins. The fifth
vehicle crashed, allowing
an Irish hostage inside
to clamber out to safety
with an explosive belt still
Strapped around his neck.
Three days into the crisis
at a natural gas plant deep
in the Sahara, it remained
unclear ,how many had
perished in the faceoff
between Africa's most un-
compromising militant
group- and the region's
most ruthless military.
SBy Friday, around 100
of the 135 foreign workers
on the site had been freed
and 18 of an estimated
30 kidnappers had been
slain, according to the Al-
gerian government, still
leaving a major hostage
situation centered on the
plant's main refinery.
The government said 12
workers, both foreign and
Algerian, were confirmed
dead. 'But the extremists
have put the number at 35.
And thegovernment attack
Thursday on the convoy
- as pieced together from
official, witness and news
media accounts sug-
gested the death toll could
go higher.
In Washington, U.S. of-
ficials siid one American
- a Texan was known


Unidentified rescued hostages receive treatment in a hospital Ain Amenas, Algeria, in this Image taken from television on Friday.


to have died.
Meanwhile, the al-Qai-
da-linked Masked Brigade
behind the operation of-
fered to trade two Ameri-
can hostages for two ter-
rorists behind bars in the
U.S., including the mas-
termind of the 1993 World
Trade Center bombing.
The U.S. rejected the deal
out of hand.
"The United States does
not negotiate with terror-
ists," declared State De-
partment spokeswoman
Victoria Nuland.
' The Algerian govern-
ment released few details
about the continuing siege
at the Ain Amenas plant,
which is jointly run by BP,
Norway's Statoil and Alge-
ria's state-owned oil com-
pany. By Friday, however,
the outlines of the take-
over by Islamic militants
were coming into focus.


The attack had been in
Sthe works for two months,
a member of the Masked
Brigade told an online
Mauritanian news outlet
that often carries al-Qaida-
related announcements.
The band of attackers in-
cluded militants from Al-
geria, ,Mali, Egypt, Niger,
Mauritania and Canada,
he said.
He said militants tar-
geted Algeria because they
expected the country to
,support the international
effort to root out extrem-
ists in neighboring Mall.
SInstead of passing
through Algeria's rela-
tively well-patrolled des-
erts, the attackers came
in from southern Libya,
where there is little central
government and smug-
glers have long reigned
supreme, according to
Algeria's Interior Minister


Givenchy makes 2013


menswear combatorial


The Associated Press
PARIS -- Gladiatorial
combat is in the air for
Givenchy's ever-creative
Riccardo Tisci.
For the fall-winter 2013
menswear show, the Ital-
ian designer delved into
.his rich ancestry bringing
back hundreds upon hun-
dreds of candles which
carved out an ominous
catwalk arena.
Like Roman torches, they
lit the way for the models
who filed by in 48 mainly
black-and-white looks..
The references were
subtle but unmistakable,
.square breastplate-like
photographs by Robert


Mapplethorpe printed' on
T-shirts, sweaters.and tank
tops.
Winter bubble jackets,
tied round the waist, fell in
the shape of 'a legionary's
skirt sometimes on
top of shorts almost to
the groin that exposed
the muscular models'
legs.
Then, leather shoes
shined provocatively with
a silver armor-band; while
combat gear was also
evoked in crudely stitched
padded biker jackets and
sweaters.
For several minutes, An-
cient Rome did indeed
come to Paris albeit
with a contemporary, even


futuristic edge.
There was, however,
a real sense of continu-
ity with previous season's
styles despite the new
theme.
Tisci's signature gothic
and bladk-heavy palette
was used, for instance.
A long gray coat that
lacked lapels, also evoked
the ecclesiastical style of
last season's show, that
Tisci said explored his
catholic roots.
As ever, the look was
unbusy, clean and often
minimalist, with a tight
silhouette.
For fall-winter.therefore,
it was not revolution, but
evolution, Roman-style.


Branford Marsalis makes


headlines i jazz festival


SThe Associated Press:
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti
Saxophone legend Bran-
ford Marsalis is headlining
a jazz festival in Haiti..
Marsalis arrived in the
impoverished Caribbean
nation Friday to perform
several sh6ws at the Port-
au-Prince International
Jazz Festival.
The first show for. the
Branford Marsalis Quar-
tet will be Friday night in
the coastal town of. Jac-
mel. The second show will
be Saturday in Port-au-
Prince at a concert venue
that was once a sugarcane
plantation..
Marsalis will also per-
form a private show,
Tuesday at the residence of
U.S. Ambassador Pamela
White.
"It's really cool to .be
here,' Marsalis, 52, said by
telephone from an ocean-
front hotel in Jacmel. "The
people are beautiful to
me.",
The annual festival, now
in its seventh year, runs
from Friday through Jan.
26. More than two dozen
jazz musicians are coming
from Mexico, Brazil, Spain,
Cameroon and elsewhere.
Marsalis' trip was orga-
_nized by the U.S. Embassy.


He was supposed to per-
form in Haiti two years
ago but several days of
rioting over, a contested
election scuttled those
plans. The festival, how-
ever, went on a rponth
later.
The festival seeks to pro-
mote jazz in Haiti, increase
understanding between
the Haitian and American
cultures, and encourage
tourism.


Haitian, President Mi-
chel Martelly is seeking to
attract tourists and out-
side investors to boost
the economy, but such ef-
forts could prove a hard
sell.
The United States last
month sharpened its travel
warning to Haiti, citing
kidnapping, crime, chol-
era and a tattered infra-
structure. Canada followed
with a similar advisory.

^ff^CTT B


Daho Ould Kabila.
He said the attackers
consisted of about 30
men armed with rocket
launchers and machine
guns and under the direct
supervision of the Masked
Brigade's founder himself,
Moktar Belmoktar, a hard-
ened, one-eyed Algerian
militant who has battled
the Algerian government
for years and has built a
Saharan smuggling ahd
kidnapping empire linked
to al-Qaida.
Early Wednesday morn-
ing, they crept across the
border, 60 miles from the.
natural gas plant, and fell

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on a pair of buses taking
foreign workers to the air-
port. The buses'. military
escort drove off the at-
tackers in a blaze of gun-
fire that sent bullets zing-
ing over the heads of the
crouching workers. A Brit-
on and an Algerian, prob-
ably a security guard, were
killed.
Frustrated, the militants
turned to the vast gas
complex, divided between
the workers' .living quar?
ters and the refinery itself,
and seized hostages, the
Algerian government said.
Several of the former
hostages, who arrived


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS


haggard-looking on a
late-night flight into Al-
giers on Friday, said that
the gunfire began around
5 a.m. and that the mili-
.tants who stormed the
living quarters almost im-
mediately separated out-
the foreigners. (None of
'those interviewed would
allow their last names to
be used, fearing trouble
for themselves or their
families.)
Mohamed, a 37-year-
old nurse, said at least five
people were shot to death,
their bodies still in front of
the infirmary when he left
Thursday night.


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18A SUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 2013






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


MARKSKINNER/FLORIDAN
Jackson County Cooperative Extension Agent Rob Trawick (right) became the Plant Doctor
during the Jackson County Master Gardeners' fifth annual Garden Fair and Plant Sale. He is
seen identifying a mystery plant for Pete Wolfe. The plant in question was a fairy magnolia,
also known as a-variety of the banana shrub.


Master Gardener training


session available soon


SFrom staff report
It takes a special kind
of person to be a
SMaster Gardener Vol-
unteer. If you love people,
if you love and-want to
know more about plants
ahd if you enjoy help-
ing others, it might be.
for you. Now is the time
to sign up for this year's'
Master Gardener training
session.
The course will be held
at the Jackson County
Extension Service build-
ing in Marianna. It's at
2741 Pennsylvania Ave.
But students will travel to
many other locations as
well. Field trips will also
take participants to a cit-
rus grove, an olive grove,
a bee and honey farm,
the Oglesby plant lab in
Calhoun County, Florida
Caverns State Park and
to the test gardens at the
University of Florida's Re-
search and Education site
in Quincy:At the Quincy
facility, studentswill also
get a look at the Pistance
,Diagnostic and Identifi-
cation System there.
Classes start Feb. 18,
and continue each week-
day.for two weeks. You
must apply to sign up and
return the completed ap-
plication by Friday, Feb.
8, no later than 4:30 p.m.
that day. The 60-hour
course costs $120;, ith..'
the tuition due by b.'i5.,
The money helps defray
the cost of putting on
the course. It helps pay


for the printed course
materials, morning coffee
and snacks, two days of
lunches, and propaga-
tion materials; trainees
will inoculate their own
shiitake mushroom log
and graft their own tree to
take home.
To find out more or to
get an application, call
482-9620, email jackson
mg@ifas.ufl.edu, or stop
by the extension service.
Students will need to ar-
rive between 8 a.m. and
8:30 a.m. onthe first day
to take care of registra-
tion; and by 8:30 a.m. on
each subsequent day.
They'll finish up around
3:30 p.m. each day.
Master Gardeners from
Jackson; Gadsden and
Washington counties
are participating in the
course presentation.
The course provides
basic information to help
students obtain a good
"basic understanding of
plants, how they work,
and what makes them
go awry," according to
a press release about
the upcoming course.
The course will cover '
basic plant botany, soils
and what they mean
to a plant, information
on pH and why it is so
important, as well as
information on fertilizers,
good and bad bugs, plant
diseases, gooddandbad
chemicals, invasive and
native plants, ornamen-
tals, lawns, vegetables,
herbs, fruits and nuts,


composting, plant
identification, pruning,
propagation and planting
techniques.
Graduates of the course
may be asked to share
their new knowledge
with others in a variety of
ways. Manning phones
to answer questions from
homeowners might be
one duty. You might help
tend to demonstration
gardens on the grounds
around the extension
service building. If you're
comfortable with pub-
lic speaking, you might
be asked to take a turn
answering questions at'
local events, or you might
help hand out university
publications at those
sessions.
In the press release, a
volunteer helping pro-
mote it talked about why
it's something to seriously
consider and sign up for
by the Feb. 8 deadline.
"Being a Master Gardener
Volunteer is a wonderful,
fulfilling experience," the
individual wrote. "Not
only do you get to pass
along your knowledge
and experience to those
in need of it, but being a
Master Gardener Volun-
teer means continuing
education for yourself.
through field trips,
seminars, conventions, ""
Advanced Master Gar-
dener Training, access to
university publications .
and libraries, and just ;
hanging out with like- :"
minded individuals."


Construction staon


on SR69 inJackson County

From staff report of resurfacing the exist- expected to be completed
ing travel lanes, minor this summer.
Constriction begins drainage work, pavement All .construction ac-
Monday Jan. 21, on State marldngs, i niinqr *side- tivities .are weather de-
Roadf 69 between US .90 walk replacement.' t SR: pebdent and may be de-
in Grand Ridge;and SR 71 71 and traffic signal loop played or rescheduled in
(Bryan Street) in Green- replacement. the. event of inclement
wood, according to the FDOT advises that al- weather. Motorists are re-
Flotida Department of ternating 'lane.; closures minded to pay attention
Transportation. ;:'! will occur and flaggers and use caution when
The $4.5 million redir- will direct drivers through driving through, the work
facing project consists the work zone, Work is zone.

i'' opportunities they might this will really go over well
R l 'not have known anything and we're asking everyone
about. Michael Kilts (of to come check it out."
From .PagelA the Jackson County school' He said most presenters
something 'relevant for ; system) yiil be there with will also have goodie bags
every age 'bracket iii the information about how' filled with information on.
county. We think these 'health affects student their topics and possibly'
kirids f presentations will achievement, and there some small giveaways like,
give people a way'to find 'are 'several other things pens, erasers, notepads or
direction on some things, going on. We're hoping other objects.

l0 1- of the wide scope of embrace the opportunity
lu ian services it provides for to engage with clients
S ,the people who live from the non-secure
From Page 1A there, it also has valuable portion of Sunland as
determined incompetent partnerships with busi- they shop, learn and dine
to proceed with trial. nesses, other agencies during frequent outings
While Sunland is largely and individuals in into the larger outside
self-contained because the community who community.


There were no obituaries o death notices submitted
to the Floridan as of the d'e lih at 4p.m. yesterday.





FiAPTIST...LLEGE


DEER RESCUED


FROM SINKHOLE


RKSKINNER/FLORIDAN
A young deer nervously circles the bottom of a sinkhole, Fri-
JL day in Greenwood. Dick Dunlap, while working on a nearby
S sinkhole at his pond, decided to look at another sinkhole on
his property and found the trapped animal inside.-Dunlap asked the
town of Greenwood for assistance with a rescue attempt and help
arrived in the form of Public Works Director James Wilson and a
backhoe. Wilson quickly dug a trench into the hole; the deer promptly
climbed out and headed for the woods.


Arrests
From PagelA
warrant fo- violation of
state probation.
Over on Hope' School
gIoad, near Marianna; a
second traffic stop net-
ted four more arrests
that day, for various:
charges.
Officials say the stop was
the result of an expired li-
ceno e plate on a 2007 GMC
SYukon. *The driver, Cecelia
M. Corbin of Alford, was
using h suspended driver's
licehe .


After an open-air sniff,
a Jackson County Sheriff's
Offce'.canine alerted of-,
ficers to the odor of nar-
cotics emitting froni:tfe.
vehicle and a search was
.conducted and chemicals
utilized to,: manufacture
methamphetamine were
found, as were hypoder-
mic needles.
. 'To of the passengers,'
Randy Dwayne Morris and
.RobertDewane Clements,
both of AlforFwere in pos-
session of listed'chemicals
to manufacture metham-
phetamine, the. release
said.


According to the re-
lease, a third passenger,
Jessica Marie Lt of.Chi-
pley; was in posession of
hypodermic ntdles.used
to intravenously: inject
methamphetamine .
Corbin was arrested "for
driving while license sus-
pended; Morris and'.Cle-
ments for possessioO of
listed chemicals for' the
purpose of manufacturing
methamphetamine; and
SLent for possession of dfug
paraphernalia. -
All five were takeiim'to
the Jackson County Jail to
await first appearance.


VANHUSS IS OPTIMIST SPEAKER
'S. "


S' 'SUBMITTEDPHOTO
T he Marianna Optimist Club recently welcomed Mike VanHuss
(left) as guest speaker. VanHuss spoke to club about many of
the rules involved in officiating both high school and collegiate
football games. VanHusS has been a referee for some 20 years hav-
ing officiated high school games as well as college and arena football
games in the ACC and SEC. At present, he is a game cloclkoperator
for Florida State Seminoles; He is pictured with club president Lowell
Centers.


LOCAL & FROM THE FRONT


SUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 2013 9Af"









JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Gov. Scott wants


$20Mback from


Digital Domain


The Associated Press

WEST PALM BEACH
- Florida officials want
to recoup the $20 mil-
lion in taxpayer funds
they invested in Digital
Domain now that the vi-
sual effects studio is facing
bankruptcy.
The Tampa Bay Times re-
ported Saturday that Gov.
Rick Scott directed the
state's Department of Eco-
nomic Opportunity to hire
lawyers to represent the
state in bankruptcy court.
He said the company broke
its contract by not notify-
ing the state it was filing for
bankruptcy.
The $20 million awarded
in 2009 was part an incen-
tive to bring the company
to Port St. Lucie with the
promise of hundreds of
high-paying jobs. Digi-
tal- Domain Media Group
also partnered with Flor-
ida State University's film
school to build a branch
campus in West Palm
Beach.
But the company shut
down all of its Florida
operations, closed its
new animation studio in
Port St. Lucie and laid off
about 280 employees last
fall.
The production com-
pany, which was founded
by James Cameron, has
produced visual effects
for movies including "Ti-
tanic," "Pirates of the Ca-
ribbean: At World's End"
and the "Transformers"
series.
State and local officials
had hoped the company
would draw filmmakers
from all over the world,
giving the Sunshine State
the ability to compete
with California and New
York with the backing of
an established Hollywood
entity.
The state moved forward


with the funding incen-
tive even though its lead
public-private business
screening
company,
Enterprise
Florida, re-
jected it.
Digital Do-
main pulled
Scott in a total of
$40 million
in cash and land from state
and local economic devel-
opment funds. The com-
pany also has a $40 million
bond issue with the city
of Port St. Lucie, but that
money must be paid back
eventually.
It's just the latest twist for
the embattled company.
Florida State Univer-
sity President Eric Barron
made a pitch this week
to keep his school's digi-
tal film program in West
Palm Beach, even though
the partner company has
filed for Chapter 11 bank-
ruptcy protection. Digital
Domain also helped Flor-
ida State establish a new
bachelor's degree program
,related to digital media
production.
Barron said talks are
under way with four
other companies inter-
ested in replacing Digital
Domain.
The board that oversees
Florida's 12 public univer-
sities is considering wheth-
er Florida State should be
required to move the pro-
gram to its main campus
in Tallahassee. Besides los-
ing its business partner,
the program has drawn
opposition from Florida
Atlantic University in
Boca Raton, which is only
30 miles from West Palm
Beach.
A three-member com-
mittee will study the
issue and make a rec-
ommendation to the
panel.


GRecording Case


Gov's staff ordered to testify


The Associated Press

TALLAI-IASSEE Sever-
al current and former em-
ployees in the administra-
tion of Gov. Rick Scott are
being ordered by a judge
to testify in a sensational
criminal case that centers
on allegations of illegal
taping.
It is still unclear after
Friday's hearing whether
Lt. Gov. lennifer Carroll
will be forced to answer
questions in the criminal
case against her former
aide that has also included
allegations of improper
relationships in Carroll's
office.
Carletha Cole, who was
fired last year, was arrested
in 2011 and accused of giv-
ing a reporter a secret re-
cording containing a con-
versation between Cole
and Carroll's chief of staff.
Cole has not been charged
with making the recording
- nor have prosecutors.
said exactly when the re-
cording was made.
Circuit Judge Frank Shef-
field initially ruled that
Carroll must answer ques-
tions from lawyers repre-
senting Cole. But then he
changed his mind at the
urging of Scott's top law-
yer. Sheffield said Carroll
would be questioned last


"We are not going
to try the lieutenant
governors office."
Frank Sheffield,
circuit judge

and only if Cole's lawyers
could show her testimony
was needed.
Sheffield, however, made
it clear that questions of
Scott administration em-
ployees will be limited to
illegal taping and whether
or not top officials work-
ing for the governor had
ordered widespread tap-
ing as alleged by Cole.
The judge said lawyers
could not ask Carroll or
anyone else about the
lieutenant governor's sex-
ual preference or whether
or not her office was the
"absolute worst place in
the world to work."
"We are not going to try
the lieutenant governor's
office," Sheffield said.
Cole's attorneys have as-
serted that their client was
being set up because she
witnessed unprofessional
behavior by Carroll and
other employees, includ-
ing walking in on Carroll
and a female aide in a
"compromising position."
Carroll, who is a former
Navy officer and married,


has called the allegations
"false and absurd."
Attorney Stephen Web-
ster suggested other
employees in Carroll's of-
fice placed recordings on
Cole's computer and she
assumed they were pub-
lic records. A spokesman
for the governor's office
has previously denied that
there was a widespread
policy of taping people.
It is against Florida law to
record someone without
consent, but there have
been legal questions about
recordings made in public
buildings. Cole is charged
with a third-degree felony
and could face up to five
years in prison.
The current and former
employees who were or-
dered to answer questions
include Carroll's travel aide
Beatriz Ramos, former
chief of staff Steve MacNa-
mara, and former chief of
staff Mike Prendergast.
The Scott administration
last year had tried to get the
judge to shield both Ramos
and Carroll from answering
any questions but Sheffield
denied the request.
Pete Antonacci, a for-
mer prosecutor and now
general counsel for Scott,
repeated the request on
Friday and said that as an
elected official that Car-


roll was "special" and she
should not be subjected to
questioning.
"It's very clear from what
the prosecutors said that
she had no role," Antonac-
ci told the judge.
Sheffield shot back that
she "is not special" and
that she and anyone else
should be subject to ques-
tioning since the crimi-
nal case could result in
Cole going to prison. But
the judge then agreed to
Antonacci's request that
Carroll's deposition be
delayed.
\ Sheffield 6n Friday also
turned down requests for
a long list of records and
documents sought by
Cole's attorneys, including
surveillance tapes, emails,
calendars and phone logs
of various administration
employees. He did agree to
allow some travel records
and calendars of Carroll's
chief of staff to be turned
over.
The tape recording at
the center, of the crimi-
nal case was placed on
the website of The Florida
Times-Union. On it lohn
Konkus, the chief of staff
for Carroll, can be heard
saying that MacNamara,
is afraid of Carroll. Konkus
also complained that Scott
"is not leading."


State unemployment drops to 8 percent in December


TheAssociated Press in jobs, with 29,900 new positions
over the past 12 months, a gain of
TALLAHASSEE State labor of- 3.1 percent. The growth has led
ficials said Fiday that Florida's sea- to ancillary improvements in the
sonally adjusted unemployment trade, transportation and utili-
rate dipped to 8 percent in Decem- ties arenas, according to Friday's
ber, ticking down from 8.1 percent monthly report from the Depart-
the previous month. ment of Economic Opportunity.
The state's unemployment rate Gov. Rick Scott, who has staked
now stands at its lowest level since his re-election chances on creating
November 2008, when it was 7.8 jobs, said the figures show the state
percent, though 749,000 workers -is headed in the right direction.
remain jobless ..- ..,. "Trends show, that-we,aw- .also
The latest 8 percent figure also is experiencing growth in riimay dif-
an improvement from a year earlier ferent economic indicators that
- the December 2011 rate was 9.9 are key to job creation," Scott said
percent.. .;.:. .... ,.. a statementfrom his office Fri-
The leisure and hospitality indus- day. "Housing startstre on te'rise,
try has enjoyed the biggest increase businesses and families continue to


move to Florida, and more jobs are
being created."
Scott, who campaigned in 2010 on
a promise to create some 700,000
jobs over a seven-year period, noted
that unemployment has dropped
3.1 percentage points since he took
office two years ago. But Florida's
unemployment rate still lags behind
thenational average of 7.8 percent in
December.
And while the unemployment
.Fate .declined in December, the
state also lost 15,300 nonagri-
cultural jobs, said Rebecca Rust,
chief economist for the labor
agency. Overall,' Florida gained
34;'00; nonagricultural jobs during
2012.


*dometee p th did Courthouse,
Which was.biilt in 1904 in the


Blountstown who was honored at
the University of Florida, with the


a' --I ~II~-- -~ICI -I I -I II


-110A SUNDAY. JANUARY 20, 2013


STATE


'11W W ll 111 1111111111a I liml!1

*Mosier lellifil Tchican

One Stop Tire Center1










f,
JM **J


High School Basketball



Tigers fend off Gators


BY DUSTIN KENT
Oderit,'lctloridan com

The Graceville Tigers picked up
a big district road victory Friday
night inWewahitchka, beating the
Gators64-60 to stay in the hunt for
the top seed in the District 3-1A
tournament. *
Rasheed Campbell scored 21
points to lead the'Tigers, while
Marquis White added 16, and
Taylor Rousseau 14.
Thewin was the seventh in a row
in district for Graceville, which


improved to 8-2 in league play to
tie Sneads at the top of the Dis-
trict 3 standings.
The two teams will meet Tues-
day in Graceville to decide who
will get the top seed and opening
round bye in the upcoming dis-
trict tournament.
Friday's win came just one
night after a 71-46 home loss to
the Malone Tigers, and Gracev-'
ille coach Man Anderson said
he was very concerned about
playing a big district game
just one night after an intense


county matchup.
"I was very concerned about
this game. I just knew it was
going to be tough," the coach
said. "Under the circumstances,
with it being the third game in
four days and coming off of a
loss in a big game, to win this
one was pretty huge. The kids
stepped back up, got over last
night's loss and played very
well."
With the loss, Wewahitchka
See TIGERS. Page 2B


PsaRR P :PIrlERf Lu ICAr,
Graceville's Rasheed Campbell goes
for two against Marlanna last week.


Bulldogs beat Braves


Improve to

12-7 overall
BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcflondan com

The Marianna Bulldogs
kept alive their hopes of
getting a district tourna-
ment first round bye and
automatic playoff Friday
night with a 55-47 road
victory over the Walton
Braves.
With the win, the Bull-
dogs improved to 12-7
overall and 2-2 in District
1-4A competition, while
Walton fell to 1-2'in league
play, with a matchup with
Pensacola Catholic comihg
Friday that will carry great
consequence for all three
District 1 clubs.
If the Crusaders win,
then they finish with the
top seed and get an auto-
matic'bye into the district
title game and the playoff
spot that comes with it,
but if the Braves win, then
all three teams finish 2-2,
which would result in a
blind draw to determine
which team gets the bye.
Marianna still needs help
to get that top seed, but it
had to take care of busi-
ness on the road Friday to
get in that position.
"We played with a sense
MARIh SI INNER FLORIDAN
See BULLDOGS, Page 2B Herman Williams tries to get off a pass against Rutherford Monday.




Brown leads Yellowjackets by Hornets

Vernon improves to 5-6 in District 3-LA competition


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan corn

COTTONDALE The Vernon Yel-
lowjackets got perhaps their most
impressive road victory of the season
Friday night, beating the Cottondale
Hornets 71-58.
Austin Brown put in 29 points to
lead the Yellowjackets, with Alex
Brown adding 14, and Alex Andrews
and Ty Murray each scoring eight.
D) Roulhac had 18 points to lead
Cottondale, with Jerodd Blount add-
ing 16.
With the win, Vernon improved
to 5-6 in District 3-1A competition,
while the Hornets fell to 6-5 in league
play and 10-10 overall.
It was the fourth straight loss for
the Hornets and their third straight
defeat in district play.
The game was back and forth in
the early going, with a pair of three-
pointers by Tristan Braxton putting
Cottondale up 13-12 early in the sec-
ond quarter.
But Austin Brown answered with a
two and a three, followed by a bucket
from Ty Brunson to put Vernon up
19-13, and the Yellowjackets never
trailed again.


Vernon did much of its damage on
the offensive glass where it used its
size to punish Cottondale with sec-
ond-chance points.
A pair of offensive rebounds and
put-backs by Brunson and Mur-
ray along with a layup by Andrew
helped Vernon take a 35-24 halftime
lead.
The Hornets cut the margin to 39-
35 midway through the third quarter
thanks to six straight points by Shel-
,don Vann and a bucket by Dakota
Haddock, but Vernon responded
with an 8-0 to push the lead back to
double digits.
Alex Brown hit back to back
jumpers, followed by a put-back
by Austin Brown, who followed
up with another jumper and then
a three-pointer to make it 50-36
Vellowjackets.
The lead was 16 points at the end
of three quarters and the Hornets
could never get closer than 13 in the
final period.
Cottondale will finish up its dis-
trict schedule Tuesday night in Altha
before wrapping up the week Friday
at home against Malone.
See'JACKETS, Page 2B


MAIP INrN~lERFLOPIDAt I
Cottondale's D.J. Roulhac goes for two against Vernon Friday night.


_ __ i__ i_ ___ __ _I__


~PJ~k~""li".-.'. 2L~~2f lfL"rJU~*fI


--I. --..--- --- -~- ---


Sports Briefs
High School Boys
Basketball
D Monday Gracev-,
ille vs. Cairo (Ga.) at
Rickards High School,
12 p.m.
n Tuesday -Marianna
at Malone, 5:30 p.m.,
and 7 p.m.; Sneads at
Graceville, 5:30 p.m.,
and 7 p.m.; Cottondale
atAltha, 6p.m., and
7:30 p.m.
D Thursday-- Sneads
at Marianna, 5:30 p.m.,
and 7 p.m."
SFrday Malone at
Cottondale, 5:30 pan.,
and 7 p.m.; Graceville at
Vernon, 6 p.m., and 7:30
p.m.; Sneads at Altha,
6 p.m., and 7:30 p.m.;
Marianna at Holmes '
County, 5:30 p.m., aihd'.
7p.m.


Baskitbal
Sa MondScay-Malobe a
tbra.cev.le, 5 p.m.;,; '.5!
*TU. -da4iCM1^4
at Cottondale, 5:8'30L fi.
Sneads af. Xunetii




S le,5.ni .
Ip.m.; f4l:' a*'
at Chple 6:0p.t,
Bay Haven at
dale,1:30 p




ball m i r

H'tqaiW -n









Sneads
.' wllb... ,

















girls get
huge win



over PDL
BY DUSTINKENT
dlrentti cflondan.com
The Sneads Lady Pirates
got their biggest win of
the season Friday night at
.home, stunning the de-
fending state champion
Ponce de Leon 62-54 to
snap PDL's 21-game win-
.ning streak against District
3-1A teams.
The win was the sixth
in a row for Sneads (15-3
overall, 8-2 in district), in-
cluding the eighth straight
In district play, and it
locked up the second seed
in the upcoming district
tournament.
Ponce de Leon, which
was without star wing
player Ashley Harper due
to injury, dropped to 19-4
overall and 9-1 in league
,play.
See SNEADS. Page 2B


III I I I -Y---LII II I _


- I, ----- --- ----~,~






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Sneads
From Page 1B
"(Harper being out)
helped us, but even
without her, they're bet-
ter than most people,"
Sneads coach Andy Ward
said after the game. "It's a
huge win for us. It doesn't
matter if it's with the
Harper girl or without; it's
still Ponce de Leon and
they still won state last
year.
"Last year we were the
fourth or fifth seed in dis-
trict and finished around
.500, so to come in this
year and show you can
play with PDL and get a
win, that's big."
Sneads led 13-11 after
the first period and 25-20
at halftime, but starting
guard Aaliyah Williams
picked up her fourth foul
earlyjin the third quarter
and PDL took advantage'
with a big run to take a
one-point lead.
However, SHS stopped
the rnn there, regained
the lead by the endiof the
period; and then surged
ahead in the fourth and
never relinquished the
lead.
"I thought we were in
trouble when they took the"
lead," Ward admitted, "But
the girls fought back. It
would've been easy to lay
down when they took the
lead and say, 'oh well, we
played with them for three
quarters,' but we fought
back and got the lead back.:
Iwas proud of them. It wss
a really big win. They were
all happy and excited after
the game. Ponce de Leon
is without a doubt the best
team in the district, so to
be able to beat them is big
forus."'
Tasherica McMillon
scored 20 points to lead
Sneads, with Logan Neel
adding 15, and Krissi Sat-
terfield and Williams each
scoring nine.
Chasity McGriff also had
seven points for SHS.
HannahHowellledPonce
de Leon with 33 points.


Lady Bulldogs fall to Walton


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcflolrdan.com

The Walton Lady Braves got
28 points from Deja Tucker
and 22 points from Krista Mc-
Queen to take a 73-44 district
victory over the Marianna Lady
Bulldogs on Thursday night in
Marianna.
The win, improved the Lady
Braves to 12-7 overall and 4-0 in
District 1-4A competition, while
Marianna fell to 5-11 and 1-3 in
league play.
Shaniah Spellman led the Lady
Bulldogs with 15 points; while
.Danielle Holden added 10, and
Bri Johnson nine.


"McQueenjust dominated in the post. We didn't have an answer
for (her or Tucker). The last game we played against Walton,
those two realy didn't produce against us. But theyplayed
really wel. And they're both sophomores, so we're going to have
to worry about them for two more years."
SChucky Brown,
Marianna coach


Walton controlled the game
from the opening tip, jumping out
to a 20-9 lead in the first quarter
and taking a 16-point edge into
the halftime break.
By the end of the third, the lead
had swelled to 56-32.
Marianna coach Chucky Brown
said the plari coming into the


game was to try to contain Lady
Braves senior star Taliah Moore,
who came in averaging over 17
points per game..
She was limited to just 14 points
Thursday night, but unfortunate-
ly for MHS, Tucker and McQueen
Both sophomores more than
picked up the slack.


"McQueen just dominated in
the post. We didn't have an an-
swer for (her or Tucker)," Brown
said. "The last game we played
against Walton, those two really
didn't produce against us. But
they played reallywell. And they're
both sophomores, so we're going
to have to worry about them for
two more years."
The Lady Braves also enjoyed an
advantage at the free throw line,
making 14-of-16 attempts, while
Marianna struggled in convert-
ing just 9-of-28 from the charity
stripe.
Marianna will next travel to
Malone on Tuesday to take on the
Lady Tigers at 4 p.m.


Sneads trounces Ponce de Leon


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcflQrldan.com

The Sneads Pirates notched
their fourth consecutive win Fri-
day night at home, cruising to an
easy 71-43 victory over the Ponce
de Leon Pirates.
Darius Williams scored 19
points to lead Sneads, with Devin
Hayes and Jeremy Wert adding
13 each, Alfonso Brown 11, and
Dustin Pittman 10.
The lead was just two for
Sneads after one quarter, but SHS
blew the game open with a domi-
nant second period, making five
three-points in the period and
outscoring the visitors 27-5 to
take a 42-18 halftime lead.
The, margin was 30 through
three quarters, with PDL never
threatening again after the first
quarter.
"I thought we played well. The


Tigers.
FromPagelB
fellto 14-5overalland8-4in
the district.
Raheem Wright scored
21 points for the Gators,


"I thought we played wel The
kids vegot are very unsefish
and they distributed the bal
and hit the open man."
Kvlvn Johnson,
Sneads coaph

kids I've got are very unselfish
and they distributed the ball ahd
hit the open man," Sneads coach
Kelvin Johnson said after the'
game. "We played pretty good.
We're really building and trying:
to get better."
The win improved Sneads to
10-9 overall and 8-2 in District 3-
1A competition.
It sets up a key district match-
up with the Graceville Tigers on
, Tuesday night in Graceville, with
the winner to get the top seed
and the bye in the upcoming dis-
trict tournament.


with Clay Sasser adding inWewa's favor at the half, tact and had a chance
13. and Graceville moved into to tie, the game with a
The Tigers jumped out the lead in the third quar- late three-pointer that
to an 8-0 start to the game, ter and never relinquished missed.
but the Gators stormed it. Graceville got the re-
baclk to take a 20-12 The lead got as high bound and Rousseau
lead. as -eight for the Tigers, made 1-of-2 free throws
The margin was just one but the Gators:kept con- 'to give, the Tigets the


Sneads'
Jeremy Wert
tries to make
a two-point
shot during
Friday's game
against Ponce
De Leon.


final margin.
The Tigers will compete
at Rickards High School
on Monday against Cairo
(Ga.) at 12 p.m. before
coming back home Tues-
day to host Sneads at 7
p.m.


'Jackets
FromPagelB
Vernon will also wrap up its dis-
trict schedule this week, hosting
Graceville on Friday.
Regardless of what happens in
those games, the Yellowjackets
and Hornets will face each other
in the No. 4 vs. No. 5 matchup
in the first round of the district
tournament.
Wewahitchka (8-4) has locked
up the third seed, with Graceville
(8-2) and Sneads (8-2) playing
each other Tuesday to determine
who will get the top seed and the
Sfist round bye.


Bulldogs
From Page lB
of urgency and a little fire in
our belly," Bulldogs coach Tra-
vis Blanton said of his team's
effort. "We rebounded the ball
defensively like we did earlier
in the season. It was like when
we came out of the gates, in
early November and Decem-
ber. We had that lull the last few
weeks, but I hope this is a new
spark and something to re-en-
ergize our batters and shoot us
forward. We haven't taken that
,.many steps forward the last few
Weekss"


The Bulldogs had lost two in a
row coming into Friday's game
and three of the past five, with
close losses coming to Pensaco-
la Catholic and Graceville and a
lopsided defeat at the hands of
Rutherford.
But Marianna controlled
Friday's game from the start,
jumping out to a 12-point half-
time lead and never allowing
the Braves to get closer than five
points the rest of the way.
Trey Clemons finished with 17
points to lead the Bulldogs, with
Herman Williams adding 12.
Walton's senior star guard De-
shun Tucker finished with 26
points to lead the Braves, but


Blanton said he felt his team de-
fended the slick 6-fobt-3 lefty as
well as possible.
""We did a pretty good job on
him defensively. He had to work
for everything he got," the coach
said. "Of course he still ended up,
with a pretty good night, but he's
a really good player."
The Bulldogs are now done
with district play until the tour-
nament commences Feb: 8 in.
Pensacola.
It won't be known for at least
another week who they end up
playing, but Blanton said his
primary concern is getting his
team to sustain the quality of
playjt had Friday.


"If we play like we played
(against Walton), I like my
chances against either one," he
said. "I still think it's anybody's
game because all three teams
are comparable. But if we play
like we did (Friday), then I feel
gpod. But ifwe revert to what we
were doing the last few weeks,
we'll struggle to beat either one
of them."
'Marianna was scheduled to
take on Mosley on Saturday
night before traveling to Malone
on Tuesday to take on the Tigers;
and then finishing the week
with games against Sneads on
Thursday and Holmes County
on Friday..


Sponsored by JACKSON'COUNTY

MCCOY'S J FLORIDAN


lig Buck Contest

INCLUDES ARCHERY, GENERAL GUN AND MUZZLE LOADING SEASONS!
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SCoitest Rules
* Entry must be a Florida WhitetAilDeer.' Deadline for entries is February 25,2013.
* The whole deer must be brought to McCoy's to qualify for the contet. All FBR score sheets must be submitted to McCoy's by March 10, 2013.
* The highest grossed scored deer will determine the winner. No entry fee required.
* Each entry is required to provide an official signed FBR score sheet;.
Winners will be announced on March 17, 2013 and be pufbished in the Jackson County Floridan on March 24, 2013.


Weekly entries will run in the Jackson County Floridan or go to www.jcfloridan.com to see all.entries
SEach photo will be placed on our braggin' board located at McCoy's.
Enter at McCoy's 2823 Jefferson St. Hours 5:00am 7:30pm
11111 liIm1111I


JOSH
WILLIAMS
8 POINT


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11 POINT ,


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- --- ----


""


128 SUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 2013


SPORTS


IC8lm:l


NEEKLYV =1; hI ;1






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Dear Annie: My problem is my relation-
ship with my daughter, "Carolyn." It
started 10 years ago when she went to
visit her grandparents in another state.
My parents and 1 haven't had a close
relationship since I was in my 20s. I am
now 57.
I raised Carolyn as a single parent
without a dime of child support from her
father. I worked 12-hour days six days
a week to provide for her. When Caro-
lyn was 6 years old, I was promoted. It
required extensive travel, and I needed
help from my parents. My daughter lived
with them for two years, during which
time they told her awful things, saying
I was a terrible mom and didn't care
about her. When I began seeing a man
(whom I eventually married), my parents
labeled him "a monster." He was actu-
ally wonderful. He loved Carolyn and
adopted her and was the only father she
ever knew.
When Carolyn went to visit my parents
in her 20s, however, they convinced her
that this man had mistreated her when
she was little and she simply didn't
remember. But, Annie, he never did any
such thing. They made it up.
Carolyn is now in her 30s and has been
estranged from me for more than 10
years due to my parents' brainwashing.
Since then, my life has changed dramati-
cally. I've been quite ill, in and out of the
hospital, and Carolyn has never inquired
about my health. How can I reconnect
with my daughter?
HELP ME IN TENNESSEE

Dear Tennessee: Your parents sound
mentally unbalanced. However, if
Carolyn truly believes that her stepfather


Bri

Carl Jung said, "Your vision will
become clear only when you can look
into your own heart. Who looks outside,
dreams; who looks inside, awakes."
At the bridge table, though, the
opposite applies. If you worry only
about your 13 cards, your partner will
be dreaming of getting a new "third
opponent."
This deal requires vision. How should
South play in six hearts after West leads
the diamond jack?
North's Jacoby two-no-trump response
showed four-plus hearts and game-forc-
ing values.
South starts with 11 top tricks: two
spades, six hearts, two diamonds and
one club. Probably his immediate reac-
tion is to hope that the club finesse is
working. Then he might think about
eliminating diamonds and spades
before trying to duck a club to West for
an endplay.
However, declarer can do better. He
should win the first trick with his dia-
mond king, draw two rounds of trumps,
play three rounds of spades (ruffing the
last in his hand), return to dummy with
a diamond, and call for the last spade.
Here, when East discards, South
throws a club. West takes the trick
but is endplayed. If he leads a club, it
is into declarer's ace-queen. Or if he
does something else, South ruffs in the
dummy and sluffs his club queen.
If, though, East follows to the fourth
spade, declarer ruffs, crosses to dummy
with a trump, and ducks a club, hop-
ing West will win the trick. But if East
takes it and leads another club, South is
forced to take the finesse.


abused her, you need to acknowledge
this true or not in older to deal with
it. Please don't argue with her recollec-
tions. She will think you are simply pro-
tecting your husband. Instead, suggest
to Carolyn that the two of you get family
counseling together because you love
her and want to find a way to keep her in
your life. We hope she is willing.
Dear Annie: I have a friend who does
not drive and depends on friends and
family members to get around. I take her
shopping, to the bank, to doctor ap-
pointments and other places. Occasion-
ally, she gives me gas money. 4
The problem is, when I shop, I like to
get in and get out. My friend, however,
takes her time. I find this very aggravat-
ing. If I am doing the driving on her
behalf, you'd think she would show more
consideration.
She also has no idea that driving has
a lot of costs associated with it besides
gasoline. I feel taken advantage of. Any
ideas?
FRUSTRATED

Dear Frustrated: Many people who
don't drive cannot appreciate the cost
involved in maintaining a car or the
aggravation accrued when you expect
someone else to cater to your schedule.
Some of this is easily fixed. When your
friend asks you to take her shopping,
inform her that you have exactly one
hour (or whatever you can manage), and
when the time is up, you will have to ,
leave. And stick to it. You also don't have
to say "yes" every time. Space out these
favors so you are less annoyed, and you
might also discover that you are happier
to be in her company.


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
"O'G BKE ENR AOBS KU YVEKT ENYE

FKPHS ABKF FNYE GX VNYTYVERT NYS

UKT J TRYAUYIE HYIE EPRISYX."

HOYG BRRI KB



Previous Solution: "Every great work of art has two faces, one toward its own
time and one toward the future, toward eternity." Lester Bangs
TODAY'S CLUE: 8Elenbe
2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 1-19



CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter In the cipher stands for another.
"EPH XCHZRA ZVC NDXVYXNRHA UID

OPXYP CD. TXVM UIJMPE PZWH VHWHD

GHHV U I D M I E E H V." M H ID M H R JYZA'





Previous Solution: "I'm not the kind of actor that would know what my character
had for breakfast last Tuesday." Liam Neeson
TODAY'S CLUE: M slenbe O
2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 1-21


Annie's Mailbox


Entertainment Brief


Horoscopes

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) Even if you feel time
is running out for getting
done what needs doing,
keep a cool head.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) Should you find
yourself in an uncomfort-
able position of your own
making, don't make mat-
ters worse by succumb-
ing to the temptation to
blame others.
ARIES (Marci 21-April 19)
It behooves you to be
watchful over your prized
possessions lock your
car even when it's parked
in your driveway.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20) Keep your impul-
sive tendencies in check,
especially when it comes
to sensitive career mat-
ters. There's a strong
chance you could create
an otherwise avoidable
complication.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
Instead of doing the
smart thing and bring-
ing a problem out in the
open, you might make
matters harder by suffer-
ing in silence.
CANCER (June 21-July
22) Friends will ap-
preciate you more if you
make some kind of effort
to hew to the will of the
majority.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
It's important to keep
a sense of fair play in all
your one-on-one relation-
ships, especially when in-
volved with people who
are being unreasonable.
Set an example that they
will want to follow.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
* 22) Getting along with
co-workers might be a
bit tougher than usual, so
be careful. By being t6o
bossy or arrogant, you
would only shatter what-
ever structure has been
holding things together.
UBRA (Sept 23-Oct
23) If you find yourself
involved with someone
who, in your opinion, is
behaving too wildly, pro-
tect your position at all
times.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nv.
22) There is a good
chance that some petty
annoyances could easily
get blown out of propor-
tion by your mate or other
family members if things
are not handled well.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-
Dec. 21) First and fore-
most, be safety-conscious
at all times when handling
unfamiliar tools.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19) You need to
place more importance
on something of an aes-
thetic nature than you do
on anything material.


Judiciary Department
Says Judge Raphael
Queiroz Campos issued
the order after he saw
kids in a store looking
through erotic books.
Eleven copies of the
"Grey" series are among
64 books taken from the
shelves of two book-
stores because their
content was deemed
"improper" for youths.
From wire reports


NEA Crossword Puzzle


ACROSS
1 Knock
- loop
5 Wielded
an ax
10 Black belt
sport
12 Goofball
13 Funds for
research
14 Pine
products
15Sing loudly
16 Kiddle's
ammo
18- kwon do
19Crushed
grapes
23 BTU kin
26 Rough
shelter
27 Horrid
tasting
30 Cover
stories
32 Quartet
members
34 Mountains
and trees
35 Muse of
astronomy
36Jiffles
37Social
Insect
38Travel
stopover
39 Mustiest
42 Sparkle


45Ziegfeld
nickname
46 Woodwind
50 Mark of
shame
53 Like junk
mail,
usually
55 Nanny from
abroad
(2 wds.)
56 BLT need
57 Connection
(hyph.)
58 Webbing
DOWN
1 Cab tab
2 By mouth
3 Declaims
violently
4 LL.D.
holder
5 Half a bray
6 Ice, to
Fritz
7 Court
order
8 Ms. Ferber
9 Prescribed
amount
10 Frequent
007 foe
11 Adopt
12 Enfold
17 Rescue
squad
mem.


Answer to Previous Puzzle
YODEL WOVENI
UNUSED SEODS0NATA
LOOTER AMULET
AIR I ASI
OEDA INCAN DCC
MM EE E KEID HULA
EMBASSY PECANm
LEANTLR EOPARD
ETTE SROAD TEL
TSE H HENR I STE
2 MUD WAG
ABSSUIRD GITAALIC
TOA S TY G RlE AS1E
MASKS YAHOO
20 Parched 40 Remote
feeling 41 Smooth
21 Turns singer
Inside out Mel -
22Ms. Merrill 42Exam
23Paint forjrs.
container 43 Needle
24 Sorrowful case
cry 44Plusmblng
25 Diet unit
28 Burt's ex 47 Arthur and
29 Poet's Lllle
Ireland 48Solemn
31 Tampa Bay promise
grldders 490ld name
32griddgnore for Tokyo
(2 wds.) 51 Moo goo
33- Andreas 52 Oposite
Fauit 52 Opposite
Fault
37 More than 54- me
most plume
most plume


1-19 O 2013 UFS. Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


NEA Crossword Puzzle


1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
5


World
Almanac |
3
Today is the 20th day of
2013 and the 31st day of 3
winter.
TODAY'S HISTORY: In3
2009, Barack Obama was 4
sworn in as the first Afri- 4
can-American president.
TODAY'S BIRTHDAYS:
George Burns (1896-1996),
comedian; Federico Fellini
(1920-1993), film director;
Patricia Neal (1926-2010),
actress; BuzzAldrin (1930-
), astronaut; David Lynch
(1946- ), director; Rainn
Wilson (1968-), actor; Ah-
mir Thompson aka Quest-
love (1971-), rhusician.
TODAY'S FACT: Digital
music sales accounted for
50.3 percent of total music
sales in 2011, surpassing
physical music sales for
the first time.
TODAY'S QUOTE: "Amer-
ica did not invent human
rights. In a very real sense,
it is the other way round.
Human rights invented
America."


ACROSS
1 - unto
Itself
5 Windy City,
breezily
8 Skip stones
11 Uh-uh
2 Dodge City
marshal
4 Promise to
Paey
5 istful
feeling
7 Circle part
8 Highborn
9Willowy
21 French
cleric
!3 Sax-playing
Simpson
!4 Draws
close
!7MGM
mascot
9 Bean hull
0 "Viva -"
34 Fragrant
7 Russian
space
station
&Notorious
pirate
9 Swimsuit
fabric
1 Steak
order
43 Mete'
former
ballpark


45Cantina
fare
47 Pop a top
50 Umbrella
art
51 busted, as
a dictator
54WNW
opposite
55 Put on
56 Check mark
57 Always, to
Keats
58 Farm
. shelter
59 Lip,
slangily
DOWN
1 Ms.
Landers .
2 Weird-
sounding
bird
3 Lhasa -
4 Mixologlst's
station
(2 wds.)
5 Media star
6 Crone
7 Eye part
8 Indicators
9 Ventricle
neighbor
10Brownish
purple
13 is name
may ring a
bell?


-JimmyCarter 1-21

ALLEY OOP BY JACK AND CAROLE BENDER

S'ro IXACLY AS I
IBEL04e6 TO MeI


Answer to Previous Puzzle


KARAT E
GRIANITS

A L HU
A LIBI
NATURE

PEP F
ST I GMA
A U P A I R
TI I E| I N I
16Wbite
Svestments
20 One, in
Munich
22 Veldt
grazers
24 Radio's
PBS
25 Want ad
letters
26Tack on
28 Devotee's
suffix
30 Guided
31 Truck mfr.
32 Vanish into
thin
33 Mexican
Mrs.
35 Cajun
veggie


El I RDO
RES I INIS

MPEDy
TVI VILIE
URANI A
SIas I IN
AEST IN
LO OBOE
UNREAD




40 Ritzy boats
41 Jack up
42 Color of
honey
44 Get the
lead out
46 Poetic
twilights
48Tune from
an opera
49 Chest
muscles,
briefly
52 Snack on
53 Calendar
dlvs.


@ 2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


Judge orders'50
Shades' removed

SAO PAULO -A
Brazilian judge has or-
dered the erotic trilogy
"Fifty Shades of Grey"
taken off the shelves of
bookstores in the city
of Macae, or wrapped
to prevent minors from
opening them.
A statement by the
Rio de Janeiro State


North 01-19-13
4K532
fAJ74
*A4
4532
West East

,J984 Q 10 7

V63 I2

J 10 9 8 6 5 3 2
SKJ6 410987
South
4 A6 -
V KQ 10 9 8 5
4 K7

4AQ4

Dealer: South
Vulnerable: North-South

South West North 4East

1V Pass 2 NT Pass

4 NT Pass 5 Pass

5 NT Pass 6 Pass

6V Pass Pass Pass


Opening lead: J


- ~~"--- ~~-~~'


SUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 2013 3BF


ENTERTJINIVIENT






148 SUNDAY, JANUARY 20,2013


SPORTS


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN + www.jcfloridan.com


Malone stays perfect



against county foes


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkentjctlorldan corn

GRACEVILLE The
Malone Tigers improved to
4-0 against Jackson County
opponentsThursdaynight,
going into Graceville and
coming away with a 71-46
victory.
The win moved Malone
to 17-1 on the season, while
Graceville had a six-game
winning streak snapped to
fall to 11-7.
Ty Baker scored 22 points
to lead Malone, with Chai
Baker adding 14, and An-
twain Johnson 12, while
Marquis White put in 22
points to lead Graceville.
Malone won despite bat-
tling foul problems the
majority of the game, with
four starters picking up
two first-half fouls, and
Chai Baker eventually foul-
ing out in the fourth.
Point guard Austin Wil-
liams also picked up his
fourth foul in the third
quarter and had to sit out
much of the second half,
with GHS going on an 8-0
run to cut a 20-point lead
to eight midway through
the period.
But Malone pushed the
margin back to 18 by the
end of the third, and then
outscored Graceville 18-11
in the fourth quarter.
"The thing I was most
proud of was when it did
get a little hairy, the kids
never fell apart," Malone
coach Steven Welch said


after the game. "They kept
their composure."
Malone controlled the
game from start to fin-,
ish, jumping out to a 13-1
lead to start the game, with
nine of those points com-
ing from Chai Baker.
The lead was 13 at the
end of one quarter, and
Graceville was unable to
take advantage of Malone's
foul problems in the sec-
ond quarter, with the visit-
ing Tigers upping the lead
to 39-21 at the break.
It didn't help that Gracev-
ille made just 9-of-21 free
throws in the first half.
White scored seven quick
points to start the third pe-
riod to help Graceville trim
the lead to 43-31, but Ty
Baker made four straight
free throws to put the lead
back to 16, and then fin-
ished the period with a
bucket and a dunk to make
it 53-35.
Chai Baker came up with
a steal to start the fourth
and found Williams for
a basket and a foul, with
the three-point play giving
Malone a 21-point edge.
Another three-point play
by Chai Baker and an-
other two-handed dunk
by Ty Baker made it 61-36
Malone with just over six
minutes to play and effec-
tively ended any notion of
a Graceville rally.
GHS coach Matt Ander-
son said his team sim-
ply didn't do enough to
compete with a team of


Malone's caliber.
"They're good and we
didn't play good," the
coach said.. "We missed
too many easy buckets and
free throwS. Those misses
started a lot of transition
opportunities for Malone.
You just can't miss those
kinds of opportunities
against a team that good."
It was the sixth straight
win for Malone and the
fourth straight against
county competition, with
the Tigers taking wins over
Sneads, Cottondale, Mari-
anna, and Graceville by
an average margin of 25.8
points per game.
Welch attributed much
of his team's success this
season to its play at the de-
fensive end of the court.
"I like my team. Obvi-
ously, we have the ability
to score, but our guys take
tremendous pride in their
defense," he said. "If you
have that approach, you
always have a chance."
Malone will have two
more county games this
week, hosting Marianna
on Tuesday and traveling
to Cottondale on Friday.
A rematch with Gracev-
ille will come Jan. 28 before
finishing up the regular
season at Sneads on Feb. 1.
Graceville has a big
district showdown with
Sneads on Tuesday in a
game that will determine
who gets the top seed ih
the upcoming district
tournament.


Ward leads Lady Hornets


to victory over Graceville


BYUSTIN KENT
dkent@cfloridan.com

The Cottondale Lady
Hornets got 23 points from
senior point guard Khade-
jah Ward en route to a 48-
41 road district victory over
the Graceville Lady Tigers
on Thursday night.
It was the third straight
win for the Lady Hornets,
who moved to 10-10 on the
season and 7-3 in District
3- A competition.
The win combined with
Sneads' upset victory over
Ponce de Leon on Friday
locked the Lady Hornets
into the third seed in the
upcoming district tourna-
ment, with Graceville fin-
ishing No. 4.0
The Lady Tigers dropped
to 5-11 with the loss, which
was their fifth in a row.
The game was nip and
tuck early one, with Cot-
tondale leading by one and
two points after each of the
first two quarters, but the
Lady Hornets extended the
lead to 35-24 going into the
final period.
In the fourth, Graceville
opened up with a 7-0 run


MARK SKINNER/FLORAN
Cottondale's KadlesIa Blount goes for two as Gracevlle's
Madison McDaniel tries to block her shot Thursday night.


to cut the lead to four with
seven minutes to play, but
Ward answered with a bas-
ket, and then Cottondale
got a three from Aaliyah
Blount to make it a 40-31
lead.
The Lady Tigers got It
back to five with just under
two minutes to play, but
could not get any closer.
"We played hard and
came out with a little bit
more energy," Cottondale


coach Shan Pittman said.
"Even when (Graceville)
made that run, we fought
through it and got some
defensive stops when we
needed to."
Deunna Gonzalez added
eight points for the Lady
Hornets.
ShaniceMackled Gracev-
ille with 15 points on five
three-pointers, with Zay
Henderson adding 13, and
Madison McDaniels 12.


Get Active, Stay Active and Eat Healthier. Join us at Wiregrass Commons Mall
for this free cardiac wellness event that will feature screenings, high energy
fitness and a healthy cooking demonstration.
Some of the health screenings will include cholesterol (non-fasting), glucose
and thyroid. Don't forget your workout shoes as we offer fitness demonstrations
in cycling, spinning, running, yoga, Zumba, extreme fitness and more.
There will be plenty of information on women and heart disease, a sampling
of heart healthy dishes and access to physicians and clinical personnel to
answer your healthcare questions.


I
-1-lr----i --- ----------- ----.-.. -.--.I-.--.r_


Malone's
Chai Baker
takes the
ball to
the hoop
Thursday
night
against
Graceville.


We


IC


""'~






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


A standoff with a buck that will never be forgotten


Many "experts" say
they won't move
in a wind. The big
ones, I mean. The thick-
necked heavily-antlered
behemoths that know all
the tricks. They're too savvy
and wise, I'm told, to wan-
der about indiscriminately
when arctic air slams in
behind a strong cold front.
"Can't trust their noses,"
say the whitetail sages.
"Too risky when the wind
shifts and bends through
the woods. They instinc-
tively know many a young
and foolish buck has lost
his life simply because he
didn't know exactly where
a suspicious scent came
from."
That's true, of course,
as a rule. With patience
and a well-documented
survival instinct, big buck
whitetails usually lay low
when the wind is blowing
hard. Much better to suf-
fer hunger or unrequited


BobKornegay
Outdoors columnist
sexual urge to browse and
breed another day.
There are exceptions,
however. My mind back-
tracks to December, 2005.
I saw him and he saw
me at the same instant. I
stepped from the conceal-
ment of an old monarch
live oak in the same
eye-blink during which he
walked into the clearing
from the thicket of wax
myrtle and privet. We
gazed at each other like
gunfighters In an old Hol-
lywood western.
He was huge. His body
inundated my field of
vision and his size was im-


mediately evident, though
it took my eyes awhile to'
adjust to the changing '
light and shifting shadows
of hardwood and shrub
in the dawning forest.
He carried a good winter
weight and stood there in
that classic pose big bucks
assume in those much-
distributed wildlife-cal-,
endar photographs. What
sort of image I presented ,
to him, or how impressed
he was by it, I cannot say.
The antlers, "horns"
in Southwest Georgia/
Southeast Alabama/North
Florida parlance, were al-
most as impressive as his
mammoth body. I've seen
better, but only on those
out-of-proportion bucks
from Texas and Canada's
other-worldly giants. The
ten points, long tines,
impressive mass, and
ample spread balanced
well with his big frame.
The rack was a "typical,"


one side an almost-identi-
cal twin of the other, high
and wide, tines scrubbed
white from rubbing.
He stood posed, as
majestic buck whitetails
are wont to do, like some
ego-flooded body builder:
as if he knew his "audi-
ence" was looking on in
amazement and jaw-
dropping wonder. We each
'remained motionless and
stared each other down for
perhaps a minute, much
longer than most humans
ever have to view a living
deer of that magnitude.
"He should be running,"
my mind informed. "Why
doesn't he?"
Then came the thought,
"He's not going to move
unless I do," and then, "or
unless he smells me."
The wind That revela-
tion came suddenly. He's
confused. He's not sure
what I am or what I have
in mind. For all the years


he's roamed these woods
he's bedded down all day
on days like this. Can he be
wondering how he could
have been so foolish, to let
his guard down this way?
No, of course not. Deer
don't think or reason.
Or do they?
Twenty yards apart we
stood, this buck and I. I
held the upper hand, of
course. I knew exactly
what he was, I could accu-
rately guess his next move
if things didn't change
soon, and, above all, I had
a clear sense of his vulner-
ability right at that mo-
ment. I had him. He was'
mine, pure and simple.
For a few seconds lon-
ger, the standoff contin-
ued. In those few seconds,
the wind, I suppose, made
a subtle shift to the point
where it carried man-
smell to his olfactory
works. Stalemate over.
Mexican standoff at an


end. Primordial instinct
and wild-animal smarts
now in high gear; he leapt
upward and sideways at
once, then bounded away.
I watched the "flag" and
those magnificent antlers
get progressively smaller
and smaller as his flight
carried him away.
No longer instinctively
cautious about moving, I
exhaled a cloud of cold-
morning vapor that was
quickly caught up and car-
ried away by the stiffening
breeze now rustling the
deep-woods foliage.
Today, more than 8 years
later, there remains no
doubt in my mind he was
the finest whitetail deer
I've ever seen alive.
Oh, yes. I had no gun
with me that morning.
For me, it was a morning's
walk, not a hunt.
That happenstance
bothered me some then.
Not now.


Fishing Report


LAKE SEMINOLE
Bass fishing has been on
the "iffy" side of late as water
temperatures across the ,
lakefluctuate. Largemouths.
however, are beginning some
pre-spawn staging activity and
fishermen should soon see a
marked increase in angler suc-
cess. Recent fair catches have
come on Carolina-rigs fished
in the migration "ditches"
adjacent to spawning areas.
Use lip-less crankbaits to
locate bass concentrations.
Spinnerbaits are good for this
purpose as well. Also try drop-
shot rigs on light line in deep
water in the Spring Creek area.
Fish drop-shots and other
soft-plastic rigs very slowly.
Crappie fishing is "up and
down." At present, the best
catches are coming from the
Fish Pond Drain area on jigs.
Fish in about 20 feet of water
for the best results. Larger
crappies are deep right now.
Minnows may take greater
numbers, but jigs are produc-
ing bigger fish.
Hybrids, bream, and catfish
are slow.

LAKE EUFAULA
Bass are fair to good on
spoons right now, espe-
cially following a cool-weather
"snap:' Fish 3/4 to 11/2-ounce
jigging spoons on humps and
ledges in 12 to 20 feet of water.
As staging for the spawn be-
gins, look to warmer water in'
sloughs and backwater areas.
Staging bass may be taken
on jerkbaits.spinnerbaits, or
a naturally fished swimbait.
Fishing Carolina-rigs and
heavy, slow-rolled spinnerbaits
on the deep ledges may pay
off as well from now through
the next couple of weeks.
Main-lake and creek channel
ledges are holding some hy-


brids now. as are some of the
deeper humps. Jigging spoons
may take a few. As the water
warms, try trolling deep crank-
baits in these same areas.
Crappies are improving
and should continue to do so.
Drop-fish live minnows now
and troll bare or minnow-
tipped jigs in shallower water
as temperatures rise.
Bream and catfish are
producing no viable reports
right now.

ULAKE ANDREWS/
CHATTAHOOCHEE RIVER
For bass, deeper areas
near creek mouths are best
right now. Seek out the
least-stained creeks and fish
medium to deep-running
crankbaits and Texas-rigged
worms. Dark-colored worms
with a hint of chartreuse in the
pattern are suggested. Craw-
fish-patterned crankbaits are
the best hardbait producers
at present. Bass fishing on the
river itself is rather slow, but
a few fish may be caught with
jigging spoons and jig-and-pig
combinations from main-river
and deeper creek channel
ledges.
Catfish are relatively slow,
but are better on the river than
in the reservoirs right now.
Tailwater cats are fair on live
and cut bait
Crappies are slow, though a
few good individual fish have
appeared for anglers fish-
ing from the bank late in the
afternoons.
Hybrids and bream are very
slow.

Generation schedules, pool levels,
and other such information for
area waterways may be obtained
by calling toll-free 1-888-771-4601.
Follow the recorded instructions
and access the touch-tone for the
Apalachicola River System.


Jorge says, '"Now is the best time to buy!"
ani4


ALL REMAINING 2012 2 '

'CAMRYS'MUSTiGO NOW!' .

RO DOWN APPROVED CREi ,* SPECIAL I:EA1E.PROGR MS
SG EAT SELECTION WHILE IT ASTS". GREAT FACTORY INCE TIVE
*


AN. 14
TEAM STANDINGS
W-L
1) Marianna Office Supply 25-15
2) Adam's Funeral Home 25-15
3) 1 Don't Know 22-18
4) Monday NIte Special 18-22
5)iMaa,s Day Care 15-25
) 2 Men & A Lady 15-25
,i High Team Game Adam's Funeral
Home: 691
x High Team Series -Monday Nite
Special: 1989
* High Game Female Barb Gilbert-
son: 164
a High Game Male Tom Arnold: 211
a High Serles Female Bettle
Grinsted: 448
a High Series Male Tom Arnold: 585



IMlN. 15
TEAM STANDINGS
W-L
1) Klndel Awards 48-32
2) Champion Tile 46.5-33.5
3) Jim's Buffem & Grill 44-36
4) Family pentlstpy 43-37
5) Down Home Dental Center 43-37
6) Maranna AnimalHospta Hosl 33-47
7) Perfect Nails 32-48
8) James & Slkes 30.5-49.5
* High Team Series: Jim's Buffet &
Grill: 962
a High Team Game: Jim's Buffet &
Grill: 2766
* High Game Female: Heather
Hagan: 199
" High Game Male: Jim Miller: 223
a High Series Female: LuAnn Kindel-
spire: 550
a High Series Man: Jim Miller: 645
S itUPAY NI
T ;U^ ^ HIQMl '", -:.

AN. 15
TEAM STANDINGS
W-L
1) Kindel Pro Shop 54.5-25.5
2) All Day 48.5-31.5
3) Lu's Crew 48.5-31,5
4) We're Back Again 47.5-32,5
5) X-Men 47-33


6) Shelton Trucking 38.5-41.5
7) James Gang 35-45
8) Oak Creek Honey 34.5-45.5
9) DandD 34-46
10) Backwoods Bowlers 33.5-46.5
11) Marlanna Metal 33.5-46.5
11) EI-Rio 20-60
a High Game Hdcp: Shelton Trucking:
972
* High Series Hdcp: We're Back
Again: 2705
a High Game Men: Jack Townsell: 269
a High Game Women: Cheryl Gaf-
faney:203
a High Series Men: Jack Townsell: 731
" High Series Women: Cheryl Gaf-
faney: 523


JAN. 16
TEAM STANDINGS
W-L
1) Big Lots 52-28
2) Adventure Drive 48-32
3) Marianna Metal 45-35
4) y Hards 44-36
5) Fireballs 44-36
6) Perfections Detailing 42-38
7) Hollls Body Shop 39-41
8) Harley's Hawgs 37-43
9) 2 Pair of Nuts 36-44
10) Smith's Supermarket 34-46
11) EJ Sound Machine 33-47
12) Mr. Bingo 26-54
a High Team Hdcp Game: 2 Pair of
Nutz: 929
a High Team Hdcp Series: Big Lots:
2689
SHigh Game Female: LuAnn: 200
* High Game Male: Robert Booth: 279
a High Series Female: Thelma Beloat:
523
3 High Series Male: Jason K: 729

CHIPOLA MEN'S LEAGU,.,
JAN. 17
TEAM STANDINGS
W-L
1) Ouzts Again 8-0
2) Remedlals 7-1
3) Kindel Lanes 2 6-2
4) X Men 5-3
5) Perfections Detailing 5-3
6) 3 Aces & a Deuce 4-4
7) Ricoh -s
8) The Possee 2-6
9) Man On 2-8
10) The Wolf Pack 2-8
a High Team Game: Kindel Lanes 2:988
a High Team Series: KIndel Lanes 2:2772
3 High Man Game: Jim R. &Jason K.: 279
SHigh Man Series: Al Pumphrey: 697


MORE GREAT DEALS ON ALL

NEW 2012 AND NEW 2013 TOYOTA'S IN STOCK.

COME CHECK IT OUT! DON'T MISS IT!
All prices and discounts after daalqr cash excludes Lta tag registration and title and includes dealer fees. 0% sat Finance Tier 1 2 3 4 Approved Credit.


* 1 Year,
12,000 Miles
I Platinum Warranty'


Great Selection
d^^*MI^ *


7 Years, 100.000 Miles a
Limited Powertrain '-rmlA i
Warranty V 4


BETl EETIN *IIEBEAT BEASI1

COMPETITIVE INTEREST RATES!

PAYMENT TO EU9 YW [ BnWUTCBET


IIa



2961 Penn. Ave., Marianna, FL

(850) 526-3511 1-800-423-8002


www.mariannatoyota.com


.... ....e Lr. 7 7~~r~lu-WON! ....R ... 2.._-7 IVE ,:,


SUNDAY, JANUARY 20, 2013 5B


I
]


6


.----~ ~


SPOiRTS






6 B Sunday, January 20.2013 Jackson County Floridan


CLASSIFIED


www..ICFILORIDAN.com


WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED



ARKETPLAC


BY PHONE: (850) 526-3614 or (800) 779-2557
BY FAX: (850) 482-4478 or (334) 712-7975,
ONLINE: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM


BY MAIL: WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE
P.O. BOX 520, MARIANNA, FL 32447
IN PERSON: 4403 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA


Publication Policy Errors and Omissions: Advertisers should check their ad the first day. This publication shall not be liable for failure to publish an ad or for a typographic error or'errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the ad for the first days
Insertion, Adjustment for errs Is limited to the cost of that portion of the ad wherein the error occurred. The advertiser agrees that the publisher shall not be liable for damages arising out of errors in advertisements beyond the amount paid for the space
actually occupied by that portion of the advertisement in which the error occurred, whether such error is due to negligence of the publishers employees or otherwise and there shall be no liability for non-insertion of any advertisement beyond the amount paid for
such advertisement. Display Ads ate not guaranteed position. All advertising is subject to approval. Right is reserved to edit, reject, cancel or classify all ads under the appropriate classification.
Fllei


Professional Piano & Organ Teacher
I teach private piano and organ lessons In my
home in the Highlands. 30 years experience
teaching private lessons and in schools.
Great Gift For All Ages!.
334-446-4226
GENEAL & PCAL NTCS


USIESSOPPORNTYU

14) To Hmesfioiale






NEED TO PLACE AN AD?


It's simple, call one of our friendly
Classified representatives


Baby boy clothes 0-18 mo. $20 850-693-3260
Baby Clothes-girl 0-12 mo. $30 bx, 850-693-3260


Bakers Rack/Sideboar .


Box Spring & Mattress: Qu. $50. 850-482-2039
Carseat/Booster combo $30 850-693-3260.
Chest -antique,4 drawer, oak, $60,850-209-0702
Chest of Drawer $25. 850-482-2039
China Cabinet extra nice $300. 850-482-3780
Computer laptop 14" new in box $400. 477-4513
Dining room set (oak) $350. 850-482-3780.
End Table, Glass Top $35 239-272-8236
End Tables (2) w/2 lamps $80. 850-482-3780.
End Tables, new $25. ea. 334-477-4513


Own your own business!
Franchises needed in Dothan and
surrounding areas NOW!
Training, equipment and guaranteed initial
customer base with all franchise plans.
Call now to schedule your appointment
1800-375-5264

FIEW O S. UE


FIREWOOD (all split oak)
Delivery avaBablel TRUCK LOAD $70. 4
CALL MARK 334-701-4967 or 334-791-6704


Sand they will be glad to assist you. Split Oak Firewood
Delivered in the Wiregrass!
$75 For a Full Sized Pickup load.
$12 for 5 Gallon bucket of kindling wood.
334-393-9923

Wante Ol:d -Cobm God,
Damonds, Guns, And Tools
West Main Jewelry & Loan 334-671-1440.

IT'S AS EASY AS Qart she hitl Ja, Wooden Boxes w/ screen
lid (8L x 3'W x 30"H), Propane tanks (2) 250 gal
CALL (1) 500 gal, Propane heaters, Hay $20 bale. Call
(334)596-2354 or (850)482-2489
2. PLACE YOUR AD |. |:,,r:[H -I:lJ. hll.,d i
3. GET RESULTS 1- NEW 2 DOOR GLASS FLOWER COOLER ON
CASTERS TRUE MODEL# GDM-61FC-
$2,500.00
1- NEW 2 DOOR COMMERICAL GLASS DOOR
COOLER MASTERBILT
MODEL# GR48S --- $.,995.
1- NEW 1 DOOR COMMERICAL KITCHEN
FREEZER ON CASTERS, STAINLESS STEEL
MASTERBILT MODEL# F23-S $1,995.00
*, PiLASSECALLj17-8894 IFINTERESTED.


Gold rope chain mens 20" $300.334-477-4513. Border Cole: F/9mo old, S&W Free to good
Luggage sei (4) Protacol $50, 334-477-4513. Home. Call 850-526-0864


Mirror w/shelves, $50.850-693-3260.
OCCUPIED Japan Figurine $6 850-209-0702
Shotgun: Winchester 1400 12 qa. $350. 573-5135
Sleeper Sofa: Queen $250. Call 239-272-8236
Steel Door- 32 x 80 LH, $50,850-482-2636
Table Lamp: $30 Call 239-272-8236
Trollng Motor: Minn Kota $250. 850-482-4185


Watches mens Invict 3


Wedding gown new, sz 16, $300 850-693-3260.
Window- 29 1/2x30 1/4, $115,850-482-2636


I Windows-14x73, plastic, $45, 850-482-2636


Boston Teter Puppes$250. 850-547-9351
Vet___chcked.-_w& S cents on-site
w/guarantee. 850849-0176.
CKC Bulmasti puppies for sale for $700, Born
Nov. 15, 2012- have shots and their papers.
They are ready for GREAT home only. Already
people friendly and love to play. Please call me
at 334-618-0987, Peggy.
FREE DOG to approved home; beautiful fe-
male gold bulldog, 9 mths old, 334-464-3757
Lost: Female 501bs black w/white markings on
face. Indian Springs area. 850-557-6477


Sudoku


2013 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserve


level: h U I
Complete the grid so each row, column and
3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit
1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku,
visit www.sudoku.org.uk.
Solution to last Sunday's puzzle


ved.


1/20/13


I() ;FARMER'S MARKEls

r ........... ...................."
** Bahia seed for sale 4-
Excellent germination with over 40 yrs
experience. Kendall Cooper
Call 334-703-0978, 334-775-3423,
L or 334-775-3749 Ext. 102
L ... ....4 ................ ..
m OLarge rolls of Hay for Sale
Bahia & Coastal
Daytime 334-585-3039,
after 5pm & weekends 585-5418
Quality Coastal Hay; Large Rols
Ferted Weed Control
850-209-9145 4w
Wrapped Peanut Hay For Sale.
Never been rained on. Call 229-254-0854


WATE Fyour &ea GA"RE


Pa PRiver Tm "br,
4 334389* 3 -20
Wanted to Rent: Farm Land or Pasture in Ma-
rianna or West of Marianna; Call 850-718-1859




Earn

Extra $

Great for Retired Persons

Campbellton
Earn an average of

$450'
3 hrs per night, 5 nights per week, before
6:06 a.m.
Looking for mature business-minded
newspaper carriers with dependable trans-
portation, minimum liability insurance and
a valid driver's license.
Come by and fill out an application at the
Jackson County Floridan,
4403 Constitution Lane, Marianna, FL


25 Drivers

Trainees
NEEDED NOW
Learn to drive for
Werner Enterprises
Earn $800 per week
No experience needed!
Local CDL Training
job ready in 15 days!
1-888-368-2198
1, o a o I o0, .2198

Multiple Merchandising
positions available for a
10 week temporary job in
Chipley, FL. $12. Per Hr.
Please call 888-678-8966 x1189
Please leave a message.


P lace an A d1 Fast, easy, no pressure
P lace an 24 hours a day, 7 days week!
Get live previews of your classified ads, receive price quotes
and make secure online payments.

www.jcfloridan.com


/ r


__ 8 4 9

3 4

5 3 7
-- -- ---
8 5 4 6

7 2 1

1 13 5 2
----- -
2 '6 7

9.19

37 2


4 6 7 8 1 5 9 3 2
921436758
853927114 6
5 926 834 17
3 1 8 7 4 9 6 2 5
631874 9625251 389
674251389
1 36592874_
249178563
785364291


~~___~_


UISISRSE!-


I






.-..-.**. IrPT rnF T% A mT


DECLASSIFIED


Jackson County Floridan *


Sunday, January 20, 2013- 7 B


www.JCFLORIDAN.com


DRIVERS: All Miles PAID
(Loaded & Empty)!
Home on the weekend!
Running Class-A CDL Flatbed.
Lease to Own-No Money Down
CALL: 888-880-5911

Easy Ways to
Increase Your Ad's Results...

1. Use bold type
2. Use an Attractor
3. Start your ad with the item you are selling.
or a benefit headline ,
4. Abbreviate as little as possible,
5. Describe your item or job positin'in detai'i
6. Include the price of the item yo are selling-
7. Use whie space, large type andrdphic
visually compelling
tomk d ndotade


SParamedlic/Flgt tre
1 High school graduate or
equivalent and some
experience beyond
obtaining the required
certifications for the
position. Certification as a Paramedic by
the FL Department of Health Bureau of
Emergency Medical Services.
Certification in Fire Fighting Standards.
Certification in CPR and A.C.L.S. by the,
American Red Cross, EVOC certified,
valid class D FL drivers license.
Starting Salary $30,688.97/yr

EMT/Fire Fighter
SMust have high school diploma or GED
with 1-2 years exp; in fire protection; or
any equivalent combination of training
and experience. Certification as an EMT
by the Emergency Medical Division of the
Florida Dept. of Professional Regulation.
Certification in Fire Fighting Standards..
Certification in CPR by the American Red
Cross. Must have a valid FL drivers ,
license with D endorsement.
Starting Salary $23,947.00/yr.


Submit Jackson.County employment
application to: Human Resources Dept,
A. it.I .T 2864 Madison St, Marianna, FL 32448'.
Activity Director PHONE (850) 482-9633.
Web stew wwadcksoncountyfl.net
Minimum of 2 yrs long term Deadline to apply s 01-28-2013
care su vor e Drug-Free Workplace/EOFEV.Pref/ADA/AA
care supervisory experience.
Must be licensed by state of
Alabama4, R C


PAPER TRANSPORT seeks
16 Class A Drivers
Sto Travel in Surrounding States
for our Dedicated Account.
COMPETITIVE PAY PACKAGE,
BONUSES & BENEFITS
18 Months Ep & Class A Requred


S! eare GROWING!
IDRIERS-47CLASS A : -


RETIREMENT IS JUST

A :iUNDTHECORNER. "
Are you word aboutyor : tirement savings? Or perhaps you .:"
have always wai. ted to retreeearly, butJust couldn't
figure out how? Newspaper routes are a great source of
supplementalincome. Just a small investment each morning can.
make a big Investment n your retirement.
JACKSON COUNTY .

Come By And Inquire Tod4y
4403 ConESnio lane Mara a 32446


Classes Forming Noy

FORTIS More
Afor Medical Assisting,

COLLEGE Call Fortls College
Today! 888-202-4813 or
visit www.fortiscollege.edu. For consumer
Information visit www.fortis.edu





GIBB MARIANNA VILLAGE
Now taking applications for people with
disabilities & who have very low incomes.
1 & 2 bedroom apartments.
Wide doorways, lower counters, roll-in
showers. Accessible for wheelchairs &
other mobility aids HUD subsidized rent.

2933 Milton Ave, Marianna,
FL Call 850-482-4663


l*I. I

1/1 Apartment for Rent
For Info call 850-5798895


S& 2 BR Apartments available In town near
Chlpola. Water/garbage/sewer Included.
No pets. 850-526392 or 850-209-5620










D aplkx inAt la. $475/Mo.
Located at15664 N.W. Broad St
Pro TromRoat SMV674. 3M


S& 2BR Houses &Apts ALSO
2 & 3mR Mobe Homes Rent to Own
Lot rent incled. Fordetals
4.850-557-342or 54-814615 4.
1r1/ABA Home Downtown Maranna -
Large walla doset .CH&A and refdirator
frsisNed. $375 M. + $2M. Dep.
Cal856 264Me64,
2B 1BA House for rent, 3043 Noland St
Safe neighborhood, $500/mo + dep.
850-482-8196/209-1301
2BR/1DA House on Burke SL
Grand Ridge ,425. Mo. + $425. Dep.'
S alP5l0-592-5S71
2BR/IBA w/ofice n Grand Rige, Rent to own,
very nice, $1000 down $650/mb. 850-997-
2464/850-274-9896
AustinTyle&LAssodates *
Quality Homes & Apartmenits
S- *850-526-3355 4
"n 4..LA,--- --


rR E F E


Huge 7BR 4 BA Home for rent in Marianna,
PERFECT FOR LARGE FAMILIES : 2 kitchens,
Z dining rooms, 3 living rooms, plenty of
storage, barn,huge fenced pool.Will consider
separating into individual apartments.
Zoned for Residential & Commercial.
1/4 Mile From Wal-Mart 850-544-0440

2 & 3 bedroom mobile Homes In Cottondale.
$500 and up. H20, garbage, sewer Included.
http:// www.charloscountrylivlng.com.
850-209-8847 4
2 & 3BR Mobile Homes in Cottondale.
NO PETS CH&A $325- $500/Month
Roomate situation also available.
850-258-1594 Leave Message
lr 2BR1BA MH In Dellwood ;water/iw .- ,
Included on own lot, 535.+* StOP. diBp ;
2BR Mobile Home Cottondale Area
Water & Garbabge Included. $425. Mo + Dep.
Call 850-890-8485 or 850-890-8487
3BR 2BA MH in Marianna $500/mo, $500 dep.
w/no pets; Or $750 dep. with small pets
.850-573-6307 or 850-482-5449
3BR 2BA MH in Sneads $500/mo. No Pets
850-573-0911/850-593-5251
Mobile Homes for Rent 2/1 Located
between Grand Ridge & Sneads
includes water & garbage. $350/month
4 850-573-0308 4
Quiet, well maintained Park, Water/sewer/
garbage/lawn included. Available Now
3/2 DW $625 & 3/2 $475 & 2/1 $425
Joyce Riley RE 850-209-7825 4w
Spacious 2BR 2BA Plus Office, Family of 3
$450-$550 Plus deposit. Clean and Quiet,
No smokers, No pets 850-718-8158



For Lease:-6,000 sq. ft. Daycare on 2.58 acres.
SLicensed for 93 children. Room for expansion.
'Call 850-718-6541..



Very Private
1,600 sq. ft, 2 bedrooms 1 bath with a loft,
and a screened in back porch. House is 60%
complete. Septic system complete, temporary
power pole on 3+ acres. You will love it when
you see Itl! $39,000. Call Allison at 850-381-0720

For Sale By Owner 41
Briar Hus Drive, Dha
3 bedroom, 2 bath on 1
acre of land. 1300 square
feet Built in 2008. All stain-
less steel appliances in kitchen stay. Hard-
wood, tile and carpet floors. Screened in patio.
2 car attached carport Covered front porch.
Country setting 10 minutes from Southside
Walmart or SAMC. Asking $113,500. For more
Information call 334-701-5889.
Graceviae: Recently renovated 3 BR, 1.5 baths
1350 sq. ft. Great neighborhood and huge back-
yard, $89,999. Call 850-658-4081.
Very we maintained
5 bedroom,12bath,older
home. Includes 2 carports,
yard completely fenced '
(privacy) and a shed.
Close to schools. Room for
a family to grow! Call today for your personal
viewing. 850-263-2755.'

One of a kind home
'a.-' on the Apalachicola River
in Wewahitchka, Florida.
3BR, 2B modular home.
Outdoor kitchen, shop,
greenhouse and boat
house. Beautiful fenced yard on nice high
riverbank. Large lotis also zoned commercial.
Reduced to sell. $129,000. Call 850-819-0401



14 ft. Aluii Boat, stick drive, 2 swivel seats,
1997 SuzukI 25 hn mdtor, all new parts in
miiotor $1200. 850.592-1934 or 850-693-5812
Bass Tracker 20 2: 18Ft, 90HP Mercury, black
and gray, Garmin GPS fish finder, front fish
finder, AM/FM/CD Radio, ExcellenfCondition
$6,500. Call 850-774-6230
mBB^5^^1|*H


SPackages From
$4,995
All Welded .
All Aluminum Boats


MOTO ] ES o & RV,,I


A I SEI OU ic &REA IR1


Now offering mob
Sand outside, oil chi
Detailing now for thi
^ (850) 57.
A I I4= ..


Find jobs


fast and


easy!


ile wash inside


HOE IS

"Beautification of Your Home"
Carpentry/Painting Installations
Furniture Repair & Refinishing
General Repairs Insured


NEED TO PLACe AN AD


DIesel Pusher. Only 64,000
miles vl/Cummings diesel
engine and Freightliner
chassis, highly polished
hardwood floors inliving
area kitchen & bath. Lots of storage inside &
out, no smokers. $45,999.
334-296-2989 ask for Brian.


AUTOSFRS A


ange & vacuum 's simple, call one of our friendly i Buick 2002 endezvous;
elow price of $50. $1195 down with 0%
3- 509 Classified representatives Interest. Daylight Auto
lll nd 'col o youl and they will be glad to assist you. Financing 850-215-1769

JACKSON COUNT Y


FLORIDAN
jcflorldar.com


F T monster.

FIND LOCAL JOBS AT: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM/JOBSL


PHTORAH


--I


TREE SERVICE -


. ---- ---- -- --- --


I


CLEANING HOUSEKI! EPIN


I


I I






C .T AQ CTTfrT rT\ !


O B Sunday. January 20 2013 Jackson County Floridan SLnJrJjiJi3
AUTOSFORS*LEMOTOCYCLSTRCS, OS.


Chevrolet 2008 Impala ;
$1695 down with 0%
Interest. Daylight Auto
Financing 850-215-1769
9AM-9PM


m Chevrolet HHR 2009 LS,
sliver 62K miles, $9500.
334-798-5669.

Ford 1993 Thunderbird Super Coupe 3.8L Su-
percharged V6, Exterior Red, Interior Black
leather. 114k miles, Very clean, no rust power
everything. Plenty of modifications. 13.8 1/4
mile time. Asking $3,000. Please call for pic-
tures, 330-461-1958.
Hyundai2004 Sonata:
Sliver, very low miles,
64k miles highway, 4 door
sedan, V6 engine, clean
title, good tires, new paint
jOb, immaculate interior, great gas mileage,
one owner. Retail $8,995. Selling $5,000, OBO.
Call646-456-2807
fl U ulMeredes Benz, 1901 0M CSL


silver & blue convertible
with hard top, V8 engine,
.75K low miles, garage kept
runs in exc. cond. must see to believe it,
Sl~dI 080786-417-1355 o 334-538-7475.


Pontiac 2000 Grand Prlx ;
$695 down with 0%
Interest. Daylight Auto
Financing 850-215-1769
JAM-9PM

Tdyota 2006 Solara Convertible, navigation
system, DVD player, Cosmic Blue metallic,' tan
top & tan leather, loaded, low miles, 1-owner,
low miles 41,239 $21,500. 334-803-1638


Toyota 2011 Camry SE (Sport Edition), 4dr.,
auto, power pkg., White, 9,000 miles, show
room condition, ext. warranty,. $19,500. 850-'
569-2215, 850-718-5461, 850-717-7105.


2003 Harley Davldson Ultra Classic, blue,
comes with extras $6,999. Great condition
850-573-1695 or 850-263-1678
HARLEY DAVIDSON 2012 UL-
MILES, CHROME WHEELS,
ABS BRAKES, CD,CB,AM/FM
RADIO,HEATED HAND GRIPS,
PYTHON PIPES, CRUISE CON-
TROL, RIDERS BACK REST,
PLUS MORE EXTRAS, NO TIME TO, ENJOY, CALL
334-268-3900, ASKING $19,900
Honda 2004 VTX 1300 cc 22K ml. new tires,
service, 2 helmets, leather bags, adult owned
334- 803-3397 $3950. NICEIIII


Dodge 2001 Durango; $695
down with 0% Interest.
Daylight Auto Financing
850-215-1769
9AM-9PM

Ford 2002 Explorer.
ReLently painted. Tinted
windows. CD player. New
tires. Needs motor and
transmission work.
Title in hand. $1,000. 334-701-0107 after 5PM.
Jeep 2003 ULiberty; $1095
down with 0% Interest.
Daylight Auto Financing
850-215-1769
9AM-9PM



Chevrolet 2001 Silverado;
$1495 down with 0%
Interest. Daylight Auto
Financing 850-215-1769
9AM-9PM

Volvo 1996-DIESEL TRUCK, Good Condition
Asking price $10,000 OBO 334-695-1954


Dodge 2004 Ram; 4-Door
Crew Cab; $1895 down
with 0% Interest. Daylight
Auto Financing 850-215-
1769; 9AM.9PM


iLd k& GMC 1997 Shoit Bed; $795
down with 0% Interest.
Daylight Auto Financing
850-215-1769
9AM-9PM
GMC 2003 2500 HD SLT Turbo Diesel 140K
mileage, V8, Good condition with only one pre-
vious owner, well kept maintenance records.
5th wheel attachment and equipment with
'trailer brakes. Call for all other accessories
'such as heatedseats leather, tinted windows,
etc. $15,200, 334-718-8225


p U Pontiac 2003 Montana Ext Mini-Van
Seats 8 White 102K mi 20/25 MPG
Runs Great, Auto trans, alloy
wheels. Frt-Rear A/C Power Windows Locks,
Mlrrs & Drvr Seat, Cruise Ctrl, Remote Keyless
Ent. Roof Rack, Clean, serviced every 3K mi
New tires 2011 garage kept
$5700 (334) 618-4645



1ST PLACE TO CALL FOR ALL OF
YOUR TOWING NEEDS
Wgae .'a # W %" 7.MrP
AUTO BODY & RECYCLING
PAYING TOP DOLLAR FOR JUNK CARS
Contact Jason Harger at 334-791-2624

ij CALL FOR TOP PRICE
S FOR JUNK VEHICLES

2 ALSO SELL USED PA7TS
24 HOUR TOWING 334-792S664M


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Call -tod ay t lc 3u dIl


SUNNY SOUTH PROPERTIES
4630 Hwy. 90 Marlanna, FL 32448
(850) 826-2891
HAh01ToceIIndpendedt OmDwnEd *d Ol
SMARTER. BOLDER. FASTER


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REDCE


Oudia Morris
REALTOR@
Broker/Owner
850-209-4705




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REDUION $109,90.


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1190247898*$104,900.
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bbie Roney
iith, Realtor


850-209-8039

de( .im it@ embarqmail.com

ik \ ioa Spiq so Coi ,a
3/2 am 230mtw lago w0sG
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htkmd kma pim i. $299
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Cian a- i $850

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MISc 2 p $12 I
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M14 4 $118,


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www.JCFLORIDAN.com


. ^ Got a Clunker
We'll be your Junker!
We buy wrecked cars
and Farm Equip. at a
fair and honest price!
$325 &t Complete Cars
CALL 334-702-4323 OR 334-7146285
mmum mmmmi m mmmmnmum mmll mmiimm mimm
WANTED Nice Pick-Up, preferably Extended
Cab Ford Ranger or Tacoma must have air, any
color but black. 334-687-8863


I







www.JCFLORIDAN.com


CLASSIFIED


Jackson County Floridan *


Sunday, January 20, 2013 9 B


S ii i i , i i[ * *
... .. I. , >. .. r ,


,p |,Fast, easy, no pressul

S24 hours a day, 7 da

Get live previews of your classified ads, receive price quotes


re

ays a week!


r and make secure online payments.


www.jcfloridan.com


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remord ia.rap haita
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uruatrewdia^^ dt^sr^h^sc^ao ILS 2H4739 $119,



4 etad AN a


RED. UE' D


COONIRY SPLENDOI. .mol
mfed pcod rt dy IM yo to
hird horm pli o einorbl hro
on nd hve pety of mom fro rna
ohlmnls or a nke gden. G t homn
si on 4.39 oSa s
MIS 247041) $1,SO.


od uad te o=h ma ioous


PIIA I24785 s$129,00w
P iikno d,vS iTi, ToaiUhln
by formsnd po ma. There Is o
hior srem, h b tot shed ond stomo
I shed In ploce. Older mobile h oi
will convey ond. sill hove room
to huild or Oln(e c newerl mobil'
home. Gmotice for this 40 Oacrs.
*, ..1',, ;" *" F .S 247794 O, Q .

aI nrnIE L MLreK I fiEAfUl AQUIETION6lB .rickk'


Min l rm 16.34 acre tract
on Hfit0 with a 3 BR. 2.5
BA 2 stoiy home with master
bedmom on the Bt floor,
iaim ylSe detached aMother taw-i e tdn
teheltconwge *nd waosed hot tub mItdo'the pool,
aso l with mil up doors and heavy dutycar lift. Roo for
A IItalla built horse stlls, natural stocked fish ped tt Is private.
isn must see. Make a.applontment todal MLS I R0247871A $335,000
Locatdi on quiet dud"
ad sete This is a 4 B,
1-4 B e l ee do once in
0oo H lhtsTailsome.

ream. ftlaily w, spIecimus al~ i phl ta latMtracti , MCA l4o0 mami.tiiil II ac 18 Y;14b "InK i Mw caicnil a
deck owt tteaM I eeas e a. aid "e m et el ad m aetdMuy
Srllrw ila bmuaslteBuihaeohlutrepoura|meentti tih! iSiHeottl49W0
M anb t .mwhenan ama?
3Zoraalaorme located m h

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SHS d, IVstu5 1l 'InK
hasapoorltreeseut
though Ipae optt suNlplatyfo d land for a hO nsie
Uniestoctd SW247853s.12i0o


1.1 Mwm & W rum
1dl.pd P4rs apim a-ml
ste rmo.Wt Ur, m\ cm
nmombi Ilnh Dct orn
mln.i20 ktfC}lln il


Need space? ,Great
warehouse: spacVe
close to down town
with Ilst under 6,000
SF of space. Currently being used as a warehouse for Habitat
for Humanity of Marianna. Make an appointment today MLS#
CC247736A. $70,000.


Ora Mock, GRI i,
'.-eroker asogate a
a .,.


Call Ora for appointment
Marinma MUST SEK mtrenovte like new,
ndirad nc ining ingarea.i Kie
(.,oo w staiihnoster Ocrp t. K1Ithen
has mw orei mople binets, ish washr
sove, ad untrow M(oncrte ive on pved street.
Would quly for UDAt R hi$79,900. MIS# 247456


Well mainialind 2 BR 2 BA ~iobIl'ho lin iuntry
setting. Master bedroom has a walk-in closet. All
Appiances included. Most of property is Chain-link
fenced, .7 ac lot is cross fenced with large garden space.
Open shed 18x15, stemrge bldg. 12x8. Front and back
porh. $39,900. MLS # 47915. ,


EI .\1M413


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oned^ s unLict iwiasi
a-t amrolnliur41o,-if
I3 bedroom l buth
adh 7 oIto O 4th as
bed om with over.
summer days. i the below grpod l with ple~n mo elft in the rcYl',
fence beacie1rdl CieD e oa- LAGM room r ea0tI tiroets.SOf

a t Tc o l frontra tthewoodberoi fIreplace, t a

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C" Limlp Mt Wa *"'
Tam M arp teno et ", e

emp SnO1M Vem Its


IIW IIMI i. Form ho~e in the
room dining room, bdmothen,
siding, motel roof ond corpor
Approimolely 8 ores cleoml ond
redy in rm, Loyood on newly
led rood.
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* i" 00100


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NEWLISTING~HHB


BEIOEmIfiH





JACKSON COUNT i' FORIDAN* vvw ji:floridan,com


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I:


SE SPORT PACKAGE,
|SPOILER. 17" ALLOYS
MSRP ..............................$21,300
CHPOA FORD DISOUNT........$1,365
RETAIL CUTOMER CASH.........$2,000

sw17,996


FUSION
SEL
ve, LEAN ER o
SPORER, M00MNOOtF


liA tAM


MIIPOA FORD MSCOUNr.......$2,000
RETAILCUSTOMER CASH........$1,500
FMCC BONUS CASH................$170

- vi*24,245
-- ~c~lpLINA


FOCUS SEL
HATCHBACK
M FORD TOUCH, 4CYL.
POWER PACKAGE
...... M H . .....-....$22 ,5
A FORD DISCOUNT......... 4700
.CUSTDMER CASH.........2,000


TAURUS
SE
V6, POWER PACKAGE
AUOY WHEELS
MSRP ........... ...........$26,425
CHIPOLA FORD DISCOUNT........$2,430


w *a 19%,9S5 IUU *23,995Af


Fi10O SUPER
CREW LARIAT
4X2. ECOBOOST ENGINE
20 WHEELS
NMtP-.................44J4
oCnnIA FORD DISCOUNr....$S,t750 B
RETAIL CUSTOM ICASH...$3,250 M
'RMCC BONUS CASL............J.1,2
W 3------,
)0*38,495


EXPEDTmON
LIMITED 4X4
2 H RO E_ WHEELS,_ *


i250 XLT
CREW CAB
4X4, 6.2 V-8,
XLT PREMIUM PACKAGE
MSRP ......................................$47,125
CHIPOLA FORD DISCOUNT......$3,130
RETAIL CUSTOMER CASH........2,000
SFMCC BONUS CASH.............$1,000

So*0*s40,995

)o


0-BOOBOOSTEGINE. CHROME PIG..
,NAy MAX TRAILER, TOW, LOADED
....nLR .... ............ ......... 1,860
CHIPOA FRD DISCOUNT.......$3,865
ETL CUSTOMER CASH.-.....$360
FMOgC BONUS CAIS................i1,250

m so*$4384951


rMRP -...... ...... 12,350
eip OrtA FDISC D8CU....$ 1,85
M EILC USoMER CASH..-... 00
4rfMC BOiUS CASH4................500
-" -*45.495


VF250
CREW CAB
4 DIES, INWEROR PACKAGE
MSRP .................................. 7,3
p CHIPOLA FORD DISCOUNT......$5,140
' RETAIL CUSTOMER CASH.........$3,000
FMCC BONUS CASH...............$1,000

0*48.495


Ia


11 AIA 3
POWER PKO, 4 CYL..
CD PLAYER,' 8K MILES
#PP378
WAS $17,995
now $81 .990


6.0 V8, POWER PKG.,
ALLOYS 27K MILES,
#P336B4
WAS $25,995
now s1aa00


12 FORD
CERTIFJEb PC6WER PKQ.,
AUTO.TRANS, 28K MILES
S#R3,r8.6
WAS $10,95
ow $16,0995


08 TOYOTA
HIOHLANDER
V6, POWER PAQ KGE
NICE 66K MILES*P6a3'
WAS S19.995
Now $17.095


C 9 I~


10 5I!M0LMU
MOONROOF. LEATHER.
NAVIGATION. 19K #R3363
WAS 827,995
maO *2g.0


SUPERORIMW LARIAT
LEATHER.
20" WHEELS. 48K MI.
#P3385
WAS $28,995
NOW $2Ot.99


11 FORD FOCUS SEL
..EATER, MOONROOF,
ICETWIFIED, 33K MILES
#R3359
WAS S19,995
NOW $17,995


10 0ADILLAo
8RX
LEATHER, CHROME WHEELS.
43K MILES. #13110A
WAS S32.995
Now $28.995


11 W LOMWV BT 08 enaPla laP
? iStPT P0SCAPE XLT
LEATHER MOONROOF, SETUP LEATHER. 8.4 V8. NICE 4 CYL, POWER PKG..
FOR TWINH, H INCLUDED. 24K 45K MI. #P3365A CFUIE 4OK MILES
N12352B #1221 4A
WAS 520,995 WAS 23,905 WAS 'S24.,95
Now 1i6m,0A now 6$a21.95 ow WaI.0o95


LEATHER. MOONROOF.
DVD. 48K MILES
WAS $32,090
Now IUS.OSas


nXPLORNR LMT.
LEATHER. LOADED.
CERTIFIED 24K MI.. #P33614
WAS 36S,995


SUPER N ILIAl
4X4. 5.0 VB. LEATHER.
CNEiE OWNER. 35K
#1 2162A
WAS $37,995
IAfw AI 9,09


Is HeSHim-eY l .... *
*All prices plus $299.50 P&H, R
tax, tag & title.
All Incentives applied.
Incentives good thru 2-4-2013
Pictures for Illustration purposes only. ,
Prices good thru 1-23-2013 W.A,C. Jh llAI"" dbtm Daig n allsg uoy mR Matulh I L
Nwr U0' o UMAUNPmA Las l,, 4 S l(* 1 PUa
wwwChIpelo Fordem RICN BaNN11 a4....


8RP ......$294 5


10B SUNDAY, JANUARY 20,2013


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