<%BANNER%>
PRIVATE ITEM Digitization of this item is currently in progress.
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028304/00958
 Material Information
Title: Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title: Sunday Floridan
Portion of title: Floridan
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Jackson County Floridan
Publisher: Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Marianna Fla
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates: 30.776389 x -85.238056 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note: "Independent."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID: UF00028304:00996
 Related Items
Preceded by: Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by: Marianna Floridan

Full Text




1B Rams roll over'D. wgs
Informing more than 17,0(() readers daily in print and online


JACKSON COL 1


VT W
Cl 2 ,IobScq 74 11q.k, 003
..., *-*. G.LN MIXED ADC dic
LIBRARY OF' FLORID1A HILS'TORY
PO BOX 117007I..
GAINESVILLE YL 32611--'7007 '. i '' .:
'31 11' 4, AARL&M.


eIlfare agency
Isn't miss child .
'i..: ,t ,..


.i. .. - Vo.l. 90'No.16



Library research reveals need for repairs


BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com

It could cost $75,000 or more
tb repair the deteriorated un-
derpinning of Jackson County's
library building in Marianna and
prevent further degradation, ac-
cording to the structural engi-
neer hired to assess the scope of
the problems there.
His low estimate on. the cost
was $37,500, and he stressed in
his report to the board that the
eventual hard estimate could.
fluctuate beyond either extreme.
The study was ordered after
library officials noticed and re-
ported potential structural is-
sues, including holes in the vis-
ible portion of the building's
north stem wall, which stands
upright between the foundation
underground and the finished
floor above. The damage to the
visible part of the stem wall is
easily seen; "mouse holes" of de-
terioration exist along the north
side where the building meets


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
These holes at a pair of roof drains show some of the deterioration caused by rain water that, over many years,
dripped onto and eroded parts of the Jackson County library building on Green Street in Marianna. A consultant
says drains were set too close to the building and that the system should be retooled.


the ground. The damage extends
more than a foot below ground
in some spots as well.


In his report, BTK Engineer-
ing Services President Brad Kent
summarized the damage he


found in the stem wall.
"The stem wall on the north
side of the building has failed at


the grade level (where building
and ground meet). The face of the
masonry on many cells (of the
stem wall) has been completely
eroded and dissolved. There are
some cells that the only thing left
on the face of the masonry is the
concrete that would have been
encased in the cell."
Kent goes on to say that, while
the footings for the stem wall are
structurally intact, the cells of
the wall hold water that further
deteriorates it. He also advised
that "there are numerous cracks
in the wall below the finished
floor...the demise of the stem
wall will advance these cracks
and lead to more problems."
Further, "the grading around
the building allows water, rain,
condensation and runoffto flow
next to the building," the study
advised. "The surface of the wall
loses all protection, from the
elements and opens the pores
(that) allow this water to enter.
See LIBRARY, Page7A


FARM TO TABLE


Lauren O'Bryan gives a quick lesson in the mechanics, physics and aesthetics of making ice cream Tuesday
at Southern Craft Creamery.

Artisan creamery will use local


produce to create unique treats


BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com

auren O'Bryan's childhood provide the
inspiration for her calling as an adult.
The little girl who grew up on the Cin-
dale dairy farm in Jackson County is now 28
years old, and she wants to make ice cream.
She'll.be buying locally-produced fruits and
other crops to create the unique flavors she
hopes will solidly establish her as a ma-
jor force in the small, artisan market she's
targeted as her niche. Of course the milk she
needs will come from Cinfdale Farms, where
her parents Cindy and Dale continue their
operation full tilt with help from her sister
and brother-in-law.
O'Bryan and Satsuma farmer Mack Glass
,have already informally decided that she'll
buy some of his produce in the next harvest
season, and she's already taken a few back to
experiment with in her production space/ice
cream science lab. In fact, she already has at
least one tasty, colorful sorbet sample which
features his satsumas combined with ginger.
She's still tinkering with the recipe, but has
already accomplished a unique flavor that
has the potential to put her on the map in her
niche market.
She and husband Zach, a native of Calhoun
County, are renting a modest-sized produc-
tion space in the old Goldkist peanut ware-
house off Franklin Street in Marianna and she


"Well be making our products completely
from scratch. Think the demand ill
be there, because not many people are
making it like we do."
Lauren O'Bryan,
Owner, Southern Craft Creamery

already has dozens of test-run sample batch-
es of many flavors in her freezers. O'Bryan
said she feels she's in the perfect place for
this venture and that this is an enterprise that
reflects her philosophy of food and her and
love of the region.
O'Bryan has no desire to become a giant in
the ice cream industry; she wants her cus-
tomers and her growers very near at hand.
She wants her reach to extend from Pensacola
to Tallahassee and has no interest in expand-
ing further. Her place in the shadow of the
local landmark peanut silo off Franklin Street
is somewhat symbolic ofher business goals.
For her, the Southern Craft Creamery won't
just be about making money. In fact, she says;
it's about something much more than the size
of her own bank account.
"I studied, grew up in and moved around
in areas all my life where local agriculture
and the rural lifestyle were really celebrated,"
O'Bryan said. "Farm-to-table restaurants
See CREAMERY, Page 7A


IT'S MAGICAL


,W!'iH'fi//t/fl/At/!1 1t I-. U, I ,\
PH OS l B .Il i. A lilt'ERl 'FiCPIOAII
Dianne Oswald and Macky Gortemoller applaud magical comedian Vernon
Linton as he makes a glass disappear Tuesday during a show for the Chipola
Regional Arts Association.


Vernon Linton shows the crowd that there is nothing In the ag wniie
performing his magic comedy show for the Chlpola Regional Arts
Association.


) CLASSIFIEDS...6B


) ENTERTAINMENT...5B


) LOCAL...3A


)) OBITUARIES...2A


This Newspaper
Is Printed On
Recycled Newsprint




7 65161 8005!1 9


Follow us




Facebook Twitter


) STATE...5A


SSPORTS...1B


) NATION...8A


--


.. .


rrl~lnrsa~*lA~aaaP~d~:


~. :..,..... li~-*;x.a:...m~~~.nram~llllr~a ;e I~RddlYPI
I'? PI ~l:~Lj~:~~t~~l~~ '!IIIOLL*I~:!3li~.~.~:L.r~4*jpy*~Bmnu~P~ (rrr . :';,' I;'.r~a~LL


.; r'< .,,' : ; ,. .N ,: .' e '1 .







-12A WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16, 2013


Thursday
Rain and Much Colder



- High- 620
S Low -390


Saturday
Mostly Sunny and Cool


. High 580
2 _, : Low 38

Friday
Sunny, Breezy and Cold


High 640
Low 38


Sunday
Partly Cloudy and Mild


WAKE-UP CU


2-4 hours, O(I I" Year it, date, 0 54"
Month to date 0 54'" Nornal YTD 2.53"
Normal MTD 2.53" Nonnal for year 59.26"
TIDES


Panama City
Apalachicola
Port St. Joe
Destin
Pensacola


Low
Low
Low
Low
Low


RIVER READINGS
Woodruff
BlCoillelttO n
Marianna
Caryville.


7:24 AM
12:56 PM
7:29 PM
8:40 AM
9:14AM


High,
High
High
High
High


Reading
40.35 ft.
0.46 ft.
6.33 ft.
3.89 ft.


- 3:07 PM
- 6:23 AM
- 12:07 AM
- 12:40 AM
- 1:13 AM


Flood Stage
66.0 ft.
15.0 ft.
19.0 ft.
12.0 ft.


Weather Outlook


FLORIDA'S REAL

PANHANDLE Jm

MEDIA PARTNERS WJAQ OO0.9 '

LI S iO .WT U El D


JACKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN
Publisher Valeria Roberts
vroberts@jcfloridan.com

Circulation Manager Dena Oberski
doberski@jcfloridan.com

CONTACT US
Telephone: 850-526-3614
FAX: 850-482-4478
Email: editorial@jcfloridan.com
Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447
Street Address:
4403 Constitution Lane
Marianna, FL 32446
Office Hours:
Weekdays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

MISS YOUR PAPER?
You should receive your newspaper no later
than 6 a.m. If it does not arrive, call Circula-
tion between 6 a.m. and noon, Tuesday to
Friday, and 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. on Sunday. The
Jackson County Floridan (USPS 271-840)
is published Tuesday through Friday and
Sunday mornings. Periodical postage paid
at Marianna, FL.


SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Home delivery: $11.23 per month: $32.83
for three months; $62.05 for six months;
and $123.45 for one year. All prices include
applicable state and local taxes. Mail
subscriptions must be paid in advance. Mail
subscriptions are: $46.12 for three months;
$92.24 for six months; and $184.47 for one
year.

ADVERTISING
The advertiser agrees that the publisher *
shall not be liable for damages arising
out of errors and advertisements beyond
the amount paid for the space actually
occupied by that portion of the advertise-
ments in which the error occurred, whether
such error is due to the negligence of the
publisher's employees or otherwise, and
there shall be not liability for non-inser-
tion of any advertisement beyond the
amount paid for such advertisement. This
newspaper will not knowingly accept or
publish illegal material of any kind. Advertis-
ing which expresses preference based on
legally protected personal characteristics is
not acceptable.

HOWTO GETYOUR
NEWS PUBLISHED
The Jackson County Floridan will publish
news of general interest free of charge.
Submit your news or Community Calendar
events via e-mail, fax, mail, or hand delivery.
Fees nom j.p, for I.r'ddirn e i, e-iaerr er
anniversary and birth announcements.
Forms are available at the Floric3rn oiice? .
Photographs must be of o.:..i rlujiii, ir,,d
suitable for print. The Floridan reserves the
right ', i ll dit i ll ij rni::i,. n

GETTING IT RIGHT
The Jackson County Floridan's policy
is to correct mistakes promptly. To
report an error, please call 526-3614
Monday-Friday.


Conuunity Calendar


WEDNESDAY, JAN. 16
n Jackson County Tourist Development
Council Meeting 10 a.m. at The Russ House,
Lafayette St. in Marianna.
) Early Learning Coalition of NW Fla. Inc.
Board of Directors Meeting 11a.m. at the
Workforce Center in Panama City. Call-in number:
1-888-67-3525: guest code: 499S4.?9399#
) Chlpola Retirees Luncheon 11:30 a.m. at the
Gazebo Coffee Shoppe & Deli, Marianna. All retirees
and friends are invited,
D Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting
Noon to 1 p.m. in the AA room of First United
Methodist Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.
) Basic Computer Class, Part 1 Noon to 3
p.m. at the Goodwill Career Training Center, 4742
U.S. 90, Marianna. Learn basic components and use
of a computer.Call 526-0139.

THURSDAY, JAN. 17
u International Chat n' Sip 8:30-10 a.m. at
the Jackson County Public Libiu, iC .'.GI ,ice,
St. in Marianna. Learning Center staff and their
international English learners invite te pubi.- for
the exchange of language, culture and ideas in a
relaxed environment. Light refreshments served. No
charge. Call 482-9124.
) St. Anne Thrift Store Hours 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Tuesday and Thursdays at 4285 Second Ave. in
Marianna. Toys/clothing sale: Buy one; get one
(same or lesser value) for 50 cents. Call 482-3734.
) Caregiver Support Group Meeting -11 a.m.
to noon in the First Presbyterian Church Social
Hall, 4437 Clinton St. in Marianna. Open to all
family caregivers providing care to loved ones or
friends. Confidential group, facilitated by a profes-
sional group counselor. Coffee, water, light snacks
provided.
Arbor Day Celebration and Tee Planting
- 11:30 a.m. on the front lawn of Jackson Hospital.
Call 526-4875.
Garden Gala Committee Kick-off Event
- Noon at Covenant Hospice, 4215 Kelson Ave.,
Suite E, in Marianna. Volunteers needed to help
plan, prepare and present the eighth-annual Garden
Gala set for June 22. Lunch will be provided. Call
482-8520 or 209-8008.
) Marlanna KIwanIs Club Meeting Noon at
Jim's Buffet & Grill, 4329 Lafayette St., Marianna.
Call 482-2290.
a Job Club Noon to 3 p.m. at t he Gr.odallr
Career Training Center, 4742 U.S. 90, Marianna.
Learn job seeking/retention skills; get job search
assistance. Call 526-0139.


) Jackson County NAACP Meeting 6 p.m.
in the St. James A.M.E. Church basement. 2891
Orange St. in Marianna. Call 569-1294.
a Alcoholics Anonymous Closed discussion,
8-9 p.m.. First United Methodist Church, 2901 Cale-
donia St., Marianna, in the AA room. Attendance
limited to per:'ons '-Ith .j desire to stop drinking:
paper ill not be signed

FRIDAY, JAN. 18
Celebrate Recovery 7 p.m. at Evangel Wor-
ship Center 2b645 Pebble Hill Road in Marianna.
Adult, teerii meetllgs to o.jercome hurts, habits and
hang-ups. Dinner 6 p m Child care available. Call
209-7856,573-1131.
D Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 8-9
p.m. in theAA room of First United Methodist
Church. 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.

SATURDAY, JAN. 19
v 2nd Annual Martin Luther King Day Block
Celebration 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Orange Street,
between Hannah and Andrews streets, in Marianna.
Presented by the -AMLI Alumni Association, I W Fla
Chapter. For event/vendor space information, call
482-8420 or 209-2943.
* Florida Bull Test Sale -12:30 p.m. at the UF
North Fla. Research and Education Center, Mari-
anna. Only bulls meeting specific benchmarks are
eligible for the sale. Call 850-394-9124.
a Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting
- 4 30 5:30 p.m. in the AA room of First United
Methodist Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.
a Jackson County Talent Show 5 p.m. at
Chipola College in Marianna, featuring soloists,
choirs, praise dancers and speakers. Part of Jack-
son County NAACP's Martin Luther King: Keeping
the Dream Alive festivities. Call 272-8231.
) St. Joseph Masonic Lodge No. 99 39th An-
nual Banquet 6 p.m. in the New Mount Olive
Missionary Baptist Church Fellowship Hall, 2870
Barnes St., Marianna. Guest speaker: The Rev.
Sinclair Forbes. Tickets: $15 donation. Call 850-
594-6181.

SUNDAY, JAN. 20
* Fine Arts Series Concert: Lopez Tabor
Duo 4 p.m. at St. Luke's Episcopal Church in
downtown Marianna, featuring Venezuelan violinist
Alfonso Lopez and pianist Michelle Tabor. Meet the
artists at a reception following the concert.
Public welcome. Donations accepted for the arts
series.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Closed Discussion


- 6:30 p.m. at 4349 W. Lafayette St. in Marianna
(in one-story building behind 4351 W. Lafayette St.).
Attendance limited to persons with a desire to stop
drinking.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Meeting 8 p.m. in
the board room of Campbellton-Graceville Hospital,
5429 College Drive, Graceville.

MONDAY, JAN. 21
Martin Luther King Jr. Day Breakfast 7
a.m. at the Saint James A.M.E. Church, 2891Orange
St., Marianna. Free event. Call 693-3055.
a Martin Luther King Jr. Day Parade -10 a.m.
beginning at Borden St., ending at Madison St. in
Marianna. Call 693-3055.
) Chipola Chapter, NSDAR Meeting -11 a.m. in
the Hudnall Building Community Room, Marianna.
Dr. Ray Marling '.*,11 discuss "Women's Heart Health."
Reservations required for the luncheon: contact
Vice Regent Carolyn Jordan at 638-1947 or cdjor-
dan@bellsouth.net.
a Jackson County Quilter's Guild Meeting
5:30-7:30 p.m. at Ascension Lutheran Church,
3975 U.S. 90 West, Marianna. Business meetings
are fourth Mondays: other Mondays are for
projects, lessons, help. All quilters welcome. Call
209-7638.
a Capt. Luke Lott's Calhoun Guards, Camp
2212, Sons of Confederate Veterans Monthly
Meeting 6 p.m. at the Altha Diner, 25563 North
Main St., Altha (U.S. 71 downtown).
a Alford Community Organization Meeting 6
p.m. in the Alford Community Center. New mem-
bers from Alford, surrounding communities invited
to join. Call 579-4482,638-4900 or 579-5173.
Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 8-9
p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
'Church, 2901 Caledonia St., Marianna.

TUESDAY, JAN. 22
* St. Anne Thrift Store Hours 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Tuesday and Thursdays at 4285 Second Ave. in
Marianna. Toys/clothing sale: Buy one; get one
(same or lesser value) for 50 cents. Call 482-3734.
) Orientation Noon to 3 p.m. at Goodwill Career
Training Center, 4742 U.S. 90, Marianna.
Learn about and register for free services. Call
526-0139.
a Sewing Circle 1 p.m. at Jackson County
Senior Citizens, 2931 Optimist Drive in Marianna.
Call 482-5028.
* Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 8-9
p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.


Ihe sui bbmnt .ior, deadline for this calendar is t oI dljj, s lore ,i bh11.ir ~Lo'in Submit to: C,:mniliiiuinj C l-den1.i-al 1i ,i 'on '' I .i F I.:r .1,i11 P. O .. '*.*"* i Mii i Riiiii FL 32447.
errmii' ~ ',ir.ji "'l.:r: i lr d 1 -,rn : 850-482-4478 or bring items to 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.

---Police Ro--undup


Marianna Police
Department
The Marianna Police De-
partment listed the following
incidents for Jan. 14, the latest
available report: One acci-
dent, one suspicious.vehicle,
three suspicious persons, one
report of illness, one burglary,
one drug offense, one bur-
glar alarm, two traffic stops,
two larceny complaints, one
obscene/threatening phone
call, one assault, three animal
complaints and one assist of
another agency.

Jackson County
Sheriff's Office
The Jackson County Shli ill's
Office and county fire/rescue
reported the following inci-


dents for Jan. 14, the latest
available report. (Some of these
calls might be related to after-
hours calls taken on behalf of


Sii


Graceville and
Cottondale
police depart-
ments): 'Wo
accidents,, one
hospice death,
one stolen


tag, four abandoned vehicles,
three suspicious vehicles, five
suspicious persons, one escort,
one highway obstruction, one
report of illness, three burglar-
ies, three verbal disturbances,
four fire calls (one with police
response), two drug offenses,
16 medical calls, two traffic
crashes, one burglar alarm,
one panic alarm, 12 traffic
stops, eight larceny complaints,


one trespass complaint, one
obscene or threatening phone
call, one assault, one suicide at-
tempt, four animal complaints,
two assists of motorists or pe-
destrians, four assists of other
agencies, one public service
call, one criminal registration,
one welfare check, one patrol
request, and one threat/harass-
ment complaint.

Jackson County
Correctional Facility
The following persons were
booked into the county jail dur-
ing the latest reporting periods:
) Victoria Richardson, 24, 2443
Sapp Road (Lot 3), Cottondale,
violation of conditional release.
) Bonnie Kent, 27, 16740 NE
Luke Holland Road, Althea,


grand theft auto.
) Thomas Swearington, 32,
L'i).5 SE Iola St., Blountstown,
violation of state probation.
) Charles Gaither, 43, 717 East
13th Court (Apt. A), PIni;um a t
City, non-child support.
SIsaac Mount, 35, 51nti7 Bevis
Road, B ot.-.tm, grant theft auto.
Maher Salem, 35, 1216
\\W idllhain North, Gretna, A,
carrying concealed weapons,
possession of narcotics, driving
while license suspended/re-
voked, hold for Hillsborough
Co.

Jail Population: 211
To report a crime, call CrimeStoppers
at 526-5000 or a local law enforcement
agency.
-,-, pi ,, .,..iil ...i -i.-. ,, ,,, call 1-888 -
40.1 F.'L JJl


Chevrolet-Buick-Cadillac-Nissan
4204 Lafayette St. Marianna, FL

(850) 482-3051
*'/';

JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN ww~. ji i.. -I ,::.m






18 I'gh 7


High: 72 .' ..* ,
Low: 50.A"-'. .



h ., $ 3 ..
w,53 ,% .' .. "




ULTRA VIOLET INDEX

0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8-10 Very High, 11+ Extreme
0 2 3 4

THE SUN AND MOON
Sunrise 6:39 AM
Sunset 5:03 PM
Moonrise 9:40 AM Feb. Jan. Jan. Feb.
Moonset 10:26 PM 10 18 27 3


~~`~I---~------------~





JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.comr


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Signing of the proclamation for the city is Marianna Mayor James B. Wise (seated). Pictured
with Wise (from left) Chris Sharkey, Rosie Smith, Charlotte Hunter, Jimmie Irwin, Mary Ann
Gibbs, Juanita Sanson, Carol Schoepf, Joyce Dennis, Pam Pittman, Muriel Turner and Nancy
McMullin.

Arbor Day Crepe Myrtle tree


planting set in Marianna
h a


Special to theFloridan
The Marianna Garden Club, The Mari-
anna Woman's Club, and the Marianna
Tree Board will join together Thursday at
11:30 a.m. for a celebration of the plant-


ing of five Natchez Crepe Myrtle trees on
the front lawn at Jackson Hospital.
After the ceremony, everyone is invited
for a Dutch treat lunch in the hospital
cafeteria. For additional information,
call Juanita Sanson at 526-4875.


Hope School announces


employees of the year


Special to the Floridan
Hope School is pleased
to announce the em-
ployees of the year for
the 2012-13 school year.
Hope School's teacher of
the year is Tanya Wiggins.
Wiggins is completing
her first full year at Hope
School. She teaches the
Pre-K 1 class and also
serves as the decorat-
ing committee chairper-
son. She is a graduate of
Marianna High School
and has a Bachelor of Sci-
ence in elementary edu-
cation from Florida State
University.
She has taught at Mari-
anna Middle School as


well as Golsofi Elemen-
tary School before com-
ing to Hope School. She is
certified in ESE and Pre-
K. She is married to Brian
Wiggins and they have
two sons, Ben and Sam.
, Wiggins has been a tre-
mendous asset to the stu-'
dents and staff of Hope
School.
Hope School's school-
related employee of the
year is Don Holland.
Holland is a paraprofes-
sional/head basketball
coach and has been at
Hope for 12 years. He also
serves as basketball coach
of the three time Special
Olympics State Champion
Falcons basketball team.


Holland graduated from
Cottondale High School
and received his associ-
ates of arts from West Ala-
,bama and is working on
his bachelor of science in
education from Ashford
University. Coach Holland
has two daughters, Deana
and Ciarra. He serves as
a mentor for many Hope
School students that he
works with.


Several MLK Day events


planned in Blountstown


Special to the Floridan
The 18th annual Dr.
Martin Luther King Jr. cel-
ebration will be observed
on Jan. 21, beginning at
Blountstown City Hall lo-
cated at 2059 W. Central
Ave. After the invocation
prayer community leaders,
clergymen, politicians, and
entrepreneurs will lead a
march and sing in solemn
and unified manner. This
will be done to reflect and
honor King as a pioneer,
pastor, motivational and
civil rights leader rioted
for his feats of courage and
nobility of purpose. King's
tireless yet effective efforts
forever changed the view
and face of freedom.
The line-up and proces-
sion will begin at 9 a.m.
and proceed to St. Paul
A.M.E. Church, located at
16076 SE River St., where
a program will be held fol-
lowing the march. The fea-
tured speaker will be sister
Alicia Clemmons.
Clemmons resides in
Marianna, is the wife of
LaDon Clemmons and
the mother of Savannah,
14, Olivia, 9, and Hayle, 3.
Reared in Blountstown, she
is the daughter of James
and Amanda Dawson, and
the sister of Jamie and the
late Vanessa Dawson. She
is also the granddaugh-
ter of Minnie Lee Dawson
of Grand Ridge. She is a
graduate of Blountstown
High School, Chipola Col-
lege and attended Florida
State University. She is a
seventh- and eighth-grade


science teacher at Roulhac
Middle School in Chipley.
She has been honored as
rookie teacher of the year
for both the school and dis-
trict of Washington County
Schools.
In February of 2012, she
received a master's in ed-
ucation leadership from
Concordia University in
Portland, Ore. Her goal is
to become a principal and,
educate as many young
people as possible, help-
ing them grow into posi-


tive leaders and citizens
of society. She is an active
member of the Saint Paul
African Methodist Church
in Blountstown.
The winner of the $50 gas
raffle will be announced at
the program.
Commemorative T-shirts
are available. Small, me-
dium and large are $10,
x-large and xx-large are
$11. For more information
call Betty Hudson at 850-
674-7310 or Hazel Ming at
850-674-8587.


Companion Animal Medicine & Surgery

SWe Appreciate the Citizens qf:
andyour t support
Jacksonf County and your suppdt.
2909 JeffersonStreet 850.482-3520
____ _^__ ^_^^ ^^.^ _j.


Your smile is onn6'Tfhe first thiiis pole
notice about you, and a brilliant smile makes.
a lasting impression. Inquire today about our
general and cosmetic dental procedures.
EASY FINANCING PLANS AVAILABLE



4307 Third Avenue Marianna
850-526-4220


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Employee of the year Don Holland and teacher of the year
Tanya Wiggins


Marriages,
Divorces
Special to the Floridan
The following marriages
and divorces were record-
ed in Jackson County dur-
ing the week of Jan. 7-11:
Marriages
) Joseph Maylon Bien
and Sara Elizabeth Riley.
n Michael Anthony
Brown and Tonr Holmes
Stout.
Divorces
) Bruce E Chase vs. Lori
Frank Chase.
)) James C. Avery vs. De-
lores Turner.
) David Cumbie vs. Me-
lissa Cumbie.
7* Steven Stanton vs. Kris-
tin Kent-Stanton
, Jason Preston Phillips
vs. Michelle Faye Phillips


Stunning


Brilliant
'The Forever
After Diamond'






Sa tson
OEMOLOOISTS
Marianna's Most
Trusted Jeweler
Est. 1971 -0
850.482.4037
watsonjewelersecom
II IIIM O


'8 [.,CHIPOLA

COMMUNITY

BANK

Marianna's Only Locally Owned Community Bank


4701 Highway 90
Marianna, FL 32446

Phone: 850-526-7144

Fax: 850-526-7166
chipolacommunitybank.com


Me nm be *


Surgical Excellence in Marianna
if you or a family member need surgery, look no farther than Marianna for a hospital and
surgeons you can trust. We're focused on ensuring outstanding surgery services in many
different specialities including general surgery, gynecologic surgery, breast surgery, orthopedic
surgery and urologic surgery. We also have state-of-the-art surgery suites, imaging capabilities,
and an operating room team that is experienced and caring. Couple this with our excellent
hospital-wide support and our commitment to patient service and you'll quickly understand


what sets us apart.


For a surgery referral or more information about
our surgical services, please call 850.526.2200.


4250 Hospital Drive / Marianna, Florida 32446 / 850.526.2200 / www.jacksonhosp.com


ii Jackson
Hospital


(ii, i i'n!l a Healthier Community,


I I I III --


S"WE TRAILER YOUR NEEDS"

Sales & Service
From Utility to
Goose Neck Eauipment






iuM Truck Trailer & Rental

850.482.4442
2163 Post Oak Lane, Marianna
Behind Ruby Tuesday


3A WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16, 2013


LOCAL












Publisher
VALERIA ROBERTS ,

Florida Voices

There's a better way


,to curb 'malicious'

political ads

N o one likes to be criticized unfairly- least of all
political candidates.
And organizations that run malicious and
potentially defamatory ads should be called to ac-
count for the political statements they make on the
airwaves'or in mailers.
That said, a bill filed by state.Sen. Maria Sachs, D-Del-
ray, is an incomplete response to a problem that reared
its ugly head again during the 2012 elections.
Under Florida law, electioneering communications
organizations (ECOs) can draw unlimited donations to
Produce attack ads, while at the same hiding behind a
system that blurs transparency. For example, ECOs are
not required to report all the candidates they're sup-
porting or attacking.
As a result of this flawed system, voters were inun-
dated with obnoxious mailers during the 2012 elections
and had little or no idea where these ads originated
or who really was behind them. Some mailers, such as
the ones that bashed David Dees as a "liberal" in the
Martin County sheriffs GOP primary and called Leslie
Swan a third-rate supervisor of elections during Indian
River County's Republican primary, were inaccurate,
but legal under state election law.
So what to do about malicious political ads?
Sachs',proposal Senate Bill 114 would compel
groups buying attack ads.to fdlloW the same rules as
candidates, who aren't allowed to run ads that libel or
defame opponents..It also would enable an aggrieved
candidate to file a defamation complaint with the
Florida Elections Commission, vhich could impose a
fine as high as $5,000 on the group that produced the
offending ads.
There are problems with Sachs' proposal. i
First, it may not pass constitutional muster.
Second, the courts, not the Florida Elections Commis-
sion, should be the venue where defamation com-
plaints are heard and adjudicated.
The solution if there is one is to require greater
transparency of these shadowy electioneering commu-
nications organizations. Such groups almost certainly
would hesitate to make malicious or outlandish state-
ments about candidates if voters knew, with greater
clarity, exactly who the messengerss are.
Or, better yet, the state should eliminate~ECOs
altogether.
Sachs' proposal is well-intentioned. However, it fails
to address the most critical issue: The very existence of
these (poorly regulated) electioneering communica-
tions organizations....

SThis editorial was published in thq Treasure Coast Palm.

Contact representatives
Florlda Leglatu


Rep.-Marti Coley, R-District 7
Marti.Coley@myfloridahouse.gov
Building A, Room 186 Chipola College
3094 Indian Circle
Marianna, FL 32446-1701


Rep. Brad Drake, R-District 5
Brad.Drake@myfloridahouse.gov
NWFL State-Chautauqua Campus #205
908 U.S. Highway 90 West
DeFuniak Springs, FL 32433-1436
Sen. Bill Montford. D-District 6
208 Senate Office Building
404 South Monroe St.
Tallahassee, FL 32399-1100
montford!bill.web@ flsenate.gov

U.S. Congress
Rep. Steve Southerland, R-2nd District
1229 Longworth HOB
Washington, DC 20515
Phone: (202) 225-5235
Fax: (202) 225-5615
Sen. Bill Nelson (D)
Washington office
United States Senate
716 Senate Hart Office Building
Washington, DC 20510
(202) 224-5274
Sen. Marco Rubio (R)
Washington office
United States Senate
B40A Dirksen Senate Office Bailding
Washington, D.C. 20510
(202) 224-3041


STAHWER.
60 COM ICSc(DM
2013


Sandy should be Florida's


BY CHARLES LEE
Florida Voices
uper storm Sandy left behind
vast devastation and a chilling
reminder of the powerful
destruction just one act of Mother
Nature can exact on our nation.
Sandy's wrath left more than 100
people dead and 8 million more
without power for weeks. Insured
damage estimates
continue to climb and are pro-
jected to top $20 billion, with total
economic losses estimated to be
$50 billion or more.
For Floridians, Sandy should be
a wake-up call, reminding us that
although the hurricane season has
come to an end, we must prepare
for the next unavoidable storm
or series of natural disasters that
frequent our coastline.
Questions remain unanswered
regarding the viability of state-
funded subsidies that Florida
taxpayers rely on to cover damages
in the event of a major storm. Citi-
zens Property Insurance Corp. and
the Florida Hurricane Catastrophe.
Fund are woefully underfunded
state-run programs that lack the
ability to protect Florida residents
in the case of a natural disaster.
The current structure of Citizens
requires any Florida insurance


policyholder to help pay claim ob-
ligations beyond what the compa-
ny and its reinsurer the Cat Fund
- currently have saved.
While we may have just closed
the book on the 2012 hurricane
season, it would be irresponsible
to not start looking toward and
preparing for the 2013 season.
Should 2013 bring a storm to our
shores, Floridians could be faced
with enormous hurricane tax as-
sessments to help cover Citizens
policyholder claims. These crush-
ing hurricane taxes would cripple
businesses and families across
our state. Once considered the
insurer of last resort, Citizens has
burgeoned beyond its healthy size
to insure'one out of four homes in
Florida.
Some have suggested that Flori-
da's previous storm-free years have
provided Citizens and the Cat Fund
with a sizable cushion to rely upon,
but good luck is not a sufficient
plan for disaster recovery. Lawmak-
ers should work toward reducing
the risk associated with these
government entities and lessen the
burden on Florida taxpayers. The
meager reserves and capital Citi-
zens and the Cat Fund have built
up would not be enough to cover
immense damage wrought by a


wake-up call
storm such as Sandy, leaving all
Florida homeowners, businesses,
renters, charitable organizations,
and automobile policyholders to
pay the state's debt. '
Reforming Citizens and the Cat
Fund will benefit our state finan-
cially and environmentally. In ad-
dition to Florida's natural habitats,
which are important to native
wildlife and our robust tourism
industry, Florida's low-lying coastal
areas include barrier islands and
wetlands that are essential in
providing natural wind and storm-
surge buffers. Our distinctive
coastline actually protects inland
areas, helping reduce the number
of storm-related insurance claims.
The actuarially unsound low
rates currently offered by Citizens
and the Cat Fund have incentiv-
ized reckless coastal development
in our naturally sensitive areas.
Returning Citizens to its original
role as an insurer of last resort and
right-sizing the Cat Fund so that
it can safely meet its obligations
will ensure that Florida preserves
critical coastline protections and
has the ability to recover after a
hurricane.

Charles Lee is the director
of advocacy for Audubon of Florida.


Academy Prep shows results matter
BYLUIS VIERA
Florida Voices for students at elite boarding as educational empowerment,
O ne famous Abraham schools. equal opportunity and footing,
Lincoln story holds that, Each morning at 7:30 Mr. Tamayo and social justice are realized at
upon being questioned stands at the school entrance and Academy Prep. Here, as President
by his advisers on Gen. Ulysses welcomes each student. Students Calvin Coolidge once remarked,
Grant's alleged alcoholism, Lincoln greet Mr. Tamayo with a firm hand- "duty is not collective, but per-
responded, "find out what whiskey shake. They then gather for their sonal." Academy Prep opens doors
he drinks and send all of mygener- convocation, where two students for its students by confronting the
als a case, if it will get the same speak on life goals, and Mr. Tamayo devastating social pathologies in
results." has a few words of motivation for which they often live. At Academy
To me, the value behind this story the students. Prep, students are not defined as
that is applicable to our education And the results are outstanding. victims, but as empowered Ameri-
system is this that results matter, More than 90 percent of Academy cans with a God-given mind, brain
regardless.of process. ., *' Prep students graduate from high and spirit. To the staff at Academy
In an era when stakeholders on r" school. Compare this to Florida's Prep, social justice is a value to be
left and right have their o .'lased 1hgh'school graduation rate of 80 cherished; but properly defined, as
say in what works in education'. 'percent, and the abysmal high it is mutually dependent on society
there exists in my hometownr'f. .'' school graduation rates for the and the individual and predicated
Tampa an institution that gett "' .District of Columbia, Detroit and on reciprocity.
results, regardless of process. "' the state of Georgia, where more Most importantly, Academy Prep,
Sinte 2003, Tampa native Lincoln than one in three students do not though not a religious school, af-
Tamayo*has served as the head of graduate from high school. firms the, Catholic idea of solidarity,
school for Academy Prep Center of After graduating at Academy Prep, wherein a community empowers
Tampa. Academy Prep is a private most students go to prestigious its members to attain their full
school in Ybor City that serves un- preparatory high schools and potential through a mutual respect
derprivileged fifth- to eighth-grade colleges. for one another's dignity, duties,
students with outstanding results. The devastating statistics involv- and rights ...
Academy Prep affirms the idea that ing minority achievement in public In our present public school sys-
one's background should have no schools are well known and need tem the dignity, duties and rights
relevancyto the standards society not be repeated here, However, it is qftoo mahy of our students are not
expects from them. Quite often, clear that finding a holistic solution respected. "Thinking outside of
what has been called the "soft big- to what has become an accepted the box" in finding solutions in ed-
otry of low expectations" drives our crisis in minority education is the ucation is not heresy. And though
culture to expect less from students next worthy step in a long Ameri- I believe the solution should begin
from historically underprivileged can journeytoward and end'with a strong; well-funded
backgrounds in a display of equality. In seeing the predomi- public school system, giving time-
crippling and counterproductive nantly African-American student limited public support to account-
paternalism. body at Academy Prep, I am able institutions like Academy
It is this misguided system that reminded that this is one of the Prep is a welcome step for our
Academy Prep vigorously con- many institutions that continue children. That is something this
fronts. At Academy Prep, students the work in equality begun by the Democrat and supporter of public
attend school up to 11 hours a day, likes of Frederick Douglass, Medgar schools can not only stomach, but
six days a week, and 11 months of Evers, President Lyndon Johnson welcome.
the year. The quality of the educa- and others. Like President Lincoln with Gen.
tion received is one often reserved Many progressive goals such Grant's whiskey, we should find out
a ," .'.... '". ,^ ; .'. what the childre~iand staff at Acad-
emy Prep drink, pd send a gallon
or two to the public school system,
if it will get the sine results.

S beus 'the Luis Viera is an attorney who practices in
lIer t IrIII 8i.50-'526 the Tampa Bay area. He can be contacted at
... .Lvirato gdensullivan.con.


1G TAHLER.
@2013 Jeff Stahler/Dist. by Universal UClick for UFS


II _11____1_1~_11~11~_~ _.1_ ~I.I._I1I~_I.._1_II ......~T1-~~.ii_~-i--_ .-~Z~ .....__.._


(II I4A






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcflorldan.com


STATE


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY16,2013 5Ar


Report: Welfare investigate
The Associated Press


MIAMI A child wel-
fare investigator did not
notice that a 5-month-old
boy now presumed dead
was missing when visiting
the family's South Florida
home in September, state
records show.
The investigator only
checked on the older chil-
dren in the home and did
not see the boy, according
to documents released
late Monday by the De-
partment of Children and
Families. A month later,
Brittney Sierra told police
she hadn't seen her baby in
more than a year.
Remains that are believed
to be those of Dontrelle
Melvin were unearthed
Friday in the backyard of
the parents' former home.
The medical examiner is
conducting DNA tests to


STHEASSOCIATED PRESS
Miramar Police investigate the crime scene, Friday, Jan. 11 in
Hallandale Beach. It took more than a year, but authorities
in South Florida are searching for Dontrell Melvin who went
missing when he was just 5 months old.


identify the remains. Si-
erra, 21, and the baby's fa-
ther, Calvin Melvin, 27, are
not married and have an


on-and-off relationship.
Both have been charged
with child neglect.
A child welfare investiga-


r didn't
tor went to Sierra's ho
in September after so0
one complained to
state abuse hotline
the children were dirty
smelled and that Sie[
younger sister brought
pornographic magazine
school.
Sierra and her two ot
children lived with
mother and Sierra's i
siblings, officials said.
The investigator also
ited the children at sch
interviewed them and
termined there were
signs of abuse or negl
only that the house.
smell a bit. The child
said they were fed and
cared for, according to I
records.
But younger child
including 5-month
Dontrelle, "were not se
the report said. DCF p
cies require case work


notice missing baby
me to be aware of conditions vestigators and casework-
me- for all children in a home, ers claimed they visited a
the not just the child involved home, but really did not, or
that in a particular case, DCF did not make contact with
and spokeswoman Erin Gil- all of the children living in
rra's lespie noted Tuesday. the home.
it a Child welfare officials An investigator follow-
e to said the.agency had no in- ing up on a 2011 call that
teraction with the family a 10-year-old girl from
their while the baby was miss- Miami-Dade County was
her ing and never received an in danger did not make
four abuse allegation about contact with her when she
him. DCF contracts out visited the family's home
vis- child investigative work to and didn't call police. Nu-
ool, local law enforcement in bia Barahona's body was
de- some counties around the found days later, decom-
no state, including Broward, posing in the back of her.
Ject, where Dontrelle lived. The adoptive father's pickup
did agency is working with the truck. Records released af-
Iren Broward Sheriff's office to ter her death show that the
well 'make sure that workers in- state hotline had received
DCF vestigating other cases are numerous calls from peo-
"following safety measures pie who claimed the child
ren, for all the children in the smelled and had bruises.
-old home," Gillespie said. .In Dontrelle Melvin's
en," The agency has been crit- case, records also indicate
?oli- icized over several cases in the agency had 30 prior
kers recent years in which in- contacts with the family.


FAMU delays hiring new leader for band


The Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE Flori-
da A&M University unex-
pectedly delayed the an-
nouncement on Tuesday
of a new director for the
university's famed march-
ing band, citing contract
negotiations with the
finalist for the job.
Before an auditorium full
of faculty and students,
university officials abrupt-
ly said that the appoint-
ment of a new director for
The Marching 100 was on
hold for now. The band
- which has appeared at
Super Bowls and inaugu-
ration parades has been
in limbo for more than a
year following the haz-
ing death of drum major
Robert Champion.
Champion died in No-
vember 2011 after being
beaten aboard a band bus.
More than a dozep band
members were charged
in connection with the
incident.
Sharon Saunders, a uni-


versity spokeswoman,
said she did not know ex-
actly what stalled negotia-
tions with the finalist. But
she said that one issue
was that FAMU changed
the responsibilities of the
band director in the wake
of Champion's death.
"They needed more time
to talk about the contract
and the structure of the
organization before they
could make an announce-
ment," Saunders said.
The delay comes just
one day before FAMU of-
ficials are scheduled .to
go before the university
system's Board'of Gover-
nors to discuss a blistering
report that concluded that
the school lacked internal
controls to prevent or de-
tect hazing prior to Cham-
* pion's death.
. FAMU officials say they
have already made sweep-
ing changes in the after-
math of Champipn's death,
which also resulted in the
retirement of the band di-
rector and the resignation


of the university president.
Those changes include
limiting the Marching 100
to just FAMU students and
putting in new academic
policies. The school is also
hiring a compliance of-
ficer for the band as well
as a top official whose job
will be to focus on hazing.
Interim President Lar-
ry Robinson has said he
planned to announce the
fate of the band soon. But


Robinson has added he
wants to make sure that
the university has taken
the necessary steps to ad-
dress hazing before the
band returns.
FAMU initially fired
band director Julian'White
shortly after Champion's
death. But his dismissal
was put on hold at the urg-
ing of law-enforcement of-
ficials investigating Cham-
pion's death.


David Malloy
,, .RealtoPr
S Business: 850-258-4947
S *I E n a c b
Email: dlmadoy@ahoo.com fa^I

D)ebbie Roney Smith
850-209-8039 cell
CALL OR TE)T i
debbleroneysrmith@embarqrmalircom
Century 21
SunIy South
SM .llER. ID 4630 Hwy. 90


SMARTER. BOLDER. FASTER.
PAT FURR
Sunny South Properties
4630 Hwy. 90, Marianna, FL
Business: 850.526.2891
Cell: 850.209.8071
furr19@msn.com


,shing all a
healthy, happy and
prosperous 20131


BEN SAUNDERS, D.M.D.
PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY
4711 Highway 90 East Marianna, FL
(Between Burger King & Big Lots) 526-SPIT


Iaf/5K0MU993.dflgu91 '*lt~l
A~AMMji|^^|MJAT|Uj Jv U--
r~rervcrP~warMe AllNmr
~vulr"""""""""Aft FLI M


SEETHECARTHATWONTHE2I07


WM OiliAHiI


2WANU 0 ROM-AM WUSPORS M i#AIWM
CARStRUESOCAMPONHSHIPS

7^tfirl-(WtlftYt^
i Ow W jt bysW NASW s fll:eule*i

l~tK~d~ff9Aidaoh _


1__~ _;_~_11__~1_1__1~111--~~.11n~.m~1nn


I I I I -Y- ,, L I IC I~ I I





JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Smoked Bacon............
Farmland 4x6
Cooked Ham
or Turkey .................. ....
Land 'O' Frost
Ham & Turkey
or Italian Sub Kits........



Gourmet Dining
Beef or Chicken Stirfry.....


Lee Hot or Mild
Roll Sausage....................
Snowden S
Smoked Sausage.............


188
I 10 z.

398
24 oz.


32 oz.


$


55
16 oz.


9932
package


Jumbo Pack
r Fryer Drumsticks
or Thighs. .....................

3-Pack Small Pork
Spare Ribs.....................


Bar S" .
Corndogs

$356
3f3 Ib. box


Seabest
Tilapia Filets


168
I lb.


Gwalney
Jumbo Franks

99<16 oz.


Ronco
Spaghetti or
Elbow Macaroni
s2$06
32 oz.


Furlani
Garlic Loaf'

960.
^ ^^10 oz.


Russet Baking
Potatoes


1 5 lb. bag0


Vine Ripe Large $119
Tomatoes 4pa


Velvet
Bath Tissue


71


C


4 rolls


Pet
Evaporated Milk

954.
jr~1 ioz.


FRESH PRODUCE


Fresh Express l1 4
American l oz
or Italian Salad


U.


California
Juicy Sweet
Navel
Oranges


$245
4 Ib. bag


GO E S m i


Pepsi Products
$134
2 Itr.


hoyol ok,8.3b. $26
CharCoal.................$2


rrlo-uay
Doritos
$ 58
10.5-11.5 oz.


a


U


Gold Com Sweet Peas Green Beans
Libby's Vegetables

5 2 14.5 oz.


V*arwe l ..........
2-Ply Towels............48<


Bumble Bee
Chunk Light Tuna

92 5 oz


45 ox. Del Monte, 26.5 o .
Country Crock........ 282S aghetti Sauce...... 85



Del Monte Sauer's
Ketchup Mayonnaise

6 $1 32 oz.
On 24i I i


No Yolk, 8 ox.
Egg Noodles............ 87


Assorted Flavors
Hamburger Helper
$105
6-8 oz.


Kraft Velveta, 12-14 ox. $2
Deluxe Mix...........$201


Van Camp's
Baked Beans
$ 138
S28 oz,


I GOCRSP S


MET ARETSPCIL


- --- ------ ----


-----


.,r. I.cI


-1 6A WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16, 2013


F1,' ""
r
;ij
tb~iUTtP~*
ILL MILK
1~ rrPulran d,


EDI







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Obituaries


James & Sikes
Funeral Home
Maddox Chapel
4278 Lafayette Street
Marianna, FL 32446
850-482-2332
www.jamiusandlkesftianonlloii .com


James & Sikes Funeral
Home
Maddox Chapel
4278 Lafayette Street
Marianna, Fl 32446
850.482.2332
www,Jmsandsi. llkshu r'llmlono s,c(m


Eva Anderson Frank Thomas


Eva Anderson, 84, of Ma-
lone, died Tuesday, Janu-
ary 15, 2013, at her resi-
dence.
Funeral arrangements
will be announced by
James & Sikes Funeral
Home Maddox Chapel of
Marianna.
James & Sikes
Funeral Home
Maddox Chapel
4278 Lafayette Street
Marianna, FL 32446
850-482-2332


Lillian H.
Chandler
Burgess

Lillian H. Chandler Bur-
gess, 99, of Bascom, FL
died Tuesday, January 15,
2013, in Panama City.
Born in Eatonton, Gqor-
gia, Mrs. Burgess was a
long time resident of '
Greesboro, GA, and a
member of the West End
Baptist Church prior to
moving to Bascom to be
near her children. Jn
Greensboro she was.a Sun-
day School teacher, song
leader, and served in many
other capacities in her
church.
She was preceded in
death by her first husband,
Boyd G. Chandler and her
late husband Ranchel Bur-
gess; her parents, Carl
Wynn Hadden and Sara
Bedsole' Hadden; a son,
Harvel Chandler; five
brothers, Raymohd, Mar-
shal "Doc", Emorite, Ho-
ward G. and Quenton
Hadder.
Survivors include her
daughter, Winona
"Winkie" Burnham andG
husband Don of Cotton-
dale; four sisters-in-laws,
Lula Hadden, Lorrain
Hadden, Marjorie Hadden
all of Georgia; daughter-in-
law, Fay Chandler of
Bascom; four grandchil-
dren, Jo Burnham Sapp,
Ben Burnham, and Mitch
Chandler of Panama City,
Patrick Chandler'of Bed-
ford TX.; nine great-
grandchildren and one
great-great-granddaughter.
Funeral services will be
at 2:30 p.m. Thursday, Jan-
uary 17, 2013 at Maddox
Chapel with Rev. Jack
Brock and Dr. Steve Cana-
da officiating.
Graveside services will be
at 2 p.m. EST Saturday Jan-
uary 19, 2013 at the
Greensboro City Cemetery
in Greensboro, Ga. with
Rev. Robert Robinson offi-
ciating and James & Sikes
Funeral Home Maddox
Chapel directing.
The family will receive
friends from 1:30 p.m. until
funeral time Thursday, Jan-
uary 17, 2013, at James &
Sikes Funeral Home Mad-
dox Chapel.
Expression of Sympathy
may be made online at
www.Jamesandslkesfiineralhomes.coi


Library
From Page 1A

This water dissolves min-
erals in the masonry, leav-
ing aggregate behind," it
states.
Kent said it could cost
as much as $20,000 to re-
pair the stem winall, which
is made up of large con-
crete slabs. The problem
occurred, in part, because
rooftop storm drains were
not extended far enough
away from the building to
prevent rain water and air
conditioner condensation


Hyles Jr.,

Frank Thomas Hyles Jr.,
76, of Marianna, died Tues-
day, January 15, 2013, at
Jackson Hospital.
Always aware of his call-
ing, Frank began his minis-
try at a very young age, be-
ing licensed to preach in
1952 with his first appoint-
ment in the Alabama-West
Florida Conference at age
18. Graduating from
Huntingdon College in
1957 and Candler School of
Theology in 1960, he
earned his Doctor of Minis-
try from Emory University
in 1981. Frank served nine
appointments to churches,
plus three years as Confer-
ence Missionary Secretary
and eight years as District
Superintendent of the An-
dalusia District.
Frank was known for his
love of books, music, fine
arts, crossword puzzles,
sports and good food. A
man faithful to his Lord, his
commitments and his fam-
ily, Frank spent his life giv-
ing to others loving, pray-
ing, encouraging and seek-
ing to help wherever he
saw a need.
He was preceded in'
death by his parents, Frank
Thomas Sr. and Willie
Frances Hyles and half
brother, Morris Hyles.
He is survived by his
wife, Martha Hyles; one
son, Marcus Hyles and
wife; Anna, of Montgomery
AL.; three daughters, Karen
Culverhouse and husband,
Jessie, of Wedowee, AL.,
Kathreen Ashline of Hay-
market VA., Jennifer Salter
and husband, French, of
Madison, AL; nine grand-
children, Christopher
Culverhouse, Lex
McLelland Jr. and wife, Re-
becca, Chelsea McLelland,
Joshua Hyles, Bayleigh
Fraser and husband, An-
drew, Caleb Hyles, Kaitlin
McLelland, Summer
Culverhouse, and Trent
Salter and one great-
grandson, Justin.
Memorial service will be
at 11 on Friday, January 18,
2013 at First United Meth-
odist Church of Marianna,
with James and Sikes Fu-
neral Home Maddox Chap-
el directing.
Family will receive
friends one hour prior to
memorial service at the
First United Methodist
Church of Marianna.
In Lieu of flowers, memo-
rial contributions may be'
made to, United Methodist
Children's Home at, 3140
Zelda Court, Montgomery,
AL. 36177-9257
Expression of Sympathy
may be made online at http
www.jamesandsikesfuneralhomes.com


James & Sikes
Funeral Home
Maddox Chapel
4278 Lafayette Street
Marianna, FL 32446
850-482-2332
www.jamesandsikesfuneralhomes.com

Wanda
Sullivan

Services will be at 10
a.m., Wednesday, January
16, 2013, at First Assembly
of'God in Marianna. Inter-
ment will follow in Lipford
Cemetery. e


from dripping down the
visible wall and on down
to the stem wall below.'
When the acidic water
hits the concrete, it sets in
motion a chemical reac-
tion of break-down that
leads to crumbling in sec-
tions of the wall. In some
cases, deteriorated bits
could easily be pulverized
when squeezed between
thumb and index finger.
Kent said this is a sign that
the bonding of aggregate
materials in the masonry
has been compromised by
the water's infiltration. The
damage has been slowing
taking its toll since a sec-


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Students of Golson Elementary School Go Green Team, second nine weeks 2012: From left (front row), Sam Garrett, Nicolas
Tocci, DaQuanna Simmons, Samantha Hopkin, Amarius Patterson-Rhodes and Alex Martin; and (back row) Connor Oswald,
Lyla Batista, Allison Millwood, Jeremiah Stewart, Chase Bethea, Cayman Smith, Jasmine Bess and Dylan Rogers.


Golson Elementary forms science club


Special to the Floridan

Teaching the impor-
tance of taking care of our
Earth has been a focus for
the students in science
class.
Therefore, in a
collaborated effort with
Waste Management and


Creamery
From Page 1A
became a big thing in
the Athens, Ga. area
when I was there. It was
an artisan approach to
food, and my husband
and I really enjoyed that
culture. We started think-
ing about the Panhandle,
where we both'grew up,
and we knew that we
wanted to bring that cul-
ture full circle here. If we
can create a value-added
product to utilize what
our local farmers pro-
duce, and if we can mar-
ket it specifically to the
users in our own region, I
think that's something to
celebrate. For us, it is."
O'Bryan said she's tak-
ing things slow ind being
careful as she carries
out her business plan
but that she's moving at
a speed that suits her,
toward a possible full
production date this
summer.
"It has already been
very rewarding and excit-
ing," O'Bryan said. "We're
in the perfect location.
We've got people here
who grow strawberries,
blueberries, ana sweet
corn which makes a
fantastic ice cream, I
promise. People grow
melons and produce of
all kinds, and I've already
got someone in Calhoun
County who's going
to provide me Tupelo
honey that's something
you can't get very many
places. We're experiment-
ing with a muscadine
ice cream, we have local
peanuts we can use. We
have people who are
willing to work with us.
Really, whatmnore could
we ask for? Most of our
ingredients are right
here at our fingertips
and there's so much to
choose from. It's really a.


Sunland Recycling, Gol-
son Elementary School
began a Science Club the
second nine-weeks in the
2012-13 school year for
recycling known as the
Go Green Team.
In order to join,
students grades must


be a C or better, atten-
dance must be in com-
pliance with our county
policy, and the student
must not have discipline
referrals. A student will
be randomly selected to
represent their classroom
on the team.


sa---- 1' "d' :- ^

MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Lauren O'Btyan dips out a sample of one of her Satsuma
creations Tuesday at Southern Craft Creamery.


dream coming true for
us, to bepart of the local
agricultural economy.
It means a lot to us, and
we're really excited to get
started."
O'Bryan said she will
not only hand-stamp her
containers with the name
of the creamery, she'll
also write in the names
of the farms that pro-
duced the local ingredi-
ents she uses in a given
batch.
"We want to take a
branding approach,
to highlight the fact
that we're using pro-
duce grown right here,
and that everything is
handcrafted. Instead of
buying prepared caramel
for our ice cream, I take
sugar and make it into
caramel. We'll be making
our products completely


"There are numerous cacks in the wtaUl elow the
finishedfloor...the demise ofthe stem all rell
advance these cracks and lead to more problems."


tion was added onto the
north side of the building
in the 1980s. Kent called
the damage "significant"
rather than critical at this
point, but said it must be
repaired to avoid the stem
wall's eventual total de-
struction in a "slow demo-
lition," and, subsequently,
the potential collapse of


BRAD KENT,
BTK Engineering Services President

the building onto its foun-
dation; There was one bit
of good news in Kent's
findings; the foundation
itself does not appear to be
compromised structurally.
But repairing the stem
wall, by cleaning out its
water-filled cells and pour-
ing new concrete to make
them solid again, isn't the


from scratch. I think the
demand will be there, be-
cause not many people
are making it like we do.
We use an 80-year-old
process here, and non-
homogenized milk. We
use an old-style batch
freezer, but with new,
eco-friendly technology.
We go to extreme lengths
and use a very complex
system for formulating
exactly how much of
each ingredient we use,
and we have a unique
formulation to get the
right amount of milk
solids in order to create a
very scoopable product."
O'Bryan learned the
complexities of ice cream
science by taking the
country's most famous
short course in the
subject, a 120-year-old
program offered only at


only remedy needed.
The grounds around the
Green Street structure also
need a raised sidewalk
sloped especially to route
rainwater away from the
structure. The high esti-
mated cost of that con-
struction is $10,000. As
an alternative, the county
could reslope the grade of
the land to direct the water
away.
Another $10,000 might
be needed to relocate the
storm drains so that they
properly route the water
into an existing retention
pond.
The north wall needs


Each grade group
will have a team to col-
lect plastic bottles from
classrooms. The project
will consist of plastic on
our campus; nothing
will be brought in for the
recycling project.
The Science Club meets


Penn State, and addition-
al courses at the Univer-
sity ofWisconsin, where
another well-known ice
cream program is on the
course list. She obtained
a bachelors degree in
food and resource eco-
nomics at the University
of Florida, a degree she
is confident will help her
further explore, in the
real-life microcosm
she is creating, the
agricultural aspect of the
economy.
Her landlord, and
a family friend, Rex
Wimberly, counts himself
a lucky man; his ware-
Shouse is next door and
he' been one of her pri-
mary taste-testers from
the start.
"The things they're
doing, you can't get any
fresher that what they've
got going on there and,
man, is it good," Wim-
berly said. "It's exciting
that we have a young
couple who grew up here
and came back to start
and grow a business.
They're going to be suc-
cessful. They have all the
ingredients, and it's a big
plus that they're using
local produce. It's a real
pleasure to play my small
part in it."
Once O'Bryan's hus-
band finishes school in
Georgia this summer,
they'll be working side by
side to hand-craft their
artisan ice cream, sher-
bets and sorbets. They'll
market their products to
restaurants, caterers and'
small retail outlets from
Pensacola to Tallahassee.
They have no immedi-
ate plans to-open up an
ice cream shop where
individual customers
can come in for a pint
or two of their products,
but they'd like to do that
someday, once they get
a firm foothold in the
wholesale market.


to be repaired, repainted
and resealed, at a high es-
timated cost of $15,000,
and asphalt repairs to the
building could cost about
$20,000, based on the high
end of the estimates Kent
gave.
County officialsisay mon-
ey has been set aside in the
current budgetfor county
building repairs in gen-
eral and that the amount
includes enough to do the
work.
Commissioners hired
Kent, at a cost of $10,000,
to prepare documents
necessary for bidding the
repair job.


Jackson Conty Vault & Monu
Qukw ,w iAtfovwWt e Pw ,
Come Visit us at our NEW LOCATION
3424 West Highway 90 (a/1 mile west ron ourprowvous locaton)
i5 0so.-so50 IsL


BL

BAPTIST CLEGk


_


_ _E___i____il_l___lI**XL_I


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16, 2013 7A


FROM THE FRONT






18A WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16,2013


NATION


I H "... I T L ..
New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo and legislative leaders applaud after Cuomo signed New York's
Secure Ammunition and Firearms Enforcement Act into law during a ceremony in the Red Room
at the Capitol on Tuesday.

NY passes first US gun


control law since massacre


The Associated Press
ALBANY Jumping
out ahead of Washington,
NewYork state enacted the
nation's toughest gun re-
strictions Tuesday and the
first since the Connecticut
school massacre, includ-
ing an expanded assault-
weapon ban and back-
ground checks for buying
ammunition.
Democratic Gov. An-
drew Cuomo signed the
measure into law less than
an hour after it won final
passage in the Legislature,
with supporters hailing it
.as a model for the nation
and gun-rights activists
condemning it as a knee-
jerk piece of legislation
that' won't make anyone
safer and is too extreme to
win support in the rest of


the country.
"Common sense can
win,". Cuomo said. "You
can overpower the extrem-
ists with intelligence and
with reason and with com-
mon sense,"
Owners of an estimated
1 million previously legal
semiautomatic rifles, such
as the Bushmaster model
used to kill 20 children
and six adults in Newtown,
Conn., a month ago, will be
allowed to keep their weap-
ons but will have a year to
'register them with police.
The sale of any more such
weapons is prohibited.
"When there's a pileup of
events, when the federal
government does not do it,
the state of New York has
to lead the way," said state
Assemblyman Joseph Len-
tol, a Brooklyn Democrat


and co-sponsor.
In addition to outlawing
a broader array of mili-
tary-style weapons, the
measure restricts ammu-
nition magazines to seven
rounds, down from the
current 10, creates a more
comprehensive database
of people barred from
owning guns, and makes
New York the first state to
require background checks
to buy bullets. The system
will also help flag custom-
ers who buy large amounts
of ammo.
In another provision,
therapists, doctors and
other mental health pro-
fessionals will be required
to tell state authorities if a
patient threatens to use a
gun illegally. The patient's
weapon could then be tak-
en away


Briefs


Twenty kids dead
from lu so far
NEWYORK How bad
is this flu season, exactly?
Look t6 the children.
Twenty flu-related
deaths have been reported
in kids so far this winter,
one of the worst tolls this
early in the year since the
government started keep-
ing track in 2004.
But while such a tally is
tragic, that does not mean
this year will turn out to
be unusually bad. Roughly
100 children die in an
average flu season, and
it's not yet clear the nation
will reach that total.
The deaths this year
have included a 6-year-old
girl in Maine, a 15-year
Michigan student who
loved robotics, and 6-foot-
'4 Texas high school senior
Max Schwolert, who grew
sick in Wisconsin while
visiting his grandparents
for the holidays.

Tough obstacles '
ahead for gun plan
WASHINGTON Presi-
dent Barack Obama is
launching the nation's
most sweeping effort
to curb gun violence in
nearly two decades, urging
a reluctant Congress to
ban military-style assault
weapons and high-capaci-
ty ammunition magazines
like those used in last
month's massacre of 20 el-
ementary school children
in Newtown, Conn.
The broad package
Obama will announce
Wednesday is expected to
include more than a dozen
steps the president can
take on his own through
executive action. Those
measures will provide
a pathway for skirting
opposing lawmakers, but
they will be limited in
scope, ard in some cases,
focused simply on enforc-
ing existing laws.
But Congress would
have to approve the bans
on assault weapons and
ammunition magazines
holding more than 10
bullets, along with a
requirement for universal
background checks on
gun buyers.

Facebook unveils new
search feature
MENLO PARK, Calif.
- Facebook CEO Mark
Zuckerberg unveiled a


new search feature that's
designed to entice people
to spend more time on his
company's website and
will put the world's largest


online social network
more squarely in com-
petition with Google and
other rivals such asYelp
and Linkedln.


Santa Got Your Cash?
Sell ybor Old gold at:..



JE W ELER
Paid on Site
4432 Lafaypte Street S26-548 ww imithjndsmilhanline rom


Marianna's Newest Cafe and Gift Boutique!




'.'',,, ,





We offer unique and personalized gifts as well as home decor
and indulgences for the body and mind.
Delight your taste buds at our gourmet caf6 and coffee bar.
Satisfy your sweet tooth with a treat from our sweet shop.
Complimentary Qift Wrap with Every purchasee
NOW SERVING DINERonFrida&Satrdayights


HATTON HOUSE


Utilities Included in rent
Ample off-street parking Clubhouse
Indoor pool Fitness room
Laundry facilities New Management
Monthly Resident activities & events
Income guidelines apply.




2045 3rd Avenue I Sneads, Florida 32460
hatton-house-apartments.comrn


House ai
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON More
than 10 weeks after Su-
perstorm Sandy brutal-
ized parts of the heavily
populated Northeast, the
House approved $50.7 bil-
lion in emergency relief
for the victims Tuesday
night as Republican lead-
ers struggled to close out
an episode that exposed
painful party divisions in-
side Congress and out.
The vote was 241-180,
and officials said the Sen-
ate was likely to accept
the measure early next
week and send it to Presi- I
dent Barack Obama for
his signature. Democrats
supported the aid in large
numbers, while majority
Republicans opposed it
by a lopsided margin.
"We are not crying wolf
here," said Rep. Chris
Smith, R-N.J., one of a
group of Northeastern
lawmakers from both
parties who sought
House passage of legisla-
tion roughly in line with
what the Obama admin-
istration and governors
of the affected states have
sought.
Democrats were more
politically pointed as
they brushed back South-


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


proves Sandy aid
ern conservatives who Ike, Gustav, Katrina, Rita
sought either to reduce but when it comes to
the measure or offset part the Northeast, with the
of its cost through spend- second worst storm in the
ing cuts elsewhere in the history of our country, to
budget, delay, delay, delay."
"I just plead with my One key vote. came on
colleagues not to have a an attempt by Rep. Rod-
double standard," said neyFreylinghuysen to add
Rep. Carolyn Maloney of $33.7 billion to an original
New York. "Not to vote allotment of $17 billion in
tornado relief to Alabama, aid. That roll call was 228-'
to Louisiana, to Missis- 192 and Democrats broke
sippi, Missouri, to -with 190-2 in favor.


Broker/Owner
(850) 209-4705 cell
C21SunnySo@aol.com


SMARTER. BLER FASTER
SMARTER. BOLDER FASTER


Century 21
Sunny South
Properties


41630 Hwy 9l)
MrarIann FL
(850) 526-2891


Chipola Nursing Pavilion
and
Retirement Center

Speca li-t m Sgd- <7k ReaU4taiio


4294 Third Avenue
Marlanna, FL 32446


Phone: [8501 526-3191
www.gchc.com


Order your 2013
Jacksonr County
vying Calerodir



-ww.Frida
,


SOUTHERN CHARM
WEDDING AND SPECIAL EVENTS EXPO


i etng. y gi &u need taptan&
oauw 6pecia event!


Sunday, January 20, 2013
2:00 PM to 5:00 PM
Fashion Show at 4 PM

National Guard Armory

Marianna, FL

The expo will include food tasting,
fabulous giveaways and musical
entertainment.


*1*" ,~


I,.
'.4
'F. i -',. `-


The event will
conclude with a
fashion show
provided by Bridal
Elegance & Pageant
Perfect, and
Michael's Toggery,


with hair and
': ... o:". makeup by
..."" A Wild Hair.


www.southerncharmexpo.com

Join us
on


I13~p~ra3~~~a ~ y~n ~ lr~~:."~ik~i~~f :~?i~~~T4'~~E~~k~~~5i7~


Mon-Fri: 7:30 5:30 Sat: 9:00 2:00
Downtown Marianna
4430 Lafayette St. (Highway 90)
850.482.7500


MIN


"

.^.A
,.~~~ ^.^y
'''. ""'-AM R,*^
1. O-;V-













Sneads Girls Basketball



Lady Pirates still surging


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Sneads Lady Pirates made
it seven district victories in a row
Monday night in Graceville, taking a
46-33 win over the Lady Tigers.
Tasherica McMillon scored 20
points to lead the Lady Pirates, with
Logan Neel adding 18. and De'Aryll
Green seven.
Shanice Mack had 13 points to top
all Graceville scorers, with Zay Hen-
derson and Dominique Robinson
adding eight each.
The Lady Tigers actually led 12-
9 through one period of play, but
Sneads fought back to take a 20-16


lead into the halftime break, and
then slowly started to pull away in
the third.
Sneads led 32-23 going into the
fourth quarter and kept Graceville at
bay to close the game out.
"We played alright. We knew'going
into the game that (the Lady Tigers)
are a good team," SHS coach Andy
Ward said. "They've struggled a little
bit, but the girls played hard for the
most part. It was just kind of a sloppy
game. But it was a big win for us."
It was the fourth straight loss
for the Lady Tigers, who fell to 5-
10 overall and 3-5 in District 3-1A
competition.
For Sneads, it was the fourth


straight win overall, with a loss to
Malone at Grand Ridge on Dec. 22
the only loss the Lady Pirates have
taken since the start of December.
SHS is now 13-3 overall and 7-2
in league play, with Monday's win
guaranteeing a top three seed for the
Lady Pirates, which is important in
that it allows them to avoid playing
top-seed and defending state cham-
pion Ponce de Leon in the district
tournament semifinals.
With Cottondale winning Monday
over Vernon, it sets up to be a dis-
trict tournament semifinal matchup
between Sneads and Cottondale to MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Tasherica McMillon recovers a loose ball for Sneads during a
See SURGING, Page 2B game against Graceville on Monday night.


SpoIts Briefs

High School boys
.sketbarll
Thursday Malone at'
Gracevllle, 5:30 and 7
p.m.;
FWiday-Pbnce de
Leon at Sneads, 5:30
and 7p.m.; Vernon
at Cottondale, 6 and
7:30 pm.; Grac;vllle at
Wewahitchka, 4:30 and
7:30 p.m.; Mariazna at
Waltozi 5:30 ad.'p1O.-
Sitibulr 'rSaanna

Stat onAa., 6 p.m.'



flauday Grnceville
at Cottondale, 4 p.m.;
p.m . .. '
- irsftQ e, de .
at Cottonda.,4 ,,"...'.


week inM1ir. City'
on Saturday against
GulfCoast Staqte.The.,,..
women's game will tar
at 5:301pn. fillP wedby
the men's gae'at 7:30
p.m ,. * .



Southern Elite Past-
pitch 12U Gold fll be
holding tryouts Jan. 26
at the Alford RecPark
at 2 p.m. Call or fext
850-258-8172 for more.
information.


Send all sports items to edito-
rial@jcfloridan.com or fax them
to 850-482-4478. The mailing
address for the newspaper is
Jackson County Floridan P.O. Box
520 Marianna. FL 32447


VIRRIRNNA BOYS BASKETBALL



Rams roll over 'Dawgs


First half key to

Marianna loss

BY QUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Rutherford Rams picked up their
fourth straight victory Monday night in
Marianna, dominating in the first half
and cruising in the second to a 55-34
victory over the Marianna Bulldogs.
Khaliel Spearman scored 13 points to
lead the Rams, with Jai Jencks adding
10, and Keith Arts nine.
Shaquarious Baker had 12 points
for Marianna, with Keyman Borders
contributing seven.
With the win, the Rams improved to
..x .16-3 on the season, while the Bulldogs
dropped to 11-7.
Rutherford wasted little time seizing
control of the game, getting a bucket
from Jencks and a three-pointer by Ga-
briel Steele for the first five points of the
game, and then a three and a two from
Arts to go up 10-2 midway through the
first period.
An 11-0 run to end the quarter capped
by a steal and layup by Kieran William-
son and a buzzer-beating jumper by
Alex Banks made it 21-4 Rutherford
after one.
Spearman got in the act in the second
period with a basket and then a three-
point play to push the margin to 26-5
with 6:06 to halftime.
The Bulldogs got baskets biy Baker
and Trey Clemons, and then a three
from Baker to cut the lead to 17 late in
the half, liut consecutive buckets by
Stephen Carr and Banks gave the Rams
a 35-14 lead at the break.
Baskets by Williamson and Spear-
man to start the third quarter gave the
Rams their biggest lead of the night
at 25 points, but the Bulldogs gradu-
ally fought back. to get the margin
back under 20 thanks .to a three by
Baker and a steal and layup by Jamel
Johnson to make it 43-24 early in the
MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN fourth.
Shaquarious Baker shoots a Jump shot.for Marianna during Mohday night's game against
Rutherford. See MARIANNA, Page 2B


Malone girls bounce back against Dothan

BY DUSTIN KENT
'dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Malone Lady Tigers bounced
back from a tough loss to Chipley
last week with a 45-20 road win over
Dothan High on Monday night. -
The Lady Tigers improved to 15-5
on the season with the victory, which
was their eighth in the last nine
games.
"We played pretty well," Malone
coach Byron Williams said, "We just
kept applying pressure. (Dothan) had
some young guards and they turned
the ball over and we were able to
get some steals out of the full-court
pressure."
Curteeona Brelove led the Lady
Tigers with 17 points, with Angelica
Livingston adding 14.
Dothan led after a low-scoring
first quarter 6-5, but the Lady Tigers
stormed back in the second period to
take a 20-12 halftime advantage. P
The margin was pushed to 12 in the
third quarter, and Malone dominated
the final period 15-2 to blow the game .
open.
Williams said it was an impor- P
tant win for his team, which was
MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
S6e MALONE, Page 2B Malone's Brianna Dallas takes the ball in against Chipley on Friday night.


Cottondale Girls Basketball


Lady Hornets


snap losmg skid,


rout Vernon


BY DUSTIN KENT
dlrit 'icflorldan coin

The Cottondale Lady
Hornets snapped a three-
game losing streak Mon-
day night with a 66-26 road
victory over the Vernon
LadyYellowjackets.
Khadejah Ward led all
scorers with 31 points and
added four assists and six
steals for the Lady Hor-
nets, who improved to 8-10
overall and 5-3 in District
3-1A competition.
Cottondale was com-
ing off of losses to Mari-
anna, Ponce de Leon, and
Sneads, but the Lady Hor-
nets stopped the skid by
beating the team they got
their last win over, as they
topped Vernon 62-29 on:


Jan. 3 in Cottondale.
In that game, the Lady
Hornets were a bit sluggish
in the first half of their first
game back from the Christ-
mas break and led just 23-
21 at halftime before blow-
ing the game open in the
third quarter.
On Monday, Cottondale .
separated itself from Ver-
non much earlier, staking
claim to a 23-8 halftime
lead and extending the
margin to 45-20 through
three quarters.
"We started out with
some energy and played
hard for four quarters in-
stead of just one," Lady
Hornets coach Shan Pitt-
man said. "We talked about
See ROUT, Page 2BL


____lj _;;__ _____miji P~ _I_ ____ ~ _I ~Lil 1_)____1 ~~__r__~_1____1_1__~_ l__i_ __~~ )____~I_______ ~ ___ II_


Xlpli VINNINYROW"", 01414


U.,






-12B WEDNESDAY. JANUARY16,2013


SPORTS


JACKSON COUNTYFLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Rout
From Page 1B
starting out with energy.
We can't start out flat. The
focus is starting out with
energy because when we
have that energy we per-
form better."'
Ward's effort was again
the key, as she followed
up her 24-point, five-as-
sist performance in the
first meeting with Vernon
with another strong per-
formance Monday.
The senior guard is now
averaging 20 points per
game for the season.
"Vernon played man, so
(Ward) was able to get a
lot of things going (Mon-
day)," Pittman said. "The
post players did a great
job of dominating on the
boards and getting it oit,
so she was able to get a
lot of fast-break points."
The Lady Hornets were
scheduled to travel to
Wewahitchka on Tuesday
night before finishing the
week with a home game


against Graceville on
Thursday.
If they can win both
games, they'll clinch a
top three seed in the dis-
trict tournament, a key
position for any team
that wants to avoid de-,
fending state champion
and undefeated in dis-
trict Ponce de Leon in the
second round ofthe dis-
trict tournament.
"We're trying to end the
season on a good note.
The next two district
games are important, so
we've got to raise the bar
and play more competi-
tively for four quarters,"
Pittman said. "That's a
big deal for us. We have to
play hard for four quar-
ters and not wait until we
dig a hole and then come
out fighting. Its great
that we're not rolling over
and giving up, but at the
same time you exert a lot
of unnecessary energy
when you have to keep
coming back, and we
fell short in the last two
(losses)."


MARK SKINNER/FLOROAN
Cottondale's Aaliyah Blount looks for an opening as she is
guarded by Sneads' Aaliyah Williams on Friday night.


Surging
From Page 1B
earn a spot in the league
title game and a playoff
berth.
SFor a Lady Pirates pro-
gram that hasn't had
much to cheer for in re-
cent seasons, getting
this close to the postsea-
son is reason enough for
optimism.-
"I think (the players)
have kind of surprised


themselves a little bit,"
Ward said,
"They've got some con-
fidence after getting some
big wins. Beating Mari-
anna twice was a big deal
for us. They haven't had
a whole lot of success
in basketball before, so
this is kind of different.
They're doing a good job,
but we still have a long
way to go. We aren't near
where we need to be. We'll
just keep on trying to get
better."


Lunm IU IL Eurmu
The Lady Bulldogs' soccer team won a district tournament game Monday night against Walton.


Lady Bulldogs notch district win


BY SHELIA MADER
Floridan Correspondent -

For the first time in at
least six years, the Marian-
na High School Lady Bull-
dogs soccer team picked
up a 1-0 win in a district
tournament Monday.
The squad traveled to
South Walton to take on
the Walton Lady Braves,
who had twice this year
taken wins over the Lady
Bulldogs.
Marianna coach Scott
Wiggins went with Emily
Fuqua and Taniyah Robin-
son as forwards, with Lexie
Basford, Arianna Domen,
Reagan Oliver and Heather
Wilson as midfielders, and
backs Tensia Clark and
Yazmine Bellamy.
Sophia Pereda anchored

I1 ^ Ellen M


down the stopper position,
with Desiray Declouet at
sweeper.
Ashley Griffin. took' over
in the goal in place of in-
jured starting goalie Whit-
ney Lipford.
The Lady Bulldogs scored
their only goal within three
minutes of the start of the
game off the foot of Lexie
Basford, and the defense
took over from there.
An elated Wiggins said
after the game he couldn't
be happier to see his team
get the win.
"These girls played their
hearts out all night, in-
cluding the subs when
they went in to relieve the
starters," he said. "I am just
so proud of the total team
effort put forth. These
are a great group of girls

arsh nf *W. I


CRS, REALTOR "

Sunny South Properties
4630 Hwy 90 Marianna, FL 32446

850-209-1090
II ,' I .=


to coach."
The Lady Bulldogs will
have little time to enjoy
their victory, as they were


scheduled to travel to Pen-
sacola on Tuesday night
to take on the Pensacola
Catholic Lady Crusaders.


Marianna
From Page 1B
A basket by Borders
made it 46-28, but the
Rams answered with a 9-
2 run capped by a driving
three-point play by Spear-
man to make it 55-30 with
3:19 remaining.
It was th'e second straight
loss for the Bulldogs, who
also lost to Graceville last


weekend.
Marianna will travel
to Walton on Friday for
a big District 1-4A con-
test against thd 'Walton
Braves in a game the Bull-
dogs must win.to keep
any hope alive of earning
the top seed in the league
tournament.
Rutherford will travel
to Pensacola on Fri-
day to take on West
Florida.


Malone
From Page 1B
scheduled to play a district
game Tuesday night in
Laurel Hill, especially after
a 73-58 loss to Chipley last
weekend that led to frus-
tration among the Malone
players.
"The girls started to point
fingers after that one, and
I had to get on them for
that," he said.
"We really needed this


one, especially with Laurel
Hill coming up. If we had
lost (to Dothan), it would
have been even harder
to win (against Laurel
Hill)."
The Lady Tigers will fin-
ish this week out with a
road game against Beth-
lehem on Friday night in
their district finale, with
next week featuring a
three-game slate against
Jackson County foes
Graceville, Marianna and
Cottondale.


VI..


C I.
Dotan C


feet with the area's ELITE
bridal professionals!


See the hottest trends in
wedding fashion!


I




I


Win Door Prizes!


\ 0Bring your guy to hang out in the state of the art
~* Man Cave sponsored by Sears!


.U 7 3600
U Productions

For more information visit:
dothaneagle.com
A Like us on Facebookl


S.. ..~-.;
(. .






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


SPORTS ,


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY16,2013 3BF


Cycling



Winfrey says Armstrong interview intense'


The Associated Press

AUSTIN, Texas "Emo-
tional" doesn't come close
to describing Lance Arm-
strong's conversation with
Oprah Winfrey an in-
terview that included his
* confession about using
performance-enhancing
drugs to win seven Tour de
France titles, Winfrey said
Tuesday.
I She recounted her ses-
sion with Armstrong on
"CBS This Morning" and
promoted what has be-
come a two-part special
on her OWN network, even
while international doping
officials said it wouldn't
be enough to save the dis-
graced cyclist's career.
"I don't think 'emotion-
al' begins to describe the
intensity or the difficulty
he experienced in talk-
ing about some of these
things," Winfrey said.
Armstrong admitted
during the interview at an
Austin hotel that he used
drugs to help him win the
titles.
"It was surprising to me,"
she said. "I would say that
for myself, my team, all of
us in the room, we were
mesmerized and riveted
by some of his answers."
Winfrey said she went
right at Armstrong with
tough questions and, dur-
ing a break, he asked if
they would lighten up at
some point. Still, Winfrey
said she did not have to.
dig and that he was "pretty
forthcoming."
"I felt that he was
thoughtful. I thought that
he was serious," she said.
"I thought that he certainly
had prepared for this mo-
ment. I would say that he
met the moment."
The session was to be
broadcast in a single spe-
cial Thursday but Winfrey
said it will now run in two
parts on consecutive nights
Thursday and Friday -
becatse there is so much
material. Winfrey would
not characterize whether
Armstrong seemed con-
trite, saying she'll leave
that to viewers.
As stunning as Arm-
strong's confession was
for someone who .relent-
lessly denied using PEDs,
the World Anti-Doping
Agency said he must con-
fess under oath if he wants
to reduce his lifetime ban
from sports.
The cyclist was stripped
of his Tour titles, lost most
of his endorsements and
was forced to leave his
cancer charity, Livestrong,
last year after the U.S. Anti-
Doping Agency.issued a
1,000-page report that ac-
cused him of mastermind-
ing a long-running doping
scheme.
WADA's statement said:
"Only when Mr. Armstrong
makes a full confession


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
This photo provided by Harpo Studios Inc., shows talk-show host Oprah Winfrey interviewing
cyclist Lance Armstrong during taping forthe show"Oprah and LanceArmstrong: The Worldwide
Exclusive" In Austin, Texas, on Monday. The two-part episode of "Oprah's Next Chapter" will air
natlonallv Thursday and Friday.


under oath and tells the
anti-doping authorities all
he knows about doping
activities can any legal
and proper process for
him to seek any reopening
or reconsideration of his
lifetime ban commence."
The International Cy-
cling Union, or UCI, also
issued a statement, urging
Armstrong to tell his story
to an independent com-
mission it has set up to ex-
amine claims that cycling's
governing body hid suspi-
cious samples from the
cyclist, accepted financial
donations from him and
helped him avoid detec-
tion in doping tests.
Before the Winfrey in-
terview, Armstrong vis-
ited the headquarters of
Livestrong, the charity
he founded in 1997 and
turned into a global force
on the strength of his ath-
letic dominance and per-
sonal story of surviving
testicular cancer that had
spread to his lungs and
brain.
"I'm sorry," Armstrong
told about 100 staff mem-
bers gathered in a confer-
ence. He choked up during
the 20-minute talk, ex-
pressed regret for the long-
running controversy tied
to performance-enhanc-
ers, but stopped short of
admitting he used them.
"Heartfelt and sincere,"
is how Livestrong spokes-
woman Katherine McLane
described his speech.
Winfrey has promoted
her interview, one of the
biggest for OWN since
she launched the network
in 2011, as a "no-holds
barred" session and said
she was ready to go with
112 questions. Not all of
them were asked, she said,
but many were.
USADA chief execu-
tive Travis Tygart, a long-
time critic of Armstrong's,
called the drug regimen
practiced while Armstrong
led the U.S. Postal Service
team "the most sophis-
ticated, professionalizedd


and successful doping pro-
gram that sport has ever
seen." USADA did not re-
spond to requests for com-
ment about Armstrong's
confession.
Armstrong often went
after his critics during his
long reign as cycling cham-
pion. He scolded some in
public and didn't hesitate
to punish outspoken riders
during the race itself. He
waged legal battles against
still others in court.
At least one of his oppo-
nents, the London-based
Sunday Times, has already
filed a lawsuit to recover
about $500,000 it paid him
to settle a libel case, and
Dallas-based SCA Promo-
tions, which tried to deny
Armstrong a promised o-


nus for a Tour de France
win, has threatened to
bring another lawsuit
seeking to recover more
than $7.5 million awarded
by an arbitration panel.
In Australia, the govern-
ment of South Australia
state said it will seek the
repayment of several mil-
lion dollars in appearance
fees paid to Armstrong
for competing in the Tour
Down Under in 2009, 2010
and 2011.
"We'd be more than
happy for Mr. Armstrong
to make any repayment of
monies to us," South Aus-
tralia Premier Jay Weath-
erill said.
Betsy Andreu, the wife of
former Armstrong team-
mate Frankie Andreu, was


one of the first to publicly
accuse Armstrong of using
performance-enhancing
drugs. She called news of
Armstrong's confession
"very emotional and very
sad," and choked up when
asked to comment.
"He used to be one of my
husband's best friends and
because he wouldn't go
along with the doping, he
got kicked to the side," she
said. "Lance could have a
positive impact if he tells
the truth on everything.
He's got to be completely
honest."
Betsy Andreu testified in
SCA's arbitration case chal-
lenging the bonus in 2005,
saying Armstrong admit-
ted in an Indiana hospital
room in 1996 that he had
taken many performance-
enhancing drugs, a claim
Armstrong vehemently
denied.
"It would be nice if he
would come out and saythe
hospital room happened,"
Andreu said. "That's where
it all started."
Former teammate Floyd


Landis, who was stripped
of the 2006 Tour de France
title for doping, has filed
a federal whistle-blower
lawsuit that accused Arm-
strong of defrauding the
U.S. Postal Service. An at-
torney familiar with Arm-
strong's legal problems told
the AP that the Justice De-
partment is highly likely to
join the lawsuit. The False
Claims Act, lawsuit could
result in Armstrong pay-
ing a substantial amount
of money to the U.S. gov-
ernment. The deadline for
the department to join the
case is Thursday, though
the department could seek
an extension if necessary.
According to the attor-
ney, who works outside
the government, the law-
suit alleges that Armstrong
defrauded the U.S. govern-
ment based on his years
of denying use of perfor-
manc6-enhancing drugs.
The attorney spoke on
condition of anonymity
because the source was not
authorized to speak on the
record about the matter.


'r'^ wi^ r


4415C Constitution Ln
Marianna, FL 32448
(Next door to Marianna Office Supply)
www.theupsstorelocal.com/6003
store6003@yahoo.com

850-526-4877

Shipping...


UPS & Postal Shipping Freight Service
Packaging Supplies & Services
Moving Supplies, Boxes & Mailing Tubes


anda wl2olelotn2ore!


Small Business Support Services
Faxing Notary Service Laminating
Binding Scan & Email *Shredding
Document Design & Printing Flyers
Business Cards Brochures Postcards
EDDM Mailings Custom Calendars
Name Badges Color & B/W Copies


4






l4B WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16,2013


SPORTS


NFL



McCoy takes Chargers job


The Asspciated Press

SAN DIEGO Mike Mc-
Coy is the new head coach
of the San Diego Chargers.
The 40-year-old McCoy
replaces Norv Turner, who
was fired along with gener-
al manager A.J. Smith after
the Chargers finished 7-9
and missed the playoffs for
the third straight season.,
McCoy's hiring comes
three days after the top-
seeded Broncos were
eliminated from the play-
offs in a home loss to the
Baltimore Ravens.
The coaching search was
led by Tom Telesco, who
was hired as Chargers GM
last week. Telesco also is
40.
The Broncos have won
consecutive AFC West
titles. McCoy tutored
quarterbacks Kyle Orton
and Tim Tebow in 2011
and Peytoni Manning in
2012.
McCoy, who interviewed
with the Miami Dolphins
last year after retooling
Denver's offense to fit
Tebow's skill set, burnished
his head coaching cre-
dentials this season while
blending the power forma-
tions the Broncos used in


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
New San Diego Chargers head coach Mike McCoy (center) poses with President Dean Spanos,
(left) and general manager Tom Telesco after being Introduced during a news conference
Tuesday In San Diego. ,


leading the league in rush-
ing last year with Tebow
and some of the spread
.formations that Manning
ran in Indianapolis,
"I think he's going to be
a great head coach. Very
detail-oriented, knows the
game, relates with players
very well," Broncos wide
receiver Brandon Stokley
said. "So, I think he'll be an
excellent head coach."


Denver swept the Char-
gers in 2012, including an
epic 35-24 victory at San
Diego on Oct. 15 when
Manning calmly led them
back from a 24-0 halftime
deficit.
With the Chargers, Mc-
Coy will work with Philip
Rivers, who struggled this
season, ih large part be-
cause of a shaky offensive
line. Rivers was sacked
*


49 times and commit-
ted 22 turnovers, giving
him 47 turnovers in two
seasons.
McCoy played quarter-
back at Long Beach State
and Utah before moving
on to the NFL Europe and
the CFL He began his
pro coaching career with
Carolina in 1999 before
moving to the Broncos in
2009.


College Basketball


Auburn showing signs of progress


The Associated Press

AUBURN, Ala. Au-
burn had easily won three
straight nonconference
games when Winthrop
came for a visit in late
December.
The Tigers Weren't too
worried about that game,
which they wound up los-
ing in a lackluster perfor-
mance that seemed to help
spark a turnaround.
"Everybody just walked
in planning what they
were doing after this," cen-
ter Rob Chubb said. "We
were out of the mind-set of
basketball.
"Winthrop was kind of a
shock, so all of a sudden


everybody was starting to
come together."
Auburn (8-7, 2-0 South-
eastern Conference) re-
sponded with a near-miss
in an 81-79 loss to No. 23
Illinois in Chicago and has
since won three straight
games even with No. 2
scorer Chris Denson and
3-point threat Jordan Price
sidelined with foot injuries.
The Tigers hadn't started 2-
0 in SEC play since Cliff El-
lis' 2002-03 team that won
two games in the NCAA
tournament.
Auburn hasn't been back
in the .NCAA field since
then and would need quite
a surprising run through
the SEC to make it this


season. The Tigers have
shown signs of progress
lately, though.
This week will supply
another measuring stick
of how far Auburn has re-
ally come this season.
The Tigers visit Arkan-
sas tonight and host de-
fending national cham-
pion Kentucky three days
later.
Auburn won just nine
SEC games in coach Tony
Barbee's first two seasons
and didn't win two in a
row last season. They have
beaten Florida State, LSU
and South Carolina during
this span teams with a
combined 29-15 record -
after trailing by one point


at halftime in all three.
"It's just like all of a sud-
den it clicked," Chubb
said. "All of the guys all of
a sudden started pulling in
the same direction. We had
a couple of guys just kind
of dazed, looking around.
Then all of a sudden it just
all clicked and the chemis-
try came together and guys
started picking up what
they hadn't been picking
up in the past, and it's been
paying off."
Barbee said signs of a
turnaround didn't emerge
in any game.
'It was how we were per-
forming and how we were
competing in practice," he
said.


Increase in court cases could impact NCAA image


The Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS The
NCAA will open its annual
convention this week with
a host of reform measures
on the agenda, part of
President Mark Emmert's
push to address sev-
eral years of high-profile
scandals.
It may turn out that at-
torneys will have a lot of
say in what the NCAA does
in comingyears --perhaps
as much as any athletic di-
rector or school.president:
The NCAA is facing more
than a half-dozen law-
suits in what could signal
a new era of legal compli-
cations for the largestgov-
erning body in collegiate
'sports.
The list runs from the
mundane, a'wrongful ter-
mination suit stemming
from an investigation into
Arizona State's baseball
program, to the recent,
headline-grabbing lawsuit
from the.Pennsylvania gov-
ernor over the $60 million
in sanctions against Penn
State for the Jerry Sandusky
scandal. But there are also
intriguing cases involving
brain injuries, scholar-
ship limits and a case in
which Ed O'Bannon and
other former players ac-
cuse the NCAA of operat-
ing a monopoly because
they are required to sign
away their commercial
rights to play collegiate
sports.
Going to court is
nothing new for the
NCAA.
There have been huge
wins such as the Supreme
Courtrulingthatreinforced
the NCAA's right to disci-
pline its member schools,
throwing out a' decade-
SJold injunction allowing


ex-UNLV coach Jerry Tar-
kanian to continue coach-
ing, and a federal appeals
court win when an SMU
alum alleged the NCAA
violated antitrust laws by
imposing the "death pen-
alty" on the Mustangs'
football program.
There have also been
costly losses. The NCAA
agreed to pay $54.5 million
to settle a case challeng-
ing the "restricted earn-


ings" rule for non-football
coaches and in 1984, the
Supreme Court ruled that
the NCAA was improp-
erly restricting the abil-
ity of its member schools
to negotiate television
rights.
The impact of the latest
round of litigation remains
to be seen.
Two weeks ago, Penn-
sylvania Gov. Tom Cor-
bett 'filed suit and said


60 Months 0% APR
Now is the perfect time to experience
the Total Co'mfort Difference.
0% APR financing with
equal payments for 60 months on all'
complete Home Comfort Systems







l III T O Ifoo o u Ir r I2 201
OWO1D ALL'S


F Ij'Q Offer good through February 28, 2013
Iin ^4"'-FL#CAC058636


the NCAA overstepped its
authority when Emmert
punished Penn State for
Sandusky's child sex-as-
sault crimes by imposing
a four-year postseason
ban on' the football team
and the unprecedented
$60 million fine on the
school.


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN + wwwjcfloridan.com

NASCIR


Watkins Glen Cup

race lands Cheez-It

as title sponsor


'The Associated Press

SYRACUSE, N.Y. -Wat-
kins Glen International
has signed a multi-year
deal with Cheez-It crack-
ers to sponsor the NAS-
CAR Sprint Cup race at
the Finger Lakes track.
WGI president Mi-
chael Printup and Kel-
logg Co. officials made
the announcement of
the Cheez-It 355 at The
Glen on Tuesday. This is
the company's first race
entitlement sponsorship,
though Kellogg has been
involved with NASCAR
since 1991.
Last year's race was run
without a main spon-
sor at The Glen, which is
owned by International
Speedway Corp. This
year's race is Aug. 11.
"Obviously, going 29
years in a row and then
not having one that's


not good," Printup said.
"This is beyond exciting
for us. It's historic be-
cause of the brand level.
It's like the older. days,
when we had the Bud at
The Glen, you had Win-
ston in the sport, all of
these consumer products
that were really blowing
up the sport in a really
positive way. I trust that
brand, I trust that sport.
That's what we're back to.
"It's the first time since
the Bud at The Glen we
have a consurper product
that's available anywhere
- in every corner store,
every grocery store, every
gas station."
Budweiser was the title
sponsor for Cup races
at Watkins Glen Inter-
national from 1986-98.
There have been six other
sponsors since 1999, in-
cluding Sirius Satellite
Radio for four years.


FRONT END & TIRE SERVICE
"Not ust A Front End Shop"
We can take care ofALLYOUR AUTO NEEDS!
2984 Dekle Street COBB'S 1 4167 Lafayette Street
Marianna, FL32448 (2 ldgs Down from COBB I)
SMarianna, FL 32448
850-526-4706 oneBBs 2c 850.482-2028
850-482-2028
Hours: Monday-Friday 7:00AM 5:00pM
WE APPRECIATE YOUR BUSINESS!!


State Farm '""I '
Providing Insurance and Financial Services
Home Office, Bloomington, Illinois 61710 .. c


Linda Pforte Insurance Agency Inc
Linda J Pforte, Agent
2919 Penn Avenue, Suite B,
Marianna, FL 32448-2716
Bus 850-482-3425 Fax 850-482-6823
Toll Free 1-877-364-6007
linda.pforte.bxrs@statefarm.com
Good Neighbor Since 1986


S.. a e ia veoobne :
U
iyvants to quit?
usHEL YOU
C YOUR. GOAL -.

VAPOR TECH INC.
A HEALTHIER LIFESTYLE


,- r - . -
bwww.vaportechinc.org

Mondyrdlqy m.,90-pm
S49441B:M.lo Plza;Marionna
(850)482-0036


heMR A vrn-im r ,,, m ii-i~
fm6 In"N",muHB
tvron40horStof
ei 40 ft&= sto
dkm fmBinl.


We would like to welcome back







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


PEANUTS BY CHARLES SCHULTZ
SHOVEL ARE VOU TRYING TO
YOUR WALK ? TAKE APVANTA6E OF OUR
MISFORTUNE? OUR IDElALK
I5 COVERED O ITH SNO
IOH NO FAULT OF OURS,
ANDO'O WANT TO
PROFIT BYTIHIS
TERRIBLE MISFORTUNE?
77I' i r


I THINK THAT'S DIS6RACEFUL,
CrARLIE BROWN!

^---


BORN LOSER BY ART AND CHIP SANSOM
SAVE EC\DEI VEIR4 WELL I STT 5, I A\ IfPRESSE> ,



IN .
TOD YOUR, OUFO- THE .tAUKfE.NNERaWIIaWCH a



=RIX-Z


SO I AM ASK NATE
FOR HELP, BECAUSE
HE 15 EXPERT AT
TALKING TO GIRLS!
'---r"


SOUP TO NUTZ BY RICK STROMOSKI


FRANK & ERNEST BY BOB THAVES


GRIZZWELLS BY BILL SCHORR


C's
0iw ^- .
9 ^ S


THAT A BABY BY PAUL TRAP
LOow.\T! -o Fouir
S PRAe.$-NT FtRou\

I c5OTa.(/


FROM NO) ON, EVER
TIME IT SNO6S,
I'LL FEEL GUILTY
`-r----'

cy

5crr^


HEH UH...YOU KNOW
HEH! WHAT "EXPEgT
MEANS, RIGHT
DON'T LISTEN'
TO THEM.
11 ^ .^ .


ACROSS
1 Fiberglass
bundle
5 Vaccine
meas.
8 Rub
12 Grades
1-12
13"SI," to
Maurice
14Pharaoh's
god
15Sandals'
lack
16 Lantern fuel
18 Came next
20 Units of
resistance
21 FedEx rival
22 Amigo of
Fidel
23 Monte-
zuma's
empire
26 Himalayan
guide
29 Misfortunes
30Timber
31 That fellow
33 Geological
period
34 Rough It
35 Bingo kin
36 o hungry
38 Witches
brew
Ingredients
39Coral islet


40Color
Easter
eggs
41 Extend
over
43Type of
sausage
46 Fake pills
48 Limerick
locale
501mport
vehicle
51 List
shortener
52Warehouse
pallet
53Butte
54 Want ad
letters
55 Herbal
soothers

DOWN
1 Gamble
2 vera
lotion
3 After that
4 Disposable
hankies
5 Burger
go-withs
6 Signaled
7 Knight's
title
8 Laundry
appliance
9 Big-ticket
_


Answer to Previous Puzzle

FIAT NEMO RAZE
ISU OVER AHO Y
10 Markers 34BA Wading bird
METAL G IBED
FYI JAI i
PIAF MAUD LAX


INDover 3PIN ORPBS
SID GALE BRA



R22 Mince 40 Nightclub
24 Where aroundE
N 0 GIO KINI I PS EA D




25 Backpack- 43Go to the
10 Markers 34 Wading bird
11 Ay from 35 Mosti
WSW -enthusiastic
17 Exclaimed 37Thorntree
over 38hPBS
19 Merchan- "Science
dise ID Guy"
22 Mince 40 Nightclub
23 a tzzle 41 Swing
24 Where around
tigers pace 42Tablets
25 Backpac- 43 Go tothe
er's load p oils
26A few 44 Running
27SIgh of shoe name
*28"- No highlight
Sunshine" 46 Pan spray
30 Undulating 47 Busy one?
32Jan.and 49Publishing
Feb. execs


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuUlDrlverBooks.com


0 2013 UFS. Dist. by Universal Udick forUJFS


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celabty Cfw ay5logrms am caUd from quotaions by famous people. past and pansl.
EMd inar khb da hw stands for anol.
"YGI YE LVI Z. DILZ YE KFEI FZ

LVTL TKK LVTL FZ DITKKN JYDLV LVI
CYFGS FZ JVTL JI CY EYD YLVIDZ."
KIJFZ OTDDYKK


Previous Solution: "Excellence is the unlimited ability to improve the quality of
what you have to offer." Rick Pitino
TOOAYSCLUE: 9 snbe
0 2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 1-16


Dear Annie: I have been married for
six months and am crazy for my hubby.
He has back problems and some sexual
issues that keep us from being intimate.
At least, those are the excuses he uses for
the fact that we don't touch like we used
to.
I recently came across some love
notes to an ex-girlfriend, saying how
they are going to be happy growing old
together and how much he loves her. I
pay his child support and love his kids
like my own. He says he loves me, but I
have doubts that he is being honest. He
is constantly texting and mailing and
never puts his phone down. He acts as if
he is afraid I will look at it.
What do I do?
SCARED AND LONELY
Dear Scared: Were these recent love
notes or old ones that you happened to
find? If they are old, try to ignore them.
He married you, not his ex-girlfriend. If
they are recent, however, it could be seri-
ous, especially when combined
with constant and secretive texting, call-
ing and mailing. Married partners owe
it to, each other to be open and honest.


South is in six spades. West leads the heart jack. How
should declarer proceed?
East opened three clubs to show a respectable seven-
card suit and limited high-card values. True, because
there is no weak two-bid in clubs, sometimes a player
will open three clubs with a strong six-card suit. But
in this instance, if West had had a club, he would have
led it.
North's raise to five spades was aggressive, but with-
out it, South would not have had a story with which to
bore dinner companions for weeks.
Declarer will think that if the diamond finesse works,
he will take seven spades, two hearts, two diamonds
and a diamond ruff in the dummy. But what chance
has that finesse?
It is surely zero. Assuming West's lead is honest, East
is marked with nine points in hearts and clubs. With
the diamond king as well, he would have opened one
club, not three.
There is one winning line. South ruffs the first trick,
draws two rounds of trumps ending on the board, and
cashes the top hearts, discarding his diamond ace
and queen! Then he ruffs a heart, removes West's last
trump, and leads his remaining diamond. West must
let declarer into the dummy. South takes seven spades,
four hearts and one diamond.


Horoscope

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) Try to alter your
weekday routine a bit. Do
something fun that you
would usually reserve for
weekends.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19)- Make a concerted ef-
fort to stay in contact with
family and/or friends who
are important to your im-
mediate plans.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) Don't hesitate to
think when putting togeth-
er a financial endeavor.
Conditions are good for
you to pull off something
grand.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
What works out well for
you is likely to do so for
those with whom you're
involved because every-
one is looking out for one
another's interests.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20) Think positive and
keep the faith, because at
the times when things look
like they're going against
you, your associates are
likely to come through.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
Even though it might
look like you're behaving
extravagantly, what you're
really doing is trying your
best to make an invest-
ment of good will in your
relationships.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
This might be one of
.your better days to talk to
people about helping you
advance a big ambition.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) If
you've been restless lately,
this might be a good time
to make some travel plans.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept 22)
This could be a profit-
able day in more ways than
one. Although you might
gain financially, you'll also
learn something.
UBRA (Sept 23-Oct' 23)
Persons with whom
you'll have one-on-one
dealings are likely to treat
you in a more bountiful
fashion than usual.
SCORPIO (Oct24-Nov. 22)
Your motives for help-
ing others will be honest,
yet you'll be the one who
stands to benefit the most.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-
Dec. 21) Although your
rabbit's foot might not be
working in high-risk situ-
ations, you still could be
very lucky.


Talk to your husband. If his answers
don't reassure you, the next step is coun-
seling.
Dear Annie: I am a small woman with
large breasts. I did not buy these. For
years, I've tolerated leering men and .
boys, suggestive comments, questions
about breast enhancement and assump-
tions that I am of easy virtue.
I have learned to deal with all that. But
I have issues with the way other women
treat me. Most take an immediate dislike
to me. Men stare no matter how mod-
estly I dress, and their wives and girl-
friends glare at me, call me names they
think I don't hear and generally treat me
like dirt. Even walking in public past a
group of women seems to bring on the
negativity.
We talk about bullying because of body
type, but doesn't this qualify?
TOO WELL ENDOWED IN KANSAS
Dear Kansas: Women can sometimes
ascribe negative traits'to an object of
jealousy. If your chest attracts their hus-
bands and boyfriends, they need to find
a reason to dislike you. We hope Aur let-
ter serves as a plea for greater tolerance.


West
4542
VJ 10 9 8
tK 10 9 6 5 3
6-


North 01-16-13
4A3
VAK6532
SJ44
#9744


East
46
YQ74
487
* A QJ 10652


South
4 KQJ 10987
V-
*AQ2
*K83

Dealer: East
Vulnerable: East-West
South West North East
3.
44 Pass 5 Pass
64 Pass Pass Pass

Opening lead: V J
L


--


--Y... ---- -illm~~---i~.----.------I----------i


-----.- ----I---- -- ------ ----------


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16, 2013 5BF


ENTERTAINIVNMENT







6 B- Wednesday. January 16. 2013 Jackson County Floridan


CLASSIFIED


www.JCFLORIDAN.com


WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED




ARKETPLA


BY PHONE: (850) 526-3614 or (800) 779-2557 BY MAIL: WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE
BY FAX: (850) 482-4478 or (334) 712-7975 P.O. BOX 520, MARIANNA, FL 32447
; ONLINE; WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM IN PERSON: 4403 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA
Publication Policy Erors and Omissions Advertisers should chect their ad the first day. This publication shall noi be liable for failure to publish an ad or for a typographic error or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of ihe ad for ine first Oay'b
insertion Aajustment for enor is limited to le cost of that portion of the ad *neren me error occurred. The advertiser agrees that the publisher shall not be liable for damages arising out of errors n advertisements beyond the amount paid for me space
actually occupied by tl portion of Ins advartaement in which the error occurred. whether such error is due to negligence of the publishers employees or otherwise and there shall be no liability for non-insertion of any advertisement beyond the amount paldfor
such advertsement Display Ads are not guaranteed position All advertising is subject to approval. Right Is reserved to edit, reject, cancel or classify all ads under the appropriate classification.

Fo dadins al 0tl-fre rviiSw w cl Sia.c


~I ~ l i I I



LOC gATE T21S RC OHNNX
-O aUHID MR.. ..4-1-95



BUS--S.-PRTNIIE


Own your own business
Franchises needed in Dothan and
surrounding areas NOW!
Training, equipment and guaranteed initial
customer base with all franchise plans.
Call now to schedule your appointment
1-800-375-5264


an idea that SELLS.





Prom and Sweet 16 gowns, sizes 4 to 7/8, $50
to $250, Mori-Lee, Tony Bowls, Jovani and
Sherri Hill. Call 850-482-5481.


FIREWOOD (all split oak)
Delveryavallablel T tUCK LOAD $70. 4
CuABJLA334TM-gk63Lr 334-791-6704

Split Oak Firewood
Delivered in the Wiregrassl
$75 For a Full Sized Pickup load.
$12 for 5 Gallon bucket of killing wood.
334-393-9923

AK47 (7.62x39) Paratrooper/Tank Corp short
design, fodg metal stock to right side. New,
never flred, 8 extd mags: lM rds. Rapid
loader & man'. All for $700. 1st person w/ the
moneyets It.No checks 334-699-1671

Wanted: Old Cob, God,
Diamonds, Guns, And Tools
West Main Jewelry & Loan 334-671-1440.
I a 8 5I:*! Jl[ tl=JII=1oJ.IIIJ.UJ:h


* 1- NEW 2 DOOR GLASS FLOWER COOLER ON
CASTERS TRUE MODEL# GDM-61FC-
$2,50oo.0
* 1- NEW 2 DOOR COMMERICAL GLASS DOOR
COOLER MASTERBILT
MODEL# GR48S --- $1,995_
S1-'NEW 1 DOOR COMMERICAL KITCHEN
FREEZER ON CASTERS, STAINLESS STEEL
MASTERBILT MODEL# F23-S $199500
PLEASE CALL 678-8894 IF INTERESTED.


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
Your source for selling and buying!


We are GROWING!
DRIVERS CLASS A


HOME WEEKLY
NO TOUCH
$1000 SIGN ON BONUS


TRANSPO /NC


PAPER TRANSPORT seeks
16 Class A Drivers
to Travel in Surrounding States
for our Dedicated Account.


I


COMPETITIVE PAY PACKAGE,
BONUSES & BENEFITS
18 Months Exp & Class A Required
s a -J ( *I ( 5


Boston Terrier Pupples $250. 850-547-9351
Vet checked, H/C & S/W, parents on-site
w/guarantee. 850-8490176.


CKC Bullmastiff puppies for sale for $700, Born
Nov. 15, 2012- have shots and their papers.
They are ready for GREAT home only. Already
people friendly and love to play. Please call me
at 334-618-0987, Peavy.


FREE DOG to approved home; beautiful fe-
male gold bulidoq 9 mths old 334-464-3757


Lost: Female 501bs black w/white markings on
face. Indian Springs area. 850-557-6477



r................................
aBahia seed for sale 4-
Excellent germination with over 40 yrs
experience. Kendall Cooper
Call 334-703-0978, 334-775-3423,
S or 334-775-3749 Ext. 102
L..... ........................ J
Large roll of Hay for Sale
Bahia & Coastal
Daytime 334-585-3039,
after s5pn & weekends 585-5418


Wrapped Peanut Hay For Sale.
Never been rained on. Cal 229-2540854













Earn

Extra$

Great for Retired Persons

Campbellton
Earn an average of

$450
3 hrs per night, 5 nights per week, before
600 a.m.
SLooking for mature business-minded
newspaper carriers with dependable trans-
portation, minimum liability insurance and
a valid driver's license.
Come by and fill out an application at the
Jackson County Floridan,
4403 Constitution Lane, Marianna, FL


Sutloku


_93 _

9 4 8 2

9 1' 4
-L __-- _---
45 7 6

6

L6 3 89
m-- --- ---
7 2 9

3 5 7 2

8 5


2013 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.
.I


level: U[-2 3
Complete the grid so each row, column and
3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit
1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku,
visit www.sudoku.org.uk.
Solution to Tuesday's puzzle
319785462
5 2 4 6 1 9387
6 7 8 3 2 4 1 5 19
6783241759
786531924




8 6 7 1 9 2 5 4 3
2 4 3 1
195248736
867192543
432857691
9 5 1 4 6 3 2 7 8


1/16/13


Cnoniamirit) Hotpila)
Northwest Florida Community Hospital,
Chipley, FL a leading healthcare provider
in the panhandle is seeking qualified
candidates for the following position:
Registered Nurses- ER 7p-7a
Experience Preferred.
Applications available online at
www.NFCH.org and/or application to:
Email dblountfnfch.org
(850) 415-8106 or Fax (850) 638-0622
Smoke and Drug Free Campus. EOE


Orchard Pointe Apartments seeldng
4 RESIDENT MANAGER In Marianna.
Management experience a plus will turn in
resume to office at: Orchard Pointe 4445
Orchard Pointe Dr. Marianna, FI 32448


*Paramedi/Fire Fighter
High school graduate or,
equivalent and some
experience beyond
obtaining the required
certifications for the
position. Certification as a Paramedic by
the FL Department of Health Bureau of
Emergency Medical Services.
Certification in Fire Fighting Standards.
Certification in CPR and A.C.LS. bfthe
American Red Cross, EVOC certified,
valid class D FL drivers license.
Starting Salary $30,688.97/yr
EMT/Fire Fihter
Must have high school diploma or GED
with 1-2 years exp. in fire protection; or
any equivalent combination of training
and experience. Certification as an EMT
by the Emergency Medical Division of the
Florida Dept. of Professional Regulation.
Certification in Fire Fighting Standards.
Certification in CPR by the American Red
Cross. Must have a valid FL drivers
license with D endorsement
Starting Salary $23,947.00/yr.
Submit Jackson County employment
application to: Human Resources Dept,
2864 Madison St, Marianna, FL 32448.
PHONE (850) 482-9633.
Web site wwwjacksoncountyfLnet
Deadline to apply is 01-28-2013
Drug-Free Workplace/EOE/V.Pref/ADA/AA


S.CHOOLS T UC TI
rri


GIBB MARIANNA VILLAGE
Now taking applications for people with
disabilities & who have very low incomes.
1 & 2 bedroom apartments.
Wide doorways, lower counters, roll-in
showers. Accessible for wheelchairs &
other mobility aids HUD subsidized rent.
2933 Milton Ave, Marianna,
FL Call 850-482-4663




1/1 Apartment for Rent.
For Info call 850-579-8895


1 & 2 BR Apartments available in town near
ChipOla. Water/garbage/sewer included.
No pets. 850-526-8392 or 850-209-5620


Classes Forming Noe
for Medical Assisting,
FOR TIS Electrical Trades and
R TIS More!
COLLEGE Call Fortis College
Today! 888-202-4813 or
visit www.fortiscollege.edu. For consumer
information visit www.fortis.edu


---3mmwBEBQ


i


I L-








www.JCFLORIDAN.com CLASSIFIEDS Jucksoii County Floridait Wednesday, January 16, 2013- 7 B


Orchard Polnte Apartments
Now accepting applications for 2 & 3 BR Apts.
Call or come by to plaic up
I application
: 4414 Omihard Pointe Dr.
M i Eunna. Ca, TUI _.. .ll-


2/1 Duplex In Alha. $475/Mo.
Located at 15664 N.W. Broad St.
Pro Team Realty 850-674- 3002
HOS ESLI I I ID
1 & 2BR Houses & Apts ALSO
2 & 3BR Mobile Homes Rent to Own
Lot rent included. For details
4 850-557-3432 or 850-814-6515 4m
2BR/1BA House on Burke St.
Grand Ridge $425. Mo. + $425. Dep.
Call 850-592-5571
2BR/1BA w/offlce In Grand Ridge, Rent to own,
very nice, $1000 down $650/mo. 850-997-
2464/850-274-9896
Austin Tyler & Associates *
Quality Homes & Apartments
4 850- 526-3355 4m
'Property Management Is Our ONLY Business"
Huge 7BR 4 BA Home for rent in Marlanna,
PERFECT FOR LARGE FAMILIES : 2 kitchens,
2 dining rooms, 3 living rooms, plenty of
storage, barn,huge fenced pool.WIII consider
separating Into individual apartments.
Zoned for Residential & Commercal,
S 1/4 Mile From Wal-Mart 850-544-0440


2 & 3 bedroom mobile Homes in Cottondale.
$500 and up. H20, garbage, sewer Included.
http://www.harloscountrylMng.com.
4W-209-8847 4.
2&3BRMH's in
Marianna& Sneads (850)209-8595.


2BR 1 BA MH'S in Alford, $370 mo.S370 dep.
850-579-888250-209-1664/850-573-1851.
2BR Mobile Home Cottondale Area
Water & Garbabge Included. $425. Mo + Dep.
Call 8508908485 or 850-890-8487
3/2 DW In Malone, CH/A, No pets, security
neg., Section 8 ok. 850-594-9991 or 850-557-
7719
3BR 2BA MH in Marianna $500/mo. $500 dep.
w/no pets, Or $750 dep. with small pets
850-573-6307 or 850-482-5449
3BR 2BA MH in Sneads $500/mo. No Pets
850-573-0911/850-593-5251
Mobile Homes for Rent 2/1 Located
between Grand Ridge & Sneads
includes water & garbage.$350/month
4 850-573-0308 4.
Quiet, well maintained Park, Water/sewer/
garbage/lawn included. Available Now
3/2 DW $625 & 3/2 $475 & 2/1S425
Joyce Riley RE 850-209-7825 4w
Spadous 2BR 2BA Plus Office, Family of 3
$450-$550 Plus deposit Clean and Quiet,
No smokers, No pets 850-718-8158



U I .. -;RER

For Lease: 6,000 sq. ft. Daycare on 2.58 acres.
Licensed.for 93 children. Room for expansion.
Call 850-718-6541.




Very Private
1,600 sq. ft, 2 bedrooms 1 bath with a loft,
and a screened in back porch. House is 60%
complete. Septic system complete, temporary
power pole on 3+ acres. You will love it when
you see it!! $31,000. Call Allison at 850-381-0720


For Sale By Owner: 41
Briar Hills Drive, Dothan
3 bedroom, 2 bath on 1
acre of land. 1300 square
feet Built In 2008. All stain-
less steel appliances in kitchen stay. Hard-
wood, tile and carpet floors. Screened in patio.
2 car attached carport. Covered front porch.
Country setting 10 minutes from Southslde
Walmart or SAMC. Asking $113,500. For more
information call 334-701-5889.
Graceville: Recently renovated 3 BR, 1.5 baths
1350 sq. ft. Great neighborhood and huge back-
yard, $89,999. Call 850-658-4081.
Very well maintained 5 bedroom, 2 bath, older
home. Includes 2 carports, yard completely
fenced (privacy) and a shed. Close to schools.
Room for a family to growl Call today for your
personal viewing. 850-263-2755.


S^';jl One of a kind home
rJ F n on the Apalachicola River
jin Wewahltchka. Florida.
~3BR, 2B modular home.
SOutdoor kitchen, shop
greenhouse and boat
house. Beautiful fenced yard on nice high
riverbank. Large lot is also zoned commercial.'
Reduced to sell. $129,000. Call 850-819-0401




* Dowtown Chlpley House Ideal for gift shop,
former sandwich shop w/ comm.
kitchen, approx. 3000sf. nice lot $145K
S850-579-1290 leave message.




Bass Tracker 2002: 18Ft, 90HP Mercury, black
and gray, Garmin GPS fish finder, front fish
finder, AM/FM/CD Radio, Excellent Condition
$6,500. Call 850-774-6230


mmmIII! JAlcrmIDf I


IXtreme

Boats


Packages From
$4,995
All Welded
All Aluminum Boats


www.xtremelndustrnes.com



37' 1999 Tiffin Alegro
Diesel Pusher. Only 64,000
miles w/Cummings diesel
engine and Freightliner
chassis, highly polished
hardwood floors in living
area kitchen & bath. Lots of storage inside &
out, no smokers. $45,999.
334-296-2989 ask for Brian.
i Ford 1987 Cutaway 27',
I K .... Al-


j $ Che
sllvei
334-




Repos, Slow Cred
Push, Pull or Drag
BRING IN YOUR W2

Ford 1993 Thundertbr
percharged V6, Exter
leather. 114k miles, V
everything. Plenty of
mile time. Asking $3,(
tures. 330-461-1958


Toyota 2006 Soara C
system, DVD player, C
top & tan leather, loa
$21.500. 334-803-1638


LUW Miles,
Clean/Generator, $4599.
Call 334-714-2700.








SBuick 2002 Rendezvous;
$1195 down with 0%
Interest. Daylight Auto
Financing 850-215-1769
9AM-9PM
Chevrolet 2008 Impala;
$895 down with 0%
Interest. Daylight Auto
Financing 850-215-1769
9AM-9PM
vrolet HHR 2009 LS,
er 62K miles, $9500.
798-5669.



mentTaxTag&M e
rt, Past Bankruptcy OK!
p, Will Trade Anything!
2 OR LAST PAY STUB!!!!

d Super Coupe 3.8L Su-
ior Red, Interior Black
ery clean, no rust power
Modifications. 13.8 1/4
)00. Please call for plc-

KiM 206 Ro, 83k miles,
35 MPG, $4999. Call 334-
714-2700.


Pontiac 20 Grand Prix;
$695 down with 0%
Interest. Daylight Auto
Financing 850-215-1769
9AM-9PM

convertible, navigation
Cosmic Blue metallic, tan I


ided, low miles, 1-owner


Toyota 2011 Camry SE (Sport Edition), 4dr.,
auto, power pkg., White, 9,000 miles, show
room condition, ext warranty,. $19,500. 850-
569-2215, 850-718-5461, 850-717-7105.


2003 Harley Davidson Ultra Classic, blue,
comes with extras $6,999. Great condition
850-573-1695 or 850-263-1678
HARLEY DAVIDSON 2012 UL-
TRA GLIDE LIMITED, 1500 '
MILES, CHROME WHEELS,
ABS BRAKES, CD,CBAM/FM
RADIO,HEATED HAND GRIPS,
PYTHON PIPES, CRUISE CON-
TROL, RIDERS BACK REST,
PLUS MORE EXTRAS, NO TIME TO ENJOY, CALL
334-268-3900, ASKING $21.500
Honda 2004.VTX 1300 cc 22K mi. new tires,
service, 2 helmets, leather bags, adult owned
334-803-3397 $3950. NICE!!!!
Meed a New Pomn? Checd out the Casifieds


For General House or
Office Cleaning
Call Debra
Free Estimates References Available
850-526-2336


B&B Professional Auto Detailing
Now offering mobile wash inside
and outside, oil change & vacuum
Detailing now for the low price of $50.
S(850) 573-5509
Just give i s a call and we'll come to you!
All services perlonned on site.




"Beautification of Your Home"
Carpentry/Painting Installations
Furniture Repair & Refinishing
General Repairs Insured
(850)5I69-290


BBOATSU6
^^^^^^^ FACTORY DIRECT ^~-^


---9
GMC 2003 2500 HD SL1
mileage, V8, Good con
vious owner, well kept
5th wheel attachment
trailer brakes. Call fo
such as heated seats,
etc. $15.200. 334-718-8


Title in hand. $1,000. 3






'ii


.... -- 4--.----I .. 1 ...
Heavy Duty Disc Harrow In good condition
$250. 334-695-5123 or 334-687-2319


fl5 Pontiac 2003 Montana Ext Mini-Van
Seats 8 White 102K mi 20/25 MPG
Runs Great, Auto trans, alloy
wheels, Frt-Rear A/C Power Windows Locks,
Mirrs & Drvr Seat, Cruise Ctrl, Remote Keyless
Ent Roof Rack. Clean, serviced every 3K mi
New tires 2011 garage kept
$5700 (334) 618-4645


1ST PLACE TO CALL FOR ALL OF
YOUR TOWING NEEDS


AUTO BODY & RECYCLING
PAYING TOP DOLLAR FOR JUNK CARS
Contact Jason Harger at 334-791-2624

. -. _----- -----,-- -;

Ir .
*i4


CLASSIFIEDS...
24 HOURS A DAY
7 DAYS A WEEK
52 WEEKS A YEAR
JUST A CLICK AWAY.

Visit us at:
i\ www.jcfloridan.com


L 4IiJ


30 Elec fence post & yel. con. $35.850-352-4181
Barb wire 1320 ft new $25. 850-352-4181.
Boat Trailer '97 magic tilt $350. 850-209-0747.
Box Spring & Mattres: Qu. $50. 850-482-2039
Chest -antiaue.4 drawer, oak. $60. 850-209-0702


ISCLAmNEOUIS = RCllL4 .'AJ:IR


I POTORAPY


DBESTWAYl
DlDTARLF RUILDINIS


ThATr' ClAssifiEd


Refrigerator-tabletop 4 cu.ft.,$100,850-573-0851
Refrigerator-Whirlp.,18 cu.ft,$125,850-573-0851
Shotgun: Winchester 1400 12 ga. $350. 573-5135
Sleeper Sofa: Queen $250. Call 239-272-8236.
Steel Door- 32 x 80 LH, $50,850-482-2636
Table Lamp: $30 Call 239-272-8236
Window- 29 1/2x30 1/4, $115, 850-482-2636
Wlndows-14x73, plastic, $45, 850-482-2636
Yr Books "99-"00 Crocodiles $20. 850-592-2881


I SELFSTORAG


Disabled? Denied
Social Security?
Then let the experts help. Retired Solal NI | ED
Security Administration Hearing Office *
Director Jerry Glover knows the law and
wants to help you.
Call today for your FREE Consultation
(850) 762-2266 or (850) 557-6251

ITR=E=1ER, IC


In The Classifieds


Dodge 2001 Durango ; $695
down with 0% Interest. CALL FOR TOP PRICE
Daylight Auto Financing
850-215-1769' FOR JUNK VEHICLES
9AM-9PM
I ALSO SELL USED PARTS
Ford 2002 Explorer. 24 HOUR TOWING 4 334-792-8664
Recently painted. Tinted
windows. CD player. New WANTED Nice Pick-Up, preferably Extended
tires. Needs motor and Cab Ford Ranger or Tacoma must have air, any
transmission work. color but black. 334-687-8Qp3
334-701-0107 after 5PM.
Jeep 2003 Liberty; $1095 LEGALS
down with 0% Interest.
Daylight Auto Financing
850-215-1769
9AM-9PM LF160012 INVITATION TO BID
CB&I Inc., an Equal Opportunity Employer, is
Volvo 2003 XC90, T6 Pack actively seeking material and or subcontract
Volvo 2003 XC9, T6 Pack- quotations from all qualified and certified
age, 3rd Row Seating, Small, Minority, and/or Women's Business En-
$5999. Call 334-714-2700. terprise for the 500,000 Gallon Waterspheroid
Elevated Water Storage Tank for the City of
Marianna in Jackson County, Florida.
it l -TJr] n'Can This project is funded in part by a Florida com-
munity Development block Grant (CDGB). As
Chevrolet 2001 Sllverado ; such, it will require Davis-Bacon Minimum
$1495 down with 0% Wage Rates and certified payrolls. At this time
Interest. Daylight Auto we have not determined if "Buy American" pro-
Financing 850-215-1769 visions apply.
9AM-9PM
______Plans and Specifications may be viewed at the
Dodge 2004 Ram; 4-Door office of the consulting engineer David H. Mel-
Crew Cab; $1895 down vin, Inc. in Marianna, Florida. Please contact
re tthe engineer, Jake Mathis at 850 482 3045 for
with 0% Interest. Daylight any questlonsyou may have regarding this
Auto Financing 850-215- project.
1769; 9AM-9PM
Please direct your quotation and definition of
GMC 1997 Short Bed ; $795 scope to:
down with 0% Interest. CB&I Inc.
Daylight Auto Financing 3600 Mansell Road, Suite 230
850-215-1769 Alpharetta, GA 30022
Attention: Don Nason
AM-9PMPhone: (678) 935 3652
T Turbo Diesel 140K Fax: (678) 935 3659
edition with only one pre- Email: dnason@cbi.com
t maintenance records.
and equipment with Your quotation must be telephoned, faxed or
ir all other accessories emailed to this office no later than noon, Tues-
leather, tinted windows, day, January 22, 2013 so we can get our pro-
B225 posal completed in time.


I ;UCiKS,-BU:SESi


IrAUTOS


I


Jackson County Floridan Wednesday, January 16, 2013- 7B


ijjp


a


www.JCFLORIDAN.com CLASSIFIED






SPORTS


18B WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16,2013


. b


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


NFL


Suddenly unwanted, Tebow's future uncertain


The Associated Press

NEW YORK From
nearly unstoppable to
nearly invisible.
Tim Tebow was two wins
from the Super Bowl a year
ago. Now, he's pretty much
a player without a team
likely to be released by
the New York Jets after one
frustrating season and his
hometown team in Jack-
sonville already pulling in
the welcome mat.
Even Tebow doesn't
know how this will unfold.
A backup role on another
NFL team? A position
change? The Canadian
Football League?
"I don't know what my
future holds, but I know
who holds my future," the
devout Christian said in a
recent interview with Fox
Business Network, his only
public comments since his
strange Jets season ended.
"And, in that," he added,
"there is a lot of peace and
a lot of comfort."
Tebow barely played for
the Jets last season. 'An
absolute mess," is the way
recently retired special
teams coordinator Mike
Westhoff described it.
Tebow has two years left
on his contract, but New
York is expected to trade or
release him in the next few
weeks. So far, destination
unknown.
"I can'timagineascenario
in which he'll be a Jackson-
ville Jaguar," new general
manager David Caldwell
declared last week. "Even if
he's released."
While there's an outside
chance Tebow could re-
main a New Yorker, de-
pending on the whims of
the still-to-be-hired GM, it
appears highly unlikely.
So, that's two NFL teams
down the only ones, at
that, who showed any in-
terest last offseason when


to use him effectively, and
Tebow wasn't particularly
productive when he got his
few snaps in the wildcat-
style formation. He made
his biggest mark on special
teams as the personal punt
protector, and did all he
could to hide his frustra-
tion at not playing. But the
numbers said it all: a mere
102yards rushing and 6-of-
8 passing for 39 yards. And,
the most damning stat of
all: zero touchdowns.
"I would've liked to see
him get a chance," de-
ferisive end Mike DeVito
said.
SIt didn't even come when
Mark Sanchez struggled so
badly that he was benched
for the first time in his ca-
reer. Instead of going with
Tebow, the No. 2 quarter-
back on the depth chart,
Ryan went with third-
stringer Greg McElroy.
Tebow now had a bruised
ego to go along with the
two broken ribs that lim-
ited him earlier in the
season.


"Every opportunity you
get, you want to make the
most of," Tebow said a
few weeks before the sea-
son ended, "and I'd have
loved to have more of an
opportunity to just play
quarterback."
Acquiring Tebow ul-
timately led to Tannen-
baum and Sparano losing
their jobs. And, it clouded
Tebow's prospects in the
NFL. No matter what,
though, he insists he's a
quarterback.
Eric Crouch, a fellow
former Heisman Trophy
winner, knows what he's
going through. Crouch
was Tebow before Tebow,
a tremendous athlete who
played quarterback at the
University of Nebraska
but was told he'd have to
switch positions to have a
future in the NFL.
"I came out of a running
attack at Nebraska where
we didn't read a whole lot
of passing defenses," said
Crouch, now a college
analyst for Fox Sports.


SunnySout Proprtie
460 wy 9 -Maiana F 344


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE
New York Jets quarterback Tim Tebow (15) warms up before of an NFLgame against the Buffalo
Bills, in Orchard Park, N.Y. on Dec. 30.


Denver shopped him
- and the 25-year-old
Tebow's options appear to
be dwindling.
"Tim Tebow is an ex-
tremely popular individual
- or, he was," said former
Cowboys executive Gil
Brandt, now an analyst
for NFL.com. "I think his
popularity has waned sig-
nificantly the last three or
four months."
The buzz these days
belongs to young quar-
terbacks like Washing-
tons Robert Griffin III,
Seattle's Russell Wilson,
Indianapolis' Andrew
Luck and San Francisco's


Colin Kaepernick.
It seems so long ago now
that Tebowing his signa-
ture dropping to a knee for
a prayerful pose was all
the rage.
But even Tebow never
,Tebowed during the regu-
lar season for the Jets. Not
once. Quite a fall for a Heis-
man Trophy winner and
two-time national cham-
pion with the University
of Florida, and whose No.
15 Broncos jersey ranked
second in national sales to
Green Bay's Aaron Rodgers
in 2011.
"I think it's fair to say,"
Tebow acknowledged last


month, "that I'm a little
disappointed."
The Jets had every in-
tention of trying to make
things work with Tebow
when general manager
Mike Tannenbaum sur-
prisingly acquired him
from Denver last March -
after Pevton Manning ar-
rived for a fourth-round
draft pick. But once Tebow
got on the field, something
went woefully wrong.
Tebow went from be-
ing considered a key part
of Rex Ryan's offense to
almost non-existent Of-
fensive coordinator Tony
Sparano didn't know how


m.YA .

I t t-,-ej UeIed-_





OuIOA Monus PAT FURR CouRc BOYETr
(no0) 2"4705 s ) |0209071 (80) 573-1572
MBrokefwnw Furl9@n.cm n





Daeeu Roam Srm ED McCoY BEVEL THOMAS
(50) 20 (39 I850)573418 (850) 20.5211
d~bn*rhmlth mwmrccolrtoy.om
mbn.Rmuc mn meucovw0lmhcnhm


College Ibotball


Penn St. attacks


claims by McQueary


The Associated Press


HARRISBURG, Pa. -
Penn State's lawyers asked
a judge Tuesday to throw
out a whistleblower and
defamation lawsuit filed
by a former assistant foot-
ball coach who testified he
saw Jerry Sandusky attack
a boy in a school shower
more than a decade ago.
Mike McQueary's lawsuit
is too vague and does not
meet legal standards to
support claims of defama-
tion and misrepresenta-
tion, the university wrote
in a court filing.
McQteary has sued the
university for millions of
dollars, claiming in an Oc-
tober complaint that then-
president Graham Spanier
made him a scapegoat in
2011 after Sandusky, a
retired assistant football
coach, was arrested on
child molestation charges.
"It is riot enough that the
alleged victim of a state-
ment be embarrassed or
annoyed, he must have
suffered the kind of harm
which has grievously' frac-

1Em "IY'mV isfi


tured his standing in the
community of a respect-
able society," wrote Penn
State attorney Nancy
Conrad.
A phone message seeking
commentfromMcQueary's
lawyer, Elliot Strokoff, was
not immediately returned.
Sandusky, who spent
decades at Penn State
under longtime coach
Joe Paterno, was convict-
ed of 45 counts of child
sexual abuse and is serv-
ing a lengthy state prison
sentence.
Last week, he appeared
in a central Pennsylvania
courthouse for a hearing
on his claim that he did
not get a fair trial, in part
because his lawyers lacked
time to prepare.
Conrad's new filing said
that a Nov. 5, 2011, news
release by Spanier, 'in
which he expressed "un-
conditional support" for
outgoing athletic director
on leave Tim Curley and
retired vice president Gary
Schultz, did not relate to
McQueary and did not
defame him by innuendo.


COMERFORD VAULT
MEMORIAL SERVICE
Let us help you
of BEAUTY and
with a memorial 4
DURABILITY


All Work & Material Guaranteed

Burial Vaults, Mausoleums,
SBenches, Markers
and All Cemetery Supplies




Pete Comerford Owner & Operator
S 593-6828 1-800-369-6828
comerfordvaultmemorial@hotmail.com
Hwy. 90 W Sneads, FL


Es


Complete the form below; then submit it, with your grandchild's photo & $18 per submission to:
Valentine Grandchildren, C/O Jackson County Floridan, P.O. Box 520, Marianna, Florida 32447
or drop them off at our office at 4403 Constitution Lane.
Deadline is 5:00pM on February 8, 2013

Child's Name
Grandparent Name(s)j
Daytime Phone Number__
Submitted By
i __1___ ii


~4*~Ai~ it


-1


r-


T~ i,