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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028304/00958
 Material Information
Title: Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title: Sunday Floridan
Portion of title: Floridan
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Jackson County Floridan
Publisher: Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Marianna Fla
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates: 30.776389 x -85.238056 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note: "Independent."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID: UF00028304:00995
 Related Items
Preceded by: Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by: Marianna Floridan

Full Text


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County prepares to begin road paving project


BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbu'c hallerp 'cloridan con'
Jackson County Com-
missioners have hired
Baxter's Asphalt to resur-
face a 2,300-foot section
of College Drive and all of
the 3,500 feet. River For-
est Road, along with some
other Marianna-area roads
which are included in the
county's current $10 mil-
lion extensive road paving
project.
County Engineer Larry
Alvarez said the work
should begin in tOo or
three weeks, and should
be finished by the end of
*March or first of April.


A short section of River
Forest Road had already
been widened'and a turn
lane added, back when
Chipola College created
Prough Drive on campus.
When that happened. Riv-
er Forest became a prima-
ry entrance'to the school,
as it connects to Prough.
The rest of the road,
though, has some rough
spots, as does intersecting
College Drive.
There are several other
roads in this $474,643
package of improvements.
Fish Hatchery Road is
one of those. Alvarez said
that, while most of the


road work in the project
will not result in excessive
traffic delays for motorists,
the Fish Hatchery project
might be a different story.
The road, which begins at
the terminus of College
Drive and runs 3,500 feet
before the pavement ends,
has dips,and other serious
problems and must be re-
worked. To do the work
the county may have to
create some temporary de-
tours and /or hold traffic
at times during the work
period.
Other roads included in

See ROADS. Page 3A


MARh SMNHIER'FLORIDAN
Baxter's Asphalt and Paving will repave River Forest Road in the coming days. Jackson County
Commissioners hired the company to do the work last week and engaged Preble-Rish to provide
construction engineering inspection services on the job.


FROM SPORTS TO SPATULRS


Getting a



kick out



of cooking
BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@iclloridan corn

When Andrew Isabella lived in Jackson
County, he was probably best known as
"Izzy." a football player for Marianna High
Schod ITe was a primary punter and field-
goal kicker for MHS and graduated in 2007.
Fans might remember that he once kicked
a 72-yard punt out of the back of the end
zone. He was an all-state punter for the Big
Bend, and one of the top three kickers in
the region.
He got a football scholarship to Webber
International University in Polk County,
but shortly into that first academic year, he
steered his life in a different direction. He
went back to his first love cooking. He
went to culinary school at Keiser University,
graduating there in 2010. He is now second
in command at No. 246, a restaurant in the
north Georgia town,of Decatur, about five
miles outside Atlanta. As the kitchen's sous
chef, he prepares and cooks food, manages
line cooks, butchers meat, makes pasta,
sauces and stock from scratch, and carries-
out other responsibilities.
His calling made itself known early in life.
Some of his favorite childhood memories
involve sitting on a counter watching his
mom, Lee Isabella, prepare meals for the
family table. Her talent and the love that
went into her work inspired him.
In his childhood, there weren't many
cooking shows -just the classic Julia Child
and a male chef who had his own show
but Izzy and his mother watched those
religiously. After an episode ended, he'd cut
out pictures of the ingredients in the dishes
the chefs made, put the pictures in pans
and pretend to cook them.
When was five years old, he knew exactly
what he wanted for Christmas that year -
a boy's Easy Bake oven. His parents could
only find a powder-pink girl's edition, so
they stuck a piece of duct tape over the
word 'girl's' and wrote the word 'boy's' on
Sthe tape.
For the next three years or so, he whipped
up many a dish by the power of the oven's
mighty 120-watt light bulb. Heoften aban-
doned the Easy Bake recipes, trying to repli-
cate his mother's dishes, instead. His efforts
weren't always successful -the light bulb
can only do so much but his fasciiiation
with the attempt never waned.
He doesn't remember what happened to
his old Easy Bake he figures it must have
broken down at some point but regrets
that he didn't keep it no matter what its
condition.
"I didn't know it was going to be such a


MA Rl r INNER, rtoRFLOtA
A one-time star kicker on the Marianna High School football team, Andrew Isabella is now the sous
chef at the restaurant "No. 246" near Atlanta.


sentimental tdol,'r he said. "I don't have it
but 1 kinda wish I did so I could pass it on
to my kids."
His mother remembers when she realized
that her son might find his life's path in the
kitchen rather than the football field.
"Back when he was in high school, some
friends of ours had a tragic loss and he went
over to their house one night and cooked
them a meal. When he came home, talking
about the experience and'howit made him
feel to be a small part of their healing, there
was something special abopt the light in
his eyes arid in the sound of his voice. Right
then I thought, 'maybe my boy is going to
do something with this.'
Andrew remembers it well, himself.
"It really hit me then," he said. "Just the
pleasure of other people enjoying what I
take pride in and have the pleasure of do-
ing; itwas very memorable to me, to be part
of helping them."
At Keiser, he started his studies in a class
of 22. By the second month, the roster had
dwindled to 12. By the end of the program
he was the only one of the original 22 to
graduate.
"That was my life at that time, my number
one priority," Isabella said. "I was an aver-


age B student in high school and didn't re-
ally study, but in college, I m&de the Dean's
List, and my dad (Vince), was thrilled. I re-
ally had such a passion for it."
Isabella said he prides himself on spe-
cializing in seasonal and local foods at No.
246, and is well-versed in everything from
French to modern American cuisines.
He has one-time "Top Chef" contestant
Tracy Bloom to thank for his big break in
the restaurant industry. She was the execu-
tive chef at Table 1280 in Georgia and Isa-
bella was there as a line cook when she got
the chance to compete on "Top Chef." That
opportunity meant she'd be away from the
restaurant for several weeks. She put her
sous chef in the executive position for the
period and, having been impressed with
the leadership skills she'd seen in Isabella
over time, she moved him temporarily into
the sous chef's slot.
When she came back, the two men shift-
ed back into their old jobs, but Bloom didn't
want to see Isabella languish forever on the
line. She recommended him to Luma, an-
other restaurant that needed a sous chef.
From there, he went to No. 246 with the


See ISABELLA, Page 3A


MARKSKINNERFLORIDAN
A local pecan grower
wants Jackson County
Commissioners to enact
an ordinance making it a.
misdemeanor to pick up
pecans that fall into the
public right-of-way from the
overhanging limbs.

Grower asks

forpecan

poaching

ordinance
BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckalter@jcfloridan.com,

Pecan-grower Richard
Harrison is trying to get
Jackson County Commis-
sioners to enact an ordi-
nance that would make it
against the lawto pick up
the pecans that fall from
private property onto the
public right of way during
harvest season, or from
limbs that overhang the
right-of-way.
Last Tuesday, he made
his second attempt, of-
fering the board a sample
ordinance from- Georgia
and saying that a state leg-
islator here may attempt to
get such a law on the books
for Florida at large. Harri-
son said that when pecan
tree branches extend over
roads or ditches, strangers
sometimes pick the nuts
that fall on the ground
below. He said he thinks
that's unfair and that, with
no ordinance preventing
it, the poachers then feel
free to pick from the over-
hanging limbs and some-
times go onto the private
property nearby to harvest
more nuts.
He wants the county to
declare it a misdemeanor
offense to'pick from the
right-of-way, saying he
hopes that would also pre-
vent the ultimate trespass
See PECANS, Page 3A


s CLASSIFIEDS...8A


) ENTERTAINMENT..7A


. LOCAL...3A


SOBITUARIES...4A


) STATE.. 4A


) SPORTS...5A


NATION...1OA


This Newspaper
Is Printed'On
Recycled Newsprint




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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Weather Outlook


Today


Mostly Cloudy. Warm.

Justin Klefer WMBB


High -761
Low 586


High 700
Low 490

Wednesday
Showers. Cooler.


High- 600
Low -410


Friday
Sunny. Breezy & Cold.


High 600
Low 42'

Thursday
Possible Storm: Colder.


High 61
Low- 43'


Saturday
Becoming Cloudy & Cold.


TID ES ULTRA VIOLET INDEX
Panama City Low 9:04 AM High 11:34 PM
Apalachicola Low 12:32 PM High 5:24 AM 0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8-10 Very High, 11+ I
Port St. Joe Low 8:09 PM High 12:07 AM
Destin Low 9:20AM High 12:08 AM 0 1
Pensacola Low 9:54AM High 12:41 AM


RIVER READINGS
Woodruff
Blountstown
SMarianna
Caryville


Reading
40.37 ft.
0.45 ft.
6.35 ft.
3.96 ft.


Flood Stage
66.0 ft.
15.0 ft.
19.0 ft.
12.0 ft.


THE SUN AND MOON
Sunrise 6:39 AM
Sunset 5:02 PM
Moonrise 9:05 AM
Moonset 9:28 PM


i


Feb. Jan. Jan. Feb.
10 18 27 3


FLORIDA'S WhBl
PANHANDLE

MEDIA PARTNERS WJAQ 100.9.
hLISTEN FOR HOURLYWEAHERUPDATES


JACKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN
Publisher Valeria Roberts
vroberts@jcfloridan.com

Circulation Manager Dena Oberski
doberski@jcfloridan.com

CONTACT US
Telephone: 850-526-3614
FAX: 850-482-4478
Email: editorial@jcfloridan.com
Malng Addrss:
P.O. Box 520, Marianna. FL 32447
Street Address:
4403 Constitution Lane
Marianna, FL 32446
Office Hours
Weekdays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

MISS YOUR PAPER?
You should receive your newspaper no later
than 6 a.m. If it does not arrive, call Circula-
'tion between 6 a.m. and noon, Tuesday to
Friday, and 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. on Sunday. The
Jackson County Floridan (USPS 271-840)
is published Tuesday through Friday and
Sunday mornings. Periodical postage paid
at Marianna. FL.


SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Home delivery: $11.23 per month; $32.83
for three months; $62.05 for six months;
and $123.45 for one year. All prides include
applicable state and local taxes. Mail
subscriptions must be paid in advance. Mail
subscriptions are: $46.12 for three months;
$92.24 for six months; and $184.47 for one
year.

ADVERTISING
The advertiser agrees that the publisher
shall not be liable for damages arising
out of errors and advertisements beyond
the amount paid for the space actually
occupied by that portion of the advertise-
ments in which the' error occurred, whether
such error is due to the negligence of the
publisher's employees or otherwise, and
there shall be not liability for non-inser-
tion of any advertisement beyond the
amount paid for such advertisement. This
newspaper will not knowingly accept or
publish illegal material of any kind. Advertis-
ing which expresses preference based on
legally protected personal characteristics is
not acceptable.

HOWTO GETYOUR
NEWS PUBLISHED
The Jackson County Floridan will publish
news of general interest free of charge.
Submit your news or Community Calendar
events via e-mail, fax, mail, or hand delivery.
Fees may apply for wedding, engagement,
anniversary and birth announcements.
Forms are available at the Floridan offices.
Photographs must be of good quality and
suitable for print. The Floridan reserves the
right to edit all submissions.
GETTING IT RIGHT
The Jackson County Floridan's policy
is to correct mistakes promptly. To
report an error, please call 526-3614
Monday-Friday.


Community Calendar


TODAY
n St. Anne Thrift Store Hours 9
a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday and Thursdays
at 4285 Second Ave. in Marianna.
Toys/clothing sale: Buy one; get one
(sarre or lesser value) for 50 cents.
Call 482-3734.
N Chlpola Regional Arts Assoca-
tion Meeting 11:30 a.m. at Jim's
Buffet and Grill, Marianna. After a
Dutch-treat buffet luncheon, the noon
program will feature a performance by
the Magic Comedy Show. Attendees
will be entered into a drawing for artist
series tickets to the Jan. 17 show
by illusionist Sammy Cortino. Call
718-2257.
* Optimist Club of Jackson County
Meeting Noon at Jim's Buffet &
Grill in Marianna.
* Orientation 12-3 p.m. at Goodwill
Career Training Center, 4742 Highway
90, Marianna. Learn about and regis-
ter for free services. Call 526-0139.
a Sewing Circle 1 p.m. at Jackson
County Senior Citizens, 2931 Optimist
Drive in Marianna. Call 482-5028.
SJackson County School Board
Meeting 4 p.m. in the JCSB meet-
ing room at 2903 Jefferson St. in
Marianna. Call 482-1200.
* Chlpola College District Board
of Trustees Meeting -7 p.m. in the
Public Service Building, Chipola Col-
lege, Marianna.
a Disabled American Veterans
Meeting 7 p.m. at the DAV Chapter
22 house, 3083 DAV Lane, Marianna.
Call 482-5143.
a Alcoholics Anonymous Open
Meeting 8-9 p.m. in the AA room of
First United Methodist Church, 2901
Caledonia St. in Marianna.

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 16
3 Jackson County Tourist Develop-
ment Council Meeting 10 a.m.
at The Russ House, Lafayette St. in
Marianna.
* Early Learning Coalition of NW
Fla. Inc. Board ot Directors Meeting
- 11 a.m. at the Workforce Center in
Panama City. Call-in number: 1-888-
67-3525; guest code: 4998489399#.
a Chlpola Retirees LUncheon
- 11:30 a.m. at the Gazebo Coffee
Shoppe & Deli, Marianna. All retirees


and friends are invited.
a Alcoholics Anonymous Open
Meeting -12-1 p.m. in the AA room of
First United Methodist Church. 2901
Caledonia St. in Marianna.
a Basic Computer Class, Part 1
-12-3 p.m. at the Goodwill Career
Training Center, 4742 Highway 90,
Marianna. Learn basic components
and use of a computer. Call 526-0139.

THURSDAY, JAN. 17

a International Chat'n' Sip 8:30-
10 a.m. at the Jackson County Public
Library, 2929 Green St. in Marianna.
Learning Center staff and their inter-
national English learners invite the
public for the exchange of language,
culture and ideas in a relaxed environ-
ment. Light refreshments served. No
charge. Call 482-9124.
a St Anne Thrift Store Hours 9
a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday and Thursdays
at 4285 Second Ave. in Marianna.
Toys/clothing sale: Buy one: get one
(same or lesser value) for 50 cents.
Call 482-3734.
SCaregiver Support Group Meet-
ng 11 a.m. to noon in the First
Presbyterian Church Social Hall, 4437
Clinton St. in Marianna. Open to all
family caregivers providing care to
loved ones or friends; Confidential
group, facilitated by a professional
group counselor. Coffee, water, light
snacks provided.
* Garden Gala Committee Kickoff
Event Noon at Covenant Hospice.
4215 Kelson Ave., Suite E. in Mari-
anna: Volunteers needed to help plan,
prepare and present the 8th Annual
Garden Gala set for June.22. Lunch
will be provided. Call 482-8520 or
209-8008.
3 Marianna Kiwanis Club Meet-
ing Noon at Jim's Buffet & Grill,
4329 Lafayette St., Marianna. Call
'482-2290.
a Job Club 12-3 p.m. at the
Goodwill Career Training Center,
4742 Highway 90, Marianna. Learn
job seeking/retention skills; get job
search assistance. Call 526-0139.
* Jackson County NAACP Meeting
- 6 p.m. in the St. Jame
s A.M.E. Church basement, 2891
Orange St. in Marianna. Call 569-1294.


a Alcoholics Anonymous Closed
discussion, 8-9 p.m., First United
Methodist Church, 2901 Caledonia
St., Marianna. in the AA room. At-
tendance limited to persons with a
desire to stop drinking; papers will not
be signed.

FRIDAY, JAN. 18
SCelebrate Recovery 7 p.m.
at Evangel Worship Center, 2645
Pebble Hill Road in Marianna. Adult,
teen meetings to "overcome hurts,
*habits and hang-ups." Dinner: 6 p.m.
Child care available. Call 209-7856,
573-1131.
* Alcoholics Anonymous Open
Meeting 8-9 p.m. in the AA room of
First United Methodist Church, 2901
Caledonia St. in Marianna.

SATURDAY, JAN. 19
S2nd Annual Martin Luther King
Day Block Celebration -11 a.m.
to 4 p.m. on Orange Street, between
Hannah and Andrews streets, in
Marianna. Presented by the FAMU
Alumni Association, NW Fla. Chapter.
For event/vendor space information,
call 482-8420 pr 209-2943.
a Florida Bull Test Sale 12:30
p.m. at the UF North Fla. Research
and Education Center, Marianna. Only
bulls meeting specific benchmarks
are eligible for the sale. Call 850-394-
9124.
Alcoholics Anonymous Open
Meeting 4:30-5:30 p.m. in the
AA room of First United Method-
ist Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in
Marianna.
Jackson County Talent Show 5
p.m. at Chipola College in Marianna,
featuring soloists, choirs, praise
dancers and speakers. Part of Jackson
County NAACP's Martin Luther King:
Keeping the Dream Alive festivities.
Call 272-8231.
a St Joseph Masoiic Lodge No. 99
39th Annual Banquet 6 p.m. in the
New Mount Olive Missionary Baptist
Church Fellowship Hall, 2870 Barnes
St., Marianna. Guest speaker: The Rev.
Sinclair Forbes. Tickets: $15 donation.
Call 850-594-6181.

SUNDAY, JAN. 20
a Fine Arts Series Concert: Lopez


Tabor Duo 4 p.m. at St. Luke's Epis-
copal Church in downtown Marianna,
featuring Venezuelan violinist Alfonso
Lopez and pianist Michelle Tabor. Meet
the artists at a reception following the
concert. Public welcome. Donations
accepted for the arts series.
3 Alcoholics Anonymous Closed
Discussion 6:30 p.m. at 4349 W.
Lafayette St. in Marianna .in one-story
building behind 4351W. Lafayette St.).
Attendance limited to persons with a
desire to stop drinking.
3 Alcoholics Anonymous Meeting
- 8 p.m. in the board room of Camp-
bellton-Graceville Hospital, 5429
College Drive, Graceville.

MONDAY, JAN. 21
a Martin Luther King Jr. Day Break-
fast 7 a.m. at the Saint James
A.M.E. Church, 2891 Orange St., Mari-
anna. Free event. Call 693-3055.
* Martin Luther King Jr. Day Pa-
rade -10 a.m. beginning at Borden
St., ending at Madison St. in Marianna.
Call 693-3055.
a Chipola Chapter, NSDAR Meeting
-11a.m. in the Hudnall Building
Community Room, Marianna. Dr. Ray
Marling will discuss "Women's Heart
Health.' Reservations required for the
luncheon; contact Vice Regent Caro-
lyn Jordan at 638-1947 or cdjordan@
bellsouth.net.
* Jackson County Quilter's Guild
Meeting 5:30-7:30 p.m. at Ascen-
sion Lutheran Church, 3975 US 90
West, Marianna. Business meetings
are fourth Mondays; other Mondays
are for projects, lessons, help. All
quilters welcome. Call 209-7638.
a Capt. Luke Lott's Calhoun
Guards, Camp'2212, Sons of Con-
federate Veterans Monthly Meeting
- 6 p.m. at the Altha Diner, 25563
North Main St., Altha (Highway 71
downtown).
a Alford Community Organiza-
tion Meeting 6 p.m. in the Alford
Community Center. New members
from Alford, surrounding communities
invited to join. Call 579-4482, 638-
4900 or 579-5173.
a Alcoholics Anonymous Open
Meeting 8-9 p.m. in the AA room of
First United Methodist Church, 2901
Caledonia St., Marianna.


The submission deadline for this calendar is two days before publication. Submit to: Community Calendar, Jackson County Floridan, P.O 0. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447,
email editorial@jcfloridan.com, fax 850-482-4478 or bring items to 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.


Police Roundup


Marianna Police
Department
The Marianna Police
Department listed the follow-
ing incidents for Jan. 13, the
latest available report: One
suspicious person, one report
of mental illness, one burglary,
one burglar alarm, two reports
of shooting in the area, three
traffic stops, one civil dispute,
one suicide attempt, one
animal complaint, one threat/-
harassment complaint, one 911
hang-up.


Jackson County
Sheriff's Office
The Jackson County
Sheriff's Office and county
fire/rescue reported the follow-
ing incidents for Jan. 10, the
latest available report. (Some
of these calls maybe related
to after-hours calls taken on
behalf of Graceville and Cotton-
dale police departments):
One accident, five abandoned


vehicles, four suspicious
vehicles, two suspicious
incidents, two suspicious
people, seven
Physical
disturbances,
two verbal
Ce ~l~ E disturbances,
: two pedestrian
complaints,
one residential
fire call, two woodland fire
calls, two
commercial structure fire
calls, 15 medical calls, four
burglar alarms, three reports
of shooting in the area, 15
traffic stops, one larceny com-
plaint, one criminal mischief
complaint, two civil disputes,
one trespass complaint, one
juvenile complaint, one noise
disturbance, one animal
complaint, three assists of
motorists or pedestrians, three
assists of other agencies, one
welfare check; one transport,
two patrol requests, three
threat/harassment complaints,
and one report of counterfeit
money.


Jackson County
Correctional Facility
The following persons were
booked into the county jail dur-
ing the latest reporting periods:
Tony Manning, 25, 2927
Harley Drive, Marianna, pos-
session of marijuana -less than
20 grams.
Melissa Lombardo, 39,
4409 Holly Hill Drive (Apt. A),
Marianna, driving under the
influence.
Mary Hall, 38, 2803 Penn Ave.,
Marianna, violation of county
probation.
Zakia Randolph, 37, 7034
Esther St., Jacksonville, posses-
sion of marijuana-more than 20
grams.
Donald Bennett, 44, 605
Dowling Road, Marianna, hold
for court (hold for DOC).
Frank Mobley, 42,1301 Alex-
ander Drive (Apt. D-37), Do-,
than, Ala., driving while license
suspended/revoked, attaching
unassigned tag sticker, fugitive
from justice (Mississippi).
Jessica Gilbert, 21, 3070 Cart-


ers Mill Road (Apt. H1), Mari-
anna, failure to appear.
Ashley Perry, 25, 125 27th
Terrace, Cape Coral, hold for
Hillsborough Co.
Fredrick Ricks, 21, 5543 Wil-
lis Road, Greenwood, felony
battery (domestic batteryby
strangulation).
Charles Stewart, 40, 899
St. Rose Road, Grand Ridge,
domestic battery, domestic
assault.
Anthony O'Bryan, 35,15812
Broad St., Altha, driving under
the influence (alcohol).
Miranda Gay, 24,1220 Gun
Club Road, Atlanta, driving
while license suspended or
revoked (knowingly).
Tony Watts, 27, 5262 Alabama
St., Graceville, aggravated
assault.
Bruce Parker, 52, 181 Shell
Road, Port St. Joe, driving while
license suspended or revoked.
Jail Population: 211
To report a crime, call CrimeStoppers
at 526-5000 or a local law enforcement
agency.To report a wildlife violation, call
1-888-404-FWCC (3922).


JCFLOR I DAN.CO M


"12A TUESDAY, JANUARY 15,2013


Wake-up Call






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Hospital auxiliary convenes for quarterly meeting


Special to the Floridan

The Jackson Hospital
Auxiliary held its first
quarterly meeting on
Friday, Jan. 4.
President Betty
McDaniel called the
meeting to order and
welcomed guests and
members. Following the
traditional opening, all
enjoyed a delicious meal
prepared and served by
hospital staff.
McDaniel introduced
guest speaker Merita
Stanley of ElderCare Ser-
vices, who presented the:
group with information
about several programs:
Retired Senior Volunteer,
Foster Grandparent and
Senior Companion.
Stanley stressed that
anyone 55 and older
is eligible to work as a
volunteer.
Elizabeth Ann Ward,
former auxiliary president,
installed the 2013 officers:
Betty McDaniel, president;


K r





I i,


From left: Elizabeth Ann Ward, former auxiliary president;
Betty McDaniel, president; Marilyn Mabardy, vice president;
Daisie Schoultheis, secretary; and Brenda Peacock, treasurer,
pose for a photo at the Jan. 4 meeting.


SUBMITTED PHOTOS
Flower arrangement winners, from left, Sandra Durden, Waunell King and Nancy Branch pose
for a photo with their prizes.


Marilyn Mabardy, vice
president; Daisie Schoul-
theis,'secretary; and
Brenda Peacock,
treasurer.
Lovely flower arrange-
ments were won by San-


dra Durden, Waunell
King and Nancy Branch.
The next meeting of
the Jackson Hospital Aux-
iliary is set for Friday,
April 5 in the Hudnall
Building.


RIGHT: Guest speaker
Merita Stanley of ElderCare
Services addresses the
quarterly meeting of the
Jackson Hospital Auxiliary.


Malone School will



celebrate literacy week


Special to the Floridan
M alone School, in
celebration of
SFlorida Literacy
Week Jan. 14-18, has sev-
eral activities planned
in accordance with the
week's theme: "Take the
Lead and Read."
On Wednesday, Jan. 9,
a contest between grade ,
levels (K, 1-2,3-5, 6-8 and
9-12) began for AR points.
Each grade level/teacher
has a car and race tracks
are posted in the hallways.
Each day, cars are moved
based on the number
ofAR points earned the
previous day.
The contest continues
through Jan. 17 and the
winners will be an-
nounced the next day.
The winning class in
each group will receive a


cupcake party.
On Monday was the
"Million Minute Read,"
when from 8-8:20 a.m. the
entire school was asked
to "Drop Everything and
Read."
Elementary school
students participated in a
book cover contest, where
each student designed
a cover for their favorite
book. Each teacher chose
the best one to be judged
for the school and the
winner received a $10 gift
card.
. Today's LiteracyWeek
activity is a read-a-thon,
for which students pay $1
and get to bring a book
Sand sleep bag, blanket,
etc. to the band room and
read for one hour.
Tomorrow at 8:30
a.m., kindergarten and
first-grade students will


be treated to a reading
of "Hot Rod Hamster"
by Cynthia Lord in the
auditorium.
On Thursday, students
will have invited guests
- a high school student,
another teacher, admin-
istrator or outside person
- come to their class
and read a story or book.
And "School is Cool"
yo-yo programs are
planned for elementary
and middle/high school
students.
Malone School wraps
up Florida Literacy Week
activities Friday, with a
morning parade in which
elementary school stu-
dents will be dressed
as their favorite book
character, followed by
the announcement of
winners for the reading
race.


Isabella
From Page 1A
blessing of the Luma ex-
ecutive chef, who is best
friends with the chef at No.
246.
Isabella said he would
one day like to open a res-
taurant of his own, but is
very happy to be where he
is right now.
"I'm the eyes and ears
of the kitchen," he said.
"I watch food costs, labor
costs, manage employ-
ees, we go over menus
and develop new ideas
together, and I enjoy it all.
I'm learning a lot, from
.preparing a dish to the
business aspect, mak-
ing sure the numbers
are right for the restaurant,
so it's a great experience
for me."
Isabella is so busy with
the restaurant now that
he doesn't even have a
television., He works at


Realtors welcome new

board officers for 2013


Special to the Floridan

The Chipola Area Board
of REALTORS swore in
their 2013 officers recent-
ly at a special General
Membership meeting.
Ouida Morris, a past Flor-
ida District 8 vice presi-
dent, gave the oath to this
year's board of directors.
The 2013 members are:
President Cresh Harri-
son, President-elect Pat
Furr, Past President Jim
Gibbs, Secretary/Trea-
surer Kathy Milton, and
Directors Ann Jones,
Dennis Mundy, Bettie
Slay, Mary Beth Kaminski,
Stacy' Borges, Sheila Bar-
bee and Jim Palmer.
Past President Jim
Gibbs thanked everyone
who had been on the
board for 2012 for their
time and service. Most
seats on the Board are for
.three years. Phoebe Mey-
er, Diana Kosciw and
Deborah Mathewuse


least 12 hours a day, and
many times pushes into 15
hours. A typical week runs
75 hours. But when he
does have access to TV, he
usually browses through
the channels to find some-
thing related to food. He
likes the show 'Chopped,'
in which chefs compete
to prepare their best dish-
es using ingredients that
are kept secret until they
open their food baskets
and commence cooking
in three intense, timed
rounds.
Isabella once applied to
appear on the. show and
may try again.
"I like the uncertainty
of Chopped. We did that
kind of thing a few times
when we were school. It's
about thinking on your
toes. I like the excitement
of it. I'Ve heard people
tell me that I've grown
so fast, that I'm like a
sponge because I pick up
things pretty fast, and that

ILTT^T^^CTT~


SUDMII I tU U I
Jim Gibbs, left, passes the
gavel to incoming President
Cresh Harrison.
served their final year in
2012. Don Cornelius re-
mains as the board's asso-
ciation executive and has
had that position since
2011.
The Chipola Area Board
of REALTORS is char-
tered by the National
Association of Realtors
and is also part of the
Florida Realtors. It cov-
ers a geographic area
that includes Calhoun,
Holmes, Washington and
Jackson counties. They
can be reached online at
www.ChipolaAreaBoard-
ofRealtors.com or by call-
ing 526-4030.


I'm young to be a sous
chef. I go into the kitchen
every day thinking, 'What
am I going to learn to-
day?', so keeping an open
mind and being ready to
learn anything has brought
me a long way so far. I
think it would be a fun
challenge."
For now though, Isabella
would be happy to see
some of.his old classmates
at No. 246 if they hap-
pen to be passing through
north Georgia. And they
might keep an eye peeled
for Isabella on a televised
cooking competition
someday.


Roads
From Page 1A
this project include a
1,000-foot section of
Angela Drive, from. its
intersection with Fish
Hatchery to its end; a
370-foot section of Mi-
chael Drive, from Angela
to its end; a 560-foot sec-
tion of Sequoya Street,
from its intersection
with College Street to its
end; and all of the 1,030
feet comprising Second
Street.



Pecans
From Page 1A
onto private property.
Harrison said he'd ac-
tually like to a local ordi-
nance that would cover
a broader array of crops,
as well.
Commissioners took
no action on his request.


Stunning


Brilliant
'The Forever
After Diamond


P-atson

Marianna's Most
Trusted Jeweler
Est.1971i )
850.482.4037
watsonjewelers.com


SKE LON DISCOUNT
Marnan RDRU GS



8 Jtefferson St. Marianna, -FL


COMERFORD VAULT
MEMORIAL SERVICE


Pete Comerford Owner & Operator
593-6828 1-800-369-6828
comerfordvaultmemorial @hotmail.com
Hwy. 90 W Sneads, FL


S BEN SAUNDERS, D.M.D.
PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY
S4711 Highway 90 East Marianna, FL
(Between Burger King & Big Lots) 526-SPIT


-~----------~,~--~-~~~*-----c~c~c~c~c~c~


TUESDAY, JANUARY 15,2013 3AF





LOCR L








JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Obituaries

James'& Sikes,
Funeral Home
Maddox Chapel
4278 Lafayette Street
Marianna, FL 32446
850-482-2332
www.j)men-dskeshmuralhome.com

Wanda
Sullivan

Wanda Sullivan, 64, of
Marianna died Sunday,
January 13, 2013, at Flow-
ers Hospital in Dothan.
She was employed at the
Jackson County Health De-
partment and an active
member of the Marianna
First Assembly of God
Church.
She was preceded in
death by her husband,
Gary Wayne "Kookie" Sull-
van; parents, Mary and Pop
Rowan and a sister, Inez
Edwards.
Those left to cherish her
memory include one son,
James Walter Sullivan of
Marianna; one daughter,
Deanna Leckie and hus-
band, Austin of Pollock, La;
two sisters'Betty of Qqincy,
Ann White and husband,
Winston of White, Ga; four
grandchildren Michael
Poole, Zackary Phillips, Al-
lison and Nicholas Van
Dusen, brother-in-law Carl
Sullin and wife, Margar-
et, sster-in-law Betty
Broome, and husband,
John, and a special friend,
Terry Campbell; Numerous

at .iWednesday,
January 16,2013 at First As-
sembly of God Church with
Revs. Stephen ?Potter, and
J:'t e officiating.
S.:will follow 1
Lipfod""'Cemetery with
James & Sikes Funeral
Home Maddox Chapel di-
recting. The family will re-
ceive friends from 5 to 7
p7 '14nuary 15,


ette Street, Marianna.
In lieu of flowers, memo-
rial contributions may be
made to Emerald Coast
Hospice, 4374 Lafayette St.
Marianna, FL 32446.
-qfIesslo sympathy
may be made online at
wwwj&amsandsieunerWhomes.com


DCF: Cops

shouldhave


persons report
The Associated Press

FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla.
- Child welfare officials
said Monday that Hallan-
dale Beach Police should
have filed a missing- per-
son report in October af-
ter talking with a mother
who hadn't seen her baby
in more than a year. Au-
thorities dug up what they
believe are the baby's re-
mains in the backyard of
the parent's former home
last week.
An officer called the state
abuse hotline in October
after Brittney Sierra com-
plained that the father of
her 5-month-old son, Don-
trelle, made excuses when-
ever she asked to see him.
The couple were not mar-
ried and had an on-and-off
relationship.
"She doesn't even know,
I mean, whether the baby
is even alive or not," an of-
ficer said on a transcript of
ihe call released Monday.
When the operator asked
what was going on in the
case, the officer added,
"We really just don't know
the whereabouts of this
child."
Authorities charged Sier-
ra, 21, and the baby's father,
27-year-old Calvin Melvin,
with child neglect Friday.
After talking with the cou-


pie, they began digging in
the backyard 'of their for-
mer home and eventually
unearthed a wooden box
with human remains. The
medical examiner is con-
ducting DNA tests to iden-
tify the remains.
It is unclear why it took so
long for authorities or fam-
fly members to investigate
the baby's whereabouts.


NEW BUSINESS OFFERS A FRENZY OF FLOWERS


S- MARKSKINNER/FLORIDAN

Michael Smith checks a wreath he made at Artistic Designs Unlimited Thursday in Marianna. The store,
which opened last week, is a full service florist with both silk and fresh flowers, Smith said. It is also an
affiliate of the FTD and Bloom.net flower services. This is Smith's second foray into the flower business
in Marianna. is first, AMtisteighiMichael, was open from 2003-05. After it closed, Smith went to Okla-
homa and thin came bait'o71tfPitlawml*e he worked his way up from understudy to manager at a flower and
event company in Jacksonville. While .hfe he oversaw 1,600 weddings, Smith said. He came back to Marianna
in November. ,,


1mwmuch wil
i ssocatedPress .'

FORT LAUDERDALT,
Fla. How much the new:#
federal health care law will
cost state businesses was
the prevailing question...
Monday as Florida law-:
makers met todiscuss the
law. The answers were all
over the map.
"I would hesitate to say
there's a universal answer
that applies to everyone
'but7yonFnowithink-fpr9
the majority of employers
it's going to be pretty close in this May 16
to status quo to where Lauderdale. Fl
they're at currently," said BarackObama'
Justin Kindy, a senior
vice president with Aon
Hewitt. His company!
Jpn. Urbanek, a senior haveabreakdo
vice president with Blue lar amount t
Cross and Blue Shield of have on a bu
Florida, warned that be- 25 employee!
cause ofnewrequirements ployees and sc
in the federal law, many he said they a
small business employ- ing for federal
ers will have to increase ficials to cl
the benefits they currently guidelines.
offer in their packages, That leaves
which means spending business in lin
more money. Tallahassee
"Most will have to of- ness owner K
fer a lot richer benefits said he was
than they offer today," he confused" an
told a Senate health care tremendous
committee. about how the


Health law co employers?


THEASSOCIATEDPRESS
photo, Florida Gov. Rick Scott speaks in Fort
rida Gov. Rick Scott, long opposed President
s remake of the health insurance market.


y still doesn't
own ofa dol-
he law will
isiness with
s, 100 em-
on because
re still wait-
l health of-
arify many

a lot small
nbo.
small busi-
im Williams
"thoroughly
id still had
uncertainty
i new health


care law would impact his
company of about 75 em-
ployees. His company has
picked up 100 percent of
employees' health care
costs every year except for
this past year.
"A lot of small business-
es out there are seriously
considering that they're
going to have to go out of
business because of the
convoluted way this all
plays out," said Williams,
president of Marpan Sup-
ply Company.
Urbanek said about
50 percent of the small


businesses his '6mpany
talked with initially indi-
cated they would opt out
and pay a penalty for not
providing coverage. But
as Blue Cross Blue Shield
of Florida is working with
employers, that number
has fallen below 20 per-
cent, he said.
The health plans that
employers offer must meet
two criteria.
It must have an actuarial
value of 60. perc.ipt and
employees can't cntrib-
ute more than 9.5 percent
of their wages. If the plan
doesn't meet that require-
ment and an employee
goes to exchange and gets
a subsidy, the employer
will get hit with a $3,000
penalty, said Urbanek.
He also ticked off a list
of likely additional costs
that employers will face,
extra administrative costs,
counting seasonal work-
ers as full time equivalents
and increasing the age for
which dependents can be
covered.
Democratic Sen: Darren
Soto asked why the analy-
sis did not include po-
tential savings that could
come from the law.
"So we're talking about


the costs of compliance'
but we don't have any in-
formation on what money
would be saved by bring-
ing all these folks into an
insurance system so our
premiums wouldn't go to
subsidize their care which
is currently uninsured," he
said.
* Committee Chair Sen.
Joe Negron said the panel
would consider those
cost savings in future
discussions.
A House committee also
met Monday to discuss
health care but did not
make any decisions and
was still in the informa-
tion gathering stage.
Florida lawmakers are
facing two major deci-
sions regarding the fed-
eral health overhaul. They
must decide whether to
expand Medicaid rolls to
offer health coverage to
more low-income fami-
lies and whether to allow
the feds to run an online
health exchange or wheth-
er to partner with them.
Florida spends about
$21 billion a year to cover
nearly 3 million of the
state's poorest residents,
about half of whom are
children.


Haslam to introduce own school voucher proposal


The Associated Press

NASHVILLE, Tenn.
Gov. Bill Haslam con-
firmed Monday that he
will introduce his own
proposal to create a school
Voucher program in Ten-
nessee, though he de-
clined to elaborate abopt
which parents he wants to
make eligible to use public
money to send their chil-
dren to private schools.
The Republican gov-
ernor would only tell re-
porters after an education
discussion with, former
Florida Gov. Jeb Bush
that his voucher bill will
be targeted at children
from lower-income fami-
lies who attend the state's
worst schools.
"We will have a voucher
bill and we're working out
the specifics on that, and
talking with a lot of differ-
ent parties," he said.
Haslam last year per-
suaded the Legislature to
defer taking up voucher
proposals while a task
force he appointed stud-
ied the various options on
school choice. He had pre-


THEASSOCIATEDPRESS
Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, right, and Tennessee Gov.
Bill Haslam talk about education reform during a forum on
Monday, Jan.14 In Nashville, Tenn.


viously been undecided
about whether he would
take the lead on a voucher
proposal or if he would
let lawmakers, control the
measure.
"We spent an extraor-
dinary amount of time
. looking at it," Haslam said.
"We thought 'once we did
that we had the responsi-
bility having said, 'Hold
off, let's study it' to
come with a proposal that
we thought would make
sense."


The governor said his
plan will be paid for
through the state's school
funding formula, but
wouldn't say how much
the program would cost,'
He' so ruled out replicat,-
ing tax credit programs
established"in states like
Florida that have cre-
ated, tai~redit programs
to offset corporate dona-
tions used to fund the
vouchers.
Haslam said he also
plans to introduce legis-


lation to give, local school cation of. Phoenix-based
districts more flexibility Great Hearts Academies
on how they pay teachers, despite being ordered to
but that it won't be a re- by the state Board of Edu-
peat of his failed attempt cation lastyear.
last year to lift a cap on av- The Haslamadministra-
erage class sizes. tion in response decided
"We're not going to go to withhold $3.4 million
down that road," he said. ,from. the city's public
Haslam declined to give school system.
',further details abouAt his "The concerns'over what
voucher to teaFier .pay happened right here, in
proposals that.he plans Nashville has raised the
to unveil alotdig wth'rest awareness level of that.on
of his legislative agenda the radar screens,' Haslaii
at his annual State of the said. "What they're rlg.
State address Jan. 28. to look forI:a bll'hst e"
Democratic state Rep. tains some local a I ority,
Lois DeBerry of Memphis but makes certain the au-
said she has a series of thorizations are according
questions about vouchers, to what the Legislature in-
including about the ove ial tended them to be."
cost and whether the pro- Bush said during the fo-
gram would be targeted rum hosted by the StatF
solely at urban areas. Collaborative on Reform-n
"Right now, I'm just not ing Education, or SCORE,
sold on it," she said. that statewide authorizer
Haslam did rule out would be helpful to keep
sponsoring legislation to local boards to unfairly
create a state-wide autho- blocking deserving char-
rizer for charter schools, ter schools. State appeals
He said he expects law- court declared Florida's
makers to sponsor such 2006 law creating a state-
legislation in the aftermath wide authorizer be in "to-
of a fight over Nashville's taland fatal conflict" with
refusal to accept the appli- the states constitution.

kson Colnty VIaut &Moiint
Quaigr Senrer at Akfrd^Pt
Come Visit us at our IEW LOdCATION ,
424 West Highway 90 ro nomie west from ouprewous ,loaon o)
850-482-5041 t


HIB~kHBp

BAPIST CLLEG
1.4.1.B- 'd"),BHBHmmm


"


"14A TUESDAY, JANUARY 15,2013


LOCAL & STATE


1I


. I i I ..


r






JAC SONCONT LORIA

tITESA, JNAY 521


F~h; S.


High School boys
basketball
kiUsdy-s Tilavana
at Sneads, 5:30 and 7
p.m. Ponce de Lebn
at Graceville, 6 and
7,3 p.m.; Laurel Hill
at.'Maldne, 7 p.m.;
Cpuondale atWewa-.
hitchka, 4 and 7p.mri.
S Thursday Malone
SatGraceville, 5:30
Sand 7 p.m.;
I1 'FHd"y- once de.
leon at Sneddsi 5:30
d,,, di7p..;oVernon
,a.CottoidalEe,'6 and ..: "
Of3' t inlmGr ceville -
,at W ahItcWiA:3
#. d9:30 p.ni.;,Mari
SafWa49i 5'30
: Satura-M ,i- .
anna at Mosley, 5:"
':and 7r~r.; Malone at ,
Sm'iths Statlln (Ala.),




i\ VTilanvanae
at Sh~ieals,a'4pm.,. '.
IaurplMit Malone,,.;
'5:30 %,:; Cottondale
, atW~l bih hka.5:30
SThMildyq- Gracev-
,ll aatCbttondtle
6jm.;mWaltoriat .

Seon atrWeais& '

Wawhhptchkep.;




the wom p playing




W' . tf . 1 f -
-dmen's l td~wmn ents
:w i play host to
'- ensacola State on
Thesday.nght with
the womep playing
wediy the men at ,
7:30 p.m.
ihe teany li
fiish'the weakii; :
an ama iityb :: -*
SurdayagafisttGulf
coast State. :'"


Southern llite
S.a.tpitchl2U Gold
wil e holding
try6idtsJan. 26.atthe
; AlfordtecParka2,- 2 '
: p;m..Ca'llorP e O- -
- .258-8172for nIore ,~,
infoiatior


.Senai sportsrte isto

*. .bmt ;0.i,-2'4. ?& ,

Ma .'


Cottondale's
Jacquez
Walker
blocks a
pass to
Sneads'
Darius
Williams on
Friday night.


IAARMH ll .IrJNLI'.F.LlDl ,


Loo


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Cottondale Hornets lost their
second straight heartbreaking home
game Saturday night in Cotton-
dale, 'falling to the Chipley Tigers
58-57.
Chipley freshman Trent Forrestmade
a beautiful spinning bank shot with 43
seconds to play to give the Tigers the
lead for good, with a potential, game-


winning putback by Cotondale's Jac-
quez Walker going in just after time
had expired.
It was a dramatic ending to a game
with many wild swings in momentum,
with the Hornets jumping out in front
by seven in the first quarter before a
19-2 Chipley run in the second quar-
Ster helped propel the Tigers to a 33-22
halftime lead.
See HORNETS, Page 6A


CHIPOLH WOMmENS BSKETBL




king to get well


MARP YJNNER'FLORIDAN


Chipola's Treyvonna Brooks heads tothe basket against the Lady Eagles

Lady Indians face ratestonight at 5:30p.m.
Chipola (16-2 overall, 1-1 in
Pensacola after conference) is coming off a
tough 62-61 road loss to No.
suffering first 7 Northwest Florida State last
week, while Pensacola State
league defeat (11-6, 0-2) is still looking for its
first league victory after suffer-
ing losses of 79-54 to Northwest
BY DUSTIN KENT Florida State and 78-65 to Gulf,
dkent@jcfloridan.com Coast State.
t The Lady Pirates have strug-
The No.*11 Chipola Lady In- gled somewhat this season, but
ilians will look to bounce back Chipola coach Greg Franklin
from their first Panhandle Con- said his team is in no position
ference loss when they pliy host to overlook anyone, let alone a
to the Pensacola State Lady Pi- Panhandle opponent.


I think ourkids a
ready to play. It
loss (toNorthwest
with themfor the


"I have to make
every basketball ga
every game as ser
possibly chn," the c
think our kids are
play. I think the los
west) resonated w
the last week. I've e


eral times that the reason we lost
ire very was a lack of defensive irtein-
ink the sity.I thinkwe're ready to hit the
)sonaed floor. (The players) are tired of
last eek. looking at me and ready to play
someone else and get after it."
iGregf nkil The loss to the Lady Raid-
Chipolacoach ers was a tough one to swal-
low for the Lady Indians, who
sure we win had multiple opportunities
me and take in the last minute to take the
iously as we lead, but it was the team's play
:oach said. "I at the other end of the court
very ready to that Franklin said was most
ss (to North-. frustrating.


ith them for
choed it sev-


See CHIPOLA, Page 6A


Chipola Men's Basketbal


Indians try to rebound


against Pirates after loss


|Chipola's Krulze Pinkins goes for two during a game against Tallahassee.


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

After suffering their first
loss of the season last
week, the No. 1 Chipola
Indians will try to get back
on track tonight at home
against the.Pensacola State
Pirates at 7:30 p.m.
The Indians (18-1 over-
all, 1-1 in the Panhandle
'Conference) were stunned
80-65 by No. 7 Northwest
Florida State last week in
a game that the Raiders
controlled from the open-
ing tip.
Chipola will try to get
back on the winning side
against a Pensacola State
(14-6, 0-2) club that has
been very competitive In
its two league games de-
spite coning up on the
wrong end of the score line
eachltime
The Pirates lost their
Panhandle opener to Gulf
Coast State 75-70 before


falling to Northwest Flori-
da State 73-69 on Saturday
in a game they led much of
the way.
Pensacola State actually
was in front of the defend-
ing state champions 40-
31 at halftime before the
Raiders rallied to outscore
the Pirates 42-29 in the
second half.
It was the third consecu-
tive loss for the Pirates, who
also fell to Baton Rouge 68-
53 on Jan. 4 in their final
nonconference game.
The Pirates are led offen-
sively by freshman guard
Qiydar Davis, who is aver-
aging 13.4 points pergame
on 47.1 percent shooting
from the field and 38.9
percent from the 3-point
line.
Davis also leads the team
in rebounding at 6.4 per
game.
Deviri Wilson also aver-
ages 10.2 points per game
for the Pirates and is mak-


ing 38.9 percent of his
five shots per game from
3-point range, while also
leading the team with 3.5
assists per game and 2.8
steals per game.
"Sophomores Josh Turner,
and DeAngelo Kirkland are
chipping in with 9.8 and
7.7 points per game.
The Pirates are shooting
43.4 percent from the field
as a team and 34.5 percent
from three, while holding
opponents to 42 percent
from the floor and 24.5
percent from three.
That excellent 3-point
defense will get a major
test from a Chipola, team
making .37.3 percent of
its 15.8 deep attempts per
game.
The Indians are'Hso con-
verting a remarkable 51.6
percent of their attempts
from the field on the sea-
son, though they were held
See INDIANS, Page A L


Cottondale Boys Basketball


Hornets lose another


home heartbreaker


_I_ ____ _________ ~_~I___ _ ___ ___ I__ _ _ ~ _~ __ ___


~~-`------


"-IC~ ~IICT~lr*r~ ~~ I ~C --1 I ly ~ -L1C----LL.~ICIIC -~ II -I






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Florida loses Prather for several games


The AsSociated Press

GAINESVILLE Casey
Prather is the latest Florida
player on'the mend.
Prather will be out 10 to
14 days, including Thurs-
day's game at Texas A&M,
after sustaining a high-ain-
kle sprain in Saturday's win
at LSU. Prather, a junior
averaging 6.8 points and
3.3 rebounds, was wearing
a walking boot on his left
foot and using crutches
Monday.
The 10th-ranked Gators
(12-2, 2-0 Southeastern
Conference) already are
dealing with injuries to
guard Mike Rosario, guard
Scottie Wilbekin, forward
Erik Murphy and forward
WillYeguete.
Rosario sat out Saturday's
game with a sprained left
ankle, buthas been cleared
to practice and play. Wil-
bekin (finger) and Murphy
(rib) are playing with bro-
ken bones, and Yeguete is


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LSU forward Shavon Coleman (5) chases after a loose ball with Florida's Will Yeguete (15) and
Casey Prather (24) during the game at the Pete Maravich Assembly Center in Baton Rouge, La.,
on Saturday.


getting more tests to see if
there are more issues than
tendinitis in his right knee.
"A team that's able to


bounce back and play a re-
ally good game with some
of their best players out,
that shows a lot about their


team," center Pat Young
said. "Just wait until we
have everybody healthy.
Hopefully, later in the sea-


son we won't have any in- sprain where you're out for
juries affecting us." a month to six weeks. It's
With all the injuries ham- something hopefully he
pering Florida, Prather can get back."
started the last games and Yeguete's injury could
played well. linger the longest. Yeguete
It seemed like a turn- is averaging 6.5 points and
ing point for his season, 6.6 rebounds, and is the
which got off to a slow team's best post defender.
start. Prather missed the Donoyan said the junior
first four games because will have X-Rays on Mon-
of a concussion sustained day to see if there is any-
in practice. And in his first thing else that is causing
few minutes on the court inflammation in his knee.
against UCF in November, "Whether or not it's
he busted his lip and need- anything more than that,
ed stiches. we'll have to wait and see,"
"Can't get out of the way, Donovan said. "I think the
right?" coach Billy Dono- first diagnosis by our train-
van said. "He started the er and our doctor is that it
year with the concussions was tendinitis. It could be
and it took him a while to more than that. What? I
get in the flow and then, don't know."
you know, he's been play- Rosario, second on the
ing really good basketball. team in scoring at 12.3
... So it's unfortunate that points a game, also had
he's had to deal with some X-rays Monday to see how
different things through- his ankle is progressing.
out the course of his ca-. Donovan hopes he will be
reer. But thank God it's able to play against the
not a severe high-ankle Aggies.


Hornets
FromPage'5A
TheTigers led byas much
as 14 in the third quarter,
but Cottondale's senior
stars Jerodd Blount andr
DJ Roulhac spearheaded
a Hornet rally to draw to
within one, at the end of
the period.
Blount started theta run
with a four-point playand
then got a steal and break-
away dunk, followed by
another steal and two from
Rolha fto cut the margin
to six.
Another triple by Blount
ahd the a a driving layup
by Roulhac cut the Chipley
lead to one at 44-43.
Roulhac started the
fourth with another strong
drive to the basket to put
the Hornets in the lead,
and Blount's fourth three
of the night capped a 19-


0 run to put Cottondale
ahead 49-44 with 7:10 to
play.
Chipley answered back
with six straight points
to regain the lead, with
.a,jumper by Blount put-
ting the Hornets back up
before a bucket by Forrest
gave the Tigers the lead at
52-51 with 4:03 remaining.
But back-to-back threes
by Roulhac and 'Blount
moved Cottondale in front
57-52 with just under two
minutes to play.
A basket by Kobe Mc-
Crary got Chipley back to
within three, and after an
ill-advised 3-point attempt
by Blount at the other
end, Tyrome Sharpe came
back down and drove to
the hoop for two more to
make it 57-56 with 1:21 on
the clock.
After a Cottondale turn-
over, the Tigers took the
lead for good on Forrest's


shot, and the Hornets were
unable to convert on their
next possession.
A strange officiating se-
quence followed on the
ensuing Chipley inbounds
play, with Carlon Smith
taking a pass and draw-
ing contact and a whistle
on a play that-appeared
to be either a foul on Cot-
tondale ,or a travel on
Chipley.
However, the official did
not make a call and even-
tually ruled it to be an in-
advertent whistle and gave
the ball back to the Tigers
to inbound again, with the
two seconds that came off
the clock on the play un-
able to be put back on by
rule.
Those seconds proved
crucial to the Hornets,
who just failed to beat the
clock on their final posses-
sion after. Chipley's Logan
Justice missed the front


end of a 1-and-1 with 8.5
seconds to play.
Blount hurried down
the court after securing
the rebound and missed a
runner on the right base-
line, with Walker going
high for the rebound and
putback attempt, which
went in but came just
after the final horn had
sounded.
-The Hornets lost. in
similar fashion Friday
night, falling by a point
in overtime to Sneads
with Walker again hav-
ing a chance to win'it on
a last-second putback,
with that shot beating the
clock but falling just off the
rim.
"It's a little frustrating be-
cause we pride ourselves
on winning cl6se games,"
Cottondale coach Chris
Obert said of the last two
losses. "A lot of times, we're
able to pull those out, but


the last two nights we
haven't beenable to. That's
a trend that we've got to
stop. We've got to change
that and get back to win-
ning those. We usually do
a good job in those situ-
ations, but we didn't this
week. But we'll work to get
better."
Blount finished with 31
points to lead the Hornets,
with Roulhac adding 20.
For Chipley, Sharpe had
13 points, while Forrest led
the team with 28, includ-
ing three big buckets in the
fourth' quarter.
S"'lent is a real good play-
er. He deserves the praise
that he gets," Obert said of
the Tigers' 6-foot-3 fresh-
man. "He's a good player
and a good kid. He played
a real good game. I thought
we did a pretty good job on
him at times, but it's just
hard to hold him down all
night.


"I thought we showed a
little toughness to bounce
back and take the lead,
but they just made one
more play than we did.
Overall, I think the kids did
pretty well, but. (Forrest)
just made a tough shot:
You've got to give them
credit"
It was the second straight
game the Hornets have
been done in by a dreadful
second, quarter, losing the
period 23-7 Saturday after
being outscored 17-0 by
SneadA.
In the other six periods
and overtime, the Hornets
outscored Sneads and Chi-
pley 103-72.
With the loss, the Hornets
fell to 10-8 on the season,
while the Tigers improved
to 15-2.
Cottondale will return
to action tonight with a
big district road contest
against Wewa:tihka.


Chipola
From Page 5A
"Going back and watch-
ing the film three or four
times now, and also watch-
ing with the players, we
were all disappointed with
our effort defensively," he
said. "We allowed them to
get too many easy buck-
ets. We also got caught
watching off the ball and
didn't do a great job of
keeping people in front of
'us. We were disappointed
with the defensive effort.
The kids feel like they're
better than how they
performed."
Pensacola State hasn't
been as good as North-
west this season, but the
Lady -Pirates will present
a unique challenge to the
undersized Chipola team


Indians
From Page 5A
to just 44 per-
cent in the loss to
Northwest.
Chipola has one of
the most balanced of-
fensive attacks of any
team in the country, with
six different players av-
eraging double figure


with their ability to offen-
sive rebound.
The Lady Pirates lead the
nation in second-chance
.points, and with the Lady
Indians possessing no
players taller than 6-foot,
they'll need to put forth a
,big effort on the glass to
minimize the damage in
the paint.
"We have to make sure
we pay attention to keep-
ing them off the glass and
keeping them from get-
ting easy buckets," Frank-
lin said. "That's been our
Achilles' heel all year long
with our lack of size and
depth, so that doesn't bode
well for us. (The Lady Pi-
rates) are not a big team,
but they're very active on
the glass. They're bigger
than us, but that's not say-
ing much. But they're very
active on the glass and al-


scoring.
Freshman guard Car-
los Morris leads the team
with 12.5 points per'game,
followed by sophomore
post player Kruize Pinkins
(12.0), Earl Watson (11.4),
Demetrious Floyd and
Cinmeon Bowers (11.3),
and freshman guard Chris
Thomas (10.9).
Morris is one of three
Chipola sharpshooters


4. r L


S..

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WWW-SUIIIYS~throprie9o
Email: iv g yso(0olsco


PAT FURR
1860) 20.s071
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CLARICE BOYETTE
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BIVIRLY THOMAS
(80s) 20O.S211


ways trying to get second-
chance points, so we've got
to do a better job of box-
ing out and making them
one-and-one.
"But I know my kids and
I know they'll be ready. I
know that they'll be very
prepared to box out be-
cause we'll do a lot of box-
out drills from now until
then."
Pensacola State is led by
freshman guard Teandra
Jones, who is averaging
16.5 points per game to
go with 3.9 assists and 2.6
steals per game.
Former Chipola player
Shanay Corbett is also av-
eraging 10.6 points and 7.2
rebounds per game for the
Lady Pirates.
"With the Jones kid, we
have to pay extra attention
to her because she likes to
score early in the offense,"


all making over 40 per-
cent from the 3-point line
this season, led by Floyd
(47.4), then Demone Har-
rison (44.0) and Morris
(41.7).
Sophomore point guard
Terel Hall is leading the
Indians in assists with
5.5 per game followed by
Thomas' 4.1, while Watson
tops Chipola in rebound-
ing with 7.5 per game, fol-


Social Thanks to


Badcock Home Furniture and
More of Graceville
Barnes & Noble Bookstore
Dr. Larry Cook
Florida Public Utilities
Jackson Hospital
Marianna Inn


Franklin said. "She's a very
versatile kid, long and
athletic. (Jones and Cor-
bett) both draw a lot of
attention."
The Lady Indians are led
by Lashonda Littleton's
15.7 points per game,
with Kristine Brance just
behind at 15.6 points per
game, and Rayven Brooks
at 14.6.
Rahni Bell is also in dou-
ble figures at 10.3 points
per game, with Jasmine
Crawford just behind at
9.8.
Crawford also leads the
team in steals at 3.1 per
game- and is second in
assists at 4.6 per game,
just behind point guard
Jade Givens, who is av-
eraging 4.8 assists per
game.
Littleton is the team's top
rebounder at 8.1 per game,


lowed by Bowers (7.2) and
Pinkins (7.1).
The loss to the Raid-
ers marked just the sec-
ond time all season that
the Indians were ,held
below 70 points in a
game.
After tonight's game,
the Indians will finish
the week with a road test
against Gulf Coast State on
Saturday night.


Chicola's SoonsorS


Melvin Engineering
Paul A. Donofro & Associates,
Architects
Rahal-Miller Chevrolet
State Farm Insurance
Tyndall Federal Credit Union
Wal-Mart


Coyle Mayo Insurance Agency


with Brooks pulling in 7.5
per game.
Chipola has had near-
ly a week to prepare for
tonight's game, which
Franklin said was just fine
with him despite having
to stew over last week's
loss for a little while
longer.
"When you lose, you al-
ways want to jump back in'


and get another win, but
I think (the ime off) was
good for us because we
redirected our mindset on
the defensive end of the
court," he said.
"We have to be able
to put pressure on peo-
ple and keep them in
front of us. Hopefully,
we're getting back to
that."


CHIPOLA VS.
PENSACOLA
Tuesday, January 15
Women 5:30 p.m. Men 7:30 p.m.
Milton Johnson Health Center


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F %


-JLI


-16A TUESDAY, JANUARY'15,2013


SPORTS





JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


PEANUTS BY CHARLES SCHULTZ


ENTERTINVWENT


BORN LOSER BYARTAND CHIP SANSOM
"OK NO! 'YOU URT OUR.LF. SEPk\E~R T TOL YOU TO USE REMWM5EREM WRA~'t1TOL7
LIFTING&TFATRANfY V1. YOUR- LE(6 WKER a t AfN-T'S i1AE.
JUG OF WATER! LIFTING REAVY I ROLE. PROsLEeA-
-^ o& CTcOS 50 a UDOMA'r i I T'S1^% LZES TRAT


r AM SURE SHE
SOON WILL TO
BREAK UP WITH ME.
REALLY?
RE T


I^


... LY THANK,
DISTRESSING. YOU,


' L
GREATLY NATE.
DISTRE&SINYG. 10NU ARE
TOTAL
PAL.


FRANK & ERNEST BY BOB THAVES


gAjNI
C$EcIING
ANf
. AVITf


I



Ii

iJ


ALLEY OOP BY JACK AND CAROLE BENDER


KIT'N' CARLYLE BY LARRY WRIGHT


*Rarenr+s.


HERMAN BY JIM UNGER


















1.1
Swanna be able to breathe If I sink."
"I wanna be able to breathe If I sink."


NEA Crossword Puzzle
NE rswodPzl


ACROSS
1 Seemly
4 Verne
skipper
8 Level
12Ames Inst.
13Completed
14 Popeye's
greeting,
15 Paris
attraction
(2 wds.)
17 Hamlet, e.g.
18 Good
conductor
19Jeered
20 Murphy
Brown's
show
22- alai
23 "The Little
Sparrow"
26 Mlss Muller
28 Negligent
31 Memorial
Day race
32 Brooch
33 Pay dirt
* 34Arlth. term'
35Steln filler
36Cereal
ingredient
37Puzzled
comments
38 Ms. Kudrow
39"Fancy"
singer
40IRS month


41 "Close
Encounters"
craft
43 British
peers
46Bygone
anesthetic
50 Bride's
apparel
51 Complexion
protector
54Thus
55 Make socks
56 Schoolboy
57 Prone to
snoop
58 Small
barks
59911
responder
DOWN
1 Thin
coating
2 Got It!
(2 wds.)
3 Clump of
grass
4 With dignity
5 "The Loco-
Motion"
girl *
6 checkers
pieces
7 Sitcom
planet
8 Diameter
halves


Answer to Previous Puzzle
AHA BRAS FO G
RAN SLOTH AGA
CHIC KADEE CRT
SALOONS I TEL
MAC SK I
ANGL RB1USBOYS
NE ARRI I B FO0 E
EEL ELS P IK E
WRESTLEIMETEDI

ASKEW MASSAGE
PIE DEEPSIXIEG
ERR RAWLY LAG
DER YULE ERE


9 Obsessed
whaler '
10Tow-away
11 Inspected
16Chewy
candy
19 Roam
around
21 Weaken
22 Alaska's
capital
23 Stack
24 Rainfall
measure
25 Attaches
27 Feels awful
28Tradltional
learning
29 Halk wearer
30 Lawless
role


36 Soup stock
38 DJ's
platters
40 Bronze or
pewter
42Galas
43Tied
44Space
lead-in
45 Outfits
47 Sound In
body'
48 Party tray
cheese
49 Lipstick
shades
51 Cloud
backdrop
52 Kind of
cycle
53 Pnch


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


1-15 02013 UFS, Dst. by Universal Ucllckfor UFS


CELEBRITY CIPHRER
by Luis Campos
Celetiy Cw agoyC ms ,aen raM w Inx quotions by fous people past and preet.
EaI IW k W dpiw slndslor b noh.
"YHOYWWYXOY SJ KTY CXWSISKYZ
NPSWSKA KB SILMBGY KTY RCNWSKA
BE FTNK ABC TNGY KB BEEYM."
MSOU LSKSXB

Previous Solution: 'I don't say we all ought to misbehave, but we ought to look
as it we could." Orson Welles
TOOArsa vUE: Ogwrlbs
02013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Ucick 1-15


TUESDAY, JANUARY15, 2013 7AF


Horoscope
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19) -You seem
to be better equipped
to handle mental
assignments than to do
anything physical.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) Although you'll
have good earning
abilities, conversely you
could also have strong
urges to spend.
PISCES (Feb. 20-
March 20) -You could
be far more fortunate
than usual working on
endeavors or enterprises
that you personally
initiate and/or manage.
ARIES (March 21-April
19) Developments
taking place behind the
.scenes of which you'll
be unaware are likely
to have a constructive
effect upon your material
well-being.
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20) -You'll get a
desired opportunity to
strengthen a troubling
relationship that has
meant a lot to you.
GEMINI (May 21-
June 20) Once your
ambitions are aroused,
there's no stopping you,
as events are likely to
prove.
CANCER (June 21-Jiily
22) If you're a keen
observer and a good
student, you're likely to
learn something through
a personal experience.
LEO (July 23-Aug.
22) Be alert for an
unusual opportunity to
participate in something
exciting that's originated
by another.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept
22) In an endeavor
that mutually affects
you and your special
someone, don't make a
move without discussing
it with your partner.
UBRA (Sept 23-Oct 23)
- Regardless of what is
asked of you, perform to
the best of your abilities.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) Even if you have
difficulties in managing
certain jobs assigned
to you, do the very best
work that you can.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
23-Dec. 21) It doesn't
matter how busy you are
or how many projects
you start, what counts is
how much you complete.


lhnie's Mailbox


Dear Annie: I used to travel a fair
amount for my job. These trips included
lunches and dinners with my co-workers,
sometimes in groups, sometimes not.
At no time did I ever have the faintest
interest in having an affair. But my
husband thinks otherwise.
During the entire time I traveled,
he constantly accused me of sleeping
with "somebody." I never once gave
him a reason to think I was cheating. I
recognized that this was just his way of
dealing with his own insecurities and
poor self-image.
I have not worked for a number of
years, but on occasion, he still insinuates
that I had affairs. Instead of being
supportive of my hard work then and
now, he thinks it's more important to


keep suggesting that I'm always looking
for someone else to sleep with. How do I
get him to stop? Not a Cheater

Dear Not: Your husband sounds overly:
suspicious. We don't mean to add to the
problem, but sometimes those who are
having affairs accuse the spouse of the
same offense. Tell your husband that
his continuing accusations undermine
your trust and make you wonder what is
really going on. Counseling could help
get to the bottom of it. If he is unwilling,
you can choose to turn a deag ear or get
counseling on your own. However, if
his accusations become more strident
,or more frequent,'this could indicate
mental health or medical issues, and he
should see his doctor.


ri: IB:


William James, an eminent 18th- and
19th-century psychologist, said, "To
study the abnormal is the best way of
understanding the normal."
Today's deal seems to contain a normal
play, but is it time for an abnormal one?
South is in three no-trump. West leads
the diamond king. What should declarer
do?
South had seven top tricks: one spade,
one heart, one diamond and four clubs.
He saw that at least two more tricks
would come from spades. And since he
knev a Bath Coup when he saw one, he
played his low diamond at trick one.
However, East had correctly played his
diamond three. And West knew that his
partner would have thrown out the jack
or ace if he had held it, or played a high
spot card. So West cleverly shifted to the
heart jack. This time, East encouraged
enthusiastically with his nine. Declarer
ducked, but West continued with the
heart 10, and East accurately overtook
with his queen.
Now South could not succeed. If he had
taken this trick, crossed to the dummy
with a club, and tried the spade finesse,
West would have won with his king and
led his last heart to give the defenders
one spade, four hearts and one diamond.
And if South had ducked the second
heart, East would have reverted to
diamonds, giving the defense one spade,
two hearts and four diamonds (unless


West
4 K43
V J10 7
+ K Q 10 9 1
472


North 01-15-13
SQJ85
S 64
* 762
# AK103
East
S962
?KQ982


953
4984


East
Pass
All pass


8


South
4 A 10 7
VA53
AJ4
QJ65

Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Both
South West' North
1 NT Pass 2 4
2 Pass 3 NT


Opening lead: + K


declarer cashed his seven top tricks).
South should have won the first trick,
crossed to the dummy, and run the
spade queen. Yes, the finesse would have
lost, but declarer's diamond jack-four
would have been a stopper with West on
lead.


S I WITH DIPoCT PEPOfIr OF YOUR PAYCWCK
,Qi. / AND AUTO PAYMENT OF YouR
fk LS, WE COMPLeTrL-Y
S DO AWAY WITH Til
1 ILLUSION THAT YOU
ACTUALLY OVER
StE ANY OF
YOUR NMO Y.


-- --------------


L-






8 A Tuesday, January 15, 2013 a Jackson County Floridan


CLASSIFIED


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DRIVERS CLASS A


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NO.TOUCH
$1000 SIGN ON BONUS


7"QRApOR o /4'L:


30 Elec fence post & yel. con. $35. 850-352-4181
Barb wire 1320 ft. new $25..850-352-4181.
Bdrm Ste: 5 pc/kina/espresso.$400. 394-8402
Bedroom set. 5 piece $250 850-209-3160
Boat Traler '97 magic tilt $350. 850-209-0747.
Box Spring & Mattress: Qu. $50.850-482-2039
Camcorder, Sony, digital $300. 850-482-7665
Chest of Drawer $25. 850-482-2039
Dinng Room Table, $300; 850-569-2194
Dolls Porcelain dressed $10/ea 850-482-7665'
Dryer Lg. Front load $400. 850-482-3780.
Entertainment Center $65 850-209-3160
Entertainment ct: oak, 6'x7' $350. 850-272-1811


PAPER TRANSPORT seeks
16 Class A Drivers
to Travel in Surrounding States
for our Dedicated Account.
COMPETITIVE PAY PACKAGE,
BONUSES & BENEFITS
18 Months Exp & Class A Required


Cal s at1 a


Ara


Exercise Stepper $30. 850-482-8347.
King bedSealy Tempurpedic $400 850-209-3160
LG ATT Phone touch creen $70. 850-443-6806.
Living Room Set, Pine $250 850-209-3160
Pistol. Glock mod 36.45 $500 firm 850-569-2194
Revolver, small 7 shot .22; $230 850-569-2194
Steel Door- 32 x 80 LH. $50.850-482-2636
Trailer Hitch off Mustang $29. 850-482-7665
Washer Lg. front load $400. 850-482-3780.


odniW w- 29 1/2x30 1/4 $1 6


Window bench wf3 drawe 0


Windows-14x73. plastic, $45, 850-482-2636
Yr Books "99-"00 Crocodiles $20. 850-592-2881


2013 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.


Prom and Sweet 16 gowns sizes 4 to 7/8, $50
to $250, Morl-Lee, Tony Bowls, Jovani and,
Slerri Hill. Call 850-482-5481.


I


FIREWOOD (all split oak)
Delivery available! a e TRUCK LOAD $70. 4
CALL MARK 334-701-4967 or 334-791-6704
Split Oak Firewood
Delivered In the Wiregrass!
$75 For a Full Sized Pickup load.
$12 for 5 Gallon bucket of kindling wood.
334-393-9923

Wanted: Old Coins, Gold,
Diamonds, Guns, And Tools
West Main Jewelry & Loan 334-671-1440.

* 1- NEW 2 DOOR GLASS FLOWER COOLER ON
CASTERS TRUE MODEL# GDM-61FC-
s2500.00
1- NEW 2 DOOR COMMERICAL GLASS DOOR
COOLER MASTERBILT
MODEL# GR48S -- $1995.
1- NEW 1 DOOR COMMERCIAL KITCHEN
FREEZER ON CASTERS, STAINLESS STEEL
MASTERBILT MODEL# F23-S $ S,9
*a PLEASE-CMI 6W 144S jIfjNTERESl.



r Bosto Terries Pupps S25.
Vet Wcked. C & /W. parents onse with
guairate 8S-547-935L 8-1S -849176.
CKC BaasuMt poppies for sale for $700, Born
Nov. 15, 2012- have shots and their papers.
They are ready for GREAT home only. Already
people friendly and love to play. Please call me
at 334-618-0987, Peggy.
Lost Female 0Sbs black w/white markings on
face. Indian Springs area. 850-557-6477



-* Bahla seed for sale -
SExcellent germination with over 40 yrs
S experience. Kendall Cooper
Sally 334-703-0978. 334-77t-3423,
* or 334-775-3749 Ext. 102
Large rolls of Hay for Sale
Bahia & Coastal
Daytime 334-585-339,
after Spmn & weekends 585-5418


Wrapped Peanut Hay For Sale.
Never been rained on. Call 229254-0854


Level: UF2F3
Complete the grid so each row, column and
3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit
1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku,
visit www.sudoku.org.uk.

Solution to Friday's puzzle
2 6 9 1 538 4 3 72

57163458921768
9 2 -7 6 1 3 5 8 4
6 3 4 5_ 8. 2 1 7 9
1 8.5 4-796213,
7 5 6-8 4 1 3 9 2'
7568 2 413 92 5
498235716
3129667845


1/15/13


I BUSINES SO R. ES.


Place an Ad


Fast, easy, no pressure
24 hours a day, 7 days a week!


I Get live previews of your classified ads, receive price quotes
and make secure online payments.

www.jcfloridan.com
. ..


Earn

Extra $

Great for Retired Persons

Campbellton
Earn an average of

$450
3 hrs per night, 5 nights per week, before
S6:00 a.m.
Looking for mature business-minded
newspaper carriers with dependable trans-
portation, minimum liability insurance and
a valid driver's license.
Come by and fill out an application at the
Jackson CountyFloridan,
4403 Constitution Lane, Marianna, FL




Iorlmc Forid
Northwest Florida Community Hospital,
Chipley, FL a leading healthcare provider
in the panhandle is seeking qualified
candidates for the following position:
Registered Nurses- ER 7p-7a
Experience Preferred.
Applications available online at
www.NFCHtorg and/or applkation t:
Ema dblountnfkh.org
(850) 415-816 or Fax (850) 63822
Smoke and Drug Free Campus. EOE
I


High school graduate or
equivalent and some
experience beyond
obtaining the required
certifications for the
poSition. Certification as a Paramedic by
the FL Department of Health Bureau of
Emergency Medical Services.
Certification in Fire Fighting Standards.
Certification in CPR and A.C.LS. by the
Arierican Red Cross, EVOC certified,
valid class D FL drivers license.
Starting Salary $23,947.00/yr
EMT/Fire lighter
Must have high school diploma or GED
with 1-2 years exp. in fire protection; or
any equivalent combination of training
and experience. Certification as an EMT
by the Emergency Medical Division of the
Florida Dept. of Professional Regulation.
Certification in Fire Fighting Standards.
Certification in CPR by the American Red
Cross. Must have a valid FL drivers
license with D endorsement.
Starting Salary $30,688.97/yr.
Submit Jackson County employment
application to: Human Resources Dept,
2864 Madison St Marianna, FL 32448.
PHONE (850) 482-9633.
Web site www.acks6ncountyfl.net
Deadline to apply is 01-28-2013
Drug-Free Workplace/EOE/V.Pref/ADA/AA



-HEC


Own your own business I
Franchises needed In Dothan and
surrounding areas NOW!
Training, equipment and guaranteed initial
customer base with all franchise plans.
CaH now to schedule ymo appointment
1-00-375-5264


I I


Sudoku


5 7

6 8 2
- -8----- -

5 _2 4

2 4 9 6 1 5

9 8 3

7 9 5 _3

4 1_ _

---- -----


I--J


Ill.A( AN A


Twomm- w- & Aj - -


I "







www.JCFLORIDAN.com CLASSIFIED


Jackson County Floridani


Tuesday, January 15, 2013- 9 A


^ URCAT IDN
IWM.^Si^RUG~TIQNf ll-iREALB ~f)O^A


Classes Forming Noe
for Medical Assisting,
FOR TIS ElectricalTrades and
COLLEGE Call Fortls College.
Today 888-202-4813 or
visit www.fortlscollege.edu. For consumer
Information visit www.fortls.edu





GIBB MARIANNA VILLAGE
Now taking applications for people with
disabilities & who have very low incomes.
1 & 2 bedroom apartments.
Wide doorways, lower counters, roll-in
showers. Accessible for wheelchairs &
other mobility aids HUD subsidized rent.

2933 Milton Ave, Marianna,
FL Call 850-482-4663

a



1/1 Apartment for Rent
For info call 850-579-8895


1 & 2 BR Apartments available in town near
Chipola. Water/garbage/sewer Included.
No pets. 850-526-892 or 850-209-5620


I u I m


2/1 Duplex In Altha.$475/Mo.
Located at 15664 N.W. Broad St
Pro Team Realty 850-674- 3002


1&2BR Houses&Apts ALSO
2 & 3BR Moble Homes Rent to Own
Lot rent Included. For details
4 850-557-3432 or 80-814-6515 ,4
2BR/1BA House on Burke St.
Grand Ridge $425. Mo. + $425. Dep.
Call 850-592-5571
2BR/1BA w/oflce In Grand Ridge, Rent to own,
very nice, $1000 down $650/mo. 850-997-
2464/850-274-9896


Very Private
1,600 sq. ft, 2 bedrooms 1 bath with a loft,
and a screened in back porch. House Is 60%
complete. Septic system complete, temporary
power pole on 3+ acres. You will love It when
you see Itl! $39,000. Call Allison at 850-381-0720


For Sale By Owner: 41
Briar Hills Drive, Dothan
bedroom, 2 bath on 1
acre of land. 1300 square'
feet. Built in 2008. All stain-
less steel appliances in kitchen stay. Hard-
wood, tile and carpet floors: Screened in patio.
2 car attached carport. Covered front porch.
Country setting 10 minutes from Southside
Walmart or SAMC. Asking $113,500. For more
information call 334-701-5889.
Very well maintained 5 bedroom, 2 bath, older
home. Includes 2 carports, yard completely
fenced (privacy) and a shed. Close to schools.
Room for a family to grow! Call today for your
personal viewing. 850-263-2755.


S'' ',.,. One pf a kind home
'd .., on the Apalachlcola River
* in Wewahitchka, Florida.
3BR, 2B modular home.
Outdoor kitchen, shop,
greenhouse and boat
house. Beautiful fenced yard on nice high
riverbank. Large lot is also zoned commercial.
Reduced to sell. $129,000. Call 850-819-0401




*' Dowtown Chlpley House ideal for gift shop,
former sandwich shop w/ comm.
kitchen, approx. 3000sf. nice lot $145K
850-579-190 leave message


iE~ii-B.5


Bass Tracker 2002: 18Ft, 90HP Mercury, black
and gray, Garmin GPS fish finder, front fish
finder, AM/FM/CD Radio, Excellent Condition
$6,500. Call 850-774-6230


Xtreme

Boats
j f


Packages From
$4M95
All Welded
All Aluminum Boats


Bonifiay FL


I


MOTOR1HOME So&1RV


37' 19991
Diesel Pt
!A miles w/


Austin Tyler & Associates engine
Quality Homes & Apartments chassis
850-526-3355 4 w hardwood
"Property Manaement Is Our ONLY Business" area kitchen & bath. Lots of
out, no smokers. $Q
Huge 7BR 4 BA Home for rent in Marlanna, 334-296-2989 ask fo
PERFECT FOR LARGE FAMILIES : 2 kitchens,
2 dining rooms, 3 living rooms, plenty of Ford 19
storage, barn,huge fenced pool.Will consider Low Mi
separating intb individual apartments. Clean/(
S1/4 MIe From Wal-Mart 850-544-0440
IoLE:[ I HOMES-] FOR REN.To] 1=
2 & 3 bedroom mobile Homes In Cottondale.
$500 and up. H20z garbage, sewer Iucluded.
http:/ www.charloscountrylving.com.
850-2i09847 4
2&3BRMHs in '
Marianna & Sneads. (850)209-8595.
2 & 3BR Mobl Homes hi Cottondale.
NO PETS CH&A $325 $500/Month
Roomate situation also available.
.50-258-1594 Leave Message
2BR 1 BA HS, in Aford, $370 mo. $370. dep.
850-579-8882/850-209-1664/850-573-1851
2BR Mobile Home Cottondale Area
Water & Garbabge induded. $425. Mo + Dep.
Call 850-890-8485 or 850-890-8487
3/2 DW In Malone, CH/A, No pets, security I- .
neg., Section 8 ok. 850-594-9991 or 850-557-.
7719 PHOTOGRAPHY
3BR 2BA MH in Marianna $500/mo. $500 dep. UNb ATLE CA
w/no pets, Or $750 dep. with small pets online photo reprint
850-573-6307 or 850-482-5449 sen ices liable with
iree photo dowivobds. '
3BR 2BA MHIin Sneads $500/mo. No Pets
850-573-0911/850-593-5251
Mobile Homes for Rent 2/1 Located
between Grand Ridge & Sneads H E PR ]
includes water & garbage. $350/month "Beautification of Y
4 850-573-0308 Carpentry/Painting Ii
Furniture Repair & R
Quiet, well maintained Park, Watdr/sewer/ General Repairs *
garbage/lawn included. Available Now ,
3/2 DW $625 & 3/2 $415 & 2/1 $425 ,
Joyce Riley RE 850-209-7825 4= _I__llwlligl
Spacious 2BR 2BA Plus Office, Family of 3
$450-$550 Plus deposit Clean and Quiet, B B Profesio Anu
No smokers, No pets 850-718-8158 Now offering mobile
and outside, oil change
[ j/ Detailing now for the low
=1= (850) 573-5
l I o "Just give us a call l
B INEAll services erfo
For Lease: 6,000 sq. ft. Daycare on 2.58 acres. l
Licensed for 93 children. Room for expansion.
Call 850-718-6541; For GeneralH
Office Clea
Call Debi
A E4.U Free Estimates Referen
Cass8fies 850-526-:


1iAlegro
usher. Only 64,000
'Cummlngs diesel
and Freightliner
, highly polished
*d floors in living
storage inside &
15,999.
r Brian.
7 Cutaway 27r,
les,
Generator, $4599.
1-714-2700.


our Home"
installations
Refinishing
Insured



to Detallin
wash inside
e& vacuum
v price of $50
;509
nd we'll comnie to)
incd ot site.
I 3 [I JI


( bi)


TRANSPORTATION;


S Buick 2002 Rendezvous ;
$1195 down with 0%
Interest. Daylight Auto
Financing 850-215-1769
9AM-9PM
Chevrolet 2008 Impala ;
$895 down with 0%
Interest. Daylight Auto
Financing 850-215-1769
9AM-9PM
Chevrolet HHR 2009 LS,
silver 62K miles, $9500.
334-798-5669.,



$0 Down/lst Payment, Tax, Tag & Title
Repos, Slow Credit, Past Bankruptcy OK!
Push, Pull or Drag, Will Trade Anything!
BRING IN YOUR W2 OR LAST PAY STUB!!!!!
RIDE1'ODA! Cll*Iev Ppe 334-,80,-9 I50

Ford 1993 Thunderbird Super Coupe 3.8L Su-
percharged V6, Exterior Red, Interior Black
leather. 114k miles, Very clean, no rust power
everything. Plenty of modifications. 13.8 1/4
mile time. Asking $3,000. Please call for pic-
tures, 330-461-1958
Honda 2008 Fit, 40 MPG, under warranty, Must
Sell! $200 down, $249 per month. Call Ron Ellis
714-0028.
SKla 2006 Rio, 83k miles,
35 MPG, $4999. Call 334-
714-2700.


Nissan 2012 Versa, low miles, like new! $200
down, $269 per month. Call Steve 334-791-8243.
Pontiac 2000 Grand Prix
$695 down with 0%
Interest. Daylight Auto
Financing 850-215-1769
9AM-9PM

Toyota 2011 Camry SE (Sport Edition), 4dr.,
auto, power pkg., White, 9,000 miles, show
room condition, ext warranty,. $19,500. 850-
569-2215, 850-718-5461, 850-717-7105.
VW 2011 Jetta, Must Sell! $200 down, $269 per .
month. Call Steve 334-791-8243.


2003 Harley Davidson Ultra Classic, blue,
comes with extras $6,999. Great condition
850-573-1695 or 850-263-1678
HARkEY DAVIDSON 2012 UL-
TRA GLIDE LIMITED, 1500
MILES, CHROME WHEELS,
ABS BRAKES, CD,CBAM/FM
RADIO,HEATED HAND GRIPS,
PYTHON PIPES, CRUISE CON-
TROL, RIDERS BACK REST,
PLUS MORE EXTRAS, NO TIME TO ENJOY, CALL
334-268-3900, ASKING $21,500
Honda 2004 VTX 1300 cc 22K mi. new tires,
service, 2 helmets, leather bags, adult owned
334- 803-3397 $3950. NICE!!!!


Swdown with 0% Interest.





tires. Needs motor and
D transmission work.
Title in hand. $1,000.334-701-0107 after 5PM.
Lexus 2003 LX470-One owner, 'garage kept,
light beige, 120K miles, Reduce for quick Sale
$17,000 OBO 334-687-5283


? : .. ; -,: ' 'r,



Disabled? Denied
Social Security?
Then let the experts help Retired Social
Security Administration Hearing Office
Director Jeny Glover knows the law and
wants to help you.
Call today for your FREE C
850) 762-2266 or 80)




M Groomh
SAppointme
Groomer
ULsa Shores & T
5 1 , u 'u 1 oO u n e a t ,
o a ne s&to yo



lltractor Repa
0.
MF, Ford, IMT, New H
o! 37 years experien
yu ,Call Jimmy at (850) 21

a s M
I ,- ,


housee or
ning
"ra
nces Available
2336


- I


1)1;MM| I ! .-
----,HLisT

onsultation2
557-6251


ng by
nt Only
5/Styllet .,
ammy Martbano
i.r Appolntientlo tdlyW


M&M Day Laborers
Need general labor for the day-week?
Call: 850-272-2339
SMost all type work done
SSmall jobs Big jobs Satisfaction is our goal
Cnd Bless America


$2910x)63
YItlBears B inu M1U10j08


LDUI n Ir
PORTABLE BUILDINGS N I
LBGsrT MmmltltniR OF PORTABtE fUlLornss IN Mnrrou l
WE
HAVE
OVER
OFFERED I lT Sl
YOU CAN CHOOSE
COLOR 3 85 LE.t

361 Hwy. 90 Marlnnia, 850M-4482-38


Find jobs



fast and



easy!


-JACKSON 'COUNTY


FLORIDAN

jcflorldan.com



mFINns er"I

FIND LOCAL JOBS AT: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM/JOBSL


I


CIIILC~IICn


%JUU "-G-- "RM-M l


I I Lh=c


; -Pk -


L-


I-


IVICEN


down with 0% Interest.
Daylight Auto Financing
850-215-1769
9AM-9PM

Suzuki2004 XL7, Super Sharp! Must sell, $200
down, $179 per month. Call Ron Ellis 714-0028.
Volvo 2003 XC90, T6 Pack-
age, 3rd Row Seating,
$5999. Call 334-714-2700.




Chevrolet 2001 Silverado;
$1495 down with 0%
Interest. Daylight Auto
Financing 850-215-1769
9AM-9PM

Dodge 2004 Ram; 4-Door
Crew Cab; $1895 down
with Oa Interest. Daylight
-Auto Financing 850-215-
1769:; 9AM-9PM

5GMC 1997 Short Bed; $795
down with 0% Interest.
Daylight Auto Financing
850-215-1769
9AM-9PM
GMC 2003 2500 HD SLT Turbo Diesel 140K
mileage, V8, Good condition with only one pre-
vious owner, well kept maintenance records.
5th wheel attachment and equipment with
trailer brakes. Call for all other accessories
such as heated seats, leather, tinted windows,
etc. $15,200, 334-718-8225
Heavy Duty Disc Harrow in good condition
$250. 334-695-5123 or 334-687-2319


Dodge 2002 Grand Caravan
Sport, rear air, 3rd seat,
79,000 miles, new tires, ex-
cellent, $5500. Call 334-790-
7959.
SPontiac 2003 Montana Ext Mini-Van
Seats 8 White 102K mi 20/25 MPG
Runs Great, Auto trans, alloy
wheels, Frt-Rear A/C Power Windows Locks,
Mirrs & Drvr Seat, Cruise Ctrl, Remote Keyless
Ent Roof Rack, Clean, serviced every 3K mi
New tires 2011 garage kept
$5700 (334) 618-4645


1ST PLACE TO CALL FOR ALL OF
YOUR TOWING NEEDS!
P '4A& w ftM 7e7meap
AUTO BODY & RECYCLING
PAYING TOP DOLLAR FOR JUNK CARS
Contact Jason Harger at 334-791-2624

CALL FOR TOP PRICE
S FOR JUNK VEHICLES
I ALSO SELL USED PARTS
24 HOUR TOWING 334-792-8664
WANTED Nice Pick-Up, preferably Extended
Cab Ford Ranger or Tacoma must have air, any
color but black. 334-687-8863
-




If You Have It and
Don't Need It..Sell It in the
fi A c'IFlnc






"11OA TUESDAY, JANUARY 15,2013


NATION


Obama: Debt limit fight


The Associated Press

WASHINGTON De-
claring "we are not a
deadbeat nation," Presi-
dent Obama warned on
Monday that Social Secu-
rity checks and veterans'
benefits will be delayed if
congressional Republicans
fail to increase the govern-
ment's borrowing author-
ity in a looming showdown
over the nation's debt and
spending.
Obama said he was will-
ing 'to negotiate deficit
reduction with GOP lead-
ers but insisted that those
talks be separate from de-
cisions to raise the $16.4
trillion debt ceiling and
avert a possible first-ever
national default.
"They will not collect a
ransom in exchange for
not crashing the American
economy," Obama said
in a news conference one


President Barack Obama walks towards the lectern before
speaking about the debt limit in the East Room of the White
House in Washington, Monday, Jan. 14.


week before he is sworn in
for a second term. "What I
will not do is to have that
negotiation with a gun at
the head of the American
people."
Bitter brinkmanship be-
tween the White House
and congressional Repub-
licans over spending has


become a defining event
over the past four years,
testing both Obama's le-
verage and his resolve
at different moments of
his presidency. House
Speaker John Boehner
brushed off Obama's
insistence on separat-
ing the debt ceiling from


imperils
negotiations over spend-
ing cuts.
"The American people
do not support raising the
debt ceiling without reduc-
ing government spending
at the same time," Boehner
said. "The consequences of
failing to increase the debt
ceiling are real, but so, too,
are the consequences of al-
lowing our spending prob-
lem to go unresolved.
Underscoring the ur-
gency, Treasury Secretary
Timothy Geithner said in a:
letter to Boehner on Mon-
day that the government
will exhaust its borrowing
limit as soon as mid-Feb-
ruary, earlier than ex-
pected. The Treasury has
been using bookkeeping
maneuvers to keep from
surpassing the debt ceil-
ing, but Geithner said
those measures will be ex-
hausted by mid-February
to early March.


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com



elderly's checks


In addition to noting
possible effects on older
Americans and veterans,
Obama recited a litany of
possible consequences if
Congress fails to raise the
debt ceiling, including
sending the economy back
into recession.
"We might not be able
to pay our troops, or
honor our contracts with
small business owners,"
he said. "Food inspectors,
air traffic controllers, spe-
cialists who track down
loose nuclear materials
wouldn't get their pay-
checks. Investors around
the world will ask if the
United States of America
is in fact a safe bet. Mar-
kets could go haywire, in-
terest rates would spike
for anybody who borrows
money. Every homeowner
with a mortgage, every
student with a college
loan, every small business


owner who wants to grow
and hire."
At this moment, the gov-
ernment faces three loom-
ing deadlines:. The debt
limit must be raised soon
to meet spending obliga-
tions and prevent a first-
ever default, a Series of
across-the-boardspending
cuts is to kick in on March
1, and funding for most
government programs will
run out on March 27.
After Obama won tax
rate increases for wealthier
Americans during budget
negotiations last month,
Republicans became dou-
bly determined to win
spending cuts. They see
the confluence of events
ahead of April 1 as their
best opportunity.
lust weeks from hitting
the first of the deadlines,
the two sides are neither on
the same page nor pursu-
ing a common approach.


AP source: Armstrong tells Oprah Winfreyhe doped


The Associated Press

Lance Armstrong ended
a decade of denial by con-
fessing to Oprah Winfrey
that he used performance-
enhancing drugs to win the
Tour de France, a person
familiar with the situation
told The Associated Press.
The admission Monday
came hours after an emo-
tional apology by Arm-
strong to the Livestrong
charity that he founded
and turned into a global
institution on the strength
of his celebrity as a cancer
,survivor.
The person spoke on
condition of anonymity
because the interview is
to be broadcast Thurs-
day on Winfrey's net-
work. She tweeted after-
ward, "Just wrapped with
(at)lancearmstrong More
than 2 1/2 hours. He came
READY!" She was sched-
uled to appear on "CBS
This Morning" on Tuesday
to discuss the interview.
The confession was a
stunning reversal for Arm-
strong after years of pub-
lic statements, interviews
and court battles in which
he denied doping and
zealously protected his
reputation.
Even before the taping
session with Winfrey be-
gan around 2 p.m., EST,
Armstrong's apology sug-
gested he would carry
through on promises over
the weekend to answer her
questions "directly, hon-
estly and candidly."
The cyclist was stripped
of his Tour de France titles,
lost most of his endorse-
ments and was forced to
leave the foundation last
year after the U.S. Anti-
Doping Agency issued a
damning, 1,000-page re-
port that accused him of
masterminding a long-
running doping scheme. ,
About 100 staff members
of the charity Armstrong
founded in 1997 gathered
in a conference room as
Armstrong arrived with a
simple message: "I'm sor-
ry." He choked up during
a 20-minute talk, express-
ing regret for the long-
running controversy over
performance'-enhancers
had caused, but stopped
short of admitting he


In this 2009 photo, Lance Armstrong speaks at the opening
session of the Uvestrong Global Cancer Summit In Dublin,
Ireland.


used them.
Before he was done, sev-
eral members were in tears
when he urged them to
continue the charity's mis-
sion of helping cancer pa-
tients and their families.
"Heartfelt and sincere,"
is how Livestrong spokes-
man Katherine McLane
described his speech.
Armstrong later huddled
with almost a dozen peo-
ple before stepping into a
room set up at a downtown
Austin hotel. k
The group included
close friends and advis-
ers, two of his lawyers and
Bill Stapleton, his agent,
manager and business
partner. They exchanged
handshakes and smiles,
but declined comment
when approached by a re-
porter. Most members of
that group left the hotel
through the front entrance
around 5 p.m., although,
Armstrong was not with
them.
No further details about
the interview were avail-
able immediately because
of confidentiality agree-
ments signed by both
camps. But Winfrey pro-
moted it as a "no-holds
barred" session, and after
the voluminous USADA
report which included
testimony from 11 former
teammates she had
plenty of material for ques-
tions. USADA chief execu-
tive Travis Tygart, a long-
time critic of Armstrong's,
called the drug regimen
practiced while Armstrong
led the U.S. Postal Service
team, "The most sophis-
ticated, professipnalized
and successful doping
program that sport has
ever seen."


Armstrong also went af-
ter his critics ruthlessly
during his reign as cycling
champion, scolding some
in public and waging legal
battles against others in
court. At least one of his
opponents, the
London-based Sunday
Times, has already filed a
lawsuit to recover about
$500,000 it paid him to
settle a libel lawsuit, and
Dallas-based SCA Promo-
tions, which tried to deny
Armstrong a promised bo-
pus for a Tour de France
win, has threatened to
bring yet another lawsuit
seeking to recover more
than $7.5 million an arbi-
tration panel awarded the
cyclist in that dispute.
In addition, former
teammate Floyd Landis,
who was stripped of the
2006 Tour de France title
for doping, has filed a fed-
eral whistle-blower lawsuit
that accused Armstrong of
defrauding the U.S. Postal
Service. The Justice De-
partment has yet to decide
whether it will join the suit
as a plaintiff.
The lawsuit most likely
to be influenced by a con-
fession might be the Sun-


day Times case. Potential
perjury charges stemming
from Armstrongs sworn
testimony in the 2005 arbi-
tration fight would not ap-
ply because of the statute
of limitations. Armstrong
was not deposed during
the federal investigation
that was closed last year.
Armstrong is said to be
worth around $100 mil-
lion. But most sponsors
dropped him after USA-
DA's scathing report at
the cost of tens of millions
of dollars and soon af-
ter, he left the board of
ivestrong.
After the USADA find-
ings, he was also barred
from competing in the
elite triathlon or'running
events he participated in
after his cycling career.
World Anti-Doping Code
rules state his lifetime ban
cannot be reduced to less
than eight years.


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