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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028304/00937
 Material Information
Title: Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title: Sunday Floridan
Portion of title: Floridan
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Jackson County Floridan
Publisher: Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Marianna Fla
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates: 30.776389 x -85.238056 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note: "Independent."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID: UF00028304:00937
 Related Items
Preceded by: Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by: Marianna Floridan

Full Text
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***<****^ORIGIN MTILXED ADC 325
LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HJ STORY
PO BOX 117007
PIPE ^ 'INESVI LLE FL 32611-/00,7



Informing more than 700()i readers daily in print and online






FLORIDAN


Vol. 89 No. 208



NAACP early voting march set for Oct. 28


BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com

Early voting starts this Sat-
urday, Oct. 27 and, to get the
community into the spirit
of the opportunity, the local
NAACP chapter has orga-
nized an early-voting march
for Sunday, Oct. 28, at 2 p.m.
The march will be a short


one; it starts at the Jackson
County Courthouse and will
end at election headquarters
down the hill, just a block
away. NAACP Area Coordi-
nator Elmore Bryant said
those wishing to participate
should start arriving at the
courthouse by around 1:45
p.m. There will be an invo-
cation and brief comments


before the march begins.
Bryant said the primary
reason for the event is to
get more people out to vote
ahead of election day, but
that it was also timed for
Sunday in honor of Cynthia
Slater, a key player in the
successful court battle to
restore Sunday as an early
voting day in Florida. The


decision in that class action
suit was made a few weeks
ago, and Bryant said Slater,
along with the NAACP was
largely responsible for ,the
success of the challenge.
"We're not telling you who
to vote .for, vote for whoever
you want," Bryant said. "The
See VOTING, Pagq 7A


NAACP Area Coordinator
Elmore Bryant talks
about the Souls to the
Polls early voting march
Sunday.


Florida's


black bears


busy filling


bellies in fall
The Associated Press
MIAMI Florida's black bears are busy filling their
bellies this season.
A statement from the Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission says bears are stocking
up on calories this fall. Wildlife officials are asking
residents to be extra diligent in securing food sourc-
es around their homes and businesses that can at-
tract bears and create problems.
David Telesco is the commission's bear manage-
ment program coordinator. He says preventing ac-
cess to food is the most important thing people
can do to keep bears and other wild animals out of
neighborhoods. As he puts it, stale doughnuts and
last night's leftovers "may be more appealing than
foraging in the woods for palmetto berries and
acorns."
Bear-related calls to the commission are up this
year in many parts of the state.
According to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conser-
vation Commission there are black bear populations
in the Florida panhandle.. The Commission reports
there are six major bear populations restricted to
expansive, undeveloped forest tracts, mostly public
lands including the Apalachicola National Forest,
Ocala National Forest/Wekiva River Basin, Osceola
National Forest, St. Johns River area in northeast
Florida, Eglin Air Force Base in Florida's panhandle
and Big Cypress National Preserve in southwest
Florida.
See BEARS, Page 7A


REVTtuLIZIpTION PROJECT


Group hopes to increase


ecotourism in Chattahoochee

rf* ~ ~ i^^i


Karen Marsh and
Cory Childs help
get the pirate
room ready for
the Project Scare
Haunted House
in Chattahoochee
Tuesday.


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN

Haunted house to raise funds for revitalization efforts


BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com
With jobs gradually drying up at
Florida State Hospital and busi-
nesses closing over a long period
of time some people in Chat-
tahoochee have wondered if the
community will become a ghost
town. Well, yes, it will, but just for


the next few nights as Halloween
approaches.
A group of residents and support-
ers have formed to create the Chat-
tahoochee Revitalization Project,
a long-term effort to make sure
the town survives and thrives well
into the future. They have several
fundraisers planned to help them


achieve that goal. One of them
is a Halloween haunted house. It
will be open this Thursday, Friday
and Saturday from 6-9 p.m. East-
ern time (5-8 Central time), each
night. Admission is $2 for children
12 years of age and younger and $3
for everyone else. The setting for
See HAUNTED, Page 7A


,JURE SHARES STORY


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Circuit Judge William Wright shares a story of how he was stuck in one of the Jackson
County Courthouse elevators as a child during a ribbon cutting ceremony for the
freshly renovated building. The structure, the third county courthouse, was built in
1962 and over the past year has undergone extensive external remodeling such as the
addition of a sloped metal roof to replace the previously flat roofed structure, The $1.8
million dollar project also redid the steps and sidewalks around the building, installed
new windows and signage. It restuccoed and repainted the exterior as well. Work on
the renovations started in November 2011 and finished at the start of October.


ANNUAL HAUNTED HOUSE
.. ."An unsuspecting Spider Man,
S .'. aka Joshua Horosecz, and
.'' Jennifer Harden were about
to meet Freddy Krueger, as
played by Gary Mack, Monday
night in the third annual
Haunted House of Horrors
in Marianna. The event
is being put on by North
Florida Wild West Shows and
Masonic Lodge 3 F& AM, with
proceeds going to charities
Supported by the Masons,
and to help NFWWS prepare
for next year's house. Gary
Mack with NFWWS said
the group has been doing
haunted houses around the
country for 30 years as well
as wild west shows. Among
the changes to this year's
haunted house are the use
of more animatronics and a
S maze. The house is located at
the corner of Jefferson Street
and Highway 90 in Marianna.
Hours are 6-9 p.m. Sunday
-through Thursday, 6-10 p.m.
Friday and Saturday and from
6-11 p.m. on Oct.30 and 31.


> CLASSIFIEDS...5-7B


This Newspaper
Is Printed On '
Recycled Newsprint .



7 I 11 III
7 665161 80050" 9


)> ENTERTAINMENT...4B


Facebook Twitter


> LOCAL...3A


) OBITUARIES...7A


SOPINION...4A


) SPORTS...1B


> TV LISTINGS...3B


,. .- , .: ,

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Chevrolet-Buicir-|


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_~ __ ~_.~_111_.__ I~ ....._~11_1111_- ---------1_ 1







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN e www.jcfloridan.com


Weather Outlook


Mostly Sunny & Warm.
Today-Justin Kiefer / WMBB


'/


High 85
Low -61


Thursday
Patchy AM Fog.
Then Sunny & Warm.


S High 820
2 Low 53


Saturday
Partly Cloudy.
Possible Shower.


High 84
Low 57':


' l'. High: 82
SLow: 57
4,,'.I *


.., High: 84
Low: 55


High: 182 L4 4...
Lo,: 58 High: 84
- -;! -o%: 58 Low: 59

L :High: 84
Low: 57'


Low: 64


47,vi$i


High 850
Low 580


Friday
Patchy AM Fog.
Then Sunny & Warm.


. ., High 760
... Low- 470


Sunday
Mostly Cloudy & Cooler.


.', rHigh: 83
1 Low: 64


_ :" igh:84
Lov: 60


PRECIPITATION


24 hours
Month to date
Normal MTD
TIDES
Panama City
Apalachic6la
Port St. Joe
Destin
Pensacola


0.00"
2.30"
2.44"


Low
Low
Low
Low
Low


RIVER READINGS
Woodruff
Blountstown
Marianna
Caryville


Year to daic
Normal Y [rD
Normal for year


2:14 PM
6:58 AM
2:19 PM
3:30 PM
4:04 PM


High
High
High
High
High


Reading
39.00 ft.
0.37 ft.
6.38 ft.
2.47 ft.


5 I "
5. 44-
59.20-


- 5:39 AM
- 1:06 AM
- 6:12 AM
- 6:45 AM
- 7:18 AM


Flood Stage
66.0 ft.
15.0 ft.
19.0 ft.
12.0 ft.


ULTRA VIOLET INDEX

0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8-10 Very High, 11+ Extreme


0 1 2 3 4 5


THE SUN AND MOON
Sunrise 6:50 AM
Q...t o,1u "riv,/


Sunset
Moonrise
Moonset


2:58 PM
3:01 AM(Thu)


Oct. Nov. Nov. Nov.
29 7 13 20


FLORIDA'S REAL

PANHANDLE JurNyY

MEDIA PARTNERS WJAQ 100.9F"

STERHRYEAERD


*JACKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN
Publisher Valeria Roberts
vroberts@jcfloridan.com

Circulation Manager Dena Oberski
doberski@jcfloridan.com

CONTACT US
Telephone: 850-526-3614
FAX: 850-482-4478
Email: editorial@jcfloridan.com
Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447
Street Address:
4403 Constitution Lane
Marianna, Ft 32446
Office Hours:
Weekdays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

MISS YOUR PAPER?
You should receive your newspaper no later
than 6 a.m. If it does not arrive, call Circula-
tion between 6a.m. and noon, Tuesday to
Friday, and 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. on Sunday. The
Jackson County Floridan (USPS 271-840)
is published Tuesday through Friday and
Sunday mornings. Periodical postage paid
at Marianna, FL.


SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Home delivery: $11.23 per month; $32.83
for three months; $62.05 for six months;
and $123.45 for one year. All prices include
applicable state and local taxes. Mail
subscriptions must be paid in advance. Mail
subscriptions are: $46.12 for three months;
$92.24 for six months; and $184.47 for one
year.

ADVERTISING
The advertiser agrees that the publisher
shall not be liable for damages arising
out of errors and advertisements beyond
the amount paid for the space actually
occupied by that portion of the advertise-
ments in which the error occurred, whether
such error is due to the negligence of the
publisher's employees or otherwise, and
there shall be not liability for non-inser-
tion of any advertisement beyond the
amount paid for such advertisement. This
newspaper will not knowingly accept or
publish illegal material of any kind. Advertis-
ing which expresses preference based on
legally protected personal characteristics is
not acceptable.

HOW TO GET YOUR
NEWS PUBLISHED
The Jackson County Floridan will publish
news of general interest free of charge.
Submit your news or Community Calendar
events via email, fax, mail, or hand delivery.
Fees may apply for wedding, engagement,
anniversary and birth announcements.
Forms are available at the Floridan offices.
Photographs must be of good quality and
suitable for print. The Floridan reserves the
right to edit all submissions.

GETTING IT RIGHT
The Jackson County Floridan's policy
is to correct mistakes promptly. To
report an error, please call 526-3614
Monday-Friday.


Community


TODAY

) Food Distribution 8 a.m. at 4297 Lid-
don St., Marianna. Eldercare Services will
give out USDA and Brown Bag food. Call
482-3220.
) Jackson County Habitat for Humanity
Warehouse hours 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
) Job Club 10:30 a.m.' to 1:30 p.m.
at the Marianna Goodwill Career Train-
ing -Center, 4742 U.S. 90 in Marianna.
Learn job seeking/retention skills. Call
526-0139.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting
- Noon to 1 p.m. in the AA room of First
United Methodist Church, 2901 Caledonia
St. in Marianna.
THURSDAY, OCT. 25
) St. Anne Thrift Store Hours 9 a.m.-1
p.m. Tuesday and Thursdays at 4285 Sec-
ond Ave. in Marianna.
) Free Classes Beginning Genealogy,
1-4 p.m.; and Computer Basics Simplified:
Email, 9 a.m. to noon at the Jackson County
Public Library, 2929 Green St. in Marianna.
To register, call 482-9631.
) Chipola Healthy Start Coalition Open
House 12-6 p.m. at .2915 Pennsylvania
Ave., Marianna. Get information on preg-
nancy, early childhood and services offered.
by CHSC. Light refreshments provided. Call
482-1236.
) Orientation 12:30-3:30 p.m. at the
Marianna Goodwill Career Training Cen-
ter, 4742 U.S. 90 in Marianna. Register
for free job placement and computer
training; learn about services. Call
526-0139.
) Employability Workshop Creating an
Effective Resume, 3 p.m. at the One Stop
Career Center in Marianna. Call 718-0326.
Jackson County Public Library Advisory
Board Meeting 3 p.m. in the conference
room of the County Commission cham-
bers, 2864 Madison St., Marianna. Public
welcome.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Closed dis-
cussion, 8-9 p.m., First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St., Marianna, in
the AA room. Attendance limited to persons
with a desire to stop drinking.
FRIDAY, OCT. 26
a Big Bend Highland Games & Scottish Fes-


tival Oct.-26-28 at Citizens Lodge Park,
4574 Lodge Drive, Marianna. Gates open
at noon Visit BigBendScots.com for details,
ticket prices. A portion of proceeds benefits
Salvation Army of Jackson County,
Spirit of the Caverns 6-9:30 p.m. Oct.
26-27 at Florida Caverns State Park, 3345,
Caverns Road in Marianna. Games, candy,
prizes and an interpretation of the "spirits
and folklore" of our ancestors are planned.
Park entrance fees waived for participants.
Call 573-0390.
) Senior Singles Get-Together 6 p.m. at
Gazebo Coffee Shoppe & Deli, downtown
Marianna. Single seniors age 50 and older
are encouraged to get acquainted, form
friendships. Games, food, prizes and a guest
speaker are planned. No charge; donations
accepted (proceeds fund charitable endeav-
ors of Marianna's Gathering Place Founda-.
tion). Call 526-4561.
) Celebrate Recovery 7 p.m. at Evangel
Worship Center, 2645 Pebble Hill Road in
Marianna. Adult, teen meetings to "over-
come hurts, habits and hang-ups." Dinner:
6 p.m. Child care available. Call 209-7.856,
573-1131.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting
- 8-9 p.m. in the AA room of First United
Methodist Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in
Marianna.
SATURDAY, OCT. 27
Fall Farmers' Market Open at 8 a.m. in
Madison Street Park, downtown Marianna.
) Big Bend Highland Games & Scottish
Festival Oct. 26-28 at Citizens Lodge Park,
4574 Lodge Drive, Marianna. Gates open at
8:30 a.m.Visit BigBendScots.com for details,
ticket prices.
) 34th Annual Sunland Fall Festival 9
a.m. at Sunland Center Environmental
Park, on U.S. 71, north of Marianna. The
festival begins with a parade. Arts and crafts
booths, food vendors, music, entertainment
and children's activities are planned, as are
cane-grinding and syrup-making demos,
horse and wagon rides, and square dancing
from the Sunland Swingers.
) Alford Community Health Clinic Hours
- 10 a.m. until last patient is seen, at 1770
Carolina St. in Alford. The free clinic for
income-eligible patients without medical
insurance treats short-term illnesses and
chronic conditions. Appointments avail-


able (call 263-7106 or 209-5501); walk-ins
welcome. Sign in before noon.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting
- 4;30-5:30 p.m. in the AA room of First
United Methodist Church, 2901 Caledonia
St. in Marianna.
) Spirit of the Caverns 6-9:30 p.m. Oct.
26-27 at Florida Caverns State Park, 3345
Caverns Road in Marianna. Games, candy,
prizes and an interpretation of the "spirits
and folklore" of our ancestors are planned.
Park entrance fees waived for participants.
Call 573-0390.
SUNDAY, OCT.28
Big Bend Highland Games & Scottish Fes-
tival Oct. 26-28 at Citizens Lodge Park,
4574 Lodge Drive, Marianna. Gates open at
8:30 a.m. Visit BigBendScots.com for details,
ticket prices.
) Scottish Heritage Sunday 11 a.m. at
First Presbyterian'Church on Jefferson Street
in Marianna. Procession with bagpiper, tar-
tan flags representing congregation mem-
bers with Scottish heritage. Lunch follows;
bring a covered dish to share.
) Tripp Reunion Planning Meeting 5 p.m.
at St. Matthew Missionary Baptist Church
in Cottondale. All family members encour-
aged to help plan next year's reunion (May
24-26), which is dedicated to the memory of
Robert "Jake" and Trussie Lee BellamyTripp.
Call 352-1254 or 326-5683.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Closed Discussion
- 6:30 p.m. at 4349 W. Lafayette St. in Mari-
anna (in one-story building behind 4351 W.
Lafayette St.). Attendance limited to per-
sons with a desire to stop drinking.
MONDAY, OCT. 29
Jackson County Quilter's Guild Meeting
- 5:30-7:30 p.m. at Ascension Lutheran
Church, 3975 U.S. 90 West, Marianna. Busi-
ness meetings are fourth Mondays; other
Monday are for projects, lessons, help. All
quilters welcome. Call 209-7638.
) Hispanic & Women Farmers/Ranch-
ers Claim Process Public Meeting 6 p.m.
at Jackson County Extension Office, 2741
Pennsylvania Avenue in Marianna. Con-
ducted by the USDA FSA, NRCS and RD,
meeting regards Hispanic and women
farmers/ranchers who allege USDA dis-
crimination when seeking USDA farm loan
assistance between 1981 and 2000.


The submission deadline for this calendar is two days before publication. Submit to: Community Calendar, Jackson County Floridan, P. O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447,
email editorial@jcfloridan.com, fax 850-482-4478 or bring items to 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.


MARIANNA POLICE
DEPARTMENT.
The Marianna Police De-
partment listed the following
incidents for
Oct. 22, the -- -
latest available -'
report:.One -ir .
armed/dan- '" .I
gerous person,
two accidents,
one suspicious vehicle, one es-
cort, one burglary, one physical
disturbance, three verbal dis-
turbances, one burglar alarm,
one report of shooting
in the area, two traffic stops,
two animal complaints, one
fraud, one assist of a motorist


or pedestrian, one public
service call and one welfare
check.

JACKSON COUNTY
SHERIFF'S OFFICE
The Jackson County Sheriff's
Office and county fire/rescue
reported the following incidents
for Oct. 22, the latest available
report. (Some of these calls may
be related to after-hours calls
taken on behalf of Graceville
and Cottondale police depart-
ments): One accident, two
stolen tags, three abandoned
vehicles, three suspicious ve-
hicles, one suspicious incident,
two suspicious persons, two


escorts, one highway obstruc-
tion, six burglaries, one physi-
cal disturbance, one verbal
disturbance, one residential
fire, 16 medical calls, two bur-
glar alarms, 15 traffic stops, two
larceny complaints, two civil
disputes, three trespass com-
plaints, one noise disturbance,
one sex offense, two assists of
motorists or pedestrians, one
assist of another agency, one
public service call, one trans-
port, one Baker Act transport,
and four threat/harassment
complaints.

JACKSON COUNTY
CORRECTIONAL FACILITY


The following persons were'
booked into the county jail dur-
ing the latest reporting periods:
)) Olen Hunter, 31, 8019
Church St., Sneads, violation of
county probation.
)) Tom Lipford, 56, 3390 High-
way 90, Grand Ridge, violation
of county probation.
)) Timothy Whittley, 53, 3138
Lake St., Cottondale, failure to
return rental property.

Jail Population: 198

To report a crime, call CrimeStoppers
at 526-5000 or a local law enforcement
agency.
To report a wildlife violation, call 1-888-
404-FWCC (3922).


Chevrolet-Buick-Cadillac-Nissan
, 4204 Lafayette St. Marianna, FL.

S (850) 482-3051


W.t-. n


...,9 ., 1


-----~


-12A WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2012


WAI(E-UP CALL





JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


council to meet


Special to the Floridan
The Area Agency on Ag-
ing for North Florida Inc.
will convene its board of
directors and advisory
council meetings, starting


at 10 a.m. EST tomorrow,
at 2414 Mahan Drive in
Tallahassee.
The meeting is open
to the public and an
agenda will be


available to anyone on.
request.
For more information
about the agency, call 1-
866-467-4624 (toll free) or
visit AAANEorg.


Special to the Floridan
The 4-H Explorers Club
of Jackson County recent-
ly joined together to help
clean and preserve the
environment.
Club leaders Connie
Young and Cheryl Robin-
son worked with Francis
Stone, a retired school
teacher and volunteer
with the Chipola Green-
way Volunteers, to co-
ordinate efforts for the


Explorers 4-H club mem-
bers to clean the area
around Yancey Bridge
on Caverns Road in
Marianna.
The group of 18 children
met Friday morning, Oct.
12, and used the buddy
system to .pick up trash
in the parking lot, ditches
and along the walking
trails. Working in pairs al-
lowed for one 4-H mem-
ber to pick up trash with
pinchers, while the other


-'." ~ -


held the bag, swapping
those duties along the
way.
For more information
about joining 4-H or start-
4ing a. 4-H club in your
community, contact the
Jackson County 4-H Agent
Ben Knowles at 482-9620.
For more information
about the Explorers Club,
please contact club lead-
ers Connie Young at 482-
5824, or Cheryl Robinson
at 557-7049.


4L ~ -- ~--sp Il-s


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Explorers 4-H club members take a short break from cleaning the area around Yancey
Bridge to pose for a picture: (front, from left) Liam Bagy and Noah Sloan; (middle row)
Sarah Young, Katelyn young, Ceridwen Bagy, Zarren Bagy, Jordan Sloan, Chipola Greenway
volunteer Francis Stone, Eli Cox, Sarah Cox and Abigail Melvin; and (back row) Taylor Young,
Mason Young, Raven Bagy, Quinn Bagy, Jared Robinson, Michael Young, Wade Robinson and
Madison Cox.



Tripp reunion is



planning business



meeting Sunday


Special to the Floridan
The Tripp Family Re-
union Planning Commit-
tee will conduct a business
meeting on Sunday, to
plan next year's reunion,
which is set for May 24-26,
2013.
All family members


are asked to take part
in planning the event,
which is dedicated to the
memory of Robert "Jake"
and Trussie Lee Bellamy
Tripp.
Committees, are in
place for volunteers to
join.
For more information,


call Derrick Henderson
at 352-1254 or Judy Tripp
at 326-5683, or search
Facebook for additional
details.
The planning meeting
starts at 5 p.m. Sunday,
at St. Matthew Mission-
ary Baptist Church in
Cottondale.


'Senior Singles' group


to resume meetings


Special to the.Floridan
Those missing their
monthly Senior Singles
Get-Together can look
forward to Friday, when
the regular event resumes
- at a new downtown
location.
Following a temporary
hiatus, organizer Lilia
Durand of Marianna's
Gathering Place Foun-
dation says the Senior


Singles Get-Together is
set to pick up again,
moving from its previous
meeting space (Winn-
Dixie) to a new home:
Gazebo Coffee Shoppe
& Deli, 4412 W. Lafay-
ette St. in downtown
Marianna.
Single seniors age 50
and older are encour-
aged to get acquainted,
form friendships, and
partake in games, food,


prizes and guest speak-
ers that are regularly
planned.
There is no charge to
attend, but donations
are accepted, with pro-
ceeds funding the chari-
table endeavors of Mar-
ianna's Gathering Place
Foundation.
The group meets on the
last Friday of each month.
For more information, call
Durand at 526-4561.


- iHNIS TOP EMPL,. E


SUBMITTED PHOTO
S hawn Keihn (right) accepts a plaque from Chipola president Dr.
Gene Prough for being named the Chipola College Career Em-
ployee for October. Keihn serves as departmental staff assistant
in the Teacher Education Department. She has worked at the college
since 2008.


ADULT ED LEARNS ABOUT

DRIVING SAFETY


SUBMITTED PHOTO

Sgt. J.D. Johnson, with the Florida Highway Patrol, speaks to
Jackson County Adult Education students about driving rules
and habits, and the dangers of drinking and driving and texting
while driving. He also stressed to the students to always be alert and
drive safely.

Marriage, Divorce Report


Special to the Floridan
The following marriages
and divorces were re-
corded in Jackson County
during the week of Oct.
15-19:
Marriages
) Jeremiah James
Hunt and Rebeca Ann
Rockefeller.
) James Earl Duvall and
Kacie Deanne Smith.
) Janie Bennett Canada
and Calvin Green Jones.
) David Gilbert Coisman
and Sandra L. Salvaty.
) Bobby Lee Redmon
and Pamela Butler Selbe.
) Scott Patrick Casey and
Ruby Amber Saye.


Cotton


) Taylor Mckenzie Christ-
mas and Nicholas Daniel
Stroud.
) William Matthew Cruce
and Ashley Lynn Daniel.
) John William Mc-
Daniel and Patricia Lynn
Sellers.
) Clarence Eugene Cole-
man and Rebecca Grace S.
Holton.
) Vickey Lynn Davis and
William Edward Herb.
) Tammatha L. Davis and


Mark David Johnson.
) Sandra Gail James and
Clifton T. Kirkland.
Divorces
) Barbara Joan Aaron vs.
Michael Ernie Aaron.
) Lisa Carnley Carmi-
chael vs. Tommy Eugene
Carmichael.
) Andreal L. Grant vs.
William Leo Grant.
) Jimmy Ray Lanier vs.
Rebecca Lanier.


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7-


is soon

Special to the Floridan
Nov. 1 is the last day
for contestants to enter
the Miss Jackson County
Cotton Pageant.
The pageant is set for
Nov. 10 in the Graceville
Civic Center.
Girls age 5-18 are eligible
and the entry fee is $60.
For more information,
call 592-9563.


M1#Ii) !rfU A RRvWlP


*( \ I11


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WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM


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LOCAL


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2012 3AF












Publisher
VALERIA ROBERTS


Florida Voices



Of pollution



and pumping

Those of us who grew up playing in North Florida's
springs remember refreshing ourselves by taking
gulps of the cool, clear water that gushed from
beneath us and never giving it a second thought. It was
so clean, so clear, so sweet.
Today, you might want to give it a second thought. The
springs that once were so spectacularly clear, no longer
are. The water that was so remarkably clean, no longer
is.
The folks at the Florida Department of Environmental
Protection reminded me just how polluted our springs
and, by the way, that means our aquifer have be-
come during a meeting in Dunnellon on Thursday
where they outlined a plan to begin "restoring" Rainbow
Springs and the Rainbow River to the way it once was.
The undertaking will be difficult and take decades.
All one has to do to know the springs and river are in
trouble is take a look. The water is nowhere near as clear
as it once was. Brown algae clinging to what was once
green eel grass now carpets the river bottoms, except
where it has gotten so thick that it has killed the grass -
and with it important habitats for fish and other aquatic
life.
Compounding the problem is that overpumping of our
aquifer has slowed the flow of the springs by a third or
more in the case of Silver Springs, by half so the
rush of water that used to flush a lot of the nitrates and
other pollutants away doesn't anymore.
So the DEP is now trying to slow down the amount of
nitrates reaching our springs and rivers by getting us to.
change the way we handle human wastewater, livestock
manure, fertilizers and stormwater runoff.
Here are the scientific data. The DEP says that to get
the Rainbow back to some semblance of normal, nitrate
levels need to be brought down to 0.35 mg per liter in
the springs and river. So how far do we have to go? The
nitrate level in Rainbow Springs is currently about 1.92
S.mg/L. Yeah, gulp.
One-has to wonder, why has it taken reaching 1.92 mg/
L for our environmental police to stop,the assault.
And now that they are administering life support, it
isn't with any great sense of urgency. It will be a process
and take years, if not decades, they say.
Meanwhile, the state's water management districts,
under orders from Tallahassee, are feverishly working to
"streamline" the consumptive-use permitting process
to make it faster and easier for big business and devel-
opment to pump more billions of gallons of water from
an aquifer an aquifer that water managers openly ac-
knowledge cannot possibly meet Florida's future water
needs.
This, folks, is what passes for 21st century Florida wa-
ter policy. It goes without saying, it needs a lot of work.
This was published in the Tuesday, Oct. 23, edition of the Ocala
Star-Banner.


Contact representatives
Florida Legislature
Rep. Marti Coley, R-District 7
Marti.Coley@myfloridahouse.gov
Building A, Room 186 Chipola College
3094 Indian Circle
Marianna, FL 32446-1701

Rep. Brad Drake, R-District 5
Brad.Drake@myfloridahouse.gov
NWFL State-Chautauqua Campus #205
908 U.S. Highway 90 West
DeFuniak Springs, FL 32433-1436

Sen. Bill Montford. D-District 6
208 Senate Office Building
404 South Monroe St.
Tallahassee, FL 32399-1100
montford.bill.web@ flsenate.gov


Letters to the Editor
Submit letters by either mailing to Editor, P.O Bo, 520,
Marianna FL 32447 or facing to 850-482-4478 or send
email to editorialicfloridan.com. The Floridan reserves
the right to edit cr not publish any letter Be'sure to
include your full address and telephone number These
will only be used to verify the letter arid will not be
printed. For more information call 350-526-3614


Remembering George McGovern


BY MARK O'BRIEN
Florida Voices
We all remember .our first crush,
our first kiss, our first car.
How about your first vote for
president of the United States?
It was a big deal for me, a memory
that comes back now with news that
George McGovern died Sunday.
Despite my enthusiastic vote for
him, McGovern didn't win. In fact,'
he was blown out of the water by
Richard M. Nixon. But I'm still hap-
py with my vote for McGovern, who
was a standup guy unafraid to take
on the powers-that-be with his early
and well-spoken opposition to the
war in Vietnam.
Critics liked to describe McGov-
ern as a pointy-headed intellectual
because he was a history profes-
sor and a traditional liberal when
Democrats were proud to be called
liberal.
But long before he became a
professor, McGovern was in World
War II, a kid piloting a B-24 on 35
combat missions over Nazi-con-
trolled France. Unlike Jabber-Jaws
John Kerry, he didn't brag
about his military service; he just
did it.
McGovern's military service and
his history expertise gave him strong
credentials to criticize a war that
seemed to make no sense. Although
truth be told, some of us would have
taken anyone over Nixon, the per-
sonification of evil to many college-
age people in 1972.
I was one of those angry college
kids in Boston then, when the coun-
try was split between anti-war pro-


testers and counter-protesters who
denounced war opponents as trai-
tors and worse.
People think of Massachusetts as
all liberal all the time, but in 1972
it had many people angry and per-
plexed by the protests a first for
the post World-War II country. Yet
the body bags kept rolling across
the TV screens on the nightly news
and young people kept marching
off to war unless they had connec-
tions or the money and smarts to go
to college.
This war lacked the rightness of
the two world wars we all knew
about, and the draft meant mili-
tary service for many teenagers
and young adults who saw no need
for fighting people in faraway Asia.
Other Americans, however, believed
in "my country right or wrong," or
just wanted to trust the president,
whoever he was. In those days,
maybe people trusted'government
more.
While McGovern, a U.S. Senator
from South Dakotq, spoke against
the war as early as 1963, he picked
up momentum a few years later as
the war went on and the American
casualties kept rising.
It wasn't just McGovern's courage
in speaking against awar when more
powerful establishment Democrats
such as Hubert Humphrey dithered.
McGovern also spoke for civil rights
for minorities and for better treat-
ment of women, two other groups
that wouldn't be where they are to-
day if not for liberals.
Nixon was a huge favorite in the
race even though he seemed to


exude trickery from every pore. And
McGovern bumbled early and often.
Unable to find a big-name running
mate, he chose Sen. Thomas Eagle-
ton of Missouri without thoroughly
checking his background.
Sound like John McCain and Sarah
Palin?
It soon came out that Eagleton
had been treated for. depression,
one of those illnesses not men-
tioned in polite society in the 1970s.
At first, McGovern said he was
"1,000 percent" behind Eagleton,
but those ill-chosen words came
to haunt him during the campaign
and Eagleton stepped aside amid
the controversy.
Still, McGovern soldiered on a
man of conscience earning credit
for trying. He took a tremendous
licking, winning only Massachu-
setts and the District of Columbia
as Nixon took the race 61 percent to
37 percent.
Less than two years later, people
realized, "Hey, maybe McGovern
would have been better."
That's because Nixon was fleeing
the White House, his sleazy win-at-
all-costs attitude exposed through
the Pentagon Papers, the Water-
gate cover-up and so many more
scandals.
It was too late for the country, but
people in Boston had a bumper
sticker for the ages: "Don't blame
me, I'm from Massachusetts."

Formerly a columnist for the Pensacola News
Journal, Mark O'Brien is a writer in Pensacola,
and the author of "Pensacola On My Mind" and
"Sand In My Shoes."


Witches, Jack-o'-lanterns and black cats


Ever hear the phrase, "I never
had time to be a kid?" Of course
you have! As for myself, growing up
dirt poor on a sharecroppers farm
in an economically depressed part
of Tennessee, working the fields
from dawn to dusk, and then going
to school when it rained, kept me
pretty well busy all things consid-
ered.
However, I always found the time
to hook-slide into second base,
shoot a big ol' rabbit for the next
day's meal, and then cry out "trick-
or-treat" on Halloween night!
Reflecting back to my seventh
year, I remember asking my grand-
pa if there really were "old witches,
ghost, and black cats with fiery red
eyes" waiting out there to get
me.
"Yes Billy-Bob, if you truly want to
see them," he answered.
Dating back to 1846, it was be-
lieved that ghost came back to the
earthly world on Halloween, and
could be encountered upon leaving
ones home after dark. To avoid
recognition, people would
wear masks so the ghosts would
mistake them for fellow spirits.
Today's mythical ghosts are often
depicted as much more fearsome
and malevolent.
Of course with that in mind, our
customs and superstitions are
scarier, too.
Avoiding black cats cross-
ing your path, walking un-
der ladders, breaking mir-
rors, stepping on cracks in the
road, or spilling salt are some
examples. Over time, Halloween
has evolved into a secular, commu-
nity-based event characterized by
child-friendly activities. The
Spirit of giving has been, and must


always remain, the cornerstone
of it all.
The most memorable Hallow-
een for my wife and I, as adults,
was back in 1996 when we were
host to 234 kids at our home in
Marianna. Of course, one quarter
of all the candy sold in the U.S., was
purchased on Halloween of that
year. Today, Americans spend an
estimated $6 billion annually mak-
ing it the country's second largest
commercial holiday.
This Halloween, the wicked ol'
witch should turn into pumpkins
for anyone who claims they were
robbed of being kids. Do you agree?
Of course you do. May I suggest
that we bury the hatchet, so to
speak, turn our porch lights on up
and down the streets, compromise
all the tricks with an option to
treat, ahd help polish the spirit that
anchors it all.
In closing, my wife and I would
like to personally thank our fellow
Americans who have continued to
light the Jack-o'-lanterns year after
year. The real test, I guess, is what
makes America the best country
on earth? The answer comes in
four short words ... our kids of
course. God willing, we'll be there
for them. Best wishes for a safe and
joyous Halloween.
W. ISAAC AND ESTELLA BISHOP
Marianna

We must defend our right of
expression
In response to Dr. Hoff's letter of
Oct. 21,1 I totally agree that it was
wrong for anyone to go on to his
property and take down any sign
that expressed his opinions. Dr.
Hoff is a combat veteran and as far


as I am concerned not only paid
for his right to express his political
views but also the right of pth-
ers to do so as well; something all
American Service men and women
have done. Sadly though by Dr.
Hoffs calculations, this action gives
100 times more reason to vote
for the other candidate. I say that
because at least that many Obama
signs have been taken from private
property in Jackson County in the
last month.
Like Dr. Hoff, many of the prop-
erty owners who have had their
signs removed are themselves vet-
erans of our Armed Forces. Many
of them have served in combat.
Some are disabled as a result of that
combat service. I know some of
these people as they are members
of organizations such as Disabled
Veterans of America as I am.
Some of these property owners
also have family members who
came home in flag covered caskets.
Yet like in the case of Dr. Hoff, some
people have taken it upon them-
selves to deny them one of our
basic principals of citizenship the
freedom of political expression.
By doing so, and under the cover
of darkness, these people are the
ones who are displaying a lack of
American principals.
As someone who joined the
Republican party in 1972,1 I am
appalled by this action on the
part of anyone regardless of party
affiliations. We as Americans have
an obligation not only to defend
our own right of expressions, but
" also and of equal importance the
rights of others as well. Even if they
disagree with us.
W.K. JOHNSON
Marianna


"TI VOTE PO U5 PART.


- Fondly


'~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ . ,-4 .- 4 ,: .. ',, " .. .. ... '






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


A -.-T-cL., I--,r-P ; -
A;.n iyrA1 -


1<


BL~ NA, -


SUBMITTED PHOTOS

Guest speaker Becky Dunaway, R.N. (center), a nursing pro-
gram specialist with the Jackson County Health Department,
gathers for a photo with AARP members Earl Williams (left)
and Bernice Grimes during the Oct. 15 luncheon meeting of AARP
Chapter 3486 in Marianna.
..................................................... I*..............................................................


GAS WATCH
G( I,:. pi rc i-y 'l l H hIi: -.II
Itl leV:I IP 3 : 'IiC p i:Il. :l, : II:l lJ ,
TI 1,- :,:1.i, .. -r r].:,,:, l

1. $3.37. Murphy Oil. Highway 71
S., Marianna
2. $3.38, Pilot. Highway 71.
Marianna
3. $3.38, Travel Center, Highway
71 S.. Marianna
4. $3.39. Dar-Bee's Quick Stop.
Highway 90. Cypress
5. $3.39. McCoys Food Mart.
Jefferson. Marianna
6. $3.42. Chevron. Lafayette.
Marianna
7. $3.42. Chipola Mart,
Lafayette, Marianna
8. $3.43. Greens BP. Highway 71,
Marianna

,I t I 1 It I, .' ,'- ,i


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Jackson County
Floridan


Musician Roger Whitaker poses for a photo at the Oct. 15
meeting of AARP. Whitaker entertained chapter members
while lunch was served.



Troop 3 Boy Scouts visited


by Founder of Boy Scouts'


Special to the Floridan

Troop 3 Boy Scouts of
Marianna were given a
special treat during their
most recent troop meeting
when they Were visited by
character-speaker James
Moore of Niceville.
Moore, attended the
scout meeting in charac-
ter as "Lord Baden-Pow-
ell," founder of Boy Scouts.
Scouts and leaders gath-
ered at the First United
Methodist Church to see
"Baden-Powell" and hear
his speech.
For over 20 years, Moore
has volunteered to per-
form historical presen-
tations -for schools, civic
clubs, churches and frater-
nal associations. Studying
the lives of each persof-
ality he portrays, Moore
is able to appear in dress
appropriate for the
occasion.
VisitingTroop 3 as Baden-
Powell, Moore explained
the historical background
of the scouting program
and the significance of
teaching outdoor skills to
youth. Former Lieuten-
ant-general Baden-Powell
was a British officer who
served in India and Africa
from 1876-1910. He wrote
"Scouting for Boys," which
was published in 1907, and
has sold approximately 150
million copies..
With his book as their
guide, boys and girls spon-
taneously formed Scout
troops, with the Scouting
movement inadvertently
starting, first as a national,
and soon as an interna-
tional phenomenon.
Following the presen-
tation, scouts and lead-
ers made the short walk
back to their Scout hut
to prepare menus and
camping gear for their
weekend camping
trip to St. Andrews State
Park.
The Marianna Optimist
Club is the chartering or-
ganization for Troop 3 Boy
Scouts. For more informa-
tion, call Scout Master Bill
Kleinhans at 526-2897 or
209-1778.


I', I -,
~NS~'
'I


! I
_- ..i 1


SUBMITTED PHOTOS
Lord Baden-Powell (as portrayed by James Moore) gestures
while talking with Troop 3 Boy Scouts about the creation of
the Scouting program.


Troop 3 Boy Scouts pose with James Moore (in character as
Lord Baden-Powell): (front row, from left) Everett Johnson,
Mathew Pelham, Keary Nichols, C.J. Barnes, and Chad Case;
(back row) Christopher Gay, Scoutmaster Bill Kleinhans,
Cameron Powell, James Moore, Noah McArthur, Jacob Lafferty
and Skylar Suggs. In back: Senior patrol leader Levin Berry.





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( BEN SAUNDERS, D.M.D.
PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY
4711 Highway 90 East Marianna, FL
(Between Burger King & Big Lots) 526-SPIT


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LOCAL






16A WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2012


Obama makes closing case to voters


The Associated Press

WASHINGTON Bat-
tling to win late-break-
ing undecided voters,
President Barack Obama
is pressing a closing ar-
gument that balances
economic optimism with
second-term specifics, all
while raising doubts'about
Republican Mitt Romney's
trustworthiness.
The revamped strategy
is an acknowledgement
that Obama must do more
than just criticize Romney
for shifting his positions.
With two weeks left until
Election Day, the president
still has to articulate what
that narrow band of per-
suadable voters would get
if they grant him four more
years in office.
The president barreled
,out of Monday night's
third and final debate with
a 20-page booklet detail-
ing an array of previously
released positions, in-
cluding spending more
on education, boost-
ing manufacturing jobs
and raising taxes on the
wealthy.
"That's how you build a
strong, sustainable econo-
my that has good middle-'
class jobs to offer," Obama
said during a rally in Delray
Beach, Fla., Tuesday. "Now
it's up to you to choose the
path we take from here."
The president also
tweaked his criticism of
Romney's newly moder-
ate stances, particularly on
the foreign policy issues
that dominated the third
debate. Obama's argument
for the homestretch will be
that such moves are a sign


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
President Barack Obama waves as he boards Air Force One on Tuesday at West Palm Beach
Airport en route to Ohio for a campaign stop after his final debate Monday night against
Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney at Lynn University
in Boca Raton.


that voters can't trust the
Republican nominee.
"The person who leads
this country, you've got to
have some confidence that
he or she means what he
or she says," Obama told
Florida voters. "You can
trust that I say what I mean


and I mean what I say."
Obama advisers see the
new approach as a way
to capitalize on polls that
show voters see the presi-
dent as more trustworthy
than Romney. A Washing-
ton Post/ABC News poll
last week showed 55 per-


cent of likely voters said
Obama is "honest and
trustworthy" compared to
47 percent who felt that
way about Romney.
The GOP nominee has
exuded confidence on the
campaign trail following
his strong performance in


the first debate on Oct. 3.
In recent days, he sharply
criticized Obama for not
providing enough specif-
ics about what he would
do in a second term.
Some Democrats have
also echoed that critique,
quietly griping that the
lack of clarity was keep-
ing Obama from closing
the deal with undecided
voters.
Obama advisers insisted
that Tuesday's push was
long-planned, not a reac-
tion to such criticism. A
new television ad incor-
porates more specifics
about the president's sec-
ond-term agenda and was
taped days before the final
debate.
The spot features Obama
speaking to the cam-
era and delivering what'
amounts to his final case
for re-election, both high-
lighting accomplishments
from his first term and
promising stronger results
in a second.
"We're not there yet. But
we've made real prog-
ress and the last thing we
should do is turn back
now," Obama says in the
ad. "It's an honor to be
your president. And I'm
asking for your vote."
At 60-seconds long, the
ad represented a signifi-
cantfinancial commitment
in nine competitive states:
Ohio, Florida, Virginia,
New Hampshire, Iowa,
North Carolina, Colorado,
Nevada and Wisconsin.
Polls show Romney
gained nationally after his
strong performance in the
first debate. Obama advis-
ers insist they maintain an


edge in key battleground
states, including Ohio,
where every Republican
has needed to win in order
to claim the presidency.
"We are tied, or. ahead, in
every battleground state,
and we're not leaving any-
where where we're tied or
ahead," said Jim Messina,
the president's campaign
manager.
With millions of Ameri-
cans already casting early
votes, Messina said the
campaign was focusing on
getting out "sporadic vot-
ers" and broadening the
universe of people who will
vote for the president. That
includes what he predicted
would be record turnout
from minority voters.
In 2008, Obama rode
early voting advantages to
victory despite losing in
votes cast on Election Day
in Colorado, Florida, Iowa
and North Carolina.
Obama advisers say the
president will spend near-
ly every day between now
and the Nov. 6 election
campaigning in battle-
ground states, though he
has some time scheduled
in Washington to attend to
governing duties.
Underscoring the elec-
tion's dwindling days,
Obama will start a 48-hour,
six-state blitz on Wednes-
day morning.
With both the Obama
and Romney campaigns
predicting victory, the
president's chief strategist,
David Axelrod, offered
some assurance that at
least the end was near.
"We'll know who is bluff-
ing and who isn't in two
weeks," he said.


Plan for new state license plates put on hold


The Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE Florida's
chief motor vehicle official has
put the brakes on proposed
changes to the state's license
plates after tax collectors object-
ed to a new method for distrib-
uting them.
Julie Jones, executive director
of the Department of Highway
Safety and Motor Vehicles, on
Tuesday withdrew the agency's
request for Gov. Rick Scott and
the Florida Cabinet to approve
the changes. She plans to con-
sider new information as well as
opposition from county tax col-
lectors whose offices now dis-
tribute the tags.


Jones wants the plates rede-
signed to make it easier for toll
and red light cameras to read
them because the state and local
governments are losing millions
due to illegible tags.
However, it's her idea to hire a
statewide vendor to handle on-
line and mail orders that has tax
collectors in a lather.
"I did not anticipate the level
of resistance that I got," Jones
said. "I felt like I engaged early
and often but apparently I didn't
engage early and often enough,
and I needed more specifics.
The plan would not affect
walk-up sales, but the tax col-
lectors say consumers could pay
more for online and mail orders


because some counties don't
currently charge for postage.
They also say it could take mo-
torists longer to get their plates.
"I'm glad she pulled it back,"
said' Attorney General Pam
Bondi, a Cabinet member. "A
lot more needs to be discussed
among all the parties."
Jones said she plans to form
a team that would include tax
collectors to put together a de-
tailed plan with assistance from
vendors.
"I'm going to drill down and
have a specific proposal with the
exact numbers and know exactly
what we're talking about before.
we come back," Jones said.
Jones said several vendors have


contacted her office saying they
could handle production as well
as distribution.
A state-created nonprofit cor-
poration, Prison Rehabilitative
Industries and Diversified Enter-
prises, uses inmate labor to make
the current tags with raised let-
ters and numbers. Jones wants
to replace them with flat plates
that are easier for the cameras to
read.
"PRIDE has told me, flat plate
or embossed plate, they'll be
able to retool and do either type
of plate," Jones said.
She said she has encouraged
PRIDE to submit a proposal
to negotiate for doing all of
the work or try to partner with


a private vendor.
The department still plans to
let Floridians vote online for a
new design in miacdovember,
Jones said.
The image of two oranges and
an orange-blossom depicted in
the middle of the current plate
also hampers the ability of cam-
eras to read the tags. Four pro-
posed alternative designs also
include an orange or orange slice
but on the top of the plate so they
don't interfere with the number
and letter combinations.
The delay will not alter plans to
begin replacing nearly 18 million
standard tags in January 2014,
Jones said. Specialty tags initially
will not be replaced.


Debt falls for 2nd
year in a row, now
$26.2B
TALLAHASSEE Flori-
da's debt has dropped for
the second year in a row to
$26.2 billion due largely to
falling utility tax revenues.
Bond Finance Director
Ben Watkins on Tuesday
said the state, therefore,
has been unable to float
bond issues with those
funds that are dedicated
to constructing and re-
pairing school, college and
university buildings.
Watkins provided the
update to Gov. Rick Scott
and the Florida Cabinet.
He said the state's debt
dropped $1.5 billion in the
budget year ending June
30 and $500 million in the
previous budget year.
That was the first
time the debt level had
dropped since 1990.

15 arrested outside
presidential debate
BOCA RATON Fifteen
members of a political
group aimed at youth
issues have been released
from jail after their arrests
outside the Boca Raton
university where last
night's presidential debate
was held.
Palm Beach County
Sheriff's Office spokes-
woman Teri Barbera
tells The Palm Beach
Post members of the
group Dream Defend-
ers refused to remove
i *


themselves from sitting
in the middle of a road
during the debate at Lynn
University. The group was
arrested Monday night
and charged with unlaw-
ful assembly, blocking a
highway and trespass after
warning. They have since
been released from jail.


Marion County
woman latest to
contract meningitis
TALLAHASSEE A
Marion county woman
is the latest Floridian to
contract meningitis from a
tainted steroid, shot.
State health officials said
Tuesday that the 66-year-


old woman is the 19th
person in the state to con-
tract fungal meningitis.
The nationwide outbreak
of this rare disease is
linked to patients seeking
pain relief who received
contaminated steroid
injections.
The injections all came
from contaminated lots of
steroids made by the New
England Compounding
Center in Massachusetts.
An investigation of how
the medicine became
tainted is under way.
Three people in Florida
have died from fungal
meningitis after receiving
the shots. Officials say the
incubation period of the
disease is 7 to 81 days after


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receiving the shots.


Scott to propose
debit cards for
teachers
TALLAHASSEE Gov.
Rick Scott says he'll pro-
pose giving Florida teach-
ers debit cards to help pay
for classroom supplies so
they won't have to dig into
their own pockets as many
say they now do.
Scott on Tuesday also
said he'll ask lawmakers to
lift limits on the number
of charter schools in an
education proposal he
plans to offer in more
detail on Thursday.
From wire reports


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State Briefs


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


NATION & STATE







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN o www.jcfloridan.com


Voting
From Page 1A
only thing we're saying
is, go vote. Cynthia Slater
testified before the Flori-
da Supreme Court on the
issue of Sunday voting,
very eloquently, and we
want to honor her by do-
ing this on a Sunday. It's a
day that provides a good
opportunity for people
- they can go right after
church, and a lot of people
are so busy during the rest
of the week that it's difficult
to do any other time. We're
hoping that a lot of people
turn out. Almost anybody
can walk one block, and
if you can't, we'll be there
to help. I know of one lady
who is 90 or 91 years old
who's going to roll down
that street in her wheel-
chair and vote. Who she
votes for is up to her, but
the most important thing
is that she's getting out
there to exercise her right
to make that choice."
Early voting is possible
every day from this Sat-
urday through Saturday,
Nov. 3, at three locations
in Jackson County. Elec-
tion headquarters in



Haunted
From Page 1A
the haunted house is
somewhat spooky on its
own; it will be held in the
old, now vacated funeral
home at 25 Madison St.
A team of about 25 vol-
unteers will dress up as
werewolves, vampires,
.ghost pirates, swamp
people skeletons or witch-
es, and there's at least
one mad scientist in the
group. They're setting up a
haunted cemetery behind
the funeral home, where
some of those characters
may be roaming.
Light refreshments
will be available to any-
one who has the stom-
ach for snacks after a
walk through the scary
scene.
The money raised will
be used to help the town
achieve status as a Main
Street community, a dis-
tinction which would
bring the possibility of
financial assistance with
some of the CRP's revi-
talization projects. But to
get in position to do that
and carry out some other
plans, the organization
must first be officially
recognized as 501c3 non-
profit body and take some
other preliminary steps.
The. cost of doing these
things will come to about
$1,000, CRP members es-
timate. If most people in


Marianna, Graceville and you didn't receive one, call
Sneads city halls will be election headquarters at
open for early voting from 482-9652 and one will be
8 a.m. to 6 p.m. every day sent. Voters can also ac-
except this Sunday, when cess the sample ballot at
the hours will be from 10 jacksoncountysoe.org.
a.m. until 6 p.m. There are several local
Bryant said Sunday's offices on the ballot this
walk to election headquar- year, in addition to the
ters is just one avenue be- U.S. presidential and con-
ing used to encourage lo- gressional races and those
cal citizens to vote. Today for the Florida Senate and
at 10 a.m., for instance, House of Representatives.
Bryant is speaking to stu- There are several judicial
dents at Chipola College posts on the ballot as well.
about the importance of Locally, the offices of
voting. Bryant, a former county sheriff and tax col-
Marianna City Commis- lector are on all ballots,
sioner and Mayor, said he and the races for Jackson
expects to tell some per- County Commissioner
sonal stories about the Districts 3 and 5 are on the
power in exercising the ballots prepared for those
right to vote. At the invita- specific districts.
tion of the Chipola College Voters are reminded that
Black Student Union, he'll they must provide a pic-
be in the Social Sciences ture and signature identi-
department, located in fiction when they arrive
building C. to vote.
Voters will have a long The Jackson County Re-
ballot this year it's two publican Party is offering
pages long and has 11 a ride to vote. If you are
amendments to consider, a resident from Jackson
Election officials advise County and need a ride to
voters to go ahead and early vote or vote on elec-
study the amendments tion day, call the Republi-
before they get to the can Headquarters at 526-
polls-a sample ballot was 1929, Monday through
sent to every household Friday from 11 a.m. to 6
with a registered voter. If p.m.


town and the surrounding attempting to refurbish
areas come to the haunt-' one that once belonged to
ed house, the fundraiser. actress Debbie Reynolds.
could go alongwaytoward He wants to bring paddle-
paying that cost and even boat tours to town.
put a few more dollars in .There are a couple of RV
the revitalization fund. parks in or near town, and
CRP member Pam the list of potential tour-
Drummond Medley is a ism sites goes on. The CRP
1970 graduate of Chat- is hoping that its efforts
tahoochee High School, will lead to much more
which has since been ecotourism in the area,
shuttered. She and some and is planning to work
of her fellow grads, along with other communities
with many other people to establish some inland
who graduated before and day trips for tourists al-
after her, make up the core ready in the area visiting
of the CRP. the beaches in this part
Medley said the team of the state, or for people
is focused on preserving who live in the region but
buildings and other physi- may not know about all
cal assets, as well as pro- that Chattahoochee has to
moting awareness of the offer.
many natural resources As the town continues to
in and around town. It work toward Main Street
borders the Apalachicola designation, CRP invited
River and the wilds of Marianna residents Pat
Chattahooch6e have some Crisp and Paul Donofro Jr.
of the rarest plants in Flor- to speak about Marianna's
ida ecosystem. One of the successful effort to do the
most well-respected bota- same several years ago.
nists in the world, Angus Medley said their visit
Gholson, lives in town and was a productive one that
has a park there named gave the group some new
after him. ideas and insights. Work-
The town also borders ing together, Medley said,
Georgia, and claims the will be a key to ensuring a
Booster Club on Lake brighter future for Chatta-
Seminole as its own. Chat- hoochee and other small
tahoochee abuts the Jim, towns in the area.
Woodruff Dam, which She's hoping to see
separates the Apalachic- many familiar faces and
ola River and Lake Semi- some new folks in town
nole. Paddleboat traffic this Thursday, Friday and
was once common along Saturday as the town takes
the banks of the town, and one more step toward that
a business owner is now future.


Court blocksInd. defimding


of Planned Parenthood


The Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS In-
diana stepped between
women and their physi-
cians when it enacted a
law that blocked Medicaid
funds for Planned Parent-
hood just because the or-
ganization provides abor-
tions, a federal appeals
court ruled Tuesday.
The 7th U.S. Circuit
Court of Appeals in Chi-
cago upheld a lower
court's finding that Indi-
ana violated federal regu-
lations when it enacted a
law that denied Planned
Parenthood Medicaid
funds for general health
services including cancer
screenings.
The ruling is the latest
setback in conservative
efforts in several states to
cut off funding for abor-
tion providers that judges
say go too far, intrud-
ing on women's right to
choose their own medical
care.
On Friday, a federal
judge blocked Arizona


,from applying a similar
law to Planned Parent-
hood. Also last week, Tex-
as released new rules for a
state women's health pro-
gram requiring officials to
shut dowti the program
entirely if a court asks
the state to include pro-
viders tied to groups like
Planned Parenthood. The
state broke the program
off from Medicaid fund-
ing after federal officials
determined it violated
women's right to choose
their own doctor.
And earlier this month,
Oklahoma withdrew
federal funding to three
Planned Parenthood clin-
ics in Tulsa that for 18
years has allowed them
to provide food and nu-
tritional counseling to
low-income mothers.
Ken Falk, legal direc-
tor of the American Civil
Liberties Union of Indi-
ana that handled the case,
said that while people of-
ten associate Planned Par-
enthood with abortion, it
also is a critical provider


of non-abortion-related
health services to both
women and men.
"It's all kind of part and
parcel of an attack on
Planned Parenthood gen-
erally," said Betty Cock-
rum, president of Planned
Parenthood of Indiana.
Mallory Quigley, spokes-
woman for the anti-abor-
tion Susan B. Anthony List,
said 14 states have either
enacted or introduced
measures to end taxpayer
funding for abortion pro-
viders over the past two
years.'
Elizabeth Nash, state
issues manager for Gutt-
macher Institute, a pro-
abortion rights nonprofit
whose numbers are
widely respected, said the
defunding laws were part
of a broad attack, not just
on abortion but family
planning.
"In 2011 we saw this just
kind of tidal wave ... the
most number of abortion
restrictions that have ever
become law," Nash said
Tuesday.


S1~~~~~~TkBg ~ i~T~. C.~JIJ~J


4.


. K


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
hristy King, owner of Cowboys & Angels Salon and Boutique,
trims Tracy Taylor's hair Friday morning. The salon, formerly
known as Bella Vita, offers hair styling and coloring as well as
dermabrasion, facials and waxing. King said she is planning to add
tanning and nails to the salon's services. It opened on Oct. 12 and is
located at the corner of Seventh Avenue and Brown Street in Gracev-
ille. Hours are Tuesday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and on
Saturday by appointment. Also located in the salon is Crafty Girls
Boutiques, which sells shirts and accessories.
.


Bears
From Page 1A
Two smaller populations
occur; one north of the
city of Tampa in the Chas-
sahowitzAa National Wild-
life Refuge area and one
in forested private lands
in Highlands and Glades
counties in central Florida.


James & Sikes Funeral
Home Maddox Chapel
4278 Lafayette Street
Marianna, Fl 32446
850.482.2332

Don W.
Livingston.

Don W. Livingston, 70 of
Marianna died Monday
Oct. 22, 2012 at Jackson
Hospital in Marianna.
He was a retired furniture
manufacturing manager at
Lehigh and Higdon Furni-
ture companies.
Preceded in death by two
sons, Bill & Wade Living-
ston
Survivors include his
wife, Jean Livingston;
daughter, Donna Tharpe
and husband Rick; brother,
Randolph Barfield; sisters,
Corene Hill and Ann
Weathers; and seven
grandchildren.
Funeral will be at 10 a.m.
Thursday, October 25, 2012
at Salem Free Will Baptist
Church with Pastor Donnie
Hussey officiating. Inter-
ment will be in the church
cemetery with James &
Sikes Funeral Home Mad-
dox Chapel directing.
The family will receive
friends from 6-8 p.m. ,
Wednesday at James &
Sikes Maddox Chapel.
Expressions of sympathy
may be made online at http
:/ /www.jamesandsikesfune
ralhomes.com/


Follow us on

Twitter

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0;.1







twitter.com/
jcfloridannews


State & :


California surfer
killed in shark attack
VANDENBERG AIR
FORCE BASE, Calif.
A California surfer was
killed Tuesday by a shark
off a beach at coastal Van-
denberg Air Force Base,
authorities said.
The attack was reported
by another surfer about
11 a.m. off the coast of
Surf Beach in Lompoc,
the Santa Barbara County
Sheriff's Department said
in a statement.
The victim "had a friend
who he was surfing with
who saw the shark bite
or hit the man," said
sheriff's Sgt. Mark A. Wil-
liams. "His friend ended
up swimming over and
pulling him from the
water where he received
first ai'd."
The friend started first
aid while another surfer
called for help, but the
male victim was pro-
nounced dead by para-
medics at the scene.
The Air Force said only
that the victim was 38
years old and was not
affiliated with the base,
which allows public
access to some of its
beaches.
The type of shark in-
volved and other details
were under investigation.
Williams said the man's
identity will be released
after his next of kin are
notified.
It was the latest shark
attack fatality at Surf
Beach, about 150 miles
northwest of Los Angeles.
In October 2010, Lucas
Ransom, a 19-year-old
student at the University
of California, Santa Bar-
bara, died when a shark
nearly severed his leg as
he body-boarded.

Fla. set to execute
mass killer after
stay denied
STARKE The U.S. Su-
preme Court has denied
an emergency request for
a stay in the scheduled
execution of a Florida
mass killer who sought
a reprieve because of
mental illness.
The justices rejected
the request Tuesday from
64-year-old John Errol
Ferguson, who has been
on Florida's death row for
34 years. Ferguson's


lawyers contend his men-
tal illness should prevent
his execution.
The execution was
scheduled for Tuesday
evening.
Ferguson was convicted
of killing eight people
in South Florida in the
1970s, including a teen-
age couple, and was a
prime suspect in another
double slaying. Previous
judges have ruled that he
is legally competent to
be executed even though
he suffers from paranoid
schizophrenia.

Mass. firm in
meningitis case:
Officials inspected
BOSTON An at-
torney for a Massachu-
setts company linked
to a deadly meningitis
outbreak says it's "hard to
imagine" state regulators
didn't know the scale of
its operations because it's
worked so closely with
them.
The statement by New
England Compounding
Center attorney Paul Cirel
(sih-REL') came Tuesday
after Gov. Deval (deh-
VAL') Patrick announced
the state has moved to
revoke the company's
operating license.
State officials say they
found unclean condi-
tions at the company and
evidence it was making
drugs for general distri-
bution, a violation of its
license.
Patrick says he's
ordered regulators to
conduct surprise inspec-
tions at similar types of
pharmacies.

Clarification: Oil
Pipeline-Texas Land-
owners story
SUMNER, Texas In
a story Oct. 17, The As-
sociated Press reported
that landowners were
filing lawsuits to fight
TransCanada's land con-
demnations. Attorneys
for some of the landown-
ers say the lawsuits are in
the process of being filed
but are not yet com-
plete. Other landowners
are appealing lawsuits
filed against them by
TransCanada to fight the
company's condemna-
tion of their land.
From wire reports


Jackson County Vault & Monuments

Come Visit us at our NEW LOCATION
3424 West Hig hway 90 (3/10 mile west from our previous location)
......L^ 850-482.5041


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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2012 7Ar


LOCAL, STATE & NATION







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN o www.jcfloridan.com


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE
In this July 26, 2011 photo, Austin Mitchell (left) and Ryan Lehto, work on an oil derrick outside of Williston, N.D. U.S. oil output
is surging so fast that the United States could soon overtake Saudi Arabia as the world's biggest producer. U.S. production of
oil and other liquid hydrocarbons is on track to rise 7 percent in 2012 to an'average of 10.9 million barrels per day. It's the fourth
straight year of crude increases, and this year drillers are on track to post the biggest single year gain since 1951.




US may soon become




world's top oil producer


The Associated Press

NEW YORK U.S. oil
output is surging so fast
that the United States
could soon overtake Saudi
Arabia as the world's big-
gest producer.
Driven by high prices
and new drilling methods,
U.S. production of crude
and other liquid hydro-
carbons is on track to rise
7 percent this year to an
.average of 10.9 million
barrels per day. This will
be the fourth straight year
of crude increases and the
biggest single-year gain
since 1951.
The boom has surprised
even the experts.
"Five years ago, if I or
anyone had predicted to-
day's production growth,
people would have
thought we were crazy,"
says Jim Burkhard, head of
oil markets research at IHS
CERA, an energy consult-
ing firm.
The Energy Department
forecasts that U.S. produc-
tion of crude and other liq-
uid hydrocarbons, which
includes biofuels, will av-
erage 11.4 million barrels


per day next year. That
would be a record for the
U.S. and just below Saudi
Arabia's output of 11.6
million barrels! 1Citibank
forecasts U.S. production
could reach 13 million to
15 million barrels per day
by 2020, helping to make
North America "the new
Middle East."
The last year the U.S.
was the world's largest
producer was 2002, after
the Saudis drastically cut
production because of low
oil prices in the aftermath
of 9/11. Since then, the
Saudis and the Russians
have been the world
leaders.
The United States will
still need to import lots
of oil in the years ahead.
Americans use 18.7 mil-
lion barrels per day. But
thanks to the growth in do-
mestic production and the
improving fuel efficiency
of the nation's cars and
trucks, imports could fall
by half by the end of the
decade.
The increase in produc-
tion hasn't 'translated to
cheaper gasoline at the
pump, and prices are


expected to stay relatively
high for the next few years
because of growing de-
mand for oil in developing
nations and political insta-
bility in the Middle East
and North Africa.
Still, producing more oil
domestically, and import-
ing less, gives the economy
a significant boost.
The companies profiting
range from independent
drillers to large interna-
tional oil companies such
as Royal Dutch Shell, which
increasingly see the U.S. as
one of the most promising
places to drill. ExxonMobil
agreed last month to spend
$1.6 billion to increase its
U.S. oil holdings.
Increased drilling is
driving economic growth
in states such as North
Dakota, Oklahoma, Wyo-
ming, Montana and Texas,
all of which have unem-
ployment rates far below
the national average of 7.8
percent. North Dakota is at
3 percent; Oklahoma, 5.2.
Businesses that serve the
oil industry, such as steel
companies that supply
drilling pipe and railroads
that transport oil, aren't


the only ones benefiting.
Homebuilders, auto deal-
ers and retailers in energy-
producing states are also
getting a lift.
IHS says the oil and gas
drilling boom, which al-
ready supports 1.7 mil-
lion jobs, will lead to the
creation of 1.3 million
jobs across the U.S. econ-
omy by the end of the
decade.
"It's the most important
change to the economy
since the advent of person-
al computers pushed up
productivity in the 1990s,"
says economist Philip Ver-
leger, a visiting fellow at
the Peterson Institute of
International Economics.
The major factor driv-
ing domestic produc-
tion higher is a newfound
ability to squeeze oil out
of rock once thought too
difficult and expensive to
tap. Drillers .have learned
to drill horizontally into
long, thin seams of shale
and other rock that holds
oil, instead of searching for
rare underground pools of
hydrocarbons that have
accumulated over millions
of years.


I'.''.


Wis. shooter's spa
rampage shatters
three families
BROOKFIELD, Wis.
- The owner of the 4
Wisconsin spa where a
gunman killed his wife
and two other women
remembers her employ-
ees as wonderful mothers
who worked hard and
made people happy.
Tami Gemmell told
reporters Tuesday that
her.staffwas heartbro-
ken over the loss of their
colleagues. She says
buildings can be re-
stored, but human loss is
immeasurable.
Gemmell owns Azana
Spa and Salon in the
Milwaukee suburb of
Brookfield.
The estranged hus-
band of 42-year-old Zina
Haughton burst into the
salon Sunday and opened
fire before committing
suicide. Haughton died,
as did 35-year-old Cary L.
Robuck of Racine and 38-
year-old Maelyn M. Lind
of Oconomowoc.
Haughton's husband
had a history of domestic
abuse. Gemmell says she
hopes the attack opens
a serious dialogue about
domestic violence.

Apple reveals iPad
Mini for $329 and up
SAN JOSE, Calif.
- Apple Inc. on Tuesday
revealed a smaller ver-
sion of its hit iPad tablet
computer thatwill start
at $329 and comes with
a screen that's about
two-thirds the size of the
full-size model.
Apple starts taking
orders for the new model
on Friday Oct. 26 and will
ship the Wi-Fi-only mod-
els on Nov. 2, said mar-
keting chief Phil Schiller
at an event in San Jose,
Calif. Later, the company
will add models capable
of accessing "LTE"


wireless data networks.
The iPad mini weighs
0.68 pounds, half as.
much as the full-size
iPad, and is as thin as a
pencil, Schiller said.
The screen resolution
is 1024 by 768 pixels, the
same as the iPad 2 and a
quarter of the resolution
of the third-generation
iPad.
"It's not just a shrunken
down iPad, it's an entirely
new design," Schiller
said.
Company watchers
have for a year been ex-
pecting the company to
release a smaller iPad to
counter cheaper tablets
like Amazon.com Inc.'s
Kindle Fire. However,
most were expecting it to
cost between $250 and
$300. At $329, it's twice
the price of the basic
Kindle, Fire.
In a surprise, Apple also
said it's upgrading its full-
size iPad tablet just six
months after launching a
new model, doubling the
speed of the processor.
Previously, the company
has updated the iPad
once a year.

Report: NM inmate
Steals money
walking out of jail
SANTA FE, N.M.-A
New Mexico inmate on
his way out of jail was
quickly thrown back in
after authorities say he
stole another inmate's
.cash then treated himself
to a hearty lunch.
The Santa Fe County
Sheriff's Office told
KOAT-TV that 20-year-old
Frank Rodriguez-Tapia
swiped $80 in cash while
a guard's back was turned
as Rodriguez-Tapia
was walking out of jail.
The money belonged
to another inmate who
was just coming into the
Santa Fe jail and going
through booking.
From wire reports


Stocks sink as DuPont,



Xerox, 3M scare investors


The Associated Press

NEW YORK Nobody
was expecting this round
of corporate financial
reports to be great. But
underwhelming results
particularly revenue,
which offers a read on
the economy are still
rattling investors.
The Dow Jones industrial
average plunged Tuesday
to its lowest level in nearly
seven weeks. Big-name
companies reported weak
quarterly revenue and low-
ered their forecasts for the
rest of the year.
Since the end of the
Great Recession, investors
have rewarded compa-
nies for increasing profit,
even if revenue growth has
been unimpressive. And
companies have turned in
three years of growing
profit.
But companies can
squeeze profit many ways,
including cost-cutting, and
revenue offers a truer read
on customer demand. That
is on investors' minds as
the world economy lum-
bers along.
And even the profit
streak may be over. Finan-
cial analysts predicted that
profit would fall at S&P
500 companies for July
through September com-
Jpared with the year before,
,.? j+,:.a t.+ -':_,-: *,.+ :,,


which would end a three-
year streak.
On Tuesday, the Dow
sank as much as 262
points, or roughly 2 per-
cent, before ending the
day down 243.36 points to
13,102.53. The decline was
the Dow's third-steepest


this year.
Other indexes also fell
sharply. The Standard
& Poor's 500 index shed
20.71 points to 1,413.11,
and the Nasdaq compos-
ite index lost 26.50 points
to 2,990.46. The Nasdaq
hadn't closed below 3,000


since Aug. 6.
Companies of all stripes
signaled that the economy
is far from healed, and that
demand. is weaker than
a year ago. 4Revenue fell
compared with a year ago
at DuPont, 3M, UPS and
Xerox.


if



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NPF Office until 4 PM. Thursday. November 1" .


"18A WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2012


NATION
















High School football
Friday Cottondale at
Sneads, 7 p.m.; Graceville at
Jay, 7 p.m.; Marianna is off this
week.

Youth football
Marianna Recreation Depart-
ment will offer two tackle foot-
ball leagues and one boys' flag
football league this year. Regis-
tration for youth ages 6-13 will
be held through Nov. 1 from 8
a.m. to 4 p.m. at The Marianna
Educational and Recreational
Expo located at 3625 Caverns
Road in Marianna.
Registration fee for flag foot-
ball is $30 for all participants,
$45 for all participants of
tackle football. The fee must be
paid with a check or money or-
der. No cash will be accepted.
Special registration will be
held at the MERE on Oct. 12
from 4-7 p.m. No one will be
allowed to, register after Nov.
1, and allparticipants must
bring a copy of their birth
certificate.
For more information, or for
anyone that maybe interested
in coaching a team or officiat-
ing youth football, call Mari-
anna Recreation Department
at 482-6228 or.come by during
registration.

Golf tournament
The Chipola College athletics
program will host a golf tour-
nament at Indian Springs Golf
Course on Friday at 12:30 p.m.
Entry and sponsorship dead-
line is today.
Entry fee is $200 per team for
a four person scramble which
covers green fees, cart, lunch,
andithe chance to win door
prizes. Mulligans are $5.
Tournament prizes will be
awarded for: Longest drive,
closest to the pin and hole-
in-one. Two sponsorships are
available. Corporate sponsor
($300) includes entry for one
team and a club house sign.
Hole sponsorships are $50.
All Chipola fans are invited
to show support by playing,
sponsoring a team, purchas-
ing a sponsorship or making
a monetary donation. All pro-
ceeds will benefit the Chipola
Athletic Department.
For more information, call
Terry Allen at 850-849-0462 or
Joc Calloway at 850-718-2451.

Flare5K Run/Walk
The City of Marianna Fire
Department & Covenant Hos-
pice would like to invite you
to join us at the CARE WITH
FLARE 5K Rufi/Walk on Nov.
3. We are very excited-to an-
nounce the addition of a pos-
trace celebration and family
fun day filled with food, drinks,
games, 'inflatables, music and
awards.
Cost is $25, and T-shirts and
race packets will be a first
come first serve basis. -
Registration will start at 7:30
a.m. the day of the event and
the race will begin at 9 a.m.
The student entry fee will be
'$10. There will also be a free
kid's one mile fun run for chil-
dren under the age of 14.
You can register online at
www.eventsatcovenant.com/
carewithflare or www.active.
com. For more information
call Jennifer Griffin or Angela
Jackson at 850-482-8520 or
850-209-8008, or via email
jennifer.griffin@covenanthos-
pice.org or angela.jackson@
covenanthospice.org.
Covenant Hospice is a non-
profit organization dedicated
- to providing comprehensive
compassionate service to
patients and their loved ones
during times of life limiting ill-
nesses, based on need, regard-
less of ability to pay.

Sports Items
Send all sports items to editorial@.
jcfloridan.corm, or fax them to 850-482-
4478. The mailing address for the paper
is Jackson County Floridan P.O. Box 520
Marianna, FL32447.


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Graceville's Kaylee Vaughn pushes the ball over
the net during a district tournament match
against Vernon on Monday night in Altha.


Off week lets

Bulldogs prepare

for Taylor Co..

BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

After winning in their big-
gest game of the season to
date last week in DeFuniak
Springs, the Marianna Bull-
dogs will get another week to


Graceville Voleyball


Lady Tigers eliminated


by Vernon in tourney


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Graceville Lady Tigers had their
season come to an end Monday night
in Altha, falling to Vernon in three sets
in the first round of the District 3-1A
tournament.
Vernon won the match by scores of
25-17, 25-18 and 25-20 to advance to
Tuesday night's semifinal match against
Altha.
With the loss, Graceville's season ended
with an 0-18 record, failing to'win a match
after winning 14 a season ago.
The Lady Tigers only had 13 kills as a
team in Monday's loss, with Caroline


Nichols and Destiny Robinson tying for
the team lead with four each, followed by
Taylor McDaniel's three.
McDaniel led the team in service points
(7) and aces (4), while Caidin Miller add-
ed six service points, and Telisha Nettles
had three aces.
Dominique Robinson also had two
aces.
Miller was tops on the team with 14
digs, with Nettles contributing 12, Nich-
.ols 10, McDaniel eight and KayleeVaughn


seven.
McDaniel
block.


had the team's only

See GRACEVILLE, Page 2B


rest and prepare for their lat-
est big game of the season.
The Bulldogs (7-1) routed
the Walton Braves 42-7 on the
road last week in a game they
needed to win to stay in the
hunt for a playoff berth.'
They next play Taylor
County on Nov. 2 in a game
that serves as a virtual play-
in game for the 4A state
playoffs.
The winner will clinch the
runner-up spot in District 1-
4A behind league champion


East Gadsden; the loser will
be home for the postseason.
But before the Bulldogs get
to that game, they get a rare
moment to exhale. and re-
group after playing games in
nine consecutive weeks going
*back to their preseason clas-
sic against West Florida Tech.
"We've played a lot of ball.
We've been going at since
day one without a break,"
Marianna coach Tim Cokely
said Tuesday. "We haven't re-
ally taken a day off. I'm sure


(the players) are tired of me
by now, but there's a lot of
enthusiasm and excitement
right now because it's going
to be such a fun game against
Taylor County to try to win
and go to the playoffs. Any-
body that coaches or plays
football looks forward to that
opportunity."
Cokely gave his players
Monday off before returning
to the practice field Tuesday.

See REST, Page 2B


--- - - -----------

Graceville Football


Graceville players honored by FACA

SBY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

Four Graceville Tigers
i .football players have been
honored by being named
to the Florida Athletic
S1Coaches Association All
"**' I District 2 football team
Tuesday.
The region of which the
players were picked covers
27 schools in nine different
counties.
.o"Senior Rasheed Camp-
bell was chosen as a utility
.. .player, while fellow seniors
Cameron Graham (defen-
sive lineman) and Kevin
"_"_ ~ Edwards (tight end) were
PHOTOS BY MARKSKINNER/FLORI DAN also picked.
LEFT: Graceville's Rasheed Campbell carries the ball against Liberty County earlier in the season. RIGHT: Jared
Padgett makes a pass for Graceville during a game against Liberty County. See HONORED, Page 2B


OZZIE GUILLEN
Miami Marlins fire
manager. See more
on page 3B.


Coming in tomorrow's edition of the !:' FLORIDAN
H--- AMKRICA'S P LMt I SPORT TI'UBISPU It

ATHLON SPORTS


Exclusive one-on-one interviews with today's top sports superstars? (,hoak,.
Feature stories that cut to the heart of why we love sports? thy' r hotw, too.
Previews of the top events on the sports calendar? Of totnmm


w tt i 'M y i'V, I f il t A Af iflM I ('"O n c 1 1 i i I ly iIl


SRRIMNA FOOTBALL


MHS rests, refocuses


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN


Jock Wooden carries the ball for Marianna at a recent game against East Gadsden.


~~___11~___1 _1


rl-


--


r







-2B WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2012


SPORTS


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Rest
From Page 1B
Taylor County will be
in action this week with
a home game against 5A
Suwannee, but the MHS
coach said that having
an extra week to prepare
for a big game is often
overblown.
"I'm not a real big believ-
er in that necessarily be-
ing an advantage," Cokely
said. "It's more along the
lines of us having a chance
to heal up. For anyone
who is playing football this
time of year, something's
sore. That's just the reality
of playing this game. This
gives us a week to rest and
heal up some bumps and
bruises. Guys have been
fighting through some
things, so us just getting a
chance to heal up is prob-
ably the biggest thing."
The Bulldogs certainly
earned their Monday off
with a dominant win over
the Braves in what has to
be considered Marianna'
most consistent perfor-
mance to date.
"We played well," Cokely
said. "I don't think we're the
best team in the world, but
we're a really good team
when we take care of the
ball on offense and play
sound football on offense
and defense. We also made
some good plays in the.
kicking game, just hung in
there with field position,
and executed pretty well
offensively. When we do
that, we're pretty good."
The performance' was
especially, important for
Marianna after its dis-


Honored
From Page 1B
The only underclass-
man for the Tigers to make
the team was sophomore
Jared Padgett, who plays
both ways for Graceville
but made the team as a
cornerback. ,
Bozeman's Jacob Marti-
nez was tabbed as Player
of the Year in the district,
with Liberty County's Alex
Marlowe the runner-up.
Marlowe's teammate,
quarterback Dustin Wat-
son, also made the team,
as did Holmes County's
Jacky Miles and Ty Russ.
Port St. Joe's Chuck Gan-
non was named Coach of
the Year. -
Graceville coach Mark
Beach said he was ex-
tremely proud of his play-
ers for making the team.
"Obviously it's an honor,"
he said. "It's one of the
things you play for. You
want to be recognized. It's
as big of an honor as an
all state or all county pick.
Obviously, it's coming from
the coaches and our peers.
It's just an honor to even be
mentioned with all those
great athletes in this area."


Graceville
From Page 1B
For the season, the Lady
Tigers were led in kills by
McDaniel's 149, followed
by Nichols' 86.
Nettles finished with the
team lead in service points
with 139, and McDaniel


heartening district debut, a
47-0 home thrashing at the
hands of East Gadsden.
The win over Walton not
only kept the Bulldogs
in play for the playoffs, it
also provided a needed
jolt of energy and confi-
dence heading into the
bye.
"I think it was just a
reward for a lot of hard
work," Cokely said. "Guys
put in a lot of time. There's
no magic potion. No coach
has that. It's just how hard
are you willing to work
and how much time are
you willing to put in to be
successful. As a coach, you
preach that all the time.
When kids can finally say,
'we played pretty well and
made the sacrifice,' that
reward is the life lesson
you want kids to learn.
You only get out of football
what you put into it."
The Bulldogs will try to
put in two good weeks of
practice and preparation
for Taylor County in a game
that couldn't be much big-
ger, though Cokely said
he doesn't think his young
team will be overwhelmed
by the moment.
"I just think this team
is pretty steady," he said.
"They're really excited arid
have a lot of enthusiasm,
but I don't think we'll be
fazed by the fact that the
loser doesn't get to go to
the playoffs. We just need
to pay attention in practice
and do the little things that
matter. I think it will be
a great game and a close
game. In close games, the
little things matter, so you
have to pay attention to
detail."


Beach was effusive in his
praise of all four players.
On Edwards: "Kevin
has been busting his butt
wherever I put him. He's
a blocking tight end and
plays tackle for us as well
and does a heck of,a job.
He plays outside lineback-
er on defense and doesn't
leave the field. He is obvi-
ously deserving and one
of the spokes on the wheel
that makes us go."
On Graham: "Cam-
eron transferred in (from
Bay) last May and fought
through a little adversity
coming here. He didn't
get to play a lot at Bay, but
he has redeemed himself
this year and had a good
attitude."
On Campbell: "He has
762 yards and 30 tackles,
and for his size and what
he brings to the table, he's
one of the best players I've
ever coached."
On Padgett: "He's that
guy that the other coaches
rave about. He has played
quarterback, cornerback,
and running back. He's just
a great athlete."
The Tigers (5-2, 3-0 in
District 2-1A) will play the
Jay Royals on Friday in
Jay.

had the most aces with 39.
In blocks, McDaniel's
54 led the way and Nich-
ols added 31, and Miller
led four Graceville play-
ers over 100 digs with
118.
McDaniel was second
with 110, followed by Net-
tles with 103 and Vaughn
with 101.


NFL Brief


With Jones-Drew
out, Jaguars sign
RB Toston
JACKSONVILLE -With
Maurice Jones-Drew out,
the Jacksonville Jaguars
have signed running back
Keith Toston and waived
rookie defensive end Ryan
Davis.
Toston will back up
Rashad Jennings, who
will start Sunday's game
at Green Bay in place of
Jones-Drew.
Jones-Drew sprained his
left foot in Sunday's loss at
Oakland and could miss


several games.
Toston spent the pre-
season with the Jaguars
before being waived in
final cuts. He ran 22 times
for 171 yards, including
a 42-yard touchdown at
New Orleans.
Toston spent the 2010
season and the 2011
preseason with St.
Louis.
He also was a four-
year letterman at Okla-
homa State, where he
finished with 2,757
yards rushing and 27
touchdowns.
From wire reports


SLOOKINGFOR MORE NEWS? VISIT


' ____WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM


Bullpups take two over Tigers


BY SHELIA MADER
Floridan Correspondent

The Marianna Middle. School
Bullpups basketball season began
2012 on the road with a pair of solid
wins over Graceville Middle School
on Monday.
The 'B' team held the Tigers off
the boards and walked away with a
36-0 shutout victory.
Werlean Pollock got the Bulldogs
off to a strong first period start with
six points, while Mark Sims and Cur-
tis Screen both added two points to
make it a 10-0 lead after one.
In the second period, Stephan
McMillian and Javshawn Jackson
both added a pair of buckets, with
Sims posting two free throws and
MileakWilliams adding a free throw
to give the Bullpups a 17-0 halftime
lead.
Marianna added a pair of layups


in the third period by Trayvon John-
son and Screen and coasted in the
fourth quarter.
Adin Domen nailed two 3-
point shots and added a 2-point
bucket and a free throw to lead
the team with nine points on the
evening.
Tristan Dozier, Terez Armstead,
and McMillian all added two points
to secure the 'B' team victory.
In A' team action, the Bullpups
jumped out to a 21-4 first quarter
lead behind the scoring of Deontre
Rhynes, who posted nine of his 15
points in the first period.
Olajuwan Brown added six points,
while Jokquer Orange put up four
and Jaeden Harley two points.
Eric Watford had a shot from
downtown for Graceville, with
Devonte O'Neal adding a free
throw.
Brown had two 3-point shots in


the second period and a two, while
Deontreal Pittman and Rhynes
each added a 2-point shot to make
it a 34-11 halftime edge.
Graceville's points came from a 3-
point shot by Berrarius Pender and
lay-ups from O'Neal and Jonferris
Smith.
Marianna took the court follow-
ing the halftime break with offense
on their minds, putting up 15 third
quarter points.
Orange had seven points, while
Rhynes added four. Jabari Kirkland
and Anton Williams both added
two points.
Pender had a layup for Graceville,
with Smith and Deonte Swain both
putting up a free throw.
In the final quarter, Kirkland
scored all four of Marianna's points,
while Watford led the Tigers with
three 3-pointers and Smith and
Swain each added two.


Rested offbye, Dolphins look toward Jets


The Associated Press

DAVIE Just about every mem-
ber of the Miami Dolphins had a
different bye-week itinerary.
Richie Incognito went to the
beach and did little else. Brian Har-
tline watched Ohio State. Paul So-
liai walked in a 5-kilometer race for
breast cancer awareness and tried
to avoid even thinking about foot-
ball. Lamar Miller tailgated at the
Miami-Florida State game. Cam-
eron Wake attempted, somewhat
unsuccessfully, to ignore his alarm
clock.
"Then you start getting that itch,"
Wake said.
And there's nothing like a match-
up with the New York Jets to snap
the Dolphing out of vacation mode.
Three days off was enough for
the Dolphins, who returned to
work on Monday officially medio-
cre in terms of record yet with the
knowledge that if the season was
now complete, they would be in the
AFC playoffs. Granted, there's still
a ton of football left to play, but for
a team that didn't exactly deal with
the highest of preseason expecta-
tions, there's reason for moods to
be pleasant these days.
"One thing 1 said to the team to-
day, part one of the statement was,
'Progress has been made. There's no
doubt about it,'" Dolphins coach


r:~:;: i s-


I Ht ASSUUAIA L RU tl S
Miami Dolphins head coach Joe Philbin looks up during the first half of a game
against the St. Louis Rams on Oct. 14 in Miami.


Joe Philbin said. "Part two of the
statement was, 'There's a heck of a
lot of work still left to be done.' I see
us playing better football than we
were earlier in the season, no ques-
tion. But we're still not where we
need to be."
The Dolphins (3-3) visit the Jets
T3-4) on Sunday.
"Looking forward to going to their
stadium and being a different team
than we were three or four weeks
ago," Hartline said.
Of the 16 teams in the AFC, nine
are either 3-3 or 3-4 New Eng-
land, at a surprising-for-the-Pa-


triots 4-3, not only leads the AFC
East but has the third-best record in
the conference. One win can help
a team escape the pack right now,
one loss can send a team spiraling
toward the bottom of the pack, and
division games seem even more
important than usual with so many
teams off to similar starts.
"We can't predict what's going to
happen later on down the road,"
Soliai said. "We've just got to focus
on this game."
That doesn't figure to be a prob-
lem especially with it being Jets
Week.


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Well-rested Tigers take on well-tested Giants


The Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO Jim Ley-
land and the Detroit Tigers found
out the hard way that rest means
rust in the World Series.
Six years ago, their last Se-
ries appearance, they lounged
around for nearly a week before
getting wiped out by St. Louis.
This time, while once again
waiting for the National League
opponent to be decided, they
stayed busy by working on
bunts, playing
against their
instructional
league team
and letting
@ace Justin Ver-
lander throw to
hitters.
"Well, we just
TIGERS tried to come
AT GIANTS up with some-
World Series thing," Ley-
Game 1 land said Tues-
TV: 7:30 p.m., Fox. day. "It wasn't
like in 2006,
where some people would indi-
cate we sat around happy to get
there, not doing anything, eating
bon-bons."
"That wasn't the case. We ran
into bad weather problems in
Detroit, so we were really handi-
capped," the manager said. "So
this time we've done some things
to try to keep us from being idle
for four or five days. I definitely
think it affected the last World
Series."
Verlander will start Game 1 on
tonight against Barry Zito and
the San Francisco Giants, fresh
off another stirring comeback
and a Game 7 win Monday night
over the Cardinals.
"I feel like I haven't played
in over two months, when you
clinch so quick like this and have
to wait for the other team," Tigers


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Detroit's Miguel Cabrera answers reporters' questions before a workout
ahead of the World Series on Tuesday in San Francisco. The Tigers play the
San Francisco Giants in Game tonight.


reliever Jose Valverde said.
Not quite that long.
"What is it, eight months of
baseball? What's five days?" Ti-
gers star Prince Fielder asked.
Said Zito: I guess we can hy-
pothesize for a while on how pre-
pared they are, being that they
haven't played these high-inten-
sity games."
The Tigers made it easy on
themselves, sweeping the Yan-
kees in the AL championship
series. They traveled to San Fran-
cisco on Tuesday and held a late-
afternoon workout at AT&T Park.
"I loved it because it means
we're in the World Series," Tigers
catcher Alex Avila said.
"Someone asked me that ques-
tion after we won and I was like,
'Would you rather if we had lost
some of those games?' It doesn't
really matter to me. We did every-
thing we could to stay mentally
sharp."
The Giants had no trouble in
that department. They've been
on quite a wild ride this October,
first overcoming an 2-0 deficit to


beat Cincinnati in the best-of-
five division series, then escap-
ing a 3-1 hole to beat the defend-
ing champion Cardinals in the
NLCS.
"You have to throw it all away
because it could work in either
team's favor," Giants shortstop
Brandon Crawford said. "We've
been playing every day, so guys
might be a little more tired,
whereas they've got more rest.
Then again, we've been playing,
so we've got our timing, where
they might not."
And this little fact: Three times
in the past, the World Series has
matched a team that went to
Game 7 in the LCS against a club
that swept its series. In all three
instances, the team coming off
a Game 7 win breezed to the
championship.
Boston swept Colorado in 2007,
St. Louis chased Detroit in five
games in 2006 and Orel Hershiser
and the Dodgers beat Oakland in
five games in 1988.
"We're fine. I think we're in the
groove and feeling good," Giants


ace Matt Cain said.
Triple Crown winner Miguel
Cabrera has gone both routes in
early rounds.
The Tigers slugger was a rookie
with the Marlins in 2003 when
they rallied past the Chicago Cubs
to win the seven-game NLCS and
went on to beat the Yankees for
the title.
This time, the Tigers gave them-
selves five off days.
"It's very different. In '03 we
came from behind like San Fran-
cisco did this year," he said. "We
have to focus on what we can do.
We can't focus on, 'OK we haven't
played, we're going to get down.'
It's tough. We have to be ready to
play tomorrow and we'll see what
happens."
Leyland and Giants manager
Bruce Bochy both hoped to be a
quick study. There's not a lot of
history between these longtime
franchises they've never met in
the postseason, and have played
only 12 times since interleague
action began in 1997.
"I don't really know the Giants
that well. I'm kind of getting a
crash course on them," Leyland
said.
"But to be honest, when they
were down 0-2 going into Cincin-
nati having to win three games,
for me that was unbelievable. So
nothing surprised me when they
got to the championship series
after I saw what they did in the
divisional series," he said.
Likewise for Bochy.
"I'll have to learn a lot about
them real soon, to be honest," he
said Monday night.
"I know what a great club they
are. And we know all about the
guy we're going to be facing
opening day and their whole
staff," he said. "They swept the
Yankees. That tells you how good
they are."


"I loved it because it means we're in the World Series. Someone asked me that question

after we won and I was like, 'Would you rather if we had lost some of those games?'It

doesn't really matter to me. We did everything we could to stay mentally sharp."

Tigers catcher Alex Avila,
On having extra time to prepare for the World Series after sweeping the N.Y. Yankees


WEDNESDAY MORNING / AFTERNOON C Comcast C/R Comcast Rebuild D Dish DTV DirecTV


Guillen fired
as Marlins manager
MIAMI Ozzie Guillen
was fired Tuesday after
one year as manager of the
last-place Miami Marlins,
whose promising season
began to derail in April
when his laudatory com-
ments about Fidel Castro
caused a
backlash.
Miami's
next man-
ager will
be the fifth
for owner
Jeffrey Guillen
Loria since
early 2010. Two managers
he fired made the playoffs
this year. The Marlins still
owe Guillen $7.5 million
for the three years remain-
ing on his contract.
"After careful consider-
ation following the disap-
pointment of the 2012
season, we decided to dis-
miss Ozzie," president of
baseball operations Larry
Beinfest said in a state-
ment. "Our managerial
search begins immediately
and our hope is that a new
manager, along with roster
improvements, will restore
a winning culture."
The franchise was sup-
posedly transformed by an
offseason spending spree
and the move into a new
ballpark, and the Marlins
expected to contend for a
playoff berth. But a dismal
June took the Marlins out
of contention for good,
and management disman-
tled the roster in July.
The season went sour
from the start. Guillen's
comments praising Castro
in a magazine interview
angered Cuban Ameri-
cans, who make up a large
segment of the Marlins'
fan base. The Venezuelan
manager apologized re-
peatedly at a news confer-
ence for his remarks about
the former Cuban leader.
From wire reports ,


OCTOBER 24, 2012


S 4
7 7
lq tn


ood Morning Show (N) CBS This Morning John Grisham James Dyson. Griffith Milioaire Lets Make a Deal (N) The Price Is Right (N) News Young & Restless old The Talk (N) (CC) The Ricki Lake Show DrOz
NTVY News 4-ThisMorning (N) (CC) CBS This Morning John Gnsham; James Dyson. Live! Kelly and Michael The Price Is Right (N) Young & Restless Live at Bold The Talk (N) (CC) Let's Make a Deal (N) R. Ray
MewsChannel 7 Today (N) (CC) Today Nicole Polizzi and Jionn LaValle. (N) (CC) Days of our Lives (N) Newschannel 7at oon Rachael Ray (N) (CC) Steve Harvey (N) (CC) Doctors
ws 13 This Morino(NI Good Morning America (N) (CC) Livel Kelly and Michael The View (N) (CC) WMBB Midday News The Chew (N) (CC) General Hospital (N) Katie (N) (CC) Dr. Phil (N)


SFOX 10 10 28 28 PaidProg. Outdoor Auto Tech Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Aqua Kids America Judge B. Judge Mathis (N) (CC) The People's Court (N) Anderson Live (N) A New Life Church Th' Jeff Probst Show The Ricki Lake Show Peo. Court
1 PBS 11 11 Clifford Wild Kratts Arthur Martha Curious Cat in the Super Why! Dinosaur Sesame Street (N) Tiger Sid WordWorld Barney Calliou Tiger Super Why! Dinosaur Cat in the Curious Arthur
A&E 30 30 118 265 Humana Shark Vac Dog Dog Dog the Bounty Hunter Criminal Minds (CC) Criminal Minds (CC) CSI: Miami (OC) CSI: Miami "F-T-F Criminal Minds (CC) Criminal Minds (CC) The First 48 (CC) First 48
AMC 33 33 130 254 Superfood Hang Ups Nopalea My Pillow WEN Hair Humana Comic Men The Dark Half** (1993, Horror) Timothy Hutton.'R' (CC) Z PetSematary** (1989) Dale Midkiff. 'R'(CC) V PetSematary Two ** (1992) Edward Furlong. V Hallown
BET 35 35 124 329 BET Inspiration Paid Prog. Sleep! The Game Chris, Chris IMyWife MyWife jamie Foxx Jame Foxx Parkers Parkers 1V Meet the Browns** (2008) Tyler Perry. 'PG-13'(CC) IMyWife Jamle Foxx
CNN 45 45 200 202 EarlyStart Starting Point (N) CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) Situation
CNN2 43 43 202 204 Morning Express With Robin Meade News Now Making t
CSS 20 20 Miracle PaldProg. Mayhem In the A.M. (N) (ive) SEC Inside N.D. Ladder Pillow PaidProg. racle Sports Radio College Football Auburn at Vanderilt. Football College Football
CW 6 6 8 8 Better (N) (CC) The Daily Buzz (CC) Payne Payne The Steve Wllkos Show The Jeremy Kyle Show Wendy Williams Show TBA Tummy WEN Hair IMemory The Steve Wilkos Show Bill C.
DISC 24 24 182 278 Loss CrefloDoll Zumba Fit J. Roblson J. Meyer Cindy C The FBI Files (CC) The FBI Files (CC) The New Detectives The New Detectives Impaledl (CC) U.S. Drug Wars (CC) U.S. Drug Wars (CC) Drug Wars
DISN 21 21 172 290 Gaspard & Octonauts Little Chugging Mickey Never Land Mickey Mckey DocMcSt. Never Land Mickey Octonauts mickey Little Agent Oso Gaspard& Phneas IShakelt Shaket Shake It Wizards
ESPN 19 19 140 206 SportsCenter (CC) SportsCenter (CC) SportsCenter (CC) SportsCenter (N) (CC) SportsCenter (N) (CC) SportsCenter (N) (CC) SportsCenter (N) (CC) SportsCenter (N) (CC) SportsCenter (N) (CC) Outside Football NFL Live
ESPN2 18 18 144 209 Mike and Mike in the Morning (N) (Live) (CC) First Take (N) (Live) (CC) First Take (CC) Best/NFL NFL Films NASCAR First Take Numbers
FAM 28 28 180 311 J. Meyer Amazing Boy/World Boy/World Boy/World Boy/World Boy/World 700 Club The 700 Club (N) (CC) Gilmore Girls (CC) WhatLike What I Like 8, Rules 8 Rules 70s Show 70s Show '70s Show '70s Show. Reba (CC)
HALL 46 46 185 312 Love Lucy Love Lucy Love Lucy Love Lucy Gold Girls Gold Girls Marie "Fran Drescher" Home & Family (N) (CC) Marle "Abby Lee Miller' Frasler iFrasler Frasier Frasler Gold Girls Gold Girls Family
HBO 301 301 300 501 V It Takes Two* (1995)'PG'(CC) Eagle Weight Nation The Weight of the Nation (CC) Weight Nation The Weight of the Nation (CC) The Girt(2012) Toby Jones. (CC) Conchords Pure Country 2: The Gift (2010)
HGTV 49 49 112 229 Ninja ever Get t Sold Hidden Cash, Carl Junk Color Sp. High Low Love It or Listt (CC) Love It or List t (CC) Hunters HuntlInt Hunters Huners Hunters Hunters House Hunters Reno Hunters
HIST 81 120 269 Humana Paid Prog. Modern Marvels (CC) Restoration Restoration Restoration Restoration Restoration Restoration Restoration Restoration Restoration Restoration Restoration Restoration Restoration Restoration Restoration Restoration Restoration
LIFE 29 29 108 252 Nopalea Paid Prog. The SUZANNE Show Will/Grace Will/Grace Frasler Frasler Frasler Frasler Chris Chris Chris Chris V, The Secret Life of Bees ** (2008) Queen Latifah. 'PG-13' V. Disappearing Acts
MAX 320 320 310 515 Ordi t. Waking Ned Devine*** (1998) I. The Art of Getting By (2011) SV The Running Man** (1987) 'R' (CC) V. Gulliver's Travels (2010)'PG' IS Phantasmll** (1988) R'(CC) V. Love& Other Drugs** (2010) 'R'(CC)
NICK 14 14 170 2)9 Full House Full House Fanboy SpongeBob SpongeBob Bubble Max, Ruby Dora... Dora... Umizoomi Bubble Bubble Max, Ruby Max, Ruby Dora... Go, Diego SpongeBob SpongaBob Parents Parents Parents
SHOW 340 340 318 545 TheExtraMan ** V Smoke** (1995) William Hud.'R'(CC) V. My Own Country (1998) NaveenAndrews 'R' V. Lebanon, Pa.(2010) 'PG-13'(CC) |L Rodnie&Julle** (1997)Teri Garr.'PG'(CC) )V The Tempest** (2010) HelenMirren.'PG-13'
SPEED 99 62 150 607 Paid Prog. Tool Talk NASCAR Race Hub Dumbest Dumbest Hard Parts Hard Parts My Ride My Ride Hair Rest. Tommie NASCAR Sprint Cu Replay (N) Monster Jam On Edge
SPIKE 47 47 168 241 Cindy G Loss Tommie P90XI insanity! Paid Prog. CSI: NY (CC) CSI: NY (CC) CSI: NY (CC) Bar Rescue Bar Rescue Bar Rescue Bar Rescue Rescue
SYFY 32 32 122 244 Humana Shark Vac Cook Safe Quit-Job Paranormal Witness Paranormal Witness Paranormal Witness Paranormal Witness Paranormall Witness Paranormal Witness Paranormal Witness Para. Wit.
TBS 16 16 139 247 Married Married Earl Home Imp. Home Imp. Jim Jim There Yet? Browns Payne Prince Prince Prince Amer. Dad Amer. Dad Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond Selnfeld Friends
TLC 98 98 183 280 Stuffocating (CC) Baby's Multiples Baby Story Baby Sto BabBaby St Baby Story Addiction Addicton Say Yes Say Yes What Not to Wear Baby Story Baby Story T6ddlers & Tiaras What Not to Wear Say Yes


23 23 138 245 SmallvilleSpaceship.


31 31 176 296 Looney Regular


Harmed (CC)
Ben 10 Beyblade


-harmed (CC) Supernatural (CC)
"okemon NinjaGo Johnny T Dog


TVLND 22 22 106 304 Octspiing Defrosting PaidProg. SuperFood Murder, She Wrote


Leave ILeave


Your Weather Today With Abrams and Bettes (CC)
(2006) Robin Williams. 'PG-13' (CC) IS License to Wed (2007) 'PG-13'


Supernatural (CC)
I Dear Dracu/a (2012)


Van Dyl


Casper's Almost


1 0--------- 1.
Tom & Jerry
Loosay Tanan grim Loonay Annoying


ke Van Dyke Love Lucy Love Lucy Griffith Gunsmoke "Slocum" (CC) Gunsmoke "OQuillian" Bonanza (CC) Bonanza
rwskaeTitFt oatGadAak ete


Wake Up With Al (CC)


3ay Planner (CC)


. Nutty Professor II: The Klumps ** (2000) (CC) NCIS "Ravenous" (CC) NCIS "Bai" (CC)


NIi ice C) mbUno ai


WEDNESDAY EVENING / LATE NIGHT C Comcast C/R Comcast Rebuild D Dish DTV DirecTV OCTOBER 24, 2012

. CBS 2 2 Dr Oz News News News CBS News Wheel Jeopardyl Survivor: Philippines (N) Criminal Minds (N) CSt: Crime Scene News Late Show Letterman Late Late Show/Craig Extra (N) Up to the Minute (N)
ScCBS 3 3 4 R. Ray Ellen DeGeneres Show News CBS NeNewNews Wheel Survivor: Philippines (N) Crminal Minds (N) CSI: Crime Scene News Late Show Letterman Late Late Show/Craig Inside Ed. Up to the Minute (N)
o NBC 5 5 7 7 Doctors Millionaire Jeopardy! News NBC NNews News Wheel League of Women Voters Candidate Forum Chicago Fire (N) News Tonight Show w/Leno Jimmy Fallon Daly Today (CC)
(l ABC 8 8 13 13 Dr. Phil (N) The Dr. Oz Show(N) News ABC News News Ent The Middle Neighbors Mod Fam Suburg. Nashville (N) News Nightline Jimmy Kimmel Live (N) Jim Excused The Dr. Oz Show (CC)
gE FOX 10 10 28 28 Peo. Court J dgJudy Jdg Judy ThisMinute ThisMinute Big Bang Z- 2012 World Series Game 1 -- Detroit Tigers at TBA. (N) (CC) (Live) News View America Two Men Two Men 30 Rock friends Friends How I Met Big Bang
0 PBS 11 11 WordGirl W1 d Kratts Electric Martha PBS NewsHour(N) Dlimension Nature (N) NOVA (CC) (DVS) Nova scienceNOW (N) Charlie Rose (N) (CC) T. Smiley T. Smiley Nature (CC) (DVS) NOVA (CC) (DVS)
A&E 30 30 118 265 First 48 The First 48 (CC) Storage Storage Storage Storage Stuck. orage Duck D. Duck D. DuckD. Duck D. Storage Storage DuckD. Storage DuckD. uckD.
AMC 33 33 130 254 V. Halloween 5: Revenge... V. Halloween: Resurrection (2002) 'R' (CC) V. Halloween 4: The Return of Michael Myers ** V Halloween **** (1978) Donald Pleasence. 'R' `S Halloween 4: The Return of Michael Myers S* V Graveyard Shift *
BET 35 35 124 329 Jamie Foxx Parkers Parkers 10 & Park: BET's Top 10 Live (N) (CC) The Game V MchaelJackson 'sThiss It *** (2009) Michael Jackson. Sleepi TheGame WendyWilliams Show V. Doing Hard Time (2004) Boris Kodjoe. R' (CC)
CNN 45 45 200 202 The Situation Room (N) Erin Burnet OutFront Anderson Cooper360 Piers Morgan Toight Anderson Cooper360 Erin Burnett OutFront Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 Erin Burnett OutFront
CNN2 43 43 202 204 Making It Evening Express Jane Velez-Mitchell (N) Nancy Grace (N) Dr. Drew on Call (N) Nancy Grace Showbiz Tonight Dr. Drew on Call Nancy Grace Showbiz Tonight
CSS 20 20 # College Football Georgia at Kentucky. Dawg Talkln'SEC Football (N) To Be Announced College Football Paid Prog. Paid Prog. PaldPog- Paid rog Paid Pao d Prog.
CW 6 6 8 8 Bill C. There Yet? There Yet? King King Rules Rules Arrow "Lone Gunmen" Supernatural "Bitten" Seinfeld Seneld TII Death 'TII Death '70s Show '70s Show Browns Browns Cops(CC) TBA
DISC 24 24 182 278 Drug Wars Sons of Guns (CC) Sons of Guns (CC) Sons of Guns (CC) Sons of Guns (CC) Sons of Guns (N) (CC) Milltia Rising (N) (CC) Sons of Guns (CC) Militia Rising (CC) Sons of Guns (CC) Almost, Away
DISN 21 21 172 290 Wizards Wizards Wizards Phineas Good Luck Jessie Shake it Gravity Wizards of WaverlyPlace Phneas Phineas ANT Farm Vampire Wizards Wizards Sute/Deck Suite/Deck Good LuckGoodLuck
ESPN 19 19 140 206 NFL Live Around Interruption SportsCenter (N) (CC) All-Access Best/NFL ) WNBA Basketball Indiana Fever at Minnesota Lynx. (N) (CC) All-Access SportsCenter (N) (CC) SportsCenter (N) (CC) SportsCenter (N) (CC) SportsCenter (N) (CC)
ESPN2 18 18 144 209 Le Batard SportsNation (N) (CC) NFL32 (N) (Live) (CC) Baseball Tonight (N) NBA Studio Specials 30 for30 (N) E:60 All-Access Baseball Tonight (N) NFL Live (N) (CC) All-Access Toker
FAM 28 28 180 311 Reba (CC) V. HocusPocus ** (1993) Bette Midler PG Scooby-Doo ** (2002) Freddie Pnnze Jr.'PG' V Scooby-Doo2: Monsters Unleashed ** (2004)The700 Club (CC) Prince Prince insanity[ Paid rog. Paid Prog. insanity
HALL 46 46 185 312 Home & Family (CC) Little House on Prairie Little House on Prairie Little House on Prairie Little House on Prairie Frasier Frasler Frasler Fraser Gold Girls Gold Girls Gold Girls Gold Girls Cheers Cheers
HBO 301 301 300 501 Pure Diary of Wimpy-Rodrick Ethel ** (2012) CC) Docume TeGntary)r2012) Toby Jones. (CC) Boardwalk Empire Real Time/Bill Maher Treme (CC) Real Sex V .Pulp F/ctlon *** (994)'R'(CC)
HGTV 49 49 112 229 Hunters House Hunters Reno House Hunters Reno House Hunters Reno Property Brothers (CC) Buying and Selling (N) Hunters Hunt Intl Property Brothers (CC) Buying and Selling Hunters Hunt Intl Property Brothers (CC)
HIST 81 120 o269 Restoration Restoration Restoration RestorationxRestoration RestoraionReorion storationRestoration Restoration |Restoration Cajn CPwn unwn An merican Pickers (CC) Restoraton Restoraton Restoration Restoration .Cajun Pwn Cajun Pwn
LIFE 29 29 108 252 V. Disappearing Acts ** (2000) R' V Steel Magnolias (2012)ueen Latifah. (CC) Houstons Remember Houstons Houstons My'Life, Movie Ho s ustons too Houstons Remember Houstons eHoustons Myy Life, Movie
MAX 320 .320 310 515 In Time (2011) 'PG13' (CC) V An American Werewolf ln Paris (1997) 'R' Hunted "Mor" (CC) Anchorman: Legend of Ron V Underworld ** (2003) Kate Beckinsale. R Emmanuelle Through Time Depravity }V Hart
NICK 14 14 170 299 SpongeSBob SpongeBov SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob Figure t Drake/Josh Full House Full House Full House Full House The Nanny The Nanny Friends Friends Friends Friends George George Lopez CC) George
SHOW 340 340 318 545 V Down and Out in Beverly Hills*** (1986)' V.TannerHall** (2009) R'(CC) Homeland (CC) Insidethe NFL (N) NASCAR Comedy Inside the NFL (CC) exerRun (CC) ASCAR Trade ** 2007) Kevin Kline R
SPEED 99 62 150 607 Garage Chop Cut Gearz NASCAR Race Hub (N) PassTime PassTime Pnks All Out 101 Cars 101 Cars Barrett-Jackson Spec. Pinks AII Out 101 Cars 101 Cars BarrettJackson Spec. Unique Whips
SPIKE 47 47 168 241 Rescue Bar Rescue Bar Rescue Bar Rescue Bar Rescue Bar Rescue Bar Rescue Bar Rescue Bar Rescue Repo Repo Repo Repo
SYFY 32 32 122 244 ara. Wit. Paranormal Witness Paranormal Witness aranormal Witness Ghost Hunters (CC) Ghost Hunters (N) (CC) Paranormal WtnessThe Tenans" Ghost Hunters (CC) Paranormal Witness "The Tenants" V. House of Bones
TBS 16 16 139 247 Friends Fr friends |Fr King iKngK Seinfeld Seinfeld F am G Family Guy Family Guy Big Bang Big Bang Conan (N) (CC) The Office The Office Conan(CC) Earl Earl
TLC 98 98 183 280 Say Yes Four Weddings (CC) Medium Medium LExtreme Extrme Hoarding: Buried Alive Half-Ton Killer (CC) Addicted Jason" (N) Half-Ton Killer (CC) Addicted"Jason"' Hoarding: Buried Alive Extreme Extreme
TNT 23 23 138 245"/ PGA Tour Golf Grand Sam Golfl, Day Two. (N Same-day Tape) (CC) Castle (CC) Castle (CC) Castle "Fool Me Once" Perception 'Cipher Southland Identity' Cold Case (CC) Dallas(CC)
TOON 31 31 176 296 Adventure Dragons Reguar Regular Gumball Adventure NinjaGo Dragons Johnny T King of Hill King of Hill Amer. Dad Amer Dad FamilyGuy Family Guy Chicken Moral Orel Squidbillies Amer. Dad Amer. Dad Family Guy
TVLND 22 22 106 304 Bonanza Bonanza (CC) MAoSH MRASH MAS'H Cosby Cosby Cosby Raymond Raymond Cleveland The Exes King King King King 70 Show '70s Show Roseanne Roseanne
TWC 25 25 214 362 Weather Storms IStorms Full ForceF Full Force 'Weather Center Live Coast Guard Florida Coast Guard Florida (N) Weather Center Live Coast Guard Florida Coast Guard Florida Weather Center Live Impact TV Impact TV
USA 26 26 105 -242 NCIS (CC) NCIS Hiatus (CC) NCIS Hialus NCIS Shalom -C)" NCIS Siakeout(CC) NCIS Dog Tags (CC) INCIS Interal Affairs" Covert Affairs NCIS "Ravenous" (CC) House 5 to 9 (CC) House Private Lives


0 CBS
OCBS
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n ABC


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WC 125 25 214 362 Wake Up With Al (N)


26 26 105 242 1 Man of the Year**


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Twist Fate TwlstFate Coast Guard Alaska


S ICN
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S ICN Untouchable







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


PEANUTS BY CHARLES SCHULTZ
HEY, CHUCK, 60 ASK YOUR
DOG WHAT HAPPENED WITH
THE MESSAGE HE DELIVEREP FOR ME _




A I I I-. *



BORN LOSER BY ART AND CHIP SANSOM
A POLICE OFFICER COITEINE OU GOT A TICKET FOR
FO RECKLE5 OPE-KTION | RECKLESS tR.tMfG7
-e OFA\/VER.\CLE.i \


BIG NATE BY LINCOLN PIERCE
WOw/. yDOE5N'T ,EALLYU. y
THESE MATTER.CHAD ALLY P JNXES
GUYS JINXED US, --TRUMP EVERY-
LOOK SO ,WE'RE THING. 'THEY
AWFUL. IN BIG .TRUMP CHARMS,
.. TROUBLE SPELLS, OMENS,
CURSES... You
NAME IT.


-^ L_






O-FOR. R.CCKLSS Pi.Il.
No-FOR RECKVLE55 P~ARK. >


SOUP TO NUTZ BY RICK STROMOSKI
MR GeoRc. Love is Lt e. a caT. No /
MaT-treR ow HaRD -'ou -M
( eu- Ge LsITo eT tT ocMe To me O,

PTSTaRs aa


GRIZZWELLS BY BILL SCHORR
WT YoU SK Yolk M A


T- -



,,,,.,. !~ H 'lTR Sl8X 'W Ct HS


MONTY BY JIM MEDDICK

v0 so As wrSMA

_IWy l. aow U rV MM IovRt






COW L RV RY MADK I FIKNFS


HERMAN BY JIM UNGER


ACROSS
1 Weird-
sounding
bird
5 747, for one
8 Change
12 Golden
Fleece ship
13Turkish
title
14 Oscar's
cousin
15 The red
planet
16 Ripples
18 Ogled
20 Skating
leap
21 Awful
22 Loud noise
23 Rani's
husband
26 Very strong
29 Gangster
30 Capsule,
maybe
31 de
cologne
33 Untold
centuries
34Flour
holders
35 Earl
Biggers
36 Gave a
holler
38 Olympics
prize
39 hree
strikes


40 Fizzy drink
41 Comic
strip dog
43 Noisy
insect
46 Toll booth
locale
(2 wds.)
48 Bankrupt
50 Actress
Russo
51 Female
antelope
52 Hooray for
me! (hyph.)
53 Amtrak
driver,
briefly
54 Finale
55 Marble
block

DOWN
1 Go on
the -
2 Kind of
hygiene
3 Monstrous
giant
4 Oats holder
(2 wds.)
5 Yakked
6 Victorian
oath
7 Hebrew T
8 Radio
sound
9 Aid and -
10Cracker
brand


Answer to Previous Puzzle
T E ;IIS G0A T
TEA KIMS GOAT
ALA OMAR EDGE
MAHARAJA NOON
ENSUE BER GS
GAP DAS
CODE YVES HAT
U SER LON ORO
EL F OCT VEIN
DOT KN EE ODDS
M IFS DEW
BROWN AERI T
ISLE STERLING
AVER ARAT DIG
SPOT MYTH STY


11 Of course!
17 Bring
cheer'
19 Fan's yell
22 Head
honcho
23 Country
addr.
24 Popeye's
greeting
25 Popular
wedding
month
26 Tadpole's
home
27 Require
28 Fictional
plantation
30 Cut calories
32 Website
address


34 More
downcast
35 Leaves
37 Hang
around
38 Comfy
shoe
40- up
(spoke)
41 Draft
animals
42 Fender nick
43 Slangy
summons
44Two-way
45Nonsoap
opera
46 Before now
47 Sugary
drink
49 Collar


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


10-24 @2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
"VPLWY YKTZVKYN NELWU THOF YT

YKL YKTZVKYSZO JXHC, DZY VPLWY

WRYXTHN NELWU YT WOO J.WH'UXHC."
YKLTC'TPL PTTNLALOY


Previous Solution: "Los Angeles is a microcosm of the United States. If LA
falls, the country falls." Ice T
TODAY'S CLUE: d slenba 3
2012 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 10-24.


Dear Annie: I've been out of work for
two years. My family has suffered greatly,
and my daughter's mild depression
turned severe when this started affecting
her life.
Recently, my in-laws were kind enough
to let the three of us moved in so we could
save what little we have. But .the sum-
mer could not have gone worse. My
mother-in-law has turned into a bully.
She doesn't approve of how I raise my
daughter and has been taking it out on
the child. Mom calls her hurtful names
and has told her that all of our financial
problems are her fault. My husband has
spoken to his mother numerous times,
and I have, as well. But she is stubborn.
My daughter has a history of self-harm
and low self-esteem, so we began to
work on alternate living situations. Sadly,
I know the best place for my daughter
right now is not with her stepfather and
me. I've been the one to support her and



Bridge is a game of winners and losers. A
once the final contract is chosen, each side
how many winners it needs to avoid being
In today's deal, how should South try to t
winners in four spades doubled after West
the diamond queen to declarer's ace.?
The bidding was interesting. East was rig
open one heart although his hand contain
11 high-card points. The two five-card suit
considerable value. West's two-spade cue-1
showed heart support and game-invitatior
better values. North's three-heart cue-bid w
the same ilk, inviting game in spades. Now
rebid four clubs, in case his side had a dou
fit and could win 10 or 11 tricks. South bid
spades as an each-way bet: Perhaps it wou
cheap save over four hearts, or it might ma
West, with short clubs, had no desire to go
five-level. Instead, he doubled for penalty.
When the dummy came down, South cot
several losers: one, two or three in spades,
in hearts and one in clubs. Clearly, declare:
ruff some hearts in the dummy.
South immediately conceded a heart. Ea.
cashed his spade ace, and shifted to the cli
queen. Declarer won with his king, ruffed a
on the board, threw a club on the diamond
trumped a diamond, ruffed a heart, trump
diamond, cashed the spade king, and clain
conceding two spades and one club.
Can East-West defeat four spades? Buy
tomorrow's newspaper.


SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.22)
- Even if this is not your
day off, your energies are
best suited toward pursuits
that are fun or social in na-
ture rather than related to
work.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-
Dec. 21) Provided you
-can act independently, you
could be luckier than usual
where your material affairs
are concerned.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) If you truly believe
that your plans are supe-
rior to those of your col-
leagues, press forward
alone. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 19) Your material
aspects look better than
usual, provided you're en-
terprising and resourceful.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) Try to do something
fun with friends who are
optimistic and hopeful, if
you can.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
- Don't talk about your in-
tentions prematurely, since
what you say could end up
being counterproductive.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
- Use your wonderful gift
of expression in a manner
that captures the imagina-
tion of potential allies, es-
pecially when the subject
involves latest interests.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
- A critical achievement
is possible, but only if you
narrow your focus. Ad-
ditionally, be sure to ac-
knowledge those who help
you fulfill your aims.
CANCER (June 21-July
22) You're a good team
player to begin with, but
you may soon find an ally
who will be exceptionally
valuable.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) A
substantial amount of your
time is likely to be spent
on helping others sort out
their problems.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
- If there's something im-
portant that you want to
work out with an impor-
tant client, associate or
friend, try to do so in an
environment convivial to
both parties.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
- You'll be most success-
ful working on some im-
portant matters that you're
anxious to finalize, so put
off everything else and get
right on them.


be there her whole life. Now she's living
with her biological father, and it breaks
my heart. He's a good dad, but I feel like I
let her down.
I write today because I am having a
hard time forgiving my mother-in-law. I
understand that our conflicting par-
enting styles can be hard on her in her
house. What I can't understand is why
she's taking it out on my daughter.
MOTHER IN MUD

Dear Mother: You made the right choice
to get your daughter out of the home of
your bullying, stubborn mother-in-law.
While we would have recommended that
your husband put his foot down a little
harder, apparently neither of you could
set boundaries that stick. *Until this situ-
ation is resolved, it may not be possible
to forgive the woman for her unconscio-
nable behavior. Please find a way to get
out of there as soon as possible.


North 10-24-12
S J 74
VQ
K87632
*A85
West East
4 Q103 4 A
VA 10 7 6 VKJ832
*QJ109 54
*96 4*QJ 10 32
South
K98652
S954

*A
,K74

Dealer: East
Vulnerable: East-West
South West North East
1V
1i 24 3V 4
4 4 Dbl, All pass


Opening lead: + Q


1024 0 LaughingSlock Inctrnationa Inc Dist by Unversal UC0k I UFS 2012

"Imagine anyone planting
a tree right there!"


14B + WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2012


ENTERTAINMENT







www.JCFLORIDAN.com


CLASSIFIED


Jackson County Floridan Wednesday, October 24, 2012- 5 B


WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED




ARKETPLAC


BY PHONE: (850) 526-3614 or (800) 779-2557
BY FAX: (850) 482-4478 or (334) 712-7975
ONLINE: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM


BY MAIL: WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE
P.O. BOX 520, MARIANNA, FL 32447
IN PERSON: 4403 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA


Publication Policy Errors and Omissions: Advertisers should check their ad the first day. This publication shall not be liable for failure to publish an ad or for a typographic error or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the ad for the first day's
insertion. Adjustment for errors is limited to the cost of that portion of the ad wherein the error occurred. The advertiser agrees that the publisher shall not be liable for damages arising out of errors in advertisements beyond the amount paid for the space
actually occupied by that portion of the advertisement in which the error occurred, whether such error is due to negligence of the publisher's employees or otherwise and there shall be no liability for non-insertion of any advertisement beyond the amount paid for
such advertisement. Display Ads are not guaranteed position. All advertising is subject to approval. Right is reserved to edit, reject, cancel or classify all ads under the appropriate classification.

Ida 0 reo vit 06.


For Sale:
AFFORDABLE PLACE
AT THE BEACH
2/2, Many Extras! 1 -
$87,000 www.epr287.com


(9^ ANNOUNCEMENTS


Join the Wiregrass
Homeschoolers Concert Band!
Trumpets, Trombones, Clarinets,
Flutes, Saxophones, Drums
Beginner and Advanced Students
Open to all Wiregrass.Homeschoolers
Private Guitar Lessons Also Available
Contact James Bell Phone 334-648-5690
Email jhbell97@yahoo.com

( MERCHANDISE


King's Clocks & Antiques
OPEN Wed- Fri. 10-3
1015 Headland Ave. Dothan 334-792-3964

I s "I
FIREWOOD----UEL
, -SEASONED SPLIT -
OAK FIREWOOD
$75. Will deliver.
L Call 334-685-1627 or 334-798-3040 J
Split Oak Firewood, Delivered in Wiregrass.
$75 For a Full sized Pickup load. $12 for 5
Gallon bucket of kindling wood. 334-393-9923








Wanted: Old Coins, Gold,
Diamonds, Guns, And Tools
West Main Jewelry & Loan 334-671-1440.


SIV- MERCHANDISE
GOD TUF HSENTS






' S': ,, I Followsigns: Bar L Ranch
,- i Early tree ripe satsumas
Let ue o or order for holidays at
S w & discount price. Wholesale
and retail. Great for
fundraisers or christmas gift. (850)209-5506
Truck bed, hard cover, Tri-Glass off of
1999 Ford Ranger, extended cab, 6' bed,
flare side. $300. Call 389-0738 or 393-6499.
e |i-:
PETS & ANIMALS

AKC Boxer Puppies, German Champion
Bloodlines, Brindle & White and Fawn & White,
S/W, 3M, 1FM, 6 weeks old, parents on site,
$500 Call 334-347-8053
American Bulldog Puppies NKC Registered.
BEAUTIFUL! Some black/white spotted &'some
brown/white spotted. 2 Males, 3 Females, S/W;
$300 each. 334-695-4213 or 334-695-0856
.. American Bulldog pups
CKC registered. $300
Males & females.
Additional photos available.
Call 731-212-9102
American Pitt Bull Terrier Puppies ADBA
Registered, 2FM, B&W born 6-4-12, $300 ea.
Located in Elba Area. Call or text 334-282-3128
Dachshund puppies: CKC miniature long-
haired, two males, black with tan marks,
6 weeks old Oct 27, wormed, $200. Serious
inquiries only please. Call 334-449-2068.
If no answer, leave message please.


2012 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.


Free Rescued Dogs to GOOD homes ONLY.
Many breeds, S/W, Call 334-791-7312!
Free to good home, Beagle mix FM, Spayed,
very energetic! Was abandoned- 334-692-2566
Shih-tzu puppies .CKC. Parents on premises.
Hand raised. $275. Call 334-792-0202
Yorkie-Poos on Sale $225.,,
Ready Now Yorkies!
Taking deposit on Chorkies.
.* 334-718-4886 4..

Happy Jack DD33: Kills fleas quicker, last
longer on dogs & cats. Citrus odor.
Biodegradeable. ALTHA FARMERS COOP
(482-2416) www.happyjackinc.com

FARMER'S MARKET


GRASS FED BEEF!! GREAT QUALITY!!
Quarters and Halves. Freezer Ready.
ESTO MEATS CALL 850-263-7777



i uAplin Farms
You Pick or We
I Pick
Pumpkins Sun Flowers
Corn Maze *
Open Mon-Sat 8-6 Sun 1-6
334-726-5104 *

^ ~FRESH
GREEN
PEANUTS
a- 850-209-3322 or
850-573-6594 850-352-2199
mo 4128 Hwy 231

Hewett Farms


FALL PEAS READY NOW
Several varieties. Shelled or
Unshelled or U-Pick.
Off hwy 90 between Cypress &
Grand Ridge on Mayo-Rd.
Bobby Hewett
850-592-4156/899-8709
Now Open Jackson Farms Grand Ridge, FL
U-Pick Tomatoes
Bring your own bucket! 7 days a week.
4 850-592-5579 4w
U PICK PEAS:
1.1' 231 to Alford, turn west onto 276 to
Washington County line, follow signs.
850-260-1368


Level: In iW
Complete the grid so each row, column and
3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit
1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku,
visit www.sudoku.org.uk.

Solution to Tuesday's puzzle
8 7 5 3 21 4 9 6_


9 3 1 1 6 4 8 7 5 2.
4 9---9- 8 1 7 -3 6-2 5
498173625


3274568199 37
65381 2 9 7 4


7 8 2 9 6 4 5 3 1


10/24/12


Large rolls of Hay for Sale
Bahia & Coastal
Daytime 334-585-3039,
after 5pm & weekends 585-5418

r.....";....erlee.....
HORSE TRAILER: 2004 Super Bee
2 horses, walk-thru, bumper pull, double
dutch doors, padded sides & butt bars, $3,200
OBO. Call 334-685-1627


Sem-Angus Yearly Bulls *
Top Blood Lines. Priced to Sell.
Call 334-898-1626 or 334-360-5035

REINSMAN SADDLE, handmade in Yoakum,
Texas, 16", comes with original stirrups and
easy rider stirrups. Like new, cost $1,300 brand
new, will sell for $500. 334-65-1627


Buying Pine / Hardwood in
your area.
No tract to small / Custom Thinning
Call Pea River Timber
S4 334-389-2003

( *) EMPLOYMENT


,.- o Community Manager
Dominium seeking FT Community Manager
for 76 unit, affordable, senior living
apartment community in Sneads.
Resp: Establish/maintain visibility/
professionalism/rapport, day-to-day
operations, resident relations & collections/
maximizing occupancy.
Req: 2-3 yrs property management exp, basic
leasing/exp & MS Office exp, Tax Credit,
Yardi software exp.
Competitive salary/benefits.
Apply online:
www.dominiumapartments.com (Careers Page).
EOE/DFWP



FLORIDAN
has an immediate opening for a
Reporter
Excellent opportunity for a recent college
graduate looking for their first job, or for a
beginning reporter at a weekly or a small
daily looking to move to a larger market.
Duties include covering events, writing
stories for print and the Web, taking photos,
shooting video, assisting with the newspa-
per's website and social media sites. One to
two years at a weekly or small daily paper
preferred, but not required. Basic knowledge
of computers, and still and video cameras re-
quired. Benefits include medical, dental, and
vision insurance, 401K, paid holidays and va-
cation. Pre-employment drug screen and
background check required.
EOE M/F/V/D
Qualified applicants may apply online at:
fhttp://forldmediaenlterprise.com/section
1/wme04 0
TRANSP. IN .......S

AT THE JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN, WE ARE LOOKING
FOR MATURE, DEPENDABLE, BUSINESS-MINDED,
NEWSPAPER CARRIERS

COTTONDALE
Earn an average of

$500
per month

Ask about our $300 -Sign on Bonus
BE YOUR OWN BOSS -1 A.M. to 6 A.M.
Must have dependable transportation,
minimum liability insurance & valid
driver's license.

Come by and fill out an application at the
Jackson County Floridan, 4403 Constitution
Lane, Marianna, FL




!^UIEIEE~l lL


RETIREMENT IS JUST
AROUND THE CORNER.
Are ou worriedd about t our retirement satinos? Or i erhapj u '
rate alt a ti anted to retire earl\. but lust couldn't .
figure out h.:' ? Nlet f..paper routes are a grEat source .-f
supplemental income. Just a small in, estmernt Iiach morning can -
make a big int estmernt in \ our retirement nr

FLORIDAN l-


Come By And Inquire Today ... il ':' ...
4403 Constitution Lane Marianna, FL 32446 i .


Sudoku


8 2 5 9

7 8 4

4 5



4 _3 5

8 17 1

3 7

2 6


6 34 2


PLACEAN AD








6 B Wd d Otb 242012 J kso n


DECLASSIFIED


- e nes a
y, c o er ac n
.


25 Drivers


Trainees

NEEDED NOW!
Learn to drive for
Werner Enterprises
Earn $800 per week!
No experience needed!
Local CDL Training
job ready in 15 days!

1-888-368-2198





MEDICAL/CLERICAL
Immediate opening for individual
with strong computer skills.
Benefits after 3 months. Up to $15/hr
depending on experience.
Contact human resource department at
866-675-3614



SeSpectrum
HEALTH SYSTEMS, INC.

Spectrum Health Systems Is In Need Of A
Program Manager in Malone, Florida
Must be a Certified Addictions
Professional (CAP) in the State of Florida.
Work location is within the
Jackson Correctional Institution.
Other requirements:
Degree in a related field, 2 years minimum
working in a Therapeutic Community (TC),
and 1-2 years supervisory experience.
Corrections experience preferred.
Email resume/cover letter to
resumes@spectrumhealthsystems.org
Include Job ID: FLOOO

() EDUCATION
S& INSTRUCTION


Professional Piano & Organ Teacher
I teach in my home in the Highlands. 30 years
experience teaching private lessons and
teaching in schools. Recently moved from KY.
Great Christmas Gift For All Ages!
334-446-4226


S Classes Forming Now
for Medical Assisting,
FOR TIS Electrical Trades and
FORTIS More!
COLLEGE Call Fortis College
Today! 888-202-4813 or
visit www.fortiscollege.edu. For consumer
information visit www.fortis.edu

(\ ~RESIDENTIAL
REAL ESTATE FOR RENT


2/1 UnFurn. or .Furn. Apt. Convenient
location, Clean, hw floors, No pets, W/D
supplied* 850-718-5089/482-4172/624-7407 4
2BR/1BA, apt., in town, $450. mo. No pets. 850-
557-2000 for more info.
2BR/2BA TOWNHOUSES
Chipola River Townhouses
850-482-1050/557-8560 4-
Beauty Shop Downtown equip. incl, avail, now,
$600/mo, 4376 Lafayette 727-433-RENT
Deering St 4320; Cute 1bd 1st fl. quiet $340.
mo. NO PETS also Clinton St. 4381 furnished
rms, pvt bath,pvt. entrance, all util. incl. $375/
mo. AVAIL NOW 727-433-RENT. 24 hrs.
Orchard Polnte
Now accepting applications for 2 & 3 BR Apts.
Call or come by to pick up application
: 4445 Orchard Pointe Dr. Marianna
850-482-4259




1BR Duplex for rent, Blue Springs area.
Like us on Facebook at BlueSpringsApartments
or www.bluespringsapt s.com or contact
Joanne at 850- 693-0570.


1 & 2BR Houses & Apts ALSO
2 & 3BR Mobile Homes Rent to Own
Lot rent included. For details
850-557-3432 or 850-814-6515 -
2BR 2BA and 2BR 1BA houses 2BR 2BA, 2BR
1BA and 3BR 1BA furnished or unfurnished,
Sent + dep. 850-630-8221
' 3BR/1BA, 2640 Church St. C'dale CH&A No
Pets, $675+ $50.0 dep. (850) 352-4222/557-4513
*A Austin Tyler & Associates *
Quality Homes & Apartments
850-526-3355 -


"Property Management Is Our ONLY Business"
Nicest in Marianna area! Nearly new 2BR/1BA
Home $560 w/lease. Call 850-526-8367
ThAT's ClAssifiEd


2 & 3 bedroom mobile Homes in Cottondale.
$500 and up. H20, garbage, sewer included.
http:// www.charloscountryliving.com.
850-209-8847
2&3BRMH's in
Marianna & Sneads (850)209-8595.
2 & 3BR Mobile Homes in Cottondale.
NO PETS CH&A $325- $500/Month
Roomate situation also available.
850-258-1594 Leave Message
2BR 1BA Furn. MH, CH/A, no pets/smoking,
$450 + dep. current credit report ly lease req.
182 Alford Rd C'dale 850-638-4620/638-6405
2BR 1BA Located between Grand Ridge &
Sneads water& garbage included
$300/month -s 850-573-0308 4
2BR 1BA Located in Sneads $350/month
850-573-0308 4-
2BR 1 BA MH'S in Alford, $350-$380 + dep.
850-579-8882/850-209-1664/850-573-1851
3BR 2BA, DW, No Pets, Private Lot $595./mo. +
dlep. 850-638-7822
3BR 2BA MH in Sneads $500/mo. No Pets, 850-
573-0911/593-5251
MOBILE HOMES FOR RENT
$325 to $380. Water, trash and sewer included
NO PETS ALLOWED. Call 850-209-7087
Quiet, well maintained Park, Water/sewer/
garb/lawn included. Available:
3/2 DW $625 & 3/2 $475
-* Joyce Riley RE 850-209-7825 4m
Small Quiet Family Oriented Park 1, 2 & 3BR
MH's for Rent includes water, garbage, lawn
care, No Pets 850-592-1639
( ) RESIDENTIAL
U REAL ESTATE FOR SALE


3BR 2BA DWMH For Sale: Lg kitchen, lots of
cabinets, large washroom, ceiling fans, MUST
BE MOVED, $30,000 OBO 850-557-7661

RECREATION


Bayliner 2006 197SD Deck boat, Mercruiser
4.3L, full custom made sun cover, swim plat-
form w/ ladder, excellent condition, low hrs.
$14,950, 334 797-6001
FACTRY DREC


Xtremn

Boa


Packages From
S $4,995S
All Welded
All Aluminum Boats
www.xtremeindustries.com


Hydro Sport 1994-175 Everdude, 19 ft., Good
Condition, tournament ready, $4,800 OBO 334-
689-3907

&(:) TRANSPORTATION


Cadillac 1992 Allante Convertible 2-seater,
White with red leather interior. 68K miles. Good
condition. $6,900. Call 334-714-7129.
FORD 1938
Standard Coupe:
All original parts:
hood, fenders, grill,
bumpers, and some
new. Owned for 42
years, stored inside. It has a chevy rearend,
front disc brakes and set up for chevy
350/350. $9,500. Also have a 223 cu. In.
engine and complete front end out of a
1956 FORD truck. Can be seen in DaleviHe.
Call 1-334-301-0669 or 1-251-610-6644.


Buick 2007 Lucerne CX one owner, $10,600
call 850-526-4073
Ford 1995 T-Bird, low miles, runs good, looks
good, cold AC $2,500 334-687-4353, 334-695-
4294
Honda 2012 Civic, 4 door, under warranty, like
new, $200 down, $279 per mo. Call Ron Ellis
714-0028.
Lexus 2003 LX470 -One owner, garage kept,
light beige, 120K miles, $22,500 334-687-5283
-ql y -- -- Lexus 2003 md#SC430
red 'saddle interior 37,798
mi. I owner garage kept,
tint. chrome wheels, Gold
pkg, Lexus maintained,
Lexus warr. until 4/23/13 $25,900.
* 334-393-3794.
Nissan 2012 Altima. low miles, Must Sell!, $200
down, 2889 per mo. Call Ron Ellis 714-0028.
Pontiac 1977 Grand Prix: Beautiful Classic Car
that needs to be restored. $1,000. OBO Call 334-
735-5213 or 334-807-1309
Toyota 2005 Corolla LE 4dr. 54K mi. Michelins,
silver, very good cond. inside & out, no smok-
ers, AC, CD player, power windows, spoiler,
cruise no frame or structural damage, drives
great, under Kelly book @ $9,900. 334-699-5688
Volkswagon 2011 Jetta, .great gas saver, nice, 4
door, $300 down $299 per mo. Call Steve
Hatcher 334-791-8243.
'. Volvo, 2004 C70 LT Convdrtible,
80,000 .miles, Blue, Great Cond.
ft $7,800 BEAUTY! 850-557-0893
Volvo 2005 S40 T5, low miles, great gas saver,
luxury, $300 down, $200 per mo. Call Steve
Hatcher 334-791-8243.


Harley-Davidson 2012, FXDF,
Si' FAT BOB, 103ci, Black & Or-
ange, Custom Seat, Black Ac-
cessories, 1,200 miles, origi-
nal parts. $15,000, 334-464-
0995


Clem Your Closet ~ Coect Some Cash


Find jobs



fast and



easy!


BMW 2001 X5, Nice Vehi-
cle, $6999. 334-714-2700.


Chevrolet 2002 Blazer,
4.3, V-6, auto, 4 door,

miles, like new, $5895.
m Call 334-790-7959.
Chevrolet 2011 Traverse, Less than 10K Miles,
One owner, Excellent Condition, VERY Clean, 6
cylinder, 4-door $25,000. Gold with Charcoal
interior, Power locks, backup sensor,
For Further Details, Call 334-702-9226
Volvo 2003 XC90 T6,
$AWD 3rd row seating,





4000 Ford Tractor good condition, new engine
$4,450. 334-791-0700
ArjrI. Chevy 2007, 1500 LTZ 4X4
Z1- eKtended cab pickup.
S5.3L V8. 78,700 mi. Loaded.
Leather seats, 6-changer
j CD player/XM Radio, Bose
speakers, remote start, OnStar, heated seats,
outside power windows, dual climate control.
$19,800. See it at the Lemon Lot in Dothan, spot
No. 85. 334-494-3860.
Dodge 1975 D-100, Custom, One Owner, Proof
of title, Runs good, Vehicle Garage kept, fleet
maintained. Too many parts to list. Call for
Details. $2700 334-479-1377
Ford 1993 XLT Truck, 2 door, 4 cyln. standard
shift, needs work on transmission OBO .
850-209-1722
Ford 2006 Ranger XL, reg-
ular cab, automatic, 4
cyl., new tires, cold air,
A like new, $7995. Call 334-
790-7959.
Mazda 1988 B2200 single cab, 4 cyl. automatic,
air, hit in the rear, still drivable, clear title.
$1000. 334-7691-2987 or 798-1768
Silverado 2004 ext. cab, 121K miles, 4-wheel
drive, $11,500. 334-677-3809. after 5pmr
Toyota 2004 Tacoma Double
Cab SR5D,T 2WD ONE
S OWNER, CARFAX AVAILABLE,
Maintenance Records. Clean,
Garage Kept, New Tires, Cold
A/C, Line-X sprayed bedliner,
Power Windows, Power
Brakes, Cruise Control, Airbags, Automatic,
Tinted Windows, AM/FM/CD, Step Rear Bump-
er, Sliding Rear Window, 117,000 miles. $12,000
(850) 693-0764
r.. Toyota 2007 Tacoma
SS Ext. cab, 2-wheel drive,
automatic, silver in color,
109k miles. One owner.
Good condition, never wrecked, no mechanical
problems... Must See! $11,000. 334-596-6608.


-_ Chevrolet 2012 Express
3 -EM I3 White Diamond Custom
a I Conversion, 14,000 mi. Sun-
Sroof. black leather seats,
back sofa turns into bed w/touch of a button.
Bluray DVD player w/surround sound. 26" TV,
LED lighting inside. Carfax available. Lists over
$71,000 new. Asking $55,900 obo. 334-268-3900.
Honda 2004 Odyssey,
SVery clean, $6999.
334-714-2700.





1ST PLACE TO CALL FOR ALL OF
YOUR TOWING NEEDS!

AUTO BODY & RECYCLING
PAYING TOP DOLLAR FOR JUNK CARS
Contact Jason Harger at 334-791-2624


I ALSO SELL USED PARTS
24 HOUR TOWING .4 334-792-8664

tGot a Clunker
.h We'll be your Junker! :
We buy wrecked cars -
and Farm Equip. at a
fair and honest price!
$325 & t Compte Cars
CALL 334-702-4323 OR 334-714-6285
LilI..ll lE............mi l mi.lllli

Guaranteed

Highest prices paid
for old Farming

Equipment, Tractors,
Semi Junk Cars
Nothing to big,
nothing to small
So call a Cash Cow Now!




850-849-6398
For your Convience FREE Pick up!


r - - - - - ----------------
la We buy Wrecked Vehicles
Running or not!
334-794-9576 or 344-7914714


wwwJCFLORIDAN.com


WE PAY Ca$H
FOR JUNK CARS!!"!!
Call 334-818-1274


LEGALS


LF15933
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
DIVISION:
CASE NO.: 32-2012-CA-000160
WELLS FARGO BANK, NA,
Plaintiff,
vs.
SUMMER S. DURDEN, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated Octo-
ber-03, 2012 and entered in Case No. 32-2012-
CA-000160 of the Circuit Court of the FOUR-
TEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for JACKSON
County, Florida wherein WELLS FARGO BANK,
NA is the Plaintiff and SUMMER S. DURDEN;
MICHAEL PALMER; are the Defendants, The
Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash at NORTH DOOR JACKSON
COUNTY COURTHOUSE, MARIANNA, FLORIDA
at 11:00AM, on the 15th day of November,
2012, the following described property as set
forth in said Final Judgment:
COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT
(BLANK) KNOWN AS MARKING THE SOUTH-
WEST CORNER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER
OF SAID SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 29,
TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH, RANGE 7 WEST, JACKSON
COUNTY, FLORIDA AND PROCEED THENCE
NORTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 03 SECONDS
WEST ALONG THE SOUTHERN BOUNDARY OF
THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SOUTH-
EAST QUARTER FOR A DISTANCE OF 88.0 FEET
TO AN IRON BAR AND METAL CAP 3266 MARK-
ING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF A 4.87 ACRE
TRACT FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE
NORTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 03 SECONDS
WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 192.2 FEET TO A
BLANK CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE
NORTH 01 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 12 SECONDS
WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 541.5 FEET TO AN
IRON PIPE MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER
OF THE EASTERLY ONE ACRE LOT; THENCE
NORTH 22 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 05 SECONDS
EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF 210.0 FEET TO A
CONCRETE MONUMENT 679 ON THE SOUTHERN
BOUNDARY OF A 200 FOOT WIDE RIGHT OF
WAY KNOWN AS STATE ROAD NO. 10 (US.
HIGHWAY 90); THENCE SOUTH 67 DEGREES 37
MINUTES 40 SECONDS EAST FOR A DISTANCE
OF 75.23 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT
SRD R/W; THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 67 DE-
GREES 37 MINUTES 40 SECONDS EAST FOR A
DISTANCE OF 337.96 FEET TO AN IRON BAR AND
METAL CAP 3266 MARKING THE NORTHWEST
CORNER OF SAID 4.87 ACRE TRACT; THENCE
SOUTH 23 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 00 SECONDS
WEST FOR A DISTANCE OF 632.91 FEET TO SAID
POINT OF BEGINNING.
A/K/A 7743 HIGHWAY 90, SNEADS, FL 32460-
4081
Any person claiming an interest in th surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must
file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court
on October 15, 2012.
Dale R. Guthrie.
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Tammy Bailey
Deputy Clerk

If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assistance.
Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at
P. 0. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by
phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days
before your scheduled court appearance, or
immediately upon receiving this notification if
the time before the scheduled appearance is
less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing im-
paired, please call 711.
ADA Coordinator
P.O. Box 1089
Panama City, Florida 32402
Phone: 850-747-5338 Fax: (850) 747-5717
Hearing Impaired: Dial 711
Email: ADARequest@judl4.flcourts.org
LF15930
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
DIVISION:
CASE NO.: 32-2011-CA-000471
PHH MORTGAGE CORPORATION,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ANTHONY F. ALGARIN, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated Octo-
ber 03, 2012 and entered in Case No. 32-2011-
CA-000471 of the Circuit Court of the FOUR-
TEENTH Judicial Circuit in and'for JACKSON
County, Florida wherein PHH MORTGAGE COR-
PORATION is the Plaintiff and ANTHONY F.
ALGARIN; BLONDELL MURRAY; are the De-
fendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash at NORTH
DOOR JACKSON COUNTY COURTHOUSE, MA-
RIANNA, FLORIDA at 11:00AM, on the 15th day
of November, 2012, the following described
property as set forth in said Final Judgment:


LOT 3, BLOCK B, OF WILDWOOD ESTATES SUB-
DIVISION, THIS TRACT IS LOCATED IN THE
SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE NORTHEAST 1. 4 OF
SECTION 6, TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH, RANGE 10


JACKSON COUNTY


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CLASSIFIED


Jackson Conty Flridan- Wednesday, October 24, 2012
Jackson County Floridan Wednesday, October 24, 2012- / B


WEST, JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA.
A/K/A 2860 WILDWOOD CIRCLE, MARIANNA, FL
32446
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must
file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court
on October 15, 2012.
Dale R. Guthrie
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Tammy Bailey
Deputy Clerk
If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assistance.
Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at
P. 0. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by
phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days
before your scheduled court appearance, or
immediately upon receiving this notification if
the time before the scheduled appearance is
less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing im-
paired, please call 711.
ADA Coordinator
P.O. Box 1089
Panama City, Florida 32402
Phones 850-747-5338 Fax: (850) 747-5717
Hearing Impaired: Dial 711
Email: ADARequest@jud14.flcourts.orq
LF15935


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
JACKSON COUNTY
CASE NO.11-1032CA
TYNDALL FEDERAL CREDIT UNION,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JASON SHAYNE CURRY A/K/A JASON S. CURRY,
SHARON RENAE CURRY A/K/A SHARON R. CUR-
RY N/K/A SHARON R. CURRY POWELL, AND
JACKSON COUNTY TEACHERS' CREDIT UNION,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Jackson County, Florida, pur-
suant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure, en-
tered in this cause, the Clerk of this Court shall
sell the property at public sale at 11:00 A.M.
C.T., on the 29th day of November, 2012 at the
Jackson County Courthouse, 4445 Lafayette.
Street, Marianna, FL 32446, the following de-
scribed real property lying and being in Jack-
son County, Florida, to-wit:
The East 1/3 of the West 3/5 of the North of
the NW % of Section 11, Township 3 North,
Range 12 West, Jackson County, Florida.
Less and Except:
The South 714 feet of the West 300 feet of the
East 1/3 of the West 3/5 of the North 1/ of the
NW 1/4 of Section 11, Township 3 North, Range
12 West, Jackson County, Florida.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE
SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER


THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE
OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
This Notice dated this 15th day of October,
2012.
DALE RABON GUTHRIE,
CLERK CIRCUIT COURT,
JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
BY: Tammy Bailey
Deputy Clerk
LF15922
NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO
CHAPTER 83, PART IV
Notice is given pursuant to the Self Storage Fa-
cility Act, Florida Statutes Chapter 83, Part IV,
that Alternative Storage, a self storage facility,
will have elligible for sell the contents of the
following units:
UNIT A22 KEVIN PHILLIPS
UNIT B34 SHARON DAUGHTREY
UNIT C15 JERRELL LOVETT
UNIT C 7 MARSHALL RALLS
The Auction of contents will be November
27,2012 at 10am. Owner reserves the right to.
refuse any and all bids.
Gene Wilferd & Scotty Roland, Owners


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Mirror w/shelves, $50. 850-693-3260.
One Man Sheet Rock Hanger $300 850-272-0244
Pedestal sink: New. $100. obo 850-352-2040
Porcelain Dolls 7 dressed $15/ea 850-482-7665
Refrigerator Frigidaire28 cft $150 850-526-4425
-Shirts/Jeans, boys 14/16 $1 ea 850-693-3260
Sofa and loveseat, plus stuffed lounge chair,
with matching footstool, will provide cell photo
$250/all 334-347-1253
Sofa and loveseat, plus stuffed lounge chair,
with matching footstool, will provide cell photo
$250/all 334-347-1253
Trailer Hitch, adjustable $29 850-482-7665
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counter, perfect shape, $100 OBO,
334-794-2167
TV, 55" floor model $75 Call 850-209-3156
VHS TAPES: Ig variety .50 ea Call 850-209-3156
Wall Surround Kit: New $100. 850-352-2040
Wedding gown, new, sz 16, $300 850-693-3260.
Wedding Gown, sz.8,$200 firm 677-7334
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Heat hoping to be even stronger in title defense


The Associated Press

MIAMI The biggest oppo-
nent for the Miami Heat enter-
ing this season might not be
the veterans from Boston, those
up-and-comers from Oklahoma
City or a revamped group of Los
Angeles Lakers.
Apparently, it's labels.
Talk of a repeat championship,
that's not a conversation Heat
coach Erik Spoelstra wants any
part of, saying his,expectation is
that this year's journey will prove
to be vastly different than last
year's even if it ends up with
another title celebration. Being
called favorites, the Heat aren't
fazed by that one, either. And
trying to define players by posi-
tion, that was largely impossible
in Miami even last season.
"We're about one thing," Spoel-
stra said. "We're going to try to
get better. Every day."
Given the makeup of this ros-
ter, the Heat would already seem
better than the team that won
the title last season.
Start at the top: The eight play-
ers who were in the primary
rotation for Game 5 of the NBA
Finals are back, including reign-
ing MVP LeBron James who
enters the season insisting that
just one ring won't come close
to satisfying him. Dwyane Wade
had knee surgery over the sum-
mer and says he's as healthy as
he's been in years, perhaps since


.----- r- --r---m. '- '
Miami Heat players Norris Cole (left), Dwyane Wade (center), and LeBron
James celebrate during a preseason game on Saturday.


college. Chris Bosh has over-
come the abdominal injury that
slowed his playoff run.
And if that rotation was good'
enough to win it all last year, it's
no wonder the Heat are a popu-
lar pick to win another title this
time around.
"Ultimately, we want to de-
fend our title," James said. "But
we don't want to short-cut any-
thing. We've never been a team
that's been that way. We're go-
ing to work each and every day
to get better, on the court or film
sessions, whatever the case may
be."
Or through free agency
-again.'
Two years after pulling off the
enormous series of coups that


brought James and Bosh to Mi-
ami, Pat Riley did it again this
past summer. Without much
room to maneuver under the
salary cap, Riley lured Ray Allen
- the best 3-point shooter in
NBA history away from the
rival Celtics.
"Crazy, isn't it?" Wade asked.
Allen, who still excels at mov-
ing without the ball and finding
-space, seems to fit the Heat per-
fectly. The notion that this team
was conventional a point
guard, shooting guard, small for-
ward, power forward and center
on the floor went out the win-
dow long ago, when Spoelstra
came up with what's now known
as the positionless way of play-
ing. It's not a term the Heat are


fond of, but it works for them.
For example, in a recent poll
of NBA general managers, James
was picked far and away as the
league's top small forward. In
Miami this season, he could
wind up spending most of his
time at power forward (where
GMs picked him as the league's
third-best). Bosh insisted for
years that he's a power forward;
the Heat won a title with him
at center. What the Heat do, in
some respects, is play the most
sophisticated form of pickup
ball: Five guys go on the floor,
match up on defense and mesh
together on offense, trying to
run at every opportunity.
Pace-and-space was the moni-
ker given to it last year. Spread-
ing the floor opened lanes for
James and Wade to get to the
basket, and created opportuni-
ties for shooters like Shane Bat-
tier, Mario Chalmers and Mike
Miller. Now add another pair of
3-point sharpshooters in Allen
and Rashard Lewis (another free
agent signee) to the mix, and
Miami's list. of weapons is even
longer.
"We have confidence knowing
we did it," Battier said. "We knew
the intensity and passion and
togetherness that it took to get
there. It's very difficult to reach
that level. You can't just turn
it on. But we know how to get
there. And I think we're the same
knuckleheads."


The league is not the same this
year, though. In the East, Bos-
ton even without Allen has
clearly said that their target is
Miami. Out West, the Lakers fig-
ure to be much better, with the'
additions pf Dwight Howard and
Steve Nash. Oklahoma City was
title-caliber last year and has a
young core that will likely only
keep getting stronger.
"There's no bigger bulls-eye for
us than what we dealt with since
the arrival of LeBron and Chris
in Miami," Wade said. "The big-
gest challenge for us, first of all,
is to stay healthy. That's going
to be the biggest challenge. And
secondly, to keep that, focus all
the way through and understand
what we're still playing for. The
reason we got together to win
championships. We got one. We
want to continue to get more."
Spoelstra spent the summer
talking to coaches about the
challenge of trying to win two
straight titles, like close friend
Billy Donovan at Florida and of
course his boss, Riley. Remem-
ber, it's Riley that once obtained
copyright on the phrase "three-
peat," but Spoelstra doesn't even
enjoy the term "repeat."
He doesn't have to, and his
players seem to understand why.
As long as they get another ring,
that's all that matters.
"Nothing changes for me,"
James said. "I've kind of had that
bulls-eye for a long time now."


Magic remain optimistic as post-Howard era begins


The Associated Press

ORLANDO In the
building Dwight Howard's
exploits helped build it's
hard to find even the small-
est remnant of the former
Orlando center these days.
The photographs, murals
and other likenesses that
once adorned virtually
every other crevice inside
the Magic's Amway Center
have been scraped away,
now just painful remind-
ers of championship aspi-
rations never realized.
After taking the Magic
through one of the most
tumultuous years in their
history, the six-time all-
star who called himself
Superman is now a villain
- departed from the city
he once pledged to take to
its first NBA title.
Change is everywhere for
the new-look Magic.
Orlando enters the sea-
son with a new general
manager, coach and roster
full of new faces and a
promise to recover is the
rallying cry of those that
are left.
The marketing slogan for
the first year of the post-
Howard era: "We will."
"It's anew, excitingbegin-.
ning, a new era for Magic
basketball," CEO Alex Mar-
tins said. "It's great to see a
bunch of guys in camp that
really want to be here and
really want to wear that
Orlando Magic on front of
their uniform."
Whatever the mood fol-
lowing -the divorce from
Howard, change is not a
new word here. After all,
the franchise is helped by
similar wholesale upheav-
al following the departure
of Shaquille O'Neal in 1996
to the same Los Angeles
Lakers team that Howard
now finds himself. :
Since taking over for
fired coach Stan Van Gun-
dy, first-year coach Jacque
Vaughn has not shied
away from the new slate
he's been handed by first-
time general manager Rob
Hennigan. He's also sell-


THE'ASSOCIATED PRESS
Orlando Magic head coach
Jacque Vaughn motions to
one of this players during a
preseason game on Friday.
ing a fresh start approach
to a roster that returns
just four players that have
been with the organization
more than one season.
One of those players,
pointguardJameer Nelson,
isn't fearing the newness,
even though he acknowl-
edges it will be a vastly dif-
ferent team now. ;'
"I think we can be better
than people think because
they don't know, nobody
knows what's gonna hap-
pen," Nelson said. "So for
people to .count us out
automatically, that's just
people writing things. It's
up to us to go out there
and work hard, make our-
selves better and establish
an identity."
Health will be an extra
impediment for the Magic,
at least during the early
part of the season.
Vaughn was one of the
last coaches to begin the
cut down process for his
regular-season roster be-
cause so many members
of his projected rotation
spent most of the pre-
season on the mend.
With shooting guard Ja-
son Richardson, forward
Ryan Anderson and How-
ard all gone from last year's
starting lineup, Nelson and
forward Hedo Turkoglu en-


tered training camp as the
only holdovers.
But Vaughn has been
curtailed in seeing 'what
will likely be his opening
night lineup of Nelson,
shooting guard Arron Af-
flalo, forwards Turkoglu
and Glen Davis and center
Nik Vucevic, mostly be-
cause Afflalo has been re-
stricted by a nagging sore
left hamstring.
Other expected rotation
contributors also have also
spent their preseasons
rehabbing injuries, in-
cluding rookie forward
Maurice Harkless (sports
hernia surgery), forward Al
Harrington (knee surgery),
backup point guard Ish
Smith (shoulder surgery)
and swingman Christian
Eyenga (hamstring).
It's all going to demand
a coach with a lot of pa-
tience to manage a group
that likely won't be in the
best position to produce
the Magic's fifth 50-win
season in the last six sea-
sons or seventh consecu-
tive playoff appearance.
The 37-year-old Vaughn
fashions himself as a no
frills person, who has a
calm demeanor that he
says won't change. Even
as he becomes the league's
youngest head coach.
"That's the most impor-
tant thing, for me not to
pretend to be anyone else
but myself," Vaughn said.
"That's how I've been and
that' great advice for me
going forward...I will be
me."
His mentor as a player
and assistant the past two
seasons in San Antonio,
Spurs' coach Gregg Popo-
vich, said that he doesn't
think Vaughn will have
trouble finding his coach-
ing legs.
"We're all different,"
Popovich said. "He'll do it
with a lot more class than I
do it. If I get angry, it shows
up on a sleeve...But he in
that sense is a lot classier
and lot more mature. And
I think over time that will
serve him really well.


"I have to be who I am
and he has to be who he
is. But he's a much more
calm individual. Now, he
will get miffed from time
to time and they will test
his patience from time to
time, like any time would
and he'll be as direct as he
needs to be."
The good news for
Vaughn is that he seems to
have a group that is primed
to embrace the remaking
of the Magic.
Vaughn has promised
an up-tempo, free-will-
ing .approach to his of-
fense and merit-based
system for playing time
that has piqued everyone's
interests.
That is particularly true
for an upward trajectory
player like Afflalo, who
will have a role with the
Magic, that could allow
him to raise his profile like
he never really had the op-
portunity to do in Detroit
or Denver.
His outputs, most nota-
bly his scoring, have im-
proved each of his five sea-
sons in the league. Though
he shuns any talk of being
able to be a first-time all-
star, he says he's ready to
be counted on.
"I want to be a versatile


player for this -team," Af-
flalo said. "To be able to
score, to defend, to mentor.
Whatever the coach needs,
if I can enable this team to
be successful, I want to be
able to do it."
Davis said no one in
the locker room is think-
ing about who isn't in it
anymore.
"The only all-star in here
is Jameer. So, for us to be


successful we're gonna
have to use each other," he
said. "We're gonna have to
play basketball. And that
is making sure we execute
whatever coach wants us
to do...The mentality that
(Vaughn) has us playing,
he's telling us to play free,
with the right mindset and
great spirit...That's what it's
about and what we have to
do to be successful."


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=18B WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2012


NBA


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