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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028304/00932
 Material Information
Title: Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title: Sunday Floridan
Portion of title: Floridan
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Jackson County Floridan
Publisher: Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Marianna Fla
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates: 30.776389 x -85.238056 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note: "Independent."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID: UF00028304:00932
 Related Items
Preceded by: Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by: Marianna Floridan

Full Text
Ct 2 JohScq (S PkgScq 003
S* *I A ^ I ( N; I j m I i d )(' '"2 )
LIBRiARY OF FLORLDA II HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
CAINESVILLE FL 32611-7007


ShInforming more than 17,000 readers daily in print and online







SFLORIDAN,


Vol. 89 No. 203


Diver rescued from cave, rescuer's fourth


BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com
Edd Sorenson saved another
diver this week his fourth this
year. That makes him responsi-
ble for four of the only eight cave
rescues on record around the
world. Most are body-recovery
jobs. Sorenson said Monday's
almost was.
The diver made several


Sorenson


Sorenson


mistakes, Soren-
son said. First,
wearing back-
mounted tanks, he
went into a narrow
passage meant for
use by someone
wearing a side-


mount tank.
'He and the three others in his


party had gone into the wrong
offshoot of the iain passage,
Sorenson said. He let go of his
guide line in trying to squeeze
through,a narrow passage. But
the other three had backed out
of the passage after encounter-
ing zero-visibility in the tight
spot.
When the fourth, who was the


first in, didn't show up back at
the main passage, the men tried
to, find him but, as their air be-
gan to run now, two went for
help and the other stayed look-
ing for the missing diver.
He had no luck, but back on
shore, the two who came out of
the water had made contact with
just the right person. They called


Sorenson's Cave Adventurers
dive shop. The manager, Frank
Gonzalez, sprung into action.
He yelled for Sorenson and
started getting Sorenson's gear
loaded into a trucks Meanwhile,
Sorenson loaded his diver pro-
pulsion vehicle a kind of
See RESCUE, Page 7A


Malone


Want fries


with that?


School staff working

at McDonald's for

fundraiser
BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com
Some teachers and administrators
from Malone School will be pulling duty
at McDonald's after the last school bell
rings next Tuesday. In exchange for their
labors at the McDonalds on Highway 71
North in Marianna, their school will get
up to 20 percent of the sales made that
evening while they're on the job.
They'll be working from 5-8 p.m. Prin-
cipal Doug Powell will be on French fry
duty, accordingto store manager Tabitha
Mercer. The rest of-the school staffers
will be bagging food, possibly taking
orders and perhaps attending to some
other duties around the restaurant.
They're raising money to buy books
.and other supplies they need in the
transition to Common Core Standards.
Florida and 42 other states have ad-
opted those, according to the school's
.assistant principal, Connie Brisolara.
They took effect this year in grades K-2,
and will be system-wide next year.
The curriculum takes a holistic ap-
proach to learning, similar to educa-
tional philosophies that emerged in the
1980s, but updated and improved upon
in the ensuing years. In the program,
students use extra books and other
See FRIES, Page 7A


HARVESTING WEATHER IS


IN THE FORECAST


I ..

....... .
.. - '" -.' -' * .


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
\ harvester leaves a trail of dust as it makes its way through a field near Campbellton. This
is a familiar sight around Jackson County this time of year as the peanut harvest goes into
11 swing and the cotton harvest gets underway. It will be good harvesting weather through
Thursday, when a chance of rain enters the forecast, and on Friday thunderstorms will be possible.
Daytime temperatures are expected to stay in the high 70s and the low 80s. The many farmers
'who continue to pick their crops into the night can expect temperatures Wednesday and Thursday
night in the low 60s. After that, night temperatures will mostly be in the low to mid-50s.


Going Online



Smart 911 now operational in Jackson County


BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
Sdbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com

Jackson County resi-
dents can now go online
and enter information
about themselves on the
Smart911 system.
E-911 Coordinator LaVon
Pope said she's already put
in some information about
herself, including the types
of medications she takes.
With the list already on
Smart911, emergency re-
sponders would have that
information immediately
available if they were ever
dispatched to her home.
Residents can also up-
load pictures into the


system; if a teenager is
reported missing, for in-
stance, law enforcement
officers would have an
image to use and/or dis-
tribute immediately in the
search if a parent uploads
a picture to Smart911. To
access the system, go to
www.smart911.com.
Pope said she already
feels more secure as a pri-
vate citizen, knowing that
some of her vital informa-
tion is directly at hand for
emergency teams. It elimi-
nates some of the confu-
sion that might arise in a
potential 911 event, she
said.
The process of creating


her personal profile was
"simple and very easy,"
Pope said.
Those who use the
Smart911 system will be
able to update it at any
time, she added, and
those who participate are
required to check their
information for current
accuracy at least every
six months. There is no
charge to use the service,
and the site is protected
by front-end firewalls and
machine firewalls, as well
as limited-access proto-
cols, Pope said. Periodic,
comprehensive security
See SMART911, Page 7A


SCLASSIFIEDS...6-8B


This Newspaper
Is Printed On
Recycled Newsprint




7611 1111 5 9I
76 51 61 8 0 050 9


a ENTERTAINMENT...5B


Follow us





Facebook Twitter


) LOCAL...3A


a OBITUARIES...7A


) OPINION...4A


> SPORTS...1B


) TV LISTINGS...2B


r *. ..


Lady Bul-kdI"s
Sover R" L -,i
- '' *is.'


Jackson County
E-91 Coordinator
LaVon Pope
listens to a
statewide E-911
conference call
Tuesday.


`-~-----~~-







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN & www.jcfloridan.com


Weather Outlook


SHigh- 830
Low -540


Thursday
Possible Storms.



High 800
S' Low 490


Saturday
Sunny & Mild.


High 80'


Friday
Clearing & Mild.


High- 810
Low- 530


Sunday
Sunny & Mild.


._ ,- H ghi: 82 K ', Hgh" u- -82" -:
High: igh
L Lo%%: 60 \ - High: 82 ,..
. =--- ',_: ~Low: 60 :" 2

High: 83
"1" Low: 60


PRECIPITATION


24 hour
NM-nih ito djic
Normal MTD
TIDES
Panama City
Apalachicola
Port St. Joe
Destin
Pensacola


1111'"

1. 7U"


HIigh: 81
'Low: 66
r, ",


High: 82
Low: 58
! .


'car tod. deii 51 5I'
Normal tr1D 4yer "6'
Normal tor year 59.26"


Low 9:41 AM
Low 12:07 PM
Low 8:21 AM
Low 9:32 AM
Low 10:06 AM


RIVER READINGS
Woodruff
Blountstown
Marianna
Caryville


High
High
High
High
High


Reading
38.90 ft.
0.38 ft.
6.24 ft.
2.50 ft.


- 10:43 PM
- 4:16 AM
- 11:16 PM
- 11:49 PM
- 12:22 AM


Flood Stage
66.0 ft.
15.0 ft.
19.0 ft.
12.0 ft.


U'LTRA VIOLET INDEX

0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8-10 Very High, 11+ Extreme
0 1 2 3 4 5 ''
-- - - - -


THE SUN AND MOON
Sunrise 6:45 AM
Sunset 6:07 PM
Moonrise 9:08 AM
Moonset 7:56 PM


Oct.. Oct. Nov. Nov.
22 29 7 13


FLORIDA'S iEAl

PANHANDLE JCOUNYM

MEDIA PARTNERS WJAQ 1 00.9C

LISTENYEA .ED


JACKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN
Publisher Valeria Roberts
vroberts@jcfloridan.com

Circulation Manager Dena Oberski
doberski@jcfloridan.com

CONTACT US
Telephone: 850-526-3614
FAX: 850-482-4478
Email: editorial@jcfloridan.com
Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447
Street Address:
4403 Constitution Lane
Marianna, FL 32446
Office Hours:
Weekdays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

MISS YOUR PAPER?
You should receive your newspaper no later
than 6 a.m. If it does not arrive, call Circula-
tion between 6 a.m. and noon, Tuesday to
Friday, and 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. on Sunday. The
Jackson County Floridan (USPS 271-840)
is published Tuesday through Friday and
Sunday mornings. Periodical postage paid
at Marianna, FL.


SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Home delivery: $11.23 per month; $32.83
for three months; $62.05 for six months;
and $123.45 for one year. All prices include
applicable state and local taxes. Mail
subscriptions must be paid in advance. Mail
subscriptions are: $46.12 for three months;
$92.24 for six months; and $184.47 for one
year.

ADVERTISING
The advertiser agrees that the publisher
shall not be liable for damages arising
out of errors and advertisements beyond
the amount paid for the space actually
occupied by that portion of the advertise-
ments in which the error occurred, whether
such error is due to the negligence of the
publisher's employees or otherwise, and
there shall be not liability for non-inser-
tion of any advertisement beyond the
amount paid for such advertisement. This
newspaper will not knowingly accept or
publish illegal material of any kind. Advertis-
ing which expresses preference based on
legally protected personal characteristics is
not acceptable.

HOW TO GET YOUR
NEWS PUBLISHED
The Jackson County Floridan will publish
news of general interest free of charge.
Submit your news or Community Calendar
events via email, fax, mail, or hand delivery.
Fees may apply for wedding, engagement,
anniversary and birth announcements.
Forms are available at the Floridan offices.
Photographs must be of good quality and
suitable for print. The Floridan reserves the
right to edit all submissions.

GETTING IT RIGHT
The Jackson County Floridan's policy
is to correct mistakes promptly. To
report an error, please call 526-3614
Monday-Friday.


Community


TODAY
Christmas Fund Referral Deadline Today is
the last day the Jackson County Christmas Fund will
accept referrals. Those in need of assistance during
the upcoming holiday season can call 718-7768.
) Jackson County Habitat for Humanity
Warehouse hours 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
) Jackson County Tourist Development
Council Meeting -10 a.m. at the Russ House,
4318 Lafayette St., Marianna. Call 482-8061.
) Goody's Grand Opening Jackson County
Chamber of Commerce will conduct a ribbon-cut-
ting ceremony for the grand opening of new retail
store Goody's at 2800 U.S. 71 in Marianna. Call
526-2202.
) Job Club 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the Mari-
anna Goodwill Career Training Center, 4742 U.S. 90
in Marianna. Learn job seeking/retention skills. Call
526-0139.
n Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting
Noon to 1 p.m. in the AA room of First United '
Methodist Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.

THURSDAY, OCT.18
n St. Anne Thrift Store Hours 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Tuesday and Thursdays at 4285 Second Ave. in
Marianna.
) Free Classes Beginning Genealogy, 1-4 p.m.;
and Computer Basics Simplified: Surfing the Inter-
net, 9 a.m. to noon at the Jackson County Public
Library, 2929 Green St. in Marianna. To register, call
482-9631.
) Caregiver Support Group Meeting -11 a.m.
to noon in the First Presbyterian Church Social
Hall, 4437 Clinton St. in Marianna. Open to all
family caregivers providing care to loved ones or
friends. Confidential group, facilitated by a profes-
sional group counselor. Coffee, water, light snacks
provided.
) Orientation 12:30-3:30 p.m. at the Marianna
Goodwill Career Training Center, 4742 U.S. 90 in
Marianna. Register for free job placement and com-
puter training; learn about services. Call 526-0139.
) Chipola Healthy Start Coalition Board of
Directors Meeting 2 p.m. CST (3 p.m. EST) at
the Veterans Memorial Civic Center in Bristol. Call
482-1236.
) Employability Workshop Using the Employ
Florida Marketplace, 3 p.m. at the One Stop Career
Center in Marianna. Call 718-0326.
) 9th Annual Breast Cancer Awareness
Symposium 5:30 p.m. at the Assembly of God
District Activity Center, 4792 U.S. 90 in Marianna.
Speakers: Drs. Edward E Partridge and Teresa


Goodpaster. Salad supper. No cost. Reservations
required. Call 718-2884.
) Jackson County NAACP Meeting 5:30 p.m.
Sin the St. James A.M.E. Church basement, 2891
Orange St. in Marianna. Call 569-1294.
) Guitar Recital 7 p.m. in the R. G. Lee Chapel
at The Baptist College of-Florida in Graceville. Guitar
Professor Jonathan Erp and his students will enter-
tain listeners with a range of music: contemporary
Christian, classical, jazz and sacred. Call 800-328-
2660, ext.427.
n Alcoholics Anonymous Closed discussion,
8-9 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901 Cale-
donia St., Marianna, in the AA room. Attendance
limited to persons with a desire to stop drinking.

FRIDAY, OCT. 19
n International Chat'n' Sip.- 8:30-10 a.m. at
the Jackson County Public Library, 2929 Green St.
in Marianna. Learning Center staff and their inter-
national English learners invite the public for the
exchange of language, culture and ideas in a relaxed
environment. Light refreshments served. No charge.
Call 482-9124.
) Craft & Bake Sale Fundraiser -10 a.m. to
4:30 p.m. at Jackson County Senior Citizens, 2931
Optimist Drive, Marianna. Proceeds fund programs
for seniors. Call 482-5028 to donate baked goods.
) Apply for Holiday Assistance -10 a.m. to
4 p.m. at the Salvation Army, 4439 Clinton St.,
Marianna. Applications for Christmas food and toy
assistance will be accepted from Jackson County
residents. For details, including required
documentation, call 482-1075.
n Money Sense (Financial Literacy) Class -10
a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Marianna Goodwill Career
Training Center, 4742 U.S. 90 in Marianna. No
charge. Call 526-0139:
) Sneads Homecoming Events -10 a.m. alumni
reception in the SHS lobby; 2 p.m. parade (line-up: 1
p.m.); and 7 p.m. football game against Wewa (rec-
ognition of honored classes, crowning of homecom-
ing queen at half-time). Call 482-9004, ext.241.
) Celebrate Recovery 7 p.m. at Evangel Wor-
ship Center, 2645 Pebble Hill Road in Marianna.
Adult, teen meetings to "overcome hurts, habits and
hang-ups." Dinner: 6 p.m. Child care available. Call
209-7856,573-1131.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 8-9
p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.

SATURDAY, OCT. 20
n SHS Homecoming 5K 8 a.m. at Three Rivers


State Park in Sneads. Registration: $20. Proceeds
benefit the SHS Foundation. Call 573-1599 or 593-
6576; email SneadsHigh.Foundation@gmail.com.
) Marianna Farmers' Market Pumpkins in the
Park Market opens at 8 a.m. in Madison Street
Park, downtown Marianna. From 8:30 a.m. to noon,
pumpkins will be given to children to decorate at
provided crafts tables. Food demos, face painting
and music by Jonny Lipford are also planned.
Emerald Coast Volkssport Club Fun Walk
- Start between 8:30 and 11:30 a.m. at Florida
Caverns State Park in Marianna; several trails/dis-
tances to choose from. Participants are asked to
try to finish the trails by 3:30 p.m. Park entrance
fees apply. Email dj.tycl949@gmail.com or call
850-628-4016.
) Graceville Harvest Festival -10 a.m. on the
grounds of the Factory Stores of America mall, 950
Prim Ave., in Graceville. Annual event features a
parade, car show, arts & crafts and food vendors,
games, live music and more. Free admission. Call
263-3250.
o Old Central School Reunion 10:30 a.m. at
the old Central School grounds; lunch to be served
between 11:30 a.m. and noon. Fish, hushpuppies,
drinks provided; bring a side dish, dessert. Lawn
chairs recommended (In the event of rain, reunion
moves to Oak Grove Church Pavilion, Oak Grove
Road, old Parramore Community). Call 592-6145 or
272-0143.
) McKinnie Family Reunion Descendents
of Arthur David and Silvintey McKinnie will meet
at the log cabin in Sneads. Bring covered dishes,
desserts (paper goods provided). Call 593-6943 or
526-2984.
n Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting
- 4:30-5:30 p.m. in the AA room of First United .
Methodist Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.

SUNDAY, OCT. 21
n Alcoholics Anonymous Closed Discussion
- 6:30 p.m. at 4349 W. Lafayette St. in Marianna
(in one-story building behind 4351 W. Lafayette St.).
Attendance limited to persons with a desire to stop
drinking.

MONDAY, OCT. 22
n Employability Workshop 5 Steps to Rapid
Employment, 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Monday-Thursday,
Oct. 22-Nov. 1 at the One Stop Career Center in
Marianna. Call 718-0326.
> Free Eye Screenings -10 a.m. at Jackson
County Senior Citizens, 5400 Cliff St., Graceville.
Screenings conducted by Eye Center South of
Dothan. Call 263-4650.


The submission deadline for this calendar is two days before publication. Submit to: Community Calendar, Jackson County Floridan, P. O. Box 520, Marianna. FL 32447,
email editorial@jcfloridan.com, fax 850-482-4478 or bring items to 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.


MARIANNA POLICE
DEPARTMENT
The Marianna Police De-
partment listed the following
incidents for Oct. 15, the latest
available
report: One
drunk pe- :"-. -_ -
.. s . .


destrian, one
accident, one
suspicious.
vehicle, one


CRIME


suspicious person, one escort,
one verbal disturbance, five
traffic stops, three follow-up
investigations, two animal com-
plaints, one assist of a motorist
or pedestrian, one retail theft,
two property damage reports,
one threat/harassment


complaint and one 911
hang-up.


JACKSON COUNTY
SHERIFF'S OFFICE
The Jackson County Sheriff's
Office and county fire/rescue
reported the following inci-
dents for Oct. 15, the latest
available report. (Some of
these calls may be related
to after-hours calls taken on
behalf of Graceville and Cot-
tondale police departments):
One missing adult, one miss-
ing juvenile, four abandoned
vehicles, one reckless driver,
one suspicious incident, three
suspicious persons, one escort,


three reports of mental illness,
. two burglaries, one physical
disturbance, one pedestrian
complaint, one prowler, one
drug offense, 20 medical calls,
two traffic crashes, two burglar
alarms, seven traffic stops, one
larceny complaint, three crimi-
nal mischief complaints,- two
trespass complaints, one found
or abandoned property report,
one juvenile complaint, one
assault, one animal complaint,
one fraud complaint, one assist
of a motorist or pedestrian, one
retail theft, one assist of another
agency, three public service
calls, one criminal registra-
tion, one transport, four Baker
act transports, and two 911
hang-ups.


JACKSON COUNTY
CORRECTIONAL FACILITY
The following persons were
booked into the county jail dur-
ing the latest reporting periods:
) April Scott, 32, 23588 NW
Petunia Road, Fountain,
violation of court order.
) Lionel Crawford, 40, 5017
Pinewood Court, Marianna,
hold for court-hold for DOC.
) Brandon Swanson, 52, 5532
Hurstcliff Drive, Kinnesaw, Ga.,
retail theft.

Jail Population: 208
To report a crime, call CrimeStoppers
at 526-5000 or a local law enforcement
agency. To report a wildlife violation, call
1-888-404-FWCC (3922).


iA-h ' 'J -' '.J i jt
iiiI I J.
Chevrolet-Buick-Cadillac-Nissan
I EP 4204 Lafayette St. Marianna, FL.
Asv s (850) 482-3051 4


-2A WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 17. 2012


WAIE-UP CALL


:"'' '
::I







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com
M-P

RETIREE


HONORED


AT SUNLAND


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Retiree Jerry Spires (left) accepts a com-
memorative plaque from Mike Miller,
residential services director, Unit II.
Spires, of Marianna, recently retired from
Sunland with 30 years of service, almost all of
which were on third shift. A complete meal
was served at midnight (their mealtime) with
fried chicken, collards, macaroni and cheese,
and all the trimmings. The area was
decorated with colors of black and white.
Spires enjoyed the fellowship of the meal with
his friends, co-workers and supervisors.

Marriage, Divorce Report.


Special to the Floridan

The following marriages
and divorces were record-
ed in Jackson County dur-
ing the week of Oct. 8-12:
Marriages
) Steven Alton Boyd and
Beverly Sue Laurimore.
) Reynaldo Junior Can-
delaria and Shelley Desirae
Miller.
)) Donna Marie Collins
and Marvin D. McCall.
a Rachel Tantoco


Santos -and Timothy
Robert Waters.
) Christopher Michael
Herrell and Sarah Lynn
McGinity.
) Aaron Blake Coleman
and Anna Rebekah Gasses.
a Steven Richard Devine
and Lynsey Ann Krueger.
a Laurie Irene Bechtol
and Jacob Keith Frymire.
) William Cody Hughes
and Keila Grissel Martinez.
Divorces
) None


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2012 3AF


Fun Walk set



for Saturday



at Caverns


Special to the Floridan

The Emerald Coast
Volkssport Club, a mem-
ber of the American
Volkssport Association, is
hosting a"fun walk on park
trails," Saturday at Florida
Caverns State Park in
Marianna.
With several trails/dis-
tances to choose from,
walkers can start anytime
between 8:30-11:30 a.m.
and are asked to try to fin-
ish the trails by 3:30 p.m.
Hike the trails and find
out about the walking
club, which also offers
other walks in the Pan-
handle Historic St.


Andrews area in Panama
City, DeFuniak Springs
and Ft. Walton Beach
- that can be enjoyed
almost any day of the
year. Next year the club
plans to add an event at
Top Sail Hill State
Preserve.
Florida Caverns State
Park offers several picnic
shelters at which walk-
ers can enjoy lunch af-
ter completing the trail.
Standard park entrance
fees apply.
For more information
about the Emerald Coast
Volkssport Club, email
dj.tycl949@gmail.com or
call 850-628-4016.


GAS WATCH

Gas prices are going up. Here are
the least expensive places to buy
gas in Jackson County, as of
Tuesday afternoon.
1. $3.53, Murphy Oil, Highway 71
S., Marianna
2. $3.53, Pilot, Highway 71,
Marianna
3. $3.55, LOVES Travel Center,
Highway 231, Cottondale
4. $3.55, Raceway 861, Highway
231, Cottondale
5. $3.59, A&S Food, South St.,
Marianna
6. $3.59, BP-Steel City, Highway
231 S., Alford
7. $3.59, Dar-Bee's Quick Stop,
Highway 90, Cypress
8.$3.59, KMEE II, 10th, Malone

If you see a lower price,
contact the Floridan newsroom
at editorial@jcfloridan.com.


lorida
CASH7: PLAY4!FANASY


Mon.
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Tue,
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S WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM
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great Td.graT ,prceC-.great people.


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LOCAL








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Florida Voice:.



Race-based



academic goals



will reinforce



inequalities


The stereotype that Asians are good at math alor
with other even more detrimental
ones should be stopped by education leaders, not


propagated.
The Florida Board of Education's approval of race-
based academic goals last week serves to further wedge
apart, rather than close, inequality gaps in the state.
According to the state board's strategic plan, the
state would like to see 90 percent of Asian, 88 percent
of white, 82 percent of American Indian, 81 percent of
Hispanic and 74 percent of black students reading at
or above grade level by 2018, and 92 percent of Asian,
86 percent of white, 81 percent of American Indian, 80
percent of Hispanic and 74 percent of black students
performing math at or above grade level.
Backers of the plan state that the goals are based on
existing performance metrics in the state. Currently, 76
percent of Asian, 69 percent white, 55 percent Ameri-
can Indian, 53 percent Hispanic and 38 percent black
students read at or above grade level, and 82 percent
of Asian, 68 percent of white, 58 percent of American
Indian, 55 percent of Hispanic and 40 percent of black
students perform math at or above grade level.
But there's a bigger problem: According to a report by
the Center for American Progress, the median weekly
earnings in 2011 for Asians was $877, for whites $744,
for Latinos $549 and for blacks $674.
Education has long been viewed as a great equalizer,
able to close margins of socioeconomic inequality that
have left communities, like black and Latino communi-
ties, with higher rates of unemployment, lower wages
and a lower standard of living in the U.S.
For the Board of Education, which comprises six
white members, one Hispanic member and one Asian
Indian member, to say it is OK for a smaller percent-
age of black students than Asian students to meet a
set standard is an injustice to all that only contributes
to social inequality by grouping students into racial
categories and expecting less of certain groups.
Rather than changing its future "goals" to match the
set of statistics it faces, the board needs to think about
how to change its strategy in allocating resources to
best serve communities that aren't performing at the
standards the board is setting.
Though the board claims that by setting these goals it
is taking into account "starting points" for all students,
by the very definition of a "goal," the board should set
standards to improve academic performance, not rein-
force systemic societal problems.
This editorial was published in the University of South Florida's student
newspaper "The Oracle" on Sunday. Oct. 14.


Contact ri..e. ;.

Florida Legislature
Rep. Marti Coley, R-District 7
Marti.Coley@myfloridahouse.gov
Building A, Room 186 Chipola College
3094 Indian Circle
Marianna, FL 32446-1701

Rep. Brad Drake, R-District 5
Brad.Drake@myfloridahouse.gov
NWFL State-Chautauqua Campus #205
908 U.S. Highway 90 West
DeFuniak Springs, FL 32433-1436.

Sen. Bill Montford. D-District 6
208 Senate Office Building
404 South Monroe St.
Tallahassee, FL 32399-1100
montford.bill.web@ flsenate.gov


PraspaW W -tHBu4ar uIJM l'L.-u
Tpri~i ll1lrd p


Check the bottom of the Nov. 6 ballot


lorida's 2012 election ballot
saves the best for last.
The presidential race, a
statewide contest that will help de-
termine if Democrats keep control
of the U.S. Senate, and scores of
competitive campaigns for congres-
sional, legislative and local offices
are at the top of the ballot.
Those offices are certainly sig-
nificant, but the people holding
them come and go. No matter how
strongly we feel about our favorite
candidates, they will all be replaced
some day.
The issues decided by referen-
dum are far more important than
the people on the ballot. They're
forever well, almost. Voters got a
mulligan on high-speed rail a few
years ago, mandating creation of an
inter-city route with one constitu-
tional amendment and repealing it
a few years later, but the vox populii
is rarely reconsidered.
This year's ballot is the longest in
modern history. Fortunately, early
voting and aggressive mailed-ballot
efforts by both political parties will
help hold down the length of lines at
the polls on Nov. 6.
But it's highly likely that tens of
thousands of voters, maybe hun-
dreds of thousands, will vote in the
hotly contested races president,
U.S. Senate, maybe some hard-
fought city or county campaigns
- and skip the ballot items that
they either don't know, or don't care
much about.
This year, 11 constitutional
amendments, mostly junk, and


three vitally important Florida Su-
preme Court retention issues, are
on the ballot. Across the state, 15
District Court of Appeal judges are
alsb up for yes-or-no votes on their
retention in office.
There are some concerted cam-
paigns for a few of the amend-
ments, particularly No. 4 on prop-
erty taxes and No. 8 on permitting
religiously affiliated organizations
to receive public funding, but the
amendments haven't drawn a lot of
attention.
The Republican Party of Florida
turned up the heat in the normally
low-profile Supreme Court retention
campaign by opposing all three jus-
tices. Superficially, the GOP claims
the three are "activist" judges out of
touch with the common folk of Flor-
ida, but the real issue is whether we
want judges to consider the public
popularity of their decisions. A little
side.bet in the Supreme Court refer-
enda is whether Gov. Rick Scott gets
to appoint replacements, if any or
all of the justices are turned out.
No appeals court judge has been
rejected in 34 years of retention
elections. In fact, they've usually
been retained by 60 percent of the
vote or more. But Justices R. Fred
Lewis, Peggy Quince and Barbara
Pariente are facing a very serious
political challenge this year -
for what should not be a political
job.
One tactical difficulty in their
retention effort is. the dramatic
decline of voter interest for the
down-ballot races.


In the last presidential election,
for instance, a combined 8.4 million
votes were cast for all White House
contenders in Florida. But only 6.6
million people voted for or against
Justice Charles Wells, who was on
the ballot that year.
Well, all right, there was no seri-
ous effort to oust Wells four years
ago. What about two years ago,
when two of the four justices then
on the ballot had a minor campaign
run against them? Same thing, big
falloff.
Scott and other candidates at the
top of the ballot drew 5.35 million
votes, compared to 4.4 million in
the Supreme Court races. Even the
most hard-fought constitutional
amendments on the ballot that
year, twin proposals establishing
legal criteria for the Legislature to
use in redrawing the state's con-
gressional and legislative boundar-
ies, were skipped by about 350,000
of the people who voted in the
gubernatorial and Cabinet races.
Even a non-binding referendum
on whether Congress should bal-
ance the federal budget, a mean-
ingless feel-good straw ballot, drew
about a half-million more votes
than the Supreme Court retention
questions.
It's too bad that ballots are like
theater posters or fight cards. The
big stars and heavyweight title con-
tenders get top billing. But most
years, certainly this year, the under-
card is at least as important, if not
more important, to the long-range
future of the state.


'What will this election show?'


The greatest threat to our repub-
lic, indeed all democracies, was
foretold by our founding fathers.
They recognized that all free societ-
ies would eventually fail as soon as
the citizens figured out that they
could use their freedom to vote to
take things away from their neigh-
bors and give them to themselves.
They warned us to be on constant
diligence and guard against this
cancer. We did for the first 150
years while we battled with other
demons such as slavery, westward
expansion and voting rights.
But creeping socialism was some-
thing harder to ward off. It infected
us slowly, preying on our need to
solve specific problems and take
shortcuts to solutions. It was also
likely fed by the deterioration of our
value system. It not only.grew into
the monster which we battle today
but also corrupted the political
process as it grew.
I fear that only a minority of
voters now judge the candidates
by their honesty, competence in
doing whatever job they run for,
or examples they set for the rest of
us. Rather, the overriding criteria
for gathering votes is to show each
voter how your election results in
the benefit to that voter (even if
it is as the expense of other
citizens).
The philosophical term for this
is the concept of "legal plunder."
This concept identifies a behavior
where politicians act as an inter-
mediary in the theft of one group of
citizens by another group. Thus if a
politician takes money from one of
us to buy a TV set for another, this
is no different than if I broke into
my neighbor's house and stole his
TV set. The plunder is the same.
The only difference is a politician
became involved in the process and
committed the theft for me and all
it cost me was my vote. It is also
legal so there is no recourse by the
victim short of anarchy. Eventually
it leads to various levels of class


warfare.
The need to protect oneself from
legal plunder distorts all kinds
of behavior. The most notable
these days is for the rich to try to
hide their wealth in places the
politicians can't get to it or don't
even know it exists. We of course,
demonize such behaviors now as
being un-American. People who
try to prevent the redistribution of
wealth are "greedy" or "not willing
to pay their fair share (whatever
that means)."
It is mostly a matter of math once
the ethics are gone. Assume there
are 20 people, and one suggests
that it is unfair that another in the
group has $2,000 in his pocket. It
would be "much fairer" if everyone
in the group should have $100 to
spend. The person making this
suggestion doesn't think of himself
as a "thief" so he suggests that this
be done legally by taking a vote. If
11 people vote for this redistribu-
tion of wealth then it can be done
"legally." It is likely that one person
will vote against it (the one losing
the $2,000) but how many of the
remaining 19 can rationalize their
desire to take the money by voting
yes?
The only thing that has saved our
democracy over the past 230 years
has been the preponderance of
honest people. Of the 19 remain-
ing people in the example, if nine
or 10 of them were taught from
their church, parents, schools, or
neighbors that it is wrong to take
something which "doesn't belong to
you" then the legal plunder doesn't
occur. That's what happened pretty
much for over the first half of our
nation's history. For the last 80
years, though, the transformation
has slowly occurred. At times it
happened rapidly and other times
slowly but less and less
"honest" citizens are willing to use
their votes to do what is right
- not what is in their "best
interests."


Critics of democratic republics
have always seen one of the biggest
negatives of our governmental
system as the majority's ability
to oppress the "minorities." Most
people today would laugh if one
would suggest that the "rich" are an
"oppressed minority!" If you were
that one in 20 who was having your
$2,000 divided up by the other 19,
don't you think that that's how you
would feel?
The Americans who feel that they
"are poor" today and therefore
justified in their "legal plunder"
might feel differently if we had a
socialist world government who
was dividing things up and began
taking what America's poor had in
order to give to the world's poor.
Obviously our poor are considered
extremely rich by almost everyone
in sub-Sahara Africa.
We were reminded recently, in
fact, that politicians once they have
given away all their (our?) money,
and given away all the money they
can borrow can resort to an even
more direct form of legal plunder
- they can pass a law that requires
some citizens to give money di-
rectly to their fellow voters without
further government involvement.
The "Health Bill" went into effect
mandating that all kinds of free
services be provided by the
insurance companies.
I have lived my life almost
exclusively on a teacher's salary.
Therefore I have never come close
to the current plunderer's defini-
tion of $250,000 as the amount
which it is now politically correct
to steal from. But I am still one of
the "19" who is willing to support
the one in 20, not because it is in
my self interest, but because it is
wrong to steal. 1 know that 1 am not
yet alone, but over the years I have
seen our numbers in a constant
decline and wonder, "what will this
election show?"
ROBERT E. PAINE
Alford


-'
.iF: .~
"


ng


.;_7







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Librarian Jane Stephens is pictured with a display she created to bring attention to the issue of
book-banning, part of Banned Books Week, Sept. 30-Oct. 6, at Chipola College.


Banned Books Week


celebrates freedom to read


Special to the Floridan
The Chipola College
Library recently marked
Banned Books Week,
Sept. 30-Oct. 6. The an-
nual event celebrates the
freedom to read.
Banned Books Week
brings together the en-
tire book community -
librarians, booksellers,
publishers, journalists,
teachers, and readers
of all types in shared
support of the freedom
to seek and to express
ideas, even those some
consider unorthodox or


unpopular.
The books featured dur-
ing Banned Books Week
have all been targeted with
removal or restrictions
in libraries and schools.
While books have beenand
continue to be banned,
part of the Banned Books
Week celebration is the
fact that, in a majority of
cases, the books have re-
mained available thanks
to the efforts of librarians,
teachers, students and
community members
who stand up and speak
out for the freedom to
read.


The American Library
Association compiles lists
of challenged books in or-
der to inform the public
about censorship efforts
that affect libraries and
schools. The ALA con-
demns censorship and
works to ensure free access
to information.
A few of the titles that
have been challenged
or banned are "To Kill a
Mockingbird," "The Hun-
ger Games," "Twilight,"
"Harry Potter," "The Kite
Runner," "Adventures of
Huckleberry Finn" and
"Beloved."


Reunion Saturday for 'Old Central School'


Special to the Floridan
"Old Central School"
alumni will have a
school reunion on
Saturday.
The gathering begins at
10:30 a.m. at the old Cen-
tral School grounds, with


lunch to be served between
11:30 a.m. and noon. Fish,
hushpuppies and drinks
will be provided; bring a
side dish and dessert, if
you wish. Lawn chairs are
also recommended.
In the event of rain, the
reunion will move to the


Oak Grove Church Pavilion
on Oak Grove Road in the
old Parramore Communi-
ty. Again, this location will
only be used in the event
of rain.
For more information,
call Alfred Cox at 592-6145
or 272-0143.


32ND Annual-


GftEVILLE

Harvest Day, Festivl
Saturday, Oct. 20, 201f2 -

Factory Stores of America Mall, Hwy 77 South

PARADE DOWNTOWN GRACEVILLE 10:00AM
ENTERTAINMENT THROUGHOUT THE DAY BY:


The Morris Family Freedom Hill Quartet
"Gospel Music" "Gospel Music"
. ONOW..--


Josh Cobb
"Country Music"


Also Featuring:
98T Army Band
Graceville
High School Band
Graceville
Middle/High School
Show Choirs


ARTS & CRAFTS
FOOD BOOTHS
* GAMES & RIDES FOR KIDS
Contact Dorothy Padgett !
850-263-3238 /


The Thompsons
"Gospel Music"


Antique & Classic

CAR SHOW


Contact Terry Allen
850-263-4401


spomorm so: The City of Graceville
fu=L4ed 6n fat bij the


Jaozsoe. COLU t Toutrst
teLDOwnKet CouLn'lw


West Florida Electric
A Touchstone Energy' Cooperative ?_(t
The power of human connections
& WFECA Board Members


SHS Foundation elects

officers, prepares for

homecoming events


Special to the Floridan
The Sneads High School
Foundation elected new
board members at its
most recent monthly
meeting.
Joining longtime board
member, Vice President
James Earl Edwards, is
Sneads graduate and
active member of the
foundation, Tyler Poole,
who was elected to
the position of
president.
Treasure Tony Beau-
champ retains his posi-
tion, and is joined on the
board by SHS alum Lindsey
Smithermann as secretary.
Founded in 1991, after
fire destroyed the SHS
building, the foundation
established an endowment
that enhances the aca-
demic programs at Sneads
High.
Through alumni and
community support, the
foundation has been able
to provide several addi-
tions to the SHS campus,
including classic novel
sets for the SHS Library,
graphing calculator
sets for standardized
testing, and new stage
curtains for the audito-
rium, and a baby grand
piano for lessons and
performances.
As part of its ongoing
fundraising efforts, the
foundation is sponsoring
its inaugural SHS Foun-
dation Homecoming 5K
race, Saturday at 8 a.m. at
Three Rivers State Park in
Sneads. The race is held
in conjunction with SHS
homecoming celebra-
tions taking place that
weekend. Cash prizes are
being awarded to the
top three finishers in the
men's and women's
divisions.
The race is open to all
ages and you can even


walk the scenic course, if
you'd prefer.
Three Rivers State Park
has waved the park entry
fee for participants.
Anyone interested in
participating can contact
Tyler Poole at 573-1599,
Tony Beauchamp at 593-
6576 or email SneadsHigh.
Foundaton@gmail.com.
Alumni of Sneads High
are encouraged to take
part in the homecoming
festivities this year, begin-
ning with the annual alum-
ni reception, Friday at 10
a.m. in the SHS lobby, fol-
lowed by the homecoming
parade at 2 p.m., and the
football game against the
Wewa Gators at 7 p.m.
The recognition of this
years honored classes
takes place at halftime
followed by the crowning
of the 2012 homecom-
ing queen. On Saturday,
the 5K kicks things off,
followed by the alum-
ni dinner at 7 p.m.
that night in the SHS
Gym.


Wallenda to cross
Grand Canyon
without harness
SARASOTA- South-
west Florida aerialist
Nik Wallenda says he
won't be wearing a
safety harness when
he crosses the Grand
Canyon on a tightrope,
as he did when he
crossed Niagara Falls.
Wallenda told the
Sarasota Herald- Tri-
bune on Tuesday that
he has signed a con-
tract with an unnamed
cable network to
broadcast the roughly
half-mile walk.
In June, Wallenda
crossed a 1,800-foot
span over Niagara
Falls. The event was
televised live by ABC,
which required Wal-
lenda -against his
protests to wear
a safety harness. His
contract for the Grand
Canyon walk specifies
that he doesn't need a
harness.
Wallenda said: "We
cleared that up on the
front end this time. I'm
clear and free."
From wire reports


momar~Peasemmumms~8pam e wmNm.nee
BEN SAUNDERS, D.M.D.
PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY
4711 Highway 90 East Marianna, FL
(Between Burger King & Big Lots) 526-SPIT


J.D. OWENS INC.

CARPET & CERAMIC OUTLET

CARPET, CERAMIC, PORCELAIN, VINYL, NAFCO,

LAMINATE, HARDWOOD & AREA RUGS


JUST IN
-IST QUALITY CARPETING,
FACTORY OVERSTOCKS

,Originally $1.89/SF NOW 99/SF
Originally $3.39/SF NOW $1.25/SF


NEW SHIPMENT

OF AREA RUGS


2'x4' ..****.... $5"


$1 50


2'x8' A .......... 550

3'x5'..... 12


4'x6' ........... $1990

5'x8' ........... s3990

e6'x9' .........L T9 SIf M


LOOSE LAY FIBER BACK VINYL
13'2" WIDE
691/SF

HEAVY FIBER BACK CLOSEOUTS
REG. $2.50/SF
NOW 99I/SF


T


I DISIO IS FRE O LLEVNT


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2012 5AF


LOCAL & STATE


^ *


f ^


r LRYRWR

fdAAA L4


I'v i'





JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Fully Cooked $ 11 50
Hot Wings ................ 5Ib bag


Bar "S" 4x6
Cooked Ham ................

Sunnyland
Sliced Bacon ..................


Boneless Beef
Bottom Round Roast.....


$224
.1 Ib pkg.

s21 5


Zeigler $ 52
Red Hots ....... ............... 24 oz.

Zeigler Regular or $ 1 28
Thick Sliced Bologna ........ 2Ioz.

Kelley's63
Sausage Patties ....... $263......oz.
12 oz.


3 Pack
Pork Spare Ribs
$174
lb.


Bar "S"
Jumbo Franks

99 16 oz.


Kelley's Smoked Baby
Link Sausage

$270
16 oz.


PE IXS*.. A,,


0 A q


Coke Products
$399
S12 pak 12 oz. cans


French's Yellow
Mustard
$107
14 oz.


US #1 Russet
Baking Potatoes
$198
8 lb. bag


Florida Juicy
Sweet Oranges

$216a
14 b. bag


Del Monte
Ketchup

8614oz.


I


Margaret Holmes Seasoned
Collards, Turnips or
Mixed Greens.

89 27oz.


. 'FS i


.;'. '1' .,
Fresh Express Crisp
Cole Slaw
$1 14
H 16 oz. bag,


Tl'. .

Peruvian Sweet
Yellow Onions

771Ib.


Royal Oak
Charcoal
$263
8.3 Ib.


46 $191
Vlasic Kosher Dills.... I


Angel Soft
Bath Tissue
$546
5y24 rolls


Wacky Mac
Pasta

96 2


Sparkle Towels

s4978 roll pkg


13 oz., Peanut Patch
Boiled Peanuts...........


Del Monte Whole Kernel or
Cream Corn, French Style or -
Cut Green Beans

72-14 oz.


10 pk..
Capri Sun................


Blackburn
Grape Jelly
$136
32 oz.


26.5 oz., Del Monte 48 oz. s 87
Spaghetti Sauce ......... Crisco Oil............$....



Frito-Lay
Snack Packs Folger's Coffee

20ct. -20oz. 33.9oz
28 oz., Van Camp $ 138 8 o 0 87
Baked Beans............ No Yolk Noodles ........O4


_ ____


0 UR TCS..FTEWEK.


6A WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2012







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Rescue
From Page 1A
underwater scooter. Gon-
zalez got in the bed of
the truck and lay down
so that he could safely
work to fit the pieces of
Sorenson's gear together as
Sorenson drove at speeds
close to 100 mph to reach
Blue Springs where the div-
ers had entered the water.
While he suited up, Gonza-
lez filled him in on all the
information he'd gotten
from the men who'd called
for help.
Only 11 minutes had
passed between the time
the lost diver's buddies
called and the time Soren-
son entered the water. It
usually takes a diver 45-50
minutes to get ready and
hit the water.
Sorenson found the diver
in about 20 minutes. He
was almost out of air, and
he'd broken the guide line
that could have helped him
find his way out. He'd then
groped and found another
line, which he thought was
the one he'd dropped, but
he was wrong. The line he
picked up had led him into
a dead end. All the air in
his tank was gone, but the
bubbles from the exhaust-
ed nitrogen-enrich air in
his tank had somehow cre-
ated a very small air pocket
in the water that helped
him stay alive.
Sorenson estimated the


Fries
From Page 1A
aides in addition to their
main texts. They use the
additional materials to
learn a variety of skills,
deepen their understand-
ing of concepts and chal-
lenge themselves in higher
thinking.
Malone, as a Title 1
school, received $1,000 to
purchase one copy of the
books on the Common
Core list for each grade
level, but Brisolara said
the goal is to buy at least
five or six copies for each
classroom.
The school has a few
overhead projectors that
teachers can use so the en-
tire class can see the page
of the given book they're
working in, but Brisolara
said it's always better to
have as many books as
possible in the hands of
students. She said she's


Smart911
From Page 1A
audits further ensure that
the information will be
safely held.
When a call comes in
on a phone registered
with Smart911, the
dispatcher will see a
profile match and a


diver had about 5-10 min-
utes of air left in that supply
when he found him, and
was near death after some
25 minutes in that spot.
He was lethargic, Sorenson
said, but survived in part
because he did not panic
after getting in trouble and
was able to use all the air
he had left in his tank.
Sorenson, who has par-
ticipated in many rescue
and recovery missions,
said many divers who
don't survive died because
they stripped off their gear
in an uncontrollable
panic when they get in
trouble.
When Sorenson arrived,
the diver was able to stay
calm and follow him in
their slow trek out on So-
renson's air, with no visibil-
ity most of the way. That he
survived until Sorenson got
to him was something of a
miracle, Sorenson said.
"He was so close to be-
ing dead that I'm shocked
that he was alive," Soren-
son said. "He was slow re-
sponding to my questions.
When something like this
happens, you start pro-
ducing and breathing in
carbon dioxide, a poison-
ous gas that makes you-
really sleepy. He was in a
bad spot. If it hadn't been
for the incredibly efficient
way my manager used the
time we had, I don't' know.
This would probably have
been a recovery, not a
rescue."


looking forward to Tles-
day's opportunity to help
make that happen.
"I think it'll be fun," she
said. "It's a chance for the
children to see us out of
the school- environment;
some of the youngest ones
probably think we live
here (at school). This will
give them a chance to see
that we're real people
with lives outside the
classroom."
Mercer said she's excited
to have the extra hands on
deck next Tuesday, and that
this won't be the last crew
of school staffers on the
job. Hope School teachers
and administrators will do
the same thing on Monday,
Oct. 29, also working from
5-8 p.m.
' She said she will set up
her restaurant special for
the families who come in
to dine next Tuesday. For
instance, she plans to have
board games set up in the
lobby, along with a face-


drop-down menu -where
they can access the
information.
Smart911 is part of
'the "Next Generation"
E-911 service, which will
allow people to send
text messages, photo
images and videos
if needed when they,
contact emergency
services.


Lane closure


today on U.S. 90


The' westbound outside
lane of U.S.90 between
Smith Street and Mil-
ton Avenue in Marianna
will be closed today from
8:30 a.m. until 2 p.m. A
Florida Department of


Follow us on
Twitter


twitter.com/
jcfloridannews


Transportation mainte-
nance team will perform
curb work. Motorists are
reminded to pay atten-
tion and use caution when
driving through the work
zone.


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Jackson County
Floridan


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MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Stacy Holden hangs up some clothing Tuesday at her new business, Simply Unique
Fashions. The store, which opened Oct.9, sells women's clothing, including plus and
extended plus sizes, as well as shoes, jewelry and other accessories. Holden said she
always wanted to open a store, so she decided to give it a try and see how it goes. It is lo-
cated in the Lafayette Centre shopping center next to Subway and is open from 10 a.m. to 8
p.m. Monday through Saturday and from 1-6 p.m. on Sunday. Holden said she will be add-
ing merchandise to the store for its grand opening on Nov. 3.


James & Sikes Funeral
Home Maddox Chapel
4278 Lafayette Street
Marianna, F132446
850.482.2332

Kathryn W.
Blalock

Kathryn Windsor (Kathy)
Blalock, age 88, passed into
her new eternal life early
Monday, October 15, 2012,
at Marianna Health and
Rehabilitation Center. She.
had been convalescing
there for the past year and
a half with breathing diffi-
culties.
She was born in
Albertville, Alabama and
was a long time resident of
Birmingham, Alabama pri-
or to her marriage. As the
widowed wife of Jack N.
Blalock, LT, USN (ret.), she
resided in 5 states and 2
foreign countries before
moving to Marianna from
New Smyrna Beach in
1989.
Kathy was also an artist,
and designed the perma-
nent trademark for the
Florida Ladies of the Order
of Elks, where she had pre-
viously served as President
of the New Smyrna Beach
chapter. She was also an
active member of the Ma-
rianna Women's Club,
American Legion Women's
Auxiliary, and a founder of
the Better Breathers of
Jackson 'County, as well as
a member of the Order of
the Eastern Star.
Kathy is probably best
known for her extensive
volunteer service as an Am-
bassador for the Jackson
County Chamber of Com-
merce, where she was rec-
ognized as Chamber Vol-
unteer of the Year in 2008.
She is survived by her
son, Jack Nobles Blalock II,
of Gainesville; a brother,
James Waddell Windsor, of
Birmingham, Alabama; a
devoted niece, Glenda Sue
Parmer of Marianna; three
grandchildren; six great
grandchildren, and one
great great grandson.


A Celebration of Life me-
morial service will be con-
ducted at 11:00 AM, Satur-
day, October 20, 2012 at
Trinity Baptist Church,
3023 Pennsylvania Ave.,
Marianna, FL 32448. The
family will receive friends
from 10:00 AM to 11:00 AM
(Central Time) at the
church.
In lieu of flowers, the fam-
ily requests donations to
the Trinity Baptist Church
building fund.
Expressions of sympathy
may be made online at http
:/ /www.jamesandsikesfune
ralhomes.com/


James & Sikes Funeral
Home Maddox Chapel
4278 Lafayette Street
SMarianna, Fl 32446
850.482.2332

Margaret G.
Despres

Margaret G. Despres, 90,
of Alford, died Tuesday,
October 16, 2012, at Jack-
son Hospital.
Funeral arrangements
will be announced by
James & Sikes Funeral
Home Maddox Chapel of
Marianna.

James & Sikes Funeral
fome Maddox Chapel
4278 Lafayette Street
Marianna, Fl 32446
850.482.2332'

Rubye Mae
Scott

Mrs. Rubye Mae Scott,
93, of Chattahoochee,
passed away, Sunday, Oc-
tober 14, 2012
Services will be at.11 a.m.
EST, Wednesday, October
17, 2012, at Grace Com-
munity Baptist Church
near Chattahoochee. Inter-
ment will 'follow in Mt.
Pleasant Cemetery. The
family will receive friends
one hour prior to the serv-
ice at the church.


Airline executives urge

airport security overhaul


The Associated Press

ABU DHABI, United
Arab Emirates Airport
securityneeds to undergo
a radical overhaul or else
passengers will become
further disgruntled, lines
will grow'and terminals
will be overwhelmed,
airline executives said
Tuesday at a global avia-
tion conference.
"We simply can't cope
with the expected vol-
ume of passengers with
the way things are to-
day," said Tony Tyler, di-
rector general and CEO
of the International Air
Transport Association,
the airlines' trade group.
Tyler spoke at an air-
lines conference held
in Abu Dhabi, the capi-
tal of the United Arab
Emirates.
He predicted that by
2020, governments will
be using a "checkpoint
of the future" where pas-
sengers can race though
without stopping, re-
moving clothing, or tak-
ing liquids and laptops
out of bags.
While a lot of work has
to be done to get numer-
ous countries and regu-
lators on board, Tyler is
optimistic that today's
"one-size-fits all ap-
proach to screening" can
be replaced with a sys-
tem based on individual
passenger risk. The in-
dustry hopes to test the
concept at a handful
of airports starting late
2014.
The example cited by
Tyler and airline execu-
tives of what is working:
the U.S. Transportation
and Security Adminis-
tration's relatively new


PreCheck program.
Frequent fliers who
voluntarily share more
information with the
government get to keep
their shoes, belts and
light jackets on at se-
curity. The program
will be expanded to 35
airports by the end of the
year.
"If you are willing to
share a little more in-
formation, then you can
have a much better ex-
perience," John S. Pisto-
le, head of the TSA, told'
the conference. "We can
then spend more time on
those we know the least
about."
The additional per-
sonal information would
most likely' be handed
over voluntarily to the
government by passen-
gers who see the benefit
of the time savings.
Pistole said the TSA
would ideally like to ana-
lyze passengers' travel
history and patterns but
lacks Congressional au-
thority to do so. Any such
changes would occur
after the election, at the
earliest, he said.
"I applaud the TSA. I
never thought I would
say it because they are
the worst part of travel,"
said Montie Brewer, for-
mer CEO of Air Canada.
James E. Bennett, who
used to head the Wash-
ington Airport Authority
and is now CEO of the
Abu Dhabi Airports Co.,
said if the current immi-
gration and security pro-
cedures remain in place
as more and more pas-
sengers take to the skies,
airports will run out of
terminal space to hold
all the lines.


Jaokson Cunty Vault. & Monumente

Come Visit us at our NEW LOCATION
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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2012 7AF


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LOCAL & WORLD


NEW DBU.: ESS / -






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


CHIPOLA AFC SCHOLARS


State
No quick appeals of
voter purge case
MIAMI A federal ap-
peals court won't quickly
review a challenge to
Florida's plan to purge
almost 200 voters from
the rolls because they are
non-citizens.
The llth U.S. Circuit
Court of Appeals decision
Tuesday will leave the le-
gal fight for after the Nov.
6 election. Two Florida
federal judges have ruled
that the planned purge of
198 non-citizens can go
forward, despite claims
it violates a federal law
against removing vot-
ers within 90 days of an
election.
The judges decided the
90-day doesn't apply to
non-citizens. Most super-
visors of elections have
said the removal process
would run past Election


Briefs
Day anyway.

Next Senate leader
vows ethics reform
TALLAHASSEE One
of Florida's incoming leg-
islative leaders wants to
make sweeping changes
to the state's ethics laws.
Sen. Don Gaetz,
R-Niceville, on Tuesday
said he wants to toughen
conflict-of-interest rules
for legislators and make
it easier for the public to
see financial disclosure
.forms.
He wants to bar elected
officials from taking a
job that relies on govern-
ment funding. Gaetz also
wants to look at banning
legislators from opening
up separate campaign
accounts that have few
limits on how the money
is spent.
From wire reports


SUBMITTED PHOTO
T he Chipola College Chapter of the Association of Florida Colleges recently awarded
seven scholarships to children and grandchildren of college employees. Scholarship
recipients (seated) with their sponsors (standing, from left) are Courtney Massengill
and father Rance Massengill; Coleton Barberree and grandmother Kim Collins; Ryan Smith
and mother Bonnie Smith; John Whittington and grandfather Gene Prough; Sicily Sapp and
mother Stacey Hinson. Not pictured: Bert Givens and father Steve Givens. Since 1993, AFC
has awarded over $113,000 to more than 100 students through Chipola's AFC Scholarship
Endowment. AFC members raise funds through concession sales at college sports events and
with an annual silent auction.





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Special to the Floridan

The Partners for Pets ani-
mal shelter in Marianna
is participating in several
upcoming events.
Saturday, from 9 a.m. to 1
p.m., Partners will be at the
Tractor Supply Company
on SR71 and US90 in Mari-
anna, with puppies on site
for adoption. Hot dogs and
sodas will be sold to raise
money for the shelter. Also
participating will be Hid-
den Springs Horse Rescue
and Dr. Carla Hubbard
with her Mobile Vet Clinic
doing vaccinations.
The weekend of Oct. 26-
28, Partners for Pets will


Nation Briefs


Judge reverses seltin
prostitution case
KENNEBUNK, Maine
-A judge has reversed his
decision about a Maine
prostitution case, ruling
that addresses and other
identifying information
can now be released for
men charged with pay-
ing for sex with a fitness
instructor.
SAn attorney for The
Portland Press Herald says
Justice Thomas Warren
agreed Tuesday that the
addresses and ages of
the suspected johns can
be made public, along
with their names. War-
ren on Monday allowed
the release of the names
but no other identifying
information.

Experts list many
ways fvriguses can
t~i t drugs
NEWYORK- Experts
say there are many ways
funguses could have
gotten inside the Mas-
sachusetts pharmacy at
the center of the nation's
deadly o(l break of fungal
meningitis.
Dirty conditions at the
pharmacy, faulty steril-
izing equipment, tainted
ingredients or careless lab
technicians could have
led to contamination of
the steroid medication
blamed for the outbreak.
I F'ninwire repot ts


be at Citizens Lodge in
Marianna, for the Big Bend
Highland Games and Scot-
tish Festival. Proceeds from
the festival will benefit the
Salvation Army of Jackson
County. The organizers of
the festival are donating
some prizes to the shelter
to be raffled off at their
booth; proceeds from the
raffle will go to the shel-
ter. Puppies available for
adoption will be on site.
On Nov. 10, Partners for
Pets will have a yard sale
fundraiser at the shelter,
4011 Maintenance Drive in
Marianna, from 7 a.m. to 1
p.m. To donate items for
the yard sale, drop them


JCFLORIDAN.COM


Let us help you
with a memorial
of BEAUTY atnd
DURABILITY





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off at the shelter, 8 a.m. to
3 p.m. any day before the
sale.
Partners for Pets is a
private, nonprofit, no-kill
animal shelter.



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18A WEDNESDAY. OCTOBER 17, 2012


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Sports Briefs

High School football
Friday Wewahitchka at
Sneads, 7 p.m.; Vernon at
Graceville, 7 p.m.; Marianna at
Walton, 7 p.m.; Cottondale is off
this week.

Youth football
Marianna Recreation De-
partment will offer two tackle
football leagues and one boys'
flat football league this year.
Registration for youth ages 6-13
will be held through Nov. 1 from
8 a.m. to 4 p.m. at The Marianna
Educational and Recreational
Expo located at 3625 Caverns
Road in Marianna.
Registration fee for flag foot-
ball is $30 for all participants,
$45 for all participants of tackle
/football. The fee must be paid
with a check or money order. No
cash will be accepted.
Special registration will be held
at the MERE on Oct. 12 from
4-7 p.m. No one will be allowed
to register after Nov. 1, and all
participants must bring a copy
of their birth certificate.
For more information, or for
anyone that may be interested
in coaching a team or officiating
youth football, call the Mari-
anna Recreation Department
at 482-6228 or come by during
registration.

SHS Homecoming 5K race
The Sneads High School
Foundation is holding the first
SHS Homecoming 5K race. The
race will take place at Three
Rivers State Park in Sneads on
Saturday. For more information,
email sneadshigh.foundation@
gmail.com orcall Tyler Poole at
573-1599 or Tony Beauchamp at
593-6576.

Golf tournament
The Chipola College Athletics
program will host agolf tour-
nament at Indian Springs Golf
Course on Oct. 26 at 12:30 p.m.
Entry and sponsorship
deadline is Oct. 19.
Entry fee is $200 per team for
a four-person scramble which
covers green fees, cart, lunch
and the chance to win door
prizes. Mulligans are $5.
Tournament prizes will be
awarded for longest drive, clos-
est to the pin and hole-in-one.
Two sponsorships are avail-
able. Corporate sponsor ($300)
includes entry for one team and
a club house sign. Hole sponsor-
ships are $50.
All Chipola fans are invited
to show support by playing,
sponsoring a team, purchas-
ing a sponsorship or making a
monetary donation. All proceeds
will benefit the Chipola Athletic
Department.
For more information, call
Terry Allen at (850) 849-0462 or
loc Calloway at (850) 718-2451.

Flare 5K Run/Walk
The City of Nlarianna Fire De-
partment & Covenant Hospice
would like to invite you to join
us at the CARE WITH FLARE 5K
Run/Walk on Nov. 3. We are very
excited to announce the addi-
tion of a postrace celebration
and family fun day filled with
food, drinks, games, inflatables,
music and awards.
Entries cost after Oct. 8 in-
creases to $25, and T-shirts and
race packets will be a first come
first serve basis.
Registration will start at 7:30
a.m. the day of the event and the
race will begin at 9 a.m. The stu-
dentenntry fee will be $10. There
will also be a free kid's one-mile
fun run for children younger
than 14.
You can register online at www.
eventsatcQvenant.corn/care-
withflare or www.active.com. For
more information call Jennifer
Griffin or Angela Jackson at 850-
482-8520 or 850-209-8008, or via
email jennifer.griffin@'cOvenan
thospice.org or angela.jackson@'
coveqanthospice.org.
Covenant Hospice is a non-


profit organization dedicated to
providing comprehensive com-
passionate service to patients
and their loved ones during
times of life limiting illnesses,
based on need, regardless of
ability to pay. :

Sports Items
Send all sports items to editorial@jcfloridan.
cor, or fax them to 850-482-4478. The
mailing address for the paper is Jackson
County Floridan P.O. Box 520 Marianna, FL
32447.


Hornets hope to refocus in bye week


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Cottondale defenders drag down a Vernon runner during the
Hornets' recent Homecoming game.


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

Three Jackson County, football
teams are currently preparing
for monster district matchups
Friday night, while the fourth is
simply trying to regroup from a
sloppy loss before its own league
showdown next week.
The Cottondale Hornets are off
this week following a turnover-
plagued 36-20 road loss to the Jay
Royals last week in a game that
the Hornets gave the ball away a
whopping eight times.
While fellow District 2-1A teams
Graceville and Sneads are ready-
ing for important league games
against Vernon and Wewahitch-
ka, and District 1-4A Marianna is
trying to even its district record
with a trip to Walton, the Hornets
are just hoping to remember how
to hang on to the football for four
quarters.
"We'll do a lot of work this
week on ourselves," Cottondale


coach Mike Melvin said Thurs-
day. "We've talked about getting
refocused because we've got two
big games.coming up and we've
got to be ready. We can't make
the mistakes we made the other
night and hope to win."
Cottondale will travel to Sneads
on Oct. 26 to play the Pirates
in a makeup game from ear-
lier this season before returning
home Nov. 2 to take on archrival
Graceville.
The two games will determine
whether or not the Hornets are
able to make it back to the post-
season after a one-year absence,
but they have little hope of win-
ining either game if they don't
correct the ball security issues
that led to last week's loss.
"We're watching tape of it now
and the players themselves can't
believe the mistakes they made,"
Melvin said. "They can't explain it.
We watched the tape and showed

See HORNETS, Page 2B


JUNIOR VARSITY FOOTBALL



Tigers nipped by Sharks


Graceville's Denny Eligson looks for an opening during the Tigers'junior varsity game against Port St. Joe.


Graceville JV

team falls 8-6

BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Graceville Tigers ju-
nior varsity team's dreams
of a perfect season went by
the wayside Monday night at
home with an 8-6 defeat at
the hands of the Port St. Joe
Sharks.
The Tigers came into the
game at 5-0 and were look-
.ing to cap off a banner year
for the first season as a sev-
enth-through-ninth grade


program, but a strong Sharks
defense proved too difficult
to overcome.
GHS coach Butch Burrell
said he and his players all
hoped to go undefeated, but
he was still proud of the way
his team competed against
the Sharks.
"It was disappointing that
we didn't have a perfect sea-
son, but we gave those guys
a fight," he said. "That game
could've gone either way. I
was disappointed with the
amount of penalties we got,
but I was really proud of
my defense. Other than a
few personal fouls, they re-
ally stood up to a bigger and


SENIOR NIGHT VICTORY








,, .,


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Haley Boggs sets up a spike for Cottondale on
Monday night during the Lady Hornets Senior
night game against Holmes County. Cottondale
won the match in three sets.


older group."
Both defenses had their way
for much of the evening, with
the difference in the game
ultimately proving to be
the 2-point conversion that
Port St. Joe added to its lone
score.
The teams exchanged
fumbles on their opening
possessions, but the Sharks
struck first with a nine-
play, 63-yard drive capped
off by a 5-yard touchdown
run with 2:50 left in the first
period.
A running play converted
the 2-point play to make it
8-0.
Graceville finally broke


through with a score of its
own after forcing Port St. Joe's
third turnover of the half with
a sack and fumble recovery
that set the Tigers up at the
Sharks' 9-yard line late in the
second quarter.
Three plays later, Deante
Swain got in from a yard out,
but the 2-point play failed,
leaving the Tigers behind at
the half.
The Tigers had several op-
portunities to get the lead
in the second half, possess-
ing the ball deep in Port
St. Joe territory on all threb
possessions.

See TIGERS, Page 2B


Lady Bulldogs


win wild one


over Rutherford


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Marianna Lady
Bulldogs took a wild
four-set victory over the
Rutherford Lady Rams on
Monday night to improve
to 11-8 on the year.
Rutherford won the
first set 25-23, but the
Lady Bulldogs answered
by winning the second
33-31 in the longest set
that Marianna has played
all season.
It was another close


win for Marianna, 27-25
in the third, and the Lady
Bulldogs finally finished
Rutherford off with a
solid 25-19 victory in the
fourth.
It was the second vic-
tory over Rutherford in as
many tries for Marianna,
but this one was much
more difficult to come by
than the first.
"I don't know what
we were doing the first
three sets, but we were

See WIN, Page 2BL


-i


~111111~11~1


- "'


I;


'''








JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN + www.jcfloridan.com


Tigers
From Page 1B
But they were stopped
on downs each time, the
last came on a fourth-and-
4 play from the Sharks' 24-
yard line with just less than
five minutes to play, as
LaDarius Nix was dropped
for a 2-yard loss.
Port St. Joe took over on
its own 26-yard line with
4:13 to play and caught a
big break after being forced
to punt and having the Ti-
gers called for a roughing
the punter penalty to keep
the possession alive.
The Sharks then added
another first down to en-
able themselves to run out
the clock.


Hornets
From Page 1B
them where the mistakes
and breakdowns were and
we'll try to fix them when
we get on the field. We've
got to do a better job of
controlling the football to
win the big ones."
The eight turnover per-
formance against Jay came
ironically after a 34-13
win over Vernon in which
the Hornets played virtu-
ally error-free football and
didn't turn it over once.
That discipline and
execution didn't follow
the Hornets on the road,
though their focus might.
have been shaken by the
sudden death of a former
classmate of the CHS se-
niors who had moved away


Quarterback Derrick
White led Graceville in
rushing with 63 yards on
11 carries, with Nix add-
ing 35 yards, and Swain 31
yards.
Graceville finished with
just 116 total yards, and
held the Sharks to only 102
yards.
Burrell said it was a pret-
ty evenly matched game
between two teams who
could do little to surprise
each other.
"The offenses were iden-
tical. They run the exact
same offense as us and the
same defense, so it was
like looking in the mirror,"
he said. "They were very
physical and well coached.
We did have some chanc-
es, but penalties really got


after the previous school
year.
"It was a tough week for
some of the seniors. The
viewing was Wednesday
and the funeral was Thurs-
day, so it was very fresh on
their minds," Melvin said of
his players. "It didn't even
look like the same football
team as the Vernon game.
We have to regroup and do
what we do.
"It's a good week to be off
and we're getting past all of
that. It's good to get back to
the fundamentals and heal
up some bangs and bruises
and just focus on playing
fundamental football."
Another benefit for the
Hornets is having an ex-
tra week to prepare for
their next biggest garie of
the season against a very
talented and explosive


us. That all comes back
down to my job of I guess
not having us disciplined
enough on the penal-
ties. I'll take the blame on
that."
Still, it was a pretty
impressive season for
the Tigers, who sur-
passed all preseason
expectations.
"Nobody even gave us
a chance when we de-
cided to go to a seventh-
through-ninth JV even the
people here," Burrell said.
"A lot of the parents didn't
agree with it. But to go 5-
1, I couldn't be happier.
You can't argue with that..
We would've loved 6-0, but
I'll take 5-1 and that gives
us something to shoot for
next year."


Sneads team.
However, Melvin said
that his team's focus will be
primarily directed inward.
"This week we'll spend
most of our time on our-
selves, not on (Sneads
or Graceville)," he said.
"We've got to work on get-
ting ourselves better."
While the Hornets are
busy working through
some issues after last
week's loss, they still find
themselves in a great po-
sition, sitting at 2-0 in dis-
trict with total control of
their postseason destiny.
"That's what we've em-
phasized to the guys, that
you're 2-0 but you've still
got two big ones to seal the
deal," Melvin said. "Both of
those teams are looking at
the same prospects. There's
nobody out of it yet."


NFL Brief


Jaguars sign veteran
safety Harris
JACKSONVILLE -The
Jacksonville Jaguars have
signed veteran safety
Chris Harris and waived
cornerback Kevin
Rutland.


Harris was a sixth-round
draft pick by Chicago in
2005 who has played for
the Bears, Panthers and
Lions, starting at least
seven games in each of
his first seven seasons.
He played in 11 games in
2011, seven with the Bears


and four with the Lions,
with eight starts.
His most productive
year was in 2010, when
he started all 16 games
with Chicago and finished
with a career-high five
interceptions.
From wire reports


MARKSKINNER/FLORIDAN
Marianna's Bre Johnson makes a diving save during a recent game against Sneads.


Win
From Page 1B
not working as hard as we needed to
work," Lady Bulldogs coach Belinda
Christopher said. "The last game was
how we should've been playing the
whole match. But we were on our heels
most of the night. I guess because we
already beat them in three before, we
thought it would be an easy match. But
Rutherford made some improvements
and was a better prepared team for us
this time."
Porsha Morgan had another big night
for the Lady Bulldogs with a team-best
16 kills to go along with 21 service points,
three aces, four digs and two blocks.
Bre Johnson added eight kills and two
blocks, while Linsey Basford had sixkills,
29 assists and three blocks, and Lexie
Basford had four kills, 17 service points,
three aces, 38 assists and four digs.
Whitney Lipford led the team with 10
digs, and Tia Bass led with six blocks.
Megan Tillman had 15 service points
and three aces, but serving was not
a strong point for the Lady Bull-
dogs on Monday night, according


to Christopher.
"We were real inconsistent with our
serves. That's still our weakness," she
said. "We lost a lot of serving points,
and when you do that, you start losing
momentum and that changes the entire
pace of the game."
But the coach also gave credit to the
Lady Rams for their performance in
defeat.
"They worked on their defense and
their offense a little bit, changed the
lineup a little, and had a couple of hit-
ters that we had a hard time blocking,"
Christopher said. "But we hung in there
and battled it out, and in the final set, we
-jumped on them and had pretty good
control of the game. I guess we wanted
to get it over with.
"We got our serving percentage back
up and started making some plays that
we should've been making all night."
Marianna was scheduled to play host
to Chipley on Tuesday night to conclude
the regular season.
The Lady Bulldogs will next compete
in the district tournament in Walton
on Tuesday against the Lady Braves,
who won both regular season meetings
against MHS.


WEDNESDAY MORNING / AFTERNOON C Comcast C/R Comcast Rebuild D Dish DTV DirecTV OCTOBER 17, 2012

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CNN2 43 43202 204 Morning Express With Robin Meade News Now Making It
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ESPN 19 19 140 .206 SportsCenter (CC) SportsCenter (CC) SportsCenter (CC) SportsCenter (N) (CC) SportsCenter (N) (CC) SportsCenter (N) (CC) SportsCenter (N) (CC) SportsCenter (N) (CC) SportsCenter (N) (CC) Outside Football NFL Live
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LIFE 29 29 108 252 Ninja CIndyC The SUZANNE Show WIll/Grace WiIl/Grace Frasier Frasler Frasier Frasler Chris Chris hrs Chris Grey's Anatomy (CC) Grey'sAnatomy (CC) Grey'sAnatomy(CC) How I Met
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SPEED 99 62 150 607 Knife Set Hair Rest. NASCAR Race Hub Dumbest Dumbest Hard Parts Hard Parts My Ride IMy Ride Loss Tommie NASCAR Sprint Cup Replay (N) Monster Jam On Edge
SPIKE 47 47 168 241 WEN Hair Loss Tommie JIllian Insanltyl Octspring CSI: NY (CC) CSI: NY "Super Men" CSI: NY (CC) CSI: Crime Scene CSI: Crime Scene A Few Good Men*** (1992, Drama) Tom Cruise.'R'
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TLC 98 98 183 280 People People Baby's Multiples Baby Story Baby Story Baby Story Baby Story Hoarding: Burled Alve Say Yes Say Yes What Notto Wear Baby Story Baby Story Toddlers & Tiaras What NottoWear Say Yes
TNT 23 23 138 245 Smallvllle "Nicodemus" Charmed (CC) Charmed (CC) Supernatural (CC) Supernatural (CC) Castle The Third Man" Castle (CC) Castle (CC) Castle (CC) Castle Boom!" (CC) Castle
TOON 31 31 176 296Looney Regular Ben 10 Beyblade Pokemon NInjaGo Sidekck Dog Garfield Garfield Casper's Scooby Looney Tunes Tom& JerryScooby Scooby Grim Looney Annoying
TVLND 22 22 106 304 Octspring Defrosting Hollywood SuperFood Murder, She Wrote Leave Leave an Dyke Van Dyke Love Lucy Griffth Griffith Gunsmoke "Hill Girl" (CC) Gunsmoke (CC) Bonanza "The Actress" Bonanza
TWC 25 25 214 362 Wake Up With Al (N) Your Weather Today With Abrams and Bettes (CC) Wake Up With Al (CC) Day Planner (CC) Twst Fate wt Fate Coast Guard Alaska Weather
USA 26 26 105 242 VI The Interpreter *** (2005) Nicole Kidman.'PG-13' (CC) I. Gone Baby Gone *** (2007) Casey Affleck.'R' (CC) I Shoot'Em Up** (2007) Clive Owen. 'R' (CC) NCS "Homeown Hero" NCIS"SWAK" (CC) NCIS "Twilight (CC) NCIS (CC)

WEDNESDAY EVENING / LATE NIGHT C Comcast C/R Comcast Rebuild D Dish DTV DirecTV OCTOBER 17, 2012
1a ID TV S330dS4.014:00n =Sm1:55: 5 1S5 5 5555AZ IS 111 S 55tl
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SCBS 3 3 4 R.Ray Ellen DeGeneres Show News CBS News News Wheel Survivor: Philippines (N) Criminal Minds (N) CSI: Crime Scene News Late Show Letterman Late Late Show/Craig Inside Ed. Up to the Minute (N)
a NBC 5 5 7 7 Doctors Millionaire Jeopardyl News NBC News News Wheel Practice Guys-Kids Law & Order: SVU Chicago Fire (N) (CC) News Tonight Show w/Leno Jimmy Fallon Daly today (CC)
SABC 8 8 13 13 Dr. Phil (N) The Dr. OzShow (N) News ABC News News Ent The Middle Neighbors Mod Fam Suburg. Nashville (N) News Nightline Jimmy Kimmel Live (N) Jim Excused The Dr. Oz Show (CC)
) FOX 10 10 28 28 & MLB Baseball TBA Big Bang Big Bang The X Factor The judges narrow their search. (N) News View America Two Men Two Men 30 Rock Friends Friends King of Hill How I Met Scrubs
SPBS 11 11 WordGIrl Wild Kratts Electric Martha PBS NewsHour (N) Dimension Nature (CC) (DVS) NOVA (N) (CC) (DVS) Nova scienceNOW (N) Charlie Rose (N) (CC) T.Smiley T. Smiley Nature (CC) (DVS) NOVA (CC) (DVS)
A&E 30 30 118 265 First48 The Frst 48 (CC) to e re Storage Storage trage oStorage Storage Storage DuckD. Duck. Duck D. buck D. Storage Storage Storage Storage Duck. DuckD.
AMC 33 33 130 254 V DeadSilence ** (2007) 'NR'(CC) F Friday the 13th: Te Final Chapter (1984) Friday the 13th- A New Beginning (1985) iV Friday the 13th, Part VI: Jason Lives (1986) V. Friday the13th A NewBeginning (1985) V White Noise (2005)
BET 35 35 124 329 Jamie Foxx Parkers Parkers 106 & Park: BET's Top 10 Live (N) (CC) BET Hip Hop Awards 2012 (CC) TheGame The Game Sleep The Game Wendy Williams Show The Express ** (2008) Dennis Quaid.'PG'
CNN 45 45 200 202 The Situation Room (N) Erin Buett OutFront Anderson Cooper 360 Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 Erin Burnett OutFront Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 Erin Burnett OutFront
CNN2 43 43 202 204 Making It Evening Express Jane Velez-Mitcheli (N) Nancy Grace (N) Dr. Drew (N) Nancy Grace Showbiz Tonight Dr. Drew NancyGrace Showbiz Tonight
CSS 20 20 To Be Announced Dawg Talkin' SEC Football i College FootballAuburn at Mississippi. # College Football Tennessee at Mississippi State. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog.
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ESPN 19 19 140 206 NFL Live Around Interruption SportsCenter (N) (CC) All-Access Best/NFL WNBA Basketball Indiana Fever at Minnesota Lynx. (N) (CC) All-Access SportsCenter (N) (CC) SportsCenter (N) (CC) SportsCenter (N) (CC) SportsCenter (N) (CC)
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HALL 46 46 185 312 Waltons he Waltons (CC) Little HouseonPrairie Little House onPrairiie Little House on Prairie Little House on Prairie Frasier Frasier Frasier FraIser Gold Girls Gold Girls Gold Girls Gold Girls Cheers Cheers
HBO 0301 301 300 501 Harry Potter Weight A Thousand Words (2012) Eddie Murphy. V Cowboys& Alens** (2011)DanielCraig. Boardwalk Empire Real Time/Bill Maher Treme (CC) S The Whole Nine Yards ** (2000) V Mother
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LIFE 29 29 108 252 Selena *** (1997, Biography) Jennifer Lopez, 'PG'(CC) I Abducted: The Carlna White Story (2012) Houstons Remember My Life, Movie IV Abducted: The Carlina White Story (2012) Houstons Remember My Life, Movie
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TOON 31 31 176 296 Adventure Dragons Regular Regular Gumball Adventure NinaGo Dragons JohnnyT King oHill King of Hill Amer. Dad Amer. Dad Family Guy (CC) Chicken AquaTeen Franken. Amer. Dad Amer. Dad FamilyGuy
TVLND 22 22 106 304 Bonanza Bonanza(CC) A'S'H MAS'H MASH Coby Cosby Cosby Raymond Raymond Cleveland The Exes King Kg ng King 70s Show '70s Show Roseanne Roseanne
TWC 25 25 214 362 Weather Storms Storms Full Force Full Force Weather Center Live Coast Guard Florida Coast Guard Florida (N) Weather Center Live Coast Guard Florida Coast Guard Florida Weather Center Live Impact TV ImpactTV
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I


-12B WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 17 2012


SPORTS







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


College Basketball



Indians win three in preseason finale


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Chipola Indians men's
basketball team wrapped up
its preseason schedule over the
weekend with three games in Co-
lumbus, Ga., winning all three.
Chipola took wins of 18 points
over Marion Military Academy,
20 points over Chattahoochee
Valley, and 10 points over Chat-
tanooga Tech to finish 5-1 in the
preseason.
The only loss came to Cen-
tral Florida in the first game
of a three-game jamboree at
Tallahassee.
First-year Indians coach Pat-
rick Blake said he wanted to
see marked improvement in his
team's execution last weekend,


and he did get that, at least at
one end of the court.
"Offensively, I thought we were
a lot better in our shot selection
and executing, but defensively
we're still not where we need to
be," he said. "It's just more about
defensive rebounding, getting
loose balls, and just taking some
pride in it. We still don't play as
hard as we need to on the defen-
sive end.
"But I thought we did a good
job of. carrying over the things
we had worked on in practice."
Despite the early struggles,
Blake did say he believed his
team has the ability to be elite on
the defensive end as the season
unfolds.
"It's just a mentality. With our
length and athleticism, we have


the potential to be a great defen-
sive team, but it's creating that
mentality and realizing how im-
portant it is," he said. "Obviously
as the season goes on and the
competition gets tougher, the
things we're getting away with
now we won't be able to get away
with against the good teams."
Better progress is being made
on offense where the Indians are
still figuring out how to strike the
right balance between playing
the up-tempo game that Blake
prefers and still playing under
control.
"I thought our ball movement
was a lot better and shot selec-
tion was better. We didn't settle
for as many jump shots as in the
previous weekend," the coach
said. "We still need to get a lot


crisper just on offensive execu-
tion and with where our guys are
supposed to be."
The Indians will open the sea-
son in Baton Rouge, La., on Nov.
2-3 by playing Christian Life
(Tex.) and Baton Rouge CC.
As the team continues to pre-
pare for the games that actually
count in the standings, Blake
said that the six scrimmage
games the Indians played served
a useful purpose.
"I just think it was great for us
to play against some other teams
to see what we need to work on,"
he said. "To watch film on those
games and see when we're not
in a defensive stance or we don't
execute a play, it's just a great
learning tool for us."
Chipola will have just over


two weeks to get ready to start a
season in which it will be widely
seen as one of the national fa-
vorites due to a strong returning
core and one of the best recruit-
ing classes in the country.
But Blake said there's still a
lot of work to do for his team to
reach its potential.
"We're just trying to get better
every day with our three main
points, which are communica-
tion, valuing possession, and be-
ing focused in everything we do,"
he said. "If it's defensively always
talking,' not giving up offensive
rebounds, keeping the ball out
of the paints, not turning the ball
over, or taking good shots, it's
about just staying focused. We
want to apply those three main
points to everything we do."


College Football



Miami waiting to see if Morris can play
~MiaPi


The Associated Press

CORAL GABLES Miami is willing to
wait and see if Stephen Morris' sprained
left ankle improves before the Hurricanes
choose a quarterback to start on Saturday
night against No. 12 Florida State.
Ryan Williams practiced Tuesday as Mi-
ami's presumptive starter, with Preston
Dewey as his backup, while Morris spent
the day in and out of treatment and un-
able to do anything on the field. And while
plenty of signs point to Williams getting
the call in- the annual rivalry game with
the Seminoles, Miami coach Al Golden
said he's still giving Morris a chance.
"We've got a long way to go," Golden
said. "I would have to classify him as a
game-time (decision) right now. ... So
we'll see. Ryan did a great job today, threw
the ball well, practiced really well, made
all the throws so we're excited about him.
We don't have really two separate game
plans going in. And if Stephen's healthy,
we'll give it a shot."
Golden said the earliest he expects
Morris would have any chance of being
on the practice field is Thursday, and if he
makes it out there then, he'd likely be lim-
ited to 7-on-7 work. Miami is obviously
concerned, and obviously doesn't know if
Morris will be ready, as proven by Golden
sending a 5:30 a.m. text message to ask
how his quarterback was feeling.
Small problem: Golden sent that text to


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Miami quarterback Stephen Morris (17) is
helped off the field during the second half of
a game on Saturday.
the wrong Morris he sent it to Jim Mor-
ris, Miami's longtime baseball coach.
"I'm feeling fine," Jim Morris said.
Either way, Florida State is ready for
either Williams or Morris. Seminoles
coach Jimbo Fisher said his staff might
even study some tape of Williams' games
at Memphis in 2010 he transferred to
Miami after that season -'even though


that wouldn't do them any good as far as
breaking down what the Hurricanes might
try against them on Saturday night.
"You have to prepare for both," Fisher
said. "And when you say prepare for both,
though, how drastic are they going to
change? I mean, in two or three days of
practice, you could change your offense
and do some different things, but the
foundation is still going to be the same.
One's a little more mobile, one's a little
bigger and stronger, but they're both very
good quarterbacks."
Fisher's offense has no such who-will-
start dilemma.
The Seminoles boast perhaps the ACC's
hottest quarterback right now in EJ Man-
uel, who led Florida State past Miami last
season and is coming off a career-best
439-yard, four-touchdown showing last
weekend against Boston College.
Going back to last October, Manuel is
13-2 in his last 15 appearances. And he'll
be facing a Miami defense that, in only
seven games so far this season, has al-
lowed at least 32 points five times and at'
least 498 yards of offense to opponents
four times.
Still, the Miami defense that Manuel
sees on film, he said, is fast and athletic.
"Those guys are still smart, I'm sure,
too," Manuel said. "So I think we have to
go out there and execute. I don't really
think it's necessarily about the defense
that we're playing against. I think we have


to go out there and do what we're sup-
posed to do."
Morris has thrown for 1,991 yards in
seven games this season, including a
school- and Atlantic Coast Conference-
record 566 against North Carolina State.
He's one of the biggest reasons why Mi-
ami, a team widely picked to finish near
the bottom of the Coastal Division, is in
the thick of the league race.
Golden indicated Morris has earned the
chance to get back on the field this week.
"We all only get so many shots at this,"
Golden said. "I'm not going to ask him to
sit out the Florida State game or for any
game, to be honest with you. If he's ready
to go, he's ready to go. If you see him out
there, it's because he is ready to go and he
can execute in that game. If he's not, then
that.question is answered."
For his part, Williams is taking the add-
ed responsibility of potentially making
his first Miami start in stride, even though
it would be on, national television against
an archrival before what's expected to be
a jampacked crowd in Sun Life Stadium.
The way he sees it, games like this are
why he came to Miami in the first place.
"The only thing different is getting more
reps with the first team now," Williams
said. "I'm preparing the same. I do the
same amount of film study every week.
I've been preparing like I was the starter.
I just wasn't with the (first-string) doing
the actual reps that Stephen was taking."


Seminoles' weak schedule weighs down BCS standing


The Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE Flor-
ida State appears to be
paying the price for a soft
schedule.
The 12th-ranked Semi-
noles (6-1, 3-1 Atlantic
Coast Conference) find
themselves at No. 14 in the
first Bowl Championship
Series ratings that deter-
mine who plays for the na-
tional title.
And the computer por-
tion used in the rankings
formula was not good for
the Seminoles, who have
just one win over a team
with a winning record as
they prepare for Saturday's
visit to instrastate rival Mi-
ami (4-3, 3-1).
Strength of schedule is
a significant factor in the
computer rankings," BCS
executive director Bill
Hancock said Monday.
"It's early," Hancock
noted.
"There's much more
football to be played."
The highest and lowest
computer rankings are
dropped out and the other
four averaged. Anderson &
Hester; Richard Billingsley,
Colley, Matrix, Kenneth
Massey, Jeff Sagarin and
Peter Wolfe provide the
computer scoring.
Florida State's opponents
are a combined 19-24
this season and the Semi-
noles 49-37 victory over


e-- am L 4 lt
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Florida State fullback Lonnie Pryor (24) is hammered by Boston College defensive end Kasim
Edebali (91), causing him to fumble the. ball in the first quarter of a game on Saturday in
Tallahassee.


14th-ranked Clemson last
month is their only win
this season over a team
with a winning record. Two
of Florida State's wins are
over lower-division teams
from the Football Cham-
pionship Subdivision and
another over Boston Col-
lege, whose lone win was
over lower-division Maine.
"We've got to play our
schedule and everybody
play their schedule and
we'll see where we're at the
end," Florida State coach
Jimbo Fisher said Monday.


"That's what you've got to fense and defense, but
do." some of its gaudy numbers
Florida State is among are a result of opponents
the nation's leaders in of- like lower-division Savan-


~ ~tlbers Sp i
4 uffiers & Exhaust Used Tres'1 I


nah State and Murray State
along with an unusually
weak Boston College team,
which is still searching for
a win over a FBS team.
Florida State is ranked
12th by AP 10th in the
coaches poll and eighth in
the Harris Interactive Poll,
but dropped dramatically
in the computer rankings
when strength of schedule
was factored in.
"It scares me where
our world is going some-
times that we're taking
the human element out of
some things," Fisher said.
"There's got to be a human
element in some things."
Florida State quarter-
back EJ Manuel, who was
named the ACC's offensive
back of the week for the
second time this season
after throwing for a career-
best 439 yards and four
touchdowns in Saturday's
51-7 romp past Boston
College, isn'tworried about
where the Seminoles sit in
the current BCS rankings.


"It's out of our hands,"
he said. "We've just got to
continue playing ball."
Manuel said things won't
be easy against Miami in
a series where the Hur_
ricanes have averaged
exactly one point a game
more over the last dozen
meetings.
"Both sides have great
athletes and great talent,"
he said. It'll be a tough
game. We're up for it and
I know those guys will be
ready."
Miami, however, may be
without starting quarter-
back Stephen Morris, who
suffered a sprained left
ankle in last Saturday's 18-
14 loss to North Carolina.
Backup Ryan Williams
completed 11 of 15 passes
for 87 yards after replacing
his injured teammate in
the fourth quarter.
The Seminoles, who have
several players from South
Florida on their roster,
are a 17 V2 point favorite
Saturday.


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f Each Office Is Independently Owned and Operated
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SPORTS


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2012 ,* 3BF







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


No. 3 Florida winning with 1-dimensional offense


The Associated Press
GAINESVILLE No. 3
Florida is making balanced
offense seem overrated.
The Gators are last in
the Southeastern Confer-
ence in passing, averaging
a mere 145 yards a game at
a time when throwing the
football is as fashionable
as alternate uniforms. And
it's not because they're
running the triple option
or the Wing T.
Nope, the Gators are
simply sticking with what
works best getting the
most out of a shifty run-
ning back, a fleet-footed
quarterback and a physical
offensive line that tends to
get better the longer it's on
the field.
Although the close-to-
the-vest, grind-it-out style
has carried Florida to its
highest ranking in three
years, it also has created a
perception that the Gators
(6-0, 5-0) are vulnerable
heading into Saturday's
game against No. 9 South
Carolina (6-1, 4-1).
What if the Gamecocks,
who rank fourth in the
league in rushing defense,
shut down Florida's seem-
ingly one-dimensional
attack? What if Florida
gets behind early? Could
the Gators survive costly
turnovers?
"I didn't realize we were
last in passing, but we're
first in the East," quar-
terback Jeff Driskel said.
"That's all that matters.
We're undefeated. We
haven't dropped a game
yet. If you're winning,
everything's all right. Ob-
viously we got to get bet-
ter in the passing game,
but we're winning games.
That's all that matters."
The Gators have used
stingy defense and stellar
second-half performances
to climb up the polls. They
have trailed in five of six
games this season, been
down at halftime in three
and never really looked
like one of the best teams
in the country.
It's clear that Florida has
become exactly what Mus-
champ promised from Day
1 a tough, physical team
that outworks its oppo-
nents and does whatever it
takes to win games.
Call them the orange and
blue-collared Gators.
It should be no surprise
that the Bowl Champion-
ship Series computers
- unbiased machines that
rank teams based on com-
plicated algorithms and
don't see a single down
- love Florida. Others
have their doubts, believ-
ing it's difficult to maintain
success in this day and age
while completing just 13
passes a game.
Offensive coordinator
Brent Pease, who came to
Gainesville after six sea-
sons at Boise State, wants
to be more balanced. But
he also makes it clear that
if his offense continues
giving opponents fits on
the ground, he's going to
stick with it.
"When we go in and hit
10 explosive plays, the
bottom line is run them
again," Pease said. "Run
them again, OK. Let's not
get greedy here as a coach
and say, 'I don't like that.
I'm throwing the ball be-
cause that's what we all
love to do."'
Mike Gillislee ranks sec-
ond in the SEC in rush-
ing, averaging 102 yards
a game. Sophomore Jeff
Driskel has just four touch-
down passes, but he's com-
pleting nearly 67 percent
of his passes and has just
two turnovers. He also has
326 yards rushing and four
scores, including a school-
record 177 yards and three
TDs on the ground last


week at Vanderbilt. The of-
fensive line, which raised
eyebrows when coaches
called it the team's strength,
has held its own against
formidable fronts.
Throw in Florida's stout
defense and two of the
best specialists in the na-
tion punter Kyle Christy
and place-kicker Caleb St-
urgis and it's hard to ar-
igue when Muschamp and


Pease pass on passing and
play for field position and
field goals.
"If Jeff Driskel can carry
the ball 70 yards and out-
run everybody, he's getting
the ball," Pease said. "If
Mike Gillislee can get the
ball and outrun everybody,
he's getting the ball. And if
our O-line blocks like they
block, we're giving them
the ball. I'm not going to be
stubborn as far as playing
off numbers every week.
I'm going to do what's best
for this team and what they
create for us to be produc-
tive and score points and
win football games."
South Carolina coach
Steve Spurrier, who will


YOUR
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Redeem October 31-November 4, 2012.
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return to his alma mater
Saturday and the place he
nicknamed "The Swamp"
during his 12-year coach-
ing tenure in Gainesville,
always had Florida at or
near the top of the league
in passing. But even the
head ball coach recognizes
that what the Gators are
doing could be special.
"There's all kind of ways
to win the game," Spurrier
said. "The best one is to
play outstanding defense,
special teams and run the
ball. There've been a lot
of champions that ran the
ball. I remember it was
1992 when Alabama won
the national champion-
ship. I think they com-


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pleted one pass in the na-
tional championship game
against Miami. So you
don't have to throw the ball
to win championships."
The Crimson Tide com-
pleted four passes in that
Sugar Bowl, but Spurrier's
point is valid.
And the Gators know it.
"We're just doing what
it takes to win," receiver
Frankie Hammond Jr. said.
"If it's running the ball 40
times and throwing it 10,
as long as we get the 'W,'
I can't complain. Because
at the end of the day, we're
brought here to win games
and win championships,
and that's what we're try-
ing to do."


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Florida quarterback Jeff Driskel runs for a touchdown during a
game against Vanderbilt on Saturday in Nashville, Tenn.


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-q






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


PEANUTS BY CHARLES SCHULTZ
YES, YOUR HONOR.. WE'RE HERE TO SUE YES, SIR, I'LL HE WANTS TO KNOW
THIS YOUNG LAPY THE WOLF WHO ATE ASK HER.. WHY YOU'RE WEARING
5 MY CLIENT.. HER GRANDMOTHER.. THAT5TUPIP LOOKING
REP RISING HOOP IN
STHE COURTROOM..


BORN LOSER BY ART AND CHIP SANSOM
A > ANOTIAEKTRING I WANTEi" REY, POP, CAW I ASK YOU A P'D ON'T INTERRUPTYOUEFkATRE.'
TO TELLYOU, BRUTU5... QUESTION? WIAHEN aRE' LISTEIINGTO ME




:!.m /
/ :1 I


BIG NATE BY LINCOLN PIERCE
t1, WHAT UP, YEAHAS LON6 MOI?
SCHOOL KID? READY AS YOU DON'T WHAT'S
PICTURE TO MAKE DO WHAT I Do?
GUY! SOME PHOTO YOU DID
MAGIC?s <) LAST !


SOUP TO NUTZ BY RICK STROMOSKI


GRIZZWELLS BY BILL SCHORR


ALLEY OOP BY JACK AND CAROLE BENDER
T WHAT DO YOU I DUNNO' THERE SEEMS I HOPE DOG CAN
THINK IS WRONG ,ThE SOME KINDA ITMELEHO FIX IT BEFORE ANY I
I" WITH THE TIME- THAT CONNECTING MOO O )MORE MAYANS FALL HAPPYP
TRAVEL MACHINE' L.,THIS MAYAN WORLD!.l THRO- 6 -
/. r re


YOU TOOK MY
PICTURE WHEN I I WAS
WASN'T READY! LIKE:
r LOOKED LIKE NYURRR..
WAS SRAIN-DEAD!


II 6 C


I Guess THey were l
sePaRaRl-eP aT GelfI.

0-0'- *c %1


MONTY BY JIM MEDDICK


KIT'N' CARLYLE BY LARRY WRIGHT
kitncarlyle@comcast.net -- -' www.GoComics.com


AND THEN HOPE THEY
CAN INVENT A MACHINE
THAT ERASES ALL OF THE
DISHONEST THINGS I'M
NOT SO PROUD OF.


os o o


YOUR FIRST EIGHT YEARS
WILL BE PRETTY BLANK.
THEY CAN CALL IT
THE "CONSCIENCE
CLEANSER." 1
p -4f-_


HERMAN BY JIM UNGER


10-17 0 LaugingStoc Interatonal Inc, Dis by Unlversal UCck ior UFS, 2012

"I'm sorry, sir, Dr. Rogers can see
you only by referral."


ACROSS 35 Swell
1 Comic outward
strip 37 Fixes the
Canyon fight
6 The Thinker 39Yves' girl
sculptor 40 Hose down
11 Mended 41 Arizona
socks city
12Brass band 45Apple
event gizmo
13 Puts on a 47 Money in
show the bank
14"Arabian 48 Kirk's
Nights" weapon
hero 51 Change
15 -pocus genetically
16 Hearty's 52 Perfumed
partner pouch
17Trout 53Mount
habitat Hood state
18 Dracula, at 54 Role model
times 55Walk-on
19 Rani's
husband DOWN
23 Did laps 1 Fiji
25 Pancake neighbor
topper 2 Pickup
26 Recipe 3 Happens
word next
29 Exec. 4 Geese
group formations
31 Mountain 5 Asner and
pass Bradley
32 Bikini top 6 Travel
33 Davis of choice
"The Fly" 7 Crabby
34Can. ,8 Smidgen
province 9 Ms. Lupino


Answer to Previous Puzzle

G Ma BR R FAL L
EMU WEEP ALOE
ACCLAIMS CASE
RAK I NG YEASTS




LIIILIP IAD
S EDA EA AR ETH A
ODOR NOSTRUMS
WINE TOTE BOA'
SME ED HECR ASPI
10Rorem or 30- for
Beatty keeps
11 Actress 36Teahouse
Arlene hostess
12 Exam forjrs. 38 Solar -
16 Pounded 40 Bump on a
18 Invited frog
20 Golden 42 Custom
Fleece ship 43 Ditto
21 San (2 wds.)
Capistrano 44Ra's
22 Client mtg. symbol
24"Minimum" 46 Potato skin
amount 47 Mystique
25 Disadvantage 48Air-pump
26 "Fernando" meas.
band 49Ate for
27 Oil barrel dinner
28 "Soft 50 Crack pilot
Watches" 51 Beaded
painter shoe


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


10-17 2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
"CYK FA WXK AYYL KZY BYGFSCMVNW

NWAPYB XB KZY HYJXVBNKMV

NWAPYB, SFK KZY BMUZK NWAPYB."
TXZW D. LYWWYHO


Previous Solution: "One day if I do go to heaven ... I'll look around and say, 'It
ain't bad, but it ain't San Francisco.' "- Herb Caen
TODAY'SCLUE: slenban
2012 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 1.0-17


Dear Annie: My husband's only sibling warmth.
is his 65-year-old brother, "Larry." Larry's He has
mother spoiled him rotten. To say he's pipes fro:
lazy is an understatement. He does noth- the water
ing to help himself. He was fortunate up a hose
enough to win a local election when he cut his ha
ran unopposed, and he held that office seldom sl
for 30 years. I doubt if he put in 20 hours at him.
a month. We hav
Two years ago, Larry retired, drawing expect hi
a pension and Social Security. He says often tell
he can hardly make it. He inherited his advice, bt
mother's home and land and has done stares ant
nothing to tend it. He has a few cows, but for some
he doesn't care for them. They got out he sits an
onto his neighbor's land, and they issued afraid to
a complaint. Now they don't speak. His him beca
mother's house is falling down around forever.
him. He was forced to put on a new roof
because the leaking caused the ceilings
to fall in. There is no heat or air condi- Dear Si,
tioning in the house. He has not had a hoarder.
working indoor toilet for 20 years. You grooming
cannot open the windows because of all or menta
the junk in the house. This may
Years ago, my husband said he'd repair but it cou
the heater if Larry would clean up the contact tl
mess around it, but he hasn't touched tion (ocfc
a thing. He uses an electric blanket for informati


Bridge

In this deal, North and South push into six spades.
West leads the heart king. How should South plan
the play, assuming trumps are 2-1?
In the aggressive auction, four clubs and four dia-
monds were control-bids expressing interest in a
slam. The jump to five spades said that South wanted
to be in a slam but had two immediate heart losers.
When the dummy appears, it looks as though de-
clarer will lose one heart and one diamond. To get
home, South needs an endplay. He wins the first
trick, draws trumps, takes his top clubs, ruffs the
club three in the dummy, and casts adrift with a
heart. What happens?
If the defender who wins this trick plays a heart or
a club, South ruffs in the dummy and discards his
diamond loser.
If West wins and shifts to a diamond, South plays
low from the dummy, hoping for the best.
If East takes the heart trick and leads a diamond,
should South play the queen or low?
The clue is that if East had the diamond king, he
would have let West take the heart trick, so that he
could lead a diamond through dummy's ace to guar-
antee defeating the contract. South should play his
low diamond, hoping East has the jack.


LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
It doesn't help to worry
about how your colleagues
are going to handle a spe-
cific situation you need
to find out.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) An arrangement that
could be of benefit to you
financially should not be
treated with indifference.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-
Dec. 21) If you get care-
less about researching the
experience of an individual
who is scheduled to do a
job for you, you could end
up getting a rookie.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) Usually you're pretty
smart about when to keep
things secret, butyou might
freely discuss something
you shouldn't with those
who are deliberately prob-
ing you for information.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) Because your resis-
tance to splurging tends to
be rather low at present, it
might be best to steer clear
of stores that offer all kinds
of unique items.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) When something is
really important, you can
be a tenacious person who
sticks to the course until
your objective is achieved.
ARIES (March 21-April
19) It behooves you not
to act on impulse when it
comes to your financial or
business affairs.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
-You've heard the old bro-
mide "Haste makes waste."
That could apply to you if
you try to take shortcuts in
your work.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
- There's a good chance
that a purveyor of bad ad-
vice could pressure you
into making an unwise
decision.
CANCER (June 21-July
22) Try to be tolerant
of somebody who doesn't
seem to grasp ideas or con-
cepts as quickly as most
people.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) It
would be best not to bor-
row any special equipment
that you've never used
before.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
- If you are ill-equipped
and unfamiliar about a big-
ticket item that you want
to buy, take more time to
learn all you can about it.


no water because when the
ze two years ago, he cut off
r to the house and hooked
e to an outside faucet. He hasn't
air since he retired, and he
haves. It makes us sick to look

e offered to help Larry, but we
m to put in some effort. He
s us he should have taken our
ut whenever we talk to him, he
d ignores us. I think he's waiting
one to take care of him while
Id smokes his cigarettes. We're
take on the job of caring for
use then he'd expect us to do it
low do we handle this?
THE SISTER-IN-LAW

iter-in-Law: Larry sounds like a
Along with the lack of personal
g, it seems more like depression
1 illness than sheer laziness.
not make it easier to deal with,
ld change your response. Please
he International OCD Founda-
undation.org/hoarding) for
ion and help.




North 10-17-12
A J 10 3
TA6
S A10 8 5 3
S72
West East
#6 192
SK Q 10 5 VJ8743
SK72 J 9 4
4108654 4QJ9
South
4 KQ 8754
y 92
Q6
4AK3
Dealer: North
Vulnerable: Both
South West North East
l Pass
1 Pass 3 Pass
44 Pass 44 Pass
54 Pass 6 Pass
6 # Pass Pass Pass

Opening lead: V K
L_


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2012 5B F


ENTERTAINMENT


Anirels








6 B Wednesday, October 17, 2012 Jackson County Floridan


CLASSIFIED


www.JCFLORIDAN.com


WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED




ARKETPLAC


BY PHONE: (850) 526-3614 or (800) 779-2557
BY FAX: (850) 482-4478 or (334) 712-7975
ONLINE: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM


BY MAIL: WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE
P.O. BOX 520, MARIANNA, FL 32447
IN PERSON: 4403 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA


Publication Policy Errors and Omissions: Advertisers should check their ad the first day. This publication shall not be liable for failure to publish an ad or for a typographic error or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the ad for the first day's
insertion. Adjustment for errors is limited to the cost of that portion of the ad wherein the error occurred. The advertiser agrees that the publisher shall not be liable for damages arising out of errors ri advertisements beyond the amount paid for the space
actually occupied by that portion of the advertisement in which the error occurred, whether such error is due to negligence of the publisher's employees or otherwise and there shall be no liability for non-insertion of any advertisement beyond the amount paid for
such advertisement. Display Ads are not guaranteed position. All advertising is subject to approval. Right is reserved to edit, reject, cancel or classify all ads under the appropriate classification.


|l&) ANNOUNCEMENTS


Experienced, compassionate,creative lady
would like to take care of your loved one in the
Dothan and Marianna area. 850-209-5843

Garden of Memories Cemetery.
Chapel of Memories. Companion Mausoleum
Crypts B-65-66 with two o/c and two plaques.
The current stated value as provided by
Garden of Memories Cemetery is $8,500.00.
I am seeking $6,500.00. I have the QUIT DEED
for this property. Contact Mark E. Holton at
pedi.care@hotmail.com for more information.


SJoin the Wiregrass
Homeschoolers Concert Band!
Trumpets, Trombones, Clarinets,
Flutes, Saxophones, Drums
Beginner and Advanced Students
Open to all Wiregrass Homeschoolers
Private Guitar Lessons Also Available
Contact James Bell Phone 334-648-5690
Email jhbell97 @yahoo.com

0(-? MERCHANDISE

SEASONED SPLIT OAK FIREWOOD $75.
Will deliver. Call 334-685-1627 or 334-798-3040.
Split Oak Firewood, Delivered in Wiregrass.
$75 For a Full sized Pickup load. $12 for 5
Gallon bucket of kindling wood. 334-393-9923







Wanted: Old Coins, Gold,
Diamonds, Guns, And-Tools
West Main Jewelry & Loan 334-671-1440.

Boat trailers, sizes are 21' Triton w/2 axles, 16'
Custom Built Williams Craft Trailer, Galvanized
20' and 18', 16' Baff Trailer, also Biminy Tops
$50 each. Misc. Equipment too. Red Williams
Boat Shop in "cilH h. Call 334-677-5003






Truck bed, hard cover, Tri-Glass off of
1999 Ford Ranger, extended cab, 6' bed,
flare side. $300. Call 389-0738 or 393-6499.

(i PETS & ANIMALS


FREE: 3 Kittens 850-272-7013 or 850-557-2846.

'American Bulldog pups
CKC registered. $300
Males & females.
Additional photos available.
SCall 731-212-9102
American Pitt Bull Terrier Puppies ADBA
Registered, 2FM, B&W, born 6-4-12, $300 ea.
Located in Elba Area. Call or text 334-282-3128
ASDR Mini Aussies. Merles, Tri's, B/W's. Tak-
ing deposits $150. Call 706-761-3024.
See @ facebook.com/huntsminiaussies
Chihuahua puppies! Beautiful!
2 Females, Shots & Wormed. $300.
Call 334-796-3731
Doberman Puppies, 2 Red males, 1 Red
female, Full Blooded, but not registered $350
BEAUTIFUL! 334-266-5914
FOR SALE AKC GERMAN SHEPHERD PUPPIES .
$300, PARENTS ON SITE. PUPPIES ARE UP TO
DATE ON SHOTS AND WORMING.
JCALL 334-393-7284 OR 334-806-5851


Free Rescued Dogs to GOOD homes ONLY.
Many breeds, S/W, Call 334-791-7312!
German Shepard Pups, Full Blooded, 4
Black/Tan, 2 Solid Black, Parents On Site,
$150 each. S/W, Call 334-494-1899
LOST: Male tan Lab,name is Sam, last seen in
Sneads on October 6th, 850-276-5772
Yorkle-Poos on Sale S225.,
Ready Now Yorkles!
Taking deposit on Chorkies.
.+ 334-718-4886_ *


Happy Jack DD33: Kills fleas quicker, last
longer on dogs & cats. Citrus odor.
Biodegradeable. ALTHA FARMERS COOP
(482-2416) www.happyjackinc.com

(M) FARMER'S MARKET


GRASS FED BEEF!! GREAT UALTY!!
Quarters and Halves. Freezer Ready.
ESTO MEATS CALL 850-263-7777

FRE SHPR

.1 \ Aplin Farms
You Pick or We
_. Pick
Pumpkins Sun Flowers
Corn Maze @
Open Mon-Sat. 8-6 Sun 1-6
334-726-5104 4

FRESH
GREEN
PEANUTS
850-209-3322 or
850-573-6594 850-352-2199
4128 Hwy 231
Now Open Jackson Farms Grand Ridge, FL
U-Pick Tomatoes
Bring your own bucket! 7 days a week.
"* 850-592-5579 4m
IT'S AS EASY
AS 2 3
1. CALL 2. PLACE YOUR AD 3. GET RESULTS


Large rolls of Hay for Sale
Bahia & Coastal
Daytime 334-585-3039,
after 5pm & weekends 585-5418
_SELNO INVEST CK


SSem-Angus Yearly Bulls *
Top Blood Lines. Priced to Sell.
Call 334-898-1626 or 334-360-5035


(") EMPLOYMENT


,-n ."#- CHIPOLA NURSING
PAVILION AND
RETIREMENT CENTER
is accepting applications for the
following position:

RN Staff Development
Coordinator/Risk Manager
C.N.As
Full time all shifts & Baylor

If interested, please apply in person at
4294 Third Ave. Marianna, FL



Reporter
Jackson County Floridan has an immediate
opening for a reporter.
Excellent opportunity for a recent college
graduate looking for their first job, or for a
beginning reporter at a weekly or a small
daily looking to move to a larger market.
Duties include covering events, writing
stories for print and the Web, taking photos,
shooting video, assisting with the
newspaper's website and social media sites.
One to two years at a weekly or small daily
paper preferred, but not required. Basic
knowledge of computers, and still and video
cameras required, Benefits include medical,
dental, and vision insurance, 401K, paid
holidays and vacation. Pre-employment
drug screen and background check required.
EOE M/F/V/D
Qualified applicants may apply online at:
www.mediageneral.com




25 Drivers

Trainees

NEEDED NOW!
Learn to drive for
Werner Enterprises
Earn $800 per week!
No experience needed!
Local CDL Training
job ready in 15 days!

1-888-368-2198


I


Driver Development
Paper Transport is a forward thinking,
multimillion dollar company based in Green
Bay, WI. Due to our strong & continued
growth in the Georgia market, we have an
opening within our Safety Department in our
satellite office in Cedar Springs, GA
This position requires:
Interview & evaluate potential new drivers.
Work with corporate Driver Recruiters in
support of driver recruiting. Full understand-
ing of CSA. Road test potential new hires,
conduct Driver Orientations, accident
investigations, & support quarterly driver
meetings. Conduct remedial training with
drivers where needed.
We offer a very competitive benefit package
along with a family friendly work
environment. Please submit your resume:
Paper Transport, Inc. Attn: HR,
2701 Executive Drive, Green Bay, WI 54304
or bkornowske@papertransport.com
or Fax: 888-315-3230


PAPER
TRANSPORT, /NC.





MEDICAL/CLERICAL
Immediate opening for individual
with strong computer skills.
Benefits after 3 months. Up to $15/hr
depending on experience.
Contact human resource department at
866-675-3614


ryV l FARMERS FURNITURE MARIANNA
SC^ f We are looking for a
"P.5' SALES CONSULTANT
High school diploma or
equivalent Some sales experience.
Come by to apply 4230-A Lafayette St.
EOE


The City of Marianna Police Department
has a Dispatcher position available.
Apply at your local One Stop Career Center
or call 850-718-0326 for details.
EOE/Drug Free Workplace Employer




Jj I


Ml I!


Sudoku


2012 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.


Level: I~B
Complete the grid so each row, column and
3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit
1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku,
visit www.sudoku.org.uk.

Solution to Tuesday's puzzle




9 3 7 5 8 214 6 1

71 9 5 8 21 6 3 4


41 6 9 3 5 217 8
2 71493586



-6 -419 2 5 8 7 1 3


10/17/12


- -------- -
7 6 5

46

9 3 1

2 8 1
6 597 2


92 3

6 1 4

3 6

1 2- 5


_


m; PLAC A


I i i CLAS S IFIE









CLASSIFIED


ww IwFrEOR TI AN.com


Jackson County Floridan Wednesday, October 17, 2012- 7 B


(4)


EDUCATION
& INSTRUCTION


Professional Piano & Organ Teacher
I teach in my home in the Highlands. 30 years
experience teaching private lessons and
teaching in schools. Recently moved from KY.
Great Christmas Gift For All Ages!
334-446-4226


Classes Forming Now
4 for Medical Assisting,
CFOR% T $ f ,Electrical Trades and
FORIIS More!
COLLEGE Call Fortis College
Today! 888-202-4813 or
visit www.fortiscollege.edu. For consumer
information visit www.fortis.edu

RESIDENTIAL
REAL ESTATE FOR RENT


1BR 1BA Apt. in Cypress, very quiet, very clean
, newly remodeled, water/ sewer/garbage incl.
free laundry mat, $450 + dep (no elect. dep)
Furnishings avail, if needed 850-573-6062
2/1 UnFurn. or Furn.Apt. Convenient
location, Clean, hw floors, No pets, W/D
supplied 850-718-5089/482-4172/624-7407 4
2BR/2BA TOWNHOUSES
Chipola River Townhouses
m* 850-482-1050/557-8560 4m
For Rent Greenwood, Marianna, &
Cottondale, starting @ $375/mo.
Water/sewer/garb./ lawn maintlncl.
n 850-593-4700 4
Orchard Pointe
Now accepting applications for 2 & 3 BR Apts.
Call or come by to pick up application
4445 Orchard Pointe Dr. Marianna
850-482-4259




LG 2/1 in Marianna, nice kitchen, open floor
plan, w/d hkup, yard/porch, pvt/safe, at end of
deadend road, Ideal For A Couple. NO PETS
$700/mo 850-352-2103
0 I

1 & 2BR Houses & Apts ALSO
2 & 3BR Mobile Homes Rent to Own
Lot rent included. For details
4 850-557-3432 or 850-814-6515 4w
2BR 2BA and 2BR 1BA houses, 2BR 2BA, 2BR
1BA and 3BR 1BA furnished or unfurnished,
rent + dep. 850-630-8221
3BR 1.5 BA Brick Home in Malone ,CH/A,
fenced yard, storage shed,, Stove, Refrigera-
tor, No Pets $600/mo + dep. 850-569-2697
3BR/1BA, 2640 Church St. C'dale CH&A No
Pets, $675+ $500 dep. (850) 352-4222/557-4513
3BR 1%BA House behind Arrowhead, CH/A,
screened porch, W/D hookup, open garage,
$750 + dep. 850-570-4706
4BR 2BA house, 4484 Lime St. Marianna, $875 +
deposit 850-718-6541
Austin Tyler & Associates *
Quality Homes & Apartments
850- 526-3355 4-
"Property Management Is Our ONLY Business"
Nicest in Marianna area! Nearly new 2BR/1BA
Home $560 w/lease. Call 850-526-8367


2/2 Mobile Home $450 + deposit, appliances,
washer & dryer, water/garbage & sewer
included 850-482-4455
2 & 3 bedroom mobile Homes in Cottondale.
$500 and up. H20, garbage, sewer included.
http:// www.charloscountryliving.com.
850-209-8847
2&3 BRMH's in
Marianna & Sneads (850)209-8595.
2 & 3BR Mobile Homes in Cottondale.
NO PETS CH&A $325- $500/Month
Roomate situation also available.
850-258-1594 Leave Message
2BR 1BA Furn. MH, CH/A, no pets/smoking,
$450 + dep. current credit report ly lease req.
182 Alford Rd C'dale 850-638-4620/638-6405
2BR 1BA Located between Grand Ridge &
Sneads water& garbage included
$300/month 4 850-573-0308 4w
2BR 1BA MH, in Cottondale, Quiet, $400/mo
NO PETS, 850-573-4456
2BR 1 BA MH'S in Alford, $350-$380 + dep.
850-579-8882/850-209-1664/850-573-1851
3BR 2BA, DW, No Pets, Private Lot $595./mo. +
dep. 850-638-7822
3BR 2BA MH in Sneads $500/mo. No Pets, 850-
573-0911/593-5251
5BR 3BA DWMH, in Marianna, $650/mo, 1st &
last mo sec. lyr lease, No Pets/Smoking
863-258-2589 after 5:30pm
MOBILE HOMES FOR RENT
$345 to $425. Water, trash and sewer included
NO PETS ALLOWED. Call 850-209-7087
Small Quiet Family Oriented Park 1, 2 & 3BR
MH's for Rent includes water, garbage, lawn
care, Nq Pets 850-592-1639
RESIDENTIAL
REAL ESTATE FOR SALE


3BR 1BA, on acre lot, fenced back yard,
close to Merrits Mill Pond, new appliances,
new roof. $110, 000 850-526-7292/272-0435


3BR 2BA DWMH For Sale : Lg kitchen, lots of
cabinets, large washroom, ceiling fans, MUST
BE MOVED, $30,000 OBO 850-557-7661


1 RECREATION


Bayliner 2006 197SD Deck boat, Mercruiser
4.3L, full custom made sun cover, swim plat-
form w/ ladder, excellent condition, low hrs.
$14,950, 334 797-6001
FATOYIR


Xtreml

Boa


Packages From
e $4,995
S All Aluminum Boats
www.xtremeindustries.com


Hydro Sport 1994-175 Everdude, 19 ft., Good
Condition, tournament ready, $4,800 OBO 334-
689-3907
Monark 1996 Pontoon Boat, 1 owner, 100 HP
Mariner, trailer, 2 fish finders (1 GPS), 3 batter-
ies, trolling motor, more $4,500 334-687-9311
Suntracker 2006 Pontoon 18' party barge, 40
horse Mercury 4 stroke w/trailer
Call: 334-209-8962 or Cell: 573-680-5864 or
see at 2409 Creekwood Dr. Dothan, AL


Coachman 2004 Liberty Edition, air ducted,
34ft. 6000 mi. slide out, $52,000. 334-701-7011.


Itasca 2001 Motor Home 35", 2 slides, CH/A, V-
10 gas, 47k miles, $28,500 OBO 850-593-6613

Cw'a TRANSPORTATION


GMC 2008 Sierra 1500 Denali AWD black/tan,
50k miles, clear title, $11,800,
gcbdw@ymail.com


Cadillac 1992 Allante Convertible 2-seater,
White with red leather interior. 68K miles. Good
condition. $6,900. Call 334-714-7129.
FORD 1938
Standard Coupe:
All original parts:
hood, fenders, grill,
bumpers, and some
Snew. Owned for 42
years, stored inside. It has a chevy rearend,
front disc brakes and set up for chevy
350/350. $9,500. Also have a 223 cu. In.
engine and complete front end out of a
1956 FORDtruck. Can be seen in Daleville.
Call 1-334-301-0669 or 1-251-610-6644.


*, l AOlFlll.ORAl|JIJJ .- JlIJ
$0 Down/ist Payment, Tax, Tag & Title
Repos, Slow Credit, Past Bankruptcy OK!
Push, Pull or Drag. Will Trade Anything!
First Payment 30 Days Out!

Ford 1995 T-Bird, low miles, runs good, looks
good, cold AC $2,500 334-687-4353, .334-695-
4294
Honda 2012 Civic, 4 door, under warranty, like
new, $200 down, $279 per mo. Call Ron Ellis
714-0028.
Lexus 2000 RX300 all wheel drive, leather inte-
rior, towing package, 6-disc CD changer &
more! Needs engine re-built, but in great shape
$27500. Jason 334-791-2598 or Jon 334-790-5217.


--~ Lexus 2003 md#SC430
red 'saddle interior 37,798
mi. I owner garage kept,
tint, chrome wheels, Gold
pkg. Le~us maintained,
Lexus warr. until 4/23/13 $25,900.
a+ 334-393-3794.


Nissan 2012 Altima. low miles, Must Sell!, $200
down 2889 per mo. Call Ron Ellis 714-0028.


Volkswagon 2011 Jetta, great gas saver, nice, 4
door, $300 down $299 per mo. Call Steve
Hatcher 334-791-8243.


Toyota 2005 Corolla LE 4dr. 54K mi. Michelins,
silver, very good cond. inside & out, no smok-
ers, AC, CD player, power windows, cruise no
frame or structural damage, drives great.
Priced under Kelly book priced
@ $10,400. 334-699-5688
*, M Volvo, 2004 C70 LT Convertible,
SIY 80,000 miles, Blue, Great Cond.
-'$7,800 BEAUTY! 850-557-0893
Volvo 2005 S40 T5, low miles, great gas saver,
luxury, $300 down, $200 per mo. Call Steve
Hatcher 334-791-8243.
MOTORCY*CLE


Harley-Davidson 2012, FXDF,
FAT BOB, 103ci, Black & Or-
ange, Custom Seat, Black Ac-
cessories, 1,200 miles, origi-
nal parts. $15,000, 334-464-
0995


BMW 2001 X5, Nice Vehicle, $6999. 334-714-
2700.
2700 Chevrolet 2002 Blazer,
-'L .. .Ja-i 4.3, V-6, auto, 4 door,
Loaded, cold air, 86,000
^ -' miles, like new, $5895.
Call 334-790-7959.
Chevrolet 2011 Traverse, Less than 10K Miles,
One owner, Excellent Condition, VERY Clean, 6
cylinder, 4-door $25,000. Gold with Charcoal
interior, Power locks, backup sensor,
For Further Details, Call 334-702-9226
Jeep 2006 Wrangler, 6 cyln/6sp, only 22k mi.
33" tires, chrome bumpers, tow package, new
Biminy Top, $18,400 OBO 850-593-6613
S~ "~~-~- Volvo 2003 XC90 T6,
j- 5 AWD, 3rd row seating,
7I .sy $5999. 334-714-2700.




4000 Ford Tractor good condition, new engine
$4,450. 334-791-0700
Dodge 1975 D-100, Custom, One Owner, Proof
of title, Runs good, Vehicle Garage kept, fleet
maintained. Too many parts to list. Call for
Details. $2700 334-479-1377
Ford 1993 XLT Truck, 2 door, 4 cyln. standard
shift, needs work on transmission OBO .
850-209-1722
Ford 2006 Ranger XL, reg-
ular cab, automatic, 4
cyl., new tires, cold air,
like new, $5895. Call 334-
790-7959.
,Mazda 1988 B2200 single cab, 4 cyl. automatic,
air, hit in the rear, still drivable, clear title.
$1000. 334-7691-2987 or 798-1768
Silverado 2004 ext. cab, 121K miles, 4-wheel
drive, $11,500. 334-677-3809. after 5pm
Toyota 2004 Tacoma Double
Cab SR5, TRD, 2WD ONE
OWNER, CARFAX AVAILABLE,
Maintenance Records. Clean,
Garage Kept, New Tires, Cold
A/C, Line-X sprayed bedliner,
Power Windows, Power
Brakes, Cruise Control, Airbags, Automatic,
Tinted Windows, AM/FM/CD, Step Rear Bump-
er, Sliding Rear Window, 117,000 miles. $12,000
(850) 693-0764
Toyota 2007 Tacoma ext. cab, 2-wheel drive,
automatic, silver in color, 109K miles, never
wrecked, 1- owner, good condition, no mechan-
ical problems Must See! $11,000 334-596-6608.
Volvo 1996-DIESEL TRUCK, Good Condition
Asking price $10,000 OBO 334-695-1954


_- Chevrolet 2012 Express
mllmli White Diamond Custom
SI Conversion, 14,000 mi. Sun-
0 B roof. black leather seats,
back sofa turns into bed w/touch of a button.
Bluray DVD player w/surround sound. 26" TV,
LED lighting inside. Carfax available. Lists over
$71,000 new. Asking $55,900 obo. 334-268-3900.


-- Honda 2004 Odyssey,
Very clean, $6999.
334-714-2700.





1ST PLACE TO CALL FOR ALL OF
YOUR TOWING NEEDS!
Warem'rs 24 Hora 7Two
AUTO BODY & RECYCLING
PAYING TOP DOLLAR FOR JUNK CARS
Contact Jason Harger at 334-791-2624

CALL FOR TOP PRICE
S r FOR JUNK VEHICLES
I ALSO SELL USED PARTS
24 HOUR TOWING ) 334-792-8664

,, Got a Clunker
We'll be your Junker!
C -We buy wrecked cars '
S *? and Farm Equip. at a
.. fair and honest price!
$325&tComplete Cars
CALL 334-702-4323 OR 334-714-6285
L ...........................I...
r ------- ---------------- --------
i We buy Wrecked Vehicles
S Running or not
334-794-9576 or 344-791-4714


WE PAY Ca$H

: FOR JUNK CARS!!!!!!
Call 334-818-1274


LEGALS


LF15922
NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO
CHAPTER 83, PART IV
Notice is given pursuant to the Self Storage Fa-
cility Act; Florida Statutes Chapter 83, Part IV,
that Alternative Storage, a self storage facility,
will have elligible for sell the contents of the
following units:
UNIT A22 KEVIN PHILLIPS
UNIT B34 SHARON DAUGHTREY
UNIT C15 JERRELL LOVETT
UNIT C 7 MARSHALL RALLS
The Auction of contents will be November
27,2012 at 10am. Owner'reserves the right to
refuse any and all bids.
Gene Wilferd & Scotty Roland, Owners


LF15919
JTrans Request for Proposals /
Notice to Bidders:
Notice is hereby given that Jackson County
Transportation, Inc. dba JTrans will be accept-
ing sealed bids on a 21' Cutaway Transit Vehi-
cle. All bidders shall comply with federal,
state, and local laws concerning licensing, reg-
istration, and regulations of contractors doing
business in Florida. All DBE's are encouraged
to bid. JTrans reserves the right to accept or
reject any and all bids as deemed in its best in-
terest. Spec sheets are available at JTrans
3988 Old Cottondale Road, Marianna, FL 32448
or by calling 850-482-7433. Proposals will be
received thru Friday, October 19, 2012 12:00
PM.

S THE__

ASSIFIEDS
^fyg 7 gr- g


Find jobs



fast and



easy!


JACKSON COUNT Y


FLORIDAN

jcfloridan.com



Tmonsrer

FIND LOCAL JOBS AT: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM/JOBS,


www j% _I, _V_


I


A


I


:~e,


---'~








8 Wednesday, October 17, 2012 Jackson County Floridan


CLASSIFIED www.JCFLORIDAN.com


Breakig new

Fin ot te atet n ntinalan loalevets


Alternator for 2003 Cavalier $30 850-352-4181
Amplifier, Boss $50 850-443-6806
Antique candle holders (2) $25.Ea 334-671-0070
Baby Clothes boys 2T-4T $50 850-693-3260.
Baby Clothes-girl 0-12 mo. $30 bx, 850-693-3260
Barbie: 1996 Olympic, NIB $20. 850-557-0778 -
Bedroom suite: King, Oak, $200. 850-272-7424
Bicycle, Girls 20" New $50 850-547-4004
Bicycle, Toddler, New $20 850-547-4004
Books, general romance .10 ea 850-693-1600
Bookshelf (tall) w/TV 24" $65 850-592-1234
Camcorder, Sony, digital $300 850-482-7665
Camera: Olympus $159 FIRM. Call 850-482-7665
Carburetor 350 Chevy $100 OBO 850-482-7665
Chest of Drawers $150 334-671-0070 Mornings
China cabinet, great cond. $220. 334-347-1253
Chipper/Shredder: $250: 850-352-2040
Christmas lights, in/outdoor $45 850-352-4181
Clothes Racks, (5) $45ea. 850-693-1600
Coffee table-2 side table set: $250 334-671-0070
Crib, Winnie the Pooh $75 OBO 850-547-4004
Dining Table w/4 Chairs $250 334-671-0070
Doors(6),exterior ,6 panel $35 850-573-4425
Doors(6)interior, 6 panel $20 850-573-4425
Dryer, Maytag, white, $110 8504823267
Elec. Guitar w/stand, new, $150 850-557-5065
Ent. Ctr, shelves,glass doors. $75. 850-272-7424
Gear Box, powersteering $200 850-557-5065
Generator: Troy Bilt, new $500. 850-352-2040


Glass Blocks, used, $2 OBO 850-573-4425


Hair Dryers, Antique 50's, $25 ea., 850-557-0778


Ham Radio Kenwood TS 520 $185 810-265-3423


Hubcaps orig Mercedes(7) $45ea 850-557-5065
Humidifier, new $25 850-693-3260.
Jeff Gordon Collection: $100. 850-557-0778
King BR Set: black, 5pc. $350. 850-272-4828
Ladders: Alum. 16' $50. 24' $75. 850-352-2040
Ladders: alum. 16' $50 & 24' $75. 850-352-2040
Magazines: Easyrider. $2 ea. 850-352-2040


Magazine Table: brown wood $25 334-671-0070


Mirror w/shelves, $50. 850-693-3260.
Motorcycle Helmet, $175 OBO 334-790-0188
Pedestal Sink: $100. obo 850-352-2040
Porcelain Dolls (7) $15/each 850-482-7665
Power Juicer, Jack Lalannes $60 850-557-5065
Quilting Material, $1 per yard 850-693-1600
Router, Craftsman 1/2 hp $50 850-482-7933
Satellite Radio, Sirius, NIB $45 850-352-4181
Shirts/Jeans, boys 14/16 $lea 850-693-3260
Snow Ski's, "Head" $50 850-557-5065
Sofa & loveseat: Purple, $125. 850-272-7424
TV 25" great cond. $50. obo 850-209-6977
TVs. (2) $60 ea. or $100 for both. 850-272-7424
Vacuum, Eureka Commercial $60 850-557-5065
Wall Surround Kit NIB $100.00 obo 850-352-2040
Wedding gown, new, sz 16, $300 850-693-3260.


Your Business


In The Classifieds


L -..,-

.BULLDo.OZING
" rf kB1-"*,


Clay O'Neal's
Land Clearing, IIc.
ALTHA, PL
850-762-9402
Cell 850-832-5055


WE OFFER COMEIE

A CLADDIOIU
a2YEWSMBIPBW.


Grader Pan Excavator
Dump Truck Bulldozer
Demolition Grading Site Prep
* Debris Removal v Retention Ponds Leveling
* Top Soil Fill Dirt Gravel Land Clearing





For General House or
Office Cleaning
Call Debra
Free Estimates References Available
850-526-2336


SSrC r Your guide to great ocal
-businesses & series
IESS'"':




E DIRE T


Call 526.3614 to place yroll4I


I .] ll' M =l N I "J Il
CLAIG&HUEEPN


28 Step Healthy Home Cleaning
Organization of Closets &Cabinets
Disinfecting Toys
SConstruction & Remodeling Cleanup


Pressure Washing Patios
References Available
& Years of Experience m
Swww.huykecleaning.com


OaK
HANOHMAN
CARPmENTY Dowau SERVICE
ELEC CAL & PLUMBING
INTIEIOR & EXTERIOR PAINTING
2419 Hollister Rd Marianna, FL 32446
Phne: 850.592.3436
Cell: 850.209.9373


I.'
KE,^ ^
II I'H^^


"Beautification of Your Home"
Carpentry/Painting Installations
Furniture Repair & Refinishing
General Repairs Insured
^Bff~ffn (850)569-2903^


HAPPY
HOME REPAIR
WE'LL BEAT ANY PRICE!
Big Or Small Jobs WELCOME










M&M Day Laborers
Need general labor for the day-week?
Call: 850-272-2339
Most all type'work done
SSmall jobs- Big jobs Satisfaction is our goal
God Bless America

Cal :8 7
This Month's Special
$239500
.33 Years in Business
WE Movr PomAtB BlILliNaS ,i _J


BESTWAY
PORTABLE BUILDINGS
LARonTs MANuFA[IIEh IF PurOmL BuioN. Ni NomTH FLuRIA
HAVE
OVER
w' 80
DIFFERENT SIZES'
YOU CAN CHOOSE
COLOR & STYLE!
BUIllT..ONSITE ,BG H-
36 9 Marianna, FL 850-48-86


I Will Provide Elderly/
Housekeeper Overnight Care
10 years experience Will Relocate up to 3-4 days
SReferences Provided Physically Challenged Person in
Need of Care Safe Environment
SRun Background Check If Needed
eat. 593-0007
SERVIES*OFERE


CLASSIFIED HILL TREEJERVICE

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ace an A d Fast, easy, nopressu
,ace and A 24 hours a day, 7 da
Get live previews of your classified ads, receive price quotes
and make secure online payments.
www.jcfloridan.com


re
ays a week!


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