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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028304/00892
 Material Information
Title: Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title: Sunday Floridan
Portion of title: Floridan
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Jackson County Floridan
Publisher: Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Marianna Fla
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates: 30.776389 x -85.238056 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note: "Independent."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID: UF00028304:00892
 Related Items
Preceded by: Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by: Marianna Floridan

Full Text
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LIBRARY OF FLORIDA ,11, .
PO BOX 117007
GAINESVILLE F'L 326': 7(17


at e re a- o r
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Informing more than 17,000 readers daily in ] ft and online







FLORID;


THANK YOU FOR YOUR SUPPORT
am JACKSON COUNTY.
to serve as your new
Superintendent of Schools.


Working 'we,
Swill provide the best
S education possible
,,, for our youth.



SPAID POLITICAL ADVERTISE
E NT AD _APPROVEDOBY


Marianna man convicted in sexual molestation case


From staff reports found Anthony Ewers
guilty of two
A Marianna man pled counts of
no contest in the Bedford aggravated
County Circuit Court in sexual bat-
Virginia on Friday to four tery and two
felony charges linking him counts of an-
to the sexual molestation imate object
of a 7-year-old Virginia Ewers penetration.
girl. Ewers will
Judge James Updike serve 15 years in prison


and faces 40 years of su-
pervised probation after
his release.
In an earlier interview,
Bedford County Common-
wealth's Attorney Randy
Krantz said Ewers trav-
eled between Florida and
Virginia to check on his ill
mother's Virginia property.
His mother's neighbors


befriended Ewers and in-
vited him to their home.
Eventually, the fam-
ily let him take the girl on
small trips, such as pick-
ing blackberries, none of
which were overnight.
Krantz said the sexual
contact started in January
2011. The child eventu-
ally told her parents, who


called local authorities.
Since being indicted in
May, Ewers has stayed in
jail.
According to an article by
The Roanoke Times, inves-
tigators recorded phone
calls Ewers placed in jail to
a female relative in Sara-
sota, Fla.
He apologized to the


woman for what occurred
when she was a teen,
asking her to keep the
incidents secret.
Florida Police inter-
viewed the woman, who
said Ewers had sexually
abused her when she was
a teen. The information
helped investigators make
a case against Ewers.


West Nile

a concern

for region

BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com

Several surrounding
counties are reporting the
presence of West Nile and
Eastern Equine Encepha-
litis in animals monitored
for those illnesses. Because
this signals an increase
of the risk to humans,
through bites from infect-
ed mosquitoes, Jackson
County residents are urged
to take all possible steps to
avoid mosquito .bites that
could lead to infection.
Holmes, Walton, Bay and
Washington counties have
reported one or more of
the illnesses in sentinel
chicken flocks, horses and/.
or mosquito pools which
are monitored specifically
to detect the presence of'
these viruses. And 11 hu-
man cases of West Nile,
along with one human EEE
case, have been detected
this year in a county a bit
farther east of here.
In horses 17 cases of EEE
have been reported, 97
monitored chickens have
tested positive for the pres-
ence of West Nile antibod-
ies, and 34 more for EEE.
Residents should double-
check the property sur-
rounding their dwellings
to make sure there are no
sources of standing water;
mosquitoes multiply in
that environment.
They should also make
sure that entrances to
their home are properly
safeguarded from mosqui-
toes that might try to get
in through broken panes
or unsealed gaps. Install
screens where needed.
When outdoors, wear
long pants, long-sleeved
shirts, shoes and socks,
and use effective mosquito
See ILLNESS, Page 7A


Marianna Cinema





launches re-opening.

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PHOTOS BY MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Over the summer the Marianna Cinemas added two screens and underwent extensive renovation work.


Event will be Sept. 1 from noon to 3

p.m., feature entertainment, food


BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com

Marianna Cinema has undergone
two significant upgrades in the past
year or so, and on Sept. 1 the the-
ater will host a grand re-opening to
showcase the latest improvements.
The event will be from noon until 3
p.m., and will feature entertainment,
free food, giveaways and prizes.
The theater now has two addi-
tional auditoriums and all sound
and projection are digital systems,


including those in the. two original
auditoriums which were gutted and
improved last year. A party room has
also been added, so that parents can
host pre-movie birthday parties for
their youngsters, or for other kinds
of gatherings. The additions put the
theater at 10,380 square feet, up from
its original 3,900 square feet. Patrons
will likely be able to rent the party
room for a fee in a package deal with
a movie run, the owners say.
See CINEMA, Page 7A


Brianna Moss and Rachel Callahan get the popcorn ready
for the night movies at the refurbished Marianna Cinemas
Thursday.


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Marisa Penland from Panama City guides her horse, Karma,
through a showmanship event Saturday at Lope For Hope.


Lope for Hope raises cancer awareness


BY LAUREN DELGADO
ldelgado@jcfloridan.com

Renee Kozlowski, a breast cancer
survivor, was raised around horses,
and found them to be a great help
when she was battling cancer.
"When people go through cancer,
horses and any animals are proved to
be so therapeutic," Kozlowski said.
Her family's love of horses and
fights against all types of cancers in-
spired her to start "Lope For Hope,"
which raises funds for women un-
dergoing cancer treatments and
raises awareness about early detec-
tion of cancer. They don't give to


the bigger' cancer awareness orga-
nizations, Kozlowski said. They give
directly to those affected what they
need, whether it be gas cards or
funeral expenses.
"It's all about supporting families
and people going through cancer,"
Kozlowski said.
This Saturday, the nonprofit held
its first "Lope For Hope", event in
the south at the Jackson County
Ag Center in Marianna. Kozlowski
said the event exceeded everyone's
expectations.
Marianna was chosen because of
its strong horse presence, Kozlowski
said. The support from folks in the


Panhandle was enormous. The show
had a number of breed classes and
divisions, bringing in about 750 en-
tries. Kozlowski said the show didn't
end until about 3 a.m. on Sunday.
People came from all over the
region, even from south Florida,
Kozlowski said'. She attributed the
organization's Facebook page as the
major way of getting the word out
about this event.
The sponsorships made before
the show had already paid for its ex-
penses, Kozlowski said, so anything
made at the show will go directly to
See HOPE, Page 7A


> ENTERTAINMENT...4B


) LOCAL...3A, 8A


)) OPINION..4A


) SPORTS...1-3B, 8B


) TV LISTINGS...3B


CLASSIFIEDS...5-7B


This Newspaper
Is Printed On -
Recycled Newsprint



7I65161 8 5II I 9
7L65 161 8 00 50 9


huck Anderson Greg AndersonnF Gus Parmer

Chevrolet-Buick-Cadillac-Nissan I f .-

g 4204 Lafayette St. Marianna; FL. ,
" .. ( SO) 482-3i0511i t, Service Manager j Body Shop Manager 1 Parts Manager


Vol. 89 No..168


Follow us





Facebook Twitter


I -


OBITLUARIES...7A







l2A WEDNESDAY. AUGUST 22, 2012


WIKE-UP CALL


Weather Outlook


High 910
Low 68


Thursday
Mostly Sunny & Warm.



" High 880
Low 700


Saturday
Partly Cloudy & Warm.
Isolated Storms.


High 880
Low 70


Friday
Mostly Sunny & Warm.



High- 890
Low 70


Sunday
Partly Cloudy & Warm.
Isolated Storms.


24 hours 0.11" Year to date 4.' '-4
Month to date 6.22" Normal YTD -.. ...4
Normal MTD 3.65" Normal for year 58.25"
TIDES


Panama City
Apalachicola
Port St. Joe
Destin
PensacQla


Low
Low
Low
Low
Low


RIVER READINGS
Woodruff
Blountstown
Marianna
Caryville


10:51.AM
2:22 PM
10:56 AM
12:07 PM
12:41 PM


High
High
High
High
High


Reading
38.91 ft.
0.77 ft.
7.43 ft.
5.28 ft.


- 1:03 AM
- 7:01 AM
- 1:36 AM
- 2:09 AM
- 2:42 AM


Flood Stage
66.0 ft.
15.0 ft.
19.0 ft.
12.0 ft.


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN o www.jcfloridan.com








High: 8 9 I.lligh:90..

Low: 68 ,
i ,ZI4 . r'.Ini 'M-. 89 "'. 'r


Lw, L .: 69











") 1 2 3 4 '
*... ,, ., ,


THE SUN AND MOON


Sunrise
Sunset
Moonrise
Moonset


6:12 AM
7:14 PM
12:26 PM
11:14 PM


Aug Aug Sep Sep
24 31 8 16


FLORIDA'S JREAL

PANHANDLE uiCODNTY

MEDIA PARTNERS WJAQ 1o.09

L IST .NF.IIRHUR.YWEAHEiUPiDA


JACKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN
Publisher Valeria Roberts
vroberts@jcfloridan.com -

Circulation Manager Dena Oberski
doberski@jcfloridan.com

CONTACT US
Telephone: 850-526-3614
FAX: 850-482-4478
Email: editorial@jcfloridan.com
Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447
Street Address:
4403 Constitution Lane
Marianna, FL 32446
Office Hours:
Weekdays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

MISS YOUR PAPER?
You should receive your newspaper no later
than 6 a.m. If it does not arrive, call Circula-
tion between 6 a.m. and noon, Tuesday to
Friday, and 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. on Sunday. The
Jackson County Floridan (USPS 271-840).
is published Tuesday though Friday and
Sunday mornings. Periodical postage paid
at Marianna, FL.


SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Home delivery: $11.23 per month: $32.83
for three months; $62.05 for six months;
and $123.45 for one year. All prices include
applicable state and local taxes. Mail
subscriptions must be paid in advance. Mail
subscriptions are: $46.12 for three months;
$92.24 for six months; and $184.47 for one
year.

ADVERTISING
The advertiser agrees that the publisher
shall not be liable for damages arising -
out of errors and advertisements beyond
the amount paid for the space actually
occupied by that portion of the advertise-
ments in which the error occurred, whether
such error is due to the negligence of the
publisher's employees or otherwise, and
there shall be not liability for non-inser-
tion of any advertisement beyond the
amount paid for such advertisement. This
newspaper will not knowingly accept or
publish illegal material of any kind. Advertis-
ing which expresses preference based on
legally protected personal characteristics is
not acceptable.

HOW TO GET YOUR
NEWS PUBLISHED
The Jackson County Floridan will publish
news of general interest free of charge.
Submit your news or Community Calendar
events via email, fax, mail, or band delivery.
Fees may apply for wedding, engagement,
anniversary and birth announcements.
Forms are available at the Floridan offices.
Photographs must be of good quality and
suitable for print. The Floridan reserves the
right to edit all submissions.

GETTING IT RIGHT
The Jackson County Floridan's policy
is to correct mistakes promptly. To
report an error, please call 526-3614
Monday-Friday.


Community ..


TODAY
USDA Food Distribution 8 a.m. at 4297 Liddon
St. in Marianna, Eldercare Services will give out
USDA and Brown Bag food.
) Jackson County Habitat for Humanity Ware-
house hours: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
) Job Club 10:30 a:m. to 3:30 p.m. at the Mari-
anna Goodwill Career Training Center, 4742 Highway
90 in Marianna. Learn job seeking/retention skills.
Call 526-0139.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting Noon
to 1 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.
) Computer Basics Workshop 2:30-3:30 p.m.
at the Marianna One Stop Career Center. No charge.
Call 718-0326 to register.
) Special Meeting: Jackson County Tourist
Development Council 3 p.m. at the Russ House
in Marianna, to discuss by-laws, policies and proce-
dures, other business. Call 482-8060.

THUPISDAY, AUG. 23.
) Marianna City Farmers Market Open at 7 a.m.
in Madison Street Park.
Peanut Field Day 8 a.m. registration (field '
tours start at 8:30 a:m.) at the UF/IFAS North
Florida Research and Education Center, 3925 High-
way 71, Marianna. Topics include disease, nematode
and weed control, new varieties and crop rotation.
CEUs available. Call 394-9124.
) St. Anne's Thrift Store Hours 9 a.rfn. to 1
p.m. at 4285 Second Ave. in Marianna. Many items
marked down for the August sale.
) Chipola College District Board of Trustees
Special Meeting 11 a.m. in the Chipola College
Public Service Building, Marianna. Agenda: Building
"0" remodeling project bids.
) Orientation 12:30-3:30 p.m. at the Marianna
Goodwill Career Training Center, 4742 Highway 90 in
Marianna. Register.for free job placement and com-
puter training; learn about services. Call 526-0139.
) Employ Florida Workshop 1:30-2:30 p.m. at
the Marianna One Stop Career Center. No charge.
Call 718-0326 to register.
) Panhandle Seminole Club Kickoff Meeting/
Awards Dinner 6:30 p.m. at the First United
Methodist's Wesley Center, Lafayette Street in
Marianna. Scholarships will be presented. Guest
speaker: 2011-2012 ACC Men's Basketball Coach of
the Year Leonard Hamilton. Dinner (pulled pork with
all the trimmings) is free to members, $5 for non-
members. For reservations, call George Sweeney at
482-5526.
) Free Summer Concert 7-9 p.m. at Madison
Street Park, downtown Marianna. Season's final


show of the series will feature jazz from the Dr. Jill
and Gary Sextet.
Alcoholics Anonymous Closed Discussion
- 8-9 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901
Caledonia St., Marianna, in the AA room. Attendance
limited to persons with a desire to stop drinking.

FRIDAY, AUG. 24
Emerald Coast Hospice Meet-n-Eat -11 a.m.
at 4374 Lafayette St. in '.13rinri.j ECH Chaplain
Gino Mayo hosts the luncheon offering education,
bereavement support. Public welcome. R.S.V.P. to
526-3577.
Ole' Fashion Ice Cream Social 6 p.m. at
Panhandle Pioneer Settlement in Blountstown.
Homemade ice cream, kids' games and music by
Swiftwater are planned, inside Frink Gym. Admis-
sion is free. Call 850-674-2777.
Celebrate Recovery 7 p.m. at Evangel Worship
Center, 2645 Pebble Hill Road in Marianna. Adult,
teen meetings to "overcome hurts, habits and
hang-ups." Dinner: 6 p.m. Child care available. Call
209-7856, 573-1131.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 8-9
p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.

SATURDAY, AUG. 25
Marianna City Farmers Market Open at 7
a.m. in Madison Street Park.
) Pick-Up Marianna Day 8 a.m. starting at
Circle Drive Park in Mari anna'. Giveaways are
planned, including a month of free City utilities.
Public encouraged to join City of Marianna Public
Works in this city-wide clean-up effort. This event
was rescheduled from Aug. 11 due to rain. Call 482-
4129 or email nlong@cityofmarianna.com for more
information.
Alford Community Health Clinic Hours -10
a.m. until last patient is seen, at 1770 Carolina St. in
Alford. The free clinic, for income-eligible patients
without medical insurance, treats short-term
illnesses and chronic conditions. Appointments
available (call 263-7106 or 209-5501); walk-ins
welcome. Sign in before noon.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 4:30-
5:30 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.

SUNDAY, AUG. 26
Alcoholics Anonymous Closed Discussion
- 6:30 p.m. at 4349 W. Lafayette St. in Marianna
(in one-story building behind 4351W. Lafayette St.).
Attendance limited to persons with a desire to stop
drinking.


MONDAY, AUG. 27
Marianna Lions Club Meeting Noon at Jim's
Buffet & Grill. Call 482-2005.
) Mathematics Workshop 3-4 p.m. at the
Marianna One Stop Career Center. No charge. Call
718-0326 to register.
) Jackson County Quilters Guild Meeting 5:30-
7:30 p.m. at Ascension Lutheran Church, 3975 US
90 West, Marianna. Business meetings are fourth
Monday; other Mondays are for projects, lessons,
help. All quilters welcome. Call 209-7638.
) Boston Butt Sale Order Deadline Today is
the last day to order smoked Boston :uti r.:. Irnm lh
Panhandle Seminole Booster Club. Order pick-up is
Aug. 30. Call 482-3466 or visit Sweet Stuff Bakery in
Marianna. Proceeds fund scholarships to help local
students attend FSU.
)) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 8-9
p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist Church,
2901 Caledonia St., Marianna.

TUESDAY, AUG: 28
Marianna City Farmers' Market Open at 7 a.m.
in Madison Street Park.
) St. Anne's Thrift Store Hours 9 a.m. to I p.m.
Tuesday and Thursdays at 4285 2nd Ave. in Mari-
anna. Many items marked down for the August sale.
)) Sewing Circle 1 p.m. at Jackson County Senior
Citizens, 2931 Optimist Drive in Marianna. Call 482-
5028.
Spanish Workshop 3-4 pIm. at the Marianna
One Stop Career Center. No charge. Call 718,0326 to
register.
)) Big Hits BBQ Fundraiser 4:30-7 p.m. at the
St. Luke's Episcopal Church Parish Hall in Marianna,
meals of barbecued pulled pork, baked beans, cole-
slaw, a roll and dessert will be sold for $6 each (dine
in or carry out/drive thru). Kiwanis and Pilot clubs
are raising money to help buy new football helmets
for Marianna High School athletes. Tickets available
from any club member. Call 482-7507.
) Initiative Workshop 5:30-6:30 p.m. at the
Marianna One Stop Career Center. No charge. Call
718-0326 to register.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 8-9
p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist Church,
2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.

WEDNESDAY, AUG. 29
Jackson County Habitat for Humanity Ware-
house hours: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
) Job Club 10:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the Mari-
anna Goodwill Career Training Center, 4742 Highway
90 in Marianna. Learn job seeking/retention skills.
Call 526-0139.


The submission deadline for this calendar is two days before publication. Submit to: Community Calendar, Jackson County Floridan, P. O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447,
email editorial@jcfloridan.com, fax 850-482-4478 or bring items to 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.


Pol i t Ti.ce .


MARIANNA POLICE
DEPARTMENT
The Marianna Police
Department listed the following
incidents for Aug. 20, the latest
available report:
one missing .- .. -
juvenile, two -: --- ,-
suspicious -- --
people, CRIME
one verbal
disturbance,
one drug overdose, seven
traffic stops, three larceny
complaints, one assault, one
report of stabbing, one noise
disturbance, two assists of
another agency, three public '
service calls and one welfare
check.


JACKSON COUNTY
SHERIFF'S OFFICE
The Jackson County Sheriff's
Office and county Fire/Rescue
reported the following incidents
for Aug. 20, the latest avail-
able report. (Some of these
calls may be related to after-
hours calls taken on behalf
of Graceville and Cottondale
police departments): one
stolen vehicle, one abandoned
vehicle, one suspicious vehicle,
two suspicious incidents, three
funeral escorts, one burglary
complaint, two physical distur-
bances, one verbal disturbance,
two hitchhiker/pedestrian
complaints, one prowler com-
plaint, 20 medical calls, one


traffic crash entrapment, one
fire alarm complaint, 14 traffic
stops, one larceny complaint,
one criminal mischief com-
plaint, two civil disputes, three
trespassing complaints, one
animal complaint, one assist
of motorists/pedestrians, two
assists of another agency, one
public service calls, one welfare
check and four threat/harass-
ment complaints.

JACKSON COUNTY
CORRECTIONAL FACILITY
The following persons were
booked into the county jail dur-
ing the latest reporting periods:
) Varisia Raffington, 23,
2420 Vega Drive, Tallahassee,


possession of marijuana less
than 20 grams.
) Joshua Strickland, 26, 3030
Aycock Road, Cottondale,
grand theft auto, burglary of a
dwelling.
) Chastity Cook, 4178 Long
Oak Lane, Greenwood, non
child support, failure to appear
(driving while license suspend-
ed or revoked), failure to appear
(obstruction by disguise), ag-
gravated battery with a deadly
weapon.

JAIL POPULATION: 215

To report a crime, call CrimeStoppers
at 526-5000 or a local law enforcement
agency. To report a wildlife violation, call
1-888-404-FWCC (3922).







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


K

,*j.


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Michael Muldef (left), who was
introduced by Jerry Glass, spoke to
the Marianna Kiwanis Club recently
about his responsibilities and experiences as
a postal inspector and his previous career as a


Secret Service agent.




Police find baby sitter
topless in parking lot
MELBOURNE A
central Florida baby sitter
is behind bars after police
found her topless and
incoherent in a hotel park-
ing lot.
Melbourne police were
investigating calls that a
child was alone Thursday
night. They found the 5-
year-old boy playing video
games with the hotel staff.
He said his mother had
gone to the casino and left
him with a baby sitter.
Police found 47-year-old
Stacey Kerres lying top-
less in the middle of the
parking lot and said she
appeared lethargic and in-
coherent as she struggled
to talk. According to police
reports, she told officers
- she didn't know where the
child was.
Florida Today reports
Kerres was charged with
child neglect.
The Department of
Children and Families is
investigating. No attorney
was listed for Kerres.


Police fatally shoot
gun-wielding man
LAKE CITY Authori-
ties say a man was shot
and killed by Lake City
police officers during a
disturbance at an apart-
ment complex.
Police say 30-year-old
Jeramey Sweeny came
outside his apartment
early Tuesday as officers
were responding to a 911
call.
According to police
reports, Sweeny pointed
a handgun at officers
around 2:27 a.m. One of
the officers shot Sweeny,
who was pronounced
dead at the scene.
The Gainesville Sun
reports the Florida De-
partment of Law Enforce-
menrit is investigating the
shooting. The officers
involved have been placed
on administrative leave
pending the outcome of
the investigation.
No further details .were
immediately available.

From wire reports'


H ij. College


Ga. group tours new art center

Special to the Floridan | "


Several citizens from
Donalsonville, Ga.
recently toured the new
Chipola College Center
for the Arts in Marianna.
"Chipola has
a long history of
talented students and
supportive patrons from
Donalsonville, and this
new Center for the Arts
will give its citizens an
opportunity to experience
world-class performances
at rock-bottom prices
that will make the small
commute worth it," Dr.
Daniel Powell, associate
dean of Fine and
Performing Arts said.
For more information,
visit http://chipola.edu /
schlact/perfacts/artist2.
htm or call 718-2277.


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SUBMITTED PHOTO


SUBMITTED PHOTO
(From left) Jim and Polly Roberts of Marianna, and John Hanna, Laura Clark and J.B. Clark of
Donalsonville, Ga., pose for a photo during a recent tour of the Chipola College Center for the
Arts in Marianna.


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Pianist Eun Mi Lee is part of the trio set to perform Sunday
at Chipola College.


Chipola concert


series to feature


chamber music


Special to the Floridan

The Chipola College
"Spring into Summer"
concert series concludes
with an afternoon of
chamber music on Sun-
day. The event starts at 2
p.m. in the Chipola Arts
Center.
Admission is by
donation.
The concert will feature
violinist Dr. Min Young
Cho, cellist Dr. Boyan
Bonev, and pianist Ms.


Eun Mi Lee. The trio will
perform selections by
Mozart, Piazzolla and
Shostakovich.
Members of the en-
semble are graduates of
Florida State University
with an outstanding list
of awards and personal
achievements. All three
are heard regularly in
concert throughout
North America and
abroad on some of the
world's leading concert
stages.


Local !


Litter pick-up event
rescheduled
Pick Up Marianna Day
has been rescheduled for
Saturday.
The city-wide litter con-
, trol event was previously
scheduled for Aug. 11,
but cancelled due to rain.
On Saturday, partici-
pants will depart at 8 a.m.
from Circle Drive Park to
pick up in areas along Old
Cottondale Road from
Pennsylvania Avenue
back to the city limits,
west to Sunrise Drive,
north on Hall Street (cov-
ering Hall, Sunset and
McCrary to US 90).
For more information,


call 482-4129 or e-mail
nlong@cityofmnarianna.
com.

Early Learning
Coalition board
to meet
The Early Learning Co-
alition of NW Fla. Board
of Directors convenes at
11 a.m. Wednesday, Sept.
12. The meeting will be
at the Workforce Center
located at 625 Highway
231 in Panama City.
The meeting call-in
number is 1-888-670-
3525; use guest code:
4998489399#.

Special to the Floridan


Marriage, Divorce
Report


Special to the Floridan

The following marriages
and divorces were
recorded in Jackson
County during the week
of Aug. 13-17:
Marriages
)) Cozy Denise Davis and
Eric Cleve Jones.
)) Stephen Gregory
Petorak and Julia Charlene
Smith.
) Mindy Raine Day and


Steven Craig Johnson.
) Anthony Elton Burch
and Sandra Sue Widner.
Divorces
) Teresa Joan Greenlee
vs. Christopher Allen
Greenlee.
) John Chaney Jr. vs.
Dorothy Ellis.on Chaney.
)) Heather Gwen
Sheffield vs. Brandon
Clifford Sheffield.
) Donna M. Collins vs.
Clarence R. Collins.


M0n (E) 8.20 0.47 63.13 11-12-13.16.21


Mor, I'M


Tropical storm on GOP convention radar


The Associated Press

MIAMI Forecasters
cast a wary eye Tuesday
on Tropical Storm Isaac,
which was looming in the
Atlantic Ocean and poses a
potential threat to Florida
during next week's Repub-
lican National Convention
in Tampa.
It's much too early to say
with any certainty wheth-
er it will gain hurricane
strength or make a beeline
for Tampa, on Florida's
west coast. But it's the type
of weather that conven-
tion organizers knew was a
possibility during the peak
of hurricane season and
they have backup plans
in place in a worst-case


scenario.
It's been 90 years since
a major hurricane made a
direct hit on Tampa. The
last to strike Florida's west
coast was Hurricane Char-
ley, a Category 4 packing
150 mph winds. The Aug.
13, 2004, storm was small
yet' powerful and was
initially forecast to strike
the Tampa Bay area before
it turned and slammed
Port Charlotte, about 100
miles south,
National Hurricane
Center computer mod-
els predicted Isaac would
become a hurricane over
the next few days, mean-
ing maximum winds must
be at least 74 mph. Some
models had the storm


striking Florida, including
the Tampa Bay area, after
moving across Cuba or the
Bahamas as early as Sun-
day'morning.
Jeff Masters, director of
meteorology at Weather
underground.com, said
long-range storm track
predictions five days in
advance are notoriously
inaccurate, often off an av-
erage of 260 miles.
But Masters said the
climate situation has im-
proved chances that Flori-
da could be in the system's
sights during the GOP
event that runs Monday
through Thursday.
"It would take a perfect
storm of a scenario where
a bunch of factors all con-


Wed


spire together," Masters Wed
said. "But we definitely
have to watch this one." Thuri
At 5 p.m. Tuesday, Isaac ThurS
had maximum sustained Fr,
winds near 40 mph but was Fr,
expected to strengthen. at
GOP and state officials
have contingency plans in ,at
place if the storm makes its Sun
way to Tampa, including Sun
an evacuation in a worst-
case scenario.
About 70,000 delegates,
party officials, journalists,
protesters and others are Wedr
expected for the conven- satu
tion that culminates in
the nomination of former
Massachusetts Gov. Mitt wecd
Romney for president and Satui
Wisconsin U.S. Rep. Paul
Ryan for vice president.


7.52 12--6
8,21 9.5.4 9.1-5.1
1 5 .9 5.3 .2 1


Not available


(E'i 8 15 34- 6 59.6- 5 1.7-18-25-30
M) 1 8 2 6 6--3
'E) 8.,16 95 96-51 12 12-19-29
(Mi 9.7.3 2.i 5.2 ,, -;
E' S 17 .4 .4 '9 8 0 .3 4-9-10-14-25
(,M 927 9.5-65,
IE 8, 18 7-7- 6-0 5 9 3 6.14-29-34


S(M


(El 8. 19 5-5-4 2-0-9-0 9.14-16 21-35
tM 6-8-8 8-4-7-9


E = Evering drawing


M = Midday drawing


-.sday 8/15 6-27-46-51-56 PB 21
rday 8/18 14.26-11-55-59' PB.

nesday 8/15 3-7-10-19-24-27 xtra x2
rday 8/18 4-26-39-42-45-47 xtra x5
For lottery information, call 850-487-7777 or 900-737-7777


GAS WATCH
;.: if..:e: ,.- going up. Here are
lh,b. I, -1t prn:, ie places to buy
,: ,:in -i: i county, as of
Ti :.J ] id ,,:,:.n.
1. $3.45. Loves Travel Center,
Highway 231. Cottondale
2. S3.51. Pilot. Highway 71,'
Marianna
3. $3.51. Travel Center, Highway
71 South, Marianna
4. $3.52, Murphy Oil, Highway
71 South. Marianna
5. S3.54. McCoy's Food Mart,
Jefferson Street, Marianna
6. $3.55, BP Steel City,
Highway 231 South, Alford
7. S3.55, Dixie Food & Gas,
Highway 231 South, Alford
8. S3.58. BP Station, Highway
231 South, Campbellton
',. -,- .' ,, ,* o n ce,
Sn newsroom
. dan.com.


'i


SBEN SAUNDERS, D.M.D.
PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY
4711 Highway 90 East Marianna, FL
(Between Burger King & Big Lots) 526-SPIT /


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 2012 3AF


LOCAL & STATE


8-0 8 0-1-8-4














Publisher
VALERIA ROBERTS

Florida Voices


Florida should


not be proud


of being 6th


most toxic state
Last week the Natural Resources Defense
Council released a list of the "Toxic 20"
states for power plant pollution. Florida
came in at No. 6 on the most toxic list another
ranking our wonderful state should not be proud
to hold.
Among other things, coal-fired power plants ac-
count for 75 percent of Florida's mercury air pol-
lution. Much of that mercury ends up in surface
waters lakes, streams and rivers where it can
contaminate fish which, when eaten, can create
serious public health problems.
The good news is that the state of Florida has
a goal of reducing mercury emissions by 86
percent.
The bad news is that state regulators don't really
have a plan to achieve that reduction, despite
their recognition and admission that the problem
is real.
"Eighty-six percent is a large reduction when
you're looking globally" Trina Vielhauer, deputy
director for the Florida Department of Environ-
mental Protection's Division of Environmental
Assessment and Restoration, told the Sarasota
Herald-Tribune recently. "Certainly we're expect-
ing Florida sources to do what they can to meet
that goal."
Of course, being a regulation-averse state,
officials will likely rely on voluntary reduction
measures on the utility industry's part. That won't
be good enough. But in that regard there is more
good news-bad news.
The good news is that newly adopted U.S.
Environmental Protection Agency mercury and
air toxic standards will require utilities to reduce
harmful emissions by 75 percent from 2010 levels
beginning in 2015.
The bad news is that members of Congress,
including Florida's U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio, are try-
ing to repeal those tougher federal standards.
Why representatives of the nation's sixth most
toxic state a state that relies heavily on clean
waters, clean beaches and clean skies would
want to ease up on anti-pollution measures is a
mystery and, frankly, an irresponsible represen-
tation. Certainly there is nothing about Florida's
regulatory history to indicate that the state will
act in the absence of an EPA mandate, and that is
lamentable.
Floridians deserve more protection than that.
This is no time to let up in what is one of the
nation's most toxic states.

This editorial was published in the Ocala Star-Banner on Monday, Aug. 20.

Contact representatives


Florida Legislature

) Rep. Marti Coley, R-
District 7
Marti.Coley@myflorida
house.gov
Building A, Room 186
Chipola College,
3094 Indian Circle
Marianna, FL 32446-1701
) Rep. Brad Drake, R-
District 5 -
Brad.Drake@myflorida
house.gov
NWFL State-Chautauqua
Campus No. 205
908 U.S. Highway 90W.
DeFuniak Springs, FL
32433-1436
)) Sen Bill Montford. D-
District 6
208 Senate Office
Building
404 S. Monroe St.
Tallahassee, FL 32399


montford.bill.web@
flsenate.gov

U.S. Congress
Rep. Steve Southerland,
R-2nd District
1229 Longworth HOB
Washington, DC 20515
Phone: (202) 225-5235
Fax: (202) 225-5615
) Sen. Bill Nelson (D)
Washington office
United States Senate
716 Senate Hart Office
Building
Washington, DC 20510
(202) 224-5274
)) Sen. Marco Rubio (R)
Washington office '
United States Senate
B40A Dirksen Senate
Office Building
Washington, DC 20510
(202) 224-3041


What a 14-year-old homeowner


can teach everyone about thrift


BY WILLIAM MATTOX
Florida Voices

W en Florida students head
back to the classroom this
month, 14 year-old Willow
Tufano of North Port will not be
among them. Willow, you see, has ,
more important things to do like
collecting rent from the tenants
who live in the house she bought
recently with earnings from her
small business.
If you need to re-read that last
sentence, go ahead. Because it isn't
every day that a 14-year-old buys
a house. And Willow's remarkable
story not only should give hope
to everyone worried about the
future of the American dream, but
it also should help us rediscover a
time-honored American ideal that
can help get our nation out of its
current economic mess.
Two years ago, Willow's mother
was helping process a foreclosure
along Florida's Gulf Coast. When
Willow learned that the man in
charge of the property planned to
dispose of the household belong-
ings left behind, she asked if she
could have them instead. He
agreed. Soon Willow began posting
notices on Craig's List, selling these
and other items she found at yard
sales and by "dumpster diving."
Willow quickly learned the used-
goods market. "Baby items, bunk
beds, video games, and electron-'
ics sell well," she says. 'Appliances
- like dishwashers and old TVs
- don't."
Willow saved her earnings,
amassing $6,000 over 18 months.
Then, one day, she overheard her
mother talking about a home once
valued at $100,000 that was on the
"short sale" market for $16,000. Wil-
low said she'd like to buy the home.
And buy it she did for $12,000


(half with her savings, half with
funds borrowed from her mother.)
Once Willow pays back her mom
- using the $700 in rent she col-
lects every month from tenants
nearly twice her age she hopes
to buy another house. "I calculated
that I can make more doing this
than I can in a typical teenage job,"
she says, innocently.
In case you're wondering, Willow
is not being deprived of a formal
education. She's taking a full slate
of advanced courses through the
Florida Virtual School (FLVS). And
she plans to go to college some day.
She says taking classes online gives
her the flexibility she needs to run
her business. "On trash days, being
able to go out and get the good
stuff that people leave on the street
is really important. If it weren't for
FLVS, I'd never be able to do this."
That Willow has educational op-
tions is a testament to the endur-
ing influence of economist Milton
Friedman, America's original school
choice champion, whose centen-
nial birth was commemorated at
more than 100 events all over the
world last month. Indeed, Willow's
propensity to see business oppor-
tunities where others see none is
just what one might expect from a
student who's been conditioned to
see schooling options beyond the
conventional.
But Willow's story is about more
than the benefits of educational
freedom. It's also about the ben-
efits of economic freedom and
the rediscovery of a time-honored
idea that Benjamin Franklin once
championed.
"If Jefferson wrote the Declara-
tion of Independence and Madison
crafted the Constitution, then
Benjamin Franklin, it might truly
be said, invented the American
Dream," writes social historian


Barbara Dafoe Whitehead.
Franklin encouraged Americans
to be industrious and frugal to
practice thrift, which, interestingly,
comes from the same roof as "thriv-
ing." And Franklin did this not just
to facilitate upward mobility, but
because he knew that economic
dependency and chronic debt hin-
ders one's liberty.
Sadly, America's "thrift ethic" has
declined in recent years. Whitehead
reports that the term "thrift" is
rarely associated with industrious-
ness anymore. And frugality, which
comes from the same root as "fruit-
fulness," remains a foreign word to
many in our day, especially govern-
ment officials in Washington.
Thankfully, the John Templeton
Foundation is seeking to reverse
these trends. In recent years, Tem-
pleton-funded projects in Pennsyl-
vania and Florida have successfully
revived "Thrift Week" celebrations
tied to Benjamin Franklin's Jan.
17 birthday. As part of this effort,
a supplemental thrift curriculum,
All About the Benjamins, reached
more than 135,000 Florida students
earlier this year.
Had Willow Tufano been in the
classroom instead of out buying
her first home she might have
encountered this curriculum. But
judging from this spunky teenager's
remarkable story, it's safe to say
Willow already knows something
about the value of hard work and
saving for the future.
The rest of us should follow this
little entrepreneur's example.



William Mattox is a resident fellow at the James
Madison Institute, the project manager for All
About the Benjamins and a columnist for Florida
Voices. A version of this article appeared in USA
TODAY.


Letter to the Editor


'Setting the facts straight' on


Sneads High School photos


This is in response to the
letter to the editor printed
Wednesday, Aug. 15, 2012,
in your paper.
Mrs. Betty Jean
Edwards-Johns failed to
share the entire story with
the readers.
You are correct, the
pictures were removed
from the hallway, but
however, they were not
stored as your letter
implied.
On Sept. 1, 2005, the
Jessica Lunsf6rd Act was
enacted and it requires


Letters to the Edi


everyone to report to
the main office. Had the
pictures remained placed
in the hallway in the
classroom areas, it would
have been very difficult
for visitors to come in and
see the pictures during a
normal school day, due
to the security process
required by the Jessica
Lunsford Act.
Furthermore, the
pictures have been
vandalized by students
and taken off the walls by
students as pranks.


With all of this taken
into consideration, the
pictures were moved to
the main lobby so visitors
would be able to see them
upon immediate entrance
of the school.
Also, with the pictures
in the lobby, they were
no longer vandalized or
removed from the wall by
students.
Visitors that came to see
the pictures do not have
to go through the process
of getting clearance and
having a staff member


to serve as an escort,
especially during class
changes, where there is
a possibility of pushing
and/or shoving, resulting
in possible injury.
The pictures were placed
in the lobby, all together,
and very eloquently
displayed for all Sneads
High School students, staff
and alumni to enjoy.
Thank you for allowing
me to set the facts
straight.
PAULETTE JACKSON
Greenwood


Submit letters by either mailing to Editor, P.O. Box 520, Marianna FL, 32447 or faxing to 850-482-4478 or send
email to editorial@jcfloridan.com. The Floridarl reserves the right to edit or not publish any letter. Be sure to in-
clude your full address and telephone number. These will only be used to verify the letter and will not be printed.
For more information call 850-526-3614.


I. 8/22
S @2012 Jeff Stahler/Dist. by Universal UOliQk for UFS









JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN *> www.jcfloridan.com


USDA eyes whether tainted


beef entered food supply


The Associated Press

FRESNO, Calif. Fed-
eral regulators who shut
down a Central California
slaughterhouse after re-
ceiving an animal welfare
video were investigating
Tuesday whether beef
from sick cows reached
the human food supply.
The video appears to
show workers bungling
the slaughter of cows
struggling to walk and
even stand. Under federal
regulations, sick animals
cannot be slaughtered for
human consumption.
The investigation will
determine whether sick
cows were slaughtered
and whether meat prod-
ucts from the company
should be recalled, said
Justin Dejong, a spokes-
man for the USDA Food
Safety Inspection Service.
The agency suspended
operations Monday at
Central Valley Meat Co.
in Hanford after receiv-
ing the video Friday from
the animal welfare group
Compassion Over Killing.
The footage shows ani-
mals bleeding and thrash-
ing after being repeatedly
shot in the head with a
pneumatic gun in unsuc-
cessful efforts to render
them unconscious for
slaughter.
Federal regulations say
that to avoid unnecessary'
suffering during slaughter,
animals must be rendered
unconscious by a single
shot to the head from a
pneumatic gun that fires
a bolt through the skull to
pierce the brain.
In-N-Out Burger, a fast
food chain, severed its ties
with the company after
learning about the situ-
ation. Mark Taylor, chief
operating officer, said on
Tuesday that the company
acted immediately upon
becoming aware it.


THEASSOCIATED PRESS
A security guard opens the gate at the Central Valley Meat
Co., the California slaughterhouse shut down by federal
regulators on Tuesday after they received video showing
dairy cows being repeatedly shocked and shot before being
slaughtered, in Hanford, Calif.


'As soon as we became
aware of the allegations
regarding Central Valley
Meat Company and their
handling of cattle, we im-
mediately severed our
supplier relationship with
them. In-N-Out Burger.
would never condone the
inhumane treatment of
animals and all of our sup- '
pliers must agree to abide
by our strict standards for
the humane treatment
of cattle," Taylor said to
The Associated Press in a
written statement.
In-N-Out's agreement
with suppliers prohibits
companies from ship-
ping beef from sick ani-
mals. The agreement
also includes standards
on humane treatment of
animals.
The USDA said investi-
gators are trying to deter-
mine whether the cows in
the video were just lame
or sick, which would ren-
der them unfit for human
consumption.
"That's the main issue
right now," said DeJong
of the USDA's Food Safety
Inspection Service.
Central Valley Meat Co.,
owned by Brian and Law-
rence Coelho, declined to
comment on the video,


saying company officials
had not seen it. On Tues-
day the company hired
a public relations firm,
which issued a state-
ment saying the com-
pany is cooperating with
investigators.
"Central Valley Meat is
working closely with the
USDAs Food Safety and
Inspection Service to ad-
dress animal-handling
concerns arising from a
covert video provided to
USDA by an animal rights
group. Central Valley Meat
takes these issues very se-
riously and is now devel-
oping a plan of action to
present to FSIS to remedy
any potential violations of
USDA guidelines. Based
on our own investigation
and 30 years of produc-
ing safe, high-quality US
beef, we are confident
these concerns pose no
food safety issues. We take
these allegations very seri-
ously and will immediate-
ly address any concerns
the USDA may have," the
company said.
The video also shows
cattle lying in pens unable
to move and cattle with
swollen udders that are
unable to keep their legs
under them.


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Firefighter Chuck Mitchell hoses down a hot spot of the Ponderosa Fire near Viola, Calif., on
Monday.


Huge fire burns to



edge of 3 Calif. towns


The Associated Press

MANTON, Calif. As a lightning-
sparked wildfire raged near Lynn Rodg-
ers' home of less than a year, the evacu-
ated resident said Tuesday she remained
optimistic in spite of her growing
frustration and fear.
"Yeah, but what can you do? Everything
is in God's hands and the firefighters',"
said Rodgers, who lives in Shingletown.
Aided by a shift in winds, firefight-
ers were making a stand against the fire,
which has destroyed seven homes and
prompted fearful residents to take shelter
at a sports complex in nearby Redding.
Since igniting Saturday, the fire grew to
more than 30 square miles. Nearly 1,900
firefighters were battling the blaze in rug-
ged, densely forested terrain as it threat-
ened 3,500 homes in the remote towns"
of Shingletown, Manton and Viola, about
170 miles north of Sacramento. '
The fast-moving fire is one of many
burning across the West, where dry light-
ning has sparked up grass, brush and
timber, bringing an early start to the fire
season.
Like Rodgers, many other evacuees
were anxious to hear the latest informa-
tion from officials. Dozens of people, as
well as about a dozen dogs, were waiting
at the Redding gym.
"The evacuation part? It's hard


because I don't know what's happening
to the house up there," said Jimmy Hall, a
Shingletown resident whose family spent
another night sleeping on cots.
"It's my dad's house ... There's a lot of
things in there," Hall added. "I've heard
that my friend is still up there protecting
his house. It's just hard. Look 4t how we're
sleeping."
Eric Kiltz, an emergency services coor-
dinator for the American Red Cross, said
"there's more frustration than anxiety,
and people, for the most part are grateful
they have a safe and secure place to stay,
even though their home may be lost."
Gov. Jerry Brown announced Tuesday
that National Guard. troops will be assist-
ing with the firefighting efforts. The news
comes a day after the Federal Emergency
Management Agency said it is offering
federal funds to help fight the blaze.
Remnants of the fire spotted in some
homes included melted satellite dishes,
burned furniture and charred refrig-
erators. As the wildfire burned, massive
amounts of smoke poured from the for-
est. The fire forced the closure of Highway
44 and other roads, and prompted the
declaration of an emergency in Shasta
County.
Elsewhere in California, a massive wild-
fire in Plumas National Forest grew over
the weekend. The blaze has consumed 79
square miles since it started in July.


0 - B S S - S 0 - S S S


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 2012 5AF


NATION







-16A WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 2012 NATION


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Officials inspect part of a CSX freight train that derailed alongside a parking lot overnight in Ellicott City, Md., on Tuesday.


Two women killed in train derailment


The Associated Press

ELLICOTT CITY, Md. They were
seemingly ordinary tweets from two
friends hanging out on a railroad
bridge in their hometown, enjoy-
ing one last summer night together
before heading back to college.
"Drinking on top of the Ellicott City
sign," read one. "Looking down on
bld ec," read another. Accompany-
ing photos showed their view from
the bridge and their bare feet, one
with painted blue toenails, dangling
over the edge.
Minutes after those messages
were sent, a CSX freight train loaded
with coal barreled down the tracks
and derailed, killing the 19-year-old
women and toppling railcars and
coal on the streets below.
Investigators were still trying to
figure out what caused the derail-
ment. It appeared the women were
sitting on the edge of the bridge as
the train passed a few feet behind
them, Howard County police said.
At some point, the train derailed
'and the women's bodies'were found
buried under coal.
' It wasn't clear whether the women's
presence on the tracks had anything
to do with the derailment.
Killedwere Elizabeth ConwayNass,
a student at James Madison Uni-
versity in Virginia and Rose Louese
Mayr, a nursing student at the
University of Delaware.
The railroad is easily accessible
from picturesque downtown Ellicott
City arnd generations of young peo-
ple have played and partied along
the tracks. The railroad was com-
pleted in 1830 and crosses over Main
Street in the city's historic district,
following the route of the nation's
first commercial railroad, accord-


ing to the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad
Museum.
"We grew up running on those
tracks," said Ellicott City na-
tive Bridgette Hammond, 25. "It's
actually really beautiful up there."
Nass and Mayr graduated from
Mt. Hebron High School in Ellicott
City and planned to finish college
in 2014, according to their Facebook
pages.
One of Nass' sorority sisters, Donya
Mossadeghi, called her "a joy to talk
to" and someone who "would never
say a bad thing about anybody."
Nass made the dean's list in the fall of
2010 and 2011, according to a
university spokesman.
Tori Mace, of Ellicott City, knew
Mayr through mutual friends. "She
was really fun, really friendly," Mace
said. Another college friend said
'Mayr loved to dance and joined a
dance group at the school.
A person who answered the tele-
phone at Nass' home declined to
comment, as did a family mem-
ber who answered the phone at a
number listed for the Mayr family.
The pictures and the tweets from
Mayr were no longer publicly avail-
able Tuesday afternoon, but friends
confirmed they were hers and police
said they were aware of the posts and
looking into them.
Residents described hearing the
derailment. Jill Farrell, who lives
across the street from the tracks,
said she heard what sounded liked
squealing brakes and then a crash,
followed by silence.
Benjamin Noppenberger was get-
ting ready for bed when he and his
wife heard what sounded like gun-
shots. They waited about 10 minutes
before going outside.
"We could see all the cars that


fell over. I just saw catastrophe," he
said.
CSX spokesman Bob Sullivan said
that the train was traveling from
Grafton, W.Va., to Baltimore. It had
two train operators, who were not
harmed.
Jim Southworth, investigator in
charge for the NTSB, declined to
speculate on a possible cause. He
said the train was equipped with
video recording devices that inves-
tigators will review to help them
determine what happened. He said
the train was going about 25 miles
per hour but would not say whether
that was an appropriate speed limit
for the area.
The train had two locomotives,
was 3,000 feet long and weighed
9,000 tons, he said.
Environmental, officials also re-
sponded. About 100 pounds of coal
the train was carrying spilled .into a
tributary of the Patapsco River, a ma-
jor Maryland waterway that parallels
the tracks. Maryland Department
of the Environment spokesman Jay
Apperson said much more coal lay
along the edge of the tributary, rais-
ing concerns it could boost the acid-
ity of the water or otherwise threaten
aquatic life. The agency will direct
CSX's environmental consultant
to test the tributary for pollutants,.
Apperson said.
Eric Weiss, an NTSB spokesman,
said investigators will be on the
scene for several days, possibly a
week. Weiss says he does not know
how long it will take to clear the
tracks.
The derailment damaged some
of Verizon's equipment, disrupt-
ing land-line telecommunications
services to clients, including some
government customers.


Obama shifts attack to Ryan education plan


The Associated Press

COLUMBUS, Ohio -
'President Barack Obama
charged rival Mitt Rom-
ney with being oblivious
to the burdens of paying
for college on Tuesday,
telling young voters in
battleground Ohio that his
opponent's education pol-
icies amounted to having
students borrow from their
parents or "shop around"
for the best deal.
"That's his plan. That's
his answer to young people
who are trying to figure out
how to go to college and
make sure that they don't
have a mountain of debt,"
Obama said at Capital
University in Columbus.
"Not everybody has par-
ents who have the money
to lend. That may be news,
to some folks."
Turning to young voters,
a key part of his 2008 coali-
tion, the president sought
to draw a bright line with
Romney on education
policy in his latest attempt
to meld Romney with the
House Republican budget
blueprint offered Rep. Paul
Ryan, Romney's running
mate.
Obama and Romney
remain lockedin a tight
presidential campaign a
week before the former
Massachusetts governor
formally claims his party's
nomination at the GOP
convention in Tampa,
Fla. Both campaigns have
broadened their message
to voters in recent weeks
beyond the economy,
'which remains the most
pivotal issue for voters less
.than three months before
_the election.


Romney sought to dis-
tance himself from Mis-
souri GOP Senate nominee
Todd Akin, who apologized
after saying in an inter-
view that women's bod-
ies are sometimes able to
prevent pregnancies after
what he called "a legiti-
mate rape." Romney said
in a statement that fellow
Missouri Republicans had
urged Akin to quit and "I
think he should accept
their counsel and exit the
Senate race."
Romney was raising
money to bolster his cam-
paign in Texas, where he
told donors that his cam-
paign was "a little wiser in
our spending of dollars"
than Obama's campaign,
pointing to new finance
documents released by
Obama's campaign on
Monday that showed it
spent more money in July
than it brought in.
Romney and Repub-
licans have outraised
Obama and Democrats
for the past three months,
a sign of broad GOP in-
terest in defeating the
incumbent president.
"I'm not managing their
campaign for them, but
we're going to spend our
money wiser," Romney
said in Houston, where
he was expected to pull
in more than $6 million.
"We're going to spend it to
win."
In a nod to oil-rich Texas,
Romney told donors he
planned to announce a
"comprehensive energy
plan" during a stop in New
Mexico later this week but
offered few details beyond
a focus in part on fossil-
based fuels. Romney said


THEASSOCIATED PRESS
President Barack Obama speaks at Capital University on
Tuesday in Columbus, Ohio.


his aim was to "fully take
advantage of our energy
resources."
Romney's campaign
countered the president's
education critique, saying
college costs had skyrock-
eted under Obama's watch
and his economic poli-
cies had made it difficult
for recent college gradu-
ates to find vork. Romney
spokeswoman Amanda
Henneberg said Obama's
policies were "just more of
the same from a president
who hasn't fixed the econ-
omy or kept his promises
to the young people who
supported him four years
ago."
Democrats have tried to
use Ryan's budget propos-
al to undermine Romney's
pitch to blue-collar voters,
and Obama's appeal on
higher education was no
different.
Democrats contend
that Ryan's budget pro-
posal would cut $115 bil-
lion from the Education
Department.


Homemade Meatloaf
.'th gravy
Fried Fillet of Rsh
with tartar OR cocktail
Fried Pork Chop


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Unheard Martin


Luther King Jr.


audio found in attic


The Associated Press

NASHVILLE, Tenn. -
Stephon Tull was looking
through dusty old boxes in
his father's attic in Chatta-
nooga a few months ago
when he stumbled onto
something startling: an
audio reel labeled, "Dr.
King interview, Dec.,21,
1960." -
He wasn't sure what he
had until he borrowed a
friend's reel-to-reel player
and listened to the re-
cording of his father in-
terviewing Martin Luther
King Jr. for a book project
that never came to frui-
tion. In clear audio, King
discusses the importance
of the civil rights move-
ment, his definition of
nonviolence and how a
recent trip of his to Africa
informed his views. Tull
said the recording had
been in the attic for years,
and he wasn't sure who
Other than his father may
have heard it.
"No words can describe.
I couldn't believe it," he
told The Associated Press
this week in a phone in-
terview from his home in
Chattanooga. "I found ... a
lost part of history."
Many recordings of King
are known to exist among
hundreds of thousands
of documents related to
his life that have been
catalogued and archived.
But one historian said the
newly discovered inter-
view is unusual because
theie's little audio of King
discussing his activities in
Africa, while two of King's
contemporaries said it's
exciting to hear a little-
known recording of their
friend for the first time.


Tull plans to offer the
recording at a private sale
arranged by a New York
broker and collector later
this month.
Tull said his father, an
insurance salesman, had
planned to write a book
about the racism he en-
countered growing up in
Chattanooga and later as
an adult. He said his dad
interviewed King when he
visited the city, but never
completed the book and
just stored the recording
with some other inter-
views he had done. Tull's
father is now in his early
80s and under hospice
care.
During part of the inter-
view, King defines non-
violence and justifies its
practice.
"I would ... say that it is a
method which seeks to se-
cure a moral end through
moral means," he said.
'And it grows out of the
whole concept of love, be-
cause if one is truly non-
violent that person has a
loving spirit, he refuses to
inflict injury upon the op-
ponent because he loves
the opponent."
The interview was made
four years before the Civil
Rights Act became law,
three years before King's
famous "I Have a Dream"
speech, and eight years
*before his assassination.
At one point in the inter-
view, King predicts the
impact of the civil rights
movement.
"I am convinced that
when the history books
are written in future years,
historians will have to re-
cord this movement as
one of the greatest epics
of our heritage," he said.


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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Young people from the Dror School in Israel at the site of the former German Nazi death
camp of Sobibor, in eastern Poland, on Tuesday.


Israeli archaeologist digs


into Nazi death camp


The Associated Press

KIRYAT MALACHI, Israel When Is-
raeli archaeologist Yoram Haimi decided
to investigate his family's unknown Ho-
locaust history, he turned to the skill he
knew best: He began to dig.
After learning that two of his uncles
were murdered in the infamous So-
bibor death camp, he embarked on a
landmark excavation project that is
shining new light on the workings of
one of the most notorious Nazi killing
machines, including pinpointing. the
location of the gas chambers where
hundreds of thousands were killed.
Sobibor, in eastern Poland, marks per-
haps the most vivid example of the "Fi-
nal Solution," the Nazi plot to wipe out
European Jewry. Unlike other camps
that had at least a facade of being prison
or labor camps, Sobibor and the neigh-
boring camps Belzec and Treblinka were
designed specifically for exterminating
Jews. Victims were transported there in
cattle cars- and gassed to death almost
immediately.
But researching Sobibor has been dif-
ficult. After an October 1943 uprising at
the camp, the Nazis shut it down and
leveled it to the ground, replanting over
it to cover their tracks.
Today, tall trees cover most of the for-
mer camp grounds. Because there were
so few survivors only 64 were known
- there has never been an authentic lay-
out of the camp, where the Nazis are be-
lieved to have murdered some 250,000
Jews over an 18-month period. From
those few survivors' memories and par-
tial German documentation, researchers
had only limited understanding of how
the camp operated.
"I feel like I am an investigator in a
criminal forensic laboratory," Hairgi,
51, said near his home in southern Is-
rael this week, a day before departing
for another dig in Poland. "'After all, it is a
murder scene."
Over five years of excavations, Haimi
has been able to remap the camp and
has unearthed thousands of items.
He hasn't' found anything about his


family, but amid the teeth, bone shards
and ashes through which he has sift-
ed, he has recovered jewelry, keys and
coins that have helped identify some of
Sobibor's formerly nameless victims.
The heavy concentration of ashes
led him to estimate that far more than
250,000 Jews were actually killed at
Sobibor.
"Because of the lack of information
about Sobibor, every little piece of infor-
mation is significant," said Haimi. "No
one knew where the gas chambers were.
The Germans didn't want anyone to find
out what was there. But thanks to what
we have done, they didn't succeed."
The most touching find thus far, he
said, has been an engraved metal iden-
tification tag bearing the name of'Lea
Judith de la Penha, a 6-year-old Jewish
girl from Holland who Israel's Yad Vash-
em Holocaust memorial confirmed was
murdered at the camp. Haimi calls her
the "symbol of Sobibor."
"The Germans didn't discriminate.
They killed little girls too," he said. "This
thing (the tag) has been waiting for 70
years for someone to find it."
Haimi's digs, backed by Yad Vashem,
could serve as a template for future
scholarship into the'Holocaust, in which
the Nazis and their collaborators killed
about 6 million Jews.
"I think the use of archaeology offers
the possibility of giving us information
that we didn't have before," Deborah Lip-
stadt, a prominent American Holocaust
historian from Emory University, said.
"It gives us another perspective when we
are at the stage when we have very few
people who can speak in the first person
singular."
She said that if the archaeological evi-
dence points to a higher death toll at So-
bibor than previously thought, "it is not
out of sync with other research that has
been done."
Haimi and his Polish partner Wojciech
Mazurek, along with some 20 laborers,
have stumbled on of personal items be-
longing to the victims: eye glasses, per-
fume bottles, dentures, rings, watches, a
child's Mickey Mouse pin and more.


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
A City of Marianna truck spays for mosquitoes along Borden Street earlier in the summer.


Illness
From Page 1A
repellent on exposed skin. Infants should
be protected when outside by way of
netting that will shield them from mos-'
quitoes. Avoid being outside at dawn
and dusk if possible, when mosquitoes
are most actively feeding.
Jackson County Environmental Health
Director T.G. Harkrider said that, while


no local cases have yet been reported,
residents should follow the above rec-
ommendations. He also reminds horse
owners to have their animals vaccinated
against the viruses and to make sure
those vaccines are up to date.
The county regularly sprays for mos-
quitoes in a continuing pattern of cover-
age, but Harkrider said that the county
will spray on demand in specific areas if
asked to do so. The department can be
reached at 526-2412 or 482-9228.


Assad's regime steps


up use of air power


The Associated Press

BEIRUT Its forces
stretched thin on multiple
fronts, President Bashar
Assad's regime has signifi-
cantly increased its use of
air power against Syrian
rebels in recent weeks,
causing a spike in civilian
casualties.
The shift is providing
useful clues about the
capability of the Syrian
air force as Western pow-
ers consider the option
of enforcing a no-fly zone
over the, northern part of
the country, where reb-
els control large swaths
of territory along the
Turkish border.
If a no-fly zone is en-
forced, Western aircraft
will likely go head-to-head
with the Syrian air force
as well as try to neutral-
ize, at least partially, its air
defense system.
"It is certainly a sign of
increased concern on the
part of the regime," said
senior political scientist
Christopher S. Chivvis
of the Rand 'Corpora-
tion. "The growing use
of air power, particularly
fixed-wing aircraft, raises
the possibility of foreign
intervention."
U.S. Defense Secretary
Leon Panetta said Aug. 14
that plans to set up a no-fly
zone over parts of Syria is
"not on the front burner,"
despite persistent calls
from rebel forces there.
that they need the added
protection from escalat-
ing regime airstrikes in
the civil war.
Secretary of State Hill-
ary Rodham Clinton has
said that the U.S. and Tur-
key are discussing a range
of steps, including a no-
fly zone over some parts
of Syria. Russia, Assad's
main foreign backer,
opposes a no-fly zone.
There are no estimates
on how many civilians
have been killed in air-
strikes in the four-week
period in which stepped


up attacks have been de-
tected, but Syrian activ-
ists speak of hundreds,
maybe thousands, across
the country.
Helpless civilians run for
cover when they hear the
distant buzz of aircraft.
Terrified and screaming,
they. head to the near-
est basement or ground
floor.
"May God exact ret-
ribution on him!" they
shout against Assad or the
pilot involved. "May God
cripple him!" and "May
he rot in hell!" are other
frequently used curses.
Syria's air force has an
unimpressive record it
* lost 85 planes in a battle
with Israel in 1982 but
without any effective anti-
aircraft weapons in the
hands of the rebels, the.
relatively antiquated fleet
of Soviet-era warplanes is
unchallenged..
"We used to think mor-
tars are bad," activist
El-Saeed Mohammed
said by Skype from a Da-
mascus suburb. "Now,
we think they are almost
sweet when compared to
what warplanes do to us.
There is no kidding with
planes."
He recounted how
two elderly women died
of heart attacks, possi-
bly triggered by anxiety,
during air raids in the
past week in the greater
Damascus area. .
Besides the deadly
airstrikes, activists and
residents say, pilots also
employ psychological
tactics. Jets frequently
swoop down in mock
strafing raids, break the
sound barrier over urban
centers, or fly menacingly
at high altitudes, a sign of
a possible bombing raid.
Low flying helicop-
ter gunships also spray
streets with machine-
gun fire, and residents
lose sleep over air ac-
tivity at night that frays
the nerves of both
civilians and rebels alike.


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Chelsea Hutto works in the ticket window Thursday night at
Marianna Cinemas.


Cinema
From Page 1A
Sarah and Bill Homer
own the theater. This was
the first in a string of 16
theaters they purchased
in the mid-1990s. They
eventually sold them
all, in 2004, but in 2009
re-purchased just one
- their original buy in
Marianna.
Sarah Homer said
she considers this her
"baby" and her "boutiqcie
cinema."
It is now also equipped
with 16 cameras, and
the couple can remotely
see inside the auditori-
ums and other parts of
the facility at any point
from their home base in
Jacksonville. Homer said


cameras are her hobby,
but they were primar-
ily installed as a security
measure.
The theater can show
four different movies at
a time, or double up on
a favorite that might sell
so well a double sitting
could be necessary at a
given time. Homer said
the theater will continue
its tradition of targeting
blockbusters and fam-
ily favorites in selecting
movies to show, and that
the additional seating will
give them more options.
It will allow them to hold
over the most popular
movies if needed, while
still bringing in new titles,
or show four different
films in hopes of satisfy-
ing the varied tastes of
more movie-goers.


Obituaries

Lanier-Andler
Funeral Home
8261 Highway 90 East
Sneads, FL 32460
850-593-9900



Gene E.
O'Hara

Mr. Gene E. O'Hara, 88, a
native of Cypress, passed
away Friday August 10,
2012 in Jacksohvill after a
lengthy illness. He was a
member of the Parkwood'
Baptist Church in Jackson-
ville and had retired as an
Engineer with the Jackson-
fille Shipyards. He was a
US Navy Veteran of WWII
and loved fishing in his
spare time. He was also
listed in the Architect Mag-
azine as No. 1 Farmer in
America. Gene and his
'family had moved to Jack-
sonville in 1968, from Alba-
ny, GA.
Gene is survived by his
- beloved wife, Dorothy Nell
Robbinson O'Hara of Jack-
sonville; son Butch O'Hara
and wife Toni of Jasper;
daughter, Linda O'Hara
James of Jacksonville; sis-
ters, Malba Lanier of
Sneads and Bernice Dennis
of Marianna; five grand-
children, Keith M. O'Hara
and wife Darlene, Dianne
Capel and husband Brian,
Angela Lipsey, Mike and
Tara; eight great-
grandchildren and two
great- great-grandchildren.
Services were held on Au-
gust 14, 2012 at Shady
Grove Cementery. Lanier-
Andler Funeral Home in
Sneads was in charge of ar-
rangements.



Hope
From Page 1A
women affected by can-
cer. The show had a silent
auction, concession stand,
and more in addition to
the show. Kozlowski cred-
ited the show's manager
Kristen Massaro with its
success.
Planning for next year's
local Lope For Hope has al-
ready begun. They're look-
ing into making it a bit later
Sin the year to bring in more
people, getting more cor-
porate sponsorships, and
extending it into a two-day
event.
"We're seeing a lot of pos-
itive energy coming out of
this," Kozlowski said.

World Briefs
Afghan rockets hit
U.S. general's plane
KABUL, Afghanistan
-An insurgent rocket
attack damaged the plane
of the top U.S. military
general as it sat parked at a
coalition base in Afghani-
stan on Tuesday, dealing
another blow to the image
of progress in building a
stable country as foreign
forces work to wind down
the 10-year-old war.
The Taliban claimed
responsibility for the two
rockets that landed near
the C-17 transport plane
that U.S. Army Gen. Mar-
tin Dempsey, the chair-
man of the Joint Chiefs of
Staff, flew into Bagram Air
Field north of Kabul on a
day earlier. Jamie Gray-
beal, a spokesman for the
U.S. military and the in-
ternational coalition, said
Dempsey was unhurt.

Police identify victim
in body parts case
TORONTO Police on
Tuesday identified the vic-
tim whose body parts were
found scattered around
Toronto as a single mother
of three who owned a


now-defunct spa. The
head, foot and hands of
41-year-old Liu Guanghua
were discovered in a river
west of Toronto last week.
Over the weekend, her two
calves, a thigh and an arm
were found in a creek in
eastern Toronto.
From wire reports


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WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 2012 7AF


LOCAL & WORLD






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN : www.jcfloridan.com


SERVICE DRUG STORE SHOWS TEAM SPIRIT
"-- -.-, - .
,.;, -... .. ,:,... .._ ,.
...YU &", ; ':.


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
S service Drug Store owner Stacy Cook was showing her support for the Graceville Tigers on Monday morning by decorating the front of
her business. The store, which features an old fashioned soda fountain and gift shop as well as a pharmacy, will be having pre-football
game spirit parties from 2:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. on Fridays. SerVice Drug, which has been a community fixture in Graceville for 106 years,
was taken over by Cook in January.


SHS BAND PERFORMS FRIDAY I fWIN A $50


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Sneads High School Band members
Chelsey Neely and Corey Knight
practice Monday afternoon. This year
they will be playing as a pep band to keep the
Pirates' fans fired up at football games. Their
first performance will be this Friday during
the Pirates football game against Berrien, Ga.,
at 6 p.m.

-'1 \LOOKING FOR MORE NEWS? VISIT
WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM

Do you have'Cute Kids'?
Email your'Cute'Kids*' photos to editorial@jcfloridan.com.
mail them to P.O. Box 520. Marianna, FL 32447 or bring them
by our offices at 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.
"12 years or under, with Jackson County ties. Include child's
full name. parents'name(s) and city of residence. Thisjs a free
service All entries subject to editing.


Can You Identify This lWcation?
Sunday through Thursday of each
week the Jackson County Floridan
will publish a series of four photos
from a location in Jackson County. If
you can identify the location of these
photos, you will be entered in a weekly
drawing for a chance to win the $50
Grocery Outlet Gift Certificate.






I .c/o Jackson County Floridan, P.O. Box 520,
I Marianna, FL 32447, or you an drop it off at our
SI office located at 4403 Constitution Lane,
I Marianna, FL 32448. You may also enter online
at jcfloridan.com during contest dates.
,Tight Shot Location:

| Name:

I Address:'

I Daytime Phone Number:

I Age:
i.--in


-8A WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 2012


LOCIL












Graceville VolleybaU


Lady Tigers face challenge to replace stars


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@)cfloridan.com

The Graceville Lady Tigers
had a breakout season in
2011, winning 14 games and
finishing third in the District
2-1A standings.
But, replicating that success
will be a challenge in 2012 af-
ter losing three key starters in
Wynterra Pittman, Tiara Sorey
and Zia White.
Still, Lady Tigers coach Bob
Bloomer said he sees the


ability in his current group of
players to put together anoth-
er good run, though there are
still many questions that need
answers.
"There is potential there,
but we're starting behind a
lot of other schools, so we're
playing catch-up," he said.
"Everything has to go amaz-
ingly right for us to improve
on the level we were last year,
but I think it can happen. We
can play with anybody if we're
mentally ready to play."


Bloomer said it was the
mental approach by his team
that still wasn't where it needs
to be.
"It's just being able to think
ahead and not having to react
on the court," he said. "It's be-
ing more comfortable on the
floor and more confident in
what they're going to do even
when something happens
they're not ready for. You just
have to know the game."
Graceville does return
some regulars from last year's


squad, led by senior outside
hitter/middle blocker Taylor
McDaniel, who finished sec-
ond on the team behind Pitt-
man in kills last year with 107,
and was tops on the team with
158 blocks.
Setters Kaylee Vaughn and
Telisha Nettles also return,
as do libero Caitlin Miller
and outside hitter Caroline
Nichols.
New to the varsity this year
See REPLACE, Page 3B


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Erin Rosa and Caroline Nicholes both go for
the ball during a game against the Wildcats
Tuesday in Chipley


SNEADS FOOTBALL




Haven't we met before?


Pirates take on
familiar foe in classic
BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Sneads Pirates will get
their feet wet against live com-
petition Friday night at home,
as they host a preseason clas-
sic against Berrien (Ga.) High
School at 6 p.m.
The varsity will play for three of
the four quarters, with the junior
varsity teams playing in the sec-
ond period.
Berrien is coached by former
Marianna and Chipley coach
Rob Armstrong, who employs
the same Wing-T offense that the
Pirates do, meaning that the two
sides will essentially be looking
into a mirror on every snap.
"Our playbooks are basically
the same. The ball is not going to
be in the air very much," Sneads
coach Don Dowling said Tues-
day. "(Pirates assistant coach
Andy Ward) worked with Rob at
Marianna, and three years ago
we sat down and talked with
Rob about putting in the Wing-T.
Since then, whenever we've had
a question 'about it, he was the
one we were calling."
The Pirates coaching staff is
-much less familiar with the Ber-
rien personnel, but with the Reb-.
els coming off of back to back 1-9
seasons, it's obvious that the pro-,
gram is in a rebuilding phase.
"They've been struggling a
little bit in the past few years,
but eventually they'll get it all to-
gether and be good to go," Dowl-
ing said. "I don't know how good
they'll be this Friday."
The coach said he liked hav-
ing his team face an opponent
with the same offensive system
as his, as it has simplified the


Sneads Head Coach Don Dowling gives the Pirates some advice after a play during a recent practice.


Pirates' approach to a game that
ultimately doesn't count in the
standings.
"Because they're so similar to
us or about the same, we can do


more practicing and game-plan- offense and defense, so they can
ning than if we played someone pin their ears back and just be
who runs something completely able to work on actual plays and
different," Dowling said. "Our techniques. You can just do what
twos know how to play this you do.


"I don't know if we're ready to
play as far as being fit and having
all our stuff in, but we're ready
See PIRATES, Page 2B


Cottondale JV Football


Cottondale JV Coach Demeetrius
Tuesday's practice.


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Beachum talks to his players after


Hornets to be tested at jamboree


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Cottondale Hornets varsi-
ty team will make its 2012 debut
Friday night when it hosts a pre-
season jamboree against Port St.
Joe and R.E Munroe, but before
they do, the CHS junior varsity
team will take the field for a half.


The JV Hornets, led by new
coach Demeetrius Beachum,
will play the first half on a run-
ning clock in their first live ac-
tion of the season.
Cottondale didn't have a JV
team last season, but has re-
placed the middle school team
See HORNETS, Page 2B


MEETING WITH THE LOCALS



S Km,.


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Chipola men's basketball coach Pat Blake (second from left) and women's
basketball coach Greg Franklin (third from left) addressed the members
of the Marianna Optimist Club recently. Both men are in their first year as
head coaches at Chipola. They expect a good upcoming season as both squads
have a tremendous amount of talent, both academically and athletically. They
are joined in the photo by Chipola athletic director Dr. Steven Givens (far left) and
Optimist President Lowell Centers.


NFL
Maurice Jones-Drew on his
way out of Jacksonville?

3B


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Coming in tomorrow's edition of the


FLORIDAN


S--- - AMERICA cS R a oI I1 --R -----lr

ATHLON SPORTS
EYclusooe n-on-onne inTerviewNs ith today's top sports u).j'rstars'l CL'.w
Feature stories Ihat cul to tne near of why we love sports ieS *, Elk .-r.- ..
Previews of thne to events on the silorts calendar7 ', *.:,J'=.


- -W A &T I







-l2B WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 2012


SPORTS


Baseball


Clemens hopes to have fiun in return


The Associated Press

SUGAR LAND, Texas Hours af-
ter Roger Clemens agreed to join the
Sugar Land Skeeters, he was back on
the field playing in an over-50 soft-
ball league.
And the ultra-competitive Cle-
mens, now a half-century old, was
quick to point out just how well he
did against that group of geezers.
"I hit two homers, by the way," he
said.
Things will be a bit tougher on Sat-
urday when he is scheduled to start
for the independent Atlantic League
team at home against Bridgeport.
The right-hander agreed to play for
the team on Monday and was intro-
duced on Tuesday.


Whether this all leads to Clemens
pitching in the major leagues the
seven-time Cy Young Award winner
played that down, conceding he's
nowhere near big league pitching
shape.
"I'm 50 years old. We're just going
to go out and have fun with this and
make it fun for the fans," said Clem-
ens, who has a touch of gray stubble
on his chin but still sports a shock of
blond highlights in his hair.
Clemens didn't understand all the
rules of his old-man softball league at
first. When he hit his first home run
and dashed to first base, his team-
mates told him to stop. He thought
it was because home runs weren't al-
lowed. It turned out that the over-50
set doesn't see the need to run all of


the bases on a homer.
"I really play in that league for the
exercise and the fun," he said.
He laughed off questions about
playing professionally at an age
when he qualifies for an AARP card.
"I hope nothing breaks and I hope
I don't pull anything," a still fit-look-
ing Clemens said.
Some believe his return to the mi-
nor leagues is the first step to anoth-
er comeback in the major leagues,
where he last pitched for the New
York Yankees in 2007 at age 45. Cle-
mens is set to appear on the Hall of
Fame ballot going to voters late this
year. If he plays in a major league
game this' year, his Hall consider-
ation would be pushed back five
years.


Sports Briefs


High School Football
Friday Holmes
County at Graceville, 7
p.m.; Port St. Joe/RF Mun-
roe at Cottondale, 6 p.m.;
Berrien (Ga.) at Sneads, 6
p.m.; West Florida Tech at
Marianna, 7 p.m.

Southern Elite
Fastpitch
Southern Elite Fast-
pitch 12U Gold will hold
tryouts Aug. 26 at 2 p.m.
at Alford Rec Park. Call
850-258-8172 or email
ikiev@yahoo.com for more
information.

Assault on Alford
Wrestling
The second annual As-
sault on Alford Wrestling
Match will be held Sept.
1 at the Alford Ball Park.
Gates open at 5 p.m., with
bell time at 6 p.m.
Tickets are $5 for adults,
kids 12U get in free. Con-
cessions available. Bring a
lawn chair.
New-car raffle tickets
are available for $5 each.
Call 326-2510 for more
information.

Marianna Football
Fundraiser
In an effort to combat
the risk of head injuries to
football players, The Ki-
wanis Club and The Pilot
Club have joined together
to raise funds to purchase
new football helmets for
Marianna High School
athletes.
This event will be Aug.
28 from 4:30 7 p.m. at St.
Luke's Episcopal Church
Parish Hall in Marianna.
Eat In or Drive Thru
available. Menu includes
pulled pork BBQ, baked
beans, coleslaw, roll, and
dessert. Cost is $6 per
ticket.
Tickets can be obtained
from any Kiwanis Club
or Pilot Club member.
Call 482-7507 for more
information.


Soccer Registration
Marianna Recreation
Department will offer five
soccer leagues to give boys
and girls the opportunity
to play soccer.
Registration for youth
ages 5 to 18 will be held .
through the Friday from
8 a.m. to 4 p.m. at The
Marianna Educational and
Recreational Expo (MERE)
located at 3625 Caverns
Road in Marianna.
The registration fee
for soccer is $30 for all
participants. The fee must
be paid with a check or
money order, no cash will
be accepted.
Special registration
will be held at the MERE
on Aug. 6 from 4-7 p.m.
No one will be allowed
to register after Aug. 28.
All participants must
bring a copy of their birth
certificate. The age of all
participants on Aug. 1 of
the current year will be the
player's age for the entire
season.
Anyone that may be
interested in coaching a
team or officiating youth
soccer please contact
the Marianna Recreation
Department at 482-
6228 or come by during,
registration.

Golf Tournament
The First "Teeing Off"
For Kids golf tournament
will be held Saturday at In-
dian Springs Golf Course
in Marianna at 8 a.m.
Benefits of the tourna-
ment are going to The
Children's Burn Camp of
North Florida and The
Jackson County Firefight-
ers Association Charity
Fund.
Cost is $65 per golfer
and $260 for a four-man
team, which includes 18
holes, car, driving range,
lunch, goody bag, and
entries into drawing. A
hole in one will win a new
car from Rahal Chev-,
rolet. Sponsorships are
available.
For more information,


Pirates
From Page 1B
to play because we're tired of beating up
on each other. Pretty much everyone is
ready to hit someone else."
The Pirates recently suffered their first
significant injury of training camp, with
starting left tackle Chris Helms suffering
a strained MCL that will keep him out for
at least two weeks.
Top reserve Bacarius Boykin will move
into the starting lineup to replace Helms.
Boykin had primarily been working at


Hornets
From Page 1B
with a seventh through
ninth grade junior varsity.
The Hornets had low
numbers through much
of camp, but have picked
up eight new players since
the start of school to bring
their roster to 25 players.
But Beachum said that
despite the arrival of added
help, his team is still a long
way from getting where he
thinks it should be.
"We have a core group of
guys that can contribute to
the system we run, but oth-
er than that, we have some
guys that still have a big
Learning curve," the coach


call RickyWinget at
850-557-2652 or email at
rwinget03@gmail.com.

Panhandle Seminole
Club's annual kickoff
meeting and awards
dinner
The Panhandle Seminole
Club will hold its An-
nual Kickoff Meeting and
Awards Dinner at the First
United Methodist's Wesley
Center on Lafayette Street
in Marianna on Thursday.
The Club will introduce
and present scholarships
to four local students who
will be attending FSU
this fall. Each student
will be awarded a $1,000
scholarship coming from
monies that were raised
through several fundrais-
ers supported by our local
community. These schol-
arships bring the Club's
most recent ten-year total
to $40,000 in support of
FSU students.
The guest speaker will
be the 2011-12 ACC Men's
Basketball Coach of the
Year Leonard Hamilton.
Coach Hamilton is the
only men's coach to win
the honor in both the Big
East and ACC Conferences
(twice). He will highlight
. last season and discuss
the upcoming year.
Friends of FSU and local
boosters will be treated
to a pulled pork meal
with all the, trimmings.
The awards dinner is free
-to club members and $5
to all non-members. For
reservation information,
please call George Swee-
ney at 850-482-5526.
Information about the
Club's activities may be
found on their website
at www.panhandlesemi-
noles.com and Facebook.

5K run/walk
and 10K run
The Building Strong
Families 5K run/walk and
10K run will be held Sept.
29 at the Citizens Lodge


left guard, but Dowling said that all of his
offensive linemen have been cross-train-
ing at other positions up front to prepare
for such a situation.
As for what he's looking for from his
team overall, the coach kept it simple.
"I want to see them hustling all the
time, protecting the football, and I want
to see them swarming to the ball on de-
fense," he said.
"We have to cut out mental errors; no
missed assignments. I really want them
to pin their ears back and just play, and
I want to see how the new guys do under
live fire."


said. "We got a lot of new
guys, but we've got some
that have never played be-
fore. I'm looking forward to
a good 15 of them contrib-
uting (Friday night). That's
probably all I can really say
at this time."
While he has developed a
level of trust with the core
group that he referenced,
Beachum said that there's
another group of players
that still have to prove to
him that they deserve that
same trust.
"Some of the other guys
that are not coming to prac-
tice every day for whatever
reason are not on the same
skill level as some of the
other guys, and that's re-
ally holding them back," he


said. "I question our com-
mitment level at times."
All of the IV Hornets,
trusted or otherwise, will
get an opportunity to prove
something to their coach
Friday in the environment
that matters most: un-
der the lights against live
competition.
"I want to see if when
they actually get in there
against somebody bigger
than them are they going
to fold up or put out?," Bea-
chum said. "I want to judge
character after a game like
this. How do we handle ad-
versity? That's a question
mark right now. But this
will force us to get better."
The game kicks off at 6
p.m.


Park in Marianna at 8 am.
Early registration is $25
for the 5K and $30 for the
10K.
This event is sponsored
by not-for-profit organiza-
tions of Tri-County Home
Builders Association, Big
Bend Community Based
Care, Quality Parenting
'Initiative and Heart Gal-
lery of North Florida.
All proceeds from this
event goes toward provid-
ing a safe, healthy and
positive environment for
children and families in
our communities.
For registration informa-
tion, call Tammy Dean
at 850-209-0397 or Kathy
Donofro at 557-3660.
You can print a regis-
tration form by going to
Facebook and search-
ing for Building Strong
Families Event, or find
the details of this event at
www.Active.com.

Sports Items
Send all sports items to
editorial@jcfloridan.com,
or fax them to 850-482-
4478. The mailing address
for the paper is Jackson
County Floridan P.O.'Box
520 Marianna, FL 32447.


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com




Labor talks to resume

with wide gap to bridge

The Associated Press

TORONTO NHL labor talks are set to resume with
a wide gap remaining and time running out to avoid a
potential lockout.
NHL Players' Association executive director Don
Fehr and NHL commissioner Gary Bettman are sched-
uled to be back at the negotiating table at the union's
headquarters in Toronto on Wednesday. It will mark
the first time in a week the respective leaders will meet
face to face after negotiations hit a significant snag.
Last week, Bettman essentially rejected the union's
counterproposal by calling it incomplete and suggest-
ed the sides aren't on the same page in addressing the
league's economic issues.
Both sides are committed to continuing discussions
with a belief a breakthrough can be achieved.
"We are hoping that our meetings this week can
serve as a jumping off point for further discussion and
negotiation over the critical economic and system is-
sues that we need to resolve in order to reach an agree-
ment," NHL deputy commissioner Bill Daly wrote in
an email to the Canadian Press.
Fehr is hoping the sides can begin finding common
*ground on the union's proposal to increase revenue-
sharing between teams.
"Hopefully we'll find a way during that process to
achieve more common ground than we have so far,"
he said.
Fehr took time off from talks to update players in
Chicago and British Columbia on the status of nego-
tiations. He is also set to hold a similar meeting with
players in Toronto later this week.


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN > www.)cfloridan.com


Agent: MJD unhappy with owner's comments


The Associated Press

JACKSONVILLE, Fla.
Maurice Jones-Drew's
holdout appears far from
over. His agerit, Adisa Ba-
kari, told The Associated
Press on Tuesday that the
Jacksonville Jaguars run-
ning back is upset with
owner Shad Khan's recent
public comments about
his client's 27-day holdout.
"Maurice wants to play
for an organization that
wants him and for an own-
er who respects him and
values what he brings to
a team on the field, in
the locker room and in the
community," Bakari said.
ESPN reported that
Jones-Drew is open to
being traded.
When asked Tuesday
whether he would trade



Replace
From Page 1B
are hitters Erin Rosa, Des-
tiny Robinson, and Sara
So, as well as defender
Bethany Layton.
McDaniel and Nichols
will try to make up for the
lost production of Pittman
and Sorey, but most other
positions on the court are
still unsettled.
Bloomer said that out of
Rosa, So, and Robinson, he
wanted at least one to step
up and become a reliable
presence in the middle so
that Miller can play her
natural libero position in-
stead of having to come to
the net to provide support
for the offense.
"Caitlin is athletic
enough to play the front,
but the libero position is
where she helps us the
most," the coach said of
his team captain.


"M1aurice wants to play for an organization that wants him and for an owner who respects him and
values what he brings to a team on the field, in the locker room and in the community."
Adisa Bakari,
Maurice Jones-Drew's agent


Jones-Drew, Khan said he is
"not going to get into all the
theses and hypotheses."
Khan added that Jones-
Drew is "a great player, and
we would love for him to be
back."
Last week, however, Khan
said MJD's absence "doesn't
even move the needle" in
terms of stress. Khan reiter-
ated his stance Tuesday by
saying, "This is not a team
about one person."
His message to
Jones-Drew?
"Train's leaving the sta-
tion. Run, get on it," Khan
said.
Bakari made it clear that


The team went through
the summer, season
with only pieces of its
roster intact, with several
varsity players having
other commitments that
precluded the entire team
from getting together at
once.
That, according to
Bloomer, has made it dif-
ficult to get this team up
to speed before the season
officially starts on Aug., 28.
"It's the same way every
year with multiple girls
playing softball and bas-
ketball during the sum-
mer, and some have jobs,"
the coach said. "We never
had a night with all of them
there, so it's always a strug-
gle when school starts and
everyone is here. It's tough
to get a hold on where
we're at until we all come
together."
But the coach said
that the goal is still try to
crack into the top three


those statements don't sit
well with Jacksonville's big-
gest star.
"Obviously, he's not hap-
py that what started as a
very cordial and private
conversation is now public
and contentious," Bakari
said.
Now, with both sides
seemingly digging their
heels in as deeply as pos-
sibly, it is unclear when or
if Jones-Drew will show up
in Jacksonville. The Jaguars
open the season Sept. 9 at
Minnesota.
Jones-Drew's holdout is
fairly simple. He wants a
new deal after leading the


in district, with defending
champion Sneads and last
year's runner-up Altha still
the favorites to take the
top two spots.
"This year, it's hard to put
us past the first two at this
point, but we will be fight-
ing for that third spot,"
Bloomer said. "We were
close to No. 2 last year, but
there were other teams like
Cottondale that were very
young but started improv-
ing a lot late last year and
will be better this season.
There will be big competi-
tion for the third spot, and
if anybody can upset one
of the top two, that would
be wonderful."
Graceville was sched-
uled to play a preseason
game in Chipley on Tues-
day night before taking on
Cottondale on Thursday in
Chipley.
GHS will open the regu-
lar season Aug. 28 at home
against Sneads.


NFL with 1,606 yards rush-
ing last season. He has two
years remaining on a five-
year, front-loaded contract
worth $31 million. He is
scheduled to make $4.45
million this season and
$4.95'million in 2013.
Khan and general man-
ager Gene Smith insist they
have no plans to negotiate
a new deal with MJD, not
wanting to set a precedent
of paying players with two
years remaining on lucra-
tive deals that 'included
large signing bonuses.
Jones-Drew skipped the


team's entire offseason
workout program, includ-
ing a mandatory, three-day
minicamp last month. If
new coach Mike Mularkey
is fining Jones-Drew the
maximum allowed under
the collective bargaining
agreement $20,000 for
each day of minicamp and
$30,000 for each day since
training camp opened -
the total is up to $870,000.
Mularkey said Tuesday
he has had no recent con-
tact with Jones-Drew or
his agent. Coming off a
career year, Jones-Drew


wants to be one of the NF's
highest-paid backs. His av-
erage salary per year ranks
behind Minnesota's Adrian
Peterson, Tennessee's Chris
Johnson, Philadelphia's
LeSean McCoy, Houston's
Arian Foster, St. Louis'
Steven Jackson, Carolina's
DeAngelo Williams and Se-
attle's Marshawn Lynch.
Both sides have valid
arguments.
Jones-Drew signed his
deal in 2009, before rush-
ing for at least 1,300 yards
in three consecutive sea-
sons. Not only has he
seemingly outperformed
his contract, MJD is the
face of the franchise and
probably the onlyplayer on
the roster known outside
small-market Jacksonville.


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TNT 23 23 138 245 Smallville "Injustice" Charmed (CC) Charmed (CC) Supernatural (CC) Supernatural (CC) Rizzoli & Isles (CC) The Mentallst (CC) The Mentallst (CC) The Mentallst (CC) The Mentalist (CC) Mentalist
TOON 31 31 176 296 Looney Annoying Regular Beyblade Pok6mon Nin)aGo Tom and Jerry: The Magic Ring Tom-Jerry Tom-Jerry Almoat Johnny T Johnny T Looney Tunes Scooby MA Adventure Adventure Gumball
TVLND 22 22 106 304 Tummy Cook Safe Hair Rest. Octspring Murder, She Wrote Beaver Leave Van Dyke Van Dyke Love Lucy Love Lucy Griffith Griffith Gunsmoke (CC) Gunsmoke (CC) Bonanza (CC) Bonanza
TWC 25 25 214 362 Wake Up With Al (N) Your Weather Today With Abrams and Bettes (CC) Wake Up With Al (CC) Day Planner (CC) Pyros Coast Guard Alaska Weather
USA 26 26 105 242 Royal Pains Necessary Roughness V. Blue Crush2(2011) SashaJackson. 'PG-13' V Over HerDeadBody** (2008) 'PG-13'(CC) IHouse (CC) House "Changes" House "The Fix" (CC) NCIS Tribes" (CC) NCIS(CC)

WEDNESDAY EVENING / LATE NIGHT C Comcast C/R Comcast Rebuild D Dish DTV DirecTV AUGUST 22, 2012

0 CBS 2 2 |. Dr Oz News |News News CBS News Wheel Jeopardy! Big Brother (N) (CC) Criminal Minds CSI: Crime Scene News Late Show Letterman Late Late Show/Cralg Extra (N) Up to the Minute (N)
0 CBS 3 3 4 R. Ray Ellen DeGeneres Show News CBS News News Wheel Big Brother (N) (CC) Criminal Minds CSI: Crime Scene News Late Show Letterman Late Late Show/Cralg Inside Ed. Up to the Minute (N)
O NBC 5 5 7 7 Doctors Ellen DeGeneres Show News, NBC News News Wheel America's Got Talent America's Got Talent Law & Order: SVU News Tonight Show w/Leno Jimmy Fallon C. Daly Today (CC)
B ABC 8 8 13 13 Dr. Phil The Dr. Oz Show (CC) News ABC News News Ent The Middle FSuburg. Mod Fam Suburg. NY Med (N) (CC) News Nightline Jimmy Kimmel Live (N) Excused Jim Access H. Mally
9 FOX 16 10 28 28 Peo. Court Jdg Judy Jdg Judy ThisMlinute ThisMinute Big Bang Big Bang So You Think You Can Dance (N) (Live) (CC) NewsView HowlMet Two Men Two Men 30 Rock Friends Friends King of Hill Scrubs Lewis
1 PBSI 11 11 WordGirl Wild Kratts Electric Fetch! With PBS NewsHour (N) Dimension' Best of... Charlie Rose (N) (CC) T. Smiley T. Smiley Nature (CC) (DVS) NOVA (CC) (DVS)
A&E 30 30 118 265 First48 The First 48 (CC) Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Hoggers Hoggers Hoggers Hoggers Storage Storage Storage Storage Hoggers Hoggers
AMC 33 33 130 254 CSI: Miami CS: Miami Kill Zone" CSI: Miami 'Hard Time" CSI: Miami (CC) V. Groundhog Day** (1993) Bill Murray.'PG (CC) .I GroundhogDay** (1993) Bill Murray. 'PG'(CC) Breaking Bad "Buyout" own V1 Raising
BET 35 35 124 329 My Wife Parkers Parkers 106 & Park: BET's Top 10 Live (N)(CC) V John0 ** (2002, Drama) Denzel Washington. 'PG-13' (CC) The Game TheGame Wendy Williams Show V HaltfPastDead (2002) Steven Seagal. (CC)
CNN 45 45 2001 202 The Situation Room (N) Erin Burnett OutFront Anderson Cooper 360 Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 Erin Burnett OutFront Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 Erin Burnett OutFront
CNN2 43 433 202 204 News Now Evening Express Jane Velez-Mltchell (N) Nancy Grace (N) Dr. Drew (N) Nancy Grace Showbiz Tonight Dr. Drew Nancy Grace Showbiz Tonight
CSS 20 20 r College Football Football alkin' Football College Football 2007 Georgia at Alabama. (CC) College Football 2007 Alabama at Mississippi. Talking' Football Paid Prog. Paid Prog. PaidProg. PaidPro. Paid Prog. Paid Prog.
CW 6 6 8 8 S. Wilkos Browns Browns King King Seinfeld Sein!eld Oh Sit! (N) (CC) The Next "Oriando" Cops(CC) 'Til Death 1TII Death '70s Show '70s Show South Park South Park TBA More sex BeautyTip
DISC 24 24 182 278 Dirty Jobs Dirty Jobs (CC) DirtyJobs (CC) ]American Guns (CC) American Guns (CC) American Guns (N) Dirty Jobs (N) (CC) American Guns (CC) Dirty Jobs (CC) American Guns (CC) American Guns (CC)
DISN 21 21 17212901Austin Jessie Wizards Shake It Good Luck Phineas Phineas V. G-Force ** (2009) Bill Nighy. Shake It Up! (Part 1 of 2) (CC) Shake It Good Luck ANT Farm Vampire Fish Hooks Suite/Deck Good Luck Good Luck
ESPN 19 19 l140| 206 -' Little League Baseball SportsCenter (N) (CC) ESPN All-Access (N) -Little League Baseball World Senes: Teams TBA. SportsCenter (N) (CC) SportsCenter (N) (CC) SportsCenter (N) (CC) SportsCenter (N) (CC) SportsCenter (N) (CC)
ESPN2 18 18 1441 209 Soccer SportsNation (N) (CC) NFL32 N) (Live) (CC) NFL Live (N) (CC) MLB Baseball NewYork Yankees at Chicago White Sox. (CC) (Live) Baseball Tonight (N) NFL Kickoff (N) (CC) Baseball Tonight (N) NASCAR Football
FAM !28 28 180 311 Reba (CC) Reba (CC) Reba (CC) Daddy Daddy Melissa Melissa Melissa Daddy VS ThePacifier ** (2005) Vin Diesel.'PG' The700 Club (CC) Prince Prince Insanityl Total Gym Paid Prog. Insanity!
HALL 46 | 46 185 312 Waltons The Waltons (CC) Little House on Prairie Little House on Prairi e Litt le House on Prairie Little House on Prairie Frasier Frasier Frasler Frasier Gold Girls Gold Girls Gold Girls Gold Girls Cheers Cheers
HBO 301 301 300 501 -V Hanna V. Green Lantern ** (2011) Ryan Reynolds. (CC) Hard Knocks The Change-Up ** (2011) Ryan Reynolds. R' True Blood "Sunset" Hard Knocks RealTime/Bill Maher What's Your Number? ** (2011) Anna Fans.
HGTV 149 49 112 1 229 income income Income income income Hunt Intl Hunters Property Brothers (CC) Property Brothers (N) Hunters Hunt Intl Property Brothers (CC) Property Brothers (CC) Hunters Hunt Intl Property Brothers (CC)
HIST 81 120 269 UFO Files UFO Files (CC) UFO Files (CC) UFO Files (CC) Cajun Pwn |Cajun Pwn Cajun Pwn Cajun Pwn Restoration IRestoration Restoration Restoration Cajun Pwn CajunPwn Cajun Pwn Cajun Pwn Restoration Restoration
LIFE 29 29 108 252 Howl Met WifeSwap (CC) ITrading Spouses Trading Spouses Wife Swap (CC) Wife Swap (CC) Wife Swap (CC) WifeSwap (CC) Wife Swap (CC) Wife Swap (CC) WifeSwap (CC)
MAX 320 320 !310 515 V. Sudden Death ** V TheThing ** (2011) Mary Elizabeth Winstead. Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part1 *** (2010) Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part2 Lingerie Lingerie V. Machete** (2010) Danny Treo. 'R'(CC)
NICK 14 14 170 299 SpongeBobSpongeBob SpongeBob You Gotta Victorious Figure It Splatalot Victorious Victorious MyWie Wife George George Friends Friends Friends Friends George GergeLopez (CC) Chris
SHOW 340 340 318 545 !% Lime |Kevin Nealon: Whelmed [I Eternal Sunshine V The Core** (2003, Action) Aaron Eckhart. 'PG-13' (CC) Franchise Weeds Franchise Episodes V. TheRock *** (1996, Action) Sean Connery. 'R' V. Born Kil
SPEED 99 62 150' 607 Garage 14 NASCAR Racing i NASCAR Racing Setup NASCAR Racing 0 NASCAR Racing A NASCAR Racing The 10
SPE 47 47 168i 241 CSI Auction Auction Aucti Auction Auction Auction Auction Auction ction Auction Action Auct Auction Auction Auction Auction Auction action Auction Entourage Entourage
SYFY 132 32 122 244 Destination Truth (CC) Face Off Paranormal Witness Haunted Collector Haunted Collector (N) Paranormal Witness (N) Haunted Collector (N) Paranormal Witness Lost Girl (CC) Haven "Fu'
TBS 116 16 139 247 Friends Friends Friends iKing King Seinfeld Seinfeld Family Guy Family Guy Family Guy ig Bang Big Bang Big Bang Conan.(CC) Sullivan The Office Conan (CC) Seinfeld Senfeld
TLC 98 98 1183 280 !Weddings Say Yes Say Yes Toddlers & Tiaras Toddlers & Tiaras Honey Honey Toddlers & Tiaras (N) Honey Honey Toddlers & Tiaras Honey Honey Honey Honey Toddlers & Tiaras
TNT 23 23 138 245 Mentalist The Mentalist (CC) The Mentalist (CC) The Mentalist (CC) The Mentallst (CC) The Mentalist (CC) The Mentalist (CC) CSI: NY "Holding Cell" The Great Escape CSI: NY "Party Down" Rizzoli & Isles (CC)
TOON 31 31 |176 296JohnnyT Johnny T Regular Regular Gumball Adventure Johnny T NinjaGo NnaGo KingofHill King of Hill Amer. Dad Amer. Dad Family Guy Family Guy Chicken Squldblles Metal Amer.Dad Amer.Dad family Guy
TVLND 22 22 106i 304 Bonanza Bonanza (CC) M'A'S'H M'A'S'H M'A'S'H M'A*'SH MA'SH MASH Raymond Raymond Soul Man TheExes Retiredat King King King Soul Man The Exes Retired at King
TWC 25 1 25 214, 362 Weather Storms Storms Full Force Full Force Weather Center Live Hurricane Hurricane Coast Guard Alaska Weather Center Live Hurricane Hurricane Coast Guard Alaska Weather Center Live Impact TV Impact TV
USA 26 26 105 242CIS (CC) NCIS "Dog Tags" (CC) NCISMothers Day" NCIS "Doubledentity NCIS "DeadAir (CC) Royal Pains(N) Necessary Roughness SuitsAsensk Royal Pains NecessaryRoughness House (CC)


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST22, 2012 3Br


SPORTS








-14B WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22, 2012


PEANUTS BY CHARLES SCHULTZ


FININGY ME' I MEAN... I'M NOT, WELL, IF YOU NEED)
RYTHING NO. UT MY SON IS. ANY HELP, JUST
I NEE UH HE'S..UH...HE'S TRYING LET ME KNOW
.._ES ON SOME PANTS RIGHT
NOW. HEN HEH ..TEN FOUR


'oo





IP TO NUTZ BY RICK STROMOSKI

I CaN Move o3-ec I" THINK 'YouLre CoNFUSING
A1T4 rq M IN ... TaT- Wot CLeaRiNG a
RooM B TakiNG OFF
YIOR SHoeS'..


ARLO & JANIS BY JIMMY JOHNSON


SPOP! YOU HE'6
POUT GEME TOO&C00D
OM THE FRYER! FOR VAT
^-MOW


!! O BOT HE JUST &OT HOME!
WE,., I,. WAUT TO 54OW HIM
ALL IVEDOUe TOTHNEHOUE5
I


YOU KMOWAUDY'H'L EE. .
ALOWN1MEAA)WHILE, It',
SEE WHAT TCAKDO!
OK,
POO."


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


DID IT I WOULDN'T
JUST GET KNOW. I'M
WARM IN IN MY
HERE? UNDERWEAR.



^ Itttttt


FOR YEARS, A FATHER PRtD)Sl 1
0 KOW EVERY WI &,TmHE

07
HERTD-KWM


ALLEY OOP BY JACK AND CAROLE BENDER
7 TELL HE ALLEY FOLLOWED ME HERE D AND NOW HE HAS TO PLAY
ABOUT YOUR FRIEND B BECAUSE I WAS ABDUCTED BYJ OME STUPID SANE TO SAVE
)ALLEY 00PF WHY YOCHIF HE CAME TO RESCUE 1 1 HIS OWN LIFE AND BE ALLOWED
E EE E ND V L TO TAKE ME ACK HOME!
F


COW & BOY BY MARK LEIKNES


WHEN PEOPLE SUCCEED,
IT'S NOT THAT THEY'RE
MORE TALENTED, IT'S
THAT THEY'VE STUCK
WITH IT LONGER.

'


I MEAN, SURE, IT'S
EASIER FOR TALENTED
PEOPLE TO SUCCEED,
BUT DETERMINATION AND
HARD WORK,
THOSE ARE
THEREALX
FACTORS.


ALTHOUGH, YOU
SHOULD HAVE SOME
TALENT. OTHERWISE,
YOU'RE JUST DELUSIONAL
AND DON'T
KNOW
WHEN .
TO QUIT. 1^

^-x


50 WE'RE NOT*
SIGNING ME UP FOR
FALL SOCCER?
SI DUNNO,
I'M STILL
THINKING
ALOUD.



' i. ,1 '. (


KIT'N' CARLYLE BY LARRY WRIGHT HERMAN BY JIM UNGER


"We sleep in separate bedrooms mainly
to prevent the house from tipping over."


NEA Crossword Puzzle


ACROSS
1 Hindu sage
6 Sunspot
activity
11 Add salt
12 Muffle, as
sound
13Roman
army
14 Forces
15 Bits of
gossip
16 Goose
formations
17 Extinct
bird
18 Finish a
dress
19 Pennsylvania
port
23 Strives to
win
25 Decree
26Tea holder
29 Written in
the stars
31 Monsieur's
refusal
32 Baseball
stat
33 Brief affair
34 Double
helix
35 Dangerous
37 Leaves
39 Collar site
40 Wield
an ax


41 Pilots'
sightings
45 Current
events
47 Dazzle
48 "Rose
Marie"
hero
51 Actress
Stone
52 Piano
fixers
53 Scale
54 Move
crabwise
55 Search
party

DOWN
1 Deal with
(2 wds.)
2 Conducted
3 Isaac of
sci-fi
4 Dairy
sounds
5 Rural
lodging
6 Wife, to a
lawyer
7 Expired
8 Lemon
cooler
9 Family mem.
10OAnnapolis
grad
11 Lost
traction


Answer to Previous Puzzle

AIN E|V|El/ NIP
LI SOLE YIVE
SCAPISM LES
OETIC BOOST
LEE LPN
ETAS VERSE
C E S GAMYNR

ORII ENT RISE
CDT TVS
D VIS E RAIDE
RIC EXULTAN
GLE IRE SA


12 Carpe -!
16 Traces
18 Get better
20 Watermelon
part
21 Symbol
22 Famed lava
spewer
24 Uncertain
25 Razor
feature
26 City near
Zurich
27 Soprano's
piece
28 Breathe
hard
30 Plenty, to a
poet
36 "Hotel" for
dogs


38Wild
shrubs
40 AAA
recommen-
dations
42 Ticket
prices
43 Kind of
hole
44 Dispatch
46Raison d'-
47 Mr. Moto's
reply
(2 wds.)
48 Rockies,
e.g.
49Ja, to Yves
50 And, to
Fritz
51 Maple
syrup base


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


8-22 2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS



CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
"B HRCDO KHAKTH PZVP KBANCP CM

PZH OCNNHBHDWH EHPYHHD' BHJHDSH
VDO HGKHDMH. PZCM RVXHM LAS TAAX

MRVBP." MWAPP VOVRM


Previous Solution: "You build on failure ... you don't try to forget the mistakes,
but you don't dwell on it." Johnny Cash
TODAY'S CLUE: stenba 3
2012 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 8-22


Horoscope
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
- Take positive measures
to fulfill your aspirations.
You're presently in a brief
cycle where your hopes
have better than usual
chances of being realized.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
- One of your greatest as-
sets is the ability to take the
ideas of others and expand
upon them in ways that
could prove beneficial to
everyone involved. Don't
waste this gift.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
- If you think and behave
like a winner, positive re-
sults are likely. Don't doubt
yourself.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) Lady Luck is likely
to single you out in help-
ing you reach a financial or
career objective.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-
Dec. 21) You could be in
for a wonderful surprise
when a situation that
you've been fretting about
turns out to be a boom
rather than a bust. Don't
doubt yourself.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) There's no need to be
resistant toward change,
even if it's being imposed
upon you by outside
forces.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) You could derive
some extra benefits by
treating business associ-
ates as if they were friends
or comrades. A person-
al touch can be quite
powerful.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) That big break you've
been longing for might be
ushered in through a set of
fortunate circumstances.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
Someone you know so-
cially could be a big help
when it comes to a nettle-
some business issue.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
Provided you are pre-
pared to follow an impor-
tant endeavor to its con-
clusion, this could be an
extremely productive day.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
An idea or concept that
you've been mulling over
has greater potential than
you may realize..
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
If your judgment tells
you that the odds appear
to be in your favor, make
a move to better your
financial situation.


Annie's Mailbox


Dear Annie: Years ago, my brother,
"Harry," cheated on his wife. She forgave
him, and they got back together. They
seem very happy.
A few years after his affair, the other
woman had him served with paternity
papers. Harry pays child support, but
he has never met the child and says he
doesn't plan to. He doesn't feel he can
give that child the kind of relationship
he has with his other children. He also
doesn't want his kids to find out that he
cheated on their mother.
Harry has asked that I keep this news
private, but I feel he needs to play some
part in this child's life. I've.tried talking
to him, but he says it's not my business.
I also feel his children have the right to
know, and that as the aunt to all of these
children, I should tell them they have a
sibling.
Harry told me this is not my place,


Bridge

Few players can resist the temptation to open
a weak two-bid with a six-card suit and five to
10 high-card points. Do you and your partner
know how to compete effectively against one?
Basically you treat it like a one-bid, but with
a few differences. When.you enter the auction,
assume partner has six or seven points. A jump
overcall is intermediate, not weak; it shows
some 14 to 16 high-card points and a good six- 4
card or longer suit. A third variation crops up y
in today's deal. A
After North makes a takeout double, if South
were to bid a natural two no-trump, it would 4A
show 10 or 11 points. So here, South must ad-
vance with three clubs. Then, when North cue-
bids three hearts, it asks South to bid three no-
trump with a heart stopper.
Against three no-trump, West leads the heart
four. With only five top tricks, South must es-
tablish three diamonds and one spade. Here,
though, if he wins trick one and plays a dia-
mond, West should take the trick and lead his
second heart, establishing that suit while East
still has the spade ace as an entry. And if South
leads a spade at trick two, West should play his
jack. Then East will take dummy's queen with
his ace and return a spade, giving the defend-
ers four spades and one diamond.
The winning play is to let East win the first
trick. This is usually best when you have two
stoppers in the suit led and two high cards to
dislodge. ,.


and if I continue to press the matter, he
will not allow me to be alone with his
children for fear that I will not respect his
wishes.
What should I do?
STUCK IN A FAMILY DILEMMA

Dear Stuck: Please respect Harry's
choices, even though you disagree.
Depending on the ages of these children,
telling them could be complicated and
confusing.
Yes, we agree that they should know
they have a sibling, but how and when
to tell them is not your decision. Inform
Harry that you will keep quiet, but that
eventually, his kids will find out, and it
would be best if it came directly from
him, with Mom by his side, and not from,
say, the Other Woman'or her child. Urge
him to consult a counselor who can help
him find the best way to do this.


North 08-22-12
A KQ73
V~65
4 KQJ7
AKQ
est East
J10986 A4
42 IKJ 10987
A8 643
J1086 *52
South
4 5 2.
VAQ3
10 9 5 2
49743

Dealer: East
Vulnerable: North-South
South West North East
2V
Pass Pass Dbl. Pass
3 4 Pass 3 Pass
3 NT Pass Pass Pass


Opening lead: V 4


&-22


SLaulghnStmklnterulanallncOs ,byUniveralUclck,20121


ENTERTRIN1VENT








CLASSIFIED


www.JCFLORIDAN.com


Jackson County Floridan Wednesday, August 22, 2012- B
Jackson County Floridan Wednesday, August 22, 2012- 5 B


WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED




ARKETPLA


BY PHONE: (850) 526-3614 or (800) 779-2557
BY FAX: (850) 482-4478 or (334) 712-7975
ONLINE: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM


BY MAIL: WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE
P.O. BOX 520, MARIANNA, FL 32447
IN PERSON: 4403 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA


Publication Policy Errors and Omissions: Advertisers should check their ad the first day. This publication shall not be liable for failure to publish an ad or for a typographic error or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the ad for the first day's
insertion. Adjustment for errors is limited to the cost of that portion of the ad wherein the error occurred. The advertiser agrees that the publisher shall not be liable for damages arising out of errors in advertisements beyond the amount paid for the space
actually occupied by that portion of the advertisement in which the error occurred, whether such error is due to negligence of the publisher's employees or otherwise and there shall be no liability for non-insertion of any advertisement beyond the amount paid for
such advertisement. Display Ads are not guaranteed position. All advertising is subject to approval. Right is reserved to edit, reject, cancel or classify all ads under the appropriate classification.

Fordedlne clltol-re5orviitww5jflrianco


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN
LABOR DAY DEADLINES


CEMETERY LOTS: GARDEN OF MEMORY
431 N. Dothan 2 spaces together in
Garden of Valor $2400. OBO 334-799-2138 -


I Pay CASH for Diabetic test
strips. Up to $10 per box!
Most brands considered.
All boxes must be unopened
and unexpired.
Call Matt 334-392-0260

FINANCIAL






(l MERCHANDISE

Shot Gun Blegium Browning A-5 12 gauge 3"
chamber 30" vent rib barrel $850. 850-482-8333

Wanted: Old Coins, Gold,
Diamonds, Guns, And Tools
West Main Jewelry & Loan 334-671-1440.

WANTED: 3 W Electric Scooter for Disabled Vet.
Reasonably Priced 850-272-6919 5-7pm

Baby Things Store
"Like Us" On Our Facebook Page
Swings, Cribs, Fomula, Toys & Clothes
1330 Hartford Hwy Ste 1. Dothan 334-794-6692


AFFORDABLE
-"', PLACE AT

k 2/2, Many Extras!
www.epr287.com


FOR SALE on Waterfront Lot
(Black Creek) Mbl. Home
in Freeport Florida
with ad on, boat house & sea wall
s80,000 OBO 334-897-8310.


Wednesday, August 22, 2012








THiE SUDOKU GAmE WITH A KICK!.
HOW TO PLAY
Fill in the 9x9 grid with the missing
numbers so that each column, row and
3x3 box contains the digits 1 9 only once.
There is only one correct solution
for each puzzle.'
GET MORE WASABI
PUZZLES ONLINE!
ARCHIVES AND MORE GREAT GAMES AT
BOXERJAM.COM


@ 1:00 PM
@ 2:00 PM


Interment rights for two in Memory Hill Ceme-
tery, The Garden of the Pines, Lot 211, Section
2, Spaces 1 and 4 in the monument section of-
fering raised bright granite markers. $1,500
each, $2,500 for both, OBO; these rights cur-
rently sell for $2,100 each. For questions or ad-
ditional information we can be reached at (407)
504-5657 or by email at memory.hill.cemetery@
gmail.com.
STOP GNAT, FLY, & MOSQUITO BITES!
Buy Swamp Gator All Natural
Insect Repellent.
Family Safe-Use head to toe.
Available at The Home Depot

'PETS & ANIMALS

AVAILABLE NOW! AKC basset hound pups for
sale, $400. Champion Bloodline! 2 M/ 2 F.
Dewormed and current shots. For more info
and photos, call (334) 797-6063 or go to www.bl
ountsbamabassets.dbodlekit.com
Beautiful Pomeranian Puppies: Ready Now!
CKC with papers, FM, Tan/Brown, S&W,
Vet Checked. ONLY ONE LEFT!
Call 334-445-0982


V Big PUPPIES SALE! V
Chorkies $100, Chinese Crested/Chihuahua
S150, Also Malti-Poos $250, Taking Deposits on
Yorkie-Poos $350; Hairless Puppies, S250
334-718-4886 .
CKC Shih Tzu puppies.
Swveet nalties! Ready
Auaust 18th. $400 firm.
Call or tlex 334-587-2632.



Free Rescuted Dogs to GOOD homes ONLY.


I


Many breeds, S/W, Call 334-791-7312!
Registered Lab Pups (6), 2 Blond males,
3 Black Males, 1 Black FM, Parents on site,
Sire is Excellent Hunting Dog. $400 each S/W,
6 wks old, Ready To Go. 334-790-9730


7 I 7'


4 PANAMA CITY BEACH CONDO
2/1.5, Pool, Tennis, Club House
Fully Furnished On Front Beach Road
$125/Night $750/Week, $80 Cleaning Fee
334-300-6979 or 334-393-3559
www.portsideresort.com


Free To Approved Homes: I have 4 fun,
sweet Large Lab Mix Pups S/W &6,months
old. 2 short hair, 2 medium, 3 girls and 1 Big
Boy. I also have a Brown/white bulldog mix,
FM. Must have a fenced yard & a big heart!!
Dothan/Webb Alabama area.
Call 334-699-3496 after 5 P.M. for info/pics
Lab puppies (yellow) full blooded 1st.
shots & wormed Ready now!!! $150.
334-388-5617 or 334-488-5000 4
..... Miniature Australian
.# ~ Shepherd Puppies
,e for sale. Beautifully
marked red merles
& one blue merle.
All males $600. NSDR & ASDR.
Call or text for more information.
334-550-9895
Purebred Irish Setter puppies, parents
registered, 3FM, 2M, Exc. hunting and family
dog. 7 weeks, old, 760-514-2264 Ozark, AL
S.E. ALABAMA KENNEL CLUB
Good Manners Obedience,
Confirmation classes,
$50. for 6 weeks
Rally/Agility Intro. $75.
4 Shots required 4-
Starting Sept. 11th
4 Call 334-790-6226 or 334-299-3315
or 850-547-2370

Happy Jack DD33: Kills fleas quicker, last
longer on dogs & cats. Citrus odor.
Biodegradeable. ALTHA FARMERS COOP
(482-2416) www.kennelvax.com

S FARMER'S MARKET


FRESH
GREEN
PEANUTS
850-209-3322 or
850-573-6594 850-352-2199
4 4128 Hwy 231

FRESH LOCAL HONEY
Variety of Sizes & Prices!
1955 Enon Rd. Webb 36376
Call 334-899-5650

NEW CROP
U-PICK PEAS: 6 miles N of
Grand Ridge, or 2.1 miles
S of Dellwood on Hwy 69.
$6/per 5 gal. bucket, Field opens at
6:30- 6:30 7 days/wk.
Dark (ready now) & White Peas NOW
*. 850-718-7750 t -
SNELL FARMS SKIPPERVILLE, ALABAMA
Shelled Peas $20/Bushel
U-Pick Peas, Green Peanuts, Boiled Peanuts
334-774-0787


I I


_















2008 BLOCKDOT. INC. WWW.BLOCKDOTCOM


Tuesday's
WASABI SOLUTION


BE SURE TO VISIT OUR
NEWEST GAME SITE

Elf(WL .coM
KEWLBOX.COM


CLASSIFIED
Deadline is Friday 8/31
Deadline is Friday 8/31


Sunday 9/02
Tuesday 9/04


Sunday 9/02
Tuesday 9/03


RETAIL DISPLAY
Deadline is Tuesday 8/28 @ 5:00 PM
Deadline is Wednesday 8/28 @ 5:00 PM ,


--SI



-i .: -






HOME GROWN TOMATOES!
Shelled Peas & Butterbeans!
Fresh Squash, Cucumbers
And Other Fresh Vegetables!!
All Farm Fresh!
220 W. Hwy 52 Malvern
334-793-6690 *


S Large rolls of Hay for Sale
Bahia & Coastal*
.. Daytime 334-585-3039,
after 5pr & weekends 585-5418


Buying Pine / Hardwood in
your area.
No tract to small / Custom Thinning
Call Pea River Timber
4 334-389-2003

1(11*) EMPLOYMENT


BILL CRAMER
-, aM. -
BODY TECH NEEDED!!
Our Body Shop is under new Management
and we need an experienced Body Tech.
Call Curt Lee at 850-747-7606 for details and
to schedule an interview. DMV record check,
Drug-Free Workplace/ EOE


AT THE JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN, WE ARE LOOKING
FOR MATURE, DEPENDABLE, BUSINESS-MINDED,
NEWSPAPER CARRIERS

COTTONDALE
Earn an average of

$500
per month

Ask about our $300 -Sign on Bonus

BE YOUR OWN BOSS -1 A.M. to 6 A.M.
Must have dependable transportation,
minimum liability insurance & valid
driver's license.

Come by and fill out an application at-the
Jackson County Floridan, 4403 Constitution
Lane, Marianna, FL

AT THE JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN, WE ARE LOOKING
FOR MATURE, DEPENDABLE, BUSINESS-MINDED,
NEWSPAPER CARRIERS

GRACEVILLE
Earn an average of

$850
per month

Ask about our $300 -Sign on Bonus

BE YOUR OWN BOSS -1 A.M. to 6 A.M.
Must have dependable transportation,
minimum liability insurance & valid
driver's license.

Come by and fill out an application at the
Jackson County Floridan, 4403 Constitution
Lane, Marianna, FL


0


IPLACE;iANA


I









6 B Wedne-dav. August 22. 2012 Jackson (
MI M-


25 Drivers


Trainees

NEEDED NOW!
Learn to drive for
Werner Enterprises
Earn $800 per week!
No experience needed!
Local CDL Training
job ready in 15 days!

1-888-368-2198





JNFCH

Northwest Florida Community Hospital,
Chipley, FL a leading healthcare provid-
er in the panhandle is seeking qualified
candidates for the following positions:
Med/Surg Registered Nurses
All shifts, Exp. Preferred.
ER Registered Nurses
Night shifts, Exp. preferred.
Lab Med Tech
Bachelor's Degree in Medical Technology,
Florida Clinical Laboratory License and
ASCP or equivalent certification.
Applications available online at
www.NFCH.org and/or application to:
Email dblount@nfch.org
(850) 415-8106 or Fax (850) 638-0622
Smoke and Drug Free Campus. EOE

( EDUCATION
C) P& INSTRUCTION


Get a Quality
Education for a New
FORTIS Career! Programs
SRu nIii offered in Trades,
SCOLLEGE Healthcare and More!
Call Fortis College
Today! 888-202-4813 or visit
www.fortiscollege.edu. For consumer
information visit www.fortis.edu


l REAL ESTATE FOR RENT

1BR 1BA Fully Furnished Apt. in Cypress, very
,quiet, very clean, newly remodeled, water/
'sewer/garbage incl. free laundry mat, $450 +
dep (no elect, dep) 850-573-6062*
1BR 1BA Furnished Apt. in Cypress, $375/mo +
dep. incl. water/garb./lawn/pest control 850-
592-2359/209-7195
* 2/lFurn.Apt. Near Hosp, Clean, No pets,
* 2/1 Furn. Mobile Home Wooded, pvt drive,
deep well, sun deck, clean, no pets. dep. req.
4 850-718-5089/624-7407 4k


1/1 Apartment for Rent. For info call 850-579-
8895
1 & 2 BR Apartments. available in town near
Chipola. Water/garb/ sewer incl. No pets. 850-
526-8392/209-5620
2BR/2BA TOWNHOUSES
Chipola River Townhouses
n 850-482-1050/557-8560 4
2BR Apartments for rent, Marianna area 850-
693-0570
Orchard Pointe
Now accepting applications for 2 & 3 BR Apts.
Call or come by to pick up application
4445 Orchard Pointe Dr. Marianna
850-482-4259


6 I
'2BR/1BA, 2658 Railroad St. C'dale, No Pets,
$350/mo. + $250 dep. (850) 352-4222
Austin Tyler & Associates *
Quality Homes & Apartments
P 850- 526-3355 4w
"Property Management Is Our ONLY Business"
Enterprise Home for Rent 4 br, 2.5 ba., Oak
Ridge, inc. pest and lawn. 2 car gar. updated &
cared for. eat-in kitchen, dining, sunroom &
family room. deck & patio. $1,500; 256-489-8200
Nicest in Marianna area! Nearly new 2BR/1BA
Home $560 w/lease. Call 850-526-8367

2/1 in Alford, $350 + deposit 850-579-
8882/850-209-1664/850-573-1851 ,
2/1 Located in Sneads $350/month
850-573-0308
2/2 Mobile Home $450 + deposit, appliances,
washer & dryer, water/garbage & sewer
included 850-482-4455
2&3BRMH's in
Marianna & Sneads (850)209-8595.
2 & 3BR Mobile Homes in Cottondale.
NO PETS CH&A $325- $500/Month
Roomate situation also available.
850-258-1594 Leave Message
2BR 1 BA in Greenwood Area, $400 + dep.
CH/A, water/garbage/sewer/lawn included.
850-569-1015


3BR 2BA, Private lot, CH/A, access to Mill Pond,
water/sewer/yard maint. incl. $525. No pets.
Deposit required. Also, DW, 3/2, No Pets,
Private Lot $595./mo. 850-638-7822
For Rent Greenwood, Marianna, &
Cottondale, starting @ $375/mo.
Water/sewer/garb./ lawn maint.incl.
4 850-593-4700 4
Lg 3/2 $500 Quiet, well maintained Park,
Water/sewer/ garb/lawn included.
Also Available 2/1 $425, 3/2 DW $595
mo Joyce Riley RE 850-209-7825 4w
Rent to Own: 2 & 3BR Mobile Homes.
Lot rent included. Also available,
1 & 2BR Apts & Houses. For details
]" 4, 850-557-3432 or 850-814-6515 4


CL ASSTFIEDS


www..CFL ORID a N.com


Uif I& *Your guide to greal locol

3IBS & businesses & services



SERVICE DIRECTORY


Call 526-3614 to place your ad.


HEATING
JEMISON & CooLING
24 HOURS 7 DAYS A WEEK SERVICE
SALES INSTALLS DUCT CLEANING


S850-762-8666
I-'.- j -. ":: -7". ] '-',


MARIANNA APPLIANCE SERVICE, INC
HEATING &
' ..:



DESHAZO'S
AUTO SERVICE
Come See Us For All Your Car & Truck Mechanical Needs!
SOwner: Phillip DeShazo We
S850-482-3196 Appreiatle
807 Jefferson Street, Your Business!
Marianna, FL 32446
m*


ERIC WALDON
Fitianat' Manlrer
Orc(850) 482-4043
Fx (850) 482-5246
Tou. FREE (866) 587-3673


CHIPOLA FORD WWW.Cfl'cAIFoRDo.cL
4242 LAFAYETTE ST MARIANNA, FL 32446


-, Bill Allard
Sales Representative
Ofc (850) 482-4043
Fx(850) 482-5246
ToL L(866) 5873673
CEUi(850) 718-7499
CHIPOLA FORD wWW.CIomI1FORD.COM
4242 LAFAYETTE ST MARIANNA, FL 32446
RYAN McLAULIN
Orc (850) 482-4043
RiFx (850) 482-5246
Ton FR(866)5873673
S Cm (850) 209-7004
CHIPOLA FORD www.c,,PoAvoFoRD.Co
4242 LAFAYETTE ST MARIANNA, FL 32446
S Craig Bard
FA (850) 482-5246
TonL FeE (866) 587-3673
CmoLU (850) 557-3444
CHIPOLA FORD ,ww..CIpoLAFOD.coM
4242 LAFAYETTE ST MARIANNA, FL 32446
S JOHN BRYAN
Or (850)482-4043

F4 (850)482-5246
TouFRE (866) 587-3673
CEnusfe (850) 573-0875
CHIPOLA FORD WWW.CHIPOFORD.COM
4242 LAFAYETTE ST MARIANNA, FL 32446

"r JOHN ALLEN
O0c(850) 482-4043
FAv(850) 482-5246
Tou Ftu(866) 587-3673
CHIPOLA FORD WWW.C1iP0iFRO.C0M
4242 LAFAYETTE ST MARIANNA, FL] 2446

lIIiFN. SIREi' JlT'l'OO'ilUE IUPIlBq


RONNIE COLEY
Sah's eprseuft!rfve
F' (850) 482-5246
TLTonFRE (866) 587-3673
CELUeR (850) 573-8731
CHIPOLA FORD WWW.CHIIOLAFORD.COM
4242 LAFAYETTE ST MAmANNA, FL 32446


2984 Dekle Street 4167 Lafayette Street
Marianna,FL32448 Mon-Fri Marianna,FL 32448
850-526-4706 7AM 5PM 850-482-2028
"Not Just A Front End Shop"
We can take care ofALLYOUR AUTO NEEDS!
BULOZN


Clay O'Neal's
Land Clearing, Inc.
ALTHA, PL
850-762-9402
Cell 850-832-5055


WE OFFER COMPLETE

m Y ARSEi,


F OFEINGTEEPANIG
CLAN : OSKEP


28 Step Healthy Home Cleaning
Organization of Closets & Cabinets

Construction & Remodeling Cleanup
References Available
& Years of Experience
ww.huykecleaning.com



Your Business






In The Classifieds
I


i -.' . .< .t -# ., ';. ,

Janitorial Service &., piv .
-We Mean ro Keep tour Busness



For General House or
Office Cleaning
Call Debra
Free Estimates References Available
850-526-2336
HAI~R& lBARB:_q 2"ERt


"Beautification of Your Home"
Carpentry/Painting Installations
Furniture Repair & Refinishing
General Repairs Insured


GREEN'S FUTURE (& APPLIANCES
Large Selection of
catmapper Lift Chair Recliners
412i L.l.5 rtre 'wri (W'14, 1Ud)
4H1 Lane ree ~ .nd 526-1549
H,l Mo, Fr, aw fI\

Jackson County ,-
Lumber and ___i._.
Building Supply 4091Lafayett St.
MarionPits,Manager Office: (850)526-5125
Fax: (850)526-7647
DO ,BE St Cell: (850)718-3038

HAPPY
HOME REPAIR
WE'LL BEAT ANY PRICE!!
Big Or Small Jobs WELCOME
85 -i 8C: :: -.E 8: 27, ..-


'OH
Spray Foam Open/Close Cell Blown
I. Ul: Fiberglass Cellulose a Mobile Home
'W Roof insulation Railed Baits Garage Doors,
&mGD A -' ".. 1e


State Farm
Providing Insurance and Financial Services
Home Office, Bloomington, Illinois 61710
Linda Pforte Insurance Agency Inc
Linda PMorle, Agent
Dustin Stevens, Office Associate
2919 Penn Avenue, Suite 8. Marianna, FL 32448-2716 I AN
us 850 482345 850 482.6823f ds2 ts ste1ens.0 statefaUm corn

State Farm
Providing Insurance and Financial Services
Home Office, Bloomington, Illinois 61710
Linda Pforte Insurance Agency Inc f
Linda PirtieAgent Ir
Wanda Swails, Office Manager
2919PennAvenue, SuiteB,Marianna.FL 32448-2716
Bus 850482f3425* f Fa85482-6823 wandaswalsh310lstat ofair rio

'State Farm
Providing Insurance and Financial Services
Home Office, Bloomington, Illinois 61710
Linda Pforte Insurance Agency Inc
Linda Pforte, Agent
Adrienne Unverferth, Office Associate
2919 Penn Aenue, Suie B, Mariann, FL 32448-2716
,Bu850-482-3425 Fa x 850-482-6823 adrde inverierthpnvr lani irmrr ion N

State Farm
Providing Insurance and Financial Services
Home Office, Bloomington, Illinois 61710
Linda Pforte Insurance Agency Inc ,
Linda Pforte, Agent
2919 Penn Avenue, Suite B8, Marianna, FL 32448-2716
Bus 850-482-3425 Fax 850 482-6823
Toll Free 1- 877-364 6007 alinda pforte.bxrs@statefarm corm .


ALTHA FARMERS
COOPERATIVE, INC
Altha Blountstown Marianna
3am35oF @99 0 @33ag o o 2891 Penn. Avenue Marianna, PL
850-482-2416_







IlIA SII RVICES,..II U -: J 1


Magic Fun
Excitement!!
Go Rent Us!!
b l Good Clean Family Fun!


Ann Jones ,,.
Broker/Owner \ -
Cell: 850-209-9077
Ofc: 850-482-0045 L
4438 Lafayette St '. r
Marianna, FL .~ ', ..
www.RealFloridaPropert.com '
. ,iiL '_,. . L K.' 3;,-s .';: K ",



This lonIths Special

$239500
33 Years in Business
= WE Mavi Pa,, Beua' L


BESTWAY
PORTABLE BUILDINGS
LAR I Si MANUF luAC t iF PI W AeL BIIIL IN N ilN FI'IIF 0
HAVE
OVER
DIFFERENT SIZES!
YOU CAN CHOOSE
COLOR & STYLE!


Ijp


----- BUILT ON SIfl ,
3614 Hwy. 90 Marianna, FL 850-482-8682


w G-inger Harris
mTiERLE noRmRn .






Ao, 1,LA



ervin Jackson Count

WE SERVICE WHAT JE SELL.
o tCK US 9T4piances. La*n Tra. aors.

4159 Lafayette St'* 526-!i2- '


located inside Merle Norman Day (7Sp 37)
T l r I : P .: "
U=-1 ^-0 A.. ir Seriimg Jackson Count.







-''.WE SERVICE WHAT WE SELL! .U,.





Locally O wned &HCK US Operated Spliance La196n 1as

Old 4159 Lafaette St. 526-51 210
H9Eas- Snas-3607 Gas '(7 Ne7d





















Tanks for Sate
HI20 O JACKSON COUNTYr Lease
........... VAULT & MONUMENTS
Ld o T R ( r Rd Mariann'a.-52 2 ,;,_,, i






Hwy, 90 East-Sneads-593X070 ., Needs.
Hwy,20West-.Blountstown 6744040 or* Leae.


Got Stumps?.

j HaLL.'S TREE ER vICE


LAWYER TREE SERVICE
L,, 'r..- r' 2 I a ,,r,.J
IS
r,. R ",.'l ii l.i dilip.. '
4 ( or 20 t E.ir E ,aE ,, I fin Pim. alh lc
LOCALLY OWNED BEST PRICES IN TOWN
(. r-' 8SO-866-S219


Call For Quote
GEORGE'S &More fo
Auto
Glass Tinting Commercial
., .. .= .. Residential
2847 S. Jefferson St., Marianna
482-6542


ThAT5s ClAssifiEd


w, Ftri& Three 'offices to serve you:
Gr.40o-n11

K,,, 5 ,,, -, I .4 f
w ef d o o-t0 4,-i4r
,,,.l,.,,tfklo,.coop (800) 342-7400


E


mnJ


I%- X-A I -x


I


AMP-1)


I I









www..ICFLORIDAN.com


f COMMERCIAL
HIH REAL ESTATE FOR RENT


WAREHOUSE RENTAL SPECIAL!!!
Starting at $25/month.Call for details.
850-526-2892/209-2891 4-

RESIDENTIAL
REAL ESTATE FOR SALE


3BR 1BA Brick Home, 1642 sq.ft. Split level,
deck, 4 acres, 28x40 barn, quiet, private area in
Blountstown. Good fishing nearby. $153k 850-
447-0085


Fixer Upper home located in the City of
Newville. 2 bedroom, 2 bath, Living room
(could be used as 3rd bedroom), Dining
room, Den, Inside Laundry, Pantry, Large
wrap around front porch, Outside storage
with electricity, 1 acre lot perfect for
gardening. Four inch well, plus city water.
Central heat and air.






4/2, 2010 Cavalier DWMH 28X80, appliances
incl. must be moved. $65,000 850-526-4706 day/
352-2243 eves.
4BR 2BA DWMH : 1143 Fairview, 6.5
acres, all util. underground, work-
shop out back w/elec. all appl. lots of
.'-n upgrades, $149,000 859-333-8989

|J RECREATION


Suzuki 2006 Eiger Quadrunner: 4WD, automatic
trans, 400CC engine, excellent shape.
$3,400. Call 334-308-1016


Z .N% Baja Monti Cristi, Clean
Boat, $18,500 or trade.
Call 334-714-2700
BAYLINER '96, 18' CAPRI SKI BOAT W/FORCE
120 HP O/B MOTOR & TRAILER. COMPLETELY
REFINISHED. NEW FACTORY UPHOLSTERY.
LOOKS LIKE NEW. $8,000. BOAT ACCESSORY
PACKAGE: SKI ROPES, TUBES, LIFE JACKETS,
MOARING WHIPS $1,000. 334-790-2188

FACTORY1DIRECT


Xtrem

Boa


Packages From
S $4,995
tS All Welded
All Aluminum Boats
vjrUYfpmithqfiq-n


I www.xtlremei usties.comII



2007 fifth-wheel campe r, -
-' -.. 27-foot, one slide,
t Like new, one owner,
S and 2001 Chevy Silverado,
4-door, 1500 HD, with 5th
wheel hitch, 88,000 miles. $25,500 for both.
Call 334-794-3735 for more information.


l 1993 Chev Four Winds 31'
I -II[ 1 Owners health prevents
S using this very nice RV.
^ ' ^Sheltered since purchased
new. Sleeps 6-8, generator,
TV, microwave, full length awning, & more! Has
had this owner & the original owner. Taken
very good care of. Must see to appreciate.
$10,500. Call 850-526-2975 or 850-557-0230

TRANSPORTATION



S- Chevrolet '07 Corvette
STS, Twin Turbo
System, low miles,
$31,999. Call 334-714-2700
Chevy '08 Cobalt LT 4 door sedan, great shape,
only 62k miles, $7900 850-592-2852
BB-- Crysler'05 PT Cruiser
-- Touring Edition, loaded,
4 cyl, automatic, cold air,
93,000 miles, excellent,
$5995. Call: 334-790-7959


$0 Down/ist Payment, Tax, Tag & Title
Repos, Slow Credit, Past Bankruptcy OK!
Push, Pull or Drag, Will Trade Anything!
First Payment 30 Days Out!

Hyundai '07 Azera Limited:
4 door, Silver, 68k miles, good condition,
power everything, heated seats, Sirius radio,
sunroof, new tires and under KB.
$12,000. Call 334-618-2145 or 334-798-5714


Lexus '00 RX300 all wheel drive, leather interi-
or, towing package, 6-disc CD changer & more!
Needs some work but in great shape $2,800.
Call Jason 334-791-2598 or Jon 334-790-5217.


Lexus'06 IS 250 AWD, loaded, 74,000 miles,
850-526-5621


Lincoln 1997 Towncar -
124,000 miles; cold air; sun-
roof. Great interior and exte-
rior new tires and brakes.
$2,750. Call 334-797-2422.


Mercedes Benz '98 E320 Sedan:
One owner, silver with cream puff.
99k miles. See at Fort Rucker Lemon Lots.
$10,000. OBO. Call 334-347-7665

Mercury 1999 Marquis 71,000 miles,
black/brown, One owner,very good condition,
$4,800, 334-618-3955
T-Bucket'23, Custom
Built, $21,999 or trade.
Call 334-714-2700


Harley Davidson '01 Sportster 883XL
5000. miles, windshield, extra seat, back rest,
great cond. $3,600. 334-692-5686.

Harley Davidson '08 Soft Tail Custom
black in color 4,800 mi. Vances & Hines Pro
pipe, High Performance filters, new battery,
lowering kit, 4-Helments, Racing Tuner
ASKING $ 0M --334-701-6968,

MOTORCYCLE-Boulevard '06 C90, 1,500CC-10-
500 miles, windshield, cobra pipes, backrest,
luggage rack, running boards, excellent condi-
tion, two helmets 334-621-8277
Roadstar '07 silver 1600CC
with 5,200 miles, like new
condition, asking $6,900.
Call: 334-726-1580.



Chevrolet '01 Tahoe LS ,
Fully Loaded, Hunter
Green, Fender Flares,
.Running Boards, Power
Seats, Heated Mirrors, No
Leaks or Mechanical Problems, Third Row Seat,
4WD, 5.3L V8, Really Good Condition, 186K
Miles, $7,000 Text for Pictures 334-618-7248
N n Chevrolet '02 Trailblazer
LT, loaded, sunroof, leath-
er, 88,000 miles, cold air,
like new, $6775. Call:
334-790-7959.

jJeep '03 Grand Cherokee,
White, Leather Interior,
Fully Loaded, Heated
Seats, V8, Good Condition,
No Mechanical Problems,
4WD, 162K Miles, $5,000,
Text for Pictures 334-618-7248


Jackson County Floridan Wednesday, August 22, 2012- 7 B


Jeep '07 Wrangler: 2 door, excellent condition,
Silver, 31k miles, bikini top included, Ipod port,
gear rims. $19,000. Call 334-618-2145 or 334-
798-5714
JEEP '08 Grand Cherokee
White-loaded. Prof-
owned, Serv. 5k mi. New
set tires. 93k Hwy mi.
Exc-Cond. By Local
owner.S13K. ($1500 be-
low book) Call 678-5333.
Jeep '08 Wrangler X,
SSale: $15,800. NADA
Retail: $18,350.
P Call 334-714-2700


Dodge '69 Power Wagon 4x4 ,318, 4-spd.
Baby blue color. $2,500 obo. Call 334-726-1700
Ford 2010 F-150 Lariat Super Crew Cab 5 1/2 ft
bed w/bedliner and cap, sync, Sirius, back up
camera, heated and cooled seats, all power,
electric rear window, multi-disc CD player.
Beautiful truck, only 33,500 miles.
$28,500, 334-723-6228
Ford '86 Bronco 2: 4x4,
m f runs and drives good,
no rust, blue. $2,500.
Call 334-441-5580

Toyota 2007 Tundra Double
Cab 2WD TRD SR5 w/5.7 V8.
59,850 miles. Red w/ beige
cloth int. Weathertech front
floor liners. Nfab step bars.
305/60/R18 BF Goodrich KM2
tires. 3"/1" level kit.
Flowmaster dual exhaust. New battery.
Never any trouble. 18.900.334-685-2883


1ST PLACE TO CALL FOR ALL OF
YOUR TOWING NEEDS!
Harqer '424 Hor 7Tow
AUTO BODY & RECYCLING
'PAYING TOP DOLLAR FOR JUNK CARS
Contact Jason Harger at 334-791-2624
r'


- FOR JUNK VEHICLES
I ALSO SELL USED PARTS
24 HOUR TOWING 4. 334-792-8664

SGotaclunker :
-../. We'll be your Junker! d
We buy'wrecked cars
and Farm Equip. at a
fair and honest price!
$325 & tComplete Cars
CALL 334-702-43230 R 334-714-6285

Guaranteed
highest prices 4 Junk vehicles & farming


I._j02 '.. _iL i

equipment, TITLE OR No TITLE
4 850-849-6398
r-- ----------------------------------------
a We buy Wrecked Vehicles
Running or not!
334-794-9576 or 4-791-4714


WE PAY CaSH

FOR JUNK CARS!!!!!!
Call 334-818-1274


Sell Your
aI Xj


In The Classifieds


LEGALS


LF15853
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR JACKSON COUNTY
CASE NUMBER: 12-477 CA
IN RE: FORFEITURE OF: 1999 Red Chevrolet
Pickup Truck, ID#2GCEK19TXX1771565
NOTICE OF FORFEITURE PROCEEDINGS
TO:: ALL PERSONS WHO CLAIM AN INTEREST IN
THE ABOVE-DESCRIBED PROPERTY, WHICH
WAS SEIZED ON OR ABOUT JULY 10, 2012, IN
MARIANNA, JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA:
Said property is in the custody of the
City of Marianna Police Department. Any own-
er entity, bona fide lienholder, or person in pos-
session of the property when seized, has the
right to contest the Petition for Forfeiture by
filing a Response with the Circuit Court within
twenty (20) days of the publication of this no-
tice, with a copy of the Response sent to H.
Matthew Fuqua, Attorney for the City of Ma-
rianna Police Department, at Post Office Box
1508, Marianna, Florida 32447. A Petition for Fi-
nal,Order of Forfeiture has been filed in the
above styled cause.

s/ H. Matthew Fuqua
H. MATTHEW FUQUA
Bondurant & Fuqua, P. A.
4450 Lafayette Street
Post Office Box 1508
Marianna, Florida 32447
850-526-2263
Florida Bar No. 0451101
ATTORNEY FOR CITY OF MARIANNA
POLICE DEPARTMENT
LF15856
Notice of Lien Enforcement
Under FL Statute 83.806, Leigh Cope's Self
Storage, 2773 Pontiac Loop, Cottondale, FL
32431 will sell contents (household & misc.
items) of the following units on 8/30/2012 @
5:15pm:
6 La-Donnica Jowers
13 Jennifer Powell
16 Laticia Ward
17 Lisa Cloud
30 Glenn Straight
32 Jeremy Cassatt
35 Morris Bellamy
45 Kadeijah Cummings


LF15865
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Mallory Towing and Recovery, Inc. gives Notice
of Foreclosure of Lien and intent to sell these
vehicles on at 2pm on 9/06/2012, at 4141 Lafay-
ette St. Marianna, FL 32446, pursuant to sub-
section 713.78 of the Florida Statutes. Mallory
Towning & Recovery Inc. reserves the right to
accept or reject any and/or all bids.
2007 KAWASAKI
VIN#JKAENVC117A204359
1986 NISSAN
VIN#JN1HZ14S1GX159480


LF15867
INVITATION TO BID
CITY OF MARIANNA
NOTICE is hereby given to all interested per-
sons or firms that sealed bids will be accepted
by the Marianna City Clerk at Marianna City
Hall located at 2898 Green Street, Marianna,
Florida 32446 until 2:00 p.m. on Thursday,
September 6, 2012, for the following item:
BID NUMBER: PW 12-01
BID TITLE: Uniform Lease/Service
Bids will be opened and recorded at the City of
Marianna Commission Meeting Room at 2:00
p.m. on September 6, 2012.
Specificationsand details may be obtained
from the City Clerk at Marianna City Hall be-
tween the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m.
Monday through Friday.
IMPORTANT
Quotations SHALL be submitted in a sealed en-
velope marked:
SEALED QUOTE and identified by the NAME OF
THE FIRM, NAME OF THE QUOTE, along with
the DATE AND TIME OF OPENING.
A list of bidders and award notice will be pub-
licly announced at the next scheduled meeting
of the City of Marianna City Commissioners fol-
lowing bid opening if possible. Bid award will
be made to the best bidder, but the right is re-
served to reject any or all bids.
BOARD OF CITY COMMISSIONERS

Jf You Have It and
Don't Need It...Sell It in the
CLASSIFIED


L*'*-t4I


00t>


Air purifier, Hunter, electric $40 850-573-4990
Antique candle holders (2) $25.Ea 334-671-0070
Area Rugs (2) Earthtones $10 ea. 850-526-3426
Barbie Doll, 1996 Olympic, $20, 850-557-0778
Bar stools (4) white wicker $25 850-573-4990
Basket 2'x15" wood woven, $8, 850-573-4990
Bench Car Seats: $50 850-209-6077 after 12


Bicycle, mens, excel. cond. $ 85 850-482-4616


Box Springs (3) Twin, $25 each. 850-209-0706.


Butcher block maple, large, $350, 850-593-2269


Carpet Shampooer Eurika, $35, 850-573-4990


CB base: Browning R27/S23 $350. 850-352-2040
Chairs (4) antique, w/arms $100 850-573-4990
Chairs (6) antique, carved $200 850-573-4990
Chest of Drawers: $150 334-671-0070 Mornings
Christmas Tree w/lights, $15, 850-573-4990
Coat blk leather trench, $50, 850-573-4990
Coffee Table $10 850-693-3321 or 209-6671


Coffee table-2 side table set: $250 334-671-0070
Coffee table, Mermaid $35 850-573-4990
Crutches, nearly new, $20 850-573-4744
Deep Fryer, never used $15 850-526-3426
Dining Table w/4 Chairs $250 334-671-0070
DirecTV dish, free, pick it up 850-482-7933
Dremmel tool & attachments $12 850-573-4990
D/R table (dolphin)+6 chairs $250 850-573-4990
Drum set -minus bass drum: $200, 850-592-8769
Elvis bust $15, 4' Bolt cutters $50 850-573-4990
Elvis Plate Hearbreat Hotel $35 850-573-4990
Entertainment center 3 pc. $125 850-573-4990
File cabinet, locks, 2 door $15 850-573-4990
Games, Nin. Gamecube (10) $30 850-526-3426.
Game table, blackjack & more $35 850-573-4990
Generator, 3300 watt, new, $350 850-573-4990
Generator: Troy Bilt, new $500. 850-352-2040
Hair Dryers, Antique 50's, $50 ea., 850-557-0778


Hand truck/dolly $25 850-573-4990
Jacket black leather biker's, $50, 850-573-4990
King B/R suite, $250 850-573-4990
Lady coffee table $250 850-573-4990
Lamps (2), black marble $25/both 850-573-4990
Leaf blower: Toro electric. $50. 850-352-2040
Magazines: Easyriders. $2 ea. 850-352-2040


Office chair, green w/arms, $25 850-573-4990
Pistol, Smith&Wesson 40cal $350 850-482-4616
Ramps/car (2), metal, new 3' $25 850-573-4990
Recliner: Light Brown $200 334-671-0070
Recliners (2) good cond. $50 ea. 850-593-5302
Recliners, (2)matching, $225/both 850-573-4990
Riding mower, Craftsman $450 850-573-4990


Rims(5) 17" new, Jeep, alloy $275 850-415-1442
Rocking chair, adult small $35 850-593-5302
Rug, small oval india 4'x17" $20 850-573-4990
Santa & Snowman, light up 3' $6 ea850-573-4990
Serving Trays 5-silver, $5 all, 850-573-4990
Sink: Pedestal, new $100 obo. 850-352-2040
Step Ladder, 8' aluminum $50 850-573-4990
Stereo,surround, 300 w/skrs $80 850-573-4990
Table/4 chairs, '50's, Red $325 850-415-1442
Tea Set, Japan, gold, $35 850-526-3426
Toilet, white, $50. Call 850-482-8310


Toolbox: Matco, $125 obo. 850-352-2040


Tool Box "rolls" 11 drawers $150. 850-352-4181.


TV 35" went. center, $350 850-573-4990
TV, 55" Big Screen $75 Call 850-209-6671
VHS TAPES: Ig variety .50 ea Call 850-209-6671
Weedeater: Craftsman. $200 obo. 850-352-2040
Wet tile saw, $50 850-573-4990


CLASSIFIED


CALL FOR TOP PRICE


Magazine Table: brown wood $25 334-671-0070


Mardi Gras Beads (33) $10/all 850-573-4990


Motor & Trans '00 GrandAm $400. 850-209-3930.


NASCAR Collection: Jeff G. $200. 850-557-0778


i


s.
Advertise your ",'COOL STUFF" for FREE by visiting vjww.jcfloridan.com. See site for detail =


I "-






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


-18B WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 22,2012


THEASSOCIATED PRESS
Miami Dolphins quarterback Ryan Tannehill (17) directs his team against the Carolina Panthers
during the first quarter of a preseason game in Charlotte, N.C. on Friday.



Going with the rookie


Teammates

stand behind

QB Tannehill

The Associated Press

DAVIE The lilting fal-
setto came from a '320-
pound lineman as the
Miami Dolphins' young
quarterback walked
through the locker room
Tuesday.
"Oooh, Ryan Tannehill,"
said guard Richie Incogni-
to, imitating a star-struck
fan. '
Several veterans chuck-
led. So did Tannehill. As a
rookie, he's not above teas-
ing from teammates.
But as of Monday, he's
also a starter. First-year
coach Joe Philbin chose
Tannehill for the job over
Matt Moore, who started
the final 12 games last
year.
While Moore is popular
with teammates, they en-
dorsed Philbin's decision
Tuesday- with varying
degrees of enthusiasm.
"We're not in a position
to pick," receiver Davone
Bess said. "Right now we
want- to focus on keeping
the team together and not
having animosity toward
:anybody."
: Moore, a backup for most
,of his six-year career, took
,the high road after finish-
ing as the runner-up in the
Tihost scrutinized position
battle of training camp.
"I was disappointed," he
said. "You want to play. As
-a leader of this team, you
want to be-back there with
,the guys. But I understand
,Ihe decision, and I support
the decision. I'm behind
coach Philbin and Ryan
100 percent and will be
ready if they need me."
Tannehill's reaction to


the decision: "I'm excited
to have the opportunity to
go out and play. I'm just go-
ing to do everything I can
to go out and win games."
The Dolphins (No. 27 in
the AP Pro32) will start a
rookie quarterback in a
season opener for the first
time when they play at
Houston on Sept. 9. Tan-
nehill will be the first rook-
ie QB to start for Miami
since John Beck in 2007.
Beck went 0-4 that year.
The Dolphins anticipate
better results from Tan-
nehill, the first quarter-
back they've drafted in the
opening round since Dan
Marino in 1983.
Philbin said he had no
qualms about turning the
offense over to a rookie.
"I don't think that's, go-
ing to be an issue," Philbin
said. "He has earned peo-
ple's respect, and he has
done it quietly in his own
way. He has done it mostly
by his professionalism in
this building and his work
ethic."
Camp began with three
contenders for the starting
job, but knee surgery took
veteran David Garrard out
of the mix. Moore was un-
impressive in the first two
exhibition games, while
Tannehill had some en-
couraging moments.
The rookie doesn't lack
for confidence, and he
started the summer hop-
ing to win the No. 1 job.
"It's human nature as a
competitor, to want to be
the guy," he said. "I was go-
ing out there every day try-
ing to prove I could be the
guy to win games with this
team. Right now that's the
case, but I've got to con-
tinue to get better."
The Dolphins figure
Tannehill's upside is con-
siderable, especially con-
sidering he was a college
receiver two years ago. He


switched to quarterback
midway through his junior
season at Texas A&M and
started only 19 games at
the position.
With Miami he has ben-
efited from the tutelage of
new offensive coordinator
Mike Sherman, who was
Tannehill's head coach at
A&M and brought the same
offense to the Dolphins.
"For a young kid, Ryan's a
leader," tight end Anthony
Fasano said. "He's a rookie
telling veterans how to line
up. He's a little more confi-
dent because he knows the
offense."
The Dolphins play At-
lanta on Friday in the most
important of their four ex-
hibition games, with the
starters seeing significant
action. When asked what
he wants to see from Tan-
nehill in the game, Philbin
responded with a long list
that took more than a min-
ute to recite.
"He has to do what good
quarterbacks do," Philbin
said. "They make great
decisions. They throw the
ball accurately. They make
plays when they have to.
They get you out of bad
plays and they manage the
game well."
In other words: They
don't play like a rookie.


Buccaneers giving



Shipley a chance


The Associated Press

TAMPA Jordan
Shipley has some catch-
ing up to do.
"It's a totally different
system as far as terminol-
ogy," the wide receiver
said Tuesday after his first
workout with the Tampa
Bay Buccaneers. "I'm go-
ing to have a busy night
tonight and the next sev-
eral days, just learning
everything."
'The former Texas star
might have to learn
quickly just to make the
roster of the Bucs, who
claimed him off waiv-
ers Monday. Shipley will
have two ways to impress
the coaching staff as a
slot receiver and as a punt
returned.
"I got a phone call yes-
terday and I'm practicing
this morning," he said
four days after the Ben-
gals placed him on waiv-
ers. "It's a pretty' quick
turnaround and I'm just
excited to be down here
playing football."
Shipley was the AFC's
leading rookie receiver
in 2010 with 52 catches
for 600 yards and three
touchdowns. After be-
ing drafted in the third
round, he was Cincinna-


ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE
Wide receiver Jordan Shipley
catches a pass during
practice on July 31.

ti's No. 3 receiver behind
Terrell Owens and Chad
Ochocinco. But his sec-
ond NFL season ended in
the B6ngals' second game
when he tore ligaments in
his left knee.
After surgery and a
couple of weeks in the
Bengals' training camp,


Shipley says he is "full-go
right now."
"It's one of those deals
where I spend extra time
warming it up and I will
be icing it afterwards. It
feels good, ready to go,"
'he said of his knee. "I am
honestly not sure what
(the Bengals') thought
process was. I'm just glad
to be in Tampa. I think
this is a team where there
s a lot of discipline going
on, and this team is going
to get better and better."
Coach Greg Schiano
said claiming Shipley
was not in response to a
need.
"It's just if you have a
chance to investigate a
player that you liked, you
do it," he said. "Now is a
time when we can do it."
Shipley ran back punts
at Texas, where he also set
records for career recep-
tions (248), receptions in
a season (116) and touch-
down catches in a season
(13). But after returning a
punt 63 yards in his first
preseason game with the
Bengals, Shipley has yet
to return a punt in an NFL
regular-season game.
"I love punt returns,"
he said. "Any chance to
get out there, I will go out
there."


Jags to play 4 home


games in London


The Associated Press

The Jacksonville Jaguars
are going to be England's
team.
The NFL and the Jaguars
announced Tuesday that
the small-market franchise
will play one home game
in London for four consec-
utive seasons beginning in
2013 a step the team be-
lieves will broaden its fan
base and take some pres-
sure off locals who have
mostly failed to fill the
stands in recent years.
"I passionately believe
the big growth now is going
to come from overseas,"
owner Shad Khan said.
"We've got to go where we
can leverage and take ad-
vantage of some of those
things. You've got to fish
in ponds where you've got
fish in there. We're going to
a pond where there are no
fishermen."
The Jaguars will play at
historic Wembley Stadium,
which has hosted one NFL
game annually since 2007.
"We want to create an
identity, a bold, ambitious
franchise that is aggres-
sive and forward-think-
ing on the field and away
from the field," Khan said.
_J"We want to be the kind of


franchise players want to
belong to, sponsors want
to be part of, and Jackson-
ville is proud of. ... The key
point is to sell Jacksonville
to the world. We are a well-
kept secret, but after today,
that's not going to be the
case."
By all accounts, the Jag-
uars are the NFL's least
popular team. They rank
at or near the bottom
of the league in website
hits as well as Twitter and
Facebook interactions.
Although Jacksonville is
the largest city in the con-
tinental United States in
terms of land mass, it is
home to just 1.3 million
people; London alone has
8 million people.
Missing the playoffs in
10 of 12 seasons has made
attracting fans a problem
in Jacksonville. Playing an
annual game in London
will reduce season-ticket
prices by 10 percent, possi-
bly making the remaining
package a more affordable
and enticing option.
: "You can't fault them if
anyone is mad about this,"
kicker Josh Scobee said.
"We can only ask for their
support in going over there
and ask them to watch it
on TV"


Picture Grandma and Grandpa thumbing through their morning paper to
find a Grandparents' Day greeting from their loving grandkids...
you'll make their day! Simply send your favorite family photo, entry form
and $20 to the Jackson County Floridan by September 5, 2012.
Submission Guidelines:
1 Send a family photo, this entry form and $20 check or money order to
Jackson County Floridan
P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447.
2. All submissions must be received by 5PM. on September 5, 2012.
3. Photos can be picked up from the Jackson County Florldan office.
4. All greetings will be published in the Jackson County Floridan on
National Grandparents' Day, September 9, 2012.
5. The Jackson County Floridan office will be closed Monday, Sept. 3, 2012 in observance of Labor Day.


Ii~*.


-... ^... .........rri J V, t' '



Inside Sunday'S


Jakson CEaounty

Floridan


Name
Addres


Grandcr-ild Nanrc Si S
Grandparent': Namer is
Greeting,


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NFTL


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