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Jackson County Floridan
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028304/00782
 Material Information
Title: Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title: Sunday Floridan
Portion of title: Floridan
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Jackson County Floridan
Publisher: Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Marianna Fla
Creation Date: March 2, 2012
Publication Date: 3/21/2012
Frequency: daily (except saturday and monday)[<1979-1995>]
weekly[ former 1934-<1955>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates: 30.776389 x -85.238056 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note: "Independent."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID: UF00028304:00782
 Related Items
Preceded by: Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by: Marianna Floridan

Full Text


Informing more than 17,000 readers daily in print and online
I.. .! .


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LIBI1ARY OF FLy.OI DA ItISORY
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to try and even series

with Northwest Florida

State. See more page IB.


Vol. 89 No.58


Crime Reports


Man found with


42.9 grams


of marijuana


From staff reports


Ford truck. Police said Kirk-
land admitted to having


A Malone man was ar-
rested during a traffic stop
on Monday after Marianna
Police Department offi-
cers reportedly found 42.9
grams of marijuana.
Joshua Allen Kirkland
was charged with posses- Kirkland
sion of more than 20 grams
of marijuana. Kirkland w
Kirkland was initially en for proce
stopped for running a red Marianna Po
light on Lafayette Street. ment and la
Officers said they noticed Jackson Coi
Kirkland was nervous and tional Facilit
asked to search'the yellow appearance.


marijuana
in the truck.
Officers
searched
the car and
reportedly
found 42.9
grams of
marijuana.
/as then tak-
essing at the
police Depart-
ater taken to
unty Correc-
y to await first


Two children


accidentally shot


in Walton County


From staff reports ,
Two children were acci-
dentally shot in Defuniak
Springs by their caretaker
on Tuesday.
According to a press
release from the Walton
County Sheriff, the 3-and-
5-year-old boys were play-
ing outside when their
caretaker found a large
snake in a shed. The press
release said it was reported


that the children were told
to sit on the porch while
the caretaker killed the
snake. The boys were re-
portedly still outside when
stray birdshot hit them in
the chest and head.
The children were taken
to Sacred Heart Hospital in,
Pensacola where they were
treated and released.
According to the press
release, the investigation is
still open.


City Cleanup


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Members of the community will be scouring the area around
Clay and Borden Streets in Marianna for litter like this can this
Saturday.


Pick Up Marianna

Day is this Saturday


BY LAUREN DELGADO
Idelgado@jcfloridan.com

The City of Marianna's
Public Works department
is hosting a "Pick Up Mari-
anna Day" this Saturday
> CLASSIFIEDS...6-7B >


for city officials, residents
and organizations to pick
up litter.
"We're just trying to
make more of an effort in
See CLEAN, Page 7A
ENTERTAINMENT...5B ) LOC


CAL.


PEST PROBLEMS



Large mosquito




infestation in cou


42


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Sharon Pumphrey, environmental supervisor for the Jackson County Health Department, drives a mosquito sprayer
truck along Leland Road Monday night.


Mild winter,

rain to blame
BY LAUREN DELGADO
Idelgado@jcfloriddn.com

Local entities in charge of mos-
quito control are reporting a high
infestation in Jackson County
due to the relatively mild winter
and rainy past few weeks.
Ron Block, meteorologist with
the NationalWeather Service, said
the temperatures from December
to February have been, on aver-
age, 6-8 degrees higher than nor-
mal for this area. Although the
area is about 4-5 inches short of
average year's rainfall, during the
severe storms at the beginning
of the month, the area received
about 3 inches of rain, with some
isolated areas receiving more.
Samuel Everett, supervisor of
streets, facilities and fleet main-
tenance for the City of Marianna,
said this isn't just a local problem,
but one the whole state of Flori-
da is facing. Mosquito eggs can


survive a dry season only to hatch
with rain, Everett said. His team
has been spraying larvacide
everyday for the past two weeks.
The team is also gathering
landing rates for the insects. They
count how many mosquitoes
-land within a certain timeframe,
which helps them see how bad
the infestation is. Everett said the
landing rates are extremely high.
T.G. Harkrider, the county's en-
vironmental health director, said
they've been running two trucks
five to six nights a week and
may increase it to seven nights
if needed. They are also hiring
another technician.
The county has a complaint
driven program, meaning resi-
dents of cities without a mos-
quito control program or of unin-
corporated areas call in and leave
their names and addresses. The
department uses Aqua-Reslin,
which kills adult mosquitoes in
the area during the spraying.
Besides calling their mosqui-
to control organization, locals
should remember "the five D's"
to lower the infestation. Avoid
going out at dawn or dusk, drain


Mosquito Control
) Cottondale (within the city
limits): 352-4361
) Graceville (within the city
limits): 263-3250
a Grand Ridge (within the city
limits): 592-4621
n Marianna (within the city
limits): 482-4353
) Jackson County
Environmental Health (all
other cities or unincorporated
areas): 482-9227

any water outside (including dog
bowls or bird baths), apply mos-
quito repellent with DEET in it
and dress in long pants and long
sleeves, Harkrider said.
Bobby Furiderburk, the public
works supervisor for the City of
Cottondale, said his team sprays'
either at dusk or at dawn. The
city has already received numer-
ous calls for spraying, he said.
Residents can call 352-4361 to get
relief from this complaint driven
program.
Scottie Greenwood, the parks
See INFEST, Page 7A


Veterans Wheelchair Games

Army vet eyes more medals in upcoming games


Needs community's help to attend


BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com

Jacob resident Melvin
Henderson is headed
to Richmond, Va., next
month to compete in the
33rd annual National Vet-
erans Wheelchair Games.
An Army veteran, Hen-
derson was an avid par-
ticipant in basketball,
track and other sports be-
fore a traffic crash in the
early 1980s left him with
a brain injury and severe
physical limitations. Now
confined to a wheelchair,
Henderson is classified
as a quadriplegic but has
..3A, 6A, 8A )>STATE...


defied his physical chal-
lenges by winning more
than 34
Henderson comedals in
the veter-
ans' games
over 13
members. This years.

Henderson compete in
the wheel-
chair slalom, the 200-
yard wheelchair dash,
the motorized rally and a
relay game with two team
members. This year, Hen-
derson is dedicating his
performance to his father,
Samuel Henderson, who
died on Christmas Eve
7A )>OPINION...4A


last year at the age of 72.
To pay for his plane trip
and other expenses, Hen-
derson needs donations
from the community. It
will cost an estimated
$1,500. He has about $200
of that; if his father had
lived one more day, he
probably would have had
more. Henderson said
his father would typically
give him cash each year
on Christmas Day, money
that was meant to help
with his upcoming trip
to the games. Henderson
said he will push himself
to achieve even more this
year in the name of his
father.
"I'm going to try to do
more, to master it; that's
)> SPORTS...1-4B,8B


"When Igo to these
games, rm trying to
show others that life
goes on... You can still
make a contribution."
MeMn Henderson,
Jacob resident

the way he'd want me to
do it," Henderson said.
"I've had a lot of trag-
edy; these injuries really
changed my world. I lost
my wife five years ago,
and two years after that,
one of my sons died in
Afghanistan, and now my
father, but I can't let it all
See GAMES, Page 7A
> TV LISTINGS...4B


This Newspaper
Is Printed On (
Recycled Newsprint




7 65161 80050 9


Chevrolet-Buick-Cadillac-Nissan


4204 Lafayette St. Marianna, FL.
t850)482-6317


Follow us





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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Weather Outlook

Sunny. Breezy. Warm.
Today-Justin Kiefer / WMBB


High 85
Low 62


High 81
Low 60'


Thursday
Possible Storm.


"- High 80'
., Low -L610


Saturday
Scattered Storms.


S High -83o
Low- 62'

Friday
Scattered Storms.



High 78'
Low 58


Sunday
Sunny & Mild.


FLORIDA'S _RL=

PANHANDLE COUNTRY

MEDIA PARTNERS WJAQ 100.9,'m

ISEN S "EATES


,I aLL 111
',Iig
, /v Hit!


I, "1 ,
'*..


SLoI: 64 1 ligh: 85 .
Low: 63

~ h: 84I .High: 85
w: 63 ,,-.-,"Los: 62 -- -
H'Lh:' 5 -,.:Ia I "." "
.t. .,_.

tig.h : 8 5a .E i h 8fl igh58 4 ; I ; "
I,, .....* ":'L w: 61 .


PRECIPITATION


24 hours
Month to date
Normal MTD
TIDES
Panama City
Apalachicola
Port St. Joe
Destin
Pensacola


0.00"
5.39"
3.93"


Low
Low
Low
Low
Low


RIVER READINGS
Woodruff
Blountstown
Marianna
Caryville

MOR ijua '
'^zjX-^ fthD
rrctf uuiOr{SOSI


"y High: 77
-- Low: 65


ele.i I' i.iLc 5 "
Normal Y ID 14.b3"
Normal for year 58.25"


5:03 PM
10:36 AM
5:08 PM
6:19 PM
6:53 PM


High
High
High
High
High


Reading
43.54 ft.
5.43 ft.
8.55 ft.
7.05 ft.


- 10:26 AM
- 4:04 AM
- 10:59 AM
- 11:32 AM
- 12:05 PM


Flood Stage
66.0 ft.
15.0 ft.
19.0 ft.
12.0 ft.


ULTRA VIOLET INDEX

0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8-10 Very High, 11+ Extreme
. -'


THE SUN AND MOON
Sunrise 6:43 AM
Sunset 6:53 PM
Moonrise 5:53 AM
Moonset 6:19 PM


Mar. Mar. Apr. Apr.
22 '30 6 13


JACKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN

Publisher Valeria Roberts
vroberts@jcfloridan.com

Circulation Manager- Dena Oberski
doberski@jcfloridan.com








CONTACT US
Telephone: 850-526-3614
FAX: 850-482-4478
Email: editorial@jcfloridan.com
Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447
Street Address:
4403 Constitution Lane
Marianna, FL 32446
Office Hours:
Weekdays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

MISS YOUR PAPER?
You should receive your newspaper no later
than 6 a.m. If it does not arrive, call Circula-
tion between 6 a.m. and noon, Tuesday to
Friday, and 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. on Sunday. The
Jackson County Floridan (USPS 271-840)
is published Tuesday though Friday and
Sunday mornings. Periodical postage paid
at Marianna, FL.

SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Home delivery: $11.23 per month; $32.83
for three months; $62.05 for six months;
and $123.45 for one year. All prices include
applicable state and local taxes. Mail
subscriptions must be paid in advance. Mail
subscriptions are: $46.12 for three months;
$92.24 for six months; and $184.47 for one
year.

ADVERTISING
The advertiser agrees that the publisher
shall not be liable for damages arising
out of errors and advertisements beyond
the amount paid for the space actually
occupied by that portion of the advertise-
ments in which the error occurred, whether
such error is due to the negligence of the
publisher's employees or otherwise, and
there shall be not liability for non-inser-
tion of any advertisement beyond the
amount paid for such advertisement. This
newspaper will not knowingly accept or
publish illegal material of any kind. Advertis-
ing which expresses preference based on
legally protected personal characteristics is
not acceptable.

HOW TO GET YOUR
NEWS PUBLISHED
The Jackson County Floridan will publish
news of general interest free of charge.
Submit your news or Community Calendar
events via email, fax, mail, or hand delivery.
Fees may apply for wedding, engagement,
anniversary and birth announcements.
Forms are available at the Floridan offices.
Photographs must be of good quality and
suitable for print. The Floridan reserves the
right to edit all submissions.

GETTING IT RIGHT
The Jackson County Floridan's policy
is to correct mistakes promptly. To
report an error, please call 526-3614
Monday-Friday.


.~--'.J -


TODAY
USDA Food Distribution 8 a.m. at 4297 Lid-
don St. in Marianna, Eldercare Services will give out
USDA and brown bag food.
) Jackson County Habitat for Humanity
Warehouse hours: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
)) Free Tax Prep at Chipola 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
Wednesday at Chipola College, room M-201. Busi-
ness instructor Lee Shook and student volunteers
provide free tax preparation and electronic 'llii,.
(individual returns only). Call 718-2368 for an ap-
pointment; -. all iri:, may have a longer wait.
) Free Tax Preparation/E-filing AARP Tax-Aide
is available, by appointment only, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
at the Jackson County Agriculture Offices, 2741
Pennsylvania Ave. in Marianna. C 11l 482-9620 (8:30
a.m. to 4:30 p.m.) for an appointment.
) Job Fair Sign-Up 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at Good-
will Training Center, 4742 Highway 90 in Marianna.
The GTC is signing up interested persons for a job
fair at Family Dollar 1i:triL-ul,:.rn To sign up, call
526-0139 or stop by the center.
) Job Club 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the Good-
will Career Training Center, 4742 Highway 90 in
Marianna, providing free job-seeking and -retention
skills. Call 526-0139.
n Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting Noon
to 1 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.
) Jackson Hospital Board of Trustees Finance
Committee Monthly Meeting 5 p.m. in the
classroom. The Board r:ii,. foii.:.. .: Call 718-
2629.

THURSDAY, MARCH 22
Sneads Elementary School Strawberry Sale
-.$14 per flat (cash only, no checks accepted).
Available for pickup at the school at 8 a.m. on March
22 (orders due by 3 p.m. March 20). Proceeds help
support our Relay for Life team. Call 482-9003, ext.
229.
) St. Anne's Thrift Shop Hours 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Tuesday and Thursdays at 4285 Second Ave. in
Marianna. Now featured: Spring attire.
) Free Tax Preparation/E-filing AARP Tax-Aide
is available, by appointment only, 4:30 to 7:30 p.m.
at the Jackson County ,gri,.:ulih.ire Offices, 2741
Pennsylvania Ave. in Marianna. Call 482-9620 (8:30
a.m. to 4:30 p.m.) for an appointment.
Orientation 12:30 p.m. at the Goodwill Career
Training Center, 4742 Highway 90 in Marianna.


Register for job placement and computer training
classes and learn about services offered to people
with disadvantages/disabilities. Call 526-0139.
n Dayspring Christian Academy Open House
- 4:15 to 6:15 p.m. at 4685 Meadowview Road
in Marianna, for new and existing K3 8th-grade
students. Families are encouraged to -it, ii':l Call
526-4919.
) FDOT Public Meeting 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. in the
Marianna City Hall Commission Chambers (2898
Green St.), regarding proposed improvements to
SR 73 (Jefferson Street) and SR 166 from County
Road 167 (South Street) to the Chipola River Bridge
in Jackson County. Maps, drawings and other
information will be on display; FDOT representatives
will answer questions, explain the project. C 311 888-
638-0250, ext. 755.
) Free Yoga Class 5:30 p.m. at Chipola Fitness
Center, 4230 Lafayette St. in Marianna. Mats
provided. Offered in partnership with the Jackson
County Health [,,p:-ir triei-it s C i: inig the Gap
program. Call 482-6221.
) Guitar Recital 7:30 p.m. in the Chipola College
Theatre, featuring Troy University guitar professor
Dr. Robby Gibson.
)) Alcoholics Anonymous Closed :: a1: i':',, 8
to 9 p.m., First United .eli':,d,: Church, 2901 Cale-
donia St., Marianna, in the AA room. Attendance
limited to rr L ,n: ,..h a desire to stop drinking.

FRIDAY, MARCH 23
Free Workshops Budgeting Workshop (8:30
to 9:30 a.m.), Employ Florida Marketplace (10 to 11
a.m.), Computer Basics 101 (1:30 to 2:30 p.m.) and
Spanish Workshop (3 to 4 p.m.) at Marianna One
Stop Career Center. Call 718-0326.
) Marianna Garden Club Flower Arranging
Workshop -10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at First Presbyterian
Church, fe.3turing i ri lru,: tnii:ifrom Jane Brewer, the
District II director of Florida Federation of Garden
Clubs. Lunch will be served. Cost: $5. Call 482-7565.
n Panhandle Seminole Club Scholarship Golf
Tournament 1 p.m. shotgun start at Indian
Springs Golf Club in Marianna. Registration and
warm-up begin at noon. Cash prizes will be awarded
to the first-, second-, rid tra-ird ,pi:e teams. Cost:
$65 (includes greens fees, lunch). Event proceeds
fund FSU scholarships for area students. Call 526-
4005 or 482-8787.
) Music Program 2 p.m. in the Riverside
Elementary School multi-purpose room, celebrating
Music in Our Schools Month, a time to focus on the


importance of music in education. Public welcome.
) Celebrate Recovery 7 p.m. at Evangel Worship
Center, 2645 Pebble Hill Road in Marianna. Adult,
teen meetings to "overcome hurts, habits and
hang-ups." Dinner: 6 p.m. Child care available. Call
209-7856 or 573-1131.
) Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting 8 to
9 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.

SATURDAY, MARCH 24
Multi-Team Yard Salq Fundraiser 7 a.m. in
front of McDaniel's Grocery in Sneads, benefitting
East Jackson Relay for Life.
) Pick Up Marianna Day 8 a.m. at McLane
Community Center, 4291 Clay St. in Marianna.
Volunteers, City Public Works Department, local '
community service leaders/organizations will clean
up the community. Call 482-4129 or email long@
cityofmarianna.com.
) Union Grove School Fundraiser 9 a.m. to
2 p.m. on school grounds, 4517 Basswood Road
in Greenwood, to help repair the roof of old Union
Grove school, with old-fashioned games for children
and adults, entertainment, food and opportunities
to purchase Union Grove memorabilia. Potential
vendors, others, call 209-4951 or 594-4160.
) Emerald Coast Hospice Memorial Service at
the Jackson County Agricultural Conference Center
in Marianna. Patients who passed away in 2011 will
be honored. Designed for families served by ECH,
but open to the community. Call Emerald Coast
Hospice Chaplin Gino Mayo at 526-3577.
) Turkey Shoot Fundraiser -1 p.m. at AMVETS
Post 231, north of Fountain (east side of US 231, just
south of CR 167). Cost: $2 a shot. Call 850-722-
0291.
) Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting 4:30
to 5:30 p.m. in the AA room of First United Method-
ist Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.
a VFW Mardi Gras Dinner and Dance at the
National Guard Armory on US 90 West in Marianna.
Dinner is 5 to 7 p,m. and the dance is 7 to 11 p.m.
Cost: $15 (single) or $25 (couple). Call 718-7773.

SUNDAY, MARCH 25
D Spaghetti Dinner Fundraiser 12:30 to 2 p.m.
EDT at Calvary Baptist Church of Chattahoochee.
Plates (spaghetti, salad, garlic bread, tea and cake)
are $5 each. Proceeds go to Relay for Life. Call 850-
663-2599 or 850-447-2088.


The submission deadline for this calendar is two days before publication. Submit to: Community Calendar, Jackson County Floridan, P. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447,
email editorial@jcfloridan.com, fax 850-482-4478 or bring items to 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.


MARIANNA POL
DEPARTMENT'
The Marianna Police
ment listed the following
dents for March 19, the
available report: One ai


with no injury,
one reckless
driver, one sus-
picious vehicle,
one suspicious
incident, one
suspicious


CR


person, one funeral esc
verbal disturbance, 18 t
stops, two larceny corn
one civil dispute, one fi
abandoned property, o
of a motorist/pedestria
assist of another agency
three public service cal

JACKSON COUI


.ICE


SHERIFF'S OFFICE


I The Jackson County Sheriff's
Depart- Office and county Fire/Rescue
ng inci- reported the following incidents
latest for March 19, the latest avail-
ccident able report. (Some of these calls
may be related to after-hours
S-, calls taken on behalf of Gracev-
i ille and Cottondale Police de-
partments): One hospice death,
IME one stolen tag, one abandoned
vehicle, one reckless driver,
seven suspicious vehicles, one
cort, one suspicious person, one funeral
traffic escort, one highway obstruc-
plaints, tion, one physical disturbance,
found/ two verbal disturbances, two
ne assist prowler complaints, one drug
n, one offense, 15 medical calls, one
\ and burglary alarm, one fire alarm,
lls. 15 traffic stops, two larceny
complaints, three criminal
NTY mischief complaints, one
trespassing complaint, one


obscene/threatening call, one
suicide attempt, three animal
complaints, two assists of a
motorist/pedestrian, one assist
of another agency, one child
abuse complaint, two public
service calls, two transports
and two threat/harassment
complaints.

JACKSON COUNTY
CORRECTIONAL FACILITY
The following persons were
booked into the county jail dur-
ing the latest reporting periods:
) David Cook, 45, 203 Jackson
Lake Inn Road, Jackson, Ga.,
DIJI, leaving the scene of an
accident.
) Markey Golden, 26, 67
Dorothy Lane, Wetumpka,
Ala., driving while license
suspended / revoked.
) Dante Hall, 28, 2016 Limpkin


Lane, Tallahassee, violation of
state probation.
) Kenyetta Garrett, 21, 2875
Orange St., Marianna, sen-
tenced to 1 year in county jail.
) Paul Fuder, 34, 6430 Marvin
Lane, Southport, violation of
state probation.
) Patrick Thompson, 22, 1204
West Reynolds St., Plant City,
Fla., fugitive from justice.
)) Robin Webb, 63, 1708 A
Louise Drive, Panama City, two
counts of grand theft.
)) Kelsey Crutchfield, 19,
145 Lee Road 394, Auburn
Ala., driving while license
suspended/revoked.

JAIL POPULATION: 209

To report a crime, call CrimeStoppers
at 526-5000 or a local law enforcement
agency. To report a wildlife violation, call
1-888-404-FWCC (3922).


TEAM RAHAL MILLER
c chevrolet-Buick-Cadillac-Nissan
S4204 Lafayette St. Marianna, FL

2 (850) 482-3051


4 a


Chad Oliver






Team Sales


Chuck Basford


Team Sales


Leroy Boone






Team Sales


Wes Polston






Team Sales ,


~~""~ '' ;" '


-2A WEDNESDAY, MARCH 21, 2012


WAIE-UP CLL


~I, i


cuoQ






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Alzheimer's Conference is March 28 in Dothan


Special to the Floridan

The Alzheimer's Resource Cen-
ter and Wallace Community Col-
lege will hold the 23rd annual
Alzheimer's Educational Confer-
ence Wednesday, March 28, at
the Dothan Civic Center, 126 N.
Saint Andrews St., Dothan, Ala.
Speakers will be David S. Geld-
macher, MD, FACP; Jennifer El-
gin, CDRS, PTR/L; Deputy Scott
Wilson; and E Cleveland Kinney,
PhD, MD.
Dr. David Geldmacher is the
director of the University of Ala-
bama at Birmingham Division of


Memory Disorders and Behav-
ioral Neurology and a professor
of neurobiology at UAB. He will
speak on "Alzheimer's Disease
2012: New Frontiers in Diagnosis
and Treatment."
Jennifer Elgin is the clinic co-
ordinator for the Driving Assess-
ment Clinic, School of Medicine,
at UAB. She will discuss the im-
portance of making decisions
about driving safety, the skills
needed to be a safe driver and
impairments that lead to in-'
creased crash risks. She will also
talk about research on dementia
and driving..


Houston County Sheriff's Dep-
uty Scott Wilson, Project Life-
saver coordinator, will discuss
Project Lifesaver, eligibility, lo-
cating the nearest provider, and
the importance of supplement-
ing existing care with technology
available from Project Lifesaver.
Dr. Cleve Kinney is a profes-
sor emeritus of psychiatry and
behavioral neurobiology at the
UAB School of Medicine. He will
speak on "Alzheimer's Disease:
Diagnosis of and Treatment
of Psychiatric Manifestations
including Depression in the
Elderly."


Kay Jones, executive direc-
tor of the Alzheimer's Re-
source Center, said Alzheimer
caregivers are encouraged to
attend the conference.
The conference hours are 8
a.m. to 3:15 p.m. Registration
will begin at 7:30 a.m. The fee
is $65 for CEUs and $25 without
CEUs.
To register by phone, use
VISA, Discover, or MasterCard,
and call 334-556-2205, or FAX
334-984-2132 Monday through
Thursday, 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.,
and on Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.
The cost includes lunch and


break refreshments, as well as
certificate of completion.
For information about servic-
es provided by the Alzheimer's
Resource Center, call 334-702-
CARE, email at alzheimer@
graceba.net, or visit www.we
sharethecare.org.
The ARC is a local, indepen-
dent, non-profit organization
serving 22 counties in south-
east Alabama and northwest
Florida. It is totally dependent
on the community for funding.
Donations may be sent to the
Alzheimer's Resource Center, PO
Box 1170, Dothan, AL 36302.


Cruz-White


SUBMITTED PHOTO
From left, Kathleen Hightower (People's Choice), Madison Christmas (Miss Freshman), Alexandria Watson (Miss Campus
Beauty), Jaree Flowers (Miss Junior) and Caroline Rogers (Miss Sophomore) are crowned during the Marianna High School
Campus Beauty Pageant on March 10.


Campus Beauty winners announced


Special to the Floridan

The 17th annual Marianna High
School Campus Beauty Pageant
was held March 10 at the MHS
auditorium.
Winners were:
) People's Choice Kathleen High-
tower (junior), daughter of Jerry and


Von Cobb.
) Miss Freshman Madison Christ-
mas, daughter of Bobby and Tres
Christmas.
) Miss Campus Beauty Alexandria
Watson (senior), daughter of Philip
and Susan Watson and Michael and
Janet Stripling.
) Miss Junior Jaree Flow-


ers, daughter of Steve and Cricket
Moore.
) Miss Sophomore Caroline Rog-
ers, daughter of Rhett and Donna
Rogers.
The pageant is a varsity cheerlead-
er fundraiser and the People's Choice
proceeds went to St. Jude's Research
Center.


'Tour of Miraces' to benefit young cancer patients


Special to the Floridan

The 10th annual TriStates
100 bicycle ride rolls out
Sunday, April 1 from the
Wiregrass Museum of Art
(126 Museum Ave. in Do-
than). The ride benefits
The Dawn Pitchford Fund
at Children's of Alabama.
Registration begins at
6 a.m. the day of the ride.
The ride begins at 7 a.m.
Registration and an op-
portunity to donate is also
available online at www.
tristatesl00.com.
The TriStates 100 spans


100 miles and three states
- Alabama, Georgia and
Florida and presents
riders with a challenging,
but not difficult course.
Riders may opt to partici-
pate in the 25- and 62-mile
courses that loop through
scenic southeastern Ala-
bama. More informa-
tion is available at www.
tristatesl00.com or by
calling 334-678-9039.
The Dawn Pitchford
Fund and the TriStates 100
committee joined forces
10 years ago in memory
of the 14-year-old who


lost her fight against acute
myelogenous leukemia.
Nearly 300 cyclists partici-
pated in the 2011 ride, rais-
ing more than $21,000. The
fund benefits the Alabama
Center for Childhood Can-
cer and Blood Disorders at
Children's, where 95 per-
cent of the children in Ala-
bama who are diagnosed
with cancer are treated.
Last year, children in the
Wiregrass region made
5,601 visits to Children's
for treatment for a wide
variety of injuries and
illnesses.


Marriage, Divorce Report


Special to the Floridan

The following marriages and divorces
were recorded in Jackson County during
the week of March 12-16:
Marriages
) Frances Dianne Edenfield and Ross
Spencer Schamens
) Jody Franklin Daniels and Jennifer
Hope Fullington


)) Timothy Allen. Brown and Jolene
Cassandra Gayhart
a Herbert Johnson Jr. and Kisha Lynette
Lewis
) Ashley Nicole Adkins and Ezra
Thomas Childs
) Kenneth Eugene Bohannon and Mar-
ian Howell Edwards.
Divorces
n None.


GAS WATCH
;3'. rin'c.. .jre ',iri. up He-re ire
the lea:.t ..pen:r ,.e pl.,: to t, t, ,
S' J in .3. :.C : ouri j .3 :.
Tuedicl'jy a3ltrnoj-r

1. $3.69. McCoy's Food Mart.
Jefferson St.. Marianna
2. $3.73. Murphy Oil. Hwy. 71 S.,
Marianna
3. $3.73. Travel Center, Hwy. 71
S., Marianna
4. $3.73. Pilot. Hwy. 71,
Marianna
5. $3.73, Loves Travel Center,
Hwy 231. Cottondale
6. $3.74. Pilot. Hwy. 71.
Marianna
7. $3.75. Kmee II. 10th St.,
Malone
8. $3.75, Greens BP, Hwy 71.
Marianna
II t. l 'l .' O I I ..V


Children's of Alabama in
Birmingham is the only
medical center in Ala-
bama dedicated solely to
the care and treatment of
children. More informa-
tion is available at www.
childrensal.org. .1


Fashion Forwardl


S0 n





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www.watsonjewelers.com
Downtown Marianna
850.482.4037


* *
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(85) 56-500


named to NCTM


Accreditation


audit team


Special to the Floridan

Chipola College Asso-
ciate Professor of Math-
ematics Dr. Irma Cruz-
White has been selected
by the National Council
of Teachers of Mathemat-
ics to serve as a member
of the National Council
for the Accreditation of
Teacher Education Audit
Team.
The audit team serves
a vital function in the
NCATE Program Review
Process ensuring consis-
tency in the decision to
grant mathematics teach-
er education programs
national recognition. The
audit team evaluates the
reviews submitted by the
teams and works with the
NCTM Specialized Pro-
fessional Association to
make sure that the review
criteria are consistently
applied and the final rat-
ings are consistent across
programs.
The expertise that Dr.
Cruz-White will gain by
participating as an audi-
tor for the National Coun-
cil of Accreditation for
Teacher Education will
assist Chipola's School
of Education in seeking
and attaining national
certification.


In 2010, Dr. Cruz-White
served on a panel to re-
view pro-
posals sub-
mitted to
the Nation-
al Science
Foundation
Scholar-
Cruz-White" ships in Sci-
ence, Tech-
nology, Engineering, and
Mathematics program.
In 2009, Dr. Cruz-White,
along with researchers
from other institutions,
published a paper on
Applications of Com-
putational Homology to
Prediction of Treatment
Response in Breast Can-
cer Patients ("Topol-
ogy and Its Applications,"
2009; 157 (1); 165-172).
Dr. Cruz-White has
worked at Chipola Col-
lege since 2003, teaching
mathematics in both the
Associate in Arts program
and the Bachelor of Sci-
ence program in Second-
ary Math Education and
Middle School Math-
ematics. She also directs
Chipola Honors students
on special projects, and
has been instrumental in
the development of the
curriculum for the Sec-
ondary Math Education
program.


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WEDNESDAY, MARCH 21, 2012 4 3AF


"O'vel


it^ 'f


LOCAL













Publisher
VALERIA ROBERTS


The Tampa Tribune



Health reform's



elusive cost

SA at a great poet once said of the ocean is true
\1/\ of the nation's expansive new health care law.
SV "It's always ourselves we find in the sea," E. E.
Cummings wrote.
Likewise, whether you are a defender of the insurance
mandate or want the law repealed depends on your
ideology and on which parts of the law you focus.
Where some see inspiration and security, others see
intrusive rules and fiscal danger. We have been among
the skeptics who expect the reform., to accomplish less
than advertised at a much higher price, but we're alert
for evidence to allay our fears.
Unfortunately with this law, what appears to be hope-
ful news often becomes less so as more light is shined
on it. So it was with headlines the other day that the
Congressional Budget Office now thinks the health care
bill will cut the federal deficit more than anticipated
last year.
Some hailed the news as confirmation the law is on
the right track. But the estimate was. changed partly
because fewer small businesses now are forecast to
participate. Growing numbers are expected to opt to
pay a federal fine instead of providing health coverage
for their workers.
The lower participation would help cut the budget
deficit in three ways. First, more fines will bring more
federal revenue: Second, fewer companies offering
insurance will mean fewer tax credits that must be paid
by the government. And third, because less personal
income will go to tax-sheltered health care, workers will
pay more income tax.
That all helps the nation's bottom line. But let's not
forget that the price is an additional 3 million people
without health insurance, plus higher taxes for busi-
ness. The increasing ineffectiveness of the law is noth-
ing to celebrate.
Another point of confusion is how supporters refer
to net costs. The law increases taxes and fees, which
supporters say helps balance the budget. They don't
concede that the added costs will be a drag on the
overall economy.
The whole package of costs and benefits has always
been a slippery fish to get a grip on. The total price is
now about twice as much as the early estimates. The
heavy spending doesn't start until 2014, which made
the initial 10-year estimate of costs appear smaller than
the real annual bill will be when everything is up and
running.
Waivers have been offered to favored groups, such
as labor unions, making the law feel like something of
a penalty to everyone else. Plans to increase taxes and
cut Medicare give the illusion of financial responsibility,
but political resistance to both will be significant.
Already, Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke
warns that a risky conversion of events is looming.
The scheduled end of the Bush tax cuts, the end of the
two-year payroll tax holiday and an agreed-upon $1.2
trillion in spending cuts will all arrive at the same time
on Jan. 1. The combination could send the economy
plunging off a "massive fiscal cliff," Bernanke warned.
Beyond costs and the unresolved question of whether
the health care mandate is constitutional is the issue of
whether it will help or hurt patients. In a recent na-
tional survey, 60 percent of doctors say they expect the
Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act to pressure
them to treat more people at a lower cost, which they
expect will actually hurt overall patient care.
We can hope that doctors can treat more patients for
less money and do a better job of it, but it's a false hope.
It would also be helpful to the success of federal
health care reform if higher taxes and fees would feed
an economic boom and lower the federal deficit. But we
realists don't expect it to happen.
The law grew out of many good intentions and opti-
mistic assumptions. But a law, like a medical diagnosis,
is most helpful when based on facts, not hope.


Letters to the Editor
Submit letters by either mailing to Editor. P.O. Box 520.
Marianna FL. 32447 or faxing to 850-482-4478 or send
email to editorial@jcfloridan.com. The Flondan reserves,
the right to edit or not publish any letter. Be sure to
include your full address and telephone number. These
will only be used to verity the letter and will not be
printed. For more information call 850-526-3614.

I.---------------


plr ,%A ( Ie Hf.Drj.p-JOURma. uuCL.CK-UF $20o


History an excellent guidepost


BY DAN K. THOMASSON
Scripps Howard News Service

One has to wonder whether
politicians ever really read
history or pay any atten-
tion to it if they do. Rather, they
march toward the avoidable follies
(with an apology to the late histo-
rian Barbara Tuchman) that have
marred civilization since Troy.
The latest of these historic mis-
takes, of course, came with the in-
vasion of.Iraq and the subsequent
misguided efforts to turn Afghani-
stan into something it never will be,
a democracy, all in the benighted
belief that the United States could
accomplish what no other country
has been able to achieve. Having
watched the Soviet Union's rul-
ers commit political suicide in the
mountainous hardscrabble of a
nation where tribal and religious
culture make it impossible to alter
the political landscape, America
has done the same thing. '
After a decade of slugging away
against the forces of a ninth-
century idealism, this country
is no nearer its goal whatever
that may be than it was when
President George W. Bush foolishly
diverted limited resources only
inches away from routing the Tal-
iban to open a second front in Iraq
- which was no real threat to any-
one. Now, with the combat troops
finally out of Iraq, we have been
asked by Afghanistan's president to.
withdraw back to the cities where
the Russians once repaired before
fleeing in distress.


We went to Afghanistan on legiti-
mate business in the wake of 9 /11
- to rid the world of Osama bin
Laden. The Iraq invasion let him off
the hook, until Navy Seals dis-
patched him last May in Pakistan.
In between came years of disrup-
tions to the Mideast by those who
misguidedly believed our national
security was at risk in Iraq.
What is at risk, it seems to me,
is pride embedded in what we
attempt to teach our children:
that this nation never goes to war
except to protect truth and justice
and fair play. Did the terrorists
need quelling? Of course they
did, and they do. But Tuchman's
definition of folly is an overreaction
that produces results counter to
one's self-interests after repeated
warning. There was a reason to be
in Afghanistan originally, but it's
increasingly obvious that there is
none now and that our self-in-
terest probably lies in permitting
the inevitable to happen without
the loss of another American life or
of overstressed combat troops who
have been asked to fight too long
snapping either at home or in the
combat zone.
The nation's brave troops are too
few the Army has just over a
half-million to find themselves
deployed again and again in a
situation that is half-occupy, half-
fight, with an unachievable end.
Sgt. Robert Bales, the Army sniper
accused.of a murderous attack on
sleeping villagers, including many
women and children, had served
1,192 days in Iraq and Afghanistan


and was on his fourth deployment.
He had been denied promotion,
and his appeal to be let out of the
latest assignment had been denied.
He and his wife, who have two
young children, were forced to put
up the family home for sale.
In Iraq, he had received a head
wound.
Was Bales psychologically fit for
duty? The question might never
be settled, but the results of this
pressure are hard to deny. He has
been called a good soldier and,
obviously, thousands of his fellow
combatants haven't inexplicably
committed murder. But check the
military suicide and family violence
rates if you doubt the impact of this
prolonged nightmare. Every person
under similar circumstances reacts
differently.
What should the military and
its civilian leaders learn from this
episode that they couldn't have
learned from Vietnam or by listen-
ing to generals and there were
several prominent ones who
warned that the nation could
hardly sustain occupying Iraq and
Afghanistan with so few troops? To
be trite, the proof of these warnings
is in the pudding. There is no draft
to support such adventurism. If
there had been, we would have left
this miserable scene much sooner.
History is an excellent guidepost
if it is followed ask the Russians
or the British or the Trojans.

Email Dan K. Thomasson, former editor of the
Scripps Howard News Service, at
thomassondan@aol.com.


Too many laws stymie progress


BY PHILIP K. HOWARD
The Providence Journal

NEWYORK
A merica is basically run by
dead people: We elect new
IL representatives, but continue
on with policy from decades ago.
To go forward, Congress needs to
confront the past.
America is mired in a tarpit
of accumulated law. Reformers
propose new laws to fix health care,
schools and the regulatory system,
but almost never suggest cleaning
out the legal swamp these institu-
tions operate in. These complex
legal tangles not only set goals but
allocate resources and dictate the
minutest details of how to meet
those goals. Most are obsolete in
whole or part.
Nothing important can get fixed
without remaking a coherent legal
framework.
The flaw is not one that can be
solved by deregulation. Almost no
one, for example, would disagree
about the need to provide educa-
tion for disabled children. But a
special education law, enacted in
1975, was structured as an open-
eaded mandate, and soon spun
out of control. Today, special ed
consumes 20 percent of the total
K-12 budget in America. Programs
for gifted children get less than half
of one percent, and pre-K educa-
tion gets almost nothing. Is this a
sensible allocation of education
dollars? No one is even asking the
question.
Congress treats most laws as
if they were the Ten Command-
ments except they're more like
the 10 million commandments.
Most legislative programs do not
codify timeless principles of right


and wrong. They are tools of social
management. These laws allocate
social resources almost 70 per-
cent of federal revenue in 2010 Was
consumed by three entitlement
programs enacted a half century or
more ago. Congress almost never
goes back to rationalize these pro-
grams. Running government today
is like trying to run a business using
every idea every manager ever had.
There are four problems caused
by the accumulation bf old law:
Too much law causes paralysis.
Over the past century laws have
piled up, like sediment in the
harbor, until it's almost impossible
to do anything sensibly. Building a
"green infrastructure," for example,
is stymied by environmental pro-
cesses that sometimes consume
upwards of a decade.
Laws have unintended conse-
quences. Things never work out as
planned. Sometimes a well-mean-
ing idea, such as special educa-
tion, ends up undermining other
important goals.
Priorities change. The more
specific a law, the faster it becomes
obsolete. In the 1930s, when many
farmers were struggling, Congress
enacted farm subsidies. The crisis
ended by 1941. Now, 70 years later,
farm prices are at record highs, and
much of farming is done by cor-
porations. But the farm subsidies
continue $15 billion in 2010.
Fixing what ails America is im-
possible, indeed illegal, without a
legal spring cleaning. The goal is
not mainly to "deregulate" but to
restate programs in light of current
needs and priorities.
As a practical matter, this requires
Congress to authorize special
commissions to make proposals,
area by area. Using the base closing


commission model, these propos-
als would be submitted to Congress
for an up or down vote.
Going forward, Congress should
incorporate sunset provisions in all
laws with budgetary impact. The
goal is not to end good programs
but to impose a discipline that is
essential for a functioning democ-
racy that must constantly make
tough tradeoffs.
Accumulated law is not a prob-
lem our founders anticipated.
They made it hard to enact new
laws, thinking they would thereby.
protect the open field of freedom
against too much legal interfer-
ence. But 200 years later, the land of
the free is a legal swamp. It's hard to
dredge, because those same checks
and balances apply to repealing a
law with one additional impedi-
ment. Once a law is enacted, it is
immediately surrounded by an
army of special interests. Not one
word can be changed until a major-
ity of Congress has run a gauntlet
of special interests, flogging each
member with campaign fund-
ing. That's why changing old law
is so politically difficult as to be
unthinkable.
"The difficulty lies not in the
new ideas," John Maynard Keynes
observed, "but in escaping from the
old ones." American government
is trapped in structures of its own
making. The essential first step in
rescuing America is a spring-clean-
ing. It's hard to fix things until we
can make fresh choices.

Philip K. Howard is the author of "The Death of
Common Sense" and "Life Without Lawyers" He
is chairman of Common Good (commongood,
o rg). a i, ,- I i- i . 111- . m i: i -,i This
piece or igirated on the Web site of The Atlantic
(www.theatlantic.com). Foi movie stories visit
scrippsnews.com.


E

MAHLER. 3/21
I 2012 Jeff Stahler/Dist. by Universal UClick for UFS
._J





WEDNESDAY, MARCH 21, 2012 5A F


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Hillshire Smoked or Polish 2 4 1
Sausage.................. ....... 4oz.


Farmland Sliced Boneless Center Cut
Pork Loins ....................

Hickory Hollow #2 $
Bacon......................



Bar S Reg. or Thick Sliced
Bologna .......................

Seabest Raw In Shell Medium $
Shrimp.......................


Hillshire Farm Ultra Thin
Ham, Turkey,


or Chicken


$218

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V$118
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1076


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Fryer Breasts ..............
Cook's Shank Portion
Smoked
Ham Butt Portion -$1.33
H a m e............... "... .... ..
Family Pack
Ground
Beef ..........................


$162


$130


METAT MRKT SECAL


Blackwell Angus
Whole Beef
Sirloin Tips

$258


Ball Park
Jumbo
Franks


65
1 lb. pkg.


I &


-, ,y
r rA


1r. -4.


White
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682 Ibag


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California Juicy Sweet 14 Fresh Expmss, American or Italian 23
Tangerines........... 3 1b .bog Salad................... 0oz

Tangein, 14 rs ExrsAmIlian

C H ---' -- N, 'I.IH H LHHH BI HME,

Chobani Greek Dutch Farms
Yogurt American Cheese

90 $163
Minute Maid $ 7304
Orange Juice..... 59oz Sunny D............... I 64


AlI4,.

Mr. P's^


Mr. P's
Pizza
73o.
I ~ 5 z'


Shurfine Crinkle Cut
Potatoes
$440
4 5 b.


20 Pack
Coke Products
$596
5 12 oz. cans


Champ Mini-Chunks
Dog Food
$488
$4T 15 lbs.


Jif, 18 oz. 59 Chinet, 10 pack $1 94
Peanut Buffer....... Comfort Cup ........ 16oz.





Heinz Jim Dandy
Ketchup Grits
$194 92
40 oz. 32 oz.
Margaret Holmes Italian, 27 oz, 9 4 Mueller Spaghetti or Elbow, 16 oz.
Green Beans ....... Macaroni .............






Luzianne Crisco
Tea Bags Ve table Oil
$1 337 323
S24 t. 3^ 48 oz.


KC Masterpiece, 18 oz. 8 Martha White, s5 b. 36
Barbecue Sauce ... 0 0 Flour ................... .
rT a 111. a.


Ball Park Fully Cooked
Grilled
Beef Patties

$435
T 18 oz.


Fresh Vine Ripe Large
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771b


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Jimmy Dean 19 Shurfine $ 1 70
Breakfast Bowls... 7o. Whip Topping....... I ,6


1FP DU


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193






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN + www.jcfloridan.com


Troop 3 Scouts perform a service to the community


Special to the Floridan
Troop 3 Boy Scouts joined
together on the cool Satur-
day morning of March 10 to
perform a helpful commu-
nity service project at the
MERE Complex on Cav-
erns Road in Marianna.
Scouts met early in the
morning to start pull-
ing weeds, putting down
mulch and planting flqw-
ers at the entrance and
around a large sign inside
the recreational park.
Marianna Optimist Club
is the chartering organi-
zation for Troop 3 scouts,
and this was one way of
giving back to the club and
to the community. Part of
the Scout Law states that
"A scout is helpful." A scout
cares about other people
and helps others with-
out expecting payment or
reward.
For more information
about Boy Scouts, call
Scoutmaster Bill Kleinhans
at 526-2897.


; ....

14

643-9166



l. .,. : .,
: .... Y;- .


SUBMITTED PHOTOS
Troop Guide Jacob Lafferty prepares to lay Scout Matthew Pelham' helps with the raking Life Scout Skylar Suggs digs around the edges of the flower
mulch by raking a flower bed. duties. bed.


4-H to host'Container Gardening for Kids' on March 31


Special to the Floridan
Jackson County 4-H will
host a "Container Garden-
ing for Kids" workshop on


March 31, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. lunch for the participant.
at the Jackson County Ex- Youth will learn how to
tension Service. Cost is properly plant a container
$20. This will cover the cost garden, how to care for
of take-home plants and their plants and how they


can exhibit their take-
home plants at the 2012
Panhandle Youth Expo.
The workshop is open
youth, ages 5-18. Registra-


tion form, fee and a 4-H March 23.
enrollment form (if youth Contact the Extension
is not currently enrolled in Service to obtain forms
4-H) must be turned into or for more information:
the Extension Service by 482-9620.


NATIONAL GUARD REP

VISITSADULT ED


3:;:' Annual Single

Membership
Valued at



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March 25 until

April 3, 2012!


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Local National Guard Recruiting Station
representative Staff Sgt. Ambrocio Bias
speaks with Jackson County Adult
Education students during a recent visit.
Career interests and academic services
available in the National Guard were
discussed and Blas identified the academic
requirements for entry into the various
programs and the educational benefits
students could expect.

&SIL











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Burial Vaults, Mausoleums,
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and All Cemetery Supplies




rford Owner & Operator
828 1-800-369-6828
ultmemorial@hotmail.com
90 W Sneads, FL


SFind us online all the time at www.jcfloridan.com


FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

PUBLIC INFORMATION MEETING


State Road (S.R.) 73 from County Road 167 (South Street) to the Chipola River Bridge
Financial Project Identification Number: 424621-2-32-01


The Florida Department of Transportation
(FDOT) will host a public information meeting
concerning proposed improvements to State
Road (S. R.) 73 and S.R. 166 from County
Road 167 (South Street) to the Chipola River
Bridge in Jackson County, Florida.
The meeting will be held Thursday,
March 22, 2012, from 5:30 p.m.to 6:30
p.m., at the Marianna City Hall Commission
Chambers, 2898 Green Street, Marianna.
This meeting will provide participants
an opportunity to review proposed
improvements and provide comment. Maps,
drawings, and other information will be on
display. There will be no formal presentation.
Representatives from FDOT will be available
to answer questions and explain the project.

FDOT plans to resurface the existing travel
lanes and remove on-street parking between
Clinton Street and Kelson Avenue. A railroad
crossing near McCoy's Food Mart will be
replaced. Curb ramps will be reconstructed to
meet current Americans with Disabilities Act
standards and other safety improvements will
be added. The total length of the project is
1.8 miles. Construction is funded in 2013.

Public participation is solicited without
regard to race, color, natural origin, age, sex,
religion, disability, or family status. Persons
who require special accommodations under
the Americans with Disabilities Act or persons
who require translation service (free of
charge) should contact Greg Rogers, FDOT
Project Manager, toll-free at (888) 638-0250,


SD ND






SH I/



..,a. i n a
C.,', R 64


S EXCEPTION O .
': -' South St. .? R t.

PROJECT


extension 755 at least seven days prior to
the meeting.

If you have questions regarding this project
or meeting, please contact Greg Rogers
at the number listed above or via e-mail at
greg.rogers@dot.myflorida.com. You may
also contact lan Satter, District Three Public
Information Director, at (888) 638-0250,
extension 205 or via email at ian.satter@dot.
myflorida.com.


I


LOCAL


-6A WEDNESDAY. MARCH 21, 2012


2 bids.com


l






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.cornW


Phoebe Denson (left) and Myrtle Hudson march towards the Titusville Courthouse on Sunday in Titusville.


Feds probe teen's shooting by watch captain


The Associated Press

SANFORD An unarmed black
teenager shot to death by a neigh-
borhood watch captain told his girl-
friend moments before he was killed
that he was being followed, a lawyer
said Tuesday, as federal and state
prosecutors announced they would
investigate.
"'Oh he's right behind me, he's
right behind me again,'" 17-year-old
Trayvon Martin told his girlfriend on
his cellphone, the Martin family's
attorney said.
The girl later heard Martin say,
"Why are you following me?" Anoth-
er man asked, "What are you doing
around here?'" attorney Benjamin
Crump said.
The phone call that recorded Mar-
tin's final moments was disclosed as
the U.S. Justice Department opened
a federal civil rights probe into the
Feb. 26 shooting and the local pros-
ecutor convened a grand jury to
investigate. A grand jury will meet
April 10 to consider evidence in the
case, said Seminole County State
Attorney Norm Wolfinger.
The neighborhood watch captain,
George Zimmerman, has not been
charged and said he shot Martin,
who was returning to a gated com-
munity in Sanford after buying
candy at a convenience store, in self-
defense after Martin attacked him.
Police say Zimmerman is white; his
family says'he is Hispanic.
"She absolutely blows Zimmer-
man's absurd self-defense claim
out of the water," Crump said of
Martin's girlfriend, whose name was
withheld.
The case has ignited racial ten-
sions in this Orlando suburb of
53,500 people, sparking rallies and a
protest in Gov. Rick Scott's office on
Tuesday. The Justice Department's
Civil Rights Division said it is send-
ing its community relations service
this week to Sanford to "address
tension in the community."
More than 350 people packed into
the wood panelled sanctuary of the
Allen Chapel AME Church, located
in a traditionally black neighbor-
hood of Sanford. A line flowed down
steps with others trying to get in.
Residents attending the town hall
meeting cheered and jumped to
their feet when. local NAACP leader
Turner Clayton Jr..suggested that the
U.S. Department of Justice shouldn't


"This is just the beginning
of what is taking place.
We're going to make sure
justice prevails."
Turner Clayton Jr.
Local NAACP leader
just review the investigation but it
should take over the Sanford Police
Department.
"This is just the beginning of what
is taking place," Clayton said. "We're
going to make sure justice prevails."
Prior to the meeting, Sandera
Duval held up a white sign in the
sanctuary that said in simple black
letters, "Justice for Trayvon."
"We want justice for Trayvon be-
cause this is a senseless crime," said
Duval, 62, a retired nurse. "That
could have been my child or my
grandchild." .
Crump told reporters Tuesday it
was Martin who cried out when a
man bearing a 9mm handgun came
at him. Police said Zimmerman was
bleeding from his nose and the back
of his head, and told police he had
yelled out for help before he shot
Martin.
Martin, who was in town from
Miami to visit his father in Sanford,
called his 16-year-old girlfriend in
Miami several times on Feb. 26, in-
cluding just before the shooting,
Crump said. The discovery of the
lengthy conversations, including
one moments before the shooting,
was made over the weekend by Mar-
tin's father by checking his son's cell
phone log, Crump said.
The teenager told the girl on his
way back from the store he'd taken
shelter from the rain briefly at an
apartment building in his father's
gated community, Crump said. Mar-
tin then told the girl he was being
followed and would try to lose the
person, Crump said.
"She says: 'Run.' He says, 'I'm not
going to run, I'm just going to walk
fast,'" Crump said, quoting the girl.
After Martin encountered Zim-
merman, the girl thought she heard
a. scuffle "because his voice chang-
es like something interrupted his
speech," Crump said. The phone
call ended before the girl heard
gunshots.
The last call was at 7:12 p.m. Police
arrived at 7:17 p.m. to find Martin


lying face down on the ground.
Zimmerman was handcuffed after
police arrived and taken into custody
for questioning, but was released by
police without being charged. Police
have interviewed Zimmerman two
times since then.
Crump called the treatment pa-
tently unfair and asked if Martin
would have received the same treat-
ment if he had been the shooter.
"We will not rest until he is arrest-
ed. The more time that passes, this
is going to be swept under the rug,"
Crump said.
Crump said he plans to turn over
information about the call to fed-
eral investigators; a grand jury in
Seminole County is also likely to
subpoena the records. The Florida
Department of Law Enforcement is
also involved in the state case.
Former federal prosecutors said
there are limitations to a Justice De-
partment civil rights probe, which
typically would involve a sworn
law enforcement officer accused of
abusing his authority.
In this case, they said, it's not clear
whether Zimmerman had any actual
law enforcement authority or if the
Sanford Police Department did any-
thing improper. Zimmerman had a
permit to carry a gun, but it was not
required for his neighborhood watch
patrol.
"I think the community has the
feeling that there's some type of cov-
er-up," said Jeffrey Sloman, former
U.S. attorney in Miami. "At least the
department's involvement makes
sure it gets some review. He wasn't a
police officer. I'm sure that this is go-
ing to be a tough case to prosecute."
Authorities may be hamstrung by
a state "Stand Your Ground" law that
allows people to defend themselves
with deadly force and does not re-
quire a retreat in the face of dan-
ger. Asked Tuesday if that law needs
change, Republican Gov. Rick Scott
said "it's always positive to go back
and think about existing laws."
An online petition urging local au-
thorities to prosecute Zimmerman
has drawn more than 500,000 signa-
tures at website Change.org. About
50 defense attorneys and protesters
filled the lobby in the governor's of-
ficeTuesdayto deliver letter seeking
an independent investigation and a
task force to study racial profiling.
They applauded when Scott came
out of his office to talk to them.


State preparing for legal battle on drug testing


The Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE Gov. Rick Scott
believes state employees should be
randomly tested for drug use, and
Florida's chief legal officer is ready
for the much-anticipated legal chal-
lenge to a new law that allows for the
testing.
Scott signed the drug testing bill
(HB 1205) into law late Monday.
The American Civil Liberties Union
of Florida responded by saying they
expect the law to be struck down as
unconstitutional.
"People do not lose their constitu-
tional rights just because they work
for the state of Florida," ACLU of
Florida executive director Howard
Simon said Tuesday.
"No one should be surprised if this
latest effort ends up in court just
as the governor's past efforts to im-
pose urine testing on applicants for
government benefits and his execu-
tive order for state employee testing
are now before the courts," said Si-
mon, who stopped short of saying
that his group would file a suit. "We


expect they will make it clear once
again that government cannot sub-
ject people to suspicion-less search-
es just because it wants to."
' Scott, however, said he believes
state employees should be subject
to the same scrutiny as those in the
private sector.
The bill cleared both the House
and Senate in a vote along party
lines in Florida's Republican-domi-
nated Legislature.
State employees could be random-
ly tested every three months under
the plan. The random sample, how-
ever, can't be more than 10 percent
of the agency's workforce and must
be "computer-generated by an inde-
pendent third party."
The measure, which has an effec-
tive date of July 1, also makes it easier
to fire a worker after a first confirmed
positive test. No extra money was set
aside, so department heads have to
pay for tests out of existing budgets.
Urine tests, the most common, cost
from $10-$40 each.
Scott, a Republican, previous-
ly tried to enforce random drug


testing through an executive order,
but that was suspended due to a
, court challenge.
"It's amazing that the governor and
the Legislature would move ahead
with a law that so clearly violates the
Constitutional protections against
invasive government searches with-
out suspicion especially while
a legal challenge on precisely the
same issue is pending in the federal
court," Simon said.
Scott and Agriculture Commis-
sioner Adam Putnam both said Tues-
day that they already have drug test-
ing policies in place and that some
employees have been tested.
Attorney General Pam Bondi said
Tuesday that her lawyers will be
working on the case, but ducked a
question on whether she planned
to require employees in the attorney
general's office be drug tested.
She also declined to talk about the
expected litigation.
"When we represent other agen-
cies, we can't comment on that,"
Bondi said. "We're going to wait and
see what happens next."


Marianna grad


completes basic


training in Ga.


Special to the Floridan

Army Spec. Derrick
C. Howard has gradu-
ated from basic infantry
training at Fort Benning,
Columbus, Ga.
During the nine weeks
of training, the soldier
received training in drill
and ceremonies, weap-
ons, map reading, tactics,
military courtesy, mili-
tary justice, physical fit-
ness, first aid, and Army
history, core values and
traditions.
Additional training



Infest
From Page 1A

and recreation director
for the City of Graceville,
said there have been more
calls for spraying than
in past years. His team
sprays about twice a week
at dusk. Although the pro-
gram is mainly complaint
driven, the team has also
been proactive in their
spraying. Residents can
call 263-3250.
Sneads Town Manager
Connie Butts said the
town was establishing
routes for its pest control
workers. The workers will
begin 4 a.m. Thursday
with the ballpark and
work their way around


Clean
From Page 1A
terms of litter control and
trying to get the commu-
nity involved as well," said
Nadine Long, administra-
tive assistant at the city's
public works director's
office. "As a concerted ef-
fort, we can control litter
better with the help of the
community."
Volunteers can meet at
the McLane Community
Center on Clay Street at



Games
From Page 1A

get me down.
"When I go to these
games, I'm trying to show
others that life goes on,
regardless. You can still
make a contribution. You
can still be a vital person,
no matter what befalls
you."
The 52-year-old hopes
to come home with a few
more medals to prove that
this summer.
Over the years, he has
won gold, silver and


Man gets life for
fatal home invasion
OCALA -A Georgia
man has been sentenced
to life in prison for a
fatal north Florida home
invasion.
A Marion County judge
sentenced 25-year-old
Antonio Lyons on Tues-
day after a jury found him


included development of
basic combat skills and
battlefield operations and
tactics, and experiencing
use of various weapons
and weapons defenses
available to the infantry
crewman.
Howard is the grand-
son of Jessie Howard of
Greenwood.
The specialist is a 2006
graduate of Marianna
High School. He earned
a bachelor's degree in
2010 from Florida Agri-
cultural and Mechanical
' University in Tallahassee.


Sneads, spraying every
morning for a few weeks.
If tests show the infesta-
tion has decreased, the
town will also decrease
the amount of spraying
and may also change the
time they're spraying in a
few weeks.
Grand Ridge Town Man-
ager J.R. Moneyham said
the town was trying to res-
urrect its mosquito con-
trol program due to the
number of calls from resi-
dents. The calls justify the
county coming in to spray
in Grand Ridge. The town
is also currently trying to
calibrate its equipment
and looking into buying
new equipment to ensure
the program meets all
requirements. Residents
can call 592-4621.


8 a.m. The group will
clean the streets south of
Highway 90 and west of
Borden Street. The city
usually holds these events
quarterly, Long said.
The city will provide
cleaning supplies and wa-
ter bottles. There will also
be a giveaway. Volunteers
will receive a ticket toward
a drawing for one month
free for city utilities.
"It takes all of us to
help keep the commu-
nity beautiful and clean,"
Long said.


bronze medals in a num-
ber of events. In his ear-
liest years, he competed
in many more events, in-
cluding the shot put, dis-
cus, table tennis, air rifle
and bowling, along with
the races he's signed up
for this year.
He must register for the
games by April 15, and
will leave for the venue on
June 23.
To get in touch with
Henderson, call 263-6850.
To communicate by mail
or to send a donation,
write to 2317 Magnolia
Drive, Cottondale, FL
32431.


guilty of murder.
Authorities say Ly-
ons and another man,
41-year-old Arthur Lee
Dukes, went to rob Mar-
vin Wilkerson's home in
October 2008 after they
heard he had won a large
sum of ium i '%Ioni dog
fighting
Roma wie reports


Jackson County Vault & Monuments

Come Visit us at our NEW LOCATION
3424 West Highway 90 (3/10mite west trom our previous location)
850-482-5041 L


ThTere we't'C 110

obituaries or

death notices

submitted to the

Floridan as of the

deadline at 4 p.m.

yesterday.


Pinecrest


3720 Caverns Road Marianna, FL 32446-1806 (850) 482-3964


_~~


~11111111111111 111111_1111111~1111


WEDNESDAY, MARCH 21, 2012 7A-


LOOciM. & S'WI'I:


tate"-






18A WEDNESDAY, MARCH 21,2012


LOCAL


ENJOYING THE BEACH


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Wth Spring Break already going on in many areas and fast approaching for Jackson
County, even members of the insect family, like these eastern tiger swallowtails,
were heading to the beach Monday. Jackson County Public Schools and Chipola
College will be out on spring break from March 26-30.


Spires running for County Commissioner District 1


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN + www.jcfloridan.com


COURTHOUSE


RENOVATION


I


W.'





MARKSKINNER/FLORIDAN
Daniel Smith with Great Southern
Demolition moves a compact
excavator into position while
working on removing the concrete
sidewalks and stairs around the Jackson
County Courthouse building Monday. The
$1,927,997 courthouse renovation project
is on track to be finished by the middle of
August according to County Administrator
Ted Lakey.


Dr. Willie E. Spires would
like to announce his can-
didacy for re-election to
the Board of County Com-
missioners from District-
1. Spires would like to ex-
press his sincere gratitude
to his constituency who
has re-elected him to the
foregoing post on five pre-
vious occasions.
Spires is a native of Jack-
son County. He graduated
from the former St. Paul
High School that was lo-
cated in Campbellton. He
received his A.A. Degree
from Chipola Junior Col-
lege, Bachelors Degree
from the University ofWest
Florida, Masters and Edu-
cational Specialist Degrees
from Troy State University
and his Ph. D. Degree from
Florida A&M University.
He is married to the for-
mer Martha Edwards of
Greenwood. They have


been married for 32 years.
They have two daughters,
Brittni, a

Manager
for Spires
Behavioral
Healthcare
i Center and
WSpires inter an
attorney
and co-founder of Spires/
Wood Law Firm in Destin.
Spires has been employed
at Chipola College for 26
years and currently is the
Associate Dean of the So-
cial and Behavioral Sci-
ences Division.
Spires stated he pledged
that he would provide un-
bias and efficient represen-
tation to all of the citizens
of Jackson County regard-
less of the geographical
location of their residence.
He believes this is a pledge
that he has kept and is very


proud of this accomplish-
ment. Spires pledges to
continue to provide unbias
and efficient representa-
tion to the citizens of Jack-
son County.
Some immediate goals he
plans to continue to pursue
include: infrastructure and
economic development to
entice new industry and
jobs, road improvements,
streamlining services in
the various county depart-
ments to facilitate the ef-
ficient delivery of services
and to provide the neces-
sary leadership and over-
sight to ensure that essen-
tial services will continue
to be provided to enhance
the safety, health and wel-
fare of the citizens of Jack-
son County.
Spires presently serves
on numerous boards to
include Habilitative Ser-
vices of Northwest Florida


Inc. He also serves on the
Florida Association of
Counties Finance and Au-
dit Committee. Spires was
granted an Educational
Scholarship to complete
the Leadership Florida
Training Program. The
most recent appointment
was to the National Associ-
ation of Counties Steering
Committee for community
and economic develop-
ment. Spires also serves on
other local human services
boards.
Your past support of my
candidacy as your com-
missioner from District 1
is highly appreciated and
your continued support
will be equally appreci-
ated. I will continue to
adhere to the pledge that
I made when you initially
elected me to the office
of County Commissioner
from District 1. Thank you.


Troy guitar professor in concert tomorrow at Chipola


Special to the Floridan

Troy University guitar
professor Dr. Robby Gib-
son will appear in concert,
7:30 p.m. March 22, at the
Chipola College Theatre.
Dr. Gibson will also
speak to students at 2 p.m.
on the same day. Chipola
music majors will have the
opportunity to play for Dr.
Gibson and receive feed-
back. During the evening
recital, Dr. Gibson will
perform some of the most
treasured literature in the
guitar repertory,
Dr. Gibson has won priz-
es in several competitions,
including the Appalachian
Guitar Festival Competi-
tion, the U.T.S.A Concerto
Competition, the Etude
Music Club Competition
and the M.T.N.A. National
Competition. This sea-
soned professional has
given performances in
the United States, Mexico,'
Spain, and Italy. Dr. Gib-
son earned his Doctor of
Musical Arts degree at the
University of Texas and has
studied with some of the
most respected teachers
in the world. He began his
musical studies at age 11.
In 2000 he earned a Bach-
elor of Music Degree in
Guitar Performance from
the University of Texas at
San Antonio under the
direction of Dr. Matthew
Dunne. He completed a
Master's of Music degree in
2002 and a Doctor of Mu-
sical Arts degree in 2007
with Adam Holzman at the
lUniversity of Texas


at Austin.
In 2006, he completed
his fourth year of studies
with the legendary gui-
tarist Oscar Ghiglia at the
Accademia Musicale Chi-
giana in Siena Italy. Dr.
Gibson has also studied
with Pepe Romero, David
Russell, Eliot Fisk, Sharon
Isbin, Aaron Shearer, Leo
Brouwer, Ricardo Cobo,
Bruce Holzman and others
in master-class settings.
Call Dr. Daniel Powell at
718-2257.


Fr


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Troy guitar professor Dr. Robby Gibson will appear in a concert
on Thursday at the Chipola College Theatre.


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MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Marianna's Linsey Basford gets a hit
Tuesday night against Chipley.


Chipola Baseball


Chipley able to hold off Lady 'Dawgs


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridman.com

The Marianna Lady Bulldogs
dropped their second straight
game Tuesday night, falling to
the Chipley Lady Tigers 6-3 at
home.
Chipley scored three runs
in the top of the fourth inning
to break open a tie game, and
pitcher Sara Gilbert allowed just
one run the rest of the way to
hold on for the victory.
Gilbert went all seven innings'
in the circle, giving up two
earned runs on four hits and


three walks, while striking out
three.
Mallory Dean started for
Marianna and took the loss,
allowing three earned runs on
seven hits and five walks, and
striking out seven.
Chipley got on the board in the
first inning when Janae Ritter
singled and scored on an RBI hit
by Chelsea Carter, but the Lady
Bulldogs answered back with an
RBI single by Whitney Lipford to
tie it in the bottom half.
Carter then delivered another
run for the Lady Tigers with
a solo home run in the third


inning to put Chipley back on
top, but once again the Lady
'Dawgs tied it up the next frame,
this time on an RBI double by
Linsey Basford.
The big burst for Chipley
came in the fourth, as Kara
Bush walked and scored on a
Marianna error on a ground ball
by KariWaldrip, who later scored
on a passed ball to make it 4-2.
Another run came home when
Mary Taylor hit a ground ball
to shortstop and Marianna's
Reagan Oliver threw home, but
not before Paige Carter could
beat the throw to the plate


and score.
Lipford got a run back for the
Lady Bulldogs in the bottom of
the fifth with a solo home run to
centerfield, but Chipley added
an insurance run in the top of
the seventh.
In their last at-bat, the Lady
Bulldogs got a one-out hit by
Taniyah Robinson and a two-
out walk by Lipford, but Gilbert
struck out Basford swinging with
a changeup to end the game.
Chelsea Carter led Chipley
offensively, going 2 for 4 with

See DAWGS, Page 4B


CHIPOLA BRASEB e.L




Looking for revenge


Indians try to even

series vs. Raiders
BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

After another disappointing Panhan-
dle Conference loss Monday night, the
Chipola Indians will try to get back on
track when they return home today to
host the Northwest Florida State Raiders
in the second of a three-game series at 5
p.m.
Chipola (22-13, 2-2 in the Panhandle)
will be looking to even the series and snap
a two-game losing skid after blowing a 6-
0 lead in a 10-9 loss to Northwest (19-9,
4-0) on Monday night in Niceville.
The Raiders scored two runs in the bot-
tom of the ninth to win in walk-off fash-
ion and take a commanding early lead in
the conference.
Chipola had its ace Robby Coles on the
mound and a six-run cushion going into
the bottom of the second inning, but that
ultimately wasn't enough to hold off the
surging Raiders.
"With your No. 1 pitcher on the mound
and'up 6-0, you think you have a pretty
good shot to get a win," Indians coach
Jeff Johnson said Tuesday. "We just made
too many mistakes. We walked seven,
hit a batter or two, made a couple of er-
rors, and struck out 13 times. You put that
whole mess together and it's going to be
hard to end up getting a win. We just kind
of gave it away."
It was the second start in Panhandle
play for Coles and the second time he has
struggled, giving up six earned runs in
five innings on seven hits and five walks.
The sophomore, who had been domi-
nant much of the season leading into
-league play, has now surrendered 11
earned runs on 14 hits and seven walks in
111/3 innings of Panhandle action.
Johnson said he was struggling to figure
out the reason for Coles' struggles.
"I really don't know to be honest. He's
just not throwing enough strikes," he
said. "In the first inning (Monday) he was
lights out, and then all of the sudden he
started struggling. I really don't know. I


.r" :
,:,. ,,:; "


* = -
-
-,


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Jerad Curry gets in front of a grounder during Saturday's game against Gulf Coast.


"We just don't understand what it takes right now. We're not mentally tough
enough, and we're not competitive enough. "
Jeff Johnson,
Chipola head coach


wish I had an answer. He just has to keep
working and trying to figure this thing out.
He's just scuffling-a little bit right now.
"But it's not all him by any means. We're
kicking balls, not taking advantage of
scoring opportunities, and letting people
stay in games when we have a chance to
finish them off. And give Northwest some
credit. They didn't quit when we got them
down."
The Indians won their first two league
games before falling to Gulf Coast 5-1
on Saturday, with Chipola going from a
chance to sweep the opening series to
now needing a win today to keep from


falling below .500.
"Our effort and the way we played Sat-
urday was very disappointing," Johnson
said. "(On Monday), it looked like we
would play well again, but to not finish it
off was real disappointing. We just don't
understand what it takes right now. We're
not mentally tough enough, and we're
not competitive enough. We want it to be
easy.
"These guys haven't figured out yet that
it's not going to be easy. We don't have
that killer instinct and that drive to play

See INDIANS, Page 4B


Malone Baseball


Tigers,


trounce



Wildcats
BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcflordian.com
The Malone Tigers picked up
their second consecutive lop-
sided victory Monday night at
home, beating the Altha Wild-
cats 11-1 in five innings.
With the win, the Tigers im-
proved to 10-5 on the season
after having knocked off Beth-
lehem 18-1 in their previous
game.
Malone led 3-1 after two in-
nings, but scored four runs in
the third and four more in the
fifth to blow the game open.
Antwain Johnson and Robert
Orshall each had three hits to
lead the Tigers, with Johnson
driving in two runs and scoring
two with two stolen bases, and
Orshall knocking in three and
scoring one.
Nick Breeden had a hit, a run
and an RBI, while Garrett Harris
had a,hit and two runs scored;
and Jonathan Sikes had a hit and
a run.
Jay Henson scored twice and
had an RBI.
Sikes started on the mound
and got the win for Malone, go-
ing all five innings and allowing
just one earned run on two hits
and one walk, and striking out
six.
The Tigers played stellar de-
fense behind their starter, not


See TIGERS, Page 4B

Follow us on
Twitter





@JCFSports


Chipola Softball


No. 5 Lady Indians set to face off against No. 4 Lady Raiders


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Chipola Softball Head Coach Belinda Hendrix talks with Chandler Seay
during a timeout at the game against Southeastern Iowa last week.


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Chipola Lady Indians will
venture back into Panhandle
Conference play today when
they travel to Niceville for a dou-
bleheader with the Northwest
Florida State Lady Raiders at 4
and 6 p.m.
Chipola (33-6, 1-1 in Panhan-
dle play) split its league-opening
doubleheader. against Tallahas-
see, winning the first game 4-1
and losing the second 3-0.
The Lady Raiders (28-7, 1-1)
also split their opening series,
beating Gulf Coast 4-0 before
falling 3-0.
Northwest Florida State,
ranked No. 4 in the state, is led
by sophomore shortstop Shelby
Knock, who is leading the team


in batting (.491), home runs (7)
and RBI (37). The team is batting
.364 overall with 29 home runs
on the season.
Their top two pitchers are Rose
Portiolli, who has an 11-4 record
and a 2.19 Earned Run Average,
and Michelle Phelps, who has
won a team-high 14 games and
has an ERA of 2.26.
Michelle Eubanks has also
pitched well for the Lady Raiders,
winning three of four decisions
and posting a 2.20 ERA in 35 in-
nings. Chipola, ranked No. 5 in
the state, has had great balance
between offense and pitching
thus far, batting .410 as a team
with a 1.59 team ERA.
The Lady Indians have eight
different players batting .400
or better at the moment, with
Chandler Seay leading the team


at .491. Sayumi Akamine is close
behind at .473, with Kristen Allen
batting .446.
Chelsey Steedley is at .416 and
leads the team with 52 RBI, while
Lindsey Hamlin has a team-best
eight home runs to go along with
a .368 average and 41 RBI.
Mya Anderson is tied with
Hamlin for the home run lead,
while also batting .412 with a
team-high 11 doubles, 37 RBIs
and an .814 slugging percentage,
also best on the team.
Evan Voortman has been the
ace of the Chipola pitching staff,
leading the team in wins (17),
ERA (0.74), innings pitched (104)
and strikeouts (77). Michele
Hester is having a big season as
well, posting a 12-3 record with a
1.61 ERA and 47 strikeouts in 87
innings.


- w`MA-mb"A 'iam Wm


h HINES CALLS IT QUITS
Steelers legend retires. 2B


Coming in tomorrows edihon of the


IFLORIDRAN


-- ---- AMERH1(A S PREMIER SPORT%5 PUBHI 4 H 1A

ATHLON SPORTS
Exclusive one-on-one Interviews with today's lop sports superstars? Cheri.
Feature stories that cut to the heart of why we love spurts? rhe) 're he tre ho
Previews of the top events on the sports calendar' Of coNiic..


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-l2B + WEDNESDAY, MARCH 21.2012


SPORTS


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Now a Bronco, Manning says hello to his new eateam


Now a Bronco, Manning says hello to his new team


The Associated Press

DENVER John Elway flashed
that mile-wide grin and turned
the microphone over to his new
quarterback, Peyton Manning.
Talk about a powerful pair.
Introducing Manning as the
newest Denver Bronco on Tues-
day, the two Super Bowl winners
each talked about hoisting an-
other Lombardi Trophy, this time
together. And soon.
"I realize I don't have 14 years
left, by any means," Manning
said.'"This isn't something where
I'm just building a foundation
to do something in two years or
three years. This is a 'now' situa-
tion. We're going to do whatever
we can to win right now. That's all
I'm thinking about right now."
Just so long as Manning's sur-
gically repaired neck goes along
with the plan.
Neither he nor Elway has a
doubt it will, and the Hall of
Famer-turned-executive knew
the NFL's only four-time MVP
was just what his club needed.
The franchise has won just two
playoff games since Elway's ca-
reer came to an end with a sec-
ond straight Super Bowl triumph
in 1999.
Denver's last playoff victory
came over Pittsburgh two months
ago, when Tim Tebow delivered a
stadium-rocking, 80-yard pass to
Demaryius Thomas on the first
play of overtime.
But things change, and in
the NFL, they can change fast.
Tebowmania is now a passing fad
in Denver.
A couple of photos of Tebow
-that once adorned the halls at
the Broncos' headquarters were
gone Tuesday by the time Man-
ning was introduced.
"I believe that he's got a lot of


I nAL /SSUlUUIA LU VKLR
(From left) Denver Broncos owner Pat Bowlen, newly-signed quarterback Peyton Manning and executive vice
president of football operations John Elway pose for photos during a news conference at the team's headquarters


"I believe that he's got a lot of great football left in him."
John Elway,
Denver Broncos executive vice president of football operations


great football left in him," Elway
said of his new QB. And if that's
true, the Broncos will wind up
paying him $96 million over five
years under his new deal.
After holding up his new, bright
orange jersey in a photo op with
Elway and owner Pat Bowlen,
Manning answered many of the
questions that have been bounc-
ing around since March 7, when
his old team, the Colts, released
him to avoid paying a $28 million
bonus and set in motion one of
the most frenetic free-agent pur-
suits in history. I
The first issue on everyone's
mind: So, Peyton, how do you


feel?
"I'm not where I want to be. I
want to be where I was before I
was injured," Manning said, re-
ferring to the neck problem that
kept him off the field in 2011 after
he'd started every game for the
Colts for the previous 13 seasons.
"I have a lot of work to do in get-
ting to where I want to be from a
health standpoint and learning
this offense. This is going to take
a ton of work."
As far as being the man who
could bring about the end of
Tebow's stay in Denver, Man-
ning said: "I know what kind of
player Tim Tebow is, what kind of


person he is ... and what an awe-
some year he had this year. If Tim
Tebow is here next year, I'm going
to be the best teammate I can be
to him, he and I are going to help
this team win games. If other op-
portunities present themselves
to him, I'm going to wish him the
best."
On Elway's role in leading him
to choose Denver over other suit-
ors, the most serious of which
were the Titans and 49ers: "Ev-
eryone knows what kind of com-
petitor he is as a player. I can tell
he's just as competitive in this
new role. That got me excited."
And so, the deal the club's


most dramatic since Elway was
acquired from the Colts in 1983
- was sealed.
With the new contract in place,
Manning plans to retire in Den-
ver. The Broncos, meanwhile,
have some protection in the way
the deal was formulated. There's
no signing bonus.
Manning will get $18 million
guaranteed for next season, but
must pass a physical before each
season, starting in 2013, to get
paid.
"I don't consider it much of a
risk, knowing -Peyton Manning,"
Elway said. "I asked him, 'Is there
any doubt in your mind that you
can't get back to the Peyton Man-
ning we know of?' And he said,
'There's no doubt in my mind.'"
Elway's move to the front of-
fice last year set off a whirlwind
of activity that landed the Bron-
cos in the playoffs. But the old
QB is in this to win Super Bowls
and he's throwing his hat in with
Manning, the 50,000-yard passer
who redefined the quarterback
position through the 2000s, not
Tebow who seems most com-
fortable carrying and not throw-
ing the ball.
"Tim Tebow's a great kid. If
I want someone to marry my
daughter, it's him," Elway said.
But to run an NFL offense, to
get a title, he wanted Manning. *
"My goal is to make Peyton
Manning the best quarterback
that's ever played the game," El-
way said, "and he's got that abil-
ity with the football that he's got
left.
"He's a guy that raises all boats.
He's already made (his team-
mates) better, and they haven't
met him yet just because of the
type of person he is, his reputa-
tion and what he's done in this
league."


Steelers WR Hines Ward retires


In this Dec. 11, 2011 photo, Denver Broncos quarterback Tim Tebow prays in the end z
before the start of a game against the Chicago Bears in Denver.


SSFILE
one


Elway: Tebow took news of


Manning deal with class


The Associated Press

DENVER On the day
the Denver Broncos cel-
ebrated the arrival of Pey-
ton Manning, all the ac-
tion photos of Tim Tebow
that once graced the hall-
ways at the team facility
were gone.
How's that for a subtle
hint?
Though executive John
Elway and coach John Fox
wouldn't exactly come out
and say it, the Tebow era
in Denver looks to be all
but over.
At a news conference
Tuesday to introduce
Manning, Elway said he's
exploring all his options
for Tebow, the incredibly
popular and polarizing
quarterback who led the
Broncos back to the play-
offs last season for the first
time since 2005.
"Tim Tebow is a great
kid. If I want someone
to marry my daughter,
it would be him," Elway
said. "But I think with the
opportunity to have Pey-
ton Manning's services,
we had to take advantage
of that. Now that it's hap-
pened, we have to go back
and address Tim and see
what the best situation is
for the Denver Broncos as
well as him."
A message was left by
The Associated Press for
Tebow and his agent, Jim-
my Sexton.
Although disappointed
at Manning's decision to
come to Denver, Tebow
took the news in stride
during a phone conversa-
tion with Elway.
"He's said, 'Well, we're


talking about Peyton Man-
ning. I understand exactly
what you're doing,'" Elway
explained. "He was very,
very positive."
The next. step in the
process may be finding
a trade partner, but the
Broncos are in no hurry
to do so. As for an outright
release, well, the Broncos
said no way.
"He's a first-round pick,"
Broncos general manager
Brian Xanders said. "He's
just won the division, we
were 1-4 at the time, he's
got a guaranteed contract.
I can't see that."
Tebow's base salaries for
the next few seasons are
very cap friendly: $1.942
million ,in 2012, $2.266
million in 2013 and $2.590
million in 2014.
Teams such as San Fran-
cisco, Green Bay and Jack-
sonville could be in the
market for Tebow, at least
as a backup.
However, his next des-
tination likely will not be
Miami.
A person familiar with
the situation said Tebow
would not fit the West
Coast offense the Dol-
phins plan to install this
season under first-year
coach Joe Philbin. The
person spoke on condi-
tion of anonymity because
trades and 'other person-
nel moves are confidential
until completed.
The Dolphins have been
mentioned as a possible
Tebow landing place after
he starred at the Univer-
sity of Florida. Miami has
incumbent quarterback
Matt Moore on its roster
along with recently signed


David Garrard, who is ex-
pected to compete for the
starting position.
For as well as this has
gone for Denver, Elway
hopes this turns out well
for Tebow, too.
"It would be our goal to
get him in the best situa-
tion possible for him to
have success also," Elway
said.
Although the unortho-
dox QB energized the
Broncos last season and
guided them back to the
postseason,'Tebow's long,
looping throwing motion
led to some accuracy is-
sues. And with his eager-
ness to run, he's hardly
the prototypical pocket
passer.
Still, Tebow has a flock of


See TEBOW, Page 8B


The Associated Press

PITTSBURGH Hines
Ward believes he can still
play football. The longtime
Pittsburgh wide receiver
known for his high-wattage
smile and his bone-crunch-
ing blocks jttst couldn't
stomach the thought of do-
ing it in some strange uni-
form on some strange field
with nary a Terrible Towel
in sight.
"I just wouldn't feel right,"
Ward said.
So rather than play for a
15th season and his first
outside the Steel City a
tearful Ward opted to retire
on Tuesday and secure a
legacy unmatched in the
franchise's long history.
"I can say I'm a Steeler for
life and that's the bottom
line, that's all I've really ever
wanted," Ward said.
Ward holds every signifi-
cant franchise receiving
record, including recep-
tions, receiving yards and
touchdowns. His 1,000 ca-
reer catches rank eighth all
time and he is one of two
players with at least 1,000
receptions and two Super
Bowl rings.
The decision comes three
weeks after the 36-year-old
was released by the Steel-
ers in a salary cap maneu-
ver. Ward says he was con-
tacted by several clubs but
never had any formal dis-
cussions. He insists there
are no hard feelings for his
release, understanding that
football is a business. As
if to prove the point, Ward


-- -- - - -- ---- - -- ----- --

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embraced Steelers owner
Art Rooney II after stepping
away from the podium fol-
lowing the announcement.
"Thank you (Mr. Rooney)
for giving a small town boy
from Forest Park, Ga., a
chance," Ward said.
The former third-round
pick out of Georgia was due
to make $4 million next
season, an expensive op-
tion for a player whose role
diminished significantly
in 2011 when he finished
with 46 receptions. He em-
braced his role as mentor
to Pro Bowlers Mike Wal-
lace and Antonio Brown
even though he knew they
were chewing into his play-
ing time.


"I know the wideouts are
going to be in great hands,".
he said. "They're full of
talent."
And they're part of an of-
fense that didn't exist when
Ward made his debut 14
years ago.
Over time, the Steelers
evolved from the grind-it-
out attack that has been the
club's identity for decades.
Ward's breakout season
came in 2001 when he set
a franchise record with 94
receptions then obliterated
that mark in 2002 when he
finished with 112 catches.
He made four straight
Pro Bowls from 2001-2004
and was named the MVP of
the 2006 Super Bowl.


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN wwwjcfloridan.com

Women's College Basketball



Griner dunks



in Baylor's win



over Florida


The Associated Press

BOWLING GREEN, Ohio
Brittney Griner- took
a pass from a teammate,
stepped toward the basket,
stretched out her right
arm and slammed the ball
through.
Then the Baylor star
reacted in typically modest
fashion.
"I think my team got fired
up a little bit more than
me. I got a little bit more
fired up, I think, on one of
the blocks I had," Griner
said. "But it definitely felt
good throwing it down."
Griner became the
second woman to dunk
in an NCAA tournament
game Tuesday night, and
top-seeded Baylor rolled
to a 76-57 win over ninth-
seeded Florida. The 6-foot-
8 junior phenom went
nearly 12 minutes without
scoring at the beginning of
the game, but she finished
with 25 points.
The highlight, of course,
was Griner's dunk early in
the second half.
"That wasn'tjust abarely-
over-the-rim type of dunk.
That was a monster dunk,"
Baylor coach Kim Mulkey
said. "I think Brittney is
so conscious of people
writing good or bad about
the dunk, that she's scared
to get excited sometimes
and celebrate a dunk,
because she's been written
about in a negative way.
I said, 'Honey, if I could
dunk it, I'd do backflips
down the floor.'"
Odyssey Sims added 14
points for Baylor (36-0).
Azania Stewart led Florida
(20-13) with 14.
Candace Parker of
Tennessee dunked twice
in an NCAA tournament
game in 2006 against
Army. Griner's dunk was
her first of the season and
sixth of her career. Parker
holds the career record
with seven.
Baylor led 35-26 at
halftime, but Griner was
only beginning to assert
herself. She scored eight
points in the first half,
including six in the final
3:56.
"It was hard to get her
touches," Mulkey said. "I
go back to what I've said all
along. I don't care how you
guard Griner. We've seen it
all. If you guard her with
two and three, the other
positions are going to be
exposed and we will score.
If you guard her with one
-you saw what happened,
tonight when they guarded
her with one."
Griner began the second
half with a turnaround and
a layup. Then Kimetria.
Hayden came up with an
offensive rebound near the
basket and passed to an
open Griner, who dunked
for the first time since Feb.
19, 2011, at Texas Tech.
The Lady Bears lea 41-
28, although Florida didn't


BAYLOR 76, FLORIDA 57


"I think my team got
fired up a little bit more
than me. Igot a little bit
more fired up, I think,
on one of the blocks I
had."
Brittney Griner,
Baylor center


exactly crumble.
"We talked about it in
the locker room. We know
she's capable of doing that.
She's does it in warmups,"
Stewart said. "We said that
if they make a big 3 or she
dunks, we have to get the
ball in and out quickly.
It didn't affect us, I don't
think. It's a great play
most women can't do
that."
Baylor hasn't lost since
falling in the quarterfinals
of last year's NCAA
tournament. The Lady
Bears will face fourth-
seeded Georgia Tech in the
round of 16 on Saturday in
Des Moines, Iowa.
Griner began this
tournament quietly,
playing only 22 minutes
in Baylor's first-round
rout of UC Santa Barbara.
She delighted the crowd
Tuesday with her dunking
display 'in warmups, at
one point throwing down
a two-handed effort and
pulling herself up toward
the rim.
When the game started,
Griner was called for
an early charging foul
when she tried to dribble
coast to coast following a
defensive rebound. She
didn't attempt a shot until
about midway through the
half and didn't score until a
layup with 8:18 remaining.
The Gators used a zone
defense to deny Griner the
ball inside, and although
Baylor led 26-11 at one
point, Florida answered
with a 9-0 run.
Griner then scored six
quick points for the Lady
Bears two free throws,
a putback and a shot from
out near the free throw line.
The Gators kept answering
for the rest of the half, but
that stretch was a sign of
things to come for Griner.
Griner went 8 of 14
from the field with nine
rebounds and six blocks.
Florida beat Ohio State
in the first round, defiantly
holding off the Buckeyes
in front of a partisan
crowd in northwest Ohio.
The Gators didn't back
down from Baylor either.
At one point in the second
half, Deana Allen lost her
left shoe while going to
the basket. She hustled
back and played an entire
defensive possession
without it.


SPORTS


WEDNESDAY, MARCH 21, 2012 3BF


National Basketball Mssociation


HI E ASCUIAI LP U rEtSnS
Phoenix Suns' Grant Hill (33) trails Miami Heat's LeBron James (6) as he goes for a layup during the second half of their game
in Miami on Tuesday.


Heat score 17 straight late, rally past Suns


The Associated Press

MIAMI Chris Iosh scored 29
points, LeBron James survived two
scary falls and the Miami Heat used
a 17-0 fourth-quarter run to erase a
10-point deficit and beat the Phoe-
nix Suns 99-95 on Tuesday night for
their 14th straight home victory.
James finished with 20 points, Dw-
yane Wade had 19, and Udonis Has-
lem added a season-high 15 for the
Heat, who survived, two huge late
scares a double-digit hole, and a
frightening collision between James
and Grant Hill in the final minute.
James was chasing a long pass and
never saw Hill, crashing into him.
James went down, failing on his first
attempt to get up and stayed on the
court holding his head for about a
minute. He remained in the game
after a timeout.


Hill led Phoenix with 19 points.
Marcin Gortat had 13, MarkieffMor-.
ris 12, Jared Dudley 10 and Steve
Nash finished with nine points and
10 assists.
The Suns had the NBAs second-
best record since Feb. 19, having
won 11 of their last 14 coming in.
Shannon Brown's 3-pointer with
7:29 lefteput Phoenix up 90-80, but
the Suns missed their next 10 shots.
James, Wade and Haslem all made
a pair of free throws to start Miami's
late run, and the Heat tied it when
Mario Chalmers stole the ball from
Nash and set up Wade for a break-
away dunk.
Bosh made two more foul shots
to put the Heat up for good, Wade
made a layup while sprawling to
the floor and stretched the lead to
95-90 after Suns coach Alvin Gen-
try was called for a technical, and


James' jumper with 1:52 left capped
the flurry. Miami made 13 of 16 free
throws in the final quarter, while
Phoenix was only 3 for 4.
The Suns missed four. straight
shots at the rim in one stretch, all in
a span of 34 seconds, and the Heat
started to roll.
James had another hard fall in the
early going, hitting the floor hard
and coming up wincing. On a drive
into the lane, James was hit by Mor-
ris and reached back with his right
arm to brace himself for the fall.
James appeared to hit his right el-
bow directly on the floor he was
wearing a pad on that one, though
not the left and stepped away
from the foul line briefly while shak-
ing the arm.
He remained in the game and did
not get any noticable treatment dur-
ing the next timeout.


Spring Training


Davis takes hard shot off ankle, stays in game


The Associated Press

JUPITER, Fla. After
watching Wade Davis take
a one-hop smash off his
right ankle and stay in the
game, Joe Maddon could
make light of it.
"The moral of the story is
to hit him in the foot, hard,
with a blunt object before
he goes out to pitch," the
Tampa Bay manager said,
"because he was entirely
different after that ball hit
him on the foot."
Davis allowed one run


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and three hits over five in-
nings Tuesday during the
Rays' 3-2 win over the Mi-
ami Marlins. He struck out
five and walked none.
Donnie Murphy's
grounder hit Davis with
two outs in the second
inning. The ball bounced
into right field for a double
and left the pitcher limp-
ing. After he was attended
to by a trainer, Davis took
some practice jogs on the
infield.
"It was numb for a little
bit, but nothing to take me


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LOOKING FOR MORE NEWS? VISIT
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out," Davis said.
Maddon had an unusual
dugout companion: foot-
ball great Joe Namath.
Maddon grew up in Penn-
sylvania idolizing the
quarterback.
"For me personally, it's
quote 'a moment,'" Mad-
don said. "I'm not usually
star-struck but I have been
today."
Namath lives in Teques-
ta, about 10 minutes from
the Marlins' complex, and
said he's a Maddon fan.
"I just like Joe's style and


what I've read about him,"
Namath said. "I was flat-
tered that he invited me tq
practice."
Marlins starter Josh
Johnson gave up two runs
and four hits in 4 2-3 in-
nings with four strikeouts
and one walk. He has a
2.33 ERA in four starts, is
likely to have two more
exhibition outings and is
lined up to start the major
league opener against St.
Louis on April 4 the first
official game at Marlins
Park.


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Taylor, Johnson star in championships


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

Young track athletes from
Jackson County traveled
to Chiles High School last
weekend to compete in the
13"t Annual Chiles Fresh-
man-Sophomore Cham-
pionships, with Sneads'
Josh Taylor and Marianna's
Quashawn Johnson among
the standouts.
Taylor had two first place
finishes in the competition
- more than any other
county competitor win-
ning the 100-meter dash
(11.07 seconds) and the


Indians
From Page 18
the game the right way
for nine innings. Until we
get that desire to be in the
moment to get the big hit
and make the big play,
we're not going to be very
good. I just don't think
it's important enough to
them right now. Our talent
level is fine if we'll learn to
play."
Chipola will try to get
it back- on track today
by sending LJ Hollins to
the mound, who pitched
very well in an 11-3 win
over Gulf Coast in his first
league start, pitching seven
innings and allowing just


Dawgs
From Page 1B
the home run and two
RBI, while Ritter and Paige
Carter each had two hits.


Tigers
From Page 1B
committing a single error,


200-meter dash (22.84).
The Bulldogs' Johnson
also had a first place fin-
ish, winning the long jump
with a mark of 19 feet, 4.5
inches, while his team-
mates Roderick Copeland
(19 feet, 3 inches) and Tion
Long (19 feet, 0.25 inches)
also finished in the top five.
Johnson was also third in
the 400 meters with a time
of 54.14 seconds.
Long was third in the
100 meters with a time of
11.27 seconds, and fourth
in the 200 meters at 24.08
seconds.
Daniel Hardbower was


the top county finisher in
the 800-meter run, taking
11"' at 2:29.57, with fellow
Bulldogs Dylan Standland
(2:35.42) and Clyde De-
Clouet (2:39.16) taking 14'1h
and 15th.
In the 300-meter hurdles,
Marianna's Qua Brigham
took third with a time of
43.82 seconds, and was
also part of a Bulldogs'
4x100 team that included
Long, Shondre McElroy,
and Johnson that placed
fourth at 45.40 seconds.
Marianna's 4x800 relay
team of DeClouet, Floyd
Clark, Alex Ramos-Vadillo,


"Right now, LI (Hollins) is our best guy....
Hopefully, he'll continue to do that because we need
a big game out ofhim. We have to try to make some
plays behind him and face some of the tough left-
handers they've got."
Jeff Johnson,
Chipola head coach


one earned run on two hits
to get the win.
"Right now, LJ is our best
guy. There's no question
about it," Johnson said.
"Hopefully, he'll continue
to do that because we need
a big game out of him. We
have to try to make some
plays behind him and face
some of the tough left-
handers they've got."
If the Indians lose again


For Marianna, Lipford
was 3 for 3 with a home
run, a walk, two RBIs and
two runs scored, while
Lipford had a double and
an RBI and Robinson
finished with a hit and


while the Wildcats had five
defensive miscues.
Malone was scheduled
to take on the Graceville
Tigers on Tuesday night


tonight, they'll fall three
games behind the Raiders
with a quarter of the
conference season gone by,
and Johnson said that his
players need to understand
the importance of these
early games with a 20-
game schedule.
"When you look at the
fact we're playing 20 games
here and not 24, the team
that wins the league will


two runs.
With the loss, the Lady
Bulldogs fell to 5-12 on the
season and will next play
March 30 at home against
district foe Pensacola
Catholic.


before returning home
to face to District 1-1A
competition on Thursday
against Poplar Springs at
6p.m.


and Tristan Tharpe also
took fourth at 10:21.56.
Copeland gave the Bull-
dogs another top five fin-
isher in the triple jump
with a mark of 38 feet, 6.5
inches. In the team compe-
tition, Marianna finished
fifth out of 11 schools, with
Sneads coming in ninth.



I

S-

JCFLOR IDOANM-CO M


probably win around 14 or
15 games," the coach said.
"If you look at it in the big
picture, if we want to win
the league, we probably
can't lose but three or
four more times. The kids
don't understand that yet,
so we've got to put a little
more pressure on them. As
coaches, we have to be a
little tougher on them.
"Having (Tyler) Bocock-
out and (Jonathan) Paquet
out with injuries isn't
helping us, but those are
excuses. We have the guys
here to win games, so we've
got to start doing that."


Follow us on

Facebook


Jackson County
Floridan


p. -i


High School Baseball
Wednesday Chipley
at Graceville, 4 and 6 p.m.
Thursday Graceville
at Cottondale, 6 p.m.;
Poplar Springs at Malone,
6p.m.
Friday Ponce De
Leon at Sneads, 6 p.m.;
Marianna at Walton, 4:30
and 6:30 p.m.

High School Softball
Thursday -Vernon at
Cottondale, 4 and 6 p.m.;
Malone at Poplar Springs,
4 and 6 p.m.; Sneads at
Blountstown, 4 and 6
p.m.

Chipola Baseball
Chipola will return
home today to face
Northwest Florida State
for the second game of
the series at 5 p.m., with
the third back in Niceville
on Friday at 2 p.m.
Chipola will also host
the first of a three-game
set with Tallahassee on
Saturday at 1 p.m.


Chipola Softball
The Lady Indians will
head to Niceville today
for a doubleheader with
Northwest Florida State
at 4 p.m., and 6 p.m.,
and they'll return home
Saturday for another
conference doubleheader
against Gulf Coast State
at 1 p.m., and 3 p.m.

Soccer Registration
Marianna Recreation
Department will offer a
spring soccer league for
boys and girls ages 5-14.
Registration will be
held through Friday from
8 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the
Marianna Educational
and Recreational Expo
located at 3625 Caverns
Road in Marianna, or at
City Hall.
Registration fee for soc-
cer is $30 for participants
who live inside the city
'limits of Marianna and
$45 for those outside the
city. For more informa-
tion, call the Marianna
Recreation Department
at 850-482-6228.


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4 Every 24 seconds someone in the
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United States is suffering a stroke.


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-4B WEDNESDAY, MARCH 21, 2012


SPORTS







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN + www.jcfloridan.com


TIAT'5 RIGHT...
LOOKING FOR THAT
LITTLE ED6E..


YES, MA'AM..I
KNO EVERYTHIN6
BUT THE ANSWERS.,


BORN LOSER BY ART AND CHIP SANSOM
ANMALL GORM CGETTR I L TROUR T IVE GOT IT IFL KIP E.LECICTN
GiA'T CREE ATV VE.YEEN YOU COULDN'T AL- aUREL F r CA6LE 6\LLS FORTRE.
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BIG NATE BY LINCOLN PIERCE
GoRm, HI, NATE I'LL GET HMM1...
WHAT RIGHT TO WE'LL
MAW! KLASStC ASK WAYNE.
KOMIX
WANT TO
SPONSOR.
MY LITTLE
LEAGUE
TEAM?


FRANK & ERNEST BY BOB THAVES


GRIZZWELLS BY BILL SCHORR


HE'S THE ONE WHO'LL
BE ABLE TO GIVE
YOU AN ANSWER'


OTHE. SPRIGc, A LIVELI 10 THE SPRIkG AYDOtUO DOMY LOOK ATAIE.
IRIs CHAMe5 00 HE IMA'5 FA)CY LIGHTLY URM5 \ THAT WAY!
fURPISH'DDOVE; TOTHOMOUHT5 OF LOVE.








ALLEY OOP BY JACK AND CAROLE BENDER
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COW & BOY BY MARK LEIKNES
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I BET YOU COULD
OUTRUN A MUMMY IF
HE WAS CHASING YOU.


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I MEAN, EVEN IF HE'S
POWERED BY EVIL CURSE-
MAGIC, HE'S STILL RUNNING'
ON THOUSAND-YEAR-OLD
MUMMY LEGS, SO YOU
DEFINITELY
H ^IT
tri ,'t


OK, LONG DISTANCE HE
MIGHT CATCH UP TO YOU,
BUT BY THAT TIME YOU'VE
HOPPED IN YOUR S.U.V.
AND HAVE .----.


H, BLE MUMBLE
OH, maBiLE L
GOODY. HUMBLE MUMBLE
MUMBLE MUMBLE



-410Einin~np


OLD M/a HAVE THOSE,
-MOU6HTS YEAR-'ROU1D.






j00a ^) 1


WHAT IF THE MUMMY
SEES YOUR LICENSE
PLATE AND ACCESSES
THE DMV DATABASE? .
TI1K OF TKATf ))

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5 Dogie
stopper
10Build a fat
resume
(hyph.)
12 Goose, at
times
13 Shoguns
and
geishas
14Choosing
15 Porgy's
love
16 Health
resort
18- take
forever!
19 Cafe
customers
22 Cola
option
25 Stick (to)
29 Musical
ensembles
30 Secret
romance
32 Declare
invalid
33 Paris
subway
34High
regard
37 Pyromaniac's
work
38Train
parking
place


40 Lunch
counter
order
43 Summer
hrs.
44 Red-waxed
cheese
48 Theatrical
group
50 Weather
culprit
(2 wds.)
52 Lacking
good taste
53 Guess
54Squirrel
away
55 High
schooler

DOWN
1 Winning
margin
2 Stork
cousin
3 Discontinues
(2 wds.)
4 Father,
once
5 Chop off
6 Not "pro"
7 Mini-play
8 Cellphone
.button
9 Web suffix
10Punch
11 Attention
getter


Answer to Previous Puzzle
PLO W RAE AHAB
DOLE IVY FEME
Q U E ENBEE FLAN
PCS DIREST

RIOT EMT TALL
BABA ROI STOA

BALLS M A NNOOP
ARNE L 0 E AB B E
R I N SE W R I S
12 Cache 39 Centurion's
17 Kiddie's highway
ammo 40 Dry
20 Supermarket 41 Kinks' tune
lanes 42 Barge
21 Medicine pushers
man 45 Netherlands
22 "Harper sight
Valley -" 46 Erelong
23 Sea eagle 47 Dude,
24 Lapel Jamaica-
ornaments style
26Coming 48HBO
out receivers
27 Spoils 49 Cry of
28 Franc's disdain
replacer 51 go
31 Howard or (release)
Perlman
35 Pillow filler
36 HMO
workers


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QulllDrlverBooks.com


3-21


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


Horoscope
ARIES (March 21-April
19) Don't be surprised if
more than one person con-
fides in you without you or
them knowing why.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20) It may not be smart
to push for certain things,
such as matters that af-
fect your material affairs,
if you sense the timing is
bad. Listen to what your
instincts are telling you.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
- Instead of going with the
flow as you normally might
do, you are likely to be de-
termined to focfls on one
specific goal. It'll be for a
worthy purpose.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
- Pay attention and you
could learn something im-
portant by observing how
another conducts him or
herself.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
- Being fortunate enough
to be in the right place at
the right time will make
you privy to some advance
information concerning
something profitable.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
- Someone you respect
who has counseled you
correctly in the past is the
same person you should
go to again if you're having
a problem.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
- Any idea you get that
you think might help your
work or career is best kept
to yourself, at least until
you are absolutely certain
you would be able to suc-
cessfully pull if off.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) Try to distinguish be-
tween being protective and
being possessive regarding
a loved one. If the leash is
held too tightly, it could
become a choke chain.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-
Dec. 21) An important
development can be final-
ized to your satisfaction,
provided you are tenacious
and persistent.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) If there is something
important that you need
to do, get it out of the way
early in the day.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) Take some time to
study and review your
financial position.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) Any favors you do
for others aren't likely to be
repaid immediately.


Annie's IMailbox


Dear Annie: My friend "Jodi" is 27 and
very sheltered. Her parents still pay her
rent and bills. I'm worried because Jodi .
has been acting out of character.
She cheated on her husband with
a 59-year-old man. He's now her new
boyfriend and so-called "soul mate." He's
creepy. He talks down to her all the time
and gropes her in public. She gives him
her paycheck and the use of her parents'
credit cards. '
Jodi has a daughter from her marriage,
and the little girl lives with her father. I
work for Child Protective Services and
know this "dream boyfriend" is a sex
offender.
When we go out as friends, she brings
him along, and he says crude, disgusting
things to us about our clothes and our
bodies. He even tried to take money ou.t
of my purse. Jodi thinks this is funny and
says I should lighten up.
I told her about his history and that
she should be cautious with him around
her daughter. She became very angry
and said she never wanted to speak to
me again. I'm OK with that. She's not the




One bridge deal should not be that exha
ing, but many, especially in no-trump, are b
tles for suit establishment as we saw yes
day and will see today.
How should the play go in three no-trump
ter West leads the spade six?
There are five scenarios. First, East wins w
his spade ace and returns the spade jack, c
ered by the queen and king. South takes
third spade and .plays three rounds of
monds, losing the last of those but taking
rest for an overtrick.
Second, West ducks at trick two, giving Sc
the trick he is due and retaining commun
tion with his partner. Then, when East get
with his diamond trick, a third spade gives \
three tricks in that suit to defeat the contract
Third, South does not cover the spade jac
trick two. This saves the contract whenevi
can be made.
Fourth, East plays his spade jack at trick o
(Since East can anticipate gaining the lead
diamonds, this is not far-fetched, trying
make South burn up his one spade stopper
mediately.) If South does win the trick, lie
fail. But, fifth, if he works out to duck, he
get home.


person I once knew.
My job obligates me to report that this
man is spending time with a young child,
and I have informed his parole officer.
But I also think I should advise the little
girl's father, who has primary custody,
and Jodi's parents, who have secondary
custody.
My boss says I've done my duty by
alerting the parole board, and that speak-
ing to the family is a personal choice. My
husband says I don't need to crusade to
protect every child.
Finding out that the creep stays over-
night when her daughter is in the house
made my skin crawl. Should I tell the
family?
NOT A CRUSADER

Dear Crusader Yes. We doubt Jodi's par-
ents will do anything since they already
enable their daughter to be irresponsible.
But the little girl's father will want to do
everything he can to protect his child.
You can't prevent Jodi from being an idiot
about this man, but please don't turn
your back on her daughter.


ONE OF MY LN$16r POPPEf OUT,
S- FUT IT'$ NOT A
PROBLM, I'1-L JUST n
6fT IT IePACEP. .
YOU SfE YOUR
61.A$565 A5 9
_. IIALF-FU/ZLI./
.* _- - IAV pE


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present,
Each letter in the cipher stands for another,
"FG'N VH GR GCT MRVXPET R W

GCT WFKLLPBTXN'GR LPBT PXG FJ
MFJ TLP, JRG OVNG SVN FJTN N."
- STJ EP Y Y PX P

Previous Solution: "No matter how chaotic it is, wildflowers will still spring up in
the middle of nowhere." Sheryl Crow
TODA YS CLUE: 0 slenbea"
2012 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 3-21


North 03-21-12
4 8
VA6 5
AK 10 9 8 52
.74
West East
4 K 9 7 6 4 4 A J 3
V743 YQJ 10
S6 QJ 7
Q 1063 49852
South
4 Q 10 5 2
SK 9 8 2
S43
4 AK J

Dealer: North
Vulnerable: Both
South West North East
1 Pass
1 V Pass 24 Pass
3 NT Pass Pass Pass

Opening lead: 4 6


Q L aughl IngStock Intirnntional Inc, Dis by UnrlvofsalUCIIck, 0?1


. 21


WEDNESDAY, MARCH 21, 2012 5B F


ENTERTAINMENT


FYEwREAS4 B








6 B Wednesday, March 21, 2012 Jackson County Floridan


CLASSIFIED


www.JCFLORIDAN.com


WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED




MARKETPLACE


PLACE5 AN


BY PHONE: (850) 526-3614 or (800) 779-2557
BY FAX: (850) 779-2557
ONLINE: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM


BY MAIL: WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE
P.O. BOX 520, MARIANNA, FL 32447
IN PERSON: 4403 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA


Publication Policy Errors and Omissions: Advertisers should check their ad the first day. This publication shall not be liable for failure to publish an ad or for a typographic error or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the ad for the first day's
insertion. Adjustment for errors is limited to the cost of that portion of the ad wherein the error occurred. The advertiser agrees that the publisher shall not be liable for damages arising out of errors in advertisements beyond the amount paid for the space
actually occupied by that portion of the advertisement in which the error occurred, whether such error is due to negligence of the publisher's employees or otherwise and there shall be no liability for non-insertion of any advertisement beyond the amount paid for
such advertisement. Display Ads are not guaranteed position. All advertising is subject to approval. Right is reserved to edit, reject, cancel or classify all ads under the appropriate classification,

I I iloEo vi0 0 0


G.M. Properties of PC Beach 800-239-2059
Fully furnished condos
& townhouses near Pier Park.
2bdrm Gulf front- starting @ $175 nt.
3bdrm Gulf front- starting @ $225 nt.
2bdrm Lake front- starting @ $100 nt.
Studios Lake front- starting @ $70 nt.
www.gmproperties.com


GF ANNOUNCEMENTS
y. *!* ^*



Let s slml yu lmostinew stff frcash.l^^^
Wewiltag & r~gfice ourstflf or youcan
Call334677GOO "463"Dowtow


FINANCIAL


ESTABLISHED RESALE/CONSIGNMENT
STORE for sale.
This is a great deal for the right person.
We have a dedicated customer/consignor
database. In today's economy this is the
business to be in. This is a turnkey
business that has everything needed
including a dedicated software program
specific to consignment shops.
Owner retiring but will be happy to train.
Serious inquiries only.
334-714-0705.

MB HM. PARK FOR SALE
WITH 23 MBL. HMS.
1 HOUSE & 1 RV
ON 62 ACRES all rentals.
Great income with good down payment
Owner Finance
386-329-5227 / 386-312-6363

) MERCHANDISE


Refrigerator: Side-by-side Kenmore. Exc. cond.
Ice maker which hasn't been used in awhile.
Beige in color. $400. 850-482-8204 for more info.

Bedroom Set Mattress, BoxSprings, Rails,
Headboard, Footboard. Like New. Paid $400.
Will sell for $225. Cottondale FL, 330-204-2888

Wanted: Old Coins, Gold,
Diamonds, Guns, And Tools
West Main Jewelry & Loan 334-671-1440.

SKAG Tiger Cat Mower, excellent condition,
used for residential home only, Kawasaki en-
gine. 48 inch cut, $5,500 OBO. 334-618-7691

PETS & ANIMALS


Free Domestic short-haired cat Very sweet,
lovable grey and white striped female cat. Has
been spayed and has all shots. Loves to be pet-
ted and is a very loving cat. Looking for a good,
loving home. Approximately 3 years old. Pre-
fers to be indoors. Please contact us by email if
you are the home for her or call/text 850-624-
6825. Thank you.'
Kittens: Free to good home, 1 black, 1 orange,
1 calico.Friendly. 4.5 mths. Florida,850-482-2994

Brittany Spaniel Puppies AKC, Champion
Bloodline Orange and White (4) Girls and (4)
Boys CH. Nolan's Last Bulet Bloodline $375.
Ready Date 3/19/2012. Phone 229-724-8839
V Easter Babies Are Here V
Yorkie-Poos $300. Chinese Crested M/F $500.
Shih-Pom $300. Now Taking deposits on
Shorkies. $300. Call 334-718-4886.
FREE: Bulldog white mix, spayed will make a
great companion in calm home. 334-693-9097.
Free Dog -Sr. white bulldog mix, loving, spayed,
wonderful companion for calm home, 693-9097
Free Red Bone Coon Hound Mix Beautiful 5
month old male. Has a pretty coon dog howl
and is very sweet and affectionate. Saved him
from going to the pound a few months ago but
really don't have time to spend with him. He is
good with children and other pets. Very playful
and full of energy. Please email or call/text
850-624-6825.


Cal 2-314t sl


-ourieInt'e


FREE TO GOOD HOME: F/husky mix, 6 Mo.,
friendly, great with kids. Call 850-272-1065
0*0 TAKE ME
*ow HO)ME
Jack Russell
CKC registered Jack Russell pups, tri-colored;
s/w; 1 female; 3 males; $250; 334 886 2524
1 Maltese AKC Pups!
Will be small. S/W,
M & F. Ready March
14th! Will Deliver!
Now Taking deposits.
ICall 334-703-2500
Pit Mixes puppies 1st shots and wormed
10 weeks old. $100. 850-209-0159.

Free Teddy Bear Hamster: M/F, very cute,
great pets for children. Call 334-797-1095
( ) FARMER'S MARKET



GREEN
FROZEN
PEANUTS
850-209-3322
or 850-573-6594


r................................I
0- Bahia seed for sale l 4."
Excellent germination Kendall Cooper
Call 334-703-0978, 334-775-3423,
or 334-775-3749 Ext. 102 "
L.......M ... MN...............
(01) EMPLOYMENT
*INSTALL>ATIONM:AINTJENANCE


APAjC__
MIDQI UTH


is looking
to hire an
Experienced
Mechanic.


This is a skilled position involving making
repairs to and maintaining road
construction equipment and mechanical
equipment such as trucks, trailers, batch
plants, paving machines, bulldozers,
engines, motors, pneumatic tools,
conveyor systems, and other road
S construction equipment.
Experience w/ Asphalt Equipment a plus.
NO PHONE CALLS OR LOCAL DROP INS.
All applicants must apply at
www.oldcastlematerials.com

IT'S AS EASY AS
1 CALL
2. PLACE YOUR AD
3. GET RESULTS


Wednesday, March 21, 2012









THE SUDOKU G-AME WITH A KICK!
HOW TO PLAY
Fill in the 9x9 grid! with the missing
numbers so that each column, row and
3x3 box contains the digits 1 9 only once.
There is only one correct solution
for each puzzle,
GET MORE WASABI
PUZZLES ONLINE]
ARCHIVES AND MORE GREAT GAMES AT
BOXERJAM.COM


FAMILY P DULAt.
DISTRIBUTION CENTER
MARIANNA, FLORIDA
Now Hiring Full Time
Warehouse Positions
1st, 2nd, and 3rd Shifts
Competitive Pay and
Benefits Package!
Apply at Family Dollar Distribution Center
3949 Family Dollar Parkway,
Marianna, Florida 32448
Must be 18 Years Old
Equal Opportunity Employer
Drug Free Workplace

JACKSON COUNTY
FLORIDAN
LOOKING FOR MATURE, DEPENDABLE
NEWSPAPER CARRIERS IN THE JACKSON
COUNTY AREA


EARN EXTRA
$$CCC


BE YOUR OWN BOSS
1AM to 6 AM

Must have dependable
transportation, minimum
liability insurance & valid
driver's license.

Come by and fill out an
application at the Jackson
County Floridan,
4403 Constitution Lane,
Marianna, FL

Place your ad in our

Sales & Service

Directory
and grow your business!!!


Camera, Olympus SP 600 UZ digital, new con-
dition, $160 FIRM, 850-482-7665 after 12pm
Chair: Unique upholstered chair w/ foot rest.
Over 20 years old. $100. 850-482-2636
Entertainment Center .White. 48"Wx60"Hx20"D
$35. 850-482-2636
Home Gym, Club Weider, 560 Model, $250 obo,
850-532-3333
Hot Tub 5 PERSON HOT TUB, $500, CALL 850-
557-3399
Pool: 24' w/ pump, clean &ready for you to take
down & haul away, $300 OBO. 850-557-5179


II


E EI


EDUCATION
&. INSTRUCT TION


Enroll in Childcare
LOOK Training Classes Today!!
Call: Mrs. Alaina 334-714-4942
Job Placement Upon Completion


Train for a Career in
Medical Assisting!
FOR TIS We also prepare for
FR TIS HVAC & Refrigeration,
COLLEGE Electrical Trades
and more.
Call 888-202-4813 or
visit www.fortiscollege.edu For consumer
information visit www.fortis.edu

RESIDENTIAL
(G REAL ESTATE FOR RENT

1BR 1BA Apartment on Dickson St. in Marianna,
$400/mo. No pets. 850-526-8392



2/1 Recently Remodelled. CH&A, $600 + dep.
No Pets, Marianna 850-718-1165 4

3/1 brick home, Malone/ Bascom area, Ig yard,
taking applications, $575/mo. 850-209-1265
3\2 Brick Home CH/A Large Lot Alford $650
3\1 CB Home CH/A C'dale $575 Dep., ref, & 1 yr
lease req. on both 850-579-4317/866-1965


2/1 Located between Grand Ridge & Sneads
water& garbage included $350/month
S850-573-0308 4,
3/2 Mobile Homes in Cottondale. NO PETS
CH&A $500/Month $250 deposit
850-258-1594 Leave Message "
3BR 2BA, big lot, deposit & ref. req. no pets, $500 850-
593-6457


Rims: Dodge.Dakota Set (4) Stock 6 lug, 15"
rims w/tires (2 good, 2 fair) $100. 850-889-0010
Scroll Saw: 15" Dremel with stand. $50.
Call 850-209-7098 or 850-482-3810
Sewing Machine: Kenmore 12 stitch w/cabinet
and accessories $150 for all. 850-482-2636
Table & 6 chairs: Cherry oak, never used $500.
850-557-1115
Washer & Dryer: Sears Kenmoore, works good,
$200. both. Call 850-209-7098 or 850-482-3810


Tuesday's
WASABI SOLUTION

7 1 @ 5 @ 3 2
8 4 3 5 1
5 D _1 9 6
0 42 3
4 2 3 6 7 9 8

6 7 9 4 8
@T4


BE SURE TO VISIT OUR
NEWEST GAME SITE


KEWLBOX.COM


L.


Sports Anchor
WRBL-TV is looking for a Main Sports
Anchor. This position requires 2 years
experience in broadcast journalism.
Must have the ability to anchor, report
and produce stories for newscasts and web
products. This position will be responsible
for shooting, writing, editing and planning
coverage of local sporting events. EOE
M/F/D/V. Pre-employment drug and
background screening required.
Please apply online at:
www.mediageneral.com
Send recent reel, resume & references to:
Human Resources, WRBL
1350 13th Avenue, Columbus, Ga. 31901


0@_ 001










00I


@_@@



2008 BLOCKDOT. INC. WWW.BLOCKDOT.COM


. I


p I


-1 1


A r e u Lby s n w fr n m e i f d i


- --- -


6=;;:


.r








JCFLORIDA


CLASSIFIED


Jackson County Floridan *


Wednesday, March 21, 2012-7 B


Mobile homes for rent Marianna area
1,2,3 and 4 bedroom $335. to $425. per month.
L $400. deposit No pets allowed. 850-209-7087
Rent to Own: 2 & 3BR Mobile Homes.
Lot rent included. Also available,
1 & 2BR Apts & Houses. For details
P*850-557-3432 or 850-814-6515 4w
*Special* Mobile Home for rent between
Chipley & Cottondale, for 1-2 people for $450
850-258-4868/209-8847
RESIDENTIAL
I REAL ESTATE FOR SALE


,. Awesome views of
Flint River!
Boat ramp 300 feet from
home. 2 bedrooms, 1.5
bath, 1680 sq ft. $129,900.
Will consider lease/option/rent. Owner financ-
ing available. Call 850-509-3913
UNIQUE RIVERFRONT HOME One of a kind -
Wewahitchka Florida, Boat House, Outdoor
Kitchen, Greenhouse, Shop, fenced yard. Call
Abby 850-819-0401. Reduced price $149,999.

J RECREATION


350 HONDA-Fourtrax Rancher, low mileage,
garage kept, great condition $3,000 334-687-
0328,334-695-8126
Go-Cart Rebel 4-wheel go-cart with Briggs &
Stratton 5 hp engine, by Fun-Wheels, $350,
334-805-0141, leave message if no answer


'94 BassCat Pantera Classic 19FT
150HP Evanrude, stainless prop, 24 volt
motor guide trolling motor, built in cooler, 2
rod boxes, and Hummingbird & Lawrance
fish finder. Asking $9,200. Call 334-797-1095
Bayliner Trophy,
22.5', 2000 model,
r Well kept and clean.
334-794-0609

Boat Ranger Bass 17' 10" 115 Hp Johnson ,
fully equipped, garage kept with boat cover
Asking $3500. 334-886-2739 or 334-797-7599.



X trei Packages From
(Xtrme $4995
Bdn s All Welded
BV0ats All Aluminum Boats
www.xtremeindustries.com


PONTOON BOAT '97 Eagle Angel, 22ft. 50
Mecury, excellent shape (in Eufaula) $6,000
1-251-599-5127, 1-251-675-6883
Triton '07 188SF Fish and Ski: Mercury Optimax
150HP, 24 volt trolling motor, trailer included,
garage kept, like new conditions, less than
150 hours, $20,500. Call 334-685-3921
Well Craft 1981 18ft:
in-board and out-
board motor, runs
great but needs

trailer. Priced to Sell $1,995.
Call 334-793-3494 or 334-333-1291


Fifth Wheel: 2010, 30.5 ft Jayco Super Lite
5th Wheel 1 Slide, Extra Nice, $22,900.
Call 334-701-2101
i l Forest River '01
Reflections: 37ft, 1
large slideout, 23k
miles, 50 amp, (2)
A/C's, diesel pusher, loaded, includes dishes,
linens, small appliances. $42,900. OBO or will
trade for luxury car or truck. (205) 790-2152.
MOTO .3* HM & 0VS


Good fixer Upper 78 Ford Mida Mini 200 RV,
Great for hunting and camping, sleeps 6, white
in color, $2000.334-671-1162. BUY NOW!!!


YAMAHA'05 FX 1100 Waverunner, 125 hrs., 3
heater, with cover, with trailer, garage kept
$5,500 334-687-0218, 706-575-3760

(G TRANSPORTATION


Jeep '93 Wrangler CJ-5, Straight line 6 w/fuel
injection. Has lift kit. Also comes with bikini
top and hard top. CD player. 4WD. $6200 Neg.
850-579-2217 or 850-573-1962


AMC 1974 Gremlin X 6.6L, torqe-flite, bucket
seats, flomaster exhaust, Holley carb, mallory
ignition, mag wheels, much more. call 334-
699-8488
Cadillac '93 Allante: Last year of 7 years
production of 2 seat convertible, only year
with Northstar 32 valve V8, rare collectible.
First $10,000. Takes It! Call 850-209-0747


'03 Mercury Grand Marquis
I LS, A must see!
silver w/ leather seats, all
-' LS options, good cond. good
tires. 61,600 mi. Asking $7400. 334-794-6781
Cadillac '94 Seville, 4-door, new motor, good
condition white in color $2500. 334--792-5822.
CHEV '76 MONTE CARLO-
i ,l-l 400/4 BBL Numbers
match, cold A/C. 100K all
orig. runs strong cream
tan, car road ready $4,000
OBO 334-689-9045-MT
Chevrolet '99 Camero Z28 Convertible white in
color, less then 16K mi., garage kept, 1-owner
$20,000 OBOQ 850-638-0668.
Ford 2002 Explorer Sport Trac Fully loaded
with only 105,000 miles. Second owner of vehi-
cle and have owned it for the last 8 years. No
mechanical or drivetrain defects. Meticulously
cared for and maintained. Serviced regularly.
Leather, moonroof, tonneau cover, DVD player,
bed extender, running boards...it has it all!
$9,250 OBO. Contact Jordan at 913-219-2266.
=- Ford '95 Mustang GT
Convertible-1 Owner, white
S- --"" leather interior. 200k mile ,
runs great. needs paint,
$3,500. Firm 334-695-2340
-, Ford Mustang '10 Coupe
A .V6 Automatic with dark
grey exterior and tinted
windows. Garage kept
and in great condition.
$15,000. Please call 334-791-7180
SOT BAD CREDIT? DO YOU NEED A VEHICLE? L
Call Steve 334-803-9550 RIDE TODAY!
$0 Down/ 1st Payment, Tax, Tag & Title
Repos, Slow Credit, Past Bankruptcy OK!
Push, Pull or Drag, Will Trade anything!
$10Wamart Gift Cardw/IPurchase! )

Mercedes '93 300 SD, REDUCED
one owner, very clean, excellent condition,
never wrecked or damaged, sunroof,
leather interior, 4 door, champagne color,
$5995 850-569-2475
Mercury Grand '03 Marquis LE 1-owner, V-8,
service regularly, garage kept, exc. cond. good
gas mil. 59K mi. $8000. Firm. 334-393-1440.
NISSAN '08 MAXIMA, 6 cyl., 4 dr., grey 65K mi.,
very clean $17,000 334-687-6036
Pontiac 2005 GTO -excellent condition 82k
miles a/c blows COLD tires have less than 2k
miles on them Oil changed with mobile 1 syn-
thetic every 5k miles manual 6 speed Hurst
performance shifter K&N filter Gets on average
26 mpg on the hwy (most mileage is hwy) and
20 in the city $14,500 or best offer, call between
1-10 p.m., 334-796-2000, No trades

Pontiac'96 Trans Am: Red, low miles,.
fully loaded, T-tops, automatic.
Non Nicer $4,500. Priced to Sell!
Call 334-687-9788 or 334-695-6368

AD- e<-ERTi SE IN
TH-E CLASSIFIEDS


2006 Honda CRF250r. low hours, runs excellent.
$600 Tune-up just completed at Dothan
Powersports. Brand new rear tire! Aftermarket
exhaust. Located in Graceville, FL.
Call 229-977-2137.
2009 Kawasaki Ninja
Z\-.,)R Monster Edition
fBlack with monster logos
& qreen trim. Has less
Shan 3000 miles. Great
cond. $6,500 negotiable.
Call or text 334-714-1758, and leave message.
2010 Harley Davidson Ultra Classic FLHTCUI,
vivid black, 5594 miles, $9,750. No time
wasters! riderheavey@gmail.com,334-663-2773
Harley Davidson '01 Dyna Super Glide:
1450CC, runs great, just out of storage. Only
3200 miles. Asking $6000. Call 850-209-0747
Harley Davidson '08 Soft Tail Custom
black in color 4,800 mi. Vances & Hines Pro
pipe. K & N filters, new battery, lowering kit,
extras asking $12,000. 334-701-6968.
Troy area. 1-owner
Yamaha 2008 YZ250F White Edition. XL racing
rims. Pro taper handle bars. Full set of inter-
changeable black plastic. K N air filter. Runs
great. Low hours. Well-maintained. $2,800.
(334) 701-6262. Please leave message if no an-
swer.


Chevrolet '11 Tahoe
-LT, LOADED,
White, All Leather,
Captain's Chairs, DVD
System, 5k Miles.
Excellent Condition.
LIKE NEW!! ONLY $37,500 Call 334-714-7251
Ford '10 Expedition 4x4, fully loaded, sunroof, ,
factory installed rear entertainment system,
towing package with hitch,19,000 miles, arctic
winterized with auto-start and factory installed
arctic plug-in, flex fuel equipped (E-85), LED
light bar installed, great vehicle for dity moves
or anyone pcsing to Alaska. Asking $37,000.
Please call 907-231-0227. Enterprise, Alabama
GMC '06 Yukon XL SLT
sp172,000 mi. one owner, A/C
ice cold, Always garaged,
Exc. cond, New brakes,
Loaded w/all the goodies,
Looks drives great, mostly hwy. miles. Non-
smoker, very clean int, well maintained, Free
Carfax report incl. $9,995. Tim 850-728-3316


Chevrolet '00 Silverado, 3-door, 128 K + Miles,
$7000 334-588-2117
Chevrolet '86 Pickup, longwheel base
w/camper top. 79K + Miles. $3000
334-588-2117
Chevrolet '92 Cheyenne
Truck V6 5-Speed,
A/C, New Tires, Long Bed,
92K mi.
Excellent Condition
$2800 OBO 334-798-1768 or 334-691-2987
FARM EQUPIMENT: 2 sets of Cultivators,
4 sets of Duplex Covington Planters, needs
some repair, but will make a good set.
$1000. For All 334-791-4742.
Ford '02 Ranger Edge V-6, cruise control
am/fm/cd, air-cold, white in color, very clean
$5000. OBO 334-726-1215.
Ford '09 450 King Ranch
Very good condition,
Navi, back up camera,
moon roof, extra fuel
tank, extended
warranty, 28k miles,
$42,500. Call 334-447-2335

B- r 't John Deere '06 5103
tractor: 351 Hrs, bush
hog, box blade, and disc
all 72" also comes with
goose neck trailer and
tool box, 30 gal fuel tank,
electric pump and winch.
$14,500. Call 334-447-2335
Kubota '08 4240 HST: with 852 front end loader,
4WD. 450 hours. $17.900. Call 850-573-1806


NISSAN '94 EXT. CAB, Auto, 4 wh drive, $3,500
and Cobra '92 Boat, 16ft, 55HP Johnson motor,
power trim., good condition $4,200 334-232-
4610


Old John Deere M series
Tractor: with bushhog,
discs, planters and plow.
Works. $3000 OBO
(850) 557-4416 or (334)
718-6698.
Toyota 2008 Tacoma Regular
Cab Pickup. Like New! Less
than 12,000 mi-one owner.
It is white with grey interior
bench seat. 4 cyr auto-
e ..3 3..4-7 matic-air cond. I am asking
$13,500. $2,000 less than KBB
value! 334-714-4874


Chevy '01 Astro Mini Van, loaded, 8 passen-
gers, 110K miles, $5,000. Call 334-794-7447.
Ford '03 E350 Van:
S Super Duty Cargo
series, V8 engine, auto,
power windows and
locks, steel storage
drawer and shelves, cold AC, rack on top for
ladders. $4,900. Call 334-726-1958

Ford '06 E-250 Econoline:
ladder rack, 5.4 eng. Air
Second tilt wheel, cruise,
good cond:, 120k miles.
Must see and drive to
appreciate!
$7900.00 call 334-894-2315
GMC '94 Safari:
7 passenger, 4 captain
chairs, bench seat rear,
power door locks, 125k
miles, white with black
pin stripes. Asking
$2,995. Call 334-347-1058


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Mariamnna JV


JV Bulldogs get


two straight wins

BY SHELIA MADER
Floridan Correspondent
The Marianna High Bulldogs junior varsity baseball
team picked up a pair of wins this past weekend, handing
Crestview a 12-2 loss Friday and topping Wakulla 5-1
Saturday.
In Saturday's game, Walker Roberts went the distance
for Marianna, giving up one run on seven hits and no
walks while striking out five.
Marianna struck first with a run in the top of the first
inning.
Kody Bryan singled with one out. Walks to Andrew
Shouse and Chris Johnson, followed by Seth Singletary's
single plated a run.
Wakulla tied the game in the bottom half of the fourth
inning, but Marianna exploded in the top of the fifth
inning for its final four runs.
Heath Roberts got things going with a leadoff walk
but was out at second on a fielder's choice by Trenton
Nobles.
Tyler Colson tripled home Colson and scored on an
errant throw at third.
Nic Helms took advantage of another Wakulla error
to reach safely, with Bryan, being hit by a pitch to put
runners at first and second.
A walk to Shouse loaded the bases before an RBI single
by Johnson, a wild pitch and a passed ball, plated the
final two runs.
A single in the seventh inning by Helms was the final
hit of the game for Marianna.
Madison Harrell went the distance for the Bulldogs in
Friday's game, giving up two runs on no hits and three
walks while striking out seven.
The bats were alive for the Bulldogs, and they took
advantage of every Crestview miscue.
A total of six walks were issued to Marianna hitters,
with Chris Johnson picking up a triple to make it an 11-
2 game.
Walks and errors plated the final run of the game for
Marianna, which was scheduled to host county rival
Sneads on Tuesday night.


Marixanxm.a. Baseball


.5' ~
A V1 ~' .3


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Austin Branch pitches for Marianna Monday night during
the Bulldogs'game against Niceville.


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SPORTS


; 1


hits and three walks while
striking out three.
Madison Harrell pitched
a scoreless seventh to earn
the save, walking one and
striking out another.
Branch also led the Bull-
dogs offensively, finishing
2 for 3 with two RBI and
a run scored, while Bran-
don Burch had two hits, a
run, and an RBI, and Seth
Singletary was 2 for 3 with
a double, an RBI and two
runs. Bradly Middleton had
a hit, a run, and an RBI, and
Michael Mader also had a
hit and an RBI.
The Bulldogs hosted
Sneads on Tuesday night
and will finish the week
Friday by getting back into
District 1-4A competition
with a road trip to Walton
to take on the Braves.
MHS is 1-1 in the league
while Walton is 0-1.


~t:; ;"


more difficult for Elway.
"I've got to make the
best decisions I can for the
Denver Broncos. Without
a doubt in my mind, this
is the best decision for the
Denver Broncos at this
point and time," Elway
said.
Manning eventually
plans to reach out to
Tebow, once he settles in
and catches his breath
after his whirlwind free
agency tour.


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Bulldogs end losing

sid against Niceville


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Marianna Bulldogs
posted their 10h victory of
the season at home Mon-
day night at home while
also snapping a two-game
losing streak with a 6-3 win
over the Niceville Eagles.
The Bulldogs had suf-
fered a pair of heartbreak-
ing losses in their last two
games, falling to Crestview
and Wakulla by a single run
each.
But Marianna found its
way back to the winners'
circle Monday, jumping out
to a 5-0 lead through three
innings and holding off a
late charge by Niceville.
Austin Branch started on
the mound and got the win
for the Bulldogs, going six
innings and surrendering
three earned runs on seven


Tebow
From Page 2B
fans for reasons that have
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A devoted Christian, he's
been a role model since his
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tional titles and captured
the Heisman Trophy.
His soaring popularity
made this decision even


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