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Jackson County Floridan
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028304/00772
 Material Information
Title: Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title: Sunday Floridan
Portion of title: Floridan
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Jackson County Floridan
Publisher: Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Marianna Fla
Creation Date: March 2, 2012
Publication Date: 3/7/2012
Frequency: daily (except saturday and monday)[<1979-1995>]
weekly[ former 1934-<1955>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates: 30.776389 x -85.238056 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note: "Independent."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID: UF00028304:00772
 Related Items
Preceded by: Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by: Marianna Floridan

Full Text


Informing more than 17,000 readers daily in print and online


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Sneads Pirates defeat

Liberty County Bulldogs

in extra innings. See

more on page lB.


1 Aledia (;eierr l Neuwi A )er


Washington County


Man accused of murder enters no-contest plea


From staff reports neighbor, Bobby Lynn Hawkins.
In addition to the primary
A Washington County man ac- charge, he pleaded to the re-
'cused of second-degree murder lated offense of home invasion
entered a no-contest plea to that robbery with a firearm.
charge and other related offens- Reed's plea came roughly three
es in court this week. weeks before his trial was set to
Tamia S. Reed was charged begin.
in the shooting death of his "In a press release issued on


behalf of the State Attorney's
Office, authorities say that Reed
shot himself in the arm after
killing Hawkins, and concocted
a story about a masked gun-
man. Hie initially told officers
he found Hawkins on the' floor
after hearing gunshots, and that
he was shot himself by a masked


gunman who ran past as he
attended to his neighbor.
But investigators determined
that Reed killed Hawkins after
an argument the previous night
about a deer that one of them
had killed.
Reed, 27, of Bonifay, faces 25
years to life forthe second-degree


murder, and life for the home
invasion robbery.
The plea was unexpected, ac-
cording to the press release, as
the state had offered no plea
deal in the case.
Circuit Judge Chris Patterson is
scheduled to sentence Reed on
April 19.


Officials


react to new


state 'parent


trigger' bill

BY LAUREN DELGADO
ldelgado@jcfloridan.com

A bill that will allow parents to create
a plan for a failing school is being de-
bated by the Florida Senate.
State Reps. Marti Coley and Brad
Drake both voted in favor of this bill.
They were in session Tuesday and were
unable to respond to the Floridan's
questions.
Parents with students in a failing
school can gather petitions to imple-
ment a plan for the school. If a major-
, ity of school parents agree, the plan can
constitute moving students to a differ-
ent school, converting the school into
a nonprofit charter or hiring a school
management, company to oversee the
school.
No Jackson County school has an F
grade at this time. However, the increase
in the criteria for FCAT passing scores
threatens those grades, said Superin-
tendent Lee Miller. He doesn't expect
any Jackson County school to receive
an F next year but remains cautious.
Miller also said the bill doesn't give fail-
ing schools enough time to improve.
"If you don't do good you need a
change, but I just think it gives the op-
portunity for corporate takeovers in a
hurry," Miller said.
Proponents of the bill say it will give
parents more of a hand in their child's
education and give them more of an in-
centive to do so.
Dave Galloway, president of the Jack-
son County Educators Association,
said the bill turns over publicly funded
schools to corporations who may not
have the interests of students at heart.
The bill isn't truly empowering for par-
ents, he said, because it gives them poor
alternatives for their child's education.
"I'mn not saying there's no good char-
ter school, but they have a failure rate
way above that of public schools,"
Galloway said. '
The bill also requires the school board
to notify parents that their children
See PARENTS, Page 7A


CONSTRUCTION NEWS



Marianna's natural gas




line gets an expansion

BYDEBORAH BUCKHALTER C:- -
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com .

SCrews from RAW Construction are busy .
this week laying out and welding the sec- !1
tions of an expanded natural gas line for
the city of Marianna.
Stretching an estimated 21,000 feet
eastward from the existing end-of-line on
the edge of town, the six-inch steel line
will run along U.S. 90 to the Anderson-
Columbia road construction company
on State Road 71 in unincorporated Jack-
son County. Funding is being sought for
a second phase, which would send the ..- .
line further south to the Dairy Queen res- 4. -- ,
taurant. Before gets to Anderson-Colum- -
bia on SR 71, the line will turn south off .'. .4..
U.S. 90 into the Park Centre commercial ..
complex. From there it will continue east --.
and south to the paving company. Be-
cause sections of Park Center abut SR 71,
potential customers on the SR 71 stretch
north of Anderson Columbia could also
tap into the line.LA
Park Centre is a holding of Quality Ser-
vices, with Bob and Katherine Pforte as
two of the principal owners who gave
easement allowing the line to come
through. Bob Pforte said he sees the line
as a positive development for his own
property, other businesses in the area
and for the city's overall welfare.
"It opens the doorway to other com-
mercial projects coming in," Pforte ex-
plained, "That's why we agreed to give
easement."
In addition to making his Park Centre
parcels more attractive because it gives
potential buyers more utility options, it
could also make the entire pathway of the ,
line a more desirable location for incom- ,
ing businesses, he acknowledged. .- .'
This phase of the project is expected be -
completed near the end of summer.
Another 7,600 feet would take the line ,
to Dairy Queen. Design for that second DEBORAH BUCKHALTER/FLORIDAN
phase is underway now. The cost of the Zach Brock of RAW Construction (left) welds sections of a natural gas line together as
Melvin Engineering welding inspector Pete Gilmore looks on. Melvin has the inspection
See LINE, Page 7A services contract on the job,


Local author participating in contest

BY LAUREN DELGADOF
idelgado@jcfloridan.comrn

Local author Margena Bell Myrick I .i R'
is competing against 1,300 other
entrepreneurs in Walmart's "Get on
the Shelf" contest. I .
Contestants pitched their prod-
uct via video to Walmart. The com- A.
pany is posting those videos so the ....."
public can vote on their favorite
product during two rounds. The .
first round begins today and lasts
until April 4. The 10 contestants .
with the most votes will then have at U '
voting period from April 11-24. The ....
three contestants with the highest .
votes will have their productsold at SUBMITTED PHOTO
A copy of Margena Bell Myrick's book "Grandparents and Grand Lessons" along
See AUTHOR, Page 7A with two purses that correlate with one of the book's stories,"Pocketbook:'


State cutting security

hours at rest stops


BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com

People traveling through
Florida may not always see
a security officer on duty at
the state's rest stops when
they motor through the
state.
At the close of February,
the state Department of
Transportation cut secu-
rity hours significantly.
Instead of manning each
rest stop 16 hours, primar-
ily in the evening, the state
cut the duty hours to 10,


and those hours are to be
split between the east and
west bound rest stops in
the case of paired rest ar-
eas, which is the case in
most instances. There are
paired stops in Jackson
County and the nearby
counties of Gadsden, Leon,
Jefferson, Holmes, Okaloo-
sa and Santa Rosa, and at
most other counties across
the rest of the state.
The result is that each
stop will have about five
See CUTS, Page 7A


CLASSIFIEDS...5-7B


This Newspaper f ,
Is Printed On .
Recycled Newsprint




,7 '6 5 1 61 80050 9


) ENTERTAINMENT...4B


) LOCAL...3A, 6-7A


> OBITUARIES...7A


> OPINION...4A


Chevrolet-Buick-Cadillac-Nissan

"".t ^4204 Lafayette St. Marianna, FL.
S,' ; 4 4


> SPORTS...1-3B, 8B


) TV LISTINGS...3B


,Chuck Anderson Greg Anderson Gus Parmer





Service Manager Body Shop Manager, Parts Manager
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Vol.89 No.48


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


12A WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7, 2012


Weather Outlook


Today



/ -
_1#J- -M-:=


Sunny & Breezy.
-Justin Kiefer / WMBB


High 750
Low 530


ti --'igh: 74
. LE.Lu: 53 .
... igh: 7.1
S -^.. li.n: 53


.-. High: 76
Lo-w: 53


Hilh:72


High-780
SLow 59


Thursday
Mostly Sunny and Warmer.


- ",- High 770
Low -600


Saturday
Scattered Showers.


'' High-790
Low 610

Friday
Warm & Humid.


Sunday
Isolated Showers.


- i- High: 75
PRECIPITATION ,- Low: 57


24 hours
Month to date
Normal MTD

TIDES
Panama City
Apalachicola
Port St. Joe
Destin
Pensacola


0.00"
5.31"
1.19"


Low -
Low -
Low -
Low -
Low -


RIVER READINGS
Woodruff
Blountstown
Marianna
CaryvillI


Year to date
Normal YTD
Normal for year


1- 4-

58.25"


5:10 AM High 9:53 PM
9:35 AM High 2:25 AM
5:15AM High 10:26 PM
6:26 AM High' 10:59 PM
7:00 AM High 11:32 PM

Reading Flood Stage
47.16 ft. 66.0 ft.
11.47 ft. 15.0 ft.
12.42 ft. 19.0 ft.
9.12 ft. 12.0 ft.


ULTRA VIOLET INDEX

0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8-10 Very High, 11+ Extreme
0 1 2 3 4 5


THE SUN AND MOON
Sunrise 6:00 AM
Sunset .5:44 PM
Moonrise 5:17 PM
Moonset 5:47 AM (Thu)


Mar. Mar. Mar. Mar.
8 15 22 30


FLORIDA'S fREAL

PANHANDLE COUNTRY

MEDIA PARTNERS WJAQ 10.9

hLjISTEN OR HURLYWEATER UDAE


ciim~ ~ ii ~3 ~JEJ[~*. -,
~ ]TTD ~il ~if1ix~ *
-

Th1W~D ~ -,


JACKS :,. COUNTY

FLORIDAN

Publisher Valeria Roberts
vroberts@jcfloridan.com

Circulation Manager Dena Oberski
doberski@jcfloridan.com




-II


CONTACT US
Telephone: 850-526-3614
FAX: 850-482-4478
Email: editorial@jcfloridan.com
Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447
Street Address:
4403 Constitution Lane
Marianna, FL 32446
Office Hours:
Weekdays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

MISS YOUR PAPER?
You should receive your newspaper no later
than 6 a.m. If it does not arrive, call Circula-
tion between 6 a.m. and noon, Tuesdayto
Friday, and 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. on Sunday. The
Jackson County Floridan (USPS 271-840)
is published Tuesday though Friday and
Sunday mornings. Periodical postage paid
at Marianna, FL.

SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Home delivery: $11.23 per month; $32.83
for three months; $62.05 for six months;
and $123.45 for one year. All prices include
applicable state and ':,:.jl1 : t .1ail3
subscriptions must be paid in advance. Mail
subscriptions are: $46.12 for three months;
$92.24 for six months; and $184.47 for one
year.

ADVERTISING
The advertiser agrees that the publisher
shall not be liable for damages arising
out of errors and advertisements beyond
the amount paid for the space actually
occupied by that portion of the advertise-
ments in which the error occurred, whether
such error is due to the negligence of the
publisher's employees or otherwise, and
there shall be not liability for non-inser-
tion of any advertisement beyond the
amount paid for such advertisement. This
newspaper will not knowingly accept or
publish illegal material of any kind. Advertis-
ing which expresses preference based on
legally protected personal characteristics is
not acceptable.

HOWTO GETYOUR
NEWS PUBLISHED
The Jackson County Floridan will publish
news of general interest free of charge.
Submit your news or Community Calendar
events via email, fax, mail, or hand delivery.
Fees may apply for wedding, engagement,
' anniversary and birth announcements.
Forms are available at the Floridan offices.
Photographs must be of'good quality and
suitable for print. The Floridan reserves the
right to edit all submissions.

GETTING IT RIGHT
In a story that ran Tuesday, the
names of the Graceville candidates
were inadvertently attributed to
Malone, and the Malone candidates
were erroneously attributed to
Graceville.


.. . '


TODAY
Blood Drive Southeastern Community Blood
Center's mobile unit stops in Sneads today: 8 a.m.
to noon EST at Apalachee Correctional Institution-
East Unit; and 1to 4 p.m. EST at ACI-West; or give
blood at the SCBC office: 2503 Commercial Park
Drive in Marianna, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. CST Monday-
Friday. Call 526-4403.
) Jackson County Habitat for Humanity
Warehouse hours: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
) Free Tax Prep at Chipola 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
Wednesday at Chipola College, room M-201. Busi-
ness instructor Lee Shook and student volunteers
provide free tax preparation and electronic filing
(individual returns only). Call 718-2368 for an ap-
pointment; walk-ins are welcome but may have to
wait longer.
Free Tax Preparation/E-filing AARP Tax-Aide
is available, by appointment only, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
at the Jackson County Agriculture Offices, 2741
Pennsylvania Ave. in Marianna. Call 482-9620 (8:30
a.m. to 4:30 p.m.) for an appointment.
Southerland Staff Mobile Office Hours -10
a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Sneads Town Hall Council
Room, 2028 Third Ave., Sneads. Residents of Jack-
son County and the surrounding area are invited
to join members of Rep. Steve Southerland's staff
to provide input on legislation, ask questions or
request assistance with a federal agency.
- Job Club 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the Good-
wHI Career Training Center, 4742 U.S. Highway 90 in
Marianna, providing free job-seeking and -retention
skills. Call 526-0139.
)) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting noon
to 1 p.m. in the AA roomn of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.
)) Florida JuCo basketball tournament March
7-10 in the Chipola College Milton H. Johnson Health
Center with games at 1, 3, 6 and 8 p.m. Wednesday-
Friday; championship games are 5 and 7:30 p.m.
Saturday. Tournament passes (14 games) are $25
for adults, $15 for students. Single session tickets
(two games) are $10. Call 718-2220, or visit www.
chipola.edu.
) Grand Ridge Town Council Meeting 5 p.m.
in the Grand Ridge Town Hall. Public welcome. Call
592-4621.
) Jackson Hospital Board of Trustees Building
and Grounds Committee Meeting 5:30 p.m. in
the classroom. Call 718-2629.
n Puppy/dog obedience Class Jackson
County Ag Center Horse Arena. The 8-week class,
presented by the Southeast Alabama Kennel Club,
meets Wednestdays, March 7 through April 25. Call
209-0872 or 579.4424 for reservations and more
.information.


S ..


THURSDAY, MARCH 8
a Rummage Sale Fundraiser 7:30 a.m. to 3
p.m. March 3, 6, 8, 9 and 10 at Panhandle Pioneer
Settlement in Blountstown, with over 4,000 square
feet of clothing, furniture, house wares, collectables,
toys and more. Call 850-674-2777.
) Orientation 12:30 p.m. at the Goodwill Career
Training Center, 4742 U.S. Highway 90 in Marianna.
Register for free job placement and computer
training classes and learn about services offered
to people with disadvantages/disabilities. Call
526-0139.
) Florida JuCo basketball tournament March
7-10 in the Chipola College Milton H. Johnson Health
Center with games at 1, 3, 6 and 8 p.m. Wednesday-
Friday; championship games are 5 and 7:30 p.m.
Saturday. Tournament passes (14 games) are $25
for adults, $15 for students. Single session tickets
(two games) are $10. Call 718-2220.
D Free Tax Preparation/E-filing AARP Tax-Aide
is available, by appointment only, 4:30 to 7:30 p.m.
at the Jackson County Agriculture Offices, 2741
Pennsylvania Ave. in Marianna. Call 482-9620 (8:30
a.m. to 4:30 p.m.) for an appointment.
) Free Yoga Class 5:30 p.m. at Chipola Fitness
Center, 4230 Lafayette St: in Marianna. Mats
provided. Offered in partnership with the Jackson
County Health Department's Closing the Gap
program. Call 482-6221.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Closed discussion, 8
to 9 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901 Cale-
donia St., Marianna, in the AA room. Attendance
limited to persons with a desire to stop drinking.

FRIDAY, MARCH 9
Rummage Sale Fundraiser 7:30 a.m. to 3
p.m. March 3, 6, 8, 9 and 10 at Panhandle Pioneer
Set UIe,-,,-r in Blountstown, ..'ith over 4,000 square
feet of clothing, furniture, house wares, collectables,
toys and more. Call 850-674-2777.
) Free Workshops Budgeting Workshop (8:30
to 9:30 a.m.), Employ Florida Marketplace (10 to 11
a.m.), Computer Basics 101 (1:30 to 2:30 p.m.) and
Spanish Workshop (3 to 4 p.m.) at Marianna One
Stop Career Center. Call 718-0326.
n Small Business Seminar "International
Import/Export Trade Basics," 9:30 to 11:30 a.m.
at Chipola College, Business and Technology
building, Room M-108. An overview of import and
export opportunities for Florida businesses. Cost:
$30. Pre-registration required; call 718-2441, visit
http://bit.ly/CCSmallBusiness or iriinl seversone@
chipola.edu.
) Salem Soldiers Relay for Life Team Pulled
Pork Plate -10 a.m. at Salem Wesleyan Church in
Sneads. $6 per plate (pulled pork, coleslaw, baked


beans, bread and dessert). Call 491-1022.
) Florida JuCo basketball tournament March
7-10 in the Chipola College Milton H. Johnson Health
Center with games at 1,3, 6 and 8 p.m. Wednesday-
Friday; championship games are 5 and 7:30 p.m.
Saturday. Tournament passes (14 games) are $25
for adults,'$15 for students. Single session tickets
(two games) are $10. C all 718-2220, or visit www.
chipola.edu.
) Marianna Social Security Office Move The
Marianna Social Security Administration Office
at 2916 Madison St. closes at 3 p.m. today. It will
reopen 8:30 a.m. Monday, March 12 at its new loca-
tion: 4125 Jireh Court (next to Marianna Toyota on
Pennsylvania Avenue). C a1l 888-397-4815.
) Celebrate Recovery 7 p.m. at Evangel Worship
Center, 2645 Pebble Hill Road in Marianna. AJult,
teen meetings to "overcome hurts, habits and
hang-ups." Dinner: 6 p.m. Child care available. Call
209-7856 or 573-1131.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 8
to 9 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.

SATURDAY, MARCH 10
Rummage Sale Fundraiser 7:30 a.m. to 3
p.m. March 3, 6, 8, 9 and 10 at Panhandle Pioneer
Settlement in Blountstown, with over 4,000 square
feet of clothing, furniture, house wares, collectables,
toys and more. Call 850-674-2777.
Life Expo/Marianna Day of Hope 9 a.m.
to 1 p.m. at the Assemblies of God District Camp-
grounds/Donald E. Price Activity Center, 4792 U.S.
Highway 90 in Marianna, "Advocating Community
Wellness and Safety." Free health screenings, food
pantry (1-tritjbulirn, infant CPR training, comrrunity
wellness and safety vendors, kids carnival and
entertainment. Free to the public; all ages welcome.
Call 718-2661 or 482-3844.
Turkey Shoot Fundraiser -1 p.m. at AMVETS
Post 231, north of Fountain (east side of US 231, just
south of CR 167). Cost: $2 a shot. Call 850-722-
0291.
) Florida JuCo basketball tournament
championship games 5 and 7:30 p.m. in the
Chipola College Milton H. Johnson Health Center.
Tournament passes (14 games) are $25 for adults,
$15 for students. Single session tickets (two games)
are $10. Call 718-2220, or visit www.chipola.edu.
Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting 4:30
to 5:30 p.m. in the AA room of First United Method-
ist Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.

SUNDAY, MARCH 11
a Spring Forward Daylight Saving Time begins
at 2 a.m. Set clocks ahead one hour.


The submission deadline for this calendar is two days before publication. Submit to: Community Calendar, Jackson County Floridan, P. 0. Box 520, Marianna, FL32447,
email editorial@jcfloridan.com, fax 850-482-4478 or bring items to 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.
- --, i- -


MARIANNA POLICE
DEPARTMENT
The Marianna Police De-
partment listed the following
incidents for March t, the latest
available report: One hit and
run vehicle, one
missing juve- .,
nile, one suspi- ... -- :-
cious vehicle, I
one suspicious CRIM E
incident, one
suspicious
person, one burglary alarm,
eight traffic stops, one obscene/
threatening call, one fight in
progress, one animal com-
plaint, one fraud complaint,
one assist of a motorist/pe-
destrian, one assist of another


agency and one public service
call.

JACKSON COUNTY
SHERIFF'S OFFICE
The Jackson County Sheriff's
Office and county Fire/Rescue
reported the following incidents
for March 5, the latest available
report. (Some of these calls may
be related to after-hours calls
taken on behalf of Graceville
and Cottondale Police de-
partments): One hit and run,
vehicle, one accident with no
injury, one hospice death, two
stolen vehicles, three suspicious
vehicles, two suspicious inci-
dents, one. suspicious person,
one funeral escort, one burglary


complaint, one verbal distur-
bance, one prowler complaint,
22 medical calls, one traffic
crash, four burglary alarms, six
traffic stops, one larceny com-
plaint, two civil disputes, one
juvenile complaint, one suicide
attempt, one noise disturbance,
two assists of a motorist/'pe-
destrian and two public service
calls.

JACKSON COUNTY
CORRECTIONAL FACILITY
The following persons were
booked into the county jail dur-
ing the latest reporting periods:
) Bobby Freeman, 38, 2826
Barnes St., Marianna, pos-
session of cocaine, disorderly


conduct.
a Andrew Hammond, 26,1249
Hwy 71, Marianna, violation of
community control.
)) Jeffery McCall, 37, 2132
Minnesota Ave., Lynn Haven,
violation of state probation.
) Amber Criswell, 23, 6436
Marvin Lane, Southport, viola-
tion of county probation.
) Charles Adamson, 48, 325
13 St., Panama City, failure to
appear.


JAIL POPULATION: 191

To report a crime, call CrimeStoppers
at 526-5000 or a local law enforcement
agency. To report a wildlife violation, call
.1-888-404-FWCC (3922).


". Iligh: 75
- Low: 52


Chevrolet-Buick-Cadillac-Nissan
4204 Lafayette St. Marianna, FL.

(850) 482-3051


I~'~`-`~`~~I-x~`-------~II-~


W1IHE-UP CALL


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Awards recognize excellence in community health


Special to the Floridan

During the Sapphire
Award presentation, eight
honorees were recognized
for positively impacting
the health of their fellow
Floridians. The Sapphire
Award is presented annu-
ally by Blue Cross and Blue
Shield of Florida Founda-
tion, the philanthropic
affiliate of Blue Cross and
Blue Shield of Florida.
The Sapphire Award is
Florida's only statewide
honor that recognizes
organizations that have
demonstrated excellence
in addressing community
health care needs.
This year $360,000 in
grants were made, includ-
ing $30,000 awarded to


Life Management Center
of Northwest Florida for
receiving a 2012 Sapphire
Award Honorable Mention:
Excellence in Community
Health Organization.
LMC of Northwest Florida
provides mental, behav-
ioral, family counseling
and substance abuse ser-
vices to low-income, un-
insured and underinsured
children and adults in Bay,
Calhoun, Gulf, Homes,
Jackson and Washington
counties.
"We salute this year's
honorees for their ad-
mirable work to reach
underserved and unin-
sured Floridians.. These
individuals, programs and
organizations have each
demonstrated excellence


while working to improve
their community," said Su-
san Towler, vice president,
Blue Cross and Blue Shield
of Florida Foundation. "It
is our hope that others will
follow their lead and im-
prove the health and well-
being of Floridians who
need it the most."
This year's ceremony
took place at the Wynd-
ham Grand Orlando, Bon-
net Creek following a sym-
posium featuring health
care experts and leaders,
including a keynote ad-
dress from Dr. Leighton Ku
of The George Washington
University.
For more information
on the BCBSF Foundation,
visit www.BlueFounda
tionFL.com.


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Life Management Center CEO Ned Ailes accepts the award
from Pat Geraghty, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida's
president, chairman and CEO.


Marianna High band members perform at festival


Special to the Floridan

Fifty-seven members of
Marianna High School's
band participated in the
Florida Bandmasters Asso-
ciation's annual District II
Solo and Ensemble Music
Performance Assessment.
Held at The Baptist Col-
lege of Florida and Gracev-
ille High School, the Febru-
ary competition included
Marianna's participation
in 28 separate competi-
tions, including instru-
mental and auxiliary solos,
a sax quartet, a brass quin-
tet, a brass ensemble, the
Dance Line (10 members),
the Color Guard/Flag Line
(three members), two sep-
arate percussion ensem-
bles, and the Jazz Band.
Many students performed
several times in various


combinations of solos and
larger ensembles.
All performances were
scored by sanctioned ad-
judicators who gave the
students comments and
issued scores ranging from
a top score of, Superior
(I) to Excellent (II), Good
(III), Fair (IV), and Poor
(V). MHS students earned
.a total of 74 Superior (I)
medals, six Excellent (II)
medals, and one Good (III)
medal. The Flag Line at-
tended for comment only
and did not receive a score.
The Dance Line earned a
score of Superior and is
eligible to advance to the
State MPA which subjects
the performances to a
higher level of grading.
An additional factor in
the instrumental perfor-
mances is the difficulty


SUBMITTED PHOTO
The Marianna High band students perform.
rating of the music being instrumentalist playing advance to the State MPA.
performed with Level I be- music rated at Level 5 or The North Florida MPA
ing the easiest and Level higher and earning a score will be held April 2-3 in
7 being the hardest. Each of Superior is eligible to Gainesville.


Divorce

Report

Special to the Floridan

The following mar-
riages and divorces were
recorded in Jackson
County during the week
of Feb. 27-March 2:
Marriages
> Ryan Cody Brown-
ing and Brittany Danielle
Lundgren
) Kenneth Wayne Lee
and Julia Marie Francis
Suggs
) Jessica La Nea Gard-
ner and Edward Lee
Perry Jr.
) Jonathon Earl Baker
and Elizabeth Quinn
Fuller
) Forrest Chad Chafin
and Catherine Elizabeth
Lane
Ln Joshua Brandon
Bradford and Melissa
Ann Harris.
Divorces
) Julie Rayne Ball vs.
Jeffrey Michael Ball
) Michelle Isabel Abar-
zua vs. Ernest Wayne
Cummings IV
) Jennifer Denise Reyn-
olds vs. Kenneth Jack
Reynolds
) Crystal Gooden vs.
Dustin Gooden
> Myra Gail Helms vs.
Charles Elliette Helms
) Heather Ozburn vs.
Andrew Kyle Gris
) Joel Friedrich vs.
Patricia Ann Friedrich.


Osteoporosis was focus of Optimist speaker Nuccio


Special to the Floridan that about 1 out of 5 Amer- As you age, calcium and
ican women over the age phosphate may be reab-
Guest speaker for the of 50 have osteoporosis. sorbed back into the body
Optimist Club of Jackson About half of all women from the bones, which
County this month was over the age of 50 will have makes the bone tissue
Mike Nuccio. Mike is an a fracture of the hip, wrist, weaker. This can result in
associate with Tallahassee or vertebra (bones of the brittle, fragile bones that
Orthopedic Clinic in Mari- spine), are more prone to frac-
anna and he explained Osteoporosis occurs tures, even without injury.
the cause and preventa- when the body fails to Usually, the loss occurs
tive meds for Osteoporosis form enough new bone, gradually over years. Many
which is the most common when too much old bone times, a person will have a
type of bone disease. is reabsorbed by the body, fracture before becoming
Researchers estimate or both. aware that the disease is
present. By the time a frac-
Fioridla LOtt er ture occurs, the disease is
Sin its advanced stages and
[ASH3PL4 FANTASY 5 damage is severe.
or' (E -3. 7 8 5 1 7-1120228 The leading causes of
orn (E 3, 7-2 0519 -11-20.2.28 osteoporosis are a drop
Mocn (M) 9.8 5 3 32-9 in estrogen in women at


Optimist Club of Jackson County President
with guest speaker Mike Nuccio of TOC.


the time of menopause
and a drop in testoster-
one in men. Women over


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Brigitta Nuccio


age 50 and men over age
70 have a higher risk for
osteoporosis.


Fashion Forward















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850.482.4037


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I OWRAL


WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7, 2012 3AF


LOCAL













Publisher
VALERIA ROBERTS


Tl Tampa Trfibune



Lets not forget



why we explore



outer space

We put a man on the moon. The Chinese didn't
do it. The Russians didn't do it. We Americans
did, and we're proud of it.
In these days of international trade, huge budget defi-
cits, a faltering economy, the end of the shuttle program
and partisan attacks on every bold idea put forward, it's
easy to forget why former President Kennedy set us on
a path that took us all the way from the Florida sand to
the rocky moon.
This would be a good time to remember. The public is
tmdecided about what NASA should do next. The pres-
ident's budget calls for a slight decrease in NASA fund-
ing and a big cut in programs to explore the planets.
Florida's Space Coast lhs worried about layoffs, but
Kennedy's thinking in the early 1960s wasn't about
creating jobs.
Kennedy said we were going to the moon hot because
it was easy, but because it was hard. But that doesn't
really explain why. In a recent article in Foreign Affairs
magazine, Neil de Grasse Tyson recalls Kennedy's
motive, which many of us have forgotten.
"He might have simply said, 'Let's go to the moon:
What a marvelous place to explore!' But no one would
have written the check," Tyson correctly observes.
Instead, Kennedy helped the nation see a moon trip
as part of the battle between freedom and tyranny. He
spoke of "the impact of this adventure on the minds of
men everywhere, who are attempting to make a
determination of which road they should take."
Seen as another way to fight communism, moon
rockets became a good investment.
America, rightly worried in 2012 about running up
unpayable debts, has scaled back space flights. We don't
need to roar off to Mars at any price and on borrowed
money, but it's not a choice between all or nothing.
A strong space program remains an important part
of U.S. world leadership, is only a small fraction of
the budget, and will pay off in ways we cannot now
imagine.
President Obama proposes going to Mars by the
2030s, which is to say he is leaving it to other adminis-
trations to figure out.
Republican presidential hopeful Newt Gingrich, in a
Florida speech, echoed Kennedy in taking responsibil-
ity for getting there on his watch: "By the end of my
second term, we will have the first permanent base on
the moon, and it will be American."
Gingrich envisions a primarily private venture, not a
government one. We aren't sure how the commercial in-
vestors are supposed to get a return on their money, but
Gingrich raises issues that could get the nation thinking
creatively, and big. Before writing off the idea as loony,
think what an endorsement the project would be for
both our political and economic freedoms.
Tyson, who is director of the Hayden Planetarium at
the American Museum of Natural History, also em-
phasizes how pure research can improve our lives and
health. He cites the Hubble Space Telescope, whose
initial pictures of the stars were too fuzzy to be of much
use.
The telescope was later fixed, and people all over
the world are using stunning shots of distant galaxies
as screen savers on personal computers. But even the
initial malfunction paid off. ,
Techniques invented to bring the blurred images into
focus were found to also help reveal abnormalities in
mammograms. What helped astrophysicists see stars
also helped doctors searching for potential tumors.
Because of the design flaw in the Hubble, "countless
women are alive today," Tyson writes.
U.S. budget problems are real and must be fixed. But
in the process, let's not forget who we are. We're the
people who went to the moon, and that was just the -
beginning.

Letters to the Editor
SSubmit letters by either mailing to Editor. PO. Bo,. 520.
Marianna FL. 32447 or la. ing to 850-482-4478 or send
email to editorial@ 'cfloridan corn. The Floridan reserves .
the right to edit or not publish any letter Be sure to
include your lull address and telephone number. These
will only be used to verify the letter and will not be
printed. For more information call 850-526-3614


UNIVERSAL UCLICKO toZ


A great loss for the Republic


BY DONNA BRAZILE

W ow. While Mitt Romney
was saying he would not
"set my hair on fire" to
corner conservative votes, senior
GOP lawmaker Olympia Snowe of
Maine was throwing in the towel.
Politico ran the headline "Snowe
Out, Democrats Celebrate." But
trust me, their relief over having
a fair shot for Snowe's Senate seat
was tempered by their personal
sorrow over her departure. Olym-
pia Snowe is a highly respected
lawmaker with a history of fre-
quently working across party lines.
She helped make our democratic
process function. She bridged
gaps of ideology to forge common
agreements.
Voters interested in seeing more
civility in our public discourse and
among officeholders should be
saddened by her decision and view
it as diminishing the democratic
process. With Snowe gone, the Re-
publican Party will move even more
to the right.
Only a handful of the moderates
who once dominated the Republi-
can Party are left. Democrats also
have had their share of retirements
this year, but Snowe's departure
quickens a slide to a Constitu-
tional crisis, where the legislative
branch becomes increasingly
non-functional.
Olympia Snowe has served 18
years in the U.S. Senate. She is the


only woman in American history
to have been elected to both the
Maine House and Senate, as well as
the U.S. House and Senate. During
the tumultuous battle over health
reform, she was the only Republi-
can willing to sit down and forge a
compromise. Though Snowe voted
against the final version of the
bill, her vote to allow the Senate to
proceed with its deliberations on
the issue brought her a tea party
primary opponent.
You may be familiar with the
expression "RINO." The acronym
stands for: "Republican in Name
Only." It is a derisive term and is be-
ing increasingly applied to a wider
and wider scope of Republican
officeholders. Today, for instance,
there are no liberal Republicans
currently holding office in the U.S.
Senate. They are as extinct as the
Dodo bird.
People my age recall Republican
liberals like Nelson Rockefeller,
who became vice president under
Gerald Ford, Jacob Javits, a Repub-
lican liberal revered enough to have
New York City's Convention Center
named after him, Clifford Case
of New Jersey, Mark Hatfield of
Oregon, just to name a few.
Even moderates have been
almost completely purged from
the Republican Party. There are but
three centrist Republicans left in
the U.S. Senate: Richard Lugar of
Indiana, Orrin Hatch of Utah and
Susan Collins of Maine. The


moderates of days past, senators
like Everett Dirksen of Illinois,
Margaret Chase Smith of Maine
and Howard Baker of Tennessee,
exemplified the party's principles
and still worked across the aisle.
Lugar should be a star of the '
Republican Party. He is third in
seniority in the Senate, first among
Republicans, and has served longer
than any other senator from Indi-
ana. Yet it has become clear that he
is being challenged in the'ndiana
primary as part of the ideological
purge of the party. Political scien-
tists say that while both parties
in Congress are moving to the
extremes, the Republican Party is
moving to the fringe at quantum
speed.
Ironically, while Congress acceler-
ates to the political margins, the
American people are gravitating
toward the center. Today, if you're a
Democrat, you belong to a minority
party. If you're a Republican, you
belong to a minority party. The bulk
of Americans now identify them-
selves as independents.
In interviews given since her an-
nouncement, Sen. Snowe has said:
"You can never solve a problem
without talking to people with
whom you disagree. The United
States Senate is predicated and,
based on consensus building.
That was certainly the vision of the
Founding Fathers. And if we aban-
don that approach, then we do it at
the expense of the country.


Santorum needs a lesson on the value of education


BY COKIE ROBERTS AND'
STEVEN V. ROBERTS "
Candidates say nutty things,
but usually they're acci-
dental, unscripted remarks.
No adviser or focus group ever
suggested to Mitt Romney that he
mention his wife's two Cadillacs or
bet Rick Perry $10,000. While those
comments revealed Romney's iso-
lation from the realities of kitchen-
table America, they were not part
of his game plan. .
But when Rick Santorum called
President Obama a "snob" for
wanting kids to go to college, he
said it deliberately. In fact, he's
said it before in New Hampshire
in early January so he can and
should be held accountable for
his words. And those words create
sharp doubts about his qualifica-
tions for the presidency.
Even Republicans were appalled.
Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell (who
has endorsed Romney) said: "I wish
he'd said it differently. When you
look at what's going on in other
countries China, India, the pre-
mium they put on higher education
- we've got to do better if we still
want to be the global leader that we
are."
Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer, no
friend of Obama's, said the presi-
dent "has a good, strong message
on education. In Arizona, we're
trying to implement the things he


We need change now
I see storm clouds on the horizon.
May not get here while, I'm alive,
but they're coming Three things we
can't run from much longer debt,
Social Security and Medicare. They
can all be fixed relatively easily
now. Social Security and Medicare
only require a later retirement year.
No reduction in benefits, just wait
till 67 to 70 to start. Debt is harder


talked about."
GOP strategist Ed Rogers, writing
in The Washington Post, summed
up: "I don't think I haveever seen
another candidate so mistakenly
head in the opposite direction of
where common sense should have
compelled him to go."
Santorum was actually making
two separate points. The first was
that college is not the only place to
acquire useful work skills.."Not all
folks are gifted in the same way," he
told a crowd in Troy, Mich. "Some
people have incredible gifts with
their hands."
Fair enough, but Obama never
demeaned those folks by prais-
ing the value of higher education.
As the independent organization
FactCheck.org reported, Santorumn
was "twisting Obama's words." The
president never said that every
youngster should attend Brown,
or Berkeley; he did say that in the
modern economy, some form of
advanced training is essential for
success.
As the president told the National
Governors Association this week:
"When I speak about higher educa-
tion, we're not just talking about a
four-year degree. We're speaking
about someone going to a com-
munity college and getting trained
for that manufacturing job that is
now requiring somebody walk-
ing through the door, handling a
million-dollar piece of equipment.


and if's what's gonna get us first. It
is $16 trillion now, $20 trillion by
the end of Obama's second term.
After that, we're Greece and there's
no one big enough to bail us out.
Gotta.get a new leader in now with
the backbone to take on the storm
head-on.
We have got to get it in our heads,
we can no longer live off of our
grandkids' credit card. We start now
and we can pay this debt off at $200


And they can't go in there unless
they've got some basic training
beyond what they received in high
school."
That's fact, not opinion, and it's a
fact for everyone, including young
people whq have "incredible gifts
with their hands." In January the
Labor Department-reported these
unemployment rates: 13.1 per-
cent for high school dropouts, 7.2
percent for those with just a high
school degree, 4.2 percent for col-
lege grads. Last August,.a George-
town University study reported that
a college degree was worth about
$1 million in additional lifetime
earnings.
Santorum's life story contradicts
his own comments. Yes, his grand-
father was a coal miner, but his
father was a clinical psychologist,
and Santorum himself has gradu-
ate degrees in business and law. On
his own website, Santorum boasted
that he is "equally committed to
ensuring that every Pennsylvanian
has access to higher education."
The whole point of being young
is to separate from parents, try out
new ideas, question tradition, and
shape individual identity and value
systems. Any child who fails to go
through that process can never
become a complete adult.-But San-
torum seems blind to that fact. He
even seems afraid of it. And no one
should be president of this country
who fears the future.


billion a year, principal payment.
Only take a hundred years to pay
it, too.
Get ready. These are the choices.
Put it off, keep the same "no lead-
ing" leadership we have now, and
you better be storing food, water,
guns and ammo, and survival
gear. Remember too. This old man
warned you back in 2012.
MILTON KENDRICK
Marianna


BUT I
APOLOGIZED IN A
NoN-LIAUGH-N iH
WAY.


~~1"'~~'"~~1'~~"1111"""""1.~-1"


better to Wrw ,:.i ,





WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7,2012 + 5A !


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan:com


savings In Effect Mar. 7- Mar. 13, 2012



i.'4m 1 : d 1 Family Pack _


Ball Park
Franks............................

Bryans Reg., Thick or Garlic
Bologna ...... .......

Conecuh
Smoked Sausage............



Land 0' Frost Thin Sliced
Ham or Turkey...........

Aunt Bessie Clean
Chitterlings ......................

Snowden
Smoked Sausage............


$303


6 5 lb.


IFI 1 .%;1.


Faygo 12 Pack
Soft Drinks

$25612 oz


Frito-Lay
Doritos

$2 z76


Castleberry
Idaho supreme B Brunswick $ 1 86
Instant Potatoes 8 St .
Instant Potatoes.... 8 oz Stew .................... 24 oz






Russet
Baking Red Ripe
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$425 $124
4 20 lb. bag | 16 oz.
Green Giant Iceburg 0
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Blue Bunny Velveeta
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$303 $542
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Garlic Loaf ............ 961oz Country Crock...... 45o


sBIIPILIII(IBIBB~Il~il






16A WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7, 2012


LOCAL


New book by Dale Cox


examines 1934 Neal lynching


Special to the Floridan
Writer and historian Dale
Cox has released the first
new book on the infamous
1934 Claude Neal lynching
in 30 years.
"The Claude Neal Lynch-
ing: The 1934 Murders of
Claude Neal and Lola Can-
nady," from Old Kitchen
Books, explores a violent
outbreak that took place in
Jackson, Washington and
Bay counties in Florida, as
well as Escambia County,
Ala. The eruption includ-
ed the murder of a young
woman named Lola Can-
nady, mob scenes at jails
in Washington and Bay
Counties, an armed raid
on the jail in Brewton, Ala.,
the lynching of Claude
Neal near what is now
Lake Seminole and a riot


in Marianna that was so
severe two companies of
Florida Na-
tional Guard
troops were
andordered in
to calm the
situation.
"I grew
Cox up near the
scene where
Claude Neal was tortured
and killed back in 1934,"
Cox said. "I knew that the
full story had never been
told."
Southern novelist and
writer Janis Owens said
of the book, "Drawing on
a variety of sources lo-
cal libraries, courthouse
records, land records
and first-source oral his-
tory, Cox has created a
readable and clear time-
line of events that give


SUBMITTED PHOTOS
A cover of "The Claude Neal
Lynching: The 1934 Murders
of Claude Neal and Lola
Cannady."
structure to a complex,
multi-state mob action. He
debunks myths and misin-
formation and decades of


baseless gossip and sup-
plies maps to the actual
sites of the murders, along
with an invitation for other
historians to build on his
work."
"The Claude Neal Lynch-
ing: The 1934 Murders of
Claude Neal and Lola Can-
nady" is available in both
book and Amazon Kindle
formats.
It is available in Mari-
anna at Chipola River
Book & Tea on Lafayette
Street downtown, or can
be ordered online at www.
amazon.com or at www.
exploresouthernhistory.
com/dalecox.
A Jackson County native,
Cox grew up near Two Egg
and is the father of two
grown sons, William and
Alan. This is his ninth book
on Southern history. .


GI'ACEVILLE ACADEMIC TEAM

WINS DISTRICT


SUBMITTED PHOTO
The Graceville High School Academic Team won first place in the recent 2012 Jackson
County District Academic Bowl. Competing against the county's four high school
academic teams, Graceville won the coveted title and the opportunity to take the
trophy back to their trophy case for the next 12 months. Marianna High School's Academic


Team placed second. From left are Lee Miller, Superintendent of
Schools; Rebecca Delgado; Annemarie Nichols; David Cluff; Trent
Padgett; Hunter Potts; Katelyn Padgett;, and Joshua Graham, academic
team coach.

Workshop aims to 'Grow Timber Revenue'


Special to the Floridan
Those who own a timber stand, young
pine plantation, or are interested in grow-
ing trees for profit and other benefits are
invited to the UF-IFAS Washington Coun-
ty Extension Ag Center, from 9 a.m. to 3
p.m. on Thursday, March 15.
The Forest Stewardship Program's
"Grow Timber Revenue" workshop will
provide guidance on timber manage-
ment and marketing strategies that "can
increase returns from harvests, reduce
costs and encourage forest management
for its many benefits," according to an
Extension press release.


MEGA BED PRICING
S Mega Visit....... .........
Unlimited Mega ....;... .........$55
-Student *.1 Mega Vita .....;98
Student' tilJli Jited ga..,; ..


A $10 fee covers lunch and materials.
To reserve a space, contact the Washing-
ton County Extension Office at 850-638-
6180, or register online at http://fsp-work
shop031512.eventbrite.com/.
Florida's Forest Stewardship Program
is a cooperative outreach program of the
University of Florida and Florida Forest
Service. The UF-IFAS Washington County
Extension Ag Center is located at 1424
Jackson Ave. in Chipley.
For more information about the work-
shop, contact Chris Demers at the UF-
IFAS School of Forest Resources and Con-
servation at 352-846-2385 or cdemers@
ufl.edu.


BRONZING BED PRICING
1 Bronzing Visit....,................s6
Unlimited Bronzing .................45
Student 1 Bronzing Visit........$5
Student Unlimited Bronzing ..s35


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


'Paint Your Pet'


event for March


9 fundraiser


Special to the Floridan
.The Outside the Lines
Art Studio in downtown
Marianna, in conjunc-
tion with Partners for
Pets, presents "Paint Your
Pet," a fundraiser for the
animal shelter on Friday,
March 9.
Create a colorful paint-
ing by sending a photo of
your pet (through email or
drop off at studio) that will
be drawn on a canvas and
be ready for you to paint
on Friday. Artist/owner


Debra Pelc Menacof will
guide you through the
painting process to create
one-of-a-kiild keepsake.
No experience is neces-
sary to participate. The
cost is $50 per person,
with 25 percent going
to Partners for Pets. Two
sessions are available on
Friday: 9 a.m. to noon; or
6:30 to 9:30 p.m.
R.S.VP. by calling Me-
nacof at 482-8289 or 557-
2399, or mailing her at
debimenacof@embarq
mail.com.


GOLD STIMULUS

WE BUY GOLD
(Paid on the Spot!)

SMIBl SMI 4432 Lafayette Street
JEWELERS
www.smithandsmithonline.com


COMERFORD VAULT
MEMORIAL'SERVICE

with a memorial
of BEAUTY and
DURABILITY _.


All Work & Material Guaranteed
Burial Vaults, Mausoleums,
Benches, Markers
and All Cemetery Supplies


Pete Comerford Owner & Operator
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Hwy. 90 W Sneads, FL


HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS WASTE

AMNESTY DAY EVENT
The Jackson County Board of County Commissioners is sponsoring
a project to collect, recycle, treat and properly dispose of household
hazardous waste. This event will take place at the Jackson County
Recycling Facility located at 3530 Wiley Drive. It is being held on
Saturday, March 10, 2012, starting at 8:00 a.m. and will end at
12:00 p.m.

Examples of household hazardous waste:


Pesticides
Engine Degreasers
Stale Gasoline
Paint/Paint Thinners


Batteries
Solvents
Anti-Freeze
Insecticides


Used Oil
Brake Fluid
Pool Chemicals


Computer Electronics will also be accepted: CPU's, Monitors,
Keyboards, Printers and Scanners.

This service is being provided to households, Local Governments
only. No commercial / industrial businesses.

Conditionally exempt small quantity generators (Small
Businesses, Schools, Growers and Etc.) will be accepted
at a reduced rate. Call Chuck Hatcher, Director, Parks and
Recycling at 718-0437 to schedule a drop off time.

WHITE GOODS AND ELECTRONICS WILL BE ACCEPTED.

NO GAS CYLINDERS OR EXPLOSIVES!

WARNING: PLEASE FOLLOW MANUFACTURER'S HANDLING
INSTRUCTIONS AND USE CAUTION IN THE TRANSPORTING
OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TO COLLECTION SITE. DO NOT
MIX CHEMICALS OR ALLOW SKIN CONTACT.

3530 WILEY DRIVE, MARIANNA, FL. (IN THE INDUSTRIAL PARK)


In *I R$l Prk Dr


I
~IItd~N


NORTH


Rfltea UL


Do you have'Cute Kids'?
Email your'Cute Kids*' photos to editorial@jcfloridan.com, mail them to P.O.
Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447 or bring them by our offices at 4403 Constitution
Lane in Marianna.
*12years or under, with Jackson County ties. Include child's full name, parents'
names) and city of residence. This is a free service. All entries subject to editing.


Also come 2ejoy our ro8tng8reb with NEWrBVLBSS
850-482-6855 2884 Jefferson St. Downtown Marianna






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.corn


Chipola River level nears 'action stage'


From staff reports

Recent heavy rain has swelled
the Chipola River to a level near
the "action stage," when emer-
gency officials would start warn-
ing people in low-lying areas near
the river to move their vehicles,
outdoor equipment, tables and
chairs, toys and other items they


I-.


don't want ruined or carried off by
thewater.Asof 4 p.m. Ti i -di \ the
river was at 14.77 feet, just inches
from the 15-foot action stage.
Although the river is expected to
start falling to normal levels, the
coming weekend has a moderate
forecast for rain. It's predicted at
a 20 percent chance on Friday, 30
percent on Saturday and back to


20 percent on Sunday.
Jackson County Emergency
Management Director Rodney
Andreasen said officials feel the
action stage won't be reached, but
that it's a close call. While there is
little or no danger of the water
reaching its 19-foot flood stage,
Andreasen issued the informa-
tion as a precaution.


The two most vulnerable areas
are the neighborhood of Cook
subdivision just north of the In-
terstate 10 exchange on State
Road 71 at Marianna, and in the
area of Turtle Bend just south of
the interstate, Andreasen said.
The river level can be moni-
tored at http://water.weather.
gov/ahps2/index.php?/wfotae.


I I




"- . . .. *
- :. ..-. ...... i J....: ; ,; .


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Sneads High School has announced the SHS Pirate Award winners for the second nine-week term. Throughout
the grading period, students are awarded gold coins for things such as turning in signed papers, not being
tardy and making the honor roll. At the end of the nine weeks, all coins are put into a treasure chest and a
select few are drawn.Prizes given vary. Students win everything from assigned parking to cash. At the end of the
year, one lucky winner will receive a cash prize of $500. SHS Pirate Award winners are (from left, front row) Latilia
Baker, Tasha Scott and Bo McClamma; (middle row) Katelyn Roberts, Chasity McGriff, Amber Dykes, Kimberly
Maldanado, Brianna McCaffery, Teddy leter, Deanna Griffin, Melissa Wray, Ashley Tharp and Alexis Goldwire; and
(back row) Shelbi Byler and Savannah Owens.


T ~ 2 T T


SUBMtTTED PHOTO
Patriotic Instructor'Peggy McCool visits veterans at the Chipola Nursing Pavilion in Marianna on Valentine's
Day. VFW Post 12046 Ladies Auxiliary honored veterans in the community on Feb. 14. Signs, decorations and
snacks combining cookies, sweets and fresh fruit were personally delivered to the VA Clinic, Chipola Nursing
Pavilion and the Chipola Retirement Center. Patriotic Instructor Peggy McCool said, "We appreciate and remember
our veterans at every opportunity and want them to know our Auxiliary is here to serve them and their families." For
additional information about the Ladies Auxiliary, contact McCool at 209-1894 or peggy_mccool@yahoo.com.


Parents
From Page 1A


any 'i
subje
certify
mino


were assigned to certain- not st
teachers. expert
Parents would be noti- distrii
fied of "out-of-field", in- cie.
structors teaching their be to]
children. This constitutes from



Author
From Page 1A
Walmart.com and the grand prize
winner will also get their product
sold iniselect stores.
*Myrick's product is her book,
"Grandparents and Grand Les-
sons," along with purses that cor-
relate with one of the book's sto-
ries titled "Pocketbooks."
The. book follows the adven-
tures of children Mott and Rose,
which are based on Myrick's
own childhood adventures with


instructors teaching a
ct they have not been
ied in, do not have a
r degree in, or have
shown to have enough
tise in, as decided by
ct school board poli-
The parents would
Id virtual instruction
an in-field teacher


is available.
Parents would also be
notified of any teachers
who have had poor per-
formance evaluations.
This includes any class-
room teachers with two
consecutive unsatisfac-
tory performance evalu-
ation ratings, two annual


her friend Rosemary Robinson
Jackson. Myrick lived with her
grandmother until she was about
13, during which the elder im-
parted a number of lessons to her
granddaughter.
"It crosses cultural bounds,"
Myrick said. "No matter what na-
tionality you are, when you pick
up this book, there's a taste of.
wisdom."
As soon as the idea for the book
came to her, it was easy to write it,
Myrick said. The entire book was
written in about 90 days.
"These stories are food for the


unsatisfactory perfor-
mance evaluation ratings
within a 3-year period or
three consecutive needs
improvement or another
combination of needs
improvement and unsat-
isfactory annual perfor-
mance evaluation ratings.
The parents would be told


soul," Myrick said. "They're uni-
versal and timeless. They'll never
go out of style. They'll never be
replaced."
Myrick said God led her to this
contest. She heard about the con-
test two days before the entry;
period closed.
She and Jackson rushed to
get the video finished and were
amazed to see it had. been
chosen.
"You have to have faith," Myrick
said. "You have to act on it."
The book harkens back to a
simpler time, when children


of'the availability of virtual
instruction from a teacher
with an effective or highly
effective performance
evaluation rating.
All of this information is
already public record.
"You do your job and
you don't worry about it,"
Galloway said.


played outdoors instead of inside
on their electronics and when
neighbors watched after children
in addition to parents, Myrick
said.
"Even though you didn't have
much, there was family there,"
Myrick said. "There was unity
there."
Towvote for Myrick, visit www.ge
tontheshelf.com/product/5444/
grandparents-and-grand.
To find a copy of her book, visit
amazon.com, Basford Chris-
tian Supply in Marianna or Cj's
Country Pantry in Marianna.


McMullen Funeral Home
3874 Gentian Blvd.
Columbus, GA 31907
(706) 569-8015

Pauline A.
Mercer

Pauline A. "Meemaw"
Mercer, 91, of Columbus,
GA died Monday, March 5,
2012 at Columbus Hospice
House.
Funeral services will be
held 10:00 A.M. Thursday,
March 8, 2012 at McMullen
Funeral Home Chapel with
Reverend Robert French
and Reverend Dennis Lacy
officiating. .Interment will
be held 3:00 P.M. EST
Thursday, March 8, 2012 at
New Hope Freewill Baptist
Church Cemetery in
Dellwood, FL. The family
will receive friends Wed-
nesday evening from 6:00
to 8:00 P.M. at the funeral
home 3874 Gentian Blvd.
Columbus, GA 31907.
Mrs. Mercer was born
February 7, 1921 in
Dellwood, FL. She was the
daughter of the late Walter
Roy and Tyla Frances Con-
rad. She was a homemaker
and also tended to the care
of many children through-
out her life. As an avid gar-
dener, she cultivated a
long, loving life of family
and flowers. She was a
member of North Highland
Assembly of God.
Other than her parents,
she was preceded in death
by her husband, Brunell H.
Mercer.
Survivors include her
daughters, Ovaline An-
drews (Harold) of Mobile,
AL and Melissie Walden
(Wayne) of Columbus, GA,
six grandchildren, 16 great-
grandchildren, and seven
great-great-grandchildren.
Flowers will be accepted
but those so desiring may
make memorial donations
to Columbus Hospice
House 7020 Moon Rd. Co-
lumbus, GA 31909
www.columbushospice.com
Those who wish may
sign the online guest regis-
try at
www.mcmullenfuneralhome.com



Cuts
From Page 1A
manned hours a night.
Those hours may be split
by alternating on-the-
hour or in some other way
deemed appropriate for
the circumstances.
Security will be on duty
from the hours of roughly
8 p.m. to 6 a.m., instead
of the previous 4 p.m. to
8 a.m. shift. The timing of
the duty hours will fluctu-
ate with time of year, with
security contractors com-
ing on later in the summer
months and earlier in the
shorter days of winter.
According to District 3
DOT spokesman Ian Sat-
ter, the state hopes to save
about $5 million a year
by cutting down on the
security hours.


line
From Page 1A
additional section is esti-
mated to be $1:1 million.
The city has a ...7D0.000
state grant committed for
the second phase, arid
would fund the rest from
utility reserves if the proj-
ect is built out futhll as
planned and exceeds the
grant amount.
The project, with both
phases figured in, would
cost a little more than $2.1
million. The bulk of the
Phase 1 tab, estimated at
$1 million, is a cost being
absorbed by the city.
The line's extension east-
ward also sets up the poten-
tial for its expansion into
the Indian Springs subdi-
vision on the north side of


U.S. 90, with the residen-
tial area not far from State
Road 71, but there are not
concrete plans in place as
yet for such a project.

Find us on Facebook
and Twitter


Jackson County Vault & Monuments
(.i. ,/i.'v Srm it ,, a I 1//,,.,,,.i.*/ Pric',s
Come Visit us at our NEW LOCATION
3424 West Highway 90 (3/10 mile west from our previous location)
850-482-5041


Pinecrest


3720 Caverns Road Marianna, FL 32446-1806 (850) 482-3964


WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7,2012 + 7AF


LOCAL






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN 4 www.jcfloridan.com


Judge strikes


down Fla. pension


contribution law


The Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE Gov.
Rick Scott and the Legis-
lature violated the state
constitution when they
enacted a law requiring
Florida teachers, police
officers, state workers and
other public employees
to contribute 3 percent
of their pay toward their
pensions, a judge ruled
Tuesday in a decision that
could cost the state $2
billion.
Scott announced he will
appeal Circuit Judge Jackie
Fulford's ruling. She wrote
in her 11-page opinion
that a budget crisis is no
excuse for violating pub-
lic employees' collective
bargaining, property and
contract rights, which
. are guaranteed under the
Florida Constitution.
"To find otherwise
would mean that a con-
tract with our state gov-
ernment has no mean-
ing and that the citizens
of our state can place no
trust in the work of our
Legislature," the Tallahas-
see-based judge wrote.
An ultimate decision
against the contribution
requirement would blow
holes of about $1 billion
each in state budgets for
the current fiscal year and
the next one, which starts
July 1, but House Speaker
Dean Cannon said Ful-
ford's decision would have
no immediate effect..
"The ruling of a trial
court judge is the first and
not the final step," the
Winter Park Republican
said in a statement.
The case likely will wind
up before the Florida Su-
preme Court.
"This is another exam-
ple of a court substitut-
ing its own policy pref-
erences for those of the
Legislature," Scott said in
a statement. "The Court's
decision nullifies the will
of the people and leaves
Florida as one of the only
states in the country in
which public employees
contribute nothing to-
wards their retirement,
leaving working Florid-
ians with 100 percent of
the tab."
Several individual pub-
lic employees and their
unions challenged the
law, including the Florida
Education Association,
which represents teachers
and other school workers
across the state.
."We once again find
out that the Florida Leg-
islature and the governor
have overstepped their
bounds by avoiding the
constitution," said FEA
President Andy Ford.
"They just don't have re-
spect for the law."
At Scott's urging, the
Legislature passed the
law last year as a cost-cut-
ting measure. It allowed
the state and local gov-
ernments to reduce their
contributions to the Flor-
ida Retirement System.
That's because Florida's
plan is rated as one of
the nation's strongest and
does not currently need
additional funding.
The law affects 560,000


"The power over
appropriations
does not allow the
Legislature to excuse
negotiation. Otherwise,
the fundamental right
to collectively bargain
in Florida's constitution
would be meaningless."
Circuit Judge Jackie Fulford

public employees includ-
ing all those at the state
and county levels and
some city workers.
Scott initially asked for a
5 percent employee con-
tribution. The Republican
governor said it would be
only fair because private
sector workers and public
employees in most other
states contribute to their
retirement plans.
Public employees and
their unions called the
contribution an "income
tax" and said it amounts
to a 3 percent pay cut
after they've gone years
without raises.
Lawyers for the state ar-
gued the Legislature has
the authority to require
the employee contribu-
tions under its constitu-
tional budgeting powers,
but Fulford disagreed. She
noted employees have
a constitutional right to
collectively bargain over
the terms and conditions
of their employment; but
no such negotiations were
conducted in this case.
"The power over appro-
priations does not allow
the Legislature to excuse
negotiation," Fulford
wrote. "Otherwise, the
fundamental right to col-
lectively bargain in Flor-
ida's constitution would
be meaningless."
Fulford also cited prior
Florida Supreme Court
opinions and a 1974 law
that declared pension
benefits to be a contract
right.
Senate President Mike
Haridopolos, R-Merritt
Island, blasted the rul-
ing, saying the former
prosecutor, who was ap-
pointed to the bench in
2009 by then-Gov. Charlie
Crist, "has proven once
again that she is an ac-
tivist judge who has no
problem overstepping her
authority and overruling
the decisions of the state's
elected representatives."
Fulford, who last year
struck down a budget
provision that would
have privatized nearly 30
prison facilities in South
Florida, anticipated such
criticism.
"At the onset let me state
clearly, the role of the ju-
diciary is to interpret the
law before it; not to make
new law," she wrote. "This
court cannot set aside
its constitutional obliga-
tions because a budget
crisis exists in the state of
Florida. To do so would be
in direct contravention of
this court's oath to follow
the law."
Plaintiffs' attorney Ron
Meyer defended Fulford
against the judicial activ-
ism accusation.


New Iran nucear talks seen


The Associated Press

WASHINGTON
Alarmed by rising talk of
war, the United States, Eu-
rope and other world pow-
ers announced Tuesday
that bargaining will begin
again with Iran over its
fiercely disputed nuclear
efforts. Tehran, for its part,
invited inspectors to see
a site, suspected of secret
atomic weapons work.
In Washington, President
Barack Obama declared
he had been working to
avert war with Iran during
intensive meetings with Is-
raeli Prime Minister Benja-
min Netanyahu this week.
Israel, fearing the prospect
of a nuclear Iran, has been
stressing a need for pos-
sible military action, but
Obama said sanctions and
diplomacy were already
working.
The president rebuffed
Republican critics, who
say his reluctance to attack
Iran is a sign of weakness,
holding up the specter of
more dead Americans in
another Mideast war.
"When I see the casual-
ness with which some of
these folks talk about war,
I'm reminded of the costs
involved in war," Obama
said. "This is not a game.
And there's nothing casual
about it."
Although Obama's re-
marks were suffused with
American election-year
politics they came the
same day as the biggest
batch of Republican pri-
maries to choose his op-
ponent in November he
spoke for capitals around
the world in warning that
"bluster" and posturing to
appear tough on Iran could
edge the world closer to an
avoidable war.
European Union foreign
policy chidf Catherine
Ashton said the five per-
manent members of the
U.N. Security Council and
Germany had agreed to a
new round of nuclear talks
with Iran more than a year
after suspending them in
frustration.


+


+


+
-





IHE ASSOUIAI LD PRESS
The armchair of Iran's Ambassador to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Ali
Asghar Soltanieh, remains empty at the start of the IAEA board of governors meeting at the
International Center, in Vienna, Austria on Tuesday.


Previous talks have not
resolved international
suspicions that Iran is en-
gaging in a nuclear energy
program as cover for an
eventual plan to build a
bomb. On a practical level,
the negotiating group also
has failed to strike a deal
for Iran to stop enriching
uranium that might one
day be turned into bomb
fuel.
The rush to diplomacy
was partly an answer to in-
creasingly hawkish rheto-
ric from Israel, which is
publicly considering a mil-
itary strike on Iranian nu-
clear facilities this spring.
Obama and Western allies
say such a strike would
be risky and premature,
and that there is still time
to persuade Iran that it is
better off without nuclear
weapons.
Iran insists that its pro-
gram is only for energy
production and other
peaceful purposes.
In sitting down with Iran,
Ashton said negotiators
want "constructive dia-
logue" that will deliver real
progress in resolving the
international community's


Every 29 seconds someone in the
United States is having a heart attack.
Every 24 seconds someone in the
United States is diagnosed with cancer.
Every 45 seconds someone in the
United States is suffering a stroke.

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long-standing concerns on
its nuclear program."
The time and venue of
the new talks have not
been set. Iran has a history
of agreeing to talks or other
concessions when it feels
under threat, and Western
leaders have grown skepti-
cal that Iran will bargain in
good faith.
Following gatherings in
five-star European hotels,
Iran often publicly rejects
pressure but privately
agrees to small compro-
mises. Diplomats return
home to consult their presi-
dents and prime ministers,
and Iran, the theory goes,
presses on with its nuclear
development work.
However, initially mild
economic sanctions on
Iran have grown stronger
and more difficult for the
government to circumvent.
The oil-rich country is still
able to sell its oil, mostly
in Asia, but labors under


severe banking restrictions
that will get far tougher
this summer. .Europe also
imposed an unprecedent-
ed oil embargo on Iran, to
take effect in July.
Obama and others said
diplomacy and such sanc-
tions should be given more
time.
Iran appeared to partial-
ly answer concerns Tues-
day from the U.N.'s Inter-
national Atomic Energy
Agency that it has some-
thing to hide, by announc-
ing long-sought access to
its Parchin military com-
plex southeast of Tehran.
The IAEA has singled out
the complex, which Iran
had long refused to open
for inspection. Terms ap-
peared limited and unclear
in Iran's announcement.
In Washington, Obama
said he saw a "window of
opportunity" to use diplo-
macy instead of force to
resolve the dispute.


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FLORIDAN

jcfloridon.com
Information for the AGES!


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,* "."'" "
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18A WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7, 2012


STATE/NATITON


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MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Marianna's Jae Elliott rounds third
base during a game earlier this
season.


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com


The Sneads Pirates outlasted
the Liberty County Bulldogs
in a marathon game Monday
night in Bristol, winning 2-1 in
12 innings thanks to a big hit
by Austin Lombardo.
Sneadsled 1-0 through much
of the game after a one-out tri-
ple by Aaron Green in the third
inning was followed by an RBI
double by John Locke.
Locke also started on the
mound for the Pirates and was
outstanding for seven innings,


JlMarianna Baseball


Bulldogs extend win streak to 3


BY SHELIA MADER
Floridan Correspondent

The Marianna High School
Bulldogs baseball 'team made
it three wins in a row with a 6-3
victory over the visiting Bay High
Tornadoes at Bulldog Field on
Monday evening.
Coach Andy Shelton sent se-
nior righty Zac Davis to the
mound with Clayte Rooks
behind the plate.
At first was Michael Mader
with Brandon Burch at second,


Brad Middleton at short and
Taylor Strauss at third. J.T. Mead-
ows took over in left with Austin
Branch anchoring down center
and Chris Godwin taking care
of right field. Jae Elliott was the
designated hitter.
Davis followed a leadoff single
with two quick outs before is-
suing a walk to put runners on
first and second. A fly to Burch at
second ended the inning with no
runs crossing the plate. Middle-
ton led off with a single in the
first inning and moved to second


with one out when Rooks took a
hit by pitch for the seventh time
this year. Middleton stole third
and scored on a fielder's choice
by Godwin that got Rooks at
second. A grounder back to the
mound ended the inning.
A two-out walk was the only
base runner in the second in-
ning, with a grounder to Middle-
ton that got the final batter out.
Marianna scored three in the
second inning to go up 4-0.
With one out, Burch singled and
moved to second when Mader


took advantage of a throwing er-
ror. A walk to Meadows loaded
the bases for Middleton's RBI
single.
With two outs, Rooks reached
on a dropped ball in left field
scoring two runners. A strike-
out ended the inning with two
on base. Davis worked,around
a lead off single in the third, re-
tiring'the next three. Marianna
went quietly in the bottom of the
frame.

See BULLDOGS, Page 2B



LET IT FLY!


-? .. .


MARK K INNER/LUOIDAN
Malone's Brett Henry delivers a
pitch during a 3-2 loss to Laurel Hill
this season. Malone fell to Laurel
Hill 3-2 on Monday.


lMalone Softball

Tigers drop

3rd straight

BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com
The Malone Lady Tigers suf-
fered their third straight district
defeat on Monday in Laurel Hill,
falling to the Lady Hoboes 17-9.
Malone fell to 1-4 on the sea-
son and 0-3 in District 1-lA play.
Laurel Hill Improved to 3-0 in
league play.
The teams faced off on Friday
in Malone, with Laurel Hill tak-
ing a 5-1 victory.
The rematch saw far more ac-
tion, as the Lady Tigers used a
seven-run fourth inning to take
an 8-4 lead before Laurel Hill
responded with five runs in the
bottom of the frame, and then
four more in the fifth and sixth
to blow the game open.
Sara Newsom started for Malo-
ne and went the distance to take
the loss, allowing five earned
runs on 12 hits, two walks, two
hit batter, and six strikeouts.
Unfortunately for the Lady
Tigers, they were victimized by
nine defensive errors that al-
lowed for 12 unearned runs for
the Lady Hoboes.
Offensively for Malone, Jakivia
Hearns led the way with a 2 for
4 with a run and three RBI per-
formance, with sister Venisha
Hearns going 2 for 4 with two
runs and two RBI.
Newsom had a hit and two RBI,
and Sheyanna Chambliss and
Olivia Daniels each had a hit and
drove in a run. Kayla Lewis had a
hit and scored a run.
Malone was scheduled to host
Poplar Springs on Tuesday be-
fore finishing the week in Paxton
on Friday at 5 p.m.


surrendering just four hits and
three walks, and striking out
six.
But the Bulldogs finally
broke through in the bottom
of the seventh, getting a hit
and then taking advantage of
a dropped fly ball in center
field to tie it up and send the
game into extra innings.
Brandon Moats came on
in relief for the Pirates in the
eighth and pitched four score-
less innings, despite issuing
seven~walks.
Moats allowed one hit and
struck out seven, and earned


the win, thanks to the Pirates'
run in the top of the 12th.
In that inning, Green led off
with a hit and Locke followed
with another.
Devin Hayes singled again
to load the bases with no outs,
but Moats popped out to third
base and Green was thrown
out at home trying to score
on a ground ball. But Lom-
bardo came up with the big hit
Sneads needed to bring Locke
in for the go-ahead run.
Lombardo then came out to
the mound for the bottom,,of
the 12th to nail it down, giving


up a hit and a walk, and strik-
ing out one to end the game
and get the save.
"It was a real good game,"
Sneads coach Mark Guerra
said. "Both teams made some
mistakes and it went back and
forth, but we played good.
Liberty County is a really good
team."
The win moved the Pirates
to 5-2 on the season and came
on the heels of a disappoint-
ing 15-13 district loss to the
Cottondale Hornets.

See PIRATES, Page 2B


Marianna Junior Varsity Baseball


Roberts handcuffs Walton


Bulldogs earn 5-2 win
BY SHELIA MADER
Floridan Correspondent

The Marianna Bulldogs junior
varsity team got a spectacular
pitching performance from ju-
nior right-hander Heath Roberts
on Friday night to help take a 5-2
victory.
Roberts started for the Bull-
dogs and pitched six innings of
no-hit ball, allowing no runs on
three walks before being pulled
due to pitch count.
An error allowed the first Wal-
ton batter of the night to reach,


but Roberts responded by retir-
ing the next nine hitters he faced
before a lead-off walk in the
fourth.
Roberts walked two more in
the inning, but got himself out of
the jam with no damage done.
He got some early run support
with Seth Singletary singling and
scoring on a passed ball in the
first inning.
In the fourth, Kody Bryan
reached on an error and scored
on an RBI sacrifice fly by Reid
Long, with Tyler Colson follow-
ing with an RBI single to make it
3-0 Marianna.
Marianna scored itg final two


runs in the sixth inning when
an RBI single by Chris Johnson
scored Jeremiah Emanuel, and
Gray Gilmore came around to
score on an error.
Freshman pitcher Trent
Charles finished the game out
on the mound for the Bulldogs,
giving up two runs on a hit and
a walk, with Marianna commit-
ting two errors behind him.
Bulldogs JV tops Chipley: The
Marianna junior varsity also beat
Chipley one night earlier, taking
a 5-3 victory over the Tigers in
Chipley.

See JUNIOR, Page 2B


PHOTO COURTESYOI'SHERRI JOHNSON
Marianna junior varsity pitcher Heath Roberts delivers a pitch during a
game Friday against Walton. Roberts didn't allow a hit in six innings. L


SNEADS BASEBALL




Monday marathon


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Sneads' Caleb Alexander gets set to throw the ball to first base during a game against Cottondale this season.


Pirates outlast Bulldogs 2-1 in 12 innings


1_~_1_~_1 _


''


~Cerrr,~~







-12B WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7,2012


SPORTS


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Duke looks to bounce back at ACC


The Associated Press

DURHAM, N.C. Duke may
have stumbled upon an unorth-
odox recipe for success in the
Atlantic, Coast Conference tour-
nament: Lose to North Carolina
first.
Five times since 2003, the Blue
Devils (26-5) were beaten in the
regular-season finale by the rival
Tar Heels and then went on to
win the ACC tournament. It hap-
pened last year, and they hope it
happens again this weekend.
No one is suggesting it's sim-
ple cause-and-effect relation-
ship, but rather evidence, of the
Blue Devils' knack for quickly
refocusing under coach Mike
Krzyzewski.
As they prepare to head to At-
lanta for the league tournament,
they find themselves in familiar
territory after they were routed
88-70 on their home court with
the ACC's regular-season title
and No. 1 seed on the line.


Duke coach Mike Krzyzewski speaks with an official during the second half
of a game against North Carolina in Durham, N.C., on Saturday.


Second-seeded Duke begins
play Friday night against the
Clemson-Virginia Tech winner.
"I think we've got a lot of in-
centive to go in there and win
this one," guard Seth Curry said
Tuesday. "Hopefully, we'll win
our first two games, and I hope


we see Carolina again. Go in
there and try to win the cham-
pionship. You want to put a ban-
ner up. That's your goal coming
into the season, and we didn't
do that in the regular season, so
hopefully we can do that'in the
postseason."


That's happened plenty of
times for the Blue Devils under
Krzyzewski, who often speaks of
how seriously he takes the event.
His teams have won it in 10 of the
last 13 years including three
in a row to give the school an
ACC-record 19 titles.
No player on Duke's roster
knows what it's like to lose a
league tournament game; their
last such loss came to Clemson
in 2008, when the oldest player
- senior Miles Plumlee was
still a senior in high school.
"Throughout the year, the
main goal for a team is to land a
spot in the NCAA tournament,"
Krzyzewski said. "And then, if
you have an opportunity as a
result of pursuing that goal to
win your regular season, then it's
there. And we had that, and then
we lost the game against North
Carolina.
"So, it's easy to get on to the
next thing, because that's not an
ultimate goal," he added. "The


tourney
main goal is to make the tour-
nament and be as high a seed
as you possibly can, and then
whatever happens as a result of
pursuing, to me, that's a higher
goal.... But it's really very easy to
get on to the next thing."
Besides, the players say, there's
no sense dwelling on one loss to
the Tar Heels when if the seeds
hold they'll meet again a few
days later with another type of
title on the line.
Curry says the feeling is "real
similar, honestly" to last year
when North Carolina won the
season-ending matchup in Cha-
pel Hill, only to lose to Duke in
the tournament championship
game.
North Carolina beat the Blue
Devils in the 2009 finale before
Duke took advantage of some
bracket chaos the Tar Heels
were knocked out early after
point guard Ty Lawson hurt
his toe to begin its run of
consecutive league titles.


Kentucky's Miller expects bench to be big in NCAAs


The Associated Press

LEXINGTON, Ky. Senior Darius Miller
expects No. 1 Kentucky to get even more
production from its bench by the time the
NCAA tournament starts. It's just another
sign of strength for a team that expects to
play for the national championship next
month.
"Hopefully our bench can step up big,
give these guys a break when they need it.
It's going to be a long-run, a long tourna-
ment both of these two tournaments,"
Miller said. "Hopefully we do our part just
as well as they do.",
Miller was named the Southeastern
Conference's Sixth Man of the Year by the
league's coaches on Tuesday, one of many
end of year accolades the Wildcats (30-1,
16-0) picked up after they polished off the
third undefeated season in league play in
the last 56 years over the weekend.
Still, it's been easy to compare the SEC
lineup with power conferences like the
Big East as a way of explaining Kentucky's


dominance in league play, but coach John
Calipari says the league deserves more
credit than it has gotten.
"Think about it, we had to go to Vandy.
No one wins at Vandy. We had to go to
Florida. They only lost one game there.
We had to go to Tennessee and eek out
'a game. You're talking about Mississippi
State and they're up 13 at the half," said
Calipari, who was picked as the SEC
coach of the year by his colleagues. "We
didn't walk through the league. If Missis-
sippi State plays like they did against us
they're a Sweet 16 team. Just go play that
way. This league is solid top to bottom."
A solid league that Kentucky won by six
games. That puts the Wildcats as a heavy
favorite in the SEC tournament beginning
Thursday and one of the teams to watch
in the NCAA tournament as they chase an
eighth national title.
They've been bolstered by the likes of
freshmen Anthony Davis and Michael
Kidd-Gilchrist. Davis was tabbed SEC
player of the year and defensive player of


the year.
"He's really playing well and I'm anx-
ious to see how he finishes," Calipari said.
"He's just getting better and better and
better."
Davis has been so good that Calipari has
been running practice without the 6-foot-
10 forward on the first team in an effort to
replicate a scenario where he might be in
foul trouble.
Forward Terrence Jones, the SEC pre-
season player of the year, has been work-
ing in Davis' position and Calipari is
confident that Miller and freshman Kyle
Wiltjer will provide meaningful minutes.
"People want to say, talk about our
bench, I'm almost like, 'Man, are you just
trying to grab anything?'" Calipari said. "I
have two players that come off the bench
that could score 25. If there's any other
team in the country that has two players
that come off the bench that can score 25,
tell me who they are. Maybe it's Syracuse,
maybe it's Ohio State. I don't know who it
is."


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE
Kentucky's Darius Miller (1) shoots under
pressure from Georgia's Nemanja Djurisic
during a game in Lexington, Ky., on March 1.


Pirates
From Page 1B
Monday night's victory
won't completely wash
away the sour taste from
the league loss, but the
coach said it wvas a good
start.
"We played better.
We didn't make a lot of
mistakes except for one
or two base-running
mistakes and just some
mental mistakes," Guer-
ra said.
"But it's a big win. Lib-
erty County is a very
good .team in their dis-
trict, and that's the kind
-of team I expect for us


to be able to compete
with and beat if we have
a chance to go anywhere
in the playoffs.
"They're a well coached
team, and very disci-
plined. Every win for us
right now is important."
Lombardo had a mon-
ster night offensively,
finishing with five hits to
lead Sneads, with Green
and Locke each adding
three hits.
The Pirates will take
the field on Thursday at
home against Graceville
at 6 p.m., and Sneads
will finish out the week
on Friday against Altha
at home, beginning at 6
p.m.


Junior
From Page 1B
Madison Harrell started
on the mound and got the
win for MHS.
Harrell went six innings
and giving up three runs on
three hits, with five walks,
and one hit batter.
Marianna got a run in
the first inning when Tyler
Colson reached on an er-
ror and scored on another
one, with Bryan scoring in
the second inning on an
RBI sacrifice by Nic Helms
to give the Bulldogs a 2-0
lead.
Bryan gave the Bulldogs
another run in the fourth


when he singled, stole
second, and scored on
a passed ball, and MHS
scored again in the fifth
when Singletary singled
with two outs and scored
on a passed ball.
The last run of the night
for the Bulldogs came in
the seventh inning on an
RBI double by Singletary to
score Long.


WEBOLOYIGOL
WathtRpaioP


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w a-ts o j w ergs co


Bulldogs
From Page 1B
Davis retired the side
in order in the top of the
fourth. Marianna added
their final two runs in the
bottom of the frame.,
A lead off double by Mad-
er was followed by a single
by Meadows. Middleton
took one to the leg to load
the bases. Mader was out at
home on a fielder's choice
by Branch. Rooks picked up
an RBI on a fielder's choice
that got Branch at second
but Godwin singled home
Middleton before a fly out
ended the inning.
Errors plagued the Bull-


dogs in the fifth inning.
Davis struck out the
leadoff batter, with the
next one reaching on an
error. A walk put rfinners
at first and second with
a misplayed ball loading
the bases. Another error
scored a pair of runs bring-
ing senior righty Jae Elliott
to the mound with two on
base.
Elliott walked the first
batter before beaming
the second. Elliott settled
down and fanned the next
two to get out of the in-
ning. In the bottom half of
the sixth, Elliott led off with
a single but was out on an
attempted steal at second.
With two outs, Mader


reached on a dropped ball
in left field but was left on
base when the next batter
ground out. Elliott worked
out of a hit and a walk in
the sixth inning with a
fielder's choice and two
strikeouts.
Marianna produced a
pair of baserunners on
a Walk to Middleton and
a single by Rooks but no
runs were plated. Elliott
faced the minimum in the
seventh to end the game
and pick up the save.
Marianna was sched-
uled to take on Rutherford
Tuesday evening at Bulldog
Field. Results of that game
were not available at press
time.


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


SPORTS


WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7,2012 3BF


Mcllroy
R ory Mcllroy made
quite a first impres-
sion in America,
even when he lost.
He made his pro debut
on American soil in the
Arizona desert at the 2009
Match Play Champion-
ship. As a 19-year-old,
Mcllroy advanced to the
quarterfinals and threw
everything he had at Geoff
Ogilvy until losing on the
17th hole.
Ogilvy, who went on to *
win his third World Golf
Championship that week,
recalls riding back to the
clubhouse with his caddie,
Allistair "Squirrel" Mathe-
son, both of them realiz-
ing that the landscape was
,about to change.
"I played so good that
day," Ogilvy said Sunday
morning from his home
in California. "I birdied 15,
16 and 17 and halved all
three holes. We were way
under par that day. Both
Squirrel and I said, 'This
guy is going to be uribe-
lievable.' And then Squir-
rel said, 'If you want to be
No. 1, you're going to have
to be better than this guy.'
Because not many people
in the world will be better
than that."
Never mind that Ti-
ger Woods was No. 1 in
the world by miles, and
would go on to win seven
times that year. There was
something special about
this freckled-face kid with
brown curls spilling out
from under his cap, who
played the game with a
delightful mixture of joy
and reckless abandon.
"Since that first day I saw
him play, he was a level
above us," Ogilvy said.
Their premonition
came true when Mcllroy
won the.Honda Classic in
fashion befitting the No. 1
player in the world.
He didn't flinch when
Woods went birdie-eagle


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y
1

fi
t
A
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A
E
a
r
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b


No. 1 that gets no argument
more than five years, top for so long and had
It's too early to call Mcll- won 14 majors before he
roy the next Tiger. turned 33.
Even though there are That's why Donald,
similarities in their age, it despite being No. 1 longer
is worth pointing out their than anyone besides
differences. Woods in the last 15 years,
Mcllroy reached No. 1 in was slow to gain proper
Douglb rgSon his 115th tournament that respect. It took him win-
National Golf Writer count toward the ranking; ning the money titles on
Woods reached the top in two tours before Donald
for a 62, his best final his 21st tournament, got his due..
round ever, and nearly Mcllroy won for the fifth Kaymer had won a
nine shots better than time in his career, includ- PGA Championship, yet
he average score Sunday. ing a U.S. Open he won remained an enigma.
McIlroy could hear the at Congressional by eight With McIlroy, there is no
roar from a mile away, shots with a record score debate.
gathered himself and then '(268). When Woods played "He's got a game that
rolled in a birdie putt. He 115 tournaments, he people think is world
followed with three par already had won five ma- No. 1," three-time ma-
saves over the last five jors and 32 tournaments jor champion Padraig
holes for a two-shot vic- around the world. .Harrington said. "That's
story, elevating him to No. 1 Even as Woods appears why nobody is going to
n the world. to be getting closer to have any complaints
McIlroy became the 16th regaining full form, his about Rory being world
player to become No. 1, gallery was double the No. 1. He won a major
ending the 40-week reign size .of the crowd following at a young age. He's got
of Luke Donald. McIlroy in the final round, the game. Yeah, you can
Mcllroy is so unbeat- and not just because compare him with Tiger.
ible right now he won a Woods has made south He's still got a lot to do.
point off tennis star Maria Florida his new home. And there's no doubt that
Sharapova hours later. At Woods remains compel- Tiger's 14 majors are very
Madison Square Garden ling. No one has ever won impressive.
on Monday night to cheer more majors so quickly,' "But if you're going to
)n girlfriend Caroline and there remains interest win a lot of majors, you've
Wozniacki in an exhibi- whether he can make it all got to start winning them
ion match, he was invited the way back. early," Harrington said. 'At
)nto the court with Wozni- Four players have 22 years of age, the world
acki a game from losing, been No. 1 since Woods No. 1, a major in the bank,
n jeans and a sweater, abdicated his throne 16 he's going to play a lot of
MlcIlroy showed off a one- months ago Lee West- majors where he'll be the
landed backhand, and wood, Martin Kaymer, favorite."
;harapova hit his lob wide. Luke Donald and now Mc- ,Harrington won his first
Asked if he was sur- Ilroy. The difference is that major at Carnoustie in
trised, Mcllroy joked: "I've McIlroy is so young, and 2007, when Mcllroy was
von a few off Caroline." already has accomplished an 18-year-old amateur
McIlroy is the second- so much. who played bogey-free in
youngestt player to be No. He might only have five the opening round for a 68
in the world ranking wins, but three were in the and went on to be the low
-Woods was 21 when he United States, including a amateur. "There's very few
first reached the top after major. players as good as him at
he U.S. Open in 1997. Not everyone accepted his age out there winning
knd it should be noted Westwood as the world's tournaments," Harrington
hat Woods only stayed at No. 1 player during his said. "There are guys with
4o. 1 for one measly week. two stints that covered 22 potential, but he's already
kfter trading places with weeks because he never delivered. And he has a
.rnie Els, Greg Norman won a major. There is no good balance in his life.
ind eventually David correlation between No. He doesn't look like a guy
)uval, Woods finally 1 and winning majors, who is going to burn out.
-stablished himself as the it only seemed that way He looks like he's going to
best bvy staving at No. 1 for because Woods was at the be here for a while."


The Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS The
Peyton Manning era in
Indianapolis is expected
to end Wednesday, ac-
cording to a report.
Citing anonymous
sources, ESPN reported
Tuesday that the Colts
plan to hold a news con-
ference to announce the
long-expected decision.
Manning is expected


to attend.
Team owner Jim Irsay
and Manning's agent,
Tom Condon, did not
immediately respond to
messages left by The As-
sociated Press.
Manning turns 36 later
this month, and missed
the entire 2011 season
.after a third neck surgery.
Before that, he'd never
missed a game in his 13
NFL seasons.


Milton H. Johnson Health Center

Chipola College

March 7-10, 2012

March 7, 8 and 9 at 1 p.m., 3 p.m., 6 p.m. and 8 p.m.
Finals on March 10 Men at 5 p.m. and Women at 7:30 p.m.
Phone: 850-718-2270 Website: www.chipola.edu

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Wat aaemnFoidaLtev n h


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TVLND 22 22 106 304 Lose 30bs My Pillow CindyC Paid Prog. Murder, She Wrote Leave Leave an Dyke Van Dyke Griffith Griffith Griffith Griffith Murder, She Wrote Bonanza (CC) Bonanza (CC) Bonanza
TWC 225 5 214 362 Wake Up With Al (CC) Your Weather Today With Abrams and Belles (CC) Wake Up With Al (CC) Day Planner (CC)
USA 26 26 105 242 Cheers Law Order: Cl Psych (CC) is Man of the Year** (2006) Robin Williams.'PG-13' (CC) House "Saviors" (CC) House "House Divided" House"Under My Skin" NCIS "Knockout" (CC) NCIS "Hide and Seek" NCIS(CC)

WEDNESDAY EVENING / LATE NIGHT C Comcast C/R Comcast Rebuild D Dish DTV DirecTV MARCH 7, 2012

OCBS 2 2 DrOz News News News CBS News Wheel Jeopardyl Survivor: One World (N) Criminal Minds CSI: Crime Scene News Late Show Letterman Late Late Show/Craig Extra (N) Up to the Minute (N)
IOCBS 3 3 4 R. Ray Ellen DeGeneres Show News CBS News News Wheel Survivor: One World (N) Criminal Minds CSl: Crime Scene News Late Show Letterman Late Late Show/Craig Inside Ed. Up to the Minute (N)
0 NBC 5 5 7 7 Doctors Ellen DeGeneres Show News NBC News News Wheel Whitney (N) Chelsea Law & Order: SVU Rock Center News Tonight Show w/Leno Late Night Carson Today (CC)
B ABC 8 8 13 13 Dr. Phil (N) The Dr. Oz Show (CC) News ABC News News Ent The Middle Suburg. Family Happy Revenge tor Real (N) News Nightline Jimmy Kimmel Live Excused Jim Access H. Paid Prog.'
E FOX 10 10 28 28 Peo. Court Jdg Judy Jdg Judy ThisMinute ThisMinute Two Men Big Bang American Idol "Finalists Compete" (N) (CC) Scrubs How I Met Big Bang Two Men 30 Rock Friends Friends ing of Hill Scrubs Lewis
D PBS 11 11 WordGiri Wild Kratts Electric Capitol PBS NewsHour (N) Education Oscar Hammerstein --Out Blood Sugar Solution With Dr. Mark Capitol Charlie Rose (N) (CC) Oscar Hammerstein Out Blood Sugar Solution
A&E 30 30 118 265First48 The First 48 (CC) Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage
AMC 33 33 130 254 Oceans CSI: Miami "Fallen" CSI: Miami (CC) CSI: Miami (CC) V National Lampoon's Vacation ** (1983) 'R' V National Lampoon's Vacation ** (1983) 'R' t& Tootsie **** (1982, Comedy) Dustin Hoffman. 'PG' (CC) CS: Miami
BET 35 35 124 329 MyWife Parkers Parkers 106& Park: BET's Top 10 Live (CC) V Soul Plane ** (2004) Keyin Hart.'R' (CC) EV Steppin: The Movie (2009) Darius McCrary. Wendy Williams Show V. SoulPlane** (2004) Kevin Hart.'R'(CC)
CNN 45 45 200 202 Situation Room John King, USA (N) Erin Bumelt OutFront Anderson Cooper 360 Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 Erin Burelt OulFrnt Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 Erin Bumett OutFront
CNN2 43 43 202 204 News Now HLN Special Report Prime News (CC) Jane Velez-Mitchell Nancy Grace (N) Dr. Drew Nancy Grace Slowbiz Tonight Dr. Drew Nancy Grace Showbiz Tonight
CSS 20 20 -. College Basketball SportsNite (N) (CC) SEC Football dy College Basketball SEC ( College Basketball Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog.
CW 6 6 8 8 Browns 70s Show 70s Show 'Til Death King Selnfeld Seinfeld One Tree Hill (N) (CC) America's Next Top Cops (CC) 'Til Death King South Park South Park Roseanne Roseanne To Be Announced Paid Prog.
DISC 24 24 182 278 Chopper Man vs. Wild (CC) Sons of Guns (CC) of Guns (CC) Sns of Guns (CC) Sons of Guns (N) (CC) Doomsday Bunkers (N) Sons of Guns (CC) Doomsday Bunkers Sons of Guns (CC) Sons of Guns (CC)


21 21 172 290 Good Luck Austin Austin


Shake It Good Luck


ANT Farm IAustin Random Shake It Jessie ANT Farm


F-F a-a-a Il -i.


Around Interruption SportsCenter (N) (CC)
SportsNation (N) (CC) NFL32 (N) (Live) (CC)


9 College Basketball
( College Basketball


,ustin Austin


SCollege Basketball


FAM 28 28 180 311 '70s Show 70sShow V Raising Helen ** (2004) Kate Hudson. 'PG-13' V The Parent Trap *** (1998, Comedy) Lindsay Lohan.'PG'
HBO 301 301 300 501 Vi TheA-Team** (CC) V HarryPotterandthe Deathly Hallows: Part 1 *** (2010) V ,Something Borrowed (2011) 'PG-13'(CC) Luck (CC)
HGTV 49 49 112 229 Property Property Property Property Property Hunters House Property Brothers (CC) Income Kitchen House Hunters
HIST 81 120 269 How the How the States Larry the Cable Guy Restoration Resoraton storaon Resoration Larry the Cable Guy Restoration Restoration
LIFE 29 29 108 252 Reba (CC) Wie Swap "Baur/Fine" Wile Swap (CC) Wile Swap (CC) Wife Swap (CC) Wile Swap (CC) Wile Swap (CC)
MAX 320 320 310 515 V JustMarried* (CC) V BigStan *** (2007) Rob Schneider.'R'(CC) Face/Ol *** (1997, Action) John Travolta. 'R'(CC) X-Men:First Class **
MTV 34 34 160 331 Jersey Deml Lovato: Stay 70s Show 70s Show Pranked Pranked The Challenge Battlee nge: Battlnge: Batte The Challenge: Battle
NICK 14 14 170 299 Big Time Kung Fu SpongeBob iCariy Victorious Anubis SpongeBob My WiGeorgGeorge 70sShow 70sShow
SHOW 340 340 318 545 V The Twilight Saga: Eclipse ** (2010) 'PG-13' V. Youth in Revolt ** (2009)'R' Shameless (CC) Bad Gils of Comedy Les Califom.
SPEED 99 62 150 607 Garage Hot Rod TV Gearz NASCAR Race Hub (N) Pass Time assTime Dumbest bet CarWarriors "Chevelle" Stuntust. Slunlbuist.
SPIKE 47 47 168 241 UFC Unleashed UFCUnleashed Enter the Dragon*** (1973, Adventure) Bruce Lee. 'R' IAn Bruce Lee (2011) Promiere. 'NR'(CC)
SYFY 32 32 122 244 Face Off Face OffTriple Threat" Face Off Face OI "Buronesque" Ghost Hunters (CC) Ghost Hunters Inter. Face Off"DInoplasty"
TBS 16 16 139 247 Friends Friends Friends King King Seneld ld Faily Guy Family Guy Fail y Famly BiBang Bg Baig
TLC 98 98 183 280 Cake Boss ke Boss CakeBoss CakeBoss CakeBoss Medical Examiner Hoarding: Buried Alive Untold Stories of ER Obsession Obsession
TNT 23 23 138 245 Law Law& Order"Castoff' Law& Order Law L&Order Law&rder"Monster' Law & Order Law & Order
TOON 31 31 176 296 Johnny T Johnny T Regular MAD Gumball Adveriture Johnny T NinjaGo Level Up King of Hill King of Hill Amer. d Aer.Dad
TVLND 22 22 106 304 Bonanza Bonanza (CC) M'A'S'H M'A'S'H MA'S'H MA'S'H HomeImp. Imp.Raymond Raymond Cleveland Divorced
TWC 25 25 214 362 Day Plan Storms Storms Cantore Cantore Weather Center Live Coast Guard Alaska Coast Guard Alaska Weather Center Live
USA 26 26 105 242 NCIS (CC) NCS "Legend" (CC) NCIS "Legend" (CC) NCIS: Los Angeles NCS "Cracked" (CC) NCIS "One Last Score" Psych (N) (CC)


Austin ANT Farm Wizards Wizards
SportsCenter (N) (Live) (CC)


3ood Luck Good Luck Random Random
SportsCenter (N) (CC) SportsCenter (N) (CC)


SportCtr Basketball NFL Live (N) (CC) NBA SportsNation (CC) Nation
The 700 Club (CC) Prince Prince Total Gym Hair Paid Prog. Paid Prog.
Real Time/Bill Maher Eastbound V Your Highness* (2011) 'R'(CC) f Terminator 3
Property Brolhers (CC) Income Kitchen House Hunters Property Brothers (CC)
Larry the Cable Guy Restoration Restoration Larry the Cable Guy Restoration Restoration
Wife Swap (CC) Wife Swap (CC) Wife Swap (CC) Wife Swap (CC)
a (2011) James McAvoy. Lingere Feature 5: Sheer Delight (CC) Depravity Is Out
The Chal The Challenge: Battle The Chal Teen Mom 2 The Challenge: Battle
friends friends Friends Fiends 70Show 70s Show Chris George
Comedy Drive Angry (2011) TV. 'R' Windialkers * (2002, War) Nicolas Cage. R'
NASCAR Race Hub [Dunibeost IiDumbest Car Wariors "Chevelle" Slunlbust. Stuntbust.
SEnter the Dragon ** (1973, Advenluro) Bnice Lee 'R' / An Bnrce Lee (2011) NR (CC)
Ghost Hunters Intor. Face Off Dinoplasty" Lost Girl "Vexed" (CC) Stargate SG-1 (CC)
Coan (N) The Offico (CC) Conai Seinfeld [Sinfeld
Untold Stories of ER Obsession obsession Hoarding: Burid Alive Medical Examiner
Souithiad (CC) CSI: NY Olticer Blue" CSI; NY "Night, Mother" Rizzoi & Isles (CC)
Family Guy Fa-mily Guy Chicken Boondocks Aqua Teen Amer.Dad Arer. Dad Family Guy
Divorced Cleveland King King Cleveland Divorced King King
Coast Guard Alaska Coast Guard Alaska Weather Center Live Coast Guard Alaska
NCIS "Knockout" (CC) NCIS "Hide and Seek" Psych (CC) Taking Woodstock


ESPN 19


19 140 206 SportCtr


ESPN2 18 18 144 209 LeBatard


I


1, College Basketball


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE
Indianapolis Colts quarterback Peyton Manning talks-to
reporters in Indianapolis on Dec. 11, 2011.


Colts expected to


cut Manning loose


r_-.








74B WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7, 2012


ENTERTAINIVIENT


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN o www.jcfloridan.com


PEANUTS BY CHARLES SCHULTZ
AFTER I. HIT EVENTY-ONE HOW DOES THE WORST PLAYER
HOME RUNS, I'LL SELL THE IN THE HISTORYOF THE 6AME
BALL FOR THREE MILLION DOLLARS EXPECT TO HIT SEVENTY-ONE
HOME UNS?

-V>'~~~~~ ~ r ij- y


I'VE NEVER SEEN A AU -
SKY LOOK QUITE 50
BLUE, HAVE YOU -,
-Ln


BORN LOSER BY ART AND CHIP SANSOM
tl tvYOU NOTICE- WORK. I o 'TAT'S IT DON'T I DESERVE CONGRATULkTONS ON A JO6'
LWTE LAST NlIGIT TO FINiSR S COGRATULksION5 O A JOB E
TRE GUlGLE.Y IREPORT,ASYOU WELL DONE, T
REQUESTED? w 7


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BIG NATE BY LINCOLN PIERCE
MA, KIDS' I'M CHIP 'M HERE To TALK TO
CAVENDISH, C..+IEF YOU ABOUT WEATHER!
METEOROLOGIST FOR. I'LL TELL YOU WHAT
CHANNEL 7- CAUSES WIND, RAIN,
ACTION NEWS SNOW, AND So ON!


...AND IF YOU DON'T
UNDERSTAND SOMETHING
I'VE SAID, JUST RAISE
YOUR HANDAND ASKS


SOUP TO NUTZ BY RICK STROMOSKI
siNCe WHLN DoES
suRaN weaR
M rsY4edt8a i u ou ? M -f




0 ( & E A



FRANK & ERNEST BY BOB THAVES


HOW DO YOU SLEEP
AT NIGHT, KNOWING
YOU'VE DESTROYED
WINK SUMMERS' LIFE?
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ALLEY OOP BY JACK AND CAROLE BENDER


I GUESS THAT'S BE THE
RIGHT THING TO 00, BUT
WE'RE NOT ALL RICH. FOLKS
HAVE TO MAKE ENDS MEET.
SADLY,
I FEEL ,- "0
WE'RE (
ONLY AS \
GOD r '(_(4
AS OUR L ,_.,/
WALLETS = "
ALLOW US
TO BE 3
isI


YOUR LEATHER,
CALFSKIN WALLETS...
PLEASE, I CAN ONLY
FEEL GUILTY ABOUT
ONE THING AT A TIME.




*^jj 3


KIT'N' CARLYLE BY LARRY WRIGHT HERMAN BY JIM UNGER


3-7 0 aughngSloci nlemIrnaonal Inc., Di by UInlvoMn al UCIck klo UI S, 2012
"Muriel, I told you this morning
I'd be home late."


NEA Crossword Puzzle


ACROSS
1 Gourmet
cook
Child
6 "Laughing"
animal
11 Harvest
Time
12 Thundered
13 Crunchy
14 Rococo
15 Young
horses
16 Gone to
the bottom
17Squirrel
abode
18Well-put
19 Charles
Lamb
23 Plump and
juicy
25 eshing
parts
26 Starry vista
29Country
parson
31 Travel
word
32 Modern
33Jung's
inner self
.34 Deadly
snake
35 Of a
Peruvian
empire
37 Switch
positions


39 Garden
dweller
40 Shaggy
flower
41 Rust
component
45Bullfight
shouts
47Soar
48Tusked
animal
51 Ms. Starr
52 Cupcake
toppings
53 Winter trim
54Aquatic
birds
55 Out-and-
out
DOWN
1 Courtroom
figure
2 Good for
something
3 Sheen
4 Bratty kids
5 Some
6 Fearsome
cape
7 Rebel's foe
8 Baseball
stat
9 After
expenses
10 Lime
cooler
11 Bank
statement
no.


Answer to Previous Puzzle


NAE RO
I NKLITN
EAR
RANGY
OREO SI
ETC ST
SKATE
CUT
BROODS
REAR 0
ATTN N/

12 Put to
flight
16 Dubious
18 Neat
as -
20 Pumice,
source
21 Late spring
flower
22 Now!
24 "Terrible"
tsar
25 Zeppelin
26 Fit of pique
27 Casino
game
28 Swimming
pool loc.
30 Kind of
radio
36 Festoons


38 Completely
still
40 Predicament
42 Wash cycle
43 More weird
44"Hud"
Oscar
winner
46Winter
Olympics
event
47 Fortitude
48 Disguise
item
49 Hole in one
50 Commit
perjury
51 Heat meas.


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDrlverBooks.com


3-7 2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS



CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
"W LYWTP STNLWZH NCK DST SAAHDL

XHCXMH WT RHTHVSM WT S XCGWLWEH

BSN, LYHT NCK'VH S MKDPN

WTJWEWJKSM." GSZ HMMWCLL


Previous Solution: "There are some days when I think I'm going to die from an
overdose of satisfaction." Salvador Dali
TODAY CLUE: M slenbe g
2012 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 3-7


PISCES (Feb.20-March 20)
- Don't be afraid to make a
bold judgment call if you
believe it would work.
ARIES (March 21-April
19) Some kind of op-
portunity of considerable
dimensions could develop
for you. It has something to
do with your finances and
might be able to enhance
your security.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
- If there are many players
involved but they lack your
managerial skills, assume
a leadership role and take
the reins.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
- If you're in need of some
assistance concerning a
confidential matter, go to
someone close.
CANCER (June 21-July 22),
- As conditions start to
change for the better, fresh
hope will instill itself in
your heart.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
- Due to the fact that Lady
Luck wants to divert your
attention onto something
that would be beneficial,
it isn't likely that you'll be
able to dismiss commercial
matters from your agenda.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
- Go ahead ,and think in
grandiose terms don't
be afraid to put the things
you conceive into action.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
- If you have something
of importance to do, you'll
find that you will work far
better if you don't have
anyone .peering over your
shoulders.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) Dame Fortune is
likely to look favorably on
partnership arrangements,
so don't impatiently go off
on your own.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-
Dec. 21) Co-workers
might lack your industri-
ousness, so don't allow
them to distract you from
gratifying your ambitions
and fulfilling what you
want to accomplish.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) Just because they like
you, certain people are apt
to treat you in a far more
generous fashion than they
do others.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) This might be a good
time to devote both your
mental and physical ener-
gies to a matter that you've
been afraid to tackle.


Annie'sailbox


Dear Annie: "Bill" and I have been mar-
ried for 43 years. He retired three years
ago. We didn't socialize with any of his
co-workers, so I didn't know them well.
Last Christmas, Bill got a card with no
return address. It only had Bill's name on
it. I handed it to him so he had to open
it in front of me. It was a really nice card
from "Betty" and a note telling him how
much she missed him, their talks, their
lunches and their personal conversa-t
tions. She suggested they get together for
a holiday lunch.
When I asked Bill why he never men-
tioned Betty to me, he said the lunches
didn't mean anything and he probably
forgot because they were so insignificant.
He put Betty's card on display with the
others, but I asked him to take it down
since it wasn't sent to us as a couple. He
said he'd throw it away. But my instincts
said he was lying, so I checked the trash.
No card. The other day, I saw his old


It is well-known that no-trump contracts are
races. The defense is trying to set up its long
suit, while declarer is battling to establish the
winners that he needs to get home. Suit con-
tracts tend not to be such clear-cut contests.
But sometimes speed is important. In this ex-
ample, West leads the diamond three against
four spades. Who should win and how?
North has 12 high-card points and four-card
spade support, which would often be sufficient
for a game-forcing response. However, with
4-3-3-3 distribution and eight losers, North
sensibly downgraded the value of his hand
to a game-invitational limit raise. South, hav-
ing more than a minimum opening, raised to
game. Declarer starts by counting his losers:
none in spades, one in hearts, one or two in dia-
monds and two in clubs. Next, he should check
his winners: six in spades, two in hearts, one or
two in diamonds and one in clubs. South needs
one diamond and one club or two diamonds.
There is a strong temptation to take the dia-
mond finesse at trick one. Here, though, it los-
es, and if East shifts to the heart queen, declarer
will go down. The defenders will take one heart,
one diamond and two clubs before South can
establish his 10th winner in clubs. Instead, de-
clarer should win immediately with dummy's
diamond ace, draw trumps using honors from
his hand, and play on clubs.
The defenders lose the race.


briefcase, and insidewas Betty's card. He
had written her phone number on it.
If this card meant nothing to him, why
keep it? f love my husband. I want to
trust him, but I'm shaken to the core.
Now I pay close attention when he leaves
the house. Last week, he said he needed
to run some errands and was gone for
nearly two hours. He claims he ran into
"Dave," a former co-worker, but I wonder
if this was Betty's holiday lunch.
My kids say to forget about it before I
make myself sick. Am I just paranoid?
CARD WOES

Dear Card: No. Your husband is not be-
ing totally truthful about Betty, and this
creates suspicion and distrust, both of
which undermine your relationship. You
need to have a long talk with him and
explain why his behavior is hurting you.
If he cannot reassure you, the next step is
counseling.


COW & BOY BY MARK LEIKNES


North 03-07-12
4 K652
7 762
AQ5
A Q 5
QJ 10
West East
4 4 4 3
S853 YQJ109
* J983 K1064
SA 7 4 2 K 9 8 3
South
SA QJ 10 9 8
VAK4
S72
*65

Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Both
South West North East
14 Pass 3 4 Pass
4 Pass Pass Pass


Opening lead: + 3


Bridge*







CLASSIFIED


www.JCFLORIDAN.coin


Jackson County Floridan *


Wednesday, March 7, 2012-5 B


WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED




ARKETPLA


BY PHONE: (850) 526-3614 or (800) 779-2557
BY FAX: (850) 779-2557
ONLINE: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM


BY MAIL: WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE
P.O. BOX 520, MARIANNA, FL 32447
IN PERSON: 4403 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA


Publication Policy Errors and Omissions: Advertisers should check their ad the first day. This publication shall not be liable for failure to publish an ad or for a typographic error or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the ad for the first day's
insertion. Adjustment for errors is limited to the cost of that portion of the ad wherein the error occurred. The advertiser agrees that the publisher shall not be liable for damages arising out of errors in advertisements beyond the amount paid for the space
actually occupied by that portion of the advertisement in which the error occurred, whether such error is due to negligence of the publisher's employees or otherwise and there shall be no liability for non-insertion of any advertisement beyond the amount paid for
such advertisement. Display Ads are not guaranteed position. All advertising is subject to approval. Right is reserved to edit, reject, cancel or classify all ads under the appropriate classification.


G.M. Properties of PC Beach 800-239-2059
Fully furnished condos
& townhouses near Pier Park.
2bdrm Gulf front- starting @ $175 nt.
3bdrm Gulf front- starting @ $225 nt.
2bdrm Lake front- starting @ $100 nt.
Studios Lake front- starting @ $70 nt.
Swww.gmproperties.com


GIOST ANNOUNCEMENTS


,Sn to s es, S eson.-

r S1 ,I, -] S z
69SuhOtsS. Dta. NxttoDoha. Gas


FINANCIAL


Raceway is currently seeking
business owners to lease a
Raceway location near you.
All interested parties please call
(800)688-6199 or visit our website at
www.myracewaystore.com

() MERCHANDISE

Wanted: Old Coins, Gold,
Diamonds, Guns, And Tools
West Main Jewelry & Loan 334-671-1440.

STORAGE SHED 12x16 cream/green S/U, has
electricity & lock with deadbolt, 48" wide
door $750. Great Condition!! 334-790-8400.

PETS & ANIMALS

Kittens: Free to good home, 1 black, 1 orange,
1 calico. Approx. 4.5 mths old. Call 850-482-2994

S3 CKC Cocker Spaniels left!
1/F $350. & 2/M $300. each
Born 2/3/12, ready 3/16/12
Ow Tails docked, dew claw
removed, wormed female
red/males buff and white.
Call 334-798-1578 or 334-798-0656
AKC Reg. Chocolate Lab male puppies
12 weeks old. Vet checked-all shots.
$300. -* 229-942-1358_4.,
Brittany Spaniel Puppies, AKC, Champion
Bloodline Orange and White (4) Girls and (4)
Boys CH. Nolan's Last Bulet Bloodline $375.
Ready Date 3/19/2012. Phone 229-724-8839
Dachshund puppies. CKC registered.
1st shots. 2 males and 2 females. $150.
Call 334-692-3662.
Doberman Puppies For Sale
2/F & 5/M, 1 red M, 2 black F,,4 black M. 6wks
old, S&W, tails docked, parents onsite.$350.
Call 334-266-5914
V Easter Babies Are Here V
Yorkie-Poos $300. Chorkies Male $150.
Shih-Pom $300. Now Taking deposits on
Chorkies. $300. Call 334-718-4886.
Maltese AKC Pups!
Will be small. S/W,
M & F. Ready March
14th! Will Deliver!
Now Taking deposits.
Call 334-703-2500
MINI AUSTRALIAN SHEPHERDS
S e., ,, Bre.:d.:-r; t t,-,autiful show quail
S1 ly do'-.. PUPPIES AVAIL. NOW!
S600. + up. www.peachtreeminia
ussies.com 33-4 405-3155..
MOVING: Old English Bulldog male 2 yrs. old.
Fire-Westminster Champion $2500. OBO
334-03-3291. ikccl hntmailconm


14..


w.- .ejuvu-- ULV\A\UV-- III


IT'S AS EASY AS
1. CALL
2. PLACE YOUR AD
3. GET RESULTS


Puppies for Sale AKC Toy Poodles- Males $300.
Female $400. also Shih-poos Males $250 or "
females $350. Home raised and Paper trained.
Call 334-794-2854.
Shih-Tzu puppies: Just in time for Valentine.
CKC registered. Male and female left. $300
each. Call, text or email 334-596-3940
wridothanmgr@aol.com
S FARMER'S MARKET













WE HAVE STRAWBERRIES
Frozen Peas, Collard, Turnip,
& Mustard Greens, &
Other Fresh Vegetables!!
All Farm Fresh!
220 W. Hwy 52 Malvern
334-793-6690 *


Bahia seed for sale 4-
* Excellent germination Kendall Cooper
Call 334-703-0978, 334-775-3423,
or 334-775-3749 Ext. 102
L.....o............. ... ......
.= Large rolls of Hay for Sale
-- Bahia & Coastal
,- Daytime 334-585-3039,
',--. after 5pm & weekends 585-5418
IT'S AS EASY
AS1 -2-3
1. CALL 2. PLACE YOUR AD 3. GET RESULTS


Wednesday, March 7, 2012








1THE SUDOKU GAME WITH KlICK!
HOW TO PLAY
Fill n the 9x9 grid with the missing
numbers so that each column, row and
3x3 box contains the digits 1 9 only once.
There is only one correct solution
for each puzzle.
GET MORE WASABI
PUZZLES ONLINE!
ARCHIVES AND MORE GREAT GAMES AT
BOXERJAM.COM


Find jobs


fast and


easy!


/ Now paying top prices for
Pine / Hardwood in your area.
No tract to small / Custom Thinning
Call Pea River Timber
I 334-389-2003
WANTED TO RENT: Farm/Pasteur Land
in surrounding Jackson County Area.
850-718-1859

I ~EMPLOYMENT


1 NOW
VANTAGE HIRING
50 CUSTOMER SERVICE
ASSOCIATES
12:00-9:00,1:00-10:00 or 2:00-11:00 Shifts
Competitive Pay & Benefits Package
Must Type 30 wpm
Background Check & Drug Screen Required
Visit www.vantagesourcing.com for job
description and additional position requirements.
328 Ross Clark Circle Dothan, AL 36303
Apply in Person Mon-Fri 9AM-3PM


JACKSON COUNTY
FLORIDAN
LOOKING FOR MATURE, DEPENDABLE-
NEWSPAPER CARRIERS IN THE JACKSON
COUNTY AREA

EARN EXTRA



BE YOUR OWN BOSS
1AM to 6 AM

Must have dependable
transportation, minimum
liability insurance & valid
driver's license.

Come by and fill out an
application at the Jackson
County Floridan,
4403 Constitution Lane,
Marianna, FL











FAMILY,
DISTRIBUTION CENTER
MARIANNA, FLORIDA
Now Hiring Full Time
Warehouse Positions
1st, 2nd, and 3rd Shifts
Competitive Pay and
Benefits Package!
Apply at Family Dollar Distribution Center
3949 Family Dollar Parkway,
Marianna, Florida 32448
Must be 18 Years Old
Equal Opportunity Employer
Drug Free Workplace



DOCK WORKER
The Jackson County Floridan is looking
for a dependable individual to work in
our distribution center. Individual should
be well organized, have dependable
transportation and be able to work nights,
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Tuesday's
WASABI SOLUTION
S5s 7| 3 ||67





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6 7 1Q 8 1' 3 9

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BE SURE TO VISIT QUR
NEWEST GAME SITE
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i @_


JACKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN%
jcfloridan.com


monster
FIND LOCAL JOBS AT: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM/JOBS


I


Im ^^I-


:j


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BR ,,dnner:sd Ilan ch 1 ,0 l~,o CouIII Flohrid:In


'. .EDUCATION
S~& INSTRUCTION


INTUCIN UTRN


LOOK


Child Care Director Training
for more info visit:
childcarejobseekers.com


Call Fortis College
Today!
r OR TI Prepare for a career in
F OR TIS Healthcare, HVAC &
COLLEGE Refrigeration and
Electrical Trades.
Call 888-202-4813 o r
visit www.fortiscollege.edu For consumer
information visit www.fortis.edu

RESIDENTIAL
1I!_- ?REAL ESTATE FOR RENT


1BR 1BA Apartment on Dickson St. in Marianna,
$400/mo. No pets. 850-526-8392


Deering Street Private 1BR 1st floor $340 Mo.
No Pets. Clinton St Eff. Apt Call 727-433-7878


Hay pasture on New Hope Rd.( 3 miles west of
Marianna) for rent. Call 770-532-7207.


3/1 brick home, Malone/ Bascom area, Ig yard,
taking applications, $575/mo. 850-209-1265
3\2 Brick Home CH/A Large Lot Alford $650
3\1 CB Home CH/A C'dale $575 Dep., ref, & 1 yr
lease req. on both 850-579-4317/866-1965


. 2/1 Located between Grand Ridge & Sneads
water& garbage included $300/month
850-573-0308 4
2/2 Located between Grand Ridge & Sneads
water& garbage included $350/month 850-573-
0308.
2 & 3BR 2BA Mobile Homes in Cottondale no
pets, Central Heat & Air $400-$450 850-258-
1594 leave message
2BR 1BA $350 + deposit, Clean, CH/A, located
in Sneads. No Pets, 850-593-5251/573-0911
2BR 1BA MH, in Cottondale, Quiet, $275/mo
NO PETS, 850-352-2947
3BR 2BA, big lot, deposit & ref. req. no pets, $500 850-
593-6457
Rent to Own: 2 & 3BR Mobile Homes.
Lot rent included. Also available,
1 & 2BR Apts & Houses. For details
*#850-557-3432 or 850-814-6515 4





Clinton St. Efficiency, util. incl. $395 & rooms
for $375 or 1BR avail. Call Now 727-433-7878

RECREATION


350 HONDA-Fourtrax Rancher, low mileage,
garage kept, great condition $3,000 334-687-
0328,334-695-8126





Xtreme Packages From
Xtreme $4,995
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2010 Jayco Eagle Super Lite 5th Wheel
One Big Slide Out, 2 Flat Screen TVs Sidewinder
Hitch "Like New" $23,900 Call 334-701-2101
j ,Forest River '01
Reflections: 37ft, 1
large slide-out, 23k
miles, 50 amp, (2)
A/C's, diesel pusher, loaded, includes dishes,
linens, small appliances. $42,900. OBO or will
trade for luxury car or.truck. (205) 790-2152.
Forest River'12 Microlight: 23 LB, sleeps 5-6,
used 2 times, Tv, grill, lots of storage, and ,
plenty extras, fiberglass siding. Like New Con-
dition! Newville $14,000. Call 334-889-2259
Palomino '06 Thoroughbred: fiberglass, 30ft
sleeps 8, super slide, awning, air, all options,
will deliver. $8,900. Call cell @ 484-550-9821


Good fixer Upper 78 Ford Mida Mini 200 RV,
Great for hunting and camping, sleeps 6, white
in color, $2000. 334-671-1162. BUY NOW!!!

TRANSPORTATION


E < :-, .- Jeep'83CJ-7, Over$25K
'.;' 'invested. 350 Chevy en-
j~i 1mgine. 400 Turbo Transmis-
rBl ~sion & Transfer Case..410
p '* Gears. Too many extras
to list. Contact me and I
will email you a complete list of extras. Must
sacrifice at $9,000. Call Blake at 334-695-1033
Jeep '93 Wrangler CJ-5, Straight line 6 w/fuel
injection. Has lift kit. Also comes with bikini
top and hard top. CD player. 4WD. $6200 Neg.
850-579-2217 or 850-573-1962


Cadillac '94 Seville, 4-door, new motor, good
condition, white in color $2500. 334--792-5822.
CHEV '76 MONTE CARLO-
.400 -1 BBL Numbers
I.. LPj- match, cold A/C. 100K all
r orig. runs strong cream
tan, car road ready $4,000
OBO 334-689-9045-MT
..,s Ford '95 Mustang GT
SConvertible- 1-Owner white
with leather interior, 200k
mile, runs great, needs


paint, $3,500. Firm Call 334-695-2340
.. "PGMC 2009 2500 HD SLT.
-. -Summit White with tan
iJ|jlL If leather interior. 6 speed
M A.T. 6.6 Duramaxx with
Allison Transmission.. Heated seats, XM radio,
OnStar, Bose CD player, new tires. 1 owner,
66,000 mi. $33,500. 334-585-2259; 334-729-1868.
Mercedes '93 300 SD, one owner, very clean,
excellent condition, never wrecked or damaged,
sunroof, leather interior, 4 door, champagne
Color, REDUCED TO $6900 I 850-569-2475


CLASSIFIED


AUTOSFOR SALE i S


GOT BAD CREDIT? DO YOU NEED A VEHICLE?
I can get U Riding Today!
$0 Down/ 1st Payment, Tax, Tag & Title
Repos, Slow Credit, Past Bankruptcy OK!
Push, Pull or Drag, Will Trade anything!
Bring In Your W-21 Ride Today! *
Call Steve 334-803-9550


-, 1 1 Lincoln "92 Town Car .
r.ea -- M 'hinicall sound anti
ciood tires. $1.7?5 or bu.st
oitler 334-618-9852

Mercury Grand '03 Marquis LE 1-owner, V-8,
service regularly, garage kept, exc. cond. good
gas mil. 59K mi. $8000. Firm. 334-39341440.
Pontiac 2005 GTO -excellent condition 82k
miles a/c blows COLD tires have less than 2k
miles on them Oil changed with mobile 1 syn-
thetic every 5k miles manual 6 speed Hurst
performance shifter K&N filter Gets on average
26 mpg on the hwy (most mileage is hwy) and
20 in the city $14,500 or best offer, call between
1-10 p.m., 334-796-2000, No trades


2006 Honda CRF250r. low hours, runs excellent.
$600 Tune-up just completed at Dothan
Powersports. Brand new rear tire! Aftermarket
exhaust. Located in Graceville, FL.
Call 229-977-2137.
2009 Kawasaki Ninja
SZX-6R Monster Edition
Black with monster logos
&i reen trim. Has less
H ~than 3000 miles. Great
cond. $6,500 negotiable.
Call or text 334-714-1758, and leave message.
Harley '98 Heritage Softtail Red, 31K Mi. New
Tires, New Brakes, Real Good Condition $8500
850-526-1414


SGMC'09 Denali
'XL 1500 AWD: black with
black leather interior,
fully loaded with all
options, 48k miles.
Must Sell!! $38,950. OBO Call 334-790-0511


Chevrolet'00 Silverado, 3-door, 128 K + Miles,
$7000 334-588-2117
Chevrolet '86 Pickup, longwheel base
w/camper top. 79K + Miles. $3000
334-588-2117
.Chevrolet '92 Cheyenne
Truck V6 5-Speed,
A/C, New Tires, Long Bed,
92K mi.
Excellent Condition
$2800 OBO 334-798-1768 or 334-691-2987
Ford '02 Ranger Edge, V-6, cruise control
am/fm/cd, air-cold, white in color, very clean
$5000. OBO 334-726-1215.
Ford '04 F-250 Super Duty 4X4 Crew Cab Lariat
6.0 V-8 Diesel, Dark Blue, Loaded, 146K Mi.
Excellent Condition, $18,995 334-790-4167
or 334-714-2129
Ford '06 F-150 XLT
Supercrew 4 Door.5.4L
V-8. Bedliner, Toolbox,
Garage Kept,
Very Clean,
Excellent Condition. 75K Miles. $14,500.
Day: 334-596-4095
GMC '06 Sierra 1500 HD SLE: 4x4 with Leer
Fiberglass Truck Cap with side doors, flashing
roof light, 206k miles, and in good condition.
Must see! $8,800. Call 334-793-4700
lOld John Deere M series
Tractor: with bushhog,
discs, planters and tiller.
Works. $3000 OBO
(850) 557-4416 or (334)
718-6698.


Chevrolet '97 Astro Van
conversion Van raised
roof, loaded, new tires,
One owner. GREAT
condition. 52K mi.
$8,900. 334-897-2054 or
334-464-1496
Chevy '01 Astro Mini Van, loaded, 8 passen-
gers, 110K miles, $4000. 334-794-7447.
S Ford '06 E-250 Econoline:
ladder rack, 5.4 eng. Air
i cond., tilt wheel, cruise,
Good cond., 120k miles.
Must see and drive to
appreciate!
$7900.00 call 334-894-2315


J H GMC '02 Savannah
1500 Van: White. Explorer
Conversion. excellent
condition, 41933K miles,
new tires, limited slip
Deferential, one owner, $11,500. 334-347-7923
GMC '94 Safari:
7 passenger, 4 captain
i A chairs, bench seat rear,
power door locks, 125k
miles, white with black
pin stripes. Asking
$2,995. Call 334-347-1058
Honda '95 Odyssey Van
j' g loaded, rear air, clean, 160k
m mi. $2200. OBO 334-691-7111
or 334-798-1768 or 334-691-
7111



1ST PLACE TO CALL FOR ALL OF
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vehicle 334-794-9576 or 344-791-4714


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FOR JUNK CARS!!!!!!
Call 334-818-1274


(v~


LF15737
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
DIVISION:

CASE NO.: 32-2010-CA-001045
JAMES B. NUTTER & COMPANY,
Plaintiff,
vs.
THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES,
OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST HUGH M.
RAWLS, DECEASED, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF ACTION

TO: HELEN B. RAWLS
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: 1679 Baker St Ne Palm
Bay, FI 32907
CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose
a mortgage on the following property in
JACKSON County, Florida:
ALL OF LOT 3; AND A STRIP OF LAND 10 FEET IN
WIDTH ON THE SOUTH SIDE OF LOT 4 OF THE
PHILLIPS ADDITION TO THE PLAN OF THE CITY
OF MARIANNA, DESCRIBED AS BEGINNING AT
THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SAID LOT 4 AND
RUNNING NORTH ALONG THE WEST SIDE OF
RUSS STREET A DISTANCE OF 10 FEET; THENCE
WEST PARALLEL WITH THE SOUTH LINE OF THE
SAID LOT 4, 209 FEET TO AN ALLEY; THENCE
SOUTH ALONG THE EAST LINE OF SAID ALLEY,
10 FEET TO THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SAID
LOT 4;THENCE EAST ALONG THE,SOUTH LINE
OF LOT 4,209 FEET TO THE BEGINNING; ALL BE-
ING IN PHILLIPS ADDITION TO THE CITY OF MA-
RIANNA, JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
has been filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your written defenses
within 30 days after the first publication,.if any,
on Florida Default Law Group, P.L., Plaintiff's
attorney, whose address is 4919 Memorial
Highway, Suite 200, Tampa, Florida 33634, and
file the original with this Court either before
service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded in the
Complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once each week
for two consecutive weeks in the Jackson
County Floridian.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court on
this 22nd day of February, 2012.
Dale R. Guthrie
Clerk of the Court
By: Tammy Bailey
As Deputy Clerk

If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assistance.
Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at
P. 0. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by
phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days
before your scheduled court appearance, or
immediately upon receiving this notification if
the time before the scheduled appearance is
less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing im-
paired, please call 711.


LF15744
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND
FOR JACKSON COUNTY

CASE NO. 09-196 CA
HANCOCK BANK
Plaintiff,

VS.
MARIANNA REAL ESTATE DEVELOPMENTS, LLC,
SUNIL DHIR, CHUCK ANDERSON,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE is hereby given pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Foreclosure dated February 22,
2012, Jackson County, Florida, wherein HAN-
COCK BANK is the Plaintiff and MARIANNA RE-
AL ESTATE DEVELOPMENTS, LLC, SUNIL DHIR
and CHUCK ANDERSON, are the Defendants, I
will sell to the highest bidder for cash at the
Front Door of the Jackson County Courthouse,
4445 Lafayette Street, Marianna, Florida, Jack-
son County, at 11:00 a.m. Central Time, on the
29 day of March, 2012, the following described
property situated in Jackson County, Florida,
and set forth in the Order or Final Judgment,
to-wit:
As to Counts I, II and III
Commence at an existing iron rod and cap
(3214) marking the NE corner of the NW 1/4 of
Section 4, Township 4 North, Range 11 West,
Jackson County, Florida; thence South 89 de-
grees 59 minutes 09 seconds West along the
North boundary of said NW 1/4 a distance of
18.89 feet; thence South 00 degrees 13 minutes
39 seconds East for 6.59 feet to an existing nail
and disk; thence continue South 00 degrees 13
minutes 39 seconds East for 132.00 feet to the
Northerly right of way line of State Road No. 10
(U.S. Hwy. 90), said point being on a curve con-
cave to the North, having a radius of 5861.65
feet; thence Westerly along said curve, through
a central angle of 02 degrees 03 minutes 43
seconds, an arc distance of 210.94 feet (chord
bearing North 89 degrees 11 minutes 47 sec-
onds West for 210.93 feet) to an iron rod
(5943); thence South 03 degrees 33 minutes 09
seconds West for 107.36 feet to an iron rod
(5943); thence South 23 degrees 16 minutes 10
seconds West for 147.72 feet to an iron rod
(5943) said iron rod being the POINT OF BEGIN-
NING; thence South 13 degrees 28 minutes 49
seconds West for 195.26 feet to an iron rod
(5953); thence South 19 degrees 05 minutes 48
seconds West for 229.20 feet to an iron rod
(5953); thence North 81 degrees 38 minutes 12
seconds West for 85.09 feet to an iron rod


(5953); thence North 13 degrees 17 minutes 46
seconds East for 225.03 feet to an iron rod
(5943); thence North 10 degrees 32 minutes 17


LEGALS


____www..CFLORID) N.com


J.-


Clerk of the Circuit Court

By: /s/Tammy Bailey
Deputy Clerk


Place your ad in our


Sales & Service


Directory


and grow

your business!!!


-.1


seconds Ea-t for 191.31 feet to an iron rod
k5943); thence South 83 degrees 14 minutes 18
seconds East for 118.55 feet to the POINT OF
BEGINNING.
Said parcel being located in the NE 1/4 of the
NW 1/4 of Section 4, Township 4 North, Range
11 West, Jackson County, Florida,
Being together with a 30 foot easement for in-
gress and egress purposes being described as
being 15 feet either side of the following cen-
terline: Commence at an existing iron rod and
cap (3214) marking the NE corner of the NW
1/4 of Section 4, Township 4 North, Range 11
West, Jackson County, Florida; thence South 89
degrees 59 minutes 09 seconds West, along the
North boundary of said NW 1/4 a distance of
18.89 feet; thence South 00 degrees 13 minutes
39 seconds East for 6.59 feet to an existing nail
and disk; thence continue South 00 degrees 13
minutes 39 seconds East for 132.00 feet to the
Northerly right of way line of State Road No. 10
(U.S. Hwy.90) said point being on a curve con-
cave to the North, having a radius of 5861.65
feet; thence Westerly along said curve, through
a central angle of 02 degrees 03 minutes 43
seconds, an arc distance of 210.94 feet (chord
bearing North 89 degrees 11 minutes 47 sec-
onds West for 210.93 feet) to an iron rod (5943)
said iron rod being the POINT OF BEGINNING;
thence South 03 degrees 33 minutes 09 sec-
onds West for 107.36 feet to an iron rod (5943);
thence South 23 degrees 16 minutes 10 sec-
onds West for 147.72 feet to an iron rod (5943),
said iron rod being the POINT OF TERMINUS.
As to Count IV, V and VI
Parcel 1:
Commence at the Southwest corner of Section
4, Township 4 North, Range 11 West, Jackson
County, Florida and thence run N 010 08'19" E,
along the West boundary of said Section 4, for
a distance of 1,800.00 feet to an iron rod for a
Point of Beginning, thence from said Point of
Beginning continue N 01008'19" E, along said
West boundary, for a distance of 280.00 feet to
an iron rod, thence run S 89030'58" E, for a dis-
tance of 768.00 feet to a concrete monument,
thence run S 01003'59" W, 287.26 feet to an iron
rod, thence run N 88058'28" W, for a distance of
768.31 feet to the Point of Beginning.
Subject to county graded Lawrenceville Road
lying over and across the West boundary there-
of.
Parcel 2:
Commence at the Southwest corner of Section
4, Township 4' North, Range 11 West, Jackson
County, Florida and thence run N 01208'19" E,
along the West boundary of said Section 4, for
a distance of 1,520.00 feet to an iron rod for a
Point of Begipning, thence from said Point of
Beginning continue N 0108'19" E, along said
West boundary, for a distance of 280.00 feet to
an iron rod, thence run S 88058'28" E, for a dis-
tance of 768.31 feet to an iron rod, thence run S
01003'59" W, for a distance of 287.26 feet to a
concrete monument, thence run N 88925'59" W,
for a distance of 768.70 feet to the Point of Be-
ginning.
Subject to county graded Lawrenceville Road
lying over and across the West boundary there-
of.
In accordance with the Americans With Disabil-
ities Act, persons needing a special accommo-
dation to participate in this proceeding should
contact the Court Administrator's Office no lat-
er than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding
at 4445 Lafayette Street, Marianna, Florida,
32446; Telephone: (850) 482-9552; 1-800-955-
8771 (TDD); or 1-800-955-8770 (V), via Florida
Relay Service.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the lis pendens must
file a claim within 60 days after the sale.
WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this
Honorable Court, on this 29 day of February,
2012.
DALE RABON GUTHRIE
Clerk of the Circuit Court, Jackson County
By:/s/ Tammy BaileyDeputy Clerk
LF15743
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR JACKSON COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION

CASE NO: 32-2010-CA-000091
U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee for
BNC Mortgage Loan Trust 2007-1, Mortgage
Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2007-1
Plaintiff,
VS.
DEAN EDDY AND TANGELA EDDY,
WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., AND UNKNOWN
TENANTS/OWNERS,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE

Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered in this
cause on February 22, 2012, in the Circuit Court
of Jackson County, Florida, I will sell the prop-
erty situated in Jackson County, Florida descri-
bed as:
LOT 9, OF TARA ESTATES SUBDIVISION,
ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK A-4, AT PAGE 152A,
OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF JACKSON
COUNTY, FLORIDA.

and commonly known as 4350 ANGELA DR.,
MARIANNA, FL 32446; including the building,
appurtenances,a nd fixtures located therein, at
public sale, to the highest bidder, for cash,
Sales are held at the north door of Jackson
County Courthouse, on March 29,2012 at 11am.
Any persons claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of lis pendens must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.

Dated this 29th day of February, 2012.
Dale Rabon Guthrie







CLASSIFIED


Jackson County Floridan *


Wednesday, March 7, 2012- 7 B


Antique Tobacco Table 24"Hx12"Dx12"W
ornate legs. Beautiful $85.firm 334-393-1432
Cinderella Play Castle w/lots of accessories
from Disney Website $45. 850-482-5434
Couch, multi-color earth tone, $75 OBO 850-
272-8967
Counter Top, Great Condition, complete,
(2) 40" pcs (1) 141" piece $50 all 334-793-4905
Cricut Electronic Cutter $75 OBO. 850-209-1700
Entertainment Center .White. 48"Wx60"Hx20"D
$35. 850-482-2636 Marianna
Formal Dress: Purple, size 16, $40. 850-209-1700


Golf Clubs, Trident, like new, $100 OBO 850-
272-8967
Kids Play Piano 25 keys upright style by
Schoenhut black/mahagony, $50. 850-482-5434
Laptop: Toshiba TECRA 8000 w/case, network
adapter, programs, more. $90. 850-482-4120
Prom Dress.Orange Crush,Size 10 Strapless
w/BIG POOFY Bottom $200. 850-482-2636


Rims: Dodge Dakota set (4) stock 6 lug, 15"
rims w/tires (2 good, 2 fair) $100. 850-889-0010


Sewing Machine: Kenmore 12 stitch w/cabinet
and accessories $150 obo for all. 8 6


Skillet, 14" all, clad by Emeril Lagassi, nearly
new $25 850-482-4132


Stroller/car seat combo with two vehicle bases
$100 or best offer. 334-693-0206


Get it fast


Emerson Heating & Cooling
The Cooling & Heating Specialists
Now Serving Jackson County!
Service & Installation Commercial or Residential
Free Estimates 850-526-1873



at
GAIL'S SITTING AGENCY
25 Years Experience
7 days a week /24 hours a day!
7xVlflnteM fl Mrnc r


Clay O'Neal's
Land Clearing, Inc. DEWAMNPNDM1
ALTHA FL AMW ADMBUl
850 762-9402 St2IS20 i WVB
Cell 850-832-5055 2YSEPBI.


For General House or
Office Cleaning
Call Debra
Free Estimates References Available
850-526-2336
HANDYWORKERS_;t_______"-,]


* COMMITMENT TO QUALITY CARE ChristTown Community Services
COMPASSIONATE Pressure Washingree
Painting r
SKILLED CAREGIVERS : rot repair estimates!
* SAFETY EFFICIENT HEALTH CARE : Clean-up
SELocal moving/hauling Call: 850-272-4671


CaroIi l I aUiX'i

C: : 5 55 0 8
I II


Need a Mew ltomre?
Checl out the Clatificd


Grader Pan Excavator
Dump Truck Bulldozer
SDemolition Grading Site Prep
* Debris Removal Retention Ponds Leveling
* Top Soil Fill Dirt Gravel Land Clearing






"Beautification of Your Home"
Carpentry/Painting Installations
Furniture Repair & Refinishing
General Repairs Insured
fflffl~m H. Lng,& ( 50592 3


COULD
let- H"e:.. 191.


I1 g I A

$140000
33 Years in Business



iLester Basford
Well & Pump Company
4513 Lafayette St Marianna, FL
850.526.3913 0 850.693.0428 C
S850.482.2278 H 850,363.0501 C

Place your ad in our

Sales & Service

Directory

and grow

your business!!!


e d Fast, easy, no press
Pla an A 24 hours a day, 7 da
. Get live previews of your classified ads, receive price quotes


and make secure online payments.

www.jcfloridan.com


re
ays a week!


I


Avrieor"OL foFE byviigww fordno.Seitef


allu a-a-I 1- -W IVI "I,.


\


~4g9P






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Britain says handshakes OK for its Olympians


The Associated Press
LONDON
On the other hand ...
The British
government has
rejected advice from the
Olympic team's top doc-
tor that athletes should
not shake hands at the
London Games to avoid
germs that could make
them sick.
Government health ad-
visers seemed perplexed
by the guidelines, which
Olympic hopefuls derided
as "rude" and "pointless."
By the end of the day,
the British Olympic As-
sociation had softened its
stance.
Yes, the athletes will be
able to greet the 10,000
visiting Olympians and
hundreds of dignitaries
with handshakes. They'll
just have to make sure
they wash thoroughly
later.
"Team GB's 550 athletes
will of course warmly
welcome their fellow
competitors from around
the world this summer
there is no question
about that," BOA commu-
nications director Darryl
Seibel said Tuesday.
"We are not advising our
athletes to avoid shak-
ing hands. We are simply
reminding them to follow
common-sense measures
by maintaining good hand
hygiene to minimize the
risk of becoming ill," he
said.
During a briefing with a
small group of reporters,
BOA chief medical officer
Dr. Ian McCurdie pointed
out that the OlympicVil-,
lage environment could
be a "pretty hostile one"
for infections and said a
handshake ban was "not
such a bad thing."
His comments went viral
in Britain, drawing deri-
sion on TV and radio.
Even the Department of
Health urged Olympians
to disregard the advice.
"It goes without say-
ing that we should all
wash our hands regularly
to keep them clean and


"Can't we just carry around a small bottle of
alcohol hand gel 8f not be so rude to everyone we
meet?"
Pete Reed,
Former Olympic champion via Twitter


iTHE ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE PHOTOS
United States' gold medal winner Michael Phelps looks on as Hungary's silver medalist Laszlo
Cseh (left) and Japan's bronze medalist Takeshi Matsuda shake hands during the medal
ceremony after the men's 200-meter butterfly final at the Beijing 2008 Olympics, in Beijing
on Aug. 13,2008.


prevent spreading bugs,"
the department said in
a statement. "But there's
no reason why people
shouldn't shake hands at
the Olympics."
And athletes took to
Twitter to insist that they
would still shake on it at
the games.
"Can't we just carry
around a small bottle of
alcohol hand gel & not be
so rude to everyone we
meet?" tweeted Pete Reed,
an Olympic champion in
the coxless four.
Another Olympic cham-
pion rower, Zac Purchase,
tweeted that the advice
seemed a "bit pointless
unless u r going to run
around with disinfectant
4 every surface you come
into contact with."
But triathlete Hollie Avil,
who was forced to pull
out of the 2008 Beijing
Olympics after picking up
a virus, quipped: "Maybe I
shook too many hands in
Beijing."
The BOA's clarification is
now merely about mini-
mizing the risk of germ
transmission during the
Olympics.
'After years of train-
ing and sacrifice, the last
thing an athlete would
want to do-is uninten-
tionally compromise or


undermine their ability to
perform at their very best
at the Olympic Games,
and basic, common-sense
measures can go a long
way toward making cer-
tain that doesn't happen,"
Seibel said.
That echoed the mes-
sage from the U.S. team,
which will send the most
athletes to London.
"We always encourage
our athletes at the Olym-
pic Games to embrace


the Olympic spirit and
meet, greet and interact
with as many different
athletes from as many
nationalities as possible,"
USOC spokesman Patrick
Sandusky said.
The advice being given
to Olympic volunteers on
how to deal with delicate
situations also emerged
on Tuesday.
About 70,000 people
have beeni given the
advice at training sessions


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where they were asked
to complete a quiz on
dealing with diversity and
inclusion.
One question in the
workbook describes a
complaint from a specta-
tor made "very uncom-
fortable" by two men
sitting next to him holding
hands and asks volunteers
how they would respond.
Among potential mul-,
tiple-choice answers are
the options to tell him to
"stop being a homophobic
idiot" or "politely ask the
couple to stop holding
hands."
The third answer is:
"You explain that there is a
huge diversity of people at
the London 2012 Games,
which includes gay,,les-
bian and bisexual indi-
viduals and couples."
In the gender section,
volunteers are asked how
to direct a member of the
public to the toilets if they
could not tell whether
they were male or female.
"Ask them politely if they


are male or female," "pan-
ic," or "tell them where
the male, female toilets
and accessible toilets are,"
are the possible options.
London organizers said
the advice is designed to
"deal with a wide array of
possible situations."
"Most major events offer
' volunteers similar guid-
ance and we've had very
positive feedback," the
statement added.


Bronze medalist Sanya
Richards (left) of the United
States, and gold medalist
Christine Ohuruogu, of
Britain, shake hands in 2008.


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