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Jackson County Floridan
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028304/00754
 Material Information
Title: Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title: Sunday Floridan
Portion of title: Floridan
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Jackson County Floridan
Publisher: Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Marianna Fla
Creation Date: February 15, 2012
Publication Date: 1934-
Frequency: daily (except saturday and monday)[<1979-1995>]
weekly[ former 1934-<1955>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates: 30.776389 x -85.238056 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note: "Independent."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID: UF00028304:00754
 Related Items
Preceded by: Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by: Marianna Floridan

Full Text


Informing more than 17,000 readers daily in print and online


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A Mr"ica Gealm I/NVcTcwxIper


Chipola Lady Indians

lose a close game to the

Lady Raiders, 59-55. See

more page on IB.


Vol. 89 No.33


County signs loan to buy building


$500,000 loan borrowed from Hancock Bank; total purchase price is $925,000


BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com

Jackson County Commission-
ers signed loan papers Tuesday
which formalized plans to buy
a two-story building on Green
Street in Marianna. It houses


upstairs offices for the State At-
torney in Mirianna and a parole
office downstairs. The purchase
price is $925,000.
The county is taking out a
$500,000 loan at 2.04 percent
interest from Hancock Bank
and making a $425,000 down


payment. The money for the
down payment came from funds
the county had set aside with
potential plans to build a new
administration complex. The
county plans to replenish that
fund.
The county will make its loan


payment once a year, and will
not be penalized if it should pay
out before the 10-year term of
the deal expires.
As collateral, the board is
pledging a portion of the landfill
host fees that the county receives
from Waste Management.


Part of the loan payment will
come from the rent the county
expects to collect from the De-
partment of Corrections parole
office downstairs. The down-
stairs rent is $5,610 a month.

See LOAN, Page 7A


, K,.. ."* ..


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Susan Melvin, the activities coordinator at
the Jackson County Senior Citizens Center,
talks about how the center's Nintendo Wii
game system and a flat screen- television
were stolen.


TVgame

system stolen

from local

senior center
BY LAUREN DELGADO
Idelgado@jcfloridan.com

A trip to the Jackson County Senior
Citizens Center is the only outing for
the week for some senior citizens, said
Dorothy Hyatt, a frequent visitor to the
center. It's a time for friends to come
together, share a meal and play some
games.
"It means so much to so many peo-
ple," Hyatt said.
Many of the seniors enjoyed playing
with their Nintendo Wii, donated by the
Pilot Club of Marianna about a year ago
and played on a 27-inch TV the center
fundraised for. Activities coordinator
Susan Melvin said they spent hours
playing Wii bowling, a game that even
those in wheelchairs enjoyed.
"Older people that needed the en-
couragement to get exercise played,"
Melvin said.
Local senior citizens will have a few
less activities to enjoy at the center af-
ter their TV, Nintendo Wii game system
and two Wii games were stolen some-
time between Monday afternoon and
Tuesday morning.
Melvin is unsure how the thief or
thieves broke in. The center is typically
closed to senior citizens on Monday to
be cleaned, but a maintenance worker
or office staff members were in the
building until about 5 p.m. Monday.
The loss was discovered by Rev. Dr. Billy
Bruner when he opened up the cabinet
to play Tuesday morning.
Bruner said he thought someone had
borrowed the TV at first, but after some
investigation, the Marianna Police De-
partment was alerted.
The center isn't sure how it's going to
replace these electronics.
After lunch on Tuesday, Carolyn Kill-
ings took note of how the crowd was
slowly ebbing away. Typically, the se-
niors came together to play some Wii. It
was a way to get others involved, Hyatt
said.
There are a number of activities and
board games to play at the center, but
it's not quite the same.
"It takes a lowdown person to steal
from these seniors," Hyatt said.


EDUCATION AID



Local schools awarded



$200 grants fom CRAA


PHOTOS BY MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Graceville Elementary School Art Educator Roberta Newell and students in Stephanie Mclntosh's third-grade class look over some of
the tiles made by GES students for a mosaic.

Art, music and theater teachers get hard-to-come-by funds


BY LAUREN DELGADO
ldelgado@jcfloridan.com .

Five Jackson County art,
music and theater teachers
were awarded $200 grants
from the Chipola Regional
Arts Association.
Music teacher Norma Bean
from Cottondale Elemen-
tary School; music teacher
Rebecca Dilmore from Cot-
tondale High School; mu-
sic teacher and first-grade
aide Cassandra Adams from
Dayspring Christian Acad-
emy; art teacher Roberta
T. Newell from Graceville
Elementary School; and


music teacher Richard Bou-
ton from Graceville High
School received the funds.
To teach her students an
instrument and how to fol-
low music, Bean bought
handbells, Through reading
music, students increase
their fluency by learning
how to hear patterns and
rhythms and looking at a
whole phrase, not just, one
word and a time.
"We're hoping to help by
having 'stuff we do in the
music classroom carry over
to the regular classroom,"
See GRANTS, Page 7A


Graceville Elementary School students made these tiles so they
could be assembled into a mosaic for the school.


Workplace Achievement

Woman works for Hinson Insurance for 50


BY LAUREN DELGADO
Idelgado@jcfloridan.com

he insurance industry
has changed substan-
tially over the last 50
years. Applications are larger,
coverage is broader and
agencies that once focused
on one specific type of insur-
ance are focusing on another.
For one local insurance
agency, however, something
has stayed the same over the
past five decades.


June Conrad, a customer
service representative at
Hinson Insurance Agency, is
celebrating her 50th year with
the business this month.
"I've enjoyed working with
people the whole time," Con-
rad said.
Conrad first met the
company's original owner,
Dick Hinson, while working
at Farm Bureau. When he
decided to leave and start
See CONRAD, Page 7A


years



June
Conrad will
soon be
celebrating
her 50th
year at the
Hinson
Insurance
Agency in
Marianna.


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN


) CLASSIFIEDS...5-7B


) ENTERTAINMENT...4B


> LOCAL...3A


) NATION...8A


))OPlIJICf1I...4A


) SPORTS...1-3B, 8B


)TV LISTINGS...3B


This Newspaper
Is Printed On S
Recycled Newsprint



II7 11 11
7 65161 80050 9


RAHAL*MILLER
Chevrolet-Buick-Cadillac-Nissan

* SERVICE TEAM
4204 Lafayette St.* Marianna, FL. *
(850) 482-3051 jisw*mqL-l -azy11 opw M1


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Weather Outlook


'E High- 750
^i Low 53


Thursday
Scattered Storms.


Saturday
Showers Likely.


High- 72
Low 49

Friday
Partly Cloudy & Mild.



S High- 68'
Low 400


Sunday
Partly Cloudy & Mild.


TIDES ULTRA VIOLET INDEX


Panama City Low -
Apalachicola Low -
Port St. Joe Low -
Destin Low -
Pensacola Low -

RIVER READINGS
Woodruff
Blountstown
Marianna
Caryville


1:56 AM High
4:58 AM High
2:01 AM High
3:12 AM High
3:46 AM High

Reading
39.75 ft.
1.88 ft.
6.17 ft.
2.61 ft.


3:29 PM
8:34 PM
4:02 PM
4:35 PM
5:08 PM


Flood Stage
66.0 ft.
15.0 ft.
19.0 ft.
12.0 ft.


0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8-10 Very High, 11+ Extreme
1 23 4-:7 E1
______ *'W~HIBBBOBBBBBBBBB


THE SUN AND MOON


Sunrise
Sunset
Moonrise
Moonset


6:22 AM
5:28 PM
1:03 AM
11:36 AM


Feb. Mar. Mar. Mar.
21 1 8 15


FLORIDA'S Ei-S

PANHANDLE JET

MEDIA PARTNERS WJAQ o100.9

LIST EN HO LWAH


JACSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN

Publisher Valeria Roberts
vroberts@jcfloridan.com,

Circulation Manager Dena Oberski
doberski@jcfloridan.com








CONTACT US
Telephone: 850-526-3614''
FAX: 850-482-4478
Email:.editorial@jcfloridan.com
Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447
Street Address:
4403 Constitution Lane
Marianna,.FL 32446
Office Hours:
SWeekdays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

MISS YOUR PAPER?
You should receive your newspaper no later
than 6 a.m. If it does not arrive, call Circula-
tion between 6 a.m. and noon, Tuesday to
Friday, and 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. on Sunday. The
Jackson County Floridan (USPS 271-840)
is published Tuesday though Friday and
Sunday mornings. Periodical postage paid
at Marianna, FL.

SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Home delivery: $11.23 per month; $32.83
for three months; $62.05 for six months;
and $123.45 for one year. All prices include
applicable state and local taxes. Mail
subscriptions mist be paid in advance. Mail
subscriptions are: $46.12 for three months;
$92.24for six months; and $184.47 for one
year.

ADVERTISING
The advertiser agrees that the publisher
shall not be liable for damages arising
out of errors and advertisements beyond
the amount paid for the space actually
occupied by that portion of the advertise-
ments in which the error occurred, whether
such error is due to the negligence of the
publisher's employees or otherwise, and
there shall be not liability for non-inser-
tion of any advertisement beyond the
amount paid for such advertisement. This
newspaper will not knowingly accept or
publish illegal material of any kind. Advertis-
ing which expresses preference based on
legally protected personal characteristics is
not acceptable.

HOWTO GETYOUR
NEWS PUBLISHED
The Jackson County Floridan will publish
news of general interest free of charge.
Submit your news or Community Calendar
events via email, fax, mail, or hand delivery.
Fees may apply for wedding, engagement,
anniversary and birth announcements.
Forms are available at the Floridan offices.
Photographs must be of good quality and
suitable for print. The Floridan reserves the
right to edit all submissions.

GETTING IT RIGHT
The Jackson County Floridan's policy
is to correct mistakes promptly. To
report an error, please call 526-3614
Monday-Friday.


Community Calendar


TODAY
n Free Tax Preparation/E-filing AARP Tax-Aide
is available, by appointment only, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
at the Jackson County Agriculture offices, 2741 .
Pennsylvania Ave. in Marianna. Call 482-9620 (8:30
a.m:to 4:30 p.m.) for an appointment.
) Free Tax Prep at Chipola 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
Wednesday at Chipola College, room M-201. Busi-
ness instructor Lee Shook and student volunteers
Provide free tax preparation and electronic filing
(individual returns only). Call 718-2368 for an
appointment; walk-ins may have a longer wait.
n Jackson Countj Habitat for Humanity
Warehouse hours: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
) Job Club 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at Goodwill
Industries Career Training Center, 4742 Highway 90
in Marianna, providing free job seeking/retention
skills. Call 526-0139.
) Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting Noon
to 1 p.m. in the AA.room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901Caledonia St. in Marianna. -

THURSDAY
St. Anne Thrift Store Brown Bag Sale Feb.
14-28 at 4285 Second Ave. in Marianna. All clothing
that can fit in a brown bag: $4. Hours: 9 a.m. to 1
p.m. Tuesday and Thursdays.
) Caregiver Support Group meeting 11 a.m.
to noon in the social hall of First Presbyterian
Church, 4437 Clinton St. in Marianna. Opep to all
family caregivers providing care to loved ones or
friends. Confidential group is facilitated by a profes-
sional group counselor. Coffee, water, light snacks
provided.
) Free "Quit Smoking Now" classes Meeting
weekly at noon on Thursdays beginning Feb. 16 in
the Jackson Hospital Hudnall Building community
room. No cost to attend. Free NRT available for
participants. Call Brigitta Nuccio at 482-6500 or
email bnuccio@bigbendahec.org.
) Jackson County Public Library board meeting
3 p.m. in the Jackson County Commission Board
Room in Marianna. Call 482-9631.
n Free Tax Preparation/E-filing AARP Tax-Aide
is available, by appointment only, 4:30 to 7:30 p.m.
at the Jackson,County Agriculture Offices, 2741
Pennsylvania Ave. in Marianna. Call 482-9620 (8:30
a.m. to 4:30 p.m.) for an appointment.
n Breast Cancer Support Group meeting 5
p.m. in the ground-floor classroom of the Jackson
Hospital, 4250 Hospital Drive in Marianna. Open
to anyone who has or had breast cancer or breast


health issues. No cost to attend. Call 718-2661.
) Jackson County NAACP meeting 5:30 p.m.,
in the St. James A.M.E. Church basement, 2891
Orange St. in Marianna. Call 569-1294.
) Free Yoga class 5:30 p.m. at Chipola Fitness.
Center, 4230 Lafayette St. in Marianna. Mats
provided. Offered in partnership with the Jackson
County Health Department's Closing the Gap
program. Call 482-6221.
n Free Veterans' Benefits Class 6 p.m. at
Veterans of Foreign Wars Ted Walt Post 1246, 2830
Wynn St. in Marianna. Junior Vice Commander and
Service Officer Larry Roberts will teach-veterans
and their spouses about how-to file a disability
claim with the VA, state benefits, employment
preference, educational assistance, burial/memo-
rial benefits and more. Those attending the class
are asked to bring a dish or beverage to share at the
6 p.m. pot luck dinner.
a Chipola Amateur Radio Club meeting 7
p.m. at the Jackson County Emergency Operations
Center, 2819 Panhandle Road in Marianna. Meetings
are open to all persons interested in ham radio. Visit
www.chipolaarc.org.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Closed discussion, 8
to.9 p.m., First Uniteq Methodist Church, 2901 Cale-
donia St., Marianna, in the AA room. Attendance
limited to persons with a desire to stop.drinking.

FRIDAY
n Black History School Program 8:30 a.m. in
the new gym at Grand Ridge School, 6925 Florida
St. in Grand Ridge, with special performances and
program assistance by students of Grand Ridge
School. Theme: "Black Women in American Culture
and History." Guest speaker: Angela McFarland,
Asst. Pastor, Sunrise Worship Center in Marianna,
and President/CEO, H.E.L.P.S. Center and HIScare
Clinic. Call 482-9835.
n Free Employability Workshops "Budgeting
Workshop,' 8:30 to 9:30 a.m.; "Employ Florida
Marketplace," 10 to 11 a.m.; "Computer Basics 101,"
1:30 to 2:30 p.m.; and "Spanish Workshop," 3 to 4
p.m. at the Marianna One Stop Career Center. Call
718-0326 to register.
) International Chat'n' Sip 8:30 to 10 a.m.
at the Jackson County Public Library, 2929 Green
St. in Marianna. Learning Center staff and their
international English learners invite the public to
join them for the exchange of language, culture and
ideas among our local and international communi-
ties. Light refreshments served. No charge. Call
,482-9124.


n Register for Food Giveaway Mt. Olive Baptist
Church in Bascom and Kevin Chambliss Crusades
will distribute a box of food to 500 families on Feb.
25. Register Feb 6-17 by calling 850-394-9188 or
850 394-9942,8 a.m. to noon or 2 to 6 p.m.
) Celebrate Recovery 7 p.m. at Evangel Worship
Center, 2645 Pebble Hill Road in Marianna. Adult,
teen meetings to "overcome hurts, habits and
hang-ups." Dinner: 6 p.m. Child care available. Call
209-7856, 573-1131.
) SHS Project Graduation Benefit 7:30
p.m. in the Sneads High School Gym. Following a
taekwondo exhibition, Greater Southern Wrestling
starts at 8 p.m., with T-Bird, Call Kid, The Arrogant
Americans, Scarface Waylon Barley, Trooper, JT
Angel, Chuck Diamond, Chris Corbin and more
(subject to change). Admission: $5 (kids under 5,
free). Concessions available.
n Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting 8 to
9 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.

SATURDAY
i Free Yoga class 8:30 a.m. at Chipola Fitness
Center, 4230 Lafayette St. in.Marianna. Mats
provided. Offered in partnership with the Jackson
County Health Department's Closing the Gap
program. Call 482-6221.
) Sacred Harp Sing 9:30 a.m. at the Panhandle
Pioneer Settlement in Blountstown's Sam Atkins
Park. Stay for the fish fry; bring side dishes. Call
850-674-2777.
a Blountstown Black History Parade 10 a.m.
starting at Blountstown Middle School on Main
Street. Line-up is at 9 a.m. Call 850-674-8683 or
850-272-2482.
) Muskogee Creek Indian Seminar -10 a.m.
at the Blue Lake Community Center in Chipley.
The culture, history, clothing and language of the
Muskogee Creek Indian will be discussed. No cost
for the seminar. Seminar books, $20 each, available
at the venue. Lunch will be served; bring a covered
dish. Call 1-888-451-0653.
n Alford Community Health Clinic hours -10
a.m. to 2 p.m. at 1770 Carolina St. in Alford. ACHC,
a free clinic.for income-eligible patients without
medical insurance, treats short-term illnesses and
chronic conditions. Appointments available (call
263-7106 or 209-5501); walk-ins welcome. Sign in
before noon.
) Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting 4:30
to 5:30 p.m. in the AA room of First United Method-
ist Church, 2901 Caledonia St. in Marianna.


The submission deadline for this calendar is two days before publication. Submit to: Community Calendar, Jackson County Floridan, P.. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447,
email editorial@jcfloridan.com, fax 850-482-4478 or bring items to 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.



Police Roundup


MARIANNA POLICE
The Marianna Police De-
partment listed the following
incidents for
Feb. 18, the
latest avail- ':
able report: _--
Two accidents CRI ME
with no injury, -
one suspicious
vehicle, one
suspicious incident, three
suspicious persons, three verbal
disturbances, one strong-arm
robbery, one robbery alarm,
10 traffic stops, two criminal
mischief complaints, one
obscene/threatening phone
call, one follow-up investiga-
tion, one fight in progress, one
animal complaint, four public


service calls, three open doors/
windows discovered and one
threat/harassment complaint.,


JACKSON COUNTY
SHERIFF'S OFFICE
The Jackson County Sheriff's
Office and county Fire/Rescue
reported the following incidents
for Feb. 13, the latest available
report. (Some of these calls nay
be related to after-hours calls
taken on behalf of Graceville
and Cottondale Police depart-
ments): One accident with no
injury, one abandoned vehicle,
three suspicious vehicles,
one suspicious incident, one
suspicious person, one physi-
cal disturbance, three verbal


disturbances, two hitch-
hiker/pedestrian complaints,
two woodland fire calls, one
commercial fire call, 21 medi-
cal calls, one traffic crash, one
burglar alarm, one robbery
alarm, two fire alarms, five
traffic stops, two larceny com-
plaints, one criminal mischief
complaint, two civil disputes,
one trespass complaint, one
animal complaint, one assist
of a motorist/pedestrian, five
assists of other agencies, four
public service calls and three
transports.


JACKSON COUNTY
CORRECTIONAL FACILITY
The following persons were


booked into the county jail dur-
ing the latest reporting periods:
) Latasha Jackson, 26, 2571
Vista Rise Road, Tallahassee,
non-child support.
) Phillip Patterson, 26, 2340A
Walter Road, Cottondale, non-
child support, hold for St. Lucie
Co.
) Richard Owens, 37,1760
Sinai Road, Sneads, sentenced
to 10 days.
) Shawn Goff, 38, 16978
NW Mayo St., Blountstown,
violation of state probation.


JAIL POPULATION: 207


To report a crime, call CrimeStoppers
at 526-5000 or a local law enforcement
agency. To report a wildlife violation, call
1-888-404-FWCC (3922).


Smim.w ui1mmrr mmmM -nmm u
S-Chevrolet-Buick-Cadillac-Nisman
4204 Lafayette St. Marianna, FL

y~t.^(8O})82-30SOi.


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--- --


712A WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2012


WAIEE-UP CJELL






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


BARNES IS TOP EMPLOYEE


'I~n


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Ionia Barnes is the Chipola College Career Employee of the Month for January. Barnes
serves as the department staff assistant in Mathematics and Natural Science and has
worked at the college since 1976. From left, are Dr. Rose Cavin, associate dean of Math-
ematics and Natural Science; Ionia Barnes; and Dr. Gene Prough, Chipola president.



Troop 3 Boy Scouts receive flag


Special to the Floridan

Troop 3 Boy Scouts were treated
to a special visit during their Jan.
23 meeting. JoAnn Truette, a finan-
cial representative from the Mari-
anna lodge of the Woodmen of the
World, stopped by to talk with scouts
and present them with a brand new
Troop 3 flag.
Woodmen of the World, a non-
profit, family fraternity, is involved
in servicing the families in their
communities. The organization pur-
chases and donates flags, including
U.S. flags, to various groups and
clubs. They also sponsor Ameri-
can history awards in schools and a
Youth Camp for boys and girls ages
8 to 15. Youngsters that attend their
camps can learn new skills and earn
awards by participating in a vari-
ety of programs such as Patriotism,
Nature Study, Physical Fitness, First
Aid, Nature Study and more.'


Troop 3 Boy Scouts display
their new flag, which was
purchased and given to
them by the Marianna
Lodge of Woodmen of the
World. From left, (front row)
JoAnne Truette, Joshua
Walker, Noah McArthur,
Chad Case and Matthew
Walker; (middle row) Everitt
Johnson, Daniel Tillman,
Matthew Pelham and
Christopher Gay; (back
row) Cameron Powell, Levin
Berry and Skylar Suggs.


SUBMITTED PHOTO


Scoutmaster Bill Kleinhans dis-
cussed with scouts an upcoming
hiking and camping event; food
preparation, tent and sleeping sup-
plies, and other issues were checked
and prepared. Prior to the adjourn-
ment, scouts surprised "Mr. K." with
a cake and song to honor him on his
birthday. Scoutmaster Kleinhans has


MI ar riage, -" .;


been a teacher, friend, father figure,
and much more to these and count-
less other scouts throughout the
years.
The Marianna Optimist Club is the
chartering organization for Troop 3
Boy Scouts. For more information
about scouting, call Scout Master
Kleinhans at 526-2897.


.'"' .3 P... ." ., .
'< ,: ,o. ; .... ,., :..<.? ';


Ryan Darling



graduates from


Florida State


Special to the Floridan

Ryan Edward Darling,
23, graduated from Flor-
ida State University on
Dec. 17,2011.
He earned a Bachelor
of Science degree with
a double major in ac-
counting and finance.
Graduation ceremonies
were held in the Tallahas-
see-Leon County Civic
Center.
'He is currently living
in North Palm Beach
and has received and
accepted an internship
with the accounting firm
of McGladrey in West
Palm Beach. He will fin-
ish his internship in the
summer of 2012. He will
then go back to school at
Florida Atlantic Univer-
sity in Palm Beach Gar-
dens to earn a master's
degree in taxation.
He was a 2007 grqdu-
ate of Palm Beach Gar-
dens High School and
received a Bright Fu-
tures scholarship. He is
the son of Susan Walker
Darling and Billy Joe
Lipford of Grand Ridge
and Patrick E. Darling of


I Iamr Sl


Palm Beach Gardens.
Maternal grandparents
are Rebec-
ca Walker
Edwards
and Glenn
Edwards of
Sneads and
the late H.
G. "Bill"
Dling Walker of
Grand Ridge.












A-






ratson
WJMEWELERS
GEMOLOQISTS

www.watsoniewelers.com
Downtown Marianna
850.482.4037


Thelma L. Russ Brown

S1946-2008


We know you're
celebrating your
birthday as an
angel. We miss
you and you will
live in our hearts.
The Russ & Brown
Families


Special to the Floridan

The following marriages
and divorces were record-
ed in Jackson County dur-
ing the week of Feb. 6-10:
Marriages
Joshua Michael Mon-
troy and Julie Ann Stone
) Charles Anthony Isa-
bella and Janna Catherine
Wise
) Robert Larry Harris and


Sarah WestbrookWilliford
) Tomas Suarez Mil-
lan and Maria Elizabeth
Salinas
) Penny Lorine Campbell
and Nathapiel Lee Hamby
)) Amy Nicole Alien and
James Shalbe Ray Revels
) Calvin L. Miller and
Sarah Teresa Thorpe.

Divorces
a Steve Barnes vs.
Herlinda Morales.


SUBMITTED PHOTO
From left are Liam McDonald, Robbie Sims, Calen Sims, Steve
Hutton and Hunter Hutton.


Troop 170 completes

Environmental Science


Special to the Flor


idan


Troop 170 weathered the
freezing temperatures by
the fire to enjoy a recent
camping expedition.
The Cobra Patrol awoke
Saturday and began their
morning routine of cook-
ing breakfast. After biscuits
and sausage, they began
the final journey to com-
plete their Environmental
Science Merit Badge.
The scouts were required
to mark off a plot of 4
square yards in a study area
of a field and a forest. They
were required to count the
number of species found
and estimate how much
space was occupied by
each plant and species
and the type and num-
ber of nonplant species.
Then they were required
to discuss their findings
with their merit badge


counselor, assistant scout-
master, Robbie Sims. Then
the scouts were required to
discuss air pollution and
explain acid rain and how
it affects plants, the envi-
ronment and mankind.
They discussed the natu-
ral causes along with the
pollution problems which
contribute to acid rain and
many preventative mea-
sures that can be taken to
reduce the effects.
The patrol conducted
an experiment to deter-
mine the effects of acid on
limestone and determined
that vinegar acid would
dissolve limestone and
conclude the long term
negative effects on the en-
vironment. After a merit
badge counselor's confer-
ence, all three Star Scouts
earned and were award-
ed their Environmental
Science Merit Badge.


Mon
Mon ,
Tue
Tue.


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I POWEBALL


WEDNESDAY. FEBRUARY 15, 2012 3AF


LOCAL


0








WENSA, FBRA RY1,21


Publisher
VALERIA ROBERTS


Other Opinion


Obama budget


lays down battle


lines for fall
Scripps Howard News Service
Once upon a time in Washington, the an-
nual presentation of the president's budget
was a big deal. But over the years the
Reagan administration is as good a place to start
as any the opposition would gleefully greet
the arrival of the budget on Capitol Hill with the
pronouncement that it was DOA, or "dead on
arrival."
The House and Senate budget committees
would go about writing their own budgets, which,
after all, is Congress' constitutional preroga-
tive, using the president's submission, if he was
lucky, as a starting point. The versions would be
combined into a single document that, however
messy the process of getting there, did what
budgets are supposed to do: Lay out the govern-
ment's priorities,-how much they would cost and
how the government planned to pay for them.
The reduced standing of the budget in the
Washington calendar was underscored by Presi-,
dent Barack Obama's decision to announce his
outline at a suburban community college the
symbolism being an $8 billion plan to increase
junior colleges' ability to train students for jobs of
the future. No one was impolite enough to bring
up the government's poor track record in predict-
ing what those jobs will be and what skills they
will require.
The cost, market inefficiencies and technical
obstacles indicate that some kind of job-creat-
ing bonanza out of the "green-energy revolution"
may have passed us by except as a campaign
rhetorical device.
Congress has not passed a budget resolution
since 2009, and it's not going to do so this year.
The outlook is for Congress to do what it has
been doing and thrash out 12 separate spending
bills, most of them late, coming after the much-
ignored Oct. 1 starA of the fiscal year. What's
left undone will be wrapped into a single huge
spending bill, which is what Congress did and
passed in mid-December.
This year promises to be more of the same'
because Congress has mapped out a light work-
load for itself and lawmakers willbe increasingly.
focused on, and distracted by, the November
elections.
This is not to say that the new $3.8.trillion
budget is a pointless exercise. The two parties
have vastly different approaches to bringing the
United States back to some kind of fiscal balance.
The Republicans propose to cut their way to
prosperity, opposing any and all tax increases
and proposing major cuts, sometimes labeled as
"reforms," in Social Security, Medicare and Med-
icaid. Obama proposes to bring the deficit down.
to under $1 trillion next year if so, the first
sub-trillion-dollar deficit in four years and,
ultimately, to $575 billion in 2015 by allowing the
GeorgeW. Bush-era tax cuts for the wealthy to
expire; requiring households making more than
$1 million annually to pay at least 30 percent in
income taxes; imposing $61 billion in taxes on
big banks; raising $41 billion by eliminating some
energy tax breaks; and saving $848 billion from
ending the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.
This is the last budget of Obama's four-year
term. Come fall, it may not matter, although de-.
pending on how the elections come out, it could
matter greatly.

Lefttes the Editor
Submit letters by either mailing to Editor. P.O. Box 520,
Marianna FL, 32447 or faxing to 850-482-4478 or send
email to editorial@jcfloridan.com. The Floridan reserves
the right to edit or not publish any letter. Be sure to
include your full address and telephone number. These
will only be used to verify the letter and will not be .
printed. For more information call 850-526-3614.


6jRQ\T!'FWOEMW~
BOXESoI 10U&s

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GP6Amm'~ VOMYI

'BxGU W


Obama's needless fight




with Catholic bishops
m oop


BY DAN K. THOMASSON
Scripps Howard News Service

The current flap over mandat-
ing birth control services to
employees of institutions
owned or run by the Catholic
Church is yet another example of
mistakes brought on by political
tone deafness in the White House
and by President Barack Obama's
decision to turn over the crafting of
the giant health care reform
package to Congress.
It's always the small things that
come up and bite one on the rear.
But it is astounding that the presi-
dent didn't anticipate the results of
this hot issue. What it demonstrates
to me is that Obarna's aloofness in
the beginning has now put him in
danger of alienating a vote he will
need come November. Had the
White House been more involved
in the details of the enormous
health care bill, it is hard to believe
that someone on the president's
staff wouldn't have red flagged this
potential disaster.
The offended Catholic clergy's de-
cision to reject Obama's proposed
"compromise" to offer the church's
workers the opportunity to receive
contraceptive aid and comfort
through private hospitals could
have been anticipated. After all, it
isn't who pays for the process or
where it takes place, it's the process
itself that runs counter to church
policy.
The U.S. Conference of Catholic


Bishops clearly has the president
on the ropes on this issue and it
obviously needn't have happened.
But lest we forget, Obama's politi-
cal experience before assuming the
presidency was nearly nonexistent.
He had barely discovered the loca-
tion of the Senate floor when he
decided he was ready to run the
country. His prior jobs as a commu-
nity organizer and state legislator
were hardly an apprenticeship to
the biggest position in the world.
If he truly had done his home-
work before determining that the
best way to convince people he was
ready for the White House was to
alter 14 percent of the economy,
he would have at least understood
that such an enormous task should
not be left up to Congress without
dailyguidance. And if he didn't get
it, somebody he had hired to advise
him on such matters sure should
have.
So now what should he do? It
might not be a bad idea to run to
the nearest cathedral and offer his
mea culpa over and over again.
Is it possible that Obama was not
privy to thebest-known "secret" in
modem-day Catholicism: that 80 ,
percent of American women who
are among the faithful ignore the
church's edicts when it comes to
birth control? Outside the church's
own hospitals, doctors rarely ask
the religion of the women they are
treating. Why should the federal
government, as represented by the
president, get involved in such a


no-win issue, one that is clearly not
the government's business?
Whether the church's policies on
sex and propagation belong in the
21st century is not for me or, for
that matter, other non-Catholics
- to say. They can do what they
want, as they always have. I, for
one, don't intend to vote or not vote
for anyone because of religion or
church doctrine.
It does seem that if the bishops
had gone after the moral corrup-
tion in the priesthood as fiercely as
they have over reproductive rights
of women, the tattered image they
now display worldwide might have
been improved dramatically. There
might have been even more toler-
ance for some of the church's less
popular edicts. That, of course, is
just a personal opinion of one who
believes pedophilia and other aber-
rations are not only intolerable but
a sure ticket to Hades.
But, again, that is not what this is
all about. It occurs that during this
discussion thle insensitivity on the
, part of theWhite House is amazing.
One needn't be Catholic to realize
the ramifications. Obviously, the
Catholic Jack Kennedy wouldn't
have been caught in this trap.
Neither would most of Obama's
predecessors. Few presidents in the
nation's recent history would have
allowed a badly divided Congress to
provide the details of a health care
bill that is so monumental it ap-
pears even Obama might not know
what is in it.


After wins, Santorum targets Romney's native state


BY BYRON YORK
Thursday, Feb. 9 was just the
second time Rick Santorum's
campaign has raised more
than a million dollars in a single
day. The first was the day before,
immediately after Santorum
swept GOP contests in Minnesota,
Colorado and Missouri. That's what
winning will do.
Santorum is now enjoying the
bounce he never got after his be-
lated victory in Iowa. The question
is, what is he going to do with it?
The next primaries are on Feb. 28
in Arizona and Michigan. They're
both big, they're both important,
and they're both states in which
Mitt Romney will have some ad-
vantage. Arizona has a significant
Mormon population less than
Nevada, where Romney won with
90-plus percent of the Mormon
vote, biut still significant. Michigan
is where Romney was born and
raised and where his father served
as governor.
Add to that Romney's advantages
in money and organization, and
Santorum has an uphill climb. And
then, after Arizona and Michigan,
come the March 6 Super Tuesday
contests. So even with those


million-dollar days, Santorum will
have to pick and choose which
states to target.
In the short run, it appears he's
looking closely at Michigan, for
several reasons. First, while Rom-
ney won the state solidly in 2008,
it wasn't a blowout: 39 percent
for Romney to John McCain's 30
percent and Mike Huckabee's 16
percent. No one can say Romney
has a lock on Michigan.
' Second, Santorum starts out in
better shape in Michigan than in
Arizona. A Rasmussen poll taken
the first week of February showed
Romney with a huge lead in Ari-
zona: 48 percent to Gingrich's 24
percent and Santorum's 13 percent.
At the same time, Rasmussen found
Romney up in Michigan 38 per-
cent.to Gingrich's 23 percent and
Santorum's 17 percent. Santorum
is undoubtedly in better shape
after his recent wins. Still, he would
rather start out in a state 21 points
behind the leader than 35 points
behind.
Third, Romney's Michigan
favorite-son advantage might not
be decisive. "I don't believe the
home field advantage in Michigan
is as strong as people think," says
pollster Scott Rasmussen. "In New


Hampshire, Mitt Romney benefited
from having been the governor of
Massachusetts and having his face
beamed into the state on a very
regular basis. He had a home there.
He was there all the time. Romney
has roots in Michigan, but he does
not have the same kind of presence
he did in New Hampshire."
Fourth, Michigan seems custom-
made for Santorum's message of
reviving American manufacturing
and paying more attention to the
problems of American workers
who don't have college degrees. It's
something Santorum has been talk-
ing about since his earliest days of
campaigning in Iowa, and it seems
' likely to resonate in Michigari.
Fifth, while Arizona is a win-
ner-take-all state when it comes
to awarding delegates, Michigan
is not. In Michigan, whoever wins
a particular congressional district
will win that district's delegates.
That would allow Santorum to
target places where he is strong and
have the chance to walk away with
delegates even if he doesn't win
the whole state. If he doesn't win in
Arizona, he gets nothing.
Santorum will present himself
as the conservative alternative to
Romney.


Letters to the Editor


This isn't California
(Editor's note: This letter refers to a story from
last week about a man who'objected when he
saw a deceased dog being dragged with a chain
from the roadway to clear the way for traffic)

I am also a truck driver and my
home is right here in Marianna,
Fla. Having traveled into and all
around California for over 35


years, I can say with some authority
that Mr. Hildebrand sounds very
much like a true Californian.
You see, at some point in this
nation's history, we had a severe
continental shift toward the left
coast and every loose nut in the
country rolled to California. Most
of them stayed there and unfortu-
natelyhad kids. His statement that
animals are Americans too, with


attendant rights would be applaud-
ed vigorously on the left coast.
It seems like nasty work and
thankless enough to begin with-
out further harassment by Mr.
Hildebrand. He needs to let the
worker do his job and maybe just
look for his lost cat and/or his
mind.
MILTON KENDRICK
Marianna


e~E~t~t~3~8,





JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


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l-6A WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2012


LOCAL/STATE


STEERING THE STEER


MARK'SKINNER/FLORIDAN
ackson 4-H member Josie Scott gives her steer Clumsy a tug during the showmanship
competition at the Jackson County Cattlemen's Association Fed Cattle Show and Sale
Tuesday. This year's event had 11 steers entered by 4-H and FFA programs from around
the county. The daylong event started with a steer judging competition for participating
young people and wrapped up Tuesday night with the auctioning off,of the steers.


Florida only state with an official chef


The Associated Press

ORLANDO The air in
the parking lot of Orlan-
do's Citrus Bowl smells like
fresh cut oranges, shrimp
and barbecue. A crowd
has gathered before the
game around a guy in a
black chef's coat. A camera
crew orbits as he sets some
shrimp and star melon
kebabs on the grill with a
flourish.
"Florida seafood ya
gotta love it!" the guy
says, grinning. The crowd
cheers. The cameraman is
happy.'
A man walks up and in-
quires about the hoopla.
Someone in the crowd tells
him the man in black is
Justin Timineri, the state
chef of Florida who's film-
ing a spot for ABC.
"Never heard of him,"
said Paul Pedersen, of Or-.
lando. "He's like the gover-
nor's mansion kinda deal? I
had no idea we had a state
chef."
Move over, Mario Batali.
Step aside, Gordon Ram-
say. There's a new chef


on the cusp of celebrity
in the U.S., and he's from
Florida.
Timineri is part culinary
ambassador, part farm ex-
pert and part cheerleader
for Florida-grown food.
Technically, he's a state
employee working for the
Florida Department of Ag-
riculture and he's the
only full-time state chef in
the nation.
Timineri tall, bald and
known for wearing col-
orful sneakers travels
the Sunshine State show-
ing people how to use the
state's produce and sea-
food in recipes. He creates
healthy menus for people
on food stamps and lim-
ited incomes and pro-
motes the state's food dur-
irig trade missions around
the world and in TV spots.
Next month, he's headed to
Brussels to talk up Florida
grouper at the world's larg-
est seafood expo.
It makes sense for the
state to market its bounty:
Agriculture is Florida's No.
2 industry, and unlike tour-
ism, the No. 1 business,


farming didn't suffer much
in the recession. Florida is'
the nation's top producer
of oranges, grapefruit and
sugarcane. It's also No. 1
with a range of vegetables,
from snap peas to squash
and sweet corn, according
to the U.'S. Department of
Agriculture.
S"He is such a fantastic
ambassador not only for
promoting products grown
in Florida," said Florida
Agriculture Commissioner
Adam Putnam. "But he's
also a terrific ambassador
with kids."
Timineri has a new
mission this year: teach-
ing schoolchildren to eat
healthier. As part of the
Department of Agricul-
ture's effort to get kids
to eat locally grown pro-
duce, Timineri does in-
school cooking demos he's
dubbed "Extreme Cuisine."
A recent personal victory
came when he got a class
of sixth-graders to try gua-
camole; the children were
skeptical of whole avoca-
dos but loved the finished
product.
"I have the best job in
all of state government,"


Timineri said.
The 37-year-old grew up
in Tallahassee with Italian
grandparents and good
food.
"I knew ever since I could
remember that I wanted to
be a chef," he said. "When
I was little, I was always
peeking around in the
kitchen."
Timineri didn't go to
culinary school. Instead,
he got a job in a Tallahas-
see restaurant and then
worked his way up in vari-
ous kitchens. Eventually,
he took a job as an event
chef for the professional
stock car and golf tours.
In 2006, he heard the
state chef's job created in
the mid-1990s was open.
He was hired over 60 others
and makes $43,000 a year
as part of the ag agency's
marketing department.
His office includes a small
test kitchen attached to
the Bureau of Seafood.
Since becoming Florida's
state chef, Timineri won a
Food Network Challenge
with- a recipe for crispy,
pan-seared Florida snap-
per with passion fruit
cream.


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Navy bomb school


told to remove


unofficial motto


The Associated Press

PENSACOLA The
school where bomb tech-
nicians from all branches
of the U.S. military learn
their craft has been or-
dered to remove the unof-
ficial motto "Initial Suc-
cess or Total Failure" from
its classroom walls.
Rear Adm. Michael Til-
lotson told school leaders
this month that the motto
could be viewed as disre-
spectful to the hundreds
of Explosive Ordnance
Disposal technicians who
have died in the line of
duty.
"The motto itself holds
potential insensitivi-
ties and implies that our
fallen and wounded EOD
Warriors have somehow
failed," Tillotson, who is
based in Norfolk, Va., said
in a memo to the Florida
school.
"Throughout history
many EOD techs from
the Army, Navy, Marine
Corps, Air Force, other
U.S. government and ci-
vilian agencies, as well
as foreign partners have
lost their lives or been
wounded in the line of
duty. To imply that they
failed is insensitive and
disrespectful. We owe our
fallen warriors and their
families honor and dig-
nity for their heroic ser-
vice," the admiral said in
a prepared statement.
Officials said the admi-
ral is especially concerned


Let
with
of B
DU


about the hundreds of
family members who visit
the school each spring for
a memorial to military
bomb technicians who
have died in the line of
duty the previous year.
The school will add the
names of at least 17 of its
graduates to its memorial
wall when it holds its an-
nual ceremony this May,
said Ed Barker, a spokes-
man for the Naval Educa-
tion and Training Com-
mand that over sees the
EOD school at Eglin Air
Force Base.
The elite school trains
EOD techs for the Army,
Navy, Air Force and Ma-
rines and is among the
toughest schools in the
military.
The admiral's mandate
was not popular with
some current and for-
mer EOD members. A
Facebook page has been
dedicated to keeping
the motto. They wrote
on the Facebook page
that the motto reminds
them of the life or death
consequences of their
jobs.
"The motto is not about
the individual, it is about
the mission, and when
you are dealing with an
explosive device you
generally get one shot to
render it safe," Will Pratt,
a former'Army EOD tech-
nician, wrote in an email
to the Northwest Florida
Daily News newspaper of
Fort Walton Beach.


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan com


CHIPOLA BOARD OF REALTORS 2011 AWARDS


PHOTOS B LH~ulN REIjLLUi U/ ELuh'lO i
Diamond Club awards were given to Matt Milton; Lauren Milton and Kathy Milton of ERA Platinum Club awards were given to Ouida Morris of Century 21 Sunny South Properties; Jim
Chipola Realty; Robby Roberts of Prudential Jim Roberts Realty; and Jerry Parrish of Jerry Gibbs of Prudential Jim Roberts Realty; Betty Slay of Bettie's Country Realty; and Cindy Birge
Parrish Realty at the Chipola Board.of Realtors 2011 Awards Carnival on Feb. 10. Not Pictured: of Elite Realty at the Chipola Area Board of Realtors 2011 Awards Carnival on Feb. 10. Not
Tim Sapp of Florida Showcase Realty. Pictured: Barbara Ogburn of Grand Oaks Realty.


Gold Club awards were given to Jim Palmer of ERA Chipola Realty; Ed McCoy of Century 21 Honor Society awards were given to Jim Gibbs of Prudential Jim Roberts Realty; Gina Stuart of
Sunny South Properties; Dana Wood of Elite Realty; Debbie Roney Smith of Century 21 Sunny ERA Chipola Realty; Deborah Mathewuse of ERA Chipola Realty; Lauren Milton of ERA Chipola
South Properties; Ora Mock of Real Florida Property; and Max Wells of Progressive Realty at Realty; Debbie Roney Smith of Century 21 Sunny South Properties; Ouida Morris of Century
the Chipola Area Board of Realtors at the 2011 Awards Carnival on Feb. 10. Not Pictured: Dianna 21 Sunny South Properties; Stacy Borges of Indian Springs Realty; Ellen Marsh of Century 21
Kosciw of The Hatcher Agency; Wanda Raney of Southern Way Realty: and Pricilla "Cissy" Sunny South Properties; Pat Furr of Century 21 Sunny South Properties; and Kathy Milton of
Faison of Grand Oaks Realty. ERA Chipola Realty at the Chipola Area Board of Realtors 2011Awards Carnival on Feb. 10.


The 2011 president of the Chipola Area Board of Realtors, Kathy Milton of ERA Chipola
Realty, passes the gavel to the 2012 president of the Chipola Area Board of Realtors, Jim Gibbs
of Prudential Jim Roberts Realty, at the 2011Awards Carnival on Feb. 10.


Pictured here at the Chipola Area Board pf Realtors 2011 Awards Carnival are Jim Gibbs,
the 2012 president; Kathy Milton, the 2011 president; 2011 Citizen of the Year award winner
Ginger Green of ERA Chipola Realty; 2011 Presidents Choice award winner Lauren Milton of
ERA Chipola Realty; 2011 Realtor of the Year award winner Joann Walsingham of ERA Chipola
Realty; representatives Shelly Burns and Theresa Williams of the 2011 Affiliate of the Year
award winner Cadence Bank; and 2011 Realtor Spirit award winner Pat Furr of Century 21 Sunny
South Properties.


Grants
From Page 1A
Bean said.
Bouton plans to buy some
music books for students to
practice their sight reading.
The beginner and interme-
diate band students could
also use these for concerts.
These books typically cost be-
tween $50 and $100, so usu-
ally they're for the advanced
band.
"It's just wonderful that we
can get a really good book
written with the beginning or
intermediate group in mind,"
Bouton said.
Extra funds are hard to come
by for arts programs despite
numerous studies showing
their positive correlation with
test scores, Bouton said..
"We haven't figured out how
to sell it but we know it," Bou-
ton said.
Newell had the students
create a large mosaic for the
school. The students used
different rocks, buttons
and other items that don't
decompose.
"I wanted it to be a lifetime
keepsake for the school and
for the children," Newell said.
Newell incorporates other
subjects in her art lessons.


For the mosaic tiles, students
learned about the history of
mosaics along with reasoning,
staying within a limit con-
cepts needed for the FCAT.
"Without art that sounds
so complicated," Newell said.
"But when you think about
it, it took all that to make one
mosaic tile."
According to a press release,
the CRAA budgeted for about
10 grants, but a donation from
Florida Public Utilities al-
lowed five additional teachers
to be awarded. The organiza-
tion covers all of the Chipola
area, or five counties: Jackson,
Liberty, Calhoun, Washington
and Holmes.
Other area teachers who
received a grant were: Kathy
Blalock from Bethlehem High
School; Janet Edewaard from
Blountstown Middle School;
Gayle Grissett from W.R. To-
lar K-8 School; Stewart Hob-
bie from Blountstown Middle
School; Heather Howell from
Poplar Springs High School;
Karon Mattox from Poplar
Springs High School; Gyll
Moore from Liberty County
High School; Gail Seabach
from Vernon Elementary
School; Vicki Steverson from
Bonifay Elementary School;
and Ricky Ward from Holmes
County High School.


State i7:4


Senate kills prison
privatization
TALLAHASSEE
-A divisive bill that
would have privatized
South Florida prisons
has failed to pass the
Florida Senate.
The bill (SB 2038)
died in a close 21-19
vote on Tuesday. A
bloc of Iepublicans
had revolted against
their own leadership
that pushed the prison
privatization plan this
legislative session.
A group of correc-
tions officers cheered
in the Senate


Conrad
From'Page 1A

his own agency, Con-.
rad decided to join
him.
"I liked the family
and they were good
people," Conrad said.
Although her title
has been customer
service representative,
Conrad said she has


Jackson County Vault & Monument

Come Visit us at our NEW LOCATION
3424 West Highway 90 (3/10 mile west from ourprevious location)
850-482*041


gallery as the vote was
announced. Nearly
4,000 prison jobs in 24
facilities in 18 South
Florida counties could
have been affected.
Lawmakers in sup-
port of privatization
said it would save at
least $16.5 million a
year. Opponents said a
public safety duty like
corrections shouldn't
be contracted out.
Senate President
Mike Haridopolos has
said he would look
for cuts elsewhere if
privatization failed.

From wire reports


done a little of every
job in the office. She's
also watched the com-
pany change hands
over the years, still
loving her job through
the changes.
Conrad said she
plans to continue
working for the agency
for as long as they'll
have her.
"I've just enjoyed my
work and continue to
enjoy it," Conrad said.


Loan
From Page 1A
The- county had being
renting the upstairs of-
fices for roughly the past
six years, providing space
for the State Attorney as
mandated by law. Their
rent for that 6,063 sq. ft.
space had come to $2,800
a month.
To help make the loan
payment, the county
plans to combine the
$2,800 monthly rental
payment it will now save


with the $5,610 it will
receive in rent from the
parole office.
Lawyer Clay Milton
represented the county
in ironing out the loan
and purchase contracts.
An outside lawyer was
required to draw up the
contract because board
attorney Frank Baker had
a potential conflict of in-
terest; his wife, Lynn Baker
is a principal owner in the
structure on Green Street,
along with Jerry Glass,
an investigator with the
public defender's office.


3720 Caverns Road Marianna, FL 32446-1806 (850) 482-3964


3720 Caverns Road Marianna, FL 32446-1806 (850) 482-3964


There were no

obituaries or

death notices

submitted to the

Floridan as of the

deadline at 4 p.m.

yesterday.
UMM~


---- -_1111__1___1_ 1_1_11111_111__1_1111_111)~_1_1_111 ----~lll-_i---tlll-__1___111111_111


-I ----- _111_111_1___ 1


LOCRL/STATE


WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2012 7A-


:=... s ... . ... "
; ,,i, *.'? ^- ., .- .. .' .- :,.;* ?'
5: ::7-z..";i"'.- i:' .. :" :....... :. ...







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Obama: Strong US-China ties help rest of the world


The Associated Press

WASHINGTON President
Barack Obama assured Chinese
Vice President Xi Jinping on
Tuesday that the United States
welcomes Beijing's rise in the
world, offering a warm welcome
despite sharp policy differences
over Syria, Iran and economic
issues.
But the U.S. reiterated long-
standing concerns over human
rights, which Obama described
as a "critical issue."
Xi, who is expected to become
China's leader in 2013, defended
the communist-governed coun-
try's rights record over the past
30 years, but added: "Of course
there's always room for improve-
ment on human rights."
His comments, made at a
State Department luncheon af-
ter meeting Obama at theWhite
House, were similar to those
made by president Hu Jintao -
the man he is slated to replace as
Communist Party leader this fall
- during a state visit to Wash-
ington a year ago.
Underscoring the sensitivity of
the rights issues among China's
critics, a few hundred protest-
ers marched outside the White
House, waving Tibetan flags and
calling for a free Tibet. They held
signs proclaiming, "Xi Jinping:
Tibet will be free." They shouted
"Shame on Chinese government"
and "Stop lying to the world."


THEASSOCIATEDPRESS
President Barack Obama meets with Chinese Vice President Xi Jinping, on
Tuesday in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington.


But Xi's unusually long and
high-level visit to the United
States reflected the stature he is
set to assume, and the impor-
tance the Obama administra-
tion puts on building ties with
Beijing. Both sides stressed the
importance of stable relations
between the two global powers,
and their ability to air differenc-
es without recrimination.
"We welcome China's peaceful
rise," Obama said as the two men
sat in the Oval Office. "We be-
lieve that a strong and prosper-.
ous China is one that can help to


bring stability and prosperity to
the region and to the world."
Obama said he looks forward
to future cooperation.
A smiling Xi told Obama he
wants to build on the- past rela-
tionship between Obama and
Hu and "deepen the friendship"
between the people of the two
countries.
"I hope to engage with a broad
cross-section of American soci-
ety during my current visit so as
to deepen mutual understand-
ing, expand consensus, strength-
en cooperation and deepen the


friendship between the Chi-
nese and American people," Xi
said, a reference to an itinerary
that includes stops in Iowa and
California.
Xi's visit is being closely
watched because he will likely
lead China over the coming de-
cade. After becoming party lead-
er, he is expected to replace Hu
as president in 2013.
In the years ahead, the U.S.
and China are likely to see their
economic ties grow even as they
are viewed increasingly as mili-
tary rivals.
"We are not always going to
see eye-to-eye. We are not al-
ways.going to see things exactly
the same, but we have very im-
portant economic and political
concerns that warrant that we
work together," Vice President
Joe Biden said as the talks began
at the White House.
Xi has impeccable Commu-
nist Party credentials as the son
of a famed revolutionary, but
is viewed as more able to make
personal connections than Hu
and more willing to step away
from the traditional aloofness of
Chinese high office.
While Xi's trip is unlikely to
herald any policy changes it
may signal his leadership style.
Other than his genial demeanor,
he revealed little in his rather
staged appearances at the White
House although Obama let on
that Xi may take in an LA Lakers


basketball game when he visit
Los Angeles toward the end of
his trip.
Later Tuesday, Xi was meeting
with Defense Secretary Leon Pa-
netta, who will be hoping to in-
ject some vigor into halfhearted
ties between their two militaries.
Washington will need to con-
vince a skeptical Beijing that an
adjustment in U.S. foreign policy
to emphasize the economically
booming Asia-Pacific region is
not aimed at containing the rise
of China.
For its part, China needs to
convince the U.S. and many
Asian nations that they need
not fear its two-decade military
buildup.
Biden and Obama also dis-
cussed with Xi some thorny
foreign policy issues, includ-
ing North Korea, Iran and Syria.
Last week China joined Russia
in vetoing a U.N. Security Coun-
cil resolution pressuring Syrian
President BasharAssad's govern-
ment over its violent crackdown
on opponents.
Xi said that a greater part'of
his discussions with Obara and
Biden were on economic and
trade issues. He said that the
U.S. and China shared the view
that the international economic
and financial situation remains
"grim." He said ensuring growth
and .promoting employment
were high on the domestic agen-
da of both countries.


Dig for human remains left by'Speed Freak Killers' resumes at N. Califwell


The Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO The
childhood friends killed
for the first time less than
three months after their
high school graduation
in 1984. Then they seem-
ingly killed with impunity
for the next 15 years, with
one man making barroom
boasts about their ability
to make people disappear.
By the time the hunt-
ing buddies were finally
arrested in 1999, investi-
gators say the notorious
"Speed Freak Killers" killed
as many as 20 people dur-
ing a 15-year spree that
terrorized California's ru-
ral Central Valley. Some of
their victims were left at
the scene. Most were never
seen again, especially their
female victims.
Even after their convic-
tions in 2001, Wesley Sher-
mantine and Loren Herzog
steadfastly refused to di-
vulge any burial sites..
Now, motivated by a
bounty hunter's prom-
ise to pay $33,000 for the
location of the missing,
Shermantine is breaking a
long silence. Family mem-
bers of the missing hope
the new details will lead to
the discovery of their loved
ones' remains and closure
after years of torment. Two
victims have already been
identified and hundreds of
human remains have been
recovered over the last
several days.
More are expected to
be found as the search
resumed Tuesday after a
daylong postponement
due to rain.
"It is a happy occa-
sion," said Paula Wheeler,
mother of 16-year-old Ch-
evelle "Chevy" Wheeler,
who disappeared in 1985
and whose remains were
tentatively identified
Friday. Chevy's portrait
hangs in the living room
of the Wheelers' Crossville,
Tenn., home. The Wheel-
ers intend to have Chevy's
remains cremated and
displayed at their home.
Shermantine told Sac-
ramento bounty hunter
Leonard Padilla that he
plans to use the $33,000
to pay $15,000 in court-
ordered restitution to vic-
tims' families. The rest
will buy headstones for
his deceased parents and
small luxuries in prison
like candy bars and a pri-
vate television set he can't
buy because every penny
he receives now is used
to pay down the restitu-
tion debt. Padilla hopes to
claim rewards offered by
the state of California for
information about missing
persons thought to be the
victims of Shermantine
I and Herzog.


Using crude maps Sher-
mantine hand-drew in his
Death Row cell, investiga-
tors have dug up three sites
since Thursday that have
yielded human remains.
The site of the biggest
find is an abandoned well
outside the city of Stock-
ton, near the town of Lin-
den, that produced hun-
dreds of human bones,
purses, shoes, jewelry and
other- evidence over the
weekend. That raised Joan
Shelley's hopes that her 16-'
year-old daughter JoAnn
Hobson will be found.
"I feel they are going to
find her," a tearful Shelley
told The Associated Press
in a phone interview from
her Manteca home. JoAgn.
disappeared in 1985, and
investigators have long
suspected Shermantine
and Herzog in the girl's ab-
duction and murder. But
they never had enough
evidence to charge them.
Padilla said Shermantine
calls the well "Herzog's
boneyard," and pins all the
bodies that will be found
there on Herzog. That's
nothing new. Beyond
steadfastly refusing to dis-
close the location of bod-
ies, the childhood friends
have also maintained that


the other single-handedly
did all the killing.
Herzog hanged him-
self on Jan. 16 outside the
Susanville trailer he was
paroled to after an ap-
peals court tossed out
his confession as illegally
coerced. He committed
suicide hours after Padilla
told him Shermantine was
prepared to tell authorities
about the missing.
"I could hear him catch
his breath when I men-
tioned the well," Padilla
said of his conversation
with Herzog on Jan. 16;
"He thanked me, and
didn't say anything more,
but I could hear him catch
his breath."
On Thursday, at a site
in Calaveras County near
property Shermantine's
parents once owned,
searchers found a skull
identified as CyndiVander-
heiden's. She disappeared
in 1998. The day after the
skull-was found, about a
quarter-mile away, search-
ers found a blanket con-
taining a partial skull and
other remains believed to
belong to Wheeler.
Shermantine was con-
victed of both women's
murders in 2001. He was
arrested in 1999 after his


Personal Care
Transportation
Errands
Light Housekeeping
Companionship
Meal Preparation


car was repossessed and
investigators found Van-
derheiden's blood in the
trunk. Using a new collec-
tion technique not avail-
able in 1985, they also
found Wheeler's DNA in a
remote Calaveras County
cabin owned by Sherman-
tine. The cabin was' near
where Wheeler's body was
found.
Shermantine was) con-
victed of four murders
and sentenced to death. THEASSOCIATEDPRESS
Herzog was sentenced to On Sunday, San Joaquin Sheriff detectives Paul Hoskins (left)
78 years in prison, but that and Lindsay Smith sift for human remains that were excavated
sentence was reduced, from an abandoned cattle ranch near Linden, Calif.




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-18A WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2012


NATION











eTii/KS,


Lady Tigers missing key



players in loss to Munroe


*w .- .' --S "'--i. - -* ..~r* -;- -' - '. -I
MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Malone's Joella Duncan makes a catch at first for an out
against Munroe on Monday.


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

Missing several key players, the
Malone LadyTigers struggled in their
season opener Tuesday evening at
Chipola, losing to the Miinroe Lady
Bobcats 18-5.
Malone was missing six starters
who are still with the Lady Tigers'
basketball team, and Nlunroe was
able to take full advantage. :
The Lady Bobcats scored three
runs in the first inning, four in the
second, three in the third and fourth


and five more in the fifth :to end Corbally started in the circle for
the game with the 10-run mercy Munroe and went all five innings to
rule. get the win, allowing three earned
Haleigh Corbally and Anna Jones runs on two hits, three walks and six
each had two hits and four RBI t9 strikeouts.
lead Munroe offensively, with Kait- Sara Newsom started for and
lyn Sirmons going 3-for-5 with three took the loss, going 2 2/3 innings
RBI, and Emilee Harris 2-for-3 with ,and striking out three, with no
three RBI. walks.
Ramsey Higdon also had three hits Kamrie Calloway also went 2 1/3
and an RBI, while Corbally and Sir- innings and struck out two batters,
monseach scored four runs. : while walking five.
The Lady Bobcats were also able Munroe had 16 hits as a team.


to take advantage of 14 Malone
defensive errors.


See LOSS, Page 2B


NORTHWEST FLORIDA STATE 59, CHIPOLA 55





Rally falls short


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN


Sara Djassi drives to the basket for Chipola against the Raiders on Tuesday night.


Lady Indians run

out of time in loss

BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The No. 13 Chipola Lady Indians suf-
fered a gut-wrenching loss Tuesday
night at home, falling'to the No. 18
Northwest Florida State Lady Raid-
ers 59-55 at the Milton H. Johnson


Health Center.
The loss drops Chipola (17-9) to 5-5
in the Panhandle Conference and into
a tie for third with the Lady Raiders
(21-5), who were playing, their second
game without leading scorer and point
guard JoAnna Harden.
The Lady Raiders played Gulf Coast
State tough in their first game without
Harden before ultimately running out
of steam at the end.
The same thing nearly happened
Tuesday night, but Northwest was


able to hold off a late charge by
Chipola thanks to a key steal by Kiani
Parker.
Chipola trailed 29-19 at halftime and
fell behind 50-31 with just over nine
minutes left in the game.
But the Lady Indians stormed back
with an inspired rally, scoring nine
straight to cut it to 10, and then go-
ing on an 11-0 run to get to within two
with 1:46 to play.
See SHORT, Page 2B


Malone


edged by


Seminole
BYDUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Malone Tigers narrowly lost their
season opener Tuesday in Donalson-
ville, Ga., falling to the Seminole County
Indians 5-4.
Malone trailed 4-3 heading into the
seventh inning when Harrison Floyd
walked, moved to second on a sacrifice
by Garrett Harris, and then took third
and home on passed balls.
The Tigers had a chance for the go-
ahead run
with Nick
Breedenatthe "We were able to do
plate with two some things well, and
outs and Jon- also have some things
than Sikes we saw we need to get
at second, betterat."
but Breeden
struck out Max Harkrider,
to end the Malone coach
inning.
It was one of 13 strikeouts on the night
for Malone batters.
In the bottom of the seventh, relief
pitcher Harris gave up a pair of singles
to start the inning to put runners at first
and third with nobody out.
Seminole County tried a squeeze play,
but the Tigers threw out the runner from
third at home for the first out.
The runners moved to second and
third on the play, and Malone elected to
intentionally walk the next batter to load
the bases and create a force play at every
base.
But the next Indians batter was hit by a
Harris curve ball to force in the winning
run.
Despite the loss, Malone coach Max
Harkrider said it was a good way for his
team to start the season.
"It was a real good game, real competi-
tive on both sides," the coach said. "We
were able to do some things well, and
also have some things we saw we need
to get better at. It's a loss we can learn
from. It was just a good high school
baseball game."
See EDGED, Page 2B


LADY TIGERS WIN


B rooke Slio,., hurls the ball in during
C( )Ir( l,l'-, i,;; ._' against Cliplcy
.M id;iiy nili II liirLadyTildfTg'r beat
the Lady Hornets 22-2,


Brandon
Burch tags
a Maclay
runner
headed
to second
base
during
Saturday's
game.


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN

Bulldogs rip Maclay in preseason game


BY SHELIA MADER
Floridan Correspondent

The Marianna High Bulldogs
baseball team picked up a lopsid-
ed victory over Maclay in the pre-
season classic held at Bulldog Field
on Saturday.
Marianna topped the Maraud-
ers 12-2 behind the pitching of se-
nior Michael Mader, right-hander
Bradly Middleton and left-hander
Hayden Hearst.


Mader went two innings, giving
up two runs on one hit, one walk
before giving way to Middleton,
who 2 1/3 innings and gave up no
runs on one hit, one walk, and one
hit batter.
Hearst closed it out and allowed
no runs on three walks.
Offensively, the Bulldogs had a big
night, as Clayte Rooks led the way
with a triple and a double, followed
by Jae Elliott, who had a single and
a double.


Also on board with hits were
Tyler Hampton, Brandon B'irch,
Reid Long, Taylor Strauss, Mason
Melvin and Heath Roberts, who
singled home the game ending
run.
The regular season was scheduled
to start Tuesday night for Marianna
with a road trip to Bristol to take on
Liberty County.
The Bulldogs will end the week
Friday with a road game against
Crestview.


___I__^_~_I_~ I~


_=_==~__1_1_1___11_______________~


L
~I~E~T~$~ -1 rl~- ;-I ., r .._ ''
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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


BAUTISTA GREETS KIDS


MARKSKINNER/FLORIDAN,
T oronto Blue Jay Jose Bautista signs a baseball for 6-year-old
Drew Fleener while visiting Chipola College for its Baseball
Alumni weekend Saturday.


Edged
From Page 1B

Breeden started on the
mound and gave up a
hit and two runs one
earned with one walk
and four strikeouts in two
innings.
Brett Henry pitched
three innings of relief and
took the loss, allowing two
earned runs on two hits,
one walk, and three strike-
outs, while Harris went
an inning and 1/3 and


Loss
From Page 1B

For Malone, Kayla Lewis
was 2-for-3 with a double,
two runs, and an RBI, with
Cailyn Haight was 2-for-3
with an RBI.
Sheyanna Chambliss had
a hit and two RBI, and Jen-
nifer Hewett was 1-for-2.
Lady Tigers coach
Greg Ford said that he


allowed an earned run on
three hits, no walks and
two strikeouts.
Seminole County scored
its first run in the bottom of
the second when an infield
pop-up landed between
first and second base to al-
low a runner to score from
second with two outs.
Malone answered with
three runs in the top of the
third, with Travlaen Shu-
maker singling and scored
on an RBI single up the
middle by Floyd to tie the
game, and RBI singles by
Sikes and Breeden making


was happy overall with
the effort his team gave
given how many players
were missing, especially
with his team's offensive
output.
"I was a little surprised
we hit Haleigh as well as we
did. She's one of the fastest
pitchers we'll see all year,"
he said. "I was happy with
the way we made contact
and put the ball in play.
On the other hand, we
committed way too many


it a 3-1 Tigers lead.
But the Indians grinded
out three runs of their
own in the bottom of
the frame to go up a run,
which is where the game
remained until the final
inning.
Sikes finished 2-for-3
with a run, an RBI and two
stolen bases, with Breeden
going 1-for-4 with an RBI,
Shumaker 1-for-3 with a
run, and Floyd 1-for-2 with
an RBI and a run.
Malone will next play
Friday night at Ponce de
Leon.


errors and allowed too
many easy hits.
"But it's tough when
you're missing six starters.
With a full squad, it will be
a little different story. But
Munroe did what it had to
do to win."
The Lady next scheduled
game with Cottondale on
Monday has been can-
celled, leaving Malone's
next contest on Feb. 24
against Emmanuel Chris-
tian on the road.


Sports h'J-


High School Boys
Basketball
The Marianna Bulldogs
play host to East Gadsden
on Thursday night in the
first round of the 4A state
playoffs at 7 p.m.

High School Softball
Thursday Cottondale
at Graceville, 4 and 6 p.m.;
Vernon at Sneads, 4 and 6
p.m.; Marianna at North
Florida Christian, 2:30
p.m.
Friday Walton at
Marianna, 6 p.m.; Altha at
Graceville, 6 p.m.; Holmes
County at Cottondale,
4 and 6 p.m.; Sneads at
Monroe, 5 p.m.

High School Baseball
Thursday Cottondale
at Sneads, 5 p.m.
Friday Graceville at
Port St. Joe, 6 p.m.; Mari-
anna at Crestview, 6:30
p.m.; Malone at Ponce De
Leon, 6:30 p.m.

Chipola Baseball
Chipola will host Chat-
tahoochee Valley on
Friday at 1 p.m., and St.
Petersburg on Saturday at
noon
_I


Chipola Softball
The Lady Indians will
travel to Aiken, S.C.,
this weekend for games
against USC Sumter,
Gordon College, Spartan-
burg Methodist College on
Friday, and Aiken Tech on
Saturday.

Malone/Bascom
Baseball Registration
The Malone/Bascom
Baseball League will be
holding registration for
ages 5-12 at Malone Town
Hall on Saturday and Feb.
11 from 8 a.m. to noon
both weekends.
Bring a copy of birth
certificate. Registration
fee will be $40 per child.
For more information, call
Jamie Floyd at 569-2343,
or Michael Padgett at 569-
5917 or 209-1250.

Alford Baseball/
Softball Sign-up
Alford baseball and soft-
ball sign-up will conclude
on Saturday.
T-ball (5-6 years of age)
costs $45, with AA (7-
8) $55, AAA (9-10) $55,
O'Zone (11-12) $65, and
softball (9-12) $65.
A copy of your child's


birth certificate and regis-
tration fees are due at the
time of registration.
For more information,
call Patricia Melvin at
326-2510, Tracy Jones at
628-2199 or Margie at
628-9583.

Sportsman's Dinner
There will be a Sports-
man's Dinner on Feb. 24 at
6 p.m. at Eastside Baptist
Church, 4785 Highway 90
in Marianna.
Cost is $7. Guest
speaker will be Evan-
gelist Morris Anderson
of Morris Anderson
Outdoors.
Giveaways include
a shotgun, rifle, and a
$1,000 hunting trip.
All hunters, fishermen,
campers, shooters, run-
ners, joggers and sports
fans welcome.
Arrive early for bow
target shooting from 5
to 6 p.m. For tickets, call
526-2004, 526-4050 or
718-7735.

Sports Items
Send all sports items to editorial@
jcfloridan.com, or fax them to
850-482-4478. The mailing address
for the paper is Jackson County
Floridan P.O. Box 520 Marianna FL
32447.


Short
From Page 1B
Madel Madden and Sara Djassi both
had driving lay-ups to get it back to sin-
gle digits with 3:16 to play, and a 3-point
play by Jeniece Johnson with 2:29 on the
clock cut the margin to six at 54-48.
The foul on the play was also the fifth
for Northwest star sophomore Shae Kel-
ley, and the Lady Raiders had trouble
adjusting to her not being on the court.
An offensive foul in the backcourt gave
it right back to Chipola, and Johnson
scored again to make it a 4-point game.
Oneal Session stole the inbound pass,
which led to two Djassi free throws to
make it 54-52 with just under two min-
utes on the clock.
A pair of free throws by the Lady Raid-
ers got the lead back to four, but a 3-
pointer by Denaya Brazzle got the Lady
Indians to within one at 56-55 with 34
seconds remaining.
Parker then missed two free throws
with 19.3 seconds on the clock, and
Djassi secured the ball and brought it
past half-court.


But Parker raced back in transition
and stole the ball from behind Djassi,
who never saw her coming.
That led to two free throws by Mi-
lan Germany with 10.7 seconds left to
make it 58-55, and a last-second corner
3-point attempt by Kristine Brance fell
short for Chipola.
Ester Stokely finished with 12 points to
lead Northwest, with Shicole Watts and
Germany each adding 11, and Kelley 10.
Johnson had 18 points and 14 rebounds
to lead the Lady Indians, with Djassi add-
ing 11 points and 10 boards, and Session
10 points and seven rebounds.
Both teams struggled mightily from
the field, with Chipola shooting 25 per-
cent from the field and making just 2 of
15 from the 3-point line, and Northwest
connecting on 27 percent from the floor
and only 18 of 31 free throws.
There are two conference games left
for both teams, with the Lady Raiders
to go to Pensacola State on Saturday be-
fore finishing at home next week against
Tallahassee.
Chipola will also play at Pensacola
State next week and finish up at home
against Gulf Coast State.


Report: Irsay to meet with


Manning in next week


I The Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS According to Colts
owner Jim Irsay, Peyton Manning will
decide whether he plays another game
for Indianapolis.
Irsay expects to meet with Manning in
the next seven days, and the owner told
The Indianapolis Star on Tuesday the
return of the four-time MVP depends
on his willingness to restructure his
contract.
Manning has spent the past five
months recovering from his third neck
surgery in less than two years, and there
have been conflicting reports about how
much progress he has made.
The Colts owe Manning a $28 million
roster bonus by March 8. They want to
use the No. 1 pick in this year's draft on
Manning's successor, and the future of
their star QB will affect how much room
they'll have under the salary cap.
Manning turns 36 in March.
"We can make it work if he wants to be
here," Irsay told the newspaper. "We'd
be excited to have him back and finish
his career with us.
"I want him to be able to make the


choice. We would love to have him back
here if he can get healthy and we can
look at doing a contract
that reflects the uncer-
S tainty Of the ... healing
process with the regen-
S eration of the nerve."
The Colts went 2-14 last
season without Manning,
Irsay who started every game
in his first 13 seasons in
the NFL. He threw for 33
touchdowns and a career-
high 4,700 yards in 2010,
when Indianapolis went
10-6 and won the AFC
South.
Manning guided the
Manning Colts to a win in the Su-
per Bowl after the 2006
season.
Also Tuesday, the Colts completed
their coaching staff by hiring eight as-
sistants and making Clyde Christensen
quarterbacks coach..
First-year head coach Chuck Pagano
already hired Bruce Arians as offen-
sive coordinator and Greg Manusky as
defensive coordinator.


S--) LOOKING FOR MORE NEWS? VISIT
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12B WEDNESDAY. FEBRUARY 15, 2012


SPORTS






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


SPORTS


NCAA


WVU settles


Big East lawsuit,


will oin Bi 12


The Associated Press

MORGANTOWN, W.Va.
-WestVirginia University
announced Tuesday it has
settled a lawsuit with the
Big East for an unspecified
amount, clearing the way
for the conference power
Mountaineers to join the
Big 12 in July in time for
the fall football season.
Athletic Director Oliver
Luck said the terms of
the deal were confiden-
tial and WVU wouldn't
release details. But Luck
said, no state, taxpayer,
tuition or other academic
dollars will be used in the
settlement.
A person familiar with
the agreement said the
settlement totaled $20
million but did not know
how much money would
come from the university
and how much the Big 12
may contribute. The per-
son spoke on condition
of anonymity because
financial terms were
not announced with the
agreement.
Luck said the funding
will come only from pri-
vate .sources and money
that athletics raised in-
dependently. WVU has
already paid half of the re-
quired $5 million exit fee.
Luck said the new re-
lationship puts WVU
among peers that are also
large, public, flagship .in-
stitutions for their states
and have strong academic
and research programs.
Athletically, it's a "chal-
lenging and competitive"


group, he said, populated
by schools with "tremen-
dous legacies, passionate
fan bases."
It's also lucrative: Luck
said WVU should get
about $18 million to $19
million a year in television
payouts, about double,
what it gets from the Big
East. Payments are being
prorated for the first three
years at 50 percent, 67
percent and 87 percent, THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
he said, reaching 100 per- West Virginia UniversityAthletic Director Oliver Luck addresses
cent in the fourth year. the media during a news conference, at the WVU Coliseum in
"It's a very healthy tele- Morgantown, W.Va.
vision payout, and it's-


important we maintain
our self-sufficient sta-
tus," Luck said. "With this
move, we'll be in an excel-
lent position to do so."
A spokesman for the
Big 12 didn't immediately
comment, but the confer-
ence released its football
schedule about an hour.
after the announcement.
West Virginia makes its
Big 12 debut Sept. 29 at
home against Baylor.
The Mountaineers and
their explosive offense
went 10-3 last season and
finished ranked in the Top
25. West Virginia capped
off the season with a re-
cord-setting 70-33 victory
over Clemson in the Or-
ange Bowl,
Luck didn't rule out the
possibility of a noncon-
ference game against
archrival Pitt after the
2012 season but said that
both schools -have nine
nonconference games
and a matchup would be
"difficult to schedule."


"It's pretty obvious there
will be no Backyard Brawl"
in 2012, he said.
WVU sued the Big East
in Monongalia County
Circuit Court in Morgan-
town in November, chal-
lenging its bylaws in a bid
to join the Big 12 in time
for the 2012 season.
The Big East counter-
sued in Rhode Island four
days later, arguing that
WVU had breached its
contract with the confer-
ence and should remain
in the Big East for another
two years as required in
the bylaws. In late De-
cember, 'the judge there
denied WVU's motion to
dismiss.
Big East Commissioner
John Marinatto had re-
peatedly said West Virgin-,
ia would not be allowed to
leave until the 2014 foot-
'ball season.
But in a statement Tues-
day, Marinatto said the
board of directors voted
to terminate WVU's mem-


bership in the conference
as of June 30. The board
agreed to the deal because
WVU was willing to drop
its lawsuit and pay an exit
fee "well in excess of that
required by the bylaws,"
he said.
WVU also has agreed
tp have the West Virginia
court enter a judgment
that declares the Big East's
bylaws "valid and enforce-
able," which Marinatto
told The Associated Press
was the most important
thing to his board.
"The bylaws are the
foundation of how the
conference governs itself,"
he said. "To have the court
in West Virginia acknowl-
edge their validity of en-
forceability obviously re-
inforces the premise that
the conference is viable
moving forward, and in a
position to do so."
Continuing to fight West
Virginia "would have only
made the lawyers happy,"
he said.


WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2012 3BF


Olympics

Rome withdraws its


bid for 2020 games


The Associated Press

ROME Rome
dropped its. bid for the
2020 Olympics on Tues-
day after Premier Mario
Monti said the Italian
government would not
provide financial backing
for an estimated $12.5-
billion project at a time
of economic crisis.
Monti announced after
a Cabinet meeting that it
would be an irresponsi-
ble use of taxpayer mon-
ey to fund the Olympics
with a guarantee that the
government would cover
any deficit.
"We arrived 'at this
unanimous conclusion
that the government
didn't feel it was respon-
sible to assume such a
guarantee in Italy's cur-
rent condition," Monti
said. "We studied the


plans with great care.
"italy can and must
have ambitious goals.
Our government is fo-
cused also on its growth,
not just on strictness,
but at this time we don't
think it would be fitting
to commit Italy to this
type of guarantee, which
could put at risk taxpay-
ers' money."
The decision came a
day before the deadline
for formal submission
of bid files to the Inter-
national Olympic Com-
mittee. The IOC requires
government financial
guarantees from bid
cities.
Rome's exit leaves five
cities in the 2020 race:
Madrid; Tokyo; Istanbul;
Doha, Qatar; and Baku,.
Azerbaijan. The IOC will
select the host city in
2013.


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20 CSS College Basketball: Georgia at South Carolina. College Gymnastics in the Huddle [SEC SportsNite Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog.' Pad Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Hair Free Focused
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22MAX (5 351 Breakaown" *Pan"'** e (20O1IlSr',inPegg R *i'ape, easr' ** (1i91a RobenDe Niro Forolaaen Science Feature 4 ', Srar,'*** i20u7) Rob Scr.swi,' R tGi 6"*' Iri961 Trn.resa Randle.'RS M "Manhattan'**** (1979)
23 TNT Law& Order "Coma" Law & Order Law & Order Law& Order Southland "Legacy" CSI: NY "Holding Cell" SI N P,.in, I:.... Fran.,in & Basn 'iO Law & Orser ILaU & Order Smalville "Kandor" Angel "Shells" E
24DISC Beast Tracker Best Tracker eBeast Tracker EBe Collision Course EL Beast Tracker E Collision Course ,= Beast Tracker Ba Monster Bug Warst Popoff IPaidProg. Teleworld TrVita Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Free CrefloD.
25 TWC Weather Center Live Epic Epic Coast Guard Alaska Weather Center Live Epic Epic Coast Guard Alaska Weather Center Live Epic Epic Coast Guard Alaska First Outlook n Wake Up With Al
26 USA NCIS: Los Angeles NCIS (In Stereo) I NCIS (In Stereo) B l Royal Pains (N) 0 Covert Affairs BE NCIS "Faking It" Royal Pains '"The M.rk~smsn'* (2005, Action) 8E Law Order: Cl Law Order: CI Law Order: CI
28 FAM 1500,i "The Pire.Af'** | Perrm ,eran * l(. Rromarce.-C'meoy, Tne 700 Cun i0o Prince Prince Jian PaidProg. Paid Prg.GetHot The 700 Club 0 Take It Butt Lift Prince Life Today J.Meyer TriVita
29 LIFE Wife Swap (in Stereo) Wife Swap (In Stereo) Wife Swap (In Stereo) Wife Swap (in Stereo) Wie Swap (In Stereo) Wife Swap (In Stereo) Wife Swap (In Stereo) Wife Swap (in Stereo) Wife Swap (In Stereo) WEN Hair BeautyTip Total Gym Ogreenic 10minGym Cindy C
30 A&E Storage IStorage Storage IStorage Dog Bounty Hunter Dog Bounty Hunter Dog Bounty Hunter Storage Storage Dog Bounty Hunter Dog Bounty Hunter Dog Bounty Hunter TriVita Total Gym Supremes Paid Prog. Oreck Sexy
32 SYFY Face Off Ghost Hunters E Ghost Hunters E0 Face Off (N) Ghost Hunters BM Face Off Lost Girl (In Stereo) Stargate SG-1 N "Bloodsuckers'(2005, Science Fiction) Paid Prog. Money Twist Tummy
33 AMC CSI Miami lr, i ..-.... E'aer' r. ia9| m' ScAn ar.-' new er R', ~i*cmarnri'o* i985. Acli,) R I' .CSi Miarmi (In Stereo) CSI: Miami (In Stereo) CSI: Miami (In Stereo) "Trhe OR-of-Towne's"*** (1970)'G'Ba .Stooges Paid Prog. Oreck
34 MTV Teen Mom 2 "Falling" (In Stereo) ITeen Mom 2 (In Stereo) The Challenge: Battle |The Challenge: Battle Teen Mom2 (In Stereo) Pants The Challenge: Battle AMTV (In Stereo) AMTV (In Stereo) AMTV (in Stereo) AMTV: Morning
35 BET 106/Park '"tryDio1Ger.tarnem''**r 7 i r0Coeh(r Drama BET Honors 2012 ?i Wenay Williams Show trinewarcn'l2r 8 Dramal Cua CGoodingJr Ine Mo lirq S Sn.:.w Inspiration Popoff Inspiration Popoff BET Inspiration
36TOON Adventure Johnny T NinjaGo Level Up King/Hill King/Hill Amer. Dad Amer. Dad Fam. Guy Fam. Guy Chicken Aqua Aqua Amer. Dad Amrr Daa 'Fam Guy Farn Guy Cnh.:ien Delocated Aqua King/Hill King/Hill Looney Ben 10
39 HIST American American American American Larry the Cable Guy American American Mudcats 0 American Amerlcan Larry the Cable Guy American American Mudcats E Wealth Free Paid Prog. Money Paid Prog. Fluidity
40 TVLND M'A'SH M*A*S*H Home Imp. Home Imp. Raymond IRaymond Cleveland The Exes King IKng King King Cleveland The Exes Roseanne The Nanny The Nanny 3's Co. 3's Co. Roseanne Home Imp. Hoe Imp. Pilates Paid Prog.
43 CNN2 Jane Velez-Mitchell Nancy Grace (N) Dr. Drew Nancy Grace Showbiz Tonight Dr. Drew Nancy Grace Showbiz Tonight Jane Velez-Mitchell Showbiz Tonight Dr. Drew Morning Express
45 CNN Erin Burnett OutFront Anderson Cooper 360 Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 ErinBurnett OutFront Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 Ern Burnett OutFront Piers Morgan Tonight World Business Today Early Start (N) American Morning (N)
46 CW Senfeld Selnfeld One Tree Hill Remodeled (In Stereo) Cops 'Til Death King South Pk South Pk Roseanne Roseanne To Be Announced Paid Prog. Money Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Better (N) (In Stereo) Paid Prog. The Dally Buzz E
47 SPIKE The Ultimate Fighter Clay Guida vs. Diego Sanchez. (In Stereo) UFC Unleashed UFC Unleasted Ways Die WaysDie Ways Die Ways Die Ways Die Ways Die Entourage Entourage Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Sex Toys riverex Butt Lift Lose30Lb


49 HGTV Hunters House Property Brothers Income Kitchen


98 TLC Medical Examiner Hoarding: Buried Alive Untold Stories of ER


House Hunters Property Brothers


ly 600-lb Life JUntold Stories of ER


Income Kitchen


Mv 600-lb Life S


House Hunters Property Brothers
Hoarding: Burled Alive Medical Examiner


propertyy Brothers
'aid Prog. Paid Prog.


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Burn Sx Total Gym Paid Prog. Paid Prog. People ,People
FIA World Touring Car Paid Prog. Heating Shark Vac CarMD


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99 SPEED Pass Time IPass Time Dumbest IDumbest Pimp, Ride Plimp, Ride jMy Ride IMy Ride


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Dumbest IDumbest Pimp, Ride Pimp, mo. R IPimp, Ride Pass Time IPimp, Ride German Touring Cars







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


BORN LOSER BY ART AND CHIP SANSOM
M( OPPO.mENT I1s NOATORIOUSl F kA NOT FLIP-FLOPPER! EERE.YOU RAVE. IT-IN HIS
FLIP-FLOPPER-RE CANNOT AN> IF L eeRF.KLP-FOPP~E OW WORMCS,REAS RNOW EVER
IND'{ IT! I IN TIAE PAST, I DEFINlTEL"( WILL 3 --. FUP-FLOPPEUt ABOUT
R I .NEVE K. FLIP-FLOP WAIN! |1 lk FLIP-FLOPPIN6!
i lI- --


BIG NATE BY LINCOLN PIERCE
Now THAT I'VE LET'S HAVE AN
WRITTEN THE LYRICS *ENSLAVE THE
TO OUR NEW FIGHT MOLLUSK' JAM
SONG, ALL WE NEED SESSION AFTE.
T7 MUSIC! FRANCIst BUT WE'RE
A ROCK
BAND

SOUP TO UT BY RICK STROOSKI



SOUP TO NUTZ BY RICK STROMOSKI


FIGHT SONGS ARE
USUALLY PLAYED BY
MARCHING BANDS !
HM. GOD POINT

S I
--i-- J ---


CAAD. MY HOUSE
3 30. BRING
YOUR OBOE

ROGER'



-


FRANK & ERNEST BY BOB THAVES


ARLO & JANIS BY JIMMY JOHNSON


I/t


ALLEY OOP BY JACK AND CAROLE BENDER
THAT'S REA.L WE FEEL BADLY 'THAT LOLA'
NicE OFouT AL EE MOO WAS
'THROW A PARTY 50 UNPLEACAHT, 50 WE WANT
FORLOLAJ? TO ACE IT UP TO HERW -
J"` !j"" ,


AND THEN I ASKED IT,
'DO I LIKE TWINKIES?"
AND IT WAS LIKE, "'ASK
AGAIN LATER. 50 I ASKED
AGAIN LATER AND IT WAS
LIKE,
"YES.
AND (
GUESS
WHAT. I
DO LIKE
TWINKLES! "i "


DEI ASK IT IF
I LIKE TWINKIES.
DOES COW LIKE
TWINKIES?




AJj


"ALL SIGNS
POINT TO YES."
"ALL SIGNS'I! WHATS
THAT SUPPOSED
TO MEAN, LIKE
I'M FAT?!



\ C&)i]


"YES DEFINITELY."
WOW, MAG(C 2
BALL'CUTS DEEP.

CU4


KIT'N'CARLYLE BY LARRY WRIGHT HERMAN BY JIM UNGER


"Shouldn't be more than ten minutes.
He was in a locker at the airport."


NEA Crossword Puzzle


ACROSS
1 Tower over
5 "- -Man
Fever"
8 Rum cake
12"Fernando"
band
13Turkish
official
14 Malevolent
15"Who's
Who"
entries
16 Hull
18 Break
away
20 Woods
insect
21 Santa -
winds
22Vandal
23Jungle
warnings
26 Bank, often
29Machu
Picchu
builder
30 Sentry's
cry
31 Indent key
33Snacked
on
34 Lacking
energy
35 Points of
convergence
36Coveted
awards


38 Dazed,
with "out"
39 Reuben
bread
40 Mr. Voight
41 Roll of
stamps
43 Hollow
rocks
46 Keel
clinger
48 Reindeer
herder
50 Boast
51 Caveman
from Moo
52 Happily -
after
53 Store lure
54 Location
technique
55 Fresh
DOWN
1 Chem
room
2 Geishas'
apparel
3 Woodwind
4 Lash
darkener
5 Bamboo
muncher
6 Feverish
chill
7 Feline
8 In arrears
9 With, to
Yves


Answer to Previous Puzzle
YO TBJAIRIE AJFIT
Y RNAIGIEID U OT
ERAS ROSoUBIE


IEA EARABO
EDIT PIAER

M RO BBOSA
DR R R R
YIIED IOS IIBURI


10Swindle
11 Each and
every
17 Dwarf
19Jr. naval
officer
22Tide over
23 Estuary
24 Not fooled
25 Does well
26 Escapes
27 007's alma
mater
28 Compete at
Indy
30 Rent, as a
limo
32 Proposal
34 Clapton
classic
35 Caressed


37 Shrink in
fear
38 Elephant
quarters
40 Army
wheels
41 Irene of
"Fame"
42 Kind of
hygiene
43 Mashed
potato
serving
44 A-frame
feature
45 Hurl forth
46Small shot
47 Part of a
gearwheel
49 Apply a
jimmy


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QulllDrlverBooks.com


2-15 2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS



CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
.Each leter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY CLUE: S equals V
"ZJMW WOYWRXHCRG UENZT FVEU

AG ZWHYB HCT AENCTB JM FVwWC
SWFi WXHAZWB BPWZZWT HB FEET HB
AHREC." TENF ZHVBEC


Previous Solution: "The more I think about it, the more I realize there is nothing
more artistic than to love others." Vincent van Gogh
@2012 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 2-15


Horoscope
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 19) Guard against
thoughtlessly taking full
credit for something that
others had a part in.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) If you haven't been
getting the type of mile-
age you thought you would
from your budget, examine
it to find out why
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
- The world isn't going to
open up any obvious paths
for you to follow; you'll be
the one who decides what
you want and where you
want to go. Put forth the
necessary effort yourself.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
- Forbidden fruit might
beckon you, but that does
not mean you have to
respond.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
- If someone tries to pin
something on you, defend
yourself with everything
you've got.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
- An alliance of conve-
nience is likely to be tested.
If what binds this union
isn't tough enough, and it
probably isn't, the results
could be disappointing.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
- Don't attempt to stand
by a job to which you aren't
proud to affix your name,
just because you don't
think it will be closely scru-
tinized by others. It will be.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
- Be on your best behav-
ior, because social involve-
ments are likely to have a
significant effect on your
reputation.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
- If what you do for oth-
ers doesn't come from the
goodness of your heart,
people will quickly pick up
on it and suspect you of an
ulterior motive.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) Even if your inten-
tion is to be helpful, others
will take any unsolicited
suggestions you make as
criticism of their work.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-
Dec. 21) With an eye to
the future, manage your
resources as prudently as
possible.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19) You might find
yourself facing a situa-
tion where tough love is
called for. Don't give into a
youngster if you kriow that
it could be risky.


Annie's Mailbox


Dear Annie: My husband and I work
comparable hours, but I earn less than
half of what he does and have little
discretionary income. I come home to
my "second shift," which includes cook-
ing, cleaning and picking up after this
man, who leaves his dirty clothes, snack
packaging and other things strewn about
the house. Meanwhile, he runs off to play
golf. After dinner, he falls asleep in front
of the TV. He doesn't even mow the lawn
or do routine household maintenance.
He hires out for those things.
Anything he's asked to do, he deflects
by saying "I pay." He pays the majority of
household bills. But I pay for most of the
food and all of the household products
that we use. I even keep a garden to help
pad our grocery bill.
I've told him I feel like his servant. I
don't earn enough to hire a housekeeper.
And don't tell me to go on strike. I've
tried it, and he is perfectly content to live
in a pigsty. He says I'm a clean freak. I


Bridge


This deal would catch out many inexperi-
enced players because there is a natural in-
stinct to win any trick that comes by. Which
one should South give away in this three-
no-trump contract after West leads a fourth-
highest spade six and East puts up the jack?
The auction is straightforward, North choos-
ing not to use Stayman with 3-4-3-3 distribu-
tion. Here, though, South is also 3-4-3-3, and
four hearts should be made without difficulty.
Declarer starts with five top tricks: two spades
(given the first trick) and three diamonds. He
can establish three heart and two club winners,
but there is a risk that the defenders will first
take three spades and two aces.
The natural reaction is to win the first trick
and to play a heart. Here, though, East takes
that trick and returns his remaining spade, the
contract ending down two. Yes, if South attacks
clubs immediately, he is safe, but why should
he? There is a reliable rule in this situation: If
declarer has two stoppers in the suit led at trick
one but must lose the lead twice before run-
ning for home, he should duck the first trick.
So, South should let East take trick one. He
will presumably return his second spade. De-
clarer wins and drives out the heart ace. Here,
East does not have a third spade, but even if he
did, the defenders would get only two spades
and two aces.


simply cannot live in such filth.
Other than this, he's a good man, intel-
ligent, fun and he makes me laugh. I'm
not ready to throw us away for this prob-
lem. But I admit there are days when the
idea of living alone is very appealing. He
reads you faithfully and respects your
opinion. Please help.
LAKE-EFFECT WIFE

Dear Wife: Marriage is a partnership.
Married couples who have disparate
incomes and insist on splitting the bills
often run into these problems. Since you
work the same hours, you should both
do equal amounts of housework and
share laundry and cooking duties. Since
he doesn't do these things, however, and
you are picking up his used food contain-
ers and dirty clothes, cooking the meals.
and doing his laundry, he should pay for
cleaning help. This does not mean you
are a clean freak. It means you are
avoiding a visit by the board of health.


"VO(UMIZIIG SHAMPOO
FOR DRY, FI~HAIR"
*, n
\i:


COW & BOY BY MARK LEIKNES


North 2-15-12
4 A.5 2
4A52
YQJ87
*KJ4
,J43
West East
4K9863 J4
V962 VA3
*72 498653
4 A 7 2 10 9 8 5
South
4 Q 107
SK'10 54
+AQ10
*KQ6

Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Neither

South West North East
1NT Pass 3 NT All pass


Opening lead: A 6


S A -IM 'I J[ U I w


-4B WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 15,2012


ENTERTAINMENT








CLASSIFIED


Jackson County Floridan Wednesday, February 15, 20125 F-
Jackson County Floridan Wednesday, February 15, 2012- 5 B


WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED




ARKETPLA


BY PHONE: (850) 526-3614 or (800) 779-2557. BY MAIL: WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE
BY FAX: (850) 779-2557 P.O. BOX 520, MARIANNA, FL 32447
ONLINE: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM IN PERSON: 4403 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA
Publication Policy Errors and Omissions: Advertisers should check their ad the first day. This publication shall not be liable for failure to publish an ad or for a typographic error or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the ad for the first day's
insertion. Adjustment for errors is limited to the cost of that portion of the ad wherein the error occurred. The advertiser agrees that the publisher shall not be liable for damages arising out of errors in advertisements beyond the amount paid for the space
actually occupied by that portion of the advertisement in which the error occurred, whether such error is due to negligence of the publisher's employees or otherwise and there shall be no liability for non-insertion of any advertisement beyond the amount paid for
such advertisement. Display Ads are not guaranteed position. All advertising is subject to approval. Right is reserved to edit, reject, cancel or classify all ads under the appropriate classification.

For deadl ines call oll-free or v isit'wwwcfl[oridancLom


Beach home in Panama
City Beach 3/3
Sleeps 5-6, 2 Pools Tennis
Court Exercise Room.
Exclusive Property. Starts May 1.
Toll Free 1-800-541-3431, $1300


S .IDDEN Hidden Dunes Condos
-'\iIQIDES All Condos are Gulf Front,
*",,W' 3 Bedroom, 3 Bath units
with a 2-person Hot Tub overlooking the Gulf.
Mention this ad for a special rate.
www.hiddendunescondo.com 877-377-7707


iP) ANNOUNCEMENTS


Timbercreek Auction
Located at Medford Interiors & Antiques
in Dothan, AL 3820 Ross Clark Circle
(intersection of Denton Rd & RCC)
Saturday, February 18th at 10am/
preview at 9am
OPEN TO THE PUBLIC-EVERYONE INVITED
Estate Auction
Antiques, furnishings,'collectibles, coins,
rugs, pottery. Coins sold after 12:00.
All dealers must submit a hard copy of
current tax-exempt certificate.
DRESS WARMLY!
Approved Consignments Accepted,
Absentee Bids Welcome 10% Buyer's .
Premium for Cash & Checks, 15% Buyers
Premium for Credit Cards.
Check www.timbercreekauction.com
& www.auctionzip.com for photos.
AL License # is: AL5183, Jamey Cochran
334-714-3685


I Pay CASH for Diabetic test
strips. Up to $10 per box!
Most brands considered.
All boxes must be unopened
and unexpired.
Call Matt 334-392-0260


ALMOST NEW CONSIGNMENTS
Women-Men-Kids-Maternity-Toys-Baby Stuff- Formals.
Let us sell your almost new stuff for cash.
Bring it to us anytime, any season.
We will tag & price your stuff or you'can.
Call 334-677-SHOP "7467"
1656 Montgomery Hwy. Dothan. Inside RCC.
ESTATE SALE: Sat Feb. 18th, 8-?
4404 Putnam St. Marianna.
Contents of entire house. Cash and carry.

(P) MERCHANDISE

Lawnmower: Commercial 2009 Ferris Mower
with brand new engine. Sells for 10k new. Will
sell for $7,200. Also selling enclosed 7ft by 20ft
trailer. $2,700. Call Ben 334-796-9554

Bar Stools: (2) Gold metal w/cream seats. $75
for both. 850-482-7491
Rocker: antique rocker, $250. Call 850-482-7491
Sofa: Victorian, wine colored original fabric
wood carving. $450. 850-482-7491.
Tables: Mahogany carved w/marble tops.
Excellent condition, $400. 850-482-7491

Wanted: Old Coins, Gold,
Diamonds, Guns, And Tools
West Main Jewelry & Loan 334-671-1440.

Pool: Above ground. Round 18'X4'deep. New.


C a ll 850 -4 8 2 -7 491 $ 1 75 L . . , . ... . .
O -- -----------------


CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
Your source for selling and buying!


; PETS & ANIMALS

Free: M/Cat orange & white, 1 year old, litter
trained, Great w/other cats! Call 334-596-6196

AKC REGISTERED ROTTWEILER PUPPIES
$250. CALL TODAY 334-714-1233
Boxer: AKC Brindle Boxer puppies 3-Males/4-
Females $350 each. Both Sire and Dam on site.
Now taking deposits. Puppies will not be ready
until Feb. 22, 2012. Call 334-701-1722
CKC Jack Russel Pups!
Tri-color, white with brown,
S/W Will Deliver! $250.
Also Maltese Pups AKC
call for more info.
*1 334-703-2500 4*
Free: Beautiful puppies to good home. Mother
on site. Ready middle of March. 850-579-4153



Lost: Female yellow labpuppy with blue collar
Sneads Call 850-276-5772
Puppeis for Sale CKC Toy Poodles- Males $250.
also Shih-poos Males $250 or females $350.
Home raised and Paper trained.
Call 334-794-2854.
S.E. ALABAMA KENNEL CLUB
Good Manners Obedience,
Confirmation classes,
$50. for 6 weeks
RallyJAgilitIntro. $75.
4 Shots required 4
Starting March 6th
4 Call 334-790-6226 or 334-2993315
or 850-547-2370
lfed a New Pomn? Check out the Classifieds


Wednesday. February 15, 2012


TH SUDOKIU GAE WITH A KICK!
HOW TO PLAY
Fill in the 9x9 grid with the missing
numbers so that each column, row and
3x3 box contains the digits 1 -9 only once.
There is only one correct solution
for each puzzle.
GET MORE WASABI
PUZZLES ONLINE!
ARCHIVES AND MORE GREAT GAMES AT
BOXERJAM.COM


Shih-Tzu puppies: Just in time for Valeritine.
CKC registered. Male and female left. $300,
each. Call, text or email 334-596-3940
wridothanmgr@aol.com
V Valentine Babies Tiny Chorkies $175.-$225.,
F- Shih-tzu $350. F Chihuahua $300.
Taking deposits on Yorkies & Yorkie-Poos
Older Puppies Available $150. 334-718-4886.
FARMER'S MARKET

08' md#9996 John Deere 6-row cotton picker
982 eng. hrs. 624 fan hrs. Mud Hog, LMC Bowl
Buggy all exc. cond. kept under shed. Call;
Kendall Cooper 334-703-0978 or 334-775-3749
ext. 102,334-775-3423.
Trailer: Four Bale Hay Express ; Good Condition
$2000 334-714-2850 Or 334-299-3368


GREEN
FROZEN
PEANUTS
850-209-3322
n or 850-573-6594












WE HAVE STRAWBERRIES
Frozan Peas, Collard, Turnip,
& Mustard Greens, &
Other Fresh Vegetables!!
All Farm Fresh!
220 W. Hwy 52 Malvern
334-793-6690 *

r.......................... I
m o Bahia seed for sale
Excellent germination Kendall Cooper
Call 334-703-0978, 334-775-3423,
S or 334-775-3749 Ext. 102


WANTED TO RENT: Farm/Pasteur Land
in surrounding Jackson County Area.
850-718-1859

le6d a M6w Pomn?





(





out the Cla ifieds


T"


(T*)


EMPLOYMENT


Drivers Needed
Professional Transportation, Inc. is seeking
local drivers for 7-passenger mini-vans in
the Chattahoochee, FL area. Drug screen,
driving record, and criminal background
check required. EOE 1-800-471-2440
www.professionaltransportationinc.com
NOW HIRING! Are you making less than
$40,000 per year? COVENANT TRANSPORT
Needs Driver Trainees Now!
No Experience Required
*Immediate Job Placement Assistance
OTR, Regional, & Local Jobs
4 CALL NOW FOR MORE INFORMATION 4
1-866-280-5309 4
JACKSON COUNTY
FLORIDAN
LOOKING FOR MATURE, DEPENDABLE
NEWSPAPER CARRIERS IN THE JACKSON
COUNTY AREA


EARN EXTRA



BE YOUR OWN BOSS
1AM to 6 AM

Must have dependable
transportation, minimum
liability insurance & valid
driver's license.

Come by and fill out an
application at the Jackson
County Floridan,
4403 Constitution Lane,
Marianna, FL



URA N FAY
S \1.RI\'LN I Ib\IIL-i[\II R I


IMMEDIATE OPENINGS FOR
CNAs
3-11 & 11-7 SHIFT
) Shift differential for both shifts,
Full time Only need apply.
180-BED SKILLED NURSING FACILITY
FRIENDLY ATMOSPHERE WORKING
WITH GREAT PEOPLE
CALL850-547-9289
EEO/AAEMPLOYER M/F/V/D





____@_
0



_ 0
_______





0


@20O__LWWCITCLB0@ @ _
@@@@_ _


Tuesday's
WASABI SOLUTION


BE SURE TO VISIT OUR
NEWEST GAME SITE

KEWLBOcooM
KEWLBOX.COM


- \- -
\'p\~r


S Fast, easy, no press
lace an Ad 24 hours a day, 7 da
Get live previews of your classified ads, receive price quotes


re
lys a week!


and make secure online payments.

www.jcfloridan.com


www.JCFLORIDAN.com


G.M. Properties of PC Beach 800-239-2059
Fully furnished condos
& townhouses near Pier Park.
2bdrm Gulf front- starting @ $175 nt.
3bdrm Gulf front- starting @ $225 nt.
2bdrm Lake front- starting @ $100 nt.
Studios Lake front- starting @ $70 nt.
www.gmproperties.com


I'


9- I S-I f


-


. ---------~~-~


ChrcK


L-


-- - -- -------








6 B Wednesday, February 15, 2012 Jackson County Floridan


CNA'S
We are looking for mature & compassionate
people who enjoy spending time with the
elderly. Flexible hours. Contact: Home
Instead Senior Care M-F 9-3 850-526-2500'


r.-
'*1


Blountstown Health &
Rehabilitation Center
is looking for a


(PRN basis)


Pick up application at
16690 SW Chipola Rd.
Blountstown, FI 850-674-4311,
Fax resume' to 850-674-3798 or email to
therapy@blountstownhealthandrehab.com



Full-time professional position to provide
assessment and intensive in-home services
to families in crises. Program covers the
four county areas of Jackson, Calhoun,
Washington & Holmes Counties.
Qualifications include a minimum of
bachelor's degree in human services field;
preference given to candidates with at
least two years related experience.
Based in Marianna.


Sponsored by Habilitative Services of North
Florida, Big Bend Community Based Care, and
Department of Children & Families.
EEO
(W) EDUCATION,
& INSTRUCTION


LOOK Childcare Director
LK Classes Now Enrolling
Must have a diploma or GED
& have 12 mo. childcare exp. Call Ms Alaina
334-714-4942 www.childcarejobseekers.com
Get a Quality Education for a
New Career! Programs
FORTIS offered in Healthcare, HVAC
& Refrigeration and
Electrical Trades.
Call Fortis College Today!
COU.iEGE 888-202-4813
For consumer information
visit www.fortis.edu



Classified



can sell it!



CALL



TODAY!


CLASSIFIED


i i RESIDENTIAL,
( l U) REAL ESTATE FOR REN


1 and 2 BR Apartments for rent, Marianna are
call 850-693-0570 Iv msg.

3BR 1BA Furnished House in Rocky Creek Cor
munity, $550/mo. No pets, credit report, de-
posit, lyr lease required. 850-638-4620/638-
6405
HOUSEo S U ISH


3BR 2BA Block Home on 10 acres Compass
Lake area, Energy efficient, CH/A, Outdoor
pets ok. $850 + dep. 850-573-0466


Austin Tyler & Associates *
Quality Homes & Apartments
850- 526-3355 4
"Property Management Is Our ONLY Business


WANTED: Land to lease for hunting .
Adult group of 4-6 hunters. Any size property
considered. Pay in cash, have insurance.
*386-547-9447 4

2/2 Located between Grand Ridge & Sneads
water& garbage included $350/month 850-573
0308.
2 & 3 bedroom mobile Homes in Cottondale.
$500 and up. H20, garbage, sewer included.
http:// www.charloscountry living. com.
850-258-4868/209-8847
2 & 3BR 2BA Mobile Homes in Cottondale no
pets, Central Heat & Air $400-$450 850-258-
1594 leave message


2BR 1BA MH, in Cottondale, Quiet, $275/mo
NO PETS, 850-352-2947


Rent to Own: 2 & 3BR Mobile Homes.
Lot rent included. Also available,
1 & 2BR Apts & Houses. For details
1850-557-3432 or 850-814-6515 4


Rent to Own: 2 & 3BR Mobile Homes.
Lot rent included. Also available,
1 & 2BR Apts & Houses. For details
u4850-557-3432 or 850-814-6515 4
M BLEOHO: I L O TSF O R- RENT
2&3BRMH's in
Marianna & Sneads (850)209-8595.
) RESIDENTIAL
S REAL ESTATE FOR SALE


17.4 Acres Land For Sale, Located on Hwy 90
West, Marianna, FL $3,000 P/A 850-209-8089


3BR 1BA brick home w/2 car carport on 1 ac. in
Malone. all electric, 2 block out bldgs, fruit &
nut trees, $75k will consider owner financing.
850-569-1015


RECREATION


Yamaha '06 Gas Powered Golf Cart
White 2 seater; sun shade; windshield;
storage baskets; drink and tee holders
Exc. Cond. $2,250 334-793-4700


2004 Moomba Mobius LSV
; 21' Brand new 5.7L V8
Vortec motor, under war-
ranty, tower w/speakers,
-SBR.B CD player, iPod hookup, 3
AMPS, Perfect Pass, Wake Plate, and extras!
$27,500 OBO. Call 334-618-3356

.eed a Mew 6 ome? Check out the Clagsifieds


: ExeciiUtve Director
Jackson County Tourist Develop'ent Council
The Jackson County Tourist Development Council (TDC) is
accepting applications for an Executive Director of the TDC.


C



This position is responsible for overall administration of all functions of the TDC,
including administration, advertising and marketing, public relations, operations and
visitor center management, event coordination and management, and all other
functions performed through or on behalf of the TDC.

These responsibilities include, but are not limited to: budget preparation, marketing
plan development and implementation, visitor center staffing, TDC administration,
acting as the spokesperson and media representative for the TDC, appearing before
the Jackson County Board of County Commissioners on behalf of the TDC, working
with professional and volunteer organizations and committees, and serving as
contract monitor for grants awarded by the TDC or contracts entered into by the TDC.


This is a full-time, exempt, contract employee position, and as such, the benefits
only include workers' compensation and unemployment insurance. The contract is
budgeted for and funded by the.Jackson County Tourist Development Council,
and will be a'one-year annually renewable contract.
Compensation is competitive based on qualifications and experience.

This is a new position with tremendous opportunity to impact the community
through increased tourism and economic growth, and be financially rewarded
for results achieved.

Applications and a complete job description is available from the
Jackson County Human Resources Department located at:
2864 Madison St, Marianna FL 32448, and our web site www.jacksoncountyfl.net/

Application deadline is Monday, February 20,2012, 4:30pm CST.
EEO/AA/ADA/Vet Pref/Drug Free-Workplace


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)10 Jayco Eagle Super Lite 5th Wheel
ne Big Slide Out, 2 Flat Screen TVs Sidewinder
itch "Like New" $23,900 Call 334-701-2101


02 Hurricane Class A Motorhome 34 ft. ,
ngle Slide, Just serviced. New A/C. Approx.
000 miles. Excellent condition. Asking
31,000. Call 850-526-4394 after 5PM or
i0-718-6259
Damon 2005 Intruder,
r3 slide-outs, 38', 23,200
Miles. Excellent
Condition, Full Body
Paint, 50 AMP, 2 A/Cs,
Banks System for Fuel
efficiency, will swap for land 1 334-797-6860


lomino '06 Thoroughbred: fiberglass, 30ft
keeps 8, super slide, awning, air, all options,
II deliver. $8,900. Call cell @ 484-550-9821

i) TRANSPORTATION


ep'83 CJ-7, Over $25K invested. 350 Chevy
gine. 400 Turbo Transmission & Transfer
ase..410 Gears. Too Many Extras To List.
intact me and I will email you a complete list
extras. Must sacrifice at $9000. Call Blake at
4-695-1033


Y- 1'.';a 1. 1964 Impala SS283 engine,
& i disc brakes, power steer-
I I ing, beautiful interior.
95% Restored. Serious
luires only please. Call 334-618-1055, leave
'ssage.


Chevrolet '05 Suburban LS:
V-8, fully loaded, 49K
miles flex fuel, black,
great condition and very
clean. Located in
Enterprise $17,000. OBO Call 352-207-0032
Chevy'03 Malibu, fair condition,
needs repairs, 176.8k miles, blue
book value $2300, will sell for $1500
OBO 850-693-3145
Ford 2000-150 23,000 Miles.
16 Months Old This is a 2010
F150 4X4 Super Cab with 4.6L
V8. Color is Metallic Dark
Blue Pearl with tan cloth inte-
rior. It is a four-door with 2
full size benches (to include
console on front bench). It
a the Microsoft Sync bluetootlh audio and
one system, 6-disk CD player, auxiliary
adphone jack size) input, and USB
ut/charger. It has a 5' plastic lined bed with
rax-brand bed cover (lockable, waterproof,
ractable aluminum bed cover). It also has
step-assist system (that includes a step
d handle that pull out of the tailgate to help
ting in and out of the bed very conven-
t). It has a few scratches for which pictures
Sbe sent over email upon request. 845-325-
2, $22,000
OT BAD CREDIT? DO YOU NEED A VEHICLE?
I can get U Riding Today!
SO Down/ 1st Payment, Tax, Tag & Title
Repos, Slow Credit, Past Bankruptcy OK!
Push, Pull or Drag, Will Trade anything!
Bring in Your W-2! Ride Today! *
Call Steve 334-803-9550
ttiac '99 Firebird Formula LS 1:
>p with midnight blue, leather seats, low
eage, 8 cylinder, 6 speed manual. New
:ch, trans., and brakes. Transmission still
er warranty. $4,500. Call 334-268-9046


Cdet rwe


que dresser with mirror $60.
0-693-4189
arium w/lid and stand, 10 Gallons $25
526-3426 Marianna
y Boys Clothes, 0-12mos $25-$30/box 850-
3260
work bench with Park Tool bench mount
Lir stand and wheel truing stand, vice, &
STool bike tools. $500. OBO 334-599-1245.
ks collection of Danielle Steel hardcover
ks, $5 each, 850-526-4237


era Cannon AE-1. 3 Auto. exposure
els/manu. over. satchel
02$ 85 8


era Nikon Lite Touch Zoom, 120ed. Built
2x lens.38-120 mm. range. $50.850-272-5408


era, Olympus SP 600 UZ digital, new con-
n, $160 FIRM 850-482-7665 after 12pm


r Wine colored accent club chair, like
,$150, 850-526-4237
iging Table, white $20, Crib, white, like
$45 850-526-3426
r Gas Clothes Dryer, $40, 850-326-1774
rtainment Center .White. 48"Wx60"Hx20"D
850-482-2636 Marianna
Tanks for Outboard motors. Filled only
. 6 gal $60 3 gal $25 850-482-7671
Jar Cabinet, Hand made 24"X49" Tall $100
526-3426


r -- ---1--------- -
SLarge Dog House, Any Color, Shingle Roof,
L Will Deliver. $135. 334-794-5780 Dothan
Lens -Cannon EP 80-200 mm.-$40. Speed lite,
118A-$10,Cannon 28-70mm. $25,850-272-5408


Motorcycle Saddlebags .NEW 18"Ix10"hx7d
Studded w/Eagle emblem. $100. 850-482-2636
r---------------.
L Porch/Lawn Swing With Chains,
L Will Deliver. $95 334-794-5780
Rims: Dodge Dakota Set (4) Stock 6 lug, 15"
rims w/tires (2 good, 2 fair) $100. 850-693-9961


Ring 10 kt gold 1/4 carat diamond, round en-
gagement ring, $175 OBO, 850-326-1774


Ring -14 kt gold, ruby, and diamond ring, size
6, $300 OBO, 850-326-1774


Sewing Machine: Kenmore 12 stitch w/cabinet
and accessories $150 for all. 850-482-2636


Sink white cast iron double sink with faucet
attached, $60, 850-482-4616
Stroller, blue plaid w/matching car seat $45
for both 850-526-3426
Tail lights Mitsubishi Eclipse OE Tail lights off
1996. $50 for pair, 850-482-2636
Tripod Professional video/camera tripod, $25,
850-272-5408
Wedding Dress Size 8 tag still inside -sequins
long sleeves $89. 850-592-8769


JACKSON COUNTY


FLORIDANW

jcfloridan.com



monster

FIND LOCAL JOBS AT: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM/JOBS


I


I


OTBAD CREDIT? DO YOU NEED A VEHICLE?
I can get U Riding Today!
$0 Down/ 1st Payment, Tax, Tag & Title
Repos, Slow Credit, Past Bankruptcy OK!
Push, Pull or Drag, Will Trade anything!
Bring In Last Paycheck Stub! Ride Today! *
Call Steve 334-803-9550

Lincoln '92 Town Car .
SMechanically sound and
good tires. $l.795 or best
offer. 334-618-9852

Mercedes '93 Sedan Diesel 300, Avg 30mpg,
one owner, very clean, excellent condition,
never wrecked or damaged, sunroof, leather
interior, 4 door, champagne color, service re-
cords available, REDUCED TO $6900 Call 850-
569-2475
Nisssan '00 Maxima
$3599.00. Local Trade!
2180 Montgomery Hwy.
Call: 334-718-2121.
Nissan '05 Maxima, Silver with tinted windows,
Moonroof, LOADED, Great Condition, 122k Mi.
Asking $9,900. Call 334-797-9290 t
Nissan'06 Altima. 2.5 S. Special Edition. 36,700
Miles. 1-owner, Like New, All Power, Asking
$11,500 Call 334-702-6635
-E Toyota'98 Camry
UZ .B $4599.00. Run Excellent!
2180 Montgomery Hwy.
Call: 334-718-2121.


2003 Suzuki 1400 Intruder
for sale. Beautiful bi
ke in great shape. 8,000
miles. Windshield, saddle
bags, new battery, NICE!!!
Call (334) 797-9772 to ar-
range appointment. $6,000
Harley '98 Heritage Softtail Red, 31K Mi. New
Tires, New Brakes, Real Good Condition $8500
850-526-1414
Harley Davidson'08 md#FXSTB Night Train,
17800K miles, 1-Owner, excellent condition,
photos available.
334-798-3247 or 850-217-1647. $12,500.
Harley Davison '06 Super Glide solo mustang
seat w/matching saddle bag, mid rise handle-
bars, forward controls, less than l1k mi, lots of
xtras, $8500 850-482-4537
Motorized Bicycle kit.
Runs great, Shock absorb-
er seat post. lights, horn,
blinkers, and brake light.
Heavy duty tires with
thorn resistant tubes.
Call 334-393-9654, $450
SPORlTUTlllTY
GMC'09 Denali XL 1500 AWD: black with black
leather interior, fully loaded with all options,
48k miles. Asking $39,950. OBO Call 334-790-
0511


406 S/B Chevy Drag Engine, angle plug heads
steel crank and more $2700 850-573-1443
Ford '04 F-250 Super Duty 4X4 Crew Cab Lariat
6.0 V-8 Diesel, Dark Blue, Loaded, 146K Mi.
Excellent Condition, $18,995 334-790-4167
or 334-714-2129
Ford '06 F-150 XLT
Supercrew 4 Door. 5.4L
V-8, Bedliner, Toolbox,
Garage Kept,
Very Clean,
Excellent Condition. 75K Miles. $15,200.00.
Day 334-5964095
Ford '87 F150- runs good,
white, good condition,
clean. $1,800
Call 334-798-1768 or 334-
691-2987 or 334-691-7111
Ford '97Ranger, 5 speed, 4cyl, looks and runs
great, good on gas $2100 850-573-1443
Freightliner'04 Columbia,
APU, Refrigerator.
Microwave, XM Radio,
Great Shape, Looks Good,
$23.000 OBO
i 334-798-1587


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John Deere 7810, good clean tractor
Call: 334-701-4119 or 334-701-8500.


www.JCFLORIDAN.com


aE~3;








r--.. /''T DTAN m


CLASSIFIED


Jackson County Floridan Wednesday, February 15, 2012-7 BF
Jackson County Floridan Wednesday, February 15, 2012- B


GMC '06 Sierra 1500 HD SLE: 4x4 with Leer
Fiberglass Truck Cap with side doors, flashing
roof light, 206k miles, and in good condition.
Must see! $8,800. Call 334-793-4700


Chevrolet'97 Astro Van
conversion Van raised
roof, loaded, new tires,
One owner, GREAT
condition. 52K mi.


1500 Van: White, Explorer
Conversion, excellent
condition, 41933K miles,
new tires, limited slip
Deferential, one owner, $12,500. 334-347-7923
Honda '95 Odyssey Van
loaded. rear air, clean, 160k
Smi. $2200. OBO 334-691-7111
or 334--798-1768 or 334-691-
7111
Nissan '11 Quest LE:
Titanium Beige, fully
loaded, leather seats,
Boss Audio, DVD sys-
tem, nagivation, blind
spot warning, double
moon roof, only 8,100 miles. Must see!!!
$34,850. Call 334-347-5096 or 334-406-2925
Pontiac '99 Montana V-6, One owner. 145K
miles, needs head gasket, $1,750. OBO CASH
Serious inquiries only call 334-693-3141,
9AM -8PM ONLY.


1ST PLACE TO CALL FOR ALL OF
YOUR TOWING NEEDS!

%~eU,~li' fonmr 7w( T
AUTO BODY & RECYCLING
PAYING TOP DOLLAR FOR JUNK CARS
Contact Jason Harger at 334-791-2624

d a NewNme? Chd out th Claeifi


'" CALL FOR TOP PRICE
FOR JUNK VEHICLES
I ALSO SELL USED PARTS
24 HOUR TOWING 4 334-792-8664

. Got a Clunker
^g/ We'll be your Junker!
i We buy wrecked cars
and Farm Equip. at a
'fair and honest price!
$325.& upfor :
Complete Cars CALL 334-702-4323

SGuaranteed highest prices
paid for your Junk or unwanted vehicles
& farming equipment,
a6 6 850-849-6398 as


WE PAY Ca$H
FOR JUNK CARS!!!!!!
Call 334-818-1274


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jcfloridan.com


LEGALS


LF15723 INVITATION TO BID
JACKSON COUNTY GRANTS DEPARTMENT
Notice: Is hereby given to all general contrac-
tors, licensed by the State of Florida, that
sealed bids will be accepted at the Grants
Dept. located at 4487 Lafayette St.
Bid Name: SHIP Rehab Bid Number: 1112-21
Description: The Jackson County Board of Com-
missioners (JCBCC) is seeking qualified general
contractors to participate in work involving
various forms of rehabilitation of single-family
pre/postl978 homes.
Pre-qualifications: Each contractor must pro-
vide pre-qualifying data concerning their eligi-
bility to participate in the SHIP Program 5 cal-
endar days prior to walk thru. Contractor
packets may be picked up at the Grants Dept.
Special Note: The walk thru of homes will be
on 2/29/12 all contractors must meet at 9 AM
CST in the Conference Room, 4487 Lafayette St.


w~


,i'S
ADUL CARE I


at
GAH'S SITTING AGENCY
25 Years Experience
7 days a week / 24 hours a day!
Excellent References
* COMMITMENT TO QUAUTY CARE
COMPASSIONATE ,
SKILLED CAREGIVERS :
* SAFETY EFFICIENT HEALTH CARE


Emerson Heating & Cooling
The Cooling & Heating Specialists
Now Serving Jackson County!
Service & Installation Commercial or Residential
Free Estimates 850-526-1873


BUY IT!


SELL IT!


FIND IT!


ISELFSTORAnGo I


Grader Pan Excavator
Dump Truck Bulldozer
SDemolition Grading Site Prep
* Debris Removal Retention Ponds Leveling
* Top Soil Fill Dirt Gravel Land Clearing

I E EO EOFFERC




Clay O'Neal's -ar
Land Clearing, Inc. p mmtMw
ALTHA, FPL ASROAD
850-762-9402 S WMO
Cell 850-832-5055 20E.BaR .


IT'S AS EASY AS 1 2 3
1.ALL 2. PLACEYOUR AD 3,.GET RESULTS


(


W IE ILLING& PI


I SELF STOAG


Lester Basford BESTWAY
Well & Pump Company PORTABLE BUILDINGS
PORTABLE BUILDINGS
S4513 Lafayette St Marianna, FL LARGEST MANUFACTURER OF PORTABLE BUILDINGS IN NORTH FLORIDA
850.526.39130 850.693.0428 C
850.482.2278 H 850.363.0501 C WE
HAVE E
~~_________O___________ M ZVERS'
*ii DIFFERENT SIZES!
H O M EI M P R O V E M E N S I o YOU CAN CHOOSE
41119jjaj ..1COLOR & STYLE!
"Beautification of Your Home" BUI UIL?. .N S [ gB
Carpentry/Painting Installations 361 Hwy. 90 Marianna, FL 850482-8682
Furniture Repair & Refinishing


General Repairs Insured




I IChristTown Community Services
SPressure Washing Free
*Painting /Estimates!f "
*Wood rot repair ESimates!
SClean-up
Local moving/hauling Call: 850-272-4671


Shores Cabinet Shop, LLC
SPECIALIZING IN ALL WOOD CUSTOM BUILT
CABINETS & COUNTERTOP REPLACEMENT
Licensed Homebuilder
Call (850) 579-4428 Donnie Shores, Sr.
www.shorescabinets.com


0ES HOME REPAIR
By Joseph Dominello -
All types of remodeling and repairs:
SKitchens Bathrooms Additions Doors &Windows
Installed Drywall Repair Water Damage Repairs
Painting Weatherization l.&ns
(772) 285-2475 Marianna, Florida


For General House or
Office Cleaning
Call Debra
Free Estimates References Available
850-526-2336

ADVERTISE IN
THE CLASSIFIED h


i, ^Je w ---




DID YOU KNOW

Bob Pforte Chrysler Dodge Jeep/Ram
Has been selling Chrysler Products 50 yrs
Has Low Overhead & Friendly Employees
Has 4 Generations of Loyal Customers
Is a Family Oriented Business
SIs Surviving Because of our Loyal Customers
Has Exceptional Five Star Service
SWants to Continue to be Your Dealer
Our Employees invite you to help us
Just Click BobPforteDodge.com
or call 850-482-4601
THANKS!!!


www.JCFr LOR U ui.com


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Qualifications and General Conditions will be
handed out prior to beginning the walk thru.
Contractors must participate in the walk thru
to bid on homes.
Submission Deadline: 3/5/12 at 9 AM CST Bids
SHALL be submitted in a sealed envelope
marked: SEALED BID, FIRM NAME, BID NAME &
NUMBER, DATE & TIME of OPENING.
Bid Opening: 3/5/12 at 10 AM CST at the
JCBCC Board Room, 2864 Madison St. Bids will
be awarded during a JCBCC's meeting. Bids
will be made to the best bidder, as determined
by the JCBCC; the right is reserved to reject
any and all bids.
Information: 850-482-9083
Dale Rabon Guthrie, CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT
By: Chuck Lockey, BOARD CHAIRMAN, JCBCC
EEO STATEMENT
Jackson County is committed to assuring equal
opportunity in the award of contracts and,
therefore, complies with all laws prohibiting
discrimination on the basis of race, color, reli-
gion, national origin, age and sex.







;/.' A, i ( I ( I l-I ,I l I www.lcfloridan.com


18B WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2012


NFL


* ~


THEASSSOCIATED PRESS FILE
In this Nov. 14,1983, photo, Dallas Cowboys running back Tony Dorsett (33) is stopped after a two-yard gain by St. Louis
Cardinals safety Lee Nelson (38) and linebacker Charlie Baker (52) during the second quarter of a game in Irving, Texas: Dorsett
is one of at least 300 former players suing the National Football League.


Retired NFLplayers still seek better benefits


The Associated Press

MINNEAPOLIS The group of
NFL retirees that was a part of the
labor talks during the lockout last
year has not given up their push for
,better post-career care.
The money they helped gain for
their fellow former players was less
than what they believe they were
promised, and they're eager to argue
their case in court.
"I'm going to fight 'em to the
end," said Hall of Fame guard Joe
DeLamielleure, one of 47 ex-players
who signed on as plaintiffs in the
lawsuit filed in federal court against
the NFL Players Association. They've
alleged the current players illegally
overreached by determining the
retiree share of the $10-billion-a-
year business without them.
U.S. District Judge Susan Richard
Nelson will hear oral arguments
Wednesday in St. Paul, Minn., from
both sides. The union has motioned
to have the case dismissed.
Spokesman Carl Francis said the
NFLPA won't comment on the


lawsuit. The union's response to the
complaint was filed under seal.
MichaelHausfeld, thelead attorney
for the retired player group led by
former Minnesota Vikings defensive
end Carl Eller, insisted his clients
aren't trying to make a money grab.
Eller said they've estimated between
$300 and $500 million in additional
benefits they were promised in the
early stages of CBA talks and didn't
get.
Their contention is they were
pushed out of negotiations to
streamline the mediation process
despite a court order for their
inclusion. Those talks last summer
led to a new collective bargaining
agreement for the owners and
players and saved the 2011 season.
"The retirees don't begrudge the
present players any income they
merit, but at the same time they
don't feel it. was appropriate for
the current players to essentially
shortchange the retirees," Hausfeld
said.
The NFL's new "Legacy Fund" is an
additional $620 million carved into


the new CBA to go toward pension
increases. Current payments to
retirees or beneficiaries were
bumped up to at least $600 per
month. Players over 55 already
receiving pensions were given a
benefit credit, an extra $124 per
season for those accrued prior to
1975 and an additional $108 per
season for those played between
1975 and 1992.
Overall, including the "Legacy
Fund," an extra $1 billion was set
aside in the new CBA to improve
benefits, league spokesman Greg
Aiello said.
Hausfeld's firm also filed a
concussion-related lawsuit on
behalf of more than 100 former
players last month against the NFL in
Philadelphia federal court, alleging
negligence and minimization by
the league toward head-injury risk
in. the game. Commissioner Roger
Goodell said during Super Bowl
week the NFL "will not quit" helping
"retired players, the current players
and future players by making the
game safer."


Orioles no longer

interested in Ramirez


The As-ocatcd Prei,

BAfI'MORE The
Baltimore Orioles are no
longer interested in free
agent slugger Manny
Ramirez.
Dan Duquette, the Ori-
oles vice president of
baseball operations, told
The Associated Press on
Tuesday, "1 don't know
that Manny Ramirez is a
fit for our club right now."
The 39-year-old
Ramirez retired last sea-
son rather than serve a
suspension for violating
Major League Baseball's
drug policy. He was sus-
pended for 100 games,
but the ban was trimmed
to 50 games because he
sat out nearly all of the
2011 season. The suspen-
sion would start with the
first game he is eligible to
play after signing with a
club.
A week ago, Duquette
said he had conduct-
ed exploratory talks
with Ramirez's agent.
But Duquette also ac-
knowledged that signing


I[ainirez wild not come
without risk.
(n Tuesday, it was evi-
dent thalit I)q(tIte didn't
want Manny being Man-
ny in Baltillore.
Ramirez has 555 career
home runs, 1,831 lHlIs
and a .312 lifetime aver-
age. lHe's also a 12-time
All-Star.
But he comes with bag-
gage. [lamirez was sus-
pended for 50 games in
2009 for violating the
league's drug policy be-
fore being cited again last
April during his first sea-
son with the Tampa Bay
Rays.
Duquette believes the
Orioles have enough pow-
er in the lineup without
Ramirez, who wouldn't
be eligible to play until
sometime in May.
"Offensively, we have
four hitters in our lineup
who hit 20 home runs last
year," Duquette said, re-
ferring to Mark Reynolds
(37 homers), J.J. Hardy
(30), Adam Jones (25) and
Matt Wieters (22). "Not
many clubs have that."


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