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Jackson County Floridan
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028304/00722
 Material Information
Title: Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title: Sunday Floridan
Portion of title: Floridan
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Jackson County Floridan
Publisher: Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Marianna Fla
Creation Date: January 4, 2012
Publication Date: 1934-
Frequency: daily (except saturday and monday)[<1979-1995>]
weekly[ former 1934-<1955>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates: 30.776389 x -85.238056 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note: "Independent."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID: UF00028304:00722
 Related Items
Preceded by: Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by: Marianna Floridan

Full Text



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MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
April Rackley reorganizes a shelf of baby food at Winn Dixie
Tuesday. Some employees in Florida will be seeing a slightly
larger paycheck under a minimum wage increase that went
into effect Monday.


Bd
Idi


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e!

ILGADO
dan.com


Shea Rot n employee of
Zaxby's in :, spends all of
her paycheLD un uus. To compound
this, her roommate and best friend is
disabled and unable to work.
"It's just so hard," Robertson said.
"You have to work extra to keep up."
That stress may ease some in the
coming months. Florida raised its
minimum wage this week from $7.31
an hour to $7.67, about a 5 percent
increase.
Although the change has employ-
ees like Robertson excited, employ-
ers have mixed feelings about the
change.


Chipola Lady Indians

bounce back with win

over Daytona State. See

more on page 1B.


Vol. 89 No. 3


Sminimur


Claire Grigsby, the general manag-
er of Zaxby's, said the raises will cost
the franchise, but the restaurant will
continue hiring.
She said the increase gives recently
hired employees the same raise as
employees who have been with ihe
company for several months, regard-
less of merit.
"I would love to give everyone a
raise, just on my own terms," Grigs-
by said.
Tarvis Gillette, the assistant grocery
manager ofWinn-Dixie in Marianna,
said consumers shouldn't feel the in-
crease from the store. Like any other
increase, the store makes do.
S"Things just trickle down," Gillette
said.


n wage

Dr. James Froh, the director of
business and technology at Chipola
College, said that while the wage
increase was great for employees
struggling to make ends meet, it
could hurt businesses trying to do
the same.
"Increasing the cost to do business
is pretty significant to do in this time
and age," Froh said.
The extra 36 cents may not sound
like a lot, Froh said, but it adds up.
For an employee working 40 hours a
week, it amounts to an extra $14.40 a
week and an extra $748.80 a year.
For Robertson, she plans to try to
start saving with the extra money.
"I'll actually have the opportunity,"
Robertson said.


DEEP FREEZE



Getting through the cold


LAUREN DELGADO/FLORIDAN
Two dogs snuggle up to a blanket in their dog house at Partners for Pets Monday. The shelter is taking a variety of precautions to help
the animals in their care deal with this week's frigid temperatures.

One call about pipes bursting, no carbon monoxide calls


BY LAUREN DELGADO
Idelgado@jcfloridan.com

Jackson County residents had a rela-
tively safe Monday night, although
temperatures reached 28 degrees.
The Jackson County Fire Rescue and
Marianna Fire and Rescue both report-
ed that no carbon monoxide calls or
fires started from heating equipment
occurred Monday night. Both depart-
ments ask residents to continue fol-
lowing safety procedures..
Capt. Sean Collins from Marianna
Fire and Rescue said residents should


check their carbon monoxide detector
batteries and use approved heaters.
Harrison Plumbing did have one call
on Tuesday about pipes bursting. They
had a number of calls last year, and
expect the same this year, said Donna
Cripes, office manager.
For residents wanting to keep their
pipes from having problems, they can
wrap up any outside with Styrofoam
tubing from a parts store or even just
blankets or sheets, Cripes said.
Any indoor pipes can be protected
by keeping a steady stream of water on
during the night. It doesn't need to be


heavy, but definitely more than simple
dripping, Cripes said.
At Partners for Pets, all of the puppies
have been brought indoors. With the
shelter already full, manager Debbie
O'Quinn has about four dogs rooming
in her office. The dogs currently out-
doors are bigger breeds and did well
Monday night in the rare cold temper-
atures affecting the county. The shel-
ter is doing everything from wrapping
kennels in tarps to stuffing kennels
and dog houses with hay to installing
heat lamps. Anyone with extra tarp is
asked to donate.


Homestead, tax exemptions deadlines loom


BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com

Property owners who plan
to claim homestead and other
exemptions this tax year can
now start making their appli-
cations. The window opened
Tuesday, and the deadline for
completing applications is
March 1.
Although existing home-
stead exemptions generally
automatically renew from
year to year if no changes
have occurred on the given
property or in its ownership,
property owners will have to
apply anew in order to en-
sure they get the exemption
if certain changes occurred to


cause an interruption in the
exemption.
To apply for a new home-
stead this year the property
owner must have been resid-
ing on the subject property as
of midnight on Jan. 1, 2012.
In order to qualify for the
new exemption, property
owners must present a Flori-
da Driver's License or state-is-
sued ID card, and if they have
'a vehicle, their Florida vehicle
registration information, and,
if they vote, a Jackson County
Voters Card showing the pre-
cinct where they live.
All these items must be
dated prior to Jan.' 1, 2012. A
See DEADLINE, Page 7A


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Monica Tyre (left) helps Teresa Carver and Quillian Carver with their
homestead exemption paperwork at the Jackson County Property
Appraiser's Office Tuesday.


State drops


grand theft


charge

Former Alford

employee wants his

old position back

BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com

The state has decided not to pursue
a case against former Alford employ-
ee Robert Turner, who was accused
of grand theft in the disappearance
of a city-owned demolition saw last
summer.
Now that the charges
i have been dropped,
Turner says he wants his
job back, and plans to ask
the city commission to
reinstate him in his old
Turner Jr. position with the street
department. He was dis-
missed from his job after the allegation
was made.
In a court document of Dec. 16, 2011;
assistant state attorney Ana M. Kent
advised that the state would not pros-
ecute the case for the following reasons:
"Upon further investigation our office
See CHARGE, Page 7A


Nominations


open for

Citizen of the


Year award
BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com
Do you know someone who should be
recognized as Jackson County's Citizen
of the Year for the year just passed? If so,
you can nominate your candidate for
the 2011 title. You have until 5 p.m. on
Jan. 19 to do so.
After that, the names and the docu-
ments supporting the nominations
will be reviewed by a Jackson County
Chamber of Commerce committee
and a selection made. The winner will
be announced at the annual Chamber
banquet on Jan. 27.
The Chamber has set out the criteria
by which candidates are measured.
The person must have taken a signifi-
cant part in a new or existing civic en-
deavor during 2011. That project must
have helped advance a community
See CITIZEN, Page 7A


> CLASSIFIEDS...6-8B


> ENTERTAINMENT...5B


) LOCAL...3A, 5A


> OBITUARIES...7A


)> OPlHllOr .4A


> SPORTS...1-4B


> TV LISTINGS...3B


This Newspaper
Is Printed On
Recycled Newsprint


r *


7111 1118 l9
65161 80050


cnevrolet-BuicK-caaillac-Nissan

S4204 Lafayette St. Marianna, FL.
850) 4824s317


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


wgaIv OutEMlook


- .- .... "i g : 55





H igh 59
L Lovwi 38
.-, -' -l ^'s *M \


S High 620
'Low 410


Tomorrow
Sunny & Warmer.



Y High- 700
S Low -510


Saturday
A Shower Or Two.


High 670
Low 48

Friday
A Few Clouds.



T;, High- 690
,wiJ Low 480


Sunday
A Few Showers.


PRECIPITATION


24 hours
Month to date
Normal MTD

TIDES
Panama City
Apalachicola
Port St. Joe
Destin'
Pensacola


0"
.01"
6.09"


Year to date
Normal YTD
Normal for year


.1.I"
.6124"
58.24"


ULTRA VIOLET INDEX


Low
Low
Low
Low
Low


RIVER READINGS
Woodruff
Blountstown
Marianna
Caryville


3:57 AM
7:16AM
4:02 AM
5:13AM
5:47 AM


High
High
High
High
High


Reading
40.00 ft.
1.20 ft.
5.20 ft.
2.80 ft.


5:31
10:56
6:04
6:37
7:10


Flood Stage
66.0 ft.
15.0 ft.
19.0 ft.
12.0 ft.


S0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 I-
0 1 2 3

THE SUN AND MOON


Sunrise
Sunset
Moonrise
Moonset


6:39 AM
4:52 PM
1:13 PM
2:30 AM


Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan.
9 16 23 31


FLORIDA'S REAL

PANHANDLE JOU

MEDIA PARTNERS WJAQ 100.9-

6L* ISTEN l!OR IHOULY'ATlJIJHERUPDA


JACKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN

Publisher Valeria Roberts
vroberts@jcfloridan.com

Circulation Manager- Dena Oberski
doberski@jcfloridan.com








CONTACT US
Telephone: (850) 526-3614
FAX: (850) 482-4478
Email:editorial@jcfloridan.com
Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447
Street Address:
4403 Constitution Lane
Marianna, FL32446
Office Hours:
Weekdays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

MISS YOUR PAPER?
You should receive your newspaper no later
than 6 a.m. If it does not arrive, call Circula-
tion between 6 a.m. and noon, Tuesday to
Friday, and 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. on Sunday. The
Jackson County Floridan (USPS 271-840)
'is published Tuesday though Friday and
'Sunday mornings. Periodical postage paid
Sat Marianna, FL.

SUBSCRIPTION RATES
,Home delivery: $11.23 per month: $32.83
'',r three monrthr, $62.05 for six months;
-and $123.45 for one year. All prices include
applicable state and local taxes. Mail
subscriptions must be paid in advance. Mail
,subscriptions are: $46.12 for three months;
'$92.24 for six months; and $184.47 for one
,year.

ADVERTISING
The advertiser agrees that the publisher
,shall not be liable for damages arising
,out of errors and advertisements beyond
!the amount paid for the space actually
occupied by that portion of the advertise-
ments in which the error occurred, whether
such error is due to the negligence of the
publisher's employees or otherwise, and
there shall be not liability for non-inser-
;tion of any advertisement beyond the
,amount paid for such advertisement. This
nrew p i'aper vil II :. I inowiigly .3c cepl t:r
publish illegal material of any kind. Advertis-
ing which expresses preference based on
legally protected personal characteristics is
not acceptable.

HOWTO GETYOUR
NEWS PUBLISHED
'The Jackson County Floridan will publish
news of general interest free of charge.
*Submit your news or Community Calendar
-events via email, fax, mail, or hand delivery.
"Fees may apply for wedding, engagement,
anniversary and birth announcements.
Forms are available at the Floridan offices.
Photographs must be of good quality and
suitable for print. The Floridan reserves the
right to edit all submissions.

GETTING IT RIGHT
'The Jackson County Floridan's policy
,is to correct mistakes promptly. To
report an error, please call 526-3614
Monday-Friday.


Community Clenrdar


TODAY
Blood Drive The Southeastern Community
Blood Center mobile unit will be at ACI East, 7 to 11
a.m. and at ACI West, 12 to 3 p.m., or give blood at
SCBC's Marianna office, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Mon-
day-Friday at 2503 Commercial Park Drive. Call
526-4403.
) Chipola College registration for returning stu-
dents is 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Applications for admission
are available in the Admissions Office in the Student
Services Building or online at www.chipola.edu.
n Jackson County Habitat for Humanity Ware-
house hours: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
i Job Club 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the
Goodwill Career Training Center, 4742 Highway 90,
Marianna. Job Club provides job seeking andjob
retention skills. All services are free: Call 526-0139.
n Alcoholics Anonymous Open meeting, noon
to 1 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901
Caledonia St., Marianna, in the AA room.

THURSDAY, JAN. 5
a Chipola College registration for new ard return-
ing students is 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Classes begin Jan.
6. Applications for admission are available in the
Admissions Office in the Student Services Building
or online at www.chipola.edu.
) Chipola Healthy Start Board of Directors
Meeting 3 p.m. EST (2 p.m. CST) at the Veterans
Memorial Civic Center in Bristol.
) Ted Walt VFW Post No. 12046 and Ladies
Auxiliary meet at 6 p.m. for a covered-dish supper,
followed at 7 p.m. by a business meeting. Call 372-
2500.
) Chipola Show Choir Jazzmatazz Concert 7
p.m. Jan. 5-7 Tickets available from Show Choir
members and the Fine and Performing Arts Depart-
ment (718-2277). Cost: $10 for adults, $7 for 18 and
younger.
Alcoholics Anonymous Closed discussion, 8
to 9 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901 Cale-
donia St., Marianna, in the AA room. Attendance
limited to persons with a desire to stop drinking.

FRIDAY, JAN. 6
n Jackson County Chamber of Commerce First
Friday Power Breakfast 7 to 8:45 a.m. at the
Jackson County Agriculture Conference Center,
2741 Pennsylvania Ave., Marianna. Guest speakers:
John Milton, outgoing chairman of the board, and
Mickey Gilmore, incoming chairman. New officers,
members of the board will be introduced.
n Blood Drive The Southeastern Community
Blood Center mobile unit will be at Tri State Ware-
house, 8 to 10 a.m. and at Marianna Convalescent
Center, 2 to 4 p.m., or give blood at SCBC's Mari-
anna office, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday-Friday at 2503
Commercial Park Drive. Call 526-4403.


n Chipola College Spring classes begin. Late regis-
tration continues through noon on Jan. 12. Applica-
tions for admission are available in the Admissions
Office in the Student Services Building or online at
www.chipola.edu.
n Free Employability Workshops Budget-
ing Workshop, 8:30 to 9:30 a.m.; Employ Florida
Marketplace, 10 to 11 a.m.; Computer Basics 101,
1:30 to 2:30 p.m.; and College Acceptance, 3 to
4 p.m. at the Marianna One Stop Career Center,
4636 Highway 90 E., Suite K. To attend, call 718-
0456.
n International Chat'n' Sip Jackson County
Public Library Learning Center staff and their
international English learners invite the public to
join them, 8:30 to 10 a.m. at 2929 Green St. in
Marianna, for the exchange of language, culture and
ideas among local and international communities in
a relaxed environment. Light refreshments served.
No charge. Call 482-9124.
) Chipola Show Choir Jazzmatazz Concert -7 .
p.m. Jan. 5-7. Tickets available from Show Choir'
rin iber Lr ari the Fine and Performing Arts Depart-
ment (718-2277). Cost: $10 for adults, $7 for 18 and
younger.
) Celebrate Recovery Adult, teen meetings to
"overcome hurts, habits and hang-ups' 7 p.m. at
Evangel Worship Center, 2645 Pebble Hill Road.
Dinner: 6 p.m. Child care available. Call 209-7856,
573-1131.
D Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, 8 to
9 p.m. in the AA room at First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St., Marianna.

SATURDAY, JAN. 7
Panhandle Pioneer Settlement Pancake
Breakfast Fundraiser 6 to 9 a.m. in the Club
House in Sam Atkins Park, Blountstown. Cost:
adults, $5 each; kids ages 6-12, $3 each (free for
ages 5 and younger), for all-you-can-eat pancakes,
sausage, and your choice of coffee, milk or juice.
Proceeds benefit the Club House porch. Call 850-
674-2777 or visit www.ppmiseum.org.
n The William Dunaway Chapter, Florida Soci-
ety, Sons of the American Revolution, host their
fourth annual Installation of Officers meeting, 11
a.m. at Jim's Buffet and Grill in Marianna. Compa-
triot Larry Kinsolving will present "A Collection of
Revolutionary War Stories." Anyone who is inter-
ested in the SAR is welcome. Call 594-6664.
) Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, 4:30 to
5:30 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St., Marianna.
) Chipola Show Choir Jazzmatazz Concert 7
p.m. Jan. 5-7. Tickets available from Show Choir
members and the Fine and Performing Arts Depart-
ment (718-2277). Cost: $10 for adults, $7 for 18 and
younger.


SUNDAY, JAN. 8
n NAACP Jackson County Youth Council Meet-
ing 4 p.m. at the McLane Community Center
on Clay Street in Marianna. Council participation
in the upcoming Martin Luther King Parade will be
discussed.
n Alcoholics Anonymous closed discussion,
6:30 p.m., 4349W. Lafayette St., Marianna (in
one-story building behind 4351 W. Lafayette St.).
Attendance limited to persons with a desire to stop
drinking.

MONDAY, JAN. 9
"AWR Crisis Management for School-Based
Incidents" 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Jackson
County Sherriff's Office in Marianna. The eight-hour,
instructor-led course is presented by Rural Domes-
tic Preparedness Consortium, for rural law enforce-
ment and school personnel. Call 877-855-7372.
) Free Employability Workshops Interview
Workshop, 8:30 to 9:30 a.m.; and Resume Work-
shop, 10 to 11 a.m. at the Marianna One Stop Career
Center, 4636 Highway 90 E., Suite K. To attend, call
718-0456.
) Chipola College late registration will continue
through noon on Jan. 12. Applications for admission
are available in the Admissions Office in the Student
Services Building or online at www.chipola.edu.
n Orientation 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the
Goodwill Career Training Center, 4742 Highway 90,
Marianna. Find out about and/or sign up for free
services. Call 526-0139.
) Lions Club of Marianna meeting, Jim's Buffet &
Grill, at noon on second and fourth Mondays. Call
4822005.
) Free Employability Workshop Five Steps to
Rapid Employment, 1to 4 p.m. Monday-Thursday,
Jan. 9-19 (first class) and Jan. 23-Feb. 2 (second
class) at the Marianna One Stop Career Center,
4636 Highway 90 E., Suite K. To attend, call 718-
0456.
) The Cottondale City Commission convenes for
its regular meeting at 6 p.m. Call 352-4361.
) City of Jacob officials convene for the regular
monthly council meeting at 6 p.m.
) "Godspell" Auditions 6 p.m. Jan. 9-10 at
the Chipola College Theatre. Actors should come
prepared to sing, act and dance. Audition packets
are available in the lobby of the Fine Arts building.
Contact Chipola Theater Director Charles Sirmon at
718-2227 or sirmonc@chipola.edu.
) Writers Group Meeting 6 p.m. in the Chipley
Library. Those interested in writing or already writ-
ing (published and unpublished) are welcome to
share ideas/suggestions for fellow writers.
) Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, 8 to
9 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St., Marianna.


The submission deadline for this calendar is two days before publication. Submit to: Community Calendar, Jackson County Floridan, P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447,
email editorial@jcfloridan.com, fax (850) 482-4478 or bring items to 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.


MARIANNA POLICE
The Marianna Police De-
partment listed the following
incidents for Jan. 2, the latest
available report: One accident
with injury, one suspicious
vehicle, one burglar alarm, 19
traffic stops and one illegally-
parked vehicle.


JACKSON COUNTY
SHERIFF'S OFFICE
The Jackson County Sheriff's
Office and county Fire/Rescue
reported the following incidents


'*J-7-- ---
..

(CR]ME
1 .~


Police Roundup


for Jan. 2, the
latest available
report. (Some
of these calls
may be related
to after-hours
calls taken on


behalf of Graceville and Cotton-
dale Police departments):Two
accidents with injury, one miss-
ing adult, three abandoned ve-
hicles, one suspicious vehicle,
one suspicious incident, one
suspicious person, one physi-
cal disturbance, four verbal
disturbances, two fire calls, one
drug offense, 12 medical calls,


one traffic crash, one fire alarm,
five traffic stops, one larceny
complaint, one civil dispute,
one trespass complaint, two
assaults, one noise disturbance,
one animal complaint, one as-
sist of a motorist or pedestrian,
one public service call, one
transport, three threat/harass-
ment complaint and one report
of counterfeit money.


JACKSON COUNTY
CORRECTIONAL FACILITY
The following persons were
booked into the county jail dur-


ing the latest reporting periods:
) Lorintheis Hayes, 50, 909
Orange St., Marianna, hold for
Bay Co.
) Stephen Adams, 29, 2741
Henderson Road (Lot G), Cot-
tondale, driving while license
suspended/revoked.
) Omar Sanchez, 23, 1242 Bet
Line Road (Apt. 905), Decatur,
Ala., no valid driver's license.

JAIL POPULATION: 196

To report a crime, call CrimeStoppers
at 526-5000 or a local law enforcement
agency. To report a wildlife violation, call
1-888-404-FWCC (3922).


WAKE-UP CALL


]2A WEDNESDAY. JANUARY 4, 2012







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Marriage,
Divorce Report

Special to the Floridan
The following mar-
riages and divorces
were recorded in
Jackson County dur-
ing the week of Dec.
26-30, 2011:
Marriages
) Martha Custo-
dio Morales and Jake
Buntin Rodgers
) Joseph Brandon
Bruner and Amber
Denese Powell
)) Jason Lamar Tuck-
er and Jessica Nicole
Tucker
) Tube Beachim and
Mary Philyor Roulhac
) Clifford E. Ankrum
and Patricia D.
Mercer
) Erica Lynn Batdorf
and Ahmad Jamal
Smith
a Jodi L. Stumpf and
Christopher Stephen
Vason.
Divorces
) None


Assistant State Attorney to be

named top Animal Defender'


Special to the Floridan
According to the State Attorney's Office,
Assistant State Attorney Erin Oliver will be
named one of "America's Top Ten Animal
Defenders" during the week of Feb. 19-
25 by the Animal Legal Defense Fund for
her work in bringing Ronald Williams to
justice.
Williams, 37, was sentenced to approxi-
mately six years in prison Oct. 20 for 39
counts of felony animal cruelty. Thirty-
seven greyhounds in Williams' care were
discovered dead in 2010, and five more in
severe distress were rescued, after officials
responded to a complaint about the career
dog trainer. Williams' license to train dogs
was revoked.
Oliver was the Division Chief of the
Washington County State Attorney's Of-
fice from November 2010 to November
2011. She's been with the 14th Circuit State
Attorney's
Office since June 2005 and is currently
working a felony division in Panama City.
In a letter dated Dec. 30, 2011, the ALDF
told Oliver, "Your hard work securing the
maximum sentence for Ronald Williams
has set an outstanding example in the


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"Your hard work securing the
maximum sentence for Ronald
Williams has set an outstanding
example in the criminaljustiefield."
Letter from Animal Legal Defense Fun

criminal justice field."
The Animal Legal Defense Fund is a na-
tional, nonprofit organization of attorneys
who specialize in the protection of animals
and who work to ensure the enforcement
of existing animal protection laws. This
year, ALDF will celebrate its fourth annual
National Justice for Animals Week Feb. 19-
25. The theme of the week is "Fighting Ani-
mal Cruelty, Honoring Animal Victims."
In addition to naming its top "Animal
Defenders," the ALDF says it will be us-
ing National Justice for Animals Week to
"bring attention to current statistics and
trends relating to animal abuse, includ-
ing animal fighting, hoarding, recidivism
among abusers, and the link between vio-
lence toward animals and violence toward
humans."
For more information about the ALDF,
visit http://www.aldf.org.


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Publisher
VALERIA ROBERTS


Guest View



Occupy, pragmatic,


squeezed


middle words


of the year?

By Scripps Howard News Service
Merriam-Webster recently announced that
its top word of the year is "pragmatic."
Is it too punny of us to note that it was a
logical choice?
The word was looked up so many times on the
company's online dictionary that publishers
had no choice but to be, as the word is defined,
practical, realistic, hardheaded, sensible, matter-
of-fact or down-to-earth about the decision.
It is a word that we are so often asked to be, and
so often by people who do it much too well, at
times at the expense of compassion Congress,
CEOS and other authority figures, just to name a
few.
But we're not sure that this is the season to em-
phasize, as John Morse, president and publisher
of the dictionary company told the Associated
Press, "practicality over frivolity."
For this is the time of year in which we are fan-
ciful and sometimes foolish and whimsical and
other words also found in Merriam-Webster
that indicate we've reverted to childhood, at
least for a time.
"Austerity" was 2010's top word. In 2009, it was
"admonish." And, as you might recall, "bailout"
was the big one for 2008. Sadly, other words mak-
ing the top 10 list this year include some we'd
rather not use in reference to ourselves or friends:
ambivalence, insidious and vitriol.
We have other wordsmiths out there who desig-
nate words of the year. A good bet for the Ameri-
can Dialect Society is "occupy," not so much
because people need to look it up for a definition
but because it is a word in the American con-
sciousness. According to AP, the group's annual
choice refers to a word that "members consider
widely used, demonstrably new or popular and
reflects the year's popular discourse."
Which "occupy" does.
The Oxford English Dictionary, that bastion of
all things proper, selected not one word but two:
"squeezed middle." It's credited to a British politi-
cian and used to describe "the financial pinch"
felt by Great Britain's middle class.
Of course, that phrase could also refer to us, as
we exercise our non-pragmatic season of celebra-
tion by consuming tidbits we deny ourselves
the rest of the year and find ourselves with a
"squeezed middle" come January.
Which will be soon enough, thank you very
much, to start thinking pragmatically again.


Contact representatives
Rep. Marti Coley, R-District 7
Marti.Coley@myfloridahouse.gov
Building A, Room 186 Chipola College
3094 Indian Circle
Marianna, FL 32446-1701

Rep. Brad Drake, R-District 5
Brad.Drake@myfloridahouse.gov
NWFL State-Chautauqua Campus #205
908 U.S.' Highway 90 West
DeFuniak Springs, FL 32433-1436

s Ltterstot Eitor
Submit letters by either mailing to Editor, P.O. Box 52t '
Marianna FL. 32447 or faxing to 850-482-4478 or send
e-maill to editorial@icfloridan.com. The Floridan reser' :
the right to edit or not publish ary letter. Be sureto '
r. include your full address and telephone number, These; '
will only be used to verify the letter and will not be
.. printed. For more information call (850) 526-3614 '..j
; *. :' : .:I : "' .


Viewpoint


Where in constitution is court



allowed to hide from us?


BY NAT HENTOFF

The first reporter I turn to for
accurate news and analysis
on a Supreme Court deci-
sion is Adam Liptak of The New
York Times. In a recent article
("Supreme Court TV? Nice Idea,
but Still Not Likely," Nov. 28), he
told us: "The Supreme Courts of
Canada and the United Kingdom
allow cameras" during their oral
arguments.
But in the self-governing con-
stitutional republic of the United
States, Justice David Souter, when
he was on our highest court, noto-
riously pledged: "The day you see a
camera come into our courtroom,
it's going to roll over my dead
body."
If I were teaching a high school
civics class, I don't know how I
would explain to the students that
they, like the rest of us ordinary
citizens, are banned by the court
from seeing and hearing how these
top interpreters of our rule of law
decide cases, thereby preventing
us from learning who they are and
how they think.
But as a longtime reporter on
the court, I would tell the students
what I knew about each justice,
including my respect for David
Souter's exceptionally fair, lucid
judgments while he was there
- and my shock at his harsh
rebuke concerning cameras in the
courtroom.
Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg,
of the present court, whom I also
respect for her knowledgeable
independence, disappointed me,
however, with her explanation of
Souter's order to keep cameras out:
"David... can go to the supermar-


ket and do his shopping, and no
one will notice."
Huh? In my work, I've looked
hard through the Constitution
many times, but cannot find any
grant of anonymity to Supreme
Court justices.
While a decisive majority of these
self-protecting justices on the cur-
rent court still oppose letting TV
cameras in, they're not, I assume,
going to sacrifice their lives if those
dreaded cameras were to enter
their historic courtroom.
A notable exception to the
justices' prevailing distrust of the
citizenry's presence in their court-
room is the recently confirmed
Justice Elena Kagan, former dean of
Harvard Law School.
After President Barack Obama
nominated her to the court, I ex-
pressed considerable reservations
in my previous columns about
her record as solicitor general. I
was very pleased, however, to read
Adam Liptak's report, where Kagan,
before joining the court, talked
about being able to watch oral
arguments, thereby explaining why
now she would welcome the TV
cameras.-
In what she says, I do question
her exalted opinion of the qualities
of some of her current colleagues:
"Everybody was so prepared, so
smart, so obviously deeply con-
cerned about getting to the right
answer ... I thought if everybody
could see this, it would make
people feel so good about this
branch of government and how it's
operating. And I thought it's such
a shame, actually, that only 200
people a day (in the visitors' small
seating section) can get to see it"
(The NewYork Times, Nov. 28).


But what about the many Ameri-
cans who would like to see for
themselves how smart and pre-
pared each of the justices are on
live, unedited television? Wouldn't
they like to know if the justices are
more concerned with making a
decision that confirms their own
strong prejudgments on a case
than making a decision that is
influenced by the arguments of the
lawyers on each side?
So what do We The People actu-
ally want? As I reported last year
("We citizens are still excluded
from the Supreme Court," hanford
sentinel.com, March 23, 2010),
Tony Mauro, a continually valuable
reporter or the court, wrote in the
March 9, 2010, New York Law Jour-
nal that a poll had revealed that
"more than 60 percent of voters
think that televising U.S. Supreme
Court proceedings would be 'good
for democracy.'"
He added: "Only 26 percent said
televising oral arguments would
undermine the court's 'dignity or
authority.'"
At New Jersey's Fairleigh Dickin-
son University, which conducted
the poll, Bruce Peabody, chairman
of its department of social sciences
and history, said:
"It is striking that majorities of
Republicans, as well as Demo-
crats, young and older voters, and
political independents all believe
that televising the Supreme Court
would support self-government"
(hanfordsentinel.com, March 23,
2010).
Nat Hentoff is a nationally renowned authority
on the First Amendment and the Bill of Rights.
He is a member of the Reporters Committee for
Freedom of the Press, and the Cato Institute,
where he is a senior fellow.


3 improbable resolutions for the New Year


BY JOHN M. CRISP

N ewYear's resolutions often
spring from short-lived re-
grets over holiday excesses.
Shame provokes us to vow, for
example, never to drink again or, at
least, to lose some weight. Resolu-
tions like these don't bear much
hope for long-term success, but
it doesn't hurt to make them. You
never know.
Similarly, I'm not particularly
optimistic about the prospects for
these three not-necessarily-related
national resolutions; nevertheless,
I propose them in the spirit of the
season and with hope for the New
Year:
) Resolution 1: Learn something
good from a bad war: It would
have been interesting to be a
neurological fly on the wall on
President Barack Obama's cranium
in mid-December as he welcomed
the last American combat troops
home from Iraq. After almost nine
years of war, Obama said, in wild
understatement, that "Iraq is not
a perfect place." But at least, he
added, "we are leaving a sovereign,
stable and self-reliant country
with a representative government
elected by its people."
Of course, part of Obama's job
is to put the best light on things.
But one wonders if it wouldn't be
healthier to admit that nothing of
the rosy picture that the president
presented is true about Iraq at pres-


ent and that the prospects for sta-
bility and democracy are grim. In
fact, civil war is much more likely.
The troops deserve a good
homecoming. Out of all the players
in Iraq during the past nine years,
they've behaved with more honor,
courage and competence than
most others. Nearly 4,500 didn't
come home from doing precisely
what we asked of them.
But we do them a disservice if
we casually record Iraq as another
successful war and forget its origins
in the mendacity, arrogance and in-
competence of George Bush, Dick
Cheney, Donald Rumsfeld and Paul
Wolfowitz. Let's resolve not to make
this mistake again.
) Resolution 2: Start taking cli-
mate change seriously: Whenever
I mention climate change, readers
write to tell me that the jury is still
out. No, the jury has returned, and
the verdict is "Guilty." The main
question is whether the sentence is
"Life Without Parole" or "Death."
Ironically, in the face of mount-
ing evidence that human activity is
having a significant impact on the
weather, Americans are less and
less inclined to believe in climate
change. There's only one word for
this: denial. We should have started
on this problem sooner, but given
that we haven't, 2012 would be an
excellent year for taking action; it
represents one of a rapidly dimin-
ishing number of opportunities.
a Resolution 3: Save the Post


Office: Okay, this resolutionjnay
be impossible to keep. Still, as I
stood in line to send a package this
Christmas, I considered what a fine
privilege it is to be able to push a
physical object across a counter in
Texas and have it delivered rapidly,
efficiently and accurately a few
days later for a very reasonable
price to any address in the United
States.
From the early days of our re-
public, the Post Office's influence
has been democratizing. It tied
every citizen to every other and had
the effect of drawing the country
together: everyone was included
and got the same service, and the
1 percent always paid the same as
the 99 percent.
Privatization might be more
financially efficient. But the
purposes and effects of the Post
Office were never entirely com-
mercial: it probably shouldn't be
expected to make a profit any more
than a battleship or aircraft carrier
should.
By the way, the Post Office clerks
were efficient and courteous, and
my package arrived in plenty of
time for Christmas. Let's resolve to
assess the value that the Post Of-
fice provides for American life and
consider maintaining it.
John M. Crisp teaches in the English Depart-
ment at Del Mar College in Corpus Christi,
Texas. Email him at jcrisp@delmar.edu For more
news and information visit www.scrippsnews.
com.


TA HLE
1/4
S@2012 Jeff Stahler/Dist. by Universal UClick for UFS


ol4A
WEDNESDAY; JANUARY 4,2012]
ion








JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN + www.jcfloridan.com


Spring registration begins today at Chipola College


Special to the Floridan

Chipola College will hold
registration for return-
ing students today, Jan. 4,
from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. New
and returning student reg-
istration is Thursday, Jan.
5, from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Classes begin Jan. 6. Ap-
plications for Admission
are available in the Admis-
sions Office located in the
Student Services Building
or online at www.chipola.
edu.
Chipola offers the As-
sociate in Arts Degree, the
Associate in Science De-
gree and Workforce Devel-
opment programs. Bache-
lor's Degrees in Education
include majors in Middle
and High School Math or
Science, English Educa-
tion, Exceptional Student
Education and Elemen-
tary Education. A Business
Administration degree is
available with concentra-
tions in Management or
Accounting. A Bachelor of
Science in Nursing (BSN)


degree also is offered. Ad-
ditionally, the college of-
fers the Educator Prepa-
ration Institute, a Teacher
Certification program for
those with a B.S. in a non-
teaching field.
The Associate in Arts
degree is designed for stu-
dents who plan to com-
plete their first two years
of college work and then
transfer to a four-year pro-
gram at Chipola or another
college or university. Cred-
its earned are transferable
and are applicable toward
a bachelor's degree. Aca-
demic advising guides that
outline requirements for
specific majors are avail-
able from Student Affairs
and are located on the
college website at www.
chipola.edu.
Several Associate in Sci-
ence (AS) and Workforce
programs are offered
which provide training for
high wage jobs. Workforce
programs include: Auto-
motive Service Technology,
Cross-Over Law Enforce-


ment to Corrections, Com-
puter Systems Technology
I, Firefighter II, Computer
Systems Technology II,
Law Enforcement Officer,
Correctional Officer, Cos-
metology, Cross-Over Cor-
rections to Law Enforce-
ment and Patient Care
Assistant.
Associate in Science (AS)
programs include: Busi-
ness Administration, Early
Childhood Education,
Computer Information
Technology, Fire Science
Technology, Criminal Jus-
tice Technology (Crime,
Scene Track), Networking
Services Technology, Culi-
nary Management, Nurs-
ing (RN and LPN) and Rec-
reation Technology.
College Credit Certificate
programs include: Child
Care Center Management,
Information Technology
Management, Emergency
Medical Technician (EMT)
and Paramedic;
For information, call 718-
2211 or visit www.chipola.
edu.


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Chipola College students Jaren Bannerman (left) and Stevie Blanchette study in the college ACE
lab. Chipola College will hold registration for returning students 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Wednesday,
Jan. 4. New and returning student registration is 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 5. Classes begin
Friday, Jan. 6. Applications for admission are available in the Admissions Office in the Student
Services Building oronline at www.chipola.edu.


STEP RIGHT UP


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
N ola Bosland (right) is excited to help her cousin, Nyleah Merritt man the admission
table as basketball fans head to the Marianna High School Shootout.on Thursday
night.


Scott panel cannot compare state hospitals


The Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE A pan-
el appointed by Gov. Rick
Scott, who once headed the
nation's largest for-profit
hospital chain, told him on
Tuesday that it could not
determine whether Flori-
da's public hospitals pro-
vide better or worse care
than private ones.
A study commissioned
by the seven-member
Commission on Review of
Taxpayer Funded Hospital
Districts said it was diffi-
cult to compare the qual-
ity of care at various types
of hospitals because they
are very diverse and have
complex business models.
The commission noted
a third of Florida's pub-


licly owned hospitals are
in rural areas that have too
few patients to generate
data comparable to urban
hospitals.
The report did conclude
that patient expenses are
up to 12 percent higher in
public hospitals. A public
hospital economist attrib-
uted the difference largely
to Miami's Jackson Memo-
rial Hospital.
Scott created the panel
last March to determine
if it's in the public's best
interest to continue hav-
ing government-operated
hospitals.
Florida has 30 active hos-
pital districts but only 16
have the authority to levy
taxes or receive tax money.
The panel recommended


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M


a number of changes in its
final report to Scott and the
Legislature, but it stopped
short of calling for an end
to public hospitals.
A key proposal is that
voters should be given a
chance every eight to 12
years to determine if local
hospital districts should
continue receiving taxpay-
er funds.
The panel also urged the
districts to pay for indi-
gent care at private as well
as public hospitals and
clinics.


The commission also
agreed with the Republican
governor's push to make
Medicaid reimbursements
more uniform for public
and private hospitals alike.
Scott has proposed
cutting Medicaid reim-
bursements in his annual
budget proposal to the
Legislature.
The panel said Scott and
lawmakers should sup-
port efforts by the Florida
Agency for Health Care Ad-
ministration to refine and
publish data on quality.


State Briefs


Golf ball diver found
at golf course
BROOKSVILLE The
body of a diver hired to
retrieve golf balls from a
Tampa Bay area country
club has been found.
Forty-three-year-old
David Voiles was found
Tuesday. He was re-
ported missing about 7
p.m. Monday. Hernando
County Sheriff's officials
say the certified diver ar-
rived at the Sherman Hills
Golf Course earlier in the
day to collect golf balls
from the bottom of a lake.
Voiles' vehicle was still
in the parking lot and
the golf cart he used was
beside the lake. Officials
say divers from the Pasco
County Sheriff's Office
were called to help search
the lake. Voiles was found
in the lake along the
course's 10th hole shortly
after 10:30 a.m. Tuesday.
The cause of death could
not be determined.

Man falls to death
front parking garage
PANAMA CITY BEACH
- Police say a man in his
early 20s fell to his death
from a parking garage at
a Florida Panhandle con-
dominium complex.
The area around the
Thomas Drive condo was
cordoned off late Monday
while police searched for
clues and witnesses.
Panama City Beach
Police Chief Robert Hard-
ing says investigators


don't know which floor
the man fell from. The
Laketown Wharf Condo-
minium complex has'a
10-story parking garage.
The Panama City News
Herald reports this is
the second fatal fall in
a month in Panama
City Beach. On Dec. 3,
22-year-old Aaron Scott
Thompson of Kalamazoo,
Mich., fell to his death
while climbing on a bal-
cony at The Holiday Inn.

Judge: Teen acted
in self-defense
NAPLES -A judge has
ruled that a southwest
Florida teen acted in self-
defense when he stabbed
a fellow high school
student at a bus stop.
A Collier County judge
issued the ruling Friday.
The judge agreed with de-
fense attorneys that the
15-year-old boy's actions
were covered under Flor-
ida's "Stand Your Ground"
law, which allows the
use of deadly force to
prevent serious injury or
death. The teen had been
charged as a juvenile with
manslaughter. ,
During a hearing last
month, several students
testified that 16-year-
old Dylan Nuno and
his friends followed the
younger, smaller boy off
the bus last January and
that Nuno repeatedly
punched the boy. The boy
then pulled a knife and
stabbed Nuno.
From wire reports


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WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 4, 2012 5A"


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


" 6A WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 4, 2012


If Ar TI


Grocery
Outlet


IJac L C rl'
READER'S
CHOICE


Family Pack Split
Fryer
Breast...............
Family Pack Ribs
Pork Steak or
Country Style......
12 oz. Tennessee Pride
Sausage
Patties ..............


98


161

179


14 oz., Hot, Beef or Cheese
Bryan Cocktail
Smokies...............
1 Ib. pkg. Kelley's Smoked
Baby Link
Sausage...............
16 oz. Country Best Hot or Mild
Roll
Sausage...............


75


153


16 oz. Bar "S"
Jumbo
Franks...............


1 Ib. pkg. Aberdeen Sliced
Smoked
Bacon...............
16 oz. Country Best
Bratwurst or
Italian Sausage...


12 pk. Charmin
Bath $619
Tissue ............ 9
10 13 oz. Lay's or Tostitos
Potato $276
Chips ............. 2

40 oz. Blackburn Made $2 69
Syrup ..........


29 oz. Bruce's
cut $ 128
Yams............. $
24 ct. Luzianne
Tea $137
Bags .............


15 oz. Southgate
Chili
With Beans......


78


16 oz. Vlasic
Sweet or Dill
Relish...............
8 oz.
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Pineapple..........


50 oz. Tide
Liquid


,V


98(


$284


86'


46'


$620


Florida Red 1 67 Bell 36'
Ripe Strawberries ........... 1 Ib. pkg. Peppers ...........................each


tj o


77r=,


e4 t vrh^Tf Uf jt


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Los Angeles firefighters battle an arson car fire under a carport in Los Angeles on Monday,
Twelve suspected arson fires broke out early Monday in the Los Angeles area.


LA arson suspect cursed



US just days before fires


The Associated Press

LOS ANGELES Harry Burkhart
watched as his mother was arrested last
week on fraud charges from their native
Germany, and a day later he exploded in
an expletive-laced rant against the U.S.
at her court hearing.
That's when, authorities believe,
Burkhart, angry over his mother's legal
troubles, went on a nighttime rampage
of arson attacks that terrorized Los An-
geles and caused $3 million in damage.
Court documents unsealed Tuesday
said Dorothee Burkhart, who is in her
50s, was charged with 19 counts of fraud
in Frankfurt, including failing to pay for
a 2004 breast-augmentation surgery and
pilfering security deposits from renters.
In a brief court appearance, she ap-
peared perplexed; wondering .aloud if
her son had disappeared or was dead. At
one point, she said, he is mentally ill and
questioned whether Nazis knew where
she and her son lived.
"Where is my son? What did you do
to my son?" she asked U.S. Magistrate
Judge Margaret Nagle.
Harry Burkhart, 24, was being held
without bail after being arrested in the
arson case Monday. His mother also is
being held without bail and her court
hearing was delayed until Friday so she
can hire an attorney.
Outside his Hollywood apartment,
some neighbors described him as a lon-
er who loitered around the busy com-
mercial strip at night and could be heard
arguing with his mother.
But Shlomo Elady, a hair stylist who
regularly trimmed Burkhart's long hair,
recalled someone who spoke three lan-
guages, dreamed of visiting Jerusalem
and cared for a sickly mother who had
trouble walking.
Elady said he was stunned that the
man who lived with his mother above
his Sunset Boulevard shop is suspected
of torching vehicles, some just steps
from his home.
"He loved his mom, the way every son
loves his mom," Elady said. "He's not a
creepy guy."
Burkhart was taken into custody after
/authorities received a tip from federal
officials who recognized him in a securi-
ty video that showed a pony-tailed man
emerging from a garage where a car was
set ablaze.
"When they saw the security footage,
they recognized him and they contacted
the arson task force," a State Department
official told The Associated Press, speak-
ing on condition of anonymity because
the investigations are ongoing.
Burkhart had been living in the U.S.
when his mother arrived in October and
went with him to the German consulate
in Los Angeles to renew his passport,
according to court documents.
Authorities didn't say how long


Deadline
From Page 1A
Social Security number is also required
for all owners who live on the property.
Other than homestead, there is a Wid-
ow or Widower's Exemption, a Senior
Citizen Exemption, various general Dis-
ability Exemptions and certain exemp-
tions for disabled veterans and active
duty military personnel.
Additionally, property owners who ac-
quired agriculture lands in 2011 should
also make a new application in 2012 to
ensure the land can be placed in that tax
classification if it is bona fide agricultur-
al property.
To find out more about each, and to re-
ceive assistance if needed in applying for
the appropriate exemptions, call Jackson
County Property Appraiser Sharon Cox
or her staff at 482-9646.
Cox encourages friends and relatives to
talk with the people they know who may
qualify for these exemptions, and en-
courage them to speak with Cox, in case
the property owners have not heard or
read media reports about the available
exemptions and the rules that apply.


Burkhart had been in Southern Califor-
nia, but both mother and son had the
appropriate legal documents.
A federal law enforcement official,
speaking on condition of anonymity
because the official was not authorized
to discuss the case, said Harry Burkhart
was present when his mother was ar-
rested Dec. 28 on a provisional arrest
warrant.
Provisional arrest warrants are normal-
ly issued when there are criminal charg-
es pending overseas against someone.
Ordinarily, U.S. authorities then obtain
an arrest warrant through the State De-
partment and the Justice Department.
Burkhart had been in court Thursday
afternoon. Harry Burkhart launched into
an obscenity-laden tirade, saying "F--
the United States!" said Thom Mrozek,
spokesman at the U.S. attorney's office
in Los Angeles.
Mrozek said Burkhart was detained
and later escorted out of the courthouse.
He said Burkhart did not make any spe-
cific threats against anyone or property
at his mother's court hearing.
A law enforcement official, who re-
quested anonymity because the inves-
tigation is ongoing, said authorities be-
lieve Burkhart went on the arson spree
because he was angry over his mother's
legal troubles.
Galina Illarionova, who lives in the
same apartment complex as the suspect,
said through a Russian translator that an
agitated Burkhart visited her Sunday and
said his mother was having some kind of
legal problems.
He told her his mother was in trouble
with authorities and wanted Illarionova
to attend a legal hearing with him, but
he later said he didn't need her help.
A domain name for a website offer-
,ing appointment-only sensual massage
is registered to Dorothee Burkhart. Her
name is hot mentioned on the web-
site, which states the service. is not
prostitution.
The series of fires appeared to have
stopped with Burkhart's arrest. The on-
slaught of intentionally set fires kept res-
idents anxious over the holiday weekend
in some of the most densely populated
areas of the city.
One of Saturday's fires occurred at the
Hollywood and Highland entertainment
complex, a popular tourist destina-
tion bordered by the Walk of Fame in a
neighborhood that includes Grauman's
Chinese Theatre.
Damaged buildings included a former
home of Doors singer Jim Morrison.
Hundreds of investigators, police of-
ficers and firefighters raced to deal with
the blazes. Police conducted extra pa-
trols all weekend, and the noise of he-
licopters and sirens persisted virtually
nonstop in Hollywood.
The fires forced many apartment
dwellers from their homes.


Tax exemptions
Tj3 able i alue c urrentl rfI the_ .ljck,,)n
oLunt' t3, f ,lidue toe emption.
n Homestead: Applies to a property
owner's first $50.000 worth of taxable
value $368 339 '13 of value comes
of the roll. with about 11.000 parcels
receiving thi.:. About 85 percent of this
group is paving some ta'., since property
values e,:ceed the 50.000 exemption in
most cases Based on the Iinal 20.11 mill-
age rate of last year the value off the roll
represents about $5 million in potential
ta.es not realized
n The Senior Citizen additional
homestead: Which applies to the
second $50 000 worth of ta-.able value
owned by qualified seniors who are 65
years of age or older In this category.
about $9 876 190 comes off the taxable
roll This is applied to about 431 parcels
in the county
Other individual exemptions, includ-
rn widow, widower, various disability
and veteran exemptions, take about
$12 044 661 worth of value off the
taxable rolls


James & Sikes Funeral
Home Maddox Chapel
4278 Lafayette Street
Marianna, Fl 32446
850.482.2332

Ora Bee Land

Services 2 pm Wednes-
day, January 4, 2012 at Cy-
.press Community Church.
Interment will be at Sims
Cemetery
Marianna Chapel
Funeral Home
3960 Lafayette Street
Marianna, Florida 32446
Phone 850-526-5059

Martha Jean
Nelson

Martha Jean Nelson, 80
of Chipley, passed away on
Monday, January 2, 2012 at
her home. Mrs. Nelson
lived most of her life in
Washington County, living
several years in Panama
City. After many years of
service, Mrs. Nelson retired
from the Florida Highway
Patrol as a dispatcher.
Mrs. Nelson was preced-
ed in death by her parents;
Charles Eastor and Hester
Owens Gainey, her loving
husband; Horace Nelson
and her son; Phillip Nel-
son.
She is survived by one
son; John Easton Nelson of
Chipley, two. daughters;
Katherine Nelson Roberts
of Chipley and Rose Mary
Nelson Perkins and her
husband Tim of Chipley,
two sisters; Ollie Taylor of
Dothan and Exa Bush of
Chipley, six grandchildren
and nine great grandchil-
dren, she is also survived
by her caregivers; grand-
daughter Rachel Anderson
and Mrs. Kay Bias.
Funeral services for Mrs.


Citizen
From Page 1A
ideal in education, chari-
table endeavors, civic rela-
tionships, beautification or
patriotic goals or activities,
or other such arenas.
Nominees cannot be
elected officials or an-
nounced candidates for
office, and cannot cur-
rently be on the Chamber
Board of Directors or work
for the Chamber in a paid
position.
The individual must be
at least 21 years of age.
Nominations must be
written, and should in-
clude the name, contact
information, and reasons
the individual should be
considered as the "2011
Citizen of the Year." The
packet must also include
the name, address and'
phone number of the per-
son or group making the
nomination. Anonymous
nominations or nomina-
tions without the proper
contact information will
not be accepted.
Homer Hirt, Citizen of
the Year for 2010,- said he
has enjoyed his year wear-
ing that title, and he has
tried to show his gratitude
by becoming even more
involved in his community.
He anticipates the Cham-
ber will have a difficult task
ahead in choosing from
the nominees because the
list will likely include some
of the community's most
giving people.
"I've watched the ones
selected in the past, and
I believe you have to give


Charge
From Page 1A


has determined that while
there was sufficient prob-
able cause to charge the
defendant with the above-
referenced crime (grand
theft), the state cannot
prove that the crime was
committed beyond and
to the exclusion of any
reasonable doubt."
Turner said he will be at
the Alford City Commis-
sion meeting next Tuesday,
"trying to appeal the deci-
sion of being fired without


Nelson will be held at 10:00
AM, Thursday, January 5,
2012 in the Marianna
Chapel Funeral Home with
Pastor Teddy Joe Bias offi-
ciating. Interment will fol-
low in the Piney Grove
Cemetery in Washington
County. Time of remem-
brance will be held from
6PM to 8PM on Wednes-
day, January 4, 2012 in the
Marianna Chapel Funeral
Home.
Flower will be accepted
or donations may be made
to Emerald Coast Hospice
at 4374 Lafayette Street,
Marianna, FL 32446
Marianna Chapel Funer-
al Home is in charge of ar-
rangements. Condolences
may be expressed online at
www.mariannachapelfh.co
m.
Lankford Funeral Home
220 E. New York Ave.
DeLand, FL 32724
(386) 734-2244


legine Rowe
Streetman


Regine Rowe Streetman,
88, of DeLand, passed away
peacefully on January 2,
2012 at Majestic Oaks, John
Knox Village, Orange City.
Born September 24, 1923 in
Chipley, she graduated
from Marianna High
School in June of 1941. She
married J.P. (Streety)
Streetman on November 6,
1941. They were married
for 39 years before he


passed away in 1980. She
was a mother and home-
maker in Marianna for
many years and very active
in Junior Woman's Club. A
member of First Methodist
Church of Mariannd, she
worked as medical secreta-
ry to Dr. James T. Cook
from 1960- 1964. Moving to
DeLand in August of 1964
she began working at
DeLand State Bank in Au-
gust of 1964 as a reception-
ist. She worked throughout
the transition from DeLand
State Bank to -Sun
Bank/SunTrust and retired
in 1993 at age 70, holding
the title of Executive Vice
President., Her passion in
retirement was her grand-
children and traveling.
In addition to her hus-
band, she was preceded in
death by her parents, Ruth
Jones Rowe and Charles
Dewey Rowe.
She is survived by her
two children, Patricia S.
Baldauff (Jim) of DeLand,
FL and James P. Streetman
III (Amy) of Madison, MS;
her two grandchildren, Da-
vid Malone Baldauff of
DeLand and Regine Louise
Baldauff of Norcross, GA.
There will be a visitation
at Lankford Funeral Home
on Thursday, January 5,
2012 from 6:00 pm 8:00
pm. Graveside services will
be held at Pine Crest Me-
morial Gardens in Marian-
na, on Saturday,.anuary 7,
2012 at 11:00 am. In lieu of
flowers, contributions can
be made to the American
Heart Association or to
Journey's End Animal
Sanctuary, P.O. Box
220163, Glenwood, FL
32722-0163. You may share
your memories with the
family at www.lankfordfun
eralhome.com. Lankford
Funeral Home in DeLand is
in charge of arrangements.


FLORIDAN FILE PHOTO
Homer Hirt prepares ,to deliver his acceptance speech after
receiving the 2010 Citizen of the Year.


something extra to be con-
sidered, somethingbeyond
what's associated with your
business or profession," he
said. "You have to try some
new things, some different
things in your life to make
things better for the com-
munity. You have to be in-
terested in what happens
to other people. This might
be through volunteer work,
or some work they're do-
ing that makes it clear that
they want to have a part in
helping something worthy
succeed.
"The beauty of it is that,
when we reach into all
these nominations, we
reach into all aspects of
our society where people
are making a difference.
No two of us have the same
ideas and desires, but peo-
ple are doing some good
for their schools, their
government, and their
neighborhoods."
Hirt said he tried to re-
turn the honor bestowed
upon him.
"I appreciated the ones


any evidence."
Turner said he is the one
who informed city officials
that the saw was missing,
and that he had nothing to
do with its disappearance.
The saw turned up at
an area pawn shop, found
there by Alford Mayor
George Gay.
Turner was never ac-
cused of pawning the saw
himself, but of giving it to
someone in order to settle
a personal debt. Turner
said he did not do so. At
the time he was accused
of taking the saw, Turner
pointed out that the gate to
the city's equipment yard


that nominated me, be-
cause it was a wide range
of people," he said. "It was
a great honor. I decided
when I was chosen that I
would help represent the
Chamber wherever I could.
I went to ribbon cuttings,
the First Friday breakfasts,
because I don't think it
ends with being selected;
it's a beginning."
All nominations should
be submitted in writing
and in a sealed envelope
to the Chamber office by
5 p.m. on Jan. 19. Late en-
tries will not be accepted
or considered in the selec-
tion process. Nominations
may be hand delivered to
Jackson County Chamber
of Commerce, at the Russ.
House, located at 4318
Lafayette St. in Marianna,
or mailed to the Jackson
County Chamber of Com-
merce/Citizen of the Year,
P.O. Box 130, Marianna,
32447. For more informa-
tion, please contact the
Jackson County Chamber
of Commerce at 482-8060.


is unlocked during the day
so work crews have easy
access. That leaves it open
to entry by any number of
other people, he argued.
Turner said he may seek
recourse in civil court if the
city doesn't give him his
job back, but that he hopes
it doesn't come to that.
"I'd never had any write-
ups (any disciplinary ac-
tions taken by the city) up
to that point, and I feel like
I was done wrong from the
beginning of this, but (a
lawsuit) is not a route I re-
ally want to go. I really just
want my job back," Turner
said.


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Chipola Women


Lady Indians bounce back



with win over Daytona St.


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The No. 13 Chipola Lady Indians
bounced back from a disappointing
loss over the weekend with a 70-54
win over Daytona State on Monday
night in Marianna.
With the win, the Lady Indians moved
to 14-4 on the season, and will make
their Panhandle Conference debut
Saturday when they travel to Tallahas-
see to take on the TCC Lady Eagles.
Chipola was coming off of a 64-
53 loss to South Georgia Tech, and
it looked early in the second half as
though a second straight defeat might


"It was a good win to get going in
the right direction somewhat."
David Lane,
Lady Indians coach

be in the cards.
The Lady Indians jumped out to a
16-2 lead to start the game, but Day-
tona State fought back to take a 30-29
halftime lead, and then extended the
advantage to 37-29 with a quick 7-0
run.
Daytona State maintained a 45-40
edge midway through the second
half, but Chipola responded with an


8-2 spurt to go up by one and then
stretched the lead out from there.
"It was a good win to get going in
the right direction somewhat," Lady
Indians coach David Lane said after
the game. "We played really well for
the first 10.minutes, and then we were
just horrible for the next 20 minutes.
We started playing better with about
10 minutes left in the second half. We
played much better defense."
Sara Djassi had 15 points to lead
Chipola, and Lane said that the sopho-
more forward's recent play has been
encouraging.
See WOMEN, Page 2B


Denaya Brazzle makes a pass for Chipola against
Monroe.


CHIPOLA MEN




Marquee matchup


Jason Carter looks for a path to the goal for Chipola during a recent game.


Chipola heads to TCC

for Panhandle opener
BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com
The No. 6 Chipola Indians will make
their first foray into Panhandle Con-
ference play Saturday for one of the


marquee matchups on the league
schedule, as they travel to Tallahassee
to take on the, defending state cham-
pion Eagles.
The Indians (16-1) are the defend-
ing conference champions, but it was
the Eagles (12-4) that emerged with
the state crown and a trip to the NJ-
CAA tournament after ending Chipo-
la's season with a 61-52 victory in the


state final.
From that team the Eagles return
three. regulars in guards Christian
Farmer and Marterrace Brock and
forward Leek Leek.
Farmer is second on the team in scor-
ing at 11.5 points per game and is one
of the best shooters in the country,

See MATCHUP, Page 2B


Wrestling


Marianna


focused on


February
BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

After three weeks off, the Marianna
Bulldogs wrestling team will get back
into action Saturday in the Timber-
wolf Duals at
Chiles High Follow us on
School. Twitter
Marianna
most recently
competed at
the Beast Of
The Beach in
Fort Walton
Beach on Dec. --
16-17, and CFSpo
just returned
to practice Monday in preparation
of this weekend's eight-team dual
meet.
Bulldogs coach Ron Thoreson said
it will be tough way for his team to
return to the mat after an extended
break.
"It's going to be a real good chal-
lenge for us, no doubt," he said. "But
for where we are and the amount of
experience we have, I think we'll do
well. We're not going to beat a Chiles
or Lincoln, but we can compete and
we'll win some matches.
"All we're really looking for is tough
matches to get them ready for the
district tournament."
While the break may have added
a bit of rust, it also provided the
Bulldogs with an opportunity to get
healthy, with junior 113-pounder
Tyler Helms and senior 170-pounder
Dalton Hendrix both returning from
injuries to compete Saturday.
Cole Thoreson, who competes
at 106, will still be out another two
weeks with'a shoulder injury, ac-
cording to the coach.
But the return of Helms and Hen-
drix could provide a big boost for the
Bulldogs.

See WRESTLING, Page 2B


Cottondale Girls Basketball


Lady Hornets look to


rebound against Bethlehem


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Kendriece Gardner goes for two for during a recent game for Cottondale.
p.. *'JI


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

After a tough week, the Cot-
tondale Lady Hornets will return
to the court Thursday when they
travel to Bethlehem to take on
the LadyWildcats.
Cottondale will try to bounce
back from an 0-3 showing last
week at the Marlin Classic at
Arnold High School in which
the. Lady Hornets took on big-
ger schools, including 5A Arnold
and 6A Tate.
They didn't come away with
any wins, but CHS coach Shan
Pittman said she hopes that her
Lady Hornets came out a better
team.
"I feel like we did get better,"
she said. "We rebounded better,
and we were able to execute our
offense a little better.
"But it gave the girls the oppor-
tunity to see a different type of


"We saw some real size and some Division-Iplayers, so they
should have no fear the rest of the way because we won't see
any competition like this in the playoff if we're able to make it
out of district."
Shan Pittman,
Cottondale coach


player than they're used to see-
ing around here. We saw some
real size and some Division-I
players, so they should have no
fear the rest of the way because
we won't see any competition
like this in the playoffs if we're
able to make it out of district."
Cottondale will return to dis-
trict play Monday with a road
game against undefeated Ponce
De Leon, but before that the Lady
Indians will take on a Bethlehem
team they have beaten twice this
year, once by double figures in a
preseason classic, and again in a
regular season game on Nov. 21


by eight points.
"It is tough (beating a team
three straight times), especially
when the games are somewhat
close," Pittman said.
"The biggest thing for us is al-
ways size. We don't have much
size and they do. We need to play
real aggressive. I hope the tour-
ney gave us some momentum
going in."
If Thursday's game will be
tough, Monday's will be a bear
against a Lady Pirates team that
hasn't been seriously challenged
See COTTONDALE, Page 2BL


,r


sa








12B WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 4, 2012


Matchup
From Page 1B
converting 42 percent of his 3-point
attempts.
Leek is third on the team 10.4
points per night, and tied for the
team lead in rebounding at 4.8 per
game, while Brock is fifth in scor-
ing (6.5 ppg), first in steals (1.4) and
second in assists (2.1).
"Obviously they're the reigning
state champions and they return
three of their five starters from last
year," Chipola coach Jake Headrick
said. "All three of those guys have
played a lot in the league. They're all
Experienced guys, and I think that's
the key to their team."
The Eagles also had three sig-
.nificant additions in Southern Miss
*transfer point guard Kody Williams,
who leads the team in assists at 4.6
per game, freshman forward CJ
,Washington, who leads the team in
scoring at 13.1 ppg, and 7-foot tall
center Deng Leek, who averages
nearly two blocks per game.
Freshman forward Joell Hopkins
has also contributed seven points


Wrestling
From Page 1B
"This helps us out tremendously,"
the MHS coach said. "We got beat
up pretty bad at the Beast Of The
Beach, so I hope this will make us
better. We've got solid kids coming
back, but I don't want to discount
what the younger kids with less ex-
perience have done. They did a good
job as well."
Injuries have bugged the Bulldogs
much of the season, but improved
health and solid performances in
the next three events could give the
team needed momentum heading
into the Feb. 4 district meet.
A district championship was the
primary goal at the beginning of


Women
From Page 1B
"She's really starting to play well.
These last two games, she has played
very well and gotten back to what
she was like in the summer and in
September," the coach said.
Jelleah Sidney also added 13 points
for Chipola and Jeniece Johnson had
eight.
It was still an uneven performance
by the Lady Indians, who again had


SPORTS


per game on 57 percent shooting
from the field.
Tallahassee hassuffered losses to
Daytona State, Gordon College, and
twice to Santa Fe, but the Eagles have
won six of their last seven games
coming in.
Chipola has lost just once, falling
to Santa Fe on Dec. 17 in Winter Ha-
ven, but Headrick said he knows that
this will be one of his team's toughest
games all year.
"I tell our kids that the hardest thing
to do is go win a true road game in
college basketball," he said. "We've
played a lot of road games this year,
but this is probably the first time
we'll be in a hostile environment.
Tallahassee has a lot of guys back
from last year that are good players,
so we have to have an understanding
of how tough of a game this is going
to be."
The teams split the regularseason
match-ups last year, with each team
winning in the other's home gym.
Headrick said a win at TCC to
start this year's conference schedule
would be a big boost for his team.
"It would be huge for us, and it's
something I feel like we've got to do,"


the season, and Thoreson said he
believes his team is fully capable of
making that dream a reality.
"I feel 100 percent confident with
the kids we have going into dis-
trict that we have the ability to win
it," he said. "It comes down to the
want-to and the attitude. I believe
they can do it this year. I believe it
with all my heart. I think we're one
of the top two or three teams in the
district right now with South Waltdn
and Bozeman. We just need to stay
healthy."
Before they get to district, the Bull-
dogs will host the Panhandle Duals
on Jan. 14 and finish up the regular
season with the Panhandle Cham-
pionship at Mosley High School on
Jan. 20-21.
Between now and Feb. 4, Thore-


trouble taking care of the basketball
after a 26-turnover performance
.against South Georgia Tech.
"Our offense was horrible in the
first half," Lane said. "We just turned
the ball over too much:It's two games
in a row now that we've been worse
than usual with our turnovers."
The coach said that's a problem his
team will need to solve quickly if it's
going to compete for a conference
title.
"I think the physical and mental
mistakes that we're making are cor-


he said. "You want to set the tone
with the first game. For us, nothing
would be better than opening up on
the road with a win, especially at a
place like TCC."
To do that, the coach said that
his team which has only one
player in Aishon White who has
played in the Panhandle Conference
- would need to have maximum
focus and mental toughness come
Saturday.
"We've got to mentally be prepared
when we walk into that gym, and
we've got to understand that for us
to win that game, our guys have to
be locked in on the scouting report,
locked in on executing what we're
trying to do, and then get out there
and give it all we've got," he said.
"We've got to focus on our identity,
which is defending, playing hard and
playing with toughness every pos-
session. (TCC coach Eddie Barnes)
always does a good job of having
his teams ready to go, and they don't
beat themselves. We've got to beat
them because they won't make many
mistakes and they'll defend every
possession. It will be about which
team imposes its will on the game."


son said the team simply needed to
get better every day and continue
to gain strength through these next
three meets.
"We just need to keep working on
the basics, keep a positive attitude,
and stay focused in the right direc-
tion," the coach said. "Everything we
do now counts. Everything up to this
point in terms of mat time experi-
ence and working out the kinks has
been about getting the kids ready
for February for district, regionals
and state. That's what counts for
wrestlers.
"From a mental mindset, you can
go 50-0 during the season and then
go to the district tournament and
lose twice, and then your season is
done. We've been really focused on
making February count."


rectable. You just hope that the light
clicks with some of these bad passes
we're making," he said. "We're trying
to make these phenomenal plays in-
stead of making the simple ones.
"But if we can limit our turnovers,
we'll be really tough to play because
we're guarding well and we're getting
good looks offensively and we've got
some kids who can score."
Chipola will take on TCC on Satur-
day before returning home Tuesday
to take on Northwest Florida State at
5:30 p.m.


AP source: Barfield new IndyCar race director


Press conference
scheduled for today

The Associated Press

The IndyCar Series has selected
Beaux Barfield as its new director
for racing, according to a person fa-
miliar with the hiring.
Barfield will be introduced during
a news conference today at India-
napolis Motor Speedway, the per-
son told the Associated Press on the
condition of anonymity because the
formal announcement has yet to be
made.
He replaces Brian Barnhart, who
lost race control responsibilities last
month.
Barfield spent the last four years
as race director of ALMS sports car
series and was the race steward for
the now-defunct Champ Car Series
from 2003-2007. He then moved to


the Formula Atlantic Series for two
seasons and then ALMS. A former
race car driver, IndyLights Series was
his highest level of competition.
Barfield will oversee a reworking
of IndyCar's rule book. Although
Barnhart was criticized by drivers
for alleged arbitrary calls, the re-
laxed rule book contributed to the
inconsistencies.
IndyCar CEO Randy Bernard had
been searching for a new race direc-
tor since relieving Barnhart of his
duties after a dramatic 2011 season.
Barnhart was under fire most of
the season after a handful of deci-
sions cost him the respect of the
drivers. In two very public incidents,
Will Power was caught on live televi-
sion making an obscene gesture to-
ward the race control tower at New
Hampshire, and Helio Castroneves
called Barnhart a "circus clown" in a
Twitter rant.
Power was furious when Barnhart


decided to resume racing at New
Hampshire despite driver protests
it was raining too hard. The slick
conditions 'caused a crash on the
restart that collected Power, who
infamously flashed his two middle
fingers toward Barnhart.
Barnhart admitted his error after
the race "You're just kind of sick
to your stomach and realize it was
an error on race control's standpoint
and, clearly, my fault," he said but
he was lampooned for the call and
never restored his credibility.
About six weeks later, three-time
Indianapolis 500 winner Castro-.
neves took to Twitter to vent about
Barnhart penalizing him for pass-
ing under yellow in Japan. He com-
plained Barnhart was inconsistent
in penalizing some drivers and not
others, changed the rule book when
it was convenient and blamed Barn-
hart for "bringing down an entire
series."


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com



Spanos keeps


Turner, Smith



for 2012


The Associated Press

SAN DIEGO San Di-
ego Chargers President
Dean Spanos didn't feel
he had to issue any ulti-
matums when he made
the unpopular decision
to bring back coach Norv
Turner and general man-
ager A.J. Smith despite
the team missing the
playoffs for the second
straight season.
"Everybody knows in
this business that you've
got to win. OK?" Spanos
said Tuesday. "That's the
net bottom line. You don't
have to say that."
The Chargers haven't
been winning enough
Lately, which is why
Spanos was forced to de-
' cide the future of his top
football men. The Char-
gers are 17-16 since the
end of the 2009 season,
including an embarrass-
ing home playoff loss
to the New York Jets in
January 2010 that was the
Chargers' last postseason
appearance.
San Diego went 4-1 at
the beginning and end of
this season but was un-
done by a six-game losing
streak in the middle. One
more win would have
earned the Chargers (8-8)
the title in the mediocre


AFCWest.
Feeling that he has a
good team with a mar-
quee quarterback in Phil-
ip Rivers, "Keeping this
intact gives us the best
chance to win and change
this thing as quickly as
possible," Spanos said.
Spanos said he was
heartened by the play-
ers' response to Turner in
winning four of five down
the stretch. The one loss,
though, a rout at Detroit,
eliminated the Bolts from
playoff contention.
"I was confident that
I had a good chance to
stay here," said Turner,
who has two years left on
his contract, at $3 million
a season.
Turner has a 49-31
regular-season record
in five years in San Di-
ego but is only 3-3 in the
playoffs.
"I would expect we'd
have to make the play-
offs" to stay employed,
Turner said. "If we man-
age things right and have
some good fortune, I
imagine we will."
Turner was an unpopu-
lar hire in February 2007
after Marty Schotten-
heimer was fired follow-
ing a 14-2 season and
a home playoff pratfall
against New England.


The Associated Press

DAVIE Jeff Fisher has
completed an interview
for the Miami Dolphins'
head coaching job.
Fisher departed the
team's complex at mid-
afternoon Tuesday the
same way he arrived
- via owner Stephen
Ross' helicopter. The Dol-
phins then confirmed the
visit.
He's believed to be the
Dolphins' top choice, and
Ross is willing to pay big


Cottondale

From Page 1B
so far and has won ev-
ery game by double
digits.
Cottondale is currently
at '4-1 in District 3-1A,
good for sole posses-
sion of second place be-
hind PDL and ahead of
Graceville, which is just a
game out.
Pittman said it would
be nice to pull the upset
Monday and pull even
with PDL, but in the


money, but competition
from other NFL teams
may be fierce.
The Buccaneers and
Rams fired their coaches
on Monday, increasing
to five the number of top
vacancies. The Rams'
vice president and chief
operating officer, Kevin
Demoff, happens to be
the son of Fisher's agent,
Marvin Demoff.
Fisher coached the
Titans franchise for 17
years and led Tennessee
to the 2000 Super Bowl.


grand scheme of things, a
No. 2 seed in the district
tournament which
would mean avoiding
the Lady Pirates until the
district tournament title
game would be a nice
consolation.
"It's important for us to
maintain that two-seed,"
the coach said. "That's
the goal right now. It
would be great to be No.
1, but realistically, No. 2
would be great. We just
need to reduce the num-
ber of turnovers and take
care of the ball better."


Sports Briefs


High School Boys
Basketball
Friday Graceville at
Cottondale, 6 and 7:30
p.m.; Malone at Poplar
Springs, 6, and 7:30 p.m.;
Sneads atVernon, 5:30
p.m.; Marianna at Pen-
sacola Catholic, 6 and 7:30
p.m.

High School Girls
Basketball
Thursday Chipley at
Malone, 4:30 and 5:30
p.m.; Cottondale at Beth-
lehem, 6 and 7:30 p.m.
Friday Pensacola
Catholic at Marianna, 5:30
p.m., and 7 p.m.; Holmes
County at Graceville, 6
p.m.; Sneads atVernon,
4 p.m.; Malone at Poplar
Springs, 3:30 and 4:30 p.m.


Chipola Basketball
The Chipola men's and
women's basketball teams
will open up Panhandle
I.


Conference play Saturday
in Tallahassee against the
TCC Eagles.
The women will tip at
5:30 p.m., with the men to
follow at 7:30 p.m.


Chipola Softball
Camp
Area softball players
will have the once-in-a-
lifetime chance to work
with world-class softball
players Charlotte Morgan
and Kelsi Dunne at the
Chipola College Softball
field from Jan. 20-22.
There will be a hitting
instruction session on Jan.
21 for$100, and a pitching
session on Jan. 22 for $100.
There will be a home run
derby on Jan. 21 for $20
per person, and a ban-
quet withthe players on
the same day for $30 per
person.
An all-inclusive three
day camp with hitting and
pitching sessions, addi-
tional instruction, Ban-


quet, Home Run Derby,
lodging and food is $350.
Deadline to Register is
Jan. 6.
For additional informa-
tion, visit www.chipo-
laathletics.com or call
coach Belinda Hendrix at
718-2358 or coach Kelly
Brookins at 718-2468.


Kids'Christian
Basketball League
Upward Sports, a Chris-
tian sports league for chil-
dren, is coming to Victory
Baptist Church in Sneads.


Upward Sports teaches
sport fundamentals in an
environment of healthy
competition, helping kids
to develop skills for the
sports arena and values
for life. Victory Baptist
Church offers basketball
for kids pre-K-4 to sixth
grade.
The deadline to register
is Jan. 16, which is the
first week of practices.
Interested parties should
contact Victory Baptist
Church today at 850-593-
6699 for more information
or to register.


Sports Items
Send all sports items to editorial@
jcfloridan.com, or fax them to 850-
482-4478. The mailing address is
Jackson County Floridan P.O. Box
520 Marianna, FL 32447.


JCFLORIDAN..COM


Fisher interviews


for Dolphins job


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SPORTS


Injuries test Steelers' depth as Broncos loom


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE
Pittsburgh Steelers free safety Ryan Clark (25) throws his shoe
to the fans following a game against the Cincinnati Bengals
Dec. 4, in Pittsburgh.


Beckham set to stay with IA Galaxy


M y
IHE -'::ii:lT|l fI : 14 W 1-11-F
This Nov. 20, photo shows Los Angeles Galaxy midfielder David
Beckham (center) as he holds .up the MLS Cup after they won
their match against the Houston Dynamo in Carson, Calif.


6:00 6:30 17:00 17:30 18:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:0010:3011:00111:30l12:00112:30 1:00 1:30 2:00 2:30


--


JANUARY 4, 2012
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45 CNN (5:00) American Morning (N) B CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) The Situation Room With Wolf BlItzer (N) John King, USA (N)
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WEDNESDAY EVENING / LATE NIGHT JANUARY 4,2012
6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00110:30111:00011:3 2:0012:30 1:o00 1:30 2:00 2:30 3:00 13:30 4:00 4:30 5:00 5:30
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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Tomlin did the same this time
around, pointing to the inherent
dangers involved and the capability
of backup Ryan Mundy.
Clark did not speak to reporters
on Tuesday but thanked fans for
their concern through his Twitter
account.
"I will not be playing. Glad that it's
out now. So no more questions to
ask," Clark tweeted.
Clark's teammates urged the 10-
year veteran to sit out, with defen-
sive end Brett Keisel and linebacker
James Farrior both insisting the
game isn't more important than
Clark's life.
Mundy, who has two career starts
on his resume, will get the call in
place of Clark. The former West Vir-
ginia star has played well in spot
duty and collected his first career in-
terception in a win at Kansas City in
late November.
"In a nutshell, he's starter capable,"
Tomlin said.
Veterans Will Allen and Bryant Mc-
Fadden could also see spot duty if
Mundy falters.
The Broncos (8-8) have struggled
throwing the ball with quarterback
Tim Tebow, finishing 31st in the


league in passing yards.
Yet Tomlin remains wary, pointing
to Tebow's ability to come through
in pressure situations, but believes
Mundy can be effective with Clark
watching in street clothes.
The Steelers should get a boost
from the return of linebacker LaMarr
Woodley, who has spent the second
half of the season dealing with a
strained left hamstring. Woodley is
expected to play as is starting left
guard Doug Legursky, who missed
last week's game with a left shoulder
injury.
While Clark will be missed, at
least he'll be back if the Steelers ad-
vance. The same can't be said for
running back Rashard Mendenhall,
who is out for the entire postsea-
son after tearing the ACL in his right
knee in Sunday's 13-9 victory over
Cleveland.
Isaac Redman and rookie John
Clay will get the first crack at re-
placing Mendenhall. Veteran
Mewelde Moore could be available
as he recovers from a sprained left
knee but Tomlin wouldn't specu-
late on if he would use Moore a
third-down back in a feature
role.


The Associated Press

PITTSBURGH Steelers coach
Mike Tomlin knows safety Ryan Clark
wants to play in Denver on Sunday
when the Steelers take on the Bron-
cos in the wild card round.
It's why Tomlin didn't give Clark
the option.
The Steelers (12-4) will begin their
quest for a second straight AFC title
without Clark, who will be held out
of the lineup as a precaution due
to a sickle-cell trait that becomes
aggravated when playing at higher
elevations.
Tomlin and Clark met Monday to
discuss the situation, with Tomlin
telling the team's leading tackler he
can travel but not suit up. '
"Looking at data and all the vari-
ables he is at more risk, so we're not
going to play him," Tomlin said. "It's
just that simple."
Clark nearly died in 2007 when
the condition first presented itself,
losing his spleen and gall bladder
in addition to losing 30 pounds. He
was cleared by team doctors to play
in Denver during Pittsburgh's last
trip out west in 2009 before Tomlin
intervened.


first MLS Cup in November. He
was wooed by several clubs across
Europe.
"David Beckham is (with) Los An-
geles," al-Khelaifi said. "And he's go-
ing to stay there." '
Beckham will try to finalize a new,
improved rolling one-year contract
this week with the Galaxy, which was
paying him an annual base salary of
$6.5 million.
French media had reported that
Beckham would have been paid al-
most double that at PSG, whose Qa-
tari owners have spent more than
$100 million on players during six
months in charge.
Beckham and wife Victoria, a for-
mer member of the "Spice Girls,"
moved to California in 2007 after
four years at Real Madrid.


The celebrity couple now have
four children and decided during
a Christmas break in England that
they did not want to move back to
Europe permanently.
"I'm very proud of the time that
I've spent with the Galaxy and it
might continue," Beckham stressed
recently.
The Galaxy's recent success and
the signing of Ireland captain Rob-
bie Keane have shown Beckham that
the LA club can meet his ambitions
during the final years of his career,
which began at Manchester United.
Beckham is also a regular starter
with the Galaxy, whose new season
begins in March. He has expressed
hope of playing for Britain's football
team at the London Olympics as one
of three players above the age of 23.


The Associated Press .

DOHA, Qatar David Beckham is
set to stay with the Los Angeles Gal-
axy after turning down a chance to
join Paris Saint-Germain, the French
club said Tuesday.
After weeks of negotiations with
PSG, the 36-year-old midfielder and
former England captain decided he
doesn't want to move his family from
the United States.
"David Beckham is not coming,"
PSG President Nasser al-Khelaifi
said at the Qatar Open tennis tour-
nament. "We feel a little disappoint-
ed. But both.sides agreed it would
be better that we not do the deal ...
maybe in the future."
Beckham's five-year contract with
the Galaxy ended after he won his


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Orange Bowl


West Virginia worried


about Clemson's Davis


The Associated Press

MIAMI When Sam-
my Watkins first arrived
on Clemson's campus last
summer and reported
for a workout with other
incoming freshman re-
ceivers, quarterback Tajh
Boyd sent him out for a
pass.
"I told him to run a
post route, and I threw it
and thought I overthrew
him," Boyd said.
"But his speed was so
ridiculous. I was like, 'It
doesn't get any better
than that.'"
That completion of-
fered a hint of things
to come in the ensuing
months. Watkins set a
school record with 1,153
yards receiving, was
chosen a first-team All-
American and helped
the Tigers earn their first
major bowl berth in 30
years.
Clemson (10-3) will
face West Virginia (9-3)
in a chilly Orange Bowl
on Wednesday night,
and Watkins is the player
who most concerns the
Mountaineers.
"Clemson's offense runs
through Sammy," defen-
sive back Eain Smith said.
"You eliminate Sammy's
big plays, you eliminate
their offense."
Well, not entirely. Boyd
set school records for
yards passing, passing
touchdowns and total
offense. First-team All-
American Dwayne Allen
won the John Mackey
Award as the nation's top
tight end. Andre Elling-
ton has rushed for 1,062
yards and 10 scores.
But everyone agrees the
18-year-old Watkins was
the primary catalyst for a
team that scored at least


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE
Clemson's Sammy Watkins
is shown against Georgia
Tech on Oct.29.


CLEMSON (10-3) VS.
WEST VIRGINIA (9-3)
Orange Bowl
7 p.m.; TV: ESPN


35.points eight times. His
first touchdown came 26
seconds into the season,
and he finished the year
with 12 scores, 77 recep-
tions, 229 yards rushing
and a kickoff return aver-
age of 26.3.
He became only the
third true freshman to be
selected a first-team All-
American, joining Her-
schel Walker and Adrian
Peterson.
'"Somebody had bet-
ter check his birth cer-
tificate," Allen said, "be-
cause there's no way this
kid is 18."
The Tigers plan a fea-
ture role for Watkins in
what should be another
high-scoring bowl game.
The forecast 'calls for


temperatures in the 50s
at kickoff, but Clemson
and West Virginia still
are likely to heat up the
scoreboard, because
both teams are potent on
offense and suspect on
defense.
The Mountaineers'
Geno Smith has thrown
for 3,978 yards this sea-
son. His inviting targets
include Stedman Bailey,
who set a school record
with 1,197 yards receiv-
ing, and third-team All-
American Tavon Austin,
who set another school
record with 89 receptions
and ranked No. 2 nation-
ally in all-purpose yards.
per game.
Both teams will have
plenty of support from
friends and family, be-
cause both recruit heavily
in Florida. Watkins grew
up across Alligator Alley
in Fort Myers and will be
matched against a former
high school teammate,
defensive back Brodrick
Jenkins.
Watkins crossed paths
with Jenkins back home
over the holidays.
"The first thing he said
to me is, 'You better get
ready,'" Jenkins said. "I
said, 'Bring it.'"
The older Jenkins
played both receiver and
defensive back in high
school and served as
a sort of big brother to
Watkins.
"I wanted to be like
him," Watkins said.
"Coach always talked
about him, and I fol-
lowed him. But in high
school I even got better
than him. Actually I got
way better than him at
my position."
Jenkins doesn't dispute
it: "I knew he was going
to be special."


Fiesta Bowl


A dejected Stanford quarterback Andrew Luck (12) walks off the field amid Oklahoma State
celebration after the Fiesta Bowl on Monday in Glendale, Ariz.



Worthy of the title?


Cowboys make
strong case after
beating Stanford

The Associated Press

GLENDALE, Ariz.
- Oklahoma State has
its chance to be in the
national-championship
conversation.
All the Cowboys need
now is a little help from
Alabama.
Surviving a missed field
goal at the end of regula-
tion and getting a big kick
Sof its own in overtime, No.
3 Oklahoma State opened
the door for the chance at
a split national champi-
onship with a wildly en-
tertaining 41-38 win over
No. 4 Stanford on Monday
night.
"There is nothing we can
do from here," said Okla-
homa State receiver Justin
Blackmon, who tied the Fi-
esta Bowl record with three
touchdown catches. "I do
think we do have the best
team in the nation."
Oklahoma' State (12-1)


(t)

OKLAHOMA STATE 41,
STANFORD 38, OT
Fiesta Bowl Late Monday
kept pace with Andrew
Luck and the high-scor-
ing Cardinal, getting huge
performances from its two
stars, Brandon Weeden
and Blackmon, in their fi-
nal college game. Weeden
threw for 399 yards and the
three touchdowns to Black-
mon, who announced he's
leaving for the NFL after
catching eight passes for
186 yards.
All that and the Cowboys'
fortunes came down to two
legs, those of Stanford kick-
er Jordan Williamson and
their own Quinn Sharp.
Williamson couldn't
come through. The redshirt
freshman missed a 35-yard
field goal wide left as time
expired in regulation and
another from 43 yards to
open overtime.
Given a chip shot af-
ter Weeden hit Colton
Chelf on a 24-yard pass -


initially ruled a touchdown
but overturned on review
- Sharp came through,
sending his 22-yard field
goal through the uprights
and the Cowboys charging
onto the field.
Should Alabama knock
off top-ranked LSU in next
week's BCS championship
game, Oklahoma State
will be right there, ready to
stake its claim at being No.
1 in The Associated Press
poll.
"We feel like we could
beat anyone in the coun-
try,". Chelf said.
Stanford (11-2) had its
chances, but the Cardinal
just couldn't finish it off.
Luck calmly led Stanford
63 yards over the final 2:35
of regulation to set up a
chance at winning its sec-
ond BCS bowl game in two
years. Instead, Williamson
missed in regulation, again
in overtime and was left
sobbing in front of his lock-
er while his coaches and
teammates tried to shoul-
der some of the blame.
"In the end, we lost, and
I'm as much to blame as
anyone," Luck said.


Cotton Bowl


Arkansas' Wilson impresses in first go as starter


The Associated Press

FAYETTEVILLE, Ark.
- Tyler Wilson has tried
to reflect on his first sea-
son as Arkansas' start-
ing quarterback, one
that saw him go from un-
known to first-team All-
Southeastern Conference.
No matter how hard he
tries to enjoy and soak in
his own accomplishments,
however, Wilson keeps
coming back to the Razor-
backs' two losses this sea-
son- at No. 1 LSU and No.
2 Alabama.
The junior will have one
last chance to put those
setbacks behind him on
Friday night when No. 7 Ar-
kansas faces No. 11 Kansas
State in the Cotton Bowl.
The game will be played in
Cowboys Stadium, which
was also the site of what
turned out to be a coming-
out party of sorts for Wil-
son earlier this season a
42-38 comeback win for
the Razorbacks over Texas
A&M on Oct. 1.
Wilson threw for a


KANSAS STATE (10-2) VS.
ARKANSAS (10-2)
Cotton Boli
Friday, 7 p.m.; TV: Fox
school-record 510 yards in
that win, helping Arkan-
sas (10-2) rally from a 35-
17 halftime deficit. It was
the first time this season,
Wilson's first as the starter
after replacing Ryan Mal-
lett at quarterback, that he
made it a point to throw
the football downfield
rather than attempting
shorter, safer passes.
The performance also
came a week after the Ra-
zorbacks' first loss of the
season, a 38-14 defeat at
the hands of the Crimson
Tide after three easy non-
conference wins to open
the season.
That loss led to questions
from Arkansas' coaches
about the team's competi-
tiveness, and it prompted
Wilson to call the game a


Arkansas quarterback Tyler Wilson (8) celebrates the game-
winning touchdown against Texas A&M on Oct. 1.


"must win."
Behind Wilson, the Ra-
zorbacks did just that
against the Aggies be-
ginning a seven-game win-
ning streak that was only
snapped when Arkansas
ended its regular season
with a 41-17 loss against
the Tigers in Baton Rouge,
La.
It was a win that, by
Wilson's account, saved
Arkansas' season.
"We had been built up to
the Alabama game all year,
all summer," Wilson said.
"And we go down there and
get beat pretty good. If you
come to Dallas and you


take a loss there (against
Texas A&M), you go to 3-
2 and then you've got to
kind of work out of that as
opposed to being 4-1 and
headed for a good stretch.
"I think that was a key
game to get us 4-1 and
kind of get the ball mov-
ing and the team believing
we're a pretty good football
team."
The Razorbacks capital-
ized on that belief, with
Wilson leading the way. He
led the SEC with an aver-
age of 285.2 yards pass-
ing per game this season,
doing so despite facing
consistent pressure from


opposing defenses par-
ticularly early in the sea-
son as the Razorbacks' of-
fensive line broke in three
new starters.
Those early hits and
the fact Wilson kept getting
up from them served
Wilson well in the eyes of
his teammates.
"Tyler did a great job
at taking shots and get-
ting back up, standing in
the pocket and deliver-
ing the ball," Arkansas re-
ceiver Jarius Wright said.
"We couldn't have asked
for anything better from
Tyler."
Still, it's those two nag-
ging losses that remain
on Wilson's mind. And
no, it doesn't help that
they came against the two
teams playing for the BCS
national championship.
"You know, there's some
areas where I'd say 'Heck
yeah, I'm excited by what
happened this season,'
but there's also some areas
where you just say, 'We had
some chances to win it all
and accomplish our No. 1


goal,"' Wilson said. "And
we didn't get to achieve
that. So there's some kind
of frustration looking back
on it. But we accomplished
a lot of great things this
season."


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College Football Briefs


UNC's Fedora hires 8
assistant coaches
CHAPEL HILL, N.C.
- North Carolina coach
Larry Fedora is bringing
six members of his South-
ern Mississippi coaching
staff with him to the Atlan-
tic Coast Conference.
Offensive assistants
Blake Anderson, Walt Bell
and Chris Kapilovic will
join defensive assistants
Deke Adams, Dan Disch
and David Duggan with
Fedora in his first season
as head coach of the Tar
Heels. Fedora also hired
former Illinois defensive
coordinator Vic Koen-
ning as associate head
coach for defense. Koen-


ning served as the Illini's
interim coach for the
Fight Hunger Bowl victory
against UCLA after the
firing of Ron Zook.
In addition, Fedora hired
former Mississippi assis-
tant Gunter Brewer, who
worked at North Carolina
from 2000-04, as wide
receivers coach.

Akron hires former
NCSU coach
AKRON, Ohio Former
N.C. State coach Chuck
Amato is Akron's new
defensive coordinator.
New Akron coach Terry
Bowden named Amato
his associate head coach
Tuesday. The 65-year-old


Amato coached North
Carolina State, his alma
mater, from 2000-06,
posting a 49-37 record and
leading the Wolfpack to
five bowl games.


Bowden, hired last
month to turn around the
Zips, called Amato "an
exciting addition" to his
staff.
From wire reports


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


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NEA Crossword Puzzle


ACROSS
1 Short-
billed
marsh bird
6 Bats an
eyelash -
12Going
steady
14 More frilly
15 Put aside
for a while
16 They have
pseudopods
17 Drain
cleaner
18 Skip
stones
19 Extreme
happiness
21 Mark of
Zorro
230z. ortsp.
26Clingy
seedpod
27 Dixie
fighter
28 False
alarm
30Santa -
winds
31 Moon or
planet
32 Rubber
city
33 Skaters'
haunts
35 Octopus
defense
37Trigger's
rider


38 Par plus
one
39 Bridal
notice
word
40 Envir.
monitor
41 Stimpy's
al
42 Freud topic
43 Badges
44Ariz.
neighbor
46 Not pro
48 Withdraw
51 Make up
for
55 Upholstery
fabric
56 Daughters'
cousins
57 Dough
raisers
58 Kiddie ride
DOWN
1 Investor's
options
2 Go, team!
3 Put away
4 Skier Jean-
Claude -
5 Begrudge
6 Propeller
arm
7 Tibetan
monk
8 Swelling
reducer
(2 wds.)


Answer to Previous Puzzle


9 Tip of a
pen
10 Large
parrot
11 Mex.
gentlemen
13 Old coot
19 Kind of
college
20 Popsicle
flavor
22 aning
24 Having
blemishes
25 Regiments
26 Cutting
remark
27 Blushing
28 Quaff with
sushi
29 New Age
singer
34 Doghouses


stance
42 Odds'
opposite
43 Derive by
reasoning
45 Mark up for
revision
47 Never
heard --
48 Double
agent
49 Help-
wanted
abbr.
501040 pro
52 Biol. or
astron.
53 Startled
cry-
54 Mao
-tung


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


Horoscope
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) You'll take both pride
and pleasure engaging in
what needs to be done and
doing it well.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) You won't be content
with the way things are be-
ing done if you believe you
can do them better. Take it
upon yourself to make the
improvements you deem
to be necessary.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) Even if you feel that
doing things a different
way would benefit the
other guy more than it
would you, you'll do what
is best for the majority.
You wouldn't be content
otherwise. .
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
- If you need to make a few
extra bucks, focus on some
different ways to gain addi-
tional income. You'll come
up with something.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
-When you see that some-
thing isn't being properly
managed, volunteer your
services.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
- Regardless of how tough
the job in question, you'll
not hesitate to jump in and
take control.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
- You'll listen to what oth-
ers have to say but won't
embrace their suggestions
without first taking some
time to digest it. It you like
what you hear, you'll try it.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
- Although your financial
aspects look exceptionally
good, you will still have to
earn what's due you.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
- Whether you're selling,
teaching or merely con-
veying information, you'll
be exceptionally good at
getting your points across.
Any little morsel of wisdom
you offer will be helpful.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
- Although some unex-
pected changes could buf-
fet you about a bit, you'll
hold steady.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) Operating indepen-
dently of others would suit
you best, but that doesn't
mean you wouldn't do well
working with a group.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-
Dec. 21) It won't mat-
ter what is thrown at you,
you'll take things on and


Annie's Mailbox


Dear Annie: I have been married to
"Horace" for less than a year. This is his
second marriage. His prior marriage was
to his high school girlfriend, and they
have two children together.
I met Horace in my "partying" stage.
He, too, enjoyed going to the bars. He
actually did it quite a bit when he was
married. His ex-wife didn't enjoy going
out, so he went with his friends. When I
married Horace, I became a stepmother
and quickly learned life wasn't about
what I wanted anymore. I put Horace
and his children first.
We have the kids every other weekend.
Horace is a great father who loves to do
things with the children when they are
with us. But on weekends when we don't
have the kids, Horace still likes to go to
the bars. He would love it if I went along,
but I'm past that stage in my life. I enjoy
going out to movies, dinner and such,
but the bars don't interest me anymore.
I realize this is only twice a month, but
those are the only weekends we have
together without the children. I want


Horace to be with me, but I don't want
to force myself on him. When he asks
whether it's OK if he goes to the bars
without me, I always say it's fine.
Annie, am I overreacting, or does
Horace need to grow up and start being a
better husband? If this continues, I don't
want to have children with him, as it
means I'll be sitting at home with a baby
while he's off to the bars with his friends.
IOWA

Dear Iowa: Having children did change
Horace's behavior because he doesn't
go to the bars while the kids are visit-
ing. That means there is hope he will be
more circumspect when you have a child
at home all the time. Not every spouse
objects to an occasional night out with
friends.
You need to decide how many such
nights you can tolerate and whether Hor-
ace has a drinking problem or is prone
to cheat. If the two of you cannot reach
an agreement, please discuss it with a
counselor.


Bridge
Over North's garhe-invitational limit raise of North 1-4-12
three hearts, East might have risked a takeout 6 7 2
double. No doubt this would have persuaded Q 10 9
West to sacrifice in four spades, based on the
double fit in the black suits. Four spades dou- A J 10
bled would have cost only 200 points, West los- 4 K 8 5
ing one spade, one heart and two diamonds. West East
Admittedly, that would not look so good if Q 8 6 5 3 K J 10 4
West was going to lead a club against four
hearts. And to be honest, I think that is the
correct start. Against trump contracts, shorter 6 5 3 4 K 42
suits generate more tricks on average. 6 Q 9 6 2 4 A J 10 7
Suppose, though, that West does lead a low South
spade. What should happen? First, East, know- 4 A 9
ing his partner cannot have the spade ace,
should put in his 10, to find out who holds the A K 7 6 3
queen. Then, if South wins the trick, he should Q 9 8
go down. After trumps are drawn and the los- 4 4 3
ing diamond finesse taken, East leads his spade
four. West wins and shifts to the club two not Dealer: South
the queen in case South has the jack and must Vulnerable: Both
guess the suit. The defenders collect one dia-
mond, one spade and two clubs. South West North East
However, if South plays his spade nine at 1 Pass 3 V Pass
trick one, cutting the defenders' communica- 4 Pass Pass Pass
tions, he is safe. Later, declarer discards one
club loser on dummy's fourth diamond, losing Opening lead: A 5
only one trick in each side suit.


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and.present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: M equals U
"ZN LBPK FKBEGBT, XLVWNHK TNMW
F KBE S. O .. Y NWS K J.
"FXJZNWT XJ B WBOK SKZGKKA
KEMO-BZXNA BAE OBZBJZWNVFK."
- F.C. GKRRJ

Previous Solution: "As beautiful as simplicity is, it can become tradition that
stands in the way of exploration."- Laura Nyro
2012 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 1-4


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 4.2012 5B F










6 B Wednesday, January 4, 2012 Jackson County Floridan


CLASSIFIED


www.JCFLORIDAN.com


IREGRASS CLASSIFIED


BY PHONE: (850) 526-3614 or (800) 779-2557 BY MAIL: WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE
BY FAX: (850) 779-2557 P.O. BOX 520, MARIANNA, FL 32447
ONLINE: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM IN PERSON: 4403 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA.
Publication Policy Errors and Omissions: Advertisers should check their ad the first day. This publication shall not be liable for failure to publish an ad or for a typographic error or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the ad for the first day's
insertion. Adjustment for errors is limited to the cost of that portion of the ad wherein the error occurred. The advertiser agrees that the publisher shall not be liable for damages arising out of errors in advertisements beyond the amountpaid for the space
actually occupied by that portion of the advertisement in which the error occurred, whether such error is due to negligence of the publisher's employees or otherwise and there shall be no liability for non-insertion of any advertisement beyond the amount paid for
such advertisement. Display Ads are not guaranteed position. All advertising is subject to approval. Right is reserved to edit, reject, cancel or classify all ads under the appropriate classification:

[O@I6ISI~fUEO IUtESq1 IIt`AUS I[JrmnwI'


[ ANN OUNCEMENTS


ALMOST NEW CONSIGNMENTS
Women-Men-Kids-Maternity-Toys-Baby Stuff-
Formals. Let us sell your almost new stuff for
cash. Bring it to us anytime, any season.
We will tag & price your stuff or you can.
Call 334-677-SHOP "7467"
1656 Montgomery Hwy. Dothan. Inside RCC.
Uquidation Sale. Office & Rest. equip.- Collect-
ibles, custom cabinetry, gas wall heaters +
bldg + stuff left from renovations. Need to sell
this month. Call 850-526-3987 or 850-899-8601

if) MEFOCRAN ISE

Car Seats: (2) Pink Car Seats-$30 each. Excel-
lent condition. Call 850-557-8757.

i- WANTED SHOTGUN -1
BROWNING: 20 Gauge, made in Belgium.
Remington 1100: 20 Gauge.
Call 334-714-0105

Wanted: Old Coins, Gold,
Diamonds, Guns, And Tools
West Main Jewelry & Loan 334-671-1440.


A Baby Things Store %
SELL/BUY your things with us! New and
used toys, cribs, swings, walkers, formula,
Etc.. Also 30 day "u tag" 1330 Hartford Hwy
Suite 1, Dothan 334-794-6692
Email: babythingsstore@aol.com See all our
listings e Facebook Page-BabyThing s Store
"Like Us" for daily update.

rr

JERRY SEINFELD
in Panama City Feb. 10th
Cool date idea, 7PM show at Marina Civic
SCenter, two awesome second row stage
seats, $315, call 334-714-9819.




LOST: Male Gray Tabby/Tom Cat last seen on
Big Oak Dr & SR 69 in Greenwood 850-594-9905
oI.
AKC chocolate labs. One Male and 7 females.
Sire is Puddle Duck Too Tuff of Puddle Duck
Labs. Puppies are ready to go. $600.00 334-672-
0026 Carla.winborne@laybythedoor.com
Lab puppies; Chocolate and Blonde, cute and
cuddly. $200 each. 334-388-5617, 334-488-5000,
334-488-3979
LOST: Black Malteese mix, near Blondies in
Grand Ridge, 850-693-1421/573-3055
OOQ K Maltese puppy
L Female, White, 6 mos. old.
$450. Call 334-790-6146
T New Year's Babies Are Herel Tiny Chorkles
$250, Chl-a-poo $100. Imperial Shl-Tzu 5400,
Taking deposits on Yorkies & Yorkle-Poos
Older Puppies Available $100. 334-718-4886.
Rescued Golden Retriever Lab Mix 1 yr. old.
"Sugar",SWEET,Free 2 good home 334-792-6963



08' md#9996 John Deere 6-row cotton picker
982 eng. hrs. 624 fan hrs. Mud Hog, LMC Bowl
Buggy all exc. cond. kept under shed. Call;
Kendall Cooper 334-703-0978 or 334-775-3749
ext. 102,334-775-3423.


Classified


can sell it!


CALL


TODAY!


Plenty of Shelled
Peas, Collard,
Turnip, & Mustard
Greens And Other
Fresh Vegetables!!

All Farm

Fresh!

220 W. Hwy 52

Malvern

334-793-6690 *

r------- --- ------------A
m. Bahia seed for sale 4 s ;
Excellent germination Kendall Cooper
Call 334-703-0978, 334-775-3423,
or 334-775-3749 Ext. 102


Sem-Angus Cattle Vary In Ages; From Heiffers
to grown Cows 334-898-1626


A .A 5 -

EW,-Yg F/T Food Services
ofpGMy Director
for Christian Conference Center. Benefits
available. Must have 3-5 years in Food
Services exp. Must be able to handle cooking,.
ordering, meal planning as well as other.
managerial duties. Hrs will vary as we have
weekend groups as well as summer camps.
Apply in person to:
Blue Springs Baptist Conference Center
2650 Lakeshore Dr. in Marianna.
Call 850-526-3676 M-F 8-4.

Wednesday, January 4, 2012






0 T)

THE SUDOKU GAME IITH A KICK!

HOW TO PLAY
Fill in the 9x9 grid with the missing
numbers so that each column, row and
3x3 box contains the digits 1 9 only once.
There is only one correct solution
for each puzzle
GET MORE WASABI
PUZZLES ONLINEI
ARCHIVES AND MORE GREAT GAMES AT
BOXERJAM.COM


Analyst Marketing/Sales

The Alabama Newspaper Group of Media General is seeking a marketing professional
with strong organizational skills to take on the role as special projects coordinator/
Newspapers in Education coordinator.
This position requires a person who is proficient in Adobe InDesign, understands how to
effectively utilize new media platforms to effectively market and our products, grow
audience and help open new revenue streams. This person must be willing to learn new
skills and be eager to take on new tasks that challenge personal comfort zones and require
professional development. Two years of marketing/advertising experience is preferred.
Bachelor's Degree or equivalent in relevant experience in marketing and/or communication
required. A can-do attitude that focuses on goals and not obstacles a must.

Applicants should apply at @www.mediageneral.com





- 5- .:...
^L'01 aI


Advrtie yur"COO gL STUFF'l N'' '" frFE b iiin -'ordncm.Sest Je for details.


15" Tires & Wheels (4), for F150 $150
24" Magnovox TV w/remote $30 8 0


Antique Cash Register and it works. Early
1900's $300. Call 850-526-3987 Cash Only


Antique Electric Coffee Grinder. Holwick, 1915
Works. $275 850-415-1442
Aroma Warmer, PartyLite, exc. cond, wrought
iron, $7. 850-592-1288/ 850-693-0761
ATV Reese Sleeve, use for pulling wagon, etc.
Good cond. $7. 850-592-1288/ 850-693-0761
Baby Stroller, neutral color, $25 OBO 850-209-
6977/569-2705
Beauty shop shampoo bowl. CAST IRON. By
Belvedere. Good cond. $140 850-415-1442


Bookcases: 2 pine bookcases with roll top glass
sevlehs $250 Call 850-526-3987


Bookcases two leaded glass pine bookcases
w/roll too alass shelves, $250. 850-526-3987


Bottles collected old Soft Drink Bottles, + 3
old brown bottles (10), $125, 850-526-3987
Bottles: Collectible Soft Drink Bottles (old) Pep-
si, Dr. Pepper, etc. (7) $125. Call 850-526-3987
Buck Knives (2) model 112, 1w/sheath, both
from 1970's $25 each call 850-579-4650
Cash Register: Antique, and it works.Early
1900s. $300. Call 850-526-3987
Chairs two blue padded chairs, like new. $150
for both or $85 each. Cash Only. 850-526-3987
Clawfoot Bath Tub, needs refinishing,
$170 OBO 850-209-6977 before 5pm


Compound Miter saw, 10", 13amp motor
w/xtra blade $90 080 850-209-697 5


Desk: 2 pc. Computer Desk with Hutch. Beauti-
ful oc of furniture. $250 cash only. 850-526-3987


Desk/Hutch: 2 pc.lighted Oak Computer Desk
with Hutch. $250 cash only. 850-526-3987
Desk: Oak desk refinished. 5 drawers. Very.
nice. $125. 850-526-3987
Desk Oak desk refinished. 5 drawers. Very
nice. $125, Cash Only. 850-526-3987


Desk with 2 cabinets 1 drawer. abt 5 1/2'
ediw Cash only $50 850-526-3987


Dishes: New- red speck. plates, bowls, skillet,
sugar, creamer, teapot. $150. 850-526-3987


Dishes: plates, salad, soup bowls, skillet, sugar,
creamer, teapot. $150. 850-526-3987
Dresser, blonde in color, $25 850-592-2881
Entertainment Center White 48"Wx60"Hx20"D
Bargain Priced $50. 482-2636 Marianna
Guitar Electric Bass Gibson Epiphone EBO $325
OBO w/hardshell touring case. 850-482-6022
Guitar Electric Bass Gibson Epiphone EBO $325
OBO w/hardshell touring case. 850-482-6022
Heaters: 4 gas heaters, wall mount, will sell
separately. $400 for all. Call 850-526-3987
Heaters: 5 gas heaters, wall mount, like new.
$500 for all. Call 850-526-3987
Infrared Oven: NuWave with extender ring &
cookbook. Hardly used. $50. 850-592-8676.
Juicer: Jack LaLanne Power Juicer. Used twice.
Like New. $50. Call 850-592-8676.
Large Dog House, Any Color, Shingle Roof,
L Will Deliver. $135. 334-794-5780 Dothan
Pedestal Sink By Aqua Source. $90 NIB
850-415-1442
r- ------_-- --- -.----
Porch/Lawn Swing With Chains,
S Will Deliver. $95 334-794-5780 J
Table/chairs: Retro kitchen table, red with 4
matching chairs. $125. Call 850-526-3987
Table Retro/antique wooden kitchen table,
red w/4 matching chairs. $125, 850-526-3987
Tail lights: Mitsubishi Eclipse 96-99 OE. Only
$75 pair. 850-482-2636 Marianna
Toddler Car Seat, neutral color, $20 OBO 850-
209-6977/569-2705
Total Gym 1500: Used once. Like new. $150.
Call 850-592-8676.
Washer & Dryer: Kenmoore & Whirlpool, $125.
each 334-347-7576 looks runs new Enterprise
Washer & Dryer: Kenmoorb & Whirlpool, $125.
each 334-347-7576 looks runs new Enterprise
White 4-Thread Serger: Like new. Paid $250
Asking $75. 850-482-4428 or 526-8739
Window Regulators with motor for F150,(2) $60
for both 850-579-4650


__0)


@10 @


010


I


Tn


00@


P 2008 BLOCKDOT. INC WWW BLOCKDOT.COM


Tuesday's
WASABI SOLUTION
( I9 1 1 0 10 4 (

1 (D 25 7 4 9
6 2 4 3 59

I l -l I -. : :


I9 14 1 3 1 5r |C |110 8 )] 7 1

BE SURE TO VISIT OUR
NEWEST GAME SITE

K EWLBO .COM
KEWLBOX.COM


Fast, easy, no pressure
e a n 24 hours a day, 7 days a week!
\ Get live previews of your classified ads, receive price quotes
n and make secure online payments.

S \www.jcfloridan.com


1Im I


. .... ... ... .. . . .. ....~ -- ~~~


....... - --.. .. .


"wt~" .... ... . "T . . ... .. .. .. .. .


.. . ..... --' ... ... ....


* .; _= ;.


I I I








www..ICFLORIDAN.com


has grown rapidly by offering a high quality,
competitive product with excellent customer
service. Ice River Springs now operates
eight plants in North America. Each of these
facilities is dedicated to the community in
which it operates. We are now accepting
resume's for the following position in our
Marianna Florida facility:

Maintenance Technician
Electromechanical experience is required
SQualified candidates are invited to
submit their resumes via email to
hrmadanna@iceriversprings.com
We thank all applicants; however only those
selected for an interview will be contacted.
Ice River Springs is an EOE employer.


JAC KS N C U N T \

FLORIDAN

WE ARE LOOKING FOR
MATURE, DEPENDABLE,
BUSINESS MINDED
NEWSPAPER CARRIERS


Bascom
Earn an average of

$1,150
per month for approximately
3 hours at night.

Ask about our
$300
Sign on Bonus

BE YOUR OWN BOSS
1AM to 6 AM

Must have dependable
transportation, minimum
liability insurance & valid
driver's license.

Come by and fill out an
application at the
Jackson County Floridan,
4403 Constitution Lane,
Marianna, FL
HELTf'k', 'HCARE


CLASSIFIED


2BR/1BA Concrete block Rental in Marianna,
Tile floors, washer h/u, pets ok, $300/mo + $30
credit/bkgrnd ck. Additional houses and
apartments in Graceville 850-263-5753
4BR Brick home in Marianna, $650 + deposit.
No Pets, 1 year lease. 850-718-1165
Austin Tyler & Associates *
Quality Homes & Apartments
850- 526-3355 4
"Property Management Is Our ONLY Business"
Lovely 3BR 1BA House, Clean, in town, near
schools, nice yard, quiet neighborhood,
outdoor pets ok, $575/mo with deposit. I mo.
free with lyr lease. 850-482-6211/209-0188 4

2 & 3 bedroom mobile Homes in Cottondale.
$500 and up. H20, garbage, sewer included.
http:// www.charloscountry living. com.
850-258-4868/209-8847
2 & 3BR 2BA Mobile Homes in Cottondale no
pets, Central Heat & Air $400-$450 850-258-
1594 leave message
2&3BRMH's in
Marianna & Sneads (850)209-8595.
2BR 1BA MH, in Cottondale near Loves Trvl Ctr.
Quiet, $400/mo NO PETS, 850-352-2947


3BR 2BA MH in Marianna. $500/mo. Small pets
ok with deposit. 850-573-6307/482-5449


Jackson County Floridan Wednesday, January 4, 2012- 7 B


Lg 3/2 $625 Quiet, well maintained Park,
Water/sewer/ garb/lawn included. 2/1 Duplex,
Diana Ln. Near Citizens Lodge $495
Joyce Riley RE 850-209-7825 4
Rent to Own: 2 & 3BR Mobile Homes.
Lot rent included. Also available,
1 & 2BR Apts & Houses. For details
#850-557-3432 or 850-814-6515 -

RESIDENTIAL
A REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

Townhouse for Sale, Downtown Eufaula 2BD,
2.5BA, Well Taken Care of, Updated, Newer
Apple, W/D Hookup, Private Deck/Yard, Conven-
ient Shopping $ Dining, $115,000, 256-437-3768


4BR 2BA Home w/16 acres of land 10 acres of
which are farm land. Home has 2 living areas.
$150,000 or make offer. 850-569-2643
HOMS I RS


3/2 in quiet subdivision
on end lot with fenced in
T' backyard. Built in 2004,
1300 sq. ft. and only 6
miles to Northside Wal-Mart. New tile and car-
pet, ohe car garage $115,000. 850-373-5018.


RECREATION


Honda Foreman ES 4x4 Atv's. Two 2003 models.
Both have less than 125 hours. Both recently
serviced. Both excellent condition. $2,500 each
firm. Call 334-774-3737 between 8 am and 8 pm
FACTORnY D-

^^^^^^^^^^9' I' ^


Xtrem
Boa


Packages From
e $4,995
All Welded
1S All Aluminum Boats
www.x.p pindtrip.m .


I-I-IPAllCIiidLIm -I Ell


,. .5


RN
RN needed for an outpatient wound care
clinic. Wound care exp. a plus.
No nights/weekends.
Competitive salary and benefits.
Please fax resume to (888) 835-6946 or
email to jobsCawoundcarespecialists.com
( ) EDUCATION
& INSTRUCTION

= Make the New Year Count
with a quality education in
FORTIS Healthcare and Trades!
S Call Fortis College Today!
888-202-4813 or visit
www.fortiscollege.edu
COUL.IGE FFor Consumer information
www.Fortis.edu

(V"I RESIDENTIAL
REAL ESTATE FOR RENT

SOUTHSIDE APARTMENTS
Accepting Applications for 1 and 2 BR apts.
Must meet income requirements.
n* 850-526-4661 TDD 850-955-8771 4w
APARTMENTS UNFURNISH ED


1BR Duplex, 3145 A Redbud Lane, Blue Springs,
ceramic tile, DW, stove, frig, $500/mo 1 year
lease, small pets ok with $525 dep 850-693-0570
Iv msg.
2BR 1BA Duplex, 3153 B Redbud Lane, Blue
Springs, new carpet/ceramic tile, DW, stove,
frig, W/D hkup $590/mo 1 year lease, small
pets ok with $600 dep 850-693-0570 Iv msg.


Greenhouses
"""m: At
$1 4'0000
33 Years in Business
We M WE M AuE PniB BUILDS .




Grader Pan Excavator
Dump Truck Bulldozer
Demolition Grading Site Prep
* Debris Removal Retention Ponds Leveling
* Top Soil Fill Dirt Gravel Land Clearing





Shores Cabinet Shop, LLC
SPECIALIZING IN ALL WOOD CUSTOM BUILT
CABINETS & COUNTERTOP REPLACEMENT
Licensed Homebuilder
Call (850) 579-4428 Donnie Shores, Sr.
www.shorescabinets.com


4 Point Insurance Inspections
Wind Mitigation Inspections
Performed by JAMES GRANT
State Certified Building Code Administrator
State Certified Building Contractor
State Licensed Electrical Contractor



HAPPY
HOME REPAIR
WE'LL BEAT ANY PRICE!!'
Big Or Small Jobs WELCOME



~LEGMCALREPAW
& UPGRADES
Replace your old Electrical Service
with a New Service
QUAuTY WORK REACOmASLE PRICE Ql 1
JAMES GRANT LLC "" "O.


SiMell Xt!
3Emfind M Xe


BEST WAY
PORTABLE BUILDINGS
LARGEET MANuil. iuEn iOF Punia lt BUILDINGS IN NOkil FLlr111i
HAVE
S OVER
DIFFERENT SIZES!
YOU CAN CHOrOSE
COLOR & STYLE

3614 Hwy 90 Marianna, FL 850-8 8682



"Beautification of Your Home"
Carpentry/Painting Installations
Furniture Repair & Refinishing
General Repairs Insured


"QUALrrY SERVICE
FOR OVER 50 YEARS"
Charles Morse (850) 526-8445
Ben Morse (850) 573-1705
S Office (850) 482-3755
S 479 Hwr 7 IMAsL FL 2448
"Our prices WILL NOT shook you"


Find jobs


fast and


easy!


JACKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN

jcfloridan.com


Tnonsler"

FIND LOCAL JOBS AT: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM/JOBS


U U


Clean Out Your Kitchen

and Turn Extra Appliances

Into Cash.


Those appliances might be wasting your valuable cabinet
space, but chances are someone out there would love them. By
using the Classifieds, you'll make it easier for them to find,
and easier for you to sell. So try it today!


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN

(850) 526-3614 or (800) 779-2557


i m


.


--


L


X treme Packages4,995
Boats All Welded
Bats All Aluminum Boats
www.xtremeindustries.com
85-57-50 I ,F


I HtlL i1


Mw


I










8B Wednesday, January 4, 2012 Jackson County Floridan


MO- HM &*1AT FRA1


'03 Fleetwood Bounder35ft. satellite TV, full
sz. shower, washer & dryer combo, sleeps 6,
2-slide outs, 3300 miles $89,225. 334-983-1206.




Dodge Dually, Quad Cab.
6.7 Cummins eng, 2WD, 61K mi, Exc. cond. Both
for $45,000. Will sell together or separately.
334-303-9780 or 334-709-4230.

Dixie RV SuperStores
FL's Newest RV Dealer
NOW OPEN.!f
*Store Hours*
Monday-Saturday
8:00am-6:00pm

21 Acres / 30 Brands New and Pre-Owned
f Newmar W Keystone o Heartland a Jayco
SFleetwood e Prime Time s Coachmen
m Forest River

Service Department
Parts and Acces. Store
RV Collision Center

Located off 1-10 Exit 70 / SR285
328 Green Acres Dr.
De Funiak Springs, FL 32435
Sales and Service: 850-951-1000
www.dixierv.com DO 12756


SEA-DOO '03 GTX 4 TEC, Super Charge, 117
hrs., w/Triton Trailer, w/extra accessories
$3,200 334-616-7816




SChevy 1978 Nova
'95% Restored !
350-4 bolt main engine,
bearings, interior, CD play-
er, heater, hoses, brakes & booster, less than
300 mi., looks & runs great. Won different
awards. $13,000. OBO Call 334-791-6011


BMW '07 3281, 65K mi. Silver, 4-door,
FULLY'LOADED! $17,500 334-726-9500
Chevrolet Cobra RV
Class C Generator Low
Sales n Miles- Nice $4999.00
o 2180 Montgomery Hwy.
Call 334-714-0755.


Chevy '11 Aveo
LOW MILES, LIKE NEW!
$200 down, $249 per month.
Call: Ron Ellis at 334-714-0028.
Mercury '97 Cougar XR7: 30th Annivrsary.
One clean car! 93k miles, new motor @ 47k
due to intake recall, 4 wheel independent
suspension, 4 wheel disc brakes, 1 owner,
garage kept, wife driven.$4,500. Call 334-693-
3t2n nr l a.Ca-C77nr I nd ale fner nnnnw rr nDa.


Dodge '07 Dually PU truck,
Silver, 6.7 Cummins diesel
engine, 6 speed automatic
transmission, Quad cab,
sprayed in bedliner, 61k
miles, towing packages, heavy duty. Exc. cond.
Must see to appreciate. $28,000. 334-303-9780;
334-709-4230. Also have 5th wheel if interested.
[OT BAD CREDIT? DO YOU NEED A VEHICLE?
SI can get U Riding Today!
$0 Down/ 1st Payment,Tax, Tag & rile
Repos, Slow Credit, Past Bankruptcy OK!
Push, Pull or Drag, Will Trade anything!
Warranty On Every Vehicle Sold!
q Call Steve 334-803-9550
Honda '07 Civic: 2 door, only 6000 miles, wifes
car, like new, metallic gray, moon roof, never
wrecked or painted, 16" alloy rims, garaged
kept. $16,490. no TAX. Call 334-699-5688
sHonda:'10 Accord EX-L
Ma# Coupe VTEC 4 cyl, 5 spd
auto, overdrive, 1 owner,
non-smoker, all power,
cruise, telescoping tilt,
leather seats, sunroof, alloy wheels, blue tooth,
premium sound, navigation system, factory
warranty. $20,995. 850-592-3304; 850-209-4070.
Mazda '10 3
SUPER SHARP! MUST SELL!
$200 down, $249 per month.
Call: Ron Ellis at 334-714-0028.
Nissan '05 Maxima: Great deal! Clean,
one owner car that has 49,000 miles on the
engine. Engine has 2 year warranty. Asking
$11,500 but will negotiate. Call 334-692-4120.
Nissan '06 350Z-
Low Miles, Touring
Package $14,599.
2180 Montgomery Hwy.
Call 334-714-0755.

Pontiac'98 Trans Am, Excellent Condition,
Low Miles, T-Tops, Everything Works,
$7,000 334-687-9788 or 334-695-6368

"c Volvo '05 S40:
Cherry Red with black
interior, awesome
sound system, power
windows & locks,
perfect starter car, great gas mileage,
91k miles, $10,000. Call 334-726-3136

MOTRCYLE


Harley Davidson '09 Motorcycles (2), 883 L, low
miles, 1 black, 1 red $5000 each 850-419-9194


NEW '11 Yamaha TR125 blue & white dirt bike,
electric start $2850.913-660-2954 Dothan
SP]ORT;UTJIITYh


I


Chevrolet'11 Tahoe LT, LOADED, White, All
Leather, Captain's Chairs, DVD System, 3k
Miles. $39,500 Excellent Condition, LIKE NEW
334-714-7251
Chevrolet'96 Blazer SUV
Automatic, V-6, Loaded,
LIKE NEW! 49,000 miles,
$4,995. Call: 334-790-7959.

Jeep '03 Wrangler Sport 4x4, white, big tires,
tow pkg, 46k miles, $13,000 850-419-9194
Jeep '93 Grand Cherokee, 2 wheel drive, Rebuilt
Transmission. 4 New Tires. 180K Mi. $1500
r-ach 14-.7QA-47T1


Lincoln '06 Navigator,
Fully Loaded with Sun
Roof. THX Sound with
DVD & 6-Disk Player.
Excellent Condition.
New Tires. $19,500 Firm Will consider trade
334-790-6410
SUV Toyota'08 Rav-4 3rd seat, drop down
dvd, 45K mi. 1-owner, excellent condition, new
tires, $18,000. 334-899-5703


'61 Massey Ferguson 50 Tractor
with front end loader $3800.
334-677-7748 or 334-803-7210

Chevrolet '02 Z71
Nice Clean Truck $7999.00
2180 Montgomery Hwy.
Call 334-714-0755.


Dodge '08 Ram Lonestar,
Quad Cab, Excellent Condi-
tion, Extended Warranty,
Has 20" Wheels, Sprayed
bed liner, Silver-Metallic
in color. 18K mi. $20,000
334-687-2954 or 334-619-1045
Ford '01 F150XL super cab, 4-door, all power,
bed liner, new tires, low miles, exc. condition
$7500. OBO 334-585-6689.
k Ford'04 Lariat Super
Crew Cab, Truck is
completely loaded. 6 CD
change, Heated seats,
All Leather, Excellent condition, 6.0L Diesel.
$14,000. 334-237-1039

Ford '04 Ranger
with Camper Top,
4 cylinder, automatic, new
tires, 44,000 miles, clean,
$7,895. Call! 334-7907959

Ford '08 Kings Ranch F150: Stone green with
saddle leather interior, 4 door, fully loaded,
heated seats, fiberglass bed cover, sprayed in
liner, new tires, 45k miles, running board, bug
sheild, Service record available.
$29,900. Call 334-618-7682

l ~ FORD '89 F150, 4wh, 4x4
Auto, $4,600 or reasonable
offer. Call 229-334-8520.

Isuzu FTR '02 white in color 24ft. box truck with
approx. 140K miles. Good shape $14,900. OBO
Call: 334-299-0300.
Kubota Tractor M105S front end loader
LA13015 640hrs. dual speed mint cond.
$37,000. 334-797-8722
Tractor, Kubota 5000, 50 HP, 183 Hours, with 6'
Bushhog & 20X7' Trailer. $14,250 334-699-2346


Mercury '01 Villager A/C AT 133K mi.
very clean $3800. Exc. Cond.
334-803-7210 or 334-677-7748

IT'S AS EASY
AS 2 3
1. CALL 2. PLACE YOUR AD 3. GET RESULTS


www.JCFLORIDAN.com


I ALSO SELL USED PARTS
24 HOUR TOWING = 334-792-8664

Got a Clunker
: We'll be your Junker! :
We buy wrecked cars -
and Farm Equip. at a
fair and honest price! -
$325.&up for
Complete Cars CALL 334-702-4323
L .............................
Guaranteed highest prices paid for your Junk
or unwanted vehicles & farming equipment,
Also pay finders fee. .n 850-849-6398

ar We buy Wrecked Vehicles
running or not $325 & up accordingto
vehicle 334-794-9576 or 344-791-4714


SWE PAY Ca$H
FOR JUNK CARS!!!!!!
Call 334-818-1274


LEGALS


LF15641
NOTICE
Tri-County Community Council, Inc., Board of
Directors will meet on Thursday, January 12,
2012 at 5:00 P.M. with Finance Committee
meeting at 4:00 P.M. and Board Development
Committee meeting at 4:30 P.M. at McClains
Restaurant located on 331 South in Defuniak
Springs.


Make Your Point!

Advertising is the best way to make

points with prime prospects who are

ready, willing and able to buy.

Let us show you the most effective

way to advertise in the newspaper

that reaches the right people,

right where they live.


CLASSIFIED


IP TTIWNDU S


1ST PLACE TO CALL FOR ALL OF
YOUR TOWING NEEDS!
'sny 94 24 aO'PS 7er AUTO BODY & RECYCLING
PAYING TOP DOLLAR FOR JUNK CARS
Contat Jason Harger at 334-791-2624


CALL FOR TOP PRICE
FOR JUNK VEHICLES


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