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Jackson County Floridan
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS MAP IT! ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028304/00703
 Material Information
Title: Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title: Sunday Floridan
Portion of title: Floridan
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Jackson County Floridan
Publisher: Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Marianna Fla
Creation Date: December 8, 2011
Publication Date: 1934-
Frequency: daily (except saturday and monday)[<1979-1995>]
weekly[ former 1934-<1955>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates: 30.776389 x -85.238056 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note: "Independent."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID: UF00028304:00703
 Related Items
Preceded by: Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by: Marianna Floridan

Full Text



Informing more than 17,000 readers daily in print and online


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Graceville Tigers

improve to 4-0 in

district play. See more

on page lB.


A Media General Niexp r -
Crime Update


Two more arrests made in drug investigation

From staff reports .- [ I involved in They are: Benson Lloyc


The Jackson County
Sheriff's Office arrested two
more suspects on Wednes-
day in the continuation of
its six-month investigation
into drug activity.
The sheriff's office ar-
rested Mershon Pope Jr.
and Tramel Collins on
outstanding warrants.


Pope was arrested on two marijuana. Collins was
warrants for the sale of arrested on two warrants
a controlled substance, for the sale of a controlled


substance, cocaine.
The task force arrested
about 22 people who were


the sale of
narcotics, on
Dec. 5.
The sher-
iff's office
is still seek-
Hayes ing five in-
dividua'ls
on outstanding warrants
for the sale of illegal nar-
cotics in Jackson County.


for three counts of sale of
a controlled substance,
cocaine; Patrick Pinder
for two counts of sale of a
controlled substance, co-
caine; Marcus Daughtry of
two counts of sale of a con-
trolled substance, cocaine;
Thabit Mateen for sale
See DRUGS, Page 7A


ORIGIN STORY


'Christmas In Two Egg' plays Dec.


18 at Lovedale Baptist Church


MARK SKINNER/FLORIlAN
Rhonda Melnik puts up Christmas decorations in the Lovedale Baptist Church Fellowship Hall on Wednesday. The church will host the
play, "Christmas in Two Egg:' written and narrated by Jackson County author Dale Cox on Sunday at 6 p.m.


Most of the actors

are from Two Egg
BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com

Ever wonder how Two Egg got its
name? Theories abound, and no one is
sure .of the absolute truth. But the de-
bate makes for fun conversation, as the
community can see on Dec. 18, when.
the subject comes up for discussion in
a play written by Dale Cox.
"Christmas In-Two Egg". will be
presented -in the fellowship hall of


Lovedale Baptist Church that night, a
Sunday, at 6 p.m. Admission is free.
'Most of the actors are from Two Egg,
DellWood or communities in the im-
mediate vicinity, and most of them are
in their 60s or 70s. The youngest is in
her mid-40s or early 50s. One in the
troupe. Arthur Basford, is 80 years old.
Many are local farmers.
In one act, Basford and some of the
others talk about the stories they've
heard on the origins of Two Egg's
name. Most of their parents or other
elders lived in the community around
the time the town was named, during
the Great Depression. Cox didn't script
this part of the play as the actors will


tell their stories in their own words.
Cox said he felt that having them ad-lib
\ this scenewould be a more interesting
and entertaining approach than hav-
ing them memorize a script.
Considered one of the best and most
prolific historians dedicated to lo-
cal. legend, lore and fact, Cox wrote
the play in its current form based on
a short novel he published last year,
which he'd based on a longer form of
the play he'd written earlier.
Cox will be on hand to serve as nar-
rator, tying the play's five acts together
with readings from the novel.
See PLAY, Page 7A


Grand Ridge

Man


sentenced


for Microtel


meth fire
From staff reports
The second of two people arrested
following a meth-related fire at the Mi-
crotel in 2009 has been sentenced.
After pleading no contest to. arson,
unlawful possession of a listed chemi-
cal and the attempted manufacture of
a controlled substance (methamphet-
amine), Grand Ridge resident Noah
Damian Johnson was sentenced to time
served, three years probation on two
of the charges, along with two years of
community control and 10 years ad-
ministrative probation to follow.
Johnson spent three months in the
Jackson County jail .and completed a
one-year drug treatment program, ac-
cording to court records.
His co-defendant, Alicia Baxter, was
offered a similar plea deal and initially
accepted it but then opted for a trial, ac-
cording to court officials. She was-sen-
tenced to 20 years in prison following
her conviction earlier this year.

Local Brief

Public input sought from local
state legislative delegation
Members of Jackson County's state
legislative delegation will hold a Leg-
islative Delegation Meeting Tuesday,
Dec. 13, from 6 to 7:30 p.m. in the
Jackson County Commission meeting
room at 2864 Madison Street, Mari-
anna, FL 32448.
The purpose of the meeting is to re-
ceive public comments and to hear lo-
cal bills for the upcoming 2012 Regular
Session of the Florida Legislature. To
request a spot on the agenda, individu-
als should contact Carter Johnson (850)
488-2873 no later than 5 p.m., Monday,
Dec. 12.
The Jackson County legislative dele-
gation consists of Representative Marti
Coley, Representative Brad Drake, and
Senator Bill Montford.
From staff reports


S2012 will be busy election year


I
-~ ~I'~
.4


il


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Bridgette Rehberg works on registering new voters at the
Supervisor of Elections office Wednesday.


fr.-ri :tan repl.,r, -

Election year 2012 will be a busy
one locally, as 14 offices across the
county and region are up for grabs,
along with statewide and national
offices.
Candidates running for local office
in 2012 may submit an announce-
ment and photograph for publica-
tion on an inside page of the Flori-
dan once at no charge berneen now
and Oct. 11, 2012. No announce-
ments will run on Sunday. Otherwise
the date of publication will be at the
discretion of the Floridan, but the


items will be run as close to the date
of submission as possible.
Jan. 31 is the Republican presiden-
tial preference primary, with a Jan. 3
voter registration.
Jackson County Commission Dis-
tricts 1, 3 and 5 are up for election
this year, along with Jackson County
School Board Districts 2 and 3.
Several constitutional offices will
also be up for contention, includ-
ing sheriff, clerk of court, property
appraiser, tax collector, superinten-
dent of schools, supervisor of elec-
tions and county judge.
The circuit judge'for groups 3,and


11 are also on the ballot.
With the exception of the judge
slots, candidate qualifying dates are
from noon June 4 to noon on jine
8. Qualifying dates for judicial can-
didates are from noon on April 16 to
noon on April 20.
The pi imary for state, local and na-
tional offices is Aug. 14. with a voter
registration deadline of Jul 16 for
that election.
The general election is Nov. 6. with
a voter registrauon deadline of Oct.
9.
See ELECTIONS, Page 7A


> CLASSIFIEDS...5-7B


) ENTERTAINMENT...4B


) LOCAL...3A


) OBITUARIES...7A


> STATE...4A


> SPORTS...1-3B, 8B


> TV LISTINGS...3B


... ... -- ---' .'. . .-- -- .' .t _-.. ... .. ..


This Newspaper o
Is Printed On a i
Recycled Newsprint




7 65161 8005 9


*Cfld n-"Ranked'NUMBER4lin-Jackson County"

jct~ ~id n~tE9JJ o~~VA3cpern'lnt h
JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDA per month
*per month
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72A THURSDAY, DECEMBER 8,2011


Wei^bes O'iuttook


WRKE-UP CJJLL


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PRECIPITATION


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


*.- -. - .' ,! r


h: 56 ,
3 4 5- .. -': 6 .. '


Big
l.Lo


^,Irk


-.. High 64
) Low 380

Tomorrow
Sunny & Warmer.



High 600
Low -38o


Sunday
Cooler.


Saturday
Partly Cloudy.


High 610
. .Low 390


Monday
Mostly Sunny.


24 hours
Month to dale
Normal MTD


0 .43"
0.49"
0.95"


Year to dale
Normal TE)
Normal for year


34 95"
55 34"
58.25"


TIDES
Panama City Low -. 5:14 AM High 7:05 PM
Apalachicola Low 9:05 PM High 12:15 AM
.Port St. Joe Low 5:19AM 'High 7:38 PM
Destin Low 6:30 AM High 8:11 PM
Pensacola Low 7:04AM: High 8a:44 PM

RIVER READINGS Reading Flood Stage
Woodruff 38.95 ft. 66.0 ft.
Blountstown 0.29 ft. 15.0 ft.
Marianna 4.67 ft. 19.0 ft.
Caryville 0.97 ft. 12.0 ft.


ULTRA VIOLET INDEX

.0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8-10 Very High, 11+ Extreme


0 1 2 3.


8 9 1 It


THE SUN AND MOON


Sunrise
Sunset
Moonrise
Moonset


6:26 AM
4:39 PM
3:17 PM
5:33 AM (Fri)


Dec,. DeI. Dec. Jan.
10 18 24 .1


FLORIDA'S .INL n .. [ i

PANHANDLE &tuly a D D-*

MEDIA PARTNERSwAQ 10.9 FM.-

L STENFO HURL WATER-PDTE


JACKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN

Publisher Valeria Roberts
vroberts@jcfloridan.com

Circulation Manager Dena Oberski ..
doberski@jcfloridan.com








CONTACT US
Telephone:' (850),526-3614
FAX: (850) 482-4478,
Email: editorial@jcfloridan.comrn
Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL32447
Street Address:
4403 Constitution Lane
Marianna, FL 32446
Office Hours:
We.4l-day 3 a irn to5p. '

MISS YOUR PAPER?
You should receive your newspaper no later
than 6 a.m. If it does not arrive, call Circula-
tion between 6 a.m. and noon, Tuesday to
Friday, and 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. on Sunday. The
Jackson County Floridan (U.P'S 27-.840 '
is published Tuesday thouJgh Friday arnd '
Sunday rfiornings. Periodical postage paid
at Marianna, FL.

SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Home delivery: $1123 pr ,-,rnth $3 83..
for three months; i,62 05 lor 7..i months-
and $123.45for oneyear All prices include '
applicable state and lo: al taS e- M!- l .1
subscriptions must be paid in advance. Mail
subscriptions are: $46.12 for three months;
$92.24 ior :.i. monrih., and I.li4 47fd rone
.year. .

ADVERTISING
The adveri.t'i r agrees thit ihe pitbliher
shall not be liable ior damrrge : ariinrg
out of errors, and advertieneritb: bteyo.ind
the arnourt paid icr the :paf e .clu3ily, .
'.:cupied by that port:rio :,i thre J d erti;.:
mTients in which the error occurred whether.
.i.uch error is due to the riegiigern.:e of the
pub.l.her ernmpl,.yee:" or :tlherw,.se arind
hiiere shall be no.t liabili) for ron.r,,r,er-
tion oI any advertisement bevcond the
amount paid tor such advertisement. This
newspaper will not knowingly accept or
publish illeUal.material of any kind. Advertis-
"ng which e.pres.es3 pre[eren,:e based ion
egally protec ted perscrial Crharateri .tih s ,.
not acceptable.

HOWTOGETYOUR
NEWS PUBLISHED
The Jackson County Floridan will publish
news of general interest free of charge.
Submit your news or Community Calendar
events via email, fax, mail, or hand delivery.
Fees may apply for wedding, engagement,
anniversary and birth announcements.
Forms are available at the Floridan offices.
Photographs must be of good quality and
suitable for print. The Floridan reserves the
right to edit all submissions.

GETTING IT RIGHT
The Jackson County Floridan's policy
is to correct mistakes promptly. To
report an error, please call 526-3614
Monday-Friday.


THURSDAY, DEC. 8
n St. Anne Thrift Store Pre-Christmas Sale -.
Dec. 6-15 at 4284 Second Ave. Marianna. Buy one
item of clothing; get a second-item (equal or lesser
value) for half price. All shoes are half price. Store.
hours: 9 a.m. to I p.m:Tuesdays and Thursdays.
)) Networking Healthcare Professionals Lunch
& Learn -11a.m. at the Gazebo Coffee Shoppe
& Deli in downtown Marianna. Spotlight speaker:
Norrie Chumley of Panhandle Area.Health Network/
Medical Center of Blountstown..Call 850-674-5464.
) )Orientation -12:30-3:30 p.m, at the Goodwill
Career Training Center, 4742 Highway 90 in Mari-
anna. Register for freb training classes; learn about
services offered to people with disadvantages/dis-
abilities. Call 526-0139; .
) Grand Ridge Town Council convenes at 6 p.m: in
the Grand Ridge Town Hall for the.regularmonthly
council meeting. Public welcome. Call 592-4621.
7 Bascom Christmas Party 6:30 p.m. in Town
Hall, with a free ham/turkey dinner (bring a side
dish), a musical program by children from Mary's
Day Care, and a raffle drawing for a hand-stitched
quilt (raffle tickets: $1'eac.i or six for $5; 569-2159).
7 Marianna High School Band Winter Concert
-7 p.m. in the MH: Auditorium. The concert is
preceded by a spaghetti dinner fundraiser, 4-6 p.m.
in the MHS Cafeteria. Donations for the dinner: $6.
Prc',eed, benefit the MHS Band.,
Alcoholics Anonymous Closed discussion; 8
to 9 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901 Cale-
donia St., Marianna, in the AA'room. Attendance
limited to persons with a desire to stop drinking.

FRIDAY, DEC. 9
a Third annual Hope School Christmas Invi-
tational Basketball Tournament 9:30 a.m. to
2:30 p.m. in the Grand Ridge Middle School Gym,
Hope School Falcons, the host team, will compete
with te-rrms rorn Fort Walton, Pensacola, and Bay
County. Public welcorne. Free admission.
Commencement exercises -10 a.m. at The
Baptist C 'l-Ige O Florind in Graceville. Call 263-
32'61. e.t "460.
))Free job skills workshops --"Employ Florida
Marketplace" (10-11 a.m.) and "College Acceptance!'
(2-3 p.m.) at the Marianna One Stop Career Center.
on U.S. 90:. Call 718-0456.
7 Town of Greenwood's 13th annual Christmas
Open House -.15:30 p.m. in Greenwood Town
'Hall, 4207 Bryan St. Holiday snacks will be served.
i Better Breathers, helping meet the challenges of
'.chronic lung disease, meets 2-3 p.m. in the Hudnall
Building Community Room, Jackson Hospital cam-
pus, 4230 Hospital Drive, Marianna. Sandy Watson
of Amedisys Home Health Care will present, "Family
and Friends CPR." Bring a friend or caregiver. No
cost to attend. Light refreshments served. Call
,718-2849.
Grand Ridge Christmas Parade and Festival
Parade begins-at 4 p.m. (line-up: 3 p.m. on Hall
Street) at town hall, ends at John Thomas Porter
Park on-Florida Street, the festival location, where
there will be a free hot dog and chili dinner, games
and prizes for children, and a visit from Santa
SClaUs, who will be taking Christmas lists and giving
out goodie bags. To participate in the parade, call ,
592-4621.: .
a The deadline for making Toys for Tots
donations in the drop-off box inside the Floridan
offices at 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna, is 5


:ommm ty Caend
p.m. today
) Today is the application deadline for the First .
Generation:in College Scholarship for the Spring
2012 semester. Four partial $1,000 scholarship -
will be awarded. Must be Pell-eligible, enroll as
an undergraduate, degree-eeking student for a ..
minimum of six hours, and comefrom a family.:
where neither parent has completed a baccalaure-
ate degree. Call 713.-404
. Malone School Homecoming The Homecom-
ing basketball game (Malone School vs. Laurel Hill
High School) stats'`at&5 p'.m.The Homecom-
ing Court and Homecoming Queen winner will be
announced at 5 p.m.(lbefore the JV Boys game)..
Malone invites all alumni to attend.
Eighth annual Christmas Light Show Dec.
9-11 and Dec. 16-18, 6 to 8 p.m. nightly at Three .
Rivers State Park on River Road north of Sneads.
The drive through is free to the public, donations of
cash or canned goods for the needy accepted. Park,
personnel will be in the Seminole Pavilion (follow
the lights) serving hot cocoa and cookies.
Celebrate Recovery Adult, teen meetings to
'.overcame hurts, habits and hang-ups,'" 7 p m at
Evangel Worship Center, 2645 Pebble Hill Road..
Dinner:'6 p.m. Child care a,.uilable Call 2C0-7856.
573-1131. .
) Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting. 8-9 p.m.
in r.he AA room at First United Methodist Church,.
2901 Caledonia St,,Manranna. .

S., SATURDAY,DEC.10 .
Living Heritage Day-8 a.m. to-3 p.m. at -
Renaissance Park, 5989 Heritage Road in Marianna,
with food, entertainment, horse rides for children,
and volunteers making cane juice, pork rinds,
brooms, lye soap and blacksmithing. Admission is
free. Call 482-7497.
n Marianna City Farmers Market is open 8 a.m. to-
noon for the fall season, Saturdays only in Madison
Street Park.
n Wreath Laying Ceremony The Marianna
Composite Squadron-of the Civil Air Patrol, in con-
junction with Wreaths Across America, will conduct
a wreath laying ceremony to honor fallen veterans
at 11 a.m. in the Pinecrest Memorial Gardenr. 3720
Caverns Road in Marianna. Public welcome. Call
482-8310.
Turkey Shoot Fundraiser -1 p.m. each Satur-
day through December at AMVETS Post 231, north .
of Fountain (east side of U.S. 231, just south of.CR
167). Cost: $2 a shot. Call 850-722-0291. .
T Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, 4:30-
5:30 p.m. in the-AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St., Marianna./
) Eighth annual Christmas Light Show Dec.
9-11 and Dec. 16-18, 6-8 p.m. nightly at Three Rivers,
State Park on River Road north of Sneads. The .-
drive through is free to the public; donations of
cash or canned goods for'the needy accepted. Park,
personnel will be in the Seminole Pavilion (follow
the lights) serving hot cocoa and cookies.

.SUNDAY, DEC. 11-
) Bennett Christmas Dinner Descendants and,
family of Polly Mooneyham Bennett and Luther
Bennett will gather at 10:30 a.m.in the Dellwood
Community Center. Lunch is at noon; bring covered
dishes, drinks (paper goods furnished). Call 593-
6549.
) Bingo Fundraiser 2 to 5 p.m. at AMVETS Post


231, north of Fountain (east side of U.S. 231, just
south-of CR 167) 'Proceeds benefit the Post building
fund.,
) Veterans of all American wars will be remem-
bered at a 4 p.m. ceremony at St. Luke's Episcopal.
Church, 4362-Lafayette St., Mariahna:.After the
service, fresh wreaths will be :laced on headstones
of veterans in the churchyard. Call 209-4066 or
email snoopyxii60@hotmail.com.
1, Eighth annual Christmas LightShow Dec.
9-11-and Dec. 16-18,6 to 8 p.m. nightly at Three
Rivers State Park-on River Road north of Sneads.
The drive through is free to the public; donations of
cash or canned goods for the needy accepted. Park
personnel will be in the Seminole Pavilion (follow
the lights) serving holcocoa and coolies.
A Alcoholics Anonymous closed discussion. 6.30
p.m.. 4349 W. Lafayette St.. Marianna (in one-story
building behind 4351 VWLafaydtt St.). Attendance
limited to persons with a desire to stop drinking.
MONDAYA, DEC.12
n Orientation 10.30 a.m to 1 30 p.m. ai the
Goodwill Career Training Center. 4742 Highway 90
in Marianna. Register tor free training classes: learn
-about services offered to people with disadvan-
tages/disabilities. Call 526-0139.
) Lions Club of Marianna meeting. Jim's Buffet &
Grill, at noon on second and fourth Mondays. Call
4822005 . .. , .. .:, .
)) Free job skills workshop "Resume Workshop."
3 to 4 p.m at the Marianna Ooe Stop Career Center
on U.S.90. Call 718-0456.
Sneads High School Band Christmas Concert
5:30 p.m. in the SHS Auditorium. Admission is
free.
) Riverside Elementary School Christmas
Program 6 p.m. in the Marianna High School
Auditorium. Call 482-9611.
))Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, 8-9 p.m.
in the AA room qf First United Methodist Church,
2901 Caledonia St., Marianna.

TUESDAY, DEC. 13
Heaven's Garden Food Pantry distributes
food on the second Tuesday of the month, 9 a.m.
to noon at 3115 Main-St. in Cottondale. Jackson
County residents only. Call 579-9963 or visit www.
, ,aidaspina.org.
. St. Anne Thrift Store Pre-Christmas Sale
- Dec. 6-15 at 4284 Second Ave., Marianna. Buy
one item of clothing; get a second item (equal
or lesser value) for half price. All shoes are half
price. Store hours: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday and
Thursday:
Republican Club of Northwest Florida meet-
ing, noon, Jim's Buffet and Grill, Marianna. Guest
speaker: U.S. Senate candidate Deon Long. Call
718-5411.
Optimist Club of Jackson County board meet-
ing, noon, First Capital Bank, Marianna.
7 Jackson County Legislative Delegation Meet-
ing 6 to 7:30 p.m. in the JacksonrCounty.Com-
missioh Chamber, 2864 Madison St:.in Marianna.
Members of Jackson County's state legislative
delegation, which consists of Reps. Marti Coley
and Brad Drake and Sen. Bill Montford, will receive
public comments and hear local bills for the upcom-
ing 2012 regular session of the Florida Legislature.
To request a spot on the agenda, call 850-488-2873
before 5 p.m. Monday, Dec. 12.


The submission deadline for this calendar is two days before publication. Submit to: Community Calendar, Jackson County Floridan, P. O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447,
email editorial@jcfloridan.com, fax (850) 482-4478 or bring items to 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.


Police Roundup


MARIANNA POLICE
The Marianna Police De-
partment listed the following
incidents for Dec. 6, the latest
available __
report: Three Z -'r '
accidents --
with no injury, f ]ME
two suspi- .'R M
cious persons,
one physi-
cal disturbance, two. verbal
disturbances, one burglar
alarm, one fire alarm, five traffic.
stops, two larceny complaints,


two follow-up investigations,
one assault, one sex offense,
three assists of other agen-
cies, two public service calls
and two threats/harassment
complaints.

JACKSON COUNTY
SHERIFF'S OFFICE
The Jackson County Sheriff's
Office and county Fire/Rescue
reported the following incidents
for Nov. 30, the latest available
report. (Some of these calls may
be related to after-hours calls


taken on behalf of Graceville .
and Cottondale Police Depart-
ments): One accident with no
injury, one dead person, two
abandoned vehicles, three sus-
picious vehicles, two suspicious
incidents, two highway ob-
structions, one report of mental
illness, one burglary, three fire
alarms, seven traffic stops, one
criminal mischief complaint,
one civil dispute, three tres-
pass calls, one sex offense, four
assists with other agencies,
one public service call and one
transport.


JACKSON COUNTY
CORRECTIONAL FACILITY
The following persons were
booked into the county jail dur-
ing the latest reporting periods:
) Casey Byrd, 29, 16342 SW
State Road 73, Clarksville, drug
court sanctions.

JAIL POPULATION: 192

To report a crime, call CrimeStoppers
at 526-5000 or a local law enforcement
agency. To report a wildlife violation, call
1-888-404-FWCC (3922).


(-xi\\~'t~







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


WM's Springhill Regional Landfill gets re-certified


Special to the Floridan

At its 23rd annual Sympo-
sium,.People, Partnerships and
Pathways, the Wildlife Habitat
Council presented Waste Man-
agement's Springhill Regional
Landfill with its Corporate Lands
for Learning program re-certifi-
cation. According to a press re-
lease from Waste Management,
thisre-certificationis one ofWM's
128 WHC-certified programs at
110 sites company-wide.
"WHC .believes that collabo-
ration among all stakeholder
groups is critical to addressing
the complex issues facing the
sustainability of the planet," said
Robert Johnson, WHC presi-
4rent. "Congratulations to Waste


Management for their commit-
ment to a healthy natural world
and connected communities."
Springhill Regional Landfill's
wildlife program aims to con-
tinue to conserve, enhance and
protect habitat resources on-site
and to stimulate community in-
volvement, according to the re-
lease. Since 2007, the Corporate
Lands for Learning program at
the landfill has allowed learners
to experience the site's wildlife
habitat value first-hand. Habi-
tat is showcased in three focus
areas; ponds, where students
spy alligators and numerous
fish; forests, where deer .tracks,
bird nest boxes and other ani-
mal signs can be observed, and
the forested wetland, where


learners walk on a recycled plas-
tic boardwalk.
As part of its community out-
reach efforts, WM will host a se-
ries of field trips for fourth- and
fifth-grade students from several
Dothan City Schools during the
2011-2012 school term. These
field trips are part of their com-
mitment as a corporate level
adopter of the school system.
"There's a saying 'it takes a vil-
lage to raise a child.' Well,. that
notion certainly applies here.
Without the active engagement
of our volunteer groups earn-
ing this prestigious certification
may not have been possible,"
said Jeff Massey, Springhill Re-
gional Landfill district manager
for Waste Management. "To see


WM employees working side by
side with our neighbors and cus-
tomers to improve the environ-
ment brings back a real sense of
community for everyone. I can
truly say I am proud of what we
all have accomplished here."
According to the press release,
this year's certifications also
helped WM meet and exceed
two of its company-wide sus-
tainability goals well before the
target year of 2020. In 2007, WM
pledged to preserve and restore
25,000 acres of wildlife habitat
across North America. The com-
pany achieved this goal in 2010
and now has 26,000 acres. WM
also committed to have WHC
certified programs at 100 or
more of its facilities with WHC


-A IL


Troop 3 Boy Scouts


study astronomy


Special to the Floridan

Troop 3 Boy Scouts met
for their weekly meeting
on Nov. 27, and began an
exciting urit of study on
astronomy, with Scout
Master Bill Kleinhans as
instructor.
"Mr. K.," as the boys call
him, taught the scouts
how to find directions us-
ing the sun by the "Watch
Method." This technique
involves laying a watch
completely level and plac-
ing a short, straight twig
upright against the edge
of the watch at the point of
the hour hand. The watch
is turned until the shadow
of the twig falls along the
hour hand's position. Fi-
nally, noticing the angle
formed 'between the nu-
meral 12 and the shadow
lying on the hour hand,
a line from the center of
the watch that divides that


angle' in half will point
south. Kleinhans used a
dry erase board and lan-
tern to help demonstrate
the technique.
Troop 3 scouts contin-
ued this unit of study by at-
tending the "Night of Star
Gazing" Dec. 3 at Florida
Caverns State Park, where
the Tallahassee Astronom-
ical Society provided op-
portunities, to learn more
about stars, planets and
other constellations with
the use of large, powerful
telescopes.
The Marianna Optimist
Club is the chartering or-
ganization for Troop 3 Boy
Scouts.
For more information
about the Tallahassee As-
tronomical Society, visit
www.stargazers.org.
For more information
about1 Boy Scouts, Scout
Master Bill Kleinhans can
be reached at 526-2897.


SUBMITTED PHOTOS
Scout Master Bill Kleinhans teaches the scouts about the
various constellations in the sky.


Chipola science ed students attend conference


Special to the Floridan

Chipola Collegestudents
in the science education
bachelor's degree pro-
gram recently attended
the Florida Association of
Science Teachers profes-
sional development con-
ference in Orlando.
Students Jessica Har-
rell, Rebecca Hambly,
Travis Moore and Schel-
lane Smith attended the
conference along with Dr.
Santine Cuccio, Chipo-
la science education
facilitator.
Educators from Florida
and other states con-
ferred, planned lessons,
and networked. Students
spoke with veteran teach-
ers, scientists and conser-
vationists; attended dem-
onstrations and lectures
on magnetism, genetics,
energy, conservation, and
ecology; and participated
in workshops on integrat-


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Chipola College students in the Science Education bachelor's degree program (from left) are
Travis Moore, Rebecca Hambly, Jessica Harrell and Schellane Smith. They attended the recent
Florida Association of Science Teachers professional development conference in Orlando.


ing music, readingand the
Florida environment into
the K-12 curriculum.
Participating 'students
stated that both their
content knowledge and
pedagogy were reinforced
and extended to'the level
of application; and will


transfer their knowledge
to the classroom.
FAST conference ven-
dors provided the students
with sample textbooks, in-
structional materials, CD's
and DVD's to use in their
classrooms.
Students who attended


the conference will share
some of the outstanding
teaching strategies at the
Future Educator's Club
Teacher Workshop on Sat-
urday, Jan. 21, 2012. The
conference held on the
Chipola campus is free to'
all district educators.


Jazzmatazz concert moved to January


Special to the Floridan

The popular Chipola
College Show Choir se-
ries, "Jazzmatazz," has an
interesting twist this y'ar:
it is called "Stadsmatazz"
to honor Joan Stadsklev,
retiring Associate Dean of
the school's Fine and Per-,
forming Arts Department.
The song and dance
performances under the
direction -of Angie White
and Dr. Josh Martin are
scheduled for Jan. 5, 6 and
7 at 7 p.m. in the Chipola
;Theatre.
Originally slated for De-
cember, "Jazzmatazz" has


been rescheduled in part
to allow more alumni to
come back to campus to
be a part of this historic
event. Signature songs
highlighting the history of
the group are slated to be
performed.
Dr. Daniel Powell, As-
sociate Dean of Fine and
Performing Arts, said,
"Come join this 'now and
then' experience as the
Show Choir electrifies
the stage to honor one of
their founding directors:
Joan Stadsklev." Powell
invites everyone to enjoy
the high energy group
that will feature musical


selections from a wide va-
riety of styles.
Show Choir members
are selected through com-
petitive auditions and
Powell indicates the tal-
ent of this year's group is


exceptionally strong.
Tickets went on sale Nov.
28 and are available from
Show Choir members and
through the Fine and Per-
forming Arts Department
at 718-2277.


Florida Lottery

Mon. (E) 12/5 3-6.6 3-8-6-6 1-6-.L3.15-31


Mon. (M)


4-2-9 3.0.8-9


Tue. (E) 12/6 5-0-5 6-2-5-1 1-6-23-24-26
Ti XA -,C: -


me. (M)i
Wed. (E)
Wed.- (M)
,'. hu.. (E)
Thurs. (M)

Fri.' '(E)
Fri. (M)


.q4-6-5 U0-1-3-
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12/3 05-5
0-7-0
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Sun. (M)


Special to the Floridan

Members of the last
eighth-grade class of the
old Jackson County School
(January 1970) are invited
to an organizational meet-
ing on Monday, Dec. 19.
The meeting will begin
at 6 p.m. in the home of


the late Irene V Blaine:
3639 Blaine Drive in Mari-
anna. Refreshments will be
served.
Come meet old class-
mates and help plan the
reunion. Sharon Norris
McMillion is the event
sponsor. For more infor-
mation, call 272-5664.


3-5-9-9
8-3-9-6
2-8-2-6


13-19-21-24-30

4-7-13-24-33


9-7-7 1-5-8-9


E = Evening drawing, M = Midday drawing

Saturday 12/3 5-18-33-43.45 PB 8 PP,3


Wednesday 12/7


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Saturday 12/3
. Wednesday 12/7


Not available


21-27-39-48-49,53 xtra5


Not available


xtraX


For lottery inlormation..call (850) 487.7777 or (900)737-7777


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NEtW"%TT'B


Scout
Master
Bill
Kleinhans
shows
Troop 3
scouts
how
to find
directions
without
the use
of a
compass.


School reunion


organizational


meeting planned


Do you have'Cute Kids'?
Email your 'Cute Kids*' photos to editorial@jcfloridan.com,
mail them to P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447 or bring them
by our offices at 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.
*12 years or under, with Jackson County ties. Include child's
full name, parents'name(s) and city of residence. This is a free
service. All entries subject to editing.


John W. Kurpa, D.C.
D.A.B.C.N., FA.C.EN
Board Certified
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LOCAL


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2011 3AF


~IIL~~ L


.. .


certifications.' With the addi-
tion of this year's certifications,
the company has surpassed this
goal.
"At Waste Management our
conservation goals are aggres-
sive but achievable. Look at what
we've accomplished in just four
years," said President and CEO
David Steiner.
Waste Management has been
working closely with WHC since
2000. In 2008, the company was
the first recipient of the organi-
zation's William W Howard CEO
Award recognizing the compa-
ny's efforts in conservation, edu-
cation and outreach efforts.
To lear more, visit http://www.
wm. corn/wm/community/
whc/index.asp.


A'







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN <, www.jcfloridan.com


'14A o THURSDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2011


Students outperforming peers in big cities


The Associated Press

MIAMI -. Students in two of
Florida's largest.districts are out-
performing their peers in math
and reading at other large, urban
schools, according to fest scores
released Wednesday.
Results from the National As-
sessment of Educational Prog-
ress, also known as the Nation's
Report Card, show fourth- and
eighth-grade students in Miami-
Dade and Hillsborough coun-
ties had higher average scores at
nearly every level.
Hillsborough had the highest
average fourth grade reading
score of all 21 urban districts
studied, and tied for first with
Charlotte, N.C., in eighth grade.
Hillsborough tied for second at
both grade levels on the math
portion of the exam.
Superintendent MaryEllen Elia
credited the district's partner-
ship with the Bill and Melinda
Gates Foundation for the high
scores. The foundation has com-
mitted to providing $100 million


"..let's not lose sight of the fact Miami-Dade has
outperformed basically urban America and in some
cases matched suburban America."
Alberto Carvalho,
Miami-Dade superintendent

over seven years, to boost effec- "The fact the scores are flat,
tike teaching in the district. Last notwithstanding increased stan-
xt-dr. the district insntiruid anew dards and requirements and
teacher evaluation s stiemn based tough .economic conditions, the
on student learning gains and fact we were able to hold on to
peer feedback. It's also boost- the ground we had, conquered
ed professional development speaks loudly for the hard work,
opportunities, dedication and strategic teach-
"It's the first indication we ing taking place," he _aid. "With
have that it's really paying off," that said, obviously there is a lor
Elia said. of work to he done, but I~ts not
'This was the first year Hillsbor- lose sight oli the fact Miam- Dade
ough participated in the study has outpeiformed bAsic,4ly ui-
and the second year for Mi- ban America and in somd cases
ami-Dade. Compared to 2009, matched subhuiban America."
Miami-Dade's results were not Infor th-grade leading, the a\-
significantly different, mirroring erage score for Hillsborough snl-
the stagnant scores seen in state- dents i as 231 out of 500. a full 20
'wide results in November.-- points higher than the average
Miami-Dade Superintendent for students in large cities. For-
Alberto Carvalho said he was ty-fout peiceni ot Hillsborough
thrilled with the results. students scored at the proficient


- ii -1 -- 1 -------IC --


i I


Study: Medicaid premiums too high


The Associated Press

MIAMI New premi-
ums and copay propos-
als for Florida -Medicaid
beneficiaries, including
$100 for every non-emer-
gency ER visit, are among
the highest in the country
and a new study warns it
could cause hundreds of
thousands to drop out be-
cause they can't afford to
pay them, according to a
report released Wednesday
by Georgetown University.
"This is a very radical
proposal which would un-
dermine the progress Flor-
ida has made in covering
children," said Joan Alker,
co-executive director of.
the Georgetown University
research center.
Nearly a dozen states saw
enrollment declines as a
result of new or increased
premiums charged to
Medicaid beneficiaries,
although specific policies
varied considerably, ac-
cording to the report.
The majority of people
enrolled in Florida's Med-
icaid program are below
the poverty level of $22,314
for a family of four. ,
The state's Medicaid
overhaul also requires
beneficiaries to pay a $10
per. person monthly pre-
mium, according to state
health 'officials, -meaning


$40 for a family of four.
Advocates warn those
monthly charges add up
and will overburden the
state's poorest.
Florida lawmakers
passed sweeping changes
to the Medicaid program
this past session, plac-
ing the care of the state's
most vulnerable residents,
mostly children, into the
hands of private provid-
ers and hospital networks.
Lawmakers said the rough-
ly $20 billion a year Medic-
aid costs are a strain on a
tight state budget and the
program couldn't continue
without changes.
The bills expand on a
controversial five-county
pilot program that .pays
for-profit providers a set
fee to cover recipients
and allows providers great
flexibility in determining
patient coverage. Doctors
have dropped out of the
program, complaining of
red tape and that the in-
surers deny the tests and
medicine they prescribe.
Patients have complained
they struggled to get doc-
tor's appointments. Sup-
porters of the overhaul say
new accountability mea-
sures will address those
concerns.
But the state needs
permission from federal
health officials to continue


Briefs


Trailer full of gifts for
needy families stolen
ORLANDO Hundreds
'of presents have been sto-
len from a central Florida
charity for needy families.
Teddy bears, dolls, dia-
pers and cribs were stolen
when thieves used a bolt
cutter to unlock a 12-foot
trailer jammed with gifts
this weekend. The Orlando
Sentinel reports the trailer
was also stolen.
One Heart for Women.
and Children volunteers
were going to surprise
more than 500 families
with the gifts on Christmas
Eve.
The organization's presi-
dent Stephanie Bowman
says she doesn't know
what she'll do now..
Years ago, an anony-
mous donor provided gift's
for her own children after
picking their names from
an angel donanonr nee.
Bowman says the idea that
someone cared enough to"
buy gifts for a stranger's
kids changed her and she
vowed to help others.

Woman sentenced
for child porn
FORT MYERS -A
southwest Florida woman
has been sentenced to 25
years in prison for produc-
ing and distributing child
pornography.
Federal prosecutors in
Fort Myers said Tuesday.
that 31-year-old Candice
Marie Miller produced
sexually explicit images
of her two children and
distributed about 100 of
[them to a man she met


in an Internet chat room.
Miller was found with 500
images of child pornogra-
phy on a computer.
She pleaded guilty in July
to charges of possessing,
producing and transport-
ing child pornography.

Artist pleads guilty to
wildlife smuggling
NM LMRNI.BEACH A
Miami Beach artist faces
five years in prison after
pleading guilty to traffick-
ing protected wildlife.
Federal prosecutors say
48-year-old Enrique Go-
mez De Molina imported
animal parts for use in
bizarre sculptures that
sold up to $80,000.
He pleaded guilty Thurs-
day. Sentencing is sched-
uled for March 2. He also
faces $250,000 in fines. A
phone message'was left
Wednesday bv The Associ-
ated Press on a number
listed for De Molina.
The South Fiorida Sun
Sentinel repotted Wedne,-
dai that court papers
show De Molina imported
th e wildlife from C a,
Indonesia, Bali, Thlailand
and the Philippines. He
bought orangutan skulls,
a king cobra, a slow loris,
a woolly stork, skulls of
heavy-beaked birds called
hornbills, a rare bird called
the Himalayan Moial and
many other protected
species.

.Man gets 5 years for
stealing laptops
TAMPA- A Miami man
has been sentenced to
nearly five years in prison


the plan. The parties have
been negotiating for about
six months and talks are
likely to continue into next
year.
New Jersey lawmakers
tried a similar proposal
earlier this year, moving
Medicaid participants
into managed care plans
and requiring a $25 copay
for non-emergency room
ER visits. But that fee was
dropped after stakehold-
ers warned it wasn't likely
to deter behavior and that
hospitals would have trou-
ble collecting the money.
In 2003, Oregon in-
creased Medicaid pre-
miums for poor adults
to between $6-$20 and
enrollment dropped by
nearly half, or roughly
50,000 people. Enrollment
dipped 30 percent in Mis-
souri in the two years fol-
lowing the 2005 introduc-
tion of new premiums in
2005. In Maryland, 28 per-
cent of children dropped
out in one year after some
participants at. higher in-
come levels were charged
$37 monthly premiums,
according to the report.
"Florida's eligibility levels
for families are riot gener-
ous. That's why these pre-
miums would have such
a devastating effect. No
other state is charging pre-
miums to kids uniformly at


after authorities say he
led a group of thieves who
stole $7.4 million in mili-
tary laptop computers.
The St. Petersburg Times
reports Alvarez pleaded
guilty to a count of theft'
of government property.
During Tuesday's sen-
tencing, Alvarez was also
ordered to pay $2.8 million
in restitution.
From wire reports


this income level."
.But Florida lawmak-
ers say Medicaid patients
should not receive better
or worse benefits than res-
idents who pay for private
insurance and want Med-
icaid recipients to chip in
on costs.
The $100 copayshouldn't
be an issue because more
families will receive medi-
cal treatment from primary
care clinics instead of rely-,
ing on emergency rooms
for minor problems.
"I do not believe Med-
icaid recipients will drop
out because the benefits in
Medicaid ate very gener-
ous and other health care
options are unavailable,"
said Sen. Joe Negron, who
spearheaded the passage
of the health bills.


LI-II:it 1 IG FOR MORE NEWS? VISIT
'^ WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM








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i.-. -M I -- L. --r'- *


On Sunday, December 25, 2011 the Floridan will
publish It's annual In Loving Meioly page.
If y0o would like to pay tribute to a lo\ed one that
you ha\e lost, send the folllow1ng information along
with a photo and payment of $lIS. ll) to:

In LoWing Memory
c/o Jackson -County Floridan
P.O. Box 520
Marianna, FL, 32447

or drop by our office at.
4403 Constitution Lane, Marianna
between the hours of 8:00AM and 5:00pM.

Deadline is December 16, 2011 at 5:00p.M.


r - - n
Name of Loa ed One:
I-. . . I
Year Boni:
I \ear Died:
I message i ..... I - I '


I Phone Ntl nibel.


--I,


Bet.' Smith





9

1921 2005

i r -I 1


J.: I


level, 20 percentage points high-
er than the urban average. At the
eighth grade level, 32 percent of
Hillsborough students scored as
proficient in reading, compared
to 24 percent in large cities.
The average fourth-grade read-
ing score in Miami-Dade was
221, 10 points higher than the
211 urban public school average.
Thirty-two percent of Miami-
Dade students were rated as pro-
ficient, also higher than the large
city average. Eighth grade stu-
dents scored an average of 261)
points, five 'points higher' than
the urban a\ erige. Twenty-eight
percent scored at the proficient
level, not significant different
From 2009. :
Inii math. 43 percent of HiUl--
borough fourth-grade students
were rated as proficient, com-
pared to 33 percent in Miami-
,Dade. Both scores were higher
than the .national average. At
the eighth grade level, 32 per-'
cent were proficient in, Hills-
borough and 22 percent in Mi-
ami-Dade. The average score in


STATE


Miami-Dade was 272, not signifi-
cantly different from the average
scores of 274 for students in large,
urban school districts.
Florida Education Commis-
sioner Gerard Robinson praised
the results.
"The commitment and leader-
ship in these districts represent
Florida's focused mission to
reduce the academic achieve-
ment gap while supporting our
students in their pursuit of ex-
cellence," Robinson said in a
statement.
Across the 21 urban public
school districts analyzed, read-
ing scores remained mostly
flat, while average math scores
climbed in four districts.
"Despite their distinct chal-
lenges, many of these districts
are making steady progress in
math," said David Driscoll, chair
of the National Assessment Gov-
erning Board, which oversees
the NAEP exam. "But, like school
districts nationwide, they need
to find ways to raise student
achievement in reading."


I


I


--


- I







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN o www.jcfloridan.com


Blagojevich gets 14 years in prison


The Associated Press

CHICAGO Rod
Blagojevich, the ousted
Illinois governor whose
three-year battle against
criminal charges became
a national spectacle, was
sentenced to 14 years in
prison Wednesday, one of
the stiffest penalties im-
posed for corruption in
a state with a history of
crooked politics.
Among his 18 convic-
tions is the explosive
charge that he tried to
leverage his power to ap-
point someone to Presi-
dent Barack Obama's
vacated Senate seat in ex-
change for campaign cash
or land a high-paying job.
Judge James Zagel gave
Blagojevich some credit
for taking responsibility
for his actions which
the former governor did
in an address to the court
earlier in the day but
said that didn't mitigate
his crimes. Zagel also
said Blagojevich did good
things for people as gov-
ernor, but was more con-
cerned about using his
powers for himself.
"When it is the governor
who goes bad, the fabric
of Illinois ig torn and dis-
figured and not easily re-
paired," Zagel said.
As the judge announced
the sentence, which in-
cludes a $20,000 fine,
Blagojevich hunched for-
wardandhis face appeared
frozen. Minutes later, his
wife, Patti Blagojevich,
stood up and fell into her
husband's arms. He pulled
back to brush tears off her
cheek and then rubbed
her shoulders.
On his way out of the,
courthouse, Blagojev-
ich cited author Rudyard
Kipling and said it was a
time to be strong, to fight
through adversity and be
strong for his children. He
said he and his wife were
heading home to speak to
their daughters, and then
left without t answering
- .-. a n y ,q u e sd o n s :-- -
The twice-elected Dem-
ocrat received by far the
harshest sentence among
the four Illinois gover-
nors sent to prison in the
last four decades. .He is
the second in a row to go"
to prison; his 'Republi-
can predecessor, George
Ryan, currently is serving
6 1/2 years. The other two
got three years or less.
Blagojevich, in a last
plea for mercy, tried some-
thing he never had before;


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS.
Former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich departs his home in
Chicago on Wednesday for the second day of his sentencing
hearing on 18 corruption counts, including trying to auction
off President Barack Obama's old Senate seat.


an apology. After years of
insisting he was innocent,
he told the judge he'd
made "terrible mistakes"
and acknowledged that he
broke the law.
"I caused it all, I'm not
blaming anybody," Blago-
jevich said. "I was the gov-
ernor and I should have
known better and I am
just so incredibly sorry."
But Zagel gave him little
leeway.
"Whatever good things
you did for people as gov-
ernor, and you did some, I
am more concerned with
the occasions when you
wanted to use your pow-
ers ... to do things that
were only good for your-
self," Zagel said.
The judge said he did
not believe Blagojevich's
contention, as his lawyers
wrote in briefings, that
`his comments about the
corruption schemes were
simply '-.musings." Zagel
said the* jury concluded
and he agreed that Biago-
jevich was engaged in ac-
tual schemes, and the un--
deniable leader of those
schemes.
"The governor was not
marched along this crimi-
nal path by his staff," Zagel
said. "He marched them."
Prosecutors had asked.
for a sentence of 15 to 20"
years; which Blagojevich's :
attorneys said was too.
harsh. The defense also
presented heartfelt ap-


peals from Blagojevich's
family, including letters
from his wife and one of
his two daughters that
pleaded for mercy.
But the judge made it
clear early in the- hear-
ing that he believed that
Blagojevich had lied on
the witness stand when he
tried to explain his schem-
ing for the Senate seat, and
he did not believe defense
suggestions that the for-
mer governor was duped
by his advisers.
The 54-year-old was or-
dered to begin serving his'
sentence on Feb. 16. In
white-collar cases, con-
victed felons are usually
given at least a few weeks
to report to prison while
federal authorities select a
suitable facility.
Blagojevich is expected
to appeal his conviction,
but it is unlikely to af-
fect when he reports to
prison.
According to federal
rules, felons must serve
at least 85 percent, of the
.sentence a judge imposes
- meaning Blagojev-
ich wouldn't be eligible
for early release until he
serves nearly 12 years.
Going into the sentenc-
ing, many legal experts
said the governor was like-
;\ to get around 10 years. A
former Blagoje\ich f:und-
raiser, Tony Rezko, recent-
ly was sentenced to 10 1/2
years, minus time served.


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Pearl Harbor survivors stand at attention during the National Anthem during the Pearl Harbor
memorial ceremony on Wednesday in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.


Pearl Harbor survivors



group: We will disband


The Associated Press

PEARL HARBOR, Hawaii
- About 120 survivors of
the Pearl. Harbor bomb-
ing commemorated the
Japanese attack and the
thousands who lost their
lives that day 70 years ago
by observing a moment of
silence on Wednesday.
During the ceremony, a
group of survivors of the
Dec. 7, 1941, attack an-
nounced that they would
disband at the end of the
month. William Muehleib,
president of the Pearl Har-
bors Association, cited
age and poor health of the
remaining members.
Survivors will be able to
attend future commemo-
ration ceremonies on their
own. About 3,000 people,
including Navy Secretary
Ray Mabus and military
leaders, attended this year's
70th anniversary event at a
site overlooking the sunken
USS Arizona and the white
memorial that straddles
the battleship.
"It was time. Some of the
requirements became a
burden," Muehleib said af-
ter the ceremony. Most of
the survivors have realized
that at their age, there are
other things they'd like to
do, he said.
He said the association
has 2,700 members but
there are an estimated
7,000 to 8,000 Pearl Harbor
survivors. Local chapters
will function as long as
they have members and
survivors can gather so-
cially, but they will no lon-
ger have a formal, national
organization.
The group's announce-
ment came as President
Barack Obama hailed vet-
erans of the bombing in


a statement proclaiming
Wednesday as "National
Pearl Harbor Remem-
brance Day." The attack
brought the United States
into World War II.
"Their tenacity helped
define the Greatest Gener-
ation and their valor forti-
fied all who served during
World War II. As a nation,
we look to December 7,
1941, to draw strength
from the example setfby
these patriots and to honor
all who have sacrificed for
our freedoms," he said.
Also this week, five ash
scattering and interment
ceremonies are being held
for five survivors whose
cremated remains are re-
turning to Pearl Harbor
after their deaths.
On Tuesday, an urn con-
taining the ashes of Lee
Soucy was -placed on his
battleship, the USS Utah,
which is lying on its side
near the place where it
sank. The ashes of Vernon
Olsen, who was on the Ari-
zona during the attack, will


be placed on his ship late
Wednesday. The U.S. lost
12 vessels that day, but the
Arizona and the Utah are
the only ones still sitting in
the harbor.
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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton is greeted by
members of the audience after she defended the rights of
lesbian, gay, bi-sexual and transgender persons from around
the world on Human Rights Day in a speech entitled "Free and
Equal in Dignity and Rights," at the United Nations in Geneva,
Switzerland on Tuesday.

Obama, Clinton


to world: Stop gay


discrimination,


The Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO The
Obama administration's
declaration that it plans
to use foreign assistance,
international diplomacy
and political asylum to
promote gay rights abroad
is a momentous step that
could dangerouslybackfire
if not pursued with delica-
cy and an appreciation of
how the challenges faced
by gays and lesbians, vary
by nation, human rights
activists said.
President Barack Obama,
in a memorandum to ex-
ecutive departments, and
Secretary of State Hillary
Rodham Clinton, during
a speech before the U.N.
Human Rights Council, is-
sued a coordinated denun-
ciation Tuesday of anti-gay
discrimination, stating
that equal treatment of
gay, lesbian and transgen-
der people was an explicit
U.S. foreign policy goal,
The White House said
the twin moves represent-
ed the U.S. government's
first comprehensive strat-
egy to, combat sexual ori-
entation-based human
rights abuses around the
world. Gay rights groups
cheered the actions, not-
ing that gays and lesbians
can be arrested, tortured
and even executed in some
countries.
Wayne Besen, founder
of Truth Wins Out, a group
that monitors religious
organizations with anti-
gay views, listed Russia,
Nigeria, Cameroon, Ugan-
da, Iran and Zimbabwe
among the nations that
had recently "declared war
on... sexual minorities" and
said that he hoped they
would be chastened by the
administration's blunt talk.
"This was one of those
times where our nation
demonstrated true inter-
national leadership and
made me incredibly proud
to be an American,"' Be-


sen said. "There were no
carefully crafted and focus
grouped code words that
sugarcoated the abuses
- just the honest truth
spoken from the heart."
Other activists focused
on gay rights infernation-
ally were more restrained
in their praise. Neil Grun-
gras, founder of the San
Francisco-based organi-
zation for Refuge, Asylum
and Migration, which rep-
resents gay asylum-seek-
ers, said it was critical for
the administration to se-
cure allies on every conti-
nent to avoid looking like
it was imposing Ameri-
can values on parts of the
world that view the West
with mistrust or hostility.
Recalling how large
demonstrations, broke
out in Pakistani in June
after staff at the U.S. Em-
bassy held a gay pride
celebration there, he said
that Obama's sincere com-
mitment to improving the
gay rights picture globally
could inadvertently make
life worse for gays and
lesbians abroad.
"This cannot be seen as
a U.S.-only issue because
at the end of the day that
would be counter-produc-
tive," said Grungras, who
was in the audience for
Clinton's speech.
In his presidential memo,
Obama directed the State
Department, the U.S.
Agency for International
Development and other
agencies to make sure U.S.
diplomacy and foreign as-
sistance helps gays and
lesbians who are facing hu-
man rights violations. He
also ordered U.S. agencies
to protect vulnerable gay
and lesbian refugees and
asylum seekers. But. the'
directive does not make
foreign aid contingent on
a nation's gay rights record
or include sanctions for
poor performers, making
the policy more of a moral
challenge than a threat.


HHS says no to over-the-



counter morning-after pill


The Associated Press

WASHINGTON In a surprise
move, the nation's health secretary
stopped the Plan B morning-after
pill from moving onto drugstore
shelves next to the condoms, de-
ciding Wednesday that young girls
shouldn't be able to buy it on their
own.
The Food and Drug Administra-
tion was preparing to lift a contro-
versial age limit and make Plan B
One-Step the nation's first over-the-
counter emergency contraceptive,
available for purchase by people of
any age without a prescription.
But Health and Human Services
Secretary Kathleen Sebelius inter-
vened at the eleventh, hour and
overruled her own experts.
Plan B instead will remain behind
the pharmacy counter, as it is sold
today available without a pre-
scription only for those 17 and older
who show an ID proving their age.
Sebelius'. reason: Some girls as
young as 11 are physically capable
of bearing children, and Plan B's
maker didn't prove that younger
girls could properly understand
how to use this product without
guidance from an adult.
"It is common knowledge that
there are significant cognitive and
behavioral differences between old-


"What else can this be but
politics? It's not science. It's
not medicine. It's not women's
health."
Cynthia Pearson,
executive director of the National Women's
Health Network

er adolescent girls and the youngest
girls of reproductive age," Sebelius
said in a statement. "I do not believe
enough data were presented to sup-
port the application to make Plan B
One-Step available over-the-coun-
ter for all girls of reproductive age."
It was the latest twist in a nearly
decade-long push for over-the-
counter sales of pills that can
prevent pregnancy if taken, soon
enough after unprotected sex. Ma-
jor doctors' groups and women's
health advocates say easier; quicker
access to those pills could cut the
nation's high number of unplanned
pregnancies.
The decision shocked maker Teva
Pharmaceuticals, which had been
gearing up for over-the-counter
sales to begin by month's end, and
women's health groups.
"We are outraged that this ad-
ministration has let politics trump
science," said Kirsten Moore of the


Reproductive Health Technologies
Project, an advocacy group. "There
is no rationale for this move."
"What else can this be but poli-
tics?" said Cynthia Pearson, execu-
tive director of the National Wom-
en's Health Network, an advocacy
group that supports making Plan B
available to all ages. "It's not science.
It's not medicine. It's not women's
health."
Indeed, FDA Commissioner Dr.
Margaret Hamburg made clear in
her own statement that the deci-
sion is highly unusual. She said her
agency's drug-safety experts had
carefully considered the question of
young girls and she had agreed that
Plan B's age limit should be lifted.
"There is adequate and reason-
able, well-supported and science-
based evidence that Plan B One-
Step is safe and effective and should
be approved for nonprescription
use for all females of child-bearing
potential," Hamburg wrote.
But, she added, she had fol-
lowed her boss' order to deny Teva's
application.
"We commend the FDA for mak-
ing the recommendation ... and we
are disappointed that at this late
date, the Department of Health and
Human Services has come to a dif-
ferent conclusion," said a statement
Teva issued Wednesday.


Simpler credit card agreement gets a tryout


The Associated Press

WASHINGTON -A sim-
pler credit card agreement
is getting a tryout.
The Consumer Finan-
cial Protection Bureau
on Wednesday released a
prototype of a credit card
agreement that's written
in plain English. The idea
is to sweep away the legal-
ese and make it easier for
consumers to understand
a card's costs and terms.
The agency is asking
for the public's feedback
on the model agreement,
which can be found at
www.consumerfinance.
gov/ credit-cards/know
beforeyouowe.
For now, there are no
plans to require credit


card companies to adopt
the form. But if the agency
decided to make the form
mandatory once its test-
ing phase is over, it could
establish a consistent, in-
dustrywide template that
would make it easier for
consumers to comparison
shop for cards.
As it stands, the Con-
sumer Financial Protec-
tion Bureau noted that the
average credit card agree-
ment runs 5,000 words
and is packed with fine
print that consumers don't
understand.
The prototype agree-
ment, by contrast, is just
over 1,000 words and is
broken down into three
key sections costs,
changes and additional


information.
The form will be tested
over the first half of 2012
with new credit card ap-
plicants at the Pentagon
Federal Credit Union,
one of the nation's largest
credit unions. Some ap-
plicants will get the exist-
ing version of the credit
union's card agreement so
that the CFPB can com-
pare consumer feedback.
The American Bankers-
Association, which rep-
resents the banking in-
dustry, praised the model
form as a "good first step,"
but said it could be made
even shorter and less sus-
ceptible to costly lawsuits.


The Consumer Financial
Protection Bureauwas cre-
ated as part of the Dodd-
Frank Wall Street Reform
and Consumer Protection
Act to police the finan-
cial products marketed to
consumers.
Consumer advocates
have said that clearer
mortgage disclosures
could have helped prevent
the subprime crisis that
precipitated the financial
meltdown.
Since it officially began
operations this summer,
the agency has focused
on simplifying the disclo-
sures consumers receive
with financial products.


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Cops arrest man in Ga. girl's murder


The Associated Press

CANTON, Ga. A 20-
year-old maintenance
worker was arrested
Wednesday in the beat-
ing death .of a 7-year-old
north Georgia girl who
was abducted and killed
at an apartment complex
and her body left'in a trash
bin.
Ryan Brunn, who lived
and worked at the apart,
ment complex, was jailed
on a murder warrant, said
Georgia Bureau of Inves-
tigation Director Vernon
Keenan.
Jorelys Rivera was last
seen Friday evening leav-
ing the playground to
walk back home to get
drinks for her friends. Au-
thorities said they believe
she was taken to an empty
apartment in the complex,
where she was sexually as-
saulted, stabbed and beat-
en to death. Her body was
found Monday.
Keenan said Bninn, who
has no known criminal
record, had keys to the
empty apartment and
the trash compactor bin
where Rivera's body was
placed.
"We are confident that
Brunn is the killer and that
is why he is in custody,"
Keenan said, declining to
detail what evidence in-
vestigators have against
him.
.According to a warrant
obtained by The Associ-
ated Press, Brunn was
arrested on suspicion of
murder and making false
statements to authori-
ties. The' arrest warrant
says, '"the accused did


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Murder suspect Ryan Brunn, 20, of .Canton, Ga., is escorted
into the Cherokee. County jail in Canton, Ga., after he was
arrested Wednesday.
unlawfully and with mal- County jail. Lt. Jay Baker
ice aforethought cause with the Sheriff's Office
the death of Jorelys Rivera said Brunn's initial appear-
by hitting her on the head ance in Superior Court
with a blunt object." No was set for Thursday.
other details are contained Brunn, wearing a blue
in the document, which hooded sweat shirt and
was filed Wednesday, jeans, was arrested at the
Brunn's brother says apartment complex and
Brunn is not violent and taken in handcuffs to a
says he doesn't believe sheriff's patrol -car sur-
the younger man was rounded by a handful of
involved in the 'slaying. armed law enforcement
.Steven Brunn, 26, told officers. Video aired by
The Associated Press on WSB-TV shows Brunn
Wednesday night that "the keeping his head down
real person may still be. and ignoring comments
out there" plotting anoth- shouted by an observer.
er attack. Keenan said investiga-
"I don't know where this tors focused on Brunn af-
all is coming from," Steven ter receiving information
Brunn said. "They said it's from the public. Brunn
innocent until proven had been under police
guilty, but they already surveillance since Tuesday
done proved him guilty." night. Keenan said the in-
It was not immediately vestigation will continue
clear whether Brunn had for several months.
an attorney. He was be- "This is a mammoth
ing held at the Cherokee case," Keenan told report-


Big promise is seen in 2 new breast cancer drugs


The Associated Press

SAN ANTONIO Breast
cancer experts are cheer-
ing what could be some
of the biggest advances in
more than a decade: Two
new' medicines that sig-
nificantly delay the time
until women with very ad-
vanced cases get worse..
In a large international
study, an experimental
drug from Genentech
called pertuzumab held
cancer at ba'y for a median
of 18 months when given
'with standard 'treatment,
versus 12 months for oth-
ers given, only the usual
treatment. It also strongly
appears to be improving
survival; aind follow- up
is continuing to see if it
does.
"You don'f see -that very
often. ... It's a spectacu-
lar result," said one study
leader, Dr. Sandra Swain,
medical director of Wash-
ington: Hospital Center's
cancer institute."
In ha second study, an-
other drug long used in
organ transplants but not
tried against'breast 'can-
cer everolimus, sold as
Afinitor by. Novartis AG
- kept cancer in check
for a median of 7 months
in women whose disease
was worsening despite
treatment with hormone-.
blocking drugs. A compar--
ison group that received
only hormonal medicine
had just a 3-month delay
in disease progression.
Afinitor works in a novel
way, seems "unusually ef-
fective" and sets a new
standard of care, said Dr.
Peter Ravdin, breast can-
cer chief at the UT Health
Science Center in San An-
tonio. He has no role in
the work or ties to drug-
makers. Most patients
have tumors like those in
this study their growth


American Legion Christmas
event is Dec. 13
American Legion Christmas Cel-
ebration and Smoked Steak Dinner
is set for 6 p.m. on Tuesday, Dec.
13, in the American Legion build-.


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this photo taken Sunday. Rachel Midgett of Houston, Texas (foreground).stretches with
Heather Keister of Lubbock, Texas before heading to the start line to run in the half marathon
of the Las Vegas Marathon. in Las Vegas.


is fueled by estrogen.
Results were released
Wednesday at the San
.:Antonio .Breast. Cancer.
Symposium and some
were published online by
the New, England Journal
of Medicine. They come
a few weeks after federal
approval was revoked for.
another Genentech drug,
Avastin, that.did not mean-
ingfully help breast cancer
patients. It still is sold for
other tumor types.
. The new drugs are some
of the first major devel-
opments since Herceptin
came out in 1998. It has
become standard treat-
ment for a certain type of
breast cancer.
"These' are powerful ad-
vances ... an important
step forward," said Dr. Paul
Burstein, a breast expert at
Dana-Farber Cancer Insti-
tute in Boston who had no
role in the studies.
A reality check: The
new drugs are likely to be
very expensive up to
$10,000 a month- and so
far have not proved to be
cures. Doctors hope they
might be when given to


women with early-stage
cancers when cure is pos-
sible, rather than the very
advanced cases treated in
these studies.;
Even short, of a cure,
about 40,000 U.S. women
each year have cancer
that spreads beyond the
breast, and treatment can
make a big difference in
their lives.
Rachel Midgett :is an
example. The 39-year-'
old Houston woman .has
breast cancer that spread
-to multiple parts of her
liver, yet she ran a half-
marathon in Las Vegas on
Sunday. She has had three
scans since starting on
Afinitor nine months ago,
and "every time, my liver
lesions keep shrinking,"
she said.
"My quality of life has
been wonderful. It's amaz-
ing. I have my hair. ... If
you saw me you wouldn't
even know I have cancer."
Genentech, part of, the
Switzerland-based Roche
Group, applied Tues-
day to the federal Food
and Drug Administra-
tion for permission to sell


ing located on the west end of the
Jackson County Agricultural Center
parking lot, 3627 Highway 90 West
in Marianna.
Entertainment will be provided
by country music artist Roger
Whitaker.


pertuzumab (per-TOO-
zoo-mab) as initial treat-
ment for women like those
in the study.
The drug targets cells
that make too much of
a protein called HER2
- about -one of every
four or five breast cancer
cases: 'Herceptin attacks
the same target but in a
different way,'and the two
medicines complement
each other.
The study tested the,
combination in 808 wom-
en from Europe, North
and South America and
Asia and found a 6-month
advantage in how long
the cancer stayed stable.
All women also received
a chemotherapy drug,
docetaxel.
"That's a huge improve-
ment" in such advanced
cases, said study leader
Dr. Jose Baselga, associ-
ate director of the 'Massa-
chusetts General Hospital
Cancer Center. He is a paid
consultant for Roche.
The most common side
effects were diarrhea, rash
and low white blood cell
counts.


All veterans and spouses are in-
vited. Meal cost: $12.50 per person.
Members and guests are asked to
bring a dessert.
. R.S.VP. to 482-5526 by Dec. 9.

From local reports


Marianna Chapel
Funeral Home
3960 Lafayette Street
Marianna, Florida 32446
Phone 850-526-5059
Fax 850-526-3066


fames & Sikes Funeral
Home Maddox Chapel
PO Box 328
4278 Lafayette Street
Marianna, FL 32446
850.482.2332


Otis Harrison Charlie Relma
"l /1"-. . .


ers at a news conference in
Canton. "We believe that
this horrendous crime was
planned and calculated,
and we've recovered a lot
of evidence."
About 65 local, state
and federal investigators
worked the case and con-
ducted several hundred
interviews:.
"Our goal was to make
an arrest for what has hap-
pened to this sweet, inno-
cent little girl," Canton Po-
lice Chief Jeff Lance said.
Blue Ridge District At-
torney Garry Moss said
he had not yet decided
whether to seek the death
penalty.
When Rivera's body was
found, the community
where neighbors said they
all knew each other was
shaken and a makeshift
memorial took root at the
playground.
Investigators said they
received numerous tips
from the public and that
valuable evidence had
come from apartment
complex residents. They
also interviewed several
sex offenders living at the
complex, Keenan said. On
Tuesday he said officials
had no reason to believe
those sex offenders were
involved.
Steven Brunn, a tattoo
artist, said his brother "is
great with kids" and has
no criminal record. He
said he last saw his young-
er brother two months
ago. The family is origi-
nally from Brooklyn,' N.Y.,
he said, adding that Ryan
Brunn and his siblings
moved to .Georgia with his
mother several years ago.,


Play
From Page 1A

He wouldn't tell all the se-
crets of the play, but gave a
summary of what the audi-
ence can expect. Set inethe
1930s, the show surrounds
the life and times of Ben,
a character played by 75-
year-old Harvel. Chandler.
Ben is in a state of depres-
sion when the play opens.
He lost his wife to an ill-
ness in 1918, and his son
had died in World War I.
It's near Christmas, and
he's, feeling. bitter about
the cards that life had dealt
him. His transformation
into a happier man and
a community champion
begins after he hears a
strange noise in the barn
* on Christmas Eve. There's.
an angel involved ~some-
where along the way., As
Ben's life is changed 'in a
single night, he takes an ac-
tiop that changes the-lives
of the entire community.
Cox will say little else,
but describes his play as
a story of redemption and
renewal of faith. He further
describes this work, his first
attempt at fiction, as "his-
torical.Christian fiction."
Some of the other main


Drugs
From Page 1A
of a controlled substance,
cocaine; and Darryl Hayes
for three counts of sale of
a controlled substance,
cocaine.
Anyone with information
about these individuals is
asked to contact the Jack-
son County Sheriff's Office
at 850-482-9624 or 850-
482-9648 or CrimeStop-
pers at 850-526-5000.
Most of the drug trans-
actions took place on


Elections
From Page 1A
State offices on the ballot
are state attorney and pub-
lic defender for the 14th
judicial circuit, the Florida
Senate District 6 and Flor-
ida House of Representa-


Otis Harrison, 68, of Ma-
rianna passed away on
Wednesday, December 7,
2011 at Jackson Hospital.
He was employed by, Le-
high Furniture for 27 years
and was a resident of Jack-
son County most of his life.
He spent his leisure time
watching football and fish-
ing.
He was preceded in
death by his parents, Ben
and Laura Mae Harrison
and his brother Lewis Har-
rison.
Survivors include three
brothers, Odell Harrison
and wife Mae, Earl Harri-
son and wife Mary and
James Harrison and wife
Sandra; three sisters, Ruth
Hobbs and husband Her-
man, Martha Johnson and,
wife Johnny and Mary Har-
rison; and a host of nieces
and nephews.
Services for Mr. Harrison
will be held on Friday, De-
cember 9, 2011 and 10:00
A.M. at Marianna Chapel
Funeral Home with the
Rev. Mae Harrison officiat-
ing. Interment will follow
in Enon Baptist Church
Cemetery in Alabama.
A time of visitation will
be held one hour prior to
service time.
Marianna Chapel Funer-
al Home is in charge of ar-
rangements.
Expressions of sympathy
may be submitted online at
www.mariannachapelfh.co
m.


characters are played by
Arthur Basford, Charles
Tipton, Ted Bruner, Al-
fred Cox, Duane Davis,
Stanley Pittman, Russell
Register, Charles Hudson.
and Norman Davis. Their
characters will gather on
a bench at a storefront,
representing the old Bevis
Store in their community,
speculating over the nam-
ing of Two Egg. Props and
scenery pieces are mini-
mal, with church member
Rhonda Melnik in charge
of set design. Cox said he
was impressed by her work
on another production
and is pleased that she is
involved. Church member
Diane Tipton is in charge
odfmusic.
The youth of the church
will have 100 copies of the
book on. hand for sale at
$10' each, fundraising for
a trip they have planned.
They get 10.0 percent of the
proceeds. Cox will be there
'to autograph .the volumes
on the night of the play.
The church is located at
6595 Lovedale Road in the
Lovedale/Two Egg com-
munity. There will be an
exhibit of Two Egg memo-
rabilia on display in the
fellowship hall/theater.
For more information, call
592-5415 or 592-2134.


"Friendly Corner" or the
intersection of St. Andrews
Street and Barnes Street in
Marianna. Other drug sales
occurred around Marianna
Garden Apartments and
near Sanders Avenue and
Highway 77 in Graceville.
The investigation uncov-
ered about 38 people as
suspects on 77 charges in-
cluding sale of a controlled
substance, which involved
marijuana, cocaine, crack
cocaine and hydroco-
done, and trafficking of
the controlled substance,
hydrocodone.


tives Districts 5 and 7.
Officers for Groups 1, 3
and 6 on the Soil and Water
Conservation special dis-
trict will also be selected.
Nationally, the president
and vice president, U.S.
Senate and U.S. District 2
House of Representatives
slots are on the ballot.


3720 Caverns Road Marianna, FL 32446-1806 (850) 482-3964


Jackson County Vault & Monuments
Quality Service at Affordable Prices


850'482-1041


F eI'L


Obituaries


Pinecrest


IViercer



Charlie Relma Mercer,
88, of Dellwood died Mon-
day, Dec. 5, 2011 at Noland
Hospital in Dothan.
He was a native and life-
long resident of Dellwood
and served in the U S Army
for three years. Mr. Mercer
was also a truck driver for
Pyrofax Gas Company of
Marianna. for several years
and a member of Welcome
Assembly of God Church. *
He was preceded in
death by two brothers,
Herbert and Marion Mer-
cer; three sisters, Mildred
Green, Inez Edwards, Mary
Lewis.
He is survived by his
wife, Hazeline Mercer; one
daughter, Della Mercer of
Dellwood; one brother,
Harry Mercer of Dellwood;
two sisters, Lavern Ussery
of Knoxville, TN., Myra
McCroan of Belle Glade.
Funeral services will be
at 2 p.m. Saturday, Decem-
ber 10, 2011 'at Welcome
Assembly of God Church
with Dr: Thomas Batts offi-
ciating. Interment will fol-
low at Welcome Church
Cemetery with James and
Sikes Funeral Home Mad-
dox Chapel directing.
The family will receive
friends from 5-7 p.m. Fri-
day, December 9, 2011 at
James & Sikes Maddox
Chapel.
Expressions of sympathy
may be made online at ww
w.jamesandsikesfuneralho
me.com.


-------L -------1..--I-I~-.1..........~.~


-111. 1 ~ .......... 1


_I~----- I~


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2011 7At


LOCAL/NATIONAL






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


78A THURSDAY, DECEMBER 8.2011


Germany, France scale


back ambitions of summit


The Associated Press

BERLIN German and
French officials lowered
expectations Wednesday
for a deal to save the euro
at this week's European
summit, deflating inves-
tors' hopes for a broad
resolution to Europe's debt
crisis.
Instead of a new treaty
among the 27 members
of the European Union, a
French official suggested
a more likely outcome will
be an accord by the 17 na-
tions. that use the euro. A
German official said reach-
ing a deal might take until
Christmas.
The summit, which be-
gins Thursday night, has
been described as do-or-
die for some eurozone
countries, whose econo-
mies are being dragged
down by crippling debts.
Further urgency was add-
ed after the ratings agency
Standard & Poor's threat-
ened to downgrade Euro-
pean bonds. That would
likely make it more expen-
sive for governments to.
borrow.
German Chancellor An-
gela Merkel and French
President Nicolas Sar-
kozy released the details
Wednesday of a plan for
eurozone nations to sub-
mit their economies to
tighter scrutiny from a cen-
tral European authority.
That proposal was
cheered by markets be-
cause investors believe
such an agreement would
push the European Central
Bank to take bolder action
to reduce borrowing costs.
for Italy, Spain. and other
heavily indebted countries.
That would give govern-
ments time to strengthen
their finances.
After Thursday's ,com-
ments by the German of-
ficial, who like the French
official spoke on condition
of anonymity because the
talks are ongoing, the mar-
kets turned lower. Germa-
ny's main stock index fell
1.1 percent, while in the
U.S. the Dow Jones indus-
trial average dropped 0.6
percent. The euro shed 0.3
percent to $1.3358.
"There is a very, very
strong expectation that
the summit is going to be
a success so there is some
potential for disappoint-


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
U.S. Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner (right) is welcomed
by France's Finance Minister Francois Baroin prior to their
meeting with President Nicolas Sarkozy at the Elysee Palace
in Paris on Wednesday.


ment," said Stefan Sch-
neider, chief international
economist at Deutsche
Bank. "But if there is a con-
vincing plan, which in
-contrast to some of the
previous plans might
survive the next two or
three weeks, then that
could support markets
in the first two or three
months of next year."
In their letter to EU
President Herman Van
Rompuy, Merkel and Sar-
kozy stressed a decision
was needed at this week's
meeting to have the new
treaty in place by March.
"We are convinced that
we need to act without de-
lay," they wrote.
Herman Van Rompuy,
the president of the Euro-
pean Council, offered an
alternative way to secure
future fiscal discipline. He
favors simply amending
existing rules that apply to
the 17 countries that use
the euro. That would allow
leaders to avoid the tricki-
er step of requiring every
country to approve the
new treaty through parlia-
mentary votes.. ,
The German official dis-
missed the proposal as a
"typical Brussels bag of
tricks" that '"lag behind
both public and market
expectations."
He insisted that to restore
lost trust in the euro cur-
rency and calm markets,
Europe needed the legiti-
macy of a properly agreed
and ratified treaty.
"If several rounds of ne-
gotiations are necessary
for that then we are also
. prepared for that," the of-
ficial said, adding "there
is still no majority on new


treaty changes among
the member states and
institutions."
Indeed, he suggested the
talks, scheduled to wrap
up late Friday, might take
longer to reach an agree-
ment on the broad strokes
of treaty changes.
"We have made no plans
for the weekend," he said.
The senior French of-
ficial said Paris expects to
strike a deal with at least
the eurozone's 17 members
- and others who want
to join voluntarily by
Friday night.,
Certain provisions in the
Franco-German proposal,
such as setting automatic
penalties for countries that
overspend, are controver-
sial and have the potential.
to delay an agreement.
The 10 EU countries that
do not use the euro are
concerned that they'll be
left out of future economic;
discussions that would
affect all of Europe. Ger-
many has insisted that any
interested countries would
be welcome to adopt the
changes of the eurozone
17. British leader David
Cameron is wary of losing
influence within Europe if
France and Germany cre-
ate a tighter club of euro-
zone nations. His govern-
ment also does not want
to transfer any of its deci-
sion-making powers to
Brussels.
Earlier Wednesday, U.S.
Treasury Secretary Timo-
thy Geithner struck a more
optimistic tone on the
prospects for a deal.
"We are very encouraged
with the progress that is
being made,". Geithner
said to reporters.


S-w- v ny-
--O 10 \4


AgII


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this undated image provided by ABC, Syrian President Bashar AI-Assad speaks with ABC
News Anchor Barbara Walters for an interview that aired Wednesday on ABC.

Syria's president denies ordering

brutal crackdown on uprising


The Associated Press

SBEIRUT Syrian President Bashar
Assad said in a rare interview broadcast
Wednesday that he never ordered the
brutal suppression of the uprising in his
country and insisted only a "crazy per-
son" would kill his own people.
Apparently trying to distance himself
from violence that the U.N. says has
killed 4,000 people since March, Assad
laughed off a question about whether he
feels any guilt.
"I did my best to protect the people,"
he told ABC's Barbara Walters during an
interview at the presidential palace in
the Syrian capital, Damascus. "You feel
sorry for the life that has been lost, but
you don't feel guilty when you don't kill
people.".
"No government in the world skills) its;
people unless it is led by a crazy person,"
Assad added in the interview, which
was conducted in English. Assad, who
trained as an opthamologist in Britain,
speaks the language fluently.
The interview offered a rare glimpse
into the character of the 46-year-old
Assad, who inherited power from his
father in 2000. His brother widely re-
garded as the chosen heir had died in
a car crash years earlier.
Assad, who commands Syria's armed
forces, has sealed off the country to
most outsiders while clinging to the al-
legation that the uprising is the work of
foreign extremists, not true reform-seek-
ers aiming to open the authoritarian po-
litical system. The United Nations and
others dismiss that entirely, blaming the


regime for widespread killings, rape and
torture. Witnesses and activists inside
Syria describe brutal repression, with
government forces firing on unarmed
protesters and conducting terrifying,
house-to-house raids in which families
are dragged from their homes in the
night.
"They're not my forces," Assad re-
sponded when asked if Syrian troops had
cracked down too hard on protesters.
"They are military forces (who) belong
to the government. I don't own them. I'm
president. I don't own the country."
He said some Syrian troops may have
behaved badly, but they faced punish-
ment if so. He also said most of the peo-
ple who died in the unrest were his own
supporters and troops, slain by terrorists
and gangsters an allegation disputed
by most outside observers.
The comment that Syrian troops are
"not my forces" raised flags in Syria and
abroad because it suggests Assad might
uhim.ately try to lay the blame on his in-
feriors, analysts said.
"Those around him got the message,
which is he could abandon them at any
moment," said Muhieddine Lathkani, a
Syrian opposition figure in Britain.
Murhaf Jouejati, a Syria expert at
George- Washington University, said
Assad's interview was both "defiant and
delusional."
"He is the commander in chief of the
armed forces," Jouejati said. "To say that
the security forces do not have orders to
kill or to brutalize the people that it's
maybe the mistake of some bad apples
- is not a response."


Send your child's Santa letter to the Jackson County
Floridan and it will appear in our December 25, 2011
"Letters to Santa" special edition.
Your child will also receive a letter back from Santal


5 JYour $5 donation will go to

County teachers at no cost for
5 them use as a living textbook in






For Santa's reply letter, please include your
child's mailing address, gender, and age.
You can also mention a special
accomplishment, hobby, etc.


Submit your letters to:
Letters To Santa
c/o The Jackson County Floridan
P.O. Box 520 Marianna, FL 32447
or drop them off at our office at
4403 Constitution Lane.


aeneryl"T....


Just like healthy eating can boost your
energy every day, making a few small
changes at home can save you energy
every month.

Start by skipping the heated dry cycle
on your dishwasher. Then call FPU at
888.220.9356 and learn more ways to
save energy with ourfree energy check-up,
including our free weatherization kit.


rFW K
U T! L I T I E S
...-. erfi' ---


www.FPUC.com


kl&TC4I


Deadline to submit letters is 5 .m. December 12,2011
- I .. ..o ,. .. .;. /', . .


INTERNATIONAL


0*













Cottondale Basketball



Late charge lifts




Hornets past Gators


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com
The Cottondale Hornets overcame a
13-point second half deficit to pull out
a 66-60 road victory over the Wewahi-
tchka Gators on Tuesday night to stay
perfect in District 3-1A competition.
The Hornets (5-1) went on a 10-0
run to close the game to improve to 4-
0 in league play.
Jerrod Blount scored 31 points to
lead Cottondale, while Theryl Brown
scored 22 in the loss for the Gators.
Wewahitchka jumped on the visit-
ing Hornets early, taking a 16-4 lead


to start the game, but Cottondale
was able to fight back to cut the mar-
gin to four at 20-16 at the end of the
period.
The Hornets pulled ahead by a point
in the second quarter, but the Gators
answered with an 11-0 spurt to go
back up 36-26.
However, Cottondale kept the lead
within striking distance at 38-31 at the
half, but the Gators again responded
with a run of their own to push the
lead back out to double figures.
Wewa led 50-37 late in the third pe-
riod before the Hornets went on a 7-2
spurt to make it 52-44 going into the


fourth.
Prentice Webb knocked down a 3-
pointer for Cottondale to start the
final period, and the Gators were un-
able to shake free from the Hornets
again.
Trailing 60-56 with 3:13 remaining,
Cottondale scored 10 points in a row,
with a basket by Blount off of a pass
from DJ Roulhac with just under two
minutes to play putting the Hornets
up for good 61-60.
After a defensive stop, point guard
Cliff Canty drove the lane and dished'
See HORNETS, Page 2B


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Cottondale's D.J. Roulhac goes up for two in a recent
game against Sneads.


GVRRCEVUJr- R-SIKL"IRRL




A perfect start


Tigers improve

to 4-0 in district

with victory

BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

GRACEVILLE The Gracev-
ille Tigers and new coach Matt
Anderson entered this season
with a lot of questions thanks to
a largely revamped roster.
Five games into the season, the
Tigers are finding more answers
than questions.
Graceville won its fourth Dis-
trict 3-1A game in as many tries,
Tuesday night at home, beating
the Sneads Pirates 61-55 to im-
prove to 5-1 overall.
At 4-0 in the league and tied
with preseason favorite Cot-
tondale atop the district stand-
ings, it's a position that not even
Anderson believed the Tigers
would be in at the start. of the
year.
"It's unbelievable," the coach
said. "If you had told' me we
would be hittingg at 4-0 before the
season, I probably would've lost
that bet. I'm proud of the kids.
They're working verybhard."
The Tigers got another bal-
anced effort in the win over
Sneads, placing four players in
double figures led by Marquis
White's 13 points.
Diquan Johnson added 12,
Rasheed Campbell 11 and Isam
Britt 10 for Graceville.
John Locke had 22 points to
lead the Pirates, who fell to 2-2 in
the district and 3-2 overall.
"It was probably not our best
game, but Graceville played very
MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
See TIGERS, Page 2B Graceville's Allante Oliver-Barnes tries for two in a game against Wewa last week.


I Marianna Basketball


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Amp Speights takes a shot during a recent Marianna
game.

Bulldogs


fall to Rams
BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com
The Marianna Bulldogs fell to 1-3 on the sea-
son with a 71-52 home loss to the Rutherford
Rams on Tuesday night.
The game was close in the first quarter, with
the Bulldogs trailing by just two, but the Rams
blew the game open in the second period and
never looked back.
Rutherford outscored Marianna 20-9 in the
second quarter to go up 31-18 at the half, and
kept the lead in double figures through the
third period.
The Bulldogs were able to cut the margin to
nine at one point in the second half, but the
See BULLDOGS, Page 2B


GHS girls

explode in 2nd

half for win

BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com
The Graceville Lady Tigers used a mon-
ster second-half performance to take a 68- f
36 victory over the Sneads Lady Pirates on .
Tuesday night at home.
Graceville actually trailed 17-10 through
one quarter and led just 27-25 at the half e_ L.
before outscoring the visiting Lady Pirates
41-11 in the second half.
* Wynterra Pittman had 22 points to lead
the Lady Tigers, while Shanieka Jones add-
ed 13 points and-Zay Henderson 10.
Tasharica McMillon scored 21 points
to lead Sneads, with Logan Neel adding
10.
Graceville, which improved to 2-0 in Dis- .
trict 3-1A competition with the win, will
next play host to district and county rival
Cottondale tonight at 6 p.m.
Sneads, which fell to 0-3 in league play,
will play host to Vernon on Friday at 6 p.m. Shanieka Jones shoots two for Graceville against the
v; *: :' -


Coachless Lady Tigers

lose close one to Paxton
BY DUSTIN KEN'T
dkent@jcfloridan.com
The Malone Lady Tigers lost a close one to the Pax-
ton Lady Bobcats on Tuesday night at home, falling
42-40 in a. game they had to play without their coach.
First-year Lady Tigers
coach Byron Williams was
unable to attend the game "Wejust kind of
due to a family emergency, grinded through it. We
leaving Malone boys coach were at a disadvantage
Steven Welch to lead the because I don't really
team in his absence. .
Malone fell behind big Inow their stuff.
early, as Paxton led 17-4 in Steven Welch,
the first quarter. Malone boys coach
However, the Lady Tigers
answered back to cut the lead to four at halftime, and
even took the lead at 33-32 going into the fourth.
But the Lady Bobcats proved to be a bit too tough on
the interior and pulled it out late.
"We just kind of grinded through it," Welch said.
"We were at a disadvantage because I don't really
know their stuff. They led me through it and I helped
them out however I could. I thought they played hard
and gave great effort amid the distraction. I thought


Lady Gators. I
'I


See COACH, Page 2BL








JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN o www.jcfloridan.com


Malone mauls Paxton, 65-29

BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.cc rn

The Malone Tigers posted an-
other dominant victory Tuesday
night at home, routing the Paxton
Bobcats 65-29.
It was a matchup of undefeated
5-0 District 1-1A teams comiing in,
but the game proved to hardly be a ,':
meeting of equals.
Malone led from the start, going
up 26-14 at the half and using a 20- "
4 run in the secondhalf to blow the
.game open.
Ty Baker had 1. points and 15
rebounds to lead the Tigers. while
Chai Baker added 13 points and:, .
nin boards..
Antwain Johnson scored eight for
Malone and Chris Murff had sx.


"It was probably the best game
we've played all year," Tigers coach
Steven Welch said after the game.
"It was one of our best efforts. no
doubt. Maybe the best was the win
over Cottondale, but we played
with great defensive, energy all
night (against Paxton)."
The Bobcats were. averaging 67
points .per game coming in, but
were not able to crack the 20-point
barrier in either half Tuesday.
Star guard Marcus Bradley came
in averaging 24 points per game
for Paxton, but was held to three
by the Tigers while being guarded
primarily by Nlurff.
r'Murff did a great job on him,
and collectihely we did a good job
defensively," Welch said. "(Bradley i
is avery good player. He's a talented
kid, he just couldn't get an opening
tonight."
Chad Zessin led Paxton with 13
points.
Welch said that even though he
was very impressed by his team's
performance, he believes the Ti-
gers will see a much different Bob-
cats team the next time they do
battle.-
"The score is ve-r surprising to
me because I thought it would be
,a grind-it-out dogfight," he said.
"They are pretty good. I don't think
we got a true glimpse of how good
they are. We just got rolling."
Malone will finish the week Fri-
day at home against Laurel Hill for
homecoming.


Hornet
From Page.lB'

off to Blount for an
score to push the le
three.
Blount then made
free throws to salt the
away for Coriondale.
Hornets coach Chri
ert described the garr
"dogfight" for his teaT
"I felt like it was go
be a tough game," he
S"I knew they had a
team, but I didn't


. .... ., .. .'..... ;, ," ..
. ..... .. :

.. .



..'- ,


Malone's Chris Murf takes aim during last week's game against Marianna.
Malone's Chris Murff takes aim during last week's game against Marianna.


S. toplay from behind the
:s 'whole night. If it had just
been back and forth and
swapping leads all night,
that's the kind of game I
other expected. I didn't expect
ad to to have to play forn down
double digits. Every time
3 of -4 we made a run, they an-
game swered it."
Canty added nine points
s Ob- for Cottondale while ler-
ieas a emv Morrill had 15 fto
m. Wewa. Bryce Gerber and
ing to Raheem Wright each
Said. added 10 for the home
good team.
plan Obert credited lus team's


ulld g Pringley adding 13.
B u ldogs N^l Marianna coach Traiis
r.n...g-B Blanton said he could not
F r-.,nIP-B have been more impressed
Rams responded with one. by the Rams.
last chargetopushthelead "They're the best team
back out of reach. we've played, and that's
Khaliel Spearman had 19 evenwithout the Wade kid
points and Jai Jencks 16 to playing," he said. "I'd be
lead the Rams, who were very shocked if they're not:
without star guard John a final four team."
Wade. As for his team, Blanton
SQuay Royster led the said the Bulldogs contin-.
Bulldogs with 20, with Trae' ued to have some of the


Tigers'
From Page 1B .

well. They deserve a lot of
credit." Sneads coach Kel-
vin Johnson said after the
game. "In the first half, I
thought they out-hustled
us and out-worked us flat
out.
"In the second half,, we
just had a hard time put-
ting the ball in the basket.
We got some good looks,
but couldn't finish. We
just really struggled offen-
sively. But Graceville is a
good team. They're much
improved."
It was a nip and tuck first
half before a 7-0 Tigers run
late in the second quarter
opened things up.
Devonte Merit got a steal
and layup to start the run,
with a basket by Allante
Oliver-Barnes and a 3-
pointer by Marquavious
Johnson making it 27-191
GHS with 2:40 left in the.
half.
The Pirates answered
with four straight, but a 3-


pointer in the closing mo-
ments of the half by John-
son gave Graceville a 30-23,
halftime edge.
Sneads was able to stay
close in the second half,
getting to within two at
50-48 midway 'through the
fourth after a basket by
Troy Durant. .
However, Campbell.
quickly sped back down
the court for a bank shot,
and Britt scored moments
later on a layup after a
blocked shot by White at
the other end to make it
54-48 with 3:19 toplay.
Another .bank shot by
Campbell made it 57-50
Tigers with 1:36 to play,
and the speedy point
guard took the ball up the
court after a defensive stop
on the next possession
and dished off to Britt for
another basket to increase
the margin to nine.
Anderson credited
Campbell for his on-court
leadership Tuesday night
as well as the entire season
so far.
"He's playing under
control and doing a great


perimeter defense for
helping keep the Hor-
nets in the game. holding
WewLa point guard Sebas-
tian Quentin to just three
points, and keeping Brown
to just six points in the sec-
ond half.
"I thought DI did a
real good job on i Brown i to
slow him up in the second
half. IBrowni is real quick,'
the coach said. "Brandon
SFranklini and lerrod both
did a good job on iQuen-
tin to hold him to three.
"It wasn't easy. They've
got a real good point guard,


same problems that have
plagued therm in previous
games.
"We had 11 turnovers
and gave up 15 offensive
rebounds at halftime, and
it didn't get a whole lot
better in the second half,"
he said. "I still think team
chemistry is an issue, as
well as taljrig.care of the
ball. \Ve couldn't keep
them off the glass. It's just'
going to be aii ongoing


job for us," the coach
said.
"He's so fast, and he's
making good decisions.
I'm a pretty good coach
when I have a good point
guard and a pretty bad one
when I don't."
William:n. added 12 points
for Sneads, while )Dein.
Hayes scored eight and


a real good wing player,
and a real good post play-,
er, and. they've got guys
around them who play
their roles. They just came
out and hit us in the mouth
,and were hitting some'
shots early. We were prob-
ably not doing the best job
in transition defense, but
fortunately \we wele able,
to hang in there."
The Hoi nets will next
travel to Graceville on Fri-
day for another district
game against the rival
Tigers at 6 p.m. and 7:30
p.m.


issue.
"This team has got to
realize that we have to go
down fighting together.
They share responsibility :
for wins and losses. Uin-
til we can grow together
as a team and trust one
another. it's going to be
tough." ,
Marianna will nex ta'tfvel
to Walton on Friday to take


on thie Biae
1-4A opener.


_ in its District


Durant seven.
Graceville will next travel
to Altha tonight to take on
the Wildcats in another
district game. and finish
the %week at home Friday
against the rival Hornets of
Cpttondale.
Sneads will finish thLis
%week at home Ftiday night
against Vernon.


11.1"1~".: 1 'l:'L~f r


High School Boys
Basketball
Thursday- Graceville
at Altha,5:30 and 7 p.m.
Friday- Cottondale
at Graceville, 7:30 p.m.;
Vernon at Sneads, 5:30
and7 p.m.; Laurel Hill at
Malone. 5:30 and 7 p.m.;
Miarianna at Walton, 5:30
alid 7 p.m.

High School Girls
Basketball
Thursday- Cottondale
at Graceville,. 6'and7
p.m.; Malone at Bay, 5,
and 6 p.m.
Friday- Vernon at
Sneads, 4 p.m.; Eniter-
prise at Graceville, 6 p.m

Hope School
Hope School will host
its third annual Christ-
mas Invitational bas-
ketball tournament on
Friday at Grand Ridge
Middle School. '
Games begin at 9:30
a.m. and continue until
2:30 p.m. Hope School
will compete.with teams
from Ft. Walton, Pensac-
ola and Bay Cotunty.
The public can come
and thereis no charge


for admission.

Kids' Christian
Basketball League
Upward Sports, a
Christian sports league
for children, is coming to
Victory Baptist Church in
Sneads.-
Upward Sports teaches
sport fundamentals in an
environment of healthy
.competition,,helping
kids to develop skills
for the sports arena and
values for life.
Victory Baptist Church
offers basketball for kids
'pre-K4 to sixth grade.
The deadline to register
is Jan. 16, which is the
first week of practices.
SInterested parties
should call Victory
Baptist Church today
at 850-593-6699 for
moreinformation or to
register.

Sports Items
Semi till sports items
to .'dirorial@ijefloridan.
com, or fax then to 850-
482-4478. The mailing
address for tle paper is
.lackson County Floridan
P.O. Bo.x 520 Marianina,
FL 32447.


C ""oach, ;' not at full strength. (Pax-
Oach ton) beat us up on the.
boards a litre bit, and
-r.,,inF., .. i they were a little deeper
they dida great job under than us and that had an
the circumstances. effect."
"\Ve played hard and Curteoona Brelove had
had a shot to win it at the 15 points to leadMalone.
end, which is all you can The Lady Tigers will
ask for on any night, but next play tonight at Bay
especially when you're High.
... .. . -_ ....... -_ : .. .. '. . ::. ... . . .. . . -


Guillen: Marlins


reach deal with


..lefty Buehrle


Tnie- ..,, t[ d re..

Dr' ALLAS The Miami
Marlins plucked another
free agent prize Wednes-
day. reaching, .a deal
with four-time All-Star.
pitcher Mark Buehrle
for $58 million over four
years.
Manager Ozzie Guillen
praised Buehrle over and
over at baseball's winter
meetings. They were to-
gether on the Chicago
White Sox this season,
and Guillen was eager to
have the left-hander on
his side next year.
"This kid .is special,"
Guillen said. "He pitched
in the big scenarios, big


moments, very tough city
to pitch. When people
love you in Chicago, that
means something." .,
Buehrle's deal .is
subject to 'a physical,
which the sides were
..arranging.
The32-year-old Buehrle
has been one of the ma-
jors' most durable and ef-
fective pitchers for more
than a decade. He has
reached double figures in
victoriess and thrown over
200 innings in each of the
last 11 seasons, all with
the White Sox.
Buehrle was 13-9 with
a 3.59 ERA this year and
won his third straight
Gold Glove.


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72B o THURSDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2011


SPORTS


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EK


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Major League Baseball


Marlins show Jose Reyes the love and money


The Associated Press

DALLAS -Jose Reyes felt
the love from the Miami
Marlins. And the money.
When the free-agent
signing period began last
month, the Marlins want-
ed to meet the All-Star
shortstop right away as
in not a minute to spare.
So owner Jeffrey Loria
and top baseball executive
Larry Beinfest arranged
a midnight rendezvous
with Reyes and his agent
in Bemelmans Bar at The
Carlyle, the New York hotel
famous for hosting Presi-
dent John E Kennedy and
Marilyn Monroe a half-
century ago.
"12:01. Those guys are
crazy," Reyes said Wednes-
day, when his $106 million,
six-year contract was final-
ized. "They showed me a
lot of love."
Leaving the cash-
strapped New York Mets,
who signed him when he
was 16, Reyes accepted
an offer that pays him $10
million in each of the next
two seasons, $16 million
in 2014 and $22 million
in each of the final three
years. Miami has a $22 mil-
lion option for 2018 with a
$4 million buyout, which
could raise the total to
$124 million.
Reeling from three
straight. losing .seasons,
$70 million in losses and
a lawsuit seeking to re-
cover money from their
owners for the victims of
the Bernard Madoff Ponzi
scheme, the Mets never
inade a formal proposal to
retain their first NL batting
champion.
"They didn't make a real
offer, so that means they
don't want me there,"


THEASSOCIATED PRESS
Miami Marlins owner Jeffrey Loria (right) looks over to Jose Reyes during a news conference
at the Major League Baseball 2011 Winter Meetings in Dallas on Wednesday. The Marlins
introduced the newly signed free-agent shortstop.


Reyes said. "I need to move
on."
After trading Francisco
Rodriguez and Carlos Bel-
tran, All-Stars are disap-
pearing as fast from the
Citi Field home clubhouse
as spectators are from
the stands. Reyes sound-
ed hurt that the Mets
made little effort to retain
him.
"If you're asking whether
I should have sent him
a box of chocolates, per-
haps I should have done
that," general manager
Sandy Alderson said. "But
on the other hand, the box
of chocolates would have
cost $106 million."
Wearing the new look of
the Marlins a cap with
a blue, white, orange and
yellow "M" with a swoosh
that looks like it could be a


logo for a fast food chain -
Reyes' dreadlocks dangled
onto the white jersey of the
team, which was renamed
from the Florida Marlins
as it prepares to move into
its $515 million downtown
ballpark next season.
It appears as Reyes' bank
account swells, his hair will
shorten.
"We have team rules,
Period," Loria said. "Every-
body adheres to them."
Beinfest, Miami's presi-
dent of baseball opera-
tions, said he arrived at
11:56 p.m. for the initial
meeting.
"Jeffrey walked into the
Hotel Carlyle with a long
overcoat because it was
about 12 degrees out,'and
under the overcoat was
the Jose Reyes new Mar-
lins jersey that had not


been released yet," he
said. "A few other people
in the bar thought that this
was some sort of strarige,
freaky show, because the
owner of the team stood
up and literally went like
this, and underneath was
Jose Reyes' jersey," Bein-
fest said, pulling apart his
jacket by the lapels. "We
then ordered some drinks
and stayed around for a
couple of hours just talk-
ing and getting to know
each other, and a few days
after that Jose came down
to Miami and saw the ball-
park. So 12:01 to us was al-
ways a big deal because we
wanted to show Jose from
the beginning that we had
an idea."
A four-time All-Star, the
28-year-old Reyes hit .337
and also topped the league


with 16 triples, while also
stealing 39 bases. But ham-
string injuries have limited
him to no more than 133
games in any of the last
three years.
He joins a team that sud-
denly aspires to be among
baseball's big spenders.
When the meetings began
Monday, the Marlins final-
ized a $27 million, three-
year contract with closer
Heath Bell. And the winter
meetings have been domi-
nated by Miami's pursuit
of three-time NL MVP Al-
bert Pujols.
"It's a perfect situation
in Miami," Reyes said. "We
have a lot of talent there
and the new stadium,
the weather, close to Do-
minican, a lot of Spanish
people there, so I think I'm
going to like it and enjoy it
as much as I can."
His arrival means All-Star


shortstop Hanley Ramirez
will have to move to third
base. Loria said he spoke
with him.
"It was an upbeat con-
versation. He's going to be
a member of our team,"
the owner said.
For months, Reyes had
been waiting for the Mets
to make an offer. Alder-
son said Friday and early
Saturday that he thought
maybe some of the pa-
rameters he suggested
could develop into an of-
fer, but by Saturday night it
was clear to him the Mets
weren't willing to pay what
was needed.
The realization of the
switch dawned on Reyes
on Sunday night, when
agent Peter Greenberg ac-
cepted the Marlins' offer.
Greenberg said Reyes' re-
action was simple: "I'm a
Fish."


THURSDAY MORNING I AFTERNOON DECEMBER 8, 2011
6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:0010:3011:0011:3012:0012:30 1:00 1:30 2:00 2:30 3:00 3:30 4:00 4:30 5:00 5:30
20 The Early Snow (l)I i.-e:; l Griffihh Millionaire Lei' Make a Deal til The Price is R.ght rlit ) deis Young & Resiless Bold The Tain Iv. ;.,:,l Nele Berkus The Dr Oz Snow ireas New Ne.s CBS hews
3 WTVY News 4 The Early Show (N) (In Stereo) rm LIvel With Kelly 9 iThe Price Is Right (N) Young & Restless Live at Bold rhe Talk (In Stereo) Let's Make a Deal (N) Rachael Ray (N) S0 Ellen DeGeneres News CBS News
5 0 NewsChannel7 Today Today Jessica Biel:Seth Meyers; Evan Lysacek. (N) (in Stereo) 0I Days of our Lives (N) News 7 atNoon Rachael Ray (N) EM Millionaire Jeopardyl The Doctors (N) 8H Ellen DeGeneres News NBC News
8 0 News 13 This Morning Good Momrning America (N) B Livel With Kelly IThe View (In Stereo) WMBB Midday News TheChew (In Stereo) One Life to Live General Hospital (N) Dr. Phil (N) (In Stereo) The Dr. Oz Show News ABC News
10"1 Auto Tech Paid Prog. Eco Co. Chris Funniest Home Videos Justice Judge B. Nate Berkus Anderson (In Stereo) Syfrett Paid Prog. America America Judge Mathis [W The People's Court Jdg Judy Jdg Judy RightThisMinute ra
11(i Arthur. Martha Curious Cat in the Super Dinosaur Sesame Street Sid |WordWrld Super |Barney Calliou SId Dinosaur Cat In the Curious Martha Arthur WordGrl Wild Kratt Electric Fetch |NewsHour
7 SHOW GourAn -p ficonVPewasva rlAfri NfR' Hap y'fNEerfArterl'r PG *DealnaraFuar~,friaTi R "Sut raci TAo' *. 12C'|6 H-.,rO.) R SBams Mulndar** ?2010)'R ThEcvif1se' 0 * 200F) A |te1r.O Julva ** i2010.Drarr. ) PG'
14 NICK Sponge Sponge Sponge. Sponge Mal, Ruby MaxRuby Dora Dora.. BubDie Bubble Dora Dora UemIooma Unilzoomi Spange KungFu WieClubCany iCari ICarly ICarly iCairy iCarly
16 TBS Home Imp. Home Imp. Prince Prince Prince Payne Browns Browns Payne Jim Yes, Dear Yes, Dear Amer. Dad Earl Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond .Friends Friends Friends Friends King King
17 HBO (50iS00 ci 'feryS' yi y M t' *i' lHar.k A:ana Amelea'"* 120091Hilary warl, 'PG 0 -Un,*n'*it \ r IllLiarmneile.ni Strangers 'e ;iy.able Mew*, (i010 Cor.dyl PG Concnordis lf'ilnnle ir'sn-i. **'. |(20l)I0I
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19 ESPN SportsCenter ] SportsCenter m |SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (L!ve) SportsCenter (N) (Live) Report Football NFL Live (Live) IM Around Pardon SportsCenter (N) (Live)
20 CSS Mayhem in the A.M. (N) (Live) SportsNite (In Stereo) In Huddle Heal Power-Julcing Paid Prog. PaId Prog. Bamhart & Durham (N) College Football: Troy at Arkansas Slate. In Huddle Game : Aggle Hurricane SportsNIte (N) 9M
21 DISN Lrse Chugging Mickey Pirates Mrckey Mickey Mouse Lile Mickey Mickey 3id & Bird Agentr O o Ju.Igie [Pirales iLe rm are Chnsiri Pr t' Gooa Good Good Jessie Jes'e Shake It Good
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23 TNT ]Angerl I I,, Cn3rmea ii, ': iT.e.i C armeaO Ir.' :,l.,'.. Supernatlral Il Supernaturai i Smarliilii Lup,ri- Le, as Vegas iV g'i I':,.i V a Las Vegas ,I f.i3 Toe Cioer Law & Oraer Filual Law & Order ri.:.r.r,, Bones (in Stereo)
24 DISC Paid Prog. IJ. Robison J. Meyer Pald Prog. Almost, Away Almost, Away Gold Rush: Alaska Dirty Jobs (In Stereo) American Chopper American Chopper American Chopper .American Chopper ,Sons of Guns Sons of Guns SB
25 TWC Your Weather TodayWith Abrams and Bettes WI Wake Up With At Day Planner I Storms IStorms Full Force |Full Force
26 USA Law Ci Law Oruer: Cl lup.,rf * i* ?00a. Rr.marce-CComery) juii Rotert Buiri ollcali Burn Nontice 'I Burn Nolice L. Burn Nolice a-, Burn police oI Burn Iotilce ID' Burn Nolice J Law & Order: SVU
28 FAM Boy Worna Boy World WnatiLiKe Wnat Like Full House 700 Club The 700 Club iI Gllimorei Girls lStillSn StlillSind Grounded |Grounoed My Wile IMy Wile 8 Rules 8 Rules 70s Show 70w Sno* 70s Snow 70s Show Jack Frost
29 LIFE Balancing Designing Reba Reba WillGrace Will/Grace Will/Grace Wlll/Grace Chris Chris Chris Chris Desp.-Wives Grey's Anatomy I Grey's Anatomy WI How I Me How I Met Reba Reba Unsolved Mysteries
30A&E The First 48 The First 48 0 The First 48 r' The First 48 The First 48 B The First 48 The First 48 The First 48 "Ditched" The First 48 0 The First 48 The First 48 B The First 48 N
32 SYFY Snark Vac PaidProg Warernouie 13 i Eureka I.i,,, r, A.r Eureka i.'i.Ti: Eurekaier':l Eureka i, l.-ji Eurekain :.,re-aco urek r Eureka | Eureka t .i Eurekl.ai'"le iEr -e: EureKaiw.E :i.i",'.I 'Fircl."Caspan"
33 AMC TrVia Cceleilair Sexy No. |Mop Stooges Slooges 1f-frc rr -'**** l' i'3. Core CDraaTlSear PenRn. R I ttJmt Biacll' i (1 TThe Gnm Reaper asume- IhrE orm ol a rei:enly deceased Tma TeaCe' Te.'*** 12004I PG r3',5I
34 MTV AMTV f.lui..: ... AMTi 10 on op Next Next Next Next Made I'. 'ier.-':.l Teen Mom 2 Catch up Teen Mom 2 116 and Pregnant oin i..'i ,it 16 and Pregnant l ii'..t'., B 70s Snow 70s Snow 70s Show 70O Snow
35 BET inspiration Popoff Chris Cnr's Bernie Bernie Bernie Bernie Parkers Parkers My Wife My Wife iHair P.l I rad'1i107, Ah ion) urupr l Cnris Cnris My W.le My Wife Parkeis Parkers rIr & Park. Top 10
36 TOON Hero Beyblade Poemon Squirrel Jonnny T Johnny T Codenine Codename lAImost Squirrel Looney Tune Looney Jerry tom-Jerry Almost Looney Johnny T Jonnny T Aoventue Regular MAD Gumbal JonnnyT
39 HIST The Most 11 Modem Marvels OM Declassdied 0 Super City: New York Manhattan's evolution. Modem Marvels Wa Big Shrimpin' WI Modem Marvels WI Declassified OM Super City: New York Manhattan's evolution. Modem Marvels WI
40 TVLND Lose30Lb IPaid Prog. Leave Leave Van Dyke Dick Van Dyke Bewitched Griffith Griffith GoodTime [Jeffersons Sanford Bonanza"The Wild One" Bonanza Bonanza Bonanza M'A*S*H W
43 CNN2 (5:00) Morning Express With Robin Meade News Now Courtroom updates and analysis. HLN Special Report Prime News WI
45 CNN. (5:00) American Morning (N) Wa CNN Newsroorh (N) CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) The Situation Room With Wolf Blitzer (N) John King, USA (N)
46 CW (5:00) The Daily Buzz W Steve Wilkos Show Jeremy Kyle Payne Payne TBA ITBA TBA [BA Steve Wilks, Show Lifechangr ,Llfechangr Browns Browns '70s Show '70s Show 'Til Death King
47 SPIKE 1OmlnGym Paid Prog. Triverex WEN DEA (In Stereo) CS1: NY (In Stereo) CSI: Crime Scene CSI: Crime Scene CSI: Crime Scene CSI: Crime Scene Jail Wa Jall I Jail a Jail WI Jail WI Jail WI Jail WI Jail W
49 HGTV Thread My House Walls Talk Walls Talk Holmes on Homes Unsellable Unsellable Untellable Designed House |Hunters Design Design Design Design Genevieve Genevieve First Place First Place First Place First Place First Place First Place
98 TLC 19 Kids and Counting Baby Baby Baby's Pregnant Pregnant Say Yes Say Yes What Not to Wear Baby Baby Multiples Baby's Police Women Police Women Police Women Police Women
99 SPEED Monster Jam Dumbest Dumbest Pimp, Ride Pimp, Ride My Ride My Ride Paid Paid NASCAR Racing: Sprint Cup: Wonderful Pistachios 400. Gearz Hot Rod Barrett-Jackson Spec. Monster Jam Pimp, Ride Pimp, Ride

THURSDAY EVENING / LATE NIGHT DECEMBER 8, 2011
6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:0010:3011:0011:30112:0012:30 1:00 1:30 2:00 2:30 3:00 3:30 4:00 4:30 5:00 5:30
2 0 Wheel Jeopardy! Big Bang Rules Person of Interest I Jl) The Mentailsi News Late Snow Letlterman Late Lale ShooiCraig Exlra (pi Up lo the Minute ri) "ii i ).. CBS Niews Dayoreak Good Morning Snow
3 Q News Wheel Big Bang Rules Person of Interest (N) The Mentallst W News Late Show Letterman Late Late Show/Craig Inside Ed. Up to the Minute (N) (In Stereo) CBS News WTVY News 4
5 0 News Wheel Commun Parks The Office Whitney Grimm (N) (In Stereo) News Tonight Show w/Leno Late Night Carson Today (In Stereo) Extra (N) The Bankruptcy Hour Shepherd's Chapel Early Tdy NewsChannel7 Today
8B News Ent Wipeout (N) (In Stereo) Funniest Home Videos Big American Auction News Nightline Jimmy Kimmel Live Excused Jim Access H. Pald rog. Paid Prog. ABC World News Now (N) Ia Morning News 13 This Morning
10 ( 12 Days Big Bang The X Factor WI Bones.(In Stereo) (PA) Scrubs How I Met Big Bang Two Men 30 Rock Friends Friends KingHill Scrubs Two Men Paid Prog. The People's Court Paid Prog. Shepherd's Chapel Paid Prog. Outdoor
11 ( NewsHour Fla. Face Great Performances: Andrea'Bocelli Live In Central Park The A to Z Guide to Healing Charlie Rose (N) WI Great Performances: Andrea Bocelll Live In Central Park The A to Z Guide to Healing NOVA WI'(DVS) Clifford Wild Kratt
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14 NICK Sponge. Sponge. MyWife My Wile 7Os Snow 70 Snoi. George George Friends Frircis Friens Frieds O. 70snu 70s Snow Chtris My Wile Tne Naney Tne Nanny Tne Nanry Tne Nanny Maners TBA Matter Matters
16TBS Seinleld Semilei Fam Guy Fam Guy BigBarg BigBang BigBang BIgBang ConanrBiTina ineeOfice Th-eOffice Coansun Seineea SEineld 'Ratiii.a.:ew* (I.Jl .Comr dyI] Manied Marrime Married Married
17 HBO 14,r-0.ma ierem'o ilR' Unkmnicn * \ (2011) LIam rn .Erfn Hung RealSee ;i"..:i Enlighten Oiner a. 'rimi..'ks' *i * 125101 .ui Dfid ln. *r a i nl K.e/,n B.8,r,1 ;1,ltiinid"u
18 ESPN2 College Baskeeball l ci ..at iC..,,-i.,:r..:uW l College BasKeiOali Sportsialion aQ iFFL LiveILt.-tI.-J Baseriali College Football Awards Oiir i SpornsCenler iL SpporlCerter 1 NFL Live 1 MIKe and Mike
19 ESPN Audibles (N) (Live) SEC Storied (N) College Football Awards From Orlando, Fla. SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) College Football Awards From Orlando, Fla. SportsCenter WI SportsCenter a8
20 CSS SEC ACC College Football: ACC Championship Clemson vs. Virginia Tech, SportsNIte (In Stereo) Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Frog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Pald Prog. Pald Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Walk Fit
21 DISN ANT Farm Jesile Auslirn "1c-LuCih CUan"' ANT Farm Jessie (Auslin qood Wizards Wizards Good GCood Random ANT Farm Dec Deck Phineas Pnineas Phireas Phineas Jungle Little
22 MAX "T~e LostA itan .Ju asc Pan' .ar LiRr'* 1 (1907)0 'Thie uiual SuS't.s' s (1935)' Co-Ed Conllaentiai 2Sopnomoresa Wti S ae r ** t|i'871 Miro.el D.:rugias C.nt,nce" c 1(20',i) R Murer 0lrri,. O1et Epr.s'I192-1 PG1PG
23 TNT Bones Quarantined. CSI: NY"Hostage" CSI: NY "Veritas" CSI: NY"Justified" CSI: NY"Jamalot" CSI: NY "Veritas" CiS NYIY, .il,a.:.) LeverageeC Law &Oroer ,ii-i La* a Order .litr.yy Law & Order Angel0, Iei
24 DISC Sons of Guns Sons of Guns W Moonshiners a Weed Wars (In Stereo) Moonshiners W Weed Wars (In Stereo) Sons of Guns 0a Sons of Guns WI Paid Prog. PaIdProg. MagicJack Pald Prog. Paid Prog. IPaid Prog. Paid Prog. Pald Prog.
25 TWC Weather Center 0 Happen Happen Full Force Full Force Weather Center Wa Happen Happen ull Force WFullForce Weather Center WI Happen Happen Full Force Full Force First Outlook Wa Wake Up With Al
26 USA Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Bum Notice (N) WI Covert Affairs WI NCIS "Chained" W Burn Notice ,T1 iFaecome ioe ,;r Jena.1'* w. Law Order Ci1 La* Order Cl Lav Order CI
28 FAM Frosty's Cranberry Santa Claus, Town Year Without a Santa Miser Brothers he 700 Club I Whose? Whose? Orec Vac alr o110Sle-p? Younger Tne700OCluanQ' Bun Lutt Tnvaa Prince Lirle today J Meyer World
29 LIFE Unsolved Mysteries Project Accessory Project Accessory Project Accessory (N) Project Accessory Project Accessory Project Accessory Project Accessory Project Accessory Cindy C Total Gym Paid Prog. Younger Sexy Face MagicJack
30 A&E The First 48 WB The First 48 a The First 48 (N) Ba Beyond Scared Amer. Most Wanted The First 48 W The First 48 W0 Beyond Scared Amer. Most Wanted Paid Prog. Tom-Wear Paid Prog. MagicJack Paid Prog. Paid Prog.
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35 BET 106 & Park. Top1O0 Re- Lirs Re Lines The Game a) BEv', * i2001 Dramirn Ty-ese Gitcon Ir Wenay WiIIuamn, Show' 'Blue Hi 4Leu'W 2iJ1i Cnmp Dramnl Panther BET Inspiration Popoff BET Inspiration
36 TOON Johnny T Adventure Regular MAD King/Hill KIng/Hill Amer. Dad Amer. Dad Fam.Guy IFam. Guy Chlidrens Aqua Aqua Amer. Dad Amer. Dad Fam. Guy Fam. Guy Childrens Mole Men Aqua King/Hill King/Hill Looney Ben10
39 HIST Big Shrimpin' B Big Shrimpin' a Swamp People WI Big Shrimpin' WI Off the Grid: Big Shrimpin' W Swamp People WE Big Shrimpin' a Off the Grid: Grt Pillow Paid Prog. Brk. Bod. Wealth Oreck Paid Prog.
40 TVLND MWA'S*H M*A'SH Home Imp. IHome Imp. Raymond ond o Raymon d Raymond Raymond King King King King Roseanne (In Stereo) Roseanne The Nanny Nanny 3's Co. 3's Co. The Nanny (n Stereo) The Nanny Carol B MaglcJack
43 CNN2 Jane Velez-Mhtchell Nancy Grace (N) Dr. Drew The Joy Behar Show Showbiz Tonight Dr. Drew Nancy Grace Showbiz Tonight The Joy Behar Show Showbiz Tonight Dr. Drew Morning Express
45 CNN Erin Bumett OutFront Anderson Cooper 360 Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 Erin Burnett OutFront Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 Anderson Cooper 360 Piers Morgan Tonight World Business Today AM: Wake Up Call (N) American Morning (N)
46 CW Senfeld Seinfeld The Vampire Diaries The Secret Circle Cops TII Death King South Pk South Pk Roseanne Roseanne TBA PaidProg. PaidProg. Vacuum MaglcJack No Sleep? Better (N) (In Stereo) PaidProg. The Dally Buzz WM
47 SPIKE Jal IK Jail = J Ial Ji aJaIli IMPACT Wrestling (N) (In Stereo) lI MANswers MANswers MANswers (In Stereo) GTTV MANswers MANswers MANswers MANswers Ways Die Triverex Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Vacuum Paid Prog. Paid Prog.
49 HGTV Hunters House Celebrity Holiday House Hunters Selling LA |Selling NY House Hunters House Hunters Selling LA Selling NY House Hunters Celebrity Holiday Younger WORX Paid Prog. Mop TriVita Clever
98 TLC Police Women D.U.I. D.U. D.U.I. (N) D.U.I. (N) Celblock 6 D.U.I. D.U. Cellblock 6 D.U.I. D.U.I. Police Women Paid Prog. Paid Prog. MaglcJack Paid Prog. Oreck Vac Paid Prog. 19 Kids 19 Kids
99 SPEED Pass Time Pass Time Pimp, Ride Pimp, Ride Pumped Pumped Trucker Trucker Pimp, Ride Pimp, Ride Pumped Pumped Trucker Trucker Boat Race BoatRace Gearz Hot Rod Garage Truck U PaidProg. PaidProg. PaidProg. PaidProg.


Patsy Sapp, Tim Sapp,
Licensed Agent Broker/Owner,
Realtor





Tim Cell (850) 209-3595
Office (850) 526-5260
Fax (850) 526-5264

artsE,. 4257 Lafayette St.
Marianna, FL 32446 "
www.floridashowcaserealty.com


B5216-526


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 8,12011 3BF


SPORTS







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


PEANUTS BY CHARLES SCHULTZ
YES, MA'AM., PO WE HAVE I MEAN,DO WE HAVE
ABOUT THIS TO READ THE TO READ THE PREFACE,
INTRODUCTION AND THE
E 5ELECTEDP BBLIO6RAPHY?


BORN LOSER BYART AND CHIP SANSOM
SIUSIE.OTO FEE TT LIFE I BUT IT" t.'T
WS &GOING TO MI PSS E.- (...
PIASS^C ^, yE r-l-r ___


BIG NATE BY LINCOLN PIERCE


YOU'RE
NOT UPSET UPSET \
ABOUT Abour I
TH15+ ?

F T


ABOUT SPITSY AND
PICKLES,, FRANCIS!
Do65 AND CATS
SHOULDN'T...
,--HE WHAT'S
S THATPN HER
i a4 w


GRIZZWELLS BY BILL SCHORR
ooL) I doT A AHRSTMA C4M rS f r6 A VA"
F4 MY TwIN--v--- WN\
OuT Wes FATAVAT


ARLO & JANIS BY JIMMY JOHNSON,
r1 IeTRACKS IDOICATE6 k H /iTEY'& 006'O1 6
'SMALL MAM FOLLOWEDD 41 10 I DODOT
BY TWO-,AR&6R A6EI,. OUDeR6TAD/


COW &BOY BY MARK LEIKNES
THERE ARE REALLY' THOSE WHO BELIEVE
ONLY TWO MINDS YOU CANT'TRAVEL BACK
WHEN IT COMESTO IN TIME BECAUSE IF YOU
TIME TRAVEL. s SOMEHOW KILLED YOUR
RANFATHER,
YOU -
woDI WOULD S
NOT i
EXIST.
I'


NO, WE PON'T
MIND READING
THE PA6E
NUMBERS..



ijin


AND THEN THOSE
.WHO BELIEVE IN THE
MULTIVERSE THEORY-
WHERE, IF YOU KILLED
YOUR GRAND-
FATHER,
THEN
YOU'D\ /
SETUP \- /
ANOTHER .
TIMELINE OF -
EXISTENCE. -


A LITTLE
5ARCASM
THERE MHUH,
MA'AM?



y- v


KIT'N'CARLYLE BY LARRY WRIGHT HERMAN BY JIM UNGER


12-8 LaughinStock Inernationa In DisLby Universal Udckor UFS 2011

"Don't nag. If you want the light
out just say so!"


NEA Crossword Puzzle


ACROSS
1 Scoped out
6 Nibbles
away
11 City near
Syracuse
12 Maneuvers
slowly
13 Honeydews.
15 Frequent
fliers
(2 wds.)
16 tortilla
snacks
18 NFL events
19 Writer -
Tolstoy
21 Diving bird
22 Balmy
23 Fr. ladies
25 Refrain
Syllables
28 Rubber-'
stamps
30 Half a
bikini
31 Lean-to
32 Home tel.
33 ncan
treasure
35 Madrid art
gallery
/37 Previously
38 Become
tiresome
40Great Wall
locale
41 Spud st.
42 Overly glib


43 Heifer's
mouthful
46 Snare
48 Coral reefs
50 Engine
noises
54 Boat
runways
55 Nearer the
facts
56 Get in
' touch with
57 Shorthand
writer, for
short
DOWN
1 Magna -
laude
2 Enjoyed a
smorgasbord
3 Part of
RSVP
4 Election
issue
5 Andrews
or Wynter
6 Turns right
7 "Mona
Lisa"
crooner
8 Like some
mgrs.
9 Dandelion,
to many
10 Former
JFK ,
arrivals


Answer to Previous Puzzle

14 Telearkeng 39S EBRscapadeS
17Cold ocean 44 LSFour
OIcurrent Corners
*F|O0O WB|AOWGNISA
19 TNBA state
LIE T UMA I IRE




hoopster 45H MEajor- -
ENDER WA TERMS
R22IHadEND47 PicnicAVE
14Telemarketing 39 Escapade
danger 43 Bottom
15 Wild card feeder
17 Cold oWeaken 44 Fotruders
19 NBA state
hoopster 45 Major--
20 Clean the 46 threat
board ender
e2 Had on 47 Picnic
'25 Tibet's 49 Hosp.
capital staffer
26 Books 51 Billiards
inspection stick
27 Portico 52 Cowboyd-
29Wet Maynard
thoroughly 53 B'way
34 Monsoons posting of
36 Deep yore
affinity


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QulllDriverBooks.com
.*4 I' 10 IA 15 5-- I' ID C' II


12-8 2011 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS



CELEBRITY CIPHER
Iby Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher clyptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: 0 equals W
"U EYNG LZG U L'KEUKD .KW YA E U, AG.
U EYNG LZG AYYH. U E'YN G. LZG
TGYTEG. U EYNG LZG KLLULJHGX YA
ULKEUKDX." GELYD PYZD


Previous Solution: "I was a little girl id World War II and I'm used to being freed
by Americans." Madeleine Albright
2011 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 12-8


Horoscope

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-
Dec. 21) Tried and true
procedures may not be
the best ones to follow any
longer.
CAPRICORN. (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) You're likely to be
more effective later in the
day, after you've had time
to study an important mat-
ter, than you will be in the
early hours.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) If your early efforts
fail to bringyou the success
you're seeking, don't be a
quitter try, try again.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) There is a good
,chance that the advice
you get from your mate
might-be vastly superior
to any counsel you receive
from outsiders, even from
those who have impressive
credentials.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
Agreeing to do some-
thing for another merely
to get that person to, do
something for you in 're-
turn could be an exercise
in futility.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
The only consideration
ypu should have is to make
sure you're .moving in a
positive direction.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
Be sure you have all the
facts and figures at hand
before, defending an unfa-
miliar position.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
There is nothing wrong
with curiosity, because, it
does have its place when
employed constructively.
However, don't misuse it
by prying onto somebody
else's private affairs.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
Instead of paying for
needed services or advice,
first try to figure things out
for yourself.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
Adhere to proven proce-
' dures and methods in all
work-related matters.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
Don't hesitate to warn a
friend about someone who
does not have his or her
best interests at heart, even
if the adversary is likely to
hear about it.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) If you've made a
commitment you now re-
gret, try to rectify it instead
of disappointing the other
party when you're expect-
ed to honor your pledge.


Annie's Mailbox


Dear Annie: My 12-year-old son recently
informed me that his 18-year-old cousin
was molesting him. I immediately in-
formed my in-laws. They were in 'shock
and denial., Both said, "Are you sure?
Maybe they were experimenting." I was
outraged and disgusted,- and so was my
husband. I went to the police and filed
a report. Both the perpetrator and the
victim are their grandsons. My husband
no longer speaks to his. brother because
of what his son did. His brother said he
should have been informed before I filed
the police report. But the police advised
us not to, saying it would give the perpe-
trator a chance to develop a defense. The
cousin was arrested. He didn't deny what
he'd done. He was sentenced to a year in
the county jail and will have to register as
a sex offender for the rest of his life,
The problem is that my in-laws have
chosen to keep this a family secret. When-
ever relatives visit and ask where the cous-
in is, they respond that he is away at col-
lege. I find this appalling. What happens
when the cousin gets out of jail and goes
back to live with his parents? Will they tell
the relatives with little kids then?
Should I tell the family members who
have children?
DAUGHTER-IN-LAW


Bridge

In this week's deals, declarer has had to be pa-
tient, willing to sacrifice a trick to get several oth-
ers in return. Here is another example. South is in
three no-trump. West leads the diamond queen.
What should declarer do?'
After South opened one rio-trump, showing 15
to 17 points, North was right to raise immediately
to game. His hand, with two aces and a good five-
card suit, was worth nearer 11 points than nine.
Look especially fondly on aces.
Declarer starts with eight top tricks: three hearts,
two diamonds and three clubs. Everything looks so
easy. Take the first trick in hand, unblock the king
and queen of clubs, play a diamond to dummy's
ace, and run the clubs to bring home an overtrick.
That would be fine if the club jack were dropping
doubleton or tripleton, but with this layout, South
takes only his eight top tricks, ending with an un-
dertrick, not an overtrick.
Trade in the overtrick for an improved chance
of making the contract, which is laydown if clubs
are 3-3, or the jack is doubleton, or the nine is
doubleton.


Dear Daughter-in-Law. Family members
need to know the truth, but it.would help
if you could approach your in-laws with
love and understanding, instead of anger
and'recriminations. This is breaking their
hearts. Help them see how important it
is for relatives to know why they cannot
permit their young children to be alone
with the cousin. When he is released from
prison, he likely will be prohibited from
being near these children anyway, so the
L- 'aws are only postponing the inevi-
table. Please talk fo your son's therapist
about the best way to word this.

Dear Annie: We have four kids. Three
of them are 'doing well, but our young-
est, age 23, still lives with us, does drugs
and has no job. He sleeps all day and does
nothing around the house to help. What
should we do?
AT THE END OF OUR ROPE

Dear Rope: First try to get your son to a
doctor to make sure there are no medical
or psychiatric problems, hampering his
development. Then please take the nec-
essary steps to make him responsible for
his own life. Contact Because I Love You
(bily.org) and Families Anonymous (fami-
liesanonymous.org) for support.


______________ A


North 12-8-11
4J52
V764
*A3
A 10 8 6 5
West East
4AKQ 4984
S5 3 V J 10 9 8 2
SQJ108 +954
SJ743 4* 92
South
4 10763
VAKQ
+K762
4KQ

Dealer: South
Vulnerable: North-South
South West North East
1NT Pass 3 NT All pass

Opening lead: Q


-14B + THURSDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2011


ENTERTAINIVIMENT









CLASSIFIED


www.JCFLORIDAN.com


Jackson County Floridan Thursday, December 8, 2011- 5 B


WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED





ARKETPLA


BY PHONE: (850) 526-3614 or (800) 779-2557 BY MAIL: WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE
BY FAX: (850) 779-2557 P.O. BOX 520, MARIANNA, FL 32447,
ONLINE: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM IN PERSON: 4403 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA
Publication Policy Errors and Omissions: Advertisers should check their ad the first day. This publication shall not be liable for failure to publish an ad or for a typographic error or errors in publ,:ai,- .c ,,: .(. i r.-. ,- ,u, I irh .:u;t a ir.ei a i.:.r ine ifir-it 5
insertion. Adjustment for errors is limited to the cost of that portion of the ad wherein the error occurred. The advertiser agrees that the publisher shall not be liable for damages arising out o- 'ir. ,r .. en'.aTn.:i.Te..i be,'r.d itr., amourint a.d "Ir troe i.,3ace
actually occupied by that portion of the advertisement in which the error occurred, whether such error is due to negligence of the publisher's employees or otherwise and there shall be no liability fo. ..r....,anir. an i ar., ad..rn. rmen, retond ire .6roiuni paia I..,r
such advertisement. Display Ads are not guaranteed position. All advertising is subject to approval. Right is reserved to edit, reject, cancel or classify all ads under the appropriate classification.


0da i sa tlf ovs 000 0


ANNOUNCEMENTS





Florida Department ofAgrioulture and Consumer Services
ColmussommAm H. PueTn

Recall: Heath(r)/Zenith and
SWirelessCommand(r)
motion sensing wall switches
The Florida Department of Agriculture and
Consumer Services, the U.S. Consumer Prod-
uct Safety Commission, and HeathCo, LLC of
Bowling Green, Ky., have announced the re-
call of about 75,000 Heath(r)/Zenith and
WirelessCommand(r) motion sensing wall'
switches. When the'switches are in the auto
mode and the light is off, a small amount of
leakage current passes through the electric
circuit, including the socket. If consumers fail
to disconnect the power at the circuit break-
er and make contact with both terminals in-
side the socket while replacing the bulbs,
there is a risk of an electric shock..
This recall involves Heath(r)/Zenith and
WirelessCommand(r) motion sensing wall
switches with model numbers listed below.
The product replaces a standard household
wall switch and is designed to turn off the at-
tached lighting load when motion is no longer
detected in the. room. The products come in
white or ivory. The brand name and model
number can be found on a label located on
the side of the switch .
Heath(r)-Zenith I MODELS SL-6106- (IV; IV-A;
WH; and WH-A)
Wireless Command(r) I MODELS WC-6106- (IV
and WH)
Heath(r)-Zenith I MODELS SL-6108- (IV; IV-A;
WH; and WH-A)
Wireless Command(r) I WC-6108- (IV and
WH)
The recalled switches were manufactured in
China and sold at mass merchants; electrical
distributors, hardware retailers and online re-
tailers from August 2007 through August 2011
for between $20 and $25.
Consumers should immediately stop using
the recalled wall switches and contact the
company for a free wall switch replacement.
Call (toll-free) 855-704-5438 between 9 a.m.
and 6 p.m. ET Monday through Friday, email h
zproductnotice@heathcollc.com or visit the
company's website at www.heath-zenith.com
/hzproductnotice.

Number: CW-1066
Date: December 8,2011
Florida Department of Agriculture and
Consumer Services


Indian Springs. 5190 Clubhouse Drive.
Moving! Everything must go! Toys, clothes for
all ages, appliances, sports equipment, crib &
mattress, furniture, holiday items, much more!
New this week: New booth with old
Nautical items; 1960 Spring/Rocking horse;
56" Vintage Santa; 8 ft. Farm table;
60' Setee & chair; Corner cabinet
@Medford Antique Marketplace,
3820 RCC Dothan. 334-702-7390.

FINANCIAL,


DO YOU WANT A DISCOUNT ON YOUR
.; HOMEOWNERS INSURANCE COST:
Most existing homes have one or more
wind resistive construction features needed
,to qualify for insurance discounts.
| FLORIDA LAW now reuires.Insurance
- Co.'s to provide wind mitigation discounts.
o get discounts (or refund) you maybe
entitled to, get an inspection and report.
James Grant has the Florida Professional
SLicense(s) required to perform Wind -
Mitigation Inspections.
The fee for an inspection is only $150.00.
(Recently, my customers are averaging more
than $300.00 per year savings on insurance).
Call James at 850-526-8367 to discuss
an inspection for you.

IT'S AS EASY AS
1. CALL
2. PLACE YOUR AD
3. GET RESULTS


C?) MERCHANDISE



S OPUt OAK FIREWOOD D
SDelivered in the wiregrass '
S75: La*getruick oIad.
Call 334-685-1248 or 334-389-737



Wanted: Old Coins, Gold,
Diamonds, Guns, And Tools
West Main Jewelry & Loan 334-671-1440.

Tree ripe satsumas and grapefruit harvested
daily $20 bags, location of grove Hwy 73 south
and Laramore Road Marianna, FL, follow signs
to Bar L Ranch for more info call (850)209-5506
Visit us to find great gifts for Christmas '
birthdays or any occasion. Don't waste time in'
lines at the malls or big box stores we ship
straight to your door and as always shipping is
free, We have Children toys, men cologne,.
hunting gear, jewelry, xbox games and more.
KEWLSTORE.COM as Kewl as it gets.

( ) PETS & ANIMALS


2 Male (1 neutered), 1 FM (spayed) Adult cats
for Adoption 334-712-2121
Free Cats to GOOD home Neutered/Spayed,
shots current, Different Colors 850-482-4896

Adult Husky/Shepherd Mix, Male for Adoption,
Beautiful BLUE EYES! 334-712-2121
AKC BULLMASTIFF PUPS 'and OLDE ENGLISH
BULLDOG CHAMPION LINES, UGA # FOUR IS
THE GGG GRANDPA, AWESOME LITTER BREED-
ING THE BEST TO THE BEST. I OFFER SERV-
ICEMAN & VETS A $200 DISCOUNT REALLY
\BULLY, TRI COLORED- TANS, SABLES AND BLUE
FAWNS MALES AND FEMALES, THEY CAN GO
TO THEIR NEW HOMES THE WEEK OF CHRIST-
MAS $1,200 FOR BULLDOG, and $1,250 for
BULLMASTIFF; 334-806-5911
WWW.SEXTONSBULLZ.COM
AWESOME LITTER BREEDING THE BEST TO THE
BEST BRINDLE MALES AND FEMALES ARE
AVAILABLE, I OFFER A $200.00 SERVICEMAN &
VETS DISCOUNT GOING TO THEIR FOREVER
HOMES THE WEEK AFTER THANKSGIVING
$1250.00 WWW.SEXTONSBULLZ.COM 334-
806-5911
Blond FM Beagle Mix 1 yr old, Very Playful up
for adoption. Dothan 334-712-2121
BOXER PUPS AKC: will be ready for christmas.
tails have been docked and dew.claws re-
moved. taking deposits now. Pickup will be two
days before christmas or.christmas eve, two
solid white pups, the others are flashy brindle.
both parents are on site. $350. (334)692-5335.
Leave a message.
V Christmas babies are ready! Yorkies $400.
& up, Shih-a-poos $100. Yorkie-poos $300.,
Chi-a-poos $250. Chinese Crested $450. Older
[puppies avail. $100.334-718-4886.
CKC Toy Chihuahua puppies 2 -females
black & white 1st shots & Wormed,
Ready to go NOW! 850-579-8895.
Maltese AKC Pups!
Will Deliver!
males & females ready for
Christmas. S/W,
will be small.1 tiny F
C all 334-703-2500


Thursday, December 8, 2011






O )


,1TiE SUDOKU GAmE mWITH A KICK!

HOW TO PLAY
Fill in the 9x9 grid with the missing
numbers so that each column, row and
3x3 box contains the digits 1 9 only once.
There is only one correct solution
for each puzzle
GET MORE WASABI
PUZZLES ONLINE!
ARCHIVES AND MORE GREAT GAMES AT
BOXERJAM.COM


DYNASTY SHIH-TZU
is proud to announce a champion sired litter.
Will be ready With cold noses for warm
hearts at Christmas. 3 generational pedigree,
shots, and up to date health certificate
included. Starting at $600 Some retired
breeders for sale as well. 850-482-8261,-
FOUND: Male dog, red collar,large, brn w/white
mkgs, Caverns & Old Grnwd Rd 850-482-3020




Southern Old English Bull dogs puppies vet
checked & wormed on the 19th, 229-308-3893.

) FARMER'S MARKET


Now Open Jackson Farms U-Pick Tomatoes
& Peppers! Bring your own bucket!
7 days a week. 850-592-5579


Auto Through The Lens Flash Cord & Bracket,
private owned, new in box, $196 850-482-7665
Backpack Speaker System for IPOD IPHONE
MP3. New $45. 334-400-3736
Barbie Doll: Bob.Mackie Moon Goddess Barbie.
Still in box $350. 850-272-6236
Barbie Wizard of Oz dolls,, boxed set of 4. $10.0
850-526-1414


Battery: 56 hour Ipod Nano battery w/charger
in box $15. 334-400-3736'


Blood Pressure Monitor: Automatic digital
RdliOn. w/extra Il. cuff. $20. 850-482-4120.


Bob Mackie Neptune Fantasy Barbie still in box
$450 or best offer 850-272-6236
CHAIRS (4) padded backs & seats, light gray
fabric, sq. chrome legs, $10.00/ea. 482-2282
Concrete cylinders. 1'L x 6" diameter. $3 each
or LOT of 81 for $175. 693-9961 Marianna
Concrete table. 40" Round w/concrete base &
umbrella hole $150. 850-693-9961 Marianna
DVD Player: Sunvisor DVD player.passenger
side for car new in box $75. 334-400-3736
Entertainment Center, solid oak, $200 OBO
850-579-5165
Entertainment Center with TV $300 850-526-
1414
Free Cats to GOOD home'- Neutered/Spayed,
shots current, Different Colors 850-482-4896
Gym System Weider'2100 Exercizer with
weights. Great condition $150. 850-482-4120.


Hammond Organ, Leslie Speaker, Rhythm Sec-
tion. medals, bench $500 Firm 850-526-1414


Handsaw set 3 different type saws new in
-pouch $7. 334-400-3736
r------- -- ^
Large Dog House, Any Color, Shingle Roof,
L Will Deliver. $120, 334-794-5780 Dothan
Michelin P215/55R17, two, decent tread. $25,
each both for $40. 850-482-4120
Microphone Mixer: 6 Chan. New in box $40
334-400-3736


Make Your Point!

Advertising is the best way

to make points with prime prospects

who are ready, willing and able to buy.

Let us show you the most effective

way to advertise in the newspaper


that reaches the right people,

right where they live


Night Stand with one drawer, med. oak color
$15 850-209-4500
'Olympus Camera, SP 600 UZ digital, new con-
dition, $160 FIRM 850-482-7665 after 12pm
Pendant: 10K gold 4 carat teardrop shape blue
topaz pendant $475. 850-272-6236
'Piano, console style, good condition, $500 cash
preferred. 850-526-3474
Playstation 3 with 6 games and 1 controller,
$300 850-491-9432
Poker table top 6 player by Cardinal new in box
$35, 334-400-3736
r r
S Porch/Lawn Swing With Chains,
- Will Deliver. $85 334-794-5780
Purse: Coach Purse, Poppy, gold and tan,
excellent condition $80.BO Call 334-389-7452
Rod Case: Pack-A-Pole, padded; 4 rods, hard
case 60"-90, Like new, $40. 850-482-4120


Scope Ultra Vision 3x9X32 with Weaver
mounts. Very dear. Little us 0


Show her she's beautiful. Mirror, full length
cherry wood easle stvle. '$50 OBO 8502094500


Skates inline girls size 6 used very little looks
new $15. 334-400-3736
Speakers NHT Zero highend Speakers: book-
shelf size, black. Little use $15. 850-482-4120.
Subwoofer: Sony 12" powered 150w amplfied ,
home Active Subwoofer $75. 334-400-3736
Table: Dining table/5 chairs, 4x6 glass top,
white wicker. Exc. cond. $175.850-481-2304
TV Stand. Glass, 3 Tiers, Black wood finish,
Only $50. 850-693-9961 Marianna
Washer & Dryer: 2 yr. old Kenmore washer with
free dryer $350. 850-27-2-6236 or"850-718-7926
Wedding Dress Size 8 tag still inside -sequins
long sleeves $89. 850-592-8769
Wine Cooler: New Frigidaire 38 bottle. Reg
$399, asking $300 obo. 850-209-2506
Woodburning Stove: Heat with wood Potbelly
style $399. Charlie 850-592-8769 Dellwood FL


Wednesday's
WASABI SOLUTION
11 7 1(5 8 3 l@| 9 |


4( 2 2 111 9 5 8

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0 412798


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6B Thursday. December 8. 2011 Jackson County Floridan


CLASSIFIED


www..JCFLORTDAN.com


FRESHPROiDUCE
I------------------------- ~~1f - ---

I I


Plenty Of Shelled
Peas, Collard, Turnip
& Mustard Greens!


220 W. Hwy 52 Malvern
** 334-793-6690 ** |

() EMPLOYMENT-



Northwest Florida
Community Hospital
IN FCH is a 59- bed healthcare
.. ., ,. facility that includes a
25- bed Critical Access
hospital, a 34- bed Long Term Care Facility
and a Home Health Agency.
Now Hiring Full Time
Advanced Registered Nurse Practitioner
Rural Health Clinic Practice Exp.
preferred. FL license.
Registered Nurses
ER, FT, nights.
&
DON, Long Term Care Unit, FT

Applications available online at
www.NFCH.org and/or application to:
Email dblount@nfch.org
(850) 415-8106 or Fax (850) 638-0622
Smoke and Drug Free Campus. EOE

-' EDUCATION
( & INSTRUCTION






^ Fortis College is Now
Enrolling for Careers in
FORTIS Trades, Healthcare and
: More! Call Fortis College
Today! 888-202-4813 or visit
www.fortiscollege.edu
COLLEGE For Consumer information
www.Fortis.edu

RESIDENTIAL
(1l REAL ESTATE FOR RENT


COTIONDALE VILLAGE APARTMENTS
Now accepting applications for 2
bedroom units. Rental assistance. No
application fee. We pay water, sewer,
and trash'service. 4052 Old Cottondale
Road, Marianna, FL 32448. (850) 526-4062,
TDD/TTY 711. "This institution is an
equal opportunity provider, and employer."


BR Apartment, 3145 A Redbud Lane, Blue
Springs. Built '08. energy efficient, $525/mo
$500 dep. 1 year lease, small pets ok with
deposit. Call 850-693-0570 Iv msg.

Camelot Apartments For Rent in Enterprise
1 BR Apartments 5300/$325 mo. + $300 dep.
pool & laundry on premises, Approved Credit
Needed. Small dogs OK with pet fee.
Call 334-347-0604


2BR/1BA Concrete block Rental in Marianna,
Tile floors, washer h/u, pets ok, $300/mo + $30
credit/bkgrnd ck. Additional houses and
apartments in Graceville 850-263-5753


2BR 1BA house, Baker Ave, Marianna. Fenced
backyard, DW, Stove, Frig, Washe $580/mo,
$600 dep.. 1 year lease, small pets ok with
deposit. Call 850-693-0570 Iv msg.


FLORIDAN


FOR 3BR 1 BA House, 3222 Bobkat Rd
[IOs (Dogwood Hts) 1 car garage,
fenced, $695 +dep. Text first
850-217-1484 4m
Austin Tyler & Associates *
Quality Homes & Apartments
850- 526-3355 4
"Property Managementls Our ONLY Business"


Large 3BR 2BA Brick Home w/fish in pond &
deer in back yard $850/mo. also, 3BR 2BA Brick
Home. $650. Both in Alford lease, idep. & ref.
req. on both. 850-579-4317/866-1965


2/2 in Alford, window A/C, $380 + deposit 850-
579-8882/850-209-1664/850-573-1851
2 & 3 bedroom mobile Homes in Cottondale.
$500 and up. H20, garbage, sewer included.
http:// www.charloscountry living. com.
850-258-4868/209-8847
2 & 3BR 2BA Mobile Homes in Cottondale no
pets, Central Heat & Air $400-$450 850-258-
1594 leave message
2&3BRMH's in
Marianna & Sneads (850)209-8595.
3BR/2BA Mobile Home on 5 Ac off of Rocky
Creek Rd. Refference Required. $550. Month
lst/Last/$450dep. Call 772-577-0223
For Rent Greenwood, Marianna,&
Cottondale, starting @ $375/mo.
Water/sewage/garbage/ lawn mainL
included. 850-593-4700

Lg 3/2 $625 Quiet, well maintained Park,
Water/sewer/ garb/lawn included. 2/1 Duplex,
Diana Ln. Near Citizens Lodge $495
4 Joyce Riley RE 850-209-7825 4
Rent to Own: 2 & 3BR Mobile Homes.
Lot rent included. Also available,
1 & 2BR Apts & Houses. For details
*850-557-3432 or 850-814-6515 4m

RECREATION :


'04 Kawasaki KVF 700 Camo, 4-Wheeler,
garaged kept. Only 25 hrs. used. like new,
$4800. 334-648-3217 4m
Honda Foreman ES 4x4 Atv's. Two 2003 models.
Both have less than 125 hours. Both recently
serviced. Both excellent condition. $2,500 each
firm. Call 334-774-3737 between 8 am and 8 pm
Yamaha '11 Raptor 700R: well maintained,
excellent condition, low hours, essential extras,
blue, $7,800. Call 334-432-5800




itr ~ Packages From
Xtrme $4,995
SBoats All Welded
B0oat sAll Aluminum Boats
www.xtremeindustries.com



5th Wheel: 28 ft Cardinal LX 5th wheel and
Chevy Silverado Dually, low mileage. $14,000
for both. 334-793-1721



Dixie RV SuperStores
FL's Newest RV Dealer
NOW OPEN!!!
*Store Hours*
Monday-Saturday
8:00am-6:00pm
21 Acres / 30 Brands New and Pre-Owned
Newmar o Keystone Heartland Jayco
Fleetwood Prime Time Coachmen
Forest River
Service Department
Parts and Acces. Store
RV Collision Center
Located off 1-10 Exit 70 / SR285
328 Green Acres Dr.
De Funiak Springs, FL 32435
Sales and Service: 850-951-1000
www.dixierv.com DO 12756


TOW DOLLY: DEMCO Kar Kaddy II tow dolly
with hydraulic surge brakes, auto-steer
wheels, 3 new tires (including spare) $1,000
OBO. Call 334-701-7849 or 334-886-7226.


34FT Stationary Motor Home for Rent
Highest rated RV Park in SE Alabama.


www.ozarktravelpark.com
9 miles to Ozark/Ft. Rucker gate. Perfect for
1 or 2 people. No Deposit. WIFI, & C able TV.
$550. Month. Call 334-774-3219


MALONE
Earn an average of

$1000+ Per mon


Ith!


11


Chevrolet 07' Suburban LT:
Solid white with grey cloth
interior, 5.3 V8 Auto, 64k
miles, 3rd row seating, key-
less entry, tinted windows.
Awesome Condition! $24,900. 334-797-1095
Chevrolet '11 Tahoe LT, LOADED, White, All
Leather, Captain's Chairs, DVD System, 3k
Miles. $39,500 Excellent Condition, LIKE NEW
334-714-7251
Ford '96 Explorer XLT, LOADED! 214K Mi.
$1900-334-400-3736 '-I
: .... ,. Jeep '02 Wrangler Sport,
Mt1^ ^ A/C. power locks, tilt
Top/Soft Top. $4,300.
-^ sdigd56fty4.live.conm.
Call 213-985-2930

SLincoln '06 Navigator,
SFully Loaded with Sun
Roof. THX Sound with
DVD & 6-Disk Player.
ave S w .a 1 Excellent Condition.
New Tires. $19,500 Firm
334-790-6410
Nissan '03 Pathfinder. V6, 173k mi.
Runs Very Good. Cold Air, Very Clean.
$6200 OBO 334-794-5780
Nissan '04 Xterra, Low Miles; 53,800 mi.
1-Owner, Excellent Condition. $10,995
334-714-2129 or 334-790-4167
SUV Toyota '08 Rav-4 3rd seat, drop down
dvd, 45K mi. 1-owner, excellent condition, new
tires, $18,000. 334-899-5703
S^.,," -: ,.. Toyota '06 4-Runner.
Black. One owner. Only
1 53,500 miles. Leather
seats. 6 disc CD changer,
moon roof, rear spoiler,
etc. (It has all the extras) $23,500. In excellent
condition. Please call 334-596-2242.


'61 Massey Ferguson 50 Tractor
with front end loader $3800.
334-677-7748 or 334-803-7210

Chevy '92 Silverado, black, extended cab, 350
engine, automatic, runs good, $1500 850-209-'
8323
Tractor, Kubota 5000, 50 HP, 183 Hours, with 6'


9 I IBushhog & 20X7' Trailer. $14,250 334-699-2346


----^-


a We buy Wrecked Vehicals
running or not $325. & up according to
vehical 334-794-9576 or 344-791-4714
SA* We buy Wrecked Vehicals running or not
$325. & up according to vehical
DAY -334-794-9576 NIGHT 334-794-7769

WE PAY Ca$H
FOR JUNK CARS!!!!!!
Call 334-818-1274


LEGALS


LF15614
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL COURT IN AND FOR JACKSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO. 322008CA000228XXXXXX
THE BANk OF NEW YORK AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CER-
TIFICATE HOLDERS SWABS, INC. ASSET-BACKED CER-
TIFICATES, SERIES 2006-6,
Plaintiff,
vs..
WENDY GASKA; U.S. BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION,
AS TRUSTEE FOR THE C-BASS MORTGAGE LOAN
ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-SL1; UN-
KNOWN TENANT NO 1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; AND
ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT
TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE
ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY
HEREIN DESCRIBED,
Defendants
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or
Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated Novem-
ber 22, 2011, and entered in Case No.
322008CA000228XXXXXX of the Circuit Court in and for
Jackson County, Florida, wherein THE BANK OF NEW
YORK AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATE HOLDERS
SWABS, INC. ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES
' 2006-6, is Plaintiff and ,WENDY GASKA; U.S. BANK, NA-
TIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE C-BASS
MORTGAGE LOAN ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SER-
IES 2006-SL1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO 1; UNKNOWN
TENANT NO. 2; AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING
INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A
NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR
CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN
THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED, are Defendants, I
will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the


Find jobs



fast and



easy!


JACKSON COUNTY


FLORIDANI

jcfloridan.com



F monsBerN

FIND LOCAL JOBS AT: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM/JOBS


K


WE ARE LOOKING FOR DEPENDABLE, BUSINESS MINDED NEWSPAPER CARRIERS!
BE YOUR OWN BOSS (1AM to 6AM)


4 Ask about our $300 Sign on Bonus


Must have dependable transportation, minimum liability
insurance & valid driver's license.

Come by and fill out an application at the
Jackson County Floridan, 4403 Constitution Lane,
Marianna, FL, 32447


__ __~____~~_II_~~_~


I


IN" Ilv Tllnlc c


www.JCFLORIDAN.com


----- --


th


{ Bushhog & 20X7' Trailer. $14,250 334-699-2346


r-


I


I t TRANSPORTATION


'07 Hyundai Accent 2DR, 4_cyl. white, auto-
matic, Pwr. steering/brakes. AC, am/fm/cd,
exc. cond. no accidents 110K mi.
_$5500. Or Best Offer 334-389-3071.
ft. '07 Pontiac Grand Prix fully
loaded with leather & sun-
roof, exc cond, 334-726-3359.
334-585-5525.

BMW '07 3281, 65K mi. Silver, 4-door,
FULLY LOADED! $17,500 334-726-9500
v -- Buick '97 Skylark Limited:
.. Blue in color. 4 door, auto-
matic, power locks, power
windows, AC, AM/FM CD.
Runs good. $2,000 OBO.
For more info call 334-805-0502.

Chevrolet '00 Cavalier, 2 dr, New Tires, Runs
Good, $4200 334-347-9829 Day Or Evening
MUTTT' f Ford'05 Mustang GT:
jMUST I S Award winning show car,
white with black interior,
53k miles, 5 speed, in excellent condition.
$15,000. Call 334-794-7493
Ford '07 Escape, Fully Loaded, Power Locks,
Power windows, Moon Roof, Well Kept,
100k mi. Good Condition, $9,000 OBO
I717-824-6053 (DOTHAN)
M -ILincoln '08 Towncar
S Signature Limited:
Silver, gray leather
interior, garage kept,
only 18k miles, fully loaded, power everything.
Must See this car!! $24,500. Call 334-792-7050
Mercury '97 Cougar XR7: 30th Annivrsary.
One clean car! 93k miles, new motor @ 47k.
due to intake recall, 4 wheel independent
suspension, 4 wheel disc brakes, 1 owner,
garage kept, wife driven. $4,500. Call 334-693-
3330 or 334-685-7706 and ask for Donny or Dee.






Nissan '05 Maxima: Great deal! Clean,
one, owner car that has 49,000 miles on the
engine. Engine has 2 year warranty. Asking
$11,500 but will negotiate. Call 334-692-4120.
_P Oldsmobile 71 Cutlass
i Supreme Convertible.
' Red with white top and
-' upholstery. PS. PB, AC,
S"3- " :8 track, electric windows,
350V8, bucket seats, rally wheels. Automatic
transmission. Runs well. Need garage space.
$10,500. Call 334-792-1171 or 334-792-3058.
Toyota '03 Camry: Champagne, cloth interior,
56k miles, fully loaded, brand new tires.
See to appreciate! $9,275. Call 334-792-?829
Please leave message.
Toyota '05 Avalon
I.Umited Edition:
one owner, desert sand
mica with tan leather
interior, fully loaded,
45k miles, excellent
condition. $16,500. Call 334-347-7923


Harley Davidson '07
Softail custom with ex-
tras, 1,700 miles. $14,000.
Call Dean 334-406-0043.

HONDA '07 CRF-230F 4-STROKE ,$2500.
Honda CRF-80F '07 $1500, Yamaha TtR50 '05
$750 334-718-5149
-SP LITY


, *, t . .


SDaewoo '98 220 LC3 Solar Ex-
cavator low hours, $40.000
334-792-7552.

Dodge '02 Ram: Black Quad cab, V8, 4 x 4, 5.9
liter, New Engine, new supsenion, shocks,
tires, and brake, and 20" rims.
Price to Sell $10,000. Call 850-272-2713
Ford '08 Kings Ranch F150: Stone green with
saddle leather interior, 4 door, fully loaded,
heated seats, fiberglass bed cover, sprayed in
liner, new tires, 45k miles, running board, bug
sheild, Service record available.
$29,900. Call 334-618-7682
Ford '77 F150: Gray, 4WD, standard trans.,
good condition, 2 owners, clean title.
$3000. Call 334-447-5316

,' FORD '89 F150, 4wh, 4x4
Auto, $4,600 or reasonable
offer. Call 229-334-8520.

International Tractor F1466 145HP diesel,
red in color $5000.334-898-7995 or
305-343-9790 (2761 Coffee Springs Rd. 36318)
Isuzu FTR '02 white in color 24ft.box truck with
approx. 140K miles. Good shape $14,900. OBO
Call: 334-299-0300.
Tractor, M9000 Kabpta with Cab, air, radio, 675
hrs, exc. condo. $21,900 also: Round Hay Baler,
535 John Deere, $5,750 850-209-5694/850-593-
2213


-. Chevrolet '97 Astro Van
conversion Van raised
roof, loaded, new tires,
One owner. GREAT
condition. 52K mi.$9,500.
..- _.-_ 334-897-2054 or
334-464-1496
Ford '06 -350: 12 seat passenger van, good con-
dition, tow package, rear air, sony am-fm-cd,
5.4 V8, 126,000 miles, $8,100. 334-333-3368
Mercury '01 Villager A/C- AT 133K mi.
very cleah $3800. Exc. Cond.
334-803-7210 or 334-677-7748
Pontiac '04 Montana Van: Silver metallic with
gray interior, extended body, 46k miles, one
owner, New tires, front and rear AC, power
seats, power side door, CD/radio with XM,
cruise control, and much more. Clean and'in
very good condition. Never WRECKED!
Price to Sell. $9,250. Call 334-333-0863


1ST PLACE TO CALL FOR ALL OF
YOUR TOWING NEEDS!
FIIwAC'O C4 SALrM 7ALq
AUTO BODY & RECYCLING
PAYINGTOP DOLLAR FOR JUNK CARS
Contat Jason Harger at 334-791-2624

Call for Top Price for
Junk Vehicles
I also sell used parts
24 HOUR TOWING 4 334-792-8664 4i
Gaurenteed highest prices paid for your Junk
or unwanted vehicals & farming equipment,
Title or no Title 24 hrs a day,
also pay finders fee. .850-849-6398

^ ~Got a Clunker
r We'll be your Junker!
We buy wrecked cars
and Farm Equip. at a
fair and honest price!
$325. & up for
Complete Cars CALL 334-702-4323
Ll..n... m.. mll...............


-1








WWT W .J-r LUIIJAfNl.cOLMI


North Door of the Jackson County Courthouse, 4445 La-
fayette Street, Marianna, Florida 32446 at Jackson
County, Florida, at 11:00a.m. on the 12th day of Janu-
ary, 2012 in said Order or Final Judgment, to-wit:
COMMENCE AT AN EXISTING IRON ROD MARKING THE
NW CORNER OF SECTION 3, TOWNSHIP 5 NORTH,
RANGE 9 WEST, JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE
S 01020'43" W ALONG THE WESTERLY LINE OF SAID
SECTION A DISTANCE OF 661.69 FEET TO A CONCRETE
MONUMENT ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF
STATE ROAD 69, THENCE S 6842'22" E ALONG SAID
RIGHT OF WAY A DISTANCE OF 400.00 FEET TO A CON-
CRETE MONUMENT, THENCE 0120'43"W A DISTANCE
OF 1090.12 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT AND
CALL THIS THE POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE CON-
TINUE 01020'43" W A DISTANCE OF 811.06 FEET TO A
CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE N 8842'11" W A DIS-
TANCE OF 376.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT,
THENCE N 01120'43" E A DISTANCE OF 811.06 FEET TO
A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE S 8842'11" E A DIS-
TANCE OF 376.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
THIS PARCEL IS LOCATED IN THE NW 1/4 OF SECTION 3,
TOWNSHIP 5 NORTH, RANGE 9 WEST, JACKSON COUN-
TY, FLORIDA
ROADWAY EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS TO
THE ABOVE DESCRIBED PROPERTY:
COMMENCE AT THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF THE
ABOVE DESCRIBED PARCEL AND CALL THIS THE POINT
OF BEGINNING OF A ROADWAY EASEMENT FOR IN-
GRESS AND EGRESS, THENCE N 0120'43" E A DIS-
TANCE OF 1090.12 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT
ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF STATE ROAD
69, THENCE S 68042'22" E ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY
A DISTANCE OF 63.83 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONU-
MENT, THENCE S 01020'43" W A DISTANCE OF 1473.87
FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE N
8839'17" W A DISTANCE OF 60.00 FEET TO A CON-
CRETE MONUMENT, THENCE N 01620'43' E A DISTANCE
OF 405.53 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
THIS PARCEL IS LOCATED IN THE NW %4 OF SECTION 3,
TOWNSHIP 5 NORTH, RANGE 9 WEST, JACKSON COUN-
TY, FLORIDA.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS
FROM THIS SALE, IF ANY, THAN THE PROPERTY OWN-
ER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A
CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act
of 1990, persons needing special accommodation to
participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk
of the Court not later than five business days prior to
the proceeding at the Jackson County Courthouse. Tel-
ephone 850-482-9552 or 1-800-955-8770 via Florida Re-
lay Service.
DATED at Marianna, Florida, on November 22, 2011
DALE RABON GUTHRIE
CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT
By: /s/Tammy Bailey
TAMMY BAILEY
AS DEPUTY CLERK
Place your ad in our

Sales & Service

Directory

and grow

your business!!!


CLASSIFIED


WELLDRILL.]:G [cR33IZ


Jackson County loridan Thursday, December 8, 2011
Jackson County Floridan Thursday, December 8, 2011- / B


L ST


Lester Basford
Well & Pump Company BEST WAY
4513 Lafayette St Marianna, FL LARGEST MANUFACTURER OF PORTABLE BUILDINGS IN NORTH FLORIDA
850.526.391330 850.693.0428 C .
850.482.2278 HHWE
__________ OVER
ROOI : R A E DIFFERENT SIZES'
YOU CAN CHOOSE
r.....A COLOR STYLE'
... BUILTION-SITE -
I,. 1 ,,nj-4 HI.9, a.* ,1 ",1 -'8. .


SGrader *Pan Excavator
Dump Truck eBulldozer
Demolition Grading Site Prep
Debris Removal Retention Ponds Leveling
Top Soil Fill Dirt Gravel Land Clearing





& UPGRADES _
Replace your old Electrical Service
wivith a New Service .
QUALITY WORK REACONAvLE PRICE
JAMES GRANT, LLC 900=LORIDAELECI,,1L
.- p'S* S

J*iR 0FSIONAL HOME REPAIR
By Joseph Dominello -
All types of remodeling and repairs:
Kitchens Bathrooms Additions Doors & Windows
Installed Drywall Repair Water Damage Repairs
Painting Weatherization tn. & Ins.
(772) 285-2475 Marianna. Florida


I


4 Point Insurance Inspections
Wind Mitigation Inspections
Performed by JAMES GRANT
State Certified Building Code Administrator
State Certified Building Contractor
State Licensed Electrical Contractor



"Beautification of Your Home"
Carpentry/Painting Installations
Furniture Repair & Refinishing
General Repairs Insured




l t^ Charles Morse (850) 526-8445
S Ben Morse ( 850) 5731705
I '' Office,* (850) 482-3755
S8479 Hw 7 Mmianum L 58448
|y ^ "Our prices WILL NOT shook you"
L IN


WE OFFERCOMPETE
~~
20 iMHNOe1
ZJ VE4RS lIPS W.


I NOW0 S3I3EANG


850-209-1090
For ALL your Real Estate Needs!
Century 21 Sunny South Properties
850-526-2891
S4630 Hwy 90 Marianna



Greenhou-T.
$ 144000
33 Years in Business
' tl^^B WW M,,n Psea,,, B,,ii,,,,: ._..I


OMESGIt HOME REPAIR
By Joseph Dominello -
All types of remodeling and repairs:
Kitchens Bathrooms Additions Doors & Windows
Installed Drywall Repair Water Damage Repairs
Painting Weatherization Lie. & ns.
(772) 285-2475 Marianna, Florida

HAPPY
HOME REPAIR
WE'LL BEAT ANY PRICE!!
Big Or Small Jobs WELCOME
850:-48 28831Cell:85-272-6627


Shores Cabinet Shop, LLC
SPECIALIZING IN ALL WOOD CUSTOM BUILT
CABINETS & COUNTERTOP REPLACEMENT
Licensed Homebuilder
Call (850) 579-4428 Donnie Shores, Sr.
www.shorescabinets.com


Che about wCl t ifod?
Chicl out ft fClzoificb


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Clay O'Neal's
Land Clearing, Inc.
ALTHA, FL
850-762-9402
Cell 850-832-5055


CFLORIDAN


L-






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


-18B THURSDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2011


College Football


Alabama's Richardson chasing 2nd title, Heisman


The Associated Press

TUSCALOOSA, Ala. -
-Alabama's Trent Richard-
son wasn't a starter when
he arrived on the scene.
He was biding his time
behind tailback Mark In-
gram, who was on his way
to becoming Alabama's
first Heisman Trophy win-
ner. But Ingram knew long
before Richardson was se-
lected as a finalist that the
Crimson Tide might have
another candidate waiting
in the wings.
Then a freshman, Rich-
ardson broke four tack-
les en route to a 52-yard
touchdown against Arkan-
sas two years ago in a run
that has only grown in the
retelling.
"He broke like seven
tackles and then took it
up the sideline for like 40
yards," Ingram recalled. "I
was like, 'Yeah, that's not
really normal.' I figured
that we had a special guy."
A program that collected
by its own count 12
national titles before field-
ing a Heisman winner now
is hoping for its second in
three seasons. Because of
Ingram's looming pres-
ence, Richardson was a
star long before he was a
starter.
Compact, powerful and
with a sprinter's burst,
Richardson joins LSU cor-
nerback Tyrann Mathieu,
Wisconsin tailback Mon-
tee Ball and quarterbacks
Andrew Luck of Stanford
and Robert Griffin III of
Baylor as finalists for this
year's Heisman, which will
be presented Saturday in
NewYork.
"As a child you dream
of winning the Heisman
or MVP at any level, and
now that it's here and my
team has worked hard for
this, and I know I worked
hard for it," Richardson
said. "Just to represent for
Alabama is going to be an
honor for real, and to rep-
resent for (Florida home-
town) Pensacola. It's pretty
big for me. My name will be
in the books if I do win."
Alongside Ingram, his
former backfield mate
now with the New Orleans
Saints.
Richardson picked up


THEASSOCIATED PRESS FILE
This Oct. 22 photo shows Alabama running back Trent Richardson (3) running past Tennessee
defensive lineman Daniel Hood (76) during a college football game in Tuscaloosa Ala.


where his predecessor left
off, powering the Tide's of-
fense into a national title
shot Jan. 9 against LSU.
. Since Archie Griffin won
his second straight in
1975 for Ohio State, only
Southern California has
had two. Heisman' win-
ners in a three-year span:
Charles White and Marcus
Allen (1979, '81) and Car-
son Palmer ('02) and Matt
Leinart ('04).
Richardson has run for
1,583 yards and has 20
rushing touchdowns and
three as a receiver. Not bad
for a first-year starter, who
never let on.publicly if he
minded running in second
place for two seasons. His
handling of that situation
endeared Richardson to
teammates.
"The first word that
comes to my head when
I think of Trent is 'team-
mate,'" Alabama left tackle
Barrett Jones said. "He re-
ally is the ultimate team-
mate. Not many guys
would have ,had the at-
titude he had these past
two years. Probably would
have started anywhere else
in the country just with the


talent level he had.
"He never said anything
complaining. He was al-
ways worried about the
team. All of us who have
been here for a while we're
really excited for him to
step up this year and for
this to be his team. His
humility and the kind
of teammate he is really
makes you want to block
for a guy like that."
Richardson said he "just
really had to humble"
himself. He still racked up
1,451 yards and 14 touch-
downs and two Sports
Illustrated covers be-
fore becoming a starter
when Ingram left for the
NFL, another move that
Richardson soon could
duplicate.
The 5-foot-ll,' 224-
pounder has gotten plenty
of attention for his weight
room prowess Tide
coaches limit him to 475
pounds on the bench press
and 600-pound squats
and ability to steamroll
defenders or carry several
for extra yardage.
Despite Richardson's
physical style, coach Nick
Saban scoffs at labeling


him a "bruiser".
"You're talking about a
guy to me that shouldn't
be pigeonholed into a guy
that is a bruising back be-
cause to me he's so much
more," Saban said. "He's a
great leader on our team.
He's a hard worker. He sets
a great example. He cares
about the other players on
the team. He's certainly a
. very, very productive, com-
petitive guy who has been
probably as good a player
as I've.ever had the oppor-
tunity to coach in terms of
the whole package.
"Bruising back would
be an insult to what he
is, even though he does
that pretty well, too, be-
cause he's tough and he's
physical."
Richardson made a
strong final statement
with a career-best 203-
yard game in the final
romp against Auburn. It
also provided a so-called
"Heisman moment," when
he halted his momentum
and straight-armed a de-
fender on the sideline then
raced across the field for- a
57-yarder.
Against Mississippi, he


shed two tacklers, cut over
to the right sideline and
stopped short to shake
one defender around the
10 before sprinting to the
end zone to punctuate a
76-yard run.
"That was awesome,"
Jones said. "The Iron Bowl
run was awesome, too, but
the Ole Miss run where he
did the little move at the
end, that was a lot of fun to
watch."
Richardson also had a
solid overall effort against
No. 1 LSU. He ran 23 times
for 89 yards and had five.
catches for 80 yards.
'Richardson's nine 100-
yard rushing games ties
Ingram for the school re-
cord. He's only 75 yards shy
of the Alabama mark set
by Ingram two years ago
in one extra outing the
Southeastern Conference
championship game.
* Richardson is also a final-.
ist for the Maxwell Award
as player of the year and
the Doak Walker Award
given to the nation's top
running back.
The lone drawback to
all these awards: Flying.
The back that fearlessly
smashes into 230-pound


linebackers can't stand it.
"I really just start praying
before I get on and when I
get on just go from there,"
Richardson said. "I start
sweating, and it's just a
big mess, for real. I haven't
gotten over it yet, but I'm
used to flying. Just when it
takes off and when they be
about to land, it's crazy."
Richardson, Tim Tebow
and Cam .Newton are the
only SEC players to rush
for 20 touchdowns in a
season, and those two
quarterbacks are Heisman
winners.
Alabama has cited the
quality of defenses Rich-
ardson has faced in pro-
moting his candidacy. He
has faced eight defenses
ranked among the nation's
Top 51, and the school says
no other Heisman con-
tender went against more
than five.
The thickly-muscled
Richardson doesn't hesi-
tate when asked about
what drives him: Daugh-
ters Taliyah, 5, and Elevara,
3, and his mother. He says
he is "just happy to be out
.there making everybody
smile," but especially
.them.


Big East


set to


expand

The Associated Press

NEW YORK The Big
East will introduce five
new members, including
Boise State.
The conference said in
a release Wednesday that
Commissioner John Mari-
natto would be joined on
a teleconference to ad-
dress conference mem-.
bership by the university
leaders from Boise State,
San Diego State, Hous-
ton, SMU and Central
Florida.
The league will announce
those five schools are join- I
ing the conference in 2013.
The Big East, depleted
by the planned departures
of Syracuse, Pittsburgh
and West Virginia, is try-
ing to rebuild as a 12-team
football conference with a With Hig
western division. a month.
Boise State and San Di-. a month.
ego State, which currently That's tl
play in the Mountain West
Conference, will join the, Cali 85
Big East only for football. lick c
Houston, SMU and UCF
will be leaving Conference Come i
USA and joining the Big Para oir
East in all sports.
The BigEasthas also been
pursuing Air Force and
Navy as football onlymem- 'OfferendsO1/2R/2012.Ne
bers, but those schools surcharges. andmonthlyreci
customer changes their accol
have yet to commit. (including professional instal
approval and deposit may be
The Big East has only five CaierUniersalServicescha
Taxes, oees, and surcharges
football members com- eachremaining service. HSI
centurylink.com/30days at le
mitted to the conference business days following cust
Not available with other of fer
beyond this season: Con- providing High-Speed Inern
U S. Virgin Islands: excludes
necticut, Cincinnati, Lou- calling billed separately. B21
Jisville, Rutgers and USE
-,V Y- ia


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