<%BANNER%>
PRIVATE ITEM
Digitization of this item is currently in progress.
Jackson County Floridan
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS MAP IT! ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028304/00696
 Material Information
Title: Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title: Sunday Floridan
Portion of title: Floridan
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Jackson County Floridan
Publisher: Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Marianna Fla
Creation Date: November 24, 2011
Publication Date: 1934-
Frequency: daily (except saturday and monday)[<1979-1995>]
weekly[ former 1934-<1955>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates: 30.776389 x -85.238056 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note: "Independent."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID: UF00028304:00696
 Related Items
Preceded by: Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by: Marianna Floridan

Full Text





I~-LU'FN~ I~fIN[Lci'C IIfIINK:~i


FLORIDAN


; more than 17,000 readers daily in print and online


I,:' I


In GOP debate,

Gingrich gambles in

bid to catch Romney.

See more on page 7A.


S sc100 320
c2 * *** t\\'

Cvo llo,. I
GAI"' -


A Media GeneralNewrespaper


Vol. 88 No. 229


Start Your Christmas Shopping!


Local stores preparing for Black Friday

BY LAUREN DELGADO the surrounding areas so BY A
Idelgado@jcfloridan.com we just wanted to give our c --'*
shoppers an opportunity
Local stores have begun to shop," said store man- l -
preparing for Black Friday ager John Turner. -
by doing everything from Those who come before
ordering more merchan- 1 p.m. will also receive a ,
dise to changing store coupon with a mystery .. -, .
hours. discount, the amount of
Black Friday is one of the which customers find out
biggest days of the year for when they check out. There *
the VF Outlet in Graceville, are even some 100 percent
so it'll be opening at 7 a.m. off coupons in the mix.
on Friday and extending Another local store plan- PHOTOS BYMARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
its hours until 8 p.m. ning on a big crowd is Dottie McCallister checks the aisle ahead of her while pushing
"We do have a lot of our a cartload of pants toward the men's section Wednesday at the Loretha Spears hangs up children's items at the VF Outlet in
customers that come from See FRIDAY, Page 7A VF Outlet in Graceville. Graceville Wednesday.


HELPING OUT THIS THANKSGIVING


Marianna donates to food banks


...




MARKSKINNER/FLORIDAN
From the left are Eric DeLoach, Brent Caraway, George Gay, Byron Bennett and Nicky Lovett (all with the Marianna Fire Department),
Jim Dean and Julie Chance with the City of Marianna, Dr. Huw Christopher, Karen Robinson with King's Table, Valerie Marlow with First
Presbyterian Church, Diane Shiver with St. Luke's Episcopal Church, Fred Cook with Chipola Family Ministries and Joy Gilbert with
Kings Table.
Items given to Chipola Family Ministries, the First Presbyterian
Church of Marianna, St. Lukes Episcopal Church and the King's Table


BY LAUREN DELGADO
Idelgado@jcfloridan.com

Stacks of canned yams and peas,
boxed mac and cheese, peanut butter
and more nonperishable food items
were some of the food items the City of
Marianna had in its Commission room
on Monday, ready to be given to local
food banks and organizations.
The vittles came from the food drive
the city held until Nov. 18. Employees
brought in some items.


The One-Stop Center in Marianna
donated three copy-paper boxes of
food, said Julie Chance, the drive's
coordinator and the city's human re-
source director.
The city also took $600 from the
money it raised from the barbecue
fundraiser held on Nov. 10.
Everything was distributed to four
organizations: Chipola Family Minis-
tries, the First Presbyterian Church of
Marianna, St. Lukes Episcopal Church
and the King's Table.


"We just wanted to do our own fund-
raiser and give back to the communi-
ty," Chance said. "If we do it ourselves
we know where it goes."
All of the food will be distributed by
the organizations during their regular
hours.
The donation comes at a time when
local food banks are running low due
to not as many people donating and
more people needing aid.
The city plans to hold another fund-
raiser sometime after the new year.


Person on the Street

Locals talk

Thanksgiving

food, treats
BY LAUREN DELGADO
Idelgado@jcfloridan.com
The Jackson County
Floridan asked some lo-
cals what their Thanks-
giving food is and why.
Christina Shirah didn't
skip a beat when asked
what her favorite Thanks-
Shirah giving food is. She loves a
nice Thanksgiving ham.
"You can do so much
with it and it's a family
tradition," Shirah said.
Accompanying Shirah
was Brenola Williams,
another ham lover.
Williams "We're never cared for
turkey too much," Wil-
liams said.
Turkey and ham were
Both on Gwen Watford's
List of favorite Thanks-
giving foods along with
dressing and some oth-
Watford er traditional holiday
staples.
"It's tradition and I just
love Southern cooking,"
,i '.. Watford said.
Stephanie Leuenberg-
er adores her mother's
S homemade cornbread
dressing.
Leuenberger dressing.
euenbeer After a few tries, the
Floridan found a turkey
lover. Vicky Bruner said
Turkey is simply a tradi-
Stion that must be kept on
S Thanksgiving.
"Ham's OK, but turkey
you can only have about
Bruner two times a year," Bruner
said.
iaJ Terre Arnold had a list
of favorites that included
turkey, dressing and red
S velvet cake.
*." i "You can't beat your
mother's cooking," Ar-
Arnold nold said.


Guardian ad Litem program advocates for local kids


BY LAUREN DELGADO
Idelgado@jcfloridan.com

Sharon Arnett has always loved
children. So when she saw an ad
for classes on becoming a Guard-
ian ad Litem, or an advocate for
children who are under the su-


) CLASSIFIEDS...5-7B


pervision of the Department of
Children and Families, she knew
it was a "good way to help."
Ten years later, she still loves
this volunteer work, handling a
few cases each month.
"My kids are wonderful," Ar-
nett said. "If I could I'd bring


) ENTERTAINMENT...4B


) LOCAL...3-4A


every single one of them home
with me."
The local Guardian ad Litem
program is looking for volun-
teers in order to start training
classes.
Guardian ad Litem literally
means the guardian of the law,
) OBITUARIES...7A


said Jane Powell, the case co-
ordinator. Their job is to make
recommendations to the court
on behalf of children who have
been placed into the depart-
ment's care. They recommend
on anything from where the
child should be placed to what


))STATE...5A


services the child may need.
"When it comes time to go to
courts, the mom has an attorney
to help her, the dad has an at-
torney to help him, but the kids
have no one," Arnett said.
See GUARDIAN, Page 7A


) SPORTS...1-3B, 8B


) TV LISTINGS...2B


This Newspaper
Is Printed On
Recycled Newsprint




7 6 5 1 65 1 8010509C


l sm mo.'.... "Ranked N UMBERmo 1in Jackson County"


"m rK.O. \ per month
JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDA \ 0permonth
~'1pe r 'Dr month
,.. .o.. W ;. ,, ,014 .
l :l.Qhe ., 1
., ., : ,,.: ,v ',:-0.,,,-


Follow us




Facebook Twitter







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


-l2A THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24,2011


Weather Outlook


High- 740
Low- 490

Tomorrow
Sunny & mild.


*--.-


High -63o
Low 350


Sunday
Possible storms.


.' High 760
Low-560

Saturday
Partly cloudy


High 550
Low-370

Monday
Much colder.


ULTRA VIOLET INDEX


0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8-10 Very High, 11+ Extreme

0 1 2 3 *


THE SUN AND MOON
Sunrise 6:15A
Sunset 4:40P
Moonrise 5:32A
Moonset 4:13P


Nov. Dec. Dec.' Dec.
25 2 10 18


JACKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN

Publisher Valeria Roberts
vroberts@jcfloridan.com

Circulation Manager Dena Oberski
doberski@jcfloridan.com





-IN


CONTACT US
Telephone: (850) 526-3614
FAX: (850) 482-4478
Email: editorial@jcfloridan.com
Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447
Street Address:
4403 Constitution Lane
Marianna, FL 32446
Office Hours:
Weekdays, 8 a.m. to 5p.m.

MISS YOUR PAPER?
You should receive your newspaper no later
than 6 a.m. If it does not arrive, call Circula-
tion between 6 a.m. and noon,Tuesday to
Friday, and 7 a.m. to 1I a.m. on Sunday. The
Jackson County Floridan (USPS 271-840)
is published Tuesday though Friday and
Sunday mornings. Periodical postage paid
at Marianna, FL.

SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Home delivery: $11.23 per month; $32.83
for three months; $62.05 for six months;
and $123.45 for one year. All prices include
applicable state and local taxes. Mail
subscriptions must be paid in advance. Mail
subscriptions are: $46.12 for three months;
$92.24 for six months; and $184.47 for one
year.

ADVERTISING
The advertiser agrees that the publisher
shall not be liable for damages arising
out of errors and advertisements beyond
the amount paid for the space actually
occupied by that portion of the advertise-
ments in which the error occurred, whether
such error is due to the negligence of the
publisher's employees or otherwise, and
there shall be not liability for non-inser-
tion of any advertisement beyond the
amount paid for such advertisement. This
newspaper will not knowingly accept or
publish illegal material of any kind. Advertis-
ing which expresses preference based on
legally protected personal characteristics is
not acceptable.

HOW TO GET YOUR
NEWS PUBLISHED
The Jackson County Floridan will publish
news of general interest free of charge.
Submit your news or Community Calendar
events via email, fax, mail, or hand delivery.
Fees may apply for wedding, engagement,
anniversary and birth announcements.
Forms are available at the Floridan offices.
Photographs must be of good quality and
suitable for print. The Floridan reserves the
right to edit all submissions.
GETTING IT RIGHT
The Jackson County Floridan's policy
is to correct mistakes promptly. To
report an error, please call 526-3614
Monday-Friday.


Community Calendar


THURSDAY, NOV. 24
D King's Table Thanksgiving Lunch Local
people in need of a traditional meal and company
to share it with are invited to a free lunch,11 a.m.
to 1 p.m., served under a tent in the Grocery Outlet
parking lot in Marianna. Diners can eat there or
take their meals home. First come, first served. To
donate or volunteer, call 557-3595 or 272-8350.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Closed discussion, 8
to 9 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901 Cale-
donia St., Marianna, in the AA room. Attendance
limited to persons with a desire to stop drinking.

FRIDAY, NOV. 25
n AARP Driver Safety Class 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
in the conference room of theJackson County
Sheriff's Office on Highway 90 West. For ages 50
and older. DHSMV-approved for a three-year insur-
ance premium reduction. No testing required. Fees:
$12 for AARP members; $14 for non-members. Fees
waived for veterans. Enroll by calling 482-2230.
) Senior Singles Get-Together, 6 to 8 p.m. on the
last Friday of the month, near the floral department
of Winn-Dixie in Marianna. Single seniors age 50
and older are encouraged to get acquainted, form
* friendships. Games, food, prizes and a guest speak-
er are planned. No charge; donations accepted
(proceeds fund charitable endeavors of Marianna's
Gathering Place Foundation). Call 526-4561.
Celebrate Recovery Adult, teen meetings to
"overcome hurts, habits and hang-ups' 7 p.m. at
Evangel Worship Center, 2645 Pebble Hill Road.
Dinner: 6 p.m. Child care available. Call 209-7856 or
573-1131.
) Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, 8 to
9 p.m. in the AA room at First United Methodist
Church; 2901Caledonia St., Marianna.

SATURDAY, NOV. 26
o Marianna City Farmers Market is open 8 a.m. to
noon for the fall season, Saturdays only in Madison
Street Park.
) Turkey Shoot Fundraiser -1 p.m. each Satur-
day through December at AMVETS Post 231, north.
of Fountain (east side of US 231, just south of CR
167). Cost: $2 a shot. Call 850-722-0291..
) Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, 4:30 to
5:30 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St., Marianna.

SUNDAY, NOV. 27
n Bingo Fundraiser 2 to 5 p.m. at AMVETS Post
231, north of Fountain (east side of US 231, just
south of CR 167). Proceeds benefit the Post building
fund.
n Alcoholics Anonymous closed discussion, 6:30
p.m., 4349 W. Lafayette St., Marianna (in one-story
building behind 4351W. Lafayette St.). Attendance
limited to persons with a desire to stop drinking.

MONDAY, NOV. 28
) The Jackson County Public Library


Bookmobile will be off the road Monday, Nov. 28
through Monday, Dec. 5; regularly scheduled stops
resume Tuesday, Dec. 6. Call 209-4970 or 482-9631.
) Orientation 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the
Goodwill Career Training Center, 4742 Highway 90
in Marianna. Learn about/sign up for free services.
Call 526-0139.
) Lions Club of Marianna meeting, Jim's Buffet
& Grill, at noon on second and fourth Mondays. Call
4822005.
) Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, 8 to
9 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St., Marianna.

TUESDAY, NOV. 29
Story Time 10 to 11 a.m. (preschool) and 3:15
to 4:15 p.m. (school age) at the Jackson County
Public Library in Graceville. Stop by for stories,
poems, jokes, finger plays and more. Call 482-9631.
D Sewing Circle 1 p.m. at Jackson County Senior
Citizens, 2931 Optimist Drive in Marianna. Call
482-5028.
n Jackson County Quilters Guild Sit-n-Sew
- 5:30 to 8 p.m. in the First United Methodist
Church Youth Hall on Clinton Street, behind the
Marianna Post Office. Work on a project, get free
help, and find out about upcoming classes, lessons
and workshops. The guild's monthly meeting is on
the fourth Tuesday of the month. Call 209-7638.
) Jackson County Board of County
Commissioners meets at 6 p.m. in the Commis-
sion meeting room, 2864 Madison St. in Marianna.
Call 482-9633. '
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open meeting, 8 to 9
p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901 Caledo-
nia St., Marianna, in the AA room.

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 30
a Jackson County Habitat for Humanity
Warehouse hours: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Job Club 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the
Goodwill Career Training Center, 4742 Highway 90
in Marianna. Learn job-seeking and job-retention
skills. All services are free. Call 526-0139.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open meeting, noon
to 1 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901
Caledonia St., Marianna, in the AA room.
a Volunteer Workshop 1 to 3 p.m. at Covenant
Hospice, 4215 Kelson Ave., Suite E, in Marianna.
Free, open to the public. Food, drinks provided.
n Chipola College new student application
deadline for the Spring 2012 semester is today.
Call 718-2311 or visit www.chipola.edu.
) Jackson Hospital Board of Trustees Joint
Conference Committee Meeting 5:30 p.m. in
the cafeteria classroom.

THURSDAY, DEC. 1
n Ted Walt VFW Post No. 12046 and Ladles
Auxiliary meet for their regular covered-dish sup-
per at 6 p.m., followed by a business meeting at 7
p.m., at 2830 Wynn St. in Marianna. Call 209-0065.


) Alcoholics Anonymous Closed discussion, 8
to 9 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901 Cale-
donia St., Marianna, in the AA room. Attendance
limited to persons with a desire to stop drinking.

FRIDAY, DEC. 2
) Small Business Seminar "Marketing Series,
Part 2, Marketing on the Internet and Using Social
Media," 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. in Chipola College
Business and Technology Building, Room M-108.
Register at http://bit.ly/CC-SmallBiz. Cost: $30.
Call 718-2413 or email frohj@chipola.edu.
) Christmas Parade of Trees & Winterfest .
Festival in downtown Marianna. Winterfest
hours: 1 to 7:30 p.m. with vendors stationed in
Madison Street Park. Parade start: 5:30 p.m. (entry
fee: $25). Parade proceeds earmarked for down-
town improvements. Visit www.cityofmarianna.com
or call 718-1022.
) Celebrate Recovery Adult, teen meetings to
"overcome hurts, habits and hang-ups,"7 p.m. at
Evangel Worship Center, 2645 Pebble Hill Road.
Dinner: 6 p.m. Child care available. Call 209-7856 or
573-1131.
Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, 8 to
9 p.m. in the AA room at First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St., Marianna.

SATURDAY, DEC. 3
S16th annual Robert E Long Cane Syrup Cook-
off 7 a.m. in Two Egg. Free sausage and biscuits,
7 to 10 a.m. Family fun with arts and crafts, plus
ribs, Boston butt, chicken and more. Call 592-8012
or 592-2088 for booth rental info.
S)Yard Sale Fundraiser 7 a.m. to noon on Lafay-
ette Street in Marianna, across from the post office.
Miscellaneous items, including baked goods, will
be for sale. Proceeds benefit the American Cancer
Society Relay for Life.
)) Marianna City Farmers Market is open 8 a.m. to
noon for thie fall season, Saturdays only in Madison
Street Park.
) Skeet Shoot Tourney/Old Fashioned Turkey
Shoot Fundraiser 9 a.m. at the Florida Sheriff's
Youth Ranch on Highway 71 South, 4.5 miles
from Interstate 10, hosted by the Jackson County
Sheriff's Office. Youth and adult divisions; open to
all. Registration is 8-8:45 a.m. Skeet shoot tourna-
ment entry fee: $25 (includes lunch); turkey shoot:
$3 per round. Call 557-7262 or 557-7125.
) Turkey Shoot Fundraiser -1 p.m. each Satur-
day through December at AMVETS Post 231, north
of Fountain (east side of US 231, just south of CR
167). Cost: $2 a shot. Call 850-722-0291.
R Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, 4:30 to
5:30 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St., Marianna.

SUNDAY, DEC. 4
n Bingo Fundraiser 2 to 5 p.m. at AMVETS Post
231, north of Fountain (east side of US 231, just
south of CR 167). Proceeds benefit the Post building
fund.


The submission deadline for this calendar istwo days before publication. Submit to: Community Calendar, Jackson County Floridan, Pi 0. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447,
email editorial@jcfloridan.com, fax (850) 482-4478 or bring items to 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.

Police Roundup
POlicO RORutlup


MARIANNA POLICE
DEPARTMENT
The Marianna Police De-
partment listed the following
incidents for Nov. 22, the latest
available report:
One accident _
with no injury, -
three suspi- C1ME
cious people, 4 M
one highway
obstruction, one burglary, one
burglary alarm complaint, 21
traffic stops, three criminal mis-
chief complaints, one found/
abandoned property, one
suicide attempt, one noise dis-
turbance, two assists of another
agency, four public service calls
and three patrol requests.


JACKSON COUNTY


SHERIFFS OFFICE
The Jackson County Sheriff's
Office and county Fire/Rescue
reported the following incidents
for Nov. 22, the latest available
report. (Some of these calls may
be related to after-hours calls
taken on behalf of Graceville.
and Cottondale Police Depart-
ments): One drunk pedestrian,
four abandoned vehicles, one
reckless driver, two suspi-
cious vehicles, four suspicious
people, one special detail, three
highway obstructions, one
mental illness call, one physical
disturbance, one hitchhiker/
pedestrian complaint, one
woodland fire, 30 medical calls,
three burglary alarms, six traffic
stops, five larceny complaints,
one civil dispute, two trespass-
ing complaints, one found/


abandoned property, one
littering/garbage complaint,
two animal complaints, two
assists of a motorist/pedestrian,
two assists of another agency,
two public service calls, one
transport and one threat/ha-
rassment complaint.

JACKSON COUNTY
CORRECTIONAL FACILITY
The following persons were
booked into the county jail dur-
ing the latest reporting periods:
)) Jimmy Hammond, 22,140
McLon Drive, Marianna, hold
for Gulf County.
) Heather Yeatman, 28, 7730
Hwy 90, Sneads, battery domes-
tic violence.
) Jerry Franklin, 30, 7730 Hwy
90, Sneads, battery domestic
violence.


a Tood McGathey, 49, 315
Grossbeak Ave., Seabring, hold
for Charlotte County.
) TeleskororVictoriano, 33,
4348 Deering St., Marianna,
DUI, no valid driver's license.
) Nickie Wilkinson, 35, 2799
Freeman Road, Alford, violation
of state probation.
) Christopher Leperte, 23,
6052 Kenya Trail, Cypress, viola-
tion of state probation.
) Sabirna Brown, 25, 262
Knight Road, Marianna, viola-
tion of state probation.
) Portia Vause, 31, 5185 Lynch
Road, Marianna, hold for Gads-
den County.

JAIL POPULATION: 197

To report a crime, call CrimeStoppers
at 526-5000 or a local law enforcement
agency. To report a wildlife violation, call
1-888-404-FWCC (3922).


TIDES
Panama City Low- 6:02A High- 8:18P
Apalachicola Low 12:54A High 9:23P
Port St. Joe Low- 5:28A .High- 8:09P
Destin Low- 6:39A High- 8:42P
Pensacola Low- 7:13A High- 9:15P

RIVER READINGS Reading Flood Stage
Woodruff 40.2 ft. 66.0 ft.
Blountstown 2.2 ft. 15.0 ft.
Marianna 4.73 ft. 19.0 ft.
Caryville 1.0 ft. 12.0 ft.


FLORIDA"S M lw Gtx
PAeHtBLE "ahncl'"o-

W0 year of experience

"is, Team.


WAICE-UP CaLL







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


DCA GIVES THANKS TO VETS


D ayspring Christian Academy's first-
through eighth-grade music classes
honor veterans on Veteran's Day with
patriotic songs. The students also bestowed
handmade gifts to area veterans.

Florida Lottery
CASH 31] PLAY 4 _FANlTASY 5..


Mon. (E) 11/21 9-8.0 55-3 1
Mon (M) 0-67 4-36.7


3 4.17-27-29


(E) 11/22 5.1.8 5-651 2.9.28-29-35


Tue (M)


6-7-1 53-9-4


Wed (E) 11/23 Not available Not available


Wed. (M)


2-0-9 2-6-1-3


Thurs (E) 11/17 3-1-4 0-6-77 9-11-24.26-28


Thurs
Fri.


Fri. (M)


(M) 9.3-2 0-90-2
(E) 11/18 3-0-7 1-1-7-2 1.4-16-29-30


5.77 4-857


SUBMITTED PHOTO


Talking Toys for Tots


Richard Kunde (left) introduced Toys for Tots Coordinator Tom
Perry, who discussed the program during a recent Kiwanis Club
meeting. Those wanting to support the Toys for Tots campaign
can contact Perry at 592-2294. A Toys for Tots donation box,
accessible during regular business hours, is located just inside
the offices of the Jackson County Floridan on Constitution


Lane in downtown Marianna.


Lights


of Love


is Dec. 1
Special to the Floridan


Online all the time
at jcfloridan.com


NAACP Freedom


Fund Banquet is


set for Dec. 16


Special to the Floridan
The Jackson County
Branch (5104) of the
NAACP will host its 33rd
Annual Freedom Fund
Banquet on Friday, Dec.
16. Festivities will take
place in the Jackson
County Agriculture Com-
plex on Pennsylvania Av-
enue in Marianna. Early
arrivals to the 7 p.m. event
can enjoy a "social hour"
starting at 6:30 p.m.


Organizers say that sup-
port o from individuals,
churches, civic organiza-
tions and sponsors help
make the Freedom Fund
Banquet possible.
Tickets are on sale
now; an eight-seat table
is $320, a 4-seat table is
$160, and single tickets
are $40 in advance or $45
at the door. Tickets can
be purchased by calling
569-1294, 557-0374 and
526-2317.


Sat (E) 11/19 6.8-9 6-1 3-1 8.15-18.33-34


(E) 11/20
.(M) "
E -Evening drawing.


820 4-81.3
776 241.8 10-21.272829
9-0-3 8-2-5-9
M = Midday drawing


'S A


Saturday 11/19 9-16-17-2830
Wednesday 11/16 1322-25-39.51


PB 11 PPx3
PB 28 PPx2


I OITi


Saturday 1119
Wednesday 11/16


3-5-17-24-34'53
10-24.34.37.39.45


.ra 5
xtra 4


For lottery Information. call (850) 487-7777 or (900) 737-7777


John W. Kurpa, D.C.
D.A.B.C.N., FA.C.EN
Board Certified and Fellowship Trained*
Effectively managing pain and reducing patient
risk of major organ damage, disfigurement and
death from drugs and surgery for 31 years

THERE IS AN ALTERNATIVE
TO YOUR
NECKAND BACK.PAIN
Treating Nerve Damage Second Opinions
Auto Accidents wlDisability Ratings
SPhysical Therapy School/DOT Physicals $45.00
An Automobile Accident & Injury Clinic
* Veterinarian Approved Small Animal Spinal Treatment
'The highest level of recognition by the Board of Chiropractic Medicine
concerning competency and experience. Requires years of additional training.

4261 Lafayette St 482-3696


The 21st Annual Lights
of Love Lighting ceremony
ushers in the winter holi-
day season Thursday, Dec.
1, at 5 p.m. on the front
lawn of Jackson Hospital.
Each year, more than 100
people attend this remark-
able event to remember
and honor their loved ones
at Christmas time. Jackson
Hospital CEO Larry Meese
and Foundation Executive
Director Jill Miller will read
the names of each person
honored or remembered
before the Christmas tree,
sparkling with lights and
stars, is officially lit for the
season.
The Golson Elemen-
tary School Second Grade
Chorus will herald arriving
participants with songs of
the season, bringing mu-
sic and heart to the event.
Word has that an extra
special guest will be arriv-
ing just in the nick of time
before cookies and punch
are served at the end of the
ceremony.
Call the Foundation at
718-2601 to order Stars for
$25, Lights for $10, to re-
Aiember and honor your
loved ones this year.
Lights of Love is one of
several fundraisers of the
Jackson Hospital Founda-
tion with all proceeds go-
ing towards the purchase
of medical equipment, not
funded in the operating
budget, for Jackson Hospi-
tal. This necessary equip-
ment advances the scope
of care available here in
Jackson County for the
community. Other annual
Foundation events are the
Spring Gala and the James
T. Cook, Jr., Golf Tourna-
ment. The Foundation also
sponsors a Wine Tasting in
conjunction with the Mari-
anna Rotary Club.
T Call Jill Miller or Geor-
ganne Sherrel at 718-2601
for more information on
how you can volunteer,
participate or contribute
to Foundation events.


WE BUY GOLD
YOUR TRUSTED JEWELER
FOR ALMOST 40 YEARS

Expert atson Exprt
Jewelry D t Watch
Repair GKAO Repair
Downtown Marianna
850-482-4037


F MATTRESS SALE
jTwin ..... Ea. Pc. s47.95
Full ........... Ea. Pc. $57.95
Queen ...... Ea. Pc. $64.95
King ......... Ea. Pc. s87.95

IL SOLD SETS ONLY


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2011 + 3AF


LOCAL







14A THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24,2011


Spanish Clul
Special to the Floridan

The Chipola College Spanish Club is
planning trips to St. Augustine,and An-
tigua. In November, students will spend
two days and nights at the historic St.
George Inn in the heart of the Old Span-
ish Quarter.
Chipola Spanish Club advisor, Dr. Mark
Ebel, has devised a scavenger hunt for
students to follow as a way of discovering
St. Augustine's historic and cultural trea-
sures. Students will obtain information
for the scavenger hunt by riding the town
trolley and listening to the interpretive
talks by the trolley guides. Students will
move from site to site on foot, collecting
information as they go. An evening meal
is planned at a restaurant which serves
authentic Spanish and Latin American
cuisines.


JACKSOPJ COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


b plans trips
Dr. Ebel noted that while most of his
students know a little about American his-
tory, the part of that history that predates
the Pilgrims, the early Spanish period, is
often neglected. He said the purpose of
this trip is to rediscover that history, while
engaging in informal learning experienc-
es that are fun.
Chipola will offer a travel and study pro-
gram in Antigua, Guatemala over Spring
Break, March 25 to April 1, 2012. The
program will feature 30 hours of private
instruction from native speaking Spanish
instructors.
The program fee of $2,160 is all-inclu-
sive covering transportation, meals, lodg-
ing and excursions. The study program
provides three hours of credit in Latin
America Travel Study (LAS 1950).
For information, call Dr. Mark Ebel at
718-2282 or email ebelm@chipola.edu.


to St. Augustine, Antigua


SUBMI'I ItUE nuI
The Chipola College Spanish Club is planning trips to St. Augustine and Antigua. From left,
are Cade Guthrie, Dr. Mark Ebel, Misty Kirkland, Jason Storm, Kellie Mott, Jameson Cullifer,
Cindy Phillips, Francis Hollan, Maranda Lewis, Sandra Salvaty and Ariel Savell. Not pictured
are: Zack Weiland and Sharreneka Jackson. For information, call Dr. Mark Ebel at 718-2282 or
email ebelm@chipola.edu.


Marianna Duplicate Bridge Club results
Special to the Floridan ) Fifth place Dorothy Baxter and Jane


The Marianna Duplicate Bridge Club
announces the winners for the game
played Monday, Nov. 21:
) First place Elaine Yost and Jeff
Payne
) Second place Ollie McGarrh and
Lois Stanwaity
) Third place Lottie Williams and
Drucilla Brown
a Fourth place Douglas Parker and
Kurt Opfermann


Sangaree..
The Marianna Duplicate Bridge Club
is sanctioned by the American Contract
Bridge League.
The game is held every Monday, except
holidays, 12:30 p.m. at Saint Luke's Epis-
copal Church in Marianna.
Everyone is welcome to play or ob-
serve. Lessons are available. Douglas
Parker, club director, is certified to teach.
For more information, contact Parker at
482-8025.


Brad Tate (left) minister of
The Caverns Road Church
of Christ, is welcomed by
Marianna Lion's Club Vice
President Arlon Stephens.
Tate was the Thanksgiving
speaker for the Club recently.
He gave an inspirational
talk on "What Thanksgiving
Means to Me" and what it
could mean for everyone.


Follow us on
Facebook




113B^M,.-..^^


Jackson County
Floridan


Follow us on
Twitter






twitte'r.corn/
Jcfloridennews,


SUBMITTED PHOTO

- -i wwuI


COMING IN THE NEXT

American Profile


Expressing Gratitude
It makes us feel good,
has lasting spiritual and
psychological benefits, and
hels us view the world
and our relationships in
positive ways.
Also...
* Singing Handel's "Messiah" for 65 years
* Raising creative kids


Find us


Fo-w us
Follow us


americanprofile.com
Visit us


AmericanProfile


'What Thansgiving Means to Me'


iKWIIIb


2011 Calendar Cover with J I
winner Austin Roberts
Cast your vote at www.FloridanCutestKld.com
The child with the most votes will appear on the 2012
Jackson County Life calendar. 12 runners up will each
appear on a month.
VotlngendsDecember2andthe winners willbeannouncedDeceinber
7. All proceeds from the contest go to Newspaper in Education which
supplies newspaper to teachers to use in the classroom at no cost to
the school. Your support is much appreciated.
Add your Birthday or Event to the calendar
for a $1.00 donation to Newspaper In
Education. Drop by the Floridan office or
call us at 850-526-3614 to get it in.
litindblua gg) aueMouaiyl


LOCAL


iI AI \u-u ,i a3,} D LILY 1 A
BUY ONE... GET ONIE FREE!
26 Weeks. ........ $32.83* 52 Weeks ..........$62.05*
New subscriptions only


~I : ~







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Navy's Blue Angels fly into era of budget questions


The Associated Press

PENSACOLA NAVAL AIR
STATION The Navy's
Blue Angels have been
thrilling audiences for
more than six decades
with their acrobatic flying
in fighter planes, but a new
era of federal budget wor-
ries and proposed deficit
cutting has some inside
and outside the military
raising questions about
the millions it costs to pro-
duce their shows.
Some want the popular
shows grounded and some
readers of the Air Force
Times newspaper most
of them active or retired
service members re-
cently listed eliminating
the Blue Angels and simi-
lar programs as one way to
cut defense spending.
The Pentagon spends
$37 million for the Blue
Angels, whose mission is
to enhance recruiting for
the Navy and Marines and
to be their public goodwill
ambassador. That's a frac-
tion of the Pentagon's $926
billion annual budget, but
that's not the point, critics
say. They argue that lots
of smaller programs will
have to be eliminated to
meet required spending
reductions.
Automatic cuts trig-
gered by the collapse of
the debt supercommittee
in Washington this week
combined with spend-
ing reductions previously
hainmered out by Presi-
dent Barack Obama and
Congress mean that the
Pentagon would be look-
ing at nearly $1 trillion in
cuts to projected spending
over 10 years.
"It goes to show the scale
of the Department of the
Defense budget the de-
fense department always
goes big," said Laura Pe-
tersoni a spokeswoman
for the Washington-based
group Taxpayers for Com-
mon Sense. She said the
money could be better


I;;


spent on other programs.
"The point is to look at all
federal spending. We can
no longer afford the wants;
we have to look at the
needs."
But Capt. Greg McWhert-
er, the Blue Angels' com-
mander, said his team fills
a vital national security
role by improving morale,
helping with recruiting and
presenting a .public face
for the nation's 500,000
sailors and Marines. The
Navy says about 11 million
people see the squadron's
F/A-18 fighter jets scream
and twist overhead during
each year's show season.
"We still live in a country
that has an all-volunteer
force. Everyone that signs
up to join the military does
so because they were moti-
vated and inspired; maybe
it was an aunt or an uncle,
maybe it was a teacher or
maybe it was the Blue An-
gels, you never know," he
said.
"It is difficult to put a
price on that and on the
number of young men
and women inspired by
a performance." But, he
said, it helps ensure "that






/-- --------
/







"The Forever.After Diamond"

INTatson

GEMOLOGATS

www.watsoniewelers.com
Downtown Marianna
850.482.4037


the Navy and the Marine
Corps is strong 10 to 15
years from now."
Loren Thompson, a
military analyst with the
conservative think tank
Lexington Institute in
Washington's Virginia sub-
urbs, said it is very unlikely
anyone in Congress would
specifically target the Blue
Angels because the team is
so popular.
"I think any legislator
who called for eliminat-
ing the Blue Angels would
be digging and digging
through emails filled with
outrage," he said.
But he said it is possible
spending for promotional
programs could be cur-
tailed under a larger um-
brella bill.


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE PHOTO
In this Oct. 8,2010 photo, the Blue Angels practice near the stadium before the start of Game
2 of a National League Division Series baseball game between the San Francisco Giants and
Atlanta Braves in San Francisco.


On Sunday, December 25, 2011 the Floridan will
publish it's annual in Loving lemuni' page.
If you would like to pay tribute to a lo\ed one that
you ha3e lost, send the following information along
with a photo and payment of $1 S.llJ to:

In Loving Memory
I/o Jackson County Floridan
P.O, Box 520
Marianna, FL, 32447

or drop by our office at:
4403 Constitution Lane, Marianna
between the hours of 8:00A and 5:00mI.

Deadlne is December 16, 2011 at 5 OOPM.


.,, ** *t ' / '.
on Ie anc J te

Ppeop*&4i n2riiej

so mi our es.


Name of Loved One:
I I
Year Born:
I Year Died: I
I Message,,.,,1 ,r ,.i. --i

I I

I I

I Phone Number: I
L - - I


1921 2005
'lur L,: i,'rio H .bh.inj ird 'i Idjldrr',r


I


-- --------~II ~--;---~---~. .-~.---~----. .~--2~~- .c_ .. ;,----~


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2011 5AF


STATE


7 2008 Mercedes Benz C350,
23!04 Miles, M1433A

,/





$299392 ii







-16A THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2011


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN + www.jcfloridan.com


Costlier holiday travel off and running across US


The Associated Press

CHICAGO Holiday
travel got off to a soggy
start in parts of the country
Wednesday as millions of
Americans undeterred by
costlier gas and airfare set
out for Thanksgiving cel-
ebrations, but few major
problems were reported.
About 42.5 million peo-
ple are expected to drive,
fly or ride trains to their
Thanksgiving destinations,
according to travel tracker
AAA. That's the highest
number since the start of
the recession.
"Sacrifice to see the ones
you love, that's what we
do," said John Mahoney,
who was driving with his
girlfriend 20 hours from
New Hampshire to visit
his mother and sister in St.
Louis. "Americans will still
do what Americans do. We
travel the roads."
Mahoney, 44, acknowl-
edged, the economy has
changed the way he trav-
els, which is why the cou-
ple slept in the car instead
of getting a motel room
when a heavy, wet snow-


storm flared up along the
New York State Thruway.
The 90 percent of holi-
day travelers who plan to
drive will pay 16 percent
more than last year for gas,
which reached an aver-
age of $3.33 a gallon as of
Wednesday, according to
AAA.
Air travelers have been
hit, too. The average
round-trip airfare for the
top 40 U.S. routes is $212,
up 20 percent from last
year. Rail tickets on most
one-way Amtrak trips have
climbed 2 to 5 percent. Ho-
tel and motel rates also are
up slightly.
Jake Pagel, 32, a restau-
rant server from Denver,
said he worked longer
hours to save money and
get bills in order before the
holidays.
"We've just been working
pretty much nonstop for
the past few days to make
sure rent's paid before we
go," said Pagel, 32, who
was flying from the Denver
airport with his girlfriend
to see her family in San
Jose, Calif.
Pagel said the trip meant


he had to give up working
during one of the service
industry's most busy and
profitable times.
"I think it's something
you can't quantify in
terms of monetary cost,"
he said. "I mean, being
able to spend quality time
with your family is fairly
significant."
Shun Tucker, 33, of sub-
urban Chicago, decided
just this week that she'd
spend the holiday with
family in Memphis and
booked a $49 bus ticket
for a nine-hour trip south.
She didn't bother to look at
airfare.
"It's about time and
money and how it works
out," she said. "And yeah, I
could go to the airport, but
it's going to cost me $300."
Some motorists who tried
to get an early start along
the Pennsylvania Turnpike
found themselves stopped
by or stuck in a gooey
mess after a leaking valve
on a tanker truck spread
driveway sealant along
nearly 40 miles of high-
way. Officials said at least
150 vehicles were disabled


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Airline passengers wait in security lines as they make their way to the gates at George push
Intercontinental Airport on Wednesday in Houston.


and an unknown number
of others were damaged
Tuesday night.
"Now we have to turn
around and go back
home," Laura Frick, who
was traveling from Cleve-
land to New Jersey for the
holiday, told WTAE-TV "It's
horrible."
Turnpike workers who
peeled up the sticky pud-
dles, then covered them
with sand to hasten drying,
had traffic moving nor-


mally again by Wednesday
morning.
Travelers also were at the
mercy of the weather.
Heavy rains prompted
flood warnings and road
closures across swaths of
the East early Wednesday.
Emergency workers in
eastern Pennsylvania had
to rescue one man from
the roof of his car when
he was trapped by rising
waters.
Snow, meanwhile, mixed


with sleet and freezing
rain to make for treacher-
ous driving and thousands
of power outages across
parts of New England and
upstate New York. The Na-
tionalWeather Service pre-
dicted up to a foot would
fall in some areas. Airports
along the East Coast saw
minor delays for some ar-
rivals and departures, but
the Federal Aviation Ad-
ministration reported few
other early disruptions.


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Nov. 17 photo, New York City police officers are deployed before demonstrators
affiliated with the Occupy Wall Street movement march through the streets of the financial
district in New York.


Occupy protests cost



cities at least $13M


The Associated Pres

NEW YORK I
the first two month,
nationwide Occup
tests, the movemei
is demanding more
the wealthiest AmE
cost local taxpay
least $13 million in
overtime and other
nicipal services, acc
to a survey by The I
ated Press.
The heaviest fir
burden has fallen
law enforcement
cies tasked with mi
ing marches and e
protesters from o
camps.
The AP gathered
from government
cies in 18 cities w
tive protests and fi
on costs through
15, the day pro
were evicted from
York City's Zuccott
where the protests
Sept. 17 before spr
nationwide.
Broken down city
the numbers are m
less in line with th
of policing major
events and emerge
In Los Angeles, for
ple, the Michael J;
memorial concert c
city $1.4 million. A
lanta spent several r
dollars after a majo
and ice storm this y


ss Aside from policing,'
cleaning and repairing x
During property at dozens of 24- t
s of the hour encampments, cities f
y pro- have had to monitor fre- p
nt that quent rallies and protests. c
South of The spending comes J
ericans as cash-strapped police t
ers at departments have cut e
police overtime budgets, travel r
er mu- and training to respond a
:ording to the recession. None- t
Associ- theless, city officials say f
they have no choice but r
nancial to bring in extra officers p
upon or hold officers past their i
agen- shifts to handle gather- i
onitor- ings and marches in a way
victing that protects free speech
outdoor rights and public safety. In
some cities, officials say
figures the spending is eating into
agen- their overtime budgets
ith ac- and leaving less money
focused for other public services.
iNov. Protesters blame exces-
testers sive police presence for
i New the high costs in some
i Park, places. And they note the
began cost has been minimal in
leading other cities, and worth the
spending because they
by city, have raised awareness
lore or about growing inequality
ie cost between rich and poor.
public In Oakland, where pro-
encies. testers temporarily forced
exam- the shutdown of a major
ackson port, the city has spent
ost the more than $2.4 million re-
nd At- spending to the protests.
million The cash-strapped city,
r snow had to close a $58 million
ear. budget gap this year.


YOUR HOME
TOWN DEALER
. ...RD
SANY NEW IN STOCK
F150 TRUCKS
INCLUDING DIESEL

$100.00
OVER COST

J YS OX GENERAL MANAGER
TODD LEE WOULD LIKE TO INVITE
i:ALL HIS PAST CLIENTS AND
.i. FRIENDS TO BAY FORi
,fON TkE EClRNI OF RT 20 AMN MAIN ST BULUNTSTLWN
, 850-674-5462


"The cost of the encamp-
nents is growing and put-
ing a strain on our already
fragile resources police,
publicc works, and other
:ity staff," said Mayor
ean Quan. "We will con-
inue to be vigilant and
ensure that public safety
remains our first priority
nd that our downtown
businessess are protected
rom vandalism. We will
lot tolerate lodging on
publicc property, whether
n parks or open space. It
s illegal."


Economy gets mixed batch


of news ahead of holidays


The Associated Press

WASHINGTON At the
start of the critical holi-
day shopping season, the
economy received a dose
of mixed news Wednesday.
Consumers barely in-
creased their spending in
October, and businesses
pulled back on investment
in long-lasting manufac-
tured goods. Still, Ameri-
cans' pay rose by the most
in seven months, a sign
they may spend more in
coming weeks.
Some economists were
discouraged by the reports,
especially after a separate
report earlier this month
showed Americans spent
more on retail goods in Oc-
tober for the fifth straight
month.
Paul Dales, a senior U.S.
economist with Capital
Economics, said the slow-
er consumer spending
growth and decline in busi-
ness investment suggest
economic growth in the
October-December quar-
ter could be weaker than
first thought. He expects
just 2.5 percent growth in-,
stead of 3 percent.
Consumer spending in-
creased 0.1 percent last


"We're Your
Hunting
Headquarters!"


Happy Thanksgiving!
Start your Christmas Shopping with Us...
We Carry a Large selection of
Camouflage Brand Apparel
Hunting Boots & Accessories
for Infants, Youth, Women, and Men


Gift Certificates &
5 Layaway Available
LOWEST PRICES & BEST SERVICE GUARANTEED
2823 Jefferson St. Marianna, FL
850-526-2082 ok 850-526-1024
Gun Shop .. .e.oo. Archery Shop
uapobook.com/McCoysOutdoors
www.McCoysOutdoors.com info@ McCoys Outdoors.com
Financing Available 12 Months Same as Cash


Would Like

To Welcome

Steve Roberts


He would like to invite all
his family and friends to
come by for a great deal!


S IlTS~iI
BS H H~


month, the Commerce
Department said. It was
the poorest gain in four
months. Spending on du-
rable goods such as autos
showed a solid increase.
But spending on nondu-
rable goods, such as food
and clothing, fell.
"Today's report was a
good reminder that much
of what consumers spend
their money on is not pur-
chased at the shopping
mall, but is rather spent
on their homes and on
their health," said James
Marple, senior economist
at TD Economics. "With
services spending making
up 65 percent of total con-
sumption expenditures,
the poor performance here
more than made up for the
continued gains in spend-


ing on goods."
The report also showed
that Americans earned
more in October. Income
increased 0.4 percent last
month, the best showing
since March. Private wag-
es and salaries drove the
gain.
The solid increase fol-
lowed five straight months
of weak income gains. And
when subtracting taxes
and adjusting for inflation,
income rose 0.3 percent in
October.
Many Americans chose
to save the extra money.
The savings rate ticked up
to 3.5 percent of after-tax
incomes, up from 3.3 per-
cent in September the
lowest level since Decem-
ber 2007, the month the
recession started.


-- *** o$
pape fordetils N,,


We are thankful for our loyal
customers. We hope you and
your family have a Safe and
Happy Thanksgiving!


^U^ Lsv"ASSOAIATE
S TORE
Serving Jackson County Since 1964
4159 Lafayette St 526-3210










Rggj Etaa.A Mseted





ED McCoY DEBBIE RONEY SMITH OUIDA MORRIS NAN HARKLEROAD
(850) 5734198 (850) 209.8039 (850) 209-4705 (850) 526-2891
emccoy02 debbleroneysmith Broker/IOwner nan.harkleroad
@yahoo.com @embarqmail.conm Ocntlury21.com




CLARICE BOYETTE PAT FURR BEVERLY THOMAS ELLEN MARSH
(850) 573.1572 (850) 209-8071 (850) 209-5211 (850) 209-1090
FurrlO9msn.com ellenteducMerealeltate.net


---'---~'--'-`


NATIONAL,







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


2012 Presidential Race

Gingrich gambles in bid to catch Romney


BY CHARLES BABINGTON
The Associated Press

WASHINGTON Newt Gingrich,
a political gambler his whole life, is
banking on unorthodox stands on
immigration, Social Security and
other issues to propel him past Mitt
Romney in the Republican presi-
dential contest.
In a few weeks, GOP voters in
Iowa and New Hampshire will show
whether' they think the best per-
son to challenge President Barack
Obama is a comparative stranger
to Washington politics or a conten-
tious and sometimes cantankerous
veteran of decades of inside-the-
Beltway battles.
Gingrich, 68, may be the most fa-
miliar of the eight Republican can-
didates. But he has never been a
play-it-safe politician. He has a long
career of highs and lows to prove it.
Romney, meanwhile, is sticking
with his run-out-the-clock strategy.
He's adhering to GOP orthodoxy on
immigration, not making too mich
noise about Social Security, and fo-
cusing his criticisms on Obama.
His strategy has kept him fairly
steady in the polls for months while
others notably Rep. Michele
Bachmann, Texas Gov. Rick Perry
and businessman Herman Cain
- have risen and fallen. Now it's
Gingrich, the history-quoting for-
mer House speaker, with a chance
to prove he's the Romney alternative
who can rally and inspire Republi-
can voters.
With time running short, he's
drawing attention to himself with a
familiar mix of big ideas, huge con-
fidence and occasional bombast.
Gingrich highlighted his break
with traditional GOP thinking on
immigration Tuesday in a televised
debate, stepping into a touchy area
that tripped up Perry earlier this
year. Gingrich said he favors path-
ways to legal status for illegal im-
migrants who have lived peaceful,
law-abiding, tax-paying lives in the
United States for many years.
"I don't see how the paity that says
it's the party of the family is going to
adopt an immigration policy which
destroys families which have been
here a quarter-century," Gingrich
said in the forum, televised on CNN.
"I'm prepared to take the heat for
saying let's be humane in enforcing
the law."
That spells amnesty to some crit-
ics of illegal immigration. Romney,
the former Massachusetts governor
and the GOP establishment's favor-
ite, was among those who refused


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Republican presidential candidates former Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman and former
House Speaker Newt Gingrich talk with former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney
at a Republican presidential debate in Washington on Tuesday.


to play along. Any type of pathway
to legal status is a magnet for more
unlawful crossings from Mexico,
Romney said.
Immigration has vexed U.S. poli-
ticians for. years. Many analysts
say Republicans risk angering the
fast-growing Hispanic population
by showing little sympathy for the
millions of illegal residents already
here.
Gingrich, like fellow Republicans
John McCain and George W. Bush,
has supported more lenient immi-
gration policies in the past. On Tues-
day he chose to portray his record as
humane and courageous. In coming
days, GOP insiders will watch to see
if voter reaction mirrors the rebuke
that Perry suffered for saying people
are heartless if they don't support
his policy of granting in-state col-
lege tuition to illegal immigrants.
"Newt did himself significant
harm tonight on immigration
among caucus and primary voters,"
said Tim Albrecht, deputy chief of
staff to Iowa Gov. Terry Branstad, on
Twitter.
Pushing new ideas for conserva-
tive governance and congressio-
nal reform, Gingrich led the 1994
Republican revolution that put his
party in control of the House for the
first time in 40 years.
Four years later, after overreach-
ing in his battles with President Bill
Clinton and even some fellow Re-
publicans, Gingrich was dumped
from leadership. He soon left
Congress.
Since then' he has lectured, writ-
ten books, made documentaries
and earned millions of dollars as a


consultant to organizations, includ-
ing Freddie Mac, a backer of thou-
sands of home mortgages.
Eyeballs sometimes roll when
Gingrich cites his books, college de-
grees and big-thinking proclivities.
But he's rarely dull. On Tuesday he
detailed why he thinks the United
States should follow Chile's model
of making Social Security accounts
private for workers.
"It has increased the economy,
increased the growth of jobs, in-
creased the amount of wealth, and
it dramatically solves Social Security
without a payment cut and without
having to hurt anybody," Gingrich
said.
Cain, who struggled to break
through in Tuesday's foreign-poli-
cy-focused debate, also has hailed
the Chilean modelbut in less detail
than Gingrich.
Romney took few chances in Tues-
day's debate. He is all but ignoring
his GOP rivals as he sharpens his
attacks on Obama. His campaign
drew fire Tuesday for a new TV ad
that quotes Obama out of context in
a 2008 speech about the economy.
The CNN debate offered signifi-
cant TV time for Rep. Ron Paul of
Texas, former Utah Gov. Jon Hunts-
man and former Pennsylvania Sen.
Rick Santorum. But few veterans of
Republican campaigns give them a
chance to win the nomination.
Republican campaign consul-
tant Matt Mackowiak said Gingrich
"made his view on immigration
more persuasively than Perry had
previously." But Gingrich will suffer
if it "can be construed as amnesty,"
he said.


Medicare chief steps aside in political impasse


The Associated Press

WASHINGTON The
.point man for carrying out
President Barack Obama's
health care'law will be
stepping down after Re-
publicans succeeded in
blocking his confirma-
tion by the Senate, the
White House announced
Wednesday.
Medicare chief Don Ber-
wick, a Harvard professor
widely respected for his
ideas on how to improve
the health care system,
became the most promi-
nent casualty of the po-.
litical wars over a health
care overhaul whose con-
stitutionality will be now
decided by the Supreme
Court.
Praising Berwick for
"outstanding work," White
House deputy press secre-
tary Jamie Smith criticized
Republicans for "putting
political interests above
the best interests of the
American people."
Berwick will be replaced


Guardian
From Page 1A

About 30 hours of training is
needed. The classes cover every-
thing from the court process to
families. Usually, the children have
been taken from their home due to
suspected abuse or neglect, so the
risk factors surrounding those two
subjects are discussed as well.
To become a Guardian ad Litem,
a person needs to be over 21 and
undergo a background check before
starting classes.


by his principal deputy,
Marilyn Taveinner, former-'
lyVirginia's top health care
official. Tavenner has been
at Medicare since early
last year, earning a repu-
tation as a problem solver
with years of real-world
experience and an exten-
sive network of industry
contacts. A nurse by train-
ing, she worked her way
up to the senior executive
ranks of a major hospital
chain. She ran Virginia's
health department under
former Democratic Gov.
Tim Kaine.
Berwick's fate was sealed
early this year when 42
GOP senators more
than enough to derail
his confirmation an-
nounced their opposition
to his nomination. That
started a countdown on
his temporary appoint-
ment. His resignation
takes effect Dec. 2.
Berwick's statements
as an academic praising
Britain's government-run
health care had become


a source of controversy in
politically polarizedWash-
ington. Although he later
told Congress that "the
American system needs
its own solution" and Brit-
ain's shouldn't be copied
here, his critics were not
swayed.
In an email to his staff,
Berwicksaidheleaveswith
"bittersweet emotions."
"Our work has been
challenging, and the jour-
ney is not complete, but
we are now well on our
way to achieving a whole
new level of security and
quality for health care in
America, helping not just
the millions of Americans
affected directly by our
programs, but truly health
care as a whole in our ia-
tion," Berwick wrote.
A pediatrician before
becoming a Harvard pro-
fessor, Berwick has many
admirers in the medical
community, including
some former Republi-
can administrators of
Medicare. His self-styled


"We are looking for people with
good common sense who love
children," Powell said.
Once a person completes training,
they are assigned to a child. Guard-
ian ad Litems can decline a case or
place parameters as to which cases
they'll take. A Guardian ad Litem
is asked to visit their child at least
once a month, said Powell.
"You have to have a passion for
children," said Arnett "You have to
have a passion for volunteering."
Many people think they need to
know a lot about the law, but that
isn't so said Powell. An attorney is
available for Guardian ad Litems


"three-part aim" for the
health care system in-
cludes providing a better
overall experience for in-
dividual patients, improv-
ing the health of groups in
the population such as se-
niors and African-Ameri-
cans, and lowering costs
through efficiency.
But some of his profes-
sorial ruminations dogged
him in Washington. Re-
publicans accused him
of advocating health care
rationing, which Berwick
denies.
But Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-
Utah, said Berwick's past
record of controversial
statements and his lack
of experience managing
complex bureaucracies
should disqualify him
from the Medicare job.
Hatch, the ranking Repub-
lican on the Senate panel
that oversees Medicare,
led the opposition to his
nomination. The White
House said Obama will
now seek Senate confir-
mation ofTavenner.


to consult if the need should arise.
Theresa Roberts, the 14 Judicial
Circuit Program Recruiter/Trainer,
said Guardian ad Litems receive a
mentor as well to help them with
any questions or concerns they may
have.
"It's probably one of the most re-
warding things you can do," Roberts
said. "It really makes a lifelong im-
pact on a child's life."
For more information on Guard-
ian ad Litems, visit GuardianAdLi
tem.org.
If you're interested in becoming a
Guardian ad Litem locally, call the
Marianna office at 482-9127.


Lanier-Andler
Funeral Home
8261 Hwy 90 E
Sneads, Florida 32460
850-593-9900

Jerry Lamar
Hicks

Mr. Jerry Lamar Hicks,
63, a native of Grand Ridge,
went to be with the Lord
after his short battle with
aggressive cancer.
Jerry joined his family
members and friends who
were waiting for him on the
other side. To include his
parents, Edward Ross and
Luzelle Martin Hicks, son,
Kevin Hicks, two brothers,
Roy Baker and Larry Hicks.
A lifelong member of
Sneads First United Meth-
odist Church and a 1966
graduate of Sneads High
School. Jerry married Mary
Jane Davis and they had
three surviving children,
Bonnie Murray and hus-
band Tim of Enterprise, AL
Beverly Warrington and
husband Del of Midland
City, AL and Darren Hicks
and wife Stephanie of At-
lanta, GA.
Jerry was first employed
by Burford Equipment
Company, worked also
with International Paper
Company and was a truck
driver for several compa-
nies. In 1989 he decided to
start a career at ACI to later
retire from Jackson Correc-
tional Instutition as a work
Squad Lieutenant.
Marring his best friend
and fishing partner in 2006,
Brenda Kay Owen, his fam-
ily became larger with his
step children, Starla (An-
thony) ward, Stacey (Scott)
Raines, Jennifer Baxter and
Skeeter (Karen) Redmon.
Jerry will be most remem-
bered' by his stories, jokes
and history lessons that he
talked to all of his friends
and co-workers. Jerry was a
friend to all who met him
and was always willing to
lend a hand to those in
need. Taking a year off he
enjoyed his fishing trips
and just doing what he en-
joyed doing such as plant-
ing a garden with lots of
fresh vegetables.
Jerry returned to work at
ACI in 2010 as a Correc-
tional officer. No one could
go to Jerry's house without
taking part of some fresh
vegetables or fresh eggs, or
jelly or pepper sauce that
he had put up. You had to
at least sit and drink a glass
of tea and take a tour of the
home place where stories
were told and you knew
that it was such an impor-
tant part of his life. Sitting
around the fire, eating oys-
ters, boiled peanuts and
listening to Old Farley Tay-
lor on the radio will be
memories that all will hold
so dear in all the friends
and family who spent time
with Jerry.
Besides his friends and
children he leaves to cher-
ish his memories his sis-
ters; Alberta (John) Stone
and Judy (Harold) Branch
of Grand Ridge and Brenda
(Leslie) Hand of Sneads
and one brother, Wayne
(Terri) Hicks of Nashville,
Georiga.
Jerry leaves the sparkle of
his eyes his 19 grandchil-
dren and his special baby
girl (Sally) his dog.


Friday
From Page 1A


Farmers Home Furniture
in Marianna. It'll open at 8
a.m. on Friday.
"(The size of the crowd)
depends from year to year,
depending on people's
wallets," said bookkeeper
Amber Poole.
The AT&T in Marianna
will have the same hours,
but the store is promoting
its Toys for Tots box.
"The more the merrier,"
said self-manager Ty-
ler Grigsby about people
bringing in donations.


- Visitation Will be held on
Friday, November 25, 2011
from 6:00-8:00 PM CST at
Sneads First United Meth-
odist Church with the fu-
neral to be held at the
church on Saturday, No-
vember 26, 2011 at 2:00 PM
CST
Flowers will be accepted
or contributions in memo-
ry can be sent to Emerald
Coast Hospice, 4374
Layfaette Street, Marianna,
Florida 32446

Lanier-Andler
Funeral Home
8261 Hwy 90 E
Sneads, Florida 32460
850-593-9900

Estelle Alice
Keels Medley

Mrs. Estelle Alice Keels
Medley, 90, a native of
Grand Ridge, passed away
November 22, 2011 after a
lengthy illness in Marian-
na. She was a member of
the First United Methodist
Church in Chattahoochee
for 50 years and had retired
as Unit TreAtment Rehabil-
itation Specialist Supervi-
sor with the Florida State
Hospital in Chattahoochee.
She was a past member
and Worthy Matron and
Chaplain of the Order of
Eastern Star, Washington
Chapter # 43 in Quincy,
and past member of Unit-
ed Methodist Women and
Fellowship Sunday School
Class. Estelle also sang with
the 39rs Choir at the First
Baptist Church in.
Chattahoochee.
Estelle was preceded in
death by her beloved hus-
band, Joe Ernest Medley,
her son, Joe Glenn Medley,
her parents, Rev. Henry
William and Laura Nancy
Lawrence Keels, two sis-
ters, Eva Mae Messer and
Eunice Stephens, and four
brothers, George, Grady,
Audis and Paul Keels.
She is survived by two
daughters, Janice Beard
and husband Richard of
Marianna and Rita Dodson
and husband Philip of Cli-
-max, Georgia; three sons,
Ernest Medley. and wife
Joyce of Sneads, Jack Med-
ley and wife Kathy of White
City and Ralph Medley and
wife Pamela of
Waynesboro, -Georgia;
three brothers, Fred, Clyde
and Earl Keels and two
stepsisters, Frances Poolf
and Oneida Coley; eight
grandsons, four
granddaughters, eight
great-grandsons and four
great-granddaughters.
Visitation with the family
will take place Friday, No-
vember 25, 2011, 6:00 till
8:00 p.m. EST, at Lanier-
Andler Funeral Home in
Sneads, Florida. Funeral
Services will be Saturday,
November 26, 2011, 11:00
a.m. EST, at Lanier-Andler
Funeral Home Chapel in
Sneads with the Rev.'s Ro-
land Bamberg, Steven
Poppell and Mike
Hutcherson officiating.
Flowers will be accepted
or donations can be made
to the First United Meth-
odist Church Children
Home, 51 Main Street, En-
terprise, Florida 32725
Lanier-Andler Funeral
Home in Sneads, Florida is
in charge of arrangements.
850-593-9900.


It's "teacher" apprecia-
tion month at Michael's
Toggery in Marianna, so
anyone who receives a
paycheck from the school
district will get 10 percent
off anything except tuxedo
rentals.
Pastors also get a 10 per-
cent break.
Nancy King, an assistant
store manager at a Big Lots
in Milton, said the store
had specific ads running
everyday this weekend
with sales offered each
day.
"Just so the custom-
ers have the information
ahead of time if they want
to be selective," King.said.


Jackson County Vault & Monuments

Quality Sc'rvite at Affordable Prcs

| 850-482-5041 L


Obituaries


Pinecrest


3720 Caverns Road Marianna, FL 32446-1806 (850) 482-3964


Do you have 'Cute Kids'?
Email your'Cute Kids*' photos to editorial@jcfloridan.com, mail
them to P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447 or bring them by our
offices at 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.
*12 years or under, with Jackson County ties. Include child's full
name, parents'name(s) and city of residence. This is a free service.
All entries subject to editing.


--


--


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24,2011 7AF


LOCAL/NRTIONAL






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


18A THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2011


Israel girding for possible trouble for Egypt pact


The Associated Press

JERUSALEM Israel ex-
pects a "grave erosion" in
its peace agreement with
Egypt and is even prepar-
ing for the possibility of the
historic deal collapsing al-
together, a Cabinet minis-
ter said Wednesday, in the
first official assessment of
the unrest rocking Israel's
southern neighbor.
The comments by Matan
Vilnai, the minister for civil
defense and a retired mili-
tary general, reflected the
government's grave con-
cerns that Egypt's Muslim
Brotherhood could make
major gains and even win
elections in Egypt that be-
gin next week.
"The picture is quite
clear. We've been saying
it for months. Apparently
what we call the Muslim
Brotherhood ... will ulti-
mately be the majority in
all the (Egyptian) institu-
tions," Vilnai told Israel's
Army Radio station.


The Brotherhood is the
most organized political
group in Egypt and it is
widely expected to make
a strong showing in the
election. Estimates of how
much of parliament it will
win have ranged from 20
percent to nearly 50 per-
cent. Other Islamic funda-
mentalist parties are also
running, raising the possi-
bility that they could form
a majority, though there
are also divisions among
the religious parties.
But amid Egypt's. stormy
politics, it is unclear how
much leeway the Brother-
hood will have after elec-
tions. It is under heavy
pressure to workwith liber-
al groups, and the military
is likely to dominate the
upcoming government.
Brotherhood leaders
have said they do not seek
to outright end the 1979
peace accord with Israel.
Like many liberal and
secular factions, they say
they want amendments


in the deal, particularly
to change provisions that
bar the Egyptian military
from deploying in the Si-
nai Peninsula, near the
border with Israel. Many
in Egypt see that provision
as a blow to national pride


and as fueling insecurity in
the desert territory.
Vilnai said he did not ex-
pect the peace agreement
to unravel immediately
since Egypt's post-revolu-
tion government will be
preoccupied with domes-


tic issues.
"But once the regime
stabilizes, as we expect it
to do, we expect that there
will be a grave erosion of
this agreement. And we
have to prepare for such a
situation," Vilnai said.


Israeli worries have been
heightened by five days
of mass protests in Cairo
and other Egyptian cit-
ies demanding the ruling
military immediately step
aside and hand power to a
civilian government.


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
An Egyptian boy holds two Molotov cocktails during clashes
with Egyptian riot police (unseen) in Cairo, Egypt, on
Wednesday.


Clashes break



out for 5th



day in Egypt


The Associated Press

CAIRO Egyptian po-
lice clashed with anti-gov-
ernment protesters for a
fifth day in central Cairo
Wednesday as a rights
group raised the overall
death toll from the ongoing
unrest to at least 38. The
United Nations strongly
condemned what it called
the use of excessive force
by security forces.
The clashes resumed de-
spite a promise by Egypt's
military ruler to speed up
a presidential election to
the first half of next year, a
concession swiftly rejected
by tens of thousands of
protesters in Tahrir Square.
The military previously
floated late next year or
early 2013 as the likely date
for the vote, the last step
in the process of transfer-
ring power to a civilian
government.
The standoffhas plunged
the country deeper into
crisis less than a week be-
fore parliamentary elec-
tions, the first since the
ouster nine months ago
of longtime authoritarian
leader Hosni Mubarak.
Field Marshal Hussein
Tantawi tried to defuse
tensions with his address
late Tuesday, but he did
not set a date for handing
authority to a civilian gov-


ernment, instead offering a
referendum on the imme-
diate return of the armed
forces to their barracks.
The Tahrir crowd, along
with protesters in a string
of other cities across the
nation, want Tantawi to
step down immediately in
favor of an interim civilian
council to run the nation's
affairs until elections for a
new parliament and presi-
dent are held.
Street battles have cen-
tered around the heavily
fortified Interior Ministry,
near the iconic square,
with police and army
troops using, tear gas and
rubber bullets to keep the
protesters from storming
the ministry, a sprawling
complex that has for long
been associated with the
hated police and Mubarak's
former regime.
The protesters, who have
withstood tear gas and
beatings, say they have no
wish to storm the ministry
but were trying to keep the
police and army froi mov-
ing on Tahrir Squqre.
Elnadeem Center, an
Egyptian rights group, said
late Tuesday that the num-
ber of protesters killed in
clashes nationwide since
Saturday is 38. The clashes
also have left at least 2,000
protesters wounded, most-
ly from gas inhalation.


1.800.256.4646 VERIZONWIRELESS.COM/HOLIDAY VZW.COM/STORELOCATOR


*Our Surcharges (incl. Fed. Univ. Svc. of 15.3% of interstate & int'l telecom charges (varies quarterly), 164
Regulatory & 834 Administrative/line/mo. & others by area) are not taxes (details: 1-888-684-1888); gov't taxes
& our surcharges could add 6% 40% to your bill. Activation fee/line: $35.
IMPORTANT CONSUMER INFORMATION: Subject to Cust. Agmt, Calling Plan, rebate form & credit approval. Up to $350 early
termination fee/line & add'l charges for extra minutes, data sent/received & device capabilities. Offers & coverage, varying
by svc, not available everywhere; see vzw.com. Limited-time offer. Restocking fee may apply. Rebate debit card takes up to
6 wks & expires in 12 months. LTE is a trademark of ETSI. 46 LTE is available in 175 cities & 105 airports in the U.S. DROID is
a trademark of Lucasfilm Ltd. and its related companies. Used under license. Double your data applies to data paks 2 GB or
higher. 2011 Verizon Wireless. BFRI


SParents,
Sids We'll send your child's lel
it will also appear in the J

lend our Floridan on December 23
end Yr P.S. )our child will recerie a reply from
Your child's letter needs to reach us b. Decemb
add notes about your child's accomplishments.
r Post Script (PS:) and give us )our child's mallln
eter 55 for each child or to hale your child's picture
donation of 8 10.


to Santa FLORIDAN

i ligsJst. SO 4403 Consillullori Lane Maranna. FL 32447-520
s anta's m aogsll ","""'"
l La- 9 1 Ill All6' ,, I [iiill IIii go l hi< -wpper
I-0urs *o u I -9 ,C...Nf,, II,, AIIIr11.. 1111 l. p %I,,l, JoldeI


tter to Santa and
lackson County
rd.
you-know-who! Shhhh...
ber 12th. For Santa's reply,
gender, age, friends, and/or a
g address. Send a donation of
Sprint with the letter. send a




(tl..


make sure Ih e


iN COLLARORAl4ON WITH
Alcatel Lucent


rlI



I


M NIE


-- ---- I~L~sr~a- ~a~arp~aslr;~ss~ "


L-
*IP C
Ir


INTERNATIONAL


In














Malone 63, Maclay 36

; ., ,'.m"L ,.


MARKSKINNER/FLORIDAN
Malone's Chal Baker goes up for a bucket during a game last
week.


Tigers' defense


key in victory


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Malone Tigers were
dominant in their first
two preseason games last
weekend at Marianna High
School.
In their regular season
opener on Tuesday night at
Maclay, they were dominant
once again, using stifling
half-court defense to throt-
tle the Marauders 63-36.
Chai Baker had 19 points
to lead Malone, with Ty


Sneads girls 55,
Wewahttchka 23


Lady Pirates

move to 2-0

with another

blowout win
BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com
The Sneads Lady Pirates
moved to 2-0 on the young sea-
son Tuesday with their second
win in as many nights, beating
Wewahitchka 55-23 at home.
Tasharica McMillon had 23
points, 12 rebounds, and five
steals to lead the Lady Pirates,
while Logan Neel added 10
points and seven rebounds,
and Chasity McGriff 10 points
and five rebounds.
The Lady Pirates dominated
from the start, jumping out to
a 19-4 lead in the first quarter,
and extending their advantage
to 37-9 at halftime.
Sneads led 47-21 at the end
of the third quarter and was
never seriously threatened in
the fourth.
The Lady Pirates were com-
ing off of a 52-22 win on Mon-
day over Tallavanna Christian
at home.


Sneads' Chasity McGriff goes for a
shot Tuesday.


Baker adding 14 and Austin
Williams 13.
Senior point guard Chris
Murff also had eight points
for the Tigers, but perhaps
did his best work on the
other end of the court in
limiting talented Maclay
point guard JT Escobar to
just nine points.
It was an assignment that
Murff asked Malone head
coach Steven Welch for, and
the senior delivered on his
See TIGERS, Page 28


COTTONDALE 59, MARIRNNA 47



Hornets sting Dawgs

Cottondale

overwhelms ..

Marianna
BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com
COTTONDALE The Cotton-
dale Hornets used ferocious full-
court defense and some red-hot
shooting from long distance to
take a 59-47 win over the Mari-
anna Bulldogs on Tuesday night
in the season opener for both
teams.
The Hornets made seven 3-
pointers in the first half and
forced a myriad of Marianna
turnovers to jump out to a 42-19
halftime lead, and held off a late
Bulldogs run in the second half.
Senior point guard Clifford
Canty made four of those sev- ,
en triples and finished with 14 i "
points on the night, while Jerrod
Blount made two from deep and
had a team-high 16 points for ,
CHS. -
"In the first half, we shot it re-
ally well," Hornets coach Chris
Qbert said after the game. "That
was probably the difference, us
making seven 3s in the first half.
That doesn't happen much. But
we did play really good defense,
good with pressure and good in
the half-court. I'm proud of the
effort and proud of the defense."
The Hornets simply over-
whelmed the Bulldogs at the
start with a barrage of 3-pointers
and intense full-court pressure
defense that forced them into
bundles of early turnovers that
were seemingly converted into
points every time.
A 3-pointer by Blount and a
basket by Eli Jackson put the
Hornets up 12-2, with another
triple by Canty followed by a
steal and bucket by Sheldon MARKSKINNER/FLORIDAN
The Hornets' Jerrod Blount gets past Marianna's Quay Royster Tuesday
See HORNETS, Page 2B night in Cottondale.


Sneads boys 67,Wewahitchka 40


Graceville 60,
PDL 31

Anderson


gets winin


coaching


debut
BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com
The Graceville Tigers made
new coach Matt Anderson a win-
ner in his debut with the club,
beating Ponce De Leon 60-31 on
the road despite being without
top scorer Marquis White.
The Tigers' lefty missed the
game due to illness, but Gracev-
ille hardly missed a beat, jump-
ing out to a 30-16 lead in the first
half and never being seriously
threatened.
Marquavious Johnson scored
11 points to lead Graceville,
with Devonte Merritt and Isam
Britt each adding eight points,
and Taylor Rosseau and Jayt-
won McKay each finishing with
seven.
"We played pretty well," An-
derson said after the game. "We
shared the ball well offensively.
In a game like that, it's easy to
be selfish, but the kids did a
good job being unselfish, and
we were pretty solid defensively.
We still went for a few too many
steals, but overall I was pleased
with the effort offensively and
defensively."
The coach said that he was es-
pecially encouraged to see his
team perform so well without
one of its key components in
White.
"Absolutely, it's always good to
get a win without your leading
scorer and possibly your lead-
ing rebounder too," Anderson
said. "But I don't want to play too
many nights without him."
The Tigers will get the rest of
the week off before returning to
action Tuesday at home against
Wewahitchka. L


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Sneads' Hunter Johnson reaches out to snag a loose ball during a recent game against Franklin County.



Pirates pull away from



Gators in second half


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Sneads Pirates took a 67-
40 victory over the Wewahitch-
ka Gators on Tuesday night in
their season opener at home.
John Locke scored 21 points
to lead the Pirates, and Aaron
Green added nine.
The game was fairly even
through one period with the Pi-
rates leading 18-14, but Sneads
dominated the second period
21-4 to take a 39-18 halftime
lead.


"We pressured them a little
bit and got some steals."
Kelvin Johnson,
Pirates head coach

"We pressured them a lit-
tle bit and got some steals,"
Sneads coach Kelvin Johnson
said of that lopsided second
quarter. "We tried to run and
jump them a little bit and that
caused some problems. They
weren't ready for that."
Quinton Sebastian had 11


points to lead Wewa, but the
Gators didn't have enough con-
tributions from others to stay
with the Pirates.
"They weren't real deep, and
I think we wore them down
some," Johnson said. "We
played pretty well. They've got
a good team. We're still a young
team trying to get some games
under our belt, but I'm happy
with the effort."
Sneads will be off for the rest
of the week before returning
to action on Tuesday at home
against Altha at 7:30 p.m.


Graceville 60,


* 1








JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


3-way tie in SEC West would cause real BCS mess


The Associated Press

Chaos! You want BCS chaos?
If No. 3 Arkansas beats No. 1 LSU on Fri-
day in Baton Rouge, La., now you really
have some chaos.
Remember the 2008 season? Texas beat
Oklahoma, Texas Tech beat Texas and
Oklahoma beat Texas Tech, producing a
three-way tie among highly ranked teams
atop the Big 12 South standings. This
would be similar, though the Southeast-
ern Conference has a different tiebreaker
system.
It can be a little confusing on paper, but
here's all you need to know: If Arkansas
beats LSU and Alabama takes care of Au-
burn on Saturday, and the Tigers, Crimson
Tide and Razorbacks finish in a three-way
tie for first in the SEC West, the team with
the lowest rating in the BCS standings is


eliminated.
Then the tie between the two highest-
rated teams is broken by head-to-head
result.
It's a better system than the Big 12 had
at the time, which simply was to pick
the team with the best BCS rating of the
three. Had the Big 12 used the SEC sys-
tem or something similar in '08, Texas
would have played for the Big 12 title with
a chance to reach the BCS title game.
Instead Oklahoma moved on, pounded
Missouri for the Big 12 title and lost the
BCS title game to Florida 24-14.
Longhorns fans are still bitter.
Even with the SEC's tiebreakers, a pos-
sible three-way tie is still going to be
messy.
If Arkansas hands LSU its first loss in Ti-
ger Stadium, it seems logical that voters
in the Harris and coaches' polls, which


are used to rank teams in the BCS stand-
ings along with computers, would jump
the Razorbacks past the Tigers.
But it would be hard to justify having
Arkansas ahead of Alabama, consider-
ing the Tide beat the Razorbacks 38-14 in
Tuscaloosa back in late September.
So Alabama is No.' 1, Arkansas is No. 2
and LSU, which beat the Tide 9-6 on the
road in overtime and has by far the most
impressive nonconference wins of the
three, would be ... No. 3?
The fact is there are no good solutions.
And the reality is the team that loses the
head-to-head tiebreaker and doesn't play
No. 13 Georgia in the Southeastern Con-
ference championship and risk be-
coming a two-loss team and being elimi-
nated from national title contention- is
probably better off.
Now that, right there, is chaos.


Arkansas tight end Chris Gragg (80) makes
a 12-yard gain against Mississippi State
defensive backs Wade Bonner (7) and
Johnthan Banks on Saturday in Little Rock,


Hornets
From Page 1B
Vann made it 17-5 at the end of
the first quarter.
The Hornets continued to
attack in the third quarter,
with Vann coming up with an-
other steal and layup to start
it off, followed by a jumper by
Brandon Franklin and two free
throws by Blount to push the
lead to 23-5.
Two more triples by Canty
swelled the Cottondale lead
to 30-8 with 4:23 left in the
half, with two more Marianna
turnovers in the backcourt re-
sulting in two more layups for
Vann to make it 34-8.
Blount and DJ Roulhac added
two more 3-pointers to make it
a 40-11 Cottondale advantage
with 2:46 on the clock.
The Bulldogs were able to
close the gap with an 8-2 run
to finish the half thanks to put-
backs by DJ Granberry and Trey
White and four free throws by
Chris Bowers and White.
In the third quarter, however,
the threes stopped falling for
the Hornets, who went 0 for 12
from deep in the period, but
Marianna wasn't able to take
advantage and could only cut
the margin to 17 going into


"(Cottndale) deserved to win. They outplayed usforfour
quarters. We played them pretty even for two quarters, but
two quarters isn't enough to win a game."
Iravis Blanton,
MHS head coach


the fourth.
Cottondale led 57-37 after a
driving layup by Roulhac with
4:18 left in the game, but the
Bulldogs were able to cut it to
12 with an 8-0 run capped off
by a 3-pointer by Quay Royster
with two minutes to play.
But that was as close as they
got, and MHS coach Travis
Blanton credited the Hornets
after the game for a superb
performance.
"You have to give it to Cot-
tondale. Their pressure really
hurt us, and they took advan-
tage of every opportunity they
had after we turned it over," he
said. "They forced us into some
mistakes, and they shot it really
well. Chris (Obert) did a great
job of preparing his kids.
"Cottondale is really good.
They deserved to win. They
outplayed us for four quarters.
We played them pretty even for
two quarters, but two quarters
isn't enough to win a game."
Royster finished with 12
points all in the second half


- to lead the Bulldogs, with
Amp Speights and Keyman
Borders each adding nine.
Bellamy and Vann each had
eight points for the Hornets.
While the win was convinc-
ing and his team's perfor-
mance terrific, Obert said that
outcome wasn't necessar-
ily reflective of how the teams
match up.
"We know that Marianna
is better than they showed
tonight," he said. "They're a
good team for how they fought
in the second half. We knew
coach Blanton wasn't going to
let them quit. You look at how
we shot the ball, and that's not
going to happen every night. I
don't think this showed exactly
who both teams are."
The Bulldogs will be back
in action on Tuesday at home
against Blountstown at 7 p.m.
The Hornets, however, are
not yet done for the week, as
they again play host to a coun-
ty rival Friday when they take
on Malone at 7 p.m.


Tigers
From Page 1B


quarters i
"That's
against tl
effort.
"They'l


promise to keep Escobar in did a go(
check. and took
"He was on (Escobar) most of the most
the night, and he was with him pretty we
everywhere he went," the coach We played
said. defensive
"Chris is definitely one of our and we re
better on the ball defenders. He Malone
accepted the challenge. He re- outset, le
quested it, and he did a nice job quarter a
on him. He had nine points, but 17 points
he had to work hard to get all of The Til
them." Cottonda
It was representative of the kind a heavily
of defense the Tigers played as showdown
a team all night as they held the who will
normally efficient Maclay offense home vi(
to just 25 points through three Tuesday.


of play.
pretty sporty, especially
hem," Welch said of the

I run their stuff, but we
od job on their screens,
Saway easy buckets for
part. I thought we played
ell defensively all night.
ed well offensively, but
*ly we had a lot of energy
'bounded the ball well."
Shad control from the
ading 20-8 through one
nd extending the lead to
at the half.
gers will next travel to
le on Friday night for
ly anticipated county
n against the Hornets,
be coming off of a 59-47
:tory over Marianna on


Briefs


HIG L SSCHOOLBOYS

Friday- Malone at Cot-
tondale, 5:30 p.m., and
7p.m.

CH POAEQMEN'S

The Lady Indians will
head to Niceville this


weekend to take on Santa
Fe on Friday, and Central
Florida on Saturday, both
games at 1:30 p.m.

CHIPOLA MEN'S
BASKETBALL
.Chipola will be in Niceville
for the Northwest Florida
Rick Flores Classic this
weekend, taking on La-


mar State on Friday and
Albany Tech on Saturday,
both games at 3:30 p.m.

SPORTS ITEMS
Send all sports items to
editorial@jcfloridan.com, or
fax them to 850-482-4478.
The mailing address for the
paper is Jackson County
Floridan P.O. Box 520 Mari-
anna, FL 32447


THURSDAY MORNING / AFTERNOON NOVEMBER 24, 2011
]6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00|10:3011:0011:3012:0012:30 1:00 1:30 2:00 2:30 3:00 3:3014:00 4:30 5:00 5:30
2 he Early Show (N) (In Stereo) The Thanksgiving Day Parade on CBS (N) (In Stereo Live) News Young & Restless Bold e Talk (In Stereo) Paid Prog. NFL NFL Football: Miami Dolphins at Dallas Cowboys. Cowboys Stadium.
30 The Early Show (N) (In Stereo) 8 Tnhe Thanksgiving Day Parade on CBS (N) (In Stereo Live) Young & Restless Iron Bowl The Talk (In Stereo) Let's Make a Deal NFL NFL Football: Miami Dolphins at Dallas Cowboys. Cowboys Stadium.
50 NewsChannel7 Today Today A Thanksgiving meal with BobbyFlay. Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade The annual event features floats. (N) he National Dog Show (N) (In Stereo) M Millionaire Jeopardy The Doctors Ellen DeGeneres News NBCNews
8 News 13 This Morning GoodMorning America (N) B LUvel With Kelly B View (In Stereo) BB Midday News ae Chew (In Stereo) One Ufe to LIve 0 General Hospital (N) Dr. Phil (In Stereo) he Dr. z Show News BC News
10 ( Auto Tech Paid Prog. EcoCo. Chrs Funnlest Home Videos Justice judge Mathis FOX NFL Prgame (N) NFL Football:Green Bay Packers at Detroit Lions. Ford Field. B eOT Kaleidoscope on Ice JdgJudy JdgJudy RightThlsMinute 0
11 ( Arnnur Martna Curious Cal nine Super Dinosaur Sesame Streel d WordWrilo T*fuoige'(2006,CoXedI) "CinOsGeorgeP Curious George Anrnur (WoroGIr Wllo Kranr Electric Fetch NewsHour
7 SHOW "Warmon Fore "The Fs Tune'(20009) R'm apr-Ma '* ( 2009)Jen Dsnrela.fr S Upef *re Me*TV.h (2(l04 iTV.TPWG-13' 7"lW Ma' (2009) D itel -Lew. s'*** (2002) DMel Dy-Le p "'PusI (2009) ChrlsEvan.
14 NICK 'TheRugrrs re'** 9 (1998.Advetiurs) Winx Club Ilrin isarc The Fairly OddParen ts Penguins SpongeBob [SpongeBob Big Time Rutn h Victorious in Sie.ei ICarny "1' ric..a,." ... iteroi .:i Cay ",Pi.ay W.ir. .i..tir.."
16TBS Home mp Homet mp. Pnnce Prince Pnnce Payne Yun.re sA ue s'** (2005 ,omedy) *17AgeWnkeai (009.Comedy) "*S I"m aleg ialmes (20M.Co me"d) SuasIMio'*r (200S.Comeay) INVer'*** m .
17 HBO Brad PIrronbs ofl Na Dawn i Trei'arr 'ashieTLan'** T(I;) ootfaf'*-** (2009) PG-1' toeHasqpons'* fM09) AarMn EckhMt 'sNchAAYbaCaf'**ta (2002) Lonardo ODCapno 24/7Coto "Pe r Jacks
18 ESPN2 (5:00) Mike and Mike In the Morning (N) (Live) r ESPN First Take (N) (In Stereo Live) College Basketball: Old Spice Classic College Basketball: Old Spice Classic College.Basketball: 76 Classic
19ESPN SportsCenter l SportsCenter 0 SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportaCenter (N) (Uve) SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N)(Uve) SpotiCenter(N)(Uve) SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) rtsCenter (N) (Live)
20 CSS In the Huddle High school football. SportsNIte alkin' SEC Football Pald Prog. Pas Prog. FoodChop Paid Prog. Women's College Volleyball College Football: Miami at South Florida. GSU Game he Sea Hurricane alkin' SEC Football
21 DISN Mickey |Pirales 'Alad~e**' (11 921G' 'ema adrheBeesf'(1 )G aw mr iniMa i e sdm Otd)'PIt Q'* m h Shakeii Jesle 0 shFla Phineas Pineas Phlneas Phineas Good Wizrms
22 MAX BT a News Beera'* *e (19761) PG' 1"Sometgsla a'*** (2003) *Wurir s s '- TCOiai*plBl fIed"*I 2O0)BMeryl Sraep.'R' ~ GCuligEil" *Assai'** (20109 Sam Wuthglon PG-13
23TNT Angel (In Stereo) Charmed (In Stereo) Charmed (In Stereo) Bones (In Stereo) Bones (in Stereo) Bones (In Stereo) Bones (In Stereo) Bones (in Stereo) Bones (In Stereo) Bones (In Stereo) Bones (In Stereo) Bones (In Stereo)
24 DISC Removal Roblson J. Meyer Paid Prog. American Guns lo American Guns 2 American Guns 0 Amrican Guns B American Guns EI American Guns I ricnG Guns 0 Amedrcan Guns American Guns 00 Amecan Guns eB
25 TWC Your Weather Today With Abrams and Bettesa Wake Up Wth Al Day Planner BStorms IStorms Full Force Full Force
26 USA Bum Notice r Bum Notice 0 Bum Notice B NCIS "Judgment Day' NCIS'Judgment Day' NCIS (In Stereo) IM |NCIS "Agent Afloat NCIS "Murder 2.0' NCIS (In Stereo) 0 NCIS "Cloak" EM NCIS 'Dagger' 0 NCIS Child's Play"
28FAM *Bruc Amngy'**w (12003. Comedy) Full House 00 Club rhe 700 CluD B M more Girls E Qf L** (T2007 Comedy) WllyWooti b and eCoDcoi.el Fauiay(1971. Fantasy) e and fle teFFsay'200S Famnasy)
29 LIFE Balancing Designing WillGrace lilliGrace lTPrsadernWife'a f* B FaBs y)DeDn zelWishirgion Cbsas Wdug'2 Comdy) 01 e tHweH"(2M06 Comady-Drama) l Iyou ry MelrMa?(2a0. nDaamal)a "Vy Mry
30A&E CSI: Miami (In Stereo) he First48 m \ TheFlnrt48 T Fjrt48 Theret48 h rat0 Fheret48 neFlrt4 Fhert48BI IeFlrst480 TheFirst480 herrst48
32SYFY PaidProg PaidProg. "Thdander ii-1* 196 A5,Actin)SeanConneiy. hl is Arvm Foarvaer** (1971.Ac on)BI I*G lMrginoi** (1IBM64. A n)SenConniy. 1C as FkaRoy5ae *** 20i Actiorn Dniel Craig Eva G en 0 Ount
33AMC 3xFaster CarMD FatLuss iSy "TaODsrw ***, (i7B, Drma) Robea DeNiro R' 'The GoMahi'w',***-* 1972Amafmipaiarc sltoholdhisimprelogne Rr TeGalt ,a Panf**** (t974, CiaeoDramal APacro 'Rm f
34 MTV Parental rental Parental Parental Friend Friend Friend Friend Friend Friend Friend Friend 2011 MTV Video Music Awards (In Stereo) RIdic. Ridic. RIdlc. Rid. Idic. Ridic. Ridic. VGood Vibe
35BET Inspiration Popoff MyWife MyWife MyWife MyWife MWife MyWife MyWife MyWife ife MyWif e MyWife MyWife MyWife MyWifee Wife Wife MyWife MyWife Re.-Unes Re-Unes Re.-Unes Re.-Unes
36 TOON "A'maneyv Cen~ierottlEEath" om & Jerry om& Jerry Tom Jerry Jerry Tom and Jerry: The Magic Ring Tom & Jerry om & Jerry Tom &Jerry Jerry Tom and Jerry: Blast Off to Mar
39 HIST The Most IRT Deadliest Roads IRT Deadliest Roads IRT Deadliest Roads IRT Deadliest Roads IRT Deadliest Roads IRT Deadliest Roads IRT Deadliest Roads IRT Deadliest Roads IRT Deadliest Roads IRT Deadliest Roads IRT Deadliest Roads
40 TVLND ZumbaFit PaldP rog. Griffth Grffith Griffith Andy Griffth Griffh Griffith Grh Grifith Grifith Grffith Griffh Griffith AndyGriffithShow Griffith Griffit Griffth Griith Gfh AnndyGriffth
43 CNN2 (5:00) Morning Express With Robin Meade News Now Courtroom updates and analysis. HLN Special Report Prime News 0
45 CNN (5:00) American Morning (N) MB CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Presents 0 CNN Presents 00 Education In America Black In America CNN Presents C CNN Presents l
46 CW (5:00) The Dally Buzz 6B Steve Wilkos Show JeremyKyle Payne Payne A BA A TBA Steve Wllkos Show Lfechangr Ufechangr Browns Browns '70s Show '70s Show 'll Death Klng
47 SPIKE 10minGym Tool Talk WEN ITakelt DEA i' tIr.n,, Oni DledyGrnilOf** (1994 Action) Steven Seegal DangerosMan'* (2M ,Adlon) tew s l cSw 12006. Acon) Slrven Sgeal mIionoKWfo208.,Action )SlevenSeagat
49 HGTV Property Brothers Property Brothers Property Brothers Property Brothers Property Brothers Property Brothers Kitchen Kitchen Kitchen Kitchen Property Brothers Property Brothers Property Brothers Property Brothers
98 TLC Cake Cake Cake Cake Cake Cake Cake Boss (In Stereo) Cake Boss (In Stereo) Cake Boss:Next Cake Boss:Next Cake Boss:Next Cake Boss:Next C ake Bo s s:Next e Bos:Next Cake Boss:Next
99 SPEED Monster Jam Monster Jam Monster Jam Monsterm Jam Monster Jam Jam monster Jam onsterJam Monster Jam Dumbest Dumbest Dumbest [uDumbest umbest Dumbest

THURSDAY EVENING / LATE NIGHT NOVEMBER 24, 2011
6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:0010:3011:0011:30112:0012:30 1:00 1:30 2:00 2:30 3:00 3:30 4:00 4:30 5:00 5:30
20 Football Jeoparoyl Big Bang Rules Pereon ol Inlerest The Menlalisl tci News Late Show Lenerman Late Late Shoa;Craig Era rN Up to Up Ine Minute () (i ~n 5.:.) CBS News Daybreak Good Morning Show
30 Football Wheel Big Bang Rules Person of Interest The Mentallst IE News Late Show Letterman Late Late ShowlCraig Inside Ed. Up to the Mlnute (N) (In Stereo) CBS News WTVY News 4
5 News Wheel 'ionon Hears a lthorp(200B Aiventum) n) Macy's-Paraoe News Tonighl Shou nlLeno Lale Night Carson roday (In Stereo) Extra (N) he Bankruptcy Hour Shepherd's Chapel Early Tdy NewsChannel 7 Today
8 01 News Ent Charlie Brown Middle A Very Gags Thanksgiving 00 News Nightline Jimmy Kimmel Live Excused Jim Access H. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. ABC World News Now (N) 0 Morning News13 This Morning
10 g Two Men Big Bang Ice Age "Halpp(nes le" SImpson News How Met Big Bang Two Men 30 Rock Friends Friends KingHll Scrubs Anderson(In Stereo) he People's Court Judge B. Shepherd's Chapel Paid Prog. Outdoor
11 I NewsHour Wildlife Crossroad Fla.Face ThisOld House Hr Globe Trekker Charlie Rose (N) l T. Smlley 1' Smre1y rThis Old House H I IndependentLens JSecrets ofl he Dead in Performance NOVA 'Sccirvi -iuas Oeogem" *
7SHOW Pusr e ThLatrPlayaerShea'(010 'TheiSwunmi '"w* (2010l PG-13'm Gigolos OldPom Ggolos OlddPorn Ccc klneiCoMwoySlf HUSl 1" "BgFan'"*** 12009) R'lM C lonmackSesaso*** 1 (206 PG-13 sBal'mtain"(2t0BI
14 NICK '"ThiSpngaBoe&i SuarsPanmsiabkur' e Friends Frie.ds Frenos Fiends Fns rien ds Frends Frienus Friends [Frienas Friends Frieens FrianOs Friends Frends [Frenos IFnends A Matters Matters
16TBS I500i 'HiHtcl'h Fam. Guy Farm Guy Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Conan i TheOtlace eOfltice Conan rn Seinfeld Seinfeld 'luessageaien Bie** (1999. Romance) B Married Married Maed
17HBO 'PeracyJ iaclo"rn' Crnwnv5eoolfNms Dan Treader" Bored Hung RealSe i.. re.:i l America Enligen a'GokingeDlsiarrc(2010' R' T'rmnaranl. RlRseaneof ecIanh '(2003) 1SayNotfIrig' (20011)R'm leg and Odes
18 ESPN2 College Basketball: Old Spice Classic College Basketball: Old Spice Classic College Basketball:76 Classic NFL a Greatest Games ra() 1 SportaCenteir ro pontsCenter E 60(N li Mikee and Mike
19 ESPN SportsCenter (N) (Live) [College,Football: Texas at Texas A&M. (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) 1 SportsCanter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) College Football: Texas at Texas A&M. SportsCenter IN SportsCenter N
20 CSS College Football ACC [SEC Talkn' SEC Football Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Pad Prog. Paid Pro g. PadProPd Prog. Paid Pro. Pal Pg. aPrg. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Prostate Pad Prog.
21DISN Shake I J essie ANT Farm .-Force" 2009 Bin Nighy Jessie IANTFarm Snakell Iizards Wizrds Wizaros Good Good Ranaom ANNTFarnDeck Deck Pnlneas Phineas Pnineas Phineas Snomwar he'
22MAX PulpFinsn"*** 1994 Crtme Drama) John Tra lla R B "ThLeios.5s'* 120101 PG 13' "Busty Coeds vt Liusy" "ThePsoovs. Laryjrir*** (199 ) "PeildecrC relura'* (W ) "Ai(BpAdMeir ** (2002 lNicoas Cage |Goden PI
23 TNT Bones (in r..L.:.) CSI NY (i. Sie-.) [CSI NY (i', ,IiK.) CSI: ly tin 1Ir.i ,) [CCSI NY (1.lu. ti.e l CSNY rI.li. ,.:,) CSI NY A3a.r.,,,'.,i- IFranklin & Bash I, Law & Order La Omrer aiw 0 roer 1-ei."r. Angel In i,.,i l


American Guns Punkin Chunkln 2011 (N) (In Stereo) 00


Sons of Guns Punkin Chunkin 2011 (In Stereo) 0E


:oast Guard Alaska CoastGuard AGuard laska Guard Alaska Coast uard Alask CoastGuard Alaska
CI5 'ii'e.r i.r,rj "e a 12003 Comreiy) Wiln Fernrll Ie El *** 1200 Comredyl Will Faenrll IM
IMonrmtI Inr *i* 12001 Conedy) IWALL.E *' 120iu Advenruro) The 70 Club IKl
r1) Marrn" "A t m tieiraa Prpora e c* o Nile Egger Hr.aii S.ni'ni"12007 Comedyl 50
rhe First 48 c TneF First 48 iO The F4s8 4 1 ine Firb 48 s Tne Firsl s48 '


5 301 'Qlu.iIum of SraC'e" I2 Action
Ood IrMer Ptf "Tn wuodfamer'* *
Beavi Beasl "Scani SMr)u ote'* (20f0
Re.- Unes Re.- Lnes Re,- Lnes [Re.-Lines


36 TOON I0en Ssaona**tX (2006, ComedyJ
39 HIST IRT Deadliest Roads The Real Story


Grifflth M'A'S'H Roseanne Rgseanne
Jane Velez-Mitchell Nancy Grace (N)


Black In America CNN Heroes
Seinfeld ISeinfeld The Vampire Daries


47 SPIKE TheKeeper(2009, Action) Steven Seagal.
49 HGTV Property Brothers IHome Strange Home
98 TLC Cake Boss: Next Great Baker Cake


"Di Another Da,'* (2002 Aciorn. Pierce Bmrnar, HIal iiBanr


(1912) A mala Darnarch mea to no10a has erire log
l, CorredyJ *Sry0sie 'I(0l0
Re.- Lines Re- Lines Re.- Lnes Re.-Lines
KinIHI ng/H I Amer. DD m adI
Swampaglving 0 Big Shrimpin' aM
Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond
Dr. Drew The Joy Behar Show
Nepal's Stolen Chill CNNHeroes
The Secret Circle Cops Death
IMPACT Wrestling (N) (In Stereo) I
Radio City Holiday (N) Holiday, Inc. (N) MB
Family Feast Boss: Buddy
Dumbest Dumbest Dumbest Dumbest


iner.'R Ma
I, Comedy)


Re.-Lines Re.- Lines
Fam. Guy Fa. uy
The Real Story
King IKing
Showblz Tonight
Nepal's Stolen Chll
King South Pk
IMANewers MANswers
untere Hunters
Family Feast
OumbesI Dumbestl


KWense toI Ifll
he Goalathe
19aKclui'hr


Sons of Guns American Guns a MagicJack Paid Prog. TriVia [Paid Prog. [Paid Pro. Pald Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog.
Alaska Coast Guard Alaska Coast Guard Alaska Coast Guard Alaska Rrst Outlook e Wake Up With Al
Pi p NCIS "Silent Night" Bum Notice [0 Bum Notice 0 Burn Notice 0 Bum Notice 0a iaNoAto
hose l Removal Paid Prog. LttGlant Younger he 700 Club Walk Fit Pad Prog. rince Lfe Today J. Meyer Wordd
Ifrouer' *W* nicola Eggen "Holera Swrcn'(2007. Comedyil M Hair Tool ToialGym Younger CarMD Pala Prog Ci.u, C
S he First 48 0LI The First 48 0 e First 48 a Paid Prog. lna Mop MaglcJack Pad Prog. Paid Prog.
'e** i a84 Drsma Jamois Farontno I The Spy WholondMd'1 * 11977, lActin Tni Zone Pal Prog lEN
r. Pan i'" * (1974) MIdhel Coleone moves his fasmer'sc me family to Las Vegas Sooges Slooges Stooges Vacuum riVi
* ? 001 Comedyl iRair c osSnon Bearis [Beavis Bea.is Good Viba Goo VIoe Good Vine Frena Froena
ma show 'SoulPlrtneo* (2004, Comedy) Kevin alt TheMo'NiqueShow BET Inspirtllon Popoff BET Inspiration
qua Heart mer. Dad Amer. Dad.Fam. Guy Fam Guy Ihldrens Renegade Heart King/HIIll Kngr/Hll Looney Ben 10
y Swampaglvlng .m Big Shrimpin' .. The Real Story MONEY Cash Flow PaidProg. MagicJack PaidProg. Paid Prog.
ng Roseanne (I n Stereo) Roseanne le Nanny The Nanny Co. are's Company The Nanny The Nanny Removal MagcJack
Nancy Grace Showbiz Tonight The Joy Behar Show Showbiz Tonight Dr. Drew Morning Express
r Next Ungodly Dscipline The Last Heart Attack Plers Morgan Tonight Ungodly Discipline AM: Wake Up Call (N) Aerican Morning (N)
oseanne Roseanne TBA Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. iMakeover reainer Better (N) (In Stereo) Paid Prog. The Daily Buzzn B
TTV GTTV MANswers MANswers MANawers MANswers Ways Die Trivrex Midnight Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Tiverex
allday Holtday, nc. 0t Huars Hunters Home Strange Home No Sleep? Cash Flow Rockwell Paidrog. Sexy Now Frst Place
Cake Boss: Next Great Baker Cake Younger Bosley Paid Prog. Paid Prog. fPaidProg. Paid Prog. Say Yes Say Yes
umbet Dumbest Dumbest [Dumbest Dumbest Dumbest Dumbest Dumbest Dumbest PaidProg. LItlGlant PaidProg. Paid Prog.


24 DISC


25.TWC
26 USA
28 FAM
29 LIFE
30 A&E
32 SYFY
33AMC
34 MV
35 BET


40TVLND
43 CNN2


45 CNN
46 CW


99 SPEED Dumbest Dumbest Dumbest Dumbest


~ 1 __ ijiij/iiiii;;;i~~ /_/1_ _____~___~~~_~i;i; ~~___


I I I I


I;


T


_L_ __I I I 1 __


4





I


-12B THURSDAY. NOVEMBER 24, 2011


k


II


SPORTS







JACKSON COUNTYFLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


SPORTS


NFL



Pep talk gives Redskins a boost



Grossman among the Washington leaders who delivered a speech which jump-started sputtering offense


THURSDAY. NOVEMBER 24, 2011 3BF


BY RICH CAMPBELL
Media General News Service

WASHINGTON A
group of leaders on the
Washington Redskins' of-
fense decided last week
they were fed up with
failure and done with be-
ing embarrassed. They
had scored a total of only
20 points in three games.
They weren't even com-
petitive anymore.
Enough was enough.
"It was time to fight
back," receiver Jabar Gaff-
ney said.
Gaffney joined quarter-
back Rex Grossman and
offensive linemen Jammal
Brown and Will Mont-
gomery in delivering mo-
tivational speeches to the
entire offense during a pre-
game meeting Saturday
night at the team hotel.
Inspiring words don't al-
ways result in production
on the field. If it were that
easy, perhaps the Redskins'
season wouldn't have come
unhinged weeks ago. But
some players on Monday
attributed the unit's resur-
gence in their 27-24 over-


time loss against Dallas to
the pre-game pep talks.
"I think it was long over-
due," fullback DarrelYoung
said. "It opened up some
eyes."
After Washington's of-
fense showed a pulse by
scoring a season-high
24 points against Dallas,
players trickled into team
headquarters on Monday
morning with a brighter
outlook than in recent
weeks.
The playoffs are almost
certainly out of reach, but
the Redskins (3-7) at least
restored a measure of con-
fidence that could serve
them well over the final six
games.
"There is no moral victo-
ry column, but it is a build-
ing process," nose tackle
Barry Cofield said. "Guys
do improve. Teams do im-
prove win, lose or draw
- and sometimes teams
take a step back. There's
something to be said for
that. If guys focus and
continue to prepare and
we get on the same page, I
think we've got a chance to
win some games."


N


THEASSOCIATED PRESS
Receiver Jabar Gaffney's numbers have improved in recent
weeks following an offensive pep talk from Redskin players.


For coach Mike Shana-
han, the biggest difference
between Sunday's game
and other losses during the
Redskins' six-game losing
streak was their response
to adversity.
Tight end Fred Davis
fumbled on Washington's
first drive, and the Cow-


boys turned it into a 7-0
lead three plays later. The
Redskins' next four pos-
sessions ended in punts,
a familiar outcome during
their recent slump.
But then Grossman led
them on back-to-back
touchdown drives to end
the first half. His 4-yard


score on a quarterback
draw and his 16-yard
touchdown throw to Gaff-
ney were like CPIR for the
offense.
"You understand that
when things don't go right,,
you don't panic," Shana-
han said. "You just kind of
relax, guys get together, ev-
erybody does their job. We
didn't have that in the first
quarter so I was wonder-
ing what direction we were
going to go.
"I was pleased with the
way they kept their poise
and the way they worked
and theywere able to come
up with some big plays and
some big drives late in the
game."
Grossman was a driving
force. His 65.8 completion
percentage was his best
since he completed 71.4
percent of his passes in Su-
per Bowl XLI on Feb. 2007.
"He just had that confi-
dence," Gaffney said. "He
had that look in his eye that
he was just ready to go. We
definitely pick up on it and
feed off of it."
It continued an emo-
tional boost that began


the night before. Young
cited speakers who exuded
confidence and stressed
cohesion.
"Just let it go and play
for yourselves now," he
recalled.
"Play together, but know
that the person next to you
is going to be playing hard,
so you don't want to let
that person down."
Whether the message's
effect lasts into this Sun-
day's game at Seattle and
beyond is unknown.
For now, at least, the tone
inside team headquarters
has changed.
A week ago, Cofield
openly discussed the pos-
sibility of the season be-
coming "historically ugly."
"As depressed as I was
last week, I'm optimistic
this week out of some of
the things that we did," he
said.
"Offensively we played
great, in my opinion. They
gave us a chance to win.
Defensively I know we've
got the guys that will re-
spond, and we won't let
those guys down next
week."


NASCAR


RCR moves


personnel to


give Harvick


new crew chief


The Associated Press

CHARLOTTE Richard
Childress predicted at the
start of the season one of
his drivers would win NAS-
CAR's championship.
So after falling short for
a second consecutive sea-
son, Kevin Harvick will
have a new crew in 2012.
Richard Childress Rac-
ing announced Wednes-
day that Shane Wilson
will replace Gil Martin as
crew chief of Harvick's
No. 29 team. Martin, who
had been Harvick's crew
chief since May 2009, was
moved to director of team
operations.
"Kevin came to me after
the Phoenix race a couple
weeks ago and asked for a
change in the leadership
of his team for the 2012
season," Childress said in
a statement. "The expec-
tations at RCR are to win
championships, so the de-
cision was made to move
Shane Wilson."
Wilson spent the last
three seasons as crew chief
for Clint Bowyer. That
team is shutting down with
Bowyer's move to Michael
Waltrip Racing, although
the No. 33 is expected to
run select events with
Truck Series champion
Austin Dillon, Childress'
grandson.
Wilson and Harvick
worked together in the
Nationwide Series in 2006,
winning 10 races, scoring


CHIPOLA FORD


24 top-five finishes and
winning the title by a re-
cord 824 points.
"Shane is a good friend
of mine and we had a lot
of success together in the
NASCAR Nationwide Se-
ries," said Harvick. "He
has a lot of experience in
the Sprint Cup Series and
I look forward to working
with him again."
Harvick finished third to
Jimmie Johnson and Den-
ny Hamlin in last year's
Chase for the Sprint Cup
championship, and Chil-
dress was certain at least
one of his drivers would
make a run at the title this
year, and dethrone five-
time champion Johnson.
Instead, only Harvick
qualified for the Chase.
Although he opened it
tied with Kyle Busch for
the top seed, he finished
third again in the final
standings.
This marks the third
crew chief change since
the season ended Sunday
at Homestead. Steve Add-
ington quit as Kurt Busch's
crew chief this week,
and Chip Ganassi Racing
lured engineer Chris He-
roy away from .Hendrick
Motorsports to crew chief
Juan Pablo Montoya next
season.
Also, three-time NASCAR
champion Tony Stewart is
in limbo: He told Darian
Grubb he was being let go.
as crew chief before Grubb
rallied Stewart to the title.


rn


John

Bryan

John Invites All His
Friends And Family
To Come See Him
For The Best Deal!


Hwy. 90 Marianna, FL

1-866-587-3673 850-482-4043
www.chipolaford.com


College Football


Meyer says no offer from Ohio State

Former University of Florida head coach reportedly offered a 7 year contract


The Associated Press

COLUMBUS, Ohio Despite nu-
merous reports saying he's all but set
to become Ohio State's next football
coach, Urban Meyer said Wednes-
day that is not the case.
"I have not been offered any job
nor is there a deal in place," the for-
mer Florida coach said in a state-
ment released through ESPN, where
he is a college football analyst. "I
plan on spending Thanksgiving with
my family and will not comment on
this any further."
Several websites, TV stations and
The Columbus Dispatch have re-
ported that Meyer has reached an
agreement in principle with Ohio
State and, barring any last-minute
problems, will be introduced as the
Buckeyes' coach next week.
People within the athletic depart-
ment and close to the team told The
Associated Press the job has not
been offered to Meyer and nothing
has been completed. They spoke
on condition of anonymity because
the coaching search is supposed to
be confidential. Athletic director


Gene Smith declined to comment
Wednesday.
Ohio State, under interim coach
Luke Fickell, plays at No. 17 Michi-
gan on Saturday. Fickell, who some
reports have said will be retained
on Meyer's staff, declined to address
the story, which has been percolat-
ing for days.
"No. I won't," he said Wednesday.
"It's not about that. I'm going to
have enough respect for this foot-
ball game to make sure it's about
this football game. I don't think this
is the time and the place."
Speaking briefly to reporters, he
was asked if he knew if a decision on
a new coach had been made yet.
"I know there's a game at noon on
Saturday," he said.
Meyer is from Ashtabula and was
a graduate assistant at Ohio State
under Earle Bruce in the 1980s. He
grew up an Ohio State fan and has
said he has a portrait of legendary
Buckeyes coachWoody Hayes hang-
ing prominently in his home.
In addition to winning national
titles in Florida in 2006 and 2008, he
has also been a head coach at Bowl-


ing Green and Utah and worked as
an assistant at Notre Dame, Colo-
rado State and Illinois State.
He announced in December 2009
he was stepping away from coach-
ing because of health concerns, but
quickly changed his mind.
After taking a leave of absence,
he returned to the sidelines for the
2010 season and then retired again
in December.
Alabama coach Nick Saban said
he would welcome Meyer back into
the coaching fraternity.
"Urban Meyer is a verygood coach,
he's a good teacher. He's good for
young people," Saban said on the
Southeastern Conference coaches
conference call this week. "If coach-
ing is in his heart, I think that's what
he should do."
Saban said he understood why
Meyer had apparently changed his
mind about returning to coaching.
"As you go through life and you do
things and you make choices and
decisions about what you do,"
- and I know his involved circum-
stances around his health but still
you learn about yourself."


Hawaii won't discuss

point-shaving allegations


The Associated Press

HONOLULU Univer-
sity of Hawaii head foot-
ball coach Greg McMack-
in says he won't discuss
point-shaving allegations.
He spoke to reporters
after Wednesday's prac-
tice only to say he's direct-
ing questions to univer-
sity spokeswoman Lynne
Waters.
Waters would not com-
ment on whether the
university will conduct a
probe despite police say-
ing there's not enough


information for a criminal
investigation.
The university received
an anonymous letter
Nov. 3 accusing,unnamed
players of intentionally
playing poorly to affect
the final score.as part of a
gambling scheme.
The NCAA says it's taking
the allegations seriously
and has been in contact
with the school since early
this month.
The Warriors won 10
games in 2010 but have
only five wins this year.
with two games left.


Hearty, Homestyle Cooking

GIVING THANKS

BUFFET

with all the fixins'


$ SERVED
S^ 10AM 8PM
10% Discount B k u
for Senior Citizens
$4.99 Age 3-10
Under age 3 ~ FREE
UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT
2193 S. HWY. 71
(850) 526-2969


New Grand L40 Series
Kubota proudly introduces eight new Grand L40 models ranging from
34 to 59 HP each with increased power output and PTO torque.
Innovative features like our new HST Plus hydrostatic transmission,
Hydro Dual Speed (H-DS), Load Sensing system, Auto Throttle
Advance and Response Control make operating a tractor as easy as
driving a car.
When you have a tractor like this, life is better than good. Life is Grand.
nJbo a. Panhandle Itactor, Inc.
M'"G YW 5003 Hwy. 90 Marianna, F 32448
www.iaiou.cotm B
Kubola Tcstor Comoratlon. 27 (850) 526-2257


2-ec/Cyo /1 i'a/ld





As our gift to you we would like to offer.
12 months no interest financing (wac)
A $500.00 VISA gift card
S1 .ear maintenance agreement
Any Model and Any Efficiency
Call today to schedule your free comfort consultation



WOCoDALL'S

www.woodallstotalcomfort.com
850-482-8802
License #CAC058636
**This offer is good through December 31, 2011**


1r








JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


14B THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2011


BORN LOSER BY ART AND CHIP SANSOM
BRUTUS RE c LY UT E.CU5E OF TIAE 5ltA'C WREN W -5 RE REE
KNOCKED> OUT -- TRYPOPPW FRO\ -s TRYPTOPIAN TO DOSE.
AFT T I ( L L TwL TURKEY OFF A TTE.MOPOF
MNtERI! Z) ,rla- 'a A. TE= -E k


BIG NATE BY LINCOLN PIERCE
I4EY, I'VE 6OTAN IDEA! YOU ONLY Do IT DUR-
NEXT TIME MARCUS ING A "YO MAMA
INSULTS You, JUT SMACKDOWN"! YOU
(Yo MAMA HIM'/ DON'T YO MAMA
PEOPLE AT
You CAN'T "JUST RANDOM
YO MAMA" PEOPLE,
FRANCIS!

-I -


HOW WOULD YOU FEEL
IF,OUT OF NOWHERE,
I SAID TO YOU:'YO
MAMA'S SO FAT HEP
THtGHS ARE WHERE
CORDUROY GOES
TO DI E"
E


UM...
BAD. EXACTLY'
SEE, I'D
NEVER
,DO THAT'





P -i


SOUP TO NUTZ BY RICK STROMOSKI

Iou KaL)o Ienou\N aHeN ea.U GW Uzp
1 Lnia-le ano 0ou- I-I 1NI aM ReaLize


FRANK & ERNEST BY BOB THAVES


GRIZZWELLS BY BILL SCHORR


ARLO & JANIS BY JIMMY JOHNSON


WEHAVE. BEE) 5D
A DEFECTIVE TURKEY







L JOI


HEHAS TWOKODER
b)0 VITAL HOW HE.
AIOC., E.VER G OT
TH1551&.


1^ -


ARLO, SToP
PLEAWE VHAT!
IA6






d,
from 1996


aowpa
0
...
;^3b~
^S-// ^gS
Jj^^


ALLEY OOP BY JACK AND CAROLE BENDER


MONTY BY JIM MEDDICK


COW & BOY BY MARK LEIKNES


KIT'N' CARLYLE BY LARRY WRIGHT HERMAN BY JIM UNGER


.4 0 LaughingStock Inlnatonma l Inc llst by Undveral Udck lor UFS, 2011

"Can't you go any faster?"


NEA Crossword Puzzle


ACROSS
1 -, amas,
amat
4 Recipe
amt.
8 Obi
12 Sidekick
13 Waikikl's
Island
14 Jazzy
Fitzgerald
15 Lunar
events
17 Average
grades
18 Ghostly
meet
19 Kind of
cuisine
21 Drowses
off
23 Corner
24Hobby
wood
27 Bird abode
29Wear and
tear
30 Run out of
energy
32Teeming
36 Ankle-
length
38 Magician's
prop
40- de
plume
41 Village kin
43 Chalet
features


11-24


45 Kukla's
friend
47 Dotty
49 Leaves at
the altar
51 Crystal-
filled rocks
55 Central
points
56 Plant or
animal
58 Fierpe
whale
59- accompli
60Good
name for a
cook?
61 Thor's dad
62"Rag Mop"
brothers
63 Family pet
DOWN
1 Gorillas or
chimps
2 Kitchen
spice
3 Earthen pot
4 Fall
garment
5 Stationed
6 "Murder, -
Wrote"
7 Jostle
8 Less at
risk
9 Prince
Valiant's
wife


Answer to Previous Puzzle


YIUIKIOINM
AME BAS
PANOUTT
AGA IV
B RR L E N
RECOUN
OATHSIIE
BASIS TI

EAS VERp
SWEETS
CLA WS
10 Hit-the hay
11 Possesses
16 Quaint
hotels
20 Munched
22 String of
pearls
24 Kind of
steer?
25 Film speed
ind.
26 Villain -
Luthor
28 Cartoon
Chihuahua
31 Labor org.
33Mdse. bill
34 Antagonist
35911
responder
37Felllnl, e.g.
39 Vanquishes


42 Que.
neighbor
44This must
weigh -
-1
45Viking's
bay
46 Designer
Nina -
48 Prize
marble
50 Living-
room piece
52 Half of DJ
53 This, to
Pedro
54Chimney
dirt
55Egg -
yung
57 Sheep


0 2011 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS
*


Annie's Mailbox


Dear Readers: Happy Thanksgiving!
We hope you are fortunate enough to
be spending the holiday with family
and friends. And an extra shout-out to
those readers who are spending the day
volunteering at shelters and soup kitch-
ens. Bless you for your kind hearts and
generosity of spirit. Here is one of Ann
Landers' favorite essays, which we feel is
quite appropriate for Thanksgiving:
I Asked God (author unknown)
I asked God for strength, that I migit
achieve. I was made weak, that I might
learn to obey.
I asked for health, that I might do
greater things. I was given infirmity, that
I might do better things.
I asked for riches, that I might be
happy. I was given poverty, that I might
be wise.
I asked for power, that I might have the
praise of men. I was given weakness, that
I might feel the need of God.
I asked for all things, that I might enjoy
life. I was given life, that I might enjoy all
things.
I got nothing that I asked for but
everything I had hoped for. Almost de-
spite myself, my unspoken prayers were
answered.
I am, among all men, most richly
blessed.


Bridge


Look at the South hand. You deal and open
one heart, West overcalls one spade, North
passes, and East raises to two spades. What
would you do now?
We will never know whyWest failed to make a
takeout double over one heart. And East's two-
spade raise was distinctly cautious, with an
ace-king, a singleton and four-card support for
what he expected to be a five-card suit. Note
that seven spades is makable byWest.
Holding the South cards was Fred Whittaker,
who is a fun guy with a dangerously imagina-
tive streak to his bridge. In this instance, antici-
pating a spade lead, he rebid three no-trump!
West, though, had not read the spade-lead
script. He tabled the club ace. He then cashed
three more club winners, East discarding two
hearts (good) and an encouraging diamond
(bad). Now his side could take only three dia-
mond tricks, followed by four spades. Whittaker
took the last two tricks with dummy's diamond
queen and club nine for down seven.


Horoscope
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-
Dec. 21) A strange set of
circumstances could lead
to you hearing from certain
people whom you haven't
talked to for some time.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) Certain good things
that happen to you may.
occur just because you're
in the right spot at the right
time.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) If you approach the
objectives you're seek-
ing in a practical manner,
your hopes will have better
chances of being fulfilled.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) This is likely t6 be
a day of many substan-
tial achievements. Even if
your success appears to
others to be rather easy in
the making, you'll know
differently.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
- One of the things you
can do well is deal with
groups and the larger
the better.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20) Unfortunately, you
might have to deal with
two individuals whom the
world has treated badly.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
- It won't be from text-
books that you'll learn
some of the greatest les-
sons of your life.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
- You're presently in a cy-
cle where some kind of ser-
vice you've acquired will be
responsible for generating,
far more returns than you
ever garnered previously.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) If
you want to earn a "good
guy/gal" title, make an ef-
fort to treat others the way
you want to be treated.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept
22) Just when you're not
looking for it, a solution
to a problem nobody has
been able to resolve may
be found.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
Even if you feel a great
need to be.around people,
you'll still be extremely
selective in choosing with
whom you want to spend
your time.
SCORPIO (Oct.24-Nov. 22)
- Although you're likely to
be luckier than usual in sit-
uations pertaining to your
earnings, you'll still need
to be selective regarding
what you get yourself in-
volved in.


Dear Readers: This was written many
years ago by JudyVekasy, a registered
nurse and director of activities in a
nursing home in Savannah, Tenn., and it
appeared several times in Ann Landers'
column:
You say you can't do anything. Can you
read? Good. Read to me. My eyes aren't
what they used to be.
Can you write? Good. Write a letter or a
card for me. My hands are shaky.
r"m you sing? Good. Help me with the
words and I'll sing along.
Can you tell me about your job? I was a
nurse once myself.
Can you listen? Wonderful. I'm starved
for conversation.
Can you bake a sponge cake or zucchi-
ni bread or angel biscuits or make fudge?
They aren't on the nursing home menu,
but I remember how good they were and
I would like to taste them again.
Do you play checkers or dominoes or
rummy? Fine, so do I, but there is never
anyone who has the time. They are un-
derstaffed around here, you know.
Do you play the violin or the flute or
the piano? My hearing is poor, but I can
hear any kind of music. Even if I fall
asleep, you'll know I enjoyed it.
This home, whatever its name, is
"home" to us and you're an invited guest.


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Ceebrty Cipher cryptograms are createdtrom quotation by famous people, past and present.
Each letter lirthe cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: A equals P
"FL BR H NBRL EHC NFJ TJLR CJP
DWBLSL OJW PFL PFBCDR NFBMF FL
FHR CJP, VYP WLXJBMLR OJW PFJRL
NFBMF FL FHR." LABMPLPYR


Previous Solution: "Don't you ever let a soul in the world tell you that you can't
be exactly who you are." Lady Gaga
0 2011 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 11-24


North 11-24-11
4 6 2
462
V 10 7
Q 5 3 2
*Q532
98764
West East
4A QJ 5 410 943
V-- V 9542
J 1086 *AAK94
*AKJ1O03 Q
South
4K87
VAKQJ863
S7
4 5 2
*52

Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Neither
South West North East
IV 14 Pass 24
?

Opening lead: A


~11-~-1~-~-1-111II~


ENTERTAINMENT








CLASSIFIED


www.JCFLORIDAN.com


Jackson County Floridan Thursday, November 24, 2011 B


IREGRASS CLASSIFIED


BY PHONE: (850) 526-3614 or (800) 779-2557
BY FAX: (850) 779-2557
ONLINE: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM


BY MAIL: WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE
P.O. BOX 520, MARIANNA, FL 32447
IN PERSON: 4403 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA


Publication Policy Errors and Omissions: Advertisers should check their ad the first day. This publication shall not be liable for failure to publish an ad or for a typographic error or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the ad for the first day's
insertion. Adjustment for errors is limited to the cost of that portion of the ad wherein the error occurred. The advertiser agrees that the publisher shall not be liable for damages arising out of errors in advertisements beyond the amount paid for the space
actually occupied by that portion of the advertisement in which the error occurred, whether such error is due to negligence of the publishers employees or otherwise and there shall be no liability for non-insertion of any advertisement beyond the amount paid for
such advertisement. Display Ads are not guaranteed position. All advertising is subject to approval. Right is reserved to edit, reject, cancel or classify all ads under the appropriate classification.


Fordedlnescal ollfre r isi wwFcflrianco


r~a ANNOUNCEMENTS ( MERCHANDISE


I Pay CASH for Diabetic test
strips. Up to $10 per box!
Most brands considered.
All boxes must be unopened
and unexpired.
Call Matt 334-392-0260

'^^ ---------

Florida Department ofAgriculture and Consumer Services
CoMMI qONEReAM H. PUTrMw
Recall: Ashland(tm) glass vases sold at
Michaels Arts & Crafts
The Florida Department of Agriculture and
Consumer Services, the U.S. Consumer Prod-
uct Safety Commission (CPSC), and Michaels
Stores Inc. of Irving, Tex., have announced
the recall of about 28,000 Ashland(tm) glass
vases.
The glass vases can break or fracture when a
consumer picks them up, posing a laceration
hazard. The firm has'received four reports of
the vase shattering, causing lacerations to
the hands for all four. One person had sur-
gery, two got stitches.
The vase is rectangular and made of clear
glass. It is 12 inches tall, 8 inches wide and
2.5 inches deep. The SKU number "425827"
and UPC number "6-927619-661665" are print-
ed on a label on the bottom of the vase.
The recalled vases were manufactured in Chi-
na and sold exclusively at Michaels Arts &
Crafts stores from January 2008 through Octo-
ber 2011 for about $20.
Consumers should stop using the vase and re-
turn it to a Michaels Arts & Crafts store for a
full refund. To avoid the risk of breakage and
possible injury, handle the vase with care.
For additional information, contact Michaels
at (800) 642-4235 Monday through Saturday
from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. and Sunday from 10 a.m.
to 7 p.m. ET or visit the firm's website at ww
w.michaels.com.
Number: CW 1064
Date: November 24, 2011
Florida Department of Agriculture and
Consumer Services

THEJACKO
FLORIA

W ILB COE
THRSAY1/2/1


FINANCIAL


Retail Business Opportunities!!
Local BL-.. ess for Sale by owner in Dothan for
Children Clothing/Pageant Store.
Established since 1951. Owner retiring.
Call 334-792-8012 for serious inquiries!


DO YOU WANT A DISCOUNT ON YOUR
S HOMEOWNERS INSURANCE COST:
* MostPexisting homes have one or more
wind resistlve construction features needed
Sto qualify for insurance discounts.
FLORIDA LAW now requires Insurance
Co.'s to provide wind mitigation discounts.
*To get discounts (or refund) you may be
entitled to, get an Inspection and report.
James Grant has the Florida Professional
License(s) required to perform Wind
Mitigation Inspections.
The fee for an inspection is only $150.00.
recentlyy, my customers are averaging more
than $300.00 per year savings on insurance).'
S*-Call James at 850-526-8367 to discuss
an Inspection for you.

9U11 IT! SELL IT! FINO IT!


GUN SHOW 4
December 3rd & 4th
National Peanut Festival Building
Hwy 231 S. Dothan, Alabama
Over 275 Tables *
Sat 9-5 Sun. 10-4
Call 334-279-9895


Sell Xt!-














Airmap 100: 12 channel receiver Air navigation
system used. $75. 850-579-1299
Antique Coors Pitcher: Clear glass 8-3/4" tall
Coors Banquet in red. $20. 850-482-4120
Antique Pitcher: Aluminum Guardian Service
bakalite handle. $20. 850-482-4120
Auto Through The Lens Flash Cord & Bracket,
private owned, new in box, $196 850-482-7665
Black & Decker Food Processor Quick & Easy
Plus, brand new in box $12 850-482-7665
Blood Pressure Monitor: Automatic Digital with
additional extra large cuff. $25. 850-482-4120.
Bostich Roofing Nails, 3/4 of box, 1 $15
850-592-2881
Cans/Tins: 10 Campbell's soup cups + Camp-
bell's enameled cracker tin. $40. 850-482-4120
Clawfoot Bath Tub, needs refinishing, $200
OBO 850-209-6977 before 5pm
Clay Pigeon Thrower: Outers brand trap throw-
er on stand. Cock & throw. $50. 850-482-4120
DJ Equip. Amp, mixer, DVD/CD, microphone,
cords, etc. Complete set. $400'OBO 8504826022
Dora Jeep, like new, needs battery $50
850-592-2881
Dresser w/2 mirrors, large, all cherry wood,
$125 850-592-2881
DVD Player: Sunvisor DVD player passenger
side for car new in box $75. 334-400-3736
Entertainment Center. White. 48"Wx60"Hx20"D
Only $50. 850-482-2636 Marianna
Estate Dryer by Whirlpool, white great cond
$150. 850-482-3267.
Fenders: Honda 300 foutrax set of fenders. $100
obo. 850-272-1842
Thursday, November 24, 2011








E SUDOKU GATE WITH A KICK!
HOW TO PLAY
Fill in the 9x9 grid with the missing
numbers so that each column, row and
3x3 box contains the digits 1 9 only once.
There is only one correct solution
for each puzzle.
GET MORE WASABI
PUZZLES ONLINEI
ARCHIVES AND MORE GREAT GAMES AT
BOXERJAM.COM


SJACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN.
THANKSGIVING DEADLINES

CLASSIFIED
THURSDAY 11/24 Deadline is Wednesday 11/23 @ 9:00 A.M
FRIDAY 11/25 Deadline is Wednesday 11/23 @ 1:30 PM
SUNDAY 11/27 Deadline is Wednesday 11/23 @ 2:00 PM

RETAIL DISPLAY
Wednesday.11/23 Deadline is Friday, 11/18,@ NOON
Thursday 11/24 Deadline is Friday, 11/18 @ 5PM
Friday,. 125 Deadline is Monday, 11/21 @ NOON
Sunday, 11/27 Deadline is Monday, 11/21 @ 5pm
Tuesday, 11/29 Deadline is Tuesday 11/22 @ 5 PM
Wednesday, 11/30 Deadline is Wednesday, 11/23 @ 5PM








11 o REb iiin wwjfoia5o. e iefrdtis


Fenders Honda 300 foutrax set of fenders. r" Prch/awn wing WithCi
$200 OBO, 850-272-1842 Porch/Lawn Swing With Chains,
$200 OBO, 850-272-1842 Will Deliver. $85 334-794-5780 |
Girls clothes, size 8 & 14/16, Name Brand, $1 L- -ill De $5 34-74-58- -
each, 850-372-2419 Rims original stock for Nissan Titan Truck
Gym System: Weider 2100 Exercizer with 18" caps & lugnuts. $50. 334-790-1877.
weights. Great condition $150. 850-482-4120. Rod Case: Pack-A-Pole, padded, 4 rods, hard
Handsaw set 3 piece new in pouch $7. case 60"-90" $50 like new 850-482-4120
334-400-3736. Scooter: Baja Sport ideal for children. Like new.
Headboards. Wood. Good for (2) twin beds or a Green $250. OBO 334-796-6613.
Full/Queen. $15each. 850-482-2636 Marianna Scooter: Jalon '03 JT500T-15, ideal for young-
Ipod Battery: 56 hour Ipod Nano battery sters or adult $400. OBO 334-796-6613. No title
w/charger in box, $15. 334-400-3736 Scope Ultra Vision 3x9x32 with Weaver
Ipod Iphone MP3 backpack speaker system. mounts. Very clear.Little use. $45, 850-482-4120
$45. 334-400-3736 Scope: Weaver Qwik-point R-1 red dot pointing
Keyboard, Yamaha Mod. DGX-505, 88 keys, 500 sight for shotgun or rifle. $25. 850-482-4120.
voices, w/stand & manual $400 850-482-7933 Shed Door. Measures 4 x 6. Bargain Priced $60.
KIDS TOY TALKING KITCHEN SET COMPLETE 850-482-2636 Marianna
WITH FOOD AND DISHES, EXC. COND. Skates inline girls size 6 used very little $15.
$50.334-790-087.0 LEAVE MESSAGE 334-400-3736
r - D-o H --------------- -- o Speakers: NHT Zero highend Speakers: book-
Large Dog House,Any Color, Shingle Roof, shelf size, black. Little use. $25.850-482-4120.
L Will Deliver. $120, 334-794-5780 Dothan Subwoofer: Sony 12 in. 150 watt home active
Large wood trunk, good condition $40 wubwoofer in box $75. 334-400-3736
850-592-2881 'Tire Inflator: Campbell-Hausfeld air pump. Up
Microphone Mixer: 6 Channel. $50. 334-400- tp 150 psi. $20. 850-482-4120
3736 Tires: 2 Michelin P215/55R17 decent tread. Re-
Olympus Camera, SP 600 UZ digital, new con- placed due to irregular wear. $40. 850-482-4120
edition, $160 FIRM 850-482-7665 after 12pm Tires: Michelin. Lots of tread left. $25 each or
Piano with bench Hallet, Davis, and Compa- both for $40. 850-482-4120
ny, $300, like new, 850-594-3895 Water Softener, $100, 850-482-3866
Poker table top by Cardinal, new in box $35 Wedding dress for Fall Size 8 tag still inside.
334-400-3736 $99, call 850 592-8769 Dellwood. FL
Rims Mickey Thompson. 16" 5 lug Will fit Woodburning stove Potbelly Style Comfort,
Ford F150 or Dodge, $200, 850-693-9961 Woodburning stove. $425, 850 592-8769 -


S@_____
_@_ @@_





__o

O

.71 0





BL KDO NC.- BLOKDO


Wednesday's
WASABI SOLUTION


BE SURE TO VISIT OUR
NEWEST GAME SITE


KEWLBOX.COM


Find jobs


fast and


easy!


JACKSON COUNTY


FLORIDAN
jcfloridan.com


Tmonstero

FIND LOCAL JOBS AT: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM/JOBS


(SY


m Ilw


.L-


r-










2 County Floridan


IDOGSlI


Guns:
Thompson/Center. Encore pistol,
15" bull barrel 30-06, 2x6 power scope
very accurate to 300 yards, moderate
recoil. New in Box $1,100.
H&R Point 17CAL: 22" bull barrel, very
accurate to 200 yards, 3x9x40MM Nikon
bucketmaster with target and ammo. $375.
Call 850-573-1443


Wanted: Old Coins, Gold,
Diamonds, Guns, And Tools
West Main Jewelry & Loan 334-671-1440.


SATSUMAS, tangerines and grapefruit $20.
bags. Located at Hwy 73 S. and Laramore Rd,
follow the signs to Bar L Ranch. Open daily
Ipm-6pm. For more info call 850-209-5506.
Tree ripe satsumas and grapefruit harvested
daily $20 bags, location of grove Hwy 73 south
and Laramore Road Marianna, FL, follow signs
to Bar L Ranch for more info call (850)209-5506
Visit us to find great gifts for Christmas ,
birthdays or any occasion. Don't waste time in
lines at the malls or big box stores we ship
straight to your door and as always shipping is
free. We have Children toys, men cologne,
hunting gear, jewelry, xbox games and more.
KEWLSTORE.COM as Kewl as it gets.


Baby Grand Piano:
Beautiful Ebony, like new, Weber.
Price to sell for Chirstmas Special $3,900.
Can 334-671-0776 Today for appointment





AKC BULLMASTIFF PUPS and OLDE ENGLISH
BULLDOG CHAMPION LINES, UGA # FOUR IS
THE GGG GRANDPA, AWESOME LITTER BREED-
ING THE BEST TO THE BEST. I OFFER SERV-
ICEMAN & VETS A $200 DISCOUNT REALLY
BULLY, TRI COLORED- TANS, SABLES AND BLUE
FAWNS MALES AND FEMALES, THEY CAN GO
TO THEIR NEW HOMES THE WEEK OF CHRIST-
MAS $1,200 FOR BULLDOG, and $1,250 for
BULLMASTIFF; 334-806-5911
WWW.SEXTONSBULLZ.COM
AWESOME LITTER BREEDING THE BEST TO THE
BEST BRINDLE MALES AND FEMALES ARE
AVAILABLE, I OFFER A $200.00 SERVICEMAN &
VETS DISCOUNT GOING TO THEIR FOREVER
HOMES THE WEEK AFTER THANKSGIVING
$1250.00 WWW.SEXTONSBULLZ.COM 334-
806-5911
BOXER PUPS AKC: will be ready for christmas.
tails have been docked and dew claws re-
moved, taking deposits now. Pickup will be two
days before christmas or christmas eve. two
solid white pups, the others are flashy brindle.
both parents are on site. $350. (334)692-5335.
Leave a message.
v m CKC Cocker S panel Puppiesl
Ready to go 12-3-11, Parents on
site. 1M. 5F All Buff and white.
Tails docked. Dew claws
removed wormed & 1st. shots
$250 334-798-1578 Taking
SDeposits $100. & $150. on pick up.
CKC Toy Chihuahua puppies black & white,
$400 each. Call 850-579-8895
free Puppes: (5) Dalmation Collie, white
W/black spots, mama included. 850-482-3539
LOST: North of Old U.S. Rd. 2 female
Rotweillers, Childs Pets 850-718-1513


Maltese AKC Pupsl
1 Female Ready Now-
Will Deliver!
M/F ready for Christmas.
S/W, will be small.
Call 334-703-2500


V OLDER PUPPIES ON SALE 334-718-4886 V
$75 & up Yorkle Poos, Shih-poos, Morkies,
Yorkie-pom ,also Yorkies $400 and up.
Maltaee ;50M & Shorkles $250. Chi-A-poo $125.


UKC & NKC Registered Treening Feist Puppies
5 months old with all shots, white with black &
brown spots. Will be great pets for any house-
hold. Great squirrel dogs and ready for training
this season!! Sight Treening Now.
$300. Call 334-618-4194

IA 'MER'S MARKET
L


06' md#9996 John Deere 6-row cotton picker
1026 eng.hrs. 772 fan hrs., 08' md#9996 John
Deere 6-row cotton picker 982 eng. hrs. 624 fan
hrs. Mud Hog, LMC Bowl Buggy all exc. cond.
kept under shed. Call; Kendall Cooper 334-703-
0978 or 334-775-3749 ext. 102, 334-775-3423.
MF 1835 Square Bailer: Chrome 8 hay cutter,
Rossi Grass Cutter & Rake. Excellent Condition.
Must See! $12,000. Call 334-447-5316


Cherokee Satsumas available at the farm
1525 Fairview Rd. Marianna 850-579-4641.

FRESH

GREEN
'PEANUTS
850-352-2199
OR 850-352-4423

Now Open Jackson Farms U-Pick Tomatoes
& Peppers! Bring your own bucket!
7 days a week. 850-592-5579

WAY" A ~Wffl3
*Li~siuf-1


Plenty of Shelled

Peas, Collard, Turnip

& Mustard Greens!


All Farm Fresh!

220 W. Hwy 52 Malvem







Apartment Manager
Detail oriented, motivated, good with people,
able to work independently, computer
literate, HS diploma or GED required,
will train. 850-482-4259 call for appt.



Temporary Laborers and Operators
Must not be scared of heights, confined
spaces and be able to work nights.
Cal (850) s59-2020


I EFSOAEa M =^


BESTWAY
PORTABLE BUILDINGS
LAJIne UFACTURER OF PORTABLE BUILt iNGS INOERIDA
WE
HAVE
OVER
DIFFERENT SIZES
YOU CAN CHOOSE
CQLOR & STYLE


3614 .90*MrlamnnhLsM850 866M






Grader Pan Excavator
Dump ruck Bulldozer
Demolition Grading Site Prep
* Debris Removal Retention Ponds Leveling
* Top Soil Fll Dirt Gravel Land Clearing


-m uMy svcjll UIlllllcIlu -
All types of remodeling and repairs:
* Kitchens Bathrooms Additions Doors & Windows
Installed Drywall Repair Water Damage Repairs
Painting Weatherization tic. Ins.
(772) 285-2475 Marianna, Florida '


* Ellen Marsh
850-209-1090
For ALL your Real Estate Needs!
Century 21 Sunny South Properties
850-526-2891
4630 Hwy 90 Marianna
ROO [ 4 I IRELATED


rJ4A mand Rewrol: Shln-lI 3n a] l.jPal
Rool .-padl S r"nd C i6ar.ir.i
Ffee EsiliTile LICiO'Ee l i,'O ISure"1
ALL Irij FLC'RIOA


E R9'ON- ALNWq0M"&iREPAIR
By Joseph Domlnello -
All types of remodeling and repairs:
SKitchens Bathrooms Additions Doors & Windows
Installed Drywall Repair Water Damage Repairs
Painting Weatherization ic. & Ins
(772) 285-2475 Marianna, Florida

HAPPY

HOME REPAIR
WE'LL BEAT ANY PRICE!!
Big OrSmall Jobs WELCOME




Clay O'Neal's Rm
Land Clearing, Inc. "7ms M
ALTHA, FL PBW.M
850-716-94021
Cell 850-832-5055 aBEaSM .

IT'S AS EASY
AS1 -2-3
1. CALL 2. PLACE YOUR AD 3. GET RESULTS


CASSIFIEDS


ITI


1-1_-- ---.......... T .. ... r


2 & 3BR 2BA Mobile Homes in Cottondale no
pets, Central Heat & Air $400-$450 850-258-
1594 leave message


SLester Basford
SWell & Pump Company
4513 Lafayette St Marianna, FL
850.526.39130 850.693.0428 C
850.482.2278 H







Sa w o ? C Greenh ous the Clasifie
$140000
33 Years in Business







4 Point Insurance Inspections
Wind Mitigation Inspections
Performed by JAMES GRANT
State Certified Building Code Adminuistrator
State Certified Building Contractor
State Licensed Electrical Contractor
e .r ; c ..-I I* :



"Bcautification of Your Home"
Carpcntry/Painting Installations
Furniture Repair & Refinishing
General Repairs Insured




R ELECTRICAL WEOcPAIRS K rc
& lPGRADES
Replace your old Electrical Service
with a New Service
QuALuT WOuK REACONAOLE PRICE
AMES GRANT, LLC .'


I %-uullty r lug lul-


Local Telephone Contractor now hiring
for experienced person for underground
construction. Call for Interview
050-526-8616/25212037

EDUCATION
& INSTRUCTION


SGet a Quality Education for a
New Career! Programs
FORTIS offered in Healthcare,
HVAC and Electrical Trades.
Call Fortis College Today!
888-202-4813.
COL.I k. For consumer information
www.Fortis.edu

C T RESIDENTIAL
S REAL ESTATE FOR RENT


COTTONDALE VILLAGE APARTMENTS
Now accepting applications for 2
bedroom units. Rental assistance. No
application fee. We pay water, sewer,
and trash service. 4052 Old Cottondale
Road, Marianna, FL 32448. (850) 526-4062,
TDD/TTY 711. "This institution is an
equal opportunity provider, and employer."
t0 1
qTUAL HOUSUNFWCOHUlNIy




BR Apartment, 3145 A Redbud Lane, Blue
Springs, Built '08, energy efficient, $525/mo
$500 dep. 1 year lease, small pets ok with
deposit. Call 850-693-0570 Iv msg.


3BR 1BA duplex & 2BR 2BA duplex both in
Grand Ridge both $425/mo + $425 dep. 850-
592-5571


2BR/1BA Concrete block Rental in Marianna,
Tile floors, washer h/u, pets ok, $300/mo + $30
credit/bkgrnd ck. Additional houses and
apartments in Graceville 850-263-5753
2BR 1BA house, Baker Ave, Marianna. Fenced
backyard, DW, Stove, Frig, Washe $580/mo,
$600 dep.. 1 year lease, small pets ok with
deposit. Call 850-693-0570 Iv msg.
2BR 1BA in Marianna City Limits. Energy
Efficient, w/appliances, CH/A, $475/mo
850-272-6121
3BR 2BA w/bonus room, House in Marianna,
very clean, CH/A, dishwasher, $650 + dep. Call
for appointment 904-214-6980
Austin Tyler & Associates *
Quality Homes & Apartments
a 850-526-3355 4*
"Property Management Is Our ONLY Business"
For Rent: 316 Red Bud
Circle in Dothan
This one-year-old Garden
home has hard wood
floors, carpet in bed
rooms and ceramic tile
with granite counter tops
n kitchen. Double garage, 9 foot ceiling,
fenced in back yard and irrigation. (in Grove
ark 84 West) 334-794-2894. $1300 per month


2/2 in Alford, window A/C, $380 + deposit 850-
579-8882/850-209-1664/850-573-1851
2 & 3 bedroom mobile Homes in Cottondale.
$500 and up. H20, garbage, sewer included.
http://www.charloscountry living. com.
850-258-4868/209-8847


TRANSPORTAT


Nissan 2008 Titan 4x45.6L DOHC 32 valve en-
durance V-8, 317/385 Ib.ft.Torque, shift-on-the-
fly 4WD system, 4 door, 20x8 alloy wheels, bed
mounted lock box, leather seats, 350 watt
Rockford Fosgate Powered Premium Audio
with 6 disc in dash CD player, XM satelitte ra-
dio, power sliding vertical back glass, rear so-
nar system, heated seats, bluetooth, moonroof,
tow package, navigation system with 7" LCD
display with GPS and DVD atlas. $26,500.00
OBO 334-792-0650 or 334-685-0217


Plymouth '65 Valiant
Convertible,
Automatic, A/C, 273
V8, Good Condition!
$9,000 OBO 850-263-4563


-4 -.iE;$ "07 Pontiac Grand Prix fully
loaded with leather & sun-
roof, exc cond. 334-726-3359.
334-585-5525.

Buick '98 LeSaber, gray, $2000. Call for appt.
850-557-0145
Chevrolet'00 Cavalier, 2 dr, New Tires, Runs
Good, $4200 334-347-9829 Day Or Evening
Chevrolet'98 Lumina Clean, $1500
334-793-2142
Chrysler '98 CIrrius v-6, less than 40K miles, 4-
door, $4,200. 334-677-8645.
Crysler '05 PT Cruiser.
4 Cylinder, Automatic,
~4 Door, Cold air,
Excellent condition, $6300.
Call: 334-790-7959.

I can get U Riding Today Repos, Slow
Credit, Past Bankruptcy OK! $0 Down/ 1st
Payment, Tax, Tag & Title Push, Pull or Drag,
Will Trade anything Warranty On Every
Vehicle Sold! S20 Gift Card w/pu rchase


il


Xtreme

Boats


Packages From
$4,995
All Welded
All Aluminum Boats


8W50W.AUt-5E0IUU ICIl.IIlIL





Dixie RV SuperStores
FL's Newest RV Dealer
NOW OPEN!!!
*Store Hours*
Monday-Saturday
8:00am-6:00pm

21 Acres / 30 Brands New and Pre-Owned
Newmar Keystone Heartland Jayco
Fleetwood Prime Time m Coachmen
Forest River
Service Department
Parts and Acces. Store
RV Collision Center
Located off 1-10 Exit 70 / SR285
328 Green Acres Dr.
De Funiak Springs, FL 32435
Sales and Service: 850-951-1000
www.dixierv.com DO 12756


TOW DOLLY: DEMCO Kar Kaddy II tow dolly
with hydraulic surge brakes, auto-steer
wheels, 3 new tires (including spare) $1,000
OBO. Call 334-701-7849 or 334-886-7226


34FT Stationary Motor Home for Rent
Highest rated RV Park in SE Alabama.
www.ozarktravelpark.com
9 miles to Ozark/Ft. Rucker gate. Perfect for
1 or 2 people. No Deposit. WIFI, & C able TV.
$550. Month. Call 334-774-3219


I' -I


cm A


r


V -UU


I


I


IL III


www.JCFLORIDAN.com


2 & 3 BR MH's in
Marianna & Sneads (850)209-8595.
3BR/2BA Mobile Home on 5 Ac off of Rocky
Creek Rd. Refferenc'e Required. $550. Month
lst/Last/$450dep. Call 772-577-0223
For Rent Greenwood, Marianna, &
Cottondale, starting @ $375/mo.
Water/sewage/garbage/ lawn maint.
included. 850-593-4700

Lg 3/2 $625 Quiet, well maintained Park,
Water/sewer/ garb/lawn included. 2/1 Duplex,
Diana Ln. Near Citizens Lodge $495
o- Joyce Riley RE 850-209-7825 4
Rent to Own: 2 & 3BR Mobile Homes.
Lot rent included. Also available,
1 & 2BR Apts & Houses. For details
4850-557-3432 or 850-814-6515 4
Small Quiet Family Oriented Park- 2BR 1BA MH for
Rent includes water, garbage, lawn care, No Pets 850-
592-8129
RESIDENTIAL
W REAL ESTATE FOR SALE


Downtown Eufaula, AL 2 Bedrooms, 22 baths.
Updated. Newer appliances, W/D hookup, deck,
yard. Convenient shopping and dining. Call 256-
437-3768 5pm or 334-728-1004 9am-5pm CST


3BR 1BA Brick House for Sale: HW floors, LR,
Din, Den, porch, 2 carports, near Riverside. 850-
352-4389

(^) RECREATION


Yamaha '11 Raptor 700R: well maintained,
excellent condition, low hours, essential extras,
blue, $7,800. Call 334-432-5800
4YAMAHA 4
WHEELER GRIZ-
ZLY 600-'98 4X4,
Auto, runs great,
low miles, winch.
$2,000 OBO
S334-695-1306

FATOY IRC


i~a~


11


~4iB









www.JCFLORIDAN.com CLASSIFIED


AUT o FOR AE


* ,onac sw uran Am $4WI uowr
* Chevy 99 Blazer $575 Down
* Ford 98' F150 X-Cab $775 Down
* Dodge 02' Duranan 95 nnwni


Dodge '83 Ram Charger 318 engine 150K miles.
334-726-0147.
MUST f Ford '05 Mustang GT:
MUV 8 | Award winning show car,
white with black interior,
53k miles, 5 speed, in excellent condition.
$15,000. Call 334-794-7493
Ford '06 Sedan 500
LOW MILES! LIKE NEW! MUST SELL!
$200 down, $189 per month.
Call: Ron Ellis at 334-714-0028.
Ford '09 Focus
LOW MILES! GREAT GAS MILEAGE!
4 door, $200 down, $199 per month.
Call: Ron Ellis at 334-714-0028.
Ford '94 Tarus 42K miles, clean $1995.
334-793-2142.
Ford '95 Mustang GT Convertible- white with
leather interior, 200k mile runs great, needs
paint, $3,500. Firm Call 334-695-2340
1-Owner
Honda'11 Accord EX-L: fully loaded, black with
gray leather interior, only 19k miles, $24,900.
Call 334-343-2701
Honda 2007 Civc EX, coupe, 106,000 mi., great
condition, one owner, auto, moon roof, premi-
um stereo and wheels, good Michelin tires. pw,
pdl, a/c,tilt, cruise. $11,500. 334-797-1890 or
334-648-3939
Hundal '04 Elantra GLS
ONLY 60,000 Miles,
4Cylinder, Automatic,
Economical, Good
Options, NEW TIRES!
LIKE NEW! $6625.
Call: 334-790-7959.
Hyundai '11 Sonata


LOW MILES! GREAT GAS MILEAGE!
FULL WARRANTY! $500 down, $350 per month.
Call: Steve Hatcher at 334-791-8243.


Kla '05 Optima LX,
Loaded, 4 cyl., Automatic,
4 Door, NEW TIRES! Clean,
62,000 miles, Excellent.
$5795. Call: 334-790-7959.

Lexus '07 LS 460 41K,
Loaded and in excellent
condition. Pearl White
with tan interior. $43,500.
Call 334-405-9127
Lncoln '91 Town Car. Runs well. $900, or best
offer. 334-899-7377.
Mazda '02 Protege 4-cyl.4Dr. 106K mL white,
automatic, power steering/brakes, AC,
Am/FM/CD, sports rims & + tires.
$3900. OBO 334-389-3071. ,
Mercedes '8 C300 Sport, LOADED, 1 owner,
Silver with Black Leather, 63K mi. (all high-
way). 100K mi. Extended warranty. $22,500
OBO. iPod system, Sunroof. Excellent Condi-
tion. Super'Clean 334-618-2154 or 334-798-5714
Mercury '02 Marquis V8 85K Mi. All Power,
Leather seats, 27mpg Highway, Non-smoker,
1-owner, Retail $5517.00. Sale price: $4500
Perfect Condition Call 334-983-4941 or 596-4170
NIssan '09 Altima
LOW MILES! LOADED!
$500 down, $350 per month.
Call: Steve Hatcher at 334-791-8243.


b i t Toyota '02 Tacoma Crew
Cab. V6, Automatic, 139k
miles, PERFECT Condi-
tion. Loaded, $9,500.
334-596-9966

TRACTOR 4230 John Deer 100hp, $8500. & 2010
JD 45hp $4500. 334-735-2464

TRACTOR-IH1440 Combine, LOOK I
Field Ready, Grain Head and Corn Head,
$6,000.850415-0438
Tractor, M9000 Kabota with Cab, air, radio, 675
hrs, exc. cond. $21,900 also: Round Hay Baler,
535 John Deere, $5,750 850-209-5694/850-593-
2213
-t-vl

Chevrolet '97 Astro Van
conversion Van raised
roof, loaded, new tires,
One owner, GREAT
condition. 52K mli.9,500.
__ W 334-897-2054 or
334-464-1496


-..... .....-.- ....."--- -r -- ... ... ... ....
Ford '06 -350: 12 seat passenger van, good con-
dition, tow package, rear air, sony am-fm-cd,
5.4 V8, 126,000 miles. $8,100. 334-333-3368
Pontlac'04 Montana Van: Silver metallic with
gray interior, extended body, 46k miles, one
owner, New tires, front and rear AC, power
seats, power side door, CD/radio with XM,
cruise control, and much more. Clean and in
very good condition. Never WRECKED!
Price to Sell. $9,250. Call 334-333-0863


1ST PLACE TO CALL FOR ALL OF
YOUR TOWING NEEDS!

AUTO BODY & RECYCLING
,PAYING TOP DOLLAR FOR JUNK CARS
Contat Jason Harger at 334-791-2624

J C Call for Top Price for
S Junk Vehicles
I also sell used pars
24 HOUR TOWING ) 334-792-8664 4m


SGot a Clunker
Well be your Junker!
We buy wrecked cars
and Farm Equip. at a
n F fair and honest price!
: $325. & up for
COmpete Cars CALL3370243- 3 .
Lu '^ fl *!11^ 1'8 ^ ^11'''",


Jackson County Floridan Thursday, November 24, 011- 7 F
Jackson County Floridan Thursday, November 24, 2011- / B


iWE PAY Ca$H
FOR JUNK CARS!!!!!!
Call 334-818-1274





LF15601
NOTICE is hereby given that REGIONAL PEDIA-
TRICS AND NEWBORN CARE, GEORGE L SAN-
CHEZ, M.D. has moved his office. The new lo-
cation is 3028-B FourthSt. Marianna, FL 32446.
This will be effective as of November 14,2011.


LF15590
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN THE
FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 11-731-CA
MAINOR MOORE, SR.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
KATIE M. LINDSEY F/K/A KATIE BROWN;
SHAUN LINDSEY; LORETHA BROWN; JACKSON
COUNTY CLERK OF COURT; AND UNKNOWN
TEkANTS,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: LORETHA BROWN
YOUR ARE NOTIFIED that a Complaint for Fore-
closure has been filed against you and others,
regarding the following property in Jackson
County, Florida:
0.57 acres of land, more or less located at the
Intersection of the East right-of-way line of
South Caledonia Street and the West right-of-
way line of State Road No. 73, In Section 10,
Township 4 North, Range 10 West, Jackson
County, Florida, as more particularly described
as follows:
COMMENCE AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE
EAST R/W LINE OF SOUTH CALEDONIA STREET
AND THE WEST R/W LINE OF STATE ROAD NO.
73 OF JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE
RUN N 0 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 17 SECONDS E
ALONG SAID EAST R/W LINE, 104.06 FEET TO
THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE
N 0 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 17 SECONDS E
ALONG SAID R/W LINE, 221.98 FEET; THENCE N
89 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 27 SECONDS E, 180.64
FEET TO A POINT ON SAID WEST R/W LINE OF
SOUTH CALEDONIA STREET BEING ON A CURVE
CONCAVE SOUTHEASTERLY; THENCE RUN
SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVING R/W
LINE THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 12 DE-
GREES 24 MINUTES 24 SECONDS, HAVING A RA-
DIUS OF 1214.59 FEET FOR AN ARC DISTANCE
OF 263.0 FEET, THENCE S 89 DEGREES 40 MI;
NUTES 46 SECONDS W, 43.48 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING, CONTAINING 0.57 OF AN
ACRE MORE OR LESS.


You are required to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on ANDREW J. POW-
ER, ESQUIRE, SMITH, THOMPSON, SHAW,
MINACCI & COLON, P.A., Plaintiffs attorneys,
3520 Thomasville Road, 4th Floor, Tallahassee,
Florida 32309-3469, no more than thirty (30)
days from the first publication date of this no-
tice of action, and file the original with the
Clerk of this Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorneys or immediately thereafter;
otherwise, a default will be entered against


you for the relief demanded in the complaint or
petition.
DATED this 2nd November, 2011.
DALE GUTHRIE
CLERK OF COURT
BY: /s/TAMMY BAILEY
DEPUTY CLERK
LF15598
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 32-2011-CA-000695
BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COMPANY
Plaintiff,
vs.
LINDA FADROSKI, ET. AL,
Defendant(s)
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: LINDA FADROSKI AND UNKNOWN SPOUSE
OF LINDA FADROSKI, if alive, and/or dead his
(their) unknown heirs, devisees, legatees or
grantees and all persons or parties claiming
by, through, under or against him(them). Resi
dence is unknown.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an Action for foreclo-
sure of a mortgage on the following property in
JACKSON County, Florida:
LOT 18, BLOCK B, COMPASS LAKE HILLS UNIT
ONE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK A-4 AT PAGES 94A
THROUGH 97A, INCLUSIVE, OF THE PUBLIC RE-
CORDS OF JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA.
has been filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your written defens-
es, if any, to it on SPEAR AND HOFFMAN, P.A.,
Attorneys, whose address is 9700 South Dixie
Highway, Suite 610, Miami, Florida 33156,
(305)670-2299, within 30 days after the first
publication of the notice, and to file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either before serv-
ice on SPEAR AND HOFFMAN, PA., Attorneys or
immediately thereafter, otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the relief de-
manded in the Complaint or Petition.
Witness my hand and seal of this Court on this
7th day of November, 2011.
DALE RABON GUTHRIE
Clerk of the Court
/s/Tammy Bailey
Deputy Clerk


Make Your Point!

Advertising is the best way to make points

with prime prospects who are ready,

willing and able to buy.

Let us show you the most

effective way to advertise

in the newspaper that reaches

the right people,

right where they live.


Pontiac '08 Solstice convertible 52K miles,
silver with black leather interior, auto trans,
4cyl. 1 owner, auto locks & windows, new tires.
S15.500. blue book is $18.000 334-18-5427


.. .. ......9 ,. .
Volkswagan'88' Cabrlolet, white with read
interior, white top, good condition, automatic,
runs, good, transmission won't shift into high.
$650. 850-482-8818.
-Volkswagen '04 Jetta.
126k. Black w/black leath-
er nt. Automatic, Sunroof,
auto lock power windows.
New tires. Can be seen at
Dothan Lemon Lot $3,5Q0
or best offer. For more info. call 334-702-1669


HONDA '07 CRF-230F 4-STROKE ,$2500.
Honda CRF-80F'07 $1500, Yamaha TTR50 '05
$750 334-718-5149
YAMAHA '09 110 Dirt Bike, excellent
condition, rarely used $1,400 or trade for 4
wheeler 334-687-4686


--Chevrolet 07 Suburban LT:
Solid white with grey cloth
interior, 5.3 V8 Auto, 64k
miles, 3rd row seating, key-
less entry, tinted windows.
Awesome Condition! $24,900. 334-797-1095
Ford '93 Explorer SUV, Clean, 79K Axel Miles,
$1500 334-793-2142
Nissan '03 Pathfinder. V6, 173k mi.
Runs Very Good. Cold Air, Very Clean.
$6200 OBO 334-794-5780
Nissan '04 Xterra, ,Low Miles; 53,800 ml.
1-Owner, Excellent Condition. $10,995
334-714-2129 or 334-790-4167
7, Toyota '064-Runner.
Black. One owner. Only
53,500 miles. Leather
seats, 6 disc CD changer,
moon roof, rear spoiler,
etc. (It has all the extras) $23,500. In excellent
condition. Please call 334-596-2242.


Chevy 2500'99 273K miles, engine has knock
rest of truck in good cond. $1900. 334-792-6248.
Dodge '02 Ram: Black Quad cab, V8, 4 x 4,5.9
liter, New Engine, new supsenion, shocks,
tires, and brake, and 20" rims.
Price to Sell $10,000. Call 850-272-2713
Ford 77 F150: Gray, 4WD, standard trans.,
good condition, 2 owners, clean title..
$3000. Call 334-447-5316


Clean Out Your Kitchen


and Turn Extra Appliances


Into Cash.



Those appliances might be wasting your valuable cabinet

space, but chances are someone out there would love them. By

using the Classifieds, you'll make it easier for them to find,

and easier for you to sell. So try it today!



JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN

(850) 526-3614 or (800) 779-2557


la Fast, easy, no pressure
l c. an A 24 hours a day, 7 days a week!
Get live previews of your classified ads, receive price quotes
and make secure online payments.

www.jcfloridan.com


U







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN + www.jcfloridan.com


18B THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24,2011


Major League Baseball


HGH tests, restraints on amateur bonuses forMLB
uno -at om lesr -ils.I--toeW- T- 8.110- IT A r-A LU


The Associated Press

NEW YORK Baseball
has labor peace while
the NBA is stopped and
the NFL nearly came to a
standstill.
"We've learned," baseball
Commissioner Bud Selig
said Tuesday after play-
ers and owners signed an
agreement for a five-year
contract running until
December 2016. "Nobody
back in the '70s, '80s and
the early '90s, 1994, would
ever believe that we would
have 21 years of labor
peace."
The agreement makes
MLB the first pro major
league in North America
to conduct blood tests for
human growth hormone,
allowing it during spring
training and future off-
seasons but for now only
studying whether it will be
implemented during the
regular season.
"MLB and the play-
ers union should be ap-
plauded for taking the
strong step to implement
the HGH test at the ma-
jor league level to protect
clean athletes," said Travis
Tygart, chief executive of-
ficer of the U.S. Anti-Dop-
ing Agency. "This is great
progress in MLB's effort
to protect the integrity of
baseball at every level."
The deal, which must be
ratified by both sides and
drafted into a formal con-
tract, expands the playoffs
from eight to 10 teams by
2013, lessens draft-pick
compensation to teams for
losing free agents, expands
salary arbitration by a few
players and for the first
time allows teams to trade
some draft selections.
It also adds unprecedent-
ed restraints on signing
bonuses for amateur play-
ers coming to the major
leagues from high school,
college and overseas, per-
haps hurting -MLB as it
competes with the NFL


union wants to make sure
it's done in a way that
doesn't interfere with play-
ers' health and safety. In
addition, the number of
offseason urine tests will
increase gradually from
125 currently to 250 before
the 2015 season.
As for the playoffs, there
will be an additional two
teams that will give base-
ball 10 of 30 clubs in the
postseason. In the NFL, 12
of 32 teams make the play-


offs. In the NBA ana lNHL,
16 of 30 advance.
The wild-card teams in
each league the non-
first place teams with the
best records -- will meet
in a one-game playoff,
with the winners advanc-
ing to the division series.
Manfred said a decision
on whether the expanded
playoffs would start next
year likely will be made
by the January owners'
meeting.


THEASSOCIATED PRESS
Major League Baseball commissioner Bud Selig (center) is flanked by MLB Vice President of
Labor'Relations Rob Manfred (left) and MLB Players Association Executive Director Michael
Weiner, after a news conference announcing a five-year collective bargaining agreement,
Tuesday In New York.


and NBA for multisport
talent.
"If I've got a great ath-
lete, why am I going to go
to baseball? I'm going to
focus on the other sports,"
said agent Scott Boras, who
has negotiated baseball's
highest signing bonuses.
Following eight work
stoppages from 1972-95,
baseball reached its third
consecutive agreement
without an interruption of
play. The agreement was
signed three weeks be-
fore the current deal was
to expire Dec. 11, the sec-
ond straight time the sides
reached a deal early.
Baseball seems to have
learned the lessons of
the 1994-95 strike, which
wiped out the World Series
for the first time in nine
decades.
"I think our history is
more important than
what's happening in oth-
er sports," said Michael
Weiner, who took over
from Donald Fehr as union
head last year. "It took a
while for the owners to
appreciate that the union
is not only here to stay,
but that the union and its
members can contribute


positively to a discussion
about the game about
its economics, about the
nature of the competition,
about how it's marketed in
every way."
Other highlights includ-
ed: requiring players to
play in the All-Star game
unless injured or excused;
expanding instant replay
to include decisions on
foul lines and traps, sub-
ject to an agreement with
umpires; banning smoke-
less tobacco products dur-
ing televised interviews
by players, managers and
coaches; requiring players
arrested for DWI to under-
go mandatory evaluation;
and wearing improved
batting helmets manufac-
tured by Rawlings by 2013.
An initial positive test
for HGH would result in
a 50-game suspension,
the same as a first posi-
tive urine test for a per-
formance-enhancing sub-
stance. HGH testing in the
minor leagues started late
in the 2010 season.
"It meant a great deal to
me personally, and a great
deal to our sport," Selig
said.
Random testing for


HGH will take place dur-
ing spring training and the
offseason, but there is no
agreement yet on random
testing in-season. There
can be testing at any time
for cause.
Although the NFL has
wanted to start HGH blood
tests, its players' union has
thus far resisted.
"The agreement to begin
testing puts baseball ahead
of other American profes-
sional sports leagues and
is a credit to their leader-
ship," Rep. Henry Waxman
said. "It will be important
that the testing be extend-
ed to the regular season to
avoid creating a loophole
in the new policy."
The sides will explore
in-season testing, but the


Good Thru November 28, 2011


IMS C60PONS and PRICES..ONE STOP SHOP







-ST. MARIANA, FL 482-3051 482-6317 ri ond uson
S --r book'
:K.COM..-EMAIL: CHUCK@RAHALCHEVYBUICK.COM

:N ON SATURDAYS 8AM TO 12PM FORYOUR CONVENIENCE


SPORTS


Tw p BR j -SERVICE
,. * .