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Jackson County Floridan
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028304/00695
 Material Information
Title: Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title: Sunday Floridan
Portion of title: Floridan
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Jackson County Floridan
Publisher: Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Marianna Fla
Creation Date: November 23, 2011
Publication Date: 1934-
Frequency: daily (except saturday and monday)[<1979-1995>]
weekly[ former 1934-<1955>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates: 30.776389 x -85.238056 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note: "Independent."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID: UF00028304:00695
 Related Items
Preceded by: Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by: Marianna Floridan

Full Text



Informing more than 17,000 readers daily in print and online
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Lady Hornets get first

win of season with

victory over Bethlehem.

See more on page lB.


.1 Akaia .,(em'lrw MSpaperIl Vol. 88 No. 228
State News


Hazing looked at in FAMU band member's death


The Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE Florida A&M
University's famed Marching 100
band, which has a history of haz-
ing, has been shut down until in-
vestigators find out more about


how one of its members died af-
ter a football game.
University President James
Ammons said on Tuesday he
suspended all performances and
other activities out of respect for
the family of 26-year-old Robert


Champion of Atlanta. The drum
major was found unresponsive
on a bus parked in front of an
Orlando hotel Saturday night
after the school's loss to annual
rival Bethune-Cookman. Cham-
pion was vomiting and had


complained he couldn't breathe
before he collapsed.
Orange County Sheriff Jerry
Demings said a preliminary au-
topsy was inconclusive and that
more tests would be needed to
know what caused Champion's


death. But Demings said that
investigators had traveled to
Tallahassee and had concluded
that "hazing was involved in the
events that occurred prior to the
See DEATH, Page 9A


FOOD FOR THE HOLIDAYS


Buffalo Soldiers give away



Thanksgiving meals


About 26 people will get

extra help for the holiday


BY LAUREN DELGADO
Idelgado@jcfloridan.com

The Marianna branch of
the Buffalo Soldiers gave
away bags full of Thanks-
giving food on Tuesday to
those who called in to their
hotline.
S"There's a lot of needy
families in Jackson Coun-
ty," said Will Barnes, this
chapter's president.
The organization had an
advertisement on WJAQ
100.9 running for about
two weeks, the cut off to
call in was Nov. 21. About
26 people called in, re-
questing some extra help
this Thanksgiving.
"I know I'm going to have
a Thanksgiving dinner, but


not all families can afford
them," said 14-year-old
Daniel Marks, a volunteer.
Each person received
a turkey, candied yams,
green beans, macaroni and
cheese, mashed potatoes,
dressing, dinner rolls and
cranberry sauce. All the
foods was donated by local
businesses and people.
Eva Palmer drove from
Bascom to get her Thanks-
giving feast. She heard
about the giveaway from a
friendandcalled in. :
"I think it's a great idea,"
Palmer said. "It helps .the
people in the community. It
helps the elderly who may
not be able to get out."
See SOLDIERS, Page 9A


PHOTOS BY MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Marquis Kelly carries a bag of food out to a car Tuesday during
the Buffalo Soldiers' annual program to help people in need of
food for Thanksgiving.


4;ir


Quatre Couch fills up a bag with groceries Tuesday during the Buffalo
Soldiers' annual program to help needy local people.


HOLIDAY HERITAGE FESTIVAL


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
T he air was filled with Christmas carols Friday night as the Baptist College of Florida's musicians
and singers performed among the historic building in the college's Heritage Village. The
performance was part of the college's annual Holiday Heritage Festival.


Person on the Street

What are

you looking

forward to on

Thanksgiving?
BY LAUREN DELGADO
ldelgado@jcfloridan.com
The Jackson County Floridan
asked some locals what they
were looking forward to this
Thanksgiving. Here are their answers:
RonaldMizer, the pastor of St. James
AME Church, said he's
looking forward to
spending the day with
his wife. He's thankful for
their health and that God
has kept them together
for the past 11 years.
Mier "We're not rich, but
we're blessed," Mizer
said.
Vernon Speights will spend his
Thanksgiving with his
dad and mom, who is
in the hospital. He'll be
bringing her a deep dish
sweet potato pie.
"We're just looking
forward to a long and
Speights prosperous Thanksgiv-
ing with my mom,"
Speights said.
This year, Raven Griffin's grandmoth-
er is teaching her how to
cook some Thanksgiving
dishes namely the
dressing and dumplings.
"I'm looking forward to
just spending time with
family that I haven't seen
Griffin all year," Griffin said.
Sera Cooper will sleep
over with the rest of her family at her
S grandmother's house.
There, everyone will
cook a dish for the feast
Sand start decorating for
Christmas.
"It's always so much
fun to do stuff like that,"
Cooper Cooper said.
Robert Davis plans
to spend the day watching football
with his grandchildren,
who are coming over
from Tallahassee, Ken-
tucky and right here in
Marianna.
"It's a first time affair
for me," said the recent
Dai retiree. "This is the first
time I've done this that I
can remember."


Stay safe this

Thanksgiving
BY LAUREN DELGADO
Idelgado@jcfloridan.com

By remembering a few safety tips, you
and your family can enjoy the Thanks-
giving holiday with minimal drama.
Cooking
Anything cooking on the stove top
should never be unattended, said Jack-
son County Fire Marshall Chuck Sawyer.
See SAFETY, Page 9A


> CLASSIFIEDS...7-9B


) ENTERTAINMENT...6B


) LOCAL...3-4A


> OBITUARIES...9A


> OPINION...6A


) SPORTS...1-4B, 10B


)) TV LISTINGS...3B


This Newspaper
Is Printed On
Recycled Newsprint


7 65161 80050 9

.l


(YJ)


Follow us




Facebook Twitter
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Chevrolet-Buick-Cadillac-Nissan


4204 Lafayette St.* Marianna, FL.
S(850) 482.6317


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12A + WEDNESDAY. NOVEMBER 23, 2011



Weather Outlook


AM rain
-Justin Kiefer/WMBB


,i High -78
t, .Low 430


I ligh- 71
Low -42'

Tomorrow
Sunny & cooler.


SHigh -76
'- ... Low 560

Saturday
Possible showers.


SHigh- 730
S Low 490

Friday
Mild & sunny.


High 63
S Low -.340

Sunday
Much colder.


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Hig h : i 74 A .. l .. --_
L- ,.. : 4 -2 '": 6 H ig h : 7 7
3.' ' Low: 44 High: 77
-- "^L Lo4w: 44 "
;. !. ,-- 2. Ly-: HuIg 7 ;' "
S- High: 7 ..


'. Loi:50 '' '. '
:-'. . l ow: 45-
PRECIPITATION

4 hourll ear to dae 33 4-


Mh..nlih o daie
Normal MTD


-'."
; II's"


Normnil T D 53 34"
Normal for ,ear 5S 2'


ULTRA VIOLET INDEX

0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8-10 Very High, 11+ Extreme

0 1 2 3 5
i


THE SUN AND MOON
Sunrise 6:14A
Sunset 4:40P
Moonrise 4:21A
Moonset 3:20P


Nov. Dec. Dec. Dec.
25 2 10 18


FLORIDA'S
PANHANDLE
MEDIA PARTNERS


l ,I J.IF .I. I l 'WE .!IHERU I.


JACKSON COL:: Y

FLORIDAN

Publisher Valeria Roberts
vroberts@jcfloridan.com

Circulation Manager Dena Oberski
doberski@jcfloridan.com





-II


CONTACT US
Telephone: (850) 526-3614
FAX: (850) 482-4478
Email: editorial@jcfloridan.com
Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 520, Marianna. FL 32447
Street Address:
4403 Constitution Lane
Marianna, FL 32446
Office Hours:
Weekdays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

MISS YOUR PAPER?
You should receive your newspaper no later
than 6 a.m. If it does not arrive, call Circula-
tion between 6 a.m. and noon, Tuesday to
Friday, and 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. on Sunday. The
Jackson County Floridan (USPS 271-840)
is published Tuesday though Friday and
Sunday mornings. Periodical postage paid
at Marianna, FL.

SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Home delivery: $11.23 per month; $32.83
for three months: $62.05 for six months:
and $123.45 for one year. All prices include
applicable state and local taxes. Mail
subscriptions must be paid in advance. Mail
subscriptions are: $46.12 for three months;
$92.24 for six months; and $184.47 for one
year.

ADVERTISING
The advertiser agrees that the publisher
shall not be liable for damages arising
out of errors and advertisements beyond
the amount paid for the space actually
occupied by that portion of the advertise-
ments in which the error occurred, whether
such error is due to the negligence of the
publisher's employees or otherwise, and
there shall be not liability for non-inser-
tion of any advertisement beyond the
amount paid for such advertisement. This
newspaper will not knowingly accept or
publish illegal material of any kind. Advertis-
ing which expresses preference based on
legally protected personal characteristics is
not acceptable.

HOW TO GET YOUR
NEWS PUBLISHED
The Jackson County Floridan will publish
news of general interest free of charge.
Submit your news or Community Calendar
events via email, fax, mail, or hand delivery.
Fees may apply for wedding, engagement,
anniversary and birth announcements.
Forms are available at the Floridan offices.
Photographs must be of good quality and
suitable for print. The Floridan reserves the
right to edit all submissions.

GETTING IT RIGHT
The Jackson County Floridan's policy
is to correct mistakes promptly. To
report an error, please call 526-3614
Monday-Friday.


Conmunity Calendar


TODAY
n Jackson County Habitat for Humanity
Warehouse hours: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
) Job Club 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the
GooQ::.;ll Career Training Center, 4742 Highway 90
in Marianna. Learn job-seeking and job-retention
skills. All services are free. Call 526-0139.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open meeting, noon
to 1 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901
Caledonia St.. Marianna, in the AA room.

THURSDAY, NOV. 24
n King's Table Thanksgiving Lunch Local
people in need of a traditional meal and company
to share it with are nlted to a free lunch, 11 a.m.
to 1 p.m., served under a tent in the Grocery Outlet
parking lot in Marianna. Diners can eat there or
take their meals home. First come, first served. To
donate or volunteer, call 557-3595 or 272-8350.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Closed discussion, 8
to 9 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901 Cale-
donia St., Marianna, in the AA room. Attendance
limited to persons with a desire to stop drinking.

FRIDAY, NOV. 25
AARP Driver Safety Class 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
in the conference room of the Jackson County
Sheriff's Office on Highway 90 West. For ages 50
and older. DHSMV-approved for a three-year insur-
ance premium reduction. No testing required. Fees:
$12 for AARP members; $14 for non-members. Fees
waived for veterans. Enroll by calling 482-2230.
) Senior Singles Get-Together, 6 to 8 p.m. on the
last Friday of the month, near the floral department
of Winn-Dixie in Marianna. Single seniors age 50
and older are encouraged to get acquainted, form
friendships. Games, food, prizes and a guest speak-
er are planned. No charge: donations accepted
(proceeds fund charitable endeavors of Marianna's
Gathering Place Foundation): Call 526-4561.
) Celebrate Recovery Adult, teen meetings to
"overcome hurts, habits and hang-ups," 7 p.m. at
Evangel Worship Center, 2645 Pebble Hill Road.
Dinner: 6.p.m. Child care available. Call 209-7856 or
573-1131.
n Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, 8 to
9 p.m. in the AA room at First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St., Marianna.

SATURDAY, NOV. 26
n Marianna City Farmers Market is open 8 a.m. to
noon for the fall season, Saturdays only in Madison
Street Park.
) Turkey Shoot Fundraiser -1 p.m. each Satur-


day through December at AMVETS Post 231, north
of Fountain (east side of US 231, just south of CR
167). Cost: $2 a shot. Call 850-722-0291.
) Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, 4:30 to
5:30 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St., Marianna.

SUNDAY, NOV. 27
Bingo Fundraiser 2 to 5 p.m. at AMVETS Post
231, north of Fountain (east side of US 231, just
south of CR 167). Proceeds benefit the Post building
fund.
) Alcoholics Anonymous closed discussion, 6:30
p.m., 4349 W. Lafayette St., Marianna (in one-story
building behind 4351W. Lafayette St.). Attendance
limited to persons with a desire to stop drinking.

MONDAY, NOV. 28
D Orientation 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the
Goodwill Career Training Center, 4742 Highway 90
in Marianna. Learn about/sign up for free services.
Call 526-0139.
) Lions Club of Marianna meeting, Jim's Buffet
& Grill, at noon on second and fourth Mondays. Call
4822005.
) Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, 8 to
9 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodtst
Church, 2901 Caledonia St., Marianna.

TUESDAY, NOV 29
a Story Time -10 to 11 a.m. (preschool) and 3:15
to 4:15 p.m. (school age) at the Jackson County
Public Library in Graceville. Stop by for stories,
poems, jokes, finger plays and more. Call 482-9631.
) Sewing Circle 1 p.m. at Jackson County Senior
Citizens, 2931 Optimist Drive in Marianna. Call
482-5028.
a Jackson County Quilters Guild Sit-n-Sew
- 5:30 to 8 p.m. in the First United Methodist
Church Youth Hall on Clinton Street, behind the
Marianna Post Office. Work on a project, get free
help, and find out about upcoming classes, lessons
and workshops. The Guild's monthly meeting is on
the fourth Tuesday of the month. Call 209-7638.
) Jackson County Board of County
Commissioners meets at 6 p.m. in the Commis-
sion meeting room, 2864 Madison St. in Marianna.
Call 482-9633.
n Alcoholics Anonymous Open meeting, 8 to 9
p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901 Caledo-
nia St., Marianna, in the AA room.

WEDNESDAY, NOV.30
n Jackson County Habitat for Humanity


Warehouse hours: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
) Job Club 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the
Goodwill Career Training Center, 4742 Highway 90
in Marianna. Learn job-seeking and job-retention
skills. All services are free. Call 526-0139.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open meeting, noon
to 1 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901
Caledonia St., Marianna, in the AA room.
) Volunteer Workshop I to 3 p.m. at Covenant
Hospice, 4215 Kelson Ave., Suite E, in Marianna.
Free, open to the public. Food, drinks provided.
) Chipola College new student application
deadline for the Spring 2012 semester is today.
Call 718-2311 or visit www.chipola.edu.
) Jackson Hospital Board of Trustees Joint
Conference Committee Meeting 5:30 p.m. in
the cafeteria classroom.

THURSDAY, DEC. 1
n Alcoholics Anonymous Closed discussion, 8
to 9 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901 Cale-
donia St., Marianna, in the AA room. Attendance
limited to persons with a desire to stop drinking.

FRIDAY, DEC. 2
n Small Business Seminar "Marketing Series,
Part 2, Marketing on the Internet and Using Social
Media," 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. in ChipolaCollege
Business and Technology Building, Room M-108.
Register at http://bit.ly/CC-SmallBiz. Cost: $30.
Call 718-2413 or email frohj@chipola.edu.
) Christmas Parade of Trees & Winterfest
Festival in downtown Marianna. Winterfest
hours: 1to 7:30 p.m. with vendors stationed in
Madison Street Park. Parade start: 5:30 p.m.
(entry fee: $25). Christmas Parade proceeds are
earmarked for downtown Marianna improvements.
Visit www.cityofmarianna.com or call 718-1022 for
more information.
) Celebrate Recovery Adult, teen meetings to
"overcome hurts, habits and hang-ups," 7 p.m. at
Evangel Worship Center, 2645 Pebble Hill Road.
Dinner: 6 p.m. Child care available. Call 209-7856 or
573-1131.
) Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, 8 to
9 p.m. in the AA room at First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St., Marianna.

SATURDAY, DEC. 3
S16th Annual Robert E. Long Cane Syrup Cook-
off 7 a.m. in Two Egg. Free sausage and biscuits,
7 to 10 a.m. Family fun with arts and crafts, plus
ribs, Boston butt, chicken and more. Call 592-8012
or 592-2088 for booth rental info.


The submission-deadline for this calendar is two days before publication. Submit to: Community Calendar, Jackson County Floridan. P. O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447,
email editorial@jcfloridan.com, fax (850) 482-4478 or bring items to 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.


Police Roundup


MARIANNA POLICE
The Marianna Police De-
partment listed the following
incidents for Nov. 21, the latest
available report: One accident
with no injury, two suspicious
vehicles, one -.-,
suspicious per- '- -
son, one physi- ..- -
cal disturbance, CRR ME
one burglary 4<
alarm, 22 traffic
stops, one larceny complaint,
one civil dispute, one juvenile
complaint and one public
service call.

JACKSON COUNTY
SHERIFF'S OFFICE
The Jackson County Sheriff's


Office and County Fire/Rescue
reported the following incidents
for Nov. 21, the latest available
report. (Some of these calls may
be related to after-hours calls
taken on behalf of Graceville
and Cottondale Police Depart-
ments): One stolen vehicle,
nine abandoned vehicles, one
reckless driver, three suspicious
vehicles, two suspicious people,
one burglary complaint, three
hitchhiker/pedestrian com-
plaints, one prowler complaint,
one woodland fire complaint,
18 medical calls, one report of a
shooting in the area, six traffic
stops, five larceny complaints,
one civil dispute, one trespass-
ing complaint, one suicide at-
tempt, two animal complaints,


one fraud complaint, one assist
of a motorist/pedestrian, one
assist of another agency, three
public service calls, three trans-
ports and five threat/harass-
ment complaints.

JACKSON COUNTY
CORRECTIONAL FACILITY
The following persons were
booked into the county jail dur-
ing the latest reporting periods:
) Christopher Roberts, 23, 208
Baywind Drive, Niceville, pos-
session of less than 20 grams
of marijuana, hold for Walton
County.
) Cornelius Shipman, 31,
413 S. College St., Dothan,
Ala., driving while license


suspended/revoked.
) Daniel Calhoun, 23, 2730
West Fischer St., Pensacola,
introduction of contraband into
a correctional facility.
) Ryan Baker, 27, 3978 Hwy
278, Graceville, driving while
license suspended/revoked,
2 counts fleeing and eluding,
felony criminal mischief, failure
to appear.
) Olga Dusek, 40,1408 Dust-
more Lane, Tampa, trespassing
after warning.

JAIL POPULATION: 197


To report a crime, call CrimeStoppers
at 526-5000 or a local law enforcement
agency. To report a wildlife violation, call
1-888-404-FWCC (3922).


TEAM RAHAL* MILLER
. .Chevrolet-Buick-Cadillac-Nissan
S 4204 Lafayette St. Marianna, FL

(850) 482-3051


Today


TIDES
Panama City Low- 4:59A High- 7:31P
Apalachicola Low- 12:19A High- 8:33P
Port St. Joe Low- 4:25A High- 7:22P
Destin Low- 4:38A High- 7:19P
Pensacola Low- 6:10A High- 8:28P

RIVER READINGS Reading Flood Stage
Woodruff 40.5 ft. 66.0 ft.
Blountstown 1.58 ft. 15.0 ft.
Marianna 4.49 ft. 19.0 ft.
Caryville 4.0 ft. 12.0 ft.


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WI(E-U-P CALL








JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Country Bumpkins 4-H Club


participates in leadership training


Special to the Floridan

The newly elected officers of the
Country Bumpkins 4-H Club in Cy-
press met on Nov. 8 to receive lead-
ership training taught by 4-H Agent
Ben Knowles. Club leader Terri
Hardin was also a facilitator for the
training.
The purpose of the training was to
help new officers learn and practice
the basic principles of conducting a
meeting and the primary responsi-
bilities of each office.
The newly elected officers for
2011-2012 include: President Chase
Elkins; Vice President Elizabeth
Haling; Secretary Andrew Driggers;
Treasurer Alan Toole; Reporter Noah
McArthur; Historian Myra Miles; and
Sergeant at Arms Faith Hardin.
Knowles started the night by
teaching the members a few ice-
breaker games, which are designed
to help participants relax and get to
know one another at the start of a
meeting.
Members then began the study of
their roles and duties as club leaders;
theywill use this new knowledge and
training at their next club meeting in
December..
For more information about join-
ing 4-H or starting a 4-H club in your
community, contact the Jackson
County 4-H Agent Ben Knowles at
482-9620.
For more information about the
Country Bumpkins Club, contact
club leader Terri Hardin at 272-3728.


SUBMITTED PHOTOS
Newly elected 2011-2012 officers for the Country Bumpkins 4-H Club include (from
left) Andrew Driggers, secretary; Alan Toole, treasurer; Noah McArthur, reporter;
Myra Miles, historian; Faith Hardin, sergeant at arms; and 4-H Agent Ben Knowles.
Not shown: President Chase Elkins and Vice President Elizabeth Haling.


Country Bumpkins 4-H members, from
4-H Agent Ben Knowles discusses the left, Faith Hardin, Myra Miles and Noah
proper steps to start a meeting during McArthur create Veterans Day cards to
his leadership training program. deliver to the VA Clinic in Marianna.


MAKING THE RIGHT DECISIONS


1


SUBMITTED PHOTO
MElaine Myers speaks to Jackson County Adult Education students during a recent visit.
Myers discussed the use of illegal drugs such as methadone and how it can affect a
family and the community they live in. She emphasized the importance of making
healthy decisions and how this can help prepare them to be accountable to their family and
friends.

Chipola bFrd Helps Chipola Auto Tech Program


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Chipola Ford recently donated a 40th Anniversary Mustang and thousands of dollars worth of automotive parts to the Chipola
College Automotive Technology program. Here, Will Rogers of Chipola Ford (center) presents the Mustang to Chipola Automotive
instructors John Gardner (left) and Chase Vlieg.


Florida Lottery
CASH 3[ P'.]LAY 4FANTASY5 '[.


Mon. (E) 11/21 9-80 5.5.3.1


Mon. (M)


0-6-7 4-3-6-7
11/22 5.1.8 5.6-5.1
6.7-1 5-3-9-4


3.4.17'27.29

Not available


Wed. (E) 11/16 2-1-4 0.618 8.22.27-32-33


Wed. (M)


2-7-4 1-5-2.1


Thurs (E) 11/17 3.1-4 0-6.77 9-11-24 26 28


Thurs (M)


Frn.
Fri.
Sa. :
Sat.
Sun.


9 3-2 0-90-2


11/18 30-.7
57/19 8-9
11/19 6-8-9


11-7-2 1 416-29 30
4 -85-
6-1-3-41 8-15-18-33-34


(M) 8-2-0 4-8-3-3'
(E) 11/20 7-7-6 2-4-1-8 10-21-27-28-29


Sun. (M)


9-0-3 8-2-5-9


E= Evening drawing, M= Midday drawing
"T"


Saturday 11/19 9 1617-28-30
Wednesday 11/16 1322-25-39.51


PB 28 PP 2


Saturday 11/19 3-5-17-24-34-53 xtra 5
Wednesday 11/16 10-24-34-37-39-45 xtra 4
S For lottery iif6rmation, call (850) 487-7777 or (900) 737-7777


LOOKING FOR MORE NEWS? VISIT
WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM


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D.A..C.N., F.A.C.F.N
Board Certified and Fellowship Trained*
Effectively managing pain and reducing patient
risk of major organ damage, disfigurement and
death from drugs and surgery for 31 years

THERE IS AN ALTERNATIVE
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A An Auitomobile Accident & Injury Clinic
* Veterinarian Approved Small Alniimal Spinal Treatment
*The highest level of recognition by the Board of Chiropractic Medicine
concerning competency and experience. Requires years of additional training.

4261 Lafayette St 482-3696


SUBMITTED PHOTO
From left, (standing) are Lions Stan Davis, Pat Hall, Ashley
Wohlschlaeger, Daun Crews, Jimmy Standland, Roland Rabon
and Vice President Arlon Stephens. Seated is special guest
Brad Tate.


Lions initiate



new members


Special to the Floridan

The Marianna Lions
Club recently initiated
three new members into
their club.
Lions Stan Davis and
Ashley Wohlschlaeger
were sponsored by Lion
Pat Hall and Lion Jimmy
Standland by Lion Roland
Rabon.
Lion Daun Crews con-
ducted the impressive
ceremony as other mem-
bers of the club looked
on.
The new Lions were
presented vest, pins and
certificates.


The Lions Club is the
world's largest service
organization with over
1.3 million members in
more than 45,000 clubs
worldwide.
They host activities
that include sight, diabe-
tes, youth, environmen-
tal, hearing and Special
Olympics projects.
The motto is "We
Serve," and the Marianna
Lions try to do that in our
community.
For further information,
contact first vice presi-
dent and membership
chair Arlon Stephens at
482-2523.


and Samuel Edward
Smith
) Clayton Drew Baxter
and Kelly Ann Hudson
) James Warren Curry
and Evelyn Josephine
Riddle.
Divorces
)Winema Nichole Davis
vs. Kenneth Wesley Davis
) Deborah Kay Ward vs.
James Earl Ward
) Vicki Lynn Smith vs.
Roger Derrell Smith
) Michael A. Barnes vs.
Amy Elizabeth Barnes.


Special to the Floridan

The following marriages
and divorces were re-
corded in Jackson County
during the week of Nov.
14-18.
Marriages
) Tiffany Nicole Bar-
rett and William Michael
Seiss
) Jeannie Lawler Bed-
sole and Joey Terance
Railey
) Leigh Anne Colson
and Carl Anthony Weeks
) Christine Marie Hill


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WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2011 4 3AF


LOCAL






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


-4A WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 23.2011


SES holds annual first grade pumpkin contest


r7.. .: ?
,A -, .

SUBMITTED PHOTOS
The annual first grade pumpkin contest was held the week of
Oct. 24-28 at Sneads Elementary School with 35 students
entering the three categories: painted, carved or decorated. All
entries were awarded a certificate for participation. The overall
winner was Alaina Moody, who was awarded a plaque. First-, second-
and third-place winners were awarded ribbons. ABOVE: Decorated
-Trey Thomas, first place; Brian Page, second place; Kylie Stephens,
third place; Tommy Dunaway, Jacob Heidelberger, Marissa Jackson,
Shiley Coulliette, Brandon Peaden, Kael Durden, Jesse Rosenberger,
Cooper Alexander and Austin Thomas.
Cooper Al -


Carved Emilie Ganstine, first place; Om Bhakta, second place; Hannah Kirkland, third place;
Haley Williford, Aedan Lucas, Kade Glisson, Katie Rhodes, Caleb Hester, Kinsley Williams, Eli
Simpson, Braden Gable, Kolby Stidam, Javian Barnes and Katie Hamilton.


Painted Rosie McDaniel, first place; Caden Mercer, second place; Ashlyn Tucker, third place;
Alaina Moody, Andrew Tindall, Chase King, Elizabeth Arnold, Levi Burke and Reanna Harrell.

On Sunday, December 25, 2011 the Floridan will
publish it's annual In Loving .l niorv page.
If you would lke to pay tribute to a loved one that
you have lost, send the following information along
with a photo and payment of S18.00 to:
In Loving Memory
S/o Jackson Conmt Floridan
P.O. Box 520
SMarianna, FL, 32447
or drop by our office at:
4403 Constitution Lane, Marianna
between the hours of 8:00.M and 5:00M.
Deadline is December 16, 2011 at 5:Op.


Overall winner Alaina Moody was the overall winner of the
annual first grade pumpkin contest at Sneads Elementary
School.


2s we fool lowarf our
fueurwe e also reffeac
on f/4epas/ and e .
people /A'fl canfriuled
so mucin our foes.
~-^P ." t- *. *, -


Name of Loved One:
I ----- I
Year Born:
I Year Died: I
SMessage(12 words or less!)__
I I
I I
I Phone Number: I
L .-


Bett' Smith

A



1921* 2005
We miss you!
Your Loving Husband, and Children
4 .1 z :.t L ?..x r l n 1,,A .-.


" ;.0 t


LOCAL







WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 23,2011 5AF-


PSC approves Progress


Energy Fla. nuclear costs


The Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE Customers will pay
$140 million next year so Progress Ener-
gy Florida can buy electricity from other
sources while a nuclear plant remains
shut down for repairs.
Consumer advocates opposed the
power replacement charge, which will
take effect Jan. 1, but it won unanimous
approval Tuesday from the five-member
Florida Public Service Commission.
The panel's decision is a prelude to a
determination next year whether a por-
tion of the repair costs should be passed
on to customers or paid in full by the
company's investors owing to problems
that have delayed the work. The Crystal
River plant was closed for repairs in 2009
but now isn't expected to reopen until
2014. That's about three years later than
initially expected.
The repair bill is expected to total $2.5
billion. The utility wants customers to
pay $670 million, or about a quarter of
that amount.
The 2012 purchased power charge
works out to $3.88 per 1,000 kilowatt
hours, which is about average, monthly
residential consumption. That's six cents
more than residential customers now
pay for purchased power since the plant
was closed for repairs in 2009.
Consumer advocates say it's premature
to pass that cost on to customers before
the commission determines if the com-
pany's decisions related to the repairs
were prudent.
That won't happen until after the panel
holds hearings next June. They will focus
on whether cracks that occurred in a re-
actor containment wall during the repair
were the result of negligence by the St.
Petersburg-based utility.
"The commission basically presumed
that the utility is going to win the case
next year, and we think that if it's any
presumption, it should be in favor of the
rate payer," said Public Counsel J.R. Kel-
ly, the state's consumer advocate.
Kelly said he and other consumer ad-
vocates expect to make a strong case.
'against Progress Energy.
In a letter last week to state lawmakers,
utility president and CEO Vincent Dolan
denied the companywas to blame for the
delaminationn" cracking or separation
of the concrete wall when workers cut
a hole in it while making repairs.
"Independent analysis later deter-
Smined that the delamination could have


"The commission basically
presumed that the utility is
going to win the case next year,
and we think that if it's any
presumption, it should be in
favor of the rate payer"
Public Counsel JR. Kelly,
state's consumer advocate
neither been predicted nor prevented,"
Dolan wrote. He dismissed arguments to
the contrary as "unsubstantiated claims,
allegations and misinformation."
In defense of their purchased power
decision, commissioners said the com-
pany would have to make refunds if it.
loses the prudence case.
They also said if Progress wins that
case and they had reduced or postponed
the 2012 charge, customers would have
been "shocked" by much higher rates in
2013 and 2014.
"I'm concerned about rate shock, and
not rate shock right now, but rate shock
in the future," said Commissioner Julie
Brown.
Commissioner Ronald Brise said it may
be '"slightly painful for some right now,"
but that "it will be a whole lot more pain-
ful in the future."
The panel also was worried about how
delaying the charge or approving just
half of it, another option, might have
affected the utility's cash flow and Wall
Street bond rating.
"I would have been a lot more com-
fortable with the decision if we had
heard more about the concerns people
on Main Street are going to have with
this," said Jon Moyle Jr., a lawyer for the
Florida Industrial Power Users Group.
Also arrayed against the purchased
power charge were the Florida Retail
Federation and U.S. military bases that
buy power from the utility that serves 1.6
million homes, business and other cus-
tomers in central and north Florida.
The purchased power charge is one of
several elements of each customer's pow-
er bill. The commission also recently ap-
proved other charges in fees for nuclear
power plant construction and upgrades,
fuel, and environmental compliance.
The combined effect, including the
purchased power charge, will increase
the 1,000 kilowatt hour bill by $3.85 TO
$123.19 in January.


More alleging botched


buttocks surgeryby fake doc


The Associated Press

MIAMI Several possible victims
have come forward alleging a woman
posing as a Florida doctor and prom-
ising buttocks enhancement pumped
their behinds with a toxic concoction of
cement, superglue and flat-tire sealant,
state health officials said Tuesday.
Oneal Ron Morris who police say
was born aman and identifies as a wom-
an was arrested Friday after nearly a
year of being sought and charged with
practicing medicine without a license
with serious bodily injury. Authorities
,say a victim who was looking to get a
job at a nightclub and wanted a curvier
,figure paid Morris $700 for the injections
in 2010. Morris allegedly used some type
of tubing and inserted the toxic chemi-
cals into her backside during a painful
procedure.
The victim, who is not being identified
due to: medical privacy laws, suffered
permanent scarring around the injec-
tion sites. Shortly after the surgery, she,
went to the hospital, but left because
she was too embarrassed to tel] doctors


about the procedure.
The victim required multiple surgeries
and had a 24-hour home health aide for
an extended period of time, according
to a statement from the Department of
Health.
State health officials said Tuesday that
several possible victims have since come
forward alleging Morris performed simi-
lar procedures resulting in life-threaten-
ing injuries.
The 30-year-old Morris has since been
released from jail'on a bond. A phone
listing for Morris could not be found,-
and it's unclear if Morris has an attorney.
Police say Morris performed the same
surgery on herself.
Authorities said Morris may be part
of an underground plastic surgery ring
in South Florida. Health officials said
additional arrestsare possible, but did
not elaborate because it's an ongoing
investigation.
Investigators spent nearly a year track-
ing Morris throughout South Florida and
said she moved frequently.
State health officials are encouraging
other potential victims to contact them.


Lakeland officer
surprises burglars
LAKELAND Lakeland
police say one of their
officers surprised two bur-
glars in his apartment and
ended up shooting one of
them in the leg.
The police department
said off-duty officer Pres-
ton Chatmon returned
home Tuesday morning
and found the suspects
in his apartment. He.said
he ordered them to stay
where they were, but they
charged him instead.
The 24-year-old officer
fired his weapon once and
hit one of the suspects in
the leg before both fled.
The officer gave chase and
the suspects were taken
into custody.
The suspect who was
shot was identified as 18-
year-old Anthony Santia-
go. The other suspect was
his 33-year-old stepfather
father, Nelson Ivan Rodri-
guez. It wasn't clear if they
had attorneys yet.

Ronald Brise elected
next chairman of PSC
TALLAHASSEE Flor-
ida Public Service Com-
missioner Ronald Brise
will chair the five-member
panel in 2012 and 2013.
The commission, which
regulates utilities, on Tues-
day unanimously elected
Bnse to a two-year term.
effective Jan. 2.
The former state rep-
resentative from North
Miami, a Democrat, will
succeed Commissioner
Arthur Graham.
Then-Gov. Charlie Crist
appointed Brise in 2010.
Gov. Rick Scott this year
reappointed him for a
term through January
2014. Crist appointed
Brise and Graham after
the Florida Senate refused
to confirm two earlier ap-
pointees, David Klement
and Benjamin Stevens.
Crist said it was payback
because Klement and
Stevens voted to reject
huge rate increases sought
by the state's two largest
power companies.
Senators said they
weren't qualified and
their appointments left
the panel with no minor-
ity members. Brise and
Graham are black.

Teen identllfed as St.
Cloud shooter
ST. CLOUD-Au-
thorities have identified
a central Florida teen as
the person who went on
a shooting spree with
two AK-47s in a St. Cloud
neighborhood.
Police say 18-year-
old David Alyn Penney
remained hospitalized In
critical condition Tuesday
from a self-inflicted gun-
shot wound to the face.
Police responded early
Monday after multiple
people called 911 to report
that a man was firing a
gun.
Police say Penney fired
multiple times into one
home before he fired at
the responding police
vehicles. Officer Clinton
Wise was shot in the foot


Briet
as he got out of the car. Of-
ficer Spencer Endsley was
injured by glass fragments.
Police say the officers
exchanged gunfire with
Penney before he shot
himself. Doctors believe
he will survive.
The Orlando Sentinel
reports that police contin-
ued to investigate.

Cops: Officer strikes,
'. kills bicyclist
DAVIE -Authorities
say an on-duty Pembroke
Pines detective in an
unmarked car struck and
killed a bicyclist in South
Florida.
Davie police spokes-
man Dale Engle told the
Miami Herald the crash
happened about 9:15 p.m.
Monday. Officials say 47-
year-old Douglas Beebout
died at the scene.
Engle says preliminary
reports indicate the bicy-
clist may have cut in front
of the detective's car. The
crash did not occur at an
intersection.
There was no word on
why the Pembroke Pines
officer was in nearby Da-
vie at the time of the crash,

SDisabled vet cheers
on Martinez In DWTS
TAMPA A severely
wounded Tampa veteran is
among the fans rooting for
"DancingWith the Stars"
finalist J.R. Martinez.
Martinez is an Iraq war
veteran who was injured
when his Humvee hit
a land mine. The actor
reached out to Sgt. Joel Ta-
vera and the two became
fast friends. Tavera has
had 75 surgeries since his
SUV was struck by rockets
in 2008. He lost his sight,
right leg and has severe
burns.
Martinez called the
nonprofit group Build-
ing Homes for Heroes
and asked them to build
a home for Tavera. Tavera
is moving into the custom
Florida home soon.
Tavera will be in the au-
dience Tuesday cheering
as Martinez and partner
Karina Smirnoff compete


for the trophy. Though Ta-
vera can't see the dances,
he says he feels the energy.

Police, family search
for missing woman
ORLANDO More than
a dozen detectives and
hundreds of volunteers
continued searching
Tuesday for an Orlando
woman who went missing
after her episode of "The
People's Court" aired on
television.
Orlando police say 33-
year-old Michelle Parker
was last seenThursday,
the daythe episode aired.
Authorities say her SUV
was found on Friday and
family members believe
she was carjacked. They
say it's unlike Parker to
disappear because she has
three children and a job as
a bartender.
Parker and her ex-boy-
friend were on the show to
resolve a dispute about a
$5,000 engagement ring
Parker's brother, Dustin
Erickson, says the TV show
didn't have anything to do
with her disappearance as
it was taped three months
ago.
:He is pleading for some-
one to Come forward with
information.
From wire reports


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


STEflE










W I6IA


Publisher
VALERIA ROBERTS


Guest Opinion


'Supercommittee'


is a super dud
By The Tampa Tribune
he United States has a leadership crisis even
greater than its debt crisis. The bungling
failure of the misnamed congressional "su-
percommittee" to devise a thoughtful plan to cut
$1.2 trillion from the federal debt should outrage
every American.
SSure, the task was going to require painful com-
promise. But the stakes the nation's economic
welfare and future security justified sacrifice
by all parties.
But participants were more concerned with
partisan histrionics and generating talking points
for the next election.
So much for a commitment to the greater good.
While the panel floundered, President Obama
was characteristically passive, offering no guid-
ance. There is plenty of blame to go around, but
it was the Democrats who refused to pursue a
plan by Sen. Patrick Toomey of Pennsylvania that
would have raised income taxes by $250 billion
over a decade, a significant concession for the
Republican members who had entered the talks
vowing that they would never consider a tax
increase.
Toomey's plan, as syndicated columnist Robert
Samuelson pointed out, actually represented tax
reform. It would have reduced most itemized
deductions and used the extra revenue to lower
tax rates. It would have adjusted the rates for the
top two brackets to produce the $250 billion. The
revenue thus would have come from higher-in-
come citizens, an obsession of the Democrats.
Yes, the agreement likely would have forced the
Democrats to accept Social Security and Medi-
care reforms, but those programs are unsustain-
able as now structured. Ignoring that fact only
jeopardizes the nation's financial health and the
welfare of those who will need the programs.
The Republicans, for their part, were a bit
dreamy about tax cuts, acting as if they were an
elixir for all the nation's ills. Tax cuts often, but
not always, stimulate the economy.
Some revenue increases are going to be neces-
sary if the'nation is to ever put its fiscal house
in order. But Republicans are correct to want
to keep money in citizens' pockets and out of
government's hands whenever possible. Toomey's
plan provided a way to ease the tax burden on
most citizens and yet bolster revenues.
The committee's failure will trigger $1.2 tril-
lion in automatic spending cuts over 10 years
to military and domestic programs, starting in
2013. But such dictated cuts are no substitute for
the thoughtful map toward financial stability the
panel could have provided.
In another era our leaders might have felt a pa-
triotic duty to put aside their differences and act
on behalf of the nation's long-term welfare. Alas,
that kind of selfless leadership is sadly missing in
Washington these days.

Letters to e Edor
Submit letters by either mailing to Editor, P.O. Box 520,
Marianna FL, 32447 orfaxihg to 850-482-4478 or send
email to editorial@jcfloridan.com. The Floridan reserves .
the right to edit or not publish any letter. Be sure to
include your full address and telephone nuniber. These
will only be used to verify the letter and will not be
printed. For more information call (850) 526-3614.


PARENTS ARE DAD WANTS MM WANTS
SO HARDTO A TAX CUT A LOWER

SHOP FOR. --HEALTH-CARE


5TAWR.
1 tC(MBABUSO (5FARcl
*2QCI


The squeeze on Thanksgiving


BY DALE MCFEATTERS
Scripps Howard News Service


perhaps memory has grown
golden and the rough edges
have worn off, but it seems
that there was a time in this
country when Thanksgiving was
a benign and festive stand-alone
celebration.
School children dressed up as
Pilgrims, Indians and turkeys in
pageants observing the 1621 feast
that served as a gesture of friend-
ship toward the Indians who
helped save the infant Plymouth
Bay colony from starvation. On
a more elevated level, it marked
the Mayflower Compact, signed a
year earlier, that was the European
settlers' first written step toward
democratic self-government.
We imagine that the pageants
have begun to disappear. The por-
trayal of the Pilgrims might offend
some religious sensibilities. Our
new political correctness toward
Native Americans seems to consist
of erasing public acknowledgement
of their existence, by outlawing
Indian nicknames for schools, and
a powerful vegan movement is
gradually edging the turkeys off the
stage.


Thanks for making Sunday
Afternoon with Arts
a huge success
Words cannot express our sincere
gratitude to the more than 80 vol-
unteers, businesses and corporate
sponsors from Jackson County and
surrounding counties that assisted
The Artists Guild of Northwest
Florida Inc., Chipola Regional Arts
Association, and Chipola College in
bringing the seventh annual Sun-
day Afternoon with Arts to Chipola
Arts Center.
This year's event attracted over
800 visitors to the Arts Center dur-
ing the 10 day period the exhibit
was open. The Sunday, Nov. 6, af-
ternoon event had an unparalleled
audience of over 700 people. Jack-
son County volunteers greeted our
visitors at the door and made them
feel welcome and comfortable in
our Florida Panhandle home. We
recorded visitors from near and far,
including foreign countries and
states as far away as California.
As I surveyed the room, I ob-
served people greeting people, old
friends saying hello, children enjoy-
ing both the art and the fun art
activities and volunteers from every
corner of Jackson County working
diligently to keep the afternoon
activities flowing smoothly.
We have had thank-you notes
from our three special guest artists
and they were genuinely pleased
with the warm reception and the
professional manner in which the
event was organized. Two of them
stayed Saturday night at the Hinson
House Bed and Breakfast and raved
about the experience.
Since the first Sunday Afternoon
with the Arts in 2005, this event has
been successful due to the sup-
port of members of TAG, CRAA and
Chipola College. However, this year
through the extraordinary efforts
and support of volunteers from
throughout our community the
afternoon became one of the most


It seemed a harmless conceit. The
young scholars would learn soon
enough that the early display of
amity between the Pilgrims and the
Wampanoags would end in a series
of bloody and brutal massacres
as the Europeans encroached on
Indian lands.
They would also learn that the
promise of the Mayflower Compact
would not be fulfilled for another
150 years, and for blacks not for
another 244.
If the myths of Thanksgiving are
fading, Thanksgiving Day itself is
in danger. Due to Black Friday and
what is called "Christmas creep," a
day marking a landmark in Ameri-
can history is in danger of being re-
duced to, simply, an excuse to take
a day off and have a large dinner.
"Within the last decade," says the
National Retail Federation, "we've
seen Black Friday morph from a
leisurely mid-morning venture
around a handful of stores to a
competitive free-for-all among
retailers eager to nab those first
holiday shoppers."
Stores are opening earlier and
earlier. Last year, the number of
people who went shopping at
midnight, when many of the big
retailers open for Friday, tripled


Letters to the Editor


successful events in the county.
With over 80 volunteers, space
will not permit me to list every-
one. However, I must applaud
Juanita and Tom Sanson, Tool-
lie Harkins, Rachel Christopher,
Dr. Daniel Powell, the Marianna
Woman's Club Juniorettes, and
my co-chair, Tamara Tanner, for
going the extra mile and helping us
create an atmosphere of warmth
and friendliness for the exhibit.
The Chipola College staff worked
tirelessly behind the scenes to set
up the event venue and create a
very professional printed program.
Our caterer, Something Special
Catering, Alford, produced a lovely
presentation of food and Oglesby
Plants International, Altha, pro-
vided us with beautiful plants to
enhance the stage.
Over the last few months we
have made every effort to keep you
informed of new additions to this
year's show. Our local media, espe-
cially the Jackson County Floridan,
have been supportive of our efforts
every year and we appreciate the
news coverage we have received.
We are deeply indebted to our
corporate sponsors. Without their
support we could not have pro-
duced this year's celebration of
the arts. Our'heartfelt thanks goes
to our Renaissance GOLD Spon-
sors: Florida Public Utilities and
the Jackson County Floridan; our
Renaissance Silver Sponsors: Focus
Credit Union and United Member
Business Services, LLC; and our
contributing business sponsors:
Florida Commerce Credit Union,
John Brewer's Studio, The UPS
Store, Outside The Lines Art Studio,
The Jackson County Chamber of
Commerce and The Jackson Coun-
ty Tourist Development Council.
On behalf of all of the sponsoring
organizations, Chipola College, the
exhibiting artists and authors, the
Marianna High School art students,
and the professional artists and
musicians may I extend our sincere


from the year before, and the NRF
estimated that almost one-fourth
of shoppers hit the stores before 4
a.m., leaving little time, one would
think, to ponder the Compact's
promise of "just and equal laws" for
the general good.
Coming at Thanksgiving from the
other side, so to speak, is Christmas
creep, the reason you're hearing
Christmas music and seeing Christ-
mas decorations go up seemingly
right after Halloween.
You really can't blame the retail-
ers. They are in a tough business
in an anemic economy. The reason
it's called "Black Friday" is because
the stores supposedly stop operat-
ing in the red that weekend and
begin turning a profit. It is no small
economic event. Estimates are that
the holiday season sales will total
$466 billion, equivalent to the gross
domestic product of Belgium or
Poland.
Thanksgiving retains one over-
whelmingly redeeming feature:
42.5 million of us will brave dodgy
weather and endure airfares and
gas prices that are 20 percent high-
er to be with family and friends. In
their own way, these trips, too, are a
kind of pilgrimage.
Happy Thanksgiving!


thank you for your gift to all of us:
your time, talents and support.
Sincerely,
JUDY D. BROOTEN,
co-chair, seventh annual Sunday
Afternoon with the Arts, Bascom


Upset with Murphy column
On Nov. 20, 2011, one of your
columnists, Thomas Murphy, wrote
about the current child abuse/
rape scandal at Penn State. While
the majority of his column is fair
minded, he goes on to strongly
imply that modern depictions of
adult same-sex relationships in the
media were partly responsible for
the alleged pedophilia that took
place at Penn State.
This implication is outrageous
and is part of the hate speech that
drives gay teenagers to suicide.
Being gay and being a pedophile is
not the same thing!
The acts alleged at Penn State
are not criminal because they are
homosexual, but because they in-
volve pedophilia. Most pedophiles
are heterosexual, as is most of the
population.
Gay citizens are no more respon-
sible for one man's act of homo-
sexual pedophilia than a straight
citizen is responsible for hetero-
sexual pedophilia.
While I understand that Mr.
Murphy's column is an opinion
piece, not all opinions are worthy
of publishing, especially if they
tend to foster hatred. To allow this
unfounded assertion by Mr. Mur-
phy to be published is irresponsible
and does great harm to the com-
munity. It fosters ignorance and is
part of the culture of hate toward
the gay community.
I believe your paper and Mr. Mur-
phy owe Jackson County an apol-
ogy for publishing this unfounded,
ignorant and hateful statement.
PATRICIA SHEPARD
Marianna







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Bush tax cut debate dooms deal to cut deficit


The Associated Press

WASHINGTON A long-run-
ning war between Democrats
and Republicans over Bush-era
tax cuts doomed the debt super-
committee's chances of reaching
a deal. Efforts to overhaul the tax
code may await the same fate
as both parties gear up to make
taxes a central issue in the 2012
elections.
Republicans insisted during
the supercommittee negotia-
tions that curbing tax breaks to
raise revenues be coupled with
guarantees that all the Bush tax
cuts would, continue beyond
2012. The tax cuts, which af-
fect families at every income
level, were enacted under Presi-
dent George W. Bush and were
extended through 2012 under
President Barack Obama.
Republicans for years have
bashed Democrats as eager to
raise taxes a theme they will
employ often in next year's elec-
tions so they weren't about
to agree to a tax hike unless
they also could take credit for
preventing a huge tax increase
scheduled to take effect in 2013.


Democrats countered that the
supercommittee was created to
reduce the budget deficit, not
add to it .by extending tax cuts.
Most Democrats, including
Obama. want to extend the Bush
tax cuts only to individuals mak-
ingless than $200,000 a year and
married couples making less
than $250,000.
"We simplycould not overcome
the Republican insistence on
making tax cuts for the wealthi-
est Americans permanent,"
said Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass.,
a member of the supercommit-
tee. "This was simply doctrine
for some of our Republican col-
leagues, even as many worked
very hard in good faith to find a
better way forward." ,
Another member of the super-
committee, Rep. Dave Camp, R-
Mich., said, "It is deeply regretta-
ble that my Democrat colleagues
could not see their way to ad-
dressing these much-needed re-
forms without at least $1 trillion
in job-killing tax increases on
families and employers."
Extending all the Bush tax cuts,
including provisions to spare
millions of middle-class fami-


lies from paying the alternative
minimum tax, would add $3.9
trillion to'the budget deficit over
the next decade, according to
projections by the nonpartisan
Congressional Budget Office.
The Democratic plan would add
about $3.1 trillion to the deficit
over the same period and make
the wealthiest Americans pay
about $800 billion more in taxes.
The supercommittee was
formed to come up with a pack-
age that reduces government
borrowing by at least $1.2 tril-
lion over the next decade. But
since today is the deadline, the
committee's co-chairs conceded
failure Monday.
Democrats had said they
would accept' significant cuts
to benefit programs like Medi-
care and Medicaid, but only if
Republicans would agree to tax
increases. Despite Republicans'
aversion to tax increases, a grow-
ing number of GOP lawmakers
said they would consider higher
taxes if they were coupled with
significant spending cuts.
Other Republicans wanted
even more political cover: a
guarantee that all the Bush tax


cuts would be made permanent.
"It's not easy during this hard
economic time to go back and
justify any kind of tax increase,"
Rep. Wally Herger of California,
a senior Republican on the tax-
writing House Ways and Means
Committee, said while talks were
still ongoing. "But I think if it's
going to be justified, this is the
one exception that maybe you
could use to justify it."
At one point, supercommit-
tee member Sen. Pat Toomey,
R-Pa., proposed a tax overhaul
package that Republicans said
would raise about $290 billion in
additional revenue over the next
decade but lock in all of the Bush
tax cuts.
Democrats, however, never se-
riously considered an agreement
to continue the Bush tax cuts for
high earners. Agreeing to extend
them would make it harder for
Democrats to accuse Republi-
cans of supporting policies that
favor the wealthy, a staple of
Democratic political campaigns.
"If anybody in our party votes,
for that, they will have a real
problem for themselves in the
next election," said Rep. Jim


McDermott of Washington, a se-
nior Democrat on the Ways and
Means Committee.
The debate has played out
even as lawmakers, presidential
candidates and interest groups
from across the political'spec-
trum have called on Congress
to simplify the tax code. The two
tax-writing committees in Con-
gress, the Ways and Means Com-
mittee in the House and the Fi-
nance Committee in the Senate,
have held numerous hearings
on tax reform. Their respective
chairmen, Camp and Sen. Max
Baucus, D-Mont., both served
on the supercommittee.
But tax reform won't happen
until Congress resolves the dis-
pute over the Bush tax cuts, said
Howard Gleckman, a fellow at
the Urban Institute and editor of
the blog TaxVox.
"You can't do tax reform unless
you agree in advance how much
revenue you want to raise,"
Gleckman said. "The problem is,
there is simply no consensus at
all on what the revenue goal is."
The election could go a long
way toward deciding the fate of
tax reform.


More students surrender in NY SAT-cheating scandal


The Associated Press

MINEOLA, N.Y. Thir-
teen more current and for-
mer high school students
from an affluent commu-
nity on New York's Long
Island were charged Tues-
day in a widening college
entrance exam cheating
scandal, bringing the total
to 20.
Nassau County District
Attorney Kathleen Rice
said four of the new defen-
dants are accused of taking
payments of $500 to $3,600
to stand in for students on
SAT or ACT exams. The
other nine are accused of
paying the alleged impos-
tors to 'stand in for them.
In total, prosecutors al-
lege that 15 high school
students got five others to
take tests for them. Rice
said prosecutors actually


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Joshua Chefec (left), Adam Justin (background, center) and
George Trane (right) are escorted from the Nassau district
attorney's office in Mineola, NY on Tuesday.


suspect 40 students were
involved in cheating, but
the two-year statute of
limitation had expired for
many.
"Honest hard-work-
ing students are taking
'a back seat to the cheat-
ers," she said at a news
conference. "This is a sys-


tem begging for security
enhancements."
Attorney Brian Griffin
represents two of the de-
fendants Joshua Che-
fec, a 20-year-old accused
of taking a test for money,
and a student accused of
paying someone to take
a test. Griffin said the two


were not guilty, but that
the allegations should be
handled by the schools,
not the district attorney's
office.
"You're talking about
students cheating on
tests," Griffin said. "You're
not talking about violent
crime. You're not talking
about drugs. No one con-
dones it, but it does not
belong in the criminal jus-
tice system."
Michael DetGarabedian,
who represents a student
accused of paying a test
taker, agreed.
"I find it very difficult to
believe that they're now
prosecuting kids based
on allegations that they
cheated," DerGarabedian
said. "Let the school han-
dle it."
Tuesday's announce-,
ment follows the arrests of


seven people in Septem-
ber. At the time, authori-
ties said six Great Neck
North High School stu-
dents paid'the seventh, a
former Great Neck North
student, to take their SAT
exams for them. All seven
have pleaded not guilty.
The scandal prompted
New York State Sen. Ken-
neth Lavalle to convene a
hearing on test security,


and a firm run by former
FBI Director Louis Freeh
was retained to review
security on standardized
testing procedures.
Seven students accused
of paying others to take
the test were also arrested
Tuesday and face mis-
demeanor charges. One
is expected to surrender
Monday due to a medical
condition.


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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Volunteers Dorothy Albertie (center) and Marta Gutierrez (right) sort donated food before
packing it into boxes for those in need at the Pass It On Ministries, on Tuesday in Miami.

Bad economy means another


scaled-back Thanksgiving


The Associated Press

Some are holding potluck dinners in-
stead of springing for the entire feast.
Others are staying home rather than fly-
ing. And a few are skipping the turkey
altogether.
On this the fourth Thanksgiving since
the economy sank, prices for everything
from airline flights to groceries are go-
ing up, and some Americans are scaling
back. Yet in many households, the occa-
sion is too important to skimp on. Said
one mother: "I don't have much to give,
but I'll be cooking, and the door will be
open."
Thanksgiving airfares are up 20 percent
this year, and the average price of a gal-
lon of gas has risen almost 20 percent, ac-
cording to travel tracker AAA. Still, about
42.5 million people are expected to travel,
the highest number since the start of the
recession.
But even those who choose to stay
home and cook for themselves will prob-
ably spend more. A 16-pound turkey and
all the trimmings will cost an average of
$49.20, a 13 percent jump from last year,
or about $5.73 more, according to the
American Farm Bureau Federation, which
says grocers have raised prices to keep
pace with higher-priced commodities.
In Pawtucket, R.I., Jackie Galinis was
among those looking for help to put a
proper meal on the table. She stopped
at a community center this week seek-
ing a donated food basket. But by the
time she arrived, all 300 turkeys had been
claimed.


So Galinis, an unemployed retail work-
er, will make do with what's in her apart-
ment. "We'll have to eat whatever I've got,
so I'm thinking chicken," she said.
Then her eyes lit up. "Actually, I think I've
got red meat in the freezer, some corned
beef. We could do a boiled dinner."
Galinis has another reason to clear out
her apartment's freezer: Her landlord is
in the process of evicting her and her 3-
year-old son.
Carole Goldsmith of Fresno, Calif., de-
cided she didn't need to have a feast, even
if she could still afford it.
Goldsmith, an administrator at a com-
munity college in Coalinga, Calif., said
she typically hosts an "over-the-top meal"
for friends and family. This year, she can-
celed the meal and donated a dozen tur-
keys to two homeless shelters. She plans
to spend Thursday volunteering before
holding a small celebration Friday with
soup, bread "and lots of gratitude."
"I think everybody is Ok with it," she
said. "They understand. Everybody is in
a different place than they were a year
ago."
In suburban Chicago, the Oak Park
River Forest Food Pantry got rid of turkey
altogether. Last year, the pantry had a lot-
tery in October to distribute 600 turkeys
between almost 1,500 families.
The pantry's management has decided
to give all of its families a choice between
other kinds of meat, along with the other
trappings of a Thanksgiving feast. The de-
cision will save $16,000, money that can
go to feeding the hungry for the rest of the
year.


Missing Ohio man could


be 3rd Craigslist victim


The Associated Press

COLUMBUS, Ohio A
man missing since Nov.
13 answered a Craigslist
help-wanted ad that po-
lice say was actually a
deadly scheme that lured
people to a nonexistent
farm job in southern Ohio
so they could be robbed,
his family said.
His father called the
outlook "pretty grim" and
the missing man's son
said his father had been
murdered. The missing
man, who would be the
scheme's third known
victim, had called the job
offer "strange" in a Face-
book post.
Two people are in cus-
tody, but law enforcement
officials have released few
details because of a gag
order.
Timothy Kern was prom-
ised $300 a week, a trailer
and a truck for the job
near Caldwell, his father,
Jack Kern, told The Associ-
ated Press on Tuesday. He
said his son was excited
about the job because
of the chance of better-
ing his life. In a Facebook
post on Nov. 10, Tim Kern
wrote: "Just got one of
the strangest job offers.
A good offer but strange.
The job is to watch over
680 acres south of cam-
bridge. Odd jobs and
such but mainly just se-
cure it. Trailer, utilities,
salary. Drawbacks? No
cell phone service, kids
are up here, and i have to
move this sunday."
Jack Kern, of Massillon,
said his son was rarely
out of touch and often
texted and called family
members.
"We're holding hope,
but pretty grim, I think,"
he said.
One man who replied to
the bogus ad was found
dead in Noble County


last week. Another said he
escaped after being shot
on Nov. 6.
Before a judge issued
a gag order, the Noble
County sheriff said it was
unclear how long the
ad had been online or
whether there were other
victims.
Timothy Kern, 47, di-
vorced and the father of
three sons, worked most
recently cleaning gas sta-
tion driveways, his father
said.
He said his son appar-
ently answered the Craig-
slist ad Oct. 30 and inter-
viewed for the job with a
man in an Akron restau-
rant Nov. 9. His son left his
car with a friend in Akron
Nov. 13 and was driven to
what he was told was the
job site.
Timothy Kern told fam-
ily members the job in-
volved running a 600-acre
farm in Noble County.
The man who escaped
Nov. 6 gave police a similar
account of a farm job, say-
ing he was going to build


fences. Neighbors near
the property where the
man escaped said there is
no such farm.
Instead, the area is a for-
mer strip mine owned by
a coal company that rents
the land to hunters.
Timothy Kern said he
was told there would be
no cellphone or Internet
service where he was go-
ing but he could call when
driven to nearby Cam-
bridge, his father said.
"He would have called,
definitely," Jack Kern said.
"That's why my daughter-
in-law called the sheriff,
and got the FBI involved."
Before the gag order was
imposed, Sheriff Stephen
Hannum said that a man
from South Carolina who
answered the ad was tak-
en Nov. 6 to the desolate
area, where he managed
to deflect a gun cocked
at the back of his head
and ran. Wounded in the
arm, he hid in the woods
for hours, then showed up
covered in blood at a farm-
house outside Caldwell.


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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Dangerous or toxic children's toys, according to US Public Interest Research Group's (PIRG) 26th annual report, are seen on
Capitol Hill in Washington on Tuesday, during their annual news conference.

Toy safety report finds some holiday dangers


The Associated Press

WASHINGTON Hidden dan-
gers lurk in some of those less-ex-
pensive toys that parents might
grab as stocking stuffers this time
of year like a Sesame Street Oscar
the Grouch doll.
The small furry green Oscar, pur-
chased for $6.99, was one of the toys
singled out in the annual toy safety
report from the U.S. Public Interest
Research Group.
The consumer advocate's report,
released Tuesday, found just over a
dozen toys on store shelves that vio-
late federal safety standards. Some
had unsafe levels of lead or chemi-
cals called phthalates, and others
contained small parts that young
children could choke on.
Besides Oscar, other toys deemed
potentially dangerous included a
plastic book for babies; a $1 plas-
tic mini-crossbow that fires off
little balls and a hand-held "whirly
wheel."
The Oscar doll has a small hat that
could come off easily, which is a
possible choking hazard, PIRG said.
The crossbow's small parts also put
young children at risk of choking,
according to the report.


The book and the whirly wheel
had high levels of lead, according
to the study. But an importer of the
whirly wheel disputes that, and says
the company's own testing shows
the spinning magnetic toy with lead
levels well below the limit.
PIRG also warned about toys that
are too loud and could lead to dam-
aged hearing, such as an Elmo talk-
ing cellphone that the group says
tested just above voluntary industry
noise limits.
Ed Mierzwinski, the group's con-
sumer program director, said in-
dustrial chemicals and toxins in
toys were the biggest problems the
group found this year. Exposure to
lead can cause irreversible brain
damage, and some studies have
linked phthalates to reproductive
problems.
Toy makers played down the re-
port and pointed to government fig-
ures showing sharp declines in the
. number of national toy recalls.
"All eyes have been on toy safety
for several years now," said Joan
Lawrence, the Toy Industry Associa-
tion's vice president fot safety stan-
dards. "I am confident that the toys
on store shelves are safe. The toy in-
dustry works year-round on this."


of the university music
department. The move
affects more than 400 stu-
dents, but it comes after
football season when the
band has most of its per-
formances. Its last show
was during the annual
Florida Classic against
Bethune-Cookman.
The Marching 100
- whose rich history in-
cludes performing at sev-
eral Super Bowls and rep-
resenting the U.S. in Paris
at the 200th anniversary of
the French Revolution -
was scheduled to perform
at the fall commencement
on Dec. 16.
Music department chair-
man Julian White, who's
the director of bands, was
at the news conference
where the suspension was
announced, but he did not
comment. White did not
respond to a phone call
requesting comment.
Band members told The
Tallahassee Democrat
before the band was sus-
pended that they would
be dismissed from the
Marching 100 if they spoke
to the media.
Champion's father, also
Robert Champion, said
his son always wanted to
be in the band.
"He did what he wanted


Death
From Page 1A
911 call for assistance."
In Florida, any death
that occurs in connection
with hazing is a third-de-
gree felony.
"In the next few days
or weeks, it will become
clearer as to whether any
criminal charges will be
forthcoming," Demings
said in a statement.
University officials ac-
knowledged Tuesday that
30 students this semester
were kicked off the band
because of hazing and
.that there are three active
investigations. Ammons
said it would be wrong
to allow the band to keep
performing until more is
known about what hap-
pened to Champion.
"I think we need to stop
and give ourselves the op-
portunity to find out the
facts," Ammons said. "And
until we do I just don't
think it's appropriate to
have the band perform-
ing and representing the
university."
And Ammons didn't
stop at the Marching 100.
He suspended all bands
and ensembles that oper-
ate under the supervision


Safety
From Page 1A


Drapes, kitchen towels and other
flammable objects should be kept
away from the stovetop. Turn off the
stovetop if you leave a room and use
a timer to remind you about what-
ever's cooking.
"It seems like kitchen fires increase
during the holidays," Sawyer said.
When frying a turkey, keep the fry-,
er outside on a flat surface nowhere
near anything 'flammable. Also,
never try to deep fry an unthawed
turkey.
"The grease will boil over and you'll
have a fire," Sawyer explained.
Burns
Accidents happen and with so
much food cooking, burns are al-
ways a possibility on Thanksgiving.
First degree burns affect the first
layer of skin, almost like sunburn.
Second degree burns hit the second
layer of skin, blisters may appear.
For first or second degree burns, put
the burned area under some cold
water, Sawyer said.
However, if the burn is large or in a


Government figures show 34 toy
recalls in fiscal year 2011 down
from 46 recalls the previous year; 50
in 2009 and 172 in 2008. Recalls re-
lated to lead were down from 19 in
2008 to 4 this past year.
PIRG credited a 2008 law that set
stronger standards for children's
products, including strict limits on
lead, for helping to make many of
the products on store shelves safer
for youngsters. The law was passed
after a wave of recalls of lead-taint-
ed toys.
Bob Adler, a commissioner at the
Consumer Product Safety Commis-
sion, said some problems remain
but added that new rules that re-
quire manufacturers to have their
toys tested at independent third-
party labs have led to important im-
provements in safety.
"I would feel much more con-
fident today than I would several
years ago," Adler said as the report
was released.
PIRG reviewed about 200 toys and
other children's products from ma-
jor retailers and dollar stores for its
26th annual "Trouble in Toyland"
report. The full list and report can
be found at http://www.uspirg.
org/edfund/toysafety-2011.


"I think we need to stop and give ourselves the
opportunity to find out the facts, and until we do
Ijust don't think it's appropriate to have the band
pe, orming and representing the university."
James Amiaons
FAMU president


to do and he reached the
plateau that he wanted to
be," he told Atlanta's WSB-
TV. "I think he was in pret-
ty good condition. He ate
and he trained and had no
medical condition that I
know of."
The Associated Press left
a voice message at a num-
ber listed for the Cham-
pions. The number was
called again and the line
was busy.
Ammons also said that
he was creating a special
task force to review wheth-
er there have been ongo-
ing inappropriate band
customs or traditions.
Ammons said the school
will cooperate with Orange
County deputies who are
investigating the death.
This isn't the first time
that the Marching 100 has
been confronted with haz-
ing allegations.
Tallahassee police back
in 1998 opened, and then
closed, an investigation
into an incident where
a band member was hit


major spot like the hands, feet, face,
groin or buttocks, or a major joint,
get medical help immediately.
Third degree burns are dark or
charred. For third degree burns,
don't use cold water. Instead, cover
the burn with a sterile dressing and
call 911 immediately.
Sawyer said one burn many people
don't talk about is throat burn.When
gas has built up in a gas grill from a
person having trouble lighting it,
that gas becomes incredibly hot. If a
person breathes this in, it can burn
their respiratory tract, causing it to
swell up. If you believe this has hap-
pened, call 911 immediately
Choking
If you believe someone is chok-
ing to the point of being unable to
breathe, use the Heimlich maneu-
ver. This can also be done to your-
self if there's no one in the room by
using a counter or chair to thrust
into your stomach.
"We discourage slapping people
in the back when they're choking,"
Sawyer said. "If they're coughing, let
them cough."
Traveling
The Florida Highway Patrol has


more than 300 times with
paddles as part of an ini-
tiation into the clarinet
section. Police at the time
dropped the case by say-
ing the band member's
participation in the event
was voluntary. In 1989,
eight band members were
charged with battery and
jailed allegedly for holding
a student against his will
and beating his head with
their elbows. Prosecutors
dropped the charges af-
ter FAMU disciplined the
suspects.
Ammons, who earned
both his bachelor and
master's degree from
FAMU, said he was "com-
mitted to making certain
that we end this prac-
tice here at Florida A&M
University."
"I'm very disappointed
that we are at this point in
the' life of this, university
and we are here in 2011
dealing with an issue that
should, have been long,
long past on our campus,"
he said.


said more troopers will be on the
roads from Nov. 23-27, because
of the expected large number of
travelers.
Troopers will be on the lookout for
impaired driving, speeding, follow-
ing too closely, aggressive behavior
and seat belt violations.
In a press release, the Florida
Highway Patrol had the following
safety tips:
Only drive sober.
n Obey all speed limits.
n Rest before a big trip.
) Allow enough time to reach your
destinations.
) Eliminate distractions like cell
phones or eating while driving.
Use your seatbelt.
Make sure your car is ready for
the trip.

Resources to have on
hand
) For poisoning emergencies or
questions: Call the Poison Informa-
tion Center at 1-800-222-1222.
) For more Thanksgiving safety
tips: Check out the National Fire
Protection Association website
www.nfpa.org.


Pinecrest


3720 Caverns Road Marianna, FL 32446-1806 (850) 482-3964


Dorothy
LaVignaAppel

Dorothy LaVigna Appel
passed away Thursday, No-
vember 17, 2011 at the age
of 95. She was the daugh-
ter of an Italian clothing
designer of LaVigna Coats.
She first began work at her
father's factory until she
passed the Civil Service
Test and began work at the
Pentagon during WWII. Af-
ter the war she married Ro-
nald, her life-long neighbor
and moved with him to
Tampa, where she worked
for the US Attorney until
retirement. She designed
and sewed all her and her
daughter's clothing, win-
ning first prize at the coun-
ty fair each year. Even at
the age of 75, she could do
a jack-knife off the dock in-
to Mill pond. She was also
a renowned cook.
She is survived by her
two sons, Steven & wife
Darlene, Victor & wife
Sharon; one daughter,
Bonnie Appel Goff & hus-
band Richard; eight grand-
children, including Emily
Goff-Dunaway and Rachel
Goff and five great grand-
children. From a family of
nine children, Dorothy is
also survived by her sister
Virginia Bradbury and two
brothers Richard & Theo-
dore LaVigna.
Dorothy's sweet wit will
be missed at the Marianna
Convalescent Center where
she resided her last four
years and she will be
missed by all who knew her
as well.
James & Sikes Funeral
Home Maddox Chapel
4278 Lafayette Street
Marianna, Fl 32446
850.482.2332

Betty Howell
McMullian

Betty Howell McMullian,
80, of Tallahassee died
Tuesday, Nov. 22, 2011 at
her residence.
She was born in Bonifay
and worked for many years
with the State of Florida.
She was a wonderful
homemaker, wife and
mother, a fabulous cook.
She was a member of
Towne East Baptist Church
in Tallahassee.
She was preceded in
death by her daughter, Am-
ber McMullian in 1964.
Survivors include her hus-
band, Andrew J. "Andy"
McMullian of Tallahassee;
one daughter, Alice Beall
Shirey of Tallahassee; one
sister, Naoma Howell
Foran and husband, Brady
of Alford; two grandchil-
dren, Joshua Shirey and
Jessica Hartsfield and hus-
band, Ben; two great-
grandchildren, Aurora
Biggs Shirey and Jackson
Hartsfield; several nieces
and nephews.
Funeral services will be
at 2 p.m. Friday, Nov. 25,
2011 at Dellwood United
Methodist Church with the
Rev. Jim Hankins and Fa-
ther Myron Moore officiat-
ing. Burial will follow in
Dellwood Methodist
Church Cemetery with
James & Sikes Funeral
Home Maddox Chapel di-
recting.
The family will receive
friends following the funer-



Soldiers
From Page 1A

Three boys who volun-
teer with the Buffalo Sol-
diers packed up the food
and made phone calls to
remind people to come
and pick it up.
"We shouldn't be the only
ones who have food to eat
for Thanksgiving," said 11-
year-old Marquis Kelly.
For Quatre Couch, the
reason he decided to vol-
unteer was simple.
"It just feels like the right


thing to do," Couch said.


al services at Dellwood
Farms.
In lieu of flowers, contri-
butions may be made to
Big Bend Hospice, 1723
Mahan Center Blvd., Talla-
hassee, FI 32308 or The
Alzheimers Project, Inc.,
301 East Tharpe, Tallahas-
see, FL 32303
Expressions of sympathy
may be made online at ww
w.jamesandsikesfuneralho
mes.com

James & Sikes Funeral
Home Maddox Chapel
4278 Lafayette Street,
Marianna, Florida 32446 ,
850.482.2332
Waymon
Moneyham

Funeral services will be
10 am Wednesday, Novem-
ber 23, 2011 at the First
United Methodist Church
of Marianna Interment
will be at Riverside Ceme-
tery with James & Sikes Fu-
neral Home Maddox Chap-
el directing.

James & Sikes Funeral
Home Maddox Chapel
4278 Lafayette Street
Marianna, Fl 32446
850.482.2332
Ronda
Tait-Vogel

Ronda Tait-Vogel 40, of
Marianna, died Sunday,
November 20, 2011, at.
Jackson Hospital. She was
born in Cape Canaveral,
lived most of her life in
Brevard County before
moving to Jackson County
three years ago. She was a
loving mother, grandmoth-
er, daughter.and sister.
Preceded in death by her
father, Ronnie Tait, grand-
father, Norman Dixon;
niece, Ashlynn Crossen.
She is survived by one
son, Kyle Vogel 11 of Grand
Ridge; two daughters, Va-
nessa Pando and husband,
Brad of Boynton Beach,
Victoria Sherrod and hus-
band, Josh of Sneads; her
mother, Norma Burch and
husband, John C. of Grand
Ridge; her fiance' Hal Hop-
kins of Marianna; her ma-
temal grandmother, Imo-
gene Dixon of Rockledge;
one brother, Mark Ready of
Cocoa; one sister, April
Vincent and husband, Billy
of Cocoa; two grandchil-
dren, Laila Sherrod and
Madison Pando; one
nephew, Ric Gable.
Funeral services will be
at 2 p.m. Wednesday, Nov.
23, 2011 at First United
Methodist Church in Ma-
rianna with the Rev. Con-
nie Farnell officiating. Buri-
al will follow in Shady
Grove Cemetery with
James & Sikes Funeral
Home Maddox Chapel di-
recting.
The family will receive
friends one hour prior to
services at the church
sanctuary.
Expressions of sympathy
may be made online at ww
w.jamesandsikesfuneralho
mes.com
James & Sikes Funeral
Home Maddox Chapel
4278 Lafayette Street,
Marianna, Florida 32446
850.482.2332

Tracy Lyn
Wierman,

Funeral services will be 2
p.m. Wednesday, Novem-
ber 23, 2011 at Eastside
Baptist Church Interment
will be in Pinecrest Memo-
rial Gardens.
The family will receive
friends at 1 p.m., one hour
prior to funeral service at
the church.

The Buffalo Soldiers or-
ganization has been doing
this giveaway for about six
years now.
The members wanted
to help out the people of
Jackson County and its
food banks.
"We know they can't feed


everybody," Barnes said.
The Buffalo Soldiers plan
to sponsor 15 families for
Christmas. There will be
another radio advertise-
ment and the first 15 to call
in will be chosen.
Barnes said the group
hasn't decided on when to
have the advertisements
yet.


Jia.kon 4County Vault & Monurmenti

Qa li/i Sen /at Aor dal/ffvi PFi,"

r O 45$"4 04i I L


WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2011 + 9AI


Fql~~ild.~kL~ ~11~1:5


LOCAL/NATIONAL











US, Russia and UK back Israel at Mideast meeting


The Associated Press

VIENNA In a boost to
Israel, Russia joined the
U.S. and Britain on ITes-
day in backing the Jewish
state's view that the Middle
East cannot be turned into
a nuclear arms-free zone
without progress on re-
gional.peace.
The three nations who
are charged with register-
ing new members to the
Nuclear Nonproliferation
Treaty- also blunted Arab
efforts to get them involved
creating such a zone, tell-
ing an International Atom-
ic Energy Agency meeting
that was the sole respon-
sibility of countries in the
region.
The three-nation state-
ment was made at a rare
venue a meeting bring-
ing Israel and the Arab
states together for a discus-
sion of how to work toward
establishing a Mideast
nuclear-arms free zone.
While nearly 100 nations
attended the forum, it was
primarily meant to allow
those two opposing camps
to exchange views on the
issue one of many di-
viding Israel from its Arab
neighbors.
Organizers had warned
against high 'expectations,
and officials at the closed
two-day meeting said
it ended Friday without
bridging the differences.
"This was a small posi-
tive step," said Norwegian
Ambassador Jan Petersen,
who chaired the gathering,
acknowledging "there is a
very, very long way ahead"
to reach the goal of a Mid-
east nuclear-weapons free
zone.
"There are a lot of dif-
ficult issues, which will
have to be tackled," he told
reporters.
Still the three-nation
statement was signifi-
cant. Russia is tradition-
ally in the Arab corner and
Moscow's decision to join
Washington and London
in the joint statement of
support for Israel's view
was a rare nod from Mos-
cow recognizing Israel's
security concerns.
"While Nuclear Weapon-
Free zones improve the
security of the entire inter-
national community, they
do not exist in isolation
from other security fac-
tors," said the statement
which was shared with The
Associated Press.
Any such zone, it said
must see "the states in
the region united in their
aspiration to provide for
strengthened regional sta-
bility and security."
That dovetails with Isra-
el's view that peace must
prevail in the Middle East
before it can be made into
a nuclear free zone. But it
clashes with the Arab posi-
tion that the two issues are
separate.
The Arabs say Israel's
undeclared nuclear arse-
nal represents the biggest
threat to Mideast peace.
But Israel says Iran is the
greatest threat to the re-
gion through its refusal to
heed U.N. Security Coun-
cil resolutions demanding
it stop activities that could
be used to make nuclear
weapons and suspected
research and development
of such capabilities. Teh-
ran denies any interest in
such arms.
Iran boycotted the meet-
ing. But a decision last year
by the 189 members of the
Nuclear Nonproliferation
treaty to convene a U.N.-
sponsored conference on
establishing a Middle East
nuclear-free zone in 2012
was an incentive for Israel's
Arab neighbors to come
to the exploratory Vienna
talks even if there are no
formal links between the


acknowledging that it has
nuclear weapons and al-
lowing IAEA in-piliCu to
probe its atomic activities.
Israel is unlikely to do
any of that. It remains un-
clear whether it will even
attend the 2012 talks and
came to the Vienna meet-
ing only under the stipula-
tion that it remain a non-
binding give-and-take on
the issue of nuclear-free
zones in general.
Petersen noted that in-
ternational pressure on


Iran had grown since a
Nov. 8 IAEA report that was
the most thorough to date
on backing up suspicions
that Tehran is conducting
research and development
of nuclear arms.
"They have one more
question to answer now,"
he said about Iran's deci-
sion to stay away. "I don't
think it was particularly
helpful to their cause.
The three-nation state-
ment also sought to put
into context the value of the


meeting which featured
presentations on nuclear-
free zones elsewhere.
It said "zones free of nu-
clear weapons cannot be
created counter to the will
of the countries of the re-
gion by the efforts of extra-
regional powers or interna-
tional organizations." That
was an rebuttal of an Arab
push to get powers that are
members of the Nonprolif-
eration Treaty involved in
creating a Mideast nucle-
ar-free region.


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Syrian Arab Republic Ambassador to the International Atomic
Energy Agency (IAEA) Bassam Sabbagh leaves the forum on
creating a Nuclear-Weapon-Free-Zone (NWFZ) in the Middle
East at the International Center in Vienna, Austria on Tuesday.


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two.
"Hopefully, we were able
to identify quite a lot of is-
sues which will be useful"
at that conference, Peters-
en said.
Arab countries and Iran
are aware of the poten-
tial of using the 2012 U.N.
conference as a platform
to pressure Israel to ful-
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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


110A WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2011


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Prep Basketball



Pirates open season with big win


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Sneads Lady Pirates used a
big second quarter performance
to pull away from Tallavanna
Christian and take a 52-22 vic-
tory in the team's season opener
Monday at home.
Tasharica McMillon had 20
points to lead the Lady Pirates,
with Aaliyah Williams adding 15,
and Logan Neel six points and
five rebounds.
McMillon also had six assists


and three steals, and Krissi Sat-
terfield had a team best seven
rebounds for Sneads.
The game was tied at 3-3
through the first period, as
Sneads coach Erich Alderman
started his second team players
at the beginning of the game,
bringing in his starters in the
second quarter.
The difference was evident,
as the Lady Pirate starters out-
scored their opponents 23-5 to
take a 26-8 halftime advantage.
The reserves re-entered in the


third period and performed bet-
ter, winning the quarter 16-2 to
extend the lead to 32 points.
Alderman then brought back
his starters for the first few min-
utes of the fourth before taking
them out with the game well in
hand.
"We did pretty good. I'm pretty
happy with the girls' perfor-
mances," the coach said. "Talla-
vanna is a young team, but they
fought hard and never quit. (The
reserves) did much better in the
third. They calmed down a little


bit, they were hustling very well,
and I told them to pick up and
attack and they started shoot-
ing the ball more, taking bet-
ter shats, and grabbing some
rebounds.
"They really stepped up, and
we also got a lot of hustle and
great defense from the starters."
Sneads was scheduled to host
Wewahitchka on Tuesday night
before taking six days off for
Thanksgiving break and coming
back to take on Ponce De Leon
on the road Monday.


College Basketball


MARK SKINNER / FLORIDIAN
Chipola's Jerel Scott gets off a three pointer
during a game earlier in the season.



Chipola ready


for biggest


test of season
BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The C jpola Indians will face their big-
gest challenge of the season, and will see a
familiar face when they travel to Niceville
on Friday to take on the No. 15 Lamar State
Seahawks.
The Seahawks (7-1) have already notched
a victory over preseason No. 5 Howard, win-
ning in blowout fashion 95-61 on Nov. 11.
The lone loss on the schedule came the
very next day to No. 6 South Plains College
81-68.
Lamar State is led by a pair of tough 6
foot, 2 inch guards in Shondel Stewart (19.8
points per game) and Brandon Peters (17.5
points per game), as well as former Indian
forward Elijah Pittman, who is leading the
team with 21 points and 8.8 rebounds per
game.
"This is a huge weekend for us. It's the
biggest test of the year for us playing La-
mar State," Chipola coach Jake Headrick
said. "They beat a team in Howard who is
top 10 in the country 96-61, and Howard
won the national title two years ago. That
says a lot about what kind of team Lamar
State has. It's a team that could make a run
at a national title, so we're fired up about
the opportunity. It's definitely going to be a
huge test for us."
Pittman was a key part of Chipola's Pan-
handle Conference championship season
as a freshman in 2010-2011, but was kicked
off the team after a failed drug test in thie
spring of 2011 that followed an earlier mar-
ijuana arrest in late 2010.
The 6 foot, 8 inch forward is now thriv-
ing at Lamar State, and Headrick said it
will be unusual to see Pittman on the other
sideline.
"I'm sure it will be an emotional game
when the ball goes in the air because Eli-
jah played here and was a part of our team
and obviously went through a lot of stuff,"
the coach said. "Some of our guys are still
S his friend, so it will be emotional for them.
Everybody knows how good of a player
Elijah is, but their team is a lot more than
just him. They've got 5-6 players who start
or come off the bench that are really good
players."
Chipola will also play Summit Christian
Academy out of Detroit on Saturday in
Niceville, but it's Friday's game that Head-
rick said will tell the.tale of just where his
team is at this point in the season.
"No doubt," he said. "This is a team that
when it's all said and done could win it all.
We hope to be able to say the same about
ourselves, so it will be a weekend that will
let us know where we're at and what we
need to do to get where we need to be. We're
prepared for a battle and a tough game for
our guys.
"It's the first time we've played a team
this good. For them, they've already played
in a couple of big games with Howard and
South Plains, so they're probably a little bit
ahead of us with who they've been able to
play so far. They're probably a little more
battle-tested."
"..i ., ,


Cottondale's Khadejah Ward takes the ball down the court Monday night against Bethlehem.


White, Ward help Lady Hornets notch first win


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

COTTONDALE Freder-
icka White and Khadejah
Ward combined to score 39
points to help lead the Cot-
tondale Lady Hornets to a
43-35 victory over Bethle-
hem on Monday night.


It was the first win of the
season for the Lady Hor-
nets, who were 0-2 going
into the game after los-
ing their first two contests
to Malone and Holmes
County.
Things looked bleak early
on for Cottondale, as the
Lady Wildcats jumped out


to an 8-1 lead thanks to six
quick points from Kaylin
Griffin, who led Bethle-
hem with 14 points on the
night.
But the Lady Wildcats'
best player soon picked
up two quick fouls and left
the game for the rest of the
half.


Cottondale took full ad-
vantage, using an 11-0
run to seize control of the
game.
White scored the first CHS
bucket of the night with
3:31 left in the first quarter,
and scored again on a put-

See HORNETS, Page 2B


Malone girls suffer first loss of season


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Malone Lady Tigers
suffered their first loss of the
season Monday night, falling
to Chipley 51-36 on the road.
Amanda Paschal scored
23 points to lead the way for
Chipley, with Rakia Sorey
adding 15.
Curteoona Brelove had
11 points to top all Malone
scorers.
Malone actually led the
game 19-15 at the half, but
Chipley stormed back with
a 16-7 third period to take a
31-26 edge and then pulled
awayin the fourth.
"In the second half, I think
we got a little rattled," Malone
coach Byron Williams said.
"Chipley was playing tough
half-court man defense and
we just got frustrated. They
were playing some in-your-
face defense and we didn't
react that well."
The coach said it was the
first time his team has seen
man to man pressure defense
this season.
"It kind of caught us off
guard," Williams said. "Chi-
pley did a good job of de-
nying the pass to the wing.
A lot of our offense comes
from our pressing, but we
weren't making shots so we
didn't have a chance to press
much. We also had a lot of


MARK SKINNFR / FORIDIAN
Malone's Olivia Daniels tries to get free of a pair of Chipley defenders Monday night.


missed three throws, and we
had five turnovers and lour
missed lay-ups to start the
third quarter, and that hurt
us also.
"Chipley also had a real
good guard in (l'.l.h.hil
She's really good with the
ball. They just outworked us


a little bit."
Malone was impressive
through its first three games,
all wins over Cottondale,
Laurel Hill, and Bethlehem,
but Williams said that the
Chipley game made it clear
that his team still has a long
way to go.


"1 think they recognizewhat
areas they need to work on
more, so the next time we see
a team go man to man, we'll
be ready for that," he said.
Malone will next travel to
Dothan today to play Charles
Henderson HIigh School
(Ala.) at 7 p.m.


t-~


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Twitter


twitter.com/
jcfloridannews







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


12B WEDNESDAY. NOVEMBER 23, 2011


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Detroit Lions quarterback Matthew Stafford (9) in the huddle during their game against the Carolina Panthers in Detroit on
Sunday.


Thanksgiving slate best in decades


The Associated Press

After so many years of
bad Detroit Lions teams
- and their games, no
matter the week, meaning
so little all of a sudden
that traditional Turkey
Day contest in the Motor
City is no turkey at all.
Detroit, which is 7-3,
hosts the reigning Super
Bowl champion Green
Bay Packers, who are 10-
0, to open a tremendously
compelling three-game
NFL feast Thursday.
The always-polarizing
Dallas Cowboys (6-4) host
the Miami Dolphins (3-7)
next in a matchup between
two teams on three-game
winning streaks, and the
San Francisco 49ers (9-1)
are at the Baltimore Ra-
vens.(7-3) at night in the
Harbaugh Bowl, the first
time two brothers will face
each other as head coach-
es in the league.
A case can be made that
these are the three most
intriguing NFL games of


the week. It certainly qual-
ifies as the most enticing
Thanksgiving Day lineup
in decades.
"That's good. Good for
the NFL, good for the fans,.
good for the people," Min-
nesota Vikings linebacker
Erin Henderson said.
"Something entertaining
to watch while we all stuff
our faces with that good
food."
Not convinced this is a
special tripleheader?
Consider:
>> The six teams are 42-
18, which translates to a
.700 winning percentage.
The last time the holiday's
NFL participants boasted
that strong a combined
win-loss record was 1975
(also .700).
>> It's the first Thanksgiv-
ing since 1998 when
there were only two games
- that each club in action
won its previous game.
> The Packers are the
first unbeaten team to
play on the fourth Thurs-
day in November since the


1962 Packers also were 10-
0, before losing to Detroit.
Including the playoffs,
Green Bay has won its last
16 games in a row.
> San Francisco coach
Jim Harbaugh will match
wits with his older broth-
er, Baltimore coach John
Harbaugh, in a game for
family bragging rights -
and with significant play-
off-seeding implications.
>> Even the game that
was shaping up as a dud,
Miami at Dallas, now be-
comes worth watching,
because the Dolphins are
the only team in NFL his-
tory to go from 0-7 to 3-7
and present a real chal-
lenge to the recently re-
surgent Cowboys and
quarterback Tony Romo
(who, by the way, is 18-2
with 49 touchdown passes
and 12 interceptions for
his career in November).
> The lineup includes
four teams with at least a
share of first place (Green
Bay, San Francisco, Balti-
more and Dallas), two who


can clinch a playoff berth
this week (Packers, 49ers),
and one with the inside
track for a wild-card berth
(Detroit).
Give the Lions credit
for helping boost the an-
ticipation for this year's
Thanksgiving games, be-
cause they sure deserve
a lot of the blame for the
holiday's NFL blandness
of late.
"Heck, there even was
talk about moving that
game out of Detroit I
thought it was sacrilegious
talk because Detroit
hadn't been very com-
petitive on those days on
national TV. So the think-
ing was, 'Hey, let's spread
it around to other cities,"'
said NFL Network ana-
lyst Steve Mariucci, who
coached the Lions from
2003-05.
"And I think that talk
went away, thankfully,
because it needs to be in
Detroit forever," he added.
"And they're really com-
petitive right now."


Hornets
From Page 1B
back to cut the lead to
three.
A lay-up by Ward
pushed the lead to four,
with Summer Potter's 3-
pointer at 4:06 of the first
half ending the spurt and
giving Bethlehem its first
points in 7:40.
A quick 6-0 spurt later
in the half gave the Lady
Wildcats the lead right
back, as consecutive lay-


ups by Savannah Miller
and Kazzie Ellemburg fol-
lowing Cottondale turn-
overs put Bethlehem up
18-17 with just under two
minutes on the clock.
The Lady Hornets got
the lead right back and
took a 20-17 edge into the
break.
The second half was all
Cottondale, which used
a 13-4 run to start the
third.
Cottondale will next
be in action on Dec. 1 at
Ponce De Leon.


Sports Briefs

High School Boys Basketball
Friday- Malone at Cottondale, 5:30 p.m., and 7 p.m.

Chipola Women's Basketball
The Lady Indians will head to Niceville this week-
end to take on Santa Fe on Friday, and Central Florida
on Saturday, both games at 1:30 p.m.

Chipola Men's Basketball
Chipola ill be in Niceville for the Northwest
Florida Rick Flores Classic this weekend, taking on
Lamar State on Friday and Albany Tech on Saturday,
both games at 3:30 p.m.

Sports Items
Send all sports items to editorial@jcfloridan.com, or fax them to 850-
482-4478. The mailing address for the paper is Jackson County Floridan
P.O. Box 520 Marianna, FL 32447.
I 1


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SPORTS









JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.corn


SPORTS


WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2011 3Br


NFL



Jack and Jackie Harbaugh proud of coach sons


The Associated Press

SANTA CLARA, Calif. -
From the pounding of in-
tense knee football games
on their bedroom floor to
stop-watch timed races up
the stairs from the base-
ment to grab refreshments
for the group, and all those
competition-spurred
bumps and bruises be-
tween, Jack Harbaugh has
watched his sons go at it
for nearly five decades.
That's why he sees no
need to be there in person
for Thursday's history-
making matchup between
brothers John and Jim
Harbaugh separated in
age by all of 1S months -
when the coaches face off
from opposite sidelines
with their division-lead-
ing teams and the world
watching.
Jack and Jackie Harbaugh
plan to swing by the sta-
dium for a quick visit and
photo with John and Jim,
then go to John's house to
watch the game on TV and
under the radar. This day
belongs to their boys and
their teams.
No surprise Mom and
Dad, too, are all about the
team.
"We're hoping to find
some place where Jackie
Sand I can watch the game
and allow the stage to be
John and Jim's," Jack said.
"I want to rephrase that.
Let the stage be the 49ers
and the Ravens. I stand
corrected."
The love of competition
was bred into the brothers.
Sons of a football coach,
living room couches got
rearranged to create space
so they could dive over the


coffee table and use cush-
ions for tackling practice.
Coat hangers were bent to
become basketball hoops
and yarn transformed into
homemade nets. -There
were hand-written score-
cards and scoreboards.
These two thought up
their own games and,
sometimes, creatively be-
came announcers to in-
troduce each other before
they started.
"Starting at forward for
Michigan, standing 4-
feet-5, wearing No. 23, Jim
Harbaugh!" Jack recalled
of those days.
Come Thursday night at
sold-out M&T Bank Sta--
dium, there's no make be-
lieve about it.
Jim's resurgent 49ers are
9-1 and could clinch the
NFC West with a win cou-
pled with a loss for the Se-
ahawks. John's Ravens are
7-3. and leading the AFC
North.
"We know it's going to be
emotional, we're just not
sure what emotions we're
going to experience," Jack
said. "It's such uncharted
waters. We've experienced
it in this business being
married for 50 years and
coaching 43 years myself.
And football and bas-
ketball and all the other
things we've had in our
family. This is such un-
charted waters to see two
in our family competing
at this level on this stage.
We've just never experi-
enced anything like it. It's
not one of those things
you go into and you have
anything that you can
possibly measure it with
or against."
This week, Jack's long-


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Jackie and Jack Harbaugh stand before an NFL football game between the 49ers and the Seattle Seahawks in San Francisco.


time catch phrase of
"Who's got it better than
us? Nobody!" seems as fit-
ting as ever for this family.
The slogan has been a
huge hit out West, where
49ers players have made
their own T.shirts featur-
ing those words.
Aside from the game,
there's another special
moment the family will
celebrate: Jack and Jackie's
50th wedding anniversary
on Friday. Everything has
come together in one spe-
cial, whirlwind week for
this sports-crazed family.
Jack and Jackie Har-
baugh don't remember
a single serious fight be-
tween their sons. Sure,
there were arguments,
like the common debate
over chores such as
who had to mow the more


challenging, sloping side
of the lawn. If somebody
had a beef with the boys,
they would always team
up. Each time the fam-
ily moved as their father
changed jobs, they left
friends behind but always
had each other.
And don't forget their
tag-along sister, Joani.
Five years younger than
Jim, she would run around
in the middle as the boys
threw a football during
backyard battles, of the
keep-away game, pickle.
Joani married to Indi-
ana basketball coach Tom
Crean will cheer them
both from afar, thrilled
that each earned a much-
deserved path to the NFL
on his own despite being
the son of a successful
coach.


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WEDNESDAY MORNING / AFTERNOON ,NOVEMBER 23, 2011
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~14B WEDNESDAY. NOVEMBER 23, 2011


SPORTS


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN + www.jcfloridan.com


Georgia

mourns


the


voice of


the 'Dogs


The Associated Press .,


ATLANTA When Larry
blunIon first arrived at
Georgia in 1966, he showed
no signs of the trait that
would make hir as be-
loved as the
coaches and
players he
described
for- millions
of radio
listeners.
Munson Sure' he.
had that
gra\ell. voice.
But, no. he didn't wear his
red-and-black heart on his
sleeve. It took time to de-
velop that love for the Bull-
dogs, to grow so passion-
ate about the team that he
was, without a doubt, more
than just their voice.
He was their biggest fan.
"Lalry wasn't like that
when he came here," long-
time Georgia coach Vince
Dooley said Monday. "He
was.good. very good, pro-
fessionally. But he didn't
have that uniqueness right
away. That developed over
a period of time as he came
to know and love the Geor-
gia program and Georgia
football and the Georgia
people.
Munson ,Who was Geor-
gia's radio play-by-play
announcer "for nearly 43
years, died Sunday night
at his home in Athens of
complications from pneu-
monia. He was 89.
Known for his distinctive
calls such as "Run, Lindsay,
run!" and blatant partisan-
ship, Munson arrived at
Georgia in 1966 and stayed
through the first two ga mes
of the 2008 season.
Then, with his health fail-
ing, he suddenly retired.
Munson will live on
through the numerous vid-
eo and audio collections
documenting his most fa-
mous calls, highlighted by
his, pleading exhortation
to Lindsay Scott, ori a ,93-
yard touchdown reception
that pulled out an inptob-
able victory over Florida.


College Fbotball


Mistakes continue to hurt Clemson

Tigers need to rebound off disappointing loss to NC State to compete with South Carolina


I hI, ,' ., i, lfI I *


CL.MNSON, S.. -
hlere', little m\snery be-
hind Clemson's recent
problems and coach Dabo
Swinney said the fix is just
as simple: Cut down on
mistakes.
' "You want some grand
answer?" Swinney said
Tuesday\ of Clemson's is-
'sues. "It's 11 turnovers in
three games."
The Tigers 19-2i led the
nation in fewest turnovers
with just six during their
8-0 start. But they've been
extremely error prone the,
past three games, result-
ing in losses to'Georgia
Tech itwo interceptions.
two fumbles) and to North
Carolina State (two inter- Clemson head coach Dabo Swi
cept ions, two fumbles). rival South Carolina this Satur
The Tigers needed a sec-
ond-half rally back two
weeks ago to overcome efforts haven't wavered
a nwo-touchdown deficit the past month despite
and defeat Wake Forest, ,thelosses. :
31-28. despite two inter- "We know exactly who
ceptions and a fumble. :we are," the coach said.
.. We're lucky we hadn't 'We've got a great group
lost all three." Swinney 6f guys that winning is ex-
said. tremely important to."
The ACC Atlantic Divi- Especially this week in
sion winners will need to what is the state of South
shore up ball security is- Carolina's biggest sporting
sues when they face No. contest. The Tigers have
14 South Carolina (9-2) at owned the rivalry since it
Williams-Brice Stadium began with a 65-39-4 edge.
on Saturday night., But the Gamecocks have
Swinney said his players' the chance to win three


THE ASSOUIAI ED PRHiS ILL
nney (left) hopes to end a two game losing streak to in state
day in Columbia.


straight, something that
hasn't happened since
1968-70.
"We know what this ri-
valry means." defensive
coordinator Kevin Steele
said.
First up, though, is re-
gaining his team's focus
after last week's surprise,
37-13, beatdown to the
Wolfpack. North Carolina
State scored 27 second-
quarter points, capital-
izing on fumbles by Boyd
and freshman tailback


Buckeyes will play bowl game


Tne Assocated P ess

COLUMBUS, Ohio If
the NCAA allows Ohio
State to go to a bowl game,
the Buckeyes will i ack
their bags.
Ohio State athletic di-,
rector Gene Smith said
Tuesday that Ohio State
would not penalize it-
self by keeping the foot-
ball team from making a..
postseason trip as -a way
of mitigating potential
NCAA sanctions.
In an 'exchange of text
messages with The As-
sociated Press, Smith
said, "Cannot speculate'
on what they (the NCAA).
may do. No, we do not in


tend to self impose a post
season sanction."
There has been specu-
lation that
the NCAA
might hand
Ohio State
a bowl ban
in addition
to its other
Pryor penalties.
PryoF College
sports' rul-
ing body is still deciding
Ohio State's sanctions for
several instances of play-
ers accepting improper
benefits, and coach Jim
Tressel not revealing
knowledge of violations
and playing ineligible
players. Tressel was forced


out on May 30.
Ohio State has offered
to vacate its 12-1 record.
in 2010, return $389,000
from its share of Big Ten
bowl receipts last season,
go on two years of NCAA
probation and surrender
five football scholarships
over the next three years.
Schools often ban
themselves from bowl
games as a way of soften-
ing the NCAA's eventual
sanctions.
In a second letter of al-
legations sent to Ohio
State this fall, the NCAA
charged that the school,
had shown a "failure to
monitor" its football pro-
,gram appropriately.


Mike Bellamy to take
control.
Clemson's defense, faced
with short fields much
of the game, allowed 37
points to a Wolfpack team
that had scored only 23 its
previous three games.
"This sounds like a cli-
chd, but our own mistakes
are killing us," Boyd said.
Swinney spoke to the
players Monday about
their football focus, saying
some had spent more time
away from practices and


organized meetings work-
ing at their technique.
Center Dalton Freeman
said the offensive line had
plans to put in some extra
work as a group on their
own to prepare for the
Gamecocks.
Tight end Brandon Ford
said the players have ad-
ditional free time without
classes during Thanks-
giving break to devote to
football.
"A key to us winning to
keep from turning the
ball over," he said. "If we
can execute like we did
the first eight games, that
should be OK."
Clemson should have
most of its injured players
back for South Carolina,
including left tackle Phil-
lip Price, who sprained
a knee ligament against
Wake Forest and did not
play against North Caro-
linaState.
The Wolfpack had six
sacks after Clemson had
only allowed 18 its first 10
games. Swinney said the
team would work Price
hard at practice to see if
the knee would hold up to
play or if Price should wait
until the ACC title game in
Charlotte, N.C., on Dec. 3.
Also back is star wideout
Sammy Watkins, held out
against NC State.


Student athletes possibly


treated better at Penn State


The Associated Press

STATE COLLEGE, Pa
Former Penn State stu-
dent disciplinarian. Vicky
Triponey tells The Wall
Street Journal that football
players were treated "more
favorably than other stu-
dents accused of violating
the community standards
as defined by the student
code of conduct."
Triponey, who resigned
her post as the university's
standards and conduct
officer in 2007. spoke to
the newspaper after it ob-
tained a 2005 email from
her to then-president Gra-
ham Spanier and others in
which Triponey expressed;
her concerns about the
disciplinary process as
it pertained to football
players.


Coach Joe Paterno "is
insistent he kriows best
how to discipline his play-
ers ... and their status as a
student when they com-
mit violations of our stan-
dards should NOT be our
concern ... and I think he
was saying WOshould treat
football players different
from other students in this
regard," Triponey wrote in
a Aug. 12, 2005, email ob-
tained by the newspaper.
"Coach Paterno would
rather we NOT inform' the
public when a football
player is found respon-
sible for committing a se-
rious violation of the law
arid/or our student code,",
she wrote in the e-mail,
"despite any moral or legal
obligation to do so."
Triponey's email was
written the day after a


meeting in which Paterno
criticized Triponey for
"meddling," the Journal'
reported citing two anony-
mous sources.
In a response to her note,'
Athletic Director Tim Cur-
ley wrote Paterno felt "it
should be his call if some-
one should practice and
play in athletics."
Paterno and Spanierwere
ousted from their jobs in
the wake of the scandal.
,In a-statement Mondav to
the Journal Triponey said:
"There were numerous
meetings and discussions,
about specific and pending
studentt discipline cases
i'that involved football play-
ers," which included "de-
mands" to adjust the pro-
cess for players resulting in
them being treated "more
favorably than others.


FILE AND DRIVE
gag go, gl l


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estimate your taxes and allocate a
portion for your down payment!
We Have Moved!!! Just Down The Street!!!
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4804 Hwy 90 + Marianna + 850-482-4572
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m


Parents,
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it will also appear in the Jackson County

se d yOur Floridan on December 23rd.
e P.S. Your child will receive a reply from you-know-who! Shhhh...
lour child's letter needs lo reach us b, December 12th ror Sanln's repl.
add notes aboul our child's iccoipllihmenls, sgnder. age. friends, nnd 'r a
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'II%


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A $500.00 VISA gift card
1ear maintenance agreement
Any Model and An Efficiency
Call today to schedule your free comfort consultation



WODALL'S

www.woodallstotalcomfort.com
850-482-8802
License #CAC058636
*This offer is good through December 31, 2011*


- -


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.I


I


Ml ihIllololi- goI., N4 -s spnaper
i In lu illhoii IhII pro,\Ile-
llp nMP1t.e1t IDN hI ller*. nt
nii hlargv lo iu-, -II I IItIIIng
nr l I i i -ir I1 "'' il lll l 1 I 1i^
.lu xlimn ( miIn1 lla lppre. wile
.iii ppl ii r I
ylI I I Mqllpo*rll






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


2012 CUTEST KID CONTEST


Emma Grace Selena
10 10


Tra'Kaya'


Yasmin


15 1


19


N!


Il



Ii


20


Joshua


Kori


30


Nakia


Iremaine


40


Christina


Sponsored By:
Sweet Stuff Bakery
*The Florida Caverns State Park
: Kindel Lanes
The City of Marianna
The Oaks Restaurant


Heavenly
Mail to or stop by:
JC Floridan/Cutest Kid Contest
4403 Constitution Lane
Marianna, FL 32448


Voter's Name


Address ___


City
Child Number


STelephone
State _


Child Name


VOTE on/te at
www. FloridanCutestKi.dcom

All proceeds benerii Newspaper in Education.


1 $0.25
4 $1.00
20 $5.00
40 $10.00
60 $15.00
80 $20.00
'F...


My Donation of $ to NIE Equals ____ votes.
Payment: D Check O Money Order Credit/Debit Card
Name on Card


Credit Card Number
Ra fnntim


Exp. Date


Jade


Makenna


Morgan


Kathrine .


INy'Miracle


28
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Zip


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mmmmmmmm,^
Number You^


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WEDNESDAY:NOVEMBER 23, 2011 5B [


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


PEANUTS BY CHARLES SCHULTZ
"...IN HOPES THAT ST.NICHOLA5 THAT'S MY FAVORITE POEM..
SOON WOULD BE THERE OU 5HOULP WRITE
SOMETHING LIKE THAT..


BORN LOSER BY ART AND CHIP SANSOM
'I'M LEADING NOW, CAIE.F! T WOY- 0 1 IAVE TE KA. P VEW't TAKEtA AY COFFEE
TIEA CONNNG! REAM ALL
o A~! IT oNT .

I ,
O'CLOCK!

0 ,;


FRANK & ERNEST BY BOB THAVES


GRIZZWELLS BY BILL SCHORR


s

1 I

I
1
a


FOILED

X 5PUTTERWi'
OH, COME
ON'


ARLO & JANIS BY JIMMY JOHNSON
Flu)DA Y ooBuTa
Se... WHOA! WAIT...








ALLEY OOP BY JACK AND CAROLE BENDER


IN CARTOONS, THE SMELL I CALL GRAVY "LAVA" IS THE REASON DOLPHINS YOU REALLY DO
OF FRESH PIE CAN MAKE WHEN MOM POURS IT ON DON'T HAVE BEARDS KNOWEVERYTHING,
YOU FLOAT. DOES THAT MY MASHED POTATOES. BECAUSE THEY SHAVE DON'T YOU?
MEAN SPACE SMELLS 00D YOU THINK REAL LAVA THEM WITHCORAL? DOLPHINS
LIKE BLUEBERRY? TASTES LIKE GRAVY? SHAVE WITH
rI / NOPE. NOPE L OBSTER
NOPE. CLAWS.

NOPE.



KIT'N' CARLYLE BY LARRY WRIGHT HERMAN BY JIM UNGER


11-23 O LaUgUPSlOrh InmtenlO nal Ine .Dt byL U r UdrM t UFS, 2011
"Twenty years? Good grief It is youl
I thought I recognized the suit."


NEA Crossword Puzzle


ACROSS
1 Jack
London
setting
6 Handled
roughly
11 Microscopic
animals
13 Geisha's
attire
14Succeed
(2 wds.)
15 Be against
16 Paris
season
17 Home tel.
18Turkish
honorific
21 Leafy
climbers
23 Fabric
means.
26Wintry
cry
27 "Stormy
Weather"
singer
28 -dsh pie
29 Election
loser's
demand
31 Parrot's
word
32 Vows
33 Facilitator
35 Garage
sale tag
(2 wds.)
36 Monorail


37 One-time Answer to Previous Puzzle
Giant
homer-hitter UND GAR|B ALIT
38Holiday mo. COO ENYAA TUNAA
390veralls LISTENED AN IL
material ARES IRATE
40 NBA coach G UN I
Unseld EPT NUN ARC
41 itinerary ALES OPT O
word
42Sanctloned VAN MII SUNG
44Notas END VEND TADS
hard OWS YEA
47 Destroyed PULLSI ILI N
data E G S F I GURI lN E
51 Desserts ALOE ROAD0 N E E
52Stemfrom LY N N INGE EE|K
53 Crowbar 8 Seek to 30 Cries at a
endsnw persuade circus
54Snow 9 SN officer 31 Pounded
White's
friend 10 Motherrabbit 34 Boarded
12 Even-- up
W 13"M*A*S*H" 36 Muscle
DOWN locale injuries
1 Barkoryelp 18 Atlarge 39Slims
2 Emma in 19 Bribe, down
"The informally 41 Regard
Avengers" 20 Polar bear 43 Luau staple
3 Barble's domain 44 PC key
friend 22 Future 45 Hole maker
4 Wind resident 46 Neptune's
Instrument 23Cheerful kingdom
5 Spiral- color 48 Drink
shelled 24 Remove slowly
creature from text 49 Night
6 Organ parts 25News before
7 Rock- section 50 Susan -
concert 28 Society of "L.A.
gear newble Law"


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QulllDrlverBooks.com


11-23


2011 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


Horoscope
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) This can be a good
day when it comes to some
kind of personal achieve-
ment for which you're
striving. You're likely to
get the break you've been
looking for.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-
'Dec. 21) Even if certain
prospects appear fuzzy,
continue to be. hopeful.
Positive aspects are work-
ing behind the scenes,
helping you achieve your
aims.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) Lucky you, because
a friend is in a position to
help you pull off some-
thing that you've long been
working for.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) The present aspects
under which you're work-
ing will produce exactly
what you're hoping to
accomplish.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) Watch for an unusu-
al opportunity that could
enable you to strengthen
yourposition in a joint en-
deavor. The other parties
could profit as well.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
- Check with friends to see
if anybody has some good
ideas for fun activities.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
- Favorable conditions are
moving in your direction,
which could have an effect
upon your work, finances
or even your leisure hours.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
- If you've made a prom-
ise of some kind, be sure
to follow through on what
you pledged to do.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
- Keep all your avenues
for gain open, so that you'll
be able to act immediately
when they give off positive
signals.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
- Something constructive
can be done to uplift your
financial position, so take
advantage of any chance
you get for gain.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept 22)
- You'll be at your best
when it comes to anything
that has to do with profit.
Something financially con-
structive can be advanced.
LIBRA (Sept 23-Oct. 23)
- News is coming your way
that will encourage you to
revive a social endeavor
on which you worked hard
and long, but gave up on.


Annie's .Mailbox


Dear Annie: My oldest child is 27 and
engaged. He and his fiancee, "Kayla,"
ordered the wedding rings together.
Last May, my sontexted, saying, "We
are going to pick up the ring on Thurs-
day." That Sunday we celebrated Moth-
er's Day at my daughter's home. While
cooking, I asked Kayla if I could see
the ring. She did not respond. Instead,
she left the kitchen and sat in the living
room. My son told me, "You ruined the
surprise." I was astonished. He said Kayla
didn't know he had picked up the rings.
Apparently, when he texted "we," he
meant his sister.
Kayla wouldn't speak to me the rest of
the morning, and my son disinvited me
to an evening barbecue because I had
"made Kayla cry." Two weeks later, he
called to say I owed Kayla an apology. I
disagreed and said if anything, she owes
me one for treating me so rudely. I've
barely,seen him since.
My father passed away in September,
and all the kids came over. I went to greet
them, but Kayla walked away to avoid
me. She expressed condolences to my


Bridge


Australian Bridge is published every two
months. It follows the standard policy of aim-
ing primarily at tournament players but also
tries to appeal to players who wish to improve
their game. Tim Bourke is one of the world's
most prolific composers of declarer-play prob-
lems. This one appeared in Australian Bridge.
How should South plan the play in four hearts
after West leads the diamond jack? It is sensible
for South to open one no-trump. When North
transfers into hearts, South must superaccept
with five-card support.
South is faced with lots of losers: one in
spades, one or two in hearts and one or two in
clubs. It is a matter of trying to maximize the
chances. Declarer should win the first trick in
the dummy and play a heart to his 10 he
should not risk losing two trump tricks if East
has all three. Here, West wins with his queen
and plays a second diamond.
South should win with his king, cash the heart
ace, play a diamond to dummy's ace, and call
for the spade queen, encouraging East to cover
if he has the king. But when he plays low, de-
clarer should win with his ace and exit with the
spade jack. Whoever wins the trick must either
open up clubs or concede a ruff-and-sluff.


sister, but not to me. Obviously, I feel
this girl is immature, disrespectful and
extremely selfish, and my son is allow-
ing her to treat me this way. Should I tell
them how hurtful their behavior is?
--P.

Dear P.:Your son has terrible commu-
nication skills and blames you when he
messes up. Kayla sounds too infantile to
be married.
And instead of approaching this over-
sensitive child to smooth things over,
you demand an apology. We think there
are plenty of apologies to go around.
The question is whether you want to get
along with your future daughter-in-law
or be estranged.
Neither Kayla nor your son has the ma-
turity to handle this situation, so you will
have to be the grownup. Talk to Kayla,
preferably in person, and apologize for
upsetting her. Don't judge or blame.
Simply tell her sincerely that you want to
have a good relationship and hope you
can start over. We hope she has the sense
to agree.


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Ceflebty Ciher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each better in the cipher stands for another
TODAYVS CLUE: D equals S
"CAW'L FAO YZYX GYL R DAOG EW
LMY SAXGC LYGG FAO LMRL FAO
BRW'L PY YKR BLGF SMA FAO RXY." -
GRCF HRHR


Previous Solution: "In a very real sense, it will not be one man going to the
moon, it will be an entire nation." -John F. Kennedy
0 2011 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 11-23


North 11-23-11
ZQ5
VJ8642
*AQ5
*J62
West East
SK 9.72 10 8 6 4 3
VQ K5
J 1092 4643
4K975 *Q83
South
4AJ
VA 10 9 7 3
+K87
A 104

Dealer: South
Vulnerable: East-West

South West North East
1 NT Pass 24 Pass
3 V Pass 4V All pass

Opening lead: J


L


-16B WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2011


ENTEE NMEN








CLASSIFIED


www.JCFLORIDAN.com


Jackson County Floridan Wednesday, November 23, 2011- 7 B


WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED





ARKETPLA


BY PHONE: (850) 526-3614 or (800) 779-2557 BY MAIL: WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE
BY FAX: (850) 779-2557 P.O. BOX 520, MARIANNA, FL 32447
ONLINE: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM IN PERSON: 4403 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA
Publication Policy Errors and Omissions: Advertisers should check their ad the first day. This publication shall not be liable for failure to publish an ad or for a typographic error or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the ad for the first day's
insertion. Adjustment for errors is limited to the cost of that portion of the ad wherein the 6rror occurred. The advertiser agrees that the publisher shall not be liable for damages arising out of errors in advertisements beyond the amount paid for the space
actually occupied by that portion of the advertisement in which the error occurred, whether such error is due to negligence of the publisher's employees or otherwise and there shall be no liability for non-insertion of any advertisement beyond the amount paid for
such advertisement. Display Ads are not guaranteed position. All advertising is subject to approval. Right is reserved to edit, reject, cancel or classify all ads under the appropriate classification.

Ir ed nsclto -fr ti


ANNOUNCEMENTS


BALLROOM DANCER
(No need to be professional)
Female Dancer looking for dance partner to
donate 1 hr/week for 8 wks to assist teaching
teenagers in preparation for Prom &
Graduation events. 850-526-4561



I Pay CASH for Diabetic test
strips. Up to $10 per box!
Most brands considered.
All boxes must be unopened
and unexpired.
Call Matt 334-392-0260











( S) FINANCIAL


DO YOU WANT A DISCOUNT ON YOUR
HOMEOWNERS INSURANCE COST:
SMost existing homes have one or more
wind resistive construction features needed
to qualify for insurance discounts.
FLORIDA LAW now requires Insurance
Co.'s to provide wind mitigation discounts.
To get discounts (or refund) you may be
entitled to, get an inspection and report.
James Grant has the Florida Professional *
License(s) required to perform Wind
Mitigation Inspections.
The fee for an Inspection is only.$150.00.
Recently, my customers are averaging more
t an $300.00 per year savings on insurance).
Call James at 850-526-8367 to discuss
an inspection for you..

16) MERCHANDISE



a* GUN SHOW a*
December 3rd & 4th
National Peanut Festival Building *
Hwy 231 S. Dothan, Alabama
Over 275 Tables
Sat 9-5 Sun. 10-4
Call 334-279-9895

Guns:
Thompson/Center: Encore pistol,
15" bull barrel 30-06, 2x6 power scope
very accurate to 300 yards, moderate
recoil. New in Box $1,100.
H&R Point 17CAL: 22" bull barrel, very
accurate to 200 yards, 3x9x40MM Nikon
bucketmaster with target and ammo. $375.
Call 850-573-1443


Wanted: Old Coins, Gold,
Diamonds, Guns, And Tools
WNest Main Jewelry & Loan 334-671-1440.


SATSUMAS, tangerines and grapefruit $20.
bags. Located at Hwy 73 5. and Laramore Rd,
follow the signs to Bar L Ranch. Open daily
lpm-6pm. For more info call 850-209-5506.
Tree ripe satsumas and grapefruit harvested
daily $20 bags, location of grove Hwy 73 south
and Laramore Road Marianna, FL, follow signs
to Bar L Ranch for more info call (850)209-5506
Visit us to find great gifts for Christmas ,
birthdays or any occasion. Don't waste time in
lines at the malls or big box stores we ship
straight to your door and as always shipping is
free. We have Children toys, men cologne,
hunting gear, jewelry, xbox games and more.
KEWLSTORE.COM as Kewl as it gets.
IT'S AS EASY
AS 1-2-3
1. CALL 2. PLACE YOUR AD 3. GET RESULTS


0 "


Baby Grand Piano:
Beautiful Ebony, like new, Weber.
Price to sell for Chirstmas Special $3,900.
Call 334-671-0776 Today for appointment!

(4) PETS & ANIMALS


Quail for Sale flight condition
Ready for Hunting
4" 850-326-3016


AKC BULLMASTIFF PUPS and OLDE ENGLISH
BULLDOG CHAMPION LINES, UGA # FOUR IS
THE GGG GRANDPA, AWESOME LITTER BREED-
ING THE BEST TO THE BEST. I OFFER SERV-
ICEMAN & VETS A $200 DISCOUNT REALLY
BULLY, TRI COLORED- TANS, SABLES AND BLUE
FAWNS MALES AND FEMALES, THEY CAN GO
TO THEIR NEW HOMES THE WEEK OF CHRIST-
MAS $1,200 FOR BULLDOG, and $1,250 for
BULLMASTIFF; 334-806-5911
WWW.SEXTONSBULLZ.COM
Blond FM Beagle Mix 1 yr old, Very Playful up
for adoption. Dothan 334-712-2121
BOXER PUPS AKC: will be ready for christmas.
tails have been docked and dew claws re-
moved. taking deposits now. Pickup will be two
days before christmas or christmas eve. two
solid white pups, the others are flashy brindle.
both parents are on site. $350. (334)692-5335.
Leave a message.
CKC Cocker S panel Puppiesl
S Ready to go 12-3-11, Parents on
-site. IM, SF All Buff and white.
aTails docked Dew claws
Removed wormed & 1st. shots
$250 334-798-1578 Taking
Deposits $100. & $150. on pick up.
CKC Toy Chihuahua puppies black & white,
$400 each. Call 850-579-8895



LOST: North of Old U.S. Rd. 2 female
Rotweillers, Childs Pets 850-718-1513
Maltese AKC PupsI
1 Female Ready Now-
Will Deliver!
M/F ready for Christmas.
S/W, will be small.
Call 334-703-2500
T OLDER PUPPIES ON SALE 334-718-4886 V
$75 & up Yorkle Poos, Shih-poos, Morkles,
Yorkie-pom also Yorkies $400 and up.
Maltese $500 & Shorkies $250. Chi-A-poo $125.
UKC & NKC Registered Treening Feist Puppies
5 months old with all shots, white with black &
brown spots. Will be great pets for any house-
hold. Great squirrel dogs and ready for training
this season!! Sight Treening Now.
$300. Call 334-618-4194

(C) FARMER'SMARKET
3. -

06' md#9996 John Deere 6-row cotton picker
1026 eng. hrs. 772 fan hrs., 08'md#9996 John
Deere 6-row cotton picker 982 eng. hrs. 624 fan
hrs. Mud Hog, LMC Bowl Buggy all exc. cond.
kept under shed. Call; Kendall Cooper 334-703-
0978 or 334-775-3749 ext. 102,334-775-3423.
MF 1835 Square Bailer: Chrome 81/ hay cutter,
Rossi Grass Cutter & Rake. Excellent Condition.
Must See! $12,000. Call 334-447-5316

Wednesday, November 23, 2011










THE SUDOKU GAME WITH i9 KICIC!

HOW TO PLAY
Fill'in the 9x9 grid with the missing
numbers so that each column, row and
3x3 box contains the digits 1- 9 only once.
There is only one correct solution
for each puzzle. -
GETMORE WASABI
PUZZLES ONLINEI
ARCHIVES AND MORE GREAT GAMES AT
BOXERJAM.COM


T


HAY 6x6ft. Argentina, Bahia, Bermuda, 116
rolls, $60. each. 334-805-3403 or 334-677-3247.




Temporary Laborers and Operators
Must not be scared of heights, confined,
spaces and be able to work nights.
Call (850) 579-2020

Need a New H-ome?
Chec.- out the Classifieds


Cherokee Satsumas available at the farm
1525 Falrview Rd. Marlanna 850-579-4641.

FRESH
GREEN
PEANUTS
850-352-2199
OR 850-352-4423

Now Open Jackson Farms U-Pick Tomatoes
& Peppers! Bring your own bucket
7 days a week. 850-592-5579










Airmap 100: 12 channel receiver Air navigation
system used. $75. 850-579-1299
Antique Coors Pitcher: Clear glass 8-3/4" tall
Coors Banquet in red. $20.850-482-4120
Antique Pitcher: Aluminum Guardian Service
bakalite handle. $20. 850-482-4120
Auto Through The Lens Flash Cord & Bracket,
private owned, new in box, $196 850-482-7665
Black & Decker Food Processor Quick & Easy
Plus, brand new in box $12 850-482-7665
Blood Pressure Monitor: Automatic Digital with
additional extra large cuff. $25. 850-482-4120.
Bostich Roofing Nails, 3/4 of box, 1 $15
850-592-2881
Cans/Tins: 10 Campbell's soup cups + Camp-
bell's enameled cracker tin. $40. 850-482-4120
Clawfoot Bath Tub, needs refinishing, $200
OBO 850-209-6977 before 5pm
Clay Pigeon Thrower: Outers brand trap throw-
er on stand. Cock & throw. $50. 850-482-4120
DJ Equip. Amp, mixer, DVD/CD, microphone,
cords, etc. Complete set. $400 OBO 8504826022
Dora Jeep, like new, needs battery $50
850-592-2881
Dresser w/2 mirrors, large, all cherry wood,
$125 850-592-2881
DVD Player: Sunvisor DVD player passenger
side for car new in box $75. 334-400-3736
Entertainment Center. White. 48"Wx60"Hx20"D
Only $50. 850-482-2636 Marianna
Estate Dryer by Whirlpool, white great cond
$150. 850-482-3267.
Fenders Honda 300 foutrax set of fenders.
$200 OBO, 850-272-1842
Girls clothes, size 8 & 14/16, Name Brand, $1
each, 850-372-2419
Gym System: Weider 2100 Exercizer with
weights. Great condition $150. 850-482-4120.
Handsaw set 3 piece new in pouch $7.
334-400-3736
Headboards. Wood. Good for (2) twin beds or a
Full/Queen. $15each. 850-482-2636 Marianna -
Ipod Battery: 56 hour Ipod Nano battery
w/charger in box. $15. 334-400-3736
Ipod Iphone MP3 backpack speaker system.
$45. 334-400-3736
Keyboard, Yamaha Mod. DGX-505, 88 keys, 500
voices, w/stand & manual $400 850-482-7933
Water Softener, $100, 850-482-3866


I


1~0IooIo[


1001


STuesday's
WASABI SOLUTION
1| 7 (D


1) 3 19 1Q) 9 6 71 ( 5
2 32 1 7 8 3
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KIDS TOY TALKING KITCHEN SET COMPLETE
WITH FOOD AND DISHES, EXC. COND.
$50.334-790-0W70 LEAVE MESSAGE
Large Dog House, Any Color, Shingle Roof,
L Will Deliver. $120, 334-794-5780 Dothan J
Large wood trunk, good condition $40
850-592-2881
Microphone Mixer: 6 Channel. $50. 334-400-
3736
Olympus Camera, SP 600 UZ digital, new con-
dition, $160 FIRM 850-482-7665 after 12pm
Piano with bench Hallet, Davis, and Compa-
ny, $300, like new, 850-594-3895
Poker table top by Cardinal, new in box $35
334-400-3736
--- -I
Porch/Lawn Swing With Chains,
L Will Deliver. $85 334-794-5780
Rims Mickey Thompson. 16" 5 lug Will fit
Ford F150 or Dodge, $200, 850-693-9961
Rims original stock for Nissan Titan Truck
18" caps & lugnuts. $50. 334-790-1877.
Rod Case: Pack-A-Pole, padded, 4 rods, hard
case 60"-90" $50 like new 850-482-4120
Scooter: Baja Sport ideal for children. Like new.
Green $250. OBO 334-796-6613.
Scooter: Jalon '03 JT500T-15, ideal for young-
sters or adult $400. OBO 334-796-6613. No title
Scope Ultra Vision 3x9x32 with Weaver
mounts. Very clear.Little use. $45,850-482-4120
Scope: Weaver Qwik-point R-1 red dot pointing
sight for shotgun or rifle. $25. 850-482-4120.
Shed Door. Measures 4 x 6. Bargain Priced $60.
850-482-2636 Marianna
Skates inline girls size 6 used very little $15.
334-400-3736
Speakers: NHT Zero highend Speakers: book-
shelf size, black. Little use. $25. 850-482-4120.
Subwoofer: Sony 12 in. 150 watt home active
wubwoofer in box $75. 334-400-3736
Tire Inflator: Campbell-Hausfeld air pump. Up
tp 150 psi. $20. 850-482-4120
Tires: Michelin. Lots of tread left. $25 each or
both for $40. 850-482-4120
Wedding dress for Fall Size 8 tag still inside.
$99, call 850 592-8769 Dellwood, FL
Woodbuming stove Potbelly Style Comfort
Woodburning stove. $425, 850 592-8769


I T@








8 B WVlednesdniv, November 23, 2011 Jackson CountyFloridan


p ~ EDUCATION
& INSTRUCTION


Get a Quality Education for a
New Career! Programs
S offered in Healthcare,
k'* ,g HVAC and Electrical Trades.
Call Fortis College Today!
888-202-4813.
For consumer information
www.Fortis.edu

<, RESIDENTIAL
REAL ESTATE FOR RENT


COTTONDALE VILLAGE APARTMENTS
Nowaccepting applications for 2
bedroom units. Rental assistance. No
application fee. We pay water, sewer,
and trash service. 4052 Old Cottondale
Road, Marianna, FL 32448. (850) 526-4062,
TDD/TTY 711. "This institution is an
equal opportunity provider, and employer."




1BR 1BA Apartment in town, $450 per month.
No pets. 850-557-2000


BR Apartment, 3145 A Redbud Lane, Blue
Springs, Built '08, energy efficient, $525/mo
$500 dep. 1 year lease, small pets ok with
deposit. Call 850-693-0570 Iv msg.


3BR 1BA duplex & 2BR 2BA duplex both in
Grand Ridge both $425/mo + $425 dep. 850-
592-5571
LG 2/1 in Marianna, nice kitchen, open floor
plan, w/d hkup, yard/porch, pvt/safe $600/mo
850-352-2103


2BR/1BA Concrete block Rental in Marianna,
Tile floors, washer h/u, pets ok, $300/mo + $30
credit/bkgrnd ck. Additional houses and
apartments in Graceville 850-263-5753
2BR 1BA house, Baker Ave, Marianna. Fenced
backyard, DW, Stove, Frig, Washe $580/mo,
$600 dep.. 1 year lease, small pets ok with
deposit. Call 850-693-0570 Iv msg.
2BR 1BA in Marianna City Limits. Energy
Efficient, w/appliances, CH/A, $475/mo
850-272-6121
3BR 2BA w/bonus room, House in Marianna,
very clean, CH/A, dishwasher, $650 + dep. Call
for appointment 904-214-6980
Austin Tyler & Associates *-
Quality Homes & Apartments
4. 850- 526-3355 4"
"Property Management Is Our ONLY Business"
.. For Rent: 316 Red Bud
X RMCircle in Dothan
Si, This one year-old Garden
home has hard wood
floors, carpet in bed
rooms and ceramic tile
with granite counter tops
in kitchen. Double garage, 9 foot ceiling,
fenced in back yard and irrigation. (in Grove
-Park 84 West) 334-794-2894. $1300 per month
Large house in a fantastic quiet neighborhood .
4 BR 2.5 ba 3228 sq. ft. with a basement and
outside building in a fenced back yard. $1,500
deposit & $40 application fee. Call 334-618-3414


2/2 in Alford, window A/C, $380 + deposit 850-
579-8882/850-209-1664/850-573-1851
2 & 3 bedroom mobile Homes in Cottondale.
$500 and up. H20, garbage, sewer included.
http:// www.charloscountry living, com.
850-258-4868/209-8847
2 & 3BR 2BA Mobile Homes in Cottondale no
pets, Central Heat & Air $400-$450 850-258-
1594 leave message
2&3BRMH's in
Marianna & Sneads (850)209-8595.
3BR/2BA Mobile Home on 5 Ac off of Rocky
Creek Rd, Refference Required. $550. Month
lst/Last/$450dep. Call 772-577-0223
For Rent Greenwood, Marianna, &
Cottondale, starting @ $375/mo.
Water/sewage/garbage/ lawn maint.
included. 850-593-4700

Lg 3/2 $625 Quiet, well maintained Park,
Water/sewer/ garb/lawn included. 2/1 Duplex,
Diana Ln. Near Citizens Lodge $495
Joyce Riley RE 850-209-7825 w
Rent to Own: 2 & 3BR Mobile Homes.
Lot rent included. Also available,
1 & 2BR Apts & Houses. For details
-850-557-3432 or 850-814-6515 4
Small Quiet Family Oriented Park- 2BR 1BA MH for
Rent includes water, garbage, lawn care, No Pets 850-
592-8129
'" RESIDENTIAL
.LJ- REAL ESTATE FOR SALE


Downtown Eufaula, AL 2 Bedrooms, 2V baths.
Updated. Newer appliances, W/D hookup, deck,
yard. Convenient shopping and dining. Call 256-
437-3768 5pm or 334-728-1004 9am-5pm CST


3BR 1BA Brick House for Sale: HW floors, LR,
Din, Den, porch, 2 carports, near Riverside. 850-
352-4389

: "y RECREATION


Yamaha '11 Raptor 700R: well maintained,
excellent condition, low hours, essential extras,
blue. $7.800. Call 334-432-5800


YAMAHA 4
WHEELER GRIZ-
ZLY 600.'98 4X4,
k Auto, runs great,
low miles, winch.
S$2.000 OBO
. 334-695-1306


XFtreme Packages From
Extreme $4,995
Boats ,All Welded
Boats All Aluminum Boats
www.xtremeindustrles.com
I I i




Dixie RV SuperStores
FL's Newest RV Dealer
NOW OPEN!!!
*Store Hours*
Monday-Saturday
8:00am-6:00pm
21 Acres / 30 Brands New and Pre-Owned
Newmar Keystone u Heartland Jayco
0 Fleetwood w Prime Time a Coachmen
Forest River
Service Department
Parts and Acces. Store
RV Collision Center
Located off 1-10 Exit 70 / SR285
328 Green Acres Dr.
De Funiak Springs, FL 32435
Sales and Service: 850-951-1000
www.dixlerv.com DO 12756



TOW DOLLY: DEMCO Kar Kaddy II tow dolly
with hydraulic surge brakes, auto-steer
wheels, 3 new tires (including spare) $1,000
OBO. Call 334-701-7849 or 334-886-7226



34FT Stationary Motor Home for Rent
Highest rated RV Park in SE Alabama.
www.ozarktravelpark.com
9 miles to OzarK'Ft. Rucker gate. Perfect for
1 or 2 people. No Deposit. WIFI, & C able TV.
5550. Month. Call 334-774-3219


) TRANSPORTATION


Nissan 2008 Titan 4x45.6L DOHC 32 valve en-
durance V28. 317/385 lb.ft.Torque. shift on-the-
fly 4WD system. 4 door. 20x8 alloy wheels, bed
mounted lock box. leather seats. 350 watt
Rockford Fosgate Powered Premiumn Audio
with 6 disc in dash CD player. XM satellite ra-
dio, poer sliding vertical back glass, rear so-
nar system, heated seats, bluetooth. moonroof.
tow package, navigation system with 7" LCD
display with GPS and DVD atlas. $26.500.00
OBO 334-792-0650 or 334-685-0217

















BESTWAY
PORTABLE BUILDINGS
LARGEST MANUFACTURER OF PORTABLE BUILDINGS IN NORTI ILORIDA
Wh I E
HAVE
OVER
DIFFERENT SIZES!
YOU CAN CHOOSE
COLOR & STYLE!
BUILT ON SITjE
3614 H .90 Marianna FL 85048-8682






Grader Pan Excavator
Dump Truck Bulldozer
Demolition Grading Site Prep
Debris Removal Retention Ponds Leveling
Top Soil Fill Dirt Gravel Land Clearing






S- LS "QUALITY SERVICE I
SFOR OVER 60 YEARS"
Charles Morse (850) 526-8445
a '-. ^wj Ben Morse* (850) 573-1705
i r~ \ Offlce (850) 482-3755
8479 HWY 75 MAIUANA FL 58448
"Our prloes WILL NOT shook you"


PnRRFES$SINALROME REPAIR
By Joseph Dominello -
All types of remodeling and repairs:
Kitchens Bathrooms Additions Doors &Windows


Installed Drywall Repair Water Damage Repairs
Painting Weatherization L, s is
(772) 285-2475 Marianna, Florida


-~I----c


MUST f I Ford '05 Mustang GT:
MU l Award winning show car,
white with black interior,
53k miles, 5 speed, in excellent condition.
$15 .00. Call 334-794-7493


Ford '94 Tarus 42K miles, clean $1995.
334-793-2142.


www.JCFLORIDAN.com
AU T SF R-SALE


m -l


S~ JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN
THANKSGIVING DEADLINES


SCLASSIFIEDS.
THURSDAY 11/24 Deadline is Wednesday 11/23 @ 9:00 A.M
FRIDAY:11/24 Deadline is Wednesday. 11/23 @ 1:30 PM
SUNDAY 11/27 Deadle is Wednesday 11/23 @ 2:00PM

SRETAllkDISpiAy

Wednesday 11l )eadilne-s FrTay; 11/18 @ NOON
Thursday 11/,2:Deadline is Fi'y 11/18 @ 5PM :
Fdday /25 Deadline is Minday, 11/21@ NOON
Sunday; /2. Deadline is Monday. 11/21 @ 5p
Te siday,1ii 0iadliels Tesd elay,. 11/22 ,5PM
M i1i ay,'l d ne 'TS Wednesday, 11/23 S PM ,


Ellen Marsh
850-n M20 Lester Basford
850-209-1090
For ALL your Real Estate Needsl Well & Pump Company
Century 21 Sunny South Properties 4513 Lafayette St Marianna, FL
850-526-2891 850.526.3913 O 850.693.0428 C
4630 Hwy 90 Marianna 850.482.2278 H







LL FLFr .. :I 3 u $1 40000
LCL33 Years in Business
WE MoVE PoRA Butoil s t


PROFESSIONAL ME REPAIR "
-By joseph Dominello-. 4 Point Insurance Inspections
All types of remodeling and repairs: 4 Int IMnantn Inspectaons
Kitchens Bathrooms Additions Doors &Windows Wind MItIgatlon InspectIons
Installed Drywall Repair Water Damage Repairs Performed byJAMES GRANT
Painting Weatherization Lic S ns, Stae Certified Building Code Administrator
(772) 285-2475 *Marianna, Florida State Certified Building Contractor
State Licensed Electrical Contractor

HAPPY
HOME REPAIR *R
WE'LL BEAT ANY PRICE!! .__RA__ B ,.._
Big Or Small Jobs WELCOME
85*-4828: 3C:ll :85-27.26T2 "Beautification of Your Home"
Carpentry/Painting Installations
Furniture Repair & Refinishing
ULL I General Repairs Insured

Clay O'Neal's s"1 (5)9-0
Land Clearing, Inc. DO POMM
AoROAmm
ALTHA, FL aBELCTICL OR
850-762-9402 SIM
Cell 850 313-5055S YLECRICAL'REPAIRS / \
&UPGRADMI
Replace your old Electrical Service ,
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING .' New Serv
Yor source for selling and buying! JAMES GLLC "


Find jobs



fast and



easy!


J A C K.S 0 N COUNTY


FLORIDANi

jcfloridan.com



monster"

FIND LOCAL JOBS AT: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM/JOBS


CLASSIFIED


i -


Plymouth '65 Valiant
Convertible,
Automatic, A/C, 273
V8, Good Condition!
$9,000 OBO 850-263-4563


.. v, .,n, ~ 4 *'07 Pontiac Grand Prix fully
loaded with leather & sun-
roof, exc cond. 334-726-3359.
334-585-5525.

Buick'98 LeSaber, gray, $2000. Call for appt.
850-557-0145
Chevrolet'00 Cavalier, 2 dr, New Tires, Runs
Good, $4200 334-347-9829 Day Or Evening
Chrysler '98 Cirrlus v-6, less than 40K miles, 4-
door, $4,200. 334-677-8645.
Crysler '05 PT Cruiser.
4 Cylinder, Automatic,
4 Door, Cold air,
Excellent condition, $6300.
Call: 334-790-7959.

L0

PontIac 98' Grand Am $475 Down
Chevy 99 Blazer $575 Down
Ford 98' F150 X-Cab $775 Down
Dodge 02' Durango $995 Down
Chevy 02' Sllverado $1395 Down
.., -'- ;I;.-;. -


Dodge '83 Ram Charger 318 engine 150K miles.
334-726-0147.


Ford '06 Sedan 500
LOW MILES! LIKE NEW! MUST SELL!
$200 down, $189 per month.
Call: Ron Ellis at 334-714-0028.
Ford '09 Focus
LOW MILES! GREAT GAS MILEAGE!
4 door, $200 down, $199 per month.
Call: Ron Ellis at 334-714-0028.
Ford '95 Mustang GT Convertible- white with
leather interior, 200k mile runs great, needs
paint, $3,500. Firm Call 334-695-2340
1-Owner
Honda'11 Accord EX-L: fully loaded, black with
gray leather interior, only 19k miles, $24,900.
Call 334-343-2701
Honda 2007 Civic EX, coupe, 106,000 mi., great
condition, one owner, auto, moon roof, premi-
um stereo and wheels, good Michelin tires. pw,
pdl, a/c,tilt, cruise. $11,500. 334-797-1890 or
334-648-3939
Hunda '04 Elantra GLS
ONLY 60.000 Miles,
4Cylinder, Automatic,
Economical, Good
Options, NEW TIRES!
LIKE NEW! $6625.
Call: 334-790-7959.
Hyundai '11 Sonata
LOW MILES! GREAT GAS MILEAGE!
FULL WARRANTY! $500 down, $350 per month.
Call: Steve Hatcher at 334-791-8243.
Kla '05 Optima LX,
Loaded, 4 cyl., Automatic,
4 Door, NEW TIRES! Clean,
62,000 miles, Excellent.
$5795. Call: 334-790-7959.

Lexus '07 LS 460. 41K,
Loaded and in excellent
Condition. Pearl White
with tan interior. $43,500.
Call 334-405-9127
Lincoln '91 Town Car. Runs well. $900, or best
offer. 334-899-7377.


~--'---~ --~' --' ~-~~~--


r-


I I


I


.1


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i


11













( ) TRANSPORTATION


Mazda '02 Protege 4-cyl. 4Dr. 106K mi. white,
automatic, power steering/brakes, AC,
Am/FM/CD, sports rims & + tires.
$3900. OBO 334-389-3071.
Mercedes'08 C300 Sport, LOADED, 1 owner,
Silver with Black Leather, 63K mi. (all high-
way). 100K mi. Extended warranty. $22,500
OBO. iPod system, Sunroof. Excellent Condi-
tion, Super Clean 334-618-2154 or 334-798-5714
Mercury '02 Marquis V8 85K Mi. All Power,
Leather seats, 27mpg Highway, Non-smoker, .
1-owner, Retail $5517.00. Sale price: $4500
Perfect Condition Call 334-983-4941 or 596-4170
L :*4II 7
I can get U Riding Today Repos, Slow
Credit, Past Bankruptcy OK! $0 Down/ 1st
Payment, Tax, Tag & Title Push, Pull or Drag,
Will Trade anything! Warranty On Every
Vehicle Sold! $20 GiftCard w/pu rchase

Nissan '09 Altima
LOW MILES! LOADED!
$500 down, $350 per month.
Call: Steve Hatcher at 334-791-8243.

Pontiac '08 Solstice convertible 52K miles,
silver with black leather interior, auto trans,
4cyl. 1 owner, auto locks & windows, new tires.
$15,500. blue book is $18,000 334-618-5427
Toyota 2006 Camry LE: 98k miles, black/tan,
fully loaded, one owner, garaged kept, very
nice. $9,900. Call 334-671-0776
Volkswagan 88' Cabriolet, white with read
interior, white top, good condition, automatic,
runs, good, transmission won't shift into high.
$650. 850-482-8818.
SVolkswagen '04 Jetta.

er int. Automatic, Sunroof,
auto lock power windows.
New tires. Can be seen at
Dothan Lemon Lot. $3,500
or best offer. For more info. call 334-702-1669
Volkswagen 09 EOS:
hard top convertible with
pano roof, silver with tan
leather interior, fully
loaded luxury package,
29k miles, super nice and very clean, $23,500.
Call 334-685-1070


HONDA'07 CRF-230F 4-STROKE,$2500.
'Honda CRF-80F '07 $1500, Yamaha TTR50 '05
$750 334-718-5149
YAMAHA '09 110 Dirt Bike,, excellent
condition, rarely used $1,400 or trade for 4
wheeler 334-687-4686


Chevrolet 07 Suburban LT:
Solid white with grey cloth
interior, 5.3 V8 Auto, 64k
miles, 3rd row seating, key-
less entry, tinted windows.
Awesome Condition! $24,900. 334-797-1095
Nissan '03 Pathfinder. V6, 173k mi.
Runs Very Good. Cold Air, Very Clean.
$6200 OBO 334-794-5780
Nissan '04 Xterra, Low Miles; 53,800 mi.
1-Owner, Excellent Condition. $10,995
334-714-2129 or 334-790-4167
l. Toyota '06 4-Runner.
Black. One owner. Only
53,500 miles. Leather
seats. 6 disc CD changer,
moon roof, rear spoiler,
etc. (It has all the extras) $23,500. In excellent
condition. Please call 334-596-2242.


Chevy 2500 '99 273K miles, engine has knock
rest of truck in good cond. $1900. 334-792-6248.
Dodge '02 Ram: Black Quad cab, V8, 4 x 4, 5.9
liter, New Engine, new supsenion, shocks,
tires, and brake, and 20" rims.
Price to Sell $10,000. Call 850-272-2713
Ford '77 F150: Gray, 4WD, standard trans.,
good condition, 2 owners, clean title.
$3000. Call 334-447-5316
Toyota'02 Tacoma Crew
miles, PERFECT Condi-
tion. Loaded, $9,500.
334-596-9966

TRACTOR 4230 John Deer 100hp, $8500. & 2010
JD 45hp $4500. 334-735-2464

TRACTOR-IH1440 Combine, LOOK !
Field Ready, Grain Head and Corn Head.
$6,000.850415-0438


Chevrolet'97 Astro Van
conversion Van raised
Sroof, loaded, new tires,
One owner, GREAT
condition. 52K mi.$9,500.
334-897-2054 or
334464-1496
CHEVY '06
2500
Express Van
39,500 miles
w/over $2k
in storage
bins & ladder racks, $13,900 334-687-4686
Ford '06 -350: 12 seat passenger van, good con-
dition, tow package, rear air, sony am-fm-cd,
5.4 V8, 126.000 miles, $8,100. 334-333-3368
Pontiac'04 Montana Van: Silver metallic with
gray interior, extended body, 46k miles, one
owner, New tires, front and rear AC, power
seats, power side door, CD/radio with XM,
cruise control, and much more. Clean and in
very good condition. Never WRECKED!
Price to Sell. $9,250. Call 334-333-0863



1ST PLACE TO CALL FOR ALL OF
YOUR TOWING NEEDS!
qvtw 4 2^P4 7 A4Urr BODY & RECYCLING
PA ING TOP DOLLAR FOR JUNK CARS
Contat Jason Harger at 334-791-2624

Call for Top Price for
S,.. 4Junk Vehicles
I also sellused parts
24 HOUR TOWING 4 334-792-8664 4
Gaureteed highest prices paid for your Juk.
or unwanted vehcals & farming equhment
TrIe or no Ti e 24 hrsa dayn
also pay finders fee. 8

Got a Clunker.
: Well be your Junker!:
and Farm Equip. at a m
fair and honest price! _
$325. &upor
SComplete Cars CALL 334-7024323

1e W.e ly Wrecked rVelc lnmn or pt.
s35. tip accaidfigt wveM ca
nA A-- .t 1*17r iA n0


Jackson County Floridan Wednesday, November 23, 2011- 9 B


Got a Clunker
*.' We'll be your Junker!
We buy wrecked cars
and Farm Equip. at a
a.nd* r fair and honest price!
$325. & up for
. CompleteCars CALL334-702-4323
lnllllllnlllllllllllnlll llllll


(%)


LEGALS


LF15603
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
DIVISION:

CASE NO.: 32-2009-CA-000779
US BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUST-
EE FOR CITIGROUP MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST
2006-WFHE2,
Plaintiff,
vs.
TAMMY E. POTTER, ET AL,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated No-
vember 03, 2011 and entered in Case No. 32-
2009-CA-000779 of the Circuit Court of the
FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for JACK-
SON County, Florida wherein US BANK NATION-
AL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR CITIGROUP
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2006-WFHE2 is the
Plaintiff and TAMMY E. POTTER; PHILLIP W.
POTTER; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the
Court will sell to the highest and best bidder
for cash at NORTH DOOR JACKSON COUNTY
COURTHOUSE, MARIANNA, FLORIDA at
11:00AM, on the 8th day of December, 2011,
the following described property as set forth in
said Final Judgment:
LOT 5, TARA ESTATES SUBDIVISION, A SUBDIVI-
SION RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK A-4, PAGE
152A, IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF THE
CIRCUIT COURT OF JACKSON COUNTY, FLORI-
DA.
A/K/A 4375 ANGELA DRIVE, MARIANNA, FL
32446
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must
file-a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court
on November 7, 2011.
Dale R. Guthrie
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Tammy Bailey
Deputy Clerk
If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assistance.
Please contact: Ms. Amber Baggett
Senior Court Program Specialist
P. O. Box 826 Marianna, FL 32447-0826
Phnn: R850-4R2-.R44 Fax: R85-4R2-9123


WE PAY Ca$H

FOR JUNK CARS!!!!!!
Call 334-818-1274


CALL


STAY INFOR


with tha latest newv


www.JCFLORIDAN.com CLASSIFIED


1 _


LF15608
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
DIVISION:
CASE NO: 32-2008-CA-000781
COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS, INC,
Plaintiff,
vs
BONNIT R. BAILEY, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order
Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated Novem-
ber 10, 2011 and entered in case NO. 32-2008-
CA-000781 of the Circuit Court of the FOUR-
TEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for JACKSON
County, Florida wherein COUNTRYWIDE HOME
LOANS, INC, is the Plaintiff and BONNIT R. BAI-
LEY; JACKSON COUNTY; are the Defendants,
The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest
and best bidder for cash at NORTH DOOR JACK-
SON COUNTY COURTHOUSE, MARIANNA, FLOR-
IDA at 11:00 A.M. on the 15th of December,
2011 the following described property as set
forth in said Final Judgment:
THE EAST OF LOT 4, AND ALL OF LOT 5, OF
BLOCK 1, IN THE NORTHEAST '/4 OF THE
NORTHEAST '/ OF SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP 5
NORTH, RANGE 12 WEST; SAID LOTS CONTAIN-
ING 47 % FEET EACH FRONT, AND RUNNING
BACK SOUTH 75 FEET; SAME BEING IN THE
TOWN OF COTrONDALE, JACKSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA
A/K/A 2591 MILTON STREET, COTTONDALE, FL
32431
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must
file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and seal of this Court on
November 14, 2011.
Dale R. Guthrie
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: /s/ Tammy Bailey
Deputy Clerk
LF15609
NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO
CHAPTER 83, PART IV
Notice is given pursuant to the Self Storage Fa-
cility Act, Florida Statutes Chapter 83, Part IV,
that Alternative Storage, a self storage facility,
will have eligible for sell the contents of the
following units:
UNIT B32 RHONDA GRAY
UNIT B34 SHARON DAUGHTREY
UNIT C17 SHELTER SWILLY
UNIT CC1 JOSH CAMP
UNIT B23 COSSENYA BALLE
The Auction of contents will be December 3,
2011 at 10am. Owner reserves the right to re-
fuse any and all bids.
Gene Wilferd & Scotty Roland, Owners


Classified



can sell it!







O10B WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2011


SPORTS


B.seball



Braun wins NL MVP

Milwaukee slugger is the first Brewer to ever win the award


The Associated Press

NEW YORK Milwau-
kee's Ryan Braun won the
NL Most Valuable Player
Award on Tuesday after
helping lead the Brewers
to their first division title in
nearly 30 years.
The left fielder received
20 of 32 first-place votes
and 388 points in voting
announced by the Base-
ball Writers' Association of
America.
"I'm not going to pre-
tend like I wasn't anxious
or nervous because I was,"
said Braun, who was sit-
ting on the balcony of his
home in Malibu, Calif.,
when he received the call
that he had won. "I was
obviously thrilled, excited.
It's honestly difficult to put
into words how much this
means to me.
Los Angeles center field-
er Matt Kemp, who came
close to winning the Triple
Crown, received 10 first-
place votes and finished
second with 332 points.
Braun's teammate Prince
Fielder finished third with
229 points, and Arizona's
Justin Upton finished
fourth with 214 points.
Fielder and Upton each re-
ceived one first-place vote.
St. Louis' Albert Pu-
jols finished fifth. It was
the llth straight year the
three-time MVP was in the
top 10 in balloting.
NL Cy Young Award win-
ner Clayton Kershaw was
12th in the voting a day
after Detroit's Justin Ver-
lander added the AL MVP
to his CyYoung.
"I think he was the single
most dominant player in
baseball this year," Braun
said of Verlander. "As a po-,
sition player I'm biased to
the fact that I think posi-
tion players should be at
the forefront of the award


IHEASSOCIAIED PRESS FILE
Milwaukee Brewers' Ryan Braun celebrates after hitting a game-winning home run during the
Uth inning of a baseball game against the Colorado Rockies in Milwaukee.


but if you honestly look
at what he accomplished,
how much he meant to
that team and how domi-
nant he truly was you can-
not make any argument
against ,him winning that
award."
Braun led the NL with
a .597 slugging percent-
age and had a chance to
overtake Jose Reyes for the
batting title on the last day
of the season but finished
second with a.332 average.
The four-time All-Star had
33 homers, 111 RBIs, 109
runs scored and stole 33
bases as Milwaukee won
a franchise-best 96 games.
His 77 extra-base hits was
tops in the league.
Kemp led the NL in hom-
ers with 39 and RBIs with
126 and was third in aver-
age (.324), but played for
the NL West's third-place
Dodgers. He also won a
Gold Glove.
"Matt's one of the best
players in the :game. No
question about it. The sea-


son ihe had will go down
as one of the greatest in
Dodgers history," said
Braun, who grew up root-
ing for the Dodgers. "If he
had won the MVP I cer-
tainly couldn't have argued
with him winning. He had
a phenomenal year."
While Braun and Kemp
had similar statistics,
Kemp was hindered by the
Dodgers' 82-79 third-place
finish in the NLWest.
"Without a doubt I think
it's a drastically different
experience playing mean-
ingful games down the
stretch," Braun said.
The 28-year-old Braun is
the first Brewers player to
win the MVP award in the
National League and first
since Robin Yount won in
1989, when Milwaukee
was in the AL East. Rollie
Fingers (1981) andYountin
1982 are the other Brewers
to take home MVP honors.
"Robin's the greatest
player in Milwaukee Brew-
ers history so anytime


you're mentioned along-
side him it's a tremendous
achievement," Braun said.
Braun signed a $105 mil-
lion, five-year contract
extension in April, link-
ing him to the Brewers
through 2020. He received
a $100,000 bonus for win-
ning the MVP.
"This team has been so
loyal to me. They believed
in me. They drafted me.
They helped to develop
me and there would be
nothing more meaningful
to me than to eventually
win a world championship
in Milwaukee," he said. "It
would mean a lot more to
me than if I went to a large-
market team, big-market-
team and won two or three
championships."
The 2007 NL Rookie of
the Year winner rewarded
the club with his fourth
straight season with-more
than 100 RBIs. He hit a
three-run, go-ahead hom-
er on September 23rd to
clinch the division title.


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com

College Basketball

Dispute simmers

over Syracuse

coach investigation


The Associated Press

SYRACUSE, N.Y. A
prosecutor frustrated
that police won't turn
over records about a sex-
ual abuse investigation
into Syracuse Univer-
sity assistant basketball
coach Bernie Fine now
has a subpoena, but the
dispute over the material
won't be settled this week.
Attorneys for Onondaga
County District Attorney
William Fitzpatrick and
Mayor Stephanie Miner
appeared Tuesday before
state Supreme Court Jus-
tice Thomas Murphy, who
ordered the proceeding
sealed.
Fitzpatrick issued a sub-
poena for records from a
police investigation into
Fine in 2002, but Miner
said the city police de-
partment won't turn over
records in a "piecemeal"
fashion to any entity, in-
cluding the prosecutor.


She said police first will
conduct a thorough in-
vestigation.
Both sides
are due back
in Murphy's
c h a m -
bers next
Tuesday.
Fine Two for-
mer ball
boys for the Syracuse
basketball team say they
were molested more than
25 years ago by Fine, who
is on paid leave from the
university."
Fitzpatrick said that
when the subpoena was
delivered to police on
Monday it was greeted
with an obscenity.
"I've never seen this hap-
pen in my history with the
DA's office," Fitzpatrick
told The Post-Standard of
Syracuse about the lack
of police cooperation. But
he added: "The records
are going to be provided."


Good Thru November 28, 2011


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4CNJ UTES

1N| WiC-S;

cl-ON?


2011 Calendar Cover with
winner Austin Roberts


Cast your vote at www.FloridanCutestKid.com
The child with the most votes will appear on the 2012
Jackson County Life calendar. 12 runners up will each
appear on a month.
Votingends December 2andthe winners willbe announcedDecember
7. All proceeds from the contest go to Newspaper in Education which
supplies newspaper to teachers to use in the classroom at no cost to
the school. Your support is much appreciated.
Add your Birthday or Event to the calendar
for a $1.00 donation to Newspaper in
Education. Drop by the Floridan office or
call us at 850-526-3614 to get it in.
JI I I WV


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