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Jackson County Floridan
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028304/00691
 Material Information
Title: Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title: Sunday Floridan
Portion of title: Floridan
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Jackson County Floridan
Publisher: Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Marianna Fla
Creation Date: November 16, 2011
Publication Date: 1934-
Frequency: daily (except saturday and monday)[<1979-1995>]
weekly[ former 1934-<1955>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates: 30.776389 x -85.238056 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note: "Independent."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID: UF00028304:00691
 Related Items
Preceded by: Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by: Marianna Floridan

Full Text



Informing more than 17,000 readers daily in print and online


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Lady Pirates

eliminated by Baker in

state volleyball playoffs.

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Vol. 88 No. 223


Beware of new scam in area


From staff reports
The Jackson County Sheriff's
Office' is warning the pub-
lic about a new scam making
rounds in this area.


Authorities have received
reports from local residents
that someone is calling and at-
tempting to obtain personal
information.
Typically, a person calls


the resident claiming to rep-
resent a pharmaceutical
company.
The person claims to help
save the intended victim mon-
ey by shipping prescription


medications directly from the
company to the resident.
The person will ask for per-
sonal information from the resi-
dent such as date of birth, bank
account number and social


security number.
This is a scam. Do not give out
your personal information to
anyone that you do not know
without researching the person
or company.


MARIANNA HIGH SCHOOL



Students celebrate book


PHOTOS MAReK SMNNR, [ ORIDAN
TOP: Marianna High School students Roneika Williams, Ophiela Wooden, Timothy Paramore and Nyleah Merritt look through a copy of
"I'm Almost Famous" during the reception following the awards ceremony Tuesday. BELOW: Quanisha Johnson and Sharon Hardy laugh
as they find their names in the "I'm Almost Famous" book Tuesday at Marianna High School.


'I'm Almost Famous'" ..

released Tuesday
BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com

More than 200 students at Marianna
High School became published au-
thors in one fell swoop recently, and on
Tuesday they celebrated the publica-
tion of their group volume, "I'm Almost
Famous."
The book is a compilation of their re-,
actions to books on their summer read-
ing list. Even with that many writers, the
book was less than 75 pages long. That's
because most wrote a single sentence
summing up one of the books they read F
See BOOK, Page 9A


Scott supports

shrinking

hurricane fund
The Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE Gov. Rick Scott
said Tuesday that he supports shrink-
ing Florida's hurricane insurance
backup fund even though that would
SScott also said he sees
no need to abolish the
state's mandatory no-
fault automobile in-
surance system, which
has been riddled with
massive fraud. Scott
GOv. Scott said he's confident
lawmakers can find a
way to fix the system.
The governor and Florida Cabinet
took no action after listening to a
proposal for downsizing the Flori-
da Hurricane Catastrophe Fund to
eliminate a potential $3.2 billion
shortfall.
Later though, Scott said he sup-
ported the idea.
"It's shrunk already," Scott said. "We
can't borrow the money.... I want to
spend more time "on that proposal,
but I think we do need to reduce the
size of the 'Cat Fund.'"
Cat Fund chief operating officer
Jack Nicholson told Scott and the
three Cabinet members that due to
volatility in the world finance mar-
kets, the state would be unable to
find investors willing and able to buy
enough bonds to help meet its cov-
erage goal of $18.4 billion.
Insurers including the state-backed
Citizens Property Insurance Corp.
can get reinsurance through the Cat
Fund at lower rates than in the pri-
vate market.
The fund, though, has only $7.1
billion in cash. That's expected to
increase to $8.4 billion if Florida fin-
ishes the year without getting hit by
a hurricane.
To make up the difference, the
fund would have to borrow the rest,
but Nicholson said it no longer can
expect to find buyers for the full
amount, hence the estimated $3.2
billion shortfall.
Nicholson said the fund probably
could sell no more than $7 billion
in bonds. He recommended the Cat
Fund's coverage goal be reduced
by $5 billion, which would require
See SCOTT, Page 9A


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Pianist Dr. Christine Yoshikawa talks about the production
challenges she encountered in putting together her first
commercial CD, "Journeys Within."


Pianist shares with Arts Association


BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhaltet@jcfloridan.com

Dr. Christine Yoshikawa now calls
Marianna home, but she is a well-
travelled and renowned pianist with
multiple performance awards to her
credit. The wife of Chipola College
department head Daniel Powell,
Yoshikawa was the guest speaker at
Tuesday's meeting of the Chipola
Regional Arts Association. ,
She talked about the sometimes-
frustrating process of getting her first
commercial CD produced; "Journeys
Within" is almost ready after more
than a year of pre-production ups
and downs. It includes 16 selections,
some classical and some contempo-
rary. Yoshikawa said she didn't know


"Journeys Within"
The track list from Dr. Christine
Yoshikawa's first commercial CD
) Piano Sonata No. 1 in D minor by
Sergei Rachmaninoff
a Barcarolles by Ned Rorem
) Two Reflections on '.ilton by Phil-
lip Neil Martin
))Twenty-Four Preludes, op. 11 by
Alexander Scriabin
o Selections from Preludes and
Fantasies by Stephen Chatman
The CD will be released soon un-
der the Eroica Classical Recordings

at the time she selected the title just
how much of a journey it would be in
other ways.
Canadian by birth, she is


considered one of the most excit-
ing young pianists of her generation.
She has won international acclaim
and several awards, performing in
major U.S. cities such as New York,
Boston, Chicago, Phoenix, Los An-
geles, and abroad in Madrid, Paris,
Munich, Prague, Sofia and Tokyo as
well as other points on the globe. As
her prize in one of the many perfor-
mance contests she's won, Yoshika-
wa earned a management contract
and the cost of producing the CD.
On Tuesday, she played snippets
from a pre-release copy of the work,
and said those in the audience were
among the very first to hear it. As her
music played in the background, she
See CD, Page 9A


) CLASSIFIEDS...7-9B


This Newspaper
Is Printed On
Recycled Newsprint




7 65161 80050 9


)) ENTERTAINMENT...6B


t) LOCAL...3, 5-6A


)) OBITUARIES...9A


)) OPINION...4A


RAHAL*MILLER
Chevrolet-Buick-Cadillac-Nissan
No SERVICE TEAM
4204 Lafayette St. Marianna, FL.
(850) 482-305s


> SPORTS...1-4, 10B


> TV LISTINGS...2B


M~U~Lr ~~~a'uhRsma~r *iL


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


--12A # WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 2011


Weather Outlook


1 Low 40

Tomorrow
Clearing & Cooler.


Saturday
Partly Cloudy.


j '- High 690
SLow- 47

Friday
Sunny & Mild.


High 770
Low 56


Sunday
Warmer.


TIDES ULTRA VIOLET INDEX


Panama City Low -
Apalachicola Low -
Port St. Joe Low -
Destin Low -
Pensacola Low -

RIVER READINGS
Woodruff
Blountstown
Marianna
Caryville


11:15 AM High
1:27 PM High
10:41 AM High
11:52PM High
12:26 PM High

Reading
38.96 ft.
0.26 ft.
4.40 ft.
0.31 ft.


- 12:01 AM
- 5:26 AM
- 12:34 AM
- 12:25 AM
- 12:58 AM

Flood Stage
66.0 ft.
15.0 ft.
19.0 ft.
12.0 ft.


0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8-10 Very High, 11+ Extreme
0 1 2


THE SUN AND MOON


Sunrise
Sunset
Moonrise
Moonset


6:08 AM
4:43 PM
9:53 PM
11:24 AM (Thu)


Nov.
18


Nov. Dec. Dec.
25 2 10


FLORIDA'S REAl

PANHANDLE

MEDIA PARTNERS WJAQ 0oo.e
L^)ISTE !I.IIULY0 iJEAiTHE D


JACKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN

Publisher Valeria Roberts
vroberts@jcfloridan.com

Circulation Manager Dena Oberski
doberski@jcfloridan.com







CONTACT US
Telephone: (850) 526-3614
FAX: (850) 482-4478
Email: editorial@jcfloridan.com
Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447
Street Address:
4403 Constitution Lane
Marianna, FL 32446
Office Hours:
Weekdays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

MISS YOUR PAPER?
You should receive your newspaper no later
than 6 a.m. If it does not arrive, call Circula-
tion between 6 a.m. and noon, Tuesday to
Friday, and 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. on Sunday. The
Jackson County Floridan (USPS 271-840)
is published Tuesday though Friday and
Sunday mornings. Periodical postage paid
at Marianna, FL.


SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Home delivery: $11.23 per month; $32.83
for three months: $62.05 for six months;
and $123.45 for one year. All prices include
applicable state and local taxes. Mail
subscriptions mr,u.l [,e pid r. i ja,:r,-:e Ma3i
subscriptions are: $46.12 for three months;
$92.24 for six months; and $184.47 for one
year.

ADVERTISING
The advertiser agrees that the publisher
shall not be liable for damages arising
out qf errors and advertisements beyond
the amount paid for the space actually
occupied by that portion of the advertise-
ments in which the error occurred, whether
such error is due to the negligence of the
publisher's employees or otherwise, and
there shall be not liability for non-inser-
tion of any advertisement beyond the
amount paid for such advertisement. This
newspaper will not knowingly accept or
publish illegal material of any kind. Advertis-
ing which expresses preference based on
legally protected personal characteristics is
not acceptable.

HOW TO GET YOUR
NEWS PUBLISHED
The Jackson County Floridan will publish
news of general interest free of charge,
Submit your news or Community Calendar
events via email, fax, mail, or hand delivery.
Fees may apply for wedding, engagement,
anniversary and birth announcements.
Forms are available at the Floridan offices.
Photographs must be of good quality and
suitable for print. The Floridan reserves the
Right to edit all submissions.

CORRECTION
The free Thanksgiving Dinner pro-
vided by The King's Table will be held
on Thanksgiving Day, Thursday, Nov.
24, in the Grocery Outlet parking lot.
The numeric date was incorrect in a
previous story about the event.


Comnnunity Calenda


WEDNESDAY, NOV. 16
n Eldercare Services, at 4297 Liddon St. in
Marianna, will give out USDA and Brown Bag food
at 8a.m.
) Jackson County Habitat for Humanity Ware-
house hours: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
) Dr. Geoffrey Brooks, professor of Engineering at
the Florida State University/Panama City will speak
at Chipola College at 10 a.m. in Jackson Lecture
Hall. Dr. Brooks will discuss his students' robotics
projects and upcoming rocket conipetition Call
526-2761. ext. 3252.
) Job Club 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the
Goodwill Career Training Center, 4742 Highway 90
in Marianna. Learn job-seeking and job-retention
skills. All services are free. Call 526-0139.
)) Alcoholics Anonymous Open meeting, noon-1
p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901 Caledo-
nia St., Marianna, in the AA room.

THURSDAY, NOV.17
Story Time 10-11 a.m. (preschool) and 3-4
p.m. (school age) at the Jackson County Public Li-
brary in Marianna. Stop by for stories, poems, jokes,
finger plays and more. Call 482-9631.
) Caregiver Support Group meeting -11 a.m.
to noon in the social hall of First Presbyterian
Church, 4437 Clinton St. in Marianna. Open to all
family caregivers providing care to loved ones or
friends. Confidential group is facilitated by a profes-
sional group counselor. Coffee, water, light snacks
provided.
) Orientation 12:30-3:30 p.m. Learn about/sign
up for free services at the Goodwill Career Training
Center, 4742 Highway 90 in Marianna. All services
are free. Call 526-0139.
a Breast Cancer Support Group 5 p.m. in the
ground-floor classroom of Jackson Hospital, 4250
Hospital Drive, Marianna. Open to anyone who has
or had breast cancer or breast health issues. No
cost. Call 718-2661.
)) Jackson County NAACP meeting, 5:30 p.m.
in the St. James A.M.E. Church basement, 2891
Orange St. in Marianna. Call 569-1294.
) Chipola Regional Workforce Development
Board General Meeting 6 p.m. in the Workforce
Board office, 4636 Highway 90 West, Suite K,
Marianna. Call 718-0456.
n VFW Smoked Turkey Fundraiser Today is the
deadline to order a smoked turkey from Veterans


of Foreign Wars Post 12046. Birds are 10-12 pounds
each, and will be available for pick-up on Nov. 19
from 8 a.m. until noon at the Post: 2830 Wynn
Street (the former senior citizens building) in Mari-
anna. Cost: $20. To place an order, call 209-1919.
The Chipola College Theatre Showcase is at 7
p.m. Theater-goers will enjoy 18 different scenes of
songs and humor during the one-hour show. Tick-
ets, $10, are available from theater students, in the
Fine Arts Department or at the door. Call 718-2227
or visit www.chipola.edu.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Closed discussion,
8-9 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901 Cale-
donia St., Marianna, in the AA room. Attendance
limited to persons with a desire to stop drinking.

FRIDAY, NOV. 18
) Farm City Day Breakfast 7 a.m. in the Jackson
County Ag Office Complex on Pennsylvania Avenue
in Marianna, hosted by the Jackson County Cham-
ber of Commerce, in honor of Farm City Week (Nov.
18-24). Guest speaker: Kevin Kelley, Agricultural
Liaison for Rep. Steve Southerland, R-Panama City.
) The City of Marianna Holiday Food Drive ends
today. Drop off item donations at City Hall. Call
718-1001.
) Telephone Skills Class 8:30 a.m. to noon at
the Goodwill Career Training Center, 4742 Highway
90 in Marianna. All services are free. Call 526-0139.
)) International Chat'n' Sip 8:30-10 a.m. at
2929 Green St. in Marianna. Jackson County Public
Library Learning Center staff and their international
English learners invite the public to join them for
the exchange of language, culture, and ideas in a
relaxed environment. Light refreshments served.
Free admission. Call 482-9124.
) Making Strides against Diabetes 9-11 a.m.
in the old Marianna High School gym (now Jackson
County Early Childhood Center). Free paper screen-
ings, literature and education about diabetes from
the Jackson County Health Department; free eye
screenings from Walmart Vision Care. Students
(and the public) can participate with the Marianna
Lions Club in raising funds for the Lions Children's
Diabetic Camp of Florida; prizes awarded to the top
three fundraisers. Call 482-1378, ext. 234.
) Holiday Heritage Festival starts at noon in
Heritage Village on the Graceville campus of The
Baptist College of Florida, with musical performanc-
es, craft demonstrations, a life-size Old Testament
Tabernacle replica exhibit, carriage rides, electric


trains, antique cars, quilt exhibits, a Civil War re-
enactment and more. Strolling carolers perform
at 1, 3:30 and 6 p.m. Crafts, baked goods and box
lunches will be for safe. Call 800-328-2660, ext. 416,
or visit www.baptistcollege.edu.
Dellwood F.D. Smoked Turkey Fundraiser
- Today is the deadline to order a smoked turkey
from the Dellwood Fire Department. Birds average
10-12 pounds and will be available for pick up Nov.
23 at Kelley's Grocery and Deli in Dellwood. Cost:
$40 each. To order, call 592-9807,8 a.m. to noon
Nov. 3-18.
) Registration deadline Today is the last day to
register and pay for the Jackson County Extension
Service's upcoming series, "Beekeeping in the
Panhandle:' Workshop videos will be presented in
eight Monday evening sessions beginning Nov. 21.
Cost: $50 per person (plus $25 for each additional
person). Call 482-9620.
)) Celebrate Recovery Adult, teen meetings to
"overcome hurts, habits and hang-ups," 7 p.m. at
Evangel Worship Center, 2645 Pebble Hill Road.
Dinner: 6 p.m. Child care available. Call 209-7856,
573-1131.
) Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, 8-9 p.m.
in the AA room at First United Methodist Church,
2901 Caledonia St., Marianna.

SATURDAY, NOV. 19
n Malone Pecan Festival Pecan pancake
breakfast ($5) starts at 6 a.m.; 5K run at 7:30 a.m.;
parade at 10 a.m.; and music at 11 a.m. featuring
Pure arid Simple, North Florida Band and Chipola
College Jazz Band. Food and arts and crafts vendors
will be downtown, and the car show will be behind
PeopleSouth bank near town hall.
) Marianna City Farmers Market is open 8 a.m. to
noon for the fall season, Saturdays only in Madison
Street Park.
) Christmas Shopping Open House 9 a.m.
to noon at The Russ House, 4318 Lafayette St. in
Marianna, with door prizes, pictures with Santa and
shopping. All vendor fees will be donated to the
Historic Russ House Foundation. Call 693-0478.
) Alford Community Health Clinic is open 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. at 1770 Carolina St. in Alford. The free
clinic for income-eligible patients without medical
insurance treats short-term illnesses and chronic
conditions. Appointments available (call 263-7106
or 209-5501); walk-ins welcome. Sign in before
noon.


The submission deadline for this calendar is two days before publication. Submit to: Community Calendar, Jackson County Floridan, P. 0. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447,
email editorial@jcfloridan.com, fax (850) 482-4478 or bring items to 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.


Police Rounidup


MARIANNA POLICE
The Marianna Police De-
partment listed the follow-
ing incidents for Nov. 15, the
latest available report: One
abandoned vehicle, one suspi-
cious incident, one suspicious
person, one escort, two high-
way obstructions, one burglary,
two verbal disturbances, one
burglar alarm, 18 traffic stops,
two larceny complaints, two
trespass complaints, one as-
sault, one noise disturbance,
one animal complaint, one
fraud complaint, three assists
of other agencies, one property
damage complaint and four
public service calls.


JACKSON COUNTY
SHERIFF'S OFFICE
The Jackson County Sheriff's
Office and county Fire/Rescue


CRIME
4 -..-


reported the
following
incidents for
Nov. 15, the
latest avail-
able report.
(Some of these
calls may


be related to after-hours calls
taken on behalf of Graceville
and Cottondale Police Depart-
ments): One hospice death,
one stolen tag reported, 20
abandoned vehicle reports, one
reckless driver, one suspicious
person, one highway obstruc-
tion, one burglary, two verbal
disturbances, two fire calls, 22
medical calls, one fire alarm, 15
traffic stops, two larceny com-
plaints, two criminal mischief
complaints, one civil dispute,
one trespass complaint, one
obscene or threatening phone
call, one noise disturbance, one
animal complaint, one assist


of a motorist or pedestrian,
five assists of other agencies,
one public service call, three
criminal registrations and four
transports.


JACKSON COUNTY
CORRECTIONAL FACILITY
The following persons were
booked into the county jail dur-
ing the latest reporting periods:
) Jamie Barwick, 24, 6907
Park St., Grand Ridge, leaving
the scene of an accident with
injury.
)) Isiah Merritt, 18, 4424 Pan-
dora Road, Marianna, violation
of PTI.
) Michael Burns, 33, 903 Pow-
der Circle, Alford, attempted
manufacture of meth, driving
while license suspended or
revoked.
)) Joseph McDonald, 26, 20813


NE McDonald Lane, Blount-
stown, attempted manufacture
of meth.
) Daren Rivera, 41, 3013
Hwy 90, Cottondale, worthless
checks.
)) Jerry Thurman, 38, 1047
Lilinac Court, Gulfport, Mich.,
,hold for court/DOC.
) Tramon Brown, 20, 2833
Washington St., Marianna, driv-
ing while license suspended or
revoked, trespass after warning.
) Dennis Singletary, 63, 4384A
Kent Drive, Marianna, battery-
domestic violence.
) Roger Coleman, 23, 5847
Elkton Pike Road, Prospect,
Tenn., obstructing an officer.

JAIL POPULATION: 213

To report a crime, call CrimeStoppers
at 526-5000 or a local law enforcement
agency. To report a wildlife violation, call
1-888-404-FWCC (3922).


EAM RAHAL MILLER d
f7'Chevrolet-Buick-Cadillac-Nissan
? ~ 4204 Lafayette St. Marianna, FL .

(850) 482m3051 Team Sales


WMCC-up CRLL







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


DCA LEARNS ABOUT FARMING


SUBMIIITUPHUlU
D ayspring Christian Academy's seventh and eighth grades spent the day learning
about farming at the Sunbelt Expo in Moultrie, Ga. From left are (front row) Christian
Wynn, Logan McKinnie, Carylee Sapp and Ruthie Hall; and (back row) Brandon Reed,
Joshua Wynn, Kalvin Peterson, Jonathon Long, Drew Laggman, Ryan Redfern, Dawson Davis,
Marcus Bishop and Maverick Haddock.


Dean Mitchell at Sunday Arts Event


WWW. DEANMITCHELLSTUD


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Watercolorist Dean Mitchell was a featured artist and speaker at the Sunday Afternoon with the Arts event at Chipola College
on Nov. 6. Mitchell (right) is pictured here with his childhood art teacher Tom Harris (left) and Marianna High Art student
Maddie Craven. Mitchell grew up in Quincy and now lives in Tampa.


A THANKSGIVING GIFT


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Lanet James and Linda Cherry gather
items at their car on behalf of The
Marianna Woman's Club. The organi-
zation started a mission project at their last
meeting to send a donation to the Baptist
Ministries for Thanksgiving.

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WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 2011 3AF


LOCAL


$139


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'I 4AB' 0 S


Publisher
VALERIA ROBERTS


Editorial



Debt can



overwhelm



democracy,



sovereignty

By The Tampa Tribune

IT ters in Greece, Italy and other countries deeply
in debt are learning that they have unwittingly
given up power to unelected bankers and bu-
reaucrats who are now calling the shots. The welfare
of individual taxpayers and workers is not the top
concern of the new bosses.
It no longer matters that austerity measures are
unpopular. When the prime minister of Greece called
for a vote on a bailout deal that would raise taxes and
surely add to an unemployment rate twice as high as
in the United States, he discovered that voting was not
an option. He was forced to resign, as was the prime
minister of Italy.
While the European financial crisis has the unique
aspect of being linked to a central currency, the euro,
there is a moral lesson for U.S. taxpayers: Politicians
who say that constantly adding big sums to the national
debt is the best strategy to grow the economy are taking
big risks with the nation's future.
The larger the sovereign debt, the less sovereignty
a country really has. Former Greek Prime Minister
George Papandreou said it would be "a supreme act of
democracy and of patriotism for the people to make
their own decision" by voting the bailout plan up or
down.
The possibility of a no vote so startled world markets
that the proposed referendum was quickly dropped. So
much for democracy.
"We are no longer sovereign in the sense that many
people think," Sylvie Goulard, a French member of the
European Parliament, told Reuters.
If a national government can't decide how much to
tax and spend, what real power does it have? The time
to think about that question is before debts get out
of hand, not after. Clearly, a country has the power
to borrow too much, but that decision also threatens
to limit its future financial options, which is to say its
sovereignty.
Explosive questions are being asked in Greece about
whether the cuts in pensions and public spending, as
wages fall and the jobless rate rises, are intended to
bail out the Greek people or bail out foreign bankers. If
saving the euro means lowering the standard of living
in Greece, it's an easy decision for the technocrats: Save
the euro.
The euphemisms used in the economic crisis, such as
bailout and financial contagion, don't help clarify the
issue, which is, in fact, quite straightforward.
When a nation borrows money, it is saying it needs
the money now more than later, when future taxpayers
will repay it, plus interest. Borrowing money to fight
World War II was a brilliant move. Today, heavy borrow-
ing in hopes future taxpayers will be better able to pay
than today's is much less brilliant.
. In Greece, the economy is weaker now than when
it ran up the big debts. The budget deficits of the past
have turned out to have been a terrible mistake. Simply
put, without major financial help, Greece will go bank-
rupt before Christmas. Americans have little room to
gloat. The amount of help Greece needs is much less
than California's unfunded pension obligation.
People who still think such debts don't matter should
keep watching Greece and learn.

iLettsn to t:uw Eo. :,
* Sublit lettetd byeiltetf ma fie t ^ r.P.O. E!1520, ',
SMarianna FL,;32447.r faxing to 8 .42-4478 orsend '
:'email to editorial@jdlorida'.com, ti loridan reserve s
t. he eight to edit or not publish any ~ttr. Be srir ,to
lihclude yofiftll.adir. .drks tele iorjo~number. These
will'pnlybe used to verfi the letter and will not be
, printed.ForrtibnelInrmation cal)A850) 526-.14. .
. .. J A ';'. ,, .. . '-. .


Viewpoint


Habitat home a fresh start for



woman displaced by Katrina


BY BILL MAXWELL
St. Petersburg Times

BAY ST. LOUIS, Miss.
n Aug. 28, 2005, Donna
Horstmann heeded the
nonstop warnings issued
by Hancock County emergency
officials: All residents should leave
all low-lying Gulf Coast towns in
the county immediately. Hurricane
Katrina is coming. It is a Category 5
storm, packing winds of 125 mph.
When it makes landfall, it will bring
a storm surge of 30 feet or more.
Horstmann and her brother
evacuated to her son's house on
higher ground a few miles away,
leaving behind the home she had
owned and loved for years just two
blocks from the beach in Clermont
Harbor.
That night, Katrina came ashore,
battering the house. Next door,
a mobile home exploded, and
houses were lifted off their concrete
foundations.
"After it all calmed down, there
was nothing," Horstmann, now 52,
said. "The whole area was com-
pletely destroyed."
I first met Horstmann a year ago.
Her experience is horrible to con-
template: a hardworking woman
who lost everything by no fault of
her own.
"For the first two weeks, National
Guard helicopters dropped C-ra-
tions and water," she said. "That's
how we pretty much survived.
We ate C-rations.... The National
Guard finally got to us on the


ground and brought cleaning
supplies. We didn't know what to
do with cleaning supplies. Clean
what?
"They set up a kind of station
where we could go and pick food
and water. We were in a tent for a
while. It was horrible.... There were
about 20 of us in different families
staying in tents on the property. We
didn't have sanitation or anything.
We bathed in the creek. It was bad,
primitive. There was debris every-
where. Thousands of dead seagulls
were all over the place. There were
no living animals. We didn't see any
living animals for months. It was
eerie."
Fed up with the degradation,
Horstmann and her brother packed
up and moved back to Cincin-
nati, where she was born. But after
about three months, she missed
her children so much that she re-
turned to Bay St. Louis and stayed
in a tiny FEMA trailer for about
three months.
After she found a job at the new
Walmart, a co-worker told her
she should apply for a house with
Habitat for Humanity. That advice
changed her life in ways she had
not imagined. And it is how I came
to meet her last year, volunteer-
ing on the project that built her
new home. Her story is a poignant
reminder of how this nonprofit
program, run largely on volunteer
labor across the country, continues
to make an extraordinary difference
' in people's lives.
"I'd never heard of Habitat, but I


applied," she said. "One thing led to
another. I was approved and here I
am. I've been in my new home for
about four months. From the time
I applied, it took 13 to 14 months to
get in my house. To qualify, I had to
have a job. Salary was the big thing.
They did a background check and a
credit check."
There was also the requirement
for 250 hours of sweat equity. "I
learned a lot," Horstmann said.
"I wouldn't appreciate my house
as much as I do if I hadn't helped
build it. I can fix just about any-
thing because I worked on it and
saw how it was built."
Horstmann said she knows that
without Habitat she would likely
have never again owned a home:
"I could not have qualified for a
regular FHA loan. I am divorced,
and I would not have made enough
money." Her down payment for
the house, with the lot, was a mere
$250. Her interest-free monthly
mortgage payment is $530, which
includes insurance.
Long before Katrina destroyed
everything, Horstmann had been
a hard worker. Now, she works
harder than ever, holding down two
jobs one at Walmart, the other
at Grammy's Donuts and More.
She works 18-hour days five days a
week.
"Habitat gave me a new start,"
she said. "I am living in my own
home."
Bill Maxwell is a columnist for the St. Petersburg
Times. Email bmaxwell@sptimes.com


Occupy protesters have made
their point. Now

,their point., Now. go home


BY DALE MCFEATTERS
Scripps Howard News Service

In 1981, a group of demonstra-
tors set up camp outside a
British air base to protest the
government's decision to allow U.S.
nuclear-tipped cruise missiles to
be based there.
The Greenham Common Wom-
en's Peace Camp initially generated
a great deal of publicity, inspired
imitators in other countries, spo-
radically tried to block access to
the air base, and perhaps reached
its zenith in 1983 when as many as
70,000 people turned out for one of
their demonstrations.
The women survived several
attempts by police to evict them,
and eventually the authorities left
their tent cities alone, as long as
the women, and they were almost
all women, confined themselves to
picketing, leafleting and chanting.
In 1991, thanks to a nuclear-arms
treaty with the Soviet Union, the
last of the cruise missiles were


removed, taking with them, one
would have thought, the reason for
the camp. But the women stayed
on for nine more yeafs, expressing
an increasingly vague and incho-
ate commitment to "peace." Many
of the Greenham women cited a
sense of unity, sisterhood, shared
purpose arid, when pressed, little
desire to return to the humdrum
routine of their former lives.
One senses that, in accelerated
fashion, the Occupy Wall Street'
movement has'arrived at that
point. On Wall Street and in cities
across the country, the protesters
have effectively made their point
about income inequality the
1 percent versus the 99 percent;
lopsided tax breaks given to hedge-
fund managers and the proclivity
of Wall Streeters to lavishly reward
themselves regardless of whether
their performance merits it. And,
yes, economically the great middle
class has been stagnant for a de-
cade or more.
As the Occupy movement drags


on the first encampment went
up Sept. 17 -the issues that in-
spired it are receding in the public
consciousness and the issue has
increasingly become the encamp-
ments themselves.
There have been problems of
noise, sanitation, isolated incidents
of crime and violence andttie
inevitable run-ins with poiicek'b6.
generally the Occupy movement-
has been a benign one. But its time
in the public square is over. Public
space meant for the enjoyment of
the many should not be arrogated
to advance the interests of the few.
Go home. Find political candi-
dates who share your views and
go to work for them. Raise money.
Man phone banks. Knock on
doors. Help the poor and minori-
ties and those with limited English
get government IDs in states that
have passed voter-suppression
laws.
And don't forget to vote your-
self. It really works in this country.
Always has.


Contact representatives


Florida Legislature

Rep. Marti Coley, R-District 7
Marti.Coley@myfloridahouse.gov
Building A, Room 186 Chipola
College
3094 Indian Circle


Marianna, FL 32446-1701

Rep. Brad Drake, R-District 5
Brad.Drake@myfloridahouse.gov
NWFL State-Chautauqua Campus
#205
908 U.S. Highway 90 West
'a


DeFuniak Springs, FL 32433-1436

Sen. Bill Montford. D-District 6
208 Senate Office Building
404 South Monroe St.
Tallahassee, FL 32399-1100
montford.bill.web@ flsenate.gov
I


11/15 sAIE y,
@2011 Jeff Stahler/Dist. by Universal UClick for UFS


... .......







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


MASONS DONATE SUPPLIES TO RIVERSIDE


DEBORAH BUCKHALTER/FLORIDAN

Members of the Red Level Masonic Lodge in the Alliance community recently
donated school supplies to Riverside Elementary School fourth-grade teacher Holly
Nichols. From left, (back row) mason Jimmy Strength, Nichols, Red Level Worship-
ful Master Roy Cooke, and Red Level Sr. Deacon Jeremy Strength stand with several children
from Nichols' classroom after donating the items shown on the table.



Beekeeping course


series registration


deadline is


Special to the Floridan
Jackson County Exten-
sion and the University of
Florida Institute of Food
and Agricultural Science
soon will present a series
of classes called Beekeep-
ing in the Panhandle.
Covering a variety of
beekeeping topics, includ-
ing types of honey bees,
pollen collection and how
to split hives, the classes
will be offered by interac-
tive video at the Jackson
County Extension Office,
located at 2741 Pennsylva-
nia Ave. in Marianna. The
videos will be presented in
eight sessions on Monday
nights from 6 to 8 p.m. on
the following dates:
)) Monday, Nov. 21: Intro-
duction to Bees
N Monday, Nov. 28: Intro-
duction to Beekeeping and
Beekeeping Equipment
n Monday, Dec. 5: Bee
Management
) Monday, Dec. 12: Pests
and Diseases
) Monday, Jan. 9: Honey
Plants and Pollination
Ecology
) Monday, Jan. 16: Prod-
ucts of the Hive


JaPLORIDANOOM


) Monday, Jan. 23:
ting Hives, Increasin
Numbers and Pollin
) Monday, Jan. 30:
Topics in Beekeeping
Along with the re
tion form, a $50 fi
person, plus $25 fo
additional person,
the cost of the class
materials.
Participants can di
or mail the registrar
the Jackson County
sion Office, 2741 Pe
vania Ave., Suite 3,
ana, FL 32448. Regist
and payments are d
Friday.


Friday
Split- On a related note, a Bee-
.g Hive keeping Tradeshow is set
ation for 10 a.m. Saturday, Dec.
Others 10, at the Washington
g. County Extension Office,
gistra- located at 1424 Jackson
ee per Ave. in Chipley. Pre-regis-
r each tration is at 9 a.m. the day
covers of the event. The trade-
ss and show will feature hands-on
demonstrations, exhibits
rop off and more.
tion to To download the reg-
Exten- istration form and flier,
nnsyl- go to http://jackson.ifas.
Mari- ufl.edu, or call Jackson
tration County Agriculture Exten-
due by sion Agents Rob Trawick or
Doug Mayo at 482-9620.


U WjAtlj
j I




2011 Calendar Cover with M UM M 0
winner Austin Roberts
Cast your vote at www.FloridanCutestiKid.com
The child with the most votes will appear on the 2012
Jackson County Life calendar. 12 runners up will each
appear on a month.
Voting ends December 2andthe winners will beannouncedDecember
7. All proceeds from the contest go to Newspaper in Education which
supplies newspaper to teachers to use in the classroom at no cost to
the school. Your support is much appreciated.
Add your Birthday or Event to the calendar
for a $1.00 donation to Newspaper in
Education. Drop by the Floridan office or
call us at 850-526-3614 to get it in.
calendar j sal Januse
77nne Auiin Rbert


Come and Enjoy a Special $12 9
THANKSGIVING DAY BUFFET $549 Unders
11:00am 9:00pm 5.plustax 12
MENU
Turkey & Dressing Carved Ham
Fried Chicken Sweet Potatoes & Plenty of
"Home Cooked" Vegetables with All the Trimmings
Includes Salad Bar & Dessert Bar
I-10 & SR 71
3 .Marianna
W'. 526-3303


"The Forever After Diamond" I


M dade rici-i.


Hearing resumes
on trainer death
SANFORD A hearing
over SeaWorld Orlando's
appeal of a $75,000 fine
for three citations it
received following the
death of a trainer by a
killer whale last year is
continuing in central
Florida.
The hearing resumed
Tuesday in the Orlando
suburb of Sanford after
a break of seven weeks.
It is expected to last
through the end of the
week.
SeaWorld is arguing
that three safety cita-
tions it received from the
Occupational Safety and
Health Administration
are unfounded.
Trainer Dawn Bran-
cheau died in Febru-
ary 2010 when the
whale named Tilikum
grabbed her and
dragged her underwater
violently.
An administrative


judge isn't expected to
rule on the appeal until
a month after the end of
the hearing.
Investment panel
delays vote
TALLAHASSEE A
board chaired by Gov.
Rick Scott that invests
billions in retire-
ment and other state
funds has put'off a
decision on whether
to keep its executive
director.
The State Board of Ad-
ministration on Tuesday
accepted Ash Williams'
recommendation to
delay its annual vote on
his retention.
The postponement
came even though an
advisory panel on Mon-
day found no conflict of
interest resulted from
the board's hiring of a
company with ties to
Williams.

From wire reports


www.watsonjewelers.com .0
Downtown Marianna
850.482.4037



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12'x12'-Burgundy Plush
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12'x13'6"-Light Blue Frieze
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12'xl 5'-Tan Berber
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WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 2011 5AF


LOCIL/STATE


eves"*""O








JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


-16A WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 2.011


Sneads Forestry wins first place at competition
Special to the Floridan A f

The Sneads High School
Forestry team competed
against four other lo-
cal high school teams on
Thursday, Oct. 6, at Three
Rivers State Park. (From
Members were expected
to identify trees, insects left) Josh
to ientfy tees insctsWeeks,
and disorders, equipment, Georgia
do map interpretation, and Pevy,
timber cruising. Blake
Alan Toole took first place White
in timber cruising, third and Alan
place in equipment iden- =.Toole
tification and map inter- display
pretation. Mitchell Hines their
received second in timber awards.
cruising.
Third place in timber
cruising went to Christen
Howell.
The first place team con-
sisted of Alan Toole, Josh
Weeks, Blake White and SUBMI`.EPHOTOr
Georgia Pevy.


FLAG DONATION


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Soanne Truett and Luveme Powell of the Woodmen of the World
Insurance Company present an American flag to the Marianna
Woman's Club before their board meeting in October. Shown are
Joann Truett from Woodmen of the World; Ellie Green, president; and
Luverhe Powell from Woodmen of the World. Powell also gave a brief
talk on the meaning of the stars and stripes.


Shown at the Challenger Learning Center In Tallahassee are (not listed in order): Cole, John, and
Kayla Maddox; Jordan and Noah Sloan; Amy and Ashley Schierer; Jared and Wade Robinson;
Amanda Camley; Abigail Melvin; Anna-Lisa and William Potter; Len, Sydney, and Cole Nobles;
Conner, Emily, Jacob, Jeremy, and Kayli Obert; Jacob and Krista Hasty; and Timothy, Jeffrey,
Katy, Rebekah, and Tabitha Edwards. (Not shown, John Michael Sloan).


Chipola Home Educators visit


Challenger Learning Center


Special to the Floridan

The Chipola Home Edu-
cators home school group
enjoyed afun-filled, educa-
tional field trip to the Chal-
lenger Learning Center on
Nov. 4, 2011. The Chal-
lenger Learning Center,
located on Kleman Plaza
in downtown Tallahassee,
features a state-of-the-art
Space Mission Simula-


tor, an IMAX 3D Theater,
and the Downtown Digi-
tal Dome Theater and
Planetarium. Twenty-nine
children and their parents
enjoyed learning about the
mysteries that black holes
in space have in the uni-
verse, exploring the Flight
Director Activity for grades
k- 12, observing kinetic and
potential energy demon-
strations, studying about


satellites in space, and
viewing a laser demonstra-
tion of sound waves.
For more information
about Challenger Learning
Center, please visit http://
http:/ /www.challengertlh.
com/.
To learn more about
Chipola Home Educa-
tors, visit their website at
http://www.ChipolaHo-
meEducators.com.


SUBMITTED PHOTO
(From left) are Jesse Carter, Stephanie Lawson, Ashley Pavik, Dr. Lou Cleveland, Tammy
Smith of Vernon Middle School, Dr. Cherry Ward, Jessica Haid, Joe Whitfield, Jordan Coley,
Sam Griffin and Robbie Glawson.


Chipola math ed students


attend FCTM conference


Special to the Floridan
Students in the math-
ematics education pro-
gram at Chipola College,
along with their instruc-
tors, recently attended the
Florida Council of Teach-
ers of Mathematics Con-


ference in Jacksonville.
The FCTM conference
provides mathematics
teachers from throughout
the state the opportunity
to share teaching strate-
gies for grades K-12.
Participants also at-
tended sessions to review


new teaching materials
and to learn about the
new Florida mathematics
requirements.
The pre-service teacher
candidates were joined by
other Chipola mathemat-
ics education graduates
from the college District.


New coasters, immersive


rides offered for 2012


The Associated Press

ORLANDO A host of
new roller coasters, a 12-
acre town lifted straight
out of the animated "Cars"
movies and an elabo-
rate "Transformers" 3-D
simulator ride are among
the new theme park at-
tractions scheduled to
open around the country
in 2012.
The list was introduced
Tuesday by the Inter-
national Association of
Amusement Parks and
Attractions as the trade
group opened its week-
long expo at the Orange
County Convention Cen-
ter. The event drewaround
25,000 people to wander
500,000 square feet of ex-
hibits highlighting what's
new in the industry -
from rides and ticketing
systems to concessions
and smartphone apps
for park guests.
SeaWorld Orlando an-
nounced last week a


new attraction for 2012
centered on sea turtles,
including a first-of-its-
kind 360-degree domed
theater showing a 3-D
movie about the endan-
gered creatures. Legoland,
which opened in October
in central Florida, is reno-
vating and reopening an
existing water park at the
site next year.
New roller coasters
opening in 2012 include
the "Manta" at SeaWorld
San Diego, which will sim-
ulate underwater flight;
and "Superman"-themed
launch coasters at Six
Flags Discovery Kingdom
in Vallejo, Calif., and Six
Flags Magic Mountain in
Valencia, Calif. Six Flags
Great America in Gur-
nee, Ill., introduces a new
coaster called "X-Flight."
"I think this is the first


time in several years
we've seen that number
of blockbuster attractions
open in one year," trade
group spokesman David
Mandt said Tuesday.
As expected, the theme
park industry overall saw
modest growth around
2 to 4 percent- in 2011
as parts of the country
have been slower to re-
cover from recession.
"If weather, if economy,
if oil (prices) all stay about
where they are now, we
would anticipate another
up season," said industry
consultant Dennis Spei-
gel, president of Interna-
tional Theme Park Ser-
vices Inc.
"There's a lot of new
product coming on line
for 2012, o the parks
should be able to capital-
ize on that."


Marriages, Divorces


Special to the Floridan
Marriages
The following mar-
riages and divorces were
recorded in Jackson Coun-
ty during the week of Nov.
7-11.
Marriages
) Eric Lamont Staley
and Doneisha Aretha
Thompson.
) Connie Kelly
Hinson and Tallice Eugene
Hinson.
) Ted Jason Hinson and
Martha Anne Mallory.
S)) Sanguesh Vithu


Konkare and Amanda
MarieVarnum.
) Jessica Anne Cullen
and William Kenneth Scott
Jones.
B Donna Lyrin Lemon
and Raymond W. Young. .
) Chasity Marie Tharp
and Stephen Caz Wester.
Divorces
) Jason Edward Merri-
field vs. Ashlynn Brianna
Merrifield.
)) James David Carter Jr.
vs. Elizabeth W. Carter.
) Jillian Smith Finch vs.
Joey Finch.


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Killer of 3 executed at Florida State Prison


The Associated Press

STARKE --A Florida inmate,
who was convicted of the June
1989 killings of an Ohio woman
and her two teen daughters in
Florida as they returned from a
dream vacation to Disney World,
was executed Tuesday.
Oba Chandler, 65, was given a
lethal injection and pronounced
dead at 4:25 p.m. Tuesday at the
Florida State Prison, Gov. Rick
Scott's office said. When a correc-
tions official asked if Chandler
had any last words, Chandler
said, "No." The execution began
at 4:08 p.m. and concluded with-
out any problems.
There were 21 witnesses, plus
11 members of the media in at-
tendance. Hal Rogers, the hus-
band and father of the victims,
watched calmly from the front
row. Neither Rogers nor any of
the other witnesses spoke dur-
ing the execution.
Chandlerwas convicted in 1994
of killing 36-year-old Joan Rogers,
and her daughters, Christe and


Michelle, who were 14 and 17,
and dumping their bound bod-
ies in Tampa Bay.
The three were on
their first vaca-
tion and making
their way home to
their small farm-
ing community
of Willshire, Ohio,
Chandler after their Florida
trip.
Authorities concluded that the
women met Chandler on June
1, 1989, when they stopped and
asked him for directions to their
Tampa area motel. Chandler,
who had ties to Ohio, apparently
sweet-talked the women into go-
ing on his boat, police said.
Once aboard, Chandler bound
the women' arms and legs, tied
concrete blocks to ropes around
their necks and then threw them
overboard, according to de-
tectives. Despite the concrete
blocks, the bodies surfaced and
were found days later, naked
from the waist down.
Detectives didn't crack the


case for three years. Two things
helped make the arrest: A tourist
brochure with Chandler's hand-
writing was found in Rogers' car
and Chandler looked similar to
a composite sketch of a suspect
wanted in an earlier unsolved as-
sault against a Canadian woman
who was raped aboard a boat in
Tampa Bay.
Authorities took the unusual
step of publicizing the hand-
writing on the tourist brochure,
putting it on a billboard to see if
anyone recognized it, under the
words: "WHO KILLED THE ROG-
ERS FAMILY?" One of Chandler's
former neighbors recognized the
"writing and called authorities.
At Chandler's trial, prosecutors
used details of the unrelated rape
for which he was never tried.
The Canadian woman testified
Chandler took her by boat to see
the sunset out on the bay and
raped her. She said she believed
the reason she wasn't killed was
because a friend was waiting for
her at the dock. Based on the
similarities of the cases, pros-


ecutors hypothesized that Rog-
ers and her daughters were lured
onto his boat with the promise of
seeing the sunset and were then
sexually assaulted before being
murdered.
Chandler took the stand and
acknowledged to giving Rog-
ers directions, but denied he
had anything to do with the
killings.
Gov. Rick Scott signed Chan-
dler's death warrant on Oct. 11,
the second he has signed since
taking office. The Florida Su-
preme Court affirmed a lower
court decision to proceed with
the lethal injection.
For his last meal Tuesday,
Chandler ate two salami sand-
wiches on white bread, half of a
peanut butter sandwich and had
coffee. "He's cooperative and do-
ing what the officers tell him,"
Florida State Prison spokes-
woman Gretl Plessinger said.
Chandler's lawyer, Baya Har-
rison, said that some members
of Chandler's family had wanted
to see him. But years ago, Chan-


dler became angry with his fam-
ily and took all of them off his
visitation list, the lawyer said.
According to state prison rules,
once the death warrant was
signed, Chandler couldn't add
family back to his visitation list,
the lawyer said, which is why he
hasn't seen anyone prior to the
scheduled execution.
"He's had problems with his
family over the years," said Har-
rison, adding Chandler would
have liked to have seen some of
his relatives.
About three dozen protest-
ers bused in from Our Lady
of Lourdes Catholic Church in
Daytona protested less than
a half mile from the prison gates
against the death penalty. They
held up signs ,reading, "Thou
Shalt Not Kill" and "We Remem-
ber the Victims But Not With
More Killing."
About 50 yards away, four pro-
testers in favor of the death pen-
alty stood by. Florida Highway
Patrol officers stood watch be-
tween the two groups.


Consumers hit retail stores


to give economy boost F


The Associated Press

WASHINGTON Con-
sumers are giving a mod-
est lift to the economy.
They spent more on
trucks, electronics and
building supplies in Octo-
ber to boost retail sales for
the fifth straight month.
The gains provide an
encouraging start for the
October-December quar-
ter. They come just as
separate reports show that
wholesale prices are flat-
tening and U.S. shoppers
are spending more at Wal-
Mart, the world's largest
retailer.
Still, consumers might
not be able to sustain
their spending growth if
unemployment remains
high and pay raises scant.
And Europe may be on the
brink of a recession that
could further slow U.S.
growth next year.
"The consumer has to
come through this holiday
season if we are going to
get back to more decent
growth rates, and the early
readings are those house-
holds have hit the stores
quite strongly," said Joel
Naroff, chief economist, at
Naroff Economic Advisors.
Retail sales rose 0.5 per-,
cent from September to
October, the Commerce
Department said Tuesday.
Healthy auto sales helped.
Even without autos, sales
rose by the most since
March.
And excluding autos and
sales at gasoline stations,
sales rose 0.7 percent, also
the biggest increase since
March.
A rebound in consum-
er spending was the key
reason why the economy
grew at an annual rate of
2.5 percent in the July-
September quarter. It was
the best quarterly perfor-
mance in a year.
Economists said the
October retail sales data
suggest that the economy
is growing at roughly the
same pace in the final
three months of the year.
Consumer spending fuels
about 70 percent of eco-
nomic activity.
Stronger growth has
helped calm fears that the
U.S. economy might be at
risk of another recession.
Still, economists worry
that the spending can't
continue at the same pace.
Over the summer, con-
sumers spent mrrre while
earning less. Many had to
dip into their savings to


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE
In this Nov. 9 file photo, people shop at Dolphin Mall, in Miami.


-make up the difference.
"Overall, the economy
appears 'to be growing at
a decent clip," said Paul
Dales, a senior U.S. econo-
mist at Capital Economics.
Still, Dales added, "Con-
sumption cannot grow at
a faster rate than incomes
indefinitely."
Many fear Europe's debt
crisis is on the verge of
triggering a recession in
the region. The eurozone
economy barely grew in
the July-September quar-
ter, according to the Eu-
ropean, Union statistics
office. It was the second
straight quarter of paltry
growth.
Most economists say
growth won't improve in
the months ahead. Con-
sumers and governments
in Europe are expected to
spend less because of the
debt crisis.
One positive sign for the
U.S. economy: Inflation
pressures are starting to
ease, largely because en-
ergy costs have declined.
U.S. companies paid less
for wholesale goods last
month for the first time
since June. And exclud-
ing volatile food and en-
ergy costs, so-called "core"
wholesale prices were
unchanged.
Lower prices mean con-
sumers will have. more
buying power, potentially


boosting consumer spend-
ing. A jump in gas and food
prices earlier this year had
slowed consumption over
other goods.
October retail sales were
7.2 percent higher than
the same month last year.
Internet and catalog sales
have risen more than 11
percent since then. Con-
sumers also spent more
on sporting goods and at
hobby and book stores.
Auto sales have also re-
bounded since the Japan
earthquake and tsunami.
The 0.4 percent rise in Oc-
tober from September fol-
lowed a 4.2 percent surge
in the previous month.
Sales have increased 7 per-
cent from the same month
last year.
In the Miami area, auto
sales were decent in Oc-
tober and picked up in the
first half of November, said
Ed Williamson, part owner
of two Buick-Cadillac-
GMC dealerships.


.THEASSOCIATED PRESS
House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio (left) and House Majority Whip Kevin McCarthy,
R-Calif., wait to speak to media Tuesday on Capitol Hill in Washington.


Boehner calls GOP


deficit plan a 'fair offer'


The Associated Press

WASHINGTON -The top Republican
in the House says a recent proposal by
GOP members of a special deficit com-
mittee is a "fair offer" despite criticism
from conservatives who say it breaks
the party's pledge on taxes.
"It's important for us, in my opinion,
to reform the tax code," said Speaker
John Boehner, R-Ohio, adding that a tax
overhaul would "make America more
competitive and produce economic
growth."
And a top GOP member of the panel
got some words of support from House
Republicans Tuesday morning after
briefing rank-and-file Republicans on
last week's GOP proposal, which called
for a net tax revenue increase of almost
$300 billion in exchange for significantly
lowered tax rates.
Rep. Jeb Hensarling, R-Texas, co-chair-
man of the deficit panel said the badly
divided group is still working in hopes
of reaching an agreement.
"They haven't thrown me out, so I
guess I got a good reception," Hensar-
ling said of how House Republicans re-
acted to his status report on supercom-
mittee talks. "I gave them an update, I
told them we haven't lost hope yet but ...
this week is crucial."
The panel faces an official target of
next Wednesday to approve a plan, but
sometime this week is a more realistic
deadline, given the realities of drafting
proposals into legal language and get-
ting them "scored" by congressional
analysts to measure their impact on the
deficit.
With time growing short, Boehner


and top Senate Democrat Harry Reid
of Nevada met Tuesday morning on the
panel's work. It's likely to require a push
from such top leaders to help break an
impasse over taxes and cuts to popular
benefit programs.
Hensarling, a stout conservative, got
support from some of his colleagues in-
side a closed-door GOP caucus Tuesday
morning. He pointed out that a far larg-
er tax increase looms at the end of next
year with the expiration of the Bush-
era cuts in tax rates, investments, and
breaks for married couples and families
with children.
"I thought it was a very serious effort in
trying to break a logjam and get atom-
promise," said House Budget Commit-
tee Chairman Paul Ryan, R-Wis. "Held
up against the big tax increase coming,
I'll take that any day."
But last week's GOP plan has gotten
a cold shoulder from GOP presidential
hopefuls like former Speaker Newt Gin-
grich and Texas Gov. Rick Perry.
Campaigning in Iowa, Gingrich said
he would "do everything in my power
to defeat" any committee deficit-re-
duction plan that includes higher
taxes.
Jason Miner, a spokesman for Perry,
said the Texas governor "wants to look
at details but if those details include a
tax increase he's not going to be for it.
He does not favor higher taxes."
Some conservative Republicans are
restive about last week's GOP proposal
for higher tax revenues, which would be
skimmed off the top in a future overhaul
of the tax code that trades the elimina-
tion of many tax breaks for significantly
lower income tax rates.


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Obituaries

Brown Funeral Home
1068 Main Street
Chipley, Florida 32428
850-638-4010

Charles
Wesley (Wes)
Davis



Charles Wesley (Wes) Da-
vis, 70' of Cottondale,
passed away Monday, No-
vember 14, 2011 at his
home. Mr. Davis was born
January 13, 1941 in
Cottondale to the late
James Edward and
Yukibelle (Newton) Davis.
He had been a resident of
Cottondale for the past 21
years, moving there from
Chipley. He had retired as
an E5 Sgt with the 144th
Transportation Unit of the
Florida National Guard and
had served during opera-
tion Desert Storm and had
also retired from the Flori-
da Department of Trans-
portation. He was a mem-
ber of the Lovewood Free
Will Baptist Church.
Survivors include, two
sons, Tim Allen Davis of
Cottondale and Michael
Craig Davis of Chipley; one
daughter, Wendy Corbin
and husband David of
Cottondale; five brothers,
James Earl Davis of
Campbellton, Donnell Da-
vis of Alford, Gary Davis of
Bentonville, Arkansas,
Charles Miles. of Steel City
and Don Miles of Kansas
City, Kansas; four sisters,
JoAnn Jernigan Pennington
of Panama" City, Agnes of
Dothan, Ala., Martha Mott
Howard of Marimnna and
Bonnie Griggs of Malone;
six grandchildren.
The family will receive
friends Wednesday, No-
vember 16, 2011 from 5 to 8
P.M. at Brown Funeral
Home, .Brickyard Road
Chapel. Funeral services
will be held Thursday, No-
vember 17, 2011 at 2:00
P.M. at Brown Funeral
Home, Brickyard Road
Chapel with the Rev's.
Henry Matthews and Ken-
neth Adkison officiating.
Interment will follow in Pil-
grim's Rest Cemetery with
military honors. Friends
and family may sign the
online register at www.bro
wnfh.net.



Nation Brief

13 arrested protesting
immigration law
MONTGOMERY, Ala.
- Police arrested 13
protesters in Alabama's
capital Tuesday as they
demonstrated against
the state's strict new law
clamping down on illegal
immigrants.
About 100 people, most
of them Hispanic and
college-aged, chanted
slogans as they marched
in light rain around the
state Capitol and to the
adjacent Statehouse where
the legislature works.
Some sat down on Union
Street between the State-
house and the Capitol
when police approached
and warned them in Eng-
lish and Spanish that they
would be arrested if they
didn't move.
None did and police
arrested 11 protesters,
tying their hands with
yellow straps and loading
them into a city bus. It was
unclear what charges the
protesters would face.
Federal courts have
blocked parts of the Re-
publican-backed law from
taking effect, but both
supporters and critics still
call it the nation's tough-
est state law against illegal
immigration. The Obama
administration opposes
the law, which is calls an


overreach by the state.
After walking all the way
around the Capitol one
time, about 20 protesters
entered the Statehouse
and went up to the sev-
enth-floor office of state
Sen. Scott Beason, R-Gar-
dendale, a key proponent
of the law.


From wire reports


Book
From Page 1A
from the Florida Teens' Reading
Booklist.
A few wrote short essays, one
person produced a short video
and some made pieces of art to
represent the work they read.
Some read historical pieces, like
"Night," Elie Wiesel's account of
his experiences in the Holocaust,
or "Alive," by Piers Paul Read, a
book outlining the experiences
of rugby players who survived
72 days snowbound after a plane
crash.
Others read fictional works that
featured teens struggling toward
adulthood under some difficult
circumstances.
The students' book was orga-
nized by title of the work they
read; reading all comments on a
particular volume can give read-
ers the sense of having a Cliff's
Notes-style guide to the plot as
each student presented his or her
own take on the elements of the
given work.
Each contributing writer or art-
ist got a copy of the book. After a
short program in the auditorium
acknowledging its. publication,
the teens rushed to the cafeteria
where each person picked up
their copy. Many leafed through
the volume as they snacked on
punch and cookies.
Some students said the exercise
was an empowering experience.
Some got an extra reward in the
form of gift certificates or checks
as first, second or third place
winners in the'writing or art di-
vision, along with a black T-shirt
emblazoned with the name of the
group book.
Event emcee Scott Jacob en-
couraged students to keep read-
ing as they go forward, a message
echoed by the guest speaker, lo-
cal author Margena Bell Myrick.
The event was sponsored
by the Friends of the Jackson


CD
From Page 1A
talked about the project's
many challenges, from
the headache of getting
copyright permissions
to the frustration of re-
cording do-overs made
necessary by the noise of
janitors working near the
sound-sensitive studio
where she worked. There
was also a slightly out-of-
tune piano in the mix of
complications.
But the experience, she
said, was worth all the
challenges it entailed.
She said she was able to
meet and talk in detail
with some of the com-
posers whose work ap-
pears on her CD, a rare
opportunity for someone


Scott
From Page 1A
legislative action.
"The state is taking a risk to-
day that it doesn't need to take,"
Nicholson said. "You've got a pri-
vate insurance market. It has the
capacity today to take that risk." /
Private reinsurance, though,
would cost more. A preliminary
analysis shows the down-siz-
ing proposal would increase
premiums for homeowners,
businesses and other consumers


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
The attending winners in the "I'm Almost Famous" event are (front row, from left) Sarah Peterman, Caroline Rogers,
Madison Zimmerman, Caitlyn Carpenter and Bradley Middleton; back row, Alyssa Grimes, Bridgitte Burns, Alexus
Perry, Cahnce Pender and Levi Cobb.


County Library System, The Art-
ists Guild of Northwest Florida,
corporate partners and indi-
viduals in the community. Mari-
anna High School staff members
were also involved in organizing
th'e writing exercise and ensu-
ing event to celebrate the book's
publication.
A brief sampling from I'm Al-
most Famous:
) First place 'sentence' win-
ner Caroline Rogers wrote this in
summing up "Orange Houses,"
by Paul Griffin: "Jimmi, Tamika
and Fatima strive to make their
neighborhood a better place
through art and their lives a bet-
ter place through love."
) Brittany Saintz had this to
say about the same book: "It is
very interesting to read and find
out why the book titled "Orange


whose work revolves so
often around long-dead
classical composers.
Yoshikawa began
playing at age 2, and
debuted in the public
eye at age 9, when she
performed Beethoven's
Concerto No. 1 with the
London Westminster
Philharmonic. She has
gone on to appear as a
soloist with many other
major orchestras around
the world, picking up an
armload of awards and
honors along the way.
She conducts clin-
ics and classes around
the world and cur-
rently serves on the
Chipola College music
faculty.
For more information,
visit her website at chris
tineyoshikawa.com.


Houses" was not all about orange
houses."
Piper Irwin, who got a special
mention for her contribution,
added yet another observation
to the mix in summarizing that
book. She wrote that "Life in the
Bronx is tough for Tamika and
Jimmi, but made even harder
when they take on an illegal im-
migrant as their friend."
) Bridgette Burns, who won
second place, offered a succinct
yet mysterious sentence about
"Baby Girl," by Lenora Adams.
Burns wrote, "Rasheda just wants
her mother to know."
) Zak Blank, writing on "Night"
by Elie Wiesel, was similarly
mysterious in his offering, writ-
ing simply, "They never saw it
coming."
) Samuel Barnes offered a criti-


./
4 *


S & N:,.: ,


by 10 percent over seven years,
Nicholson said.
Scott said higher rates would be
worth the trade-off.
"Consumers actually want real
insurance," Scott said. "They
don't want to have insurance that
they know that no one can write
the check. And basically right
now if the Cat Fund can't bond,
then people are buying insurance
believing that they're going to get
paid when they're not."
The Cat Fund repays its bonds
through special assessments on
almost all insurance policies sold


in the state, including auto.
Scott and Chief Financial Of-
ficer Jeff Atwater held a news
conference to urge the passage of
legislation that would stop auto
insurance fraud they say is cost-
ing Florida insurers and motor-
ists $900 million a year.
They did not, however, offer
specific suggestions. One option
lawmakers are considering is to
abolish what's known as Personal
Injury Protection, or PIP cover-
age, but Scott said he doesn't
think that's necessary.
"We'll see what comes through


cism in his sentence about the
book he read, writing that "'Gym
Candy' is a very disappointing
book."
) Tylor Blank. was even less re-
vealing in his sentence on "Split"
by Swati Avasthi. Blank wrote,
"You should read this book; I
don't want to ruin it so I won't tell"
you any details."
) About "The Tempest" by Wil-
liam Shakespeare, Salina Lamb
wrote that "The Tempest"s plot
had me glued to the. pages wait-
ing to read the wondrous end to a
magic twist of events."
a Laita Bass read. "Willow" by
Julia Hoban. In writing about
the volume's title character, Bass
seemed to relate. She wrote, "Wil-
low is just like most teens today,
she is misunderstood and look-
ing for a way to cope."


Shown is the
cover of the
"Journeys
Within" CD.



GRAPHIC SUBMITTED


the Legislature," Scott said. "Right
now I believe it can be fixed."
Motorists now must buy PIP
insurance that provides $10,000
in coverage for injuries suffered
in traffic accidents regardless of
who is at fault.
Officials say the system is being
abused through staged accidents
as well as claims for unneeded
health care services. They also
blame lawyers who often seek
fees more than the $10,000 limit
even though no-fault was sup-
posed to eliminate or reduce the
need for litigation.


Ex-prosecutor knocks Casey Anthony lawyer, jurors


\ The Associated Press


had not been re.
the case, even th


ORLANDO A retired pros- some level I thi
ecutor from the Casey Anthony have deserved it,'
murder trial calls her lead attor- the 324-page boo
ney "smarmy" in a new book and just didn't think tl
says he didn't think a jury would there."
ever agree to the death penalty As it turns out,
for the Florida mother, who was to accept a deal p
ultimately acquitted of killing her July acquitted h(
2-year-old daughter. of her daughter,'
Jeff Ashton writes in Tuesday's was released front
"Imperfect Justice: Prosecuting she is in hiding
Casey Anthony" that he would Florida, serving p
have been happier if the pros- unrelated check f
ecution team had left the death Ashton's book
penalty off the table. He also con- count written by
firmed that toward the end of the players in the tri,
trial, Anthony's attorneys tried to the attention of
persuade the 25-year-old to ac- summer. The 54-
cept a plea deal but she refused prosecutor retire(
to listen. ter the trial, follo,
"Personally, I think I would have trying cases.
been happier if the death penalty The film and t

SUN. N OV. 20 6:00PM
BIBLETONES
DA"OW1 FIRST


introduced into
ough I think on
ink Casey may
" Ashton said in
k. "Simply put, I
he jury would go

Anthony refusal
aid off. Jurors in
er in the killing
Caylee, and she
u prison, though
somewhere in
probation for an
raud case.
is the first ac-
one of the key
al that captured
the nation last
-year-old career
d as planned af-
wing 30 years of


for the book have already been
bought by Fox Television Studios,
studio spokeswoman Leslie Oren
said.
In the book, Ashton takes di-
rect aim at Anthony's defense
attorneys, specifically Jose Baez,
whom he said he genuinely dis-
likes. He said Baez was careless
with the facts, unmindful of dead-
lines and encouraged Anthony to
be uncooperative with detectives
searching for her daughter.
"There is an unearned air of
arrogance about the man that is
incredibly frustrating to witness,"
Ashton writes. "The word I used in
describing Jose is smarmy: some-
body who is slick, underhanded
and doesn't shoot straight."
Baez said in a statement that
Ashton's characterizations were


false.
television rights "Ilaving read several of the


comments Mr. Ashton makes in
his new book, I am both surprised
and somewhat disappointed he
has chosen to attack me on a per-
sonal level," Baez said. "Without
going into specific detail, I will
say only that many of his accusa-
tions are absolutely false."
Ashton also displays an un-
flattering view of the jurors. He
wrote they seemed to give a lot of
thought and discussion to which
movies they wanted to watch or
which restaurants to go to while
they were sequestered. Yet no ju-
ror asked a single question about
the evidence during deliberation.
"From the moment our jury had
been fielded ... we'd had concerns
over their apparent absence of
strong opinions as well as over
the amount of effort they seemed
willing to expend on this," Ashton
writes.


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'. ''


BY DUSTIN KENT
'Ll '.dkent@jcfloridan.com
-j -7 The Sneads Lady Pirates'
S..- dream of a state title was
dashed Tuesday morning
in Kissimmee, as they fell
to the Baker Lady Gators
in five sets in the 1A state
.semifinals.
Baker jumped out early
.with a25-12 first set victory
to put the Lhdy Pirates on
their heels, but the Sneads
girls responded bywinning
the next two sets by scores
of 25-19 and 25-22.
The Lady.Gators forced
a fifth and deciding set by
taking the fourth 25-20,
but it appeared the Lady
S -- -Pirates were going to close
it out in the fifth when they
.,,.scored the first six points
of the set.
MARKSKINNER/FLORIDIAN However, a series of er-
The Lady Pirates' Emily Jones sends the ball back Saturday rors gave the momentum
during a match against Blountstown. backto Baker,whichfought


back to earn the 15-12 win
and the match victory.
It was a disappointing
end for the Lady Pirates,
who had the look of a fa-
vorite after two dominant
performances in the first
two rounds of the playoffs.
"It's really sad," Sneads
coach Sheila Roberts said
after the match. "We came
out in the first game and
looked like a deer in the
headlights. We were not
playing well. I don't know
if it was jitters from playing
in that large arena, but we
didn't play well and gave
away the first game.
"We started, building
some momentum towards
the end of it and carried it
into the next two games.
We came out really strong
in the fifth, but we had
some unforced errors and
lost the momentum. But


take nothing away from
Baker. They're a great team
and a great defensive team.
My hitters were spraying
the ball all over the court
and they kept coming up
with it."
Roberts said that it was
the Lady Gators' ability
to dig out balls and keep
points alive that proved
to be the difference in the
match.
"We were probably the
better offensive team, but
they were probably the
better defensive team,"
the coach said. "They were
digging everything we put
over the net. They say that
defense wins champion-
ships, and I guess they
proved that. They kept dig-
ging the ball and waiting
us out until we made an
error."
While the goal of a state


title was not reached, it
was still an historic season
for the Lady Pirates, who
became the first Jackson
County volleyball team to
ever make it to the state
final four.
Sneads also won 22
matches and a district
championship, but while
Roberts said she's extreme-
ly proud of her team's ac-
complishments, she's still
looking for a way to get
over that final hurdle.
"I'm very proud of these
seniors of mine because
they made history. They
had a great season," she
said. "I'm trying to look on
the bright side, which is
that I'm glad we got here.
But we're evaluating what
we need to do differently
so that we can win this

See ELIMINATED, Page 10B


Prep Soccer


Bulldogs

notch 4-0 win

over Braves
BY SHELIA MADER '
Floridan Correspondent
The Marianna High School Bull-
dogs soccer team improved to 1-1 in
district play Monday night with a 4-0
win over the visiting Walton Braves at
Bulldog Stadium.
The Bulldogs returned a full squad
for Monday's game with football and
cross country players on the field.
Early in the first half of play, senior
Seth Gilley found the back of the net
to, give the Dogs a 1-0 lead.
Following a penalty, Marquelle
Comer made it a 2-0 game with a
penalty kick past the goalie.
Following the water break, it was
again Gilley on an assist from John
Metzler for the third goal of the night.
Shortly before the half, the Dogs
added their final goal off the foot of

See BULLDOGS, Page 2B



Lady Bulldogs

earn draw

with Walton
BY SHELIA MADER
Floridan Correspondent
The Marianna High School Lady
Bulldogs soccer team has been a work
in progress over the last two years, but
on their home field Monday night,
they saw the light at the end of the
tunnel.
The Lady Dogs played to a 2-2 tie
against district foe Walton, but were
overjoyed with the moral victory of
avoiding another loss on their record.
Marianna has added talent this
year, bringing not only athleticism
to the field but experience from

See DRAW, Page 2B


Prep Basketball





New beginnings


MARK SKINNER / FLORIDIAN
Graceville Head Coach Matt Anderson moves some players around during practice Tuesday.

Coach Matt Anderson tasked with finding success in new group


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com
After a disappointing sea-
son in 2010-11, the Graceville
Tigers are hoping new coach
Matt Anderson can help them
return to the postseason in
2012.
However, the former Malo-
ne and Bay High coach will
have to find a way to replace
a handful of impact players


from last year's team to do so.
Graceville finished 9-16 last
year and was knocked out in
the district tournament to end
a consecutive playoff streak of
nine years.
From that team, the Tigers
lost leading scorer Kevin Potts
and leading rebounder Byron
Laster, as well as key players
such as Jacky Miles, Leander
Ford, and Ali Williams.


The Tigers do return speedy
point guard Rasheed Camp-
bell and sharp-shooting lefty
Marquise White, but Ander-
son will have to find answers
in new players if his team is
going to compete at a high
level this season.
"It's real tough because you
don't know a lot about them
not having seen them play
before, so we go into each


practice trying kids at differ-
ent spots, figuring out who
cin shoot the ball, who can
handle the ball," he said. "It's
just tough because you're
finding the right positions and
roles for kids but you're com-
ing in totally brand new and
you don't really know their
strengths and weaknesses.

See ANDERSON, Page 2B


Prep Wrestling


MHS wrestling ready for season


MARK SKINNER /1 LURIDIAN
The Marianna wrestling team works on their moves at a recent
practice.


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com
The Marianna Bulldogs wrestling
team will open its regular season to-
day in a quad meet in South Walton
against the likes of Bozeman, Crest-
view, and the host Seahawks.
MHS had a preseason meet last
weekend in Tallahassee in which
it went 1-1 with a win over Florida
High and a loss to Wakulla.
Florida High was still missing
some competitors who were not yet
done with the football season, but
Wakulla had its full complement,
and Bulldogs coach Ron Thoreson


said that match-up proved to be a
great challenge.
"It was a really good test to see
how we did against an established
program that had a full team and
I thought we did well," he said. "I
thought we were competitive with
Wakulla. With a few tweaks and a
few changes in some of the matches,
it would've been a whole lot closer."
The Bulldogs were also hurt by the
fact that they had to forfeit the 160-
pound division due to not having a
wrestler there, but Thoreson said
that he would have someone for 160
in today's meet.


.-n *'*E


But the second year coach said
he was expecting another Iill test
today.
"I hope we. win, but it will be a
tough meet," Thoreson said. "I went
and watched South Walton and Boz-
eman and Crestview in a preseason
meet and all of those kids are solid
this year. It's going to be a battle. But
if the kids perform like they did (in
Tallahassee), we stand as good of a
chance as anybody to win.
"I like our chances. I like what the
kids are doing. We just have to keep

See READY, Page 2B


COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Sandusky declares his
innocence on 2B


Cominng in tomoiow 's edition of the 1 1.( ) I I).\N
AMH LONA S PO RTS I < PI H[l

ATHLON SPORTS

e.'i u r...I.I h.. lIh il c. u l h Ill ,' hll. .- 2ll ,.' \ lh 1-.. h" _. ,* o ul'. 'h" 'F ,' l ." t o o
r-'h_.- Ii.'v'; ,,i IIh_ to li'r'll| ii. unl~l |h' ,|inll', I..lIl.nldii i)t (ii. 'l.


IL


S 1 *


Prep VoUeybaH


Lady Pirates eliminated by Baker





The Associated Press

STATE COLLEGE, Pa.
- Former Penn State as-
sistant football coach Jerry
Sandusky's admission that
he showered with and
horsedd around" with boys
could be used by prosecu-
tors trying to convict him
of child sex-abuse charges.
Experts in criminal law
and crisis management
questioned Sandusky's de-
cision to give aTVinterview
in which he said there was
no abuse and that any ac-
tivities in a campus shower
with a boy were just horse-
play, not molestation.
"Mr. Sandusky goes on



Draw
From Page 1B
previous players.
Within minutes of the
water break in the first half,
Emily Fuqua broke away
from the defenders and
found the net from 15 yards
out for the first score of the
game.



Bulldogs
dB W.
From Page 1B
Metzler.
That score held, giving
the Dogs their first district
win in two tries following a
3-0 loss at Bay last week.
Keeper Michael Mader
had l6saveson21 attempts
with no goals scored and
five missed shots.
Austin Nelson, on in
relief for the final half of
the game, had six saves


WEDNESDAY MORNING / AFTERNOON NOVEMBER 16;2011l
6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:0010:3011:0011:3012:0012:30 1:00 1:30 2:00 2:30 3:00 3:30 4:00 4:30 5:00 5:3Q
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8 0 News 13 This Morning Good Morning America (N) B Live Regis & Kelly The View (In Stereo) WMBB Midday News The Chew (In Stereo) One Life to Live 90 General Hospital (N) Dr. Phil (N) (In Stereo) The Dr. Oz Show (N) News ABC News
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45 CNN (5:00) American Morning (N) 1M CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) The Situation Room With Wolf BIItzer (N) John King, USA (N)
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6:00_6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 90013009010:0016 l:3011:0011:3012:0012:30 1:00 1:30_2:0 2o o 3:0013:30 4:00 4:30 5:00 5:30
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-r,


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


-12B WEDNESDAY. NOVEMBER 16, 2011


in the Lincoln Duals on
Saturday in Tallahassee,
which will be the team's
last competition for the
month of November.
"We're just going to do
what we can, learn from
our mistakes, regroup


and come back in De-
cember really strong,"
Thoreson said. "These
meets are good learning
experiences for us. The
ultimate goal is to get
prepared for district and
region."


worldwide television and
admits he did everything
the prosecution claims he
did, except for the ultimate
act of rape or sodomy? If I
were a prosecutor, I'd be
stunned," said Lynne Abra-
ham, the former district
Attorney of Philadelphia.
"I was stunned, and then I
was revolted."
Abraham, who led a
grand jury probe involving
63 accused priests from the
Philadelphia archdiocese,
was retained this week
to lead an internal inves-
tigation of The Second
Mile, the children's char-
ity founded by Sandusky,
from which he allegedly


Early in the second half,
the Lady Braves evened the
score at 1-1.
Marianna answered eight
minutes later on a kickfrom
freshman Arianna Domen,
playing in just her second
high school varsity game.
The lead wouldn't hold,
however, as the Lady
Braves answered with just
three minutes left to tie the


on nine attempts with no
goals scored and three
missed attempts.
Following the game,
Marianna coach Garyn
Waller said he was pleased
with the win but saw room
for improvement.
"We played good the first
half but got a little com-
placent in the second," he
said. "But everybody got a
lot of playing time and we
got to try different guys in
different spots. Our for-
wards did a better job of


culled his victims.
The child sex-assault
charges filed against San-
dusky this month have
toppled Penn State's long-
time football coach, Joe Pa-
terno, and the university's
president, Graham Spa-
nier. The school's athletic
director and vice president
are accused of not report-
ing what they knew to
. police and have left their
posts.
Sandusky is charged with
abusing eight boys over the
span of 15 years. He told
NBC on Monday that he
was not a pedophile but,
in retrospect, should not
have showered with boys.


game.
On the night, MHS keep-
er Mallory Dean had eight
saves on 16 attempts, two
goals scored and six missed
shots.
The Lady Bulldogs will
have little time to regroup
as they were scheduled
to travel to South Walton
on Tuesday for ,another
district game.


making different runs in-
stead of just straight runs.
"Midfield transitioned
better and defense was
solid again. Football and
cross country did a good
job for it being their first
time out. It's good to be
even in the district. We
just need to keep moving
forward."
Marianna was scheduled
to travel to South Walton
on Tuesday night for its
third district game in a
row.


he's very talented," he
said. "Rasheed is a nice
point guard. He can get
into the lane and create
for himself and other
people. We've got a lot of
depth. I just don't know
how good the players
we've got are yet. But
we've got a lot who will
be able to play a lot and
play a certain style that I
like to play."
That style is up tempo
with a lot of defensive
pressure, the kind of bas-
ketball Anderson learned
as an assistant and then
head coach at Malone
and then carried over
into his stints as coach at
Ponce De Leon and Bay.
It's a style that the
coach said it's the way
always likes to play, but
that this Tigers team has
personnel perfectly suit-
ed for such a fast tempo.
"It's something I pre-
fer to do every year, but
some teams in the past
haven't had the depth or
the speed and quickness
to do so. This year, we do
have the speed and depth
to do that, so hopefully
we can keep a lot of pres-
sure on people this year,"
he said. "We don't have
much size, and guys are
going to need to learn to
take care of the ball bet-
ter if we're going to .play
fast, so we'll see. Defen-
sively, we should be able
to keep a high pressure
system going. Offensive-
ly, that's yet to be seen."
The lack of height and
interior depth could be
an issue for GHS all sea-


son, the coach said.
"With our size, re-
bounding could be a
problem for us," Ander-
son said. "We work on re-
bounding every day, but
there's only so much as
a coach and a team you
can do when you're as
small as we are. We want
to get into an up and
down situation without
as much five on five bas-
ketball, and that's one of
the many reasons we'll
try to press and get it into
an up and down game."
Anderson should have
no trouble earning his
players' 'belief and trust
with a resume that in-
cludes four straight state
championships at Malo-
ne, a combined 158 wins
at PDL and Bay, as well
as experience as an as-
sistant coach at Chipola.
The coach said that his
players know what he
has done, but more im-
portantly, know what he
expects of them.
"They know I expect a
high level of play, a high
level of discipline, a high
level of energy every day
at practice, and a high
level of focus, and es-
pecially high defensive
intensity every day in
practice," he said. "If we
do those things, I feel
like all of those high lev-
els together can bring a
high level of basketball. I
hope by mid to late Janu-
ary that we can surprise
some people and play at
the level of some of the
other good teams around
here."


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SPORTS


College Football


Sandusky TV interview



could haunt him at trial


Ready
From Page 1B
working hard, plugging
along and making ad-
justments as we go."
Marianna will compete


Anderson
From Page 1B

"I think it will really be
about a month into the
season before we get a
regular lineup and a sub-
stitution pattern. It will
probably be ugly early;
we just hope it's not go-
ing to be too ugly late."
Anderson said that he
hopes to improve the
team's record this season,
but to do so the players
will have to break some
bad habits that may have
formed last season.
"I never saw them play
last year, but from what I
hear, there was some self-
ish play and some things
like that that went on. "'I
tried to let the guys know
that I don't deal with that
verywell," he said. "We've
also got to improve on
the defensive end. If we
can do that, then we'll be
in ballgames.
"We want to improve
overall as a team play
better together. Hope-
fully by January or some-
where around then we
can be competitive with
the better teams around
here."
White and Campbell
are the two most expe-
rienced returners, and
while Anderson said he
liked both of them, the
team is going to need to
find more production to
be successful.
"I know Marquise will
be able to score the ball
if he figures out what to
do on the other end, but









JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


SPORTS

Golf


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Tiger Woods, fresh off a third-place finish at the Australian Open, looks to continue his strong play this week at the President's
Cup in Melbourne, Australia.


Couples confident the President's


Cup will remain in American hands


The Associated Press

MELBOURNE, Australia The
motto for Tiger Woods these days is
to move forward, and that covers a
lot of territory.
Woods nearly made it through his
entire interview Tuesday at the Presi-
dents Cup before he was asked about
the prospects of playing Adam Scott
and ex-caddie Steve Williams, who
caused such a stir over a racial com-
ment he made to disparage Woods
two weeks ago.
Would it not be better to face him
early and get it out of the way?
"It's already done," Woods said. "I
addressed it last week and I said life
goes forward, hot backward."
He is ready to put behind a sum-
mer of injuries, especially after such
a promising showing last week in the
Australian Open when he was twice
within one shot of the lead on the
back nine and finished third, two
shots behind, his best result against
a full field in two years.
Woods even sounded resigned to
moving beyond such a successful


partnership with Steve Stricker.
It took a dozen years and 16 part-
ners in the Presidents Cup and Ryder
Cup until Woods found what ap-
peared to be the perfect partner.
Two years ago at Harding Park, they
became the first tandem to win all
four team matches in the Presidents
Cup, and the first to go 4-0 in any cup
in 30 years.
They won two out of three matches
at the Ryder Cup last year.
But there were growing indications
that U.S. captain Fred Couples might
break them up for some matches
when the Presidents Cup gets under
way at Royal Melbourne.
"Hopefully, we'll get put out there
together," Woods said. "I know that
we feel very comfortable with one
another and we were talking about it
today. There's a certain comfort level
about each other's games."
He added, however, that the pair-
ings for the week have not been
decided.
"A lot of pairings have not been set
in stone," Woods said.
Woods was excited the way Stricker


hit the ball in a practice round Tues-
day, particularly because Stricker last
competed Sept. 25 at the Tour Cham-
pionship while dealing with a neck
injury that weakened his left arm.
The turf is firm at Royal Melbourne,
yet Stricker never nched when he
had to go after a sW.
A year ago, the United States
thought it had a dream pairing in
Johnson and Phil Mickelson a pair of
swashbucklers who often play money
games against each other in practice
rounds at the majors.
They lost both matches badly in
Wales, with neither one reaching the
17th hole.
"Me and Phil will not be playing to-
gether this week," Johnson said with
a grin. "We do better playing against
each other than with each other.
We're good buddies. We love play-
ing each other. But as Phil put it, we
didn't have good energy."
Where does that leave Johnson?
Someone suggested Woods, and he
didn't blink.
"That's a possibility," Johnson said.
"We'll see what happens."


WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 2011 3BF


The 2011 President's Cup a

reflection on golf's landscape
MELBOURNE, Australia
O ne thing already
can be said for
this Presidents
Cup. The Americans have
come a long way.
Only it has nothing to
do with the oceans and DougFerguson
time zones they crossed On the Fringe
to get Down Under. Nor is
progress measured by the er, so many players stayed
outcome, for the Ameri- away most of them
cans have lost this event Americans that the
only once since it began tournament went down
in 1994. to No. 104 in the ranking
It's all about their will- (Greg Kraft) to fill the 64-
ingness to travel amid the man field.
changing landscape in That led to Stuart Ap-
golf. pleby's famous line about
The Presidents Cup re- Americans.
turns to Royal Melbourne "They're like a bag of
for the first time in 13 prawns on a hot Sunday,"
years, and just think how he once said. "They don't
differently golf looked travel well."
back then from an Ameri- Nowthose passportpag-
can perspective. It was es are filling up quickly.
late in the season the U.S. captain Fred
second week in December Couples wanted his two
some six weeks after captain's picks to play
the Tour Championship. the week before in the
Hardly anyone was play- Australian Open, and
ing meaningful golf. Even was pleased that six oth-
fewer felt like going all the er players joined them.
way to Australia. Some of them started
The International team even earlier.
handed the United States Jim Furyk, Bill Haas,
its worst loss in any team Hunter Mahan, David
competition. The score Toms and Nick Watney
was 20V2-11V2, such a were in Shanghai the
blowout that the cup week before at the HSBC
was secured when Nick Champions. Furyk and
Price beat David Duval in Mahan were in China
the second of 12 singles even earlier, playing the
matches on the final day. Shanghai Masters. Phil
"Got beat and still had Mickelson was in Sin-
time to eat breakfast," gapore last week. After
Duval said with a laugh. the Presidents Cup, Matt
That was the year before Kuchar is headed to China
the World Golf Champi- for the World Cup.
onships began, a series They worry less about
of tournaments for play- the destination and more
ers around the world, and about what time the plane
originally designed to be leaves.
played around the world. "I think it's fantastic the
But in the first year, a way Americans have em-
half-dozen Americans braced the way global golf
from the top 50 in the is played nowadays," In-
world chose not to go to ternational captain Greg
Spain at the end of the Norman said Tuesday.
season. Norman says more trav-


And when the Match
Play Championship went
to Australia two years lat-


el, especially this time of
the year, could make the
matches closer this time.


WeC Help'








-14B WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 16,2011


The Associated Press

FLORHAM PARK, N.J. The New
York Jets have watched as much film
as they can gather on Tim Tebow, and
still aren't quite sure what to expect.
They know Denver's quarterback
will run a whole lot Thursday night in
the Broncos' unconventional option-
style offense. But will he throw some,
too? And, how much?
"You're looking at formations or
personnel groupings that tell you it's
going to be a pass, and it's not with
this group," Jets coach Rex Ryan said
Tuesday. "That's a little different, but
you better be sound and obviously
assume he's running with it."
After spending last week prepar-
ing for New England's Tom Brady, a
quarterback they've had plenty of
experience playing against, the -Jets
have only a few days to get ready for
a player who's a completely different
type of opponent.
"You think of running quarter-
backs, and most guys are a little more
shifty and kind of got that make-you-
miss (style)," safety Jim Leonhard
said. "He'd rather run you over than
run around you. It's just different, a
different mentality. He's more like a
fullback than a true tailback when he
runs the football."
Which is often. Tebow was just 2 of
8 passing for 69 yards in a 17-10 win
at Kansas City last Sunday, but also
ran for 43 yards on nine carries. The
second-year quarterback has been
criticized for not being an NFL-cali-
ber passer, but he has won three of
his four starts this season mostly
with his legs.
Tebow is 47 of 105 for 605 yards
and seven touchdowns and just one
interception, and is Denver's second-
leading rusher with 320 yards and
two scores on only 48 carries.
"This is a college-style offense and
it's around Tim Tebow and it looks
just like he's at the University of Flor-
ida," cornerback Darrelle Revis said.
"He does a great job running it and
we know he's going to have his car-
ries and we know he's going to throw
the ball. They have no choice but to
throw the ball. They did it in the past,
and they're going to do it again."
But when is the question, and that's
what has kept defenses off balance so
far.
The Broncos ran 55 times in 63
offensive plays against Kansas City
- and that was even with running
backs Knowshon Moreno and Wil-


SPORTS


NFL



Tebow has the Jets attention


lis McGahee getting hurt in the first
quarter. With the game still in the
balance, Tebow made a play with his
arm, tossing a 56-yard pass to Eric
Decker to seal the victory.
"The thing with him is you have to
stay disciplined because as inconsis-
tent as he is throwing the football,
all of the sudden he'll make a throw
where you go, 'Wow, that was impres-
sive,'" Leonhard said. "And for the
most part, those throws have been
touchdowns. They're a big-play, fast-
strike offense when they do throw
the ball down the field."
Moreno is out for the season with
a knee injury, and McGahee's status
was uncertain because of a tweaked
hamstring. That means there could
be a lot of third-stringer Lance Ball
and, of course, a scrambling Tebow.
The Jets have been using 41-year-
old Mark Brunell, one of the game's
most mobile quarterbacks in his
prime, on the scout team to mimic
the 24-year-old Tebow.
"I'm left-handed and he is left-
handed, and that's about it right
there," Brunell joked when asked
how similar he is to Tebow.
With such a run-heavy offense,
there will be plenty of action for the
Jets' run stoppers, particularly defen-
sive linemen Sione Pouha and Mike
DeVito.
"The world falls on me and (De-
Vito)," Pouha said. "We like to pride
ourselves on being the two fat guys,
I guess, in the middle, but we pride
ourselves on being able to stop the
run."
Despite the success Tebow and the
Broncos have been having, Revis isn't


Jaguars sign

defensive help
The Associated Press

JACKSONVILLE The
Jacksonville Jaguars have
signed cornerback Ashton
Youboty and defensive end
George Selvie.
Youboty is expected to
help fill the void left after
starter Rashean Mathis was
placed on injured reserve.
Will Middleton will replace
Mathis in the starting line-
up Sunday at Cleveland,
and Youboty will serve as a
backup.
Youboty, a third-round
pick by Buffalo in 2006,
played in 44 games for the
Bills. He. spent the pre-
season with Tampa Bay. He
has 54 tackles, two sacks
and an interception.
Selvie, a seventh-round
pick by St. Louis in 2010,
played in 16 games as a
rookie. He was claimed
off waivers by Carolina in
September and played in
four games. Selvie could
help fill in for starter Aaron
Kampman.


Leinart


The Associated Press


quite so sure .the option style of of-
fense can succeed for a full season
in the NFL. Except, he told report-
ers, if a team had Michael Vick as the
quarterback and Chris Johnson at
running back. But not a big, bruis-
ing quarterback such as the 6-foot-3,
235-pound Tebow.
"This guy, he's a tough guy," Revis
said. "He's really another running
back when he carries the ball. When
you look at him on film, he's not try-
ing to avoid hits. He's actually trying
to lower his shoulder and take people
on. You've got to respect that."
Tebow wasn't offended by Revis'
comments that the option couldn't
work with him as the quarterback,
saying he was looking forward to
playing against the Jets cornerback
Thursday night.
"I honestly don't necessarily pay
attention or worry too much about
what others say," Tebow said. "I just
try to get better every day and consis-
tently try to improve."
Tebow said the Broncos shouldn't
be labeled as one type of offense be-
.cause the team is trying to come up
with different approaches depending
on the opponent. After all, he threw
39 times in a 45-10 loss to Detroit
three weeks ago.
"It's difficult in a way because it's
similar to a wildcat offense where
they can run and they can also pass,"
Revis said. "On defense, for us, the D-
line and the linebackers just need to
focus on the run and this is a game
for the secondary, for us not to fall
asleep back there because we've seen
on film that they've done a lot of dou-
ble-moves and trick plays."


gets his chance


HOUSTON Matt
Leinart had a quick chat
with Andre Johnson before
leaving the Texans' locker
room on Tuesday to catch T'
a flight home to Southern Matt Leinart wil
California. the injured MatI
When he returns next
week, Leinart will have a first-place team
to lead and Johnson should be healthy
enough to help him.
Leinart will be the Texans' starting
quarterback in the first game after their
bye, at Jacksonville on Nov. 27, because
Matt Schaub is out indefinitely with what
coach Gary Kubiak termed a "significant"
right foot injury.
"I've just got a job to do, be efficient and
get the guys and this team in the right
situation," Leinart said. "I'm extremely
bummed for Matt, just because of what
he's put into this organization and to get
us to this point. At the same time, it's op-
portunity for myself to step up."
It could be Leinart's job for the rest, of
the season.
Kubiak said Tuesday that Schaub will
undergo testing and his status will be
determined next week. Schaub's agent,


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
II take over for
t Schaub


Joby Branion, did not return
a phone message.
"We're still evaluating the
injury," Kubiak said. "That's
going to go on for about
a week, and then at some
point next week, we'll know
whether he has a chance to
come back or he doesn't."


Johnson, meanwhile, is
expected to return for the Jacksonville
game after sitting out six weeks with a
right hamstring injury. And that's a com-
forting notion to Leinart, who hasn't
started a game since 2009, when he was
with Arizona.
"It's a great offense to be a part of,"
Leinart said, "and now we get the best
receiver in the NFL back, which is awe-
some to have. That's going to be great."
Even without Johnson, Houston (7-3)
has managed to take control of the AFC
South by winning its last four games. Ari-
an Foster and Ben Tate both rank among
the league's top 10 rushers.
Leinart had dinner with Schaub on
Monday night to go over details and try to
make the transition as seamless as pos-
sible. He also made Schaub 9 promise.
"I told Matt that I was going to make
him proud and just win games."


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


College Football

Buckeyes have plenty

of their own problems


The Associated Press

COLUMBUS, Ohio-
Everybody's got a solu-
tion for what ails Ohio
State.
Interim coach Luke
Fickell said he was grilled
by fans at a meeting with
a booster group on Tues-
day morning.
"Sorry about that," he
said after he showed up
a few minutes late for his
weekly news conference.
"The Quarterback Club
had a lot more questions
today."
One persistent mem-
ber of that club wanted
to know why the Buck-
eyes only run on first and
second downs and only
throw on third.
"He told me when
he was coaching high
school, 'We threw it on
first, threw it on second
and then ran draw plays
on third and it was re-
ally successful,'" Fickell
said. Then he added, "If
Penn State's listening,
that might be our game
plan."
There are plenty of
problems for players,
coaches and fans to
address.
The Buckeyes (6-4, 3-3
Big Ten) got off to a mis-
erable start, showed rare
flashes of being able to
move the ball, but ul-
timately fell 26-23 in
overtime at Purdue on
Saturday.
Now they have to ad-
dress all the things that
went wrong, and some
that have been going
wrong all year, before
taking on the 21st-ranked
Nittany Lions (8-2, 5-
1) on Saturday in their
home finale.
The No. 1 problem fac-
ing the Buckeyes is an
offense particularly a
passing game that has
had great difficulty mak-
ing plays.
Over the last five games,
they've completed just 27
of 63 passes (43 percent)
for 401 yards, an aver-
age of just 80 yards per
game.
Purdue dared the Buck-
eyes to throw the ball.
And they couldn't.
"A lot of it has to do with
where they're at with the
quarterback position,"
Boilermakers coach
Danny Hope said after
the game. "Even though
(Braxton Miller) is a very
talented quarterback,
he's a freshman, and nor-
mally a freshman quar-
terback can't come out
there and manufacture a
passing offense."
As a result, the Boiler-
makers crowded the line
with eight or nine defend-
ers and matched up with
any receivers. As a result,
Ohio State was limited to
166 yards on the ground
- 101 yards fewer than
it had averaged over the
previous four games.
Miller was 8 of 18 pass-
ing for 132 yards and two
touchdowns.
"You've just got to be
able to make a few yards
and rely on some of those
guys up front even if they
are putting in the extra
guys," Fickell said.


"Obviously there are a
lot more questions. We all
know. We've said it a mil-
lion times:
Balance
has got to
be the key.
We've got
to create
and find
some more
Fickell of that
whether
it's throwing it or screen-
ing it or drawing it like
the guy from the Quar-
terback Club said."
Fickell said one of the
problems is that receivers
aren't getting open. The
return of DeVier Posey
might solve that.
Posey has had two dif-
ferent NCAA suspen-
sions both for accept-
ing improper benefits,
first from a tattoo-parlor
owner for signed memo-
rabilia and the second
for being overpaid for a
summer job totaling
10 games. He returns to
the Buckeyes just in time
to play in his final game
at Ohio Stadium.
His loss has been felt
more than anyone might
have guessed. He was
the second-leading re-
ceiver last year with 53
catches for 848 yards and
seven touchdowns. All
of this year's wideouts
- in 10 games have
combined for 46 catches
for 745 yards and five
touchdowns.
Posey also brings a lev-
el of consistency, sohie-
thing sorely lacking in
the receiving corps. He
has caught a pass in 27
consecutive games.
' Two other prominent
players who served at
least five-game suspen-
sions for improper bene-
fits, offensive tackle Mike
Adams and running back
Dan "Boom" Herron,
started the very first game
they were available.
But Fickell wasn't
ready to declare Posey a
starter.
"I don't know yet. We've
got to go out there and
see how that whole thing
works out," he said. "He'll
have an opportunity.
We'll see how practice
goes, and we'll see as we
get closer to game time."
Ohio State is also deal-
ing with problems on
defense opposing
teams have converted
on 53 percent of their
third-down plays over
the last two games and
special teams. It was a
blocked extra-point kick
in the final minute that
allowed Purdue to force
the overtime.
Fickell is confident the
Buckeyes can bounce
back from their lat-
est defeat. He said they
were upbeat when they
showed up at the football
facility the day after the
game.
"Yes, they're disap-
pointed. Yes, they're
hurt," he said. "They've
got a passion to play.
They've got a passion to
get better. They're not
happy with where they
are, so that was the great-
est thing to see come
Sunday."


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EIE RotY Su TH OUIDA MORRIS NAN HARKLEROAD
(850) 209-8039 (850) 209-4705 (850) 526-281
debblrWoneysmith Broker/lOwner nan.haklwoad
emnbarqnmal.com Ocntury2ll.corn



U -
PAT FURn BEVERLY THOMAS ELLIN MARSN
(850) 200S071 (8501 209-5211 (803 209-1090
Furri9@msn.com ell*t ducatmeletatAnt


Tebow has led Denver to a 3-1 record since being named the starting quarterback.
Tebow has led Denver to a 3-1record since being named the starting quarterback.


ln, Honor of National
Weatherization Day,
October 30

Free Home Comfort Diagnostic
to the first 10 customers that call and schedule an appointment
Plus 20% off*
Home Weatherization Projects
such as sealing attics and ceiling insulation
*(20% off Offer Good Thru November 18,2011)
Federal Tax Credits for weatherlzatlon
projects EXPIRE 12/31/2011






www.woodallstotalcomfort.com
850-482-8802
License #CAC058636


ED McCoY Do
(850) 573-6190
erccoy02
*wh -c a


CLARICE BOYETTE
(80) 573-1572


I







'ACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


z


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w


'I


Sthis TO ENTER: '1
Fill oit this coupon and take it into
Qn of the businesses listed below.

Name
SAddress I
I Day Phone_____
, Evening Phone I
S.--,----------------------.


SHOP COMPARE SAVE


COBB FRONT END AND
TIRE SERVICE
"Not Just A Front End Shop"
NOW LOCATED at TWO LOCATIONS to BETTER SERVE YOU...


West Florida Electric
A Touchstone Energy' Cooperative )A
The power of human connections
(800) 342-7400
www. westflorida. coop
Graceville Sneads Bonifay





Bob Pforte Motors, Inc.
4214 Lafayette Street
Marianna, Florida 32446
(850) 482-4601
(800) 483-1440 www.bobpfortedodge.com
1- .I


"You take care of the inside ...
... well take care of the outside!" '


850-526-HAIR (4247)
4 30)8 l 5 '0 1 I.Lro%;Iri ,n r r ,;-. l. .i Pht', r:,r, ,rr
, ll. i, D,:.".h, Da Cha. k.m B -rid IL....i,, Di . ,- ,'i "
SMxar Phill.p ;.. Hahurmi & Man Araloujic.

State Farm "
Providing Insurance and Financial Services
Home Office, Bloomington, Illinois 61710 INSURANCE
Linda Pforte Insurance Agency Inc
Linda J Pfole, Agent
2919 Penn Avenue, Suite B, Marianna, FL 32448-2716
Bus 850-482-3425 Fax 850-482-6823
Toll Free 1-877-364-6007
linda.ptorte.bxrs@statefarm.com
Good Neighbor Since 1986
, i ,i"-im I | IJ T" Ir \W/ l,

Hours: 5:30 ivi 2 ,rj, i 1,day Soturdoy.
850-482-8797 t
Dcally Lunch Spmcicils
No- Mh MVIoncJdcv Fridcty
Com. Join Us for
Good O1i Fashion
Breakfast or Lunch,
9W-A;a NA 10


w i I
O


f CHIPOLA
COMMUNITY
BANK
Marianna's Only Locally Owned Community Bank
4701 HIGHWAY 90
MARIANNA, FLORIDA 32446
850-526-7144
www.chipolacommunitybank.com


BARNES TIRE & SERVICE CENTER
4458 Jackson St. Marianna, FL 32448
Phone: (850) 526-3813 Fax: (850) 482-3207


)aks Restaurant MARIANNA TOYOTA
k Station Shopping C.ntcer 2961 PENN AVE MARIANNA, FL
,iCiO US Southr 850-526-3511
s Sther Www.MARIANNATOYOTA. COM
Lunch Buffet Jubo shrimp Come check out our ,, -
R Home ,0 great selection of :.
Home Coota- I MFw and iu M I.
Full Menu Available NEW and
8 5PRE OWNED
(850) 526-1114 4727 Hwy 90 EasI Marianna FL inventory! U


The (
The Oa
, '



IIz II III I I


WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 2011 + 5B I


EL_









-16B WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 16,2011


PEANUTS BY CHARLES SCHULTZ
r .1 1- li 1 11-1


SOUP TO NUTZ BY RICK STROMOSKI


FRANK & ERNEST BY BOB THAVES


ARLO & JANIS BY JIMMY JOHNSON


V% wnrWHAT*
fJ<..- YOOUPWb
rr"---- 4'^


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


'(00K0OW!
UKETWE
SFABCY
N5PA5'


IuW)OTAbOUTTO PUr
WITH YU OTADID&f)U '


ALLEY OOP BY JACK AND CAROLE BENDER
BOARD THE COAST GUARD RESCUE SHIPT WOULD YOU --- THIS IS
et -- -.I I- xcuse U 1 PIEEDEDED


COW & BOY BY MARK LEIKNES


PETA JUST HEARD WHAT
YOU'RE UP TO, AND YOUR
COW IS UNDER ARREST FOR
ROOSTER ENDANGERMENT,
WHAT?! CAN
YOU DO THAT?


ARREST A COW? WHY?
CUZ WE'RE ALL PFDANIMAL,
WE CAN'T ARREST
ANIMALS FOR EX-
PLOITING OTHER
ANIMALS? I
DON'T THINK SO!


NO, I MEAN,
YOU'RE NOT A
GOVERNMENT
POLICING
AGENCY.
CAN YOU
ARREST
ANYONE?


KIT'N'CARLYLE BY LARRY WRIGHT HERMAN BY JIM UNGER


"I'm In the dry-cleaning business."


NEA Crossword Puzzle


ACROSS
1 Marsh
wader
6 More
friendly
11 Tabby
12 Professor's
goal
13 Floated
downriver
14"Messiah"
composer
15Mine
passages
16 Old Italian
currency
17"Auld
Lang -"
18 Knows
how
19 Like a
sourball
23 Kind of
rage
25 Zeus'
shield
26 Circulars
29 Stares
rudely
31 Yodeler's
perch
32 -de-sac
33 Rinds
34 Lawyer's
thing
35 Whodunit
suspects
37 Inaugural
ritual


39Tar's
patron
saint
40 Roll
41 Inscribe
45 A TV
Maverick
47- firma
48 Carry-on
bag
51 Angora
sweater
52 Complained
53 Situated
54Chili-
pepper dip
55 Wieded an
axe

DOWN
1 Exhilarating
2 Dainty
3 Singing
cowboy
Tex -
4 Teller's
stack
5 Actor -
Beatty
6 Close
7 Natural
8 Bossie's
chew
9 Sooner
than
10 Family
mem.
11 Monks'
titles


Answer to Previous Puzzle

MOA ACT SLOB
AH SLAP PALE
PHANTOMS OTIS
SUBARU YOOHOO
COD CPL0
AMAHS CHASED
TYPO HAIL OER
NT MARC GNAT





12 Like wafers 36 Signs of
16 Serve the spring
soup 38 Donkey's
(2 wds.) bray
18 Parakeet 40 Raised
home cattle
20Culture 42Slight
dish goo amount
21 Rub the 43 Wailed
wrong 44 Difficult
way 46 Crossing
22 Bakers' the ocean
meas. 47 Enameled
24Uh-oh! metal
25 D.A.'s 48 German
backup "bugs"
26Joint 49Gleeful
problem shout
27 Oater 50 Diamond
showdown -
28 Lithe 51 Speed
30 Vitality meas.


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDrlverBooks.com


11-16 2011 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS



CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebnty Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: B equals C
"LMY GYRDL AO LMEWHD SELM R
KYRWEWH ED SAXLM KAXY EW GEOY
LMRW LMY HXYRLYDL AO LMEWHD
SELMANL EL." BRXG UNWH


Previous Solution: "Why join the Navy if you can be a pirate?"
"I want to put a ding in the universe." Steve Jobs
2011 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 11-16


Horoscope
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) Something quite
fortunate could transpire
for you today through the
good auspices of a relative.
Try to be nicer than usual
to both kith and kin.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-
Dec. 21) In an area where
you're trying to make prog-
ress, you might initially
meet resistance but will
soon find cooperation.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) Because of having a
natural ability to establish
order where chaos is run-
ning rampant, you'll func-
tion far more effectively
today.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) Once you discover
you are allowing challeng-
ing developments to in-
timidate you, you'll be able
to do anything.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) By bringing people
who possess talents you
lack into an endeavor that
is giving you fits, you can
solve most any problem
you encounter today.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
- An infusion of hope con-
cerning a financial matter
could come through for
you from an unexpected
conduit today.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20) It behooves you to
develop a few partnership
arrangements today, espe-
cially where each has a dif-
ferent expertise to offer.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
- Don't be so quick to give
up on hope where your ca-
reer is concerned, because
something significant is
brewing for you.
CANCER (June 21-July
22) If a friend or associ-
ate of yours should make a
promise to do something
for you today, don't take it
lightly.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
- Something on which
you're working could yield
far more benefits than you
ever expected it to do.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22) Regardless of how
bumpy the road looks, stay
the course with someone
you recently met.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
23) Chance could play
a powerful role today in
bringing about condi-
tions for producing more
material growth than you
thought possible.


Annie's Mailbox


Dear Annie: My girlfriend, "Sophie," and
I broke up three months ago after a five-
year relationship because of my inability
to commit.
Sophie and I have taken multiple short
breaks in the past. I saw her last month
and apologized. I told her I had made
the mistake of my life by letting her go.
Apparently, I needed substantial time to
realize what was important to me. Un-
fortunately, Sophie told me she no longer
sees a future for us and asked me to stop
calling. She said she'd contact me when
she was ready to be friends.
I want to give her the time she has
asked for, but I'm afraid if I wait too long,
I will lose her forever. If I ignore Sophie's
request to give her time, it might only
make matters worse. Should I go after
her or wait for her to come to me?
M IN HAWAII

Dear M: Are you going to propose? If
so, go after her. If not, leave her alone.
Your feelings are no longer trustworthy
to Sophie. Unless you are ready for a
lifetime commitment, ring in hand, do


the girl a favor and let her find someone
she knows won't walk out when he feels
overwhelmed.

Dear Annie: I sympathize with "Maine
Husband," who is the caregiver for his
wife with multiple sclerosis. I'm sure his
wife is extremely grateful to have him in
her life. My husband has had to take over
more and more of the household chores
because of my disabilities, and I am so
honored to have him.
When we are invited out and I don't
feel well enough to go, I make sure I have
everything I'll need for the few hours my
husband will be gone. Then he can go
and relax. I can always call him if I have
a problem, but he feels better for getting
out of the house, and I feel better know-
ing I am not taking up all of his time.
"Maine" has to speak up for himself.
Maybe if he asked the relatives to watch
his wife for a few hours, they would
understand his position. They might see
how hard it is to rely on someone else to
do all the things they take for granted.
C.


Bridge

Bridge players should not jump to conclu- North 11-16-11
sions, but sometimes a jump in the bidding will 4 6 4
keep the auction from falling over backward. V A 2
Back to the bidding in a moment. How should A Q 10 5 3 2
South play in seven hearts after West leads the A Q 5
spade king to declarer's ace? West East
The strong jump shift has fallen out of favor, K Q J 3 4 9 8 7 2
but I think it is much more useful than its weak V 9 4 V g 3
cousin. The responder announces 13 to 16 8 4 K J 9 7
high-card points with either an excellent six- 9 7 6 4 2 4 10 8 3
card or longer suit, or a two-suiter: his own suit
and the opener's. South
Here, South rebids three hearts to show the 4 A 10 5
one-suiter. North control-bids (cue-bids) four V K Q J 10 8 7 5
clubs to indicate slam interest. South uses 6
Blackwood and jumps to seven hearts oppo- K J
site three aces. South, with only 12 top tricks, Dealer: North
must establish dummy's diamond suit. But he .Vulnerable: Both
has to be careful with dummy's entries. This is
the right line of play: Cash the heart king, play South West North East
a diamond to dummy's ace, ruff a diamond, 1i Pass
lead a heart to dummy's ace, ruff a diamond 2 V Pass 3 Pass
high, draw trumps, overtake the club jack with 3 V Pass 4 4 Pass
ig 14 NT Pass 5 Pass
dummy's queen, ruff another diamond, over-Pss P Pass
take the club king with dummy's ace, and dis-
card South's spade losers on dummy's two high Opening lead: 4 K
diamonds. Opening lead: I K


ENTERTAINMENT


r-








CLASSIFIED


www.JCFLORIDAN.com


F
Jackson County Floridan Wednesday, Novemb~er 16, 2011- B


WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED





ARK TPLAC


BY PHONE: (850) 526-3614 or (800) 779-2557 BY MAIL: WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE
BY FAX: (850) 779-2557 P.O. BOX 520, MARIANNA, FL 32447
ONLINE: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM IN PERSON: 4403 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA
Publication Policy Errors and Omissions: Advertisers should check their ad the first day. This publication shall not be liable for failure to publish an ad or for a typographic error or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the ad for the first day's
insertion. Adjustment for errors is limited to the cost of that portion of the ad wherein the error occurred. The advertiser agrees that the publisher shall not be liable for damages arising out of errors in advertisements beyond the amount paid for the space
actually occupied by that portion of the advertisement in which the error occurred, whether such error is due to negligence of the publisher's employees or otherwise and there shall be no liability for non-insertion of any advertisement beyond the amount paid for
such advertisement. Display Ads are not guaranteed position. All advertising is subject to approval. Right is reserved to edit, reject, cancel or classify all ads under the appropriate classification.
FoIedinscl tl-reIrvst w .cIoia~o


(iK ANNOUNCEMENTS


BALLROOM DANCER
(No need to be professional)
Female Dancer looking for dance partner to
donate 1 hr/week #)r 8 wks to assist teaching
teenagers in preparation for Prom &
Graduation events. 850-526-4561


I Pay CASH for Diabetic test
strips. Up to $10 per box!
Most brands considered.
All boxes must be unopened
and unexpired.
Call Matt 334-392-0260





i .lLiJ :1 ^'^l
THURDAY 11 24/11A &


Farm Equipment & Antique Auction. Sat.Nov.
19, 2011 9 AM EST. 20960 NE Burlington
Rd..Hosford, FL Tractors, Mowers, Cult.& Farm
Equip. John Stanley Lic. AU044 or Felton Hall
AU4266 -AB2969. 850-379-8410/850-566-6646
10% Buyers Prem. Consq. Welcome


JUST IN: Old Country Rose Biscuit Jar & Soup
Tureen; Alaskan Prints by Annette Hartzell;
5' coffee table by Baker;, wood Deacons bench;
Beautiful old podium; metal gates
@Medford Antique Marketplace,
3820 RCC Dothan, 334-726-1204

C $ FINANCIAL


Would You Like To Be Your Own Boss??
Local Transport Company for Sale based
in Dothan with 5 trucks and 1 car included.
Annual income $435k. 9 years in business.
Your new future for only $165K!I
Call 334-596-8179

MISCELLANEII o hFINANCMIALSERVICSi

DO YOU WANT DISCOUNT ON YOUR
.HOMEOWNERS.INSURANCt COST:.
*-Most existing homes have one or mord
wind resistive construction features needed
to qualify for insurance discounts. .
'FLORIDA LAW 'now require Insurance
Co.'s to provide wind mitigation discounts.
T -o. get dislobnts (or refunds you may be
entttle-td, get'an Inspection and report.
James Grant has the Florida Professional
License(s) required to perform Wind
'' Mitigation Inspections.
The fee for an inspection is only $150.00.
-(Recently, my customers are averaging more
$30000 per year savings bn insurance).
lta ijames at 50-526-8367.to discuss
1,';'.: an Inspection for you.__

(UR) lIRHNDI$iE
L ) R .


Entertainment Center This is a solid oak, with
glass shelves, 4 piece unit, $400, 850-263-4477

Wanted: Old Coins, Gold,
Diamonds, Guns, And Tools
West Main Jewelry & Loan 334-671-1440.
MISCELLANOS FO SAE*


Satsumas: Free bag of Jackson County Lee
Tangerines with your purchase of $20 or more
of fresh tree ripe satsumas. Location of grove
Hwy 73S and Laramore Road, follow signs to
Rar I Ranch For mnre infn (850)209-5506


SATSUMAS, tangerines and grapefruit $20.
bags. Located at Hwy 73 S. and Laramore Rd,
follow the signs to Bar L Ranch. Open daily
lpm-6pm. For more info call 850-209-5506.

ri )" PETS & ANIMALS


Quail for Sale flight condition
Ready for Hunting
-i 10 850-326-3016 4


Free kittens Multi-colored, multi-hair length
850-482- 5880/850-303-9727 after 3pm

AKC Labrador Retriever Chocolate, one male,
Vet checked S/W very healthy. Hunting Blood-
line, Ready 11/5 $400, 334-693-2912 sdejones@
comcast.net
T OLDER PUPPIES ON SALE V
$75 & up Yorkie Poos, Shih-poos, Morkies,
Yorkle-pom also Yorkies $400 and up.
Maltese $500 & Shorkies $250. Chi-A-poo $125.
334-718-4886


UKC & NKC Registered Treening Feist Puppies 3BR 1BA duplh
5 months old with all shots, white with black & Grand Ridge b
brown spots. Will be great pets for any house- 592-5571
hold. Great squirrel dogs and ready for training LG 2/1 in Mari
this season!! Sight Treening Now. plan, w/d hkul
$300. Call 334-618-4194 850-352-2103

FARMER'S MARKET
2BR/1BA Com
lRS-P DC1. mTile floors, wa
credit/bkg
Cherokee Satsumas available at the farm apartmer
1525 Fairview Rd. Marianna 850-579-4641. 2BR 1BA In Ma
Efficient, w/ap
850-272-6121
FRESH 3BR 2BA w/bo
GREEN very clean, CH
GREEN for appointme
PEANUTS A
.Qualil
850-352-2199 "Property Man
OR 850-352-4423

Fresh Shelled Peas, Several Varieties
2307 Mayo Road, (Grand Ridge)
Bobby Hewett (850) 592-4156

AE iin kitchen, Dou
enced inbac
Hark 84 West
P ULarge Country
2 car garage,2
in Alford, $650
i 850-579-4317/8
SLarge house in
4 BR 2.5 ba 322
outside buildir
deposit & $40
Lovely 3BR 1BA
schools, nice y
door pets ok,
6211

Plenty of Shelled, Fresh Peas, 3/2 in Afford,w
Tomatoes & other Vegetables 2/ MH South
ed, Central He
All Farm Fresh! 209-4516
220 W. H 52 Malvern $500andup
.Fihttp://www.c
850-258-4868/2
2 & 3BR2BAM
Ho us R a AIN pets, Central I-
1594 leave me:
HAY 6x6ft. Argentina, Bahia, Bermuda, 116
rolls, $60. each. 334-805-3403 or 334-677-3247. Marianna
E DUCA'iO "N T 3/2 $550
-' INSTRUCTON Water/s
Other rent
SC OOL & NSRU TION* Joyc
3BR/2BA Mo
Get a Quality Education for a Creek Rd. Re
New Career! Programs 1st/Last
FORTIS offered in Healthcare, Rent to O
SHVAC and Electrical Trades. Lot ren
Call Fortis College Today! 1 & 2BR,
(GCOLI.E; 1 For consumer information
www.Fortis.edu

RESI E TRIAL -
GA REAL ESTATE FOR RENT

COTTONDALE VILLAGE APARTMENTS THUI DS
Now accepting applications for 2
Flbedroom units. Rental assistance. No FIDAYY 1
application fee. We pay water, sewer, SUNDAY)
and trash service. 4052 Old Cottondale
Road, Marianna, FL 32448. (850) 526-4062.,
TDD/TTY 711. "This institution is an
equal opportunity provider, and employer." Wednes

U,..A......NW rIThursday
APRMET URNIFriday, 1
IBR 1BA Apartment in town, $450 per month. Sunday,:
No pets. 850-557-2000 Tuesday,

4 C l-8 5- n e
Wednesday, November 16, 2011










GETSUDKU MORE WASABIT KICK









PUZZLES ONLINEI
ARCHIVES AND MORE GREAT GAMES AT
BOXERJAM.COM 0201


ex & 2BR 2BA duplex both in.
both $425/mo + $425 dep. 850-


anna, nice kitchen, open floor
p, yard/porch, pvt/safe $600/mo


~l I i]I 1 lo 111
icrete block Rental in Marlanna,
fisher h/u, pets ok, $300/mo + $30
rnd ck. Additional houses and
its in Graceville 850-263-5753
rianna City ULimits. Energy
appliances, CH/A, $475/mo


inus room, House in Marianna,
/A, dishwasher, $650 + dep. Call
nt 904-214-6980


stin Tyler & Associates *
ty Homes & Apartments
* 850- 526-3355 4m
nagement Is Our ONLY Business"
W For Rent. 316 Red Bud
Circle in Dothan
This one-year-old Garden
home has hard wood
floors, carpet in bed
rooms and ceramic tile
with granite counter tops
uble garage, 9 foot ceiling,
k yard and Irrigation. (In Grove
334-794-2894. $1,300 per month
Home West of Alford 3/2 brick,
2 large sheds, $850/mo. 3/2 brick
/mo/ lease, dep. & ref. req.
866-1965
a fantastic quiet neighborhood .
!8 sq. ft. with a basement and
ig in a fenced back yard. $1,500
application fee. Call 334-618-3414
A House, Clean, in town, near
'ard, quiet neighborhood, out-
$575/mo with deposit 850-482-


window A/C, $380 + deposit 850-
209-1664/850-573-1851
of Cottondale, water is furnish-
at/Air, $500 + dep. 850-352-439-3/
Mobile Homes in Cottondale.
H20, garbage, sewer included.
harloscountry living. com.
209-8847
obile Homes in Cottondale no
leat & Air $400-$450 850-258-
ssage
2&3BRMH's in
a & Sneads (850)209-8595.
Quiet, well maintained Park,
sewer/ garb/lawn included.
tals available starting @ $395
ce Riley RE 850-209-7825 4
mobile Home on 5 Ac off of Rocky
efference-Required. $550. Month
/$450dep. Call 772-577-0223
wn: 2 & 3BR Mobile Homes.
it included. Also available,
Apts & Houses. For details
57-3432 or 850-814-6515 4w




""-' ;Ca'$

AY11/24 DeadlI
1/25 Dea0l0.'
11/27 Deadllneo

RETAIL
lay 11/23 Deadline is]
11/24 Deadline is I
1/25 Dea'dline is
11/27 Deadline is I
11/29 Deadlineis
lay, 11/30 Deadline.is'


@_--@





00 0





08 BLOCKDOT, INC. WWW.BLOCKDOTCOM


Tuesday's
WASABI SOLUTION
2 3 () 614 8 9 1
1 @ 5 12 7
7@@11@ 6 3
O 7 8 5s 9 G9 @1 6
@ D2 6 3 7 5 4
5 6 3 4 8 1 9 7 (D
(D9 4 1 5 2 @ @(8
8 5 1 9 7 6 @ 4 3



BE SURE TO VISIT OUR
NEWEST GAME SITE

,KEWLOX.COM
KEWLBOX.COM


<3Eu IB


I


Small Quiet Family Oriented Park- 2BR 1BA MH for
Rent includes water, garbage, lawn care, No Pets 850-
592-8129




Downtown Eufaula, AL 2 Bedrooms, 2 baths.
Updated. Newer appliances, W/D hookup, deck,
yard. Convenient shopping and dining. Call 256-
437-3768 5pm or 334-728-1004 9am-5pm CST

3BR 1BA Brick House for Sale: HW floors, LR,
Din, Den, porch, 2 carports, near Riverside. 850-
352-4389






Selling by Order of
U. S. Bankruptcy Court
Middle District of Georgia
Chapter 12, Case No. 11-10378

167 Acres Divided




This property sells by order of the
Bankruptcy Court at Absolute
Auction..no minimums..no reserves.
High dollar buys.regardless of
price.
85 Acres in Cultivation
82 Acres in Pines & Hardwoods
Offered as a Whole or Divided
3 Tracts from 18 to 129 Acres
Auction held on site, 2 miles NE of
Arlington on Hwy. 45.
Terms: Pay 20% down, 10% buyer's
premium. 2% broker's commission.
Inspection: Anytime at your own
risk or Nov. 11, from noon till 2 p.m.

For Detailed Information
Johndixon.com
800.479.1763
GAL # 2034







JOHN DIXON
& ASSOCIATES
AUCTION ~ MARKETING








fi' 'day, -


",SPLA .;:- """'?





Tuesday. 11/22 @ 5 PPM
Wednesday, 11/23 @$PM


.I-








N h 1 Oil I 1a ks n C unts F .


CLASSIFIED


IVww..JCFI.ORTDAN.com


LEGALS


I' s~A~FlON' fr=~=z~~~I'.


.'J) PcImis 4x4'i 500EFI.
Winch, top, windshield. Foria 9' B aze S ,:,, Down
';- Never in mud. Only 31 hrs. Chevy99Blaze; 5, )own
Parked in carport. New o Ford 98'F150 X-Cab $7751Down
co -.d 11 00 prNew. g *e Dodge 02' Durango $995 Down
$8 ,500 0 334 897-2870 Chevy 02' Sil verado $1395 Down
$8,500.334897-2870 Call 850-215-1769
Yamaha'11 Raptor 700R: well maintained, 9AM 9PM
excellent condition, low hours, essential extras,
blue, $7,800. Call 334-432-5800 Dodge '83 Ram Charger 318 engine 150K miles.
~- YAMAHA 4 334-726-0147.
SWHEELER GRIZ- M T Ford '05 Mustang GT:
ZLY 600-'98 4X4, MUST Award winning show car,
Auto, runs great, white with black interior,
low miles, winch. 53k miles, 5 speed, in excellent condition.
$2,000 OBO $15,000. Call 334-794-7493
334-695-1306 TI
S334-695-1306 Ford '06 Sedan 500 T
;' '' LOW MILES! LIKE N_ W! kIUST SELL!
$200 down, $189 ii-r momnh.
kW Call: Ron Ellis a[ 3i 14-0028.
Ford'09 Focus
LOW MILES! GREAT GAS MILEAGE!
Packages From 4 door, $200 down, $199 per month.
S $4,9995 Call: Ron Ellis at 334-714-0028.
All All Welded Ford 2010 Fusion SE, 4cvyL. 4-door, 29K miles,
b a s All Aluminum Boats factory bumper to bumper warranty $14,500.
FIRM 334-618-8255.
www.xtremeindustries.com Ford '94 Tarus 42K miles, clean $1995.
H,334-793-2142.
Ford '95 Mustang GT Convertible- white with
............T RAIl weather interior, 200k mile runs great, needs
paint, $3,500. Firm Call 334-695-2340
PUMA '07-29ft., 2 slide-outs, king bed, like 1-Owner 75pon_
Ford '98 F-ISO X/Cab $775 pown, 09 Interest.
new $12,000 334-695-6359,334-687-6157 Open 9am 9pm, 1-800-470-0650
MO TORHOME& [. ]Honda '11 Accord EX-L: fully loaded, black with
gray leather interior, only 19k miles, $24,900.
Call 334-343-2701
Dixie RV SuperStores Honda 2007 Civic EX, coupe, 106,000 mi., great
FL's Newest RV Dealer condition, one owner, auto, moon roof, premi-
NOW OPEN um stereo and wheels, good Michelin tires. pw, b
pdl, a/c,tilt, cruise. $11,500. 334-797-1890 or
*Store Hours* 334-648-3939 .... .... F
Monday-Saturday Hyundai '11 Sa(l d
8:00am-6:00pm LOW MILES! GRFAI: tu'. MILELAGE! '.
FULL WARRANTY! $500 down, $350 per month. p
21 Acres / 30 Brands New and Pre-Owned Call: Steve Hatcher at 334-791-8243. g
Nw KyleMHeta Kia '05 Optima LX, o
Newmar Keystone Heartland Jayco Loaded, 4 cyl., Automatic, s
a Fleetwood a Prime Time a Coachmen 4 Door, NEW TIRES! Clean, cI
a Forest River 62,000 miles, Excellent. I v
____$5795. Call: 334-790-7959. r
Service Department
Parts and Acces. Store
RV Collision Center Lexans '7 LS 460 41K,
Loaded and in excellent
Located off 1-10 Exit 70/ SR285 condition. Pearl White
328 Green Acres Dr. with tan interior. $43,500.
De Funiak Springs, FL 32435 Call 334-405-9127
Sales and Service: 850-951-1000 Lincoln '91 Town Car. Runs well. $900, or best
www.dixierv.com DO 12756 offer. 334-899-7377.
Mazda '02 Protege 4-cyl. 4Dr. 106K mi. white,
Ii._ automatic, power steerihg/brakes, AC,
TOW DOLLY: DEMCO Kar Kaddy II tow dolly Am/FM/CD, sports rims & + tires.
with hydraulic surge brakes, auto-steer $3900. OBO 334-389-3071.
wheels, 3 new tires (including spare) $1,000 Mercedes '08 C300 Sport LOADED, 1 owner,
OBO. Call 334-701-7849 or 334-886-7226 Silver with Black Leather, 63K mi. (all high-
Sway). 100K mi. Extended warranty. $22,500
I -TAhILSOBO. iPod system, Sunroof. Excellent Condi-
tion, Super Clean 334-618-2154 or 334-798-5714
34FT Stationary Motor Home for Rent Mercedes '97 S500 Roadster: red convertible,
Highest rated RV Park in SE Alabama. wine leather interior,55k miles, excellent condi-
www.ozarktravelpark.com tion. Call 334-693-3980
9 miles to Ozark/Ft. Rucker gate. Perfect for ,,:
1 or 2 people. No Deposit. WIFI, & C able TV.
S550. Month. Call 334-774-3219 I can get U Riding Tcda., Ropes. v
Credit. Past Bankruntc, '"0 .
.. . ... ... Payment, Tax, Taq & Tit!,', Pt.h. P'1I n. Dr1 al.,
T'-== TRANSPORTATION Will Trade anything! '.i, ra,:y On Evary
Vehicle Sold! $20 Gift Ci -r w pu rciase -


Nis .. : .6 L DOHC 32 valve en- NEED A VEHIC.LE?
dur n.:ce V-, 3 :, '. )h.rt.Torque, shift-on-the- can get U Ridi, v
fly 4WD system, 4 door, 20x8 alloy wheels, bed Credit, Past Bank up .. 0 Down/ 1st
mounted lock box, leather seats, 350 watt Payment, Tax, Tag & Titl lPush, Pull or Drag, r
,Rockford Fosgate Powered Premium Audio Will Trade anything! Warranty On Every
with 6 disc in dash CD player, XM satelitte ra- Vehicle Sold! $20 Gift Card w/pu rchase
dio, power sliding vertical back glass, rear so- Call Steve 800-809-4716
nar system, heated seats, bluetooth, moonroof, Nissan '09 Altima
tow package, navigation system with 7" LCD LOW MILES! LOADED!
display with GPS and DVD atlas. $26,500.00 $500 down, $350 per month.
OBO 334-792-0650 or 334-685-0217 Call: Steve Hatcher at 334-791-8243.

Pontiac '01 Grand Prix $575 Down, 0% Interest. I
r Plymouth'65 Valiant Open 9am 9pm, 1-800-470-0650
Convertible, Pontiac '08 Solstice convertible 52K miles,
Silver with black leather interior, auto trans,
Automatic, A/C, 273 4cyl. 1 owner, auto locks & windows, new tires.
V8, Good Condition! $15,500. blue book is $18,000 334-618-5427
$9,000 OBO 850-263-4563 Toyota 2006 Camry LE: 98k miles, black/tan,
fully loaded, one owner, qaraged kept, very
,___ __,_.__ __nice. $9,900. Call 334-671- 077'
__VolksWagen 09 EOS:
2 -. hard top convertible with
Fuel Injection Edelbrock electronic pano roof, silver with tan
for Chevy 1985, used $1000. leather interior, fully
334-726-3349 or 334-677-4971 4w loaded luxury package,
29k miles, super nice and very clean, $23,500.

S. '07 Pontiac Grand Prix fully
leaded with leather & sun- 9 ,
roof, exc cond. 334-726-3359. YAMAHA '09 110 Dirt Bike, excellent
3: .34-585-5525. condition, rarely used $1,400 or trade for 4
wheeler 334-687-4686
Buick '98 LeSaber, gray, $2000. Call for appt.

Chevrolet '00 Cavalier 2 dr, New Tires, Runs Chevrolet 07' Suburban LT: .
Good, $4200 334-347-9829 Day Or Evening Solid white with grey cloth
Chevrolet '01 Silverado X/Cab $1900 Down, interior, 5.3 V8 Auto, 64k
0% Interest. Open 9am 9pm, 1-800-470-0650 miles, 3rd row seating, key-
Chrysler '98 Cirrius v-6, less than 40K miles, 4- less entry, tinted windows.
door, $4,200. 334-677-8645. Awesome Condition! $24,900. 334-797-1095
Crysler '05 PT Cruiser. Dodge '99 Durango $575 Down, 0% Interest.
4 Cylinder, Automatic, Open 9am 9pm, 1-800-470-0650
4 Door, Cold air, Nissan '03 Pathfinder. V6, 173k mi.
I- Excellent condition, $6300. Runs Very Good. Cold Air, Very Clean.
Call: 334-790-7959. $6200 OBO 334-794-5780
W '^. ^ ~Hundai'04 Elantra GLS i L.,. .. Toyota '06 4-Runner.
ONLY 60,000 Miles, l.1,: on,.,-...ner. Oni,
4Cylinder, Automatic, 53,n. h: _In :. Leat-,er
A Economical. Good o-ents,. 6 disc CD c.hanger.
Options, NEW TIRES! m:,on r:.:,[, rcar spoier. ,
LIKE NEW! $6625. etc. (It has all the extras' 523.500. In e.,cellent
Call: 334-790-7959. condition. Please ,:all 334 596 2242.


tin s, anil biral, .ilA 20" rimls.
Price to Sell $10,000. Call 850-272-2713

'- .' Y) FORD '89 F150, 4wh, 4x4
--.., Auto, $4,600 or reasonable
'"-'" offer. Call 229-334-8520.

Toyota '02 Tacoma Crew
Cab. V6, Automatic, 139k
miles, PERFECT Condi-
Stion. Loaded, $9,500.
334-596-9966

RACTOR 4230 John Deer 100hp, $8500. & 2010
D 45hp $1500. 334-735-2,164
,...' c.. 'i.LOOK !

Field Ready, Grain Head and Corn Head.
$6,000.850-415-0438


Chevrolet '97 Astro Van
conversion Van raised
roof, loaded, new tires,
One owner, GREAT
condition. 52K mi.$9,500.
334-897-2054 or
334-464-1496


CHEVY '06
2500
Express Van
39,500 miles
w/over $2k
in storage
ins & ladder racks, $13,900 334-687-4686
ord '06 -350: 12 seat passenger van, good con-
ition, tow package, rear air, sony am-fm-cd,
..I VS. 126,000 miles, 5$8,100. 334-333-3368
ontiac '04 Montana Van: Silver metallic with
ray interior, extended body, 46k miles, one
wner, New tires, front and rear AC, power
eats, power side door, CD/radio with XM,
rise control, and much more. Clean and in
ery good condition. Never WRECKED!
rice to Sell. $9,250. Call 334-333-0863


-,
'0~'-~ LJ~4


2.i:l53


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
DIVISION:
CASE NO.: 32-2009-CA-000779
US BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUST-
EE FOR CITIGROUP MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST
2006-WFHE2,
Plaintiff,
vs.
TAMMY E. POTTER, ET AL,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated No-
vember 03, 2011 and entered in Case No. 32-
2009-CA-000779 of the Circuit Court of the
FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for JACK-
SON County, Florida s1herein US BANK NATION-
AL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR CITIGROUP
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2006-WFHE2 is the
Plaintiff and TAMMY E. POTTER; PHILLIP W.
POTTER; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the
Court will sell to the highest and best bidder
for cash at NORTH DOOR JACKSON COUNTY
COURTHOUSE, MARIANNA, FLORIDA at
11:00AM, on the 8th day of December, 2011,
the following described property as set forth in
said Final Judgment:
LOT 5, TARA ESTATES SUBDIVISION, A SUBDIVI-
SION RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK A-4, PAGE
152A, IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF THE
CIRCUIT COURT OF JACKSON COUNTY, FLORI-
DA.
A/K/A 4375 ANGELA DRIVE, MARIANNA, FL
32446
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must
file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court
on November 7, 2011.
Dale R. Guthrie
Clerk of the Circuit Court


' _'. |. By: Tammy Bailey
Deputy Clerk


Call for Top Price for
Junk Vehicles


I also sell used parts
24 HOUR TOWING m 334-792-8664 <4


S Call for Top Price for
Junk Vehicles
I also sell used parts
24 HOUR TOWING 4 334-792-8664 4

CALL TODAY FOR YOUR TOWNG NEEDS


.' 0s /, ., -

;)!a 1 ,5 ,.. :" 33,'T4-791-2624 1


'" .. s" ay,.
(I - .........'.. ... "j pS "a- i I,

., Got a Clunker
'- We'll be your Junker!
z. .Lr ".z. We buy wrecked cars
''' jand Farm Equip. at a
fair and honest price!
$325. & up for
Complete Cars CALL 334-702-4323

1 WANTED WRECKED OR JUNK VEHICLES
6 PAY TOP DOLLAR
P DAY -334-794-9576 .1 NIGHT 334-794-7769

,,. ~WE PAY CaSH
'' FOR JUNK CARS"......
Call 334-818-1274




S i'' .-t :J'1 ].
'-', L:L D


If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to thd provision of certain assistance.
Please contact: Ms. Amber Baggett
Senior Court Program Specialist
P. 0. Box 826 Marianna, FL 32447-0826
Phone: 850-482-9844 Fax: 850-482-9123
LF15606
Public Auction/Sale at Southside Self Storage
2765 Jefferson St., Marianna, FL 32446.
Sale date is December 3, 2011, at 8:00 AM CST
All the units contain personal property within.
Units will not be open for viewing until start of
sale:
UNIT 1: Patricia Lang
UNIT 6: Ronald Booth
UNIT 10: La'Tarra Garrett
UNIT 31: Christina Perry
UNIT 35 Unknown


GIVE US A RING.,



Call today to place


your item in the


classified.



(850) 526,3614


(800)779.2557


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www.JCFLORIDAN.com nCLASSIFIEDS


Jackson County Floridan Wednesday, November 16, 2011 9 B


I SE LF -Ti AGE; --;-


I Lester Basford ETWA
Well & Pump Company BEST WAY
4513 Lafayette St Marianna, FL PORTABLE BUILDINGS
5.526.f3913O85069304285LARGEST MANUFACTURER OF PORTABLE BUILDINGS IN NORTH FLORIDA
Wr 850.482.2278 H ----- E f
HAVE
EXCAVATO OVER
DIFFERENT SIZES!
YOU CAN CHOOSE
.de E. 9K COLOR & STYLE!

SGrader Pan *Excavator 3614 Hwy. 90 Marilanna FL 850482-8682


ump irucK Bulldozer
Demolition Grading Site Prep
* Debris Removal Retention Ponds Leveling
* Top Soil Fill Dirt Gravel Land Clearing
LETEXPRIENC DO T E WR
CLD OK WE
20-3590Sice19048-58


Clay O'Neal's
Land Clearing, Inc.
ALTHA, PL
850-762-9402
Cell 850-832-5055


WE OF ER OMTE
m-B B.
A.E,2i
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"Beautification of Your Home"
Carpentry/Painting Installations
Furniture Repair & Refinishing
General Repairs Insured




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Replace your old Electrical Sen ice
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QUAUTY WORK REACONAILE PRICE
JAMES GRANT. LLC fo


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4 Point Insurance Inspections
Wind Mitigation Inspections
Performed by JAMES GRANT
State Certified BBuilding Code Administrator
State CetI ifidt Building Contactor
State Iice'nsied EIctrical Contrac(tor


ORS, "QUAIrTY SERVICE
IFOR OVER 50 YEARS"
Charles Morse (850) 526-8445
S Bn Morse* (850) 573-1705
Office* (850) 482-3755
I8479 Hwr 73 MAuNNA FL 32448E
7"One0, nep WILLYTJ A'Pshook ron"


Buy3 Xt!

Sell It!

Find IEt!


i *












L .+


Purse: New Sling pack Coach. $40. 850-272-1842


Refrigerator 1.8, used only twice $70 239-272-
8236
Refrigerator 1.8, used only twice $70 239-272-
8236
Smith & Wesson small handgun, 38 cal., 5 shot
$200 OBO 850-592-4109


(2) Shed Doors. Each measures 4 x 6. Bargain
Priced $100 ea 850-482-2636 Marianna
Headboards: Wood. Good for (2) twin beds or a
Full/Queen. $15each 850-482-2636 Marianna
Rims: Set of 4, 5 lug 16" rims. Will fit Ford F150
or Dodge. $250 Call 850-693-9961 Marianna
Tires: 4 Radial 215x65-R16 $12 ec or 4 for $40.
fair tread 850-272-2871
5 Star Olympus Camera, SP 600 UZ digital,
new cond., $160 FIRM 850-482-7665 after 12
Acto TTL Flash, Cord & Bracket, private owned,
new in box, $196 850-482-7665
Antique Curio Cabinet, $50 850-482-3984 or
850-557-1807
Ashley L/R Suite 3-pc, Exc. Cond. Sofa,
Loveseat w/ottoman $350 334-701-0728
Bicycle, Next Ascent 21 speed $100 850-594-
3282
Clawfoot Bath Tub, needs refinishing, $200
OBO 850-209-6977 before 5pm
Dining Table, Vintage Solid Wood with pop up
leafs $80 850-209-4500
Dishwasher Works great. Under cabinet. $60,
850-482-7357
Dive Tanks- 2 S80 alum. yellow tanks w/ boot-
s.climate control kept. $125 ea, 850-482-7357
DJ Equip. Amp, mixer, DVD/CD, microphone,
cords, etc.Complete set. $400 OBO 8504826022
Entertainment Center White. 48"W x60"H
x20"D Only $50, 850-482-2636, Marianna
Free kittens Multi-colored, multi-hair length
850-482- 5880/850-303-9727 after 3pm
Freezer Chest, G.E. 7 cu.ft. $50 850-482-4382
Girls clothes, size 10/12 & 14/16, Name Brand,
$1 each, 850-372-2419
Graco Infant Car seat & carrier, 2 pieces, per-
fect condition, $15 850-209-6977
Grill Guard Ranch Hand Like new grill guard
for truck. Fits GMC $500, 850-482-7357
Handsaw set: 3 pieces, new in pouch $7.
334-400-3736
IPOD PHONE MP3 BACKPACK SPEAKER SYS-
TEM NEW IN BOX $45, 334-400-3736


Subwoofer SONY 12" 150 WATT HOME ACTIVE
SUBWOOFER IN BOX, $75, 334-400-3736
Table Bench Saw, 10" $50 850-482-4382
TailGate Cap Tail Gate Protector TG Guard fits
99-06 Silvrdo.NIB $40, 850-272-1842
Tiered End Table w/3 shelves $25 850-209-
4500
Truck Bed Cover: Undercover brand, '04-'06
Chevy Silverado & GMC Sierra Crew Cab, 5.8ft
black, key entry, LED lights, & used 3 months.
PRICED TO SELL $500. OBO Call 334-803-0613
Two Shed Doors. Each measures 4 x 6. Bargain
Priced $100 ea, 850-482-2636 in Marianna
Vintage White Buffet & China Cabinet ,
$300/set 850-209-4500
Wedding Gown w/trane, Ivory, size 18, Silk Or-
ganza w/Sequins, $500 850-693-1337
Wedding Veil, Ivory w/crystals, and Ivory
Pump Shoes size 9 $50 850-693-1337
Wood headboards .Good for (2) twin beds or a
Full/Queen. $15 each. 850-482-2636, Marianna


- Ellen Marsh

For ALL your Real Estate Needs!
Century 21 Sunny South Properties
850-526-2891'
4630 Hwy 90 Marianna

=ROOFIG &RELATDi f-1


New and Rerools Shingles and Meta
Roof Repairs and Cleaning
Free Estimates Licensed and Insureo
ALL NW FLORIDA


HAPPY
HOME REPAIR
WE'LL BEAT ANY PRICE!!
Big Or Small Jobs WELCOME



CLASSIFIED

ADVERTISING
Your source for selling and buying!


P aCe a A d Fast, easy, no pressure
Sa 24 hours a day, 7 days a week!
Get live previews of your classified ads, receive price quotes
and make secure online payments.

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I WELL DRILLING.&:REPAIR.1.


NOOF'HIT I


i your "COO STFF frREJcfloida. om.. ei Jtefrdea- .


Lexmark 3 in 1 Fax Copier Printer $40, Excel-
lent shape, 850-272-1842
MICROPHONE MIXER 6 CHAN. NEW IN BOX $50
334-400-3736
Microphone Stand, floor type, adjustable
height, black & chrome $10 850-482-7933
Monitor: 19" Flat screen computer monitor like
new $50. 850-272-1842
Octagon End Table, wood w/marble inlay,
17x20, $40 850-209-4500
POKER TABLE TOP BY CARDINAL, NEW IN BOX
$35, 334-400-3736


Sony Bravia Home Theater System $350 OBO.
Great Christmas present. Call 850-482-7357


die
-.I?







-110B WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 16,2011


SPORTS


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Eliminated
From Page 1B
thing next time.
"Now that the ice has been bro-
ken and we've gotten here and
know what it looks and feels like,
at least we'll be able to be better


prepared in the future for what
this thing is all about. We hope to
be back here next year."
One of the things the coach said
she may try to do is make the 2012
schedule as difficult as possible.
Sneads' toughest district com-
petitor, Blountstown, moved out
of the league.


As a result, the Lady Pirates
coasted through the district, win-
ning all 14 league games.
Sneads did play a tough non-
conference schedule, with three
games against 5A Arnold, one
against 3A powerhouse Maclay,
as well as games against 4A Flor-
ida High, 5A Bartram Trail and 6A


Fort Walton Beach.
But Roberts said she still felt like
there were too manyeasymatches
for her team during the season.
"We won so many in three
straight, and we weren't chal-
lenged in a lot of them. I think that
worked against us a little bit," the
coach said. "It's all about growing.


Every year, we want to get bet-
ter and better, so we're going to
be evaluating the program and
what we can do to get better next
season. Maybe we can make the
schedule a little bit tougher and
instill a spirit of fight and battle.
We want to be warriors on the
court."


Sports in Brief

High School Boys
Basketball
The Sonny's Preseason
Tip-Off Tourney at Marianna
High School will be Thursday
and Saturday.
Thursday- Malone vs. Hol-
mes County, 4:30 p.m.; Cot-
tondale vs. Maclay, 6 p.m.;
Port St. Joe vs. Marianna,
7:30 p.m.
Saturday- Cottondale vs.
Holmes County, 4:30 p.m.;
Malone vs. Port St. Joe, 6
p.m.; Marianna vs. Maclay,
7:30 p.m.

High School Girls
Basketball
Thursday- Marianna at
Graceville, 6 p.m.; Malone at
Laurel Hill, 6 p.m., and 7:30
p.m.; Cottondale at Holmes
County, 1 p.m., and 2 p.m.
Friday- Malone at Bethle-
hem, 6 p.m., and 7:30 p.m.;
Marianna at Pensacola Catho-,
lic, 5:30 p.m., and 7 p.m.

Chipola Women's
Basketball
Chipola will travel to Mid-
land, Tex., this weekend to
play games Thursday, Friday,
and Saturday.
The Lady Indians will
play Angelina on Thursday
at 4 p.m., with Friday's and
Saturday's opponents to be
determined.

Sports Items
Send all sports items to edi-
torial@jcfloridan.com, or
fax them to 850-482-4478.
The mailing address for the
paper is Jackson County '
Floridan P.O. Box 520
Marianna, FL 32447:


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Good Thru November 21, 2011

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