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Jackson County Floridan
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028304/00690
 Material Information
Title: Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title: Sunday Floridan
Portion of title: Floridan
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Jackson County Floridan
Publisher: Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Marianna Fla
Creation Date: November 15, 2011
Publication Date: 1934-
Frequency: daily (except saturday and monday)[<1979-1995>]
weekly[ former 1934-<1955>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates: 30.776389 x -85.238056 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note: "Independent."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID: UF00028304:00690
 Related Items
Preceded by: Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by: Marianna Floridan

Full Text




Informing more than 17,000 readers daily in print and online


k 4 ,-


A Media Geneml ., '* ,


Toys for Tots drive gearing up


Pressure mounts on

Syrian leader to step

down. See more on

page 8A.


vol. 66 No. 222


From staff reports
Families in need of Christmas
toys for their children can submit
applications for help through the
Marine Corps Reserve Toys for Tots
program.
Families in need of help can pick
up a program application until Dec
2. All applications must be turned
in by noon on Dec. 9, be filled out
completely and with all the required


documents provided.
The applications should be picked
up at Anchorage Children's Home,
located at 4452 Clinton Street in
Marianna, or at the Salvation Army
building, at 4439 Clinton Street. The
forms should be returned to those
locations as well.
The annual campaign is gearing
up in Jackson County, with toys col-
lection boxes already in stores, res-
taurants, doctor's offices, schools


and churches here, most of them
currently in Marianna.
The campaign started on Saturday,
Nov 5, with a motorcycle toy run.,
More than $1,000 was raised and 45
toys were collected in that effort. The
motorcycle run was the idea of three
local business owners, Scott O'Brien
of Beef 'O'Brady's, Leigh Reed of
Champion Motorsports and Mark
See TOYS, Page 7A


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Leigh Reed, an organizer and participant in the Jackson County
Toy Run Nov. 5, is shown here with his motorcycle and some of
the toys collected in the inaugural motorcycle event.


Crime Report


Police say


man sped


away from


traffic stop

From staff reports
A Marianna man who allegedly sped
away from a traffic stop last week was
arrested and charged with fleeing and
attempting to elude after a police cruis-
er blocked his way at a turn.
According to a press release from
the Marianna Police De-
partment, 47-year-old
Elexander Speights was
pulled over while behind
the wheel of a red Ford
car because he was driv-
ing in the opposite lane
of travel on Pebble Hill
Speights Road.
Noting in the report that they smelled
marijuana at the scene, they tried to get
Speights out of the car to search the ve-
hicle. When asked to exit the car, Spei-'
ghts allegedly put it in gear and sped
away south on Pebble Hill Road.
, Pursuing officers followed him to
Pooser Road, where he made an abrupt
right turn. The car fishtailed, but Spei-
ghts maintained control of the car and
continued to the intersection of Pooser
and Old Airbase roads. He made an-
other right-hand turn onto Old Airbase,
traveling in excess of 60 miles per hour,
officers reported. Another patrol unit
was waiting as he approached the in-
tersection of South Street and was able
to block the car from turning. Officers
arrested Speights there and took him
to the Jackson County jail to await first
appearance.


$10,000

reward offered

in burglary case
From staff reports
A $10,000 reward is being offered for
information that leads to the arrest and
conviction of the burglar or burglars
who stole property from Mowrey Eleva-
tor in recent days.
According to a press release from the
Marianna Police Department, the busi-
ness at 4518 Lafayette Street was bur-
glarized twice; once on Nov. 3 and again
on Nov. 10. In the second incident, the
thief or thieves stole thousands of dol-
lars worth of copper power wires and
welding equipment. The business is un-
dergoing expansion, and as a result is an
active construction site. The owner of
Mowrey is offering the reward, and an
additional $1,000 maybe available from
CrimeStoppers for information leading
to arrest and conviction in the case.
Those wishing to remain anonymous
and become potentially eligible for the
reward can call in tips to Crime Stoppers
at 526-5000. The Marianna Police De-
partment can be reached at 526-3125.


HINSON CONSERVATION AND RECREATION AREA



Seeing nature at its best


PHOTOS BY MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Bird watchers check out the surrounding trees during a hike at the Hinson Conservation and Recreation Area Saturday.

Inaugural Fall Field Day draws many to newest nature park


BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com

bout 100 people braved a bit of
brisk weather last Saturday to
ake part in the inaugural Fall
Field Day at the Hinson Conservation
and Recreation Area, Marianna's new-
est nature park.
"The reason that we put together
that little event Saturday was that we
wanted to make sure the people of
Jackson County were well informed
that the park was available, open,
and is rich in flowers, trees, birds and,
among them, are some things that
you don't normally find in the pan-
handle," said Mark Hebb, a volunteer
and friend of the park. He said bird
and plant experts led nature walks and
talked about the abundant plant and
animal life in the park.
"We were well-pleased by the
response, and we're planning to have
another Field Day in the spring," Hebb


said.
By then, volunteers should be get-
ting ready to develop a one-mile trail
laid out with the expertise of people
who recognize and made sure to pro-


Randy Ditty brings his kayak to shore at the Hinson Conservation and Recreation Area
Saturday during Fall Field Day at the park.


tect the unusual flora and fauna in the
park as they designed the trail.
The visitors on Saturday were able to
enjoy two "very special features of the
park," Hebb said. One of those is Bluff
Trail, an accessible walking area along
the boundary fence and the Chipola
River which surrounds the park.


Observant visitors last Saturday saw a
wide variety of birds, including cedar
waxwings and red-tail hawks in the
trees or on the wing along the trail.
Alamo Cave is another feature that
former owner Dick Hinson is very
See HINSON, Page 7A


Jackson County Sportsman's Day Tournament


Skeet shoot to benefit youth ranches


BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com


Jackson County Sheriff Lou
Roberts is putting on a skeet
shoot tournament early next
month to benefit the Florida
Sheriffs' Youth Ranch.
The Jackson County Sports-


man's Day tournament will
be held Saturday, Dec. 3, on
State Road 71 South about 4.5
miles south of Interstate 10
below Marianna. The location
is a 500-acre recently-plowed
peanut field near the Dolo-
mite plant. Its use was donat-
ed by Baggett Farms owner


Larry Baggett.
Registration for the event
begins at 8 a.m. that day and
the tournament begins at 9
a.m. The entry fee is $25, and
the cost includes a barbecue
pork lunch. First, second and
third-place winners in the
adult and youth divisions will


get trophies.
An old-fashioned turkey
shoot will also be held, with
an entry fee of $3 per round.
Lunch is not included in this
fee. Winners in the turkey
shoot are determined by the
See SKEET, Page 7A


CLASSIFIEDS...6-8B


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Is Printed On
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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


TIDES ULTRA VIOLET INDEX


Panama City Low -
Apalachicola Low -
Port St. Joe Low -
Destin Low -
Pensacola Low -

RIVER READINGS
Woodruff
Blountstown
Marianna
Caryville


10:40 AM H
12:41 PM H
10:06 AM H
11:17AM H
11:51AM H

Reading
38.92 ft.
0.29 ft.
4.39 ft.
0.28 ft.


[igh
[igh
[igh
[igh
[igh


- 12:00 AM
- 4:34 AM
- 11:52 PM
- 11:44 PM
- 12:17 AM

Flood Stage
66.0 ft.
15.0 ft.
19.0 ft.
12.0 ft.


0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8-10 Very High, 11+ Extreme
0 1 2 3 i. g: I
______ *^BBIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII


THE SUN AND MOON


Sunrise
Sunset
Moonrise
Moonset


6:07 AM
4:44 PM
8:53 PM
10:45 AM (Wed)


Nov.
18


EEI]
Nov. Dec. Dec.
25 2 10


FLORIDA'S REAL

PANHANDLE Y

MEDIA PARTNERS WJAQ 100.9

SE ES "EERE


JACKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN

Publisher Valeria Roberts
vroberts@jcfloridan.com

Circulation Manager Dena Oberski
doberski@jcfloridan.com








CONTACT US
Telephone: (850) 526-3614
FAX: (850) 482-4478
Email: editorial@jcfloridan.com
IMailing Address:
P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447
Street Address:
4403 Constitution Lane
Marianna, FL 32446
Office Hours:
Weekdays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

MISS YOUR PAPER?
You should receive your newspaper no later
than 6 a.m. If it does not arrive, call Circula-
tion between 6a.m. and noon, Tuesday to
Friday, and 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. on Sunday. The
Jackson County Floridan (USPS 271-840)
is published Tuesday though Friday and
Sunday mornings. Periodical postage paid
at Marianna, FL.

SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Home delivery: $11.23 per month; $32.83
for three months; $62.05 for six months;
and $123.45 for one year. All prices include
applicable state and local taxes. Mail
subscriptions must be paid in advance. Mail
subscriptions are: $46.12 for three months;
$92:24 for six months; and $184.47 for one
year.

ADVERTISING
The advertiser agrees that the publisher
shall not be liable for damages arising
out of errors and advertisements beyond
the amount paid for the space actually
occupied by that portion of the advertise-
ments in which the error occurred, whether
such error is due to the negligence of the
publisher's employees or otherwise, and
there shall be not liability for non-inser-
tion of any advertisement beyond the
amount paid for such advertisement. This
newspaper will not knowingly accept or
publish illegal material of any kind. Advertis-
ing which expresses preference based on
legally protected personal characteristics is
not acceptable.

HOW TO GET YOUR
NEWS PUBLISHED
The Jackson County Floridan will publish
news of general interest free of charge.
Submit your news or Community Calendar
events via email, fax, mail, or hand delivery.
Fees may apply for wedding, engagement,
anniversary and birth announcements.
Forms are available at the Floridan offices.
Photographs must be of good quality and
suitable for print. The Floridan reserves the
right to edit all submissions.

GETTING IT RIGHT
The Jackson County Floridan's policy
is to correct mistakes promptly. To
report an error, please call 526-3614
Monday-Friday.


Community Calendar


TODAY
Blood Drive 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Walmart in Mari-
anna; or give blood 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday-Friday
at the Southeastern Community Blood Center,
2503 Commercial Park Drive in Marianna. Call
526-4403.
) Story Time -10 to 11 a.m. (preschool) and 3:15
to 4:15 p.m. (school age) at the Jackson County
Public Library in Graceville. Stop by for stories,
poems, jokes, finger plays and more. Call 482-9631.
)) Internet/email Class Nov. 15 (part 1) and Nov.
29 (part 2), 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Goodwill Career
Training Center, 4742 Highway 90 in Marianna. All
services are free. Call 526-0139.
) Chipola Regional Arts Association Meeting at
Jim's Buffet in Marianna. Dutch-treat luncheon at
11:30 a.m., program at noon. Guest speaker, inter-
national pianist Dr. Christine Yoshikawa, will share
details about the release of her commercial piano
solo CD. Public welcome. Call 718-2257.
) Optimist Club of Jackson County meeting,
noon, firsthand third Tuesdays, Jim's Buffet & Grill,
Marianna.
) Sewing Circle -1 p.m. at Jackson County Senior
Citizens, 2931 Optimist Drive in Marianna. Call
482-5028.
) The Panhandle Public Library Cooperative
System Board of Directors meets at 4 p.m. in the
PPLCS office, 4439 Marion St. in Marianna.
) Jackson County Quilters Guild Sit-n-Sew
- 5:30 to 8 p.m. in the First United Methodist
Church Youth Hall on Clinton Street, behind the
Marianna Post Office. Work on a project, get free
help, and find out about upcoming classes, lessons
and workshops. The Guild's monthly meeting is on
the fourth Tuesday of the month. Call 209-7638.
) The Chipola College District Board of
Trustees convenes for its regular meeting at 7 p.m.
in the Public Service Building,
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open meeting, 8 to 9
p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901 Caledo-
nia St., Marianna, in the AA room.

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 16
Eldercare Services, at 4297 Liddon St. in
Marianna, will give out USDA and Brown Bag food
at 8 a.m.
) Dr. Geoffrey Brooks, professor of Engineering at
the Florida State University/Panama City will speak
at Chipola College at 10 a.m. in Jackson Lecture
Hall. Dr. Brooks will discuss his students' robotics
projects and upcoming rocket competition. Call
526-2761, ext. 3252.
) Job Club 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the
Goodwill Career Training Center, 4742 Highway 90
in Marianna. Learn job-seeking and job-retention
skills. All services are free. Call 526-0139.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open meeting, noon
to 1 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901
Caledonia St., Marianna, in the AA room.

THURSDAY, NOV. 17
D Story Time -10 to 11 a.m. (preschool) and 3 to
4 p.m. (school age) at the Jackson County Public


Library in Marianna. Stop by for stories, poems,
jokes, finger plays and more. Call 482-9631.
) Caregiver Support Group meeting -11 a.m.
to noon in the social hall of First Presbyterian
Church, 4437 Clinton St. in Marianna. Open to all
family caregivers providing care to loved ones or
friends. Confidential group is facilitated by a profes-
sional group counselor. Coffee, water, light snacks
provided.
) Orientation 12:30 to 3:30 p.m. Learn about/
sign up for free services at the Goodwill Career
Training Center, 4742 Highway 90 in Marianna. All
services are free. Call 526-0139.
) Breast Cancer Support Group 5 p.m. in the
ground-floor classroom of Jackson Hospital, 4250
Hospital Drive, Marianna. Open to anyone who has
or had breast cancer or breast health issues. No
cost. Call 718-2661.
) Jackson County NAACP meeting, 5:30 p.m.
in the St. James A.M.E. Church basement, 2891
-Orange St. in Marianna. Call 569-1294.
) Chipola Regional Workforce Development
Board General Meeting 6 p.m. in the Workforce
Board office, 4636 Highway 90 West, Suite K, Mari-
anna. Call 718-0456.
) VFW Smoked Turkey Fundraiser Today is the
deadline to order a smoked turkey from Veterans
of Foreign Wars Post 12046. Birds are 10-12 pounds
each, and will be available for pick-up on Nov. 19
from 8 a.m. until noon at the Post: 2830 Wynn
Street (the former senior citizens building) in Mari-
anna. Cost: $20. To place an order, call 209-1919.
) The Chipola College Theatre Showcase is at 7
p.m. Theater-goers will enjoy 18 different scenes of
songs and humor during the one-hour show. Tick-
ets, $10, are available from theater students, in the
Fine Arts Department or at the door. Call 718-2227
or visit www.chipola.edu.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Closed discussion, 8
to 9 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901 Cale-
donia St., Marianna, in the AA room. Attendance
limited to persons with a desire to stop drinking.

FRIDAY, NOV.18
Farm City Day Breakfast 7 a.m. in the
Jackson County Ag Office Complex on-Pennsylvania
Avenue in Marianna, hosted by the Jackson County
Chamber of Commerce, in honor of Farm City Week
(Nov. 18-24). Guest speaker: Kevin Kelley, Agricul-
tural Liaison for Rep. Steve Southerland, R-Panama
City.
)) The City of Marianna Holiday Food Drive ends
today. Drop off item donations at City Hall. Call
718-1001.
Telephone Skills Class 8:30 a.m. to noon at
the Goodwill Career Training Center, 4742 Highway
90 in Marianna. All services are free. Call 526-0139.
)) International Chat'n' Sip 8:30 to 10 a.m. at
2929 Green St. in Marianna. Jackson County Public
Library Learning Center staff and their international
English learners invite the public to join them for
the exchange of language, culture, and ideas in a
relaxed environment. Light refreshments served.
Free admission. Call 482-9124.
) Holiday Heritage Festival starts at noon in


Heritage Village on the Graceville campus of The
Baptist College of Florida, with musical performanc-
es, craft demonstrations, a life-size Old Testament
Tabernacle replica exhibit, carriage rides, electric
trains, antique cars, quilt exhibits, a Civil War re-
enactment and more. Strolling carolers perform
at 1,3:30 and 6 p.m. Crafts, baked goods and box
lunches will be for sale. Call 800-328-2660, ext. 416,
or visit www.baptistcollege.edu.
n Dellwood F.D. Smoked Turkey Fundraiser
- Today is the deadline to order a smoked turkey
from the Dellwood Fire Department. Birds average
10-12 pounds and will be available for pick up Nov.
23 at Kelley's Grocery and Deli in Dellwood. Cost:
$40 each. To order, call 592-9807,8 a.m. to noon
Nov. 3-18.
) Celebrate Recovery Adult, teen meetings to
"overcome hurts, habits and hang-ups," 7 p.m. at
Evangel Worship Center, 2645 Pebble Hill Road.
Dinner: 6 p.m. Child care available. Call 209-7856 or
573-1131.

SATURDAY, NOV. 19
Malone Pecan Festival Pecan pancake
breakfast ($5) starts at 6 a.m.; 5K run at 7:30 a.m.;
parade at 10 a.m.; and music at 11 a.m. featuring
Pure and Simple, North Florida Band and Chipola
College Jazz Band. Food and arts and 'crafts vendors
will be downtown, and the car show will be behind
PeopleSouth bank near town hall.
) Marianna City Farmers Market is open 8 a.m. to
noon for the fall season, Saturdays only in Madison
Street Park.
) Christmas Shopping Open House 9 a.m.
to noon at The Russ House, 4318 Lafayette St. in
Marianna, with door prizes, pictures with Santa and
shopping. All vendor fees will be donated to the
Historic Russ House Foundation. Call 693-0478.
) Founders Day/Love Festival Noon to 3 p.m.
at the Jackson County Community Helpers Club,
4571 Dickson Road, Greenwood, in honor of the
late Sister Ora Mae Peterson, JCCHC founder. All
gospel groups, praise dancers, soloists, and com-
munity elected.officials are invited. Menu includes
collard greens, rice, chicken, beef and gravy, bread,
beverages, dessert and more. Call 592-4649 or
209-2352.
)) Turkey Shoot Fundraiser 1 p.m. each Satur-
day through December at AMVETS Post 231, north
of Fountain (east side of US 231, just south of CR
167). Cost: $2 a shot. Call 850-722-0291.
)) The U.S. Postal Service will hold a public
meeting to discuss its proposal to make pos-
sible changes in the way services are provided for
Cypress, 2 p.m. at the Cypress Baptist Church on
Brogden Avenue. Customers can meet with a USPS
representative to discuss alternatives.
) Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, 4:30 to
5:30 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St., Marianna.

SUNDAY, NOV. 20
n Bingo Fundraiser 2 to 5 p.m. at AMVETS
Post 231, north of Fountain (east side of US 231).
Proceeds benefit the Post building fund.


The submission deadline for this calendar is two days before publication. Submit to: Community Calendar, Jackson County Floridan, P. O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447,
email editorial@jcfloridan.com, fax (850) 482-4478 or bring items to 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.

Police Roundup


MARIANNA POLICE
The Marianna Police De-
partment listed the following
incidents for Nov. 13, the latest
available report: One accident
with no injuries, -- -
two suspicious ..,. .., -
persons,, one (. L =
burglary of a fwi E
vehicle, one t
physical distur-
bance, four verbal disturbances,
one burglar alarm, 12 traffic
stops, one trespass complaint,
one noise disturbance, one
open door/window discovered
and one threat/harassment
complaint.

JACKSON COUNTY
SHERIFF'S OFFICE
The Jackson County Sheriff's


Office and county Fire/Rescue
reported the following incidents
for Nov. '13, the latest available
report. (Some of these calls may
be related to after-hours calls
taken on behalf of Graceville
and Cottondale Police Depart-
ments): Two armed/dangerous
person complaints, one acci-
dent, 14 abandoned vehicle re-
ports, one reckless driver, three
suspicious vehicles, two suspi-
cious incidents, five suspicious
person reports, two burglary re-
ports, one physical disturbance,
five verbal disturbances, one
pedestrian complaint, 20 medi-
cal calls, two traffic crashes, two
burglar alarms, 28 traffic stops,
three civil disputes, two tres-
pass complaints, one juvenile
complaint, two assaults, one
suicide attempt, three noise


complaints, one animal com-
plaint, two assists of motorists
or pedestrians, three assists of
other agencies, one child abuse
complaint, one public service
call, one open door/window
discovered and one threat/ha-
rassment complaint.

JACKSON COUNTY
CORRECTIONAL FACILITY
The following persons were
booked into the county jail dur-
ing the latest reporting periods:
) Tammy Rainge, 43, 4243 Al-
len St., Marianna, driving under
the influence.
) Rodney Ellis, 29, 2148 Mi-
chelle Ave., Sneads, aggravated
battery on a pregnant person.
) Fitzgerald Williams, 22,
1938 Wagon Lane, Marianna,


trespass after warning.
) Philip Livingston, 30,
1683 Defour Ave., Atlanta,
Ga., driving while license
suspended/revoked.
) David Roberts, 27, 3750
Thompson Road, Marianna,
driving under the influence.
)) John Webster, 50, 4734 Cliff
Road, Graceville, driving under
the influence, refusal to sign
citation.
)) Joseph Jackson, 63, 1013
Sanders Ave., Graceville,
assault, resisting without
violence.

JAIL POPULATION: 206


To report a crime, call CrimeStoppers
at 526-5000 or a local law enforcement
agency, To report a wildlife violation, call
1-888-404-FWCC (392,'2).


WeE~tIw# OutlooI


High 66
Low 460


Friday
Cooler.


High 71
Low 51


Saturday
Mild.


JCFLORuDANCOrvl


WAI--UP CALL


-2A TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 2011








JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


MHS FFA IS LARGEST LIVESTOCK EXHIBITOR AT FESTIVAL


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Marianna High School FFA had 21 students exhibiting 30 beef projects at the National Peanut Festival, as part of their Supervise
Agricultural Experience programs. MHS FFA had the Grand Champion and Reserve Champion Limousine exhibited by Darby
Sweeney and Ty Partin. MHS FFA also had the Grand Champion and Reserve Champion Parthenais exhibited by Jake Daniels and
Kody Bryant. From left are Darby Sweeney, Dustan Gay, Brandon Whitfield, Dustyn Sweeney, Ty Partin, Dylan Jackson, Jake Daniels, Katie
Mayo, Kody Bryant, Kyle Snyder, Cheyenne Welch, Jason Barwick, Julia Velez, Justin Kent, Tim Snyder and Jennifer Nagg. Not pictured: Taylor
Strauss, Jonathan Githens, Ann Renegar and Laurence Glover.


Chipola 3-D course set for January


Special to the Floridan

Chipola College is now accepting
students for the Simulation Model-
ing Technician (3-D) Certificate pro-
gram which begins in January, 2012.
Application deadline for the pro-
gram is Dec. 15. Applications .must
be submitted to Christen Bennett in
A-115.
Students in the program will de-
velop the technical skills necessary
to produce three-dimensional con-
tent to be used in business, industry,


education, state and federal govern-
ment as well as the military.
Matt White, Chipola's Network Co-
ordinator and Dylan Bass will teach
the course.
Software used in the program will
include Photoshop, 3D Studio Max,
Java Script, AutoCAD and Unity gam-
ing software. Prospective students
must have proficiency in computer
applications in order to successfully
complete the course.
The course begins Jan. 9, 2012 and
runs through May 1. Classes are


scheduled for Monday, Tuesday and
Thursday evenings from 5 to 10 p.m.
Cost of the program is $1,500. Due
to the length and the nature of the
program, traditional Financial Aid is
not available.
The course is limited to the first 12
students. The college reserves the
right to cancel the program if mini-
mum enrollment requirements are
not met.
For information, call 718-2455,
email bennettc@chipola.edu or visit
www.chipola.edu/3d.


A Boost for the Boosters


Dec. 11 ceremony


at St. Luke's wil


honor veterans


Special to the Floridan

Veterans of all American
wars will be remembered
on Sunday, Dec. 11, dur-
ing a 4 p.m. ceremony
at St. Luke's Episcopal
Church.
After the service inside
the church, fresh wreaths
tied with red ribbon will
be placed on headstones
of veterans buried in the
St. Luke churchyard.
The event is sponsored
by the Chipola Chapter


of the National Society,
Daughters of the Ameri-
can Revolution and the
Blue Springs Society of the
National Society Children
of the American Revolu-
tion, in conjunction with
the Marianna Squadron
of the Civil Air Patrol.
St. Luke's is located
at 4362 Lafayette St. in
Marianna.
For information, con-
tact Mary Robbins at 209-
4066 or snoopyxii60@
hotmail.com.


Florida Lottery

Mon. (E) 11/14 7-4-4 3-3-7-7 Not available


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Jorge Garcia (center), general manager of Marianna Toyota, donates funds to the Marianna High School Band Boosters;
accepting for the Pride are band members Mallory Mock and Lori Tucker. The donation helped the Pride travel to Perry on Nov.
4 to show their support for the MHS Bulldogs.



-. 4-. '
-r E_-%TL'*tl i .:.j .,


SUBMITTED PHOTO
From left, Hunter G. Hutton, Calen Sims, the Rev. Dr. Huw Christopher of First Presbyterian Church, Scout Master Steve Hutton,
Liam McDonald and Winn-Dixie Assistant Grocery Manager Travis Gillette are shown with some of the donations made to a
recent food drive organized by the Cobra Patrol of Troop 170.

Hard work, generosity provide much needed food


Mon. (M)


Tue.
Tue.
Wed
Wed.
Thurs:


.1-0-2 :9-2-9-9


(E) 11/8 2-0-8 9-0-6-0 3.6 9-19-28
(M) 7-0-6 1-2-6-4


11/9 7-1-1 4-0-3-3
6-9-9 0-6-1-7


Thurs (M)


2-5-15-29-31


11/10 4-1-6 4-0-2-8 1-17-18-26-31
2-0-1 4-6-8-7


(E) 11/11 2-1-1 1-1-7-9 17-18-19-24-36


(M),
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4-6-8 6-7-3-9
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Sun (E) 11/13 8-2-9 6-6-7-8 1-14-21-25-34


Sun. (M)
E= Evening drawing.


0-2-0, 0-3-4-6
M = Midday drawing


Saturday 11/12 4-35-36-51-56 PB 8 PPx5


Wednesday 11/9


5-35-57-58-59 PB 12 PPx3


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Wednesday 11/9


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extra 4


For lottery information. call (850) 487-7777 or (900) 737-7777


LOOKING FOR MORE NEWS? VISIT

S WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM


Special to the Floridan

The Cobra Patrol of
Troop 170 spent a recent
Saturday working a food
drive they had organized
to complete the require-
ments for the Citizenship
of the Community Merit
Badge.
The charity of choice for
the Troop was the First
Presbyterian Church Food
Pantry, to which they ob-
ligated themselves to con-
tribute eight hours of com-
munity service.
Scouts planned the food
drive with the local Winn-


Dixie grocery store, where
they asked for food dona-
tions as patrons entered to
shop.
They explained the need
in the community for food,
and listed some of differ-
ent items that were much
needed.
After the eight-hour col-
lection shift was done,
the total number of food
items donated was 1,393.
According to Troop lead-
ers, along with other bread
donations, the collection is
estimated to provide food
to the community for a pe-
riod of seven weeks.


Once sorted and orga- the scouts past their eight-
nized, items were taken hour requirement; they
to the food pantry, where spent nine and a half hours
the shelves were stocked serving the community for
and organized, pushing the merit badge.



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TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 2011 3AF


LOCAL







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN + www.jcfloridan.com


14A # TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 2011


Legal experts focus on death penalty


The Associated Press

TALIAHASSEE A panel that
included legal experts, academ-
ics and lawmakers on Monday
renewed a push for changes to try
to make Florida's death penalty
more just and prevent innocent
people from being executed.
Participants' views about their
chances of success ranged from
hopeful to despairing in a state
that leads the nation with. 23
death row inmates who have
been exonerated.
"It seems to be a problem that
may not be able to be solved,"
said former State Attorney Harry
Shorstein of Jacksonville. "What
the public doesn't understand is
how expensive this litigation has
been over the years."
Shorstein, who participated by
telephone, supports the death
penalty but said he's troubled
with the lack of movement to-
ward fixing its problems.
Florida State University's law
school sponsored the forum to
mark the fifth anniversary of an
American Bar Association study
that criticized the state's death
penalty procedures and made a
number of recommendations.
One was that juries be unani-
mous in recommending death
sentences. Florida is the only
death penalty state that lets


"This is an issue about rationality, about making the
justice system rational and making sure that only those
that are guilty are convicted and only those who commit
the most egregious murders are sentenced to death."
Raoul Cantero,
former Florida Supreme Court justice


juries make sentencing deci-
sions or recommendations
by a simple majority. Florida
judges have the final say but
must give great weight to jury
recommendations.
State Sen. Thad Altman for
a second year is sponsoring a
bill (SB 772) that would require
unanimous findings of aggra-
vating factors as well as death
sentence recommendations.
His legislation failed without so
much as a committee hearing
earlier this year.
"I'm hoping ... we can at least
get a hearing," the Viera Repub-
lican told other panel members.
"I don't think that's asking too
muchh"
The panel's moderator, Mark
Schlakman, senior program di-
rector at Florida State's Center
for the Advancement of Human
Rights, was more optimistic.
Schlakman noted the new bill
would apply only to crimes com-
mitted after Oct. 1, 2012. Prose-
cutors had been worried about


it being retroactive to existing
cases. Also, since the last legisla-
tive session, U.S. District Judge
Jose E. Martinez in Miami has
ruled Florida's death sentence
law is unconstitutional because
jury recommendations don't
have to be unanimous. The state
is appealing.
"Irrespective of where the ap-
peal goes, it underscores the
concern about that process,"
Schlakman said in an interview.
Some lawmakers have op-
posed changes because they
were afraid that might result in
more appeals. Martinez' ruling
shows the opposite may be the
case, Schlakman said.
In a prerecorded video presen-
tation, former Florida Supreme
Court Justice Raoul Cantero said
the high court as long ago as
2005 had urged unanimous jury
recommendations.
Noting he was appointed by
Republican former Gov. Jeb
Bush, Cantero also criticized
Bush's decision to abolish a state


office that represented death row
inmates on appeal to save mon-
ey and replaced it with private
lawyers. Two similar state offices
covering the rest of Florida were
not closed.
North Florida inmates often are
represented by inexperienced or
unqualified lawyers and some
of their briefs have been "atro-
cious," Cantero said.
He said it's not a liberal versus
conservative or Democrat versus
Republican issue.
"This is an issue about ratio-
nality, about making the justice
system rational and making sure
that only those that are guilty are
convicted and only those who
commit the most egregious mur-
ders are sentenced to death,"
Cantero said.
Schlakman also is hopeful Gov.
Rick Scott, a Republican busi-
nessman who never ran for pub-
lic office before last year, will be
receptive.
"Gov. Scott approaches issues,
whether one agrees or disagrees
with his policy, with a fresh look
and an open mind without hav-
ing had much in the way of po-
litical background on these is-
sues and tends to look at issues
in general within the context of
business practices," Schlakman
said.
He pointed out there has been


some progress with the Supreme
Court adopting the ABA's recom-
mendations for changes in death
penalty jury instructions.
Chief Justice Charles Canady
also has created an Innocence
Commission that's working on
recommendations for ways to
avoid wrongful convictions for
crimes of all kinds. The com-
mission's executive director,
Les Garringer, a former Monroe
County judge, said a separate
panel should be formed to ex-
amine issues unique to the death
penalty.
Schlackman also was hopeful
a death penalty documentary
planned by Florida State's Col-
lege of Motion Picture Arts would
help shift public opinion.
The forum was held just one
day before the scheduled ex-
ecution of Oba Chandler. He
was convicted of killing an Ohio
woman and her two teenage
daughters and throwing their
bodies into Tampa Bay in 1989.
The focus, though, was not on
the execution or whether the
death penalty is right or wrong
but on improving the adminis-
tration of justice although one
lawmaker has filed a bill to abol-
ish it.
"Our goal and role is to change
the conversation," Schlakman
said.


Problems persist with



Medicare fraud contractors


The Associated Press

MIAMI Contractors paid tens
of millions of taxpayer dollars to de-
tect fraudulent Medicare claims are
using inaccurate and inconsistent
data that makes it extremely diffi-
cult to catch bogus bills submitted
by crooks, according to an inspector
general's report released Monday.
Medicare's contractor system has
morphed into a complicated laby-
rinth, with one set of contractors
paying claims and another combing
through those claims in an effort to
stop an estimated $60 billion a year
in fraud. The U.S. Department of
Health and Human Services inspec-
tor general's report obtained by
The Associated Press before its offi-
cial release found repeated prob-
lems among the fraud contractors
over a decade and systemic failures
by federal health officials to ad-
equately supervise them.
Health officials are supposed
to look at key criteria to find out
whether contractors are effectively
doing their job for instance, how
many investigations the contractors
initiate. But investigators found that
health officials sometimes ignored
whether contractors were opening
any investigations at all.
The contractors are supposed to
detect fraud by checking basic data,
such as what type of service was
given, how much of it was given and
how much it cost. But not all con-
tractors were looking at the same
types of data, and some of the infor-
mation was inaccurate.
The same issues were identified
10 years ago by inspector general
investigators, and dozens of reports
in the past decade also have found
problems. In 2001, acting Inspector
General Michael Mangano testi-
fied that the Centers for Medicare
and Medicaid Services wasn't doing
a good job of holding contractors
accountable.
"The issues- we identified have
been problematic for some time
and present a serious obstacle" to


overseeing the contractors, Inspec-
tor General Daniel R. Levinson
wrote in Monday's report.
Medicare officials have repeat-
edly said the latest system of fraud
contractors was designed to fix the
problems with earlier contractors
and allow the agency to better mon-
itor them.
Critics say fraud contractors have
been revamped over the years, but
nagging problems persist.
Investigators found that one con-
tractor referred only two cases of
potential fraud to Medicare officials
between 2005 and 2008; another did
not refer any. But they may have no
incentive to refer cases because they
are not paid contingency fees for
doing so, investigators said. Many
experts agree.
"Very few private contractors have
financial incentives which are gen-
uinely linked to protection of pub-
lic funds," said Malcolm Sparrow, a
health care fraud expert at Harvard
University.
In 2010, inspector general offi-
cials testified on Capitol Hill that
contractors reviewing fraud in
Medicare's prescription drug pro-
gram also faced serious problems.
One contractor didn't receive cer-
tain data until nearly one year after
being awarded the contract. Once
it received the data, key parts were
missing or incorrect. Another con-
tractor didn't have access to certain
data before its contract ended.
In Monday's report, contractors
also said they had difficulty obtain-
ing data they needed and said that
daily access to real-time Medicare
claims data is critical. One contrac-
tor said it eventually had to buy the
data from another contractor, which
caused a 30-day delay.
The contractors generated only
about 100 cases each of potential
fraud using the limited data during
a nine-month period. Critics say
those figures are anemic compared
to the billions of dollars of fraud oc-


curring annually.
U.S. Sens. Tom


Briefs


Boy driving pickup
injures woman
SARASOTA Authori-
ties say a 12-year-old driv-
ing a pickup truck struck
and critically injured a
woman in southwest
Florida.
According to a Florida
Highway Patrol report, the
boy was getting driving
lessons from a 32-year-old
man and driving back and
forth in the driveway of a
Sarasota home.
The Herald reports that
the 26-year-old woman
was standing between the
truck and a second vehicle
in the driveway.
FHP says the woman
was directing the boy
when he accelerated and
pinned her between both
vehicles.
1 Authorities say the wom-


an was struck in the lower
right leg and hospitalized
in critical condition.

Small plane crash in
Everglades kills 2
BOYNTON BEACH
- Authorities are investi-
gating a small plane crash
that killed two people in
'the Florida Everglades.
Palm Beach County
Sheriff's Office spokesman
Eric Davis says another
pilot witnessed the crash
Sunday afternoon and
called the control tower at
Palm Beach International
Airport.
The wreckage of the
two-seat plane was found
Sunday night in the Loxa-
hatchee National Wildlife
Refuge near Boynton
Beach.
From wire reports


Carper, D-Del.,


"Very few private
contractors have financial
incentives which are
genuinely linked to
protection f public funds."
Malcolm Sparrow,
health care fraud expert at Harvard University

and Tom Coburn, R-Okla., have
introduced legislation that would
require Medicare officials to share
fraud data with law enforcement
and contractors, as well as put accu-
racy requirements into the payment
administration contracts. '
Medicare officials said they are
working diligently to give contrac-
tors access to data. They also said
the investigation was conducted
during early stages of the transition,
so many issues have since been ad-
dressed. They agreed contractors
should have access to data, but
the agency has not indicated that
improved access has been put in
place.
Historically, Medicare has paid
claims first and reviewed them lat-
er, which worked when most pro-
viders were hospitals. But the "pay
and chase" method gives criminals
weeks of lag time to get paid for
fraudulent claims and skip town be-
fore authorities catch on.
Critics say separating contractors
who pay claims from fraud contrac-
tors has created a system where the
two are essentially working against
each other.
Fraud detection must be built into
the payment system so contractors
can track fraudulent claims as soon
as crooks send them in, not days
or weeks later, said Kirk Ogrosky,
former head of the Justice Depart-
ment's division that investigates
health care fraud.
"By divorcing the job of paying
claims from detecting fraud, CMS
encourages an ineffective 'pay-and-
chase' system," he said.


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Officer fired 10


rounds at colleague


The Associated Press

DAVIE A South Florida
police officer accused of
firing several shots at a fel-
low officer he once dated
was ordered held without
bond Monday after the
weekend shooting, au-
thorities said.
Kristopher John Bieger, a
Lauderhill Police officer, is
charged with premeditat-
ed attempted murder and
discharging a firearm after
allegedly firing 10 rounds
at former girlfriend and
fellow Lauderhill officer
Brittny Skinner, authori-
ties said.
Authorities say Bieger
fired at Skinner around
7:30 p.m. Saturday as she
was working an off-duty
security job outside a Den-
ny's restaurant. One bullet
struck Skinner's protective
vest, but she wasn't injured
and wasn't taken to the
hospital, Lauderhill Police
Capt. Constance Stanley
told the Sun Sentinel.
Bieger subsequently
drove 16 miles to a res-
taurant where he ordered
some slices of pizza to go.
The 30-year-old officer
was arrested outside that
restaurant as he waited for
his order.
During Bieger's initial
court appearance Monday,
defense attorney Alberto
Milian argued unsuccess-

Br
Broward deputy jailed
on domestic violence
FORT LAUDERDALE
- A Broward County
sheriff's deputy is jailed on
domestic violence charges
after allegedly attempt-
ing to strangle his live-in
girlfriend.
A police report says
56-year-old Theodore
Miller was arrested early


fully for pre-trial release
of his client, noting Bieger
has a clean record and sur-
rendered peacefully.
Broward County Judge
John "Jay" Hurley declined
the request and ordered
Bieger to have no contact
with Skinner.
"If any calls are made
to her from the Broward
County jail, I will cut off
your phone privileges,"
Hurley said. "You've made
many, many phone calls to
Ms. Skinner."
Milian said he would en-
ter a not guilty plea on be-
half of Bieger.
Skinner, 31, was on leave
for several days, which is
routine when an officer is
involved in a shooting. An
internal investigation was
under way, but Stanley re-
fused to comment on any
motive.
"They work together on
the same shift," she added.
Bieger joined the Lau-
derhill police force in 2006
and Skinner in 2009. Hur-
ley said the two worked
uniformed patrols dur-
ing the midnight shift and
once had dated.
Skinner broke up with
Bieger and told him to stay
away from her, accord-
ing to a probable cause
affidavit.
"There was jealousy, mis-
trust ... and harassment,"
Hurley said.

ief
Monday. Miller is a 21-
year veteran who is now
suspended without pay.
The police report says
Miller called authorities to
say he'd been head-butted
by his girlfriend. When
deputies arrived, she told
them Miller spit in her
face, punched her and
squeezed her throat.

From wire reports


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Cain accuser's former


boyfriend says they all met


The Associated Press

SHREVEPORT, La.
- The former boyfriend
of a woman who accused
Republican presidential
contender Herman Cain
of inappropriate sexual
behavior said Monday that
he and this then-girlfriend
met the businessman in
the late 1990s.
Victor Jay Zuckerman's
account of an evening he,
Sharon Bialek and Cain
spent together in 1997 di-
rectly contradicts the can-
didate's assertions that he
had never met his accuser
and did not recognize her
name.
"During the National
Restaurant Association
convention in Chicago,
Sharon indeed did meet
and spend time with Mr.
Cain," Zuckerman said at a
news conference, describ-
ing an after party Cain had
invited them to in a hotel
suite after a National Res,
taurant Association event
in Chicago.
Cain was chief executive
of the Washington trade
group at the time.
"At that party, Mr. Cain
engaged both of us in con-
versation," Zuckerman
said.
Zuckerman's spoke just
as the firestorm around
Cain seemed to be subsid-
ing since the first disclo-
sures on Oct. 30 set off a
week of wall-to-wall news
coverage. There hadn't
been any new information
disclosed in the past week
about Cain or the accusa-
tions, and plans for a joint
news conference, by his
accusers seemed increas-
ingly unlikely.
Cain's campaign did not
have an immediate re-
sponse to Zuckerman.
Attorney Gloria Allred,
who represents Bialek, ap-
peared at Zuckerman's side
and called on Cain to ac-
knowledge that he had met
his accuser, one of at least
four who have alleged that
Cain sexually harassed or
made unwanted advances
toward them.
"Mr. Cain's strategy of
blanket denials simply
won't work," Allred said.


Oil boom raises rents in ND, pushes seniors out


The Associated Press

WILLISTON, N.D. After living all of
her 82 years in the same community, Lois
Sinness left her hometown this month,
crying and towing a U-Haul packed with
her every possession.
She didn't want to go, but the rent on her
$700-a-month apartment was going up
almost threefold because of heightened
demand for housing generated by North
Dakota's oil bonanza. Other seniors in her
complex and across the western part of
the state are in the same predicament.
"Our rents were raised, and we did not
have a choice," Sinness said. "We're all on
fixed incomes, living mostly on Social Se-
curity, so it's been a terrible shock."
It's an irony of the area's economic suc-
cess: The same booming development
that made North Dakota virtually im-
mune to the Great Recession has forced
manylongtime residents to abandon their
homes, including seniors who carved
towns like Williston out of the unforgiving
prairie long before oil money arrived.
In addition to raising the rent, Sinness'
hindlords were going to require even
long-term tenants to pay a $2,000 de-
posit. She fled for a cheaper apartment
in Bismarck, beyond the oil patch, where
her daughter also lives. Her new home is
230 miles away.
Thanks to new drilling techniques that
make it possible to tap once-unreachable
caches of crude, a region that used to have
plenty of elbow room is now swarming
with armies of workers. Nodding pumps
dot the wide, mostly barren landscape.
But because it has limited housing, the
area is ill-prepared to handle the influx of
people. The result is that some rents have
risen to the level of some of the nation's
largest cities, with modest two-bedroom
apartments commonly going for as much
as $2,000. The skyrocketing cost of living
is all the talk at the senior center in down-
town Williston.
"Grandma can't go to work in the oil
fields and make a 150 grand a year," said
A.J. Mock, director of the Williston Coun-
cil for the Aging. Many of the seniors who,
are moving out "have lived here their
entire lives and wanted to live here until
they die."
Ellavon Weber, 88, is getting elbowed
out of the state entirely. She's reluctantly


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Oct. 27 photo, Alton and Mary Lou
Sundby take a break during a move into a new
apartment in Williston, N.D. The Sundby's
were notified last month that their rent would
nearly triple to $2,000 a month.
moving to Arizona, where two of her three
children live, leaving behind friends, her
church and her weekly aerobics classes,
as well as pinochle games and quilting
bees.
"I thought I'd be in North Dakota the
rest of my life, but evidently, that's not the
case," Weber said.
Drilling operations have transformed
the area, which now resembles an indus-
trial park. Previously uncongested high-
ways and city streets are clogged with
18-wheelers.
Some workers live in tents, cars and
campers. Hotels are booked for months.
Just a handful of homes were listed for
sale in October in Williston, including a
humble mobile home priced at $149,500.
Two mobile home parks that were aban-
doned after the last oil bust are now full.
In most of the surrounding towns, tem-
porary housing camps have sprung up.
Because many of them are little more than
dormitories made out of shipping con-
tainers, some communities have banned
them for sanitary and safety reasons.
Developers have been slow to build
more apartments, largely because they
got stung by the region's last oil boom
when it went bust ii the 1980s. About
1,000 new housing units are planned for
this year.
Local officials are "turning over every
rock to see if we can find a solution,"
Mayor Ward Koeser said. But "nothing
has been found yet."


"He needs to come clean
with the American people.
Now is the time."
Zuckerman said Bialek
told him that Cain inap-
propriately touched her
later that year when she
met him in Washington
to seek employment help
after being fired from the
association.
Cain said last week that
he doesn't remember her
and had never seen Bialek
until she went public.
"I saw Ms. Allred and her
client yesterday in that
news conference for the
very first time," Cain said
after that news conference.
"As I sat in my hotel room
with a couple of my staff
members, as they got to
the microphone, my first
response in my mind and
reaction was, I don't even
know who this woman is.
Secondly, I didn't recog-
nize the name at all."
Later, Cain added: "I
don't even know who this
woman is. I tried to re-
member if I recognized her
and I didn't."
Cain has been dogged
since late last month by
sexual harassment ac-
cusations by former as-
sociation employees. The
controversy was entering
its third week Monday as
the Louisiana pediatrician
stepped forward to cor-
roborate some of Bialek's
allegations.
Zuckerman did not, how-
ever, witness the alleged
sexual advances. He could
only confirm that they and
Cain had met.
"When she returned, she
was upset," Zuckerman


said. "She said that some-
thing had happened and
that Mr. Cain had touched
her in an inappropriate
manner. She said she han-
dled it and didn't want to
talk about it any further."
There also was fresh evi-
dence that accusations are
causing Cain to lose pub-
lic support. Some surveys
show him dropping from
the top of the polls, where
he had been in the weeks
before the first of the de-
cade-old accusations
surfaced.
Cain has defiantly de-
nied any wrongdoing but
he also has been unable to
put the questions behind
him with less than two
months until Iowa's leadoff
caucuses.
Cain has vowed to stay
in the race for the GOP
nomination and has de-
ployed his wife of 43 years
to defend him. Gloria Cain
was appearing in a televi-
sion interview set to air
Monday night after being
absent from the campaign
trail for much of the year.
"I'm thinking he would
have to have a split per-
sonality to do the things
that were said," she said in
excerpts of the Fox News
Channel interview that
were released Sunday.
She said she cannot be-
lieve the claims.
"To hear such graphic
allegations and know that
that would have been
something that was totally
disrespectful of her as a
woman and I know that's
not the person he is," Glo-
ria Cain said. "He totally
respects women."


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Police break up an encampment for a Occupy Wall Street demonstration in Oakland, Calif.,
on Monday.


Police clear out the



Occupy Oaldand camp


The Associated Press


OAKLAND, Calif. Riot-clad law en-
forcement officers cleared out Oakland's
weeks-old anti-Wall Street encampment
early Monday, arresting Occupy dem-
onstrators and removing tents from a
downtown plaza after issuing several
warnings over the weekend.
Protesters appeared to put up little
resistance, and officers could be seen
calmly leading some demonstrators
away in plastic handcuffs. Warnings
from authorities had been similar to
those issued before officers used tear gas
and bean bag projectiles to clear the en-
campment on Oct. 25.
Officers made 32 arrests during Mon-
day's raid, Police Chief Howard Jordan
said, adding that there were no reports
of injuries to officers or protesters.
After officers blocked off the streets
surrounding Frank Ogawa Plaza, some
demonstrators gathered near the bar-
ricades and vowed to return. By 9 a.m.,
however, most of the demonstrators had
left the area.
"Where we go from there is up to tim-
ing and chance," said Shon Kae, who's
on Occupy Oakland's media committee.
"We just do what seems right at the time,
and we'll roll with the punches.
"There is no secret plan. We all have to
just keep on with the struggle," he said.
The action came a day after police
drove hundreds of anti-Wall Street dem-
onstrators from weeks-old encamp-
ments in Portland, arresting more than
50 people.
Oakland officials stepped up calls for
an end to their city's encampment af-
ter a man was shot and killed Thursday
near the plaza. Police issued a fourth
cease and desist order Sunday night tell-
ing demonstrators they couldn't camp
there.
Mayor Jean Quan had allowed protest-
ers to reclaim the disbanded site after
facing criticism following the Oct. 25
raid.
In his first statement since being hit
in the head and seriously injured in the
raid, Marine Corps veteran Scott Olsen
said Monday he was feeling a lot better
but still had a lot of work to do in rehab.
Olsen's plight has become a rallying cry
for the Occupy Wall Street movement,
with shrines set up in his honor through-
out the nation.
The 24-year-old posted a statement on
his Google+ account, which was verified
by his roommate Keith Shannon.
"You'll be hearing more from me in the
near future and soon enough we'll see
you in our streets!" he wrote.
The camp grew substantially after the
Oct. 25 raid, although city officials said
Sunday the number of tents had dropped
by about 30 to 150 since Nov. 8.
"We came to this point because Oc-
cupy Oakland, I think, began to take a
different path than the original move-
ment," Quan said. "We had to bring the
camp to an end before more people got
hurt."
Not everyone in Quan's camp agreed.
Dan Siegel, one of the mayor's top legal
advisers, resigned over the decision to
raid the ariti-Wall Street protest encamp-
ment on Monday.
Siegel, a civil rights attorney and long-


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"We came to this point because
Occupy Oakland, I think, began
to take a different path than the
original movement."
Mayor Jean Quan

time friend of Quan, worked as an un-
paid adviser. He has been a vocal critic
of Oakland police and also had opposed
the Oct. 25 raid.
Protesters would be allowed to return
to the plaza after the tents were cleared
out, but they wouldn't be allowed to
spend the night, officials said.
Officials across the country have been
urging an end to similar gatherings in
the wake of three deaths in different cit-
ies, including two deaths by gunfire.
Demands for Oakland protesters to
pack up increased after a man was shot
and killed Thursday near the encamp-
ment site.
Protesters had said there was no con-
nection between the shooting and the
camp. But police identified the slain
man as 25-year-old Kayode Ola Foster of
Oakland, saying his family confirmed he
had been staying at the plaza.
Police officer Johnna Watson said wit-
nesses have told police that one of two
suspects in the shooting had also been a
frequent resident at the plaza. The sus-
pects' names haven't been released.
Investigators suspect that the shoot-
ing resulted from a fight between two
groups of men.
In the hours after the midnight Sat-
urday eviction deadline in Portland,
protesters flooded the park area. At one
point, the crowd swelled to thousands.
As dawn arrived, riot police had retreated
and most of the crowds had gone home,
but protesters who have been at the two
parks since Oct. 6 were still there.
Police moved in later. An officer on a
loudspeaker warned that anyone who
resisted risked arrest and "may also be
subject to chemical agents and impact
weapons." Demonstrators chanted "we
are a peaceful protest."
"We were talking about what we were
going to do and then they just started
hitting people. Seems like a waste of re-
sources to me,"' protester Mike Swain,
27, said.
One man was taken away on a stretch-
er; he was alert and talking to paramed-
ics, and raised a peace sign to fellow pro-
testers, who responded with cheers.
City officials erected temporary chain-
link fences with barbed wire at the top
around three adjacent downtown parks,
choking off access for demonstrators as
parks officials cleaned up.
Portland Mayor Sam Adams defended
his order to clear the park, saying it is
his job to enforce the law and keep the
peace.
Officials said one officer suffered mi-
nor injuries.
In other cities over the weekend:
) In Salt Lake City, police arrested 19
people Saturday when protesters re-
fused to leave a park a day after a man
was found dead inside his tent at the
encampment.
) In Albany, N.Y., police arrested 24
protesters after they defied a curfew.


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Attorney Gloria Allred introduces Victor Jay Zuckerman (left),
the former boyfriend of Allred's client, Sharon Bialek, during a
news conference in Shreveport, La., on Monday.


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Supreme Court to tackle health care law


L The Associated Press

WASHINGTON The
Supreme Court on Mon-
day promised an extraor-
dinarily thorough spring-
time review of President
Barack Obama's historic
health care overhaul -
more than five hours of
argument, unprecedented
in modern times in time
for a likely ruling affecting
millions of Americans just
before the presidential
election.
That ruling, expected
before next summer's
Independence Day holi-
day, could determine the
fate of Obama's signature
domestic achievement,
the most far reaching
domestic legislation in a
generation but a political
lightning rod as well. It is
vigorously opposed by all
of Obama's prospective
GOP opponents.
The Patient Protection
and Affordable Care Act
aims to provide health
insurance to more than
30 .million previously un-
insured Americans. But
Republicans have brand-
ed the law unconstitu-
tional since before Obama
signed it in a ceremony in
March 2010.
The court's ruling could
be its most significant and
political decision since
George W. Bush's 2000
presidential election vic-
tory. But the justices left
themselves an opening to
defer the outcome if they
choose, by requesting ar-
guments on one lower
court's ruling that a deci-
sion must wait until 2015,


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE PHOTO
In this March 23, 2010 photo President Barack Obama signs the health care bill in the East
Room of the White House in Washington.


when one of the law's
many provisions takes
effect.
Legal experts have of-
fered a range of opinions
about what the high court
might do. Many promi-
nent Supreme Court law-
yers believe the law will
be upheld by a lopsided
vote, with Republican
and Democratic appoin-
tees ruling in its favor.
But others predict a close
outcome, with Justice
Anthony Kennedy, a Re-
publican who sometimes
joins his four Democratic
colleagues, holding the
deciding vote.
The White House has
pushed for a final ruling
as soon as possible, and
Communications Director
Dan Pfeiffer said the ad-.
ministration was pleased
the justices agreed to take
the case now, with argu-
ments in March. "It's im-
portant that we put to rest
once and for all the issue
of maybe ihe law will dis-


appear," said Health and
Human Services Secretary
'Kathleen Sebelius.
Republicans also said
they were happy the high
court would hear argu-
ments on the constitution-
ality of the provision at the
heart of the law and three
other questions about the
act. The central provision
in question is the require-
ment that individuals buy
health insurance starting
in 2014 or pay a penalty.
"That the Supreme
Court is taking this up, I
think, is a positive signal
that there are legitimate
concerns surrounding the
constitutional aspects of
mandating that individu-
als purchase health care
insurance and purchase it
according to Washington's
guidelines," said House
Majority Leader Eric Can-
tor of Virginia.
The exceptional five and
a half hours allotted for ar-
gument demonstrates the
significance the justices


see in this case. Normally,
they allow only one hour,
split between two sides.
The health care overhaul
would achieve its huge ex-
pansion of coverage by re-
quiring individuals to buy
health insurance starting
in 2014, by expanding
Medicaid and by applying
other provisions, many yet
to take effect.
The central question be-
fore the court is whether
the government has the
power to force people
to buy health insurance.
The White House says
Congress used a "quintes-
seritial" power its con-
stitutional ability to regu-
late interstate commerce,
including the health care
industry when it passed
the overhaul.
But opponents of the
law, and the 11th U.S. Cir-
cuit Court of Appeals in
Atlanta, say that Congress
overstepped its authority
when lawmakers passed
individual mandate.


Deep-chilling trauma patients to try to save them


The Associated Press

WASHINGTON Suspended
animation may not be just for sci-fi
movies anymore: Trauma surgeons
soon will try plunging some criti-
cally injured people into a deep chill
- cooling their body temperatures
as low as 50 degrees in hopes of
saving their lives.
Many trauma patients have inju-
ries that should be fixable but they
bleed to death before doctors can
patch them up. The new theory:
Putting them into extreme hypo-
thermia'just might allow them to
survive without brain damage for
about an hour so surgeons can do
their work.
In a high-stakes experiment fund-
ed by the Defense Department,
the University of Pittsburgh Medi-
cal Center is preparing to test that
strategy on a handful of trauma vic-
tims who are bleeding so badly from
gunshots, stab wounds or similar in-
juries that their hearts stop beating.
Today when that happens, a mere 7
percent of patients survive.
Get cold enough and "you do OK
with no blood for a while," says lead
researcher Dr. Samuel Tisherman, a


Skeet
From Page 1A

most accurate shooter in each heat
as each contestant fires at a fixed
target. The winners in this event
take home a ham or turkey ready for
cooking.
The event was timed to coincide
with a period in which gun season
is closed for deer.
Jackson County Deputy Adam
Walker is helping coordinate the
skeet shoot, and has participated in
such events many times. He said the
sheriff's office is hoping to build this
into a major event for the region.
To his knowledge, local skeet
shooters currently have to travel
some distance to compete. He
knows of events in Panama City, Tal-
lahassee, and perhaps'Dothan, Ala.,
but none closer on a regular basis.
He said two national skeet shooting
champions are helping put on the
event.
In the local tournament, each
shooter will fire on a series of "clay
pigeons" that will be sent skyward
via an automatic launch machine.
They will sometimes fire at singles,
and sometimes two targets will be
in the sky at once. The clay discs
can travel between 30 and 70 miles
per hour and up to 30 feet -off the
ground. The first, second and third


University of Pittsburgh critical care
specialist. "We think we can buy
time. We think it's better than any-
thing else we have at the moment,
and could have a significant impact
in saving a bunch of patients."
Tisherman calls the rescue attempt
"emergency preservation and resus-
citation," EPR instead of CPR. His
team plans to begin testing it early
next year in Pittsburgh and then ex-
panding the study to the University
of Maryland in Baltimore.
If the dramatic approach works,
it will spur some rethinking about.
that line between life and death,
says Dr. Arthur Caplan, a University
of Pennsylvania bioethicist who is
watching the research.
But before the first candidates get
chilled, the scientists face a hurdle:
The law requires that patients con-
sent to be part of medical experi-
ments after they're told the pros
and cons. That's impossible when
the person is bleeding to death.
There won't even be time to seek a
relative's permission.
So starting Tuesday, the Pittsburgh
team is beginning a campaign
required by the Food and Drug
Administration to educate area


place winners will be determined by
the number of targets they hit.
Walker said about 40 people have
already called to say they'll be there
to shoot. Giving prior notice is not
necessary, but people can do so if
they wish or get further information
by calling Walker at 557-7262, or fel-
low deputy Sean Hill at 557-7125.
Shooters will pay their fee as the
register on the morning of the event,
and can present cash or checks.
Participants in both the skeet
shoot and the turkey shoot must
bring their own shotguns and
ammunition.
The Youth Ranches are residen-
tial programs designed to help
troubled boys and girls as they
grow into adulthood. The young
people have chores to do and other
responsibilities to carry out at the
ranches, where they live in a fam-
ily-style atmosphere. They attend
school' and have other educational
opportunities.
Roberts said the skeet shoot will
be going to a very worthy cause.
"We had an antique car show earli-
er in this year for the Youth Ranches,
and it's something I can really feel
good about getting behind. They
provide some very good programs
for young people who need some
long-term guidance because of cir-
cumstances in their lives. Maybe, for
various reasons, they don't have the
adult leadership they need at home,


residents about the study instead
- with signs on city buses, video on
YouTube, a website and two town-
hall meetings next month. Resi-
dents worried about possible risks,
such as brain damage, could sign a
list saying they'd opt out if they ever
were severely injured.
Go even a few minutes without ox-
ygen and the brain in particular can
suffer significant damage. Doctors
have long sought to use hypother-
mia in medicine since discovering
that cooling can slow the metabo-
lism of the brain and other organs,
meaning they can go without oxy-
gen for longer periods. Donated or-
gans are chilled to preserve them, for
example. And people whose hearts
are shocked back into beating after
what's called cardiac arrest often are
iced down to about 90 or 91 degrees,
mild hypothermia that allows the
brain to recover from damage that
began in those moments between
their collapse and revival.
But the CPR that buys time during
more routine cardiac arrest doesn't
help trauma patients who've already
lost massive amounts of blood. In-
juries are the nation's fifth-leading
killer.


or they may be heading down a bad
path for whatever reason. We 'want
them to have the support they need
to learn and grow into responsible
adults so that, later on, we don't
have to deal with them in the court
system or have to see them coming
to some other unfortunate point in
their lives.
"The Ranches are facing some
tough economic times; they've had
to close some facilities because of
lack of funds. When that happens,
it's one less opportunity for our
young people, so we definitely want
to help in every way we can to keep
them going."
Roberts said some young people
from Jackson County are currently
living in Youth Ranch facilities and
that at least one local child is en-
rolled somewhere in the system at
any given time.
Roberts said he expects the shoot
to be a big success.
. "We thought this skeet shoot
might be a good thing to try in the
fall, around hunting season," Rob-
erts said. "A lot of people do this for-
fun, so it seemed like a good fit for
us to have a little competition built
around it.
"We have an expert helping us
set everything up and I've got some
staff members helping who have
been involved in this type of com-
petition before, so it's going to be
done right."


Obituaries


Lanier-Andler
Funeral Home
8261 Hwy 90
Sneads, Florida 32460
850-663-4343

Wayne Cay
McClamma



Mr. Wayne Cay
McClamma, 80 of Sneads,
Fl. passed away Sunday
November 13, 2011 in Ma-
rianna. He was a lifelong
resident of Sneads and a
member of Sneads United
Methodist Church.
Wayne was a U.S, Army
Veteran of Korean Conflict.
He was Retired Farm and
Dairy Manager with
Apalachee Correctional In-
stitute in Sneads.
He was proceeded in
death by his parents and a
brother.
He is survived by his be-
loved wife Danylu
McClamma of Sneads; one
daughter Debra Lynn Gib-
son and husband Jay of
Troy, Al.; three sons,
Wayne C. McClamma, Jr
and wife Paula, Daniel
Wade McClamma and wife
Jan both of Sneads and Ke-
vin Clay McClamma and
wife Dyan of Beavercreek,
Ohio; one sister Ruth
Stueve of Diamond Bar,
California; 11 grandchil-
dren, four great-grand chil-
dren and several nieces
and nephews.
Services for Mr.
McClamma will be Wed-
nesday, November 16, 2011
at 12:00 CST at Lanier-
Andler Funeral Home
Chapel in Sneads. Visita-
tion with the family will be
one hour prior to service
time at Lanier-Andler Fu-
neral Home Chapel. Inter-.
ment will be at Pope Ceme-
tery in Sneads, Fl.


Hinson
From Page 1A

fond of. He often speaks
of his family gathering
arrowheads near that
site and from other spots
on the 260-acre park.
Hinson speculates that a
skirmish in defense of the
cave may account for the
number of arrowheads
he and his children were
able to collect from the
area directly in front of
the cave. Hinson sold the
tract to the Department
of Environmental Protec-
tion a few years ago at a
friendly price in order to
ensure that it would be
accessible to the public for
generations to come. The
city of Marianna manages
the property under a long-
term agreement with the
state agency.
One of his sons, Randall
Hinson, was on hand
Saturday to be part of the
Field Day. He showed the
collection of arrow heads
that he, his brothers and
his father had collected on


Toys
From Page 1A
Panichella of Madison's
Warehouse Restaurant.
Tom Perry, the local co-
ordinator, has been talk-


The family would like to
thank Dr. Mark Akerson ,
Dr. John Spence and their
staff. Also a special thanks
to Amedisys Home Health.
Lanier-Andler Funeral
Home in Sneads, FI is in
charge of arrangements.
850-593-9900
Sunset Memorial Park
Funeral Home and
Crematory, LLC
1700 Barrington Road
Dothan, AL
(334) 983-6604

Calvin Hunter
Thomas

Calvin Hunter Thomas,
infant son of David and
Alana Thomas of Gordon,
passed away Friday, No-
vember 11, 2011 at a local
hospital.
Survivors include his pa-
rents David and Alana Tho-
mas of Gordon; a brother
Eli David Thomas of Gor-
don; grandparents, E. Allan
and Mary Burdette of
Dothan, Hugh David Tho-
mas, Jr. of Lake Placid, FL,
and Barbara Jean Thomas
of Okeechobee, FL; aunts
and uncles, Ruth Ann
Burdette of Little Hocking,
OH, Joe Burdette of Boyds,
MD, and Andrew Thomas
of Okeechobee, FL.-
Funeral services will be
held 11 am Tuesday, Nov.
,15, 2011 at Ashford United
Methodist Church with
Brother Matt Albritton offi-
ciating. Burial will follow in
Friendship United Meth-
odist Church Cemetery
with Robert Byrd directing.
The family will receive
friends from 10-11 am pri-
or to the service at the
church.
In lieu of flowers memo-
rial donations may be
made to the Ashford Unit-
ed Methodist Church, 500
Adams St., Ashford, AL,
36312.


the property.
In addition to walking
tours led by Hebb and oth-
er volunteers, the Jackson
County Public Library sent
a representative to read
stories to children on Field
Day, and an area artist
helped youngsters paint
some scenery.
Representatives of the
Florida Trails Association,
The Nature Conservancy,
DEP and other entities
with land in the area also
attended.
The park is open seven
days a week from 8 a.m.
until 5 p.m. People can
fish the Chipola River
there, where they can
catch brim, bass, catfish
and other kinds offish,
launch their canoes, or
walk throughout the park.
In the future, Hebb said,
plans may be developed to
open the facility to over-
night camping and to hire
an on-site manager.
Currently, visitors are
asked to donate $2 on a
voluntary basis when they
use the park. That could
become a mandatory fee
in the future.


ing with civic groups and
businesses, getting boxes
out and telling the story
of Toys For Tots. He can'be
reached at 850-592-2294.
Other information is
available at greenwood-
fl.toysfortots.org.


Toy Box Drop-off sites In Marianna
a Beef'O'Brady's, 4994 Malloy Plaza
n Big Lots, 4700 Hwy 90
) Century 21 Real Estate, 4630 Hwy 90
) Champion Motorsports, 4461 Lafayette St.
o Chipola Community Bank. 4701 Hwy 90
a Chiploa Ford, 4242 Lafayette St
n City of Marianna, 2898 Green Street
" Dr. Larry Cook DMD, 4307 Third Ave
" Family Dollar Store Distribution Center, 3949 Family
Dollar Parkway
) Florida Public Utilities. 2825 Pennsylvania Ave.
a Airport Salon & Barber Shop. 3206 Caverns Road
a Jackson County Courthouse. 4445 Lafayette St.
a Jackson County Floridan. 4403 Constitution Lane
)) John Brewer's Studio, 3202 Caverns Road
" Madisons Warehouse Restaurant. 2881 Madison St.
" Marianna Toyota. 2961 Penn Ave.
a Outside The Lines, 2863 CaledoniA St.
i Rahal Miller Chevrolet. Buick, GMC & Cadillac.,4204
West Lafayette St.
a The UPS Store. 4415C Constitution Lane
a U.S. Marine Recruiters Office, 4889 Westside Plaza
" Winn Dixie Supermarket. 4878 Market St.


SUN. NOV. 20 6OOPM
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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN + www.jcfloridan.com


Pressure mounts on Syrian


leader amid crackdown


The Associated Press

BlIIIU I Jordan's king
said Monday that Syr-
ian President BasharAssad
should step down for the
good of his country, the
first Arab leader to publicly
make such a call as Syria's
neighbors close ranks
against an increasingly
isolated regime.
Syria's crackdown on an
8-month-old uprising has
brought international con-
demnation, but Damascus
generally has been spared
broad reproach in the Arab
world.
That changed Saturday,
with a near-unanimous
vote by the 22-member
Arab League to suspend
Syria.
Assad has tried to blunt
the most serious threat to
his family's 40-year dynasty
by promising reform while
also using the military to
crack down on protests
that refuse to abate despite
3,500 dead including at
least 12 reported killed on
Monday.
He still has a firm grip
on power, in part, because
the opposition remains
fragmented and he retains
the support of the busi-
ness classes and minority
groups who feel vulnerable
in an overwhelmingly Sun-
ni nation. The 46-year-old
leader can ride. out sanc-
tions imposed by the U.S.
and Europe at least in
the near term as long as
he has the support of key
allies Russia, China and
Iran..
As the uprising wears on,
the regime could wobble.
Sanctions are chipping
away at the ailing econ-
omy, and a financial col-
lapse might persuade the
middle classes to abandon
their allegiance to Assad.
The call by Jordan's King
Abdullah II for Assad to
leave was the latest blow.
"IfBashar (Assad) has the


I LHEA^SUIATI -U EPLR
Pro-Syrian regime protesters hold portraits of Syrian President
Bashar Assad and shout slogans against the Arab League, as
they gather outside the Syrian foreign ministry, where Syrian
Foreign Minister Walid al-Moallem held a press conference, in
Damascus, Syria, on Monday.


interest of his country, he
would step down, but he
would also create an abil-
ity to reach out and start a
new phase of Syrian politi-
cal life," Abdullah told the
BBC in an interview.
"If I was in his position,
I would if it was me
- I would step down and
make sure whoever comes
behind me has the ability
to change the status quo
that we're seeing," he said.
After the interview aired,
a top Jordanian govern-
ment official said the
king didn't directly call on
Assad to step down, noting
the monarch was respond-
ing to a reporter's question
about what he would do if
he were in Assad's place.
The official spoke on con-
dition of anonymity be-
cause he is not authorized
to comment publicly on
the king's statements.
Still, the king's comments
were the strongest yet by
an Arab leader.
Earlier Monday, Syria
struck back at its interna-
tional critics, branding an
Arab League decision to
suspend its membership
as "shameful and mali-
cious" and accusing other
Arabs of conspiring with


the West to undermine the
regime.
The sharp rebuke sug-
gests Damascus fears the
United States and its al-
lies might use the rare
Arab consensus to press
for tougher sanctions at
the United Nations as the
unrest appears poised to
escalate.
"We wanted the role of
the Arab League to be a
supporting role but if the
Arabs wanted to be con-
spirators, this is their busi-
ness," Foreign Minister
Walid al-Moallem told a
televised news conference
in Damascus.
The unified Arab position
also puts more pressure on
the U.N. Security Council
to impose sanctions, de-
spite objections by Russia
and China.
Of the Arab League's
22 members, only Syria,
Lebanon and Yemen voted
against the suspension,
with Iraq abstaining.
A similar Arab League
decision to suspend Libya
earlier this year paved the
way for the U.N.-mandat-
ed no-fly zone and NATO
airstrikes that eventually
brought down Moammar
Gadhafi.


Monti can't say if Italy needs measures


The Associated Press

ROME- Italy's Premier-
designate Mario Monti
insisted Monday it was
"premature" to say if the
country will require more
tough measures to rescue
the nation's finances and
revive its economy, as he
sought enough backing.
from political parties to
form a government.
Two days after Silvio
Berlusconi resigned, and
with investors still ner-
vous about Italy's credibil-
ity, Monti spent the day
consulting with political
parties, then told report-
ers he couldn't say when
he would have a Cabinet
lined up.
Pressured by the mar-
kets, Parliament last week
gave final approval after
weeks of political squab-
bling over emergency
measures aimed at cut-
ting spending and spur-
ring economic growth,
but it is unclear if action
is enough with Italy's debt
costs shooting upward.
Asked if Italywould need
a "corrective" package of
measures, Monti replied:
"I appreciate the question,
but it would be premature
on my part to reply."
A few party leaders -
including some in Berlus-
coni's party have been
demanding the nonparti-
san Monti only last long
enough to implement
economic reforms, then
step down so elections
can be called this spring,
a year ahead of schedule.
But Monti made clear
that he intends to serve
until spring 2013 elec-
tions, calling it counter-
productive to say when
he'd step down.
"If a date before (2013) is
set, this haste would take
away credibility from the
government's actions,"
Monti said, adding, in the
brief, news conference,
"I won't accept" such a
condition.
Tuesday was shaping
up as a crucial day for


Monti to decide if he can
count on Parliament's
support. He meets iq the
morning with Italy's two
largest parties in the leg-
islature- those of Berlus-
coni's conservatives and
a center-left part made
up of former communists
and ex-Christian Demo-
crats. Their votes would
be crucial in a confidence
vote, likely to come later
this week, which would
seal the start of Monti's
government.
Monti.- an economist
- was tasked Sunday
night by Italy's president
with creating a govern-
ment of experts capable
of overhauling an ailing
economy and keeping
market fears over the
country from threatening
the existence of the euro.
But beside the clamor
from some parties for
elections soon, some
have been insisting po-
litical figures have roles
in his Cabinet. That could
undo the technocraticc"
character many analysts
expected he would bring
to his government. Monti
told reporters he would
take the time needed to
line up a strong time, and


said he hoped the markets
would "temper their im-
patience" by his need to
choose well. ,
Investors initially
cheered Monti's appoint-
ment, though concern
lingered about the sheer
amount of work his new
government will have to
do to restore faith in the
country's battered econo-
my and finances. Monti's
government would need
to implement economic
reforms aimed at reviving
stagnant growth to bring
down public debt, stuck
near 120 percent of GDP
Some parties were look-
ing to extract concessions
in exchange for support to
Monti's government.
That risks slowing the
process of forming a gov-
ernment, after days in
which Italy's political ma-
chinery had moved with
rare efficiency. Both hous-
es passed fresh auster-
ity and reform measures
within two days, paving
the way for Berlusconi's
resignation.
Improving market confi-
dence in Italy is crucial. to
the future of the eurozone,
as the country would be
too expensive to rescue.


S..WWAL



n.
2011 OM M



2011 Calendar Cover with M UIJi
winner Austin Roberts
Cast your vote at www.FloridanCutestKid.com
The child with the most votes will appear on the 2012
Jackson County Life calendar. 12 runners up will each
appear on a month.
Votingends December 2andthe winners willbeannouncedDecember
7. All proceeds from the contest go to Newspaper in Education which
supplies newspaper to teachers to use in the classroom at no cost to
the school. Your support is much appreciated.
Add your Birthday or Event to the calendar
for a' $1.00 donation to Newspaper in
Education. Drop by the Floridan office or
call us at 850-526-3614 to get it in.
It aft.m"iay IM


Good Thru November 21. 201


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718A TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 2011


IEN RMTIONRL









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L...' Ji,'A ^1 ,


PREP VOLLEYBAUIL


I


G HISTORY

Lady Pirates continue

quest for'state crown


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Sneads' Brandy Strickland returns the ball during Saturday's match against Blountstown.


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com
The Sneads Lady Pirates are
now just two wins a way from the
school's first ever state volleyball
championship.
Sneads will begin play in the
1A state semifinals this morn-
ing at 10 a.m. against Baker, with
a win vaulting the Lady Pirates
into Wednesday's state champi-
onship game in Kissimmee.
SHS got to state thanks to a
dominant three-set victory over
Blountstown on Saturday in
Sneads, winning by scores of 25-
11, 25-12, and 25-12.
It was one of the Lady Pirates'
best performances of the sea-
son, and it came in their biggest
match of the year.
"We did really well. We were
aggressive from start to finish,"
Sneads coach Sheila Roberts
said. "It seems like we jumped
out on top from the beginning
and that's the way it stayed from
start to finish. That's the way I
like it in a big match like that."
The victory propelled the
Lady Pirates to the final four for
the first time in school history,
which must have come as relief
for them after beating knocked
out of the regional finals for the
past three seasons.
"It was huge. We made his-
tory," Roberts said. "No Jackson


County volleyball team has ever
made it to the final four, so it was
a big day for us. It was a wonder-
ful win, but we're not finished. It
feels great to go to state, but we
also feel like we still have unfin-
ished business. We have more to
do. We're ready to play."
Sneads was led Saturday by
Jordan Jackson's 11 kills, while
Becca Aaron added 20 assists,
and Emily Jones 10 digs and 14
serve receives.
Aaron also led with 16 service
points and five ace serves, while
Brandy Strickland added four
kills, Ashley Rogers three, and
Jackson and Yonna Bell each
contributed three ace serves.
Jackson also had two block-
kills, while Logan Neel had one.
Aaron and Jackson each added
six digs, with Strickland adding
four.
The Lady Pirates' attention
now turns to Baker, a squad that
they're familiar with after knock-
ing them out of the playoffs each
of the past three seasons.
"Baker is always very scrap-
py, they always want to win,
and they'll fight," Roberts said.
"They're going to be fired up to
play us, so you better believe it's
going to be a battle. But I just
See PIRATES, Page 2B


JUCO Basketball


Indians


take 2 in


Georgia

BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com
The Chipola Indians notched
a pair of wins over the weekend
in Decatur, Ga., beating Atlanta
Metro 66-61 on Friday and Geor-
gia Perimeter 65-55 on Saturday.
With the wins, the Indians
improved to 4-0 on the young
season.
The Indians got off to a slug-
gish start against Atlanta Metro
and led only 24-23 at the half
before opening things up in the
second half.
Chipola led .60-49 with five
minutes to play and held on for
the win.
Joseph Uchebo had 13 points
and nine rebounds to lead the
way for the Indians, with Aishon
White adding 12,.Tevin Baskin
nine, Mo Lee nine, Trantell
Knight nine, and Kruize Pinkins
eight.
See INDIANS, Page 2B
MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Chipola's MoHammad Lee goes in
for a lay-up during a game earlier
this season.


Chipola women still perfect after Classic


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com
The Chipola Lady Indians
went a perfect 3-0 in the JUCO
Girls Basketball Report Classic
in Marianna over the weekend,
moving to 5-0 overall on the
season.
After taking wins of 69-56 over
South Georgia Tech on Thurs-
day and 54-45 over Monroe
Community College on Friday,
the Lady Indians came back Sat-
urday night to earn a 73-58 win
over Monroe College.
Jeniece Johnson had 16 points
and seven rebounds to lead
Chipola, with Jelleah Sidney
adding 12 points, O'Neal Ses-
sion, Sara Djassi, and Kristine
Brance all 11 each, and Denaya
Brazzle 10.
Djassi also had a team-high 11
rebounds and four assists.
w s ,' :, avN',':,*.""*"'. -, .


Chipola shot 48 percent from


the field despite going just 1 of
11 from the 3-point stripe.
"For the most part, I was hap-
py," Lady Indians coach David
Lane said of his team's weekend
efforts.
"One of the glaring problems
that we have right now is that
we're not starting the game very
well. After the first media time-
out against South Georgia Tech,
we were down 19-9. With 14
minutes to go (in the first half)
against Monroe on Friday, we
were down 15-0, so we're bad
starting right now."
Chipola trailed South Georgia
Tech 30-24 with four minutes
left in the first half, but used a
23-0 spurt that extended into
the second half to go up 46-30
and seize control.
See CHIPOLA, Page 2B


Prep Cross-Country


Tigers' Potts


qualifies for state


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com
Graceville's Hunter Potts fin-
ished ninth in the Region 1-1A
cross-country meet on Saturday
in Lake City to qualify for the
state meet that will be held Sat-
urday in Dade City.
A junior, Potts ran the 5K race
in 17:15.84 to set a new personal
record by 10 full seconds.
"It was a good day," Potts said.
"I did my best, but I still think I
can do better."
The junior will get his chance
Saturday in Dade City, .but
Graceville coach Jajuan Clark
said it's a big accomplishment
for Potts just to get there.
"For us, it's a really big thing,"
the coach said. "It's just the sec-
ond year for us having cross-
country since 2006, and our first
ever state competitor. We kind of
had a feeling (Potts could quali-
fy). We knew he had the poten-
tial to do it because he's also a
real good track athlete who runs
distance races, so about halfway
through the season we started
comparing his times to other


SUBMIT ED PHUl
Graceville's Hunter Potts qualified
for the 1A state cross-country meet
on Saturday in Dade City after
placing ninth in the Region 1 meet
on Saturday in Lake City.
kids to see where he was at, and
we could see that he was starting
to rank."
See POTTS, Page 2B


BYDUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com
The Marianna Bulldogs fell just
short of qualifying for the 2A state
meet on Saturday, finishing one
spot out of qualification at sev-
enth in the Region 1-2A meet in
Lake City.
Marianna's boys finished with
an average time of 17:59.86, just
four seconds behind sixth-place
finisher Episcopal.
The Bulldogs were the No. 9 team
in the region going into the race,
and coach Allan Gibson said he
couldn't have been happier with
the way his group performed.
"They gave a valiant effort and
represented us very well. We just
came up a little short," he said.
"They gave me everything they
had."
Five of the top six Marianna run-
ners all posted personal records,
,.


MAMK ASMKNNEPFLORI AN
Marianna's Jesse McGowan runs
during a race earlier this season.
and it was the team's fastest race
of the season.
See BULLDOGS, Page 2BL


Bulldogs fall just short

of escaping regionals










-12B TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 15,2011


SPORTS


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Sports Briefs

High School Boys Basketball
The Sonny's Preseason Tip-Off Tourney at
Marianna High School will be Thursday and
Saturday.
Thursday- Malone vs. Holmes County, 4:30
p.m.; Cottondale vs. Maclay, 6 p.m.; Port St. Joe
vs. Marianna, 7:30 p.m.
Saturday- Cottondale vs. Holmes County, 4:30
p.m.; Malone vs. Port St. Joe, 6 p.m.; Marianna vs.
Maclay, 7:30 p.m.

High School Girls Basketball
Tuesday- Cottondale at Malone, 5:30 p.m., and
7 p.m.; Graceville at Choctawahatchee, 6:30 p.m.
Thursday- Marianna at Graceville, 6 p.m.;
Malone at Laurel Hill, 6 p.m., and 7:30 p.m.; Cot-
tondale at Holmes County, 1 p.m., and 2 p.m.
Friday- Malone at Bethlehem, 6 p.m., and 7:30
p.m.; Marianna at Pensacola Catholic, 5:30 p.m.,
and 7 p.m.

Chipola Women's Basketball
Chipola will travel to Midland, Tex., this
weekend to play games Thursday, Friday, and
Saturday.
The Lady Indians will play Angelina on
Thursday at 4 p.m., with Friday' and Saturday's
opponents to be determined.

Chipola Men's Basketball
The Indians will head to Port Arthur, Tex., over
the weekend to compete in the Lamar State
Classic.
Chipola will play Texas Southern on Friday at
5:30 p.m., and Baton Rouge Community College
on Saturday at 1:30 p.m.

Alumni Football Game
There will be a full contact alumni football
league held this winter.
The games are full pads with officials, an-
nouncers, and video crew, and is open to all
2 former high school football players 18 and older
in the area.
Games will take place on weekends from Janu-
ary through March of 2012.
There must be at least 35 players to a team.
'Those interested can sign up at www.alumni
footballusa.com.



Send all sports items to editorial@jcfloridan.
com, or fax them to 850-482-4478. The mailing
address for the paper is Jackson County Floridan
PO. Box 520 Marianna, FL 32447.


Indians
From Page 1B

The Indians came back on
Saturday with more energy
and jumped out to a 38-21
halftime lead over Georgia
Perimeter and was never
seriously challenged.
Knight was the top scorer
in that game with 18 points,
with Uchebo adding 13,
Jerel Scott nine, and Pinkins
eight.
Chipola was unable to
practice on Thursday af-
ter making the trip due to
a scheduling issue, and In-
dians coach Jake Headrick
said that was evident in how
his team played Friday.


"I believe you play like
you practice the day before.
That's something I preach to
the guys every day," he said.
"We came out really rusty
Friday and not ready to play.
Our focus was not there like
it needed to be because we
didn't get a chance to prac-
tice the day before.
"I thought 'we came back
on Saturday and really re-
sponded. Georgia Perimeter
is always a tough place to
play."
Headrickpraised his team's
defense over the weekend
and through the first four
games overall, but Chipola
turned the ball over 28 times
against Georgia Perimeter
and missed 15 of 33 free


Bulldogs
From Page 1B
"When you end the year with your best
race ever, they've given you everything,"
the coach said. "That's what we asked for
and that's what they gave us. We did every-
thing we could do, and I have no regrets
looking back. For us to finish seventh is an
accomplishment."
Jesse McGowan had the best time for
the Bulldogs, running in 17:06.83 to finish
19th, while Isaiah McFarland came in at
17:16.5 to finish 25th.
Freshman John Metzler was 33rd with a
time of 17:32.15, Zach Brockner was 62nd
at 18:34.42, Gavin Shouppe was 81st at


Chipola
From Page 1B
Lane said it's nice to be 5-0, but the
slow starting issues have to be addressed
soon.
"We always tell them that winning is
better than losing, but we've got to figure
this out," he said.
"We can't let it become a habit be-
cause we're going to face some compe-
tition later on in the Panhandle Con-
ference that will bury you if you start
slow."
The Lady Indians will next com-
pete this week in a tournament in


throw attempts.
"We have to try to limit
turnovers, which have been
high in every game," the
coach said. "We have to get
it to 10 to 12 every game. But
it's early and guys are still
trying to understand the of-
fense and what we're trying
to do. I think some guys are
forcing a little bit to show
what they can do offensive-
ly, but instead it's leading to
turnovers."
While the offense is still
a work in progress, the de-
fense has been superb thus
far, as the Indians are hold-
ing opponents to just 53
points per game.
"I've told the guys that's
what our identity is, trying


19:29.39, and Dylan Standland was 92nd
at 20:18.41.
Lindsey Toole was the only MHS girl
who made it to regionals, and she placed
25th with a time of 20:37.75.
Gibson said that while they didn't ulti-
mately get to where they wanted to be, the
2011 season one in which the. Bulldogs
won their first district title since 1999 -was
a banner one to be sure.
"We had the best season we've had in a
decade," he said.
"We've gotten back to where we were in
the mid 1990s in terms of competition,
which is very satisfying for me. These kids
wanted to make their mark and they did.
We had a stellar race. Unfortunately, it just
wasn't enough."


"We always tell them that winning
is better than losing, but we've got to
figure this out. We can't let it become
a habit because we're going toface
some competition later on in the
Panhandle Conference that will bury
you ifyou start slow."
David Lane,
Lady Indians coach

Midland, Texas, starting off Thursday
with a game against Angelina before
playing one of Midland or South-
ern Idaho on Friday in the second
round.


to defend and rebound ev-
ery night," he said.
"Our defense in the first
half against Georgia Perim-
eter was unbelievable. Our
half-court defense is really
good, but we can't defend
against turnovers. That's our
focus this week, getting the
guys to understand what
we're trying to do, which is
get the ball in the post or
attack the rim and get the
best shot we can get every
possession."
Chipola will be back in
action Friday in Port Ar-
thur, Tex., against Baton
Rouge Community Col-
lege, with a game Saturday
against Texas Southern to
follow.


Potts
From Page 1B

Clark ran for the Tigers in high
school and previously had the
school's best time of 17:30 that
he set in 2006.
Potts broke that record at the
Panhandle Championships in
Marianna earlier this season, and
then set a new mark at regionals.
He said he wasn't sure how high
he would finish in the state race,
but he couldn't wait to get down
there and see.
"I'm looking forward to it a lot,"
he said. "It will definitely be a
great experience for me."




Pirates
From Page 1B

think that I've got an offensive
arsenal, and with some of the
defensive gains we've made, I
feel really confident. I feel like
we can come out on top if we're
playing our game.
"We feel like we've done every-
thing we could to prepare, and
we're excited to get there and get
it started."


TUESDAY MORNING / AFTERNOON NOVEMBER 15, 2011
___ 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:0010:3011:011:3012:0012:3 1:00 1:30 2:00 2:30 3:00 3:30 4:00 4:30 5:00 5:30
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TUESDAY EVENING / LATE NIGHT NOVEMBER 15, 2011
___6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:0010:3011:0011:3012:0012:30 1:00 1:30 2:00 2:30 3:00 3:30 4:00 4:30 5:00 5:30
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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


said. "We've got to win out and fin-
ish strong."
But Manuel, who grew up in Vir-
ginia Beach, said he wasn't inter-
ested in playing spoiler against his
home state university.
"It doesn't matter if it's UVA or any
other team," Manuel said. "These
guys are playing great football right
now and we want to play great foot-
ball too."
Manuel said he was a fan of college'
football in general and no school in
particular as a boy.
"There were a lot of programs
that I liked," said Manuel, who was
Fisher's signature signee after his
arrival at Florida State in 2007 as of-
fensive coordinator. "You get a great


SPORTS


NBA Lockout



Players reject NBA's offer,



begin to disband the union


The Associated Press

NEWYORK NBA play-
ers rejected the league's
latest offer Monday and
began disbanding the
union, likely jeopardizing
the season.
"We're prepared to file
this antitrust action against
the NBA," union executive
director Billy Hunter said.
"That's the best situation
where players can get their
due process."
And that's a tragedy as
far as NBA Commissioner
David Stern is concerned.
"It looks like the 2011-12
season is really in jeopar-
dy," Stern said in an inter-
view aired on ESPN. "It's
just a big charade. To do it
now, the union is ratchet-
ing up I guess to see if they
can scare the NBA owners
or something. That's not
happening."
Hunter said players were
not prepared to agree to
Stern's ultimatum to ac-
cept the current proposal
or face a worse one, say-
ing they thought it was
"extremely unfair." And
they're aware what this
battle might cost them.
"We understand the
consequences of poten-
tially missing the season;
we understand the conse-
quences that players could
potentially face if things
don't go our way, but it's a
risk worth taking," union
vice president Maurice
Evans said. "It's the right
move to do."
But it's risky. The league
already has filed a pre-
emptive lawsuit seeking to
prove the lockout is legal
and contends that without
a union that collectively
bargained them, the play-
ers' guaranteed contracts
could legally be voided.
During oral arguments
on Nov. 2, the NBA asked
U.S. District Judge Paul
Gardephe to decide the le-
gality of its lockout, but he
was reluctant to wade into
the league's labor mess.
Gardephe has yet to issue a


T HE ASSUOIATI PU REtS
NBA Players Association president Derek Fisher speaks during
a news conference after a meeting of the players' union in New
York on Monday.


ruling. Stern, who is a law-
yer, had urged players to
take the deal on the table,
saying it's the best the NBA
could offer and advised
that decertification is not
a winning strategy.
Players ignored that
warning, choosing instead
to dissolve its union, giv-
ing them a chance to win
several billion dollars in
triple damages in an anti-
trust lawsuit.
"This is the best decision
for the players," union
president Derek Fisher
said. "I want to reiterate
that point, that a lot o(
individual players have
a lot of things personally
at stake in terms of their
careers and where they
stand. And right now they
feel it's important we
all feel it's important to all
our players, not just the
ones in this room, but our
entire group that we
not only try to get a deal
done for today but for the
body of NBA players that
will come into this league
over the next decade and


beyond."
Fisher, flanked at a
press conference by doz-
ens of players including
Kobe Bryant and Carmelo
Anthony, said the deci-
sion was unanimous. But
there were surely players
throughout the league
who would have preferred
union leadership put the
proposal to a vote of the
full membership instead.
Hunter said the NBPA
was in the process of con-
verting to a trade asso-
ciation and that all play-
ers will be represented in
a class-action suit against
the NBA by attorneys Jef-
frey Kessler and David
Boies who were on op-
posite sides of the NFL la-
bor dispute, Kessler work-
ing for the players, Boise
for the league.
"The fact that the two
biggest legal adversaries
in the NFL players dispute
over the NFL lockout both
agree that the NBA lockout
is now illegal and subject
to triple damages speaks
for itself," Kessler said in


an email to The Associated
Press. "I am delighted to
work together with David
Boies on behalf of the NBA
players."
Stern was not impressed
with his legal adversaries.
"Mr. Kessler got his way,
and we're about to go into
the nuclear winter of the
NBA," he told ESPN. "If I
were a player ... I would be
wondering what it is that
Billy Hunter just did."
The sides still can nego-
tiate during the legal pro-
cess, so players didn't want
to write off the season just
yet.
"I don't want to make
any assumptions," union
VP Keyon Dooling said. "I
believe we'll continue to
try to get a deal done or
let this process play out. I
don't know what to expect
from this process."
Hunter said the NBPA's
"notice of disclaimer"
was filed with Stern's of-
fice about an hour before
Sthe news conference an-
nouncing the move.
Hunter said the bargain-
ing process had "com-
pletely broken down."
Players and owners have
been talking for some two
years but couldn't reach
a deal, with players feel-
ing the league's desires to
improve competitive bal-
ance would hurt their free
agency options.
.And beyond that, the
owners' desire for a 50-50
split of basketball-related
income, after players were
guaranteed 57 percent
under the old deal, meant
players were shifting at
least $280 million per year
to the owners.
"This deal could have
been done. It should have
been done," Hunter said.
"We've given and given
and given, and they got
to the place where they
just reached for too much
and the players decided to
push back."
Over the weekend, Stem
said he would not cancel
the season this week.


Florida State Football


Surging Seminoles on a roll, return to Top 25


The Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. Florida
State is back in Top 25 after more
than a month on the outside look-
ing in.
Coach Jimbo Fisher's young club
has reeled off five straight wins
to climbed back to No. 23 follow-
ing Saturday's 23-19 victory over
Miami.
The Seminoles had dropped com-
pletely out of sight in the rankings
after Wake Forest handed them a
third straight defeat on Oct. 8.
It was a hard fall for a team that
was ranked fifth nationally only
three weeks earlier and came into
the season picked as a possible con-
tender for a national title.
"We're growing through the sea-
son," Fisher said after the Miami
game. "We've got problems, we
aren't perfect but we are figuring out
how to win."
The Seminoles (7-3, 5-2 Atlantic
Coast Conference) now prepare to
face another hot club, Virginia, in its
home finale Saturday.
' "They've still got hopes of winning
their division," Fisher said Monday
about the resurgent Cavaliers. "We
need to get over the Miami game
and move on."
The Cavaliers (7-3, 4-2 ACC) have
won five of their last six and will be
after their fourth straight win Satur-
day. They're still in the, hunt for the
ACC's Coastal Division title if they
can knock off the Seminoles and
Virginia Tech on successive week-
ends and are already bowl eligible
for the first time since 2007.
"They've won a lot of close games,"
Fisher said. "The magic thing is con-
fidence. He's got them playing with
confidence."
Florida State, however, has no
such opportunity. Clemson locked
up the Atlantic Division's berth in
the conference title game with its
win Saturday over Wake Forest.
"We've only got three more games
left, including the bowl game," Flor-
ida State quarterback EJ Manuel


education from there (Virginia)..
At the time their program wasn't
as great as it is now so that's why I
looked elsewhere."
Florida State has a 14-2 edge in its
series with Virginia, including last
year's 34-14 win in Charlottesville.
The Cavaliers were the first school
to defeat Florida State in ACC com-
petition when they won 33-28 in
1995 to end the Seminoles' 29-game
winning streak in league play.
The Seminoles wrap up the regu-
lar season at Florida on Nov. 26 and
await a bowl invitation for a 30th
straight season, the longest current
streak in college football.
But for the moment, only Virginia
is on their mind.


The Associated Press

NEW YORK Atlanta
Braves closer Craig Kim-
brel became the NL Rook-
ie of the Year in a unani-
mous vote and Tampa Bay
pitcher Jeremy Hellickson
was a clear winner for the
AL award Monday.
Kimbrel set a major
league record for saves by
a rookie with 46. The hard-
throwing right-hander
earned all 32 first-place
votes in balloting by the
Baseball Writers' Associa-
tion of America. Kimbrel
outpointed Braves team-
mate Freddie Freeman.
"It definitely did sur-
prise me," he said during
a conference call from his
vacation in Hawaii. "I ex-
pected it to be close."
Hellickson went 13-10
with a 2.95 ERA in helping
the Rays win the AL wild-
card spot. He drew 17 of
28 first-place votes and
finished well ahead of Los
Angeles Angels first base-
man Mark Trumbo.
"It's something I really
wanted to win," Hellick-
son said by conference
call from his home in
Iowa. He said there were
"three or four guys"
equally deserving of the
award.
The AL Cy Young Award
will be announced today.
Detroit ace Justin Ver-
lander is expected to eas-
ily win.
Kimbrel was overpow-
ering for much of the sea-
son, striking out 127 in 77
innings. He also anchored
a dominant Braves' bull-
pen, pitching 79 games.
He was 4-3 with a 2.10
ERA.
The 23-year-old Kim-
brel made 38 straight ap-
pearances in midseason
without allowing a run.
He seemed to wear down
a bit in the stretch as the
Braves frittered away a
10V-game lead in the NL
wild-card race. His eighth
blown save of the year
came in the final game
of the season, when he
gave up the tying run in
the ninth inning against
Philadelphia. The Phillies
went on to win in 13 in-
nings, costing the Braves
a spot in a one-game
playoff against St. Louis
for the wild-card slot.
"I'm going to get over it,
but I'm not going to forget
it," he said. "I need to fix
it."
Kimbrel wound up tied


for Milwaukee's John Ax-
ford for the NL lead in
saves. He became the
10th unanimous NL rook-
ie winner, and first since
Albert Pujols in 2001.
Kimbrel was the seventh
Braves player to win the
award that began in 1947,
and first since Rafael Fur-
cal in 2000.
Kimbrel, who pitched
21 games in 2010 but still
retained his rookie eligi-
bility, earned 160 points
in the BBWAA balloting.
Freeman, who hit .282
with 21 home runs and 76
RBIs. was second with 21
second-place votes and 70
points. Kimbrel and Free-
man became the first pair
of teammates to finish 1-
2 in the NL rookie voting
since Cubs outfielders Je-
rome Walton and Dwight
Smith in 1989.
Philadelphia pitcher
Vance Worley was third
and Washington catcher
Wilson Ramos was fourth.
Ramos was kidnapped
in Venezuela last week
and freed Saturday when
commandos raided the
mountain hideout where
he was being held.
Hellickson was a big
reason the Rays were able
to erase a nine-game def-
icit against Boston in the
last 3V2 weeks to win the
AL wild-card spot. He was
unbeaten in five starts
against AL East teams in
the final month, and fin-
ished 7-3 in games against
division rivals.
The 24-year-old Hellick-
son is generously listed at
6-foot-1, but held up ex-
tremelywell over 29 starts.
He led all big league rook-
ies in ERA, innings (189)
and opponents' batting
average (.210).
Hellickson, who went
4-0 in 10 for the Rays in
2010, joined Evan Longo-
ria (2008) as Tampa Bay
players to win the AL
rookie honor. Hellickson
finished with 102 points.
Trumbo drew five first-
place votes and 63 points,
Eric Hosmer, who hit .293
with 19 home runs and 78
RBIs after being called up
by Kansas City in May, got
four first-place votes and
38 points.
Ivan Nova, 16-4 with a
3.70 ERA for the NewYork
Yankees, got one first-
place vote and was fourth
with 30. Seattle second
baseman Dustin Ackley
drew the other first-place
vote.


$0 Down & 0'. Financing for 5 Years"
It's time to save with special financing on proven Kubota quality,
including versatile RTV Series utility vehicles. Offer ends 12/31/11.
Panhandle Tractor, Inc.
5003 Hwy, 90
Mariann, FL 32446
(850) 526-2257


VERYTlHING YOU VAt UE
www.kubota.com '
K" r C.por.ala Co on. :011


TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 15,2011 3BF


Major League Baseball















THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Atlanta Braves relief pitcher Craig Kimbrel works in the
ninth inning of a game against Colorado Rockies in Atlanta
on July 5.


Pitchers Kimbrel,


Hellickson named


rookies of the year


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Florida State mascot Chief Osceola, riding Renegade, plants his spear at the 50-yard
line before an NCAA college football game against North Carolina State,at Doak
Campbell Stadium in Tallahassee, Fla., on Oct. 29.


9 1






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN + www.jcfloridan.com


*0~*~.


JACKSON COUNTY \

FLORIDAN


Please

1 I


I ______

IT
17





1I _______________
4
2


S 136 TOTAL POINTS
Names
- Address


e cut along dotted line

HOW TO PLAY
Select a winner trom each ot the week's
games, listed below. Select in descending
order of your CONFIDENCE in your choices.
Win points at left for eaqh correct selection
toward possible total of 136 points. See
complete rules below. You must be at least
8 (eight) years old to enter. To enter, clip
along dotted line, then place game entry in
POWER POINTS container located at the
Jackson County Floridan. Entrants must list
name, address and phone number below.
LIMIT: You may enter only one coupon
per week.


DEADLINE: 2 P.M.THURSDAY
TIEBREAKER 1 Total points scored (both
teams) in BEARS game.

TIEBREAKER 2 -- Total offensive yards ,
F (both teams) in this gam


IT


NY Jets at Denver
Cincinnati at Baltimore
Dallas at Washington
Buffalo at Miami
Tennessee at Atlanta
Oakland at Minnesota


I City, State (zip) Jacksonville at Cleveland
Day Phone ( ) Carolina at Detroit
Night Phone( )___________


Tampa Bay at Green Bay
Seattle at St. Louis
Philadelphia at NY Giants
San Diego at Chicago
Nebraska at Michigan
Texas Tech at Missouri
Penn State at Ohio State
Wisconsin at Illinois


Deposit Your
Entry At The
Jackson
County
Floridan Office
Located


At
4403
Constitution
Lane
Marianna,
Florida


By
2 P.M.
Thursday


1. Object of the game is to amass as many of the 136 weekly points as you can. Simply
review the week's schedule of games listed on entry form, and decide which game you
are SUREST of picking a winner in. Write the name of your projected winner on the
16-point line, and so on down to the 1-point line, which game you figure to be a toss- up.
Next, fill in Tiebreaker 1, the total points scored by both teams in the week's designated
game. If this step fails to produce a winner, the judges will apply Tiebreaker 2, total
offensive yardage from scrimmage in this game. If a winner still doesn't emerge, a
drawing will be held among those contestants still tied. Decisions of the judges are final.
The weekly contestant from among all participating newspapers who tallies the most of
the 136 points will win $1000.
2. Any entry form that does not contain a legible name, address, etc. will be disqualified.
3. Entries that fail to forecast a winner from each and every game will be disqualified,
as will entries that fail to distinguish between the Jets and Giants of New York and other
similar sounding team names games.
4. No points are awarded on tie games or in case any game is not played for any reason
during its scheduled week.
5. Entering POWER POINTS constitutes permission by contestant for his or her name
and photograph to be used for news and reasonable promotional purposes at no charge.
6. Employees of this newspaper and their immediate families are ineligible to participate.
7. Any inquiry about or protest of weekly results must be made by noon on the Friday
following the announcement of winners.
8. No purchase necessary. Facsimile game entry forms will be accepted. Enter contest
by dropping entry form into POWER POINTS container at the Jackson County Floridan.
9. Weekly deadline for entry will be 2 p.m. Thursday except when noted otherwise on
weekly entry form.
10. Neither this newspaper nor any co-sponsor will be responsible for illegible entry
forms or those lost, stolen or damaged in any way or entries misdirected or arriving
postage due or for any claim or injury by contestants made in connection to any activity
involved in entering contest. Entrants assume all liabilities.
11. Limit: one entry per person per week. Each entry must represent the original work of
one entrant: "group" entries, "systems" or other attempts to enter multiple entries will be
disqualified. Filling out extra forms and putting your friends and relatives names on them
violates this rule. Any such entries are destroyed prior to grading.
12. Contestants must have reached the age of eight (8) years by the Sunday of any
week's play.


Hwy. 90 Marianna, FL
1-866-587-3673 850-482-4043
www.chipolaford.com


[Us'SsASSOCIATE
STORE
Serving Jackson County Since 1964
THANKSGIVING SPECIAL!


*^ 4- ^ 4 a
-
A_""


"We're Your
Hunting
Headquarters!"
Gift Certificates & Layaway Available

We Carry a Large selection of
Camouflage Brand Apparel
Hunting Boots & Accessories
for Infants, Youth, Women, and Men


LOWEST PRICES & BEST SERVICE GUARANTEED
2823 Jefferson St. Marianna, FL
850-526-2082 ebook 850-526-1024
Gun ShopFacebook Archery Shop
Iacobook.com/McCoysOutdoors
www.McCoysOutdoors.com info@ McCoys Outdoors.com
Financing Available 12 Months Same as Cash


15
14
13


CHIPOLA FORD

Craig
7 Bard


Craig Invites All His
Friends And Family
To Come See Him
For The Best Deal!


YOUR HOME
TOWN DEALER


FORD


ANY NEW IN STOCK
F150 TRUCKS
INCLUDING DIESEL
$100.00
OVER COST
JERRY COX GENERAL MANAGER
TODD LEE WOULD LIKE TO INVITE
ALL HIS PAST CLIENTS AND
FRIENDS TO BAY FORD
RIB-HT ON THEC ORNER 13F RI R: ANO MAIN ST. EfLOUNTSTOWN
850-674-5462


S4B TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 2011


. I








JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


PEANUTS BY CHARLES SCHULTZ
YES, MA'AM, I PUT POWON I WELL, MAAM,.I REALIZE,
"TRUE" FOR ALL OF A5 I'M SURE YOU MU5T ALSO
THE QUESTIONS.. REALIZE,THAT WE DO NOT
'-.---Li----- nE IN A PERFECT WORLP.. 50,..


BORN LOSER BYARTAND CHIP SANSOM
kLo PD t: LEYXNA.U YCESTE 1 I-ROW 50, PRM TELL "RE ZEFEr5 TO t< UPPE.. A M
DAY.' tW )ETIST S A, WEF-.> LOWEK. C4.E.S A55TALECTITE5
5 1R5E.OFkUROR AN 5T.LA5GNLTES!








BIG NATE BY LINCOLN PIERCE
YOU GREW ...AND THE GOATS AND -MARGE, I LOST
UP oN A YUP I PIGS AND CHICKENS, THEN WHY DON'T A BUTTON.
DAIR.Y' LOVED HTOO' VE ALWAYS YOU HAVE ANY PTS?
FARM THOSE BEEN THE TYPE
P16HT, COWS'! TO TAKE CARE OF I CAN
GRAM? -- CRITTERS! ONLY
T.l.. I TAKE so
llijt i .[ MUCH.


SOUP TO NUTZ BY RICK STROMOSKI
So I To PLat p0o o0 THYou tiNK
MSoTimesT TH lIN t ()w alt. OF Tnem -That MeaNS
SUHNou PLVW WirtH eNoUGH So-1-4ey au. aNRTliNG,Bas ?
Y,-e! GeTTO B e aLite.


FRANK & ERNEST BY BOB THAVES


AREYOUGLADYOUDOWT YEAH, IU666.. BUT I DO)T
HAvTO WEARAAT1ETOWORK TRU5TTHW6A!
AAMORC






0 D

ALLEY OOP BY JACK AND CAROLE BENDER


I SUPECT 1IEY DOtr PAY
AS AUCH 5eVERAk.AC&
TOD PEOPLE WITHOUT TfE.


ALLEY OOP BY JACK AND CAROLE BENDER


COW & BOY BY MARK LEIKNES


COW, YOU CAN'T ENTER
OUR ROOSTER IN FIGHTS.
I'M PRETTY SURE IT'S
ILLEGAL.



.


ILLEGAL FOR HUMANS
MAYBE, BUT COWS? I
THINK FOLKS MIGHT JUST
I LOOK THE OTHER WAY.
BESIDES, IT'S NOT
LIKE I'M BOXING
SABALD)EAGLE._J


I LEARNED MY LESSON!
FIGHTING EAGLES WAS
WRONG, NO MATTER HOW
JUSTIFIED IT WAS!
YES, IT WAS WRONG, BUT
WHAT ABOUT A ROOSTER
VERSUS AN
\ EAGLE


WOW, YOU'RE
REALLY PLAYING
INTO MY RESENTMENT
. OF THAT BALD EAGLE.





1^~ 15KM IT


KIT'N'CARLYLE BY LARRY WRIGHT HERMAN BY JIM UNGER
i


1 15 LiaugingSlock inonationlall Inc l by Unlvobrsal Udk lor US, 20

"Steak, you Idiot! Rare steak!"


TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 15,2011 5B I


NEA Crossword Puzzle


ACROSS
1 Ostrich
look-alike
4 False front
7 Messy
person
11 Open-wide
word
12 Cad's
rebuke
14Turn white
15 Ghosts
17 Elevator
guy
18 Outback
maker
19"Anyone
home?"
(hyph.)
21 Ocean
fish
22 Noncom
23 Bombay
nannies
26 Ran after
29 Printing
error
30 Icy precip
31 Above, to a
bard
33 Diligent
insect
34 Cleopatra's
wooer
35 Small fly
36 Move
upward
38 Usher's
beat


39 Double
curve
40 "Wheel"
buy
(2 wds.)
41 Hogan
dweller
44 Candy
48 Geishas'
sashes
49 Practice
Zen
51 Yokel
52 Astonish
53Call -
day
54 Like good
cheddar
55 Mi. above
sea level
56 Shirt or
blouse
DOWN
1 Atlas
contents
2 Honolulu's
island
3 Moby Dick
pursuer
4 Lone Star
nine
5 Rain bringer
6 Woolen
cap
7 Thread
purchases
8 Strip of
wood


Answer to Previous Puzzle
HOE WEDS USE
E BBS ISEE RIAE
CIAO NESTEGGS
KEYING EENY
LIS V OL

O I L V RH A S Ly
PSI HIPS CRIB'.
ENABLE URALS
FOE ASA
REFORESTNAETY
FDA OPEC TOOK
SIR TACH NAE


9 Melange
10"Eso -"
(Anka
tune)
13 Mind
reader
16Tex-Mex
snack
20 Iridescent
stone
23---
moment's
notice
24 Chatty pet
25 Many
NYC
homes
26 Ask for ID
27 Untold
centuries
28 Begin a
hand


30 Horse-
drawn
cabs
32Tpk.
34 Screen
35 Economy-
size
37 Halted
38 Consecrate
40 Kareem -
-Jabbar
41 Ibsen
heroine
42 Snug as -
43 Intuition
45 Minnows
46 Klemperer
or
Preminger
47 Tide type
50 LGA info


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


11-15 2011 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS



CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebnty Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: 0 equals D
"UDG KEJC XDW CHSG J M GEN RHC AW
H YJVHXW?"
"J UHCX XE YNX H OJCF JC XDW
NCJSWVBW." B XWSW KEAB


Previous Solution: "I think our chances are not looking great today, but the only
way to fail for me is just not to try." Garry Kasparov
@2011 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 11-15


Horoscope
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) Whereas sometimes
it is smart not to reveal
your plans prematurely, to-
day it might be wise to let
others know where you're
heading.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-
Dec. 21) In order to get
others to readily forgive
any infractions you have
made, you need to hope
you've been merciful with
them in the past.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) Don't expect those
who haven't been sup-
portive of your positions in
the past to suddenly be so
today.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) A negative attitude
will not only make matters
worse for you today, but it
is likely to be extremely an-
noying to your associates
as well.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) Don't get drawn into
putting good money after
bad again; you've made
this mistake in the past. If
something didn't work be-
fore, why would you think
it would now?
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
- Be careful about enter-
ing into a partnership ar-
rangement with someone
who owes more than he or
she can handle.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20) The wrong choice of
words could quickly anger
someone who would oth-
erwise be a supporter.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
- Be the first one to gen-
erously ante up your fair
share of costs for an outing
with friends today.
CANCER (June 21-July
22) The cost of success
could be a bit more expen-
sive than you're prepared
to pay.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -
Your very nature is adven-
turous and courageous, yet
today small doubts could
intimidate you from mov-
ing forward.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
- Your tolerance for peo-
ple who tend to be takers
rather than givers will be at
a very low ebb.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
- Be as diplomatic as you
can. Without meaning to,
you could make others
think you're competing
against them instead of
working with them.


Annie's Mailbox


Is this fair?


Dear Annie: Here's the story: My sister
married into a wealthy family. Unfortu-
nately, her husband died three weeks ago
at the age of 63.
My grieving sister was visiting with
her in-laws recently and was informed
through casual conversation that they
had prepared a new will so that their
surviving two sons receive equal shares
of the estate, and no provision had been
made for my sister.
Now she feels as if 35 years of being
a loyal, loving and dependable fam-
ily member meant nothing to these
people. Although I know they have no
legal obligation to include their late son's
spouse in their will, don't you think there
is a moral obligation to see that she is
provided for to some degree after being
part of their family all this time?
I'm sure if they had had children
together, the kids would have inherited
some of that money, but because they
were childless, my sister gets nothing.


Bridge

Bridge players learn that they must think
about the dangers to their contracts. In this
example, how should South plan the play in
three no-trump? West leads a fourth-highest
diamond seven: two, six, jack. Maybe one day
someone will figure out the percentage ac-
tion.with that North hand over two no-trump.
Should he just raise to three no-trump, or is it
right to look for a 4-4 major-suit fit?
The drawback of using Stayman arises when
no fit is found: The defenders gain free infor-
mation about declarer's hand. But if a 4-4 fit is
uncovered, that might be a better contract than
three no-trump.
My guess is that with honor-doubleton, North
should raise to three no-trump. With two low
clubs and ace-third of diamonds, he should
try Stayman. South has eight top tricks: two
spades, two hearts, one diamond (given the
opening lead) and three clubs. The ninth win-
ner will come from clubs, and while establish-
ing it, declarer can afford to lose one club trick.
What is the danger?
The danger is that East gains the lead to push
a diamond through South's king into the jaws
of West's ace-queen. What is the solution? Play
a club to dummy's ace and return the club
three, covering East's card as cheaply as pos-
sible. West is welcome to the trick with his 10
because he cannot hurt declarer.


- Just Wondering in the USA


Dear Wondering- We know you have
your sister's best interests at heart, but
keep in mind that parents have no obli-
gation, moral or otherwise, to leave their
estate to any of their children or grand-
children. They could easily give it all to
charity. Unfortunately, when one child
receives less, for whatever reason, it gives
the impression that the child is not loved
as much as the others.
We suspect your sister's in-laws are
simply dividing the estate to ensure that
it goes to future descendants, but your
sister feels that her contributions are not
valued. This is undoubtedly not true, and
she might want to express those hurt
feelings to them before the relationship
is permanently damaged. We.do hope
they leave her some piece of jewelry or
other personal memento to show how
much they love and appreciate her.


North 11-15-11
*7643
VJ875
+ 9 4.2
4A3

West East
*95 4QJ 108
V6432 VQ 109
*AQ875 *63
S102 4J876
South
,4AK2
YAK
4 K J 10
4KQ954

Dealer: South
Vulnerable: East-West

South West North East
2 4 Pass 2 Pass
2 NT Pass 34 Pass
34 Pass 3 NT All pass

Opening lead:4 7
I


ENTERTAINMENT









6 B Tuesday. November 15, 2011 Jackson CountyFloridan


CLASSIFIED


www.JCFLORIDAN.com


WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED




ARK ETPLAC


BY PHONE: (850) 526-3614 or (800) 779-2557 BY MAIL: WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE
BY FAX: (850) 779-2557 P.O. BOX 520, MARIANNA, FL 32447
ONLINE: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM IN PERSON: 4403 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA
Publication Policy Errors and Omissions: Advertisers should check their ad the first day. This publication shall not be liable for failure to publish an ad or for a typographic error or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the ad for the first day's
insertion. Adjustment for errors is limited to'the cost of that portion of the ad wherein the error occurred. The advertiser agrees that the publisher shall not.be liable for damages arising out of errors in advertisements beyond the amount paid for the space
actually occupied by that portion of the advertisement in which the error occurred, whether such error is due to negligence of the publisher's employees or otherwise and there shall be no liability for non-insertion of any advertisement beyond the amount paid for
such advertisement. Display Ads are not guaranteed position. All advertising is subject to approval. Right is reserved to edit, reject, cancel or classify all ads under the appropriate classification.


/ ANNOUNCEMENTS


I Pay CASH for Diabetic test
strips. Up to $10 per box!
Most brands considered.
All boxes must be unopened
and unexpired.
Call Matt 334-392-0260










Farm Equipment & Antique Auction. Sat.Nov.
19, 2011 9 AM EST. 20960 NE Burlington
Rd..Hosford, FL Tractors, Mowers, Cult.& Farm
Equip. John Stanley Lic. AU044 or Felton Hall
AU4266 -AB2969. 850-379-8410/850-566-6646
10% Buyers Prem. Consg. Welcome

[$) FINAL.


Would You Like To Be Your Own Boss??
Local Transport Company for Sale based
in Dothan with 5 trucks and 1 car included.
Annual income $435k. 9 years in business.
Your new future for only $165K!
Call 334-596-8179




Wanted: Old Coins, Gold,
Diamonds, Guns, And Tools
West Main Jewelry & Loan 334-671-1440.

Satsumas: Free bag of Jackson County Lee
Tangerines with your purchase of $20 or more
of fresh tree ripe satsumas. Location of grove
Hwy 73S and Laramore Road, follow signs to
Bar L Ranch. For more info (850)209-5506
SATSUMAS, tangerines and grapefruit $20.
bags. Located at Hwy 73 S. and Laramore Rd,
follow the signs to Bar L Ranch. Open daily
lpm-6pm. For more info call 850-209-5506.
PES ANIMALS

Free kittens Multi-colored, multi-hair length
850-482- 5880/850-303-9727 after 3pm

AKC Labrador Retriever Chocolate, one male,
Vet checked S/W very healthy. Hunting Blood-
line, Ready 11/5 $400, 334-693-2912 sdejones@
comcast.net
T OLDER PUPPIES ON SALE T
$75 & up Yorkle Poos, Shih-poos, Morkles,
Yorkle-pom also Yorkies $400 and up.
Maltese $500 & Shorkles $250. Chi-A-poo $125.
334-718-4886
UKC & NKC Registered Treening Feist Puppies
5 months old with all shots, white with black &
brown spots. Will be great pets for any house-
hold. Great squirrel dogs and ready for training
this season!! Sight Treening Now.
$300. Call 334-618-4194
) FARMER'S MAKET


Cherokee Satsumas available at the farm
1525 Fairview Rd. Marianna 850-579-4641.

FRESH
GREEN
PEANUTS
850-352-2199
OR 850-352-4423


Fresh Shelled Peas, Several Varieties
2307 Mayo Road, (Grand Ridge)
Bobby Hewett (850) 592-4156


Tuesday, November 15, 2011




i-


THE SUDOKU GAME WIT f KICK!
HOW TO PLAY
Fill in the 9x9 grid with the missing
numbers so that each column, row and
3x3 box contains the digits 1 9 only once
There is only one correct solution
for each puzzle.
GET MORE WASABI
PUZZLES ONLINEI
ARCHIVES AND MORE GREAT GAMES AT
BOXERJAM.COM


I_ SOiI
s__000 0





0000 E


I 'I


i1I i I


1 0 I


@2008 BLOCKDOTINC WWW BLO M


Sunday's
( WASABI SOLUTION

8 1 @ 6 3 4 7 @ 5
3 @ 5 7 2 8 4 6


@.2 1@ 1 8 s 5 4-
2 4 6 5 8 1 9 7 (
s3 4])4 1 6

BE SURE TO VISIT OUR
NEWEST GAME SITE


O- KEWLBOX.COM


P la c an A d Fast, easy, no pressure
la ce an 24 hours a day, 7 days a week!
Get live previews of your classified ads, receive price quotes
and make secure online payments.

www.jcfloridan.com


,It


r min.- -,NIt


For deadlines call toll-free or visit www.jcfloridan.com


PLAE A AMi


A -'I ' ""TYFLORIDAN



THURSDAYiWy 11/23 @9:00 A.M
FRIDAY 1. e nI Wednesday 11/23 @1:30 PM
SUNDAY itIWednesday >11/23 @2:00 PM

ISP.AY
WiednAY ui i[ rliday, 11/18 @ NOON
Thu ieday 11/18 @ 5PM
Friday ad Monday, 11/21 @ NOON
Plenty ofShelledFresh Peas Sunda i is Monday, .11/21 @ 5pm
Tomatoes & other Vegetables W Tuesdanea iAiiredn Tuesday 11/22 @ 5 PM
AU FamFeWed &ni06 Wednesday, 11/23 @ 5PM
AU Farm Fresh!
220 W. HM52 Malvern



HAY 6x6ft. Argentina, Bahia, Bermuda, 116
rolls, $60. each. 334-805-3403 or 334-677-3247.

Southeastern ou to oPremier next sales (2) Shed Doors. Each measures 4 x 6. Bargain Lexmark 3 in 1 Fax Copier Printer. $40, Excel-
wouldke to invite you to our next sale Priced $100 ea 850-482-2636 Marianna lent shape, 850-272-1842
County arm Center. Tack begins at loam Headboards: Wood. Good for (2) twin beds or a MICROPHONE MIXER 6 CHAN. NEW IN BOX $50
and horses to follow for more Info go to Full/Queen. $15each 850-482-2636 Marianna 334-400-3736
www.dothanhorsesale.com Rims: Set of 4, 5 lug 16" rims. Will fit Ford F150 Microphone Stand, floor type, adjustable
or call Scott Roberts at 229-891-4454 or Dodge. $250 Call 850-693-9961 Marianna height, black & chrome $10 850-482-7933
S.... Step2 Patio Set indoor/outdoor, with/umbrella Monitor: 19" Flat screen computer monitor like
.-- 5, & 4 chairs. Exc. cond $40. 850-482-5434 new $50. 850-272-1842
.I j Tires: 4 Radial 215x65-R16 $12 ec or 4 for $40. Octagon End Table, wood w/marble inlay,
__ fair tread 850-272-2871 17x20, $40 850-209-4500
-SeCHOOLS&:INST RT'I ONa Wood burning Stove: Comfort Potbelly style Old fashioned push mower new, $75 B00 850-
Get a Quality Education for a $425. Call 850-592-8769 Dellwood, FL. 209-6977 before 5pm
GNew Career! Programs 5 Star Olympus Camera, SP 600 UZ digital, POKER TABLE TOP BY CARDINAL, NEW IN BOX
FO TI S offered in Healthcare, new cond., $160 FIRM 850-482-7665 after 12 $35, 334-400-3736
SHVAC and Electrical Trades. Antique Curio Cabinet, $50 850-482-3984 or P orch/Lawn Swing With Chains,
^!9 Call Fortis College Today! 850-557-1807 I Will Deliver. $85 334-794-5780
888-202-4813. Barbie Jeep. Fisher Price. Wrangler
COLI.EGE For consumer information Pink/Purple. $150 cash only. 850-526-0136. Refrigerator 1.8, used only twice $70 239-272-
www.Fortis.edu Clawfoot Bath Tub, needs refinishing, $200 Smith & Wesson small handgun, 38 cal., 5 shot
SOBO 850-209-6977 bef~oreP 5Dpm $200 OBO 850-592-4109
Designer handbags, good condition, $3/ea or
LLE-J-.4 one price for all. 850-209-6977 before 5pm Sony Bravia Home Theater System $350 OBO.
one price for all. 850-209-6977 before pm Great Christmas present. Call 850-482-7357
lAPA E NTSUNFURN 'l SHED"Dining Table, Vintage Solid Wood with pop up Subwoofer SONY 12" 150 WATT HOME ACTIVE
leafs $80 850-209-4500 SUBWOOFER IN BOX, $75, 334-400-3736
IBR 1BA Apartment in town, $450 per month. DJ Equip. Amp, mixer, DVD/CD, microphone, Table Bench Saw 10" $50850-482-4382
No pets. 850-557-2000 cords, etc.Complete set. $400 OBO 8504826022 TablGate BenCap Tail Gate Protector TG Guard fits$50 850-482-4382
Electric Stove: GE with self cleaning oven $150. 99-06 Silvrdo.NIB $40, 850-272-1842
Entertal intent C850-593-6919 White.48"W x60H Tiered End Table w/3 shelves $25 850-209-
x20"D Only $50, 850-482-2636, Marianna
3BR IBA duplex & 2BR 2BA duplex both in Te' D Only$5. 850-482-2636 5 Marianna- Truck Bed Cover. Undercover brand,'04-'06
Grand Ridge both $425/mo + $425 dep. 850 Freezer Chest G.E. 7 cu.ft. $50 850-482-4382 heavy Silverado & GMC Sierra Crew Cab, 5.8ft
592-5571 Girls clothes, size 10/12 & 14/16, Name Brand, black, key entry, LED lights, & used 3 months.
LG 2/1 in Marianna, nice kitchen, open floor $1 each, 850-372-2419 PRICED TO SELL $500. OBO Call 334-803-0613
plan, w/d hkup, yard/porch, pvt/safe $600/mo Graco Infant Car seat & carrier, 2 pieces, per- Two Shed Doors. Each measures 4 x 6. Bargain
850-352-2103 fect condition, $15 850-209-6977 Priced $100 ea, 850-482-2636 in Marianna
H E F SHandsaw set: 3 pieces, new in pouch $7. Vintage White Buffet & China Cabinet,
I=[TllM.-iJl] mi.' l ^334-400-3736 $300/set 850-209-4500
2BR/1BA Concrete block Rental in Marianna, IPOD IPHONE MP3 BACKPACK SPEAKER SYS- Wedding Gown w/trane, Ivory, size 18, Silk Or-
Tile floors, washer h/u, pets ok, $300/mo + $30 TEM NEW IN BOX $45, 334-400-3736 ganza w/Sequins, $500 850-693-1337
credit/bkgrnd ck. Additional houses and r" -"-- -- "--"-- "-"- Wedding Veil, Ivory w/crystals, and Ivory
apartments in Graceville 850-263-5753 Large Dog House, Any Color, Shingle Roof, Pump Shoes size 9 $50 850-693-1337
3BR 2BA Kynesville, CH/A, big yard, $600+ L Will Deliver. $120, 334-794-5780 Dothan Wood headboards.Good for (2) twin beds or a
dep. 850-638-1703 Purse: New Sling pack Coach. $40. 850-272-1842 Full/Queen. $15 each. 850-482-2636, Marianna


Wt. U L)L [%UW1 11










www.JCFLORIDAN.com


CI RESIDENTIAL
( REAL ESTATE FOR RENT

2BR 1BA in Marianna City Limits. Energy
Efficient, w/appliances, CH/A, $475/mo
850-272-6121
3BR 2BA w/bonus room, House in Marianna,
very clean, CH/A, dishwasher, $650 + dep. Call
for appointment 904-214-6980
Austin Tyler & Associates *
Quality Homes & Apartments
850-526-3355 4m
"Property Management Is Our ONLY Business"

Circle in Dothan
This one-year-old Garden
home has hard wood
floors, carpet in bed
rooms and ceramic tile
with granite counter tops
in kitchen. Double garage, 9 foot ceiling,
fenced in back yard and irrigation. (in Grove
Park 84 West) 334-794-2894. $1,300 per month
Large Country Home West of Alford 3/2 brick,
2 car garage, 2 large sheds, $850/mo. 3/2 brick
in Alford, $650/mo/ lease, dep. & ref. req.
850-579-4317/866-1965
Large house in a fantastic quiet neighborhood .
4 BR 2.5 ba 3228 sq. ft. with a basement and
outside building in a fenced back yard. $1,500
deposit & $40 application fee. Call 334-618-3414
Lovely 3BR 1BA House, Clean, in town, near
schools, nice yard, quiet neighborhood, out-
door pets ok, $575/mo with deposit 850-482-
6211


2/2 in Alford, window A/C, $380 + deposit 850-
579-8882/850-209-1664/850-573-1851
2/2 MH South of Cottondale, water is furnish-
ed, Central Heat/Air, $500 + dep. 850-352-4393/
209-4516'
2 & 3 bedroom mobile Homes in Cottondale.
$500 and up. H20, garbage, sewer included.
http://www.charloscountry living, com.
850-258-4868/209-8847
2 & 3BR 2BA Mobile Homes in Cottondale no
pets, Central Heat & Air $400-$450 850-258-
1594 leave message
2 & 3 BR MH's in
Marianna & Sneads (850)209-8595.
2BR 2BA Private Lot, close to FCI, $550/mo.
plus $550 dep, 1 yr. min. lease, no pets.
850-482-2370
3/2 $550 Quiet, well maintained Park,
Water/sewer/ garb/lawn included.
Other rentals available starting @ $395
o* Joyce Riley RE 850-209-7825 4
3BR/2BA Mobile Home on 5 Ac off of Rocky
Creek Rd. Refference Required. $550. Month
lst/Last/$450dep. Call 772-577-0223
Rent to Own: 2 & 3BR Mobile Homes.
Lot rent included. Also available,
1 & 2BR Apts & Houses. For details
4850-557-3432 or 850-814-6515 4m
Small Quiet Family Oriented Park- 2BR 1BA MH for
Rent includes water, garbage, lawn care, No Pets 850-
592-8129
C 'K RESIDENTIAL
U L!)REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

Downtown Eufaula, AL 2 Bedrooms, 2 baths.
Updated. Newer appliances, W/D hookup, deck,
yard. Convenient shopping and dining. Call 256-
437-3768 5pm or 334-728-1004 9am-5pm CST


I WELL1DIL .l.I ..1&!EPAIR


CLASSIFIED


3BR 1BA Brick House for Sale: HW floors, LR,
Din, Den, porch, 2 carports, near Riverside. 850-
352-4389






Selling by Order of
U. S. Bankruptcy Court
Middle District of Georgia
Chapter 12, Case No. 11-10378

167 Acres Divided
Friday, November 18, 2:00 p.m.
Calhoun County, GA
2 miles Northeast of Arlington, GA
This property sells by order of the
Bankruptcy Court at Absolute
Auction-no minimums..no reserves.
High dollar buys..regardless of
price.
85 Acres in Cultivation
82 Acres in Pines & Hardwoods
Offered as a Whole or Divided
O 3 Tracts from 18 to 129 Acres
Auction held on site, 2 miles NE of
Arlington on Hwy. 45.
Terms: Pay 20% down, 10% buyer's
premium. 2% broker's commission.
Inspection: Anytime at your own
risk or Nov. 11, from noon till 2 p.m.

For Detailed Information
Johndixon.com
800.479.1763
GAL # 2034


JOHN DIXON
& ASSOCIATES
AUCTION MARKETING


( RECREATION


,, 2010 Polaris 4x4 500EF1.
Winch, top, windshield.
Never in mud. Only 31 hrs.
Parked in carport. New
cond. $11,000 new. Asking
$8.500. 334 897-2870

Yamaha '11 Raptor 700R: well maintained,
excellent condition, low hours, essential extras,
blue, $7,800. Call 334-432-5800
,YAMAHA 4
WHEELER GRIZ-
U.."ZLY 600-'98 4X4,
Auto, runs great,
low miles, winch.
$2,000 OBO
334-695-1306


TOW DOLLY: DE
with hydraulic st
wheels, 3 new ti
OBO. Call 334-70


I SELF ~~S.OA~mmm~


Lester Basford BESTWAY
Well & Pump Company POTBE
4513 Lafayette St Marianna, FL PORTABLE BUILDINGS
4 LARGEST MANUFACTURER OF PORTABLE BUILDINGS N 'ORIl F oD
850.526.3913 0 850.693.0428 C
S850.482.2278 H -WE-- ( WE
HAVE
ROOI&ROVER U
DIFFERENT SIZES!
SYOU CAN CHOOSE
COLOR&STYLE!
New and Rr---f1 -hiinqg ri nd Metal L ;B:U: .L1.NS I
Free Estimrn ,"L,:o'3 r 1 :T- ulr- 3614 Hwy. 90 Marianna, FL 850-4828682


EA I4 Point Insurance Inspections
Wind Mitigation Inspections
CLPerformed by JAMES GRANT
State Certified Building Code Administrator
D R State Certified Building Contractor
State Licensed Electrical Contractor
*Grader Pan eExcavator : *,M. [ a 1: l :
Dump Truck Bulldozer
Demolition Grading Site Prep
* Debris Removal Retention Ponds Leveling HAPPY
* Top Soil* FillDirt Gravel Land Clearing HOME REPAIR
R WE'LL BEAT ANY PRICE!!
I'IOWEBig Or Small Jobs WELCOME


I__l__ 5_o__ I[U_ I UPGRADE I
Clay O'Neal's w- 'c P
Land Clearing, Inc. "ES= /Powl= p y r -
~ MLand Clearing, Inc. T W Replace your old Electrical Service
ALTHA, FL with a New Service
850-762-9402 M=111000
Cell 850-835-5055 2A YeSH QUAUTv WoRK REACONAVI.E PaICE
IJAMES GRANT, LLC
N ING REP [ ING!- l:.z 0 = v w 0L


"Beautific
Carpentry/
Furniture
Genera





Fc


SELL IT!


Xtrem

Boa


Jackson County Floridan Tuesday, November 15, 2011- /B


BOAS:

FACTRYIR


www.ozarktravelpark.com
e Fm^ 9 miles to Ozark/Ft. Rucker gate. Perfect for
S94,995 1 or 2 people. No Deposit. WIFI, & C able TV.
, All Welded $550. Month. Call 334-774-3219
All Aluminum Boats
www.xtremeindustries.com (6 TRANSPORTA'lT


Nissan 2008 Titan 4x45.6L DOHC 32 valve en-
durance V-8, 317/385 lb.ft.Torque, shift-on-the-
fly 4WD system, 4 door, 20x8 alloy wheels, bed
mounted lock box, leather seats, 350 watt
Rockford Fosgate Powered Premium Audio
with 6 disc in dash CD player, XM satelitte ra-
dio, power sliding vertical back glass, rear so-
nar system, heated seats, bluetooth, moonroof,
tow package, navigation system with 7" LCD
display with GPS and DVD atlas. $26,500.00
OBO 334-792-0650 or 334-685-0217
AN.sTsIQUE&CLASSICVEH ICES


50-;5I4 -950'0II ; iyFL


PUMA '07-29ft., 2 slide-outs, king bed, like
new $12,000 334-695-6359, 334-687-6157



Dixie RV SuperStores
FL's Newest RV Dealer
NOW OPEN!!"
*Store Hours*
Monday-Saturday
8:00am-6:00pm
21 Acres / 30 Brands New and Pre-Owned
Newmar Keystone Heartland J4yco
Fleetwood Prime Time Coachmen
Forest River
Service Department
Parts and Acces. Store
RV Collision Center
Located off 1-10 Exit 70 / SR285
328 Green Acres Dr.
De Funiak Springs, FL 32435
Sales and Service:6 850-951-1000
www.dixierv.com DO 12756

Dixie RV SuperStores
FL's Newest RV Dealer
NOW OPEN!!!
*Store Hours*
Monday-Saturday
8:00am-6:00pm
21 Acres / 30 Brands New and Pre-Owned
Newmar 0 Keystone Heartland m Jayco
Fleetwood Prime Time Coachmen
a Forest River


I onuac sa urana Am f tr uown
o Chevy 99 Blazer $ 575 Down
* Ford 98' FI50 X-Cab $775 Down
* Dodge 02' Durango 995 Down


Che 02'S"lverado $1395 Down

MCO Kar Kaddy II tow dolly .
urge brakes, auto-steer
res (including spare) $1,000
1-7849 or 334-886-7226 Dodge '83 Ram Charger 318.engine 150K miles.
334-726-0147.
So Ford '05 Mustang GT:
*MUSTM i Award winning show car,
white with black interior,
53k miles, 5 speed, in excellent condition.
$15,000. Call 334-794-7493
Ford '06 Sedan 500
LOW MILES! LIKE NEW! MUST SELL!
$200 down, $189 per month.
Call: Ron Ellis at 334-714-0028.
,Ford '09 Focus
LOW MILES! GREAT GAS MILEAGE!
4 door, $200 down, $199 per month.
Call: Ron Ellis at 334-714-0028.
Ford 2010 Fusion SE, 4cyl. 4-door, 29K miles,
factory bumper to bumper warranty $14,500.
FIRM 334-618-8255.
Ford '94 Tarus 42K miles, clean $1995.
334-793-2142.
Ford '95 Mustang GT Convertible- white with
leather interior, 200k mile runs great, needs
_- l paint, $3,500. Firm Call 334-695-2340
1-Owner
Ford '98 F-150 X/Cab $775 Down, 0% Interest
Open 9am 9pm, 1-800-470-0650
11 n Honda '11 Accord EX-L: fully loaded, black with
Ellen Mars gray leather interior, only 19k miles, $24,900.
850-209-1090 Call 334-343-2701
For ALL your Real Estate Needs! Honda 2007 Civic EX, coupe, 106,000 mi., great
Century 21 Sunny South Properties condition, one owner, auto, moon roof, premi-
850-526-2891 um stereo and wheels, good Michelin tires. pw,
4630 Hwy 90 Maranna pdl, a/c,tilt, cruise. $11,500. 334-797-1890 or
4630 Hwy 90 Marianna 334-648-3939


Hundai '04 Elantra GLS
ONLY 60,000 Miles,
4Cylinder, Automatic,
Economical. Good
Options, NEW TIRES!
Starting At LIKE NEW! $6625.
$ 14000 Call: 334-790-7959.
33 Years in Business Hyundal '11 Sonata
I 33 Years in Business LOW MILES! GREAT GAS MILEAGE!
WE MOWPOwiP EBi hUI8 FULL WARRANTY! $500 down, $350 per month.
Call: Steve Hatcher at 334-791-8243.
Kia '05 Optima LX,
Loaded, 4 cyl., Automatic,
RSy O. 4 Door, NEW TIRES! Clean,
S62,000 miles, Excellent.
cation of Your Home" $5795. Call: 334-790-7959.
/Painting Installations
Repair & Refinishing Lexus '07 LS 460.41K,
I Repairs Insured Loaded and in excellent
I, Condition. Pearl White
with tan interior. $43,500.
S_ Call 334-405-9127
Lincoln '91 Town Car. Runs well. $900, or best
"QuAir SERVICE offer. 334-899-7377.
OR OVER 5O YEARS"' Mazda '02 Protege 4-cyl. 4Dr. 106K mi. white,
Charles Morse (850) 526-8445 automatic, power steering/brakes, AC,
Ben Morse.* (850) 573-1705 Am/FM/CD, sports rims & + tires.
Office + (850) 482-3755 $3900. OBO 334-389-3071.
79 Hwr 73 num FL 53448 Mercedes '08 C300 Sport LOADED, 1 owner,
Silver with Black Leather, 63K mi. (all high-
ur prices WILL NOT shook you" way). 100K mi. Extended warranty. $22,500
OBO. iPod system, Sunroof. Excellent Condi-
tion, Super Clean 334-618-2154 or 334-798-5714
BUY IT! Mercedes '97 S500 Roadster: red convertible,
I IT wine leather interior,55k miles, excellent condi-
FIND IT! tion. Call 334-693-3980


Find jobs



fast and



Seas!


FLORIDANW

jcfloridan.com



Tmonstero

FIND LOCAL JOBS AT: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM/JOBS,


34FT Stationary Motor Home for Rent
Iinh+t rather* D\/ D R ark in SE1 Alahama.


Fuel Injection Edelbrock electronic 1
for Chevy 1985, used $1000.
334-726-3349 or 334-677-4971 4


-:'' -".' '07 Pontiac Grand Prix fully
loaded with leather & sun-
roof, exc cond. 334-726-3359.
334-585-5525.

Buick '98 LeSaber, gray, $2000. Call for appt.
850-557-0145
Chevrolet '00 Cavalier, 2 dr, New Tires, Runs
Good, $4200 334-347-9829 Day Or Evening
Chevrolet '01 Silverado X/Cab $1900 Down,
0% Interest. Open 9am 9pm, 1-800-470-0650
Chrysler '98 Cirrius v-6, less than 40K miles, 4-
door, $4,200. 334-677-8645.
-Crysler '05 PT Cruiser.
4 Cylinder, Automatic,
4 Door, Cold air,
Excellent condition, $6300.
C-Ill 3 3-79on-7Q9;Q


Service Department
Parts and Acces. Store
RV Collision Center


Located off 1-10 Exit 70 / SR285
328 Green Acres Dr.
De Funlak Springs, FL 32435
Sales and Service: 850-951-1000
www.dixierv.com DO 12756


I


IL-


I JEC











8 B Tuesday. November 15, 2011 Jackson County Floridan


CLASSIFIED


www.JCFLORIDAN.com


UTOS *FORSLE WANTED UTSSI NOTICE0OF SALEHE


I can get U Riding Today Repos, Slow
Credit, Past Bankruptcy OKI $0 Down/ 1st
Payment, Tax, Tag & Title Push, Pull or Drag,
Will Trade anything Warranty On Every
Vehicle Soldi $20 Gift Card wu rchase


NEED A VEHICLE? GOT BAD CREDIT?
I can get U Riding Today Repos, Slow
Credit, Past Bankruptcy OKI $0 Down/1st
Payment, Tax, Tag & Title Push, Pull or Drag,
Will Trade anything Warranty On Every
Vehicle Sold! $20 Gift Card w/pu rchase
Call Steve 800-809-4716,
Nissan '09 Altima
LOW MILES! LOADED
$500 down, $350 per month.
Call: Steve Hatcher at 334-791-8243.

Pontiac '01 Grand Prix $575 Down, 0% Interest.
Open 9am 9pm, 1-800-470-0650
Pontiac '08 Solstice convertible 52K miles,
silver with black leather interior, auto trans,
4cyl. 1 owner, auto locks & windows, new tires.
$15,500. blue book is $18,000 334-618-5427
Pontiac '96 Bonneville SSEI, black/black leath-
er, PW, PS, CD, power sunroof, HUD, non-
smoker, very good condition, 129,000 miles,
asking $4,500 OBO, 334-687-4626.
Volkswagen 09 EOS:
hard top convertible with
panQ roof, sliver with tan
leather Interior, fully
loaded luxury package,
29k miles, super nice and very clean, $23,500.
Call 334-685-1070


YAMAHA '09 110 Dirt Bike, excellent
condition, rarely used $1,400 or trade for 4
wheeler 334-687-4686


* S Chevrolet 07' Suburban LT:
Solid white with grey cloth
interior, 5.3 V8 Auto, 64k
miles, 3rd row seating, key-
less entry, tinted windows.
Awesome Condition! $24,900. 334-797-1095
Dodge '99 Durango $575 Down, 0% Interest.
Open 9am 9pm, 1-800-470-0650
Nissan '03 Pathfinder V6, 173k mi.
Runs Very Good. Cold Air, Very Clean.
$6200 OBO 334-794-5780
=i. e j .: Toyota '06 4-Runner.
--. ..----- Black. One owner. Only
53,500 miles. Leather
seats, 6 disc CD changer,
moon roof, rear spoiler,
etc. (It has all the extras) $23,500. In excellent
condition. Please call 334-596-2242.
I -. I l II :

Chevy 2500'99 273K miles, engine has knock
rest of truck in good cond. $1900. 334-792-6248.
Dodge '02 Ram: Black Quad cab, V8, 4 x 4, 5.9
liter, New Engine, new supsenion, shocks,
tires, and brake, and 20" rims.
Price to Sell $10,000. Call 850-272-2713

L FORD '89 F150, 4wh, 4x4
Auto, $4,600 or reasonable
offer. Call 229-334-8520.

> Toyota '02 Tacoma Crew
Cab. V6, Automatic, 139k
miles, PERFECT Condi-
tion. Loaded, $9,500.
334-596-9966

TRACTOR 4230 John Deer 100hp, $8500. & 2010
JD 45hp $4500. 334-735-2464

TRACTOR-IH1440 Combine, LOOK i
Field Ready, Grain Head and Corn Head.
$6,000.850-415-0438


2003 Pontiac Montana Van $5,500, 49,000
miles. extended body, 4 brand new Good year
tires! front and rear AC, cruise control,
CD/radio, exterior white, interior gray. Alaba-
ma rebuilt title after minor damage (replaced
rear bumper and side door) RUNS GREAT,
LOOKS GREAT. Perfect for business of family!
(334) 701-8862 or (334)796-6729
Chevrolet'97 Astro Van
conversion Van raised
roof, loaded, new tires,
SOne owner, GREAT
Condition. 52K ml.$9,500.
334-897-2054 or
334-464-1496
CHEVY'06
2500




bins & ladder racks, $13,900 334-687-4686
Ford '06 -350: 12 seat passenger van, good con-
dition, tow package, rear air, sony am-fm-cd,
5.4 V8, 126,000 miles, $8,100. 334-333-3368



f Call for Top Price for
,, Junk Vehicles
I also sell used parts
24 HOUR TOWING 334-792-8664 (

CALL TODAY FOR YOUR TOWING NEEDS

^ AUTO BODY & RECYCLING
PAYING TOP DOLLAR FOR JUNK CARS
Contat Jason Harger at 334-791-2624


Gaurenteed highest prices paid for your Junk
or unwanted vehicals & farming equipment,
Title or no Title 24 hrs a day,
also pay finders fee. m* 850-84980

rnn Got a Clunker
1 We'll be your Junker!.
We buy wrecked cars
and Farm Equip. at a
fair and honest price!
$325. & up for
L Complete Cars CALL 334-702-4323

WANTED WRECKED OR JUNK VEHICLES
6 PAY TOP DOLLAR
J iDAY -334-794-9576 4o NIGHT 334-794-7769


WE PAY Ca$H

FOR JUNK CARS!!!!!I
Call 334-818-1274


LEGALSS


LF15573
Rudd Family Health Care
5517 College Drive Graceville, Florida 32440
(850) 263-3964 Fax: (850) 263-3966
Office will be closing effective Nov. 30, 2011.
You may arrange to pick up a copy of your re-
cords or request transfer of records by con-
tacting our office prior to December 16, 2011.
Please allow us up to one week to meet your
requests, as we will attempt to be as prompt as
possible. Records requested after December
16, 2011 will need to be accompanied by appro-
priate consent from you. They can be request-
ed by mailing or fax to: Rudd Family Health
Care Inc. 4369 Peanut Rd. Cottondale, Fl. 32431
Fax: (850) 263-5574


LF15593
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN BY THE JACKSON
COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSION OF
ITS INTENT TO CONDUCT A PUBLIC HEARING
TO REVIEW THE FOLLOWING AND TO ADOPT
BY ORDINANCE THE CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS
ELEMENT UPDATE FIVE-YEAR SCHEDULE OF
IMPROVEMENTS TO THE JACKSON COUNTY
COMPREHENSIVE PLAt$:
A request to amend by Ordinance the Jackson
County Comprehensive Plan, Capital Improve-
ments Element. The ordinance will update the
Capital Improvements Element Five-Year
Schedule of Improvements to the Jackson
County Comprehensive Plan.
The public hearing will be held In the Jackson
County Commission Board Room of the
Administration Building located at
2864 Madison Street, Marianna, Florida
on the 29th of November, 2011 at 6:15 p.m.
Anyone desiring Information may contact the
Community Development Department between
7:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday
at 4487 Lafayette Street, Marianna, Florida or
contact by phone at (850) 482-9637. A copy of
the proposed ordinance is also available for in-
spection by the public at the County Adminis-
trator's Office, County Administration Building,
2864 Madison Street, Marianna, Florida.
In accordance with the Americans with Disabil-
ities Act, persons needing a special accommo-
dation to participate in this meeting should
contact the County Administrator's Adminis-
trative Assistant at the Jackson County Admin-
Istration Building no later than 5 days prior to
the meeting. The Administrative Assistant may
be contacted at 2864 Madison Street, Marian-
na, FL, 32448, (850) 482-9633, or (800) 955-8771
(TDD).


LF15602
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
DIVISION:
CASE NO.: 32-2010-CA-000713
WELLS FARGO BANK, NA,
Plaintiff,
vs.
REBECCA HUGGINS, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated No-
vember 03, 2011 and entered in Case No. 32-
2010-CA-000713 of the Circuit Court of the
FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for JACK-
SON County, Florida wherein WELLS FARGO
BANK, NA is the Plaintiff and REBECCA HUG-
GINS; JOSEPH W. HUGGINS; ANY AND ALL UN-
KNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UN-
DER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDI-
VIDUAL DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN
TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UN-
KNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS
SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTH-
ER CLAIMANTS; are the Defendants, The Clerk
of the Court will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash at NORTH DOOR JACKSON
COUNTY COURTHOUSE, MARIANNA, FLORIDA
at 11:00AM, on the 8th day of December, 2011,
the following described property as set forth in
said Final Judgment:
LOTS NUMBERED 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6,7, 8, 9 AND 10
OF BLOCK 27 OF GREENWOOD, FLORIDA AC-
CORDING TO THE MAP OF GREENWOOD IN-
VESTMENT COMPANY,


LESS AND EXCEPT THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED
PARCELS:
1. PROPERTY DESCRIBED IN DEED TO NANCY
BAKER RECORDED IN DEED BOOK 485, PAGE 89,
PUBLIC RECORDS OF JACKSON COUNTY, FLORI-
DA.
2. PROPERTY DESCRIBED IN DEED TO LEO BRY-
ANT RECORDED IN DEED BOOK 505, PAGE 423,
PUBLIC RECORDS OF JACKSON COUNTY, FLORI-
DA.
3. PROPERTY DESCRIBED IN DEED TO DEANNA
EDWARDS RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS
BOOK 11, PAGE 674, PUBLIC RECORDS OF JACK-
SON COUNTY, FLORIDA.
4. PROPERTY DESCRIBED IN DEED TO PENDER
PEANUT CORPORATION RECORDED IN OFFICIAL
RECORDS BOOK 242, PAGE 443, PUBLIC RE-
CORDS OF JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA.
5. RIGHTS OF WAY FOR PUBLIC ROADS AND
STREETS.
6. COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF
SECTION 31, TOWNSHIP 6 NORTH, RANGE 9
WEST, JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE
SOUTH 01 DEGREES 03 MINUTES EAST, 36.9
FEET, THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 06 MINUTES
WEST, 1622.0 FEET, THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREE
31 MINUTES EAST, 486.6 FEET ALONG THE EAST
RIGHT OF WAY OF ALLEN STREET, AND CALL
THIS THE POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE
SOUTH 88 DEGREES 34 MINUTES EAST, 60.6
FEET, THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREE 27 MINUTES
EAST, 13.1 FEET, THENCE NORTH 88 DEGREES
34 MINUTE WEST, 60.0 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 01
DEGREES 31 MINUTES WEST, 13.1 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING.
BEING BETTER DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
BEGIN AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE EAST
RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF ALLEN STREET AND
THE NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF FORT
STREET (AKA C-162) IN SECTION 6, TOWNSHIP
5 NORTH, RANGE 9 WEST OF JACKSON COUN-
TY, FLORIDA; THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES
07 MINUTES 37 SECONDS EAST, ALONG SAID
NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF FORT STREET,
249.97 FEET; THENCE DEPARTING SAID RIGHT
OF WAY LINE ON A BEARING OF NORTH 01 DE-
GREE 31 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST, 469.80
FEET; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 03 MINUTES
25 SECONDS WEST, 189.81 FEET; THENCE
SOUTH 01 DEGREE 31 MINUTES 00 SECONDS
WEST, 13.10 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES
16 MINUTES 42 SECONDS WEST, 60.16 FEET TO
A POINT ON SAID EAST RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF
ALLEN STREET; THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREE 31
MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST, ALONG SAID
RIGHT OF WAY LINE, 456.70 FEET TO POINT OF
BEGINNING.
A/K/A 5138 FORT ROAD, GREENWOOD, FL
32443
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, If any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must
file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court
on November 7, 2011.
Dale R. Guthrie
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Tammy Bailey
Deputy Clerk
If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assistance.
Please contact: Ms. Amber Baggett
Senior Court Program Specialist
P. 0. Box 826 Marianna, FL 32447-0826
'Phone: 850-482-9844 Fax: 850-482-9123
LF15591
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR JACKSON COUNTY
CASE NO: 10-344-CA
JAMES A. ROWE,
Plaintiff,
vs.
P&C DEVELOPMENT OF BAY COUNTY, LLC ,
Defendant/Counter Plaintiff.
JAMES A. ROWE,
Plaintiff,
vs.
P&C DEVELOPMENT OF BAY COUNTY, LLC, and
CATHY MCCLELLAN,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is, given that pursuant to a Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure dated the 7th day of No-
vember, 2011, in Case No. 10-344-CA in the Cir-
cuit Court, Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for
Jackson County, Florida, in which JAMES A.
ROWE is the plaintiff and P&C DEVELOPMENT
OF BAY COUNTY, LLC is Defendant, I will sell to
the highest and best bidder for cash at the
North door of the Jackson County Courthouse
at Marianna, Florida, on the 8th day of Decem-


ber, 2011 between 11:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m Cen-
tral Time, the following described property in
Jackson County, Florida;
Lots, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15,
17, 18, 19, 20 and 21 of Willow Place Subdivi-
slon located In Section 31, Township 5 North
Range 11 West, Jackson County, Florida as de-
picted on the plat Cabinet--Pages 380 382 of
the Official Records of Jackson County, Florida.
DATED this 7th day of November, 2011.
Dale Rabon Guthrie
Clerk of Courts
BY: Rachel Laramore
Deputy Clerk'
I HEREBY CERTIFY that a true and correct copy
of the foregoing has been delivered by U.S.
mail delivery this 7th day of November, 2011,
to:
Bill R. Hutto, Esq.
Hutto & Bodiford, Attorney for Plaintiff
P.O. Box 2528 Panama City, Florida 32402
P&C Development c/o Cathy McClellan
Post Office Box 8136 Southport, Florida 32409
Jack G. Williams, Esq. Attorney for Cross-
Claimant
P.O. Box 2176 Ppnama City, FL 32402
/s/ Dale Rabon Guthrie
Clerk of Court

LF15604
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
DIVISION:
CASE NO.: 32-2011-CA-000439
WELLS FARGO BANK, NA
Plaintiff,
vs.
WILLIAM A. RINDERKNECHT, ET AL,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated No-
vember 03,2011 and entered in Case No. 32-
2011-CA-000439 of the Circuit Court of the
FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for JACK-
SON County, Florida wherein WELLS FARGO
BANK, NA is the Plaintiff and WILLIAM A.
RINDERKNECHT; are the Defendants, The
Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash at NORTH DOOR JACKSON
COUNTY COURTHOUSE, MARIANNA, FLORIDA
at 11:00AM, on the 12th day of January, 2012,
the following described property as set forth in
said Final Judgment:
LOT 1 AND THE SOUTH 1/2 OF LOT 2, BLOCK 3,
LEWIS ADDITION TO THE TOWN OF MARIANNA,
BEING IN SECTION 3, TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH,
RANGE 10 WEST, JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA.
TOGETHER WITH A 1999 HOMES OF MERIT,
DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE HOME ID NO.
FLHMBFPI19542930A AND ID NO.
FLHMBFP119542930B LOCATED THEREON AS A
FIXTURE AND APPURTENANCE THERETO
A/K/A 2823 SAINT JOHNS STREET, MARIANNA,
FL 32448
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must
file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court
on November 7, 2011.
Dale R. Guthrie
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Tammy Bailey
Deputy Clerk
if you\are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assistance.
Please contact: Ms. Amber Baggett
Senior Court Program Specialist
P. O. Box 826 Marianna, FL 32447-0826
Phone: 850-482-9844 Fax: 850-482-9123


LF15589
INVITATION TO BID
Shady Grove Pentecostal Holiness Church lo-
cated at 7541 Shady Grove Rd, Grand Ridge, is
receiving Contract Bids for 2012. Two positions:
Indoor Cleaning and Lawn Maintenance. Bids
will close November 25, 2011. Call 850-592-6203
for contract information.


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