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Jackson County Floridan
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028304/00686
 Material Information
Title: Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title: Sunday Floridan
Portion of title: Floridan
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Jackson County Floridan
Publisher: Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Marianna Fla
Creation Date: November 9, 2011
Publication Date: 1934-
Frequency: daily (except saturday and monday)[<1979-1995>]
weekly[ former 1934-<1955>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates: 30.776389 x -85.238056 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note: "Independent."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID: UF00028304:00686
 Related Items
Preceded by: Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by: Marianna Floridan

Full Text



Informing more than 17,000 readers daily in print and online


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lA Atia Genn(m /'/N.spapwer Vol.88 No. 218
Graceville



Inmate escapes from work camp site


BY LAUREN DELGADO
Idelgado@jcfloridan.com

Inmate Jeremy D. Foxworth
escaped from the Graceville
Fire Department, where he was
working with other prisoners
for the Graceville Work Camp, at
9:12 a.m. on Tuesday.
He was last seen wearing a


light blue cotton uniform, with
a white stripe down either side


of his pants. He is
described as white
with auburn/red
hair, brown eyes,
approximately
5-feet-9-inches,
129 pounds. Fox-
worth has several


tattoos: a cross on his left arm,
an initial on his left wrist, and a
dagger and skull on his right leg.
Paula Bryant, the public in-
formation officer for the Florida
Department of Corrections, said
Foxworth was seen by Graceville
Fire Department Chief Tommy
Dennis at 9:07 a.m. When the
chief did not see Foxworth at


9:12 a.m., he alerted authorities.
The canine units for the
Apalachee Correctional Insti-
tution, East Unit; Holmes Cor-
rectional Institution; Liberty
Correctional Institution; and
Jackson Correctional Institution
were put on the case, The Jack-
son County Sheriffs Office is
also investigating.


None of the correctional in-
stitutions were placed on lock-
down, but the other prisoners
in the work camp were brought
back in and counted. No one
else was missing.
Whether Fdxworth has any
friends or relatives in the area
See ESCAPE, Page 9A


BEYOND THE CRLL OF DUTY


$7,600 raised for United Way
alM


PHOTOS BY MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Jackson County Sheriff Lou Roberts went just a bit beyond the call of duty Friday. He kissed a donkey to help the United Way in its
fundraiser at Jackson County Road and Bridge, and gave Red Cross volunteer Sandy Hascher a big laugh in the process.


'We have a very

giving community'

BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com

Jackson County Sheriff Lou Roberts
has been called upon often to help
the public in ways that go beyond his
law enforcement duties; last Friday, he
kissed a donkey to help raise money
for the United Way. County employees
had been told that, if their department
collectively raised at least $300 for the
cause, their supervisor would kiss the
critter.
It didn't take long for the deputies,
secretaries, dispatchers and others
under Roberts' command to meet the
challenge.
"They did it right away," said Ad-
ministrative Services Director Pam
Pichard.
Roberts said having to follow through
on the promise wasn't so bad.
"I've actually kissed worse," he said.
"This one didn't complain. It was a lit-
tle wiry, but all in all, it was OK because


. f '." L _
John Edwards looks over some of the items available in the silent auction Friday during
the annual United Way Chili Dinner Fundraiser.
it was for a great cause." Way effort for the past six years, but
County Road and Bridge Superinten- said others work diligently behind the
dent Al Green said other county em- scenes to make his plan work each
ployees also rose to the challenge. He
has spearheaded the county's United See GIVE, Page 9A


Rep. Drake visits Republican Club of West Florida


BY LAUREN DELGADO
Idelgado@jcfloridan.com

The "Worst Person in the
World" or "Dr. No," as Rep-
resentative of District 5 Brad
Drake's adversaries nick-
named him, spoke to the Re-
publican Club of West Florida
on Tuesday.
The club asked Drake to
speak about three topics: His
controversial House Bill 325,


))CLASSIFIEDS...7-9B


This Newspaper
Is Printed On [
Recycled Newsprint




7 65161 80050 9


the septic tank legislation
and the Florida budget.
HB325earned
him the title
"Worst Person
in the World"
from Keith 01-


Drake
"Countdown


bermann, a
political com-
mentator who
was the host of
with Keith 01-


bermann" on MSNBC.


>) ENTERTAINMENT...6B


)) LOCAL...3A


The bill aimed to change the
death penalty method from
lethal injection to firing squad
or electrocution. Drake de-
fended his bill by saying death
by electrocution was ruled as
not cruel and unusual punish-
ment by the Supreme Court
in the 1800s, a ruling later up-
held by the Supreme Court in
the 1970s.
With all the discussions
about lethal injection being


) OBITUARIES...9A


a cruel and unusual punish-
ment, he felt they should re-
vert to methods deemed not
cruel and unusual by the con-
stitution. The concern given
to a prisoner and his comfort
is strange to Drake.
"We're worried about peo-
ple who did the most heinous
things to innocent people,"
Drake said.
See DRAKE, Page 9A
>OPINION...7A


TEAM RAHALMILLER
CHEVROLET-BUICK
CADILLAC-NISSAN
.4204 Lafayette St. Marianna. FL

(850) 482-3051


Marc Garcia





Used Car Manager


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Bill Naples and Lyn Naples take a tour of
the new Grand Ridge wastewater treatment
plant during its 2010 open house and ribbon
cutting.


Grand Ridge,


contractor


settle most

differences
BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com

The town of Grand Ridge and North
Florida Construction have settled most
of the disputes that led to a lawsuit and
counter-claim involving the town's new
wastewater treatment plant and its
sprayfield.
North Florida Construction was the
main contractor on that job, and sued
the town after Grand Ridge refused to
make its final payment on the project,
which cost more than $1 million and
was funded largely with grants be-
stowed upon the city by various agen-
cies. The city drew down the available
funds as bills came due, and still owed
about $150,000 when it decided to stop
paying.
It had received information from the
project engineer, Hatchmott-McDon-
ald, and the University of Florida that
indicated various problems ranging
from the dimensions of the holding
pond to the way scum-wiper blades
were installed in the plant, and the dis-
pute also involved the type of grass used
to create the plant's sprayfield.
Negotiations began toward a resolu-
tion of the dispute shortly after North
Florida Construction's lawsuit and the
city's counter-claim were filed. Dur-
ing this time, Grand Ridge crews made
some of the corrections the city and its
advisors found necessary, and the con-
struction company made some of the
others. The city agreed to make the final
payment as part of the settlement, and
neither party was awarded damages
sought in the lawsuits.
Matt Fuqua, the attorney represent-
ing Grand Ridge, said the settlement
reached a few days ago resolves all but
one issue; they must still iron out the
holding pond's proper elevation and a
determination of which party should
take action if changes are needed.
Fuqua said there is still the possibility
that the remaining dispute could lead
to court action if the city and company
can't agree on a solution. The city would
file a claim against the bond if it can't
work out a solution with the contractor
on that issue.


>) SPORTS...1-48


Curtis Rogers





Sales Manager


)) TV LISTINGS...2B


Jimmy Parris





Sales Manager


Michael John





Business Manager


Follow us





Facebook Twitter


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A L
L., .


Fo-- wort

Foxworth







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Weather Outlook


High 66
Low 360

Tomorrow
Clearing Cooler.


2*y High 70
. -- Low 450


Saturday
Warmer.


"' ) High 630
"2, ^ Low 34

Friday
Very Chilly.


TIDES ULTRA VIOLET INDEX


Panama City Low -
Apalachicola Low -
Port St. Joe Low -
Destin Low -
Pensacola Low -

RIVER READINGS
Woodruff
Blountstown
Marianna
Caryville


5:41 AM High
9:19 AM High
5:07 AM High
'6:18 AM High
6:52 AM High

Reading
39.05 ft.
0.32 ft.
4.40 ft.
0.31 ft.


8:08 PM
1:11 AM
7:59 PM
8:32 PM
9:05 PM


Flood Stage
66.0 ft.
15.0 ft.
19.0 ft.
12.0 ft.


0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8-10 Very High, 11+ Extreme
0 1 2 .3,'7


THE SUN AND MOON
Sunrise 6:02 AM
Sunset 4:47 PM
Moonrise 3:59 PM
Moonset 5:52 AM (Thu)


Nov. Nov.
10 18


Nov. Dec.
25 2


FLORIDA'S REAL

PANHANDLE COUN

MEDIA PARTNERS WJAQ oo00.9'

"TE LWETED


JACKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN

Publisher Valeria Roberts
vroberts@jcfloridan.com

Circulation Manager Dena Oberski
doberski@jcfloridan.com








CONTACT US
Telephone: (850) 526-3614
FAX: (850) 482-4478
Email: editorial@jcfloridan.com
Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447
Street Address:
4403 Constitution Lane
Marianna, FL.32446
Office Hours:
Weekdays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

MISS YOUR PAPER?
You should receive your newspaper no later
than 6 a.m. If it does not arrive, call Circula-
tion between 6 a.m. and noon, Tuesday to.
Friday, and 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. on Sunday. The
Jackson County Floridan (USPS 271-840)
is published Tuesday though Friday and
Sunday mornings. Periodical postage paid
at Marianna, FL.

SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Home delivery: $11.23 per month; $32.83
for three months: $62.05 for six months;
and $123.45 for one year. All prices include
applicable state and local taxes. Mail
subscriptions must be paid in advance. Mail
subscriptions are: $46.12 for three months;
$92.24 for six months; and $184.47 for one
year.

ADVERTISING
The advertiser agrees that the publisher
shall not be liable for damages arising
out of errors and advertisements beyond
the amount paid for the space actually
occupied by that portion of the advertise-
ments in which the error occurred, whether
such error is due to the negligence of the
publisher's employees or otherwise, and
there shall be not liability for non-inser-
tion of any advertisement beyond the
amount paid for such advertisement. This
newspaper will not knowingly accept or
put'ilh:h iiliEgi iimaterialof any kind. Advertis-
ing which expresses preference based on
legally protected personal characteristics is
not acceptable.

HOWTO GETYOUR
NEWS PUBLISHED
The Jackson County Floridan will publish
news of general interest free of charge.
Submit your news or Community Calendar
events via email, fax, mail, or hand delivery.
Fees may apply for wedding, engagement,
anniversary and birth announcements.
Forms are available at the Floridan offices.
Photographs must be of good quality and
suitable for print. The Floridan reserves the
right to edit all submissions.

GETTING IT RIGHT
The Jackson County Floridan's policy
is to correct mistakes promptly. To
report an error, please call 526-3614
Monday-Friday.


Community Calendar


TODAY
n Life Management Center Yard Sale Fundraiser
8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Nov. 9 and 10, at 4403 Jackson
St. in Marianna. Proceeds will benefit needy children
at Christmas.
Blood Drive 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Federal
Correctional Institute in Marianna; or give blood 9
a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday-Friday at the Southeastern
Community Blood Center, 2503 Commercial Park
Drive in Marianna. Call 526-4403.
) Jackson County Habitat for Humanity Ware-
house hours: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Job Club 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the
oCld.,li Career Training Center, 4742 Highway 90
in Marianna. Learn job-seeking and job-retention
skills. All services are free. Call 526-0139.
) Chipola Retirees meet for lunch at 11:30 a.m.
at the Gazebo Coffee Shoppe & Deli in downtown
Marianna. All retirees and friends are welcome.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open meeting, noon-1
p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901 Caledo-
nia St., Marianna, in the AA room.

THURSDAY, NOV. 10
New and Returning Students Early Spring A
and B Registration 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Chipola
College. Call 718-2211 or visit www.chipola.edu.
D Life Management Center Yard Sale Fundraiser
- 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Nov. 9 and 10, at 4403 Jackson
St. in Marianna. Proceeds will benefit needy children
at Christmas.
) Veterans Program for Grand Ridge School 9
a.m. in the new gym. All .lerans family and friends
are invited.
)) Money Sense Class 9-12:30 p.m. at the
Goodwill Career Training Center, 4742 Highway 90
in Marianna. Orientation is 12:30-3:30 p.m. Learn
about/sign up for services. All services are free. Call
526-0139.
) Applications for the 2011 Salvation Army
Christmas Food and Toy Assistance Program
for Jackson County will be taken from 10 a.m. to 6
p.m. at 4439 Clinton St. in Marianna. Call 482-1075
for requirements and details.
) Veterans Appreciation Event -10 a.m. to 2
p.m. at the Marianna VA Clinic, 4970 Highway 90.
Lunch will be served. Call 718-5620.
Story Time -10 to 11 a.m. (preschool) and 3-4
p.m. (school age) at the Jackson County Public Li,
brary in Marianna. Stop by for stories, poems, jokes,
finger plays and more. Call 482-9631.
) Ceremony of Thanks -10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at 4374
Lafayette St. in Marianna. Emerald Coast Hospice
and the Marianna Veteran's Affair Clinic host a pin-
ning ceremony and free lunch for all local veterans.


Lunch starts at 10:30 a.m., followed by a small
ceremony at 12:30 p.m. All veterans will be honored.
Public welcome. Call 526-3577.
) City of Marianna Barbecue Luncheon Fund-
raiser 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Marianna Fire
Station at City Hall. Menu: Barbecue sandwich and
chips, $5 (local delivery available for orders of five
or more). Call 718-1001 to order. Proceeds benefit
United Way and other charities.
) Project Graduation Meeting 5:30 p.m. in the
Marianna High School Library. Parents of Class of
2012 seniors encouraged to attend.
) The Grand Ridge Town Council convenes for
its regular monthly meeting at 6 p.m. in the Grand
Ridge Town Hall. Call 592-4621.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Closed discussion,
8-9 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901 Cale-
donia St., Marianna, in the AA room. Attendance
limited to persons with a desire to stop drinking.

FRIDAY, NOV.11
n AARP Driver Safety Class Nov. 11 and Nov.
25. from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the conference room
of the Jackson County Sheriff's Office on Highway
90 West. For ages 50 and older. DHSMV-approved
for a three-year insurance premium reduction. No
testing required. Fees: $12 for AARP members; $14
for non-members. Fees waived for veterans. Enroll
by calling 482-2230.
) Veterans Day Program 8:15 a.m. in the Riv-
erside Elementary School multi-purpose room. All
active or retired veterans, law enforcement or fire
and rescue personnel are invited. Call 482-9611.
D Telephone Skills Class 8:30 a.m. to noon at
the Goodwill Career Training Center, 4742 Highway
90 in Marianna. All services are free. Call 526-0139.
) Chipola Healthy Start Board of Directors
convenes for a special meeting at 9 a.m. in the
Chipola Healthy Start Office, 4636 Highway 90 East
in Marianna. Call 482-1236.
.)) Memorial Tribute The Town of Campbellton
hosts a memorial tribute honoring veterans, 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. at Campbellton St. Paul Memorial
Park, Highway 231, Campbellton, featuring the Rev.
Randolph Dickens as guest speaker. Free event;
open to the public. A light lunch (hot dogs, chips,
soft drinks) will be served.
) Memorial Service and sixth annual Veterans
Day Parade VFW Post No. 12046 sponsors an 11
a.m. memorial service at Veterans Monument at the
Jackson County Courthouse in Marianna. The 6th
Annual Veterans Day Parade is at 5 p.m. (line-up:
3:30 p.m. on Daniels Street), with the 98th Army
Band from Ft. Rucker, Ala. No entry fee (signed
release required). Call 209-0065.
) Celebrate Recovery Adult, teen meetings to


"overcome hurts, habits and hang-ups," 7 p.m. at
Evangel Worship Center, 2645 Pebble Hill Road.
Dinner: 6 p.m. Child care available. Call 209-7856,
573-1131.
Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, 8-9 p.m.
in the AA room at First United Methodist Church,
2901 Caledonia St.; Marianna.

SATURDAY, NOV. 12
Marianna City Farmers Market is open 8 a.m. to
noon for the fall season, Saturdays only in Madison
Street Park.
) Hamilton/Carpenter Family Reunion -11 a.m.
at Cypress Park in Cypress. Bring a covered dish
and favorite beverage. Call 526-4570.
m Turkey Shoot Fundraiser 1 p.m. each Satur-
day through December at AMVETS Post 231, north
of Fountain (east side of US 231, just south of CR
167). Cost: $2 a shot. Call 850-722-0291.
) Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, 4:30-
5:30 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St., Marianna.

SUNDAY, NOV. 13
D Kittrell Family Reunion starts at 10:30 a.m. in
the Alford Community Center. Call 832-6552.
) Bingo Fundraiser 2-5 p.m. at AMVETS Post 231,
north of Fountain (east side of U.S. 231, just south of
CR 167). Proceeds benefit the Post building fund.
) Alcoholics Anonymous closed discussion, 6:30
p.m., 4349 W. Lafayette St., Marianna (in one-story
building behind 4351 W. Lafayette St.). Attendance
limited to persons with a desire to stop drinking.

MONDAY, NOV. 14
a Blood Drive 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Chipola Col-
lege; or give blood 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday-Friday at
the Southeastern Community Blood Center, 2503
Commercial Park Drive in Marianna. Call 526-4403.
) New and Returning Students Early Spring A
and B Registration 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Chipola
College. Call 718-2211 or visit www.chipola.edu.
R Orientation 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the
Goodwill Career Training Center, 4742 Highway 90
in Marianna. Learn about/sign up for free services.
Call 526-0139.
) Lions Club of Marianna meeting, Jim's Buffet &
Grill, at noon on'second and fourth Mondays. Call
4822005.
) Quit Smoking NOW! Free, six-week smoking
cessation program begins at 5 p.m. on Monday, Nov.
14 in the ground-floor board room of Jackson Hos-
pital. No cost to attend; free nicotine replacement
therapy available to participants. Call 482-6500 or
email registration to bnuccio@bigbendahec.org.


The submission deadline for this calendar is two days before publication. Submit to: Community Calendar, Jackson County Floridan, P. O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447,
email editorial@jcfloridan.com, fax (850) 482-4478 or bring items to 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.


Police Roundup


MARIANNA POLICE
The Marianna Police De-
partment listed the following
incidents for Nov. 7, the latest
available report: One reckless
driver, one suspicious incident,
one suspicious person, one
burglary of a vehicle, one verbal
disturbance, four traffic stops,
two larceny complaints, two
fights in progress, one noise
disturbance and two public
service calls.


JACKSON COUNTY
SHERIFF'S OFFICE
The Jackson County Sheriff's
Office and county Fire/Rescue


,CRIME
*.. --_


these calls may bi
ter-hours calls tal
of Graceville and
Police Departmei
pice death, one st


reported the panic alarm, eight traffic stops,
following two larceny complaints, two
incidents for criminal mischief complaints,
Nov. 7, the three civil disputes, one tres-
latest avail- pass complaint, two assists of
able report. motorists or pedestrians, one
(Some of retail theft, two assists of other
e related to af- agencies, two public service
ken on behalf calls, two criminal registrations,
Cottondale two transports, one open door/
nts): One hos- window, and two threat/harass-
tolen vehicle, ment complaints.


six abandoned vehicle reports,
one suspicious vehicle, one
suspicious person, one bur-
glary, two verbal disturbances,
one pedestrian complaint, one
prowler, three drug offenses,
17 medical calls, one traffic
crash, four burglar alarms, one


JACKSON COUNTY
CORRECTIONAL FACILITY
The following persons were
booked into the county jail dur-
ing the latest reporting periods:
)) Demetrius Graham, 34,


4396 Pearl St., Marianna, viola-
tion of county probation.
) Lee Heatrice, 29, 4350
Heatrice St., Marianna, viola-
tion of county probation.
) Jordan Davis, 19, 2839
Stewart Ave., Marianna, pos-
session of marijuana less than
20 grams, violation of state
probation.
) Jaydrian Gilbert, 21, 5329
Fin Road, Marianna, driving
while license suspended/re-
voked (habitual).

JAIL POPULATION: 212

To report a crime, call CrimeStoppers
at 526-5000 or a local law enforcement
agency. To report a wildlife violation, call
1-888-404-FWCC (3922).


". **' ; '" ;,, ', 7'.-3.5 .;-,;," "? ...;;-. '.,"


I INI RiMhK mihhcER
C. hevrolet-Buick-Cadillac-Nissan
-4204 Lafayette St. Marianna, FL

j .-,(850) 482-3051
ell ,... ..


-I2A WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2011


WAIE-Up CLL













Second place Ar-
min Kunkler and Lois
Stanwaity
Third place Jeff Payne
and Ollie McGarrh
Fourth place Nancy
Watts and Judy Duell
Fifth place Lottie Wil-
liams and Jane Sangaree.
Interested in playing
Duplicate Bridge? Call
482-8025.


Cottondale High


honor rolls


Special to the Floridan

The Cottondale High
School Honor Rolls for the
first nine-week term are as
follows:
Sixth grade
A Honor Roll Sum-
mer Hayes and Carlisha
Robertson.
A/B Honor Roll Kristen
Adams, Grayson Ball, Wil-
liam Chase, Logan Deese,
Brittany Dominguez,
Joshua Folsom, Sharleena
Franklin, Zayuni Gardner,
Joshua Glass, Bailey John-
son, Colby Roland, Andrea
Sampson and Gracie Zick.
Seventh grade
A Honor Roll Amber
White and Hannah White.
A/B Honor Roll Richard
Adderson, Kedaisha Bolds,
Priscilla Finch, Joanie Fox,
Timothy Mullaney, Tyra
Roulhac, Haley Scurlock,
Brittney Shores, Bradley
Vickery and Keyshawn
Webb.
Eighth grade
A Honor Roll Brendon
Hales, Mckaylah See, Zoee
Warren and Ryan Williams.
A/B Honor Roll Kelsey
Corbin, Tiffany Franklin,
Colby Hargrove, Trent Har-
rison, Daniel Lewis, Roy
Sampson, Joyelle Saun,
Steven Sheffield, Savan-
nah Sizemore, Austin Ste-
phens, Kevin Tharp and
AlanaWhite.
Ninth grade
A Honor Roll Chelsea
Morris. -
A/B Honor Roll An-
drew Bizallion, Cameron


Braxton, Madison Broxton,
Taylor Czecholinski, Chey-
anne Franklin, Alexander
Lamb, Connor Melvin and
SueEllen Mosier.
10th grade
A Honor Roll Patrick
Fortunato, Mary Raines
and Mercedes York.
A/B Honor Roll Austin
Baxley, Kylee Crose, Fran-
ces Dilmore, Dakota Had-
dock, Justin Klotz, Saman-
tha Maloy, Caitlin Melvin,
Michael. Mullaney, Veroni-
ca Peacock, Kourtnie Rich-
ardson, Alycia Robinson,
Danny Tate, Brittany Thur-
low, Alexander Wiebe, Der-
rick Wilson and Desperado
York.
Uth grade
A Honor Roll Roberto
Vargo.
A/B Honor Roll Alexis
Blount, Haley Boggs, Mag-
gie Braxton, Shay Daniels,
Cody Hamm, Elijawaun
Jackson, Trenton Jackson,
Austin Nix and Michael
Smith.
12th grade
A Honor Roll Caleb
Abbott, Ciarra Baxley,
Dustin Baxley, Chandler
Braxton, Kendall Brax-
ton, Magen Caruso, Val-
erie D'Ambrosio, Katelynn
Lewis, Joelle Perkins, Kris-
ten Reynolds and Brittany
Shores.
A/B Honor Roll Victor
Davis, Sharice Forward,
Chelsea Fowler, Brandon
Franklin, Andrew Melvin,
Anthony Minella, Caroline
Odom, Lawrence Raines,
William Singleton, Haley
Steverson and Ian White.


Marriage, Divorce

Report
Special to the Floridan Neil Shores
)) Doreen Lenora Hollis
For the week of Oct. and Kevin M. Taylor
31-Nov. 4, the following )) Susan Monique Jenkins
marriages and divorces and Andrew Lee Pease Jr.
were recorded in Jackson Tammy Thorne Tiller-
County: son and Stephen Randall
Marriages White
Marriages)) Brian D. Gee and Ten-
a Steven Jared Devine nille Lasche Gibson
and Kalae Leigh Watters ) Crystal Gail Allen and
) Cody Cleon Cosper and Anthony Mike Minton
Letitia Rene McRoy ) Bobby Corbin Jr. and
) Melissa Arguello and Regina Marie Schmidt.
Luis.Manuel Martinez
) Michaela Dawn Bar- Divorces
rentine and Christopher None.

Florida Lottery

Mon. (E) 11/7 4.3-4 3.1-8-4 7-9 20-22-28


Mon (M)


Tue.
Tue.
Wed.
Wed.
Thurs.
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Fri.
Fri.
Sat.
Sat.


8.9-1 64-6-3


(E) 11/8 2.0-8 9-0-6-0 Not available
(M) 7-0-6 1-2-6-4,


11/2 9-4-4

113 5-0-4


0-34-1 10-18-24-31-34
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0-6-5-4, 3-1.1-15-24-36


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Sun (E) 11/6 3-0-4 6-1-2-8 2.10-12-1528


Sun (M)


3-4.3 7.66-0


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Wednesday 11/2


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Do you have'Cute Kids'?
Email your 'Cute Kids*' photos to editorial:@jcfloridan.com,
mail them to P.O. Box. 520. Marianna, FL 32447 or bring them
by our offices at 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.
*12 years or under, With Jackson County ties Include child's
full name, parents' names) andd ciy of residence This is a tree
service. All entries subject to editing.


WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2011 3AF


Cottondale Elementary honor rolls


Special to the Floridan

The Marianna Duplicate
Bridge Club plays bridge
on Monday afternoons in
the St. Luke's Episcopal
Church Parish Hall. For the
week of Oct. 31, the win-
ners were as follows:
First place Doug-
las Parker and Kurt
Opfermann


Special to the Floridan

Cottondale Elementary School
Honor Rolls for the first nine-week
term are as follows:
First grade
A Honor Roll Zane Anderson,
Kate Ball, Braedan Barnes, Colin
Bolton, Jacob Cannon, Madison
Capps, James Champion, Charlie
Cutchins, Noah Ellis, Evan Gayhart,
A'lexis Goodwin, Kaydrianunna Gra-
ham, Jayson Harris, Zanya Hender-
son, Kailey Jackson, Ariana Jenkins,
Farynn McAlpin, Jonathan Morales,
Hunter Neal, Savanna Sheffield, Ha-
ven White and Caidy Zeringue.
A/B Honor Roll Noah Barnhart,
Hayes Braxton, Shaun Bray, Axton
Burns, Ira Carnley, Eric Clayton,
Waylon Creamer, Ernest Cum-
mings, Justin Cutchin, Anthony
Davis, Mackayla Deese, Kathrine
Dunn, Frances Farris, Janisha
Gaines, Mackenzie Garrish, Andrin-
ya Gilette, Kee'Shan Hudson, Sky-
ler Keys, Angelina Labay, Anthony
Land, Caleigh Ledbetter, Harmony
Lewis, Gary Lyon, Brianna Melvin,
Amy Paradise, Austin Pate, Jaran
Patterson, Malachi Perry, Dakota
Quick, Ashlynn Shaw, Jed Shoup-


pe, Steven Stinson, Landrie Totten,
Allie Watson, Quin Williams and Ry-
lin Youmans.
Second grade
A Honor Roll Kaylee Alexander,
Hailey Chambliss, Jay Crisp, Heaven
Land, Layne Mitchell, Luke Ohler,
Nina Rodman, Josh Scurlock and
Laney Stewart.
A/B Honor Roll Ty Burkett, Sara
Castleberry, Jacob Edenfield, Kaleb
Gardner, Tyisha Graham, Konnor
Gramling, Jersie McGinty, Kali Patel,
Savanna Powell,Tyler Smith, Da-
mian St Fleur, Nathaniel Strickland,
Brennan Tiller and Gavin Vice.
Third grade
A Honor Roll David Bush, Emily
Chambliss, Hannah Chambliss, Tay-
lor Dumas, Kirsten Haggerty, Kylie
Harvey, Patrick Lewis, Hanna Mc-
Clain, Ashlee Pate and Eve Pullin.
A/B Honor Roll Mason Braxton,
Shelby Carr, Mianna Covington,
Caitlin Cummings, Briana Davis, Ian
Gainey, Kristina Graf, Addie Griffin,
Haleigh Johnson, Timothy Jones,
Vallari Joyner, Christian Ledbetter,
Kaleb Lindley, Kayla Millard, Ethan
Parris, Laura Patel, Shamiya Perry,
Josie Scott, Najiyah Thompson,


Preserving history through song


Special to the Floridan

Members and guests of
the Chipola Chapter of the
National Society of Daugh-
ters of the American Revo-
lution were transported
to the Revolutionary War
era on Monday, Oct. 17, as
they listened to the lovely
voice of Brenda Beau-
champ-Morse, who sang
historic songs accom-
panied by her autoharp.
Beauchamp-Morse also
gave a history of ihe au-
toharp and displayed an
antique autoharp she has
recently purchased.


The program brought
the realization that we
preserve history without
thinking about it by con-
tinuing to sing songs from
18th century America.
Chipola Chapter, NS-
DAR's next meeting is at
11 a.m. Monday, Nov. 21,
in the private room at Beef
'0' Brady's in Marianna.
Lionel and Sheila Young
will present a Living His-
tory program entitled,
"American Patriots: Fran-
cis Marion and Mary Lud-
wig Hays McCauley (AKA
Swamp Fox and Molly
Pitcher)."


SUBMITTED PHOTO
From left, Regent Sharon Wilkerson, Brenda Beauchamp-
Morse and Vice Regent Marilyn Clere.


Chipola Home Educators enjoy costume bowling
Special to the Floridan

The Chipola Home
Educators home school
group enjoyed their an-
nual "Costume Bowling"
event on Oct. 28, at Kin-
del Lanes Amusement
Center in Marianna. ,
Members came dressed
as a variety of characters:
a soccer player, a boxer,
"Dorothy" from Kansas,
army men, pirates, lions,
Elvis, baseball players,
cowboys, a karate kid,
and more. The children
enjoyed bowling and re- _
freshments together, and
each child was given a
candy-filled treat bag to SUBMITTED PHOTO
take home with them. Members of the Chipola Home Educators home school group, from left, are (front) John Michael
To learn mote about Sloan and Walt Maddox; (first row) Noah Sloan, Amy Schierer, Josiah Huggins, Ashley Schierer,
Chipola Home Educa- Liam Bagy and Ceridwen Bagy; (middle row) John Maddox, Chase Elkins, Noah McArthur, Kayla
tors, visit their website: Maddox, Jordan Sloan, Zarren Bagy,Abigail Melvin, Anna-Lisa Potter, William Potter, Raven Bagy
www.ChipolaHomeEdu and Alexis Bagy; and (back row) Jared Robinson, Quinn Bagy, Wade Robinson, Jacob Hayes and
cators.com. Cole Maddox.


Partners for Pets visits the Sunland Fall Festival
Special to the Floridan

Partners for Pets participated in
the Sunland Fall Festival on Satur-
day, Oct. 29, running a food 'booth
selling hot dogs, chili, popcorn
and caramel apples. Seven puppies
were on site at the festival and one
of them, a little black Weimaraner,
went home with a new family.
Madison Chafin, one of the shel- k
ter's teen volunteers, watched over
the puppies, and shelter ghost, SUBMITTEDPHOTO
Catherine Cardinal, handed out Partners for Pets "shelter ghost" Catherine Cardinal is ready to hand out candy
candy to the kids. during the Sunland Fall Festival.


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Bridge club results


Angel Trino, Jourdan Wesley and
Christian York.
Fourth grade
A Honor Roll Michael Heafner,
Qui'Darius Henderson, Nathan
Huskey, McKenna Morrison, Chey-
enne Quick and Cameron Syfrett.
A/B Honor Roll Aubree Barfield,
Dacota Benefield, Trevor Bengry,
Jordan Braxton, Avery Burkett, Faith
Castleberry, Christian Chase, Aman-
da Clayton, Domenico Collins, Eliz-
abeth Cutchins, Corey Davis, Emily
Davis, Cody Foran, Austin Grissett,
Isabella Harrell, Kayla Kesner, Kasey
Lathan, Makayla O'Rourke, Kyra
Patterson, Valerie Sampson, Mor-
gan Seale, Kalina Torres and Conner
Vickery.
Fifth grade
A Honor Roll Da'Shan Hudson.
A/B Honor Roll Lilly Ball, Isa-
bell Barnes, Sierra Bush, Bethany
Fowler, McKenzie Gay, J D Heafner,
Deana Holland, Aaron Jackson, Jay-
len James, Tia Rivera, Toni Routt,
Blayton See, Cody Shores, Caro-
line Sweet, Emily Tyler, McKenize
Whitehead, Katrina Williams, Mici-
aih Wooden and Lauren Zeigler.


LOCAL








JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


SeaWorld announces new attractions


The Associated Press

ORLANDO SeaWorld Orlando
on Tuesday announced the most
ambitious expansion in the nearly
40-year history of the theme park,
including a sea turtle exhibit with
a domed 3-D theater and an im-
mersive penguin experience that
promises to drop guests down in the
middle of frigid Antarctica.
"TurtleTrek," with huge tanks of
live sea turtles and manatees, will'
feature a first-of-its-kind domed
theater with computer-generated
3-D images that will "put guests un-
der water with the animals into an
amazing journey into their lives,"
park president Terry Prather said.
The turtle exhibit will open some-
time in the spring of next year along
with a new area called "Freshwater
Oasis" at SeaWorld's adjacent swim-
with-the-dolphins boutique park,
Discovery Cove. That attraction will
put people in a clear spring under
a rainforest-type canopy of trees
to swim alongside Asian otters and
marmosets.
In spring 2013, SeaWorld will
open "Antarctica Empire of the
Penguin," which officials said is
the largest single expansion proj-
ect ever undertaken at the Orlando
park. An artist's rendering shows
an entire section of shops and res-
taurants with an interactive ride at
its center, somewhat similar to the
wildly successful Harry Potter at-
traction at Universal Orlando. Parts
of the experience will also include a
radical temperature change, which
will undoubtedly be welcomed by
those visiting in the steamy heat of
a Florida summer.
"This will be the coldest attraction
ever constructed," promised Brian
Morrow, the park's chief designer.
Prather would not provide a cost
estimate for the. projects, which
are unique to the Orlando park and
won't be added at SeaWorld's parks
in San Antonio and San Diego.


On Tuesday, SeaWorld Orlando executives (from back left) Julie Scardina, animal
ambassador, Terry Prather, park president, and Brian Morrow, director of creative
development, talk about a new attraction, "Antarctica, Empire of the Penguin," that
will be added to the SeaWorld Orlando theme park.


He said there are no immediate
plans for a corresponding increase
in admission prices. Following
the lead of Walt Disney World and
Universal, SeaWorld in September
added $2 onto the price of a single-
day admission ticket, bringing it to
$81.99.
The changes at SeaWorld were an-
nounced as attendance at central
Florida theme parks continues to
improve after suffering in a linger-
ing recession and the specter of a
BP oil spill that kept visitors away
from Florida in 2010.
Dennis Speigel, a Cincinnati-
based theme park consultant, char-
acterized SeaWorld's expansion
plans as "a big move on their part. It
follows suit with what Universal did
with Harry Potter and what Disney
is doing with some of their prop-


erties. I think it was needed, and I
think it's very timely for SeaWorld
Orlando."
Construction is under way on the
turtle exhibit and new Discovery
Cove attraction. Work on the Ant-
arctica section will begin soon on
the site of a current penguin attrac-
tion, which will close at some point.
Park officials said there will be other
opportunities for guests to see pen-
guins -while the park is between
exhibits.
SeaWorld debuted its first new
themed Shamu show i4 five years
in April, a little more than a year af-
ter a killer whale dragged a trainer
to her death in the tank. The park is
spending tens of millions of dollars
on new safety features in prepara-
tion for trainers to eventually work
with the animals in the water again.


Former aide to Fla. House speaker lobbying


The Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE The Florida
Legislature's upcoming fight over
gambling may already be creating
an economic boom for lobbyists.
Lawmakers will consider approv-
ing three mega-casinos in South
Florida this winter, which backers
say would inject billions into Flori-
da's economy. Gov. Rick Scott, how-
ever, has already called the pending
fight a "lobbyist relief act."
Lobbyist registration records back
up Scott's contention: More than


100 lobbyists have signed up to rep-
resent various gaming companies.
And this doesn't count the dozens
of lobbyists already registered for
business groups that have vowed to
fight the proposal.
"Pretty much everybody I can
think of in our profession is en-
gaged," said Brian Ballard, a high-
profile Tallahassee lobbyist who
represents a subsidiary of Genting,
the Malaysia-based company that
wants to build a massive resort ho-
tel and casino overlooking Biscayne
Bay.


Many of the lobbyists hired so
far have ties to Scott or legislative
leaders. They include such figures
as former U.S. Rep. Lincoln Diaz-
Balart and former Republican Party
of Florida chairman Al Cardenas.
One of the latest lobbyists hired
is Julie Fess, a former aide to House
Speaker Dean Cannon. Fess left her
job as Cannon's legislative aide in
September.
Last month she registered as a lob-
byist for Arcola Systems Florida, a
company that makes software used
by Internet cafes.


Slot machine decision being appealed


The Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE-An ap-
pellate court decision that
said the Legislature can
approve slot machines
anywhere in the state is
being appealed to the
Florida Supreme Court.
If allowed to stand, that
ruling would allow law-
makers to permit destina-
tion casino resorts in Flor-
ida. Bills have been filed
for the 2012 legislative
session, which starts Jan.
10, to license three such
resorts in South Florida.
Also, the Palm Beach
County Legislative Del-
egation voted 9-1 Tues-
day to file a local bill that
would allow slots at the
Palm Beach Kennel Club,
a dog racing track. Such
bills affecting 4 single ju-
risdiction ordinarily pass
with little or no opposi-
tion if they are backed by
the local delegation, but
any expansion of gam-
bling can expect to draw
heavy opposition.
; The casino legislation is
being opposed by some
on moral grounds as well
as competing interests.
Tourism-related business-
es such as Walt Disney
World also are lining up
against casinos because
of the fear they'll tarnish
Florida's family-friendly
image.
A three-judge panel of
the 1st District Court of
Appeal last month upheld
a 2009 law allowing the
machines at Hialeah Park
although the horse racing
track had been excluded
from a 2004 state con-
stitutional amendment
permitting slots at other
pari-mutuel facilities in
Miami-Dade and Broward
counties.
J Appeals have been filed


by competing pari-mu-
tuels. that received slots
approval through the
amendment .
Joel Perwin, a lawyer
for two of those competi-
tors, said on Tuesday he'll
argue the Hialeah law
is inconsistent with the
amendment.
"The district court took
a very narrow view," Per-
win said.
Perwin's clients, Fla-
gler Dog Track and Flor-
ida Gaming Centers Inc.,
which owns Miami Jai-
Alai, filed their notice of
appeal last week as did
Calder Race Course Inc.
The Supreme Court first
must decide whether to
take jurisdiction. If it does,
the justices then will hear
arguments on the merits
of the case.
The appellate court ruled
the amendment doesn't
prohibit lawmakers from
approving slots at facilities
other than those that meet


the amendment's criteria.
Adopted by voters in
2004, it permitted slot ma-
chines at seven horse and
dog tracks arid jai alai fron-
tons that had been active
in Miami-Dade andBroa
ward in the two years be-
fore the amendment went
into effect if approved in
local referendums.
Broward voters author-
rized slots in 2005. Miami-,
Dade voters followed in
2008.
Hialeah didn't qualify
because it had suspended
racing during those two
years. The 2009 law also
allows the machines at
any pari-mutuel that held
live racing in the two cal-
endar years before apply-
ing for a slots license.
Hialeah has since re-
sumed racing and meets
that criteria.
If the Supreme Court
takes the case, it will
hear two different argu-
ments from Hialeah's


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competitors.
Flagler and Florida Gam-
ing say the amendment al-
lows slots only at the seven
Broward and Miami-Dade
pari-mutuels. That inter-
pretation would bar the
Legislature from permit-
ting slots anywhere else
including casino resorts.
Calder's position is the
amendment applies only
to pari-mutuels. That view
would exclude Hialeah
but let lawmakers autho-
rize slots at casino resorts
because they are not
pari-mutuels.
The legal dispute does
not affect casinos operat-
ed by the Seminole Tribe.
They are covered by fed-
eral law and an agreement
with the state.


Briefs


Man sentenced on
porn charges
OCALA A former
federal corrections of-
ficer charged with child
pornography has been
sentenced to five years in
prison after agreeing to a
plea deal with prosecutors.
Circuit Judge Hale
Stancil handed down the
sentence against Ronnie
Keith Young on Monday.
He faced up to 450 years in
prison.
The Ocala Star-Banner
reports Young was not
immediately taken into
custody because he has
medical issues that need
to be attended to. He has
until Dec. 15 to report to
the Marion County Jail.
Young was a corrections
officer at Coleman Federal
Prison. He was arrested
in January after Marion
County Sheriff's detec-
tives say they traced his
IP address to an Internet
site where the porn was
downloaded.

Man gets 35 years for
shooting at deputies
OCALA-- A north
Florida man accused of
shooting at four Marion
County deputies has been
sentenced to 35 years in
prison.
A judge sentenced
25-year-old'Tyler John
McPartland on Friday.
He was convicted last
month of attempted
manslaughter, aggravated
assault with a firearm and
improper exhibition of a
firearm.
The Ocala Star-Banner
reports that McPartland
was acquitted of two
charges of attempted mur-
der of a law enforcement
officer. Those charges
carried a mandatory life
sentence.
Authorities say deputies
responded to McPartland's
apartment in November
2009 after a woman called
911 to report that McPart-
land had threatened her.
When deputies arrived,
McPartland started shoot-
ing at them. Deputies re-
turned fire, but no one was
hit. McPartland eventually
surrendered.

Man convicted in
toddler's death
TAVARES -A central
Florida man has been con-
victed in the death of his
girlfriend's toddler son. "
A Lake County jury
found 30-year-old David
Tatara guilty Tuesday of.
second-degree murder.
He faces a possible life
sentence.
According to the Or-
lando Sentinel, Tatara had
claimed that 15-month-


old Blake Rupe was fatally
injured in December 2008
when he fell from a
playpen.
Prosecutors say Tatara
lost his temper and as-
saulted the boy because
he wouldn't stop crying for
his mother.
A medical examiner
described the child's cause
of death as blunt force
trauma, reporting a frac-
tured skull and two broken
ribs.

Fla. man sentenced
to 20 years in RI
PROVIDENCE, R.I.
- A Florida man has been
sentenced to 20 years in
a Rhode Island prison for
child molestation and
sexual assault charges.
Attorney General Peter
Kilmartin said Tuesday
that Tampa resident Dan-
iel Mercedes must serve 20
years of a 35-year sen-
tence for sexually abusing
a young girl during the
1990s. Kilmartin says the
abuse was reported to
Providence police in 2009
after the victim disclosed
what happened to her pas-
tor, and later, her mother.
Kilmartin says a jury in
July convicted the 52-year-
old Mercedes of first-de-
gree child molestation and
first-degree sexual assault.
The victim was under age
14 at the time of the-first
incident.
Kilmartin says Mer-
cedes must complete 15
years of probation and
register as a sex offender
once he's released. He has
been detained since his
conviction.

Police investigate
Tampa club shooting
TAMPA Authorities
said five people were
injured Tuesday follow-
ing a shooting outside a
nightclub in Tampa's Ybor
City district.
A gunman started firing
in the parking lot about
2:45 a.m. as patrons fil-
tered out of Club Manilla,
police said.
According to a police
news release, a 22-year-
old man is in serious but
stable condition at a local
hospital, while four others
have non-life threaten-
ing injuries and are being
treated as well.
Police are still search-
ing for the gunman and
detectives are analyzing
surveillance video and
interviewing witnesses.
The club has had
problems in the past and
extra officers are brought
in on Monday nights to
help with crowd control,
authorities said.
From wire reports


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


NATIONAL


WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2011 5AF


Air Force morgue lost body parts from war dead


The Associated Press

WASHINGTON The
Air Force mortuary that
receives America's war
dead and prepares them
for burial lost portions of
human remains twice in
2009, prompting the Air
Force to discipline three
senior officials for "gross
mismanagement."
A year-long Air Force
investigation reviewed 14
sets of allegations of im-
proper handling of war re-
mains as reported by three
whistleblower workers at
Dover Air Force Base, Del.
That is where all war dead
are received from foreign
battlefields to be identi-
fied, autopsied and pre-
pared for transfer to their
families.
The Air Force inspector
general concluded that no
laws or regulations had
been violated, as alleged,
but an independent agen-
cy that reviewed the probe
said the Air Force failed to
accept accountability for
its mistakes.
Defense Secretary Leon
Panetta has asked for a
separate investigation.


The Air Force determined
that the mortuary's top
leadership failed over time
to respond to clear signs
of weakness in accounting
for human remains a
task the Air Force says it
considers one of its most
solemn duties.
Two of the three officials
who were punished are
still work at Dover but not
in supervisory jobs. None
was fired.
In reviewing the Air
Force's probe, the Office
of Special Counsel, an in-
dependent federal investi-
gative agency, sharply dis-
puted the conclusion that
none of the allegations of
mishandling of remains
amounted to violations of
law or regulation. The spe-
cial counsel submitted its
own report Tuesday to the
White House and to the
House and Senate armed
services committees that
oversee the Air Force.
The special counsel's of-
fice, which triggered the
Air Force probe by refer-
ring to it the Dover whis-
tieblowers' allegations,
said some of the Air Force's
conclusions "do not appear


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE PHOTO
In this Oct. 2003 photo, visitors leave the Charles C. Carson Center for Mortuary Affairs at
Dover Air Force Base, Del., after opening ceremonies.


reasonable" and in some
cases are not supported by
available evidence.
"In these instances the
report demonstrates a pat-
tern oftheAir Force's failure
to acknowledge culpability
for wrongdoing relating to
the treatment of remains
of service members and
their families," the special
counsel's report said.
"While the report reflects
a willingness to find paper-
work violations and errors,


with the exception of the
cases of missing portions
(of remains), the findings
stop short of accepting ac-
countability for failing to
handle remains with the
requisite 'reverence, care
and dignity befitting them
and the circumstances,'" it
said.
In addition to the two
cases of lost body pieces,
the Air Force reviewed al-
legations that mortuary
officials acted improperly


in sawing off an arm bone
that protruded from the
body of a Marine in a way
that prevented his body
from being placed in his
uniform for viewing before
burial. The Marine's family
had requested seeing him
in his uniform but was not
consulted about the deci-
sion to remove the bone.
The Marine, whose iden-
tity was not released by
the Air Force, was killed
by a roadside bomb in Af-


ghanistan in January 2010.
The 2009 cases of lost body
pieces also involved troops
killed in Afghanistan.
The Air Force inspector
general began his investi-
gation in June 2010. It con-
cluded that the mortuary
had not violated any rule
or regulation by removing
the Marine's bone as it did.
But the Air Force has since
changed procedures to en-
sure that a representative
of the deceased's service
- in this case the Marine
Corps has a formal
say in whether the family
should be contacted be-
fore altering the body so
significantly.
The Office of Special
Counsel took a different
view. It noted that the Air
Force said the decision
not to seek family consent
was based on a desire to
spare the family "undue
distress." But the special
counsel said it does not
believe the Air Force actu-
ally even considered these
issues in deciding not to
consult the family "but
rather were reasons used
to justify their actions after
the fact."


Obama will expand drilling off Alaska and in Gulf


The Associated Press

WASHINGTON The
Obama administration
cautiously offered up more
areas in the Gulf of Mexico
and off Alaska's coast to oil
and gas drilling Tuesday,
but didn't go far enough to
satisfy Republicans push-
ing to greatly expand drill-
ing as a way to create jobs
and wean the country off
foreign oil.
Interior Secretary Ken
Salazar unveiled a pro-
posal to hold 15 lease sales
for areas in the Gulf of
Mexico, including two in
the eastern Gulf, and three
off Alaska's coast in the
time frame from 2012 to
2017. The sales off Alaska,
where native groups and
environmentalists have
objected to drilling, would
be the first since 2008.
They would be held late in
the five-year time'frame to
allow for scientific evalu-
ations in the Chukchi and
Beaufort Seas, which Inte-
rior officials called a "fron-
tier" for drilling. And they
would be targeted to avoid
areas with cultural and


environmental sensitivi-
ties, officials said.
".The approach we are
taking there is a cautious
one," Deputy Interior Sec-
retary David Hayes said of
the Arctic leases. "We are
aware of the substantial is-
sues associated with major
production."
In the western and cen-
tral Gulf, by contrast, the
proposal puts all unleased
acreage up for sale. There,
drilling is more common-
place, infrastructure is
well developed, and spill
response plans have im-
proved since the Gulf oil
spill disaster in 2010.
The drilling plans are
the latest iteration of
President Barack Obama's
strategy for energy pro-
duction, which has con-
tinually shifted to account
for political realities, high
gasoline prices and envi-
ronmental disasters such
as last year's Gulf oil spill.
Weeks before that disaster,
the White House had talk-
ed of expanding offshore
drilling off Alaska, in the
Atlantic and throughout
the eastern Gulf, in part to


"The approach we
are takingthere is a
cautious one."
David Hay
Deputy Interior Secretary

help move stalled climate-
change legislation through
Congress. It pulled back
late last year after the
blowout of the Deepwater
Horizon oil rig.
In May, with Republicans
in Congress passing bills to
speed up and expand off-
shore drilling and with the
public outraged over high
gasoline prices, Obama di-
rected his administration
to extend existing leases
and to hold more frequent
sales in the federal petro-
leum reserve in Alaska to
boost oil production.
Tuesday's proposal goes
slightly further by putting
parts of the Cook Inlet,
Chukchi and Beaufort seas
back up for sale. Presi-
dent George W. Bush had
opened up those areas for
drilling in 2008, as part of
a proposal that included


drilling off the West and
East coasts, and in the
eastern Gulf.
Obama scrapped drilling
off Virginia in early 2010,
barred drilling in Alaska's
Bristol Bay and never con-
sidered drilling off the Pa-
cific coast, where opposi-
tion is widespread.
Besides the Gulf and
the Alaska leases, the pro-
posal includes a sliver in
the eastern Gulf about 150
miles off the Florida coast.
The rest of the eastern Gulf
is off limits due to a con-
gressional moratorium.
Environmentalists ex-
pressed dismay at the
decision to proceed with
drilling in the Arctic.
The announcement
came on a day when a
near-record storm was ex-
pected to pound the west-
ern Alaska coast. The focus
was in the Bering Sea, but
the National Weather Ser-
vice said winds of 65 to 70
mph with gusts to 90 mph
also were expected along
the Chukchi Sea coast.
"How do you drill a re-
lief well? How do you put
a containment system in


Wis. women save good Samaritan


The Associated Press

MILWAUKEE When a
good Samaritan stopped
along a Wisconsin high-
way to help Sara Berg and
her cousin change a blown
tire, he remarked that
"someone up above" must
have brought them togeth-
er, and she replied "Thank
God for you."
Minutes later, less than
a quarter mile down the
road, Berg and her cousin,
Lisa Meier, were able to
repay this stranger's kind-
ness, saving his life by
performing CPR on him
after he went into cardiac
arrest.
7l 100 percent believe
God had a huge hand in it
and that God did put me
and Lisa and all those peo-
ple in the right place at the:
right time," Berg, a nurse's
assistant, said by phone
from the Eau Claire area.
Tuesday. "I'm grateful for:
that. I'm grateful I could be
there as quickly as I could
to help him."
Victor and Ann Geisbre-
cht, a Canadian couple
from Winnipeg, pulled
over Saturday evening
to help Berg and Meier
change a flat on a highway
near Menomonie, in west-
ern Wisconsin.
Ann Geisbrecht said her
husband "always wants to
stop" and help stranded
motorists.
"He's the type of person
who gives you 100 percent
and worries about himself
later," she said in a state-
ment Monday.


Nearly immediately af-
ter driving off, Giesbrecht
went into cardiac arrest
and his wife helped bring
their pickup truck -to a
stop.
Berg said she and Meier
followed behind them a
few minutes later, talk-
ing about how thankful
they were that the couple
stopped, when they saw
their truck along the side
of the road.
Berg said she saw Ann
waving her hands and


Meier and Berg ran over
and started performing
CPR on Victor Giesbrecht
until emergency person-
nel arrived.
A state trooper and two
Dunn County deputies
took over anrd used an au-
tomated external defibril-
lator to help Giesbrecht
regain a pulse and resume
breathing.
Giesbrecht remained
hospitalized Tuesday in se-
rious but stable condition.
Berg said she and her


cousin have struggled with
feeling guilty that the help
Victor Giesbrecht gave
them may have helped
cause him to go into car-
diac arrest.
Berg said she spoke with
his wife, Ann, on Sunday
and she told her just the
opposite: That she saved
his life.
"We'll forever be in their
debt," Ann Giesbrecht said
in her statement, which
*was issued through the
hospital.


MUfstrO i.,ue.a. e


place in those conditions?
It is a very challenging sit-
uation up there to say the
least," said Marilyn Hei-
man, the Arctic Program
Director for the Pew Envi-
ronment Group.
William H. Meadow,
the president of The Wil-
derness Society, said in a
statement the lease sale
plan "continues to take
America down the road of
putting big oil first, threat-
ening our few remaining
pristine areas with drilling


and spilling."
"It is too soon for the
administration to say that
they will have the neces-
sary science, the proven
spill-reslponse techniques,
and the needed response
capacity and onshore in-
frastructure by the time
of their proposed Arctic
Ocean lease sales," he
said.
The American Petroleum
Institute, an oil industry
trade group, was also not
pleased.


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The child with the most votes will appear on the 2012
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76A WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2011


Cain campaign assails accuser Bialek


The Associated Press

ATLANTA Republican
presidential candidate
Herman Cain went on the
offensive Tuesday against
the only woman to public-
ly accuse him of inappro-
priate sexual behavior, the
latest in a series of claims
that have threatened his
White House ambitions.
He rejected the allegations
and said he didn't remem-
ber the woman.
"Who is Sharon Bialek?"
Cain's advisers asked in a
statement outlining the
Chicago-area woman's
"long and troubled his-
tory, from the courts to
personal finances." Bialek
on Monday accused Cain
of behaving inappropri-
ately when they were alone
more than a decade ago.
The statement included
references to civil lawsuits
in the Cook County Court
system in Illinois .alleg-
edly relating to Bialek and
cited news reports of her
involvement in a pater-
nity case and.a bankruptcy
filing.
The statement, issues
less than 24 hours after Bi-
alek went public, presum-
ably was an effort to make
her appear less credible.
"In stark contrast to Mr.
Cain's four decades spent
climbing the corporate
ladder rising to the level of
CEO at multiple successful
business enterprises, Ms.
Bialek has taken a far dif-
ferent path," the campaign
said.
1 Cain has vowed to "set
the record straight" at a
news conference Tuesday
in Phoenix.
"There is not an ounce
of truth to all these alle-
gations" and the graphic
account from Bialek is
"totally fabricated," the
Georgia businessman told
late-night talk show host
Jimmy Kimmel.
Before facing the media,
Cain said in an interview
Tuesday with ABC News
and Yahoo! News that he


did not remember Bialek
by name. "I didn't even
recognize her," he said. He
said he would not pull out
of the race over "baseless
attacks."
"I reject all of those
charges," Cain said. "I have
never acted inappropriate-
ly with anyone."
At least one of Cain's ri-
vals for the GOP nomina-
tion called on him to ad-
dress the accusations.
Former Massachusetts
Gov. Mitt Romney called
the allegations "particu-
larly disturbing" and said
Cain must address them.
Romney said he wouldn't
judge whether Bialek's
claims are true, nor would
he say whether they dis-
qualified Cain from the
race.
"These are serious alle-
gations and they're going
to have to be addressed,"
Romney told ABC News/
Yahoo! in an interview
Tuesday.
Cain agreed with
Romney.
"He's right," Cain said
in his interview with ABC
News and Yahoo! News.
"They are disturbing to me.
They are serious and I have
taken them seriously."
Bialek stood by her ac-
cusation when questioned
Tuesday morning in the
wake of Cain's denial, say-
ing in a nationally broad-
cast interview that she had
"nothing to gain" by com-
ing forward. She said "it's
not about me. I'm not run-
ning for president."
Bialek on Monday to
put a name and a face
to what had, until then,
been at least three anony-
mous sexual harassment
allegations against Cain.
Bialek's accusations that
Cain groped her in a car
after she asked for his help
finding a job spun his un-
orthodox campaign into
an uncertain new territory.
An upstart in the presi-
dential race, Cain shot to
the top of public opin-
ion polls and emerged,


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Sharon Bialek, a Chicago-area woman, waits to address a news
conference at the Friars Club on Monday in New York.


however temporarily, in
surveys as the main con-
servative challenger to
Mitt Romney. Tea party
activists and conservatives
unenthused with the for-
mer Massachusetts gover-
nor have flocked to Cain's
tell-it-like-it-is style and
self-styled outsider image
in recent weeks.
There were, however,
growing signs of unease
in conservative circles as,
one by one, a handful of
women claimed Cain act-
ed inappropriately toward
them while the head of the
National Restaurant Asso-
ciation in the 1990s.
"He deserves a fair
chance. But that doesn't
mean he gets a pass. These
are not anonymous alle-
gations anymore unfortu-
nately," said New Hamp-
shire conservative activist
Jennifer Horn, who had
condemned media cov-
erage of the allegations
against Cain. "He does
need to take another step
and answer a few more
questions."
"Oh," exclaimed South
Carolina GOP Chairman
Chad Connelly when told
details from Bialek's news
conference. He said char-
acter issues matter in a
state where the last gover-
nor tearfully confessed an
affair and the current gov-
ernor faced unproven alle-
gations from two men that
she had affairs. "Our voters


care about moral attitude,"
Connelly said. "Character
does matter."
Still, Cain backers re-
mained solidly behind the
former pizza company
executive.
They pointed to the pres-
ence of Gloria Allred a
high-profile attorney with
Democratic ties along-
side Bialek at Monday's
news conference in New
York as proof that the lat-
est claim was a partisan
smear.
"The fact that she's in-
volved removes all cred-
ibility," Georgia Christian
Coalition president Jerry
Luquire said. "If he says he
didn't do anything then I
believe him."
Bialek said Tuesday she
had no financial moti-
vation to come forward,
wasn't offered a job and
wasn't being asked by All-
red to pay a legal fee.
"I'm just doing this be-
cause it's the right thing to
do," she said in one inter-
view. Bialek said she wait-
ed so long to come forward
because "I was embar-
rassed ... and I just kind of
wanted it to go away."
Asked about Cain's char-
acterization of her charges
as a "total fabrication," Bi-
alek stood her ground. "I
wanted to give him a plat-
form to come clean, to tell
the truth," she said. "I was
trying to be nice about it
and it just didn't work."


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcflondan.com


Employers post most

job openings in 3 years


The Associated Press

WASHINGTON Em-
ployers advertised more
jobs in September than
at any other point in the
past three years. The in-
crease suggests hiring
could pick up in the next
few months.
Competition for jobs
is fierce. And many em-
ployers aren't rushing to
fill some because they
are worried about the
strength of the economy.
Still, most economists
say the increase in open-
ings is a reassuring sign.
Nearly 3.4 million jobs
were posted in September,
the Labor Department
said Tuesday. That's the
most since August 2008,
one month before the fi-
nancial crisis intensified.
"Business confidence
appears intact," said Alan
Levenson, an economist
at T. Rowe Price, "con-
firming ... that job growth
is going to continue."
Job openings have re-
bounded from a decade
low of 2.1 million in July
2009. But they are well
below the 4.4 million ad-
vertised in December
2007, when the recession
began.
Almost four years later,
roughly 14 million people
are unemployed. An aver-
age 4.2 unemployed work-
ers were competing .for
each opening in Septem-
ber. That's slightly better
than August, but it is still
more than twice the 2 to 1


ratio that economists say
is healthy.
More openings do not
necessarily mean more
jobs. Even though job
openings rose 22 percent
in the past year, hiring has
increased only 10 percent,
the Labor Department's
report shows.
Education and health
care providers have
boosted their openings
21 percent in the past
year. Yet hiring in those
fields has dropped. Retail
job openings have soared
more than 40 percent in
the past year, but hiring
has been flat.
U.S. employers re-
main extremely cautious.
Modest growth over the
summer helped calm
recession fears. But the
growth came after con-
sumers spent more while
earning less, a trend that
economists fear can't be
sustained. And the econ-
omy remains vulnerable
to shocks. Europe's debt
crisis could intensify
and throw the continent
into a recession, which
would slow U.S. exports
and reduce growth. U.S.
lawmakers are expected
to sharply cut federal
spending, which could
mean fewer government
jobs and less consumer
spending.
Hiring slowed in Octo-
ber, as employers added
only 80,000 jobs, the few-
est in four months. Even
so, the unemployment
rate dipped in October.


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VALERIA ROBERTS


Guest Opinion


Don't ignore science
By The Tampa Tribune

It will be interesting to see how Republican presi-
dential contenders respond to an exhaustive study
by a prominent skeptic of global warming that
found the planet is indeed rapidly getting hotter.
The study's conclusion does not mean GOP candi-
dates should suddenly embrace more regulations, new
fees or unbridled spending on green technologies. It
does mean they should treat the issue seriously, and
not simply dismiss it as a kooky fabrication by back-to-
nature fanatics.
While there remains a great deal of debate about the
extent of the threat, the scientific evidence is compel-
ling that climate change is occurring, and the burning
of fossil fuels is likely a factor.
The GOP candidates should be offering conservative,
market-based responses, not blanket denials. Yet so far
only Mitt Romney and Jon Huntsman have acknowl-
edged they believe climate change is real, and lately
Romney has sounded as if he were backtracking.
Texas Gov. Rick Perry says he thinks climate change
is an unproven theory advanced by scientists who have
"manipulated data." Herman Cain calls man-made
global warming "poppycock. I don't believe in it."
They should consider the findings of physicist Rich-
ard Muller, a long-time climate change skeptic, who
conducted a two-year study that was partially funded
by the Charles Koch Foundation, a conservative group
that has funded the tea party and campaigns against
environmental regulations. Brothers Charles and David
Koch are involved in oil and other industries that pro-
duce greenhouse gas emissions.
Yet Muller found the land is 1.6 degrees warmer than
in the 1950s, numbers that affirmed the findings of the
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and
NASA. Muller did not research the exact cause, but the
majority of climate scientists say the burning of coal, oil
and other fossil fuels is a factor. Muller seemed inclined
to accept those findings.
He says it was prudent to reduce the carbon dioxide
created by fossil fuels because "greenhouse gases could
have a disastrous impact on the world." This from a
University of California, Berkeley, scientist who once
mocked Al Gore.
Muller still has doubts that the climate change threat
is as grave as some claim. Research should continue
on climate change causes, likely impacts and the most
effective responses. But it is irresponsible to treat the
matter as political make-believe.
The effects of climate change could have devastating
effects on the economy, public health and the environ-
ment. Consider Florida, where even a minor increase
in ocean levels could ruin the tourism industry and the
value of coastal real estate. Rising temperatures can
increase the spread of pests and disease and can cause
more severe weather patterns. Not all the impacts are
negative. Warmer weather, for instance, can help grow-
ers in certain areas. But it may also result in damaging
droughts and floods.
The U.S. military takes climate change seriously, rec-
ognizing how changes in weather and the availability
of resources can affect the stability of other nations and
create threats to our national security.
There is no doubt some left-wing activists are using
climate change to advance government command-
and-control schemes. The level of threat is still un-
known, and certain natural events are simply beyond
our control. Doom-and-gloom scenarios always merit a
degree of healthy skepticism.
But simply ignoring the issue and leaving our na-
tion unprepared for the possibilities is hardly conser-
vative leadership.
The prudent reaction is to confront the facts, develop
-a long-term course of action and find ways to encour-
age private markets not with Solyndra-like giveaways
to develop clean-energy and other technologies that
will enable the nation to cope with whatever climate
change comes our way.

Letters to the Editor
Submit letters by either mailing to Editor, P.O. Box 520.
Mananna FL. 32447 or faxing to 850-482-4478 or send
email to editorial@4jcfloridan.com. The Floridan reserves
the right to edit or not publish any letter. Be sure to
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will only be used to verify the letter and will not be
printed. For more information call (850) 526-3614.


Ron Paul, true believer


BY DAVID M. SHRIBMAN

N ASHUA, N.H. -The trees
are ablaze with yellows and
reds and, since an early
snowfall the night before, blan-
keted with white as well. All that
color in southern New Hampshire
in mid-autumn, however, is more
than a visual display., It underlines
how mixbd up the seasons are
- how mixed up our politics are
- in the final months before the
first presidential primary.
But this is also the season for
Ron Paul, the iconoclastic Texas
congressman who for a quarter
century has been railing about
government spending, the Fed,,the
overextension of American military
power, the gold standard and, until
recently, has been relegated to the
periphery of our politics.
Now, Dr. Paul, an obstetrician and
midwife to a movement, is sud-
denly front and center, though not
exactly occupying the center of our
politics.
Which may be why, well before
7:30 on a recent morning, several
hundred of Nashua's respectable
- there were so many gray suits
in the ballroom of the Marriott
Courtyard that you could have held
a Jos. A. Bank trunk show gath-
ered in the early chill to hear Dr.
Paul talk about interest rates, the
perfidy of the Fed and an economy
where the overlords are suggesting
that "working hard and saving is
wrong." ,
He spoke, too, of the NASDAQ
bubble, the housing bubble, the
bond bubble and with every
speech (and a barrage of ads on
Granite State television), he is
building a Ron Paul bubble.
"We spent too much, we ran up
a debt, we regulated too much and
then we said we can't handle it all
so we'll depend on the Fed," he
said. There wasn't a set of notes in
sight, nor in his suit pocket. He's
given this riff for decades. "We
continue to spend, the deficit has
exploded, we continued to bor-
row and we continue to tax-- and
we wonder why we haven't had a
recovery."
This is not a message that is alien
to this terrain. Long before some of
the members of the Greater Nashua
Chamber of Commerce came of
age politically, New Hampshire
politicians, especially Gov. Meldrim
Thomson Jr., who presided in Con-
cort from 1973 to 1979, spoke in an


idiom much like Dr. Paul's. He was
the original voice for original intent
in this state, the leading critic of
the United Nations, the most vocal
opponent of taxes.
So if the Paul message of "free-
dom and prosperity" is to flourish
anywhere, this is the place and
this is the time.
"He reminds us that the govern-
ment has a limited role, not an
expansive role," said Ovide Lamon-
tagne, unsuccessful Republican
gubernatorial candidate here in
1996 and a candidate again in 2012.
Lamontagne is not committed to
any presidential candidate, but he
regards the Paul candidacy as "a
statement of empowerment, not
powerlessness."
Nobody is predicting that Dr. Paul
will prevail in January's primary.
Former Gov. Mitt Romney of Mas-
sachusetts has roots too deep in
this region and is in too strong a
position, at least right now. But the
Nashua crowd wasn't only full of
the converted. It was crowded, too,
with the curious.
One of them was Bob Hallowell,
president of the Nashua School
Board, so far uncommitted to any
candidate. He's thinking about Dr.
Paul because he's "the only one
who got the financial crisis right."
Another was Davi Peters, a Nashua
,attorney. "I'm just curious," she
said. "I'm here to listen."
For years Ron Paul events didn't
attract the curious, who were
repelled by the true believers,
committed supporters like Robert
Carley, who rose at 3 a.m. to drive
from Darien, Conn., to Nashua to
present Dr. Paul with a cartoon of
the candidate. "He has a great face
to caricature interesting eyes,
high eyebrows," Carley said. "But
I admire his conservative poli-
cies. He was prophetic about the
economy and all the money we
wasted in Iraq."
Dr. Paul is a political perennial,
which ordinarily is a political li-
ability nobody wants his name
linked with Dennis Kucinich or
Harold Stassen. But Dr. Paul is a-
perennial with a difference. No
longer are he and his views color-
ful eccentricities. He's not the only
one skeptical of the Fed, nor the
only one worried about federal
spending. His $2 million ad of-
fensive here the earliest big TV
bang yet has a simple theme: the
changing views of his rivals and the
consistency of his own views.


He hasn't adjusted his message to
the current debate. The current de-
bate has been bent to his message.
"I don't know whether things
have come my way or not," he said
in an interview. 'A lot of mistakes
have been made and people are
paying new attention to all this
overspending."
Today, with the economy still in
distress and foreign wars causing
increasing distress, a Venn diagram
of Dr. Paul's ideas would give a
viewer a serious case of vertigo.
His position on the Fed intersects
that of Sen. Bernard Sanders, the
Vermont socialist. His position
on spending intersects that of the
tea party. His position on foreign
intervention intersects those of
some conservative Republicans
and liberal Democrats. And he sees
allies in Occupy Wall Street.
"The street demonstrations are
symbols of our problems," he said
in the interview. "It's now important
that all that energy be channeled in
the right way. A lot of those people
are skeptical of the Fed. But some
of them want to penalize anybody
who's successful. That's not the way
to go."
All those intersections explain
why he was asked here by a woman
who's an officer in the National
Guard whether he'd withdraw
American troops from Afghanistan
(his answer: "Just come home") and
by a man who described himself
as a carpenter, wilderness guide,
teacher and novelist whether the
Fed was "a cabal of international
bankers" (Dr. Paul: "We can get rid
of it by congressional action").
Listen to the heart of the Paul
message:
"The Constitution is to protect in-
dividuals' rights to make their own
choices," he said. "We have accept-
ed this idea that the government
can be so big that it can bankrupt
our economy and endanger our lib-
erties. We have to decide what the
role of government should be."
Every one of those sentences
could be spoken in 2012 by any
number of Republican candidates.
Dr. Paul is running for more than
president. He is running to make
his ideas part of the mainstream
debate. He'll likely lose the first
campaign. He's already won the
second.
David M. Shribman is executive editor of the
Post-Gazette. Contact him at dshribman@
post-gazette.com or 412 263-1890. Follow him
on Twitter at ShribmanPG.


Letter to the Editor


Goodwill is here for Veterans

In 2010, more than 20 million
men and women in the United
States over the age of 18 were veter-
ans. As service members transition
to civilian life, they face a bleak job
market in addition to other signifi-
cant challenges that make it more
difficult for them to find work, grow
their careers and provide for them-
selves and their families. Physical
and psychological disabilities,
substance abuse, homelessness,


long waits for benefits and other
support services are just a few of
those challenges.
That's why Goodwill has ramped
up its efforts to prepare veterans
for careers post-deployment and
connect them to necessary sup-
port services, including Veteran
transition and job assistance and
mental health care. Goodwill helps
promote the leadership, teamwork,
and efficiency skills developed in
the military, and capitalize on fa-
miliarity with following orders and


the chain of command.
On Veterans Day and every
day, Goodwill remains commit-
ted to giving back to the men and
women who have given so much to
preserve our freedom and way of
life. Your support of Goodwill helps
us serve America's heroes as they
build new lives for themselves and
their families.
BROOKE LOCHORE
Vice President Public Relations,
Goodwill Industries Big Bend,
Inc., Tallahassee


Contact representatives


Florida Legislature

Rep. Marti Coley, R-District 7
Marti.Coley@myfloridahouse.gov
Building A, Room 186 Chipola
College
3094 Indian Circle


Marianna, FL 32446-1701

Rep. Brad Drake, R-District 5
Brad.l)rake@myfloridahouse.gov
NWFL State-Chautauqua Campus
#205
908 U.S. Highway 90 West


DeFuniak Springs, FL 32433-1436

Sen. Bill Montford. D-District 6
208 Senate Office Building
404 South Monroe St.
Tallahassee, FL 32399-1100
montford.bill.web@ flsenate.gov L


2011 Jeff Stahler/Dist. by Universal UClick for UFS





JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


European Financial Crisis


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Italian Premier Silvio Berlusconi (left) holds the hand of Reforms Minister Umberto Bossi during a voting session at the Lower
Chamber, in Rome on Tuesday.



Berlusconi promises to



resign anid Italy debt woes


The Associated Press

ROME Italian Premier Silvio
Berlusconi conceded Tuesday he
no longer had the support to gov-
ern and announced he would resign
like his Greek counterpart, becom-
ing the biggest political casualty yet
of the European debt crisis.
Berlusconi promised to leave of-
fice after Parliament passes eco-
nomic reforms demanded by the
European Union to keep Italy from
sinking into Europe's debt mess.
He came to the decision hours af-
ter a vote on a routine piece of leg-
islation made it clear he no longer
commanded a majority in the lower
Chamber of Deputies.
A vote on the reform measures
is planned for next week, giving
Berlusconi a few more days before
his turbulent 17 years in public life
- and a political era in Italy- draw
to a close. Over the years, Italy's
political establishment watched as
the media mogul survived sex scan-
dals and corruption charges while
branding his opponents commu-
nists, traitors and terrorists.
Both Italy and Greece are under
heavy pressure to reassure financial
markets that the 17-country euro-
zone is moving quickly to reduce
crippling government debts be-
fore they break apart the monetary
union and plunge the world into a
new recession.


In Greece, a government offi-
cial said a new Greek interim gov-
ernment will be announced on
Wednesday afternoon, after critical
power-sharing talks between the
country's two main parties dragged
into a third day despite intense
European pressure.
The two have agreed the new gov-
ernhient will shepherd the coun-
try's new 130 billion ($179 billion)
European rescue package through
Parliament and end a political crisis
that threatened Greece's solvency
and membership in the eurozone.
Papandreou, the son and grandson
of Greek prime ministers, will not
lead it.
Wealthier European countries in-
cluding Germany and France have
already bailed out Greece, Ireland
and Portugal, and Greece will get an
additional100 billion ($138 billion)
of debt relief as soon as it resolves
its political crisis.
But as the eurozone's third-largest
economy, Italy, with debts of around
1.9 trillion ($2.6 trillion), is consid-
ered far too big for Europe to bail
out, putting even greater pressure
on the country's leaders to reassure
markets that Italy is willing and able
to get its financial house in order.
Italy's borrowing rates spiked
Tuesday to their highest level since
the euro was established back in
1999. The yield on Italy's 10-year
bonds was up 0.24 percentage point


at 6.77 percent.
A rate of over 7 percent is consid-
ered unsustainable and proved to be
the trigger point that forced Greece,
Portugal and Ireland into accepting
bailouts.
The usually defiant Berlusconi
acknowledged he no longer has a
parliamentary majority and said he
will step aside for the good of the
country.
"The markets don't believe that
Italy is capable or has the intention
of approving these reforms," he told
his private Mediaset television. He
added: "Things like who leads or
who doesn't lead the government"
are less important than doing "what
is best for the country."
His resignation may not be
enough. Political analyst Sergio
Romano, in a front-page column
in Corriere della Sera on Tuesday,
warned that unless a clear program
emerges in a post-Berlusconi era
"the foreign observers will reach the
conclusion that the end of the Ber-
lusconi government does not nec-
essarily mean the advent of a more
credible, trustworthy government."
Italy accounts for 17 percent of the
eurozone's gross domestic product.
But a substantial part of its debt
needs to be rolled over in coming
months and years the nation
needs to raise 300 billion ($412 bil-
lion) in 2012 alone -just as interest
rates have been soaring.


UN reports Iran work 'specific' to nuke arms


The Associated Press.

VIENNA-The U.N. atomic agen-
cy said for the first time Tuesday
that Iran is suspected of conducting
secret experiments whose sole pur-
pose is the development of nuclear
arms, an assessment that draws
on 1,000 pages of intelligence and
nearly a decade of research.
The report by the International
Atomic Energy Agency is its most
unequivocal yet suggesting that
Iran is using the cover of a peaceful
nuclear program to produce atomic
weaponry. Based on years of trying
to probe Tehran's secretive activi-
ties, its release will stoke debate on
whether it's time to jettison failed
diplomatic efforts to end Iran's
nuclear defiance and replace them
with force.
The 13-page annex to the IAEA's
regularly scheduled report on Iran
included evidence that suggests the
Islamic republic is working on the
clandestine procurement of equip-
ment and designs to make nuclear
arms.
"While some of the activities iden-
tified in the annex have civilian as
well as military applications, others
are specific to nuclear weapons,"
the report said.
Among these were indications that


Escape
From Page 1A

or if other prisoners have any insight
on his whereabouts is still under in-
vestigation, Bryant said.
Graceville Schools were on lock-


Iran has conducted high explosives
testing and detonator development
to set off a nuclear charge, as well
as computer modeling of a core of
a nuclear warhead. The, report also
cited preparatory work for a nuclear
weapons test, and development of
a nuclear payload for Iran's Shahab
3 intermediate range missile a
weapon that can reach Israel.
In Washington, officials said the
report confirms U.S. suspicions
about the military nature of Iran's
program, and the Obama adminis-
tration was readying a range of sanc-
tions and other measures against
Iran should the Islamic republic fail
to answer questions raised about its
nuclear ambitions.
Israeli government spokesman
Mark Regev said there was a gov-
ernment directive not to comment
until Israel has studied the findings
in depth.
But before the report's release, Is-
raeli Defense Minister Ehud Barak
warned of a possible Israeli mili-
tary strike against Iran's nuclear
program.
"We continue to recommend to
our friends in the world and to our-
selves, not to take any option off the
table," he told Israel radio.
That phrase is often used by Israeli
politicians to mean a military as-

down Tuesday, and will be open
today.
Foxworth has many charges
against him, including aggravated
battery with a deadly weapon and
trafficking in stolen property in Es-
cambia and Santa Rosa counties. He
is serving a term of eight years, three
months and 16 days.


sault. Israeli leaders have engaged
in increased saber rattling recently,
suggesting that an attack was likely
a more effective way to stop Iran's
nuclear program than continued
diplomacy.
Iran is under U.N. sanctions for re-
fusing to stop uranium enrichment
- which can produce both nuclear
fuel and missile warhead material
- and other suspected activities
that the international community
fears could be used to make atomic
arms. But Iran dismisses such al-
legations and says its activities are
meant to be used only for energy or
research.
.ran's official IRNA news agency
dismissed the U.N. findings, ac-
cusing IAEA chief Yukiya Amano
of including "worthless comments
and pictures provided by the in-
telligence services." In Vienna, Ali
Asghar Soltanieh, Iran's chief IAEA
delegate, called the report "unbal-
anced, unprofessional and prepared
with political motivation and politi-
cal pressure by the United States."
In Moscow, Russia's Foreign Min-
istry said it would not comment un-
til it had time to study the report.
Some of the information was new
- including evidence of a large
metal chamber at a military site for
nuclear-related explosives testing.

There is no indication that Fox-
worth is armed, but authorities are
asking residents to not attempt to
apprehend him by themselves.
If anyone has information on the
inmate, please contact your lo-
cal law enforcement or the Flori-
da Department of Corrections at
850-922-6867.


Give
From Page 1A
year.
"The ladies in the office
out here really do most
of the work," Green said.
"They always put a tre-
mendous amount of effort
into it, and this year was
no exception. The commu-
nity really rallies around to
help, by buying our chili
dinners, and the things
from the auctions we have.
None of that could happen
without the people who
donate things for the sales.
"I wasn't sure how much
we were going to be able
to raise this year,, with
the economy the way it
is, but we actually came
within two or three hun-
dred of last year's total.
People are so generous in
our community; they step
up even when things are
tight financially. With the
chili dinner, the auctions,
the ball race that (Parks
and Recreation Director)
Chuck Hatcher did for us
earlier on the (Chipola)
river-which raised almost
$900 we made about
$7,600. I thought that was
a really, really good result."
One of Green's former
employees also continued
to make his annual contri-
bution to the cause, even in
retirement. James Brooks
retired last year after well
over 20 years at Road and
Bridge, but made eight
cakes for the event this
year. One of them, a cinna-
mon pound cake, was cut
up to serve with the chili
dinners. That dessert has
been as much a tradition
as Green's chili, and Brooks
baked the other seven for
auction.
Green started cooking
his chili at 7 a.m. the day
of the fundraiser, and Pi-
chard reports that it was
very good. Green disclosed


Drake
From Page 1A

Drake followed his dis-
cussion of HB 325 with as-
surances he and Coleywere
working to repeal Senate
Bill 550, which passed in
2010, mandating that ev-
ery septic tank in the state
be inspected every 5 years.
Supporters of the bill say it
,helps keep broken septic
tanks from leaking into the
waterways. Opponents,
like Drake, say the bill is
costly and overreaching
and unnecessary.
"We live in the' most
beautiful place ... I don't
think we want to destroy
that," Drake said.
The Florida House was
onboard with the repeal,
and the Senate was nearly
there, Drake said.
The report of the Flor-
ida budget was not as
promising.
"Reality is, we're going
to have more bad news,"
Drake said.
Currently, the budget is
about $2 billion short of
what is needed, Drake said.
About half of the budget is
allocated for health care,
one-third toward educa-
tion, 6-7 percent for the
transportation department


"I wasn't sure how
much we were going
to be able to raise
this year, with the
economy the way
it is... People are
so generous in our
community; they
step up even when
things are tight
financially."
Al Green,
County Road and Bridge
Superintendent

some of his secret ingre-
dients to the Floridan this
week- A good grade of
ground chuck, chili pow-
der, minced garlic, bell
peppers, onion, cumin,
salt and black pepper go
into the mix, he said.
Of the money raised with
chili sales and all other
activities spearheaded by
Road and Bridge and the
Parks department, 95 per-
cent stays in the local comr-
munity to help Jackson
Countians in need.
Pichard said she wasn't
surprised to learn the
community had risen to
the occasion.
"We have a very giving
community," Pichard said.
"The county employees
giving of their time and
effort, the businesses and
individuals who donate,
and the people who come
out to spend money are
all to be commended. I
think some people would
be amazed at the number
of everyday lives that this
money will touch. We have
28 organizations in the
county that will benefit,
and some of the money
multiplies by eight times in
matching funds from other
sources."


and 4-5 percent toward the
prison system. More cuts,
although difficult, may
need to be made, Drake
said.
"We've cut the meat,
cut the fat and cut the
bone," Drake said. "We can
continue to chisel away."
Finally, Drake discussed
his role in the reapportion-
ment committee. He and
his other committee mem-
bers have traveled around
Florida to discuss with
the people where the new
districts should be drawn,
which he hopes will be
finalized before summer.
"The districts should
be drawn for the people,"
Drake said.
Republican club mem-
bers were also afforded
some time to ask Drake
questions. The main topic
of concern was lobbyists,
their effects and whether
they should have. more
regulations concerning
them.
Drake said although lob-
byists can sway legislators,
they also bring key infor-
mation with them. Drake
said some meetings should
be private, but only if the
law allows.
"You want the govern-
ment in the sunshine, no
doubt about that," Drake
said.


There were no

obituaries or

death notices

submitted to the

Floridan as of the

deadline at 4 p.m.

yesterday.


LOOKING FOR MORE NEWS? VISIT

WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM


Jackson County Vault & Monuments


|. 850-482-5041 L


Pinecrest

3720 Caverns Road Marianna, FL 32446-1806 (850) 482-3964


WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 9,2011 + 9AF


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Sports Briefs

High School
Football
Thursday Boze-
man at Cottondale, 7
p.m.
Friday Graceville
at Chipley, 7 p.m.; Hol-
mes County at Mari-
anna, 7 p.m.; Sneads at
Port St. Joe, 7 p.m.

Chipola Women's
Basketball
Chipola will have a
trio of home games
this week, taking on
South Georgia Tech
on Thursday at 8 p.m.,
and then Monroe on
Friday and Saturday,
both games also at
8 p.m. at the Milton
H. Johnson Health
Center.

Chipola Men's
Basketball
The Indians will hit
the road this weekend
to play in the Georgia
Perimeter Classic in
Decatur, Ga.
Chipola will play At-
lanta Metro on Friday
at 4 p.m., and then take
on Georgia Perimeter
on Saturday at 3 p.m.

Alumni Football
Games
There will be a full
contact alumni football
league held this winter.
The games are full
pads with officials,
announcers, and video
crew, and is open to
all former high school
football players 18 and
older in the area.
Games will take place
on weekendsfrom
January through March
of 2012.
There must be at
least 35 players to a
team.
Those interested can
sign up at www.alum
nifootballusa.com.

Sports Items
Send all sports items
to editorial@jcflori-
dan.com or fax them
to 850-482-4478. The
mailing address for
the paper is Jackson
County Floridan P.O.
Box 520 Marianna, FL
32447.


COTTONDAIE GIRLS BASKETBALL PREVIEW




Replacing key players


Cottondale Head Coach Shan Pittman talks to the Lady Hornets after a practice last week.


Top 2 scorers gone

from last year's

La dy Hornets team

BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Cottondale Lady Hornets won 16
games during the 2010-11 season, but will
have to find a way to replace their two best
players this season to replicate last year's
success.
The two leading scorers for the Lady
Hornets last season, Shay Wright and Jakia
Grimsley, graduated last season and took


"It's almost like a brand-new team.
We've had to make some adjustments
because we're so young. Experience
will not be one of our strong suits.
However, the way they played this
summer and during our summer camp
showed me that they do have a lot of
heart."
Khadejah Ward,
Lady Hornets coach

their combined 32 points per game with
them.
The Lady Hornets do return junior guard
and third leading scorer Khadejah Ward,
but Cottondale coach Shan Pittman will


have her work cut out for her this season
competing with the top teams in the new
District 3-1A.
"It's almost like a brand-new team," the
coach said. "We've had to make some ad-
justments because we're so young. Expe-
rience will not be one of our strong suits.
However, the way they played this summer
and during our summer camp showed me
that they do have a lot of heart. They showed
me a lot of tenacity. They didn't back down,
and that was nice to see."
The Lady Hornets will look to Ward, who
last year played off of Grimsley and Wright,
as their primary playmaker this season.
Pittman said she believes that she is up to
the task.

See COTTONDALE, Page 2B


Middle School Basketball



Bullpups take two at home over Walton


BY SHELIA MADER
Floridan Correspondent

The Marianna Middle School Bullpups
basketball team made it two in a row
Thursday evening at home with a pair
of solid wins over the visiting Walton
Braves.
The 'A' team won by a narrow four-point
margin at 29-24 while the 'B' team blew
away the Braves 37-19. In 'A' team action,
the Bullpups were led by Tre Clemmons


with 12 points, followed closely by Her-
man Williams, also in double digits with
10 points.
Picking up the final seven points was
Jonathan Franklin with seven points. The
Pups came out sluggish in the first period
of play, putting up just two points while
Walton countered with four.
The Pups turned it up several notches in
the second quarter, with Williams hitting
two from downtown and adding a basket
for eight of the 16 points scored.


The defense stayed tight and held Wal-
ton to just six points, taking an 18-10 lead
into the locker room at the half.
The third quarter was a dog fight with
Walton edging out Marianna 10-9 to nar-
row the lead to 27-20.
Walton picked up four points in the
fourth while Mafianna was held to two
but captured the win.
In the 'B' team matchup, the Pups
jumped out to a 10-3 lead in the first
quarter but faltered in the second quar-


ter-picking up only one point-while Wal-
ton matched Marianna's first quarter total
of 10, to take a 13-11 lead into the locker
room at the midway point.
Marianna took the court with fire
in their eyes in the second half, and it
showed on the scoreboard with 14 points,
while Walton was held to six.
Marianna put up an additional 11
points in the final period of play and kept
See BULLPUPS, Page 2B


College Football



Miami, Florida State still a rivalry to watch


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS
Miami quarterback Jacory Harris (12)
prepares to hand off the football against
Duke on Saturday in Miami.


The Associated Press

CORALGABLES -Neitherteamis ranked.
Neither team will play for this season's na-
tional title. Neither team has regained its
spot as a college football powerhouse.
So what?
It's Miami-Florida State week.
"That's all that needs to be said," Miami
safety JoJo Nicholas said.
One of college football's top rivalries is re-
kindled on Saturday afternoon in Tallahas-
see when.Florida State and Miami meet for
the 56th time. It's only the third time since
1977 that the annual game will go off with
both teams unranked the others were in
2007 and 2008 and the first time since
1975 where both teams have at least three
losses already on their record.
Again, so what?
Miami fans, Florida State fans, they carry
who wins and loses this game with them for
the following year, much like folks do with
Michigan-Ohio State, Auburn-Alabama
and Southern Calforinia-UCLA games. And
despite there being little at stake besides


pride and bragging rights, it'll still be na-
tionally televised on ABC and ESPN, more
proof that any 'Noles-'Canes get-together
is still must-see TV.
"I don't think there's any question that
this is THAT game," Miami coach Al Gold-
en said. "There's maybe a few that have
rivaled the intensity, what it's meant from
an national implication standpoint, and of
course the breadth and depth of talent that
has been represented in this game over the
last quarter-century. The mantle has been
passed and it's our job to carry them and
move the program forward. It should be a
great game."
Both teams are coming into this weekend
after convincing wins.
Miami (5-4, 3-3 Atlantic Coast Confer-
ence) rolled past Duke 49-14 on Saturday,
easily one of the Hurricanes' most complete
efforts. Florida State (6-3, 4-2) easily beat
Boston College 38-7 on Thursday night,
the Seminoles' fourth straight victory, all of
them coming by at least 25 points. It's been

See RIVALRY, Page 2B


Florida State's head coach Jimbo Fisher
(right) talks with his quarterback EJ
Manuel in a game against Maryland on Oct.
22 in Tallahassee.


1 :







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


-12B WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 9,2011


Bullpups
From Page 1B
the Braves off the boards
completely preserving the
win.
Marianna was led by
Olajuwan Brown with 15


Cottondale
From Page 1B
"KIadejah is the only
one really with experi-
'ence. She's going to be our
ball-handler and take on
the point guard position,
which is an adjustment
for her because she's never
had to run it before," the
coach said. "She's always
had (Grimsley and Wright)
before, but now the girls
will be looking to her.
"At the same time, we're
not putting the pressure
on one person. We want to
spread the offense around,
spread the wealth around
to everyone. We're not
looking for one person
to do everything. We just
want whoever has the best
shot to take it."
Ward will be joined in the
backcourt by junior Kend-
riece Gardner, while soph-
omores Kourtnie Richard-
son and Tsara Peace, and
freshman Brooklyn Brown
alsq returri for Cottondale.
Senior Fredericka White
will also join the varsity
squad after not playing
since middle school.
However, Pittman said
she believes that White will
be able to help the team
this season.
"We're excited about
having Fredericka," the
coach said. "She's 5-9 or


points, followed by Tyler
White with nine. On the
board with seven points
was Deontre Rhynes with
seven points. Putting up
two points each was Jer-
emiah Walker, JoKquez
Orange and Anton
Williams.


5-10 and long and lanky.
We're excited about what
she will bring to the team,
especially with size being
an issue for us. She's got
a love for the game, so we
hope that love shows up on
the court."
The Lady Hornets will
also welcome a pair of
newcomers from the mid-
dle school in Deunna Gon,
zalez and Aaliyah Blount.
With only one senior and
two juniors on the team,
Cottondale will be one/
of the youngest teams, in
the area, but Pittman said
she believes her team can
overcome its youth with
its competitive nature and
toughness.
"Everybody has the same
problem with numbers
and youth, and we're very
young," the coach said.
"But one 'thing I can say
about this group is that
they've got some heart,
and they're willing to do
whatever it takes to play
their best every day. If they
come together, we could
have a good year. That's
my expectation, for us to
have a good year and rep-
resent the Lady Hornets
program."*
.Cottondale will open the
regular season on Nov. 15
in Malone against the Lady
Tigers and will make their
home debut on Nov. 21
against Bethlehem.


Rivalry
From Page 1B
11 .years since any Florida State
team has been on that kind of blow-
out streak.
It's one of those games where
pretty much everybody knows ev-
erybody on the field,, with both
rosters packed with players from
talent-rich Florida. It's not uncom-
mon for players to be matched up
with high school teammates. And in
at least one casa this year, it'll be a
family affair.
Miami's top running back is La-
mar Miller, the first Hurricane back
in nine years to reach the 1,000-
yard mark. Florida State's leading
receiver is Rodney Smith, who has
team-bests of 28 catches and 486
yards. .
Miller and Smith are cousins.


There'll be some smack talking go-
ing on this week.
"I'm going to talk to my cousin,"
Miller said. "There's going to be a lot
of braggin' and stuff."
Golden will be coaching in the
rivalry 'for the first time, but has
been to Tallahassee plenty of times
before, through his past work as a
Virginia assistant. He said he hopes
any back-and-forth between Semi-
noles and Hurricanes doesn't go on
this week.
The real bragging comes after Sat-
urday's game, of course.
Road teams have won the last
five games in the series. But Flor-
ida State has won four of the last
six matchups with the Hurricanes
overall, and certainly don't want to
commemorate the 20th anniversa-
ry of one of the sport's most fabled
games Wide Right I, a game that
helped propel Miami to the 1991


national title with another home
defeat.
"Now we can think- about Florida
State," Miami quarterback Jacory
Harris said. "It's going to be a big
challenge and we're ready."
Harris threw for 386 yards in his
only other game at Doak Camp-
bell Stadium, a 38-34 Miami victory
where the Hurricanes took the lead
with 1:53 remaining. Harris watched
Florida State's frantic comeback at-
tempt with iis arms folded and a
blank look on his face while stand-
ing on the Miami sideline, never
flinching even when Christian
Ponder's pass into the end zone on
the game's final play bounced off
the turf and sealed the Hurricanes'
victory.
Asked later why he didn't react,
Harris simply said, "Too tired. A Mi-
ami-Florida State game takes every-
thing you have."


Sparano exhales after Dolphins snap slide


The Associated Press

MIAMI There was a moment
on Sunday when Tony Sparano
looked around the Miami Dolphins
sideline, and realized he was getting
mocked by one of his best players.
It was anything but disrespectful.
A few minutes remained, the Dol-
phins' long-awaited first victory of
the year was sealed and Sparano,
was still snarling and growling like
he was unaware of the fact his team
was about to close out a 31-3 win
over Kansas City. And with that, Ja-
son Taylor started laughing at his
boss, sort of telling him to relax and
enjoy.
"That was kind of the message
I got," Sparano said. "Kind of like,
'Coach, we're all right here.'"
For the first time all season, the
Dolphins were all right. More than
all right, actually, winning by 28
points for the first time since Oc-
tober 2009. So while his team had
Monday off as a reward, Sparano
was back at work.
The seven-game losing streak
to start the season was over, and for
now anyway, the talk about his job
status and whether the team should


tank games to try and secure the
best possible draft pick is on hold.
"Beats the hell out of the alter-
native, you know?" Sparano said.
Monday. "I've had to come here for
a lot of these things and it's been
a little different so it's satisfying. I
said it last night, the most satisfy-
ing thing is getting the chance to
see those guys smile. Validate some
of the things that you've been talk-
ing about. And we're 1-7, so that's
where we are, but we won one. We
took a step up this, what appears
to be a giant mountain. Sometimes
the mountain ain't so giant."
Everything clicked. Matt Moore
completed 17 of 23 passes for 244
yards and three touchdowns. Bran-
don Marshall caught eight of those
balls for 106 yards and a score.
Reggie Bush nearly had a 100-yard
rushing day for the second straight
week, getting 92 with a touchdown.
The Dolphins got five sacks,
held the Chiefs to 4.4 yards per
play and gave up 13 yards or
less on six different Kansas City
possessions.
So after Sparano accepted the
game ball in a giddy locker room af-
terward, he told the players he'd see


them Wednesday the sweetest
words an NFL team can hear their
coach say in a Sunday postgame
meeting. Hugs all around, and more
than a few exhales as well.
"It was absolutely great to get a
little reward for all the work we've
-put in, just to have that feeling of
getting a win under your belt,"
Moore said. "I think guys now un-
derstand that, 'Yeah we can do this,'
and they're hungry and we're going
to enjoy this one and get ready for
Washington."
The Redskins (3-5) visit Miami on
Sunday.
Sparano said he expects
Vontae Davis, who was not with the
team in Kansas City, to be back this
week. He lauded the work of sev-
eral players in particular on Mon-
day, a list including the predictable
choices Bush, Moore, Marshall,
Anthony Fasano and maybe
the not-so-expected ones such as
Charles Clay, Davone Bess and Je-
ron Mastrud.
"We handled the circumstances
the best we can handle circum-
stances going into that foot-
ball game yesterday," Sparano
said.


WEDNESDAY MORNING I AFTERNOON NOVEMBER 9, 2011
6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:0010:3011:0011:3012:0012:301001:30 2:00 2:30 3:003:30 4:00 4:30 5:00 5:30
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45 CNN (5:00) American Morning (N) lM CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) The Situation Room With Wolf Blitzer (N) John King, USA (N)
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WEDNESDAY EVENING I LATE NIGHT NOVEMBER 9, 2011
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Rd me sptsnws

onlie a J'flo idancom


SPORTS









JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


SPORTS


WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2011 3BF


Boxing

The Associated Pi ess

PHILADELPHIA
oe Frazier had to
throw his greatest
punch to knock
own "The Greatest."
A vicious left hook from
Frazier put Muhammad
Ali on the canvas in the
15th round in March 1971
when he became the first
man to beat him in the
Fight of the Century at
Madison Square Garden.
"That was the greatest
thing that ever happened
in my.life," Frazier said.
It was his biggest night,
one that would never
come again.
The relentless, under-
sized heavyweight ruled
the division as champion,
then spent a lifetime try-
ing to fight his way out of
Ali's shadow.
Frazier, who died
Monday night after a brief
battle with liver cancer at
67, will forever be associ-
ated with Ali. No one in
boxing would ever dream
of anointing Ali as The
Greatest unless he, too,
was linked to Smokin' Joe.
"I will always remem-
ber Joe with respect and
admiration," Ali said in a
statement. "My sympathy
goes out to his family and
loved ones."
They fought three times,
twice in the heart of New
York City and once in the
morning in a steamy arena
in the Thrilla in Manila
in the Philippines. They
went 41 rounds together.
Neither gave an inch and
both gave it their all.
In their last fight in Ma-
nila in 1975, they traded
punches with a fervor that
seemed unimaginable
among heavyweights. Fra-
zier gave almost as good
as he got for 14 rounds,
then had to be held back
by trainer Eddie Futch as
he tried to.go out for the


great J(

final round, unable to see.
"Closest thing to dying
that I know of," Ali said
afterward.
Ali was as merciless with
Frazier out of the ring as
he was inside it. He called
him a gorilla, and mocked
him as an Uncle Tom.
But he respected him as
a fighter, especially after
Frazier won a decision to
defend his heavyweight
title against the then-un-
beaten Ali in a fight that
was so big Frank Sinatra
was shooting pictures at
ringside and both fight-
ers earned an astonishing
$2.5 million.
The night at the Garden
40 years ago remained
fresh in Frazier's mind as
he talked about his life, ca-
reer and relationship with
Ali a few months before
he died.
"I can't go nowhere
where it's not mentioned,"
he told The Associated
Press.
Bob Arum, who once
promoted Ali, said he was
saddened by Frazier's
passing.
"He was such an inspi-
rational guy. A decent guy.
A man of his word," Arum
said. "I'm torn up by Joe
dying at this relatively
young age. I can't say
enough about Joe."
Frazier's death was an-
nounced in a statement
by his family, who asked
to be able to grieve pri-
vately and said they would
announce "our father's
homecoming celebration"
as soon as possible.
On Tuesday, former
heavyweight champion
Mike Tyson posted his
condolences on Twitter.
Tyson wrote, "As a young
fighter it has always been
an honor to be compared"
to Frazier.
Also, the International
Boxing Hall of Fame
announced its flags in
Canastota, N.Y., will fly


Boxing



oe Frazier dies at 67 of cancer


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE
In this March 8,1971 photo, Muhammad All (right) takes a left
from Joe Frazier during the 15th round of their heavyweight
title boxing bout in New York.


at half-staff in memory
of Frazier. Frazier was
elected to the Hall of Fame
in 1990.
Manny Pacquiao learned
of the death shortly after
he arrived in Las Vegas
for his fight Saturday
night with Juan Manuel
Marquez. Like Frazier in
his prime, Pacquiao has a
powerful left hook that he
has used in his remarkable
run to stardom.
"Boxing lost a great
champion, and the sport
lost a great ambassador,"
Pacquiao said.
Don King, who promot-
ed the Thrilla in Manila,
said Frazier always fought
with courage and for
respect.
"One cannot underes-
timate the contribution
Smokin' Joe and Ali made
to progress and change
by creating the space,
through their talent, for
black men to be seen,
visible and relevant," King
said. "The Thrilla in Ma-
nila helped make America
better."
Though slowed in
his later years and his


speech slurred by the
toll of punches taken in
the ring, Frazier was still
active on the autograph
circuit in the months
before he died. In Sep-
tember he went to Las
Vegas, where he signed
autographs in the lobby of
the MGM Grand shortly
before Floyd Mayweather
Jr.'s fight against Victor
Ortiz.
An old friend, Gene
Kilroy, visited with him
and watched Frazier work
the crowd.
"He was so nice to every-
body," Kilroy said.
Frazier was small for a
heavyweight, weighing
just 205 pounds when he
won the title by stopping
Jimmy Ellis in the fifth
round of their 1970 fight at
Madison Square Garden.
But he fought every min-
ute of every round going
forward behind a vicious
left hook, and there were
few fighters who could
withstand his constant
pressure.
His reign as heavyweight
champion lasted only
four fights including


the win over Ali before
he ran into an even more
fearsome slugger than
himself. George Foreman
responded to Frazier's
constant attack by drop-
ping him three times in
the first round and three
more in the second before
their 1973 fight in Jamaica
was waved to a close
and the world had a new
heavyweight champion.
Two fights later, he met
Ali in a rematch of their
first fight, only this time
the outcome was differ-
ent. Ali won a 12-round
decision, and later that
year stopped George Fore-
man in the Rumble in the
Jungle in Zaire.
There had to be a third
fight, though, and what
a fight it was. With Ali's
heavyweight title at stake,
the two met in Manila in
a fight that will long be
seared in boxing history.
Frazier went after Ali
round after round, landing
his left hook with regular-
ity as he made Ali back-
pedal around the ring. But
Ali responded with left


jabs and right hands that
found their mark again
and again. Even the in-
tense heat inside the arena
couldn't stop the two as
they fought every min-
ute of every round with
neither willing to concede
the other one second of
the round.
"They told me Joe
Frazier was through," All
told Frazier at one point
during the fight.
"They lied," Frazier said,
before hitting Ali with a
left hook.
Finally, though, Frazier
simply couldn't see and
Futch would not let him
go out for the 15th round.
Ali won the fight while on
his stool, exhausted and
contemplating himself
whether to go on.
It was one of the great-
est fights ever, but it took
a toll. Frazier would fight
only two more times,
getting knocked out in a
rematch with Foreman
eight months later before
coming back in 1981 for
an ill advised fight with
Jumbo Cummings.


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-14B WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 9,2011


SPORTS


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


College Fbotball


Official tells AP support for Paterno eroding


The Associated Press

STATE COLLEGE, Pa.
- Joe Paterno's support
among the Penn State
board of trustees was de-
scribed as "eroding" Tues-
day, threatening to end the
84-year-old coach's career
amid a child sex-abuse
scandal involving a former
assistant and one-time
heir apparent.
Person familiarwith the
trustees' discussions and
who used the term "erod-
ing" said it was unclear
what the consequences for
Paterno will be and that a
decision could be rendered
before the board meets on
Friday.
Penn State President
Graham Spanier also has
lost support among the
Board of Trustees, the per-
son said, but again, how
much was unclear.
Paterno's son, Scott, said
his father hasn't spoken
with Penn State officials
or trustees about stepping
down. Addressing report-
ers outside his father's
house, he said Joe Paterno
plans to not only coach in
Saturday's game against
Nebraska, but for the long
haul.
"No one has asked Joe to
resign," Scott Paterno told
The Associated Press in a
text message.
PennStateadministrators
canceled Paterno's weekly
news conference during
which he was expected to
field questions about the
sex abuse scandal involv-
ing former defensive co-
ordinator Jerry Sandusky.
The former defensive co-


ordinator on Paterno's two
national championship
teams in the 1980s was ar-
rested Saturday on charges
of sexually abusing eight
boys over 15 years.
Scott Paterno said the
decision to cancel was
made by Spanier's office,
and that his father was
disappointed.
"I know you guys have a
lot of questions. I was hop-
ing I could answer them
today. We'll try to do it as
soon as we can," Joe Pa-
terno said to a group of
reporters as he got into
his car. About a dozen
students stood nearby,
chanting, "We love you,
Joe."
A second person
familiar with the board's
discussions said it was
focused on the horrific
aspects of the charges
against Sandusky; two
university officials have
also been charged in the
scandal, accused of failing
to notify authorities when
told Sandusky had assault-
ed a boy in a shower used
by the football team.
Trustee David Joyner
said he was unaware if any
decision had been made
on Paterno's future.
Authorities have said
that Paterno, who testified
in the grand jury proceed-
ings that led to the charges
against Sandusky, is not a
target of the investigation.
But the state police com-
missioner has chastised
him and other school offi-
cials for not doing enough
to try to stop the suspected
abuse.
Meanwhile, anoth-


S/ THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Penn State assistanthAthletic Director Jeff Nelson walks away after announcing that coach Joe
Paterno's weekly news conference Is canceled Tuesday in State College, Pa.'


er potential victim has
contacted authorities.
The man, now an adult,
contacted the department
on Sunday after seeing me-
dia accounts of Sandusky's
arrest, Lt. David Young at
the Montoursville station
said. Investigators took a
statement from him and
forwarded it to the Rock-
view station for officers
there to pursue, Young
said.
The Patriot-News of Har-
risburg, which first report-
ed thatthe man had come
forward, said he is in his
20s, knew Sandusky from
The Second Mile charity
the former coach founded
in 1977, and had never told
his parents or authorities
about the alleged encoun-
ters from about a decade
ago.
Young declined to re-
lease the man's name or
provide details about what
he claims occurred.


The Patriot-News pub-
lished a rare full, front-
page editorial calling for
this season to be Paterno's
last and for Spanier to re-
sign immediately.
"There are the obliga-
tions we all have to uphold
the law. There are then the
obligations we all have to
do what is right," the edi-
torial board wrote about
Spanier's role in the sex
abuse scandal, along with
Paterno's.
The Pittsburgh Tribune-
Review, in an editorial,
also called on Paterno and
Spanier to both resign.
A person familiar with
Sandusky's relationship
to Penn State told the AP
that the former coach long
maintained an office in the
East Area Locker building,
across the street from the
Penn State football team's
building, and that he was
on campus as recently as a
week ago working out.


College Ibotbal Brief


Alabama-Auburn set for
afternoon kickoff on CBS
AUBURN, Ala. -The Alabama-
Auburn game on Nov. 26 will be
televised nationally by CBS.


The game will kick off at 2:30
p.m. CST at Auburn's Jordan-Hare
Stadium.
It's the 10th time in the past 12
years CBS has televised the end-of-
season Iron Bowl game.


It has featured the eventual na-
tional champion the past two years,
with Alabama winning in 2009 and
Auburn last season.

fro m ire report
,<^ -t. -,r ; .1 -


The university's online
directory listed Sandusky
-,whom Penn State of-
ficials banned from cam-
pus during the weekend
- as an assistant profes-
sor emeritus of physical
education in the Lasch
building.
The grand jury inves-
tigating Sandusky found
that he was given the of-
fice, a parking pass and


other amenities as part
of his 1999 retirement
package.
Pennsylvania state po-
lice Commissioner Frank
Noonan said Monday in
Harrisburg that Paterno
fulfilled his legal require-
ment when he relayed to
university administrators
that a graduate assistant
had seen Sandusky at-
tacking a young boy in the
team's locker room shower
in 2002. But the commis-
sioner also questioned
whether Paterno had a
moral responsibility to do
more.
"Somebody has to ques-
tion about what I would
consider the moral require-
ments for a human being
that knows of sexual things
that are taking place with a
child," Noonan said.
"I think you have the
moral responsibility, any-
one. Not whether you're
a football coach or a uni-
versity president or the
guy sweeping the build-
ing. I think you have a
moral responsibility to call
us."


FEEK ONLY!

Good Thru November 14, 2011
m. mm ----m.-m m m."..m--m--, 1-,.q







IREEI




TI IR..
.l II




rmA,,.IDoOR






I1 I


-.WE OMIOR on onS aN BICES ...O E STOP SHOP






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RE SERVICE ARTSi SEPARTME 1 EN ON SATURDAY 8AM TO 12PM FORYOUR CONVENIENCE
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|Weatherization Day,
October 30
Free Home Comfort Diagnostic
to the first 10 customers that call and schedule an appointment.
Plus 20% off*
Home Weatherization Projects
such as sealing attics and ceiling insulation
*(20% off Offer Good Thru November 18,2011)
Federal Tax Credits for weatherization
projects EXPIRE 12/31/2011




TOT M AMSC

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850-482-8802
."" *- license #CAC058636 :


\~




II







'ACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


ii. ~


/


A


I


4/


*<


TO ENTER:


t this coupon and take it into
the businesses listed below.


------


--- -------------


Name
Address


Day Phone
Evening Phone.


--- ---------------------- ml


S Grocery S

SHOP COMPARE SAVE


Lafayette Plaza Marianna


COBB FRONT END AND
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"Not Just A Front End Shop"
NOW LOCATED at TWO LOCATIONS to BETTER SERVE YOU...
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Hours of Operation:
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Finduson
Facebook


"You take care of the inside ... a
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4308 5th Ave. (across from Paramore's Pharmac, i
Stylists: Dorothy Day-Chaney, Kim Barfield, lennier Deou i..h. e
Mary Phillips,Vicki Hayhurst & Majry kialc.I


State Farm
Providing Insurance and Financial Services
Home Office, Bloomington, Illinois 61710


Oil Changes New Tires Brakes
Tune-Ups $ale & Install I
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Iji ..ePO.LA
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ma1?l" BANKn


I


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850-526-7144


www.chipolacommnunitybank.com


II


BARNES TIRE & SERVICE CENTER
4458 Jackson St. Marianna, FL 32448
Phone: (850) 526-3813 Fax: (850) 482-3207


The
The


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SOme Cooi C"
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r . ... (850) 526-1114 4727 Hwy 90 East I FrIanna, PL


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850-526-3511
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Come check out our ....
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NEW and
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54



p4:.


LA


Fr oI
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A Touchstone Energy Cooperative 4i>
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(800) 342-7400

www. westflorida. coop
Graceville Sneads Bonifay


SSTAT77ARM


Bob Pforte Motors, Inc
4214 Lafayette Street
Marianna, Florida 32446
(850) 482-4601,
(800) 483-1440


)H ST


I Jeep I


CR YsLE I


WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2011 5B


ww.bobpfortedodge.com


I s__ m '0lllllllll1 1


FBWWW









JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN v www.jcfloridan.com


PEANUTS BY CHARLES SCHULTZ
50 YOU'RE 601N6 TO FLY I SUPPOSE OU REALIZE
SOUTH FOR THE WINTER... IT'S A LONG WAY..


cC04,


BORN LOSER BY ART AND CHIP SANSOM
'1'^ SOKR ',fAMAKING 507 I FIUT AT LEAST I 1EVE R TWICEE? WOUL0TlA T IT
/Ak'Y STKE.S ON TRIS I KE. TRE. SWE_. WERE. ONL' TW CE-! YOU'RE
PROJECT, CRIEF... Al TAKE TNCE, WORKING IRTO DOUBLE.








BIG NATE BY LINCOLN PIERCE
+41 WELL,HI r HAVE WHdOS HAD 1(ELL ILL "--- EL
R SWEET TO INTER-I WHAT A MORE T LET L T EH? L
WHAT' VIEW A FUN' INTERESTING I SEE ou OF'
= COOKING? SENIOR. LIFE: YOU DECIDE
r ITIZEM OR GRAMPS? FORTE!
FOP,. A / '---A <
SCHOOL I


GRIZZWELLS BY BILL SCHORR


ARLO & JANIS BY JIMMY JOHNSON


ALLEY OOP BY JACK AND CAROLE BENDER


COW & BOY BY MARK LEIKNES


HAVE WE
STOPPED
PUSHING THE
BOUNDARIES,
COW? L


HAVE WE BECOME
STAGNANT? FIT TO SIT
ON OUR LAURELS AND
CALL IT GOOD ENOUGH?
HAVE WE SET THE BAR
SO LOW L,.
THAT WE
ACCEPT ,
MEDIOCRITY r\ I
ASOUR O /
BEST? .


I TRW s w
;IlONT THNCSa.(
SKIZOOO if.



'Ae


HEY! ARE WE IN 3-1)?
iWEEEEf ,


KIT'N' CARLYLE BY LARRY WRIGHT HERMAN BY JIM UNGER


"Andr6, the usual two tables."


NEA Crossword Puzzle


ACROSS
1 Flivver
starter
6 More
tedious
12 Check to
make sure
14 On deck
15 Stir up
16 Predicaments
17Command
to a mule
18 Mate's
comeback
19Yech!
21 PSAT
takers
23Traipse
about
26 Santa -
winds
27 Perfume
label word
28 Quacks
30 Japanese
currency
31 Recolor
32 Deceitful
33 King-sized
spoon
35 Opposite
of friend
37Cal Tech
rival
38 Scared-
looking
39 Put to a
purpose
40Univ.
degrees


41 and
yang
42Jungfrau
43 Earth's
star
44Telephone
trio
46Jay-Z's
music
genre
48 Admonition
51 Wayout .
55 Overdo the
diet
56 Baking
needs
57 More on
the edge
58 Heavily
built
DOWN
1 Dernier -
2 Cartoon
Chihuahua
3 Bow shape
4 Whinny
5 Petruchio's
intended
6 Sand
mandala
builders
7 Knuckle
under
8 Small
bouquet
9 Vapor
1OAfore
11 Hwys.


Answer to Previous Puzzle
FOX COLT TEAL
UTA APEOS EXPO
LETHAL SORT
ROOF WARD
US BR AMO
CON E BAA OPRY
RHO YAMMER
SPAM ITCH
EGAD ITALIC
RUNE ROSH EPA
OMEN ABLE RPM
ADA T I ER KOP


13 Platter
spinner
19 Lacking
reassurance
20 Ben
Kingsley
film
22 Really
sorry
24 With hands
on hips
25Turndown
26 Jean Auel
heroine
27 Paradise
28 Escape
29 Certain
NCOs
34 Loan
sharks
36 Seabird


42 In the
wake of
43 No-fat Jack
45 Roof
overhang
47 Dries out,
as wood
48 St. Louis
time
49 Dined on
50 Furniture
mover
52 Paul
Anka's "-
Beso"
53 Three
before V
54 Former
JFK arrival


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QulllDrlverBooks.com


11-9 2011 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS



CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: K equals 0
"P LZFN VG YFMWN BXF GWJFZBH
MPRF. P BXPRS PB DTKF OF
AB ZWRLFZ TA T GFZAWR; PB YVPMB
DH EXTZTEBFZ." CVABPR YPFYFZ


Previous Solution: "A politician looks forward only to the next election. A
statesman looks forward to the next generation." Thomas Jefferson
@2011 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 11-9


Horoscope
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) Important matters
you negotiate will work out
to everyone's satisfaction if
you get everyone playing
off the same sheet notes.
Show them how to make
beautiful music together.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-
Dec. 21) Two ambitions
that have been looking
questionable can easily be
fulfilled if you keep your
eyes on the prize.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) If you gamble on
yourself, it'll be OK, but
wagering on others could
be another story.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) If you have an impor-
tant matter hanging fire,
it behooves you to press
for closure while things
are going your way. Don't
hesitate to be firm in your
commitment.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) You have a special
ability to sway others to
your way of thinking and
doing things. You can eas-
ily convince them to back
you in whatever important
project you choose.
ARIES (March 21-April
19) Don't waste the day
playing or doing nothing,
because it could be one of
your better times for devel-
oping opportunities.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
- Whether you're the quiet
type or one who makes a lot
of noise, your presence is
apt to be far more strongly
felt than usual. You're likely
to make a statement that
won't go unnoticed.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
- This is clearly a day to sit
down and work on money-
making possibilities.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
- You may need remind-
ing how essential it is to be
hopeful regarding the out-
comes of matters.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -
Don't shy away from com-
petitive situations, because
challenges stimulate you to
accomplish big things.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22) In order to spur you
onward, you should find
some challenging outlets
that stimulate you both
physically and mentally.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.23)-
This could be an extremely
productive day for you, but
not necessarily from your
own doing.


Annie's Mailbox


Dear Annie: My 19-year-old daughter,
"Shawna," is dating an 18-year-old boy
who is abusive of her. She lives with him
and his family. She has an 18-month-old
son, and my wife and I have custody, not
only because she felt she was too young
to raise him, but because she doesn't
want him around her boyfriend.
Since Shawna has been living there, she
only talks to us when she needs some-
thing. We haven't seen her in almost a
month. We recently found out that she is
drinking, doing drugs and stealing. She
talks about suicide a lot anrd cuts herself.
She refuses to leave her boyfriend. He
told her to choose between him and the
baby, and she chose him. The police have
been called about their fighting several
times.
Last month, the boyfriend was arrested
for theft and spent nine days in jail. Then
he threatened her, insisting she pay his
bail by any means necessary, so she stole


Bri(
At the bridge table, it is very easy to play
fectly tomorrow, after you know where a
the cards lie. The secret of success is ma]
your contract today, before you have seei
of your opponents' cards. In this six-no-tnr
contract, how should South plan the play a
West leads the spade 10?
North used Stayman to see if there was a
heart fit, because then six hearts would pr
ably have been a better contract than six
trump. South starts with 11 top tricks:
spades, two hearts, three diamonds and 1
clubs. The best chance for another winne
to find East with the heart queen. So decl
covers the spade 10 with dummy's jack
captures East's king with his ace. He then le
a club to the dummy and plays a low heal
his jack.
Here the finesse wins, but what would dec
er do if West produced the heart queen and
another spade? Now there would be only
chance: a red-suit squeeze. South must h
that the opponent with four (or more)
monds also holds four (or more) hearts. Wai
ing only for heart discards, declarer would
the second spade on the board, play a heal
his king, cash the other three clubs ending
the board, and take the heart ace. Is the hi
six high? If it is, cash it and claim. If not, I
out the diamonds, hoping that the six takes
last trick.


money from her grandmother. As soon
as he was released, things went back to
the way they were.
I have a protection order on this boy
because of the threats he has made
against my family and me. But what can
we do to get help for Shawna?
-WORRIED DAD IN GARY, IND.

Dear Dad: It is an unfortunate truth that
once a child is a legal adult, there isn't
much you can do to protect them from
a situation of their own choosing. We
urge you to stay in touch with Shawna as
much as possible and let her know you
will be there for her when she needs you.
Don't criticize her abusive boyfriend,
but do tell her she deserves to be treated
better and you hope someday she will
realize that for herself. Give her the num-
ber of the National Domestic Violence
Hotline (the hotline.org) at 1-800-799-
SAFE (1-800-799-7233).


I J ---U1 ^k_^ I^.-[- %. I


-A6B WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2011


ENTERTAINVIENT








CLASSIFIED


www.JCFLORIDAN.com


Jackson County Floridan Wednesday, November 9, 2011- 7B


WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED




ARKET PLA


BY PHONE: (850) 526-3614 or (800) 779-2557 BY MAIL: WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE
BY FAX: (850) 779-2557 P.O. BOX 520, MARIANNA, FL 32447
ONLINE: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM IN PERSON: 4403 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA
Publication Policy Errors and Omissions: Advertisers should check their ad the first day. This publication shall not be liable for failure to publish an ad or for a typographic error or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the ad for the first day's
insertion. Adjustment for errors is limited to the cost of that portion of the ad wherein the error occurred. The advertiser agrees that the publisher shall not be liable for damages arising out of errors in advertisements beyond the amount paid for the space
actually occupied by that portion of the advertisement in which the error occurred, whether such error is due to negligence of the publisher's employees or otherwise and there shall be no liability for non-insertion of any advertisement beyond the amount paid for
such advertisement. Display Ads are not guaranteed position. All advertising is subject to approval. Right is reserved to edit, reject, cancel or classify all ads under the appropriate classification.


For eadlnescalltol-fre rviiw w0clria.com


to Q


ANNOUNCEMENTS


BALLROOM DANCER
(No need to be professional)
Female Dancer looking for dance partner to
donate 1 hr/week for 8 wks to assist teaching
teenagers in preparation for Prom &
Graduation events. 850-526-4561









Lost Silver Class Ring @ Chipola. Has C'dale
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FriL 11th & Sat 12th. (8-4) kids clothes, H/H,
adults clothes, christmas items, fishing equip-
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NEED CASH!!
We Buy Whole Estates Or
Good Quality Used Furniture.
Medford Interiors & Antique Marketplace,
3820 RCC, Dothan 334- 702-7390


[$)


FINANCIAL


Call 334-596-8179





Seasoned Oak & All Split
LocalTransport Company for Sale based. wd. h
in Dothan with 5 trucks and I car included.














Wanted: Old Coins, Gold,
Diamonds, Guns, And Tools
West Main Jewelry & Loan 334-671-1440.

Annu15% off original price on items marked "BC"
@I BackYard Treasures 2331 RCC & Medford's
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SATSUMAS, tangerines and grapefruit $20.
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lpm-6pm. For more info call 850-209-5506.
)M PETS & ANIMALS


Free Cats to GOOD home Neutered/Spayed,
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AKC BULLMASTIFF PUPS AWESOME LITTER
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WWW.SEXTONSBULLZ.COM 334-806-59114
AKC Labrador Retriever Chocolate, one male,
Vet checked S/W very healthy. Hunting Blood-
line, Ready 11/5 $400, 334-693-2912 sdejones@
comcast.net
CKCSATSUMAShih-Tzu puppies, Males and Females,
First Shots and Dewormed. Beautiful Mark-a
ings. Great with kids. $300.00. Call 334-248-
3447 or after 5pm Call 334-898-7067. ;
Free: Female Catahoula Leopard mix, hyper
needs loving home. 334-791-7619 (6am-4pm)
3447 or after 5pm Call 334-898-7067.


V OLDER PUPPIES ON SALE V
$75 & up Yorkie Poos, Shih-poos, Morkies,
Yorkle-pom also Yorkles $400 and up.
Maltese $500 & Shorkies $250. Chi-A-poo $125.
334-718-4886


UKC & NKC Registered Treening Feist Puppies
5 months old with all shots, white with black &
brown spots. Will be great pets for any house-
hold. Great squirrel dogs and ready for training
this season!! Sight Treening Now.
$300. Call 334-618-4194
S FARMER'S MARKET


Aplin Farms
You pick peas, tomatoes, sweet corn,
pepers, egg plant & pumpkins.
4 334-792-6362 40
Cherokee Satsumas available at the farm
1525 Fairview Rd. Marianna 850-579-4641.

FRESH-'
GREEN
PEANUTS
850-352-2199
OR 850-352-4423
Fresh Shelled Peas, Several Varieties
2307 Mayo Road, (Grand Ridge)
Bobby Hewett (850) 592-4156
SAYE' PRODUCE
HAS FREu: SH HOM Ej GROWN


Plenty of Shelled, Fresh Peas,
Tomatoes & other Vegetables
All Farm Fresh!
220 W. H 52 Malvern



HAY 6x6fL Argentina, Bahia, Bermuda, 116
rolls, $60. each. 334-805-3403 or 334-677-3247.


Southeastern Premier Sales Inc.
would like to invite you to our next sale
December 3rd to be held at the Houston
County Farm Center. Tack begins at 10am
and horses to follow for more info go to
www.dothanhorsesale.com
or call Scott Roberts at 229-891-4454

Che.d out theW C fome
Chedc out the Clascgifiedg


Wednesday, November 9, 2011






0 0

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HOW TO PLAY
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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN
VETERANS DAY DEADLINES


FRIDAY 11/11
SUNDAY 11/13


CLASSIFIED
Deadline is Thursday
Deadline is Thursday


11/10 @ 1:00 PM
11/10 @ 2:00 PM


RETAIL DISPLAY-
Friday, 11/11 Deadline is Tuesday, 11/08 @ NOON
Sunday, 11/13 Deadline is Wednesday 11/09 @ NOON
Tuesday, 11/15 Deadline is Wednesday 11/09 @ 5 PM
Wednesday, 11/16 Deadline is Thursday 11/10 @ 5PM




A d e t s o r O L S U F o R E y v s t n wlc l r d n c m e sit e f o r d eta---_---- is


Backpack Speaker Sys for Ipod MP3 and
Phone. New in box $45. 334-400-3736
Dishwasher: Works great. Under cabinet. $60.
Call 850-482-7357
Elliptical: Weslo momentum 950 elliptical, $100.
Works great. Easy to use. Call 850-482-7357
Grill Guard: Like new grill guard for truck. Sold
truck. Fits GMC, $500. 850-482-7357
Microphone Mixer. 6 chan. New in box $50
334-400-3736
Poker Table: By Cardinal. New in box $35.
334-400-3736
Scuba Tanks: 2 S80 alum., yellow w/boots.
Climate control kept. $125 ea. 850-482-7357
Step2 Patio Set indoor/outdoor, with/umbrella
& 4 chairs. Exc. cond $40. 850-482-5434
Subwoofer: Sony 12 in. 150 watt Active
Subwoofer. In box $75. 334-400-3736
Wood burning Stove: Comfort Potbelly style
$425. Call 850-592-8769 Dellwood, FL.
Barbie Jeep. Fisher Price. Wrangler
Pink/Purple. $150 cash only. 850-526-0136.
Chair w/low harp design back, vintage maple,
27" high, $45 850-209-4500
CPR KIT: Face shields, mannequins w/metallic
click, first aid video, case, $450 850-482-6535
Designer handbags, good condition, $3/ea or
one price for all. 850-209-6977 before 5pm
DJ Equip. Amp, mixer, DVD/CD, mircrophone,
cords, etc.Complete set. $500, 850-482-6022
Oak Table Leaves (2), 12x48, $45 850-209-4500


Electric Stove: GE with self cleaning oven $150.
Call 850-593-6919
Ladies Dress Clothes & Designer Dress Shoes,
sz 8-14, $3/ea 850-209-6977 before 5pm
Large Dog House, Any Color, Shingle Roof,
SWill Deliver. $120, 334-794-5780 Dothan J
Large Slipcover for Couch Burgandy, like new,
$40, 850-209-4500
Little Tykes Step 2 Van $15 Fisher Price Bas-
ketball Hoop $10 850-209-6977 before 5pm
Mattresses 2 twins, good cond. $10/ea 850-
209-6977 before 5pm
Old fashioned push mower, new, $75 OBO 850-
209-6977 before 5pm
Porch/Lawn Swing With Chains,
L Will Deliver. $85 334-794-5780
Rattan Corner Shelf, 32H 12deep, $10 850-
209-4500
Refrigerator: 18ft Gibson frost.free with ice
maker $200. 850-593-6919
Slipcovers for Loveseat & chair, Beige like
new, $50, 850-209-4500
Tiered End Table w/3 shelves $25 850-209-
4500
Truck Bed Cover. Undercover brand, '04-'06
Chevy Silverado & GMC Sierra Crew Cab, 5.8ft
black, key entry, LED lights, & used 3 months.
PRICED TO SELL $500. OBO Call 334-803-0613
TRUCK BEDLINER OFF 2002 FRONTIER QUAD
CAB WITH 6FT BED, $50, (850)482-2636


Tuesday's
WASABI SOLUTION
7 9 ) 8


@1 2 3 9 07
------- ---- --- 5 4 1 2 7 8 3
2 8 9 2( 9) 7 71
1 81-5-1 3 2 7 6
9 2 6 1 5 - D 3 (a


S2008 BLOCKDOT. INC. WWW.BLOCKDOTCOM


3 4 7 6 9 8 (l)\ 2

BE SURE TO VISIT OUR
NEWEST GAME SITE

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Pl a an A24 hours a day, 7 days a week!
Get live previews of your classified ads, receive price quotes
and make secure online payments.

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(0@








I


ISSSE


(2) (D (1
@ ._ _ _









8 B Wednesday, November 9, 2011 Jackson County Floridan


GEERAL EMPLOYMENT



FAMILY) DWLA
DISTRIBUTION CENTER
MARIANNA, FLORIDA

Now Hiring Full Time
Warehouse Positions
1st, 2nd, and 3rd Shifts

Now Hiring Full Time
Maintenance Technician
Friday Sunday, SAM 6PM

Preferred candidate will
possess the following:
1-2 years Industrial Maintenance
experience with Technical
Certificate/Degree or 3+ years
experience in Industrial Maintenance
for equipment and facilities.
Experience with electrical and
mechanical controls, pneumatics,
hydraulics, welding, plumbing, etc...
in manufacturing or distribution
environment.
Resume required.
Competitive Pay and Benefits Package!

Apply at Family Dollar Distribution Center
3949 Family Dollar Parkway,
Marianna, Florida 32448

Must be 18 Years Old
Equal Opportunity Employer
Drug Free Workplace


ALARMING OPPORTUNITY:
Earn $500-$1000 per week *
Full Time & Part Time positions available.
Call 850-352-1125/573-1239 ask for Dan.
EDUCATfiN i
( HO & INSTRUCTION


Get a Quality Education for a
New Career! Programs
FOR'TIS offered in Healthcare,
< HVAC and Electrical Trades.
Call Fortis College Todayl
888-202-4813.
('( I.;F For consumer information
www.Fortis.edu

f ~RESIDe. ,
l REAL ESTATE.


CHIPOLA APARTMENTS
SPACIOUS EFFICIENCIES AND
1 BEDROOM APTS SECTION 8 ASSISTANCE
AVAILABLE ON ALL UNITS
UNITS SPECIALLY DESIGNED FOR
HANDICAPPED OR DISABLED
FOR RENTAL INFORMATION CALL
(850) 526-4407 TDD #800-955-8771
4401 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA
MONDAY THRU FRIDAY, 9:00 AM TO 5:00 PM
EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY




1BR 1BA Apartment in town, $450 per month.
No pets. 850-557-2000



3BR 1BA duplex & 2BR 2BA duplex both in
Grand Ridge both $425/mo + $425 dep. 850-
592-5571
LG 2/1 in Marianna, nice kitchen, open floor
plan, w/d hkup, yard/porch, pvt/safe $600/mo
850-352-2103

1/2 block off US90 in Marianna close to every-
thing, courthouse and stores. 800 sq. ft., old
home, with city utilities. New vanity in bath-
room. Cheap rent as agent/owner has no
mortgage. Good responsible tenant wanted.
Only 1/2 month sec dep. Bad credit ok, no
evictions. No app fees for quick move-ins.
At least 1 yr. lease. Ed McCoy, Century 21
Sunny South Properties (850)573-6198
2 & 3 bedroom now available in Marianna &
near Blue Springs Park. 1 year lease, small pets
ok with deposit, Call 850-693-0570 Iv msg.
2BR/1BA Concrete block Rental In Marlanna,
Tile floors, washer h/u, pets ok, $300/mo + $30
credit/bkgrnd ck. Additional houses and
apartments in Graceville 850-263-5753
2BR 1BA in Marianna City Limits. Energy
Efficient, w/appliances, CH/A, $475/mo
850-272-6121
3BR 2BA Kynesville, CH/A, big yard; $600 +
dep. 850-638-1703
3BR 2BA w/bonus room, House in Marianna,
very clean, CH/A, dishwasher, $650 + dep. Call
for appointment 904-214-6980
Austin Tyler & Associates *
Quality Homes & Apartments
-) 850- 526-3355 ^
"Property Management Is Our ONLY Business"
KI1 For Rent: 316 Red Bud
Circle in Dothan
I BM]'11 : This one-year-old Garden
a home has hard wood
floors, carpet In bed
rooms and ceramic tile


with granite counter tops
in kitchen. Double garage, 9 foot ceiling,
fenced in back yarndand irrigation. (in Grove
Park 84 West) 334-794-2894. $1,300 per month


Find jobs



fast and



easy!


CLASSIFIED


.imnii-t-UEI1I-IRISHEDREALESTAE AUTION


WELL DRILLNG l..EPAIRB


Large Country Home West of Alford 3/2 brick,
2 car garage, 2 large sheds, $850/mo. 3/2 brick
in Alford, $650/mo/ lease, dep. & ref. req.
850-579-4317/866-1965
Large house in a fantastic quiet neighborhood .
4 BR 2.5 ba 3228 sq. ft. with a basement and
outside building in a fenced back yard. $1,500
deposit & $40 application fee. Call 334-618-3414
Lovely 3BR 1BA House, Clean, in town, near
schools, nice yard, quiet neighborhood, out-
door pets ok, $575/mo with deposit 850-482-
6211

2/2 in Alford, window A/C, $380 + deposit 850-
579-8882/850-209-1664/850-573-1851
2/2 MH South of Cottondale, water is furnish-
ed, Central Heat/Air, $500 + dep. 850-352-4393/
209-4516
2 & 3 bedroom mobile Homes in Cottondale.
$500 and up. H20, garbage, sewer included.
http:// www.charloscountry living, com.
850-258-4868/209-8847
2 & 3BR 2BA Mobile Homes in Cottondale no
pets, Central Heat & Air $400-$450 850-258-
1594 leave message
2&3BRMH's in
Marianna & Sneads (850)209-8595.
2BR 2BA Private Lot, close to FCI, $550/mo.
plus $550 dep, 1 yr. min. lease, no pets.
850-482-2370
3/2 $550 Quiet, well maintained Park,
Water/sewer/ garb/lawn included.
Other rentals available starting @ $395
-* Joyce Riley RE 850-209-7825 4-
3/2 MH on Mill Pond in Marianna, access to
swimming & fishing. Water/lawn maint.
furnished. Sorry no pets. $600/mo+dep.
850-638-7822
3/2 Mobile Home $500 + deposit, appliances,
washer & dryer, water/garbage & sewer in-
cluded 850-482-4455
3BR/2BA Mobile Home on 5 Ac off of Rocky
Creek Rd. Refference Required. $550. Month
lst/Last/$450dep. Call 772-577-0223
Rent to Own: 2 & 3BR Mobile Homes.
Lot rent included. Also available,
1 & 2BR Apts & Houses. For details
v850-557-3432 or 850-814-6515 4-
Small Quiet Family Oriented Park- 2BR 1BA MH for
Rent includes water, garbage, lawn care, No Pets 850-
592-8129
/_s ~RESIDENTIAL
REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

Downtown Eufaula, AL 2 Bedrooms, 2 baths.
Updated. Newer appliances, W/D hookup, deck,
yard. Convenient shopping and dining. Call 256-
437-3768 5pm or 334-728-1004 9am-5pm CST

3BR 1BA Brick House for Sale: HW floors, LR,
Din, Den, porch, 2 carports, near Riverside. 850-
352-4389

Place your ad in our

Sales & Service

Directory
and grow your business!!!


JOHN DIXON
& ASSOCIATES
AUCTION MARKETING

(/ ~COMMERCIAL
(II) REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

Duplex Office Building for sale in downtown
Marianna. New roof, Located at 2912 Green St.
$140K will negotiate. Call 850-526-4448

RECREATION


2010 Polaris 4x4 500EF1.
S '. ~Winch, top, windshield.
Never in mud. Only 31 hrs.
Parked in carport. New
cond. $11,000 new. Asking
$8.500. 334 897-2870

WHEELER GRIZ-
ZLY 600-'98 4X4,
Auto., runs great,
low miles. winch.
$2,000 OBO
.i 334-695-1306


I SEF STRAGE--07


Lester Basford BESTWAY
Well & Pump Company TAB LE BU NGS
4513 Lafayette St Marianna, FL PO FACTRER OF POTABLE BUILDINGS
850.526.39130 850.693.0428 C LARGEST MANUFACTURER OF PORTABLE S IN
850.482.2278 H -- WE
-- FHAVE
ROOFING&IELAED: ODIFFEERR


iLL r'JLUHIC






Grader Pan Excavator
Dump Truck Bulldozer
Demolition Grading Site Prep
* Debris Removal Retention Ponds Leveling
* Top Soil Fill Dirt Gravel Land Clearing



209329 Sice190 42-98


WE OFFER COMPlME

AAV ROAD BUW.I
SB2 EMS WI OVBI
21 YEAIS BPBBICC,


4 Point Insurance Inspections
Wind Mitigation inspections
Performed by JAMES GRANT
State Certified Building Code Administrator
State Certified Building Contractor
State Licensed Electrical Contractor



HAPPY
HOME REPAIR
WE'LL BEAT ANY PRICE!!
Big Or Small Jobs WELCOME



E LECTRICAL WOEPAIR K
&UPGRADE I1 |
Replace your old Electrical Service c
within a New Service U
QUAUTV WORK REACONALE PRICE
JAMES GRANT, LLC


www..JCFIL)RIDAN.com

BOIATS.


Xtreme

Boats


Packages From
$4,995
All Welded
All Aluminum Boats


Selling by Order of
U. S. Bankruptcy Court
Middle District of Georgia
Chapter 12, Case No. 11-10378

167 Acres Divided
Friday, November 18, 2:00 p.m.
Calhoun County, GA
2 miles Northeast of Arlington, GA
This property sells by order of the
Bankruptcy Court at Absolute
Auctionno minimums..no reserves.
High dollar buys..regardless of
price.
* 85 Acres in Cultivation
* 82 Acres in Pines & Hardwoods
* Offered as a Whole or Divided
* 3 Tracts from 18 to 129 Acres
Auction held on site, 2 miles NE of


premium. 2% broker's commission.
Inspection: Anytime at your own
risk or Nov. 11, from noon till 2 p.m.
For Detailed Information
Johndixon.com
800.479.1763
GAL # 2034


Ellen Marsh
850-209-1090
For ALL your Real Estate Needs!
Century 21 Sunny South Properties
850-526-2891
JIM 4630 Hwy 90 Marianna

SE-]LF S ['l T;ORA=E


"Beautification of Your Home"
Carpentry/Painting Installations
Furniture Repair & Refinishing
General Repairs Insured




QUALITY SERVICE
( "" FOR OVER 50 YEARS"
Charles Morse (850) 526-8445
Ben Morse (850) 573-1705
Office (850) 482-3755
8479 Hw 73 Manmma FL 38448|


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
Your source for selling and-bilying!


FLORIDAN1

jcfloridan.com


Monster

FIND LOCAL JOBS AT: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM/JOBS


Clay O'Neal's
Land Clearing, Inc.
ALTHA, FL
850-762-9402
Cell 850-832-5055


N NOTS


S_-- ^ Dutchman '10 27ft. sleeps
8, Q-sz. bed, Frig, micro-
S U . wave, stove, wall mount for
flat screen, canopy, tow
hitch & cover, $15,500 OBO
334-550-9895.

PUMA '07-29ft., 2 slide-outs, king bed, like
new $13,000 334-695-6359, 334-687-6157


Dixie RV SuperStores
FL's Newest RV Dealer
NOW OPEN!!!
*Store Hours*
Monday-Saturday
8:00am-6:00pm
21 Acres / 30 Brands New and Pre-Owned
Newmar Keystone Heartland Jayco
Fleetwood Prime Time Coachmen
Forest River
Service Department
Parts and Acces. Store
RV Collision Center
Located off 1-10 Exit 70 / SR285
328 Green Acres Dr.
De Funiak Springs, FL 32435
Sales and Service: 850-951-1000
www.dixierv.com DO 12756

(- 'TRANSPORTATION


Nissan 2008 Titan 4x45.6L DOHC 32 valve en-
durance V-8, 317/385 Ib.ft.Torque, shift-on-the-
fly 4WD system, 4 door, 20x8 alloy wheels, bed
mounted lock box, leather seats, 350 watt
Rockford Fosgate Powered Premium Audio
with 6 disc in dash CD player, XM satelitte ra-
dio, power sliding vertical back glass, rear so-
nar system, heated seats, bluetooth, moonroof,
tow package, navigation system with 7" LCD
display with GPS and DVD atlas. $26,500.00
OBO 334-792-0650 or 334-685-0217


Plymouth '65 Valiant
Convertible,
Automatic, A/C, 273
V8, Good Condition!
$9,000 OBO 850-263-4563


( Fuel Injection Edelbrock electronic
for Chevy 1985, used $1000.
n 334-726-3349 or 334-677-4971 4m


m^^"Our


,


y


11


MMI


iINANCING'
AVAILABLE
WAC
"i


I- NOW OFFERING TREE PLANTING!


I










www.JCFIORIDAN.com


.. '07 Pontiac Grand Prix fully
,--: loaded with leather & sun-
roof, ec c ond. 334-726-3359.
334-585-5525.

Buick '98 LeSaber, gray, $2000. Call for appt.
850-557-0145
Chevrolet '01 Silverado X/Cab $1900 Down,
0% Interest. Open 9am 9pm, 1-800-470-0650
Chevrolet '89 Blazer: reddish color,very clean,
good condition $1,500. Call 334-793-2142.
Corvette '10 Grand Sport Coupe crystal red
metallic 2 tone titanium gray seats auto
transmission LS3 engine, 3LT preferred
equipment group 15K miles, warranty and
more. $47,000 334-393-4541 or 334-308-5672.
Crysler '05 PT Cruiser.
4 Cylinder, Automatic,
4 Door, Cold air,
Excellent condition, $6300.
S Call: 334-790-7959.

Daylight Auto Financing
With 0% Interest
Pontiac 98' Grand Am $475 Down
Chevy 99 Blazer $ 575 Down
Ford 98' F150 X-Cab $775 Down
Dodge 02' Durango $995 Down
Chevy 02' Silverado $1395 Down
til85-215_1769 ,
9AM 9PM ,

Dodge '83 Ram Charger 318 engine 150K miles.
334-726-0147.
Ford '02 Taurus $575 Down, 0% Interest.
Open 9am 9pm, 1-800-470-0650
Ue T -m Ford '05 Mustang GT:
MUS ,, Award winning show car,
white with black interior,
53k miles, 5 speed, in excellent condition.
$15,000. Call 334-794-7493
Ford '06 Sedan 500
LOW MILES! LIKE NEW! MUST SELL!
$200 down, $189 per month.
Call: Ron Ellis at 334-714-0028.
Ford '09 Focus
LOW MILES! GREAT GAS MILEAGE!
4 door, $200 down, $199 per month.
Call: Ron Ellis at 334-714-0028.
Ford 2010 Fusion SE, 4cyl. 4-door, 29K miles,
factory bumper to bumper warranty $14,500.
FIRM 334-618-8255.
Ford '95 Mustang GT Convertible- white with
leather interior, 200k mile runs great, needs
paint, $3,500. Firm Call 334-695-2340
1-Owner
Ford '98 F-150 X/Cab $775 Down, 0% Interest.
Open 9am 9pm, 1-800-470-0650
Honda '11 Accord EX-L: fully loaded, black with
gray leather interior, only 19k miles, $24,900.
Call 334-343-2701
Honda 2007 Civic EX, coupe, 106,000 mi., great
condition, one owner, auto, moon roof, premi-
um stereo and wheels, good Michelin tires. pw,
pdi, a/c,tilt, cruise. $11,500. 334-797-1890 or
334-648-3939
Hundai '04 Elantra GLS
ONLY 60,000 Miles,
4Cylinder, Automatic,
SEconomical, Good
Options, NEW TIRES!
LIKE NEW! $6625.
Call: 334-790-7959.
Hyundai '11 Sonata
LOW MILES! GREAT GAS MILEAGE!
FULL WARRANTY! $500 down, $350 per month.
Call: Steve Hatcher at 334-791-8243.
Jeep '05 Wrangler Rubicon Black. Excellent
condition. Soft top. 100k miles. One Owner.
$11,500. $750 below Kelly blue book value.
334-796-9554
Kia '05 Optima LX,
Loaded, 4 cyl., Automatic,
4 Door, NEW TIRES! Clean,
62,000 miles, Excellent.
$5795. Call: 334-790-7959.

Lexus '07 LS 460. 41K,
Loaded and in excellent
A' condition. Pearl White
with tan interior. $43,500.
Call 334-405-9127
Lincoln '91 Town Car. Runs well. $900, or best
offer. 334-899-7377.
Mecury 93' Station Wagon: light blue, very
clean, 120k miles, good condition $1,995.
Call 334-793-2142.
Mercedes '08 C300 Sport LOADED, 1 owner,
Silver with Black Leather, 63K mi. (all high-
way). 100K mi. Extended warranty. $22,500
OBO. iPod system, Sunroof. Excellent Condi-
tion, Super Clean 334-618-2154 or 334-798-5714
Mercedes '97 S500 Roadster: red convertible,
wine leather interior,55k miles, excellent condi-
tion. Call 334-693-3980
NEED A VEHICLE? GOT BAD CREDIT?
I can get U Riding Today Repos, Slow
Credit, Past Bankruptcy OK! $0 Down/ 1st
Payment, Tax, Tag & Title Push, Pull or Drag,
Will Trade anythingil Warranty On Every
Vehicle Sold! $20 Gift Card w/pu rchase
Call Steve 800-809-4716r
"-- Nissan'01 Frontier
SCrew cab SE V-6 2WD
Loaded with leather, sun-
roof, prayed on bed liner,
Setc. 139K miles. Clean,
and runs great. I love this truck, and want to
keep, but must sell. $5,900 firm. 334-685-2883
Nissan '03 350-Z Low Miles, Great Condition,
Black, Selling price $12,300 334-677-3631
Nissan '09 Altima
LOW MILES! LOADED!
$500 down, $350 per month.
Call: Steve Hatcher at 334-791-8243.

Pontiac '01 Grand Prix $575 Down, 0% Interest.
Open 9am 9pm, 1-800-470-0650
Pontiac '08 Solstice convertible 52K miles,
silver with black leather interior, auto trans,
4cyl. 1 owner, auto locks & windows, new tires.
$15,500. blue book is $18,000 334-618-5427


Pontiac '96 Bonneville SSEI black/black leath-
er, PW, PS, CD, power sunroof, HUD, non-
smoker, very good condition, 129,000 miles,
asking $4,500 OBO, 334-687-4626.
Volkswagen 09 EOS:
hard top convertible with
pano roof, silver with tan
leather interior, fully
loaded luxury package,
29k miles, super nice and very clean, $23,500.
Call 334-685-1070
Volvo '96 960: White, sedan, 225,000 miles, nice
inside and out, good tires, A/C cold. Elec
F seats, cruise, panel lights inop. $3,000. 334-
693-3692


Honda '08 Shadow Aero: BT750, 5k miles, black
with lots of chrome, never been dropped or
wrecked, $3500. Call 334-596-3656


YAMAHA '09 110 Dirt Bike, excellent
condition, rarely used $1,400 or trade for 4
wheeler 334-687-4686


2008 Chevrolet Tahoe LTZ, 44,480 miles, black,
leather, 4X4, DVD, navigation, warranty, excel-
lent condition, $9200, amassa@netscape.com
Chevrolet '02 Blazer $675 Down, 0% Interest.
Open 9am 9pm, 1-800-470-0650
Chevrolet 07' Suburban LT:
Solid white with grey cloth
interior, 5.3 V8 Auto, 64k
Smiles, 3rd row seating, key-
less entry, tinted windows.
Awesome Condition! $24,900. 334-797-1095
Dodge '99 Durango $575 Down, 0% Interest.
Open 9am 9pm. 1-800-470-0650
Nissan '03 Pathfinder. V6, 173k mi.
Runs Very Good. Cold Air, Very Clean.
$6200 OBO 334-794-5780
: W ..... Toyota '06 4-Runner.
S Black. One owner. Only
.g 53,500 miles. Leather
seats, 6 disc CD changer,
moon roof, rear spoiler,
etc. (It has all the extras) $23,500. In excellent
condition. Please call 334-596-2242.


Chevrolet '01 Silverado X/Cab $1275 Down, 0%
Interest. Open 9am 9pm, 1-800-470-0650
Chevy 2500'99 273K miles, engine has knock
rest of truck in good cond. $1900. 334-792-6248.
Ford '01 F150 $975 Down, 0% Interest.
Open 9am 9pm, 1-800-470-0650

"a FORD '89 F150, 4wh, 4x4
Auto, $4,600 or reasonable
offer. Call 229-334-8520.

SToyota '02 Tacoma Crew
Cab. V6, Automatic, 139k
miles, PERFECT Condi-
tion. Loaded, $9,500.
334-596-9966

TRACTOR 4230 John Deer 100hp, $8500. & 2010
JD 45hp $4500. 334-735-2464

TRACTOR-IH1440 Combine, LOOK !
Field Ready, Grain Head and Corn Head.
$6,000.850-415-0438


2003 Pontiac Montana Van $5,500, 49,000
miles. extended body, 4 brand new Good year
tires! front and rear AC, cruise control,
CD/radio, exterior white, interior gray. Alaba-
ma rebuilt title after minor damage (replaced
rear bumper and side door) RUNS GREAT,
LOOKS GREAT. Perfect for business of family!
(334) 701-8862 or (334)796-6729
Ford '06 -350: 12 seat passenger van, good con-
dition, tow package, rear air, sony am-fm-cd,
5.4 V8, 126,000 miles, $8,100. 334-333-3368


Jackson County Floridan Wednesday, November 9, 2011- 9 B


- .Chevrolet'97 Astro Van
conversion Van raised
roof, loaded, new tires,
One owner, GREAT
condition. 52K mi.$9,500.
334-897-2054 or
334-464-1496
- Chevrolet '97 Astro Van
conversion Van raised
roof, loaded, new tires,
One owner, GREAT
condition. 52K mi. $9,500.
334-897-2054 or
334-464-1496
CHEVY '06
2500


i . 4 Call for Top Price for

Junk Vehicles

I also sell used parts
24 HOUR TOWING 14 334-792-8664 4,,

CALL TODAY FOR YOUR TOWING NEEDS



Alt'O BODY & RECYCLING
PAYING TOP DOLLAR FOR JUNK CARS
Contat Jason Harger at 334-791-2624

Got a Clunker
SWe'll be your Junker!
We buy wrecked cars
and Farm Equip. at a
fair and honest price!
$325. & up-fofr
Complete Cars CALL 334-702-4323

A* WANTED WRECKED OR JUNK VEHICLES
i PAY TOP DOLLAR
,) DAY_-334-794-957t6 NIGHT 334-794-7769

LEGAL-S


LF15587
SECTION 00010
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS

PROJECT NAME: Willis Road and Spring Creek
Park Fences
Sealed bids, submitted in triplicate, will be re-
ceived by the Board of County Commissioners
of Jackson County, Florida, (Owner), until 2:00
P.M. (Central Time) November 17, 2011 at
the County Engineering Office, 2828 Owens


Street, Marianna, FL 32446 for the construction
of the following described Project:
NAME OF PROJECT
Replace the 6 foot high chain link fence op Wil-
lis Road and Prairieview Road, the Willis Road
side has 3 stands of barbed wire, there will be
two (2) twenty (20') foot gates and a pedes-
trian gate (3'X6'high). Remove 600 foot of six
foot (6') high chain link fence on the north side
of Willis Road to take down trees and then put
fence back up.The Spring Creek Park fence will
be an addition of approximately 400 feet of six
feet high(6')and other work as directed by the
Engineer.
The deadline for receipt of questions
will be November 14, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Central
Time. Questions must be submitted in writing
to the County Engineer (email lalvarez@jackso
ncountyfl.com: fax (850) 482-9063) with a copy
to Jeannie Bean (email: jbean@jacksoncountyfl
.com), and Purchasing Director (email: shasche
r@jacksoncountyfl.com; fax (850) 482-9682).
Bids will be opened and recorded at
2:00 PM (or immediately thereafter) on No-
vember 17,2011 at the Jackson County Board
of County Commissioners Board Room at 2864
Madison Street.
Plans, specifications, and contract
documents will be open for public inspection
after noon on November 7, 2011 at the Road
and Brjdge office at 2828 Owens Street Bid
documents must be obtained from:
County Engineer
Attn: Larry Alvarez
2828 Owens Street
Marianna, Florida 32446
(850) 482-9677
upon payment of $ (no charge) per set
which amount constitutes the cost of repro-
duction and handling. This payment will not be
refunded.
The Owner reserves the right to
waive any informality or to reject any or all
bids. Each Bidder must deposit with his/her
bid, security in the amount, form and subject to
the conditions provided in the Information for
Bidders. Sureties used for obtaining bonds
must appear as acceptable according to the
Department of Treasury Circular 570.
No bid may be withdrawn for a peri-
od of sixty days after the scheduled closing
time for receipt of bids.
To the extent applicable to this proj-
ect, attention of Bidders is particularly called
to the requirements as to conditions of em-
ployment to be observed and minimum wage
rates to be paid under the Contract, Section 3,
Segregated Facilities, Section 109 Executive Or-
der 11246, and all applicable laws and regula-
tions of the Federal government and State of
Florida, and bonding and insurance require-.
ments.
IN PARTICULAR, BIDDERS SHOULD
NOTE THE REQUIRED ATTACHMENTS AND CER-
TIFICATIONS TQ BE EXECUTED AND SUBMITTED
WITH THE FORM OF BID PROPOSAL
DATE:
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER
HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE/FAIR HOUSING
JURISDICTION
IT'S AS EASY AS
1. CALL
2. PLACE YOUR AD
3. GET RESULTS


CLASSIFIED


Idlul flIDT"A NJ -


I





JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


WY PAY NEW CAR PRICES ?
When you can buy one of these beautiful current year or late model vehicles for Aes!


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*A