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Jackson County Floridan
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028304/00682
 Material Information
Title: Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title: Sunday Floridan
Portion of title: Floridan
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Jackson County Floridan
Publisher: Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Marianna Fla
Creation Date: November 3, 2011
Publication Date: 1934-
Frequency: daily (except saturday and monday)[<1979-1995>]
weekly[ former 1934-<1955>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates: 30.776389 x -85.238056 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note: "Independent."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID: UF00028304:00682
 Related Items
Preceded by: Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by: Marianna Floridan

Full Text




Informing more than 17,000 readers daily in print and online


cm i(I)Sctl A ADC 0
C C 2 1 o S' 1
A I NI.,V L.Oi ID A N


Rival Hornets, Tigers

meet tonight with

bragging rights on the

line. See more page IB.


A M Olid (e'('l AciwMp/t er "t -
State Regulations


SENIOR OLYMPICS


S. H I :" r ', I .) I IiI rj
Durrey Auston of Signature HealthCare of North Florida in Graceville shoots a basket during the basketball competition at the Florida
Panhandle Senior Olympics.

Signature HealthCare residents go for gold


BY LAUREN DELGADO
Idelgado@jcfloridan.com
Residents of five North
Florida locations of
Signature HealthCare
gathered at the Washington
Rehabilitation and Nursing
Center in Chipley to com-
pete in a number of events,
from wheelchair races to
trivia. Representing Jackson
County were "The Bulldogs"
of Signature HealthCare at
the Courtyard in Marianna
and "The Tornados" of Sig-
nature HealthCare of North
Florida in Graceville.
Each team entered, the
arena the driveway of
the rehab center to their
own theme song. "The
Surrey Saints" of Surrey
Place Care Center in Live
Oak paraded in to "When
the Saints Go Marching In."
"The Bulldogs" strutted in
to "Who Let the Dogs Out."
The "Chautauqua Rockers"
of Chautauqua Rehab and
Nursing Center of Defuniak
Springs rocked out to "We
will Rock You." "The Torna-
dos" danced in to "Another
One Bites the Dust." "The
Tigers" of the host rehab
center trotted out to "Eye of


the Tiger."
There were seven compe-
titions: a wheelchair race,
horseshoe toss, basketball
toss, bowling, shot-put,
trivia and an ADL, or activ-
ity of daily living, challenge,
which consisted of contes-
tants buttoning up a shirt
over their clothes.
The winning team was
Washington Rehabilitation
and Nursing Center.
Most of the centers have
been training with their res-
idents for this event. Both
"The Bulldogs" and "The
Tornados" have been train-
ing for about the month
with one goal in mind.
"No strategy; we're just
in it to win it," said Julie
Collins, a rehab technician
of Signature HealthCare of-
North Florida.
Events like these are
important to keep up their
resident's quality of life, said
Ellie Curry, the quality of life
regional director.
"It's giving them a part
of every day life," said
Steffani Barber, the rehab
service manager and oc-
cupational therapist at the
Signature HealthCare at the
Courtyard. *


Fayne Sexton of Signature HealthCare at the Courtyard in
Marianna takes a turn during the wheelchair race at the Florida
Panhandle Senior Olympics.


With threats of cuts in
Medicare and other insur-
ance, Curry was happy
Signature HealthCare could
do this for its residents. She


hopes to make this an an-
nual event.
"If you put the residents
first, everything will take
care of itself," said Curry.


Habitat operations moving under one roof


BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com

All local Habitat for Hu-
manity operations should be
under one roof by the end of
spring 2012, according to the
organization's Exedutive Di-
rector Leslie Fuqua. The move
can't come too soon, Fuqua
says.
Habitat is currently work-
ing out of three spaces, and
sometimes four. A warehouse
on South Jefferson Street,
across from McCoy's gas sta-
tion/convenience store, holds
large donations like beds,
other furniture and building
supplies.
The organization rents space
for the Habitat Thrift Store,


with knick-knacks, clothing
and other household items
for sale. The store is located
on Jackson Street behind the
Jackson County Courthouse,
where parking is sparse.
Fuqua conducts day-to-day
business in donated space
at Melvin Engineering head-
quarters off Lafayette Street.
Mandatory home-ownership
classes for potential Habitat
home buyers were sometimes
held in a building off Clinton
Street.
But Habitat recently closed
on its deal to purchase the old
Victory Motors location on
U.S. 90, across from the Oak
Station shopping center. The
$350,000 purchase is being
financed over time through a


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Brenda Peterson from Donalsonville, Ga. looks through the clothes on
sale at the Habitat for Humanity Thrift Store Monday.
anIomfrbor etns


traditional bank loan.
Built in 1971, the roughly
6,000 square-foot buildingwill
have office space for Fuqua


and room for board meetings.
It will be big enough to hold

See HABITAT, Page 7A


MARKSKINNER/FLORIDAN
Activities that have an environmental
impact on the Chipola River and other
bodies of water in Jackson County may soon
be regulated by new numeric standards.

New standards

for amount of

run-off let into

waterways

Numeric limits to replace
narrative guidelines; could
effect farmers, developers,
homeowners and more
BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridancom
Florida's Department of Environmen-
tal Affairs will soon begin making rules
that set measurable limits on how much
phosphorus and nitrogen are allowed in
Florida's waterways.
These rules will apply numeric stan-
dards to replace the narrative guidelines
that are now used to determine whether.
a given activity sends too much of those
nutrients into bodies of water by way of
run-off or other means. The guidelines
will apply to lakes, rivers, streams and
springs. ,
On Wednesday morning, DEP Secre-
tary Herschel T. Vinyard Jr. authorized
staff to begin the process. Putting num-
bers in the mix could have far-reaching
consequences for farmers, real estate
' developers, individual homeowners and
governmental entities up and down the
state; agricultural operations, waste-
water plants, and certain construction
activities are among the activities that
regularly contribute to the nutrient lev;
el. Vinyard's staff will approach the rule-
making task i a way that will take into
account regional realities, rather than
setting one specific standard applicable
to all bodies of water. This differs from
the plan that the federal Environmental
Protection Agency initially attempted
to have Florida follow.
Numeric standards have been on the
horizon ever since EPA settled a lawsuit
out of court with a group of environ-
mental advocates who said that agency
was obligated to force Florida to set nu-
meric standards required in the Clean
Water Act of 1999. As a result of the.deal
between EPA and the suing parties, EPA
originally proposed a state-wide nu-
meric standards for acceptable nutrient
levels, although the state has said it was
already in the process of arriving at nu-
meric standards..
The state chaffed at EPA's original
plan, however, and began negotiating a
new plan. The state will now continue
its own efforts to establish acceptable
standards that will be tailored to vari-
ous regions of the state based on their
specific physical characteristics and
natural resources. EPA has agreed con-
ceptually to this approach.

See RUN-OFF, Page 7A


> CLASSIFIEDS...5-7B


ThisNewspaper .
Is Printed On f At
Recycled Newsprint




7 65161 8005o 9


)> ENTERTIl 1rNTI...4B


)) LOCAL...3-4A


)) OBITUARIES...7A


)) STATE...5A.7A


> SPORTS...1-3B,8B


)> TV LISTINGS...3B


Wi M, "Ranked NUMBER1 in Jackson County"


J OFO Z,-1c/ng per nor rth
JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDA.' o .. m, ,


k


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f2A THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2011


WAiE-UP CHUi


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


.W*v O Outlook

T d Shower Late.
Today -Justin Kiefer / WMBB


High 76'
Low 490


J High- 690
Low 430

Tomorrow
Much Cooler.



High 71'
Low 49


Sunday
Mild & Sunny.


TIDES ULTRA VIOLET INDEX


Panama City Low -
Apalachicola Low -
Port St. Joe Low -
Destin Low -
Pensacola Low -

RIVER READINGS
Woodruff
Blountstown
Marianna
Caryville


2:05 PM High
4:58 AM High
1:31 PM High
2:42 PM High
3:16 PM .High

Reading
39.03 ft.
0.29 ft.
4.39 ft.
0.01 ft.


3:30 AM
9:35 AM
3:21 AM
3:51 AM
4:27 AM


Flood Stage
66.0 ft.
15.0 ft.
19.0 ft.
12.0 ft.


0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8-10 Very High, 11+ Extreme

1--- :-2 3^-1 -- -


THE SUN AND MOON


Sunrise
Sunset
Moonrise
Moonset


6:57 AM
5:51 PM
1:50 PM
1:31 AM (Fri)


Nov. Nov. Nov. Dec.
10 18 25 2


I LISTPA TES


JACKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN

Publisher Valeria Roberts
vroberts@jcfloridan.com

Circulation Manager -. Dena Oberski
doberski@jcfloridan.com








CONTACT US
Telephone: (850) 526-3614
FAX: (850) 482-4478
Email: editorial@jcfloridan.com
Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447
Street Address:
4403 Constitution Lane
Marianna, FL 32446
Office Hours:
Weekdays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

MISS YOUR PAPER?
You should receive your newspaper no later
than 6 a.m, If it does not arrive, call Circula-
tion between 6 a.m. and noon, Tuesday to
Friday, and 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. on Sunday. The
Jackson County Floridan (USPS 271-840)
Is published Tuesday though Friday and
Sunday mornings. Periodical postage paid
at Marianna, FL.

SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Home delivery: $11.23 per month; $32.83
for three months; $62.05 for six months;
and $123.45 for one year. All prices include
applicable state and local taxes. Mail
subscriptions must be paid in advance. Mail
subscriptions are: $46.12 for three months;
$92.24"for six months; and $184.47 for one
.year.

ADVERTISING
The advertiser agrees that the publisher
shall not be liable for damages arising
out of errors and advertisements beyond
the amount paid for the space actually
occupied by that portion of the advertise-
ments in which the error occurred, whether
such error is due to the negligence of the
publisher's employees or otherwise, and
there shall be not liability for non-inser-
tion of any advertisement beyond the
amount paid for such advertisement. This
newspaper will not knowingly accept or
publish illegal material of arly kind. Advertis-
ing which expresses preference based on
legally protected personal characteristics is
not acceptable.

HOWTOGETYOUR
NEWS PUBLISHED
The Jackson County Floridan will publish
news of general interest free of charge.
Submit your news or Community Calendar
events via email, fax, mail, or hand delivery.
Fees may apply for wedding, engagement,
anniversary and birth announcements.
Forms are available at the Floridan offices.
Photographs must be of good quality and
suitable for print. The Floridan reserves the
right to edit all submissions.

GETTING IT RIGHT
The Jackson County Floridan's policy
is to correct mistakes promptly. To
report an error, please call 526-3614
Monday-Friday.


Ii.........


Community Calendar


TODAY
) Dedication Ceremony 10:15 a.m. at the new
Music and Worship Center in Heritage Village on The
Baptist College of Florida campus in Graceville. Call
263-9015.
) Orientation 12:30 to 3:30 p.m. Learn about/
sign up for free services at the Goodwill Career
Training Center, 4742 Highway 90 in Marianna. All
services are free. Call 526-0139.
) Chipola Healthy Start Board of Directors
meeting 3 p.m. in the Holmes County Chamber
of Commerce, 106 E. Byrd Ave. in Bonifay.
) Jackson County Habitat for Humanity
Auction and Smoked Steak Dinner is at the
Jackson County Agricultural Conference Center,
2741 Pennsylvania Ave. in Marianna. Tickets: $20 in
advance, $25 at the door, or $5 for the auction only.
Silent auction: 4:30 to 6:15'p.m. Dinner: 5 p.m. Live
Auction: 6:30 p.m. Call 482-2187.
) "Our Town" Nov. 3-6 in the Chipola Theater.
Show times: 7 p.m. nightly with a 2 p.m. Sunday
matinee. For ticket information, call 718-2220.
)) "On with the Show"- 7 p.m. in The Baptist
College of Florida Assembly Center in Graceville.
Additional show times: 4 and 7 p.m. Saturday. The
student production features music from several
popular Broadway shows. Limited number of tickets
available in the Business Office. Regular admission:
$10; student tickets: $5. Call 800-328-2660, ext.
427, or visit www.baptistcollege.edu.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Closed discussion, 8
to 9 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901 Cale-
donia St., Marianna, in the AA room. Attendance
limited to persons with a desire to stop drinking.

FRIDAY, NOV. 4
n International Chat'n' Sip Jackson County
Public Library Learning Center staff and their in-
ternational English learners invite the public to join
them, 8:30 to 10 a.m. at the Marianna branch (2929
Green St.), to exchange language, culture and ideas
in a relaxed environment. Free admission. Light
refreshments served. Call 482-9124.
) Ribbon Cutting The Jackson County Chamber
of Commerce will participate in a 10 a.m. ribbon-
cutting ceremony for the new Jackson County
Health Department facility at 4979 Healthy Way, off
Caverns Road and Russell Road, in Marianna. JCHD
can be reached at 526-2412.
) Small Business Seminar "Marketing Series,
Part 1: Introduction to 21st Century Marketing,"
9:30 to 11:30 a.m. in Chipola College Business
and Technology Building, Room M-108. Register at
http://bit.ly/CC-SmallBiz. Cost: $30. Call 718-2413
.or email frohj@chipola.edu.
) 6th annual United Way Chili Dinner
Fundraiser Food service starts at 11:30 a.m.
at Citizens Lodge in Marianna. Fo& a $5 donation,
get a 16 oz. chili, crackers and cake. Drawings and
auction start at 12:30 p.m.; and Kiss the Donkey at
1 p.m. Tickets available at Jackson County Road and"
Bridge Department on Owens Street. Call 482-
9629.
) Ribbon Cutting Jackson County Chamber of
Commerce conducts a ribbon-cutting ceremony at
4 p.m. for Michael's Toggery, 2878 N. Jefferson St. in
Marianna. Call 482-8647or 482-8060.


)) Friday Night Concert 6:30'to 9:30 p.m. at
Citizens Lodge Park in Marianna, featuring '90ss
and Southern rock from local band Heyword. Free
admission, but Jackson County Parks department,
event host, will accept donations for the Uoited
Way's fall fundraiser. Bring lawn chairs, blankets and
coolers.
n Mosier's Field of Screams Corn Maze 6:30-
10:30 p.m. Nov. 4-5 at the Mosier's Family Farm,
2565 Standland Road in Cottondale. Wear appropri-
ate shoes (no flip-flops). Concessions available.
Cost: $7 per person. Call 326-6168.
) "Our Town" Nov. 3-6 in the Chipola Theater.
The play starts at 7 p.m. nightly with a 2 p.m. Sun-
day matinee. For ticket information, call 718-2220.
) Celebrate Recovery Adult, teen meetings to
"overcome hurts, habits and hang-ups," 7 p.m. at
Evangel Worship Center, 2645 Pebble Hill Road.
Dinner: 6 p.m. Child care available. Call 209-7856 or
573-1131.
) Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, 8 to
9 p.m. in the AA room at First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St., Marianna.

SATURDAY, NOV. 5
n Troop 3 Boy Scouts Yard Sale Fundraiser -
starts at 6 a.m. in the Wynn Street Park basketball
courts in Marianna. Electronics, clothes, furniture
. and more. Proceeds will improve Camp AlaFlo and
purchase equipment. Donations accepted ahead of
time; pick-up available. Call 526-289, 209-3798 or
482-1484.
D Marianna City Farmers Market is open 8 a.m. to
noon for the fall season, Saturdays only in Madison
Street Park.
) Covenant Hospice & Fireman's Ladder Scatter
5K Run/Walk 9 a.m. (registration starts at 7:30
a.m.) at 4215 Kelson Ave., Suite E, Marianna. Race-
day registration: $20 per adult; $15 per student.
Barbecue lunches: $5. Proceeds benefit Covenant
Hospice. Call 482-8520.
n "Men United for Good Health" 9 a.m. to 2
p.m. at St. James A.M.E. Church, 2891 Orange St. in
Marianna. All Jackson County men welcome. Learn
about diabetes, sickle cell anemia, STDs, prostate
cancer and more. Continental breakfast served. Call
407-385-9235 or 526-2008.
) Toys For Tots Motorcycle Run Kicking off
this year's Jackson County Toys For Tots campaign,
registration for the 70-mile ride is 10 a.m. to noon at
Beef'O' Brady's on Highway 71 in Marianna. Riders
depart just after noon and arrive, around 2 p.m.,
at Madison's Warehouse Restaurant on Madison
Street downtown. There will be food, beverages, live
entertainment and door prizes. Registration for the
run or admission to Madison's is a new, unwrapped
toy or cash contribution. "
) Alford Community Health Clinic, at 1770
Carolina St. in Alford, will be open 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
The free clinic for income-eligible patients without
medical insurance treats short-term illnesses and
chronic conditions. Appointments available; call
263-7106 or 209-5501. Walk-ins welcome. Sign in
before noon.
) Friends and Family of Ollie Johnston are
invited to help celebrate her 90th birthday at the
Dellwood Community Center. As it is to be a sur-


prise party, guests are asked to arrive before 1 p.m.
)) Turkey Shoot Fundraiser 1 p.m. each Satur-
day through December at AMVETS Post 231, north
of Fountain (east side of US 231, just south of CR
167). Cost: $2 a shot. Call 850-722-0291.
) Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, 4:30 to
5:30 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St., Marianna.
) Fall Festival 2 to 6 p.m. at Alford Assembly of
God Church, 1782 Tennessee St. in Alford. Costume
contest at 1:30 p.m. (no scary or bloody costumes
allowed) for age divisions 4 and younger; 5-7; 8-10;
and 12 and older. Games, prizes, food, fun and
fellowship, with a moonwalk, slide, dunking booth,
cake walk, fishing booth, hula hoop contest, face
painting, sack race and more.
) "On with the Show" in The Baptist College of
Florida Assembly Center in Graceville. Two shows:
4 p.m. and 7 p.m. The student production features
music from several popular Broadway shows.
Limited number of tickets available in the Business
Office. Regular admission: $10; student tickets: $5.
Call 800-328-2660, ext. 427, or visit www.baptist.
college.edu.
American Wrestling Federation presents
Assault on Alford Bell time: 6 p.m. in the Alford
Ball Park. Scheduled to appear: Cali Kid, Joe Milo,
Shane Gibson, B-Rad, JT Angel, Creatures of the
Night, Dark Rage, Hollywood Star, Backdraft and
more. Tickets: $5 each at the gate (kids 5 and
younger, free). Bring lawn chairs.
. ) Mosier's Field of Screams Corn Maze 6:30
to 10:30 p.m. Nov. 5 at the Mosier's Family Farm,
2565 Standland Road in Cottondale. Wear appropri-
ate shoes (no flip-flops). Concessions available.
Cost: $7 per person. Call 326-6168.
)) 11th annual Rahal-Miller Customer
Appreciation Gospel Sing 6:30 p.m. in the
Marianna High-School Auditorium, featuring The
Original Florida Boys, The Bibletones and Red
Roots. Public welcome. Free admission. Call 482-
3051.
)) "Our Town" Nov. 3-6 in the Chipola Theater.
The play starts at 7 p.m. nightly with a 2 p.m. Sun-
day matinee. For ticket information, call 718-2220.

SUNDAY, NOV. 6
7th annual Sunday Afternoon with the Arts
Exhibit Reception 1 to 5 p.m. in the Chipola Arts
Center, Chipola College, 3056 College St., Marianna,
-with music, children's art activities, door prizes
and light refreshments. The exhibit features work
of regional artists and special guest artists. Free
admission. Public welcome. Call 569-5881.
) "Our Town" Nov. 3-6 in the Chipola Theater.
The play starts at 7 p.m. nightly with a 2 p.m. Sun-
day matinee. For ticket information, call 718-2220.
) Alcoholics Anonymous closed discussion, 6:30
p.m., 4349 W. Lafayette St., Marianna (in one-story
building behind 4351W. Lafayette St.). Attendance
limited to persons with a desire to stop drinking.

MONDAY, NOV. 7
Orientation -- 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the
Goodwill Career Training Center, 4742 Highway 90
in Marianna. Learn about/sign up for free services.
Call 526-0139.


The submission deadline for this calendar is two days before publication. Submit to: Community Calendar, Jackson County Floridan, P. 0. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447,
emnail editorial@jcfloridan.com, fax (850) 482-4478 or bring items to 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.
Police o dp....

PoliCe Roundup


MARIANNA POLICE
DEPARTMENT
The Marianna Police De-
partment listed the following
incidents for
Nov. 1, the latest 7,A,
available report: ~r----
Two physical M
disturbances, Y
two verbal
disturbances, eight traffic stops,
one larceny complaint, one
juvenile complaint, one assist
of a motorist or pedestrian, four
assists of other agencies, three
public service calls and one
open door/window.,


JACKSON COUNTY
Si


SHERIFF'S OFFICE
The Jackson County Sheriff's
Office and county Fire/Rescue
reported the following incidents
for Oct. 31, the latest available
report. (Some of these calls may
be related to after-hours calls
taken on behalf of Graceville
and Cottondale police Depart-
ments): One missing juvenile,.
one abandoned vehicle, three
reckless drivers, two suspicious
vehicles, two suspicious inci-
dents, two suspicious persons,
two reports of mental illness,
one physical disturbance, one
verbal disturbance, 14 medi-
cal calls, one traffic crash, four
burglar alarms, 19 traffic stops,
two larceny complaints, one


criminal mischief complaint,
one civil dispute, two trespass
complaints, two juvenile com-
plaints, two assaults, one noise
disturbance, two fraud com-
plaints, two assists of motor-
ists or pedestrians, two public
service calls and.four threat/ha-
rassment complaints.

JACKSON COUNTY
CORRECTIONAL FACILITY
The following persons were
booked into the county jail dur-
ing the latest reporting periods:
)) Corey Williams, 34, 2922
Milton Ave., Marianna, do-
mestic battery, violation of an
injunction.
)) rica Myrick, 27, 2934 Har-


ley Drive, Marianna, domestic
battery.
b Arthur Prevatt, 50, 6931
Burke St., Grand Ridge, viola-
tion of state probation.
) Robert Merritt, 28, 3070
Carters Mill Road (Apt. J5),
Marianna, domestic battery.
) Justin Oliver, 24,6017A
Spruce Lane, Marianna, viola-
tion of an injunction.
) Christopher Smith, 33, 6347
Blue Springs Road, Greenwood,
child abuse-two counts.

JAIL POPULATION: 216

To report a crime, call CrimeStoppers
at 526-5000 oi a local law enforcement
agency. To iepoi t a wildlife violation, call
1-888-404-FWCC (3922),










JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Marianna Middle honor rolls for first nine weeks


Special to the Floridan

The Marianna Middle School
Honor Rolls for the first nine-
week term are as follows:
Sixth Grade
A Honor Roll William Ad-
cock, Tanner Andress, Blake An-
gerbrandt, Natalie Baggett, Jim
Busby, Gavin Calloway, Alyssa
Cowart, Adin Domen, Laura Lee
Gause, Sydnee Goodson, Cydney
Granberry, Alexandria Hencely,,
Brady Hill, James Hollon, Hunter
Hutton, Devon Jernigan, Tama-
rique Jones, Tyler Jones, Maggie
Larkin, Gabriel Leff, Cameryn
Lein, Hunter Mitchell, Hannah
Nobles, Freddy Pruett, Turner
Seay, Calen Sims, Carlos Staley,
Riley Torbett, Leah Tucker, Nevin
Van Huss and Natalee Williams.
A/B-Honor Roll Tristan Ad-
ams, Brandon Baer, Amaya Bak-
er, Jami Baker, Jadon Barwick,
Bryson Bryant, Ashley Bunting,
Zoe Burch, Carter Cass, Jacob
Chabot, Savannah Cleveland,


Kathrine Davis, Arionna De-
cree, Majeste Denestan, Blake
Donaldson, Mallory Dykes, Tos-
salea Edge, Amarie Eutsey, Kiera
Garrett, Micheal Godwin, Mat-
thew Griffin, Gabriella Guerrero,
Kennedy Harris, Halee Hatcher,
Caleb Hawes, Toni Hayes, Ma-
dyson Hendrix, Alexis Jackson,
Alyson James, Alaysha Jennings,
Deme'cia Johnson, Pender
Johnson, Chance Keith, Kaitlin
Kent, Amelya Key, Cooper Large,
Austin Livingston, Jonathan
Lombardo, Kylie Martin, Chase
Meadows, Christopher Merritt,
Alexis Miller, Ashley Miller, Tra-
vis Morse, Jacob Moss, Tristan
Mulder, Joey Myhill Calynda Off-
haus, Aisley Patterson-Rhodes,
Radashia Peace, Mary Pervinich,
Werlean Pollock, Zack Porter,
Wesley Roedel, Bree-anna Rog-
ers, Edward Sigrest, Landen
Sims, Abrielle Smith, William
Smith, Jakil Snowden, Dante
Sonaglia, Leigh-Ann Springer,
Mykenzi Straw, Brolin Van Huss,
Nicholas Walker, Alyssa Willey,


Mack Williams, Kalysia Wynn
and Alivia York. .
Seventh Grade
A Honor Roll Sohami Bhakta,
Walter Caldwell, McKenna Fen-
ton, Kaitlyn Foster, Ellory Fuqua,
Ric Gable, Zannah Glisson, Alex
Gong, Mary Beth Harkins, Max
Harrell, Josef Ilagan, Margaux La
Fontaine, Morgan Laramore, Ka-
rissa Mercer, Ryan Reed, Valerie
Sims and Emily Stone.
A/B Honor Roll Breanna Ad-
ams, Michael Andino, Gabrielle
Aydelotte, Danielle Baker, LaNia
Baker, Hannah Barfield, Kylee
Barnes, Delaney Basford, Mad-
dison Basford, Ariel Beswick,
Jahnay Beswick, Callen Boze'-
man, Morgan Bryan, Katelyn
Cannady, Ansley Carter, Shayna
Carter, Aryan Charles, Savan-
nah Clemmons, Jimmie Collins,
Joshua Corbin, Natalie Cornwell,
Jack Craven, Jarrod Daniels, Na-
kia Donald, Tyler Dunn, Isaac El-
lis, Mara Elmore, Hunter Gilbert,
Josalynne Giles, Caroline Gilley,


Erica Godwin, Cody Gwin, Zeke
Hardy, KaytliQ Harris, Nakeysha
Holden, Matthew Ingram, Jef-
fery Jordan, Robbie Lamar, Mat-
ty Lane, Matthew Lent, Jarrad
Lewis, Madison Martin, Lauren
McAllister, Crayonia McCallister,
Jessica McCardle, Andrew Mc-
Millian, Tanner Mulder, Chris-
tian Nelson, Montana Noble,
Jordan Oliver, Jeremiah Parris,
Joshua Peacock, Mathew Pel-
ham, Erika Pereda, Gabe Porter,
James Reiff, Emma Smith, Tea
Smith, Denoris Speights, Vanes-
sa Stephens, Amber Tharp, Dan-
iel Tillman, Tanner Turrmire,
Selena Ubias, Tyanna White and
Tristan Williams.
Eighth Grade
A Honor Roll Yasmine Bel-
lamy, Bonnie Bigale, Jenna
Cartwright, Madalyn Daniels,
Madison Daniels, Katie Everett,
Binny Gocool, Sydney Holland,
Jaquainna Hughes, Abigail Kow-
alczyk, Lea Marlowe, Garrison
Melzer, Karlee Milton, Natalee


Milton, Haley Montellanos, Alex-
is Parish, Alexis Pueschel, Megan
Schrenker, Angela Smith, Steve
Spence, A'dajah Swilley, Kayleigh
Temples, Zachary Trotman and
Gracie Wallace.
A/B Honor Roll -. Evan Barber,
Hannah Blount, Kiley Bryan,
Candace Cunningham, Jona-
than Franklin, Shelton Gilbert,
Seth Gilmore, Malcom Godwin,
De'Aryll Green, Lonna Hamil,
Layton Hanlon, Jared Hendrix,
Da'Sharia Jackson, Johnathon
Lamb, Faith Long, Nichelle Long,
Sadie Mayo, Starr Mays, Jarrod
McCollum, Christian Mclntire,
Briana McKeen, Taylor Mercer,
Jack Michels, Daniel Morales,
Kanausha Oliver, Ju'Mae Pe-
terson, Landon Pippen, Lexi
Pollocks, Kaitlyn Renegar, Mat-
thew Rivers, Abbi Rushing, Will
Sanchez, Madison Schrenker,
Matthew Shouse, Morgan Sikes,
Natera Sims, Ta'Kiyah Speights,
Austin Torbett, Quaid Van Huss,
Grace Wester, Amber Whitman
and Carlee Wilson.


QUILTERS' CHALLENGE WALL HANGING CONTEST

HA linE 2
* c-~r^T^~l~n**S^s~lowSSK


SUBMIIItUPHMUUS
The Jackson County Quilters Guild recently had a Challenge Wall Hanging Contest. Members were given a popular quote and a square of
material. They had to come up with a quilted wall hanging representing the saying and incorporate the material into the picture.
Winners were as follows (from left): first place "Not My Cup of Tea," Diane Hiller; second place "Let Sleeping Dogs Lie," Lanell
Skalitzky; third place "Money Down the Drain," Linda Edwards; viewers choice "Knock on Wood," Sally Blizzard.


Cute Kids


SUBMITTED PHOTO
J.T., 12, Emma, 10, and Aidan, 5, are the children of Thad and Bonnie Richards. Their aunt
and uncle are Pete and Renee Schlybn.

Grand Champion


Dayspring Eagles
4-H member OU AI INVITATion,
Wilton Pittman c ,T*LE - o
is shown k a
here with his
crossbred heifer,
"Peaches," which
was recently
named Grand
Champion Heifer
at the Southwest
Georgia
Invitational
Steer and Heifer
Show. He is the
son of Jeff and
Ginger Pittman.

Florida Lottery
CS3PLAY 4 FNTASY


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SUBMITTED PHOTO

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Deadline


for essay


contest is


Nov. 22
Special to the Floridan

The deadline to enter
the DAR American History
Contest is Nov. 22. Students
in grades five through eight
are invited to write about
"Young America Takes a
Stand: The War of 1812."
Fifth-graders must write
between 300 and 600 words
with students in grades six,
seven and eight writing 600
to 1,000 words. A bibliogra-
phy is required.
I High school students
are qualified to enter the
Christopher Columbus
Essay Contest. The essay,
titled "Christopher Colum-
bus: In His Own Time, In
History, and Today," must
be between 800 and 1,200
words. The deadline to en-
ter is Nov. 22.
Chipola Chapter, NSDAR
sponsors both contests. On
Dec. 11, a total of approxi-
mately $500 will be award-
ed for winning essays.
Mail the essay entry to
Ruth Barnes Kinsolving,
DAR American History
Chairman, 4332 Lafayette
St., Marianna, FL 32446-
2916, postmarked no later
than Nov. 22.
For information, contact
Kinsolving at elianna@em
barqmail.com or 482-6301.


Not available

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Ntra 3


Jackson County Quilters'
Block of the Month


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Lanell Skalitzky, Dottie Rehberg and Diane Hiller display the
Jackson County Quilters Guild September Block of the Month.
For more information on the guild, find them on Facebook or
call 762-9200.


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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2011 3AF


LOCiL










JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Li ~ iiI~Li~Li' U a N~I II'


>1


SUBMITTED PHOTO
More than 1,000 area high school seniors attended Chipola College's annual Senior Day hosted by the Student Ambassadors. Pictured
are Marianna High Seniors. Students from Calhoun, Holmes, Jackson, Liberty and Washington counties enjoyed performances by
the Chipola cheerleaders, men's and women's basketball teams, show choir and theater. Seniors were treated to lunch after touring
the campus.


v , -'. ;.P ,..


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Malone High Senior Beta Club members TatumnSkipper, Niki Ferguson and Cassidy Birge deliver
donations to the Partners for Pets. The entire school collected items food, cleaning supplies,
toys, leashes and more to be donated to the no-kill animal shelter.


Scholarship Winner


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Kara Elizabeth Alford (right) is congratulated by Larry Dean for being awarded the second
Billy E. Dean Memorial Scholarship on May 23. She is the daughter of Gene Alford of Grand
Ridge and Julie Alford of Sneads.

State Finalist
". Malone FFA
'"member
Mary
Katherine
Pittman
was a state
finalist in
the Florida
Farm Bureau
Youth Public
Speaking
Contest.
As a result,
she recently
represented
District
lat the
annual FFB
convention
in Orlando.
She is the
daughter
of Jeff and
Ginger
Pittman.


Marianna grad awarded multiple scholarships


Special to the Floridan


Zachary Lucas Gilmore was award-
ed the 2011 Bradley Family Memo-
rial Scholarship on Aug. 1, for out-
standing grades as well as school
and community participation.


The Marianna High School gradu-
ate is .currently a sophomore at
Chipola College, where he is a mem-
ber of Honors, Mu Alpha Theta, Phi
Theta Kappa, Phi Beta Lambda and
a former member of the National
Champion Brain Bowl Team.t


ii!MITo1i i P iKIIlI)
7.-. hary Lucas Gilmore is the recipient of the 2011 Bradley
jFamily Memorial Scholarship.


Gilmore also received the George
T. and Millicent C. Fleming Memo-
rial Scholarship and the Lawrence D.
Cowart, Anna and William Johnson
Scholarship.
He is the son of Tina Gilmore Burns
and the late Billy E. Dean.


./


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-14A I1 HULSDAY, NOVEvMBER 3, 2011


LOCAL


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Farmers take advantage of gap in blueberry market


The Associated Press

HAWTHORNE When
you think of Florida fruit,
oranges, grapefruit and
strawberries come to
mind. But blueberries?
Hundreds of small blue-
berry farms have opened
in the Sunshine State in
the past three decades,
and blueberry production
has increased more than
tenfold in the past decade.
The farmers hope to capi-
talize on their climate by
providing fresh blueberries
when their competitors in
the North can't.
Florida produces only
a fraction of the blueber-
ries that industry leader
Michigan does, but from
mid-March to mid-April,
its farmers dominate the
market.
"It's just unbeliev-
able how this thing has
changed," said Ken Pat-
terson, who owns the Is-
land Grove Farm, one of
Florida's oldest blueberry
farms. "Twenty years ago,
when we held a Florida
Blueberry Growers Asso-
ciation meeting we'd have
40 to 50 people at a good
meeting. In November, we
expect 400 people there."
Patterson, who was once
a funeral director, has
more than 150 acres filled
with 6-foot-tall blueberry
bushes in Hawthorne and
nearly 200 acres of blue-
berries some 200 miles
south in Arcadia. There are
so many blueberry farms


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Sept. 29 photo, blueberry grower Ken Patterson looks
at some new growth on his plants in Hawthorne, Fla.


in the area just east of
Gainesville that Patterson
and other growers opened
a 27,000-square-foot pack-
ing and distribution plant
last year.
Their bushes will begin to
bloom in January, and the
fruit will be harvested by
hand a couple of months
later. Their harvest, from
mid-March to mid-April,
comes in a short, y&et im-
portant, window for gro-
cery stores, which strive to
keep fresh blueberries on
their shelves year-round.
Russ Benblatt, executive


marketing coordinator for
Whole Foods, wrote in an
email that the arrange-
ment benefits farmers,
grocers and consumers.
"This way, those sweet
Florida berries can be en-
joyed by our customers
around the country be-
fore the season starts else-
where," he said. "And the
relationship is reciprocal;
when the Florida season
ends, we know that our
global buyers are work-
ing with teams in other
regions to make sure that
berries from around the


country can be enjoyed
here in the summer when
very little can grow in the
intense Florida heat."
Florida's strawberry and
tomato growers have used
a similar growing season
to briefly dominate the
market by shipping fresh
produce nationwide when
most U.S. farms are dor-
mant. Blueberries remain
a much smaller crop for
Florida farmers worth
$47 million last year com-
pared to the $362 million
produced in strawberries,
according to the U.S. De-
partment of Agriculture
- but it's growing.
"From everything that
I've seen consumer de-
mand just continues to go
up and up," said Lisa Lo-
chridge, spokeswoman for
the Florida Fruit and Veg-
etable Association.
Farmers like Patterson
say demand for blueber-
ries has grown along with
attention to its health
benefits.
Nutritionists say all fruits
and vegetables are good
for you, and some stud-
ies suggest blueberries are
particularly beneficial.
Wild blueberries grew
in Florida before Native
Americanrs settled there,
and the first commercial
blueberry plantations in
the U.S. were likely estab-
lished in there in the late
1800s, said Paul Lyrene, a'
horticulture professor at
the University of Florida.
The industry declined in


the 1920s when customers
in northern states stopped
buying the blueberries
that they considered low
in quality.
"Florida blueberries soon
earned the reputation of
being small, gritty-fleshed
and lacking in flavor,"
Lyrene wrote in a scientific
journal. Sales continued to
drop during the Depres-
sion in the 1930s.
Fifty years later, Univer-
sity of Florida researchers
began developing Florida-
friendly varieties of high-
bush berries, the term
generally used for cultivat-
ed blueberries. Wild ber-
ries, like those common in
Maine, are called lowbush.
The new varieties were
sweeter, tastier and more
consistent in size than the
berries produced earlier in
Florida, Lyrene said. They
were hardier which
meant easier shipping,
and most importantly, they
could withstand warm
weather.
By 2000, Florida farmers
saw a way to diversify and
take advantage of consum-
er demand although
they don't ever expect to
rival the big growers in
Michigan, Maine and New
Jersey.
Blueberries are expen-
sive to grow, costing about
$20,000 an acre to plant.
And, Florida varieties pro-
duce only 4 to 5 pounds
of berries per bush, while
Northern bushes can yield
up to 20 pounds of fruit.


Still, the season gives
Florida farmers an advan-
tage by limiting their com-
petition, and they sell all
their fruit fresh which
commands a higher price
than berries sold to be fro-
zen or processed into juice
or other foods. Dole Food
Co., the world's largest
producer and marketer of
fresh fruit, saw enough of
an opportunity there that
it announced last month it
was buying Florida-based
Sunny Ridge Farm, one of
the nation's largest fresh
blueberry companies.
Florida farmers' biggest
competition comes from
overseas,particularlyChile.
The .U.S. imported more
than 156 million pounds
of fresh blueberries last
year; nearly half were from
Chile. In comparison, Flor-
ida will harvest about 20
million pounds this grow-
ing season.
But Bill Braswell, presi-
dent of the Florida Blue-
berryGrower'sAssociation,
said he's confident because
Florida blueberries are de-
livered fresher.
"Look at the label," said
Braswell, a former Delta
airline pilot who now rais-
es blueberries in central
Florida. "Instead of getting
a 4-week-old blueberry,
you're getting a 3-day-old
blueberry from Florida."
Braswell's latest project
is an indicator of his peers'
success: The first Florida
Blueberry Festival will be
held in May.


A dozen charged with weapons and drug offenses in crime takedown


The Associated Press

MIAMI GARDENS
- A dozen people were
charged Wednesday with
weapons and drug offens-
es that could bring many
of them decades in prison
in the latest of a series of,
investigations targeting
high-crime South Florida
neighborhoods.
The operation by federal,
state and local authorities
focused on a 10-block area
of the city located north of
Miami that is known as a
"bazaar" for high-powered
firearms and drugs rang-
ing from crack cocaine to
Ecstasy, said U.S. Attorney
Wifredo Ferrer.
"It was an easy place
to get these guns and get
these drugs," Ferrer said.
"It was a marketplace."
Authorities confiscated
55 weapons, including two


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Police Sgt. Buddy Hunholz (left) holds an assault rifle as he,
Det. William Wagenmann (center) and Capt. Frank Trujillo pack
up weapons, after a news conference on Wednesday in Miami
Gardens.


fully-automatic machine
guns and one assault rifle
with a 100-round drum
magazine. They seized nu-
merous shotguns, includ-
ing two with sawed-off
barrels, as well as hand-
guns, hundreds of rounds
of ammunition and two


bulletproof vests.
A buyer in the neigh-
borhood could get a mili-
tary-grade assault weapon
for as little as $100, said
Miami-Dade State Attor-
ney Katherine Fernandez
Rundle.
"These guns are horrific


killing machines," she said.
"They weren't meant to be
out on the streets."
The cases were made by
Miami Gardens officers
and agents from the Bu-
reau of Alcohol, Tobacco,
Firearms and Explosives
who went undercover to
buy guns and drugs. Those
charged weren't members
of ao organized gang but
were more like criminal
entrepreneurs, officials
said.
The investigation,
dubbed "Operation Gar-
dens Gnomes," is part of
a Justice Department-led
program aimed at tack-
ling specific high-crime
neighborhoods. Similar
operations in Palm Beach,
Broward and Miami-Dade
counties over the past four
years have resulted in fed-
eral firearm prosecutions
against more than 1,500


people and seizure of hun-
dreds of weapons, Ferrer
said.
Because many of those
charged have previous
felony records, they can
face extremely long prison
sentences if convicted in
federal court. And add-
ing a gun to the mix can
add even more years. Fer-
rer said one man arrested
Wednesday could get up
to 130 years and another
faces a 70-year maximum.


"Make no mistake -
these are very serious of-
fenders," Ferrer said.
Like the previous op-
erations, the one unveiled
Wednesday involves pros-
ecutors and investiga-
tors at the federal, state
and local levels working
cooperatively.
"Everything is on a first-
name basis," said Miami
Gardens Police Chief Mat-
thew Boyd. "That's the kind
of relationships we have."


Briefs


Woman sentenced to
life for killing infant
MILTON A Florida
Panhandle woman has
been sentenced to life in
prison for killing her week-
old baby.
Circuit Judge David
Rimmer on Tuesday
also ordered 35-year-old
Michelle Vasquez to spend
another 35 years in prison
for convictions on ag-
gravated child abuse and
violation of probation for
grand theft auto.
The Northwest Florida
Daily News reports that
Santa Rosa County
Sheriff's deputies found
Vasquez with her dead
infant on April 16, 2010.
Deputies say the woman
took Madison Flores
into the woods behind
her mother's house and
smothered her. Vasquez
was found guilty following
a trial in September.

Chaplain helps pull
victims from crash
LAKE WALES A chap-
lain for the Polk County
Sheriff's Office teamed up
with his wife and several
bystanders to pull victims
from a two-vehicle crash
near a Lake Wales orange
grove
Sheriff's spokeswoman
Carrie Eleazer says Heath
and CaseyWoolman wit-
nessed thecrash Tuesday
night and stopped to help.
Eleazer says 19-year-old
Melvin Germaine Hover
drove his Ford Taurus into
the path of a Ford Ranger,


forcing both vehicles off
the road. Hover died at the
scene.
The witnesses pulled
the other three people to
safety just before the rve-
hicles burst into flames.
Officials say Hover's
passengers 20-year-old
Kerry Michael Davis and
19-year-old Victor Virgil
Parker Jr. were airlifted
to a hospital with life-
threatening injuries. The
other driver, 51-year-old
Michael David Morrow,
was treated and released.

Fla. pushes
adoption for roughly
800 foster kids
TALLAHASSEE Flori-
da is launching a statewide
initiative to find homes for
roughly 800 foster children
during National Adoption
Month.
The Department of Chil-
dren and Families Secre-
tary David Wilkins kicked
off the movement Tuesday
in Tallahassee. He said the
majority of foster children
waiting for loving parents
are teenagers.
- Foster kids who do not
find a permanent family
before turning 18 run a
higher risk of being arrest-
ed, dropping out of school
or becoming homeless.
Wilkins stressed that
foster children who are
available for adoption
have had the legal rights
of their biological parents
terminated. That means
these children will never
be returned to their buqth


parents.
The campaign uses vid-
eos and photos to feature
different children available
for adoption. Their stories
will be featured on www.
adoptflorida.org.

SW Fla. fighting
mosquitoes
FORT MYERS A rainy
October has mosquito
control officers buzzing in
southwest Florida.
Officials say they are
experiencing the worst
mosquito season in
two decades, thanks to
weather patterns that cre-
ated the 'perfect storm' for
the pesky insects.
Lee County Mosquito
Control District spokes-


woman Shelly Redovan
says the region began the
year under a drought.
That provided salt marsh
mosquitoes a greater area
to lay their eggs. The rainy
season resulted in lots
of standing water, which
compounds the mosquito
problem. The result? Offi-
cials say they're still seeing
thousands of mosquitoes.
The Fort Myers News-
Press reports the district is
using airplanes, helicop-
ters and trucks to spray.
The newspaper reports
that southwest Florida
received 10.40 inches of
rain in October. That's 6.94
inches above the normal
rainfall for the month.

From wire reports


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-16A THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2011


The Associated Press

MAITLAND, Fla. -
Cheryl Abbarno was the
most excited she's ever
been about a presiden-
tial election when Barack
Obama was on the ballot
in 2008, but she isn't sure
she'll vote for him again.
"It's discouraging to me
that he's not doing what
he said he's going to do.
When he was campaign-
ing, it was change, change,
change, and I don't see any
change," she said.
Abbarno is a Walmart
mom women with chil-
dren under 18 at home
Who shop at the discount
superstore and two
polling firms, one Demo-
cratic, one Republican,
are following women like
her because they believe
they'll play a key role in
next year's presidential
election.
Their No. 1 concern is
the economy. They're split
fairly evenly by party affili-
ation, but more important,
they are persuadable vot-
ers who will decide late in
the election cycle whether
they'll support Obama or
the eventual Republican
nominee.
Or, as Neil Newhouse
of the Republican polling
firm Public Opinion Strat-
egies said, they're the new
soccer moms about 14
percent to 17 percent of
the electorate, predomi-
nantly white and a key
swing group.
In 2008, Walmart moms
supported Obama, but in
2010 they voted Repub-
lican, though not enthu-
siastically, according to
Public Opinion Strategies
and Momentum Analy-
sis, a firm that works with
Democratic candidates
and groups.
A poll the firms released
Wednesday shows 43 per-
cent of Walmart moms
approve of Obama's job
performance while 54
percent disapprove. That
compares to 46 percent


new credit cards for the
no-interest promotions,
cutting back on meals out
and other activities and
cancelling cable televi-
sion. One woman said she
and her son had to move in
with her parents. Another
told her kids that Santa is
poor this year. Many ei-
ther had gone through lay-
offs or had husbands who
lost jobs. While other jobs
were found, often times it
was for less money.
While not blaming
Obama, many feel like
he hasn't shown strong
enough leadership to build
consensus in Congress on
how to help middle-class
families.
"These voters have
clearly lost their passion
for President Obama and
there's a sense that he's
kind of lost his passion as
well. Some of these voters
might vote for him again,
but boy, there's no enthu-
siasm," Newhouse said.
"It does mean these voters
are still up for grabs for the
2012 election."
He said Republican can-
didates are focused first on
the primary, but the even-
tual nominee would be
wise to win over Walmart
moms and talk about
kitchen table issues these
women care about.
"Nbt just jobs, but health
and housing issues," Ne-


NATIONAL


Moms unsure of supporting Obama


of all voters that approve
of Obama and 49 per-
cent who disapprove. Yet
57 percent of the moms
said they are still hopeful
about the president com-
pared to 42 percent who
have given up on him. And
three times as many of the
moms, 22 percent, blame
President George W Bush
for the nation's economic
problems rather than
Obama, who 7 percent of
the moms say is to blame.
"There are good lessons
from this data for both
Democrats and Republi-
cans," said Margie Omerp
of Momentum Analysis.
"The bottom line from
these results is that this is
a group that can be per-
suaded either way in the
presidential contest."
The Obama campaign
wouldn't comment on
Walmart moms.
Steve Schale, who ran
Obama's Florida opera-
tion in 2008, said that the
president needs to show
the women that his eco-
nomic plan is better than
the alternative.
During the focus groups
in Florida, New Hampshire
and Iowa, the Walmart
moms repeatedly named
the economy as the most
important issue in the
election. Nearly all said
they've had to make sac-
rifices, including opening


Fed foresees far weaker growth


The Associated Press

WASHINGTON The Federal Reserve
sketched a bleaker outlook Wednesday
for the economy, which it thinks will grow
much more slowly and face higher unem-
ployment than it had estimated in June.
The central bank now predicts the
economy will grow no more than 1.7 per-
cent for 2011. For 2012, it foresees growth
of about 2.7 percent. Both forecasts are
roughly a full percentage point lower than
its June forecast.
The Fed sees unemployment averag-
ing 8.6 percent by the end of next year.
In June, it had predicted unemployment
would drop next year to as low as 7.8 per-
cent. The rate is now 9.1 percent.
The Fed's gloomier outlook is similar to
many private economists' forecasts. Bank
of America Merrill Lynch, for example, ex-
pects only 1.8 percent economic growth
this year and 2.1 percent in 2012.
Those growth rates are far too low to
drive down unemployment.
Speaking at a news conference, Fed
Chairman Ben Bernanke acknowledged
that the pace of growth will likely remain
"frustratingly slow." If conditions worsen,
Bernanke said the Fed would consider
buying more mortgage-backed securities
to try to further cut loan rates and help the
depressed home market. He declined to
specify what would trigger such a move.
"We remain prepared to take action as
appropriate to make sure the recovery
continues," Bernanke said.
Even so, the Fed said Wednesday that
the economy had improved since nearly
stalling in the spring. As a result, it's put-
ting off any new actions so it can gauge
'the impact of steps it's already taken.
Fed policymakers made the announce-
ment after a two-day meeting.
In a statement, the officials said con-
sumers have stepped up spending. Still,
they said the economy continues to face
significant risks, including the debt crisis
and risk of recession in Europe.
Speaking at his third news conference
of the year, Bernanke cited Europe's debt
crisis as a particular concern. He said the
crisis could threaten confidence and hold
back growth.
The Fed left open the possibility of tak-
ing further steps later to try to boost the
sluggish economy. But it gave no hint as
to what those moves might be.
"They're noting the better growth num-
bers but remain pretty cautious," said Mi-
chael Feroli, a former Fed economist now
with JPMorgan Chase & Co.
The vote on the Fed's policy statement
was 9-1. Charles Evans, the president of
Jthe Chicago Federal Reserve Bank, dis-


"We remain prepared to take
action as appropriate to make
sure the recaovery continues."
Ben Bemanke,
Fed chairman

sented. The statement said Evans wanted
to take stronger action to try to boost the
economy.
The vote was a shift from the previous
two Fed meetings, when three members
had dissented for the opposite reason:
They opposed the Fed's continued ef-
forts to keep rates at super-lows, for fear
it could ignite inflation. Those three
members, known as inflation "hawks,"
dropped their opposition this time.
Some analysts said the shift didn't nec-
essarily mean the Fed is any likelier to
take any additional action soon to try to
boost the economy.
"The view of the hawks is that once the
decision has been made by the majority,
it just causes confusion if they continue
to vote to roll back action that has already
been taken," said Paul Ashworth, chief
U.S. economist at Capital Economics.
Some -analysts said they expected the
Fed to take further action to support
the economy at coming meetings, given
their expectation that growth will remain
sub-par.
"Policymakers are keeping the door
open because the unemployment rate re-
mains high, and there are clear downside
risks from the economic situation in Eu-
rope," said Sal Guatieri, senior economist
at BMO Capital Markets.
After their September meeting, the
policymakers said they would shuffle the
Fed's investment portfolio to try to fur-
ther reduce long-term interest rates. And
in their previous meeting in August, they
had said they plan to keep short-term
rates near zero until at least mid-2013,
unless the economy improved.
The Fed repeated the mid-2013 target
in its statement Wednesday. It also said it
was continuing its program to rebalance
its portfolio to try to lower long-term
rates.
The Fed has kept its key short-term in-
terest rate at a record low since December
2008. This is the rate that banks charge on
overnight loans. It serves as the bench-
mark for millions of business and con-
sumer loans.
But the Fed said the job market remains
weak. And it suggested that the troubles
in Europe could hurt U.S. growth.
Still, the Fed remains deeply divided
over what, if any, action to take next.


house said, noting that
Obama, with the luxury
of not having a primary, is
already focused on those
issues.
Omero said that just be-
cause Walmart moms are
late deciders, it doesn't
mean that candidates
shouldn't begin reaching
out to them.
"Candidates that wait
too long to try to reach out
to these voters, whether
you're talking about the
presidential level or con-
gressional and statewide
level, does so at their per-
il," she said. "These moms
are going to need more
contact, they're going
to need more exposure,
they're going to need ad-
vertising, even more cam-
paign events."
What Omero saw in the
focus groups was sympa-
thy for the president and
a willingness to give him
another chance. Because
they don't directly blame
him for the nation's eco-
nomic woes means he can
still persuade them that he
cares more about the mid-
dle class than his eventual
Republican challenger.
Valerie Herrera, a 30-
year-old insurance writer
with 1- and 2-year-old
daughters, said she is will-
ing to give Obama another
chance. She says the econ-
omy is her main issue.


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN + www.jcfloridan.com


TSA to expand test for

faster airport security
The Associated Press screening program aimed
at responding to com-
WASHINGTON-Testing plaints that the govern-
for a new program aimed ment is not using common
at getting certain travelers sense when it screens all
through airport security travelers the same way at
with less hassle has gone airports.
so well that the Obama Details of which airports
administration plans to and airlines would be eli-
expand it to another round gible for the next round of
of airports and travel- testing for the pre-screen-
ers, the government said ing program are still be-
Wednesday. ing hammered out, Pis-
The expanded testing tole said. Currently about
will not affect most tray- 280,000 frequent fliers
elers expected to crowd from American and Delta
the airports during this airlines the two airlines
year's busy Thanksgiving eligible for the first round
travel season. But the gov- of testing are participat-
ernment has made other ing in the program, accord-
changes in the past year ing to TSA. The program is
that could make for a less being tested at airports in
intrusive trip through air- Atlanta, Dallas, Detroit and
port security. Miami.
Invasive pat-downs and "This new screening
full-body imaging ma- system holds great poten-
chines are still a central tial to strengthen security
part of the air traveler's ex- while significantly enhanc-
perience in the U.S. ing the travel experience,
But now children 12- whenever -possible, for
and-under are less likely to passengers," Pistole said
be patted down or forced in a prepared statement at
to take off their shoes. And a hearing before the Sen-
about half of the full-body ate Homeland Security
imaging machines have and Governmental Affairs
been upgraded to show an Committee.
outline of a person instead But some enhanced se-
of a blurry naked image, a curity measures put in
feature ofallnewmachines place at U.S. airports since
the government pfirchas- the 2001 terror attacks con-
es, Transportation Security tinue to be controversial.
Administrator John Pistole Some travelers and pri-
told Congress. vacy advocates object to
The pre-screening test the intimate pat-down,
program and policy chang- and not everyone is com-
es represent the Obama fortable going through a
administration's attempts full-body imaging machine
at a more risk-based, intel- that produces a blurry im-
ligence-driven passenger age of their naked bodies.



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I Mt aSOUUIMT EU tPR)E
Cheryl Abbarno, 47, stands outside her home on Tuesday wearing a shirt from the 2008
elections in Clermont, Fla. Abbarno overwhelmingly supported Obama during the last
election, but is disappointed with his leadership.


I









JACKSON COUNTY.FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.corn


GOP Senate candidates say politicians have failed


The Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE U.S.
Senate candidate Craig
Miller says Washington
needs more businessmen
making decisions instead
of career politicians.
The retired restaurant
executive told news edi-
* tors on Wednesday at the
annual legislative session
planning session hosted
by The Associated Press
that there are not enough
champions for free enter-
prise in the U.S. Senate,
"It's time to bring a
business perspective, a
job creator, to the United
States Senate," said Miller,
a Florida native who came
to Florida State after three
years in the Air Force in
1972, the same year U.S.
Sen. Bill Nelson began his
political career as a state
legislator. ,
Miller, 62, also pledged
Wednesday that he'd serve
just two terms if he be-
comes the nominee and
goes on to defeat Nelson
in November.
Another GOP hopeful,
retired Army Col. Mike
McCalister, created some
buzz and several ques-


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
U.S. Senate candidate Craig Miller speaks to the press
during a pre-legislative news conference on Wednesday in
Tallahassee.


tions with' his insistence
that communism may be
regaining a foothold in the
U.S.
"We still in our country
have influences that would
like to have much more of
a communist-style envi-
ronment," he said. "They
(Russia) obviously would
like to be a world power
again, but I don't want an-
other Cold War."
McCalister, who turns
60 later this month, wasn't
enthusiastic about pursu-
ing the issue although he


had several more ques-
tions about what led to his
conviction about a com-
munistic revival.
"I'm not going to go into
any more detail there,"
said McCalister, a 'favor-
ite among many tea party
supporters.
And the newest entry
into the race, U.S. Rep.
Connie Mack IV of .Fort
Myers, picked up an en-
dorsement from state Sen-
ate President Mike Hari-
dopolos, who was the first
one out-of the U.S. Senate


contest.
"He has now elevated
the debate in the Repub-
lican primary," said Hari-
dopolos, who said he was
now uncertain about his
own political future.
Mack said several weeks
ago that he would not run
for the seat held by his dad
between 1989 and 2001
and that he would instead
support Haridopolos' bid.
' Mack, whose father
Connie Mack III once held
the seat he's now seeking,
joins former state Rep.
Adam Hasner of Delray
Beach, former U.S. Sen.
George LeMieux of Fort
Lauderdale, McCalister
and Miller in the Repub-
lican race. LeMieux spent
16 months in Washington
after being named by for-
mer Gov. Charlie Crist to
serve out the remainder
of former U.S. Sen. Mel
Martinez's term.
Polls have shown the
contest is wide open, a
likely reason for Mack's
change of heart.
"pne more career politi-
cian in the race," shrugged
Miller, who finished third
in a five-way race for Con-,
gress in 2010.


Gov. Scott's former company moving to Tenn.


The Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE In a "disap-
pointing" move for Gov. Rick Scott,
the chain of urgent care clinics that
the governor helped start a decade
ago is moving its corporate head-
quarters out of the state.
Scott has billed himself as Florida's
"jobs governor" and'has contended
his push for cuts in regulations and
taxes has helped bring down the
state's unemployment rate. Florida's
current jobless rate is 10.6 percent.
But Solantic, which runs a string
of urgent care clinics across the
state, has decided to relocate its
corporate headquarters from Jack-
sonville to Nashville. This past Au-
gust, the company had announced,
it was hiring an additional 50 people
in Florida.
"I think it's disappointing they are
moving, I believe that we put our-
selves in a position that this is the
best state to do business in," Scott
said.
Scott, who helped start the com-
pany in 2001, sold his interest in the
chain in June after he was criticized
for potential conflict of interest.
Scott's shares were bought by the
New York investment firm of Welsh,
Carson, Anderson & Stowe
The new ownership said as part of
its expansion across the Southeast
that it was opening up new offices
in Tennessee. The move was first re-
ported by the Jacksonville Financial
News & Daily Record,
"We have been working with an
extensive team of consultants who
have been helping us identify sev-
eral new states and. markets that
are prime for our service offerings,"
said CEO Michael Klein in a compa-
ny release. "We will be positioning
the company to take on these new
challenges."


Solantic said it plans to open up
this new office by the end of the
year.
It is not clear how many jobs will
be shifted from Jacksonville to Ten-
nessee. The company pointed out in
a release that it plans to maintain its
billing department in Jacksonville.
The governor's office on Wednes-
day evening put out a statement
contending that it was inaccurate to
say the company was. relocating its
headquarters.
Scott's office also pointed out the
bulk of the company's jobs would
remain in Florida.
But a spokeswoman for Solantic
told the Jacksonville financial paper
it was taking part of its executive
team to Nashville because it's the
"biggest medical hub in the entire'
United States.
"They are looking at being at the
jumping-off point where the magic
is happening," said MandyVillalva.
When reached on Wednesday, Vil-
lalva said she would check to see
how many jobs were moving but
has not responded further.
Earlier in the day, Scott said
through a spokesman that he wasn't
consulted about the move.
"There was no involvement from
Governor Scott, nor his adminis-
tration in Solantic's decision," said
Lane Wright. "They never reached
out to us about it."
Scott has made jobs in Florida the
central focus of his administration
and has touted the recent drops in
the state's unemployment rate.
While addressing reporters and
editors at The Associated Press an-
nual legislative planning session,
Scott stood in front of a chart that
proclaimed the state was "headed
in the right direction" and the state
had added a net of more than 92,000
jobs since January.


"I think it's disappointing
they are moving. Believe
that we put ourselves in a
position that this is the best
state to do business in."
Gov. Rick Scott

But Solantic head Klein said it
makes sense for Solantic whose
name derives from "South on the
Atlantic" to have a presence in
Nashville because of the number
of health care companies already
based there.
"If we are to meet our expansion
goals, adding another office in the
health care hub will provide the
possible opportunities to facilitate
growth," Klein said.
Scott himself once lived in Nash-
ville when he was in charge of Co-
lumbia/HCA, which owned hospi-
tals across the country. Scott was
forced out of -the company back
in 1997 amid an investigation that
eventually led the company to pay a
record $1.7 billion in fines for Medi-
care fraud.
The governor listed the worth of
his investment in Solantic last year
at $62 million. He turned over own-
ership in the business to his wife
shortly after he won his election a
year ago.
But over the spring questions were
raised on whether Scott would ben-
efit financially from state efforts to
privatize Medicaid and require drug
testing for welfare recipients should
the state do business with Solantic.
Scott maintained that Solantic
would not seek state contracts and
said he was just too busy as gover-
nor to spend time overseeing busi-
ness interests.


Class puts students in life, death decisions


The Associated Press
AMPA -The phone rang.
Alejandra Arango took a
deep breath and picked it up.
On the other end, she heard sobs.
This is bad, Arango thought. She'd
listened in on calls like this before,
but never answered a crisis call
herself. She knew what she had to
ask, so she just came out and said
it: "Are you thinking about suicide?
Is this why you're calling?"
The voice said, "yes," and Aran- '
go's heart dropped to her stomach.
I can't freak out, she told herself. I
have to do this.
Arango, a 21-year-old University
of South Florida student, is getting
college credit to help people stay
alive.
For weeks, others have trained
her. She knows to be direct. She
knows to ask people questions that
make them think beyond their im-
mediate despair. And there's always
a supervisor listening to her on the
Crisis Center of Tampa Bay tele-
phone hotline.
The 211 Hotline Service Learning


Course is new to USF this year.
Lisa Brown, the professor who
created it, said she wanted to give
students interested in public health
or counseling a chance to apply
classroom lessons to real life. Plus,
it helps the Crisis Center, which is
in constant need of volunteers.
Nine students signed up. Two
dropped out. Brown said three
weren't quite ready to counsel
people in crisis. Four young women
made the final cut.
They started with the informa-
tion line people calling for help
finding food stamps or homeless
shelters, or wanting to vent about
losing jobs or homes or kids. Then
came the crisis calls.
"Using a bike as an example, in
most college courses you learn the
history of bikes, social and physical
benefits of bike riding, and how to
build a bike," Brown said. But in her
course, "you actually ride a bike, a
big and significant difference."
The students are required to
spend at least eight hours a week
in the call center. They also have to
write reflection papers and attend


class once a week, where they talk
about their experiences.
Christine Hilliard, a biology soph-
omore, says every time she leaves
the Crisis Center she feels more
connected to the world. "I grew up
with a privileged life," she said in
class one day. "The real world is not
what I thought the real world was.
Things aren't black and white."
Amber Boose, a junior major-
ing in public health, wrote in a
reflection paper that the class has
changed her. When she sees some-
one on campus who looks upset,
she stops and asks what's wrong. "I
thought it'd be a lot more difficult
to get people to talk to you," Boose
said. "But now it's different, differ-
ent in a good way."
Annie Phillips, a sophomore
studying microbiology, says her
long nights at the call center have
become the most rewarding part
of the semester. "There's this point
in the call when there aren't any
additional resources you can give
them," Phillips said. "They're just
happy that they have someone to
talk to."


Although Gov. Rick Scott's
business background is
similar to Miller's in many
ways,-the first-term gover-
nor didn't bite on a ques-
tion on whether he'd favor
another outsider with those
credentials in a statewide
race.


Habitat
From Page 1A

the warehouse goods and
the smaller merchandise
from the store as well.
Fuqua said that consolida-
tion in the newlocation will
ultimately save the organi-
zation money and hope-
fully help it gather in more
funds, as well. For instance,
the warehouse is currently
only open on Wednesdays
because there's not enough
volunteer manpower to go
around.
Being under one roof
means that the same vol-
unteers who man the thrift
store can see after the larg-
er items as well. The ware-
house and the thrift store
will be open five or six
days a week once the re-
location is complete. That
could mean income every
day, more spae space for dona-
tions as buyers haul away
items to make room. The
-move also means more
customer parking; instead
of five or six spaces around
the store, and none around
the warehouse, the new
Habitat building will have
about 30 slots for custom-
ers and volunteers.
The move will also mean
a shift in the thrift store's
focus, and its name will
change as well, Fuqua said.
It will be called the ReStore
once it's set up in the new


Run-off
From Page 1A

In addition to setting
these forward-looking
standards, DEP also plans
to address existing nutrient
impairment by identifying
problem areas and devel-
oping standards to control
specific nutrient targets
found to be excessive.
The DEP website has spe-
cifics of the state's plans for
which the rules are now to
be written. "The future of
Florida's environment de-
pends on the health of our
water resources, and no
one knows our waters bet-
ter than us," Vinyard wrote
about the issue. "This is
the right thing for Florida,
and the right thing to do. If
adopted, these rules will be
the most comprehensive
nutrient pollution limita-
tions in the nation, and will
serve to protect our rivers,
lakes, streams, springs and
estuaries"
Vinyard stated that
Florida's proposed stan-
dards are based on many
years worth of research.
"Using more than a de-
cade of data collection
and analysis, Florida. has
developed standards that
account for the individual
characteristics and needs
of Florida's diverse water
resources," he wrote. "By
setting standards focused
on site-specific conditions
we are better able to pro-
tect public health, improve


"I think we ought to
have as many people run
for office as possible that
come from different back-
grounds," Scott said.
The governor, however,
wasn't interested in mak-
ing any endorsement
Wednesday.


location to reflect an effort
to gear the merchandise
more toward small build-
ing supplies that buyers
can use to "restore" their'
homes. The store will con-
tinue to carry knick-knacks
and such, but that custom-
ers will likely see less cloth-
ing in the store than in the
past, and more things like
drawer pulls, hinges, and
other small similar items,
Fuqua said,
Habitat also plans to add
between 3,000 and 4,000
square feet of structure
to its new property in the
future. Development or-
ders must be obtained and
there are other tasks to be
done before that process
can begin.
Meanwhile, the organiza-
tion is focusing on move.
For instance, Habitat
recently requested and
received a waiver of the
county's infrastructure
connection fees for watej
and sewer service to the
building.
The organization is also
busy demolishing the in-
side of the new structure,
so that renovation for Hab-
itat's needs can begin. Vol-
unteers are encouraged to
help out on Saturdays dur-
ing the demolition stage.
For more information
about how to volunteer for
demolition, call Habitat's
construction committee
chairman Eric Anderson at
573-2407.


water quality and preserve
aquatic life in Florida's
unique water resources
throughout the state."
"Florida's efforts go be-
yond crafting scientifi-
cally-sound standards for
our waterbodies," he con-
tinued. "We also provide .
a reasonable and predict-
able strategy to implement
these standards, allowing
us to direct our resources
to where they will have
the most meaningful ben-
efit to our environment
and reduce the financial
burdens on Florida's hom-
eowners and businesses...
Florida has invested mil-
lions of dollars to create
nutrient rules that address
the complexity of Florida's
waters, and we intend to
finish the job."
For more information
and to access the rules,
please visit http://www.
dep.state.fl.us/secretary/
nns.htm.
Jackson County Exten-
sion Director Doug Mayo
said agriculturists can sign
on to participate in recom-
mended best management
practices through the ex-
tension office. Doing so
may protect them since
they will have committed
to operating their farms in
a way that is in compliance
with standards. Mayo pre-
dicts that the new numeric
standards to be challenged
in lawsuits, and said that
many parties in the state
will face challenges in
meeting them once they
come into effect.


Pinecrest


3720 Caverns Road Marianna, FL 32446-1806 (850) 482-3964


There were no

obituaries or

death notices

submitted to the

Floridan as of the

deadline at 4 p. m.

yesterday.


LOCAL/STATE


THURSDAY. NOVEMBER 3,2011 7A[


E ',l oi v V. i 0 4'H .


^M ,








JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www:jcfloridan.com


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Anti-globalization members wearing masks (from left) of US President Barack Obama,
German Chancellor Angela Merkel, Prime Minister of Russia Vladimir Putin and French
President Nicolas Sarkozy, demonstrate in Nice, France, against the G20 summit of Cannes,
on Wednesday.

Europe leaders summon


Greek PM to explain himself
The Associated Press ficial, who was speaking on condition of
anonymity because of the sensitivity of
CANNES, France Greek Prime Min- the issue.
ister George Papandreou flew to the chic The wait is also ramping up the pres-
French resort of Cannes on Wednesday sure on Italy, the eurozone's third-largest
to explain to his furious European col- economy, whose debts are enormous but
leagues why he was holding a surprise which is considered too big to be bailed
referendum on a bailout deal that took out. The yield on Italy's ten-year bonds
them all months to work out. a gauge of market concern rose to
Papandreou's pledge to let the Greek 6.19 percent Wednesday, uncomfortably
people themselves vote has riled finan- close to the levels that prompted Greece,
cial markets and threatens to derail an Portugal and Ireland to seek bailouts.
entire European debt crisis plan that's The very fates of some of the G-20
not even a week old. leaders and their own economies could
4 Observers called it a "back me or sack well hinge on how Papandreou's gamble
me" move to make sure the Greek public works out. Sarkozy and President Barack
will support the severe austerity mea- Obama both face potentially tough re-
sures looming ahead. election battles within the year.
But a "no" vote in the referendum Sarkozy had hoped the meeting of
would have enormous consequences leaders from the Group of 20 industrial
not just for Greece but for the rest of Eu- and developing nations, which runs
rope. It could lead to a disorderly Greek Thursday and Friday, was going to be
default, force Greece out of the 17-nation Europe's opportunity to assure the rest
eurozone, topple many fragile European of the world that a comprehensive plan
banks and send the global economy to deal with the European debt crisis
spinning back into recession, had finally been reached after nearly
With this in mihd, French President two years of half-measures, indecision
Nicolas Sarkozy, German Chancellor and procrastination.
Angela Merkel and top European Union Papandreou's gambit ended that lofty
gathered at the Palais des Festivals, site ambition.
of Cannes' famous film festival, for pri- Sarkozy and Merkel summoned Pa-
vate talks ahead of their meeting with pandreou to the meeting, continuing
Papandreou. to insist that the $177 billion bailout
Even scheduling the vote could scuttle deal for Greece'thrashed out last week
a pending bailout loan Greece needs remains "the only possible way" to sort
shortly to avoid default. out Europe's debt problem.
Eurozone finance ministers had al- "Germany and the entire international
ready approved their portion of a $11 community are striving to deal in soli-
billion aid installment to Greece, but eu- darity and responsibly with Greece, but
rozone officials said Wednesday that the there is also a responsibility on Greece's
payout was conditional on additional part toward its European partners,"
austerity measures that Greece commit- Merkel's spokesman, Steffen Seibert,
ted to as part of the new rescue deal. said in Berlin. "Countries in Europe
"If these (reforms) are now being put particularly the countries in the eu-
in question in December by the refer- rozone are so closely integrated that
endum then we have a completely dif- every serious decision in one capital has
ferent situation," said one eurozone of- effects on the other countries."


Syria accepts Arab League


proposal to end crisis


The Associated Press
CAIRO Syria accepted
an Arab League proposal
calling for it to withdraw
armored vehicles from the
streets and stop violence
against protesters in a bid
to end the country's seven-
month-old political crisis
that has led to the deaths
of some 3,000 people.
The agreement was an-
nounced by Qatar's For-
eign Minister Hamad bin
Jassim, who urged Damas-
cus to follow through with
action on the ground/Syria
has continued its bloody
'crackdown on anti-govern-
ment protesters despite in-
ternational condemnation
and previous promises of
reform.
In the latest violence,
machine-gun fire and ex-
plosions erupted inside a
city at the heart of Syria's
uprising as activists re-
ported two grisly attacks
that killed at least 20 peo-
ple in the past 24 hours,
although it was not clear
who was behind the latest
attacks.
Syria agreed to withdraw
all tanks and armored ve-
hicles from the streets,
stop violence against pro-
testers, release all political
prisoners arrested during
the uprising and begin a
dialogue with the opposi-
tion within two weeks, ac-
cording to the proposal.
Syria also agreed to allow
journalists, rights groups
and Arab League repre-
sentatives to monitor the
situation in the country.
-All have been banned from
fa fisiifW',;',', ''!.-,1 '", ': "',


entering by one of the Arab
world's most repressive
regimes.
"We are happy to have.
reached the agreement and
we'll be happier if it is car-
ried out," bin Jassim said.
"Now it is important for
the Syrian side to carry out
this agreement because it
is what will allow the situa-
tion to quiet down and the
crisis to be resolved."
"We hope that there will
be serious follow-through,
whether regarding vio-
lence and killing or regard-
ing prisoners," he said.
Arab nations have been
eager to avoid a repeat of
the civil war in Libya that
led to the capture and bru-
tal treatment of Moam-
mar Gadhafi before he


was killed. In the proposal,
the Arab League said it
sought to prevent foreign
intervention in Syria a
marked difference from
Libya in which' an Arab
League decision helped
pave the way for a NATO
bombing campaign.
It remains unclear if the
agreement will make a dif-
ference on the ground. The
agreement did not list con-
sequences should Syria
continue its crackdown.
Nor did the proposal
state where the dialogue
between authorities and
the opposition is to take
place. Syria's opposition
has refused to enter into
any dialogue as long as
President Bashar Assad re-
mains in power.


WikiLeaks' Assange loses


extradition appeal in UK
The Associated Press .


LONDON Time seems
to be running out for Ju-
lian Assange, whose long
battle to avoid extradition
to Sweden over suspected
rape and molestation cas-
es appears likely to end in
failure unless he can get
Britain's highest court to
hear an appeal.
In a major setback
Wednesday in London's
High Court, two British
judges rejected Assange's
move to block 'extradi-
tion to face questioning in
Sweden.
Court officials said
Wednesday that Assange
plans to try to take the
case to Britain's Supreme
Court.
"He has indicated that
he plans to launch an ap-
peal," a spokeswoman for
the Judicial Office said on
condition of anonymity
because she wasn't autho-
rized to give her name. It
is possible his request for
an appeal will be turned
down, making extradition
virtually inevitable.
Wednesday's ruling is the
latest reversal for Assange,
whose secret-spilling orga-
nization is on the brink of
financial ruin. The group
has suspended publishing
the sensitive government
documents that drew the
ire of governments world-
wide because of money
woes.
Assange has denied any
wrongdoing in the alleged
rape of one woman and
the molestation of anoth-
er in Stockholm last year.
He and his followers have
maintained the sex crimes
investigation is politically
motivated by those op-
posed to WikiLeaks.
He has deeply polarized
public opinion, appearing
on Europe's Most Wanted
List while winning praise
in some quarters as a brave


,A /,.-


-"
THl ':: i"T : .
The founder of WikiLeaks Julian Assange (center) gives a
statement to the media after his extradition hearing at the
High Court in London on Wednesday.


advocate for freedom of
speech and for challenging
government power.
"We will be considering
our next steps in the days
ahead," he told reporters
and supporters.
But experts said his legal
options are now extremely
limited. .
"I think it's highly likely
that he'll be in Sweden be-
fore the end of the year,"
said Julian Knowles, an
extradition lawyer not in-
volved in the case.
Vaughan Smith, the own-
er of the country mansion


where Assange is living out
on bail, said his friend's
prospects appeared bleak.
"It's not good news," he
said.
Smith said Assange is
concerned about the im-
pact on his organization if
he is sent to Sweden, fear-
ing he would likely be held
in prison as he contests the
allegations against him.
"How can you run
WikiLeaks from a jail? You
can't," Smith said.
Assange has 14 days to
decide whether to apply to
the High Court.


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2011 Calendar Cover with
winner Austin Roberts


Cast your vote at www.FloridanCutestKid.com
The child with the most votes will appear on the 2012
Jackson County Life calendar. 12 runners up will each
appear on a month.
Votingends December2andthe winners willbeannouncedDecember
7. All proceeds from the contest go to Newspaper in Education which
supplies newspaper to teachers to use in the classroom at no cost to
the school. Your support is much appreciated.
Add your Birthday or Event to the calendar
for a $1.00 donation to Newspaper in
Education. Drop by the Floridan office or
call us at 850-526-3614 to get it in.
fato A j.vOul & zj ii.)


18A THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2011


INTERNATIONAL


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CBWiD










* I
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IA~ -.~.-.*


College Basketball




Chipola wins season opener


Lady Indians overcome turnovers,

missed FTs in victory over Brevard


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Chipola Lady Indians overcame a
sloppy performance to take a 75-66 vic-
tory over Brevard on Tuesday night in the
season opener in Melbourne.
Chipola turned the ball over 31 times


on the night and shot just 8 of 25 from
the free throw line, but connected on 52
percent from the field and dominated the
glass to pull out the win.
Kristine Brance had 22 points to lead
the Lady Indians, while Jelleah Sid-
ney added 14 points and 13 rebounds
and O'Neal Sessions had 16 points and


nine rebounds.
Denaya Brazzle contributed nine points
and 14 rebounds, but also had a team-
high 13 turnovers.
Chipola jumped out to a big lead, going
ahead 28-11 with just over seven minutes
left in the half.
But foul trouble forced Sidney and Sara
Djassi to leave the game for Chipola, and
the Lady Titans took advantage with a 13-
0 run to cut the lead to four.
The Lady Indians answered back to
stretch the lead to 10 at halftime, and Bre-
vard never got closer than five points in


the second half.
"We've never been a team that goes
places and just blows people out, espe-
cially early, but I thought it was good,"
Chipola coach David Lane said of his
team's effort. "We worked against the
press, worked against a different zone,
and got to work on what we need to do
with a 10-point lead with six minutes to
go possession to possession both offen-
sively and defensively."
The coach said that the carelessness
See CHIPOLA, Page 2B


PREP FOOTBALL


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN


Graceville's Javonta Cotton hauls in a pass to score against Jay Friday night.


RIVALS DO BATTLE


Hornets, Tigers meet with

bragging rights on the line


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

There won't be a district title or
a playoff berth or even a chance
at a winning season on the line
for Graceville and Cottondale
tonight, but the Tigers and Hor-
nets rarely need extra incentive
to beat each other.
The county rivals will do battle
tonight in Graceville at 7 p.m. in
a game that will mean little more
than bragging rights for each
team.
It has been a struggle for both
Graceville (2-6) and Cottondale
(0-8) this year, but a win would


brighten the spirits of either side
towards the end of an otherwise
dreary season.
"Oh yeah, it's a big ballgame for
us," Tigers coach Todd Werten-
berger said Wednesday. "We're
glad we've got it at home. We're
looking forward to it. It should
be a good ballgame."
Hornets coach Mike Melvin
echoed those sentiments.
"We're excited about playing
them. Every time we play them
it's a big game," he said. "I think
both teams will be ready to play.
It usually means more in the dis-
trict race than it does this year,
but that doesn't take away from


"Oh yeah, it's a lig balgame
for us."
Todd Wertenberger,
Tigers head coach

the rivalry. I-expect a good game
and I expect both teams will
come ready to play."
With an improved Bozeman
team coming to Cottondale in
next week's season finale, tonight
may represent the Hornets' last
best chance to avoid a winless
season.
CHS' best two looks at a vic-
tory this season came in Week 3
against Franklin County when
the Hornets had a 12-0 lead at
halftime before giving up 27 un-
answered points in the second

See RIVALRY, Page 2B


Prep Wrestling



Taking the




next step



Bulldogs excited about 2011

BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

After a successful season in 2010, the Marianna Bulldogs
wrestling program will look to make another leap forward
this season under second-year head coach Ron Thoreson.
The Bulldogs sent five wrestlers to regionals last year and
return three of them this year in senior Dalton Hendrix,
senior Alex Wynskey and sophomore AJ Ward.
Sophomore Ben Byrd just narrowly missed out on ad-
vancing out of district.
Thoreson said he would love to see all of those wres-
tlers return to regionals and all of his seniors to make it
to state.
However, the bigger goal for the Bulldogs, according to
their coach, is a team one.
"The big goal for the team is to win the district title," he
said. "It's a big one, but it's our big goal. We started out re-
ally strong last year and then made some mistakes and
kind of fell off.
"But this is a great group of kids. I really love them.
They're focused and ready to learn. They're motivated,
they learn well, they're respectful, and just an all around
great group of kids."
Thoreson said that he hoped a. more difficult schedule
would better prepare his team for the district and regional
meets.


See WRESTLING, Page 2B

7 .


MA\RKSKINNIR/FLORIP\N
Caleb Cook and Stephen Greenie work on their moves during
wrestling practice Friday.


Middle School Basketball


Marianna beats Cottondale in hoops opener


BY SHELIA MADER
Floridan Correspondent

The Marianna Middle School
Bullpups basketball team
opened the 2011 season with a
pair of wins over the visiting Cot-
tondale Hornets on Tuesday.
The A' team took a 47-25 win,
while the 'B' team picked up a
39-12 win over the Hornets.
In the 'A' team game, it was a
22-12 first-quarter lead for Mari-
anna before it shut out Cotton-
dale in the second period.
Marianna added 11 points to
take a 33-12 lead into the locker
room at the half.


Following the halftime break,
Marianna put up only six points
in the third quarter while Cot-
tondale countered with seven.
In the final period of play, it
was a 6-4 Cottondale advantage,
but the first half lead proved to
be too much for the Hornets to
overcome.
Leading the Hornets in scor-
ing was Chris Hall with 14 points
followed by Triston Braxton with
six.
On the board with three points
was Kadeem Webb, followed by
Deonte Patton with two.
For Marianna, it was Tre Clem-
mons in double digits with 12,
4$,


followed by. Herman Williams
with nine and Aaron Williams
with eight.
Checking in with seven points
was Jonathan Franklin, followed
by Dre Perry with six and Bran-
don Smith with four.
Going 1 for 1 at the foul line
was Calvin Griffin.
In'B' team action, the Bullpups
scored 12 points in the first pe-
riod of play while holding the
Hornets to one 3- point shot by
Zia Brown.
Jaeden Harley and Olajuwon
Brown both posted 3-pointers
for the Bullpups while Anton
Williams, Jacquez Orange and


Deontre Rhynes all added 2-
point buckets.
Marianna coach Brad Cross, in
his second year as head coach of
the Bullpups, cleared his bench
for some court time in the sec-
ond quarter.
They posted four points while
Cottondale answered with two
to give the Pups a 16-5 halftime
lead.
Cottondale scored five in the
third and two in the final period
of play, while Marianna added
23 second-half points to take the
victory.
Leading Marianna was Tyler
White with nine points, followed
V


byWilliams with six.
On the board with four points
were Jabari Kirkland, Deontre
Rhynes, Dontreal Pittman and
JameelWilson.
Harlev and Brown picked up
three points while Orange post-
ed two.
For Cottondale, it was lavonte
Hall with seven points, Brown
with three and Logan Benefield
with two.
The Bullpups will be back in
action at home on Thursday af-
ternoon as they take on the WVal-
ton Braves.
Tip off times are 5 p.m. and 6
p.mn. j


.~ ~









-12B THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2011


SPORTS


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN + www.jcfloridan:com


Collee xgu ten;t



FSU hopes Manuel can extend win streak


The Associated Press

BOSTON Boston College has
seen its share of mobile quarter-
backs in the last month. To pre-
pare for Florida State's EJ Man-
uel, though, the Eagles would
have to be watching the NFL.
"He's a big guy and he can
throw and run," BC coach Frank
Spaziani said this week as he pre-
pared for Thursday night's game
against the Seminoles. "He's kind
of like Cam Newton in a lot of
ways. They don't ask him to do
as much running. But certainly
if they did, he could do it.... He's
'got it all. I don't see any flaws in
him, to be honest with you."
Florida State (5-3, 3-2 Atlantic
Coast Conference) is winning
again after a three-game losing
streak, and Manuel is the main
reason why.
After spraining his non-throw-
ing shoulder in the Sept. 17 loss
to top-ranked Oklahoma, he
missed the game against then-
No. 21 Clemson and didn't return
until midway through the Oct. 8
game against Wake Forest.
The Seminoles lost all three.
Since then, though, Florida
State has again looked like the
team that was No. 6 in The As-
sociated Press preseason poll
- as high as fifth in the na-


[ . .





..... .-.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Florida State quarterback E.J. Manuel (3) scrambles out of the pocket
against North Carolina State at Doak Campbell Stadium in Tallahassee on
Saturday.


tion a few weeks after that. The
Seminoles beat Duke, Maryland
and North Carolina State by a
combined score of 115-32, with
Manuel completing 70 percent
of his passes; he's thrown for five
touchdowns in the three games
and run for two.
"Theylooklike the team people
were picking as national cham-
pions," Spaziani said. "I don't see
a weakness. They've got it all."
Boston College (2-6, 1-4) is
hoping for a modest two-game


winning streak after picking up
its first ACC win of the season
last weekend against Maryland.
The Eagles need to win their four
remaining games to qualify for a
bowl and extend their streak of
12 consecutive bowl games.
BC's best hope for a resurgence
is in running back Rolandan
"Deuce" Finch, who started the
year fourth on the depth chart
but moved up when Montel Har-
ris was lost for the season shortly
after breaking the school's all-


time rushing record. Finch ran
39 times for 243 yards and two
touchdowns against Maryland
last week, a 28-17 BC victory.
"They lose a rusher who's go-
ing .to break the ACC record and
they put a guy out there that
ran for 243 yards this week,"
Florida State coach Jimbo Fisher
said. "They can always run the
football; their linemen are well
coached. They can throw it, they
have big receivers; not just blaz-
ing speed but very athletic and
great hands. They make you beat
them on defense. They're not go-
ing to beat themselves."
No, but Manuel might beat
them.
The 6-foot-4, 234-pound quar-
terback has drawn comparisons
to Newton, who led Auburn to
the national championship, won
the Heisman Trophy and was
the No. 1 overall pick in the NFL
draft.
Newton started his career with
the Carolina Panthers by throw-
ing for more than 400 yards in
back-to-back games; in all, he
has thrown for more than 2,300
yards and 11 touchdowns and
run for 319, with seven scores.
"He's one of those guys that
can throw the ball and run the
ball," BC linebacker Luke Kue-
chly said. "The difference with


SEC East teams overlooked in LSU-Alabama hype


The Associated Press

NASHVILLE, Tenn. Nearly every col-
lege football fan will tune in to watch
the highly anticipated LSU-Alabama
showdown.
The matchup between the top ranked
teams in the country feels like the South-'
eastern Conference championship game.
Only it's not.
It may not even decide who wins the
SEC's Western Division.


That's one reason Georgia quarterback
Aaron Murray said Saturday night he will
have one eye on the LSU-Alabama game
and the other on No. 10 South Carolina
and No. 8 Arkansas.
Either the Bulldogs or Gamecocks will
represent the SEC East in the actual title
game on Dec. 3 against either the Tigers,
Crimson Tide or possibly even the Razor-
backs from the West
"They're both on at the same time?
Man!" Murray said of the two SEC games.


"I'm going somewhere to eat so I can
watch both of them. That's what I'm go-
ing to do, making sure both games are on
so I can watch both. I definitely want to
watch the Alabama-LSU game, but ob-
viously I've got to watch the Arkansas-
South Carolina game and hope Arkansas
can pull it out."
The odds in the championship game
will be against whoever wins the SEC
East, which has been overlooked most of
this season with all the hype and atten-


tion focused on the West.
Tennessee sophomore receiver Raiion
Neal said it's tough to argue with the bal-
apce of power having shifted to the West.
"They do have the 1 and 2 team in the
country, and I mean, our side needs to
pick it up a little bit," Neal said. "We've
been in a slump, but I feel We'll grow and
hopefully come out of it. They do have
the right to feel the way they feel. You do
have the 1 and 2 team in the country, not
just the SEC, the country.".


Rivalry
From Page 1B
half, and against Vernon on Oct. 7
when they surrendered a fourth;
quarter lead in a 24-22 loss.
The last two games 'haven't been
as close for Cottondale, with a 32-
12 home loss to Jay and a 41-6 road
defeat to Holmes County.
On the contrary, Graceville actu-
ally brings a bit of momentum into
tonight's game, having won two of
its last three games, including a 30-
22 home win over Jay last week.
The Tigers also took a 20-14 vic-
tory over South Walton on Oct. 14,
but they followed that up with a
disappointing 34-18 loss to Vernon
-the next week.
Wertenberger said it's important
that his team not have a similar
performance after its second win of.
the year that it had after its first.
"The thing we preached on in
practice is that we played a good
game against South Walton and we
feel like, take nothing away from
Vernon, but like we had a big let-
down," the coach said.
"We had a great game last week,
so now we need to put two togeth-


"What we do affects every one
of those people, so we want to
do well and do our best. We do
strongly believe that what we do
now will affect our future."
Todd Wertenberger,
Tigers head coach

er. We can't have another letdown
this week. Cottondale is hungry
for a win and they can sure enough
whip us."
The Tiger coach said he was im-
pressed with the Hornets' multiple
looks on offense and playmakers
like leading rusher Sheldon Vann
and receivers Jacquez Walker and
Prentice Webb.
"They're running a bunch of dif-
ferent formations and a lot of mo-
tion, and they do a good job of mix-
ing you up and getting mismatches
.offensively," he said. "They've got a
lot of speed and a lot of weapons.
They're explosive on offense."
Graceville has some speed guys of
its own in running back Derae Last-
er and quarterback Rasheed Camp-
bell, and Melvin said he was con-
cerned not only with their ability to
get outside but also the running of


fullbacks Allante Oliver-Barnes and
larrett Brogdon inside.
"They've got a heck of a back-
field," the coach said.
"They've got a lot of weapons back
there. They're strong up the middle
with (Oliver-Barnes and Brogdon),
and (Campbell and Laster) are dan-
gerous on the edge every time they
touch it."
Graceville will finish its season
next week with a road game against
Chipley, and while a victory over
the playoff-bound Tigers may be
too much to ask, a win tonight
would give the Tigers three wins
in their last four and some positive
momentum to end the season.
"We've talked about that as a
team too, that to us it's bigger than
one game," Wertenberger said. "It's
bigger than the season. We try to
talk about Graceville football, that
it's bigger than any one player, one
game or one season. It's everybody
who came before us and everybody
who' comes after us. That's how we
approach it.
"What we do affects every one of
those people, so we want to do well
and do our best. We do strongly be--
lieve that what we do now will af-
fect our future."


HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL
) Thursday- Cottondale at
Graceville, 7 p.m.
Friday- Vernon at Sneads,
7 p.m.; Marianna at Taylor
County, 7 p.m.

CHIPOLA WOMEN'S
BASKETBALL
) Chipola will return home
this weekend for the Milton H.
Johnson Classic.
The Lady Indians will play semi-
pro team Orlando Extreme on
Friday and Faith Baptist Prep
School on Saturday. Both
games start at 5 p.m.

CHIPOLA MEN'S
BASKETBALL
) The Indians will open the
regular season at home this
weekend in the Milton H.
Johnson Classic, playing the
Panhandle All-Stars on Friday
and Raleigh Sports Academy
Saturday.
Both games are at 7 p.m.

SNEADS VOLLEYBALL


)) The Sneads Lady Pirates will
open up play in the 1A state vol-
leyball tournament on Tuesday
at home against Liberty County
at 7 p.m.

ALUMNI FOOTBALL GAME
There will be a full contact
alumni football league held this
winter.
The games are full pads with
officials, announcers, and video
crew, and is open to all former
high school football players 18
and older in the area.
Games will take place on week-
ends from January through
March of 2012.
There must be at least 35 play-
ers to a team.
Those interested can sign up at
www.alumnifootballusa.com.

SPORTS ITEMS
Send all sports items to editorial@
jcfloridan.com, or fax them to
850-482-4478. The mailingaddress
for the paper is Jackson County
Floridan P.O. Box 520 Marianna, FL
32447.


Wrestling
From Page 1B
If that is the case, the Bulldogs
may not only contend for a dis-
trict title as a team, but they may
send wrestlers to state for the
first time in five years.
"I think I've got three or four
that can make a run at get-
ting to state," Thoreson said. "I
would be very happy with a state
qualifier."


Marianna is in its second week
of practice and will first compete
in a preseason meet on Nov. 11
in Tallahassee. So far, the coach
said that the team has been fo-
cusing primarily on its weak-
nesses from last season.
"It's been going good, really
good," Thoreson said. "We've
been doing a lot of work on take-
downs off the feet and getting up
off the bottom. We're working re-
ally hard on that because those
are the things we struggled with


the most last year."
The coach said that the Bull-
dogs would have approximately
20-21 wrestlers this season to fill
all 14 weight classes, including a
new 220-pound division that will
be filled by Dylan Reed.
The Bulldogs will have more
experience than they're ac-
customed to with five seniors
with multiple years within the
program.
The value of experience in
wrestling can't be overstated,


Thoreson said.
"It's definitely going to make
things a little easier for us," he
said. "Seniors are pretty impor-
tant. The junior and sbriior years,
you're supposed to excel because
you've got all that experience
now. I expect all of them to give
100 percent, but we need the se-
niors to perform well."
If they do, the coach said the
team will have a great oppor-
tunity to reach all of its season
goals.


"This team that we've got this
year has a really good shot at
winning the district title," Thore-
son said. "That's their goal. We're
pretty solid all the way through.
We just have to be focused and be
dedicated every day at practice.
"If they come to work and
dedicate themselves to give 100
percent at every practice, they
should win the district title. It's
not an easy task, but it's some-
thing that we can achieve with
the team we have."


Chipola
From Page 1B
with the ball was disap-
pointing, but he was happy
with the way his team shot
the ball and particularly
with how it attacked the
boards with post player
Shanay Corbett out and
starting center Jeniece
Johnson limited due to an
ankle injury.
"We had a lot of our turn-
overs in the second half,
and they were bad turn-
overs. We were lazy and
loose with the ball," he
said. "But we did a pretty
good job on the glass and
__ve did hold them to 33


percent from the field."
Chipola will return to ac-
tion Friday and Saturday
for the Milton H. Johnson
Classic against semi-pro
team Orlando Extreme on
Friday and Faith Baptist
Prep School on Saturday,
Both games start at 5 p.m.
"We're finding oat what
people can do and can't
do, and we're trying to put
them in the right situations
to be successful," Lane
said. "This weekend will be
another good little match-
up to try to get things fig-
ured out. We're not going to
know what either team can
do before we play them, so
we'll just get in there and
worry about ourselves."


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Sports Briefs


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him is he's got that elite size, elite
speed and athleticism. There's
guys that can run. EJ Manuel is
a big kid. He's got control of the
offense. Sometimes guys will be
exceptional athletes, but they
don't have control of the offense.
This guy knows what to do and
he spreads the ball really well."
With the Thursday night game,
it's a short week for both teams.
The Eagles are hoping they can
make up for the lack of practice
time by using what they learned
when they played Clemson and
Virginia Tech, which both have
mobile quarterbacks.
Clemson's Tajh Boyd threw for
283 yards and a touchdown and
also ran for 37 yards and a score
in the Tigers' 36-14 win over BC.
Virginia Tech's Logan Thonias
threw for 268 yards and a score
and ran 16 times for 60 yards and
a TD against to help the Hokies
beat the Eagles 30-14.
"We've been preparing for four
weeks, but this guy might be the
best of them all in terms of juk-
ing and making moves. He's a
big dude," defensive end Max
Holloway said. "Manuel brings a
whole different side to football.
He comes in and if nothing's
happening, he can break the
pocket and make plays with his
feet."












JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN o www.jcfloridan.com


SPORTS


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2011 3BF


Major League Baseball




Cubs fire manager Mike Quade


The Associated Press '

CHICAGO Chicago Cubs
manager Mike Quade was fired
Wednesday ,n the first major
move by Theo Epstein since be-
coming the team's president of
baseball operations.
Epstein, who was introduced
in his new position last week,
said Quade would not return af-
ter traveling to Florida to tell him
in person. He called Quade an
"outstanding baseball guy" but it
was time for a change.
Quade got the job after a 37-
game audition at the end of
the 2010 season, replacing Lou
Piniella on an interim basis. The
Cubs went 24-13 and he was
chosen over Hall of Famer Ryne
Sandberg for the job last season.
The Cubs went out and stum-
bled through another disap-
pointing year, finishing fifth
in the NL Central with a 71-91
record that extended their infa-
mous World Series champion-
ship drought to 103 years.
Epstein and new GM Jed Hoyer
had a long meeting with Quade
last week. Epstein had another
lengthy conversation with him


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE
Chicago Cubs manager Mike Quade was fired in the first major move by
Theo Epstein since becoming the team's president of baseball operations.


after a news conference Tues-
day to introduce Hoyer and new
scouting director Jason McLeod.
"While Mike is clearly an as-
set to any organization and any
major league staff, Jed and I be-
lieve that the Cubs would ben-
efit long-term from bringing in a


manager for 2012 who can come
in with a clean slate and offer
new direction," Epstein said.
He said the search for Quade's
replacement would begin
immediately.
"The next manager must have
leadership and communication


skills; he must place an emphasis
on preparation and accountabil-
ity; he must establish high stan-
dards and a winning culture; he
must have integrity and an open
mind; and he must have mana-
gerial or coaching experience at
the major league level," he said.
Epstein spoke with Sandberg
on Wednesday and let him know
that he wasn't in the Cubs' plans.
Sandberg, who managed in
Chicago's minor league system
and left the organization after
Quade was chosen to replace
Piniella, does not have major
league managerial or coaching
experience. He. managed Phila-
delphia's Triple-A team last sea-
son and could be a candidate in
St. Louis.
Another potential candidate in
Chicago could be Terry Franco-
na, Epstein's manager in Boston
who did not return to the Red Sox
after their epic September col-
lapse. Another name mentioned
is Tampa Rays bench coach Dave
Martinez, who once played for
the Cubs. As for Quade, he-ends
a nine-year tenure with the Cubs
organization. His only season as
manager was filled with criticism


and questions.
Like why didn't he intention-
ally walk Albert Pujols in an ex-
tra-inning game in St. Louis? The
Cardinals star then hit a winning
homer. Why did he leave starter
Randy Wells in so long against
the White Sox, resulting in an-
other tough loss?
Why didn't he play September
call-ups more with the Cubs so
far out of contention?
Quade's season got off to a dif-
ficult start when the Cubs lost
two members of their starting
rotation, Andrew Cashner and
Wells, in early April. It didn't get
much better.
Quade was ejected seven times
in his first season and he got in
a screaming match with start-
er Ryan Dempster, one of the
clubhouse leaders. His general
manager, Jim Hendry, was fired
during the season, Ryan Theriot,
now with St. Louis, at one point
said the Cubs were playing like
a Triple-A team and mercurial
right-hander Carlos Zambrano
was a handful all year, criticizing
his own closer and then cleaning
out his locker after giving up five
home runs to Atlanta.


College Football



Familiar foes Tulsa, UCF prep for latest matchup


The Associated Press

ORLANDO Central Florida
and Tulsa took very different
paths through the month of
October.
For the Knights (4-4, 2-2 Con-
ference USA), it was a month
spent mostly in quicksand. They
dropped back-to-back confer-
ence games, including a stun-
ning setback to UAB, and in the'
process left their hopes of re-
peating as East Division cham-
pions severely fractured.


Tulsa (5-3, 4-0) finished Oc-
tober 4-0 and brought itself re-
demption from its rocky 1-3 start
to the year that included losses
to three Top 10-ranked non-con-
ference foes.
Thursday night, their wind-
ing paths intersect as two teams
that have met twice in the C-USA
title game since 2005 face off in
an important momentum game
for both team's hopes of getting
back there.
Golden Hurricanes' coach Bill
Blankenship said that despite


UCF's recent woes, he said it's no
secret that the Knights are still a
dangerous team.
"Our guys are very clear in
knowing that UCF is 4-0 at
home," he said. "They've given
up no touchdowns against op-
posing offenses at home. They
have a defense that's only giving
up 14 points a game. They are,
on average, holding the oppos-
ing offense to 55 plays a game.
"Those are all numbers thatwill
get your attention very quickly."
Since the Knights' fast start to


2011 fell apart, coach George
O'Leary has been digging deep
in his playbook to find a way to
motivate his team.
Last week before UCF went out
and blanked Memphis to snap a
two-game losing streak, O'Leary
called on former Knights' stand-
out running back Kevin Smith to
give a pregame talk.
Smith kicked the coaching staff
out of the locker room and wrote
the words "All In" on a white
board. One-by-one each player
wrote their number underneath


it to signify their commitment.
Following the 41-0 shutoutwin,
several players called it a "state-
ment game." Center Jordan Rae
said the change in mood around
the team was the most notice-
able thing that changed leading
up to it.
"It was with the whole group,"
Rae said. "All last week we just
stressed having fun. Being fo-
cused, have having fun doing
what we do. We came out there,
everyone was focused and it
showed."


THURSDAY MORNING I AFTERNOON
6:00 6:307:00 17:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:0010:3011:0011:3012:0012:3
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NOVEMBER 3, 2011
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43 CNN2 (5:00) Morning Express With Robin Meade
45 CNN (5:00) American Morning (N) s0 CNN Newsroom (N)
46 CW (5:00) The Dally Buzz B0 Steve WIikos Show Jeremy Kyle
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99 SPEED Monster Jam NASCARRace Hub Pimp, Ride Pimp, Ride My Ride My Ride


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THURSDAY EVENING /LATE NIGHT NOVEMBER 3,2011
6 :00 6-30 7:00 7:30 8:0068:30 9:00 9:30 10:0010:3011:0011:301[2:0012:30 1:00T1:30I2:p002:303:00 3:30 4:00 4:30 5:00 5:30
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19 ESPN Audibles (N) (Live) College Football. Florida State at Boston College. (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) l SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportasCenter (N) (Live) College Football SportsCenter 0SportsCenter 00
20 CSS Talkin' SEC Football College Football: Stillman at Clark-Atlana. (N) (Live) SportsNte Paid rog. Paid rog. Paid rog. Paid rog. Paid rog. I ald Prog. Paid Prog. aid Prog. Pald rog. Paid rog. Paid Prog. Pald Prog. Pald Prog. Paed Prog.
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24 DISC American Chopper American Chopper Gold Rush (In Siereo) Auctin Auction Gold Rush (In Sterco) Auction Auction American Chopper American Chopper Paid Prog. Pad Prog. Pad rog. Paid Prog. Bodies Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Mat ind
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40 TVLNDVan Dyke [Van Dyke Married [Married Scrubs Scrubs Raymond [Raymond Raymond Raymond Rose Nay The NannNannyTheNenny 3's Co. 3's Co. Roeanne [Roseanne Nanny Nany Boston Legal Removal Paid Prog.
43 CNN2 Jane Velez-Mitchell Nancy Grace (N) Dr. Drew The Joy Behar Show Showbiz Tonight Dr. Drew Nancy Grace Showbiz Tonight The Joy Behar Show Showbiz Tonight Dr. Drew Mornng Expres
45 CNN Erin Burnett OutFront Anderson Cooper 360 Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 Erin Burnett OutFront Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 Anderson Cooper 360 Piers Morgan Tonight World Business Today AM: Wake Up Call (N) American Morning (N)
46 CW Seinfeld Selnfeld The Vampire Diarles The Secret Circle (N) Cops ['TII Death King [South Pk South Pk Roseanne Roseanne TBA PaldPro d rog. Paid Prog. Lose Trainer Better (N) (in Stereo) Pald Prog. The Dally Buzz (
47 SPIKE Jeal lto Jail I Jail Ie Jall ( IMPACT Wrestling (N) (Ini Storeo) I Th Sirranr'(200, Action) Stevve Austin. GTV Race-Ring MANswers MANswers Entourage Ways Die Pad Prog. Pald Prog. Pald Prog. MagicJack PaidProg. PaidProg.
49 HGTV Hunters House First Plce First Place House [Hunter Selling LA selling NY House [Hunters House Hunters Selling LA Selling NY House Hunters First Place First Place Fat Loss Shark Vac Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Makeover Clever
8 TLC Cellblock 6 Hoarding: Buried Alive Undercover Boss Celiblik 6 Undercover Boss Cellblock 6 Hoarding: Burled Alive Cellblock 6 1 Paid Prog. MaglcJack Pald Prog. Paid Prog. Orack Paid Prog. 17 Kids 17 Kids
19 SPEED Pass Time Pass Time Pimp, Ride Pimp, Ride Wrecked Wrecked Trucker Trucker Pimp, Ride Pimp, Ride Wrecked wrecked Trnicker [Trucker NASCAR Race Hub Gearz Hot Rod Garage Truck U PaldProg. PaidProg. PaldProg. PaidProg.


--I











JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


14B THURSDAY. NOVEMBER 3, 2011


S SCHULTZ
THE INE IN BACK rIPNT
THINK rHAT lAAS VERK FUNNY..


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BIG NATE BY LINCOLN PIERCE


I'VE ALREADY
EATEN ALL MY
GOb HALLOWEEN
CANDY ALL THAT'S
LEFT 1S 1THE DREC-5
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YUCK. 'I
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STUFF. / THROW IT
(r-\AWAY!
V ,"*'F^ '--


SOUP TO NUTZ BY RICK $S

/ MR. GeoR-e .ua i .






FRANK & ERNEST BY BOB


FRANK & ERNEST BY BOB


TROMOSKI

ITS N0 1Sob IN 1 cA Now Ld2uL.,
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THAVES _______


GRIZZWELLS BY BILL SCHORR
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MONTY BY JIM MEDDICK


COW & BOY BY MARK LEIKNES


YOU KNOW HOW SKINNY
MODELS IN MAGAZINES GIVE
US A FALSE IMPRESSION
OF HOW WE ALL
SHOULD LOOK



4, 1,
i7 5 \\\


WELL, I THINK OVERLY
MUSCULAR SUPERHEROES
IN COMIC BOOKS GIVE A
FALSE IMPRESSION OF
HOW ALL VIGILANTES
SHOULD LOOK.


IS THIS WHY
I IDNT I ; YOU WANNA
THINK START THAT
Sco NEIGHBORHOOD
'l WATCH-' x'--1


KIT'N' CARLYLE BY LARRYWRIGHT HERMAN BY JIM UNGER


www.Gocomicstom nkitncarlyle@comcast.net












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"H ,1 1h lt 'lI IIIW '',llI (ll /mIl'


"I told you not to order 'home fries'!
The chef eves 20 miles away."


PEANUTS BY CHARGE

t" \ "&


Answer to Previous Puzzle


ACROSS 51 Arthur's
1 Copier sorcerer
brand 54 Kind of
6 Vonnegut folder
and 551n fact
Waldheim 56 Kind of
11 Pleasant basket
12More gaunt 57- -turvy
13 Bullion 58 Persona
14 Slow trains non -
15Singer -
Brooks DOWN
16 Farfetched 1 TV Warrior
17 Hewn Princess
190nline 2 MIT grad
auction 3 Warden's
site fear
23 Berry 4 Solemn
product promises
26 Quay 5 Big sizes
28 Feel 6 -Aid
remorse 7 Cousin's
29 Latched dad
31 board 8 Estuary
33 Street 9 Util. bill
lingo 10Almost
34Paper in grads
chem lab 11 Musician's
35 Early space stint
station 12 Alps'Mont-
36 Libra's 16 Tango
stone number
39Double 18 Extend
curve 20 Hat
40 Part-timer features
42 Recedes 21 Prime
44- vera rib -
46 Ocean's 22 Affirmative
motions votes


43 Ladder
cousin
45 Floating
flower
47Quechua
speaker
48 Force
49 Lamb's
alias
50 Kangaroo
pouch
51 A-Team
member
(2 wds.)
52 Help-
wanted
abbr.
53Jay-Z's
genre
54 Car sticker
info


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


11-3 2011 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS



CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos

TODAY CLUE S equals W
TEM LRV GEH CYRV MABU, JXH ZU
UGOEVN R TEEM PEXGM EK HPAIARY
CXPNXAH UlUPV GES "RGM RTRAG." -
KUMUPABE K U Y Y AGA


Previous Solution: "Coaches are an integral part of any manager's team,
especially if they are good pinochle players." Earl Weaver
Q 2011 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 11-3


:,' '..

Dear Annie: I am a stepmom to two
wonderful little boys under the age of 4. I
treat them the same as my own children.
The problem is their mother. "Carla" acts
as if I am the wicked witch. I know it is
hard to let another woman care for your
children. I have assured her numerous
times that I am not out to take her place.
She is their mother and always will be.
Two years ago, the children were
removed from her home due to anger
issues and drug abuse. She had some
counseling and now shares joint custody
with their father. But if I happen to run
into Carla when she is with the boys, she
causes a huge scene, yelling and cussing
at me if the boys say hello. She has sent
me awful text messages and threaten-
ing Facebook posts. I always try to be
the bigger person and ignore her, but it's
hard. I have had to call the police numer-
ous times when I felt she was a danger to
my children or me.
My husband tries to keep the peace




At the bridge table it is: "here and the
windfall (and a scoop for the journalist
hears about the deal); here and there, fail
In this deal, the declarer at the table w
expect to fail in four hearts, but if he play
a windfall, he will get lucky. What should S
do?.West leads the club queen, and the def
ers take two tricks in the suit before shiftii
a spade.
North was worth three-and-a-half heart
the second round of the auction. But mos
,ponents won't permit such a precise des
tion. (lHe had 19 support' points, 18 in
cards and one for his doubleton, which
gested rebidding four hearts. But he ha,
losers two spades, two hearts, one dian
and one club)-which advised settling for t
hearts.) South had enough to raise to gain
support points and eight losers.
Along with the two clubs, there seem I
two other losers: one in spades and o0
diamonds, resulting in down one. But I
is a chance. Maybe the person who has I
diamonds holds at most two spades. 1
trumps, cash the spade and diamond
then exit with a diamond.
Here, you get a windfall. West wins the
and must return a club. You ruff iin one I
and sluff your remaining spade Trom the (
hand. Then buy a lottery ticket.


NEA Crossword Puzzle


because no one knows what Carla is
capable of. I feel she is unstable. The
youngest son has minor surgery sched-
uled, and Carla told my husband I better
not show up at the hospital. As a step-
mom, what am I, to do?
NOT-SO-WICKED STEPMOTHER

Dear Stepmom: It doesn't sound as
if Carla's counseling was sufficient to
overcome her anger issues. She is a loose
cannon and could be dangerous. Please
keep records of her threatening texts and
posts in case your husband chooses to
fight the custody arrangement. We un-
derstand that he fears rocking the boat,
and there is no simple solution. Some-
times the best thing is just to stay out of
the way and be as non-confrontational
"as possible. That includes not going to
the hospital. Have your husband convey
your good wishes to your stepson. Also
try the National Stepfamily Resource
Center for a support group in your area.


23 Pretty in
Paris
24 Bedside
noise
25 Atlas abbr.
27 Colorful
carp
29Cellar,
briefly
30 Id
companion
32 Salt Lake
City player
34 Attorney's
deg.
37 Many-
petaled
blossom
38 Honest
prez
41 Gets
boring


North 11-3-11
*K63
VAJ85
*AK43
*K7

West East
4Q10 4J9852
V 9 4 3 V 7 6
* QJ7 *109
SQJ 105 4 *A982
South
SA 7 4 -
V K Q 10 2
4 8 6 5 2
6 3

Dealer: North
Vulnerable: Both

,South West North East
S1 Pass
IV Pass 3V Pass
4 V Pass Pass Pass

Opening lead: 4 Q


, .


ENTERTAINMlENT


Horoscope
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) -, Usually, once you set
your mind to something
it's a fait accompli, but not
today.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-
Dec. 21) There should
be no need to revise your
painstakingly laid-out
plans. Don't try to second-
guess yourself and fail to
follow through on your
arrangements.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) During this cycle,
you should be exception-
ally fortunate because of
persons with whom you're
involved.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) In your mind, every-
thing will work out as long
as everyone goes along
with your way of thinking.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) You'll be far hap-
pier devoting your efforts
and energies to tasks that
are of a mental or creative
nature.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
- You have a lot going for
you, such as sharp think-
ing, good friends and even
some help from Lady Luck,
yet you may fail to appreci-
ate this and thus not capi-
talize on it.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
- As long as you don't al-
low your impulses to over-
ride good methodology,
you can achieve more than
your share of objectives. Be
systematic, practical and
patient.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
- If you're smart, you'll
stay away from subjects
that are debatable and
can't be solved anyway.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
Teaming up with another
in a common cause can be
extremely productive, but
only if you both put forth
an equal amount of effort.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
Someone with whom
you're involved might need
a bit of a push from you to
get him or her started.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
- You're likely to be ex-
tremely productive and in-
dustrious, which is all well
and good.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
You'll be happier stick-
ing to those whom you
know like and admire you,
and staying clear of people
who think they are better
than everybody else.











vw..ICFLORIDAN.com


CLASSIFIED


Jackson County Floridan Thursday, November 3, 2011 5 B


WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED




ARKETPLAC


m


BY PHONE: (850) 526-3614 or (800) 779-2557 BY MAIL: WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE
BY FAX: (850) 779-2557 P.O. BOX 520, MARIANNA, FL 32447
ONLINE: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM IN PERSON: 4403 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA
Publication Policy Errors and Omissions: Advertisers should check their ad the first day. This publication shall not be liable for failure to publish an ad or for a typographic error or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the ad for the first day's
insertion. Adjustment for errors is limited to the cost of that portion -of the ad wherein the error occurred. The advertiser agrees that the publisher shall not be liable for damages arising out of errors in advertisements beyond the amount paid for the space
actually occupied by that portion of the advertisement in which the error occurred, whether such error is due to negligence of the publisher's employees or otherwise and there shall be no liability for non-insertion of any advertisement beyond the amount paid for
such advertisement. Display Ads are not guaranteed position, All advertising is subject to approval. Right is reserved to edit, reject, cancel or classify all ads under the appropriate classification.

For dealn ca to-r orviI


ft) ANNOUNCEMENTS












CGiONR&SPO.E AIAi LN. PTICES
Recall: Children's frog masks sold at Target
The'Florida Department of Agriculture and
Consumer Services, the U.S. Consumer Prod-
uct Safety Commission (CPSC), and Target
Corp., of Minneapolis, Minn., have announced
the recall of about 3,400 children's frog
masks. The plush frog masks lack proper ven-
tilation. When secured in place across a
child's face, it presents a suffocation hazard
to the child.
This recall involves child-sized frog-themed
animal masks. The plush mask is green with
yellow and red highlights. There are two eye
cutouts and a green elastic band with a fas-
tener used to secure the mask at the back of
the child's head. UPC code 06626491474 is
printed on a label attached to the mask.
The recalled masks were manufactured in Chi-
na and sold exclusively at Target stores na-
tionwide from August 2011 through Septem-
ber 2011 for about $1.
Consumers should immediately take masks
from young children and return the product
to any Target store for a full refund. For addi-
tional information, call (800) 440-0680 be-
tween 8 a.m. and 9 p.m. ET Monday through
Friday, or visit the firm's website at www.tar
get.com.

Number: CW 1061
Date: November 3, 2011
Florida Department of Agriculture and
Consumer Services








JUST IN: Early 1900's Fire dogs; Brass & Copper
coat rack; table made from 1950's cotton
trailer gate; Vintage bird cage w/stand;
Crystal cornucopia @Medford Antique
Marketplace, 3820 RCC Dothan,
M-Sat. 9 to 5 702-7390
LARGE YARD SALE: Fri & Sat. 7:30-?
3009 2nd St. Marianna. Lots of nice items;
furniture, household items, clothes,
crafts, christmas items, etc.
NEED CASH!!
We Buy Whole Estates Or
Good Quality Used Furniture.
Medford Interiors & Antique Marketplace,
3820 RCC, Dothan 334- 702-7390
YARD SALE & COLLECTABLES: Friday &
Saturday 8-? 1892 Mt Cello Rd (Rocky Creek)
Bunch of dolls, clothes, furn, h'hold items,
stuffed animals, & much more.

($) FINANCIAL-


Beautiful Upscale Lounge in Dothan.
Great location and price. Everything
included: custom built bar, furniture, 4-keg
cooler and other equipment, big screen tv,
and more. Owner financing available.
Serious inquiries only please.
Call 334-313-6207.

Would You Like Your Own Boss???
Local Transport Company for Sale based
in Dothan with 5 trucks and 1 car included.
Annual income $435k. 9 years in business.








Truck Load = 9 stack $400. delivered
Stack measures 4 ft. wd. &rnl h



,Wanted: Old Coins, Gold,
S Diamonds, Guns, And Tools
West Main Jewelry & Loan 334-671-1440.


SATSUMAS, tangerines and grapefruit $20.
bags. Located at Hwy 73 S. and Laramore Rd,
follow the signs to Bar L Ranch. Open daily
lpm-6pm. For more info call 850-209-5506.

PETS & ANIMALS


2 Male (1 neutered), 1 FM (spayed) Adult cats
for Adoption 334-712-2121
Free Cats to GOOD home Neutered/Spayed,
shots current, Different Colors 850-482-4896
FREE KITTENS: (2) very gentle, loves kids,
850-579-4986 after 4pm

AKC BULLMASTIFF PUPS AWESOME LITTER
BREEDING THE BEST TO THE BEST, LOOKS LIKE
ROCKY'S DOG BUTKUS $1,250; WITH A SERV-
ICEMAN, WOMAN VETS DISCOUNT OF $200,
FAWNS, LITE, DARK BRINDLES
WWW.SEXTONSBULLZ.COM 334-806-5911
AKC Labrador Retriever Chocolate, one male,
Vet checked S/W very healthy. Hunting Blood-
line, Ready 11/5 $400, 334-693-2912 sdejones@
comcast.net
Blond FM Beagle Mix 1 yr old, Very Playful up
for adoption 334-712-2121
CKC Mini-Schnauzers
Black, Silver & Chocolate
($375- $475) Taking Deposits.
S/W, Groomed. Ready Nov 2nd
Call 334-889-9024
CKC Shih-Tzu puppies, Males and Females,
First Shots and Dewormed. Beautiful Mark-
ings. Great with kids. $300.00. Call 334-248-
3447 or after 5pro Call 334-898-7067.
FOUND: Female Rat Terrier near Bumpnose Rd.
850-526-5420
FREE: adult dogs, M&F Beagles, Huskie-M mix
w/ blue eyes, 334-712-2121
FREE DOG: Very nice Red Setter type male
needs loving home. 850-592-4793



R LOST: 2 yr old F Wolf/Terrier mix. CR 167
& Nortec Blvd. 850-579-2854/557-2156
T OLDER PUPPIES ON SALE V
$75 Yorkie Poos, Shih-poos, Morkies,
Yorkie-pom also Yorkies $450 and up.
Maltese $500 & Shorkies $250. 334-718-4886
Two Free Puppies to a good home, Cocker
Spaniel and Welsh Corgie mix, 334-691-8081


UKC & NKC Registered Treening Feist Puppies
5 months old with all shots, white with black &
brown spots. Will be great pets for any house-
hold. Great squirrel dogs and ready for training
this season!! Sight Treening Now.
$300. Call 334-618-4194

( ) FARMER'S MARKET


Cherokee Satsumas available at the farm
1525 Fairview Rd. Marianna 850-579-4641.

FRESH
S GREEN
PEANUTS
850-352-2199
OR 850-352-4423
Fresh Shelled Peas, Several Varieties
2307 Mayo Road, (Grand Ridge)
Bobby Hewett (850) 592-4156


CLASSIFIED


WORK!!


Thursday, November'3, 2011






^Biilf~lll~lI^^.^v-^v~y\j---
O

THE SUDOKU GAME WITH A I KICK!

HOW TO PLAY.
Fill in the 9x9 grid with the missing
numbers so that each column, row and
3x3 box contains the digits 1 9 only once.
There is only one correct solution
for each puzzle.
GET MORE WASABI
PUZZLES ONLINE!
ARCHIVES AND MORE GREAT GAMES AT
BOXERJAM.COM


FRSHPODC

SAWYE9SPROUC
HASREHHOEGRW
PRODUC


Plenty of Shelled, Fresh Peas,
Tomatoes & other Vegetables
All Farm Fresh!
220 W. H 52 Malvern



HAY 6x6ft. Argentina, Bahia, Bermuda, 116
rolls, $60. each. 334-805-3403 or 334-677-3247.

Southeastern Premier Sales Inc.-
would like to invite you to our next sale
November 5th to be held at the Houston
County Farm Center. Tack begins at lOam
and horses to follow for more info go to
www.dothanhorsesale.com
or call Scott Roberts at 229-891-4454

($,) EMPLOYMENT






The Dove Academy
is seeking a


Buy It!

Sell I

PFt

JI




FRIDAY 11/11
SUNDAY 11/13


Friday, 11/11
Sunday, 11/13
Tuesday, 11/15'
Wednesday, 11/16


@@@@Io0


t!

nd It!*


(m


EDUCATION
& INSTRUCTION


Get a Quality Education for a
New Career! Programs
FORTIS offered in Healthcare,
SHVAC and Electrical Trades.
Call Fortis College Today!
888-202-4813.
c: )L1.1.(i. For consumer information
www.Fortis.edu
C(/) RESIDENTIAL
REAL ESTATE FOR RENT


CHIPOLA APARTMENTS
SPACIOUS EFFICIENCIES AND
1 BEDROOM APTS SECTION 8 ASSISTANCE
AVAILABLE ON ALL UNITS
UNITS SPECIALLY DESIGNED FOR
HANDICAPPED OR DISABLED
FOR RENTAL INFORMATION CALL
(850) 526-4407 TDD #800-955-8771
4401 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA
MONDAY THRU FRIDAY, 9:00 AM TO 5:00 PM
EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY



1BR 1BA Apartment in town, $450 per month.
No pets. 850-557-2000



,3BR 1BA duplex & 2BR 2BA duplex both in
Grand Ridge both $425/mo + $425 dep. 850-
592-5571

1/2 block off US90 in Marianna close to every-
thing, courthouse and stores. 800 sq. ft., old
home, with city utilities. New vanity in bath-
room. Cheap rent as agent/owner has no
mortgage. Good responsible tenant wanted.
Only 1/2 month sec dep. Bad credit ok, no
evictions. No app fees for quick move-ins.
At least 1 yr. lease. Ed McCoy, Century 21
Sunny South Properties (850)573-6198
2 & 3 bedroom now available in Marianna &
near Blue Springs Park. 1 year lease, small pets
ok with deposit. Call 850-693-0570 Iv msg.
2BR/1BA Concrete block Rental in Marianna,
Tile floors, washer h/u, pets ok, $300/mo + $30
credit/bkgrnd ck. Additional houses and
apartments in Graceville 850-263-5753
3BR 2BA w/bonus room, House in Marianna,
very clean, CH/A, dishwasher, $650 + dep. Call
for appointment 904-214-6980
Austin Tyler & Associates *
Quality Homes & Apartments
850- 526-3355 4a
"Property Management Is Our ONLY Business"
11J A For Rent: 316 Red Bud
Circle in Dothan
This one-year-old Garden
i home has hard wood
floors, carpet in bed
rooms and ceramic tile
with granite counter tops
in kitchen. Double garage, 9 foot ceiling,
fenced in back yard and irrigation. (in Grove
Park 84 West) 334-794-2894. $1,300 per month


11/10 @ 1:00 PM
11/10 @ 2:00 PM


RETAIL DISPLAY
Deadline is Tuesday, 11/08 @ NOON
Deadline is Wednesday 11/09@NOON
Deadline is Wednesday 11/09 @ 5 PM
Deadline is Thursday 11/10 @ 5PM





@

9 -- **-


I0





DD


Wednesday's
WASABI SOLUTION

V @ Z 9 1@3 s

05(D 8 .2 7 9

6 1 5 @

1 ..1 1





ITODKCOLB8 002@ NC. WWW BLOCKDOT COM


BE SURE TO VISIT OUR
NEWEST GAME SITE


KEWLBOX.COM


Experience with Adolescent Girls Preferable

Please contact Amy or
Cheryl Elligson at (850) 263-7550
, or fax resume to.(850) 263-7685. ,,


I


ACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN
VETERANS DAY DEADLINES


CLASSIFIED
Deadline is Thursday
Deadline is Friday


,f


i m i i m -


I I -


I


I I


1 0 1 1


w LUVU












6B Thursday. November 3. 2011 Jackson County Floridan


" -RESIDENTIAL.
REAL ESTATE FOR REN


Large Country Home West of Alford 3/2 brlc
2 car garage, 2 large sheds, $850/mo. 3/2 bri
in Alford, $650/mo/ lease, dep. & ref. req.
850-579-4317/866-1965
Large house In a fantastic quiet neighborhood
4 BR 2.5 ba 3228 sq. ft. with a basement and
outside building in a fenced back yard. $1,500
deposit & $40 application fee. Call 334-618-341
Lovely 3BR IBA House, Clean, in town, near
schools, nice yard, quiet neighborhood, out-
door pets ok, $575/mo with deposit 850-482-
6211


2/2 MH South of Cottondale, water is furnish-
ed, Central Heat/Air, $500 + dep. 850-352-4393
209-4516
2 & 3 bedroom mobile Homes in Cottondale.
$500 and up. H20, garbage, sewer included;
http:// www.charloscountry living. com.
850-258-4868/209-8847
2 & 38R 2BA Mobile Homes In Cottondale no
pets, Central Heat & Air $400-$450 850-258-
1594 leave message
2 & 3 BR MH's in
Marianna & Sneads (850)209-8595.
3/2 $550 Quiet, well maintained Park,
Water/sewer/ garb/lawn included.
Other rentals available starting @ $395
m# Joyce Riley RE 850-209-7825 4,
3BR 1 BA Located between Grand Ridge &
Sneads water & garbage included $350/mont
850-573-0308.
Rent to Own: 2 & 3BR Mobile Homes.
Lot rent included. Also available,
1 & 2BR Apts & Houses. For details
*850-557-3432 or 850-814-6515 e4
Small Quiet Famnly Oriented Park- 3BR 2BA MH for
Rent includes water, garbage,'lawn care, No Pets 850
592-8129




3BR IBA Brick House for Sale: HW floors, LR,
Din, Den, porch, 2 carports, near Riverside. 850
352-4389




Asl Ad e- io
Selling by Order of
U. S. Bankruptcy Court
Middle District of Georgia
Chapter 12, Case No. 11-10378

167 Acres Divided
Friday, NovemIber 18, 2M p.
Calico County, G
2 Mies Nuteast of ArihgtMIGAJ
This property sells by order of the
Bankruptcy Court at Absolute
Auction..no minimums..no reserves.
High dollar buys..regardless of
price.

85 Acres in Cultivation
82 Acres in Pines & Hardwoods
Offered as a Whole or Divided
3 Tracts from 18 to 129 Acres
Auction held on site, 2 miles NE of
Arlington on Hwy. 45.
Terms: Pay 20% down, 10% buyer's
premium. 2% broker's commission.
Inspection: Anytime at your own
risk or Nov. 11, from noon till 2 p.m.

For Detailed Information
Johndixon.com
800.479.1763
GAL # 2034







JOHN DIXON
& ASSOCIATES
AUCTION MARKETING





Duplex Office Building for sale in downtown
Marianna. New roof, Located at 2912 Green St.
$140K will negotiate. Call 850-526-4448




'. ,- 2010 Polaris 4x4 500EFI.
Winch, top, windshield.
SNever in mud. Only 31 hr
Parked In carport. New
cond. $11,000 new. Askir
$8,500. 334 897-2870

Golf cart: 2004.Like-new batteries and charger
Excellent shape. $2,200. Call 334-677-0020.

YAMAHA 4
WHEELER GRII
ZLY 600-'98 4x
Auto, runs grea
low miles, winc
334-695-1306


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UMA '07-29ft.,
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CLASSIFIED


i 1 I S AUTO&FOR UA U


-Person Boat 28 lb. Thrust Ford '06 Sedan 500
Motor, Electric Running LOW MILES! LIKE NEW! MUST SELL!
dith Aerator, 16' Trailer, $850, $200 down, $189 per month.
and leave message. Call: Ron Ellis at 334-714-0028.
Ford '09 Focus
V ILOW MILES! GREAT GAS MILEAGE!
4 door, $200 down, $199 per month.
Packages From Call: Ron Ellis at 334-714-0028.
e $4,995 Ford 2010 Fusion SE, 4cyl. 4-door, 29K miles,
All Welded factory bumper to bumper warranty $14,500.
ts AllAluminum Boats FIRM 334-618-8255.
Ford '95 Mustang GT Convertible- white with
www.xtremeindustries.com leather interior, 200k mile runs great, needs
paint, $3,500. Firm Call 334-695-2340
1-Owner
Honda 2007 Civic EX, coupe, 106,000 mi., great
Condition, one owner, auto, moon roof, premi-
* Dutchman '10 27ft. sleeps um stereo and wheels, good Michelin tires. pw,
8, Q-sz. bed, Frig, micr pdl, a/ctilt, cruise. $11,500. 334-797-1890 or
wave, stove, wall mount for 334-648-3939
flat screen, canopy, tow Hundal '04 Elantra GLS
i hitch & cover, $15,500 OBO ONLY 60,000 Miles,
334-550-9895. 4Cylinder. Automatic,
Economical, Good
2 slide-outs, king bed, like Options, NEW TIRES!
.695-6359,334-687-6157 LIKE NEW! $6625.
695-6359, 4Call: 334-790-7959.
S : I Hyundal '06 Elantra GLS,
4 c I1 4 Door Autonmatic


Dixie RV SuperStores
FL's Newest RV Dealer
NOW OPEN!!!
*Store Hours*
Monday-Saturday
8:00am-6:00pm
21 Acres / 30 Brands New and Pre-0w
* Newmar = Keystone Heartland J.
Fleetwood Prime Time Coachm
Forest River
Service Department
Parts and Acces. Store
RV Collision Center
Located off 1-10 Exit 70 / SR285
328 Green Acres Dr.
De Funlak Springs, FL 32435
Sales and Service: 850-951-1000
www.dixierv.com DO 12756


vned
ayco
oen


Trail Lite 2006 R-VISION
26 ft., fully loaded,
bought new, 13K miles
REDUCED! $39,500
334-616-6508




ssan 2008 Titan r 4x45.6L DOHC 32 valve en-
rance V-8, 317/385 Ib.ft.Torque, shift-on-the-
4WD system, 4 door, 20x8 alloy wheels, bed
mounted lock box, leather seats, 350 watt
ckford Fosgate Powered Premium Audio
th 6 disc in dash CD player, XM satelitte ra-
o, power sliding vertical back glass, rear so-
r system, heated seats, bluetooth, moonroof,
w package, navigation system with 7" LCD
splay with GPS and DVD atlas. $26,500.00
10 334-792-0650 or 334-685-0217


Plymouth'65 Valiant
Conertible,
Automatic, A/C, 273
V8, Good Conmdition!
$9,000 OBO 850-263-4563


Fuel Injection Edelbrock electronic
for Chevy 1985, used $1000.
a* 334-726-3349 or 334-677-4971 4,
AU^^ ifnTOS KFOR SALE ^


2005 Nissan Sentra I am'
selling my volcanic or-
ange 2005 Spec-V with
56,000 miles. The car
mes with I/H/E making about 205hp. Howev-
, It still manages to get over 30 mpg on the
ghway and includes sunroof and a 300-watt
ckford Fosgate audio system with sub.Gar-
e kept for over 3 years. The car is mechani-
lly sound and runs great. Contact me at
ewolfe09@gmail.com or 972-742-0393. Pics
on request. Thanks! $9,000


ick '98 LeSaber, gray, $2000. Call for appt.
0-557-0145
ewolet '01 Silverado X/Cab $1900 Down,
Interest. Open 9am 9pm. 1-800-470-0650


hevrolet '89 Blazer: reddish color,very clean,
od condition $1,500. Call 334-793-2142.
)rvette '10 Grand Sport Coupe crystal red
metallic 2 tone titanium gray seats auto
insmission LS3 engine, 3LT preferred
uipment group 15K miles, warranty and
ore. $47,000 334-393-4541 or 334-308-5672.
Crysler '05 PT Cruiser.
4 Cylinder, Automatic,
4 Door, Cold air,
Excellent condition, $6300.
Call: 334-790-7959.



PontIac 98' Grand Am $475 Down
Chevy 99 Blazer $ 575 Down
Ford 98' FSO X-Cab $775 Down
Dodge 02' Durango $995 Down
Che wy l'Silvirarln 1395 Dnown


odge '83 Ram Charger 318 engine 150K miles.
4-726-0147.


rd '02 Taurus $575 Down, 0% Interest.
ien 9am 9om. 1-800-470-0650


rd '98 F-150 X/Cab $775 Down, 0% Interest.
ien 9am 9pm, 1-800-470-0650


nomrONLY 36,000 miles,
Loaded, LIKE NEW! $8700.
Call: 334-790-7959.
Hyundal '11 Sonata
LOW MILES! GREAT GAS MILEAGE!
FULL WARRANTY! $500 down, $350 per month.
Call: Steve Hatcher at 334-791-8243.
Jeep '05 Wrangler Rubicon Black. Excellent
condition. Soft top. 100k miles. One Owner.
$11,500. $750 below Kelly blue book value.
334-796-9554
Kla '05 Optima LX,
Loaded, 4 cyl., Automatic,
4 Door, NEW TIRES! Clean,
62,000 miles, Excellent.
$5795. Call: 334-790-7959.
Lexus '07 LS 460.41K,
Loaded and in excellent
condition. Pearl White
with tan interior. $43,500.
Call 334-405-9127
Lincoln '91 Town Car. Runs well. $900, or best
offer. 334-899-7377.
Mecury 93' Station Wagon: light blue, very
clean, 120k miles, good condition $1,995.
Call 334-793-2142.
Mercedes '08 C300 Sport LOADED, 1 owner,
Silver with Black Leather, 63K mi. (all high-
way). 100K mi. Extended warranty. $22,500
OBO. iPod system, Sunroof. Excellent Condi-
tion, Super Clean 334-618-2154 or 334-798-5714
Mercedes '97 S500 Roadster. red convertible,
wine leather interior,55k miles, excellent condi-
tion. Call 334-693-3980
Mercury '00 Grand Marquis: Very Clean. White
with leather interior, mileage 64,300, $5,900.
Call 334-671-0685.
Mercury 03' Grand Marquis LS "LIKE NEW"
Beige, fully loaded, 46k miles, like new inside &
out, beige leather interior, alloy wheels.
Price to Sell! $6,999. Call 334-557-1696
NEED A VEHICLE? GOT BAD CREDIT?
I can get U Riding Today Repos, Slow
Credit, Past Bankruptcy OK! $0 Down/ 1st
Payment, Tax, Tag & Title Push, Pull or Drag,
Will Trade anything! Warranty On Every
Vehicle Sod $20 Gt Card w/pu rchase

Nissan '03 350-Z Low Miles, Great Condition,
Black, Selling price $12,300 334-677-3631
Nissan '09 AltIma
LOW MILES! LOADED!
$500 down, $350 per month.
Call: Steve Hatcher at 334-791-8243.

Pontiac '01 Grand Prix $575 Down, 0% Interest.
Open 9am 9pm, 1-800-470-0650
Pontiac '08 Solstice convertible 52K miles,
silver with black leather interior, auto trans,
4cyl. 1 owner, auto locks & windows, new tires.
$15,500. blue book is $18,000 334-618-5427
Pontiac '96 Bonneville SSEI, black/black leath-
er, PW, PS, CD, power sunroof, HUD, non-
smoker, very good condition, 129,000 miles,
asking $4,500 OBO, 334-687-4626.
Subaru '09 Forester silver with black int. 4K
miles, all wheel drive, new tires, great vehicle.
$21,000. OBO 334-308-1112.
Volkswagen 09 EOS:
hard top convertible with
pano roof, silver with tan
leather interior, fully
loaded luxury package,
29k miles, super nice and very clean, $23,500.
Call 334-685-1070
Volvo '96 960: White, sedan, 25,000 miles, nice
inside and out, good tires, A/C cold. Elec
seats, cruise, panel lights inop. $3,000. 334-
693-3692


Honda '08 Shadow Aero: BT750, 5k miles, black
with lots of chrome, never been dropped or
wrecked, $3500. Call 334-596-3656
YAMAHA '09 110 Dirt Bike, excellent
condition, rarely used $1,400 or trade for 4
wheeler 334-687-4686
-l l l~lli'

2008 Chevrolet Tahoe LTZ, 44,480 miles, black,
leather, 4X4, DVD, navigation, warranty, excel-
lent condition, $9200, amassa@netscape.com
Chevrolet '02 Blazer $675 Down, 0% Interest.
Open 9am 9pm, 1-800-470-0650
CHEVY '03 SUBURBAN- 1500 LT, Loaded, 50K
miles, Good Condition, $13,000 334-355-1373
Dodge '99 Durango $575 Down, 0% Interest.
Open 9am 9pm, 1-800-470-0650

Chevrolet '01 Silverado X/Cab $1275 Down, 0%
Interest. Open 9am 9pm, 1-800-470-0650
Chevy 2500'99 273K miles, engine has knock
rest of truck in good cond. $1900. 334-792-6248.


CALL TODAY FOR YOUR TOWING NEEDS

rQ? 4 m `24 7ao p
ALTO BODY & RECYCLING
PAYING TOP DOLLAR FOR JUNK CARS
Contat Jason Harger at 334-791-2624
.........~ ... .. ...... aulr
a ~Got a Clunker
iomr^ We'll be your Junkedr
a We buy wrecked cars
and Farm Equip. at a
fair and honest price!
S$325. & up for
Complete Cars CALL 334-702-4323

a WANTED WRECKED OR JUNK VEHICLES
& PAY TOP DOLLAR
SDAY-334-794-9576 NIGHT334-794-7769

a= WE PAY CaSH
FOR JUNK CARS!!!"!
Call 334-818-1274


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CLASSIFIEDS...

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JACKSON COUNTY



FLORIDAN

jcfloridan.com




monster'

FIND LOCAL JOBS AT: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM/JOBS'


Call for Top Price for
Junk Vehicles


I also sell used parts
24 HOUR TOWING 334-792-8664 4


www.JCFLORIDAN.com

Ford '01 F150 $975 Down. 0%.: Interest.
Open 9am 9pm, 1-800-470-0650

FORD '89 F150, 4wh, 4x4
Auto, $4,600 or reasonable
offer. Call 229-334-8520.

TRACTOR 4230 John Deer 100hp, $8500. & 2010
JD 45hp $4500. 334-735-2464

TRACTOR-IH1440 Combine, LOOK !
Field Ready, Grain Head and Corn Head.
$6,000.850-415-0438


2003 Pontiac Montana Van $5,500, 49,000
miles. extended body, 4 brand new Good year
tires! front and rear AC, cruise control,
CD/radio, exterior white, interior gray. Alaba-
ma rebuilt title after minor damage (replaced
rear bumper and side door) RUNS GREAT,
LOOKS GREAT. Perfect for business of family!
(334) 701-8862 or (334)796-6729
Chevrolet '97 Astro Van
conversion Van raised
roof, loaded, new tires,
One owner, GREAT
condition. 52K mi. $9,500.
334.897.2054 or
334-464-1496
CHEVY'06
2500
Express Van
39,500 miles
w/over $2k
in storage
bins & ladder racks, $14,500 334-687-4686
Pontiac '99 Montana V-6, One owner. 145K
miles, needs head gasket, $2600. OBO CASH
Serious inquiries only call 334-693-3141
9AM 8PM ONLY.
W T A S


I


11


I. I V M II ,


I










www.JCFLORIDAN.com CLASSIFIED


Jackso County Floridan Thursday, November 3, 2011- B-


LEGALS


LF15580
NOTICE
Tri-County Community Council, Inc., Board of
Directors will meet on Thursday, November 10,
2011 at 5:00 P.M. with Finance and Board De-
velopment Committee at 4:00 P.M., at Simbo's
Restaurant, Hwy 79 North in Bonifay.


LF15567
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR JACKSON COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NO: 11-257-PR
IN RE: Estate of TERRY JEAN LARAMORE
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Terry Jean
Laramore, deceased, whose date of death was
January 1, 2011, is pending in the Circuit Court
for Jackson County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is P.O. Box 510, Marianna,
FL 32447. The name and address of the Person-
al Representative and the Personal Represen-
tative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate, including unmatured, contingent or
unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this
notice is required to be served must file their
claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIR-
TY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against de-
cedent's estate, including unmatured, contin-
gent or unliquidated claims, must file their
claims with the court WITHIN THREE (3)
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREV-
ER BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice
is October 27, 2011.
HARRISON SALE MCCLOY
s/Carlotta Appleman Thacker
CARLOTTA APPLEMAN THACKER, ESQ.
304 Magnolia Avenue/ P.O. Box 1579
Panama City, FL 32401
Florida Bar No. 0275890
Telephone: (850) 769-3434
Fax: (850) 769-6121
Personal Representative: '
s/ Leon W. Laramqre
LEON W. LARAMORE
1442 Pittman Hill Road
Marianna, FL 32448


LF15578
SECTION 00010
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
PROJECT NAME: Meadowview Road
Resurfacing and Improvements
Sealed bids, submitted in triplicate, will be re-
ceived by the Board of County Commissioners


of Jackson County, Florida (Owner), until 2:00
p.m. (Central Time) November 9, 2011 at the
County Administration Building (Purchasing,
Stan Hascher), 2864 Madison Street, Marianna,
FL 32448 for the construction of the following
described Project:
Meadowview Road Resurface Improvements
From Caverns Road (S.R. 166) to Old U.S. Road
The work includes full depth reclamation and
resurfacing of Meadowview Road. The crown
of the road will be restored through this proc-
ess. Other improvements to Meadowview Road
will include partial paved shoulder construc-
tion, grading and shoulder work, maintenance
of traffic, sod, stormwater pollution preven-
'tion, drainage piping and structure installation,
grading ditches if needed to provide positive
drainage, and other as directed by the Engi-
neer. The work also includes resurfacing of
Bales Drive, Diana Lane, Club Drive, Clayton
Drive, River Drive, Shankle Drive, and Willow
Way and miscellaneous drainage improve-
ments as shown in the plans and as directed by
the Engineer.
A Non-Mandatory Pre-Bid Meeting will be held
on November 2, 2011 at 9:00 AM central time in
the Jackson County Road Department. Poten-
tial bidders are encouraged to attend.
The deadline for receipt of questions will be
November 7, 2011 at 4:00 PM Central Time.
Questions must be submitted in writing to the
County Engineer (email lalvarez@jacksoncount
yfl.com: fax (850)482-9063) with a copy to the
Purchasing Director (email shascher@jacksonc
ountyfl.com; fax (850)482-9682).
Bids will be opened and recorded at 2:00 PM
(or immediately thereafter) on November 9,
2011 at the Jackson County Board of County
Commissioners Board Room at 2864 Madison
Street.
Plans, specifications, and contract documents
will be open for public inspection after noon on
October 20, 2011 at the Road and Bridge office
at 2828 Owens Street. Bid documents must be
obtained from:
County Engineer
Attn: Larry Alvarez
2828 Owens Street
Marianna, Florida 32446
(850)482-9677
upon payment of $ ( no charge) per set which
amount constitutes the cost of reproduction
and handling. This payment will not be refund-
ed.
The Owner reserves the right to waive any in-
formality or to reject any or all bids. Each Bid-
der must deposit with his/her bid, security in
the amount, form and subject to the conditions
provided in the Information for Bidders.
Sureties used for obtaining bonds must appear
as acceptable according to the Department of
Treasury Circular 570. Bidders shall be FDOT
pre-approved and in good standing with FDOT.
No bid may be withdrawn for a period of sixty
days after the scheduled closing time for re- *
ceipt of bids.
To the extent applicable to this project, atten-
tion of Bidders is particularly called to the re-
quirements of the Special Provisions (Local
Agency Program/Federal-Aid Contract Require-
ments), conditions of employment to be ob-
served and minimum wage rates to be paid un-
der the Contract, Section 3, Segregated Facili-
ties, Section 109 Executive Order 11246, and all
applicable laws and regulations of the Federal
government and State of Florida, and bonding
and insurance requirements.
IN PARTICULAR, BIDDERS SHOULD NOTE THE
REQUIRED ATTACHMENTS AND CERTIFICA-
TIONS TO BE EXECUTED AND SUBMITTED WITH
THE FORM OF BID PROPOSAL.
DATE:
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER
HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE/FAIR HOUSING JURIS-
DICTION

9G9 IT! iELL IT! FIND IT!


Dresser with mirror and 7 drawers, excellent
condition, $50 850-482-3801
End Tables (2) Rustic Pine, $25/ea or $40 for
both. 850-482-8700
End Table w/magazine holder white wicker,
$25 Firm 850-482-8700


Five Wire Wheel 15" Hubcaps, Cadillac em-
blem; 15",$100 or $25 per hubcap,. 850-569-2593


Folding Tables (30) Heavy duty, 8x2.5', good
condition, $25/each or $60 for 3 850-526-2065


Golden Eagle Compound Bow 44"long, draw
40-601bs, $75 850-526-3474


HeadBoard, Double, white wicker $25
850-482-8700


Ladies Dress Clothes & Designer Dress Shoes,
sz 8-14, $3/ea 850-209-6977 before 5om


Little Tykes Step 2 Van $15 Fisher Price Bas-
ketball Hoop $10 850-209-6977 before 5pm


(2) Shed Doors. Each measures 4 x 6. Bargain
priced at $100 ea 850-482-2636, Marianna
Backpack Speaker System: For Ipod and
Phone. New in box. $45. 334-400-3736
Bed Set: Mattress, Box springs, rails, head/foot
boards. Made by Coastal Bedding Inc. Excellent
condition $250. Cottondale, FL. 330-204-2888
Buffet Server: Real wood, on wheels. A Bargain
at only $75. 850-482-2636, Marianna
Cake plate: Christmas Fitz and Floyd $15.
850-272-0148
Christmas Bowl: Large Fitz and Floyd $15.
850-272-0148
Desk: Light oak colored. Great buy at $15,
850-482-2636 Marianna.
Microphone mixer 6 channel. New in box, $50
334-400-3736.
Poker Table by Cardinal. New in box $35. 334-
400-3736
Truck Bedliner: off 2002 Frontier Quad Cab with
6 ft. bed $50. 850-482-2636, Marianna.
Wardrobe Closet. 2 available $50 each. 850-482-
2636 Marianna
5 Star Olympus Camera, SP 600 UZ digital,
new cond., $160 FIRM 850-482-7665 after 12
Christmas Snack Plates & Mugs (8), $20 850-
482-8700
CPR KIT: Face shields, mannequins w/metallic
click, first aid video, case, $450 850-482-6535
Designer handbags, good condition, $3/ea or
one price for all. 850-209-6977 before 5pm
Dining Room Chairs (4) Vintage Mahogany, ex-
cellent condition $55 for all 850-482-8700


S850-209-1090
For ALL your Real Estate Needs!
Century 21 Sunny South Properties
850-526-2891
__ 4630 Hwy 90 Marianna






Grader Pan Excavator
Dump Truck Bulldozer
Demolition Grading Site Prep
* Debris Removal Retention Ponds e Leveling
* Top Soil Fill Dirt Gravel Land Clearing







Clay O'Neal's n
Lnd Clearing, Inc. MMsP
ALTHA, FL EOM
850-762-9402 SBM m1
Cell 850-832-5055 . l
N OI NG STR-ELANING


$89 down
on any building
l100, v INANCINi AVAIL AIILE
- 3 Years in Business
- 31 WE MOVE Pam u BuIOms.


4 Point insurance Inspections
Wind Mitigation Inspections
Performed by JAMES GRANT
State Certified Building Code Administrator
Site Ce rtified Building Contr(ac tot,
SStatf Licen.\edl Electrical Coiintractor
I11 =t I A !M




Replace your old Electrical Service
W via New Service




wt a e womn?


Chdc out the Claifiefd


I WELLDRII LLING. &R


I SELF STORAGE


Lester Basford BESTWAY
Well & Pump Company RB EBT L
4513 Lafayette St Marianna, FL' PORTABLE BUILDINGS o Fou
850.526.3913 0 850.693.0428 C L ARREST MANUFACTURER OF PORTABLE BUILDINGS IRR NoRm FLORA
HAVE
OVER
I DIFFERENT SIZES!
aSYOU CAN CHOOSE
*-- COLOR STYLE!


_, o

-LL p
MICHAEL CORLETT80-6376


CLASSIFIED

ADVERTISING
Your source for selling and buying!


3614 Hwy. 90 Marianna, rFL* 850-02-8602



HAPPY

HOME REPAIR
WE'LL BEAT ANY PRICE!!
Big Or Small Jobs WELCOME







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i T .......... T ................


, i I ---


Masonic Ring, size 10, 10k gold, serious inqui-
ries only. $250 OBO 850-592-4109
Mattresses all sizes, good cond. $10/ea 850-
209-6977 before 5pm
Old fashioned push mower new, $75 OBO 850-
209-6977 before 5pm
Refrigerator 1.8, used only twice $70 239-272-
8236
Rifle. WWII German Mauser, 98k mod. 8mm,
$350 850-263-2701
Rifle. WWII Russian mod.38 carbine, 7.62mm,
$185 850-263-2701
Small Bookcase with 3 shelves, $20 850-482-
3801
T.V., 14" RGA-HD color, used very little, $40
850-482-3801


11







'8B THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2011


SPORTS


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


espet key among NASAn Chase petitors


Respect key among NASCAR Chase competitors


The Associated Press
Needing to almost win out for
a chance at his sixth consecu-
tive Sprint Cup championship,
Jimmie Johnson had every op-
portunity to make that happen
after Tony Stewart passed him
less than three laps from the fin-
ish of Sunday's crash-filled race
at Martinsville Speedway.
He opted not to use a bump-
and-run to win and Stewart
knew he wouldn't.
In the final three races of the
Chase for the championship,
many drivers in contention pro-
fess a respect for fellow drivers,
and a sense that what you give,
you also deserve to get.
Stewart launched into a mono-
logue after the race about how
drivers who insist on wreck-
ing other cars should instead
be placed in a boxing ring after
races and allowed to settle their
differences there. He added that
knowing he had Johnson's re-
spect was critical at the finish.
"Could Jimmie have hauled it
off in the corner, blown the cor-
ner to try to take us down? Abso-
lutely," he said. "He could have


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NASCAR Sprint Cup Series driver Jimmie Johnson, left, listens to Tony
Stewart before the start of the LifeLock 400 auto race at ChicagoLand
Speedway in Joliet, III.
\


done that to anybody. He didn't
do that to us.
"I think he knows we respect
him and have that level of
respect."
Johnson acknowledged think-
ing about it, though, but said
he realized that with Stewart in
better position to win the cham-
pionship at this point, he was in-
stead "minding my Ps and Qs."
"I just wanted to do the right


thing and unfortunately got beat
in the process," he said.
There is definitely a grey area,
said points leader Carl Edwards,
but the questions that bounce
around in your head have more
to do with who you are racing
than anything else.
Even then, he said, he doesn't
want to wreck someone to win.
"Right now, I can't say if we're
at Homestead (the final race of


the season) and it's the last lap
and the guy in front of me, all I
have to do is get in front of him
to win the championship. I don't
know that-there's anybody right
now that I would spin out," he
said.
He was quick to add, howev-
er, that he's not on the final lap
at Homestead just yet with
the championship there for the
taking and months to celebrate
before a driver can retaliate on
the track. Edwards will take an
8-point lead over Stewart and a
21-point edge over Kevin Har-
vick into Texas.
"I think you can only race
people based on your opinion
of them and make the best deci-
sion you can," he said. "But per-
sonally, for me, I try really hard. I
feel guilty if I do something that
I feel is kind of wrong or outside
the rules, so I try not to do that
stuff. I'd rather win fair. That's
just the way I am and I think
that's the way most of these guys
out here are."
Most, but not all -- and maybe
perspective has something to do
with it, too.
Harvick? Sounds as though


he'd take his chances.
"It's one of those things where
you do what you have to do to
try to win the championship
and you suffer the consequenc-
es later," he said.
Jeff Gordon, a four-time cham-
pion, said it also pays to know
who is around you.
"I don't want to be the deter-
mining factor that affects the
championship in a major way,
but we are here to win so I'm
gonna do just about everything
I can to win but I'm not going to
take one of those guys out to do
it," he said.
"I think those guys, we have
to be mindful of what they have
going on, but they have to be
mindful of the situation that
they're in."
Mindful, for sure, but also ever
cautious.
"You work hard all year to try
to be in this position," Stew-
art, a two-time champion, said.
"When you start the Chase off
with 10 races to go, a lot can
happen. There's a lot of variables
that you worry about along the
way. It doesn't mean we're still
not worried about it."


McCourt, MLB agree to Dodgers sale process


The Associated Press
LOS ANGELES Embattled
Los Angeles Dodgers owner Frank
McCourt and Major League Base-
ball reached an agreement late
Tuesday to sell one of the sport's
most storied franchises, ending a.
seven-year run that included four
trips to the postseason before re-
cently becoming mired in legal
troubles capped by a filing for
bankruptcy protection.
A joint statement said there will
be a "court-supervised process" to
sell the team and its media rights
to maximize value for the Dodg-
ers and McCourt. The Blackstone
Group LP will manage the sale,
which could include Dodger Sta-
dium and the surrounding park-
ing lots.


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Think Blue sign is seen at the parking lotof Dodger Stadium Wednesday
in Los Angeles.


The announcement came as the
Dodgers and MLB were headed
toward a showdown in U.S. Bank-
ruptcy Court in Delaware at the
end of the month as mediation
between both sides was ongoing.
McCourt and baseball Commis-
sioner Bud Selighave traded barbs
since MLB took control of day-to-
day operation of the team in April
over concerns about the team's
finances and the way it was being


run. McCourt apparently realized
a sale of the team he vowed never
to give up was in his best interest
and that of the fans.
"There comes a point in time
when you say, 'It's time,'" said a
person familiar with the situation
who requested anonymity be-
cause details of the negotiations
had not been made public. "He
came to that realization at the
end of today."


McCourt filed for bankruptcy lated businesses for their own use,
protection in June after the league according to divorce documents.
rejected a 17-year TV contract In bankruptcy filings, attor-
with Fox, reported to be worth neys for MLB said McCourt
up to $3 billion, that he needed to "looted" more than $180 million
keep the team afloat. Selig noted- in revenues from the club for
that almost half of an immediate personal use and other business
$385 million payment would have unrelated to the team.
been diverted from the Dodgers "The Dodgers are in bank-
to McCourt. ruptcy because Mr. McCourt has
The franchise's demise grew taken almost $190 million out
out of Frank McCourt's protract- of the club and has completely
ed divorce with Jamie McCourt alienated the Dodgers' fan base,"
and the couple's dispute over the the baseball attorneys wrote.
ownership of the team. The di- All the bad publicity appeared
vorce, which played out in public to drive fans away. There was a
in court, highlighted decadent 21 percent drop in home atten-
spending on mansions and beach dance from last season and it
homes and using the team as if it was the first time in a non-strike
were their personal credit card. year since 1992 that the Dodg-
They took out more than, $100 ers drew fewer than 3 million
million in loans from Dodgers-re- people.


Good Thru November 7, 2011


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