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Jackson County Floridan
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028304/00677
 Material Information
Title: Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title: Sunday Floridan
Portion of title: Floridan
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Jackson County Floridan
Publisher: Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Marianna Fla
Creation Date: October 26, 2011
Publication Date: 1934-
Frequency: daily (except saturday and monday)[<1979-1995>]
weekly[ former 1934-<1955>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates: 30.776389 x -85.238056 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note: "Independent."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID: UF00028304:00677
 Related Items
Preceded by: Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by: Marianna Floridan

Full Text




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********ORIGIN MIXED ADC 325
LIBnRARY OF FLORIDA IISTORy
IO BOX 117007
GAINESVILLE FL 3261 -7007


Informing more than 17,000 readers daily in print and online
*l.~~~~~ ~ ~ ~ I t J : IiiII


i i ~~*.% Ic ; T:


FLOUiIDAN


Graceville Lady

Tigers win, advance

in playoffs. See

more on page lB.


A. Media Genenl Nw.pa r ... '
A Malida Gie nred \1i'llc llwr


Vol.88 No. 208


Malone


Former fire chief arrested in sex sting


Allegedly sent emails to try and meet '13-year-old girl'


BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com

The town of Malone has ap-
pointed a new volunteer fire
chief, having relieved former
chief Dustin S. Calloway from
that duty following his arrest


in a sting operation targeting
online solicitation of children
for sex. The new fire chief, Jes-
sica Cook, said Calloway volun-
tarily stepped down from the
position.
Calloway, 25, was one of 38 men
arrested so far in the operation


carried out this month by the
North Florida Internet Crimes
Against Children Task Force. Cal-
loway was charged with using a
computer to solicit a parent for
consent for sex with a minor and
with traveling to have sex with a
minor.


As of Tuesday morning, Cal-
loway was still listed as chief
on the town of
S Malone's website,
but Mayor Gene
Wright said he is
no longer serving
in that role.
( Town officials
allowed the fire
Calloway department to


make the call on whether to re-
tain Calloway as chief after his
arrest several days ago, Wright
said. Undercover investigators
from several law enforcement
agencies were involved in the
sting, with the Tallahassee Police
Department serving a lead role.
Most of the men were arrested in
See ARREST, Page 7A


HEALTH NEWS



MinuteClinic opens in



Marianna CVS Pharmacy


BY LAUREN DELGADO
Idelgado@jcfloridan.com

MinuteClinic, a walk-in clinic open
seven days a week, has opened a loca-
tion at the CVS Pharmacy located at
4684 Highway 90 in Marianna.
A nurse practitioner provides the
medical care and advice during the
Marianna clinic's hours, which are 8:30
a.m. to 7:30 p.m. Monday through Fri-
days, 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. on Saturdays
and 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. on Sundays.
The idea behind the clinic is to pro-
vide a fast, low-cost way for people
to get basic medical care after typical
doctor office hours instead of having to
go to the emergency room. Still, nurse
practitioner Celeste Smith Covington
said she encourages patients to have a
primary care doctor.
"We work as a collaboration of care,"
said Smith Covington. "We don't try
and replace an emergency room or
primary care physician."
The nurses diagnose common dis-
eases and illnesses, such as a cold or
ear infection and prescribe medica-
tion. They can also exarfine minor in-
juries such as bug stings, minor burns
and sprains. Vaccines are available for
flu, hepatitis A and B, pneumonia and
a number of other diseases.
Cholesterol panels; glucose checks
and other monitoring of chronic dis-
eases can be performed at the clinics
as well.
No appointments are necessary.
Anyone interested in getting examined
can sign in at the kiosk in front of the
See CLINIC, Page 7A


LAUREN DELGADO/FLORIDAN
Nurse practitioner Celeste Smith Covington fills out some forms at the MinuteClinic
office in the CVS Pharmacy in Marianna.


A werewolf in the


Floridan office


Reporter
Lauren
Delgado,
dressed
asa
werewolf,
scares
visitors
of
Mosier's
Field of
Screams
Corn
Maze.


BY LAUREN DELGADO
Idelgado@jcfloridan.com

Editor's note: Floridan reporter
Lauren Delgado participated in
the corn maze to give a first-per-
son account of the event.
Love being scared. Whether
from missing that last step
or watching a scary movie, I
love that jolt of adrenaline.
A strange thing, because I'm
also the world's biggest chicken.
I hide behind splayed fingers
during horror flicks and I've left
behind more than one loved
one in a haunted house. Every
Halloween, I line up for nearby
haunted houses or scare areas.
I've always wondered what it
would be like to'actually be
the hair-raising characters that


spook their visitors.
So when I was chatting with
Walter Mosier about his haunted
corn maze for a story on fall
activities last weekend, I had a
sudden flash of inspiration.
"Ihave a kind of weird ques-
tion for you," I said to him. "Can
I come and scare people?"
To his credit, Walter didn't
laugh at me or sound terribly
surprised. After discussing pos-
sible days, we settled on Oct. 22.
I was to come around 6 p.m., 30
minutes before the maze opened
to the public and bring my own
costume.
This is the second year the
Mosiers have had fall activities at
their farm. Last year, the fam-
ily went all out with hayrides,
See WEREWOLF, Page 7A


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Eighteen-year-old Crystal Carroll O'Day, of
Marianna, died in a traffic crash in Calhoun
County on Monday evening.


Marianna


teen dies in


traffic crash
BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
Sdbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com

A Marianna teenager died Monday
evening in a Calhoun County traffic
crash.
Crystal Carroll O'Day, 18, was west-
bound on Bodiford Road when she
traveled off the roadway and onto the
shoulder of the road around 7:15 p.m.,
according to Florida Highway Patrol re-
ports. O'Day overcorrected and crossed
both traffic lanes. The 1999 Ford Ex-
plorer she was driving came to rest on
its roof, facing east.
O'Day died at Calhoun Liberty
Hospital
The young woman's death has left a
void in the lives of Connie Archer and
her daughter, Amberlyn. Three years
ago, O'Day essentially became an hon-
orary member of the Archer family be-
Scause of the friendship Amberlyn and
Crystal had formed. She came to view
Connie Archer as a second mother, and
listed her as a next-of-kin contact. She
had moved in with the Archers when
they lived in Jackson County, then
moved with them to Ocala for a time
before coming back to Marianna to
start her life as an adult.
O'Day and the Archers kept in touch,
though.
The Archers headed back to Marianna
early Tuesday morning after being noti-
fied of O'Day's death.
"I just want to hug'her and tell'her I
love her one more time," Connie Archer
said. "She had a very big, caring heart
for people. She was very outgoing, com-
passionate and fun-loving. She cared a
lot about her appearance, and was go-
ing to start cosmetology school soon
because she wanted to help others look
their best, too. She wanted to do that
for other people. She turned 18 in July;
she and my daughter were like sisters.
It's going to be hard for us both to not
have her in our lives, but my family feels
blessed that we got to have her as part
of us for a time."

"Ijust want to hug her and
tell her I love her one more
time. She had a very big,
caring heartfor people.
Connie Archer,
Friend of Crystal Carroll O'Day


) CLASSIFIEDS...6-8B


> ENTERTAINMENT...5B


> LOCAL...3A, 7A


) OBITUARIES...7A


) OPINION...4A


))SPORTS...1 4B


> TV LISTINGS...2B


." .. .. 'S .~je ,S :.... :.,. . .. ...


This Newspaper
Is Printed On
Recycled Newsprint



II I 111
7 65161 80050 9


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TEAM RAHAL*MILLER
CHEVROLET-BUICK
CADILLAC-NISSAN
i 4204 Lafayette St. Marianna, FL
(850) 482-3051


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


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^v^^f-^Ittw^i^^ ^I'~m~~p^^^^^flB1


High- 810
Low 540

Tomorrow
Partly Cloudy.



t" High 720
Low 450


Saturday
Cooler.


2~W~


High 760
Low 52


Friday
Possible Storms.



SHigh- 730
..- Low -450


Sunday
Sunny & Mild.


TIDES ULTRA VIOLET INDEX
Panama City Low 6:28 AM High 9:29 PM
Apalachicola Low 10:23 AM High 2:48 AM 0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8-10 Very High, 11+
Port St. Joe Low- 4:54AM High -9:19PM 0 2 3
Destin Low 7:05 AM High 9:52 PM


Pensacola Low -

RIVER READINGS
Woodruff
Blountstown
Marianna
Caryville


7:39 AM H

Reading
38.95 ft.
0.30 ft.
4.46 ft.
0.18 ft.


igh


- 10:25 PM

Flood Stage
66.0 ft.
15.0 ft.
19.0 ft.
12.0 ft.


THE SUN AND MOON
,Sunrise .6:51 AM
Sunset 5:58 PM
Moonrise 6:36 AM
Moonset 5:46 PM


BE131
Nov. Nov. Nov. Nov.
2 10 18 25


I ST F sOR E UA TES


JACKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN

Publisher Valeria Roberts
vroberts@jcfloridan.com

Circulation Manager Depa Oberski
doberski@jcfloridan.cdm





-I


CONTACT US
Telephone: (850) 526-3614
FAX: (850) 482-4478
Email: editorial@jcfloridan.com
Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447
Street Address:
4403 Constitution Lane
Marianna, FL 32446
Office Hours:
Weekdays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

MISS YOUR PAPER?
You should receive your newspaper no later
than 6 a.m. If it does not arrive, call Circula-
tion between 6 a.m. and noon, Tuesday to
Friday, and 7 a.m. to 11a.m. on Sunday. The
Jackson County Floridan (USPS 271-840)
is published Tuesday though Friday and
Sunday mornings. Periodical postage paid
at Marianna, FL.

SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Home delivery: $11.23 per month; $32.83
for three months; $62.05 for six months;
and $123.4 for one year. All prices include
applicable state and local taxes. Mail
subscriptions must be paid in advance. Mail
subscriptions are: $46.12 for three months;
$92.24 for six months; and $184.47 for one
year.
ADVERTISING
The advertiser agrees that the publisher
shall not be liable for damages arising
out of errors and advertisements beyond
the amount paid for the space actually
occupied by that portion of the advertise-
ments in which the error occurred, whether
such error is due to the negligence of the
publisher's employees or otherwise, and
there shall be not liability for non-inser-
tion of any advertisement beyond the
amount paid for such advertisement. This
newspaper will not knowingly accept or
publish illegal material of any kind. Advertis-
ing which expresses preference based on
legally protected personal characteristics is
not acceptable.

HOW TO GET YOUR
NEWS PUBUSHED
The Jackson County Floridan will publish
news of general interest free of charge.
Submit your news or Community Calendar
events via email, fax, mail, or hard delivery.
Fees may apply for wedding, engagement,
anniversary and birth announcements.
Forms are available at the Floridan offices.
Photographs must be of good quality and
suitable for print. The Floridan reserves the
right to edit all submissions.
GETTING IT RIGHT
The Jackson County Floridan's policy
is to correct mistakes promptly. To
report an error, please call 526-3614
Monday-Friday.


Community Calendar


TODAY
a Jackson County Habitat for Humanity
Warehouse hours: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open. meeting, noon
to 1 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901
Caledonia St., Marianna, in the AA room.
) Jackson Hospital Board of Trustees' monthly
Finance and Board meeting 5 p.m. in the Hud-
nail Building Community Room.
) The Jackson Hospital Board of Trustees meets
at 5:30 p.m. in the Hudnall Building Community
Room.

THURSDAY, OCT. 27
a Free Money Sense Class 9,a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
at the Marianna Goodwill Career Training Center.
The free class covers budgeting and savings. Gener-
al CTC orientation session: 12:30 to 3:30 p.m. Learn
about/sign up for free services. Call 526-0139.
) Mosier's Field of Screams Corn Maze 6:30
to 10:30 p.m..Oct. 27-29 and Nov. 4-5 at the
Mosier's Family Farm, 2565 Standland Road in
Cottondale. Wear appropriate shoes (no flip-flops).
Concessions available. Cost: $7 per person. Call
326-6168.
a Free Guitar Concert The BCF Guitar Ensem-
ble, student soloists and duos will showcase a range
of music classical, jazz and sacred 7 p.m. in the
R.G. Lee Chapel at The Baptist College of Florida in
Graceville. Admission is free and open to the public.
Call 800-328-2660, ext. 427, or visit www.baptist
college.edu.

FRIDAY, OCT. 28
a Volunteer Literacy Tutor Symposium 8 a.m.
to 3:30 p.m. in the Jackson County Agriculture Con-
ference Center, 2741 Pennsylvania Ave. in Marianna.
"Learning to Achieve: Strategies for Working with
Learning Disabled Adults" will be discussed. Pre-
registration required. Call 407-246-7110.
D Rural Tourism Development Summit 8 a.m.
to 5:30 p.m. at the Panhandle Pioneer Settlement
in Blountstown. Cost: $15. Register online at www.
rwsfl.org. Hosted by RiverWay South Apalachicola
Choctawhatchee.
) Beef/Forage Day 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the
University of Florida NFREC Beef Unit north of Mari-
anna, one mile west of Greenwood on highway 162.
Cost: $10 per person (lunch provided). Registration
starts at 8 a.m. Visit http://nfrec.ifas.ufl.edu, call
850-394-9124 or email tpgwinn@ufl.edu.
) Jackson County Chamber of Commerce will
conduct a ribbon cutting ceremony at 3:30 p.m.
for the grand opening of Florida Commerce Credit
Union at 4472 Lafayette St. in Marianna (next to
Winn-Dixie). Open House follows, 4 to 7 p.m. Call


718-0081 or 482-8060.
) The Spirit of the Caverns 6 to 10 p.m.
Oct. 28-29 at the Florida Caverns State Park in
Marianna, with children's games, living historians,
a spirit trail, candy and prizes, Smokey Bear and
other special guests. Cost: $4 per vehicle.,
) Never More Haunted House Oct. 28, 29 and
31 at Sneads Log Cabin in Sneads. Hours: 6 to ll
p.m. Friday and Saturday; 6 to 10 p.m. Monday.
Cost: $3 for haunted house entrants; $2 for the
kiddie corner. Presented by the SHS Project Gradu-
ation Committee.
Haunted House Starts at 6 p.m. Oct. 28,29
and 31 at 2012 Wilson Ave. in Grand Ridge (home
of Debbie Wright). Cost: $1 Candy given to all who
dare to enter. Sponsored by Sneads High School
Sweet,16.
) Senior Singles Get-Together, 6 to 8 p.m. near
the floral department of Winn-Dixie in Marianna.
Single seniors age 50 and older are encouraged
to get acquainted, form friendships. Games, food,
prizes and a guest speaker are planned. No charge;
donations accepted (proceeds fund charitable
endeavors of Marianna's Gathering Place Founda-
tion). Call 526-4561.
) Mosier's Field of Screams Corn Maze 6:30
to 10:30 p.m. Oct. 27-29 and Nov. 4-5 at the
Mosier's Family Farm, 2565 Standland Road in
Cottondale. Wear appropriate shoes (no flip-flops).
Concessions available. Cost: $7 per person. Call
326-6168.
) Celebrate Recovery Adult, teen meetings to
"overcome hurts, habits and hang-ups," 7 p.m. at
Evangel Worship Center, 2645 Pebble Hill Road. Din-
ner: 6 p.m. Child care available. Call 209-7856.

SATURDAY, OCT. 29
n Marianna City Farmers Market is open 8 a.m. to
noon for the fall season, Saturdays only in Madison
Street Park.
n Sunland Fall Festival Parade at 9 a.m. in
the Sunland Center Environmental Park, north of
Marianna on Highway 71 at 3700 Williams Drive.
Music and entertainment on three central stages
in the park; arts-and-crafts and food vendors; cane
grinding and syrup-making demos; and horse and
wagon rides. Call 482-9373.
) Turkey Shoot Fundraiser 1p.m. each Satur-
day through December at AMVETS Post 231, north
of Fountain (east side of US 231, just south of CR
167). Cost: $2 a shot. Call 850-722-0291. l
) Cow Pasture Jam 5 to 10 p.m. at the Tate.
Family Farm, 1678 Penny Road, Cottondale, with
Christian music from Echoing Angels, The Resound,
Bridge and Cottondale Praise Band, plus a bonfire,
games, food and drinks, and door prizes. Public
welcome. Free admission. Call 638-9990.


) The Spirit of the Caverns 6 to 10 p.m:
Oct. 28-29 at the Florida Caverns State Park in
Marianna, with children's games, living historians,
a spirit trail, candy and prizes, Smokey Bear and
other special guests. Cost: $4 per vehicle.
) Haunted House Starts at 6 p.m. Oct. 28, 29
and 31 at 2012 Wilson Ave. in Grand Ridge (home
'of Debbie Wright). Cost: $1 Candy given to all who
dareto enter. Sponsored by Sneads High School
Sweet 16.
) Never More Haunted House Oct. 28,29 and
31 at Sneads Log Cabin in Sneads. Hours: 6 to 11
p.m. Friday and Saturday; 6 to 10 p.m. Monday.
Cost: $3 for haunted house entrants; $2 for the
kiddie corner. Presented by the SHS Project Gradu-
ation Committee.
) Mosier's Field of Screams Corn Maze 6:30
to 10:30 p.m. Oct.' 27-29 and Nov. 4-5 at the
Mosier's Family Farm, 2565 Standland Road in
Cottondale. Wear appropriate shoes (no flip-flops).
Concessions available. Cost: $7 per person. Call
326-6168.

SUNDAY, OCT. 30
D Alcoholics Anonymous closed discussion, 6:30
p.m., 4349 W. Lafayette St., Marianna (in one-story
building behind 4351W. Lafayette St.). Attendance
limited to persons with a desire to stop drinking.

MONDAY, OCT. 31
Orientation 10:30 a.m. at the Goodwill Career
Training Center, 4742 Highway 90 in Marianna. Reg-
ister for free job placement and computer training
classes and learn about services offered to people
with disadvantages/disabilities. Call 526-0139.
) Parkinson's Support Group meeting noon
in the ground floor education classroom of Jackson
Hospital, 4250 Hospital Drive in Marianna. Guest
'speaker: Lori Franklin, RN, director of Jackson
Hospital Case Management. Lunch provided.Those
diagnosed with Parkinson's and their caregivers are
invited to attend. No cost. Call 718-2661.
) Safe Halloween 5 to 8 p.m. at the American
Legion Building, presented by American Legion
Auxiliary Unit No. 241of Sneads. All trick-or-treaters
invited to stop by for treats.
)) Never More Haunted House Oct. 28,29
and 31 at Sneads Log Cabin in Sneads. Hours: 6 to
11 p.m. Friday and Saturday; 6 to 10 p.m. Monday.
Cost: $3 for haunted house entrants; $2 for the
kiddie corner. Presented by the SHS Project Gradu-
ation Committee.
) Haunted House Starts at 6 p.m. Oct. 28, 29
and 31 at 2012 Wilson Ave. in Grand Ridge (home
of Debbie Wright). Cost: $1 Candy given to all who
dare to enter. Sponsored by Sneads High School
Sweet 16.


The submission deadline for this calendar is two days before publication. Submit to: Community Calendar, Jackson County Floridan, P. O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447,
email editorial@jcfloridan.com, fax (850) 482-4478 or bring items to 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.


Police Roundup


MARIANNA POLICE
DEPARTMENT
The Marianna Police De-
partment listed the following
incidents for Oct. 24, the latest
available report:
One suspicious -
vehicle, two sus- --/ '
picious persons,
one highway ME
obstruction,
two reports
of mental illness, one verbal
disturbance, one drug offense,
one burglar alarm, 15 traffic
stops, one criminal mischief
complaint, one obscene/
threatening phone call, one
animal complaint, two assists
of other agencies, four public


service calls, one patrol request
and one threat/harassment
complaint.

JACKSON COUNTY
SHERIFFS OFFICE
The Jackson County Sheriff's
Office and county Fire/Rescue
reported the following incidents
for Oct. 24, the latest available
report. (Some of these calls may
be related to after-hours calls
taken on behalf of Graceville
and Cottondale Police Depart-
ments): One accident with
no injury, one dead person
(natural causes-hospice), one
stolen vehicle, two abandoned
vehicles, three suspicious ve-
hicles, one suspicious incident,


two suspicious persons, one
escort, one report of mental ill-
ness, one burglary, one physical
disturbance, two pedestrian
complaints, one residential
fire report, two woodland fire
reports, one burning complaint,
one drug offense, 19 medical
calls, one traffic crash with
entrapment, one fire alarm, six
traffic stops, three civil dis-
putes, one trespass complaint,
one suicide attempt, one assist
of a motorist or pedestrian, one
retail theft, two assists of other
agencies, four public service
calls, three criminal registra-
tions and two transports.


JACKSON COUNTY
CORRECTIONAL FACILITY
The following persons were
booked into the county jail dur-
ing the latest reporting periods:
) Juan Baza-Torres, 26, 800
Tropicana St., La Belle, hold for
Hendry Co.
) Andrew Middleton, 25,
3912 Holiday Drive, Panama
City Beach, violation of state
probation.

JAIL POPULATION: 224


To report a crime, call CrimeStoppers
at 526-5000 or a local law enforcement
agency. To report a wildlife violation, call
1-888-404-FWCC (3922).


vrolet-Buick-Cadillac-Nissan
4204 Lafayette St. Marianna, FL

(850) 482-3051


;;


72A WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26, 2011


WiKE-UP CALL






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN *. www.jcfloridan.com


33rd Annual Sunland Center



Fall Festival is on Saturday


Special to the Floridan

This Saturday will mark the 33rd
annual Sunland Center Fall Festival.
The parade will kick off the day at
9 a.m., and there will be three stages
offering entertainment.
At the Main Pavilion, beginning
at 9:45 a.m., its Vessels of Praise fol-
lowed by Second Chance, The New
Beginning Trio and Webb Fam-
ily Blue Grass. On the Center Stage,
starting at 9:45 a.m., music from Riv-
erside Elementary, then Royce Rea-
gan, and Telogia Creek Band. And on
the Platform by the Pond, starting at
9:45 a.m. its the Sunland Swingers,
followed by clowns and balloons.
There will be entertainment to de-
light folks of all ages. Watch the old-
time art of cane grinding and syrup-
making come to life or ride on the
horse and wagon.
Arts and crafts vendors will be


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Arts and crafts vendors will be showing their wares, while food vendors entice
visitors at Saturday's Sunland Center Fall Festival.


showing their wares, while food ven-
dors entice visitors to enjoy meals or
snacks.
Sunland is located on Highway 71,
north of Marianna at 3700 Williams


Drive.
If you would like to be a vendor,
call Dawn Glover at 482-9373. For a
parade entry, call Karen Henrickson
at 482-9387.


Puppy Patrol comes to Little Blessings Academy


SUDMITI I .PHTOiuU
Jackson County Sheriff's Office representatives Jim Hamilton, Sean Hill, Adam Walker and K-9 Honer (black lab) visit staff and
students at Little Blessings Academy on behalf of the Puppy Patrol Program, which aims to deliver an anti-drug and anti-violence
message that is entertaining as well as educational. Children met the K-9, and received pencils, stickers and certificates from
the officers. The program is sponsored by Dogs Against Drugs/Dogs Against Crime.


CANOEING ON THE CHIPOLA RIVER


Kathy Donofro


receives Adoption


Excellence Award


Special to the Tloridan

On Oct. 12, Big Bend
Community Based Care
Permanency Special-
ist Kathy Donofro was
among 18 individuals
from across the country
recognized by the US De-
partment of Health and
Human Services with
an Adoption Excellence
Award.
Donofro was recog-
nized for contributions
she made to providing
adoption and other per-
manency outcomes for
children in foster care.
The award was presented
at the Children's Bureau
Policy to Practice Confer-
ence in Arlington, Va.
The Adoption Excel-
lence Awards Program
was established in 1997
by HHS to recognize out-
standing accomplish-
ments in achieving per-
manency for America's
children waiting in foster
care. The awards honor
States, child welfare agen-
cies, organizations, courts,
businesses, individuals,
and families for giving
abandoned, neglected or
abused children a loving
family and a safe and nur-
turing home.
Doriofro began her child
welfare career in working
with one of Florida's most
vulnerable populations of
individuals with Devel-
opmental Disabilities in
1981. Her desire and pas-
sion for children to have
permanent, non-instu-
tionalized homes led her
to becoming an Adoption
specialist in 1997. Since
then, Donofro has held
numerous roles in advo-
cating for children to be
adopted.


As the Permanency Spe-
cialist for 12 counties in
the Panhandle of Florida,
Donofro's role is to insure
children do not languish
in alternative care as well
as advocate for the goal
of adoption be set rather
than alternative goals.
Kathy played a critical
role in helping contribute
to the re-write of Florida's
Adoption Rule by insur-
ing the proper recruit-
ment of adoptive homes,
the retention and contin-
ued support of adoptive
homes as well as engag-
ing the children in under-
standing what adoption
means for them and their
lives.
"Kathy is a hero to the
many children who need
loving homes and fami-
lies," said Mike Watkins,
Chief Executive Officer
of Big Bend Community
Based Care. "Through
her efforts and continued
support, each finalized
adoption has strength-
ened a child, a family and
our community."
Donofro's passion and
dedication over the past
25 years has resulted in
the decrease of children in
alternative care, children
of all ages and develop-
mental conditions placed
in forever homes, and ed-
ucating the community
on adoption needs.
"For Kathy, working in
the adoption field has
never been just about
the job, but always about
finding the right and lov-
ing family for each child,"
said Vicki Abrams, North-
west Regional Managing
Director for DCE "Kathy
brings to our community
a passion and love for the
children she has served."


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TATebelos Scouts from Pack 300 in Marianna recently took part in a Chipola River
Clean-Up with the help of Bear Paw Adventures. In the spirit of Scouting's "Leave
No Trace," participants gathered household trash, tires, children's toys, broken
glass, lawn furniture and many other objects that had been washed or thrown into the river.
According to the Scouts, the River Clean-Up is one of many activities they take part in to show
pride in their local community and to help care for the environment. Pictured are Monte
Paulk, HueyWilliams, MarkTreadway, Gage Sellars, Clayton Williams, Kylie Sellars, Jonathan
Treadway and Bobby Holmes. Not pictured: Rusty Holmes, Rob Oswald and Caleb Oswald.

Marriage, Divorce Report


Special to the Floridan


The following marriages
vorces were recorded in
County during the week
17-21.
Marriages


and di-
Jackson
of Oct.


) Ariel Danielle Lee Davis and
Thomas Swearington Jr.


) Marshall Keith Rails Jr. and Am-
ber Lynn Reagan.
) Errol Angus Griffin and Brittani
Rochelle Toole.
) Mellonde Tomeeka Johnson and
Lynwood Williams.
) Candace Monique James and Ri-
cardo Maurice Snelling.
) Douglas Scott Murphree and
Stephanie Morris Vincent.


) Richards Dickens II and Tomeeka
Lashaye McKay.
) Dara Ann Harrison and Christo-
pher Allen Roberts Jr.
Divorces
a Sara Ann Ward vs. Daniel Bruce
Ward.
I Steve R. Benton Jr. vs. Tiffany
Kaye Benton.


E =Evening drAwing, M= Midday drawing


Saturday,
Wednesday


10/22 3-8-23-30-58
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PB13 PPx4.:
PB2 Pf5'


Saturday 10/22 7-15-32-34-43-48 xtra3
Wednesday 10/19 1-7-17-32-33-34 xtra5.
For lottery information, call (850) 487-7777 or (900) 7377777 .



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llin Honor of National
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October 30
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to the first 10 customers that call and schedule an appointment.
Plus 20% off*
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such as sealing attics and ceiling insulation
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LOCAL


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Mama












Publisher
VALERIA ROBERTS


Guest Opinion


Job creation for


connected lobbyists

Scripps Howard News Service

T he idea of a tax holiday to allow giant mul-
tinational firms to repatriate their overseas
Profits to the U.S. at substantially reduced
tax rates 5.25 percent to 8.75 percent com-
pared to the standard 35 percent is being billed
by its backers as a job creation measure.
It's a job creation measure all right but not for
the 9 percent unemployed working stiffs who
just hope to wind up on a payroll somewhere.
Instead the firms and trade groups pushing for
the tax holiday "have spent millions of dollars
and employed dozens of lobbyists to press fpr
the tax break," according to reporters for iWatch
News, the news website of the Center for Public
Integrity.
A tax holiday for profits stashed overseas by U.S.
companies was tried once before, in 2004, and it
had little noticeable impact on employment, cer-
tainly not the 1.3 million to 2.5 million jobs, the
backers of the tax holiday are promising if only
Congress will give them a second chance.
Instead of going into creating jobs or such use-
ful activity as research and development, studies
of the 2004 program, in which $863 billion was
repatriated, "went not to unemployed workers
and their families but to corporate executives and
shareholders," said the center.
Moreover, the massive tax cut -and that's what
a tax holiday is could cost the Treasury $40 bil-
lion to $80 billion over the decade, adding greatly
to our deficit woes.
A study of the 2004 tax holiday by the National
Bureau of Economic Research noted that the law
expressly prohibited stock buybacks: "But that
did not prevent the companies from doing so
the research bureau calculated that 60 percent
to 92 percent of the money repatriated was paid
out to shareholders." And some of the companies
continued to lay off workers.
It is cruel to the unemployed to portray this
tax giveaway as some kind of jbs measure. And
Sif the Center for Public Integrity is correct, it's
almost as if we've been set up. According to its
reporters, "The 2004 tax break was advertised
and sold as a one-time deal, but the affected
firms correctly perceived that after a few years
had passed they could demand another round
of relief, and they have stockpiled hundreds of
billions of dollars overseas in anticipation of the
next holiday."
This is one holiday we don't need to celebrate.

Contact representatives

Florida Legislature

Rep. Marti Coley, R-District 7
Marti.Coley@myfloridahouse.gov
Building A, Room 186 Chipola College
3094 Indian Circle
Marianna, FL 32446-1701

Rep. Brad Drake, R-District 5
Brad.Drake@myfloridahouse.gov
NWFL State-Chautauqua Campus #205
908 U.S. Highway 90 West
DeFuniak Springs, FL 32433-1436

Sen. Bill Montford. D-District 6
208 Senate Office Building
404 South Monroe St.
Tallahassee, FL 32399-1100.
montford.bill.web@ flsenate.gov


Letters to the Editor
Submit letters by either mailing to Editor, P.O. Box 520,
Marianna FL, 32447 or faxing to 850-482-4478 or send
email to editorial@jcflondan.com.The Floridan reserves
the right to edit or not publish any letter. Be sure to
include your full address and telephone number. These
will only be used to verify the letter and will not be
printed. For more information call 850-526-3614.


This


BY DON


ver the su
year-old i
sick. Lion
had always been
dent. He did not
he learned that t
battled for years
After a long hosp
members decide
move him into a
facility. We settle
war veterans.
Throughout m3
elders like my fat
their years in Koi
II. When my uncle
would discuss th
nam. From them
it meant to sacrif
and remain my h
much to learn fr
now living in nur
veterans' centers
every fime I visit
upbeat, how vali;
his fellow vets arc
The "Greatest C
not only America
civilization from
prolonged dark a
our generation a
children be the o
According to re
than 70 percent c
the nation is hea(
direction. Repub
and Independent
their opinion: Th
dence in Congres


broken
NA BRAZILE office
don't
simmer, my 80- (thin]
father became our c
el, a widower, Dei
fiercely indepen- man
complain after is suf
he cancer he had the "1
had returned. "over
?ital stay, family Acc
d it was time to even
n assisted-living disillh
d on a place for during
expre
y life, I have heard those
her talk about num1
rea or World War low, 4
les visited, they the p
eir service inViet- in the
I, I learned what 19 pe
ice. They were in ba
heroes. We have so Toda
om them- many It is
sing homes or domi
. What's surprising The p
my father is how in the
ant and how proud and i
e of their service, dress
generation" saved gain.
Sbut Western expect
descending into a dent
ge of tyranny. Will politi
nd those of our dysfu
nes to lose it all? obstr


cent polls, more
)f Americans think
ding in the wrong
licans, Democrats
ts are united in
ey've lost confi-
;s and in elected


I'm
cal pa
or the
our e
blame
do so
"How


America is our fault
als in general. Further, they ment, do we end up with nonper-
trust our major institutions forming government?"
kWall Street, banks and even To me, the answer is in "represen-
ourts). tative government." Why is our gov-
mocratic pollster Mark Mell- ernment not performing when in
recently wrote that America the last five years, in 2006, 2008 and
fering "a crisis of confidence," 2010, we sent waves of reformers to
breadth and depth" of which is fix the system, only to discover that
whelming." they are so trapped by "business as
:ording to Mellman's polling, :usual" that nothing happens? Is it
in the depths of Anericans' the politicians who "We the People"
usionment with government send to Washington? Or does the
ig the 1970s, fully "two-thirds problem lie in us?
assed.trust and confidence in Our Founding Fathers did not
who held public office. That establish an anti-government. After
ber too has receded to a record all, they created a national federal
15 percent." He also found that government to unite our nation.
public's confidence in business What they created was a.system
e 1970s was one-third then but based on the realistic assessment
recent today. Public confidence of human nature. Our separation
nks in 1979 was at 60 percent, of powers was introduced not from
y, it's 23 percent. a distrust of government but frorh
not encouraging that strategy knowledge that no human can be
nates politics in Washington. trusted with unlimited power.
people'ss spiraling loss of trust Our government institutions are
eir government, economy breaking down, and I suggest the
institutions is not only unad- problem is in our attitudes that
ed but is exploited for partisan tolerate, even cultivate, extremely
The wave of confidence and partisan, snarky public figures.
stations for the "can do" presi- Why do we make celebrities out
is crashing on the hard rock of. of people who, in the 1950s would
cs that promotes government have served as bad examples?
nation and congressional Harry Truman once came down
uctionism. hard on a teenager who referred to
not going to look at our politi- a state senator as "our local yokel."
parties, or our elected officials, Truman demanded respect for
e men and women who run senators, saying that "politics is a
economy, for someone to noble art."
e. I'm asking instead that we Unless we change ourselves, we
me introspection and ask, can't expect the change we want in
, in a representative govern- 2012.


The rise and fall of William Shirer


BY DAVID M. SHRIBMAN

It sat there on your parents'
shelf, or maybe your grandpar-
ents', alongside the six volumes
of Winston Churchill's chronicle of
World War II and the 11 volumes of
Will and Ariel Durant's "The Story
of Civilization."
It had two distinctions. One was
the menacing swastika on the
spine of the book. The other was
that it was the only one of those 18
volumes that anyone in your family
ever actually opened.
It is William L. Shirer's "The Rise
and Fall of the Third Reich," and
more than a million people did
more than buy it or open it. They
read it. It may be, aside from the
Bible, the biggest book ever read
by a big audience, and that audi-
ence devoured it, discussed it and
was shaped.by it. A generation of
Americans formed their view of the
horrors of Nazi Germany between
1933 and 1945 from its pages or
from elders or teachers who them-
selves read it and were molded by
it.
No other book of history in the
last century not Charles Beard
on the Constitution, not C. Vann
Woodward on the South, not Doris
Kearns Goodwin on Roosevelt and
Lincoln, nor David McCullough
on Harry Truman and John Adams
remotely approaches its reach,
influence and significance.
That is a remarkable achieve-
ment, even more so because this
work of history was undertaken by
a journalist one whose career
flared and flamed out, one whose
work was questioned if not pillo-
ried, one who wrote the book be-
cause he needed the money, much
as U.S. Grant wrote his remarkable
personal memoirs to pay for his
own funeral and assure the finan-
cial security of his family.
The six volumes of Churchill on
World War II are a great read, better
than you expect all the better, in
fact, because they are so one-sided


and self-serving. I have no idea
whether the Durants' civilization
series is any good because I have
never opened a single volume, even
though it has rested on my shelf for
more than three decades.
But Shirer's volume is one of the
great reading experiences, and
now it has been reissued in a new
edition commemorating the 50th
anniversary of its selection for the
National Book Award. Nowhere
except between the covers of that
book have so many read so much
about, for example, the three
Reichstag elections held within five
months in 1932 and much more.
So important a cultural force was
"Rise and Fall" that Time magazine
listed it as one of the eight best
nonfiction books written since
1923, when the magazine was
founded. It was, as Ron Rosenbaum
writes in an introduction prepared
for the commemorative edition,
"a kind of a leap from eyewitness
war correspondent to archival
historian."
Shirer was, as Dean Acheson
would say in a different context,
present at the creation (though not
at the destruction), but he sought,
as Mr. Rosenbaum put it, to write
like "the kind of historian, who, like
Thucydides, had firsthand experi-
ence of war and then sought to
adopt the analytic distance of the
historian."
That almost never works for jour-
nalists; piles of campaign books,
forgotten weeks after they are
published, provide sad testimony
to that. In fact, the only exceptions
I can think of are Theodore H.
White's "Making of the President"
volumes for 1960 and 1964 (but not
1968 or 1972) and maybe "Ten Days
that Shook the World," about the
Russian Revolution, by John Reed,
or "Scum of the Earth," about the
fall of France, by Arthur Koestler.
(Drop me a line if you can think of
another one.) Like no other book
of the period, Shirer's possesses the
gravitas of the archives as well as


the grit of the streets.
Shirer himself had a rise and
fall a rise from Cedar Rapids,
Iowa, to the world stage, where he
intersected with Hitler and Gandhi,
representatives of the two extremes
of 20th century history, and-then a
fall from grace when, as the original '
of the fabled "Murrow Boys" at CBS,
he fell afoul of Edward R. Murrow
and William S. Paley and fell into
near penury, in part as a result of
his name appearing on a list of
media leftists.
"To keep the family afloat, his
only option was to dream up an-
other book idea," Steve Wick wrote
in "The Long Night," published
earlier this year, a chronicle of
Shirer's life covering Germany. The
plan: Use captured German docu-
ments as the basis for an authori-
tative account of Hitler's ascent
and decline. It won him a $10,000
advance from Simon and Schuster.
No one thought Shirer would ever
earn back that advance.
hicluding Shirer: "I began to see
that soon I would be back to where
I had been for the last dozen years:
struggling to make ends meet and
not quite making it," he wrote in "A
Native's Return."
Shirer's book still has lessons.
Jonathan Steinberg, who teaches
modern European history at the
University of Pennsylvania, consid-
ers "Rise and Fall" a vital primary
source. "He was there," Mr. Stein-
berg says. "It has a direct vividness
of the eyewitness that other books
lack."
The book was the first serious
swipe at digesting 485 tons of con-
fidential documents in the archives
of the German government, and it
shaped like no other force the way
Nazism was remembered in the
1960s and the way it is interpreted
in 2011. But that may not be its ul-
timate significance. William Shirer
died 18 years ago. But his book
indeed, the book as an art form,
even if it isn't always in book form
- is far from dead.


_ _~ _I_~~ ~







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Briefs
Young driver crashes;
father charged
ORLANDO Authori-
ties say a 9-year-old boy
visiting Orlando with his
family was the designated
driver for his parents.
A Florida Highway Patrol
report states that troopers
responded to a call about
a crash Saturday night. An
Orange County Sheriff's
deputy witnessed the
crash and told troopers a
young boy was behind the
wheel. No injuries were
reported.
The report states that 31-
year-old Nathan Sikkenga
told troopers he and his
wife had been drinking, so
they told the boy to drive
the van. Sikkenga was
arrested on a third degree
felony charge of child
endangerment. He was
released from the Orange
County Jail on $2,500
bond. It was not immedi-
ately known if he has an
attorney. There was no
current telephone listing
for Sikkenga. The family
was visiting from Gillette,
Wyoming.

Consumer confidence
near record low
TALLAHASSEE Flori-
da's consumer confidence
is barely above a record
low set three years ago.
A University of Florida
study released Tuesday
shows the rate dropped by
a point to 63 in October.
The lowest on record is 59
in June 2008.
Consumer confidence is
rated on a scale of 2 to 150.
The index is benchmarked
to 1966, which has a value
of 100.
University researcher
Chris McCarty said it ap-
pears consumer confi-
dence may remain stuck
at a low level for some
time. That's because there
have been no consistent
economic developments
recently.

.Women charged with
helping inmates flee
VERO BEACH Two
women have been charged
with helping two maxi-
mum security inmates
escape from a Florida jail.
Authorities tell the Vero
Beach Press-Journal that
the women were arrested
Monday night after help-
ing 25-year-old Leviticus
Taylor and 51-year-old
Rondell Reed escape
Monday morning from the
Indian River County jail.
Taylor was captured
Monday night in Stuart
about 15 hours after
jail officials noticed his
absence.
According to an arrest af-
fidavit, one of the women
is Taylor's girlfriend. The
Martin County Sheriff's
Office says she drove Tay-
lor to Stuart and she knew
about his escape plans
through conversations she
had with Taylor and letters
Taylor sent from jail.
Reed remained at large
Tuesday. Authorities say
he faces a second degree
murder charge.

Shrek the turtle
released in Panhandle
PENSACOLA BEACH -
Wildlife officials released
a 14-pound sea turtle .
named Shrek in the Gulf
of Mexico after an eight-
month rehab stint in the
Florida Panhandle. About
150 people gathered on
Pensacola Beach Monday
to watch Shrek make his
trek into the water.
The Pensacola News


Journal reports Shrek was
never really friendly to the
staff at the Gulfarium in
Fort Walton Beach. A BP
cleanup worker found the
struggling turtle in the surf
on Feb. 28.
Gulfarium's Rachel Cain
oversaw Shrek's rehabilita-
tion. She says staffers usu-
ally get very attached to
the turtles they are rehab-
bing. But not Shrek. She
says he was never really
comfortable being there.
On Monday the cen-
ter also released two
other turtles Molly and
Ta'lulah.
From wire reports


Former Lt. Gov. aide accused of illegal recording


The Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE A former top
aide to Florida Lt. Gov. Jennifer
Carroll is facing felony charges
that she illegally taped a conver-
sation in Carroll's office.
State records show that 48-year-
old Carletha Cole was arrested
by the Leon County Sheriff's Of-
fice andcharged last week with a
third-degree felony. If convicted
she could face up to five years in
prison.
Cole declined to discuss the
investigation Monday with The
Associated Press. She did not im-
mediately return a phone mes-
sage Tuesday, nor was she present
at her home in Tallahassee. She
was arrested on Oct. 20 and was
released on a $1,000 bond.
The Florida Department of Law
Enforcement launched an inves-
tigation last month after receiving


a complaint that an audio record-
ing had been made in Carroll's
office. The agency reported its
findings to State Attorney Willie
Meggs.
It is against Florida law to record
someone without consent. But
there have been legal questions
about recordings made in public
buildings.
The Florida Times-Union ob-
tainied a copy of the conversation
between John Konkus, Carroll's
chief of staff, and Cole, a senior
program analyst who also acted
as a spokeswoman for Carroll.
The Times-Union placed the
recording on its website. Konkus
can be heard saying that Gov. Rick
Scott's chief of staff is afraid of
Carroll. Konkus also complained
that Scott "is not leading." Konkus
worked for U.S. Rep. Cliff Steams,
R-Ocala, before joining the Scott
administration in May.


Father of actress Lindsay

Lohan arrested in Tampa N N


The Associated Press

TAMPA The father
of actress Lindsay Lohan
was arrested Tuesday in
Florida on domestic vio-
lence charges after police
said he grabbed his on-
and-off girlfriend's arms
and pushed her down
multiple times during a
daylong argument.
A Tampa Police De-
partment report said
one cause of the fight
between 51-year-old Mi-
chael Lohan and 28-year-
old Kathryn Major was a
scheduled Tuesday court
date in nearby Sarasota
County on a previous do-
mestic violence case.
"She had some redness
on her arms, some minor
bruising and it was deter-
mined that he grabbed
her arm and threw her
to the ground a couple
of times," police spokes-
woman Andrea Davis
said.
After being placed in
custody, Lohan com-
plained of chest pains and
was taken to St. Joseph's
Hospital. Davis said he
apparently tried to check
himself out and leave un-
noticed when he thought
the officers had departed,
but they quickly arrested
him.
Lohan, who told police
he moved to Tampa to
get away from the public-
ity surrounding his celeb-
rity daughter, was being
held at the Hillsborough
County Orient Road Jail
without bail. There was
no indication he had
hired an attorney.
According to the police
report, officers arrived
at Major's condominium
early Tuesday to respond
to a domestic violence
call. They could hear a
woman yelling "stop" and
"leave me alone."
Lohan opened the door
when officers knocked,
out of breath and sweat-


ing, the report said.
"He immediately got
defensive
saying 'ev-
erything
is OK and
nothing
happened
here,"' the
Michael Lohan report said.
"The victim
started yellingin the back-
ground for us to help her
because he was lying."
In addition to the inju-
ries to Major, which did
not require medical treat-
ment, police said jewelry
and clothing from her
closet was strewn around
and a bathroom door had
a dent at about the height
of Lohan's head. The re-
port quoted Major as say-
ing Lohan had banged his
own head on the door and
that he intended to blame
her for injuring him if po-
lice came.
In addition to the court
date, police said Lohan
was angry because Major
would not perform oral
sex on him. Police said
Lohan came to Major's
condo Sunday and that
she decided to let him
stay even though she had
a temporary domestic vi-
olence injunction against
him from the Sarasota
County case. The hearing
Tuesday was whether to
make it permanent.
Lohan told police Ma-
jor, a former reporter for
the Star tabloid, was his
girlfriend and soon-to-be
fiancee.


Cole herself was fired in Sep-
tember after publicly speaking
out about infighting in Carroll's
office.
A sworn statement by an FDLE
agent says that investigators
looked into Cole's e-mails and
cellphone records and discovered
that she had sent the recording to
a reporter with the Times-Union.
The reporter then contacted Bri-
an Burgess, the main spokesman
for Scott and emailed him a copy
of the recording.
Konkus, who said the recording
was made without his permission,
told investigators it was made
sometime between June and Au-
gust 2011. He said he.was working
with Cole on Carroll's website.
Cole's job application shows
that she ran her own marketing
firm prior to going to work for
Carroll. She also said she worked
in real estate and in the banking


industry.
In 2005, a Miami Herald colum-
nist was fired for failing to get per-
mission to record telephone con-
versations he had with a former
city commissioner under investi-
gation for federal corruption.
Last december prosecutors in
Marion County decided against
pursuing charges in a case involv-
ing a mother who put a digital
recorder in the backpack of her 7-
year-old child. The tape revealed
that a teacher and a teacher's aide
had mocked the autistic first-
grader who does not speak.
The Ocala Star Banner reported
at the time that school district at-
torneys concluded that the taping
was legal because it occurred in a
public building where-there was
no expectation of privacy. Local
prosecutors declined to pursue
charges but called the law a "gray
area."


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE PHOTO
In this July 5 photo, the juror chairs sit empty in the media room at the Orange County
Courthouse in Orlando, after the jury found Casey Anthony not guilty in her murder trial.

Anthony jurors' names revealed


The Associated Press

ST. PETERSBURG -The
names of the Casey An-
thony jurors are public,
yet the reason they ac-
quitted her is still largely
unknown.
Jurors were either un-
available or didn't want
to talk to the media Tues-
day when a judge released
their names, three months
after they fond Anthony
not guilty in the death of
her 2-year-old daughter,
Caylee. In the days since
the verdict, Anthony and
the jurors received death
threats and angry mes-
sages were posted online.
Many people across the
nation thought the ju-
rors let a guilty woman go
free. Anthony went into
hiding, and it appears ju-
rors have done the same
thing.
Associated Press re-
porters went. to the.
homes where jurors were
thought to live, but in
most cases, the blinds or
drapes were closed and
no one answered. Dogs


could be heard barking
inside some of the homes.
When someone did come
to the door, they said the
juror didn't want to speak
or in one case, said the ju-
rordidn't live there.
"The jurors have known
that this day would be
coming for a long time.
They've had plenty of
time to think about it,"
said Tampa defense at-
torney John Fitzgibbons,
who was not involved in
the Anthony case. "It may
simply be that the jurors
want to move on from this
case. Or it could be some
sort of collective decision
by the jurors if they are
working on something

IA -\ #


else jointly."
Fearing for their safety,
Judge Belvin Perry delayed
releasing their names, say-
ing he wanted a "cooling
off period" to pass.
Legal experts said Perry's
decision was reasonable,
but highly unusual.
"I can't recall another
situation like this, but I
think in this case it was
necessary," said Leslie
Garfield, law professor at
Pace Law School in New
York. "... You ask people to
serve the justice system,
but in situations like this
there has to be protection
for these people. We have
to try to protect them
somehow."


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Oakland police officers in riot gear line Frank H. Ogawa Plaza on Tuesday, in Oakland, Calif.


Police arrest 75 protesters


at Oakland's City Hall


The Associated Press

OAKLAND, Calif. Police in riot gear
cleared anti-Wall Street protesters from
in front of Oakland's City Hall on Tues-
day morning, leaving a sea of overturned
tents, protest signs and trash strewn
across the plaza.
Hundreds of officers and sheriff's depu-
ties from more than a dozen agencies
went into the two week-old encamp-
ment with tear gas and beanbag rounds
at around 5 a.m., police said. Seventy-five
people were arrested, mostly on suspi-
cion of misdemeanor unlawful assembly
and illegal camping.
About 170 protesters were at the site, but
no one was injured, according to police.
"I'm very pleased with the way things
went," Interim Oakland Police Chief
Howard Jordan said at a news conference
following the raid.
Television news footage showed pro-
testers being taken away in plastic hand-
cuffs without incident, though some pro-
testers complained of rough handling by
police.
Officers fired tear gas and bean bags
when one group of demonstrators pelted
Officers with rocks and bottles near the
camp's kitchen area, Jordan said.
"It was definitely chaos. People didn't
want to get gassed," said protester Antho-
ny Owens, 40, a computer programmer
from Oakland who was at the scene when
police moved in but was not arrested.
Some people in the camp left as word
spread about possible police action, Ow-
ens said. Many of the remaining protest-
ers locked arms and shouted as officers
surrounded the plaza and moved in.
Witnesses reported seeing smoke rising
from the area. The plaza was "contained"
at around 5:30 a.m., city officials said.
The Oakland site ,was among numer-
ous camps that have sprung up around
the country, as protesters rally against
what they see as corporate greed and a
wide range of other economic issues. The
protests have attracted a wide range of
people, including college students look-
ing for work and the homeless.
In Oakland, tensions between the city
and protesters escalated last week as of-
ficials complained about what they de-
scribed as deteriorating safety, sanitation
and health issues at the site.
City officials had originally been sup-
portive of protesters, with Oakland Mayor
Jean Quan saying that sometimes "de-
mocracy is messy."
But the city later warned the protest-
ers that they were breaking the law and
couldn't stay in the encampment over-
night. They cited concerns about rats,


fire hazards, public urination and acts of
violence at the site, which had grown to
more than 150 tents and included areas
for health care, child care and cooking.
"Many Oaklanders support the goals
of the national OccupyWall Street move-
ment," Quan said in a statement on Tues-
day. "However, over the last week it was
apparent that neither the demonstrators
nor the City could maintain safe or sani-
tary conditions or control the ongoing
vandalism."
There were reports of a sex assault and
a severe beating and fire and paramedics
were denied access to the camp, accord-
ing to city officials, who said they had also
received numerous complaints of intimi-
dating and threatening behavior.
Protesters disputed the city's claims
about conditions at the camp. They said
the protest was dominated by a spirit of
cooperation that helped keep the site
clean and allowed disputes to be resolved
peacefully.
Lauren Richardson, a 24-year-old col-
lege student from Oakland, complained
that the disheveled state of the camp
following the police raid gave a false im-
pression. She said volunteers collected
garbage and recycling every six hours,
that water was boiled before being used
to wash dishes and that rats had infested
the park long before the camp went up.
"It was very neat. It was very organized,"
Richardson said.
SVolunteers at the medical tent erected
on the site said paramedics had not been
kept away.
On Thursday, the city ordered the pro-
testers to vacate, though they did not set
a deadline. Protesters said the number of
people at the camp had steadily dwindled
since the cityposted the letter, while those
who remained understood they would
likely face a confrontation with police.
After Tuesday's raid, police maintained
a heavy presence around downtown Oak-
land. Streets were closed off by police bar-
ricades, and at least two helicopters were
in the air shining lights down. Dozens of
officers were on the streets, and police in
riot gear were seen facing off with shout-
ing protesters, who briefly blocked traffic
on a busy thoroughfare.
City officials advised downtown busi-
nesses to delay opening and city employ-
ees to come in late.
Police also cleared a smaller encamp-
ment from a park near the plaza on Tues-
day morning.
The city said protesters would be al-
lowed to return to the plaza after it was
cleaned up and could stay between
the hours of 6 a.m. and 10 p.m. but not
overnight.


College prices rise as states slash budgets


The Associated Press

,It's a kick in the gut even for students
and families hardened to bad financial
news: Average in-state tuition and fees
at four-yea; public colleges rose another
$631 this fall, or 8.3 percent, compared to
a year ago.
Nationally, the cost of a full credit load
has passed $8,000, an all-time high.
Throw in room and board, and the aver-
age list price for a state school now runs
more than $17,000 a year, according to
the twin annual reports on college costs
and student aid published Wednesday by
the College Board.
Helping drive the national numbers
were huge tuition increases at public
universities in California, which enrolls
10 percent of public four-year college
students and whose 21 percent tuition
increase this year was the largest of any
state. But even without California, prices
would have increased 7 percent on aver-
age nationally an exceptional burden
at a time of high unemployment and
stagnant family incomes.
The large increase in federal grants and
tax credits for students, on top of stimu-
lus dollars that prevented greater state
cuts, helped keep the average tuition-
and-fees that families actually pay much
lower: about $2,490, or just $170 more
than five years ago. But the days of states
and families relying on budget relief from
Washington.appear numbered.
"The states cut budgets, the price goes
up, and'the (federal) money goes to that,"
said Patrick Callan, president of the Na-
tional Center for Public Policy and Higher
Education. "For 25 years we've been put-
_ting more and more money into financial


aid, and tuition keeps going up. We're on
a national treadmill."
Terry Hartle, senior vice president at the
American Council on Education, which
represents colleges in Washington, said
the cause of the price increases for the 80
percent of college students who attend
public institutions is clear. State appro-
priations to higher education declined
18 percent per student over the last three
years, the College Board found, the sharp-
est fall on record.
"To see increases of 20 percent, as we
saw in California, to see gains of 15 per-
cent in other states, is simply unprec-
edented," Hartle said. "Tuition is simply
being used as a revenue substitute in
many states."
The latest report comes with concerns
about student debt front and center
among many of the Occupy Wall Street
protesters. And President Obama was
expected Wednesday to announce a new
loan consolidation program, plus mea-
sures to encourage more borrowers to
use the government's new income-based
repayment option that caps monthly
payments.
The College Board reports roughly 56
percent of 2009-2010 bachelor's degree
recipients at public four-years graduated
with debt, averaging about $22,000. At
private nonprofit universities, the figures
were higher 65 percent and around
$28,000.
"Psychologically, practically, it's a big
number, and it will inform important
choices, like when and whether you buy
a home, start a family, save for retirement
or take the risk'of starting a new busi-
ness," said Lauren Asher, president of The
Institute for College Access and Success.


A bad economic mood, just


in time for the holidays


The Associated Press

NEW YORK Ameri-
cans say they feel worse
about' the economy than
they have since the depths
of the Great Recession.
And it's a bad time for a
bad mood because house-
holds are starting to make
their holiday budgets.
It might not be all doom
and gloom, though. Some-
times what people say
about the economy and
how they behave are two
different things.
Consumer confidence
fell in October to the low-
est since March 2009, re-
flecting the big hit that
the stock market took this
summer and frustration
with an economic recov-
ery that doesn't really feel
like one.
The Conference Board,
a private research group,
said its index of consumer
sentiment came in at 39.8,
down about six points
from September and sev-
en shy of what economists
were expecting.
The reading is still well
above where the index
stood two and a half years
ago, at 26.9. But it's not
even within shouting dis-
tance of 90, what it takes
to signal that the economy
is on solid footing.
Economists watch con-
sumer confidence closely
because consumer spend-
ing accounts for about 70
percent of U.S. economic
activity. The index mea-
sures how shoppers feel
about business condi-
tions, the job market and
the next six months.
It came exactly two
months before Christ-
mas, with retailers pre-
paring for the holiday
shopping season, their
busiest. Almost twice as
many people now expect
a pay cut over the next six
months as expect a raise.
"If people think their in-
come is declining, they're
not going to be inclined
to spend," said Jacob Ou-


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE PHOTO
In this Sept. 29 photo, a woman and child leave a mall with
purchases in Culver City, Calif.


bina, an economist at RBC
Capital Markets.
Economists point out
that consumer confidence
is not as simple as a single
number, though. The feel-
ings people express about
the economy do not al-
ways track how they actu-
ally spend money.
In September, for ex-
ample, despite feeling bad
about the economy, peo-
ple increased their spend-
ing on retail goods by the
most since March. More
people bought new cars, a
purchase people typically
make when they are con-
fidenf in their finances.
The percentage of
Americans who plan to
*buy a major appliance in


the next six months, such
as a television or wash-
ing machine, rose to 46
percent, up from 41 per-
cent. Exactly half plan to
take a vacation in the next
six months, up from 47
percent.
Jessica Jarmon was laid
off from her job in social
work in March. For the
past three months, she
has worked a temp job
in the same industry, but
that ended last week.
"You hear about one
company creating 16,000
jobs, and then you hear
about another company
laying off 10,000 jobs.
Maybe, at best, we are
just breaking even," said
Jarmon.


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-16A WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26, 2011


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MRTIIONAI







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Clinic
From Page 1A
exam rooms. Appoint-
ments take anywhere from
15 to 20 minutes.
If a patient comes and
there's a line, Smith Cov-
ington suggests signing in
at the kiosk and then run-
ning errands if necessary.
The nurse practitioner oh
duty will call when a pa-
tient's turn comes around.
"We just provide a source
of convenient care," Smith
Covington said.
Most types of insurance
are taken at the clinic. To
learn more about Minute
Clinic, call 1-866-389-2727
or visit minuteclinic.com

Other MinuteClinic
locations
S1819 West Tennessee
Street, Tallahassee
)) 5670 North Monroe,
Street, Tallahassee
D 302 E. James Lee Blvd.,
Crestview


Obituaries
James & Sikes Funeral
Home Maddox Chapel
4278 Lafayette Street
Marianna, Florida 32446

Everett Willis
Gregg



Everett Willis Gregg,
born October 7, 1912, died
October 24. 2011. He was
born in Dellwood and lived
most of this life in Jackson
County. He passed away at
his residence in Marianna.
He served as a MP in the
US Army during WW 11, and
retired as a fireman at
Tyndall Air Force Base in
Panama City. For many
years he farmed and raised
cattle in Washington and
Jackson Counties. He was a
lifetime member of Shady
Grove Baptist Church.
He was preceded in
death by his parents Rob-
ert Charles and Lola Gregg;
five brothers, Lee Gregg,
Albert Leon Gregg, Charles
Howell Gregg Willard
Otho' Gregg and Jasper
Herman Gregg; two sisters,
Callie Gregg Moneyham
and Mary Lou Gregg
Alford.
He is survived By his wife
of 69 years, Louise Gilbert
Gregg; one sister, Eleanor
Gregg Edenfield; thee spe-
cial nephews, Harold
Gregg, Duane Gregg and
Keith Gregg; numerous
other nieces and nephews.
Funeral services will be
at 2 p.m. Wednesday, Octo-
ber 26, at Shady Grove
Baptist Church with the
Rev. Bill Miller officiating.
Burial will follow in
Shady Grove Cemetery
with James and Sikes Fu-
neral Home Maddox Chap-
el directing.
The family will recieve
friends beginning at 1:30
p.m., just prior to funeral
time at the church..
Expressions of sympathy
may be made online at ww
w.jamesandsikesfuneralho
me.com.
James & Sikes Funeral
Home Maddox Chapel
4278 Lafayette Street
Marianna, Florida 32446

L. H. Moore

Funeral services will be
at 10 a.m. Wednesday, Oc-
tober 26, 2011 at James and
Sikes Funeral Home Mad-
dox Chapel. entombment
will follow at Pinecrest Me-
morial Gardens.


Follow us on

Facebook


Jackson County
Floridan


Four charged with illegal hunting


From staff reports

Four Wiregrass residents
were arrested recently by
Florida Fish and Wildlife
officers and charged with
taking deer illegally.
According to a written
release from the Florida
Fish and Wildlife Conser-
vation, Brandon Leigh
Smith, 21, is charged with
11 counts of taking deer il-
legally,'three counts oftak-
ingwildlife from a roadway


and one count of criminal
mischief. Dustin Chase
Parker, 19, is charged
with nine counts of taking
deer illegally, four counts
of taking wildlife from a
roadway and one count of
criminal mischief. William
Cody Tillery, 21, is charged
with eight counts of taking
deer,illegally and Lindsay
Brooke Holloway, 20, was
charged with four counts
of taking deer illegally.
Smith, Parker and Tillery


are all from Dothan. Hol-
loway lives in Troy.
According to the re-
lease, officers responded
to complaints from resi-
dents about illegal hunt-
ing and began patrolling
the area of north Jackson
County near Sellar's Road
and Highway 2 beginning
in mid-September.
On Oct. 12, officers
stopped a car on Christmas
Road after seeing it shine a
peanut field with its head-


lights. Officers searched
the car and found firearms
and deboning kits, and
the trunk was lined with
plastic.
The release stated Flor-
ida Wildlife officer Mike
Guy conducted interviews
that eventually led to the
recovery of processed deer
meat, antlers, a shotgun
and bow and arrow.
In addition to the
charges of taking deer il-
legally, Smith and Parker


face charges for shooting
from a Florida roadway
and criminal mischief for
driving across and dam-
aging peanuts that were
in the process of being
harvested.
Information about vio-
lations of Florida fish and
wildlife laws can be re-
ported to the FWC's Wild-
life Alert hotline at 888-
404-FWGC (3922). People
can also send a text mes-
sage to Tip@myfwc.com


KIWANIS CLUB PRESENTS PROGRAMS



R~;~; l~iP~I~l~ ~~i~~l~lCIA


SUBMITTED PHOTOS
LEFT: Master Gardner Vicki Fuqua (left) recently presented a program on winter planting to the Marianna
Kiwanis Club. She was introduced by Jonathan Fuqua. RIGHT: Melissa Boggs and Teresa Harrison recently
presented a program,on the duties of Healthy Families of North Florida to the Marianna Kiwanis Club. They
were introduced by Les Furr.


A est were posing as underage girls or
A arrest as parents of underage girls who
were interested in offering their
From Page 1A children up for sexual encoun-
ters. Eventually, the men were
the initial week of the operation, steered to location in Tallahassee
Oct. 10-16, but a few others have in connection with the planned
since been charged. encounters. They were arrested
Local law enforcement learned there and charged with various
of Calloway's arrest after he was crimes related to their particular
reported as a missing person alleged activities.
the week of Oct. 10. The Jackson In the probable cause related to
County Sheriff's Office was called Calloway's case, authorities say
in to search for Calloway after he he responded to a posting made
failed to show up for work at a lo- by an undercover investigator
cal car dealership. who posed as the mother of a 13-
The search was called off after year-old girl. In the posting, the
they learned he had beer arrest- investigator said he was a mother
ed and jailed. Calloway posted a looking for 'the right teacher for
$12,500 bond on Oct. 12, the day my daughter's first time."
of his arrest, and was released to Calloway allegedly wrote that
await further court action in his he had "been with younger girls,"
case. adding that he had dated a 14-
According to authorities in- year-old in the past. He indicated
volved in the operation, the ar- that he would perform oral sex on
rested men were allegedly in- the girl and then involve his geni-
volved in Internet conversations tals in acts with. her, according
with undercover officers who to the report. Authorities say he


Werewolf
From Page 1A

a pumpkin patch, a bounce
house and more, in addition to
the corn maze. This year, the
Mosiers decided to whittle the
festivities down to their most
popular event: The corn maze.
I quickly recruited my boy-
friend Bill Homoney there
was no way I was sitting alone
in a corn maze at night, never-,
mind I was the scarer and we
grabbed costumes from Walmart.
He came as a "Scary Nightmare,"
(the costume company's name
for it) basically a grey, wrinkled
face mask with a black and grey
torn robe. My costume was less
up for interpretation I came as
a werewolf.
Walking into the ticket sale
and concession building, we met
Terri Mosier, Walter's wife, who
was bouncing her granddaugh-
ter on her hip while making
popcorn at the concession. Her
four daughters and a niece from
Gainesville were also on hand to
help out throughout the night.
"It's a family thing," Terri said.
Last year, Terri was Chuckie, a
pretty prominent part, so I had to
ask her for advice. "Just have fun
out there," she replied.


"When you're out there, you're
into it," Terri said.
As Bill and I began putting our
costumes over our clothes, we
met some other characters. Al-
ford Mayor George Gay, dressed
as a ghost with grey body paint
and period clothes, was using a
smoke machine-to give the maze
an even creepier vibe.
"We freak people out because
we're not storybook characters,"
Gay said of himself and his wife,
who dresses as his lady ghost
counterpart.
Gay had some very practi-
cal advice when it came to the
maze's'visitors.
"Don't touch'em," he seri-
ously told me. "Scared people are
dangerous."
Other characters haunting the
maze were Freddy Krueger, Mi-
chael Myers, a demented clown
andWalter as Leather Face.
"I don't know whether he's Saw
or Pee Wee Herman," W'alter said
laughing as he indicated to a tall
youth in a dark suit and red bow
tie (the question was certainly
answered after he put on his Saw
mask).
Bill and I began wandering the
maze, looking for the ideal creepy
spot to scare. This isn't your aver-
age corn maze. Chilling music,
full of wolves, ghouls, tortured
souls and other sounds that


eventually asked for an address
and, once he acquired it, sent
an email that h7e was on his way
there.
Officers were waiting to take
him into custody when he ar-
rived. According to the affidavit,
Calloway admitted that he was
the only one who had access to
the email account, he was using
and that he had sent the emails
to the undercover officer. He also
admitted traveling from Malone
to meet with what he had thought
to be the mother and daughter,
according to the affidavit.
Cook, the newly appointed
chief, has been a member of the
Malone Volunteer Fire Depart-
ment for more than a year, join-
ing her husband on the crew.
Cook said she was voted into the
position because the assistant
fire chief; Robby Worthington,
could not step into the chief's
role. Worthington's father, Jeff, is
being treated at a burn unit be-
cause of injuries he received in an


make your skin crawl blares from
a loudspeaker. Walking through
certain areas in the maze trips
some surprises for visitors.
We found our spot, a long
hallway of corn with alcoves
perfect for hiding in the shadows.
As we waited for our first victims,
we went over our plan of attack..
Feeling a bit unscary, I asked Bill
for'a pep talk.
"You're scary," Bill said grab-
bing my shoulders and staring
me seriously in the eyes. "You're
funny looking and you're scary."
With a pep talk like that how
could I not succeed?
A tour guide holding a blue
light leads guests through the
maze. Although visitors may
not see the monsters hidden in
the maze as they walk through,
believe me, they can see you.
Not confident that our $15 Wal-
,mart masks would do the job, we
simply decided to surprise the
people coming by.
I buried myself into the corn
stalks, throwing myself practi-
cally on top of the visitors with a
growl, while Bill silently appeared
at their sides and followed them
a few feet or two.
Most of the time, it worked. If
they hadn't seen me in the stalks,
the shock of a weird werewolf-
looking thing, coupled with
a strange man coming from


accident a few weeks ago, and his
son needs to be available for him
whenever needed.
Cook expects the, department
to continue operating as well as
it has in the past. She said Callo-
way ran it well, but stepped down
after the incidents that led to his
arrest, saying he did not want the
reputation of the department to
suffer by association with those
events.
The department will go for-
ward, she said,, adding that the
fire crew is well-prepared to con-
tinue fire protection in the com-
munity. Also, she said, the team
members are focusing on an up-
coming fundraiser they hope will
assist the assistant chief's family
as they struggle to cover their ex-
penses related to Jeff Worthing-
ton's injuries.
The department will be selling
Boston butt roasts at the Malone
Pecan Festival on Nov. 4, with all
proceeds going to the Worthing-
ton family.


nowhere was enough to earn us
some screams and a few actually
ran away.
After a few hours of this, Bill
and I decided to call it a night
and experience a length of the
maze ourselves.
Between the smoke and the
muted lighting, the maze is a
haze of swaying corn stalks. Dis-
embodied heads swirl in the air,
distracting us from the 'demons'
on the ground.
I met most of the characters in
the maze and still I got scared. At
one point, a chainsaw ripped to
life behind our group and I scur-
ried forward, leaving Bill laugh-
ing hysterically behind me as I
tried to weave around the group.
I would not recommend the
maze for little kids or those easily
scared who don't like the feeling.
But, there is a bounce house and
a waiting area outside a stocked
concession stand in the front of
the maze, making the wait for
family members an easy one.
Also, get there early. This past
weekend, the maze had just
under 400 visitors.
To check out Mosier's Field of
Screams Corn Maze yourself,
visit 2565 Standland Road in Cot-
tondale from 6:30-10:30 p.m. on
Oct. 27-29 and Nov. 4 and 5. For
more information call 326-6168
or visit www.mo-ganics.com


Jackson County Vault & Monuments
Quality Service at Affordable Prices


850-482-5041


1L,


Pinecrest


3720 Caverns Road Marianna, FL 32446-1806 (850) 482-3964


-----


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26, 2011 7AF


LOCAL







-8A WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26.2011


INTERNATIONAL

Natural Disaster


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Miracle baby emerges fro

The Associated Press .


ERCIS, Turkey After 48
hours, a miracle emerged
from a narrow slit in rub-
ble of a Turkish apartment
building: a 2-week-old
baby girl, half-naked but
still breathing.
Stoic rescue workers
erupted in cheers and ap-
plause at her arrival and
later for her mother's and
grandmother's rescues a
ray of uplifting news on
otherwise grim day.
The bad news just kept
on coming Tuesday: The
death toll from Sunday's
7.2-magnitude earthquake
climbed to at least 459,
desperate survivors fought
over aid and blocked aid
shipments, and a powerful
aftershock ignited wide-
spread panic that turned
into a prison riot in the
provincial city of Van.
With thousands of quake
survivors faced a third
night out in the open in
near-freezing tempera-
tures, Turkey to set aside
its national pride and said
it would accept interna-
tional aid offers, even from
Israel; with which it has
had strained relations as
of late. 0
The fact that three gener-
ations were saved in a dra-
matic operation was all the
more remarkable because
the infant, Azra Karadu-
man, was later declared
healthy after being flown
to a hospital in Ankara, the
Turkish capital.
"Bringing them out is
such happiness. I wouldn't
be happier if they gave me
tons of money," said res-
cuer Oytun Gulpinar.
Television footage
showed rescuer Kadir Di-
rek in an orange jumpsuit
wriggling into a pile of bro-
ken concrete and warped
metal- what was left from
a five-story apartment
block and then wrig-
gling out with tiny Azra,
clad only in a T-shirt.


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Turkish rescuers carry Azra Karaduman, a two-week-old baby
girl they saved from under debris of a collapsed building in
Ercis, Van, eastern Turkey, on Tuesday.


"Praise be!" someone
shouted. "Get out of the
way!" another person
yelled as the aid team and
bystanders cleared a path
to a waiting ambulance.
In a separate rescue later
Tuesday, 10-year-old Ser-
hat Gurwaspulled fr9m the
rubble of another bMilding
after being trapped for 54
hours, but he died later at
a hospital, state-run TRT
television reported.
The pockets of jubilation
were tempered by many
more discoveries of bodies
in the worst-hit town of Er-
cis and other communities
in eastern Turkey devastat-
ed by Sunday's earthquake.
Some 2,000 buildings col-
lapsed, but the fact that
the tremor hit in daytime,
when many people were
out of their homes, averted
an even worse disaster.
Close to 500 aftershocks
have since rattled the area,
according to Turkey's Kan-


dilli seismology center.
A strong one on Tuesday
sent residents rushing into
the streets in panic while
sparking a riot by prison-
ers in the eastern city of
Van, 55 miles (90 kilome-
ters) south of Ercis. The
U.S. Geological Survey put
that temblor at a magni-
tude of 5.7.
Some prisoners de-
manded to be let out while
others set bedding on fire,
the Dogan news agency
reported. The revolt then
spread inside the 1,000-
bed prison and security
forces surrounded it to
keep more inmates from
escaping.
Turkish military ve-
hicles shot water cannon
at crowds in the streets
of Van to try to calm the
situation.
There was still no power
or running water in the re-
gion, and desperate people
stopped aid trucks even


m Turkish quake rubble


[getfod r eatp I icesgeaPople i,


Ioc] cI.arift s[jj


I PrFmd


Hu'nt'sl (


before they entered Ercis,
grabbing tents and other
supplies. Kanal D televi-
sion showed people fight-
ing over tents and blankets
in some areas.
Aid workers said they
were able to find emergen-
cy housing for only about
half of the thousands of
people who needed it.
Most of the damage was in
Ercis, but many buildings
were also damaged in Van.
A Turkish foreign minis-
try official, who spoke on
condition of anonymity in
line with ministry rules,
said the country decided
to accept offers from as-
sistance after emergency
management authorities
decided thousands of sur-
vivors would need pre-
fabricated homes to get-
through the winter in the
mountainous region.
Israel offered assistance
despite a rift between the
two countries over last
year's Israeli raid on a Gaza-
bound flotilla that killed
nine Turkish activists.
Aware of the widespread
misery, President Abdullah
Gul canceled a reception
to mark the 88th anniver-
sary of the founding of the
republic on Saturday.
At least 1,352 people were
injured in the quake, TRT
television said late Tues-
day. At least nine people
were rescued on Tuesday,
although many more bod-
ies were discovered.
The rescued baby's moth-
er, Semiha, and grand-
mother, Gulsaadet, were
huddled together, with the
baby clinging to her moth-
er's shoulder when res-
cuers found them, Direk
told The Associated Press.
Hours after the infant was
freed, the two others were
pulled from the large, half-
flattened building and
rushed to ambulances to
new cheers. The mother
had been semiconscious,
but woke up when rescu-
ers arrived, Direk said.


Firefighters and rescuers
ordered silence while they
listened for noise from
other possible survivors
in the large 5-story apart-
ment block, parts of which
were being supported by a
crane. But workers could
not find the baby's father
and there were no other
signs of life, Direk said.
Direk was chosen for
the rescue because he was
thinnest and was able to
squeeze through the nar-
row corridor that workers
had drilled, according to
NTV television.
He chatted with the
mother while trying to get
her out, at one point jok-
ingly asking her to name
the baby after his own son,
Cagan.
"She replied that the
baby was a girl, and that
she wanted her named
Azra," he said.
Gerald Rockenshaub, di-
saster response 'manager
at the World Health Orga-
nization, said the first 48
to 72 hours are crucial for
rescues and the chances of
finding survivors decreas-
es significantly after that.


He said people can survive
without food for a week or
so but having access to wa-
ter was critical.
It was not clear if her
mother was able to breast-
fed Azra, but Rockenshaub
said "if the mother was able
to keep the baby warm by
using her own body, that
would be good enough."
Earlier, 9-year-old Oguz
Isler was rescued along
with his sister and cousin,
but he waited anxiously at
the same pile of debris that
used to be his aunt's apart-
ment block for news of his
parents or other relatives
buried inside.
Turkish rescue workers in
bright orange overalls and
Azerbaijani military res-
cuers in camouflage uni-
forms searched. through
the debris, using excava-
tors, picks and shovels.
Dogs sniffed for survivors.
Hundreds of rescue
teams from throughout
Turkey rushed to the area,
while Turkish Red Cres-
cent dispatched tents and
blankets and set up soup
kitchens. But residents said
more help was needed.


CiSSCISl








WEDN AO
8BP^^^B^^Bi^BB^^HBHHBB^^, Hi^si. l *:*


Gracevile Voleybal



Lady Tigers win,



advance in playoffs


BY SHELIA MADER
Floridan Correspondent
The Graceville Lady Tigers volleyball
team has advanced to the second round
of the district playoffs after a win over
the Wewa Lady Gators in Sneads Monday
night.
The Lady Tigers had to take it to five sets
to win the match.
In game one it was aWewa 25-17 win,
while the Lady Tigers turned the tables to
take a 25-17 win over the Lady Gators.
Game three went Graceville's way as the
Tigers won 25-23.
Wewa took game four to overtime to tie


the match at two games each with a 28-26
win. In the final set it was all Graceville as
it held Wewa to just six points while post-
ing 15.
The Lady Tigers were led in attacks by
Wynterra Pittman with 15 and four kills,
followed by Taylor McDaniel with seven
attacks and two kills. Tiara Sorey was
on the board with five attacks and four
kills. In serves it was McDaniel with 23,
followed by Sorey with 17. On the board
with 14 serves was KayleeVaughn.
The Lady Tigers were scheduled to
take the court again Tuesday night for
a chance at the district championship
scheduled for Thursday.


MARKSKINNER/FLORIDAN
Graceville's Wynterra Pittnian puts the ball over the net during a match earlier this season.


Midget Soccer


Offense


takes


center


stage

Teams play at
Optimist Park
BY SHELIA MADER
Floridan Correspondent
In Midget League soc-
cer action at Optimist
Park last week, there was
no shortage of offense.
The Cheetahs defeated
the Mystics 6-3. Scoring
for the Mystics was Cole
Nobles, Anna Marie Wells
and Matthew Clikas..
For the Cheetahs, it was
Zack Jernigan who put
up three goals to lead the
team, followed by Zack
Jernigarl,. Jordan Sloan,
and Sarah Young, all'with
one goal each.
In theater game, it was
a 3-2 win for the Raptors
over the Extreme. Jade
Hendrix, Nathan Hol-
land, and Micaiah Spence
.accounted for the three
goals for the Raptors
while Chris Gable was the
scorer for the Extreme.
The Thunderbolts
showed no mercy for the
young Dayspring team as
they handed them an 8-0
shutout.
Bishop Bosland had
three goals for the Thun-
derbolts while Trett Phil-
lips and Chance Harris
both had two goals each.
Finding the back of the
net once was William
Carrel.
The Midget League soc-
cer season will come to a
close on, Thursday night
at Optimist Park.


LADY HORNETS FALL TO ALTHA


, ophia Launert digs a ball during a match earlier this season. The Cottondale Lady Hornets fell to
Altha in the first round of the district playoffs Monday night. Altha and Graceville were set to face off
Tuesday night. Results from that matchup were not available as of press time.


NFL


Jaguars shut down

Ravens in prime
0_ Ui


Youth Soccer

Pee Wee contests

dominated by defense
BY SHELIA MADER
Floridan Correspondent


LIiUm et s UW UUW Soccer action continues to be heated at Optimist
Park with defense being the key last week when the
The Associated Press Pee Wee league took the field.
The Bulldogs and Eagles were knotted at one goal
JACKSONVILLE The running back had little room. each to call it a draw. For the 'Dogs, it was Blake An-
The quarterback had little time. The receivers had little gerbrandt who scored the lone goal. Reports were
chance. not available for the Eagles player who scored their
The Baltimore Ravens had seen this before. Just not from goal.
this perspective. In the later game on the same field, it was the
The Ravens found themselves on the vkrrong side of a de- Eagles taking a 1-0 shutout over the Storm. Con-
fensive masterpiece Monday night at Jacksonville. nor Tucker notched the game winning goal for the
Maurice Jones-Drew ran for 105 yards, Josh Scobee kicked Eagles.
four field goals and the Jaguars used their best defensive In the adjacent field, it was yet another 1-1 draw.
effort in seven years to beat Baltimore 12-7 and snap a five- This time the Sharks and DCA played 48 minutes,
game slide. only to end in a tie. Pender Johnson scored for the
"You've got to give them credit. They played. like it was Sharks. The player scoring the goal for DCA was not
their Super Bowl," Ravens receiver Anquan Boldin said. listed.
Jacksonville corralled Ray Rice, pressured Joe Flacco and In the biggest offensive showing of the night, the
held the Ravens to 146 yards 89 of them in the fourth THEASSOCIATEDPRESS Crew handed Daysprings a 2-1 loss. Riley Torbett
quarter. Jacksonville Jaguars defensive back Drew Coleman (30) and Mason Young both found the back of the net
The victory could be a turning point for a young team celebrates with teammate free safety Dawan Landry (26) for the Crew while Ben Knowles put Daysprings on
trying to gain confidence after losing eight of its previous after intercepting a pass intended for Baltimore Ravens the board.
tight end Ed Dickson (84) during the fourth quarter of the Soccer action will conclude this Thursday at Op-
See JAGUARS, Page 2B game Monday in Jacksonville. timist Park. L
7,~aB" 1,-- Y.... -`L 4'.








-2B WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26,2011


guars first down on its 28th play
Jaguars' of the game when Rice
From Page broke off a 12-yard run.
That was only the second
nine games. Instead of talk play longer than 10 yards.
about coach Jack Del Rio's for the Ravens.
job security, the Jaguars "We were confident
(2-5).got back in the mix in about this game," Jaguars
the wide-open AFC South. defensive tackle Terrance
"We knew this was an Knighton said.
opportunity to right things "We knew we had to out-
and gain a little respect," play them. The difference
Del Rio said. between this and the other
They relied on Jones- weeks is that we started
Drew and the defense to fast. Our defense is capable
get it done. of that. That's why we hold
Jacksonville didn't allow ourselves to a high stan-
a first down until the 5:26 dard. We just needed to
mark of the third quarter, taste victory. Now that we
a mix of stout defense and have, we're going to keep it
inept offense. Flacco final- rolling."
ly got the Ravens (4-2) on The Jaguars spent more
the scoreboard with a little than $100 million to re-
more, than two minutes build their defense in the
remaining. He capped a offseason. The unit has
90-yard drive with a 5-yard been one of the team's
touchdown pass to Boldin. bright spots, but Monday
The Ravens failed to re- night's performance was
cover an onside kick when Jacksonville's best defen-
the ball bounced inches sive showing since holding
short of going the required Houston to 126 yards in
10 yards. Scobee followed December 2004.
with his third field goal of The Ravens finished with
at least 50 yards, tying an 11 first downs and were 2
NFL record held by many. of 12 on third-down con-
Baltimore had a final versions. Their star was
possession, but in fitting Sam Koch, who punted
fashion, Jacksonville's de- nine times for a 52.2-yard
fense came up big. Drew average.
Coleman stepped in front Flacco was sacked three
of Ed Dickson and inter- times and actually'caught
cepted lacco's final pass. a pass in what sutinmed upl
"They basically beat us Baltimore's night Jeremy
with their defense," Ra- Mincey batted Flacco's
vens coach John Harbaugh pass back into the quarter-
said. "I don't think it was back's arm. He ran'toward
any onething. It was a lack the left sideline before slid-
of execution. It's almost' ing'for an 8-yard loss.
as bad as you can play on : Rice ran eight times for
offense." 28 yards.
The Jaguars set a fran "'It baffles me," lineback-
chise record by allowing. er Terrell Suggs said, ques-
only 16 yards in the first tioning why Rice was used
half, including 1yard pass, :so little. "They fed their
ing by Flacco. horse. We've got to feed our
"We, need to make sure horse."
when we're not on our 'A' Jones-Drew finished
game, we're not this," said with 30 carries, the third.
Flacco, who completed 21 time he has rushed that
of 38 passes for 137 yards, many times in his six-year
Baltimore finally got a career.


SPORTS


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


APInterview: IndyCar



CEO revisits 'horrific' week


The Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS-RandyBernard
knows there are people who blame
him for Dan Wheldon's death, who
say the IndyCar CEO pushed the
series over the edge.
SIn the 24 hours after the two-time
Indianapolis 500 winner was killed
in a fiery 15-car accident in .the
season finale, Bernard wondered
if perhaps all the hate mail accus-
ing him of sacrificing safety for the
show was right.
"The last week was probably the
most horrific week of my life," Ber-
nard told The Associated Press in
an exclusive interview.
It's been open season on Bernard
since the accident, and his silence
all last week only intensified the
scrutiny on his leadership of the
open-wheel series. .
Now, nine days later, Bernard is
able to publicly talk about-Whel-
don and the day all his work toward
building a spectacular finale went
terribly wrong minutes into the
race. He still becomes emotional
about it, taking a deep breath in
his office at IndyCar headquarters
as he recalls the controversial deci-
sion to cancel therace.
Bernard is focused on moving for-
ward and helping IndyCar through
this dark period. He says he never
once considered resigning but ad-
mits IndyCar is now "in crisis, and
we have to get answers."
"In'tough times, that's when you
have to be focused," Bernard said.
"You have to lead, and I know this is
a time I have to make sure I am go-
ing to be very decisive, very articu-
late and be a leader. In tough times
is where you build your character;
it's not in good times."
The second-year CEO was hired
to revitalize the series despite no
"auto racing experience, and that's
contributing to blaming. Bernard
for, creating the circumstances that


_1
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this photo made Monday, IndyCar CEO Randy Bernard talks about loss of
driver Dan Wheldon during an interview in his office at the IndyCar headquarters
in Indianapolis.


led to Wheldon's death.
He allowed a season-high 34 cars
on a high-banked oval, where a
field of mixed experience levels had
enough room to race three-wide at
over 220 mph around Las Vegas
:Motor Speedway. And he offered a
jobless Wheldon the chance to earn
a $5 million bonus if he could drive
;from the back of the field to Victory
Lane.
All those elements created a
buzz around the race, where Dario
Franchitti and Will Power would
end their championship battle and
superstar Danica Patrickwould run
her final event as a full-time IndyCar
driver. It was everything Bernard
had been hired to do when IndyCar
lured him away after running Pro-
fessional Bull Riders for 15 years.
He was so confident of improving
on the poorTVratings fromthe year
before that he promised to resign if
ABC's broadcast drew anything less
than a 0.8 rating. That would have
meant that fewer than 1 percent,of


the nation's homes with televisions
watched the race.
Bernard insists he did not sen-
sationalize the inherent danger in
auto racing.
"I think anytime we are on any
track it's always dangerous we
do as much as we can to make it
safe (and) our storylines were
never, 'Come watch this dangerous
event!'" he said.
"Our storylines going to Las Ve-
gas were first and foremost 'Come
watch Will and Dario fight it out for
the world championship.' The No.
2 storyline was Dan Wheldon com-
peting for $5 million starting at the
back. Our third storyline was Dan-
ica Patrick. ... Our fourth storyline
was 34 cars in the race.
"I think none of those, looking
back on it, had any type of con-
notation of any danger. If the race
was tomorrow, it would still be the
same storylines."
Compelling competition, yes, but
with a happy ending.


E Y NIN. AFr''NO '- .." "' : OCTOBER 26, 2011
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SPOiRTS


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26,2011 3BF


Baseball


THEASSOCIATED PRESS
Former Boston.Red Sox general manager Theo Epstein, responds to
questions after he was named president for baseball operations on
Tuesday in Chicago.



Theo Epstein


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The St. Louis Cardinals bench watches during the ninth inning of Game 5 against the Texas Rangers on Monday in
Arlington, Texas.


joins the Cubs Cards in need of another


The Associated Press

CHICAGO Theo Epstein
knew it was time to move on,
even though it meant leaving
the team he loved. After nearly
a decade as general manager
in Boston where he won two
World Series titles, Epstein de-
cided change would be a good
thing.
"After 10 years, no matter how
passionate you are, you see the
same issues, day after day and
you are around the same peo-
ple day after day," Epstein said.
"You are around the same land-
scape day after day for 10 years
and eventually you will benefit
from a new landscape and fresh
problems."
Fresh problems? There are
plenty of those in Chicago.
Epstein was introduced as the
new president of baseball oper-
ations for the Cubs on Tuesday,
going from one team that ended
its long championship drought
while he was at the helm to one
desperately searching for a title
after more than a century of fu-
tility and frustration.
"I think it's equally as big
a challenge," Epstein said
Tuesday.
There is so much work to
do, from building a strong mi-
nor league system and sharp
scouting to putting together an
evaluation system that is on the
cutting edge. All while trying
to win with moves that make
sense.
"I didn't use the world re-
building and I wouldn't. I think
that is just a buzzword in base-
"ball that leads people down the
wrong path," Epstein said.
"The best way I can describe
it is there are parallel fronts -
the job of building the scouting
and player development foun-
dation that is going to serve
well for the long haul and treat-
ing every opportunity to win as
sacred."
The 37-year-old Epstein left
the Red Sox with a year left on
his contract as general man-
ager. The teams made the an-
nouncement Friday night, but
held off on the news confer-
ence until Tuesday, a travel day
for the World Series.
Epstein got a five-year deal
worth a reported $18.5 million.
Still to be determined is com-
pensation from the Cubs to the
Red Sox for plucking Epstein
away.
That left the focus squarely
on Epstein, with nearly 100
media members attending his
inaugural news conference and
"Cubs Welcome Theo Epstein"
splashed across the famous
Wrigley Field marquee at the
corer of Clark and Addison on
Tuesday morning.
The Cubs haven't won aWorld
Series since 1908 and one of
Epstein's first decisions will be
deciding the future of manager
Mike Quade, who has a year left
on his two-year deal. Chicago
was 71-91 last season and the
team Epstein inherits will not
be nearly as talented as the one
he took over with the Red Sox in
2002.
"I need to get to know Mike
Quade better. I had a great
conversation with him on the
phone. We're going to get to-
gether over the next week," Ep-
stein said.
Various reports say the Cubs
aren't through bringing in front
office staff from other teams
and San Diego's GM Jed Hoyer
and Padres assistant Jason
McLeod could be reunited with
Epstein in Chicago. The three
worked together in Boston and
Hoyer could be the Cubs' new
GM.
Epstein wouldn't comment
directly on Hoyer but said if the


Cubs do bring in a GM it will be
because of his talent.
"Obviously, there is some
scuttlebutt going on right now
about things that are happen-
ing," Epstein said. "I think it
was important to develop a
structure that allowed for the
hiring of the GM if we got the
right person."
When the Red Sox won the
World Series in 2004, it ended
talk of the so-called "Curse of
the Bambino" that hung over
the team, supposedly for send-
ing Babe Ruth to the New York
Yankees.
Of course, the Cubs have one
Sof their own. As legend has it,
they were cursed by a tavern
owner at the 1945 World Series
When he was asked to leave a
game because he was accom-
panied by his pet goat.
"I don't believe in curses and
I guess I played a small part in
helping prove they don't exist
from a baseball standpoint,"
Epstein said. "I do believe-you
can be honest and up front
about the fact that a certain or-
ganization hasn't gotten the job
done and hasn't won a World
Series in a long time. And that's
the approach we took in Bos-
ton. It wasn't a curse."
Epstein fits the description
owner Tom Ricketts put forth
after he fired Jim Hendry this
summer he uses math and
formulas as one way to deter-
mine the value of players while
also combining those evalua-
tions with scouting.
The new owner, whose fam-
ily took over the Cubs two
years ago, was all smiles Tues-
day in introducing Epstein,
who was the youngest GM in
major league history when he
took over at 28 in Boston back
in 2002 and trumped that by
becoming the youngest GM to
win a World Series title.
"We began that search in Au-
gust and I said I was looking for
someone with a background in
player development, someone
who has a proven track record
of success, someone who has
a strong analytical background
and someone who has experi-
ence in creating a culture of
winning," Ricketts said. "It was
also important to me that that
person who would not be con-
tent with past successes but
would build on those success
to improve themselves and im-
prove the organization."
Under Epstein's guidance,
Boston went 839-619 (.575) in
the regular season and a 34-23
in the playoffs, winning more
than 90 games in all but two
seasons.
He acquired such stars as
David Ortiz, Curt Schilling, Ja-
son Bay and Adrian Gonzalez,
though he will be remembered
for bringing in highly-priced
players who fell short, includ-
ing Edgar Renteria, Daisuke
Matsuzaka, John Lackey. This
season it was Carl Crawford
who didn't meet expectations
after signing a big contract.
Epstein has a history of smart
draft moves (Jacoby Ellsbury,
Dustin Pedroia and Clay Buch-
holz) and he has spent freely.
Epstein quickly pointed out
that winning a championship
doesn't happen over night but
with the right moves a strug-
gling team can get right back
into contention the following
season.
He said the Cubs would be ac-
tive in free agency, but wouldn't
commit to whether the Cubs
might be interested in a big-
name, long-term star like Prince
Fielder or Albert Pujols.
"There will be a time and
place for that," he said. "I'm not
going to say whether it's now or
down the road."


World Series comeback


The Associated Press.

ARLINGTON, Texas The
St. Louis Cardinals are going to
need a -comeback in this World
Series.
They've done it before.
After a 4-2 loss in Game 5 on
Monday night against the Texas
Rangers, St. Louis is going home
in a 3-2 hole. The Cardinals have
faced that deficit five other times,
and won the championship four
of them.
"We'd rather be up 3-2, but
we feel good," outfielder Lance
Berkman said. "Realistically,
coming into this park, we won
one and now we're going back to
St. L6uis."
Game 6 is Wednesday night at
Busch Stadium.
"It's tough. You don't want to be
in that situation," slugger Albert
Pujols said. "There's a Game 6
and hopefully we can push it to
a Game 7."
The last time the Cardinals
won Games 6 and 7 of a World
Series was in 1982 against Mil-
waukee. They also accomplished
that feat in 1946 against Boston,
1934 against Detroit and 1926
against the New York Yankees.
The one time St. Louis didn't pull
it off was 1930 after a Game 6 loss
to the Philadelphia As.

HARRYS GAME:
If the World Series extends to
seven games, Rangers manager
Ron Washington has no plans to
alter his pitching rotation.
"It's Harry's game," Washington
said Monday, referring to Matt
Harrison.
Even if potential weather is-
sues in St. Louis were to push the
series back an extra day, Wash-
ington said he wouldn't change
his pitching plans.
The question came up after
left-hander Derek Holland threw
81-3 scoreless innings in Game 4
against the Cardinals. Harrison,
who made it through only 3 2-3
innings in Game 3 on Saturday,
would get his next turn in the ro-
tation in Game 7.
"Matt Harrison earned it,"
Washington said. "You think
Derek Holland earned his start
(Sunday) night if you want to
talk about struggles. That's the
way we roll."
In his previous start' Holland
gave up four runs in 4 2-3 in-
nings and got a no-decision
in the Rangers' AL champion-


ship series-clinching win over
Detroit.

RUNNING OUT OF A RALLY:
With Allen Craig on first base
and nowhere for Texas-to put
Albert Pujols, the Cardinals ap-
peared to be in position to set up
a tiebreaking rally in Game 5 of
the World Series.
Craig saw a hit-and-run sign,
and then took off on the next
pitch. Pujols never swung at the
high and outside ball and Craig
was thrown out on what would
be ruled a caught stealing for
the second out of the seventh
inning.
"It was a hit-and-run and
(Alexi) Ogando threw an unhit-
table pitch. It was a perfect play
for them," Craig said. "Those are
the breaks."
Explained Pujols, "He's throw-
ing 99 miles per hour away. It
was tough to get that pitch."
With two outs, the Rangers then
granted Pujols his third consecu-
tive intentional walk and St. Lou-
is failed to score in the inning,
even after a single by Matt Holli-
day and another intentional pass
to Lance Berkman before David
Freese's inning-ending flyball.
Texas went on to a 4-2 victory
Monday night, taking a 3-2 series
lead.
What went unexplained was
who called the hit-and-run play
in a 2-all game. Did the signal
come from the bench, or was it
something Pujols decided on his,
own?
"It was just a mix-up," man-
ager Tony La Russa said. "On our
team nobody gets thrown under
the bus, so it was a mix-up."
Pujolswasn't saying.
"That's something that I don't
know, (I've done) maybe 200
times. I play my game," he said.
"That's secret. I can't tell you how
I play my game."

AARON AWARDS:
Blue Jays slugger Jose Bautista
joined Alex Rodriguez and Barry
Bonds as the only players to re-
peat as recipient of the Hank
Aaron Award that goes to each
league's top offensive players.
Bautista, who also won the AL
award last year with 54 homers,
had 43 homers this season and
batted a career-best .302 with
103 RBIs and a majors-best .608
slugging percentage.
Matt Kemp of the Dodgers


Cherington new


Red Sox GM

The Associated.Press

BOSTON Ben Cherington was intro-
duced Tuesday as the general manager of
the Boston Red Sox after spending three
seasons as Theo Epstein's assistant.
The 37-year-old Cherington appeared at
a news conference three hours after an-
other one in Chicago at which the Cubs
introduced Epstein as their president of
baseball operations.
Cherington's top priorities will be finding
a manager to replace Terry Francona, who
left two days after the Red Sox completed
a September collapse that left them out of
the playoffs. Cherington also must decide
whether to try to retain designated hitter
David Ortiz and closer Jonathan Papelbon,
who can become free agents.
And he will be working on obtaining
compensation from the Cubs for' hiring
Epstein with one year left on his Red Sox
contract, expected to be some form of
player package.


was the NL winner after leading
his league in homers (39), RBIs
(126), runs scored (115) and total
bases (353). His .324 batting av-
erage was third in the league.
The award were established
in 1999 to honor the 25th anni-
versary of Aaron breaking Babe
Ruth's home run record.
Commissioner Bud Selig pre-
sented the awards because Aar-
on was absent, unable to travel
while recovering from knee re-
placement surgery.
"The surgery went well. He's
recovering comfortably, but he
can't travel, and he's not going
to be able to travel for a while,"
Selig said of Aaron. "He said it's
the first time he's ever missed a
game due to an injury. He want-
ed me to say that."

WALKAWAY:
Cardinals slugger Albert Pu-
jols was intentionally walked
three times Monday night, the
first time that has happened in
aWorld Series since Barry Bonds
got three intentional passes in
Game 4 in 2002.
After Pujols had a flyball to
center to end the first, he was
intentionally walked in the third
and fifth innings by Texas starter
C.J. Wilson. Then in the seventh,
when Allen Craig was caught
stealing on a 1-1 pitch with Pu-
jols standing at the plate, catch-
er Mike Napoli stood up and
Alexi Ogando threw three wide
pitches.
Wilson, finished with five
walks, including the two inten-
tional passes to Pujols. The 19
walks by Wilson, including five
intentional, match Jaret Wright
for the most ever in a single
postseason.

NINE-HOLE HOMERS:
With his homer nearly halfway
up the second deck of seats in
right field Monday night, Rang-
ers first baseman Mitch More-
land accomplished a World Se-
ries first.
Moreland is the first person
with two World Series homers
hitting from the No. 9 spot in the
order.
Before Moreland homered in
Game 3 of last year's World Series
to become the eighth player to
go deep from No. 9 spot, there.
hadn't been a player to do it
since Mark Bellhorn for Boston
in 2004.


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sco reboard WEDNESDAY. OCTOBER 26,2011 .4B


NASCAR
SPRINT CUP LEADERS
Points
1, Carl Edwards, 2237.2, Matt Kens-
eth, 2,223.3, Brad Keselowski, 2,219.4,
Tony Stewart, 2,218. 5, Kevin Harvick,
2,211.6, Kyle Busch, 2,197.7, Jimmie
Johnson, 2,187..8, Kurt Busch, 2,185.
9, Dale Earnhardt Jr., 2,163.10, Jeff
Gordon, 2,155.
11, Denny Hamlin, 2,153.12, Ryan
Newman, 2,149. 13, Clint Bowyer,
915.14, Kasey Kahne, 896.15, Greg
Biffle, 887.16, A J Allmendinger, 878.
17, Marcos Ambrose, 847.18, David
Ragan, 846. 19, Mark Martin, 841. 20,
Juan Pablo Montoya, 841.
Money
1, Carl Edwards, $7,493,950.2,
Kyle Busch, $5,809,100.3, Jimmie
Johnson, $5,740,590.4, Kevin Harvick, .
$5,659,400.5, Matt Kenseth, $5,66,940.
6, Kurt Busch, $5,458,326.7, Tony
Stewart, $5,316,814. 8, Jeff Gordon,
$5,314,640. 9, Clint Bowyer, $5,085,669.
10, Denny Hamlin, $4,881,518.
11, Ryan Newman, $4,778,223. 12,
Brad Keselowski, $4,673,287.13,
Juan PablO Montoya, $4,556,669.
14, Jamie McMurray, $4,343,311. 15,
A J Allmendinger, $4,305,945.16,
Marcos Ambrose, $4,300,800.17,
Regan Smith, $4,162,728.18, Kasey
Kahne, $4,131,985.19, Bobby Labonte,
$4,093,548.20, David Reutimann,
$3,933,084.


WORLD SEFES GLANCE
All Times EDT
WORLD SERIES
(Best-of-7; x-i necessary)
All games televised by Fox
St Louis 2, Texas 2
Wednesday, Oct 19: Stiouis 3,
Texas 2
Thursday, Oct. 20: Texas 2, St Louis 1
Saturday, Oct 22: St Louis 16, Texas 7
Sunday, Oct 23: Texas 4, St Louis 0
Monday, Oct 24:Texas 4, St Louis 2
Wednesday, Oct 26: Texas (Lewis 14-
10) at St Louis (Garcia 13-7), 8:05 p.m.
x-Thursday, Oct. 27: Texas at St.
Louis, 8:05 p.m.


COLLEGE
BCS STANDINGS
BCSAvg' Pv
1. LSU 0.9702 1
2. Alabama 0.9627 2
3. Oklahoma St 0.9240 4
4. Boise St 0,8302 5
5. Clemson 0.8240 7
6. Stanford 0.8124 8
7. Oregon 0.6877 10
8. Kansas St 0.6681 11
9. Oklahoma 0.6642 3
10. Arkansas 0.6581 9
11. Michigan St 0.5380 16
12. Virginia Tech 0.5338 12
13. South Carolina 05014 14
14. Nebraska 0.4385 13
15. Wisconsin 0.4333 6
16. Texas A&M 0.4281 17
17. Houston 0.3676 19
18. Michigan 0.3416 18
19. Penn St 0.3071 21
20. Texas Tech 0.2012 NR
21. Arizona St 0.1633 NR
22. Georgia 0.1594 NR
23. Auburn 0.1310 20
24. Texas 0.1187 24
25. West Virginia 0.0733 15
THE AP TOP 25
/The Top 25 teams in The Associated
Press college football poll, with first-
place votes in parentheses, records
through Oct 22, total points based on
25 points for a first-place vote through
one point for a25th-place vote, and
previous ranking:
Record Pts' Pv
1. LSU (49) 8-0 1,489 1
2. Alabama (10) 8-0 1,448 2
3. Oklahoma St 7-0 1,326 6
4. Stanford 7-0 1,318 7
5.Boise St(1) 7-0 1,269 5
6. Clemson 8-0 1,225 8
7. Oregon 6-1 1,136 9
8. Arkansas 6-1 1,003 10
9. Michigan St 6-1 964 15
10. Kansas St 7-0 945 12
11. Oklahoma 6-1 912 3
12. Wisconsin 6-1 887 4
13. Nebraska 6-1 756 13
14. South Carolina 6-1 675 14
15. Virginia Tech I 7-1 673 16
16. Texas A&M 5-2 614 17
17. Michigan \ 6-1 508 18
18. Houston 7-0 400 21
19. Texas Tech 5-2 350 NR
20. Southern Cal 6-1 340 NR
21. Penn St 7-1 312 NR
22. Georgia 5-2 290 24
23. Arizona St 5-2 239 24
24..Cincinnati 6-1 71 NR
25. West Virginia 5-2 64 11
Others receiving votes: Auburn 62,
Southern Miss. 48, Baylor 47, Wash-
ington 32, Georgia Tech 30, Texas 26,
Syracuse 24, Miami 6, TCU 4, Rutgers
3, BYU 2, Illinois 2.
USA TODAY TOP 25 POLL
The USA Today Top 25 football
coaches poll, with first-place votes in
parentheses, records through Oct 22,
total points based on 25 points for first
place through one point for 25th, and
previous ranking:
Record Pts Pvs
1. LSU (41) 8-0 1,457 2
2. Alabama (18) 8-0 1;434 3
3. Stanford 7-0 1,327 5
4. Oklahoma State 7-0 1,301 6
5. Boise State 7-0, 1,213 7
6. Clemson 8-0 1;174 t8
7. Oregon 6-1 1,121 t8
8. Arkansas 6-1 974 10
9. Oklahoma- 6-1 964 1
10. Michigan State 6-1 .932 13
11. Wisconsin 6-1 867 4
12. Kansas State 7-0 827 16
13. Nebraska 6-1 798 11
14. South Carolina 6-1 730 12
-15. Virginia Tech 7-1 729 t14
16. Texas A&M 5-2 520 18
17. Michigan 6-1 519 17
18. Houston 7-0 507 20
19. Penn State 7-1 448 22
20. Arizona State 5-2 253 25
21. Georgia 5-2 208 NR
22. Texas Tech 5-2 180 NR
23. Cincinnati 6-1 159 NR
24. West Virginia 5-2 155 14
25. Southern Miss .6-1 128 NR
Others receiving votes: Texas 49;
Georgia Tech 39; TCU 33; Baylor 29;
Illinois 22; Washington 20; Iowa 14;
Syracuse 10; Brigham Young 9; South-
ern Methodist 7; Wake Forest 6; Notre
Dame 5; Auburn 3; Rutgers 2; Florida 1;
Miami (Fla.) 1.
SCHEDULE
Today
EAST
UConn (3-4) at Pittsburgh (3-4), 8
p.m.
Thursday
SOUTH
Virginia (4-3) at Miami (4-3), 8 p.m.
SOUTHWEST
Rice (2-5) at Houston (7-0), 8 p.m.
Friday
SOUTHWEST
BYU (6-2) vs. TCU (5-2) at Arlington,
Texas, 8 p.m.
Saturday
EAST


Lehigh (6-1) at Colgate (4-4), Noon
Yale (3-3) at Columbia (0-6), Noon
Drake (6-2) at Marist (3-5), Noon
Rhode Island (2-5) at New Hampshire
(5-2), Noon
Sacred Heart (4-3) at Robert Morris
(2-5), Noon
CCSU (2-6) at St Francis (Pa.) (1-7),
Noon
Albany (NY) (5-2) at Wagner (1-6),
Noon
Penn (4-2) at Brown (5-1), 12:30 p.m.
Georgetown (6-2) at Holy Cross (4-3),
1 p.m.
Duquesne (6-2) at Monmouth (NJ)
(4-3), 1 p.m.
Cornell (2-4) at Princeton (1-5), 1 p.m.
Fordham (1-6) at Army (2-5), 3:30
p.m.
Illinois (6-2) at Penn St (7-1), 3:30
p.m.
West Virginia (5-2) at Rutgers (5-2),
3:30 p.m.
J Maine (6-1) at Villanova (1-7), 3:30


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Brazil's Fabio Chiuffa (back) grabs Argentina's Juan Fernandez
during the men's handball gold medal match at the Pan
American Games in Guadalajara, Mexico on Monday.


p.m.
Coastal Carolina (4-3) at Stony Brook
(4-3), 4 p.m.
Dartmouth (2-4) at Harvard (5-1),
6 p.m.
Bucknell (4-4) at Lafayette (3-4), 6
p.m.
Delaware (4-4) at Towson (6-1), 7 p.m.
SOUTH
NC State (4-3) at Florida St (4-3),
Npon
Syracuse (5-2) at Louisville (3-4),
Noon
UAB (1-6) at Marshall (3-5), Noon
James Madison (5-2) at Old Dominion
(6-2), Noon
Arkansas (6-1) at Vanderbilt (4-3),
12:20 p.m.
Virginia Tech (7-1) at Duke (3-4),
12:30 p.m. I
Campbell (4-3) at Davidson (2-5),
1 p.m.
Morgan St (4-3) at Delaware St (2-5),
1 p.m.
SC State (4-4) at Howard (4-4), 1 p.m.
UMass (4-3) at Riohmond (3-4), 1 p.m.
VMI (1-6) at The Citadel (3-4), 1 p.m.
Charleston Southern (0-6) at Gardner-
Webb (2-5), 1:30 p.m.
Elon (4-4) at Wofford (5-2), 1:30 p.m.
Furman (4-3) at Chattanooga (4-4),
2 p.m.
E. Kentucky (4-3) at Murray St (4-3),
2 p.m.
Bethune-Cookman (4-3) at NC Central
(1-6), 2p.m.
NC A&T (4-3) at Norfolk St. (6-2), 2
p.m.
Hampton (4-3) at Savannah St (1-6),
2 p.m.
Georgia Southern (7-0) at Appala-
chian St (5-2), 3 p.m.
Texas Southern (3-4) at MVSU (0-8),
3 p.m.
Boston College (1-6) at Maryland
(2-5), 3 p.m. ,
W. Carolina (1-6) at Samford (4-3),
3 p.m.
Alabama A&M (5-2) vs. Alabama St
(6-1) at Birmingham, Ala., 3:30 p.m.
Tulane (2-6) at East Carolina (3-4),
3:30 p.m.
Florida (4-3) vs. Georgia (5-2) at
Jacksonville, Fla., 3:30 p.m.
Presbyterian (2-5) at Liberty (5-3),
3:30 p.m.
W. Kentucky (3-4) at Louisiana-Mon-
roe (2-5), 3:30 p.m.
Wake Forest (5-2) at North Carolina
(5-3), 3:30 p.m.
Tennessee Tech (4-2) at Jacksonville
St (5-2),4 p.m.
San Jose St (3-4) at Louisiana Tech
(3-4), 4 p.m.
Memphis (2-6) at UCF (3-4), 4 p.m.
E. Illinois (1-7) at Austin Peay (2-5),
5 p.m.
Henderson St (0-1) at South Alabama
(4-3), 5 p.m.
Alcorn St (2-4) at Southern U. (2-5),
6:30 p.m.
Mississippi (2-5) at Auburn (5-3), 7
p.m.
Mississippi St (3-4) at Kentucky
(3-4), 7 p.m.
Jackson St (6-1) vs. Prairie View (4-3)
at Shreveport, La., 5 p.m.
South Carolina (6-1) at Tennessee
(3-4), 7:15 p.m.
Louisiana-Lafayette (6-2) at Middle
Tennessee (2-4), 7:30 p.m.
SE Missouri (2-5) at UT-Martin (4-3),.
7:30 p.m.
Clemson (8-0) at Georgia Tech (6-2),
8 p.m.
MIDWEST
Cent Michigan (2-6) at Akron (1-6),
Noon
Northwestern (2-5) at Indiana (1-7),
Noon
Purdue (4-3) at Michigan (6-1), Noon
Michigan St (6-1) at Nebraska (6-1),
Noon
Bowling Green (4-4) at Kent St (1-6),
1 p.m.
W. Illinois (2-5) at Youngstown St
(4-3), 1 p.m.
Dayton (5-3) at Valparaiso (0-7), 2
p.m.
Ball St (5-3) at W. Michigan (4-4),
2p.m.
S. Dakota St (2-6) at Missouri St
(1-7), 3 p.m.
Illinois St. (5-3) at S. Illinois (2-5),
3p.m.
Oklahoma (6-1) at Kansas St (7-0),
3:30 p.m.
Buffalo (2-6) at Miami (Ohio) (2-5),
3:30 p.m.
Iowa (5-2) at Minnesota (1-6), 3:30
p.m.
Navy (2-5) at Notre Dame (4-3), 3:30
p.m.
N. Iowa (6-1) at N. Dakota St (7-0),
4 p.m.
Wisconsin (6-1) at Ohio St (4-3), 8
p.m.
SOUTHWEST
Missouri (3-4) at Texas A&M (5-2),
Noon
Georgia St (2-5) at UTSA (2-5), 1:30
p.m.
Lamar (3-4) at Sam Houston St (7-0),
3 p.m.
Grambling St (3-4) at Ark.-Pine Bluff
(4-3), 3:30 p.m.
Baylor (4-2) at Oklahoma St (7-0),
3:30 p.m.
SMU (5-2) atTulsa (4-3), 3:30 p.m.
McNeese St (3-4) at Stephen F.
Austin (2-5), 4 p.m.
Northwestern St (4-3) at Texas St
(5-3), 4 p.m.
North Texas (3-5) at Arkansas St
(5-2), 7 p.m.
SE Louisiana (2-5) at Cent Arkansas
(5-3), 7 p.m.
Kansas (2-5) at Texas (4-2), 7 p.m.
Iowa St (3-4) at Texas Tech (5-2),
7 p.m.
Southern Miss. (6-1) at UTEP (4-3),
8 p.m.
FAR WEST
Air Force (3-4) at New Mexico (0-7),
2 p.m.
Idaho St (2-6) at Montana St (7-1),
2:05 p.m.
Washington St (3-4) at Oregon (6-1),
3 p.m.
UC Davis (2-5) at S. Utah (4-4), 3 p.m.
Weber St (3-4) at Montana (6-2),
3:05 p.m.
North Dakota (4-3) at N. Colorado
(0-8), 3:35 p.m.
Portland St (4-3) at E. Washington
(4-4), 4:05 p.m.
Hawaii (4-3) at Idaho (1-6), 5 p.m.
Colorado St (3-4) at UNLV (1-5), 6
p.m.
Colorado (1-7) at Arizona St (5-2),
6:30 p.m.


California (4-3) at UCLA (3-4), 7 p.m.
Oregon St. (2-5) at Utah (3-4), 7 p.m.
Nevada (4-3) at New Mexico St (3-4),
8 p.m.
Stanford (7-0) at Southern Cal (6-1),
8 p.m.
South Dakota (5-3) at Cal Poly (4-3),
9:05 p.m.
N. Arizona (2-5) at Sacramento St
(3-4), 9:05 p.m.
Wyoming (4-2) at San Diego St (4-2),
10 p.m.
Arizona (2-5) at Washington (5-2),
10:30 p.m.
NFL
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W LT Pct PF PA
New England 5 1 0 .833 185 135
Buffalo 4 2 0 .667 188 147
N.Y. Jets 4 3 0 .571 172 152
Miami 0 60 .000 90 146
South
I W LT Pet PY PA
Houston 4 3 0 .571 182 131
Tennessee 3 3 0 .500 112 135
Jacksonville 2 5 0 .286 84 139
Indianapolis 0 7 0 .000 111 225
North
WLT Pt PF PA
Pittsburgh 5 2 0 .714 151 122
Cincinnati 4 2 0 .66137 1 11
Baltimore 4 2 0 .667 155 83
Cleveland 3 3 0 .500 97 120
West
W LT Pt PF PA
San Diego 4 2 0 .667 141 136
Oakland 4 3 0 .571 160 178
Kansas City 3 3 0 .500 105 150
Denier 2 4 0 333 123 155
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W LT Pct PF PA
N.Y. Giants 4 2 0 .667 154 147
Dallas 3 3 0 .500 149 128
Washington 3 3 0 .500 116 116
Philadelphia 2 4 0 .333 145 145
South
W LT Pet PF PA
New Orleans 5 2 0 .714 239 158
TampaBay 4 3 0 .571 131 169
Atlanta 4 3 0 .571 158 163
Carolina 2 5 0 .286 166 183
North
W LT Pet PF PA
Green Bay 7 0 0 1.000 230 141
Detroit 5 2 0 .714 194 137
Chicago 4 3 0 .571 170 150
Minnesota 1 6 0 .143 148 178
West
W LT Pet PF PA
San Francisco 5 1 0 .833 167 97
Seattle 2 4 0 333 97 128
Arizona 1 50 .167 116 153
St Louis 0 6 0 .000 56 171
Sunday's Games
Houston 41, Tennessee 7
Carolina 33, Washington 20
N.Y. Jets 27, San Diego 21
Cleveland 6, Seattle 3
Denver 18, Miami 15, OT
Atlanta 23, Detroit 16
Chicago 24, TampaBay 18
Kansas City 28, Oakland 0
Pittsburgh 32, Arizona 20
Dallas 34, St Louis 7
Green Bay 33, Minnesota 27
New Orleans 62, Indianapolis 7
Open: Buffalo, Cincinnati, N.Y. Gi-
ants, New England, Philadelphia, San
Frailcisco
Monday's Game
Jacksonville 12, Baltimore 7
Sunday, Oct. 30
Indianapolis at Tennessee, 1 p.m.
New Orleans at St Louis, 1 p.m.
Jacksonville at Houston, 1 p.m.
Miami-at N.Y. Giants, 1 p.m.
Minnesota at Carolina, 1 p.m.
Arizona at Baltimore, 1 p.m.
Detroit at Denver, 4:05 p.m.
Washington vs. Buffalo at Toronto,
4:05 p.m.
Cleveland at San Francisco, 4:15 p.m.
.Cincinnati at Seattle, 4:15 p.m.
New England at Pittsburgh, 4:15 p.m.
Dallas at Philadelphia, 8:20 p.m.
Open: Atlanta, Chicago, Green Bay,
N.Y. Jets; Oakland, Tampa Bay
Monday,Oct.31 '
San Diego at Kansas City, 8:30 p.m.


NCAA FOOTBALL
Thursday
at Miami 14 14 Virginia
at Houston 25% 27 Rice
Friday
TCU-x 12 13 BYU
Saturday
Mississippi St 9 10 at Kentucky
at Marshall 6 6 UAB
Cent. Michigan 10 10 atAkron
atW. Michigan 12 11 Ball St
at N.Carolina 9 7 Wake Forest
at Florida St 18 18 NC State
Clemson 4 4 at Geo.Tech
Iowa 15 15% atMinn.
at Nebraska 3% 4% Mich.St.
Northwestern 10 10 at Indiana
at Michigan 14 13 Purdue
at Penn St. 5% 5 Illinois
VirginiaTech 14 15% at Duke
West Virginia 5% 6 atRutgers
at Louisville 3% 3 Syracuse
at Maryland 8 7 Boston Coll.
at Auburn 9% 10% Mississippi
Arkansas 10 10 atVanderbilt
at Texas 28 27% Kansas
Bowling Green 6% 5% at Kent St.
Air Force 30% 30% at N. Mexico
at Tulsa 3 3 SMU
at Arizona St 31 31 Colorado
at E. Carolina 14% 16% Tulane
atTexasA&M 12 11% Missouri
at Texas Tech 15% 15 Iowa St
at Miami (Oh.) 5% 7 Buffalo
at Notre Dame 20 20 Navy
Florida-y OFF OFF Georgia
at Louis. Tech 7 7% S. Jose St
at UCF 28 28% Memphis
Hawaii 7% 8 at Idaho
Colorado St 3 2 at UNLV
at Utah 5 5 OregonSt.
California 6 5 at UCLA
at Washington 8 6 Arizona
at Oregon 34 35 Wash.St
S. Carolina 3 4 atTenn.
Oklahoma 13 13 atKansasSt.
at Okla. St 15 14 Baylor
Wisconsin 7% 7% atOhio St
Southern Miss.11 10 at UTEP
Stanford 9% 7 atSouth.Cal
Nevada 15% 15 atN. Mex.St.
at San Diego St. 14%16 Wyoming
at Louis.-Monroe 4% 6 W.Kentucky
at Arkansas St. 16 16% NorthTexas


COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Span.
ESPN UConn at Pittsburgh
GOLF
9a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, An-
dalucia Masters, second round, at
Sotogrande, Spain
2:30'p.m.
TGC Nationwide Tour Champion-
ship, second round, at Charleston,
S.C.
I; 1a.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Asia Pacific
Classic Malaysia, first round, at
Selangor, Malaysia
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7:30paL I
FOX World Series, game 6, Texas
atSt Louis
PAN AMERICAN GAMES

ESPN2 Men's volleyball: Brazil
vs. United States, at Guadalajara,
Mexico
RODEO

VERSUS PBR. World Finals, first
round, at Las Vegas

at Middle Tenn. 1 3 La.-Lafayette
x-at Arlington, Texas
y-at Jacksonville, Fla.


PGA TOUR MONEY LEADERS


Rank Player
1. Luke Donald
2. Webb Simpson
3. Nick Watney
4. KJ. Choi
5. Dustin Johnson
6. Matt Kuchar
7. Bill Haas
8. Steve Stricker
9. Jason Day
10. David Toms


Money
$6,683,214
$6,347,353
$5,290,673
$4,434,691
$4,309,961
$4,233,920
$4,088,637
$3,992,785
$3,962,647
$3,858,090


NHL
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
SGP W LOTPts GF GA
Pittsburgh 10 6 2 2 14 30 22
Philadelphia 8 5 2 1 11 27 21
NewJersey 6 3 2 1 7 13 16
N.Y.Islanders6 3 3 0 6 14 14
N.Y. Rangers 6 2 2 2 6 12 13
Northeast Division
GP W LOTPts GF GA
Toronto 8 5 2 1 11 26 27
Buffalo 7 5 2 0 10 20 13
Boston 8 3 5 0 6 19 19
Ottawa 8 3 5 0 6 24 34
Montreal 8 1 5 2 4 18 26
Southeast Division
GP W LOT Pts GF GA
Washington 7 7 0 0 14 30 14
Florida 8 5 3 0 10 20 19
Carolina 8 3 3 2 8 22 27
TampaBay 8 3 3 2 8 25.27
Winnipeg 7 2 4 1 5 16 25
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central.Divslon
GP W LOTPts GF GA
Detroit 6 5 1 0 10 19 14
Chicago 7 4 1 2 10 24 18
St Louis 8 4 4 0 8 22 24
Nashville 7 3 3 1 7 15 20
Columbus 8'- 0 7 1. 1 17 29
Northwest Division
GP W LOTPts GF GA
Colorado 8 6 2 0 12 26 20
Vancouver 8 4 3 1 9 22 23
Minnesota 8 3 2 3 9 18 20
Edmonton 7 3 2 2 8 13 12
Calgary 7 2 4 1 5 15 20
Pacific Division
GP W LOTPts GF GA
Dallas 8 6 2 0 12 19 15
Los Angeles 7 5 1 1 11 17 10
Anaheim 7. 4 3 0 8 16 17
Phoenix 7 3 3 1 7 20 22
San Jose 6 3 3 0 6 18 16
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point
for overtime loss.
Sunday's Games .
Phoenix 5, Anaheim 4
Monday's Games
Philadelphia 4, Toronto 2
Florida 2, Montreal 1
N.Y. Rangers at Winnipeg, late
Tuesday's Games
Pittsburgh at N.Y. Islanders, late
Ottawa at Caroliqa, late
Detroit at Columbus, late
Tampa Bay at Buffalo, late
San Jose at Nashville, late
Anaheim at Chicago, late
Vancouver at Edmonton, late
Dallas at Phoenix, late
New Jersey at Los Angeles, late


BASEBALL
AMERICAN LEAGUE
BOSTON RED SOX Named Ben
Cherington executive vice president/
general manager.
KANSAS CITY ROYALS Named Dave
EilaNd pitching coach.
MINNESOTA TWINS Declined
their 2012 contract option on RHP Joe
Nathan.
OAKLAND ATHLETICS Named Dan
Feinstein director of professional
scouting/baseball development
NATIONAL LEAGUE
ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS Pro-
moted Junior Noboa to vice president,
latin operations.
CHICAGO CUBS Agreed to terms
with president of baseball operations
Theo Epstein on a five-year contract
MILWAUKEE BREWERS Assigned
INF Josh Wilson and RHP Mark DiFelice
outright to Nashville (PCL). Reinstated
RHP Brandon Kintzler from the 15-day
DL and LHP Manny Parra and LHP
Mitch Stetter from the 60-day DL
Agreed to terms with INF Edwin May-
sonet on a minor league contract.
NEW YORK METS Reinstated INF
Daniel Murphy and INF Ike FLUSHING,
N.Y., October 25,2011 The New York
Mets today announced the team has
reinstated infielders Daniel Murphy,
INF Ike Davis, RHP Taylor Buchholz
and LHP Johan Santana from the
60-day DL.
AMERICAN ASSOCIATION
AMARILLO SOX Released RHP
Kevin Altman and INF Ron Fenwick.
WICHITA WINGNUTS Acquired
RHP Brandon Mathes from Florence
(Frontier) and LHP Shawn Joy from
Southern Illinois (Frontier) to complete
earlier trades.
CAN-AM LEAGUE
NEW JERSEY JACKALS Released OF
Juan Portes.
WORCESTER TORNADOES Re-
leased INF Abraham 0. Nunez.
FOOTBALL
NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE
ATLANTA FALCONS Placed FB Ovie
Mughelli on injured reserve and G
Mike Johnson. Signed RB Mike Cox and
OL Kirk Chambers.
BUFFALO BILLS Placed LB Shawne
Merriman on injured reserve.'
INDIANAPOLIS COLTS Placed QB
Kerry Collins and FB Chris Gronkowski
on injured reserve. Re-signed OL
Jamey Richard, OL Michael Toudouze
and RB Darren Evans. Waived WR-KR
David Gilreath from the practice
squad.
MIAMI DOLPHINS Signed QB J.P.
Losman. Placed QB Sage Rosenfels on
the reserve-non-football illness list
NEW YORK JETS Waived C Colin
Baxter. Released OL Matt Kroul from
the practice squad.
WASHINGTON REDSKINS Placed TE
Chris Cooley and RB Tim Hightower on
injured reserve.
HOCKEY
NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE
CAROLINA HURRICANES Recalled
F Zach Boychuk from Charlotte (AHL).
Placed F Zac Dalpe on injured reserve,
retroactive to Oct. 14.


Golf




A different ballot




for the PGA Tour


The Associated Press

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -
The PGA Tour was going to
send its postseason awards
ballot to the players on
Tuesday until realizing the
World Golf Championship
in Shanghai counts as offi-
cial if a PGA Tour member
wins.
On a slow news day, this
became a controversy, and
in some corners a con-
spiracy against Luke.Don-
ald. Now players will have
only a month, instead of
six weeks, to decide which
box to check. They might
Need longer than that to
find someone who had a
better year than Donald. If
what Donald did at Disney
was that special and it
was --then it won't be
forgotten. '
Would it not have been
worse if the tour became
aware of an oversight and
chose to do nothing at all?
Of course, this could
have been avoided if the
PGA Tour treated the
HSBC Champions like the
other three WGC events.
It's still a "world" event,
even though it's not held in
global communities such
as Marana, Ariz., and Ak-
ron, Ohio. .
Now that's a controversy.


BEST MAJOR:

There simply was no
topping Charl Schwartzel
at Augusta National. Eight
players had a share of the
'lead at some point in the
final round, and the South.
African became the first
Masters champion to bird-
ie the last four holes. So
spectacular was'the finish
that it overshadowed his
60-foot chip for birdie on
No. 1 and holing out from
the fairway for eagle on
No. 3.


was remarkable.


SHOT OF THE YEAR:

The best shots come
from the biggest moments,
and it's hard to argue with
Bill Haas splashing out of
the water from left of the
17th hole in a playoff at
East Lake to save par and
stay in the hunt for the $10
million FedEx Cup, which
he won. It was a great shot.
It was a greater moment.
And because of the water
level, it was a great break.
SFor a pure golf shot that
not many saw? Go back to
Honolulu at the start of the
season, when Steve Ma-
rino needed an eagle on
the last hole to tie for the
lead. With his feet in the
bunker and the ball chest-
high on the side of a hill,
Marino hit fairway metal
from 234 yards that landed
on the front of the green
and stopped 40 feet away.
He missed the putt.


BIGGEST BREAKUP:

In a peculiar year, this
gets plenty of candidates.
Start with Tiger Woods
and Steve Williams, his
caddie for 12 years and 13
majors.
The award, however,
goes to Mark Steinberg
and IMG.
Steinberg for so many
years was seen primarily as
Woods' agent and known
in some quarters as "Dr.
No" for his propensity to
rarely say "Yes." However,
he also was the head of the
powerful IMG golf division
and a major player when it
came to creating new tour-
naments around the world
and finding a spot for them
on the schedule.


BEST PERFORMER:


Donald wins under any
COMEBACK PLAYER definition.


OFTHEYEAR:

This award typically goes
to a.player who returned
from some sort of injury,
or barring any candidates,
a player who really stunk it
up the year before.
In this case, the vote is
for McIlroy.
The lasting image from
the Masters is the 22-year-
old burying his head in the
crook of his arm when he
finished four-putting the
12th hole from 12 feet on
his way to blowing a four-
shot lead with an 80 in the
final round.Yes, he's young
and resilient. But to bounce
back two months later and
win the U.S. Open by eight
shots with a record score


He turned in the best
year, no matter what hap-
pens in Shanghai, with two
wins, the most money and
the lowest scoring average.
If that's not enough, his
top 10 finishes 14 of 19
- was the highest rate this
side ofWoods.
Under the circum-
stances, was there a bet-
ter performance than his
six straight birdies on the
back nine at Disney?
Still, his best perfor-
mance came in the high
desert of Arizona at the
Match Play Champion-
ship. Donald never trailed
in any of his six matches.
Even more incredible, he
never played the 18th hole
except in a practice round.


College Football



Big 12 approves



WVU as member


The Associated Press

The Big 12 has approved
bringing in West Virginia
to replace Missouri when
the Tigers complete their
move to the Southeastern
Conference.
The person spoke on
condition of anonym-
ity because neither the
school nor the Big 12 had
announced that its board
of directors unanimously
approved inviting West
Virginia when Missouri's
spot comes open.
The move would allow
the Big 12 to maintain 10
members and is another
blow to the embattled Big
East, which already has
lost two members and one
member-to-be in the last
six weeks.
The Big East is trying
to reconfigure as a 12-
team football league and
has been courting Boise
State, Navy and Air Force
as football-only mem-


bers and Central Florida,
SMU and Houston for all
sports. Commissioner
John Marinatto met with
officials from some of
those schools Sunday in
Washington.
Since there is no time-
table for Missouri to
complete its expected de-
parture from the Big 12
- and the league's board
of directors, announced
that it expressed "a strong
desire" for Missouri to stay
during a Monday meeting
- there is no timetable for
West Virginia to receive a
formal invitation, the per-
son said.
But the school will ac-
cept an invitation once it
is offered, the person said.
Big 12 Commissioner
Chuck Neinas has already
said he expects Missouri
to compete in the Big 12
in 2012, but all signs in-
dicate Missouri is leaving
and now the conference is
prepared for that.


I a


I







'ACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


PEANUTS BY CHARLES SCHULTZ


SNOOPY, IT MAKES ME FEEL 6000 TO
KNOW THAT I CAN ALWAYS TALK TO
YOU ABOUT THE "GREAT PUMPKIN.:'

iC~--------


BORN LOSER BY ART AND CHIP SANSOM
SRe.MaRoouKR tW\oK^ A r YOU COULD SAN TFAT .. k
LYELLthOARE WX AllING B
cT 4


BIG NATE BY LINCOLN PIERCE
I DECIDED THAT YUP! INSTEAD. I'M
HANDING OUT TOFU MAKING MY OWM
KABOBS FOR, HALOWEEN RICE KRISPIE TREATS
WAS A,
LITTLE
oOFy' DAD
REALLY? JOo

'1
= -'a.


GRIZZWELLS BY BILL SCHORR


I WAS A BIT CON-
CERNED ABOUT THE
HIGH 5UGAR CONTENT,
THOUGH, SO
I TWEAKED r
THE RECIPE
SLIGHTLY'
cHOMPF!

I I


i ii TO MUCH
iNK'. (BARLEY
( K!' s'




C.-.
tG6K?

,ii /


MONTY BY JIM MEDDICK


COW & BOY BY MARK LEIKNES
THERE'SA HIKER WHO MAKES YOU WONDER I HOPE
HAD TO CUT OFF HIS IF YOU COULD 00 WHAT BOULD
ARM TO FREE HIMSELF IT TOOK TO SURVIVE, ONLY El
FROM A BOULDER. THEY EVEN IF IT MEANT LEAVING LANDS
MADE A MOVIE SOMETHING BEHIND. MY BAN
ABOUT HIM.




KIT'N'CAR

KIT'N' CARLYLE BY LARRY WRIGHT HERMAN BYJIM UNGER


"Same time next week."


NEA Crossword Puzzle


ACROSS
0 Big book
5 Household
member
8 Repartee
pros
12 Lemon
coolers
13 Web-footed
bird
14 Ms. Falco
15 May
honorees
16 Group of
boats
18 Wandered
20 Pointed
arch
21 Fabric
meas.
22 Like,
stupid!
23 Prevails
upon
26Jelly
thickener
29 Water the
plants
30 Race off
31-
Wiedersehen
33 Mrs.
Peron
34 German
Import
35"Puppy
Love,
singer
36 Marshes


38 Cleared the
dishes
39 Strive to
win
40 Get wrong
41 Thick
carpeting
43 Conceit
46Green-
eyed
monster
48 Murmurs
50 Ricelike
pasta
51 Seance
sound
52"-
Horizon"
53 Babysitter,
often
54Pistachio
55 Wonder
Woman's
friend

DOWN
1 Beret
cousin
2 Nose
stimulus
3 Quick
reminder
4 Made a try
5 Restaurants.
6 lang
syne
7 Marciano
stat
8 Pounds


Answer to Previous Puzzle


9 Not
employed
10 Mosaic
art
11 Neptune's
kingdom
17 Handle
19 Rx givers
22 Ricky
Ricardo
23Navaho
foe
24 Guns the
engine
25 Chew at
26 Shoulder
enhancers
27 Holm and
Fleming
28 Microwave
30 Deceive
32 Hot trend


34Buddy, in
Baja
35 Outer ear
37 Arthurian
paradise
38 am.
member
40 Cairo
locale
41 Dry and
withered
42Thin fog
43 Genesis
hunter
44Chimney
dust
45 Nearly all
46Scribble
down
47Samovar
49 Depot
(abbr.)


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


10-26 2011 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS



CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY CLUE: Zequals L
"IROODYE EXU WRPESY SWSPAIE
NDRY TXUIE, HDY EXU ODUEYN DH
EXU KRIPT IXDRZV YUIDRAV PA NDRY
XUSYE." SAVYUI IUWDMPS


Previous Solution: "You have got to keep autistic children engaged with the
world. You cannot let them tune out." Temple Grandin
@2011 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universl Uclick 10-26


Annie's Mailbox


Dear Annie: My eldest brother has a
secret. Before he met his wife, he was
married and had two children in a
country that does not have divorce. This
was 25 years ago. The first marriage was
very rocky, and my brother left his wife
while she was pregnant with their second
child. He then met his current wife
and moved to the U.S. His current wife
doesn't know anything about the previ-
ous marriage.
The eldest son from his first wife, who
was 6 when my brother abandoned him,
has contacted me. He wants to meet his
father. I don't know what to do.
-WORRIED SISTER

Dear Sister Tell your brother immedi-
ately about the contact with his son, and
encourage him to make this right. While
it is not your place to inform his current
wife (and possibly destroy his marriage),
your brother must realize that his son
could easily contact another person in
the family.
He should come clean before someone
else does it for him.


Bridge

Your partner's eyes will shine if you find the
right play on this deal, regardless of your dress
sense. You are in three no-trump. West leads
the heart queen. What would you do?
North should respond two clubs, not two
no-trump, with those powerless hearts. You
might rebid two no-trump, but with that un-
certain diamond holding, three clubs cannot
be criticized. But after North shows values in
diamonds, you have an easy three-no-trump 4
continuation.
You start with eight top tricks: one spade,
two hearts, three diamonds and.two clubs. You
would need to be very lucky to gain an extra
trick from spades in time. The best place to
go for winner number nine is clubs. If the suit
is splitting 3-2, you will have no trouble. But
you should also try to accommodate some 4-1
splits.
After taking the first trick with your king (or
ace), play a club to dummy's king. When East
drops the queen, do not cash dummy's ace. In-
stead, lead a low club to your nine. A club trick
must be lost whatever the layout, and this line
handles J-10-7 remaining in the West hand. He
takes your nine with his 10, but you can finesse
dummy's eight on the third round.


Dear Annie: My husband insists on
lounging on our corduroy sofa after he
exercises. He is literally dripping with
sweat, and every inch of his clothing is
soaked. I have asked him nicely to please
shower first, but he gets angry and says
he doesn't need to. He insists I am over-
reacting. I hate to be a nag, but I am tired
of damp, smelly furniture. How do I deal
with this?
STINKY'S WIFE

Dear Wife: How lovely. While your
husband obviously should not place
his sweaty self on your fabric furniture,
he doesn't seem inclined to stop. That
means you will have to make the neces-
sary adjustments. The simplest solution
is covering the corduroy sofa with sheets
or towels or a washable sofa cover. But
you also might consider giving him a
gym membership so he can work out
(and hopefully shower) elsewhere. If he
works out at home, place the treadmill or
other equipment in another area of the
house so he is more likely to lounge on
something that won't absorb moisture.


North. 10-26-11
463
V763
*AK54
4AK85
West East
SQ 10 K985
VQJ1098 V542
S82 *J 10976
4 J 10 7 6 Q
South
4-A.J 742
YAK
*Q3
49432

Dealer: South
Vulnerable: North-South
South West North East
14 Pass 24 Pass
34 Pass 34 Pass
3 NT Pass Pass Pass

Opening lead: V Q
_


Horoscope
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) You may have to say
no to someone who is a
friend but is known to have
trouble handling funds.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-
Dec. 21) Should you start
to lose your position in a
partnership arrangement,
it's time to bow out. Once it
becomes one-sided, it will
be valueless.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) There's a chance that
an endeavor that has been
rather fortunate for you is
now starting to lose some
of its luster.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) If you start searching
for faults in others, others
will suddenly examine you
closely, as well.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) Taking charge of a
situation that is beginning
to flounder is clearly the
best thing to do, but car-
rying things to extremes is
asking for more trouble.
ARIES (March 21-April
19) If you think you can
pick apart another person's
opinion and not be chal-
lenged, you're in for a big
surprise. You'd be smart to
simply accept what others
have to say.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
- Don't leave something in
the hands of another that,
if handled poorly, could
cost you a bundle of mon-
ey. Don't be indifferent.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
- More strain than usual
could arise in a valued rela-
tionship over an issue that
each party believes affects
him or her personally.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
- Unless you have a good
attitude about your work,
it isn't likely you'll do a
good job.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -
Instead of trying to be the
center of attention, relax
and let your friends show-
boat a bit.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
- If everything turns out
great, you could be the first
one to step up and take a
bow. Conversely, if things
go wrong, you're likely to
be the first one pointing a
finger.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
- Do not embellish the
facts about what you've ac-
complished recently just
because you're in the pres-
ence of a known achiever.


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26, 2011 5B F


IENTIERTINIVENT







6 B Wednesday, October 26, 2011 Jackson County Floridan


CLASSIFIED


www.JCFLORIDAN.com


BY PHONE:


(850) 526-3614 or (800) 779-2557


BY FAX: (850) 779-2557
ONLINE: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM


BY MAIL: WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE
P.O. BOX 520, MARIANNA, FL 32447
IN PERSON: 4403 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA


Publication Policy Errors and Omissions: Advertisers should check their ad the first day. This publication shall not be liable for failure to publish an ad or for a typographic error or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the ad for the first day's
insertion. Adjustment for errors is limited to the cost of that portion of the ad wherein the error occurred. The advertiser agrees that the publisher shall not be liable for damages arising out of errors in advertisements beyond the amount paid for the apace
actually occupied by that portion of the advertisement in which the error occurred, whether such error is due to negligence of the publisher's employees or otherwise and there shall be no liability for non-insertion of any advertisement beyond the amount paid for
such advertisement. Display Ads are not guaranteed position. All advertising is subject to approval. Right is reserved to edit, reject, cancel or classify all ads under the appropriate classification.


For deadew l[escall toI fee rtiipt wwtA aw[.jcfloridangKcom


JUST IN: R2D2 Robot; Coca Cola chalkboard;
Oak table w/4 chairs; 50's 4 pc Coffee Svc;
Cookbooks. Markdowns throughout store.
Medford Antique Marketplace,
3820 RCC, Dothan, 702-7390. M-Sat 9 to 5

I Pay CASH for Diabetic test
strips. Up to $10 per box!
Most brands considered.
All boxes must be unopened
and unexpired.
Call Matt 334-392-0260




Beautiful Upscale Lounge in Dothan.
Great location and price. Everything
included: custom built bar, furniture, 4-keg
cooler and other equipment, big screen tv,
and more. Owner financing available.
Serious inquiries only please.
Cal 334-313-207.

Would You Like Your Own Boss???
Local Transport Company for Sale based
in Dothan with 5 trucks and 1 car included.
Annual income $435k. 9 years in business.
Your new future for only $165KI1
Call 334-596-8179


Seasoned Oak & All Split
* Truck Load = 9stack $400. delivered
*I stack S4S. l2 stackS2S.


Wanted: Old Coins, Gold,
Diamonds, Guns, And Tools
West Main Jewelry & Loan 334-671-1440.


Ii STAMSC N SB OOKSII


oI
CKC Shlh-Tzu puppies, Males and Females,
First Shots and Dewormed. Beautiful Mark-
ings. Great with kids. $300.00. Call 334-248-
3447 or after 5pm Call 334-898-7067.
CKC Tiny Toy Poodles- parents are 41bs-51bs,
Home Raised S/W, working on paper training
$300. CASH Call 334-794-2854.
FREE: adult dogs, M&F Beagles, Huskie-M mix
w/ blue eyes, Yellow-F Lab-calm 334-712-2121
FREE Dog small female. Very energetic, playfu
& smart needs a loving home. 850-526-8417
Free Dogs Need a good home! 2 male Minia-
ture Pinscher/Chihuahua mixes, approximately
7 months old. Up to date on shots. Very loving
and active, but their favorite activity is sitting
in someone's lap. Intelligent pups! Call 850-
899-0487.


FREE: Mother & Puppies. Dothan Med/Lg.
Mixed breed 7 wks.CUTE! 334-693-2306


Free to GOOD home only, Lab mix puppies!
B/W, Males & Females334-677-3713
I OLDER PUPPIES ON SALE IV
$50-$125 Yorkle Poos, Shih-poos, Morles,
Yorkle-pom ,also Yorkles $450 and up.
Maltese $500 & Shordes $250. 334-718-4886

FRESHP RO [DUCEl =,)


Aplin
Farms
You pick PEAS


jai&^ tomatoes,
sweet corn,
peppers, egg plant &
pumpkins. 334-792-6362


FRESH
GREEN
PEANUTS
850-352-2199
OR 850-352-4423
Fresh Shelled Peas, Several Varieties'
2307 Mayo Road, (Grand Ridge)
Bobby Hewett (850) 592-4156


CLASSIFIED ADVERTI
Your source for selling and buying!
Wednesday. October 26, 2011


I.i

I

]

I,































G


--SIo

FRS 'RDC


Plenty of Shelled, Fresh Peas,
Tomatoes & other Vegetables
All Farm Fresh!
220 W. HWY 52 Malvern



Southeastern Premier Sales Inc.
would like to invite you to our next sale
November Sth to be held at the Houston
County Farm Center. Tack begins at 10am
and horses to follow for more info go to
wwwadothnhorsesalteom
or call Scott Roberts at 229-891-4454


I TECHNOLOGY


rnn rmrTYT


1 ..CKSON C 0UNT'.4A GREENWOOD
FLORIDAN I" Earn an average of
$500. Per month!
WE ARE LOOKING FOR DEPENDABLE, BUSINESS MINDED NEWSPAPER CARRIERS!
BE YOUR OWN BOSS (1AM to 6AM)

n. Ask about our $300 Sign on Bonus

Must have dependable transportation, minimum liability
insurance & valid driver's license.

Come by and fill out an application at the
Jackson County Floridan, 4403 Constitution Lane,
Marianna. FL 32447


Free kittens Multi-colored, multi-hair length
850-482- 5880/850-303-9727 after 3pm

AKC BULLMASTIFF PUPS AWESOME LITTER
BREEDING THE BEST TO THE BEST, LOOKS LIKE
ROCKY'S DOG BUTKUS $1,250; WITH A SERV- TiE SUDOIU G
ICEMAN, WOMAN VETS DISCOUNT OF $200,
FAWNS, LITE, DARK BRINDLES OW T Il
WWW.SEXTONSBULLZ.COM 334-806-5911
AKC Labrador Retrievers Chocolate 2M 1F, Yel-
low 1M 1F, Foxfire Red 1 M. Vet checked S/W
very healthy. Hunting Bloodline, Ready 11/5
$400, 334-693-2912 sdeiones@comcastnet
SCKC Minl-Schnauzers
Black, Silver & Chocolate
($375- $475) Taking Deposits.
S/W, Groomed. Ready Nov 2nd
Call 334-889-9024
Free Rescued Dogs for VERY Loving Homes,
Pit Bus, Pyranese Mbi Buldogs, Labs, Bird
Dog. All Shots/Spayed Neutered 334-791-7312



Find jobs



fast and


easy!


Tuesday's
WASABI SOLUTION


JACKSON COUNTY


FLORIDANi

jcfloridan.com



monster

FIND LOCAL JOBS AT: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM/JO


-4


*mS!ESIr


mjhiP\aN
BII~C~


~ece









CLASSIFIED


.w...C, r'O nrtIANc nm


Jackson County Floridan Wednesday, October 26, 2011- 7 B


New Phy n Opportunity
Internal rne or Family Pracice
Marianna, lorida

Physician Practice Opportunity
with potential for a partnership
Base Salary or % percent of collections
401K
Retirement Plan
Health Care Ins. and Disability

Contidentiai Please Cal 850-29225


SMedical Assistant Stheduler
rig Medcal Insurance Specialists





DISTRIBUTION CENTER
MARIANNA, FLORIDA

Now Hiring Full Time
Warehouse Positions
1st, 2nd, and 3rd Shifts

Now Hiring Full Time
Maintenance Technician
Friday Sunday, 5AM 6PM

Preferred candidate will
possess the following:
*1-2 years Industrial Maintenance
experience with Technical
Certificate/Degree or 3+ years
experience in Industrial Maintenance
for equipment and facilities.
Experience with electrical and
mechanical controls, pneumatics,
hydraulics, welding, plumbing, etc...
in manufacturing or distribution
environment.
Resume required.

Competitive Pay and Benefits Package!

Apply at Family Dollar Distribution Center
3949 Family Dollar Parkway,
Marianna, Florida 32448

Must be 18 Years Old
Equal Opportunity Employer
Drug Free Workplace







EDU[ATboN
.-




CHILDCARE CAREERS START HERE!
Now Enrolling 6 wk. Child Care Director
Course $80. Must have 12mo.Child Care
Exp. Call Mrs. Alaina 334-691-7399.
I ^L _-


FORTIS


COLLEGE


Get a Quality Education for a
New Career! Programs
offered in Healthcare,
HVAC and Electrical Trades.
Call Fortis College Today!
888-202-4813.
For consumer information
Www.Fortis.edu


I---RES'IDENTIAL
SRE.EAESmATa FO'R A t RPNE


CHIPOLA APARTMENTS
SPACIOUS EFFICIENCIES AND
1 BEDROOM APTS SECTION 8 ASSISTANCE
AVAILABLE ON ALL UNITS
UNITS SPECIALLY DESIGNED FOR
HANDICAPPED OR DISABLED
FOR RENTAL INFORMATION CALL
(850) 526-4407 TDD #800-955.-8771
4401 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA
MONDAY THRU FRIDAY, 9:00 AM TO 5:00 PM
EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY




1BR 1BA Apartment in town, $450 per month.
No pets. 850-557-2000
Deering Street 1BR over 2C/Gar. No Pets, $340
Mo. Other Beauty Shop for rent 727-433-RENT


3BR 1BA duplex & 2BR 2BA duplex both in
Grand Ridge both $425/mo + $425 dep. 850-
592-5571


1/2 block off US90 in Marianna cloe to every-
thing, courthouse and stores. 800 sq. ft., old
home, with city utilities. New vanity in bath-
room. Cheap rent as agent/owner has no
mortgage. Good responsible tenant wanted.
Only 1/2 month sec dep. Bad credit ok, no
evictions. No app fees for quick move-ins.
At least 1 yr. lease. Ed McCoy, Century 21
Sunny South Properties (850)573-6198
2 & 3 bedroom now available in Marianna &
near Blue Springs Park. 1 year lease, small pets
ok with deposit. Call 850-693-0570 Iv msg.
2BR/1BA Concrete block Rental in Marianna,
Tile floors, washer h/u, pets ok, $300/mo + $30
credit/bkgrnd ck. Additional houses and
apartments in Graceville 850-263-5753
2BR 1BA House at 4477 Fairfax Rd. $500/mo +
$500 dep. nice, quiet, safe neighborhood. 850-
482-8196/209-1301
2 Brick homes, 8mi E of Malone, 3BR 1 BA
$575/mo & 4BR 1 /zBA. $595/mo. Both require
$500 dep. lyr lease, & references, 850-569-
5940
Austin Tyler & Associates *
Quality Homes & Apartments
4* 850- 526-3355 4a
"Property Management Is Our ONLY Business"
IT'S AS EASY AS 1 2 3
1. CALL 2.PLACE YOUR AD 3. GET RESULTS


S I:I[olr'. F:-]
Large Country Home West of Alford, 3/2 brick,
2 car garage, 2 large sheds, $850/mo. 3/2 brick
in Alford, $650/mo/ lease, dep. & ref. req.
850-579-4317/866-1965
Large house in a fantastic quiet neighborhood .
4 BR 2.5 ba 3228 sq. ft. with a basement and
outside building in a fenced back yard. $1,500
deposit & $40 application fee. Call 334-618-3414
Lovely 3BR IBA House, Clean, in town, near
schools, nice yard, quiet neighborhood, out-
door pets ok, $600/mo with $600 deposit 850-
482-6211


2/2 MH South of Cottondale, water is furnish-
ed, Central Heat/Air, $500 + dep. 850-352-4393/
209-4516
2 & 3 bedroom mobile Homes in Cottondale.
$500 and up. H20, garbage, sewer included.
http:// www.charloscountry living. com.
850-258-4868/209-8847
2 & 3BR 2BA Mobile Homes in Cottondale no
pets, Ceritral Heat & Air $400-$450 850-258-
1594 leave message
2 &3BRMH's in
Marianna & Sneads (850)209-8595.
3/2 $550 Quiet, well maintained Park,
Water/sewer/ garb/lawn included.
Other rentals available starting @ $395
4* Joyce Riley RE 850-209-7825 4
3/2 MH on Meritts Mill Pond, access to swim-
ming & fishing. Sorry no pets. $600/mo + dep.
& references. 850-638-7822
Nice 2BR 1BA & 2BR 2BA MH's for rent in Altha.
$350-$450/mo. Several to choose from. Great
shape. 850-762-9555/573/5255
Rent to Own: 2 & 3BR Mobile Homes.
Lot rent included. Also available,
1 & 2BR Apts & Houses. For details
*4850-557-3432 or 850-814-6515 4




Duplex Office Building for sale in downtown
Marianna. New roof, Located at 2912 Green St.
$140K will negotiate. Call 850-526-4448
-" '. v ,t'




2010 Polaris 4x4 500EFI.
.^ Winch, top, windshield.
~--n' Never in mud. Only 31 hrs.
Parked in carport. New
cond. $11,000 new. Asking
$8,500. 334 897-2870

Golf cart: 2004.Like-new batteries and charger.
Excellent shape. $2,200. Call 334-677-0020.



10.2' Bass Hound 2-Person Boat, 28 Ib. Thrust
Minn Kota Trolling Motor, Electric Running
Lights: Live Well with Aerator, 16' Trailer, $850,
Call 334-889-4677 and leave message.


_.. : ;, l Dutchman'10 27ft sleeps
S - 8, Q-sz.bed,Frig,micro-
wave, stove, wall mount for
flat screen, canopy, tow
hitch & cover, $15,500 OBO
334-550-9895.

FLEETWOOD PROWLER '99- 30ft., 1 slide out,
in excellent shape $7,900 334-687-3334
PUMA '07-29ft., 2 slide-outs, king bed, like
new'$13,000 334-695-6359,334-687-6157



Dixie RV SuperStores
FL's Newest RV Dealer
NOW OPEN!!!
*Store Hours*
Monday-Saturday
8:00am-6:00pm
21 Acres /30 Brands New and Pre-Owned
Newmar Keystone u'Heartland Jayco
Fleetwood m Prime Time Coachmen
Forest River
Service Department
Parts and Acces. Store
RV Collision Center

Located off 1-10 Exit 70 / SR285
328 Green Acres Dr.
De Funiak Springs, FL 32435
Sales and Service: 850-951-1000
www.dixierv.com DO 12756

Trail Lite 2006 R-VISION
26 ft., fully loaded,
bought new, 13K miles
$44,995 334-616-6508


(~)


TRANSPORTATION
,.. .:: .~ .. ..


S Fuel Injection Edelbrock electronic
for Chevy 1985, used $1000.
a* 334-726-3349 or 334-677-4971 4


'10 Ford Fusion SE, 4cyl. 4-door, 29K miles,
factory bumper to bumper warranty $14,500.
FIRM 334-618-8255.
1996 Volvo 960: White, sedan, 225,000 miles,
nice inside and out, good tires, A/C cold. Elec
seats, cruise, panel lights iriop. $3,000. 334-
693-3692


2005 Nissan Sentra I am
Selling my volcanic or-
Sange 2005 Spec-V with
56,000 miles. The car
comes with I/H/E making about 205hp. Howev-
er, It still manages to get over 30 mpg on the
highway and includes sunroof and a 300-watt
Rockford Fosgate audio system with sub.Gar-
age kept for over 3 years. Thecar is mechani-
cally sound and runs great. Contact me at
thewolfe09@gmail.com or 972-742-0393. Pics
union request. Thanks! $9.000


2007 Honda Civic EX, coupe, 106,000 mi., great
condition, one owner, auto, moon roof, premi-
um stereo and wheels, good Michelin tires. pw,
pdl, a/c,tilt, cruise. $11,500. 334-797-1890 or
334-648-3939
CHEV 76 MONTE CARLO-
400/4 BBL Numbers
match, cold A/C. 98K all
orig. runs strong cream
tan, car road ready $4,000
334-689-9045-MT
Chevrolet'01 Silverado X/Cab $1900 Down,
0% Interest. Open 9am 9pm, 1-800-470-0650


Chevrolet'89 Blazer: reddish color,very clean,
good condition $1,500. Call 334-793-2142.
Crysler '05 PT Cruiser.
4 cylinder, automatic, 4 door, cold air,
Excellent condition, $6300. Call: 334-790-7959.

DayNOWht Auto Financing
SWith W% Irterest
Pontiac 98' GrandAm $475 Down
Chevy 99 Blazer $575 Down
Ford 98' F1SO X-Cab $775 Down
Dodge 02'Durango $995 Down
Chevy 02' Silverado $1395 Down


M ; ; ,~- .
Dodge '10 Charger
Sporty, NICE CAR, Loaded, LOW MILES,
GREAT FUEL ECONOMY!
$350 per mo. with $500 down.
Call: Steve Hatcher at 334-791-8243.

Ford '02 Taurus $575 Down, 0% Interest.
Open 9am 9pm. 1-800-470-0650
Ford '95 Mustang GT Convertible- white with
leather interior, 200k mile runs great, needs
paint, $3,500. Firm Call 334-695-2340
1-Owner
Ford '98 F-150 X/Cab $775 Down, 0% Interest.
Open 9am 9pm, 1-800-470-0650
Hyundai '06 Elantra GLS,
4 cyl. 4 door, automatic, only, 36,000 miles,
loaded, like new, $8700. Call: 334-790-7959.
Jeep '05 Wrangler Rubicon lack. Excellent
condition. Soft top. 100k miles. One Owner.
$11,500. $750 below Kelly blue book value.
334-796-9554
Kia '05 Optima LX,
Loaded, 4 cyl., Automatic, 4 door, New tires,
Clean, 62,000 miles, Excellent. $5795.
Call: 334-790-7959.
Mecury 93' Station Wagon: light blue, very
clean, 120k miles, good condition $1,995.
Call 334-793-2142.
Mercedes '08 C300 Sport LOADED, 1 owner,
Silver with Black Leather, 63K mi. (all high-
way). 100K mi. Extended warranty. $22,500
OBO. iPod system, Sunroof. Excellent Condi-
tion, Super Clean 334-618-2154 or 334-798-5714
Mercedes '97 S500 Roadster: red convertible,
wine leather interior,55k miles, excellent condi-
tion. Call 334-693-3980
Mercury'00 Grand Marquis: Very Clean. White
with leather interior, mileage 64,300, $5,900.
Call 334-671-0685.
NEED A VEHICLE? GOT BAD CREDIT?
I can get U Riding Today Repos, Slow
Credit, Past Bankruptcy OK! $0 Down/ 1st
Payment, Tax, Tag & Title Push, Pull or Drag,
Will Trade anything! Warranty On Every
Vehicle Soldl $20 Gift Card w/pu rchase
Call Steve 800-809-4716
Nissan '03 350-Z Low Miles, Great Condition,
Black. Selling price $12,300 334-677-3631
Pontiac '01 Grand Prix $575 Down, 0% Interest.
Open 9am 9pm, 1-800-470-0650
Pontiac '96 Bonneville SSEi, black/black leath-
er, PW, PS, CD, power sunroof, HUD, non-
smoker, very good condition, 129,000.miles,
asking $4,500 OBO, 334-687-4626.
Pontiac'98 Grand Prix: a.t., a/c. sunroof
$595 Down, 0% Interest Open 9am 9pm,
1-800-470-0650
Subaru '09 Forester silver with black int. 4K
miles, all.wheel drive, new tires, great vehicle.
$21.000. OBO 334-308-1112.
Volkswagen 09 EOS: hard top convertible with
pano roof, silver with tan leather interior, fully
loaded luxury package, 29k miles, super nice
and very clean, $23,500, Call 334-685-1070


Harley Davidson '05 Super Glide 1450 CC, Lots
of Chrome and high-end parts. Mint Condition,
Sacrifice for $7900 334-648-0348
HARLEY DAVIDSON '97 ROAD KING-45K, color
Black Emerald, excellent condition, $7,500
OBO, 229-317-3112
Honda '08 Shadow Aero: BT750, 5kmiles, black
with lots of chrome, never been dropped or
wrecked, $3500. Call 334-596-3656
." ". Suzuk '95 Savagee 650 Bur-
gundy with chrome pipes &
trim, saddle bags, new full
windshield, runs great just
serviced. 12300k mi.


Must see to aooreciate $2000. 850-526-4645.


YAMAHA '09 110 Dirt Bike, excellent
condition, rarely used $1,400 or trade for 4
wheeler 334-687-4686


2008 Chevrolet Tahoe LTZ, 44,480 miles, black,
leather, 4X4, DVD, navigation, warranty, excel-
lent condition, $9200. amassa@netscape.com
Chevrolet '01 Blazer, a.t., a.c., 4-door
$695 Down, 0% Interest Open 9am 9pm,
1-800-470-0650
Chevrolet'02 Blazer $675 Down, 0% Interest.
Open 9am 9pm. 1-800-470-0650
CHEVY'03 SUBURBAN- 1500 LT, Loaded, 50K
miles, Good Condition, $13,000 334-355-1373
Dodge '99 Durango $575 Down, 0% Interest.
Open 9am 9pm, 1-800-470-0650


Chevrolet '01 Silverado X/Cab $1275 Down, 0%
Interest. Open 9am 9pm, 1-800-470-0650
Chevrolet '99 Silverado X/Cab a.t., a.c.,
$1295 Down, 0% Interest.
Open 9am 9pm, 1-800-470-0650
Dodge '02 Ram 1500 4-wheel drive, quad cab,
P/U with 4.7 liter engine, cold air, chrome run-
ning boards, chrome rims, chrome tool box,
tow package and new tires. 149,698 miles.
Excellent condition. $8499. v* 334-790-6832.
Ford '01 F150 $975 Down, 0% Interest.
Open 9am 9pm, 1-800-470-0650
Ford '01 F-150 or Ford Ranger
$895 Down, 0% Interest.
Open 9am 9pm, 1-800-470-0650
TRACTOR 4230 John Deer 100hp, $8500. & 2010
JD 45hp $4500. 334-735-2464


I TRUCKSBUSIEST:RA. JITO ILERSI:


FORD'89 F150, 4wh, 4x4
'Auto, $4,600 or reasonable
offer. Call 229-334-8520,


TRACTOR-IH1440 Combine, LOOK !
Field Ready, Grain Head and Corn Head.
$6,00. 850-415-0438


2003 Pontiac Montana Van $5,500, 49,000
miles. extended body, 4 brand new Good year
tires! front and rear AC, cruise control,
CD/radio, exterior white, interior gray. Alaba-
ma rebuilt title after minor damage (replaced
rear bumper and side door) RUNS GREAT,
LOOKS GREAT. Perfect for business of family!
(334) 701-8862 or (334)796-6729
Chevrolet '97 Astro Van
conversion Van raised
roof, loaded, new tires,
One owner. GREAT
condition. 52K mi. $9,500.
334-897-2054 or
/ 334-464-1496
CHEVY '06 2500 Express Van, 39,500 miles
with over $2K in storage bins & ladder racks
$14,500 334-687-4686
Pontiac '05 Montana Van
GREAT FAMILY TRANSPORTATION!
Loaded, DVD, Leather, Captain chairs,
Pwr. seats, $250 per mo. with $300 down.
Call: Steve Hatcher at 334-791-8243.

Pontiac '99 Montana V-6, One owner. 145K
miles, needs head gasket, $2600. OBO CASH
Serious inquiries only call 334-693-3141
9AM -8PM ONLY.
WANTEDS AUTOS


CALL TODAY FOR YOUR TOWING NEEDS


AUTO BODY & RECYCLING
PAYING TOP DOLLAR FOR JUNK CARS
Contat Jason Harger at 334-791-2624

M Got a Clunker :
SA We'll be your Junker!
We buywrecked cars
and Farm Equip. at a *
fair and honest price!
lt C $325. & up for
Complete Cars CALL334-702-4323

S*, WANTED WRECKED OR JUNK VEHICLES
. I PAY TOP DOLLAR
D iAY-334-794-6576 NIGHT 334-794-7769

WE PAY CaSH
FOR JUNK CARS.!!!!!
Call 334-818-1274



Make Your Point!

SAdvertising is the best way to make points

with prime prospects who are ready,

willing and able to buy.

Let us show you the most

effective way to advertise

in the newspaper that reaches

the right people,

right where they live.


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Visit us at:
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Call for Top Price for
Junk Vehicles


w


F I also sell used parts
24 HOUR TOWING ) 334-792-8664 4


wwwnj - L'um"I'Ln~cuill


-








B Wd dr,,o October 2620E11 JaiknnCnt Fldn


CLASSIFIED


rI eyorCO L .TFFf FE E by.wisiting l*Jo n =. Sees it e for de'tail. ,.*.,
.^ ^ ^^M


Laptop Docking Station: HP xb2000 Notebook
Expansion Base. $50 OBO. Call 850-482-6859.
Splash Guard Set for Mazda CX-7, P/N
EG21V3450F. Never used. $100. 840-482-6859
Truck Bedliner off 2002 Frontier quad cab with
6 ft. bed. $50. 850482-2636 Marianna.
TV: 36" Sharp w/Pioneer surround sound.
Great picture & sound, $150. Call 850-579-0157.
300 TX Fish Finder, great condition, less than 1
year old, $80 850-482-7888
Angel Cookie Jars (2) $15 850-372-3327
Collector Dolls (4) Elvis $65 for all 850-592-
2881
Couch, 3 person with matching chair, excellent
condition $100 850-209-8040
Deluxe Walker w/basket & seat by ProBasics,
$50 850-372-3327
Table, Mahogany Gateleg, $195 850-593-9960


Desk Oak -19 x 47. Well made. NEW $525,
Asking $275. 334-805-3835
Dishes, 8 place set, Lighthouse, $25 850-372-
3327
Free Cats to GOOD home Neutered/Spayed,
shots current, Different Colors 850-482-4896
Lead Crystal, 12 assorted pieces $40 850-592-
2881
LOST: SD Card for'Camera, last seen upper
level East wing parking SAMC. Contains photos
of child 1st birthday. Reward Offered if Found!!
Call 850-546-1684 or 850-834-6538
Refrigerator 1.8, used only twice $70 239-272-
8236
Rims & Tires: (4) new 154.Wanli 195/60/R15,
MSR wheels, chrome hardware $400.718-4289
Sofa, 3 cushion, off white, micro fiber, like new,
$175 850-482-8980
Table w/4 chairs, wood, $50 850-372-3327


I SELF] STOi RAG^E=-


850-209-1090
For ALL your Real Estate Needs!
Century 21 Sunny South Properties
850-526-2891
4630 Hwy 90 Marianna




Grader Pan Excavator
Dump Tiuck Bulldozer
Demolition Grading Site Prep
* Debris Removal 9 Retention Ponds e Leveling
* Top Soil Fill Dirt Gravel Land Clearing

LE tEXPER ENCEDOTH lOR


Clay O'Neal's
Land Clearing, Inc.
ALTHA, FL
850-762-9402
Cell 850-832-5055


WEWOtBCOHE

BWIAfvllaBBM
-,I"
U--


4 Point Insurance inspections
Wind Mitigation Inspections
Performed by JAMES GRANT
State Certified Building Code Administrator
State Certified.Building Contractor
State Licensed Electrical Contractor


~:EL ECTRICAL WORK
S& UPGRADES I II
Replace your old Electrical Service
with a New Service
QuAUTr WORK REASONABLE PRICE
JAMES GRANT,'LLC "- v
*i~frA~g.&cg-MM r.1 <^>ffl


Jeed a ew P\ome?


Chek out the


CI&ssifieds


IE DI LL NG & RE A


I SELF STORAGE


Lester Basford BESTWAY
Well & Pump Company BE B
f 4513 Lafayette St* Marianna, FL LARGEST WNuFATuRIE OF PORTABLE BUILDINGS IN NOGIH FLORID
850.526.3913 O 850.693.0428 C r -
W 850.482.2278 H I I WEEf00
HAVE
ROOIG& EAOVER
R DIFFERENT SIZES
win00 YOU CAN CHOOSE
COLOR & STYLE!

i Aer.arE r Lr. 1 Ci, -n.r1.M
F, Esji El ,Cl nir., .- 34 ft Hwy. 90 MarlannaI, FL #850-482-68M
ALI I'M FLC )RIL)Ar]jn~ ~i''? 1L


AORS QUAIrY SERVICE
FOR OVER 50 YEARS"
Charles Morse (850) 526-8445
Ben Morse *(850) 573-1705
Office (850) 482-3755
8479 Hwr 7 mBiamna .8448
S"Our prices WILL NOT shook you"

CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
Your source for selling and buying!


HAPPY
HOME REPAIR
WE'LL BEAT ANY PRICE!!
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Clean Out Your Garage

and Turn the Items You've

Forgotten Into Cash.

That old collection of clutter might not mean much to you
anymore, but chances are someone out there would love it. By
using the Classifieds, you'll make it easier for them to find,
and easier for you to sell. So try it today!


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN
(850) 526-3614 or (800) 779-2557


X o -m. It-


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and make secure online payments.


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