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Jackson County Floridan
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028304/00673
 Material Information
Title: Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title: Sunday Floridan
Portion of title: Floridan
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Jackson County Floridan
Publisher: Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Marianna Fla
Creation Date: October 20, 2011
Publication Date: 1934-
Frequency: daily (except saturday and monday)[<1979-1995>]
weekly[ former 1934-<1955>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates: 30.776389 x -85.238056 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note: "Independent."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID: UF00028304:00673
 Related Items
Preceded by: Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by: Marianna Floridan

Full Text


Informing more than 17,000 readers daily in print and online


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*********ORIGIN MIXED ADC 325
LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-7007


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Sneads Lady Pirates

Volleyball team wins big

over Blountstown. See

L more on page lB.


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,4 Malia Generai, V 'nwpapr Vol. 88 No. 204




TDC approves 2012 budget


Ready for county approval


BY LAUREN DELGADO
Idelgado@jcfloridan.com

The Jackson County Tourist
Development Council approved
its 2012 budget on Wednesday,


and will recommend the county
approve it at the next Jackson
County Commission meeting on
Oct. 25.
TheTDC will recommend using
3 percent of the 4 percent tour-


ism tax, giving them $210,000 to
use. The rest of the moneywill go
into the capital reserve fund.
The biggest chunk of the bud-
get at $50,000 will go toward spe-
cial events. Funds for direct ads
come in at second at $45,000.
Money has been allocated
for a tourism director and his


or her expenses. About $42,500
has been set aside for a salary,
$17,500 for part-time employees
and $24,500 for expenses.
Of the expense funds, $12,500
will be available for travel ex-
penses and $12,000 for living
expenses. The board wishes for
the director to live at The Russ


House.
A committee will be appointed
at the next board meeting to be-
gin exploring the process of find-
ing a director.
The board budgeted about
$22,500 for capital improvement
projects and $8,000 for the op-
portunity reserve.


Pieces of History


Chipola Historic


Trust receives


Dozier items


BY LAUREN DELGADO
Idelgado@jcfloridan.com

The Florida Depart-
ment of Juvenile Justice
gifted several items from
the North Florida Youth
Development Center,
formerly known as the
Arthur G. Dozier School
for Boys to the Chipola
Historic Trust.
"If we did not have
them, they would have
been thrown away and
been discarded," said Pa-
tricia Crisp, the president
of Chipola Historic Trust.
"There was no other use
for them."
The school closed in
May 2011 after 111 years
of taking in troubled
youth.
According to a press
release from the trust, it
received everything from
a printing press to a pas-
tel paper to. the Dozier
Escape Whistle.
The printing press was
used since 1928 to pub-
lish a weekly newspaper
called The Yellow Jacket,
which told the news of
the campus and taught


the men the printing
trade. The old newspa-
pers were not given to
the Trust, a privacy act
prohibits the names
of the boys from being
released.
Bars of lead, which
were used to create the
linotype letters for the
press were also donated.
The bars were sold and
the funds gained will be
used by the Trust.
Pastel paper from the
printing room was do-
nated to the McLane
Community Certer
and Golson Elementary
School.
Another donation was
a car model designed by
German Opel dealership
owner Emil Hohm. It was
used by Dozier students
as a automobile repair
training tool. Tallahassee
resident Jason Faul re-
stored it in March 2011.
The Trust gave Christ-
mas decorations used by
Dozier in the 1960s and
1970s to Marianna Main
Street Director Charlotte
See DOZIER, Page 7A


SUBMITTED PHOTOS
This printing press was used since 1928 to create the
Yellow Jacket, a newspaper Dozier students put together
with stories on the events and people on campus. *


An electric automobile model designed by German Opel
dealership owner Emil Hohm and used by Dozier students
in auto repair classes.


) CLASSIFIEDS...5-7B


LET DOWN YOUR HAIR


Girl donates hair to Locks of Love


BY LAUREN DELGADO
Idelgado@jcfloridan.com

has been growing out her hair.
Well over 12 inches long, her
hair just touched her waist.
After weathering those two years
of tangles and heat, Taylor decided
to donate her hair to Locks of Love, a
non-profit organization that creates
hair prosthetics for children who have
lost their hair to disease.
"Just think of the shampoo we'll
save!" her mother Tina Jones Parnell
joked.
Sporting a "Support Cancer Re-
search" T-shirt her family made for
her, Taylor went to Brenda's Hair
Salon in Malone with her mom and
grandmother Mary Jones to get the 12
inches of hair Locks of Love requires
cut off.
As hairdresser and salon owner
Brenda Wilson began separating her
hair into tiny ponytails (14 in all when
it was all cut off), Taylor described
who she believed would receive her
hair.
"I picture just a kid l;th cancer that
can go in public and not be embar-
rassed," Taylor said.
Taylor first heard about Locks of
Love from her mother. Tina had read
about Locks of Love and knows many
people with cancer.
"I cried," Tina said about when
Taylor told her she wanted to donate.
"Just like I am now. I think she's an
angel."
Malone School will be naming
Taylor the "Tiger of the Month" on
Thursday for her donation. She'll
have her shorn hair in tow to show
-her classmates, and then it'll be sent
to the Locks of Love on Friday.
' Despite all the waiting and discom-
fort, Taylor plans to grow her hair out
again.
"Hopefully it'll grow faster," she
said.
To learn more about Locks of Love,
check out http://www.locksoflove.org


PHOTOS BY LAUREN DELGADO/FLORIDAN


State News

Gov. heads to Brazil for seven-day trade trip


The Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE Gov. Rick Scott
departs late Thursday on a seven-
day trip to Brazil, where he will pro-
mote Florida to its biggest trading
partner and a South American eco-
nomic powerhouse.
Scott, who has made jobs and eco-
nomic development the focus of his
administration, was embarking on
the third trade mission in 10 months
in office. Fortner Gov. Charlie Crist
took only two trips in his first year in
office.
Scott says the trips will help in the
long run.
"Basically what you do is you build
relationships," said Scott, a former
businessman who never held office
prior to his election last year. "Some
of the relationships are with the gov-
ernment. Some of the relationships
are with individuals. The end result
is, if two groups can figure out how


) LOCAL...3A


"Brazil is emerging as one of the great expanding
economies. Florida could be one of the great beneficiaries of
that expansion."
Manny Mencia,
Enterprise Florida's senior VP of International Trade and Business Development


they can solve each other's needs,
that is something that is going to
happen and we're going to get more
jobs here."
Brazil, which covers half of South
America, is already Florida's top ex-
port market. In 2010, exports led
primarily by the shipment of civil-
ian aircraft, engines and parts from
Florida to Brazil were $13.7 billion,
according to Enterprise Florida, the
state's economic development arm.
Scott's trip will take him first to
Rio de Janeiro where he will visit a
major trade show of Brazilian travel
agents.
Last year more than 1 million Bra-


> STATE...4A


)) SPOF


zilians traveled to the state, making
Brazil second only to the United
Kingdom. Visits from Brazil were up
43 percent during the first half of the
year and spending also increased
61 percent during that same time
period.
"Brazil is a huge market for Flori-
da," said Will Seccombe, chief mar-
keting officer for Visit Florida, which
promotes Florida's tourism industry.
"We have a significant delegation
from the state attending the show.
To have the governor join us to talk
to big producers of travel will help
See TRIP, Page 7A
RTS...1-3B )TV LISTINGS...3B


This Newspaper A
Is Printed On
Recycled Newsprint




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) ENTERTAINMENT...4B


) OBITUARIES...7A


... . ... .. .... ; .; *'.*: .iii.- "a ,.m ,







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Sunny & Cool.


High 750
Low 450


Sunday
Sunny & Mild.


Warmer, Clear.


TIDES
Panama City
Apalachicola
Port St. Joe
Destin
Pensacola


Low
Low
Low
Low
Low


RIVER READINGS
Woodruff
Blountstown
Marianna
Caryville


2:34 AM
4:25 AM
2:00 PM
3:11 PM
3:45 PM


High
High
High
High
High


Reading
39.10 ft.
0.81 ft.
4.50 ft.
0.23 ft.


- 3:30 AM
- 12:03 AM
- 3:21 AM
- 3:54 AM
- 4:27 AM

Flood Stage
66.0 ft.
15.0 ft.
19.0 ft.
12.0 ft.


ULTRA VIOLET INDEX

0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8-10 Very High, 11+ Extreme
0120


THE SUN AND MOON
Sunrise 6:46 AM
Sunset 6:05. PM
Moonrise 12:00 AM
Moonset 1:47 PM


oct. Nov. Nov. Nov.
26 2 10 18


FLORIDA'S \DS S

PANHANDLE OJit

MEDIA PARTNERS WJAQ 100.9


SJACKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN

Publisher Valeria Roberts
vroberts@jcfloridan.com

Circulation Manager Dena Oberski
doberski@jcfloridan.com




-a


CONTACT US
Telephone1 (850) 526-3614
FAX: (850) 482-4478
Email: editorial@jcfloridan.com
Mailing Aodress:
P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447
Street Address:
4403 Constitution Lane
Marianna, FL32446
Office Hours:
Weekdays, 8 a.m. to 5 p:m.

MISS YOUR PAPER?
You should receive your newspaper no later
than 6 a.m. If it does not arrive, call Circula-
tion between 6 a.m. and noon, Tuesday to
Friday, and 7 a.m. to 11a.m. on Sunday.The
Jackson County Floridan (USPS 271-840)
is published Tuesday though Friday and
Sunday mornings. Periodical postage paid
at Marianna, FL.

SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Home delivery: $11.23 per month; $32.83
for three.months; $62.05for six months;
and $123.45 for one year. All prices include
applicable state and local taxes. Mail
subscriptions must be paid in advance. Mail
subscriptions are: $46.12 for three months;
$92.24 for six months; and $184.47 for one
year.
ADVERTISING
The advertiser agrees that the publisher
shall not be liable for damages arising
out of errors and advertisements beyond
the amount paid for the space actually
occupied by that portion of the advertise-
ments in which the error occurred, whether
such error is due to the negligence of the
publisher's employees or otherwise, and
there shall be not liability for non-inser-
tion of any advertisement beyond the
amount paid for such advertisement. This
newspaper will not knowingly accept or
publish illegal material of any kind. Advertis-
ing which expresses preference based on
legally protected personal characteristics is
not acceptable.

HOW TO GET YOUR
NEWS PUBLISHED
The Jackson County Floridan will publish
news of general interest free of charge.
Submit your news or Community Calendar
events via email, fax, mail, or hand delivery.
Fees may apply for wedding, engagement,
anniversary and birth announcements.
Forms are available at the Floridan offices.
Photographs must be of good quality and
suitable for print. The Floridan reserves the
right to edit all submissions.
GETTING IT RIGHT
The Jackson County Floridan's policy
is to correct mistakes promptly. To
report an error, please call 526-3614
Monday-Friday. -


Community Calendar


THURSDAY, OCT. 20
a Marianna High School Class of 198130-year
Reunion Oct. 20-23. Events include the Bulldog
Blast, horfiecoming parade, a:pre-game cookout,
Saturday picnic, dinner/dance, and Sunday morning
worship. Call 557-2224.
) CaregiVer Support Group meeting -11 a.m.
to noon in the social hall of First Presbyterian
Church, 4437 Clinton St. in Marianna. Open to all
family caregivers providingcare to loved ones or
friends. Confidential group is facilitated by a profes-
sional group counselor. Coffee, water, light snacks
provided.
v Jackson County NAACP meeting, 5:30 p.m.
in the St. James A.M,E. Church basement, 2891
Orange St. in Marianna. Call 569-1294.
D Bulldog Blast Homecoming Pep Rally 6 p.m.
in the Marianna High School Gymnasium. Get ready
for Friday's football game. The homecoming court
will be introduced. Public welcome. Admission: $3
per person (school age and'older).
) Alcoholics Anonymous Closed discussion, 8
to 9 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901 Cale-
donia St., Marianna, in theAA room. Attendance
limited to persons with a desire to stop drinking.
a Jackson Hospital Foundation Inc. convenes for
its annual meeting in the Hudnall Building commu-
nity room. Call 718-2601 for details.

FRIDAY, OCT. 21
Blood Drive The Southeastern Community
Blood Center mobile unit will be at Malone High
School, 8 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.; or give blood 9 a.m. to 6
p.m. Monday-Friday at 2503 Commercial Park Drive
in Marianna. Call 526-4403.
International Chat'n' Sip Jackson County
Public'Library Learning Center staff and interna-
tional English learners invite the public to join them
8:30 to 10 a.m. at 2929 Green St. in Marianna, to
exchange language, culture, and ideas in a relaxed
environment. Light refreshments served. Free
admission. Call 482-9124.
S Small Business Seminar at Chipola College
"Starting Your Own Restaurant Business" is 9:30
a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in, Room M-108 of the Business
and Technology building. Cost: $30. Register at
http://clients.floridasbdc.org/center.aspx?center4.
1230&subloc4. Call 718-2441 or email seversone@
chipola.edu.
) Grand Opening/Ribbon Cutting Jackson
County Chamber of Commerce conducts a ribbon-
cutting ceremony at 11 a.m. during the grand open-
ing of Williams Paint & Body Shop, 4909 Highway
90 East in Marianna (next to Hopkins Motors).
Lunch provided. Shotgun giveaway at noon (must
be 18, one entry per household). Call owners Eddie
and Theresa Williams at 482-0332 or the Chamber
at 482-8060.


a Jackson Hospital Board of Trustees Finance
Committee meets at noon in the Hudnall Building
community room.
a Marianna High School Homecoming The
parade is at 3 p.m. in downtown Marianna (lineup is
at 2 p.m. on Daniels Street). In Bulldog Stadium, the
2011 MHS homecoming queen will be crowned dur-
ing a pregame ceremony at 6:15 p.m., and the MHS
Bulldogs face off with the Walton County Braves at 7
p.m. Admission to the football game: $5.
a Celebrate Recovery -Adult, teen meetings to
"overcome hurts, habits and hang-ups:' 7 p.m. at
Evangel Worship Center, 2645 Pebble Hill Road.
Dinner: 6 p.m. Child care available. Call 209-7856
or 573-1131.
a Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, 8 to
9 p.m. in the AA room at First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St., Marianna.

SATURDAY, OCT. 22
The Marianna High School Class of 1991
Reunion is today. Those interested in attending are
asked to R.S.V.P. to 209-2212 or 557-1701.
a Marianna Woman's Club Yard Sale Fundraiser
7 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the clubhouse. Plants, baked
goods and more will be for sale.
) Make a Difference Day Pick Up Marianna, pre-
sented by the City of Marianna, asks volunteers to
lend a hand to keep the community clean, starting
at 8 a.m. from the old jail. There will be giveaways
and a chance for one volunteer to win a free month
of utilities. Call 482-4129 or email nlong@cityof
marianna.com.
Marianna City Farmers Market is open 8 a.m. to
noon for the fall season, Saturdays only in Madison
Street Park.
a Benefit Ride The Heaven's Saints Motorcycle
Ministry's Northwest Florida Chapter hosts its third
annual benefit ride for A Womei's Pregnancy Cen-
ter. Registration: 9 a.m. at the First United Method-
ist Church, Marianna; first bikes out: 10 a.m. Ride.
ends at Page Pond Assembly of God in Altha, with
a picnic lunch. Cost: $20 per rider and $5 for the .
passenger. Those not riding are welcome for lunch
around noon. Lunch is free; donations accepted.
Call 718-7955 or 544-6908.
a Graceville Garden Club Fundraiser Ham-
burger and hot dog plates, 11a.m. to 1 p.m. in the
Graceville Civic Center back meeting room. Plates
(a hamburger or two hot dogs, chips, dessert and ,
drink) are $6 each. Contact a club member for tick-.
ets or call 263-3951. Yellow, bronze, or burgundy/
yellow mums ($12 each) will also be on sale, outside
the Civic Center; pre-order from any club member.
n Signature HealthCARE at The Courtyard Oc-
tober Fest -1 to 8 p.m. at 2600 Forest Glen Trail in
Marianna, with a pumpkin patch/pumpkin lighting;
live music and dancers; cheerleaders; bouncy


houses; hay rides; a haunted maze; face painting
and a Howl-O-Ween Dog Show. Hot dogs, popcorn,
boiled peanuts, sno-cones and hot chocolate will
be for sale. Admission: free. Vendor booths: $25.
All proceeds benefit SHC residents. Call 526-2000,
ext. 241.
nTurkey Shoot Fundraiser -1 p.m. each Satur-
day through December at AMVETS Post 231, north
of Fountain (east side of US 231, just south of CR
167). Cost: $2 a shot. Call 850-722-0291.
) Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, 4:30 to
5:30 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901Caledonia St., Marianna.
) Book Signing Author and Cottondale High
School graduate Karla Johnson will be sighing cop-
ies of "Tales of the Tick-Tock Time Traveler," 5:30 to
7 p.m. at the Half Shell Restaurant in Marianna. Kids
welcome to dress as St. Nicholas and have photos
made with the author.

SUNDAY, OCT. 23
Alcoholics Anonymous closed discussion, 6:30
p.m., 4349 W. Lafayette St., Marianna (in one-story
building behind 4351W. Lafayette St.). Attendance
limited to persons with a desire to stop drinking.

MONDAY, OCT. 24
. Orientation 10:30 a.m. at the Goodwill Career
Training Center, 4742 Highway 90 in Marianna. Reg-
ister for free job placement and computer training
classes and learn about services offered to people
with disadvantages/disabilities. Call 526-0139.
D Lions Club of Marianna meeting, Jim's Buffet &
Grill, at noon. Call 482 2005.
) Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, 8 to
9 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St., Marianna.

TUESDAY, OCT. 25
n Jackson County Chamber of Commerce will
host a free Community Appreciation Power Lunch
for Graceville/Campbellton/Jacob, noon to 1 p.m.
at the Graceville Civic Center, 5224 Brown St.,
Graceville. Guest speaker Rick Marcum, executive
director of Opportunity Florida, will give an update
on getting high-speed internet access to rural
Florida. Call 482-8060.
D Sewing Circle 1p.m. at Jackson County Senior
Citizefis,2931 Optimist Drive in Marianna. Call
482-5028.
) Jackson County Quilters Guild Sit-n-Sew
5:30 to 8 p.m. in the First United Methodist
Church Youth Hall on Clinton Street, behind the
Marianna post office. Work on a project, get free
help, and find out about upcoming classes, lessons
and workshops. The Guild's monthly meeting is on
the fourth Tuesday of the month. Call 299-7638.


The submission deadline for this calendar is two days before publication. Submit to: Community Calendar, Jackson County Floridan, P. O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447,
email editorial@jcfloridan.com, fax (850) 482-4478 or bring items to 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.

Police Roundup


MARIANNA POLICE
DEPARTMENT
The Marianna Police De-
partment listed the following
incidents for Oct. 18, the latest
available report- One drunk
driver, one -
drunk pedes- -74/ rE
trian, one hit -- -
& run vehicle, RI ME
one miss-
ing juvenile,
one suspicious incident, four
suspicious people, one funeral
escort, one mental illness com-
plaint, one verbal disturbance,
two burglary alarms, 11 traffic
stops, two larceny complaints,


one trespassing complaint,
one obscene/threatening call,
one noise disturbance, two
animal complaints, two assists
of another agency, one patrol
request and one threat/harass-
ment complaint.

JACKSON COUNTY
SHERIFF'S OFFICE
The Jackson County Sheriff's
Office and county Fire/Rescue
reported the following incidents
for Oct. 18, the latest available
report. (Some of these calls may
be related to after-hours calls
taken on behalf of Graceville
and Cottondale Police Depart-


ments): One accident with
injury, one hospice death, one
missing juvenile, two suspi-.
cious vehicles, one suspicious
person, one funeral escort, four
mental illness complaints, one
burglary complaint, one-verbal
disturbance, one complaint
on burning, one drug offense,
16 medical calls, two traffic
crashes, four burglary alarms,
one panic alarm, 13 traffic
stops, two larceny complaints,
one criminal mischief com-
plaint, two juvenile complaints,
one fight in progress, one assist
of a motorist/pedestrian, one
assist of another agency, two
public service requests and two


threat/harassment complaints.

JACKSON COUNTY
CORRECTIONAL FACILITY
The following persons were
booked into the county jail dur-
ing the latest reporting periods:
a Michael Avery, 41,
2426 Harold Drive, Mari-
anna, driving while license
suspended/revoked.

JAIL POPULATION: 227

To report a crime, call CrimeStoppers
at 526-5000 or a local law enforcement
agency. To report a wildlife violation, call
1-888-404-FWCC (3922).


Proudly gO elgu Nr igc al

SOU E RN
SUR ICAL


: High- 770
2-T Low 70


Monday
Sunny & Warm.


- --- ';; -~"--- -;- ---~-"--; ~ ~~ ;-"`--I~~~" --'--


12A THURSDAY. OCTOBER 20, 2011


WAIE-UP CALL


VBdsi~h QMU4~ljoawk







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Education majors learn to take the environment to the classroom

Special to the Floridan

Chipola College educa- .
tion majors in elementary,
middle and secondary
school science recently X
attended a Project Learn- 4 h
ing Tree workshop at the
Florida Caverns State Park *-
in Marianna.
Bill Kleinhans and fellow r
PLT facilitator, foresters,
and naturalists Linda
Hebb, Mark Hebb, Phil
Smith and Bruce Turn-
bull led the workshops. i
The purpose of the meet-
ings was to help the future
teachers learn to integrate
lessons on the Florida en-
vironment into math, read-
ing and science courses.
Chipola students re-
ceived the PreK-8 Envi- SUBMITTEDPHOTO
ronmental Education Ac- Facilitators, foresters and naturalists (from left) Bruce Turnbull, Bill Kleinhans, Phil Smith, Mark Hebb and Linda Hebb discuss activities for the Project
tivity Guide with educator Learning Tree workshop at the Florida Caverns.
resources. Activities were
selected from the guide and
implemented at the park.
They "adopted" trees, used
trigonometric functions
to calculate the heights of
trees, became a "human"
tree depicting heartwood,
xylem, phloem, cambium;
studied tree cookies and N
rings; and competed for
tree resources while con-
necting, math, science and
reading.
Developed in 1976, PLT
meets state and national
standards, while giv-
ing teachers strategies,
techniques and concep-
tual knowledge for activ-
ity-based learning to take
the environment into the
classroom and students
into the environment. Top-
ics include forests, wildlife,
water, community, plan- Naturalist Mark Hebb (left) presents an environmental lesson to Chipola College education majors during the Project Learning Tree workshop at the Florid
ning, recycling and energy. Caverns.


Jackson Hospital Auxiliary awards floral centerpieces

Special to the FloridanNI,

The Jackson Hospital V
Auxiliary met Oct. 7, in the ,._


Hudnall Building Confer-
ence Room.
President Elizabeth Ann
Ward called the meeting to
order at 11:30 a.m. with the
traditional opening.
Following the meal pre-
pared and served by the
hospital food staff, Presi-
dent Ward introduced J. D.
Tyler, one of the Auxiliary's
nursing scholarship recipi-
ents. Tyler shared some of
his experiences with the
nursing program, his goals
for the future, and his ap-
preciation to the Auxil-
iary for awarding him a


SUBMITTED PHOTOS
Recipients of the floral centerpieces used in the Oct.7 meetingof the Jackson Hospital Auxiliary
include (from left) Dorothy Rehberg, Ellie Green, Dot Wefel and Wandis Scott.


scholarship.
Several points in the Aux-
iliary handbook were high-
lighted by President Ward,
and members received
copies of recent changes


in bylaws to be placed in
their books.
The Auxiliary Nominat-
ing Committee announced
its slate of proposed of-
ficers for 2012. Members


then elected new officers,
who will be installed at the
January meeting.
New members Sandra
Durdin, Nell Roach and
Angela Walton were recog-


Jackson Hospital Auxiliary President Elizabeth Ann Ward
reviews parts of the group's handbook during the Oct. 7
meeting.
nized by President Ward, Rehberg andWandis Scott.
and welcomed by the The Jackson Hospital
group. Auxiliary's annual meet-
Recipients of the floral ing and installation of of-
centerpieces were Ellie ficers is set for Friday, Jan.
Green, Dot Wefel, Dorothy 6,2012.


a


Chipley wolf preserve ready for 'Howl-O-Ween'


Special to the Floridan


Cynthia Watkins, co-
owner of Seacrest Wolf
Preserve" in Chipley, re-
cently announced details
for this year's "Howl-O-
Ween," held each year at
the preserve.
The 10th annual event is
set for this weekend, with
hours of 9:30 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Saturday and 9:30 a.m.
to 5 p.m. Sunday. Admis-
sion is free, and attendees
can then purchase tickets
for events on the preserve
grounds.
Features of the event in-


.,..
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Mon.
Tue.
Tuie.
*Wed.
Wed;
Thurs.

Fr ".:
Fri.


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elude rare hands-on Wolf
Encounter Tours, starting
at 10 a.m. on Saturday. Hug
the skunks, feed the rac-
coons, and play with the
fox at the "Small Animal
Adventure." There will also
be hayrides, food, raffle
baskets, a bonfire on Sat-
urday evening, storytelling
and a "Dog-o-Ween" cos-
tume contest.
Camping near the wolves
is available by reserva-
tion with advance deposit,
starting at 2 p.m. Friday,
Oct. 21, with unlimited
primitive camping and a
limited number of electri-


cal hook-ups available.
For more ,information
about "Howl-O-Ween" and
Seacrest Wolf Preserve,


call 850-773-2897, email
seacrestwolfpack@yahoo.
corn or visit www.Seacrest
WolfPreserve.org.


SUBMITTED PHLU
The 10th annual Seacrest Wolf Preserve Howl-O-Ween is this
weekend in Chipley.


10/17 9-3-3
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Marianna High School

Class of'91 reunion set


Special to the Floridan

The Marianna High
School Class of '91 has
made plans for its 20-year
reunion.
Those who are interest-
ed in attending the class


reunion on Saturday,
Oct. 22, or riding in the
homecoming parade on
Friday, Oct. 21, are asked
to contact Ginger Pittman
at 209-2212. You can also
contact Nikki Maddox at
557-1701.


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3-8-2 7-2-6-5


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I ,WRAL"I


Saturday


10/15 5-10-24-38-43


SWednesday 10/19 Not available PBX PPxX

Saturday 10/15 3-9-36-41-42-44 extra 3
Wednesday 10/19 Notavailable x. xtraX
S For lottery Information, call (850) 487-77)7 or (900) 737-7777 .


Florida Lottery


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Lawsuit: Fla. students charged as non-residents


The Associated Press

MIAMI Caroline Roa was
born in Florida, graduated from
a Miami high school and has a
state voter's registration card
and driver's license. Yet when she
went to enroll in college, she was
told she would have to pay out-
of-state tuition. The reason? Her
father is an illegal immigrant.
"I was always told that if I
worked hard and did well in
school I could get a scholarship
to college," she said. "Instead of
having the chance to succeed as
otherFlorida residents have, my
efforts were unfairly blocked."
The Southern Poverty Law
Center filed a class action lawsuit
Wednesday on behalf of Roa and
four other students who were all
born in the United States. In each
case, their parent's immigration
status meant they were classified
as "non-residents" and charged
a significantly higher tuition.
Roa is now working two jobs
instead of going to college.
"This is not right or just and
it isn't the America I know," she


said.
The lawsuit was filed against
Florida education officials and
claims the policy discriminates
against citizens and violates the
Constitution. The Southern Pov-
erty Law Center estimates hun-
dreds of students are being over-
charged and thousands more,
like Roa, are unable to afford the
out-of-state tuition and forgo a
college education.
"This policy is hurting scores
of young Floridians who are try-
ing to go to college," said Miriam
Haskell, a lead attorney for the
Southern Poverty Law Center.
"They want to be doctors, they
want to be teachers, they want
to provide for their families and
support their community. And
this is their community."
A spokeswoman for the state
university system said they had
not received a copy of the law-
suit and could not comment.
The Board of Education did not
immediately respond to a re-
quest for comment.
The Florida policy has been
in place for several years, but


"Instead ofhaving the chance to succeed as other
residents have, my efforts were unfairly blocked


the Southern Poverty Law Cen-
ter said their class action law-
suit represents the first legal
challenge.
California had a similar issue
Sin which the citizen children of
illegal immigrants were being
charged as non-residents, but
the matter was resolved in favor
of the students through a con-
sent decree. Similarly, in Colo-
rado, the attorney general issued
a formal opinion in 2007 deter-
mining that legal residents of the
state were eligible for in-state
tuition even if their parents were
residing in the country illegally.
"Because it is the student, rath-
er than the parents, who is the
legal beneficiary of in-state tu-
ition status, the fact that the par-
ents may be in the country ille-
gally is not a bar to the student's
receipt of that benefit," Attorney


General John W. Suth
response to a questic
Colorado Departmen
Education.
Jerri Katzerman,
educational advocai
Southern Poverty L
said a Virginia police'
the Florida one has
lenged successfully
specific students.
Students who wan
a Florida public coll
versity but are classifi
residents" because o
ents are charged mor
the cost of tuition. Th
fects all students wh
the age of 24 and cla
pendents by parents
returns.
Roa was accepted
Dade College this ye;
found out she didn't


in-state tuition, even though she
Florida had lived in Miami-Dade County
." her entire life. According to the
Croline lawsuit, Roa couldn't show proof
Fla.student of her father's legal immigration
status and was therefore consid-
ered a non-resident.
ers ruled in She hopes to one day be able
n from the to afford college and study
it of Higher psychology.
Wendy Ruiz, another student
director of named in the lawsuit, was bor
cy for the in Miami and is an honors stu-
aw Center, dent at Miami. Dade College.
y similar to Because she is charged as an
been chal- out-of-state resident, she will
in favor of need three years instead of two
to complete her degree. The
it to attend lawsuit states she attempted to
ege or uni- apply to Florida International
led as "non- University, but was required to
f their par- submit information on her par-
e than triple ents' immigration status in order
te policy af- to file the application.
o are under "My mother has always taught
imed as de- me that if I want something that
on their tax bad to fight for it," said Ruiz, who
wants to go to medical school.
Ito Miami "All I want is to be treated the
ar, but soon same as every other Florida col-
qualify for lege student."


Faculty questions gov's


motive in posting salaries


The Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE Faculty leaders
Wednesday questioned Gov. RickScott's
motive for posting salaries of state uni-
versity employees on a website so soon
after he expressed doubts-about the
value of liberal arts degrees and floated
ideas for radical changes in tenure
A spokesman for Scott iaid it's just part
of the governor's effort to enhance the
transparency of state government. The
salary listings range from about $30,00j0
to $1.4 million. Most of the highest-paid
professors are medical doctors.
"You're starting to see a pattern here,"
United Faculty of Florida president Tom
Auxter said. "The pattern is he's looking
to cut funding for the universities."
Scott has made spending cuts a key
part of his campaign to create private-
sector jobs. He's focusing on higher edu_
cation now after trimming public school
spending and reducing pension costs by
shifting them from state and local gov-
ernments to public employees.
The governor last week drew push-
back, though, from anthropologists
when he asked if tax dollars should be
used "to educate more people who can't
get jobs in anthropology?" He used that
example to argue for more emphasis on
science, technology, engineering and
math, known as the STEM subjects.
He reiterated that theme in an inter-


view Wednesday on WSKY-FM, a radio
station serving Gainesville.
'cott noted his daughter,' Jordan Kan-
dah, has ah, anthropology degree but
couldn't find a job in that field She's pow,
studying for a, Master of Business Ad-
ministration degree.
'Let's make sure that our universities
aref first saying, 'Hey employers, what
sort. of jobs are out there?' so we can
make sure we tell our students what the:
job market is like,'" Scott said.
SLast week, Scott sent letters'to Florida's
11 public universities asking for a wide
range of information including how
many students are finding jobs and lists
of their highest-paid faculty members.
Scott also has been touting higher ed-
ucation proposals pushed by Texas Gov.
'ick Perry. They include basing tenure
decisions heavily on student ratings and
Show many students they teach.
To.Auxter, a University of Florida phi-
losophy professor, that proposal would
all't1ut abolish tenure, which university
Sfficfials say is vital for attracting top fac-*.
ulty members.
"Contrary to the misconception that
we are just a large-not-for-profit orga-
,nization and we are we're also in
arguably one of the most competitive in-
dustries known to man-- higher educa-
tion," State University System Chancel-
lor Frank Brogan told a legislative panel
,Wenesday.
Ia.


Store clerk kills would-be robber
The Associated Press Ackerman, said she was' alone briefly
during a shift change with her daughters,
TAMPA A convenience store manag- ages 1 and 2, when the man came in at
er grabbed a gun from under the counter- about 3 p.m.
and shot a would-be robber in the knee "I'm so thankful God saved my grand-
before the man scooped up the clerk's daughter and my grandbabies, because
infant daughter and tried to flee, sheriffs this guy was really vicious," Ackerman
deputies said Wednesday. said.
Daniel Ramont Hernandez, 32, died His granddaughter had taken a training
at hospital after the Tuesday afternoon course in which she was taught to shoot
shooting at Del's 24-Hour Food Store in a person in the Jegs to disable them, he
Naples, according to the Collier County said.
Sheriff's Office. The child wasn't hurt. Easterly was not hurt but was shaken
Hernandez came in store acting errati- up.
cally, causing 22-year-old manager Eliza- "She's pretty much in shock, but she
beth Easterly to be worried for her safety,. saved the baby," said Easterly's grand-
according to the sheriff's office. When mother, Nancy Ackerman.
Hernandez came around to her side of Calls to her cellphone rang unanswered
the counter, she grabbed a gun and shot Wednesday.
him once in the leg. Del Ackerman said his family has run
When she ran outside to alert a school the store continuously for 47 years. It
crossing guard, Hernandez grabbed the was closed while deputies processed the
stroller with Easterly's child and carried it crime scene, but reopened at about 2
toward the door. He put the stroller down, a.m. Wednesday.
ran outside and was tackled by another "I'm not going to let one person in the
man who was coming to work, the report United States close my doors," he said.
said. Hernandez has a lengthy arrest record
The shooting is still under in Collier County dating back to at least
investigation. 2002, the sheriff's office said.
Easterly's grandfather, store owner Del Naples is 170 miles south ofTampa.


Man gets 15 years for
fatally stabbing lover
WEST PALM BEACH
A South Florida man'
has been sentenced to 15
Years in prison for fatally
stabbing his cross-dress-
ing lover.
A Palm Beach County,
judge sentenced 25-year-
old Juan CarlosAtenco -
Camacho on Wednesday
after he pleaded guilty
to manslaughter. He had
been facing a second-de-
gree murder charge, which
carries a possible 30-year,
sentence.
The Palm Beach Post
reports that deputies ar-
rested Camacho in July ,
2010 after they say he con-
fessed to killing 33-year-
old Naum Rafael Mendez
and dumping his body.
Mendez was last seen
in February 2008, leaving
a Boca Raton restaurant-
where he worked. He was
wearing a red dress and
blond wig and carrying a
silver purse.
At the time of the killing,
authorities say Camacho
was married and also
having an affair with a 16-
year-old girl.

Convict found after
accidental release
MIAMI Authorities
say they've found a South
Florida convicted felon
after he was accidentally
released from the Miami-
Dade County Jail.
The Miami Herald
reports that 36-year-old
Dexter Davis was arrested
after going to the Uni-
versity of Miami Medical
Center's psychiatry ward.
Authorities say someone
in the ward recognized
SDavis from the TV news


Briefs
'Tesday night.
Corrections officials..
say Davis was released
Tuesday morning. He
was convicted Monday
of attempted murder
and armed burglary and
scheduled to b 'sentenced
in December.
Opa-locka plJice ar-
rested Davis i4 June 2009
After he stabbed his ex. ,
girlfriend numerous times
with a butcher knife Davis
had been in jail since his
' arrest:
Officials say an internal
investigationrhas been
launched to determine
how jailers accidently
released Davis.

Man pleads guilty to
BPspillt laims fraud
IMIAMI -AFlorida
man has pleaded guilty to
,attempting to defraud the


mercial fishing business.
Court records show
37-year-old Eliu Gonzalez
of Florida City pleaded
.guilty Wednesday tb a wire
fraud charge. He faces a
maximum 20-year prison
term when sentenced in
January.
BP created its $20 billion
claims fund to compen-
sate losses stemming from
the April 2010 oil rig explo-
sion and spill in the Gulf
of Mexico. In October last
year, prosecutors say Gon-
zalez submitted a claim of
more than $110,000.
Part of the claimed
losses included a series of
receipts from a Miami fish
market for yellowtail snap-
per that Gonzalez admit-
ted in court were false.
Gonzalez is the first
person in South Florida
convicted of a BP claims
fraud.


BP oil spill claims fund by
faking losses from a com- From wire reports

A .


S4.0
per-
Vehicl


~-L-----


- ~~ '


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


14A THURSDAY. OCTOBER 20, 2011


STATE







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN + www.jcfloridan.com


FDA cites dirty equipment in cantaloupe illnesses


The Associated Press

WASHINGTON Pools of wa-
ter on the floor and old, hard-to-
clean equipment at a Colorado
farm's cantaloupe packing facil-
ity were probably to blame for
the deadliest outbreak of food-
borne illness in 25 years, the
Food and Drug Administration
said Wednesday.
Government investigators
found positive samples of liste-
ria bacteria on equipment in the
Jensen Farms packing facility
and on frnit that had been held
there.
In a six-page assessment of the
conditions at the farm based on
investigators' visits in late Sep-
tember, the FDA said Jensen
Farms had recently purchased
used equipment that was cor-
roded, dirty and hard to clean.
The packing facility floors were
also constructed so they were
hard to clean, so pools of water
potentially harboring the.bacte-
ria formed close to the packing
equipment.
The equipment purchased


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Owner Eric Jensen examines a cantaloupe on the Jensen Farms near Holly,
Colo.,on Sept. 28.


in July, the same month the out-
break started was previously
used to wash and dry potatoes,
the agency said, and the listeria
"could have been introduced as
a result of past use of the equip-
ment," according to the report.
FDA officials said that they
are not concerned about simi-


lar listeria contamination in the
potatoes that were previously
processed on the equipment be-
cause those vegetables are rarely
eaten raw. Cooking can kill the
bacteria.
The agency said the contami-
nation likely happened in the
packing house, but the way the


cantaloupes were cooled after
being picked may have also con-
tributed to listeria growth.
The farm did not use a pro-
cess called "pre-cooling" that is
designed to remove some con-
densation, thus creating moist
conditions on the cantaloupe
rind that are ideal for listeria
bacteria growth. Listeria grows
in cool environments, unlike
most pathogens.
FDA said that samples of can-
taloupes in Jensen Farms' fields
were negative for listeria, but
bacteria coming off the field
may have initially introduced
the pathogen into the open-air
packing house, where it then
spread. Listeria contamination
often comes from animal feces
or decaying vegetation.
Another possible source of
contamination was a truck that
frequently hauled cantaloupe
to a cattle operation and was
parked near the packing house.
Contamination could have
come from the cattle operation
and then tracked into the house
* by.people or equipment, the re-


port said.
The Centers for Disease Con-
trol and Prevention says 123
people have been sickened in the
outbreak, including the 25 who
died. It is the deadliest known
outbreak of foodborne illness
in the U.S. since an outbreak of
listeria in Mexican-style cheese
in 1985.
The tainted fruit, which Jensen
Farms recalled in mid-Septem-
ber, should be off store shelves
by now. But the number of ill-
nesses may continue to grow
- symptoms of listeria can take
up to two months to appear. Bar-
bara Mahon of the CDC said that
the illnesses peaked from mid-
August through September.
The CDC on Tuesday con-
firmed a sixth death in Colorado
and a seco'id in New York. Indi-
ana, Kansas, Louisiana, Mary-
land, Missouri, Nebraska, New
Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas and
Wyoming have also reported
deaths.
FDA officials said Wednesday
that the agency has never visited
the farm to do an inspection.


"I think it's a mistake to continue No
Child Left Behind in any form or
fashion."
Sen. Rand Paul,
R-Ky.


Education makes


political comeback


in Washington


The Associated Press

WASHINGTON A rare
show of bipartisanship in
a divided Congress pro-
duced a deal to-fix an edu-
cation law long consid-
ered flawed, until a single
senator stalled progress
Wednesday.
The delay would be short
and would not deter the
committee working on
one of the most significant
overhauls of the No Child
Left Behind law since it
was passed in 2002, the
chairman said.
A little more than an
hour into the hearing by
the Senate Health, Educa-
tion, Labor and Pensions
Committee, Sen. Rand Paul
used a procedural maneu-
ver to put the brakes on the
discussion.
The renewed focus in
Washington on education
comes as the 2012 cam-
paign begins to unfold.
President Barack Obama
has chided Congress for
not acting to revise the law
and has told states they can
seek waivers from some
unpopular requirements.
He also has made saving
teachers' jobs an essential
part of his $447 billion jobs
plan.
The Senate committee
chairman, Iowa Democrat
Tom Harkin, and the top
Republican, Wyoming's
Mike Enzi, announced a
bipartisan bill on Monday
that seeks to give more
control over education to
states and local districts.
At the hearing, Harkin
and Enzi said they were
unhappy with parts of the
measure, but pleased they
could achieve a consensus
on the issue.
Paul, R-Ky., complained
thathewasn't given enough
time to review the more
than 800-page bill and said
there haven't been hear-
ings on the bill this year.
He said the federal gov-
ernment would retain too
much control over edu-
cation and that students
still would be tested every
year.
Paul used a procedural
maneuver to put a halt on
the hearing, citing a rule
that says a committee can-
not meet when the Sen-
ate is in session. That rule
typically is waived.
"I think it's a mistake to
continue No Child Left
Behind in any form or
fashion," Paul told the
committee.
Harkin said the com-
mittee had hearings last
year on the issue, and that
Paul's move would not de-


ter the committee's work.
He said the committee
could return to work as
early as Wednesday night
and that he would allow
Paul, who has indicated to
file more than 70 amend-
ments, to go ahead.
A coalition of 20 civil
rights, disability rights and
business groups, includ-
ing the. NAACP and the
Chamber of Commerce,
expressed criticism of the
overhaul.
They said "states would
not have to set any mea-
surable achievement and
progress targets or even
graduation rate goals"
and huge numbers of low-
achieving kids would slip
through the cracks.
Earlier, the administra-
tion said it wasn't pleased
that the bill left out a re-
quirement on teacher and
principal evaluations.
Obama said last month
that he was so frustrated
that Congress hadn't fixed
No Child Left Behind that
he was allowing states that
met certain conditions to
get around some parts of
the law. At least 39 states,
in addition to the District
of Columbia and Puerto
Rico, have told the Educa-
tion Department they in-
tend to seek a waiver.
A GOP-led House com-
mittee has forwarded three
bills that would revise the
law. But some of the more
contentious issues, such as
teacher accountability and
effectiveness, have not yet
been addressed.
Obama has made saving
teachers' jobs an essen-
tial part of his effort to sell
his $447 billion jobs plan.
But Senate Republican
leader Mitch McConnell
of Kentucky has compared
Obama's jobs plan to "bail-
outs" that perpetuate eco-
nomic problems, not solve
them.
TheWhite House has said
that nearly 300,000 jobs in
the education sector have
disappeared since 2008
and that Obama's plan
would support the hir-
ing or re-hiring of 400,000
educators.
When the president's jobs
plan was brought up in the
Senate last week, not a
single Republican senator
supported it and it died.
Democrats said they
would bring up parts
of it separately, starting
with the effort to save the
jobs of teachers and first
responders.
The chances of passing
the component on saving
jobs for teachers and first
responders appear dim.


1; .~ 1 $- ..77


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2011 5AF


NATIONAL.







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


16A THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2011


Obama teams up with wife to finish bus tour


The Associated Press

NORTH CHESTER-
FIELD, Va. President
Barack Obama teamed up
with his popular and per-
sonable wife Wednesday
on the final leg of a three-
day bus trip, seeking to use
her broad appeal to rally
support for elements of his
jobs bill and his re-election
campaign.
Michelle Obama's ap-
pearance on her husband's
driving tour through North
Carolina and Virginia,
two politically important
Southern states, comes
as she takes a more active
role in the 2012 campaign.
Her stated purpose
Wednesday was to help
the president announce a
commitment from several
companies to hire 25,000
veterans and military
spouses by the end of 2013.
The first lady has been
leading a national cam-
paign to rally the country
Around veterans.
But Mrs. Obama is also a
not-so-secret weapon for
the White House and the
Obama presidential cam-
paign. While her husband's
approval ratings have fall-
en to the mid- to low 40s,
the first lady's poll num-
bers remain high.
And the president, who
can sometimes come off
as professorial, is 'clearly


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
President Barack Obama stops to buy pumpkins at Wood's Orchard in Hampton, Va, on
Wednesday.


more at ease when his wife
is by his side.
"How lucky am I to
be married .to Michelle
Obama?" Obama said af-
ter being introduced by
his wife at an event at Joint
Base Langley-Eustis in
Virginia. ;
He offered advice to the
unmarried men in the au-
dience: "The whole goal is
to marry up. Try to improve
your gene pool."
SThe Obamas announced
that the American Logis-
tics Association, which
includes, major compa-
nies like Tyson Foods Inc.


and the Coca-Cola Co.,
pledged to hire more than
25,000 veterans and mili-
tary spouses by the end of
2013.
The president called for
bipartisan support for a
proposal in his jobs bill
that would give small busi-
nesses tax breaks if they
hire out-of-work veterans.
Larger tax breaks would go
to businesses that hire un-
employed wounded ser-
vice members.
"When I first proposed
this idea in a joint session
of Congress, people stood
up and applauded on both


sides of the aisle," Obama
said about tax credits to
encourage hiring of veter-
ans. "So when it comes for
a vote in the Senate, I ex-
pect to get votes from both
sides of the aisle. Don't just
applaud about it. Vote for
it."
Still, with his wife at his
side in a military, setting,
Obama's pitch for his jobs
bill was far less partisan
than it has been across his
bus tour of North Carolina
andVirginia.
He didn't target at length
the Republican lawmak-
ers who have voted against


his plan, promising more
broadly to keep push-
ing Congress to pass a bill
that's now been broken
into pieces.
From the military base,
the first lady joined her
husband on his impen-
etrable-looking, million-
dollar black bus as it hit
the road.
After a short drive, the
Obamas stopped off to
,buy pumpkins at a road-
side produce stand, one of
several unscheduled stops
the president made in the
two states.
Mrs. Obama has an easy
way with the public that
makes her a natural for
the retail, roadside politics
that are a staple of presi-
dential campaigns. She
chatted with shoppers at
the Wood's Orchard pro-
duce stand and hugged
the couple that owned the
store so frequently that
they appeared to be .old
friends, not strangers.
Mrs. Obama also joined
her husband for lunch with
a small group of veterans
at Anna's Pizza and Italian
Kitchen, a strip mall res-
taurant in Hampton, Va.
With her husband brac-
ing for a tough re-election
fight, the first lady has-
promised to put herself
into the campaign effort
like never before. Since
mid-May, she's headlined


more than 15 fundrais-
ers for her husband and
the Democratic Party. And
she's blasted out mass
emails to the party faith-
ful urging them to support
her husband.
After lunch in Hampton,
the first lady was headed to
St. Louis for the first game
of the World Series. Major
League Baseball is dedi-
cating the game to veter-
ans and their families, and
Mrs. Obama and Jill Biden,
wife of Vice President Joe
Biden, were scheduled to
participate in a pregame
ceremony.
The president, mean-
while, continued on to the
final stop on his bus trip,
a speech at a fire station
in North Chesterfield, Va.,
where he made one more
appeal for his jobs bill,
this time focusing on his
call for $35 billion in aid
for state and local govern-
ments in order to keep fire
fighters, police officers and
teachers on the job.
Republicans have criti-
cized Obama's bus trip as
being more about selling
the president's re-election
than solving the country's
economic woes. Senate
Minority Leader Mitch Mc-
Connell said Wednesday:
"Let's park the campaign
bus, put away the talking
points, and do something
to address this jobs crisis."


__ I_ Okla.judge blocks abortion law from taking effect


ITH ASOUUIAI U PRLSS
The dank sub-basement room in Philadelphia where four weak
and malnourished mentally disabled adults, one chained to
the boiler, were found locked inside on Saturday is shown
Monday.


Basement case


could be hate crime


The Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA The
case of four mentally dis-
abled adults locked up in
a basement crawl space in
an alleged scheme by their
captors to collect their So-
cial Security checks could
be among the first of its
kind prosecuted as a fed-
eral hate crime, an FBI of-
ficial said Wednesday.
The law was recently ex-
panded to include victims
with disabilities, and the
FBI is taking a broad look
at the complex, multi-state
case, said the bureau of-
ficial, who was not autho-
rized to discuss the case
publicly.
A fourth person was ar-
rested Wednesday on sus-
picion of kidnapping as
part of the alleged scheme.
Jean McIntosh, 32, is the
daughter of alleged ring-
leader Linda Weston. A
landlord described Mc-
Intosh as a former Army
nurse who lived in an
apartment above the base-
S ment with her two teenage
children.
McIntosh was arrested a
day after. Philadelphia po-
lice took 10 young people
linked to the case into pro-
tective custody.
The six juveniles and
four young adults found
Tuesday, ages 2 to 19, are
thought to be related to
the suspects and perhaps
some of the victims, police
spokesman Lt. Raymond
Evers said. Authorities are
Conducting DNA tests and


obtaining birth certifi-
cates to try to determine
the nature of the various
relationships.
Police described the 19-
year-old as Weston's niece.
McIntosh was arrested
around 3:45 a.m. after de-
tectives questioned her
about the case. Weston had
arrived at her apartment
building from Florida this
month with two men, the
four disabled adults and
others in tow, according
to neighbors, the landlord
and police.
McIntosh is expected to
be arraigned later on kid-
napping, conspiracy and
other charges, District At-
torey Seth Williams said.
It's.not immediately clear
if she has an attorney. Ac-
cordingto her landlord, she'
had a key to the basement.
The disabled adults, who
were found in a locked
boiler room by the land-
lord Saturday. Police be-
lieve Weston had been
stealing their Social Secu-
rity disability checks. They
found dozens of other So-
cial Security and identifi-
cation cards in a search of
McIntosh's apartment.
Weston was legally dis-
qualified from cashing the
victims' government dis-
ability checks because of
her criminal past.
But she apparently did
anyway, enabled in part
by a lack of accountabil-
ity and follow-through by
government agencies and
police in Philadelphia and
West Palm Beach, Fla.


The Associated Press

OKLAHOMA CITY
-. -An Oklahoma judge
on Wednesday temporar-
ily blocked from taking
effect a new law designed
to reduce the number of
abortions performed in
the state by restricting the
ways in which doctors can
treat women with abor-
tion-inducing drugs.
Oklahoma County Dis-
trict Judge Daniel Owens
issued the ruling after a
conference call with attor-
neys for both sides.
SThe temporary injunc-
tion prevents the bill from
going into effect on Nov. 1.
Passed earlier this year by
the GOP-controlled Legis-
lature and signed by Gov.
Mary Fallin, the measure
requires doctors to follow
the strict guidelines and
protocols authorized by
the U.S. Food and Drug
Administration, and pro-
hibits off-label uses of
the drugs. It also requires
doctors to examine the
women, document cer-
tain medical conditions
and schedule follow-up
appointments.
Opponents of the mea-
sure say the off-label use
of drugs such as chang-
ing a recommended dos-
age or prescribing it for
different symptoms than
the drug- was initially
approved for is com-
mon, and that the mea-
sure would prevent doc-
tors from using their best
medical judgment.
"We're thrilled that wom-
en in Oklahoma will con-
tinue to be able to access
medical care that accounts
for scientific evidence,
sound medical judgment
and advancements in
medicine," said Michelle
Movahed, an attorney


Patsy Sapp,
Licensed Agent


for the New York-based
Center for Reproductive
Rights, which challenged
the law on behalf of Nova
Health Systems, a Tulsa-
based abortion provider,
and the Oklahoma Coali-
tion for Reproductive Jus-
tice, a nonprofit abortion-
rights group.
Similar laws approved
in North Dakota and Ohio
have been delayed pend-
ing legal challenges, Mo-
vahed said.
The North Dakota
lawsuit says that state's
law would prevent doc-
tors from using the drug
misoprostol because it's
labeled for treatment of
stomach ulcers. It's one of
two drugs that are admin-
istered in combination to
induce abortions.
Attorneys for Oklahoma
contend that the drugs
are dangerous and should'
be used only in strict
accordance with FDA
guidelines.
"To date, at least eight
American women have
died from mifepristone
abortions," Assistant At-
torney General Victoria
Tindall wrote in the state's
response to the center's
lawsuit. "The dangerous
risks of mifepristone de-
mand strict adherence
to the FDA-approved
protocol."
Attorney General Scott
Pruitt said in a statement
that the judge's deci-
sion "is unfortunate for
the state and our public
health, but it is not a sur-
prise with new legislative
provisions being tested."
Movahed said as many
as 21 percent of all drugs
are prescribed for off-
label use. In the case of
drug-induced abortions,
she said a common regi-
men is to use one-third


Tim Sapp,
Broker/Owner,
Realtor


of the FDA-recommended
amount of the abortion
drug mifepristone in con-
junction with misopros-
tol, which has been deter-
mined to be effective for a
variety of other purposes
than gastric ulcers. She
said in the decade since
the mifepristone FDA la-
bel was approved, numer-
ous studies have shown
the combination is safer
and more effective.
"The evidence sup-
porting these alternative
regimens are of such high
quality that the American
College of Obstetricians
and Gynecologists gave
these alternative regi-
ments their highest pos-
sible recommendation,"
Movahed said.
Movahed also disputed
the state's assertion that
abortion drugs caused the
deaths of women.
"Those cases were in-
vestigated by both the
FDA and the (Centers for
Disease Control and Pre-
vention) and there was
absolutely no causal rela-
tionship found between
those unfortunate deaths
and the medications that
had been used," she said.
The author of the Okla-
homa measure, Repub-
lican Rep. Randy Grau of
Edmond, said he was dis-
appointed with the judge's
decision.


"It's the wrong decision.
It's one that I think puts
Oklahomans at risk," Grau
said. "This bill is about pa-
tient protection and safe-
ty, and the judge has put
a stop to those protective
measures that the Leg-
islature overwhelmingly
supported.
"If they believe the FDA
protocol needs to be
changed, then go to the
FDA and get it changed."
Oklahoma also passed
a law last year that would
require women seeking
abortions to first have an
ultrasound and listen to a
detailed description of the
fetus. The Center for Re-
productive Rights is chal-
lenging that law as well,
and it also has been tem-
porarily suspended while
the case is ongoing.
"What we see is a Leg-
islature that has time and
again said that they want
to score political points
off of a very difficult and
emotionally charged is-
sue," said Ryan Kiesel, a
former state lawmaker
and nowthe director of the
Oklahoma chapter of the
American Civil Liberties
Union. "And they're will-
ing to do so at the expense
of women's health and at
the expense of taxpayers,
who are on the hook to
fund the defense of these
pieces of legislation."


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Riots continue in Greece as



austerity steps get 1st approval


The Associated Press

ATHENS, Greece Hundreds of
youths smashed and looted stores
in central Athens and clashed with
riot police during a massive anti-
government rally against painful
new austerity measures that won
initial parliamentary approval in a
vote Wednesay night.
The rioting came on the first day
of a 48-hour nationwide general
strike that brought services in much
of Greece to a standstill, grounding
flights for hours, leaving ferries tied
up in port and shutting down cus-
toms offices, stores and banks.
More than 100,000 people took to
the streets of the Greek capital to
demonstrate against the austerity
bill, which includes new tax hikes,
further pension and salary cuts, the
suspension on reduced pay of 30,000
public servants and the suspension
of collective labor contracts.
Creditors have demanded the'
measures before they give Greece
more funds from a 110 billion ($152
billion) package of bailout loans
from other eurozone countries and
the International Monetary Fund.
Greece says it will run out of money
in mid-November without the 8
billion ($11 billion) installment.
But Greek citizens said they al-
ready are reeling from more than
one-and-a-half years of austerity
measures.
"We just can't take it any more..
There is desperation, anger and bit-
terness,", said Nikos Anastasopou-
los, head of a workers' union for an
Athens municipality, as he joined
the demonstration early in the day.
The bill won initial approval in
the 300-member Parliament late
Wednesday, with 154 deputies vot-
ing in favor on principle and 141
against. A second vote, on the bill's
articles, is due today. Only after that
procedure will the bill have passed.
A communist party-backed union
has vowed to encircle Parliament
Thursday in an attempt to prevent
deputies from entering the building
for the procedure.
The new measures have even
prompted some lawmakers from
the governing Socialists to threaten
not to vote for at least some of the
articles in the bill. But Finance Min-
ister. Evangelos Venizelos insisted


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
A protester throws a petrol bomb at riot police during clashes outside the Greek
Parliament in Athens on Wednesday.


there was no choice but to accept
the hardship.
"We have to explain to all these
indignant people who see their
lives changing that what the coun-
try is experiencing is npt the worst
stage of the crisis," he said in Parlia-
ment. "It is an anguished and nec-
essary effort to avoid- the ultimate,
deepest and harshest level of the
crisis. The difference between a dif-
ficult situation and a catastrophe is
immense."
Hours before Wednesday's vote,
one of Athens' largest demonstra-
tions in years degenerated into vio-
lence as masked and hooded youths
pelted riot police outside Parliament
with gasoline bombs and chunks of
marble smashed from' buildings,
metro stops and sidewalks.
. Police responded with tear gas arid
stun grenades. Authorities said 50
police were injured in the clashes,
along with at least three demonstra-
tors, while 33 people were detained
for questioning or arrested for al-
leged involvement in the rioting. At
least three journalists covering the
riots were also slightly hurt.
Long after Wednesday's demon-
stration was over, violence contin-
ued, with police fighting running.
street battles with youths setting up
burning barricades along the back
streets near Athens' main Syntagma
Square and near the tourist area of
Monastiraki.


Thick black smoke billowed from
burning trash and bus stops, and
debris lay strewn along the capital's
broad avenues. A hurled gasoline
bomb set fire to a sentry post used
by the ceremonial presidential
guard at the Tomb of the Unknown
Soldier outside Parliament.
In Greece's second city of Thes-
saloniki, protesters smashed the
facades of about 10 shops that de-
fied the strike and remained open,
as well as five banks and cash ma-
chines. Police fired tear gas and
threw stun grenades.
The general strike is set to con-
tinue Thursday, with all sectors -
from dentists, hospital doctors and
.lawyers to tax office workers, taxi
drivers, prison guards, teachers and
dock workers staying off the job.
Air traffic controllers scaled back
their strike from 48 hours to 12, al-
lowing flights to take off and land
after noon on Wednesday.
Meanwhile, European countries
are trying to work out a broad solu-
tion to the continent's deepening
debt crisis, before a weekend sum-
mit in Brussels. It became clear ear-
lier this year that the initial bailout
for Greece was not working as well
as had been hoped, and European
leaders agreed on a second, $151
billion bailout. But key details of
that rescue fund, including the par-
ticipation of the private sector, re-
main to be worked out.


Euro crisis: German, French, IMF, ECB leaders meet


The Associated Press

FRANKFURT, Germany
-Theleaders of Germany,
France, the IMF and the
European Central Bank
worked Wednesday to
prepare for a crucial Euro-
pean summit that markets
worldwide hope will save
the 17-nation euro cur-
rency and find a solution
to the region's deepening
debt crisis.
- The last-minute meeting
in Frankfurt came amid
mounting pressure on Eu-
ropean leaders to shore up
their banks, slash debts
and halt market volatil-
ity with a comprehensive,
dramatic plan at the EU
summit Sunday.
Expectations are fluc-
tuating wildly, as are fi-
nancial markets, amid
reports about the scope of
the plan. The meeting in
Germany ended without
the officials making state-
ments to journalists.
Retiring European Cen-
tral Bank President Jean-
Claude Trichet said the
eurozone's debt crisis re-
quires "immediate action"
in coming days and de-


fended the euro as a bul-
wark against inflation that
benefits ordinary people.
At .an event marking
Trichet's retirement, Ger-
man Chancellor Angela
Merkel repeated her warn-
ing that "if the euro fails,
then Europe fails. But we
will not let that happen."
She said the summit on
Sunday "will not be the
end point of regaining
trust. It will be a point at
which we act, but much
more will follow."
French President Nico-
las Sarkozy arrived at
Frankfurt's Old Opera on
Wednesday night for what
a French official called an
"informal working meet-
ing" with Merkel, IMF
chief Christine Lagarde,
incoming.ECB chief Mario
Draghi, EU President Her-
man Van Rompuy and Eu-
ropean Commission Presi-
dent Jose Manuel Barroso.
Sarkozy, Merkel and other
officials left several hours
later without speaking be-
fore television cameras.
Sarkozy had earlier told
a Cabinet. meeting that
the summit in Brussels "is
a crucial moment, for Eu-


rope'and for France," gov-
ernment spokeswoman
Valerie Pecresse said.
Eurozone officials are
trying to contain a crisis
over too much debt in
some countries, and re-
lated fears that a country
might default and cripple
banks who hold its bonds.
A poetry fan, Trichet
quoted the German writer
Goethe, saying:,"To know
is not enough. To intend
is not enough. We must do
it!"
"I think this applies ad-
mirably to the sense of ac-
tion which should inspire
Europe in coming days,"
he said,
Earlier this week, Ger-
man finance chief Wolf-'
gang Schaeuble said the
measures to beannounced
Sunday would not mark
the end of the eurozone
debt crisis and that some
parts may need more time
to be ironed out.
The hope has been that
eurozone governments are
preparing a three-pronged
solution to the debt crisis
- measures to boost the
firepower of their fund to
bail out weak states, a re-
capitalization of a large.
part of the banking sector,
and a plan to get banks to
take a bigger hit on their
Greek debt holdings.
France and Germany
disagree on the last point.
Germany is pushing for
banks to accept cuts of
50 percent to 60 percent
on their Greek bond-
holdings, while France is
insisting that only tech-
nical revisions should
be made to a prelimi-
nary agreement reached
with private investors in
July. That deal called for
a 21 percent loss on the


bonds.
Markets recovered after
The Guardian.newspaper
reported that France and
Germany : were putting
the finishing touches on
a massive expansion of
the bailout fund, possibly
to 3 trillion ($4.1 trillion)
from the current 440
billion.
German Finance Minis-
tryspokesmanMartinKot-
thaus, however, said there
was no agreement yet in
the eurozone on how to
boosi the lending capaci-
ties of the bailout fund
- the European Financial
and Stability Facility, or
EFSF beyond the 440
billion it has available.
Expanding the bailout
fund is not an option, but
the aim is to maximize
the possible impact of the
committed funds, he said.
"The question is: how
can we maximize the ef-
ficiency of those 440 bil-
lion?" he said.
Kotthaus described as
inaccurate media reports
that Schaeuble had sug-
gested Berlin was pre-
pared to use an insurance
model to boost the lend-
ing capacity to 1 trillion.
If Schaeuble used the 1
trillion figure in a briefing
with lawmakers, he may
have used it only as an ex-
ample to illustrate how the
idea of leveraging the EFSF
could work, he added.
"We have extremely in-
tense discussions, con-
ferences and telephone
conferences" to prepare
this weekend's summit,
he said. "We are still in
the middle of the discus-
sions. We are working un-
der high pressure. We will
certainly have a solution
in the coming days."


Former members can

join alumni band for

MHS Homecoming


Special to the Floridan

Marianna High School
Band Director Craig Bean
invites all past members of
The Pride to be part of an
alumni band at the MHS
homecoming football
game on Friday, Oct. 21.
Alumni,are asked to wear
jeans and purple shirts,
and meet in the northern
end zone of Bulldog Sta-
dium on Caverns Road at
5:45 p.m. to'warm up with
the band.
During the pre-game
show, alumni will march
onto the field with the
current band and play the
"Star Spangled Banner"
and the school fight song.


Trip
Fr6m Page lA

them know we are inter-
ested in their business."
Scott will then travel to
Sao Paulo at the head of a
delegation of nearly 200
people, including Jackson-
ville Mayor Alvin Brown,.
Broward County Mayor
Suzanne Gunzberger, and
officials from various Flor-
ida ports and airports and
companies such as Disney
and Florida Power & Light.
Those also coming on the
trip include officials from
the University of Miami,
the president of Broward
College, lawyers, and well-
known Tallahassee fixtures
such as the president of
t.ie Florida Chamber of
Commerce and a top offi-
cial with the Florida Asso-
ciation of Realtors.
Scott said he plans to
spend most of his time in
Sao Paulo meeting with
companies that do busi-
ness in Florida or are con-
sidering it. He also will
inaugurate a business
matchmaking and trade
expo that Enterprise Flor-
ida has put together.
Manny. Mencia, Enter-
prise Florida's senior vice
president of International
Trade and Business Devel-
opment, said Wednesday
that international trade is
one of the state's strongest
economic sectors and ac-
counts for 16 percent of
the state's economy and
nearly 1 out of every 6
jobs. Florida is the nation's
fourth-largestexporter.
Mencia said that inter-
national trade will likely
be a large driver, of the'
state's economy in the next
decade and that in many
ways "Brazil is Florida's
China" when it comes to
trade possibilities in the


Dozier
From Page 1A

Brunner to use in the city
around holiday time. In
Crisp's opinion, these
decorations are some of
the more impressive dona-
tions to the Trust, just for
the effect they've had on
the community.
"These (Dozier) children
are now in their 50s, but
these decorations are the
things they write about
their time in Marianna,"


During the game, alumni
will sit with the band in the
stands, play along with pep
songs, and participate in
Pride traditions such as the
"Give Me a J" chant and the
singing of the. alma mater.
Those needing to borrow
school instruments and
auxiliary items are asked to
call in advance to inquire
about availability.
Td indicate interest in
participating or check
equipment availability,
call Bean or Assistant Band
Director Raymond Walton
at 482-1317 or email craig.
bean@jcsb.com.
For music, contact Kristy
Smithatkristylynnesmith@
gmail.com or 209-1077.


future..
"Brazil is emerging as
one of the great expanding
economies," Mencia said.
"Florida could be one of
the great beneficiaries of
that expansion."
Sean Snaith, a University
of Central Florida econo-
mist, said it makes sense
for Florida to build on its
relationship with Brazil.
"I think it's certainly a
relationship we want to
foster and it's an economy
that has enjoyed a more
robust recovery than our
own," Snaith said.
I First Lady Ann Scott will
join Scott on the trade mis-
sion, as will members of
the governor's staff.
The costs for Scott's trip
are being divided up be-
tween public and.private
sources.
Visit Florida will use state
dollars to pay for the hotel
and meals of the governor
and his staff during their
trip to.Rio de Janeiro.
Enterprise Florida is pay-
ing the airfare for both
Scott and his wife to Brazil,
but a spokesman for the
agency said it would use
private donations not
state money for the ex-
penses. Enterprise Florida
will also pick up other trav-
el costs for the governor
when he is in Sao Paulo.
The two aides accompa-
nying the governor to Bra-
zil as well as a security de-
tail will have its costs paid
by the state.
Scott visited Panama and
Canada earlier this year.
In Canada, Scott met with
more than 130 companies,
while his visit to Panama
focused mainly on the ex-.
pansion of the Panama
Canal. Scott wants to use
limited state dollars to
help ports prepare for the
canal expansion, which
will allow larger ships into
the Gulf of Mexico.


Crisp said.
The Trust will be invento-
rying the rest of the items
donated. They will sell
some items and keep oth-
ers. Some will be placed in
its museum at the Davis-
West House at 4448 Put-
nam St., which is open by
appointment. Others will
be held for any potential
museum that is built in
Marianna.
"We just hope to per-
petuate some of the good
memories and the good
things that were done in
Dozier," Crisp said.


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Main Street Marianna Director Charlotte Brunner poses with a
number of Christmas decorations used on the Dozier campus
during the 1960s and 1970s.


Pinerest

3720 Caverns Road Marianna, FL 32446-1806 (850) 482-3964


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1There were no

obituaries or,

death notices

submitted to the

Floridan as of the

deadline at 4 p.m.

yesterday.


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2011 7AF


LOCRL/INTERNRTIONAL






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Iran's supreme leader ups


fight with Ahmadinejad


The Associated Press
TEHRAN, Iran In the ongoing politi-
cal skirmishes among Iran's leadership,
it was the equivalent of bringing out the
heavy ammunition: The country's most
powerful figure warning that the post
of elected president could someday be
scrapped.
Although no overhauls appear on the
immediate horizon after Supreme Leader
Ayatollah Ali Khamenei's comment he
spoke only vaguely about possibilities in
the "distant future" the mere mention
of eliminating Iran's highest elected of-
fice shows the severity and scope of the
power struggle between Khamenei and
President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad.
For months, the ruling theocracy has
been piling pressure onAhmadinejad and
arresting his allies for attempts to chal-
lenge the near-absolute authority of the
cleric-ruled system that .has controlled
Iran since the 1979 Islamic Revolution.
The blunt words by Khamenei on Sunday
suggest a twofold agenda: Further tight-
ening the lid on Ahmadinejad and show-
ing others in the wings that Iran's rulers
are ready to take drastic measures to pro-
tect what's theirs.
"There is bad blood," said Mehrzad
Boroujerdi, who follows Iranian affairs at
Syracuse University. "Khamenei is trying.
to make it very clear that the system can
only handle so much discord and that he
holds the stronger cards."
It also marks one of the first clear hints
of the ruling clerics' hardball strategies
for parliamentary elections in March.
Khamenei and his allies are expected to
use their many tools, including the abil-
ity t6 vet and block candidates, to try to
steamroll Ahmadinejad's backers and
push the president farther into the politi-
cal margins.
The ruling power structure in Iran,
which includes not only hard-line cler-
ics but also the hugely influential Revo-
lutionary Guard, appears increasingly
eager to snuff out the internal bickering.
It's seen as an unwelcome distraction as
the country confronts critical issues such
as whether to restart nuclear negotiations
with the West, complaints about its hu-
man rights record and U.S. allegations
that a special unit of the Guard was linked
to a plot to assassinate the Saudi ambas-
sador in Washington.
Hardliners still want more punishment
against Ahmadinejad for actions viewed
as political hubris including a startling


S THE ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE PHOTO
in this Aug. 29, 2010 file photo, Iranian
supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei (left)
and President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, talk
during a meeting of cabinet and supreme
leader in Tehran, Iran.
10-day boycott of Cabinet meetings this
spring to protest Khamenei's choice for
intelligence minister.
Dozens of Ahmadinejad's supporters
have been arrested in the backlash. So far,
the crackdown has spared Ahmadinejad's
chief of staff and in-law relation Es-
fandiar Rahim Mashaei, who has been
denounced as the head of a "deviant cur-
rent" that is perceived as questioning the
system of clerical rule. Some have even
claimed Mashaei employed black magic
"spells" to fog Ahmadinejad's mind.
In June, Ahmadinejad railed against his
opponents and Khamenei by exten-
sion for launching a "politically moti-
vated" campaign and vowed to stand by
Mashaei, whose daughter is married to
the president's son.
There is nothing at the moment to sug-
gest Khameneiwould attempt to drop the
presidency in favor of a prime minister
picked by parliament which would re-
quire a change of Iran's constitution.
But it could reflect the frustrations
among the ruling clerics after clashing
with presidents for more than a decade:
First the reformist efforts of Mohammad
Khatami from 1997-2005 and then the
growing ambitions of Ahmadinejad, who
helped crush the reform movement but
has also tried to carve out hisown power
base at the expense of the supreme lead-
er. Ahmadinejad finishes his second and
final term in June 2013.
Under Iran's Islamic republic system,
the president and parliament are elected.
But the system is overseen by the unelect-
ed clerical hierarchy, which is in charge of
the powerful judiciary.


I ITHL AuCIATI LU DPRES
U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton meets Libyan soldiers at the steps of her C-17
military transport upon her arrival in Tripoli in Libya, on Tuesday.


Libyans fight against


last Gadhafi holdouts


The Associated Press
SIRTE, Libya Libyan revolution-
ary forces fought building by building
Wednesday against the final pocket
of resistance in Moammar Gadhafi's
hometown the last major city in Libya
to have been under the control of forces
loyal to the fugitive leader.
But while Libya's transitional leader-
ship worked to consolidate control over
the entire country, the country's acting.
prime minister warned in a newspaper
interview that Gadhafi can still cause
trouble from his hiding place.
Mahmoud Jibril was quoted by the
pan-Arab Asharq al-Awsat Tuesday as
saying that the ousted leader is mov-
ing between Niger, Algeria and the vast
southern Libyan desert and has been
trying to recruit fighters from Sudan to
-help him establish a separate state in the
south, or to march to the north and de-
stabilize the new regime.
The report could not be confirmed,
but it underscored fears that the inabil-
ity to catch Gadhafi, who escaped with,
two of his sons after revolutionary forces
swept into Tripoli in late August, would
allowhim and his supporters to wage an
insurgency.
"Gadhafi has two options: Either to
destabilize any new regime in Libya or
to declare a separate state in the south,"
Jibril was quoted as saying, adding there
was evidence about this but he didn't
elaborate.
Suggesting that the U.S. also was con-


cerned about the possibility, Secretary of
State Hillary Rodham Clinton said during
a visit to Tripoli Tuesday that she hoped
Gadhafi would be captured or killed.
In Tripoli, meanwhile, Libya's transi-
tional government said it has formally
recognized the Syrian opposition's um-
brella group as the country's legitimate
representative, making it the first coun-
try to do so.
Hassan al-Sughayer, a member of
Libya's National Transitional Council,
announced the decision in Tripoli after
meeting with members of the Syrian
National Council, a broad-based op-
position group that was formed in Sep-
tember. The Syrians were in the Libyan
capital to drum up support for their 7-
morth-old uprising against President
Bashar Assad.
Although two months have passed
since Gadhafi fled Tripoli, Libya's new
leaders have refrained from declaring
national "liberation" until the fall of
Sirte, which Gadhafi transformed from a
fishing village into a modern city after he
seized power in 1969.
On Wednesday, Wissam bin Hmade,
the commander of one of the revolu-
tionary brigades from the eastern city
of Benghazi, said they had the Gadhafi
supporters corralled in a 700 square me-
ter residential area but were still facing
heavy rocket and gunfire from snipers
holed up in surrounding buildings.
It is unclear whether loyalists who
slipped out of the besieged cities of Bani
Walid and Sirte might continue the fight.


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% Lady Pirates


Sneads wins big over Blountstown


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Sneads' Head Coach Sheila Roberts
talks'to the Lady Pirates during a
timeout at a recent game.


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Sneads Lady Pirates
picked up their third straight win
Tuesday night at home, taking a
three-set victory over the Blount-
stown Lady Tigers in Sneads.
Sneads won by scores of 25-
21, 25-14, and 25-13 to earn the
match victory.
Jordan Jackson led the way for


the Lady Pirates with 12 kills and
also tied with Logan Neel for a
team-best two block-kills.
Yonna Bell added six kills and
Neel three.
BeccaAaron had a terrific night
all around, leading the team in
service points with 22, ace serves
with seven, assists with 17, and
digs with 14.
Emily Jones had 13 digs and
a team-high 21 serve receives,


while Brandy Strickland added
12 digs, and Jackson 10.
Jones and Jackson each had
four ace serves.
It was the second time this sea-
son that the Lady Pirates have
beaten its former district nem-
esis Blountstown, which Sneads
coach Sheila Roberts is still a re-
warding feat.
"It's always good for us to beat
Blountstown, and we beat them


pretty decisively," she said. "We
were a little sluggish in the first
game, but we seemed to pick it
up as the match went on. But it
was good to beat them the way
we did. That's possibly a team
we could face in regionals if we
make it out of district."
Sneads will finish the regu-
lar season tonight with a road
See PIRATES, Page 2B


CHIPOwL BRSIT rL




Back with purpose


MARKSKINNER/FLORIDAN


Leah Spears makes a shot during practice Wednesday at Chipola College.


Lady Indians look for return to postseason


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

After four straight appearances


ONLINE
Check out video
highlights on www.


"We want to be able to follow
through on what we tell the
Zw7o ffffnmwsjmywnr vMnifs


Marianna Volleyball


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Marianna's Tia Bass gets ready to send the ball back during a game
against Holmes County Monday night.



MHS girls beat


Altha in finale


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Marianna Lady Bull-
dogs took a three-set win
over the Altha Lady Wildcats
on Tuesday night in their
regular season finale, win-
ning by scores of 25-16, 25-
18, and 25-20.1
Aerial Folsom had a big
night for the Lady Bulldogs,
leading the way with 21
service points, five aces, no
serving errors, and a team-
high 32 assists.
"She was pretty much
flawless," Marianna coach
Belinda Christopher said of
Folsom.
Linsey Basford had the
team lead in kills with nine,


while Porsha Morgan and
Tia Bass each had six.
Megan Tillman had 15 ser-
vice points and two aces,
and Morgan had 11 service
points and four aces.
Morgan and Ashtin Mc-
Mullian each had two digs,
and Whitney Lipford had
one.
Bass and Morgan each had
a block.
The match win gave Mari-
anna the series edge over
Altha for the season after
the clubs split the first two
meetings.
"Altha has a pretty good
program," Christopher said.
"They've got two or three
See MHS, Page 2B


Marianna Golf


Three Bulldogs head

to regional tourney


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com


in the FCCAA state tournament jcfloridan.com thosekids had to go through Three arianna golfers
from 2005-2009, including three qualified for the regional
state titles, the Chipola Lady In- ed (O'Neil), Ance (Celmina), and for two years is a driving tournament Tuesday after-
dians missed out on the postsea- (Jasmine Shaw), we told them force for me on a daily basis noon at Indian Springs Golf
son the last two seasons. they would have an opportunity to get back there." Course, while the Marianna
The Chipola women will try to play for a national champion- David Lane, boys team fell just short.
to lean on balance, increased ship every year, and get to play Chipola coach Kaidd Golden qualified for
depth, and improved chemistry in the state tournament and be the Bulldog boys with a score
to try to make a return to tour- a state champion. Unfortunate- Forwards Jelleah Sydney and of 88 in the 18-hole event
nament basketball in the 2011- ly, we weren't able to give them Shanay Corbett return after to take ninth overall out of
2012 season, that experience, and that was red-shirting last season, and La- 29 golfers. He was the only
Chipola finished 18-11 last disappointing. tivian imports Kristine Brance MHS boy to make it out of
year and 6-6 in the Panhandle "We want to be able to follow and Anita Pecurcika will all be district, but two Bulldog girls
Conference despite a 15-4 start through on what we tell the kids. counted on to provide perimeter qualified in Caitlyn Carpen-
to the season. Remembering what those kids shooting, ter and Caroline Rogers.
After an injury-ravaged season had to go through for two years Lane said he liked the make- The girls' tournament was
in 2009-2010, the Lady Indians is a driving force for me on a dai- up of his team, but there was cut to nine holes due to in-
were again hit by a costly injury, ly basis to get back there. They still a lot of work to do before clement weather, and Car-
as sophomore star point guard left the program in good shape, the season starts on Nov. 1 in penter shot a 52 to take third,
Ty O'Neil had her season ended so it's up to us and myself to con- Melbourne. and Rogers came in sixth
before the start of conference tinue that building process." "We're trying to get a little with a 59.
play due to a knee injury. The Lady Indians return two cleaner offensively," he said. "Caitlyn had a real good
If the Lady Indians can avoid regular rotation players from last "This group has a lot of good performance, and so did
any more devastating injury season in 6 foot, 6 inch center pieces and good skills. It's just a Caroline and Kaidd,"' Mari-
losses this season, Chipola coach Jeniece Johnson and 5 foot, 11 matter of time to put it together. anna coach Scott Wiggins
David Lane said he thinks he has inch forward Sara Djassi, both You have to rely on trust and tim- said. "It's a tribute to the
a team fully capable of compet- of whom averaged around seven ing, andyou develop those things work they put in to get there.
ing for a Panhandle title and a points per game last year. with a lot of reps and just being They've been working hard at
state title. They'll be joined by a pair of as familiar with one another and it and it's showing. Hopefully
"Obviously, that's always the impact transfers in former Mid- as confident as you can. we can go over to regionals
goal," the coach said. "The dis- land point guard Denaya Brazzle "We're trying to push them a and improve our scores."
appointing part of the last two and former Garden City forward Golden's score of 88 was
years was that when we recruit- O'Neal Sessions. See INDIANS, Page 2B especially impressive given
i ,- ;,


the rainy conditions.
"Kaidd had a real good
score in those conditions,"
Wiggins said. "Everybody
had to compete in the same
conditions, but it'sjust tough.
The kids played as well as
they could play consider-
ing the conditions. They still
played their butts off and did
what they could."
The Marianna boys shot
a 390 as a team, which was
30 strokes off the third place
finish they needed to move
on as a team. Still, Wiggins
said he was happy with the
year his club had, as it fin-
ished 8-4 overall.
"I think we had a good
season," he said. "The kids
played hard and gave it their
best. It just shows we've still
got some work to do over the
summer to get better. The
kids just have to get after it
again and get better. I think
we've got a good nucleus
coming back next year and
a couple coming up from the
middle school. I think it was
a successful year and we'll
have another good year next
year."
Regionals will be Tuesday
in Pensacola.

i


~I~


V-41







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


NFL in London


1HI I l Ift[L I I
The Tampa Bay Buccaneers warm up during a training session, Bagshot, west of London,
Wednesday. The Buccaneers will face the Bears at London's Wembley stadium on Sunday.



Bucs QB Freeman hopes


for better results this time


The Associated Press

BAGSHOT, England -
Josh Freeman expects his
second game at Wembley
to be a lot different from
his first.
The Tampa Bay quarter-
back made his NFL debut
in London in 2009, com-
ing on aq a backup in the
fourth quarter to run the
-clock out when the Buc-
caileers took their seventh
straight loss in a blowout
against New England..
That game now "seems
ages ago," Freeman said
Wednesday.
Much has happened in
two years.
When Freeman returns
to Wembley on Sunday, he
is the established starter,


the Bucs are 4-2 and no
one is expecting them to
be a pushover against the
Chicago pears (3-3).
This time around, Free-
man may not even worry
about who is staring back
at him from across the
line of scrimmage.
"I remember it was cool.
It was a great atmosphere
at Wembley," Freeman
said about his experience
in 2009. "And then I re-
menber Junior Seau be-
ing right across from me.
But now I feel great, confi-
dent. I know exactly what
I'm seeing, and not re-
ally seeing ghosts like you
might as a rookie getting
your first start. There's re-
ally no anxiety going into
it. So yeah, I've definitely


grown."
So have the rest of Bucs,
even though they're still a
young team that remains
unpredictable. They fol-
lowed a 48-3 loss at San
Francisco by beating New
Orleans on Sunday to sit
tied with the Saints for'first
place in the NFC South.
Tampa Bay is the first
team to return to Britain
since the league started
playing a regular-season
game here in 2007. This
time, the aim isn't to earn
a first win of the season,
it's to spark a run at the
playoffs.
And part of the team's
turnaround goes back to
that first trip abroad, ac-
cording to coach Raheem
Morris.


High School Football
Friday Sneads at
Wewahitchka, 7 p.m.;
Graceville at Vernon, 7
p.m.; Walton at Marianna,
7 p.m.
Cottondale is off this
week.

High School
.Volleyball
Thursday Sneads at
Arnold, 5 p.m., and 6 p.m.

Marianna Recreation
Football
Marianna Recreation
Department will offer two
tackle football leagues
and one boys flag football
league this year.
Registration for youth
ages 6 to 13 will be held
through Friday from
8 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the
Marianna Educational and
Recreational Expo located
at 3625 Caverns Rd. in
Marianna. *
Registration fee for flag
football is $30 for partici-
pants who live inside the
city limits of Marianna,
and $45 for those who live
outside.
The fee for tackle
football is $45 for Mari-
anna residents, and $60
for those outside the city
limits.
The fee must be paid
with check or money
order; no cash will be
accepted.
No one will be allowed
to register after Friday.
All participants must


Sports Briefs
bring a copy of their birth
certificate. The age on
Nov. 1 of the current year
will be the player's age for
the entire season.
For more information,
call 482-6228.

Cottondale Baseball
Fundraiser
The Cottondale High
School Baseball program
will be holding a dodge-
ball tournament as a
fundraiser for the upcom-
ing season.
It will be a double
elimination tournament
with teams consisting of
10 players. The cost will be
$10 per player and the top
three teams will win cash
prizes.
If you're interested in
entering a team, con-
tact Greg Ohler at 482-
9821 ext. 263 for more
information.

Panhandle
Championships
The Panhandle Cross.
County Championships
will be held at Marianna
High School Saturday.
The boys 5K race will
start at 8 a.m., with the
girls race following at 8:30
a.m.
There will also be an
open 2-mile race for boys
and girls middle school
aged only at 9:15 a.m., and
an open 5K race for high
. school junior varsity and
community runners at
9:45 a.m.


Entry fee for the open
race is $5 per runner, and
checks should be made
out to The Cross Country
Club, which supports the
Marianna High School
cross country team.
Everyone who runs in
the open 2-mile race has
to pay and fill out a waiver
form, which can be picked
up at the home side con-
cession stand.
Entry fees can be mailed
or brought to the race on
race day. Mail checks to:
Allan Gibson I/C Mari-
anna High School 3546.
Caverns Road Marianna,
FL 32446.

Alumni Football Game
There will be a full con-
tact alumni football league
held this winter.
The games are full pads
with officials, announc-
ers, and video crew, and
is open to all former high
school football players 18
and older in the area.
Games will take place on
weekends from January
through March of 2012.
There must be at least 35
players to a team.
Those interested can
sign up at www.alumni-
footballusa.com.

Sports Items
Send all sports items to
editorial@jcfloridan.com,
or fax them to 850-482-
4478. The mailing address
for the paper is Jackson
County Floridan PO. Box
520 Marianna, FL 32447.


Indians
From Page 1B
little bit here to make sure
they're staying focused on
the job at hand, and get
motivated to take care of
some things so that we're
ready for that first game. I
think we hit a little stretch
where practice gets kind of
old, and they're anxious to
start playing games."
The coach said that
while the monotony of
practice can cause some
frustration and tension,
he still really likes the way
his players are interacting
with each other.
"I'm excited about the
chemistry we have," Lane
said. "We're hoping that's
something that continues
and is solid throughout the
season. It's easy in practice
and workouts when ev-
eryone is doing the same
Thing, but when games
start and you've got to
start dividing up minutes
among 12 kids who can
play, then that's the true
test. We'll see then how
solid our chemistry is."
Brazzle said she believes


that chemistry is one of
the strengths of the team.
"Just the way we play to-
gether and feed off of each
other's energy is great,"
she said. "I feel pretty
good about it. We come in
and work hard every day
and know we have work to
do. I feel good about the
season."
Lane also said that depth
would be a key for his team
this season, and could al-
low the Lady Indians to
better weather any injury
issues this season.
"I don't know if, our one,
two, and three are better
than in years past, but I
think our eight, nine, and
10 are much better, and
that will be the key," he
said. "It helps during the
course of the season being
able to get more people in
games and still be playing
well.
"Sometimes when you've
got to go to the ninth or
10th players on the bench,
it makes things frustrat-
ing. But this is a team that
encourages each other
1-through-12 and I'm ex-
cited about that part."
Lane said that Brazzle's


"Tm excited about the chemistry we have..
hoping that's something that continues an
throughout the season."


experience from her time
at Midland would be a
real asset to the team, as
would Sessions' athleti-
cism up front, and the skill
and versatility of' Brance,
who Lane called "our most
skilled player."
But the Lady Indians will
still need big seasons from
their returning sopho-
mores in Johnson and
Djassi, the latter of which
Lane said had improved
more between freshman
and sophomore sea-
sons than anyone he has
coached.
"With Sara, there are a
number of different things
that have prepared her for
this, like knowing what our
conference will be like and
what she has to do to be
successful against those
teams," the coach said.
"She doesn't have to worry
about that as a sopho-
more. She understands


that because sh
through it. Now
ter of getting the
to follow that ex
Djassi said it
ply a matter of
time in.
"In the summ
lot of work with
assistant coach
to improve my
skills and confic
said. "I know I
important played
I have more res]
so I want to be
ample for the te
Johnson. strul
her stamina as
man, but Lanes
better shape thi
better equipped
bigger minutes.
"Definitely she
to play more mi
coach said. 'iSin
ginning of May
more focus in
outs. You look b


attitude as a freshman,
We're and it's not much different
d issolid than any other freshman,
but then you start to get
that urgency going into
David Lane, your sophomore year, and
Indians coach you want to get a scholar-
ship to a good school, and
e has been things start to kick in a
,it's a mat- little bit.
e freshmen "That has helped her
ample." tremendously. Her overall
was sim- personality and approach
putting the to basketball have grown."
But Lane said that no
ler I did a one or two players will be
h (Chipola counted on to carry the
i CJ Pace) scoring load this season.
individual "We've got a lot of peo-
dence," she ple that could have their
'm a more night," he said. "I think
r this year. back to that group we
ponsibility, had in 2009 that finished
a good ex- third (in the national
am." tournament), and even
ggled with with Latoya Williams in
s a fresh- there, we still had prob-
aid she's in ably eight or nine kids that
is year and led us in scoring on some
d to play night. This is a group that
can do the same thing. If
e'll be able you focus on one person,
nutes,"the then somebody else has
ice the be- that ability to step up and
Sshe's had score."
her work- The coach said that
ack on her maintaining that balance


and having everyone on
the same page will be key
to navigating through a
typically tough Panhandle
Conference this season.
"Being able to continue
. to keep the chemistry go-
Sing plays a big part of it at
Sthe JUCO level," Lane said.
"You've got to have some
Talent, but you also have
Sto have the right mix of
i kids. It seems like we say it
every year, but it's going to
be a very talented confer-
ence this year. There will
be three teams that make
it to the state tournament
and there will probably be .
* five that deserve it.
"The toughest part is
getting the kids to under-
Sstand what the conference
Splay will be like and getting
Them to understand what
you have to do in the non-
conference to get ready for
Sit. The unfortunate part
with kids today is that they
Think too early that they've
f got it figured out. If we
get too comfortable and
relax in our non-confer-
Sence season, we'll waste
opportunities to get better
Sfor the conference season,
Sand we can't do that."


MHS
From Page 1B
pretty darn tough, com-
petitive kids. We played
well and ran the offense. It
was fun to pass and hit and
block and dig, the whole
nine yards. I was impressed
with our serving. Hopefully
we can keep it up."
The win wraps the regu-
lar season for the Lady
Bulldogs at 13-10, with the
district tournament and a
match-up with Walton on
Tuesday at 6 p.m., up next.
The Lady Bulldogs were


Pirates
From Page 1B
match against Arnold, who
has beaten the Lady Pirates
in two of the teams' three
meetings this year.
"We're looking forward


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Jackson County
Floridan
-I


winless in district this sea-
son, but Christopher said
she has been encouraged
by her team's recent form.
"These two wins this
week' boosted our spirits
a little," she said. "(Tues-
day night) really gave us
some encouragement. Our
offense is running a lot
smoother.
"It's starting to come to-
gether. We still struggle
with serve receive some,
but when we're, running
our offense like that, we're
okay. We just have to keep
the goal in mind that we've
got to beat Walton."


to it," Roberts said of the
game.
"Arnold is a great team for
us to play. It could probably
go either way. We're very
evenly matched, but I'm
hoping that the girls step
it up and come home with
another win."


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twitter.com/
jcfloridannews


Hurricanes Football


Miami suspends DT Regis for 1 game


The Associated Press

CORAL GABLES, Fla.
- Miami defensive tackle
Micanor Regis will not play
Saturday against No. 20
Georgia Tech after being
suspended one game for
punching a North Carolina
player last weekend.
Regis was not penal-
ized on the play where he
punched North Carolina
widereceiverDwightJones,
who had just been tackled
after catching a pass, in


the groin area. Miami an-
nounced the suspension
on Wednesday, and the
Atlantic Coast Conference
said it believed the Hurri-
canes' decision was "han-
dled appropriately."
"Quite honestly, I'm em-
barrassed," Miami coach
Al Golden was quoted as
saying in a statement dis-
tributed by the school.
Earlier this week, Jones
told reporters in Chapel
Hill, N.C. that he believed
the play "definitely wasn't


an accident."
Regis' absence this week-
end could prove to be a
major blow for the Hurri-
canes (3-3, 1-2 ACC), who
have serious injury prob-
lems already on the de-
fensive line and face one
of the nation's top rushing
offenses this weekend.
Georgia Tech (6-1, 3-1)
is averaging 348 yards per
game on the ground, and


more than 500 yards in to-
tal offense. Defensive line
is Miami's most banged-
up position, so much so
that Golden has even con-
sidered moving reserve of-
fensive linemen over the
other side of the ball in re-
cent weeks.
Regis is tied for the sixth-
most tackles by a Miami
defender this season, with


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--


--2B THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2011


SPORTS


1


i












scoreboard


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20,2011 3B


SPRINT CUP LEADERS
Through Oct. 15
Points
1, Carl Edwards, 2,203.2, Kevin
Harvick, 2,198. 3, Matt Kenseth, 2,196.
4, Kyle Busch, 2,185. 5, Tony Stewart,
2,179.6, Brad Keselowski, 2,178.7,
Kurt Busch, 2,176.8, Jimmie Johnson,
2,168. 9, Dale Earnhardt Jr., 2,143.10,
Ryan Newman, 2,142.
11, Jeff Gordon, 2,137. 12, Denny
Hamlln, 2,117.13, Clint Bowyer, 868.
14, A J Allmendinger, 865.15, Kasey
Kahne, 857.16, Greg Biffle, 856.17, Da-
vid Ragan, 829. 18, Marcos Ambrose,
821.19, Juan Pablo Montoya, 819. 20,'
Mark Martin, 816.
Money
1, Carl Edwards, $7,365,084. 2,
Kyle Busch, 55,687,409. 3, Jim-
mie Johnson, $5,612,979.4, Kevin
Harvick, $5,537,614. 5, Matt Kenseth,
$5,445,104. 6, Kurt Busch, $5,342,376.
7, Jeff Gordon, $5,202,179. 8, Tony
Stewart, $5,173,381.9, Clint Bowyer,
$4,825,111.10, Denny Hamlin,
$4,747,518.
11, Ryan Newman, $4,665,023.12,
Brad Keselowski, $4,529,804. 13,
Juan Pablo Montoya, $4,440,886.
14, Jamie McMurray, $4,232,122. 15,
A J Allmendinger, $4,196,259.16,
Marcos Ambrose, $4,192,434.17,
Regan Smith, $4,063,983. 18, Kasey
Kahne, $4,009,952.19, Bobby Labonte,
$3,995,678.20, David Reutimann,
$3,821,776.


POSTSEASON GLANCE
All Times EDT
DIVISION SERIES
(Best-of-5)
All games televised by TBS
American League
Detroit 3, New York 2
Friday, Sept 30: Detroit 1, New York
1, 1 innings, susp., rain
Saturday, Oct. 1: New York 9, Detroit
3, comp. of susp. game
Sunday, Oct 2: Detroit 5, New York 3
Monday, Oct 3: Detroit 5, New York 4
Tuesday, Oct. 4: New York 10, Detroit
1I
Thursday, Oct 6: Detroit 3, New
York 2
Texas 3, Tampa Bay 1
Friday, Sept 30: Tampa Bay 9, Texas 0
Saturday, Oct 1: Texas 8, Tampa
Bay 6
Monday, Oct 3: Texas 4, Tampa Bay 3
Tuesday, Oct 4: Texas 4, Tampa Bay 3
National League
St Louis 3, Philadelphia 2
Saturday, Oct 1: Philadelphia 11, St
Louis 6
Sunday, Oct 2: St. Louis 5, Philadel-
phia4
Tuesday, Oct 4: Philadelphia 3, St
Louis 2
Wednesday, Oct 5: St Louis 5,
Philadelphia 3
Friday, Oct 7: St Louis 1, Philadel-
phia 0
Milwaukee 3,Arizona2
Saturday, Oct 1: Milwaukee 4,
Arizona 1
Sunday, Oct 2: Milwaukee 9, Arizona
4
Tuesday, Oct 4: Arizona 8, Milwau-
kee 1
Wednesday, Oct 5:.Arizona 10,
Milwaukee 6
Friday, Oct. 7: Milwaukee 3, Arizona
2,'10 innings
LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES
(Best-of-7)
American League
Al games televised by Fox
Texas 4, Detroit 2
Saturday, Oct 8: Texas 3, Detroit 2
Sunday, Oct 9: Detroit at Texas,
ppd. rain
Monday, Oct 10: Texas 7, Detroit 3,
11 innings


Tuesday, Oct 11: Detroit 5, Texas 2
Wednesday, Oct. 12: Texas 7, Detroit
3, 11 innings
Thursday, Oct 13: Detroit 7, Texas 5
Saturday, Oct. 15: Texas 15, Detroit 5
National League
A41 games televised by TBS
St Louis 4, Milwaukee 2
Sunday, Oct. 9: Milwaukee 9, St.
Louis 6
Monday, Oct. 10: St. Louis 12,
Milwaukee 3
Wednesday, Oct. 12: St. Louis 4,
Milwaukee 3
Thursday, Oct. 13:'Mllwaukee 4, St.
Louis 2
Friday, Oct. 14: St. Louis 7, Milwau-
kee 1
Sunday, Oct. 16: St Louis 12, Mil-
waukee 6
WORLD SERIES
(Best-of-7; x-if necessary)
All games televised by Fox
Wednesday, Oct 19: Texas (Wilson
16-7) at St Louis (Carpenter 11-9), late
Thursday, Oct. 20: Texas (Lewis 14-
10) at St. Louis (Garcia 13-7), 9:05 p.m.
Saturday, Oct 22: St Louis (Lohse
14-8) at Texas (Holland 16-5), 9:05 p.m.
Sunday, Oct. 23: St. Louis (Jackson
12-9) at Texas (Harrisbn 14-9), 9:05
p.m.
x-Monday, Oct. 24: St Louis at Texas,
9:05 p.m.
x-Wednesday, Oct 26: Texas at St
Louis, 9:05 p.m.
x-Thursday, Oct. 27: Texas at St
Louis, 9:05 p.m.


NFL
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W LT Pct PF PA
New England 5 1 0 .833 185 135
Buffalo 4 2 0 .667 188 147
N.Y. Jets 3 3 0 .500 145 131
Miami 0 5 0 .000 75 128
South
W LT Pet PF PA
Tennessee 3 2 0 .600 105 94
Houston 3 3 0 .500 141 124
Jacksonville 1 5 0 .167 72 132
Indianapolis 0 6 0 .000 104 163
North
W LT Pct PF PA
Baltimore 4 1 0 .800 148 71
Cincinnati 4 2 0 .667 137 111
Pittsburgh 4 2 0 .667 119 102
Cleveland 2 3 0 .400 91 117

WLT Pet PF PA
San Diego 4 1 0 .800 120 109
Oakland 4 2 0 .667 160 150
Kansas City 2 3 0 .400 77 150
Denver 1 4 0 .200 105 140
NATIONAL CONFERENCE


N.Y. Giants
Washington
Dallas
Philadelphia

Tampa Bay
New Orleans
Atlanta
Carolina


East
WLT Pet PF
4 2 0 .667 154
3 2 0 .600 96
2 3 0 '.400 115
2 4 0 .333 145
South
WLT Pet PF
4 2 0 .667 113
s 4 2 0 .667 177
3 3 0 .500 135
1 5 0 .167 133
North
WLT Pet PF


Green Bay 6 0 0 1.000 19
Detroit 5 1 0 .833 171
Chicago 3 3 0 .500 14
Minnesota 1 5 0 .167 12
West
WLT Pct PI
San Francisco 5 1 0 .833 16
Seattle 2 3 0 .400 9"
Arizona 1 4 0 .200 9i
St Louis 0 5 0 .000 4!

Sunday, Oct.23
Houston at Tennessee, 1 p.m.
Washington at Carolina, 1 p.m.
San Diego at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m.
Seattle at Cleveland, 1 p.m.


Denver at Miami, 1 p.m.
Atlanta at Detroit, 1 p.m.
Chicago vs. Tampa Bay at London,
1 p.m.
Kansas City at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Arizona, 4:05 p.m.
St Louis at Dallas, 4:15 p.m.
Green Bay at Minnesota, 4:15 p.m.
Indianapolis at New Orleans, 8:20
p.m.
Open: Buffalo, Cincinnati, N.Y. Gi-
ants, New England, Philadelphia, San
Francisco
Monday, Oct. 24
Baltimore at Jacksonville, 8:30 p.m.
Sunday, Oct. 30
Indianapolis at Tennessee, 1 p.m.
New Orleans at St. Louis, 1 p.m.
Jacksonville at Houston, 1 p.m.
Miami at N.Y. Giants, 1 p.m.
Minnesota at Carolina, 1 p.m.
Arizona at Baltimore, 1 p.m.
Detroit at Denver, 4:05 p.m.
Washington vs. Buffalo at Toronto,.
4:05 p.m.
Cleveland at San Francisco, 4:15 p.m.
Cincinnati at Seattle, 4:15 p.m.
New England at Pittsburgh, 4:15 p.m.
Dallas at Philadelphia, 8:20 p.m.
Open: Atlanta, Chicago, Green Bay,
N.Y. Jets, Oakland, Tampa Bay
Monday, Oct 31
San Diego at Kansas City, 8:30 p.m.
COLLEGE SCHEDULE
All Times EDT
(Subject to change)
Tuesday, Oct.25
SOUTH
Troy at FIU, 9 p.m.
Wednesday, Oct. 26
EAST
UConn at Pittsburgh, 9 p.m.
Thursday, Oct. 27
SOUTH
Virginia at Miami, 9 p.m.
SOUTHWEST
Rice at Houston, 9 p.m.
Friday, Oct 28
SOUTHWEST
BYU vs. TCU at Arlington, Texas, 9
p.m.
Saturday, Oct 29
EAST
Illinois at Penn St., TBA
Lehigh at Colgate, 1 p.m.
Yale at Columbia, 1 p.m.
Drake at Marist, 1 p.m.
Rhode Island at New Hampshire,
1 p.m.
Sacred Heart at Robert Morris, 1 p.m.
CCSU at St Francis (Pa.), 1 p.m.
Albany (NY) at Wagner, 1 p.m.
Penn at Brown, 1:30 p.m.
Georgetown at Holy Cross, 2 p.m.
Duquesne at Monmouth (NJ), 2 p.m.
Cornell at Princeton, 2 p.m.
Fordham at Army, 4:30 p.m.
West Virginia at Rutgers, 4:30 p.m.
Maine at Villanova, 4:30 p.m.
Coastal Carolina at Stony Brook, 5
p.m.
Dartmouth at Harvard, 7 p.m.
Bucknell at Lafayette, 7 p.m.
Delaware at Towson, 7 p.m.
SOUTH
NC State at Florida St., 1 p.m.
Syracuse at Louisville, 1 p.m.
SUAB at Marshall, 1 p.m.
Arkansas at Vanderbilt, 1:21 p.m.
Virginia Tech at Duke, 1:30 p.m.
Campbell at Davidson, 2 p.m.
SMorgan St. at Delaware St., 2 p.m.
SC State at Howard, 2 p.m.
UMass at Richmond, 2 p.m.
VMI at The Citadel, 2 p.m.
Charleston Southern at Gardner-
Webb, 2:30 p.m.
Elon at Wofford, 2:30 p.m.
Furman at Chattanooga, 3 p.m.
E. Kentucky at Murray St, 3 p.m.
Bethune-Cookman at NC Central,
3 p.m.
NC A&T at Norfolk St., 3 p.m.
Hampton at Savannah St., 3 p.m.
Georgia Southern at Appalachian
St., 4 p.m.
Texas Southern at MVSU, 4 p.m.
Boston College at Maryland, 4 p.m.


COLLEGE FOOTBALL
9 pm.
ESPN UCLA at Arizona
GOLF
9 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour,
Castello Masters, first round,
at Castellon, Spain
2 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Children's
Miracle Network Classic, first
round, at Lake Buena Vista,
Fla.
5 p.m.
TGC Nationwide Tour,
Jacksonville Open, first
round, at Ponte Vedra Beach,
Fla. (same-day tape)
7:30 p.m.
TGC LPGA, Taiwan Cham-
pionship, first round, at Yang
Mei, Taiwan (same-day tape)
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7:30 p.m.
FOX World Series, game 2,
Texas at St. Louis
PREP FOOTBALL
8 p.m.
FSN Louisville (Miss.) at
Noxubee County (Miss.)
SOCCER
8 p.m.
ESPN2 MLS, Philadelphia
at New York



W. Carolina at Samford, 4 p.m.
Alabama A&M vs. Alabama St. at
Birmingham, Ala., 4:30 p.m.
Tulane at East Carolina, 4:30 p.m.
Florida vs. Georgia at Jacksonville,
Fla, 4:30 p.m.
Presbyterian at Liberty, 4:30 p.m.
W. Kentucky at Louisiana-Monroe,
4:30 p.m.
Wake Forest at North Carolina, 4:30
p.m.
James Madison at Old Dominion,
4:30 p.m.
Tennessee Tech at Jacksonville St.,
5 p.m.
San Jose St at Louisiana Tech, 5 p.m.
Memphis at UCF, 5 p.m.
E. Illinois at Austin Peay, 6 p.m.
Jackson St. vs. Prairie View at
Shreveport, La., 6 p.m.
Henderson St at South Alabama,
6 p.m.
Alcorn St. at Southern U., 7:30 p.m.
Mississippi at Auburn, 8 p.m.
Mississippi St at Kentucky, 8 p.m.
South Carolina at Tennessee, 8:15
p.m.
Louisiana-Lafayette at Middle Ten-
nessee, 8:30 p.m.
SE Missouri at UT-Martin, 8:30 p.m.
Clemson at Georgia Tech, 9 p.m.
MIDWEST
Michigan St. at Nebraska, 1 p.m. or
4:30 p.m.
Cent Michigan at Akron, 1 p.m.
Northwestern at Indiana, 1 p.m.
Purdue at Michigan, 1 p.m.
Bowling Green at Kent St, 2 p.m.
W. Illinois at Youngstown St., 2 p.m.
Dayton at Valparaiso, 3 p.m.
Ball St. at W. Michigan, 3 p.m.
S. Dakota St at Missouri St, 4 p.m.
Illinois St at S. Illinois, 4 p.m.
Oklahoma at Kansas St, 4:30 p.m.
Buffalo at Miami (Ohio), 4:30 p.m.
Iowa at Minnesota, 4:30 p.m.
Navy at Notre Dame, 4:30 p.m.
N. Iowa at N. Dakota St., 5 p.m.


Wisconsin at Ohio St., 9 p.m.
SOUTHWEST
Missouri at Texas A&M, 1 p.m.
Georgia St. at UTSA, 2:30 p.m.
Lamar at Sam Houston St., 4 p.m.
Grambling St. at Ark.-Pine Bluff,
4:30 p.m.
Baylor at Oklahoma St, 4:30 p.m.
SMU at Tulsa, 4:30 p.m.
McNeese St at Stephen F. Austin,
5 p.m.
Northwestern St. at Texas St., 5 p.m.
North Texas at Arkansas St, 8 p.m.
SE Louisiana at Cent. Arkansas, 8
p.m.
Kansas at Texas, 8 p.m.
Iowa St at Texas Tech, 8 p.m.
Southern Miss. at UTEP, 9 p.m.
FAR WEST
Oregon St. at Utah, TBA
Air Force at New Mexico, 3 p.m.
Idaho St. at Montana St., 3:05 p.m.
Washington St. at Oregon, 4 p.m.
UC Davis at S. Utah, 4 p.m.
Weber St at Montana, 4:05 p.m.
North Dakota at N. Colorado, 4:35
p.m.
Portland St at E. Washington, 5:05
p.m.
Hawaii at Idaho, 6 p.m.
Colorado St at UNLV, 7 p.m.
Colorado at Arizona St., 7:30 p.m.
California at UCLA, 8 p.m.
Nevada at New Mexico St, 9 p.m.
Stanford at Southern Cal, 9 p.m.
South Dakota at Cal Poly, 10:05 p.m.
N. Arizona at Sacramento St., 10:05
p.m.
Wyoming at San Diego St, 11 p.m.
Arizona at Washington, 11:30 p.m.


NHL
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W LOTPts GF GA
Pittsburgh 8 4 2 2 10 23 20
Philadelphia 5 4 0 1 9 19 10
N.Y. Islanders 3 1 0 6 11 6
NewJersey 4 3 1 0 6 9 8
N.Y. Rangers 4 1 1 2 4 9 9
Northeast Division
GP W LOTPts GF GA
Buffalo 5 4 1 0 8 17 10
Toronto 4 3 0 1 7 13 10
Boston 6 2 4 0 4' 11 13
Montreal 5 1 3 1 3 12 16
Ottawa 6 1 5 0 2 16 30
Southeast Division
GP W LOTPts GF GA
Washington 5 5 0 0 10 18 11
Carolina 6 3 2 1 7 17 19
Florida 5 3 2' 6 14 13
Tampa Bay 6 1 3 2 4 18 26
Winnipeg 4 1 3 0 2 7 14
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W LOTPts GF GA
Detroit 4 4 0 0 8 13 5
Chicago 5 3 1 1 7 17 12
Nashville 5 2 2 1 5 12 15
St Louis 6 2 4 0 4 15 20
Columbus 6 0 5 1 1 12 20
Northwest Division
GP W LOTPts GF GA
Colorado 6 5 1 0 10 20 13
Minnesota 6 2 2 2 6 14 16
Edmonton 5 2 2 1 5 10 10
Vancouver 6 2 3 1 5 14 20
Calgary 5 2 3 0 4 13 15
Pacific Division
GP W LOT Pts GF GA
Dallas 6 5 1 0 10 16 13
Anaheim 5 4 1 0 8 11 9
Los Angeles 5 3 1 1 7 14 10
Phoenix 5 2. 2 1 5 15 16
San Jose 4 1 3 0 2 10 11
NOTE: Two points for a win, one
point for overtime loss.
Tuesday's Games
Carolina 4, Boston 1
Washington 3, Florida 0
Dallas 3, Columbus 2
Buffalo 3, Montreal 1
Philadelphia 7, Ottawa 2
Pittsburgh 4, Minnesota 2
Calgary 2, Edmonton 1


N.Y. Rangers 4, Vancouver 0
Chicago 5, Phoenix 2
Los Angeles 5, St. Louis 0
Wednesday's Games
Winnipeg at Toronto, late
Thursday's Games
Toronto at Boston, 7 p.m.
Washington at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Montreal at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
Winnipeg at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
Buffalo at Florida, 7:30 p.m.
Chicago at Colorado, 9 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Calgary, 9:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Edmonton, 9:30 p.m.
Nashville at Vancouver, 10 p.m.
Los Angeles at Phoenix, 10 p.m.
Friday's Games
San Jose at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Columbus at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Carolina at St Louis, 8 p.m.
Dallas at Anaheim, 10 p.m.


BASEBALL
American League
NEW YORK YANKEES-Declined the
option on LHP Damaso Marte, making
him a free agent
National League
NEW YORK METS-Announced the
retirement of scout Harry Minor, ef-
fective Oct. 31.
Can-Am League
BROCKTON ROX-Released LHP Brad
Hertzler, INF Mike Torres, INF Phillip
Cuadrado, INF Jeremy Hunt and RHP
Jack Van Leur.
ROCKLAND BOULDERS-Released
RHP Justin Fry, RHP Casey Hodges, C
Chase Weems, RHP Kent Worthington,
RHP Jon Shepard, OF Ryde Rodriguez
and LHP J. Brett Carroll.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
CAROLINA PANTHERS-Placed OT
Jeff Otah on injured reserve.
MIAMI DOLPHINS-Signed S Gerald
Alexander. Placed WR Roberto Wal-
lace on injured reserve.
NEW YORK JETS-Signed WR Eron
Riley from Denver's practice squad.
OAKLAND RAIDERS-Placed DE Matt
Shaughnessy on injured reserve.
Signed OL Zach Hurd to the practice
squad.
WASHINGTON REDSKINS-Signed G
Maurice Hurt from the practicesquad.
Signed G John Malecki to the practice
squad.
Canadian Football League
CFL-Named Sara Moore vice presi-
dent, marketing.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
CAROLINA HURRICANES-Assigned D
Justin Faulk to Charlotte (AHL).
COLUMBUS BLUE JACKETS-Assigned
G Mathieu Corbeil to Saint John
(QMJHL).
DETROIT RED WINGS-Signed G Petr
Mrazek to a three-year entry-level
contract
American Hockey League
AHL-Suspended Houston F Carson
McMillan four games for an illegal
check to the head of an opponent
in an Oct. 15 game vs. San Antonio;
Rochester F Marcus Foligno two
games for a boarding incident and
Rochester F Jonathan Parker one
game for a high-sticking incident in
an Oct 16 game vs. Grand Rapids;
Bridgeport F Micheal Haley two
games and D Matt Donovan one game,
for illegal checks to the head of an
opponent and in an Oct 16 game vs.
Adirondack.
ECHL
ELMIRA JACKALS-Signed D Donnie
Harris and F Alec Kirschner.
LACROSSE
National Lacrosse League
WASHINGTON STEALTH-Re-signed D
Bob Snider to a one-year contract


THURSDAY MORNING / AFTERNOON OCTOBER 20, 2011

6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:0010:3011:0011:3012:0012:30 1:00 1:30 2:002:30 3:00 3:30 4:00 4:30 5:00 5:30
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3 WTVYNews 4 The Early Show (N) (In Stereo) s Live Regis & Kelly he Price Is Right (N) Young & Restless Live at Bold The Talk (In Stereo) Let's Make a Deal (N) Rachael Ray (N) H Ellen DeGeneres News CBS News
5 0 NewsChannel 7 Today Today Food trends; Seattle. (N) (In Stereo). 0Days of our Uves (N) News 7 at Noon Rachael Ray (N) Millionaire Jeopardyl he Doctors (N) I Ellen DeGeneres News NBC News
* g News 13 This Morning Good Morning America (N) a Live Regis & Kelly The View (In Stereo) WMBB Midday News The Chew (In Stereo) One Life to Uve 0 General Hospital (N) Dr. Phil (N) (In Stereo) The Dr. Oz Show (N) News ABC News
10 g Auto Tech Paid Prog. Eco Co. Chris Funnest Home Videos Justice judge B. Nate Berkus Anderson (In Stereo) Syfret Big Bang America America Judge Mathis rhe People's Court Jdgudy Jg Judy RghtThsMnute
11 Arthur Martha Curious Cat In the Super Dlnosaur Sesame Street Sid ordWrld Super Barney Calllou Sid Dinosaur Cat In the Curous Martha Arthur WordGlrl WildKratt Electric Fetchi NewsHour
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19 ESPN SportsCenter a SportsCenter o SportaCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportaCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) Report Football NFL Live (Live) sM Around Parddn SportsCenter (N) (Live)
20 CSS Mayhem In the A.M. (N) (Live) SportsNte Talkin' SEC Football Plates FoodChop Lose30Lb Hair Free Barnhart & Durham (N) College Football: Miami at North Carolina. TBA Hawks GSU Game The Sea Hurricane SportsNIte (N)
21 DISN little Chugging IMickey Pirates Mickey Mickey Lite Uttle Mickey Mickey 3rd Bird AgentOsoJungle Pirates Phneas Phineas Phineas Deck Wards Wizard Phneas ANT Farm Shake Good
22MAX O CryPpie IheaPfresBridea'lB7) PG iGrtca'*** (1997) PG-13' Bilack Swamr***% (2010,Dramal R' SgRi Be.'%1 (1996) PG nTheloty Bones'** + (209 I Mak Wahtiber Mg I annae" 1 2010 PG" 'Bak-.furie l
23 TNT Angel .u',jrr" Charmed (in air), Charmea idr ,r: Supernalural I. Supernatura l 0J Smaiville 'requ'.n' Las Vegas i". Sitnc.i Las Vegas Iyr .tei The Closer L O Law & OrDer Law & Orer Bones ,ii Stereo)
24 DISC Paid Prog. P. Robison J. Meyer N Hair MythBusters a MythBusters a MythBusters Es Penn & Teller American Choper American Chopper American Chopper American Chopper American Chopper Cash Cab Cash Cab
25TWC Your Weather Today With Abrams and Bettes l Wake Up With Al Day Planner B Storms Storms Full Force Full Force
26USA Law Order: CI *esf-Ptm** 1200, Comedyt Wia Fernl Bum Nolice Burn Notice I0 Bum Notice 91 Bum Notice s Burn Notice IR Bum Notice o Bum Notice s Bum Notice sao NCIS (In Stereo) so
28 FAM BoyWod BoyWorld WhatLike What Uke Full House 700 Club The 700 Club l Glmore Girls l Still Stnd Still Stnd Grounded Grounded My Wife MyWife Rules 8, Rules '70s Show Grounded 70s Show '70s Show '70sShow Goo
29 UFE Balancing Designing Reba Reba WillGrace Will/Grace WillGrace Will/Grace Chris |Chris Chris Chris Desp.-Wives Gry's Anatomy O Grey's Anatomy sO How I Met HowI Met Reba Reba Project Runway sM
30 A&E CSI: Miami (In Stereo) The Sopranos 11 The Sopranos 0 CSI: Miami 'L.A." CSI: Miami (In Stereo) The First 48 H Hoarders "Patty; Bilr Intervention Racher Criminal Minds Is Criminal Minds l he First 48 [ The First 48 E
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35 BET Inspiration Popoff Chris Chris Bemie Berie Bemie Bemie Parkers Parkers My Wife |My Wife tLo w Donatst hing'* Nick Carnnon. Cnris Chris MyWife My Wife Parkers Parkers 106 & Park: Top 10
36TOON Hero Beyblade Pok6mon Sidekick JohnnyT Johnny T Garfield Garfield Spooby Scooby LooneyTunes Looney Jerry Garfield IDog Johnny T Sideldck Almost Adventure Regular Squirrel Almost Gumball
39 HIST The Most o Black Blizzard Disaster strikes. The Crumbling of America sa Modern Marvels E Modern Marvels 0 Black Blizzard Disaster strikes. i The Crumbling of America o Modem Marvels RE
40 TVLND Lose30Lb Pald Prog. Bonanza Bonanza' Elizabeth, My Love" Van Dyke Van Dyke Van Dyke Sanford Sanford Sanford Boranza Bonanza "Sam Hill" Bonanza "The Smiler' M'A'S'H M'A'S*H M'ASH M'A'S*H
43 CNN2 (5:00) Mornng Express With Robin Meade HLN Special Report HLN News News Now (N) HLN Special Report HLN Special Report Prime News so
45 CNN (5:00) American Morning (N) 0 CNN Newsroom.(N) CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) The Situation Room With Wolf Biitzer (N) John King, USA (N)
46 CW (5:00) The Dally Buzz r Steve Wilkos Show Jeremy Kyle Payne Payne BA BA TBA TBA Steve Wilkos Show LUfechangr Lifechangr Browns Browns '70s Show '70s Show T71 Death King
47 SPIKE riverx umbaFit Lose3Lb Paid Prog. Bar Rescue (In Stereo) CSI:NY (In Stereo) CSI: Crime Scene CSI: CrmeScene CSI: Crime Scene CSI: Crime Scene Jail a Jall a Jailt JallIB Jail Jail a Jail o Jail s
49HGTV Threads MyHouse Walls Talk Walls Talk Holmes on Homes Unellable Unsellable Unsellable Designed House Hunters Design Design Design Design Genevieve Genevieve FirstPlace First Place First Place First Place FirstPlace FirstPlace
98 TLC 18 Kids 18 Kids Baby Baby Baby Baby's Pregnant and n Peril Say Yes Say Yes What Not to Wear Baby Baby Multples Baby's What Not to Wear Say Yes Say Yes Cupcake Cupcake Toddlers & Tiaras
99 SPEED MonsterJam NASCAR Race Hub My Ride My Ride TheCar Dumbest Seam Paid Prog. NASCAR Racing he 10 NASCAR Racing From Oct. 31,2010.NASCAR Race Hub


THURSDAY EVENING / LATE NIGHT OCTOBER 20, 2011

6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:0010:3011:0011:3012:0012:30 1:00 11:3012:00 2:3013:00 3:30 4:00 4:30 5:00 5:30
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30 News Wheel Big Bang Rules Person of Interest (N) The Mentalist a0 News Late Show Letterman Late Late ShowlCraig Inside Ed. Up to the Minute (N) (In Stereo) CBS News WTVY News 4
50 News Wheel Commun Parks The Office Whltney Prime Suspect r News Tonight Show w/Leno Late Night Carson Today (In Stereo) Extra (N) The Bankruptcy Hour Shepherd's Chapel Early Tdy NewsChannel 7 Today
8 ( News Ent Charle's Angels ra Grey's Anatomy s Private Practice ea News Nightllne Jimmy Kimmel Live Excused Jim Access H. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. ABC World News Now (N) 06 Morning News 13 This Morning
10 ) Two Men 2011 World Series: Game 2. (N) (In Stereo Live) INews Big Bang Two Men 30 Rock Friends Friends. King/Hill Scrubs Paid Prog. Paid Prog. The People's Court How I Met IShepherd's Chapel Paid Prog. Outdoor
11 NewsHour Wildlife ICrossroad Fa. Face This Old House Hr GlobeTrekker Charile Rose (N) 0 Smiley T. Smiley This Old House Hr Independent Lens (In Stereo) NOVA Life throughout the solar system. Ribbon Clifford Wild Krat
7SHOW *n unrrasore Man'- * (20061 Ref'* (20101 Bruce Wial PQ.13 Gigolos Old Porn Gigolos OldPom r Kaboom'*** (2010) 'NW Patton Oswalt "Cenftun'r*** (2010)R' LteftersoJullef** (2010.Drama)'PG'
14 NICK Sponge. Sponge. Sponge. Sponge. 70s Show '70s Show My Wife My Wife Friends Friends Friends Friends '70s Show '70s Show Chris Chris MyWife My Wife George George Matters TBA Matters Matters
16TBS Seinfeld Seinfeld Fam.Guy Fam.Guy Big Bang Big Bang BigBang Big Bang Conan(N) he Office TheOffice Conan Seinfeld Selnfeld *TheCisboKd**f (1994,Western)Married Married Married Married
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18 ESPN2 Pardon Baseball MLS Soccer: Union at Red BuHs NFL Live (N) a SportsCenter (N) (Live) Baseball NFLLIve 1 ISportsNation INASCAR SportsCenter 0 SportsCenter ir SportsNation t Mike and Mike
19 ESPN Baseball Tonight (Live) College Football Uve College Football: UCLA at Arizona. (N) (Live) SportaCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) College Football: UCLA at Arizond. SportsCenter 0 SportsCenter 0
20 CSS Falkin'SEC Football College Football: Central Florida at Alabama-Birmingham. (N) (Live) SportsNte (n Stereo) Paldrog. PaidProg. Paid Prog. Pad Prog. Pad Prog. Pad Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. d Prog. Paidrog. Pad Prog. Paid rog. Paid Prog. Pad Prog. MomsSlim
21DISN Random Shakelt Good I'RentfoHllfesenown(2006) .Random Shakelt Good Vmplre Wi Wzards Wza Good Good Random ANTFarm Deck Deck Phineas Phineas Phneas Phineas Babar Ltte
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23 TNT Bones (In Stereo) Bones Block party. Bones (In Stereo) Bones (In Stereo) CSI: NY "The Ride-In" CSI: NY (In Stereo) CSI: NY (In Stereo) Franklin & Bash B Law & Order Law & Order Law & Order Angel (In Stereo)
24 DISC American Chopper Sons of Guns N6 American Chopper Auction D. Money American Chopper Auction D.Money Sons of Guns 0 American Chopper Cash Flow Baby Food MagicJack Pald Prog. Paid Prog. PaldProg. PaidProg. PaldProg.
25 TWC Weather Center Happen IHappen rBA IFootball Weather Center 1[ Happen Happen TBA Football Weather Center 1 Happen Happen IBA Football First Outlook Wake Up With Al
26 USA NCIS (In Stereo) I0 Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Bum Notice 0e Law & Order: SVU CSI: Crime Scene 'Semi-Po** (2008, Comedy) Wil Fertell. Law Order: Cl Law Order: Cl Law Order Cl
28FAM (5:30) TheGootiesi(1985,Adveture)'PG' 1 sPocPuser*t (1s93, Comedy) The 700 Club Whose? Whose akel IPaldProg. Paid Prog. PaidProg. The 700 Club Bra Women Ministries Life Today J. Meyer World
29 UFE Project Runway 06 Project Runway 0 Project Runway'Finale PartOne" Runway Dance Moms 0 Project Runway 6 Project Runway Finale Part One" Runway Dance Momsa BeautyTip Paid Prog. Zumba Fit Younger Paid Prog. Oreck
30 A&E The First 48 The Fi48 he Firstt 4 (N) [ Border Border The First 48 he First 48 r The First 48 N Border Border he First 48 Paid Prog. Nlnja Paint MagicJack Paid Prog. Paid Prog.
32SYFY ChaLetle"(2010, Horror) NIkkiReed. wHoselPattll (2007, Horror) "The MnightMeat Tain'** (2008, Horror). lheProphecy'* (1995, Fantasy) *TheProphecylprising(2005, Horror) Masters of Horror Paid Prog. WEN Hair
33AMC FlOghtflMvng' Slhea*** (2008) Nathan Fillion''R' takePacl**~ (1998) ll Pullman .'R' Tles Fmm the Dasid: The Movte'(1990) "Stigmata'* (199) Patricia Arquelte.'R' "TheC Crow: CyofAngels".* (1996)'R' Cooking TriVita
34 MTV Jersey Shohore JJer ey Shorre e ry Sherseyore r0 Jersey Shore 0 Jersey Shore erseyersey Shore Shore AMTV (in Stereo) AMTV (In Stereo) AMTV (In Stereo) RIdic. RIdic.
35 BET 106& Park: Top 10 Re.- Lines Re.- Lines The Game ITogether WHelPastDead 2(2007, Action) Kuruapta Wendy Wllliams Show BTrhHar(2008, Drama)Jadeenise Dixon. The Mo'NiqueShow IBET Inspiration |Popoff BET Inspiration


36 TOON MAD Adventure


Regular Problem
Harvest 0a
Married [Married
Nancy Grace
Anderon Cooper 360
The Vampire Diaries
King King
House First Place
Hoarding: Buried Alive
Pimp. Ride PImp, Ride


Klng/HIll 'KIng/HIII
Swamp People WC
Married SMarrled
Dr. Drew
Piers Morgan Tonight
The Secret Circle (N)
IMPACT Wrestling (N) (
House Hunteor
Undercover Bons
Wrecked Wroaked


Amer. Dad Amer. Dad
Harvest"Scorchod"
Raymond IRaymond
The Joy Behar Show
Anderson Cooper 360
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Belling LA Selllng NY
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King South Pk k Roan
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House Hunters House
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Showbiz Tonight


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ruckerTrker NASCAR Race Hub


Fam. Guy Childrens
IRT Deadliest Roads


Roean (i Stereo)


Roseanne (In Stereo)
The Joy Behar Show


Piers Morgan Tonight
Vacuum Makeover
Entourage Ways Die
House First Place
Paid Prog. Paid Prog.
Gearz Hot Rod


awesome Aqua King/Hill King/Hill
Paid Prog. MagicJack Paid Prog. CarMD
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loint Better (N) (In Stereo) Paid Prog.
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garage Truck U Paid Prog. Paid Prog.


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American Morning (N)
The Dally Buzz MI
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39 HIST
40 TVLND
43 CNN2
45 CNN
46 CW
47 SPIKE
49 HGTV
98 TLC
99 SPEED


modern Marvels NM
/an Dyke Van Dyke
lane Velez-Mitchell
Erln Burnet OutFront
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all 0 JalJl iu
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boarding: Burled Alive
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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


PEANUTS BY CHARLES SCHULTZ
6000 MORNIN6..WOULD DOES IT YOU SHOULD 6ET SOMEONE
YOU BE INTERESTED IN HAVE CARTOONS TO DRAW CARTOONS IN IT..
5UB5CRIBIN6 TO OUR"6REAT IN IT? --
PUMPKIN "NEWSLETTER? 7


BORN LOSER BYART AND CHIP SANSOM
OW'5 LITTLE SHE'S5 ALREADY TilfE.FUE.-SOW DOE5 IT FELL gIT FEEL LIKF I'M AF CF5
5USE- \ IN MAbILE TO ETE.PARE~NOFA e BTWEERALI'lAOUStN E.AM B A
smHoo! i TWEVNERI ,- ATW


IG NATE BY LINCOLN PIERCE
IT'S SO OBVIOUS WELL, IF YOU OWNED
THAT GINA 5I MRS TWO ATS, AN ONE OF
GODFREY'S FAVORITE! THEM WAS WELL-
I THOUGHT TEACHERS BEHAVED AND THE
WERE SUPPOSED To OTHER WAS ALWAYS
TREAT EVERYONE SCRATCHING THE
ITHE SAME! FURNITURE, WHICH
WOULD YOU PREFER?



0


(NOW WHT IMEN



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.5


GRIZZWELLS BY BILL SCHORR
ThAT MEW B~y MtA~5 -A WE11,ToAY I'M o TO 4 l
ACT LIKE I PT EVE A'IPElTAUY PUMP1 WToU ,i
EX15T AT IllLUPEEP
SWltlRHIM ATONE

6 I WEi;L~fY f flplD HI .10v ]


I'M SUING.

WHAT?




S 4 11


YOUR CAT-COPTER
ATTACK DOG CAUSED
ME PERSONAL INJURY, AND
I WANT COMPENSATION.


WHAT'S THIS? YOUR
ROYALTY STATEMENT?
WOW, REALLY??
WOW..
THAT'S..
THAT'.S


I WOULD
NWEVE HE
OWN A DOESN'T
CAT.- KNOW
WHAT I
MEAN.
i lo}J^^^ ^


WOULD YOU LIKE SOME*
SPARE CHANGE?'

WE ALSO
ACCEPT HAY.




1 o


KIT'N'CARLYLE BY LARRYWRIGHT HERMAN BY JIM UNGER


10-20 LauhmgSlo Intonrnal in. MDl by Uri s1C ca fOa UFS. 201
"I showed him his bill. He wants
his gallstones put back in."


NEA Crossword Puzzle


ACROSS
1 Cocktail
6 Engine
parts
10 race
element in
salt
12 Leeway
14 Bellyached
15Vim and
vigor
16Tried out
18 Feminine
pronoun
19 Ancient
cosmetic
21 Tex.
neighbor
23 Hoop site
24 Piglet's
mother
26 Sidle past
29 Part of
GTO
31 Move to
and -
33 Govt.
branch
35 Big
celebration
36 banana
37Blizzard
maker
38 Sugar
amts.
40 Kind of
rally
42 Environmental
prefix


43And
then -!
45 Hurry
47 Sitcom E.T.
50 Honda rival
52 Flour
Infester
54 Bird or
beast
58 Lure
59Gasoline
rating
60 Kangaroo
pouches
61 Staring at

DOWN
1 Murky
2 Pooh's pal
3 Ms. Lupino
4 Beethoven
symphony
5 Pays
homage
6 Light
source
7 Is, for them
8 Baseball
VIPs
9 Express
relief
11 Magazine
execs
12Mild-
mannered
13PBS
"Science
Guy"


Answer to Previous Puzzle


S U R E

B L I GH[T
S A XES
17 Water-ski
gear
19 Jeweler's
measure
20 Doctoral
exams
22 Calculates
the total
.23 Quiche
base
25 Frequently
27 Trait
carriers
28.Important
period
30 Enjoys a
siesta
32 Unfold, in
verse
34Tango
quorum


G IVVEN
ORNATE
WANT D









39Seattle
A R TAICT
- WEARY
41 HorsHEP
RCE SEE



ONgait



44 Marathon
E N EACH
Y' CACAO
NORR I S
FLU ENT
COPS E
39Seattle
team
41 Horse's
gait
44 Marathon
unit
46Total
agreement
47 Floor
48Hubble
component
49 Goat
cheese
51 Tome
53Tayback or
Damone
55 After April,
In Paris
56 -Margret
57 Piano
support


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDrlverBooks.com


10-20 2011 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS



CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebri Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: E equals G
"KWY HSA SI SC LM DSRA FD FISG-
EIZM, ZGT DZT UZKD BWYYA ZUSRK
KWY DKYYOAY SC LM TIYZLD."
- HAZRTY TYURDDM


Previous Solution: "Ours is a world where people don't know what they want
and are willing to go through hell to get it." Don Marquis
S 2011 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 10-20


Horoscope
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.23)
- Be wary of taking a finan-
cial risk on an involvement
that you cannot personally
control.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) It's sad but true that
not everyone you deal with
will bide by the same high
standards you set for your-
self. Be careful not to trip
over your own naivete.
SAGITrARIUS (Nov. 23-
Dec. 21)- Even though you
have a sharp eye for details,
it might be difficult for you
to see the entire picture.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) Schedule your day
so that responsibilities are
given greater priority over
pleasurable pursuits.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) Be careful that you
don't base your judgment
and decision-making on
emotional rather than
logical aspects of your life.
Needless to say, you would
fare better if the emphasis
were reversed.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) A project you estab-
lish for yourself mightlook
far easier on paper than it
actually is.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
-You'll regret itlater if you
are irresponsible in han-
dling your personal funds.
Wasteful extravagance will
emerge victorious if you
don't practice a little finan-
cial discipline.
TAURUS,(April 20-May 20)
- If you promise or give
away much more than you
should when cutting a deal,
you'll regret it later, when
you have time to reflect.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
- Make sure you distin-
guish the difference be-
tween positive and mere
wishful thinking.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
- All types of material op-
portunities hover about
you at this point in time,
but you might not even
recognize them for what
they are.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) It
isn't right to expect others
to do things for you that
you can do equally well
or even manage far more
competently then they.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
- Even though you're a
rather perceptive individu-
al, you could accept some-'
thing at face value instead
of checking things out.


Annie's Mailbox


Dear Annie: Yesterday, our daughter-
in-law amiounced that she did not want
pictures of her children posted on Face-
book. My wife is beside herself, saying
that "Mary" has no right to do this.
My wife refuses to respect the request.
She has many pictures of the grand-
children that she took and has already
posted on Facebook. Personally, I agree
with my daughter-in-law, and as a result,
my wife won't speak to me. She accused
me of not being supportive. Should my
wife take the pictures down?
S--ANNOYED HUSBAND

Dear Annoyed: Yes, and for several
reasons. It's one thing to post a picture of
an unknown drunk at a bar. That is fair
game. But when someone specifically
asks you to remove a picture, it is a sign
of good will to do so. Also, these are pho-
tographs of children, and parents can be
highly sensitive to having those pictures
plastered in a public space. Your wife
should be respectful of Mary's parental
authority. But the overriding reason
should be maintaining a warm and lov-
ing relationship with your daughter-in-


Bridge


As we continue the week's theme of making
maximum use of kings, who comes out ahead
in this deal with best play from both sides?
South is in three spades and West leads the
heart queen.
At trick one, East probably decides he would
like West to shift to a diamond through dum-
my's unguarded king. So he will signal with his
heart two, asking partner to try elsewhere. And
a trusting West would probably next lead the
diamond 10. How does declarer react?
South has only eight tricks: five spades, two
clubs and a heart ruff in the dummy. He needs
to score a trick with the diamond king. But
West cannot have the diamond ace, because
that would give him six points and he would
not have passed over one heart.
Declarer must play low from the dummy at
trick two. East wins with his jack, cashes the
heart ace, and continues with the heart king.
South ruffs in the dummy, draws trumps, and
ducks another round of diamonds. He wins
, East's club switch in the dummy, ruffs a dia-
mond to bring down the ace, plays a club to
dummy, and discards his club loser on the dia-
mond king.


law. By refusing this request, your wife
is creating unnecessary rancor. Please
urge your wife to be patient. She can still
display the photographs at home, in her
purse or on her smartphone.

Dear Annie: I know how "Widowed and
Confused" feels about dating agaii. I was
widowed suddenly at the age of 45. For
months, I went to work and came home
and sat on my couch until bedtime. Then
a good friend took me out to a bar with.
a live band. When a man asked me to
dance ,I said yes.
My children were grown when their
father died, and my oldest was upset to
learn I was seeing someone. I said, "Can
you tell me when Dad is going to come
back? If you can, I'll sit right here and
wait for him." After a few minutes, she re-
plied, "You're right, Mom. He's not com-
ing back, and you need to live your life."
Tell "Widowed" to ask that same ques-
tion of anyone who thinks she should
mourn forever. I suspect they'll see the
simple truth and stop trying to make her
feel guilty.
DIDN'T WAIT FOREVER


FRANK & ERNEST BY BOBTHAVES


COW & BOY BY MARK LEIKNES


North 10-20-11
4 K965
VJ4
*K743
*AK2
West East
!'10 87 4 2
SQ 5 VAK10 9 6 2
S10 9 8 5 A QJ
SJ764 Q 83
South
*A QJ 43
9873
+ 6 2
*62
10 9 5
Dealer: East
Vulnerable: Both
South West North East
1Iv
PasPa ss Dbl. 2
24 Pass Pass Dbl.
Pass 3V Pass Pass
34 Pass Pass Pass

Opening lead: V Q


=1~--=i-p-


-.~-- -- o-


i ~------------------


-14B THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2011


F~N17n~4TNII~NT


I








CLASSIFIED


Tw.JCFLORIDAN.com


Jackson County Floridan *


Thursday, October 20, 2011- 5 B


WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED




MARKETPLACE


BY PHONE: (850) 526-3614 or (800) 779-2557
BY FAX: (850) 779-2557
ONLINE: WWW.ICFLORIDAN.COM


BY MAIL: WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE
P.O. BOX 520, MARIANNA, FL 32447
IN PERSON: 4403 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA


Publication Policy Errors and Omissions: Advertisers should check their ad the first day. This publication shall not be liable for failure to publish an ad or for a typographic error or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the ad for the first day's
insertion. Adjustment for errors is limited to the cost of that portion of the ad wherein the error occurred. The advertiser agrees that the publisher shall not be liable for damages arising out of errors in advertisements beyond the amount paid for the space
actually occupied by that portion of the advertisement In which the error occurred, whether such error is due to negligence of the publisher's employees or otherwise and there shall be no liability for non-insertion of any advertisement beyond the amount paid for
such advertisement. Display Ads are not guaranteed position. All advertising is subject to approval. Right is reserved to edit, reject, cancel or classify all ads under the appropriate classification.


F Id. e cltlr ovs w w 0od.co


JUST IN: Mantle w/gas logs;
Lawyers Bookcase; 6ft. kitchen table;
old toys & dolls: Blue Ridge dishes.
Medford Antique Marketplace, Hrs. 9-5.
3820 R.C.C. Dothan, 702-7390

Massive Commercial Restaurant
Equipment Auction.
Long time distributor of new & used
restaurant supplies will be liquidated.
All items must be sold.
Online bidding available.
1 pm Oct 9th 2011.
872 Coastal Hwy Panacea FL
www.affirmtedauctionscom
850-877-6180.
Ice Machines, Commercial dishwaLe,
Stainless steel sinks, Tilt skillet, Cambros,
New stainless steel hood, Dishwasher,
Delfield passthrough fridge, Pass-thru
rotisserie oven, Fire & Ice unit, Table tops,
Restaurant Booths, walk in coolers More.



I Pay CASH for Diabetic test
strips. Up to $10 per box!
Most brands considered.
All boxes must be unopened
and unexpired.
Call Matt 334-392-0260


Florida Department ofAgri ulture and Consumer Services
Cou MsONE- Ao H. PUTNAM
Recall: Drop-side cribs sold under
Scroll and Lauren names
The Florida Department of Agriculture and
Consumer Services, the U.S: Consumer Prod-
uct Safety Commission (CPSC), J. C. Perney
Purchasing Corp., of Piano, Texas, and Yu Wei
Co. Ltd., of Taipei,'have announced the recall
of about 8,000 drop-side cribs. The drop-side
rails on the crib can malfunction, detach or
unexpectedly fall down, causing part of the
drop side to fall out of position. When this
happens, a space is created into which an in-
fant or toddler can roll and become wedged
or entrapped, which can lead to strangulation
or suffocation. A child can also fall out of the
crib. Drop-side incidents can also occur due
to incorrect assembly and due to age-related
wear andtear.
Nine incidents involving drop side rails that
malfunctioned or detached have been report-
ed, including one report of a child who sus-
tained minor abrasions to the arm.
This recall involves Yu Wei full-size cribs sold
under the Scroll and Lauren model names.
The cribs were sold in antique white, pecan
and dark cherry, and have the following, mod-
el numbers and date codes listed on the in-
side of the crib's end panels.
Scroll Crib Model # 343-8225 Date Code Be-
tween: 01/2006-12/2010
Lauren Crib Model # 343-9117 Date Code
Between: 01/2006-12/2010
The recalled cribs were manufactured in Tai-
wan by Yu Wei Co. Ltd., of Taipei, and sold at
jdpenney.com and in the jcpenney catalog
from January 2006 through December 2010
for between $300 and $450.
Consumers should immediately stop using
the recalled cribs and contact Yu Wei to get a
free immobilizer kit that will immobilize the
drop side. In the meantime, parents are en-
couraged to find an alternate, safe sleep envi-
ronment for the child, suct as a bassinet,
play yard or toddler bed depending on your'
child's age.
Call Yu Wei at (877) 806-8190 between 10 a.m.
and 6 p;m. ET Monday through Friday, or visit
the firm's website at www.yuweicribrecalls.c
om. Consumers can also email the firm at yu
weiparts@aol.com to order a free
immobilizer kit.
Number: CW 1059
Date: October 20, 2011
Florida Department of Agriculture and Con-
sumer Services


Lost Silver Class Ring @ Chipola. Has C'dale
2012 & name engraved. 850-718,7507/579-2412


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
Your source for .selliigU uad Iuyng '


-- REWARD for info leading to
othe recovery of our STOLEN
'08 Green Honda Rancher.
Stolen on Sept. 16th in GranU
Ridge. Call 850-209-5801


2345 Martin Rd. Fri. 21st. 7-5 & Sat. 22nd 7-?
Tools, electronics, toys, kids clothes, kitchen /
goods, comforters, towels, christmas items,
dance with recital items, misc.
Estate Sale at 472 Lakepoint Rd. In Compass
Lake. Fri & Sat Oct 21st-22nd (8am-Spm)
We have furniture, H/H items, clothes, artwork,
and lots of misc!
MULTI-FAMILY YARD SALE :
Thurs. 7am-? & Sat. 7am-? Blue Springs Hwy
1.8mi, 1st road past Linny Ln. turn right.
Something for everyone!




Beautiful Upscale Lounge in Dothan.
Great location and price. Everything
included: custom built bar, furniture, 4-keg
cooler and other equipment, big screen tv,
and more. Owner financing available.
Serious inquiries only please.
Call 334-313-6207.













Seasoned Oak & Air Split
Truck Load = 9 stack $400. delivered
stack $45. 1/2stack $25.
Stack measures 4 ft. wd. & 4ft. high




BAR: Old English-type with matching
wooden bar stool, marble top with carved
wood front. Beatuful and in exceptional
condition. Approx. 4.5ft long $850. firm
Call 334-406-4386 after 4pm


Wanted: Old Coins, Gold,
Diamonds, Guns, And Tools
West Main Jewelry & Loan 334-671-1440.

Looking'for Hunting Land
Looking for land owner who will let me hunt
their land from 19 NOV-01 FEB. I am willing to
pay by the deer or a flat rate. I prefer the land
to be within 1 hour drive of Enterprise. It will
only be myself and'2 friends hunting the land.
Please contact me if you are interested. Aaron
@ 845-325-6332 or aaron.stark64@gmail.com.
Mobile Home Wanted looking for Gently used
S/W mobile home in good condition. 1 or 2
bdrms, preferably all electric appliances, a/c
"& heating. Will move. Call 850-569-2063


.Hot yTb 07' Solana-2 persOn,Akenew, de p, I
Edelbreck eltetronk fue nlejtlon 1r Cevyv
86' used $1000. 334_-726-3349/334:677-493j.

Thursday, October 20, 2011


'AI





THE SIDOKU s GAmE WITH A KICK!
HOW TO PLAY
Fill in the 9x9 grid with the missing
numbers so that each column, row and
3x3 box contains the digits 1 -' 9 only once.
There is only one correct solution
for each puzzle.
GET MORE WASABI .
PUZZLES ONLINE!
ARCHIVES AND MORE GREAT GAMES AT .
BOXERJAM.COM


Free kittens Multi-colored, multi-hair length/
850-482- 5880/850-303-9727 after 3pm

AKC BULLMASTIFF PUPS AWESOME LITTER
BREEDING THE BEST TO THE BEST, LOOKS LIKE
ROCKY'S DOG BUTKUS $1,250; WITH A SERV-
ICEMAN, WOMAN VETS DISCOUNT OF $200,
FAWNS, LITE, DARK BRINDLES
WWW.SEXTONSBULLZ.COM 334-806-5911
CKC Mini-Schnauzers
Black, Silver & Chocolate
($375- $475) Taking Deposits.
S/W, Groomed. Ready Nov 2nd
Call 334-889-9024
CKC Shih-Tzu puppies, Males and Ferales,
.First Shots and Dewormed. Beautiful Mark-
ings. Great with kids. $300.00. Call 334-248-
3447 or after 5pm Call 334-898-7067.
English Bulldog Puppies, 10 wks, AKC, shots,
$800/each. 850-387-1983


FOUND DOG: Male, reddish color, setter like,
near cypress needs home. 850-573-8060


FREE: adult dogs, M&F Beagles, Huskie-M mix
w/ blue eyes, Yellow-F Lab-calm 334-712-2121
Free Dogs Need a good home! 2 male Minia-
ture Pinscher/Chihuahua mixes, approximately
7 months old. Up to date on shots. Very loving
and active, but their favorite activity is sitting
in someone's lap. Intelligent pups!' Call 850-
899-0487.
FREE: Mother & Puppies. Dothan Med/Lg.
Mixed bteed 7 wks.CUTE! 334-693-2306
Free to GOOD home only, Lab mix puppies!
B/W, Males & Females 334-677-3713
LOST DOG COMPASS LAKE area near 231. Pitt
Mix,:brown /red. "Miley",Friendly. 850-693-5820
REWARD OFFERED!!


FREH ROUC


FEHPOU

SA 'S PODC
HAS FRESH[ps HOM Ej GROWNi


Plenty ofShelled, Fresh Peas,
Butterbeans, New Potatoes,
All Farm Fresh!
220 W. Hwy 52 Malvern
* 334-793-6690 e *


Southeastern Premner Sales Inc.
would like to invite yoi to our next sale
November 5th to be held at the Houston
County Farm Center. Tack begins at 10am
and horses to follow for more info go to
www.dothanhorsesalexonm
or cal Scott Robrts at 229-891-4454



TECHNLO




@___
_


5 2


2008 BLOCKDOT. INC. WWW.BLOCKDOT.


Wednesday's
WASABI SOLUTION
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eas FIND L J er
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6 B Thursday. October 20. 2011 Jackson County Floridan


CLASSIFIED


www.JCFLORIDAN.com


HELHAEHMS FRSALE


Is currently seeking individuals who are
team players, enthusiastic, and well
organized for the following positions.

RN House Supe r
Weekend (Sat. & Sun) 7a-3p
Thursday's 7p-7a

7a-7p Shift & 7p-7a Shift
F/TI& P/T

Parthenon Healthcare offers:
Great Pay and Benefits
Health, Vision & Dental

Please apply at:
Partbenbfn Hea.lacCaefodtstow
17884 NE Croml Stret Bilalttbwn, FL

I e M nimalLiftingnironmet I












CHILDCARE CAREERS START HERE!
Now Enrolling 6 wk. Child Care Director
Course $80. Must have 12mo. Child Care
Exp. Call Mrs. Alaina 334-691-7399.

^ Get a Quality Education for a
New Career! Programs
FORTIS offered in Healthcare,
HVAC and Electrical Trades.
Call Fortis College Today!
$ 888-202-4813.
COLLEGE For consumer information
www.Fortis.edu





CHIPOLA APARTMENTS '
SPACIOUS EFFICIENCIES AND
1 BEDROOM APTS SECTION 8 ASSISTANCE
AVAILABLE ON ALL UNITS
UNITS SPECIALLY DESIGNED FOR
HANDICAPPED OR DISABLED
FOR RENTAL INFORMATION CALL
(850) 526-4407 TDD #800-955-8771
4401 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA
MONDAY THRU FRIDAY, 9:00 AM TO 5:00 PM
EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY




2/1 Duplex,CH/A, water, sewer, appliances
,lawn care incl. $550 + $650 deposit, 1 year
lease 850-526-4425


3BR 1BA duplex &2BR2BA duplex both in
Grand Ridge both $425/mo + $425 dep. 8S0-
592-5571


1/2 block off US90 in Marianna close to every-
thing, courthouse and stores. 800 sq. ft, old
home, with city utilities. New vanity in bath-
room. Cheap rent as agent/owner has no
mortgage. Good responsible tenant wanted.
Only 1/2 month sec dep. Bad credit ok, no
evictions. No app fees for quick move-ins.
At least 1 yr. lease. Ed McCoy, Century 21
Sunny South Properties (850)573-6198
2 & 3 bedroom now available in Marianna &
near Blue Springs Park. 1 year lease, small pets
ok with deposit. Call 850-693-0570 Iv msg.
2BR/1BA Concrete block Rental in Marianna,
Tile floors, washer h/u, pets ok, $300/mo + $30
credit/bkgrnd ck. Additional houses and
apartments in Graceville 850-263-5753
2BR 1BA House at 4477 Fairfax Rd. $500/mo +
$500 dep. nice, quiet, safe neighborhood. 850-
482-8196/209-1301
2 Brick homes, 8mi E of Malone, 3BR 1 BA
$575/mo & 4BR 1 BA. $595/mo. Both require
$500 dep. lyr lease, & references, 850-569-
5940
3BR 2BA All tile floors, near Chipola, sm pets
ok $700/mo. + dep. Ref. req. (850) 573-1232
Large Country Home West of Afford 3/2 brick,
2 car garage, 2 large sheds, $850/mo. 3/2 brick
in Alford, $650/mo/ lease, dep. & ref. req.
850-579-4317/866-1965
Lovely 3BR 1BA House, Clean, in town, near
schools, nice yard, quiet neighborhood, out-
door pets ok, $600/mo with $600 deposit 850-
482-6211


2/2 in Alford, window A/C, $380 + deposit 350-
579-8882/850-209-1664/850-573-1851
2 & 3 bedroom mobile Homes in Cottondale.
$500 and up. H20, garbage, sewer included.
http:// www.charloscountry living, com.
850-258-4868/209-8847
2 & 3BR 2BA Mobile Homes in Cottondale no
pets, Central Heat & Air $400-$450 850-258-
l4EA I951 m maee~nn


2 &3 BRMH's in
Marianna & Sneads (850)209-8595.
3/2 $550 Quiet, well maintained Park,
Water/sewer/ garb/lawn included.
Other rentals available starting @ $395
n Joyce Riley RE 850-209-7825 4m
FIRST MONTH FREE, WATER/GARBAGE FREE
Large yards, CH/A, 2 & 3BR $300-$440/mo
In Cottondale. ** 850-249-4888 4w
Nice 2BR 1BA & 2BR 2BA MH's for rent in Altha.
$350-$450/mo. Several to choose from. Great
shape. 850-762-9555/573/5255
Rent toOwn: 2 & 3BR Mobile Homes.
Lot rent included. Also available,
1 & 2BR Apts & Houses. For details
*850-557-3432 or 850-814-6515 4w





Spacious Meeting Room Rental at Marianna
Womans Club, corner of Caledonia & Clinton
Now has 2 A/C units. $150/day 850-482-2076
[ -

M IREAL ESTATE F OSAI E


Country Home for Sale: 3BR 2BA on 2 acres, 8
mi to Marianna, Hospital. schools, churches,
Chipola College, shopping. By appt. only. $135k
J850-526-1414


HEADLAND'S BEST KEPT SECRET
699 CO RD 100, HEADLAND
$314,900
Craftsman Design Approx 2920 sq. ft.
4 BR 3 Baths Built in 2009 5.3 Acres
Slate and tile Hardwood floors
Granite Energy efficient
Formal DR 2 car garage 2 stall barn
Trey ceiling in master
18 ft. ceilingin living area
Lennox Three Zone system
Directions: Coming from Dothan take Westgate
Parkway to Harrison Rd. turn left on 134 then right
to Co. Rd. 3 go approx. 3 miles to Co. Rd. 100.
From Headland take Main St. in Headland. Left on
Hwy. 134W. to Right on Co. Rd. 83. Go approx.
2 miles andturn left on Co. Rd. 100.
REALTORS WELCOME!
Call 334-596-7763





Duplex Office Building for sale in downtown
Marianna. New roof, Located at 2912 Green St.
$140K will negotiate. Call 850-526-4448




S2010 Polaris 4x4 500EFI.
Winch, top, windshield.
Never in mud. Only 31 hrs.
Parked in carport New
Second. $11.000 new. Asking
$ 8,500. 334 897-2870

Golf cart: 2004.Like-new batteries and charger.
Excellent shape. $2,200. Call 334-677-0020.

Kubota 2008 RTV with only 209 Hours. en-
closed cab, dump back. Great for hauling.
$9,500. 334-355-0814


'06 Potter-Built, 18 ft, alum. 25hp, Yamaha, 4
stroke, galvanized trailer, decked out, garage
kept, $7200 850-482-8980
10.2' Bass Hound 2-Person Boat, 28 Ib. Thrust
Minn Kota Trolling Motor, Electric Running
Lights, Live Well with Aerator, 16' Trailer, $850,
Call 334-889-4677 and leave message.


.. ..,- Dutchman'10 27ft.sleeps
S8, Q-sz. bed, Frig, micro-
Swave, stove, wall mount for
flat screen, canopy, tow
hitch & cover, $15,500 OBO
334-550-9895.

FLEETWOOD PROWLER '99- 30ft., 1 slide out,
in excellent shape $7,900 334-687-3334
PUMA '07-29ft., 2 slide-outs, king bed, like
new $13,000 334-695-6359, 334-687-6157



Dixie RV SuperStores
FL's Newest RV Dealer
NOW OPEN!!!
*Store Hours*
Monday-Saturday
8.00am-600pm

21 Acres / 30 Brands New and Pre-Owned

Newmar Keystone s Heartland Jayco
Fleetwood Prime Time n Coachmen
Forest River

Service Department
Parts and Acces. Store
RV Collision Center

Located off 1-10 Exit 70 / SR285
328 Green Acres Dr.
De Funiak Springs, FL 32435
Sales and Service: 850-951-1000
www.dxierv.com. DO 12756

... Trail ite 2006 R-VISION
26 ft, fully loaded,
bought new, 13K miles
$44,995 334-616-6508





Ford Thunderbird '66 47 original miles, blue In
color, new tires, great condition $7,000. 334-
596-2240.
AUTO PARTS S3.Q 33SEN


Fuel Injection Edelbrock electronic
for Chevy 1985, used $1000.
4 334-726-3349 or 334-677-4971 4m


J Ford '01 F-150 or Ford Ranger
$895 Down, 0% Interest
Snn.n Cam 1n-m 1 OnnAl AA fc


'10 Ford Fusion SE, 4cyl. 4-door, 29K miles,
factory bumper to bumper warranty $14,500.
FIRM 334-618-8255.
1996 Volvo 960: White, sedan, 225,000 miles,
nice inside and out, good tires, A/C cold. Elec
seats, cruise, panel lights inop. $3,000. 334-
693-3692
2005 Nissan Sentra I am
selling my volcanic or-
ange 2005 Spec-V with
56,000 miles. The car
comes with I/H/E making about 205hp. Howev-
er, It still manages to get over 30 mpg on the
highway and includes sunroof and a 300-watt
Rockford Fosgate audio system with sub.Gar-
age kept for over 3 years. The car is mechani-
cally sound and runs great. Contact me at
thewolfe09@gmail.com or 972-742-0393. Pics
upon request. Thanks! $9,000
'98 Oldsmobile 4-door, white in color, clean
good condition $1500. 334-793-2142.
CHEV 76 MONTE CARLO-
400/4 BBL Numbers
match, cold A/C. 98K all
orig. runs strong cream
tan, car road ready $4,000
334-689-9045-MT
Chevrolet'01 Silverado X/Cab $1900 Down,
0% Interest. Open 9am 9pm, 1-800-470-0650
Chevrolet '89 Blazer: reddish color,very clean,
good condition $1,500. Call 334-793-2142.
Jeep '05 Wrangler Rubicon Black. Excellent
condition. Soft top. 100k miles. One Owner.
$11,500. $750 below Kelly blue book value.
334-796-9554


- ,* Eno CI 0 I WARI


Dodge '10 Charger
Sporty, NICE CAR, Loaded, LOW MILES,
GREAT FUEL ECONOMY!
$350 per mo. with $500 down.
Call: Steve Hatcher at 334-791-8243.

Ford '02 Taurus $575 Down, 0% Interest.
Open 9am 9pm, 1-800-470-0650
Ford '98 F-150 X/Cab $775 Down, 0% Interest.
Open 9am 9pm, 1-800-470-0650
Hyundai '06 Elantra GLS,
4 cyl. 4 door, automatic, oply, 36,000 miles,
loaded, like new, $8700. Call: 334-790-7959.
Kia '07 Optima
LIKE NEW! MUST SELL!
$200 down $189 per month.
Call Ron Ellis 334-714-0028.
Lincoln '05 LS
LOW MILES, LIKE NEW, SAVE THOUSANDS!
$200 down $249 a month.
Call Ron Ellis 334-714-0028.
Mecury 93' Station Wagon: light blue, very
clean, 120k miles, good condition $1,995.
Call 334-793-2142.
Mercedes'97 S500 Roadster: red convertible,
wine leather interior,55k miles, excellent condi-
tion. Call 334-693-3980
NEED A VEHICLE? GOT BAD CREDIT?
I can get U Riding Today Repos, Slow
Credit, Past Bankruptcy OKI $0 Down/ 1st '
Payment, Tax, Tag & Title Push, Pull or Drag,
Wll Trade anything Warranty On Every
Vehicle Soldl $20 Gift Card w/pu rchas
Call Steve 800-809-4716
Nissan '03 350-Z Low Miles, Great Condition,
Black, Selling price $12,300 334-677-3631
Pontiac '01 Grand Prix $575 Down, 0% Interest.
Open 9am 9pm, 1-800-470-0650
Pontiac '96 Bonneville SSEI, black/black leath-
er, PW, PS, CD, power sunroof, HUD, non-
smoker, very good condition, 129,000 miles,
asking $4,500 OBO, 334-687-4626.
Pontiac '98 Grand Prix: at., a/c. sunroof
$595 Down, 0% Interest Open 9am 9pm,
1-800-470-0650
Subaru 09 Forester silver with black int. 4K
miles, all wheel drive, new tires;great vehicle.
$21,000. OBO 334-308-1112.
Volkswagen 09 EOS: hard top convertible with
pano roof, silver with tan leather interior, fully
loaded luxury package, 29k miles, super nice
and very clean, $23,500. Call 334-685-1070


Harley Davidson '0 SSuper Glide 1450 CC, Lots
of Chrome and high-end parts. Mint Condition.
Sacrifice for $7900 334-648-0348


Got a Clunker
SWe'll be your Junker!
We buy wrecked cars
and Farm Equip. at a
fair and honest price!
$325. & up for
Complete Cars CALL 334-7024323








Call 334-18-1274






LF15571
Notice of Meeting

On Tuesday, October 25, at 6 PM, the Jackson
County Board of County Commissioners will
hold its regular meeting at 2864 Madison
Street, Marianna, Florida.
i-n arenrta n wit*h h.Lor Arnariran* with nir:k:


9
U1



Ui


*


III U Uaccoru ance wILIth the LII Americ ans witI Uisa
HARLEY DAVIDSON '97 ROAD KING-45K, color ities Act, persons needing special accommoda-
Black Emerald, excellent condition, $7,500 tion to participate in this meeting should con-
tact the Administrator's assistant no later than
OBO, 229-317-3112 5 days prior to the meeting. The Administra-
Honda'08 Shadow Arrow: BT750, 5k miles, tor's assistant may be contacted at 2864 Madi-
black with lots of chrome, never been dropped son Street, Marianna, FL, 32448, (850) 482-9633,
or wrecked, $3500. Call 334-596-3656 or (800) 955-8771 (TDD).
f Suzukl'95Savagee 650 Bur- -T____Cl[____F _SALE_
gundy with chrome pipes &
trim, saddle bags, new full LF15566
windshield, runs great just
serviced, 12300k mi. IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
Must see to appreciate $2000. 850-526-4645. FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
SPORTUTo _ILITYFOR JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA

2008 Chevrolet Tahoe LTZ, 44,480 miles, black, CASENO. 11-210-CA
leather, 4X4, DVD, navigation, warranty, excel- FARM CREDIT OF NORTHWEST FLORIDA, ACA,
lent condition, $9200, amassa@netscape.com Plaintiff,
Chevrolet'01 Blazer, a.t, ac., 4-door
$695 Down, 0% Interest. Open 9am 9pm, vs.
1-800-470-0650
Chevrolet'02 Blazer $675 Down, 0% Interest ALBERT L MESSER,MICHELER. MESSER,
Open 9am 9pm, 1-800-470-0650 -AMERICAN EXPRESS CENTUltION BANK and
Open 9am 9pm 1-800-4UNKNOWN TEANT(S),
CHEVY '03 SUBURBAN- 1500 LT, Loaded, 50K Defendants.
miles, Good Condition, $13,000 334-355-1373 NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
Dodge '99 Durango $575 Down, 0% Interest
Open 9am 9pm. 1-800-470-0650 NOTICE is given pursuant to a Final Judgment
Jeep '02 Liberty Lmited 4X4, red automatic of Foreclosure dated October 5, 2011, in Case
6cyl. sunroof, leather, CD, all PWR options No. 11-210-CA, of the Circuit Court of the Four-
exc. clean, good tires, no accidents, 103K mi. teenth Judicial Circuit, in and for Jackson Coun-
$7500. OBO 334-389-3071. ty, Florida, in which Farm Credit of Northwest
Florida, ACA is the Plaintiff and Albert L Mess-
Nissan '05 Xterra. V6, black exterior, running er, Michele R. Messer, American Express Cen-
boards, fog lights, and towing package. 60,000 turion Bank and Unknown Tenant(s) are the
miles. $12,000 or best offer. Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best
Home 334-894-5205 Cell 334-389-7600 bidder for cash on November 3, 2011 at 11:00
E-Mail sdclark@roadrunner.com a.m. CST at the front lobby of the Jackson
i lfT HKi I County Courthouse, 4445 Lafayette Street, Ma-
rianna, Jackson County, Florida, the property,
2008 GMC Sierra 1500 Denall Crew Cab, 25873 set forth in the Final Judgment of Foreclosure,
miles, black, leather, sunroof, navigation, DVD, and more particularly described as follows:
excellent condition, warranty, $10,900, robhof The W H of SE % of NW A, lying east of State
@netscape.com Road No. 164 (Blue Springs Dellwood Road),
Chevrolet '01 Silverado X/Cab $1275 Down, 0% less parcels sold to J.D. Barfield and Bruce
Interest. Open 9am 9pm, 1-800-470-0650 Barfleld, Also: The W of NE 'of SW%, all in
Chevrolet '92 Cheyenne Truck V6 5-Speed, Section 20, Township 5 Iorth, Range 8 West
A/C, New Tires, Long Bed, 94K mi. Excellent Less and except
Condition $2800 OBO 334-798-1768 or Less an except
334-691-2987 Commence at the Southeast corner of the W
Chevrolet '99 Silverado X/Cab a.t., a.c., of the Northeast 1/ of Southwest '/ of Section
$1295 Down, 0% Interest 20, Township 5 North, Range 8 West of Jackson
Open 9am 9pm, 1-800-470-0650 County, Florida, thence run N0012'45"E,
Dodge '02 Ram 1500 4-wheel drive, quad cab 1844.85 feet to the Point of Beginning, thence
P/U with 4.7 liter engine, cold air, chrome run- N91'18"W, 208.70 feet,thence N 0012'45"E,
ning boards, chrome rims, chrome tool box 185.40 feet, thence N 5206'35"W, 265.14 feet to
ning boards, chrome rims, chrome tool box, the Southerly right of way line of State Road
tow package and new tires. 149,698 miles. No. 164, thence N310125"E, 16.23 feet, thence
Excellent condition. $8499. 4 334-790-6832. departing said right of way line on a bearing of
Ford '01 F150 $975 Down, 0% Interest. S 89051'18"E, 334.94 feet, thence S 0012'45"W,
Open 9am 9pm. 1-800-470-0650 487.80 feet to the Point of Beginning.


I


Also less and except:


Up, ~aI,,, p.,,, I-ou- u-Vo-UU Commence at the Southeast comer of the W%
-of the Northeast % of the Southwest % of Sec-
FORD '89 F150, 4wh, 4x4 tlon 20, Township 5 North, Range 8 West of
Auto, $4,600 or reasonable Jackson County, Florla, thence run N
00-12'45"E, 1,496.97 feet to the Point of Begin-
offer. Call 229-334-8520. ning, thence N 6208'12"W, 747.92 feet to a
point on the Easterly right of way line of State
Road No. 164, thence N 31001'25"E, along said
TRACTOR-IH1440 Combine, LOOK right of way line, 418.15 feet, thence departing
TAsaid right of way line on a bearing of S
Field Ready, Grain Head and Corn Head. 35'44, 295.66 feet, then S 0012'45"W,
185.40 feet, thence S 8951'18"E, 208.70 feet,
$7,000. 8504150438 thence S 0012'45"W, 34788 feet to the Point of
Beginning.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
2003 Pontiac Montana Van $ 4 from the sale, if any, other than the property
2003 Pontiac Montana Van $5,500, 49,000 owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must
miles, extended body, 4 brand new Good year file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale.
tires! front and rear AC, cruise control,
CD/radio, exterior white, interior gray. Alaba- DATED: October 5, 2011
ma rebuilt title after minor damage (replaced
rear bumper and side door) RUNS GREAT, DALE R. GUTHRIE
LOOKS GREAT. Perfect for business of family! Clerk of the Circuit Court
(334) 701-8862 or (334)796-6729
'95 Honda Odyssey Van load BY: Tammy Bailey
ed, rear air, clean, 160k mi. Deputy Clerk
$2500. OBO 334-691-7111 or
698-1768
Chevrolet'97 Astro Van A
conversion Van raised
roof, loaded, new tires,
One owner, GREAT
condition. 52K mi. $9,500.
334-897-2054 or
334-464-1496
Pontiac '99 Montana V-6, One owner. 145K
miles, needs head gasket, $2600. OBO CASH E CLASS
Serious inquiries only call 334-693-3141
9AM 8PM ONLY.


_ I I


Pontiac '05 Montana Van
GREAT FAMILY TRANSPORTATION!
Loaded, DVD, Leather, Captain chairs,
Pwr. seats, $250 per mo. with $300 down.
Call: Steve Hatcher at-334-791-8243.




Call for Top Price for
Junk Vehicles

I also sell used parts
24 HOUR TOWING 4 334-792-8664

CALL TODAY FOR YOUR TOWING NEEDS



AUTO BODY & RECYCLING
PAYING TOP DOLLAR FOR JUNK CARS
Contat Jason Harger at 334-791-2624


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www.JCFLORIDAN.com CLASSIFIED


Jackson County Floridan *


Thursday, October 20, 2011- 7 B
Thursday, October 20, 2011 7 B


Laptop Docking Station: HP xb2000 Notebook
xE pension Base. $50 OBO. Cal .


Microphone mixer 6 chan. by Pyle Pro. New in
box $50. 334-400-3736.


Poker Table Top by Cardinal. New in box. $35..
334-400-3736
Splash Guard Set for Mazda CX-7, P/N
EG21V3450F. Never used. $100. 840-482-6859
Terracotta flower pots of various sizes $15. Call
Charlie 850-592-8769
Wood burning heater by Comfort Pot-belly
style. Like new, $450. Charlie (850)592-8769
5 Star 6lympus Camera, SP 600 UZ digital,
new cond., $160 FIRM 850-482-7665 after 12
Antique Footstools (3) $100 for all 850-566-
7066/592-7257
Baby Boys Clothes, 0-12mos $25-$30/box 850-
693-3260
Bassinet $20 Pack-n-Play $30
both blue 850-526-3426
Bed Frame, wood, double, $15
850-209-4989
Color T.V. 25" $25
850-209-4989
Converter Boxes for TV's, unused $5 each
850-209-4989


Dressers (2) $150
Highchair $15 850-693-3260
GE Electric Range, black, less than 1 yr old.
$200 OBO 850-557-4342
Glass Clorox Bottles $5 each 850-592-2881
Gun Safe by RedHead, 24 capacity, $495 850-
592-2881
Jewelry, old, with display end tables (2) $300
for both 850-566-7066/592-7257
Piano, Wurlitzer Console $500 OBO 850-718-
6299
Santa Suit with nice beard $20 850-526-3426
SStep2 Play & Shade Patio Set in/outdoor use
table w/umbrella & 4 chairs, 850-482-5434, $40
Table setting, 39 pc Christmas Joy sold by
Bealls, never used $75 850-566-7066/592-7257
TRUCK BEDLINER OFF 2002 FRONTIER QUAD
CAB WITH 6FT BED, $50, (850)482-2636


Twin bedding (2 sets) good condition, $100
850-526-3038


VHS Tapes (240) $50 850-526-3426
Wagner Power Painter Pro New in box, $50
850-526-3038
Wardrobe Storage: American Cherry Finish.
Have 2.Only $50 ea. 850-482-2636 Marianna


Call a Classified Sales Representative

for Employment Advertising, Pets,

Announcements, Transportation,

. .fFarm & Garden, Recreation,

Real Estate & Merchandise-

at 702-6060 or (800) 779-2557

to place your ad in t
DOTHAN EAGLE
JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN

The ENTERPRISE LEDGER ARMY FIER
THE DTHAN PROGRESS
THE EUFAUIA TRIBUNE
SOPELKA-AUBURN NEWS


I SELFS~TORAGE


*'8 aownl
S on any building
100% FINANCING AVAILABLE
33 Years in Business
SWE MOVE PORTABLE BuN.i.G


APPY


HOME REPAIR
WE'LL BEAT ANY PRICE!!
Big Or Small Jobs WELCOME
850-t482881 502762..k BIl-


Clay O'Neal's
Land Clearing, Inc.
ALTHA, PL
850-762-9402
Cell 850-832-5055


WE OFFER COWLE
y -
Daarna= PaDanils
AUMOEWKEM
20 YMMS FMB .


hN' ']FF INGTEE AI


850-209-1090
For ALL your Real Estate Needs!
Century 21 Sunny South Properties
850-526-2891
in4630 Hwy 90 Marianna

4 Point Insurance Inspections
Wind Mitigation Inspections
Performed by JAMES GRANT
State Certified Building Code Administrator
State Certified Building Contractor
Slate Licensed Electrical Contractor


Personal Toup 1
Computer Repair
A+ AND NETWORK+ CERTIFIED
FREE PICKUP, DELIVERY, AND SET UP
WITHIN THE CITY LIMITS MARIANNA6
RICHARD REGISTER 850-557-6061


I- WEL RILIG RPAR.


I SELF STORAGEy


Lester Basford BESTW Y
Well & Pump Company
4513 Lafayette St Marianna, FL PORTABLE BUILDINGS
0. L f 91t. F86. C LaRGEST MANUFACTURER Of PORTABLE BUILDINGS IN NoR0s FLORID
850.526.3913 0 850.693.0428 C
850.482.2278 HWE
HAVE
R G LOVER
DIFFERENT SIZES!
SYOU CAN CHOOSE
COLOR& STYLE
Newand Reroofs Shingles and Metal B.UL.. B llT.0NS l, I
Roof Repai ani Cr r 8
Free Estimates.*cl'-ero s.-r.i I,,,i U -& 3 3614 HW" 90 Mafann, FL 8048868


ALL NW FLORiOD


&LECTRCAL REPAIRS
& UPGRADES
Replace your old Electrical Service
with a New Service
QUALITY WORK REACOMAILE PRICE
JAMES GRANT, LLC =-


I EECTI CA-- LWOR, KI;


l r- l I A f Fast, easy, no pressure

Pa1 alnll Cl 24 hours a day, 7 days a week!

I, t Get live previews of your classified ads, receive price quotes
and make secure online payments.

\ www.jcfloridan. com
I ........... ...d


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


S8B THURSDAY. OCTOBER 20, 2011


Nationwide Rale ad (overage Area
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