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Jackson County Floridan
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028304/00672
 Material Information
Title: Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title: Sunday Floridan
Portion of title: Floridan
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Jackson County Floridan
Publisher: Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Marianna Fla
Creation Date: October 19, 2011
Publication Date: 1934-
Frequency: daily (except saturday and monday)[<1979-1995>]
weekly[ former 1934-<1955>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates: 30.776389 x -85.238056 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note: "Independent."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID: UF00028304:00672
 Related Items
Preceded by: Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by: Marianna Floridan

Full Text


Informing more than 17,000 readers daily in print and online
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LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY


PO BOX 11Iuu0
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-7007



i.X DiruJAJN


COUNTY


Marianna Lady

Bulldogs cruise past

Holmes County. See

more on page lB.


Vol. 88 No. 203


A Media General Nerspaape


State News


Businesses see bright future with free trade


The Associated Press
MIAMI Florida businesses
are celebrating the approval of
the free trade agreements with
Colombia, Panama and South
Korea, hoping they boost both
the state's exports and its image


as the gateway to Latin Ameri-
can business opportunities.
The agreements signed last
Wednesday will eliminate tariffs
on U.S. products, help protect
intellectual property anl im-
prove access.for American inves-
tors in those countries. Experts


say they could boost the nation's
exports by $13 billion and the
Obama administration says
it will add at least 70,000 new
jobs for Americans. Working out
the final details with the other
countries could still take several
months.


While much of the national at-
tention has focused on the South
Korea deal, in Florida the imme-
diate focus is on the Colombian.
About 16 percent of Florida's
economy is based on inter-
national business, and at $4.5
billion, Colombia is the state's


fourth-largest export market
after Brazil, Switzerland and
Venezuela.
Joseph Reagan Jr., a vice
president for the Baltimore-
based Wexford Science and
See TRADE, Page 7A


SAY FIRE SAFETY!


MARK KINNER/FLORIDAN
Marianna firefighters pose with kids at the Fire Safety Fun Day on Saturday. The firefighters
Educated the public on fire safety with speakers, tours and demonstrations, while also
providing some family fun.
.'*


Breathe Easy

Medical entities


hold respiratory


health seminars


BY LAUREN DELGADO
Idelgado@jcfloridan.com

Emerald Coast Hospice,
Campbellton-Gracev-
ille Hospital and Gentiva
Home Health held a semi-
nar covering several as-
pects of respiratory health
at the First United Meth-
odist Church on Tuesday.
"What we're shooting
for is to help educate the
community with the facts
so they can take more re-
sponsibility for their own
health care," said Carol
Ricks, an RN with Emerald
Coast Hospice.
Lecturers spoke to the
crowd of about 30 people
from throughout the area,
handing out pamphlets
and other informational
items at the end of the day.
Dr. Steve Davis with
.Campbellton-Graceville
Hospital described a num-
ber of chronic respiratory
issues, from bronchitis to
the flu, and ways to avoid
these illnesses, and care for
them at home.
He was followed up by
Brigitta Nuccio from Big


LAUKtN UtLVAUU/nULORIAN
Amanda Hinson, an
occupational therapist
from Gentiva Home Health,
demonstrates how to put on
and take off shoes without
expending a lot of energy at
the Breathe Easy Respiratory
Health Seminar held on
Tuesday.
Bend Area Health Educa-
tion Center, who spoke of
the importance of quitting
See HEALTH, Page 7A


Marianna holding food

drive for needy families


BY LAUREN DELGADO
Idelgado@jcfloridan.com

The City of Marianna is hold-
ing a food drive through Nov.
18 for families in need during
the upcoming Thanksgiving
season.
"One can of food, one item,
it doesn't matter," said Julie
Chance, the drive's coordinator
and the human resource direc-
tor for the City of Marianna. "If
you just contribute, I'd hope it'd
make you feel satisfied inside for
the holiday season to help an-
other person or family in need."
Donations can be dropped off
at either the clerks office or the
office of Julie Chance, the hu-
man resource director, at Mari-
anna's City Hall.
The food will be distributed
through- Chipola Family Minis-
tries around the holiday time.
Chance is looking for sugges-
tions from the public of other
groups who distribute food to
families in need. Depending on
the amount of food donated,
she may split donations among
the groups.
Most non-perishable items
can be donated. Chance is ask-
ing that people not donate fro-
zen food because of a lack of a
storage area, baby food because
many who need it use WIC, and
large packaged items because
they can't be divided among
families.


If you have any questions
about appropriate food dona-
tions, call Chance at 718-1001.

Favorable food
donations
SDonations can be dropped off
at the clerks office or the officeof
Julie Chance at Mananna's Cit'
Hall.
Canned meat
Canned vegetables
SCanned fruit
n Canned juice
SPeanut butter
J elly
Spaghetti Sauce
P Noodles
Grits
SCream ofWheat
SRice
Beans
SPeas
iffy Mix
SStuffing
Flour
Sugar
Sauces
Pasta
Box Meals
Please no:
Frozen food
Bread
Candy
Baby food
Large boxed items
SLarge bagged items
SPaper products .


Stay safe


during


Halloween
BY LAUREN DELGADO
Idelgado@jcfloridan.com

Members of the safety community are
reminding Jackson County residents to
be safe duringHalloween.
Although most people think of candy
tampering when thinking about poi-
soning around Halloween, glow sticks
are a more prevalent issue, said Dr.
Sollee, the assistant director of the For-
ida/USVI Poison Information Center
in-Jacksonville. Children can chew or
break the sticks, releasing the painful
and irritating chemicals inside.
Candy, although less likely to be an
issue, should still be checked for tam-
pering. Any torn or rewrapped candy
should be-thrown out.
A good idea, Dr.Sollee said, is to make
sure children have a good meal before
trick-or-treating to ensure they don't
eat candy that hasn't been checked.
Before wearing costume makeup, put
some of it on a small area of skin to test
if the person has an allergic reaction to
it.
Fire safety is another aspect of Hal-
loween to be aware of. Candles are one
of the top causes for fires, a fact that in-
creases around Halloween said Jackson
County Fire Marshal Chuck Sawyer.
Always keep an eye on candles and
blow them out when the festivities are
over, Sawyer said. People should avoid
billowing costumes. Dry decorations,
like corn stalks or crepe paper should
be kept out of reach of candles.
See SAFETY, Page 7A

Halloween safety
Resources to have on hand to have a.
fun, safe holiday.
The Poison Information Center at
1-800-222-1222 for poisoning
emergencies or questions.
The National Fire Protection.
Association (nfpaorg) for more
Halloween safety tips.

m rn_


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN FILE PHOTO
In this file photo, Nymiracle White hunts for
the perfect treat while visiting the Marianna
Fire Department on Oct. 30,2010. Members
of the safety community advise inspecting
all Halloween candy.


) CLASSIFIEDS...5-7B ENTERTAINMENT...4B


) LOCAL...3A


) OBITUARIES...7A


) OPINION...4A


) SPORTS...1-3B


) TV LISTINGS...3B


This Newspaper
Is Printed On
Recycled Newsprint




7 !6516 80050o 9


4204 Lafayette St. Marianna, FL.

^ (850) 482-6317


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12A WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 19,2011


WAIE-UP CALL


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Today -.ustinKiefer/,WMBB


High 670
Low -43


J | High 69
Low 380

Tomorrow
Sunny & Cool.



SHigh 72
S Low -450


Saturday
Sunny & Mild.


Friday
Pleasant.



High -750
4 Low 50


Sunday
Sunny & Mild.


TIDES
Panama City Low -
Apalachicola Low-
Port St. Joe Low -
Destin Low -
Pensacola Low -

RIVER READINGS
Woodruff
Blountstown
Marianna
Caryville


ULTRA VIOLET INDEX


2:00 PM
2:43 AM
1:26 PM
2:37 PM
3:11 PM


High
High
High
High
High


Reading
39.15 ft.
0.44 ft.
4.67 ft.
0.31 ft.


- 2:30 AM
- 7:39 AM
- 2:21.AM
- 2:54 AM
- 3:27 AM.

Flood Stage
66.0 ft.
15.0 ft.
19.0 ft.
12.0 ft.


0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8-10 Very High, 11+ Extreme

1o0, 12


THE SUN AND MOON
Sunrise 6:46 AM
Sunset 6:06 PM
Moonrise 11:00 PM (Tue) Oct.
Moonset 1:06 PM 20


HEL
Oct. Nov. Nov.
26 2 10


FLORIDA'S REIL

PANHANDLE

MEDIA PARTNERS wJAQ 10o.9-
. L*IS F H L.5.AE U A


JACKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN

Publisher -Valeria Roberts
vroberts@jcfloridan.com

Circulation Manager Dena Oberski
doberski@jcfloridan.com








/ CONTACT US
Telephone: 850-526-3614
FAX: 850-482-4478
Email: editorial@jcfloridan.com
Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447
Street Address:
4403 Constitution Lane
Mariana, FL32446
Office Hours:
Weekdays,8 a.m. to.5 p.m.

MISS YOUR PAPER?
You should receive your newspaper no later
than 6 a.m. If it does not arrive, call Circula-
tion between 6 a.m. and noon, Tuesday to
Friday, and 7 a.m. to 11 a.ri. on Sunday. The
Jackson County Floridan (USPS 271-840)
is published Tuesday though Friday and
Sunday mornings. Periodical postage paid
at Marianna, FL.

SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Home delivery: $11.23 per month; $32.83
for three months; $62.05 for six months;
and $123:45 for one year. All prices include
applicable state and local taxes. Mail
subscriptions must be paid in advance. Mail
subscriptions are: $46.12 for three months;
$92.24 for six months; and $184.47 for one
year.

ADVERTISING
The advertiser agrees that the publisher.
shallnot be liable for damages arising
out of errors and advertisements beyond
the amount paid for the space actually ;,
occupied by that-portion of the advertise-
ments ri which the error occurred, whether
such errdr is'due to the negligence of the
publisher's employees or otherwise, and
there shall he hot liability for non-inser-
tion of any advertisement beyond the
amount paid for such advertisement. This
newspaper will not knowingly accept or
publish illegal material of any kind. Advertis-'
ing.which expresses preference based on
legally protected personal characteristics is
not acceptable.

HOWTO GETYOUR
NEWS PUBLISHED
The Jackson County Floridan will publish
news of general interest free of charge.
Submit your news or Community Calendar
events via email, fax, mail, or hand delivery.
Fees may apply for wedding, engagement,
anniversary and birth announcements.
Forms are available at the Floridan offices.
Photographs must be of good quality and
suitable for print. The Floridan reserves the
right to edit all submissions.
GETTING IT RIGHT
The Jackson County Floridan's policy
is to correct mistakes promptly. To
report an error, please call 526-3614
Monday-Friday.


SCommunitv Calendar


TODAY
a Eldercare Services at 4297 Liddon St. in Mari-
anna will give out USDA and Brown Bag food at 8
a.m.
STourist Development Council meeting -10 .
a.m. attthe Jackson County Chamber of Commerce,
4318 Lafayette St. in Marianna. .
i. Alcoholics Anonymous Open meeting, noon
to 1 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901
Caledonia St., Marianna, ih the AA room.

THURSDAY, OCT. 20
Marianna High School Class of 198130-year
Reunion Oct. 20-23. Events include the Bulldog
Blast, Homecoming parade, a pre-game cookout,,
Saturday picnic, dinner/dance, and Sunday morning
worship.Call 557-2224.
) Caregiver Support Group meeting -11 a.m.
Sito noon in the social hallof First Presbyterian
Church, 4437 Clinton St. in Marianna. Open to all
family caregivers providing care.to loved ones or
friends. Confidential group is facilitated by a profes-
sional group counselor. Coffee, water, light snacks
provided.
) Jackson County NAACP meeting, 5:30 p.m.
in the St. James A.M.E. Church.basement, 2891
Orange St. in Marianna. Call 569-1294.
Bulldog Blast Homecoming Pep Rally 6 p.m.
in the Marianna High School Gymnasium. Get ready
for Friday's football game. The Homecoming Court
will be introduced. Public welcome. Admission: $3
per person (school age and older).
Alcoholics Anonymous Closed discussion, 8
to 9 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901 Cale-
donia St., Marianna, in the AA rooM. Attendance
limited to persons with a desire to stop drinking.
Jackson Hospital Foundation Inc. convenes
for its annual meeting in the Hudnall Building com-
munity room. Call 718-2601for details.'

FRIDAY, OCT. 21
Blood Drive The Southeastern Community
Blood Center mobile unit will be at Malone High
School, 8 a.m.'to 2:30 p,m.; or give blood 9 a.m. to 6
p.m. Monday-Friday at 2503 Commercial Park Drive
in Marianna. Call 526-4403.
International Chat'n' Sip Jackson County
Public Library Learning Center staff and interna-
tional English learners invite the public to join them
8:30 to 10 a.m. at 2929 Green St. in Marianna, to
exchange language, culture, and ideas in a relaxed
environment. Light refreshments. Call 482-9124.
S Small Business Seminar at Chipola College
-- Starting Your Own Restaurant Business" is 9:30
S'a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in Room M-108 of the Business
and Technology building. Cost: $30. Register at


http://clients.floridasbdc.org/center.aspx?center4
1230&subloc4. Call 718-2441 or email seversone@
chipola.edu.
Grand Opening/Ribbon Cutting Jackson
County Chamber of Commerce conducts a ribbon
cutting ceremony at 11 a.m. duringthe grand open-
ing.of Wijfiams Paint & Body Shop, 4909 Highway
90 East in Marianna (next to HopRins Motors).
Lunch provided. Shotgun giveaway at noon (must
be 18, one entry per household). Call owners Eddie
and Theresa Williams at 482-0332 or the Chamber
at 482-8060. .
i Jackson.'Hospital Board.of Trustees Finance
Committee meets at noon in the Hudnall Building
Community Room.
a Marianna High School Homecoming The
parade is at 3 p.m. in downtown Marianna (line-.up is
at 2 p.m. on Daniels Street). In Bulldog Stadium, the
2011 MHS Homecoming Queen will be crowned dur-
ing a pregame ceremony at 6:15 p.m., ard the MHS
Bulldogs faceoff with the Walton County Braves at 7
p.m. Admission to the footballgarne: $5.
) Celebrate Recovery Adult, teen meetings to
"overcome hurts, habits and hang-ups,"7 p.m. at
Evangel Worship Center, 2645 Pebble Hill Road. Din-
ner: 6 p.m. Child care available. Call 209-7856.
) Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, 8 to
9 p.m. in the AA room at First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St., Marianna.

SATURDAY, OCT. 22
The Marianna High School Class of 1991
Reunion is today. Those interested in attending are
asked to R.S.V.P. to 209-2212 or 557-1701.
n Marianna Woman's Club Yard Sale Fundraiser
- 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the clubhouse. Plants, baked
goods and more will be for sale.
) Make a Difference Day- Pick Up Marianna;
presented by the City of Marianna, asks volun-
teersto lend a hand to keep the community clean,
starting at 8 a.m. from the old jail. There will be give-
aways and a chance for one volunteer to win a free
month of utilities. Call482-4129 or email nlong@
cityofmarianna.com."
n Marianna City Farmers Market is open 8 a.m. to
noon for the fall season, Saturdays only in Madison
Street Park.
) Benefit Ride The Heaven's Saints Motorcycle
Ministry's Northwest Florida Chapter hosts its 3rd
annual benefit ride for A Women's Pregnancy Cen-
ter. Registration: 9 a.m. at the First United Method-
ist Church, Marianna; first bikes out: 10 a.m. Ride
ends at Page Pond Assembly of God in Altha, with
a picnic lunch. Cost: $20 per rider and $5 for the
passenger. Those not riding are welcome for lunch
around noon. Lunch is free; donations accepted.
Call 718-7955 or 544-6908.


The submission deadline for this calendar is two days before publication. Submit to: Community Calendar, Jacksc
email editorlal@jcfloridan.com, fax 850-482-4478 or bring items to 4403 Constitul


a Graceville Garden Club Fundraiser Ham-
burger and hotdog plates,11 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the
Graceville Civic Center back meeting room. Plates
(a hamburger or two hot dogs, chips, dessert and
drink) are $6 each. Contact a club member for tick-
ets or call 263-3951. Yellow, bronze, or burgundy/
yellow mums ($12 each)will also be on sale, outside
the Civic Center; pre-order from.any club member.
) Signature HealthCARE at The Courtyard
October Fest -1to 8.p.m. at 2600 Forest Glen
Trail in Marianna, with a pumpkin patch/pumpkin
lighting; live music and dancers; cheerleaders;
bouncy houses; hay rides; a haunted mate; face
painting and a Howl-O-Ween Dog Show. Hot dogs,
popcorn, boiled peanuts, sno-cones and hot
chocolate will be for sale. Admission: free. Vendor
booths: $25. All proceeds benefit SHC residents.
Call 526-2000, ext. 241.
D Turkey Shoot Fundraiser I p.m. each Satur-
day through December at AMVETS Post 231, north
of Fountain (east side of US 231, just south of Cf
167). Cost: $2 a shot. Call 850-722-0291.
) Book Signing Author and Cottondale High
SSchool graduate Karla Johnson will be signing cop-
ies of "Tales of the Tick-Tock Time Traveler," 5:30 to
7 p.m. at the Half Shell Restaurant in Marianna. Kids
welcome to dress as St. Nicholas and have photos
made with the author.

SUNDAY, OCT. 23
) Alcoholics Anonymous closed discussion, 6:30
p.m., 4349 W. Lafayette St., Marianna (in one-story
building behind 4351W. Lafayette St.). Attendance
limited to persons with a desire to stop drinking.

MONDAY, OCT. 24
D Orientation 10:30 a.m. at the Goodwill Career
Trainirig Center, 4742 Highway 90 in Marianna. Reg-
ister for free job placement and computer training
classes and learn about services offered to people
with disadvantages/disabilities. Call 526-0139.
a Lions Club of Marianna meeting, Jim's Buffet &
Grill, at noon. Call 482 2005.
) Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, 8 to
9 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St., Marianna.

TUESDAY, OCT. 25
a Jackson County Chamber of Commerce will
host a free Community Appreciation Power Lunch
for Graceville/Campbellton/Jacob, noon to 1 p.m.
at the Graceville Civic Center, 5224 Brown St.,
Graceville. Guest speaker Rick Marcum, executive
director of Opportunity Florida, will give an update
on getting high-speed Internet access to rural
Florida. Call 482-8060.
on County Floridan, P. O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447,
ition Lane In Marianna.


Police Roundup


MARIANNA POLICE
DEPARTMENT
The Marianna Police De-
partment listed the following
incidents for
Oct. 17, the --
latest available
report:To .r
accidents with ME
no injury, one
stolen vehicle,
one suspicious vehicle, five
suspicious people, one funeral
escort, one burglary complaint,
14 traffic stops, one fight in
progress, two animal com-
plaints, one fraud complaint,
two assists of another agency,
four public service calls and
one patrol.request.


JACKSON COUNTY
SHERIFFS OFFICE
The Jackson County Sheriff's
Office and county Fire/Rescue
reported the following incidents
for Oct. 17, the latest available
report. (Some of these calls may
be related to after-hours calls
taken on behalf of Graceville
/ and Cottondale Police Depart-
ments): One accident with
no injury, one accident with
unknown injury, one stolen tag,
one abandoned vehicle, one
reckless driver, two suspicious
vehicles, two suspicious inci-
dents, one funeral escort, one
mental illness case, one physi-
cal disturbance, one verbal dis-
turbance, one police response


to a fire, two residential fires, 13
medical calls; one traffic crash,
two burglary alarms, one panic
alarm, one discharged firearm,
8 traffic stops, two larceny com-
plaints, two criminal mischief
complaints, one civil dispute,
two juvenile complaints, two
noise disturbances, two animal
complaints, one assist of a mo-
torist/pedestrian, three assists
of another agency, three public
service calls, one transport
and three threat/harassment
complaints.

JACKSON COUNTY
CORRECTIONAL FACILITY
The following persons were
booked into the county jail dur-


ing the latest reporting periods:
S)Jordan Chason, 28, 761
Morgan Ave., Chattahoochee,
battery.
) Doan Huan, 32, 609 Porsche
Ave., Seabring, aggravated stalk-
ing, fugitive from justice.
) Tiffany Pete, 20, 3070 Cart-
ers Mill Road, Apt A9, Mari-
anna, violation of conditional
release.


JAIL POPULATION: 236



To report a crime, call CringeStoppers
at 526-5000 or a local law enforcement
agency. To report a wildlife violation, call
1-888-404-FWCC (3922).


v 4


r






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Bridge


club


results

Special to the Floridan

The Marianna Duplicate
Bridge Club plays bridge
on Monday afternoons in
the St. Luke's Episcopal
Church Parish Hall.
For the week of Oct.
17, the winners were as
follows:
a First place Bobbie
Fenster and Linda Hodges.
) Second place Douglas
Parker and Kurt Opferman
tied with Katrina LeBlanc
and Betty Brendemuehl.


Marriage,

Divorce

Report
Special to the Floridan

The following marriages
and divorces were record-
ed in Jackson County dur-
ing the week of Oct. 10-14.
Marriages
a Michael Ross Caughran
and Jessica Danielle Dean.
) Kimberly Lasha Smith
and Chad Payne Walker.
) James E Crabtree and
Dina M. Holland.
) Eric Lee Gilley and Gin-
ger Lee Odom.
) JeffreyWayne Land and
Kelly Ann Sims.
) Christina Nichole
McAlpin and Charles Ter-
rell Nelson II.
a Doreen Marie By-
re and Robert Eugene
Forrester.
) Kevin Brown and De-
wanda Latrell Bryant.
) David Michael Ascenc-
io and Linae Jo Johnson.
Divorces
a Bruce Dewayne Daw-
son Sr. vs. Sonya Renee
King.
) Amber Lucille Ellis vs.
Rodney Edward Ellis.
a Lisa Marie Ryerson vs.
Ronald Robert Ryerson.


Troop 3 Boy Scouts study first aid, plan camping trip


Special to the Floridan

Boy Scouts in Troop 3 enjoyed
their weekly meeting on Sept. 26,
when they worked together to
study first aid procedures, make
first aid kits, discuss popcorn
sales, and make final plans for
their upcoming camp out at Flor-
ida Caverns State Park.
Scout Master Bill Kleinhans,
Senior Patrol Leader Levin Berry,
and Assistant Patrol Leader Chai-
son Johnson led the discussion
with the Scouts, as they reviewed
and practiced the Heimlich ma-
neuver and studied again how to
observe the differences in poison-
ous and non-poisonous plants.
Scouts also reviewed the proper
way to use an EpiPen, which
they previously learned should
always be available for those in-
dividuals who have allergic reac-
tions to food, plants, bee stings, or
other possible causes. Each Scout
enjoyed making a complete first
aid kit that was compact and easy
to carry with them at all times, in-


SUBMITTED PHOTOS
Scout Master Bill Kleinhans (right) and Leaders Andy Campbell (left) and
Barry Tillman (center) discuss final plans for the upcoming camp out for
Troop 3.


cluding on hikes and camp outs.
At the upcoming, camp out,
Scouts will enjoy the beautiful
Floridan Caverns State Park. On
the first night, they will enjoy
grilled hamburgers, followed by a
special Court of Honor ceremony.
The Scouts will be presented mer-


it badges and rank advancements
that they have earned, and the
new Patrol Leaders and Assistant
Patrol Ledders for 2011-2012 will
be introduced.
The Marianna Optimist Club is
the chartering organization for
Troop 3 Boy Scouts. For more in-


Assistant seniorr Patrol Leader
Chaison Johnson demonstrates on
Senior Patrol Leader Levin Berry the
proper way to perform the Heimlich
maneuver on choking victims.
formation about Boy Scouts, call
Kleinhans at 526-2897.


PENDERGRASS IS EMPLOYEE OF THE MONTH



'A IIce


lice
P endergrass
(left) accepts
the October Chipola
College Career
Employee of the
Month award from
Chipola president,
Dr. Gene Prough.
Pendergrass serves
as a departmental
staff assistant in -
Workforce
3-. -, Development. She
has worked at the
college since 1990
and also serves as
administrator of the
State Junior College
S.Basketball
Tournament.
SUBMITTED PHOTO


SUBMITTED PHOTOS
The Jackson/Calhoun County Association of Mayors recently presented awards to the town clerks of Jackson and Calhoun counties: From left, Sylvestra Tharp (Alford), Linda Wilson (Malone),
Kim Applewhite (Marianna), Veloria Wilson (Jacob), Alicia Corder (Grand Ridge), George Hall (Bascom) and Karen Cook (Cottondale).

Jackson/Calhoun County Association of Mayors bestows awards


Special to the Floridan

The JacksonlCalhoun
County Association of
Mayors met Thursday, Aug.
18 at Jim's Buffet & Grill in
Marianna.
At the meeting, JCAM
presented awards to the
town clerks of Jackson and
Calhoun counties. Mayors
from nine of the 12 towns
were in attendance, as


were seven clerks.
The awards were in ap-
preciation of the work
done by the town clerks.
In a letter to Malone
Mayor Gene Wright, Sena-
tor Bill Nelson, D-Fla.,
joined Wright in calling the
town clerks the "heartbeat
of our towns."
Wright also presented an
award from JCAM to Dr.
Richard Hanson and the


Florida Lottery

Mon. (E) 10/17 9-3-3 1-7-9-4 6'9-10-11-21'


Marianna VA Outpatient
Clinic, in recognition for
the service the clinic pro-
vides to area veterans. Ad-

Alphonse accepted on the
clinic's behalf.
Jane Powell received an
award from theAssociation
of Mayors for her 17 years
of service to the Guardian
Ad Litem Program. Mayor Gene Wright (left) representing the Jackson/Calhoun
Powell is the current County Association of Mayors, presents an award to Dr. Richard
supervisor of the 14th Ju- Hanson and the Marianna VA Outpatient Clinic. Administrative
dicial Circuit, which in- Officer Angela Alphonse accepts on the clinic's behalf.
cludes Jackson and Cal- her career with the GAL directors for the stop over
houn counties. She started Program on the board of house.


Jane Powell (right) for her
17 years of service to the
Guardian Ad Litem Program,
was presented with an award
from the Jackson/Calhoun
County Association of Mayors
by Malone Mayor Gene
Wright.


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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2011 3AF


LOCAL








I I} I' *: ^4A


Publisher
VALERIA ROBERTS


Guest Opinion


For Cain, 9 + 9+9 = 0
By The Tampa Tribune

H erman Cain's 9-9-9 tax plan helped him win
Florida's Sept. 24 straw poll in the race for the
Republican presidential nomination, but the
enthusiasm will fade as details and implications are
exposed.
If the plan turns out to be as'simple and pure as b~usi-
nessman Cain makes it appear, it's hard to see why a
majority of taxpayers would like it..It would impose a 9
percent sales tax, apparently on everything. It would tax
businesses at 9 percent on everything they buy, appar-
ently including labor. It would set income taxes at a flat
9 percent, with no deductions for children or medical
bills.
Cain originally said his plan woild cut the total tax
bill for almost everyone, even low-income workers,
while raising the same amount of revenue as the exist-
ing system. Polls show enthusiasm for the lower taxes
Cain promises, but an early analysis shows he would
increase taxes for a family of four with an income of
$50,000 by more than 60 percent. That's for most fami-
lies, not all.
Taxes would be eliminated on investment income,
so if a family's $50,000 income was spun off from, say,
$1 million in investments, the family would pay no
income taxes. Cain will have a hard time explaining
why he would want nothing from people with money in
the bank and give no breaks to parents with a kid in the
hospital.
A new national sales tax would be the most explosive
bomb in Cain's tax arsenal.The way it is initially de-
scribed, everything would be taxed, including services.
That would be in addition to all state and county sales
taxes.
The tax here in Hillsborough County would increase
from 7 percent to 16 percent on many goods, and
would increase from zero to 9 percent for all the things
not taxed in Florida, such as groceries. Cain says low-
income workers could save by purchasing used items,
which wouldn't be taxed. You can't get a used doctor's
exam, a used loaf of bread, a used insurance policy
or a used haircut. As for taxing services, perhaps Cain
doesn't know about Florida's disastrous attempt some
years back to expand the state sales tax to include ser-
vices and advertising. That was before Google and the
Internet. Enough said.
Cain's justification for not taxing interest and
dividends is that they have already been taxed at the
corporate level. He hates double taxation, he says, but
it doesn't seem to bother him that folks who have saved
money from tax-paid earnings would now be taxed
another 9 percent when they spend it.'
Another form of double taxation would hit Workers'
pay. Cain's Web site says his plan taxes companies on
gross earnings minus costs of purchases. Conservative
critics note that under that wording, a company would
pay a 9 percent tax on wages, and the worker would pay
another 9 percent as personal income tax.
Of course such complications are nothing compared
to the trickiness of the current tax law. Cain is right that
taxes need to be simplified and made more transpar-
ent and understandable. A better tax system would
enhance economic growth and generate more income
to tax.
Merchants want to know why sharply higher sales
taxes wouldn't raise prices and hurt sales, especially for
products targeting low- and mid-income consumers.
Advocates of low taxes want to know what would
keep Congress from raising the rates of both sales taxes
and income taxes. Local officials wonder what would
happen to the interest rate on municipal bonds when
all bonds are tax-free. Homebuilders want to know
whether taxing building materials would raise the cost
of houses, and landlords want to know whether taxing
rent would lower their profits.
Parents with a big family want to know why they
should pay the same amount of taxes as a childless
couple with similar earned income. Workers with either
a big or small family want to know why their pay would
be heavily taxed while unearned income would not be
taxed at all.
Voters need to reassess whether Cain is seriously try-
ing to win the White House or just trying to sell books.

Letter^ to ubo Editr .' .. ;,
Subhnit letters byeither mailing to Editr PO.:Box 520.
Marianna FL; 324479r faxing to 850-4-0 78.ori; ;o :
e-mail td editorjal@jcfloridan.c9m. The-isn resi. i ;
the right to edit or not publish any letter Be,sute toe t ;
include your full address and telephone number. These":'
will only be used to verify the letter and Will not be
pointed. For more information call (85P) 526-3614;


Lesson for Perry: Think before you run


BY BYRON YORK

SAThat's wrong with Rick
F Perry? How did the suc-
Scessful, well-liked, long-
term governor of one of America's
largest states enter the Republican
presidential primary race with
great fanfare, zoom to the top of '
the polls, and then slide almost as
quickly back into the pack?
Blaming the Texas governor's
problems on a lackluster debating
style as Perry himself has done
after a number of poor perfor-
mances answers only part of the
question..Yes, debates are particu-,
larly important this campaign sea-
son. But debates are more than just
style and popularity contests. They
reveal deeper things about can-
didates; voters watching debates
can learn not only how a candi-
date handles tough questions but
whether he is really, truly prepared
to run for the White House.
Early in Perry's candidacy, there
was a spate of stories suggesting
he's not smart enough to be presi-
dent. They weren't subtle; one was
headlined "Is Rick Perry Dumb?"
But even Perry's critics could look
at those stories and say: Here is a
man who has successfully governed
a large and complex state, presided
over prosperity and growth, dealt
with the political challenges that
go with it all, and won re-election
repeatedly. Successful governor-
ships don't just happen by accident;
Perry's results in Texas show he is a
smart, competent executive.
But the debates have revealed a
different problem. The Rick Perry
who has taken the stage in four


Republican debates so far is a man
who, for all his governing success in
Texas, appears not to have thought
enough about whyhe wants to be
president of the United States and
what he would do if he achieved his
goal. When critics gently say that
Perry's presentations have been
"light on details," they're really
saying Perry doesn't seem to have
thought things through.
More than anything else, a lot of
thinking should precede a run for
president. There's no time to think
about much of anything once the
campaign begins, and there's no
way a candidate can collect and
organize a lifetime of experiences
into a coherent approach to nation-.
al issues once he's flying from stop
to stop. A candidate has to have
done his thinking long before he
hits the road or steps on a debate
stage.
Think back to a different example
from a different time. In 2005,
President George W Bush nomi-
nated White House counsel Harriet
Miers to the Supreme Court. Miers
was a perfectly fine White House
counsel, but she clearly had not
spent a.lifetime doing the kind of
legal thinking that prepares one
for the highest court. The White
House assured doubters that Miers
planned to study really, really hard
in preparation for her confirmation
hearings.
SBut it doesn't work that way.
Justices John Roberts and Samuel
Alito didn't have to cram at the last
minute for their hearings. Each
had a lifetime of experience and
thinking at the highest levels of the
law, and their task was to organize


the knowledge they already had to
prepare for confirmation question-
ing. The important thing was, the
knowledge was there. The thinking
had already been done. Miers, on
the other hand, wasn't prepared
and finally dropped out.
There's no doubt that former
Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney
has thought a long, long time about
being president. Romney can tell
you, at any level of generality or
detail you want, why he is running
and what he would do if he won. He
adjusts to new issues and questions
by building on all the preparation
he's already done.
For Romney, debate preparation
involves taking all the things he has
already thoughtthrough and find-
ing the most effective way to pres-
ent them in one-minute answers.
For Perry, debate preparation is
trying to learn new stuff about
national issues that he should have
been thinking about a long time
ago. It's often pointed out that since
Perry entered the Republican-race
late, on Aug. 13, he had little time to
build a campaign organization and
hone a campaign pitch. That's true,
but the fact is, if Perry wanted to
be president, he should have been
thinking seriously about the sub-
stance of national issues not just
fundraising and state party chair-
men years before he declared his
candidacy.
Now Perry is paying the price for
that lack of preparation. And if that,
in fact, is the real problem behind
his poor debate performances,
then he's not going to improve as a
candidate in the next few weeks. It's
far too late for that.


When high achievers shortchanged, we all suffer


BY BILL MAXWELL-
St. Petersburg Times

or nearly two decades, public
school educators have been
trying to close, or at least nar-
row, the race- and income-based
achievement gaps in graduation
rates and test scores. The move-
ment, which became a mandate
with passage of the No Child
Left Behind Act during President
George W. Bush's first term, has
become an obsession.
For several years, supporters
of the act, along with some early
detractors, did not question the
perceived benefits of NCLB. But
that easy acceptance is changing.
The first serious doubts about
the measure's effectiveness came
after a 2008 report by the Thomas
B. Fordham Institute, a Washing-
ton think tank, which showed that
from 2000 to 2007, progress for
students who were the highest
achievers on the National Assess-
ment of Educational Progress did
not increase, while progress for the
lowest-achieving students greatly
improved. .
Now, Fordham has reaffirmed the
2008 findings and introduced more
critical statistics in a new study,
"Do High Flyers Maintain Their
Altitude?" This study found that the
federally mandated effort to make
schools more accountable for in-
creasing low-performing students'
achievement may be harming-the
highest-performing students.
Researchers tracked the scores of
approximately 82,000 students on
the Measure of Academic Progress.
They found that many high-per-


forming students lose ground from
the elementary grades to middle
school and from middle school to
high school.
Here is the question for U.S.
educators: Is focusing on getting all
students to be proficient on reading
and math tests having unintended
negative consequences? It is a
tough question for many Ameri-
cans to answer, because it goes to
the core of our concept of equality.
Still, the mounting empirical
evidence cannot be ignored.
"Is helping kids at the bottom
improve hurting kids at the top?"
Michael Petrilli said in an inter-
view with Education Week. He is
the executive vice president of the
Fordham Institute and was a U.S.
Education Department official
when NCLB was written. "Let's
be honest about the trade-offs. It
doesn't make you a bad person or a
racist.... We've been making good
progress for kids at the bottom and
for poor children and minority kids.
It just can't be the only thing that
we do." Petrilli and others seriottsly
question, for example, the effec-
tiveness of the campaign to get as
many students as possible, even if
they have so-so academic records
and questionable abilities, to take
Advanced Placement courses. In
Hillsborough County, for exam-
ple, the school district has been
criticized for aggressively steering
so many average students into Ad-
vanced Placement courses regard-
less of whether they are prepared
for college-level curriculum.
Who benefits when such students
take these courses? Do high-achiev-
ing students suffer when teachers


are forced to devote too much time
to the lowest achievers?
Evidence shows that to relent-
lessly devote excessive time and
resources to helping students at
the bottom, many districts are
scrapping programs such as after-
school science labs for Advanced
.Placement classes. High-achieving
students lose out, and many excel-
lent teachers are being let go or are
being reassigned to courses to help
lower-achieving students.
Is this a desirable trade-off? At
the national level, Education Week
reports, Congress has eliminated
$7.5 million for the Jacob K. Javits
Gifted and Talented Program that
serves gifted and high-achieving
students. The cut was made to free
up money to finance programs for
thelowest-achieving students.
I support efforts to help our
lowest achievers, but like Petrilli
and others, I believe that we have
tipped the scales and are ill-serving
our highest achievers. As Ameri-
cans who believe in equality
we have a philosophical difficul-
ty in grouping students by ability.
Too many of us cannot accept the
reality that high-achieving students
should be permitted to go as high
as they can when we divvy up fed-
eral and state funds for education.
In truth, it is a moral imperative
for us to do as much for these stu-
dents as we do for those at the bot-
tom. This is not elitism or insensi-
tivity. It is a simple calculation that
if our highest-achieving children
are shortchanged, we all suffer. We
will lose our competitive edge in
the world, and we may needlessly
diminish our quality of life.


I 2011 Jeff Stahler/Dist. by Universal UClick for UFS





JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan comr


Grocery

Outlet


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Prisoner rehabilitation bill to get revamped


The Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE Legislation
that would shorten the sentenc-
es of low-level nonviolent pris-
oners who complete drug and
other rehabilitation programs
will be revamped, the sponsor
said Tuesday in response to Flor-
ida's sheriff's and other critics.
The' House Criminal Justice
Subcommittee approved the
measure (HB 177) on a 12-3 vote.
Several representatives who
voted for it, though, said they
would drop their support later in
the legislative process unless it's
made more restrictive.
The legislation has drawn sup-
port from such fiscally conserva-
tive organizations as Associated
Industries of Florida and Florida
TaxWatch, as well as public de-
fenders and the Florida Alcohol
and Drug Abuse Association.
They say it would cut prison
costs and make inmates less


likely to commit new crimes af-
ter their release.
"This I believe is a fiscally re-
sponsible, smart justice, cau-
tious and safe and compassion-
ate bill that's going to turn lives
around, reunite families and
reduce recidivism," said Rep. Ari
Porth, a Coral Springs Democrat
who is sponsoring the bill.
Porth, though, said he's will-
ing to revise it. That may satisfy
some critics but not all.
"We think it's unjust to thou-
sands and thousands of crime
victims out there to let some-
body out, to give a prisoner an
easy go," said Frank Messer-
smith, a former lawmaker and
now a lobbyist for the Florida
Sheriffs Association. "Don't let
people escape punishment they
deserve."
The bill as filed would let non-
violent inmates sentenced to
third-degree felonies, which
have maximum penalties of five


years, participate in the re-entry
program after serving at least
half of their terms.
But they'd first have to be
screened and get recommenda-
tions from the Department of
Corrections before asking judges
to reduce their sentences. Pros-
ecutors could file objections be-
fore the judges rule.
They'd be released on proba-
tion after successfully complet-
ing drug, education, vocational
training, personal development
and other rehabilitation for at
least 120 days. If they violate pro-
bation, though, they'd return to
prison and lose any time off they
had received for good behavior.
Subcommittee members sug-
gested waiting until inmates
have served at least 60 percent
of their sentences instead of just
half and excluding anyone who
had committed a prior violent
crime or had been convicted of
drug trafficking.


Other ideas were to limit par-
ticipation only to drug offenders
and begin with a small experi-
mental program before seeking
legislative approval to take it
statewide.
"I've taken copious notes,"
Porth said, adding that he'd work
with lawmakers who suggested
changes to craft a revised bill.
The measure must go through
two more subcommittees before
it can be heard by the full Judi-
ciary Committee. A similar bill
(SB 448) has been introduced in
the Senate but has not yet had a
committee hearing.
Porth said the program would
cost the state half as much as the
$43,000 it spends annually for
each prison inmate. A staff bill
analysis said the bill may have
a positive financial effect but it
didn't estimate how much mon-
ey might be saved.
The bill would allow the De-
partment of Corrections to con-


tract with private or public enti-
ties to provide re-entry services
at secure areas within or adja-
cent to prisons.
On one hand, Messersmith ar-
gued prisons already offer such
rehabilitation programs and that
the only difference is the bill re-
duces sentences. Then, however,
he said, "I don't think mixing re-
habilitation in a prison environ-
ment works."
The Department of Correc-
tions, though, has acknowledged
that 82 percent of inmates need-
ing drug rehabilitation don't get
it, Associated Industries' Mark
Flynn told the panel.
Messersmith also contended
the bill would conflict with an
existing law requiring prison-
ers to serve at least 85 percent
of their sentences. Porth said
that's incorrect because judges
would resentence program par-
ticipants to time served followed
by probation.


Storms bring heavy rains, high winds across state


ht 4 08 c rd in 1910


FORT LAUDERDALE
- Florida's wet weather
is expected to continue
through today with severe
thunderstorms, high wind
gusts and possible flood-
ing that could snarl traffic
and leave residents reach-
ing for umbrellas.
A disorganized low pres-
sure system off the Gulf
of Mexico is expected to
merge with a rapidly mov-
ing cold front Tuesday
night, forecasters said,
bringing heavy rains and
potentially isolated tor-
nadoes for most of the
state south of Jackson-
ville. Although the inclem-
ent weather should end
Wednesday, it will likely
dump even more rain to
areas that have had steady
rain since Sunday. Ocala
city officials opened two
sandbag sites Monday to
prepare for flooding.
"It's not going to take a
lot of rain to potentially


"We definitely need
rainfall. We need it
in the right place."
Susan Syvester,
Chief of water control operations
bureau for the South Florida Water
Management District

cause issuesas far as flood-
ing. That's the other thing
we're going to be looking at
pretty closely," said Robert
Molleda, a meteorologist
with the National Weather
Service.
At one point, the Gulf
system looked like it could
become a tropical storm,
but it became disorga-
nized. Colder weather is
expected to sweep in after
the system leaves.
The Florida Keys took
the brunt of the weather
where many residents felt
steady rains beginning
Saturday. Key West had a
record breaking 6.91 inch-
es of rain Monday, above


We ".U0 l,,UrU III lu,
Molleda said.
Key West had nearly 10
inches of rain Sunday and
Monday, while Marathon
saw more than seven inch-
es during that time.
Most flights were can-
celled at Key West Inter-
national Airport after the
airport closed for almost
three hours Monday
morning due to taxiway
flooding.
The heavy rains are
helping replenish Lake
Okeechobee's low water
levels, but experts say it's


too early to say how much Unfortunately, much season, she said.
of a boost it will bring given of last weekend's heavy The stormy weather is
the forecast for an unusu- rains fell east of the water also bringing rough seas
ally dry season, which runs conversation areas where and less than ideal boating
from November through water is stored for the dry conditions.
May.
"We definitely need rain
fall. We need it in the right ohn W Kupa, D.
places," said Susan Sylves- John Kurpa, LD.
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-16A + WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2011


STATE


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Obituaries

James
Chambliss
(Pooser)



There will be a memorial
service for Mr. James
(Pooser) Chambliss .at 10
a.m. on Saturday, October
22, 2011 at Friendship Bap-
tist Church in Malone. Full
Military Honors will be
presented.


Health
From Page 1A

smoking and the ways to
do so.
After lunch, Ladonna
Hart, a respiratory thera-
pist at Campbellton-
Graceville Hospital went
over different respiratory
treatments.
Amanda Hinsqn, an oc-
cupational therapist from
Gentiva Home Health,
demonstrated several ways
to breathe easier and con-
serve energy through-tools
like a scrub brush for the
bath and advice like doing
activities at a slow pace.
"You all are retired right?"
Hinson asked the crowd.
"There's plenty of hours in
the day."
This symposium was a
kick off for a new free re-
spiratory health support
group being provided by
the three agencies. The
first meeting will be held
on Nov. 10 at 2 p.m. at the
Campbellton-Graceville
Hospital and will take place
on the second Thursday of
each month.


Safety
From Page 1A


Trick-or-treaters should
have a flashlight while out.
'Children should be accom-
panied by an adult, Sawyer
said, but if not, they should
be reminded to look both
ways before crossing the
street.
"Anytime you have a,
large influx of people going
out at one time, you have
the potential for more ac-
cidents," Sawyer said.
Anyone with questions
is encouraged to visit their
local fire department.
"We would much rather
give you a tour of the fire
station or ambulance or a
ride on the fire truck then
for you to have to see us in
our other capacity," Saw-
yer said.


ICE deports record number of immigrants


The Associated Press

MIAMI U.S. Immigration
and Customs Enforcement Direc-
tor John Morton said Tuesday his
agency deported nearly 400,000
individuals during the fiscal year
that ended in September, the
largest-number of removals in the
agency's history.
Morton announced the Fiscal
2011 numbers in Washington,
saying about 55 percent of those
deported had felony or misde-
meanor convictions. Officials said
the number of those convicted of
crimes was up 89 percent from
2008.
Authorities could not imme-
diately say how many of those
crimes related to re-entering the
U.S. after being deported. In-
dividuals can be convicted of a
felony for returning to the U.S. or
being found in the U.S. after they
were deported.
Among the 396,906 individuals
deported were more than 1,000
convicted of homicide. Another
5,800 were sexual offenders, and
about 80,000 people were,con-
victed of drug related crimes
or driving under the influence.
Last year, the total was roughly
393,000.
"This comes down to focusing
our resources as best we can on
our priorities," Morton said. "We
continue to hope for compre-
hensive immigration reform at a
national level, working with the
Congress, but in the meantime,
we work with the resources we


have, under the laws we have."
The announcement comes as
the Obama administration has
sought to address critics on both
sides of the immigration debate.
Immigration advocates complain
law enforcement officials are
spending too much of their scarce
resources rounding up families
living illegally in the country who
otherwise are law-abiding. Oth-
ers say the administration isn't
doing enough' to stop the flow of
illegal immigration and protect
Americans from potential foreign
terrorists and other criminals.
Department of Homeland Se-
curity Secretary Janet Napolitano
has said the agency is focusing
its resources on criminals, re-
cent border crossers, those who
repeatedly cross the border and
those people the department
considers fugitives.
Authorities say two-thirds of
those deported last year either re-
cently crossed the border or had
done so repeatedly.
But House Judiciary Chairman
U.S. Rep. Lamar Smith, R-Texas,
an outspoken opponent of the
Obama administration's immi-
gration policies, called the ICE
numbers inflated. He argued they
include people who voluntarily
agree to leave the country with
no penalties and can easily return
to the U.S. especially along the
border.
. In a statement, Smith added
that under the Obama adminis-
tration, worksite enforcement has
dropped 70 percent.


"We cannot continue to spend billions ofdollars,
year after year, while denying we have a more
fundamentalproblem that our immigration
system no longer serves America wel."
Immigration Forum


"We could free up millions of
jobs for citizens and legal immi-
grants if we simply enforced our
immigration laws," he added.
In 2009, the administration
shifted from high-profile work-
place sweeps to less attention-
grabbing auditing of I-9 forms
- the documents used to verify
that employees are legally eligible
to work in the U.S. The depart-
ment says the shift better focuses
resources on the employers who
draw in illegal workers to the
country.
In Miami, Susana Barciela, pol-
icy director for Americans for Im-
migration Justice, also expressed
concerns about the numbers.
"We are worried because many
of the people who are being de-
ported have committed minor
crimes," she said.
She mentioned cases in which
immigrants were detained and
convicted of driving with broken
taillights, polarized windows or
expired driver's licenses, com-
mon among illegal immigrants
who are unable to legally obtain
or renew their licenses and then
are deported.
The Washington, D.C.-based


Immigration Forum called the
number of deportations a waste
of tax payer dollars.
"In reality, the numbers high-
light a failure of our government
to come to grips with our broken
immigration system," the group's
statement said.
"At $23,000 per individual to
go through the complete de-
portation process, immigration
enforcement without fixing our
broken system is not sustainable.
We cannot continue to spend bil-
lions of dollars, year after year,
while denying we have a more
fundamental problem that our
immigration system no longer
serves America well."
The announcement came the
same day two TV networks will
air separate shows examining
the immigration detention sys-
tem. "Lost in Detention," on PBS'
Frontline, and CNBC's docu-
mentary, "Billions Behind Bars,"
which examines the private pris-
on industry and the detention of
immigrants. Immigrant groups in,
cities across the country have or-
ganized viewing parties, protests
and other events in connection
with the PBS program.


Board of Education approves new pre-k standards


The Associated Press

SMIAMI The Florida Board
of Education approved more
rigorous learning standards for
students in the state's voluntary
pre-kindergarten program at its
meeting Tuesday in Miami.
Gathering .at Miami Edison
Senior High School in the city's
Little Haiti neighborhood, the
board also discussed several po-
tential policy changes, including
the state's application for a waiver
from federal No Child Left Behind
requirements and ongoing chal-
lenges in implementing the class-
size law.
The application for a waiver is
due to the U.S. Department of Ed-
ucation by Nov. 14, and Chancel-
lor Michael Grego said that while
the deadline is fast approaching,
Florida is set to be a leader in im-
plementing a more flexible model
aimed at improving and reward-
ing student growth.
The No Child Left Behind law
requires all students to be pro-
ficient in math and reading by
2014, but states across the coun-
try, including Florida, are far from
reaching that goal. Each year, as
benchmarks require more stu-


dents to attain math and reading
proficiency, more schools are be-
ing labeled as failures and subject
to corrective action. Only 10 per-
cent of Florida schools met the
targets last school year.
Grego told the board a waiver
is needed to better align federal
and state accountability systems
and improve student outcomes.
He said the waiver would cover
measures already under way in
Florida, including adopting col-
lege- and career-ready standards;
supporting effective teaching and
leadership, including through
new evaluations.
The biggest difference, Grego
said, would be using Florida's cur-
rent accountability system, which
gives all schools letter grades and
targets low-performing ones for
improvements, as the- federal
model.
"They are looking to Florida to
lead this flexibility model," Grego
said.
Now education officials will
need to gain the approval of local
education leaders.
Miami-Dade County Schools
Superintendent Alberto Carvalho
said Edison, which was in danger
of being closed by the state last


year, has made improvements
- including going from an F to
a C on its annual accountability
report but still doesn't meet
federal No Child Left Behind
standards.
"It is caught between two di-
chotomous accountability sys-
tems," Carvalho said.
Carvalho said he would support
eliminating the federal annual
yearly progress criteria.
He also said the district, the na-
tion's fourth-largest, had decided
not to fully comply with the state's
class-size reduction mandate,
which requires no more than
25 students in core high school
classes, and smaller sizes in lower
grade classes.
Carvalho said that while the
district could face a fine upward
of $10 million, the return on in-
vestment for 100 percent compli-
ance would have "dramatic col-
lateral damage" on the education
programs.
He pointed to several exam-
ples where the law did not make
sense, including cases where new
students would have to be turned
away or advanced placement
classes not offered.
School Board member Roberto


Martinez said flexibility in imple-
menting the mandate is needed
and encouraged the board to take
a stance on the issue. Chair Kath-
leen Shanahan advised the board
to draft a resolution for consider-
ation at its meeting in November.
The new pre-kindergarten
learning standards, adopted Tues-
day were revised based on cur-
rent research and address the de-
velopment of language, cognitive,
emotional, social and other basic
skills.
The education board is in the
process of raising standards
across the state's voluntary pre-
kindergarten program, including
increasing the percentage of stu-
dents who test as kindergarten
ready and taking action against
providers who don't meet those
benchmarks.
The board also adopted new
passing scores for teacher cer-
tification in three subject area
examinations, including middle
apd high school social studies.
They also agreed on updating
the skills required on four sub-
ject area certification tests, in-
cluding for teaching English lan-
guage learners and middle school
math.


Trade
From Page 1A

Technology, said the timing
of the deal is excellent, as his
company seeks to fill its new
Miami Life Science & Technol-
ogy Park. The biotech' center
was inaugurated last month
in Miami's downtown health
district.
"A lot of the growth in bio-
tech and life sciences is going
to happen in Latin America as
their economies grow," Reagan
said, noting that biotech firms
are also increasingly looking
to conduct clinical trials in
Latin America. "The free trade
agreements are bound to in-
crease traffic through Miami,
and we hope to grab the ap-
propriate piece of that for the
life sciences."
Among the park's new ten-
ants is Andago, the Spain-
based information technology
company that is developing
an Internet-based medical re-
cords program with Google.
More than a dozen other bio-
tech, intellectual property law
and transport firms have also
recently moved in, most with
an eye on Latin America, he
said.
Meanwhile, Goya Foods is
opening a new, state-of-the-art
distribution center in Miami
next week, which will focus in
part on ramping up distribu-


tion to Colombia and Central
America.
Joe Perez, a senior vice presi-
*dent for the Secaucus, N.J.-
based company, said Goya
planned the new center before
the deal was reached based on
growing demand, but the trade
agreements provided further
incentives.
"First off, we import many
raw goods from Colombia:
blocks of brown sugar, cookies,
crackers, beans and chocolate.
Second is our ability to get our
product into Colombia," he
said.
He called Colombia "a grow-
ing market with huge poten-
tial. Its population has reached
about 39 million, it has a size-
able middle class and a string
of urban centers.
"Florida is a natural depar-
ture point," he added.
The trade agreements' most
immediate affect will actually
be on imports, not exports.
That's because Congress also
retroactively renewed a decade
old Andean trade deal signed
during the height of the Co-
lombian drug war to promote
legitimate industries. That deal
waived duties on many agri-
cultural products like cut flow-
ers, about 90 percent of which
the U.S. imports. The majority
about seven cargo jet loads
daily come through Miami
International Airport.
The Andean deal, which had
to be renewed every two years,


expired in February, jacking
up the cost for importers. The
Colombia Free Trade agree-
ment will make the duty-free
provision permanent.
"This provides sustainability
for our business, because now
we have the duty-free status
forever. We can plan better,"
said Daniel Sabogal, president
of Fantasy Farms, a Miami-
based flower importer and dis-
tributor. "Now we can focus on
growing our businesses."
Lee Sandier, chair of the Flor-
ida Charfiber of Commerce's
International Committee, says
in the long run the South Ko-
rea deal may still be the bigger
prize for Florida. The agree-
ment with the world's 13th
largest economy is the biggest
since the North American Free
Trade Agreement with Mexico
and Canada in 1994.
"Korea, it's had higher bar-
riers in the past. It's a bigger
economy and it's a more ad-
vanced economy. If you look
at the service sector and the
goods sector, it's just a bigger
package," he said. But, Sandier
said, the Latin American con-
nection will remain key.
"We're already doing busi-
nesses .with Korean compa-
nies' managers for products
with distribution, in Latin
America," he said. "Once they
like doing business with you,
they'll likely like to create new
business, and that's what we're
hoping for."


Hurricane fund has


$3.2 billion shortfall


The Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE Florida's hur-
ricane fund, a state-created pool
intended to help insurers after di-
sasters, is confronting a potential
$3.2 billion shortfall.
Turmoil in the world financial
markets as well as an unsteady
and weak economy mean that
right now it is unlikely that the
fund could borrow all the money it
needs to help after a hurricane.
"The fact is that when you look at
the world economy we're in a very
uncertain environment," said Jack
Nicholson, the chief operating of-
ficer of the fund on Tuesday.
The fund was created after Hur-
ricane Andrew devastated South
Florida in 1992. Insurers purchase
coverage from the fund to help to
pay homeowners if a storm results
in widespread damages. The fund
plays an important role in how
much consumers pay for prop-
erty insurance in Florida because
it provides a low-cost backstop to
insurers.
But the fund doesn't have enough
cash on hand to meet all of its obli-
gations in the event of a big storm,
or worse, a series of hurricanes. So
the fund must go out and borrow
what it needs.
Just how much the fund can bor-


"We used to think we could
bondfor $55 billion in multiple
hurricane seasons. That'sfairy
land now."
Jack Nicholson,
Chief operating officer of the hurricane fund
row, however, has gyrated wildly
in the last three years, as the re-
cession and debt .crisis fears have
made borrowing large sums of
money more uncertain.
"We used to think we could bond
for $55 billion in multiple hur-
ricane seasons," Nicholson said.
"That's fairy land now."
This year the fund is providing
$18.4 billion worth of coverage. It
should have more than $7 billion
of cash on hand by the end of the
year, but it would still need to bor-
row another $11 billion if a storm
were to strike.
But new estimates drawn up byfi-
nancial experts, including some of
the nation's most prominent finan-
cial firms, suggest the fund could
borrow just $8 billion over a 12-
month period. An advisory panel
on Tuesday formally approved the
new estimates. The new figures,
however, do suggest that the fund
could borrow an additional $6 bil-
lion following a major storm.


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Obama looks to South to help keep his job

The Associated Press -1


JAMESTOWN, N.C. -
Three years after his sur-
prising wins in Southern
states, President Barack
Obama's re-election cam-
paign is doubling down in
the region, hoping to turn
changing demographics
into electoral wins and
offset potential losses in
traditional swing states
next year.
Obama's Southern strat-
egy is at the heart of the
president's three-day bus
trip this week through
North Carolina and Vir-
ginia. Obama won both
states in 2008, becoming
the first president to win
the Republican strong-
holds in a generation.
With 28 electoral votes
up for grabs between
them, wins in North Car-
olina and Virginia could
help Obama make up for
defeats in Rust Belt states
like Ohi6 and Indiana,
which he won in 2008 but
could be hard-pressed to
carry next year.
The president's bus tour
started Monday in Ashe-
ville, N.C., whose moun-
tains have attracted retir-
ees from the Northeast,
and took Obama through
rural swaths of the Blue
Ridge Mountains. He
spent the night in Greens-
boro, where four black
students launched a sit-
in at a Woolworth's lunch
counter to protest segre-
gation in 1960, a year be-
fore Obama was born.
On Tuesday, Obama was
making stops in rural Em-
poria, Va., and Hampton,
Va., where the region's
large number of black vot-
ers helped him carry the
state three years ago.
Both states have seen
economic and demo-
graphic changes that could
alter the politics. North


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
President Barack Obama greets people inside Reid's House Restaurant in Reidsville, N.C., on
Tuesday.


Carolina's economy has
shifted from textiles and
tobacco to banking and
research, while Virginia's
population has boomed in
the state's northern sub-
urbs outside Washington,
D.C., with the expansion
of large defense contrac-
tors and firms.
Along his bus tour,
Obama was making un-
scheduled stops at local
restaurants and general
stores, giving him a chance
to engage in the type of
personal politics that is
so prevalent in presiden-
tial campaigns, but hard
to come by in the White
House.
Obama was the 'first
Democrat to carry Virgin-
ia since Lyndon Johnson
in 1964 and the first to win
North Carolina since Jim-
my Carter in 1976.
Yet picking up states
in the South again could
be difficult. Obama's
poll numbers in North
Carolina and Virginia are
down, in line with nation-
al trends. A recent Elon
University poll put the
president's approval rat-
ing in North Carolina at 42
percent, and a Quinnipiac


University poll had it at 45
percent in Virginia.
That has Obama's cam-
paign putting both states
near the top of its priority
list. The Democratic party
will hold its convention in
Charlotte,'N.C., next sum-
mer, and North Carolina
and Virginia are already
showing up frequently on
Obama's travel itinerary
- a trend that is expected
to continue through the
election.
"My intention is to win
North Carolina again like
we did last time," Obama
said in an interview Mon-
day with Charlotte news,
station WCNC. "It will be
close because obviously
folks are frustrated with
the challenges that we still
face in the economy."
Obama's Southern strat-
egy extends beyond the
two states. His campaign
plans to compete heavily
in Florida, the ultra-swing
state that decided the 2000
election, and campaign
officials consider Georgia
a place where they could
challenge Republicans
on their turf. Obama lost
Georgia by five percentage
points in 2008, but Demo-


crats see potential in the
influx of black and His-
panic voters in suburban
areas outside Atlanta.
"It won't be easy," said
Mike Berlon, chairman of
the Georgia Democratic
Party. "But we are working
to register new voters and
we think the demograph-'
ics are on our side."
Southern Democrats
suffered big losses in
last year's midterm elec-
tions. Twenty Democrats
in Congress from across
the region lost their seats
and Republicans seized
control of chambers in
North Carolina, Louisiana
and Virginia. Republicans
picked up 17 state House
seats, according to the Na-
tional Conference of State
Legislatures.
Dave Beattie, a Florida-
based Democratic pollster
who has worked on cam-
paigns throughout the
South, said Obama will
need to maximize turnout
among black and Hispan-
ic voters, excite the Demo-
cratic base but also "show
the voters in the middle
that don't like politics that
he's really working for
them."


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Joe Tacopina (left) the new attorney for Deborah Bradley
(center) and Jeremy Irwin, whose 10-month old daughter
went missing Oct. 4, speaks at a news conference Monday
afternoon, in Kansas City.

Lawyer: Mom of missing

baby has 'nothing to hide'


The Associated Press

KANSAS CITY, Mo.
- The mother of a miss-
ing Missouri baby may
not be casting herself in
the best light by telling
national media that she
drank heavily the night her
daughter disappeared and
other unflattering details,
but her honesty shows that
she and her family "have
nothing to hide," her attor-
ney said.
Deborah Bradley told
television audiences Mon-
day that she may have
blacked out in the hours
before she and Jeremy Ir-
win reported that their 10-
month-old daughter, Lisa
Irwin, was missing from
their Kansas City home
early Oct. 4. Bradley.also
now says she last saw her
daughterhours earlier than
she originally told police.
"I don't recall in recent
history anyone under this
umbrella of suspicion be
so open and forthright,
warts and all, regarding the
events. Because they have
nothing to hide," said at-
torney Joe Tacopina, who
held a press conference
Monday to announce he
had been hired to repre-


sent the couple.
The parents reported
their daughter missing af-
ter Irwin returned home
from working a night shift
and found the front door
unlocked, the house lights
on, a window tampered
with and the baby gone.
Bradley and their two sons
were asleep elsewhere in
the house.
Police have said theyhave
no suspects in the case and
no major leads. On Mon-
day, the parents allowed
the FBI to bring tracking
dogs through their home.
The FBI also searched a
neighbor's house with the
dogs, as well as the yard of
the home where Bradley
and Irwin have been stay-
ing with their two sons.
Bradley had said in previ-
ous days that she checked
on Lisa at 10:30 p.m. on
Oct. 3, but on Monday told
NBC's "Today" show that
she actually last saw Lisa
when she put her to bed at
6:40 p.m. She did not ex-
plain why she changed her
story.
Bradley told NBC that
police accused her of kill-
ing Lisa, but she insisted
again that she had not
harmed her daughter.


Social Securityto hand out first raises since '09


The Associated Press

WASHINGTON Social
Security recipients will get
a raise in January their
first increase in benefits
since 2009. It's expected to
be about 3.5 percent.
Some 55 million ben-
eficiaries will find out for
sure Wednesday when
a government inflation
measure that determines
the annual cost-of-living
adjustment is released.
Congress adopted the
measure in the 1970s, and
since then it has resulted
in annual benefit increas-
es averaging 4.2 percent.
But there was no COLA in
2010 or 2011 because in-
flation was too low. That
was small comfort to the
millions of retirees and
disabled people who have
seen retirement accounts
dwindle and home values
drop during the period of
economic weakness, said
David Certner, .legisla-
tive policy director for the
AARP
"People certainly feel like
they are fallingbehind, and
these are modest income
folks to begin with, so ev-
ery dollar counts," Certner
said. "I think sometimes
people forget what seniors'
incomes are."
Some of the increase in
Januarywill be lost to high-
er Medicare premiums,
which are deducted from
Social Security payments.
Medicare Part B premiums
for 2012 are expected to be
announced next week, and
the trustees who oversee
the program are projecting
an increase.
Monthly Social Security
payments average $1,082,
or about $13,000 a year. A
3.5 percent increase would
amount to an additional
$38 a month, or about $455
a year.
Most retirees rely on So-
cial Security for a majority
of their income, according
to the Social Security Ad-
ministration. Many rely on
it for more than 90 percent
of their income.
Federal law requires the
program to base annual
payment increases on the
_lConsumer Price Index for


Urban Wage Earners and
Clerical Workers (CPI-W).
Officials compare inflation
in the third quarter of each
year the months of July,
August and September
- with the same months
in the previous year.
If consumer prices in-


creases from year to year,
Social Security recipiems
automatically get higher
payments, starting the
pext January.
If price changes are neg-
ative, the payments stay
unchanged.
Only twice since 1975 -


the past two years has
there been no COLA.
Wednesday's COLA an-
nouncement will come as
a special joint committee
of Congress weighs op-
tions to reduce the federal
government's $1.3 trillion
budget deficit.


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Lady Bulldogs cruise past Holmes


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Haden Searcy returns the ball for
Marianna during a match against Holmes
County Monday night.


BYDUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Marianna Lady Bulldogs
notched their 12th victory of the
season Monday night at home,
taking an easy three-set win
over Holmes County.
Marianna won by scores
of 25-6, 25-18, and 25-12 to
take the match victory, relying
heavily on a dominant serving
performance.
Serving has beep a bit of a
weakness for the Lady Bulldogs
this season, but that wasn't the
case Monday, as they totaled 21


"The servng was ream y
good."
Belina Christopher,
Marianna coach

ace serves on the night.
Haden Searcy and Porsha
Morgan led with seven aces
each, while Aerial Folsom had
six aces, and Megan Tillman had
one. Folsom led all players with
17 service points, with Searcy
adding 16, Morgan 12, and Till-
man one.
Basford led with 10 kills, with


Searcy contributing five, and
Morgan three.
Folsom also had a team-high
30 assists for Marianna.
"The serving was really good.
We served really well," Lady
Bulldogs coach Belinda Chris-
topher said. We hit it well, and
we ran the offense pretty well.
We'll just have to wait and see
if we can be more competitive
against the better teams."
Marianna was scheduled to
take on Altha on Tuesday night
in the regular season and home
finale in which the Lady Bull-
dogs will honor their lone senior


in Searcy. With such a young
team, Christopher said she be-
lieved this group's best volley-
ball was still ahead.
"Hopefully, we'll be stronger
next year for already having
played together and gelled this
year," the coach said. "We'll
have five seniors next year, and
a year of growth and maturing
and playing together makes you
stronger. I'm looking forward to
seeing that."
Marianna will open the dis-
trict tournament at home on
Tuesday against the Walton
Lady Braves at 6 p.m.


CHIPOLA BR.FSKETBRL.


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Chipola Head Coach Jake Headrick goes over passing with the Indians during a practice last week.





New but primed


Fresh-faced Indians look to make the leap this season


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

Jake Headrick's first season as
the Chipola head coach was a
disappointment.
The second year represented a
significant step forward.
With his third season at the
helm of the Indians program
nearing, Headrick hopes that
this Chipola team will make an
even bigger leap towards re-es-
tablishing the program's state-
wide dominance.
After missing the postseason
altogether in 2010, the Indians
won the Panhandle Conference
last season and made it to the
final game of the 2011 state tour-
nament before ultimately losing
to Tallahassee.
This year's Indians club is vir-
tually brand-new, with only one
returning player who saw game
action last season.
But the team still has the high-
est of aspirations, as echoed
by sophomore guard Trantell
Knight, a former Middle Georgia
star who transferred to Chipola
last year and red-shirled,
"We're very confident," the 6
foot, 1 inch guard said.l "V W'i re-
allygood 1 *liimiijli 12,We know
how to play wilh ercli ollier and


"Ifeel like this team is
definitely capable of
making it to the national
tournament."
Jake Headrick
Indians coach

share the ball. If we keep working
every day, we can be the team to
win the first national champi-
onship at Chipola. That would
mean a lot to us."
Headrick said he wasn't ready
to start thinking that far ahead
yet, but that he believes this
squad has a chance to have a
special season.
"I feel like this team is defi-
nitely capable of making it to the
national tournament," the coach
said. "At the same time, we've got
a lot of areas we need to improve
on. We've still got a ways to go.
What we've been good about is
working hard every day, but the
other part is realizing how hard
it is.
"Sometimes, you step back
and look at (Chipola) going to
the national tourney in six of
seven years, and you think it
just happens. The truth is that
when you've got 25 or 26 teams
in a region that are all really


good fighting for one spot, it's a
battle. We've got to realize that
our first goal is being able to win
this league and then get into the
state tournament before we can
do anything else."
While no teams at this stage
are close to a finished product,
Headrick said he couldn't be
happier with his club's progress.
"I feel like right now we're as
prepared as we've been the last
couple of years as far as be-
ing able to go out and execute
against man defense, zone de-
fense, against press ... the guys
are prepared in all those areas.
"But we've still got a lot we've
got to find out about, like who
are our top eight guys? That's my
biggest question right now."
While the Indians may lag be-
hind some other teams in terms
of the continuity to comes with
having returning players, they
take a backseat to very few in
terms of pure talent.
Chipola has a pair of Division-I
transfers in former Alabama big
man Jason Carter, as well as for-
merToledo point guard JTThom-
as, while former North Carolina
State signee Joseph Uchebo was
one of the more sought-after big
See CHIPOLA, Page 2B


MARKSKINNER/FLORIDAN
Former Marianna Bulldogs star Kruize Pinkins drives to the basket
during a high school game last year. Now a Chipola Indians player,
Pinkins is making the transition to the college level.



Pinkins finding


his focus as a


Chipola Indian


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

When the Chipola Indians
make their season debut on
Nov. 4 in the Milton H. John-
son Classic, Jackson County
basketball fans will see a fa-
miliar face on the court in
former Marianna Bulldogs
star Kruize Pinkins.
However, Pinkins' face
may be all that many fans
recognize when he puts on a
Chipola uniform for the first
time, Indians coach Jake
Headrick said Tuesday.
"Obviously a lot of people
remember seeing him in
high school, but I think' a
lot bf people are going to
be amazed by how much
better Kruize has gotten
in the last six months," the
coach said. "He's a kid who
was a late bloomer, but he
has slimmed down, got his
body in great shape, and re-
ally worked hard every day.
I think some days even he
is probably a little surprised
by where he's at, but that's a'
tribute to him."
Pinkins said that the tran-


"'s been real rough.
It's much different than
highschool"
Kruize Pinkins,
Chipola basketball player

sition has been far from easy
and has required a different
level of commitment than at
any time before.
"It's been real tough,"
he said. "It's much differ-
ent than high school. It's a
lot more practicing, more
team and individual drills.
You have to be a lot more re-
sponsible and manage your
time well. But I think I've
made some big progress."
The 6 foot, 7 inch post
player said he feels like he is
a better, more versatile play-
er all around now.
"I feel like I'm quicker and
move better, and I can shoot
better from the outside and
do more from the perim-
eter," he said. "I think I'm a
more well-rounded player.

See PINKINS, Page 2B


MERE Soccer


Dayspring takes 8-2

victory over Scorpions

BY SHELIAMADER Marie Patterson Robbins
Floridan Correspondent and Ryne Melzer picking up
goals.
The soccer action at Op- Trent Harris had a goal
timist Park picked back up taken away on an off-sides
Thursday evening after two penalty, his third of the year.
days of rain-outs earlier in On the opposite field, it
the week. was the Pythons shutting
In Tiny Mites action, it was out the Cobras 2-0 to remain
Dayspring putting on an of- perfect on the season.
fensive showing with an 8-2 Detorrian Barnes and Ke-
win over the Scorpions. aton Meese scored for the
Leading the way for Day- Pythons.
springs was James Isabella The Cobras missed out on
with six goals on the night, a golden scoring opportu-
while Jaysori Fowler and nity when Cole Reagan shot
Tony Lagman both added a from the left side but quick
goal each.
For the Scorpions, it was See DAYSPRING, Page 2BL
...- -- '' -


~-------~-~~-~-~-~


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II
-. i'
'
''1'
?
...r .


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'"
*' ;
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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


12B WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 19,2011


Jacksonville Jaguars
HKJI-c"lBI ,


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Sunday photo, Jacksonville Jaguars' Josh Scobee (10) kicksa 45-yard field goal in
the fourth quarter of an NFL football game against the Pittsburgh Steelers in Pittsburgh.
Jaguars coach Jack Del Rio drew heavy criticism on the call.


Del Rio defends call for


late field goal in loss


The Associated Press

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -
Jacksonville Jaguars coach
Jack Del Rio has no regrets
about kicking a field goal
while trailing by seven
points late at Pittsburgh.
SThe Jaguars trailed 17-10
with 4:22 remaining when
Del Rio decided to kick a
45-yard field goal instead
of trying to convert a
fourth-and-6 play against
the Steelers.
The decision drew
strong criticism. Former
All-Pro defensive tackle
and current NFL Network
analystWarren Sapp wrote
on his Twitter page that


Chipola
From Page 1B
men in the country in the
2011 class.
Knight also brings ex-
perienced talent to this
team, having taken Mid-
dle Georgia to the NJCAA
national tournament in
Hutchinson, Kan., before
transferring to Chipola.
But it's not just the most
heralded players that
Headrick said have in-
spired confidence, but the
players throughout the
roster.
"I feel confident in our
depth this year. I think
we have 11 or 12 guys
here who can help us win
games, and not just non-
league games, but league
games too," the coach
said. "All of those guys can
help us win Panhandle
Conference games. Those
guys are talented enough
to do that."
Chipola had plenty of
star power last year with
the likes of Keith DeWitt,
Sam Grooms, Geron John-
son, and Elijah Pittman,
but the team struggled
mightily when DeWitt and
Grooms suffered injuries,
and Johnson and Pitt-
man became distractions
before ultimately being
dismissed due to off court
legal issues.
Headrick said the fi-
nal stretch of last season
showed the value of qual-
ity depth.
"We were top heavy last
year. Once we got past the
first five or six, the quality
of depth dropped off," he
said. "We got to that last
game against TCC, and
the guys were really just
beaten down from those
first two nights and we
didn't have enough depth
to suck it up and win that
game. That's an area we're
definitely stronger at this
year."
The most consistent per-
former for last year's team
was undersized small for-
ward Marcos Knight, who
was second on the team in
scoring and led the Indi-
ans in rebounding stand-
ing just 6 foot, 3 inches.
Headrick said finding
someone to replace the
spark the team got from
the departed Knight was
his top priority.
"Losing Marcos was
big because he gave us
so much confidence and
I


Del Rio "Should Be Fired.
Kicking a FG Down 17-10!
(hash)Idiot.".
Fans .were equally out-
raged, especially since Del
Rio has shown a penchant
for gambling on fourth
down over the years. This
time, though, he played it
safe.
"We- make calls all
throughout the game," Del
Rio said Monday "That's
one that certainly people
will certainly look back
and ask that question.
We did what we thought
was right there, took the
points and played to the
defense."
It didn't pan out,


The Jaguars (1-5) made
the field goal and got the
ball back with a minute
left, but failed to mount
a threat and lost 17-13.
It gave the team its first
five-game losing streak
in a decade and matched
the worst start in franchise
history, which came in Del
Rio's first season.
It also was the third time
in the last four games that
Jacksonville had chances
to win in the final minutes,
'but came up short in each
of'them.
They had clock' man-
agement issues at, Caro-
lina and a botched snap
against Cincinnati.


leadership," the coach fouled. We've got skilled,
said. "We've got to have big-bodied guys, and four
another guy emerge who complete players down
can play 25-30 minutes at low."
small forward like Marcos They're also quite large,
did. That's been a really with Uchebo standing at 6
good spot at Chipola ir re- feet, 11 inches, Carter at 6
cent years, so we need to foot, 9 inches, Pinkins and
find another guy there." Watson at 6 feet, 7 inches
Freshmen Jerel Scott each, and all weighing at
and Tevin Baskin seem 240 pounds or heavier.
the main candidates to fill "Thebiggestthingishow
that void, though Head- physical our post players
rick said who starts is re- are," Headrick said. "We
ally irrelevant. can't just come down the
"What we need is for floor and jack up shots.
one to establish himself We've got to let those guys
as a guy that we can count get in the play, get involved
on in the last three or four in the offense, and make
minutes of a big game," people pay down low."
the coach said. While the pieces are in
The loss of Grooms will place, Headrick said the
also be felt, though Head- only way his team could
rick expressed confidence win championships this-
in the ability of Trantell year is by developing
Knight and Thomas to the kind of mental and
handle much of the guard physical toughness nec-
duties, as well as fresh- essary to compete in the
men MoHammed Lee and Panhandle.
Terel Hall. "It's being able to com-
"Sam was a special guy' pete every single pos-
and we're definitely going session because when
to miss his leadership, but you get to league play, so
we only had one of him many games are decided
last year," the coach said. by 10 points or less," he
"This year, I think we've said. "You've got to be
got several guys capable able to realize that those
of filling that role." possessions in the first
Distributing minutes half, those first 10 min-
among players accus- utes of the second half, if
tomed to getting a great you don't execute those,
deal of them is always a it could be what gets you
challenge at Chipola, but beat.
Thomas said he didn't "The talent is there, the
think that would be an is- togetherness, and the
sue with this group. chemistry; it's just a mat-
"Everybody is buying ter of realizing how hard
into the team concept," he you've got to play every
said. "If one man comes night. The good thing is
out, the next person has we've gotsometime.When
to go in and give the same January gets here, we've
amount of effort. It's great got to be ready then."
for us because we're good
at all 12 spots."_..
Perhaps the greatest
strength for the Indians
this year will be on the low
block where the Indians
sport a four-man rota-
tion that includes Carter,
Uchebo, freshman Earl
Watson, and former Mari- Highest O
anna Bulldogs star Kruize Hardie
Pinkins. 26 Gauge Conce,
Headrick said this be-
came more evident dur- Spray F
ing the team's recent trips Oa
to Tallahassee and Colum- Tile &
bus, Ga., for preseason
games.
"That's what stood out 2 & 3 BEDF
to me the most in these AVA
jamborees, our ability to
dominate the glass and $125,000
limit teams to one shot,"
he said. "We were being
able to throw it inside
down low and score or get


Correction
In the Marianna JV foot-
ball picture in Tuesday's
edition of The Floridan,
Marianna's Shaquarious
Baker was incorrectly
identified.

High School Football
Friday -.Sneads at
Wewahitchka, 7 p.m.;
Graceville atVernon, 7
p.m.; Walton at Marianna,
7p.m.
Cottondale is off this
week.

High School
Volleyball
Thursday- Sneads at
Arnold, 5 p.m., and 6 p.m.

Marianna Recreation
Football

Marianna Recreation
Department will offer two
tackle football leagues
and one boys flag football
league this year.
Registration for youth
ages 6 to 13 will be held
through Friday from
8 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the
Marianna Educational and,
Recreational Expo located
at 3625 Caverns Rd. in
Marianna.
Registration fee for flag
football is $30 for partici-
pants who live inside the
city limits of Marianna,
and $45 for those who live
outside.
The fee for tackle
football ig $45 for Mari-
anna residents, and $60
for those outside the city
limits. The fee must be
paid with check or money


Pindns
From Page 1B

That comes from bring-
ing a mindset every day to
work hard and get better."
SHeadrick said commit-
ment has never been an is-
sue with Pinkins since the
day he was signed.
"Ever since the day he
told me he was coming to
Chipola, Kruize has been
all in," the coach said. "It's
probably not an easy thing
for him being at home ev-
ery day, being in the same
place he has grown up.
But the biggest thing is he
hasn't shown any sign of
distraction since he's been
here.
"l!e has come with an at-
titude to get better every
day, and that's why he'll be
successful."
Pinkins said he knows
that he'll have a lot of local
support at Chipola games,
but that is not what he is
concerned about.
"That's great and it should
be fun, but it's really no big
deal," he said. "I just want


Follow us on
Facebdok


Jackson County
Floridan


Sports Briefs
order; no cash will be
accepted.
No one will be allowed
to register after Friday.
* All participants must
bring a copy of their birth
certificate. The age on
Nov. 1 of the current year
will be the player's age for
the entire season.
For more information,
call 482-6228.

Cottondale Baseball
Fundraiser

The Cottondale High
School Baseball program
will be holding a dodge-
ball tournament as a'
fundraiser for the upcom-
ing season.
It will be a double
elimination tournament
with teams consisting of
10 players. The cost will be
$10 per player and the top
three teams will win cash
prizes.
If you're interested in
entering a team, con-
tactvGreg Ohler at 482-
9821 ext. 263 for more
information.

Panhandle
Championships
The Panhandle Cross
County Championships
will be held at Marianna
High School Saturday.
The boys 5K race wily
start at 8 a.m., with the
girls race following at 8:30
a.m.
There will also be an
open 2-mile race for boys
and girls middle school
aged only at 9:15 a.m., and
an open 5K race for high
school junior varsity and


community runners at
9:45 a.m.
Entry fee for the open
race is $5 per runner, and
checks should be made
out to The Cross Country
Club, which supports the
Marianna High School
cross country team.
Everyone who runs in
the open 2-mile race has
to pay and fill out a waiver
form, which can be picked
up at the home side con-
cession stand.
Entry fees can be mailed
or brought to the race on
race day.-Mail checks to:
Allan Gibson I/C Mari-
anna High School 3546
Caverns Road Marianna,
FL 32446.

Alumni Football Game
There will be a full con-
tact alumni football league
held this winter.
The games are full pads
with officials, announc-
ers, and video crew, and
is open to all former high
school football players 18
and older in the area.
Games will take place on
weekends from January
through March of 2012.
There must be at least 35
players to a team.
Those interested can
sign up at www.alumni-
footballusa.com.

Sports Items
Send all sports items to
editorial@jcfloridan.com,
or fax them to 850-482-
4478. The mailing address
for the paper is Jackson
County Floridan .O. Box
520 Marianna, FL 32447.


"Ever since the day he told me he was coming
Chipola, Kruixe has beenall in. fs probably not
an easy thingfor him being at home every day,
being in the someplace he has grown up. But
the biggest hingis he hasn't shown any sign of
distraction since he's been here."
Jake Headrick,
Marianna head coach


to play ball."
Headrick said that he
wasn't sure exactly what he
was getting with Pinkins on
signing day, but his faith in
the freshman has been re-
warded and then some.
"I knew he was a good
player, but I didn't know
how good," the coach said.
"I knew he was a quiet kid,
so I was really surprised to
see him come in and take
a leadership role as a fresh-
man. That's probably what
I'm most proud of. Every
day, he comes into the gym
ready to work, whether it's
in the weight room, on the
court, or in the classroom.
"I think everybody that
knows him on campus
would have a nice thing
to say about him. He has


Dayspring
From Page 1B
acting Python defenders
ended the threat. The Ti-
gers took a 5-1 lead over
'the Knights with Hunter


earned my respect and
trust with just how hard he
has worked here on a daily
basis."
Pinkins will be a key part
of a four-man post rotation
that Headrick said could
be the strength of the team
this season.
The former Bulldog said
he hopes to make that
proclamation come true.
"We've got a lot of good
big guys, and they all can
play," Pinkins said. "We
can't let coach down. We
knowwhathe expects of us,
so we've got to go out there
and defend, rebound, and
put points on the board
when we get the ball. We
just have to set our minds
to come out and play hard
every game."


Smith picking up the lone
goal for the Knights, while
Benjamin Rooney scored
two goals for the Tigers.
Nathan Ziglar, Amalia
Nuccio, and Connor Os-
wald added goals for the
Tigers.


j WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM



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scoreboard


SPRINT CUP LEADERS
Through Oct. 15
Points
1, Carl Edwards, 2,203.2, Kevin
Harvick, 2,198. 3, Matt Kenseth, 2,196.
4, Kyle Busch, 2,185. 5, Tony Stewart,
2,179. 6, Brad Keselowski, 2,178. 7, Kurt
Busch, 2,176.8, Jimmie Johnson, 2,168.
9, Dale Earnhardt Jr., 2,143. 10, Ryan
Newman, 2,142.
11, Jeff Gordon, 2,137.12, Denny
Hamlin, 2,117. 13, Clint Bowyer, 868.
14, A J Allmendinger, 865.15, Kasey
Kahne, 857.16, Greg Biffle, 856.17, Da-
vid Ragan, 829. 18, Marcos Ambrose,
821.19, Juan Pablo Montoya,819. 20,
Mark Martin, 816.
Money
1, Carl Edwards, $7,365,084. 2,
Kyle Busch, $5,687,409. 3, Jim-
mie Johnson, $5,612,979.4, Kevin
Harvick, $5,537,614. 5, Matt Kenseth,
$5,445,104.6, Kurt Busch, $5,342,376.
7, Jeff Gordon, $5,202,179. 8, Tony
Stewart, $5,173,381.9, Clint Bowyer,
$4,825,111.10, Denny Hamlin,
$4,747,518.
11, Ryan Newman, $4,665,023.12,
Brad Keselowski, $4,529,804. 13,
Juan Pablo Montoya, $4,440,886.
14, Jamie McMurray, $4,232,122. 15,
A J Allmendinger, $4,196,259.16,
Marcos Ambrose, $4,192,434. 17,
Regan Smith, $4;063,983. 18, Kasey
Kahne, $4,009,952.19, Bobby Labonte,
$3,995,678. 20, David Reutimann,
$3,821,776.


POSTSEASON GLANCE
All Times EDT
DIVISION SERIES
(Best-of-S)
All games televised by TBS
American League
Detrot 3, NewYork 2
Friday, Sept 30: Detroit 1, New York
1, 1 innings, susp., rain
Saturday, Oct. 1: New York 9, Detroit
3, comp. of susp. game
Sunday, Oct 2: Detroit 5, New York 3
Monday, Oct 3: Detroit 5, New York 4
Tuesday, Oct 4: New York 10, Detroit


1
Thursday, Oct 6: Detroit 3, New
York 2
Texas 3, Tampa Bay 1
Friday, Sept. 30: Tampa Bay 9, Texas 0
Saturday, Oct 1: Texas 8, Tampa
Bay 6
Monday, Oct 3: Texas 4, Tampa Bay 3
Tuesday, Oct 4: Texas 4, Tampa Bay 3
National League
St Loui 3, Phladelphia 2
Saturday, Oct 1: Philadelphia 11, St
Louis 6
Sunday, Oct 2: St Louis 5, Philadel-
phia 4
Tuesday, Oct 4: Philadelphia 3, St.
Louis 2
Wednesday, Oct 5: St. Louis 5,
Philadelphia 3
Friday, Oct 7: St Louis 1, Philadel-
phia 0
Mlwaukee 3,Arzona 2
Saturday, Oct 1: Milwaukee 4,
Arizona 1
Sunday, Oct 2: Milwaukee 9, Arizona
4
Tuesday, Oct 4: Arizona 8, Milwaukee
I
Wednesday, Oct 5: Arizona 10,
Milwaukee 6
Friday, Oct 7: Milwaukee 3, Arizona
2,10 innings
LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES
(Best-of-7)
SAmerican League
All games televised by Fox
Texas 4, Detroit 2
Saturday, Oct 8: Texas 3, Detroit 2
Sunday, Oct 9: Detroit at Texas,
ppd. rain
Monday, Oct 10: Texas 7, Detroit 3,
11 innings


THE : : 1:. 1 I : f : .
Workers watch a Red Bull car going down the track during the
unveiling of the Buddh International Circuit, the venue for
India's first Formula One Grand Prix in Noida, 38 kilometers
(24 miles) from New Delhi, India, Tuesday. The inaugural run is
scheduled for Oct. 30.


Tuesday, Oct. 11: Detroit 5, Texas 2
Wednesday, Oct 12: Texas 7, Detroit
3, 11 innings
Thursday, Oct 13: Detroit 7, Texas 5
Saturday, Oct 15: Texas 15, Detroit 5
National League
All games televised by TBS
St. Louis 4, Milwaukee 2
Sunday, Oct 9: Milwaukee 9, St.
Louis 6
Monday, Oct. 10: St Louis 12, Mil-
waukee 3
Wednesday, Oct 12: St Louis 4,
Milwaukee 3
Thursday, Oct. 13: Milwaukee 4, St
Louis 2
Friday, Oct. 14: St Louis 7, Milwaukee
1
Sunday, Oct 16: St Louis 12, Mil-
waukee 6
WORLD SERIES
(Best-of-7; x-if necessary)
All games televised by Fox
Wednesday, Oct 19: Texas (Wilson
16-7) at St Louis (Carpenter 11-9),
9:05 p.m.
Thursday, Oct 20: Texas (Lewis 14-
10) at St Louis (Garcia 13-7), 9:05 p.m.
Saturday, Oct 22: St Louis (Jackson
12-9) at Texas (jolland 16-5), 9:05 p.m.
Sunday, Oct. 23: St. Louis (Lohse 14-
8) at Texas (Harrison 14-9), 9:05 p.m.
x-Monday, Oct 24: St. Louis at Texas,
9:05 p.m.
x-Wednesday, Oct 26: Texas at St
Louis, 9:05 p.m.
x-Thursday, Oct 27: Texas at St
Louis, 9:05 p.m.


NFL
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East


W LT Pct PF PA
New England 5 1 0 .833 185 135
Buffalo 4 2 0' .667 188 147
N.Y. Jets 3 3 0 .500 145 131
Miami 0 5 0 .000 75 128
South
W LT Pt PF PA
Tennessee 3 2 0 .600 105 94
Houston 3 3 0 .500 141 124
Jacksonville 1 5 0 .167 72 132
Indianapolis 0 6 0 .000 104 163
North
W LT Pet PF PA
Baltimore 4 1 0 .800 148 71
Cincinnati 4 2 0 .667 137 111
Pittsburgh 4 2 0 .667 119 102
Cleveland 2 3 0 .400 91 117
West
W LT Pet PF PA
San Diego 4 1 0 .800 120 109
Oakland 4 2 0 .667 160 150
Kansas City 2 3 0 .400 77 150
Denver 1 4 0 .200 105 140
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W LT Pct PF PA
N.Y. Giants 4 2 0 .667 154 147
Washington 3 2 0 .600 96 83
Dallas 2 3 0 .400 115 121
Philadelphia 2 4 0 .333 145 145
South
W LT Pet PF PA
Tampa Bay 4 2 0 .667 113 145
New Orleans 4 2 0 .667 177 151
Atlanta 3 3 0 .500 135 147
Carolina 1 5 0 .167 133 163
North
W LT Pct PF PA
Green Bay 6 0 0 1.000 197 114
Detroit 5 1 0 .833 178 114
Chicago 3 3 0 .500 146 132
Minnesota 1 5 0 .167 121 145
West
W LT Pct PF PA


GOLF
4 p.m.
TNT PGA of America, Grand
Slam of Golf, final round, at South-
ampton, Bermuda
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7:30 p.m.
FOX World Series, game 1,
Texas/Detroit winner at St. Louis/
Milwaukee winner
PAN AMERICAN GAMES
8 p.m.
ESPN2 Events TBA, at Guadala-
jara (same-day tape)
SOCCER
2:30 p.m.
FSN UEFA Champions League,
Viktoria Pizen at Barcelona
8 p.m
FSN UEFA Champions League,
Arsenal at Marseille (same-day
tape)

San Francisco 5 1 0 .833 167 97
Seattle 2 3 0 .400 94 122
Arizona 1 4 0 .200 96 121
St. Louis 0 5 0 .000 49 137
Sunday's Games
Green Bay 24, St. Louis 3
Pittsburgh 17, Jacksonville 13
Philadelphia 20, Washington 13
San Francisco 25, Detroit 19
Atlanta 31, Carolina 17
Cincinnati 27, Indianapolis 17
N.Y. Giants 27, Buffalo 24
Oakland 24, Cleveland 17
Baltimore 29, Houston 14
New England 20, Dallas 16
Tampa Bay 26, New Orleans 20
Chicago 39, Minnesota 10
Open: Arizona, Denver, Kansas City,
San Diego, Seattle, Tennessee
Monday's Game
N.Y. Jets 24, Miami 6
Sunday, Oct. 23
Houston at Tennessee, 1 p.m.
Washington at Carolina, 1 p.m.
San Diego at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m.
Seattle at Cleveland, 1 p.m.
Denver at Miami, 1 p.m.
Atlanta at Detroit, 1 p.m.
Chicago vs. Tampa Bay at London,
1 p.m.
Kansas City at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Arizona, 4:05 p.m.
St. Louis at Dallas, 4:15 p.m.
Green Bay at Minnesota, 4:15 p.m.
Indianapolis at New Orleans, 8:20
p.m.
Open: Buffalo, Cincinnati, N.Y. Gi-
ants, New England, Philadelphia, San
Francisco
Monday, Oct. 24
Baltimore at Jacksonville, 8:30 p.m.
COLLEGE SCHEDULE
College Football Schedule
All Times EDT
(Subject to change)
Tuesday, Oct 18
FIU (4-2) at Arkansas St (4-2), 9 p.m.
Thursday, Oct. 20
SOUTH
Bethune-Cookman (3-3) at Norfolk St
(6-1), 8:30 p.m.
UCF (3-3) at UAB (0-6), 9 p.m.
FAR WEST
UCLA (3-3) at Arizona (1-5), 10 p.m.
Friday, Oct. 21
EAST
West Virginia (5-1) at Syracuse (4-2),
9 p.m.
SOUTH
Rutgers (5-1) at Louisville (2-4), 9
p.m.
Saturday, Oct.22
EAST
N. Illinois (4-3) at Buffalo (2-5), 1 p.m.
Albany (NY) (4-2) at CCSU (2-5), 1
p.m.
Wagner (1-5) at Duquesne (5-2), 1
p.m.


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 19 2011 3B


Yale (3-2) at Penn (3-2), 1 p.m.
Bryant (4-3) at Robert Morris (2-4),
1 p.m.
Brown (4-1) at Cornell (2-3), 1:30 p.m.
Delaware (4-3) at Rhode Island (1-5),
1:30 p.m.
Holy Cross (3-3) at Bucknell (4-3),
2 p.m.
Princeton (1-4) at Harvard (4-1), 2
p.m.
Fordham (1-5) at Lafayette (2-4), 2
p.m.
Monmouth (NJ) (3-3) at Sacred Heart
(4-2), 2 p.m.
Columbia (0-5) at Dartmouth (1-4),
2:30 p.m.
Colgate (4-3) at Georgetown (5-2),
3 p.m.
East Carolina (2-4) at Navy (2-4),
4:30 p.m.
New Hampshire (4-2) vs. UMass (4-2)
at Foxborough, Mass., 4:30 p.m.
Old Dominion (5-2) at Villanova (1-6),
4:30 p.m.
SOUTH
North Carolina (5-2) at Clemson
(7-0), 1 p.m.
Jacksonville St (5-1) at Kentucky
(2-4), 1 p.m.
Cincinnati (5-1) at South Florida
(4-2), 1 p.m.
Arkansas (5-1) at Mississippi (2-4),
1:20 p.m.
Wake Forest (4-2) at Duke (3-3), 1:30
p.m.
San Diego (6-1) at Campbell (3-3),
2 p.m.
NC A&T (4-2) at Howard (3-4), 2 p.m.
Davidson (2-4) at Jacksonville (5-2),
2p.m.
Dayton (4-3) at Morehead St. (2-5),
2 p.m.
Wofford (5-1) at Furman (3-3), 3 p.m.
Presbyterian (2-4) at Georgia South-
ern (6-0), 3 p.m.
Auburn (5-2) at LSU (7-0), 4:30 p.m.
Georgia Tech (6-1) at Miami (3-3),
4:30 p.m.
Maine (5-1) at Richmond (3-3), 4:30
p.m.
Memphis (1-6) at Tulane (2-5), 4:30
p.m.
NC State (3-3) at Virginia (4-2), 4:30
p.m.
Towson (5-1) at William & Mary (4-3),
4:30 p.m.
Louisiana-Lafayette (6-1) at W.
Kentucky (2-4), 5 p.m.
Stephen F. Austin (1-5) at Nicholls St
(1-6), 7:30 p.m.
SGardner-Webb (1-5) at Coastal Caro-
lina (4-2), 8 p.m.
Army (2-4) at Vanderbilt (3-3), 8 p.m.
Tennessee (3-3) at Alabama (7-0),
8:15 p.m.
Middle Tennessee (1-4) at FAU (0-6),
9 p.m.
Sam Houston St. (6-0) at McNeese St
(3-3), 9 p.m.
Texas St. (5-2) at SE Louisiana (1-5),
9 p.m.
SMU (5-1) at Southern Miss. (5-1),
9 p.m.
MIDWEST
Indiana (1-6) at Iowa (4-2), 1 p.m.
Kansas St (6-0) at Kansas (2-4), 1
p.m.
Oklahoma St (6-0) at Missouri (3-3),
1 p.m.
Illinois (6-1) at Purdue (3-3), 1 p.m.
Marist (2-5) at Butler (4-3), 2 p.m.
W. Michigan (4-3) at E. Michigan
(4-3), 2 p.m.
Cent Michigan (2-5) at Ball St (4-3),
3 p.m.
Valparaiso (0-6) at Drake (5-2), 3 p.m.
Indiana.St (5-2) at Illinois St (4-3),
3 p.m.
Cal Poly (3-3) at North Dakota (4-2),
3p.m.
Austin Peay (2-4) at SE Missouri
(1-5), 3 p.m.
UT-Martin (3-3) at E. Illinois (1-6),
3:30 p.m.
N. Dakota St (6-0) at S. Dakota St
(2-5), 4 p.m.
Ohio (4-3) at Akron (1-5), 4:30 p.m.
Temple (5-2) at Bowling Green (3-4),
4:30 p.m.


Texas A&M (4-2) at Iowa St. (3-3),
4:30 p.m.
Nebraska (5-1) at Minnesota (1-5),
4:30 p.m.
S. Illinois (2-4) at N. Iowa (5-1), 5 p.m.
St. Francis (Pa.) (1-6) at Youngstown
St. (3-3), 5 p.m.
UC Davis (2-4) at South Dakota (4-3),
6p.m.
Penn St. (6-1) at Northwestern (2-4),
8p.m.
Miami (Ohio) (2-4) at Toledo (4-3),
8p.m.
SMissouri St. (0-7) at W. Illinois (2-4),
8p.m.
Southern Cal (5-1) at Notre Dame
(4-2), 8:30 p.m.
Wisconsin (6-0) at Michigan St. (5-1),
9p.m.
SOUTHWEST
New Mexico (0-6) at TCU (4-2), 3 p.m.
Central St., Ohio (0-7) at Texas South-
ern (2-4), 4 p.m.
Cent. Arkansas (4-3) at Lamar (3-3),
5p.m.
Marshall (3-4) at Houston (6-0), 5:30
p.m.
Louisiana-Monroe (2-4) at North
Texas (2-5), 8 p.m.
Tulsa (3-3) at Rice (2-4), 8 p.m.
Texas Tech (4-2) at Oklahoma (6-0),
9 p.m.
Colorado St. (3-3) at UTEP (3-3), 9
p.m.
FAR WEST
Idaho St. (2-5) at BYU (5-2), 4 p.m.
Louisiana Tech (2-4) at Utah St. (2-4),
4 p.m.
SAir Force (3-3) at Boise St. (6-0),
4:30 p.m.
Oregon (5-1) at Colorado (1-6), 4:30
p.m.
Montana St. (6-1) at N. Colorado
(0-7), 4:35 p.m.
Fresno St. (3-4) at Nevada (3-3), 5:05
p.m.
S. Utah (3-4) at Weber St. (3-3), 7 p.m.
Montana (5-2) at N. Arizona (2-4),
7:05 p.m.
Utah (3-3) at California (3-3), 8 p.m.
Washington (5-1) at Stanford (6-0),
9p.m.
Willamette (3-3) at Portland St. (3-3),
9:05 p.m.
E. Washington (3-4) at Sacramento
St. (3-3), 10:05 p.m.
Oregon St. (1-5) at Washington St.
(3-3), 11:30 p.m.
USA TODAY TOP 25 POLL
The USA Today Top 25 football
coaches poll, with first-place votes in
parentheses, records through Oct 15,
total points based on 25 points for first
place through one point for 25th, and
previous ranking:
Record Pts Pvs
1. Oklahoma (31) 6-0 1,426 1
2. LSU (15) 7-0 1,410 2
3. Alabama (12) 7-0 1,403 3
4. Wisconsin (1) 6-0 1,262 4
5. Stanford 6-0 1,222 5
6. Oklahoma State 6-0 1,173 7
7. Boise State 6-0 1,172 6
8. Clemson 7-0 1,028 8
8.Oregon 5-1 1,028 9
10. Arkansas 5-1 931 11
11. Nebraska 5-1 775 14
12. South Carolina 6-1 765 13
13. Michigan State 5-1 690 19
14. West Virginia 5-1 688 16
14. Virginia Tech 6-1 688 17
16. Kansas State 6-0 678 18
17. Michigan 6-1 458 10
18. Texas A&M 4-2 415 23
19. Georgia Tech 6-1 396 12
20. Houston 6-0 359 22
21. Illinois 6-1 260 15
22. Penn State 6-1 253 25
23. Auburn 5-2 202 NR
24. Washington 5-1 174 NR
25. Arizona State 5-2 86 20
Others receiving votes: Georgia 60;
Notre Dame 36; Rutgers 31; Southern
Methodist 27; Texas 26; Cincinnati
14; Southern Mississippi 14; Baylor 9;
North Carolina 9; Temple 3; Virginia
3; TCU 1.


WEDNESDAY MORNING/ AFTERNOON OCTOBER 19, 2011

6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00110:3011:0011:3012:0012:30 1:00 1:30 2:00 2:30, 3:00 3:30 4:00 4:30 5:00 5:30
2 The Early Show (N) (In Stereo) O Griffith Milonare Let's Make a Deal (N) ThePrice Is Right (N) News Young& Restless Bold The Talk (In Stereo) NateBerkus he Dr. Oz Show (N) News News News CBSNews
3 WTVY News 4 The Early Show (N) (In Stereo) Live Regis & Kelly The Price Is Right (N) Young & Restless Live at Bold The Talk (In Stereo) Let's Make a Deal (N) Rachael Ray (N) 0 Ellen DeGeneres News CBS News
5 0 NewsChannel7 Today Today Martha Stewart; Sting; Elizabeth Olsen. (N) (In Stereo) a Days of our Lives (N) News 7 at Noon Rachael Ray (N) a Millionaire eopardy The Doctors (N) E Ellen DeGeneres News NBC News
Si News 13 This Morning Good Morning America (N) 0 Live Regis & Kelly The View (In Stereo) WMBB Midday News The Chew (In Stereo) One Life to Live r9 General Hospital (N) Dr. Phil (N) E The Dr. Oz Show (N) News ABC News
|10 Auto Tech Paid Prog. BA Chris Funniest Home Videos Justice Judge B. NateBerkus Anderson (Ih Stereo) New Ufe Church America America Judge Mathis B The People's Court Jdg Judy Jdg Judy RIghtThisMinute 6
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28 FAM Boy World Boy World What Like What Like Full House 700 Club he700 Club Pretty Little Liars Pretty Little Liars Pretty title Liars Pretty Little Liars Pretty Little Liars Pretty Little Liars Pretty Little Liars Pretty Little Liars
29 UFE The Balancing Act (N) Reba Reba Will/Grace Will/Grace WilljGrace WII/Grace Chris Chris Chris Chris Desp.-Wlves Grey's Anatomy 0 Grey's Anatomy 0 How I Met How I Met Reba Reba Unsolved Mysteries
30 A&E CSI: Miami (n Stereo) The Sopranos a The Sopranos 6B CSI: Miami (In Stereo) CSI: Miami (In Stereo) The First 48 6 Hoarders 0 MIntervention "Darick" Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage |Storage
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43 CNN2 (5:00) Morning Express With Robin Meade HLN Special Report HLNNews News Now (N) HLN Special Report HLN Special Report Prime News 0
45 CNN (5:00) American Morning (N) e CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) The Situation Room With Wolf Blitzer (N) John King, USA (N)
46 CW (5:00) The Daily Buzz a Steve Wilkos Show JeremyKyle Payne Payne TBA BA TBA BA Steve Wilkos Show LfechangrLIfechangr Browns Browns '70s Show '70s Show 'TI Death King
47 SPIKE Nina Fat Loss 1OminGym Zumba Fit Bar Rescue (In Stereo) CSI: NY (In Stereo) CSI: Crime Scene CSI: Crime Scene CSl: Crime Scene CSI: Crime Scene UFC Unleashed UFC Unleashed UFC Unleashed UFC Unleashed
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99 SPEED Monster Jam NASCAR Race Hub Dumbest Dumbest GT Academy Wealth Pad rog. NASCAR Racing: Sprint Cup: Bank of America 500. Garage TruckU Barrett-Jackson Spec. MonsterJamNASCAR Race Hub


WEDNESDAY EVENING / LATE NIGHT OCTOBER 19, 2011

6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00010:3011o1:00 3012:00l12:30 1:00 1:302:0 2:301 3:00 3:30 4:00 4:30 5:00 5:30
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38 News Wheel Survivor: South Pacific Criminal Minds (N) CSI: Crime Scene News Late Show Letterman Late Late Show/Craig Inside Ed. Up to the Minute (N) (In Stereo) CBS News WTVYNews4
5 News Wheel All Night Whitney Harry'sLaw (N) 0 ILaw & Order: SVU News Tonlght Show w/Leno Late Nght Carson Today (InStereo) Extra (N) The Bankruptcy Hour Shepherd's Chapel Early Tdy NewsChannel_7Tday
Ig News Ent Middle Suburg. Family Happy Revenge "Guiltr 0 News Nightllne Jimmy KImmel Live Excused Jim Access H. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. ABC World News Now (N) a Morning News13 This Morning
10 Two Men 2011 World Series: Game 1. (N) (In Stereo Live) 0 INews Big Bang Two Men 30 Rock Frends Friends KIng/HIIl Scrubs Lewis and Jurnovoy The People's Court How Met Shepherd's Chapel Paid Prog. Outdoor
11 g NewsHour Dimensilon Nature N (DVS) NOVA Life throughout the solar system. (N) CharileRose(N) a T. Smiley T. Smley Nature (DVS) NOVA Life throughout the solar system. Women, War & Peace History Detectives Clifford Wild Kralt
7SHOW 'TheOthe'Woma"f Homeland e0 Inside the NFL a NASCAR *Teller Inside the NFL w Deexter (ITV) (In Stereo) NASCAR 'PaperMan'*tX(2009) JeffDaniels. R', "FaceDown'** (1997) JoeMantegna.'R' CCld Weather ** t~(2010)
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16TBS Selnfeld Seinfeld Fam. Guy Fam.Guy Fam. Guy Fam. Guy Big Bang Big Bang Conan (N) TheOffice The Office Conan Saelnfeld |Selnfeld The Last Mimzy*t*h (2007, Fantasy) Married Married Married Married
17HBO SaPig lowftoTrainYourDragotn"PG' In Time America Boardwalk Empire RealTime/Bill Maher Enlighten Bored RealSex GreenZone'**a (2010) Malt Damon. -Stealing Beey'*.** (1996) Liv Tyler.'R' BigYear 'CareerOpp.
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19 ESPN DepthChart E:60 (N) E:60 (N) NFLLive 6 SportsCenter (N)(Live) s Baseball SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter 0 SportsCenter 60 SportsCenter R SportsCenter 60
20 CSS Talkn' College Football: Alabama at Mississippi. College Football SportsNIe Paid Prog Paid rog. Paid P rog. Pai rog. Pdrog. Pai rog. Paidrog. Pald rogPald Prog. Pad Prog. aldProg. Lose Pald rog
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23 TNT Golf heMentalist a The Mentalist a Law & Order'Empire" CSI: NY On the Job" CSI:NYThe Closer" CSI: NYDecisions Southland(nStereo) Law&Order Law OrdeLaw Order ngel (In Stereo)
24 DISC MythBusters l MythBusters a~ MythBusters (N) e Penn & Teller MythBusterso l Penn & Teller MythBusters a MythBuslersr a Popoff Paid Prog. Teeworid aidProg.TriVita _Wealth Paid Prog. Pald Prog.
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26 USA NCIS: Los Angeles NCIS (In Stereo) 6 NCIS N Psych (N) NCIS Officer's sword. NCIS Sea Dog" Psycho 'Alpha Dog'* X (2006 Crime Drama) Law Order: CI Law Order: CI Law Order: CI
28 FAM Pretty Little Liars Pretty Uttle Llars (N) Pretty Little Uars Pretty Lttle Liars he 700 Club Wh whose Stem 3Faster Women 0 Days The 700 Club Hair [aid Prog. Ministries Life Today J. Meyer TriVita
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33AMC *DiaayofheDeaf 'FightoftheLvng Dead:Outbreak" HtouseofWax'** (2005. Honor)ElshaCuthbert. R' 'NliteNoise* (2005) Michael Keaton.h oise2 The Lighf (2007) 'PG-13 ter'* (1958) Cash Flw PaidProg.
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36 TOON Johnny T Hole/Wall Dude Destroy King/HIII King/Hill Amer. Dad |Amer. Dad Fam. Guy Fam. Guy. Chicken [Aqua Aquua aAmer. Dad AmerDad Pam Guy Fa. Guy Chuicken Awesome Aqua KinglHill King/Hill Looney 'Ben 10
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40 TVLN VanDyhe'Van DykeMar-ried-e ed MIarre dMarred C_,velandCleve _.lan. .Wnd Raymond R T
43 CNN2 Jane Velez-Mitchell Nancy Grace Dr. Drew The Joy Behar Show Showbz Tonight DDr.Drew Nancy Grace Showbiz Tonight The Joy Behar Show Showbiz Tonight Dr.Drew Morning Express
45 CNN Erin Bumett OutFront Anderson Cooper 360 Piers Morgan Tonight AndersonCooper360 Erin Burnett OutFront Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 Anderson Cooper 360 PiersMorgan Tonight World Business Today AM: Wake Up Call (N) American Morning (N)
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47 SPIKE UFC Unleashed King UFC Unleashed T ultimate Fighter BlueMountBlueMount Kng King TheUltimate Fighter BlueMount Entourage Entourage Entourage Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Smoking Triverex Paid Prog. Prots
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99 SPEED Pass Time Pass Time Dumbest Dumbes My Ride My Rde The Car umbest Dumbest Dumbest My Ride My Ride The Car Dumbest NASCAR Race Hub MooGP Racing Motorcycle Racing Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Steam Kitchen


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


PEANUTS BY CHARLES SCHULTZ
HERE, WE'RE 61VIN6 AWAY I'LL TAKE A POU6HNUT, BUT
A DOUGHNUT WITH EVERY I WOULDN'T REAP YOUR
SUBSCRIPTION TO THE NEWSLETTER IF IT WERE THE
"GREAT PUMPKIN"NEWSLETTER LAST NEWSLETTER ON EARTH..


BORN LOSER BY ART AND CHIP SANSOM
WNTO WMTCKTRE.& N4fM UH-O! tlF KNO o&L ,TRAT I
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PASSIONATELY ABOUT ON YOUR DESK.
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DUP TO NUTZ BY RICK STROMOSKI
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ALLEY OOP BY JACK AND CAROLE BENDER
BEFORE WE UK BACK UP WITH J 1 I DF KNOW 7
HAPT ASK YOU TY Ep UT r E WHAT OO~ s OKAY 1
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SABOU n BACK HOME!'


MONTY BY JIM MEDDICK
|iii ii ii ii iiii | B | 111


KIT'N' CARLYLE BY LARRY WRIGHT HERMAN BY JIM UNGER


"How much are these orange
and black ones?"


NEA Crossword Puzzle


ACROSS
1 Shut out
6 Assumed
as fact
11 XX,
chromosoalyh
12 Exceedingly
elaborate
13Came
down in
buckets
14 Classified
(2 wds.)
15 Kate's
sitcom
friend
16 Butte kin
17AII-
purpose
trucks
18 Boat
Implement
19 Diplomat's
asset
23 Sledding
spot
25Tired
26Jogged
29 Knack
31 Like cool
cats
32 Khan of
note
33Silly
comedy
34Bishop's
domain
35 Disgusting


37Hong -
39 Put on the
block
40 Sword
vanquisher
41 Every
45 Deuterium
discoverer
47 Chocolate
bean
48 Bamboo
eaters
51 Action star
Chuck -
520rchard
problem
53 Well-
versed
54Jazz
Instruments
55 Grove

DOWN
1 Started the
hand
2 Novelist -
Zola
3 Exile
4 Helm
position
5 Fire-engine
color
6 Mardi -
7 Present
from birth
8 Large tank
9 Depot Info
10Rorem or
Beatty


Answer to Previous Puzzle


MOU TIEIA N V IEIRN
oNDERR R
DOORS TACOMA
ER LENTAVS OPT
WEE WADE ROBE0
OSCAIRS SENSE

AERATE URANUS
B LAS TAKE BACK
LIESPEW R ILAE
E A TIS RIDS LAW


11 Herr's wife
12 Person in
debt
16 Baloney
18 Earthen
t
20 Contented
murmurs
21 Manitoba
tribe
22 Work
at a
keyboard
24 Far from a
sure thing
25 Brown
songbird
26 Flashlight
output
27The chills
28 Salt, in a
lab


30 Desktop
symbol
36 Inelegant
solution
38 Get ready
(2 wds.)
40 Ant or
roach
42 Large lots
43"Alfle" star
44Throng
46 Cheerleading
yells
47 Ariz.
neighbor
48 "Mystery!"
channel
49 - carte
50 Veto
51 Gridiron
div.


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QulllDriverBooks.com


10-19 2011 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS



CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: Y equals M
"WIZN FN V UWZRE UMPZP HPWHRP
EWO'X LOWU UMVX XMPA UVOX VOE
VZP UFRRFOB XW BW XMZWIBM MPRR
XW BPX FX." EWO YVZDIFN


Previous Solution: "If you're quiet, you're not living. You've got to be noisy and
colorful and lively." Mel Brooks
@2011 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 10-19


Horoscope
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
- Take care not to let your
anger out on an innocent
bystander if you are over-
powered on an important
matter.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) Maintain mental dis-
cipline regardless of what
happens to throw you off.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-
Dec. 21) Keep both your
social and business con-
tacts separate and avoid all
speculative arrangements
with friends.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) Taking on more ob-
jectives or projects that you
can comfortably manage
is self-defeating, so don't
gamble on your workload.
Dedicate yourself to only
one or two targets.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) Don't be coerced into
putting your signature on
something that you're hes-
itant about, and be wary of
even a verbal commitment.
What you agree to might be
deliberately distorted.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) It behooves you to be
self-reliant, becausepeople
upon whom. you depend
might make promises they
later find they can't keep.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
- If you're a bit slow and
your thinking isn't quite as
sharp as it usually is, forgo
attempting to match wits
with an adversary. Back off
until a riper time.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20) Look before you leap
when attempting to handle
a complex assignment.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
- There is a strong chance
that some social plans
you've been looking for-
ward to will get canceled.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
- It's never smart to allow
someone who can be dead
weight into an arrange-
ment where you are aim-
ing for a specific target.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
- There is one thing that
could cause you much dis-
array, and that is proceed-
ing forward on an idea
without laying out a game
plan.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
- Unless you are prudent
in .the management of
your resources, you're not
likely to have the financial
wherewithal to make ends
meet.


Annie's Mailbox


Dear Annie: My husband and I have an
old friend whom we've known more than
40 years..For the past 20, we have alter-
nated spending Christmas Eve together.
"Betsy" has one unmarried adult son
who has not attended our Christmas
events in many years. Our daughter now
spends Christmas Eve with her hus-
band's family. My son and his wife, along
with one aunt and uncle, have always
come to us for the holidays, so the events
at our home and Betsy's have been lovely
adult affairs. However, this year, our son
has a new baby, and they are flying in to
celebrate.
Yesterday, I had coffee with Betsy and
asked whether she'd mind if we host
again this year since it would be so much
simpler with the baby. Our house is al-
ready equipped with a highchair, porta-
ble crib, toys, etc. And it would be much
easier for our son and daughter-in-law
since Betsy's house is not baby-proofed.
Betsy's response was quite hurtful. She
said my husband and I are too struc-


Bridge

South barrels into four hearts. West leads the
club jack. What should happen? After North
made a game-invitational linit raise, South
momentarily thought about a slam. North
might have nothing wasted in clubs, ace-dou-
bleton of spades and the diamond ace.
South, counting losers, sees one in spades
(he can ruff his fourth spade in the dummy),
none in hearts, one or two in diamonds and
one in clubs. The risk, clearly, is two diamond V
losers. For that to happen, West must have the *
diamond ace, and East must gain the lead to
shift to that suit while South still has two dia-
monds in his hand. And if declarer makes the
natural-looking play, covering West's club jack
with dummy's king, East will kill that king with
his ace and switch to the diamond jack, killing
a second king and the contract.
Instead, suppose South plays dummy's low
club at trick one. If East overtakes with his ace
and shifts to diamonds, yes, declarer loses three
minor-suit tricks, but he no longer concedes a
spade, because dummy's two high clubs pro-
vide discards.
Now have East play low at trick one. West
leads another club, say. South ruffs away East's
ace, draws trumps ending in the dummy, and
discards a diamond on the club king to lose
only one trick in each side suit.


tured and kids should just go with the
flow. I didn't back down, and she finally
relented, but in an unfriendly way, saying
she didn't want to "create a crisis." She
totally does not understand how much
things will change with the addition of a
toddler at a dinner party. I tried to get her
to see our side, but she couldn't.
Next year, we will probably go to
Betsy's, since our son will likely start
coming home every other Christmas. But
what do you think of her response?
-A DEVOTED GRANDMOTHER

Dear Grandmother Actually, we can see
both sides. Obviously, it is easier if the
baby is at your house. However, children
are quite adaptable and can manage at
other places, too, if the parents keep a
sharp eye, bring along toys and have a
place for the child to lie down. Parents do
it every day. Still, we wish Betsy had been
more gracious in responding to your
request. It has obviously created some
ill-will.


North 10-19-11
4A72
YQ943
*965
*KQ3
'est East
J954 4Q10
6 975
AQ72 *J1083
J1096 A 8542
South
4K863
VAKJ 1082
*K4
47

Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Both

South West North East
1V Pass 3V Pass
SV Pass Pass Pass

Opening lead: J


- ;; --


-14B WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2011


ENTE'RTAENIVENT








w.JCFLORI)AN.com


CLASSIFIED


Jackson County Floridan Wednesday, October 19, 2011 5 B


WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED




RKETPLA


BY PHONE: (850) 526-3614 or (800) 779-2557 BY MAIL: WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE
BY FAX: (850) 779-2557 P.O. BOX 520, MARIANNA, FL 32447
ONLINE: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM IN PERSON: 4403 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA
Publication Policy Errors and Omissions: Advertisers should check their ad the first day. This publication shall not be liable for failure to publish an ad or for a typographic error or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the ad for the first day's
Insertion. Adjustment for errors is limited to the cost of that portion of the ad wherein the error'occurred The advertiser agrees that the publisher shall not be liable for damages arising out of errors in advertisements beyond the amount paid for the space
actually occupied by that portion of the advertisement in which the error occurred, whether such error is due to negligence of the publisher's employees or otherwise and there shall be no liability for non-insertion of any advertisement beyond the amount paid for
such advertisement. Display Ads are not guaranteed position. All advertising is subject to approval. Right is reserved to edit, reject,cancel or classify all ads under the appropriate classification.
n I I- E I

t o :d e d i


(!J ANNOUNCEMENTS


JUST IN: Mantle w/gas logs;
Lawyers Bookcase; 6ft. kitchen table;
old toys & dolls; Blue Ridge dishes.
Medford Antique Marketplace, Hrs. 9-5.
3820 R.C.C. Dothan, 702-7390
Massive Commercial Restaurant
Equipment Auction.
Long time distributor of new & used
restaurant supplies will be liquidated..
All items must be,sold.
Online bidding available.
1 pm Oct 9th 2011.
172 Coastal Hwy Panacea FL.
jww.affliatedauctions.com
850-877-6180.
rce Machines, Commercial dishware,
Stainless steel sinks, Tilt skillet, Cambros,
New stainless steel hood, Dishwasher,
Delfield passthrough fridge, Pass-thru
rotisserie oven, Fire & Ice unit, Table tops,
Restaurant Booths, walk in coolers More.



I Pay CASH for Diabetic test
strips. Up to $10 per box!
Most brands considered.
All boxes must be unopened
and unexpired.
Call Matt 334-392-0260


Lost Silver Class Ring @ Chipola. Has C'dale
2012 & name engraved. 850-718-7507/579-2412
'"" REWARD for info leading to
S the recovery of our STOLEN
'08 Green Honda Rancher.
Stolen on Sept. 16th in Grand
Ridge. Call 850-209-5801


Beautiful Upscale Lounge in Dothan.
Great location and price. Everything
included: custom built bar, furniture, 4-keg
cooler and other equipment, big screen tv,
and more. Owner financing available.
Serious inquiries only please.
Call 334-313-6207.

() MERCHANDISE




JACKSON COUNTY PICKER WILL BUY:
OLD COINS, TOYS AND COLLECTABLES
CALL 850-693-0908



Seasoned Oak & All Split
Truck Load = 9 stack $400. delivered
Stack measures 4 ft. wd. & 4ft. high
B I stack $45. 4 1/2 stack $25.

*Jll]lJ[I=IIJ.Ea:l[l334l52l220lJ9

BAR: Old English-type with matching
wooden bar stool, marble top with carved
wood front Beatuful and in exceptional
condition. Approx. 4.5ft long $850. firm
Call 334-406-4386 after 4pm


Wanted: Old Coins, Gold,
Diamonds, Guns, And Tools
West Main Jewelry & Loan 334-671-1440.

Looking for Hunting Land
Looking for land owner who will let me hunt
their land from 19 NOV-01 FEB. I am willing to
pay by the deer or a flat rate. I prefer the land
to be within 1 hour drive of Enterprise. It will
only be myself and 2 friends hunting the land.
Please contact me if you are interested. Aaron
@ 845-325-6332 or aaron.stark64@)gmail.com.


Mobile Home Wanted looking for Gently used
S/W mobile home in good condition. 1 or 2
bdrms, preferably all electric appliances, a/c
& heating. Will move. Call 850-569-2063

Antique Dining rm tbl. w/6chairs, china cabinet
& buffet, MOVING MUST SELL. pd. $2200. will
sell $1200. 334-790-7740 or 334-792-5549.
Hot Tub 07' Solana 2 person, like new, $2000,
Edelbrock electronic fuel Injection for Chevy
86' used $1000. 334-726-3349/334-677-4931.


Polaris Compound Bow RH is in great shape.
First $70 takes it, call 850-693-0439

PETS & ANIMALS


Free kittens Multi-colored, multi-hair length
850-482- 5880/850-303-9727 after 3pm

AKC BULLMASTIFF PUPS AWESOME LITTER
BREEDING THE BEST TO THE BEST, LOOKS LIKE
ROCKY'S DOG BUTKUS $1,250; WITH A SERV-
ICEMAN, WOMAN VETS DISCOUNT OF $200,
FAWNS, LITE, DARK BRINDLES
WWW.SEXTONSBULLZ.COM 334-806-5911
CKC Mini-Schnauzers
Black, Silver & Chocolate.
($375- $475) Taking Deposits.
S/W, Groomed. Ready Nov 2nd
Call 334-889-9024
CKC Shih-Tzu puppies, Males and Females,
First Shots and Dewormed. Beautiful Mark-
ings. Great with kids. $300.00. Call 334-248-
3447 or after 5pm Call 334-898-7067.
English Bulldog Puppies, 10 wks, AKC, shots,
$800/each. 850-387-1983
FOUND DOG: Male, reddish color, setter like,
near Cypress, needs home. 850-573-8060


LOST DOG,COMPASS LAKE area near 231. Pitt
Mix, brown /red. "Miley",Friendly. 850-693-5820
REWARD OFFERED!!

FARMER'S MARKET
FREH .ROUC


Aplin

Farms
You pick PEAS
and PUMPKINS
334-792-6362


FRESH
GREEN
PEANUTS
850-352-2199
OR 850-352-4423

U PICK PEAS: 231 to Alford, turn west onto 276
to Washington County line, follow signs.
850-260-1368


Wednesday, October 19, 2011


0 O
,C', o0 0
THE SUDOKU GAmE uIITH A KICK!.

HOW TO PLAY
Fill in the 9x9 grid with the missing
numbers so that each column, row and
3x3 box contains the digits 1 9 only once.
There is only one correct solution
for each puzzle.
GET MORE WASABI
PUZZLES ONLINE!
ARCHIVES AND MORE GREAT GAMES AT
BOXERJAM.COM


FRS PRODUC

SA ERS ROUC


Plenty of Shelled, Fresh Peas,
Butterbeans, New Potates,
All Farm Fresh!.
220 W. Hwy 52 Malvern
** 334-793-6690 *




Southeastern Premier Sales Inc.
would like to invite you to our next sale
November 5th to be held at the Houston
County Farm Center. Tack begins at lOam
and horses to follow for more info go to
www.dothanhorsesale.com
or call Scott Roberts at 229-891-4454


Microphone mixer 6 chan. by Pyle Pro. New in
box $50. 334-400-3736.
Poker Table Top by Cardinal. New in box. $35.
334-400-3736
Terracotta flower pots of various sizes $15. Call
Charlie 850-592-8769
Wood burning heater by Comfort Pot-belly
style. Like new, $450. Charlie (850)592-8769
5 Star Olympus Camera, SP 600 UZ digital,
new cond., $160 FIRM 850-482-7665 after 12
Antique Footstools (3) $100 for all 850-566-
7066/592-7257,
Baby Boys Clothes, 0-12mos $25-$30/box 850-
693-3260
Bassinet $20 Pack-n-Play $30
both blue 850-526-3426
Bed Frame, wood, double, $15
850-209-4989
Bedroom set, double bed, dresser, mirror,
nightstand $500 850-526-1414
Color T.V. 25" $25
850-209-4989
Converter Boxes for TV's, unused $5 each
850-209-4989
Dressers (2) $150
Highchair $15 850-693-3260
Entertainment Center with TV $300 850-526-
1414A


(iI'*)


EMPLOYMENT'
I -


, IT Support
I, Technicians)

needed in Graceville & Bristol Florida

Required knowledge of Windows
Programs, PC Hardware, Trouble
Shooting and Networking. Basic
knowledge of Exchange, SQL Server,
Linux, Wireless or Cisco operating
systems is a plus.

Salary is based on experience. Benefits
include; health insurance, 401K.program,
Vacation/Holiday. Drug Free Workplace.
-
S Rex Lumber = Florida Locations .
Emailiresume hrrgr@rex-lumber.com m
Sfax 850 263 2059 Attention: IT REX,'.


GE Electric Range, black, less than 1 yr old.
$200 OBO 850-557-4342
Glass Clorox Bottles $5 each 850-592-2881
Gun Safe by RedHead, 24 capacity, $495 850-
592-2881
Hammond Organ, Leslie Speaker, Rhythm Sec-
tion, pedals, bench $500 Firm 850-526-1414
Jewelry, old, with display end tables (2) $300
for both 850-566-7066/592-7257
Piano, Wurlitzer Console $500 OBO 850-718-
6299
Santa Suit with nice beard $20 850-526-3426


Step2 Play & Shade Patio Set in/outdoor use
e lbat w/umbrella & 4 chairs 850- 0


Table setting, 39 pc Christmas Joy sold by
Bealls. never used $75 850-566-7066/592-7257


TRUCK BEDLINER OFF 2002 FRONTIER QUAD
CAB WITH 6FT BED, $50, (850)482-2636
Twin bedding (2 sets) good condition, $100
850-526-3038
VHS Tapes (240) $50 850-526-3426
Wagner Power Painter Pro, New in box, $50
850-526-3038
Wardrobe Storage: American Cherry Finish.
Have 2.Only $50 ea. 850-482-2636 Marlanna
Washer and Dryer $225. for both. 850-718-7196
QSC-fl7-_80l


III@ (
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WASABI SOLUTION
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__@ _ - W .
2008 BLOCKOT INC.- WWW.BLOCKDOT.COM
@ 2008 BLOCKOOT, INC. WWWBLOCKDOT COM


BE SURE TO VISIT OUR
NEWEST GAME SITE

KEWBOX.COM
KEWILBOX.COM


Pla a A d Fast, easy, no press
24 hours a day, 7 da

S Get live previews of your classified ads, receive price quotes
and make secure online payments.

www.j cfloridan.com


'h\\-, iI
.\ fir~ \

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re
iys a week!


-------- L


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FINANCIAL


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..... .. ....... .. -. -. ..., ... TI --


A i r S f E i g c a Sd .

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---~--
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01~









6 B Wednesday, October 19, 2011 Jackson County Floridan


CLASSIFIED


www.JCFLORIDAN.com


Marlanna Health & Rehabilitation Center Is
accepting applications for:
CNA (11-7)
Applications may be obtained from
Marianna Health & Rehabilitation Center
or online: cityofmarianna.conhealth
4295 5th Avenue Marianna, FL 32446 /
(850)482-8091


Is currently seeking individuals who are
team players, enthusiastic, and well
organized for the following positions.
RNHOWSUpeVI ,-
Weekend (Sat. & Sun) 7a-3p
Thursday's 7p-7a
LP./RN
7a-7p Shift & 7p-7a Shift
F/T & P/T
Parthenon Healthcare offers:
Great Pay and Benefits
Health, Vision & Dental
Please apply at
PdrtbemuHeanilUnMryeymHUiaumfBtw..
17T4 NE Crozer Blodmii Fr
(Sa ) 674-5464 (5)ftnl)g6?tom ,t





EI UCAT-I 0 =
S e




CHILDCARE CAREERS START HERE
Now Enrolling 6 wk. Child Care Director
Course $80. Must have 12mo. Child Care
Exp. Call Mrs. Alaina 334-691-7399.

SGet a Quality Education for a
New Career! Programs
FORTIS offeredin Healthcare,
SHVAC and Electrical Trades.
Call Fortis College Today!
888-202-4813.
COLLEGE For consumer information
www.Fortis.edu



A *C APPEDACCSESSiBLE

CHIPOLA APARTMENTS
SPACIOUS EFFICIENCIES AND
1 BEDROOM APTS SECTION 8 ASSISTANCE
AVAILABLE ON ALL UNITS
UNITS SPECIALLY DESIGNED FOR
HANDICAPPED OR DISABLED
FOR RENTAL INFORMATION CALL
(850) 526-4407 TDD #800-955-8771
4401 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA
MONDAY THRU FRIDAY, 9:00 AM TO 5:00 PM
EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY




2/1 Duplex,CH/A, water, sewer, appliances
,lawn care incl. $550 + $650 deposit, 1 year
lease 850-526-4425


3BR 1BA duplex &2BR2BA duplex both in
Grand Ridge both $425/mo + $425 dep. 850-
592-5571


1/2 block off US90 in Marianna close to every-
thing, courthouse and stores. 800 sq. ft., old
home, with city utilities. New vanity-in bath-
room. Cheap tent as agent/owner has no
mortgage. Good responsible tenant wanted.
Only 1/2 month sec dep. Bad credit ok, no
evictions. No app fees for quick move-ins.
At least 1 yr. lease. Ed McCoy, Century 21
Sunny South Properties (850)573-6198
2 & 3 bedroom now available in Marianna &
near Blue Springs Park. 1 year lease, small pets
ok with deposit Call 850-693-0570 Iv msg.
2BR/1BA Concrete block Rental in Marianna,
Tile floors, washer h/u, pets ok, $300/mo + $30
credit/bkgrnd ck. Additional houses and
apartments in Graceville 850-263-5753
2BR 1BA House at 4477 Fairfax Rd. $500/mo +
$500 dep. nice, quiet, safe neighborhood. 850-
482-8196/209-1301
2 Brick homes, 8mi E of Malone, 3BR 1 BA
$575/mo & 4BR 1 BA. $595/mo. Both require
$500 dep. lyr lease, & references, 850-569-
5940
3BR 2BA All tile floors, near Chipola, sm pets
ok $700/mo. + dep. Ref. req. (850) 573-1232
Large Country Home West of Alford 3/2 brick,
2 car garage, 2 large sheds, $850/mo. 3/2 brick
in Alford, $650/mo/ lease, dep. & ref. req.
850-579-4317/866-1965
Lovely 3BR 1BA House, Clean, in town, near
schools, nice yard, quiet neighborhood, out-
door pets ok, $600/mo with $600 deposit 850-
482-6211


2/2 In Afford, window A/C, $380 + deposit 850-
579-8882/850-209-1664/850-573-1851
2 & 3 bedroom mobile Homes in Cottondale.
$500 and up. H20, garbage, sewer included.
http:// www.charloscountry living, com.
850-258-4868/209-8847
2 & 3BR 2BA Mobile Homes In Cottondale no
pets, Central Heat & Air $400-$450 850-258-
1594 leave message
2 & 3 BR MH's in
Marianna & Sneads (850)209-8595.
3/2 $550 Quiet, well maintained Park,


Water/sewer/ garb/lawn included.
Other rentals available starting @ $395
m+ Joyce Riley RE 850-209-7825 4m


Nice 2BR 1BA & 2BR 2BA MH's for rent in Altha.
$350-$450/mo. Several to choose from. Great
shape. 850-762-9555/573/5255
Rent to Own: 2 & 3BR Mobile Homes.
Lot rent included. Also available,
1 & 2BR Apts & Houses. For details
o#850-557-3432 or 850-814-6515 4.
WTN N-f COMMERCIAL
S-j-AL ESTATE FOR RENT


Spacious Meeting Room Rental at Marianna
Womans Club, corner of Caledonia & Clinton
Now has 2 A/C units. $150/day 850-482-2076
f< ll PRESIDENTIAL
I EAL- ESTATE FOR SALE


Country Home for Sale: 3BR 2BA on 2 acres, 8
mi to Marianna, Hospital. schools, churches,
Chipola College, shopping. By appt. only. $135k
850-526-1414









HEADLAND'S BEST KEPT SECRET!
699 CO RD 100, HEADLAND
$314,900
Craftsman Design Approx 2920 sq. ft.
4 BR 3 Baths Built in 2009 5.3 Acres
SSlate and tile Hardwood floors
Granite Energy efficient
Formal DR 2 car garage 2 stall barn
Trey ceiling in master
18 ft. ceilingin living area
Lennox Three Zone system
Directions: Coming from Dothan take Westgate
Parkway to Harrison Rd, turn left on 134 then right
to Co. Rd 3, go approx. 3 miles to Co. Rd. 100.
From Headland take Main St. in Headland. Left on
Hwy. 134W. to Right on Co. Rd. 83. Go approx.
2 miles and turn left on Co. Rd. 100.
REALTORS WELCOME!
Call 334-596-7763





Duplex Office Building for sale in downtown
Marianna. New roof, Located at 2912 Green St.
$140K will negotiate. Call 850-526-4448




2010 Polaris 4x4 500EFI.
Winch, top, windshield.
Never in mud. Only 31 hrs.
Parked ip carport. New
cond. $11.000 new. Asking
58.500. 334 897-2870

Golf cart: 2004.Like-new batteries and charger.
Excellent shape. $2,200. Call 334-677-0020.

Kubota 2008 RTV with only 209 Hours. en-
clbsed cab, dump back. Great for hauling.
$9,500. 334-355-0814


'06 Potter-Built, 18 ft, alum. 25hp, Yamaha, 4
stroke, galvanized trailer, decked out, garage
kept, $7200 850-482-8980
10.2' Bass Hound 2-Person Boat ,28 lb. Thrust
Minn Kota Trolling Motor, Electric Running
Lights, Live Well with Aerator, 16' Trailer, $850,
Call 334-889-4677 and leave message.

















BESTWAYi
PORTABLE BUILDINGS
LAMREST MANUFACTURER OF PORTABLE BUILDINGS IN NORTI LORIDA
E WE f f
HAVE H I
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DIFFERENT SIZES!
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COLOR & STYLE!.
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3614 Hy. 90 Marlanna, F. 85048-8682




HAPPY
HOME REPAIR
WE'LL BEAT ANY PRICE!!
Big Or Small Jobs WELCOME
.ca~ ,:uat


Clay O'Neal's W aBH
Land Clearing, Inc. MnkSumtey a
ALTHA, PL am=OO
850-762-9402 SBIVIM.P
COll 850-812-5055 0V1 M
BNOWc-a OFEIG REPANTING!


FIRST MONTH FREE, WATER/GARBAGE FREE
Large yards CH/A, 2 & 3BR $300-$440/mo
In Cottondale. *4 850-249-4888 4-


SDutchman'10 27ft. sleeps Chevrolet'01 Silverado X/Cab $1900 Down,
8, Q-sz. bed, Frig, micro- 0% Interest. Open 9am 9pm, 1-800-470-0650
I wave, stove, wall mount for Chevolet'89 Blazer: reddish color,very clean,
flat screen, canopy, tow good condition $1,500. Call 334-793-2142.
hitch & cover, $15,500 OBO
334-550-9895. Dodge '10 Charger
4....Sporty, NICE CAR, Loaded, LOW MILES,
FLEETWOOD PROWLER '99- 30ft., 1 slide out, GREAT FUEL ECONOMY!
$350 per mo. with $500 down.
in excellent shape $7,900 334-687-3334 Call: Steve Hatcher at 334-791-8243.
PUMA '07-29ft.. 2 slide-outs. kina bed. like


new $13,000 334-695-6359,334-687-6157



Dixie RV SuperStores
FL's Newest RV Dealer
NOW OPEN!!!
*Store Hours*
Monday-Saturday
8:00am-6:00pm
21 Acres/ 30 Brands New and Pre-Owned
Newmar Keystone Heartland U Jayco
Fleetwood Prime Time Coachmen
Forest River
Service Department
Parts and Acces. Store
RV Collision Center
Located off 1-10 Exit 70 / SR285
328 Green Acres Dr.
De Funiak Springs, FL 32435
Sales and Service: 850-951-1000
www.dixierv.com DO 12756

Trail Lite 2006 R-VISION
26 ft., fully loaded,
bought new, 13K miles
$44,995 334-616-6508





Ford Thunderbird '66 47 original mHes, blue in
color, new tires, great condition $7,000. 334-
596-2240.


Fuel Injection Edelbrock electronic
for Chevy 1985, used $1000.
m4 334-726-3349 or 334-677-4971 4m


'10 Ford Fusion SE, 4cyl. 4-door, 29K miles,
factory bumper to bumper warranty $14,500.
FIRM 334-618-8255.
1996 Volvo 960: White; sedan, 225,000 miles,
nice inside and out, good tires, A/C cold. Elec
seats, cruise, panel lights inop. $3,000. 334-
693-3692

selling my volcanic or-
--- ^ H 2005 Nissan Sentra -1 am
ange 2005 Spec-V with
56,000 miles. The car
comes with I/H/E making about 205hp. Howev-
er, It still manages to get over 30 mpg on the
highway and includes sunroof and a 300-watt
Rockford Fosgate audio system with sub.Gar-
age kept for over 3 years. The car is mechani-
cally sound and runs great. Contact me at
thewolfe09@gmail.com or 972-742-0393. Pics
upon request. Thanks! $9,000
'98 Oldsmobile 4-door, white in color, clean
good condition $1500.334-793-2142.
CHEV 76 MONTE CARLO-
400/4 BBL Numbers
match, cold A/C. 98K all
orig. runs strong cream
S. tan, car road ready $4,000
334-689-9045-MT


Ford '02 Taurus $575 Down, 0% Interest.
Open 9am 9pm, 1-800-470-0650
Ford '98 F-150 X/Cab $775 Down, 0% Interest.
Open 9am 9pm, 1-800-470-0650
Hyundai '06 Elantra GLS,
4 cyl. 4 door, automatic, only, 36,000 miles,
loaded, like new, $8700. Call: 334-790-7959.
Jeep '05 Wrangler Rubicon Black. Excellent
condition. Soft top. 100k miles. One Owner.
$11,500. $750 below Kelly blue book value.
334-796-9554
Kia'07 Optima
LIKE NEW! MUST SELL!
$200 down $189 per month.
Call Ron Ellis 334-714-0028.
Lincoln '05 LS
LOW MILES, LIKE NEW, SAVE THOUSANDS!
$200 down $249 a month.
Call Ron Ellis 334-714-0028.
Mercury 93' Station Wagon: light blue, very
clean, 120k miles, good condition $1,995.
Call 334-793-2142.
Mercedes '97 S500 Roadster red convertible,
wine leather interior,55k miles, excellent condi-
tion. Call 334-693-3980
NEEDA VEHICLE? GOT BAD CREDIT?
I can get U Riding Today Repos, Slow
Credit, Past Bankruptcy OK! $0 Down/ 1st
Payment, Tax, Tag & Title Push, Pull or Drag,
Will Trade anything! WarrantyOn Every
Vehicle Soldi $20 Gift Card w/pu rchase
Call Steve 800-809-4716
Nissan '03 350-Z Low Miles, Great Condition,
Black, Selling price $12,300 334-677-3631
Pontiac '01 Grand Prix $575 Down, 0% Interest
Open 9am 9pm, 1-800-470-0650
Pontiac '96 Bonneville SSEi black/black leath-
er, PW, PS, CD, power sunroof, HUD, non-
smoker, very good condition, 129,000 miles,
asking $4,500 OBO. 334-687-4626.
Pontiac '98 Grand Prix: a.t, a/c. sunroof
$595 Down, 0% Interest Open 9am 9pm,
1-800-470-0650
Subaru '09 Forester silver with black int. 4K
miles, all wheel drive, new tires, great vehicle.
$21,000. OBO 334-308-1112.


Harley Davidson '05 Super Glide 1450 CC, Lots
of Chrome and high-end parts. Mint Condition.
Sacrifice for $7900 334-648-0348
HARLEY DAVIDSON '97 ROAD KING-45K, color
Black Emerald, excellent condition, $7,500
OBO, 229-317-3112
Honda '08 Shadow Arrow: BT750, 5k miles,
black with lots of chrome, never been dropped
or wrecked, $3500. Call 334-596-3656
S Suzuki'95 Savagee 650 Bur-
gundy with chrome pipes &
trim, saddle bags, new full
windshield, runs great just
serviced, 12300k mi.
Must see to appreciate $2000. 850-526-4645.


2008 Chevrolet Tahoe LTZ, 44,480 miles, black,
leather, 4X4, DVD, navigation, warranty, excel-
lent condition, $9200, amassa@netscape.com
Chevrolet '01 Blazer, at., ac., 4-door
$695 Down, 0% Interest. Open 9am 9pm,
1-800-470-0650
Chevrolet'02 Blazer $675 Down, 0% Interest
Open 9am 9pm, 1-800-470-0650


Een
Lester Basford Elle
850,21
Well & Pump Company ForALLyourR
4513 Lafayette St Marianna, FL Century21 Suni
850.526.3913 0 850.693.0428 C 850-52
850.482.2278 H 4630 Hwy 9

I U S -
89$ doIwn Bl I

89 dow n New and Reroofs Shingles and Metal
on any building Roof Repa s an, CIo.n,r,a
100 FINANCING M A.ILE FE[L r..3ijr
33 Years in Business Free Estimates L r,,D- n
mp Wlo ALL N* FLORIDA



4 Point Insurance Inspections
Wind MItigation Inspections gjL EREPAIRS
Performed by JAMES GRANT & UPGRADE
State Certified Building Code Administrator Replace your old Electrical Servic
State Certified Building Contractor with a New Service
State Licensed Electrical Contractor QUALITY WORK REACONAlLE PRI
IJAMES GRANT LLC


Personal Tou 1 n dlfL I
Computer Repair 1
A+ AND NETWORK+ CERTIFIED
FREE PICKUP, DELIVERY, AND SET UP
WITHIN THE CITY LIMITS MARIANNAl
RICHARD REGISTER 850-557-6061


Marsh
09-1090
ea Estate Needs!
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?6-2891
o0 Marianna










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JACKSON COUNTY


FLORIDAN

jcfloridan.com



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FIND LOCAL JOBS AT: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM/JOBS


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DECLASSIFIED


rflT lnfllf A H I.>


Jackson County Floridan Wednesday, October 19, 2011- 7 B


CHEVY'03 SUBURBAN- 1500 LT, Loaded, 50K
miles, Good Condition, $13,000 334-355-1373
Dodge '99 Durango $575 Down, 0% Interest.
Open 9am 9pm, 1-800-470-0650
Jeep'02 Liberty Limited 4X4, red automatic
6cyl. sunroof, leather, CD, all PWR options
exc. clean, good tires, no accidents, 103K mi.
$7500. OBO 334-389-3071.
Nissan '05 Xterra. V6, black exterior, running
boards, fog lights, and towing package. 60,000
miles. $12,000 or best offer.
Home 334-894-5205 Cell 334-389-7600
E-Mail sdclark@roadrunner.com

2008 GMC Sierra 1500 Denall Crew Cab, 25873
miles, black, leather, sunroof, navigation, DVD,
excellent condition, warranty, $10,900, robhof
@netscape.com
Chevrolet '01 Silverado X/Cab $1275 Down, 0%
Interest. Open 9am 9pm, 1-800-470-0650
Chevrolet'92 Cheyenne Truck V6 5-Speed,
A/C, New Tires, Long Bed, 94K mi. Excellent
Condition $2800 OBO 334-798-1768 or
334-691-2987
Chevrolet '99 Silverado X/Cab, a.t., a.c.,
$1295 Down, 0% Interest.
Open 9am 9pm, 1-800-470-0650
Dodge '02 Rain 1500 4-wheel drive, quad cab,
P/U with 4.7 liter engine, cold air, chrome run-
ning boards, chrome rims, chrome tool box,
tow package and new tires. 149,698 miles.
Excellent condition. $8499. *'334-790-6832.
Ford '01 F150 $975 Down, 0% Interest.
Open 9am 9pm, 1-800-470-0650
Ford '01 F-150 or Ford Ranger
$895 Down, 0% Interest.
Open 9am 9pm, 1-800-470-0650


FORD '89 F150, 4wh, 4x4
Auto, $4,600 or reasonable
offer. Call 229-334-8520.


TRACTOR-IH1440 Combine, LOOK
Field Ready, Grain Head and Corn Head.
$7,000. 850-415-0438


2003 Pontiac Montana Van $5,500, 49,000
miles. extended body, 4 brand new Good year
tires! front and rear AC, cruise control,
CD/radio, exterior white, interior gray. Alaba-
ma rebuilt title after minor damage (replaced
rear bumper and side door) RUNS GREAT,
LOOkS GREAT. Perfect for business of family!
(334) 701-8862 or (334)796-6729
'95 Honda Odyssey Van load-
ed, rear air, clean, 160k mi.
$2500. OBO 334-691-7111 or
698-1768

conversion Van raised
roof, loaded, new tires,
One owner. GREAT
condition. 52K mi. $9,500.
334-897-2054 or


Pontiac '05 Montana Van
GREAT FAMILY TRANSPORTATION!
Loaded, DVD, Leather, Captain chairs,
Pwr. seats, $250 per mo. with $300 down.
Call: Steve Hatcher at 334-791-8243.

Pontiac'99 Montana V-6, One owner. 145K
miles, needs head gasket, $2600. OBO CASH
Serious inquiries only call 334-693-3141
9AM 8PM ONLY.
WNE U S


jr4r


Call for Top Price for
Junk Vehicles


I also sell used parts
24 HOUR TOWING 4 334-792-8664 4


Call for Top Price for
S Junk Vehicles
I also sell used parts
24 HOUR TOWING 334-792-8664 4

CALL TODAY FOR YOUR TOWING NEEDS


AUTO BODY & RECYCLING
PAYINGTOP DOLLAR FOR JUNK CARS
Contat Jason Harger at 334-791-2624

CALL TODAY FOR YOUR TOWING NEEDS

'asw '24 ,Wd 7eav
AUTO BODY & RECYCLING
PAYING TOP DOLLAR FOR JUNK CARS
Contat Jason Harger at 334-791-2624
r i ***fluu luu;*i. .I ********* I
. Got a Clunker
SWell be your Junker!
= ~fSf NyVe buy wrecked cars
Sand Farm Equip. at a
W fair and honest price!
$325. & up for
Complete Cars CALL 334-702-4323

S* WANTED WRECED ORJUNK VEHICLES
j PAY TOP DOLLAR
4 DAY -334-794-9576 4 MNIGHT 334t79.-776

FtWE PAY Ca$H
FOR JUNK CARS!!!!!!
Call 334-818-1274


IT'S AS EASY AS
1. CALL
2. PLACE YOUR AD
3. GET RESULTS


LF15572
CONCURRENT NOTICE
NOTICE OF FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT
IMPACT AND
NOTICE OF INTENT TO REQUEST
RELEASE OF FUNDS

Date of Publication: 10/19/2011
City of Marianna
2898 Green Street
Marianna, Florida, 32446
850-482-4353
These notices shall satisfy two separate but re-
lated procedural requirements for activities to
be undertaken by the City of Marianna.
REQUEST FOR RELEASE OF FUNDS
On or about November 07, 2011 the City of Ma-
rianna will submit a request to the Florida De-
partment of Economic Opportunity (DEO) for
the release of Community Development Block
Grant funds under Title I of the Housing and
Community Development (HCD) Act of 1974, as
amended, to undertake a project in relation to
the City of Marianna Economic Development
Project "Dairy Queen": To extend natural gas
services that will be located on State Road 71
from a point close in proximity to the Anderson
Colufbia Asphalt Plant, south approximately
7200 I.f., to the development property located
on the south side of the 1-10/SR 71 interchange.
All construction will occur in existing public
utility right of ways.
FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT
The City of Marianna has determined that the
project will have no significant impact on the
human environment. Therefore, an Environ-
mental Impact Statement under the National
Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) is not
required. Additional project information is
contained in the Environmental Review Record
(ERR) on,file at City of Marianna, City Hall, 2898
Green Street, Marianna, Florida 32446 and may
be examined or copies requested weekdays
9:00 A.M to 3:00 P.M.
PUBLIC COMMENTS


Any individual, group, or agency may submit
written comments on the ERR to the City of
Marianna Municipal Development Department.
All comments must be received within 15 days
following the publication date of this notice by
November 04, 2011. Comments will be consid-
ered prior to the City of Marianna requesting a
release of funds. Comments should specify
which notice they are addressing.
RELEASE OF FUNDS
The City of Marianna certifies to the Florida De-
partment of Economic Opportunity and HUD
that Mr. John E. Roberts in his/her capacity as
Mayor consents to accept the jurisdiction of
the Federal Courts if an action is brought to en-
force responsibilities in relation to the environ-
mental review process and that these responsi-
bilities have been satisfied. The State's appro-
val of the certification satisfies its responsibili-
ties under NEPA and related laws and authori-
ties and allows the City of Marianna to use the
CDBG funds.
OBJECTIONS TO RELEASE OF FUNDS
DEO will accept objections to its release of
funds and the City of Marianna certification for
a period of fifteen days following the anticipat-
ed submission date or its actual receipt of the
request (whichever is later) only if they are on
one of the following bases: (a) the certification
was not executed by the Certifying Officer of
the City of Marianna; (b) the City of Marianna
has omitted a step or failed to make a decision
or finding required by HUD regulations at 24
CFR part 58; (c) the grant recipient has com-
mitted funds or incurred costs not authorized
by 24 CFR Part 58 before approval of a release
of funds by the State; or (d) another Federal
agency acting pursuant to 40 CFR Part 1504 has
submitted a written finding that the project is
unsatisfactory from the standpoint of environ-
mental quality. Objections must be prepared
and submitted in accordance with the required
procedures at 24 CFR Part 58, Sec. 58.76 and
shall be addressed to the Florida Department
of Economic Opportunity, CDBG Program, 107
E. Madison Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-
4120. Potential objectors should contact the
City of Marianna to verify the actual last day of
the objection period.
John E. Roberts Mayor
Certifying Officer


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T8B + WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 19,2011


Israeli soldier freed in swap for 1,000 prisoners


The Associated Press
TEL NOFAIR BASE, Israel
- Looking thin, weary and
dazed, Israeli soldier Gilad
Schalit emerged Tuesday
from more than five years
in captivity, surrounded
by Hamas militants with
black face masks who
handed him over to Egyp-
tian mediators in an ex-
change for 1,000 Palestin-
ian prisoners.
Israeli officials said Sch-
alit showed signs of mal-
nutrition and his father
said he needed time to re-
cover from psychological
and physical wounds.
More than 450 Palestin-
ians were transferred from


Israeli prisons to the West
Bank and Gaza, where
massive celebratory ral-
lies festooned with green
Hamas flags were held.
In Gaza City, tens of
thousands crammed into
an open lot where a huge
stage was set up, decorat-
ed with a mural depicting
Schalit's capture in a June
2006 raid on an army base
near the Gaza border. The
crowd exhorted militants
to seize more soldiers for
future swaps.
The rest of the prisoners
- about 550 more are
to be released in a second
phase in two months.
Before he was flown to
an Israel air base where


he was reunited with his
parents, Schalit spoke to
Egyptian TV in an inter-
view Israeli officials later
called "shocking."
Looking gaunt and un-
comfortable, Schalit strug-
gled to speak at times, his
breathing noticeably la-
bored as he awkwardly an-
swered questions.
He said he felt good and
was "very excited" to be
going free.
Still, the circumstances
of his release, along with
the awkward TV inter-
view, in which masked
Hamas militants hovered
in the background, raised
questions about the con-
ditions the 25-year-old


had endured.
After a tumultuous day
that included a reception
with the prime minister,
Schalit touched down in
his hometown of Mitzpe
Hila in northern Israel late
Tuesday on board a mili-
tary helicopter.
. Thousands of people
jammed the streets and
stood on rooftops to cel-
ebrate Schalit's return. The
ecstatic crowd sang songs,
waved Israeli flags, popped
champagne bottles, em-
braced and cheered him
on.
A smiling Schalit briefly
waved to the crowd before
ducking into his family's
house.


Clinton in Libya to offer new aid packages


The Associated Press
TRIPOLI, Libya The Obama
administration offered millions of
dollars in new aid to Libya as Secre-
tary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton
encouraged the country's unsteady
new leadership to commit to a dem-
ocratic future free of retribution, and
acknowledged in unusually blunt
terms that the United States would
like to see former dictator Moammar
.Gadhafi dead.
"We hope he can be captured or
killed soon so that you don't have
to fear him any longer," Clinton told
students and others at a town hall-
style gathering in the capital city.
Until now, the U.S. has generally
avoided saying that Gadhafi. should
be killed.
U.S. officials usually say they want
to see him brought to justice, some-
thing Clinton also said during her
daylong visit.
"I am proud to stand here on the
soil of a free Libya," Cliriton said. "The
United States was proud to stand for
you in your fight for freedom and we
will continue to stand with you as
you continue this journey."
SShe met with the leader of Libya's
Transitional National Council, Mah-'
moud Jibril, and offered about $11
million in additional aid. The fresh
aid boosts Washington's contribu-


.s THEASSOCIATED PRESS
U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham
Clinton.poses for a photo during a visit
to Libya on Tuesday.

tion since the uprising against Gad-
hafi began in February to roughly
$135 million.
The new aid package includes
medical aid for Wounded fighters
and additional assistance to secure
weaponry that many fear could fall
into the hands of terrorists. Aides
said the money is meant partly as a
pledge ,to ongoing U.S. support dur-
ing what will be a difficult passage to
free elections and a new government
after four decades of dictatorship.


"Now the hard part begins," Clin-
ton said, heading into a meeting
with the transitional leaders. *
Clinton referred several times to
the importance of including all fac-
tions in a future democratic govern-
ment, a reference to fears among
Libyans that those with ties to the
Gadhafi regime will be punished.
"The most important thing now is
to make sure that Gadhafi and his re-
gime are finally prevented from dis-
rupting the new Libya," Clinton said.
"We want to do everything we can to
prevent him from causing trouble."
Addressing leaders of the interim
body, Clinton noted that the fighting
isn't over yet but said NATO would
continue to protect civilians as long
as the threat continues.
"We are encouraged by the com-
mitment of the Transitional National
Council of taking the steps neces-
sary to bring the country together,"
she said. But the secretary also said
that "all members of all militias must
see the benefit of joining the new
government."
She visited Tripoli Medical Center,
where she visited the bedsides of
four wounded former rebels. One
soldier was wounded Saturday dur-
ing the battle for Bani Walid, one of
two towns thought to be the most
likely hiding places for Gadhafi, who
has been on the run for weeks.


f W [.,r E
In this photo from the Israeli Defense Ministry, Israeli soldier
Gilad Schalit (second right) walks with Israeli Prime Minister
Benjamin Netanyahu (second left), Defense Minister Ehud
Barak (left) and Israeli Chief of Staff Lt. Gen. Benny Gantz
(right) at the Tel Nof Air base in southern Israel.


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