<%BANNER%>
Jackson County Floridan
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS MAP IT! ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028304/00660
 Material Information
Title: Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title: Sunday Floridan
Portion of title: Floridan
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Jackson County Floridan
Publisher: Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Marianna Fla
Publication Date: 9/15/2011
Frequency: daily (except saturday and monday)[<1979-1995>]
weekly[ former 1934-<1955>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates: 30.776389 x -85.238056 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note: "Independent."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID: UF00028304:00660
 Related Items
Preceded by: Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by: Marianna Floridan

Full Text


























"This conversation weillnot end..."
Tommy Lassman,
Jackson Yes campaign chairman


___ _11~~_1~_


^__~_______1__~__111_~llllllilll


Lo gtme


physician


dies at 80

Dr. Brnmner served

Jackson County for

more than 40 years
BY DEBORAH BUCK HALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridanlcom

Dr. William Brunner died of pancre-
atic cancer Wednesday at the age of 80,
leaving a community to mourn one of
the area's most storied and celebrated
physicians.
Brunner had served the Jackson .
I I County community more
than 40 years as a gen-
: ~~ 1eral surgeon inthe areas
of obstetrics, gynecol-
s ogy, orthopedics and
a neurosurgery.
Hlis illness forced his
iDr. Brunner retirement four .years
ago. Friend Dr. Richard
"Chris" Christopher said he imagines
that Brunner might still have been in
practice at 8() if it hadn't been for that.
Christopher said his friend. and col
league was a talented, caring physician
and a man with an insatiable appetite
for learning, discussion and tending to
the farm land that he held dear.
"He clearly raised the standard -of care
in this community," Christopher said of
Brunner. "H-e had the largest practice in
town~ for I don't know how many years.
He served on the state Board of Medi-
cine, and served as the chairman (for
many years).
See BRUNNER, Page 7A

State News

Teac ers union

fIICS Suil OVer

merit p~ay law
The Associated Press
MIAMI Florida's teacher union is
suing the state over a new law that re-
quires merit pay and ends tenure for
new hires, one of a number passed '
nationwide changing how teachers are
evaluated. .
The Florida Education Association
contends that SB 736, which was signed
in to law by Gov. Rick Scott in March, is
unconstitutional because it substan-
tially changes how teachers are paid .
and evaluated while denying instruc-
tors their right to collective bargaining.
"The provisions of SB 736 radically
transform the teaching profession
- and not for the better," said Cory
See TEACHERS, Page 7A


Informing mor~e than I _000t readers daily- in print and online


Cmn 2 JobSe e2 ;GS~ i315



..A ..R..A .71


A1 Jbledia Genevred yseqipe~v r r,


whether ic was tie to lf
ban on the sale of hard liquor by
the drink.
The chairman of the campaign
to bring it to a vote says this isn't
the last the community will hear
of the issue. "Jackson Yes" cam-
paign chairman Tommy Lass-
man said in a press release this
week that "This conversation


BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter~~jcfloridan.com

The. petition drive that be-
gan in May to put 'liquor by the
drink' to a vote of the people in
Jackson County fell short of the
mark by 1,000 names. .
This means that Jackson will


continue as a "damp" county
rather than possibly going "wet."
As things stand, hard liquor can
only be sold by the package.
Only beer and low-alcohol wine-
based products can be sold by
the drink in restaurants or other
establishments licensed to offer
those beverages.


will not end ..: voters who want
an opportunity to decide will
continue efforts to eventually
get this matter on the ballot."
On May 18, the "Jackson Yes"
campaign began with a launch


party at the Russ House after or-
ganizers filed the necessary pa-
perwork with the Jackson Coun-
ty Supervisor of Election.
See DRIVE, Page 7A


embers of the Cottondale IViddle School defense .drag down a Tiger Tuesday night in
Graceville. Cottondale won 28-0. In football action later iti the week, Marianna Middle.
School will be facing off against Ptirt St. Joe at home at 6 p.m. today, while the Sneads JV
travels to Blountstown to take on the Tigers, and the Graceville JV goes to Bristol to play Liberty
County. The'Sneads varsity will be hosting the Jay Royals on Friday night, and Marianna's varsity
will be traveling to LibbertyCounty. Gottondale's varsity will go on the road to Ila Franklin County
at Eastpoint. Graceville's trarsity squad will have Friday night off.


BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com

A local man who hunts wild
hogs tracks dowvn and de-
stroys the nuisance animals
free of charge to local farmers
and other landowners who are
plagued by the big beasts. Bill
Wilson and others like him are
kept pretty busy in that task.
Wild hogs in Florida are un-
protected by regulations of
the Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission,
and the agency fully supports
the efforts of hunters to rid the
landscape of these destructive
animals.
Now roaming almost every
part of Florida, they root up
peanuts, decimate corn fields,
and otherwise destroy the
haird work of farmers across
the state. *
FWS spokesman Stan Kirk-
land said this part of Florida
has its fair share of the un-
wanted, non-native animals.
Kirkland said today's wild


hogs are descended from
those brought to this country
by Spaniards in the late 1400s
and early 1500s. The now-fe-
ral hogs are found coast to
coast in the United States, but
the dense vegetation found in
the terrain of rural Florida is
very much to the animals' lik-
ing and it keeps many of them
contentedly foraging here.
Typically, they can be found
most often along creek and
river drainage areas, but
they'll go almost anywhere,
including high-dry lands and
fields,
K~irkland said getting rid
of these pests has become a
growing business opportu-
nity for entrepreneurs and the
agency is all~in favor of it.
"These hogs are just pests,"
Kirkland said. "When a farmer
goes out and discovers that
they've ruined a lot of hard
work, their livelihood, it's
like they've been punched in
the stomach. W~e don't want
them here, and they're not


SuunV~EIIIitnuiu
Bill Wilson hunts wild hogs free of charge for local farmers and other
landowners plagued by the beasts. He poses here with one of the
hogs and one of the dogs he uses in the hunts.


protected. They're considered
nuisance livestock and are
considered as belonging to
the landowner where they're
found, so it's strictly between
the landowner and the hunter
to make an agreement,
"You can capture, kill and
remove them. You're not al-


lowed to transport them live
to another location because
the last thing we want is' an-
other population growing up
somewhere else. People can
eat them, there's no regula-
tion on that, but they must be
See HOGS, Page 7A


> CLA~LIFIEDi.~ 5-7B


This Newspaper f
Is PrintedOn
Recycled Newsprint ''- *




7 6 5 161 8 0 05 9


ENTERTAINMENT...4B









Facebook Twitter


> LOCAL...3A


> OBITUARIES...7A


> STATE...4-5A


> SPORTS...1-3B


> TV L TH JO 1.B


iC OfritllaR '
JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDA '


Big push to cut the


to dementia patients.

See more on pa~get 4A.

Vol. 88 No. 179


Liquor petition dr ive falls short


Ca mpaign cha i nvowNs to try aga i n


2TAKZEN DOWN


Manhunts down feral hogs for 1iree


"Ranked NUMBER1 in Jackson County"

oma(i

o coper rno thi















































FLORIDA'S -RE~AL

PANHANDLE JCOy
MEDIA PARTNERS WJAQr 100.9


The submission deadline for this calendar is two days before publication. Submit to: Community Calendar, Jackson County Floridan, P. 0. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447,
email editorial@jcfloridan.com, fax (850) 482-4478 or bring items to 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.


WAKE-UP CRIJ..


JACKSON\ COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


12A *THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2011 ,


Tomorrow
Isolated T-Storm.




High 88o
Low 660


Sunday
Partly Cloudy.


Saturday
Sunny.



SHigh 90'
L~ow 650


Monday
Stray Shower.


Month to? ijre I 35. Nolrmal Y~TD -I5 75"
Normal MTD 2.15" Normal for year 58.25"


TIDES
Panama City
Apalachicola
Port St. Joe
Destin
Pensacola


Low
Low
Low
Low
Low


8:40 AM
11:54 AM
8:06 AM
9:17 AM
9:51 AM


High
High
SHigh
High
High


- 12:02 AM
-4:58 AM
-11:53 PM
- 12:02 AM
- 12:35 AM

Flood Stage
66.0 ft.
15.0 ft.
19.0 ft;
12.0 ft.


0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 I



THE SUN AND MOON


RIVER READINGS
Woodruff
Blountstown
~Marianna
Caryville


Reading
38.94 ft.
0.32 ft.
4.40 ft.
0.45 ft.


Sunrise
Sunset
Moonrise
Moonset


6:25 AM
6:47 PM
8:22 PM
10:08 AM (Fri)


482-2800.
n Alcoholics A'nonymous closed discussion, 6:30
p.m., 4349 W. Lafayette St., Marianna (in one-story
building behind 4351VV. Lafayette St.). Attendance
limited to persons with a desire to stop drinking.

MONDAY, SEPT. 19
a Blood Drive The Southeastefn Community
Blood Center mobile unit will be at Rahal Chevrolet
in Marianna, 8-11:30 a.m.; and at the VA Clinic,
1:30-4:30 p.m.; or donate at SCBC, 9 a.m.-6 p.m.
Monday-Friday at 2503 Commercial Par-k Drive,
Marianna. Call 526-4403.
n Family Dollar Job Fair -- Marianna and.Chipley's
Goodwill Career Training Centers are hosting a job
fair for the Family Dollar Distribution Center, 9 a.m.
at the Chipley Goodwill CTC, 1301 Main St. Bring
driver license, Social Security card. Various posi-
tions attallable. Call 526-0139.
a Chipola Workforce Development Consortium
meeting 1Q a.m. at 4636 US 90 East, Suite K-in
Marianna. Hearing or speech impaired persons, call
Lisa Wells at 718-0456, ext.101 or 711.
n Orientation 10:30 a.m. at the Goodwill Career
Training Center, 4742 Highway 90 in Marianna. Reg-
ister for free job placement and computer training
classes and learn about services offered to people
with disadvantages/disabilities. Call 526-0139.
n AARP Chapter 3486 of' Marianna will feature an
update on Social Security at its covered dish lunch,
noon at the United Methodist'Church, 290 Cale-
donia St., behind the Marianna post office. Annual
membership: $5. Public welcome..
n F.M. Golson Elementary School Advisory
Council meets at 5:30 p.m. in Room l0, Building 1
at Golson. Public welcome. Call 482-9607.
i Jackson County Health Department Closing
the Gap program offers a free yoga class, 5:30 p.m.
at Iritegras Weliness Center, 4230 Lafayette St.,
Suite C, in Marianna. Niat provided. Call 482-6221.
n Panhandle Youth Expo Exhibitor Meeting -
Youth who plan to participate in the 2011 Panhandle
Youth Expo are invited to an exhibitor meeting, 6 '
p.m. in the Jackson County Agriculture Complex
on Pennsylvania Avenue. Expo board members will
explain events and rules for the beef, swine, poultry
and non-livestock shows. Parents and youth can ask
questions. Call 482-9620.
n Concerned American Patriots of Jackson
County rnonthly meeting 6 p.m. at the Ag Center
on Highway West (next to the National Guard
Armory). In observance of Constitution Week, guest
speaker, constitutional attorney KrisAnne Hall will
discuss "History of the United States Constitution."
No admission. Public welcome.
n Alford Community Organization meeting in the
Alford Community Center, third Mondays, 6 p.m.
New members from Alford, surrounding communi-
ties invited to join. Call 579-4482, 638i4900 or
579-5173.
n Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, 8-9 p.m.
in the AA room of First United Methodist Church,
2901 Caledonia St., Marianna.


TODAY .
n Northeast Jackson County Optimist Club.
golf tournament at Indiani Springs Golf Couyse,
a four-man scramble with registration and lunch
beginning at 11:30 a.m., tee-off at 12:30 p.m. For
individual golfers, entry fee' is $55. Lutich, bever-
ages on the cart provided. Benefits youth activities
in Jackson County. Call 557-8637 or 569-5282.
n Breast Cancer Support Group meeting 5
p.m. in the ground floor classroom of Jackson ~
Hospital, 4250 Hospital Drive, Marianna. 0pen to
anyone who has or had breast cancer or breast
health issues. No cost. Call 718-2661.
n Jackson County NAACP meeting, 5:30 p.m.
in the St. James A.M.E. Church basement, 2891'
Orange St. in Marianna. Call 569-1294.
Project Graduation meeting for Seniors 2012
and parents 5:30 p.m. at the Marianna High
School Library. -
n Blues & Boots Hos~ted by the Democratic
Party of Jackson County, the annual event starts at
6 p.m. in the Agriculture Building on US 90 West in
Marianna, next to the Armory. Florida Democratic
Chairman and other officials will speak. Dinner
tickets are a $20 donation. AII are invited'
n Alcoholics Anonymous Closed discussion,
8-9 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901 0ale-
donia St., Marianna, in the AA room. Attendance
limited to persons with a desire to stop drinking.

FRIDAY, SEPT. 16
n Constitution Day Obserted The Baptist Col-
lege of Florida in Graceville will have a replica of the
original Constitutional document and Bill of Rights
old~isplay in the common area of the Student -
Center. Visit wyvw.baptistcollege.edu.
International Chat-'n' Sip Jackson County
Public Library Learning Center staff and their in-
ternational English learners invite the public to join
them 8:30-10 a~m. at the Marianna branch, 2929
Green St., for the exchange of language, culture and
ideas among our local and international communi-
ties in a relaxed environment. Light refreshments
served. No charge. Call 482-9124.
a Small Business Semiitar "Steps to Start-
ing a Business," 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in Chipola
College Business and Technology Building; Room
M-108, covering organizational requirements and
licensing in Florida and more. Register at http:H/bit.
ly/CB-SmallBiz. Cost: $30. Call 718-2413 or email
frohj@ch~ipola.ed0.
n Partners For Pets Benefit Spaghetti Dinner
- 4to 8 ().m. at the Great Oaks Golf Course Club
House at 3071 Highway 90 in Marianna, with live
music, door prizes, and a Thirty-One Gifts party
given by Ashley Slay, who will donate her commis-
sions to the shelter. Tickets: $5 for adults, $3 for
children under 12. Call 482-4570.
n Celebrate Recovery Adult, teen meetings to
"overcome hurts, habits and hang-ups in a safe
environment," 7 p~m., Evangel Worship Center, 2645
Pebble Hill Road. Dinner: 6 p~m. (free for first-
timte guests). Child care available. Call 209-7856,


573-1131.
SAlcoholies Anonymous open meeting, 8-9 p.m.
in the AA room at First United Methodist Church;
.2901Caledonia St., Marianna. 4

SATURDAY, SEPT. 17
n Cruisin' for a Cure A 30-mile ride benefiting
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital is 8 a.m..to
noon. Registration starts at 7 a.m. at Dar Bee's in
Cypress. AI| types of recreational vehicles welcome.
Cost: $10 per vehicle. Call 272-3474, 573-1355 or
S593-5065.
'Marianna City Farmers Market is.open 8 a.m. to
noon for the fali season, Saturdays only in Madison
Street Park.
n Jackson County Health Department Closing
the Gap program offers a free yoga class, 8:30
a.m. at Integras Weliness Center, 4230 Lafay-
ette St., Suite C, in Marianna. Mat~provided. Call
482-6221. .
n Marianna High School Cheerleading Kiddie
Clinic 8:30-11:30 a.m. at the MHS gym. Future
Bulldogs (ages 3-10 or pre-school through fifth
grade) will learn cheers, chants and dances and
cheer with the "Big Dogs" at the Sept. 23 Mari-
anna-vs.-Chipley football game. Cost: $30. Event
is a fundraiser for the MHS Varsity Cheerleaders.
Email debbie.dryden@jcsb.org or call 482-9605,
ext 252.
a Constitution Day.Luncheon Hosted by
DAR/C.A.R./SAR at 11 a.m. MacKinnon Hall of
St. Luke's Episcopal Church, 4362 Lafayette St.,
Marianna. Kenneth Brooten Jr., Esq. will discuss
"Our Endangered U.S. Constitution." Dutch-treat: .
Adults $10, children l2 and under $5. Reservations.
required. Contact Mary Robbins at snoopyxii60@
hotmail.com or 209-4066.
o Alford Commumity Health Clinic. 1770 Carolina
St., Alford, will be open 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The free
clirlic for income-eligible patients without medical
insurance treats short-term illnesses and chronic
conditions. Appointments available (call 263-7106
or 209-5501`) and walk-ins welcome. AII patients
sign in before noon.
Jacob City Day Celebrations include a parade,
entertainment, food, vendors and activities for all.
Parade contact: 263-2120. Booth/vendor contact:
263-6636.
o Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, 4:30-
5:30 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St., Manianna.

SUNDAY, SEPT. 18
n Neel Family Reunion Descendants of Daniel
"Dan" Boone Neel, George Washington Lafayette
Neel and "Jim" Neel gather at the Dellwood Commu-
nity Clubhouse. Bring historical information/photos
to share, and favorite dishes, drinks for a covered
dish lunch at l2:30 p.m. (plates, cups, utensils
provided). Call 593-6086. .
a Randy Estelle, international concert pianist
and vocalist, will be in concert at First Assembly .
of God of Marianna at 6 p.m. Public welcome. Call


..latest available
,-,-~l report. (Someof
1.--LL these calls may
rCR'IME be related to
t i c---- after-hours calls
taken on behalf
of Graceville and Cottondale
Police Departments): Two acci-
dents with no injury, one stolen -
tag, one abandoned vehicle,
one suspicious vehicle reports,
two suspicious person reports,
two escorts, two reports of
mental Ulness, two burglaries,
three physical disturbances,
three verbal disturbances,
two hitchhiker/pedestrian
complaints, 17 medical calls,
seven burglar alarms, two
panic alarms, five fire alarms'
28 traffic stops, four larceny
complaints, two civil disputes,
four trespass complaints,


two juvenile complaints, two
animal complaints, two assists
of other agencies, two public
service calls, two transports,
and three threit/harassment
complaints.


JACKSON COUNTY
CORRECTIONAL FACILITY
The following persons were
booked into the county jail
during the latest reporting
periods:
a Frank Bozeman, 41, 1708
Crouson St., Montgomery, Ala.'
possession of marijuana less~
than 20 grams, driving while
license suspended or revoked.
,, Thomas Kowcun, 46, 2451
Felix St., Round Lake, fleein 8
and attempting to elude, dniv-


ing while license suspended/
revoked, worthless checks.
n Casey Byrd, 28, 16342 State
Road 73, Clarksville, violation
of court order.
n Henry Armstrong, 34, 2409
Franklin Loop, Marianna, vio-
lation of county probation.
,, Jessica McGrothan, 28,
4357A Kent Drive, Marianna,
failure to appear (petit theft).
n Nakeisha Merriel, 29, 5151
Gold Lane, Marianna, hold for
Washington Co.
a Thomas Chason, 26, 2750
Apalachee Trail, Marianna,
violation of state probation.

JAIL POPULATION: 241
To report a crime, call CrimeStoppers
at 526-5000 or a local law enforcement
agency. To report a wildlife violation, call
1-888-404-FWCC (3922).


JACKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN

Publisher Valeria Robedts
vroberts@jcfloridan .com

Circulation Manager Dena Oberski
doberski@jcfloridan .com









CONTACT US
Telephone: (850) 526-3614
.FAX: (850) 482-4478
Email: editorial@jcfloridan.com

P.O. Box 52,Mariaa FL 32447
Street Address.
S4403 Constitution Lane
Marianna, FL 32446
.Office Hours:
Weekdays, 8 a.m.to 5 p.m.

MISS YOUR PAPER?
You should receive your newspaper no later
than 6 a~m.lf it does not arrive, call Circula-
tion between 6 a~m. and noon, Tuesday to
Friday, and 7 a.m. to ll a.m. on Sunday. The
Jacksion County Floridan (USPS 271-840) *
is published Tuesday though Friday and
Sunday mornings. Periodical postage paid
at Marianna, FL.


SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Home delivery: $11.23 per month; $32.83
for three months; $62.05 for six months;
and $123.45 for one year. All prices include
applicable state and local taxes. Mail
subscriptions mudt be paid in advarice. Mail
subscriptions are: $46.12 for three months;
$92.24 for six months; and $184.47 for one
year

ADVERTISING.
The advertie are hat the ublish r
shall not be liblef dtama es nrsi er
out of errors and advertise ents beng nd
the amount paid for the space actually
occupied by that portion of the advertise.
ments in which the error occurred, whether
such error is dueto the negligence of the
publisher's employees or otherwise, and
there shall be not liability for non-inser-
tion of anb advertisement beyond the
amount paid for such advertisement. This
newspaper will not knowingly accept or
publish illegal material of any kinid. Advertis-
ing which expresses preference based on
legally protected personal characteristics is
not acceptable.

HOW TO GET YOUR ,
NEWS PUBLISHED
The Jackson County Floridan will publish
news of general interest free of charge.'
Submit your news or Community Calendar
events via email, fax, mail, or hand delivery.
Fees may apply for wedding, engagement,
anniversary and birth announcements.
Forms are available at the Floridan offices.
Photographs must be of good quality and
suitable for print. The Floridan reserves the
right to edit all submissions.
GETTING ITRIGHT
The Jackson County Floridan's policy
is to correct mistakes promptly. To
report an error, please call 526-3614
Monday-Friday.









cr on o escoy r


Weatthes Out~look


ULTRA V10LET LNDEX


Sept. Sept. Oct. Oct.
20 27 4 12


(Gormunit Calg ar


IeOlRCO ROlrRAup


MARIANNA POLICE
The Marianna Police De-
partment listed the following
incidents for Sept. 13, the latest
available report: One acci-
dent, one abandoned vehicle,
two suspicious vehicles, two
suspicious persons, two verbal
disturbances, one burglar
alarm, 13 traffic stops, one civil
dispute, one trespass com-
plaint, one noise disturbance,
one assist of another.agency
and one public service call.


JACKSON COUNTY
SHERIFF'S OFFICE
The Jackson County Sheriff's
Office and county Fire/Res-
cue reported the following
incidents for Sept. 7, the
































__~I


susulTDPHT
From left are (front) Marianna High School Culinary Arts teacher Susie Barber, and students
Bailey Harkins, ~Elizabeth Glover, Danielle Lawrence, Samantha Rudd and Gentry Ward; and
(back) Ga rion Grant, Chris Young, Stephanie Milliser, Peter Antoine and Jody Roy. Not pictured:
Katie DeRosier, Taylor Blount, Piper Irwin and- Damien Carpenter.




M~arianna Hig School


Students receive food



Saf~ cer tific ton


_~ ~_ _1_1_1_1~1111~_1111_1.1_11111__1_1


F]lorida Lo~ttery

Mnon (E) /1 7-7-5 4-9-8-6 15-18-23-24-26
Mlno IM! 746 0.74, .
Tue. tE) 9t3 9-7-6 9-9-9-3 8-10-11-15-16


I~, .~:~ia.; 1~~l H 9 IS
At the Wells Fargo Bank branch ;
in Marianna on Wednesday,
Sept.7, Vicki Beauchamp
$ 00 chck aomeb ra o
Partners for Pets: Ann Codrick,
president, board of directors; .
Dianne lilalippa, director; and
Debbie O'Quinn, manager.
Partners for Pets, a non-
profit, no-kill animal shelter ~L
in Marianna, was chosen by
employees of the Marianna
IWells Fargo branch to be ~p;
the recipient of the bank's t~;i'~~~~ ..II
"Community Partner" program -
this year.


E = Evening irawiung. M = Midday drawing


We nonwmcarr oSackoCG s )and In All izes~

LOWEST PRICES 6~BEST SERVICE GUARANTEED
2823 Jefferson St.* Marianna, FL
850-526-2082 OtJ, 850-526-1024
Gun Shop Faeok Archery Shop
'acebook.com/McCoysOutdoors
www.McCovsOutdoors.com info@ McCoys Outdoors.com


For lottery infounation, call (850) 487-7771eor (900) 737-77T/






Sterling Silver
with 1 8k gold

svraa coors ~J~ETI~~8

www.watsonjewelers.com -
Downtown Marianna I
1 ~850.482.4037 r


i LOOKING FOR MORE NEWS? VISIT
WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM


Patsy Sapp, l 161~~I Tim Sapp,
Licensed Agent I leZL LIBroker/Owner,
Realtor





Tim Cell (850) 209-3595
Office (850) 526-5260
Fax (850) 526-5264 1r
mm 4257 Lafayette St. EiAIIUII
Marianna, FL 32446 OPRUD
www.floridashowcaserealty.com


~bssral


THURSDAY. SEPTEMBER 15. 2011 3AT


LOCAL


'JACKSON COUNTY I FLOPIDAN w iww.lcfloridan.com


l~~lT(


abuse, abandonment or
neglect.
A guardian ad litem be-
comes familiar with the
child's case and makes
recommendations to the
court on the child's behalf.
Training is required to
become a guardian ad
litem.
For information about
the next training date or
the program in general,
call the Marianna office at
482-9127.


special to the Floridan

The Jackson/Calhoun
County Guardian ad Li-
tem Program recently
graduated another class of
volunteers.
The program, funded by
the State of Florida, trains
volunteers who are ap-
pointed by the court to
advocate for area children.
Most of the children have
been removed from their
homes because of alleged


Circuit Judge William L. Wright (center) gathers for a photo with graduates of the August Guardian ad Litem training class for
Jackson and Calhoun counties. (From left) are Linda Hall, Monica Bolin, Michelle England, Judge Wright, Katrina Messer, Velma
Tensley, Sue Champion and Bobbie Sherrod,


served on the Florida Department of Ju-
venile Justice's Blueprint Commission
and served as an ex-officio member of
the State of Florida's Work
and Gain Economic Suf-
ficiency Board.
Williams grew up just
inside the southern coun-
ty line of Jackson County
Sbut attended kindergar-
Williams ten through 12th grade at
Altha School in Calhoun
County.' After he received a Bachelor of
Science degree from Texas A&rM Uni-
versity, he and his wife Denise settled in
Bristol where they have raised their two
sons, Daniel, 20, and Joshila, 17.
When asked what drives him, Wil-
liams replied, "I've got a passion for the
people of this area and I want to help.
I want to not only teach people to fish,
but how to get the fishing pole."
Chipola Healthy Start is a 501(c)3
nonprofit corporation serving Cal-
houn, Holmes, Liberty, Jackson and
Waishington counties. Their mission is
to decrease infant mortality and im-
prove health outconies for women of
childbearing age and chiildr~en under 3.
For information on services, call your
local Healthy Start at 850-643-2415 for
Calhoun and Liberty counties, 850-547-
8684 for Holmes County and 850-526-
2412 for Jackson and Washington coun-
ties or call toll-free at 866-591-2852..


Special to the Floridan

The Chipola Healthy Start. Board of
Directors welcomed Richard Alan Wril-
liams of Bristol, as their new board
member at his first meeting on Aug. 25.
Williams is one of two members repre-
senting Liberty County on the 10-mem-
ber board, joining longtime member
and past board chair Gloria Keenan,
also of Bristol. *
Williams currently serves as the ex-
ecutive director of the Chipola Regional
Workforce Development Board, a pri-
vate-sector-driven policy and oversight
organization designed to assist employ-
ers and employees in Calhoun, Hol-
mes, Jackson, Liberty and Washington
counties.
"I'm excited to add Richard's exper-
tise and resources to our team to help
Chipola Healthy Start move in a positive
direction as we continue to serve our
five-county area," said Chipola Healthy
Start Board Chair Chephus Granberry.
"He brings ~a lot of board experience
and connections that will be a valuable
asset." *
Besides Chipola Healthy Start, Wil-
liams is a board member of several
other organizations: Florida's Great
Northwest, Opportunity Florida, Early
Learning Coalition of Northwest Flor-
ida, and the Chipola River Soil and
Water Conservation District. He also


tion on safe food prepara-
tion and handling.
As a result of the train-
ing, 14 students passed
an exam and earned their
ServSafe Food Protection
Manager Certification, a
widely recognized certifi-
cation that is valid for five
years. The state. of Florida
requires that all food ser-
vice operations have at
least one certified food
safety manager on duty' at
all times.
'High school seniors Jody
Roy, Peter Antoine, Gentry
Ward, Elizabeth Glover,
Danielle Lawrence, Steph-


anie Milliser, Taylor Blount,
Garion Grant, Katie DeR-
osier, Samantha Rudd,
Bailey Harkins and Chris
Young and juniors Piper
Irwinl and Damien Car-
penter each earned their
ServSafe certification.
Students successfully
completing this~ training
were enrolled in either the
Culinary Arts Academy
or the Diversified Career
Technology program at
Marianna High School.
The training and testing
was provided by MHS Cu-
linary Arts teacher Susie
Barber.


Special to the Floridan

A select group of Mari-
annit High School stu-
dents recently took part
in ServSafe training, an
industry certification pro-
gram designed for chefs,
Cooks, servers, restaurant
owners and operators.
Thle training emphasizes
how to safeguard custom-
ers through safe food han-
dling techniques.
The ServSafe' program,
sponsored by the National
Restaurant Association,
includes hands-on train-
ing and classroom instruc-


SUBMITTED PHOTO


Le (hl


55-2 9310


Wd
Wed
Thurs.
Thurs

Frl


sat
Sun
Sun


9E /14 58 0 9-4 Not available


.IM)
(E)
(M)


6-2-1 9-4-1-1
9/8 9-6-5 8-5-4-7 2-13-16-19-31
2-5-5 4-5-4-5


Special to the Floridan

Deadlines for the Pan-
handle Youth Expo are fast
approaching, with Sept. 19
being the cut-off date for
beef and, poultry entries
and fees.
Livestock entry forms
must be submitted to the
Jackson County Exten-
sion Service. The Livestock
Shows are open to all 4-H
and FFA members cur-
rently enrolled in school
from Jackson, W~ashington,
Calhoun, Holmes, Liberty
and Bay counties.
Check-in for beef, poultry
and swine will be Thursday
morning, from 6-8 a.m. at
the Jackson Courity Agri-
culture Center on Highway
90, west of Marianna.
Entry forms are required
for the Youth Exhibit's
Show (non-livestock); no
walk in enteieso sil be ac-

open to all youth between
the ages of 5 and 18 cur-
rently enrolled in school
or being home-schooled,
living in the above-men-
tioned counties.
The last day to submit
Youth Exhibits entry forms
to the Jackson County Ex-
tension Service is Sept. 30.


Entries will be checked in
from 4 to 6 p.m. Wednes-
day, Oct. 12, in the Ag Cen-
ter Auditorium.
The Youth Exhibits Show
contests include: crafts,
art (paintings, drawings,
photography, sketches
and 'poster art), needle-
work, hobbies and collect-
ibles, tabletop displays,
scrapbooking, and baked
goods.
Farm Bureau is again
sponsoring a separate
Poster Contest, with cash
prizes, and has separate
rules and entry form.
This year's theme is
"Farm Animals of Jackson
County." The entry form
deadline and check-in
dates and times are the
same as for the Youth Ex-
hibits Show.
Complete rules and entry
forms for the livestock and
non-live tockac ntes a

Expo Poster Contest, are
available for download
at http://jackson.ifas.ufl.
edul4hlYouth _Expo~shtml
Rules and forms are avail-
able on re uest from the
Extension Office, at 2741
Pennsylvania Ave., Suite
3, Marianna, or by calling
482-9620.


(E) 9/9 0 6-5 5-8-9-1 1-8-18-21-22


2 7-2 3-6-3-4
9/10 7 4-0 7-2-9-3
5 5-3 0-4-5-5


3-7-22-23-33


(E) 9/11 7-2-4 6-5-8-2 1-11-12-18-19
(Mi) 1-5-3 4-0-9-0


Saturday 9/10 4-19-2232-53


PB24 PPx4


Not available


Wednesday 9/14


saturday 9/10
Wednesday 9/14


1-11-25-26-45 50
- Not available


xtra x


New guardians


on the watch


Chipola Healthy Start

board welcomes W7illiams


YRnhHRRde Youtu


Exo entry deadlines


approaching fast


SNEW
ARRIVALS~


aE"I





WE BU Y GOLD


YOURTRUSED E WELE



Downtown Marianna










WE LL ESTABLISH ED

F LORIS T & G IF T SHOP

FOR AsE


gNMAINA


Seared turtle swnnmmng agatm after rehab


JOhn

Bryan

John Invites All His



For The Best Deal!


Hw, 90 Marianna, FL
1-866-587-3673 850-482-4043
WWW, Chij)08f0I'd.CO co


For Information Visit
**-= "rianna********- **
or Contact: Dana Erbacher ~~~
850.832.2300 dana~cpifl.net


S'I~H~I'E


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


-14A + THURSDAY. SEPTEMBER 15. 2011


OS a


d their leave bankS.
Florida Today reports
that the union filed a
Grievance against the
city's decision to ask every
employee except police
officers and firefighters to
take two days off without
pay as a way to ease a bud-
get shortfall in 2009.
Arbitrator James Odom
Jr. of Birmingham, Ala.,
said the city breached its
contract with the union,
rOfficials say the value
of the time of is about
$32,800.

Turnpikq~officials say
drivr nt pyn
FOR LAUiEL -
Authorities say 40 percent
of the 1.2 million bills sent
to drivers under Florida's
Turnpike new license plate
tolling program have not
been paid.
The turnpike went to
a cashless toll system six
months ago, eliminat-
ing toll booths'along the
47-mile stretch in Miami-
SDade County.
Under the toll-by-plate
system,.a photo is taken of
Sthe vehicle's license plate
as it passes through a toll-
ing location.
The vehicle's registered
owner receives a moh~thly
Bill for all bf the tolls, as
well as a $2.50 administra-
tive fee.
'The South Florida Sun
Sentinel reports collec-
tions have been slower
than the state projected.
Turnpike officials had pre-
dicted about 30 percent
of those who receive bils
would not pay, amount-
ing to about $3.7 million
annually
Still, officials say about
88 percent ofturnpike
drivers pay, automatically
with SunPass.

Anthony lawyer wants
laWSuit dismissed
ORLAN~DO An at- -
torney representing Casey
Anthony has asked for a
civil lawsuit filed against
his client to be dismissed..
The Orlando Sentinel re-
ports that Charles Greenie
argues a lawsuit filed by a
diver who helped search '
for 25-year-old Anthony's.
daughter, Caylee, in 2008
lacks merit and seeks to
profit from the tragedy.
In court filings, Greene
.calls the suit filed by David
Badali "insufficient to
satisfy the requiirements of
Florida law." .
Badali, a scuba diver
from Sarasota, is seek- .
ing more than $15,000 in
damages.
The lawsuit claims he
risked his personal safety.
searching for 2-year-old
Caylee in alligator-infested
water while Anthony knew
the child was already
dead.
Anthony was acquitted
of killing Caylee in July
She is currently serving
probation on a separate
check fraud conviction.

Woman attacked by
gator. in fair condition
COPELAND The 90-
year-old woman attacked
by an alligator last month
has been upgraded to fair
condition.
The Naples Daily News
reports that Margaret .
Web of Copeland is in fair
condition at Lee Memorial
Hospital. ~
Webb had her leg ampu-
tated below the knee after
she was attacked while
walkingg near a canal out- .
side her house Aug. 31.
Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission
officials euthanized an al-
ligator captured Sept. 5 0n
a road near Webb's home.
While it isn't confirmed


the euthanized alligator
was the) onthat atta ked
"strongly suspected" to be
the culprit.
The alligator had a bullet
wound in its head, which
matches the story of a
Good Samaritan who said
he shot the alligator after
it released Webb from its
grasp. .

From wire reports


Push to cut drugs for dementia patients
The~ Asoitd rs $


WEST PAIN? BEACH Day after "
day, Hazel Eng sat on her couch, a
blank stare on her face. The power-
ful antipsychotics she was taking
often cloaked her in sedation. And C
when they didn't, the 89-year-old
lashed out at her nursing home's
aides with such anger and frequen-*
cy her daughter wondered if her
mother would be better off dead.
Until, in a matter of days, every-
thing seemed to change. ,
Eng's daughter, Jean Lynch, says
her mother was moved to a differ-
ent section of the Ecumen home.
in North Branch, Minn., and taken
off every drug but her daily aspirin.
She now beams as she ambles the
ha lays, reads the newspaper, tells In this photo taken Aug. 13, Hazel Eng, 89
stoiesandcontatly lugh (right) and son-in-law Bob Lynch (left), a
"Now I hope she lives till she's 200 home in North Branch, Minn.
years old," Lynch said. "She's just so
happy." of Medicare claims for such drugs
Antipsychotics are meant primar- were for off-label purposes such as
ily to help control hallucinations, dementia, the audit found.
delusions and other abnormal be- Since 2005, atypical antipsychot-
havior in people suffering from ics have been under an FDA warn-
schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, ing alerting doctors they could in-
but they're also given to hundreds of crease the risk of death in patients
thousands of elderly nursing home with dementia due to heart attacks
patients in the U.S. to pacify aggres- or pneumonia. The most common
sive and paranoid behavior related atypical antipsychotics are sold
to dementia. under the? brand names Risperdal,
The drugs can limit seniors' ability Zyprexa, Seroquel, Geodon, Abilify
to effectively communicate, social- and Invega. ,
ize orparticipateineverydaylife. But An older class of the drugs, known
a series of warnings has prompted a as typical antipsychotics, was add-
movement of nursing homes trying ed to the FDA warning three years
to reduce the decades-old practice, later.
often resulting in remarkably posi- The warnings did not apply to oth-
tive changes. er medicines widely used in nursing
Still, doctors say -the drugs are homes, such as the antidepressants
sometimes the only things that help Prozac and Paxil, and the anti-anxi-
the small number of dementia pa- ety medicines Xanax and Valium.
tients that display psychotic behav- Still, off-label use of antipsychot-
ior, making them a danger to them- ics has continued to be widespread.
selves and others. Some see it as a crutch, used to quiet
Ecumen's thret-year-old program seniors' outbursts or mask difficult
called "Awakenings" isn't just about personalities, though many others
reducing drugs. Personalized care' say it's the only pharmaceutical op-
'plans use exercise, aromatherapy, tion to treat a patient with a cadre of
pets and other methods. Patients behavioral problems.
who were sedated and detached are "Give someone enough medica-
now playing video games, listen- tions, you don't have to worry about
ing to music and playing balloon them wandering around or curs-
volleyball. ing or fighting," said Dr. Karl Dha-
"lt was quiet before but now it's na, medical director at MorseLife,
not," said Eva Lanigan, a nurse who which operates a nursing home in
piloted Ecumen's program. "Life is West Palm Beach, Fla. .
going on here again." For several years, MorseLife has
A government audit released- done quarterly reviews of any pa-
`in ~May looked at Medicare pay- tient on an. antipsychotic, antide-
ments for atypical antipsychot- pressant or sedative to see if such
ics, as a newer class of the drugs is medication is necessary. At the
known, and found in a six-month start, around a quarter of patients
period that was analyzed in 2007, were on such drugs. Dhana said the
about one in seven nursing home rate is now around 14 percent,
patients aged 65 or older had been But the shift hasn't been without
prescribed them. Some 83 percent challenges. There are no FDA-ap-


), shares a laugh with daugh~terJ L~ny
Is they go for a walk at the Ecumen nursing


proved drugs for behavioral prob-
lems related to dementia. Nursing
home patients today are often sicker
and showing more signs of behavior
problems than in years past;.
Dr. Jason Karlawish, a fellow at the
University of Pennsylvania's Insti-
tute on Aging, said he uses antipsy-
chotics in only about 5 percent of his
dementia patients. But sometimes
they're the only thing that helps,
such as with a woman he treated
who was showing clear signs of psy-
choses, convinced that her house
was on fire. She attacked caregivers,
tore pictures off the wall, wouldn't
eat or be bathed. When she was put
on an antipsychotic, the symptoms
subsided, Karlawish said.
"There is a' role for these drugs,"
h'e said.
Cobble Hill Health Center, aBrook-
lyn nursing home, began a program
several years back to reduce such
drugs, but the home's medical di-
rector, Dr. Louis Mudannayake still
remembers the doomsday predic-
tion of one nurse,
"She said, 'Lou, you're crazy! We're
going to have, all the patients strip-
ping," he recalled.
.Cobble Hill has cut the number
of patients on antipsychotics from
about 30 percent to less than 15
percent, and the nurse's predic-
tions never came true. The staff has
learned to help patients avoid out-
bursts without pills. The solution is
often simple: Asking before enter-
ing a room, serving a meal earlier or
putting on a favorite Nat King Cole
album.
For all age groups, in the 2006 fis-
cal year; antipsychotics drug bils
totaled about $7.9 bilion for Med-
icaid. The following year, it dropped
to about $4.9 billion.


The Associated Press

MARATHON --.A fed-
erally protected logger-
head -turtle was released
SWednesday off the Florida
Keys after recovering from
a spear gun shot to its
head.
Cheered by. spectators,
staff and' volunteers from
The Turtle Ilospital in
Marathon released the
115-pound reptile near the
iconic Seven Mile Bridge.
The turtle was rescued off
Big Pine Keyr in early Au-
gust with a four-foot un-
derwater spear embedded
in its head.
Hospital veterinarian
Doug Mader removed the
spear.
afTe reptde ghame Stha
man who found it, recov-
ered about five weeks after
surgery. .
"This has to be one of
the luckiest turtles in his-
tory," said Mader. "The
spear went in just behind
the ear, crisscrossed over
the windpipe and lodged
against the jaw on the oth-


er side. '
"Quarter-of-an-inch in
either direction and that
animal would be dead,"
he said,
Officials from National
Marine Fisheries and the
Florida Fish and Wild-
life 'Commission have
launched a criminal inves-
tigation, said FWTC spokes-
person Bobby Dube.
They hope to be aided by
donations from outraged
Keys residents and busi-
ness owners who contrib-
uted to a reward for tips
leading to the arrest and
conviction of the guilty
party.
SMore than $16,000 in
cash has been amassed,
plus services including
fihi and ighd eotr ps

free welding by a local
tradesman.
"We're used to animals
getting hit by a boat or
tangled up in fishing line
or ropes," said Richie
Moretti, whb founded the
hospital 25 years ago. "But
this is where somebody
came in deliberately and


hurt our animals."
Moretti began the first
state-licensed veterinary
sea turtle hospital in 1986
as an adjunct to his small
Marathon motel. Profits
from the motel were used
to fund research and treat-
merit programs.
In 1993, Moretti expand-
ed facilities by purchas-
ing an adjacent building
that once housed an ex-
otic dance lounge named
Famlyk .
The building features a
surgical suite, excamina-
tion room, commons area


.and classroom.
Today, the motel no lon-
ger functions, but the hos-
pital has treated and reha-
bilitated-more than 1,200
injured sea turtles and
assisted tens of thousands
.of hatchlings gone astray
after leaving their nests.
It remains the only facil-
ity of its kind in the world,
Moretti said, and even has
a turtle ambulance for pa-
tient transport.
"Our rules are real sim-
ple," Moretti said of his
patients. "You eat, you
poop and you're out."


Bnroard school boar
hiIres superintendent
FORT LAUDERDALE
The School Board
of Broward County has
selected Robert Runcie to
lead the country's sixth
largest school district.
Spokeswoman Marsy
Smith says the board
made its choice Wednes-
day. Runcie currently
serves as Chief of Staff to
the Board of Education for
the Chicago public school
system, which is the third
largest school system in
the country.
Runcie replaces Jim

fro wh dlostrrt ed Jne.
He was selected from a
pool of 47 applicants. The
school board selected six
semi-finalists before nar-
rowing their choice to two
candidates Runcie and
Bernard Taylor Jr., super-
intendent of the Grand
Rapids school district in
Grand Rapids, Mich.
The school board au-
thorized contract negotia-
tions with Runcie, whose
start date has not yet been
determined. .

Complaint against
prosecutor rejected l
TALLAHASSEE A state
ethics~panel is dropping
a complaint that for-
mer House Speaker Ray
Sansom filed against the
state attorney who pros-
ecuted him on corruption
charges.
The Florida Commis'-
sion on Ethics announced
Wednesday that it lacked
the authority to look at
whether State Attorney
Willie Meggs ofTallahas-
Ssee may have engaged in
misconduct.
Sansom's complaint
in part accused Meggs
of manipulating a grand
jury and illegally releas- ~
ing testimony. A similar
complaint was denied by
the trial court.
Sansom faced grand
theft and other charges
over earmarking $6 mil-
lion so Northwest Florida :
State College could build
a Destin airport hangar al-
legedly for use by a co-de-
fendant. The school later
gave Sansom a $110,000
job.
Meggs eventually .
dropped charges against
the Destin Republican
and two co-defendants
after they agreed to pay
$300,000 restitution.

Rubio urges US not to
cede world rol9 '
MIAM;I Florida Sen.
Marco Rubio wants the
U.S. not to give up its
role helping solve foreign
conflicts despite chal-
lenges it's faced mn Iraq
and Afghan,istan and the
economic recession.
The freshman Republi-
can says America lacks the
means to solve every issue
but still has "a meaningful
role to play in resolving
crises" that affect national
interests.

at th e saes le Hem e
in Wingate, N.C., Rubio
applauded President
Barack Obama for captur-
ing Osama bin Laden and
for U.S. support of reform-
ers mn the Middle East, but
urged the president to take
a stronger stand there and
in Latin America.
Rubio has been men-
tioned as a possible
GOP vice-presidential
candidate.
His speech follows
one he gave recently on
Domestic issues at the
Ronald Reagan Library in
California.


Arbitrator orders city
to pay up
PALM BAY- An arbitra-
tor has ruled that Palm
Bay must compensate 129
blue-collar union em-
ployees for furloughs they
were required to take off
in 2009. '
City Manager Sue Hann
says the city has until Nov.
4 to either pay the em-
ployees for the two unpaid
_days off or add the time to

















































_~1~_~_~__1_


Budget Hearmng
The Town of Sneads has
tentatively adopted a budget'
for Fiscal Yrear 2011-2012.
.A public hearing to make a
FINAL DECISION on the budget
AND TAXES will be held on .
Monday, Septem~ber 19, 2011 at
5:01 P.M. at the
Sneads Town Hall,
STown council Room,
2028 Third Aven ue,

i Sneads, Florida.


The Associated Press custody Wednesday.
U.S. Attorney A. Brant
INDIANAPOLIS- A Cook said'
Maryland man charged it was im-
with extorting an Indiana portan~t for
teen into sexual favors teens to re-
victimized 'other teens alize that
in several states after he online acts
was i-eleased on bond, that seem.
federal prosecutors said Shea harmless
Wednesday. and private -
Trevor Shea, 20, has today can lat:ercome back
agreed to plead guilty to to haunt them.
charges of sexual exploita- "It's important to' note
tion of children stemming that digital images... never
from both cases, accord- go away and can be passed
ing to the U.S. Attorney's along at the click of a but-
Office. Prosecutors say ton," he .said at a news
he blackmailed and con- conference to announce
vinced 10 girls between the charges Wednesday.
the ages of 13 and 16 to Shea could face 15 to 30
seird him sexually explicit years in prison on each of
photographs or videos. the seven counts against:
Court documents filed him under terms of a pro-
in U.S. District Court in posed plea agreement,
Indianapolis allege that and up to 30 years more
Shea coerced four girls in` for violating the'terms of
Florida, Kansas and Mary- his pre-trialrelease.
land into various acts after Shea's attorney, Michael
hisrelease onbondfollotv- Donahoe, 'declined to
ing his initial indictment comment on the case.
in Julie 2010. Ait the time, The case is an example
Sheawas on home deten- of a growing crime that
tion and being electroni- federal prosecutors call
cally monitored and had "sextortion,'' in which
agreed not to use a com- Internet predators catch
puter as a term of release. victims in embarrass-
He was in U.S. marshals' ing situations online and ~


"It's important to note that digital .

im##Cs ... NfCBT O array and an be
passed along at th~e cick ofa button."
A.Brant Cook,
U.S. Attorney


SBUDGETr SUMMARY
TOWN OF SNEADS -- FISCAL YEAR 20~112012


CASH BALANCE BROUGHT FORWARD & RESERVES


Intergovernmental Revenue
Charges for Services/Long Term Borrowing
Fines & Forfeitures
Miscellaneous Revenues

TOTAL REVENUES

TOTAL ESTIMATED REVENUES
AND BALANCES

EXPENDITURES/EXPENSES:


THE TENTATIVE, ADOPTED, AND/OR FINAL BUDGETS ARE ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF TH-E ABOVE MENTIONED TAXING
AUTHORITY AS A PUBLIC RECORD.


ST~ATE/NRTIONA


THURSDAY. SEPTEMBER 15. 2011 5AT


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.corn


said Rep. John Larson, D-Conn.,
who was surrounded by his col-
leagues on the steps of the Capi-
tol's East Front. He was referring
to the number of unemployed
Americans and the time until the
next election.
Still, there appeared to be little
if any chance that the proposal
would pass Congress in one
piece. Republicans who control
the House have made clear they
have little interest in Obama's
plans to increase spending for
things like school construction,
highways, .bridges and other
projects, which accounts for
nearly $200 billion of the legisla-
tion. GOP lawmakers seem more
open to Obama's plans to extend
unemployment insurance and
cut the Social Security payroll
tax for workers and businesses.
Even in the Democratic-led
Senate, Majority Leader Harry
Reid has suggested that Obama
is unlikely to get his way in his
call for immediate action by
Congress. Reid has said there
are some other issues that need
to be dealt with first, including
transportation funding.
Obama has made clear he'd
sign a portion of the legislation
if that's all Congress could agree
on.


right," the president said.
He told the students: "The time
for hand-wringing is over. The
time for moping around is over,
We've got to kick off our bed-
room slippers and put on our
marching shoes."
The president's trip to North
Carolina, a traditionally Repub-
lican state he won in 2008, drew
scorn from Republicans.
"This president is irrlove with
the sound of his own voice, he's
in love with campaigning, he's
in love with fundraising, and
he's in love with the stump," said
Republican National Commit-
tee Chairman Reince Priebus.
"And he's doing what he loves to
do best, which is to go to battle-
ground states, masquerade as
official business, use taxpayer
money to do it, and campaign."
As the president barnstormed
the country to build support
for his plan, which he first un-
veiled last week in a speech to
Congress, he drew support from
House Democrats.
About 50 Democratic lawmak-
ers called Wednesday for quick
passage of the jobs bil and urged
Americans to make their case in
calls to lawmakers.
"Fourteen .million people do
not have 14 months to wait,"


The Associated Press

RALEIGH, N.C. President
Barack Obama urged enthusi-
astic college students Wednes-
day to join him in his fight to
get Congress to act on his new
jobs bill. "Every single one of you
can help make this bill a reality,"
the president called out at a hot
and noisy rally at North Carolina
State University.
Someone in the crowd yelled
out, "I love you!"
"If you love me you got to help
me pass this bil," the president
responded.
It was Obama's second cam-
paign-style rally in two days as
he pushes for action on his $450
billion jobs plan. His program is
-running into a buzz saw of oppo-
sition from Republicans and
even some in his own Demo-
cratic Party over his plans to
raise taxes on the wealthy and
corporatibons to pay for it.
'The president was in Ohio
Tuesday, and last week irr Vir-
ginia, as he travels key electoral
states to sell the plan with the
economy stuck in~neutral head-
ing into his 2012 re-election
campaign.
On Wednesday Obama's focus
was small businesses, which


President Barack Obama is hugged after speaking at North Carolina State
University in Raleigh, N.C., on Wednesday.


would be helped by Social Se-
iburity payroll tax cuts. Before
speaking, he toured WestStar
Precision, small business in the
Raleigh suburb of Apex. It makes
specialized components for the
.aerospace, medical and alterna-
tive energy industries.
He also announced plans to
try to speed payments to federal
contractors.
Republicans have accused


Obama of playing politics by pre-
senting them with tax hike ideas
they've already rejected. But
Obama said Wednesday, "We've
got to make sure everybody pays
their fair share, including the
wealthiest Americans and the
biggest corporations."
"It'd be nice if we could do it all,
but we can't. We've got to make
choices. That's what governing's
about. And we know what's


threaten to expose them
unless they create sexually
explicit photos or videos
for them.
SU.S. Attorney Joe Hog-
sett said Shea's case was a
landmarkc of its ~kirid" in
part because. there were
so many! victims fr;om
across the country and he
allegedly forced the girls
to indulge in sadistic and
masochistic behavior on
webcam.
Shea's case began in Sep-
tember 2009, when po-
lice received a report that
a 16-year-old girl from
Brownsburg, Ind., was bje-
mng stalked oirer the Inter-


net. The girl and two of her
friends had visited a cha-
troom and flashed their
breasts over a webcam. A
week later, a stranger con-
tacted the girl and said he
had captured her image
obl the webcam and would
post ~the pictures to her
MySpace friends unless
she posed for more explic-
it pictures and videos for
him,. the documents said.
"Every time she logged
on to the Internet, she
couldn't escape him," said
Brownsburg police Detec-
tive :Sgt. Jennifer Pyatt,
Swho attended .the news
conference.


The Associated Press

MIAMI -A federal judge
on Wednesday blocked en-
forcement of a first-in-the-
nation law that restricted
wyhlt Florida physicians
can say about guns to their
patients,..ruling the -law
violates the U.S. Constitu-
tion's free speech guaran-
tees and does not trample
gun rights.
U.S. District Judge Mar-
tia Cooke said it was im-
portant to emphasize "the
free flow of truthful, non-
misleading information
within the doctor-patient
relationship."
"This case concerns one
of our Constitution's most
precious rights the free-
dom of speech," Cooke
said. "A practitioner who
counsels a patient on fire-
arm safety, even when en-
tirely irrelevant to medical
care or safety, does not af-
fect or interfere with the
patient's right to continue
to own, possess or use
firearms."
The law was passed earli-
er this year by the Republi-
cancnrle t 1 ltue
2 by GOP Gov. Rick Scott.
The governor, the National
Rifle Association and other
supponters contended it
was a violation of privacy
~nd possibly the Second
Amendment for doctors
to question patients about
guns at home.
But physicians' groups
representing some 11,000
doctors and the Brady
Center to Prevent Gun Vio-
lence sued.
They said the law halted
meaningful discussions
between doctors and pa-
tients especially parents
with guns about keep-
ing the weapons out of the
hands of children.
Dr. Lisa Cosgrove, presi-
dent of the Florida chapter
of the American Academy
of Pediatrics, said the rul-
ing will help save~ lives.
She said doctors routinely
counsel patients~ about
safety issues at home, on
everything from backyard
swimming pools to use of
bike helmets.
"So'metimes it's just a
reminder that if you are a
gun owner, you make sure
you are a responsible gun
owner," said Cosgrove, a
pediatrician. "Children .
cannot make these de- I
cisions about safety for
themselves. Parents have
to be the guides for that."
Daniel Vice, senior attor-
ney with the Washington-
based Brady Center, said
the decision invalidates a
"dangerous and blatantly
unconstitutional law."
"Especially with eicht


kids shot and.killed every
day in America, it's~ cru-
cial that doctors be able to ~
talk about the severe risk
of guns in the home," Vice
said.
Attorney General Pam
Bondi's office did not im-
mediately say .whether
there would be an ap-
.peal and NRA officials in
Tallahassee could not be
reached for comment.
Cooke's ruling temporarily
halts enforcement of the
law, but the judge indi-
cated that decision would
likely be made permanent.
SThe law arose out of the
so-called "Ocala incident,"
in which a young mother
in 2010 was dropped from
a doctor's practice because
she refused, to answer
questions about gun own-
ership. Her cause found its
way to the Legislature.
In her ruling, Cooke said
she found very little evi-
dence of widespread ha-
rassrnentor discrimination
of gun owners by, doctors.
"It is unlikely that a con-
cern for some patients who
may. be offended or .un-
gomfa bl rby ue tons
ship could justify;this law,"


she said.


GENERAL
FUND
$ 79,000


SPECIAL
REV. FUNDS
$ 22,000


ENTERPRISE
FUNDS
$.71,316


TOTAL

$ 172,316


ESTIMATED REVENUES:

TAXES:
SAd Valorem Taxes
Utility Service Taxes
License Fees and Permits


Millage
S.5879


$ 18,475
112,000
97,900
487,118

2,355
55,973


$ 18,475
112,000
97,900
600,679.
1,105,500
2,355
55,973

$1,992,882


$2,165,198


113,561


1,105,500



$1,105,500


$1,176,816


$113,561


$135,561


$773,821


$852,821


General Governmental Services
Public Safety
Physical Environment
Transportation
Human Services
Culture and Recreation
Debt Services

Total Expenditures/Expenses

Total Appropriated Expenditures


$134,900
484,471
3,150
150,100
8,000
72,200


$ 134,900
484,471
966,350
285,661
8,000
72,200
213,616

$2,165,198

$2,165,198


963,200



213,616

$1,176,816

$1,176,816


135,561


$852,821 $135,561


$852,821


$135,561


Obama touts jobs bill benefits for small business


Judge blocks Fla.


law that restricts



doco u tfO O


Prosecutors file more charges in 'sextortion' case

































































w~ .E j~ No more d~Sicuion about raising the retirement

avI I age, nO more discussion about culttin benefts, no

more discussion about privatizationn"
Rep.Peter DeFazio,
D-Oregon


Liberals want to raise the


Social Security tax for rich


Justice Ginsburg slides to safety off airplane


during the evacuation, cials have not confirmed
two of whom refused whether smoke was de-
treatment, and one was tected on board and have
taken to a hospital. Offi- released few details.



YOUI-R HOME
TOWN. DEALER


ANY NEW IN STOEK
F150 TRUCKS
INELUDIjNG DIESEL

gggg gg
OVER CONT

JERRY E X GEliERAL MAltAGER
STODD LEE WOl.LD LIKE TO INVITE
ALL HIS- PAST CLIENTS AND
..FRIENDS TO BAY FORD
R1ent O]N THE CORNER F RT 20 AND MAJN ST. B1L.UNT5TOWN
850-674-546+


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


16A 0 THURSDAY. SEPTEMBER 15. 2011


by previous probes, including
those by the president's inde-
pendent oil spil commission,
Congressional committees and
the companies themselves. But
it is likely to carry more weight
mn Congress, where Republican
lawmakers in particular have
said they are unwilling to adopt
reforms until the federal investi-
gation was complete.
Since the disaster, the Obama
administration has reorganized
the offshore drilling agency and
boosted safety regulations. But
Congress has yet to pass a single
piece of legislation to address
safety gaps highlighted by the
disastre report's 57 findings
about the disaster, only one per-
son.-- BP engineer Mark Hafle
_ is mentioned by name. It said
Hafle's failure to investigate or
resolve anomalies detected dur-
ing a critical test possibly con-
tributed to the crew's failure to
detect the initial influx of gas and
oil. Hafle also chose not to run a
cement log, a test that evaluates
the quality of the cement job, in
violation of BP procedures, the
report found.
Hafle a key decision maker
on the doomed rig refused
to testify before the federal
panel in August 2010, citing
his constitutional right against
self-incrimination.
The panel recommended fur-
ther changes to offshore drilling
practices, including requiring at
least two barriers to be placed
in a well one mechanical, and
one cement. The Macondo well
had a single barrier, the cement
seal at the bottom, so when the
blowout happened the only
thing to' stop it was the blowout
preventer. That didn't work, the


panel says, because the kink in
the pipe caused by the force of
the blowout kept it out of reach
of the safety device's shearing~
rams. The rams are supposed to
pinch a well shut in an emergen-
cy by slicing through the well's
drill pipe.
The team also said BOEMRE
should standardize testing pro-
cedures on oil and gas wells.
BP said in a statement that the
British company accepts the
report's conclusion that the ac-
cident was the result of multiple
causes involving multiple par-
ties. BP did'not address the re-
port's specific conclusions about

eFio mm outset, BP acknowl-
edged its role in the accident
and has taken concrete steps to
.further enhance safety and risk
management throughout its
global operations, including the
implementation of new volun-
tary standards and practices in
the Gulf of Mexico that exceed.
current regulatory requirements
and strengthen the oversight of
contractors," BP said. "We con-
tinue to encourage other parties
to acknowledge their roles in the
accident and make changes to
help prevent similar accidents in
the future.
Transocean and cement con-
tractor Halliburton did not im-
mediately respond to requests
for comment.
The report paints a dark por-
trait of the final hours aboard the
Deepwater Horizon, where the
workers in the most danger were
unaware of the anomalies being
detected by engineers looking at
data coming from the well. The
federal team also charges that
BP made decisions blindly, with-
out assessing risk.


The Associated Press

A key federal report goes fur-
ther than other investigations
and puts ultimate responsibil-
ity on BP for the worst offshore
oil spill in U.S. history and the
deaths of 11 rig workers, espe.
cially regarding the cement seal
that was put in place the day be.
fore the explosion that triggered
the spill.
The report, released Wednes-
day, said in the days leading up
to the disaster, BP made a series
of decisions that complicated
cementing operations, added
risk, and may have contributed
to the ultimate failure of the ce-

Other companies also shared
some of the blame, according
to the report, which noted that
Transocean, as owner of the
Deepwater Horizon, was respon-
sible for conducting safe opera-
tions and for protecting person-
nel onboard.
The report said BE! and in
some cases its contractors, vio-
lated seven federal regulations
at the time of the incident. They
include the failure to take nec-
essary precautions to keep the
well under control at all times, to
perform a cement job that kept
the oil and gas down hole, and to
maintain the blowout preventer
- which is supposed to lock in
place to prevent a spill in case of
an explosion in accordance
with industry-accepted practice.
The details were contained in
the final report from an inves-
tigation team of the U.S. Coast
Guard and the agency that regu-
lates offshore drilling. The panel
held hearings in the year follow-
ing the April 20, 2010, Deepwater
Horizon catastrophe. The Coast


THEASSOCIATEDPRESSFILEPHOTO
in this April 21, 2010 photo taken in the Gulf of Mexico more than 50 miles
southeast of Venice on Louisiana's tip, the Deepwater Horizon oil nig is seen


burning.
Guard-Bureau of Ocean Energy
Management Regulation and
Enforcement investigation was
amonigthe most exhaustive.
The panel's report will be used
to shape reforms to offshore
drilling safety and regulation. It
also will be used by lawyers for
victims involved in the multi-
billion dollar court battle over
the oil spil, and by government
agencies that are considering
civil and criminal charges against
.BP and other companies.
Other investigations spread
around the blame more evenly,
faulting misreadings of key data,
the failure of the blowout pre-
venter to stop the flow of oil.to
the sea and other shortcomings
by executives, engineers and rig
crew members.
The report said the decisions
included using only one cement
barrier and BP's choice to set the
production casing in a location


in the Macondo well that creat-
ed additional risk of influx of oil
or gas. The casing is a steel pipe
placed in a well to maintain its
integrity.
The panel said BP. failed to
communicate these decisions
and the increasing risks to
Transocean.
While the report recognizes
that other companies had roles
in the disaster, the panel. said
that BP was the final decision
maker.
"BP, as the designated operator
under BOEMRE regulations, was
ultimately responsible for con-
ducting operations at Macondo
in a way that ensured the safety
and protection of personnel,
equipment, natural resources,
and the environment," the panel
concluded.
The report pins the causes
for the disaster on many of the
same faulty decisions found


his 2008.presidential campaign, Obama
proposed raising the payroll tax on peo-
ple earning over $250,000. He's discussed
the idea as president but has yet to offer
legislation following through on it.
Currently, workers and their employ-
ers each owe a payroll tax of 6.2 percent
of a worker's wages up to $106,800 year.
That tax would also be imposed on wages
above $250,000 under the liberals' plan.
Other sponsors include Sens. Bernard
Sanders, I-Vt., Barbara Boxer, D-Calif.,
and Sheldon Whitehouse, D-R.I.
In an effort to boost consumer spend-
ing and create jobs, Obama last week
proposed paring the 6.2 percent payroll
tax on employees to 3.1 percent next year
and cutting the payroll tax for employers
as well. He would replace the revenue
Social Security would lose with money
from the government's overall budget.
That plan has split liberals. Sand-
ers said he opposes it because it would
make Social Security more vulnerable to
budget cuts. Boxer said she favors it be-
cause it would create jobs while protect-
ing Social Security.
In debt reduction talks between
Obama and House Speaker John Boeh-
ner, R-Ohio, this summer, they discussed
a plan to slow the growth of Social Secu-
rity benefits that they never embraced.
In 2005, President George W. Bush pro-
posed letting recipients turn part of their
Social Security nest egg into stock market
investments. The idea went nowhere.


*The Associated Press

WASHINGTONJ Nervous that So-
cial Security seems under siege from all
sides, congressional liberals on Wednes-
day proposed raising the payroll tax that
funds the program, but only'for people
earning more than $250,000 a year. .
The legislation is designed to keep the
pension program solvent for the next
75 years, which is the standard used by
government actuaries, by putting an ad-
ditional $6.5 trilion into the Social Se-
curity trust fund over that period. The
plan also is intended to head off other
efforts to overhaul the program or trim
benefits, or to use its funds to help pay
for debt reduction. ..
"No more discussion about raising
the retirement age, no more discussion
about cutting benefits, no more discus-
sion about privatization," said Rep. Peter
DeFazio, D-Ore., one of the sponsors.
With Republicans making opposi-
tion to tax increases their mantra, the
measure seems to have little chance of
enactment.
Nonetheless, it gives liberals a chance
to underscore their support for the
widely popular prograni at a time when
President Barack Obama has proposed
cutting the payroll tax to help create jobs
and GOP presidential contender Rick
Perry, the Texas governor, has called its
finances a "Ponzi scheme."
The bill's sponsors noted that daring


Associated Press lina, the only state in the Southeast that
does not have language in its constitu-
S- Barbara Von Aspern tion banning gay marriage, voted to putit
e~r, "thinks the world" of the question on the 2012 ballot. Most
laughter intends to mar- Americans who live in states where gay
the pair should have the marriage is not already legal say it is un-
s as anyone else. It paibns likely their state will pass such a law; just
ern is going to skip their 20 percent think it is likely to become law
daughter, Von Aspern ex- in their state. .
ng another woman. Americans also are conflicted on how
Sto death, and we love to go about legalizing or outlawing gay
ling judgmental," the 62- marriage.
er, Ariz., retiree said. "But One option is banning gay marriage by
age I cannot agree with.'' constitutional amendment. About half of
d, this question of legiti- the poll's respondents, 48 percent, said
iage. Americans are grap- they would favor such an amendment de-
Stheir homes to the halls fining marriage as between a man and a
n the shadow of a' presi- woman. Most who feel this way clo so in-
next year. The ambiva- tensely. About 40 percent would strongly
.in a new poll that shows favor such a change. Forty-three percent
ssionate, conflicted and said they would oppose such an amend-
Ssame-sex marriage. ment, and 8 percent were neutral, accord-
cent of the 1,000 adults ing to the poll.
the government should Most 55 percent believe the issue
nition to marriages be- should be handled at the state level, how-
f the same sex, about the ever, and opinions on how states should
according to the nation- act are split. People are about evenly di-
poll by The Associated vided on whether their states should al-
Itional Constitution Cen- low same-sex marriages 42 percent
recentt were opposed. favor that and 45 percent are opposed
milarly conflicted over and tilt in favor of state laws that al-
:, the government should low gay couples to form civil unions 47
re. percent in favor, 38 percent opposed and
gal recognition of same- 13 percent neutral, according to the poll.
s shifted in recent years, "The different moral standards in dif-
lajority opposed in 2009 ferent areas, probably, are the biggest
rity support now. Some reason that same-sex marriages are an is-
s from a generational di- sue," said Dale Shoemaker, 54, a military
:w poll showing a major- retiree from Boise, Idaho. If gay couples
under age 65 in favor of who want to get married live in a state
Sfor same-sex marriages, that doesn't allow it, they can move to one
f seniors opposed. that does, he said.
,government has moved Either way, gay couples "should have
nation debates. NewYork benefits," Shoemaker said. "If they're liv-
he sixth state, along with ing together and cohabitating and are a
lumbia, to legalize same- couple, (they should have) the insurance
ll, the issue played a part and retirement and that type of thing, the
actionn Tuesday to replace monetary benefits."
,r Rep. Anthony Weiner, Nearly 6 in 10 (57 percent) in the poll
t David Weprin's.support, shared Shoemaker's take when it comes
cost him support among to government benefits. They said same-
lodox Jews, and he lost to sex couples should be entitled to the
Turner. same legal benefits as married couples of
lawmakers in North Caro- the opposite sex.


The Associated Press

CHANTILLY, Va. U.S.
Supreme Court Justice
Ruth Bader Ginsburg,
who is 78 and lias battled
cancer, was forced to
slide down an emergency
chute to evacuate a flight
at Dulles. International
Airport on Wednesday, a
court spokeswoman said.
Ginsburg was on her
way from Washington to
San Francisco and was
not injured, said Supreme
Court spokeswoman Pa-
tricia McCabe Estrada.
A pilot noticed a prob-
lem with the engine on
the United Airlines Flight
586 and ordered 179 pas-
sengers and six crew
members to exit, said air-
port spokeswoman Kim-
berly Gibbs.
Gibbs says three people
suffered minor injuries


The

WASHINGTON
loves her daught
the person her d
ry and believes t
same legal right~
her, but Von Asp
wedding. Her d;
plains, is marryiI
"We love them
them without be
year-old Chandl~
the actual marri~
It's complicate
mixing gay marri
pling with it from
of government i
dential election
lence is reflected
the nation is pa
narrowly split on
Fifty-three per
surveyed' believe
give legal recog
tween couples o~
same as last year,
wide telephone
Press and the Na
ter. Forty-four pe
People are si
what, if anything
do about the issue
Support for lel
sex marriage ha~
from a narrow m
to narrow majo
of the shift stem
vide, with the ne
ity of Americans
legal recognition
and a majority o:
In some places
ahead while the 1
in July became tl
the District of Co
sex marriage. Sti
in the special ele
disgraced forme
D-N.Y. Democra
for gay marriage
the district's Orth-
Republican Bob
SAlso Tuesday, l~


NRTI~ONRL


Repor t: BP ultimately responsible in Gulf spill


Steve Tanism (left) and his partner Rich Garraputa, both from Greensbjoro, N.C., walk toward
the Noth Carolina Legislative Building after a rally against a state constitutional amendment
that would say marriage between a man and a woman is the only domestic legal union in North
Carolina, on Halifax Mall in Raleigh, N.C., on Tuesday-


Hol Nea-i *n U













amglreorifl~ fo 't Iave

tenure. Wthy should bad teacherss"
SLane Wright,
SGov. Scott'spress secretary


Jackson County Vault & Mronumenits Pineer e
Quality Service at Affojrdable Prices

S850-482-5041 g]~ 3720 Caverns R~oad IM~ar;iga~n~na, FL ~ 3246-80 (850) 482-3964 )


THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2011 7AT


JACKISON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.corn


ment Test. It also gets rid
of provisions which al-
low districts to prioritize
teachers with seniority
during layoffs.
Republicans say a test-
based merit pay plan will
help attract and keep top
teachers, but opponents
of the law say it will have
the opposite effect dis-
couraging new and veter-
an teachers from staying
in Florida, knowing the
role student test scores
will have on whether or
not they keep their jobs.
"In my district we have
noted that teachers, long
time teachers in our dis-
trict, have left the county
for this very reason," said
Beth Weatherstone, an In-
dian River County teacher
who is included in the
lawsuit. She said they have
left the profession or gone
back to liome states. "It's
based on what's happen-
ing here in Florida, this at-
tack on teachers."
Officials with the state
Department of Education
said they intend to defend
the new law.
"fAlthough we have not
been served yet, we be-
lieve strongly in the new
law and its focus on im-
proving ~student achieve-
ment, recognizing our
most effective teachers
and identifying teachers
who would benefit from
additional professional
development opportuni-
ties," said Thomas Butler,
a department spokesman.
There is a growing con-
sensus that teacher evalu-
ations need to reformed;


district~
had ay
particip:
school
"Flori:
ahead
it comn
pay issl
"They'v
do it in
effective
and the
And I
have lo
struggle
know w
cut ho
work.' "
In res
suit, Sc
tary, La
governo
for stud
they gel
in the
"the spe
ers unit


s implemented or
approved plans to
,ate in the 2010-11
year.
da always has been
of the curve when
ies to the. merit
ue," Exstrom said.
e just struggled to
a way that's most
e for their teachers
ir students.
think a lot of states
,oked at Florida's
:s and said, 'You
Ihat, it's not clear
w to make this

ponse to the law-
:ott's press secre-
ne Wright, said the
,r was looking out
.ents, to make sure
t the best teachers
classroom, while
:cial interest teach-
on is looking out
teachers who pay
lion dues."
lar working
don't have tenure,"
said in a statement
day. "Why should
herss"
law passed last
is similar to. one
Gov. Charlie Crist
during his Sen-
~paign after wide-
'teacher protests.
res teachers hired
ly 1, 2014, to be
on-a performance
schedule. Teachers
given one of four
lance ratings, 50
of which must be
,n data regarding
growth, includ-
:es on the Florida
hensive Assess-


until recently, they have
largely been based on a
principal's observations.
But how to judge wNhether
a teacher is "effective," and
what role merit pay should
play in that, is still under
considerable debate.
A study by Vanderbilt
University last year, for ex-
ample, found that students
of middle school math
teachers wNho were offered
a bonus pay if they made
larger gains on standard-
ized tests performed no
better than those without
the extra compensation.
Dale Ballou, an associate
professor who worked on
the study, said overall, the
studies on merit pay have
been mixed.
"Wh7~at we don't really
have much is evidence
at the teacher level, that
these things have made a
great difference," Ballou
said.
In an interview last
month with The Associat-
ed Press, Scott said merit
pa~y was worth trying at a
statewide level in Florida.
"I think that one thing
you do in business, and
I think that government
should be doing, is that
you use your best judg-
ment and you make your
decision and. you try
.something and see if it
works," he said. "It's logi-
cal to thiink that measur-
ing somebody wiill in-
crease their results. If it
doesn't work, we shouldn't
do it, but it's a logical thing
to try."
The lawsuit echoes
union ~~fights .under way


in Wisconsin and Ohio,
where public workers have
been stripped of most of
their ability to collectively
bargain. No such law has
been passed in Florida, but
the teachers union says the
Legislature changed wages,
employment contracts,
performance evaluations,
promotions and workforce
reduction provisions that
had been negotiated be-
tween teachers and school
districts in the past.
"Even though the states
are different, the governors
seem to be acting out of the
same playbook," said Randi
Weingarten, president of


the American Federation of
Teachers.
She pointed to Florida's
handling of its Race to the
Top application, which in-
cluded new teacher evalu-
ations and merit pay, as an
example of how reform can
be instituted with the inclu-
sion of teachers.
"What SB 736 does is it to-
tally focuses on testing as a
way of regulating teachers,"
Weingarten said. "It divests
teachers of any voice they
had of actually making
schools work."
The lawsuit seeks to pro-
hibit the state from enforc-
ing the law.


dents do on tests. for bad
Florida appears to be their un
the only state, however, "Regu
that is requiring merit pay folks de
statewide. Other states are Wright
working to create effective Wednes
evaluation systems first bad teach
and encouraging districts The
to imI1plement pilot perfor- spring
mance pay models, rather former
than including it as a re- vetoed
quirement, said Michelle~ ate cam
Exstrom, education pro- spread
gram principal at the N~a- It requil
tional Conference of State after Ju
Legislatures. placed (
Minnesota's Q Comp ~salary s
program, for example, al- will be
lows districts and teacher perform
unions to voluntarily opt percent
in to a teacher evaluation based o
and performance pay pro- student
:gram that is collectively ing score
bargained. Fifty school Compre





From Page lA

From. that point, they had 120
days to get.roughly 7,000 registered
voters-representing 25 percent~ of
that population-toi sign petitions
demanding that it be put on the bal-
lot sometime late this year.
When the Sept 15 deadline ar-
-rived, only 6,000 names had been
collected, about 85 percent of what
was needed.
In a press release about the mat-
ter, Lassman was cited as saying the
campaign was well ahead of sched-
ule during the first two months of
the effort but fundraising began to
stumble after that as a'weak econ-
omy took its toll. With less money
to spend, organizers were unable to
mail petitions to all voters; only half
got them through the mail. Of those,
about 4,000 signed the petitions.
Most of the remaining 2,000 were


umits and countless other
orthopedic and neurologi-
cal proce ues.numrs
community organizations,
chairman of the medical
staff, and chief of surgery
when the hospital wvas a
fledgling entity in the area.
Dr. Brunner served on the
University of Tennessee
board of governors for over
35 years' representing the
State of Florida. He served
an almost unprecedented 8
years on the Florida Board
of Medicine, serving as
chairman for half of those
years. He served as presi-
dent of the Marianna Rota-
ry Club and was a Paul
Harris Fellow. He also
served numerous years on
the Board of Directors at
the First Bank of Marianna
then Southtrust.
Dr. Bunmner saw no color
in life or in the practice of
medicine and was the first
doctor in town to abolish
different waiting rooms. He
dearly cared for all of his
patients and always felt
that human suffering wa
fheelworst of~l possil
Pop y dearly loved his'
family and always thought
family should be first. .He
loved to talk about football,
especially Tetmessee foot-
ball. He loved to be outside
in the yard, at the beach
and at the farm. His favor-
ite things were "tinkering'

H s suvved y hs whfe
Diane of 57 years, his son
Richard Brunner, M.D.,
fiance Lisa Sowell, his son
Johh Brunner and wife An-
na Brunner all of Marian-
na. He is also survived by 7
grandchildren.
He will be dearly missed
by many as a true friend,
colleague, peer, and as a

ee tok to tk Pcare o
the patient.
Poppy will be immensely
missed by his family for his
patience, honor, faith, love,
laugh, smile and persis-
tence and determination.
He was the best friend,
dad, grandfather and hus-
band a faiy~could ask for

A time of remembrance
for Dr. Brunner will be held
on Friday, September 16,
2011 from 6:00 P.M. to 8:00
P.M. in the Marianna
Chapel Funeral Home.
In lieu of flowers, the fam-
ily asks that contributions
be made to Covenant H~os-
pice on 4215 Kelson Ave-
nuSuite E, Marianna, FL

Expressions of sympathy
may be made online at
www.mariannachapelfh.com.


Marianna Chapel
Funeral Home
3960 Lafayette Street
Marianna, Florida 32446
Phone 850-526-5059
Fax 850-526-3066

Gerald Roger
Emanuel

Mr. Gerald Roger Ema-
nuel age 69, of Marianna,
passedmbaway4 017 Tusay
home.
Arrangements are incom-
plete and will be. an-
nounced later by Marianna
Chapel Funeral Home.
Marianna Chapel Funer-
al Home is in charge of lo-
cal arrangements.


Marianna Chapel
funeral Home
3960 Lafayet dS 6 ~

Poe 850- 26-5059
Fax 850-526-3066












Dr William


Brunner

Dr. William "Poppy"
Brunner passed away qui-
etly on September' 14, 2011
with his family in attend-
ance at the age of 80.
He is preceded in death
by his parents, four broth-
ers, and his beloved daugh-
teBo~r th son of a butch-
er, on a cold snowy morn-
ing on December 6, 1930,
Dr Brunner was born on a
ironing board in his family
home -in Memphis, Ten-
nessee.
Poppy was raised a Ro-
man Catholic and had all
intentions of becoming a
pnis until he met the love

oor 57 years o Din mD ws-
He attended Christian
Brothers High School,
Christians Brothers Col-
lege, Southwest in Miem-
phis and ultimately ob-
tained his M.D. degree
from the University of Ten-
nessee Health Scienlce
Center in Memphis. He
graduated top of. his class

in .y joined the U.S. Na-
vy in 1956 and began his
residency in general sur-
gery at the Portsmouth
Norfolk Naval Hospital Sys-
tem in virginia. After com-
pleting residency~he was
transferred to the Naval Air
System/Cecil Field Com-
xa.He'tanal tee ri-k o
Lt. Commander and was
then transferred to become
Chief of Surgery at the Na-
val Hospital in Key West,
Florida during the U.S. Cu-
ban Conflict.
Fle met the late Dr. Jabe
Breland from Marianna at
a meeting in Miami who
eovncead im o move to
the first board certified
general surgeon in the area
and practiced as such for
18 years as the sole surgeon
.for a 6 county area. His ex-
pertise included obstetrics,
gynecology, orthopedics
and even neurosurgery.
During his more than 45
years as a general surgeon'
Pmoapy plfo d a s r
dures at the hospital and
countless other procedures
in his office. He was proud-
ly joined by his son in 1989
who practiced with him for
22 years until he fell il.
Poppy's many accom-
plishments included spear
hatin an oh becoming
ing home in Marianna
which is city owned and
still rated as' one of the
number one facilities in the
state. He introduced upper
GI endoscopy and colonos-
copy, surgical stapling
techniques, intensive care


collected face to face by individuals
who volunteered to help. '
"Clearly, if funds were available to
send petitions to all registered vot-
ers, we would have secured the peti-
~tions needed to put this issue on the
ballot," Lassman is quoted as saying
in the release.
The projected campaign bud-
get was $55,000 to carry out all five
phases of the petition solicitation
campaign, which included a phased
direct mail approach and hiring a
professional team to go door-to-
door campaign. Organizers were
only able ~to raise about $35,000,
however.
.Lassman said in the released that
the fundraising hit "an- economic
brick wall" ht the $35,000 mark.
"People and businesses who would
normally have donated $1,000 coild
only commit to $500," he continued.
"Those who woilild~ have routinely
given $500 were giving $100-$300.
We had many real-life up close and
personal discussions abolit how the


economy was limiting the capacity
of people to support a cause they
strongly believe in."
Jackson County is now one of
only five Florida counties where li-
quor by the drink is not available in
restaurants. It had been -one of six
such communities until last month,
when a similar organization in Su-
wannee County gained' enough sig-,
natures to trigger a referendum. In
that community, the vote was 2-to-1
in favor of liquor by the drink. .
Lassman said the Jackson County
campaign, while ultimately disap-
pointing in its final result,. still had
positive elemelnts. H-e pointed out
that' tlis year's campaign was far
more successful than a previous ef-
fort a few years ago.
"Thiscampaignsecured50percent
more petitions than the last effort' in
2004 and proved that our comfnu-
nity can have a civil, constructive
and healthy debate on an issue that
some people consider divisive. We
are proud of our community."


He can be reat-hed at 850-445- .
9818. Kirkland saidWilson another
hog hunters are more than welcome
to be part of the effort to rid north
Florida of the hogs.
Some states have tried wholesale
eradication, and they've had some
success, Kirkland said, and Florida
considers it "opertseason" on hogs,
but every little bit helps.
"These.hogs..can produce up to a
dozen offspring in a single litter, and
they have multiple litters in a year,"
Kirkland said. "You can go froni
having two or three hogs hanging
around to a bountiful supply in just
a short time. People who get rid of
them are performing a valuable ser-
vice, and they just need to be expe-
rienced so they're doing everything
safely."


Kirkland said, for instance, that
hunters whio plan -to butcher and
process the animals should always
wear gloves when performing those
tasks.
"There are a couple of endemic
diseases to'some wild hog popula-
tionis-one is called brucellosis, and
it can be transmitted to humans
who have a cut or open place on
~the skin and don't wear gloves when
they butcher. You don't hear about it
a lot, but it is a danger if you don't -
use a pair of gloves to process.
"This is a needled service, there's
no doubt about that, but the hunter
needs to use caution when they're
out there. We have had instances of
the hogs charging the hunter when
they're feeling trapped,- so they need
to know what they're doing."


having a discussion with hi about
something. He was very knowledge-
able about most anything, and he
enjoyed discussion about every-
thing from social issues to detailed
medical topics.,,
As dedicated as he was to medi
cine, Brunner was yet a well-round-
ed man who enjoyed other pursuits
as well.
For instance, as a graduate of the
University of Tennessee medical
school, he remained an avid Ten-
nessee Volunteers football fan all
his life.
He enjoyed tinkering with the
multitude of tools in his farm shed
and was an enthusiastic gardener.
His family was of foremost import-
tancee in his life; his oldest grand-
daughter nicknamed him "Poppy"
when she was a child and the moni-
ker stuck. Many friends called him
that, or Bil. His easygoing person-
ality was such that the people who


"Jie rygg a mentor andig n
to mangr andii li'verlan
honomhkl h'fe. Losing him is a

Dr. RichanI Christopher,
Friend of Dr. Brunner
knew him well rarely referred to him
by the more formal "William."
Brunner never forgot his humble
beginnings; he was born on an iron-
ing boaid in his family home in
Memphis, Tenn., and was known as
a man sensitive to human suffering
in both his personal and profes-
sional life.
Christopher said Brunner will be
deeply missed.
"I don't think I can say enough
good things about this man," Chris-
topher said. "He was a mentor and
friend to many and he lived an hon-
orable life. Losing him is a loss for us
all."


I'ROM 'HIE FROM


T ace
From Page lA
Williams, a middle school
teacher included in the
lawsuit. "The expertise
and knowledge of teach-
ers have been ignored
throughout this pro-
cess and our constitu-
tional rights have been
trampled."
The FEA and the Sara-
sota Classified/Teachers
Association filed the law-
suit Wednesday in Circuit
Court in Tallahassee on
behalf of teachers state-
wide. Florida's law is one
of several passed this past
year that weaken or elimi-
nate tenure and create
new ways for evaluating
teachers, most of which
deem a teacher "effective"
based on how well. stu-


From Page lA

destroyed on site unless they have a
relocation permit." .'
Although people can make money
providing this service, Wilson said
he doesn't charge and has no in~ten-
tion of doing so. He said he does it
for sport. Sometimes he processes
the meat and gives it to poor or
struggling families to eat. He said
most often, he uses dogs to run and
corner them, then shoots them.
A native of nearby Chattahoochee,
Wilson now lives in Tallahassee but
travels often to Jackson and other
nearby counties to track, shoot and
kill hogs during the daylight hours.


B mxer
From Page 1A

Brunner's medical career had
many other points of distinction.
When he moved here in 1965, he
was the first board-certified general
surgeon in the area and for 18 years
remained the sole surgeon for a six-
county area.
He was also a man who put action
behind his sense of right and wrong.
For instance, he was the first physi-
cian in town to do away with sepa-
rate waiting rooms based on race
and was known as a person who
"knew no color" in his dealings with
others,
"Bill Brunner is a super fine man
that this community was lucky to
have," Christopher said. "He was
very gregarious, and you'd rarely
make rounds at the hospital without





_ ,- -


.Oieens9f1901,ffrppietnereieniaHahSpeinTomtcia tiononvhelste- in-Soer trntetlraet45udetnBbnedeurea2mnttreremn~fewhcteaervrsahehncrrnsadrdaaadubciinntnuvik niie


\CKSO)N COUNTY FLORIDAN + www.jcfloridan.corn


18A a THURSDAY. SEPTEMBER 15. 2011


which begins in New~ York
on Tuesday. Although the
vote would not change the
situation on the ground,
the Palestinians believe
U.N. recognition of a state
along the 1967 lines would
give them leverage in fu-
ture negotiations.
Netanyahuwants to keep
parts of the Wilest Bank un-
der anyr final peace deal
and sayrs that Israel will
never relinquish control
of east Jerusalem, home to
sensitive Jewish. Christian
and Muslim holy sites. Is-
rael withdrew from Gaza
in 2005. Israeli-Palestinian
talks stalled nearly three
years ago, reviving only
briefly last September
before foundering again
over Israeli settlement
construction.
Palestinian activists an-
nounced Wednesday that
they are planning two
major demonstrations
next week in connection
with the U.N. bid: The
first will be on Wednes-
day, and the second will
come two days later on
Sept. 23, when Abbas is
scheduled to address the
General Assembly.
The Palestinians say
they are determined to
keep the rallies peaceful.
"We want to tell world
leaders that the Palestin-
ian people seek freedom
and independence and
need your support," said
Amin Maqboul, a senior
official with Abbas' Fatah
Party.
He said the rallies will
take .place inside West
Bank towns and cities,
and avoid Israeli military
checkpoints and any other
flashpoints like entrances
to Israeli settlements. Po-
lice will ring the demon-
stratipns, to prevent any
clashes with the Israelis,
Maqboul said.
Israeli security officials
are concerned that isolat-
ed incidents could touch
off more widespread un-
rest. Soldiers and police
have been trailing for
rnonths in preparation for
possible violence.
Israeli leaders have also
'hinted of retaliation, in-
cluding financial sanc-
tions or the possible an-
nexation of parts or all of
the West Bank.
In addition to the U.S.
efforts, the European
Union's foreign policy


Tne ssociatec 2ress

JE RUSU.LE MI A\ high-
level U.S. team kicked off
a new round of shuttle di-
plomacy on Wlednesday in
a last-ditch effort to con-
tain the diplomatic fallout
from the Palestinian state-
hood push, but the odds of
a breakthrough appeared
slim as the Palestinians
pledged to go ahead with
mass rallies to draw world
attention to their bid.
U.S. diplomats Dennis
Ross and David Hale ar-
riVed late Wednesday for
talks with Prime Minister
Benjamin Netanyahu and
other Israeli leaders. They
were to travel to the West
Bank on Thursday to talk
with Palestinian President
Mahmoud Abbas.
Washington is trying to
persuade the Palestin-
ians to drop their plan to
ask the United Nations to
recognize an independent
~Palestinian -state, but so
far without success.
The Palestinians are
turning to the U.N. af-
ter peace talks with Is-
rael broke down, hoping a
U.N. bid would boost their
statehood drive. Both Is-
rael and the. U.S. oppose
the campaign, saying
there is no substitute for
negotiations.
An Israeli official said
there was "a very inten-
sive effort" under way in
hopes of finding a formula
that would allow negotia-
tions to resume. "We hope
we succeed. It's not a fore-
gone conclusion," said
the official, speaking on
condition of anonymity
because he was discuss-
ing a sensitive diplomatic
matter,
There was no immedi-
ate Palestinian comment.
Officials have said they
remain determined to go
to the U.N. unless Israel
accepts their demand for
a freeze on. West Bank
settlement construction
and commits ~to a Pales-
tinian state based on the

the West Bank, east Jeru-
jalem and Gaza --- areas ~
captured in the 1967 Mid-
east war.
With the odds of abreak-
through appearing slim,
the Palestinians plan to
sublnit resolution to the
United Nations during the
annual General Assembly,


---~


Tailor Abu Khatab sews Palestinian flags as part of the
campaign promoting the Palestinians' bid for statehood, at
his workshop in the West Bank city of Nablus on Tuesday.


ton has been in touch with
both Ashton and Blair.
While Israel has tried
to play down the signifi-
cance, a setback in -the
U.N. will add to a growing
sense of isolation.


chief, Catherine Ashton,
and special international
Mideast envoy Tony Blair
have been meeting with
the sides this week. U.S.
officials said Secretary of
State Hillary Rodham Clin-


resents .the U.S. interests
and as soon as the bail is
prepared, we will deposit
and God willing, they will
be released," he said.
In Washington, State
Department spokesman
Mark Toner said the U.S.
was trying to glean more
information on the status
of the Americans through
Swiss diplomat channels.
"We're encouraged by
what we've heard out of
Tehran," Toner told re-
porters. "We're hopeful
that we'll see a positive
outcome."
Earlier Wednesday, Iran's
powerful judiciary clouded
the case by saying it was
Still reviewing the bail pro-
visions. It was a potentially
embarrassing rejection
of President Mahmoud
Ahmadinejad's prediction
that their release could be
in a matter of days. .
The statement by the
hard-line judiciary ap-
peared to be message that
only its officials can set the
timetables and conditions
on any possible release
and not the president, who
is locked in a bitter power
struggle with Iran's ruling
clerics who control the
courts.
It also could be a swipe
at Ahmadinejad's hopes
of timing the release the
Shane Bauer and Josh Fat-
tal with his expected ar-
rival in NewYork next week
when he attends the U.N.
general assembly. ,


The Associated Press

TEH-RAN, Iran--The Gulf
state of Oman dispatched
a private plane to Tehran
Wednesday amid efforts
for a bail-for-freedom deal
for two Americans jailed
for spying in a possible
replay of the diplomatic
exchange that brought a
third member of the group
froni Iran last year.
The Omani official gave
no further details on any
possible timetable for the
release of Shane Bauer and
Josh Fattal, who' were de-
tained along the Iran-Iraq
border in July 2009 along
with friend Sarah Shourd.
The Omani official spoke
on condition of anonymity
because of the sensitivities
of negotiations.
But the Omani inter-
vention suggested niove-
ment on the complicated
judicial and diplomatic
dealings over the total $1
million bail -which was
thrown into doubt earlier
Wednesday when Iran's ju-
diciary said the deal still
needed review. .
A plane send by Om~an's
sultan brought Shourd
from Iran last September
after payment of $500,000
bail. Oman has close ties
with both Tehran .and
Washington and plays a
strategic role in the region
by sharing control with
Iran of the Strait of Hor-
mouz at the mouth of the
Gulf, which is the route for
40 percent of the world's
oil tanker traffic.
The Americans' defense
attorney, Masoud Shafici,
told The Associated Press
he is moving ahead with
the bail arrangements with
Swiss Embassy officials,
who represent U.S. inter-
ests in Iran because there
are no diplomatic relations
between the two coun-
tries. There were no details
given on the source of the

"'I have informed both
the hikers' families and the
Swiss embassy, which rep-


International
Elr*e
LIBYA
Red Cross: At least l3
mass graves found
GENEVA The Interna-
tional Committee of the
Red Cross says at least 13
mass graves have been
found in Libya over the
past three weekS.
The Geneva-based Red
Cross says its staff assisted
in the recovery of 125 bod-
ies found at 12 different
sites in and around Tripoli.
It says remains of 34
people were also recov-
ered from a site in the
Nafusa mountain village of
Galaa in western Libya.
ICRC spokesman Steven
Anderson said Wednesday
that more mass graves are
being found every week.
The aid group says it
is helping ensure the
remains are properly
recovered so that the iden-
tities of the dead can be
etblished and relatives

It said it is not involved
in collecting evidence
that could be used in
war crimes or other le al
proceedings o*
. From wire reports


tak~r


11 4 ft


I .! if 1~


a mnonthi wnhe!
you bundle'


1 year. '1 price.


With CenturyLink, you get high speeds for a low price.
* Private, direct connection that's 100% yours, 100% of the time
* Consistently fast all day, every day
* The price you sign up for is the price you pay


(.ani 855.GET.TRUE

Ici u,.- centurylink.com/save
Come inr For locations, visit century ink.com/stores
Para oir ofertas en espariol marque al 855.438.8783


ca. ..1I anlJ; Il .. .. r .,,... :y .Iil l ... ,an.. ... .. ..~l Ii iLy i~ l mIiii ., ,, ,. .... ,,, .- .. -, k..r I.;;
1 r ?.r


,,i' ,,l,.nllS I
.:'l ~ if -carr..rie a rez m~:7-eiivn~~orre u~risi excs ave


Ir .~i- ic--ari .le Ib


vionthiy recurinng charges apply to one (11 residential phone I ne withl direct 0.al rat car.vsc' de ac and 0 came rr ceca iz;g. cllr3 Atca:5 P
at 50 1/mlnute) cofei renc e nedirnetryad operaor sssance thtoe.Crwac cadri .Le R a has ng son" I^iiar.ra; cab


INTERNATIONAL


Diplomatic flurry ahead of Palestinian UN bid


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE PHOTO
in this Feb. 6 photo, U.S. hikers Shane Bauer (left) and Josh
Fattal attend their trial in Iran.


Oman plane to Iran


anid bail efforts for


American hiers


n~-~r*


TRUE SPEED



CenturyLink"" High-Speed Internet


r s1
,


> < Century Link





































__1__1_1__________1__~


GIraCelB IbtaB



JV Tigers look tO


styho *n it


"I didn't hinowe wehat to
expect. I wanted them to
compete regardless ofthe
situation, butlhad no idea
to whdat exen they w ~ul
perform, but they exceeded
it."



of the situation, but I had no
idea to what extent they would
perform, but they exceeded it."
Cottondale got on the board
first after stopping the Tigers on
downs in Hornet territory, and
getting a 65-yard touchdown run
by Tim Lockhart.
Chris Hall scored the two-
point play to make it 8-0, and Ja-
vontai Hall iater added a 20-yard
touchdown, followed by a two-
point conversion by Da'Mychael
Faulk, to put the Hornets ahead
16-_0 in the first period.
Javontai H-all scored again on
a 30-yard rushing TD late in the
first half, and Chris Hall added
a rushing touchdown in the


1-
c r:
~ .
1~ -
~ - I--~-:li';-' 'T '~;;
'~'' ~."~~BiL~!-
;-.li~-i~~i~ :X~i~iS cn: ~r r:.m.~~


i .. -` .~.i
:- ;.~
r
i-t-*
'Ekr- 3u
I9 ~i


i'
II


pitched a i riond-h i- -..li shutout to
seal the w\in.
"I was hlapp-,' to wiin, but I feel
like we've still got a lot of wprk to
do," Marianna coach Ray Lawrson
said. "W12e still had a lot of stupid
penalties, and we didn't move
the ball like I felt we should. WNe
had a lot of missed assignments.
But the defense played well, es-
pecially in the second half."
Lawson said he didn't like his
team's body language and reac-
tion to adversity in the loss to

See MIHS, Page 2B


BY DUSTIN KENT
dikent~-cfloidan.com

The Marianna Bulldogs junior
varsity bounced back from their
first loss in two seasons Tues-
day night with a 24-14 win over
the Walton Braves at Bulldog
Stadium. -
Marianna, which went a per-
fect 5-0 in 2010,10ost its first game
of the season on Sept. 8 in a 38-0
shutout defeat to Florida High.
But the Bulldogs regained their
winning form Tuesday, getting
touchdown runs by Shaquari-


ous Baker, JQ Dougles, and Teon
Long to earn the win.
Baker's 45-yard TD run got the
Bulldogs on the board late in the
first quarter, but the Braves an-
swered back with a score to tie
it up at 6-6. Touchdown runs by
JQ Dougles and Jesse Dougles
staked Marianna to an 18-6 edge,
but Walton came back with a
touchdown and two-point con-
version to trim the margin to
four at the half.
But Long broke off a 65-yard
touchdown run late in the third
quarter, and the Bulldog defense


MARKSKINNIER/FLORIDAN
Miarianna's JQ Dougles looks for air during a JV game against the Braves
Tuesday night.


The Lady Pirates' Jenna Sneads spikes the ball during a game
against Cottondale Tuesday.



Lady Pirates win


easily over CHS


Ashley Rogers had four ace
serves, Aaron had eight, and
Jackson added a block-kill.
Logan Neel was second on
the team in kills with four.
SSneads was coming off of
a four-set win over Blount-
stown on Monday, the first
time the Lady Pirates have
dropped a set since their
season-opening loss to Flor-
ida High.
But SHS coach Sheila
Roberts said she was hap-
pier with her team's effort
on Tuesday.
"We actually played pretty
good," she said. "We had
a -couple of players that
had bad nights against

See SHS, Page 3B


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Sneads ~Lady Pi-
rates made it six wins in a
row Tuesday night with a
straight-set 'victory over the
Cottondale Lady Hornets in
Cottondale.
Sneads (6-1) took the
match win by scores of 25-4,
25-16, and.25-11. *
Jordan Jackson led the
Lady Pirates with 1 1 kills and
10 ace serves, while Becca
Aaron had a team-best 22
assists, and Emily Jones had
the team lead for digs (12)
and serve receives (12).
Jackson and Aaron also
had four digs each, while
.Brandy Strickland had five.


Graceville IViddle School's Preston Nichols tries to get off a pass while under pressure from Cottondale defenders
Tuesday.

Hornets prove too much for Graceville squad


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@j cflo ridan.com

Cottondale Middle School
coach Phillip Jones said he wasn't
sure what to expect going into
his team's delayed season open-
er Tuesday night in Graceville.
But after a dominant pe~rfor-
mance on the road, the first-year
Hornets coach should perhaps
expect big things the rest of the
year.
After a cancellation delayed.
the start of its regular season by
a week, Cottondale hit the road
to face its county rivals and took
a convincing 28-0 victory.
Javontai Hall scored a pair of
touchdowns to lead the Hornets,
who overwhelmed a Graceville
team that had won its two previi-
ous games a jamboree win over
Freeport, and a regular season
victory over Vernon.
But the Hlornets proved too
much in dominating the game
from the opening kick.
"I didn't know what to expect,"
Jones said. "I wanted them to
compete really hard regardless


second half to round out the
scoring.
Jones credited his team's tough-
ness at the line of scrimmage for
the win.
"We went over there and physi-
cally won a football game. We
were more physical than they
were," he said. "We tried to throw
the football once and screwed it
up, but we really didn't have to
(throw the ball). We ran it right
at them. Our guys came out and
did their job."
Graceville coach Phillip Haynes
said his team wasn't prepared
for the H~ornets' physicality up
front.
"We were really surprised by
their size. They were a really big
team," he said. "We were disap-
pointed by our performance, but
hats off to (Jones). He did a good
job with that team.'
The Tigers were hurt by an ear-
ly injury to starting running back
LaDarius Nix, who left the game
on the first drive.
But Heynes said that didn't

See HORNETS, Page 3BL


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Graceville Tigers ju-
nior varsity football team
will look to stay hot tonight
when they travel to Bristol
for the first of two consecu-
tive games against the Lib-
erty County Bulldogs.
Because of Chipley cancel-
ing its JV season, the sched-
ules had to be rearranged,
and Graceville replaced
its scheduled home game
against Chipley this week
with a road contest with Lib-
erty, who the Tigers will host
Sept. 22.
Graceville coach Todd
Wertenberger said he doesn't
know much of anything
about the Bulldogs, other
than the fact that they'll run
the exact same offense and
defense that the Liberty var-


sity squad does.
"I don't know a thing about
them. We just worry about
doing our stuff right," he
said.
The Tigers have been do-
ing most everything right
so far this season, taking
two wins over Freeport and
SouthWalton in asplit-game
on Sept. 1, and then explod-
ing against Sneads for a 41-0
win last week.
"Yeah, they're doing
good," Wertenberger said
of his JV players. "The main
thing with them is how hard
they're working. Now, what
they've got to do is learn to
be consistent with it, and
get better and better each
day. We love winning, but we
also want to keep improving
and getting better." .

See TIGERS Page 2B


Bu~ dFogsotbaBl



Marianna JV back on track


Vlole~ybaHl


lIDTDI.E: SCHOOL FOOTBHIJ..






Lopsided victory





















































braed or more

rehai it -o


COttOrlidale VTolleybd


:Bonifay deals Ladty Hornets tough loss .


,is weas a hab~eeart ~We staitdevey set
strong, but just couldn't~fnish."
Cassie Ridley,
Cottondale coach

Our passing and attacking Brittany Shores was
has improved 'so much, next with 10 digs, Mosier
but unforced errors are and Kourtnie Richardson
eventually wNhat kill us. added nine digs each, and
As the girls mature in the Mcfinney contributed
sport, they will know ex- .seven, and Kylee Crose
actly what to do in what five. .
situation:" The Cottondale IV took
Cheyenne Franklin led a matd victory over Hol-
Cottohdale with eight mes Countywithatwo-set
kills, while Connor Melvin win by scores of25-18 and
added six, and Sue Ellen' 25-19. ,
Mosier ftour.- K~ayla Lathan and Ken-
Cameron McKinneyr and drice Gardner had three
Mosier each led the way- kills' apiece for the Lady
with eight service points, Hornets, while Brooke
while Haley Boggs had a ~Shores, had 11 service
team-best 11 digs. points, Wendy Singletoh


--


\ ~ LOOKING FOR MORE NEWS? VISIT

WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM



~U~se '"ASSOCIATE
S TORE
Serving Jackson County Since 1964
USERS ELITE


John W. Kurpa, D.C.
D.A.B.C.N., FA.C.E.N
.Board Certified and Fellowship Trained*
Effectively managing pain and reducing patient
risk of major organ damage, disfigurement and
death from drugs and surgery for 31 years

THERE IS AN ALTERNATIVE
TO YOUR
NECK AND BACK PAIN I

*Treating Nerve Damage Second Opinions
*Auto Accidents w/Disability Ratings
*Physical Therapy School/DOT Physicals $45.00
*An Automobile Accidenzt & Injury C~linic

'The highest level of recognition by the Board of Chiropractic Medicine
concerning competency and experience. Requires years of additional training.


4261 Lafayette St 482-3696


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


SPORTS


?2B *THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15. 2011


continue to have positive
attitudes mn practice."
Tolar jumped out to a
22-0 lead in the first half
before Donvontae Pollock
scored on a60-yard touch-
down run to give Grand
Ridge its first points of the
night.
But the Bulldogs scored
on an 8-yard TD.run with
two seconds left in the
first half and added atwo-
point conversion to make
it 30-6 at the break.
The Indians added apair
of scores in the second
half on a 6-yard TD run by
Jakob Farmer, =and a 10-
yard fumble return touch-
down by Rhett Wright.
Grand Ridge will next
travel to Blountstown on
Tuesday to take on the
Tigers at 6 p.m., before re-
turning home on Sept. 27
againstVernon.


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Grand Ridge Indi-
ans fell to 0-2 on the sea-
son with a 36-18 loss to
Tolar on Tuesday night in
Bristol.
The Indians lost their
opener at home to Boni-
.fay 30-14 on Sept. 8, and
fell to 0-2 on Tuesday for
the second consecutive
Season.
In 2010, Grand Ridge
bounced back to win four
straight games and earn a
trip to the postseason.
Whether the Indians can
repeat that feat this year
remains to be seen.
"This year is like ddjh vu
for us," Grand Ridge coach
Ken Gtanger said. "We're
looking to turn the season
around this year just like
last year. We still' have to


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Marianna Middle School defenders surround an Eagles runner and knock the ball loose during
last week's game.


(Sept. 6), and we've really
been game planning for St.
Joe ever since," the coach
said. "Our offense and de-
fense have been looking
good, and it was very im-
portant for us to have the
time off to practice. We're
starting to sharpen up ev-
-erything, we've expanded
the playbook a little' bit
with some different for-
mations they haven't seen,
and we'll pull them out if
we need to.
"I thinkwe're ready. We're
looking forward to the
challenge,. and we're ready
to play. If we win the turn-
over battle, I have a feeling
we'll be okay in the game.
We. cannot afford to give
St. Joe's offense any short
fields. We have to make
them work for everything
they; get."


of NV and middle school.
When the Bullpups and
Sharks met last season,
it was the Sharks com-
ing away with a 44-42 win
thanks largely to a domi-
nant performance by run-
ning back Jarkiece Davis.
But the Bullpups need
not worry about Davis
this year, as the 5 foot, 9
inch freshman is now star-
ring for the St. Joe varsity
where he is averaging 10
yards per carry with two
touchdowns through two
games. ~
However, the Sharks stil
promise to have plenty of
speed and explosiveness
as usual, and Nolen said
he was happy to have two
extra days of preparation
in 'advance of tonight's
game.
"We haven't played since


20 and Wewahitchka on
Sept. 29.
Nolen said he believes his
teaml can match up physi-
cally, but it's the disparity
in age and experience that
concerns him most.
"We're kind of big, so I'm
not worried about the size
aspect of it," he said "It's
more the mental capacity
of it, going against a ninth
grader who has had more
time to go through and
learn things on the field.
Maybe .the speed of the
game will be' a challenge
as well. *
"All in all, we'll handle
it well. We won'~t shy sway
froni any challenge. We're
looking forward to it."
The Sharks had acohven-
tional middle school team
last year, but scrapped that
in favor of a combination


"I've .'realized that
it's pretty unique to go
through tw~o of them in
two years," ~Kampman
said. "I'm trying to put
that~ ill perspective and



tendency wants to do. I'm
kind of rolling with it ~and
trying to help the team the
best I can by not being on
the field."
Without Kampmnan, the
Jaguars got off to a decent
start in Sunday's opener
against Tennessee. They
sacked Matt Hasselbeck
twice in the first half and
kept steady pressure on
him.
Coach Jack Del Rio be-
lieves his defense is better
prepared to play without
Kampman than it was a
year ago.
The Jaguars parted ways
with 2008 first-round draft
pick Derrick Harvey ~and
signed free agent Matt
Roth to a one-year deal
worth $3 million. Roth
recorded a sack on the
game's first play. They also
have high-motor ends
Jeremy Mincey and John
Chick.
Mincey led the team
with five sacks last season,
and Chick is a former de-
fensive player of the year
in the Canadian Football
League.
"A lot more experience, a
lot more bodies," Mincey
said. "You can't go wrong
with that."
He played 18 snaps
against the Titans, most-
ly on obvious passing
Downs, and finished with
one tackle.
"He did a nice job," Del
Rio said. "He got here and
picked things up quick.
John was able to .carve
out a little role for himself
and he had some effective
plays."


The Associated Press

JACKSONVILLE, Fla.
- Aaron Kampman is fol-
'lowinig protocol. He's skip- -
ping practice, working ex-


It's not what he wants to
do. --
It's what he has to do.
The Jacksonville Jaguars
are beifug extra cautious
with their top pass-rusher,
giving his knee more time
to heal before putting the
former Pro Bowler back
on the field. He's not going
to play Sunday at the New
York Jets and isn't sure he
will be back on the field
this month.
"Everyone wants a time-
line;: I want a timeline,"
K~ampman said Wednes-
day. "But it's.not like you
can give me X number of
days and OK, here we go. I
have an irritated knee, I've
Shad an irritated knee and
we're trying, a different
Method now."
The new course calls for
more rest, more rehabili-
tation and niore time on
the sideline.
It's certainly not ideal
for the Jaguars (1-0); who
have high hopes for their
revamped defense. Jack-
sonville ranked 30th in the
league last season with 26
sacks. .
Kampman's return was
supposed to bolster the
line. He missed the final
eight games last year after
tearing the anterior cruci-
ate ligament in his right
knee. He had surgery in
November and spent the
offseason trying to get
back< to full speed. He ex-
pected the recovery to be
similar to his left knee,
which he injured in No-
vember 2009.
But that hasn't been the
case.


seven service points, and
Kelsie Coi-bin five service
points.
"They played an excel-
-lent ~game," Ridley. said
of her iTV. "They are really
beginning to bl~nd again
just like they were before
I moved some of the start-
ers ~up (to varsity). They
ran their offense and were
right: where they needed '
to be on defense,
"They are, very young
just like thie varsity, so I
only have great things .
to see from them in the
future."
In action Thursday
against Wewahitchka, the
CHS varsity lost in three-
sets by scores of 25-13, 25-
14, and 25-17, while the JV
lost in three sets by scores
of8-25, 25-20, and 10-15.


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Cottoridale Lady
Hornets suffered a dis-
appointing defeat at the
hands of Holmes' County
on Monday night in Boni-
fay, losing in five sets, in-
cluding 17-15 in the fiftly
and final set.
The Lady Hornets won
the first set 25-20 be-
fore falling 25-18 in the
second. -
CHS rebounded to take
the third 25-18, but Hol-
.mes County forced a fifth ~
set with a 25-21 win iri the
fourth.
"This was a heartbreak-
-er," Cottondale coach
Cassie Ridley said. "We
started every set .strong,
but just couldn't *finish.


it is. that football is a team
game and the kids have to
be unselfish to win, and
we've got three kids there
who are very unselfish,"
the coach said. "They know
one of them is going to have
a big game, and sometimes
all three will. They under-
stand that and feed off of
each other.
"When the fullback is
doing good, it opens it up
for the quarterback and
the running back, and yice
versa. When you're running
the option, you have to
have a fullback, a tailback,
and a quarterback who the
defense has to respect, and
we have that."


good happened for one
team and everything bad
for the other. If we played
them again, I don't know if
the game goes like that."
However,. that perfor-
mance coupled with the
previous week's effort, as
well as a 15-0 first quarter
victory over Holmes Coun-
ty's JV in a varsity jambo-
ree on Aug. 26, has given
the GHS JV a big boost of
confidence.
"We definitely expect to
win, and there's nothing
wrong with that," Werten-
berger said. "But in order
to have that feeling and
that coilfidence to expect
to win, yoti better keep do-


ing what you're supposed
to do in practice. Games
are won Monday through
Wednesday doing the right
things. If you don't do that,
you won't have a chance on
Thursday night."
`The Graceville offensive
attack has been led by the
three-headed monster -of
'quarterback Jared Padgett,
fullback Jarrett Brogdon,.
and tailback Eddie Myrick,
which has given opponents
fits in the Tigers' option at-
tack. Wertenberger said it's
not just the trio's physical
abilities that have made
them successful, but also
their team approach.
"The thing I like about


we did agoodjob this week
of moving on and getting
over it," he said. "We still
have some work to do, but
we were better than we
were last week. I think this
was a step forward."
Marianna will next take
on North Florida Christian
in Tallahassee on Sept. 22.

Follow us on
Twitter


Follow us on
Face book


twitter.com/
jcfloridannews


SJackson Countyr
SFloridan


IVliddle School. ]Footbal


Bullpups


ready for






BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Marianna Middle
School Bullpups will look
to niove to 3-0 on the sea-
son tonight when they
play host to the Port St. Joe
Sharks at 6 p.m.
It. could prove to be the
.Bullpups' biggest chal-
lenge of the season thus
far, as the Sharks bring in
a "Junior High" team that
is comprised of not just
seventh and eighth grad-
ers but also over 10 ninth-
graders and even a pair of
sophomores.
MMS coach Hunter No-
len said his team is looking
forward to the challenge.
"We're going to go out
and give them our best.
The guys are really excited
about stepping up and
playing a JV team, and we
are as coaches also," he
said.
"We're about to play
three of them in a row, and
I don't know how many
middle school teams have
done that." .
The Bullpups will also
face simiilar squads in
Franl~lin County on Sept.


Indians fall to 0 -2


with loss to Tolar


T* lers
From Page 1B

The coach said .he be-
lieved his team ivould have
a chance to have a very
good year going in, but that
too much shouldn't be read
into the lopsided margin
against Sneads.
"We knew we had a good
group of kids coming in.
They were good in middle
school, and we expected
them to play well for the
TN" Wertenberger said.
"With the Sneads game,
that was just one of those
things where everything


MHS
From PagelB

Liberty County, but he
felt like his players got the
message Tuesday.
"(Against Liberty), they
would score and we'd I ind
of get our heads down, but

































































S SH their program, and I have a were dominant the whole rest of the week before re-
more experienced team. time. The girls were aggres- turning to action Monday
"B~ut it's easy for more ex-' sive with their serving and at home.against Marianna.
rom experienced players to some- playing, and I appreciated Cottondale will be back
Blountstown that kind of times not give their best that. I was pleased with in action tonight at home
picked it up (against CHS). against an inexperienced their performance." against Altha at 4 p.m., 5
Cottondale is trying to build team, but I thought we Sneads will be off for the` p.m., and 6 p.m.


New Grand IA0 Series
Kubota prairdly introduces eight new Grand L40 models ranging from
34 to 59 HP each with increased power oritput and PIO torque.
Innovative features like our new HST Plus hydrostaitic transmission,
THydro Dual Speed (H-DS), Load Sepsing system, Auto Throttle
Advance and Response Control make operating a tractor as easy as
driving a car.
When you have a tractor like this, life is better than good. Life is Grand.

1(9by>~q., Panhandle Iractor, Inc.
""""',u, m 5003 Hwv.090 Marianna, FI.32446
@Kubota~lrditmor800ation. 2007 (850) 526-2257


6:00 6:30 7:00 17:30 18:001 8:30 9:00 19:30 10:000:301:001:302:02:3 1:00 11:30 12:00 12:30 13:00 3:30 14:00 4:30 15:00 15:30
2 h Early Show (N) (In Stereo) E rfah Mlloar e' Make a Deal (N) TePrice Is Right (N) Nes Yon Restless Bod TeTalk (In Stereo) NtBrksTeDr. 02 Show (N) Nes ew Nws Nw
3 WV News 4 TeEarly Show (N) (In Stereo) aDLv Regis & Kelly ePrice Is Right (N) Yon Restless Lieat Bod TeTalk (In Stereo) etsMake aDeal (N) RhalRay (N) SD Ele DeGeneres Nws es
5 Nesh e7 TdyToday Kari Underly; Gavin DeGraw; Kris Allen:(N) (In Stereo)1 Day of our Lives (N) Nes7at Noon. ahe Ray (N) B 3 loar epry h Doctors a le DeGeneres Nes NCNews
( Nw 13 This Morning GodMorning America (N) li Lv Regis & Kelly TeVlew (In Stereo) W MBMidday News AlMy Chl~dren a On Life to Live a GnrlHospital (N) DrPhil (N) (In Stereo) .heDr.Oz Show (N) Nes ACNews
10 @ utoTeh PldPro. co o. Chis Funlet HmeVidosJusic JugeB. ot Beku Aneron InSteeo Pad rog P rd ro. Aerca meica Juge atis Te Pope'sCort dyJud Jg JdyRigtuisynue

7SHOW P'loFl' ir~,Sfe 7 e s 1131* I.M, 0004~i,w~ + 1 1s r198 P.1;1 *Raes** 1108 PG.13 "Fara~l erqts(2009)' RM "Ackans apa200) F Sonu 39"(2000) RoRrrl GarlB, iTV. R'e SwIIB th'* 1 210)


17HB0 s s ;J;1:.rancei *0onl *Filell ht'01 AET. unsl Lammilg"12:1]111 an "Fu*raurae + o 1200) CunrringEdge GaRlg frbls Gokld"NR' Isuu"** (2000)Morgan Freeman RigLife 247 epYeaf(2010)
18ESPN2 5:0 Mike and Mike In the Morning (N) (Live) In SP Fltst Take (N) (In Stereo Live) E SP First Take (In Stereo) B hse NSA Now (Live) NubrsL Batard J~i ome Sprsain(N) an N 32 (N) (Live)

20 SS ayhm n te AM. N)(Lie) porsNte alkn'SECFoobal Mkeoer oodho Coleg Fotbll:Morhose t Hwar. ambrt Duha (N Bet W Hwks GSU Gae Fotbll uricae .Spotsite(it E
2DISN~ 'ure ICr~44gging uay !Plrates ,MICYCI uncue, pue ulh house |Jnl nne Aetso Jungl Piae Fnpuief (200') Dek Wzrs Wzrs Pina ih Sael Gc
22MAX -4i ~1- Gu nc m~. nr t,m 1 Ilfri.,c.lnse, ce. o * (lp9961 WIIIRln sm i;t P 13 *C Flesrar Reen (2009) PG-13 a *NahnlScurly (2003) Ween le" (a (010l Mell pamon. antHrdrely wa a (1898~) 'e(2009) R'
23 TT Anel Insie Ot" Carme ( Steeo) Chared a Spernturl i Supea ual rLasVega (InSteeo) as egas(In t ro) Cld ase Rrefees Caslern Streo) Casle (n Sereo Ciste (I Streo) Caste (n Streo
24 [lSC Pa r Pro. J RoisonJ. eye Sey Cos &Coytes Cos &Coyoes Cos &Coyoes Boer Bildsffm Amricn Coppr Amricn Coppe .AmeicanChoper AmeicanChoper Sonsof unsan Sns f Gns
25TWC Your Weather Today With Abrams anil Bettes E ak Up With Al DyPlanner G tr Som Fl Force FulForce
26USA awOrder: CI Law Order: SVU Law Order: SVU La Order: SVU Law Order: SVU La Order: SVU Law Order: SVU Law Order: SVU aw Order: SVil NI (In Stereo)11 a N C (In Stereo) a NCS BikinI Wax"

29LIE alncngDeigin Rba Rea illtac Wlllac WIIGrceWillrae hrs Cri Hw MtHo IMe Dsp-Wve Geys naom a Prjet una W Prjet unaya roec Rnwy PojctRuwa
30A&E Dg Dg Dg Do CS;MIami (In Stereo) TeSopranos a rmla Minds in Th First46 E Th First48 m Do o S:Miami (In Stereo) TeSopranos aD Ciia Minds a heFirst48
32SYFY Pal rog.Rchs C o Chronicles ConrChronicles Conohronicles onrChronicles ConrChronicles CrnrChronicles ConrChronicles CnrChronicles PaaomlWitness SteeSG1 m t Trek: Next
33 AMC Pai Pog IPjld Progk Fae IPjla Plrog IStoogi 7ne Lange st + a a ** (1924) Bun Rleynolds R "n Ghrnound~rlggayI9)A olwral coach copes MINcrie ont an f h il Rcy9* (1990) Syvewster Stallone. PG-13' lRcy V(1985)

35 BET nprlon PaidPrg Chi hi ene Bri ene Bme Pres Pres JmeF JmeF "mrc Gangsare* c4 (2007, Crime Dramnal DenzelI Washinglan Crs Cis arrs Pres 068 Park. Top 10



43CNN2 5:0 Momning Express With Robin Meade HNNews HNSpecial Report PmeNews as
45CNN (:0 American Momning (N) E CN Newsroom (N) CNNewsroom (N) CNNewsroom (N) *NNNewsroom (N) TeSituation Room With Wolf Blltzer (N)
46CW (50)The Dally Buzz Sev Wllkos Show Bwn Brns Pne aye TA Cp A BA SveWllkos Show Th Tra Show a Lrcl yrs 0sShow 7sShow THDeadi in
47SPIKE Poi HarFree Ls0L Take it CS;NY "Cool Hunter" C~:Crime Scene CS:Crime Scene CS:Crime Scene CS:Crime Scene CS:Crime Scene UF Unleashed UCUnleashed UCUnleashed UFCUnleashed

98TLC 1 Kids 1 Kids Bb ay Bb ays Penn for46 YearsSy Yes Sa Yes Wa Not to Wear Bby ay Bbys MtilsL Ink Kat starts over. L Inkl((n Stereo) A Ink (In Stereo) L Ink "Addicted"
99SEE ontrJam NACl Race Hub M Ride MyRide Te Car Show Pad rog. Pal rg. NSA RacingTh 10 NSA Racing From July 10, 2010. NSA Racing

THURSDAY EVENING /LATE NIGHT SEPTEMBER 15, 2011
6:001 _6I30 ]7:0~807:0 80 8:30 9:00 9:30 I10:001I0:3011 :00111:301 2:00112:30 1:00 1i:30 202:300 3 3:00 3:30 4:00 4:30 5:00 5:30
2 g Wheel IJeopardyl Big Bang jBigBang TheMentalistc JDThe Mentalist ID INews ILate Show Letterman ILate Late ShowlCraig IExtra (N) IUp tothe Minute (N) (In Stereo) IAgDay ICBS News Daybreak G~ood Moming Show
0 g News IWheel Bi1~ag Bang11 Bi agThe Mentalistl SUTe Mentalist n INews Lrate Show Lettermnan Lrate Late ShowlCraig Inalde Ed. IUpto the Minute (N) (In Stereo) CBS News jWIVYNews 4
5 g News jWheel lCommun lAiINight /The Offlce IFree Ag. Law &Order: SVU INews ITonight Show wleno ILate Night Carson Pqoker AfterDark IExtra (N) TheBankruptcy Hour IShepherd's Chapel IEarly Tdy INewsChannel7 Today
(0 gNews IEnt IWlpeout "Blind Date 2.0: This Could Get Ugly" IGrey's Anatomy a INews INightline Jdimmy Kimmel Live IExcused IJim IAccess H. ISuccess IPald Prog. IABC World News Now (N) a Mlomlng INews13 This Moming
10 0 Two Men Tiwo Men B8ones Angela hides details of her pregnancy. INews IHow IMet ILaw &Order: SVU IFriends IFriends IKing-Hill Scrubs IPald Prog. Pald Prog. ThePeople's Court ISmarter /Smarter IShepherd's Chapel IPaidProg.Oudo
11INewsHour IPeter, Paul and Mary: Carry It Orl 3 Steps to Incredibie Health!-Joel ICharlie Rose(N) a IPeter, Paul and Mary: Carry It On 3 Steps to inciedlble Healthi-Joel INancy Reagan ITavis Smiley Reports IClifford FWIldKratt
7SHOW Swlitch /The Love We Make (iTV) WEDo Inis ihe Big C Weeds IT~r~BiC IC Ggolos "Fuer Ba~s10 free Wall"(010 "Grouple"(200) Tlnaryn anin IConvalbed" (2004) ponnie Nelson."R' ]7efl2008) La cey C ha~ner 18R orsendARef
14NICK INinjas jSponge. Mhy Wife My Wife ~~Lopez Lopez FrledsFiends 70s Show 170s Show ILopez (Lopez IFriends Fi~ends IChris [Chris 170s ho Show1'how My Wife Miy Wife IFam. Mat TBA iThe Nanny Tne Nanny
16 B$ tiise] .rela "Fee p m) Muacal e.,saD~yan Farr. Guy IFam Guy IConan gr lm ~ Tne Offce (The Ofic ICoenan inSeinfld ISeinlela "SI~p p & (200. M uic8cnal) ervnnDwa Mrie Mrra Mma Mrid

18ESPN2 Parac" IF:0m"ill WNBrA bai'iallj WNBAr Baskinaell NrFL Live (rr! n ISEC Storic !r) ISportsNanlon a ISponriCenter a Aluto Racing Mikle and MiK0
19ESPN IAudibles (N) (Llve) /College Football: LSU at Mississippi State. (N) (Live) jSportsCenter (N) (Live) B8aseball Tonight(Live) ISporisCenter (N) (Live) ISportsCenter (N) (Live) ICollege Football: LSU at Mississippi State. ISportsCenter a ISportllCenter Inc
20CSS /Talkin' SEC Football- College Football: Miles at West Georgia. (N) /SportsNite (In Stereo) IPaid Prog. IPald Prog. IPaid Prog. IPald Prog. IPald Prog. IPald Prog. Paid Prog. IPald Prog. IPaid Prog. IPald Prog. /Paid Prog. IPald Prog. MkomsSllm IPaid Prog.
2DISN Shakelt IWizards~ Shakelt ['SpyKids"Awk(2001)'PG' -ANTFarmlShakelt IWlzardls IWlzards /Wizards IWlrards IHannah IHannah Deck /Deck IPhineas IPhlneasandFerbMoesanyTgaBbrLtl

23TNT caie I:.><. . |cast. -ri ,r cm .. ..... Casle ,n G~- .c.:m ICSI PY *8 na ijc.: 1CSI NY I. Sly trpjl !CSI NV Isrdle.Nl (Leverage an Iron Asfe e (1997, Actin) M Ir.a d 0rder Abngel Iln :-le~iol
24DISC jCops & Coyotestr a Cops & Coyotes rm Exrm rg TxsDExtreme Dxtrem Drug Texas Drug Wrs Cps& ytres II Cp ooeslin aidPo.Pid Pog. a~dPo.Pirg adPo. adPo.Adro aain
25TWC IWeather Center~E nHappen jHappen IFull Force /Full Force lWeather Centera EHappen jHappen IFull Force IFull Force JWeather Centerg a Happen IHappen IFull Forc /Full Forc First utlookl a Wake Up Wth Al
26USA /NCIS (In Sereolr E Law & Order: SVU jLaw & Order: SVU ILaw & Otder: SVU B8um Notice a INCIS "Bikini Wax" INCIS (In Stereo)11 House"LoveHurts' IHose threee Stories' Law &Order SVU IPald Prog. IPaid Prog. ILaw Order: CI
28FAM l(5:00) "Remember the tians' IGone in 60Seconds~kk (1974, Action) H.B.Halickl. -The 700 Club a IWhose? IWhose? IGet Hot! IPaid Prog. IPald Prog. IPald Prog. The 700Club~ HAnxiety ~Take it IMinistrles ILife Today J~. MeyerWod
29LIFE /Project Runway~T EProject Runway a IProject Runway (N) m IDance Moms a IRussian IProect Runwaya IDProject Flunway11 Paid Prog. IPald Prog. INo Dlets I Har Free B8eautyTip IPaid Prog. ICelebHair IWEN Hair IPaid Prog.
30A&E IThe First 48- H The First 48 OB IThe First 48 02 Beyond Scared B8eyond Scared ITheFirst 48L so ite Frst 4811 Beyond Scared B8eyond Scared IPald Prog. IPald Prog. jPald Prog.Yoge Oec Mny
32SYFY T7heHitchar (2007, Suspense) Eii. 6Bei I 8= as Ru arii b (1190 SCer~r~c Fcuor.) a "'Eyeours'(2009. Science Renon) Adnan Paut "'Androdp4pc~alySe(200. Solenc FICDO) Ir A~aSr. lze 00 Accn) Joe Lano ILose30u riee
33AMC 1(5:00) "RockylVic* /7op Gun' * Ilja se ae.;...uel Tom Crurii pG 17op GwF** = (1986 Adventure; To Cruise PG I'ReaGer s"* I ( 1 1885 Comedy) Val Kimer 'PG IYou'reGor MrdP** 1199) Tom Mran PG'B IPala Prog Pald Prog
34 MV /"BYFan as y ts e Shorel a Jersey Shore 04 J~ersey Shore 1 erseers rseJ.y Sho rea i Jersey IRidic. IFa~nta eJreyShoren~b AMTV(In Stereo) IretenMm Time Ou t
35BET 1106 &Park Top 10 j'BailR* (2000, Acion) JamoieFoxx.lI I' OutofTime~rt (2003, Suspense)L ]Wendy Wllliame Show "'Balfk(2000, Aclon) Jamie FoxxA . Hell Date IHellDate IBET inspiraton 'Pald Prog. /BET inspration
36TO0N MAD IAdventure Regular IProblem IKing-Hll KI~ng-HIII lAmer. Dad IAmer. Dad IFamily Guy (lnStereo) (Chlidrens /Aqua 1Squldbll. IAmer. Dad IAmer. Dad IFamlhyGuy (InStereo) IChlidens IAwesome ISquldbill. IKing-Hill IKng-HIII Looney IBen 10
39HIST INostradamus Effect /Anclent AllensW E Anclent Allens a /Ancient Allens a IUFO Files n jAncient Allens la IAncient Allens a IAncient Aliens o IUFO Files a IPaldProg. Prostate IFree /Paid Prog. $f Secrets IPaid Prog.
40TVNDAl/Fmiy llFail MA'SH /M'A*S*H IRaymond IRaymond /Raymond E8verybody-Raymond 3B's Co. j3's Co. 13's Co. 3's Co. 13's Co. IHome Imp. IHome Improvement IHome Imp. IHome Imp. IHome Imp. B8oston Legal n IPaid Prog. IPaid Prog.
43CNN2 IJane Velez-Mitchell /Nancy Grace IDr. Drew The JoyBehar Show IShowbiz Tonlght /Dr. Drew INancy Grace IShowbiz Tonight ~e Joy Behar Show /Showbiz Tonlght Dr. Drew IMomnlng Express


IMACT Wrestling Icons collide: Sting vs. Flair. /MANswers IMANswers /Inalde Access IGTTV /BlueMount lEntourage lEntourage IEntourage IWays Die /Pad Prog. Prostate /Smoking IYounger IPaid Prg. f~rlverex
ce Selling NY /Property IHouse /Hunters /House IHunters ISelllng NY Property IHouse Hnunters Hnouse jHunters First Place FIrst Place /Oreck Vac /Sexy Face /Pald Prog. Makeover IPald Prog.Wekn
LAInk (In Stereo) L1A nk (N) (InStereo) jLA nk (ln Sereo) L1A Ink (In Stereo) LA, Ink (In Stereo) L1A nk Photo Finsh" IYounger Bosiey GOet Hot I PaldProg. IPaid Prog. /Splnning /Four Weddings
Torc Off Road Jam: Chicago. (N) The 10(N) Fe 10 ITorc Off Road Jam: Chicago. (N) INASCAR Race Hub G~earz jHot Rod GOarage ITruck U IWealth IPaid Prog. IPald Prog. IPald Prog.


THURSDAY. SEPTEMBER 15. 2011 3Br


JACKSON COUNTYFLORIDAN + www.jcfloridan.com


begins at 9 a.m. with skill
evaluation for hitting, .
pitching and catching to
follow.
Players should wear
baseball pants and bring
their own bats, spikes,
gloves, hats and protective
cups.
Registration deadline is
Sept. 14. Participants must
provide proof of insur-
ance and sign a waiver of
liability. Cost is $100.
For information, call
coach Jeff Johnson at 850-
718-2237, or visit www.
chipola.edu.

MHS Cheerleader
Kiddie Clinic
The Marianna High
School Cheerleading
Clinic will be held Sat- .
urday from 8:30 a.m. to
S11:30 a.m. for ages 3 to 10
at the MHS gym.
The girls will learn
cheers, chants, and
dances in order to be
prepared to cheer at the
Bulldogs varsity football
game vs. Chipley on Sept.
23 at Bulldog Stadium.
The clinic is a fundraiser
for the MHS Varsity Cheer-
leaders. The cost to attend
is $30.
For more information,
visit http:/ Imhs.jcsb.org,
or e-mail or call Deb
bie Dryden at Debbie.
dryden@jcsb.org arid 850-
482-9605, ext. 252.

TraVel Ball Try0IS


The Panama City Lady
Lightning travel softball
team will continue to
hold individual tryouts in
Alford for their 10U and
14U teams.
Pickup players for up-
coming fall tournaments
will also be sought after
for both teams.
If interested, call 850-
258-8172, or email ikiev@
yahoo.com.

College Exrposult
Tem I Tryouts
BSN Fastpitch and
Panama City Lady Light_
ning are forming an 18U
SCollege Exposure Team.
The team will play JUCO
teams and D;1 school
tournaments to be seen by
college coaches.
Tryouts are on Sunday
and Sept. 18 at arders Park
in Panama City.
Ages 16-18 are encour-
aged to try out. For more
info, call 850-276-0864.


player, including green
fees, two mulligans, riding
cart, anc} lunch.
Interested parties can
sign up at the golf course,
or call at 850-482-4257.
Companies interested in
sponsoring the event can
call 850-593-6421 for more
information.


ages 9-17.
Cost is $40 a month, or
$12 per week.
The camp will continue
for the entire summer,
focusing on becoming a
better athlete.
Please call Eric Pender
for more information at
850-284-2368.


niany different programs
and competitions for the
youth of Jackson County.
Northeast Jackson
County Optimist Club
also provides Christmas
for needy children from
Jackson County.
The format of the
tournament is a four-man
scramble with registration
and lunch beginning at
11:30 a.m., and tee time at
12:30 p.m.
Hole sponsorships for
four-person teams are
available for $350, with
entry fee for individual
golfers at $55. Lunch and
beverages on the cart are
provided for all
For more informa-
tion, contact President of
NEJCOC Liz Jackson at
850-557-8637, or NEJCOC
Board member James
Miller at 850-569-5282.

Ch pla Ba eball
Showcase
Chipola College's annual
Select Baseball Showcase
is set for Saturday at the
Chipola field.
The event is open to all
high school sophomores,
jtiniors or seniors who
are current members of a
varsity baseball team.
Check-in opens at 8 a.m.
on Sept. 17. The event will
continue rain or shine
with indoor facilities
available
Skill ev luation for run-
ning, hitting and fielding


There will be a full con-
tact alumni football league
held this winter.
The games are full pads
with officials, announc-
ers, and video crew, and
is open to all former high
school football players 18
and older in the area.
Games will take place on
weekends from Januay
through March of 2012.
There must be at least 35
players to a team.
Those interested can
sign up at w~ww.alumn~i-
footballusa.com.


w rerrg
Team Dynamic Youth
Wrestling Team will
continue practicing on
Tuesday and Thursday
nights at the-wrestling
room at the old Marianna
High School.
Practice will be from 6
p.m. to 8 p.m.
All kids in Jackson
County from ages 6 and
up are welcome to join.
For further information
please contact Marianna
coachRon Thoreson at
272-0280.

Sports Items
Send all sorts items to
editorial@jcfloridan.com,
or fax them to 850-482-
4478. The trailing address
for the paper is Jackson
County Floridan RO. Box
520 Marianna, FL 3244 7


Course.
The proceeds from the
tournament will benefit
needy children in Jackson .
county.
SThere will be three-man
teams, with cost at $60 per


Ch
.Tra
ule
Go
24


and lack of execution. .
"We had a couple of
turnovers that really killed
its with field position," the
coach said.


"And our. special teams,
which are usually a strong
poitit, were non-existent."
Graceville will next face
off against ithipley next


Tuesday in front of their
home crowd, while the
Hornets will go on the road
that same night to take on
Wewahitchka. '


0


45 CNN JonKlng,USA (N) jAnderson Cooper 36
46 CW Snfl Sened IThe Vampire Diaries
47 SPIKE IUFC Unleashedm E UFC Unleashed
49 HGT( Hunters :House ~First Place First Pla
98 TLC LA Ink PhotoFinish _LA nkink ( Streo)
99 SPEED NASCAR Race Hub iThe 10N 10 el


)lersMorgan Tonlght /Anderson Cooper360 IJohn King, USk


Piers Morgan Tonlght IAnderson Cooper360 IJohn King, USA


Piers Morgan Tonight |WorldBusiness Today IAM:Wake Up Call (N) |American Moming (N)


he Secret Circle (N)


Cops |'TIIDeath IKing /South Pk ISouth Pk |Rossenne /Roseanne TA


Brofits B8oley


Vacuum |CarMD


Anxiety Be~tter(N) (InStereoo) Paid Prg.The Dally Buzz11


SPORtTS


Sports Briefs


High School Football
Friday Jay at Sneads, 7
p.m.; Marianna at Liberty
County, 7 p.m.; Cottondale
at Franklin County, 6:30
p~m.
The Graceville Tigers
are off this week.

JuRior Varsity
Football
Thursday Graceville
at Liberty County, 6 p.m.;
Sneads at Blountstown, 6
p~m.

Middle School
Football
Thursday Port St. Joe
at Marianna, 6 p.m.

High School
Volleyball
Thursday Pensacola
Catholic at Marianna, 5
p.m., and 6 p.m.; Beth-
lehem at Graceville, 5
p.m., and 6 p~m.; Altha am

and 6 p.m. "

Optimist Golf
TOWrnament
Optimist announces its
first Northeast Jackson
County Optimist Golf
Tournament to Benefit
Youth Activties in Jackson
Co ny
Th turnament will be
today at Indian Springs
Geoe Core and pl pre


Alumni Footbarll Game Marianna Youth


Speed, AgClity, and
Golf Tournament Conditioning Camp
'he Plant Scholz Bionie Sports will hold a
.apter of the Gulf Power Speed, Agility, and Condi- .
nsformers abs sched- tion~ihg camp on Tuesdays
ditss 4th Annual Charity and Thursdays at Integras
lf Tournament for Sept. Therapy & Wellness Center
at Florida Caverns Golf for youth boys and girls .


From Page 1B '
excuse his team's errors


THURSDAY MORNING / AFTERNOON


SEPTEMBER 15, 2011












NEA Crossword Puzzle


9-15 @ 2011 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFs



CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotatldns by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another
TOOAY S CLUE; I equals K
"D BNLJ PMB UM GRI PMBNRJWA SBRU

OMF OMTMNGVWJ DU D'R UM KNJRDXJ.
MY JN UOJ G VBR J GTX R BAA JND TL MA
GTD ZGWR ." NDEO GNX K NPMN


PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "No house should ever be on a hill or on anything. It
should be of the hill. Belonging to it." Frank Lloyd Wright
(c) 201 by NEA, Inc. 9-15


I_______II__~___~__~__


North 0g.15-11
6 2
r .K 2

6 K 10 8 5 4
West East
4 AK 9 54 J3
VA J5 V 10 6 43
+ J9 3 K 10 64
S7 6 QJ 9
South
SQ 10 8 6


+ 32

Dealer: West
Vulnerable: East-West

South West North East
1 4 2 NT Pass
3 Pass Pass Pass


Opening lead: ? ?


- men..di. ,u eseu"


"I think I'll give it a shot on my
own today, Bernie."


JA4CKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.]cfloridan.com


ENTFIIITA~NIMENT


14B + THURSDAY. SEPTEMBER 15. 2011


PEANUTS BY CHARLES SCHULTZ

( YES MA'AM..I M \ SHOULD I W)AKE
SSURE' SHE'S ASLiEEP. ) \ ER UP ? /


VIRGO (Aug. 23-Se~pt. 22)
- You won't go unnoticed,
but just be sure you're at-
tracting attention for all
the right reasons. Make
certain you're not being
too self-serving or merely
showing off.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
- When it comes to an
agreement you're attempt-
Ing to facilitate, you can
expedite things by making
some minor concessions.

SeSPI th a ct. 24-Nov.
22) Be careful not to lock
horns if you have to work in
close proximity with some-
one who, like yourself, has
his or her own way of doing
things.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.' 23-
Dec. 21) This might be
one of those days when
you could come off as be-
ing a bit one-sided with
others. If you see some-
thing is antiss, adjust your
scales.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) Before becoming un-
tdulalagitated with anysbody
and cons. There's a good
chance you will find more
to praise thein condemn.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) If you hope to be
successful, your objec-
tives must first be clearly
defined.
PISCES (Feb. 20-Manch
20) There is likely to be
an opportunity awaiting
you at work that you won't
want to miss.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
- Just because those who
love you tolerate your an-
ger or outbursts, it doesn't
give you license to vent
excessively.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
- Don't be your own worst
enemy and read more into
what people do or say than
intended.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
- Assess the cost in terms
of time and money before
COmmitting yourself to a
grOup involvement.
CANCER (June2E1-July 22)
- Figure out if the reason
why things aren't going too
well for you is due to poor
timiing, or something more
Serious.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
- Those with whom you're
involved will respond' to
you in the same mariner as
you treat them.


Answer to Previous Puzzle

C A1R ES DEO GEE
DANGLE MISHAP
ELL OCT
B EDI LPN A:V E
TUX TEE AGENDA
ANA BRA PESTS
LY CRA RIVS TRI
CA TER LOO 1RE F
N O VI I SIT R Y E
O:R B E V E

I M P ED EIS NO R
GARDEN STE WS
15 Video- 39 G nt s

piy er 43 Exoeto
maker (2 44 Cuzco
wds.) founder
19 rdeer 45 Vkne
20 Venice's 46 Novelist -
place Seton
22 Shaespeare, 47 White
forexample House
24Elev. staffer
25Tired 49Noah's
26Comedian vessel
Kovacs 51 B-movie
29 Bucks and~kge, 52Kid ob f
toms system
34 Stormed 53 Make
about soaking
36Hot dogs wet


ACROSS
1 Dance
band

11 Poker
stakes
12BP
acquisition
131so lated
15Talisman
16 Skoal and
18 Vaeerdir.
19 Nothing at
21 Geen
22 nitre
23 akee i
25 eBay
milieu
28 t ver
30 Diamond
31 Period
32 Family
mem.
33 Do the
wrong
thing .
35Guitar
sound
37Uninlaresting
38 Blurted out
40 Purple
flower


41 Safari
animal
42Potat bud
movie"
locale
46 Greek sea
48 Not on the
beach
50 Long bouts
54 Like many
aoKng
55 Big Dipper
56 e~i bor
Franz -


DOWN
1 Lo- -
2 Lennon's

3 G og.
feature
4 Ladybugs
and
scarabs
5 Fjord port
6 Plows into
7"Down
under" bird
8 Tree trunk
9 Unistumable
serves
10 By heart
14 Wild oxen
of Tibet


BORN LOSER BY ART AND CHIP SANSOM
~CoTTAGE 1 NEED TO~ cEE, to?\,uooo ACTUALLY, L DORT RAVE
CHEES. ND )LOSE~DrE 50 E URE RAVE A T~ROUBLE. LC6\NG WEIGCT-
WATEF,to? GT LOT OF TROUBLE. M~ PROBLEM \5 1 XEMt T
\ ~ ~ ~~ e TOI'EMT ~ ~FNIG~~


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "us R tetC soskword Puzzles" books


I7~1I TsuecHU~\wY
MoNweY" js atReaoY
Takel.

.? .0 s


lOW DEPRESSIL\G--IHAV&
sEcOsO veOrH SY JO7E
TO LASTTHE RECST
OFMYuIFe!



;; O


DF COURS6,HAT WAST~RUS
AFTER ToEeRst
TWO OR THREE!


Dear Annie: My sister, "Ruth," has .
struggled with addiction to prescrip-
tion medication since high school. My
parents have been incredibly supportive
for the past eight years. They helped her
get into rehabilitation programs, paid for
lawyers, car insurance, health insurance
and food, and they allow her to live rent-
free ill their home.
This past spring, Ruth finally finished
vocational school, but instead of look-
ing for a job, she spends every day in her
room playing video games. She doesn't
contribute financially, nor does she help
with basic household chores. Recently,
she relapsed and ended up back in an
outpatient rehab program.
My parents are terrified to throw her
out for fear she would (once again) at-
tempt suicide. They have tried giving her
deadlines to finish school, get a job and
move out, but she always manages to
manipulate my parents, and the dead-
liries pass and life goes on unchanged.
This has destroyed my parents' lives.
My mother is taking medication for anxi-
ety. My high-strung father is so stressed




When you play bridge well, you are li
and the sun shines. But the converse is 1
of course. In this deal, if you are in midset

rmm th uWe hana a ins thrt e2 bs V
would you select?
After you open one spade, North uses
Unusual No-trump to show at least 5-5 irl
minors, South removes to three clubs,
everyone passes. One's immediate reactic
probably the spade ace. However, partna
marked with some points and would have
three spades with support. And since dumr
short in the majors, declarer must have sy
length. It is better to lead the club seiren.
If you cash the spade ace before shifting
club, declarer can win with his club ace,
the spade queen to squash East's jack,
dummy's diamond ace, ruff a diamond ir
hand, and play a heart toward dummy's kir
get home.
Here is the guideline, which isn't cas
stone: If an opponent shows a two-suiter
the advancer seems unhappy, lead a trump
pecially when it is through the length. But i:
advancer jumps in one of his partner's sui
is less likely that a trump lead will be best.


out that he has tantrums and screams in
frustration. They have both told me they
feel like prisoners in their own home. As
a result of all the stress, my parents are
separating.
My mother thinks moving out will
encourage Ruth to do the same. She also
believes it will show my father that she
will not tolerate his tantrums anymore. I -
have begged my parents to try counsel-
ing, but they fire both reluctant to do so.
I agree that Ruth needs to be cut free and
my father needs to control his temper,
but I think Mom is going about this the
wrong way. I worry she is making a vola-
tile situation worse. How do I help?
WITNESS TO A POWDER KEG IN
MAINE

Dear Witness: We think your mother has
had enough and is looking for the escape
hatch. If your parents aren't interested
in counseling, please suggest they check
out Families Anonymous (familiesanon-
ymous.org) at 1-800-736-9805, Nar-Anon
(nar-anon.org) at 1-800-477-6291 and
Because I Love You (bily.org).


WE JUST LEARNED IN
SCIENCE THAT WE HAVE

AND NOW I CAN FEEL EM
CRAWLIN' ALL OVER ME



11 ?


BIG NATE BY LINCOLN PIERCE
NATE, I: SPOICE To THE) INoT JU~sT YET. FIRST I ...AND INSTEAD OF
SCoLIMPROVEMENTI ITHE COMMITTEE WILL I ALLOWING YOU To
COMTTEE ABouIT / RECOMMEND SEVERAL PAINT IT ALL SY
uouR nVAst. Y cHANGES TO THE USTr YOURSELF, WJE RE
PROPOSAL. m OF tHISTORICAL GOING To
FIGURES ~ I INVOLVE
YES.'so \ r DEPICTED. k ALL THE
CA GET b f I STUPEN\TS'






SOUP TO NUTZ BY RICK STROMOSKI


...BUT YOt, AND IT
OTH(ERI VONT Ex
THAN \ACTLY gE
TF4AT. A MU~RAL i
THEY
LOVE
THE
IDEA.


FRANK & ERNEST BY BOB THAVES


GRIZZWELLS BY BILL SCHORR


ARLO & JANIS. BY JIMMY JOHNSON


COW & BOY BY MARK LElKNES


004 4GE
YOU DIG






c. ,


HH -

n 8

50 WHE

rooAY


KIT'N' CARLYI.E BY LARRY WRIGHT HERMAN BY JIM UNGER





BY PHONE: (850) 526-3614 or (800) 779-2557 BY MAIL: WIREGRASS CLASSlFIED MARKETPLACE
BY FAX: -(850) 779-2557 P.O. BOX 520, MARIANNA, FL 32447
ONLINE: WWW.J CFLO RI DAN.COM IN PERSON: 4403 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA
Pubhication Policy Errors and Omissions. Advertisers should check their ad the first day. This pubilcation shall not be irable for failure to publish an ad or for a typographic error or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the ad for the first day's
Insertion Adjustment for errors Is Ilmited to the cost of that portion of the ad wherein the error occurred The advertiser agrees that the publisher shall not be liable for damages arising out of errors in advertisements beyond the amount paid for the space
actually occupied by that portion of the advertisement in which the error occurred. whether such error Is due to negligence of the publisher's employees or otherwise and there shall be no liability for non-insertion of any advertisement beyond the amount paid for
such advertisement. Display Ads are not guaranteed position. All advertising is subject to approval Right Is reserved to edit, reject, cancel or classify all ads under the appropriate classification.


STOP GNATa FLY, & MrO QTOrBITES!
Insect Repellent.
Family Safe-Use head to toe.
Available at The Home Depot


Guitar: 5-String Bass Guitar with hardshell case
Peavey Millennium BXP. Transparent black fin-
ish. Like new condition. $250. Call 334-797-4314
Professional Trombone: Getzen 747 Eterna 2.
Large bore with F attachment. Hardshell case
included. $700. Call 334-797-4314

( ~~PETS & ANIMALS

CFA Reg. Persian Himalayan kittens. Litter
e aieddu aerfdoot lvwe 1epl ( rd she
ces). $200-$250. 334-774-2700 after 10am
.FOUND: 1 cat and kitteh~s around Bridge Creek
Rd. 863-258-2589
Free Cats to GOOD home Neutered/Spayed,
shots current, Different colors 850-482-4896
Free kittens Multi-colored, multi-hair length
850-482- 5880/850-303-9727 after 3pm
LOST CAT in Bascom area. Orange female
Tabby. Pink Collar. Call 850-209-8651

AKC EngH sh ldogs eVetnch ckd and curr nt.
pies will be small approx 45 Ibs when grown.
Large heads and nose ropes. Exceptional
blood line. The brindle girl is $1,800 and the
white girls are $1,600. Please call 334-464-1534
or 464-1391. Will email pics of parents if inter-
ested.
FemalehMlati-tzu black and wilite, almost 3
years old, not housebroken, but crate trained.
Great dog with kids loves to sit in your lap. On-
ly reason for giving away is not house broken,
come with 01ra Please call for more informa- .
Free to good home- female Choc lab/bull dog
mix, Call 850-509-7481 leave a message.
FREE TO GOOD HOME : Female,White American
Pit, 7-8yrs old, shots UTD. Jeff 850-592-4009
FREE TO GOOD HOME : Red nose pit mix pup-
pies. 850-272-1065
ILab Puppies: will be 6 weeks old on Sept. 11th.
Have their first shots and wormed. Yellow lab
mom and chocolate daddy. 5 pups remaining.
Males $225 and Females $2?0. 1 Blk female, 2
yellow males 1 yellow female, 1 strawberry
blond male. All very healthy. Call 334-726-1010
or 726-6929, email: tmcaldwe@southernco.com
LOST: Black ab on Sa~p/ Rd7C ton ae. Name
Select Pupples ON SALE! v
SMorkies $200, Older Chorkies $50,
SHairless Chinese Crested. Yorkies.
Yorkie-P~oos $200.-$300. Shih-A-Poos'
Malti-Poos $250. PekA-Poos $250. Pom FM
$250, & Yorkie/Pom $200 C all 334-718-4886

Want Your Ad

TO Sta nd 0 ut?

Use An Attractor Or Use
Bold Print in Your Ad

Thursday, September 15, 1011









TESUDOKU GAMrE UIITH (9 KlCK!
HOW TO PLAY
Fill in the 9x9 grid with the missing
numbers so that each column, row and
3x3 box contains the digits 1 -9 only once.~
There is only one correct solution
for each puzzle.
GET MORE WASABI
PUZZLES ONLINE!
ARCHIVES AND MORE GREAT GAMES AT
SBOXERJAM.COM


r FARMER'S MARKET


~ AlrNNOUNCEMENTS

AUCTION- Coins & Paper Currency. SAT, OCT 8,
11AM. 2001 N. Monroe ST, Tallahassee.
Accepting Consignments through FRI, SEPT23.
See catalog www.globalauctionsery.com
Aaron Joseph & Company
850-878-3030 FL AU3058




Flor da Department of Agricultura and Consurner Servic"
Coswaoo~at ADver HI F~Ur
Recall: Embark Resistance Cords
and Cord Kits sold at Target


uct Safety Commissign (CPSC) and Target
Corporation, of Minneapolis, Minn., have an-
nounced the voluntary recall of about 447,000
Embark Resistance Cords and Cord Kits. A
black plastic ball attached t9 the resistance
cord's door anchor can unexpectedly release
and strike the user, posing an injury hazard
to consumers.
Target has received three reports of incidents
inwih cn umer wewesruki shst dyby


This recall involves Embark brand individual
resistance cords and cord kits listed below.
The resistance bands are made of green, blue
or black rubber with black foam handles and
a door attachment. A strap of nylon webbing
is looped onto the band with a plastic ball at-
tached or encased that serves as a door an-
chor. "Embark" is printed on either the black
strap attached to the foam handle or on the
middle of the rubber cord itself.
Style Description: Embark Light (tension) Re-
sistance Cord (green) Embark Medium (ten- .
(tnil) Ri ea tea Co du Ibk kmb~a k Re-
sistance Cord kit (set of 3 cords in
green/blue/black stored in a mesh bag)
The recalled items were manufactured in Chi-
na and sold exclusively at Target stores na-
tionwide and Target.com from July 2009
through August 2011 for between $10 and
$20.
Consumers should immediately stop using
the resistance cords and remove the door an-
che op'yt erceie mi tu tion nto aeair
the cords to eliminate the hazard.
Call Target Guest Relations at (800) 440-0680
between 8 a.m. and 7 p.m. ET Monday
through Friday, or visit the firm's website at
www.target.com.

mber: Septle berl15, 2011 .
FloridraSDep rtsment of Agriculture and Con-

Will keep children in my home in Marianna
area. Weekdays only. 850-272-6903

4052 Bright Prospect Road, Marianna
Sat. 9-17 and 18, at 7a.m. until 5 p.m., furniture,
mirrors, some clothes, nick-nacks and pictures.

(Ii~) MERCHAlNDISE



JACKSON COUNTY PICKER WILL BUY:
OLD COINS, TOYS AND COLLECTABLES
CALL 850-693-0908


Nautical Style Furniture
SMatching Nautical
~i~E;~EI "l hav OCoumh &,
s ite sofas wit s
Or Best Offer. Call 334-791-648s


Wanted: Old Coins, Gold,
Diamonds, Guns, And Tools
West Main Jewelry & Loan 334-671-1440.

rMeed a N8W 001718
Check out the ClassifiedC


&~ NrY N ~~I ~

=s\ Get a Quality Education for a
New Career! Programs
FORTIS offered in Healthcare,
HVAC and Electrical Trades..
Call Fortis College Today!
888-202-4813.
COL~LEG:E For consumer information
www.Fortis.edu
RESIDENTIAL
f5 L ESTIA TE FOt"R REf<1

1/1 Apartment for Rent. For info call 850-579-
8895


118IA 830+ 8200d Ra Road Std C' ale
No Pets (850) 352-4222
3BR 1.5 BA, 2944 Noland St. Bonus room with
fireplace, 1 car garage, Central Heat & Air,
hardwood floors, kitchen appliances, no pets.
Deposit required, 1 year lease $700/month,
Available October. st. Call 850-594-7525 after
6pm or leave message
3BR/1.5BA Brick Home, Malone, Newv Carpet,
Stove, Refrigerator, Storage Shed,CH/A
4BR 2BA Hos n twnd 495 o8 rs S. C /A,

904-214-6980
Beautiful, stylish, newly remodeled brick home
for rent. 2 BR/1 BA. Quiet/safe neighborhood.
Nice size yard. Brick storage building on prop-
erty. $650/month. Contact 478-508-9502.

2/1 $425 & 2/1.5 $450 in Greenwood CH/A,
water/garbage/lawn included. 850-569-1015
2/2 Mobile Home $450 + deposit, appliances,
wa her a5ryr 4w er/garbage & sewer in-
$5 d druop 2 bil ,oess e n utnddlea.
http:/ www.charloscountry living. comn.
850-258-4868/209-8847
2 & 3BR 2BA Mobile Homes in Cottondale no
pets, Central Heat & Air $400-$450 850-258-
1594 leave message


Plent Of ShelliIsEeds, FehPa
Butter beans, New Potatoes,
All Fa* Festht5 ~

220 W. Hwy 52. Malvern
i S ag= J g 90 r S




LO OK
Custom cotton Picking :

Over 12 years of experience.
Satisfaction Guaranteed.
DOW Morris Farms
Call 850-326-6881 or
850-527-6291

(00)EMPLOYMENT

111~~7~
Caregiver Wanted for Elderly F with Rm & Bd + -
Salary. Med. Exp. pre Non Smoker 850*-482-5631






WE ARE LOOKING FOR DEPENDABLE, BUS
BE YOUR OWN BO

I) Ask about our $

Must have dependable trans
insurance & valic

Comne by and fill out
Jackson County Floridan,
SMarianna,


$1,000. Permnm!
IlNESS MINDED NEWSPAPER CARRIERS!
,SS (1AM to 6AM)

i300 Sign on Bonus

;portation, minimum liability
d driver's license.

an application at the
4403 Constitution Lane,
FL, 32447


GRAEm WH mm
Earn an average of


I


L


Jackson County Floridan Thursday, September 15, 2011- 5 B


wuww..ICFLORIDAN~Tcom


EDUCATION
I STRUCTIO


CLASSIFIED


WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED




ARKEPL


Find jobs


fast and


easy


JCKSON COUNTY~


jcfloridan.com


T~ntOSeGY

FIND LOCAL JOBS AT: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM/OB









B Thursday, Se
p
et mber 15, 2 n


Toyota '10 Prius, Fully Loaded, Navigation, Chevrolet '02 Silverado X/Cab $1,295 Down 0%
Backup camera, ventilation system, leather Interest. Open 9am 9pm 1-800-470-0650
seats. Heated seats, power windows & locks Chevrolet'07 Silverado Crew Cab SL 2WD,
27K Miles, 52 MPG, Sunroof, Excellent white with gray leather, 68K miles, one owner,
condition, Last year sold for $32,400, includes black toolbox, black running boards,
ASKING $22,900; Going back to a truck. new Bridgestone AT tires. $14,900
Call 334-488-6093 Call 334-596-1329
Chevy'04 Silverado Z71
) with tow package
Kawasaki'09 KXF250 -- Miihllen tires, 108K mi.
Motor by BPM, 2 brothers white $13,900.
performance pipe. Very 334-790-0068.
fast bike for the motor- ;r h~iDodge '01 Ram 1500 quad
crosing xtre stcab, V8, loaded, 183K mi.
334-72-3842runs good $2500. OBO 334-
1 798-1768 or 334-691-7111
-Ljr Chewolet'98 Slurburbn
Less than 10K mi. on new Dodge'02 Ram 1500 4-wheel drive, quad cab,
- GMC motor. Motor under P/U with 4.7 liter engine, cold air, chrome run-
factory warranty. 4 new ning boards, chrome rims, chrome tool box,
Michelin tires. Vehicle is tow package and new tires. 149,698 miles.
in above average condition. Tow Package Excellent condition.$88499. 1) 334-'190-6832.
included. $5,200 334-897-3288
Chevy '01 Tahoe LS- 4WD, 8 cylinder, auto' ,,'5Amdas 4 row i~;~k pleantcminpce
forrest greed, with 3 row seats, fully loaded' about 1200 ac. very good cond. S46,500 KMC 4
174k miles, $6000. OBO Call 334-791-7312 row peanut shaker, good cond.586500.
Dodge'99 Durango: $795 Down, 0% Interest 334-403-03510r 334-403-0249 c.
Open 9am 9pm, 1-800-470-0650
Honda '02 CR-V EX 4x4 automatic sunroof, 4cyl.
tilt, str whl. crews control, cd, new tires PWR, 2L' FORD '89 F150, 4wh, 4x4
widn wis1 wo s/r .00c ,0 no3 acecel Aulto, $4,600 or reasonable
Offer. Call 229-334-8520.
JEEP '96 Grand Cherokee, gold pack, new
battery, new tires, $2500 080 229-334-7427 Ford '99 F150 X/Cab: $975 Dowin, 0% Interest
Subaru'06 Forester Premium: Small SUV, 54K Open 9am 9pm, 1-800-470-0650
miles, one owner, regularly serviced. Automat- GM 8950Dis-
ic, 4-cyl, AC, AIL.Wheel Drive, cruise control, CD Elxcellent work truck, long
player, sunroof, trailer hitch. Champagne met- r GM'8 whee base, rne,
allic with cream interior. Exceptional condition e C 7 C rebuilt engine,
inside and out, excellent gas mileage 23+ city, $ 1,500. Quick Sell
29+ highway, top safety rating, great car to Call 334-791-9099
drive. $14,900. 334-699-6453 or 334-796-5719 GM '98 1500k~~~MC9850 3-door,
Toyota '07 4Runner. Clean one owner. Miles I ~b-loaded, 132K miles, $3400.
113,330. Engine life expectancy 350,000 +! Gets z OBO 334-691-7111 or
20MPG!' Asking price $20,000 0.B.O. Retail val- 334~u33-9 -79-768.
ue $21,575. Call/Text Rachel 334-406-9830. You can pay more,
make offer! I But you won't find a better one!






iC~d ,


RESIDENTIAL
REAL STAT FORRENTTrail Lite 2006 R-VISION
26 ft., fully loaded '
2 &3BR MH's in / kklbought new, 13K miles
Marianna & Sneads (850)209-8595. .. 49,995 334-616-6508
52BR2BA Located inSneads $350/month 850-
3/2 DW in Malone, CH/A, No pets, security YAAA0 Xr0 aeunr etr
neg., Section 8 ok. 850-594-9991 or 850-693. AAA0 X10 avrne,3sae,
6075 with cover, with trailer, garage kept $5,000
3 BR, 2 BA, 2100 sq. ft. living space. LR, DR, den, 334-687-0218, 706-575-3760
Laundry room. $600 mo. 850-718-8088. I R NSO T IN
For Rent Greenwood, Marianna, & Cottondale, AN P R TON
starting @ $375/mo. Water/sewage/garbage/
lawn maint included. 850-593-4700
Rent to Own: 2 & 3BR Mobile Homes.
Lot rent included. Also available, '~iCiEb BMW '01 3251- LOADED,
1 BR Apts & Houses. For details onlry 113K, 4-door, power
4850-557-3432 or 850-814-6515 4.eeyhn,5-pecen
Pi~l~title, leather seats, power
COMMIERCIAL sunroof, wood grain interi-
iiM REAL ESTATE FOR RENT or, 6 CD changer, radio/cassette player, excel-
lnt condition, premium sound sdytern, excel-
month!!) extremely clean and very well taken
Office Space for rent i n town, all utilities in- car. Must See $8000. Call TODAY 334-763-0146
eluded, 850-557-2000Buc'0enry

R~A ES IDTENTIRALE u custom, v-6, automatic,
REAL ~ ~L ~ ESAE O SL loaded, 110,000 miles,
nrew tires, clean, $3995.
334-790-7959.
Lot in Greenwood, FL We have a beautiful 5 Cadillac DTS 08' fully loaded, 35K miles,
acre lot for sale on Whispering Pines Circle in immaculate condition, $23,0.00. OBO 334-792-
Greenwood, FL. The property has big trees and 3089 or 334-618-1449.
plenty of building sites. We have adjacent Chevrolet'00 C5 Corvette Coupe, Black with
acreage avail. Price just reduced! black leather interior, spoiler, ground effects,
$29,000, Call: 859-536-2663. automatic, 65K miles, 229-524-2955
Chevrolet'00 Monte Carlo $575 Down 0%
RECREATION Interest. Open 9am 9pm, 1-800-470-0650
Chevrolet'03 Impala: $875 Down, 0% Interest
Open 9am 9pm. 1-800-470-0650
Honda '01 250 4-wheeler with reverse, new Ceoe 8 ovte
tires, excellent condition $1400. 334-677-7748. Autom tic 350 Si veO)BWill
334-774-1915
'07 18ft. Suntracker party baige with cover
40hp Mercury, 4-stroke big foot, TrailStar Chevy Tahoe LT '05 pewter 1-owner, loaded,
single axie trailer, uesed very little, exc. cond. leather, dvd, 3rd seat, good condition. 95K mi.
$11,000 229-768-2058. $13,000 334-685-6186.
13 ft. Gheenow boat & trailer Olive green in
color & boat is in GREAT condition with padded DO YOU KNOW ANYONE WITH BAD CREDIT?
seats. Trailer & Tires NO WEAR. Boat only used I can.get U Riding T'oday
a couple of times. Call chris 334-791-5755 to Repos, Slow Credit, Past Bankruptcy OK! .
come see. $1050. $0 Down/ 1st Payment, Tax, Tag & Title
Push, Pull or Drag, Will Trade anything!
198117r Welicraft, 170HP Inboard, Clean, Warranty On Every Vehicle sold!
New carpet, tandem wheel trailer $2395 334- $100 Refe~rras! Call Steve 800-809-4716
793-3494
Cobia 74 15' boat fiberglass with 48 hp, Ford '08 F-150 Limited 20,060 miles, 1222 of
Johnson motor & trailer, good condition $1400. 5000 made, 5.4 v8 like tiew, in dash navigation
334-677-7748 & satellite radio. Heated, capt chair front seats,
RHINO 2008, 18FT- 90 HP Suzuki, 55 I.B rmalsiuper e ab,0. r 3ecaer6alnd7a) m 2
Minnkota, Aluminum Trailer, Humminbird Ford '95 Mustang GT Convertible- white with
Depth Finder, on Board Charger, Binini top, leather interior, 200k mile runs great, needs
$14,200 334-798-4175 paint, $4,300. OBO Call 334774-0451
1-0wner
Rhino Boat: V176 Stick steer, with 70HPGM 99S LS
Szuzuki 4 stroke, loaded, low hours, like new, extra cab, new tires,
garage kept $10,900. Call 334-714-5860 automatic, 4 cylinder'
57,000 miles, excellent,
$5795. 334-790-7959.
Jaguar '90 XJS nice car! runs perfect! gray in
Dutchman '06 Denali 30ft, sleeps 8, double cor$2503437-78
sMid buEnk h 8,50 eaer ke t, shape Lincoln '99 Totwncar signaturaenseries tan with
FLEETWOODI 2005 Prowler AX6, 5th wheel, 36. fully loaded, maintenance records available,
ft, 4 slides, large shower,.30/50AMP. $20,000 one owner ss,soo. call 334-886-2433
080 Call 334-695-4995, 334-687-7862. CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
Your source for selling aind buying!


Dixie RV SuperStores
FL's Newest RV Dealer
N 0W 0 PE N!!!
'*Store Hours*
Monday-Saturday
8:00am-6:00pm -

21 Acres / 30 Brands New and Pre-Owned
a Newmar n Keystone a Heartland a Jayco
aFleetw~ood a Prime Time Coachmen ee
SForest River

Service Department ~ MC1;~
PaRt Can s ces. Store

Located offl1-10 Exit 70 /SR285 xs G N co
328 Green Acres Dr.
De Funiak Springs, FL 32435 I BUY OLD GURISI
Sales and Service: 850-951-1000 &
www.dixiery.com DO 12756 (850) 283-2701


Dixie RV SuperStores
FL's Newest RV Dealer
NOW OPEN!!!
*Cne Cllrot* Hor*


`4-


ILIM~n X~;I)~1;cI: 3LSTRE TCHE orr

89g d w n Limousmne av oxi smesv
O ARU CARS EQUIPPED WITH CLDSED CIRCUB TV
33 Years in Business sea~~ ~nroh. es" I1Th ,O~e wag n. se
Lh CRhOL~tslflhG CRA5






~Z~~~~IIIPORTA BLE BUILDINGS
F~;.itil~jl~i L~:nl C~~n~jliuri~ I.ARGEST NilUFACTURER OF PORTABLE BUILDINGS IN Nosin [ur ~i4
12 x 20 Building


Imm~BIReg. 9,.078
psotn l&rkc O nr ran@ ir- ----MIS EVERYTHING INCLUDED!
Custm ae& Foornc~,LLCSetup. Tax & Delivery!
3614 Hay. 90 Marlanna, FL 850-482-8682
Natirl& St010* 0ft C *aic Porc8 & II
Custom Showers Hardw~ood Laminate & More II
No Job too Large or Srnall! Lkecnsed & I sured
(850) 693-1423 or (850) 209.-8099
"Beautification of Your Home"
IICarpentry/Painting Installations
Furniture Repair & Refinishing
--- CARPET MAN i General Repairs Insured
We install new & used carpet.
Repairs, stretch out wrinkles. ~ ILI)P

(050 ns-.ru For General House or
Office Cleaning

fl"S S E SYFree Estimat s Refe ees Available
AS 1- 2- 3
1. CALL 2. PLACE YOUR AD 3. GET RESULTS 850-526-2336


Grader Pan Excavator
*Dump Truck Bulldozer
Demolition Grading Site Prep
* Debris Removal Retention Ponds Leveling
* Top Soil Fill Dirt Gravel*r Land Clearing






Per50 noI TO U

Computer Repair
A+ AND NETWORK+ CERTIFIED
WI IN T CIT LMTS M RIS NNE
RICHARD REGISTER 850-557-6061


Clay O'Neal's ~ol~~wows

Land Clearing, Inc. reinmapoemail
85AOL ,9 HWHral
cenl aso-ass-soss PranrIon f6C


24 Gun Cabinet by RedHead, $495 850-592-2881
Acoustic Guitar $300 OBO 850-376-9426
Antiu 3dress~er with mirror $75.
Carving Trike 3 wheel scooter that operates
by shifting your weight and turning the wheel
at the same time; hand brakes and adjustable
steering column. Adult size for up to 200
pounds. Very good condition. $50, 850-592'
9285
Disney Princess Play House 56", folds up, &
caise, excellent condition, 850-482-5434, $25
Dryer, Roper, white, $110 850-482-3267
Eterlainm~ent Center dark walnut, 67x49 $50

Fish Aquarium with cover $10
Boys Baby Clothes $30/box 850-693-4189
Halloween Costumes, several to choose from,
12mos-3T $10-$12 each 850-376-9426


Hobart-Stickmate LX Welder w/ tig rig, 220~
volt, like n~ew in Maritinna $500 850-693cL32
$40, 850-482-5434
King size Simmons Box Spring good condition
$10 850-209-2676
Mahogany dresser & chest heavy wood, 2 yrs
old, good condition $250/set 850-209-2676
Mattress, heavy California King, 10" deep. $300
OBO 850-693-5833
Small glass top tables (2) $15 each 850-592-
2881
Speakers JBL Northridge E100, $350, 850 482-

UStamp collection $250 850-272-5268
Various computer parts and CD drives $80
OBO 850-376-9462
WWII German Occupation Souvier Sheet of 3
Stamps $100 850-272-5268


21 Acres / 30 Brands New and Pre-Owned

a Newmar a Keystone a Heartland a Jayco
aFleetwood a Prime Time a Coachmen
mForest River

Service Department
Parts and Acces. Store
RV Collision Center
Located off 1-10 Exit 70 / SR285
328 Green Acres Dr.
De Funiak Springs, FL 32435
Sales and Service: 850-951-1000
www.dixiery~com DO012756
Fleetwood '03 Fiesta 31H Ford V10 engine, 32K
miles, great shape, many extras$927,500.
334-792-7105.
Trail Lite 2006 R-VISION
26 ft., fully loaded,
bought new, 13K miles
c= $44,995 334-616-6508

T" -%dDUC R IS KND' I


Place an Ad aweek!,.~
Get live previews of your classified ads, receive price quotes
and make secure online payments.


WWw.jecfloridan.com


~ ~IL_ ~II~~_III~


DECLASSIFIED


6 k C t Fl id


www.JCFLORIDAN.com


j \ \x


Monday-Saturday -
8:00am-6:00pm










www .J


HONDA'08 RIDGELINE RTL- white with tan
leather interior, sunroof and satellite radio'
new michelin tires, and only 32k miles.
$27,500. Call Scott 334-685-1070

ISilZu 2001 26' Box Truck *
19000gy, extra clean, no CDL Required.
$18,500. Call 334-299-0300.

Nissan '04 Frontier, 27K miles, New Tires, New
Battery, Automatic Trans., power windows,
power locks, one owner, Senior Citizen owned
and driven.$812,000 OBO 334-701-0998
Toyota '02 Tacoma Crew Cab. Automatic, 139k
miles, PERFECT Condition. Loaded, Beautiful!
81,00 Fim 334-596-9966
TRACTOR -IH1440 Combmne,
Field Ready, Grain Head and Corn
Head. $7,000. 850-415-0438



CARPET CLEANING VAN FOR SALE
Dodge '94 Ram 250- V8, 94k miles, new
paint, has quality Banechene equipment,
recently restored inside and out, supplies .
included. A ONLY $6900. OBO *
Call 334-774-0122 or 334-477-4767

Chewrolet'97 Astro Van
conversion Van raised
roof, loaded, new tires,
One owner, GREAT
condition. 52K mi. $9,500.
-.*334-897-2054 or
334-464-1496
Coachhouse'95 Van camper, 2 singles beds.
microwave, generator, bathroom, stove &
refrigerator. good condition. $8,000. OBO
334-347-1887 or 334-449-0162.
Ford '92 Econoline Conversion van with
Vangator wheelchair lift. Good condition.
334-475-3310 or 334-447-8738
Nissan '00 Quest, 120K mi. Clean interior, Good
Condition $5900 334-677-7321




WE PAY Ca$H

FOR JUNK CarsI!!!!!

334-818-1274




Call for Top Price for
Junk Vehicles ,

I also sell used partS
24 HQURTOWING o) 334-792-8664 (a

CALL TODAY FOR YOUR TOWING NEEDS



AUTO BODY &t RECYCLING
PAYING TOP DOLLAR FOR IUNK CARS
Contat Jbson Harger at 334-791-2624

Gaurenteed highest prices paid for your Junk
or unwanted vehicals & fanning equipment,
Tnite or no Title 24 hrs a day, also pay finders
fee. 334-596-0154 or 850-849-6398
..... e......................... 1
~Got a Clunker .
i i We'llbe ur Junker'I
We buy wrecked cars "
Sand Farm Equip. ata a
fair and honest price!
$325. & upfor ."
SCOffllete Cars CALL334-702-4323
............................... ~
B A WANTED WRECKED OR JUNK VEHICLES
CI PAY TOP DOLLAR Do 21930 _
.) DAY -334-794-9576 =& NIGHT 334-794-7769

LEGALS



LF15535
Notice and Public Explanation of a Proposed
Activity in the 100-Year Floodplain' and Wetland ,

Date of Publication: September 15, 2011
City of Marianna
Post Office Box 936
Marianna, Florida 32447
850-482-4353

To: All interested Agencies, Groups and
Individuals






to be funded by a Fiorid Small4 oxCities Commun
ity Deve fr lopmtinnt k Gant(CDBG). The pro-

PtCtity of Mariannas Ecnomic Devleomente Proj
ect "DuatiryQens To etnd natra gas C 5.0b
sherviD cso that wi behi loated on tatfet oad1
froomla pint os e ian poiiyt teAdro
Ci olmbria Aspat Plntnd so unethk approximate
7201fto the fdevey lopia ment property located
ony the soumeth sideofk the t ) 1-1/S 71it rchage
Al construction wilocur nexsin ubi
utiity ofMright a of noi ways.mntPrj
ct hDasr b een"T dtried that noractical galtr
ntvive ohe thanto prl eoceted wit Sthe work is
frmava oiae Thise acivt will have no sig nificant

imaton the envirsdeonmn o the follow 71intrng *

Th currntnrstructi wl cure boderistn pbut oe

not vexs othr wthin the wetland. wThhe poroject



will be constructed through a short distance of
an identified floodplain on State Road 71 in an
area that has been previously disturbed and
developed.


Although the project is located in the 100 year
floodplain and/or wetland, the improvements
cannot be undertaken in any other location due
to the scope of the project. There is, therefore,
no practical alternative.

The; proposed improvements conform to appli-
cable floodplain protection standards. The pro-
posed action will not affect natural or benefi-
cial floodplain values, and residents of the
community will benefit from the project. These
improvements are being made to existing fa-
cilities. Utility extensions connected with the
Dairy Queen Project are being constructed so
the new development may be connected to the
existing central utility systems that serve the
area. Failure to provide these improvements
could result in the development, and all jobs
connected with the project, not proceeding.

The only agencies currently involved in the


,


.


Jackson County Floridan Thursdaty, September 15, 2011- B


JCFLORIDANcom


funding of the project, is the City of Marianna
and the Community Development Block Grant
Program.

Written comments must be received by the
Municipal Development Director at Post Office
Box 936, Marianna, Florida, 32447, on or before
October 3, 2011.

Additional information may be obtained by
contacting: Evan M. McAllister, David H. Melvin
Inc., P.O. Box 840, Marianna, Florida 32446
(850) 482-3045
A more detailed description of the project and
the Federal Insurance Administration (FIA)
flood maps are available for citizen review by
contacting the local government

John E. Roberts
Environmental Certifying Official
Mayor



LF15426

IN THE CIRCUIT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
JACKSON COUNTY
'CASE#~ 2011-CA-000672
DIVISION#;

EverBank
Plaintiff '



Danny Frank Lipford Jr. a/k/a Danny F. Lipford
Jr.; Amy A. Lewandowski; Unknlown Tenants in
Possession.#1; If living, and all Unknlown Par.
ties claiming by, through, under and against
the above named Defendant(s) who are not
known to be dead or alive, whether said tin-
known Parties may claim an interest as
Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other
Claimants; Unknown Tenants in Possession #2,
If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by,
through, under and against the above named
Defendant(s) who are not kpown to be dead or
aliffe, whether said Unknown Parties may claim
an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees,
Grantees, or Other Claimants
Defendant(s)

NOTICE OF ACTION FORECLOSURE
PROCEEDINGS-PROPERTY

TO: Amy A. Lewandowski; ADDRESS UNKNOWN
BUT WHOSE LAST KNOWN ADDRESS IS: 4341
Kelson Avenue, Marianna, FL 32446

Residence unknown, if living, including any un-
known spouse of the said Defendants, if either
has remarried and if either or both of said De-
fendants are dead, their respective unknown
heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, creditors,
lienors, and trustees, and all other persons
claiming by, through, under or against the
named Defendant(s); and the aforementioned
named Defendant(s) and such of the aforemen-
tioned unknown Defendants and such of the
aforementioned unknown Defendants as may
beinfants, incompetents or otherwise not sui
juirs.

YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action has
been commenced to foreclose a nriortgage on
the following real property, lying and being and
situated in Jackson County, Florida, more par-
ticullarly described as follows:

STARTING AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF
LOT 24, CENTRAL HEIGHTS SUBDIVISION, MA-
RIANNA, FLORIDA; THENCE RUN EASTERLY 100
FEET ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF KELSON AVE-
NUE TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING: THENiCE
RUN SOUTHWESTERLY 145.1 FEET PARALLEL
WITH RUSS STREET; THENCE EASTERLY 50 -
FEET PARALLEL WITH KELSON AVENUE;
THiENCE NORTHEASTERLY 145.1 FEET PARAL-
LEL WITH RUSS STREET; THENCE WEST 50 FEET
ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF KELSON AVENUE
TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, ACCORDING TO
THE PLAT ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT OF JACKSON ,
COUNTY, FLORIDA. *

AND

BEGIN AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE
SAID WEST 100 FEET OF LOT 24, CENTRAL
HEIGHTS SUBDIVISION; THENCE NORTH
89009'26" WEST, ALONG THE NORTH BOUN-
DARY OF SAID LOT 24, A DISTANCE OF 11.84
FEET; THENCE SOUTH 02 059'03" EAST, 49.86
FEET TO THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT
24; THENCE SOUTH 89 009726" EAST, ALONG THE
SAI BOUTNHD UNARHY, .4 DFWE~TS T HEEH
TOTEEAST BOUNDARY OF THE SAID WEST 0 ET
100 FEET; THENCE NORTH 06 o36'52" EAST,
ALONG THE SAID EAST BOUNDARY, 50.00 FEET '
TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.

more commonly known as 4341 K~elson Avenue,
Marianna, Florida 32446.

This action has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of your written de-



aganst, yo o h eif demnde ino theR &FSMALP
Ctompant. o litf;whs drs s43

Wub d yiomng ,d sa of this Coiead ieeourt ona

cicith h andr County Courtsete efr ev
By: o Jessicai M tooneyham medaey hr







FOR JRACKSO COUNTY, FLOID

CASE NO:ic 10-825-CA




ATLANTAPOTAL CREDITIA CRUNION N


a Georgia Corporation,
Plaintiff,

vs.


SUSAN B. MURPHY, married,
UNKNOWN TENANT #1,
Defendants.

NOTICE OF SALE

Notice is given that pursuant to the Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure entered on August 29, 2011
in Civil Action No. 10-825-CA of the circuit
Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit, in and
for Jackson County, Florida, in which Atlanta
Postal Credit Union is the Plaintiff and Susan B.
Murphy, married and Unknown Tenant #1 are
the Defendants, I shall sell the property at pub-
lic sale on September 29, 2011 at 11:00 A.M. to
the highest and best bidder for cash in the
Front Lobby of the Jackson County Courthouse,
4445 Lafayette Street, Marianna, Florida 32446,
in accordance with F.S. 45.031, the following -
described real property set forth in the Final
Judgment of Foreciosure:


LF15424

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA

CASE NO. 11-414-CA

CAPITAL CITY BANK,
Plaintiff,

vs.

JANNETT MANDERSON and UNKNOWN
TENANT(5),
Defendants.

NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45

NOTICE is given pursuant to a Final Judgment
of Foreclosure dated August 18, 2011, in Case
No. 11-414-CA, of the Circuit Court of the Four-
teth Jdi iaw Cruit, in ad or a kn Cohun-

Plaintiff and JANNETT MANDERSON is the De-
fendant, I will sell to the highest and best bid-
der for cash at the front door of the Jackson
County courthouse in Marianna, Jackson Coun-
ty, Florida at 11:00 a.m., Central Time, on Sep-
tember 29, 2011, the property set forth in the
Final Judgment of Foreclosure and more partic-
ularly described as follows:

Lot 19, Block 155, COMPASS LAKE HILLS, UNIT
FIVE, according to the Plat thereof, as recorded
in Plat Book A4, Pages 130 through 140, Inchu-
sive, Public Records of ackson County, Florida .

Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must
file a claim within sixty.(60) days after the sale.

DATED: August 30, 2011

DALE RABON GUTHRIE
Clerk of the circuit Court

BY: /s/ Tammy Bailey
Deputy Clerk

Garvin B. Bowden, Esq,
Gardner, Bist, Wiener, Wadsworth & Bowden
P.A.
1300 Thomaswood Drive'
Tallahassee, Florida 32308


All that certain parcel of land lying and being
situated in the County of Jackson, State of Flor-
ida, to wit'
The West H of the SEr of the SWVI of Section
30, Township 7 North, Range 10 West of Jack-
son County, Florida.

Less and Except the South 2 chains of the
above described property*

Together with a perpetual non-exclusive ease-
ment for ingress, egress and utilities over and
across the following described property:

Begin at the Southwest corner of the Southeast
%/ of the Southwest %, thence run S 90 deg
00'00"E, 30.0 feet, thence N 00 deg 15'46"W,
1310 feet, thence N 90 deg 00'00"W, 30.0 feet,
thence S 00 deg 15'46"E, 132.0 feet to the Point
of Beginning.

IFFYU MARE A SON CLAIMING A RIGHT TO
MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK NO LAT-
ER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL
TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED
TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. AFTER 60 DAYS,
ONLY THE OWNER OF RECORD AS OF THE DATE
OF THE LIS PENDENS MAY CLAIM THE SUR-
PLUS.

Signed this 29th day of August, 2011
DALE RABON GUTHRIE
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT

BY: /s/ Tammy Bailey
As. Deputy Clerk



LF15425

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA

CASE NO.11i-433-CA

CAPITAL CITY BANK,
Plaintiff,

vs.

SANG B. NGUYEN A/K/A SANG BA NGUYEN and
UNKNOWN TEldANT(S)
Defendants.

NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45

NOTICE is given pursuant to a Final Judgment
of Foreclosure dated August 4, 2011, in Case
No. 11-433-CA, of the circuit court of the Four-
teenth Judicial Circuit, in and for Jackson Coun-
ty, Florida, in which CAPITAL CITY BANK is the
Plaintiff and SANG B. NGUYEN A/K/A SANG BA
NGUYEN is the Defendant, I will sell to the high-
est and best bidder for cash at the front door of
the Jackson County Courthouse in Marianna,
Jackson County, Florida at 11:00 a.m., Central
Time, on September 29, 2011, the property set
forth in the Final Judgment of Foreciosure and
more particularly described as follows:

The SE 1/4 of SE 1/4 of Section 14, Township 5
North, Range 13 West, Jackson County, Florida.

And all the portion of the SW 1/4 of SE 1/4 of
Section 14, Township 5 North, Range 13 West,
Jackson County, Florida which les East of State
Highway No. 273.

Less and Except that portioli deeded in official
Records/ Book 632, Page 686 and Official Re-
cords Book 640, Page 584 of the pihblic records
of Jackson County, Florida.

Any person claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must
file a claim within-sixty (60) days after the sale.

DATED: August 30, 2011 ,,

DALE RABON GUTHRIE
clerk of the circuit Court .

BY: /s/ Tammy Bailey
Deputy Clerk

Garvin B.-Bowden, Esq, ,
Gardner, Bist, Wiener, Wdw oyth & Bowden
P.A. /,
1300 Thomaswood Drive
Tallahassee. Florida 32308


LF15535

INVITATION TO BID
JACKSON COUNTY GRANTS DEPARTMENT

Notice: Is hereby given to all general contrac-
tors, licensed by the state of Florida, that
sealed bids will be accepted at the Grants
Dept. Located at 4487 Lafayette' St.
Bld Name: SHIP Rehab Bid Number: 1011-47
Description: The Jackson County Board of Com-
missioners (JCBCC) is seeking qualified general
contractors to participate in work involving
various forms of rehabilitation of single-family
pre/postl978 homes.
Pre-qualifications: Each contractor must pro-
vide pre-qualifying data concerning their eligi-
bility to participate in the SHIP Program 5 cal-
endar days prior to walk thru. contractor
packets may be picked up at the Grants Dept.
Special Note: The walk thru of homes will bie
on 9/21/11 all contractors must rheet at 9 AM
CST in the Conference Room, 4487 Lafayette St.
Qualifications and General Conditions will be
handed out prior to beginning the walk thru.
Contractors must participate in the walk thru
to bid on homes.
Submission Deadline: 10/3/11 at 9 AM CST
Bids SHALL be-submitted in a sealed envelope!
marked: SEALED BID, FIRM NAME, BID NAME &
NUMBER, DATE & TIME of OPENING.
Bid Opening: 10/3/11 at 10 AM CST at the
JCBCC Board Room, 2864 Madison St. Bids will
be awarded during a JCBCC's meeting. Bids
will be made to the best bidder, as determined
by the JCBCC; the right is reserved to reject
any and all bids.
Information: ~850-482-9083

Dale Rabon Guthrie, CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT
By: Chuck Lockey, BOARD CHAIRMAN, JCBCC
EEO STATEMENT
Jackson County is committed to assuring equal
opportunity in the award of contracts and,
therefore, complies with all laws prohibiting
discrimination on the basis of race, color, reli-
qion, national origin, aqe _and sex.,


CLASSIFIED























* 9 O 0 *


Stock #9105097


Stock #5842003


2004~r LINCOLN B
TOWNM CAR I
Stock #6007002


CREW @BBIC CA~B 4X4l
Stock #6124001




Only
$9,000
I P4u T. rp -- cr


Only
$3,000
j:I1 lus alr. .rr pectr~n


2002 MgaiTS~UBISM
eECLIsPSE SBT~s
Stock #6211001


Only




Stock #9105087


Only
$9,600


2006 CHEVROLET

Stock #6247001




Only

200 CHVROET


XCA~~B 4%4
Stock #9003073


Only
$3,800




Stock #6224001





Only


SILVRAD .


Stock #5636001'


2007ge TOY~i~sTAB
CAMRBY SE
Stock #6121001


Only
Si a,ooo
*AE; Is plus safety inspection


2004)P FOBRD F250ti~
XCABi8% 4X4r9
Stock #9105033


Only
9,200~.-
*AsIspls afey nsecio


2008bQbP NI$BSSA~N
AIRRMrABA ZlE
Stock #6225001


Only
$9,900
" 5 II plus r. rj, ir.Ep.=:I.Clr.


Only
$8,700
* Ii plui ijter, p . r :'


S88 + THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15. 2011


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN + www.jcfloridan.com


~S~:~S~S~: i-~ ct~j
'I i-I -; (1~I.~, a
I~ t~l ~~=
a ji~~i ~~
i~i
IdB ,;~:~~ ~L~a~ ~t1~i rF! i


t


'As Is PIlus Safety Inspection plus $389.00 P & H. Tax. Tag and Title.

Rkl MMr L MIVI LL Rtl

SERVICE 8 PARTS DEPARTMENT~ IS OPEN 08 SATURDAYS 8:00-12I:00Pw FOR YOUR CONVIENIENICE


482-3051 482-6317 4204 WEST LAFAYETTE STREET MARIANNA, FL


Thursday 9/15


Tuesday 9-20


Ma at


I