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Jackson County Floridan
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028304/00659
 Material Information
Title: Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title: Sunday Floridan
Portion of title: Floridan
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Jackson County Floridan
Publisher: Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Marianna Fla
Publication Date: 9/14/2011
Frequency: daily (except saturday and monday)[<1979-1995>]
weekly[ former 1934-<1955>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates: 30.776389 x -85.238056 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note: "Independent."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID: UF00028304:00659
 Related Items
Preceded by: Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by: Marianna Floridan

Full Text

































__11__~_1__~ ~~1 _~111_


This speed Ilmit sign and two other road signs are believed
to have been damaged by someone who stole a tractor and
mower from a Jackson County farmer Saturday morning.


Sheriff requesting


$100,000 more for

fuel for rest of year


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GOP foes seek cracks

in Perrys record at

Florida debate. See

more on page 7A.


Vol. 88 No. 178


soon after.
Officers lost'sight of Phil-
lips as they crossed over
McPherson Street. A pe-
rimCbter was set up around
where they last saw him.
When officers entered the
wooded area where Phil-
lips disappeared, they
found Bush and her father,

See PURSUIT, Page 7A


4I


standing. .
Joshua Phillips, 27, is
charged with aggravated
assault on a law en-force-
ment officer, battery on a
law enforcement officer,
attempted manufacture
of methamphetamine, re-
sisting arrest with violence
and possession of drug
paraphernalia.
Karlee Bush, 19, is


charged with attempted
manufacture of metham-
phetamnine, tampering
with evidence, resisting
arrest without violence
and possession of drug
paraphernalia.
The pair was standing
in a yard on Daffin Street
when police approached
them to ask about an on-
going felony case.


Phillips threw an open
pocket knife at the officers
and fled the scene. Officers
chased after him toward
McPherson Street. While
passing between a house
and chain link fence, Phil-
lips was seen hitting an
officer with a screen door
that had been lying against
the fence. Bush began run-
ning in the same direction


BY LAUREN DELGADO


A man threw a knife and
screen door at pursuing
police after officers at-
tempted to speak to him
and his female companion
about a case, according to
a press release from the
Marianlna Police D~epart-
men~t. Officers later found


Bush


rninips


a car containing suspected
methamphetamine where
the couple was originally


The tractor was subse-
quently found abandoned
in a remote location near
Chipley.
A speed limit sign and
pole-were knocked askew,
one. road identification
sign and pole were knocked
face down in the grass, and
the County Road ~164 iden-
tification sign was almost
flattened as well.
A Jackson County Road
and Bridge department
employee has since re-.
paired at replaced the
damaged signs and poles.
Anyone with informa-
tion is the case is asked to
call the sheriff's .office 'at
482-9648. ;


From staff reports

Investigators are trying to
find out wiho stole a farm-
er's tractor and mower two
weekends ago, the thief
damaging the tractor and
several road signs before
abandoning part of the rig
in neighboring Washing-
ton County,
According to a press re-
lease from -the Jackson
County Sheriff's Office,
the equipment was stolen
on the morning of Satur-
day, Sept. 3, from a loca-
tion near the intersection
of Lovewood and Earlston
roads in western Jackson
County.


tional~transfer later if it is
needed.
iA cd ng to bserst ty,
large part, because of a big
increase in the number of
calls his deputies respond-
edl to over the course of
2010-11.
From Jan. 1 to May 16,
2010, for example, depu-
ties went to 7,312 locations
as the result of 911 calls or

See FUEL, Page 7A


BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com

Jackson County Sher-
iff Lou Roberts asked the
county commission for a
$100,000 increase Tuesday
in this year's fuel and oil
budget as the fiscal period
winds down.
The board agreed to
transfer half that amount
from the county's fine and
forfeiture fund, and said it
would consider an .addi-


I. eLg .E . i
MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Jodie Shumaker works on one of his orchids Tuesday at Florida Star Nursery. He is taking his award wimiing plants
to Birmingham to compete in the 27th annual Crchid Show and Sale.

Manrillna resident to compete at Alabama orchid show


plants, from hoyas to orchids.
Shumaker said he had no
favorites.
"That's my downfall, Ilove
them all," he said.
On Sept. 16-18, his experience
with and knowledge of orchids
Swill be tested at the 27th Annual
Alabama Orchid Show and Sale.
Shumaker will have an ex-
hibit and about 30 plants to be
judged. As he was showing off his
plants, Shumaker was judging
his own plants: A knick on the
bloom here, a yellow leaf there,
all things he worried the judges
would knock off points for.
"The flower has to be better
than anything they've judged
before," he said.
Still, Shumaker believes he


has a good chance of coming
home with some prizes. The
last time he competed, he came
home-with some ribbons, and he
learned from that experience.
The goal prize for this weekend
will be the first class certificate
for his exhibit, said Shumaker.
The exhibit will have a tropi-
cal theme, with cotton candy
ferns flowing down into a mirror
'reflecting pool' as orchids are
draped around it.
A ventilated truck will carry
,the 1,000 plants Shumaker plans
to take, about 30 of which are
actual entries. Shumaker's 12-
year-old son Brandon will attend
the show as well.

See ORCHIDS, Page 7A


BY LAUREN ~DELGADO
Idelgado@jcfloridan.com


olds that fall in love with
.his grandmother's Christ-
mas cactus.
Jodie Shumaker is one of those
few. He begged his grandmother
for some clippings from the
plant and went on to grow his
own. Around 11 years old, he
bought his first orchid.
From there, he began his first
nursery at 17 years old, went to
the University of Florida to study
horticulture, and has had nurser-
ies in Gainesville and at several
different locations throughout '
Mlarianna.
He grows a number of exotic


Pi e-
F"i6 :i?
MARKSKINNER/FLORIDAN
Capt. Scott Edwards fuels up his patrol car Tuesday at the
Jackson County Sheriff's Department. The department is
requesting additional money to cover fuel expenses.


>> TV LISTINGS...3B


> CLASSIFIEDS...5-7B


This Newspaper
Is PrintedOn
Recycled Newsprint




II I!1?1


>> ENTERTAINMENT...4B


>> LOCAL...3A


>> OBITUARIES...7A


H OPINION3r 4A


>> SPORTS...1-31B


..A. DIR


Man throws knife, door at officers


Officers are seeking

information on.


tractor, mower theft


~PRI~Z=-~WI~NNING IP jNr



Man with the green thumb






























ULTRA V10 LET INDE X

0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8-10 Very High, 11+ Extreme


FLORIDA'SREl

PANHANDLE CI
MEDIA PARTNERS wJA .co.s -


_1__1~~-~~~--------~


The submission deadline for this calendar is two days before publication. Submit to: Community Calendar, Jackson County Floridan, P.O. Box 520, Marianna. FL 32447
email editorial@jcfloridan.com, fax (850) 482-4478 or bring items to 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.


Psl~icO~ ROurrdRp


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www jcloridan.corn


I2A *WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER 14. 2011


car
-I C~
Aigh: 93 rupa: 94
;Loff: 66
t~R: 66
~ ''
.r-
-L: Llj~- _:Jj~~ : I-:1. - :
;ligh: 94
_'.J;sC-
~ ,I~ow:67~ :~" ~: ~
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I~ L3'I~fl~

'~-~igh: 93
"~C~orueSS


Lorv: 73


F; High 90"Lw 7

Friday
Possible Storms.




Low 64oHgh 8


Sunday
Stray Shower.


High 92
Low 710


24 hours
Month to date
Normal MTD

TIDES
Panama City
Apalachicola
Dr USt. Joe
Pensacola


0.00"
1.38"
1.99"


Normal YTD
Normal for year


II
48.60"
58.25"


- 11:38
-4:58


12:22


Tomorrow
Possible Storms.



i'High 830
L.'y Low - 62o

Saturday
Partly Cloudy & Cooler.


Fligh
High
Hig
High


Low
Low
Lw
Low


-7:41 AM
- 11:54 AM
7:7AM

-8:52 AM


THIE SUN AND MOON


RIVER READINGS
WVoodruff
Blountstown
Marianna
Caryville


Reading
38.99 ft.
0.43 ft.
4.44 ft.
0.07 ft.


Flood Stage
66.0 ft.
15.0 ft.
19.0 ft.
12.0 ft.


Sunrise
Sunset
Moonrise
Moonset


6:25 AM
6:49 PM
7:48 PM
9:15 AM (Thu)


Sept. Sept. Oct. Oct.
20 27 4 12


rI
St.' Luke's Episcppal Church, 4362 Lafayette3 St.,
Marianna. Kenneth Brooten Jr., Esq. will discuss
"Our Endanigered U.S. Constitution." Dutch-treat:

Aedultuu C0 nh 2 en 1r20a6no udse $s.Resra 0 on

n,,Alford Community Health Clinic, 1770 Carolina
St., Alford, will be open 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The free
Clinic for income-eligible patients without medical
insurance treats short-term illnesses and chronic
conditions. Appointments available (call 263-7106
or 209-5501) and walk-ins welcome. All patients,
sign in before noon,
i Jacob City Day Celebrations include a parade,
entertainment, food, vendors and activities for all:
Parade contact: 263-2120. Booth~vendor contact:
263-6636.

SUNDAY, SEPT. 18
n Nee'l family Reunion Descendants of Daniel
."Dan" Boone Neel, George Washington Lafayette
SNeel and "Jimi" Neel gather at the Dellwood Commu-
nity Clubhouse. Bring historical information/photos
to share, and favorite dishes, drinks for a covered
dish lunch at l2:30 p.m. (plates, cups, utensils
provided). Call 593-6086.
n Randy Estelle, international concert pianist
and vocalist, will be in concert at First Assembly
of God of Marianna at 6 p.m. Public welcome. Call
482-2800.
n Alcoholics Anonymous closed discussion, 6:30
p.m., 4349 W. Lafa ette St., Manianna (mn one-st~ry
buildjrig behind 4351 W. Lafayette St.). Attendance
'limited to persons with a desire to stop drinking.

M()NDAY, SEPT. 19
n Family Dollar Job Fair Marianna and Chipley's
Goodwill Career Training Centers are hosting a job
fair for the Family Dollar D~istribution Center, 9 a.m.
at the Chipley Goodwill CTC,1301 Main St. Bring
Driver license, Social Security card. Various posi-
tions available. Call 526-0139.
n Orientation 10:30 a.m. at the Goodwill Career
Training Center, 4742 Highway 90 irl Marianna. Reg-
ister for free job placement and computer training
classes and learn about services offered to people
with disadvantages/disabilities. Call 526-0139.
n AARP Chapter 3486 of Mlarianna will feature
an update on Social Secu~rity at its covered-dish
lunch, noon at the United Methodist Church, 290
Caledonia St., behind the Marianna Post Office.


TODAY
u ackson County Habitat for Humanity
Warehouse hours: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
SEaro Leri g Coalio of Nod h et hF r d
munity room of the Chipola Workforce Board Office,
Marianna. Join the conference call at 1-888-808-
6959, guest code: 7475102.
n Chipola Retirees meet for lunch, 11:30 a.m.
at the Gazebo Coffee Shoppe & Deli in downtown ~
Marianna. All retirees and friends are welcome.
n Alcoholics Anonymous Open meeting, noon
to l p.m., First United Methodist Church, 290'1
.Caledonia St., Marianna, in the AA room.

Ti-URSDAY, SEPT.15
n Northeast Jackson County Optimist Club
G~olf Tournament at Indian Springs Golf Course,
a four-man scramble with registration and lunch
beginning at 11:30 a.m., tee-off at 12:30 p.m. For
individual golfers, entry fee is $55. Lunch, bever-
ages on the cart provided. Benefits youth activities
'in Jackson County. Call 557-8637 or 569-5282.
a Breast Cancer Support Group meeting 5
p.m. in the ground floor classroom of Jackson
SHospital, 4250 Hospital Drive, Marianna.0Open to
anyone who has-or had breast cancer or breast. -
health issues. No cost. Call 718-2661. .
n Jackson' County NAACP meeting, 5:30 p.m.
in the St. James A.M.E. Church basement, 2891
Orange St. in Marianna. Call 569-1294.
a Project Graduation meeting for Seniors 2012
and parents 5:30 p.m. at the Marianna High .
School Library.
a Blues & Boots - Hosted by the Democratic
Party of Jackson County, the annual event starts at
6 p.m. in the Agriculture Building on US 90 West in
Mlar~ianna, next to the Armory. Florida Democratic
Chairman and other officials will speak. Dinner .
tickets are a $20 donation. All are invited.
a Alcoholics Anonymous Closed discussion, 8
to 9 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901 Cale-
donia St., Marianna, in the AA room. Attendance -
limited to persons with a desire to stop tIrinking.

FRIDAY, SEPT. 16
SConstitution Day Observed -- The-Baptist Col-
lege of Florida in Graceville will have a replica of the
originalI C ons15t It u iIor.si document and. Bill of Rights
on display in the common area of the Student '


Center. Visit www. baptistcollege.edu.
n International Chat'n' Sip Jackson County
Public Library Learning Center staff and their in.
teiaina IEngli h lan es Mn ie nt he pbi
Green St:. for the exchange of language, culture and
ideas among our local and international communi-
ties in a relaxed environment. Light refreshments
served. No charge. Call 482-9124.
n Small Business Seminar "Steps to Start-
ing a Business,"'9:30 a.m. to l2:30 p.m. in Chipola
College Business and Te3chnology Building, Room
M-108, covering organizational requirements and
licensing in Florida and more. Register at http://bit.
ly/CC-SmaliBiz. Cost: $30. Call 718-2413 or email
frohj@chipola.edu. -
i> Partners For Pets Benefit Spaghetti Dinner .
4 to 8 p.m. at the Great Oaks Golf Course Club
House at 3071 Highway 90 in Marianna, with live
music, door prizes, and a Thirty-One Gifts party
given by Ashley Slay, who will donate her commis~
sions to the shelter. Tickets: $5 for adults, $3 for
children under 12. Call 482-4570.
n Celebrate Recovery Adult, teen meetings to
"overcome hurts, habits and hang-ups in a safe
environment," ? p.rn., Eva ngel Worship Center, 2645
Pebble Hill Road. Dinne'r: 6 p.m. (free for first-time
guests). Child care available. Call 209-7856 or
573-1131. ..
n Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, 8 to
9 p.m. inl the AA room at First Ulnited Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St., Marianna.

SATURDAY, SEPT. 17
n Marjanna City Farmers Markelt is open 8 a.m. to
,noon for the fall season, Saturdays only in Madison
Street Park.
n Jackson County, Health Department Closing
the Gap program offers a free yoga class;8:30 a.in.
at integras Weliness Center, 4230 Lafayette St.,
Suite C, in Marianna: Mat provided. Call 482-6221.
Marianna High School Cheerleading K~iddie
Clinic 8:30 to 11:30 a.m. at the MHS gym, Future
Bulldogs (ages 3-10 of pre-school through fifth ~
grade) will learn cheers, chants and dances and
cheer with the "Big Dogs" at the.Sept. 23 Maii-
anna-v-Chipley football game. Cost: $30. Event is a
Sfuridraiser for the MHS Varsity Cheerleaders. Email
debbie.dlryden@jcsb.org or call 482-9605, ext 252.
a Constitution Day L~uncheon Hosted by
6 DAR/C.A.R./SAR at 11 a.m. MacKinnon Hall of


one trespassing complaint, one
juvenile complaint, one assault,
one fraud complaint, two as-
sists of a mot'orist/pedestrian,
two assists of another agency,
one child abuse complaint, one
public service call, two criminal
'registrations and two threat/ha-
rassment complaints. .

JACKSON COUNTy
CORRECTIONAL FACILITY
The following persons were
booked into the county jail dur-
ing the latest reporting periods:
n Juan Cervantes, 39, 2532
Elizabeth Lane, Alford, felony
battery.
a Karlee Bush, 19, 2828
McPherson Road, Marianna,
attempted manufacture of
methamphetamine, tampering
with evidence, resisting arrest
without violence, possession of
drug paraphernalia.


a Joshua Phillips, 27, 5459
Hummingbird Lane, Bascom,
32 counts of fraudulent use of
'credit card, aggravated assault
on an officer, battery on an
officer, attempted manufacture
of methamphetamine, theft:
obtaining credit card by fraud.
a Fain Henry, 40, 2305 Reed
Lane, Marianna, petit theft.
Michael Henry, 50, 4062
Bryan St., Greenwood, 3 counts
of possession of a controlled
substance with intent to sell.
a Octxavis Garrett, 24, 6146
Paradise Club Road, Green-
wood, no valid drivers license.

JAIL POPULATION: 239

To report a crime, call CrimeStoppers
at 526-5000 or a local law enforcement
agency.
To report a wildlife violation, call -888-
S404-FWCC (3922).


MARIANNA POLICE
DEPARTMENT
.The Marianna Police De-
partment listed the following
incidents for Sept. 12, the latest
available report: two accidents
'with no injuries, one miss-
izig juvenile, two suspicious
vehicles, two
funeral escorts, -
one highway ''
obstruction, r
one verbal dis- , ?SM~E
turbance, one "
drug offense,
one burglary alarm, 10 traffic
stops, two larceny complaints,
one obscene/threatening
call, one suicide attempt, one
animal complaint, four proper-
ty/building checks, two assists
of another agency, one public
service call, one patrol request
and one threat/harassment
complaint.


WHKE-UP CA


W~ea~ther Outlook


PRECIPITATION


h


GO~tnR~t Calenda


JACKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN


vrobrts cfoi" bd s co

Circulation Manager Dena Oberski
doberski@jcfloridan.com









CONTACT US
Telephone: (850) 526-3614
FAX: (850) 482-4478 .
Email: editorial@jcfloridan.com
Mailing Address: .
P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447
Street Addmess:
4403 Constitution Lane
Marianna, FL 32446
Office Hours:
Weekdays, 8a.m:to 5 p.m.

MISS YOUR PAPER?
You should receiive your newspaper no later
than 6 a.m. If it does not arrive, call Circula-
tion between 6 a.m. and noon, Tuesday to
Friday, and 7 a.m, to ll a.m, on Sunday. The
Jackson County Floridan (USPS 271-840)
is published Tuesday though Friday and ,
Sunday mornings. Periodical postage paid
at Marianna, FL.


SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Home delivery: $11.23 per month; $32.83
for three months; $62.05 for six months;
and $123.45 for one year. All prices include
'applicable state and local taxes. Mail
subscriptions must be paid in advance. Mail
subscriptions are: $46.12 for threenrionths;
$92.24 for six months; and $184.47 for one
year.
ADVERTISING
all advertise agreesdthatathe p bis er
out of errors,and advertisements beyond
the amount paid for the space actually
occupied by that portion of the advertise-
ments in which the error occurred, whether
such eri si due toetehseo neoIen e aftnhde
there shall be not liability for non-inser-

amount paid for such advertisement. This
newspaper will not knowingly accept or-
publish illegal material of any kind. Advertis-
ing which expresses preference based on
legally protected personal characteristics is
not acceptable,

HOW TO GET YOUR
NEWS PUBLISHED
Th ackson County F oridan will publs
news of ge eral interest fr eu itcy ar e

events via email, fax. mail, or hand delivery.
Fees may apply for wedding, engagement,
anniversary and birth announcements.
Forms are available at the Floridan offices.
Photographs must be of good quality and
suitable for print. The Floridan reserves the
right to edit all submissions.
GETTING IT RIGHT .
The Jackson County Floridan's policy
is to correct mista kes promptly. To
report an error, please call 526-3614
Monday-Friday.


JACKSON COUNTy
SHERIFF'S OFFICE
The Jackson County Sheriff's
Office and county Fire/Rescue
reported the following incidents
for Sept. 12, the latest available
report. (Some of these calls ~
may be related to after-hours
calls taken on behalf of Gratcev-
ille and Cottondale Police
SDepartthents): one accident
with injury, two abandoned ve-
hicles, one reckless driver, two
suspicious vehicles, one suspi-
cious incident, one suspicious
person, two funeral escorts, one
burglary, one verbal distur-
bance, one prowler complaint,
one report of a vehicle fire, 20
medical calls, one traffic crash
Entrapment, five burglary
alarms, two panic alarms, one
report of a shooing in the area,
16 traffic stops, four larceny
complaints, five civil disputes,















































































































HOrjda IitBl o~tteTJ


Available in at~SBSOfl
several colors ~~~llllW &

Downtown Marianna
850.482.4037(







WELL ESTABLISHED






IN MARIAN NA


Itrusa International of Marianna recently donated backpacks and school supplies to two local elementary schools: E M. Golson and
Riverside. LEFT: From left, Kay Tyler, Altrusa member; Mendy Bannerman, E M. Golson Elementary School Guidance; Gina Stuart,
tua president; Jessica Craven, assistant principal at Golson; and Carolyn Glass, Altrusa vice president. RIGHT: From left are Altrusa
members Julie Kent and Kisha Basford; Riverside Elementary School Principal John Ellerbee; and Gina Stuart, Altrusa president.


Cottondale High to host

College/Career Night
Special to the Floridan from the Office of Student
Financial -Assistance to
Cottondale High School give a brief presentation
will host College/Career on Florida scholarships
Night on Tuesday, Sept. and ~other financial aid.
20. Colleges and recruiters
,; Students in grades eight will give a brief presen-
through12 and their par- station highlighting the
ents will meet from 5:30 degrees they offer, schol-
.r. to 7:30 p.m. in the school arship opportunities and
.cafeteria. application deadlines.
Organizers have invited All representatives will
several local colleges and have a table set up and
:; Imilitary recruiters to par- wtill be, available to an-
ticipate in the event, as swer questions after the
well as a representative presentations.


Attorney addresses the 'Seasoned' population


Sat. (M) 5-5-3 0 4-5-5
Sun. ~ (E /1 714 65U2 1-11-12-18-19

E=Eveningdrawing, M =-MiddaydrawNing


I .' -~JI II~JI~L'~BI~L~-~s I


L


WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 14. 2011 3AT


LOCRL


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN~ ( www.]cfloridan.com


'

& A


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Marianna Mayor John E. Roberts, surrounded by members of DAR and C.A.R., signs a Constitution.Week proclamation
commemorating the 224th anniversary of the drafting of the U. S. Constitution. (From left, front) Virginia M~ilton, Anna Beth
Milton, Lily Roberts, Judge Roberts, Tatum Milton and Cooper Milton; and (back) Natalee Milton, Alma MIVIton, Sharon Wilkerson
and Carly Miller.

MariaBRR mayor proclaims Constitution Week


may participate in the
ada txlain rules forte
beef, swine, poultry and
non-livestock shows. This
will also be a time for
parents and youth to ask
questions.
If you have any ques-
tions about the exhibitor
meeting or the Panhandle
Youth Expo, contact 4-
H Agent Ben Knowles at
482-9620.

FOllOW US On
.Facebook


Special to the Floridan

All youth who plan to
participate in the 2011
Panhandle' Youth Expo
are invited to an Exhibitor
Meeting on vionday, Sept.
19, at 6 p.m. at the Jack-
son County Agriculture
Complex oriPennsylvania
Avenue.
Members of the Pan-
handle Youth Expo board
will explain how youth


The resolution was later adopted by
the U.S. Congress and signed into
Public Law No. 915 on Aug. 2, 1956
by President Dwight D. Eisenhower.
Chipola Chapter, NSDAR has ob-
served Constitution Week since the
chaliter was founded in 1958. On this
2;24th anniversary of the signing of
the U.S. Constitution, Chipola Chap-
ter will be joined by Blue Springs
Society, Children of the American
Revolution, and William Dunaway
Chapter, Sons of the American Revo-


lution, for the annual Constitution
Day luncheon on Saturday, Sept. 17
at 11 a.m. in MacKinnon Hall of St.
.Luke's Episcopal Church, 4362 La-
fayette St., Marianna.
Kenneth Brooten Jr., Esq. will dis-
cuss "Our Endangered U.S. Con-
stitution." Cost for the Dutch-treat
luncheon is $10 for adults and
youth over 12 years old, and $5 for
children. Contact M~ary Robbins at
snoopyxii60@hotmail.com or 209
4066 to make reservations.


Special to the Floridan

Marianna Mayor John B. Roberts
and Governor Rick Scott have issued
proclamations making Sept. 17-23
Constitution Week.
The tradition of celebrating, the
Constitution was started in 1890 by
the Daughters of the American Rev-
olution. In 1955, the Daughters peti-
tioned Congress to set aside Sept.17-
23 annually to be dedicated for the
observance of 'Co~nstitutisri Week.


FOIIOW US On
Twitter


Special to the Floridan

For its Monday, Aug. 22,
program meeting, Altrusa
International of Marianna
welcomed guest speaker
Glenda Swearinge?.
Focusing on elder law,
Marianna attorney Swear-
ingen has been a lawyer for
31 years and is knowledge-
able in issues pertaining to
estate planning, long-term
care planning and asset

FSwear nen has a pro-
gram called "Seasoned,"
produced through Chipola
College, that covers issues
pertaining to the "sea-
soned" population: any-
one above 55.
She also spoke to the Al-
trusa members about the
new Florida Power of At-
t~orney Act which will be
implemented on Oct. 1.


twiter.con/
Jofloridannews


Jackson County
Florldan


SUBMITTED PHOTO
From left: are Altrusa
International of Marianna
'Program Sponsor Susie
Stevens, attorney Glenda
Swearingen, and Cina Stuart,
Altrusa president.


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Special to the Floridan

The following marriages
and divorces were record-
ed in Jackson County dur-
ing thie week of Sept. 5-9.
~arr ages
a Mattie L. King and
Douglas Leon Pope III
a Che V. Gallman and
Yvonne Mahogany Pollard.
ilvoces
,, Ella Mae Brown vs. Ivan
N. Nelson
n Barbara.Maxey vs. Ron-


ald Maxey
n Samuel Jason Os-
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Osborn
a Laura Peacock Dewey
vs. Ashle eDeeynnnhm
Lee vs. Ronald S. Lee
,, Mei Hlua Reynolds vs.
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a James Raymond Phil-
lips vs. Rosalind Helen
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n Jason E. Guettler vs.
Amy Balius Guettler.


(E) 9/9 0-6-5 5-8-9-1 1-8-18-21-22


27-2 3 6-3-4
9)/10 7-4-0 7 2-9-3


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Saturday 9/10 4-19-22-32-53
Wednesday 9/7 3-5-18-27-54


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Or ContaIct: Dana Erhacher
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For lottery information, call (850) 487-7777 or (90j) 737-7777


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Ex~hibitor s at Panhandle

YOuhil Expo invited to

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Publisher
VALERIA ROBERTS



Guest Opinion





Stop the



tax thieves
From The Tampa Tribune

Concerned about rampant tax fraud, U.S. Sen.
strengthen IRS enforcement and look for ap-
propriate ways to include local police in federal cases
of ID theft.
U.S. Rep. Kathy Castor is also calling for hearings on
how best to crack down on fraud and save the govern-
ment billions of dollars. It's a timely response to the
announcement last week that Tarnpa.police had discov-
ered local tax thieves are stealing hundreds of millions a
year from the U.S. Treasury.
Nelson wants to make identity theft in tax fraud a
felony punishable by up to five years in prison. A more
useful part of his bill would increase IRS resources.
In Senate testimony earlier this year, it was reported
that 95 percent of the identity thieves prosecuted last
year by the Department of Justice for collecting fraudu-
lent taxtrefunds wenteto pniseoi lax pnshmen doesn't

prison sentences been no deterrent?
The answer is found in other statistics. Last year, the
IRS identified more than 245,000 incidents of tax-re-
lated identity theft. But there were only 4,706 criminal
investigations of any type. What Tampa police found is
substantiated by these numbers. Criminals involved in
this scam don't worry much about getting caught.
From the IRS, perspective, it's hard enough to catch
the major thieves while sorting through honest mis-
takes and minor cheating. Making sure everyone is who
they say they are is daunting. *
From the perspective of the identity thieves, as long
as the IRS doesn't know who they are, they don't worry
about having to explain blatant lies and phonyW-2
forms.
The IRS makes sure names match Social Security
numbers, but if a taxpayer is dead and a thief is using
that name and number, the IRS might not catch it,
One approach is to try to keep secret the~numbers of
the dead, but a better approach is being tried by the
IRS in a pilot program. It is experimenting with auto-
matically flagging a return filed in the name of a dead
. person.
But instead of simply rejecting the return, the IRS
should work with local police to run down the perpetra-
tor. It would also seem possible to link Social Security
numbers to ages, to prevent thieves from using.the
identities of babies to collect low-income tax credits.
When a 2-year-old claims dependents, alarms should
sound.
One concern in such a crackdown is that innocent
taxpayers are sure to be inconvenienced. An investiga-
tion by Scripps Howard News Service discovered that
in the past 13 years, the Social Security death index
has incorrectly listed 31,931 people who were in fact
alive. The Social Security Administration explained it as
"inadvertent keying errors."
Despite the challenges, identity theft must be brought
under control. A major review of IRS enforcement pro-
cedures is overdue. ..
Some taxpayer concerns could be answered by setting
up an agency to advocate for taxpayers and help them
correct the official record in cases of error or outright
fraud.
Taxpayers who think their identity may have been sto-
len should alert the IRS right away. Already, 378,000 tax-
payers have identity-theft indicators on their accounts,
and it only seems a matter of time until we all do.
We commend Nelson and Castor for looking into how
to protect us taxpayers from thieves who are using the
confidential tax system against us. Just as intelligence
agencies are cooperating to stop terrorists, the IRS
should better work with other law- enforcement agen-
cies to stop this major drain.of tax dollars.


Letters to the Editor -
Submit letters by either mailing to Editor. PO. Box 520,
Marianna F L. 32447 or fa...ing to 850-482-4478 or send
email to editorialB~cflorldan comn The Floridan reserves
the right to edit or not'publish any letter. Be sure to
include yelr full address and telephone number. These
will only be used to verify the letter and will not be
printed. For more information call (850) 526-3614


Santorum keeps it realmi GOP debate


Thanks America, for the golden age of Islam


~L'
"" "IIIIEL"II ":'"'


cord is what it is and so he stood
byit, explained it and didn't try to
finesse it. I'm not with him, but the
man seems to know who he is and
is unapologetic about it.
Perhaps there's even an authen-
ticity to Jon Huntsman's presenta-
tion, which left everyone scratch-
ing their heads, wondering what
exactly his strategy! is or who makes
up his constituency. One can't
really accuse him of sayih~g what
conservative primary voters in
South Carolina (or wherever) want
to hear.
And then there is Rick Santorum.
Perhaps it was the Reagan over-
load that got to him, but "Hardball"
host Chris Matthews took time
out from being vocally disturbed
by most of the debate goings-on
to pay a little tribute to the former
Pennsylvania senator. Matthews,
himself from Pennsylvania, with a '
brother who has iong been active
in politics there, has always been
decent to Santorum, when many
others haven't. Just Google or
don't, especially not at work or with
kids around Santorum's name
and you'll see the kind of nonsense
he has to put up with. It's a real
injustice, considering that he has
been a self-sacrificing leader of
.the kind I think most Americans
want in government. And so, in
the post-debate analysis, he got a
few minutes, which he was clearly
grateful for. Matthews said, in in-
Stroducing Santorum: "I think you're
very honest. I don't think you play
any games."
Making the case for hiinself in the
presidential race, Santorum said:
"I've gotten things done, I've been


willing to make the compromises
necessary, but never compromises
on principle."
When people talk about wanting
SWashington to work, I think this is
what they mean. They want people
there who know who they are, and
are willing to work with leaders of
different points of view to move the
bar.
That's not what President Obama
did when he forced through' his
radical and unwieldy healthcare .*
plan. It is what Rick Santorum and
Others did when Santorum worked
with Ted Kennedy and then-presi-
dent Clinton to pass welfare reform
(since rolled back by President
Obama).
There is, of course, a certain
liberation that comes from dismal
poll numbers that lead people to
underestimate your campaign. But
This is who Santorum is. Anyone
who, like Matthews, has watched
him over the years knows that.
And it's attractive. Even to an MS-
NBC host who frequently disagrees .
with him. Even in a climate where.
S54 percent polled want every mem-
ber of Congress voted out of office.
"Transparency" has been a
buzzword in Washington for a
while now. Anyone for a revival of
"authenticity"? Not putting on a
mask, just being who you are, un-
apologetic except where an apology
is absolutely called for. Someday
historians may trace its origins
back to a little Reagan Library
Magnetism.

Kathryn Lopez is the editor of Natibnal Review
Online (www.nationair:eview.com). She can be
contacted at klopez@nationalreview.com..


BY KATHRYN JEAN LOPEZ

here was something remark-
ably attractive at the Repub-
lcan debate at the Reagan
Library ort Sept. 7.
No, it wasn't Jon Huntsman's
tan, Mitt Romney's hair, Michele
Bachmann's shoes or Rick Perry's
swagger.
Although s uppose the' swagger
isn't entirely unrelated. But what
was special was something far le~ss
superficial, the kind of thing you
.know when you see, but that we all
might be a bit too jaded about poli-
tics to acknowledge: authenticity.
Yes, even politicians can have it.
You saw it when Romney, given
the opportunity to beat up on Perry
for a terrible decision he made as
governor of Texas -- to mandate
that Texas girls going into the sixth
grade be inoculated against the
human papillomavirus (a tram-
pling of parental rights, for starters)
decided not to. Romney, the
former governor of Massachusetts,
perhaps seeing his own vulner-
abilities records can be a biting
reality didn't take the bait.
Whatever the motivation, it was
one of many pander-free zones in
the. Reagan Library debate.
You even saw it in things I don't
agree with. Consider Gov. Perry on
the death penalty. I actually fotmd
it more than a little disturbing
,when the audience applauded his
robust record of capital-punish-
ment enforcement in Texas before
. he even had the opportunity to
Speak. ..
I do think the death penalty is
used way too widely, but Perry's re-


BY DIANA WEST


years without an Islamic attack
of similarly gigantic propor-
tions to those of Sept. 11, 2001, but
it is not enough. That's because
the decade we look back on is
marked by a specifically Islamic
brand of security from jihad. It was
a security bought by the Bush and
Obama administrations' policies -
of appeasement based in apology
for, and irrational denial of, Islam's
war doctrine, its anti-liberty laws
and its non-Western customs. As
a result of this policy of appease-
ment submission we now
stand poised on the brink of a
golden age. .
Tragically for freedom of speech,
conscience and equality before the
law, however, it is an Islamic golden
age. It's not just the post-9/11 rush
into Western society of Islamic
tenets and traditions on everything
from law to finance to diet that has
heralded this golden age, although
that's part of it. More important is
the fact that our central institutions
have actively primed themselves
for it, having absorbed and imple-
mented the central codes of Islam
in the years since the 9/11 attacks,
exactly as the jihadists hoped and
schemed.
Take the U.S. military, symbol
plus enforcer of American security.
In Afghanistan, our forces are
now "trained on the sanctity of the
holy book (the Quran) and go to
significant steps to protect it," as
the official International Security
Assistance Force (ISAF) website
reported last year.


Are they similarly trained to take
"significant steps" to "!protect"
other books? Hardly. It's reckless
and irresponsible to demand that
troops make the protection of any
book a priority in a war zone. But
it's not merely the case that U.S.
troops have become protectors of
the Quran in the decade follow-
ing 9/11. "Never talk badly about
the Quran or its contents," ISAF
ordered troops earlier this year.
Did the Pentagon restrict language
about "Mein Kampf" or the "Com-
munist Manifesto"? They, too, were
blueprints for world conquest
that the United States opposed. Of
course not.
But the Quran is different. It is
protected by Islamic law, and that's
enough for the Pentagon. Not
incidentally, ISAF further cautioned
troops to direct suspects to re-
move any Qurans from the vicinity
before troops conduct a search
- no doubt for the unstated fear
that infidel troops might defile the
protected book. .
None may "touch the Quran
except in the state of ritual purity,"
the Islamic law book Reliance of
the Traveller declares. And "ritual
purity," naturally, is a state a non-
Muslim can never, ever achieve
under Islam.
Since when did Uncle Sam in-
corporate Islamic law into military
protocols?
Since 9/11.
Now take the State Department,
symbol and nerve center of U.S.
action on the world stage.
In July, Secretary of State Hillary
Clinton announced a collaborative
effort between the United States


and the OIC, newly repackaged as
Organization of the Islamic Coop-
eration. (It used to be "C" for Con-
ference.) The get-together planned
for Washington, D.C., is supposed
to implement a non-binding
resolution against religious "stereo-
typing" (read: Islamic "ste'reotyp-
ing") that passed last March at the
U.N. Human Rights Council. Such
"stereotyping," of course, includes
everything from honest assess-
ments of the links between Islamic
doctrine and Islamic terrorism
to political cartoons. This makes
this U.S.-led international effort
nothing short of a sinister attempt
to snuff free speech about Islam.
And that sure sounds like a U.S.-co-
chaired assault on the First Amend-
ment. Not only is this treachery on
the part of the U.S. government, it
also happens to be part and parcel
of the OIC's official 10-year-plan.
Since when did Uncle Sam get in
the business of doing the bidding
of the OIC?
Since 9/11.
This is just a snapshot of what
the rush toward Islamization as a
goal of national policy looks like,
10 years since the Twin Towers col-
lapsed in a colossal cloud of dust
and fire. The air has cleared, but the
appeasement and the Islamization
go on. Thus, a golden age begins,
but unless we throw off this mental
yoke of submission, it cannot be
our own.

Diana West is the author of "The Death of the
Grown-up: How America's Arrested Develop-
meht Is Bringing Down Western Civilization,"
and blogs at dianawest.net. She can be con-
tacted via dianawest@verizon.net.





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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN c www.jcfloridan.com


STTE


16A WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER 14. 2011


Sta


I~i~a~8e~iar~I~W


The Associated Press

PEMBROKE PINES The me-
morial started with a steel beam
salvaged from the World Trade Cen-
ter a small piece of the terrorist
attacks that the city of Pembroke
Pines, Fla., was determined to hon-
or mn as own way.
Nobody from this Fort Lauderdale
suburb died on Sept. 11. But plans
for its memorial grew ever more
elaborate at one point projected
to cost more than $1 million as
the years passed.
"It was a glass-enclosed, air-con-
ditioned house," recalled the city's
mayor, Frank Ortis. "With a reflec-
tion pool and water running down,
hurricane-resistant glass. Obviously
we couldn't do that."
Hundreds of small memorials to
Sept. 11 have bloomed across the
country in the 10 years since the at-
-tacks. But in inany towns, what be-
gan as a simple tribute to the dead
turned into an expensive headache
as the cost of building such memo-
rials ballooned and the economy
deteriorated.
Still short of funds, some cit-
les dramatically scaled down the
scope of the projects, paid the out-
standing bill with public money or
abandoned a memorial altogether,
Others remain unfinished with no
completion date in sight.
The numbers are minuscule com-
pared with what it cost to build the
major national memorials: $700
million for the National September
11 Memorial & Museum in New
York City and at least $60 milion for
the Flight 93 memorial near Shanks-
ville, Pa. .
But like these small towns, even
the Flight 93 memorial is still strug-
gling to raise enough money to
build its original design organiz-
ers need to raise about $10 million
fo finish the memorial's first phase
and maintain it in the future.
Jerry Sanford, a former New York
City firefighter, has been soliciting
money since 2004 for a granite-me-
naorial in the shape of an American
flag to be displayed in North Naples,
Fla. Through private donations, he
has raised about $600,000 but he
still needs $800,000 more to pay for
the granite. .
Sanford had been hoping to unveil
the memorial in time for the 10th
anmiversary, but nobw he doesn't
knoyr when; it will be completed.
"Times are very different now," he
said. "The unemployment is ram-
pant. People are out of work. The


where she was arrested.
Police say the children
had been left alone since
6 a.m. when Shorter went
with a friend to look for a
job.

Fla. has 3ni highest
fate Of UNIRSued
ORLANDO Florida,
the state which led the
challenge to President
Obama's heath care plan,
has the nation's third
highest rate of residents
without health insurance.
Data released Tuesday
by the U.S. Census shows
that more than 20 percent
of Floridians lacked health
insurance during the past
three years. The national
average was just under 16
percent.
Only Texas and New
Mexico have higher rates
of residents without health
insurance.
Florida's attorney general
filed a lawsuit challetiging
the provisions of Obama's
health care plan just min-
utes after the president
signed the health care bill
into law in 2010.
Earlier this year, a federal
judge in Pensacola ruled
that the health care law
was unconstitutional. The
ruling was appealed to the
appellate court in Atlanta.

Adm. Mullen holds
Yllaml town hall event
CORAL GABLES Adm.
Mike Mullen, chairman
of the Joint Chiefs of Staff'
has met with a crowd of
students, veterans and
military families at a town
hall event in Miami'
Mullen was at the Uni-
versity of Miami Tuesday
as part of a series of com-
munity meetings he is
holding to better connect
the military and civilians.
Mullen took questions
about the killing of Osama
bmn Laden, medical care
Sfor veterans and military
operations in Iraq.
He says troops and their
families are under high
levels of stress and that the
suicide rate has risen.
The visit was one of doz-
ens that Mullen has made
aron dthhe cour eOhnd

ing twn hall meeting in


F~la. Supmeme Court
SMSpends judge
TALLAHASSEE The
Florida Supreme Court
is immediately suspend-
ing without pay a Central
Florida judge accused of
misconduct.
The high court on
Tuesday issued an order
suspending Circuit Judge
James Turner from Osceo-,
la County while it evalu-
ates his case. Turner was
found guilty bya hearing
panel of violations of state
law and judicial canons.
The findings against
the judge range from
campaign violations to
injecting himself into the
personal life of a female
court worker. She testified
'llarer repeatedly hugged
and kissed her without her
permission. A filing by the
state Judicial Qualifica-
tions Commission also
said that Turner "exhibited
an unhealthy and~unset-
tling interest" in the court
worker's son.
Turner's own attorney
has said thejudge made
mistakes and errors in
Judgment but he has
done nothing that merits
removal.

Woman dles after
contracting West NIIO
JACKSONJVILLE Au-
thorities say a 57-year-old
Jacksonville woman has


died after contracting the
West Nile virus.
The Duval County
Health Department also
confirmed Monday her
death is the second this
year from the mosquito-
borne illness. The Florida
Times-Union reports the
health department now
Was 12 cninned casesno
this year.
From wire reports


Police still looking for
nightclub shooterS
PALMETTO Police in
Palmetto are still looking
for those who sprayed
bullets from at least one
assault rifle at a nightclub
last weekend, killing two
people and wounding 22
others.
Investigators said Mon-
day they were scouring
arrest reports and other
records trying to iden-
tify possible suspects and
motives for shooting early
Saturday. Police say at
least one AK-47 was used
when at least two shooters
open-fired.
Witnesses believe gun-
men may have targeted
25-year-old Trayon Goff of
Palmetto, who was outside
Club Elite when the shoot-
ing began. Also killed was
38-year- old Gwenette
Matthews of Bradenton.
Palmetto is just south of
Tampa Bay and north of
Bradenton,

3 officers hurt in
CFMiser crash
BOYNTON BEACH -
Three South Flonida police
officers were injured after
their patrol car crashed
into a concrete pole while
responding to a burglary
call.
A spokeswoman for the
Boynton Beach police
says the officers piled into
a single car when a call
requesting backup at a
burglary scene came in
about 8:30 a.m.'ITuesday.
It's not clear what made
the officer driving the car
lose control and hit the
light pole, which broke
and landed atop the car,
trapping the officers
inside.
Meantime, the three
suspected burglars also
crashed their getaway
truck mnto a house about
a mile from the cruiser
cra~sh. They fled the scene.
Two were later caught, but
a third remains at large.
The officers are in stabi
condition and one of them
is expected to be released
Tu~esday.

SeaWkordi r seS .

ORLANDO It's going
to cost a little bit more to

T e r rld teea park
has raised ticket price
for the second time in a
year. Officials say the latest
increase of $2 raises the
price of a single-day ticket
to $81.99.
The Orlando Sentinel
reports the park is rais-
ing the price of other
ticket options. Among
them, Florida resident
passes that pair one-day
visits to SeaWorld and the
water park Aquatica have
increased from $99 to
$127.98.
SeaWorld spokesman
Nick Gollattscheck says
the park's guests stB l
believe that SeaWorld and
Aquatica are "outstanding
values."
The marine park last
raised tickets in November
2010, when the cost went
from $78.99 to $79.99.
Gollattscheck noted the
park offers discounts, in-
cluding $i10 off single-tick-
ets purchased irk advance,

Mom arrested for
l98VIng kidls alone
WINTER HAVEN Win-
ter Haven Police have
arrested a 31-year-old
woman for allegedly leav-
ing hrd ewyoun cidren

went to look for ajob.
Officers were called .
'llesday when two chil-
dren were spotted at an


apartment complex alone.
Police arrived and say they
found poor living condi-
tions ingide the apartment
and minimal food in the
refrigerator. The children
were taken to the Police
Department and the state
Division of Children and
Families was notified.
As anofficer wastl having

the mother, Antoinette
Shorter, returned home


il~i~Cell; 850-526-9516
----Office: 850-526-5260 s"-~
E-Math: oramock~embarymall.com
4257 Lafayette St., MaPrianna, FL


THEASSOCIATEUPRESS
People gather to mark the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11 terror attacks and to
unveil a 9-11 memorial on Sunday in Pembroke Pines.


economy is bad." .
There was a nationwide rush to
build Sept. 11 memorials in the first
few years after the attacks that has
since subsided, said Erika Doss, a
professor at the University of Notre
Dame and author of the book "Me-
morial Mania: Public Feeling in
America."
"Once the recession hit, the eco-
nomic possibilities of doing so went
away," said Doss, who discovered
about 400 memorials to 9/11 while
researching her book. "People stB l
wanted to do it, but it became more
and more difficult."
It's impossible to say how much
money has been spent on the pro-
liferation of memorials of all kinds
across the U.S. from makeshift
crosses on the side of the road to
massive monuments because
most are funded through a combi-
nation of pi~ivate and public money.
Memorials weren't always popular
in this country, though. In fact, af-
ter World War II, monuments were
eschewed in favor of "living memo-
rials" like auditoripEms and swim-
ming pools.named in memory' of
veterans, Doss said. A construction
boom began in the 1980s when the
Vietnam Veterans Memorial opened
on the National Mall to much fan-
fare, Doss said.
"It has ushered in lots and lots of
other groups demanding that they
be represented by a memorial in the
public sphere," she said. "People
think if they can make a memorial,
they can come to terms with what
happened."
After the 9/11 attacks, Dennis
Stout, then the district attorney in
San Bernardino County, Calif., be-


gan an effort to build a pair of me-
morials to the victims, one east of
Los Angeles and a twin in New York.
His nonprofit group, called the
Freedom's Flame Sept. 11 Memo-
rial, had a solid start, raising more
than $200,000 in its first two years.
It picked a design, which depicts
people escaping down a staircase at
the twin towers while rescuers climb
up. They paid for renderings.
But when Stout failed to win re-
election, the donations dried up.
Now, nearly a decade after the effort
began, there is still no memorial.
The money is largely gone, too, spent
partly on organizing a temporary,
traveling memorial exhibit made up
of limestone cladding from the Pen-
tagon, a damaged FDNY fire truck
and World Trade Center steel. Today
they have only around $20,000 left
in the bank, out of nearly $262,000
raised,
Stout.says he.hasn't given up. But
he is also realistic about his chances
of building the two monuments,
which had an estimated cost of $15
.million.
"It's a wonderful idea," he said.
"But, as you are well aware, there
are wonderful ideas that don't get
finished every day."
Residents complained about a me-
morial that was set to open Sunday
in the horse-racing village of Wel-
lington, Fla., where officials failed to
raise enough money to pay for it and
were forced to use about $300,000
from the town budget. Along with
a steel beam from the towers, this
memorial features a glass-paneled
'pergola and a fountain with a gas-
lit "eternal flame" that will burn day
and night.


He has pleaded not guilty
and says he is the victim of
party conservatives who
turned against then-Gov.
Charlie Crist, Greer's po-
litical benefactor.
Thrasher repeatedly
said he didn't recall details
of how Greer's severance
contract was developed
during an August depo-
sition taken in Tallahas-
see by Greer's attorneys,
Cheney Mason, who was
one of Casey Anthony
defense attorneys, and
Don Lykkebak, who rep-
resented former astronaut
Lisa Nowak in her crimi-
nal case. The other depo-
sitions filed in court last
week included two other
party leaders who signed
the severance agreement
- Florida House Speaker
Dean Cannon and Jason
Gonzalez, the party's for-
mer general counsel.
Thrasher, a lawyer from
Jacksonville, said he didn't
understand he was sign-
ing a final deal. He also
said he didn't recall mak-
mng public statements to
reporters in the weeks
leading .up to Greer's


departure that no such
agreement existed.
"You don't .reca~ll tell-
ing them there was no
such thing?" Lykkebak
said in transcripts of the
deposition, referring to
Thrasher's statements to
reporters,
"I may have said there
was no effectuated agree-
ment, yes sir. Because in

Lykkebak interrupted,
'Well, that was a little
reckless on your part see-
ing how you signed one,
wouldn't you say?
The, severance contract
likely will be -a crucial
piece of evidence during
Greer's trial uext year since


he contends party leaders
were aware of his role in
Victory Strategies, which
Greer claims saved the
party money compared to
the previous contract with
another fundraising firm.
A draft of Greer's sever-
ance agreement included
in Gonzalez's. deposition
even mentions Victory
Strategies by name in. a
clause stating that all of
Greer's expenditures were
proper. The specific refer-
ence to Victory Strategies
was removed from the
version signed by party
leaders because the clause
covered all fundraising
contracts, Gonzalez said
in his deposition,


The Associated Press

ORLANDO The state
senator who succeeded
Jim Greer as head of the
Republican Party of Flor-
ida signed a severance
agreement that promised
the disgraced party chair-
man teris of thousands
of dollars. But state Sen.
John Thrasher now says
he never understood that
the contract with Greer
was executed.
Depositions filed last
week at the Orange Coun-
ty Courthouse show how
top GOP officials such as
Thrasher have distanced
themselves from the sev-
erance agreement: they
signed in January 2010,
promising Greer more
than $11,000 a month
for almost a year after he.
stepped down as party
chair.
Greer is charged with
steering nearly $200,000
of party money toward
a fundraising firm, Vic-
tory Strategies, he had
formed with a top aide
while keeping his interest
in the company a secret.


Ora Mock, GRI
Broker/Associate


Small cities struggle to pay for 9/11 memorials


Call Ora For


Estat Needs In
Ror~ida tAnd/Or~
A labamra!i

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Dollar
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~111111111_111.111_ ..


"= dce oue micee d
scene where Phillips and
Bush ran froni were two
green bottles of suspect-
ed methamphetamine .
residue.
The Jackson County
Drug. Task Force was
called in td' handle and
process the chemicals.
Both Bush ~and Phillips
are awaiting first appear-
ance at the Jackson Coun-
ty Correctional Facility.


cret Garden Rare Plants.
Most of his business
comes from the Internet
he said.
He and his staff pack
the plants with a pape
towel on the soil, wrap
them in newspapers and
pack them into iPriority
Mail boxes.
"The trick to selling on
the Internet: A good pic-
ture," Shumaker~ said.
To look at Shurnaker's
entire plant catalog check
out: www.secretgarden
rareplants.comn.

*-~ ee.:r-Ie.: r I back with the
Floridan to see how Schumaker
did at the Alabama show.


Pine crest


3720 Caverns Road Marianna, FL 32446-1806 *(850) 423964~ L


WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER 14, 2011 7AT


LOCAL/NRATIONAL


JACKSON COUNlT i '3FLORDAI N wwwi~ jciloridan.com


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Republican presidential candidates (from left) Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman, businessman Herman Cain, Rep. Michele Bachmann, R-Minn., former Massachusetts
Gov. Mitt Romney, Texas Gov. Rick Perry,.Rep. Ron Paul, R-Texas, former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, and former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum, sing the
National Anthem before a Republican presidential debate on Monday in Tampa.



GOP foes seek cracks in Perry's record


onstage exchange of the cam-
paign so far. But Perry had more
issues to defend. He brushed off
Rep. Ron Paul's claim that he had
raised taxes on Texas.
Illegal immigrationwas a tough-
er discussion. Perry said it was not
feasible to build a fence the entire
length of the Texas-Mexico bor-
der. And he defended his decision
to grant in-state college tuition to
illegal immigrants seeking U.S.
oitizeirship. .
H-is approach to immigration-is
similar to that of his predecessor,
President- George W. Bush.' But
like Bush, he found an utIrecep-
tive audience among conserva-
tive voters.
"Of course we build a fence,.
anid of course we do not give in-
state tuition credits to people
who come here legallyy" Romney
said. "That only attracts people to
come here and take advantage of
America's great beneficence."
Former Utah Gov. Jon Hunts-
man agreed.
Perry asked for understanding.
Mexico "has clear and along re-
lationship with this state," he said
of Texas. Illegal immigrants who
go to college can become produce
tive residents instead of staying
"on the government dole" for the
rest of their lives, he said.
"It's working well in the state of
Texas," Perry said.
Over the next few weeks and
months, his rivals seem deter-
mined to show that what works
well in Texas might not work for
the nation as a whole.


"zero income tax, low regulation,
right-to-work state (status), oil.
in the ground and a Republican
legislature."
Perry essentially laughed off the
suggestion that it's easy to create
a million jobs even with those ad-
vantages. He cited his efforts to
reduce litigation, regulation and
other perceived impediments
to job creation that other states
endure. ,
The debate turned more emo-
tional, and more problematic for
Perry, on illegal immigration and
child vaccinations.
Perry again said he should have
consulted the state legislature be-
fore ordering all Texas pre-teen
girls to be vaccinated against a
virus that can cause cervical can-
cer, unless their parents refused.
"I am always going to err on the
side of life," he said.
Bachmanri, a tea party' favor-
ite who has fallen back in recent
polls, swung in forcefully. .
"Is it about life or was it about
millions of dollars and potential-
ly billions for a drug company"
whose lobbyist was a former top
Perry aide, she asked. .
Perry said the drug maker, Mer-
ck, gave his campaign $5,000 of
the roughly $30 million he raised.
"If you're saying that I can be
bought for $5,000, I'm offended,"
Perry said.
The Minnesota congresswoman
shot back, "Well, I'm offended for
all the little girls~ and the parents
that didn't have a choice."
It was perhaps the sharpest


Security.
The deeply conservative Tampa
audience seemed to shift to and
from Perry's side during the two-
hour forum, sponsored by CNN
and the Tea Party Express.
On Social Security, Romney
said, it wasn't so bad that Perry
has called the program !'a Ponzi
scheme." The bigger prob-
lem; he said, is Perry's writings
that suggest Social Security is
unconstitutional.
"Does Gov. Perry continue to
believe that Social Security should
not be a federal program, that it's
unconstitutional and it should be
returned to the states?" Romney
said.
The federal government made
mistakes when Social Security
was created decades ago, Perry
said. However, he said, "obvi-
ously we're no't going to take that
program away" now that retirees
,have counted on it for 70 years.
Each man accused the other of
trying to frighten older Ameri-
cans. Perry noted that Social Se-
'curity's long-term finances face
problems, and asked, "Are there
ways to move the states into So-
cial Security for state employees
or for retirees?"
As for Perry's boast that Texas
added inore than a million jobs
during his time in office, Rom-
ney suggested the governor was
mostly lucky.
"If you're dealt four aces, that
doesn't make you necessarily a
great poker player," Romney said.
He actually named five: Texas's


The Associated Press

TAMPA Rick Perry's bid for
the Republican presidential nom-
ination will rise or fall on his 10-
year record as Texas governor,
In Monday's crackling GOP
debate, his rivals attacked that
record as never before, led by
a newly energized Mitt Romn-
ney and hard-chargipg Michele
Bachmann. .
Perry, holding his own but look-
ing besieged at times, defend-
ed himself vigorously on most
fronts. He acknowledged mis-
handling a schoolgirl vaccination
program, however, and asked for
understanding about Texas' need
to work with illegal immigrants
who seek citizenship and college
educations.
As President Barack Obama
might say: Welcome to the role
of an incumbent with a complex
.record to defend fr-om critics on
all sides. .-
T-he' spirited exchanges showed
that .the top Republican candi-
dates differ not merely in style
but on ~key issues such as immi-
gration, health policy and Social
Security
For now, at least, Perry: is the
front-runner the others are hop-
ing to catch.
Romney, the former one-term
Massachusetts governor running
second in recent GOP polls, tried
to blunt Perry's strongest point
- his Texas jobs record while
exploiting what might be Perry's
most troublesome issue,. Social


under and later announced it would
look at ways to screen children through
other methods to reduce the riumber of
pat-downs provided to them.
TSA Administrator John Pistole .had
called for a more aggressive pat-down
for air travelers wheri he took over the
agency last year because he thought it
gave screeners the best chance at stop-
ping a suicide bomber like'the one who
nearly brought down an airliner over De
troit in 2009 with a bomb tucked in his
pants.
To reduce the number of pat-downs
given to children, screeners will soon be
told to send children through metal de-
tectors or the walk-through imaging ma-
chines multiple times to capture a clear
picture and use more explosive trace
detection tools such as hand swabs, ac-
cording to the TSA.
"TSA anticipates these changes, which
will begin rolling out in select airports
this week, will continue to strengthen
and streamline the security screen-
ing process for travelers," said agency
spokesman, Greg Soule.
The government is expected to soon
begin testing a new airport screening
system on a small number of travelers
who volunteer personal information that
intelligence officials will vet. If cleared,
these travelers could go through security
faster, in some cases, because they won't
be asked to take their shoes off.
Removing shoes during checkpoint
screenings has been a common com-
plaint among airline travelers since se-
curity was increased after an al-Qaida
operative tried to set off a bomb built
into his shoe on an American Airlines
flight in December 2001.


The Associated Press

WASHINGTON Children 12 years
old and younger soon will no longer be
required to remove their shoes at air-
port security checkpoints, Homeland
Security Secretary Janet Napolitano told
Congress on Tuesday. The policjr also in-
cludes other ways to screen young chiil-
dren without resorting t~o a pat-down
that involves touching private areas on
the body.
Napolitano said during a Senate hear-
ing on the terror threat to the U.S. that
the changes would be rolled out ini the
coming months. But the Transportation
Security Administration later said the
changes would be rolled out iix weeks
rather than months.
Napolitano said there may be some ex-
ceptions to keep airport security unpre-
dictable. Terrorists have plotted to use
children as suicide bombers, and some
children still may be required to remove
their shoes to keep security random. -
"There will always be some unpredict-
ability built into the system, and there
will always be random checks even for
groups that we are looking at differently,
such as children," she said.
Many travelers have complained that
the TSA does not use common sense
when it screens all air travelers the same
way, including young children and.the
elderly. Criticism escalated last year
when the government began using a
pat-down more invasive than what had
been used in the past, one that involves
screeners feeling a traveler's genital and
breast areas.
Earlier this year, TSA introduced a
modified pat down for children 12 and


ii LOOKING FOR MORE NEWS? VISIT



: 'WWW.JCFLORI DAN.COM


~t~i~t~Jackson Counaty Vaeult & Monuments



.2 9850-482$ -5041cl I'1


Fuel

From Page 1A

other requests for law en-
forcement response.
During the same period
in 2011, the number of
calls jumped to 8,460.
Jackson is one of the
state's largest counties,
geographically speaking,
at 960 square miles.
Deputies patrol roughly
200 miles a day per car,
Roberts estimated, and of-
ten that daily mileage can
roll up toward 250 miles.
Outfitted with weight-in-
creasing equipment like
light bars and extra safety
equipment, the ,cruisers
get about 15 miles to the
gallon in gas mileage.
Deputy's cars must idle
much of the time, as well, to
keep the electronics inside
charged up and as a matter
of officer and public safety.
Additionally, several of the
older cruisers in his fleet

haveloggd 100 milee

carried out on the county's
many dirt roads. The age
of the vehicles can make
them less fuel efficient and
require oil changes' more
frequently, Roberts added.
Roberts pointed out that
fuel efficiency suffers as
well from the fact that a
deputy usually doesn't do
his driving on the open
road. Most of, their work,
he said, involves frequent
stops and starts on punish-
ing dirt roads.
The fluctuating price of
gasoline was also a.factor
in the~ need for more fuel-
funding, he said.
Roberts also pointed .
out that he had originally
asked the county bo8rd to
fund his gasoline budget
at $210,000, but that the
county cut it to $200,000
iri an across-the-board five
percent reduction as bud-
gets were being ironed out
for 2010-11.


O8Bb~it.a~;uaies;
James & Sikes Funeral
HomeLMaado Chaepel
Marianna, Florida 32446
850.482.2332


W~alden

Minnie B. Walden, 85, of
Grand Ridge died Monday,
September 12, 2011 at Jack-
son Hospital.



31 years of service. She was
a charter member of Shady
Grove Pentecostal Holiness
Church. Mrs. Walden was a
member of Sneads Amneri-
can Legion Post 241 Ladies
Auxillary. She cherished
heandchhiildren and her
gPreceded in death by
husband, Woodrow Wal-
den, son, Tommy and
granddaughter, Sirena
Burch.
Survivors include one
son, William Walden of
Grand Ridge; two daugh-
ters, Mary Frances Cloud of
Grand Ridge and Betty

o ndhildrenM Banna, d
Chris Burch, Angie Ste-
phens, Kevin Robinson, Ti-
na Gruver, Michael, Travis,
Ricky, Greg, Tracey, Junior,
Brad and Kassidy Walden,
April Glisson, Mitchell and
Carey Lacobon; 21 great-
grandchildren; two neph-
ewsuand two n oces, ilb
at 2 p.m. Thursday, Sep-
tember 15, 2011 at Shady
Grove Pentecostal Holiness
Church with the Revs. Gary
Cook and Jim Gosnell offi-
ciating. Burial will~ follow
in Shady Grove Cemetery'
with James & Sikes Funeral


Home Maddox Chapel di-
rhetgfamily will receive
friends Wednesday, Sept.
14, from 5-7 p.m. at James
&( Sikes Maddox Chapel in
Marianna.
Expressions of sympathy
may be made online at ww
w.j amesandsikes funeralho
me.com


Pursuit
From Page 1A

John Bttsh, scuffling. The
father had seen wh~at was
going on and tried to stop
her.
Police called in the
SJackson County Sheriff's
Office an'd the K9 units
of the Jackson Correc-
tional Institution and the
Apalachee Correctional
Institution. Phillips was


Or~hi*

From Page lA

Shumaker hopes this
competition will help
-him enter other shows
in Florida. He's on the
waiting list for several
because the venues have
become smaller.
"~We'll work our way in,"
Shumaker said.
He also hopes the show
will bring more attention
to his store. Shumaker .
currently has a nursery
at 5005 Old Spanish Trail.
SHe also has an online
store on eBay called Se-


DHS: New airport security


Polc U.H 1dd .Antf 1























































































Billions spent on food anti-terrorism plans


WE BUjY GOLD
YOUR TRUSTED.JEWELER
FOR ALMOST 40 YEARS



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Voting Ends September 30th.





Ofkiial ballots will also be

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on Sept. 18th and Sept. 25th


I 5 \ COUNTY FLORIDAN a www.jcflonidan.com


18A WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER 14. 2011


The Associated Press


million people -- accord-
ing to Census Bureau re-
visions. The increase was
due mostly to continued
losses of employer-provid-
ed health insurance in the
weakened economy.
Congress passed a health
overhaul last year to ad-
dress rising numbers of
the uninsured. While the
main provisions don't take
effect until 2014, one as-
pect taking effect in late
2010 allowed young adults
to be covered under their
parents' health insurance
until age 26.
The uninsured rate for
adults 18 to 24 actually de-
clined last year, from 29.3
percent to 27.2 percent,
noted Brett O'Hara, chief
of the Health and Disabil-
ity Statistics branch at the
Census Bureau. That was
the only age group that
posted a decrease, and he
said the law change cer-
tainly could be a factor."
For last year, the median
- or midpoint house-
hold income was $49,445,
down 2.3 percent from
2009.
The poor include Neki-
sha Brooks, 28, of Fort
Washington, Md., who
lost her job as a customer
service representative for
A4T&T several months ago
in a round of layoffs. Rais-
ing five young children,
she is -on food stamps and
leaning on family for help.
"It's hard on the kids,"
Brooks said, describing
how her family has had
to cut back on clothing
and restaurant outings.
"I've been putting in job
applications every day
and calling around, from
housekeeping to customer
service to admin or wait-
resses, but nobody seems
to be hiring right now."
Bruce Meyer, a public
policy .professor at the
University of Chicago, cau-
tioned that the worst may
be y~t to come in poverty
levels, citing in part con-
tinued rising demand. for
food stamps this year as
well as"staggeringly high"
m~imbers in those unem-
ployed for more than 26
weeks.


a Is:: ated Press

\"I..Hi';GTON -- The
ranks of the nation's poor
have sw~relled to a record
416.2 million -- nearly 1 in
6 Amnericans -- as the pro-
longed pain of the reces-
sion leaves millions still
ii ruglinl~-g and out of work.
And the number with-
out health insurance has
reached 49.9 million, the
most mn over two decades.
The figures are in a Cen-
sus Bureau report, released
Tuesday, that offers a som-
ber snapshot of the eco-
nomic well-being of U.S.
households for last year
when joblessness hovered
above 9 percent for a sec-
ond year. The rate is still 9.1
percent at the start of an
election year that's sure to
focus on the economy and
President Barack Obama's
stewardship of it.
The overall poverty rate
climbed to 15.1 percent,
'from 14.3 percent the pre-
vious year, and- the rate
from 2007-2010 rose faster
than for any similar pe-
riod sirice the early 1980s
when a crippling energy
crisis amid government
cutbacks contributed to
inflation, spiraling interest
rates and unemployment.
For last year, the official
poverty level was an an-
nual income of $22,314 for
a family of four.
Measured by total num-
bers, the 46 million now
living in poverty are the
most on record dating
back to when the census
began track in 1959. The
15.1 percent tied the level
of 1993 and was the high-
est sincel1983.
Broken down by state,
Mississippi had the high-
est share of poor people, at
22.7 percent, according to
calculations' by the Census
Bureau. It was followed by
Louisiana, the District of
Columibia, Georgia, New
Mexico andArizona. Onthe
other end of the scale, New
Hampshire had thellowest
share, at 6.6 percent.
The hare of~imericans
without health coverage
rose from 16.1 percent
to 16.3 percent or 49.9


WASHINGTON -Mem.
bers of a special House-
Senate deficit-cutting
"supercommittee" urged
their colleagues Tuesday
to go beyond the panel's
minimum speriding-cut
target of $1.2 trillion over
the coming decade, but
the price tag on President
Barack Obama's $447 bil-
lion jobs plan is compli-
cating the panel's work.
"We need to 'go big' and
reach savings of more than
$1.5 trillion to address
long-term deficits," said
Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass.
"We need to 'go long' and
address our long-term
budget issues. And most
importantly of all we need
to 'go smart' and address
the budget without pre-
conceived dogmnas or po-
litical agendas."
As the panel convened
its second session, it also
got a sobering message
about the budget deficit's
toxic effect on the econ-
omy over the long term
from economist Douglas
Elmendorf, director of the
nonpartisan Congressio-
nal Budget Office.
Elmendorf warned that
spiraling interest pay-
ments could swamp the
government's ability to
pay for its operations and
could spark a financial cri-
sis if nothing is done: "Un-
der~ current policies, the
federal budget is quickly
heading into territory that
is unfamiliar to the United
States and to most other
developed countries as
well."
"The nation cannot con-
tinue to sustain the spend-
ing programs and poli-
cies of the past with the
tax revenues it has been
accustomed to paying,"
Elmendorf said in a state-
ment. "Citizens will either
have to pay more for their
government, accept less
in. government services
and benefits, or both."
Obama's jobs plan calls
for a temporary boost
in spending on roads,
schools and blighted
neighborhoods combined
with cuts to the Social Se-


Members of the protest group Code Pink stand behind Congressional Budget Office Director
Douglas Elmendorf at the start of a hearing on the national debt by the Joint Select Committee
on Deficit Reduction on Tuesday on Capitol Hill in Washmngton.


curity payroll taxes paid
by workers and their em-
ployers. He would pay for
the initiative with a tax
increases on wealthier
workers, oil companies
and hedge fund managers
- all proposals that are
opposed by the GOP.
Elmendorf, .a former
Brookings Institution
scholar initially named to
the CBO post by Demo-
crats, said that Obama's
jobs plan which com-
bines tax cuts with spend-
ing stimulus was well
within mainstream eco-
nomic thought which.
holds that it doesn't make
sense to raise taxes or im-
pose sharp spending cuts
in periods of slack eco-
nomic growth.
"If policymakers wanted
to achieve both a short-
term economic boost and
medium-term and long-
term fiscal sustainability,
a combination of policies
would be required: chang-
es in taxes and spending
that would widen the defi-
cit now but reduce it later
in the decade," Elmendorf
said. .
But every dollar spent
stimulating the economy
inakes the supercommit-
tee's task that much more
difficult. Co-chairman
Rep. Jeb Hensarling, R-
Texas, is clearly irked.
"This proposal would
make the already arduous
challenge of finding bipar-


tisan agreement on deficit
reduction nearly impossi-
ble, removing our options
for deficit reduction for
a plan that won't reduce
the deficit by one penny,"
Hensarling said recently.
"It's not the role of this
committee to spend more
money we don't have on
jobs we don't get."
And the top Senate Re-
publican, Mitch McCon-
nell of Kentucky, weighed
in with a broadside Tues-
day that labeled Obama's
jobs plan a transparently
political exercise.
"Despite the president's
calls to pass this bill imn-
mediately, the real plan
is to let it hang out there
for a while so Democrats
can use it as an issue on
the campaign trail," Mc-
Connell said, noting
Democratic opposition
to Obama's proposals to
increase taxes on chari-
table tax deductions tak-
en by the wealthy. "The
central tax hike included
in this bill ... was already
dismissed by a filibuster-
proof, Democrat-con-
trolled Senate in 2009."
The supercommittee is
charged with finding at
least $1.2 trillion in deficit.
cuts over the coming de-
cade, which would come
on top of about $900 bil-
lion in savings wrung from
the operating budgets of
Cabinet agencies over the
same period.


Recent CBO studies say
the recent budget pact is
just a starting point on the
more draconian changes
that would be needed to
stabilize the national debt
so it doesn't spiral out of
control and drag the econ-
omry down with it. .
Numerous lawmlakcers
and deficit hawks outside
the government are press-
ing the panel to exceed
the $1.2 trillion goal and
perhaps pick up elements
of the $4 trillion "grand
bargain" that Obama and
House Speaker John Boeh-
ner, ~R-Ohio, were working
on this summer. It com-
bined higher tax revenues
with sharper .spending
cuts. .
Elmendorf didit't of-
fer an opinion as to how
much the panel should try
to cut the deficit. But he
said ,that simply meeting
the 10-year, $1.2 trillion
goal wouldn't be enough
because the national debt
will continue to grow
relative to the size of the
economy.
That growth, he said,
likely will crowd out the
ability of the government
to keep pace with the new
obligations.
Under the debt ceiling
agreement, which nar-
rowly averted a potential
federal default, Congress
must approve at least $1.2
trillion in savings by Dec.
25.


The Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO One of the
deepest fears sweeping- a' shattered
nation following the Sept. 11 attacks
was that terrorists might poison the
country's food. .
Hoping to ease people's anxieties
about what they were eating, Presi-.
dent George W. Bush vowed to draw
a protective shield around the food
supply and defend it from farm to
fork.
SAn Associated Press analysis of the
programs found that the government
has spent at least $3.4 billion on food
counter-terrorism in the last decade,
but key programs have been bogged
down in a huge, multi-headed bu-
reaucracy. And with no single agen-
cy in charge, officials acknowledge
it's impossible to measure whether
orchards or feedlots are actually any
safer.
On Tuesday, a Senate subcommit-
tee held a hearing to examine a con-
gressional watchdog's new report re-
vealing federal setbacks in protecting
cattle and crops since Sept. 11. Just
days after the 10th anniversary of the
attacks, lawmakers demanded an-
swers about potential food-related
threats and reports that the govern-
ment could have wasted money on
agriculture anti-terror programs.
"The unfortunate truth is that we,
as` a nation, lack effective surveil-
lance," John Hoffman, a former De-
partment of Homeland Security se-
nior adviser, testified at the hearing.
"At present,.our primary detection
capability is the emergency room."
Top U.S. food defense authorities
insist that the initiatives have made
the food supply safer and say exten-
sive investments have prepared the
country to respond to emergencies.
No terrorist group has threatened
:the food supply in the past decade,
anud the largest food poisonings have
not arisen from foreign attacks but
from salmonella-tainted eggs pro-
duced on lowa farms that sickened
almost 2,000 people.
Seeking to chart the government's
advances, the AP interviewed dozens
of current and former state and fed-
eral officials and analyzed spending
Jand program records for major food


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE PHOTO
This undated file photo provided by the Agricultural. Research Service of the U.S.
Department of Agriculture shows Plum~ Island, a tiny island off the coast of New
York's Long Island, where the nation's primary animal disease laboratory is located.


defense initiatives, and found:
n The fragmented system leaves no
single agency accountable, at times
slowing progress and blurring the
lines of responsibility. Federal audi-
tors found one Agriculture Depart-
ment surveillance program to test
for chemical, biological, and radio-
logical agents was not working prop-
erly five years after its inception in
part because agencies couldn't agree
on who was in control.
n Efforts to move an aging animal
disease lab from an island near New
York City have stalled after leading
scientists found an accidental re-
lease of foot-and-mouth was likely
to happen at the new facility in
America's beef belt.
a Congress is questioning whether
$3 million the Department of Home-
land Security spent to create a state-
of-the-art data integration center to
monitor biological threats to fopd
and other arenas has accomplished
anything because agencies are not


using it to share information.
a Despite the billions spent on
food defense, many of the changes
the government put into place are
recommendations that the private
sector isn't required to carry out.
As a result, it's difficult to track suc-
cesses and failures, and the system's
accomplishments are largely hidden
from public view.
"Everything that has been done to
date on food defense in the private
sector has all been voluntary,"' said
LeeAnne Jackson, the Food and Drug
Administrations health science poli-
cy adviser. "W~e can't go out and ask
them what they have done, because
they're not obliged to tell us, so we
don't have a good metric to measure
what's been done."
Sen. Daniel Akaka, D-Haw~aii, con-
vened Tuesday's hearing in light of
a new Government Accountability
Office report that found there was
no c~~-nmbI~. .. .i effort to oversee the
progress on foodi defense.


NAIfONAL


CongressionalE 'Sulperc committee' Nearlyr1 in 6 Americans

Obama's jobs plan complicates deficit cuts in povety, Census says





























~


Dolphinse


NFL's 2011 rookie class off to fine start


lowzed closely by Jenna Sneads recorded three blocks on the
with seven. evening.
Ashley Rogers was on board Sneads will have little time
with four ace series. Becca to enjoy their win as they were
Aaron record 26 assists on the scheduled to travel to Cotton-
night. dale on Tuesday evening to take
Emily Jones was the digs leader .on the Lady Hornets.
with 15, followed again by Strick- Results of that match were not
land with 10. Jordan Jackson available at press time.


wLith a 25-14 win in game four.
All starters got on the board
on the night with Jordan Jackson
leading in kills with 15, followed
by Brandy Strickland with six.
Yonna Bell pitched in with six
kills.


Lady Tigers in game one 25-
18 before dropping game twio
23-25.
The Lady Pirates took the court
with determination in the third
game from the opening serve
and walked away with a 25-15


BY SHELIA MADER
Floridan Coirrespndent

The Sneads Ladv Pirates vol-
leyball team improved to 5-1 on
the young season with a four-set
win over Rh ouLn a 1~l...*. on the


road Monday. win. Leading the way in ace serves
Sneads, handily defeated the They secured the match win was Strickland with eight, fol-


leading the way with four and
a total of 13 on the night.
In the A game, it was again
all Marianna as they demol-
-ished the Lady Braves 41-3.
Marianna jumped out to a 18-
1 lead in the first quarter.
Cha'Quisha Spears had a
huge first period with nine
points, followed by Shemeriah
Spears with five points. On
the board with four points was
Brianna Johnson.
Marianna went to the bench
in the second quarter with
D'Aryll "DeDe"' Green putting
up one from the line and a la-
yup, followed by Mary Screen,
D'Keyah Adams and Nichelle
Long with two points each.
Their efforts helped give the
Lady Bullpups a 27-1 halftime
lead.
Following the break, the
Lady Bullpups posted` 10
third-quarter points with six
of those coming off the hands
of Green,
Faith Long and Johnson
each added two points. Four
fourth-quarter points came
from Long to close out the
game.
The Lady Bullpups were
scheduled be on the road
again Tuesday evening at
Grand Ridge before return-
ing home Thursday to take on
Cottondale.


BY SHELIA MADER
Floridan Correspondent

The Marianna Middle -
School Lady Bullpups basket-
ball team started the 2011 sea-
son off with a pair of road wins
over the Walton Lady Braves.
The 'B' team took the court
first and walked away with a
38-15 victory. .
Marianna scored early and
scored often against the Lady
Braves. Ini the first quarter,
Tacoria Holden put up five
points, followed on the heels
with fouir points by JaQuainua
Hughes. .
The Lady Bullpup defense
held the Lady Braves to just
four points in both the first
two quarters. Marianna post-
ed nine points in the second
quarter to take a 18-8 lead into
the locker room at the half.
Marianna showed no mercy
taking the. court following
the break as they put up 10
third-quarter points. Alay-
sha Jennings knocked down
a three-point shot with Alexis
Jackson scoring a pair of buck-
ets. Holden added one from
the line and a layup, while Wal-
ton was only able to manage
three points. Ashley Buntinig,
Zay Blandenburg and Simone ~
Works all'posted points in the
fourth quarter with Holden


MAMnb~tlNvtWYLUKUHNIl


Marianna's Linsey Basford returns the ball during a recent home game.


T'HE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Miami Dolphins running back Reggie Bush (22) runs during the first
half of an NFL football game against the New England Patriots, Monday,
in Miami.



Bush TRHlS 10in

keep pwithBrad


time for Marianna to
pick up the 27-25 win.
Game 2 was neck
and neck throughout
the game but Mari-
anna pulled awvay with
a 25-23 win. Game 3
was a .25-21 win for
the Lady Dogs. Mari-
anna was led in scor-
ing by Megan Tillman
with 15 serves and two
aces, followed by Por-
sha Morgan with 12
serves and two aces.
On the board with 11


serves and six aces
was Linsey Basford.
Ariel Folsom checked
in with ten serves and
two aces, followed by
freshman Lexi Basford
with four serves and
twio aces.
Leading the team
with 10 spikes and
nine kills was Morgan,
followed by Haden
Searcy with eight
spikes and three kills.
Linsey Basford re-
corded four spikes,


and three kills while
Folsom had four
Spikes and one kill.
Folsom led the Lady
Bulldogs with assists
recording 23 while
Linsey Basford had 15.
Tillman and Morgan
both picked up one
block each. Whitney
Lipford led the team
digs wiith six, followed
by Folsom with four.
Marianna is next on
the road Thursday at
Pensacola Catholic.


BY SHELIA MADER
Floridan Correspondent

The Marianna Hligh
School Lady Bulldogs
volleyball team went
on the road to pick
up a win Monday
against the Altha Lady
Wildcats.
The Lady Dogs play-
ers took the match in
three sets but had their
work cut out for them
through all three. In
Game 1, it took over-


third-highest total since 1990.
But they spent much of the
night trying to keep up with
Brady, and failing.
The reigning NFL MIVP threw
for a Patriots-record 517 yards
and four touchdowns. NewT
England's 622 yards were a
franchise record and the most
Tev aga hin eed to ad-
dress the defensive deficiencies
quickly. They're already falling
behind in the AFC East, where
they're the only winless team.
And on Sunday they must deal
with Matt Schaub and Andre
Johnson, who helped Hous-
ton score 34 points in the first
half of a season-opening rout
against Indianapolis.
"There's no room for long
faces right now," coach Tony
Sparano said Tuesday. "Long
faces will get you to 0-2."
The Dolphins will again play
at home, where they've lost 10
of their past 11 games. Maybe
it's just as well that after Sun-

See BUSH, Page 3BL.


The Associated Press

DAVIE, Fla. Reggie Bush
was reduced to a footnote in
the Miami Dolphins' opener,
and that's not the role they en-
vision for him.
Even with 20 touches, his
highest total in three years,
Bush w s ovr hdowew nb
land Patriots, who riddled the
Dolphins' defense Monday in
a 38-24 victory.
Bush embraced his trade this
summer from New Orleans to
Miami because his new team
pledged to make him the fea-
ture back. He played virtually
every offensive snap in Week

"It felt great," he said. "It's ev-
erything I've been looking for-
ward to, everything I expected.
I had a fun time out there, but
obviously it's not that fun, be-
cause it's a team game and we
didn't play well as a team."
Bush made the Dolphins
more dynamic on offense, and
they gained 488 yards, their


The stellar debuts in-
cluded those by Green
Bay receiver/returner
Randall Cobb, Seattle
wide receiver Doug
Baldwin, Washington
linebacker Ryan Ker-
rigan and cornerback/
punt returned Patrick
Peterson of the Arizona
Cardinals.
None was more im-
pressive or seemed
more improbable -
than the performance
of Carolina's Cam New-
ton, who broke the NFL
record for most yards
passing by a rookie in


his pro debut.
The Heisman Trophy
winner from Auburn
was the first overall
draft pick, but questions
about his accuracy car-
ried through the pre-
season, when he com-
pleted barely 40 percent
of his passes and looked
as lost as any rookie who
missed more than four
months `of workouts
due to the league's labor
dispute.
Now, the questions
have turned from
whether he'll be a good
NFL quarterback to just


how good he'll be after
breaking the mark of
346 yards set by H-all of
Famer Otto Graham in
1950.
Newton ignited a
Carolina offense that
finished last in the NFL
in total offense, yards
passing, and scoring
last season by throwing
for 422 yards, the fifth-
highest opening day to-
tal in NFL history (it was
the fourth-highest for 24
hours before being sur-
passed Monday night by

See NFL, Page 2B


The Associated Press

DENVER -- So, maybe
that long lockout didn't
hurt the NFL rookies
after all aside from
the big hits they took to
their wallets.
With the league's new
salary structure redis-
tributing the mega-mil-
lions to vested veterans
instead of first-year
players, and encourag-
ing the 2011 draft class
to prove its worth, a slew
of rookies distinguished
themselves on the NFL's
opening weekend.


I"' '`
.VIII~Fi~
j31 ;''' 1
: -
4*. .r. .)~ rS~ :i(
*, '.7'
ii i
:; b:A~~ i) 3: :i '
;a -I-r -B "-
~- -L- ?. .-::i21t~



Smeads Yblleyball




La~ Pirates win 5th match of the season


Eiddsde School BasketbaBl




Lady Bullpups


dominate Braves


HIGH: SCHOOL VOT.T.F'YBRI.I. ,


Three and out


MHS Lady Bulldogs defeat Wildcats in straight: sets













-


_~


AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB
New York 89 57 .610 -
TapBay 6d 4 .6
Toronto 74 73 .503 15%h
Baltimore 58 88 .397 31
Central Division
Detroit 8W 6L .5PctGB
Clvla d 12 7 5 I'
Kansas City 62 86 .419 23%
Minnesota 59 87 .404 251
West Division
W L Pct GB

Lsngeles 806 24 3
Oakland 67 80 .456 16
Seattle 61 86 .415 22
Monday
amtroit 14 Ciao Whte Sox 4
Oakland 6, LA. Angels 3
N.Y. Yankees 9, Seattle 3
Tuesday
Tampa Bay at Baltimor'e, 7:05 p.m.
Toronto at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Cleveland at Texas, 8:05 p.m-
Dtrnoi a aCh c~aanos Whit 5 08p0 p.m.
L.A. Angels at Oakland, 10:05 p.m:
N.Y. Yankees at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.
Wednesday
Toronto (R.Romero 14-10) at Boston
(Lackey 12-12), 1:35 p.m-
Detroit (Penny 10-10) at Chicago
White Sox (Axelrod 0-0), 2:10 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Weaver 16-7) at Oakland
(Harden 4-2), 3:35 p.m.
Minnesota (Hendriks 0-1) at Kansas
City (Hochevar 10-11), 4:10 p.m.
Cleveland (D.Huff 2-4) at Texas
Tmp aB~ad 13 ,avi i10) at Baltimore
(Guthrie 7-17), 7:05 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (Nova 15-4) at Seattle
(Vargas 8-13), 10:10 p.mn.
Tampa Bay at Botnsu 710 p.m.
Cleveland at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Kansas City,
Detroit at Oakiand, 10:05 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE

mwe rsi Pct GB
Philadelphia 94 50 .653 -
Aln 84 64 .568 12
Ne~rk 71 76 .483 24%
Washington 68 77 .469 26'
Florida 67 79 .459 28
Central Division
Milwaukee 8W 6L .5T GB
St.Louis 79 68 .537 6'
C incnati 71 7 483 1'
Chicago 65 82 .442 20%
Houston 50 97 .340 35%
West Division
W L Pct GB
Arizona 86 62 .581 *-
San Francisco 77 70 .524 8'/
Los Angeles 72 74 .493 13
Colorado 69 77 .473 16
San Diego 63 85 .426 23
Monday
Pittsburgh 6, St. Louis 5
Chicago Cubs 12, CinCinnati 8
Florida 5, Atlanta 4, 12 innings
Washirigton 3, N.Y. Mets 2
Hpuston 5, Philadelphia l
Arizona 7, L.A. Dodgers 2
San Francisco 8, asndDiego 3
St. Louis at Pittsburgh, late
Chicago Cubs at Cincinnati, late
Florida at Atlanta, late
Washington at N.Y.' Mets, late
Philadelphia at Houston, late
Colorado at Milwaukee, late
Arizona at L.A. Dodgers, late
San Diego at San Francisco, late
Wednesday
Florida (Nolasco 10-10) at Atlanta
(Delgado 0-1), 12:05 p.m.
St. Louis (EJackson 4-2) at Pittsburgh
(Morton 9-9), 12:35 p.m.
Philadelphia (Halladay 17-5) at Hous-
ton (Norris 6-9), 2:05 p.m.
ian Dineg Latal 713))at Sn Fan-
Chicago Cubs (C.Coleman 2-7) at
Wahno na cuPetook as0 oo at N. Mets

C lrado7 )Milwo dp2) at Milwaukee
(Marcum 12-6), 8:10 p.m.
Arizo~na (DHuson 116 1)0at L.A. Dodg-
Thursdair .
Washington at NNY. Mets, 1:10 p.m. .
Florida at Philadelphia,.2:35 p.m., 1st
Chicago Cubs at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m.
Florida at Philadelphia, 7:35 p.m., 21'd
game
San Francisco at Colorado, 8:410 p.m.
Pittsburgh at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.


WNBA PLAYOFF GLANCE
CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
(8est-of-3)
Wifnecassary
,Entian vs ew nek
Thursday, Sept. 15: New York at
nS tr a~y, et. 17: Indiana at New
York, 5 p.m.
x-Monday, Sept 19: New York at
Indiana, 9 p.m.
Friday, Sept 1 lat at Cnnecti-
.cut, 8 p.m-
Sundy Sep 18: Connecticut at
x-Tuesday, Sept 20: Atlanta at Con-
netcu'st~er~n terence
Minnesota v s.an Antonio .
Friday, Sept.16: Sanl Antonio at Min-
nesota, 10 p.m. .
Sunday,65ept 18: Minnesota at San
x-Tuesday, Sept. 20: San Antonio at
Minnesotas 80o o 9-
Thursday, Sept.15: Phoenix at

nix, 11 p.m.
x-Monday, Sept. 19: Phoenix at
Seattle, 11 p.m.


WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER 14. 2011 2B


police," she says. Later, Ju-
liana told sheriff's deputies
she called 911 because she
was afraid the situation
would escalate.
At a brief court appear-
ance Tuesday, Ramirez was
ordered to have no direct
contact with his wife by
County Judge John Hurley.
An attorney who attended
the hearing on his behalf
did not immediately re-
spond Tuesday to an email
requesting comment.
After his release, Ramirez
walked out of the jail alone
and was confronted by
reporters. He had told in-
vestigators only that he
grabbed his wife by the
shoulders during an argu-
metad "shru gd" her
causing her to hit her head
on the headboard of~their
bed. But he wouldn't dis-
cuss the incident Tuesdayr
When a reporter said
"You have to give us some-
thin~g," Ramirez replied:
"Not my problem."
He spoke to another TV
reporter in~ Spanish and
put his arm around two of
the female reporters. He
was wearing a tight, mus-
cle-showing T-shirt and
dark, low-slimng trousers.
The Escalade's driver,
who identified herself as
his sister, spoke briefly.
tHe~'smy brother; we love
him no matter what. He's
an amazing guy and we
love him no matter what,"
she said before rolling up
the window. She refused to
give her name.
Ramirez retired in Apri
from the Tampa Bay Rays
after he tested positive for
a performance-enhancing
~substance.


The Associated Press

FORT IAUDERDALE,
Florida Former World
Series MVP Manny
Ramirez, a colorful slugger
WilO abruptly retired this
year amid allegations of
banned substance use, is
now facing criminal pros-
ecution on charges that he
slapped his wife during an
argument.
Ramirez, 39, could get
up to a year in jail if con-
victed of misdemeanor
domestic battery charges,
He was released on $2,500
bail Tuesday after spend-
ing the night in the Bro-
ward County Jail, with little
to say to a knot of .waiting
TepOrters. ~
"No thanks," Ramirezsaid
When asked for comment.
"Let me see, where's my
famil ? Ramirez hopped
intO a White Cadillac Es-
calade driven by~ his sister
and was whisked away.A
feW Tmilute~s earlier, the
BTOward Sheriff's Office
TeleaSed a tape of the 911
call made by his wife, 32-
year-old Juliana Ramirez,
fTOm their sprawling home
in the Fort Lauderdale sub-
urb ofWeston. .
"My husband just hit
me," Juliana Ramirez says
SCalllly On the tape.
When, the dispatcher
asks where she was struck,
Juliana replieS, "My face
and myhead; in the bed. I
have a bump on my head."
The dispatcher then
asks if Juliana has a safe
'rOom to get away from her
husband.
"'He's not doing any-
thing anymore because
he knows I'm calling the


Minnesota O 10 .000 17 24
West
W LT Pct .PF PA
San Frdncisco 1 0 01.000 33 17
Arizona 1 0 01.000 28 21
St. Louis 0 10 .000 13 31
Seattle 0 1 0.000 17 33
Thursday's Game
Green BayS4 dNaew Oreans 34
Chicago 30, Atlanta l2
Buffalo 41, Kansas City 7
Houston 34, Indianapolis 7
Philadelphia 31, St. Louis 13
Detro~it 27, Tampa Bay 20
Baltimore 35, Pittsburgh 7
Cincinnati 27, Cleveland 17
Jacksonville 16, Tenness'ee 14 '
San Francisco 33, Seattle 17

S D g20 24,%o Minta 17
Washington 28, N.Y. Giants 14
N.Y. Jets 27, Dallas 24
Monday's Games
New England 38, Miami 24
Oakland 23, Denver 20
Sunday, Sep. 18
Ciago at NewnOeseans,11 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Minnesota, 1 p.m.
Kansas City at Detroit, 1 p.m.
Jacksonville at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m.
Oakland at Buffalo, 1 p.m.
Arizona at Washington, 1 p.m. -
seattle at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.
Green Bay at Carolina, 1 p.m.
Cleveland at Indianapolis, 1 p~m.
Dallas at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m.
Cincinflati at Denver, 4:15 p.m.
Houston at Miami, 4:15 p.m.
San Diego at New England, 4:15 p.m.
Philadelphia at Atlanta, 8:20 p.m-
Monday, Sep. 19 .
St. Louis at N.Y. Giants, 8:30 p.m-


NATIONWIDE MONEY


BASEBALL.

CLEVELANAImlN NS Pre chased the
contract of RHP Zach Putnam from
C lumbus (). Designated RHP Jason
National League
ATLANTA BRAVES-Announced Bruce
Manno will continue as assistant
general manager, with an expanded
role overseeing the player develop-
ment department. Promoted Ronnie
Richardson to director of minor league
operations and John Coppolella to
director of professional scouting.
ST. LOUIS CARDINALS-Agreed to
terms with RHP Chris Carpenter on a
two-year contract extension through
the 2013 season.
American Association
GRAND PRAIRIE AIRHOGS--Traded
INF David Espinosa to Southern
Maryland (Atlantic) for future
con idratios.c TAd OFa ci$ .
future considerations. Traded RHP Jon
H~untorn to Long Iland (Atlantic) for a
ST. PAUL SAINTS--Traded RHP Tyler
Walker to Long Island (Atlantic) for
future considerations.
BASKETBALL.
National Basketball Association
MINNESOTA TIMBER WOLVES-
Named Rick Adelman coach.
FOOTBALL

BUFFANO BI L-aeld R Marcus
Easiey on injured reserve. Re-signed
WR Ruvellm ta in.r Reased QB Levi
Signed CB Terrence Wheatley to the
PTSBUG SEELERS--Placed OT
WIlie Colon ornein ured reserve, Signed
SAN DIEGO CHARGERS-Placed K
Nae Kadaong on njture dr esrve.ak
on a two-year contract. Signed DE
OmIn dNS JIuoata a contract
Canadian Football League
LW NNIE nBdaUhEBO nER-- cal
injured list.


LPGA MONEY LEADERS ~
Trn Money

tacy Lewis 16 $1,171,422
riztann eincsome e 6 8100#
neaS ford 4688868
a Yeon Choi 15 $738,546
ala rea er 16 83, 2
I.K. Kim 14 $692,894
Morgan Pressel 16 $667,743
Amy Yang 16 $656,943
Jiyai Shin 14 $9609,415
Michelle Wie 15 $533,846
Maria Hjorth 14 $511,037
HeK ng Seo' 15 $0,
Sandra Gal 14 $457,558
Ct laon ~rthew. 13 8 ,5 4
Sun Young Yoo 16 $$75,082
Sophie Gustafson 15 $357,820
Anna Nordqvist 15 $8343,818
Inbee Park 12 $331,018
Song-Hee Kim 16 $303,691
Karen Stupples 1~6 $265,519
Katie I utcher 14 $256,134
Meena Lee 14 $240,085
Hee Young Park 15 $237,164
neRi Pmk ;il $3.
Chella Choi 14 $212,261
Candie Kung 15 $205,0'i9
Amy Hung 16 $201,167
Juli Inkster 16 $201,063
Shanshan Feng 14 $188,222
Beatriz Re~car 16 $179,337
Paham Mounoz 16 81702

Vicky Hurst 16 $165,362
Hee,-Won Han 16 $153,046
Natalie Gulbis 16 $148,146
Stacy Prammanasudhl6 $143,916
Eun-Hee Ji 14 $135,643
Wen~dy Ward 16 $ 135,310
Paige Mackenzie 12 $132,220
Kristy McPherson 16 $130,512
Pat Hurst 14 $126,256
Jimin Kang 16 $122,962
Katherine Hull 14 $114,862
Momoko Ueda 12 $111,754
Mi Hyun Kim 13 $106,632
Pornanong Phatium 12 $106,224
Mina Harigae 12 $103,771
Ci d~~osse 12 80, 6
Amanda Blumenherstl6 $ 99,364
Cr eaneHedwall 1 .57
Julieta Granada. 1 9,0
Christel Boeljon 9 $90,876
JGerina Pillier 1 8,0
Dewi Claire Schreefell1 $88,797
Leta Lindley 11` $86,749
Seon Hwa Lee 16 $86,438
Belen Mozo 12 .$85,973
Jennifer Johnson 9 $84,809
M.J. Hur 16 $83,373
Heather Bowie Youngl3 $80,49s
Kris Tamulis 10 $80,401
Lindsey Wright 14 $75,550
Relly Rar in 1 7,0
Becky Morgan 12 $69,928
Marcy Hart 11 $68,369
Jennifer Song 13 $68,204
Haeji Kang 14 $59,410
Meaghan Francella 13 $58,234
Alison Walshe 10` $56,565

Ji Voun Pk 11 85,
Sarah Kemp 12 $52,772
Srh JaeSmith 1 5,7
.Pernilla Lindberg 10 $47,666
SSilvia Cavalleri 12 $45,956
.Jessica Korda 13 $45,763
Grace Park 13 95499
SKarin SJodin 11 $44,253
aruky Nmura 1 4,3
Taylor Leon 9 $40,633
.Gwa a Nocera 14 ~ 90
Na On Min 12 $37,349
0. Stephanie Sherlock 11 $35,224


2.
3. S


58.

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14.
15. 1
16. 1
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23.
24.
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26.
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33.
34.
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77.
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85.
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Putting Average
1, Corey Pavin, 1.704. 2, Mark Wiebe,
1.709. 3, Nick P~rice, 1.714. 4, Chien
Soon Lu, 1.717. 5, Mark O'Meara, 1.718.
6, Chip Beck, 1.721. 7, Gaiy Haliberg,
1.724. 8, Ru'ss Cochran, 1.726. 9,
Mic2 el Allen, 1.727. 10, John Huston,
Binlie Average

cac iC,470. 5,Jhn HuM 4.
4, Tom Lehman, 4.54. 5, Tom Watson,
4.43. 6, Mark O'Meara, 4.40. 7, Nick
Price, 4.38. 8 (tie), John Cook, Bern-
hard Langer and Corey Pavin, 4.37.
Eagles (Holes per)
1, Olin Browne, 91.6. 2, John Huston,
99.0. 3 (tie), Mark Calcavecchia and
Keith Fergus, 106.0. 5, Kenny Perry,
108.0. 6, Gary Haliberg, 112.0. 7, Steve
Lwr 125 40f .lmn 128 9 ,
144.0.
Sand Save Peltentage
1, Dan Forsman, 68.33%6. 2, Olin
Browne, 64.18%. 3, Jay Don Blake,
62.96%. 4, Larry Mize, 62.79%. 5, Roger
Chapman, 60.47%. 6, Corey Pavin,
5tte3)3 eat, enr O'er,5.36
Roberts, 56.92%/.
AHl-Around Ranking
1, Russ Cochran, 128. 2, Mark
O'Meara, 130. 3, John Huston, 131. 4,
Nick Price, 134. 5, Jeff Sluman, 136.
6 (tie), Mark Calcavecchia and John
Cook, 138. 8, Kenny Perry, 142. 9, Olin
Browne, 145. 10, Tom Lehman, 162.
WORLD GOLF RANKING
World Golf Ranking
Through Sept 11
1. LukeDonald Eng 10.48
2. Lee Westwood Eng 8.21
3. Rory Mcilroy Nlr 7.09
Itus nS rcker USA 69
6. Martin Kaymer Ger 6.77
8. Mat K har UA 5.
g.0Phil Mic~k son USA 585
11. Nick Watney USA 5.40

14l.Graeme McDowellNIr 4,66
15. Webb Simpson USA 4.k4
16. K.J. Choi Kor 4.51
17. David Toms USA 4.11
18. Ian Poulter Eng 4.02
'19. Paul Casey Eng .3.85
20. Robert KarlssonSwe 3.80
21. Hunter Mahan USA 3.76
22. Kim Kyung-Tae Kor 3.75
2. Br nFt Sedeke UA 35
25. Anders Hansen Den 3.44
26. Francesco Molinarilta 3.41
27. Thomas Bjorn Den 3.40
28l.Simon Dyson Eng 3.37
29. Zach Johnson USA 3.36
30. Retief Goosen SAf 3.33

I2 Marteo r Mnss rsolta 3.
3 Martin Laird Sco 3.30

3. Kea oB adeyUS 3.
36. Darren Clarke Nlr 3.26.
37. Ernie Els SAf 317
38. Bo Van Pelt USA 3.17
39. Miguel Angel Jimenez Esp
40. Justin Rose Eng 3.17
4 Gary WoodlandUS 3.
43. Y.E. Yang Kor 3.03 .
44 Ioshikava J 30
46. Tiger Woods USA 2.94
47. Bill Haas USA 2.92
48. Sergio Garcia Esp ~2.89
G9 oenotan rd US 28
51. Louis OosthuizenSAf 2.74
53 Eoearro oI na ita 7.6
54. Tim Clark SAf 2.63
5 Arn adhdeleyAuji 63
57. Robert Allenby Aus 2.55
58. Rory Sabbatini SAf 2.50
59. Fredrik JacobsonSw 2.50
60. Ryan Palmer USA 2.48
61. Lucas Glover USA 2.46
62. Mark Wilson USA 2.45
63. Charley HoffmanUSA 2.32
'64. Sean O'Hair USA 2.22
65. Ben Crane USA 2.22
66. Scott Verplank USA 2.21
67. Yuta Ikeda Jpn 2.20
68. Ross Fisher Eng 2.18
69. Alexander NorenSwe 2.16
70. J.B. Holmes USA 2.11 '
71. Anthony Kim USA 2.10
72. Richard Green Aus 2.09
73. Kevin Na USA 2.08
74. Charles Howell IIIUSA 2.07
LPGA TOUR STATS
through Spt II
1, Yani Tseng, 69.59. 2, Cristie Kerr,
70.35. 3, Stacy Lewis, 70.75. 4, Suzann
Pettersen, 70.85. 5, Brittany Lincicome,
70.91. 6, IK.Kim, 70.92. 7,Jiyai Shin,
70.96. 8, Paula Creamer, 70.96. 9, Na
Yeon Choi, 70.98. 10, Amy Yang, 71.06.
1, Yani TseDg 2 8.. 2 ain Hjorth,
267.1. 3, Michelle Wie, 266.4. 4, Jean
25.6 .o Britn inc come c2a6K.5 d
Ryann O'Toole, 265.5. 8, Gerina Piller'
26u 6 ile Hage, 263.4. 10,Vicky
Greens in Regulation Pct.
C1 mr, 7e4 80% 3Sz n aettersen'
S420% 4,eSashnweg A7n3 %.
Stanford, 71.90%b.7, Catriona Mat-
the 1.80%.8, Cr.% i 0, ari Hj00%h,
71.60%6.
1, Cristie Ker 173AT2,I K. Kim,
1.746. 3, Yani Tseng, 1.757. 4, Jiyal Shin,
1.7n59. 5 ohelGusan ,el7P6 k6,
1.769. 8, Ai Miyazato, 1.771. 9, Angela


1mrtediat
Aidn't sho
football st
,ietl..


e impacts tat
,w up in fantasy
tats, at least not


England's' first-
raft pick, left
te Solder, started
ljured Sebastian
and Brady didn't
at, shaking off a
over` to throw for
record 517 yards
touchdowns, in-
99-yarder to Wes
the Patriots' 3-
Miami.
helped the Patri-
e the exception
tion that th6 of-
ne and second-
d- be the ~groups
cted by the lack
because they need
synergy.
worked together,
Ik that's good for
der said of Brady,
orded the 11th
passing pe'rfor-
NFL history.
Dareus, the third
ick out of Ala-
Is a beast for the
;ills in their 41-7
g of the Chiefs in
ity.
Is had the worst
nse in the league
but with Dareus
g the middle
6-foot-3, 340-
rame, they held
harles to 56 yards

:h he was only
with two tack-
us was so good
ng up the line of
ge with his brute
Agility that Buf-
.ebackers had a

.trast, the Chiefs
thing from their
Jonathan Bald-
o hurt a thumb
ning camp fight
omas Jones, was
many first-round
:ross the league
nr't even active on
weekend.
.iladelphia Eagles
ess their top three
.t started rookies
important spots,
under Jason Kelce
er and fourth-
Casey Matthews
e linebacker.
of the 32 first-
Sdidn't play Sun-
h five of them


Tom Brady). New I
"He di everything ev- roun dd 'd d
erybody didn't expect him taclde Nat
to do," said receiver St~eve for an in
.Smiith, who caught TD Vollmer,
throws of 77 and 26 yards miss a be
from Newton. "He was on rare turn
point. He made sornegreat a team r
`ruRS, some great reads and and four
Some fantastic throws." cluding a
SNeWton may have made Welker in
a believer out of some of 24 win at
his critics, b~ut his team- Solder h
mates have always been in ots prov~
his corner, to the no
"He's had the world on fensive lii
his shoulders for a year ary woule
HOW and Ithink he's sort of most affe
gtting used to it,"l Pro Bowl~ of OTAs bl
left tackle Jordan Gross the most
saiid. "It' was a tough game: "We all
He gOt hit a lot and there and I thin
Was a lot of crowd noise. him," Sole
He had incredible compo- who rece
SUre againSt all Odds. He 500-yard
WRS RS advertised." mance in
Of course, the rookie in Marcel
that game who came oul; a -overall p
Willll6 Wasn't Newton but bama, wa
PeterSOn, Who returned a Buffalo B
punt 89 yards for the go- whooping
ahead touchdown and Kansas C
added five tackles in Ari- The Bil
ZOna's 28-21 win. run defer
Newvton, whose bid for last year
a game-tying drive in the anchoring
final minute fell a yard with his
short, makes his home de- pound fi
but Sunday against the de- Jamaal C
fending cham ion Pack- rushing.
ers, who were sparked Althoug
bytheir own remarkable credited
rOokie in Week 1. les, Dare
Randa~llCobb, a second- at jammi
round draft pick out of scrimmal
Kentucky, caught a touch- force and
down ass and tied an NFL falo's lin
record for longest kickoff field day.
return with a 108-yarder in By con
the Packers' 42-34 win over got not
the New Orleans Saints on rookies.
Thursday night. win, whe
The opening weekend in a trai
came to a close Monday with The
night in Denver, where one of I
former Texas A&M pass- picks ac
rusher Von Miler, who that were
WRS selected one spot be- opening
hind Newton in the draft, The Ph
forced fumble on his first didn't dr
snap as a pro. picks bu
Scooping it upwas safe- at two i
ty and fellow rookie Rahim sixth-rou
MOOre, a second-round at center
selection from UCIA. rounder
They were two of the at middle~
BTOnCOs' record four rook- Nine (
ieS to start on opening day, rounders
a 23-20 loss to Oakland. .day witl
Other rookies made inactive.


$Moey
$357,352

$227,934
$225,280
$221,324
$220,418
$208,563
$183,126
$177,200
$164,842
$159,912

$148,247
$145,064
$138,828
$134,662
$138,611
$132,573

$127,644

$125,447
$125,089
$118,928

$112,536

$109,750

$104,043
$102,465
$101,546

$97,034

$91,511

$85,832
$85,121


1. J.J. Killeen
2. Mathew Goggin
4-ary Cr stian
5. Ted Potter, Jr.
6. Kyle Thompson
7. Erik Compton
8. Russell Knox
9. Kyle Reifers
10. Steve Wheatcroft
11. Danny Lee
12. Scott Brown
13. James Nitties
n5 os Brnaaway
16. Martin Flores
17. Brett Wetterich
18. Roberto Castro '
19. Billy Hurley III
20. Daniel Chopra
21. Brenden Pappas
ZZGarthoMuiroy
24. Mharco Dawson
2. To mE Berthenk
~27. Will Wilcox
28. Matt Davidson
29. Richard H. Lee
s0 tv resen
32. Matt Hendrix
3 R an Arour
35. John Mallinger
a7Birarn stjs
38. Bubba Dickerson
39. Casey Wittenberg
40. Aaron Watkins
s2 aulCaton
43.Andrew Svoboda
4 Mabk An eo
46. Travis Hampshire

49. Alistair Presnell
50. Ken Duke


CHAMPIONS TOUR STATS
Through Aug. 28
Charles Schwab Cup
1, Tom Lehman, 1,985 Points. 2, Mark
Calcavecchia, 1,578. 3, Peter Senior,
1,419. 4, Olin Browne, 1,370. 5, John
Cook, 1,344. 6, Russ Cochran, 1,339.
7, Nick Price, 1,181. 8, Tom Watson,
1,131. 9, Mark O'Meara, 1,116. 10, Jeff
Sluman, 1,057.
Scoring Average
1, Russ Cochran, 68.90. 2, Mark
Calcavecchia, 69.04. 3, Tom Lehman,
69.14. 4 (tie), Bernhard Langer and
Cr P vin, IU.20. 6, Nic~k arc 69.35.
69.47.9, MarkO'Meara, 69.48.10 Pteter
Sno,65Driving Distanc
1, Kenny Perry, 295.6. 2, Steve
Lowery, 294.5. 3, John Huston, 293.8. 4,
Michael Allen, 290.6. 5, Mark Calcavec-
chia, 289.6. 6, Hal Sutton, 289.4. 7, Tom
Lehman, 289.0. 8, Eduardo Romero,
288.6. 9, Keith Fergus, 288.1.10, Jim
Rutledge, 287.8.
RDriving Accuracy Percentage
1, Allen Doyle, 84.18%6. 2, Corey Pavin,
n19k96 13, hn wMOrs,1.276 o eFred
and Hale Irwin, 79.64%6.7, Lee Rinker,
6i .8mo,s 7.5. 15eh, W~ayn .Vi,
78.25%.

1, TomG n nRa 7789 2 B rnhard
ne 69. 5, ,ef man, a5354on5, Joey
Sindelar, 75.00%. 6, John Cook, 74.44%6.
4,i Putl ge, 4.38%6. 4H3l 6rwn,
Tom Purtzer, 74.16%-

1, Tom Lehm n, 2D. 2,nny Perry,
28. 3, Bernhard Langer, 37. 4, Jim
NikPie, s3 7 3c ikhe Good2 sand
Mc~hael0Allen, 47. 9, Tommy Armour


AMERICAN CONFERENCE

W LT Pct PF PA
New England 1 0 01.000. 38 24
Buffalo 1 0 01.000 41 7
'N.Y.Jets 1 00 1.000 27 24
Miami 0 1 0.000 24 38
South
W LT Pct PF PA
3Hacustonville 10.0 1 14
Tennessee 0 1 0.000 14 16
indianapolis ON ld.000 7 34
W LT Pct PF PA
Baltimore 1 0 01.000 35 7
Cincinnati 1 0 01.000 27 17
Ceveland 0 1 0 M 17 2
Pitbrgh 0 .0 3
West
W LT Pct PF PA
Oakland 1 00 1.000 23 20
San Diego 1 0 01.000 24 17
Knsas City 01 .00 20

NATIONAL CONFERENCE

WL Pct .PF PA
Washington 1 0 01.000 28 14
Piadelphia 1 0 100 1 1 1
N.Y. Giants 0 ld.000 14 28
W LT Pct PF PA
New or eaans o1.0 344
Carolina 0 1 0.000 21 28
Atlanta UN 1d0 .000 12 30
W LT Pct PF PA
Chia0 100.0 a 0 1
Green Bay 1 0 01.000 42 34


d raoberOCS


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afte batery ha.


MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7 Pa
ESPN Cleveland at Texas
10 p~m
ESPN N.Y Yankees at Seattle
S P-M*
F5N UEFA Champions League'
Real Madrid at Za rb

BFSNc- UsEA Chamin r ea (
Lisbon, Portugal (same-day tape)


Stanford, 1.771. 10, Stacy Lewis, 1.775.
1, vani Tseng siA. 2 Cr tie Kerr,
4.09. 3, Stacy Lewis, 3.89. 4, Brittany
Lni wne. .71 e5, n3l ,tanf r,n

SChoi, 3.78. 8 (tie), I.K. Kim and Paula
Creamer, 4.00 10 ai jorth, 3.82.
1, Karen Stupples, 0.19. 2, Brittany
Lincicome, 0.14. 3, Yani Tseng, 0.13. 4
(tie), Amy Yang and Sophie Gustafson,
'0.11. 6 (tie), Jiyai Shin and Angela
Stanford, 0.10. 8, Four tied with 0.09.
Sand Save Percentage
H, roog U 6da, 6800 2, Mina
63.41%. 4, Lorie Kane, 63.33%. 5,
Natalie Gulbis, 62.22%. 6, Silvia
.Cavalleri, 61.90%. 7, Anna Nordqvist,
59.62%. 8, Catriona Matthew, 59.26%.
9, Stacy Lewis, 57.896. 10, Two tied
with 57.45%.
Rounds Under Par
1, Yani Tseng,.704. 2, Stacy Lewis,
.655. 3, Cristie Kerr, .611. 4, I.K. Kim,
.604. 5, Morgan Pressel,.593. 6, Na
Yeon Choi,.569. 7, Ai Miyazato, .558.
8 (tie), Brittany Lincicome and Paula
Creamer,.554. 10, Amy Yang,.547.


THE ASSOCI ATED PRESS
JamaiCa'S Usain Bolt runs to win' the men's 100 m sprint at
the Zagreb Meeting IAAF World Challenge in Zagreb, Croatia,
on Tuesday,


From Page 1B































































& CHIPOL;A COLLEGE
CRIMINAL JUSTICE
TRAINING CENTER
d
CrOSSOuer frOIR C~rrediORnS
.to Law Enforcement
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S Monday Friday
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WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2011 38r


SPORTS


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.corn


' Sports Briefs


Bionic Sports will hold a
Speed, Agility, and Condi-
tioning camp on Tesdays
and Thursdays at Inte-
gras Therapy & Wellness
Center for youth boys and
girls ages 9-17.
Cost is $40 a month, or
$12 per week.
The camp will continue
for the entire summer,
focusing on becoming a
better athlete.
Please call Eric Pender
for more information at
850-284-2368.

Marianna Youth
WNeSillng
Team Dynamic Youth
Wrestling Team wlll
continue practicing on
Tuesday and Thursday
nights at the wrestling
room at the old Marianna
High School.
Practice wil be from 6
p.m. to 8 p.m.
All kids in Jackson
County from ages 6 and
up are welcome to join.
For further information
please contact Marianna
coach Ron Thoreson at-
272-0280.

Sports Items
Send all sports~ items to
editorial@jcfloridan.com,
or fax them to 850-482-
4478. The mailing address
for the paper is Ja~ckson
County Floridan RO. Box
520Marianna, FL 32447.


Cheerleaders. The cost to
attend is $30.
For more information,
visit http://mhs.jcsb.org,
or e-mail or call Deb-
bie Dryden at Debbie.
dryden@jcsb.org and 850-
482-9605, ext.252.

Travel Ball Tryrouts
The Panama City Lady
Uightning travel softball
team will continue to
holodrindi dual t yunsdin
14U teams.
Pickup players for up-
coming fall tournaments
will also be sought after
for both teams. .
If interested, call 850-
258-8172, or email ikiev@
yahoo.com.

College Exposure -
Team Tryouts
BSN Fastpitch and
Panaina City Lady Light-
~ning are forming an 18U
College E~lxposure Team.
The team will play JUCO
teams and D-1 school
tournaments to be seen
by college coaches.
Tryouts are on Sunday
and Sept. 18 at arders
Park in Panama City.
Ages 16-18 are encotir-
aged to try out. For more
info, call 850-276-0864.

Golf Tournament
The Plant Scholz
Chapter of the Gulf
Power Transformers ahs


scheduled its 4th Annual
Charity Golf Tournament
for Sept. 24 at Florida
Caverns Golf Course.
The proceeds from the
tournament will benefit
needy children in Jackson
County.
There will be three-
man teams, with cost at
$60 per player, including
green fees, two mulligans,
riding cart, and lunch.
Interested parties can
sign up at the golf course,
or call at 850-482-4257.
Companies interested
in sponsoring the event
can call 850-593-6421 for
more information.


Alumm Football .
Gam9
There will be a full
contact altumni football
League held this winter.
The games are full pads
with officials, announc-
ei~s, and video crew, and
is open to all former high
school football players 18
and older in the are(.
Games will take place
on weekends from
January through March of
2012.
There must be at least
35 players to a team.
Those interested cm
sign up at tvww.alumnj-
footballusa.com.

Spe0 ad, Agility, ad
Conditioning Camp-


Optimist announces its
first Northeast Jackson
County Optimist Golf
Tournament to Benefit
Youth Activities in Jackson
County,
The tournament will
be on Thursday at Indian
Springs Golf Course, and
all proceeds will go to
provide many different
programs and competi-
tions for the youth of
Jackson County.
Northeast Jackson
County Optimist Club *
also provides Christmas
for needy children from
Jackson County.
The format of the
tournament is a four-man
scramble with registration
and luneh beginning at
11:30 a.m., and tee time at
12:30 p~m.
Hole sponsorships for
four-person teams are
available for $350, with
entry fee for individual
golfers at $55. Lunch and -
beverages on the cart are
proviided for all.
For more information,
contact President of
NEJCOC Liz Jackson at
850-557-8637, or NEJCOC
Board member Jaines
191iller at 850-569-5282.

Chipola Baseball
Showcase
Chipola College's aimual
Select Baseball Showcase
is set for Saturday at the
Chipola field. ..
The event is open to all


high school sophomores,
juniors or seniors who
are current members of a
varsity baseball team.
Check-in opens at 8
a.m. on Sept. 17. The
event will continue rain
or shine with indoor
facilities available.
Skill evaluation for run-
ning, hitting and fielding
begins at 9 a.m. with skill
evaluation for hitting,
pitching and catching
to follow. Players should
wear baseball pants and
bring their own bats'
spikes, gloves, hats and
protective cups.
Registration deadline
is Sept. 14. Participants
must provide proof of in-
surance and sign a waiver
of liability. Cost is $100.
For information, ca~ll
coach Jeff Johnson at 850-
718-2237, or visit www.
chipola.edu- ,

MHS Cheerleader
Kiddie CliniC
The Marianna High
School Cheerleading Clin-
ic will be held Saturday
from 8:30 a.m. to 11:30
a.m. for ages 3 to 10 at the
MHS gym.
The girls will learn
. cheers, chants, and
dances in order to be
prepared to cheer at the
Bulldogs varsity football
game vs. Chipley on Sept.
23 at Bulldo~g Stadium.
The clinic is a fund-
faiser for the MHS Varsity


presence seemed to make
his teammates better.
Run blockifig and pass
protection were~ spotty,
but Chad Henne managed
to find open receivers re-
peatedly. He threw for 416
yards, the most ever by any
Miami quarterback not
named Marino.
With -the Patriots wor-
ried about Bush, receivers
Brand~on Marshall, Davone
Bess, Brian Hartline' and
Anthony, Fasano all had


productive nights.
"Definitely something to
build off of," Marshall said.
The! Dolphins had 10
receptions of 20 yardsor
moie. Last year theyr had
44 all season;
''Big plays are generated
because you wori some
matchups," Sparano said.
"The more we can win the
one-on-ones, the better
We'll be."
SBush caught nine passes
for 56 yards and a score,


and while he found little
room to run, he carried 11
times for 38 yards. Spara-
no said the workload was
about right.
"He had 20 touches, and
he was probably targeted
25 tinies," Sparano, said.
"However we get him the
ball, I would like the num-
ber to be around that."
Considering, `the. in-
cons~istent blockingn, the
Dolphins moved the ball
~remarkably well.


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High School Football
Friday-- Jay at Sneads, 7
p.m.; Marianna at Liberty
County, 7 p.m.; Cotton~
dale at Franklin County,
6:30 p.m.
The Graceville Tigers
are off this week.

JHniof V8FSity
Football
Tuesday Walton at
Marianna, 6 p.m.
Thursday- Graceville at
Chipley, 6 p.m.; Sneads at
Blountstown, 6 p.m.

Middle School
Football
Tuesday Cottondale
at Graceville, 6 p.m.;
Grand Ridge at Tolar, 6
p~m. '
Thursday- Port St. Joe at
Marianna, 6 p.m.

High School
Volleyba
Tuesday -- Sneads at
Co~ttondale, 4 p.m., 5 p.m.,
and 6 p.m.; Graceville at
Altha, 5 p.m., and 6 p.m.
Thursday Pensacola
Catholic at Marianna, 5
p.m., and 6 p.m.; Beth-
lehem at Graceville, 5
p.m., and 6 p.m.; Altha at
Cotton ae, 4 p.m., 5 p.m.,
and 6 p.m.

Optimist Golf
TOWrnamen


RS h
From Page1B

day, the Dolphins have
only one home game until
Nov. li
.The latest defeat did of-
fer some cause for encour-
agement, if only on the
offensive side. The unit
sputtered through most of
last season, but as the.Dol-
phins had hoped, Bush's












NEA Crossword Puzzle


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QulllDriverBooks.com .


9-14 @2011 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS



CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are cleated from quo aiono b aos people, past and present,

TODAY S CLUE: U equals V
"uy svOW.2 WSVOXK ZUZE AZ VM H
SP XX VE VM HMFRSPM~Y. PR WS V0X K
AZ VC RS Z SP XX AZ XVMY PMY RV PR ."
- CEHMT XXV FK JEP YSR



PREVIOUS SOLUTION:':I've come to think of Europe as a hardcover book,
America as the paperback version." Don DeLillo
(c) 2011 byNEA, Inc. 9-14


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KIT'N' CARLYI. BY LARRY WRIGHT HERMAN BY JIM UNGER


9-i LagnlSloc nleoationan Ditbt h vi*~ OUdTklaULS. '"


SNorth 09-14-11
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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN o www.jcfloridan.corn


14B t WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER 14. 2011


HOROSCepse
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
- You won't find a better
day to sort out -a problem
that's been on your mind.
You should easily be able to
find the perfect solution.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
- Don't take any unneces-
sary or wild risks, but do
follow any instincts and/
or hunches pertaining to
your financial dealings.
Your perceptions are better
than tisual.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) Associate yourself
with those you believe to
be lucky. Some of their
good instincts will rub off
on you.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-
Dec. 21) Sublime condi-
tions wilqui ky rep ace
any leftover negativity that
you wake up with, Be ork
your toes.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) After a bumpy start,
Lady L ck will look x
tremelylcindly on you. This
will be especially true in`
areas where you are able to
express your creativity.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 19) Be particularly
watchful for 'developments
that would enhance your
financial well-being and
position. This could be a
better than usual time.
. PISCES(Feb.20-March 20)
- Good news is on its way
pertaining to one of your
larger, personal interests.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
- It behooves you to focus
your efforts and energies
on work-related issues that
can yield you a large profit
and/or enhance your mna-
terial interests in some
manner.
STAURUS (April 20-M~ay 20)
- Hang out with those who
.provide.you with flun and
have an interest in your
personal affairs.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
- If you need some type of
help or assistance, turn to-
those who you know have
the expertise you require.
CAN CE R (June 21-July 22)
- YOU Should put aside
whatever is bothering yrou
and turn toward optimism
and accomplishment.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -
No one is better than you
at sorting out critical issues
in ways that are advanta-
geous to yourself and oth-
ers. Use your gifts to handle
SOmething important.


Answer to Previous Puzzle


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accident
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21 Hosp.
23lvpd.oki
26 Formal
27 Uirseex
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28 Booster
rocket
30 Literary
collection
31 Bikini top
32 Genuine
nuisances
33 Brand of
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35 Campers,
foT Short
37 Part of
TNT
38 Supply the
banquet
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game


40 Sports
"'zebra"
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42 Is,to
Goethe
43 Type of
whiskey
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eye
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51 Whit
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56 Noisy
sleeper
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lot

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3 Wasn't
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genre
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25 Main
course
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base
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52 Choler
53Morning
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FIGURES IN WORLD
HISTORY!


'\\


ABACbFFOAO
CHIPS IS LIKE


: A)C6Y00fRweA
,C k)TO fles '
,,~ O"~' 1


*


Dear Annie: A while back, I signed up for
Facebook in order to stay in touch with
friends and renew old acquaintances.
Several weeks ago, my husband's 35-
year-old daughter, "Sheila," sent me a
friend request. She has nof been in touch
with us since she turned 18, when my
husband no longer had to pay child sup- -
port. Obviously, they were never close.
I told my husband about the request,
.and he said to ignore it. But Sheila is now
married with a child, and I'd like to think
she has since matured and wants to
reconnect with her father. Of course, his
impression is that she wants something
fr~om us. Even though I have no desire to
be Facebools friends with my husband's
daughter, I feel stuck in the middle. I
think he should get to know her again .
and meet his grandchild. What should I
do?
STUCK IN THE MIDDLE IN KANSAS

Dear Stuck: We hope your husband: re-
alizes that an 18-year-old girl is apt to be-


have much differently ~than a 35-year-old
married mother. As the adult during the
divorce, it was your husband s respon-
sibility to maintain a relationship with
his child and not allow her Adolescent
anger to get in the way.We think Sheila
deserves another chance, and so does
your husband. Encourage him to make
contact. He has a grandchild to think of.
And if she's only after money, he'll find
out soon enough.

Dear Annie: I sympathize with "Trired of
Wet B~eds," whose 14-year-old stepson
has enuresis. I went through the same
thing with my daughter, who wet the
bed until she was 11. I discovered that an
allergy to the lactose in milk can cause
bedwetting. After my daughter was off
whole milk for three days, she stopped
wetting the bed completely.
If the stepson has any sensitivity to
dairy products or if he was allergic to
milk as a baby, this could be the root
cause.


BIG NATE BY LINCOLN PIERCE


+(MF! YOU'VE GOT
QUITE A LINEUP
HERE'

\ ~E


'NOW, WJHO 1S...?
THArs nE.
ILIGHlT I\EXT
To LACH
GALIFIAN(AKIS 1


FRANK & ERNEST BY BOB THAVES


GRIZZWELLS BY BILL SCHORR


ARLO & JANIS BY JIMM1Y JOHNSON


ALLEY 00P BY JACK AND CAROLE BENDER
INa STIU UNFOLDING STORY TRAT Riv4L5 ATERGATE
IYVESTIGATIONS CONTINUE IN THE i IN ITS SCOPE. THERE ARE INDICATIONe OF AbeOCIATION
GOVealERNMENT CASE AGAINST WITH KEY BOVERNMENT OFFICIALS FRO* CON6RL66
EMrBELLLER AD DCILI bC*WLM rND P~s66Sa. EVEN THE PRE&IDErT& CABINET
'I'


Bridg
Here is another deal from my cruise to Nor-
way two months ago. Look at the West hand.
East opens one spade, West raises to two
spades, North makes a takeout double, and
South advances with three diamonds, which
ends the auction. What should West lead?
Note the disciplined -auction. East has a per-W
fectly respectable one-spade opening, but 6
when West can offer only a single raise, East
should not go higher, because he has no extra
values or spade length. Equally, West said his +
piece on the first round. &
When you have supported your partner's
suit, lead high from a low tripleton to deny an
honor. If West does this, East should find the
right defense. He must win with his spade king-
anld shift to the club king under which West
should signal enthusiastically with his nine to
show the jack. A moment later, when West gets
in with the heart ace, a club continuation gives
the defense five tricks: two spades, one heart
and two clubs.
Note that if West leads the spade three at trick
one, East will assume West has a spade honor,
which must be the jack. It would then be safe
for East to start with two spade winners before
switching to clubs. Here, though, that is fatal
because South discards a club from the dum-
my on his spade jack.





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Insertion. Adjustment for errors is limited to the cost of that portion of the ad wherein the error occurred The advertiser agrees that the publisher shall not be liable for damages ansing out of errors in advertisements beyond the amount paid for the space
actually occupied by that portion of the advertisement in which the error occurred. whether such error Is due to neghigence of the published's employees or otherwise and there shall be no liability for non-insertion of any advertisement beyond the amount paid for
such advertisement Display Ads are not guaranteed position. AII advertising Is subject to approval Right Is reserved to edit, reject, cancel or classify all ads under the appropriate classification.


Ir__ _IIII__ __1 ___ II____


Marty Robbins Roofing Co. is looking for
Experienced ~!~Roofer.
We offer major medical, paid holidays, and
after one year a full weeks paid vacation.
Typical work weeks are 45-50 hours per
week. Pay depends upon experience-
Please send resumes t0
WffCj0fas@gEomaio or come by our
OffiCe to fill out an application.

S EDUCATION
S& INSTRUCTION

5311rGet a Quality Education for a
New Career! Programs
ORT~S1ISS offered in Healthcare,
HVAC and Electrical Trades.
Call Fortis College Today! 8-2-41.
c:ou~.EGE~ For co e, i infration
www. oris.e u

RESIDENTIAL
d~) REAL ESTATE FOR RENT

1/1 Apartment for Rent. For info call 850-579-
8895

2BR/1BA $300 + $200 dep. Rail Road St. C'dale
eB IA(8550 35 $44 2dep. Faney st. C'dale
3/1. brick honn fo rsent,21 oulntr ar nanr
rage $800 Both require deposit, lease & refer-
ences. 850-579-4317/866-1965
3/2 Home in town, CH/A, dishwasher, fresh
paint & new carpet. 1st, last & deposit, $7so
each. 4195 Bowers St. Cali for appointment
904-214-6980
3BR/1.IBA Brick Home, Malone, New Carpet,
Stove, Refrigerator, Storaige Shed,CH/A
No Pets $600/ Mo + dep. Call 850-569-2475


chec 4,Tdeea daw yov e, bckT &ver in ~
color. $350.8 E;up. 334-790-5695/334790-2807
Female Malti-tzu black and white, almost 3
years old, not housebroken, but crate trained.
Great dog with kids loves to sit in your lap. On-
ly reason for giving away is not house broken,
comes with crate. Please call for more informa-
tion 850-209-1286
FREE TO GOOD HOME : Red nose pit mix pup-
pies. 850-272-1065
Lab Puppies: will be 6 weeks old on Sept.11lth.
Have their first shots and wormed. Yellow lab
mom and chocolate daddy. 5 pups remaining.
Males $225 and Females $200. 1 Blk female, 2
yellow.males 1 yellow female, 1 strawberry
blond male. All very healthy. Call 334-726-1010
or 726-6929, email: tmcaldwe~southernco.com
LOST: Black Lab on Sapp Rd Cottondale. Name
is Crissy, 850-352-4005/209-7366. REWARD
V Select Puppies ON SALE! V
Morkies $200, Older Chorkles $50*
Hairless Chinese Crested. Yorkies.
Yorkid-Poos $200.-$300. Shih-A-Poos
Malti-Poos $250. Pek-A-Poos $250. Pomn FM
$250, & Yorkie/Pom $200 C all 334-718-4886

%~)FARMER'S MARKET


2/1 $425 & 2/1.5 $450 in Greenwood CH/A,
water/qarbage/lawn included. 850-569-1015
2/1 Furnished Mobil Home Wooded area, pri-
vate drive, deep well, sun deck, clean, no pets.
Rent & dep. req. 850-482-4172/718-5089
2/2 Mobile Home $450 + deposit, appliances,
washer & dryer, water/garbage & sewer in-
cluded 850-482-4455
2 & 3 bedroom mobile Homes in Cottondale.
$500 and up. H20, garbage, sewer included.
httrj58 4www.ch~arlo country living. comn.
2 & 3BR 2BA Mobile Homes in Cottondale no
pets, Central Heat & Air $400-$450 850-258-
1594 leave message
2 & 3 BR MH's in
Marianna & Sneads (850)209-8595.
2BRO2BA Located-in Sneads $350/month 850-

e., ecn Mnal8 ok.8C -5A499 p Oc806
.6075
3 BR, 2 BA, 2100 sq. ft. living space. LR, DR, den,
~laundry room. $600 ino. 850-718-8088.
oott n al, t mobile honr ior rent 3rbed-
porch any covered back porch concrete patio,
central heat and air, new beige carpet, dish-
washer, washer/dryer hook up,big front anld
back yiardnwi hw lres,aNbOaPES Soust hhea ref
posit is $550. Monthly rent $550, 850-529-0396
For Rent Gr enwmind, Mar anna, & Cottaondale,
lawn maint. included. 850-593-4700
Ren moOn 2 & BR Mo Hle H mes.
1 & 2BR Apts & Houses. For details
4850-557-3432 or 850-814-6515 +=
COMMERCIAL
ec=i REAL ESTATE FOR RENT

Office Space ~for rent i n town, all utilities in-
cluded, 850-557-2000


c~m ANNOUNCEMENTS

AUCTION Wed. Sept. 14, Preview 9AM Sale 11
AM, 5159 Woodlane Circle Tallah'assee Hgh.
Spd. Printing. Equip. Mailing Equip. Comp. Ofc.
Furn. See catalog www.globalauctionsenr.com
Aaron Joseph & Company GLOBAL AUCTION
SERVICES 850-878-3030 FL AB3058


I Pay CASH for Diabetic test
Strips. Up to $10 per box!
MOSt brands considered*
All boxes must be unopened
and un expired.
Call Matt 334-392-0260
Will keep children in my home in Marianna
area. Weekdays only. 850-272-6903

LOST: Checkbook/wallet lost at Chipola Col-
lege on 9/6. Please call Dustin @ 850-272-1638

4052 Bright Prospect Road, Marianna
Sat. 9-17 and 18, at 7a.m. until 5 p.m., furniture,
mirrors, some clothes, nick-nacks and pictures.
JUST IN: Older Lefton Colonial Village &
Acce ;H 1953 Hami nCnB ach Milka eake Mi er
Game In Box; Oak Bonnet Chest; Victorian
Needlepoint Rocker; Medford Antique
Marketplace, 3820 R.C.C. Dothan, 702-7390

~QP~MERCHANDISE



JACKSON COUNTY PICKER WILL BUY:
OLD COINS, TOYS AND COLLECTABLES
CALL 850-693-0908


STOP GNAT, FLY, & MOSQUITO BITES! .
Buy Swamp Gator All Natural
Insect Repellent.
Family Safe-Use head to toe.
Available at The Home Depot.
Two burial plots in Gardens of Memory
6 00 Hwy 431 Dothan, AL.
"alor" Lots 90-D- 3 and 4. Sell both for $2800.
2 lots at retail now selling for around $3800.
Call (404) 451-5449 or
email dml~numail.orq if interested,.

Guitar: 5i-String Bass Guitar with hardshell case
Peavey Millennium BXP. Transparent black fin-
ish. Like new condition. $250. Call 334-797-4314
Professional Trombone: Getzen 747 Eterna 2.
Large bore with F attachment. Hardshell case
included. $700. Call 334-797-4314
Trumpet 2001 Blessing Trumpet with case'
two mouthpieces, cleaning snake and cleaning
rod. Excellent condition, professionally serv-
iced recently. Paid $1,500, asking only $850.
Call (912) 658-2692 for details.

(~~PETS & ANIMALS

CFA Reg. Persian Himalaylan kittens. Litter
trained & ready for new hdmes. Kittens were
raised underfoot & love people (and shoela-
ces). $200-$250. 334-774-2700 after 10am
FOUND: 1 cat and kittens around Bridge Creek
Rd. 863-258-2589
LOST CAT in Bascom area. Orange female
Tabby. Pink Collar. Call 850-209-8651

AKC English bulldogs. Vet checked and current.
They are female and seven weeks. These pup-
pies will be small approx 45 Ibs when grown.
Large heads and nose ropes. Exceptional
bloodline. The brindle girl is $1,800 and the
white girls are $1,600. Please call 334-464-1534
or 464-1391. Will email pics of parents if inter-
ested.
FREE TO GOOD HOME : Female,White American
, tiP 7-8yrs old. shots UTD. Jeff 850-592-4009


**~ 334-793-6690 **


Custom Cotton Picking:
We Pick & Pack
OVr /915 0erso experience.
Satisfaction Guaranteed.
Dow Mlorris Farms
Call 850-326-6881 or
850-527-6291


IT'S A\S EASY AS 1 2 a3 IE REUT 1
1. CAu. 2.PLACE YOUR AD 3 E EUT


OO


1 9 4


I


oi i lol ; 11


I . . . .


o


TH SI.DOKU GAlmE UIITH A KICK.
SHOWY TO PLAY
Fill in the 9x9 grid with the missing
numbers so that each column, row ajnd
3x3 box contains the digits 9 only once.
Thef6 is (inly one correct solution
for each puzzle.
GET MORE WASAB!
PUZZLES ONLINE!
ARCHIVES AND MORE GREAT GAMES AT
BOXERJAMA.COM


~i2LLLUI~


@2008 BLOCKDOTINC.- WWWBLOCKDOT(


, ,


BE SURE TO VISIT OUR
NEWEST GAME SITE

Knn~LIgcy
KEWLBOX.COM


JACKSON COUNTY

F LORIDAN

jcfloridan.com


monster"
FIND LOCAL JOBS AT: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM/JOBS


Jackson County Floridan W.ednesday, September 14, 2011- 5 B


CLASSIFIED


wwuw..ICFLOKLRIDANcom


BY PHONE: (850) 526-3614 or (800)
BY FAX: (850)


779-2557
779-2557


BY MAIL: WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED MiARKETPLACE
P.O. BOX 520, MARIANNA, FL 32447
IN PERSON: 4403 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA


ONLINE: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM


EMPLOY MENT


A Austin Tyler & Associates A
quality 1-18 e & p rtments
"
Property Management is Our ONLY Brisiness"


Beautiful, stylish, newly remodeled brick home
for rent. 2 BR/1 BA. Quiet/safe neighborhood.
Nice size yard. Brick storage building on prop-
erty. $650/month. Contact 478-508-9502.


I> Ask about our $300 Sign on Bonus

Must have dependable transportation, minimum liability
insurance & valid driver's license.

Come by and fill out an application at the
IRgl(SOR County Floridan, 4403 Constitution Lane,


Wednesday, September 14, 2411


2


5


. -0


Tuesday's
WASABI SOLUTION


~i~


1


2


5


~/~


O


O


O


O


O


WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED




ARKEP


I(ICrR)


Nautical Style Furniture Plenty of Shelled, Fresh Pes,
Matching Nautical utebanNew Ptte,
Style Navy Couch &l Fr es
ChairSof wi ah mFan, aFr rs!

Or B stOfer 3Bed. Asin~g $475 220 W. Hwy 52 Malvern


G RACEVI LLE
Earn an average of .


F LORIDAN


I ~$1 000. Pe month!
WE ARE LOOKING FOR DEPENDABLE, BUSINjESS MINDED NEWSPAPER CARRIERS!
111 BE YOUR OWN BOSS (1AM to 6AM) .


Marianna, FL, 32447


fast and



easy









ilt1Elli www.JCFLORIDAN.com


Dodge '99 Durango: $795 Down, 0% Interest
Open 9am 9pm, 1-800-470-0650 1 -'OS Amadas 4row peanut comb~ie, pckel
Honda '02 CR-V EX 4x4 automatic sunroof, 4cyl. about 1200 ac. very good comnd. $46,500 KMC 4
tilt, str whl. crews control, cd, new tires PWR, I nrowpeanut shaker, good cond.S65oo
windows/mirrors/dr. locks, no accidence 334-4-03251 o334403-M249 c
EX clean 136kmi, $8900. 080 334-389-3071.
JEEP '96 Grand Cherokee, gold pack, neW II Ford 250'07 black in polor, 2-wheel drive
battery, new tires, $2500 080 229-334-7427 168K miles n a iaon system, mar tire,
Subaru'06 Forester Premium: Small SUV, 54K pack, elec seats, cold AC $ 1_6,900.
miles, one owner, regularly serviced. Automat- ggg
ic, 4-cyl, AC, AII Wheel Drive, cruise control, CD 343_669
pae shunreof talr hi c. orn pgnedmet
inside and out, excellent gas mileage 23+ city, ,FR'9F5,4h x
29+ highway, top safety rating, great car to Auto, $4,600 or reasonable
drive. 814,900. 334-699-6453 or 334-796-5719 Offer. Call 229-334-8520.
Toyota'07 4Runner. Clean one owner. Miles
113,330. Engine life expectancy 350,000 +! Gets Ford '99 F150 X/Cab: $975 Down, 0% Interest
20MPG!! Asking price $20,000 0.B.O. Retail val- Open 9am 9pm, 1-800-470-0650
ue $21,575. Call/Text Rachel 334-406-9830' GMC'89 3500 Diesel-
make ffer!Excellent work truck, long
wheel base, orange,
rebuilt engine,
Chevrolet'O2 SIhverado X/Cab $1,295 Down 0% 5 7 1,500. Quick Sell
Interest. Open 9am 9pm 1-800-470-0650 Call 334-791-9099
Chewolet'07 Silverado Crew Cab SL 2WD,GM98103dor
white with gray leather, 68K miles, one owner, loaded, 132K miles, $3400.
includes black toolbox, black running boards, 080 334-691-7111 or
new Bridgestone AT tires. $14,900 334-798-1768.
Call 334-596-1329 You can pay more,
Chevy '04 SIhveradon Z71 But you won't find a better one!
with~tow package HONDA'08 RIDGELINE RTL- white with tan
Michilen tires, 108K mi. leather interior,' sunroof and satellite radio,
white $13,900. new michelin tires, and only 32k miles.
334-790-0068. $ 27,500. Call Scott 334-685-1070

cab, V8, loaded, 183K mi. Battery, Automatic Trans., power windows,
runs good $2500. OBO 334- power locks, one owner, Senior Citizen owned
798-1768 or 334-691-7111 and driven. $12,000 OBO 334-701-0998
'Toyota '02 Tacoma Crew Cab. Automatic, 139k
Dodge '02 Ram 1500 4-wheel drive, quad cab, i1,0 FECT. Ccm-9diti 6 Lodd Beuifl
P/U with 4.7 Inter engine, cold alr, chrome run- RCO-H4 omie
ning boa ,echrdme ris chro~m6 tol bo, Field 0ey Grin Ha an Crn
Excellent condition.S8499. 11> 334-790-6832. Ha.$,0.804503

ISU~ 20026'Box ruck* Coachhouse '95 Van camper, 2 singles beds,
19000gy, extra clean, no CDL Required. microwave, generator, bathroom, stove &
$18,500. Call 334-299-0300. refrigerator. good condition. $8,000. OB0
334-347-1887 or 334-449-0162.


6B -Wednesday, September 14, 2011 *Jact




Lot in Greenwood, FL We have a beautiful 5
acre lot for sale on Whispering Pines Circle in
Greenwood, FL The property has big trees and
plenty of building sites. We have adjacent
acre avil IPri eu~st rd cedl



FOR SALE BY OWNER;
3BR/2BA 1102 Garden Lanes with 1600SF
REDUCED $85k Call334-793-3086





Honda '01 250 4-wheeler with reverse, new
tires, excellent condition $1400. 334-677-7748.


'07 18ft. Suntracker party barge with cover
40hp Mercury, 4-stroke big foot, TrallStar
single axie trailer, uesed very I~ttle, exc. cond.
$11,000 229-768-2058. .

Iclr ba tis ib GRA oditio nw the ecl
seats. Trailer & Tires NO WEAR. Boat only used
a couple of times. Call Chris 334-791-5755 to
come see. $1050.
198117 Welleraft, 170HP Inboard, Clean,
New carpet, tandem wheel trailer $2395 334-
793-3494

Jhbn o mlo o r 8 ier gd cnhd ton 81400.
334-677-7748
RHINO 2008, 18FT- 90 HP Suzuki, 55 LB
Minnkota, Aluminum Trailer, Humminbird
Depth Finder, on Board Charger, Binini top,
$14,200 334-798-4175 .
Rhino Boat: V176 Stick steer, with 70HP Zuzuki
4 stroke, loaded, low hours, like new, garage
kept. $10,900. Call 334-714-5860


Dutchman '06 Denall 30ft, sleeps 8, double
slide, bunk house, shelter kept, great shape,
MUST SELLI $18,500. Call 334-790-9730
LEETWOOD 2005 Plowler AX6, 5th wheel, 36
ft, 4 slides, large shower, 30/50AMP. $20,000
080 Call 334-695-4995, 334687-7861



Dixrie RV SuperStores
FL's Newest RV Dealer
NOW OPEN!!!
*Store Hours*
Monday-Saturday
8:00am-6:00pm
21 Acres / 30 Brands' New and Pre-Owned

m Newmar nKeystone a Heartland a Jayco
aFleetwood a Prime Time Coachmen
mForest River '


RV Collision Center
Located off 1-10 Ext 70 / 5R285

De F 8ia rS dp,71D FL435
Sales and Service: 850-951-18000
www.dlxiery.com DO 12756


Dixie RVl SuperStores
FL's Newest RV Deirler
NOW ^OPEN!!!
*Store Hours*
Monday-Saturday
8:00am-6:00pm
21 Acres /30.Brands New and Pre-Owned

a Newmar a Keystone a Heartland a Jayco
a Fleetwood a Prime Time. m Coachmen
aForest River

Service Department
Parts and Acces. Store
RV Collision Center
Located offl1-10Exit70 / R285
.328 Green Acres Dr. .
De Funlak Springs, FL 32435
Sales and Service: 850-951-1000
www~bdixenr.com. DO 12756
icetwood'03 Fiesta 31H Ford 810, 32K miles,
-reat shape, many extras $27,500. 534-792-
6105.
Trail Lite 2006 R-VISION
26 ft., fully loaded,
bought new, 13K miles
$44,995 334-616-6508 .
Trail ILite 2006 R-VISION
,26 ft., fully loaded,
bought new, 13K miles
$49,995 334-616-6508


YAMAHA'05 FX 1100 Waverunner, 3 seater
with cover, with trailer, garage kept $5,000'
334-687-0218, 706-575-3760


Custom, V-6, automatic,
loaded, 110,000 miles*
nrew tires, clean, 53995.
334-790-7959.
Cadillac DTS 08' fully loaded, 35K miles,
immaculate condition, $23,000. OBO 334-792-

3 9vrol 4-618-1 Coette Coupe, Black with
black leather interior, spoiler, ground effects,
automatic, 65K miles, 229-524-2955
Chewolet'00 Monte Carlo $575 Down 0%
Interest. Open 9am 9pm, 1-800-470-0650
Chewrolet'03 Impala: $875 Down, 0% interest
Open 9am 9pm. 1-800-470-0650

Automatic 350 (Silver). Will
sell as is for $4,700. OBO
334-774-1915

Chevy Tahoe LT '05 pewter 1-owner, loaded,
leather, dvd, 3rd seat, good condition. 95K mi.
$13,000 334-685-6186.
DO YOU KNOW ANYONE WITH BAD CREDIT?
Tcan get U Riding Today
Repos, Slow Credit, Past Bankruptcy QKI1 \
$0 Down/1Ist Payment, Tax, ag & Title
Push, Puli or Drag,.Will Trid a yhing!
$100 efe I MbCali Steve 8800808-~716
Ford '08 F-150 Limited 20,060 miles, 1222 of
5000 made, 5.4 v8 like new, in dash navigation
& satellite radio. Heated, capt chair front seats,
super crew cab, rear camera and alarm, 22"
rims, all stock. $28,000. 334-618-7046
Ford '95 Mustang GT Convertible- white with
leather interior, 200k mile runs great, needs
paint, $4,300. 090 Call 334-774-0451
1-Owner
SGMC'99 Sonoma SLS
~i~L- ~Cextra cab, new tires,
autoooarti@ clind r,t
$S5795. 334-790-7959.
Jaguar '90 XJS nice car! runs perfect! gray in
color $2,500. 334-379-3078
Lincoln'99 Towncar Signature Series tan with
tan leather interior, extra clean, low mileage,
fully loaded, maintenance records available,
one owner $5,500. Call 334-886-2433
Toyota'06 Hybrid Prius 3, silver in color, 4-
door, 1-owner, 47K miles, 44mpg. Excellent
condition $16,200. 334-774-2216.
Toy in 0O Prius, Full Lodd avigait r
seats, Heated seats, power windows & locks,
27K Miles, 52 MPG, Sunroof, Excellent
Condition, Last year sold for $32,400,
ASKING $22,900; Going back to a truck.
Call 334-488-6093


Kawasakl'89 KXF250
Motor by BPM, 2 brothers
performance pipe. Very
fast bike for the motor-
crossing extremist
334-726-3842 .


-R Chewrolet '68 Suburban .
Less than 10K mi. on new
4GMtC motor. Motor under
Michelin tires. Vehicle is
in above average condition. Tow Package .
included. $5,200 334-897-3288
Chevy '01 Tahoe LS- 4WD, 8 cylinder, auto,
forrest green, with 3 row seats, fully loaded,
174k miles, $6000. 080 Call 334-791-7312


.r -4 .* .-..g g



~. -


gave GUNs 0 5~

I BUY OLD GUNS! '

(850) 283-2701





Grader *Pan *Excavator
Dump Thek Bulldozer
Dmolition Grading Site Prep
* DebrisRenioval *Retention Ponds *Levelin.
* Top Soil 11irt *Gravel*Land ClearinS






PerSOfalG TOU

COfnpUTEP Repair
A+ AND NETWORK+ CERTIFIED
WITHN TH CT LIM TS' MISAENTNA
RICHARD REGISTER 850-557-6061


89g down
.BU. Fll "'"CII I\ L ARLE
33 Yars in gagirress
e1 -~neraon!


ALL WI'RERMB~ooT
Limousine ~ arx service
AllI cans HouLPPle wrns nosso anant wa~
s~un ~n Jcxse, was n rr. No uns BIl


Acoustic Guitar $300 OBO 850-376-9426
Antique dresser with mirror $75. ,
850-693-4189 .
Carving Trike 3 wheel scooter that operates
by shifting your weight and turning the wheel
at the same time; hand brakes and adjustable
steering column." Adult size for up to 200
pounds. Very good condition. $50, 850-592-
9285
Chest Freezer, 7 cubic ft. $50 850-428-4112
Disney Princess Play House 56", folds up, &
case, excellent condition, 850-482-5434, $25
Dryer, Roper, white,$110 850-482-3267
Entertainment Center i dark walnut, 67x49 $50
850-594-3644
Fish Aquarium with cover $10
Boys Baby Clothes $30/box 850-693-4189


I


I


"Beaiitification of Your Home"
Carpentry/Painting Instal'lations
Furniture Repair & Refinishing
General Repairs Intured



FOr General House or
Offce Cleaning
Call Debra
Free Estimates References Available

850-526-2336


only ll3K, 4-door, power
,eelat~herg,5-speed, clan
sunroof, wood grain interi-
or, 6 CD changer, radio/cassette player, excel-
lent condition, premium sound system, excel-
lent gas mileage (only about 90 dollars per
mont! >xtre el cla and Ier we ken6


I i


_ __


__~__~~_ __ ~~~_~_


ialtural Stone Ceamillc Porcelain
nusom S ers Ilardwel lamimate Mored
85so 693-1423 or 1850) 209-8099


Free kittens Multi-colored, multi-hair length
850-482- 5880/850-303-9727 after 3pm
Halloween Costumes, several to choose from,
12mos-3T $10-$12 each 850-376-9426
Hobart-Stickmate LX Welder w/ tig rig, 220
volt, like new in Marianna $500 850-693-1323
KIDS Step2 Patio Set w/umbrella & 4 chairs,
$40, 850-482-5434
Mattress, heavy California King, 10" deep. $300

pneak~e~rs N rthridge E100, $350, 850 482-
5434



Various computer parts and CD drives $80
OBO 850-376-9462


WEOFFRCOMBE



syp~apElggu,


re

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12 x 20 Boliding

s 2,885
I I~I~T~BI1( IReg.15,078
3lustin 19;kle, gwner EVERYHUiG INCLUDEDI

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ALTHA, eL


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CARPET CLEANING VAN FOR SALE
Dodge '94 Ram 250- V8, 94k miles, new
paint, has quality Baneclene equipment,
recently restored inside and out, supplies
included. + ONLY $6900. OBO *
Call 334-774-0122 or 334-477-4767

- Chevrolet '97 Astro Van
conversion Van raised
roof, loaded, new tires,
cnd t onn 52GKR T$9,500.
334-897-2054 or
334-464-1496
Ford'92 Econoline Conversion van with
Vangator wheelchair lift. Good condition.
334-475-3310or 334-447-8738
Nissan '00 Quest, 120K mi. Clean interior, Good
Condition $5900 334-677-7321




WE PAY Ca$H

FOR JUNK CARS.....

334-818-1274


LF1530

On Friday, September 23, 2011, at 9:00 a.m.
there will be a Tourist Development Council
meeting at the Jackson County Chamber of
Commerce, 4318 Lafayette Street, Marianna,
Florida.


LF15419

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION

File No: 11-217-PR

IN RE: ESTATE OF Mabel Baker
Deceased,


CALL TODAY FOR YOUR TOWING NEEDS



ALTIO BODY& RECYCLING
PAYING TOP BOL.LAR FOR JU~NK C~Rs
Contat Jason Harger at 334-791-2624


es of the personal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are set forth
below.

AII creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this notice is re-
quired to be served must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE
OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.

All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against de-
cedent's estate must file their claims with this
court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.

ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERI-
ODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE
FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.

NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE
OF DEATH IS BARRED.

The date of first publication of this notice is
September 7, 2011.

Attorney for Personal Representative:
Charles A. Goff
E-mail Address: casogoff3@aol~comn
Florida Bar No. 137187
Casoria & Goff, P.A.

40.-aB derawe, lri a i 304
Telephone (954) 564-4600

Personal Representative
181 dW 56Aenue
Plantation, Florida 33317




PLACE AN AD?

It's simple, call one of our friendly

ClaSsified representatives

and they will be glad to assist you.


'


,


,


g


Jackson County Floridan Wednesday, September 14, 2011- B


DI AN


............................*** ~

We II be yu nker! request for a 29,123 sq. ft. development to
1 9'0 y0f JU .include a fast food restaurant with dnive-thru,
~We buy wrecked cars vehicular use areas, and a
.and Farm Equip. at a stormwater maintenance facility. The develop
fair and honest price! ment is located at 2074 Hwy 71 South in unin
corporated Jackson County.
325, Up 0fo Complete Cars The public hearing will be held in the Jackson
CALL 334-702-4323 County Commission Board Room
L ,ll lll ll11111 of the Administration Building located at 2864
Q WANTED WRECKED OR JUNK VEHICLES Matdiaon SreS Mar anna, 20 ida,:0 ~.
6 PAY TOP DOLLAR DO1!930
I) DAY -34~-794-9576 I NIGHT 334-7_94-76 Anyone desiring information may contact the


)1~1111


A


-
-


Community Development Department between
7:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday
at 4487 Lafayette street, Marianna, Florida or
contact by phone at (850) 482-9637.

In accordance with the Americans with Disabil-
ities Act, persons needing a special accommo-
dation to participate in this meeting should
contact the Planning Secretary at Jackson
County Community Development no later than
5 days prior to the meeting. The Planning Sec-
retary may be contacted at ~4487 Lafayette
Street, Marianna, FL, 32448, (850) 482-9637, or
(800) 955-8771 (TDD).


LEGALS


LF15423

PUBLIC NOTICE
The Workforce Services Plan for 2011-2012 for
the Chipola Regional Workforce Development
Board is available for review and comment-
You can review the plan at the Chipola Region-
al Workforce Development Board office located
at 4636 Highway 90 East, Suite K, Marianna, FL
or view it on our website at www.onestopahea
d.com. Any questions should be directed to Li-
sa Wells, 850-718-0456, ext. 101. The CRWDB is
an equal opportunity employer/program. Auxil.
lary aids and services are available upon re-
quest to iridividuals with disabilities.


LF15531

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN BY THE JACKSON
CUNTN PLOANNDNU CMBM SS ONR O NR-
VIEW THE FOLLOWING AND OTHER BUSINESS:


The Jackson County Planning Commission will
consider:


Q (cp,


NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Mabel Bak-
er, deceased, whose date of death was March
31, 2011, and whose social security number is
xxx-xx-6372, is pending in the circuit court for
Jackson County, Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 4445 Lafayette Street, Ma-
rianna, Floirda 32446. The names and address-


1. Eastside Plaza (GD11-00013) A request for a
38,978 sq. ft. development to include a com-
mercial building and pedestrian and vehicular
use areas. The development is located east of
Marianna at the intersection of Turner Road
and U.S. Highway 90 in unincorporated Jackson
County.


Gaurenteed highest prices paid for your Jank
or unwanted vehicals & farming equipment,
Tite or no Title 24 hrs a day,' also pqy finders
fee. 334-596-0154 or 850-849-6398


DECLASSIFIED


Caj| for Top Price for
Junk Vehicles


I also sell used part
24 HOUR TOWING 4 334-792-8664 C






























































































iiiii/i iiii _~__ j~ij_~ iiiiilii/iiijii ? __i


Naml: Phone:
Address: City: State: Zip:


Please charge my credit card Card number:
Signature


JACkSON COUN\TY FLORIDAN a www.jcfloridan.com


18B WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER 14. 2011


NEWS


States.
White House press sec-
retary Jay Carney said the
U.S. would continue to
move toward removing
soldiers sent in as part of
the 2009 troop surge and
would keep training local
forces.
"This will in no way de-
ter our commitment to
the mission, which is to
provide for security in
the country as we work to
transition a security lead
to the Afghan national
security forces," Carney
said.
NATO Secretary-Gen-
eral Anders Fogh Rasmus-
sen echoed this, saying in
Brussels that the "enemies
of Afghanistan" were try-
ing to disrupt the handing
over of security responsi-
bility to the Afghans,
Karzai said the attacks
would not deter Afghan
security forces from tak-
ing full responsibility for
Security by the time the
international community
withdraws all its combat
troops.
"By carrying out such
attacks terrorists cannot
stop the transition of se-
curity from international
.to Afghan forces," Karzai
said in a statement.
The U.S. and other for-
eign! troops intend to
withdraw from the coun-
try by the end of 2014.
President Barack Obama
has ordered uth~e with-
drawal of 33,000 troops by
the end of next summer,
and some of America's in-
ternational partners are
making plans to remove
some of their forces. There
are now about 13"1,000
foreign troops in Afghani-
stan, with 90,000 from the
United States.
The expansion of the
Afghan army and police
is critical to NATO's exit
strategy. Earlier this sum-
mer, the alliance handed
over responsibility for
security in seven areas,
including two provinces.
But violence has increased
in some of those places.
The U.S. hopes to have
325,000 Afghan army and
police in the field by the
end of 2014. But the Af-
ghan forces have been
plagued by desertions.
And on Tuesday, the Pen-
tagon announced it will
tryr to cut the multibillion
dollar cost of training the,
forces.


The Associated Press

KABUL, Afghanistan -
Teams of insurgents firing
rocket-propelledgrenades
and automatic weapons
struck at the U.S. Embas-
sy, NATO headquarters
and other buildings in the
heart of the Afghan capi.
tal Tuesday, raising fresh
doubts about the Afghans'
ability to secure their na-
tion as U.S. and other
foreign troops begin to
withdraw.
The militants' seeming
ability to strike at will in
the most heavily defended
part of Kabul suggested
that they may have had
help from rogue ~elements
in the Afghan. security
forces. The attacks also
coincided with suicide
bombings elsewhere in
the capital the first time
insurgents have organized
such a complex assault
against multiple targets in
separate parts of the city.
Although the coordi-
nated daylight attack re-
sulted in relatively few ca-
sualties seven Afghans
were killed and 15 were
wounded it- sent for-
eigners dashing for cover
and terrified the city from
midday well into the night
as U.S. helicopters buzzed
overhead. .
Late Tuesday, at least
two gunmen .remained
holed up on the top floors
of an apartment building
from which they and other
militants had attacked the
heavily fortified embassy.
The Taliban claimed re-
sponsibility for the attack,
though Kabul's deputy po-
lice chief said he thought
an affiliated organization,
the Haqqani network, car-
ried itodut.'
The Taliban and related
groups have staged more
than a dozen assaults in
the capital this year, in-
~cluding three major at-
tacks since June. That rep-
resents an increase from
years past and is clearly
intended to offset U.S.
claims of weakening the
insurgents on southern
battlefields and through
hundreds of night raids
by special forces targeting
their commanders.
The Obama adminis-
tration declared that it
woulldn't allow Tuesday's
attack to deter the Ameri-
can mission in Aifghani-
stan, warning the attack-


THEASSOCIATEDPRESS
Afghan women call their families during firing between the militants and Afghan security forces in Kabul, Afghanistan on
Tuesday. Taliban insurgents fired rocket-propelled grenades and assault rifles at the U.S. Embassy, NATO headquarters~and.
other buildings in the heart of the Afghan capital..


ers that they would be
relentlessly pursued.
Even so, the U.S. Embas-
sy in Kabul canceled all
trips in and out of Afghan-
istan for its diplomats,
and suspended all travel
within Afghanistan.
High blast walls ring
the embassy compound,
and there was little dam-
age to the reinforced con-
crete buildings, many of
which are surrounded by
sandbags. No embassy or
NATO staff members were
hurt.
Four Afghans were
wounded when a rocket-
propelled grenade hit the
original .U.S. Embassy
building next to the new
embassy, CIA Director Da-
vid Petraeus told lawmak-
ers on Capitol Hill. Among
them was a young girl who
was with a group waiting
for visas outside the em-
bassy, he said. ..
Afghan officials said the
violence around Kabul
resulted in the deaths of
three police officers and
fpur civilians. Four of the
wounded were caught
up in attempted suicide
bombings. Six insurgents
were also killed, police
said.
According to Afghan of-
ficials, the attack began
just after noon when a


car packed with insur-
gents was stopped at a
checkpoint at Abdul Haq
square, which is about
300 yards (meters) from
the U.S. Embassy. There
were a series of large ex-
plosions and the insur-
gents entered a nine-floor
building that was under
construction overlook-
ing the embassy and the
nearby NATO headquar-
ters complex.
Four to five insurgents
opened fire on the com-
plex. There was a simul-
taneous barrage of explo-
sions around the Wazir
Akbar Khan area, near the
U.S. Embassy and home
to a number of other for-
eign missions. ExplosionS
shook the neighborhood.
Three other insurgents
attempted to carry out
suicide attacks and all
were killed. One was shot
. on the road leading from
the capital to the airport,
and the two others wilhen
they tried to attack Afghan
.police buildings in west-
ern Kabul, across the city
from the embassy.
The bullets detonated
one of the militants' ex-
plosives vest, wounding
two police officers. Anoth-
er militant detonated his
vest at: a nearby bliilding,
wounding tw~o civilians.


Afghan security forces
raided the nine-story
building and killed two
insurgents, but at least
two others remained on
the top floors late into' the
night. U.S. Army helicop-
ters flew over the build-
ing and an Afghan army
MI-35~ attack helicopter
opened fire on it with its
gatling gun.
It was unclear how much
weaponry the insurgents
had, but one eyewitness.
said they were equipped
with heavy machine guns,.
rocket-propelled grenades
and possibly a mortar.
Western security offi-
cials, -speaking on condi-
tion of anonymity for se-
curity reasons, speculated
.that the insurgents may
have had help smuggling
so many weapons into Ka-
bul and the area near the
embassy. There have been
numerous instances of
insurgents infiltrating the
Afghan army and police to
carry out attacks.
Afghan police Gen.
Djaoud Amin, deputy po-
lice chief of Kabul, said the
Haqqani insurgent net-
work was likely behind the
attack. The H~aqqani net-
work is a Pakistan-based
group affiliated with both
the Taliban and al-Qaida.
It has emerged as one of


the biggest threats to sta-
bility in Afghanistan.
"This is the first time
that we had four suicide
bombers in, four differ-
ent places. This is new as
previously we: had oile or
maximum. two attackss"
said Haroun Mir, director
of the Afghanistan Center
for Research and Policy
Studies, a Kabul-based
think tank. "The Haqqani
network has the full sup-
port of al-Qaida and has
the capacity to execute
sophisticated attacks. It's
the only group with this
capacity."
The U.S. Defense De-
partment blamed the
Haqqani network for a
truck bomb that blew up
outside an American base
over the weekend, wourid-
ing 77 U.S. soldiers and
Killing five Afghans. The
attack occurred in east-
ern W~ardak province, an
hour's drive from Kabul. -
The violence carries
an unsettling message
to Western leaders and
their Afghan allies about
the resilience and reach
of the Taliban and related
organizations. It is also an
indication the militants
may not be interested in
pursuing peace talks with
President Hamid Karzai's
government or thie United


TEHRAN, Iran Iran's
president predicted Tules-
day that two Americans
arrested while hiking along
the Iraq-Iran border and
sentenced to eight years in
jail on espionage-related
charges could be freed "in
a couple of days" after a
court set bail of $500,000
each.
The events appeared
timed to boost the image
of President Mahmoud Ah-
'madinejad coinciding with
.his visit to New York next
week for the U.N. General
Assembly session. Last
year, a third American was
released on bail around the
same time.
In Washington, Secretary
of State Hilary Rodh~am
Clinton said the United
States was "encouraged" by
.JAhmadinejad's comments


about freeing Shane Bauer
and Josh Fattal.
"We obviously hope that
we wiill see a positive out-
come from what appears
to be a decision by the gov-
ernment," Clinton said at
the'State Department.
The families of Bauer and
Fattal said in a statement
that they are "overjoyed" by
the reports from Iran.
Lawyer Masoud Shafiei
said the court would begin
the process to free Bauer
and Fattal after payment of
the bail, which must be ar-
ranged through third par.-
ties because of U.S. eco-
nomic sanctions on Iran.
The timing of the court's
decision is similar to last
year's bail deal mediated
by the Gulf state of Oman
that freed a third American,
Sarah Shourd.


Dothan Eagle
Attn: Yard Sale P.O. Box 1968, Dothan, AL 36302
or drop off at: 227 North Oates Street, Dothan, AL
make check payable to Dothan Eagle


What type of items for sale:


Email Address:


_Number of inside spaces neededl$30 each) Number of outside spaces needed($25 each)
-Number of tables needed($10 each) My payment of $ is enclosed


exp.


Taliban attack US Embassy, other Kabul buildings


THEASSOCIATEDPRESS
American hikers Shane Ilauer (left) and Josh Fattal are
shown in Tehran, Iran, An Iranian court on Tuesday set bail of 3 3
$500,000 each for the two meni arrested more than two years
ago and convicted on spy-related charges, clearing the way for
their release.


Captured U.S. Hikers

likely to be freed soon