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Jackson County Floridan
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028304/00644
 Material Information
Title: Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title: Sunday Floridan
Portion of title: Floridan
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Jackson County Floridan
Publisher: Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Marianna Fla
Publication Date: 8/24/2011
Frequency: daily (except saturday and monday)[<1979-1995>]
weekly[ former 1934-<1955>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates: 30.776389 x -85.238056 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note: "Independent."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID: UF00028304:00644
 Related Items
Preceded by: Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by: Marianna Floridan

Full Text


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hope experience pushes
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Tests look good for Chipola River

said he was advising the county
Environmentalist says Chipola safe for water recreation to remove the barricades and
warning signs it posted Sunday.
BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER bacteria content, following a raw ers Landing and Magnolia Land- said the tests revealed no more Natural "breaking down" pro-
dbuikhalter@jcfloridan.com sewage spill into the creek which ing. The water was subsequently than 25 colonies of bacteria pdr cesses and dilution may have
feeds into the river Sunday. tested for bacteria content. The milliliter in any sample taken; it aided in clearing the water, he
The water at Spring Creek and Jackson County had closed all test results were given to the can have up to 200 colonies per said, although he was not able
all downstream access points to its downstream access points county late Tuesday. milliliter to be considered safe to determine how much sewage
the Chipola River have tested after the spill was discovered, Jackson County Environmental for swimmers and other water may have spilled into the water
well within the safe limits for closing off Spring Creek, Turn- Health Director T.G. Harkrider recreation activities. Harkrider before the break was discovered.


LEGISLATIVE UPDATE


Redistricting will be



main focus in next session
BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com .


State redistricting issues could send
.Florida's next legislative session into
extreme overtime, according to long-
time political analyst and advisor Mar-
ian Johnson.
A guest speaker at Tuesday's Jackson
County Chamber of Commerce legis-
lative update session, which was spon-
sored by Focus Credit Union, Johnson
serves as Executive Director of the
Florida Chamber of Commerce Politi-
cal Institute.
Johnson predicted that redistricting
will be a fractious issue that will prob-
ably involve litigation before it's done.
As a result, she said, candidates will
likely have to move quickly to get their
message out to the right people once
they know what their districts will look
like.
Meanwhile, they'll be competingwith
those in national politics for airtime in
what promises to be a busy, vocal and
heated political year in both state and
national elections.
The state re-evaluates district lines
every 10 years, and redraws them
based on population changes from the
last decade, in order to ensure that ev-
eryone has equal representation.
Johnson encouraged Chamber mem-
bers to let their voices be heard as the
district lines are redrawn, and lauded
local Chamber President Art Kim-
brough for his testimony at a recent
hearing on the issue.
Monitoring the re-districting, John-
son said, isone of many keys to ensur-
ing that the interests of business and
commerce community are protected.
The other guest speaker at the event,
Teye Reeves, brought the crowd up to
date on the most recent legislative ses-
sion and made some predictions for
the upcoming session. She is an attor-
ney, and the Florida Chamber's Direc-
tor of Business Climate and Quality of


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Teye Reeves (right) and Marian Johnson with the Florida Chamber of Commerce answers
questions from the crowd following a program about the legislative session and the
redistricting process Tuesday.
Life Policy. Chamber publication given out at the
Reeves said the state Chamber ad- meeting asserts that it increased com-
vocated on 36 issues of interest to the petition among providers and created
business community; of those, she said a more predictable property insurance
the Chamber saw success in 31. market. The Chamber says it addressed
Reeves said Senate Bill 408 was "cost-drivers" with new regulations to
among the most important. It was a
bill related to property insurance. A See UPDATE, Page 7A


Garbage


truck's


contents


catch fire
BY LAUREN DELGADO
Idelgado@jcfloridan.com

A garbage truck dumped its contents
onto the northbound lane of Highway
73 after the trash caught on fire. No one
was injured.
Around 11:45 a.m. Tuesday, Waste
Management driver James Watford no-
ticed the back of his truck was smoking.
He was on Peacock Bridge Road at the
time, and sped onto Highway 73 in or-
der to dump the truck's contents.
"I looked for a safer location to dump,
to keep it away from homes or trees,"
Watford said.
After dumping the trash onto the
road around noon, Watford called au-
thorities. The Jackson County Fire and
Rescue, Florida Highway Patrol and the
Mossy Pond Volunteer Fire Department
arrived on scene around 12:30 p.m.
. Jackson County firefighter Angel Guz-
man said firefighters first checked the
truck to ensure it was not on fire. It
See FIRE, Page 7A


LAURA DELGADO/FLORIDAN
A backhoe clears away smoldering garbage
from the northbound lane of Highway 73.


Missing in Action


Y r. .-t '200 county students


Sfail to show for class


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Bonnie Goff helps students in her sixth-grade social studies class Tuesday at Marianna Middle.
School. School attendance is down overall for the county.


BY LAUREN DELGADO
Idelgado@jcfloridan.com
Jackson County Deputy Superinten-
dent Larry Moore said about 200 Jackson
County students missed their first day of
class Monday.
School principals throughout the coun-
ty reported the change to the Jackson
County School District.
Moore said the decline in attendance
can be attributed to a number of things.
Many students simply relocate, following
a general trend of declining school popu-
lations in the Panhandle area. Some also
may have simply played hooky on their
first day of school.
Some parents may have decided to


homeschool their children, but have not
properly registered with the school dis-
trict. Any person who believes a school-
aged child in Jackson County is not going
to school or is not properly registered as a
homeschooler can call ShirlWilliams, the
director of student services for the dis-
trict, at 482-1200 ext. 216.
Riverside Elementary School and
Grand Ridge had the highest number of
absentee students. About 43 out of the
projected 629 Riverside students and 33
of the projected 589 Grand Ridge School
students were missing on Monday.
The school district bases its enrollment
projections on the previous year's school
See SCHOOL, Page 7A


>CLASSIFIEDS...5-7B

This Newspaper Wr. ,
Is Printed On S,
Recycled Newsprint -:-*



65161 8005(01 9


> ENTERTAINMENT...4B


) LOCAL...3A


) OBITUARIES...7A


)) OPINION...4A


)) SPORTS...1-3B


TEAM RAHAL.MILLER Marc Garcla Curtis Rogers
TEAM RAHAL*MILLER r .
CHEVROLET-BUICK -
CADILLAC-NISSAN .
:--T' 4204 Lafayette St. Marianna, FL
T (850) 482-3051 Used Car Manager Sales Manager
4 ;,-z'-- T-I


)) TV LISTINGS...3B


Vol.88 No.163


Follow us




Facebook Twitter







-7I2A WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24,2011


Weather Outlook


* -I: -,..- Lor: 7 7.
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; -"., -\ -' Low:

"'-, . .. .,.. At
**V ; *^ ^ :- *.' ^ -.
^*, ". "ig ; 5 .,: ,
',. -L
-a*2j


S" High- 980
,- Low 740

Saturday
Hot And Humid.


High 970
Low -750

Friday
Sunny And Hot.



5 High 970
-, Low 72

Sunday
Hot And Humid.


PRECIPITATION


24 hour'
Month to dale
Normal MTD

TIDES
Panama City
Apalachicola
Port St. Joe
Destin
Pensacola


0.02""
1 24'
5.59"


Low -
Low -
Low -
Low -
Low -


RIVER READINGS
Woodruff
Blountstown
Marianna
Caryville


Ye.r to dale
Normal YTD
Normal for year


5:39 PM High
5:44 AM High
5:05 PM High
6:16 PM High
6:50 PM High

Reading
39.51 ft.
0.58 ft.
4.47 ft.
0.26 ft.


28 S7T
42 81s
58.25"


ULTRA VIOLET INDEX


- 6:29 AM
- 3:38 AM
- 6:20 AM
- 6:53 AM
- 7:26 AM

Flood Stage
66.0 ft.
15.0 ft.
19.0 ft.
12.0 ft.


0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8-10 Very High, 11+ Extreme
01 2 -3 *4,-.."


THE SUN AND MOON


Sunrise
Sunset
Moonrise
Moonset


6:12 AM
7:14 PM
1:25 AM
3:49 PM


Aug. Sept. Sept. Sept.
29 4 12 20


FLORIDA'S BEAL

PANHANDLE JmteM

MEDIA PARTNERS WQ 100.9o.

LanzIST H ASAS


JACKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN

Publisher Valeria Roberts
vroberts@jcfloridan.com

Circulation Manager- Dena Oberski
doberski@jcfloridan.com




-I



CONTACT US
Telephone: (850) 526-3614
FAX: (850) 482-4478
Email: editorial@jcfloridan.com
Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447
Street Address:
4403 Constitution Lane
Marianna, FL 32446
Offlee Hours:
Weekdays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

MISS YOUR PAPER?
You should receive your newspaper no later
than 6 a.m. If it does not arrive, call Circula-
tion between 6 a.m. and noon, Tuesday to
Friday, and 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. on Sunday. The
Jackson County Floridan (USPS 271-840)
is published Tuesday though Friday and
Sunday mornings. Periodical postage paid
at Marianna, FL.

SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Home delivery: $11.23 per month; $32.83.
for three months; $62.05 for six months;
and $123.45 for one year. All prices include
applicable state and local taxes. Mail
subscriptions must be paid in advance. Mail
subscriptions are: $46.12 for three months;
$92,24 for six months; and $184.47 for one
year.

ADVERTISING
The advertiser agrees that the publisher
shall not be liable for damages arising
out of errors and advertisements beyond
the amount paid for the space actually
occupied by that portion of the advertise-
ments in which the error occurred, whether
such error is due to the negligence of the
publisher's employees or otherwise, and
there shall be not liability for non-inser-
tion of any advertisement beyond the
amount paid for such advertisement. This
newspaper will not knowingly accept or
publish illegal material of any kind. Advertis-
ing which expresses preference based on
legally protected personal characteristics is
riot acceptable.

HOW TO GET YOUR
NEWS PUBLISHED
The Jackson County Floridan will publish
news of general interest free of charge.
Submit your news or Community Calendar
events via e-mail, fax, mail, or hand delivery.
Fees may apply for wedding, engagement,
anniversary and birth announcements.
Forms are available at the Floridan offices.
Photographs must be of good quality and
suitable for print. The Floridan reserves the
right to edit all submissions.

GETTING IT RIGHT
In the Sunday, Aug. 21, edition,
a picture of the Golson Elemen-
tary School open house on page 1A
misidentified Rontavious Hughes as
Tyadrian Billips Graham.


Community Calendar


TODAY
n Eldercare Services will give out USDA and Brown
Bag food, 8 a.m. at 4297 Liddon St. in Marianna;
Malone City Hall will also give out USDA food at 8
a.m.
Blood Drive The Southeastern Community
Blood Center Mobile Unit will be at the Department
of Revenue in Marianna, 9 to 11 a.m.; and at the
Marianna Convalescent Center 2 to 5 p.m.; or give
blood 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday-Friday at the Center,
2503 Commercial Park Drive in Marianna. Call
526-4403.
n Jackson County Habitat for Humanity
Warehouse hours: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.'
Alcoholics Anonymous Open meeting, noon
to 1 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901
Caledonia St., Marianna, in theAA room.
n Jackson Hospital Board of Trustees Finance
Committee convenes for its regular meeting at
4:30 p.m. in the community room of the Hudnall
Building; the Board meeting follows.

THURSDAY, AUG. 25
n Jackson County Farmers Market is open 6:30
a.m. to noon (or until goods sell out) Tuesdays,
Thursday and Saturdays in Madison Street Park in
Marianna.
) Emerald Coast Hospice Summer Education
Series presents "Pain and Symptom Management"
at 4374 Lafayette St. in Marianna. Two sessions:
7 a.m. and 4 p.m. CEU (1) aVailable through Troy
University. Health care workers, public welcome. No
charge. Call 526-3577.
n Patient and Family Support Volunteer Training
- 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Covenant Hospice, 4215 Kel-
son Ave., Suite E, Marianna. Free, open to the public.
Food, drinks provided. New volunteers needed; no
special background/experience required. To regis-
ter, call 482-8520.-
D St. Anne Thrift Store is open 9 a.m. to I p.m.
Tuesday and Thursdays, at 4285 Second Ave. in
Marianna! August special: Buy one, get one (equal
or lesser value) free on all clothing.
) Blood Drive The Southeastern Community
Blood Center Mobile Unit will be at the Jackson
County Court House, 11:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.; or
give blood 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday-Friday at the
Center, 2503 Commercial Park Drive in Marianna.
Call 526-4403.
) Orientation -1 to 4 p.m. at the Goodwill Career
Training Center, 4742 Highway 90 in Marianna. Reg-
ister for free job placement and computer training


classes offered to people with disadvantages/dis-
abilities. Call 526-0139.
a Jackson County Adult Education School
Advisory Council meeting 2 p.m. in the JCAE
TABE Testing Office (Building 3) at 4294 Liddon St.
in Marianna. Call 482-9617.
) Chipola Healthy Start Board of Directors
meeting 3 p.m. in the Calhoun County Public
Library Heritage Room in Blountstown.
) The Town of Grand Ridge conducts a public
hearing at 5:30 p.m. on proposed Ordinances No.
2011-02 and 2011-03 (copies for review available at
Town Hall during business hours). A special meeting
follows, then a budget workshop. Call 592-4621.
) Rain Barrel Class Jackson County Master Gar-
deners host an informal class during which a rain
barrel will be created and installed at the Agricul-
tural Complex on Pennsylvania Avenue in Marianna.
Class is 6 to 8 p.m.; registration opens at 5:30 p.m.
Cost: $10 (includes printed information/directions,
drinks, snacks and door prizes). Pre-registration is
not necessary, but appreciated. Call 482-9620 or.
email jacksonrig@ifas.ufl.edu.
Alcoholics Anonymous Closed discussion, 8
to 9 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901 Cale-
donia St., Marianna, in the AA room. Attendance
limited to persons with a desire to stop drinking.

FRIDAY, AUG. 26
) Blood Drive The Southeastern Community
Blood Center Mobile Unit will be at Signature
Healthcare of North Florida in Graceville, 8 a.m. to
4 p.m.; or give blood 9 a.m..to 6 p.m. Monday-Fri-
day at the Center, 2503 Commercial Park Drive in
Marianna. Call 526-4403.
) The Union Grove Whole School Reunion is Aug.
26-28. Activities include: fish fry, picnic, banquet
and a dance. Cost: $75 per person (covers activities,
T-shirt and souvenir booklet). Caps available: $10
each. Call 594-4160. To join the event choir, call
209-7682.
SOle Fashion Ice Cream Social at Panhandle
Pioneer Settlement starts at 6 p.m. with games for
kids of all ages; homemade ice cream, toppings and
refreshments (available for a donation); plus music
from Swiftwater in Frink Gym. Admission is free. Call
850-674-2777; visit www.ppmuseum.org.
) Senior Singles Get-Together, 6 to 8 p.m. on the
last Friday of each month, near the floral depart-
ment of Winn-Dixie in Marianna. Single seniors age
50 and older are encouraged to get acquainted,
form friendships. Games, food, prizes and a


guest speaker are planned. No charge; donations
accepted (proceeds fund charitable endeavors
of Marianna's'Gathering Place Foundation). Call
526-4561.
) Celebrate Recovery Adult, teen meetings to
"overcome hurts, habits and hang-ups in a safe
environment," 7 p.m., Evangel Worship Center, 2645
Pebble Hill Road. Dinner: 6 p.m. (free for first-time
guests). Child care available. Call 573-1131.
n Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, 8 to
9 p.m. in the AA room at First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St., Marianna..

SATURDAY, AUG. 27
))'Jackson County Farmers Market is open 6:30
a.m. to noon (or until goods sell out) Tuesdays,
Thursday and Saturdays in Madison Street Park in
Marianna.
) Jackson County Health Department Closing
the Gap program offers a free Pilates class, 8:30
a.m. at Integras Wellness Center, 4230 Lafayette
St., Suite C, in Marianna. Call 482-6221.
Panhandle Seminole Boosters Boston Butt
Sale pre-sales end today. The 8-10-pound pork
butts will be ready for pick up Thursday, Sept. 1.
Contact a Club director or visit Sweet Stuff Bakery,
4477 Jackson St. in Marianna. Proceeds fund
scholarships.
n Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, 4:30 to
5:30 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St., Marianna.
a The Union Grove Whole School Reunion is Aug.
26-28. Activities include: fish fry, picnic, banquet
and a dance. Cost: $75 per person (covers activities,
T-shirt and souvenir booklet). Caps available: $10
each. Call 594-4160. To join the event choir, call
209-7682. -

SUNDAY, AUG. 28
Kimbrel-Duncan Family Reunion -11 a.m. in
the Sam Atkins Park Clubhouse, Highway 20 West in
Blountstown. Bring a covered dish, photos to share.
Ice, paper goods provided.
n The Union Grove Whole School Reunion is Aug.
26-28. Activities include: fish fry, picnic, banquet
and a dance. Cost: $75 per person (covers activities,
T-shirt and souvenir booklet). Caps available: $10
each. Call 594-4160. To join the event choir, call
0209-7682.
) Alcoholics Anonymous closed discussion, 6:30
p.m., 4349 W. Lafayette St., Marianna (in one-story
building behind 4351 W. Lafayette St.).


The submission deadline for this calendar is two days before publication. Submit to: Community Calendar, Jackson County Floridan, P. 0. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447,
email editorial@jcfloridan.com, fax (850) 482-4478 or bring items to 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.


Police Roundup


MARIANNA POLICE
DEPARTMENT
The Marianna Police De-
partment listed the following
incidents for Aug. 22, the latest
available report: Two accidents
with no injuries, one aban-
doned vehicle,
one highway
obstruction, -- '=
two verbal -D --
disturbances, RP E
one fire report,
one panic ',
alarm, two reports of a power
line down, 13 traffic stops, two
larceny complaints, one ob-
scene/threatening phone call,
one assist of another agency,
four public service calls and
one patrol request.


SHERIFF'S OFFICE
The Jackson County Sheriff's
Office and county Fire/Rescue
reported the following incidents
for Aug. 32, the latest available
report. (Some of these calls may
be related to after-hours calls
taken on behalf of Graceville
and Cottondale Police Depart-
ments): Two accidents, one
dead person, one stolen tag,
one abandoned vehicle, two
suspicious vehicles, three
suspicious persons, one escort,
one fire, one drug offense,
15 medical calls, two traffic
crashes, three burglar alarms,
one fire alarm, seven traffic
stops, three larceny complaints,
two trespass complaints, one .
juvenile complaint, one suicide'


attempt, one assist of a motorist
JACKSON COUNTY or pedestrian, one retail theft,
four public service calls, three


transports and one threat/ha-
rassment complaint.

JACKSON COUNTY
CORRECTIONAL FACILITY
The following persons were
booked into the county jail dur-
ing the latest reporting periods:
)) Terrance Smith, 33, 2923
Albert St., Marianna, violation
of county probation.
) Donald Smith, 46, 134 Gibbs
Way, Homerville, Ga., hold for
Pinellas Co.
) Erian Thomas, 30, 2882
Edenfield St., Marianna, pos-
session of marijuana less than
20 grams, possession of drug
paraphernalia.
) Donald Peterson, 43,5244
13th St., Malone, violation of
state probation.
) Richard Mayo, 33, 27655 NE


Jessie Stone Road, Altha, viola-
tion of county probation.
) Thomas Walker, 48, 2650
Lovewood Road, Cottondale,
trespass after warning.
) Heather Paramore, 21, 2532
Douglas Pond Road, Marianna,
violation of conditional release.
a Viola Huff, 54, 2416 Jackson
Bluff Road (Apt.4C), Tallahas-
see, worthless checks.
) Stephanie Roberts, 26, 6462
Reddock Road, Grand Ridge,
unlawful possession of listed
chemicals.
) Benjamin Heatrice, 57, 5472
Avery Road, Campbellton, pos-
session of drug paraphernalia.

JAIL POPULATION: 221

To report a crime, call CrimeStoppers
at 526-5000 or a local law enforcement
agency. To report a wildlife violation, call
1-888-404-FWCC (3922).


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN + www.jcfloridan.com


WRKE-UP CALL






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


BLONDIE'S NAMED EJCEDC BUSINESS OF THE MONTH


SUBMITTED PHOTO
The East Jackson County Economic Development Council recognizes Blondies Food & Fuel as its Business of the Month for August. The
Grand Ridge business is under the new management of Janet Fugate and offers daily lunch and dinner specials. Beginning Saturday,
Aug. 20, Blondies began offering live entertainment and karaoke from 7 to 11 p.m. each Saturday.


Chipola Nursing Grads


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Twenty-four students recently completed Chipola College Associate Degree Nursing program. Graduates (from left) are
(front) Tisha Brock of Cottondale, Ariel Johnson of Quincy, Kristen Davis of Cottondale, Kiki Dickey of Havana, Heather
Robbirds of Sneads, Shawna Phillips of Bonifay, Monica Fitzsimmons of Sneads, Mitch Lyons of Panama City Beach; (second
row) Aimee Nichols of Sneads, Jessica Ward of Panama City, Allison Brown of Chipley, Jennifer Cantrell of Perry, Jennie Crews
of Tallahassee, Keith Watford of Graceville, Jackie Peterson of Quincy, Karen Taylor of Bristol; Aryca Westfall of Marianna,
Ashley Jones of Chipley, Lauren St. Amant of Panama City, Rachel Lyons of Panama City Beach, Amanda Trawick of Iron City,
Ga., Gynell Pettis of Hunter of Bonifay, Janice Roberts of Altha, and Amy Hildebrand of Chipley.


Optimists recognize Cottondale student as 'Teen of the Month'


Special to the Floridan

Each month, the Op-
timist Club of Jackson
County honors a deserv-
ing student from area
schools.
TheOCJCTeenforMonth
for June was Johnney
Parrish. He attends Cot-
tondale High School and
is the son of Misty and
Gary Boyd. Johnney was
nominated by his English
teacher, Sheryl Brock.
Johnney serves as FFA


Chaplain and has been a
member of that club all
through school. He is also
a member and participat-
ed in Fellowship of Chris-
tian Athletes, Optimist
Oratorical Speech Contest
and Chipola Literary Arts
Festival. When not volun-
teering in the community
and at his church, First
Assembly of God in Cot-
tondale, Johnney enjoys
playing the bass guitar. He
plans on majoring in aero-
nautical engineering.


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Optimist Club of Jackson County June Student of Month
Johnney Parrish (center) is congratulated by OCJC Vice
President Shellie Hollis (left) and his mother, Misty Boyd.


Marriage, Divorce Report


Special to the Floridan and divorces were record-
ed in Jackson County dur-
The following marriages ing the week of Aug. 15-19:


Florida Lottery
[C-,SH13 P L.VA IY 4 F-ANTASY 5


Mon. (E)
Mon. (M)
Tue (E)
Tue. (M)
Wed. (E)
Wed. (M)
Thurs (E)
Thurs. (M)


4 8-18-26-27


Marriages

) Samuel Antonio Somo-
za and Rosa NeryVargas.
) Allen Lear Bigham and
Janna Leigh Tharpe.
) Justin Brent Clark and
Brandy Nicole Daniels.


)) Zachary Ryan Monroe
and Megan Rose Scott.
Divorces
) Tracey Miley vs. Tony L.
Harmon.
) Kelly Ann Sims Toole
vs. Joel Timothy Toole II.


8/23 9-0-8 3.5-0-7 Not available
865.1 7.5-2.0
8/17 5-6-9 2.0-85 5.11-19-23-26
8-8-5 3 3-5-0
8/18 8-5-2 2-4-8.2 5-6-8-23-32


9-6-8 6 2
8/19 9-1-0 7-9-
0-8-7 2-3


8/20 2-3-2


8-1-


(M) 2-9-2 1-2-
(E). 8/21 6-0-4 4-8
(M) 1-9-2 8-6
E = Evening drawing, M = Midday dra


Saturday 8/20 2.17-23-28-47
Wednesday 8/17 18-28-31-48-52
I Su S[


Saturday 8/20
Wednesday 8/17


26-33-40-44-46
1-8,15-44-46-47


For lottery information, call (850) 487-7777


-9-7 4-11-15-21-22
-9-5
1-9 4-14-21-31-34
8-3
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-6-9
wing

PB36 PPx2
PB37 PPx4

-52 xtra 3
xtra 2
or (900) 737-7777


* 2-PIECE CHICKEN DINNER

1-PIECE FISH DINNER

* FRIED CHICKEN LIVER or
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PO PLATE
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Cute Kids


.




h.,
s


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Caitlyn Kent, 10, recently competed in the 2011 Atlanta Open,
held June 16-18. She placed second out of 13 competitors in
Juvenile Girls Free Skate. Caitlyn is the granddaughter of Gene
and Marsha Kent of Marianna, and Lynn and Jim Gosnell of
Grand Ridge. Her parents are Tricia Warters and James Kent,
both of North Carolina.


Do you have 'Cute Kids'?
Email your 'Cute Kids*' photos to editorial@jcfloridan.com,
mail them to P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447 or bring them
by our offices at 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.
*12 years or under, with Jackson Qounty ties. Include child's
full name, parents'name(s) and city of residence. This is a free
service. All entries subject to editing.



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WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24, 2011 3AF


LOCAL









lie


Publisher
VALERIA ROBERTS


Guest Opinion



Tough crime



laws work
By The Tampa Tribune
The United States is often lambasted by foreign
commentators for having the highest prison in-
carceration rate in the world, nearly 750 inmates
per 100,000 population. And it frequently is ridiculed
for a Wild West obsession with guns.
But in contrast to the chaos taking place around the
globe, the United States criminal justice system, how-
ever imperfect, is looking pretty good, as is its support
of gun rights. ,
Crime has been decreasing in the United States since
the 1990s. It's no coincidence the rate began to drop
when states around the country began making sure
repeat offenders were locked up.
Florida is a key example. Because the state did not
build enough prisons or facilities for juvenile offend-
ers, criminals in the early 1990s could commit dozens
of crimes without consequences. Even a long prison
term wasn't much of a punishment because prisoners
served, on average, less than a third of their sentence.
They were given generous "gain time" to avoid prison
overcrowding.
The result: Vicious predators ran amok, and Florida
gained an international reputation for lawlessness
when several foreign tourist were murdered.
Public outrage gave state lawmakers the resolve to
fund more prisons and toughen sentences. Soon pris-
oners were serving 80 percent of their sentences.
While there may have been other factors involved,
the crime rate plummeted, as it did in other states that
adopted tough-on-crime laws.
The reason is simple. As veteran police officers know,
a relatively small group of criminals is responsible for
the majority of offenses. Keeping as many of that group
as possible behind bars is the surest way to protect law-
abiding citizens.
It's a lesson that Europe doesn't seem to have learned.
In Great Britain, gangs of youth ran wild for days, beat-
ing bystanders and burning homes, stores and cars.
George Mason University School of Law professor Joyce
Lee Malcolm pointed out in The Wall Street Journal
there is virtually no punishment in Great Britain for
criminals under 17, and adult criminals have to serve
only about half of their sentence. Or consider Norway,
where the gunman who slaughtered 68 people faces a
maximum prison sentence of 21 years.
Malcolm also points out how unarmed British citizens
were virtually helpless as the thugs marauded through
the streets, stealing merchandise and assaulting wit-
nesses. Handguns are banned in the Great Britain, and
citizens who defend themselves or their property are
often punished. She described how a British farther
once was sentenced to life in prison later reduced to
five years for killing a burglar and wounding another
intruder with a shotgun. It was the seventh break-in at
his rural home.
This could never happen in Florida, where gun-rights
laws allow citizens to protect themselves and their
possessions. Criminal predators can never be certain
a potential victim is not armed and ready to defend
himself or herself.
Our criminal justice system is not perfect. Gangs are
a growing threat. Recently "flash mobs" in some large
cities have looted stores or beaten bystanders. We prob-
ably have too many nonviolent offenders in prison for
drug offenses. And sometimes the pro-gun crowd can
go too far, such as pushing open-carry laws that would
make it impossible for police or the public to determine
who is a threat.
The reality is gun rights and tough-on-crime laws
have not turned the United States into a dangerous
Wild West show. Rather, they have resulted in a safer,
more civilized society.

Ite r to the Editor ;
.Submit letters by either mailing to Editor. P.O. Box 520.
Marianna FL, 32447 or faxing to 850-482-4478 or send *
email to editorial@jcfloridan.com. The Flondan reserves
the right to edit or not publish any letter. Be sure to
include your full address and telephone number. These
will only be used to verify the letter and will not be
printed. For more information call (850) 526-3614.


8/23

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BL -E MAN --OUPI" TIK


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Public school teachers


BY BILL MAXWELL
The nation's public schools are
opening, and teachers and
their profession are.being
attacked like never before.
Teachers are being fired and laid
off in greater numbers than ever
because of severe budget cuts.
Although their unions are facing i
decertification and collective bar-
gaining is ending in several states,
many teachers say the deepest cut
is being scapegoated for just about
every failing aspect of the nation's
schools.
Rarely is teaching called the no-
blest profession any more. Now it is
seen as one of the most ignoble of
professions.
Fueled by the high-stakes
standardized testing culture, the
uneven accountability mandates
of the Bush administration's No
Child Left Behind policy, and the
fierce competition for federal funds
awarded by the Obama adminis-
tration's Race to the Top program,
public education is being treated as
if it were a commodity rather than a
public service.
Some of the effects of Race to the
Top's requirements that schools
enact measurable reforms have de-
moralized teachers. Many districts
have begun to evaluate teach-
ers mainly on the basis of their
students' scores on standardized
tests. And to the dismay of testing
experts, more and more tests are
being required.
Race to the Top gives high points
to districts that establish voucher
programs and charter schools
that do not have to hire unionized


teachers and staff. With the bless-
ings of conservative lawmakers,
manytdistricts are ignoring teach-
ers' experience, advanced degrees
and professional crederifials in
'evaluations and salaries. Many
districts are placing.newly hired
teachers on five-year probation and
giving annual contracts thereafter.
A handful of districts are looking for
ways to get rid of veteran teachers
and hire newly minted teachers
because they are cheaper. To save
money, many districts require or
will be requiring students to take
a minimum number of online
courses to graduate.
The good news, at least for me,
a teacher, is that teachers in many
parts of the nation have grown an-
gry enough to begin fighting back,
often over the objections of their
union leaders.
For the last two years, Florida, for
example, has witnessed a surpris-
ing and growing coalition of teach-.
ers, students, parents and school
administrators protesting the harsh
policies and mean-spirited tac-
tics of the state's GOP-controlled
legislature.
It is difficult to determine if the
new movement will have any sig-
nificant impact, but the fact that it
is happening at all and that teach-'
ers are finding their voice mark a
positive turn.
In New York, the New York State
United Teachers, the umbrella
organization representing local
teachers unions, rallied teachers,
students, parents and community
leaders statewide to oppose budget
cuts that amounted to about $1.5
billion. New York Mayor Michael


.


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e
!S '"',h


- - LA-%


fight back

Bloomberg, with the support
of hedge fund bosses and.rich
foundations, threatened to lay off
4,600 teachers as a way to weaken
the teachers union. Teachers arid
their union leaders see Bloomberg's
threat as a step toward ultimately
privatizing the city's public schools,
turning them into a commodity.
Most recently, in late July, be-
tween 3,000 and 4,000 teachers
from around the country con-
vened in Washington and marched
near the White House as part of a
four-day rally primarily to bring
attention to their dissatisfaction
with standards and testing-based
accountability.
. The rally, Save Our Schools March
and National Call to Action, got
the attention of U.S. Education
Secretary Arne Duncan and the
president. Representatives met
briefly with Duncan and members
of his staff.
Save Our Schools leaders argue
that contrary to what their critics
say they are not defending the
status quo. During an interview
with Education Week, Sabrina Ste-
vens Shupe summed up the rally's
mission and that of other teacher
protests nationwide: "What we're
talking about is creating the right
conditions (for teaching and learn-
ing), not prescriptive policies."
By standing up for themselves
and their profession, teachers who
are being unfairly attacked will be
the ones who save public schools
and democratic public education
in America.

Bill Maxwell is a columnist for the St. Petersburg
Times. Email bmaxwell@sptimes.com.


A case of discretion in deportation arrests


BY DALE MCFEATTERS
Scripps Howard News Service
The Department of Homeland
Security has proposed some
common sense changes to
U.S. deportation policy and it has
kicked up a predictable storm of
protest from conservatives who be-
lieve any change in that inefficient
process puts on the slippery slope
to a Reagan-style amnesty.
Our early missteps in trying to
discourage illegal immigration
showed that, yes, it was possible
to round up illegal immigrants by
the thousands but we soon ran out
of places to put them, judges and
enforcement officers to review their
cases and the money to pay for all
this.
During his campaign, President
Barack Obama pledged to start
deporting "the worst of the worst."
That was a relatively easy bench-
mark. But with 300,000 people
contesting or awaiting deportation,
matters became more complicated.
Now DHS has settled on a variant


of that policy that might be called
"the worst first." Immigration of-
ficials will concentrate first deport-
ing those illegal immigrants who
are convicted criminals or credibly
pose a threat to public safety or
national security.
The others, in the meantime, will
be reviewed on a case-by-case basis
and if there is no pressing reason
to expel them they will be allowed
to stay, pending final resolution of
their deportation order.
They will even be allowed to
apply for a work permit, also on a
case-by-basis, and legally hold a
job.
If they're going to be here anyway,
they might as well be doing some-
thing useful and paying taxes.
In June, Immigration and Cus-
toms Enforcement issued guide-
lines to its agents on the discretion
available to them on whom to
round up. The guidelines mimic
the DREAM Act, which should have
passed but didn't, that would give
immigrants brought here as chil-
dren who attend college or serve


in the military an opportunity for
legal status.
Any reasonable immigration
policy would not just concentrate
on getting rid of the people we
don't want, like criminals, but also
on keeping those we do want, those
who are willing to serve in the mili-
tary or study for a needed specialty.
The officers were also told not to
overcrowd the jails with illegals that
have no criminal record, have lived
in the U.S. a long time or have an
American spouse or children.
Opposition was quick in com-
ing. Rep. Lamar Smith, R-Texas,
chairman of the House Judiciary
Committee, wrote, "The Obama
administration should enforce im-
migration laws, not look for ways to
ignore them. The Obama adminis-
tration should not pick and choose
which laws to enforce."
All law enforcement entails a cer-
tain amount of discretion. Even.in
Smith's hometown of San Antonio,
the police don't make busted tail
light arrests when someone is bust-
ing into a jewelry store nearby.


2011 Jeff Staher/Dist. by Universa U


@2011 Jeff Stahler/Dist. by Universal UClick for UFS


E*1 4A






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Miami job fair offers hope, but no guarantees


The Associated Press

MIAMI More than
1,000 people streamed
into a downtown conven-
tion center as a Miami job
fair aimed at lowering the
especially high unemploy-
ment rate in the black com-
munity opened Tuesday.
The Congressional Black
Caucus organized the
event, which brought in
nearly 120 employers with
roughly 3,000 job open-
ings. The city and county
were partners in the event.
U.S.. Rep. Frederica Wil-
son, D-Fla., said she is


hopeful everyone who at-
tends walks away with a
job, or at least renewed
hope of finding one amid
a weak economy. But sev-
eral job seekers said they
quickly learned after visit-
ing booths that there were
no guarantees, so they
were trying to be realistic
about their chances. Many
large employers, like UPS
and Starbucks, were direct-
ing people to apply online,
where applicants would'
face competition from
job seekers. elsewhere.
Counselors were on hand
to comfort job seekers to


"There's a good vibe. People are
addressing the issue. They are
sure something will be done."


help make sure no one left
more frustrated than when
they arrived.
Florida's unemployment
rate stands at 10.7 per-
cent. It is 12.5 percent in
Miami-Dade County. Wil-
son said the numbers are
significantly higher among'
blacks, especially men.


Wilson said ir
view that even
don't get a job al
ing the job fair
have had the o
to sharpen the
terms of how tc
finding a job.
"There are woi
how to apply for


to write a resume, how to
negotiate a salary and how
to properly interview," Wil-
fla ng son said.
Johnny Cotson, 23, of
Miami, said he was eager
to find work and hoped
Jaron Taylor, to improve his chances by
Job seeker meeting with employers
n an inter- at the job fair. Among the
if people booths he visited was one
after attend- for shipping giant UPS.
r, they will "The economy is bad
opportunity right now, but there are still
ir skills in jobs open," Cotson said.
o go about Jaron Taylor, an 18-year-
old Miami resident, said he
rkshops on is desperately looking for
a job, how work to help pay for col-


lege. Among the booths he
visited was the one set up
by Starbucks.
"I have a good feeling,"
Taylor said. "The energy.
in this room is something.
There's a good vibe. Peo-
ple are addressing the is-
sue. They are making sure
something will be done."
Thousands of people
were expected to attend
the all-day job fair before
it was over. Free bus passes
were being offered to resi-
dents who wanted a ride to
the event, and discounted
parking was available at
the venue.


State Briefs


Panhandle woman FLa. Supreme Court:
pleads no contest in Valle can be executed
1 ll ll


girls aeatn
PENSACOLA-- A Pen-
sacola mother has pleaded
no contest to the charge of
aggravated manslaughter
in the 2009 death of her
18-month-old daughter.
The Pensacola News
Journal reports 23tyear-
old Christian Woods will
be sentenced October
3. On Monday, she also
pleaded no contest to two
counts of child neglect
causing great bodily harm.
She was accused of leav-
ing Myleahya Woods home
alone for two days with
the girl's twin sister and
her brother.
The Escambia County
Sheriff's Office says Woods
found the girl dead when
she returned home and
stuffed her body in a gar-
bage can. Deputies found
the girl's sister under a bed
inside the home, barely
alive.


TALLAHASSEE The
Florida Supreme Court
says that the state can pro-
ceed with the execution of
Manuel Valle, who killed a
Coral Gables police officer
33 years ago.
The court issued a stay
last month until a lower
court could hold a hearing
on Valle's claim that a new
lethal injection drug may
cause him to feel pain dur-
ing his execution, which
had been set for Aug. 2.
A Miami-Dade Circuit
judge rejected Valle's claim
earlier this month and the
Supreme Court lifted the
stay on Tuesday.
Valle, 61, was sentenced
to die for the 1978 shoot-
ing death of Coral Gables
polite officer Louis Pena.
His death warrant was the
first signed by Gov. Rick
Scott.
The Department of Cor-
rections hasn't set a new
date for the execution.


SPRING HILL-- An art
teacher who punched an
unruly high school student
last spring is back in the
classroom but at a dif-
ferent school.
The St. Petersburg Times
reports that 64-year-old
Sandra Hadsock was '
present on the first day of
school Monday to teach
art to elementary students
at a school in Spring Hill,
north of Tampa.
She agreed to the move
as part of a deal to keep
her job.
Hadsock was arrested
in May after punching a
male student who called
her a vulgar name and,
then advanced on her. The
incident was caught on a
student's cellphone video
camera..
But prosecutors declined
to press charges, saying
the video didn't provide
conclusive evidence that
the veteran teacher wasn't
acting in self-defense.

PSC approves rate
hike for Gulf Power
TALLAHASSEE-The
Florida Public Service ,
Commission has approved
a 4 percent, $38.5 million
per year, interim rate in-
crease for Gulf Power Co.
The decision on Tues-
day will add $4.49 to the
monthly bill of a customer
who uses 1,000 kilowatt
hours. That's about aver-
age for a small home.
The interim rate will
remain in effect until
the commission decides
whether to grant the
Pensacola-based utility
a permanent base rate
increase.
Gulf Power is seeking
10 percent, or $95 million
annually.
That would bring the in-
crease to $12.14, including
the interim amount, for
1,000-kilowatt hours, or a
total bill of $134.84.
Gulf Power serves
430,000 homes, businesses
and other customers in
eight Florida Panhandle
counties.
It is a subsidiary of the
Atlanta-based Southern
Co.


WEST PALM BEACH
- Two workers at a now-
shuttered South Florida
daycare center have plead-
ed guilty in the death of a
toddler who was left in a
van all day last summer.
Petra Rodriguez Perez,
who headed Katie's Kids
Daycare in Delray Beach,
and Amanda Inman, a
driver for the center, en-
tered their pleas Tuesday
and were sentenced to 10
years of probation.
A 2-year-old girl was left
in a daycare center van
last August for more than
seven hours and died.
The defendants are
prohibited from work with
children and also must
complete community
service.

Cub Scout awarded
for saving
choking grandma
CRESTVIEW- A quick-
thinking Panhandle Boy
Scout is being recognized
for saving his choking
grandmother.
Germainye Hudson
received a special recogni-
tion this month when his
troop earned various merit
badges. The 11-year-old
saved his grandmother in
February when she began
choking on food while
watching the Super Bowl.
The Northwest Florida
Daily News reports the boy
used the Heimlich ma-
neuver, which he learned
during his scout training.
For his correct response,
Hudson earned the Cub
Scout Achievement Medal
and the Boy Scout Nation-
al Medal of Merit.

Woman charged for
throwing 4 puppies
BRADENTON-Au-
thorities say a southwest
Florida woman threw four
young puppies against a
wall, killing two of them.
The Manatee County
Sheriff's Office reports
that 19-year-old Shaniqua
Louise Porter was arrested
Saturday and charged
with two felony counts
of torturing an animal
with intent to kill and two


misdemeanor counts of
cruelty to animals.
Porter's roommate and
another witness told
deputies that Porter came,
home in a rage over the
weekend and threw the
small dogs at the wall.
Jail records show Porter
was released Sunday
on $2,240 bail. Records
didn't show if she had an
attorney.

FHP trooper spots
pilot of downed
ultralight
APOPKA Authorities
pulled a pilot from Lake
Apopka after a Florida
Highway Patrol trooper
spotted his ultralight
submerged in the gator-
infested water.
Sgt. Luis Badia called
for help about 10:30 a.m.
Tuesday and several
agencies responded. They
pulled the pilot to safety.
The Orlando Sentinel
reports the man did not
appear injured, but he was
taken to a hospital.
FHP spokeswoman Kim
Montes says it was "perfect
timing" that Badia spotted
the plane in the water be-
caushe pilot didn't have
a way of calling for help.
The pilot's name was not
released. No further de-
tails about the crash were
immediately available.

Anthony attorneys
argue, again, to
stop probation
ORLANDO Casey
Anthony's attorneys say
the Florida Attorney
General's Office is wrong
to conclude she needs to
serve a probation sentence
for check fraud.
Anthony's attorneys
filed a reply Tuesday to an
Attorney General's Office
filing in appellate court
that said she needs to start
serving probation now
that she is out of jail.
Anthony was acquitted
last month of murdering
her 2-year-old daughter,
Caylee, in a case unrelated
to the check fraud.
Since her release from
jail, she has kept a low
profile and her exact
whereabouts have been
secret.
An Orlando judge earlier
this month said Anthony
must report to a probation
office no later than noon
Friday.
Her attorneys have filed
an appeal, claiming she
served the probation sen-
tence in jail while awaiting
her murder trial.

Fla. researcher
wants rattlesnakes
protected
TALLAHASSEE A
researcher and three con-
servation groups want
the eastern diamondback
rattlesnake protected.
They asked the U.S. Fish
and Wildlife Service on
Monday for threatened
species status for the ven-
omous snakes.
Tallahassee researcher
Bruce Means said they
are a wildlife treasure that
shouldn't be allowed to go
extinct.
Only 2 or 3 percent of the
reptile's original habitat
remains and thousands
are killed every year at
"rattlesnake roundups"


LOOKING FOR MORE NEWS? VISIT
-\ WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM


in Georgia and Alabama.
The numbers of snakes
captured at the roundups,
however, has declined
in recent years and
their weights also have
dropped.
Means joined with the
Center for Biological
Diversity and the groups
Protect All Living Species
and One More Generation
to file the'request.
A review process is
expected to take several
years before a decision is
made. .

Police: 3 bodies found
in Central Fla.
EDGEWATER Authori-
ties are trying to identify
two bodies found in the
woods along Interstate 95
inVolusia County.
Edgewater Police say
hikers found the bodies
about 5:30 p.m. Monday
off a narrow dirt road.
The Daytona Beach
News-Journal reports that
at least one of the bodies
was a man.
The Volusia County
Sheriff's Office is as-
sisting police with the
investigation.
In a separate case,
Edgewater Police Chief
Dave Arcieri says a "person
of interest" in the case of
missing woman Jennifer
Rado took authorities to
the site of skeletal remains


Monday.
Police say Rado disap-
peared after leaving a
party July 17. She was


last seen walking away
from the party with an
acquaintance.
From wire reports


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Teacher who punched Daycare workers gt
student returns to Dayca oe get
classroom probation in
class hild's death


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Dr. Shores has a special
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WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24, 2011 5A F


STATE'I'E










East Coast rocked by strongest quake since 1944


The Associated Press

MINERAL, Va. The
most powerful earthquake
to strike the East Coast
.in 67 years shook build-
ings and rattled nerves
from Georgia to Maine on
Tuesday. Frightened office
workers spilled into the
streets in New York, and
parts of the White House,
Capitol and Pentagon were
evacuated.
There were no reports of
deaths or serious injuries.
The National Cathe-
dral said its central tower
and three of its four cor-
ner spires were damaged,
but the White House said
advisers had told Presi-
dent Barack Obama there
were no reports of major
damage to the nation's
infrastructure, includ-
ing airports and nuclear
facilities.
. The U.S. Geological Sur-
vey, said the quake regis-
tered magnitude 5.8 and
was centered 90 miles
southwest of Washington.
It was mild by West Coast
standards, but the East
Coast is not used to quakes
of any size, and this one
briefly raised f6ars of a ter-
ror attack less than three
weeks before the 10th an-
niversary of Sept. 11.
"I thought I was having
maybe a heart attack, and
I saw everybody running,"
said Adrian Ollivierre, an
accountant who was in his
office on the 60th floor of
the Empire State Building
when the shaking began. "I
think what it is, is the para-
noia that happens from
9/11, and that's why I'm
still out here because,
I'm sorry, I'm not playing
with my life."
Two nuclear reactors at
the North Anna Power Sta-
tion, in the same county as
the epicenter, were auto-
matically taken off line by
safety systems, said Roger
Hannah, a spokesman for
the U.S. Nuclear Regula-
tory Commission.
At the Pentagon, a low
rumbling built until the
building itself was shak-
ing, and people ran into


Office workers gather on the sidewalk in downtown Washington on Tuesday, moments after a
5.8 magnitude tremor shook the nation's capitol.


the corridors of the com-
plex. The shaking con-
tinued there, to shouts
of "Evacuate! Evacuate!"
The main damage to the
building, the largest single
workspace for the federal
government, came from a
broken water pipe. "
The Park Service closed
all monuments and me-
morials on the National
Mall, and ceiling tiles fell
at Reagan National Air-
port outside Washington.
Many nonessential work-
ers in Washington were
sent home for the day. The
Capitol was reopened by
late afternoon for people
to retrieve their things.
The National Cathedral
said cracks had appeared
in the flying buttresses
around the apse at one
end. "Everyone here is
safe," the cathedral said
on its official Twitter feed.
"Please pray for the Ca-
thedral as there has been
some damage."
In lower Manhattan, the
26-story federal court-,
house, blocks from ground
zero of the Sept. 11 attacks,
.began swaying, and hun-
dreds of people streamed
out of the building.
The New York police
commissioner, Raymond
Kelly, was in a meeting
with top deputies planning
security for the upcom-
ing anniversary when the
shaking started. Workers


in the Empire State Build-
ing spilled into the streets,
some having descended
dozens of flights of stairs.
"I thought we'd been hit
by an airplane," said one
worker, MartyWiesner.
New York District Attor-
ney Cyrus R. Vance was
starting a news conference
about the dismissal of the
sexual assault case against
Dominique Strauss-Kahn,
the former head of the
International Monetary
Fund, when the shaking
began. Reporters and aides
began rushing oft the door
until it became clear it was
subsiding.
On Wall Street, the floor
of the New York Stock Ex-
change did not shake, of-
ficials said, but the Dow
Jones industrial average
sank 60 points soon after
the quake struck. The Dow
began rising again a half-
hour later and finished the
day up 322 points.
Shaking was felt as far
south as Charleston, S.C.,
as far north as Maine and
as far west as Cincinnati
and Atlanta. It was also
felt on Martha's Vineyard,
.off the coast of Massachu-
setts, where Obama is tak-
ing summer vacation and
was starting a round of golf
when the quake struck at
1:51 p.m. EDT.
Obama led a conference
call Tuesday afternoon on
the earthquake with top


administration officials,
including his homeland
security secretary, national
security adviser and ad-
ministrator of the Federal
Emergency Management
Agency.
Around Mineral, Va., a
small town close to the
epicenter, people milled
around in their lawns, on
sidewalks and parking lots,
still rattled and leery of
re-entering buildings. All
over town, masonry was
crumpled, and there were
stores with shelved con-
tents strewn on the floor.
Several display windows at
businesses in the tiny heart
of downtown were broken
and lay in jagged shards.
Carmen Bonano, who
has a 1-year-old grand-
daughter, sat on the porch
of her family's white-frame
house, its twin brick chim-
neys destroyed. Her voice
still quavered with fear.
"The fridge came ddwn
offthe wall and things start-
ed falling: I just pushed the
refrigerator out of the way,
grabbed the baby and ran,"
she said.
By the standards of the
West Coast, where earth-
quakes are much more
common, the Virginia
quake was mild. Since
1900, there have been 40
quakes of magnitude 5.8
or greater in California
alone. There have been 43
of magnitude 6 of greater.


Quakes in the East tend
to be felt across a much
broader area.
"The waves are able to re-
verberate and travel pretty
happily out for miles,"
said U.S. Geological Sur-
vey seismologist Susan
Hough.
The Geological Survey
put the quake in its yellow
alert category, meaning
there was potential for lo-
cal damage but relatively
little economic damage.
The agency said the
quake was 3.7 miles be-
neath the surface, but sci-
entists said they may never
be able to map the exact
fault. Aftershocks may
help to outline it, said Ro-
wena Lohman, a seismolo-
gist at Cornell University.
There were at least two af-
tershocks, magnitudes 2.2
and, 2.8. The last quake of
equal power to strike the
East Coast was in New York
in 1944. The largest East
Coast quake on record
was a 7.3 that hit South
Carolina in 1886. In 1897, a
magnitude-5.9 quake was
recorded at Giles County,
Va., the largest on record
in that state.
A 5.8-magnitude quake
releases as much energy
as almost eight kilotons
of TNT, about half the
power of the atomic bomb
dropped on Hiroshima,
Japan. The earthquake
that devastated Japan ear-
lier this year released more
than 60,000 times as much
energy as Tuesday's.
The Virginia quake came
a dayafteran earthquake in
Colorado toppled grocer-
ies off shelves and caused
minor damage to homes
in the southern part of the
state and in northern New
Mexico.
On the East Coast, Am-
trak said its trains along
the Northeast Corridor
between Baltimore and
Washington were operat-
ing at reduced speeds and
crewswere inspecting sta-
tions and railroad infra-
structure before returning
to normal.
In Charleston, W.Va.,
hundreds of workers left


the state Capitol building
and employees at other
downtown office build-
ings were asked to leave
temporarily.
"The whole building
shook," said Jennifer Bun-
dy, a spokeswoman for
the state Supreme Court.
"You could feel two differ-
ent shakes. Everybody just
kind of came out on their
own."
In Ohio, office buildings
.swayed in' Columbus and
Cincinnati, and the press
box at Progressive Field,
home of the Cleveland In-
dians, shook. At least one
building near the State-
house was evacuated in
downtown Columbus.
. In downtown Baltimore,
the quake sent office work-
ers into the streets, where
lamp posts swayed slightly
as they called family and
friends to check in.
John Gurlach, air traffic
controller at the Morgan-
town Municipal Airport in
West Virginia, was in a 40-
foot-tall tower when the
earth trembled.
"There were two of us
looking at each other-say-
ing, 'What's that?'" he said,
even as a commuter plane
was landing. "It was no-
ticeably shaking. It felt like
a B-52 unloading."
Immediately, the phone
rang from the nearest air-
port in Clarksburg, and a
computer began spitting
out green strips of paper-
alerts from other airports
in New York and Washing-
ton issuing ground stops
"due to earthquake."
The earthquake caused
a stir online, where people
posted to Facgbook and
Twitter within seconds and
described what they had
felt. The keywords in posts,
or hashtags, included "DC-
quake," "VAquake" and
"Columbusquake," an in-
dication of howbroadlythe
quake was experienced.
"People pouring out of
buildings and onto the
sidewalks and Into Far-
ragut Park in downtown
DC," Kevin Madden, a Re-
publican strategist, posted
on Twitter.


Fla. Board of Ed seeks

per-student increase


The Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE The
State Board of Education
asked Gov. Rick Scott and,
Legislature on Tuesday
for a modest 1.88 percent
boost in spending for each
student in Florida's pub-
lic schools next year but
opted to seek a more dra-
matic.24.4 percent overall
increase for community
and state colleges.
The panel, though, re-
fused to ask Scott and
lawmakers to restore state
funding for Florida's 26
public television and radio
stations. The Republican
governor vetoed $4.8 mil-
lion for public broadcast-
ers from this year's budget,
which went into effect July
1.
Florida School Boards
Association executive Di-
rector Wayne Blanton said
the proposed. $117.54 per
student tlcrease is "re-
alistic" while a teachers
union spokesman called
it "a tepid response" after
lawmakers cut spending
by $542 for each student,
or 8 percent, in this year's
budget.
"Under the current eco-
nomic conditions that is
an acceptable and a wise
budget request," Blanton
said.
The Florida Education
Association's Mark Pudlow,
though, said the request
would keep the state's
school funding near the
bottom nationally.
"It's nowhere what we
need," Pudlow said. "It's
kind of sad when you have
to aspire to be average."
The state board's pro-
posal, approved during a
conference call meeting,
would bring kindergar-
ten through 12th grade
spending to $6,372.65 per
student.
I That's about $900 less


than it was in 2007-08, or a
13 percent drop.
Lawmakers took the
edge off of this year's cuts
by in effect reducing the
salaries of teachers and
other school employees.
They along with state and
county workers and some
city employees are being
required to contribute 3
percent of their pay to the
Florida Retirement System
while employers' contribu-
tions have been reduced.
Most Florida school dis-
trict also saved their shares
of $550 million in federal
jobs money they received
last year and are using it
to offset some of this year's
spending cuts
Those factors and prior
year layoffs are allowing
most districts to avoid
eliminating more teachers
this year, but they won't
have federal jobs money to
bail them out in 2012-13,
Blanton said.
He said school boards,
instead, will be lobbying
lawmakers to reduce or
eliminate unfunded man-
dates spending required
by the state but paid for
with local dollars.
The biggest is more than
$1 billion needed to de-
velop and implement end-
of-course exams over the
next two years for a revised
assessment system, Blan-
ton said. It will be used
for such purposes as grad-
ing schools and awarding
teacher merit pay.
Another unfunded man-
date is to provide trans-
portation for students who
live two miles or more from
school.
Th'e board's proposed
overall operating budget
for the Department of Ed-
ucation would total $14.4
billion or 1.39 percent less
than currently being spent.
Those figures include col-
leges but not universities.


Irene weakens, remains threat to US


The Associated Press

MIAMI Officials and resi-
dents from Florida to the Carolinas
stocked up on supplies, dusted off
evacuation plans and readied for
the worst as Irene, the first hurri-
cane to threaten the U.S. in three
years, churned over tropical waters
Tuesday after cutting a destructive
path through the Caribbean.
Federal officials warned the storm
could flood streets and knock down
power lines as far north as New Eng-
land. Irene lost some of its punch.
Tuesday afternoon and was down-
graded to a Category 1 hurricane
as it lashed the Turks and Caicos Is-
lands, but theptorm remains likely
to regain strength and become a
major hurricane before making a
U.S. landfall.
The hurricane has raked the Ca-
ribbean and could cause serious
problems along the entire East-
ern Seaboard, Federal Emergency
Management Agency administrator
Craig Fugate said Tuesday during a
conference call with reporters. Fu-
gate urged people not to become
complacent, even though the fore-
cast is still uncertain and the storm
may be days from hitting the U.S.
"We need to remind people, hurri-
canes are not just a Southern thing.


IHE ASSOCIATEDU PRESS
National Hurricane Center director Bill Read (left) talks with meteorologist Wallace
Hogsett on Monday at the National Hurricane Center in Miami. ,


This could be the Mid-Atlantic and
the northeast coast," Fugate said.
"We've got a lot of time for people
to get ready, but we don't have
forever."
Many people already have begun
stocking up on essentials such as
bottled water, gasoline and plywood
for boarding up windows. But on
North Carolina's Wrightsville Beach,
a popular tourist destination, only a
few wispy clouds dotted the sky on
a 90-degree day. Bronzed sunbath-


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the beach, not away from it.
On Tuesday afternoon, Irene was
about 50 miles south-southwest of
Grand Turk Island, moving west-
northwest at 9 mph. Its maximum
sustained winds were at 90 mph.
In South Carolina, emergency
agencies went on alert for what
could be the first hurricane to hit
there in seven years.


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9/11 brought changes


The Associated Press

CHICAGO What if it
happens again?
A decade after9/11, could
any of the nation's 21,000
high-rises withstand an at-
tack like those that caused
New York's twin towers to
collapse? Could the thou-
sands of people inside find
a way to safety?
At Chicago's Willis Tow-
er, like other skyscrapers
around the country, much
has changed since two hi-
jacked jets slammed into
the World Trade Center.
North America's tallest
building now has concrete
barriers, metal detectors
and sophisticated security
cameras that trace every
nearby movement.
But those measures
might do little to prevent
a calamity on the scale of
Sept. 11. Despite propos-
als for major structural
changes over the last de-
cade, thousands of build-
ings remain vulnerable,
experts say, because the
cost to retrofit them is too
high, and cities and states
have been slow to. adopt
tougher building codes for
new construction.
Less sweeping improve-
ments, such as equipping
elevators for use in evacu-
ations, are lagging behind
other countries, too.
"You only can do as much
as lobbyists, politicians,
and the agencies you're
dealing with will let you


The Trump International Hotel & Tower (left) is s
(right) and other downtown Chicago skyscrapers.


do," said Monica Gabrielle,
whose husband died in the
9/11 attacks and who co-
chairs the Skyscraper Safe-
ty Campaign that sprang
up afterward. "The further
away you get from events,
then you become more
complacent."
And for all the talk about
beefed-up security, there is
only so much that can be
done to protect buildings
that stand 1,000 feet or
more above the ground -
something Donald Trump
implicitly acknowledged
when he decided his new
Chicago' skyscraper would
not climb as high as the
Willis Tower because he
did not want it to become


a target.
While there w
9/11 about m
scrapers sturdi
ier to escape ir
agency, the stru
that would have
essary was eitl
pensive or just
"I don't kno
buildings that
through a struck
fit for the purpo
standing a major
9/11," said Adr
an architect wh
the Trump In
Hotel' and Tow
cago and the B
in Dubai, whici
world's tallest b
At the same t


to skyscrapers and high-rises
must provide the fire de- shafts must be stronger as
apartment with their floor well.
plans so crews know the And to prevent the pan-
exact layout of the build- caking that happened at
ings when they walk in. the World Trade Center as
People who live and one floor fell onto another,
work in high-rises around the city requires high rises
the city say evacuation to be built to prevent "pro-
drills are now routine, gressive collapse." But it
something many say never doesn't'spell out how to do
or rarely happened before that.
9/11. Even in places where
Many high-rises are also codes have not been up-
tougher to enter. In the dated, some high-rises are
immediate aftermath of taking steps to strengthen
the attack, Willis, Tower in- their buildings, said Jon
stalled airport-style secu- Schmidt, an associate
rity, complete witlh officers structural engisfeer and
searching bags. director of anti-terrorism
That has been scaled services for the Kansas
back, said David Milberg, City, Mo.-based Burns &
THEASSOCIATEDPRESS a spokesman for the Schiff McDonnell, an* engineer-
seen on Tuesday next to the Wrigley Building Hardin law firm, which has ing, architecture and con-
offices a little more than suiting firm.
halfway up the 110-story Materials and measures
ing industry groups have building. once reserved for military
ias talk after taken some steps to make "Now we have key-card and government build-
iaking sky- new structures safer and access for tenants. Non- ings are gradually becom-
er and eas- more secure. They've tenants must produce ing more mainstream, in-
n an emer- proposed .40 construc- photo IDs, and we have to cluding concrete-encased
ctural work tion code changes such as register guests in advance," stairwells to protect evac-
e been nec- wider stairways to ensure he said. eating tenants and lami-
her too ex- firefighters can climb up "It's not as conspicuous nated glass that's less likely
impossible. while occupants are coii- as it was, (but) you don't to shatter into fragments
ow of any ing down. get in here unless you're during .a blast, Schmidt
have gone Municipalities can adopt vetted," he said. said. More attention is be-
:tural retro- the changes as they see fit, Not surprisingly, new ing paid to fireproofing
ose of with- but they are not manda- buildings, those under material that better sticks
r attack like tory, said Steve Daggers, a construction and those on to steel an issue that got
rian Smith, spokesman for the Inter- the drawing board have a a lot of attention because
io designed national Code Council. number of features that the jets that hit the twin
international Chicago, for example, older buildings did not. towers apparentlyknocked
ver in Chi- adopted an ordinance that In New York City, for the coating off the girders
Burj Khalifa requires high-rises to have example, stairwell enclo- to the point they softened
h is now the an emergency evacuation sures in high-rises must be and broke.
building. plan on file with the city. wider and made of harder But money is never far
ime, build- And the tallest buildings materials, and elevator, from mind.


Update
From Page 1A

bring them more in line.
In the area of legal re-
form, the Chamber also
advocated for successful
legislation that will allow
jurors to consider more
facts when they are delib-
erating vehicle accident
cases involving allegations
of product defect. They can
now receive information
about the driver and his or
her condition while under
the wheel, for instance,,
and can spread their deter-


Fire
From Page 1A
was not, so they moved
onto the smoking trash
pile. They sprayed down
the mass with water and
foam.
Around 1:25 p.m., a back-
hoe arrived and began
spreading the garbage so
firefighters could spray the
smoldering center of the
pile. Opce the pile stopped-
smoking, the backhoe car-
ried small portions,of the
garbage tq a large dump-
ster Waste Management


School.
From Page 1A

enrollment.
Historically, Moore said,
attendance numbers settle
after Labor Day weekend,
with students either en-
tering into or withdrawing
from schools.
Financially, a continu-
ing decline in attendance
could mean cuts in the
Jackson County School
District budget. The county


mination of fault among
more parties if they find
that there are degrees of
fault to be shared.
Reeves said there were
also important victories
in the area of growth man-
agement, along with edu-
cation. The Chamber ad-
vocated for a bill which ties
teachers' salary increases
to student achievement. It
. also eliminated tenure for
new teachers.
Reeves said Chamber
lobbyists will continue ef-
forts toward passage of
other legislation it sup-
ports in the coming ses-
sion and beyond.


provided. By around 2
p.m., most, of the garbage
was off the road and offi-
cials began to leave.
Officials directed traf-
fic around the truck and
its trash throughout the
cleanup.
The cause of the fire is
unknown, and will remain
that way due to the various
items in the truck. Officials
said there are a number of
things that could have set
the garbage on fire.
. Watford listed bullets or
improperly disposed of
chemicals as two possible
causes.


receives its funding based,
on the number of students
enrolled.
In October, the official
count will be sent to the
Florida Department of Ed-
ucation and the county's
budget will be adjusted
accordingly.
At the moment, the
attendance change is
small enough that teach-
ers will not have to be
redistributed.
However, the final verdict
will not be known until af-
ter Labor Day weekend.


There were no

obituaries or

death notices

submitted to the

Floridan as of the

deadline at 4 p.m.

yesterday.


Report: Millions of unseen species fill Earth


The Associated Press

WASHINGTON Our
world is a much wilder
place than it looks.
A new study estimates
that Earth has almost 8.8
million species, but we've
only discovered about
a quarter of them. And
some of 'yet-to-be-seen
ones could be in our own
backyards, scientists say.
So far, only 1.9 million
species have been found.
Recent discoveries have
been small and weird: a
psychedelic frogfish, a liz-
ard the size of a dime and
even a blind hairy mini-
lobster at the bottom of
the ocean.
"We are really fairly ig-
norant of the complexity
and colorfulness of this
amazing planet," said the
study's co-author, Boris
Worm, a biology profes-
sor at Canada's Dalhousie
University. "We need to ex-
pose more people to those
wonders. It really makes
you feel differently about
this place we inhabit." .,
While some scientists
and others may question
why we need to know the
number of species, others
sayr it's important.
There are potential ben-
efits from these undiscov-
ered species, which need
to be found before they
disappear from. the plan-
et, said famed Harvard bi-
ologist Edward 0. Wilson,


who was not part of this
study. Some of modern
medicine comes from un-
usual plants and animals.
"We won't know the ben-
efits to humanity (from
these species), which po-
tentially are enormous,"
the Pulitzer Prize-win-
ning Wilson said. "If
we're going to advance
medical science, we need
to know what's in the
environment."
. Biologists have long
known that there's more
to Earth than it seems,
estimating the number of
species to be somewhere
between 3 million and 100
million. Figuring out how
much is difficult.
Worm and Camilo Mora
of the University of Hawaii
used complex mathemati-
cal models and the pace
of discoveries of not only
species, but of higher clas-
sifications such as fam-
ily to come up with their
estimate.
Their study, published
Tuesday in the online
journal PLoS Biology, a
publication of the Public
Library of Science, esti-
mated the number of spe-
cies at nearly 8.8 million.
Of those species, 6.5 mil-
lion would be on land and
2,2 million in the ocean,
which is a priority for the
scientists doing the work
since they are part of the
Census of Marine Life, an
international group of sci-


THEASSOCIATED PRESS
This undated photo, provided by Penn State University Biology
Prof. Blair Hedges, shows a threadsnake, the smallest snake
species currently known to exist, curled up on a quarter. The
tiny snake, found in Barbados, is approximately 1000 mm
long, lays one single long egg, and is the shortest of 3,000
species of snakes.


entists trying to record all
the life in the ocean.
The research estimates
that animals rule with 7.8
million species, followed
by fungi with 611,000 and
plants with just shy of
300,000 species.
While some new species
like the strange mini-lob-
ster are in exotic places
such as undersea vents,
"many of these species
that remain to be discov-
ered can be found literally
in our own backyards,"
Mora said.
Outside scientists, such
as Wilson and preeminent
conservation biologist
Stuart Pimm of Duke Uni-
versity, praised the study,
although some said even


the 8.8 million number
may be too low.
The study said it could
be off by about 1.3 million
species, with the number
somewhere between 7.5
million and 10.1 million.
But evolutionary biologist
Blair Hedges of Penn State
University said he thinks
the study is not good
enough to be even that ex-
act and could be wrong by
millions.
Hedges knows firsthand
about small species. He
found the world's small-
est lizard, a half-inch long
Caribbean gecko in the
Dominican Republic in
2,001. And three years ago
in Barbados, he found the
world's shortest snake.


New-home sales fall, 2011 could be worst year yet


The Associated Press

WASHINGTON Sales of new
homes fell for the third straight
month'in July, a sign that housing
remains a drag on the economy. If
the current pace continues, 2011
would be the worst year for new-
home sales on records dating back
at least half a century.
Sales fell nearly 1 percent in July
to a seasonally adjusted annual rate
of 298,000, the Commerce Depart-
ment said Tuesday. That's less than
half the 700,000 that economists say
represent a healthy market.
Last year, 323,000 homes were sold
- the worst year on records that go
back to 1963.
While new homes represent less
than one-fifth of the housing mar-
ket, they have an outsize impact
on the economy. Each home built
creates an average of three jobs
and $90,000 in taxes, according to


the National Association of Home
Builders.
High unemployment, larger re-
quired down payments and tougher
lending standards are preventing
many people from buying homes.
Plunging stocks and a growing
fear that the U.S. could tip back into
another recession are also keeping
people from entering the troubled
housing market.
Renewed concerns about job secu-
rity likely weighed on many would-
be buyers' minds, said Mark Vitner,
senior economist at Wells Fargo.
A slowdown in the U.S. economy
has more than offset any boost from
super-low mortgage rates, said Paul
Dales, senior U.S. economist at
Capital Economics.
"A new home is a luxury that many
Americans can no longer afford,"
Dales said.
All home sales remain weak. The
sales pace for previously occupied


homes is trailing last year's 4.91 mil-
lion sales, the fewest since 1997.
In a healthy economy, people buy
roughly 6 million existing homes
annually.
A report last week showed that
more home sales than usual fell
apart at the last minute, a sign that
many buyers may be nervous about
the economy. At least 16 percent of
deals were canceled head of clos-
ings last month four times the
rate in May.
The troubled housing industry is
hurting the broader economy. After
previous modern-day recessions,
housing contributed up to 20 per-
cent to U.S. economic growth. That
has fallen to 4 percent following the
Great Recession.
Sales rose in July for new homes
valued at less than $150,000. They
also increased for those going for
more than $750,000. But mid-priced
home sales fell.


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WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24, 2011 7AF


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Libyan rebels storm


seat of Gadhafi's power


The Associated Press

TRIPOLI, Libya Hun-
dreds of Libyan rebels
blasted through the green
gates of Moammar Gad-
hafi's Bab al-Aziziya com-
pound in Tripoli Tuesday
after five hours of intense
fighting around, it. They
beat and killed some of
those who defended it,
fired celebratory shots
in the air and hauled off
crates of weapons and
trucks with guns mounted
on the back.
The storming of the
sprawling compound
in the capital, long the
nexus of Gadhafi's power,
marked the effective col-
lapse of his 42-year-old
regime, even though
pockets of resistance are
likely to persist around
the country for some time.
It was only Sunday night
that the rebels surprised
everyone with their light-
ning fast advance into
Tripoli, quickly capturing
large parts of the city of 2
million.
"We're looking for Gad-
hafi now. We have to find
him now," said Sohaib
Nefati, a 29-year-old rebel
sitting against a wall with
a Kalashnikov rifle. Gad-
hafi's whereabouts were
still unknown.
One fighter climbed
atop the iconic statue of
a huge golden fist clench-
ing a model of an Ameri-
can warplane and shot his
machine gun in the air ini
celebration. The statue
stands outside a building
that was once Gadhafi's
home, preserved with the
pockmarks of an Ameri-
can bombing in 1986 as a
symbol of his defiance.
Gadhafi delivered many
a fiery speech from the
balcony of that house,
railing against, the West.
It was there that he ap-
peared on television at the


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
A rebel fighter gestures as he stands on a monument inside
Moammar Gadhafi's compound in Bab al-Aziziya in Tripoli,
Libya, on Tuesday.


beginning of the 6-month-
old uprising, mocking his
opponents.
Bab al-Aziziya has since
been pummeled many
times over by NATO
bombings in the air cam-
paign against the regime
that began in March.
Abdel-Aziz Shafiya, a 19-
year-old rebel dressed in
camouflage with an RPG
slung over one shoulder
and a Kalashnikov over
another, said the rebels
believe Gadhafi is hiding
underground inside the
complex.
"Wasn't he the one who
called us rats? Now he
is the rat underground,"
he said. Asked how it felt
to be standing inside
Gadhafi's compound, the
fighter, who came to Trip-
oli two days ago from the
rebel-held western city of
Misrata replied:
"It's an explosion of joy
inside. I lost friends and
relatives and now I can
walk into Gadhafi's house.
Many of my friends have
died and now all of that


meant something."
Associated Press report-
ers inside the compound
said parts of it appeared
to still be under control
of government forces who
were firing toward the reb-
els, making for an atmo-
sphere of joyful celebra-
tion mixed with tension.
The air was thick with
smoke from the battles
and the sound of crackling
gunfire was constant. Reb-
els chanted"AllahuAkbar"
or "God is Great" and on
loudspeakers they cried:
"Hamdullah, hamdullah"
or "Thank God."
As the fighters stormed
in, they captured a guard
at the gates and threw him
to the ground, slamming
rifle butts into his back.
A hostile crowd gathered
around, punching and
kicking him until one reb-
el stepped in, stood over
him and kept the crowd
at bay.
There was a frenzy of
looting inside, directed
mainly at weapons and
ammunition.


Gaza Strip

Rise of middle class fuels resentment


The Associated Press

GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip
- A budding middle
class in the impoverished
Gaza Strip is flaunting its
wealth, sipping coffee at
gleaming new cafes, shop-
ping for shoes at the new
tiny shopping malls and
fueling perhaps the most
acrimonious grass roots
resentment yet toward the
ruling Hamas movement.
This middle class, which
has become visible at the
same time as a mini-con-
struction boom in this
blockaded-territory, is cele-
brating its weddings in op-
ulent halls and vacationing
in newly built beach bun-
galows. That level of con-
sumption may be modest
by Western standards, but
it's in startling contrast to
the grinding poverty of
most Gazans, who rely on
U.N. food handouts to get
by. Some of the well-off
are Hamas loyalists. That
rankles many Gaza resi-


dents because the conser-
vative Islamic movement
gained popularity by tend-
ing to the poor, along with
its armed struggle against
Israel.
"Hamas has become
rich at the expense of the
people," fumed a 22-year-
old seamstress, Nisrine,
as she stitched decorative
applique onto a dress. She
wouldn't disclose her fam-
ily name, not wanting to be
seen criticizing the mili-
tant group.
Gaza's Hamas govern-
ment denies its loyalists


have gotten wealthy since
the group came to power.
But others say the militant
group must pay attention.
"There is a nouveau riche
that has followed the rise
of the government," said
Alaa Araj, a former Gaza
economic minister and
businessman considered
close to Hamas. "We must
sound the alarm," he said.
"(Resentment) is growing
in Gaza."
Some two-thirds of Ga-
za's 1.6 million people live
in poverty. Half the work
force is unemployed.


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Cottondale Football


Hornets begin preseason


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Cottondale Hornets make
their 2011, debut Friday night in
Port St. Joe as they hit the road to
take on the Sharks in a pre-sea-
son jamboree.
The Hornets will open the
regular season on Sept. 3 in
Marianna against the Bulldogs,
but Friday's dress rehearsal rep-


resents their first action against
live competition this fall.
"We're just excited about going
to play," Cottondale coach Mike
Melvin said Tuesday. "With (Hur-
ricane) Irene sitting, out there,
I don't know how much water
we'll get off of it, but as of right
now, we're still going to play at
6:30 p.m. our time, and our guys
are excited about getting after it
a little bit."


The Hornets are coming off ., ." -
of a successful 2010 season in
which they finished runner-up
in district and earned a trip to
the postseason.
But 2011 projects to be more
difficult for Cottondale, which
lost several key players off of last
year's team andwill have just 21
players in uniform on Friday.

See HORNETS, Page 2B Eli Jackson fires up the Hornets before the start of practice Tuesday.


SNEADS VOLLEYBALL




Unfinished business


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN


Aaliyah Williams, left, returns the ball as Shelbi Byler backs her up during Sneads' volleyball practice Monday.


Pirates hope experience pushes them to the top


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

For the last three seasons,
the Sneads Lady Pirates have
made it all the way to the 2A
Regional Finals of the state
tournament and for three
straight seasons, they've
been turned back by Maclay
High School.
With a senior-laden team
that returns all but one
player from last year's group,
2011 may represent the best
chance in recent years for
the Lady Pirates to make that


next step and advance to the
state semifinals.
Sneads coach Sheila Rob-
erts returns what has to be
considered one of the top
contenders in Class 2A this
season, losing only Kara Al-
ford from a team that went
27-6 in 2010.
Stand-out middle blocker
Jordan Jackson returns, as
do setter Becca Aaron, libero
Emily Jones, and outside hit-
ters Yonna Bell and Brandy
Strickland.
However, Roberts said it
was important for her play-


ers not to get ahead of them-
selves, or to think that they're
better yet than they actually
are.
"I know in reality that there
are a lot of expectations on
this team, and the commu-
nity is expecting a lot," the
coach said. "But I try really
hard to downplay that. We
don't talk about it too much.
We talk about how we can be
better. I just try to keep them
focused on that. I don't want
them to feel so comfortable
that they think they'll just
easily roll through the season


and make history. I don'twant
them .thinking that way."
While that may be so, play-
ers are still human, and these
Lady Pirates are aware of
the talk that this may be the
Sneads team to make it down
state.
But Roberts said she simply
tries to keep them focused on
.the immediate task in front
them each and every day.
"They know that there's
high expectations," the coach
said. of the players. "But as

See SNEADS, Page 3B


MVIS otball


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Alex Edwards jumps to catch a wild pass
during practice Tuesday at Marianna
Middle School.


Young team


tries to gain


experience

BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

After a week and a day of official
practice, the Marianna Middle School
Bullpups and coach Hunter Nolen are
trying to play catch-up ahead of their
season-opening jamboree on Tuesday
inVernon.
The Bullpups don't have a surplus of
experienced players on this year's club,
so getting everyone up to speed has
been a challenge thus far, Nolen said
Tuesday.
"Last week was a little shaky, just ev-
erybody getting their feet wet," he said.
"(Monday) was pretty good. We're just
trying to get in everything we can with
only one week until the jamboree."
The weather forced the Bullpups in-
doors on Monday, which Nolen said
actually turned out to be a good thing.
"It really wasn't that bad because we
went into a classroom and did some
work on the board," the coach said.
"We drew up seven or eight plays that
we need to get down. For some of the
new guys, that was big for them. It was
probably the best practice we've had to
date."
The Bullpups will play Chipley in the
jamboree before opening the regular
season just two days later on the road
against Walton.

See BULLPUPS, Page 2B


NSparano, Henne try to lead Dolphins turnaround in 2011


Sparano, Henne try to lead Dolphins turnaround in 2011


The Associated Press

MIAMI When a thunder-
storm forced the Miami Dol-
phins to move coach Tony Spara-
no's post-practice media session
inside, he took his place in front
of a black curtain, then assessed
the uncustomary surroundings.
. "My back's against the wall, I
guess," he mumbled. "Just where
I want to be."
Apparently no hot seat was
available. Whatever the cliche,
Sparano realizes he's on bor-
rowed time in Miami.
In his first season as an NFL
head coach, Sparano led the Dol-
phins to a surprising 11-5 record,
the AFC East title and their only
playoff game since 2001. But Mi-
ami slipped to a disappointing
7-9 each of the past two years,
and in January owner Stephen


Ross embarked on an awkward,
very public courtship with Stan-
ford coach Jim Harbaugh.
When negotiations broke off,
Harbaugh joined the San Fran-
cisco 49ers and Ross gave Spara-
no a contract extension through
2013. But Ross has since done
little to allay suspicions he'll go
coach-shopping again unless
Sparano's team shows substan-
tial improvement.
"He knows there's a lot of pres-
sure on him this year," Ross said.
"When you're a football coach,
there's always pressure. We've
had two losing seasons, and I
think Tony can feel it by every-
body. Hopefully he does well."
Not exactly a ringing endorse-
ment. And to compound the
tension at team headquarters,
quarterback Chad Henne has his
back against the wall, too.


Last season, Henne threw 19
interceptions and was benched
briefly, and in July the Dolphins
tried to swing a deal for Den-
ver quarterback Kyle Orton. It
fell through, and when Henne
struggled in a training camp
scrimmage, fans chanted "We
want Orton!"
With a few misfires in the sea-
son opener, the jeers would like-
ly start again. Talk about putting
pressure on the quarterback.
"There's always pressure out
there," Henne said with a shrug.
"I put more pressure on myself
than anything."
Also under scrutiny is two-
time Pro Bowl receiver Brandon
Marshall, who caught only three
touchdown passes last year, his
first with Miami. He was stabbed

See MIAMI, Page 2B


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Miami Dolphins Anthony Fasano rushes against the Carolina Panthers in
the first half during a pre season NFL football game in Miami on Friday. L












scoreboard


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24, 2011 2B


SPRINT CUP LEADERS
Through Aug. 21
Points
1, Kyle Busch, 799.2, Jimmie Johnson,
789.3, Kevin Harvick, 760.4, Carl
Edwards, 760. 5, Matt Kenseth, 759. 6,
Jeff Gordon, 739. 7, Ryan Newman, 725.
8, Kurt Busch, 722. 9, Dale Earnhardt
Jr., 700. 10, Tony Stewart, 694.
11, Clint Bowyer, 670.12, Brad
Keselowski, 642. 13, Greg Biffle, 636.
14, Denny Hamlin, 635. 15, A J Allmend-
inger, 632.16, Mark Martin, 627.17,
Kasey Kahne, 623.18, Paul Menard,
617.19, Joey Logano, 610. 20, David
Ragan, 604.
Money
1, Carl Edwards, $5,994,606. 2, Kyle
Busch, $4,478,706. 3, Kevin Har-
vick, $4,150,051.4, Matt Kenseth,
$4,141,441.5, Kurt Busch, $4,123,376.
6, Jimmie Johnson, $4,096,166.7, Jeff
Gordon, $3,872,116.8, Clint Bowyer,
$3,778,547. 9, Tony Stewart, $3,686,222.
10, Denny Hamlin, $3,676,643.
11, Ryan Newman, $3,618,848.12,
Juan Pablo Montoya, $3,447,272.
13, Brad Keselowski, $3,268,765.
14, Jamie McMurray, $3,255,285.
15, Marcos Ambrose, $3,207,081.
16, Regan Smith, $3,190,248.17, A J
Allmendinger, $3,177,546.18, Bobby
Labonte, $3,156,408.19, David Ragan,
$2,973,163. 20, David Reutimann,
$2,963,522.


NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 82 44 .651 -
Atlanta 77 52 .597 6%V
Washington 62 64 .492 20
New York 60 67 .472 22
Florida 57 70 .449 25
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Milwaukee 77 53 .592 -
St Louis 67 61 .523 9
Cincinnati 62 65 .488 13i
Pittsburgh 60' 67 .472 15%
Chicago 56 72 .438 20
Houston 42 86 .328 34
West Division
W L Pet GB
Arizona 69 59 .539 -
San Francisco 68 60 .531 1
Colorado 61 68 .473 8
San Diego 59 70 .457 10
Los Angeles 58 69 .457 10
Monday
Milwaukee 8, Pittsburgh 1, 1st game
Washington 4, Arizona 1
Philadelphia 10, N.Y. Mets 0
Atlanta 3, Chicago Cubs 0
LA. Dodgers 2, St. Louis 1
Pittsburgh 9, Milwaukee 2, 2nd game
Colorado 9, Houston 5
Tuesday
Arizona at Washington, 7:05 p.m.
Milwaukee at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Philadelphia; 7:05 p.m.
Cincinnati at Florida, 7:10 p.m.
Atlanta at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 p.m.
LA. Dodgers at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m.
Houston at Colorado, 8:40 p.m.
San Diego at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.
Wednesday
Milwaukee (Marcum 11-3) at Pitts-
burgh (A.Thompson 0-0), 12:35 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Pelfrey 6-10) at Philadelphia
(K.Kendrick 7-5), 1:05 p.m.
LA. Dodgers (Kuroda 9-14) at St. Louis
(J.Garcia 10-6), 2:15 p.m.
Houston (W.Rodriguez 9-9) at Colo-
rado (A.Cook 3-7), 3:10 p.m.
SCincinnati (H.Bailey 7-5) at Florida
(Vazquez 7-11), 4:10 p.m., 1st game
Arizona (D.Hudson 12-9) at Washing-
ton (L.Hernandez 7-11), 7:05 p.m.
Cincinnati (Arroyo 7-10) at Florida
(Volstad 5-10), 7:40 p.m., 2nd game
Atlanta (D.Lowe 8-11) at Chicago Cubs
(R.Wells 4-4), 8:05 p.m.
San Diego (Stauffer 8-9) at San Fran-
cisco (Lincecum 11-10), 10:15 p.m.
Thursday
Atlanta at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m.
Arizona at Washington, 7:05 p.m.
Cincinnati at Florida, ppd., rain
Pittsburgh at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m.
Houston at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.
AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pet GB
New York 77 48 .616 -
Boston 77 50 .606 1
Tampa Bay 69 57 .548 8/
Toronto 65 62 .512 13
Baltimore 48 77 .384 29
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Detroit 69 58 .543 -
Cleveland 63 62 .504 5
Chicago 63 63 .500 5
Minnesota 55 72 .433 14
Kansas City 52 76 .406 17/
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 74 55 .574 -
Los Angeles 69 59 .539 4
Oakland 57 70 .449 16
Seattle 54 73 .425 19
Monday
Seattle 3, Cleveland'2
Detroit 5, Tampa Bay 2
Texas 4, Boston 0
Baltimore 4, Minnesota 1
Tuesday
Cleveland 7, Seattle 5, 1st game
Oakland at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
Seattle at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m., 2nd
game
Kansas City at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
Detroit at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m.
Boston at Texas, 8:05 p.m. '
Baltimore at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at L.A. Angels,
10:05 p.m.
Wednesday
Seattle (F.Hernandez 11-11) at Cleve-
land (Tomlin 12-6), 12:05 p.m.
Boston (Beckett 10-5) at Texas
(M.Harrison 10-8), 7:05 p.m.
Oakland (Cahill 9-12) at N.Y. Yankees
(Sabathia 17-7), 7:05 p.m.
Kansas City (Hochevar 8-10) at To-
ronto (R.Romero 12-9), 7:07 p.m.
Detroit (Scherzer 13-7) at Tampa Bay *
(W.Davis 8-7), 7:10 p.m.
Baltimore (Guthrie 5-16) at Minnesota
(Slowey 0-1), 8:10 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Z.Stewart 1-2) at
L.A. Angels (Weaver 14-6), 10:05 p.m.
Thursday
Oakland at N.Y. Yankees, 1:05 p.m.
Baltimore at Minnesota, 1:10 p.m.
Detroit at Tampa Bay, 1:10 p.m.
Kansas City at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
Boston at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
LITTLE LEAGUE W.S.
At South Williamnsport, Pa.
All Times EDT
UNITED STATES
NORTHWEST: Billings, Mont., 2-0;
WEST: Huntington Beach, Calif., 2-0;
ATLANTIC: Clinton County, Pa., 2-1;
SOUTHEAST: Warner Robins, Ga., 2-1;
NEW ENGLAND: Cumberland, R.L.,
1-2; MID-SOUTHWEST: Lafayette, La.,
1-2; GREAT LAKES: LaGrange, Ky., 1-2;
MIDWEST: Rapid City, S.D., 0-3.
INTERNATIONAL
LATIN AMERICA: Maracay, Venezuela,
2-0; MEXICO: Mexicali, 2-0; JAPAN:
Hamamatsu City, 2-1; CANADA: Lang-
ley, British Columbia, 2-1; MEA: Dhah-
ran, Saudi Arabia, 1-2; ASIA-PACIFIC:
Kaohsiung, Taiwan, 1-2; CARIBBEAN:
Oranjestad, Aruba, 1-2; EUROPE: Rot-
terdam, Netherlands, 0-3.


Consolation Rotterdam, Nether-
lands vs. Cumberland, R.I., 1 p.m.
Game 21 Langley, British Columbia
vs. Hamamatsu City, Japan, 4 p.m.
Game 22 Clinton County, Pa. vs.
Warner Robins, Ga., 8 p.m.
Thursday, Aug. 18
Mexicali, Mexico 3, Kaohsiung,
Taiwan 0
Billings, Mont 6, Rapid City, S.D. 4
Hamamatsu City, Japan 12, Oranjes-
tad, Aruba 1, 4 innings
Lafayette, La. 2, Warner Robins, Ga. 0
Friday, Aug. 19
Langley, British Columbia 6, Dhahran,
Saudi Arabia 5
Huntington Beach, Calif. 11, Cumber-
land, R.I. 0
LaGrange, Ky. 1, Clinton County, Pa. 0
Maracay, Venezuela 6, Rotterdam,
Netherlands 1
Saturday, Aug. 20
Kaohsiung, Taiwan 20, Oranjestad,
Aruba 3,o4 innings
| Warner Robins, Ga. 6, Rapid City,


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
New York Giants wide receiver Domenik Hixon, left, catches a
pass for a touchdown over Chicago Bears cornerback Corey
Graham (21) during the second quarter of an NFL preseason
football game Monday in East Rutherford, N.J.


S.D.3
Dhahran, Saudi Arabia 4, Rotterdam,
Netherlands 2
Clinton County, Pa. 2, Cumberland,
R.I.0
Sunday, Aug. 21
Maracay, Venezuela 8, Langley, Brit-
ish Columbia 0
Billings, Mont. 3, Lafayette, La. 1
Huntington Beach; Calif. 10, La-
Grange, Ky. 0,4 innings
Mexicali, Mexico 3, Hamamatsu City,
Japan 2, 7 innings
Monday, Aug.z22
Oranjestad, Aruba 5, Rapid City, S.D.
0, Rapid City eliminated
Langley, British Columbia 5, Kaohsi-
ung,.Taiwan 3, Kaohsiung eliminated
Warner Robins, Ga. 8, LaGrange, Ky.
5,9 innings, LaGrange eliminated
Hamamatsu City, Japan 13, Dhahran,
Saudi Arabia 4, Dhahran eliminated
Clinton County, Pa., 10, Lafayette, La.
0,-A innings, Lafayette eliminated
Tuesday, Aug.23
Cumberland, R.I. 8, Rotterdam,
Netherlands 7
Game 21 Langley, British Columbia
vs. Hamamatsu City, Japan, 4 p.m.
Game 22 Clinton County, Pa. vs..
Warner Robins, Ga., 8 p.m.
Wednesday, Aug. 24
Game 23 Maracay, Venezuela vs.
Mexicali, Mexico, 4 p.m.
Game 24 Billings, Mont. vs. Hun-
tington Beach, Calif., 8 p.m.
Thursday, Aug. 25
Game 25 Game 21 winner vs. Game
23 loser, 4 p.m.
Game 26 Game 22 winner vs. Game
24 loser, 8 p.m.
Friday, Aug. 26
Rain day, no games scheduled.
Saturday, Aug. 27
International championship Game
23 winner vs. Game 25 winner, Noon
U.S. championship, Game 24 winner
vs. Game 26 winner, 3 p.m.
Sunday, Aug.28
At Lamade Stadium
Third Place
International runner-up vs. U.S. run-
ner-up, 11 a.m.
World Championship
International champion vs. U.S.
champion, 3 p.m.


NFL PRESEASON


AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W LT Pct PF PA
Miami 2 0 0 1.000 48 33
New England 2 0 0 1.000 78 26
N.Y. Jets 1 1 0 .500 43 27
Buffalo 0 2 0 .000 13 34
South
W LT Pet PF PA
Houston 2 0 0 1.000 47 30
Jacksonville 1 1 0 .500 27 60
Tennessee 1 1 0 .500 30 20
Indianapolis 0 2 0 .000 13 49
North
W LT Pct PF PA
Baltimore 1 1 0 .500 37 26
Cleveland 1 1 0 .500 55 47
Pittsburgh 1 1 0 .500 31 30
Cincinnati 0 2 0 .000 10 61
West
W LT Pet PF PA
Denver 1 1 0 .500 47 34
San Diego 1 1 0 .500 37 31
Kansas City 0 2 0 .000 13 56
Oakland 0 2 0 .000 21 41


. NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W LT Pct PF PA
Washington 2 0 0 1.000 32 10
Dallas 1 1 0 .500 31 43
N.Y. Giants 1 1 0 .500 51 33
Philadelphia 1 1 0 .500 27 30
South
W L T Pet PF PA
Carolina 1 1 0 .500 30 30
New Orleans 1 1 0 .500 38 30
Tampa Bay 1 1 0 .500 39 31
Atlanta 0 2 0 .000 36 43
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Detroit 2 0 0 1.000 64 31
Chicago 1 1 0 .500 23 44
Green Bay 1 1 0 .500 45 47
Minnesota 1 1 0 .500 23 21
West
W LT Pet PF PA
St. Louis 2 0 0 1.000 50 26
Arizona 1 1 0 .500 44 46
San Francisco 1 1 0 .500 20 27
Seattle 1 1 0 .500 31 37
Thursday's Games
New England 31, Tampa Bay 14
Pittsburgh 24, Philadelphia 14
Friday's Games
Washington 16, Indianapolis 3
Miami 20, Carolina 10
Detroit 30, Cleveland 28
Baltimore 31, Kansas City 13
Green Bay 28, Arizona 20
Jacksonville 15, Atlanta 13
Saturday's Games
San Francisco 17, Oakland 3
St Louis 17, Tennessee 16
Houston 27, New Orleans 14
Denver 24, Buffalo 10
Minnesota 20, Seattle 7
Sunday's Games
N.Y. Jets 27, Cincinnati 7
San Diego 20, Dallas 7
Monday's Game
N.Y. Giants 41, Chicago 13
Thursday, Aug. 25
Carolina at Cincinnati, 7 p.m.
Cleveland at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m.
Washington at Baltimore, 8 p.m.
Friday, Aug.26
St. Louis at Kansas City, 8 p.m. *
Green Bay at Indianapolis, 8 p.m.
Saturday, Aug. 27
Jacksonville at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
N.Y. Jets at N.Y. Giants, 7 p.m.
Miami at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
Atlanta at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m.
Houston at San Francisco, 8 p.m.
Dallas at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Chicago at Tennessee, 8 p.m.
New England at Detroit, 8 p.m.
Seattle at Denver, 9 p.m.
San Diego at Arizona, 10 p.m.
Sunday, Aug.28
New Orleans at Oakland, 8 p.m.

PGA Tour FedExCup Leaders
By The Associated Press
Through Aug. 21
Rank Player PointsYTD Money


1. Nick Watney 1,906 $4,397,269
2. Steve Stricker 1,865 $3,730,309
3. Webb Simpson 1,861 $3,661,043
4. Luke Donald 1,856 $4,517,748
5. Keegan Bradley 1,621 $3,432,200
6. Phil Mickelson 1,601 $3,317,035
7. KJ. Choi 1,601 $3,768,242
8. Bubba Watson .1,577 $3,96,797
9. David Toms 1,538 $3,470,010
10. Gary Woodland 1,466 $2,840,349
11. Mark Wilson 1,461 $2,877,252
12. Matt Kuchar 1,407 $3,045,075
13. Adam Scott 1:332 $3,200,477
14. Jason Day 1,308 $3,109,087
15. Bill Haas 1,273 $2,453,777
16. Fredrik Jacobson1,235 $2,234,367
17. Martin Laird 1,234 $2,466,289
18. Brandt Snedekerl,227 $2,456,895
19. Dustin Johnson 1,191 $2,686,265
20. Hunter Mahan 1,186 $2,348,500
21. Charl Schwartzell,185 $2,490,958
22. Aaron Baddeley 1,181 $2,447,182
23. Rory Sabbatini 1,175 $2,286,175
24. Jonathan Byrd 1,165 $2,401,954
25. Jason Dufner 1,143 $2,543,060
26. Charles Howell 1111,137 $2,043,356
27. D.A. Points 1,055 $2,006,463
28. Rickie Fowler 1,038 $2,025,441
29. Spencer Levin 1,025 $1,944,929
30. Tommy Gainey 999 $1,902,831
31. Scott Stallings 992 $1,891,825
32. Zach Johnson 962 $1,714,006
33. Chris Kirk 957 $1,784,827
34. Steve'Marino 935 $1,821,556
35. Jhonattan Vegas 919 $1,644,718
36. Vijay Singh 903 $1,728,170
37. Ryan Palmer 902 $1,742,359
38. Ryan Moore 883 $1,649,573
39. Bo Van Pelt 881 $1,756,566
40. Lucas Glover 875 $1,626,527
41. Brendan Steele 826 $1,590,618
42. Brandt Jobe 803 $1,335,420
43. Y.E. Yang 799 $1,739,689
44. Justin Rose 796 $1,534,420
45. Robert Karlsson 789 $1,605,255
46. Brendon de Jonge784 $1,168,726
47. Kevin Na 778 $1,467,465
48. Kyle Stanley 761 $1;109,366
49. Charley Hoffman 746 $1,182,158
50. John Senden 732 $1,177,514
51. Sean O'Hair 724 $1,322,881
52. Pat Perez 716 $1,278,293
53. Robert Garrigus 702 $1,416,437
54. George McNeill 694 $1,376,693
55, Carl Pettersson 691 $1,156,448
56. Brian Gay 685 .$1,131,954
57. Brian Davis 685 $978,033
58. Robert Allenby 679 $1,233,781
59. Sergio Garcia 662 $1,275,909
60. Jim Furyk 661 $1,066,686
61. Harrison Frazar 660 $1,282,527
62. Andres Romero 651 $1,231,853
63; Jerry Kelly 651 $1,042,452
64. Cameron Tringale644 $1,174,723
65. Kris Blanks 641 $1,029,457
66. J.B. Holmes 640 $1,398,583
67. Blake Adams 616 $855,015
68. Jimmy Walker 615 $1,131,311
69. Jeff Overton 611 $1,129,552
70. John Rollins 608 $1,027,456
71. Kevin Streelman 600 $1,073,298
72. JJ. Henry 599 $837,097
73. Charlie Wi 591 $1,033,131
74. Chad Campbell 591 $912,829
75. Scott Verplank 588 $1,194,178
76. Chez Reavie 588 $1,040,267
77. Johnson Wagner 585 $1,133,569
78. Chris Couch 573 $913,416
79..Geoff Ogilvy 571 $1,101,527
80. Scott Piercy 571 $956,224
81. Davis Love III 557 $1,040,300
82. Stewart Cink 556 $969,162
83. Ricky Barnes 552 $911,263
84. Troy Matteson 542 $916,102
85. Ryuji Imada 529 $926,542
TOUR SCHWAB LEADERS
Champions Tour Charles Schwab Cup
Leaders
By The Associated Press
Through Aug. 21
Points Money
1. Tom Lehman 1,985 $1,636,609
2. Peter Senior 1,419 $1,004,229
3. Olin Browne 1,370 $1,045,328
4. John Cook 1,344 $1,322,547
5. Mark Calcavecchial,278 $994,141
6. Nick Price 1,181 $1,095,107
7. Russ Cochran 1,163 $1,005,355
8. Tom Watson 1,131 $741,075
a. Mark O'Meara 1,116 $913,894
10. Jeff Sluman 937 $1,043,785
11. Fred Couples 880 $522,032
12. David Eger 862 $831,725
13. Michael Allen 783 $758,585
14. Corey Pavin 772 $694,456
15. Mark Wiebe 721 $829,845
16. Hale Irwin 662 $545,526
17. Jay Haas 651 $771,242
18. John Huston 638 $551,551
19. Joey Sindelar 540 $525,509
20. Bernhard Langer 536 $501,461
21. Loren Roberts 501 $472,450
22. Kenny Perry 468 $476,651
23. David Frost 466 $621,672
24. Fred Funk 400 $494,758
25. Jay Don Blake 396 $540,319
26. Rod Spittle 374 $571,831
27. Joe Ozaki 341 $441,630
28. Tom Pernice, Jr. 335 $417,575
29. Chip Beck 323 $404,027
30. Eduardo Romero 304 $221,443
31. Hal Sutton 295 $392,700
32. Mark McNulty 281 $458,888
33. Steve Pate 279 $238,210
34. Kiyoshi Murota 272 $173,463
35. Bob Gilder 259 $371,512
36. Tommy Armour III 251 $311,720
37. Brad Bryant 249 $493,973
38. Mike Goodes 245 $434,738
39. Larry Mize 231 $361,950
40. Mark Brooks 211 $312,103
41. Lee Rinker 193 $220,986
42. Barry Lane 160 $84,654
43. Chien Soon Lu 158 $388,797
44. James Mason 154 $175,557
45. Jim Gallagher, Jr. 138 $201,734
46. Scott Hoch 135 $191,961
47. Keith Fergus 129 $299,580
48. Steve Lowery 110 $299,985
49. Jim Rutledge 104 $245,155
50. Ted Schulz 103 $301,016
51. Peter Fowler 92 $49,915-
52. Dan Forsman 89 $293,729
52. Bill Glasson 89 $240,247
54. Wayne Levi 78 $126,820
54. Ian Baker-Finch 78 $78,850
56. Tom Kite 70 $307,338
56. Robert Thompson 70 $131,660
58. Peter Jacobsen 60 $102,876
59. Bobby Clampett 59 $184,543
60. Bob Tway 43 $335,547
60. Gary Hallberg 43 $187,770
60. Sandy Lyle 43 $53,373
63. David Peoples 40 $163,656
LPGA MONEY LEADERS
Trn Money
1.Yani Tseng 14 $1,799,335
2. Cristie Kerr 14 $1,141,533


ii
AUTO RACING
4 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Truck Series,
pole qualifying for O'Reilly Auto
Parts 200, at Bristol, Tenn.
5p.m.,
SPEED NASCAR, Whelen Modi-
fied Series, at Bristol, Tenn.
7 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Truck Series,
O'Reilly Auto Parts 200, at Bristol,
Tenn.
CYCUNOG
3 p.m.
VERSUS USA Pro Challenge,
stage 2, Gunnison to Aspen, Colo.
GOLF
2 p.m.
TGC USGA, U.S. Amateur Cham-
pionship, round of 64 matches, at
Erin, Wis.
LITTLE LEAGUE BASEBALL
3 p.m.
ESPN World Series, double
elimination, Maracay, Venezuela
vs. Mexicali, Mexico, at South Wil-
liamsport, Pa.
7p.m.
ESPN World Series, double
elimination, Billings, Mont vs.
Huntington Beach, Calif., at South
Williamsport, Pa.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
6 p.m.
ESPN2 Boston at Texas
9 p.m.
ESPN2 Chicago White Sox at
LA. Angels
SOCCER
1:30 p.m.
FSN UEFA Champions League,
Twente vs. Benfica, at Lisbon,
Portugal
7p.m.
FSN UEFA Champions League,
Arsenal at Udinese (same-day tape)


3. Suzann Pettersen 12
4. Stacy Lewis 14
5. Ai Miyazato 12
6. Angela Stanford 14
7. Karrie Webb 14
8. I.K. Kim 12
9. Paula Creamer 14
10. Na Yeon Choi 13
11. Brittany Lincicome 14
12. Morgan Pressel 14
13. Jiyai Shin 13
14. Hee Kyung Sed 13
15. Maria Hjorth. 13
16. Amy Yang 14.
17. Mika Miyazato 13
18. Brittany Lang 14
19. Sandra Gal 12
20. Michelle Wie 13
21. Catriona Matthew 11
22. Sun Young Yoo 14
23. Sophie Gustafson 13
24. Inbee Park 10
25. Anna Nordqvist 13
26. Song-Hee Kim 14
27. Karen Stupples 14
28. Se Ri Pak 13
29. Meena Lee 12
30. Mindy Kim 11
M ii ,.FTVR Jd =s L


$1,102,980
$946,575
$736,176
$717,217
$703,687
$661,689
$660,533
$642,820
$632,037
$624,7;5
$547,857
$501,247
$494,321
$474,816
$444,932
$401,915
$388,922
$355,865
$348,757
$331,032
$330,939
$321,575
$320,172
$256,062
$249,412
$233,895
$222,021
$219,786


BASEBALL
American League
BOSTON RED SOX Assigned LHP
Randy Williams outright to Pawtucket
(IL).
BALTIMORE'ORIOLES Called up C
Jake Fox from Norfolk (IL).
CLEVELAND INDIANS Activated OF
Shelley Duncan from the family medi-
cal emergency list Optioned RHP Josh
Judy to Columbus (I).
OAKLAND ATHLETICS Called up
C Anthony Recker from Sacramento
(PCL). Transferred RHP Trystan Mag-
nuson to the 60-day DL.
TORONT9 BLUE JAYS Acquired
2B Kelly Johnson from Arizona for 2B
Aaron Hill and INF John McDonald.
Recalled C Brian Jeroloman from Las.
Vegas (PCL).
National League
ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS Trans-
ferred RHP Jason Marquis to the
60-day DL.
PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES Placed
LHP Cole Hamels on the 15-day DL;
retroactive to Aug. 13. Recalled INF/OF
Pete Orr from Lehigh Valley (IL).
PITTSBURGH PIRATES Actiated
RHP Ross Ohlendorf from the 60-day
DL. Designated LHP Joe Beimel for
assignment Purchased the contract
of RHP Mike Loree from Long Island
(Atlantic) and assigned him to Altoona
(EL).
SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS Assigned
LHP Jason Stevenson to Fresno (PCL).
American Association
GARY SOUTHSHORE RAILCATS Re-
leased OF Nate Bryan.
SHREVEPORT-BOSSIER CAPTAINS
Traded OF Bryan Sabatella to New
Jersey (Can-Am) for cash and a player
to be named.
ST. PAUL SAINTS Released OF
Brent Krause.
BASKETBALL
ACB League (Spain)
LUCENTUM ALICANTE Signed F
Kyle Singler.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
BALTIMORE RAVENS Agreed to
terms with DE Michael McAdoo.
CINCINNATI BENGALS Waived WR
Landon Cox, OT Andrew Gardner, WR
Bart Johnson, WR John Standeford and
RB Jonathan Williams.
CLEVELAND BROWNS Agreed to
terms with T Joe Thomas on a seven-
year contract.extension.
DALLAS COWBOYS Signed PK
Shayne Graham. Released LS Corey
Adams, WR James Cleveland and RB
Frank Warren.
JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS Signed RB
Albert Young. Waived-injured S Terrell
Whitehead.
MIAMI DOLPHINS Signed RB Larry
Johnson. Waived RB Kory Sheets.
MINNESOTA VIKINGS Signed RB
Caleb King. Waived OL Rod Huntley.
PITTSBURGH STEELERS Agreed to
terms with LB Lawrence Timmons on
a six-year contract. Waived G Nevin
McCaskill.
SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS Traded
S Taylor Mays to Cincinnati for an
undisclosed draft pick. Signed P Sam
Paulescu. Activated WR Dominique
Zeigler from the physically-unable-
to-perform list. Waived QB Jeremiah
Masoli and PK Fabrizio Scaccia.
HOCKEY
American Hockey League
CHARLOTTE CHECKERS Agreed to
terms with D Chris Murray.
GRAND RAPIDS GRIFFINS Named
John Bernal trainer, Amanda Gillard
ticket operations manager and Ashley
Binning and Zack Krywyj groups sales
account executives.
ECHL
ECHL Promoted Jeff Zavatsky to
director of hockey operations.
OLYMPICS
U.S. OLYMPIC COMMITTEE An-
nounced the retirement of director of
media services Bob Condron, effective
in January, 2012.
SOCCER
D.C. UNITED Signed D Brandon
McDonald.
COLLEGE
ALBANY Named Adam Barrett as
assistant women's basketball coach.
BAYLOR Announced RB Lache Sea-
strunk is transferring from Oregon.
CHOWAN Named Kenyan Weaks
men's assistant basketball coach.
DAVIDSON Named Nikki Lieb
women's assistant lacrosse coach.
HIGH POINT Promoted Sam Phipps
to director of facilities and operations.
PFEIFFER Named Sarah Denton
women's associate head soccer coach.
QUEENS, N.C. Named Melanie
Helterbran assistant softball coach.
RHODE ISLAND COLLEGE Named
Matt Lopes media relations assistant.


Bullpups

From Page 1B
That makes this week of
practice all the more vital
for Marianna.
"We have to try to have
four more good days this
week to get ready," Nolen
said. "We're looking for-
ward to the jamboree. It's
our first live scrimmage if
you want to say it. Maybe
that will give us a good test
and allow us to see where
we're at with other people.
I know our kids want some
other people to tackle."
The Bullpups return a
good deal of talent and ex-
perience at the skill posi-
tions, with running backs
Quattre Couch and Her-
man Williams returning af-
ter big seasons as seventh
graders, and 6 foot, 4 inch
Trey Clemens giving new
quarterback Anton Wil-
liams a big and athletic tar-
get out wide.
But things are less certain
on the offensive and de-
fensive lines, with Brandon
Boykin the only returning
starter.
Nolen said getting the
players up front up to speed
with the skill players is the
top priority for his team.
Guys like Herman and


Hornets

From Page 1B

The lack of numbers has
made practice more diffi-
cult, and Friday will be the
first time that Melvin and
his coaching staff will get.
to see the Hornets going
11 on 11 on either side of
the ball.
"We're just excited to get
11 out there at once and
get some film of it to see
where we're at before the
season gets started," the
coach said. "Any time you
can get a game, it's impor-
tant this time of year. We'll
see where we're at condi-
tion-wise, which is key
also."
Melvin said it's hard to
get a gauge on exactly what
kind of shape the players
are in until they play in
a real game, particularly
when it's necessary to not
overwork them in prac-
tice, as is the case for the
Hornets.
"You think they've run
enough, but then the lights
come on and the adrena-
line gets kicking, and you
find out where you're real-
ly at," he said. "I feel good
about it right.now. I think
we're ready to go, but we
really won't know until the
lights come on."
The Hornets figure to be
set at their skill positions,
with third-year starting
quarterback CJ Smith re-
turning, along .with play-
ers such as Jacquez Walker,
Josh Simmons, Prentice
Webb, Sheldon Vann, and
Clifford Canty all hav-
ing experience as varsity
players.
But Cottondale had to
replace four starting line-
men, and Melvin said that
he and his staff are still
looking to develop sub-
stitution patterns that al-
low the Hornets players to
conserve enough energy


Miami

From Page 1B


in the abdomen during a
domestic dispute in April,
and more recently revealed
he was diagnosed with bor-
derline personality disor-
der, which can stem from
fear of failure.
Aside from Marshall's
tribulations, the NFL lock-
out and the fruitless ne-
gotiations with Harbaugh
and Orton that diminished
the status of the incum-
bent coach and QB, the
Dolphins have had a de-
cent 2011.
They added a much-
needed breakaway threat
in fragile but speedy Reg-
gie Bush, upgraded at in-
side linebacker by acquir-
ing Kevin Burnett, and
landed a promising rookie
crop, including running
back Daniel Thomas and


Quattre and Trey and An-
ton have been with me and
been through the system,"
he said. "If I call some-
thing out, they know what
I'm talking about and they
can do it. With the younger
guys, we're trying to get
them on the same page.
The line is the big question
mark for us this year; the
skill players are not."
If the offensive line can
provide protection, the
Bullpups could have more
of an aerial attack this year
than in the past, Nolen said,
thanks to Williams' strong
arm and Clemens' size and
speed.
"Anton is looking pretty
good in practice. He comes
from a baseball back-
ground, and he's got a good
arm, so he can throw it a
little bit," he said. "Trey and
Alex Edwards out at receiv-
er can catch it a little bit; it's
just giving Anton that three
or four seconds he needs
to get his drops to hit his
receivers.
"If the line can hold up
and give him some time,
he has great accuracy and
throws, a pretty good ball.
It's a good spiral. We- can
run some play action stuff
this year and try to throw it
downfield some more."


to play both ways with
enough intensity.
"We're still trying to fig-
ure stuff out. With these
numbers, everyone is go-
ing to get in, so it's just
aboutA getting them in at
the right places at the right
times," the coach said.
"It's big for the coaches to
figure out the rotation we
want to use, and this game
is a great opportunity to
find that out."
The rotation on the of-
fensive line could be most
key, as the unit was the
strength for Cottondale
last season, but has a great
deal of question marks
heading into this season.
Guard Eli Jackson and
tackle Derrick Wilson are
the only returning varsity
offensive linemen, with
others like CJ Toole, Drake
Mayo, Brian Slesser, and
Evan Swoboda still looking
to solidify positions.'
Finding continuity and
chemistry up front will be
essential, as Melvin said a
big part of what he's look-
ing for Friday is his team's
ability to limit unforced
errors.
"Really, it's the mental as-
pect of it," he said. "I want
to see where we're at with
conditioning, but mentally
as well. You're looking at
silly turnovers, penalties,
that kind of stuff. That's
the kind of stuff we don't
want to see in this game.
As far as the plays and all
that, we've got all that stuff
in, so now we see if we can
execute them."
With the Sharks appear-
ing set for a good season
this year, the Hornets
should learn a lot about
themselves rather quickly.
"They should be pretty
sporty," Melvin said of PSJ.
"They've got some big kids
up front, and they've al-
ways got a lot of speed. It
should be a real good test
for us."


center Mike Pouncey. They
also signed veteran run-
ning back Larry Johnson,
hoping the 31-year-old can
provide some much-need-
ed depth.
Even in Miami, where it
has been 11 years since a
playoff victory and 27 years
since a Super Bowl berth,
the additions were enough
to inspire standard train-
ing-camp bravado.
"I think we're going to
have an opportunity to
contend for the whole
thing, the Super Bowl,"
linebacker Karlos Dansby
said. "And that's what you
play for."
The Dolphins will likely
go as far as a potentially
stout defense takes them.
Aside from Channing
Crowder, jettisoned in fa-
vor of Burnett, the unit that
ranked fourth in the NFL in
yards allowed per play last
year returns intact.


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


SPORTS


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24, 2011 3Br


Sports Briefs


High School Football
Pre-season jamborees take
place this week, with all four
Jackson County teams in action.
Sneads will play its jamboree
on Thursday in Chipley against
Chipley and Liberty County at
7p.m.
Graceville will travel to Boni-
fay on Friday to take on Hol-
mes County at 7 p.m., with the
junior varsity playing in the first
quarter.
Cottondale will go on the road
Friday to play Port St. Joe.
Marianna will host West
Florida Tech on Friday at 7 p.m.,
with the junior varsity playing
the first quarter.

Marianna Open House
There will be a Marianna
High School Open House on
Thursday at the MHS media
center at 6 p.m., with Mari-
anna varsity and junior varsity
football players, and varsity and
junior varsity cheerleaders to be
introduced.

Sneads Recreation
The next Sneads Recreation
football, soccer, and cheerlead-
ing sign-ups will be today from
5 p.m. to 6 p.m., and the last on
Saturday from 9:30 a.m. to 10:30
p.m.,
Saturday will be the last day
of registration for football, as


football practice is scheduled to
begin on Aug. 29.
Cost is $70 for football (ages 6
and up), $60 for soccer (ages 4
and'up), and $100 for cheerlead-
ing (ages 5 and up).
A birth certificate and photo is
needed for football on the day of
registration.

Travel Ball try-outs
The Panhandle Heat Gold 14U
and 12U travel softball team
will hold try-outs in Sneads on
Saturday at 9 a.m.
' For more information, call
850-559-8660.

MERE Soccer
The Marianna Recreation
Department will offer five soc-
cer leagues this fall for boys and
girls ages 5-18.
Registration will be held
through Friday from 8 a.m. to
4 p.m. at The Marianna Educa-
tional and Recreational Expo
(MERE) located at 3625 Caverns
Road in Marianna.
Fee is $30 for participants
who live inside the city limits
of Marianna, and $45 for those
outside.
Fee must be paid with a check
or money order. No cash will be
accepted.
Special registration will be
held Aug. 8 from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m.
All participants must bring copy


of berth certificate.
For more information, contact
the Marianna Recreation De-
partment at 482-6228.

Tailgate Party
Southern Community Fellow-
ships first "Tailgate Party" will
be held Sunday at 4300 Hwy.
231, with long-time Florida
State Seminoles defensive coor-
dinator Mickey Andrews as the
guest speaker.
There will be free food start-
ing at 5 p.m., and Cottondale
coaches, football players, cheer-
leaders, and band will be guests.
Call pastor Gary Martin at 850-
630-0488 for more information.

5K Run/Walk
, The Riverfest 5K Run/Walk
will be held in Chattahoochee
on Sept. 3 at 7 a.m. Central
Tine.
The race starts and ends at
the River Landing. Participants
will enjoy this scenic course
that takes them up to the Jim
Woodruff Dam and across the
Florida/Georgia state line.
Live radio coverage begins at
9 a.m., and top finishers will be
announced.
Trophies and age group me-
dallions will be given. Race day
registration starts at 6 a.m.
Register before Aug. 26 for
$20. After Aug. 26, the price-will


increase to $25.
Registration forms and online
sign up available at www.run-
ningmoms.org.

Alumni Football Game
There will be a full contact
alumni football league held this
winter.
The games are full pads with
officials, announcers, and video
crew, and is open to all former
high school football players 18
and older in the area.
Games will take place on
weekends from January
through March of 2012.
There must be at least 35
players to a team.
Those interested can sign up
at www.alumnifootballusa.com.

Speed, Agility, and
Conditioning Camp
Bionic Sports will hold a
Speed, Agility, and Condition-
ing camp on Tuesdays and
Thursday at Integras Therapy
& Wellness Center for youth
boys and girls ranging from
ages 9-17.
Cost is $40 a month, or $12
per week.
The camp will continue for
the entire summer, focusing on
becoming a better athlete.
Please call Eric Pender
for more information at
850-284-2368.


Marianna
Cross Country/Track
Current Marianna High School
students or incoming freshmen
interested in running on the
Marianna High School boys or
girls cross country or distance
track team need to contact
Coach Allan Gibson at 850
209-3403.
The team is practicing at 6
a.m. every morning at Marianna
High School.
Please contact coach Gibson
before you show up for your first
practice.

Marianna Youth Wrestling
Team Dynamic Youth Wres-
tling Team will continue practic-
ing on Tuesday and Thursday
nights at the wrestling room at
the old Marianna High School.
Practice will be from 6 p.m. to
8 p.m.
All kids in Jackson County
from ages 6 and up are welcome
, to join. For further information
please contact Marianna coach
Ron Thoreson at 272-0280.

Sports Items
Send all sports items to edito-
rial@jcfloridan.com, or fax them
to 850-482-4478. The mailing
address for the paper is Jackson
County Floridan P.O. Box .20
Marianna, FL 32447.


Sneads
From Page 1B

long as I can keep the tone
of our practices hard, we'll
be fine. We're working just
as hard as we ever have. But
confidence is a little scary
in my job. Pride comes be-
fore the fall, so we have to
remain humble and just
keep working like we have
been.
"You have to realize that
you may think you're bet-
ter than the opponent you
play today, but tomorrow
or the next day there could


be someone better than
you, do you have to keep
working. I don't want us to
feel like it will be a walk in
the park. I always feel like
we're not there yet."
The hard work paid off
during a terrific summer
for the Lady Pirates, who
took second place in their
division in the University of
Florida Team Canip in July.
that momentum has car-
ried over into fall practice,
Roberts said.
"Things are going spec-
tacular," she said. "The girls
are healthy, they're working
hard, they've got good atti-


tudes, and they're ready to
do whatever it takes to win
a bunch of games here. I'm
very happy about where
we are. We're in a good
place with some strong se-
niors and some very solid
juniors."
Roberts said she believed
a sophomore would also
be a big factor for the team
this year in 6-foot tall mid-
dle blocker Logan Neel.
"She is coming along re-
ally well," the coach said.
"With her height, she can
make a huge difference for
us."
Jackson was the breakout


star for the Lady Pirates last
season, and was named
the Most Valuable Player of
Sneads' conference at the
UF Team Camp.
While seniors sometimes
have trouble following up
big junior seasons with
equally good senior cam-
paigns, Roberts said she
didn't think that woula be
the case with Jackson.
"I expect her to have a
great senior year. She was
a huge part of our offense
last year, and she'll contin-
ue to be this year," she said.
"She's more mature, and I
think she's gotten better.


A lot of 'times you'll have a, because we only had one
little senioritis come into senior. I know from expe-,
play where they don't have rience that a team without
as good of a senior season seniors is likely to struggle.
as they had as juniors. But These seniors are mature.
I think she has improved, The maturation that hap-
and will be even better than pens from junior to senior
she was last year." year is incredible to me."
Jackson is one of five The Lady Pirates will be
Sneads seniors that will in a new district this year,
be the backbone of the with Vernon, Cottondale,
team, with their experience Altha, Graceville, Bethle-
and leadership critical to hem, and Wewahitchka
the Lady Pirates' success joining Sneads to form the
this season, according to new league, 'which does
Roberts. not have arch-nemesis
"It's huge," she said. Blountstown in it. Sneads
"That'swhatIwas surprised will open the season on
at the success last year Monday.


WEDNESDAY MORNING/ I AFTERNOON AUGUST 24, 2011
6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:0010:3011:0011:3012:0012:30 1:00 1:30 2:00 2:30 3:00 3:30 4:00 4:30 5:00 5:30
2 The Early Show (N) (in Stereo) 0 Griffith Family Fd Let's Make a Deal (N) The Price Is Right (N) News Young & Restless Bold The Talk (in Stereo) The Dr. Oz Show Oprah Winfrey News News News News
3 0 WTVY News 4 The Early Show (N) (in Stereo) B ULive Regis & Kelly The Price Is Right (N) Young & Restless Live at Bold The Talk (In Stereo) Let's Make a Deal (N) Rachael Ray 10 Oprah Winfrey News News
5 6 NewsChannel 7 Today Today Carrie Fisher; Mark Bittman. (N) (In Stereo) 10a Days of our Lives (N) News 7 at Noon Recheel Ray BB Millionaire Jeopardyl The Doctors BB Ellen DeGeneres News NBC News
8 9 News 13 This Morning Good Morning America (N) 1a Live Regis & Kelly The View (In Stereo) The Dr. Oz Show All My Children N0 One Life to Live BB General Hospital (N) Dr. Phil (In Stereo) Oprah Winfrey News ABC News
10 E Auto Tech Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Aqua Kids Funniest Home Videos Chris Smarter Smarter Judge B. Houewlves/NJ New Life Church Judge Mathis 1 Justice Justice Nate Berkus The People's Court Jdg Judy Jdg Judy
11g Arthur Martha Curious Cat In the Super DInosaur Sesame Street Sid "WordWrid Between Barney Arthur Clifford Martha SId Electric Cyberch'e lId Kratt WordGirl Cat In the Curious Dinosaur NewsHour
7 SHOW "BottleStock' ** (20068) Alan Rickman. Lonely Streef(2009, Comedy) Jay Moir. 'R' WI7dargeT** (2010) 'PQ-13' The RivarWhy'(2010) AmberHeard.'NR' TheRoad"*** (2009)Vlggo Mortensen. "The Freb'e"(2010) "The Twilght Saga: Eclpse
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19 ESPN SportsCenter 1E SportsCenter 10 SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportaCenter (N) (Live) Report Football Little League Baseball SportsCenter (N) (Live)
20 CSS Mayhem In the A.M. SportsNlte Football Battle Fast Paid Prog. Focused Makeover Lose30Lb SportsNIte Football College Football College Football College Football From Nov. 1,2008. SportsNIte (N) 10
21 DISN Little Agent Oso Mickey Pirates MIckey Mickey PhIneas Phinease Phlneas Phineas Good Good KlckIn'It Wizards Shake It Shake It Phlneas Good Good ANT Farm Shake it Wizards Phlneas Good
22 MAX (5:30) "Nanny McPhee Retums" 'CoIpanyBusiness"(1991) *B,g Stan' ** (2007) Rob SchneIder. "RtearcaF *, (2002) Chris Klein. "'victus**** (2009) Morgan Freeman. Crazy Hear'*** (2009) Jeff Bridges.'R' Te ThreeaMusketeern'(1993)
23 TNT Angel "Offspring" Charmed (in Stereo) Charmed 'House Call Supernatural 1E Supernatural 1E Las Vegas (in Stereo) Las Vegas "Heroes" Cold Case (in Stereo) The Closer 10 Bones (In Stereo) Bones (In Stereo) Bones (In Stereo)
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25 TWC Your Weather Today With Abrams and Bettes 10 Wake Up With At Day Planner a Storm Storm Cantors Cantore
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29 LIFE The Balancing Act (N) Reba Reba Will/Grace Will/Grace Chris Chris How I Met How I Met Desp.-Wives Grey's Anatomy 1B Grey's Anatomy 10 Cold Case Files BN Cold Case Files 10 Unsolved Mysteries Unsolved Mysteries
30 A&E Dog Dog Dog Dog CSI: Miami (in Stereo) The Sopranos 10 Criminal Minds The First 48 01 Storage Storage Dog Dog CSI: Miami (In Stereo) The Sopranos 10 Criminal Minds 0 The First 48 1M
32 SYFY Look Sexy RIchesl Ghost Hunters 10 Ghost Hunters 10 Ghost Hunters.[0 Ghost Hunters 10 Ghost Hunters o Ghost Hunters 1a Ghost Hunters 10 Ghost Hunters 1a Ghost Hunters BB Ghost Hunters 10 Ghost Hunters Se
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34 MTV AMTV: 10 on Top AMTV AMTV Fantasy Fantasy Fantasy Fantasy Jersey Shore 10 VMA's The Challenge: Rivals IParental Parental Parental Parental Parental Ext. Cribs Ext. Cribs '70s Show '70s Show '70s Show 1'70s Show
35 BET (5:00) BET Inspiration Chris Chris Bernie Bemie Bernie Bermie Jamle F. Jamle F. Jamle F. Jamle F. "How She Move'*** (2007, Drama) The Game he Game Chris Chris 106 & Park: BET's Top 10 Live Tika Sumpter.
36 TOON Bakugan Beyblade Pok6mon Sidekick Johnny T Johnny T Garfield Garfield Scooby Scooby Looney Tunes Tom & Jerry Garfield 2 Dogs Johnny T Sidekick Almost Adventure MAD Looney Squirrel |Johnny T
39 HIST Modem Marvels 10 Prophets of Doom RE Super City: New York Manhattan's evolution. Mega Disasters 11 Modem Marvels rM Prophets of Doom 10 Super City: New York Manhattan's evolution. Mega Disasters 10
40 TVLNDgreenic WEN HaIr All-Family Sanford Jeffersons GoodTIme Jeannie Jeannle [Cleveland DIvorced Gunsmoke 10 Gunsmoke 1 Bonanza Bonanza Bonanza Jeffersons Sanford & Son Sanford
43 CNN2 (5:00) Morning Express With Robin Meade HLN News HLN Special Report Prime News 10
45 CNN (5:00) American Morning (N) 9 MCNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) The Situation Room With Wolf BIltzer (N)
46 CW (5:00) The Dally Buzz 10 Steve Wilkos Show Browns IPayne Cosby Cosby TBA JCops TBA ITBA Steve Wilkos Show The Tyra Show B1 Lyrical yricsl '70s Show '70s Show King King
47 SPIKE Profits WEN Hair Hair Free Paid Prog. Auction Auction CSI: NY "Zoo York" CSI: Crime Scene CSI: Crime Scene CSI: Crime Scene CSI: Crime Scene Jail IB DEA (in Stereo) DEA A fugitive murder suspect. DEA (In Stereo)
49 HGTV Spaces Hidden Cash Cash Cash, Carl Cash, Carl Get It Sold Get It Sold Get It Sold Designed House Hunters Secrets Antonio D. Design D. Design Divine Candice Design Design Get It Sold Get It Sold First Place Firpt Place
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99 SPEED Monster Jam Trucker Trucker Pass Time Pass TIme Pass Time, My Ride Paid Prog. Paid Prog. NASCAR Racing: Sprint Cup: Pure Michigan 400. The 10 Dave Despain Record NASCAR Racing NASCAR Racing


WEDNESDAY EVENING / LATE NIGHT ., AUGUST 24,2011
6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:001 9:30 10:0010:3011:0011:3012:0012:30 1:00 1:3012:00 2:30 3:00 3:30 4:00 4:30 5:00 .5:30
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3 0 News Wheel Big Brother (In Stereo) Criminal Minds OB CSI: Crime Scene News Late Show Letterman Late Late Show/Craig Inside Ed. Up to the Minute (N) (In Stereo) CBS News WTVY News 4
5 News Wheel Minute to Win It 0 America's Got Talent Law & Order: SVU News Tonight Show w/Leno Late Night Carson Poker After Dark Extra (N) The Bankruptcy Hour ]Shepherd's Chapel Early Tdy NewsChannel 7 Today
8 ( News Ent Middle Family Family Happy Primetime Nightline News Nightline Jimmy KImmel Live Lopez Jim Success PaId Prog. Paid Prog. ABC World News Now (N) 10 Morning News 13 This Morning
10 ED Two Men Two Men Buried Treasure 0e House"Changes" News How I Met Law & Order: SVU Friends Friends King/Hill Scrubs Lewis and Jurnovoy The People's Court Paid Prog. |Pald Prog. Shepherd's Chapel Paid Prog. Outdoor
11 g NewsHour Dimension Eden at the End NOVA (in Stereo) Clearing the Smoke Charlie Rose (N) 0 S T. Smiley T. Smiley NOVA (in Stereo) Earth-Manual POV (In Stereo) BB Frontline (In Stereo) History Detectives Place Between
7 SHOW "Twil:Ecipse' Green Weeds NASCAR Penn Franchise NASCAR Franchise Green Mike Epps Presents: ClubNokia 'Jackass:TheMovie'(2002)'R' *Nobe/Son"(2007) Alan Rickman. R'' 'Prince & Me 2: RoyalWedding' IfsaFre
14 NICK Sponge. Sponge. My Wife My Wife Lopez Lopez '70s Show '70s Show My Wife My Wife My Wife IMy Wlfe My Wife My Wife My Wife My Wife My Wife My Wife IMyWife My Wife My Wife TBA Fam. Mat. Fam. Mat.
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17HBO Life "DateNighrt** (2010)a0 REAL Sports Gumbel True Blood "Run" LifeasWeKnowilt** (2010)'PG-13' "SeedofChucky'*h (2004) Tracy Morgan Backdrafr*** (1991,Action) Kurt Russell.'R'Z "Bushwhecked**
18 ESPN2 MLB Baseball: Boston Red Sox at Texas Rangers. Rangers Ballpark. MLB Baseball: Chicago While Sox at Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim. ESPN All-Access SportsNatlon KM MLB Baseball: White Sox at Angels SportsNation O Mike and Mike
19 ESPN (5:00) SportsCenter (N) Little League Baseball Baseball Tonight (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) Baseball NFL Live SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter 1 SportsCenter am SportsCenter BI SportsCenter BM
20 CSS College Football From Nov. 14, 2009. TBA Football SportsNIte (In Stereo) Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Pald Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Makeover Anxiety
21 DISN Vampire Vampire Good Shake It WIzards Random Fish Good Vampire Vampire Wizards Wizards Good Good ANT Farm Shake it Deck Deck Phineas Phineas Phineas Phineas Manny Little
22 MAX 3Musktrs Sexandtlhe.City2** (2010) Sarah Jessica Parker. 'StgStan"o*** (2007) Rob Schneider.'R' Chemistry Skin-Max "EdgeofDarkness'***l (2010)'R'B1B "GraceofMyHeart((1996)'R' 'Stargate**l (1994) KuntRussell.'PG-13'10
23 TNT Bones (In Stereo) |The Mentallst 10 iThe Mentallst S "The SourneSupremacy" (2004, Suspense) Leverage 10 CSI: NY (In Stereo) Franklin & Bash 0 Law & Order |Law & Order Law & Order_____ Angel "Quickening"


24 DISC Sons of Guns 1a


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


74B WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24, 2011


PEANUTS BY CHARLES SCHULTZ
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TO HAVE BREAKFAST.. I'LL DON'T START MOVING YOUR
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KIT'N' CARLYLE BY LARRY WRIGHT HERMAN BY JIM UNGER


"He says he leaves you everything
you left him ... 38 bucks."


NEA Crossword Puzzle


ACROSS 35 Chassis
37 Gummy
1 "Snow 39 Sherpa's.
White" sighting
dwarf 40 Octopus
6 Cotton pods defense


11 In large
supply
12 Having
greater
rainfall
13 Still
packaged
14 Battery
terminals
15 Air show
stunts
16 Bowser's
pal
17 Long
sentence
18 Jacuzzi
feature
19 Aberdeen
kids
23 Ounce
fraction
25 Puts down
derisively
26 Rx givers
29 Rustorpatin
31 Habit
32 Gourman-
dize
33 Landed
estate
34 Mantra
chants


41 Dune bug-
gies, briefly
45 Belly-flop
47 Go furtively
48 Canoe's
need
51 High-pH
solution
52 Pie crusts
53 Gassed up
54 Cays
55 Mountain
top
DOWN
1 Vietnam
capital
2 Distant
3 Fixed corn
4 Corporate
VIP
5 Urge
6, Stoop down
a 7 "Becket"
actor
8 British inc.
9 1865 yielder
10 Almost-
grads
11 Beach scav-
enger


Answer to Previous Puzzle
HU G ADE A3 PlSEOl
A Cr GENE F LIEsDa
FL AS a H lI Ro EIA t D
VTA C 0MA OCEANS
USE SAS

TSK TCMON JEAN
ESCAPE SEETO
AVA VOL
D OWNER INAND



12 Hang 36 Equally
around distant
16 Ladylike from the
18 Tokyo's limits ,
space pgm. 38 Union man
20 Prefix for 40 Currier's
dynamic partner
21 Marching 42 Wild ducks
band need 43 Car parker
22 Former JFK 44 Fishtail
arrivals 46 Troubles, to
24 City on the Hamlet
Tiber 47 Put-down
25 Obnoxious 48 Tire pres-
person sure meas.
26 Resist 49 Sighs
27 Not easy of relief
to find 50 Md. neigh-
28 Right bor
away 51 Pro Bowl
30 Wharf letters


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


8-24 2011 UFS, Dist. by Univ. Uclick for UFS



CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: J equals W
"G YMZ.P FGZGEF FGNSR ... GN GS'R
V BPVYYT FMMI FGNS, G YMZP
BPOPGZGEF GS, YGAP HPJPYR, RDVYY
GRYVEIR." FGEV FPBR LME

PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Life is a little like a message in a bottle, to be carried
by the winds and the tides." Gene Tierney

(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 8-24


Dear Annie: We live in a small rural area.
We love the community, school, church,
etc., but I am sad for my daughter.
"Tess" is a junior in high school. About
six months ago, one friend became angry
with her for some reason and managed
to get the rest of their group to ostracize
her, as well. It breaks my heart that Tess
no longer has.friends. She sits home
night after night. It also makes me angry
that one girl can have so much control
over other people. This is just like bully-
ing. What can I do?
HURTING FOR MY DAUGHTER

Dear Hurting: This is not "just like"
bullying. It absolutely is bullying. Some
of these things resolve themselves over
time, although six months is a long wait.
Did Tess do something for which an
apology would help? Could Tess meet
with the ringleader privately and come to
an understanding? If no reconciliation
is possible, please encourage Tess to find
new friends both in and out of school
- perhaps at church or through sports


Horoscope
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22) Because you can't
change a sensitive friend
into someone a bit tough-
er, remember to be tactful
when around him or her.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
If you try to take all of
.the credit for something
that you and several oth-
ers played a role in accom-
plishing, don't expect your
cohorts to have anything
favorable to say about you.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.22)
Just remember that your
friends have a right to ex-
press their own opinions.
You may not like it, but it's
their prerogative to think
for themselves.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-
Dec. 21) Be cautious in
your financial dealings.
Unless you'take the time to
think before you leap, you
could make mistakes.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) Do your best not
to get tied down working
with someone who doesn't
understand the value of
teamwork.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) All those distasteful
chores you've been shov-
ing under the rug might get
thrown at you.
PISCES (Feb.20-March20)
Avoid groups or cliques
that contain certain types
who think they are better
than everybody else.
ARIES (March 21-April
19) Allowing outsid-
ers to get involved in your
family affairs is asking
for trouble. Restrict your
communications.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
There is a good chance
you could let go and level a
few choice words on some-
one who has been bugging
you for far too long.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
The best way to remain
cautious with your finan-
cial affairs is not to go
window-shopping.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
If you and your special
someone are not satisfied
with the way the relation-
ship is going, spend some
time together sorting
things out.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
If co-workers are mak-
ing your day more difficult
than need be, you should
either speak up or be pre-
pared to cover up their
ineptness.


groups. She also can check kidshealth.
org to find better ways to cope. She
should not be moping around at home.
And if these "mean girls" are verbally
or physically nasty to Tess, you should
report it to the principal and make sure
they are held accountable.

Dear Annie: Here's my story about the
effectiveness of counseling. Whenimy
girls were young, my husband wore
cowboy boots. Every night when he came
home, he would yell, "Pull my boots!" It
was quite an ordeal to get them off, so
when the girls heard him coming, they
would retreat to their rooms and I was
.the one who got stuck. It was a real bone
of contention, and I went for counsel-
ing. The counselor had me try behavior
modification when I had pulled off his
boots a certain number of times, he was
supposed to do something nice for me.
Yeah, right. One day, I walked by a store
that sold Western gear and found a boot
puller. The problem was solved.
RAPID CITY, S.D.


Bridge
Bridge players can be careless' at times, not North 08-24-11
noticing the danger that exists. For example, in A K Q
today's deal, South is in three no-trump. How T72
should he plan the play after West leads the 7 2
heart six and East puts up the queen? 4 A Q 8 6 3
With two doubletons, North was wary of rais- 4 10 9 5 4
ing to three no-trump, but he knew that five West East
of a minor was unlikely to be a better contract
than three no-trump. South starts with six top 4 8 6 3 4 10 9 7 5 2
tricks: three spades, one heart (given trick one), V A 10 8 6 3 T Q 9 4
one diamond and one club. The extra tricks 4 7 5 2 K 4
can come from either minor. But which is the 7 2 K 8 3
right one to attack first? Trick one tells declarer
that West has the heart ace hovering over the South
king. If East gains the lead, he will push a heart 4 A J 4
through and West will run the suit. This will not V K J 5
matter if hearts are 4-4, but 5-3 is more likely. J 10 9
So South should try to keep East off the lead.
He should play a spade to dummy's queen, A Q
then run the club 10. *Dealer: South
Here the finesse works and declarer has nine
tricks. But even if the club finesse loses, West Vulnerable: North-South
might err by cashing the heart ace, hoping South West North East
South started with king-jack-doubleton. Or, at
the worst, West will shift to a diamond. Then 1 NT Pass 3 NT All pass
declarer should win with dummy's ace (neces-
sary if East has the singleton king), before con- Opening lead: V 6
tinuing diamonds if the king does not appear.


Annie's Mailbox







CLASSIFIED


www.JCFLORIDAN.com


Jackson County Floridan Wednesday, August 24, 2011- B
Jackson County, Floridan Wednesday, August 24, 2011 5 B


WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED




ARKETPLA


BY PHONE: (850) 526-3614 or (800) 779-2557 BY MAIL: WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE
BY FAX: (850) 779-2557 P.O., BOX 520, MARIANNA, FL 32447
ONLINE: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM IN PERSON: 4403 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA
Publication Policy Errors and Omissions: Advertisers should check their ad the first day. This publication shall not be liable for failure to publish an ad or for a typographic error or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the ad for the first day's
insertion. Adjustment for errors is limited to the cost of that portion of the ad wherein the error occurred. The advertiser agrees that the publisher shall not be liable for damages arising out of errors in advertisements beyond the amount paid for the space
actually occupied by that portion of the advertisement in which the error occurred, whether such error is due to negligence of the publisher's employees or otherwise and there shall be no liability for non-insertion of any advertisement beyond the amount paid for
such advertisement. Display Ads are not guaranteed position. All advertising is subject to approval. Right is reserved to edit, reject, cancel or classify all ads under the appropriate classification.

F da i cltleovi w cl i .co


, ANNOUNCEMENTS. PETS & ANIMALS (Ji "EMPLOYMENT


STORE LIQUIDATION & AUCTION
AUCTION SATURDAY @ 6:30 PM
OLD TOWN SQ. 3183 MAIN ST. COTTONDALE,
THURSDAY SATURDAY
4*-, FOR INFO 850-303-3023 4,4
AU LIC#AU667 AB LIC#2727


I Pay CASH for Diabetic test
strips. Up to $10 per box!
Most brands considered.
All boxes must be unopened
and unexpired.
Call Matt 334-392-0260

JACKSON COUNTY
FLORIDAN CLASSIFIED
LABOR DAY DEADLINES

FRIDAY 9/2/11
Deadline is Thursday
9/1/11 @ 11:00 AM
SUNDAY 9/4/11
Deadline is Thursday
9/1/11 @ 12 NOON
TUESDAY 9/6/11
Deadline is Thursday
.9/1/11 @ 1:30 PM









2831 Hawk St corner of Elms near Orange St
Sat. 27th. 7-? clothes, shoes, hats, sin. appl.
games, dishes, holiday decor, toy, misc.
Just In Rare Store Display of GWTW Dolls by
World Dolls, 6 Mahogany Dining chairs, excel.
cond. Vintage Barn Shutters, Framed Bear
Bryant Picture. Medford Antique Marketplace
3820 Ross Clark CR 702-7390.


(S)


FINANCIAL


4 MUST LIQUIDATE! 4I
Having to relocate. 51 residential rental
property available ALL inside circle
All prices NEG from $18k $85k.
Possible owner financing opportunity.
Call 334-258-5822 ,

M1 MERCHANDISE

WANTED/WILL BUY: OLD COINS, TOYS AND
COLLECTABLES CALL 850-693-0908

Wanted: Old Coins, Gold,
Diamonds, Guns, And Tools
West Main Jewelry & Loan 334-671-1440.

STOP GNAT, FLY, & MOSQUITO BITES!
Buy Swamp Gator All Natural
Insect Repellent
Family Safe-Use head to toe.
Available at The Home Depot
Two burial plots in Gardens of Memory
6200 Hwy 431 Dothan, AL.
"Valor" Lots 90-D- 3 and 4. Sell both for $2800.
2-lots at retail now selling for around $3800.
Call (404) 451-5449 or
email dml@numail.org if interested.


Trumpet 2001 Blessing Trumpet with case,
two mouthpieces, cleaning snake and cleaning
rod. Excellent condition, professionally serv-,
iced recently. Paid $1,500, asking only $850.
Call (912) 658-2692 for details.


AKC English Bulldog Beautiful AKC registered
english bulldog puppies for sale. Excellent ped-
igrees, show potential, outstanding temper-
ment and well socialized. Serious inquiries on-
ly, please. 334-572-4292
AKC German Shepherd Puppies Beautiful, en-
ergetic; large bone, 4 males, 1 female. Born 15
June, first shots from vet. Parents on site. $325
each. Call 334-393-9363.
FREE TO GOOD HOME: Male Bull Mastiff puppy,
4 months old. 850-272-1065
T Select Puppies ON SALE! T
Morkies $200, Older Chorkies $50,
Hairless Chinese Crested. Yorkies.
Yorkie-Poos $200.-$300. Shih-A-Poos
Malti-Poos $250. Pek-A-Poos $250. Pom FM
$250, & Yorkie/Pom $200 C all 334-718-4886
Yorshire puppies tiny, males $700., females
$800. tails docked & declawed, S/W, Call Diane
334-585-0911
( FARMERS MARK


FRESH
GREEN
PEANUTS
850-352-2199
OR 850-352-4423













Plenty of Sheed Fresh Peas,
Butterbeans, New Potatoes,
All Farm Fresh!
220 W. Hwy 52 Malvern
* 334-793-6690 *
U-PICK PEAS: 6 miles N of Grand Ridge, or 2.1
miles S of Dellwood on Hwy 69. $6/per 5 gal.
bucket, Field opens at 6:30am till 6:30 pm,
7 ays/wk. Both dark & white peas.


Jr Large rolls of Hay for Sale
SDaytime 334-585-3039,
after 5pm & weekends
334-585-5418
IT'S AS EASY AS 1 2 3
1. CALL 2. PLACE YOUR AD 3. GET RESULTS
Wednesday, August 24, 2011








THE SUDOKU G9ME WITH 9 KICKV
J HOW TO PLAY,
Fill in the 9x9grid with the missing
numbers so that each column, row and
3x3 box contains the digits 1- 9 only once.
There is only one correct solution
for each puzzle.
GET MORE WASABI
PUZZLES ONLINE]
ARCHIVES AND MORE GREAT GAMESAT
BOXERJAM.COM


I 1 II El N -


* .


3/1.5 brick home for rent, 1 country acre near
Cottondale, $650, also 4/2 in Alford, 2 car ga-
rage $800 Both require deposit, lease & refer-


I


ences. 850-579-4317/866-1965
COMPANY DRIVERS 632 Chapelwood,Dothan 4 BR, 2 BA, Kit.
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY!!! w/refrig, stove, micro, dishwasher, DR, LR FPL.
nEEUDEU IMME I IL I... Ref, $825 mo. Security deposit $800 & lease re-
(DEDICATED RUNS) quired. Outside shed. Avail 8/15. 334-333-7777
Ex e l , Austin Tyler & Associates *
Excellent Benefit Package Quality Homes & Apartments
$.37pe Ml e ,l 850- 526-3355 4-
$.37 per Mile "Property Management Is Our ONLY Business"
Fortune 500 Customer Beautiful, stylish, newly remodeled brick home
Consistent Year Round Work for rent. 2 BR/1 BA. Quiet/safe neighborhood.
Weekly Home Time Nice size yard. Brick storage building on prop-
Weekly ome C r ime erty. $650/month. Contact 478-508-9502.
Class-A CDL required ,MOBILEMEFr. RENT
Call (866) 359-5399
10' 16x80 3/2, 2.5 acres, $575. mo. $500. dep.
4 month lease req. All Appliances. includes
water, septic, weekly trash, monthly pest and
lawn maintenance. 850-499-3717 Leave mess.
2 & 3 bedroom mobile Homes in Cottondale.
$500 and up. H20, garbage, sewer included.
http:// www.charloscountry living. com.
850-258-4868/209-8847
-GENER;ALEMPL OYMENT 2 & 3BR 2BA Mobile Homes in Cottondale no
pets, Central Heat & Air $400-$450 850-258-
1594 leave message
BfAM1Y 0L ISA 22&3BRMH's in
DISTRIBUTION CENTER Marianna & Sneads (850)209-8595.
MARIANNA, FLORIDA 2BR 1BA House for rent 2988 Pierce St.
No pets. $400. mo 850-482-3352/209-5983
o rin Fullrime 3/2 $595 Quiet, well maintained MH Park,
Now m Water/sewer/ garbage/ lawn included.
W a7re u se n s Other rentals available starting @ $395
1st, 2nd, and 3rd Shifts 4 Joyce Riley RE 850-209-7825 4-
3/2 DW in Malone, CH/A, No pets, security
Competitive Pay and neg., Section 8 ok. 850-594-9991 or 850-693-
Benefits Package! 6075
3/2 DW, w/jacuzzi, dishwasher, stove, fridge,
CH/A, in Marianna, Available 9/1/11
Apply at Family Dollar Distribution Center H20/septic/iawn/ pest inc $700 + dep 850-
3949 Family Dollar Parkway, 209-1027
Marianna, Florida 32448 For Rent Greenwood, Marianna, & Cottondale,
starting @ $375/mo. Water/sewage/garbage/
Must be 18 Years Old lawn maint. included. 850-593-4700
Equal Opportunity Employer Rent to Own: 2 & 3BR Mobile Homes.
Drug Free Workplace Lot rent included. Also available,
--s- 1 & 2BR Apts & Houses. For details
)4850-557-3432 or 850-814-6515 4
SSRON Small Quiet Family Oriented Park- 2BR MH for Rent
includes water, garbage, lawn care, No Pets 850-592-
SCHOOLS__ _&_IlNlTRUlC[TION T8129

Get a Quality Education for a J A TATEFOR
New Career! Programs
FORTIS offered in Healthcare, BUIESPOET
HVAC and Electrical Trades.U N DO W E
Call Fortis College Today! DO YOU NEED TO DOWNSIZE
S888-202-4813. YOUR RENT & OFFICE SPACE?
COLIIEGr. For consumer information 960 sq ft Completely renovated,
www.Fortis.edu 4 offices ,1 reception,1 breakroom,
2 bathrooms, Off street parking lot 2846-B
SSouth Green Street Marianna. Less than
RESIDE$1.00 per sq ft per month.
EAL ESTATE F ENTCall 850-326-0097 for info.
APARTMENS NIRII S -HE \- ',RESIDENTIAL-
1/1 Apartment for Rent. For info call 850-579- EAL ESTATE FORi,
8895 .RSLA- D IME
BiLot in Greenwood, FL We have a beautiful 5
acre lot for sale on Whispering Pines Circle in
HOUSESUNFURISH-Greenwood, FL. The property has big trees and
plenty of building sites. We have adjacent
2BR/1BA $300 + $200 dep. Rail Road St. C'dale acreage avail. Price just reduced!
3BR/ 1BA $500 + $400 dep. Faney St. G'dale $29,000, Call: 859-536-2663.
No Pets (850) 352-4222 C SI D
3BR/1.5BA Brick Home, Malone, New Carpet, ADVERTISIG
Stove, Refrigerator, Storage Shed,CH/A Your source for selling and buying!
-No Pets $650/ Mo + dep. Call 850-569-2475


TD


000



0 0





2008 BLOCKDOT, INC.-WWWBLCKDTCM


2008 BLOCKOOT, INC. WWW.BLOCKDOT.COM


Tuesday's
WASABI SOLUTION


BE SURE TO VISIT OUR
NEWEST GAME SITE


KEWLBOX.COM


Find jobs


fast and


easy!


JACKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN
jcfloridan.com


monster
FIND LOCAL JOBS AT: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM/JOBS,


0 PLACE AN AD -


I - -


I


r-


m I


I


I mm I


]@I


-(4


)I








6 B Wednesday, August 24, 2011 Jackson County Floridan


CLASSIFIEDS


www.ICFLORIDAN.com


HOMS FR SLE OAT CMPRS&-RAELTRILR-CMPRS& RAELTRILR


$109,900-MLS# 244224- 4BR, 2BA brick home
with garage. Just 3 miles from downtown
Marianna, Fl. It's a nice country home with a
large covered front porch, updated flooring
and interior doors and the hall bath is
updated with tile and new fixtures.
Great workshop that is insulated and wired
for electric and other covered storage space.
850-624-8877 sylvila9gcrealty.net



LAKE EUFAULA LOTS, 3 Contiguous Lake
front Lots. Pricing from $70K, 404-213-5754
www.keelproperties.com


3BR IBA split plan, MH FOR SALE: 2004 South-
ern Energy, 14x70, well insulated. (2) 8x10
raised porches and skirting incl. $14,000 FIRM.
850-482-3524/272-2725

RECREATION


Honda '01 250 4-wheeler with reverse, new
tires, excellent condition $1400. 334-677-7748.

MoeA a N8w i-0rme,9 Checa nit the C(laifiedl


'07 18ft. Suntracker party barge with cover
40hp Mercury, 4-stroke big foot, TrailStar
single axle trailer, uesed very little, exc. cond.
$11,000 229-768-2058.
2 JET SKIES 2003 on dbl trailer seat look
recovered and look great! matching blue
$3600. for both. 334-806-9920.
Bass Tracker 96' pan fish 16 40hp, mercury an-
chors, $4200. OBO 334-648-0139.
Bayline 89' Cabin Cruiser, GPS tracking
system, marine radio, frig, potty & sink,
bridge pumps blower, works well
$4900.334-726-0546
Cobia 74 15' boat fiberglass with 48 hp,
Johnson motor & trailer, good condition $1400.
334-677-7748
RHINO 2008, 18FT- 90 HP Suzuki, 55 LB
Minnkota, Aluminum Trailer, Humminbird
Depth Finder,-on Board Charger, Binini top,
$14,700 334-798-4175
Seacraft, '89,20 ft- Center
console, '95 225HP Johnson,
dual axle trailer w/brakes.
TT GPS-VHF $4950.
.,- 334-696-5505 4-

BUY IT!


SLL ITI


FIND IT!


2002 Winnebago Adventurer 35', 1 superslide
& 1 back bedroom slide, generator, water heat-
er, dual roof air,awning, exterior entertainment
center, rear view monitor system & automatic
hydraulic leveling jacks. 18k mi tires in good
condition recently rotated. Average retail price
per NADA bluebook $50K,low retail $42K. Ask-
ing $35,000, OBO, MUST SELL! 334-790-6758
COUGAR TRAVEL TRAILER
2004-30 foot,
big rear window,
living/dining slide, excel-
lent condition, new tires,
must see to appreciate,
$16,500 OBO, 334-687-6863, 334-695-2161
Dutchman '06 Denali 30ft, sleeps 8, double
slide, bunk house, shelter kept, great shape,
MUST SELL! $18,500. Call 334-790-9730
Dutchmen 40 ft. Travel Trailer
Ne '06, 38B-DSL, Sleeps 8, Has 2
I slideouts. Loaded, Like New.
$17,995. Call 334-406-4555 "

FLEETWOOD 2005 Prowler AX6, 5th wheel, 36
ft, 4 slides, large shower, 30/50AMP. $20,000
OB0 Call 334-695-4995,334-687-7862.

IT'S AS EASY
AS 1 -2-3
1 CAn 9 PLACE YOUnR An GET RESUIITS


Gulfstream '06 Conquest
30' Pull Behind Camper
With large slide. Excellent
Condition, 4 new tires.
Sleeps 6-8. CH&A, Full
kitchen, full bath, outside
shower. $7500 FIRM 850-693-1618



Dixie RV SuperStores
FL's Newest RV Dealer
NOW OPEN!!!
*Store Hours*
Monday-Saturday
8:00am-6;00pm
21 Acres / 30 Brands New and Pre-Owned
Newmar Keystone Heartland Jayco
Fleetwood m Prime Time Coachmen
m Forest River
Service Department
Parts and Acces. Store
RV Collision Center
Located off 1-10 Exit 70 / SR285
328 Green Acres Dr.
De Funiak Springs, FL 32435
Sales and Service: 850-951-1000
www.dixierv.com DO 12756


BUSINESSES
.& SERVICES


Concrete Masonry,

Concrete, Concrete
Texturing and Demo Work.
Free Estimates 150 miles radius from
Dothan ,AI 334-447-7853 4


CHIPOLA PROPANE GAS COMPANY
Locally Owned & Operated Since 1961
Old Coltondale Rd Marianna 526-2651 Sye` rPa
Hwy.90East-Sneads-5934070 Ga Needs.
Hwy. 20 West Blountstown 6744040 or Lease.



Bestway Portable Buildings
Largest Manufacturer of Portable
Buildings in North Florida
We have over 80
a different sizes.
You can choose
color and style.
Built on site
l Mention this ad and
receive an Extra Window
Free with the purchase
of a building!
3614 fwy 90 1 Marianna 850-482-8682



GMEN'S FURNITURE & APPLIANCES
Large Selection of
cahA r Lift Chair Recliners


M ms .f ( M 526-1549





Grader Pan Excavator
Dump Truck Bulldozer


I


Demolition Grading Site Prep
* Debris Removal Retention Ponds Leveling
* Top Soil Fill Dirt Gravel Land Clearing






For General House or
Office Cleaning
Call Debra
Free Estimates References Available
850-526-2336
AUO TV EOS SERVICE


Cobb Fi
and Tire
"Not Just A F
NOW LOCATED al
to BETTER S
Luke Shores, Owner




i -= .-


ront End
s Service
ront End Shop"
t TWO LOCATIONS
SERVE YOU...
2984 Dekle Street
Marlanna, FL 32448
850-526-4706
Coar i r l47 Lafayette St
Marlanna, FL 32448
850-482-2028
Hours of Operation:
Monday-Friday 7:teoM 5:00ps
We Appreciate Your Businessll


JEM ISON HEATING
JEMIVII& 'COOLING
24 HOURS 7 DAYS A WEEK SERVICE
SALES INSTALLS DUCT CLEANING


B &L Well and Pump, LLC.
Bill Johnson Jr.
Slate L L '2t14
(850)569-2535 (850)557-2572 cell
Bascom, FL


L
'I


Jackson county -
Vault & Monuments


MONUMENTS GRANITE MARBLE.
LOT RERSTORAONW & DESKf.V
Quality Service at Affordable Prices
Lw i, M,, .o 850-482-5041


STA T FAHENRY K WILLIAMS
5 TATE FA RM CPCU CLU ChFC, Agent







"Beautification of Your Home"
Carpentry/Painting Installations
Furniture Repair & Refinishing
General Repairs Insured




CUstOml Tile & Flooring, LLC

Natural Stone Ceramic Porcelain
Custom Showers Hardwood Laminate & More
No Job toe Large or Small! Licensed & Insured
(850) 693-,1423 or (850) 209-8099
C=]LEANING & HOUSEKE,. EPINGII 1[


DESHAZO'S
AUTO SERVICE
Come See Us For All Your Car & Truck Mechanical Needsl
mOwner: Phillip DeShazo We
850-482-3196 Appreiate
2807 Jefearson Street. Your Business!
Marianne. FL 324460 YourUS

RONNIE COLEY
Oc :(850) 4824043
ToioF.a(866)5873673
CHIPOLA FORD Clu(850) 272-2791
4242 LAFAYETTE ST wwW.C"1nI'OLAFO t.C(om

MAMAYai




011111M ` 85) 42-23


ALLA'TBETCiEDour
Limousine & Taxi Service
AU CARS 'Qolp wI oss anWf curr TV
FOR DRIVER A PASSENGER SKURIFYI gs
____ SERvING JACK&O%, WS IN, HOLMES 3S

SERVICES..... ,.


Sandys


Alterations Repair -mobroiaery Long Am Quilting
Hand Crafted Totes, Bogs, Quilts, Etc.
Pickup and Delivery Available
sewontheao4uSyvahoo.com


OuldoaMorris, CRS
Broker/Owner
(850) 526-2891
4630 Hwy 90, Marianna
tES (850) 482-2613
S C21Sunnsoaol.com
Sunny South properties ...nnysO propEfes.m
FOR ALL YOTUR REAL ESTATE NEEDS


ALTHA FARMERS
COOPERATIVE, INC
Altha Blountstown Marianna
come see Manager, Jeremy Branch and Staff for
Fertilizer Feed Seed Chemicals
Peanut Buying Point
2s Penn. Avenue Marlanna, PL
850-482-2416

Jackson County ,

Lumber and
BulddlPng .Sply ox90
on "Wan Zr o4091 Larayettest.
MorIon Pits, Manager Office: (850)526-5125
Fax: (050)526-7647
Cell: (850)718-3038


Haircuts -Color
Foil H lighlights
Perms ~-Waxing
STaTnning Beds
KRISTI WILKES KIM MATTHEWS
JULIE EOENFIFLD AMY ANDERSON



Personal Touc"f,
Computer Repair
A+ AND NETWORK+ CERTIFIED
FREE PICKUP, DELIVERY, AND SET UP
WITHIN THE CITY LIMITS MARIANNAl
RICHARD REGISTER 850-557-6061


CRAIG BARD
4 2rtrfh AY Sehs CrAnsCOtnt
O0c(850) 482-4043
OILnFREE (866) 587-3673
CHIPOLA FORD CuN(850) 57-.3444
4242 LAFAYETTE ST www.ctItPOuFroRDA.coS

JOHN BRYAN
siles Represenwain
0O (860)482.4043
Tol FRt (866) 587-3673
CHIPOLA FORD c (80so) 730876
4242 LAFAYETTE ST www.ctIioroIAF).coM

JOHN ALLEN
Or (850) 482-4043
FAx (850),482-S2,46
TouiFPn (866) 687-3673
CHIPOLA FORD Rt08S)5 262806
4242 LAFAYETTE ST WWWnIwIIItLAFOIRanooNt

IT'S AS EASY AS I 2 3
1. CALL 2. PLACE YOUR AD 3. GET RESULTS


GEORGE'S &More nfo
Auto
Glass Tinting Commercial
Residential
2847 S. Jefferson St., Marianna
482-6542





I BUY OLD GUNS!

(850) 263-2701










)RONEY SMITH OE1
REALTORm- SM&OperateH
4630 Hwy 90 Marianna, FL 32446
(850) 526-2891
Cell (850) 209-8039
debbieroneysmlth@embarqmTl.com
www.forgoetenceastlfe.com/debbieroneysmith


V "From Your Mind
1Divinz 2zaign

3 n L faet.50-526-4454
n 4461-C Jackson St. Marlanna
I r .divinedesignsandprinting.comrn






Cl 850-482-3425
INSURANCE linda.pforte.bxrs@
d___ er_ a statefarm.com





Sal o" color ct perin
4482 lafoyel4e SI, Mariann, FL Hedquaters II
(Winn Dixie Shopping CIrn) Downlown Malone, FL
(85C) 482- STY s (7895) (850) 569-2055


THE FITNESS CENTER
of MARIANNA
"Focusing on your Fitness
4966 E. Hwy. 90 Marianna, FL 32446
850-526-2466 =4=



Clay O'Neal's s
LandClearing, Inc. u
950-762-9408402 5W
Cell 850-832-5055 A



Bob Pforte Motors, Inc.
4214 Lafayette Street .
Marianna, Florida 32446
(850) 482-4601 '"
(800) 483-1440 -
www.bobpfortedodge.com *|iiii|1


() (850)I8240A3
66Eoil FI (866) 87-3671
CHIPOLA FORD (,, 90s12097001
4242 LAFAYE''TE ST Ln" n" ". c''O(o1no.1t1


850-762-8666
850-899-3259


IVMC JJV VIIJ:%A LA VI1 V%Q. _% __ 1 ; L L Cvu nmu i.u i cUI


I 1


I


0~~~ij


&CP










CFLORIDAN


Dolphin LX 04' by National 36ft workhorse
chassis GM8100 gas engine, 20900K miles, 6
new tires, all new brakes assembly. $66,500.
334-794-3085 or 334-701-5700
M Trail Lite 2006 R-VISION
26 ft., fully loaded,
bought new, 13K miles
$49,995 334-616-6508
Winnebago 02' 37 ft. with slide, AC&H leveling
jacks, back up camera, 2-TV's, auto-recliner
queen sofa, king dome satellite, con. micro-
wave ovens, full awnings $44,900.
334-792-0854 or 334-792-3805


YAMAHA '05 FX 1100 Waverunner, 3 seater,
with cover, with trailer, garage kept $5,000
334-687-0218, 70,6-575-3760

TRANSPORTATION


1999 Jeep Wrangler Excellent condition and
very well maintained. Many new and rebuilt
parts and systems. Higher milage but mostly
due to towing. Call for details. $7,200. 334-894-
5042 or cell 334-389-0056
ANTIQUE & CLASSIC VEICLE


1970 Chewolet Chevelle Big Block SS, red with
white stripes, Price $5,700, use e-mail for pic-
erut s towneay6@msn com / 239-963-2619


Plymouth '64 Valiant Station Wagon, red &
white trim. V-8 engine, auto trans $1000.OBO
Used in a movie. 334-522-3014. Runs good!!


CHEVY '96 S-10 Pick-up, 2.2 liter, 4 cly.,
selling for parts $850 334-689-9183


2007 Volkswagon Beetle 45,524 miles. One
owner. Pastel green with cream interior. Cus-
tom floormats for driver and passenger side.
Heated leather seats, cruise control, CD player,
sunroof, power locks and windows. Auxiliary
port for MP3/IPod. Great condition, regularly
serviced. Excellent gas mileage and fun to
drive. $14,500 or best offer. Please call 334-806-
6742 or e-mail lorimcarroll@yahoo.com to see
this great car.
a BMW '01 3251 LOADED,
only 113K. 4-door, power
everything, 5-speed, clean
title. leather-seats, power
sunroof, wood grain interi-
or, 6 CD changer, radio/cassette player, excel-
lent condition, premium sound system, excel-
lent gas mileage (only about 90 dollars per
month!!) extremely clean and very well taken
car. Must See $8000. Call TODAY 334-763-0146
Buick'00 Century
"7= i! Custom, V-6, automatic,
loaded, 110,000 miles,
nrew tires, clean, $3995.
334-790-7959.
M Buick '89 Park Ave
Classic Beauty.
Car restorer's dream!
Runs, needs motor mounts
Tan Ext. $700 334-718-6698 Leave message
Chevrolet '00 C5 Corvette Coupe, Black with
black leather interior, spoiler, ground effects,
automatic, 65K miles, 229-524-2955
Chevrolet '07 Corvette
Twin Turbo, FAST FAST
FAST! $32,999. 2180 Mont-
gomery Hwy. Call 334-
671-7720 or 718-2121.
U Chevrolet '81 Corvette
Automatic 350 (Silver). Will
sell as is for $4,700. OBO
334-774-1915

Chevy 81' Corvette* Red, Auto, Mirrored Tops,
52K mi. New Tires, Calipers, Brakes & Shocks.
Garage kept. $12,500. OBO 334-596-2376
Chrysler '06 Town & Country LTD Excellent
Condition, 74K miles, Nagivation, DVD, Original
Owner $15,500 850-482-3441
Hyundai 06' Elentra tan in color, 101K miles, 4-
cyl. automatic, AC, pwr options, crusie,
AM/FM/CD, $6500. OBO 334-389-3071


Desk: Black metal office $25. Standard size.
850-394-8044 or 850-482-4691


DECLASSIFIED


DO YOU KNOW ANYONE WITH BAD CREDIT?
I can get U Riding Today
Repos, Slow Credit, Past Bankruptcy OK!
$0 Down/1st Payment, Tax, Tag & Title
Push, Pull or Drag, Will Trade anything!
Warranty On Every Vehicle Sold!
$100 Referrals! Call Steve 800-809-4716
.W- Ford '01 Mustang
$4999.00.
Lot's of custom.2180
Montgomery Hwy.
Call 334-671-7720 or
718-2121.

Ford '95 Mustang GT Convertible- white with
leather interior, 200k mile runs great, needs
paint, $4,300. OBO Call 334-774-0451
1-Owner


GMC '99 Sonoma SLS
extra cab, new tires,
automatic, 4 cylinder,
57,000 miles, excellent,
$5795. 334-790-7959.


GUARANTEED FINANCING!
CSI AUTO SALES
2180 MONTGOMERY HWY.
CALL: JAMES 334-718-2121.
nt. Honda '07 Accord low
mileage 4-door. silver in
color 29,300 miles. 4-cyl.
auto trans. power win-
dows, door locks, side mir-
rors, cruise control, Michelin tires, ext. gas mil.
regular maintance at Jim Skinner Honda
$15,300. 334-803-1322. or e-mail sdykesnal@ya
hoo.com '
Honda '92, 4-door, $1695. 334-793-2142.
Jeep '98 Cherokee- silver, awesome condition,
runs great, and cold AC, Priced to Sell!
$1,600. OBO Call 334-635-7960
Saturn 05' VUE-SUV silver, 124K mi. 4-cyl. auto-
matic, AC, power options, AM/FM/CD, $5500
OBO 334-389-3071.
Saturn 08' Aura V6 Sand Color with Tan Cloth
Interior. Only 11,800 miles and under factory
warranty up to 36,000 miles. Car is an automat-
ic, power doors and locks, keyless entry, cruise
control, auxiliary port for an iPod or mp3 play-
er, XM satellite radio, and equipped with on
star. Asking $17,000 Call 334-618-2407


Toyota '06 Hybrid Prius 3, silver in color, 4-
door, 1-owner, 47K miles, 44mpg: Excellent
condition $16,200. 334-774-2216.
Toyota '07 Corolla LE- good condition, great
gas mileage, tan, approx. 81k miles, $11,000.
Call 251-300-1338
Toyota '10 Corolla LE- Owner Must Sell!
Gray, 3-warranty, 7k miles, loaded, cloth
interior, like new condition.
$15,000. Call 334-347-6396 or 334-300-3412

USED CARS FOR SALE
Most Need Repair
Ford '01 Escort ZxZ -
94k miles, 5 speed manual $2,900.
Volvo '91 240-
ingnition problems $500.
Pontiac '93 Grand AM
124k miles, 4cyl. Auto $1,995.
Ford '02 Taurus Wagon.
80k miles $2,995.
Ford '94 F150 XLT
4x4 Ext Cab, Transmission slipping $1,500.
Call 334-693-5159 or 334-618-5828



Harley Davidson '02 Sportster 1200 Custom
11k miles, Chromed Out, $5500. Call 334-691-
3468 or 334-701-3855
M Harley Davidson '91
Sturgis Classic $7999.00.
2180 Montgomery Hwy.
Call 334-671-7720 or
718-2121.



Suzuki '07 250 cc Cruiser great beginners bike.
New full windshield, black, runs great. $2500
850-526-4645


Louis Vuitton Purse (Replica) new
condition,$20 334-389-6069


Desk: Wood (dark) Roll-top computer desk $75. Luggage, Leopard Print, 1 large, 1 medium, nice
Good condition. 850-394-8044 or 850-482-4691 I condition, $20 each 850-526-3426


Entertainment Center: Solid red oak. $500 or
best offer. 850-209-8038
Gym System: Weider 2100 Exercizer in top con-
dition with some weights. $225 850-482-4120.
TV: 32 inch. Great condition $150. 850-209-8038
33 1/ speed Record collection $50
850-693-1600
3' Santa, lights up $10
3' Snowman, lights up $10 850-573-4990
Baby Dolls 5 collectibles very nice $65. for all.
334-803-5033.
Bowl and Pitcher, with gold trim, beautiful, $25
850-526-3426
Childs Recliner, red $45. Little Tykes Sandbox
$30. Call 334-803-5033
Childs Train Table.
47.5" wide, 31.5" deep, 17" tall. $25.00
Call: 334-618-0973 before 8 p.m.
Dining Room Table w/7 chairs $150
850-693-1600
Dining Table with 5 Chairs and Leaf.
ROUND. $125.00.
Call: 334-618-0973 before 8 p.m.
Dooney & Bourke & Louis Vuitton Wristlets -
Authentic, new condition,$30-$35,334-389-6069
Dooney & Burke Purses, authentic $40 and up,
brand new, 334-803-5033
Dresser with mirror, medium color wood, 8
drawers, $25 850-482-7888
Dryer, Maytag Performance, Electric 220 volt,
$125 850-482-3267
End Table. Glass Top;
One Drawer. $15.00
Call: 334-618-097,3 before 8 p.m.
Fiberoptic/lighted Poincetta $12 850-573-
4990
Hope Chest solid wood hope chest, $40, 334-
803-5033
JVC Hard Drive- video camera/DVD burner with
case $225. Call 334-803-5033


Masonic Ring, size 10, 10k gold, serious inqui-
ries only. $250 FIRM 850-592-4109
MJ Hummel 123 boy with backpack, $75.
334-806-4830
MJ Hummel Honor Student $60, 334-806-4830
Nike Football Cleats, almost new, size 8 $20
850-482-8700
Porch Rockers (2), wood, painted white,
$25 each 850-526-3426
Rims/Tires for Chevy Silverado.
6 Lug. Set of 4 w/center caps & Lug Nuts.
Tires have less than 10% tread. $175 OBO.
Call: 334-718-3194 before 7p.m.
Screens, (4) brand new, 29.5 x 26.5 $5 each
850-594-1024
Screens, (5) used.for manufactured homes $1
each. Window $5 Bathroom $5 850-594-1024
Sheepskin Rug, large, creme color $75
850-526-3426
SHOES: Nike Bk & White sz 11 $20, Nike Camo
Air sz 12 $25 Dockers sz 10V2 $25 850-482-5557.
Shutters,(2 sets) new, bordeaux color,
58.5 x 14.5, $43 each set 850-594-1024
Stereo Cabinet, 3'x16"x14", glass front & top
$10 850-573-4990
Treadmill, almost new $100. 60" Oak Rnd Table,
Excellent Condition, 4 Lg bxs of new fabric, $15
ea or $50 for all. Call 850-352-4112
Trundle Bunk Beds, ample storage, heavy duty,
place for computer/tv (2) $300 ea. 850-482-6463
Violin 23" Student Violin with bow, chin guard
and case $65, Call 850 592-8769
WCW 3 piece set DVD $35 850-482-5557.
Wheel Barrow, new tube in tire $15
4' Level w/measure on side $5 850-573-4990
Wicker Chaise with fan back, natural color, $75
850-526-3426
Your Baby Can Read Program complete set in-
cluding Spanish, NEW, $75. 334-803-5033.
IT'S AS EASY AS 1 2 3
1. CALL 2. PLACE YOUR AD 3. GET RESULTS


Jackson County Floridan Wednesday, August 24, 2011- B


Harley Davidson '95 Heritage SoftTail this bike
is exc. cond. & has less 18K miles.Vance &
Hines long shots, luggage rack, rear foot
boards, light visors, black in color, new wind-
shield & front tire & service manual, has al-
ways been garage kept & well maintained
$7,000. 334-347-4595. 334-447-3091


Harley Davidson XL 1200 Low This is a Like
New Harley with only 4,556 miles. Accessories
include chrome forward controls, Screaming
Eagle stage 1 breather kit, Vance Hines fuel
pack electronic fuel control, 2 inch Rush Pipes
for nice deep roar. Harley short sissy bar. Adult
rider since new, never dropped. Color is Blue
and chrome. Call Greg at 334-701-3039. $6.500


Kawasaki '08 Vulcan 900,
white and gold. Approx 5K
mi. FLAWLESS. $5695
334-797-0987

Kawasaki '09 KXF250
Motor by BPM, 2 brothers
performance pipe. Very
fast bike for the motor-


.U I. VVI a UWIIIZI lII


a l ll lIu. l 1


www.J .com


- .- .. . .-- --- - -d


crossing extremist
334-726-3842
Yamaha Roadster: Beautiful pearl white 2008
Yamaha Roadstar 1700. This motorcycle is ga-
rage kept, is in excellent condition, and runs
and drives like a dream. I have added too many
options to list. The price is way less than is ow-
ed but I will pay the shortage to release the ti-
tle to the buyer. I just needto get rid of the
payment. Loan value at the local credit union is
$7,300. 334-347-5953 or 334-248-1275.


Honda 1962 C102 super
-, cub 50. 4k miles, Black &
white, good condition,
electric start 3 speed,
V M$2,500. Firm. Call noon (M-
F) 334-347-9002


2003 Nissan Pathfinder SE: Tan, 3.5L, V6, 110K
miles, Cruise control, Power locks/windows,
CD/cassette player, Tinted windows, Rear car-
go cover, Very Clean! $8,900, Call 334-702-7790.
Chevrolet '98 Suburban Less than 10K mi. on
new GMC motor. Motor under factory warran-
ty. 4 new Michelin tires. Vehicle is in above
average condition.-Tow Package included.
$5,800 334-897-3288


[U Chevrolet '00 Silverado
LS Z71 ext cab, 4-door,
4x4, Red, 138K miles, all
power, 5000 miles on
tires, tow package, Must
see to appreciate. $9500.
334-791-2781 or 334-677-3050
Dodge 03' 2500 pick up long wheel base, reg.
cab, heavy duty, towing package, good condi-
tion 26K miles. $11,000. 334-791-2322
FARM EQUIPMENT: '05 Amadas 4 row peanut
combine, picked about 1200 ac. very good
cond.'$46,500 KMC 4 row peanut shaker, good
cond. $6500. 4 334-403-0251 or 334-403-0249
Ford '02 F150 Harley
Davisdon Clean Truck,
$13,999. 2180
Montgomery Hwy. Call
334-671-7720 or 718-2121.

Ford 250 '07 black In color, 2-wheel drive
168K miles, navigation system, new tires,
very well Maintained, back up camera, tow
pack, elec seats, cold AC $ 16,900.
334-333-6669

FORD '89 F150.4wh, 4x4
Auto, $4,600 or reasonable
offer. Call 229-334-8520.


GMC '89 3500 Diesel-
Excellent work truck, long
wheel base, orange,
rebuilt engine,
$1,500. Quick Sell
Call 334-791-9099
GMC "98 1500 3-door, loaded, 132K miles, $3400.
OBO 334-691-7111 or 334-798-1768.
HONDA '08 RIDGELINE RTL- white with tan
leather interior, sunroof and satellite radio,
new michelin tires, and only 32k miles.
$27,500. Call Scott 334-685-1770
International Tractor F1466 145HP diesel,
red in color $5500. OBO 334-898-7995 or
305-343-9790 (2761 Coffee Springs Rd. 36318)

Isuzu 200126' Box Truck -
19000gv, extra clean, no CDL Required.
$18,500. Call 334-299-0300.

TRACTOR '08-Massey Ferguson, 33HP, 200
Hours, like new, one owner, LOADED!!
$25,000 OBO 334-687-3173,334-695-1802
TRACTOR IH1440 Combine,
Field Ready, Grain Head and Corn
Head. $7,000. 850-415-0438


Nissan '00 Quest, 120K mi. Clean interior, Good
Condition $5900 334-677-7321
Pontiac '03 Montana Van: Perfect for family or
business. 48,700 miles. Rebuilt Alabama title.
Looks great and runs great! Automatic seats,
windows. Extended version seats 7 with 4
captians seats with bench in back. Air controls
in back. Gray cloth interior. $6000 Call 334-701-
8862 or 334-796-6729.



WE PAY CaSH

FOR JUNK CARS!!!!!!
334-818-1274




Q ~Call for Top Price for
Junk Vehicles

I also sell used parts
24 HOUR TOWING 4 334-792-8664 (

CALL TODAY FOR YOUR TOWING NEEDS



AUTO BODY & RECYCLING
PAYING TOP DOLLAR FOR JUNK CARS
Contat Jason Harger at 334-791-2624

SA D.J.EFRT-ISEE IEN
THE CLASSIFI EDS


dC3w


NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE
OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice
is August 17, 2011.
Attorneys for Personal Representatives:
Stuart E. Goldberg
Fla. Bar No. 0365971
Amy Mason Collins
Fla. Bar No. 0044582
Law Offices of Stuart E. Goldberg, P.L. Post
Office Box 12458 Tallahassee, Florida 32317
Telephone: (850)222-4000
Facsimile:(850)942-6400
Personal Representative:
Larry P. Register
5355 Tewkesbury Trace
Tallahassee, Florida 32309 L


Gaurenteed highest prices m f.
or unwanted veMcals & funin if
Tide orno Title24hrsaday, alslopal
fee. 334-596-0154 or

Got a Clunker
SWe'll b your Junker!
We buy wrecked cars W
and Farm Equip. at a
fair and honest price!
Average $ paid $225.
CALL 334-702-4323 D011208


Si PAYTOPD, "W
n DAY-34-7 .: GT334-


fWE PAY CaSH

FOR JUNK CARS!!!!!

334-818-1274 D012226



CLASSIFIED


WORK!!






LF15397
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO: 11-192 PR
DIVISION: PROBATE
IN RE: ESTATE OF FREDERICK G. COMPAGNI,
SR. a/k/a Frederick George Compagni, Sr.
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of FREDERICK
G. COMPAGNI, SR deceased, whose date of
death was May 27,2011; is pending in the Cir-
cuit Court for Jackson County, Florida, Probate
Division; File Number 11-192- PR; the address
of which is P.O. Box 510, Marianna, Florida
32447. The name and address of the personal
repsentative and the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons, who have claims or demands against de-
cedent's estate, including unmatured, contin-
gent or unliquidated claims, and who have
been served a copy of this notice, must file
their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER
OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR
THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERV-
ICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons who have claims or demands against
the decedent's estate, including unmatured,
contingent or unliquidated claims must file
their claims with this court WITHIN THREE (3)
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE
OF DEATH IS BARRED.
THE DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NO-
TICE IS August 17,2011.

Attorney for Personal Representative
Stewart M. McGough, Esq.
Scolaro, Shulman, Cohen, Fetter & Burstein,
P.C. 507 Plum Street, Suite 300
Syracuse, New York 13202
315-471-8111
Florida Bar No. 0308285
Personal Representative:
Richard A. Compagni
939 State Route 90
Cortland, New York 113045
LF15403
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NUMBER: 11-202-PR
IN RE: ESTATE OFHERMON L. REGISTER,
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Herman L.
Register, deceased, whose date of death was
June 22, 2011, is pending in the Circuit Court for
Jackson County, Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is Jackson County Court-
house, Post Office Drawer 510, Marianna, FL
32447. The names and addresses of the person-
al representative and the personal representa-
tive's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this notice is re-
quired to be served must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE
OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands against de-
cedent's estate must file their claims with this
court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.

ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERI-
ODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE
FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.


Adeis or CO STUF for^ FRE byvstn w~ rdncm. e iefrdtis






-18B WEDNESDAY. August 24, 2011


PAID ADVERTISEMENT j


PAYING CASH FOR ALL COINS


PRE-1970


&


CURRENCY


INDIAN CENT
UP TO $500*


3 CENT PIECE
UP TO $2,500*


SHIELD NICKEL
UP TO $4,000*


SEATED LIBERTY DIME
UP TO $6,500*


KENNEDY HALF DOLLAR
UP TO 8X FACE VALUE*


1797 $1
UP TO $200,000*


WHEAT BACK CENT
UP TO $1,500*


BUFFALO NICKEL
UP TO $1,800*


CAPPED BUST HALF DIME
UP TO $10,000*


STANDING LIBERTY QUARTER
UP TO $4,400*


BARBER HALF DOLLAR
UP TO $6,750*


1798 $5
UP TO $125,000*


r--- ~- -


BRAIDED HAIR LARGE CENT
UP TO $3,800*


JEFFERSON "WAR" NICKEL
UP TO $2,000*


BARBER DIME
UP TO $2,800*


BARBER QUARTER
UP TO $3,200*


PEACE DOLLAR
UP TO $3,000*


DRAPED BUST HALF CENT
UP TO $5,000*


T7-.. --.."^'-* ~FWt W ~ ^pHf


'yr j


2 CENT PIECE
UP TO $2,000.*


LIBERTY "V" NICKEL
UP TO $2,,800*


MERCURY DIME
UP TO $3,600*


WALKING LIBERTY HALF DOLLAR
UP TO $4,700*


MORGAN SILVER DOLLAR
UP TO $100,000*


1832 CLASSIC HALF CENT
UP TO $80,000*


*T.his amount depends, vpon rarity, condition, and what collecto'a'~,~ling to pay


WE HAVE UNCOVERED SOME
OF THE RAREST NOTES IN
UNITED STATES HISTORY!

BRING IN YOUR OLD BANK
NOTES TO FIND OUT IF YOU
HAVE A HIDDEN GEMI


MODA -SAURA



FARFEL NN& UIE


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN + www.jcfloridan.com



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