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Jackson County Floridan
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028304/00634
 Material Information
Title: Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title: Sunday Floridan
Portion of title: Floridan
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Jackson County Floridan
Publisher: Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Marianna Fla
Publication Date: 8/10/2011
Frequency: daily (except saturday and monday)[<1979-1995>]
weekly[ former 1934-<1955>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates: 30.776389 x -85.238056 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note: "Independent."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID: UF00028304:00634
 Related Items
Preceded by: Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by: Marianna Floridan

Full Text


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Short-handed Hornets

focus on conditioning to

have a successful season.

See more on page lB.


A AMedia Gened NAewspaper Vol. 88 No. 153


City pursues health department building

i ...... ,, ] Officials want to expand health and rehab center


BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com

The city of Marianna wants to take
over the space now occupied by the
Jackson County Health Department
once the new health building is
completed off Caverns Road on the
outskirts of town.
Jackson County Health Depart-
ment Director William Long said the
move should take place late this year,
possibly by the end of October.
The city wants to raze the old
health building on 4th Street, which
is well over 50 years old.
In its' place, Marianna wants to
expand the city-owned Marianna


Health and Rehabilitation Center,
which abuts the health department
property.
Marianna City Manager Jim Dean
spoke to Jackson County Commis-
sioners Tuesday about a possible
deal. The county did not commit to
the idea, and many details are left
to work out if the county eventually
agrees.
For instance, the city could either
take ownership of the property or
enter a long-term lease with the
county to use it.
Dean said more space is needed
for two reasons; the' city wants to
build a larger physical therapy space
and to offer more private rooms in


the facility.
Most area nursing homes and
other facilities like Health and Re-
hab have few private rooms; Dean
counted about 20 in all at other
places in Jackson County, and 20 at
Health and Rehab. He said about 20
more families have asked for private
rooms and that the wait time is, on
average, four to six months.
"There is a great demand for pri-
vate rooms; people are leaving (the
community) so they can have pri-
vate rooms somewhere else," Dean
said. "If we can provide them, this
enhances the economic impact of
See BUILDING, Page 7A


PROVIDING AID


Helping



homeless



veterans

LocalVFW

lending a hand
From staff reports
When they found out some military
veterans were living in two homeless
encampments near Marianna, mem-
bers of the Veterans of Foreign Wars Post
12046 decided to embark upon an out-
reach campaign to help them.
Post member Thomas Bower said he
found out about the encampments near
Interstate 10 and U.S. 90 only recently,
from a fellowVFW member, and that the
organization quickly stepped up to lend
a hand.
Post Commander Tommy Layton is
also helping lead the effort to assist in a
variety of ways.
Bower said the outreach plan is still
being put together and will be a work in
progress for quite some time.
But Bower said the Post hopes to pro-
vide things like blankets, food and rain
gear to veterans in need, or steer them
to shelter if they're ready to get back on a
more traditional life track. Veterans who
are homeless by choice will be respect-
ed, Bower said, and the available help
will be given them in whatever form
they need.
.The Post is also taking on what may be
some more difficult tasks, like helping
vets re-establish documentation they
may have misplaced or discarded in
their homeless years and/or in times of
emotional distress. Social Security cards
See VETERANS, Page 7A


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Tommy Layton (front), Tom Bower (center) and Ernest McNeil talk about efforts by
Veterans of Foreign Wars Ted Walt Post 12046 to help homeless veterans in Jackson
County.


Center Stage

Alabama adds

new bingo

machines
BY MATT ELOFSON
Media General News Service
HOUSTON COUNTY, Ala.,-- A state
police investigation recently found the
Center Stage Alabama development in
violation of state gambling laws.
According to a letter sent to the devel-
opment, which was released by Attor-
ney General Luther Strange's Office, the
machines at Center Stage Alabama met
the definition of illegal gambling or slot
machines as defined in Alabama law.
Center Stage Alabama, formerly
known as Country Crossing, opened on
July 1 after being closed since January
2010.
In the letter dated July 28, which was
signed by both Attorney General Luther
Strange and Houston County District
Attorney Doug Valeska, Center Stage
Alabama was asked to cease and desist
the illegal activity.
The letter also said the .machines
don't play the traditional game of bingo
as defined by Alabama Supreme Court's
ruling Barber v. Cornerstone Commu-
nity Outreach. As a result the letter said
the machines are unlawful gambling
devices or slot machines, and are sub-
ject to seizure.
Frank Wendt, president of the Hous-
ton Economic Development Associa-
tion (HEDA), said officials with HEDA
have been in "constant" communica-
tion with officials at the local and state
level.
"We've told them we will comply with
every single point in the letter," Wendt
said. "We feel like there's a way we can
work through all of this and come to
some kind of resolution."
The letter also said the development
is in violation of Amendment 569 of
the Alabama Constitution. The lettered
questioned how investors expect to
make a return on their money when,
See BINGO, Page 7A


County recycling


program is downsized ..


From staff reports
Budget cuts over a five-year period have
reduced Jackson County's state recycling.
grant to the point the county has down-
sized the award-winning program.
The department will now only take
items three days a week instead of five.
Drop-off will be from 8 a.m. until 2 p.m.
on Tuesday, Wednesdays and Thursdays.
The recycling center accepts white goods,
electronics, household hazardous waste,
aluminum, and documents to be shred-
ded. The center's regular five-day-a-week


operating hours will not change, but
workers will only accept recyclables dur-
ing the above days and hours.
The Jackson County Recycling facility
is located in Marianna'sIndustrial Park at
3530 Wiley Drive.
Officials with the department said it has
seen a 75 percent reduction in the state's
Solid Waste Grant program for small
counties over the last five years.
Additionally, Jackson County Com-
missioners cut the Business Manager
See PROGRAM, Page 7A


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Warehouse Manager Eddie Maybon dumps a load of cardboard into a bundling machine at the
Jackson County Recycling Department Tuesday.


) CLASSIFIEDS...6-8B ) ENTERTAINMENT...5B


) LOCAL...3A


) OBITUARIES...7A


S)OPINION...4A


) SPORTS...1-4B


) TV LISTINGS...4B


This Newspaper *
Is Printed On
Recycled Newsprint




7 65161 80050 9
7 511800 9


CRAHAL huck Anderson Greg Anderson Gus Parmer

Chevrolet-Buick-Cadillac-Nissan -.4;- .
..
SERVICE TEAM "- '
4204 Lafayette St. Marianna, FL. '
(8fi5r' 18 0) 4 '-"9 Service Manager Body Shop Manager Parts Manager
i7k ) r F


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Vigie Ambay and Tammy Helms help the Rev. Williams Walker
during a physical therapy session at Marianna Health and
Rehabilitation on Tuesday.


Follow us




Facebook Twitter


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


WeQWiteV (OMI4ak


High 970
Low 74


Tomorrow
Scattered Storms.


High- 950
Low 750


Saturday
Isolated Storms.


9i High 950
V, Low 76'

Friday
Hot & Humid.


' Low -740

Sunday
Partly Cloudy.


TIDES ULTRA VIOLET INDEX
Panama City Low 7:03 PM High 8:01 AM
Apalachicola Low 7:29 AM High 5:00 AM 0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8-10 Very High, 11+
Port St. Joe Low 6:29 PM High -7:52AM 1 ,3 gj i
Destin Low 7:40 PM High 8:25 AM


Pensacola Low -

RIVER READINGS
Woodruff
Blountstown
Marianna
Caryville


8:14 PM H

Reading
39.09 ft.
0.70 ft.
4.90 ft.
1.44 ft.


igh


8:38 AM


Flood Stage
66.0 ft.
15.0 ft.
19.0 ft.
12.0 ft.


THE SUN AND MOON


Sunrise
Sunset
Moonrise
Moonset


6:04 AM
7:28 PM
5:18 AM
3:58 AM (Thu)


Aug. Aug. Aug. Sept.
13 21 29 4


FLORIDA'S BEIIL

PANHANDLE JC

MEDIA PARTNERS WJAQ 100o.9

ISTSLYEiED


JACKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN
Publisher Valeria Roberts
vroberts@jcfloridan.com



Circulation Manager Dena.Oberski
doberski@jcfloridan.com




-I

CONTACT US
Telephone: (850) 526-3614
FAX: (850)482-4478 ,
Email: editorial@jcfloridan.com
Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447
Street Address:
4403 Constitution Lane
Marianna, FL 32446
Office Hours:
Weekdays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

MISS YOUR PAPER?
You should receive your newspaper no later
than 6 a.m. If it does not arrive, call Circula-
tion between 6 a.m. and noon, Tuesday to
Friday, and 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. on Sunday. The
Jackson County Floridan (USPS 271-840)
is published Tuesday though Friday and
Sunday mornings. Periodical postage paid
at Marianna, FL.

SUBSCRIPTION RATES
SHome delivery: $11.23 per month; $32.83
for three months; $62.05 for six months;
and $123.45 for one year. All prices include
applicable state and local taxes. Mail
subscriptions must be paid in advance. Mail
subscriptions are: $46.12 for three months;
$92.24 for six months; and $184.47 for one
year.

ADVERTISING
The advertiser agrees that the publisher
shall not be liable for damages arising
. out of errors and advertisements beyond
the amount paid for the spaceactually
occupied by that portion of the advertise-
Sments in which the error occurred, whether
such error is due to the negligence of the
publisher's employees or otherwise, and
there shall be not liability for non-inser-
tion of any advertisement beyond the
amount paid for such advertisement. This
newspaper will not knowingly accept or
publish illegal material of any kind. Advertis-
ing which expresses preference based on
legally protected personal characteristics is
not acceptable.

HOWTO GETYOUR
NEWS PUBLISHED
The Jackson County Floridan will publish
news of general interest free of charge.
Submit your news or Community Calendar
events via email, fax, mail, or hand delivery.
Fees may apply for wedding, engagement,
anniversary and birth announcements.
Forms are available at the Floridan offices.
Photographs must be of good quality and
suitable for print. The Floridan reserves the
right to edit all submissions.

GETTING IT RIGHT
The Jackson County Floridan's policy
is to correct mistakes promptly. To
report an error, please call 526-3614
Monday-Friday.


Community Calendar


TODAY
n Jackson County Habitat for Humanity
Warehouse hours: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.'
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open meeting, noon
to 1 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901
Caledonia St., Marianna, in the AA room.

THURSDAY, AUG.11
) Jackson County Farmers Market is open 6:30
a.m. to noon (or until goods sell out) Tuesdays,
Thursday and Saturdays'in Madison Street Park in
Marianna.
n Emerald Coast Hospice Summer Education
Series presents Hospice 102" at 4374 Lafayette St.
in Marianna. Two sessions: 7 a.m. and 4 p.m. CEU
(1) available through Troy University. Health care
workers, public welcome. No charge. Call 526-3577.
) Orientation -1 to 4 p.m. at the Goodwill Career
Training Center, 4742 Highway 90 in Marianna. Reg-
ister for free job placement and computer training
classes offered to people with disadvantages/dis-
abilities. Call 526-0139.
) Free Summer Concert Series Rebel Syn-
dicate wraps up the series, 7 to 9 p.m. at Citizens
Lodge Park in Marianna. Bring lawn chairs, coolers.
Presented by Jackson County Parks department
and Main Street Marianna. Mariarina Moose Lodge
No. 1026 will sell hot dogs, chips and drinks during'
the show (net proceeds benefit Moose charities).
Call 718-5210 or 718-1022.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Closed discussion, 8
to 9 p.m.,'First United Methodist Church,,2901 Cale-
donia St.,.Marianna, in the AA room. Attendance
limited to persons with a desire to stop drinking.

FRIDAY, AUG. 12
a Celebrate Recovery Adult, teen meetings to
"overcome hurts, habits and hang-ups in a safe
environment," 7 p.m., Evangel Worship Center, 2645
Pebble Hill Road. Dinner: 6 p.m. (free for first-time
guests). Child care available. Call 209-7856 or
573-1131. /
) Preble-Rish Gallery Local Artists Exhibit open-
ing/wine and cheese reception, 6 p.m. at 20684
Central Ave. East in Blountstown. Tickets, $10 each,
are available online www.calhounco.org/store.
cfm or at Blountstown Drugs.
) Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, 8 to
9 p.m. in the AA room at First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St., Marianna.

SATURDAY, AUG. 13
n Jackson County Farmers Market is open 6:30


a.m. to noon (or until goods sell out) Tuesdays,
Thursday and Saturdays in Madison Street Park in
Marianna.
a Jackson County CERT's free training class,
held three consecutive Saturdays (Aug. 13, 20 and
27) is 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the Emergency Opera,
tions Center, 2819 Panhandle Road in Marianna.
Topics include household hazardous materials,
fire suppression, field first aid, sheltering in place,
removing someone who is trapped, and more. To
register, call 2721372 or email training.jacksonciti
zencorps@gmail.com.
) Jackson County Health Department Closing
the Gap program offers a free Pilates class, 8:30
a.m. at Integras Wellness Center, 4230 Lafayette
St., Suite C, in Marianna. Call 482-6221.
) Marianna resident Lou Brown will lead a paper
quilling workshop, 10 a.m. at the Outside the Lines
studio on McPherson Street in Marianna, following
the 9 a.m. business meeting of The Artists Guild
of Northwest Florida. Cost: $3 for members; $5
for non-members. Public welcome at meeting and
workshop. Call 482-8289.
) Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, 4:30 to
5:30 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St., Marianna.

SUNDAY, AUG. 14
Alcoholics Anonymous closed discussion, 6:30
p.m., 4349 W. Lafayette St., Marianna (in one-story
building behind 4351W. Lafayette St.). Attendance
limited to persons with a desire to stop drinking.

MONDAY, AUG. 15
) Orientation -10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Goodwill
Career Training Center, 4742 Highway 90 in Mari-
-anna. Register for free job placement and computer
training classes offered to people with disadvan-
tages/disabilities. Call 526-0139.
) Effective today, Marianna's Social Security
office (2916 Madison St.) will begin closing at
3 p.m. daily. Call 1-800-772-1213 or visit www.
socialsecurity.gov.
) Jackson County Health Department Closing
the Gap program offers a free yoga class, 5:30 p.m.
at Integras Wellness Center, 4230 Lafayette St.,
Suite C, in Marianna. Mat provided. Call 482-6221.
)) Alford Community Organization meeting in
the Alford Community Center, third Mondays, 6 p.m.
New members from Alford, surrounding communi-
ties invited to join. Call 579-4482 or 638-4900.
) Concerned American Patriots of Jackson
County Inc. meets at 6 p.m. in the Jackson County


Ag Center, Highway 90 West (next to the National
Guard Armory) in Marianna. Speaker Karen Schoen
will discuss the Department of Education's Race to
the Top program. Admission is free; public welcome.
) Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, 8 to
9 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St., Marianna.

TUESDAY, AUG. 16
Jackson County Farmers Market is open 6:30
a.m. to noon (or until goods sell out) Tuesdays,
Thursday and Saturdays in Madison Street Park in
Marianna.
) Free Basic Computer class, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
today at the Goodwill Career Training Center, 4742 -
Highway 90 in Marianna. Register for no-cost ser-
vices during orientation Mondays and Thursdays.
Call 526-0139.
) Optimist Club of Jackson County meeting,
noon, first and third Tuesdays, Jim's Buffet & Grill,
Marianna.
n Free quilting/crocheting/knitting class led
by Mary Deese, 1 p.m. at Jackson County Senior
Citizens, 2931 Optimist Drive in Marianna. Call
482-5028.
Riverside Elementary School Parents Meet-
ings are 6 to 6:30 p.m. (third grade); 5:30 to 6 p.m.
(fourth grade); and 5 to 5:30 p.m. (fifth grade).
These meetings are for parents only. The school's
Open House will be 1 to 3 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 18.
Call 482-9611.
) Marianna Sit-n-Sew presented by the Jackson
County Quilters Guild, Tuesdays, 6 to 8 p.m., First
United Methodist Church Youth Hall, Clinton Street,
behind Marianna Post Office. Call 272-7068.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open meeting, 8 to 9
p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901 Caledo-
nia St., Marianna, in the AA room.

WEDNESDAY, AUG. 17
a Chipola College returning student registra-
tion for fall terms A and B is 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Call
718-2211; visit www.chipola.edu.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open meeting, noon
to 1 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901
Caledonia St., Marianrma, in the AA room.

THURSDAY, AUG. 18
a Jackson County Farmers Market is open 6:30
a.m. to noon (or until goods sell out) Tuesdays,
Thursday and Saturdays in Madison Street Park in
Marianna.


The submission deadline for this calendar is two days before publication. Submit to: Community Calendar, Jackson County Floridan, P. O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447,
email editorial@jcfloridan.com, fax (850) 482-4478 or bring items to 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.


Police Roundup


MARIANNA POLICE
DEPARTMENT
The Marianna Police De-
partment listed the following
incidents for Aug. 8, the latest
available report: Four accidents
with no injury, one stolen tag,
one abandoned
vehicle, one-
reckless driver, 1 -
one suspicious F'- I E
vehicle, one sus-
picious person,
one disturbance
(verbal), two alarms (burglary),
20 traffic stops, two larcenies,
two follow-up investigation
calls, one suicide or attempted
suicide, one animal com-
plaint (dog), one fraud, one
finger-printing and one VIN
verification.


JACKSON COUNTY
SHERIFF'S OFFICE
The Jackson County Sheriff's
Office and county Fire/Rescue
reported the following incidents
for Aug. 8, the latest available
report (some items may relate
to after-hours calls taken on
behalf of Graceville and Cotton-
dale police departments): One
. dead person, one stolen tag,
one abandoned vehicle, three
reckless drivers, three suspi-
cious vehicles, two suspicious
incidents, two information
calls, one highway obstruction,
one burglary, one disturbance
(verbal), one prowler, one drug
offense, one gas leak, two power
line down calls, 18 medical
calls, one alarm (burglary), one
discharge of a firearm, six traffic


stops, one larceny, three serving
papers/ex parte calls, one civil
dispute, one call to assist anoth-
er agency, one report of child
abuse, two public service calls,
four criminal registrations, two
transport calls and one report
of an open door/window.

JACKSON COUNTY
CORRECTIONAL FACILITY
The following persons were
booked into the county jail dur-
ing the latest reporting periods:
) Benjamin Watford, 30, 2715
Brightwell Ave., Marianna, driv-
ing while license suspended or
revoked.
) Kimberly Blount, 34, 3070
Carters Mill Road, Apt. D-7,
Marianna, violation of county
probation.


n Nadhi Coffey, 21, 5152 Gold
Circle, Marianna, sentenced to
180 days.
a Timothy Flowers, 41, 609 Al-
lan Ave., Panama City, hold for
Bay County.
) Daniel Bibbee, 29, 4488
Pilcher Road, Marianna, culti-
vation of marijuana, and child
abuse.
) Apiille Lawson, 42, 4488
Pilcher Road, Marianna, culti-
vation of marijuana, and child
abuse.
) Clay Alday, 23, 4523 Cook
Road, Marianna, hold for Bay
County.

JAIL POPULATION: 237

To report a crime, call CrimeStoppers
at 526-5000 or a local law enforcement
agency. To report a wildlife violation, call
1-888-404-FWCC (3922).


u a


21
4^*


12A WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 10, 2011


WAKE-UP CAL







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Sunday Afternoon With the Arts


Local artists submit poster designs for contest


Special to the Floridan

Jackson County artists are
sending in their poster designs
for the first poster contest to
benefit the seventh annual Sun-
day Afternoon with the Arts at
Chipola College.
Event planners report that
two designs have been officially
submitted and several artists in
the region have reported they
are planning to submit designs.
Planning committee members


urge all artists 18 and older to
enter this first-time event. The
deadline is Sept. 1, so there is
still time to enter.
The winner will receive $100
and their design will be used for
publicity purposes for the exhib-
it. A limited number of posters
will be printed by contest spon-
sor The UPS Store in Marianna.
The winner will be recognized
and presented the cash award
during the Exhibit Reception on
Nov. 6. Planners hope the posters


ONLINE
) All contest guidelines are now
available at www.chipola.edu.

will become collectors' items in
the future and the contest serves
as a way for local and regional
people to get involved in the cre-
ative process and promotion for
the annual fall exhibit at Chipola
College, which is scheduled for
Nov. 1-10. The Exhibit reception
is scheduled for Nov. 6, 1 to 5


p.m. It is open to the public, free
of charge, and offers a variety of
activities for the entire family.
The annual Sunday Afternoon
with the Arts is a family-friendly
event at Chipola College featur-
ing a variety of art related activi-
ties, a visual art exhibit, authors
and written word presentations,
hands-on art experiences, mu-
sical performances, door prizes
and refreshments. John Brewer's
Studio in Marianna will again
sponsor the event's grand door


prize of a framed print.
The annual exhibit and recep-
tion is sponsored by The Artists
Guild of Northwest Florida Inc.,
the Chipola Regional Arts Asso-
ciation and Chipola College.
Guidelines are available on the
Chipola College website: www.
chipola.edu (follow links to the
Fine Arts Department and Sun-
dayAfternoon with the Arts) or at
The UPS Store located at 4415-C
Constitution Lane, Monday-Fri-
day, 7 a.m. to 6 p.m.


Kids flock to Partners for Pets' Back-to-School Open House

Special to the Floridan

Partners for Pets hosted a
Back-to-School Open House
at the Phil Rotolo Memorial
Animal Shelter in Marianna T A i
on Saturday, July 30.
A highlight of the event -._
was the giving away of 55 .
backpacks filled with school
supplies. The packs and
supplies, donated by Alford
residents Dutch and Sophia
Swart, were given to kids vis-
iting the shelter. When all the
packs had been dispensed,
bags of the remaining sup-
plies were given to the rest of
the visiting children. .
Free refreshments and bal-
loons for the kids were also
made available, and there Children visit the Partners for Pets animal shelter in
was a drawing for a quilt won SUBMITTED PHOTOS Marianna for a Back-to-School Open House.
by Suzanne Speed from Geor- Organizers hung balloons in preparation for the Partners for Pets Back-to-School Open House,
gia and a vase won by Mrs. Saturday, July 30.
Coon of Jackson County.
The shelter is now raffling
off two other donated items:
a women's horse saddle and
a 22-inch, flat-screen televi- -
sion set. Tickets can be pur- L
chased in Marianna at the
shelter, The UPS Store or CJ's
Country Pantry and Sand-
wich Shop.
In addition to item dona-
tions, the shelter is also in |
need of monetary contribu-
tions. A sponsor board has
been erected in the office of
the facility. Local businesses
that become sponsors tor a.
monthly or yearly'donation
will have an ad placed on the
board. Those interested in Visitors to the Phil Rotolo Memorial Animal Shelter in
sponsorship are asked to call Partners for Pets gave away 55 backpacks filled with school supplies during its Back-to-School Marianna are treated to free refreshments and balloons
482-4570. Onen House on July 30. during the facility's Back-to-School Open House.


Details announced for 2011 Panhandle Youth Expo


Special to the Floridan


The 2011 Panhandle Youth Expo is
set for Oct. 13-15.
The Expo will offer youth from
Jackson, Holmes, Washington, Gads-
den, Calhoun, Liberty and Bay coun-
ties opportunities to show swine,
beef, poultry and general exhibits


(needlework/sewing, art projects,
posters, photography, crafts and
baked goods). All swine must be reg-
istered and tagged on Aug. 15, from
3-6 p.m. at the Jackson County Agri-
cultural Center on Highway 90 West
in Marianna.
During the Expo, youth will also
have an opportunity to show their


Marriage, Divorce Report


Special to the Floridan

The following were re-
corded during July 1-5.
Marriages
) James Horace Men-
denhall III and Cassandra
Lynn Register.
) Christopher Robert


Chancy and Jennifer Marie
Lee.
) Carolyn Sue Gibson and
Lawrence Peter Rooney.
) William Timothy Baker
and Erika Kelly Radford.
) Sacher Gernoise Dick-
son and Inoscencia Can-
delaria Zuniga.
) Ralph Colon and Jas-


Florida Lottery

Mon. (E) 8/8 8-7-4 6-4-0-3.. 1-2-7-n 21


Tue.
Tue.
Wed.
Wed.
Thurs.


4-7-6 5-8-6-8


(E) 8/9 9-8.0 7-9-9-8


Thurs. .(M)


9-5-9 7-5-8-3
8/3 0-4-8 9-1-0-5
6-3-0 2-7-2-8
8/4 3-0-7 9-4-1-8
8-0-2 9-9-1-8


mine Ann Huddleston.
) Cameron Robert Cou-
turier and Katherine Lynn
Fresenburg.
) Christine Walker and
Raymond Walker Sr.
) Justin Lee Green and
Kayla Renea Maphis.
) Carlos Luis Agosto and
Kimberlee Kimie Uejo.


knowledge of livestock and farm
crops by participating in the Agricul-
ture Judging Contest.
Show dates, rules, record books,
entry forms and deadlines are avail-
able the http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu/.
Contact the Jackson County Exten-
sion Service at 482-9620 for further
information.


)) Brittney Rena Ivey and
David Lamar Messick.
Divorces
) Sandra B. McCollough
vs. Hosie J. McCollough.
) Susan Elaine Burch vs.
Jody Levin Burch.
) Brandy Nicole Daniels
vs. Matthew Bradford.


Bridge club results


Special to the Floridan
Not available
The Marianna Duplicate
Bridge Club plays bridge
4-21-22-31-34 on Monday afternoons in
the St. Luke's Episcopal
15-20-30-34-35 Church Parish Hall.
For the week ofAug. 8, the


Fri. (E) 8/5 8-8-7 4-0-2-7 1-5-18-27-36


Fri. (M)


3-9-6 6-5-2-3


Sat. (E) 8/6 6-4-8 2-3-9-3 3-10-15--27-35


Sat. (M)


2-0-2 4-9-4-7


Sun. (E) 8/7 0-6-2 5-1-4-1. 4-20-26-29-34
Sun. (M) 2-1-3 3-8-3-4
E = Evening drawing, M= Midday drawing'
IPoWER:1BALL1!


Saturday 8/6
Wednesday 8/3


25-30-54-57-59 PB6
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Wednesday 8/3 14-21-22-24-44-48 xtra 2
For lottery information, call (850) 487-7777 or (900) 737-7777

Do you have'Cute Kids'?
Email your 'Cute Kids*' photos to editorial@jcfloridan.com,
mail them to P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447 or bring them
by our offices at 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.
*12 years or under, with Jackson County ties. Include child's
full name, parents'name(s) and city of residence. This is a free
service. All entries subject to editing.


winners were as follows:
) First place Ida
Knowles and Sara Lewis.
) Second place Betty
Brendemuehl and Lib
McRae.
) Third place Elaine
Yost and Libby Hutto.


An Exciting Future
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through Aug 23

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Apply online now at
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4 : COLLEGE


GAS

WATCH
Gas prices are going up. Here
are the least expensive places
to buy gas in Jackson County,
as of Tuesday afternoon.
1. $3.52 Kmee II, Malone
2. $3.55 Pilot, Hwy 71 near
1-10
3. $3.55 Travel Center, Hwy
71 near 1-10
4. $3.58 McCoy's, Jeffer-
son Street, Marianna
5. $3.63 BP, U.S. 231 near
Alford

If you see a lower price,
contact the Floridan newsroom
at editorial@jcfloridan.com.


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Mon. (M)


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 10, 2011 3AF


LOCAL


w .


-,--- ------ --- ---~












Publisher
VALERIA ROBERTS


Guest Columnist




Up from the



downgrade

By the Tampa Tribun6

It's possible too much is beihg made of Standard
& Poor's downgrade of U.S. debt. It doesn't mat-
ter. It's well past time for the nation to get serious
about curtailing its debt. Standard & Poor's dramatic,
if controversial, decision shows that the nation cannot
continue its free-spending ways without paying the
consequences.
But perhaps this jarring event will cause Washington
leaders to respond to the daunting challenge. The re-
cent battle over the debt ceiling did not make Standard
S& Poor's optimistic; It wrote, "the difficulty of framing
a consensus on fiscal policy" will weaken the govern-
ment's ability to "manage public finances and diverts
attention from the debate over how to achieve more
balanced and dynamic economic growth."
Yet with the recent deficit-ceiling agreement calling
for a 12-member congressional panel to devise 10-year
cuts of up to $1.5 trillion, there is an opportunity for
both parties to resolve to develop a more ambitious
deficit-cutting strategy.
Lawmakers now want the so-called super-commit-
tee to work on restoring the nation's top credit rating.
The goal should be to salvage the nation's finances, not
score campaign points.You can bet that the downgrade
would not have occurred had President Barack Obama
and House Speaker John Boehner been able to work out
that agreement to save $4 trillion over a decade, which
seemed fleetingly close for a while last month.
The financial welfare of every American is at stake.
The stock market's dive Monday, which affected the
investments and retirement savings of millions of
Americans, underscores the importance of purposeful
action.
On Monday, Standard & Poor's also downgraded the
credit ratings of mortgage lenders Fannie Mae and
Freddie Mac, which guarantee about half of all U.S.
mortgages, a step that might result in higher mortgage
rates.
It's true that Standard & Poor's miscalculated some
numbers, overestimating U.S. discretionary spending
by $2 trillion over the next decade. The other two major
rating agencies don't believe the United States should
be stripped of its triple-A rating. The country is no dan-
ger of default, and its currency and economy, however
troubled, is in better shape than most countries.
Still, there is no arguing the country on the path to
fiscal ruin. As we pointed out recently, the nation is
spending about $300 billion a month but collecting
about $180 billion in revenue, about 60 percent of what
we are spending. This can't continue.
A fiscal strategy, not political posturing, is what is
needed. The president should stop the trivial talk about
tax breaks for corporate jets and get serious about
budget cuts. Republicans have been right to focus
on reducing government but should not rule out any
possibility of increased revenues. A thoughtful plan
was produced last year by the White House's Commis-
sion on Fiscal Responsibility and Reform co-chaired
by Erskine Bowles, a Democrat, and former Sen. Alan
Simpson, a Republican. It was largely ignored by the
president and others.
The panel offered a number of bitter pills. Among
them: Raise the Social Security retirement age, cap
federal spending, increase Medicaid co-pays, charge VA
medical patients a co-pay and eliminate federal student
loans.
It offered a tax-reform scenario that would elimi-
nate all tax deductions but also lower rates. Not every
proposal may be possible or desirable, but it is a serious
plan, and Congress would be wise to use it as a starting
point for budget-cut debates. And all involved should
heed the report's leading principle: "Our country's
economicwelfare and national security depend on us
putting our fiscal house in order."

Letters to the Editor
Submit letters by either mailing to Editor, P.O. Box 520,
Marianna FL, 32447 or faxing to 850-482-4478 or send
e-mail to editorial@jcfloridan.com. The Floridan reserves
the right to edit or not publish any letter. Be sure to
include your full address and telephone number. These
will only be used to verify the'letter and will not be
printed. For more information call (850) 526-3614.


T PAI(CH


RETIREMENT


Kerry's war on citizen speech


BY JAY AMBROSEb
Scripps Howard News Service

Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass., is
really ticked at our free press,
not liking on little bit how it
affords ordinary citizen critics of
our government a chance to be
heard.
"The media in America has a big-
ger responsibility than it's exercis-
ing today," he said, which in some
ways is right, though not in the
ways he means.
"The media has got to begin
to not give equal time or equal
balance to an absolutely absurd no-
tion just because somebody asserts
it or simply because somebody
says something which everybody
knows is not factual," he went on
in an MSNBC interview, and guess
what he was referring to? Why, the
new evil beast of horrified leftist
ideologues: the Tea Party.
"It doesn't deserve the same
credit as a legitimate idea about
what you do," Kerry continued.
"And the problem is everything is
put into this.tit-for-tat equal battle
and America is losing any sense of
what's real, of who's accountable,
of who is not accountable, of who's


real, who isn't, who's serious, who
isn't."
It's interesting that Kerry made
clear he doesn't consider this an
argument of equals, for I've long
suspected this richest man in the
U.S. Senate ($186.6 million, $7 mil-
lion yacht, married well) is psy-
chologically akin to the monarchs
of old who thought their authority
divinely conferred, meaning no
lower-class disparagement allowed.
These crowned despots were
as serious as a branding iron in
the face. In the early 1600s, when
a Scotsman said he believed the
Bible a better guide than kings, the
English Court of the Star Cham-
ber granted no trial in deciding to
afflict that punishment along with
cutting open his nose and hacking
off his ears, one account recalls.
In the American colonies, how-
ever, newspapers got rambunctious
despite laws disallowing criti-
cism even if it weretrue in fact,
especially if it were true, historians
say. Ready to have at royal gover-.
nors unlike almost any newspapers
anywhere else in the world, many
kicked rear ends whenever they
thought rear ends were in need of
kicking, and wise juries said the


truth's OK to print, no matter what
the law harrumphs.
It got so bad actually, so good
- that these newspapers helped
start the Revolutionary War, getting
rid of the royal leaders altogether,
although every now and then
someone like King Kerry will try
to silence the common folks. How
dare they? Don't they know their
place?
In fact, the tea party activists do
know their place. They are constitu-
tionally empowered citizens (given
the right to free speech, to peace-
ful assembly and to petition for a
redress of grievances) who get it
that a failure to participate signals a
willingness to abdicate. Contrary to
Kerry and others who have worked
around the clock to wreck our
future and hate it when someone
notices, they are not dummies. All
kinds of top intellects, including
Nobel Prize winners in economics,
share their debt dread.
Also contrary to Kerry, the press's
chief flaw is not being overly
solicitous of tea party views. Many
mainstream news outlets have a
liberal bias, as has been shown
in repeated studies, and that's to
Kerry's immense benefit.


Who says we're taxed too much?


BY JOHN M. CRISP
Scripps Howard News Service

ure, you're overtaxed. But how
do you know? That is, how
do you know whether you're
paying enough or too much for the
various benefits that we take for
granted as citizens of a civilized
country like the United States?
For example, a few miles from my
house I can ramp onto Interstate
Highway 35. To the south lie Austin
and San Antonio; to the north are .
Dallas and connections that will
take me virtually anywhere in the
U.S. via a series of carefully engi-
neered, safe superhighways and
secondary roads.
In general, the lanes are broad
and smooth, the curves are gradual,
and the on-ramps and off-ramps
are well marked. Men and women
are paid to patrol the most remote
mile of this system and render aid if
needed. Bridges cross mighty can-
yons and in some places tunnels
render the mountains irrelevant.
This system, perhaps the best in
the world, cost many billions of
dollars to build and much more to
maintain. Yet we use it as often and
as much as we want for free!
Of course, it's not really free; we
pay for it with taxes. Still, our fine
highways are such a significant part
of the ordinary psychological infra-


structure of our lives that it's easy
to forget that they exist becausewe
decided to combine our money to
build something that would benefit
everyone, which is, I guess, one
of the most basic definitions of
civilization.
It's the same with a great deal
more that we take for granted. If
my house catches on fire, I assume
that I can call the fire department
and in short order capable men
and women with adequate equip-
ment will show up and put it out.
I assume that the water that runs
* from my tap won't make me sick,
and generally I can assume the
same thing in any town or city in
the United States.
There's much more. All of us
own a tiny fraction of the U.S.S.
George H.W. Bush, a state-of-the-
art nuclear-powered aircraft carrier
that cost $6.2 billion. And regard-
less of how you feel about our wars
in Iraq and Afghanistan, there's no
denying that our soldiers, sailors,
and Marines, and the equipment
with which we supply them, are the
best in the world. But all of this is
-very expensive.
So, how do we know if we're pay-
ing too much or too little for these
and many other services, protec-
tions, and benefits that are consis-
tent with life in a civilized nation?
This is a pertinent question


since the recent debate over the
debt ceiling casually assumed that
we already pay too much for the
benefits of civilization. It wasn't just
the radical tea party wing that so
quickly took new revenues "off the
table." Mainstream Republicans at
the state and national levels have
made "No New Taxes" their motto,
as well.
This position is based on two
dubious economic principles: First
that Americans know more about
what to do with their money than
the government does. And, second,
if we let the rich, especially, keep
more of their money, they'll create
plenty of jobs for the rest of us.
Perhaps. But these sound like
rationales produced in the service
of the basic human desire to hold
on selfishly to our own resources
rather than share them for a greater
good. In any case, they violate
another fundamental economic
principle: You have to pay for what
you get.
Let's face it: we get plenty out
of the decision in 1776 to turn 13
colonies into a single nation, and
most of us would be reluctant to
part with those benefits. Politicians
took a lot of flak during the debt
ceiling debate. But with a large na-
tional debt, perhaps the search for
irresponsibility should start a little
closer to home.


Letters to the Editor


Speak up, Americans

Our Congress has voted a debt
limit increase to keep the govern-
ment going. Yet the jobless rate has
increased, our national debt has in-
creased and we could go on and on.
There has been no action taken by
our Congress to repay the money
taken from the Social Security fund,
and no effort to pay the interest
owed. We have several federal pro-
grams shut down, "due to shortage
of funds." Yet American citizens will
spend one billion dollars helping
the country of Afghanistan train its
police force.
The leader of that country says


that the taking of lives is "our way
of life." I say bring our troops home
and let them live their "way of life."
Spend that one billion paying
back the money owed to Social
Security, or at least interest on it.
They could put these troops on
the borders of our nation and pro-
tect us from the terrorists who en-
ter our country to kill our citizens.
There are other countries that we
give millions and billions to that are
not our true friends and are "hous-
ing" the terrorists who are killing
our troops, as well as those from
other countries. Yet we keep send-
ing the money, while we go deeper
in debt as a nation.


This Congress should undo a
lot of the work done to move jobs
over seas. We could place a higher
tax on the import of products that
we once built or produced in this
country.
As to the issue of taxes, I support
fully a flat tax that everyone will
pay. This flat tax should be on all
income, regardless of the amount
earned. This will make those who
make millions pay their fair share.
Speak up, Americans. We the
people are the cause of the mess
we are in. We voted the Congress
members into office.
REV. DR. BILLY BRUNER, TH.D.
Cottondale


b U 10U
S2011 Jeff Stahler/Dist. by Universal UClick for UFS





JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


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76A WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 10, 2011


STATE


Heartbreak

Woman ends attempt to swim from Cuba to US


The Associated Press

KEY WEST The cur-
rents in the Florida Straits
finally proved stronger
than the determination
that had pushed Diana
Nyad across vast stretches
of open water before.
Nyad, 61, stroked
through shoulder pain
and floated on her back
when asthma made it dif-
ficult for her to breathe on
the attempt to swim from
Cuba to Key West that she
began Sunday.
She said she pictured
herself emerging from the
water onto the beach and
vowed to doggy-paddle
there, if that was what
it took. She swam right
through a smack of sting-
ing jellyfish. But by early
Tuesday, trembling in the
water, the record-setting
marathon swimmer knew
she had to stop, even
though it meant giving up
on her dream.
According to her Twitter
feed, she was pulled from
the water after swimming
for 29 hours. Later Tues-
day, Nyad said her captain
told her she had roughly
53 miles to go when she
stopped. The swim had
been expected to take
about 60 hours to cross
103 miles.
"Sometimes the will
is so strong. That's the
whole point of this sport
in general, that the mind
is stronger than the body,"
she said after her support
boat docked in KeyWest.
"I was shaking and
freezing, and I' thought,
there's no mind over mat-
ter anymore. I was so de-
pleted from the asthma,"
she said, crying in a white
bathrobe before cheering
supporters.
"It was so hard. I couldn't
even swim. I couldn't be
the swimmer I am," Nyad
said, detailing the ailments
that piled up as the waters
got choppier. "I had severe
asthma for 11 hours I


was taking 10 strokes and
then going on my back
and gasping. I had severe
pain in my right shoulder
that was so excruciating
that every stroke I took
from the third hour all
the way through 30, I just
winced every time."
Nyad had trained for
and dreamed about the
attempt for two years. It
was a dream deferred after
she first tried to cross the
Florida Straits in a shark
cage as a 28-year-old in
1978. Then, she quit after
41 hours and 49 minutes
in the water because of
strong currents and rough
weather that banged her
around in the cage.
Now it's a dream unful-
filled. Nyad said she won't
attempt try it again be-
cause she doesn't want to
put her team through the
ordeal of training again.
She attempted this swim
without a shark cage, rely-
ing instead on an electri-
cal field from equipment
towed by kayakers to keep
them at bay.
Her Twitter account re-
ported she decided to end
the swim herself, after "re-
alizing the conditions of 5
to 10 knot winds and less
than ideal currents."
An online chart plot-
ting the swimmer's track
showed the Gulf Stream
currents pushing Nyad
east of her intended
course. Nyad had hoped
to end her swim at the
Key West marker for the,
southernmost point in the
United States.
"When we got started, it
was a flat, glassy sea. Two
hours later, it started to
chop up. Three hours in, I
felt a twinge in my shoul-
der and it never went
away," Nyad said. "I tried
the fingers in different po-
sitions, I tried to swim in
different ways, but I was
just in wincing pain and
I thought, that's just how
it's going to be."
Nyad said she tried tak-


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this photo provided by the Florida Keys News Bureau, Diana
Nyad (right) cries as she speaks to reporters and fans after
arriving back in Key West on Tuesday, following the 61-year-
old marathon swimmer's failed attempt to swim from Cuba
to the Florida Keys.


ing puffs from an inhaler
and medication to ease
Sthe asthma and pain, but
nothing helped. A doctor
on the boat repeatedly got
into the water with her to
monitor her condition,
and supporters on the boat
passed her liquids and
shouted encouragement.
But, she said, she was
struggling so much that
she couldn't even rely
on her usual method of
maintaining her cadence
singing Neil Young and
Janis Joplin songs in her
head.
Later Tuesday, having
regained hdr composure
and wearing a T-shirt that
read "To live, not exist,"
Nyad said the pain in her
right shoulder surprised
her because it had been
a torn tendon in her left
shoulder that had the fo-
cus of concern during
training.
'Even the seas, and I
think even the shoulder


wouldn't have damned
the whole thing, but the
asthma did," Nyad said.
One of Nyad's spokes-
women said the swimmer
had received congratula-
tory text messages from
tennis legends Billie Jean
King and Martina Navra-
tilova. Nyad said she ap-
preciated the praise she's
received from around the
world, but the distance
she covered didn't mean
anything to her.
"I wanted to get there. I
wanted to get to the other
shore. I didn't even care
what the distance was, I
wanted to swim between
Cuba and Florida," she
said.
Had the latest attempt
been successful, Nyad
would have broken her
own record of 102.5 miles
for an open-sea swim
without a shark cage, set
in 1979 when she stroked
from the Bahamas to
Florida.


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Scott taps


campaign vets,


activists as 'liaisons'


The Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE Gov.
Rick Scott has hired a for-
mer tea party activist and
veterans of his and na-
tional campaigns to act as
"liaisons" to the public.
Scott and other top aides
defended the hirings, say-
ing they will help the gov-
ernor hear from the public.
But Democrats criticized
Scott and said it is "uncon-
scionable". for the Repub-
lican governor to hire his
"cronies". while pushing
ahead with massive bud-
get cuts.
The spending of nearly
$500,000 for liaisons fol-
lows Scott's signing of an
austere spending plan
that is expected to result
.in layoffs for hundreds if
not thousands of public
employees
"They're there to make
sure I hear from people
about what's important,"
Scott said Tuesday. "I got
elected to represent the
people of Florida and to try
to solve as many problems
as I can."
Those hired by Scott
recently include Robin
Stublen, a founder of a
tea party group in Punta
Gorda who has been criti-
cal of government expan-
sion. The public liaison
director Michael Dew
- was hired in June and
worked on the presidential
campaign of U.S. Sen. John


McCain. Another special
assistant hired by Scott is
Greg Williams, who once
worked for former U.S.
Sen. Connie Mack.
Stublen, who ran his own
pest control business, was
an early backer of Scott's
when the Republican es-
tablishment in Florida
was coalescing behind
then-Attorney General Bill
McCollum. Other special
assistants hired to act as
liaisons in recent months
also worked on Scott's 2010
campaign for governor.
Scott who first ap-
peared at tea party events
when he was leading the
charge against the fed-
eral health care overhaul
- said he hired Stublen
because he's "very good"
and not because of his tea
party connections. He also
joked that "he'd better do a
very good job" to earn his
$70,000 a year salary.
The duties of the liaisons
include helping arrange
visits by Scott to regions
around the state while also
working with community
leaders and residents.
Scott spokesman Brian
Burgess said previous gov-
ernors have had similar
staffs responsible for out-
reach. The governor's of-
fice also said that the near-
ly $500,000 being spent on
the eight people working
as liaisons came from shift-
ing positions and changing
duties.


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Stocks soar after Fed


pledges low rates into '13


The Associated Press

WASHINGTON The Federal Re-
serve offered super-low interest rates for
two more years Tuesday an unprec-
edented step to arrest an economic free
fall that dragged down the stock market.
Wall Street roared its approval and fin-
ished a wild day with a 429-point gain.
The rally was remarkably fast the
Dow Jones industrial average was still
down for the day with less than an hour
of trading to go and enough to erase
two-thirds of its decline the day before.
The Fed set its target for interest rates
near zero in 2008 as a response to the
financial crisis that fall. Since then, it
had said only that rates would stay low
for an "'extended period." On Tuesday,
it said that would be at least through
mid-2013.
But the Fed also said it expects the
economy to stay weak for two more
years, longer than the Fed had previous-
ly indicated. It has already been more
than two years since the end of the Great
Recession.
The central bank left open the possi-
bility of a third round of bond purchases
designed to hold interest rates down and
push stock prices up.
The second round, announced last
year, sparked a 28 percent rally in the
Dow through April 29.
It was an unusually volatile day of trad-
ing. The Dow was up about 200 points
most of the morning. It was up about
100 when the Fed statement came out at
2:15 p.m. Within half an hour, the Dow
was down more than 200.
But investors warmed to the Fed news,


Bingo
From Page 1A

according to the amendment 100
percent of the net proceeds are to
go to charity.
The amendment also prohib-
its an organization from paying
someone a salary for services per-
formed related to the operation
of any bingo games. But the letter
said employees at Center Stage
Alabama are being paid with rev-
enue from the bingo games.
The letter said the amendment
specifically limits bingo in Hous-
ton County to one five-hour pe-
riod one day per week, yet the
development is open seven days
a week.
The letter gave the development
a deadline of August 1 to comply
with the law by stopping the op-
eration of the machines or allow
the state to seize them and for the


Veterans
From Page 1A

and military service summaries,
for instance, may be among the
needed items. The Post will pro-
vide transportation to veterans
who need a ride to key places for
assistance, as well.
They've also enlisted the help
of Jackson County Sheriff Lou-
Roberts. As his officers encoun-
ter homeless veterans, he and
his employees will be the go-
between connecting vets to the
Post for help. He will screen the
individuals to make sure they are
not unstable in a way that might
endanger those who wish to help,
for instance, before putting them
together with the VFW members.
In a press release about the out-
reach, Bower explained why the
VFW wants to help.
"Most of these people live in
camps or abandoned buildings,
getting by as best they can," he
wrote. "As is characteristic of the
homeless, they typically do not
have an address of any kind so
most of the assistance network is
not available to them. Our local
VA clinic can help them only after
they are brought to them and en-
tered into their system.
"There is a rescue mission in
Panama City and a facility in Tal-


I HI ASbULIAI t LU i.) PR ILL PHUIU
In this July 14 photo, Federal Reserve
Chairman Ben Bernanke testifies on Capitol
Hill in Washington.
and the Dow made a bumpy, steep climb
for the final stretch of trading. That in-
cluded a 640-point swing from its lowest
point of the day to its highest.
The yield on the 10-year Treasury bond
briefly hit a record low, 2.03 percent, and
finished at 2.26 percent. Investors have
bought U.S. debt, driving yields down,
even after S&P stripped the United
States of its top-of-the-line credit rating
last week.
Interest rates on consumer loans, in-
cluding adjustable-rate mortgages, car
loans and credit cards, are often based on
Treasury rates. So mortgage rates, which
are already among the lowest ever, could
go even lower.
Low interest rates for two more years
could make the stock market a better bet
because bonds will return less money.
That appeared to be at least part of the
reason stocks rallied so much after in-
vestors had a chance to digest the Fed's
statement.


Program
From Page 1A
position in the Recycling
Department. It was left
vacant for the remained of
2010 and for the first half
of 2011 after Jim Wunderly
retired from the position
late last year. Recycling
Director Chuck Hatcher
planned to fill the posi-
tion at a lower salary and
under a different job clas-
sification in the new fiscal
year, but the idea failed to
gain board approval dur-
ing the county budget
hearings over the past few
weeks.
Some recycling drop.off
locations will also be shut
down or shifted.
Both the dropoff trailers
at Quick Way Carwash on
Jefferson Street in Mari-
anna and the trailer in


Building
From Page 1A

the facility on the com-
munity; Jackson County
becomes a destination for
families who are coming
to visit because they've
found a plabe in our com-
munity where their family
member has some private
space. They're going to
eat here and maybe stay
here and buy some things
here."
Dean said 60 percent of


"We complied with the letter, and ceased operation with the
machines they had a problem with. We've turned that bingo
system off and turned on a different bingo system we feel is
also compliant. It's a totally different system."
Frank Wendt,
President of the Houston Economic Development Association


case to go to court.
Wendt said there will be a meet-
ing with state and local officials,
during which they hope to get all
the points in the letter addressed.
He declined to talk about specif-
ics in the letter, including how
employees are paid, until they
have had that meeting.
"We're just trying to figure out
what role the Houston County
rules and regulations play in how
we operate,"Wendt said. "We com-
plied with the letter, and ceased
operation with the machines they
had a problem with. We've turned
that bingo system off, and turned
on a different bingo system we


lahassee, but nothing locally. Vets
are typically empathetic to their
plight and feel 'but for the grace
of God go I.' Many eventually get
picked up by law enforcement. If
their offense places them in jail,
law enforcement is often reluc-
tant to release them back into a
homeless situation. With no fam-
ily or local contacts, many spend
more time in jail than is called for
by their offense."
Bower said the plight of home-
less vets is sometimes complicat-
ed and difficult to overcome.
"Many suffer from some psy-
chiatric or chemical issue that at
some point has placed them in
their current situation," he wrote.
"Frequently, Post Traumatic Stress
Disorder is a souvenir of their mil-
itary experience. If their military
service included a tour in Viet-
nam, chances are they suffer the
effects of Agent Orange exposure.
With no address or true ties, they
are not entered into the system
for food stamps, Social Security
or VA medical assistance. Many
are homeless by choice; that may
work for some until at some point
they have a medical crisis. Then
their situation forces emergency
action by our community."
Even if they get into the sys-
tem for help, Bower wrote, the
battle doesn't end there. With no
vehicle or support person to get
them where they may need to go


feel is also compliant. It's a totally
different system."
The new bingo games allow
people to play between one and
four bingo cards at a time. Each
machine also makes noises dur-
ing the game, including a sound
as someone wins.
Before each player starts "Jum-
bo Jackpot Gold" can be seen
across the screen. Wendt said the
top.prize winner has won $1,600,
which he said will increase as
more people play the games.
"It's basically playing bingo
on an electronic computer sys-
tem," Wendt said. "You're playing
against everybody in the hall."


Dellwood will no longer
be available.
In addition, the trailer
which was previously lo-
cated at Grocery Outlet
will be moved to the Penn
Avenue Agriculture com-
plex, where a cardboard
trailer will also be located.
All customers are asked
to break down their card-
board boxes before plac-
ing them in this and other
depositories around the
county in order to save
space and the time of re-
cycling department em-
ployees. Director Chuck
Hatcher can be reached at
718-5210 if questions or
concerns arise.
The Jackson County re-
cycling program has been
recognized three times
in the past five years as
a State of Florida Out-
standing County or City
Program.


the residents now living
in the facility came from
communities outside
Marianna, some of them
out of state.
The matter was tabled
until the county can study
the issue further.
Commission Chairman
Chuck Lockey instructed
County Administrator Ted
Lakey to call each com-
missioner individually to
get their thoughts on the
matter between now and
the next board meting,
which will be later this
month.


Wendt said the facility, which
includes about 500 bingo ma-
chines, is open all week from 10
a.m. to 12 a.m., and until 2 a.m.
on Friday and Saturday. He said
there will be no bingo on Sundays
until 1 p.m. The John Anderson
Cafeteria and the saloon have
closed, but Wendt said they may
reopen later. The restaurant A. D-
licious Barbecue remains open.
Wendt said the development
has lined up two concerts for the
fall, which include Skid Row and
Warrant on Sept. 15, and Coolio
and Tone-Loc on Oct. 29. He said
they've also started a free movie
in the amphitheater.
"We're still open, and we want
people to come have a good
time," Wendt said. "We're trying
our best to make this a first class
destination for the southeast and
the country."

Matt Elofson is a reporter for the Dothan
Eagle.


"Al of us as vets learned the value of others
as brothers in arms. That obligation goes
beyond our discharge and extends to the less

fortunate...all we need is for our community
to help us get in touch with them."
Thomas Bower,
VFW Post 12046 member


for medical help, he said, it is im-
probable that they will be able to
take advantage of the opportuni-
ties to get help at veterans' facili-
ties in Gainesville, Tallahassee or
Lake City. They would need an es-
cort if anesthesia were necessary
in a procedure they might need.
Additionally, before they get the
help they need, they have to have
records like birth certificates and
the military-issued form DD214,
a summary of service they would
have received on discharge. Many
times, homeless veterans have
lost those along the way, Bower
said. VFW is anxious to help these
people improve their lot fn life.
"The VFW Post 2046 has been
asking what we might be able to
do to help our military comrades,"
he wrote. "We have to start by be-
ing made aware of these people
and how to contact them. The
VFW is willing to provide them an
address and will transport them
to places to get whatever servic-


es they need. Our members can
take them around town and even
transport them to VA clinics out
of town if needed."
Bower is asking anyone who
may know of a vet in need to call
the sheriff's office at 482-9624 or
482-9648. The sheriff will in turn
contact the VFW post if a vet is de-
termined stable for contact.
"In most cases, their situation is
a product of the military experi-
ence," Bower wrote. "As veterans
we are called to do our part in
their behalf. If they wish to re-
locate to an area that can better
serve their needs, we can make
that happen. If they are homeless
by choice and just need a tem-
porary boost to meet short term
needs, we can help. All of us as
vets learned the value of others as
brothers in arms. That obligation
goes beyond our discharge and
extends to the less fortunate...all
we need is for our community to
help us get in touch with them."


Tip


leads


to drug


arrests
From staff reports

On Monday, the Jackson
County Drug Task Force
began an a investigation
based on a tip there were
people growing marijua-
na at 4488
Pilcher Road
in Marianna.
During
surveillance,
investiga-
tors saw two
Bibbee males mov-
ing the mari-
juana plants from the yard
into the residence.
Investigators approached
the dwelling and made
contact with
the men,
one identi-
fied as Dan-
iel Bibbee.
The other is
minor.
Lawson The offi-
cers also say
a woman, Aprille Lawson,
was allegedly participating
in the grow operation.
On searching the prop-
erty, 'investigators recov-
ered 22 marijuana plants
located in a closet and in
the back yard. Investiga-
tors also report they found
drug paraphernalia such as
glass water bongs, smoking
pipes, and plastic bags that
contained marijuana.
Daniel Bibbee and Aprille
Lawson were arrested and
charged with the cultiva-
tion of marijuana, and with
child abuse.


Obituaries
James & Sikes Funeral
Home Maddox Chapel
4278 Lafayette Street
Marianna, Florida 32446
850-482-2332

Charles
Edward Riley

Charles Edward Riley, 67,
of Sneads died Monday,
August 8, 2011 at Jackson
Hospital.
He was a native of
Sneads, lived most of his
life'in Jackson County, and
attended Faith Haven As-
sembly of God Church.
He was preceded in
death by his son Ken Alan
Riley.
Survivors include his
wife, Darothy Riley of
Sneads; two sons, Charles
Edward Riley II and wife,
Shaina of Savannah Ga,
Hector Alaniz and wife,
Mary of Sea Breeze; five
daughters, Kim Simpson
and husband, Allan of
Sneads; Marci Gay and
husband, Donnie, Melynda
Mullins all of Eastpoint.,
Alaina Phillips and hus-
band, Jason of Cypress, De
De Chambliss of Dothan;
nine grandchildren, Trey,
Zach, Tracey and Saman-
tha Simpson; Julieana and
Matthew Gay; Emma Aidyn
(Punkin) Riley, Wyatt Ri-
ley, Craig Phillips; two
great-grandchildren, Ely
and Riley Simpson; niece
Shirley Reid and husband
Travis and their two chil-
dren, Sean And Tracey. A
very special friend Madalyn
Alaniz.
Funeral services will be
at 10 a.m. Thursday,
Aug.11, 2011 at Faith Ha-
ven Assembly of God
Church in. Grand Ridge
with Pastor Jeff DuBose
and Rev. James Barwick of-
ficiating. Burial will follow


Jackson county Vault & Monuments
,iWt Serie a Aifford able Prices

I 9850482-5041 n


in Pope Cemetery with
James & Sikes Funeral
Home Maddox Chapel di-
recting.
The family will receive
friends one hour prior to
services at 9 a.m. at the
church.
Expressions of sympathy
may be made online at
www.jamesandsikesfuneral
home.com


LOOKING FOR MORE NEWS? VISIT


WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM


Pinecrest


3720 Caverns Road Marianna, FL 32446-1806 (850) 482-3964


___


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 10, 2011 7AF


LOCAL/NATIONAL






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


The Middle East


Turkish Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoglu (right) meets with Syrian President Bashar al-Assad
in Damascus on Tuesday.


Turkey presses Syria to


end crackdown on protests


The Associated Press

BEIRUT President Bashar Assad dis-
cussed "concrete steps" to end the violent
crackdown on protesters during six hours
of talks Tuesday with Turkey's foreign
minister, even as the Syrian military un-
leashed a fresh assault on dissent that ac-
tivists said killed more than 20 people.
Speaking to reporters on his return to
Turkey, Foreign Minister Ahmet Davu-
toglu said the talks were cordial but did
not say what specific steps they had dis-
cussed or whether Assad had agreed to
consider them.
"We discussed ways to prevent confron-
tation between the army and the people
and tensions like those in Hama in the
most open and clear way," Davutoglu
said, referring to the Syrian city that has
become a flashpoint in the 5-month-old
uprising against Assad's autocratic rule.
"The coming days, will be important
to see if the expectations are being met.
We hope that internal peace and calm is
achieved and steps for reform are taken,"
Davutoglu added.
The Syrian regime has shown no signs
of scaling back its crackdown despite
increasing diplomatic isolation. Envoys
from India, Brazil and South Africa were
expected to meet with Syrian officials in
Damascus on Wednesday, part of a broad
diplomatic push to stop the killings.
Syria's state-run news agency reported
Assad told Davutoglu the government
will be relentless in its pursuit of "terror-
ist groups" to safeguard stability and se-
curity in the country. Syrian authorities
blame the unrest on extremist and ter-
rorist groups seeking to destabilize the
country, even though most of the people
killed are unarmed, peaceful protesters.
SANA said Assad also pledged'to press
ahead with reforms. But promises of re-
form have rung hollow, especially since
they have been coupled with a campaign
that rights groups say has killed about
1,700 people since March.
Diplomatic pressure has done little so
far to stop Syria's regime, a close ally of
Iran that is used to international isola-


tion. But Davutoglu's visit was a signifi-
cant message because Turkey until re-
cently had close ties to Damascus.
Ankara has become increasingly critical
of its neighbor over the crackdown that
has sent thousands of Syrian refugees
flooding across the border into Turkey.
Syrian troops launched fresh assaults
on several restive cities and towns, in-
cluding in Idlib province near the Turk-
ish border. Two prominent Syrian activist
groups said 22 people, including eight
children, were killed across the country.
The reports could not be confirmed.
A rights activist near the central city
of Hama said military operations in the
town of Tibet el-Imam just north of the
city killed at least five children, four of
them frdm the same family.
"They were playing in the fields when
they were struck by gunfire," said the ac-
tivist, speaking on condition of anonym-
ity for fear of reprisals.
Syria has blocked nearly all outside wit-
nesses to the violence by banning foreign
media. It also has restricted local cover-
age that strays from the party line that
the regime is fighting thugs and religious
extremists who are acting out a foreign
conspiracy.
"The situation in Syria is heading to
the point of no return," Egypt's Foreign
Minister Mohammed Amr said in Cairo,
urging the Syrian government to. carry
out nationwide reforms and end the
crackdown.
International human rights groups
Amnesty International and Human
Rights Watch called on the U.N. Security
Council.to escalate pressure on Syria by
imposing an arms embargo and more
targeted sanctions.'The calls came ahead
of a key U.N. Security Council debate set
for Wednesday at which Secretary Gen-
eral Ban Ki-moon is to deliver a report on
Syria.
A Security Council statement issued on
Aug. 3 unanimously condemned Syria's
authorities for "widespread violations of
human rights and the use of force against
civilians" but the presidential statement
is not considered binding.


London to triple police



presence to end riots


The Associated Press

LONDON London
began nearly tripling the
number of police on its
streets Tuesday to try to
end Britain's worst rioting
in a generation three
nights of looting and
burning by poor, diverse
and brazen crowds of
young people. Meanwhile,
however, the chaos spread
to at least one more major
city.
Scenes of ransacked
stores, torched cars and
blackened buildings
frightened and outraged
Britons just a year before
London is to host the
Olympics. London's Met-
ropolitan Police force said
Tuesday it would flood the
streets with 16,000 officers
over the next 24 hours, but
acknowledged they could
not guarantee an end to
the violence.
"We have lots of infor-
mation to suggest that
there may be similar dis-
turbances tonight," Cmdr.
Simon Foy told the BBC.
"That's exactly'the reason
why the Met (police force)
has chosen to now actual-
ly really 'up the game' and'
put a significant number
of officers on the streets."
In Manchester, which
previously hadn't seen
violence, police said sev-
en people were arrested
Tuesday as youths' ram-
paged through the center
of the northwestern city.
Firefighters said a clothing
store in the city center and
a disused library in.nearby
Salford were set on fire.
Assistant Chief Con-
stable Terry Sweeney of
the Greater Manchester
Police Department urged
residents to avoid the
city center. "A handful of
shops have been attacked
by groups of youths who
have congregated and
seem intent on commit-
ting disorder," he said;
The riots started Sat-
urday with a protest
over a police shooting
in London's Tottenham
neighborhood, but have
morphed into a general
lawlessness in London


London residents wait to be allowed through a police cordon
on Tuesday to help council workers with the cleanup'after the
rioting that took place the previous night outside Clapham
Junction railway station in Battersea, London.


and several other cities
that police have struggled
to halt. While the rioters
have run off with sneak-
ers, bikes, electronics and
leather goods, they also
have torched stores ap-
parently just for the fun of
seeing something burn.
Rioters, able to move
quickly and regroup to
avoid the police, were left
virtually unchallenged in
several neighborhoods,
plundering stores at will.
Police in Britain gener-
ally avoid tear gas, water
cannons or other strong-
arm riot measures, but
they said they were con-
sidering the use of plastic
bullets blunt-nosed
projectiles designed to
deal punishing blows to
rioters without penetrat-
ing the skin.
Stores, offices and nurs-
eryschools in several parts
of London closed early
amid fears of fresh riot-
ing Tuesday night, though
pubs and restaurants
were open. Police in one
London district, Islington,


advised people not to be
out on the streets "unless
absolutely necessary."
In central England, po-
lice said they made five ar-
rests in Birmingham and
dispersed a small group of
people who torched two
cars in the center of West
Bromwich, a nearby town.
Shops were targeted by ri-
oters in the city ofWolver-
hampton, police said.
In London, riots and
looting have flared from
gritty suburbs along
the capital's fringes to
the posh Notting Hill
neighborhood.
The disorder has caused
heartache for London-
ers whose businesses and
homes were torched or
looted, and a crisis for po-
lice and politicians.
"The public wanted to
see tough action. They
wanted to see it sooner
and there is a degree of
frustration," said An-
drew Silke, head of the
criminology department
at the University of East
London.


Japan ignored own radiation forecasts


The Associated Press

NAMIE, Japan Japan's system to fore-
cast radiation threats was working from
the moment its nuclear crisis began. As
officials planned a venting operation cer-
tain to release radioactivity into the air,
the system predicted Karino Elementary
School would be directly in the path of
the plume emerging from the tsunami-
hit Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear plant.
But the prediction helped no one. No-
body acted on it. The school, just over six
miles from the plant, was not cleared out.
Quite the opposite. It was turned into a
temporary evacuation center.
Reports from the forecast system were
sent to Japan's nuclear safety agency, but
the flow of data stopped there. Prime
Minister Naoto Kan and others involved
in declaring evacuation areas never saw
the reports, and neither did local authori-
ties. So thousands of people stayed for
days in areas that the system had identi-
fied as high-risk, an Associated Press in-
vestigation has found.
At Karino Elementary in the town of Na-
mie, about 400 students, teachers, parents
and others gathered in the playground at
the height of the nuclear crisis stemming
from the March 11 earthquake and tsu-
nami. Many ate rice balls and cooked in
the open air.
They were never informed of the pre-
dictions that they were at risk. In an in-
terview with the AP Namie's mayor said
it took more than 24 hours for him to
realize from watching TV that the
evacuees were in danger. He sent buses
to move some of them out. But, unaware
of the risks, they were taken to another
part of town also forecast to be in the
plume's path. Most were left to fend for
themselves.
"When I think about it now, I am out-
raged," Principal Hidenori Arakawa said.
"Our lives were put at risk."
Documents obtained by the AP, inter-
views with key officials and a review of
other newly released documents and
parliamentary transcripts indicate that
the government's use of the forecast
data was hamstrung by communication
breakdowns and a lack of even a basic
understanding of the system at the high-:
_est levels.


It's unclear how much radiation people
might have been exposed to by staying
in areas in the pjath of the radioactive
plume, let alone whether any might suf-
fer health problems from the exposure.
It could be difficult to ever prove a con-
nection: Health officials say they have no
plans to prioritize radiation tests of those
who were at the school.
But the breakdown may hold lessons
for other countries with nuclear power
plants because similar warning systems
are used around the world. This was their
first test in a major crisis.
The Japanese network'- built in 1986
at a cost of $140 million is known as
SPEEDI, short for the System for Predic-
tion of Environment Emergency Dose
Information. It has radiation monitoring
posts nationwide and has been tested in a
number of drills, including one the prime
minister led for the Hamaoka nuclear fa-
cility just last year.
Even so, according to the prime minis-
ter's office, Kan and his top advisers never
asked for or received the data. Despite
taking part in the Hamaoka drill, Kan ad-
mitted he didn't understand how SPEEDI
worked or how valuable the data was.
"I had no idea what sort of informa-
tion was available," he told Parliament on
June 17. "I didn't know anything about it
then, and there was no way I could make
a judgment."
In two post-crisis assessments, a report
to the International Atomic Energy Agen-
cy and an annual white paper on science
and technology, his government has said
the network "failed to perform its intend-
ed function."
A senior member of Kan's crisis team,
Nuclear Safety Commission chief Ha-
ruki Madarame, went so far as to say the
SPEEDI data was no better than "a mere
weather report."
He said the predictions were of no value
because they lacked accurate radiation
readings. Some of the system's monitor-
ing capabilities were compromised by
the tsunami and ensuing power outages,
and the utility that runs the Fukushima
plant, TEPCO, did not provide readings
of its own. But SPEEDI officials say Mada-
rame's position reflects a fundamental
misunderstanding of what their system is
designed to do.


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Junior Varsity Football





Pirates count on freshmen


MARKSKINNER/FLORIDAN
Sneads junior varsity coach Shawn Graham walks the Pirates through a play Tuesday.


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Sneads Pirates junior var-
sity team will head into the 2011
season with a lot of question
marks. However, that doesn't
mean that second-year Pirates
coach Shawn Graham doesn't
foresee great things for his team.
"I have high hopes for them,"
the coach said. "We've just got to
find some skill guys. Ifwe can do
that, we'll be pretty tough."
The JV lost some of its best
athletes to the varsity squad in
the likes of Dontarious Williams,
Darius Williams, Reggie Creal,
and John Michael Glover, and
may lose sophomore quarter-
back Josh Taylor to'the varsity as
well due to the injury of senior
varsity QB Blade Osborne.
That means the Pirates JV will
be counting on the rising fresh-


man coming from Grand Ridge
Middle School to add support,
perhaps more so than usual.
Graham said he expected
around five or six skill kids from
Grand'Ridge to join the team
when the school semester be-
gins, but he's not yet familiar
enough with the players or sure
which ones will actually play to
estimate how much of an impact
they'll have on the team.
"We just don't have any (skill
players) right now. They're not
out here," the coach said. "The
fast guys from Grand Ridge last
year aren't out here, and I don't
know if they're playing or not.
Right now, everything is still up
in the air."
One former Indians player
who has been at Sneads practice
this week is last year's starting

SSee PIRATES, Page 2B


Big Bend


final set
BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.con

The Gulf County Drive and
Bay County Brewers are.set
to face each other in the Big
Bend Baseball League of Flor-
ida championship series this
weekend after both -earned
wins in the semifinal round
Sunday.
The Drive defeated the Chat-
tahoochee Red Birds on Sun-
day in Chattahoochee to earn
their spot in .the final series,
while, the Western Division
champion Brewers topped
the Jackson County Jays on
Sunday in Panama City.
The two teams will play a
best-of-three series to de-
termine the league's overall
champion.
Bay County will host the first
game on Saturday, with Gulf
County set to host on Sunday,
with a third game to also be
played Sunday if necessary.


Sports
,Briefs

Hudson golf
tournament
The fifth annual Coach
John "Hud" Hudson golf
tournament will take place
Aug. 20-21 at Florida Caverns
Golf Course.
The format will be three-
man scramble, with morn-
ing or afternoon tee times
available.
Cash prizes will be paid
for the three top teams in
each flight, with a long drive
and closest to the pin prize
awarded each day.,
Lunch will be provided on
Sunday.
For more information,
contact John Donaldson at
850-573-0806, Hunter Nolen
at 850-573-6474, or Brian
McKeithan at 850-482-4257.


MERE Soccer
The Marianna Recreation
Department will offer five
soccer leagues this fall for
boys and girls ages 5-18.
Registration will be held o
through Aug. 26 from 8 a.m.
to 4 p.m. at The Marianna
Educational and Recre-
ational Expo (MERE) located
at 3625 Caverns Road in
Marianna.
Fee is $30 for participants
who live inside thd city
limits of Marianna, and $45
for those outside. Fee must
be paid with a check or
money order. No cash will be
accepted.
All participants must bring
copy of berth certificate at
time of registration.
For more information,
F contact the Marianna
Recreation Department at
482-6228.


See SPORTS, Page 2B


COTTONDArLE FOOTBALL




Hornets battling the heat


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Cottondale Hornets head coach Mike Melvin talks his team through a play during practice Monday afternoon.


Conditioning critical for short-handed Cottondale


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Cottondale Hornets kicked off fall
practice on Monday in unseasonably cool
weather thanks to cloudy skies.
Unfortunately, the Hornets were only
able to avoid the summer's oppressive
heat wave for one day, as it returned in
full force for Tuesday's two-a-days.
Cottondale coach Mike Melvin said he
couldn't have come up with better condi-
tions to start fall practice on Monday, but
the typical weather struggles returned on
the second day of practice.
"(Monday) was great. It was overcast all
day, and we got a lot of football done," he
said. "(Tuesday), it got hot early, and we
started making a few mistakes, so we had
to spend some time relaxing and cooling
down."


"We'rejust trying to get all the base
stuffing, to really review everything
we did in the spring and pick up from
there. So far, we've had two good days
ofpractice."
Mike Melvin,
Cottondale head coach

The Hornets escaped the heat early in
the afternoon, focusing primarily on the
'X's and 'O's of the offense and defense
before heading back out late afternoon
for another practice.
Melvin said the first week of fall practice
is simply an extension of the spring and
summer.
"We're just trying to get all the base stuff
in, to really review everything we did in


the spring and pick up from there," he
said. "So far, we've' had two good days of
'practice. We haven't forgotten a whole lot,
and people are picking up assignments."
However, perhaps the most important
aspect of the game the Hornets will have
to work on is their conditioning, especial-
ly with just 20 players on the roster com-
pared with 32 last year.
"When you've got 20 guys, condition-
ing is going to be huge," Melvin said.
"It's a huge emphasis. We can't run out of
gas early because we don't have enough
depth to get a lot of rest. Everybody will
get plenty of reps."
The reps will likely come at various po-
sitions as well, according to the coach.
"Everybody is having to cross train at
every position really," he said. "Everybody

See HORNETS, Page 2BL


~


-----' i~-.l'cir
:I~.~~jli~-".M-~CI r~~Hi+fYfi~








12B WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 10, 2011



Pirates
From Page 1B
quarterback, Hunter Johnson.
Depending on where Taylor
ends up, Johnson could end up
playing quarterback or fullback
for the Pirates this year.
One area that is not in question
for the Sneads JV at the moment
is offensive line, where Graham
said he has a good mix of capa-
ble players.
"We should have a good line,"
Graham said. "I would say that's
the strength of our time. We've
got some pretty good looking
kids coming from Grand Ridge
playing there. Right now, I feel
comfortable with my offensive
line, and that's good for our fu-
ture. I feel like it will be just as
strong as last year's line, and
maybe a lot better. That's what
I'm hoping for anyway."
Sophomores Joe ,Vinson and


Hornets
From Page 1B
is in different spots, and every-
one has to know multiple posi-
tions. We're down to 20 players,
so you're going to have to play
more than one position if there's
an injury or something was to
happen."
Another unfortunate conse-


Sports
From Page 1B
Speed, Agility and
Conditioning Camp
Bionic Sports will hold a
Speed, Agility and Condition-
ing camp on Tuesdays and
Thursday at Integras Therapy &
Wellness Center for youth boys
and girls ages 9-17.
Cost is $40 a month, or $12 per
week. The camp will continue
for the entire summer, focusing
on becoming a better athlete.
Call Eric Pender for more
information at 850-284-2368.


The Associated Press

HOUSTON Ben Tate never
got a rookie season.
A second-round pick in the
2010 draft, the former Auburn
running back broke his-right.an-
kle in the Texans' first preseason
game and was carted off the
field. He was placed on injured
reserve, underwent surgery and
watched his first year in the NFL
from the sideline.
The 5-foot-ll, 219-pound Tate
came into this year's training
camp eager to show the Texans
what he could do, but he's hin-
dered by an injury again. He left
Tuesday's practice with tightness
in his hamstring, and he and the
coaches are left to wonder how
he'll make up the lost time.
"It's more annoying than any-
thing," Tate said after Tuesday's
afternoon walk-through. "I need
reps. It's bugging the hell out of
me."
Adding to Tate's angst is the
stacked competition behind
2010 rushing champion Arian
Foster. Steve Slaton is looking
for a bounceback season, Der-
rick Ward is trying to follow up
a productive 2010 and former
Texas star Chris Ogbonnaya has
impressed coach Gary Kubiak in
early practices.
"It's frustrating, when you've
been working so hard in the off-
season to get ready for this, and
you have a hamstring injury
that's just nagging right now,"
Tate said. "There's nothing you
can do about it. The only thing I
can do is keep going, and when
I do get healthy, come back and
show I haven't missed a beat."
But Kubiak said Tate is losing
ground on the other backs.
"He's missed a lot of time," Ku-
biak said. "He came out (Tues-
day) and said his hamstring is
sore again, so we pulled him out.
He's missing a lot of work since
he's been out here, so we're all
just waiting on him to get back
out here and get going. Those
other guys are working their
tails off and had another good
practice."
Tate starred at Snow Hill High
School in Maryland, setting the
state single-season rushing re-
Jcord as a junior (2,886 yards). He


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Trent Jeter will be joined on the
line by freshmen AJ Johnson,
Bailey Beauchamp, Bo McClam-
ma and Chris Green.
If the Sneads offensive front
is as good as Graham believes
it to be, finding people to car-
ry the football could be a lot
easier.
"We're going to look for a
ground-and-pound," the coach
joked. "We want to get some-
body that can halfway run and
lean on that line. If the line
meshes the way I think it will, we
won't have to worry about (skill
positions)."
With several incoming fresh-
men needed to contribute this
year, Graham said that getting
them adjusted to the higher level
of competition is always the big-
gest goal early on.
"Knowing the speed of the
game is a whole lot different,
they have to really step up and
know their spots backwards and


quence of the numbers crunch is
'that the team can't go 11 on 11 in
practice, but Melvin said that the
team isn't looking for excuses,
but rather focusing on the task
at hand.
"You just get it done. We don't
even really think about it," he
said. "You know what you've
got, so every day you work with
what's here and get what you can
get done."


Marianna Cross Country/
Track
Current Marianna High School
students or incoming freshmen
interested in running on the
Marianna High School boys or
girls cross country or distance
track team need to contact
coach Allan Gibson at 850 209-
3403. The team is practicing at 6
a.m. every morning at Marianna
High School. Contact coach
Gibson before you show up for
your first practice.

Marianna Youth Wrestling
Team Dynamic Youth Wres-


forwards," the coach said.
"That's one of the things we're
really working on hard now, guys
getting to know what they're
supposed to be doing in every
situation."
Sneads, which went 3-2 last
season, will play its first junior
varsity game of this season on
Sept. 1 at home against Blount-
stown, and will also have games
against Marianna, Graceville
and Wewahitchka.
Wewa is a new addition to the
schedule, but Graham said he
expects the schedule to be just
as challenging this year as it was
last year.
"It will be about the same.
Wewa is new, but I feel like it's
going to be tough regardless, es-
pecially with Blountstown and
Marianna there,"'he said. "But I
feel like these kids have got char-
acter and they will step up and
play hard when we need them
to."


To this point, the players have
not slowed down a bit, according
to Melvin.
"Everybody has picked up on
everything so far. The coaching
staff is happy right now," he said.
"What we're seeing has been
good. We haven't added any-
thing from what we did in the
spring, but everybody remem-
bers jobs and assignments so far,
and that's big right now."


tling Team will continue practic-
ing on Tuesday and Thursday
nights at the wrestling room at
the old Marianna High School.
Practice will be from 6 p.m. to
8 p.m.
All kids in Jackson County
from ages 6 and up are welcome
to join. For further information
please contact Marianna coach
Ron Thoreson at 272-0280.


Sports Items

Send all sports items to editorial@jcflori-
dan.com, or fax them to 850-482-4478. The
mailing address for the paper is Jackson
SCounty Floridan P.O. Box 520 Marianna, FL
32447.


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
China's Xue Chen (right) jumps for the ball against, the Netherlands
Margo Wiltens (center) during the FIVB Beach Volley International
Olympic test event tournament Tuesday at Horse Guards Parade in
London.


Sports events



cancelled due



to London riots


The Associated Press

LONDON A few miles
from the worst violence to hit
the city in 25 years,.beach vol-
leyball players dived headlong
in the sand, the most summery
of Olympic sports on display
less than a year before the Lon-
don Games.
The matches were played un-
der the shadow of the London
Eye big wheel, and not far from
Buckingham Palace and No. 10
Downing Street. Yet no historic
backdrop could block the im-
ages of rioting and looting that
have swept the city the past
three days and left a mark on
British sports.
The soccer game between
England and the Netherlands
at Wembley was the biggest ca-
sualty. And as IOC officials ar-
rived to review progress leading
to the 2012 Games, they were
greeted by a forbidding land-
scape a short way from where
the Olympics will unfold.
Plumes of smoke rose from
run-down neighborhoods.
Businesses closed early
- many of them boarded up
- as authorities struggled to
contain the country's worst un-
rest since race riots set London
ablaze in the 1980s.
It was hardly the image Brit-
ain hoped to present to the
world. This was a time when
fans should have been reveling
in fhe expectation of a success-
ful Olympics and the start of
English soccer season.
Instead, athletes fielded
calls from worried relatives
watching TV footage of burn-
ing buildings and vehicles. Of-
ficials tried to downplay the
impact of the violence that be-
gan Saturday night in the Tot-
tenham area of north London
following the fatal shooting of
a local manrby police.
"My friends and family have
been calling," Canadian beach
volleyball player Heather Bans-
ley said. "They keep checking
in to make sure we're OK. It's
not a great thing to be happen-
ing to London."
The disorder comes less than
two weeks after London cel-
ebrated with great fanfare the
one-year countdown to the
opening of the games on July
27,2012.
On Monday, the violence
spread to Hackney, one the
boroughs encompassing the
Olympic Park in east London.
The unrest took place about
four miles from the park, site of
the main Olympic Stadium and
other key venues.
Prime Minister David Cam-
eron and London Mayor Bo-
ris Johnson cut short their
vacations to head back to the
capital as organizers defended
security planning and pressed
ahead with preparations for the
world's biggest sports festival. .
"We have a commitment to
deliver a safe and secure games
and we will do so," Olympics
Minister Hugh Robertson said.


"All the evidence shows this
trouble is low-level criminality
driven by messages on social
networks and not some new,
emerging security threat."
More than 500 people have
been arrested in London and
more than 100 charged so far.
With police needed else-
where, Wembley Stadium was
deemed not safe enough to
host Wednesday's soccer game.
With 70,000 tickets sold for
the visit of a Dutch team that
reached last year's World Cup
final, the Football Association
will take a financial hit because
of ticket refunds.
Tuesday's game between
Ghana and, Nigeria in neutral
Watford, 20 miles northwest
of London, was also called
off. The Premier League said
it was still talking with police
before deciding whether this
weekend's season-opening
matches at Tottenham, Ful-
ham and Queen's Park Rangers
could proceed. Two domestic
Scup games set for Tuesday also
were abandoned.
Tottenham was the scene of
the. shooting that sparked the
initial violence and one of the
areas hardest hit by riots. One
of the ticket offices at the north
London club's stadium was
closed because of damage.
With the mayhem spread-
ing outside London, dozens
of people attacked shops in
Birmingham's main retail dis-
trict. England's cricketers were
warned to stay in the team ho-
tel after dark as they prepared
for their match against India
on Wednesday. Rival captains
Andrew Strauss and Mahendra
Singh Dhoni supported the de-
cision to play.
But, for now, it's the outlying
areas of London such as Hack-
ney that are suffering.
Amid the tourist haunts of
historic central London, only
the rock music pumping from
the speaker system drowned
out the polite applause of spec-
tators at a temporary beach
volleyball court made up of
2,274 tons of imported sand.
About half the seats at the
sold-out event went unfilled.
And because of worries that
night would bring renewed
violence, officials wrapped up
the opening day almost three
hours early so fans, staff and
volunteers could get home.
FIVB Beach Volleyball Direc-
tor Angelo Squeo, who was on
site during the Olympic Park
bombing at the 1996 Atlanta
Games, said he consulted with
high-ranking London Olympic
organizers and police before
making the decision.
"I will do whatever in order to
not put in danger not even
risk putting in danger any-
body here," Squeo told The
Associated Press. "In Atlanta,
we had the bomb and I was
left with 11,000 people outside
the venue and I did not know
if I had the green light or red
light."

i


-.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Houston Texans running back Ben Tate takes a break from workouts during
training camp Tuesday in Houston.


averaged 13 yards per carry as a
senior, helping his school reach
the state championship game.
He was Auburn's leading rusher
as a senior in 2009 (1,362 yards),
and the Texans were happy that
he was available in the second
round.
Last year, Tate was competing
for time at running back with
Foster, Slaton, Chris Henry and
Jeremiah Johnson before snap-
ping his ankle early in Houston's
preseason opener in Arizona. He
tried to watch and learn all he
could as he recovered from the
surgery.
"We wanted him to watch what
was going on, howguys prepared
for the games," running backs
coach Chick Harris said. "Those
are things you sometimes don't
get unless you're into it."
But Harris said nothing beats
actual practice, and he's as
concerned as Kubiak about
how many snaps Tate is sitting
out.
"He's snake-bit," Harris said.
"You just hope that he can work
his way out of it. I can understand
injuries, they happen. But the
guys who can stay on the field,


you get more looks at them. He's
got great potential. But we've just
got to keep him on the field. Stay
on the field, that's when you get
your reps. Then you're ready."
Tate dismissed the injuries as
"just part of football." He said
the ankle held up fine through
the first week of practice, and
he said the hamstring issue is
minor.
But he.also realizes the urgency
of returning as soon as he can.
"It's tough, because you do
want to be out here with your
teammates, you do want to be
working hard," Tate said. "For
missing so much time last year,
this is stuff that I don't take for
granted anymore, practicing."
Houston plays its preseason
opener against the New York Jets
on Monday, and Tate hopes Ku-
biak gives him a look.
"My No. 1'thing is being able
to show what I can do in these
preseason games," Tate said. "If
I can get healthy and be healthy
for those, that's all that's going to
matter. I'm missing reps. But as
long as I come back, and I know
what's going on, then you've got
to get better."


'Snakebit' Tate trying




to fit with Texans


SPORTS







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


SPORTS


Jacksonville Jagul g -;


Garrard out, Gabbert to start


The Associated Press

JACKSONVILLE David
Garrard is out, Blaine Gab-
bert is in and Todd Bou-
man is once again off the
tractor.
Jacksonville's quarter-
back situation got scram-
bled a bit Tuesday when
coach Jack Del Rio ruled
Garrard out of Thursday's
preseason opener at New
England.
Gabbert, the 10th overall
pick in April's NFL draft,
will start against the Pa-
triots. Gabbert and third-
stringer Luke McCown will
share snaps, but Bouman
also will be available.
The Jaguars signed the
39-year-old Bouman,
making this his seventh
stint with the franchise in
the last five years. In 2010,
Bouman was literally sit-
ting on a tractor helping
his father harvest corn in
Minnesota when the Jag-
uars called.
"We actually made a call
to the tractor again and
Todd will be joining us
this evening," Del Rio said.
"Pulled him off the tractor
once again. He's a great
guy and we think he's a
good veteran player. He'll
be able to come in and pick
up and help us perform
throughout the preseason
and we'll see from there."
Garrard tweaked his back
during practice Thursday
and hasn't done anything
on the field since. Gabbert
started the team's scrim-
mage Saturday and was
solid despite a few dropped
passes.


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Jacksonville Jaguars head coach Jack Del Rio (right) watches.
rookie quarterback Blaine Gabbert (11) drop back to pass
during training camp July 30,2011 in Jacksonville.


He expects this to be dif-
ferent, though.
"It's going to be fun,"
Gabbert said. "Those reps
are going to be extremely
valuable, on film after the
game just to see what was
going on. That will be the
first live game I've been in
-in this league, so it will be
fun. There are going to be
mistakes made, but we've
just got to learn from those
and correct them the next
week."
Garrard will make the
trip to New England, but
several teammates will
stay behind for treatment,
rest or precautionary rea-


sons. Running back Mau-
rice Jones-Drew, defensive
end Aaron Kampman,
defensive tackle Terrance
Knighton and tight end
Marcedes Lewis won't play,
Del Rio said.
Starters will work just a
series or two, the coach
added.
"I'm not really as inter-
ested in this first preseason
game with them as much
as I am getting an oppor-
tunity to evaluate the rest
of the roster," Del Rio said.
All eyes will be on Gab-
bert, though.
The former Missouri
standout had 40 touch-


downs, 18 interceptions
and an 18-8 record in two
seasons as a starter. Jack-
sonville traded up six spots
to draft him, believing his
strong arm, decision-mak-
ing skills and scrambling
ability will allow him to
develop into a franchise
quarterback.,
He's been able to work
with the first-team offense
the last five days, repeti-
tions that should help him
prepare for the Patriots.
"The Is speed is differ-
ent," Gabbert said. "You're
going against starting NFL
players, so you've just got
to be on top of your game,
know the protections,
know the concepts and
know where to get the ball
out if they do blitz."
-Del Rio said the team is
simply being cautious with
Garrard and that he should
be able to return Saturday.
But Del Rio also expected
Garrard to practice days
after his back tightened
up.
Signing Bouman gives
the Jaguars a fill-in who
is familiar with the sys-
tem, someone who can
play against the Patriots
and still allow the offense
to function and provide
coaches a chance to evalu-
ate reserves vying for ros-
ter spots.
"Can he (play right
away)? Yes, I think he can,"
Del Rio said. "Certainly
better than somebody
that would come in, who
wouldn't have the kind the,
experience he has. We're
going to try not to overdo
it. But he'll be available."


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 10, 2011 3Br



Scott talked


with caddie


about Firestone


brouhaha


The Associated Press

JOHNS CREEK, Ga.
- Adam Scott talked
with Steve Williams
about the caddie's com-
ments last weekend at
Firestone, and both are
ready to "let our clubs do
the talking" at the PGA
Championship.
Coming off a win
against an elite field at
the World Golf Champi-
onship, Scott is one of the
favorites in the final ma-
jor of the year at Atlanta
Athletic Club.
But the very first ques-
tion the Aussie was asked
Tuesday and several
more related to wheth-
er Williams stole the at-
tention that should have
gone to Scott by lashing
out at former boss Tiger
Woods as soon as they
came off the 18th green
in Akron.
"I kind of think it's been
blown out of proportion,"
Scott said.
"I guess it's newsworthy
stuff. I don't know. Steve
was obviously delighted
to win, as was I. And,
you know, he was speak-
ing with a bit of emotion
probably."
No probably about
it. Williams gave an in-
terview that was nearly
twice as long as Scott's,


calling it "the best win
I've ever had" quite a
pronouncement, given
he was on the bag for 13
of Woods' major titles
before getting fired this
summer.
Williams also made it
clear that he felt Woods
had treated him unfairly,
saying he stuck by his
former boss even through
all his personal turmoil
and health problems.
"Look, we've had a chat
about the whole thing,"
said Scott, whose- laid-
back personalityis astrik-
ing contrast to Williams'
emotional demeanor. "I
just took what he said as
confidence in me. If he
really feels that was one
of his great wins, I'm kind
of flattered and it fills me
with confidence. I think
that's what his intention
is, to be honest."
Reached on his cell-
phone, Williams told The
Associated Press he was
caught off guard when
the media came up to in-
terview him after Scott's
win.
"It's very unusual for TV
to put a microphone in
front of a caddie's face,"
he said.
"There was a lot of emo-
tion and anger that came
out. It wasn't meant to of-
fend anyone."


College Football Preview


Big East conference gets offensive


- in a good way


The Associated Press

After a'lackluster sea-
son in the Big East that
finished with none of its
teams ranked in the Top
25, the conference that's
forever fighting for nation-
al respect is about to get a
lot more entertaining.
Maybe not better,
but definitely more
entertaining.
There are three new
coaches in the confer-
ence this season and two
of them -West Virginia's
Dana Holgorsen and
Pittsburgh's Todd Graham
- bring reputations for
producing high-scoring
and fast moving offenses.
Holgorsen was hired
after last season to be
offensive coordinator and
head-coach-in-waiting
behind Bill Stewart. He
didn't have to wait long.
Stewart was forced out
in June. Now Holgorsen,
who coached under Mike
Leach at Texas Tech and
last season directed the
third-ranked offense in
the nation as Oklahoma
State's coordinator, is a
head coach for the first
time.
Big things are expected
of West Virginia's Geno
Smith, the top-rated
passer in the Big East last
season, playing in Hol-
gorsen's spread offense.
"I knew about his re-
sume. The quarterbacks
he's had and the numbers
he's put up," Smith said.
"The offense has been
proven, it's been putting
up numbers. I think I give
it a different dynamic
because I'm able to do
more things. I'm athletic. I
can run around a little bit,
extend plays. And I can
make throws."
The other half of the
Backyard Brawl rivalry
will also have a new-look
offense.
Graham was hired after
Pitt's first pick to replace
Dave Wannstedt, Mike
Haywood, was fired
after being charged with
domestic violence in
Indiana.
Graham is a defensive
coach by pedigree, but he's
a proponent of the type
of up-tempo, spread of-
fenses that teams such as


Oregon and Auburn use.
In fact, Auburn offensive
coordinator Gus Malzahn
worked for Graham at
Tulsa:
The other coaching
change comes with far less
fanfare. Defending cham-
pion Connecticut hired
longtime Syracuse coach
Paul Pasqualoni to replace
Randy Edsall, who left for
Maryland.


WEST VIRGINIA

Key players: QB Geno
Smith; WR Tavon Austin;
CB Keith Tandy. Return-
ing starters: 9 offense, 4
defense.
Notes: Holgorsen doesn't
have anything to do with
the defense, so keeping
highly regarded coordina-
tor Jeff Casteel on staff was
key. ... West Virginia was
second in the nation in
sacks last season and No.
3 in scoring and total de-
fense. ... With Noel Devine
gone, Mountaineers are
looking for a new go-to
back. Maybe freshman
Vernard Roberts?

CINCINNATI

Key players: QB Zach
Collaros, LB JK Schaffer,
RB Isaish Pead. Return-
ing starters: 5 offense, 11
defense.
Notes: The No. 1 goal of
Year 2 under coach Butch
Jones for the Bearcats:
fewer mistakes. Cincin-
nati was the only team
in the Big East to average
more than 400 yards per
game in offense, but the
Bearcats were last in the
Big East with a minus 15
turnover margin.... They
also had the second most
penalty yards per game....
Will play two home games
at Paul Brown Stadium,
home of the NFL's Bengals.

SOUTH FLORIDA

Key players: QB B.J. Dan-
iels, LB DeDe Lattimore;
DE Ryne Giddins. Return-
ing starters: 3 offense, 6
defense.
Notes: Remember RB
Darrell Scott? He was
one of the most heralded


recruits in the country in
2008? He washed out in
two years at Colorado and
transferred to USE After
sitting out last year, he
gets a chance to shed the
bust label this season....
Bulls open at Notre Dame,
where Skip Holtz gradu-
ated from in 1986 and was
once an assistant for his
father, Lou.


PITTSBURGH

Key players: QB Tino
* Sunseri; DE Brandon
Lindsey; S Jared Holley.
Returning starters 6.of-
fense, 8 defense.
Notes: Panthers need to
improve their efficiency in
the red zone. They scored
only 26 touchdowns in 51
trips inside the opponents
20 last season. That's too
many field goals.... The
nonconference schedule
has a trip to Iowa (Sept.
17) and home games
against Notre Dame (Sept.
24) and Utah (Oct. 15).


CONNECTICUT

Key players: DT Kendall
Reyes, OT Mike Ryan, CB
BlidiWreh-Wilson. Re-
turning starters: 7 offense,
9 defense.
Notes: Paul Pasqualoni
is the other new coach in
the Big East, new to his


V r
p'.


"7!'1



THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
'West Virginia quarterback Geno Smith throws during practice
in Morgantown, W.Va. on Friday.


current school, that is.
Pasqualoni spent 14 years
with Syracuse, winning 64
percent of his games.
He was not,.however,
a popular choice among
UConn fans to replace
Randy Edsall.... USC
transfer RB D.J. Shoe-
mate could help make
up for the loss of Jordan
Todman.

RUTGERS

Key players: QB Chas
Dodd; DE MannyAbreu;
WR Mohamred Sanu.


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Returning starters: 10 of-
fense, 5 defense.
Notes: Greg Schiano is
entering his 11th season
as Rutgers coach.
No other Big East coach
has been in the league
more than two years ...
The Scarlet Knights lost
their last six games and
allowed 144 points in the
final three, bringing back
memories of the days
when Rutgers was just
about the worst program
in college football.
This turnaround
shouldn't be anywhere
near as tough for Schiano.


SYRACUSE

Key players: QB Ryan
Nassib, DE Chandler
Jones, RB Antwon Bailey.
Returning starters: 7 of-
fense, 5 defense.
Notes: Coach Doug
Marrone's rebuilding job
at his alma mater kicked
into high gear last year.
The Orange had a winning
record and won a bowl for
the first time since 2001.
... Defensive gains have
made the biggest differ-
ence. Orange have gone
from 114th to 37th to
seventh in nation total de-
fense the last three years,
though it looks as if it will
be difficult to avoid taking
a step back after losing
several key players.


LOUISVILLE

Key players: S Hakeem
Smith, RB Victor Ander-
son, DE B.J. Butler. Re-
turning starters: 4 offense,
7 defense.
Notes: If coach Charlie
Strong can continue the
progress in his second
season that he made in
his first, an inexperienced
quarterback will have to
blossom. Will Stein, who
made two starts in 2009,
is the front-runner, but
freshman Teddy Bridge-
water has a chance to play
soon.


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scoreboard


NASCAR SPRINT CUP
POINTS LEADERS
THROUGH AUG. 7
1. Carl Edwards, 720.
2. Jimmie Johnson, 711.
3. Kyle Busch, 709.
4. Kurt Busch,706.
5. Kevin Harvick, 700.
6. Matt Kenseth, 694.
7. Jeff Gordon, 668.
8. Ryan Newman, 658.
9. Tony Stewart, 642.
10. Dale Earnhardt Jr., 641.
11. DennyHamlin,618.
12. Clint Bowyer, 600.
13. Greg Biffle, 597.
14. Paul Menard, 587.
15. Mark Martin, 567.
16. Kasey Kahne, 567.
17. A J Allmendinger, 562.
18. Brad Keselowski, 558.
19. David Ragan, 556.
20. Joey Logano, 548.
NASCAR NATIONWIDE
POINTS LEADERS
THROUGH AUG. 6
1. Ricky Stenhouse Jr., 787.
2. Reed Sorenson, 775.
3. Elliott Sadler, 758.
4. Aric Almirola, 710.
5. Justin Allgaier, 704.
6. Jason Leffler, 677.
7. Kenny Wallace, 674.
8. Steve Wallace, 608.
9. Michael Annett, 598.
10. Brian Scott, 596.
11. Mike Bliss, 518.
12. Trevor Bayne, 512.
13. Mike Wqllace, 504.
14. Josh Wise, 502.
15. Joe Nemechek, 489.
16. Jeremy Clements, 447.
17. Timmy Hill, 425.
18. Eric McClure, 383.
19. Blake Koch, 372.
20. Derrike Cope, 370.
21. Morgan Shepherd, 339.
22. Scott Wimmer, 303.
23. Ryan Truex, 249.
24. Robert Richardson Jr., 245.
25. Sam Hornish Jr., 218.
26. Dennis Setzer, 188.
27. Jennifer Jo Cobb, 187.
28. Danica Patrick, 178.
29. Charles Lewandoski, 173.
30. Kevin Lepage, 167.
CAMPING WORLD TRUCK
POINTS LEADERS
THROUGH AUG. 6
1. Johnny Sauter, 493.
2. Austin Dillon, 488.
3. James Buescher, 474.
4. Timothy Peters, 465.
5. Cole Whitt,453.
6. Matt Crafton, 451.
7. Joey Coulter, 441.
8. Parker Kligerman, 439.
9. Ron Hornaday Jr., 436.
10. Todd Bodine, 415.
11. Brendan Gaughan, 396.
12. Nelson Piquet Jr., 394.
13. David Starr, 394.
14. Max Papis, 376.
15. Miguel Paludo, 367.
16. Jason White, 364.
17. Ricky Carmichael, 364.
18. Justin Lofton, 363.
19. Clay Rogers, 313.
20. Ryan Sieg, 313.
21. Justin Marks, 276.


NATIONAL LEAGUE
EAST DIVISION
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 75 40 .652 -
Atlanta 67 49 .578 8'


New York 57 57 .500 17
Washington 55 59 .482 19
Florida 55 60 .478 20
CENTRAL DIVISION
W L Pct GB
Milwaukee 65 50 .565 -
St. Louis 62 53 .539 3
Pittsburgh 55 59 .482 9
Cincinnati 55 60 .478 10
Chicago 49 66 .426 16
Houston 38 77 .330 27


WEST DIVISION
W L Pct GB
San Francisco 63 53 .543 -
Arizona 62 53 .539
Colorado 54 62 .466 9
Los Angeles 52 62 .456 10
San Diego 51 65 .440 12
Monday
Atlanta 8, Florida 5
Colorado 10, Cincinnati 7
N.Y. Mets 9, San Diego 8
Washington at Chicago, ppd., rain
Houston 9, Arizona 1
Philadelphia 5, L.A. Dodgers 3
Pittsburgh 5, San Francisco 0
Tuesday
Atlanta at Florida, late
Colorado at Cincinnati, late
San Diego at N.Y. Mets, late
Washington at Chicago Cubs late
Milwaukee at St Louis, late
Houston at Arizona, late
Philadelphia at L.A. Dodgers, late
Pittsburgh at San Francisco, late
Wednesday
Philadelphia (Worley 8-1) at L.A. Dodgers
(Billingsley 10-9), 3:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Karstens 8-6) at San Francisco
(J.Sanchez 4-6), 3:45 p.m.
Atlanta (T.Hudson 11-7) at Florida (Ani.San-
chez 6-5), 7:10 p.m.
Colorado (Millwood 0-0) at Cincinnati (Leake
9-7), 7:10 p.m.
San Diego (Harang 10-3) at N.Y. Mets (Dickey
5-10), 7:10 p.m.
Washington (Detwiler 1-1) at Chicago Cubs
(R.Lopez 2-3), 8:05 p.m.
Milwaukee (Wolf 8-8) at St. Louis (Westbrook
9-5), 8:15 p.m.
Houston (An.Rodriguez 0-4) at Arizona (Col-
Imenter 6-7), 9:40 p.m.
Thursday
San Diego at N.Y. Mets, 12:10 p.m.
Colorado at Cincinnati, 12:35 p.m.
Washington at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m.
Milwaukee at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m.
Houston at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
AMERICAN LEAGUE
EAST DIVISION


W L Pct GB
Boston 71 43 .623 -
New York 69 44 .611 '/
TampaBay 60 54 .526 11
Toronto 58 56 .509 13
Baltimore 44 68 .393 26
CENTRAL DIVISION
W L Pet GB
Detroit 61 53 .535 -
Cleveland 56 56 .500 4
Chicago 56 58 .491 5
Minnesota 51 64 .443 10
Kansas City 49 66 .426 12
WEST DIVISION
W L Pct GB
Texas 65 51 .560 -
Los Angeles -63 52 .548 1
Oakland 51 63 .447 13
Seattle 49 65 .430 15
Monday
Chicago White Sox 7, Baltimore 6
Boston 8, Minnesota 6
Tampa Bay 2, Kansas City 1
Texas 9, Seattle 2
Tuesday
Chicago White Sox at Baltimore, late
Detroit at Cleveland, late
L.A. Angels at N.Y. Yankees, late
Oakland at Toronto, Late
Kansas City at Tampa Bay, late
Seattle at Texas,'late
Boston at Minnesota, late
Wednesday
Chicago White Sox (Humber 8-8) at Baltimore


GOLF
3 p.m.
TGC USGA, U.S. Women's
Amateur Championship, round of 64
matches, at Barrington, R.I.
LITTLE LEAGUE BASEBALL
11 a.m.
ESPN2 Playoffs, Great Lakes
Regional semifinal, Grosse Point
Park, Mich. vs. La Grange, Ky., at
Indianapolis
1 p.m.
ESPN2 Playoffs, Southeast
Regional semifinal, Warner Robins,
Ga. vs. Fairmont, W.Va., at Warner
Robins, Ga.
3 p.m.
ESPN2 Playoffs, Great Lakes
Regional semifinal, Evansville, Ind.
vs. Hamilton, Ohio, at Indianapolis
7 p.m.
ESPN2 Playoffs, Southeast
Regional semifinal, Tampa, Fla. vs.
Mobile, Ala., at Warner Robins, Ga.


MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL


7 p.m.
ESPN L.A. Angels at N.Y. Yankees
8 p.m.
WGN Washington at Chicago
Cubs
SOCCER
9 p.m.
ESPN2 Men's national teams,
exhibition, U.S. vs. Mexico, at
Philadelphia'
SOFTBALL
5 p.m.
ESPN2 Big League, World Series,
championship, teams TBD, at Kal-
amazoo, Mich.


(Tom.Hunter 1-2), 7:05 p.m.
Detroit (Porcello 11-6) at Cleveland (Jimenez
0-0), 7:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Takahashi 3-2) at N.Y. Yankees
(Nova 10-4), 7:05 p.m.
Oakland (G.Gonzalez 9-9) at Toronto (Alvarez
0-0), 7:07 p.m.
Kansas City (F.Paulino 1-4) at Tampa Bay
(W.Davis 8-7), 7:10 p.m.
Seattle (Vargas 6-10) at Texas (D.Holland 10-4),
8:05 p.m.
Boston (Lester 11-5) at Minnesota (Blackburn
7-9), 8:10 p.m.
Thursday
Kansas City at Tampa Bay, 12:10 p.m.
Oakland at Toronto, 12:37 p.m.
L.A. Angels at N.Y. Yankees, 1:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
Detroit at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m.


PGA TOUR
FEDEXCUP LEADERS
THROUGH AUG. 7


Rank Player
1. Nick Watney
2. Steve Stricker
3. Luke Donald
4. K,J. Choi
5. Phil Mickelson
6. Bubba Watson
7. Mark Wilson
8. Gary Woodland
9. Webb Simpson
10. David Toms
11. Matt Kuchar
12. Jason Day
13. Fredrik Jacobson


Points
1,844
1,803
1,765
1,572.
1,552
1,535
1,419
1,404
1,361
1,361
1,358
1,308
1,235


Money
$4,264,483
$3,597,523
$4,293,248
$3,737,992
$3,235,821"
$3,145,735
$2,826,190
$2,707,563
$2,725,043
$3,073,230
$2,963,861
$3,109,087
$2,234,367


14. Martin Laird
15. Adam Scott
16. Brandt Snedeker
17. Bill Haas
18. Dustin Johnson
19. Aaron Baddeley
20. Rory Sabbatini
21. Jonathan Byrd
22. Hunter Mahan
23. Charl Schwartzel
24. Keegan Bradley
25. Rickie Fowler
26. Scott Stallings
27. Charles Howell III
28. Spencer Levin
29. D.A. Points
30. Zach Johnson
31. Steve Marino
32. Chris Kirk
33. Jhonattan Vegas
34. Bo Van Pelt
35. Ryan Moore
36. Ryan Palmer
37. Lucas Glover
38. Jason Dufner
39. Tommy Gainey
40. Vijay Singh
41. Y.E. Yang
42. Justin Rose
43. Brendan Steele
44. Kyle Stanley
45. Charley Hoffman
46.BrandtJobe
47. Sean O'Hair
48. Brendon de Jonge
49. Kevin Na
50. Robert Garrigus
51. Brian Gay
52. John Senden
53. Pat Perez
54. Robert Karlsson
55. J.B. Holmes
56. Robert Allenby
57. Brian Davis
58. Harrison Frazar
59. Andres Romero
60. Cameron Tringale
61. Kris Blanks
62. Jimmy Walker
63. Jeff Overton
64. Sergio Garcia
65. JJ. Henry
66. Charlie Wi
67. Kevin Streelman
68. Carl Pettersson
69. Blake Adams
70. Chris Couch
71. Geoff Ogilvy
72. Chad Campbell
73. Jim Furyk
74. Stewai't Cink
75. Johnson Wagner
76. John Rollins
77. Troy Matteson
78. Ricky Barnes
79. Ryuji Imada
80. Scott Piercy '
81. Chez Reavie
82. Jerry Kelly
83. Kevin Chappell
84. Hunter Haas
85. Chris DiMarco
86. Davis Love III
87. Ben Crane
88. Marc Leishman
89. Anthohy Kim
90. Graeme McDowell
91. Bryce Molder
92. Paul Goydos
93. Scott Verplank
94. Matt Bettencourt
95. Michael Bradley
96. Nick O'Hern
97. Greg Chalmers
98. John Merrick
99. Chris Stroud
100. Tim Herron


NFL PRESEA
AMERICAN
E
W LT
Buffalo 0 0 0
Miami 0 0 0
New England 0 0 0
N.Y. Jets 0 0 0


WEDNESDAY. AUGUST 10,2011 + 4B


1,234 $2,466,289
1,232 $2,941,477
1,227 $2,456,895
1,210 $2,320,991
1,191 $2,686,265
1,181 $2,447,182
1,174 $2,271,625
1,165 $2,401,954
1,137 $2,267,285
1,123 $2,358,172
1,021 $1,987,200
1,020 $2,007,941
992 $1,891,825
991 $1,796,254
983 $1,893,866
975 $1,818,463
951 $1,697,972
935 $1,821,556
921 $1,744,827
901 $1,627,218
881 $1,756,566
869 $1,632,973
853 $1,661,145
839 $1,597,563
813 $1,678,060
809 $1,549,231
799 $1,532,130
798 $1,724,689
796 $1,534,420
777 $1,509,404
761 $1,109,366
746 $1,182,158
743 $1,284,956
719 $1,307,481
715 $1,098,423
698 $1,279,465
693 $1,400,687
685 $1,131,954
683 $1,096,300
666 $1,212,513
663 $1,274,255
640 $1,398,583
637 $1,182,718
635 $896,819
631 $1,252,277
628 $1,210,353
622 $1,160,975
613 $1,010,217
612 $1,120,703
611 $1,129,552
600 $1,143,124
599 $837,097
591 $1,033,131
591 $1,057,548
587 $960,408
580 $826,051
573 $913,416
571 $1,101,527
569 $899,080
556 $896,036
556 $909,162
551 $1,104,064
546 $969,396
542 $916,102
538 $894,663
529 $926,542
529 $905,162
513 $899,867
505 $795,349
503 $1,040,038
499 $926,366
499 $740,263
497 $923,630
493 $808,851
485 $772,767
485 $1,023,946
485 $1,029,058
479 $839,011
474 $1,111,116
462 $863,178
461 $673,695
443 $818,895
435 $610,614
S434 $676,485
415 $641,378
413 $825,178
412 $681,438


ISON GLANCE
CONFERENCE
ast
Pct PF PA
.000 0 0
.000 0 0
.000 0 0
.000 0 0


WEDNESDAY MORNING / AFTERNOON ,AUGUST 10, 2011.

6:00 6:3017:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:0010:3011i:0011:3012:0012:30 1:00 1:30 2:00 2:30 3:00 3:30 4:00 4:30 5:00 5:30
20 The Early Show (N) (In Stereo) l0 Griffith Family Fd Let's Make a Deal (N) The Price Is Right (N) News Young & Restless Bold The Talk (in Stereo) The Dr. Oz Show OprahWinfrey News News News News
30 WTVY News 4 The Early Show (N) (In Stereo) 0c Lve Regis & Kelly he Price Is Right (N) Young & Restless Live at Bold The Talk (In Stereo) Let's Make a Deal (N) Rachael Ray yo Oprah Winfrey News News
50 NewsChannel 7 Today Today Dark secrets of mothers; Luke Bryan. (N) (in Stereo) BB Days of our Lives (N) News 7 at Noon Rachael Ray The Doctors ro Ellen DeGeneres Millionalre Jeopardyl News NBC News
8 News 13 This Morning Good Morning America (N) )B Live Regis & Kelly The View (In Stereo) The Dr. Oz Show All My Children 0 One Life to Live 0 General Hospital (N) Dr. Phil (In Stereo) Oprah Winfrey News ABC
10 ) Auto Tech Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Aqua Kids Funniest Home Videos qhris Smarter Smarter Judge B. Housewives/NJ New Life Church Judge Mathls Justice Justice Nate Berkus The People's Court Jdg Judy Jdg Judy
11 6 Arthur Martha Curious Cat In the Super Dinosaur Sesame Street SId WordWrd Between Barney Arthur Clifford Martha id Electric Cyberch'e WIIdKratt WordGIrI Cat in the Curious Dinosaur NewsHour
7 SHOW 4 301 r r,.l ;.ue, ,er'. 11s51Si.ir'jl PG iL 0 OfirtL 0r1 i HaiarijNj N s'n "neto iri** (O)i 91p R L *SrsiiB'lii t l 'our nr'i '' Vt I 'iii ,r * ''1 af G,. We". i * 0 10
14 NICK Unmizoom, Umizoomi Bubble 'Dora Sponge Sponge Parents Parents Sponge Sponge Sponge Sponge iCarly iCany viclorios VicIorlous Big Time Big Time Sponge. Sponge. Sponge. Sponge. ICarly ICarly
16 TBS Home Imp. Home Imp. Saved Saved/ Yes, Dear Yea, Dear Prince Prince Prince Payne Payne Browns Amer.Dad Earl Raymond Jim Jim he Office Friends Friends Raymond Raymond King King
17 HBO E .:, *LI' V:,i r hi," T w iI)11 PG 'Hrr) Prfi, ,~ald H.avii-Bi' Pnre' "* i :'o" uqt -*,i. ,i6url ndjo ln n.i.i-' I i;ji):.-i Pr,G 1 i Tie it'reI ri.,',i tP' G i '11 PC-i .Ti ** i.i0Ji41 HWlar S*ajir. PG '0
18 ESPN2 t ":, Mike ana Mi~e in nme Morning irl) L'.-~- ESPN Firse Take Lillie League Baseiall Liltle League Baeeoal Little League Baseball Softball: Big League, Final: Teams TBA. (Live)
19 ESPN SportsCenter 0 SportsCenter o SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N)'(Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) ISportsCenter (N) (Live) Report |Football NFL Live Jim Rome Around Pardon SportsCenter (N) (Live)
20 CSS Mayhem in the A.M. SportsNite Football Golf Landscap Paid Prog. Ogreenic Lose30Lb NceBoobs SportsNite Football Baseball: Cape Cod League All-Star Game. College Football: 2008 Miami at Virginia. SportsNite (N) 5B
21 DISN Pirates Mickey Mickey 'BeautyandtheBeas(1991) 'G' Phlneas Phineas Fish Deck Good Good Shake t Wizards IDeck Deck Phineas Deck Good Random Shakelt Wizards Phineas Good
22MAX "battedesnor e 9**, (2009)-'PG-13'50. T mjanWaf(199 "ginrirj s l'** t 0(ri) UMj3r Fo. oR R :.,' .*** n j .)'5.0j- .ne ,l1 :. Tr.,eo ruFr,'*. *'tir, PG .2l,.e i*\ i2 PG-13 1. t) 'kers m
23 TNT Angel The Trial Charmed (In Stereo) Charmed (In Stereo) Supemetural "Home" Supernatural o Las Vegas (In Stereo) as Vegas (n Stereo) Cold Case (In Stereo) he Closer The Life" B Stereoones (In Stereo) ones (In Stereo)


'aid Prog. IJ. Robison J. Meyer Sexy IRatzilla Dog-sized rat. Nature's Deadliest


'Ig Bomb (In Stereo) Biker Build-Off B American Chopper |American Chopper American Chopper American Chopper Cash Cab Cash Cab Cash Cab .Cash Cab


25TWC Your Weather Today With Abrams and Bettes r Wake Up With Al Day Planner torms Storms Cantore antor
26 USA Law Order: CI "TheSpy Who LovedMe'*** (1977, Action) Roger Moore. Royal Pains c Necessary Roughness House (In Stereo) NCIS "Sub Rosa" NCIS Enigma" r NCIS "Bete Noir" NCIS (In Stereo) a NCIS (In Stereo) aI
28FAM Boy World Boy/World What Like WhatLike Grounded 700 Club The700 Club 0 FullHouse Full House Still Stnd StilllStnd 8 Rules 8 Rules My Wfe My Wife '70s Show '70s Show '70s Show '70s Show Secret-Teen StillStnd StillStnd
29 LIFE The Balancing Act Reba Reba WillGrace WillGrace Chris Chris How I Met How Met Desp.-Wives Grey's Anatomy BB Grey's Anatomy 0 Cold Case Files B Cold Case Files aI Unsolved Mysteries Unsolved Mysteries
30 A&E Dog Dog Dog Dog CSI: Miami (In Stereo) The Sopranos 0 Criminal Minds N The First 48 co Storage Storage Dog Dog CSI: Miami (In Stereo) The Sopranos Bo Criminal Minds rE The First 48
32 SYFY Look Sexy $ Secrets The Twilight Zone The Twilight Zone The Twilight Zone The Twilight Zone The Twilight Zone The Twilight Zone The Twilight Zone The Twilight Zone The Twilight Zone Stargate SG-1m l Star Trek: Enterprise
33AMC Fat Loss WEN Hair Look Sexy Paid Prog. Stooges Stooges Stooges The AlUamo'*,* (2004; War) Dennis Quaid. PG-13' a IFightofthe PhoeniP** (2004) Dennis Quaid. : Marked forDeath" ** (1990, Action)'R' 'Rambo Parti
34MTV AMTV:10 on Top AMTV (In Stereo) Disaster Disaster Disaster Disaster Disaster Disaster Disaster Disaster Awkward. n Mom Stereo) Teen Mom (In Stereo) Teen Mom (In Stereo) Ext. Cribs '70s Show '70s Show 170s how '70sShow
35 BET (5:00) BET Inspiration Chris Chris Bernie Bemeie Bemie Bemie Jame F. JamleF. JamleF. JamleF. 'BringingDown the House'(2003, Comedy) The Game The Game Chris Chris 106 & Park: BET's Top 10 Live (N) (Live)
36TOON Bakugan Beyblade Pok6mon Sidekick Johnny T Johnny T Garfield Garfield Scooby Scooby Looney Tunes Tom & Jerry Garfield 2Dogs Johnny T Sidekick Almost Adventure MAD Looney Squirrel IJohnnyT
39 HIST Modem Marvels t TItanic's Final Moments: Missing Pieces Titanlc's Tragic Sister Underwater Universe Underwater Universe Modem Marvels T tanic's Final Moments: Missing Pieces Titanic's Tragic Sister Underwater Universe Underwater Universe
40 TVLND Ogreenic Meaning All-Family Sanford Jeffersons GoodTIme Jearinie IJeannle Cleveland Divorced Gunsmoke Larkin" Gunsmokda3 Bonanza Bonanza Ballerina" Bonanza Jeffersons Sanford &-Son ca Sanford
43 CNN2 (5:00) Morning Express With Robin Meade HLN News HLN Special Report Prime News Bo
45 CNN (5:00) American Morning (N) 0B CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) The Situation Room With Wolf Blitzer (N)
46 CW (5:00) The Daily Buzz m Steve Wilkos Show Browns Payne Cosby Cosby TBA ICW2011 TBA TBA Cops Payne The Tyra Show Lyrics Lyricsa 70sShow '70sShow King King
47 SPIKE Thin in 301 WEN Hair Profits Paid Prog. CSI: NY "Recycling" CSI: Crime Scene CSI: Crime Scene CSI: Crime Scene CSI: NY "Tanglewood" CSI: Crime Scene Deadliest Warrior Deadliest Warrior Deadliest Warrior Deadllest Warrior
49 HGTV Spaces Hidden Cash Cash Cash, Carl Cash, Carl Get It Sold Get It Sold Get It Sold Designed House Hunters Secrets Antonio Divine Divine D. Design Candice Design. Design Get It Sold Get It Sold First Place First Place
98TLC 18 Kids 18 Kids Baby Baby Baby Baby's Big Medicine a Say Yes Say Yes' Crazy About Pippa Baby, Baby Multiples Baby's Toddlers & Tiaras Toddlers & Tiaras Toddlers & Tiaras Toddlers & Tiaras
99 SPEED MonsterJam Trucker rucker PassTime Pass Time Pass Time My Ride Paid Prog. Paid Prog. NASCAR Racing: Sprint Cup: Good Sam RVInsurance500. Garage Truck U Barrett-Jackson Monster Jam Pass Time Pass Time



WEDNESDAY EVENING / LATE NIGHT AUGUST 10, 2011

6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:0010:3011:0011:30112:0012:30 1:00 1:30 2:00 2:30 3:00 3:30 4:00 4:30 5:00 5:30
20 Wheel Jeopardyl Big Brother (In Stereo) Criminal Minds o CSI: Crime Scene News Late Show Letterman Late Late Show/Craig Extra (N) Up to the Minute (N) (In Stereo) AgDay CBS News Daybreak GoodMorning Show
30 News Wheel Big Brother (In Stereo) Criminal Minds 8r 3 CSI: Crime Scene News Late Show Letterman Late Late Show/Craig Inside Ed. Up to the Minute (N) (In Stereo) CBS News WTVY News 4
50 News Wheel Minute to Win It 'O America's Got Talent Lovein the Wild Eo News Tonight Show w/Leno Late Night Carson Poker After Dark (N) Extra (N) The Bankruptcy Hour Shepherd's Chapel EarlyTdy NewsChannel7 Today
m8 News Ent Middle jF Family Happy Primetime Nightline News Nightllne Jimmy Kimmel Live Lopez Jim Debt Cure Paid Prog. Paid Prog. IABC World News Now (N) 0 MMorning News 13 This Morning
10 g) Two Men Two Men So You Think You Can Dance (In Stereo Live) News How IMet Law & Order: SVU Frienriend friends King-Hill Scrubs Lewis and Jurnovoy he People's Court Paid Prog. Pad Prog. Shepherd's Chapel Paid Prog. Outdoor
11 g NewsHour Dimension The Ed Sullivan Comedy Special (In Stereo) Suze Orman's Money Class (In Stereo) [ O Charlie Rose (N) I NOVA (In Stereo) Years of Telescope POV The food industry in America. (In Stereo) History Detectives Place Between
7 SHOW "The Ghost Writer Green Penn NSASCAR Weeds Franchise NASCAR Franchise Green The Killer nsideMe"** (2010)'R' 'Chftie Valentine"(2009)'R' "Tehe WarBoys'(2009) Peter Gallagher.'NR" razy Jones'**t (2000)
14 NICK ICarly ICarly Family My Wife Lopez Lopez '70s Show '70s Show 70s Show '70s Show 70s Show ]'70sShow 70s Show '70s Show '70s Show '70sShow 70s Show '70s Show '70s Show '70s Show Matters TBA Full House FullHouse
16 TBS Seinfeld Seinfeld Browns Browns Payne Payne Payne Payne Conan (N) Lopez Tonight (N) Conan Lopez Tonight "Guess Who"** X (2005, Comedy) Married Maried Married Married
17HBO "HanyPotterandtheHafl-BloodPince'*** (2009, Fantasy)'PG' TrueBlood(InStereo) RealTime/BillMaher "SheirockHolmes'**s (2009)'PG-13' The BangerSistrs'**ti (2002)'R'B 'AlltheReatGirls"*** (2003) Change Dragonhearf(1996)
18 ESPN2 Little League Baseball Soccer: Unted States vs. Mexico. (N) (Live) SportsNation NASCAR E:60 IB Rating Football SportsCenter 83 SportsCenter 83 X Games Milke and Mike
19 ESPN MLB Baseball: Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim at New York Yankees. Baseball Tonight(Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) Baseball NFL Live SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) MLB Baseball: Angels at Yankees SportsCenter EK SportsCenter
20 CSS College Football From Nov. 14, 2009. Talkln' Football SportsNite (In Stereo) Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Focused Makeover
21 DISN Good ANT Farm ood Shaket Random yards Phneas ood Random ANT Farm Deck Deck Phlneas Phineas Phineas Phineas Manny Little
22 MAX Lottery 'Runaway Jury"*** (2003) John Cusack.'PG-133'8 "Scott Pigim vs. the Word"*** (2010) 'Sexual Wdichcraft Femme "Bravehearl*** (1995, Historical Drama) Mel Gibson.'R' 8 'CocMtair**, (1988) Tom Cruise. 'R' SandPs


34 MTV Teen Wolf (In Stereo)
35BET 106 & Park:Top 10


)The Mentalist tm


Sons of Guns 8 1


"Disturbia'** 1 (2007, SuspenOe)


3ne Man Army 0 ISons of Guns B0


CS: NY Sweet 16"


One Man Army S- I


lawthoRNe E I


franklinn & Bash 3 ICSI: NY (In Stereo) CSI: NJ~Silent Night" CSI: NY Obsession" Angel "Reunion"


Sons of Guns 83 Overhaulln' (In Stereo) Paid Prog. Walk Fit Teleworld Sexy Abs Paid Prog. Kitchen Knife Set Acne


Twist Fate wlst Fate Weather Center 3 Weather Weather
Royal Pains (N) B Necessary Roughness Burn Notice [


Teen Spinr(2011, Comedy-Drama)
Roseanne IRoseanne Dance Moms B


The 700 Club R3
How I Met How IMet


ra T ta e eC el W t Weather T F T F i Outoo' ..


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Chris Chris


Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Billy Billy Storage St
Ghost Hunters rt Ghost Hunters Inter. Legend Quest (N) Ghost Hunters Inter. Legend Quest


"Swordish' w** (2001) John Travolta. 'Swordfish'** % (2001) John Travolta.
Teen Mom (In Stereo) The Challenge: Rivals The Challenge: Rivals Challenge heChaller
"A Low Down DirtyShame'* (1994, Action) E IFa. Affair The Mo'Nque Show


King-Hill King-Hill Amer. Dad Amer. Dad Fam. Guy |Fam. Guy I


Underwater Universe Deadly ocean zones.
Raymond Raymond Cleveland Divorced
Dr. Drew The Joy Behar Show
Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360
America's Next Model CW 2011 Browns
Deadliest Warrior Deadliest Warrior (N)
Income property Brothers (N)Hunters
Toddlers & Tiaras toddlers & Tiaras (N)
My Ride My Ridehe Car Show (N)


Ice Road Truckers
Divorced Cleveland
Showbiz Tonight


John King, USA


Roseanne Roseanne
Deadliest Warrior
House Property
Toddlers & Tiaras
Dumbest Dumbest


orange


Breaking Bad S0
ge: Rivals IChallenge


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Th Har Cop 20, ceI


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'he Longest Yard"*** (1974) Burt Reynolds. R' Bull Durham"
Jersey Shore 8 jTeen Mom (In Stereo) IAMTV (In Stereo)


.aw & Order: SVU Steam Cash Flow


'aid Prog. Paid Prog. Prince ife Today
teautyTip Hair Tool Zumba Fit Hair Tool
'aid Prog. Skincare' Paid Prog. Hair Free
science Fiction) Triverox Ogreenic


*** (198


Wendy Williams Show 'A Low Down Dirty Shame"* X (1994, Action) 0 [Hell Date Inspiration
Chicken Aqua Squidbill Amer. Dad Amer. Dad Fam. Guy Fam. Guy Chicken troker
American Pickers Underwater Universe Dead:y ocean zones. Ice Road Truckers Prostate
Retired at Retired at Cleveland Divorced RetiredatRetired at 3'sCo. 3's Co. 3's Co.
Dr. Drew Nancy Grace Showbiz Tonight The Joy Behar Show Showbiz Ton
Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 John King, USA Piers Morgan Tonight World Busin
South Pk South Pk Cops BA Pad Prog. Secrets Lose30Lb Makeover Paid Prog.
Ways Die Ways Die MANswers MANswers KnockoutBlueMount Entourage Ways Die Pad Prog.
Income Property Brothers hunters House Property Property income Trta
Toddlers Tiaras Toddlers & Tiaras Toddlers & Tiaras Paid Prog. Ogreenic TrVita
My Ride MyRide The Car Show NASCAR Race Hub NASCAR Racing NASCAR Rar


Wake Up With AI
Law Order: CI


J. Meyer TrVita
Flawless Lose30Lb
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Zumba Fit Knife Set


8) Kevin Costner.'R' B CarMD Fat Loss
SAMTV: Morning
'ald Prog. Inspiration Paid Prog. BET Inspiration
Squidblll King-Hill King-Hill Looney Ben 10
Cash FlowKitchen Paid Prog. Sexy Abs Steam
T's Co. Boston Legal 01 Anxiety Paid Prog.
light Dr. Drew Morning Express
ess Today AM: Wake Up Call (N) AmericanMorning (N)
Irue Hollywood Story Paid Prog. The Daily Buzz
rotatee Vacuum SexyAbs Paid Prog. Baby
Ilnja Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Dream
aid Prog. Paid Prog. Math-Mind Demo. Ladles
cing Paid Prog. Wealth i Shark VacBosley


24 DISC


23 TNT
24 DISC
25 TWC
26 USA
28 FAM
29 LIFE
30A&E
32 SYFY
33 AMC


Bones (In Stereo)
Sons of Guns M
Weather Center 80
NCIS "SpIit Decision"
Melissa Melissa
Pawn Pawn
Storage Storage
Ghost Hunters M
"Ranbo Parl II


The Mentalist 5a
Sons of Guns 03
Weather Weather
NCIS The Weak Link"
Melssa Georgia
Dance Moms e0


36 TOON
39 HIST
40 TVLND
43CNN2
45 CNN
46 CW
47 SPIKE
49 HGTV
98 TLC
99 SPEED


Johnny T Hole/Wall
Modern Marvels E
Sanford AIll-Family
Jane Velez-Mitchell
John King, USA (N)
Se leel Sednfeld--
Deadliest Warrior
Hunters House
Toddlers& Tiaras
NASCAR Race Hub


Dude Destroy
American Pickers
All-Family All-Family
Nancy Grace
Anderson Cooper 360
America's Next Model
Deadliest Warrior
Property Income
Toddlers & Tiaras
Dumbest Dumbest


_ ~ I I_ ___


South
W LT Pet PF PA
Houston 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Indianapolis 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Jacksonville 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Tennessee 0 0 0 .000 0 0
North
W LT Pet PF PA
Baltimore 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Cincinnati 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Cleveland 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Pittsburgh 0 0 0 .000 0 0
West
W LT Pet PF PA
Denver 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Kansas City 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Oakland 0 0 0 .000 0 0
San Diego 0 0 0 .000 0 0
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W LT Pet PF PA
Dallas 0 0 0 .000 0 0
N.Y. Giants 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Philadelphia 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Washington 0 0 0 .000 0 0
South
W LT Pet PF PA
Atlanta 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Carolina 0 0 0 .000 0 0
New Orleans 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Tampa Bay 0 0 0 .000 0 0
North
W LT Pct PF PA
Chicago 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Detroit 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Green Bay 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Minnesota 0 0 0 .000 0 0
West
W LT Pct PF PA
Arizona 0 0 0 .000 0 0
San Francisco 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Seattle. 0 0 0 .000 0 0
St Louis 0 0 0 .000 0 0
Sunday's Game
Chicago at St. Louis, Cancelled
Thursday, Aug. 11
Baltimore at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m.
Jacksonville at New England, 7:30 p.m.
Seattle at San Diego, 8 p.m.
Denver at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Arizona at Oakland, 10 p.m.
Friday, Aug. 12
Cincinnati at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Miami at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Pittsburgh at.Washington, 7:30 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Kansas City, 8 p.m.
San Francisco at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Saturday, Aug. 13
Green Bay at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m.
Buffalo at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at Tennessee, 8 p.m.
Indianapolis at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Carolina, 8 p.m.
Monday, Aug. 15
N.Y. Jets at Houston, 8 p.m.


FOOTBALL
National Football League
BALTIMORE RAVENS Waived S Eugene Clif-
ford and DB Michael Ricks. Signed TE Jonathan.
Stupar and TE Kris Wilson.
DETROIT LIONS Signed RB Mike Bell, RB
Jerome Harrison and OT Tony Moll. Released
WR Dominique Barnes, FB Preston Dial and
DE Greg Banks. Waived-injured CB Maurice
Leggett.
JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS Signed OL Rob
McGill. Waived G Troy White. Waived-injured
OL Kevin Haslam.
MIAMI DOLPHINS Signed LB David Nixon
and DB K.J. Gerard.'
MINNESOTA VIKINGS Waived CB Marcell
Gipson.
PHILADELPHIA EAGLES Signed DE Chris
Wilson to a one-year contract and DT Marion
Favorite. Released WR DeAndre Brown and WR
Cordario Calvin.
SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS Signed TE Chris
Blohm to a three-year contract.
TENNESSEE TITANS Agreed to terms with
OL Pat McQuistan.
COLLEGE
MUHLENBERG Named Brian Burzynski
wrestling coach.
OKLAHOMA CITY Named Lance Madison
men's assistant basketball coach and Cody
Legg athletic trainer.


I


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Weather Center BE Weather IWeather wist Fate TwFate TwstFate First Outlook 83


Twist Fate Twist Fate








JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.icfloridan.com


BORN LOSER BY ART AND CHIP SANSOM
>i'5 50 HOT T \5 SUW E R.... PrTL B\RD.5 ARE MGRATIN, O&
Z:1 u I---- N4'W\W--
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BIG NATE BY LINCOLN PIERCE
ELLEN! GO I NEED TO SEE WHAT
TO CHANNEL HAPPENED TO WINK
12'. WEBSTE SUMMERS! HURRY UP'
WHAT O KAY, OKAY'
FOR' KEEP, YOUR,
SHIRT ON'
i/

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IS THERE FORMER
ANYTHING CHIEF
THERE? METEOR-
WHAT'S OLOGIST
ITSAY?' WINK
SUMMERS.



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SOUP TO NUTZ BY RICK STROMOSKI
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ALLEY OOP BY JACK AND CAROLE BENDER
70D, OOP AND OSCAR HAVE ARRIVED AT YTOPIA...
S ,- HOW BEAUTIFUL WE'RE ALL HAPPY WITH (
14O 'PC o E Oulk (M AINAR Y U' OSCARO


Wk' 'i _






MONTY BY JIM MEDDICK
kT FIRST, I WAS 1MIeIS GRtATL .N\yvEa NOW VEGWT APAL!
t M WES OUN IMANINARY FREHP.' SOMEONrE T SHWE
AW IMASARY NO LONGER WILL I FEELs m INTERESTS IN
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CO STABLE MrMP OFF


KIT'N' CARLYLE BY LARRY WRIGHT HERMAN BY JIM UNGER


SLauqrlii SlCknlernatirallonli IIC D:st by Universal Udick ot UFS 2011
"Is there any truth to the rumor that you're
thinking of retiring from the ring?"


NEA Crossword Puzzle


1
5
10
12

13
14
15
16
18
19
22

25
29
30
32

33
34


ACROSS 37 Battle of
Lake Erie
Stroller victor Oliver
passenger Hazard -
Masked 38 Coercion
swordsman 40 Rabbit's
Like cows foot
in India 43 Amusement
She lost her provider
sheep 44 Branch
(2 wds.) offshoot
Not ready 48 Yours truly
for picking 50 Provide
Sure! lubrication
(2 wds.) 52 Fireplaces
Barely 53 Rock band
manages crew member
Hinged 54 On edge
apparatus 55 "Ettu"time
In the
doldrums DOWN
Pack
animals 1 Loan
Kate's arranger
sitcom 2 North-40
friend unit
Jungle 3 Sardines
snake 4 Oater
Flora and answer
Roamed 5 Where
about monkeys
Bobby who swing
lostto Billie 6 Opera c;
Jean symphony
Invisible 7 "Fancy"
swimmer singer
Sandy 8 Cattail
expanse 9 Cast a vote


Answer to Previous Puzzle
MEN USECKENO
TAX P:A Y E R WIDE
EHS LATTES
BADGE LOSS
AL M .LDEWL E

D 0E:C IKGBI DILL
TOYOTA KLM
LsA P PRESS
CALLUP N E A
HULA HAMSTERS
ERAT'ENEI(CTO
ER ATYEWAX NOEL
RA YEEWA XgNnOEL


10 "Croc"
Dundee's
girlfriend
11 -vu
12 Side road
17 DJ gear
20 Chartered
21 Subway
hangers,
once
22 Kenya'sloc.
23 Placed
24 Fast sled
26 Farm
27 Walkie-
talkie word
28 Kan. neigh-
bor
31 Bad hair -
35 Lions'
manes


36 Robert
Morse role
39 Cal Tech
grad
40 Ceremonial
fire
41 Strong
- ox
42 Adds
moisture to
45 Ford
a creek
46 Wife
of Osiris
47 Whiz leader
48 Gp. running
a business
49 Gypsy
Rose-
51 King,
in France


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


8-10 2011 UFS, Disl. by Univ. Uclick for UFS



CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: V equals M
"WOD, YO KSPR OZKTD HR... DTS'UO'
MTR RWO PSZ, DTS'UO MTR RWO
VTTZ, BZX DTS'UO MTR RWO ITCCHZM
PRTZOP." FOHRW IHEWBIXP

PREXIOUS SOLUTION: "I'm feeling my age and I've ordered the Ferrari. I'm
going to get the whole midlife-crisis package." Keanu Reeves

(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 8-10


Dear Annie: I am 26 and a single parent
to a 3-year-old girl. I love my daugh-
ter more than anything in this world.
However, in the past few months, she
has become a brat and a monster, doing
everything she can to test me.
Due to recent financial problems, we
had to move in with my mother until I
can finish my degree and get a job. No
matter what discipline I use, nothing
works because my mother undermines
me. There is no consistency in what is
right or wrong. My mother always gives
in to her every request.
Once in a while, I will spank my daugh-
ter, but only on very rare occasions.
My mother, however, cornered me and
gave me a lecture on how awful I am for
spanking my child. Yet I can clearly recall
being spanked by my mother numer-
ous times when I was little. Mom often
questions my parenting in front of my
daughter and then treats me like an 8-
year-old. I am enormously grateful that




In yesterday's deal, the second-best pc
- line of play would have worked with
given layout. But honesty required my r
tioning that it was not mathematically i
In today's deal, though, if you misplay, yoi
down. Well, what would you do in three
trump after West leads the spade six and
plays the queen?
North bid what he thought his partner cc
make. You start with seven top tricks: one spa
two hearts, two diamonds and two clubs.
extra two winners can obviously come f
the club suit. But what is the risk? You m
lose a club trick and watch the opponents
spades.
It will occur if you duck the first two sp
tricks and spades are 5-4, or you lose a (
trick to the opponent with the remain
spades. But if you win the first trick, it
come about only if East gets on lead to pus
spade through your jack-nine into the jaw
West's king-10.
Take the first trick, play a club to dumr
king, and lead a club back toward your ha
When East plays the last low club, put in y
10. Here it wins and you collect an overti
But even if your 10 loses to West's poter
queen, you are still safe because West car
continue spades without conceding a tric
your jack.


LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -
Although your inclination
may be urging you to waste
your time playing hooky,
get a grip on yourself and
pay attention to neglected
chores.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22) If you're not careful,
without realizing it you
could easily begin to im-
pose your will upon your
companions.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
- Striving for lofty goals
is admirable, but unless
you choose realistic aims,
they might not be easy to
achieve.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.22)
- Associates will be unre-
ceptive to your suggestions
if in the past you have been
close-minded to theirs.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-
Dec. 21) Constant vigi-
lance is essential if you are
responsible for a project
that could affect the wel-
fare of others.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) For the sake of har-
mony, you and your mate
shouldn't be butting heads,
but putting them together
for a common cause.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) With your physical
and mental energies both
in high gear, you could
have difficulty distinguish-
ing the differences between
assertiveness and mere ag-
gressiveness. Take care.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) Instead of associat-
ing with a clique that is
made up of people who
make you feel uncomfort-
able, find companions who
are pleasant.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
- If you want others to be
supportive of your inter-
ests, you must be there for
them when they need you.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
- Being in a talkative mood
could have you telling oth-
ers about things you might
otherwise keep to yourself.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
- When you find yourself
in a spending mood, your
material. desires can be
very pronounced, which
could be the case at his
juncture.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
- You're more easily influ-
enced than you may real-
ize, so take care that you're
not unduly swayed by oth-
ers to waste your time.


she opened her home to us, but I can't be
an effective parent when she constantly
undercuts my authority. How can I get
her to keep her child-rearing opinions to
herself and allow me to make the parent-
ing decisions for my child?
TEXAS

Dear Texas: While we agree with your
mother that discipline does not require
spanking your daughter, we also under-
stand how difficult it is to raise a child
when an indulgent grandparent rules the
roost. First, have a sit-down discussion
with Mom when your daughter is asleep.
Get her to acknowledge that a lack of dis-
cipline is not healthy for her grandchild.
And you can compromise by agreeing
to use different forms of discipline other
than spanking. Create rules you can both
abide by. If that doesn't work, bring Mom
to your next pediatrician appointment,
and ask the doctor to speak to her. And
find other living arrangements.


FRANK & ERNEST BY BOB THAVES


North 08-10-11
48
V653
*AK72
4KJ873

West East
4K 10 7 6 3 Q 5 4 2
VQ94 VJ1082
*J965 Q 10
4 4 4 Q 6 5
South
4A J9
VAK7
*843
4 A 1092

Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Neither

South West North East
1NT Pass 3 NT All pass


Opening lead: # 6


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 10,.2011 5B I


x :-,.-.-, ,


ENTERTAINIVIENT


i

r
D
11







6 B Wednesday, Aueust 10. 2011 Jackson County Floridan


CLASSIFIED


www..ICFLORIDAN.com


IREGRASS CLASSIFIED




IRKETPLA


BY PHONE: (850) 526-3614 or (800) 779-2557 BY MAIL: WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE
BY FAX: (850) 779-2557 P.O. BOX 520, MARIANNA, FL 32447
ONLINE: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM IN PERSON: 4403 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA
Publication Policy Errors and Omissions: Advertisers should check their ad the first day. This publication shall not be liable for failure to publish an ad or for a typographic error or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the ad for the first day's
insertion. Adjustment for errors is limited to the cost of that portion of the ad.wherein the error occurred. The advertiser agrees that the publisher shall not be liable for damages arising out of errors in advertisements beyond the amount paid for the space
actually occupied by that portion of the advertisement in which the error occurred, whether such error is due to negligence of the publisher's employees or otherwise and there shall be no liability for non-insertion of any advertisement beyond the amount paid for
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ANNOUNCEMENTS


STORE LIQUIDATION & AUCTION
AUCTION SATURDAY @ 6:30 PM
OLD TOWN SQ. 3183 MAIN ST. COTTONDALE,
THURSDAY SATURDAY
.4 FOR INFO 850-303-30 23 4.4.
AU LIC#AU667 AB LIC#2727


I Pay CASH for Diabetic test
strips. Up to $10 per box!
Most brands considered.
All boxes must be unopened
and unexpired.
Call Matt 334-392-0260

(S) FINANCIAL




Established Restaurant
Business for Sale.
Located inside the Outlet Mall
in Graceville, Florida. For more
information call 334-791-8961


(if) MERCHANDISE

Huge Antique Auction, Aug. 13th @ 10am
Contents of well established Antique business
to be sold at Auction. Store is loaded from wall
to wall: Collectibles, glass, pottery, tools, furni-
ture, Coca-Cola items, toys, signs, pictures,
memorabilia, oak glass show cases plus other
cases, cookie jars, dish sets, so much more!
Come eat- Food, drinks & snacks onsite. Build-
ing is airconditoned & clean restroom. Public
and Dealers welcome (Dealers please bring a
copy of your sales tax id) 10% buyers premium
& sales tax in effect for this auction. Location:
Rues Antique Mall 123 S. Main St. Brundidge.
Sale conducted by: 231 Auction, LLC
334-372-3532 Pictures: www.auctionzip.com
(put in id # 26327) AL1719

WANTED/WILL BUY: OLD COINS, TOYS AND
COLLECTABLES CALL 850-693-0908

Wanted: Old Coins, Gold,
Diamonds, Guns, And Tools
West Main Jewelry & Loan 334-671-1440.

STOP GNAT, FLY, & MOSQUITO BITES!
Buy Swamp Gator All Natural
Insect Repellent.
Family Safe-Use head to toe.
Available at The Home Depot

(i') PETS & ANIMALS

Small, dark and handsome (2) young kitties
looking loving families Call 334-393-9681

AKC English Bulldog Beautiful AKC registered
english bulldog puppies for sale. Excellent ped-
igrees, show potential, outstanding temper-
ment and well socialized. Serious inquiries on-
ly, please. 334-572-4292
Friend for Life has Free Wonderful Rescued
Dogs shots, spayed, neutered. 334-791-7312
i German Shorthaired
Pointers AKC Registered,
3 female pups. Born
5/30/11. Tails docked,
dew claws removed, shots
utd. Great family pet or
hunting dog. $300, OBO.
Mother on site, also for sale. Text or call 334-
790-5106.
IT'S AS EASY
AS 1 -2-3
1. CALL 2. PLACE YOUR AD 3. GET RESULTS


V Lots of Summer Puppies ON SALE! V
Morkies $100-$250, Older Chorkies $50,
Hairless Chinese Crested $450. Yorkies $450.
Yorkie-Poos S200.-$350. Chihuahua $250.
M Iti-Poos $300. Pek-A-Poos $250.
Call 334-718-4886


(N*) FARMER'S MARKET


FRESH
GREEN
PEANUTS
850-352-2199
OR 850-352-4423

Fresh Shelled Peas & Butter Beans
several varieties and Okra. 2307 Mayo Road,
(between Cypress & Grand Ridge) Bobby
Hewett (850) 592-4156
Green Gate Olive Grove. A bit of old Italy. Come
visit. Pick your own fresh olives right here in
Jackson County. Free recipes for curing. Nortek
Rd. 2mi W of Hwy 167 (850)596-4963




a< iTe., T


Fresh Peas, Tomatoes,
Butterbeans, Cucumbers,'
Snap Beans, New Potatoes,
All Farm Fresh!
220 W. Hwy 52 Malvern
* 334-793-6690 *

U-PICK PEAS: 6 miles N of Grand Ridge, or 2.1
miles S of Dellwood on Hwy 69. $6/per 5 gal.
bucket, Field opens at 6:30am till 6:30 pm,
7 ays/wk. Both dark & white peas.

[(*) EMPLOYMENT

TELLER POSITION in Marianna
Previous experience required.
,Must be able to pass a background check.
Please submit resume to: Blind Box 974
c/o JCFlorjdan P.O. Box-520
SMarianna, FL 32447


Wednesday, August 10, 2011




0 C)


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HOW TO PLAY
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ARCHIVES AND MORE GREAT GAMES AT
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Find jobs



fast and



easy!


Seeking part-time Contractor to attend
foreclosure sales on our firm's behalf. Prior
experience with the court house and/or
court services (foreclosure sales) preferred.
Please send resume to Heather at
hnewman@thesolutionsflrm.com.




Clean Cut Service Electrician needed ASAP
Computer skills and knowledge of garage
door opener a plus. Call 941-426-5417 or
send resume to electricrcs@gmall.com
EOE/DFW



NW Florida company is seeking temporary
employees to work through peanut season.
TRACTOR DRIVERS PEANUT DRYERS
WAREHOUSE WORKERS Medical & Dental
Insurance! Holiday Pay! Please apply in person
at Advantage Staffing 460 West Main Street,
Ste 3 Dothan 888-268-2466
Swww.advantagestaffingiobs.com
Advantage-
Saflifng



IE E Lincare
a leading national
respiratory company in Marianna, FL seeks
caring Service Representative. Service
patients in their home for oxygen and
equipment needs. Warm personalities,
age 21+, who can lift up to 120 Ibs should
apply. CDL w/DOT a plus or obtainable.
Growth opportunities are excellent.
Drug-free workplace
EOE.
Please fax resumes to 850-526-2832


S2008 BLOCKDOT, INC. -W


II


District Sales Manager
The Dothan Eagle is seeking mature,
energetic individual with superior
communication skills who enjoys
working with people to fill the position
of district sales manager.
Must be able to work flexible hours,
have dependable transportation and a valid
drivers' license. Responsibilities include
sales, recruiting, showing routes and
generally overseeing independent contrac-
tors that distribute the Dothan Eagle in an
assigned district or territory.
Benefits include medical, dental,
401(K), paid vacation and holidays.
Applications and/or resumes
are accepted at the.Dothan Eagle
(227 N. Oates Street Dothan, AL)
between the hours of 8:30 am to 4:30 pm
Monday through Friday,
attention Rufus A. Manora.
You may apply online at
WWW.mediageneral.com as well.
EOE


FAMiLY ( LPAR,
DISTRIBUTION CENTER
MARIANNA, FLORIDA
Now Hirina Full Time


1st, 2nd, and 3rd Shifts
Competitive Pay and
Benefits Package!
Apply at Family Dollar Distribution Center
3949 Family Dollar Parkway,
Marianna, Florida 32448
Must be 18 Years Old
Equal Opportunity Employer
Drug Free Workplace




Tuesday's
WASABI SOLUTION
2131811 4 (D 9 Z

6 7 2 5 3 @ 1 4
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BE SURE TO VISIT OUR
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JACKSON COUNTY N


FLORIDAN
jcfloridan.com



monster'

FIND LOCAL JOBS AT: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM/JOBS


EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
Bachelor's Degree In human services discipline or public/business administration; five years
experience as a supervisor and/or administrator of personnel, and five years
experience with service to abused/neglected children or comparable experience.
Experience in the management of Not-for-Profit Organizations and/or corporate business
management a1'ackground In fund raising, which Includes success in several different
functional areas with particular strength in individual giving, is essential. Appropriate
candidate will possess vision and leadership skills to strengthen the financial position and
program functions of the orgapzation. Excellent written and verbal skills are necessary.
Grant writing experience Is crucial. Responsible for public presentations to the community
representing the collaborative work of the center. Must be comfortable with the day-to-day
operations of the organization and possess the ability to design and Implement short and long
term inclusive strategy directives for the center. Outstanding interpersonal, networking, and
communication skills with demonstrated comprehensive ability to assume Chief
Executive Officer responsibilities for a large, complex, diverse organization. Compliance with
minimum standards for gbod moral character in accordance with Chapter 39, Florida Statutes.
Applleatons accepted until position filled.
Resumes should be submitted to: Gulf Coast Chldren's Advocacy Center Board of Directors
210 East 11t Street, Panama City, FL 21401


I PCE E A-N






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www. CFILORIDAN.com


CLASSIFIED


Jackson County Floridan Wednesday, August 10, 2011- /B


EDUCATION
S & INSTRUCTION


Get a Quality Education for a
S New Career! Programs
FORT'IS offered in Healthcare,
HVAC and Electrical Trades.
Call Fortis College Today!
888-202-4813.
('01 11 For consumer information
www.Fortis.edu

RESIDENTIAL
(ji_ REAL ESTATE FOR RENT


Edgewood Apartments in Cypress Area. Quiet,
Furnished 1BR 1BA.Cable & laundry included.
$440/mo + deposit. -n 850-573-6062 4


1/1 Apartment for Rent. For info call 850-579-
8895
1/1 in Grand Ridge off Hwy 90
$400. mo. $200. dep. 850-272-8880




2BR/1BA, 2658 Railroad St. C'dale No Pets,
$300/mo. + $200 dep. (850) 352-4222
2BR/1BA Concrete block Rental in Marianna,
Tile floors, washer h/u, pets ok, $300/mo + $30
credit/bkgrnd ck. Additional houses and
apartments in Graceville 850-263-5753
3/1.5 Brick Home 2589 McClain St. C'dale
$700/mo + dep 334-714-9553
3BR/1.5BA New Carpet! Brick Home, CH/A,
Near Malone School
Now Accepting Applications.
$650. Mo + dep. Call 850-569-2475
3BR 2BA Block Home on 10 acres Compass
Lake area, Energy efficient, CH/A, Outdoor
pets ok, $850 + dep. 850-573-0466
632 Chapelwood,Dothan 4 BR, 2 BA, Kit.
w/refrig, stove, micro, dishwasher, DR, LR FPL.
Ref, $825 mo. Security deposit $800 & lease re-
quired. Outside shed. Avail 8/15. 334-333-7777
Austin Tyler & Associates -*
Quality Homes & Apartments
a* 850- 526-3355 4-
"Property Management Is Our ONLY Business"



HUNTING LEASES AVAILABLE
Plum Creek, the nation's largest hunting
lease provider, has approx. 150 properties
Available for Lease in AL and GA.
Small properties perfect for families.
Large properties ideal for larger hunting
clubs. Begin your new hunting adventure
at www.plumcreekrecreation.com.


2/2 in Alford, window A/C, $380 + deposit
850-579-8882/850-209-1664/850-573-1851
2/2 Mobile Home $450 + deposit, appliances,
washer & dryer, water/garbage & sewer in-
cluded 850-482-4455
2 & 3 bedroom mobile Homes in Cottondale.
$500 and up. H20, garbage, sewer included.
http:// www.charloscountry living. com.
850-258-4868/209-8847
2 & 3BR 2BA Mobile Homes in Cottondale no
pets, Central Heat & Air $325-$450 850-258-
1594 leave message
2&3BRMH's in
Marianna & Sneads (850)209-8595.
3/2 $595 Quiet, well maintained MH Park,
Water/sewer/ garbage/ lawn included.
Other rentals available starting @ $395
,* Joyce Riley RE 850-209-7825 4
Houses and trailers for rent.starting at $300 per
month. (850) 593-4700
Rent to Own: 2 & 3BR Mobile Homes.
Lot rent included. Also available,
1 & 2BR Apts & Houses. For details
4850-557-3432 or 850-814-6515
Small 2BR 1BA Located in Sneads
$300/month 850-573-0308.
Small Quiet Family Oriented Park; 2BR MH for Rent
includes water, garbage, lawn care, No Pets 850-592-
8129
( COMMERCIAL
(a) REAL ESTATE FOR RENT


DO YOU NEED TO DOWNSIZE
YOUR RENT & OFFICE SPACE?
960 sq ft Completely renovated,
4 offices ,1 reception,1 breakroom,
2 bathrooms, Off street parking lot 2846-B
South Green Street Marianna. Less than
$1.00 per sq ft per month.
Call 850-326-0097 for info.

RESIDENTIAL
REAL ESTATE FOR SALE


$109,900-MLS# 244224- 4BR, 2BA brick home
with garage. Just 3 miles from downtown
Marianna, Fl. It's a nice country home with a
large covered front porch, updated flooring
and interior doors and the hall bath is
updated with tile and new fixtures.
Great workshop that is insulated and wired
for electric and other covered storage space.
850-624-8877 sylviagcrealty.net







HEADLAND'S BEST KEPT SECRET!
699 CO RD 100, HEADLAND
$323,900
Craftsman Design Approx 2920 sq. ft.
4 BR, 3 Baths Built in 2009 5.3 Acres
Slate and tile Hardwood floors


Granite Energy efficient
Formal DR 2 car garage 2 stall barn
Trey ceiling in master
18 ft. ceiling in living area
Lennox Three Zone system
REALTORS WELCOME!
Call 334-596-7763


( RECREATION


ATV-250, 2-wheel drive, 2-cylinders, 4-stroke
engine, new tires, runs good, needs battery.
$775. 344-673-7539.
Honda'04 Rancher ES 2WD. Great deal on a fun
vehicle. Asking price $2995. Garage kept with
low miles. Excellent condition and serviced
routinely. Call 334-692-4120 and leave mes-
sage.
John Deere '09 Gator TS 4X2 ... 72 hours on it.
Has Dump bed. Good condition $5900 OBO 334-
886-2549 or 334-796-1777


2 JET SKIES 2003 on dbl trailer seat look
recovered and look great! matching blue
$3600. for both. 334-806-9920.
Bass Tracker 96' pan fish 16 40hp, mercury an-
chors, $4200. OBO 334-648-0139.
Bayline 89' Cabin Cruiser, GPS tracking
system marine radio, frig, potty & sink,
bridge pumps blower, works well
$4900. 334-726-0546
Bayliner Trophy,
22.5'. 2000 model, well
r--- keot and clean.
- M r, e .tras. $19,950.
334.794-0609 DO 12632


Procraft 03' 1650 with 90hp Mercury, 42 Ib.
thrust trolling motor, Procraft trailer, garage
kept, like new $7000. OBO
850-593-5116 or 850-209-5934.
RHINO 2008, 18FT- 90 HP Suzuki, 55 LB
Minnkota, Aluminum Trailer, Humminbird
Depth Finder, on Board Charger, Binini top,
$14,700 334-798-4175
Seacraft,'89,20 ft- Center
-r* console,'95 225HP Johnson,
-dual axle trailer w/brakes.
_. ., Great condition, very clean.
$5,250 334-696-5505


2002 Winnebago Adventurer 35', 1 superslide
& 1 back bedroom slide, generator, water heat-
er, dual roof air,awning, exterior entertainment
center, rear view monitor system & automatic
hydraulic leveling jacks. 18k mi tires in good
condition recently rotated. Average retail price
per NADA bluebook $50K,low retail $42K. Ask-
ing $35,000, OBO, MUST SELL! 334-790-6758
99' Carri-lite Carriage md#29RK 5th wheel,
1- 12 ft. slide, 19 ft. awning, sleeps 4,
$11,500 229-395-6714.
P' ; I COUGAR TRAVEL TRAILER
--- 2004-30 foot,
l big rear winddcw,
living/dining slide, excel-
lent condition, new tires,
must see to appreciate,
$16,500 OBO, 334-687-6863, 334-695-2161
Dutchmen 40 ft. Travel Trailer
S- '06. 38B-DSL, Sleeps 8, Has 2
i- -' slideouts. Loaded, Like New.
MiaiNlili $17,995. Call 334-406-4555

Gulfstream '06 Conquest
30' Pull Behind Camper
S Vwith large slide. Excellent
Condition. 4 new tires.
Sleeps 6-8. CH&A, Full
kitchen, full bath, outside
shower. $7500 FIRM 850-693-1618
National '98 Dolphin-
37ft sleeps 6, 32k miles,
large slide, leveling jack,
back-up camera, Flatscreen
TV, Sleep Number Bed,
awning, corian counter tops, $25,000.
Call 334-793-6691
StarCraft '92 25ft sleeps 6, very clean,
microwave, CH&A, Stereo, $4,250. 334-791-4350
Trail Lite 2006 R-VISION
26 ft., fully loaded,
bought new, 13K miles
$49,995 334-616-6508




Dixie RV SuperStores
FL's Newest RV Dealer
NOW OPEN!!!
*Store Hours*
Monday-Saturday
8:00am-6:00pm

21 Acres / 30 Brands New and Pre-Owned

0 Newmar Keystone Heartland Jayco
Fleetwood Prime'Time Coachmen
Forest River

Service Department
Parts and Acces. Store
RV Collision Center

Located off 1-10 Exit 70 / SR285
328 Green Acres Dr.
De Funiak Springs, FL 32435
Sales and Service: 850-951-1000
www.dixierv.com DO 12756
Dolphin LX 04' by National 36ft workhorse
chassis GM8100 gas engine, 20900K miles, 6
new tires, all new brakes assembly. $66,500.
334-794-3085 or 334-701-5700
FLEETWOOD 2005 Prowler AX6, 5th wheel, 36
ft, 4 slides, large shower, 30/50AMP. $20,000
OBO Call 334-695-4995, 334-687-7862.
Winnebago 02' 37 ft. with slide, AC&H leveling
jacks, back up camera, 2-TV's, auto-recliner
queen sofa, king dome satellite, con. micro-
wave ovens, full awnings $44,900.
334-792-0854 or 334-792-3805


RV 1995 Four Winds 5000 32ft, gas, generator,
sound system, lots of storage, microwave,
patio awning, full bed, dinette sleeper, fridge &
freezer, $12,500. OBO Serious Inquiry Only!
Call 334-618-1654

(S) TRANSPORTATION



1999 Jeep Wrangler Excellent condition and
very well maintained. Many new and rebuilt
parts and systems. Higher milage but mostly
due to towing. Call for details. $7,200. 334-894-
5042 or cell 334-389-0056


1970 Chevrolet Chevelle Big Block SS, red with
white stripes, Price $5,700, use e-mail for pic-


tures towneay6@msn.com / 239-963-2619.
Chevrolet '81 Corvette
Automatic 350 (Sniver). Will
sell as is for $4,700. OBO
334-774-1915




CHEVY '96 S-10 Pick-up, 2.2 liter, 4 cly.,
selling for parts $850 334-689-9183


Buy It!


Sell It!


Find It!


2007 Volkswagon Beetle 45,524 miles. One
owner. Pastel green with cream interior. Cus-
tom floormats for driver and passenger side.
Heated leather seats, cruise control, CD player,
sunroof, power locks and windows. Auxiliary
port for MP3/IPod. Great condition, regularly
serviced. Excellent gas mileage and fun to
drive. $14,500 or best offer. Please call 334-806-
6742 or e-mail lorimcarroll@yahoo.com to see
this great car.
Cadillac'07 DTS fully loaded, leather interior
tan in color, 29K mi. $19,000. 334-693-3980
Chevrolet '07 Corvette
i Twin Turbo, FAST FAST
FAST! $32,999. 2180 Mont-
gomery Hwy. Call 334-
671-7720 or 718-2121.
Chevrolet '81 Corvette
Automatic 350 (Silver). Will
sell as is for $4,700. OBO
334-774-1915

Chevrolet '95 Camaro,
a V-6, 5 speed, new tires,
cold air, 111,000 miles,
Excellent condition, $3995.
Call 334-790-7959.
Chrysler '06 Crossfire- roadster, 3.2L, 215HP,
20k mile, black on black convertible with dark
gray interior, cloth seats, alum wheels, AC, 6
speed, manual, 25MPG,. like new tires, Retiring,
Enterprise $12,500. Call 334-393-4444
Chrysler '06 Town & Country LTD Excellent
Condition, 74K miles, Nagivation, DVD, Original
Owner $15,500 850-482-3441
Chrysler '06 Town & Country LTD Excellent
Condition, 74K miles, Nagivation, DVD, Original
Owner $15,500 850-482-3441
Chrysler '07 Crossfire Convertible- Silver with
dark gray leather interior, new tires, 30k miles,
like new condition, one owner "grandma" need
money for health reasons. PRICED TO SELL!
$22,500. Call 229-334-9945
DO YOU KNOW ANYONE WITH BAD CREDIT?
I can get U Riding Today
Repos, Slow Credit, Past Bankruptcy OK!
$0 Down/ 1st Payment, Tax, Tag & Title
Push, Pull or Drag, Will Trade anything!
Warranty On Every Vehicle Soldl
$100 Referrals! Cal Steve 800-809-4716
s*m an- Ford '01 Mustang
'' 1 $4999.00.
'"< Lot's of custom.2180
Montgomery Hwy.
-Call 334-671-7720 or
718-2121.

GUARANTEED FINANCING!
CSI AUTO SALES
2180 MONTGOMERY HWY.
CALL: JAMES 334-718-2121.
Hyundai 06' Elentra tan in color, 101K miles, 4-
cyl. automatic, AC, pwr options, crusie,
AM/FM/CD, $6500. OBO 334-389-3071
Jeep'98 Cherokee- silver, awesome condition,
runs great, and cold AC, Priced to Sell!
$1,600. OBO Call 334-635-7960
Lincoln '85 Towncar- Dark Gray, 4 doors,
leather interior, 59k miles, Must see and Drive!
$12,500. Call 334-696-4765
Pontiac '05 Grand Am,
I4 door, automatic, V-6,
66,000 miles, like new con-
dition. $6995. Call 334-790-
7959.
Saturn 05' VUE-SUV silver, 124K mi. 4-cyl. auto-
matic, AC, power options, AM/FM/CD, $5500
OBO 334-389-3071.
SATURN'06 ION -129K miles asking $5,000
fully loaded, runs great 334-333-4957
Saturn 08' Aura V6 Sand Color with Tan Cloth
Interior. Only 11,800 miles and under factory
warranty up to 36,000 miles. Car is an automat-
ic, power doors and locks, keyless entry, cruise
control, auxiliary port for an iPod or mp3 play-
er, XM satellite radio, and equipped with on
star. Asking $17,000 Call 334-618-2407


Toyota '07 Corolla LE- good condition, great
gas mileage, tan, approx. 81k miles, $11,000.
Call 251-300-1338


Crossbow Bolts: Set of 4 new Easton Carbon
Power 3 fin, 20" no points $20. 850-482-4120.
Crossbow: Fury unused 1751b, rope cpcker, 4
bolts, hunting points, case $185. 850-482-4120.
2 Sets of full size bed railings $30 each
850-272-6092 serious inquiries only
Aviation Schoolbooks (7) Very good condition
$200. for the set 334-598-4349
Blender, never used, excellent condition, $15
850-526-2646
Blood Pressure Monitor by ReliOn, Digital, $40
850-482-5215
Chair, attractive mauve color, excellent condi-
tion $20 850-526-2646


Computer/student des 1


Cricut Imagine, New, Sealed in box $250, Cricut
personal cutter, incl. 6X12 matt $85 797-0987
Daniel Steele books HB books most read once.
$2.50 ea or all 35 for $75. 850-482-4120.
Dell 3 in 1 printer --copy-print-scan, $25, 850-
482-7422
Dell Computer, Flat screen monitor,printer &
accessories, barely used $350 OBO 8506939311
Desk Black metal office, $25, Standard size.
850-482-4691
Desk Wood (dark) Roll-top computer desk
$75. Good Condition. 850-482-4691
Dining Table, seats 8, antique, Birch Wood,
claw foot legs $300 OBO 850-209-0830
Dresser with mirror & 7 drawers, lite oak, $60
850-592-2881
Electric Fireplace with logs, looks real, excel-
lent condition $60 850-526-2646
Emergency Necklas, Feel Secure, a
Telemergency product $40 850-482-5215
Engine for 1991 Jimmy, 4.3 Itr V6, runs fine,
$500 850-569-2194
Entertainment Center, big, solid, all wood $55
850-592-2881
Exercise Bike: wks upper/lower body, looks
rough, dirty, wks 100% $50 850-569-2194
Formal Gown Size 22 green formal gown. Tags
still attached. $100. 850-209-1077
Free guinea pig spoiled and friendly guinea
pig with cage to very good home. 11/2 years
old. Call 850-352-1104.
Tony Little Gazelle Freestyle $50 850-209-2676


USED CARS FOR SALE
Most Need Repair
Ford '01 Escort ZxZ -
94k miles, 5 speed manual $2,900.
Volvo '91 240-
ingnition problems $500.
Pontiac '93 Grand AM
124k miles, 4cyl. Auto $1,995.
Ford '02 Taurus Wagon
80k miles $2,995.
Ford '94 F150 XLT
4x4 Ext Cab, Transmission slipping $1,500.
Call 334-693-5159 or 334-618-5828



2006 Harley-Davidson Ultra Classic FLHTCUI,
vivid black, 7800 mi., one owner,l oaded, excel-
lent condition, jward3@netscape.com, $6,700,
206-984-4097
Harley '03 Davidson Herit-
age Softail Classic 100th
Anniversary. Metallic
Pearl Blue. Vance and
Hines exhaust. 19k Miles,
Beautiful Harley!
$9,000 334-446-1208 4
Harley Davidson '02 Sportster 1200 Custom
11k miles, Chromed Out, $5500. Call 334-691-
3468 or 334-701-3855
Harley Davidson '10 Dyna-Super Glide Custom
96 Cubic Inch Motor, 6-spd transmission, only
21 Miles. 2 Brand New helmets included.
$9,000. Firm. Call Vicki 775-340-9795.

Sturgis Classic $7999.00.
2180 Montgomery Hwy.
Call 334-671-7720 or
718-2121.



Harley Davidson '96 Heritage Softtail FLSTN -
32k miles, emerald green/gun metal gray, lots
of extra chrome, new tires, extra parts and
bike cover. Harley Luggage with Purchase!
Price to SELL! $9500 OBO. Call 229-269-3834
Harley Davidson XL 1200 Low This is a Like
New Harley with only 4,556 miles. Accessories
include chrome forward controls, Screaming
Eagle stage 1 breather kit, Vance Hines fuel
pack electronic fuel control, 2 inch Rush Pipes
for nice deep roar. Harley short sissy bar. Adult
rider since new, never dropped. Color is Blue
and chrome. Call Greg at 334-701-3039. $6,500
HONDA'07 CBR,
600. loaded, 4,000
miles.stretch lowered,
2 brother exhaust, $5,500
334-689-3518, 334-339-2352
Honda'07 Goldwing GL1800 Nav. comfort, amp,
many acc. ext. warr. 14K mi. blue in color
$15,500. 334-774-7230. Ready to Sell!
Kawasaki '08 Vulcan 900,
white and gold. Approx 5K
mi. FLAWLESS. $5695
334-797-0987

Suzuki '07 250 cc Cruiser great beginners bike.
New full windshield, black, runs great. $2500
850-526-4645
V-Star '07 1300 Tourer Windshield, engine
guard, hard saddlebag, 16k miles, black,
$5,500. NEG Priced to SELL! Call 334-494-2736
Yamaha Roadster: Beautiful pearl white 2008
Yamaha Roadstar 1700. This motorcycle is ga-
rage kept, is in excellent condition, and runs
and drives like a dream. I have added too many
options to list. The price is way less than is ow-
ed but I will pay the shortage to release the ti-
tle to the buyer. I just need to get rid of the
payment. Loan value at the local credit union is
$7,300. 334-347-5953 or 334-248-1275.


S2005 Honda Helix 250.
Great Shape, 4,800 Miles,
had adult rider, well main-
tained, $2,800, 334-793-
0192

Yamaha 1976 Chappie Antique Scooter- yellow,
150CC, 1500 mile, runs, need carborator $595.
Call 334-793-3494


Glass tables, 2 end, 1 coffee, $100
Lamps (2) $50 850-352-4020
Hess Toy Trucks new & in box, $30. each
(1989 thru 2010) Call 334-699-2570
Inflatable Bouncer from Intex, fast fill
w/electric pump $30 850-592-2881
Lateral Thigh Trainer new, withlo minute
workout video. $75 OBO. 850-209-1077
Magnavox console TV -Wooden cabinet-$50
works great! 850-482-7422
Metal drive up car ramps (2), 3' long $25
Dog/Cat cage 22x19x16 $25 850-573-4990
Movie Poster from Valentines Day movie 24X70
$20 with Free Taylor Swift Book 334-389-6069
NASCAR Memorabilia, Dale Earnhardt Jr & Sr.
$5- $20 850-849-6481
Office Chair, greenish/grey $45
Mardi-Gras Beads (33) $10 850-573-4990
ONKYO-7pc Home Theatre Surround Sound
System, never hkd up. $300 OBO 850-482-3877
Pack-A-Pole rod case, padded, 4 rods, hard
case 60"-90", $50, like new, 850-482-4120
Power Wheels Jeep, 2 seater, good condition
$150 850-209-2676
Pure Platinum Coin 1/10 ounce platinum,
$230 850-569-2194
Radiator, new in box, fits '94 GMC or Chevy, 4.3
Itr $75 OBO 850-849-6481
Scope Weaver Qwik-point R-1 red dot pointing
sight for shotgun or rifle. $35, 850-482-4120.
Serving trays, (6) silver, $6 for all
Mirror 1' x 4.5' $8 850-573-4990
Speakers NHT Zero bookshelf size, black.
Little use. $35. 850-482-4120.
Tilt Utility Trailer, 4 x 8 with spare tire. $325
850-482-8347
Tires Set of 4 Timberline P265/70 R17, Good
tread! $125, 850-573-1626, Leave message if no
answer
TV 32 inch, grey, Phillips TV, $150, 850-209-
8038
Used designer handbags, Agnair, $5/ea or one
price for all. 850-209-6977
Weider 2100 Exercizer in top condition with
some weights. $225, 850-482-4120.
Woven Basket, natural wood, 2'x15" $8
Christmas knick knacks $1 each 850-573-4990 [


1 Y _^ I____I___ _______


A s S f E s.Se









8 8 Wlednesdal, Aullust 10. 2011 Jackson Count' Floridan


2003 Nissan Pathfinder SE: Tan, 3.5L, V6, 110K
miles, Cruise control, Power locks/windows,
CD/cassette player, Tinted windows, Rear car-
go cover, Very Clean! $8,900, Call 334-702-7790.
SChevrolet '86 K5 Blazer:
L -]' i JI Runs & looks good. 4WD.
All power. Great for hunt-
ing. $3,300 or best offer. Call 334-790-8813.
Hummer '06 SUT, Fully Loaded, Excellent
Condition, 106K miles, $21,000 For information,
call 334-790-7942 or 334-726-1199
Trail Blazer '03 LTZ 5 passenger, red in color
with gray leather int. DVD package. 133K
miles, $5500. exc. cond. 334-435-4177


'02 Dodge Ram 1500 4-wheel drive, quad cab,
P/U with 4.7 liter engine, cold air, chrome run-
ning boards, chrome rims, chrome tool box,
tow package and new tires. 149,698 miles.
Excellent condition. $8499. 334-790-6832.
r Chevrolet '00 Silverado
LS Z71 ext. cab, 4-door,
4x4, Red, 138K miles, all
power, 5000 miles on
tires, tow package, Must
see to appreciate. $9500.
334-791-2781 or 334-677-3050
Dodge 03' 2500 pick up long wheel base, reg.
cab, heavy duty, towing package, good condi-
tion 26K miles. $12,000 334-791-2322
h ra- Ford '02 F150 Harley
B Davisdon Clean Truck,
$13,999. 2180
S Montgomery Hwy. Call
334-671-7720 or 718-2121.

Ford '84 Ranger Pick-Up Truck, Runs good, Red
in color, Above average, Clean Truck $1295
334-793-2142

.' FORD '89 F150, 4wh, 4x4
,- Auto, $4,600 or reasonable
Offer. Call 229-334-8520.


Diesel- work truck, long
wheel base, orange, re-
built engine, $1,950. OBO
Call 334-791-9099
International Tractor F1466 145HP diesel,
red in color $5500. OBO 334-898-7995 or
305-343-9790 (2761 Coffee Springs Rd. 36318)
TRACTOR '08-Massey Ferguson, 33HP, 200
Hours, like new, one owner, LOADED!!
$25,000 OBO 334-687-3173, 334-695-1802


02' VAN Venture blue is color, new engine,
$5000. 334-718-4912.
Chevrolet'97 Astro Van conversion Van raised
roof, loaded, new tires, 51K nm. $9,500. 334-897-
2054 or 334-464-1496
Pontiac '03 Montana Van: Perfect for family or
business. 48,700 miles. Rebuilt Alabama title.
Looks great and runs great! Automatic seats,
windows. Extended version seats 7 with 4
captians seats with bench in back. Air controls
in back. Gray cloth interior. $6000 Call 334-701-
8862 or 334-796-6729.


Gaurenteed highest prices paid for your Junk
or unwanted vehicals & farming equipment,
Title or no Title 24 hrs a day, also payfinders
fee. 334-596-0154 or 850-849-6398

S- Got a Clunker
.W We'll be your Junker!
We buy wrecked cars
S and Farm Equip. at a
fair and honest price!
: Average paid $225.
CALL 334-702-4323 D011208
LIIIl~ll I ilillllllilII I IIIIIII


NOW LOCATED a
to BETTER
Luke Shores,Owner
Colaonial3.17



-
""--~., -~ ,


CLASSIFIED


CRAIG BARD
Crnitfisd S, ihs Costitr n
0dc850) 482-4043
Tou. F.l (866) 587-3673
CLu (850) 557-3444
WWW.CIIIPOl.AFOKD.COMl


it TWO LOCATIONS
SERVE YOU...
2984 Dekle Street
Marianna. FL 32448
850-526-4706
Cuhn:: 2416, LlamveneSt
Mjrjann3 FL 32448
850-482-2028
Hour5 ul Operation:
MInalv Fr.daj 7:00AM-5:00PM
We Appreciate Your Business!!


DESHAZO'S
AUTO SERVICE
Come See Us For All Your Car & Truck Mechanical Needs!
Ask. .... ; Owner: Phillip DeShazo We
I 850-482-3196 Appreciate


SRONNIE COLEY
Sakst R resr'ntvwil' x
Orc (850) 482-4043
ORToLFRE(866) 587-3673
CHIPOLA FORD CEu(850)27282791
4242 LAFAYETTE ST WWW.C"'IroI nORD.COM

JOHN ALLEN
Crtfl'irlSl4214 Cirrrettt xr
0c(M850) 482-4043
S48 4(8 50) 482-5246
To iFR E(866) 587-3673
CHIPOLA FORD RLa (850) 526-2806
4242 LAFAYETTE ST WWW.CHIPOLAFORD.CO1M

Bob Pforte Motors, Inc.
4214 Lafayette Street
Marianna, Florida 32446
(850) 482-4601
(800) 483-1440
www. bobpfortedodge.com 1llll1l1

I RYAN MELAULIN
Sales" e' ,f'resentat
OcC (8 50) 48254043
To FREE (866) 587-3673
CHIPOLA FORD C1(850)209.7004
4242 LAFAYETTE ST WwW.CllPW., ORD.CO0










Clay O'Neal's wE
Land Clearing, Inc. Dmw7DVL, h
ALTHA, FL A 0DwD
850-762-94026 BWE
Cell 850-832-5055 KOSSTSMtEABE.
[ O I NGTREE [PL ANTIG!1

CLAIG&H SKEPN


Personal Touc k-
Computer Repair
A+ AND NETWORK+ CERTIFIED
FREE PICKUP, DELIVERY, AND SET UP
WITHIN THE CITY LIMITS MARIANNA!
RICHARD REGISTER 850-557-6061



THE FITNESS CENTER
of MARIANNA
"Focusing on your Fitness"
4966 E. Hwy. 90 Marianna, FL 32446
850-526-2466 + t


wSV % ..I('IC )RIt I )AN.com


Honda 1962 C102 super
..... 'a i cub 50, 4k miles, Black &
white, good condition,
electric start 3 speed,
$2,500. Firm. Call noon (M-
F) 334-347-9002


CHIPOLA FORD
4242 LAFAYETTE ST


I also sell used parts
24 HOUR TOWING 334-792-8664 4,
6 WANTED WRECKED OR JUNK VEHICLES
6 PAY TOP DOLLAR DO 11lo
DAY -334-794-9576 -4NIGHT334-794-7769

WE PAY CaSH
FOR JUNK CARS!!!!!!
334-818-1274 D012226


in


LEGALS


LF15391
On Wednesday, August 17, 2011, at 10:00 a.m.
there will be a Tourist Development Council
meeting at the Jackson County Chamber of
Commerce Russ House, 4318 Lafayette Street,
Marianna, Florida.


GIVE US A RING...


Call today to place

your item in the

classified.


(850) 526-3614

(800) 779-2557


I AM\0

Grader Pan Excavator
Dump Truck Bulldozer
Demolition Grading Site Prep
SDebris Removal Retention Ponds Leveling
STop Soil Fill Dirt Gravel Land Clearing







Custom Tile & Flooring, LLC
Natural Stone Ceramic Porcelain
Custom Showers Hardwood Laminate & More
No Job too Large or Small! Licensed`& Insured
(850) 693-1423 or (850) 209-8099


Haircuts Color
H1J A T 7 f foil Highlights
Perms- Waxing
SR -,Otz z Tanning Beds
KRISTI WILKES KIM MATTHEWS
JULE EDENFIELD AMY ANDERSON



j1C.A6 oI "Hair anMl Tan Fie,it H.cicirc
SalonE" Cnlr. c, e
Tilllillij
4482 Lafayette St, Marianna, FL Headquarters II
(Winn Dixie Shopping (tr) Downlown Malone, FL
(850) 482- STYL (7895) (850) 569-2055



GREN'S FURNITURE 6 APPLIANCES
Large Selection of
catnapper Lift Chair Recliners


4122 aaytte Steet (West Ed)
Hr: Men. Fi. SAM 5PM


526-1549


"Beautification of Your Home"
Carpentry/Painting Installations
Furniture Repair & Refinishing
General Repairs Insured


Jackson County
Lumber and L.r.._ !
Building Supply ,,o,,,ios59
Marion Pills, Manager Office: (811) 526-5125
I'ax: :(B50)526-7647
.Cell: (850)718-3038


ALTHA FARMERS
COOPERATIVE, INC
Altha Blountstown Marianna
Come see Manager, Jeremy Branch and Staff for
Fertilizer Feed Seed Chemicals
Peanut Buying Point
2891 Penn. Avenue Marimrnna, FL
850-482-2416


"From Your Mind
i ;' ^: To A )ivinw 'Esign
Full rf icco e Coir01 Spss i? ry -, n:q
;,- ,. 850-526-4484
S 4481-C Jackson St. Marianna
I "n. www.divinedesignsndprnning.com
DivneDei 4oetn l 3ioithrrk net,



Bestway Portable Buildings
Largest Manufacturer of Portable
Buildings in North Florida
We have over 80
different sizes.
You can choose
U color and style.
Ir Built on site
.. g ---- -- i Mention this ad and
receive an Extra Window
... i Free with the purchase
of a building!
5614 Hwy 90 W. Marianna 850-482-8682



89 down
S n ..... .. . ., .. ..
33 Years in Business
Wi M, I Pl,,;iLO B.,L.I,. _, s


ADVERTISE IN

THE CLASSIFIED


1 U A Serving Jackion Countr
S ai, sn.-, I964
WE SERVICE WHAT WE SELL!
COME CHECK US OUf...Appliances, Lawn Tractors,
Chan Sa*b., GenaIraler, Garden Tool, Toys and Much Morel
4159 Lafayette St 526-3210



Sandy Voss
I'icklup cu, 1 )t livery IAv .-ln-ltl










CHIPOLA PROPANE GAS COMPANY
Locally Owned & Operated Since 1961
Serving all
Old Cottondale Rd Mariannaa 526-2651 'yor at
Hwy, 90 East -Sneads 593-6070 GasNeeds.
*Tanks (or Sale
Hwy, 20 West Blquntstown 674-4040 Lease.

.. Jackson County
A Vault & Monuments
( 'XIAR14f
A' r M; .',,: C 'P.;,\'ll' A'?.If .Ir
LSi R.'i: wDi c,\
Quali/t Service at A.flordilable Prices
, ........ ;: ,., i .. .. 850-482-5041 ;
Ouida Morris, CRS
Broker/Owner
n u 92(850) 526-2891
4630 Hwy 90, Marianna
S...... 1, RES (850) 482-2613
C21Sunnyso@ool.com
Sunny South Properties ..sun.ysouhp"ropaes,.com
FOR ALL YOUR REAL ESTATE NEEDS
SPECIALIZING IN REO AND FORECLOSURE PROPERTIES


gGN GUNS Gu%

I BUY OLD GUNS!

(850) 263-2701


ALL TRETCHlEDotr
Limousine & Taxi Service
Alr CARS EQUIPPED WITH CLOSED CIRCUIT TV *,
FOR DRIVER & PASSENGER SECURITY! g
SERVING JACKSON, WASHmNGTN, HOLMES 3
AND SURROUNDING AREAS Ig



B & LWell and Pump, LLC.
Bill Johnson Jr.
State Lic. #3214
(850)569-2535 (850)557-2572 cell
Bascom, FL


Call For Quote
GEORGE'S &Morelfo
SAuto
Gildra TintinL I *Commercial
.-.... ...._.-.__ ..- Residential
2847 S. Jefferson St., Marianna
482-6542


CLASSIFIEDS...

24 HOURS A DAY

7 DAYS A WEEK

52 WEEKS A YEAR

JUST A CLICK AWAY.


Visit us at:
www.jcfloridan.com


HEATING
JEMISON & COOLING
24 HOURS 7 DAYS A WEEK SERVICE
SALES INSTALLS DUCT CLEANING
W 850-762-8666
850-899-3259

AUTOMOT ]IVESE CES


JOHN BRYAN
S0rc(850) 482-4043
TOlu FRB (866) 5873673
CHIPOLA FORD CLL(850) 5730875
4242 LAFAYETTE ST WWW.CHIPOLAFROD.CO."

Cobb Front End
and Tire Service
"Not Just A FRont End Shop"


,:-<,


WANTED JUNK
VEHICLES TOP PRICE!


I,