<%BANNER%>

JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


18B t WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 3,2011


Israel, US race to avert Palestinian UN bid


The Associated Press

JERUSALEM Israel is work-
ing with the United States to find
a way to revive peace negotia-
tions with the Palestinians in a
desperate attempt to avert a dip-
lomatic showdown at the U.N.
next month, an Israeli official
confirmed Tuesday.
The talks, meant to provide
a framework for negotiations,
are focusing on two of the most
sensitive issues in the Israeli-Pal-
estinian conflict: the borders be-
tween Israel and a future Pales-
tine, and Israel's demand that the
Palestinians recognize the coun-
try as the Jewish homeland.
Israel and the U.S. are making
a painstaking effort to find lan-
guage acceptable to all sides, the
official said.
While he said Israel is ready
to show "flexibility" on the bor-
der issue, he acknowledged
there was no imminent sign of
a breakthrough. Palestinian of-
ficials said they were unaware of
any new proposals.
Peace talks have been mostly
stalled for nearly three years,
and the Palestinians refuse to
resume negotiations while Israel
continues to build settlements


THEASSOCIATED PRESS FILE
On April 27,2010, Jewish settlers rebuild the Migron unauthorized settlement outpost In the West Bank after it
was demolished by Israeli troops. Israel's Supreme Court on Tuesday ordered the state to dismantle Migron, the
largest of the more than 100 unauthorized West Bank settlement outposts.


in the West Bank and east Jeru-
salem. The Palestinians claim
both areas, captured by Israel in
the 1967 Mideast war, for their
future state.
In the absence of a negotiated
peace deal, the Palestinians plan
to ask the United Nations to rec-
ognize their independence next


month. The vote would be sym-
bolic, but the Palestinians none-
theless hope it will isolate Israel
and improve their negotiating
position in the future.
Israel and the U.S. both oppose
the U.N. bid, saying the conflict
should be resolved through ne-
gotiations. Israel also fears the


U.N. vote could spark street
protests and potentially violent
unrest.
The Israeli official said the two
allies have been trying to devise
a "package" that would allow
talks to resume, and persuade
the Palestinians to call off the
U.N. initiative.


"Unfortunately, it has not
been successful," the official
said, speaking on condition of
anonymity because he was dis-
cussing a sensitive diplomatic
matter.
He said the U.S. is looking
for Israel to endorse President
Barack Obama's call for the bor-
ders of a future Palestine to be
based on the pre-1967 lines be-
tween Israel and the West Bank,
with some modifications based
on negotiated land swaps.
In Washington, State Depart-
ment spokesman Mark Toner
declined to comment on the re-
port that Israel agreed to negoti-
ate on the basis of the pre-1967
cease-fire line.
He also repeated U.S. opposi-
tion to the Palestinian U.N. ini-
tiative, adding that "we're work-
ing hard with both parties to find
a way back to the negotiating
table before then."
Prime Minister Benjamin Ne-
tanyahu has repeatedly said
he will not return to the 1967
lines, and that he wants to retain
chunks of the West Bank. But
the official said Israel is "willing
to show some flexibility" on the
matter, if the Palestinians show
flexibility with Israeli concerns.


In Mubarak trial, Egypt sees chance at retribution


The Associated Press

CAIRO Hosni Mubarak, 83
years old and ailing, goes on trial
Wednesday on charges of cor-
ruption and ordering the killing
of protesters during the 18-day
uprising that toppled him, and
many Egyptians are celebrating
the chance at retribution against
a longtime authoritarian ruler.
But they also question whether
the trial will truly break with the
injustices of the past. Some wor-
ry that Egypt's new military rul-
ers are touting the trial as proof
that democratic reform has been
accomplished, even as activists
argue that far deeper change is
still needed.
"I am a little worried that if
Mubarak is tried and convicted
people will take that to be the
end of the revolution. They will
say that the revolution has real-
ized its goals. This should not be
the case," said Tareq Shalaby, a
27-year-old social media con-
sultant who was among the hun-
dreds of thousands of protest-
ers who thronged Cairo's Tahrir
Square and other cities during
the uprising.


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
AnmEgyptian worker put the final touches at the court room at the country's
national police academy in a Cairo suburb, Egypt on Sunday, where ousted
President Mubarak, his' security chief Habib el-Adly and six top police
officers faced trial on Wednesday.


The prosecution of the ousted
president is an unprecedented
moment in the Arab world, the
first time a modern Mideast
leader has been put on trial fully
by his own people.
The closest event to it was for-
mer Iraqi leader Saddam Husse-


ins trial, but his capture came at
the hands of U.S. troops in 2003
and his special tribunal was set
up with extensive consultation
with American officials and in-
ternational experts. Tunisia's de-
posed president, Zine El Abidine
Ben All, has been tried and con-


victed several times since his fall
several weeks before Mubarak's,
but all in absentia and he re-
mains in exile in Saudi Arabia.
Mubarak, who ruled with un-
questioned power for 29 years,
is expected to appear during
the trial sitting in a cage set up
for him and his co-defendants,
including his two sons and his
former interior minister. The
charges could bring a death sen-
tence, traditionally carried out
by hanging.
In an ironic twist, the court-
room.has been set up in what
was once the Mubarak Police
Academy .- one of the multi-
ple security, military and other
civil buildings named after the
president, though since his Feb.
11 ouster his name has been
dropped. Security will be tight,
with barbed wire and hundreds
of troops around the compound.
Efforts have been made to ensure
spectators in the court can't get
close enough to the defendants'
case to yell and throw objects at
them, the Interior Ministry said.
Mubaraks trial came only after
heavy pressure by protesters. For
weeks after his fall, as Mubarak


lived in a palace in the Red Sea
resort of Sharm el-Sheikh, the
ruling generals, who were all ap-
pointed by Mubarak, appeared
reluctant to prosecute him. A
trial was one of the few demands
that still united the disparate
protest movement.
Their hand forced, the gener-
als now seem eager to show the
public that they are bringing
the fruits of the revolution. The
trial will be televised live on state
TV and judges say proceedings
will be expedited; without long
postponements. The around 600
people attending are expected to
include relatives of some of the
850 protesters killed during the
uprising.
"The Pharaoh in the defen-
dants cage!" gloated a banner
headline Tuesday in the inde-
pendent El-Osboa newspaper
alongside a photo-illustration of
Mubarak behind bars.
The night before proceed-
ings were to begin Wednesday,
Mubarak was still at the Sharm
hospital. Security officials said
he would be flown by helicopter
directly to the police academy
just before the session.


Syria tightens


Hama siege, Italy


pulls ambassador


The Associated Press

BEIRUT Syrian troops
tightened their siege on
the city of Hama Tuesday,
sending residents fleeing
for their lives and draw-
ing a fresh wave of inter-
national condemnation
against a regime defying
the growing calls to end
its crackdown on anti-gov-
ernment protesters.
Secretary of State Hill-
ary Rodham Clinton met
with U.S.-based Syrian
democracy activists as the
Obama administration
weighed new sanctions on
Syria. Congressional calls
also mounted for action
against President Bashar
Assad's regime, as the
death toll from two days of
military assaults on civil-
ians Sunday and Monday
neared 100.
Italy recalled its ambas-
sador to Syria "in the face
of the horrible repression
against the civil popula-
tion" by the government,
which launched a new
push against protesters as
the Muslim holy month of
Ramadan began Monday.
It was the first European
Union country to pull its
ambassador, and the mea-
sure came a day after the
EU tightened sanctions.
The mounting interna-
tional outcry has had- no
apparent effect so far in
Syria, an autocratic coun-
try that relies on Iran as a
main ally in the region.


The top U.S. military
officer said Washington
wants to pressure the Syr-
ian regime. But he added
there was no immediate
prospect of a Libya-style
military intervention.
"There's no indication
whatsoever that the Amer-
icans, that we would get
involved directly with re-
spect to this," Joint Chiefs
chairman Adm. Mike Mul-
len said Tuesday.
The British Foreign Office
said it shares Italy's "strong
concerns about the situa-
tion in Syria" but is not re-
calling its ambassador.
"In the absence of an end
to the senseless violence
and a genuine process of
political reform, we will
continue to pursue fur-
ther EU sanctions," British
Foreign Secretary William
Hague said in a statement.
Without change "President
Assad and those around
him will find themselves
isolated internationally
and discredited within
Syria."
Still there was no sign the
regime was willing to back
down.
There has been an inten-
sified campaign since Sun-
day, apparently aimed at
preventing protests from
swelling during Ramadan,
when Muslims throng
mosques for special night-
ly prayers after breaking
their daily, dawn-to-dusk
fast. The gatherings could
turn into large protests.


l d Jackson


Jackson Hospital values growth, quality, and service and is adding service lines, doubling the size of its ER, and opening
new physician practices. The hospital system has a 100-bed acute care, general medicine hospital located in beautiful
Marianna, Florida, where the opportunity to make a difference still exists. We have immediate openings for:

PHYSICIAN PRACTICE MANAGER
Responsible for the management of Jackson Hospital's affiliated Medical and Surgical Specialty practices. Provides
oversight to ensure the individual Medical Office Managers are accountable for: cost effectiveness/financial management,
access to services, member satisfaction and teamwork with operational areas. Qualified applicants must possess a
Bachelor's degree (Master's degree is preferred) with five years of management experience in a physician practice setting
with at least ten years healthcare experience.

MEDICAL OFFICE MANAGER
Local medical practice is seeking an experienced Medical Office Manager to supervise, manage, and maintain the daily
workings of our busy practice. Qualified candidate must have previous experience in a medical office setting with
management/supervisory duties.

PRIMARY CARE CLINIC ARNP
Experienced ARNP needed for a small Primary Care facility in Malone, Florida. The ARNP, under the supervision of
a Physician, will perform physical examinations, evaluate and treat injuries or illnesses for pediatric through geriatric
patients. Responsible for ordering and interpreting appropriate diagnostic tests and collaborating' with supervising
physician to provided consistent care to patients.

MICROBIOLOGIST
Tasks and responsibilities include processing of specimens, preparing reagents, performing testing and reporting of
test results, performing quality control testing and instrument maintenance, as well as consulting with lab technicians
and phlebotomists as needed. Qualified candidates must possess nationally recognized certification as a medical
technologist or equivalent, Florida licensure required for all areas of lab. BSN and minimum 1 year hospital laboratory
experience preferred.


O.R. CHARGE NURSEIO.R. CIRCULATOR
We have added 5 new surgeons creating an opening for a Full-time O.R
Charge Nurse and O.R. Circulator with call duty. Qualified applicants
must live within 20 minutes of the hospital and hold a current
Florida RN license. Previous O.R. experience is preferred.

ORTHOPEDIC ARNP or PA
Full-time ARNP or PA needed for a highly specialized orthopedic/
sports medicine surgical practice. Florida ARNP/PA license
required and orthopedics and or surgical experience preferred.
although training may be provided to qualified applicant.


Join our team by contacting us or faxing your resume to
Human Resources of Jackson Hospital
4250 Hospital Drive, Marianna, Florida 32446
(850) 718-2626 phone or i850) 718-2679 fax
EOE
v. tq'J li. :."4.r.a'lr '-- ....... .~~j~p i~ S Y~ie~~l*~


iv~~ra,~-; 1~.',I:a


INTERNATIONAL




Jackson County Floridan
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS MAP IT! ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028304/00629
 Material Information
Title: Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title: Sunday Floridan
Portion of title: Floridan
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Jackson County Floridan
Publisher: Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Marianna Fla
Publication Date: 8/3/2011
Frequency: daily (except saturday and monday)[<1979-1995>]
weekly[ former 1934-<1955>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates: 30.776389 x -85.238056 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note: "Independent."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID: UF00028304:00629
 Related Items
Preceded by: Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by: Marianna Floridan

Full Text



C-n3 j sc .. ....




A^D--N

r LL1JlDAN


C(;rVr'( ville Tigers look fir
g oo. d ti, ii around in 2011

season. See more on

pagcl 1B.


Vol. 88 No 148


A Media General VMNewtp


National Debt


Debt is a done deal, but peace truce already gone


The Associated Press
WASH INGTON -With scant time
to spare, President Barack Obama
signed legislation Tuesday to avoid
an unprecedented national default
that he said would have devastated
the U.S. economy. But the truce with
Republicans that defused the crisis
seemed to be fading already.
Wall Street crumpled, dismayed by
reports of new economic weakness
and unimpressed by Congress' pre-
scription. The Dow Jones industrial
average sank by 266 points, its eighth
straight losing session, and biggest.
The compromise deal to persuade
GOP lawmakers to raise the federal
debt limit U.S. borrowing was to
collide with it at midnight will


INSIDE
* Read more about the budget deal
and what lies ahead on 8A.

cut federal spending by $2.1 trillion
or more over the next decade. But
Obama immediately challenged
Republicans to accept higher taxes
on the wealthy in a second round of
deficit cuts this fall. They adamantly
refused to accept that idea during
the past months' dispute.
A stern-faced Obama said at the
White House that action to raise the
debt limit had been essential but.
more and different steps were
badly needed.
"We've got to do everything in our
power to grow this economy and put


America back to work," the president
said, arguing forcefulh'for including
revenue increases as well as spend-
ing cuts in the next round of efforts
to trim huge government deficits.
It was the same call the GOP suc-
cessfully resisted in the bill just ap-
proved, and there was little evidence
of a change in position.
"The American people agreed with
us on the nature of the problem.
They know the government didn't
accumulate $14.3 trillion in debt be-
cause it didn't tax enough," said the
party's leader in the Senate, Mitch
McConnell of Kentucky.
Obama placed his signature on bill
in the privacy of the Oval Office less
See DEBT, Page 7A


T ..,,, F, a
Senate Minority Leader Mitch,McConnell of Ky. (center),
accompanied by Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo. (left) and Sen.
John Thune, R-S.D., smiles Tuesday on Capitol Hill after the
final passage of the emergency legislation to prevent a default
on government debt obligations:


Unemployment in the region


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN


Shane Griggs works on a computer at the One Stop Center In Marlanna Tuesday.


Changes to unemployment Job fair this Thursday

C pensiation kn From staff reports force Business Services department,
compensation i i "The board has numerous employ-


BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com

Changes to the state's Unemployment
Compensation program kicked in on
Monday and have led to an upswing in
the number of people showing up for
help with applications at the One Stop


Center on U.S. 90 in Marianna.
One of the biggest changes is that peo-
ple must apply for those benefits online
rather than on paper. No claims sent by
traditional mail which are postmarked
on or after Aug. 1 will be processed. They
See CHANGES, Page 7A


A job fair will be held at the Jackson
County Agriculture Complex from 3 to 7
p.m. tomorrow, August 4.
It is being hosed by the Chipola Re-
gionaJ Workforce Development Board.
Employers in the region who need
workers will be part of the event. Job
seekers are encouraged to attend. Ac-
cording to Kenny Griffin, from the Work-


ers that have committed to attend with
job openings they hope to fill from this
event," Griffin said.
The Agency for Workforce Innovation
will be bring a mobile one-stop unit
which will allow those in attendance to
register with the Employ Florida system
and search for an even wider variety of
jobs during the event.


Sturgeon being raised locally


BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com

A fish farm in tiny Bascom may
be part of solving a big and grow-
ing international problem.
With beluga sturgeon popula-
tions dwindling after many years
of overfishing and damming that
cut them off from their spawn-
ing areas in the Caspian Sea, the
fish has been put on the critically


endangered list. Bans on exports/
imports and other measures have
been taken through the years in
an effort to help the populations
recover.
A Miami man has started a farm
in Bascom to raise these and two
other sturgeon types, sevruga and
sterlyad. Mark Zaslavsky said he
has three goals in his operation:
to help restock the Caspian, to sell
some of the fish as meat for con-


sumers, and to eventually harvest
fish eggs for caviar, a delicacy for
people with gourmet tastes and
incomes to back it up; the price
for beluga caviar can reach well
beyond $100 an ounce.
Sturgeon Aquafarms is stocked
with the offspring of sturgeon
from the Caspian Sea, and is
thriving in its second year of
See RSH, Page 7A


Sturgeon Aquafarms owner Mark Zaslavsky in a tank with a fully mature
Beluga sturgeon.


SCLASSIFIEDS...5-7B


This Newspaper
Is Printed On
Recycled Newsprint




7 65161 80050 9


> ENTER-Ailr.ErNT...4B


) LOCAL..3A


) OBITUARIES...7A


) OPINION...4A


> SPORTS...1-3B


Y TV LISTINGS...3B


Follow us




Facebook Twitter


,,
c







12A WEDNESDAY. AUGUST 3.2011


Td olated T-Stos.
oay-Justin Kiefer / WMBB


High- 1000

Low 75



h- 1000 High-970
/ 750 Low -730


Friday
Scattered T-Storms.


High 980
Low -740


Sunday
Isolated T-Storms.


WAKE-UP CALL


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN ,\\iv.jcfloridan.com


----
3 .y ,l- I -,

rl <1.36.


TIDES ULTRA VIOLET INDEX


Panama City Low -
Apalachicola Low -
Port St. Joe Low -
Destin Low -
Pensacola Low -

RIVER READINGS
Woodruff
Blountstown
Marianna
Caryville


7:40 PM High
1:27 PM High
7:06 PM High
8:17 PM High
9:26 AM High

Reading
39.63 ft.
1.54 ft.
5.01 ft.
1.27 ft.


3:08 AM
7:12 AM
2:59 AM
3:32 AM
4:05 AM


Flood Stage
66.0 ft.
15.0 ft.
19.0 ft.
12.0 ft.


0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8-10 Very High, 11+ Extreme
012 4l


THE SUN AND MOON
Sunrise 6:00 AM
Sunset 7:34 PM
Moonrise 10:12 AM (Wed)
Moonset 9:23 PM (Tues)


mEl30
Aug. Aug. Aug. Aug.
6 13 21 29


FLORIDA'S K-mLm

PANHANDLE

MEDIA PARTNERS WJAQ 100.9m
L ST O OO RY TEUD.T


JACKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN
Publisher Valeria Roberts
vroberts@jcfloridan.com

Managing Editor Michael Becker
mbecker@jcfloridan.com

Circulation Manager Dena Oberski
doberski@jcfloridan.com






CONTACT US
Telephone: (850) 526-3614'
FAX: (850) 482-4478
Email: editorial@jcfloridan.com
Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447
Street Address:
4403 Constitution Lane
Marianna, FL 32446
Office Hours:
Weekdays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

MISS YOUR PAPER?
You should receive your newspaper no later
than 6 a.m. If it does not arrive, call Circula-
tion between 6 a.m. and noon, Tuesday to
Friday, and 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. on Sunday. The
. Jackson County Floridan (USPS 271-840)
is published Tuesday though Friday and
Sunday mornings. Periodical postage paid
at Marianna. FL.

SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Home delivery: $11.23 per month; $32.83
for three months; $62.05 for six months;
and $123.45 for one year. All prices include
applicable state and local taxes. Mail
subscriptions must be paid in advance. Mail
subscriptions are: $46.12 for three months;
$92.24 for six months; and $184.47 for one
year.

ADVERTISING
The advertiser agrees that the publisher
shall not be liable for damages arising
out of errors and advertisements beyond
the amount paid for the space actually
occupied by that portion of the advertise-
ments in which the error occurred, whether
such error is due to the negligence of the
publisher's employees or otherwise, and
there shall be not liability for non-inser-
tion of any advertisement beyond the
amount paid for such advertisement. This
newspaper will not knowingly accept or
publish illegal material of any kind. Advertis-
ing which expresses preference based on
legally protected personal characteristics is
not acceptable.

HOWTO GETYOUR
NEWS PUBUSHED
The Jackson County Floridan will publish
news of general interest free of charge.
Submit your news or Community Calendar
events via email, fax. mail, or hand delivery.
Fees may apply for wedding, engagement.
anniversary and birth announcements.
Forms are available at the Floridan offices.
Photographs must be of good quality and
suitable for print. The Floridan reserves the
right to edit all submissions.
GETTING IT RIGHT
The Jackson County Floridan's policy
is to correct mistakes promptly. To
report an error, please call 526-3614
Monday-Friday.


Coununity Calendar


TODAY
a Jackson County Habitat for Humanity
Warehouse hours: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
) East Jackson County Economic Development
Council will conduct a ribbon cutting ceremony for
Smith & Son Auto & Diesel Repair,10 a.m. at 1962
Porter Ave. in Grand Ridge; and the EJCEDC will rec-
ognize its August Business of the Month, Blondie's
.Food and Fuel, 10:30 a.m. at 6909 Highway 90 in
Grand Ridge.
n Alcoholics Anonymous Open meeting, noon
to 1 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901
Caledonia St., Marianna, in the AA room.
* Jackson Hospital Board of Trustees Building
and Grounds Committee meets at 5:30 p.m. in
the Hospital's community room.
) Chipola College financial aid application
deadline for fall semester is today. Call 718-2211;
visit www.chipola.edu.

THURSDAY, AUGUST 4
D Jackson County Farmers Market is open 6:30
a.m. to noon (or until goods sell out) Tuesdays,
Thursday and Saturdays in Madison Street Park in
Marianna.
D Orientation -1 to 4 p.m. at the Goodwill Career
Training Center, 4742 Highway 90 in Marianna. Reg-
ister for free job placement and computer training
classes offered to people with disadvantages/dis-
abilities. Call 526-0139.
* Job Fair, 3 tb 7 p.m. at the Jackson County Ag
Conference Center, Pennsylvania Avenue in Mari-
anna. Host: Chipola Regional Workforce Develop-
ment Board Call 718-0456.
a Chipola College application deadline is today
for fall terms A and B. Call 718-2211; visit www.
chipola.edu.
D William Dunaway Chapter, Florida Society,
Sons of the American Revolution meets at Jim's
Buffet & Grill, with a Dutch-treat meal at 6:30 p.m.
and Blue Springs Society, C.A.R. presenting, "Two
C.A.R. Projects to Help Veterans and Their Families,"
plus a report from the Mid-Southern Regional C.A.R.
meeting in Lexington, Ky. Those interested in SAR
are welcome. CaH 594-6664.
3 Free Summer Concert Series Twenty on Red,
7 to 9 p.m. at Madison Street Park in downtown
Marianna. Bring lawn chairs, coolers. This is the
last show of the series at Madison Street Park; the
season concludes next week at Citizens Lodge Park.
Presented by Jackson County Parks department
and Main Street Marianna. Call 718-1022.
D Alcoholics Anonymous Closed discussion, 8
to 9 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901 Cale-


donia St., Marianna, in the AA room. Attendance
limited to persons with a desire to stop drinking.

FRIDAY, AUG. 5
] Jackson County Chamber of Commerce First
Friday Power Breakfast 7 to 8:30 a.m. at the
Jackson County Agriculture Conference Center,
2741 Pennsylvania Avenue in Marianna.Breakfast
and networking at 7 a.m.; program at 7:45 a.m.
Topic: "Growing Tourism in Jackson County."
Members of the Jackson County Tourist Develop-
ment Council and area tourism asset managers will
discuss local tourism.
3 International Chat-n-Sip Jackson County
Public Library Learning Center staff and their
international English learners welcome the public,
8:30 to 10 a.m. at 2929 Green St., to the exchange
of language, culture and ideas among local and
international communities. Light refreshments will
be served. No charge. Call 482-9124.
a Celebrate Recovery -Adult, teen meetings to
"overcome hurts, habits and hang-ups in a safe
environment:' 7 p.m., Evangel Worship Center, 2645
Pebble Hill Road. Dinner: 6 p.m. (free for first-time
guests). Child care available. Call 209-7856.
) Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, 8 to,
9 p.m. in the AA room at First United Methodist
/k ... -L. ,') n -,1 -_-;i Q >A--_-__


reading program for children 12 and younger, will be
at Citizens Lodge in Marianna Aug. 8-11. Activities
start at 9 a.m. for pre-school kids; 10:15 a.m. for
school-age. Call 482-9631 to reserve a spot.
] Orientation -10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Goodwill
Career Training Center, 4742 Highway 90 in Mari-
anna. Register for free job placement and computer
training classes offered to people with disadvan-
tages/disabilities. Call 526-0139.
3 Lions Club of,Marianna meeting, Jim's Buffet
& Grill, at noon on second and fourth Mondays. Call
482 2005.
a Jackson County Health Department CloSing
the Gap program offers a free yoga class, 5:30 p.m.
at Integras Wellness Center, 4230 Lafayette St.,
Suite C, in Marianna. Mat provided. Call 482-6221.
] Autism Support Group meeting, for fam-
ily members and ,aregivers,6 p.m. in the First
Presbyterian Church Fellowship Hall on Clinton
Street in Marianna (across from Hancock Bank).
Back-to-school preparations will be discussed. Call
526-2430.
) Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, 8 to
9 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St., Marianna.

TUESDAY, AUG. 9


nurcn., 2901 Caledonia St., Marianna.
SJackson County Farmers Market is open 6:30
ATa.m. to noon (or until goods sell out) Tuesdays,
SATURDAY, AUG. 6 Thursdays and Saturdays in Madison Street Park in
a Jackson County Farmers Market is open 6:30 Marianna.
a.m. to noon (or until goods sell out) Tuesdays, Heaven's Garden Food Pantry distributes
Thursday and Saturdays in Madison Street Park in food on the second Tuesday of the month, 9 a.m.
Marianna. to noon at 3115 Main St. in Cottondale. Jackson
3 Alford Community Health Clinic is open 10 County residents.only. Call 579-9963 or visit www.
a.m. to 2 p.m. at 1770 Carolina St. in Alford. The free aidaspina.org.
clinic treats short-term illnesses and.chronic condi- ') Optimist Club of Jackson County board meet-
tions for income-eligible patients.without medical ing, noon, First Capital Bank, Marianna.
insurance. Appointments available (call 263-7106 a Free quilting/crocheting/knitting class led
before noon. by Mary Deese, 1 p.m. at Jackson County Senior
Citizens, 2931 Optimist Drive in Marianna. Call
SAlcoholics Anonymous open meeting, 4:30 to 482-5028.
5:30 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist HeartworksCongestive Heart Failure Support
Church, 2901 Caledonia St., Marianna. )) Heartworks Congestive Heart Failure Support
Church 2901 Caledonia St., Marianna. Group meets 3 to 3:30 p.m. in the ground-floor
community room of the Hudnall Medical Building,
SUNDAY, AUG. 7 4230 Hospital Drive in Marianna. Guest speakers:
) Alcoholics Anonymous closed discussion, 6:30 Dr. John T. Chacko, urologist; and Dr. Ray Marling,
p.m., 4349 W. Lafayette St., Marianna (in one-story Cardiologist. Heart failure patients and their caregiv-
building behind 4351W. Lafayette St.). Attendance ers/supporters welcome. Refreshments served. No
limited to persons with a desire to stop drinking, cost. Call 718-2519.
a Coupon Class/Hospice Benefit Covenant
MONDAY, AUG. 8 Hospice hosts a beginner couponing class, 5:30
Sgp.m. at 4215 Kelson Ave. in Marianna. Cost: $10
3 Free reading program "One World, Many (proceeds benefit the Marianna branch of Covenant
Stories," the Jackson County Public Library summer Hospice). To register, call 482-0192.


The submission deadline for this calendar is two days before publication. Submit to: Community Calendar, Jackson County Floridan, P. 0. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447,
email editorial@jcfloridan.com, fax (850) 482-4478 or bring items to 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.


Police Roundup


MARIANNA POLICE
DEPARTMENT
The Marianna Police De-
partment listed the following
incidents for Aug. 1, the latest
available report: One report
of an armed and dangerous
individual, two
accidents with
no injuries,
one suspicious a ME
vehicle, three ',I MEJ
suspicious
persons, one
highway obstruction, one
verbal disturbance, 15 traffic
stops, one larceny complaint,
three trespass complaints,
two juvenile complaints, one
animal complaint, one fraud
complaint, one public service


call and one patrol request.

JACKSON COUNTY
SHERIFFS OFFICE
The Jackson County Sheriff's
Office and county Fire/Rescue
reported the following incidents
for Aug. 1, the latest available
report. (Some of these calls may
be related to after-hours calls
taken on behalf of Graceville
and Cottondale Police Depart-
ments): One drunk pedestrian,
two accidents with no injuries,
one missing adult, one miss-
ing juvenile, one stolen tag,
four abandoned vehicles, one
reckless driver, three suspi-
cious vehicles, three suspicious
incidents, two suspicious per-
sons, one escort, one highway


obstruction, one burglary, four
fire calls, 24 medical calls, three
burglar alarms, one firearm
discharged, one fire alarm, 25
traffic stops, three larceny com-
plaints, one criminal mischief
complaint, one civil dispute,
one trespass complaint, two
animal complaints, two assists
of motorists or pedestrians, one
retail theft, three assists of other
agencies, five public service
calls, three criminal registra-
tions, three transports and two
threat/harassment complaints.

JACKSON COUNTY
CORRECTIONAL FACILITY
The following persons were
booked into the county jail dur-
ing the latest reporting periods:


. n Donald Groover, 30,3215
NW 144th Drive, Okeechobee,
hold for Holmes Co.
a Kristopher Blount, 29, 2532
Chancer Circle, Panama City,
hold for court.
a Porfino Martinez, 51, 1218
Poole Drive, Marianna, hold for
court.
a Desiree Jones, 24, 2509 Cor-
ral Drive, Alford, hold for court.
a Henry Longmire, 37,
3093 Sunset Lane, Mar-
gate, driving while license
suspended/revoked.

JAIL POPULATION: 225

To report a crime, call CrimeStoppers
at 526-5000 or a local law enforcement
agency. To report a wildlife violation, call
1-888-404-FWCC (3922).


Tomorrow
Isolated T-Storms.


N N High 960
Low 74

Saturday
Scattered T-Storms.


I ',I i


. 46







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


PAPER QUILLING DEMO PLANNED FOR AUG. 13


SUBMITTED PHOTOS
Marianna resident Lou Brown will teach a workshop on paper quilling creating designs from curled or coiled strips of paper at
the Saturday, Aug. 13 meeting of The Artists Guild of Northwest Florida. The meeting will be held at Debi Menacof's "Outside the
Lines" studio in Marianna. The workshop costs $3 for members and $5 for non-members and will begin at 10 a.m., following the 9
a.m. business meeting. The meeting and workshop are open to the public. Workshop participants are asked to bring their own scissors and
Elmer's glue. Paper will be provided. Brown's work is currently on display at the "Art in Public Places" exhibit at the Jackson County Public Li-
brary. LEFT Marianna artist Lou Brown will teach a paper quilling workshop at the Aug. 13 meeting of The Artists Guild of Northwest Florida.
RIGHT: This paper quilling art is by Lou Brown, who will teach a workshop on the technique Saturday, Aug. 13.


Chipola Surgical


& Medical


Specialties adds


internal medicine


Special to the Floridan

Jackson Hospital recently
announced the opening of
its newest physician prac-
tice, Chipola Surgical &
Medical Specialties In-
ternal Medicine, which is
located at 2946 Jefferson
St. in Marianna.
Practice physician Dr.
Murali Krishna will focus
on the prevention, diagno-
sis, and treatment of adult
illness and conditions.
He began seeing patients
Monday, Aug. 1 and is ac-
cepting new patients.
The new practice can
be reached by calling
526-3314.
Dr. Krishna is Board Cer-


tified in Internal Medicine
and is a member of the
American
College of
Physicians
and Ameri-
can Medical
Association.
His medi-
Krishna cal training
includes. In-
ternal Medicine residency
at The Jewish Hospital, af-
filiated with the University
of Cincinnati, Ohio, and
postdoctoral training in
infectious diseases.
He brings six years of in-
ternal medicine practice
experience to Chipola Sur-
gical & Medical Specialties
- Internal Medicine.


Covenant Hospice named one of the


'Best Companies to Work For in Florida'


Special to the Floridan


Covenant Hospice was recently
named one of the state's Best Com-
panies to Work For by "Florida
Trend" magazine.
One hundred companies were
recognized in small, medium and
large company categories. Covenant
Hospice ranked 27th in the large
company category, the only com-
pany in Northwest Florida named
in this category.
The rankings the third an-


nual statewide "Best Companies"
list appear in the August issue
of "Florida Trend" and on Florida
Trend.com.
"We are truly honored and hum-
bled by this designation," said Dale
O. Knee, Covenant Hospice Presi-
dent & CEO.
To be considered for participa-
tion, companies or government
entities had to employ at least 15
workers in Florida and be at least a
year old. Companies that chose to
participate in the "Best Companies


Bridge club results


Special to the Floridan

The Marianna Duplicate
Bridge Club plays bridge
on Monday afternoons
in the St. Luke Episcopal
Church Parish Hall.
For the week of Aug.
1, the winners were as
follows:


) First place Ida
Knowles and Sara Lewis.
) Second place Ka-
trina Leblanc and Betty
Brendemuehl.
) Third place Doug-
las Parker and Kurt
Opfermann.
) Fourth place Judy
Duell and NancyWatts.


Marriage, Divorce Report


Special to the Floridan

Marriages and divorces,
as reported for the week of
July 25-29.
Marriages
Vera Mae Calhoun and
Dwight Eugene Neal.
a Gary Sean Jones and


Celeste Howard Uptain.
P Brandon Cecil Rachel
and Melissa Lynn Ward.
a Megan Marie Gagner
and Demar Lovelle Griggs.
Divorces
a Karen Cobb vs. Jimmy
Cobb.
a Chandler Scott Barrick


GAS

WATCH
Gas prices are going up. Here
are the least expensive places
to buy gas in Jackson County.
as of Tuesday afternoon.
L $3.58 Travel Center, Hwy
71 near 1-10
2. $358 Murphy's, Hwy 71
near 1-10
3. $3.63 McCoy's, Jeffer-
son Street, Marianna
4. $363 Kmee II, Malone
5. $3.63 Steele City BP,
U.S. 231, Alford
6. $3.64 BP, River Road,
Sneads
If you see a lower poce.
contact the F!ondan nev srocm
at editonal@lcflondan.com.


vs. Somer Barnes Barrick.
a James Todd Baya vs.
Leigh Ann Baya.
a Carolyn Hargrove Pow-
ell vs. Larry N. Powell.
a Shelina T. Bryant vs.


Lafayette C. Brown.
) Terri Jo Langford vs.
John Joel Langford.
) Jeff David Miller vs. Ju-
lia Nicole Miller.


Florida Lottery
CASH 3 PLAY4, FANTASY


Mon.
Mon.
Tue.
Tue.
Wed.
Wed.
Thurs.
Thurs.
Fri.
Fri.


(E) 8/1 5-7-4 7-4-7-5 1-14-23-34-35


4-0-9 3-0-2-3
8/2 1-2-7 6-6-2-8
1-6-6 5-8-4-6
7/27 1-1-0 9-0-5-1
1-9-3 6-5-1-8
7/28 6-5-9 7-2-5-1
3-2-8 4-0-4-0
7/29 7-9-0 3-6-6-5


Sat. (E)


Notavailable

3-5-9-24-30

5-10-15-21-27

3-4-12-23-24


1-4-7 4-7-5-5
7/30 4-5-2 4-2-3-3 7-15-18-21-33
3-0-6 2-8-7-8


(E) 7/31 8-3-4 3-3-2-1 6-10-11-20-34


Sun. (M)


8-0-4 0-9-5-9


To Work For in Florida" process un-
derwent a two-part survey process:
evaluation of the company's work-
place policies, practices, philoso-
phy, systems and demographics;
and an employee survey to measure
employee satisfaction.
The combined scores determined
the top companies and the final
ranking.
For a complete list of the "100
Best Companies to Work For in
Florida," go to www.FloridaTrend.
com/BestCoinpanies.


J C FLLO R I DAN' .CO M



PA N D6RA




Matson
m m Gift with Purchase
Downtown Marianna Sept B-1O

US Pt No 77.507 C 2011 Pand ry k C A It, l r.F Paor


Call Ora For
All your Real
Estate Needs In
Florida AndlOr
Alabama!

Multi-Million
Ora Mock, 6RI Dollar
Broker/Associate Producer

tj= Cell: 850-526-9516
"- Office: 850-526-5260
E-Mail: oramock@embarqmall.com
4257 Lafayette St., Marianna, FL


Wednesday 7/27


38-40-41-51-59 PB33 PPx2


6 6(


Saturday 7/30
Wednesday 7/27


4-6-7-31-44-49
13-19-23-38-42-51


xtra2
xtra3


For lottery information, call (850) 487-7777 or (900) 737-7777


E= Evening drawing. M = Midday drawing


Saturday 7/30 20-40-41-47-55 PB19 PPx2


WEDNESDAY. AUGUST 3. 2011 3AF


LOCAL










-ir rn rI


Publisher
VALERIA ROBERTS

Managing Editor
MICHAEL BECKER


Our Opinion


Teach a tax-



free life lesson
F lorida's tax-free holiday from Aug. 12-14 offers
an opportunity for local shoppers to help them-
selves, their children and local merchants all at
once in this suffering economy.
Parents, grandparents and others who want to help
outfit youngsters for the start of a new school year
can visit the Department of Revenue website at www.
myflorida.com/dor for a look at the rules. The site also
has a full list of eligible purchases.
But this is not only a chance to save money and sup-
port local stores; it's a great time to spend a little quality
time discussing money with the children in our lives.
The tax-free holiday is the perfect time to help them
start building a foundation in the practice of good
financial planning and prioritizing.
Together, go over the things that are still on the back-
to-school shopping list, or maybe just target a few
items for a little comparison browsing. Plan an excur-
sion around a set budget for the day. Grab a calculator,
throw on some stay-at-home comfort clothes, and
make a space in the living room floor. Pullout the Sun-
day inserts and see who has what, and for how much.
Put the child totally in charge of selecting one or two
particular items, something from the low end of the
budget, like pencils.
And when the big shopping day comes, do this little
"life lesson" early in the trip, before you and they get
cranky. And if they help you pick out a real bargain, try
to build a modest "savings reward" into the end of the
day.
With a little planning, these tax-free days could reap
the kind of returns that just don't show up on a line
item for the IRS.


Letter to the Editor
Mowing, paint needed to spruce things up
As many.people are working to beautify our fair city,
who's sitting on their you-know-what, rather than mow-
ing the medians and right-of-ways on US Highway 90?
We also have some downtown businesses that are in
bad need of a coat of paint.
Proud to live in Marianna,
GEORGE E.FARR


Contact representatives

Florida Legislature

Rep. Marti Coley, R-District 7
Marti.Coley@myfloridahouse.gov
Building A, Room 186 Chipola College
3094 Indian Circle
Marianna, FL 32446-1701

Rep. Brad Drake, R-District 5
Brad.Drake@myfloridahouse.gov
NWFL State-Chautauqua Campus #205
908 U.S. Highway 90 West
DeFuniak Springs, FL 32433-1436

Sen. Bill Montford. D-District 6
208 Senate Office Building
404 Soith Monroe St.
Tallahassee, FL 32399-1100
montford.bill.web@ flsenate.gov

U.S. Congress
Rep. Steve Southerland, R-2nd District
1229 Longworth HOB
Washington, DC 20515
Phone: (202) 225-5235
Fax: (202) 225-5615


Letters to the Editor
Submit letters by either mailing to Editor, P.O. Box 520,
Marianna FL, 32447 or faxing to 850-482-4478 or send
email to editorial@jcfloridan.com. The Floridan reserves
the right to edit or not publish any letter. Be sure to
include your full address and telephone number These
will only be used to verify the letter and will not be
printed. For more information call (850) 526-3614.


NO SIGN OF INTELLIGENT
LIFE FORIR THERE.


Viewpoint


We need libraries most during recessions


BY JOSE-MARIE GRIFFITHS
AND DONALD W. KING
Providence Journal

public libraries face deep cuts
in budget, staff and hours
of operation as states and
municipalities struggle with the
fiscal consequences of a recession
that is reluctant to loosen its grip.
We conducted federally funded
national surveys of public-library
use between 2004 and 2008, which
we updated in 2010, to establish
the consequences of recessions.
These studies provided abundant
evidence that libraries and the
services they provide are espe-
cially important during times of
recession.
Our data show that every year
over the past two decades, use of
public libraries has increased by
over 2 billion visits annually. When
remote access to public libraries
through the Internet is included,
the number of visits per capital
has more than doubled during the
same two decades. When we looked
specifically at the previous two
recessions, we saw that growth in
visits to libraries as well as services
they offered rose well above previ-
ous levels.
These increased levels of use
remained high following the
recovery as new and continuing
users discovered the value of library
services. The extensive use during
recessions is partially the result of
public libraries' adjusting services


to fill recession-related needs. It
also stems from a growing public
confidence in the trustworthiness
of information provided by librar-
ies, the quality of services offered
and the convenient access.
Contrary to the popular myth that
public libraries serve primarily the
recreational needs of their commu-
nities, the overwhelming majority
(over 70 percent) of visits to public
libraries are for non-recreational
purposes. For example:
) Nearly a quarter of adult visits
are to address personal or family-
related needs, such as help with
health and wellness issues, per-
sonal finance, how to make or fix
something, or to keep current with
news or find jobs.
) The proportion of visits that are
job-related increased from 3 per-
cent in 2009 to 11 percent in 2010.
Most public libraries now provide
access to jobs databases, civil-
service-exam materials, software
to help create resumes and other
employment-related information.
They help users complete online
job applications and offer helpful
classes.
) About one in eight visits is by a
small business and even some
large ones to conduct research
and to seek information and
support regarding legal, financial
and operational concerns. Public
libraries have often helped small
businesses get started. One third
of visits are for educational needs
- and not just for children doing


homework or adults continuing
their education. Teachers often use
public libraries for their continued
education or to keep up with pro-
fessional literature; they also rely
on public libraries to prepare for
class or lectures.
Recessions continue to place a
burden on public libraries and the
communities they serve. Without
budgets for new purchases, col-
lections grow stale and outdated.
When a library closes, a user bears
an additional burden: He or she
winds up spending about 45 addi-
tional minutes and more than $20
per visit to find and use alternative
sources of information.
Public libraries have adapted
to reduced collection purchases
by relying heavily on interlibrary
borrowing.
Many now also have formal part-
nerships with government agencies
and industries to meet the grow-
ing need for access to government
information, services and forms, or
for help in understanding govern-
ment programs.
Finally, public libraries in most
communities have been able to
*accommodate sharp increases in
service offerings and usage because
of their committed and highly mo-
tivated staff,'who believe in their
mission to serve the public.
Clearly, public libraries are es-
sential to all sectors of society and
for many different types of use. Do
not sell this essential community
resource short!


When partisans fling charges of partisanship


BY BYRON YORK

enate Majority Leader Harry
Reid frequently accused Re-
publicans of playing partisan
politics during the debt ceiling
crisis.
"The moment for partisan games
is long since passed," Reid said July
21. "It is time for patriots on both
sides of the aisle to join hands and
actually govern."
On July 26, Reid released a state-
ment headlined "REPUBLICANS
PUT POLITICS AHEAD OF THE
ECONOMY."
And on July 24, Reid cast himself
as a bipartisan compromiser, trying
to talk sense into his partisan ad-
versaries. "We hope Speaker Boeh-
ner will abandon his 'my way or
the highway' approach," Reid said,
"and join us in forging a bipartisan
compromise."
Now, both sides have joined
hands and governed. But Reid's
words raise a question: What's
wrong with partisanship in the de-
bate over the debt ceiling? It's a po-
litical dispute, and it hardly seems
possible, or perhaps even desirable,
to remove partisanship from it.
If you want proof that partisan-
ship is an enduring part of debt
ceiling arguments, you need look
no farther than the record of Harry
Reid himself.
Not counting the current stand-
off, in the last decade the Senate
has passed 10 increases to the debt
limit. During that time, Reid always
voted to raise the debt ceiling when
Democrats were in control of the
Senate, and never voted to raise
the debt ceiling when Republicans
were in control.


Some of Reid's colleagues also ac-
cuse Republicans of partisanship in
the debt fight. "It's time for biparti-
san leadership, not partisan games-
manship," said the No. 2 Democrat
in the Senate, Richard Durbin, after
Republicans pulled out of budget
talks with President Obama. And
Obama himself described the debt
debate as a "partisan three-ring
circus" leaving no doubt that he
considered the Republicans guilty
of partisanship.
But a look at Durbin's record
shows that he, too, has voted along
party lines when it comes to the
debt ceiling. In the last decade,
Durbin always Voted to increase the
debt limit when Democrats were in
control and never voted to increase
the debt limit when Republicans
were in control. Obama was in the
Senate for just four votes to raise
the debt ceiling. He missed two of
them, voted yes once when Demo-
crats were in charge, and voted no
once when Republicans were in
charge.
Here are the 10 votes to raise the
debt ceiling since 2002, accord-
ing to the Congressional Research
Service.
) On June 11, 2002, with the
Senate in Democratic hands, Reid
and Durbin voted to bring the total
national debt to S6.4 trillion.
) On May 23, 2003, with the Sen-
ate in Republican hands after the
November 2002 midterm elections,
Reid and Durbin voted against a
bill to raise the debt limit to $7.384
trillion.
On Nov. 17, 2004, Reid voted
"present" and Durbin voted against
a bill to bring the total debt to
S8.184 trillion.


) On March 16, 2006, Reid,
Durbin and Obama voted against a
bill to bring the total debt to $8.965
trillion.
) On Sept. 27, 2007, with the
Senate back in Democratic hands,
Reid and Durbin voted to increase
the national debt to $9.815 trillion.
Obama, running for president, did
not vote.
n On July 26, 2008, Reid and
Durbin voted to increase the
national debt to $10.615 trillion.
Obama did not vote.
) On Oct. 1, 2008, Reid, Durbin
and Obama voted to increase the
national debt to $11.315 trillion.
n On Feb. 13, 2009, Reid and
Durbin voted to increase the na-
tional debt to $12.104 trillion.
) On Dec. 24, 2009, Reid and
Durbin voted to increase the na-
tional debt to $12.394 trillion.
) On Jan. 28,2010, Reid and
Durbin voted to increase the na-
tional debt to $14.294 trillion.
The point of this is not to show
that Reid and Durbin are uniquely
partisan, although the partisan
pattern of their votes is unmistak-
able. Others are partisan, too; until
the new debt deal, the Senate GOP
leader, Mitch McConnell, voted
to increase the debt limit when
Republican George W. Bush was
president and against increasing
the debt limit when Democrat
Barack Obama was president.
The point is that leaders who
have voted along strictly partisan
lines might want to think twice be-
fore denouncing others as partisan.

Byron York is chief political correspondent for
The /ashirgton E/aminer.


TExr
TEXT
TEXT
TEXT


fft. by U l Ulk

2 2011 Jefl Stahler/Dist. by Universal UClick for UFS


~P~-SZ~a


amp ,~E x 1





JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


16 oz. 2.6 oz. Armour
Family Pack $ 53 Bar "S" Regular or $ 1 3 Fun Pack A
Ground Beef...... lIb. Thick Sliced Bologna Lunchables.......... U6
16 oz. Kelley's Smoked
16 oz. Kelley's Smoked 16 oz. Carolina Pride 16 oz. Country Best
Baby '
Baby $268 Smoked $ 38 Roll 43
Link Sausage......Sausage...............$2 Sausage............ $
12 oz. Farmland 16 oz. Land O'Frost 10 oz. Oncor
Sliced1or7Chicken
aSliced on 217 Ham or Turkey $ 97 Chicken $149 .
Bacon.............W rap Kits.............Nibblers ..........






:2 *,
r 7* L un a 1-












12 pak cans 3 oz. 6 pack 35.3 oz.
Pepsi $365 Nissin 8 coffeemate $ 93
Products ......... Ramen Noodles. Kilo..................
9 oz., Bengal 6 Roll 32 oz.,
Ant & Roach $586 scott $ 49 sauer's $ 00
Spray............ Towels............ Mayonnaise......
22 oz. 14 oz. Kraft Deluxe 18 oz. Kraft
Golden Flake $ 99 Macaroni N $1 78 BBQ 86
Variety Pack..... Cheese ........... Sauce................









Sweet White or Red $ 1 61 Fresh Express Romaine $138
Seedless Grapes........... ... b. IGarden Salad............. ..... z.
L


WEDNESDAY. August 3.2011 5A r







-16A WEDNESDAY, AUGUST3.2011


STATE


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN wwv,,..icfloridan.com


Fla. Retail Federation defends sales tax holiday


The Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE The Florida"Fam ies lov it. Ls like to
Retail Federation on Tuesday
defended the state's upcom- oygains
ing sales tax holiday on back- I
to-school purchases against Ret ers *i in
arguments that such breaks do JTm .ail ga niT m .
little or nothing to stimulate the kM Ma sts,


economy or benefit consumers.
The retailers held a teleconfer-
ence with reporters to promote
the three days of tax-free shop-
ping (Aug. 12-14) for clothing
and school supplies. A week ago,
the conservative, Washington,
D.C.-based Tax Foundation is-
sued a report criticizing tax holi-
days in Florida and other states
"political gimmicks."
The report contends consum-
ers don't spend more but simply
shift the time of their purchases
to take advantage of the tax
breaks.
"That's ludicrous," said Rick
McAllister, CEO of the state re-
tail group. "Why do we want to
go to all this trouble if all we did
was move sales from two weeks
prior or two weeks after this? We
wouldn't do it. It wouldn't make
any sense."


U


r,


CEO of Florida Retail Federation


McAllister cited an economic
study commissioned by his or-
ganization that shows sales and
tax collections 'increased last
year due to the tax holiday. He
was equally dismissive of anoth-
er contention that some retailers
raise their prices to offset at least
some of the consumer savings.
"That really is nonsensical,"
McAllister said. "We're the most
competitive industry in the
world, and there is no collusion
here. We're all out there strug-
gling to get our share of the
wallet."
During the weekend tax holi-
day, consumers can buy cloth-
ing valued under $75 and school
supplies under $15 without pay-
ing the state's 6 percent sales tax
and local taxes that can raise the


total to as much as 8 percent
The Tax Foundation called
such savings paltry compared to
sales that typically offer greater
discounts. McAllister acknowl-
edged it may not be much but
said retailers joke among them-
selves that tax holidays attract
more shoppers than sales offer-
ing 50 percent price cuts.
"There's just something psy-
chological about not wanting to
pay tax," McAllister said. "Let's
face it, Amazon.com has got rich
doing it They don't collect .the
tax. So people just enjoy not pay-
ing taxes."
Florida is one of 16 states hold-
ing sales tax holidays this year
for various types of purchases,
including back-to-school items,
computers, high-efficiency ap-.


pliances, hurricane prepared-
ness items and firearms and oth-
er hunting supplies, according to
the Tax Foundation report That's
down from 19 states in 2010.
"Political gimmicks like sales
tax holidays distract policymak-
ers and taxpayers from genuine,
permanent tax relief," Tax Foun-
dation economist Mark Robyn
said in a statement "If a state has
to offer a 'holiday' from its tax
system, it's a sign that there's a
problem with the system itself."
McAllister agreed there's room
for broader tax relief, but he said
that's not relevant to sales tax
holidays.
"Families love it," he said. "Leg-
islators like to bring it home. The
economy gains from it. Retailers
gain from it."
It'll come too late, however,
for some families. School starts
in six of Florida's 67 counties -
Brevard, Charlotte, Citrus, Lee,
Sumter and Walton before the
tax holiday. Retailers next year
may seek an earlier date, McAl-
lister said.
The Tax Foundation report
noted that cash-strapped states
are cutting back on tax holidays


VaHe Execution

"We're taking a drug that we know
everything about, replacing itith a
drug we know almost nothing about.."
Dr.Davi Walsl,
Anesthesiologist at Children's Hospital in Boston


Doctor: New



execution drug



risky to inmate


The Associated Press

MIAMI A doctor tes-
tifying for a death row in-
mate convicted of killing a
police officer 33 years ago
testified Tuesday that Flor-
ida's planned use of a re-
placement drug for lethal
injections could cause ex-
treme pain in executions.
Dr. David Waisel, an an-
esthesiologist at Children's
Hospital in Boston, said
the drug pentobarbital
commonly sold as Nembu-
tal, hasn't been sufficiently
tested to ensure an inmate
is,unconscious before two
other deadly drugs are ad-
ministered. States are us-
ing pentobarbital because
the sole U.S. manufacturer
stopped making the previ-
ous widely-used drug, so-
dium thiopental.
Waisel said use of pen-
tobarbital "exposes the
inmate to extraordinary
risk" compared with the
old drug. He said pento-
barbital is most commonly
used as a sedative and that
its effectiveness in render-
ing a person unconscious
is not well known.
"We're taking a drug that
we know everything about,
replacing it with a drug we
knowalmost nothing about
in terms of inducing anes-
thesia in otherwise healthy
people," Waisel said. "If it
did not work, they would
feel the incredibly burning
pain", of the lethal heart-
stopping drug, potassium
chloride.
Waisel testified on be-
half of 61-year-old Manuel
Valle, who was sentenced
to death for the 1978 fatal
shooting of Coral Gables
PoliUe Officer Louis Pena
during a traffic stop. Valle's
execution had been set for
Tuesday it would have
been Florida's first us-
ing the replacement drug
but it was stayed until at
least Sept. 1 to allow time
for a judge to consider his
challenge to the new lethal
injection method.
Valle did not attend Tues-
day's hearing.
The state's medical ex-
pert, Dr. Mark Dershwitz,
said that the dosage level
ofpentobarbital to be used
in Florida's execution pro-
tocol was enough to kill by
itself and would easily in-
duce a coma. He also said
the planned 5-gram dosage
level would stop breathing,
sharply reduce blood pres-


sure and cut brain activity
to near flat-line levels.
"This dosage is far in
excess of any dosage that
would be used in a human
that I can think of," said
Dershwitz, an anesthesi-
ologist at the University of
Massachusetts Memorial
Medical Center. Asked if it
would be lethal, he replied:
"Definitely."
One of Valle's attorneys,
Neal Dupree, brought up
past testimony and writ-
ing in which Dershwitz
endorsed use of sodium
thiopental over pentobar-
bital as an anesthetic. Der-
shwitz declined to answer
if he still felt that way but
added that "I stand by ev-.
erything I said.".
The Supreme Court gave
Miami-Dade Circuit Judge
Jacqueline Hogan Scola
until Friday afternoon to
issue a ruling, which will
then be reviewed by the
high court.
Pentobarbital has been
used in 18 executions
around the country since
Oklahoma first did so last
year. Like sodium thio-
pental before it, the drug is
intended to render the in-
mate unconscious so that
no pain will be felt when
two other drugs that cause
death are administered.
Lawyers for Valle and
other condemned pris-
oners have seized on the
June execution in Georgia
of Roy Willard Blanken-
ship, who appeared to
witnesses to grimace, jerk
and mutter for several
minutes after the pento-
barbital was administered.
Waisel said based on his
interviews with witnesses
at the Georgia execution,
"Mr. Blankenship suf-
fered an extremely painful
execution."
Last week, a Georgia cor-
rections officer testified
in the Florida challenge
that nothing seemed par-
ticularly unusual about the
Blankenship execution.
Attorneys for Valle failed
in an attempt to introduce
an affidavit about the Blan-
kenship case by Associated
Press reporter Greg Blues-
tein, who witnessed the
execution. The affidavit af-
firms that stories Bluestein
wrote about Blankenship's
movements during the
execution accurate por-
trayed what he saw, but
Scola ruled it inadmissible
as evidence.


CFO wants sinkhole insurance rates boosted slowly


The Associated Press

TALIAHASSEE Chief Financial
Officer Jeff.Atwater urged state in-
surance regulators Tuesday to con-
sider an affordable "glide path" for
homeowners seeking to buy sink-
hole insurance from Citizens Prop-
erty Insurance Corp.
Atwater questioned Insurance
Commissioner KevinMcCartyabout
the possibility of phasing in any rate
increase.
Last week Citizens' board said it
would ask regulators to approve a
rate increase for sinkhole coverage
by an average of 430 percent and
even more in some areas.
Homeowners in high-claim areas,
mostly around Tampa Bay, could be
hit with rate increases of as much
as $5,000 to keep their existing
coverages.
"We should not put that burden


on these citizens right away," Atwa-
ter said following the Cabinet's first
meeting after a six-week summer
break. "There should be far less of
an increase."
McCarty told Gov. Rick Scott and
the Cabinet that while the seeming-
ly exorbitant rates sought by state-
backed Citizens may be actuarially
sound, his department would con-
sider a full range of options on the
company's request, including phas-
ing in the increases to soften the fi-
nancial blow for consumers.
In 2010, Citizens received about
$32 million in premiums for sink-
hole coverage with ultimate losses
and loss-related expenses estimat-
ed to total $245 million. Sinkholes
are caused when the ground gives
way due to erosion, the collapse of a
cave roof or the lowering of the wa-
ter table.
A new law passed earlier this year


allows Citizens, which insures more
than 1.4 million homes and busi-
nesses, to charge whatever it takes
to pay for sinkhole claims. The com-
pany's regular property coverage on
homes and businesses cannot be
increased by more than 10 percent
annually.
But Atwater doesn't believe poli-
cyholders should be forced to pay
10, 20 or 30 times more on their pre-
mium all at once.
"There needs to be a real different
look-see," said the former Senate
president who was elected CFO last
November. "There should be some
glide path in place. Why not test it
for year or two at 10 percent or an-
other number."
The Legislature created Citizens in
2002 to provide insurance to home-
owners in high-risk areas and those
who couldn't find coverage in the
private market.


State
Briefs


Teen gets 20 years In
father's death
PENSACOLA- A
Pensacola teen will spend
the next two decades in
adult prison after plead-
ing guilty to shooting and
killing his father.
Warren Williams en-
tered the plea Tuesday
morning and received at
20.5-year sentenced for
second-degree murder
with a firearm.
The 15-year-old could
have faced life in prison
without parole if convict-
ed of first-degree murder
in the March shoot-
ing death of his father.
Authorities said Williams,
then 14, shot and killed
an unarmed William Bill
Williams in their family
living room.
The teenager's mother
had pleaded for a lighter
sentence for her son and
asked Judge Joel Boles to
treat him son as a juve-
nile. Anne Williams said
the judicial system had
failed her family.

Ex-Fla.PSC member
Argenzano to run for
Congress
TALLAHASSEE Nancy
Argenziano, a former
Republican state sena-
tor andex-Florida Public
Service Commission
member, says she's going
to run for Congress as a
Democrat.
Argenziano on Monday
said she'll likely challenge
freshman U.S. Rep. Steve
Southerland in north
Florida's 2nd Congressio-
nal District
Southerland, a Panama
City Republican, rode
last year's tea party wave
to victory over longtime
Democratic U.S. Rep. Al-
len Boyd of Monticello.
Argenziano, who has a
reputation as an outspo-
ken maverick, said the
Republican Party has left
her.
She said current GOP
leaders "have no allow-
ance for honest people,


and they demand mem-
bers just follow and shut
up."
She's now registered
as an independent and
living in Tallahassee but
plans to switch to the
Democratic Party.
Argenziano angered
some Republicans by
voting against power
company rate increases.

Oak Hill dissolves
city's police force
OAK HILL- The Oak
Hill police chief and six
sworn officers have been
asked to tunmin their
badges after city officials
voted to dissolve the
police force.
City commissioners
voted 3-2 Monday night
in favor of closing the
department.
The controversy came
to the forefront earlier
this month when Mayor
Mary Lee Cook told
officials she believed
someone from the police
force planted marijuana
on her property.
The Volusia County
Sheriff's Office began
handling emergency calls
from Oak Hill Monday
night
The mayor called the
special meeting, and
presented a number
of complaints against
Police Chief Diane Young.
During the discussion,
commissioners de-
cided it would be best
to "terminate the entire
department."
The mayor says Sheriff
Ben Johnson had agreed
to "aid the city anyway
they could."

New plamning law

TALLAHASSEE Add
tinyYankeetown to the
growing list of challengers
suing over new state laws
passed this year by the
Republican-dominated
Legislature.
The north Florida town
with a population of 502
sued Tuesday in Tallahas-
see against a law that


lifts most state oversight
of planning and growth
management. It also bans
local governments from
holding referendums on
planning changes.
The Yankeetown charter
requires such voter
approval for planning
amendments involving
five or more parcels, and
town officials would like
to keep that provision,
said Ralf Brookes, a Cape
Coral lawyer representing
Yankeetown.
"It's a real popular thing
in Yankeetown," Brookes
said. "They kind of like to
go to the people."
The town is seeking a
quick decision because
it's getting ready to adopt
a major amendment
resulting from a periodic
review of its comprehen-
sive plan.


The suit also alleges the
law's title is misleading
because it refers to "trust
funds" but does not men-
tion planning.
Other arguments are
that the law violates the
Florida Constitution be-
cause it covers more than
one subject, is too vague
and delegates legislative
authority to an agency
that's'set to go out of
business.
Department of Com-
munity Affairs spokesman
James Miller declined
comment because the
agency has not yet re-
ceived the suit.
Those functions of the
department that aren't
eliminated will be trans-
ferred to other agencies if
the law stands.

From wire reports


GOLD STIMULUS

WE BUY GOLD
(Paid on the Spot!)

SMIITB St II 4432 Lafayette Street

JEWELERS
www.smithandsmithonllne.com



l John W. Kurpa, D.C.
: f D D.A.B.CN., FA.C.FN
Board Certified
and
Fellowship Trained*

Treating Nerve Damage
Second Opinions
Auto Accidents w/
Disability ratings
Physical Therapy
School/DOT Physicals S45.00
An Automobile Accident
& Injury Clinic
The igest lee of recognito by the Board of Chopractric rMeine
conceiig ompetercy and experience Reqtures years of adc5 bal Itrairng.
aa s n,
4261 Lafaytte St. Marianna
482-3696


because they cannot afford the
revenue losses. State economists
estimate Florida and its local
governments \ill lose more than
S30 million as a result of this
year's tax holiday.
Florida lawmakers for that rea-
son dropped the practice in 20':8
and 2009 and reduced the num-
ber of tax-free days from as many
as 10 to three last year. Florida
also no longer offers a hurricane
preparedness tax holiday.
Yet, the Retail Federations
study, conducted by the Wash-
ington Economics Group Inc. of
Coral Gables, concludes Florido s
tax revenues increased by $7 n;i:
lion due to last year's tax holid.
despite official estimates that i-
a money-loser.
That's because state econo-
mists don't do "dynamic sccr-
ing," McAllister said.
"They do not factor in the
stimulus effect of this period of
time," he said.
McAllister, though, acknowl-
edged tax holidays wouldn't
work if they covered all items or
were in effect for a long time.
"It would lose its pizazz," he
said.







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Obituaries
Brown Funeral Home
1068 Main Street
Chipley, Florida 32428
638-4010

Delphine
Roberts

Delphine Roberts age 91
of Chipley, passed away
Monday, August 1, 2011 in
the West Florida Hospital
in Pensacola, surrounded
by her loving family. Mrs.
Roberts was born October
28, 1919 in Headland, Ala-
bama to the late Walter Lee
and Lela Bell (Tinsley)
Culpepper. She was a for-
mer pharmacy assistant at
Sunland Training Center in
Marianna and was a mem-
ber of the First Baptist
Church in Chipley.
In addition to her pa-
rents, she is pre-deceased
by her husband, Hoyt E.
Roberts and a son, William
Earl Roberts.
Survivors include; three
daughters, Gwen Moran
and husband William of
Pensacola, Linda Sue
Corbin of Compass Lake,
Nora Catherine Keith and
husband Al of Cottondale;
One daughter-in-law,
Dorothy Elizabeth Roberts
of Tallahassee; one sister,
Mary Nettles and husband
Gene of Fairhope, Ala; ten
grandchildren and 25 great
grandchildren; and two
special friends, Mrs. Leona
Sullivan of Marianna, Mrs.
Phyllis Sanders of Chipley.
Funeral services will be
held Thursday, August 4,
2011 at 11 a.m. in the First
Baptist Church in Chipley
with the Rev. Michael Orr
officiating. The family will
receive friends one hour
-prior to services at the
church. Interment will fol-
low in Glenwood Cemetery
in Chipley.
Brown Funeral Home of
Chipley is in charge of the
arrangements.
In lieu of flowers, dona-
tions may be made to Cov-
enant Hospice, 4215
Kelson Ave., Suite E, Ma-
rianna, Fla. 32446.
Friends and family may
sign the online register at
www.brownfh.net.


Eye on the Storm

Tropical Storm Emily could bring much-needed rain


BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalterjcfloridan.com

Tropical Storm Em-
ily was about 1,300 miles
southeast of Miami as of
8 am. Tuesday, and mov-
ing at around 40 miles per
hour. It was fairly disor-
ganized at that point, but
was expected to tighten
and strengthen as it moved
along a west-northwest-
ern track.
Predictions about land-
fall vary, with the system
still well away from the
U.S. border.
But most show its outer
bands possibly skirting
the east coast of Florida
with little or no damage
to the state as it continues.
northward toward South
Carolina.
With the prevailing opin-
ion that it will likely stay
off the shores of Florida, *
the storm is actually con-
sidered a bit of good news;
it might mean rain for our
parched area of the state.
Jackson County Emer-
gency Management Di-
rector Rodney Andreasen


Changes
From Page 1A

must be processed through www.
floridajobs.org.
Richard Williams of Chipola
Workforce Development said that
many people.have come in to the
One Stop because they don't want
to risk trying it on their own com-
puters at home, and failing to do
it right.
Williams said he and the staff
are glad to help, but that the "re-
employment center has looked
more like an employment center"
since Monday, when the changes
took effect.
He said some people may also
come in because they misunder-
stood the rule change and may
believe that they had to apply at a


said Tuesday that Florida
should start feeling the ef-
fects of the storm Saturday
and that it-should be past
the state by early Sunday
morning.
North Florida, he said,
should get some rain out
of it as it moves north,
whether it takes a path to-
ward the other coast of the
state or whether it moves
toward Mississippi, as
some models on the other
extreme predict.
Either way, he said, the
storm should be good
news for northwest Florida
unless it defies predictions
and heads for Panama City
at full speed, for example.
Andreasen tends to agree
with the prevailing opin-
ion about its eastward turn
off shore of Florida.
"What I want out of it is
rain," he said. "It's so dry;
we haven't seen a good
tropical system come
over Florida in quite some
time, so a very mild tropi-
cal storm or depression
would be nice.
Andreasen said local
residents should view the


While disorganized, Tropical Storm Emily still had sustained winds of 40 mph Tuesday.
storm as a good reminder pared states in the union, so Emily should help us
to stock up on hurricane but people do forget what remember to get ready for
supplies. "Florida is prob- a hurricane can do. It only the time that something
ably one of the most pre- takes one to devastate you, does head our way."


place run by public entity, such as
the One Stop.
But those who came in may be
glad they did; on the launch day
Monday, there were a few glitch-
es that the One Stop Center staff
helped them deal with.
For instance, there's a rule for
first-time applicants which re-
quires them to take a skills review.
The system wasn't properly delin-
eating between new applicants
and. returning applicants; as a
result, some people who didn't
need to do the review were being
"kicked out" at a certain stage of
the application process because
they hadn't taken it.
The down-side of this new traf-
fic into the One Stop Center, Wil-
liams said, is that people are hav-
ing to wait longer to get on the
computers to do what they need
to do, including the people who


are working on job searches a
primary mission of the Center
- rather than signing on for un-
employment compensation.
Williams said he expects the traf-
fic to slow once people are more
comfortable with the system and
understand that they can apply
on their home computers or else-
where with Internet access.
The pressure at the One Stop
should also slow down as the
bugs are worked out of the online
system.
In the meantime, Williams said,
people are more than welcome to
use the computers but may need
to prepare themselves for a bit of
a wait.
"I hate for-people to come in
and wait when they don't have to,"'
Williams said. "Folks need unem-
ployment and a lot of them would
rather have staff helping them,


so we're happy to do it but at the
same time, I'd rather have staff
working on finding people new
jobs; that's what we're about, re-
ally. If they feel comfortably filing
from their computers at home, it
might be a faster way for them to
go about it."
The One-Stop Center may also
be getting more traffic because
the new unemployment com-
pensation rules require people
receiving the benefit to do five
job searches a week, and send the
state proof of those searches via
the internet. Previously, people
could send that documentation
via fax.
Officials suggest a quick effi-
cient way to contact employers is
by using the Employ Florida Mar-
ketplace at employflorida.com.
This is the state's official online
job matching system.


Debt
From Page 1A
than two hours after a bipar-
tisan 74-26 vote in the Senate.
The House approved the mea-
sure Monday night on a 269-161
roll call that also reached across
party lines and was sealed by.a
rap of the gavel by Speaker John
Boehner.
The bill allows a quicl $900
billion increase in borrow-
ing authority as well as a first
installment on spending cuts
amounting to $917 billion over
a decade.
Without legislation in place by
day's end, the Treasury would
have been unable to pay all the
nation's bills, leading to a po-
tential default for the first time
in history. Administration offi-
cials warned of disastrous con-
sequences for an economy that
shows fresh signs of weakness on
a near-daily basis as it struggles
to recover from the worst reces-
sion in decades.
The White House and congres-
sional leaders -said legislation
was important to reassure in-
vbstors at home as well as over-
seas, and also to preserving the
nation's Aaa credit rating. Talk of
that rating's precariousness con-
tinued nonetheless.
This week's peace pact be-
tween the two parties is unlikely
to be long-lived.
The bill sets up a powerful 12-
member committee of lawmak-
ers with authority to recommend
fresh deficit savings from every
corner of the federal budget.
Politically sensitive benefit
programs such as Social Secu-
rity and Medicare will be on the


table as the panel of six Repub-
licans and six Democrats works
against a Thanksgiving deadline.
So, too, an overhaul of the tax
code. Congress will have until
Christmas tp vote on the recom-
mendations without the ability
to make changes.
As an incentive for Congress to
act, failure to do so would trigger
$1.2 trillion in automatic spend-
ing cuts, affecting the Pentagon
as well as domestic programs.
Even before the president
signed the legislation, he and
Republicans were maneuvering
for political position on the next
stage.
"We can't balance the budget
on the backs of people who have
borne the biggest brunt of this
recession," the president said,
renewing his call for higher taxes
on the wealthy. "Everyone is go-
ing to have to chip in. It's only
fair.".
Senate Republicans say it will
not happen.
"I'm comfortable we aren't go-
ing to raise taxes coming out of
this joint committee," McCon-
nell said in an interview with Fox
on Monday.
In a speech shortly before the
vote, he predicted instead a re-
newal of the most recent strug-
gle over spending cuts.
The debt limit will have to be
raised shortly after the 2012 elec-
'tion, he said, predicting that no
President of either party will be
"allowed to raise the debt ceil-
ing without ... having to engage
in the kind of debate we've just
been through."
He conceded that Republicans
got only part of what they want-
ed in the deal, and he pointed to
next year's elections with control


of the White House and Con- "Both parties sharepower in Washington,
gress at'stake as a chance to gain
greater clout. andboth parties need to take responsibility
"Republicans only control one
half of one third of the federal for improving this economy.
government, but the American
people agree with us," he said. President Barack Obama
Senate Majority Leader Harry


Reid, D-Nev.,.said the period im-
mediately ahead "is going to be
painful," particularly if Republi-
cans insist they will not raise any
taxes.
Numerous Democrats have
complained about the conces-
sions Obama accepted in the
deal, and Reid and other Dem-
ocrats sought immediately to
change the subject.
"We now have the chance to
pivot away from budget battles
to jobs. We can reset the debate,
and that's what we intend to
do," said Sen. Chuck Schumer,
D-N.Y.
Obama spoke in less partisan
terms at the White House.
"Both parties share power in
Washington, and both parties
need to take responsibility for
improving this economy," he
said.
This week's legislation ratified
an agreement that took shape
slowly. For months there had
been partisan flare-ups and in-
ternal disagreements within
each party, then suddenly things
changed last weekend when Mc-
Connell and Vice President Joe
Biden bargained by telephone.
The immediate impact is to
raise the debt limit by $400 bil-
lion, giving the Treasury what
it needs to avoid exceeding the
current $14.3 trillion cap. Anoth-
er $500 billion increase will be
available, subject to disapproval
by Congress.


In exchange, spending is to be
cut by $917 billion over a decade
from Cabinet-level agencies and
the thousands of federal pro-
grams they administer.
The hill's second phase begins
'with the creation of the special
committee of lawmakers. De-
pending on its success in rec-
ommending savings that Con-
gress ratifies by Christmas, the
nation's borrowing authority will
rise by $2.1 trillion or as much as
$2.5 trillion.
. Either way, it is estimated to
be enough to avoid a rerun of
the current crisis before the 2012
elections.
That was Obama's bottom-
line demand in a negotiating
end game, and while Republi-
cans ridiculed him over it, they
consented.
Yet Boehner and McConnell
were able to wring key conces-
sions of their own.
The maneuvering began hours
after Congress convened last
January, the House under con-
trol of Republicans for the first
time in four years.
At a news conference then,
Boehner announced the admin-
istration had notified him an in-
crease in the debt limit would be
needed, and he said any change
must include "meaningful ac-
tion" to cut spending.
Initially, the White House re-
sisted the linkage, then relented.
On May 9, Boehner laid down


a second condition any debt
limit increase must occur in
tandem with spending cuts that
were greater in size.
Obama wanted a balanced
plan that included both spend-
ing cuts and higher revenues,
and for a brief time, it appeared
that might be in the offing.
Months later, he and Boehner
sought a sweeping agreement
that would have trimmed defi-
cits by $4 trillion or more, pos-
sibly including curbs on the rise
on Social Security benefit checks
and an increase in the age for
Medicare benefits from 65 to 67.
By Boehner's own account, he
agreed to consider an overhaul
of the tax code under which
government revenues would
rise from current levels. It was
carefully framed the increase
would result -from assumed
greater economic expansion.
Then a group of bipartisan
senators unveiled a plan of their
own, calling for even higher ad-
ditional revenues.
In response, Obama raised
his demand, and Boehner an-
nounced a little more than two
weeks ago he was calling off
those talks.
That set the stage for a partisan
endgame in which House Re-
publicans and Senate Democrats
drafted rival bills and watched
each get shot down by the other
party before McConnell and
Biden worked out a final deal.


Fish
From Page 1A
operation, Zaslavsky said. He will
have to wait about eight years for
the fish to sexually mature, before he
can harvest his first roe for caviar. He
will take some of the fertilized eggs
and some of the juveniles back to the
Caspian, he said, as well as sell some
for consumption.
Zaslavsky said he'll eventually
move here himself, but currently he


makes his living distributing food
and managing people. In about 17
years, he said, he plans to retire to
the farm.
"I'm 58, I'm planning another 17
years to work then to retire on the
farm and watch the fish grow, may-
be bring in some horses," Zaslavsky
said. "We did a study of Florida
(when choosing a site for the farm),
and we went 20-25 times in last
couple of years to North Florida.
One of the properties we liked was
in Greenwood, then we found this


beautiful property. There are 10 old
pecan trees in front, beautiful trees
surrounding it, and we fell in love
with it. That's why we're here."
The farm includes more than 100
acres off Tower Road, a couple of
miles outside Bascom.
He declined to allow media in to
tour the facility, saying he doesn't al-
low visitors because the fish are so
susceptible to disease. Three people
work there, he said, feeding the fish
and washing their tanks a few times
a day.


The juvenile Beluga are healthily
Aquafarms near Bascom.


SumTBTED PHeTO
maturing at Sturgeon


Jackson County Vault & Monunits
Quality Service at Affordable Prices

S8504825041 IL


Pinecrest


3720 Caverns Road Marianna, FL 32446-1806 (850) 482-3964


WEDNESDAY. AUGUST 3. 2011 7At


IOCAL/FROM THE FRONT


I I _, as


a






18A + WEDNESDAY. AUGUST 3, 2011


PIrIOnRL


President Barackd)bama walks back to the Oval Ofce after speaking in Rose Ganrden of the Whit House Washingto on
Tuesday after the Senate passed the debt ceiling legislation.

Budget battle moves on to super committee


The Associated Press

WASHINGTON The budget
battle is not over. Many of the most
nettlesome questions have been left
for a new bipartisan super commit-
tee of 12 lawmakers whose task will
be to find at least $1.2 trillion more
in deficit cuts spread over the next
decade.
The six Democratic and six Re-
publican lawmakers equally di-
vided between the House and Sen-
ate and to be chosen in the next
two weeks is sure to experience
the same ideological divisions over
tax increases and cuts to programs
like Medicare that bedeviled efforts
involving top lawmakers and the
White House this year.
SBut there's a real price to be paid if
the committee deadlocks or if either
the House or Senate rejects the pan-
el's recommendations: the threat of
deep, across-the-board spending
cuts that would strike GOP priori-
ties like defense and programs for
the poor that are priorities for Dem-
ocrats. The cuts wouldn't hit until
January 2013, but their potential
impact would have affected interest
groups like defense contractors and
farmers gulping.
S"The answer's pretty obvious.
Hanging over the head of the joint
committee is this trigger that is
pretty drastic," said Senate Majority
Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., a driv-
ing force behind the super commit-
tee concept contained in the debt


ceiling legislation President Barack
Obama signed Tuesday.
The panel's target is to find $1.2
trillion to $1.5 trillion in budget cuts
over the coming decade, including
interest savings. Democrats insist
it will have to take an approach that
balances tax revenues with spend-
ing cuts. Republicans promise that
taxes are off the table. That in itself
is a recipe for continued gridlock.
Cynics predict the committee will
deadlock just as similar panels have
done previously. But underneath
the partisanship that has consumed
Washington recently is bipartisan
spadework undertaken by Obama's
deficit panel and the Senate's "Gang
of Six." And unlike the deficit com-
mission, which required approval
by a supermajority of 14 of the 18
members, the congressional super
committee needs just a majority
vote.
"The joint committee is not going
to gridlock, in my opinion," Senate
Minority Leader Mitch McConnell,
R-Ky., said. "The joint committee is
designed to function and to tackle
some of the very difficult problems
that we have been unwilling or un-
able to deal with."
The debt and budget measure
enacted Tuesday already contains
more than $900 billion in cuts over
the coming decade to the annual
operating budgets of Cabinet agen-
cies responsible for thousands of
programs funded by Congress each
year in appropriations bills.


That means to find the additional
savings the new committee will
scour the so-called mandatory side
of the budget programs whose.
spending levels basically run on au-
topilot because they're set by fund-
ing forniulas and eligibility criteria.
They include Medicare, the Medic-
aid health plan for the poor and dis-
abled, Social Security and veterans'
retirement benefits, among others.
The first place to start looking for
savings is the work of a group led by
Vice President Joe Biden that tried'
to find savings for the debt ceiling
bill
That group broke apart over Dem-
ocratic demands on taxes but had
made decent headway in develop-
ing a consensus package of cuts to
programs like farm subsidies, fed-
eral pensions and military health
benefits, and cuts to Medicare pro-
viders like skilled nursing facilities
and home health care providers.
Another savings option would be
to use a smaller inflation adjust-
ment when calculating Social Secu-
rity cost-of-living adjustments and
federal retirement benefits. This
also would raise revenue by easing
taxpayers into higher tax brackets
more quickly
The new debt and budget pact
also should jump-start Capitol Hill's
moribund appropriations process,
which has been hung up espe-
cially in the Senate because until
now there hasn't been agreement on
how much to cut agency budgets.


Stocks drop again as economy weakens


The Associated Press

The stock market is on
Its longest losing streak
since the financial melt-
down of 2008, confronted
almost every day by fresh
evidence that the econ-
omy is in serious trouble
again.
The Dow Jones indus-
trials declined more than
265 points Tuesday, their
worst day in more than
two months, and closed
below 12,000 for the first
time since June 24.
Investors sold all day
after a report that the
economy, which is barely
growing and straining to
produce jobs, is getting
almost no help from con-
sumer spending. Ameri-
cans saved more in June
and spent less for the first
time in almost two years.
The big declines in the
stock market came despite
the formal end of weeks of
uncertainty over whether
Congress would raise the
federal government's bor-
rowing limit.
President Barack Obama
signed into a law a bill that
raises the debt ceiling and
promises more than $2
trillion in cuts to govern-
ment spending over the
next decade. The bill was
passed by the House on
Monday and by the Senate
earlier Tuesday, 74-26.
But investors were more


worried about the econo-
my, and the sell-off only
accelerated. It was the
eighth consecutive daily
drop for the Dow and sev-
enth for the Standard &
Poor's 500 index, in both
cases the longest since
October 2008.
During its eight-day
decline, the Dow has lost
858 points, or 6.7 per-
cent. The average closed
at 11,866.62. The S&P 500
closed at 1,254.05, and is
now down slightly for the
year.
"You' need to see de-
mand and you need to see
growth in the economy,
and we're just not seeing
enough of it," said Nick
Kalivas, a vice president of
financial research at MF
Global.
The spending decline in
June came after a report
last week that the econo-
my grew at an annual rate
of less than 1 percent in
the first six months of the
year the slowest since
the end of the Great Re-
cession in June 2009.
Tuesday's report showed
that by June, Americans
had only grown more cau-
tious. They are faced with
high unemployment, stag-
nant pay, sliding home val-
ues and other challenges.
"With gasoline prices
high, incomes not growing
and the craziness inWash-
ington creating uncertain-


1t AXXIA TIW F 7mc
Specialist Patrick King (second from right) and others watch
President Barack Obama's remarks on a television monitor on
Jthe floor of the New York Stock Exchange on lbesday.
":,.".-??V, I', ...i- ,


ty, is it any surprise that
people stopped spend-
ing?" asked Joel Naroff,
chief economist at Naroff
Economic Advisors.
The government said
consumer spending
dropped 0.2 percent in
June. It was the first de-
cline since September
2009. Consumer spending
fuels about 70 percent of
economic growth.
Part of the drop was
because food and energy
prices have declined a
little after sharp increases
earlier this year. Gasoline,
for example, costs about
$3.70 a gallon after the na-
tional average flirted with
$4 earlier this year.
But Americans also cut
back on major goods, such


as cars, furniture and ap-
pliances. Those purchases
help drive growth.
Incomes, which include
Social Security checks and
other government ben-
efit payments, rose just
0.1 percent. That was the
smallest gain since Sep-
tember. Wages and sala-
ries fell.
People socked away
more of their payments,
perhaps because of in-
creasing worries about the
economy and job security.
The economy added just
18,000 jobs in June, the
fewest in nine months,'
and the unemployment
rate is 9.2 percent, the
highest all year. The gov-
ernment will issue the July
figures Friday.


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Analysis: Obama


pivots to new


string of problems


BY CHARLES BABINGTON
The Associated Press

WASHINGTON Presi-
dent Barack Obama
dodged a debt-ceiling fi-
asco Tuesday. He reacted
with a wiped brow more
than a victory lap, and with
good reason.
As -Republicans gradu-
ally weigh a potential chal-
lenger, Obama's re-elec-
tion bid faces daunting
problems: high unemploy-
ment, a limping economy,
lackluster approval ratings
and a demoralized liberal
base. The last-minute debt
agreement prevented a
full-blown disaster. But it
might do little ornothingto
help Obama's campaign.
It cuts spending that
might otherwise have pro-
duced jobs. And for now, at
least, it keeps Obama from
claiming he tackled long-
festering problems such
as Medicare, Social Secu-
rity and a revenue base
that consistently lags be-
hind the nation's spending
habits. Obama has con-
siderable political assets,
including robust fundrais-
ing and an up-and-run-
ning nationwide opera-
tion. Also, the Republican
primary process is murky,
and it's too soon to gauge
whether it will produce a
top-notch nominee who
can match Obama's proven
campaign skills.,
But job worries are dom-
inating this election, and
economists see little likeli-
hood of a serious recovery
before the November 2012
election. The man who
ran on hope 'and change
in 2008 is hoping voters
will decide against change
this time, fearing the GOP
nominee would be worse.
Obama seems well aware
of his challenges. In his
Rose Garden speech Tues-
day after the Senate com-
pleted the deal to avert a
national Mdefault, a sub-
dued president did. not
use words such as "vic-
tory" or "win" or "success."
He seemed eager to pivet
away from the unseemly
debt-ceiling debate as fast
as possible.
"While Washington has
been absorbed in this de-
bate about deficits," he
said, "people across the
country are asking what


we can do to help the fa-
ther looking for work" and
"the single mom who's
seen her hours cut back at
the hospital."
Qbama listed several of
his stalled proposals, in-
cluding "patent reform,"
a payroll tax cut exten-
sion and an "infrastruc-
ture bank," which would
provide loans for compa-
nies repairing bridges and
roads. But with the eco-
nomic recovery appearing
to lose what little steam
it once had, and the 2009
stimulus plan ended and
politically unpopular, the
president seems to have
few effective tools at his
disposal.
The Federal Reserve "is
out of arrows," said Repub-
lican strategist Rich Galen,
and Obama "doesn't seem
to have any new ideas."
In fairness, the GOP-con-
trolled House has blocked
several of Obama's ideas,
including his repeated
call for ending tax breaks
for the wealthy. That has
emboldened Republicans
and infuriated liberals,
who already were peeved
at Obama for not ending
the Iraq war sooner and for
dropping his 2009 push for
a government-run health
plan to compete with in-
surance companies.
Galen said he thinks the
public is losing confidence
in the Obama administra-
tion's leadership skills and
ideas. He said the Demo-
crats' liberal base suffers "a
lack of enthusiasm."
Polls give a mixed report
card to the president. His
approval ratings hover at
about 42 percent. That's
similar to what Ronald
Reagan received at this
point in his first term, and
he coasted to re-election in
1984.
Americans have a dra-
matically lower opinion
of Congress than they do
of Obama. And polls sug-
gest they are paying scant
attention to the still-un-
settled Republican presi-
dential race, which may or
may not help Obama.
Obama realizes he can't
hide his record. "I'm prob-
ably going to win or lose
depending on their assess-
ment of my stewardship,"
he told Missouri-based
KMBC-TV


oime Dr. Murali Krishna

Jackson Hospital is pleased to announce the upcoming opening
of Chipola Surgical & Medical Specialties Internal Medicine.
Dr. Muraji Krishna, board certified in Internal Medicine, will
serve the community and focus on the prevention, diagnosis,
and treatment of adult illnesses and conditions.

Dr. Krishna completed his residency training in Internal Medicine
S. at The Jewish Hospital, affiliated with the University of Cincinnati,
01 Nc i, in 2010. His formal education also includes postdoctoral training
in infectious diseases After completing his medical degree in India, Dr Krishna acquired
five yrar, experience while serving as a private medical practice physician, In-Charge
r.lMoeith OQti(er at Noel Holmces Hospital, and a Medical Officer in the Emergency
tep.irtrmerint it Savanna Lamar Public General Hospital, all while in Jamaica Dr. Krishna
is a member of the Americant College of Physicianr s nd Amcricdn Medical Association,

Clhit L. .l;ical & lMe.dial Specialties Internal Medicine is located at 2946 Jefferson
r,. ,i- in M ajrianna ,ind opens Monday, August 1. Dr. Krishna is currently accepting new
patients. To schedulee an appointment, please call (850) 526.3314,

A, ;.ir:, please join us in welcoming Murali Krishna, MD to Chipola Surgical & Medical
Spi ;. ^li r Ir 't r r t P1 clii, in'',.


*|j Chipola Surgical &

Medical Specialties

4 wwitksoim.con


WE BUY GOLD
YOUR TRUSTiD JIEWELR
FOR ALMOST 40 VYARS

mat'on W
Jaw&ry Watch

Downtown Maranna
850-482-4037'















HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL


Tigers loo


Graceville

wants to erase


for turnaround


memories of

2010 season

BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.corm

Following consecutive 3-7
campaigns, the Graceville Ti-
gers will head into the 2011 sea-
son with more questions than
answers.
The Tigers return just five start-
ers on each side of the ball, hav-
ing lost key contributors on the
offensive and defensive lines,
and with two-year starting quar-
terback Jacky Miles not expected
to return.
However, Graceville coach
Todd Wertenberger said that his
team's spirits are high with fall
practice set to commence on
Monday, and that his players be-
lieve in one another.
"We have great team unity," the
coach said. "I just think we're to-
gether, and I think the kids know
they can count on each other.
The main thing for us is we've
got to study football and learn
the game, learn the fundamen-
tals of each position. We've got a
bunch of guys who are enthusi-
astic to go out there and play, but
if we don't know how to play and
we're not intelligent about it, you
can't do much as a team."
The Tigers lost some key play-
ers in the trenches in KeonWou-
lard, Leander Ford, David Miller,
JT Russaw, Kyle Blitch, and Conor
Renihan, as well as running back
Jeremy Watford. But the biggest
loss comes from the departure
of Miles, who led the Graceville
offense for the past two seasons..
Wertehberger, however, says
that his team is moving on.
"It doesn't change a thing for
us," the coach said. "We've al-
ways had backups, so we'll find
others. We'll be fine."
The coach said that back-
up quarterback Jeremy Fowler
would be in the mix at QB, as
would junior wide receiver Ra-


Graceville Head Football Coach Todd Wertenberger leads the Tigers in drills during spring practice.


sheed Campbell.
"Both of them have been play-
ing back-up for a while any-
how, so I think they'll be fine,"
Wertenberger said. "It does hurt
us numbers-wise. If you take a
kid like Rasheed and put him at
quarterback, that means you're
not using him at receiver. But
we'll be fine. Both of those guys
can get it done."
Graceville does return some
experience at the skill positions,
with dangerous running back/
return man Derae Laster com-
ing back and joining in tandem
with bruising fullback Allante
Oliver-Barnes.
Wertenberger said that Laster


We've got a bunch ofguys
who are enthsiasti togo out
there and play, but jf we don't
know to play and we're not
intelligent about it, you can't
do much as a team.
Todd Wertenbeer,
Graceville head coach

and Oliver-Barnes both se-
niors --will be expected to make
big impacts in 2011, while Hunt-
er Forsyth and Austin Miller also
return at receiver.
"Having two seniors in the
backfield is a real positive thing,"


he said. "It's their senior year, so
they need to. step up. It's their
year to shine. They need to head
north and south and tote the
mail for us a little bit,"
Unfortunately for the Tigers,
they don't appear to have the size
and bulk up front that they have
had in years past, a challenge
that Wertenberger said his team
will simply have to overcome.
"We're smaller than We've ever
been physically," the coach said.
"It's on the line, but it's really
throughout the roster. We're very
small. But the smaller you are,
the quicker you better be. We've
got to run schemes that, offen-
sively and defensively, work to-


wards that.
"Whatever your characteristics
are, you have to work towards
that. We can't just line up and
knock people off the ball like we
used to do."
With a small and inexperi-
enced team that will likely be
short on numbers, some might
expect for the bar to be lowered
for the Tigers in 2011.
However, the Graceville coach-
ing staff made "Restore The
Roar" the motto in spring prac-
tice, and regardless of changes
in personnel, Wertenberger said
that is still the goal.
See TIGERS, Page 2B


Youth Baseball


SUBMITTED PHOTO
The Post 12 Heat UU baseball team won the TBUSA Championship Tournament last weekend held in Marianna at
the MERE sports complex. The team is comprised of players from Marianna, Chipley, Bonifay, and Blountstown. This
tournament concluded a very successful spring travel ball season in which the team won five tournaments and placed
in many others. Marianna was represented by Cameron Gray, Dalton Smith, and Deontre Rhynes. Others players include
Noah Gustason (Chipley)and Tyreek Sumner (Blountstown). Bonifay was represented by Shane Sellers, Colin Strickland,
and Will Brunk.


Post 12 Heat 11U wins tourney


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcflordan.com

The Dothan-based Post 12 Heat
11U travel baseball team won the
TBUSA Championship Tourna-
ment over the weekend at the
MERE in Marianna.
The team is comprised of play-
ers from Marianna, Chipley, Boni-
fay, and Blountstown.
Cameron Gray, Dalton Smith,
and Deontre Rhynes represented


Marianna, while Noah Gustason
(Chipley), Tyreek Sumner (Blount-
stown), and Bonifay's Shane Sell-
ers, Colin Strickland, and Will
Brunk rounded out the local
contingent.
Post 12 went a perfect 4-0 on the
tournament, which also featured
Georgia teams such as Bainbridge
Bearcats and South Georgia Elite.
Action started on Saturday, with
the Heat defeating South Georgia
Elite 14-1, and following it up with


a 16-3 win over the South Walton
Rays. The Heat maintained their
perfect mark on Sunday by edging
past Line Drive Baseball 8-7 to ad-
vance to the title game.
A 17-9 victory over The Benders
ensured a championship for Post
12 Heat, their fifth tournament
title of the summer.
The Benders settled for second
with a 4-1 record, while the Bain-
bridge Bearcats placed third with
a3-1 mark.


RUMBLE WINNERS


SUBMITTED PHOTO
The 10U fast-pitch softball team LA Smooth of Ashford, Ala., won
the Central Alabama Rumble on Saturday in Wetumpka, Ala. The
team features players from Georgia and Alabama as well as three
Jackson Countians' Marissa Baxter, Ashtyn Jeter and Lacee Glover.
The front row is Katey Padgett, Bailee Cochran, Lauren Bush,
Lacee Glover, Susanne Hudspeth and Libble Harden. Middle row,
Morgan Grant, Marissa Baxter (being lifted), Ashtyn Jeter, Sara
Harper and Alli Dukes. The back row is coaches Adam Cochran,
Stacy Harper and Scott Hudspeth;


Sport Brire'


MERE Soccer
The Marianna Recreation
Department will offer five
soccer leagues this fall for
boys and girls ages 5-18.
Registration will be held
through Aug. 26 from 8 am.
to 4 p.m. at The Marianna
Educational and Recre-
ational Expo (MERE) lo-
cated at 3625 Caverns Road
in Marianna.
Fee is $30 for participants
who live inside the city


limits of Marianna, and $45
for those outside. Fee must
be paid with a check or
money order. No cash will
be accepted.
Special registration will
be held Aug. 8 from 4 p.m.
to 7 p.m. All participants
must bring copy of berth
certificate. For more infor-
mation, call the Marianna
Recreation Department at
482-6228.

See BRIEFS, Page 2B


U


~`~-~"`~~~~~`~~~`~`~~~~~`~~






-12B WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2011


SPORTS


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Woods returns to Firestone


The Associated Press

AKRON, Ohio -Tiger Woods was
on the practice range just as the sun
began to rise Tuesday over Fires-
tone, his first time on a PGA Tour
golf course in nearly three months.
Even as the season heads toward a
conclusion, Woods can't wait to get
started.
"I'm excited to compete, to play,"
Woods said. "And hopefully, to win
the tournament."
That part about Woods hasn't
changed.
It's everything else in the world of
golf he once ruled that is so much
different. Woods showed up at the
Bridgestone Invitational at No. 28,
his lowest world ranking since the
start of his first full season on the
PGATour. He has a new caddie at
least temporarily in Bryon Bell,
a childhood friend who now heads
up a design business that is not get-
ting much work these days with a
downturn in the industry.
He no longer is the dominant
force in golf, having gone 20 months
since his last win at the Australian
Masters.
For Woods, however, the biggest
change is how he feels about his
health.
"The great thing is I don't feel a
thing," Woods said. "It feels solid. It
feels stable. No pain. That's one of
the reasons why I took as long as
I did to come back, is that I want
to get to this point where I can go
ahead and start playing golf again
like this. It's been a very long time,
and it feels good to go out there
today and hit balls like this, go
practice and feel nothing and walk
around and pretty much do any-
thing I want on the golf course."
Asked how long it has been since
he felt so good physically, Woods re-
plied, "Years."
It almost seems that long ago
since he was last in action. Woods,
who was No. 1 in the world at the
Bridgestone Invitational a year ago,
has not played since he walked off
the course after nine holes May 12
at The Players Championship with
recurring injuries to his left knee
and Achilles' tendon.


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Tiger Woods watches his putt.on the ninth green during practice for the
Bridgestone Invitational on Tuesday at Firestone Country Club in Akron, Ohio.


He said he injured them during
the third round of the Masters while
hitting a shot in an awkward stance
in the pine straw on the 17th hole.
Woods said if he had sat out the rest
of May, he would have been fine the
rest of the year, a lesson he learned
this time around.
Woods wasn't about to return un-
til he was 100 percent healthy, and
he is convinced of that now.
He said he started hitting balls a
couple of weeks ago, without giv-
ing an exact date, and that he got
the itch to start playing soon af-
ter. Woods said he thought about
playing The Greenbrier Classic last
week, but decided to wait a little
more. -
What gets him excited?
"Trying to beat these boys," Woods
said. "That's fun. Getting out there
and trying to win golf tournaments,
being there with a chance to win,
whether you win or fail. Just be-
ing there is just a rush, and it's just
so much fun. Trying to pull off the
shots that you've done in practice


when it matters the most, see what
you've got. That's fun."
In the three months since he was
gone, Rory Mcllroy shattered his
U.S. Open scoring record to par,
and good friend Darren Clarke fi-
nally won a major at the British
Open at age 42.
Steve Stricker .has won twice
to become the highest-ranked,
American.
, Clarke, friends with Woods' since
his final major as an amateur in
1996, will be paired with him the
first two rounds.
"Tiger has been the best player
in the world for a very long time,"
Clarke said. "He has been the guy
over my career that has set the
benchmark for all the rest of us,
and personally he's a good friend of
mine. It is fantastic, I think, not just
for you guys but for all of world golf
just to see TigerWoods back playing
again. I'm sure he will be trying to
get himself back up to where he has
been before, and personally I don't
doubt he'll do that."


Tigers
From Pge !B
"This is our team. This is
what we've got. We talked
about 'restoring the roar.'
so now we've just got to
learn, step by step. how
to do that," he said. "The
message is where do we
go from here to get to that
point? That's what we've
got to figure out over the
next few weeks."
New district
Graceville will be playing
in a new district this sea-
Sson, with Jefferson County,
FAMU, and Rocky Bayou
Christian jettisoned to dif-
ferent leagues, and Sneads,
Vernon and Wewahitchka
joining the Tigers and Cot-
tondale Hornets to form


Briefs
From Page 1B
Speed, Agility, and
Conditioning Camp
Bionic Sports will hold a
Speed, Agility, and Condi-
tioning camp on Tuesdays
and Thursdays at Integras
Therapy & Wellness Center
for youth boys and girls
ages 9-17.
Cost is $40 a month, or
$12 per week.
The camp will continue
for the entire summer,
focusing on becoming a
better athlete.
Call Eric Pender for
more information at
850-284-2368.

Marianna Cross
Country/Track
Current Marianna High
School students or incom-
ing freshmen interested in
running on the Marianna
High School boys or girls
cross country or distance
track team need to contact
Coach Allan Gibson at 850


District 2-1A.
Wertenberger said that
the new arrangement
makes travel much easier,
but there's still the chal-
lenge of facing teams in
Sneads. Vernon, and Wewa
that were all a classifica-
tion above Graceville and
Cottondale before this
season.
"Geographically, it's a
lot better for us, but it's
still going to be tough," he
said.
"It's good probably from
a financial standpoint
more than anything else
because we won't have to
be traveling all over. It will
be better for the football
fan because you'll have
local teams playing each
other, but now we're going
to be playing schools with
up to 600 students."


209-3403.
The team is practicing
at 6 a.m. every morning
at Marianna High School.
Contact coach Gibson be-
fore you show up for your
first practice.

Marianna Youth
Wrestling
Team Dynamic Youth
Wrestling Team will
continue practicing on
Tuesday and Thursday
nights at the wrestling
room at the old Marianna
High School.
Practice will be from 6
p.m. to 8 p.m.
All kids in Jackson
County from ages 6 and
up are welcome to join.
For further informa-
tion please call Marianna
coach Ron Thoreson at
272-0280.

Sports Items
Send all sports items to editorial@
jcfloridan.com, or fax them to
850-482-4478. The mailing address
for the paper is Jackson County
Floridan P.O. Box 520 Marianna, FL
32447.


Fixing interception issues


Miami's top QB priority


The Associated Press

CORAL GABLES -Jacory
Harris and Stephen Morris
both want to be picked.
Miami wants them to
stop getting picked off.
That essentially sums up
the state of the race to be
the Hurricanes' starting
quarterback this fall.
Miami led the nation by
throwing 27 interceptions
last season, continuing a
trend that the Hurricanes
have simply been unable
to shake. Since the start of
2008, the Hurricanes have
thrown 64 interceptions
as a team, by far the most
in .the country. And 39 of
those have been tossed by
Harris, tying him for the
most of any active quarter-
back entering this season.
"Jacory and Stephen, I
think, are really compet-
ing," Miami coach Al Gold'
en said. "I think the team
has accepted the compe-
tition and the challenge
there, and I think the team
as well as the coaches re-
spect and appreciate the
way those two kids have
embraced the competi-
tion and have not made it
personal or anything like
that. The net benefit is for
the team and the program,
and I'm excited to see what
those guys are going to do.
I grade the film."
SSince 1996, when Miami
throws even two inter-
ceptions, its record is just
32-27. With one or fewer
picks, the Hurricanes are
99-28. From 2000 through
2002, Miami had a total of
27 interceptions match-
ing what the 'Canes tossed
last season alone.
Big difference, and the
quarterbacks understand
the stakes.
"You learn from your
past," Harris said Tuesday,
five days before Miami
opens fall camp. "You learn
from your mistakes. Now
I can learn, 'OK, don't go
here, don't do this, don't do
that.' Even though it's been
Ja year and a half of inter-


ceptions, from the middle
of my sophomore year to
all of last year, it's been a
learning process. And I'm
glad that happened."
Golden expects the deci-
sion on a Week 1 starter to
be made after the second
scrimmage of fall camp,
sometime between Aug.
19-22.
With the then-newly
hired Golden watching
from a suite high above the
chilly field, Harris didn't
exactly make the best first
impression on his coach at
last year's Sun Bowl, a 33-
17 loss to Notre Dame that
.capped a 7-6 season.
On one hand, all of Har-
ris' seven passes that day
were caught.
Problem was, three of
them were caught by the
Fighting Irish.
Morris entered in relief
and threw two fourth-
quarter touchdowns,
which made the margin
more respectable plus
gave the one-time. under-
study a heap of newfound
confidence.
"I knew I still had to go
out and work hard and try
to get that spot," Morris
said.
"Learning a whole new
offense and going through
spring with that, it was
a little different, but it
worked out for the better
and I know it's going to
help us this year."
New Miami offensive co-
ordinator Jedd Fisch said
he has "a real clear idea" of
where Harris and Morris
were at the end of spring
practice. But the Hurri-
canes haven't been on a
field together since April
16, and the way Fisch sees
it, what the quarterbacks
learned in the last four
months away from spring
ball will be on display
starting Saturday.
"We've tried to give them
a road map of what it takes
to be successful and give
them an opportunity to
drive the car and follow
that path," Fisch said. "I


don't think myself, nor
coach Golden, has said,
'Here's the keys.' But what
we've said is, 'Here's where
you want to go.' And I think
what the guys have really
appreciated ... is the fact
that they felt everything
we were doing was going
to help them succeed."
There could be some
wild-cards in the race to be
under center this year.
Memphis transfer and
South Florida native Ryan
Williams would become
eligible to play without
sitting out the typical year
under NCAA rules if he's
awarded a hardship waiv-
er. Williams came to Miami
after coaching changes at
Memphis, plus with a de-
sire to be closer to home.
for family reasons. Spen-
cer Whipple actually held
the top spot on the depth
chart at one point in spring
practice, and says he wants
to be in the mix this season
as well.
"I can't prepare to be a
backup. I have to prepare
to be a starter and com-
pete to be a starter," Whip-
ple said. "That's going to
make these guys better in
the room, the other offen-
sive guys and the defensive
guys. That's how I go about
it each day."
Harris who turned
heads quickly as a fresh-
man and was even touted
as a potential Heisman
candidate early in his
sophomore season has
thrown for 6,340 yards and
50 touchdowns in his three
seasons. Morris appeared
in six games as a fresh-
man last year, throwing
for 1,240 yards with seven
touchdowns and nine
interceptions.
"It hurts your defense
and your offense when
you have those," Morris
said of Miami's 27 picks a
year ago. "We've thought a
lot this season about ways
to get that number down, I
think we've done that and I
think it'll be successful for
us."


AP source: Patrick still


could run Indy 500


The Associated Press

CHARLOTTE Danica
Patrick could still run the
Indianapolis 500 even
if she makes a full-time
move to NASCAR, The
Associated Press has
learned.
Two people familiar
with Patrick's 2012 plans
said she is in the final
stages of a deal to run
a full-time Nationwide
Series schedule with JR
Motorsports and limited
Sprint Cup Series races
with the team owned by
two-time NASCAR cham-
pion Tony Stewart. The
people spoke to AP on
condition of anonymity
because the deal won't be
finished until she has se-
cured a release from An-
dretti Autosport.
The talks also include
her continuing to run
the Indianapolis 500, one
person told AP.
JR Motorsports co-own-
er Dale Earnhardt Jr. said
last weekend he wants
Patrick to run a full Na-
tionwide schedule with
his team. She has driven
19 Nationwide races for
his team over the last two
seasons and has six more
scheduled starts this year.
"I would like for her to
run fulltime, and I'm sure
she is considering that,
and I think she would
enjoy it," Earnhardt said
at Indianapolis Motor
Speedway. "I feel confi-
dent that she's content
where she is and happy
with what we're doing.
I think things are look-
ing positive for us to put
something together."
Earlier this year, Stew-
art said he would love to
work with Patrick but only
in the Sprint Cup Series.'
He has wanted to expand
his two-car Stewart-Haas
Racing organization but
had no interest in fielding
a Nationwide car.
"Anybody that's got a
Cup team that would
have the availability


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Danica Patrick looks on during qualifying for the inaugural
STP 300 Nationwide race, at the Chicagoland Speedway in
Joliet, III. on June 4. Patrick could still run the Indianapolis
500 even if she makes a full-time move to NASCAR, The


Associated Press has learned.

would jump at the chance
to do something with
her," Stewart said in May.
"You would be crazy not
to entertain an offer like
that and an opportunity
for her to drive a race car
for you."
The potential to contin-
ue to race the Indianapolis
500 is a new wrinkle, con-
sidering JRM co-owner
Kelley Earnhardt has said
that it would be difficult
for Patrick to run that race
and compete for the Na-
tionwide championship.
Running the Indy 500
requires drivers to spend
most of the month of
May at Indianapolis Mo-
tor Speedway, and NAS-
CAR this year ran three
Nationwide races during
that span.
Patrick finished third
in the 2009 Indy 500, the
highest finish for a wom-
an in open-wheel's most


prestigious race. She has
one career victory in In-
dyCar and currently is
ranked llth in the series
standings. In 109 career
starts, she has three poles
and 20 top-5s.
Although she's winless
in 19 career Nationwide
races, she flirted with
victory last month at
Daytona, leading 13 laps
before the last-lap chaos
dropped her to a 10th-
place finish.
"She's way ahead of the
curve," Earnhardt said.
"We've had the opportu-
nity to put several driv-
ers in that car, and her
performance is right on
par with all those drivers.
We started out struggling
and she had a steep, steep
climb to go and she's re-
ally come a long way. I'm
excited about what the
potential is with her going
forward."








JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


SPORTS


NBA labor talks resume, a



month after start of lockout


The Associated Press

Trying to head off the chance of
an antitrust lawsuit from the NBA
Players Association, the league went
ahead and beat the union to court.
The NBA filed two claims against
the NBAPA on Tuesday an unfair
labor practice charge with the Na-
tional Labor Relations Board and
a lawsuit in federal district court in
New York.
The NBA accused the players of
being uncooperative in negotiations
toward a new collective bargaining
agreement by making "more than
two dozen" threats to dissolve their
union and sue the league under an-
titrust laws to secure more favorable
terms in a new CBA.
NFL players decertified their union
this year, though they ultimately re-
solved a 4/2- month labor dispute
with the owners.
Players' attorney Jeffrey Kessler,
who also represented the NFL play-
ers, was-named in the NBA's lawsuit
for his use of what the league called
an "impermissible pressure tactic"
that has had a "direct, immediate
and harmful" effect on CBA talks.
"For the parties to reach agreement
on a new CBA, the union must com-
mit to the collective bargaining pro-
cess fully and in good faith," Adam
Silver, the NBA deputy commission-
er and chief operating officer, said in
a statement released by the league.
Kessler, said the players are frus-
trated because they believe it's the
owners whose negotiating efforts
have been in bad faith.
"The NBA Players Association has
made no decision to decertify. They
talk about the fact that this is some-
thing the players have considered
for 30 years, and that's true. And they
haven't done it for 30 years," Kessler
said in a phone interview with The
Associated Press. "So there's no deci-
sion made. There may be no decision
made. We view this as an example
of their bad-faith bargaining. They
don't want to be at the table."
NBAPA Executive Director Billy
Hunter, in a statement released by
the union, said the players will seek


I t- ASuuIA Tu r SK.
NBA Players Association president Derek Fisher (right) NBA union chief Billy Hunter
(left) and LA Lakers' Theo Ratliff arrive at a midtown hotel for a meeting with the
NBA, Monday, in New York..


to dismiss the lawsuit, which he
called "totally without merit."
Said Hunter: "We urge the NBA
to engage with us at the bargaining
table and to use more productively
the short time we have left before
the 2011-12 season is seriously
jeopardized."
After a labor meeting in New York
on Monday, the first session since
the lockout began July 1 that includ-
ed Commissioner David Stem as well
as leaders from both the owners and
the players, a downcast Stem said
the sides were "at the same.place" as
they were a month ago in the hours
before the old deal ran out.
Owners are seeking significant
changes to the league'ssalary struc-
ture, claiming $300 million in losses


last season and hundreds of mil-
lions more in each year of the previ-
ous CBA, which was ratified in 2005.
Players have acknowledged the loss-
es but disputed the size, and they've
balked at the league's push for a hard
salary cap and reduction in salaries
and maximum contract lengths.
The NBA's lawsuit is essentially
preventative legal medicine.
It seeks a declaration from the
court that the lockout does not vio-
late antitrust laws, in case the union
breaks up to file an antitrust lawsuit.
It also cites legal backing for the
lockout itself, invoking Depression-
era legislation known as the Nor-
ris-LaGuardia Act designed to pre-
vent court intervention in a labor
dispute.


WEDNESDAY.AUGUST3. 2011 3BF


Texans WR



Johnson hurt



in practice


The Associated Press

HOUSTON Houston
Texans All-Pro receiver
Andre Johnson dislo-
cated his left index finger
during a Tuesday morn-
ing practice.
Johnson was running
a slant route in an indi-
vidual drill and leaped to
catch a pass, with rookie
cornerback Roc Carmi-
chael defending. Johnson
couldn't make the catch
and came down shaking
his left hand. He took off
his glove, his finger was
bleeding and he walked
to the sideline, where a
trainer examined him.
General manager Rick
Smith walked over to
Johnson before the five-
time Pro Bowl selection


left the field on a cart.
Coach Gary Kubiak did
not know the severity
of Johnson's injury after
the morning practice. He
did not see the play and
was hoping that Johnson
would be ready for the af-
ternoon workout.
S"We're getting it looked
at," Kubiak said. "I've got
a big lump in my-throat
like everybody else, but
hopefully, he'll be fine."
The 6-foot-3, 223-
pound Johnson had 86
catches for 1,216 yards
last season.
Johnson was the third
overall pick in the 2003
draft, he's the only player
in league history to reach
60 receptions in each of
his first eight years in the
league.


West Virginia


picked to win Big


East in media poll


The Associated Press

NEWPORT, R.I. West
Virginia has been picked
to win the Big East, with
Pittsburgh and South
Florida also receiving
first place-votes in the
conference's preseason
media poll.
The Mountaineers
have won or shared the
Big East title five times in
eight years and received
21 of the 24 first-place
votes and 188 points.


West Virginia will be led
by first-year coach Dana
Holgorsen.
Pitt also has a new
coach in Todd Graham.
The Panthers received
two first-place votes and
USF received one. Syra-
cuse is picked to finish
fourth and Cincinnati
fifth. Defending Big East
champion Connecticut
is picked to finish sixth,
with Louisville and Rut-
gers rounding out the
selections.


WEDNESDAY MORNING / AFTERNOON AUGUST 3, 2011
68:00 6:30 17:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:0010:3011:0011:3012:0012:30 1:00 1V30 2:00 2:30 3:00 3:30 4:00 4 30 5:00 15:30
2 T0 Early Show (N) (In Stereo) D Griffith Family Fd Let's Make a Deal (N) e Price Is Right (N) News Young & Restless Sold The Talk (In Stereo) The Dr. Oz Show Oprah Winfrey News News News News
38 VWTVY NewsT 4 T Early Show (N) (In Stereo) a Uve Regis & Kelly The Price Is Right (N) Young & Restless ve at Bold The Talk (In Stereo) Let's Make a Deal (N) RachaeRal Ray OprahWinrey News News
50 NewsChannl7 Today Today Ricky Gervals; Tony Bennett. (N) (In Stereo) a Days of our Lives (N) News7 at Noon Rachael RaB The Doctors M Ellen DeGeneres Millionaire eopardyl News NBCNews
g News 13 This Morning Good Morning America (N) 1L Uve Regis & Kelly The View (In Stereo) The Dr. Oz Show All My Children e One Life to Live 1a General Hospital (N) Dr. Phil (in Stereo) Oprah Winfrey News ABC News

11(D Arthur Martha Curious Cat In the Super Dinosaur Sesame Street Sid Word Between Barney Arthur Clifford Martha Sid Electric Cyberch'e Wild Kratt WordGirl Cat in the Curious Dinosaur NewsHour
7 SHOW DeryDt Q ans es**s 1 (19i2) Chrl Bele Ba1War EagieA ransas"(2008) *Amienca Bandis" 'ooXrigmhWg* ** 198 E2. Drmnal PQ G heoRad*** 1200 91 ViggoJodensen S srm Jon Las Pgs"g2009 ) "the rofsBlol m
14 NICK Max, Ruby Max, Ruby Umzoom Umizooml Bubble Dora... Sponge. Sponge. Sponge. Sponge. Parents Parents iCarly ICarly Victorious Victorious Big Time Family ICary ICarly ICary Cay Sponge. ponge.
16TBS Home Imp. Home Imp. Saved Savedl [Yes, Dear Yes, Dear Prince Prince Prince Payne Payne Browns Amer. Dad Earl Raymond Jim Jim TheOffice Friends Friends Raymond Raymond King King
17 H&fb Brooklyn Dodgers TheMAsterea'* (2IOl) Change a erorScmw rsimus'** (2010) B1 "PureCowl?2 TheGfirfT2010 Drama) PG "D'araoenfi** 2003) PG-13 'YouDoon)(inoJaor'(2010)lAPacno NR' l 'nVer-nwSf'
18 ESPN2 (5:00) Mike and Mike in the Morning (N) (Live) a ESPN Frst Take (N) (In Stereo Live) ESPN First Take (In Stereo) N Best of 1lstand10 Scott Van Pelt Show SportsNation (N)(Live) NASCAR Around Baseball
19 ESPN SportsCenter B SportsCenter B SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) Report Football NFL ULve Im Rome Around Pardon SportsCenter (N) (Live)
20 CSS Mayhem in the A.M. SportsNhI Football Goif Fast Paid Ptog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. SportsNIte Football College Football: 2007 Georgia at Alabama. World Team Tennis: 2011 Finals. From Charleston, S.C. Baseball SportsNIte (N) a
21 DISN Little AgentOso Mickey Pirates Mickey Mickey Phineas Phineas ~Phineas 'Deck Good Good Shakeit Wizards Shake it Shaken t Phineas |Deck G(qd Fish ShakeIt Wizards Phneas Good
22MAX (30)'Aex&EBna' AsJrKiddaFalySird y'W*f* (2010) .. .. IW Slrftr*** (19M7)Michael'ouglas. "Escape FramPanero lpes" l1 4pes' F 997. Ac ion)J.onTravtta R'Ma Slarga re' (1994)KurtRutMe Rse 'RpoMahn'(g4)'R
23 TNT Angel *Blind Date Charmed (In Stereo) Charmed (In Stereo) Supernatural 1 Supematural Las Vegas (In Stereo) Las Vegas (in Stereo) Cold Case Colors" ae Closer Bones (In Stereo) Bones (In Stereo) BonesQuarantined.
24 DISC Wealth Robison J.Meyer ENHair Shark Hunter Sharkman (In Stereo) M Surviving Sharks American Chopper American Chopper American Chopper American Chopper Shark Feeding Frenzy Dirty Jobs: Bte
25TWC Your Weather Today With Abrams and Bettes N Wake Up With Al Day Planner antoe o
26 USA Law Order CI I'Monoatar (1970, Acton) Roger Mooe,Lo Chles. U Royal Pains E Necessary Roughness House "Forever' NCIS "Mother'sDay" NCIS"Double Identity" NCIS "Jurisdiction" NCIS (in Stereo) 0 NCIS "Moonlighting
28 FAM Boy World Boy World What Like What Like Grounded 700 Club The 700 Club B Full House Full House Still Stnd Still Stnd BRules 8 Rules My Wife My Wfe. 70s Show 170s Show '70s Show '70s Show Secret-Teen Still Stnd Still nd
29 LIFE TheBalancing Act Reba Rebe WilGrace WII/GOrace Chris Chris How I Met How I Met Against the Wall Grey's Anatomy M Grey's Anatomy0 Cold Case Files IB Cold Case Files Unsolved Mysteries Picker Picker
30 A&E Dog Dog Dog Bounty Hunter CSI: Miami (In Stereo) TheSopranos Criminal Minds The First 48 The First 480 m Dog Bounty Hunter CSI: Miami (In Stereo) TheSopranos Criminal Minds 0 The First 48
32SYFY Look Sexy SIecrets Shair*s Venic '(2008, Hoor HamitMedSakFraFmysB *SharkSwarm'(2008, Suspense) (Part 1 of2) IS WkSinr (2008.Suspense)(Part2f 2), host Whisperer StargteSG-1 1B StrTrek: Enerprise
33AMC FatLoss Paid Prog Look Soey Makeover UeAro (199.Suspense) Du m Moom 'R' "The oda n* 1972) rafia painarc mes to nolid n empire IDgeturr.R 'The GooliAr. Pa rli (1974. CrmeDram) AlPacA n R I
34 MTV AMTV: on Top AMTV (In Stereo) Jersey Shore Parental Parental Parental Prntal Parental Parental Parental Parental Parental IParental Awkward. een Mom (In Stereo) Ext. Cribs 70s hShow 70so Sho 0 how 70s Show
35 BET (5:00) BETInspiration Chris Chris Bernie Bere Bernie Berne JamleF. JamieF. Jame F. amieF. *Slomphe Yard**t (007,Drama) The Game e Game Chris Chris 106& Park: BETs Top10 Uve Tyga (N) (Live)
36 T0N Bakugan iBeyblade Pokmon Sidekick Johnny T Johnny T arfield Garfield Scooby Scooby Looney Tunes om & Jerry Garfield Dogs Johnny T Sidekick Almost Adventure MAD Looney Scooby ohnny T
39 HIST Modem Marvels 1A Sharp Shooters B Sniper Inside the Crosshairs 1 Modem Marvels B Modem Marvel 0s Sharp Shooters 1 Sniper Inside the Crosshairs I0 Modem Marvels 8
40 TVLND NiceBoobsMeaning All-Family ford eesons GoodTme Jeannie eannie Cleveland Divorced Gunsmoke Gunsmoke Bonanza Bonanza Bonanza GoodTime nsSanford Sanford
43 CNN2 (500) Morning Express With RobinMeade HLN News HLN Special Report Prime News
45 CNN (:00) American Morning (N) 0 CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) The Situation Room With Wo Blitzer (N)
46 CW (5:00) The Daly Buzz B Steve Wilkos Show Browns IPyne ~Cosby Cosby A Cops TBA A Steve Wilkos Show TheTyra Show 1 Lyricsl Lyricl 70s Show 70 ShowKing
47 SPIKE Thin in 301 WEN Hair mnGym Paid Prog. CSI: NY (In Stereo) CSI: Crime Scene CSI: Crime Scene CSI: Crime Scene CSI: NY (In Stereo) CSI: Crime Scene Deadliest Warrior Deadliest Warrior Deadliest Warrior Deadliest Warrior
49 HGTV Spaces Hidden Cash Cash Cash, Ca sh, Carl et it Sold |Get it Sold Get it Sold |Designed House [Hunters Secrets lAntonio Divine Divine D. Design |Candice Design Design Get it Sold Get itSold Frst Place First Place
98TLC 18 Kids 18 Kids Baby Bab Baby Bb Baby's Pregnant and in Peril Four Weddlngs e What Not to Wear Baby Baby Multiples Baby's WhatNotto Wear Four Weddings a Cake ICake Toddlers&Tiaras
99 SPEED Monster Jam Trucker PassTime BarrettJackson Spec. Speedmaker Steam Pald Frog. NASCAR Racing: Spnnt Cup: Brickyard 400. Garage Truck U Barrett-Jackson Monster Jam Pass Time PassTime

WEDNESDAY EVENING I LATE lIGHT AUGUST 3,2011
6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:0019:30 10:0010:3011:0011:3012:0012:30 1:00 1:3012:0012:30 3:00 3:30 4:00 4:30 5:00 5:30
2i0 aI h Jeoprdy Big Brother (in Stereo) Criminal Minds'JJ CSI: Crime Scene Late Show Letterman Late Late Show/Craig Extra (N) Up to the Minute (N) (in Stereo) AgDay CBSNews Daybreak GoodMorning Show
3 News Wheel Big Brother (In Stereo) Ciminal Minds JJ' CSI Crime Scene Ne Late Show Letterman Late Late ShowCraig Inside Ed. Up to the Minute (N) (n Stereo) CBSNewsWTVY News 4
i5 g News Wheel Minute to Win its 'Americas Got Talent Love in the Wild 10 News Tonight Show w/Leno Late Night Carson Poker After Dark (N) Extra (N) TheBankruptcy Hour shepherd's Chapel Eary Tdy NewChnnel7Today
8 s En Middle Family Famly Happy Primetime Nightline News Nightline Jimmy Kimmel Live Lopez im Paid Prog. PaidProg. Paid Prog. ABC Word News Now (N) R Moring News 13ThisMoming
10 ) Two Men woN Men So You Think Yo CanDance ( Sereo Le) News IHow Met Law & Order SVU Friennds Friends King-Hill Scrubs Lews and Jumovoy The People's Court Paid Prog. Paid Prog. hp Chapel Paid Prog. udo
11 NewsHour Education Nature (n Stero) NOVA "Rat Attack Killer Strss: National Chare Rose (N) i Smil ey T.Smitey NOVA Rat Attack KillerStress: National POV "Seamof Lifet" he From Uncoln Center Moza anas. Place
7SHOW 7Th&eSMMeStror Green Penn ASCAR eeds o Franchise iNASCAR Franchise Green Ja aassr aMovl(2002) R |DropDpedGOrgeog'(2010)RW 9Si ofAaertk** (2008) rsaFreetntb '(2007)1W' -.rAdelde
14NICK ge. one. Family Wife L opz Show 70Sow Married Married Married Married 'Married Home Imp. Homemp. Imp. Home mp. M m. Mt. Fam.Mat. Fam. Mt A Fm. Mat Fm. M
1p4 NICK SPfLope.'Lpe 705 iShowIF 70a SMarL nT p oMt j~. 5ml. l
16 TBS Seinfeld Seinfeld Browns Browns Payne Payne Payne Payne Conan (N) Lopez Tonight I(N) Conan Lopez Tonight PrtsQ nni** (2001, Farasy) ried Married Married armed
17HBO nieWS&nal' rue Blood (In Stereo) 1True Blood (In Stereo) rue Blood (In Stereo) Real TimeBill Maher The Curious Case of Curt Flood IUacGttefW**1 (2010)W I'TlsTaBedger ** (1906) Wag *Ta (2007) RGonzaodger
18 ESPN2 Baball SportsCtr MLS Soccer Galaxy at rmbers NASCAR NFL Yrbk. NFLYr. NFL Yrbk. NFL Live SportCenter SportsCentaer j Games lke and Mike
19 ESPN Baseball Tonight (N) MLB Baseball New Yor Yankees at Cacago White Sox (Live) I S SportsCenter IN) iLe) Baseball NFL Live SportsCenter (N) (Uve) po Cnt(N) (Live) B Basebel: Yankees at Whie S SportCenter e
20 CSS Colge Football 2006 SEC Chamipanshp Alabama vs Florda. alidn Footlbhl SportsNite (In Stereo) Paid Prog. Paid o Pa P PaPog. Pag Prog. Pad Prog. Paid Prog. Prog. PaidProg. 'PadPProg. Paid Prog. aid ro. Pald Prog. Pald Prog.
21 MSN Phin a Phines Good aShket The Sull A i'(2M1) d Phineas Phineas Wizards Wizards cpd God ood ANTFarm Random Deck Deck Phineas Phinmes Phines Phinea little
22 MAX )5~) Repo ian' I.l sf'** (2010)DyTjo.' l'sid aunra ySiy, "7lLoast .ksai*Park'w** ,(1997) PGi-13 Femroe lheFilWr m ,CW (199M6) ~ epSditl'* (1983)',W Colr.~o ipaT** -*
23 TNT e Mentallst The Mentallst R Frankld & Bash = 'Bones (in Stereo) Franldin & Bash B Leverage HawthoRNe leverage Cold Case (In Stsereo) 7TheiatfW '*** (1987. Honor) Angel Ih Sereo)
24 DISC Deadly Waters C into the Shark Bite How Sharks Hunt (N) OneManAnnrmy How Sharks Hunt One Man Army a Into the Shark Bile Surviving Sharks Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Teleworld PaidProg. Ogreenic PaidProg. Concerts r Tool
e-;+- w. ---.me,-- w~.,+ -- --, .he- -,,e -
25TWC 'Westher Center K1 'Weather sether waist Fate Twist Fate Weather Center cc Weather Weather Weather Weather Weather Center X Weather Weather Wealher Weather first Outlook K Wake Up Wih Al
26 USA ;NCI sess- NCIS Patnot Down Royal Pains (N) Necessary Roughness Bum Notice 1 Royal Pains tI Necessary Roughness aThe SiBoumre'** (2004, Coaedy-Da.a) aw & Order SVU Steam Smoking olw Order C
28 FAM Meliss Mela Melssa Melissa Georgia Georgia Georgia Georgia The 700 Club1 Whose? Whose? PaidProg. Hot-Abs PaidProg. Get Hot! The700 Club Paid Prog. PaidProg. Prince UeToday J. Meyer TrVIte
29UFE Pawn Pawn Dance Moms s Roseanne Roseanne Dance Moms 1 How I Met How I Met Chris How I Met WillGrace Will/Grace Chr i HairFre Acne Paid rog. Hair Tool PaidProg. Lose3Lb PaidProg. WIN Hair Clebir
30A&E TheFirst48a Storage S rage Storag Stge Sorage orage storage Billy Billy Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage illy Bay PaidProg. 3xFaster Hair Loss *-Abs BestBral PaidProg.
32SYFY Ghost Hunters C, Ghh Hunters X Ghost Hunters Inter. Legend Quest(N) Ghost Hunters Inter. Legend uest Strgate SG-1 C Stargate Atlantis 1S ldar'20 I Science F ) river FatLoss Profits Kni(eSet
33 C AC 'odfatherPt j7 'Th#ikloraess**** (19B7) Kevin Cosner.W 1 itr'flis Way'(193) An exnidsit d to escape h nne if ciU me Breaking Bad 7hMrft'** (199. Suspense)e Ormi Moore, Stooget Ht-Abs Spiing
34MTV Jersey Shore AwkwardAw. awkward. TeenMom (n Stereo) The Chanenge: Rivals The Chalenge: Rivals True Life i Stereo True LifeincSltereo; The Challenge: Rivals AMITV (n Stereo AMTV: Morning
35BET 106& Park:TopO it oeI&Bastkeear*** (2000. Romance) FtAt lairr The Mo'Niue Show Wendy Willams Show I*Beyf* (t986.Cnme Drama) Nas. S H Dal 9Hell Date nspiraion Popoff Inpirtio Popoff ET Inspierto
36TOON ,ohnnyT Hole/Wall Dude Destroy King-Hill King-Hill Amer. Dad Amer. Dad Fam.Gu Famu Guy Chicken Aqua Squidbin. Amer. Dad Amer. Dad Pam Guy Fm. Guy Chicken TheOffice Aqua KingH KiC ng-i Looney n
39 HIST Modern Marvels 3 Sniper DeadliestMissions T Top Gear Fist Cars' Ice Road Truckers Sniper Deadliest Missions 10 Top Ger Frst Cars' Ice RoadTruckers Welh Anxiety eay S Secrats Younger Hair Tool
40 TVLND Sanford AFamily AlFamly AllFamily Raymond Raymond Cleveland Divorced Divorced Cleveland Retiredat etiredat Cleveland Divorced Retired at Rtired at 3Co. 3TCo.- 3s Co. 3s Co. Boston Legal i ceBoobs Paid Prog.
43 CNN2 ane Velez-Mitchell Nancy Grace Dr. Drew The Joy Behar Show Showbiz Tonight Dr. Drew Nancy Grace Showbiz Tonight The Joy Behar Show Showbiz Tonight Or.Drew Moning Express
45CNN John King. USA (N) In the Arena (N) Pers Morgan Tonight Andeon Cooper 360 PiersMorgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 30 Piers Morgan Tonight World BuinessToday AM: Wake Up Ca American Morning )
46 CW Selneld :Seinfeld lAmerica's Next Model America's Next Model Payne Browns Roseanne Roseanne South Pk South Pk Cops TBA Paid rog. Secnrs Lose30b Maever PaidProg. True Hollywood Story Paid rog The DailyBu
47 SPIKE Deadliest Warrior Deadliest Warrior Deadliest Warrior Deadliest Warrior ln Stereoi 3 Deadliest Warrior Ways Die MANswers MANswers Knockout BlueMount Entourage Ways Die Paid Prog. Paid Prog. PaidProg. Hot-Abs Hair Loss Pro
49)HGTV Hunters House ;Property income Income Property Brothers (N Hunters House Property Income Property Brothers Hunters House Property Property income Mearing Fat Loss Fat Loss Secrets WEN Hair Dr
98 TLC Addiction Addiction Hoarding:BuriedAlive Toddlers & Tiaras Toddlers & Tiaras N) Toddlers & Tiaras Toddlers & Tiaras Hoarding: Buried Alive Addiction Addiction Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Cooking Paid Prog. ose3Lb PaidProg. FourWeddings
99 SPEED NASCAR Race Hub Dumbest Dumbest My Ride My Ride The Car Show Ni Dumbest Dumbest My Ride My Ride The Car Show NASCAR Race Hub Motorcycle Racing NASCAR Racing Paid Prog. Bay Sieam aidProg








CLASSIFIED


wwwJCFLORIDAN.com


Jackson County Floridan *


Wednesday. August 3. 2011- 5 B


WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED




ARKETPLAC


PLACE ANP


BY PHONE: (850) 526-3614 or (800) 779-2557
BY FAX: (850) 779-2557
ONLINE: WWW.ICFLORIDAN.COM


BY MAIL: WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE
P.O. BOX 520, MARIANNA, FL 32447
IN PERSON: 4403 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA


Publication Policy Errors and Omissions: Advertisers should check their ad te first day. This publication shall not be liable for failure to publish an ad or for a typographic error or eors inpublication xcpt to the extent of the Cst of the ad for the first day's
Inertion. Adjustment for erors is limited to the cost of that portion of the ad wherein the error occurred. The advertiser agrees that the publisher shall not be liable for damages arising out of enrors in advertisements beyond the amount paid for the space
actually ocoJpied by that portion of the advertiseme in which the error occurred, whether such error is due to negligence of the publishers employees or otherwise nd there h be no ability for non nserton of any advertisement beyond the amount paid for
such advertisement Display Ads are not guaranteed position. AN advertistng is subject to approval Right is reserved to edit, reject, cancel or classify al ads under the appropriate ciassiication.

F da i sa tlfe rit w06ra c


STORE LIQUIDATION & AUCTION
AUCTION FRIDAY @ 6PM
OLD TOWN SQ. 3183 MAIN ST. COTTONDALE,
THURSDAY SATURDAY
*p FOR INFO 850-303-3023 4.4
AU LIC#AU667 AB UC#2727

4- Cemetery Plots i Memory HUI Garden of
Devotion $6,500.334-677-7012

FOUND: Set of keys at Compass Lake in the
hills on Nortek & Caddo Ave. 850-557-7342.


I Pay CASH for Diabetic test
strips. Up to $10 per box!
Most brands considered.
All boxes must be unopened
and unexpired.
Call Matt 334-392-0260


MEDFORD INTERIORS & ANTIQUE MALL
OVER 100 BOOTHS FILLED WITH ANTIQUES,
GIFTS, GLASSWARE, ART, RUGS AND
EVERYTHING IN BETWEEN! ALL REASONABLY
PRICED REGISTER FOR A $100.00 GIFT
CERTIFICATE TO BE GIVEN AWAY MONTHLY
THRU DECEMBER. WE BUY ESTATES---
WE TAKE CONSIGNMENTS CORNER OF
DENTON RD & ROSS CLARK CR.-DOTHAN, AL
334-702-7390. HOURS: 10-6 MON. THRU SAT.






Established Restaurant
Business for Sale.
Located inside the Outlet Mall
in Graceville, Florida. For more
information call 334-791-8961




Huge Antique Auction, Aug. 13th 0 10am
Contents of well established Antique business
to be sold at Auction. Store is loaded from wall
towall: Collectibles, glass, pottery, tools, furni-
ture, Coca-Cola items, toys, signs, pictures,
memorabilia, oak glass show cases plus other
cases, cookie jars, dish sets, so much morel
Come eat- Food, drinks & snacks onsite. Build-
ing is airconditoned & clean restroom. Public
and Dealers welcome (Dealers please bring a
copy of your sales tax Id) 10% buyers premium
& sales tax in effect for this auction. Location:
Rues Antique Mall 123 S. Main St Brundidge.
Sale conducted by: 231 Auction, LLC
334-372-3532 Pictures: www.auctionzip.com
(put in id # 26327) AL1719

WANTED/WILL BUY: OLD COINS, TOYS AND
COLLECTABLES CALL 850-693-0908
FURNITURE &l HOUS [O]L IaTEM


AKC Registered Golden Retriever Puppies.
Three males and two females. Each puppy
comes with AKC Reg. Papers, puppy starter kit,
and collar. $400 firm! Call 229-254-1040.
AKC Toy Poodle male vet checked $300. .
Cld-poos F-$300, M-S250. W/S/D Home raised
taking cash deposits. 334-794-2854.
LOST Great Pyrenees Solomon, male, white
long fur, 100#, eyes lined n black, red collar w/
ID, old, sweet, dug under fence July 9 and dis-
appeared. Please call 334-790-3006 if you have
any information. REWARD
V Lots of Summer Puppies ON SALE! V
Morkles $100-$250, Older Chorkldes $50,
Hairless Chinese Crested $450. Yorles $450.
Yorkle-Poos $200.-$350. Chihuahua $250.
M Iti-Poos $300. Pek-A-Poos $250.
Call 334-718-4886



Fresh Cut Okra, $1.50/Ib, 10am 8pm Monday -
Friday 850-573-5230

g FRESH
GREEN
PEANUTS
850-352-2199
OR 850-352-4423
Fresh Shelled Peas & Butter Beans
several varieties and Okra. 2307 Mayo Road,
(between Cypress & Grand Ridge) Bobby
Hewett (850) 592-4156










Fresh Peas, Tomatoes,
Butterbeans, Cicumbers,
Snap Beans, New Potatoes,
All Farm Fresh!
Plenty of Canning Tomatoes
for $10/Box!
220 W. Hwy 52 Malvern
S* 334-793-6690 .


Part time job hi professional business office.
4 Hrs 5 days a wk. Exp required with Quick
BlooksWord and Excel & Internet.



COPIER TECHNICIAN Local company
growing and expanding. Looking for
experienced technician. Benefits, Salary
negotiable. Please send resume to:
A-One Buskiess Solutions
P.O. Box 9002, Dothan, AL 36304
or fax to 334-673-1683


Sign up


for text



I
jcfloridan.com .










Backwash shampoo chair $75,850-638-5312
Floor Mats: For Ford Expedition. In very good
shape. $35. 850-592-4409I
Kids Outdoor Patio Set: KIDS Step2 Patio Set
w/umbrella & 4 chairs $40.850-482-5434
Shampoo bowl with vanity $100. Call 850-638-
5312
Speakers: JBL Northridge E100 $350. Call 850-
482-5434
Styling chair with chrome base $125. Call 850-
638-5312


Bikers Jacket, black leather, new, large, $50
850-573-4990
Black Pipe Running Boards for 2006 Tundra.'
$100 FIRM. Call 850-352-4917


Oglesby Plants International, Inc,
Atha, FL is accepting
applications for the following position

Production Planning/Inventory Control
Clerk. Full time position responsible for
planning and purchasing of product as
well as inventory control. Require 2yr
verifiable office experience. Prefer
experience in data entry, purchasing and
inventory control. Proficient in Microsoft
Office and willing to learn custom
programs. Requires excellent written
and verbal communication skills. Full
time employment with competitive
wages and benefits available.
Apply at One Stop Career Centers in
Marianna and Blountstown, Oglesby
Plants International Hwy 71 N or
Fax resume to (850) 762-3806.

Place your ad in our

Sales & Service
Directory
and grow your business!!!


End Table/NIght Stands (2), white with drawer,
good condition, $25 for both 850-592-1234
Exercise Cycle, Weslopro Pursuit CT 5.9. New
Paid $399.99, Asking $125 334-599-1245
FrigMaire Refrigerator, 18 cu.ft. with ice maker,
excellent condition, $275 850-209-3970

MJ Hummel 123 boy with backpack, $75.
334-806-4830
MJ Hummel Honor Student $60,334-806-4830
Rug, 8x10 Oval, Virgin Wool, White & Gray, like
new, $60 850-209-0702
Sofa Sleeper, full size, $35 850-272-8967
Tilting Utility Trailer, new tires, tool box &
railings, 8'x5' $390 850-573-4990
Walker- Excellent condition, barely used $75
OBO 850-482-2942/557-2184
Washing machine, Kenmore $125 & Dryer,
Whidpool, $100 works like new, 334-347-7576
Wheelchairs: Highback (2mos old) $200 OBO


Wanted: Old Coins, Gold,
Diamonds, Guns, And Tools
West Main Jewelry & Loan 334-671-1440.
LAW &GADENEQIPEN


Place an A d iFast, easy, no pressure
ce an 24 hours a day, 7 days week!
Get live previews of your classified ads, receive price quotes
and make secure online payments.

www.jcfloridan.com


I


I CATS









6 B Wednesday, Auust 3, 2011 Jackson



District Sales Manager

The Dothan Eagle is seeking mature,
energetic individual with superior
communication skills who enjoys
working with people to fill the position
of district sales manager.
Must be able to work flexible hours,
have dependable transportation and a valid
drivers' license. Responsibilities include
sales, recruiting, showing routes and
generally overseeing independent
contractors that distribute the Dqthan Eagle
in an assigned district or territory.
Benefits include medical, dental,
401(K), paid vacation and holidays.

Appcations and/or resumes
are accepted at the Dothan Eagle
(227 N. ates Street Dothan, AL)
between the ours of &3" am to 43 pm
Monday through Friday,
attention RIus A. Uaora.
You may apply online at
WWW ediageneraLcom as wel.
EOE





Edgewood Apartments in Cypress Area. Quiet,
Furnished 1BR 1BA.Cable & laundry included.
$440/mo + deposit. v 850-573-6062 m


1/1 Apartment for Rent For info call 850-579-
8895
1/1 In Grand Ridge off Hwy 90
$400. o. SM.200dep. 850-272-8880




Beach Cottage for Rent: 3BR 1.BA, Large
screened porch, Beacon Hill (Near Mexico
Beach) $550/wk 850-482-2539 or 201-888-2388


2BR/1BA, 2658 Railroad St. C'dale No Pets,
$300/mo. + $200 dep. (850) 352-4222
2BR/1BA Concrete block Rental in Marlanna,
Tile floors, washer h/u, pets ok, $300/mo + $30
credit/bkgrnd ck. Additional houses and
apartments in Graceville 850-263-5753
3/1.5 Brick Home 2589 McClain St. C'dale
$700/mo + dep 334-714-9553
3/1 brick home, Malone/ Bascom area, Ig yard,
taking applications, available 9/1/11 $575/mo.
850-209-1265
3BR 1.5 BA, 2944 Noland St Bonus room with
fireplace, 1 car garage, Central Heat & Air,
hardwood floors, kitchen appliances, no pets.
Deposit required, 1 year lease $700/month,
Available September 1st Call 850-594-7525 af-
ter 6pm or leave message
3BR/1.5BA New Carpet! Brick Home, CH/A,
Malone Area, NowAccepting Applications.
$650. Mo + dep. Call 850-569-2475
3BR 2BA Block Home on 10 acres Compass
Lake area, Energy efficient, CH/A, Outdoor
pets ok, $850 + dep. 850-573-0466
Austin Tyler & Associates *
Quality Homes & Apartments
850- 526-3355 4=
"Property Management Is Our ONLY Business"
Want to sell your

AUTOMOBILE?

Place a Classified Ad

TODAY!


IUN=I LEASES AVAIUBLE
Ph.I Crek, the nation's largest hunting
lease provider, has approx. 150 properties
AvW Me or Lease h AL aMl GA
Soal properts perfect for families.
Large proerties ideal for larger hunting
dubs. Begin your new hunting adventure
at wIFp 001re1r1roaPicPiHL



LNS7G Leftw fitAsford2l
MobiHelHome$4 5




2/2 n Alford, window.A/C, $380 + deposit
850-579-8882/850-209-1664/850-573-1851
2 & 3 bedroom moble Homes in Cottondale.
$500 and up. H20, garbage, sewer included.
http:// www.charloscountry living, com.
850-258-4868/209-8847
2 & 3BR 2BA Moble Homes in Cottondale ,no
pets, Central Heat & Air $325-$450 850-258-
1594 leave message
2&3BRMF's in
Marianna & Sneads (850)209-8595.
3/2 $595 Quiet, well maintained MH Park,
Water/sewer/ garbage/ lawn included.
Other rentals available starting @ $395
Joyce Riley RE 850-209-7825 4
Houses and traders for rent starting at $300 per
month. (850) 593-4700
Rent to Own: 2 & 3BR Mobile Homes.
Lot rent included. Also available,
1 & 2BR Apts & Houses. For details
#850-557-3432 or 850-814-6515 4
Small 2BR 1BA Located in Sneads
$300/month 850-573-0308.
Smal Quiet Fadmy Oriented Park- 2BR UH for Rent
includes water, garbage, lawn care, No Pets 850-592-
8129





DO YOU NEED TO DOWNSIZE
YOUR RENT & OFFICE SPACE?
960 sq ft Completely renovated,
4 offices ,1 reception,1 breakroom,
2 bathrooms, Off street parking lot 2846-B
South Green Street Marianna. Less than
$1.00 per sq ft per month.
Call 850-326-0097 for info.





ATV-250, 2-wheel drive, 2-cylinders, 4-stroke
engine, new tires, runs good, needs battery.
$775. 344-673-7539.
Honda '04 Rancher ES 2WD. Great deal on a fun
vehicle. Asking price $2995. Garage kept with
low miles. Excellent condition and serviced
routinely. Call 334-692-4120 and leave mes-
sage.
John Deere '09 Gator TS 4X2 ... 72 hours on it
Has Dump bed:Good condition $5900 OBO 334-
886-2549 or'334-796-1777


2 JET SKIES 2003 on dbl trailer seAt look
recovered and look great! matching blue
$3600. for both. 334-806-9920.
Baylne 89' Cabin Cruiser, GPS tracking
system, marine radio, frig, potty & sink,
bridge pumps blower, works well
carnn a 2-2rA7i.M


Digital Journalist

WRBL News 3 digital journalists will cover and report on local stories, issues and events.
Candidate must create branded content for our multi-platform newsroom and successfully
provide fair, balanced and accurate news coverage consistent with our brand. Must cultivate
and maintain both official and community-based news sources to achieve a high rate of
enterprise reporting. DJs must have strong verbal and written communications skills and
the ability to plan and coordinate news coverage, working with multi-platform producers
and news managers. Must have the ability to use (or be trained to use) digital video camera
and editing equipment and to appear on camera for taped and live news reporting. Must
have the necessary skills to achieve quality reporting for web, social media and broadcasts.
Digital journalists must be disciplined individuals who come to work prepared and make
strong contributions to news gathering daily. Must be personable and represent our station
in a professional manner at all times and have the ability to make sound journalistic judg-
ments. Must be well informed of overall state and local news stories and issues. Knowledge
and/or expertise in operating a Panasonic DVC Pro HD P2 camera and Adobe Premier Pro
and Elements editing software a plus.
Must have and maintain a good driving record and a valid drivers license.
EOE:M/F/D/V. Pre-employment Drug and Background screens required.








No phone calls please.


Find jobs



fast and



easy!


IFIEDS


Baylier Trophy
22.5', 2000 model, well
kept and clean.
Many extras. $19,950.
334-794-0609 DO 12632


Procraft I 1656 with 9hp Mercury, 42 lb.
thrust trolling motor, Procraft trailer, garage
kept, like new $7000. OBO
s85-593-5116 or 850-29-5934.
RHINO 208, 18FT- 90 HP Suzuki, 55 LB
Minnkota, Aluminum Trailer, Humminbird
Depth Finder, on Board Charger, Binini top,
$14,700 334-79-4175
Seacraft,'89,20 ft- Center
console,'95 225HP Johnson,
dual axle trailer w/brakes.
Great condition, very clean.
$5,250 334-696-5505


Seacraft, '89,20 ft- Center
console, '95 225HP Johnson,
dual axle trailer w/brakes.
Great condition, very clean.
$5,250 334-696-5505


I.


2002 Wimebago Adventurer ,35', 1 superslide
& 1 back bedroom slide, generator, water heat-
er, dual roof air,awning, exterior entertainment
center, rear view monitor system & automatic
hydraulic leveling jacks. 18k mi tires in good
condition recently rotated. Average retail price
per NADA bluebook $50K,Iow retail $42K. Ask-
ing $35,000, OBO. MUST SELL! 334-790-6758
99' Carri-lite Carriage md#29RK 5th wheel,
1- 12 ft slide, 19 ft. awning, sleeps 4,
$11,50 229-395-6714.
COUGAR TRAVEL TRAILER
2004-30 foot,
big rear window,
living/dining slide, excel-
lent condition, new tires,
must see to appreciate,
$16,500 OBO, 334-687663 334-695-2161
Dutchmen 40 ft. Travel Trailer
l '06, 38B-DSL, Sleeps 8, Has 2
slideouts. Loaded, Like New.
$17,995. Call 334-406-4555

National 98 Dolphin-
37ft sleeps 6, 32k miles,
large slide, leveling jack,
back-up camera, Flatscreen
TV, Sleep Number Bed,
awning, corian counter tops, $25,000.
Call 334-793-6691
StarCraft '92 25ft sleeps 6, very clean,
microwave, CH&A, Stereo, $4,250.334-791-4350
Tral Lite 2006 R-VISION
26 ft., fully loaded,
bought new, 13K miles
$49,995 3344164508



Dixie RV SuperStores
FL's Newest RV Dealer
NOW OPEN!!!
*Store Hours*
Monday-Saturday
8:00am-6:00pm
21 Acres / 30 Brands New and Pre-Owned
Newmar Keystone Heartland n Jayco
Fleetwood Prime Time E Coachmen
Forest River
Service Department
Parts and Acces. Store
RV Collision Center

Located off 1-10 Exit 70 / SR285
328 Green Acres Dr.
De Funlak Springs, FL 32435
Sales and Service: 850-951-1000
www.dixlerv.com DO 12756
Dolphin LX 04' by National 36ft. workhorse
chassis GM8100 gas engine, 20900K miles, 6
new tires, all new brakes assembly. $66,500.
334-794-3085 or 334-701-5700
FLEETWOOD 2005 Prowler AX6, 5th wheel, 36







1999 Jeep Wrangler Excellent condition and
very well maintained. Many new and rebuilt
parts and systems. Higher milage but mostly
due to towing. Call for details. $7,200.334-894-
5042 or cell 334-389-0056


1970 Chevrolet Chevelle Big Block SS, red with
white stripes, Price $5,700, use e-mail for pic-
tures towneay6@msn.com / 239-963-2619.
Chevrolet '81 Corvette
Automatic 350 (Silver). Will
sell as is for $4,700. OBO
334-774-1915



2007 Volkswagon Beetle 45524 miles. One
owner. Pastel green with cream interior. Cus-
tom floormats for driver and passenger side.
Heated leather seats, cruise control, CD player,
sunroof, power locks and windows. Auxiliary
port for MP3/IPod. Great condition, regularly
serviced. Excellent gas mileage and fun to
drive. $14,500 or best offer. Please call 334-806-
6742 or e-mail lorimcarroll@yahoo.com to see
this great car.
Cadlac '07 DTS fully loaded, leather interior
tan in color. 29K mi. $19.000. 334-693-3980
Chevrolet '07 Corvette
Twin Turbo, FAST FAST
FAST! $32,999. 2180 Mont-
gomery Hwy. Call 334-
671-7720 or 718-2121.


Chrysler '06 Town & Country LTD Excellent
Condition, 74K miles, Nagivation, DVD, Original
Owner $15,500 850-482-3441


wwwJCFLORIDAN.com


Chevrolet '95 Camaro,
V-6, 5 speed, new tires,
cold air, 111,000 miles,
Excellent condition, $3995.
Call 334-790-7959.


Chevy "09 Slverado 1500 LT Crew Cab 4d,
Z71, 4 wheel-drive: 5.3 L V. pick-up- Full-sized
truck for sale. GREAT Condition! Approximate-
ly 37,100 miles. Red Exterior and Black Leather
Interior. Upgraded Dual Exhaust, Towing pacK-
age, and tool box included. Need to sell quick-
ly! Appraisal value $28,000 asking $25,000 or
best offer! Make an offer! Any reasonable of-
fer will be considered! Call 334-389-6920 for
more information.
Chirysler 6 Crossfire- roadster, 3.2L 215HP,
20k mile, black on black convertible with dark
gray interior, cloth seats, alum wheels, AC, 6
speed, manual, 25MPG, like new tires, Retirin,
Enterprise $12,500. Call 334-393-4444
Chrysler '06 Town & Country LTD Excellent
Condition, 74K miles, Nagivation, DVD, Origin.
Owner $15,500 850-482-3441
Chryser '07 Crossfire Convertible- Silver with
dark gray leather interior, new tires, 30k miles,
like new condition, one owner "grandma" need
money for health reasons. PRICED TO SELL!
$22,5. Call 229-334-9945
DO YOU KNOW ANYONE WITH BAD CREDIT?
I can get U Riding Today
Repos, Slow Credit, Past Bankruptcy OK!
$0 Down/1st Payment, Tax, Tag & Title
Push, Pull or Drag, Will Trade anything!
Wananty On Every Vehicle Sold
s1 Referrals Call Steve 800-80-4716
Ford '01 Mustang
$4999.00.
Lot's of custom.2180
Montgomery Hwy. '
Call 334-671-7720 or
718-2121.

GUARANTEED FINANCING!
CSI AUTO SALES
2180 MONTGOMERY HWY.
CALL: JAMES334-718-2121.
Hyundla 06' Elentra tan in color, 101K miles, 4-
cyl. automatic, AC, pwr options, crusie,
AM/FM/CD, $6500. OBO 334-389-3071
Lncoln '85 Towncar- Dark Gray, 4 doors,
leather interior, 59k miles,. Must see and Drive!
$12,500. Call 334-696-4765
Mercury '99 Grand Marquis LS 104,300 mi.
Leather, CD changer, Alloy wheels, Dark Green
in color $4999 334-714-1977
Nissan '05 Altima- GREAT CAR! 116k miles,
silver, power windows and door locks, cloth
interior, $8000. Call 334-794-5296 or 596-5098
Pontlac '05 Grand Am,
4 door, automatic, V-6,
66,000 miles, like new con-
dition. $6995. Call 334-790-
7959.
SATURN '06 ION-129K miles asking $5,000
fully loaded, runs great 334-333-4957
Toyota '03 Corolla LE- White with gold trim,
fully loaded with leather interior, sun roof, all
extras, 47k miles, like new $10,000.
Call 334-790-8725 or 334-699-7849
Toyota '07 Corolla LE- good condition, great
gas mileage, tan, approx. 81k miles, $11,000.
Call 251-300-1338
Toyota '09 Tacoma Prerunner V6, 4 X 2 with
TRD Offroad Package Tow Package. Truck has
22,000 miles, under warranty, and clear title.
Included isan Undercover tonneau cover, nerf
bars, and bull bar. Drives great. 931-220-0118.


2006 Harley-Davidson Ultra Classic FLHTCUI,
vivid black, 7800 mi., one owner,l oaded, excel-
lent condition, jward3@netscape.com, $6,700,
206-984-4097
Harley '03 Davidson Hert-
age Softall Classic 100th
Anniversary. Metallic
Pearl Blue. Vance and
Hines exhaust 19k Miles,
Beautiful Harley!
$9,500 334-446-1208 4.
Harley Davidson '02 Sportster 1200 Custom
11k miles, Chromed Out, $5500. Call 334-691-
3468 or 334-701-3855
Harley Davidson '02 Sportster 1200 Custom 1 R
miles, Chromed Out, $5500. Call 334-691-3468
or 334-701-3855
Harley Davidson '10 Dyna-Super Glide Custorr
96 Cubic Inch Motor, 6-spd transmission, only
21 Miles. 2 Brand New helmets included.
$9,000. Firm. Call Vicki 775-340-9795.
Harley Davidson '91
Sturgis Classic $7999.C
2180 Montgomery Hwy
Call 334-671-7720 or
718-2121.


Harley Davidson '96 Heritage Softtall FLSTN
32k miles, emerald green/gun metal gray, lot
of extra chrome, new tires, extra parts and
bike cover. Harley Luggage with Purchase!
Price to SELL! $9500 OBO. Call 229-269-3834
Harley Davidson XL 1200 Low This is a Like
New Harley with only 4,556 miles. Accessorie.
include chrome forward controls, Screaming
Eagle stage 1 breather kit, Vance Hines fuel
pack electronic fuel control, 2 inch Rush Pipes
for nice deep roar. Harley short sissy bar. Adi
rider since new, never dropped. Color is Blue
and chrome. Call Greg at 334-701-3039. $6,500
U HONDA '07 CBR,
600, loaded, 4,000
miles,stretch lowered,
2 brother exhaust, $6,00'
334-689-3518, 334-339-235
Honda'07 Goldwing GL1800 Nav. comfort, am
many acc. ext warr. 14K mi. blue in color
$15,500. 334-774-7230. Ready to Sell!
Kawasaki'08 Vulcan 900
white and gold. Approx r
mi. FLAWLESS. $5995
334-797-0987


Kawasaki'09 KXF250
Motor by BPM, 2 brother:
performance pipe. Very
fast bike for the motor-
crossing extremist
334-726-3842


JACKSON COUNTY


FLORIDAN

jcfloridan.com



monster+

FIND LOCAL JOBS AT: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM/JOBS


I


I











ir a 41 l, 0" 0 > o ,, ,s',

0- Z


( 0 04


,f4ano QoaoS'r "


( I \-1 1II ID-


ISCOOTES &MOPDS


Sono

"2 0


1 4n40 4 h CoDO* 0 an(0uf Scoo*


/0 VTi~t1 HI 9


II .. 0 0'


all B8.4e, 03
(I 9 a e I (e
IIes %,00 e


oneo 03 C







Da-S*1 ge* po Io co o
0 i 0 o ce ag *0
co 0 13 ,


'02 Dodge Ram 1500 4-wheel drive, quad cab,
P/U with 4.7 IIter engine, cold air, chrome run-
ning boards, chrome rims, chrome tool box,
tow package and new tires. 149,698 miles.
Excellent condition. $8499. n 334-790-6832.
Chevrolet '00 SlIverado
LS Z71 ext. cab, 4-door,
4x4, Red, 138K miles, all
power, 5000 miles on
tires, tow package, Must
see to appreciate. $9500.
334-791-2781 or 334-677-3050


C> c 0 li i


C O. v 1 I n I oo


0oo 0 II
"O !


I I I)


I),
ii.'


4 o 8J ID QC 0 c 0o
I' ''' )


0o0 8



O D' 81
o 0


. 4 (10 a 4 0
i co o 0811 (H

oa0 00 (

52,000 080 4 oS


0


I29 I0 70


0 i 0 0 (
0 O-V 0p



I OoD0 D
4o0 807


0o 0 aO Co O*1 rf

kt-l [-


02 a. 1 44 .

Cr o0 0 o ,o -

0o itA 0 UO (0 a a


B & LWell and Pump, LLC.
c s GUMNS 7. N Pjo nson Jr.

I BUY OLD GUNSSI IW mb3214
SBUY OLD GUNS! (85: i69-25 3 o50)557-2572 cell
(850) 263-2701 Bascom, FL


SVOuiCE MoFbR CRS
SBroker/Owne
S(850) 526-2891
Yr^ik u 14630 Hwy 90 Marionno
Ss (850) 482-2613
uly South Properties wuoat
FOR ALL YOUR REAL ESTATE NEEDS
SPECIALIZING IN REO AND FORECLOSURE PROPERTIES

SEFSTOAG


Pool Maintenance & Repair from top to
bottom Also fiberglass tub installation!
(850) 573-682

HOEIPOEET


I-SE RVITSOF: iEIEDI


CHIPOLA PROPANE GAS COMPANY
Locally Owned & Operated Since 1961
OldCottondaleRd-Waianna-526-2651 "op
y.90Easl-Sneads.5LW O Gas s. Nee
Tanks for Sale



RONEY SMITH
REALTY
630MHwy90- #Mriao, FL 32446
(850) 526-2891
Cell (850) 209-8039
wwwJuFT..rGiyre/dedieip
0*'tytoctshna/*b tOTdrt


STATE ,FA RM HENRY K WILLIAMS
L4648 HighwaT 90
If 1.A Marianna, FL 2446
S850-482-8931
INSURANCE keith.williams.iy9t@
fl statefarm.com


* Grader Pan Excavator
* Dump IDuck Bulldozer


I Demolition Grading Site Prep
* Debris Removal o Retention Ponds o Leveling
* Top Soil RD Dirt Gravel Land Clearing







Personal Tou U
Computer Repair
A+ AND NETWORK+ CERTIFIED
FREE PICKUP, DELIVERY, AND SET UP
WITHIN THE CITY LIMITS MARIANNA5
RICHARD REGISTER 850-557-6061

BDZI


Clay 'Neal's
Land Clearing, Inc.
ALTNA, PL
850-762S-0O
Coi 5S0-8324055


MEWWoU


rrmBBBHea


S0' Ad ChSnle





07 *3ja Co /
D o .II O l fln'gIII




L ..... ....... ...... .. .. .. ..

WANTED JUNK

3 VEHICLES TOP PRICE!

I alsosell sed parts
24 HOUR TOWING 334-792-8664
I* WANTWED;C.lla
SPAYTOP
b* DAY -314-794576 N16T33.r79-7Bn

WE PAY CaSH

FOR JUNK CARS!!!!!!

334-818-1274 D012226


Ceo"q "Hairlab Tan
saloon"


WE'LL SANCE
YoUa NAn'RAL BoI.Fr
Finul Haircare
Color Cuts P nm
Tannmi


(I50) 482- iI i895) (5SO) 3S9-2055


Cobb Front End
and Tire Service
"Not Just A Front End Shop"
NOW LOCATED at TWO LOCATIONS
to BETTER SERVE YOU...
Uc1. 2984 Dele Street
^ --- Marianna, FL 32448

M ariam, FLS32448U
I | 850-526-4706

Howrs of operaton:
Mouly-Flday 70w 5:08m
i iWe A ppreciat YourIB iil




SJEMISON~ g HEATING
JENSO & COOLING
24 HOURS 7 DAYS A WEEK SERVICE
SALES INSTALLS DUCT CLEANING


JabmceiCoumttYi


b "dBug SuppY~ 4091 LafayelleSL
Marlon Pills, Manager Office: (850)526-5125
DDO axt :(850)526-7647
Cell: (850)718-3038



Haircuts ~- Color
Foif Hihlights
Perms -. Png
Tanning Bed
Knmsi WiuIE Ki MATImEWS
Juur EDENrim AMY ANDRSON





THE FITNESS CENTER
of MARIANNA
"Focusing on your Fitness"
4966 E. Hwy. 90 Marianna, FL 32446
850-526-2466 w- -



For General House or
Office Cleaning
Call Debra
Free Estimates References Available

850-526-2336


DESHAZOS'S


AUTO SERVICE
Come ee Us For Al Your Car r Truck Mechanical Needsl
O w n e, PhM p D eS ih a j w
850-482-3196 Appdate
2807 Jefferso Street. ur
Marianna, FL 32446


M JOHN BRYAN
Seslt Rejpai.nuiv
OK (850) 4824043
Tou Fm (866) 587-3673
CHIPOLA FORD c (850,ss73087
4242 LAFAYETE ST ww.C-IProlC r.o.m


RYAN MCLAULIN

O i850- 4824043
Toc Fu 866 587-3673
CHIPOLA FORD c. 850)209700
4242 LAFAYETr ST '.Cfou1toD~D




MARIANA
M O W a(80n)42,3'I I"


Call For Quote
GCEOR O'S ^A.
Gbss_^^ *Auto
SCommercial
l Residential
2847 S. Jefferson St.. Marianna
482-6542




,,, ,w & Teox Servytt
1a4 1. s as iniT(sem 6
6L p aM CoM.aM r Iv a
aL^ *Q i r tw o4*K l a





Sandy Voss
Alterations Repair Embroidery Long Arm Quiting
Hand Crafted Totes. Bags. Qults. Etc.
Pickup and De lvry Available
.seonthego4uyaho.omn


Vdult


k .on County
& Monuments



8 0 -8 SO0 I


Hall Roofing
Siding & Building LLC. -
Lic. #RC29027412 RB29003513
SIDNEY HALL 4939 Hwy. 2 t -j
(850) 569-2021 Malone,
(850) 526-8441 Florida 32445 S



| ALTNA FARMERS
COOPERATIVE, INC
Altha Blountstown Marianna
Come see Manager, Jeremy Branch and Staff for
Fertilizer Feed Seed Chemicals
Peanut Buying Point
2091 Penn. Avenue Macinna, PL
8SO-0a2-2416



STATE FARM LINDA PFORTE
INSURANCE AGENCY INC
S2919 Penn Ave, Ste B
Marianna, FL 32448
S850-482-3425
INSURANCE linda.pforte.bxrs@
S statefarm.com





"Beautification of Your Home"
Carpentry/Painting Installations
Furniture Repair & Refinishing
General Repairs Insured




: W Wk -, 0nIer
Custom. Tile & Flooring, LLC
Natural Stone Ceramic Porcelain
Custom Showers Hardwood Laminate & More
Ne Job tee Large er Small! Lkicesed & insred
(850) 693-1423 or (850) 209-8099

CLEANNG& OUSEKEEP NG:L:4


ST VS E

CRAIG BARD
CrifiedSales Cons ula
O(:(850)4824043
Tou Fm(866) 587-3673
CHIPOLA FORD Caj8ss) 557.3444
4242 LAFAYETTE ST ww.cmIPoun c.coM


Bob Pforte Motors, Inc.
4214 Lafayette Street =M-'l -r',
Marianna, Florida 32446
(850) 482-4601 *o= '
(800) 483-1440
www.bobpfortedodge.com


RONNIE COLEY
Salek Reprrenww1w
0" '850, 4824043
T Fm 866 587-3673
CHIPOLAFORD C u850272-2791
4242 LAFAYETTE ST -www.fn rowmL ,


JOHN ALLEN
rnfirJ. aLkszu an
(r 50 48240)43
fu'W5F 482-5246
T, .Fm 866 587-3673
CHIPOLA FORD nASO'0 5262806
4242 LAFAYETTE ST '.'"'"'R n


850-762-8666
850-899-3259


ff Mr-Mr,


I RITIG


I


tJ l l r


II *,


II
iili






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Israel, US race to avert Palestinian UN bid


The Associated Press

JERUSALEM Israel is work-
ing with the United States to find
a way to revive peace negotia-
tions with the Palestinians in a
desperate attempt to avert a dip-
lomatic showdown at the U.N.
next month, an Israeli official
confirmed Tuesday.
The talks, meant to provide
a framework for negotiations,
are focusing on two of the most
sensitive issues in the Israeli-Pal-
estinian conflict: the borders be-
tween Israel and a future Pales-
tine, and Israel's demand that the
Palestinians recognize the coun-
try as the Jewish homeland.
Israel and the U.S. are making
a painstaking effort to find lan-
guage acceptable to all sides, the
official said.
While he said Israel is ready
to show "flexibility" on the bor-
der issue, he acknowledged
there was no imminent sign of
a breakthrough. Palestinian of-
ficials said they were unaware of
any new proposals.
Peace talks have been mostly
stalled for nearly three years,
and the Palestinians refuse to
resume negotiations while Israel
continues to build settlements


THE SOOCIATED PRESS FE
On April 27,2010, Jewish settlersrebuld the Mgro unauthorized attleent outpost i the West Bak after it
was demolished by Israell troops. Israel's Supreme Court on Tueday ordered the state to dismantle Mgron, the
largest of the more than 100 unauthorized West Bank settlent outposts.


in the West Bank and east Jeru-
salem. The Palestinians claim
both areas, captured by Israel in
the 1967 Mideast war, for their
future state.
In the absence of a negotiated
peace deal, the Palestinians plan
to ask the United Nations to rec-
ognize their independence next


month. The vote would be sym-
bolic, but the Palestinians none-
theless hope it will isolate Israel
and improve their negotiating
position in the future.
Israel and the U.S. both oppose
the U.N. bid, saying the conflict
should be resolved through ne-
gotiations. Israel also fears the


U.N. vote could spark street
protests and potentially violent
unrest.
The Israeli official said the two
allies have been trying to devise
a "package" that would allow
talks to resume, and persuade
the Palestinians to call off the
U.N. initiative.


"Unfortunately, it has not
been successful," the official
said, speaking on condition of
anonymity because he was dis-
cussing a sensitive diplomatic
matter.
He said the U.S. is looking
for Israel to endorse President
Barack Obama's call for the bor-
ders of a future Palestine to be
based on the pre-1967 lines be-
tween Israel and the West Bank,
with some modifications based
on negotiated land swaps.
In Washington, State Depart-
ment spokesman Mark Toner
declined to comment on the re-
port that Israel agreed to negoti-
ate on the basis of the pre-1967
cease-fire line.
He also repeated U.S. opposi-
tion to the Palestinian U.N. ini-
tiative, adding that "we're work-
ing hard with both parties to find
a way back to the negotiating
table before then."
Prime Minister Benjamin Ne-
tanyahu has repeatedly said
he will not return to the 1967
lines, and that he wants to retain
chunks of the West Bank. But
the official said Israel is "willing
to show some flexibility" on the
matter, if the Palestinians show
flexibility with Israeli concerns.


In Mubarak trial, Egypt sees chance at retribution


The Associated Press

CAIRO Hosni Mubarak, 83
years old and ailing, goes on trial
Wednesday on charges of cor-
ruption and ordering the killing
of protesters during the 18-day
uprising that toppled him, and
many Egyptians are celebrating
the chance at retribution against
a longtime authoritarian ruler.
But they also question whether
the trial will trlly break with the
injustices of the past. Some wor-
ry that Egypt's new military rul-
ers are touting the trial as proof
that democratic reform has been
accomplished, even as activists
argue that far deeper change is
still needed.
"I am a little worried that if
Mubarak is tried and convicted
people will take that to be the
end of the revolution. They will
say that the revolution has real-
ized its goals. This should not be
the case," said Tareq Shalaby, a
27-year-old social media con-
sultant who was among the hun-
dreds of thousands of protest-
ers who thronged Cairo's Tahrir
Square and other cities during
the uprising.


AnEgyptian worker put the final touches at the court room at the country's
national police academy in a Cairo suburb, Egypt on Sunday, where ousted
President Mubarak, his' security chief Habib el-Adly and six top police
officers faced trial on Wednesday.


The prosecution of the ousted
president is an unprecedented
moment in the Arab world, the
first time a modern Mideast
leader has been put on trial fully
by his own people.
The closest event to it was for-
mer Iraqi leader Saddam Husse-


in's trial, but his capture came at
the hands of U.S. troops in 2003
and his special tribunal was set
up with extensive consultation
with American officials and in-
ternational experts. Tunisia's de-
posed president, Zine E1Abldine
Ben All, has been tried and'con-


victed several times since his fall
several weeks before Mubarak's,
but all in absentia and he re-
mains in exile in Saudi Arabia.
Mubarak, who ruled with un-
questioned power for 29 years,
is expected to appear during
the trial sitting in a cage set up
for him and his co-defendants,
including his two sons and his
former interior minister. The
charges could bring a death sen-
tence, traditionally carried out
by hanging.
In an ironic twist, the court-
room has been set up in what
was once the Mubarak Police
Academy -- one of the multi-
ple security, military and other
civil buildings named after the
president, though since his Feb.
11 ouster his name has been
dropped. Security will be tight,
with barbed wire and hundreds
of troops around the compound.
Efforts have been made to ensure
spectators in the court can't get
close enough to the defendants'
case to yell and throw objects at
them, the Interior Ministry said.
Mubaraks trial came only after
heavy pressure by protesters. For
weeks after his fall, as Mubarak


lived in a palace in the Red Sea
resort of Sharm el-Sheikh, the
ruling generals, who were all ap-
pointed by Mubarak, appeared
reluctant to prosecute him. A
trial was one of the few demands
that still united the disparate
protest movement.
Their hand forced, the gener-
als now seem eager to show the
public that they are bringing
the fruits of the revolution. The
trial will be televised live on state
TV and judges say proceedings
will be expedited, without long
postponements. The around 600
people attending are expected to
include relatives of some of the
850 protesters killed during the
uprising.
"The Pharaoh in the defen-
dants cage!" gloated a banner
headline Tuesday in the inde-
pendent El-Osboa newspaper
alongside a photo-illustration of
Mubarak behind bars.
The night before proceed-
ings were to begin Wednesday,
Mubarak was still at the Sharm
hospital. Security officials said
he would be flown by helicopter
directly to the police academy
just before the session.


Syria tightens


Hama siege, Italy


pulls ambassador


The Associated Press

BEIRUT Syrian troops
tightened their siege on
the city of Hama Tuesday,
sending residents fleeing
for their lives and draw-
ing a fresh wave of inter-
national condemnation
against a regime defying
the growing calls to end
its crackdown on anti-gov-
ernment protesters.
Secretary of State Hill-
ary Rodham Clinton met
with U.S.-based Syrian
democracy activists as the
Obama administration
weighed new sanctions on
Syria. Congressional calls
also mounted for action
against President Bashar
Assad's regime, as the
death toll from two days of
military assaults on civil-
ians Sunday and Monday
neared 100.
Italy recalled its ambas-
sador to Syria "in the face
of the horrible repression
against the civil popula-
tion" by the government,
which launched a new
push against protesters as
the Muslim holy month of
Ramadan began Monday.
It was the first European
Union country to pull its
ambassador, and the mea-
sure came a day after the
EU tightened sanctions.
The mounting interna-
tional outcry has had-no
apparent effect so far in
Syria, an autocratic coun-
try that relies on Iran as a
main ally in the region.


The top U.S. military
officer said Washington
wants to pressure the Syr-
ian regime. But he added
there was no immediate
prospect of a Libya-style
military intervention.
"There's no indication
whatsoever that the Amer-
icans, that we would get
involved directly with re-
spect to this," Joint Chiefs
chairman Adm. Mike Mul-
len said Tuesday.
The British Foreign Office
said it shares Italy's "strong
concerns about the situa-
tion in Syria" but is not re-
calling its ambassador.
"In the absence of an end
to the senseless violence
and a genuine process of
political reform, we will
continue to pursue fur-
ther EU sanctions," British
Foreign Secretary Willian
Hague said in a statement.
Without change "President
Assad and those around
him will find themselves
isolated internationally
and discredited within
Syria."
Still there was no sign the
regime was willing to back
down.
There has been an inten-
sified campaign since Sun-
day, apparently aimed at
preventing protests from
swelling during Ramadan,
when Muslims throng
mosques for special night-
ly prayers after breaking
their daily, dawn-to-dusk
fast. The gatherings could
turn into large protests.


&P.Jackson
.. : Hospital

Jackson Hospital values growth, quality, and service and isadding service lines, doubling the size of its ER, and opening
new physician practices. The hospital system has a 100-bed acute care, general medicine hospital located in beautiful
Marianna, Florida, where the opportunity to make a difference still exists. We have immediate openings for:

PHYSICIAN PRACTICE MANAGER
Responsible for the management of Jackson Hospital's affiliated Medical and Surgical' Specialty practices. Provides
oversight to ensure the individual Medical Office Managers are accountable for: cost effectiveness/financial management,
access to services, member satisfaction and teamwork with operational areas. Qualified applicants must possess a
Bachelor's degree (Master's degree is preferred) with five years of management experience in a physician practice setting
with at least ten years healthcare experience.

MEDICAL OFFICE MANAGER
Local medical practice is seeking an experienced Medical Office Manager to supervise, manage, and maintain the daily
workings of our busy practice. Qualified candidate must have previous experience in a medical office setting with
management/supervisory duties.

PRIMARY CARE CLINIC ARNP
Experienced ARNP needed for a small Primary Care facility in Malone, Florida. The ARNP, under the supervision of
a Physician, will perform physical examinations, evaluate and treat injuries or illnesses for pediatric through geriatric
patients. Responsible for ordering and interpreting appropriate diagnostic tests and collaborating with supervising
physician to provided consistent care to patients.

MICROBIOLOGIST
Tasks and responsibilities include processing of specimens, preparing reagents, performing testing and reporting of
test results, performing quality control testing and instrument maintenance, as well as consulting with lab technicians
and phlebotomists as needed. Qualified candidates must possess nationally recognized certification as a medical
technologist or equivalent, Florida licensure required for all areas of lab. BSN and minimum 1 year hospital laboratory
experience preferred.
.. . * 4.
O.R. CHARGE NURSEIO.R. CIRCULATOR
We have added 5 new surgeons creating an opening for a Full-time O.R. 0
Charge Nurse and O.R. Circulator with call duty. Qualified applicants
must live within 20 minutes of the hospital and hold a current
Florida RN license. Previous O.R. experience is preferred.

ORTHOPEDIC ARNP or PA
Full-time ARNP or PA needed for a highly specialized orthopedic/
sports medicine surgical practice. Florida ARNP/PA license
required and orthopedics and or surgical experience preferred,
although training may be provided to qualified applicant.


Join our team by contacting us or faxing your resume to:
Human Resources of Jackson Hospital
4250 Hospital Drive, Marianna, Florida 32446
(850) 718-2626 phone or (850) 718-2679 fax
EOE


-188 WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2011


INTERNIRIONRL