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Jackson County Floridan
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028304/00624
 Material Information
Title: Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title: Sunday Floridan
Portion of title: Floridan
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Jackson County Floridan
Publisher: Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Marianna Fla
Publication Date: 7/27/2011
Frequency: daily (except saturday and monday)[<1979-1995>]
weekly[ former 1934-<1955>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates: 30.776389 x -85.238056 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note: "Independent."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID: UF00028304:00624
 Related Items
Preceded by: Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by: Marianna Floridan

Full Text



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FLORIDAN


Vol.88 Nb.143


A AMedia Gcenend NasquImpor


Drug task force raids stores


Two convenience stores were allegedly selling synthetic marijuana


From staff reports
The Jackson County Drug Task
Force raided two convenience
stores in Marianna and charged
six people in connection with
the alleged sale of synthetic mar-
ijuana at the two locations.


Winston


. Mukht

Mukhtar


Ghanshyambnai


M. Prajapati


DPrajapati


D. Prajapati


gas
pro
beh
per;
cor
Tl
label
bee


According to a news release the
from the Jackson County Sher- that synthetic marijuana was someone needing medical treat- concluded an investigation into eve:
iff's Office, reports have been available, and that there was at ment after smoking it. the sale of products called Herb-
coming in for several months least one reported instance of On Monday, the drug task force al Incense and Potpourri at two


Stations. In both cases, the
ducts were being sold from
ind the counter and only to
sons over the age of 18, ac-
ding to the news release.
he release also noted that the
iels often indicated they had
n laboratory-tested and that
substances were legal. How-
r, lab tests on the products
See BUST, Page 7A


STEM EDUCATION



DISTRICT GETS GRANT



FOR MATH, SCIENCE


Goal is to

encourage more

students to

take courses
BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com

Some gifted and talented students
in Jackson County will have some new
opportunities awaiting them when
they return to school on August 22.
The Jackson County school district,
12 others in North Florida and six in
South Florida stand to benefit from a
$3.6 million grant awarded to the Pan-
handle Area Educational Consortium.
The money, which comes from the
state Department of Education, will be
used to help steer gifted and talented
students into science, technology, en-
gineering and math, or STEM educa-
tional courses and careers.
The education department has made
STEM education a top priority in fund-
ing through the state's Race to the Top
initiative, according to a press release
about the grant award.,
The consortium's Administrator of
Instructional, Services, Sharon Mitch-
ell, said the funds will be used in a vari-
ety of ways during the school year and
in summer programs.
"Part of what we're going to do is pay
for some summer and schoolyear chal-
lenges, where university staff members
and professionals in the private sec-
tor come in to do some student train-
ing," she said. "Also, well be putting
some additional guidance counselors
on board who would visit the districts
and work with students on what their
interests might be, help them get into
programs that would be geared to the
fields of interest.",
The goal is to encourage more stu-


TviMARK KINNIN L, /FLU tUtiA N
Michael Kilts and Nora Mayo works on a school event calendar for the upcoming year at
the school board main office. Graceville High will be the first school to begin using grant
money this school year to push more science and math courses.


dents to study science, math and
engineering.
"Really, we're trying to facilitate the
process of getting more of these gift-
ed students to take STEM courses,"
Mitchell said. "Those may already be
part of the curriculum, and some may
be available in special programs that
we'll help them find and sign on for.
We might be able to bring an engineer
to a central location, for example, and
the students could come from their lo-
cations in the districts to hear what he


or she has to say, to interact with that
person, so that we've used the resource
to the fullest advantage."
The Florida Council of 100 predicted
in its Closing the Gap report that, with-
in a decade, nine of 10 new jobs will
require credentials in one of the STEM
disciplines, and education beyond a
high school diploma. That prediction
is part, of what drives Race to the Top,
STEM grants and related programs.
See GRANT, Page 7A


Police



pursuit



leads to



crash

Driver was going

to be pulled

over for allegedly

driving drunk
From staff reports
A man law enforcement tried to pull
over for allegedly driving drunk instead
led a sheriff's deputy on a high-speed
cash that ended when he crashed'his
car in neighboring Washington County.
According to a news release from the
Jackson County Sheriff's Office, a dep-
uty attempted to pull over a green Ford
Explorer Monday just off U.S. Highway
231 south of Alford. The driver, identi-
fied as Steven Wayne Baxter, was ob-
served driving "in a careless manner
consistent with the actions of an im-
paired driver,' according to the release.
However, when the deputy activated
his emergency lights, Baxter accelerated
to speeds nearing 75 mph and attempt-
ed to elude the deputy. The deputy gave
chase for three miles, continuing the
pursuit into Washington County.
After Baxter crossed the county line,
he lost control of the vehicle in a curve.
The Explorer rolled twice and came to
rest on its roof, with Baxter trapped in-
side. Emergency responders were called
out and used extrication equipment.
Baxter was then taken by helicopter to
Tallahassee Memorial Hospital, due to
the severity of his injuries.
Baxter now faces pending charges to
be filed by the sheriff's office and Flor-
ida Highway Patrol, according to the
news release.


FAMU alumni plan free community event


Looks to attract new members to

association, give back to county


BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com

The Northwest Florida FAMU
Alumni Association is hosting a
free community event in Mari-
anna on July 30, with the FAMU
athletic director, several head
coaches from the university's
sports programs, and a well-


SCLASSIFIEDS...5-7B

This Newspaper
Is Printed On
Recycled Newsprint




7 165161 80050 9


known former news anchor-
woman slated to speak.
Carmen Cummings, the first
African-American news anchor
at WCTV Channel 6 in Tallahas-
see, is now the national direc-
tor of FAMU Alumni Affairs. She
leads the slate of speakers for
the July 30 "Rattler Roundup"
in' Marianna, which begins at 5


) ENTERTAH~ r.1ErlT...4B


Follow us


Facebook


Twitter


)) LOCAL...3A


uummings


Home


p.m.
The event will be held at the
Golden Key Club, 4080 Gillette
Lane. There is no charge for entry
or for refreshments, which will
include hot dogs, hamburgers,
OBITUARIES...7A


soft drinks and other snacks.
Another key speaker is FAMU
Athletic Director Derek Home.
Other speakers are softball coach
Veronica Wiggins, men's track
and cross country coach Wayne
Angel, women's track coach
Darlene Moore, head volleyball
coach Tony Trifonov, and foot-
ball coaching staff members.
The purpose of the event is two-
fold, according to local associa-
tion member Lawrence Brown.
Organizers want to acquaint
more county residents with the


) OPINION...4A


fgBILLY BAILEY
Chevrolet-Buick-Cadillac-Nissan

F 4204 Lafayette St. Marianna, FL.
S.. (8 4S. SALES MANAGER
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> SPORTS...1-3B


alumni association and attract
new members to it, he said.
Membership in the association
is $100, and the money is used in
three ways; it helps support the
FAMU athletics programs, helps
provide scholarships for Jackson
County students who want to
attend FAMU, and supports the
school's National Scholarship
Initiative.
The second purpose of
the event is to provide the
See FAMU, Page 7A


) TV LISTINGS...3B


SEAB SUMMERS JEREMY PARRIS J.AIE CCAi-





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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Weo*Aw9 Oslaokoi


I i w.-

l High: 90
Low: 74


L. ': 7" --


High 920
Low 74'

Tomorrow
Scattered Storms.



N.J High- 960
Low 76

Saturday
Hotter.


High 940
Low 750


Friday
Partly Cloudy.


24 hours 0.02" Year to date 21 2 3"'
Month to date 4.95" Normal YTD 36 09"
Normal MTD 5.79" Normal for year 58.25"


TIDES
Panama City
Apalachicola
Port St. Joe
Destin
Pensacola


ULTRA VIOLET INDEX


Low -
Low -
Low *-
Low -
Low -


RIVER READINGS
Woodruff
Blountstown
Marianna
Caryville


7:00 PM
7:23 PM
6:26 PM
7:37 PM
8:11 PM


High
High
High
High
High


Reading
40.49 ft.
2.34 ft.
4.85 ft.
1.70 ft.


7:51 AM
5:03 AM
7:42 AM
8:15 AM
8:48 AM


Flood Stage,
66.0 ft.
15.0 ft.
19.0 ft..
12.0 ft.


0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 t-
0 1 2 3: 4'. .|

THE SUN AND MOON


Sunrise
Sunset
Moonrise
Moonset


5:55 AM
7:39 PM
2:42 AM
5:11 PM


July Aug. Aug. Aug.
30 6 13 21


s s ,LI N R R WPS,


JACKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN
Publisher Valeria Roberts
vroberts@jcfloridan.com

Managing Editor Michael Becker
mbecker@jcfloridan.com

Circulation Manager Dena Oberski
doberski@jcfloridan.com




-II

CONTACT US
Telephone: (850) 526-3614
FAX: (850) 482-4478
Email: editorial@jcfloridan.com
Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447
Street Address:
4403 Constitution Lane
Marianna, FL32446
Office Hours:
Weekdays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

MISS YOUR PAPER?.
You should receive your newspaper na later
than 6 a.m. If it does not arrive, call Circula-
tion between 6 a.m. and noon, Tuesday to
Friday, and 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. on Sunday. The
Jackson County Floridan (USPS 271-840)
is published Tuesday though Friday and
Sunday mornings. Periodical postage paid
at Marianna, FL.

SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Home delivery: $11.23 per month; $32.83
for three months; $62.05 for six months;
and $123.45 for one year. All prices include
applicable state and local taxes. Mail
subscriptions must be paid in advance. Mail
subscriptions are: $46.12 for three months;
$92.24 for six months; and $184.47 for one
year.
ADVERTISING
The advertiser agrees that the publisher
shall not be liable for damages arising
out of errors and advertisements beyond
the amount paid for the space actually
occupied by that portion of the advertise-
ments in which the error occurred, whether
such error is due to the negligence of the
publisher's employees or otherwise, and
there shall be not liability for non-inser-
tion of any advertisement beyond the
amount paid for such advertisement. This
newspaper will not knowingly accept or
publish illegal material of any kind. Advertis-
ing which expresses preference based on
legally protected personal characteristics is
not acceptable.

HOWTOGETYOUR
NEWS PUBLISHED
The Jackson County Floridan will publish
news of general interest free of charge.
Submit your news or Community Calendar
events via email, fax, mail, or hand delivery.
Fees may apply for wedding, engagement,
anniversary and birth announcements.
Forms are available at the Floridan offices.
Photographs must be of good quality and
suitable for print. The Floridan reserves the
right to edit all submissions.

GETTING IT RIGHT
The Jackson County Floridan's policy
is to correct mistakes promptly. To
report an error, please call 526-3614
Monday-Friday.


Community Calendar


TODAY
Eldercare Services will give out USDA and Brown
Bag food at 4297 Liddon St. in Marianna, beginning
at 8 a.m. Malone City Hall will also give out USDA
food beginning at 8 a.m.
) Called board meeting The Panhandle Public
Library Cooperative System will convene a special,
called board meeting at 8 a.m, in the PPLCS office
at 4439 Marion St. in Marianna.
) Jackson County Habitat for Humanity
Warehouse hours: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open meeting, noon
to 1 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901
Caledonia St., Marianna, in the AA room.
) Ribbon Cutting Jackson County Chamber of
Commerce conducts a ribbon cutting ceremony at
2:30 p.m. for the new Jackson Hospital Outpatient
Center on the ground floor of the Hudnall Building
adjacent to Jackson Hospital. Tours, refreshments
follow. Call 526-2200 or 482-8060.
) The Jackson Hospital Board of Trustees con-
venes its monthly Finance and Board meeting at 5
p.m. in the Hudnall Building community room.

THURSDAY, JULY 28
D Jackson County Farmers Market is open 6:30
a.m. to noon (or until goods sell out) Tuesdays,
Thursday and Saturdays in Madison Street Park in
Marianna.
)) Emerald Coast Hospice Summer Education
Series presents "Hospice 101" at 4374 Lafayette St.
in Marianna. Two sessions: 7 a.m. and 4 p.m. CEU
(1) available through Troy University. Health care
workers, public welcome. No charge. Call 526-3577.
) Ribbon Cutting Jackson County Chamber of
Commerce conducts a ribbon cutting ceremony at
11 a.m. for the newly remodeled Hardee's at 4652
Highway 90 in Marianna. Call 229-524-2083 or
482-8060.
Orientation 1to 4 p.m. at the Goodwill Career
Training Center, 4742 Highway 90 in Marianna. Reg-
ister for free job placement and computer training
classes offered to people with disadvantages/dis-
abilities. Call 526-0139.
)) Jackson County Library Board meeting
- 3 p.m. at the Board of County Commissioners.
Agenda includes: Director's report on library opera-
tions, budget and other JCLB issues.
) Jackson County Habitat for Humanity Annual
Meeting 6 p.m. at Mowrey Elevator Company
Inc., 4518 Lafayette St. in Marianna. Public wel-
come. Call 482-2187.
Free Summer Concert Series Second Time
Around, 7 to 9 p.m. at Citizens Lodge Park in
Marianna. Bring lawn chairs, coolers. Presented by
Jackson County Parks department and Main Street
Marianna. Moose Lodge No. 1026 will sell hot dogs,
chips and drinks during the show (net proceeds
benefit Moose charities). Call 718-5210 or 718-1022.


)) Alcoholics Anonymous Closed discussion, 8
to 9 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901 Cale-
donia St., Marianna, in the AA room. Attendance
limited to persons with a desire to stop drinking.

FRIDAY, JULY 29
a Blood Drive The Southeastern Community
Blood Center Mobile Unit will be at Davis Optometry
Group in Marianna, 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.; or give
blood at 2503 Commercial Park Drive in Marianna,
9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday-Friday. Call 526-4403.
) Senior Singles Get-Together, 6 to 8 p.m. on the
last Friday of each month, near the floral depart-
ment of Winn-Dixie in Marianna. Senior singles ages
50 and up encouraged to attend. Form friendships;
get acquainted, with games, snacks and prizes.
Host: Marianna's Gathering Place Foundation.
Donations accepted; proceeds fund area charitable
endeavors. Call 526-4561.
n Celebrate Recovery Adult, teen meetings to
overcomee hurts, habits and hang-ups in a safe
environment," 7 p.m., Evangel Worship Center, 2645
Pebble Hill Road. Dinner: 6 p.m. (free for first-time
guests). Child care available. Call 209-7856 or
573-1131.
) Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, 8 to
9 p.m. in the AA room at First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St., Marianna.

SATURDAY, JULY30
Jackson County Farmers Market is open 6:30
a.m. to noon (or until goods sell out) Tuesdays,
Thursday and Saturdays in Madison Street Park in
Marianna.
a Free Car Wash for Seniors St. Joseph
Masonic Lodge No. 99 invites senior citizens (65
and older) for a free car wash, 8 a.m. to noon in the
parking lot of Advance Auto Parts, 4720 Highway 90
'East in Marianna.
) Jackson County Health Department Closing
the Gap program offers a free Pilates class, 8:30
a.m. at Integras Wellness Center, 4230 Lafayette
St., Suite C, in Marianna. Call 482-6221.
Partners For Pets Back-to-School Open
House 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at 4011 Maintenance
Drive in Marianna. The first 50 children receive
free backpacks filled with school supplies. Stop by
for refreshments and a visit with the pets awaiting
adoption at the non-profit, no-kill shelter.
n Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, 4:30 to
5:30 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St., Marianna.

SUNDAY, JULY 31
n Alcoholics Anonymous closed discussion, 6:30
p.m., 4349 W. Lafayette St., Marianna (in one-story
building behind 4351W. Lafayette St.). Attendance
hnimited to, personsvwith a desire to stop drinking.


MONDAY, AUG. 1
n Free reading program "One World, Many
Stories," the Jackson County Public Library summer
reading program for children 12 and younger, will be
at the Alford Community Center Aug. 1-4. Activities
start a.t 9 a.m. for pre-school kids; 10:15 a.m. for
school-age. Call 482-9631 to reserve a spot.
n Orientation -10 a.m. to 1,: m at the Go. xOdwil
Career Training Center, 4742 Highway 90 in Mari-
anna. Register for free job placement and computer
training classes offered to people with disadvan-
tages/disabilities. Call 526-0139.
) Jackson County Health Department Closing
the Gap program offers a free yoga class, 5:30 p.m.
at Integras Wellness Center, 4230 Lafayette St.,
Suite C, in Marianna. Mat provided. Call 482-6221.
) Children's Swimming Lessons at Chipola
College (ages 4 and older). Session 4: Aug. 8-18,
registration deadline: Aug. 1. Cost: $45. Pre-regis-
tration required. Call 718-2473.
) Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, 8 to
9 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St., Marianna.

TUESDAY, AUG, 2
n Jackson County Farmers Market is open 6:30
a.m. to noon (or until goods sell out) Tuesdays,
Thursday and Saturdays in Madison Street Park in
Marianna.
)) Heaven's Garden Worship Center, a DCF Ac-
cess Community Partner Network Site for Jackson
County residents, has services available Tuesdays
and Thursdays, 9 a.m. to noon. Hablamos Espaniol.
Call 579-9963; ..: t ,'a .%iad .i pi3 c rg
) Optimist Club of Jackson County meeting,
noon, first and third Tuesdays, Jim's Buffet & Grill,
Marianna.
) Free quilting/crocheting/knitting class led
by Mary Deese, 1 p.m. at Jackson County Senior
Citizeri:. 291 Optimist Drive in Marianna. Call
482-5028.
) Marianna Sit-n-Sew presented by the Jackson
County Quilters Guild, Tuesdays, 6 to 8 p.m., First
United Methodist Church Youth Hall, Clinton Street,
behind Marianna Post Office. Call 272-7068.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open meeting, 8 to 9
p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901 Caledo-
nia St., Marianna, in the AA room.

WEDNESDAY, AUG. 3
Jackson County Habitat for Humanity
Warehouse hours: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
) East Jackson County Economic Development
Council will conduct a ribbon cutting ceremony for
Smthn & Son Auto & Diesel Repair, 10 a.m. at 1962
Porter Ave. in Grand Ridge; and the EJCEDC will rec-
ognize its August Business of the Month, Blondie's
Food and Fuel, 10:30 a.m. at 6909 Highway 90 in
Grand Ridge.


The submission deadline for this calendar is two days before publication. Submit to: Community Calendar, Jackson County Floridan, P. 0. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447,
email editorial@jcfloridan.com, fax (850) 482-4478 or bring items to 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.


Police Roundup


MARIANNA POLICE
DEPARTMENT
The Marianna Police De-
partment listed the following
incidents for July 25, the latest
available report: One aban-
doned vehicle, one reckless
driver, two sus-
picious vehicles, /.- ,-,
four suspicious t- :.
persons, one es- Rc ME
cort, one high- z -- E
way obstruc-
tion, one mentally ill person,
one physical disturbance, one
burglar alarm, 11 traffic stops,


three larceny complaints, two
juvenile complaints, two animal
complaints, one retail theft, one
assist of another agency and
one public service call.

JACKSON COUNTY
SHERIFF'S OFFICE
The Jackson County Sheriff's
Office and county Fire/Rescue
reported the following incidents
for July 25, the latest available
report. (Some of these calls may
be related to after-hours calls
taken on behalf of Graceville
and Cottondale police depart-


ments): Two accidents, one
missing juvenile, two suspi-
cious vehicles, two suspicious
persons, one highway obstruc-
tion, one burglary, four verbal
disturbances, one fire, four drug
offenses, 14 medical calls, one
fire alarm, 21 traffic stops, two
criminal mischief complaints,
one civil dispute, one found/
abandoned property report,
one juvenile complaint, one
assault, one animal complaint,
one fraud report, two assists of
motorists/pedestrians, three
assists of other agencies, three
child abuse reports, two public


service calls, four criminal
registrations and one open
door/window checked.

JACKSON COUNTY
CORRECTIONAL FACILITY
No one was booked into the
county jail during the latest
reporting period.

JAIL POPULATION: 217

To report a crime, call CrimeStoppers
at 526-5000 or a local law enforcement
agency. To report a wildlife violation, call
1-888-404-FWCC (3922).


I- 1~1_~~~-~-~1~ _


1-2A WEDNESDAY, JULY 27, 2011


WAKE-UP CALL









JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Auxiliary holds meeting, changes bylaws

Special to the Floridan '..


The Jackson Hospital
Auxiliary's general meeting
was July 8 in the confer-
ence room of the Hudnall
Building.
JHA President Elizabeth
Ann Ward called the meet-
ing to order at 11:30 a.m.
She then welcomed fellow
JHA members, honorary
member Hilda Pittman,
and members of the Chipo-
la Dulcimers Association.
After the traditional
meeting opening, attend-
ees shared a meal that
was prepared and served
by hospital food staff, and
CDA members played a se-
lection of music.
After members voted on
four changes to the JHA
bylaws, Ward announced
that the changes would be
printed and given to mem-
bers for placement in their
handbook.
JHA Education Day is
Thursday, Aug. 11 for all
members. A program will
be presented from 9 to 11
a.m. in the Hudnall Build-
ing conference room.
The next JHA general
meeting is set for Friday,
Oct. 7.
Flower arrangement win-
ners at the July 8 meeting
were Dorothy Peters, Ella
Mae Harris and Malinda
Hudnall; and the arrange-
ment from the head table
was given to CDA Director
Joyce Shores.


-.~---- ~ ~ i r i M 1I i r ~ ~ ~ '' .~I


SUBMITTED PHOTOS


Chipola Dulcimers Association members provide musical entertainment for the July 8 general meeting of the Jackson Hospital Auxiliary.


Flower arrangement winners at the July 8 general meeting of the Jackson Hospital Auxiliary are (from left) Dorothy Peters, Malinda Hudnall and Ella Mae
Harris,


Law firm hosts educational seminar


Special to the Floridan

On Saturday, June 25, The
Gilbert Firm sponsored a
free educational counsel-
ing seminar in Marianna.
The seminar covered a
myriad of topics includ-
ing setting goals, imple-
menting future plans, and
financing a student's edu-
cation. The seminar was
attended by students rang-
ing from the seventh grade
up to students seeking
admission into technical,
undergraduate and post-
graduate programs.
In addition, The Gilbert
Firm donated a total of
$1,000 to the youth depart-
ments of the McChapel
African Methodist Epis-
copal Church and the Mt.
Zion Missionary- Baptist
Church.
The program was hosted
by attorney LaDray Gilbert
at the McChapel A.M.E.
Church in Marianna. Fa-
cilitators Andrew Colvin,
Kevin Matthews and Jared
Fields each made a pre-
sentation to the students.


I"W 11' III T I"-I,-I ,
Students, presenters and guests gather at the McChapel A.M.E. Church in Marianna on June 25
for a free educational counseling seminar.


During his presentation,
Colvin, a retired education
counselor with the De-
partment of the Air Force,
urged students to start
preparing for their futures
early by mapping out their
plans and seeking grants
and scholarships for their
education. Colvin also re-
minded the students of
the importance of remain-
ing spiritually grounded
through life's journey.
Matthews, an engineer
with the Department of
the Navy, challenged the
students to take charge of


Kimbrel-Duncan

reunion will be Aug. 28


Special to the Floridan .

The Kimbrel-Duncan
family reunion will be in
the clubhouse of Sam At-
kins Park in Blountstown
on Sunday, Aug. 28.
The park is located on
Highway 20 West, and
attendees of previous re-


unions are asked to take
note of the change in
location.
Organizers say the event
will begin around 11 a.m.
Participants are asked
to bring a covered dish
and photos to share. Ice
and paper goods will be
provided.


Florida Lottery

Mon (E) 7/25 8*2-1 4.3.8.7 410 11-1520
Mon. (M) 79-6 8.778
Tue. (E) 7/26 7.9-1 0.09-3 Not available
Tue (M) 9-3-3 3.3.0 3
Wed (E) 7/20 7-6-2 4.3-3-0 22-27-31-32-36


Wed (M)


7-9-9 4*5 ?3


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their futures by first taking
charge of themselves. Mat-
thews explained that the
only way to properly sculpt
a desirable future is to take
charge of oneself today.
The last presenter of the
day, Leon County Demo-
cratic Party district repre-
sentative Jared, Fields, 25,
lent a fresh perspective
as a recent college gradu-
ate about what it takes to
reach the goal of higher
education. He directed the
students to seek out men-
tors and to closely align
themselves with peers who


have similar goals.
After the program, Gil-
bert presented two checks
for $500 each to Mt. Zion
and McChapel Churches,
respectively. The money,
donated in the name of
The Gilbert Firm, The Lew-
is-Gilbert initiative, and
Omega Psi Phi Fraternity
Inc., was given to be used
by the youth departments
of those churches.
Refreshments were
served and students were
able to speak to the pre-
senters individually for ad-
ditional counseling.


Divorces
) Barbara Powell vs.
Othia Lee Powell Sr.
) Heather Dawn Yeat-
man vs. Leonard Clifton
Yeatman.
) Penny Denise" Wat-
kins vs. John Michael
Alexander.
) Crystal Lynn Johnson
vs. Trent Lee Johnson.
) Dianna Rena Brown vs.
Randolph Glover Brown.
)) Sheila Dowling vs. Dean
Dowling.


Special to the Floridan


Marriages and divorces
as reported for the week of.
July 18-22.
Marriages
) Suzane Spears Con-
ner and Richard Freddy
Hatcher.
) Tanya Crishelle Fussell
and Ryan Kip McKenzie.
)) Margarita Gutierrez and
Francisco Gomez Perez.
)) Joshua Allen Biggs and
Amanda L. Shields.


Bridge club results


Special to the Floridan

The Marianna Duplicate
Bridge Club plays bridge
every Monday afternoon
in the St. Luke's Episcopal
Church Parish Hall.
For the week of July
25, the winners were as


follows:
) First place John
Lewis and Libby Hutto
) Second place -,- Kurt
Opfermann and Douglas
Parker
)) Third place Dorothy
Baxter and Jane Sangaree.


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WEDNESDAY, JULY 27, 2011 3AF


LOCAL















Publisher
VALERIA ROBERTS

Managing Editor
MICHAEL BECKER


An unwelcome.'



Awelcom unwelcome



welcome
W th Dozier now closed, the rhain question on
most residents' minds is what is going to hap-
pen to the property.
But there is another question that also needs to be ad-
dressed what is going to be done about the eyesore
the vacant property has become?
Dozier is located off one of the two interstate exits
that lead directly into Marianna. Travelers approaching
the city along Penn Avenue are greeted by tall, chainlink
fences and yards and yards of razor wire.
While that may have been acceptable when Dozier
was in use, it now presents a poor welcome to people
driving in to Marianna.
We have not heard what plans, if any, the state has in
store for Dozier. However, we would ask that if there are
no short- to medium-term plans to use it as a detention
facility, the least the state could do is remove the razor
wire and some of the extra fencing.
Like Jackson County, Marianna is going to have to
find new industries and new ways of creating jobs. If
the corrections industry is no longer part of the city's
economy, there's little point in leaving such unsightly
infrastructure in full view of people entering the city.


Editor

Trial shakes faith in the justice system
It's a travesty of justice, when we view the end results
of the Casey Anthony trial a beautiful little girl tossed
on the side of the road, like trash; a mother with no
regard or care for a daughter, living life to the fullest, for
herself only; and a judicial system that has failed the
people of this country, Caley, her grandparents, and all
parents:
The facts tell us the results, and they are clear. No.
assumptions, just facts, as followed: for 31 days a child
was missing, nowhere to be found, the mother was
dancing, partying, enjoying life as expressed clearly in a
tattoo (the beautiful life), the responsible caregiver for
her daughter by law. Thirty-one days, yet not guilty of
negligent child abuse. .'
What is the definition of child abuse? What part of that
was not understood by the jury? What message is the
court sending to the people of this country?
And now Casey Anthony is on the verge of gaining a
large sum of money for her situation.
A travesty of justice, her lawyer gaining financial suc-
cess -it is disgraceful. What more needs to be said?
I've lost all faith and respect for our court system.
There is no justice, not anymore.
How long will our country endure with shameful acts?
God only knows.
We will soon know, because things will get worse long
before they are ever good again.
WILLIAM MCDONALD
Greenwood

S.t. 'representatives


Florida Legislaturp
Rep. Marti Coley, R-District 7
Marti.Coley@myfloridahouse.gov
Building A, Room 186 Chipola College
3094 Indian Circle
Marianna, FL 32446-1701

Rep. Brad Drake, R-District 5
Brad.Drake@myfloridahouse.gov
NWFL State-Chautauqua Canipus #205
908 U.S. Highway 90 West
DeFuniak Springs, FL 32433-1436


Letters to the Editor
Submit letters by either mailingto Editor, P.O. Box 520,.
Marianna FL, 32447 or ta, ing to 850-482-4478'-r send
email to editorial@jcfloridancom. The Floridan reserves
the right to edit or not publish any letter. Be sure to
include your full address and telephone number, These
will only be used to verify the letter and will not be
printed. For more information call (850) 526-3614.


2


Vi point



Corporations leave



recession, jobless behind


BY DALE MCFEATTERS

throughout the entire debt-
ceiling debate, Republicans
have been adamant about
increasing government revenues:
They're against it, whether through
tax increases, loophole closings or
ending wasteful subsidies.
Their solution is spending cuts,
spending cuts, spending cuts
- which is fine as far as it goes.
But this tactic quickly runs into the
law of diminishing returns, and at
some stage may do actual harm to
the country.
Their other answer, more wish
than actual solution, is a sustained
period of really robust economic
growth, which would be great if
we could make it happen, but we
may be waiting a long time for that
particular train to arrive.
Any meaningful deficit-reduction
program will require a mixture of
spending cuts and revenue increas-
es tax hikes, if you will.
Hard-core Republicans argue that
tax increases, even relatively mod-


est ones, would be "job-killing" and
bring economic growth to a halt.
New corporate-earnings reports
cast great doubt on that argument.
The Wall Street Journal reports
that profits are the highest they've
been in four years among S&P
500 companies posting earnings
through the first four months of the
year.
Three-quarters of the companies
reported beating analysts' expecta-
tions. And an S&P analyst pre-
dicted "the second half will be even
stronger."
That's the good news. The bad
news, according to the Journal: "Yet
there is little indication that the
strong results will jump-start the
U.S. economy and get the millions
of Americans idled by the recession
back to work."
The Associated Press calls the
profit reports "the latest proof that
booming profits have allowed Cor-
porate America to leave the Great
Recession far behind."
Also left behind are those who
want work and can't get it the


unemployment rate is 9.2 percent
- even though corporations are
sitting on $1.9 trillion in cash.
The decisions of where to invest
and when to hire are best left to the
companies.
Those big profits indicate the S&P
500 know what they're doing, and
maybe some time soon that good
fortune will trickle down to the
jobless.
In the meantime, those profits
numbers indicate America's corpo-
rations are in a position to kick into
the revenue side of the debt-reduc-
tion equation, instead of leaving
middle- and lower-income Ameri-
cans to bear the brunt of spending
cuts.
The AP notes that corporate
profits accounted for an 88 percent
increase in economic growth dur-
ing the first 18 months following
the end of the recession.
Modest tax hikes wouldn't be job-
killing if companies are hiring in
the first place, and as for impeding
economic growth, they would be
barely a speed bump.


Candidates outsourcing their brains


BY COKIE AND STEVEN V. ROBERTS


Jon Huntsman probably won't
win the Republican nomination
for president, but he's already
made a useful contribution to the
campaign season. Unlike other
Republican contenders, the former
Utah governor refuses to sign any
pledge that would limit his future
flexibility.
"I don't sign pledges," Huntsman
likes to say, "other than the Pledge
of Allegiance and a pledge to my
wife."
Huntsman's wisdom is visible
every day in Washington. Pledges
introduce an ideological rigid-
ity into the legislative debate that
paralyzes the process. In fact, the
whole point of an oath is to cripple
the system and prevent lawmakers
from finding the common ground
that makes governing possible.
Pledge-mania reflects one of the
worst ideas to infect the capital
since we started covering politics:,
that compromise is not only wrong
but also evil. It denies the ability of
lawmakers to grow and change, to
learn from experience and experts
and one another.
But compromise is not evil, it's
essential, and the fight over raising
the debt ceiling shows exactly how
damaging pledge-mania can be.
Almost all Republicans have signed
an oath, promoted by a group
called Americans for Tax Reform, to
oppose any tax increase of any kind
for any reason. Period.
So it doesn't matter that every
independent study on reducing the
budget deficit recommends a com-
bination of new reverntes and pro-
gram cuts. Republicans are locked
into an unbending and unworkable
position before the debate even
begins. They deny, from the outset,


the only possible basis for a reason-
'able compromise. As one Repub-
lican freshman, Rep. Bill Huizenga
of Michigan, candidly told The New
York Times, "There's more willing-
ness to drive off the cliff." Drive off
a cliff? Is that a responsible way to
approach your job?
While pledge-mania is largely a
Republican affliction, some Demo-
crats are almost as intransigent. A
liberal pressure group, the Progres-
sive Change Campaign Committee,
claims to have collected 200,000
promises from Democratic lbyalists
vowing not to campaign for Presi-
dent Obama's re-election if he signs
onto a budget deal that includes
cuts in entitlements.
Nancy Pelosi, the House Demo-
cratic leader, insists that any
changes to Medicare and Social
Security are "absolutely" out of
bounds and adds, "It is a flag that
we've planted that we will protect
and defend." But planting flags is
like signing pledges. Both actions
take reason and good sense off the
negotiating table.
Oath-taking is not a new idea.
Americans for Tax Reform has been
around for decades, but this year
the whole concept has exploded.
Candidates are being pressured to
oppose a range of sins, as defined
by the pledge-writers: from infidel-
ity and pornography to abortion
and gay marriage. One pledge
commits Republican lawmak-
ers to oppose any increase in the
debt ceiling unless Congress also
passes a constitutional amend-
ment requiring a balanced budget.
Since that will never happen, any
signer is automatically joining the
cliff-driving caucus.
ITwo sparks ignited this explo-
sion. One is the growing distrust of
Washington in general and Con-


gress in particular. In poll figures
compiled by the website Real Clear
Politics, fewer than one in five
voters viewed Congress favorably,
and for good reason. All too often,
lawmakers seem incapable of
grappling with the problems that
matter to most Americansi
But the answer to congressio-
nal stagnation is to remove their
ideological shackles, not add new
ones. Pledge-mania profoundly
misunderstands the nature of
representative government. Yes,
lawmakers are obligated to reflect
their constituents, but they are also
obligated to inform and educate
and lead them. The British states-
man Edmund Burke was exactly
right in 1774 when he famously
told his voters in Bristol, "Your
representative owes you, not his in-
dustry only, but his judgment; and
he betrays, instead of serving.you,
if he sacrifices it to your opinion."
The second cause of pledge-ma-
nia is the growing impulse to view
politics as a branch of theology. In
this mindset, faith matters more
than facts.
Making unbreakable promises is
a lot easier when you are untrou-
bled by doubt and have nothing to
learn.
So conservatives feel free to "drive
off the cliff" on the debt-ceiling is-
sue because, they insist, the experts
are all wrong and fears of a default
are overblown. Liberals have their
own orthodoxies that defy reality:
Social spending never has to be
reformed, for example, or free trade
costs American jobs.
USA Today was right in saying,
"Candidates who sign pledges out-
source their brains," but it's wtually
worse than that. lBy giving up their
capacity for judgment, they are
outsourcing their hearts as well.


-' *^' -- -' . : .' -' ,* 2a. 7*^ ',^ ;^ !:*^ :*-'"a;. ,=', *' ; .' ;*'.. t1", '" : *', ,. . .';* "- : ,,
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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Florida PSC rejects power conservation plans


The Associated Press

TALIAHASSEE Regu-
lators on Tuesday rejected
plans by the state's two
largest power compa-
nies to give more breaks
to customers who install
high-efficiency appliances
and take other conserva-
tion steps because they
think energy-saving goals
for Florida's electric utili-
ties may be too hard to
achieve:
The Public Service Com-
mission also asked its staff
to begin the process of re-
considering those goals for
all five of Florida's inves-
tor-owned utilities as well
as two large municipal
systems.
The commission unani-
mously voted against staff
recommendations to ap-
prove beefed-up demand-
side conservation plans
for Florida Power & Light
Co. and Progress Energy
Florida.
Instead, it let both utili-
ties continue with existing
programs although they
fail to meet conservation


goals set by the panel be-
fore four of the five com-
missioners were replaced
last year.
The new FPL plan would
have met its goal. The
Progress proposal still
would have fallen short al-
though coming closer than
the present program.
The rejected proposals
would have slightly in-
creased overall rates but
given customers a chance
to reduce their power bills
by participating in new
programs such as energy
surveys and financial in-
centives for weatheriza-
tion and buying. more ef-
ficient appliances and air
conditioners.
The 10-year goals ad-
opted in 2009 were signifi-
cantly stronger than the
utilities had proposed but
weaker than what environ-
mentalists sought.
Commissioner Ronald
Brise, who was a state rep-
resentative when the Legis-
lature passed a law requir-
ing the goals in 2008, said
lawmakers had expected
solar power and other re-


- .t. -...


"The problem of setting
a goal that's too high is
that you'll going to have
to joffr programs that
not everybody can take
advantage of".
Dianne Triplett,
Progress Energy lawyer

newable energy sources
to be major players in the
state's energy policy, but
that hasn't happened.
"It's almost unfair to look
at this from the perspective
of we are going to achieve
all of this efficiency strictly
through" demand-side
conservation, Brise said.
Commissioner Eduardo
Balbis said delaying the
need for new power plants
for two years in the case
of Progress Energy wasn't
worth the cost of the con-
servation program to
consumers.
The Progress Energy plan
was expected increase its
current monthly conserva-
tion fee by $1.49 to $4.73
for a home using 1,200


kilowatt hours, which is
about average.
The charge would have
increased to $6.13 in
2014.
FPL's proposal would
have increased its con-
servation fee by $1.44 to
$3.70 per month for 1,200
kilowatt hours. It would
have topped out at $4.11
in 2014.
Progress Energy lawyer
Dianne Triplett told the
commissioners the utility's
proposal would have re-
sulted in some customers
subsidizing others.
"The problem of setting
a goal that's too high is
that you're going to have
to offer programs that not
everybody can take advan-
tage of," Triplett said. "A
lot of our customers don't
have pools so they can't
take advantage of a pool
pump yet they may be
paying for that."
Representatives of the
Southern Alliance for
Clean Energy questioned
why Progress Energy's
proposal cost more than
other utilities' plans yet it


still wouldn't have met the
company's goal. Triplett
said the cost was greater
because the commis-
sion set a higher goal for
Progress.
Alliance lawyer Leon Ja-
cobs said setting the goals
was controversial' and re-
considering them "would
not be a simple process."
Public Counsel J.R. Kelly,
the state's consumer ad-
vocate for utility matters,
took no position. He said
some consumers favor
more conservation and are
willing to pay for it while
others say they cannot af-
ford to pay a dime more.
"Times are hard out
there," Kelly said.
Vicki Kaufman, a lawyer
for the Florida Industrial
Power Users Group, said
the proposals would have
added thousands of dol-
lars and in some cases
hundreds of thousands of
dollars to the bills of her
members including NASA,
hospitals and grocery
stores.
That kind of increase
could make the difference


in whether businesses lo-
cate or expand in Florida,
she said.
"We need to take a hard
look at whether now is the
time to impose those kinds
of costs," she said.
The Florida Senate last
year refused to confirm
two commissioners and
a legislatively controlled
nominating panel declined
to consider the reappoint-
ment of two others after
the panel rejected big rate
increases sought by FPL
and Progress Energy.
The ousted commis-
sioners and former Gov.
Charlie Crist, who ap-
pointed them, said it was
retaliation for denying the
rate hikes. Leaders of the
Republican-controlled
Legislature denied those
accusations.
The commission already
has approved conserva-
tion plans based on the
new goals for Gulf Power
Co., Tampa Electric Co.,
Florida Public Utilities
Co., Jacksonville's JEA
and the Orlando Utilities
Commission.


State
Briefs


Advocacy group:
overfishing cost
fishermen
ORLANDO A new
study from an advocacy
group shows that overfish-
ing two years ago cost mil-
lions of dollars for fisher-
men in the Gulf of Mexico
and South Atlantic.
The study released
Monday by the Pew
Environment Group says
Gulf fishermen lost $12.3
million and South Atlantic
fishermen were out $2.9
million because of de-
pleted populations of red
snapper and gag grouper.
The study says revenues
could have been 16-32
percent higher if not for
the population declines.


The study is being
released weeks before
fishery managers will
consider new protections
for gag grouper in the Gulf
and new catch limits on
dozens of species.
A congressional com-
mittee in Washington also
is weighing in Tuesday on
fishing bans.
The House subcommit-
tee will hear from fisher-
men who claim bans are
hurting their jobs.

Liberty counsel to
file appeal on 10
Commandments
TALLAHASSEE The
attorney representing
Dixie County is appealing


a federal court ruling that
ordered county officials to
remove a granite monu-
ment of the Ten Com-
mandments from in front
of the county courthouse
at Cross City.
The attorney arguing
the case on behalf of the
county, Mathew Staver
from the Liberty Counsel,
says he will file notice of
appeal Tuesday with the
11th U.S. Circuit Court of
Appeals in Atlanta.
The Dixie County Com-
mission voted unani-
mously last week to ap-
peal Judge Maurice Paul's
decision requiring the six-
ton granite monument be
removed. Commissioners
also are seeking a stay on
the order the monument


be removed by the middle
of August.
Paul decided in favor of
the American Civil Liber-
ties Union Florida which
brought the suit in 2007.

Man pleads no
contest in fatal
hit-and-run
JACKSONVILLE
- A Neptune Beach man
pleaded no contest to a
hit-and-run crash that
killed a Navy pilot last
year.
By entering the plea
Tuesday, 29-year-old
Gregory Matthew Jacobs
avoided a trial. He faces 15
years in prison when Cir-
cuit Judge Adrian G. Soud


sentences him Sept. 9.
Lt. Robert Huish was
biking with friends Nov. 28
when he was hit by a car.
He died days later.
Huish was a helicop-
ter pilot who returned
last summer from a
seven-month Persian Gulf
deployment.


Police found Huish
by matching car parts
scattered at the scene to
three types of SUVs. They
compiled a list of 100 such
cars in the area and began
knocking on doors. He
was arrested in December.

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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


-16A WEDNESDAY, JULY 27, 2011


Hospital files $9.2 million


claim for treatment

The Associated Press


TAMPA Tampa General Hospital has
filed a $9.2 million claim against the es-
tate of a woman who died after spending
five years in the hospital, according to
Hillsborough County court documents.
In court documents, that's how much
the hospital says is owed for the care
of Tameka Jaqway Campbell. She died at
age 29 two years ago of progressive de-
myelinating neuropathy, which occurs
when the immune cells attack the body's
nerves.
It's unclear whether the $9.2 million in
hospital charges is a record. Health News
Florida checked with the American Hos-
pital Association, the Health Care Finan-
cial Management Association and nu-
merous others. No one knew anyone who
keeps track.
"That would have to be the biggest bill
I've heard of," said Alan Levine, a division
president at the Naples-based hospital
chain Health Management Associates.
"I've seen more than $1 million," he
said. "But not 9 million."
Fort Myers hospital consultant Peter
Young said, "A bill that large may well
be in a league of its own and a Guinness
Book of records bill!"
Could be. An online search at the Guin-
ness Book of World Records offers no cat-
egory for "largest hospital bill."
A spokeswoman for Guinness World
Records said the organization will have to
do a search to see if there's a related cat-
egory for such an item.
Meanwhile, consultant Young said,
without knowing any details, that the case
is unusual. Hospital officials must believe
there are resources against which a claim
can be made, he said.
There aren't, said Campbell's mother
Holly Bennett.
"If they think they're getting money
from me they're crazy," she said. "Who's
ever even heard of a bill that high?"
Bennett thinks the lawsuit is punitive, to
prevent her from filing a wrongful-death
lawsuit against the hospital.
"They're trying to make me go. away,"
she said. "They're trying to cover up for
the'mistreatment of my daughter."
Bennett has a YouTube channel


"If they think they're getting
money from me they're
crazy. Who's ever even heard
of a bill that high?"
Holly Bennett,
Mother of former patient at Tampa General


with videos that accuse the hospital of not
feeding Campbell and of giving her too
much morphine. The combina-
tion caused Campbell to drop to 37
pounds, Bennett says.
The videos show a young woman, pre-
sumably Tameka, lying in a hospital bed
hooked up to tubes, including what ap-
pears to be a feeding tube.
Tampa General spokesman John Dunn
said he can't comment on patient cases.
The hospital never sent an actual bill for
its charges, Bennett said. Instead it filed
the list of charges on its claim against the
estate.
Guardianship records at the Hillsbor-
ough County Courthouse show that the
court removed Bennett as her daughter's
health care surrogate and appointed
a professional guardian. It's unclear
from the documents why Bennett was
removed.
The attorney representing Tampa Gen-
eral said he could not comment. Bennett
does not have an attorney.
But if she acquires one and pushes
forward with a wrongful death suit, the
parties will either haggle and settle out-
of-court or a jury and judgment would
decide how much money goes to the
mother, the estate or the hospital, said
South Florida attorney John Kelner.
Barry Dubinsky, a medical malpractice
attorney in Coral Springs, said hospitals
frequently file claims against the estate
of a patient who has died and has unpaid
bills.
"Technically, you have to file in case the
estate gets funded, then you've got your
hand in the pot," he said of Tampa Gen-
eral. "It's business, it's all business. The
hospital is just trying to get their money."


LOOKING FOR MORE NEWS? VISIT

WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM


Florida Supreme Court


stays Valle's execution


The Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE A
sharply divided Florida
Supreme Court stayed
the execution of convict-
ed killer Manuel Valle on
Monday so a judge can
hear evidence and rule on
whether he may feel pain
from the use of a new le-
thal injection drug.
The justices, in a 4-3 de-
cision,, delayed Valle's ex-
ecution for a month, from
Aug. 2 until Sept. 1, absent
further order of the high
court.
Valle, 61, was convicted
of fatally shooting 41-
year-old Coral Gables po-
lice officer Luis Pena dur-
ing a traffic stop 33 years
ago.
Florida and several oth-
er states have been forced
to seek alternatives to so-
dium thiopental, part of a
three-drug cocktail used
in lethal injections, be-
cause the sedative's sole
U.S. manufacturer has
stopped making it..
Florida last month ad-
opted a new procedure
that substitutes pento-
barbital, which would be
injected first to render
the convict unconscious
before the next two drugs
are administered.
Oklahoma began us-
ing the drug last year and
other states have followed
suit. It has been employed
in 18 executions this
year but none so far in
Florida.
Valle's lawyers contend
the new drug's use will
subject him to "substan-
tial risk of harm" because
it has never been tested
on humans for purposes
of inducing an anesthetic
coma.
"The court has deter-
mined that Valle's claim
as to the use of pento-
barbital as an anesthetic


in the amount prescribed
by Florida's protocol war-
rants an evidentiary hear-
ing," the majority justices
wrote in an unsigned
order.
They cited a 2007 Su-
preme Court ruling that
said if an inmate is not ful-
ly unconscious before the
second and third drugs
- pancuronium bromide
and potassium chloride
- are injected "the pris-
oner will suffer pain." ,
Chief Justice Charles
Canady wrote in dissent
that Valle is not entitled
to a fact-finding hearing
because his claims about
pentobarbital are not
based on hard evidence.
"Based on specula-
tion and conjecture, Valle
claims the right to judicial
micromanaging of the ex-
ecution process," Canady
wrote. "He has no such
right."
Justices Ricky Polston
and R. Fred Lewis joined
in the dissent.
Marketed as Nembutal,
pentobarbital is used as
a sedative in some sur-
geries, as a hypnotic for
short-term treatment of
insomnia and to control
certain kinds of seizures
including those related to
cholera, meningitis and
an emergency state of
epilepsy.
Valle's appeal will return
to Circuit Judge Jacque-
line Hogan Scola in Mi-


ami to hear evidence on
the new drug and make a
ruling. She had previously
declined to hold such a
hearing. The Supreme
Court gave her until 2 p.m.
Aug. 5 to issue a decision.
Lawyers then will have
through Aug. 19 to file
written arguments and re-.
sponses. The justices will
hold oral arguments Aug.
24 "if necessary."
Gov. Rick Scott signed
Valle's death warrant last
month, the-first for the Re-
publican governor since
taking office in January.
Since the warrant was
signed, federal judges
have stayed executions in
two other states based on
similar allegations regard-
ing the constitutionality
of lethal injections using
pentobarbital.
U.S. District Judge
Gregory L. Frost delayed
the execution of Kenneth
Wayne Smith after de-
termining Ohio enforces
some of its execution poli-
cies haphazardly.
An appeal court last
week, though, vacated the
stay of Robert Jackson III's
execution in Delaware be-
cause U.S. District Judge
Sue Robinson failed to
give a reason for putting it
on hold. Jackson is sched-
uled to die Friday, but two
court hearings are set for
Wednesday that could de-
termine if the execution
goes forward.


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Grant
From Page 1A
Students eligible to participate
in the STEM programs funded
through the grant must have been
recommended by their instruc-
tors, have scored either a 4 or a 5
on the math and science portions
of the FCAT, and must have been
identified by their school districts
as gifted or talented.
The district must follow state
guidelines in determining wheth-
er a student is gifted, but the edu-
cationally "talented" criteria is
currently being written by PAEC
and will be completed in the first
quarter of the three-year grant
program. Mitchell said a typical
example of an eligible talented
person might be a hard-working
student who makes all A's on their
report cards, but who does not
test as gifted.
Mitchell said the Race to the
Top program will be directed by
Brenda Crouch, a Jackson County
resident and long-time Marianna
High School teacher who now
works for PAEC.
More virtual coursework
In conjunction with the grant,
the consortium is also working to
establish a franchise agreement
which would allow it to offer addi-
tional, virtual courses to the vari-
ous school districts. Mitchell ex-
plained that the virtual programs
will not be funding through the
grant, but are being put in place at
the same time because the virtual
courses- geared to advanced
math, science, technology and
engineering courses can work
hand-in-hand with the purpose
of grant.
The consortium would put-
chase the virtual programs.
from the existing Florida Virtual


Bust
From Page 1A

conducted by the Florida Depart-
ment of Law Enforcement found
they contained multiple illegal
substances. The lab tests deter-
mined theywere forms of synthet-
ic marijuana and also contained
illegal ingredients found in "bath
salts," sometimes referred to as
synthetic methamphetamine.
According to the news release,
the items were selling for $16 for
one and a half grams, and $50 for
10 grams.
The drug task force execut-
ed search warrants Monday at
Chipola Mart, at the intersection
of Lafayette Street and Milton Av-
enue, and the Mobil Food Mart
at the intersection of Jefferson
Street and Kelson Avenue. The
search warrants were the result of


School program. The participat-
ing districts would reimburse the
consortium for a portion of the
cost of teachers who present the
courses. Mitchell said this could
give smaller schools the chance to
offer physics, for example. These
districts could not reasonably be
expected to absorb the cost alone
if they were paying a traditional
classroom teacher, but they could
pay a portion of the salary for a
teacher online.
The other 12 North Florida
school districts covered in the
grant are Walton, Holmes, Wash-
ington, Gadsden, Calhoun, Liber-
'ty, Gulf, Franklin, Wakulla, Taylor,
Jefferson and Madison counties.
Graceville High begins
STEM course
Graceville High School prin-
cipal Chris Franklin said a new
course of study oriented to the
state's STEM program, will begin
this August at his school.
"It's being done through our ag-
riculture program," Franklin said.
"We've been doing ag technology,
but this year we will start an ag-
riculture biotechnology program.
It consists of two courses that
will help students earn a credit
in science and possibly replace
one of the high school sciences.
It's geared to helping them pass
end-of-course exams in biology
and get the students participat-
ing to then take another science
course."
Without the grant, Graceville
High would not have been able to
contemplate doing this.
"We've been blessed with a
great deal of grant money to buy
the equipment and train a teach-
er," he said. "The teacher will be
working with a science consultant
to make sure he or she is teaching
the target science skills, and is do-
ing what's needed to supplement


"multiple purchases of synthetic
marijuana and drug parapherna-
lia" from both locations by under-
cover law enforcement.
At Chipola Mart, more than 252
packets of alleged synthetic mari-
juana were seized, with a retail
value of $7,600.
Task force officers also seized
more than 100 pipes, capable of
being used to smoke synthetic
and real marijuana, as well as
meth and crack cocaine. In addi-
tion, 68 grinders used to prepare
marijuana were seized, along
with 58 digital scales and thou-
sands of small plastic bags used
for packaging.
According to the news release,
the owner of Chipola Mart,
Dineshkumar Prajapati, as well
as two' clerks, Mukeshkumar Pra-
japati and Chaudhari Ghanshy-
ambai, were charged with one
count each of distribution of drug
paraphernalia. Mukeshkumar


"We're hoping it will appeal to a wide range of
students...This is the type of thing that college-
bound students would want to go into, certainly."
Chris Franklin,
Principal of Graceville High School


and help those taught in the other
science courses."
Franklin. said the courses will
be open to all students, not just
those on an agriculture-related.
track.
"Actually, the ag teacher is hop-
ing it will bring in some other stu-
dents he doesn't normally get,"
Franklin said. "We're hoping it
will appeal to a wide range of stu-
dents, starting with ninth graders.
This is the type of thing that col-
lege-bound students would want
to go into, certainly. This, coupled
with chemistry, will help them
do well in their advanced science
courses in their senior year, so
we're hoping the ninth graders
will go on and get into it.
"We hope our eighth graders
take agri-science foundations,
too, so they'd be prepared to start
this in their next year. The sub-
ject matter will center on things
like cell structure, genetics, ani-
mal health, anatomy, and on
into medicine. We won't have any
"Dollies' at Graceville," he said,
referring to the study of cloning.
"But the course will give students
a little deeper study of everything
from genetics to anatomy. It's
something that potential medical
students would definitely want to
sign up for, and people who want
to work with animals in any way
can learn a lot from this."
STEM going district-wide
The Jackson County School
District is working toward offer-


Prajapati was also charged with
two more counts of distribution
of drug paraphernalia; Ghanshy-
ambnai was given an additional
charge of distribution of drug
paraphernalia, and two counts of
sale of a controlled substance.
At Mobil Food Mart, task force
officers seized more than 200
packets of alleged synthetic mari-
juana with a retail value of $5,600.
The task force also seized more
than 100 pipes, eight grinders and
six digital scales.
* Three Mobil Ford Mart employ-
ees were charged. Faisal Mukhtar
faces two counts of sale of a con-
trolled substance, three counts of
distribution of drug parapherna-
lia, and possession of a controlled
substance. Kimberly Louise Win-
ston faces two counts of sale of
a controlled substance, and one
count each of distribution of drug
paraphernalia and possession of
a controlled substance. Autumn


ing additional courses' in science,
technology, engineering and
jnath, according to Michael Kilts,
the district supervisor of federal
programs.
He writes many of the grants
the district seeks at the federal
and state levels. He said the dis-
trict got-a $891,000 "Race to the
Top" grant in the early part of
2011; some of the money was
used to buy additional computers
at all secondary schools. Gracev-
ille's STEM program will also be
funded out of this grant, and the
district continues to work to-
ward offering additional courses
in the core STEM subject areas.
The money also helped send
several teachers to workshops
where they learned more about
the new teacher evaluation pro-
cess that will be implemented by
the state this year. They brought
that knowledge back and shared
it with their colleagues.
Kilts said he's currently working
on a software grant that would
help the schools accomplish Race
to the Top goals.
Jackson County School Super-
intendent Lee Miller said all the
STEM programs that are coming,
and those still being pursued, are
geared to "giving our students
and teachers some training on.
the higher order of thinking in the
area of science." He believes the
opportunities opened up by the
STEM program will help students
improve their science scores and
improve their knowledge base.


Leighanne Whaley faces one
count each of distribution of drug
paraphernalia and possession of
a controlled substance.
The news release goes on to
note that any person or business,
and any .employee of any busi-
ness that take part in selling any
synthetic marijuana marketed as
"Herbal Incense" and "Potpourri",
and drug- paraphernalia associ-
ated with it will be considered in
violation of the law.
The release noted the conse-
quences range from arrest with
possible prison or probation
time, possible fines, and the pos-
sibility of the seizure of property
and currency.
The Jackson County Drug Task
Force is the combined effort of
the Cottondale, Graceville, and
Marianna police departments,
the Florida Department of Law
Enforcement and the Jackson
County Sheriff's Office.


Conservative ire threatens GOP debt plan


The Associated Press

WASHINGTON -
Thwarted by conservatives
in his own Republican
Party, House Speaker John
Boehner scrambled Tues-
day to secure enough GOP
votes to beat a fast-closing
Aug. 2 deadline and stave
off the potential financial
chaos of the nation's first-
ever default.
Even with time running
out, the speaker prom-
ised to quickly rewrite his
debt-ceiling legislation
after budget officials said
it would cut spending less
than advertised. Mean-
while, public head-butt-
ing between Democratic
President Barack Obama
and the Republicans
showed no sign of eas-
ing. The White House de-
clared Obami would veto
the Boehner bill, even if it
somehow got through the
House and the Democrat-
ic-controlled Senate.
For all that, it was the tea
party-backed members of
Boehner's own party who
continued to vex him, and
heavily influence the debt
and deficit negotiating
terms not to mention
his chances of holding on
to the speakership.
Their adamant opposi-
tion to any tax increases
forced Boehner to back
away from a "grand bar-


gain" with Obama that
might have made dra-
matic cuts in govern-
ment spending. Yet when
Boehner turned this week
to a more modest cost-
cutting plan, with no tax
hikes, many conserva-
tives balked again. They
said the proposal lacked
the more potent tools they
seek, such as a constitu-
tional mandate for bal-
anced budgets.
Rep. Jim Jordan of Ohio,
chairman of a large group
of conservative Republi-
cans, sentatremorthrough
the Capitol Tuesday when
he said he doubted Boeh-
ner had enough support
to pass his plan Wednes-
day, when it is scheduled
for a vote. The Boehner
bill would require con-
gressional action to raise
the debt ceiling this sum-
mer, and again before the
2012 elections.
Obama strongly oppos-
es that last requirement,
arguing that it would, re-
open the delicate and cru-
cial debt discussions to
unending political pres-
sure during next year's
campaigns.
The president supports
a separate bill, pushed
by Majority Leader Harry
Reid in the Democratic-
controlled Senate, that
would raise the debt ceil-
ing enough to tide the gov-


ernment over through next
year and the elections.
Boehner wasn't helped
by an official congressio-
nal analysis late Tuesday
that said his plan would
produce smaller savings,
than originally promised
less than $1 trillion in
spending cuts over the
coming decade rather
than the $1.2 trillion he
estimated on Monday.
Boehner's office said it
would rewrite the legis-
lation to make sure the
spending cuts exceed the
amount the debt limit
would be raised. Adding a
political touch, it accused
the Democrats of declin-
ing to put forward specif-
ics subject to the same
sort of review.
Earlier, responding to
the conservative Repub-
lican opposition, Boeh-
ner quickly went on Rush
Limbaugh's radio show,
then he began one-on-
one chats with wavering
Republicans on the House
* floor during midday roll
call votes.
"He has to convince a
few people," Rep. Tom Pe-
tri, R-Wis., observed dryly
from a doorway.
A serious, almost dire ur-
gency ran through Boeh-
ner's efforts. The clock
was ticking down to next
Tuesday's deadline to con-
tinue the government's


Jackson County Vault & Monuments
Quality Service at Affordable Prices


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850-482-5041


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
House Mipority Leader Nancy Pelosi of Calif. (left), followed
by Rep. George Miller, D-Calif., arrives to address a rally on
Capitol Hill in Washington dn Tuesday.


borrowing powers and
avert possible defaults on
U.S. loans.
Congressional veterans
say a final-hour bargain
can't be reached until both
parties irrefutably prove to
themselves and the public
that neither the Demo-
crats' top goals nor the Re-
publicans' can be reached
in the divided Congress.


Moreover, Boehner's
grasp on the speakership
could be weakened if he
fails to pass the debt-ceil-
ing plan that bears his
name.
Assuming no more than
five Democrats support
the measure, Boehner
can afford to lose no more
than 28 of the House's 240
Republicans.


Obituaries
Evans-Skipper
Funeral Home
909 S. Tennille Ave.
Donalsonville, GA 39845
229-524-2789

Jacqueline
"Nanny" Perry

We regret to announce
the passing of Mrs. Jacque-
line "Nanny" Perry, 81, of
Grand Ridge, who passed
away July 24, 2011 at
Southeast Alabama Medi-
cal Center.
Funeral services for Mrs.
Perry will be held Thurs-
day, July 28, 2011 at 3 p.m.
Central at the Chapel of
Evans-Skipper Funeral
Home in Donalsonville,
Ga. Visitation will be held
from 6 to 8 p.m. Central
Wednesday, July 27, at
Evans-Skipper Funeral
Home. Interment will be at
Spring Creek Baptist
Chiirch Cemetery in
Donalsonville. You may
sign the guest register and
share your thoughts with
the family by visiting our
website at
www.evansskipperfh.com.
Mrs. Perry was born in
Donalsonville on Nov. 20,
1929, to the late Clifford
and Clyde Kidd Whittaker.
She was a homemaker and
a member of the Baptist
church.
Mrs. Perry is survived by
her daughters, Nancy Barks
of Grand Ridge, and Dana
Pritchard of Dothan, Ala.;
her sister, Jewel Sheppard
of Jacksonville, three
grandchildren, Peggy
Willis-Chumley and her
husband Kevin of Grand
Ridge, John Willis and his
wife Catrinia of Grand
Ridge, and Mark Willis and
his wife Tori of Marianna;
seven great-grandchildren,
April Ranew Kelly, Kyle
Sims, Kandyce Ranew,
Kristofer Ranew, Breanna
Willis, Jaden Willis and Eli
Willis; and three great-
great-grandchildren,
Colten Sims, Jed Kelly and
fake Kelly.
Mrg. Perry was preceded
in death by her parents,
Clifford and Clyde Kidd
Whittaker, and several
brothers and sisters.
Evans-Skipper Funeral
Home is in charge of the
arrangements.



FAMU
From Page 1A

community a day of fun
as a way of giving back to
a place where sp many
FAMU graduates were
raised.
Cummings, for instance,
grew up in Jackson County.
Her father worked for the
Dozier School for Boys, and
she was raised on the cam-
pus there as the daughter
of a staff member who
lived on the grounds. She
is expected to talk about
her memories of Jackson
County, on and off cam-
pus, Brown said.
Brown said Cummings
and the others will give their
brief speeches throughout
the event, and that several
activities will ble ongoing,
including games for chil-
dren, a spades tournament
for adults, bingo and door
prize drawings.

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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


THEASSOCIATED PRESS
Red roses float in the water on Tuesday close to Utoya island, where gunman Anders Behring
Breivik killed at least 68 people in Sundvollen, near Oslo, Norway.


Norway victims father



recounts last words


The Associated Press

OSLO, Norway The father of'a vic-
tim of the Norway massacre said Tuesday
his son was full. of love for people and
for the outdoors and the young man's
last words to him were "Dad, someone is
shooting."
Norwegian police on Tuesday began
releasing the names of those killed in last
week's bomb blast and massacre at a La-
bor Party youth camp, an announcement
likely to bring new collective grief to an
already reeling nation.
Police named the first four of at least
76 people dead. Although only names,
ages and hometowns were listed, it will
likely bring another shock to friends and
acquaintances just learning the names
of the victims. A 32-year-old Norwegian
man has confessed to the attacks, claim-
ing he was trying to save Europe from
what he says is Muslim colonization.
The first release listed three who were
killed in a bomb -blast in Oslo's govern-
ment quarter and one dead after the ram-
page at a Labor Party youth camp. They
were Gunnar Linaker, 23, from Bardu in
northern Norway, who was a victim of the
camp massacre; and Oslo residents Tove
Aashill Knutsen, 56; Hanna M. Orvik En-
dresen, 61; and Kai Hauge, 33.
Linaker's father told The Associated
Press by telephone that Gunnar was "a
calm, big teddy bear with lots of humor
and lots of love."
His voice weak and. trembling, Linaker
said he had been on the phone with his
son concerning another matter when the
shooting started. "He said to me: 'Dad,
dad, someone is shooting,' and then he
hung up."
That was the last he heard from his son,
Gunnar Linaker was among the wounded
and was taken to a nearby hospital, where
he died on Saturday. His 17-year-old sis-
ter also was at the camp, but somehow
survived the slaughter, he said.
Clearly still very much in shock, he de-
clined to speak any further.
Knutsen, a secretary at the union for
electricians and IT workers, had left the
office for the day and was on her way to a


subway station when the bomb exploded
in the government quarter, union head
Hans Felix said.
Normally Knutsen would go to and
from work on her bicycle, but earlier that-
day she had left it at a repair shop.
"It wasn't finished, so this day she had
to take the subway home. Tove never got
home," Felix said in a statement. "Tove
was a happy girl who was well liked by us
all, and it feels unreal that she is no longer
with us."
Earlier Tuesday, the national newspaper
Dagbladet posted the names and photos
of 30 people it said were killed in the at-
tacks or missing. The information, appar-
ently received from friends or relatives,
showed three victims who did not appear
to be ethnic Norwegians examples of
the multiethnic Norway that the alleged
bomber and gunman says he despised.
Among them was dreadlocked 19-year-
old Ismail Haji Ahmed, whom the news-
paper said had recently appeared on the
"Norway's 'Got Talent" television show.
Another, reported as missing, was a 20-
year-old native of Iraq, Jamil RafalYasin.
The lawyer for Anders Behring Breivik,
who has confessed to the massacre, on
Tuesday said his client was likely insane.
He called him cold, and said he saw him-
self as a warrior and savior of the Western
world.
Breivik has confessed to last week's
bombing and rampage, but he has plead-
ed not guilty to the terrorism charges he
faces. He apparently saw the governing
Labor Party as leading Norway into dete-
rioration, particularly through its policies
of ethnic tolerance. The young Linaker
was on the other end of the spectrum, a
devoted party member.
His father said he had even taken leave
from his political-science studies at the
university in Tromsoe in order to work
full-time in politics and was a regional
secretary of the party's youth wing, which
hold the camp on Utoya every summer.
"He had been to Utoya many, many
times, four or five years," his father said.
About 150,000 people filled the streets
of Oslo on Monday, laying roses feet deep
in the street as they mourned the dead.


NKorea food shortage



is worst in years


4


cials are stockpiling food
for gift baskets to be dis-
tributed during next year's
celebrations marking the
100th anniversary of late
President Kim II Sung's
birth. Others wonder
whether the distribution
of food can be monitored
closely enough to ensure
it gets to the hungry, not
the military and power
brokers in Pyongyang.
As the political debate
continues, aid workers
say shelves are bare and'
stomachs empty outside
Pyongyang.
And the question of
how to feed the North


Korean people remains
unanswered.
In Pyongyang, food ap-
pears plentiful, with side-
walk vendors doing brisk
business selling roasted
sweet potatoes and chest-
nuts, ice cream bars and
griddle-fried pancakes.
Those with cash can
splurge on hamburgers
and pizza.
But aid workers say the
food shortage is very real
in the poor provinces far
from the comparatively
prosperous capital city.
Less than a fifth of the
land in North Korea is
suitable for farming.


The Associated Press

SUNAN, North Korea
It's an unlikely sight:
hundreds of ostriches, a
bird native to sunny Af-
rica, squatting and squab-
blirig in the morning chill
on a sprawling farm in
North Korea. Even strang-
er: In winter, some wear
quilted vests.
Built on the heels of a
1990s famine, the ostrich
farm was a bold, expensive
investment that the state
hoped would help feed its
people and provide goods
to export. Years later, os-
trich meat is the specialty
at some of Pyongyang's
finest restaurants, but ap-
pears out of the reach of
millions of hungry North
Koreans.
The showcase farm is an
idiosyncratic approach to
one of the biggest issues
confronting North Korea:
food.
North Korea's food short-
age has reached a crisis
point this year, aid work-
ers say, largely because of
shocks to the agricultural
sector, including torrential
rains and the coldest win-
ter in 60 years. Six million
North Koreans are living
"on a knife edge" and will
go hungry without imme-
diate food aid, the World
Food Program said, call-
ing in April for $224 mil-
lion in emergency aid.
North Korean officials
have made quiet pleas for
help, citing rising global
food prices, shortfalls in'
fertilizer and the winter
freeze that killed their
wheat harvest. In return,
they agreed to strict mon-
itoring conditions a
rare concession.
Donations, however,
have not been flooding
the nation considered
a political pariah for its
nuclear defiance and al-
leged human rights abus-
es. The European Union
is pitching in $14.5 mil-
lion (10 million euros),
only enough to feed one-
tenth of the hungry until
the October harvest. The
U.S. has not said whether
it will provide aid.
Skeptics suspect offi-


China orders


safety inspection.


after train crash


The Associated Press

BEIJING The Chinese
government on Tuesday
ordered a two-month, na-
tionwide safety campaign
for its railway system after
a collision between two
bullet trains killed at least
39.
The Railways Ministry
said in a statement on its
website that all local rail-
way bureaus were to draw
lessons from Saturday's ac-
cident in the eastern city of
Wenzhou and immediately
launch safety inspections.
One train rammed into
the back of another that
had stalled after being hit
by lightning, causing six
carriages to derail and four
to fall about 65 to 100 feet
from a viaduct. More than
190 people were injured.
The ministry says local
railway bureaus in various
cities around the coun-
try such as northwestern
Urumqi, southwestern
Kunming, Harbin in the
northeast and elsewhere
have already begun safety
checks.
The accident was the lat-
est blow to China's bullet
train ambitions. Designed
to show off the country's
rising wealth and techno-
logical prowess, the high-
speed rail project has na-
tional prestige on par with
China's space program.
Beijing plans to expand
the high-speed rail net-
Jwork already the world's


biggest to link far-flung ..
regions and. is also trying
to sell, its trains to Latin
America and the Middle
East. But critics say tick-
ets are costly and the ser-
vices do not really meet
the needs of average trav-
elers in many areas. Last
month, China launched to
great fanfare the Beijing to
Shanghai high-speed line,
whose trains can travel at a
top speed of 186 miles per
hour. The speed was cut
from the originally planned
217 mph after questions
were raised about safety.
In less than four weeks of
operation, power outages
and other malfunctions.
have plagued the showcase
820-mile line. The Railways
Ministry previously apolo-
gized.for the problems and
said that summer thunder-
storms and winds were the
cause in some cases.
Railways Minister Sheng
Guangzu said the inspec-
tion campaign would be
held over two months, and
apologized for the crash
that was China's deadliest
rail accident since 2008,
the People's Daily newspa-
per said.
Sheng placed an em-
phasis the safety of bullet
trains, the report said, say-
ing that research should
be done to solve recur-
rent problems with the
trains' equipment. The
government also moved
to compensate relatives of
victims.


. ..- ;.N ,N



Jackson Hospital values growth, quality, ard .-ervice and ,. adding ;.er.ice line. dJoubling the se2e ot i, EF' ,and opening
new physicians practices The hospital sterm has a 1u00-bed acute care. gerieral medicine h,:.,pital Iocated in beuijtijl 0
Marianra, FloHuridad, where the opportunity to rnaie a differen,:e till esrs Vie haveie imnrriedlite ',pernirig: t:r

PHYSICIAN PRACTICE MANAGER
Responsible for the management of Jackson Hipital affiliated L'ledical and SurQrcal 'rpecialtv ypracte... Provides
oversight to ensure the individual medicalal Office i.lanager are accountable for cc: t efeLtiveriie-.' financial nanaerniernt
access to services, member satisfaction and teamw..ork with operational area. C.ualitred applicants mui.t p,"'ses a |.
Bachelor ; degree I fasterer ; degree is preferred I with ftie vear. ,:f nianagement experience in a ph'vician practice gettingg i
with at least ten years healthcare e-perierce

MEDICAL OFFICE MANAGER
LOCal medical practice is seeking an e.p ed eriened .edicealOffice n manar'le .ad rmaintair the dilv -y
wvorking- of our busy practice Qualified Ca1ndida, t must ha'.'e pr_'.':iu- e'perie :e rin a medial office -.ettin'g w1 ith .1
nmanagenenL.superviso,v dues

PRIMARY CARE CLINIC ARNP
E.perenced AP IP needed tor a ;Imall Frimnar, Ci re tacilio iin Ltalrane Flordca The -PiPF undei the uper.'ill,:'i t
a Physician. will perform ph',.ical e.,arrinwtioris e halui.te -rnd treat injuries or illne e'. fotr p,'ditric throu'uhl ge Jr
patients Pe.ponzible for ordering ,nd interpreting appropriate diagnostic te n:,,. and .-olldaboratinr ',,ith L.:upe.C. ii


physician to provided consistent care to patent-

MICROBIOLOGIST
Tasks arid re:.ponsibliies include processing of :pecimenr, preparing reagent:.. rpeilorrnng te:.ting anid reporting ot
test results. pert:rming quality control testing and instrument maintenance a'. well as con:uLltIrngiQ 'h l:Ab rechnim:in
and phlebotorists as needed 'Qualified caiididates r-nuit po:ises:, w tnaonalv recognized: :erTi:it.':,r, at. a na medical "
techn-ologist or equivalent. Florida l:ensure required tor all mreas of l B.r and minimum 1 ,'ar I.:,tpial lab rator, ,
e-penence preferred

O.R. CHARGE NURSEIO.R. CIRCULATOR
We ha'.'e added 5 new.. surgeons creating an opernng for a Full-timre 0 F _, -
Charge IJurW e and 0 R Circulator with call dut., uLJ-litied applicani -" ';
rrust li'e within 20 minute. ,of the hi:.spital anrd hold current .
Flonda Pi license Previous 0 r e'.perence i: preferred .


ORTHOPEDIC ARNP or PA
Full-tine Ff IP or PA needed tor a hiihl', ":pc .ilih d orthopedic
spori.s medicine surgical pr.act.':e Florida iF'FP F.- li.:en,
required anrid orthoped s.i and or surgical e-,peen-ce p:re'tered
although training may be pr-'.ided ho, qu lifted apph,.:-,nt


JoIl'n our team by cotnriac.ting i O ro I n, ,,',,.11 i,--ulr_ t,'
Human Fe.ource:. 'jt lad c:ri H,'l.i.t.l
J-'5c0 Hos'-it.l Drn.e Llariairina. Flijiirdi --
,50:, '1:?-26 ,rhone or i,._:ii \.i-2,~9 t1
E,-. i_


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this April 17 photo, a person on a cycle rides by as a man
plows a field outside of Kaesong, North Korea.







FOR SALE

BY OWNER

under $50K

Going Concern
Turn Key Business


ALL EQUIPMENT, STAFF,

INVENTORY, GOOD P&L

Owner Financing Available
Serious Inquiries Only!

Cal 85 877
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-8A WEDNESDAY, JULY 27, 2011


'


INTERNATIONAL










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Maria.ina So ,ffri...1 .



Lipford makes World Series appearance


BY SHELIA MADER
Floridan Correspondent

Marianna High School standout Whitney
Lipford has a World Series championship
under her belt, after competing with the
Aftershock from Bristol this past weekend : .
in the United States Fastpitch Association .
World Series at Frank Brown Park.
Lipford plays first and the outfield for
the Aftershock, which breezed through
pool play with a 2-1 win over the Kentucky
'Thunder op Wednesday and a 1-0 nine
inning win Thursday against the Indiana
Earthquakes.
Friday was a huge game for the After-
shock, as they were pitted against their
regional rival, Team Florida out of Panama
City. It was all Aftershock, as they won 9-4.
On" Saturday, four top teams moved into
championship play out of pool play. The
Aftershock took care of the Sharpsburg
(Ga.O Chill 1-0 to get to the champion-
ship game, where they had to face the Chill
again but with a different outcome. The
Aftershock fell 6-5 to force another game,
which the Aftershock won 1-0 to take the
World Series.


'.
The Aftershock
16U A squad won
their division in the
USFA World Series
in Panama City last
week. The team
includes Marianna
High School's
Whitney Lipford.


SUBMITTED PHOTO


Marianna
Baseball


Dizzy


Dean falls


short in


tourney
BY SHELIA MADER
Floridan Correspondent

The 19U Florida Dizzy Dean
Champions traveled to Boyn-
ton, Ga. this past week but fell
short of another title to bring
back to Marianna.
In the first game, the Mari-
anna All-Stars fell to the Gen-
erals 7-5. Michael Mader and
Jae Elliott were on the mound;
Mader gave up two runs in
one inning, while Elliott gave
up five in three innings.
* Offensively, Marianna was
led by Clayte Rooks, who was
2-for-2 with a walk and be-
ing hit by a pitch, followed
by Shayne Blanton, who was
1-for-3. Former Marianna
standout Drew Standland re-
turned to his home team and
took two for the team, along
with a walk and two runs
.scored.
In the second game, Mari-
anna handed JPRD a 6-5 loss
behind the pitching of Will
Bell, who went six innings be-
fore giving way to Standland,
who closed out the final in-
ning. Bell gave up five runs,
two unearned. Standland re-
tired the side in order to pick
up the save. Leading the team
offensively were Blanton and
Mader, who were both 2-for-
3. Standland led off with a solo
shot over left field. Chris God-
win was 1-for-2 with a sac.
The third game was a 7-6
loss to the Alabama Knights..
Colby Obert took the hard

See BASEBALL, Page 1B


wuwww~wwm~w~wwv 9~ ~ _0'T"


Hinson signs with Gulf Coast


I.


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MARKSKINNER/FLORIDAN
Marianna High School's Meghan Hinson (right) smiles for the cameras Tuesday during her signing ceremony with Gulf Coast State College. Her
grandmother, Ottis Ellerbee, is at her side.


Four-year standout

for Lady Bulldogs

ready for next step
BY SHELIA MADER
Floridan Correspondent

On Tuesday morning friends, fam-
ily, teammates, coaches, and supporters
gathered in the media center at Marianna
High School to witness Meghan Hinson
sign to continue her volleyball career at


Gulf Coast State College.
Hinson is a four-year standout on the
volleyball court for the Lady Bulldogs,
playing three of those years on the varsity
court. Hinson was a setter and outside
hitter during her tenure at Marianna.
"Meghan has worked really hard and is
a coach's dream, she is the first one on the
practice court and the last one off," coach
Belinda Christopher said. "She has played
at the next level in club soccer to better
herself, and has done a remarkable job as
a Lady Bulldog."
Hinson is. looking forward to the next
level of play.


"I'm just excited," she said. "I have
worked really hard to get to this point and
am excited for my future and to continue
my career. I wanted to thank my mom,
coach Christopher, my boss Mrs. Vicki
(Baker), my grandmother and my sister
for always supporting me and being there
for me."
Hinson is the daughter of Ann Ellerbee
Faircloth, and granddaughter of Ottis
Ellerbee. Hinson follows in sister Janna
Hinson Edwards' footsteps; Edwards just
completed two years at Gulf Coast State
College on a volleyball scholarship after
four years at Marianna High.


Lady Lightning take it all


Several Marianna
players featured on team
BY SHELIA MADER
Floridan Correspondent

The Lady Lightning 16U soft-
ball team is United Softball Fast-
pitch Association World Series
champions, after running the
board to go undefeated in World
Series play. Frank Brown Park in
Panama City was the site for the
World Series.
Marianna veteran softball
coach Scott Wiggins is an assis-
tant coach with' the Lightning.,
Marianna standouts Reagan
Oliver and Madison Gullett got
a pleasant taste of what it feels,
like to win at the highest level
in softball. Oliver played second
and third base, while Gullett al-
ternated between first and third.
In pool play, the Lady


Lightning defeated High Impact
from Chanute, Kan. 5-1 before
adding a 2-0 victory over the St.
Louis Nemesis.
The Lady Lightning's final pool
play win came with a 2-0 shutout
of the Atlanta Flames.
Holding the first place spot
heading into the champion-
ship round, the Lady Lightning
moved into the championship
round with the top eight teams
in the Gold Bracket. They con-
tinued their dominance with a
3-0 win over the Alabama Preda-
tors from Blountstown, Ala. to
go 4-0 in tournament play. A 6-2
win over the East Texas Trouble
put the Lady Lightning in the
championship game.
The Alabama Predators had
fought their way through the
loser's bracket to return to the
championship game, but proved
to be no match for the Lightning
as they fell 4-2.
J .,1;


..` ,.

SUBMITTED PHOTO
The Lady Lightning softball squad took home the championship trophy in the USFA World Series 16U "B"
tournament in Panama City. The team roster includes Marianna High School's Reagan Oliver and Madison Gullet,
as well as assistant coach Scott Wiggins. I










-12B WEDNESDAY, JULY27, 2011


SPORTS


NFL Football



Dolphins start showing up


The Associated Press

DAVIE Lots of players
showed up at the Miami
Dolphins' practice facil-
ity Tuesday morning, in-
cluding a very punctual
quarterback.
Chad Henne arrived
right at 10 a.m., the exact
time players were allowed
to return to after Monday's
announcement th'e lock-
out was over.
After Henne, left tackle
Jake Long, the three-time
Pro Bowl selection and
one of the team captains,
showed up. So did wide re-
ceiver Brandon Marshall,
whose offseason included
being stabbed by his wife,
Pro Bowl defensive end
Randy Starks, outspo-
ken linebacker Channing
Crowder, starting corner-
backs Vontae Davis and
Sean Smith.
Defensive end Jared
Odrick, the 2010 first-
round pick whose season
was practically wiped out
by foot and leg injuries,
also was on hand.
They all showed up be-
fore noon, ready to get
back to work.
Rookie running back
Daniel Thomas came, too
- on foot.
"I don't know where I
parked," he said.
The second-round pick
from Kansas State thought
he parked his care some-
where on the campus of
neighboring Nova South-
eastern University. He
knew he was supposed to


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Miami Dolphins running back Daniel Thomas walks to the Dolphins football training facility,
Tuesday in Davie.


be at the facility between
12:30 and 1 p.m., and was
determined to be there on
time.
"It feels like the first day
of class, college, whatever
you want to call it," he
said. "I'm pretty nervous,
but it's time to work now."'
Thomas could end up
replacing last year's start-
er, Ronnie Brown. Both
Brown and Ricky Williams
are free agents, although
both have said they're
open to returning. Last
week, defensive end Jason
Taylor, a longtime Dol-


phins great who played
last season with the Jets,
hinted he might be open
to returning to Miami, say-
ing "no ships have sailed,
no bridges have been
burned."
Miami, 7-9 last season
under coach Tony Spara-
no, could use help more
on offense than defense.
It finished 21st in total of-
fense and sixth in total de-
fense in 2010.
And the Dolphins could
feel the pinch of the lock-
out more than other
teams. Miami has a host


of new coaches, includ-
ing offensive coordinator
Brian Daboll, formerly of
Cleveland.
He's installing a new of-
fense during a training
camp that won't have two-
a-day practices.
Free agency began Tues-
day, although players
can't be signed until Fri-
day. Miami's primary free
agent targets are believed
to be a veteran quarter-
back to challenge Henne;
a running back; and a
pass-rushing defensive
end/linebacker.


NFL's free-agent frenzy: wild times


The Associated Press

The free agency free-for-
all has begun, mostly with
obscure names from the
college ranks.
It will get wilder.
Contract negotiations
for free agents and draft
picks started Tuesday,
with draftees able to sign
right away. The big names
among veterans Nnam-
di Asomugha, Santonio
Holmes, Matt Hasselbeck
- can't sign until Thurs-
day, but their agents are
negotiating deals right
now.
Throw in dozens of play-
ers who will be cut, such
as Dallas receiver Roy Wil-
liams and Baltimore tight
end Todd Heap, which of-
ficially can't happen until
Thursday, and it's "orga-
nized chaos," according
to Colts general manager
Chris Polian.
"It's a lot of stress, work,


Baseball
From Page 1B
Obert took the hard luck
loss on the mound for
Marianna, going four and
a third innings before giv-
ing way to Dustin O'Hearn.
Obert gave up five runs, two
unearned, with O'Hearn
giving up two runs, one


preparation. But it's what
we all look forward to. It's
our playoffs and our Super
Bowl," agent Peter Schaf-
fer said.
Indeed, several agents
said they didn't expect to
sleep Tuesday as the NFL
reopened for business af-
ter 4Y2 months. In addition
to their clients already in
the league who are unre-
stricted or restricted free
agents, they will have vet-
erans released. And they
are trying to set up young-
sters, such as college start-
ers safety Winston Venable
of Boise State (Chicago)
and quarterback Jerrod
Johnson of Texas A&M
(Philadelphia), with teams
after theywere passed over
in April's draft.
"I always have a lot of
guys in that category, and
it's been absolutely nuts,"
said agent Joe Linta, who-
placed Michigan State
tight end Charlie Gantt


unearned. Marianna was
led offensively by Mader,
who was 2-for-3, followed
by Obert and Godwin, who
Were 1-for-3. Blanton and
O'Hearn were both 1-for-
4. Standland led the team
in walks with twb, followed
by walks to Rooks, God-
win, Zack Smith and Aus-
tin Meyers. .


with the Chiefs and Cal
receiver Jeremy Ross with
the Patriots on Tuesday.
He also fielded calls from a
dozen teams for Utah de-
fensive tackle Sealver Si-
liga before he signed with
San Francisco.
"There are times when
you are fielding four or five
calls at once," added Linta.
"Multiply, say, 10 guys you
are trying to get signed by
maybe three to 10 teams
interested ... you do the
math."
The math adds up to
hundreds of transactions
in a few days, as opposed
to a few weeks had there
not been a 42-month la-
bor stoppage.
"I think the best way
to say it is whatever you
can imagine, it's probably
worse than that," Cardinals
coach Ken Whisenhunt
said. "There is multitask-
ing at its most furious."
Normally, teams would


The final game for Mari-
anna was another a one-
run loss, this time to Twin
Cities out of Tennessee.
Standland started on the
mound for Marianna, gave
up two runs in three in-
nings, before giving way to
Jae Elliott, who closed out
the game, giving up three
unearned runs in three


bring in players to visit
their facilities, have them
work out and take physi-
cals, perhaps even attend
meetings and speak with
potential future team-
mates. Some of that might
happen in the next few
days, particularly for a
high-profile player such
as Asomugha. Most of it
won't.
"I think all of the guys
realize this is going to be
a whole new world," agent
Jordan Woy said. "Most
said, 'Listen, the bottom
line is the team I'm with I
like. If somebody out there
is really interested, if they
come with a great offer up
front, then we'll look into
that.'
"They realize they're go-
ing to have to make quick-
er, probably less-informed
decisions than they have
in the past. They're just go-
ing to have to do best they
can."


innings.
At the plate, Standland
led the way going 2-for-4,
including a two-run home-
run in the sixth inning to
put Marianna ahead. Tay-
lor Dunham was 1-for-2,
followed by Will Bell, who
was 1-for-3. Going 1-for-4
were Rooks, Godwin, and
Mader.


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com



Jones has



strained



quadriceps,



not starting

ATLANTA Braves had arthroscopic sur-
third baseman Chip- gery on July 9 to repair
per Jones did not start torn cartilage in his right
against the Pirates af- knee. He returned with
ter he strained his 'iht two hits, including his
quadriceps in Mo ninth homer, on Monday
night's game. 1,
Braves manager Fredi mained in the
Gonzalez says there is a game a er he strained his
50-50 chance Jones could quadriceps on defense in
come in off the bench in the sixth inning and hit
Tuesday night's game. the homer in the eighth.
Gonzalez says the team Jones was receiving
hasn't discussed placing treatment and was not
Jones back on the dis- available for comment
abledlist. before batting practice
The 39-year-old Jones on Tuesday.



Buccaneers


agree to terms


with 2 draftees


The Associated Press

TAMPA Draft picks
Mason Foster and Dan-
iel Hardy have agreed to
contracts with the Tampa
Bay. Buccaneers, kicking
off what figures to be a
frenzied week of player
transactions.
Foster's agreement on
the first day following the
end of the NFL lockout
increased speculation
that veteran middle line-


backer Barrett Ruud has
played his last game.
Ruud is an unrestricted
free agent, and general
manager Mark Do
said little to dispel
notion that the seventh
year pro no longer fits
the team's plans.
Foster is a third-round
draft pick out of Wash-
ington. The Bucs also
reached terms with Har-
dy, a seventh-round tight
end from Idaho.


Jaguars agree to


terms with 24


undrafted rookies


The Associated Press

JACKSONVILLE The
Jacksonville Jaguars have
agreed to terms with 24
undrafted rookies, giv-
ing them plenty of bodies
for the start of training
camp.
The players, which in-
clude four linebackers
and five defensive backs,
need to pass physical
and sign contracts be-
fore the first practice on
Thursday.
The players signed are:
receiver Armon Binns,
offensive tackle Cameron
Bradfield, cornerback
Cole Brodie, linebacker
JoJo Dickson, receiver


Greg Ellingson, safety
Matt Estrada, tight end
Tommy Gallarda, line-
backer Eric Gordon,
guard Brandon Harper,
running. back DuJuan
Harris, cornerback T.J.
Heath, receiver Dontrelle
Inman, cornerback Jalil
Johnson, linebacker Mi-
chael Lockley, linebacker
Scott Lutrus, tight end
Kyle Miller, running back
Richard Murphy, receiver
Jamar Newsome, de-
fensive end Odrick Ray,
quarterback Scott Riddle,
cornerback Kevin Rut-
land, punter Brian Saun-
ders, defensive end Marc
Schiechl and guard Troy
White.


Marianna Cross
Country/Track
Current Marianna High
School students or incom-
ing freshmen interested in
running on the Marianna
High School boys or girls
cross country or distance
track team need to contact
Coach Allan Gibson at
(850) 209-3403. The team
is practicing at 6 a.m. ev-
ery morning at Marianna
High School. Contact
Gibson before you show
up for your first practice.

Golf Tournament
The Marianna High
School golf team will hold
a tournament on July 30-
31 at Caverns Golf Course
to.help raise money for
new golf bags and equip-
ment for the 2011 sea-
son. The event will be a


three-person scramble,
,with cost $50 per player.
Flights and payouts will be
determined on number of
entries. Closest to the pin
and longest putt prizes
will be awarded daily.
Lunch will be provided on
Sunday, and ties will be
settled by regression. For
more information, contact
Scott Wigginrs at 573-7506
or Brian McKeithan at
482-4257.

Speed, Agility and
Conditioning Camp
Bionic Sports will hold a
Speed, Agility and Condi-
tioning camp on Tuesdays
and Thursdays at Integras
Therapy &Wellness Center
for youth boys and girls
ages 9-17. Cost is $40 a
month, or $12 per week.
The camp will continue
for the entire summer,


focusing on becoming a
better athlete. Call Eric
Pender for more informa-
tion at 850-284-2368.

Chipola Swimming
Lessons
Chipola College will of-
fer programs for children
of all ages this summer.
Swimming lessons will
be offered for ages 4 and
up. Lessons are based on
a combination of nation-
ally-recognized methods.
The following sessions
are scheduled: Session 4:
Aug. 8-18 with registration
deadline Aug. 1. Classes
are available at 9 a.m., 10
a.m. or 7 p.m. Sessions
are Monday through
Thursday for two weeks of
45-minute lessons. Cost is
$45 for each session. Pre-
registration is required
with a $5 late registration


fee. For information, call
pool manager Rance Mas-
sengill at 718-2473.

Marianna Youth
Wrestling
Team Dynamic Youth
Wrestling Team will
continue practicing on
Tuesday and Thursday
nights at the wrestling
room at the old Marianna
High School. Practice will
be from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.
All kids in Jackson County
from ages 6 and up are
welcome to join. For fur-
ther information, contact
Marianna coach Ron
Thoreson at 272-0280.

Sports Items
Send all sports items to editorial@
jcfloridan.com, or fax them to 850-
482-4478. The mailing address is
Jackson County Floridan P.O. Box
520 Marianna, FL 32447.


* 2-PIECE CHICKEN DINNER

1-PIECE FISH DINNER

* FRIED CHICKEN LIVER or
GIZZARD DINNER

PO PLATE
Choose four of your favorite veggies

* SOUP AND SALAD


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Do you have'Cute Kids'?
Email your 'Cute Kids*' photos to editorial@jcfloridan.com,
mail them to P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447 or bring them
by our offices at 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.
*12years or under, ,it-i. ...i County ties. Include child's
full name, parents'name(s) and city of residence. This is a free
service. All entries subject to editing.

'LOOKING FOR MORE NEWS? VISIT
WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM

---


Sports Briefs


__


~~~__~__~_~~_~
















scoreboard

WEDNESDAY,JULY27,2011 3B


NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division
W L PctGB
Philadelphia 64 37.634-
Atlanta 59 44.5736
New York 51 51.50013%
Washington 49 52.48515
Florida 49 53.480151%
Central Division
W L PctGB
Pittsburgh 53 47.530-
St. Louis 54 48.529-
Milwaukee 54 49.524
Cincinnati 50 52.4904
Chicago 42 60.41212
Houston 33 69.32421
West Division
W L PctGB
San Francisco 59 43 .578-
Arizona 55 47.5394
Colorado 48 55.466111%
Los Angeles 46 56.45113
San Diego 45 58.4371411
All times CST
Monday
San Diego 5, Philadelphia 4
N.Y. Mets 4, Cincinnati 2
Pittsburgh 3, Atlanta 1
St Louis 10, Houston 5
L.A. Dodgers 8, Colorado 5
Tuesday
Florida at Washington, Late
San Francisco at Philadelphia, Late
N.Y. Mets at Cincinnati, Late
Pittsburgh at Atlanta, Late
Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee, Late
Houston at St Louis, Late
Arizona at San Diego, Late
Colorado at L.A. Dodgers, Late
Wednesday
Florida (Vazquez 6-9) at Washington
(L.Hernandez 5-9), 6:05 p.m.
San Francisco (Zito 3-2) at Philadelphia
(Hamels 12-5), 6:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Pelfrey 5-9) at Cincinnati (Arroyo
7-8), 6:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Maholm 6-10) at Atlanta (Jurrjens
12-3), 6:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Zambrano 7-5) at Milwaukee
(Greinke 7-4), 7:10 p.m.
Houston (Norris 5-7) at St. Louis (C.Carpenter
6-7), 7:15 p.m.
Arizona (I.Kennedy 11-3) at San Diego (Luebke
3-4), 9:05 p.m.
Colorado (A.Cook 1-5) at L.A. Dodgers (Kuroda
6-12), 9:10 p.m.
Thursday
Florida at Washington, 11:35 a.m.
N.Y. Mets at Cincinnati, 11:35 a.n.
Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee, 1:10 p.m.
Arizona at San Diego, 2:35 p.m.
San Francisco at Philadelphia, 6:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Atlanta, 6:10 p.m.
Houston at St. Louis, 7:15 p.m.
AMERICAN LEAGUE


Boston
New York
Tampa Bay
Toronto
Baltimore

Detroit
Cleveland
Chicago
Minnesota
Kansas City

Texas
Los Angeles
Oakland
Seattle


East Division
W L PctGB
62 38.620-
60 40.6002
53 48.5259%
51 51.50012
40 58.40821
Central Division
WN L PctGB
54 48.529-
52 48.5201
50 51.4953%
47 55.4617
43 59.42211
West Division
W L PctGB
59 44.573-
55 48.5344
45 57.44113%
43 59.42215%


Monday
Cleveland 3, L.A. Angels 2
N.Y. Yankees 10, Seattle 3
Kansas City 3, Boston 1,14 innings
Texas 20, Minnesota 6
Chicago White Sox 6, Detroit 3
Oakland 7, Tampa Bay 5
Tuesday


L.A. Angels at Cleveland, Late
Seattle at N.Y. Yankees, Late
Baltimore at Toronto, Late
Kansas City at Boston, Late
Minnesota at Texas,. Late
Detroit at Chicago White Sox, Late
Tampa Bay at Oakland, Late
Wednesday
L.A. Angels (E.Santana 5-8) at Cleveland
(D.Huff 1-0), 11:05 a.m.
Seattle (F.Hernandez 8-9) at N.Y. Yankees
(P.Hughes 1-2), 12:05 p.m.
Detroit (Scherzer 11-5) at Chicago White Sox
(Danks 3-8), 1:10 p.m.
Baltimore (Simon 2-3) at Toronto (R.Romero
7-9), 6:07 p.m.
Kansas City (Chen 5-3) at Boston (Lackey 8-8),
6:10 p.m.
Minnesota (Duensing 7-8) at Texas (C.Lewis
10-7), 7:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Shields 9-8) at Oakland (Cahill
8-9), 9:05 p.m.
Thursday
L.A. Angels at Detroit, 1208 p.m.
Kansas City at Boston, 12:35 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Oakland, 2:35 p.m.
Baltimore at Toronto, 6:07 p.m.
Minnesota at Texas, 7:05 p.m.


NFL
2011 PRESEASON SCHEDULE


All Times CDT
WEEK 1
Thursday, Aug. 11
Baltimore at Philadelphia, 6:30 p.m.
Jacksonville at New England, 6:30 p.m.
Seattle at San Diego, 7 p.m. (ESPN)
Denver at Dallas, 7:30 p.m.
Arizona at Oakland, 9 p.m.
Friday, Aug. 12
Cincinnati at Detroit, 6:30 p.m.
Miami at Atlanta, 6:30 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Washington, 6:30 p.m.
San Francisco at New Orleans, 7 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Kansas City, 7 p.m. (FOX)
Saturday, Aug. 13
Green Bay at Cleveland, 6:30 p.m.
Buffalo at Chicago, 7 p.m.
Indianapolis at St. Louis, 7 p.m.
Minnesota at Tennessee, 7 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Carolina, 7 p.m."
Monday, Aug. 15
N.Y. Jets at Houston, 7 p.m. (ESPN)
WEEK 2
Thursday, Aug. 18
New England at Tampa Bay, 6:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m. (FOX)
Friday, Aug. 19
Washington at Indianapolis, 6 p.m.
Kansas City at Baltimore, 6:30 p.m.
Detroit at Cleveland, 6:30 p.m.
Carolina at Miami, 6:30 p.m.
Arizona at Green Bay, 6 p.m.
Atlanta at Jacksonville, 6 p.m. (FOXY
Saturday, Aug. 20
New Orleans at Houston, 6 p.m.
Tennessee at St. Louis, 6 p.m.
Oakland at San Francisco, 6 p.m.
Buffalo at Denver, 6:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Seattle, 6 p.m.
Sunday, Aug. 21
Cincinnati at N.Y. Jets, 6 p.m.
San Diego at Dallas, 7 p.m.
Monday, Aug. 22
Chicago at N.Y. Giants, 7 p.m. (ESPN)
WEEK 3
Thursday, Aug. 25
Carolina at Cincinnati, 6 p.m.
Cleveland at Philadelphia, 6:30 p.m.
Washington at Baltimore, 7 p.m. (ESPN)
Friday, Aug.26
St Louis at Kansas City, 7 p.m.
Green Bay at Indianapolis, 7 p.m. (CBS)
Saturday, Aug. 27
Jacksonville at Buffalo, 6 p.m.
N.Y. Jets at N.Y. Giants, 6 p.m.
Atlanta at Pittsburgh, 6:30 p.m.
Miami at Tampa Bay, 6:30 p.m.
New England at Detroit, 7 p.m. (CBS)
Dallas at Minnesota, 7 p.m.
Houston at San Francisco, 7 p.m.
Chicago at Tennessee, 7 p.m.
Seattle at Denver, 8 p.m.
San Diego at Arizona, 9 p.m.
Sunday, Aug. 28
New Orleans at Oakland, 7 p.m. (NBC)


I BASEBALL


(ALL TIMES CENTRAL)

WEDNESDAY
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
6 p.m.
ESPN San Francisco at Philadel-
phia
SOCCER_
7:30 p.m.
ESPN2 MLS, All-Star Game, MLS
All-Stars vs. Manchester United, at
Harrison, N.J.

WEEK 4
Thursday, Sept 1
Detroit at Buffalo, 5:30 p.m.
Indianapolis at Cincinnati, 6 p.m.
Baltimore at Atlanta, 6:30 p.m.
St. Louis at Jacksonville, 6:30 p.m.
Dallas at Miami, 6:30 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at New England, 6:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at N.Y. Jets, 6:30 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Washington, 6:30 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Carolina, 7 p.m.
Cleveland at Chicagp, 7 p.m.
Kansas City at Green Bay, 7 p.m.
Houston at Minnesota, 7 p.m.
Tennessee at New Orleans, 7 p.m.
Denver at Arizona, 9 p.m.
San Francisco at San Diego, 9 p.m.
Friday, Sept. 2
Oakland at Seattle, 9:30 p.m.


NASCAR

SPRINT CUP LEADERS
THROUGH JULY 17
POINTS
1, Carl Edwards, 652.
2, Jimmie Johnson, 645.
3, Kurt Busch, 641.
4, Kevin Harvick, 637.
5, Kyle Busch, 632.
6, Matt Kenseth, 626.
7, Jeff Gordon, 587.
8, Ryan Newman, 586.
9, Dale Earnhardt Jr., 577.
10, Denny Hamlin, 570.
11, Tony Stewart, 570.
12, Clint Bowyer, 542.
13, David Ragan, 524.
14, Kasey Kahne, 523.
15, Greg Biffle, 523.
16, A J Allmendinger, 515.
17, Juan Pablo Montoya, 511.
18, Joey Logano, 510.
19, Paul Menard, 506.
20, Mark Martin, 500.
MONEY
1, Carl Edwards, $5,427,417.
2, Kyle Busch, $3,654,892.
3, Kevin Harvick, $3,550,032.
4, Kurt Busch, $3,547,701.
5, Matt Kenseth, $3,527,372.
6, Jimmie Johnson, $3,428,622.
7, Clint Bowyer, $3,217,490.
8, Denny Hamlin, $3,141,968.
9, Jeff Gordon, $3,140,247.
10, Tony Stewart, $3,085,090.
11, Ryan Newman, $3,025,373.
12, Juan Pablo Montoya, $2,927,115.
13, Bobby Labonte, $2,676,453.
14, A J Allmendinger, $2,647,727.
15, Jamie McMurray, $2,640,154.
16, Marcos Ambrose, $2,616,617.
17, Regan Smith, $2,593,343.
18, David Ragan, $2,573,888.
19, Brad Keselowski, $2,548,958.
20, David Reutinrann, $2,505,490.
NATIONWIDE SERIES

POINTS LEADERS
THROUGH JULY 23
1. Reed Sorenson, 702.
2. Ricky Stenhouse Jr., 697.


3. Elliott Sadler, 688.
4. Justin Allgaler, 672.
5. Aric Almirola, 631.
6. Jason Leffler, 608.
7. Kenny Wallace, 605.
8. Steve Wallace, 558.
9. Michael Annett, 550.
10. Brian Scott, 537.
11. Trevor Bayne, 476.
12. Mike Wallace, 464.
13. Mike Bliss, 459.
14. Josh Wise, 437.
15. Joe Nemechek, 424.
16. Jeremy Clements, 393.
17. Timmy Hill, 381.
18. Eric McClure, 342.
19. Derrike Cope, 334.
20. Blake Koch, 332.
21. Morgan Shepherd, 315.
22. Scott Wimmer, 269.
23. Ryan Truex, 249.
24. Robert Richardson Jr., 224.
25. Sam Hornish Jr., 197.
26. Danica Patrick, 178.
27. Dennis Setzer, 178.
28. Jennifer Jo Cobb, 174.
29. Kevin Lepage, 167.
30. Charles Lewandoski, 147..
31. Danny Efland, 144.
32. Carl Long, 142.
33. J.R. Fitzpatrick, 100.
34. Tim Andrews, 98.
35. Shelby Howard, 84.
36. Mikey Kile, 83.
37. Donnie Neuenberger, 74.
38. Jeff Green,. 71.
39. Drew Herring, 70.
40. Kelly Bires, 70.
41. Kevin Conway, 59.
42. Mike Harmon, 57.
43. Andrew Ranger, 54.
44. Chris Buescher, 54.
45. Tim Schendel, 47.
46. Johnny Chapman, 46.
47. Ron Fellows, 43.
48. Jacques Villeneuve, 42.
49. Landon Cassill, 41.
50. Alex Kennedy, 39.
CAMPING WORLD TRUCK

POINTS LEADERS
THROUGH JULY 22
1. Johnny Sauter, 431.
2. Austin Dillon, 413.
3. James Buescher, 389.
4. Cole Whitt, 388.
5. Timothy Peters, 384. .
6. Matt Crafton, 377.
7. Parker Kligerman, 373.
8. Joey Coulter, 366.
9. Ron Hornaday Jr., 362.
10. Todd Bodine, 350.
11. Brendan Gaughan, 346.
12. Nelson Piquet Jr., 334.
13. David Starr, 327.
14. Jason White, 319.
15. Max Papis, 317.
16. Ricky Carmichael, 315.
17. Justin Lofton, 311.
18. Miguel Paludo, 302.
19. Clay Rogers, 284.
20. Justin Marks, 276.
21. Ryan Sieg, 275.
22. Travis Kvapil, 252.
23. Craig Goess, 218.
24. Johanna Long, 213.
25. Shane Sieg, 209.
26. Brad Sweet, 193.
27. Norm Benning, 148.
28. David Mayhew, 98.
29. Jeffrey Earnhardt, 96.
30. Justin-Johnson, 88.
31. Chris Fontaine, 88.
32. Steve Arpin, 85.
33. Mike Garvey, 78.
34. Jamie Dick, 71.
35. Chase Mattioli, 68.
36. Dusty Davis, 60.
37. Caleb Roark, 45.
38. Josh Richards, 37.
39. BJ. McLeod, 33.
40. Brian Ickler, 30.
41. Nick Hoffman, 29.
42. Jack Smith, 26.
43. Blake Feese, 26.
44. Charles Vest, 24.
45. Dakoda Armstrong, 23.


[WEDNESDAY MORNING / AFTERNOON


JULY 27, 2011


6:00 1630 7:0017:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:0010:3011:0011:3012:0012:30 1:00 1:30 2:00 2:30 3:00 3:30 4:00 4:30 5:00 5:30
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3 WTVY News 4 The Early Show (N) (In Stereo) aR Live Regis & Kelly e Price Is Right (N) Young & Restless Live at Bold The Talk (in Stereo) Let's Make a Deal (N) Rachael Ray (N) 00 Oprah Winfrey News News
5 NewsChannel7 Today Today Wrestler Henry Cejudo; 3 Doors Down. (N) (In Stereo) IE Days of our Lives (N) News 7 at Noon Rachael Ray (N) B The Doctors a Ellen DeGeneres Mlionaire eopardyt News NBCNews

10 Auto Tech PaildProg. PaIdProg. AquaeKids Funniest Home Videos Chris Smarter Smarter Judge B. Housewives/OC New Life Church JudgeMathis 00 Justice Justice NateBerkus The People's Court Jdg Judy JdgJudy
11 Arthur Martha Curious Cat n the Super Dinosaur SesameStreet Sd ord Between Baey Arthur Clifford Martha Sid Electric Cyberch'e WildKratt WordGirl Cat n the Curious Dinosaur NewsHour
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14 NICK Max. Rub Max. Ruby Uizoomi Unrnizoomi Bubble Dora Sponge Soonge Socnge Sponge Parenti Prenis Ninja Car, Cany i, Big e y Spoge Sponge Spoge Sp.nge vionoSv
16 TBS Home mp, Home Imp. Saved/ Saved/ Yes, Dear Yes, Dear Prince Prince Prince Payne Payne Browns Amer. Dad Ear Raymond m Jim e Office Friends Friends Raymond Raymond King King
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20 CSS Mayhem in the A.M. SportsNite Football Golf Paid Prog. Pad Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. SportsNte Football College Football From Oct. 9, 2010. College Football: 2008 Florida State at Miami. SportsNite (N)
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24 DISC PaidProg. RobisonJ. Meyer Pald Prog. Overhaulln' (In Stereo) Overhaulln'(In Stereo) Overhaulin' (n Stereo) Great Biker Build-Off American Chopper American Chopper American Chopper American Chopper Cash Cab CashCab CashCab CashCab
25 TWC YourWeather Today With Abrams and Bettes B0 Wake Up With Al Day Planner M Storms Storms Cantors Cantore
26 USA Law Order: CI T DukesDfHaizzad'** (20(05, Comedy) House "Hunting" Royal Pains no Necessary Roughness House "The Mistake NCIS "Semper Fidelis" NCIS Tense reunion. NCIS (in Stereo) M NCIS "Reunion" E NCIS (in Stereo) El
28 FAM BoyWorld BoyWorld WhatLike WhatLike Grounded 700 Club The700 Club b Full House Full House Still Stnd Stll Snd Rules 8 Rules My Wife My Wife '70sShow '70s Show 70sShow '70s Show Secret-Teen Still Stid Still Stnd
29 LIFE The Balancing Act (N) Prolect Runway M Project Runway NI Project Runway N Project Runway RM Project Runway Eao Project Runway 0 Project Runway Project Runway 00 Dance Moms 0 Roseanne Roseanne Pawn Pawn
30 A&E Dog Dog og Bounty Hunter CSI: Miami "Dishonor" he Sopranos 0 Criminal Minds 0 The First 48 & The First 48 0 Dog Bounty Hunter CSI: Miami "Dishonor" The Sopranos no Criminal Minds he First 48 09
32SYFY PaidProg. PaidProg. ales ates Tales Tales Tales Tales Tale aales ales Tae ales Tales Tales ales Tales Tales Ghost Whisperer Stargate SG-1 o StarTrek: Enterprise.
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36 TOON Bakugan Beyblade Pokdmon Sidekick Johnny T Johnny T Garfeld Garfield Scooby Scooby Looney Tunes Tom & Jerry Garfield 2Dogs Johnny T Sidekick Almost Adventure MAD ILooney Scooby ohnnyT
39 HIST Modern Marvels 0 Marijuana: A Chronic History OB American Eats 00 American Eats Modern Marvels Ni Modern Marvels I Marijuana: A Chronic History y American Eats 00 American Eats 0 Modem Marvels eB
40 TVLND Paid Prog. Paid Prog. A(l/Famlly Sanford Jeffersons GoodTime Jeannie Jeannie Cleveland Divorced Gunsmoke 0 Gunsmoke 0 Bonanza BBonanza oodTime Jeffersons Sanford Sanford
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3 4 CNN2 (5:00) M de


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47 SPIKE Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. CSI: NY "Pot of Gold" CSI: Crime Sene CS: Crime Scene CSn e CSe Scene CSi: NY (InStereo) CS: Crime Scene Deadliest Warrior Deadliest Warrior
49 HGTV Spaces Hidden Cash Cash Cash, Carl Cash, Carl Get II Sold Get it Sold Get It Sold Designed House Hunters Secrets Antonio Novogratz D.Desgn 0. Design Candice Design Design
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99 SPEED Monster Jam Trucker Pass Time Barrett-Jackson Spec. Speedmakers PaId Prog. Paid Prog. National Arenacross National Arenacross AMA Pro Racing Garage iTruck U Barrett-Jackson


WEDNESDAY EVENING

6:00 6:30 7:0017:30
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30 fews aneel Big Brolner IIe 'r*T....,I
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11 l NewsHour Steves NOVA "Lizard Kings"


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19 ESPN IMLB Baseball: San Francisco Giants at Philadelp


20 CSS College Football: 2006 S.C. at Florida


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22 MAX '.rcame' *es Ir s c" *'
23 TNT 'ne Menail la Tne Meninsii n,
24 DISC Sons of Guns s Sons of Guns BB
25 TWC Weather Center e Weather iWeather
26 USA NCIS (In Stereo) a NCIS (In Stereo) ME
28 FAM Georgia- Melissa Mellssa Georgia
29 LIFE Pawn Pawn Pawn Pawn
30 A&E The Frat 48 Storage Storage


32 SYFY Ghost Hunters a0


-----------


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35 BET 106 & Park: Top 10 Nol tEasily Broken'**
36 TOON Johnny T Hole/Wall Dude Destroyj
39 HIST Modem Marvels Bn Swamp People 00
40 TVLND Sanford All-Family All-Family AII-Family
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45 CNN John King, USA (N) In the Arena (N) ,


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Gel It Sold Get It Sold First Place First Place


Cake Cake Toddlers & Tiaras
Monster Jam Pass Time PassTime


/ LATE NIGHT JULY 27, 2011

8:00 8:30 9:001i 9 l30 10:0 10:3011100 11:3012:0012:30 1:00 11:30 2:00 2:30 3:00 3:30 4:00 4:30 j 5:00 5:30
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Family Happy Primetime Nightllne News NIghtline Jimmy KImmel Live Ltpez Jim Paid Prog. aidProg. Pald Prog. ABC World News Now (N) 00. Morning News 13 This Morning
Dance (In Stereo Live) News How I Met Law & Order: SVU Friends Friends King-Hill Scrubs Lewis and Jurnovoy The People's Court Paid Prog Paid Prog. Shepherd's Chapel Paid Prog. Outdoor
NOVA (In Stereo) American Experience Chartle Rose (N) B T. Smlley T. Smiley NOVA (In Siereo) American Experience Frontline (In Stereo) POV (In Stereo) C Preview Place Between
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Storage Strag torag orage Billy Storage Storage Storage rorage Storage Storage Billy JSily Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. HairLoss Paid Prog. Paid Prog.
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14 NICK


IB TBS


33AMC


34MTV


"AFewGoodMen'


Selnfeld (Selnfeld


IC


47 SPIKE
49HGTV
98 TLC
99 SPEED


Deadliest Warrior
Hunters House
Addiction Addiction
NASCAR Race Hub


Deadliest Warrior
Property Ilncome
Hoarding: Buried Alive
Dangerous Drives


46. Bobby Hamilton Jr., 22.
47. Mike Skinner, 20.
48. John King, 16.
49. Greg Pursley, 16.
50. Brent Raymer, 15.


PGA TOUR
FEDEXCUP LEADERS
THROUGH JULY 24
Rank Player PointsYTD Money
1. Nick Watney 1,798 $4,189,233
2. Steve Stricker 1,741 $3,497,523
3. K.J. Choi 1,561 $3,694,242
4. Phil Mickelson 1,531 $3,186,521
5. Luke Donald 1,507 $3,628,248
6. Bubba Watson 1,486 $3,064,485
7. Mark Wilson 1,365 $2,736,690
8. Matt Kuchar 1,306 $2,878,861
9. Webb Simpson 1,284 $2,557,043
10. David Toms 1,280 $2,920,730
11. Gary Woodland 1,275 $2,428,363
12. Brandt Snedeker 1,191 $2,392,395
13. Jason Day 1,181 $2,776,587
14. Dustin Johnson 1,170 $2,636,965
15. Fredrik Jacobson 1,166 $2,117,034
16. Martin Laird 1,165 $2,348,956
17. Jonathan Byrd 1,154 $2,358,204
18. Rory Sabbatini 1,153 $2,222,325
19. Aaron Baddeley 1,112 $2,329,848
20. Charl Schwartzel 1,107 $2,311,672
21. Hunter Mahah' 1,106 $2,208,785
22. Spencer Levin 977 $1,881,206
23. Bill Haas 958 $1,750,741
24. Charles Howell III 955 $1,763,768
25. Keegan Bradley 937 $1,872,460
26. Steve Marino 935 $1,821,556
27. D.A. Points 905 $1,719,033
28. Chris Kirk 902 $1,730,397
29. Jhonattan Vegas 896 $1,586,468
30. Zach Johnson 855 $1,482,972
31. Ryan Palmer 853 $1,661,145
32. Bo Van Pelt 836 $1,681,316
33. Ryan Moore 824 $1,557,723
34. Jason Dufner 813 $1,678,060
35. Vijay.Singh 799 $1,532,130
36. Tommy Gainey 797 $1,535,851
37. Lucas Glover 793 $1,522,313
38. Y.E. Yang 782 $1,678,189
39. Rickie Fowler 763 $1,342,941
40. Justin Rose 760 $1,469,920
41. Brendan Steele 756 $1,460,104
42. Charley Hoffman 716 $1,123,658
43. Sean O'Hair 709 $1,263,731
44. Brandt Jobe 707 $1,252,470
45. Brian Gay 685 $1,131,954
46. Kyle Stanley 684 $941,366
47. Adam Scott 682 $1,541,477
48. Kevin Na 678 $1,259,734
49. Robert Garrigus 678 $'1,387,787
50. J.B. Holmes 640 $1,398,583
51. John Senden 627 $991,300
52. Harrison Frazar 626 $1,211,527
53. Robert Allenby 616 $1,133,418
54. Kris Blanks 613 $1,010,217
55. Brendon de Jonge 611 $872,223
56. Robert Karlsson 609 $1,184,755
57. J.J. Henry 599 $837,097
58. Charlie Wi 591 $1,033,131
59. Kevin Streelman 591 $1,057,548
60. Jeff Overton 591. $1,075,872
61. Chad Campbell 569 $899,080
62. Brian Davis 562 $796,419
63. Sergio Garcia 553 $1,071,424
64. John Rollins 546 $969,396
65. Geoff Ogilvy 541 $1,043,027
66. Carl Pettersson 538 $892,408
67. Stewart Cink 531 $856,162
68. Andres Romero 524 $984,153
69. Cameron Tringale 518 $934,775
70. Ryuji Imada 517 $913,162
71. Pat Perez 516 $888,513
72. Troy Matteson 513 $883,411
73. Jim Furyk 511 $820,786
74. Chris Couch 508 $775,416
75. Jimmy Walker 508 $894,503
76. Ricky Barnes 507 $869,463
77. Jerry Kelly 505 $795,349
78. Kevin Chappell 503 $1,040,038
79. Davis Love III 497 $923,630
80. Ben Crane 493 $808,851
81. Johnson Wagner 486 $966,064
82. Marc Leishman 485 $772,767
83. Graeme McDowell 479 $987,558
84. Paul Goydos 474 $1,111,116
85. Hunter Haas 466 $857,366


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.corn


BORN LOSER BY ART AND CHIP SANSOM
'CUKE. GLkAD'S LTE Rg C lE W tAINUTESf BUT YOURE FELL,ONCE [ KIREAW I LREDy
LkTE-! /ON WPY,S501RTO | ,ALOSTARIAOUR LATE W LATE,I FIGU.E>TR.KF.
- T ,E-TEN -RUTES/ TO WA 5N'T, r
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TARK UP RU5AINGI


BIG NATE BY LINCOLN PIRCE
SO YOU'RE SAYING ,UT IF YOU KEEP
THIS BAG OF CHEEZ CHEEZ DOODLES AROUND
DOODLES SHOULD THAT LONG,THEY GET
LAST TWO WEEKS' STALE' THEN YOU'VE
UH-HL)H. IF YoU GoT To THROW THEM
EAT ONE AWAY! THAT'S
SERVING WASTEFUL!
S / A DAY. .


DO YOU WANT ME
TO THROW AWAY
CHEEZ. DOODLE5
SO THAT THEY
POLLUTE OU. ,WATER.
AND CLOG
OUP. LAND-
FLL5s?1


SO BY EATING CHEEZ
DOODLES, YOU'RE
ACTUALLY HELPING
THE ENVIRONMENT.
"--7/ YES! YES!
I.'M AN
I ECO-
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^fc;-
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FRANK & ERNEST BY BOB THAVES

SI^IAI \r E Ev)'g SUPPO5P TO AT FROM TH
SI 1 9 / FOOD CIRZC/ IT'S
r^W oY gLACIN G T
^r~t mrn^^l^A.t <5,.^ FOOW PUAWIX^


GRIZZWELLS BY BILL SCHORR


ARLO & JANIS BY JIMMY JOHNSON
I'VE F(O )HTTrISAT 5ATL ULTIMATELY, A PER600 C
FOROVERTWOYeAR6. LEAD OULYOU6LIF e,--
IT COULD'VE.6KU WORSE OW-EVEU PAREiT&.


MONTY BY JIM MEDDICK


COW & BOY BY MARK LEIKNES
LIFE CAN BE PRETTY THAT'S WHY I CREATED
DANGEROUS. SAFETY SUlr TTO PREPARE
\ DANGEROUS. YOU AGAINST ANYTHING
~\ -r LIFE THROWS YOUR WAY.


BILLY, IT'5 105
DEGREES OUT.


rM DROWNING
IN MY SWEATI,

'4 ,


KIT'N'CARLYLE BY LARRY WRIGHT HERMAN BY JIM UNGER


NEA Crossword Puzzle


ACROSS 37 Scream and
shout
1 Fluff, 39 Ow!
as hair 40 None at all
6 35mm 41 Hotel
setting offering
(hyph.) 45 Unlucky
11 Atlantic time for
game fish Caesar
12 HIgh-tech 47 Healing
invader ointment
13 Job require- 48 Save from
ments disaster
14 On solid 51 Water
ground heater
15 Tea variety 52 Chore
16 Feminine 53 Whole
suffix 54 Rental
17 Yul's film agreement
realm 55 Stock or
18 Tomahawk bond
19 Boggy
23 Cotton pod DOWN
25 Wish
granter 1 Sulu of
26 Malt "Star Trek"
beverage 2 Slezak of
29 Juan's soaps
friend 3 Poise
31 Noncom 4 amandine
32 $1,000,000, 5 Coast
slangily Guard
33 Strictly off.
verboten 6 Speedy
34 Cleopatra's 7 Connive
snake 8 Sugar Ray
35 Gray-barked stat
tree 9 Not'neath


Answer to Previous Puzzle
PBS SST BELL
AUK TERI AS E
PRI MECUT WA N
ARD EiNAT ALLUDb
LOS L E
LAM BSI S R ER
ASIA KOAN G GO
SAC ARUN TON
PALLET RESE
IPSM WES
MONGOL ADL IB
UTAH I NSEASO
STMT NOTE EA
HOES GEM ER|


10 Before,
in combos
11 Bakers'
meas.
12 Loathe
16 Bookplate
phrase
(2 wds.)
18 mater
20 Cuzco
founder
21 Splits open
22 Shrill bark
24 Vow
25 Hired mus-
cle
26 Pulpit
27 "Instead of"
word
28 Mo.
expense


30 Touchdown
36 Girls from
Baja
38 Character-
istics
40 Must have
42 Dragon
puppet
43 Plain as
day
44 Only
46 Sand ridge
47 Dads, to
granddads
48 CSA mono-
gram
49 Prior to
50 Tijuana
"Mrs."
51 Maude
portrayer


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


7-27


2011 UFS, Dist. by Univ Uclick for UFS


Dear Annie: My granddaughter, "Tam-
mi," graduated high school at the end of
May. She has been working at a pet store
since last fall. This was her first real job,
and she was both elated and proud.
When I visited over the Christmas holi-
days, she took me to the store to meet
her boss and the other teen employees.
Tammi told me the boss had discussed
the store's finances with her, that he
didn't love his wife any longer, that he
was getting a divorce, and on and on. I
told her this is not something a 34-year-
old employer would be sharing with an
18-year-old female employee unless he
had an ulterior motive.
The day afterher 19th birthday, Tammi
left home and moved in with her boss,
who is now divorced and shares custody
of his 4-year-old child.
She is absolutely enthralled with this
guy, who is four years younger than her
father. Our family is just sick over this.
We've all tried talking to her, but she




At the bridge table, when you need ii
from your partner, you hope that he un
stands what yoh want. Look at the North h
Your partner opens one spade, you raise to
spades, and he rebids three diamonds. V\
would you do now? Why?
After one spade two spades, the op
usually passes or jumps to four spades. I
does anything else, he expresses an intE
in trying to get to game. When he bids a
suit, he is asking the responder not to won
much about his point count, but to look a
two bid suits. With good holdings in those s
the responder should jump to game; with
holdings, he should sign off in three spade
In this deal, North has only six high-
points, but he has magic holdings in the p(
ed suits, in particular that fourth spade and
ruffing value in diamonds. North should
four spades. West will probably start with t
rounds of hearts. After ruffing the last of tl
how should South continue?
South has five losers in his hand: two he
two diamonds and one club. He must ruff
diamonds on the board. He leads a diamond
dummy's king, plays a diamond to his ace,
ruffs a diamond with dummy's spade nin(
that-East cannot overruff. Back to hand w
spade, declarer ruffs his last diamond will
spade king, draws trumps, and claims.


I ,. , k ,- ,

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
- Someone you recently
met is unable to make up
his or her mind about you,
and will be observing you
closely.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
- The one time when you
should let your heart rule
your head is when you're
contemplating doing
something charitable.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
- You might want to take
a little extra time to preen
and primp if you're going
to a social function.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22)
- It isn't likely that you'll
have to do anything spe-
cial in a romantic involve-
ment that includes a bit of
competition.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-
Dec. 21) Think of any-
thing foreign as an op-
portunity waiting to be
developed. There's a good
chance you'll be more for-
tunate with goods and/or
people who come from a
distance.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) Don't be reluctant to
make your needs known,
because for no special rea-
son at all, people who like
you will be eager to do you
a favor and help you out as
best as they can.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) If you've been too
busy of late to be as atten-
tive or affectionate to your
mate or special someone,
it's a good day to make
amends.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) Working on a labor
of love could turn out to be
enormously gratifying for
you.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
- Get all the messy, stuff
out of the way early, so that
you'll be able, to get out,
run some errands and/or
circulate later on.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20) If-you want to invite
some friends over to your
place, you'd be better off
doing so in either late af-
ternoon or early evening.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
- Get off of your hammock
or out of your easy chair
and move around as much
as possible.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
- You're in a cycle, albeit
brief, where your financial
and material aspects are
likely to be advanced.


,7 '7 .

won't listen. She said we should lighten
up and that her friends are all OK with
it. I know for a fact that her best friend
doesn't like this fellow and says he's mean
to Tammi.
My granddaughter says she's an adult
and can do whatever she wants. How can
we make her realize that this is a huge
mistake?
-WORRIED SICK IN ILLINOIS

Dear Worried: Unfortunately, Tammi
is right she is an adult and can make
as-many lousy decisions as she wants.
Often, kids are attracted to what seems
most outrageous to their families. Per-
haps if you stop fighting her, Tammi will
have less to rebel against.
Welcome this man into your family
as best you can, and let Tammi see him
in context. She may decide he's not so
outrageous after all. Or you might decide
he's not as terrible a choice as you origi-
nally feared.


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebnty Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present,
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY CLUE: X equals Y
"B K FKGYB NYI EK JR Y LOVEOG KU
CNXIOVYH YJPIR. FKGRB NYLR EK
URRH HOAR ENRX YTR B K E YHKBR."
- IYHGY NYXRA

PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Kids shouldn't see all the violence they do these'
days. But the industry just doesn't care." Linda Blair

(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 7-27


1- PLAINT>


North 07-27-11
4 K9 32
Y8542
K 10
*763

West East
4 5 4764
VAKQ VJ1096
498743 *QJ
4 10 852 2KQJ9
South
4 A QJ 108
V 73
*A652
AA4

Dealer: South
Vulnerable: Both

South West North East
14 Pass 24 Pass
3 Pass ??


Opening lead: V A


U 0 ua .,r. ..laUY. ..no, ,U ,,,bn I,,,c D ,by Unv.,.an, Uci, f.or p urIS 2U0


14b WEDNESDAY. JULY 27 2011


I


ENTERTAINMIVIENT










CLASSIFIED


Jackson County Floridan *


Wednesday, July 27, 2011 5 B


WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED




ARKETPLAC


BY PHONE: (850) 526-3614'or (800) 779-2557
BY FAX: (850) 779-2557
ONLINE: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM


BY MAIL: WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE
P.O. BOX 520, MARIANNA, FL 32447
IN PERSON: 4403 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA


Publication Policy Err6rs and Omissions: Advertisers should check their ad the first day. This publication shall not be liable for failure to publish an ad or for a typographic error or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the ad for the first day's
insertion. Adjustment for errors is limited to the cost of that portion of the ad wherein the error occurred, The advertiser agrees that the publisher shall not be liable for damages arising out of errors in advertisements beyond the amount paid for the space
actually occupied by that portion of the advertisement in which the error occurred, whether such error is due to negligence of the publisher's employees or otherwise and there shall be no liability for non-insertion of any advertisement beyond the amount paid for
such advertisement, Display Ads are not guaranteed position. All advertising is subject to approval. Right is reserved to edit, reject, cancel or classify all ads under the appropriate classification.


IHr' all toll-free or visit www*jcfloridanScom


ANNOUNCEMENTS


STORE LIQUIDATION SALE
OLD TOWN SQ. 3183 MAIN ST. COTTONDALE,
STORE HOURS: THURSDAY SATURDAY
#. FOR INFO 850-303-3023 4-4
AUCTION FRIDAY NITES @ 6PM
AU LIC#AU667 AB LIC#2727



I Pay CASH for Diabetic test
strips. Up to $10 per box!
Most brands considered.
All boxes must be unopened
and unexpired.
Call Matt 334-392-0260


YARD SALE: Thurs, Fri & Sat. 10-5,
3429 Wiloliver Ln. Furniture, clothes, tools,
appliances, h'hold,items and much more

SS FINANCIAL





Established Restaurant
Business for Sale.
Located inside the Outlet Mall
in Graceville, Florida. For more
information call 334-791-8961


MERCHANDISE


Entertainment center is made of light oak
wood, Broyhill, appx. 12ft wide, 6ft high and
2ft deep. upper part has glass shelves with
lights, bottom has storage for dvd/cd etc. $995
call Billy at 334-692-5023 or 334-596-5261.

Wanted: Old Coins, Gold,
Diamonds, Guns, And Tools
West Main Jewelry & Loan 334-671-1440.

fic PETS & ANIMALS


English Bulldog Puppy. champion line and AKC
registered, fully shots, perfect Health, gets
along with kids, Fully trained, 11 weeks old,
$700. Contact: ayz235@live.com. (334) 792-2132
* Gorgeous AKC German Shepherd large bone
puppies 6 wks. old, black & tan, 2-F, 1-M,
puppies have received their 1st shots &
wormed, starting at $300 Call: 334-494-0406
V Lots of Summer Puppies ON SALE!. V
Morkies $125-$250, Older Chorkies $50,
Hairless Chinese Crested, Pomeranians $300.
Yorkie-Poos $250-$350. Chihuahua $250.
Taking deposits: Yorkies, Malti-Poos.
Call 334-718-4886

FARMER'S MARKET



Aplin Farms
You pick Peppers,
Tomatoes, Peas,
Okra Sweet Corn
S 334-792-6362 4



FRESH
GREEN
PEANUTS
_850-352-2199
OR 850-352-4423


Fresh Shelled Peas & Butter Beans
several varieties and Okra. 2307 Mayo Road,
(between Cypress & Grand Ridge) Bobby
Hewett (850) 592-4156

SAWYERS PODC
HAS RS OM'RW
PRODUCE


Fresh Peas, Tomatoes,
Butterbeans, Cucumbers,
Snap Beans, New Potatoes,
All Farm Fresh!
Plenty of Canning Tomatoes
lor $10/Box!
220 W. Hwy 52 Malvern
* 334-793-6690 *

( ) EMPLOYMENT


PART TIME
WAREHOUSE
HELPER
Contract position
located in our Graceville office.
Hours: 1:00 pm-5:00 pm, Monday-Friday.
Send Resume'to
West Florida Electric Cooperative,
Attn: Personnel Department
P.O. Box 127, Graceville, FL 32440
DRUG FREE WORKPLACE &
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER



SUPERCUTS
$500.00 BONUS
FL licensed stylists full/part-time
Good Work Environment
Up to 50% commission
CALL LAURIE (850) 348-1285

, EDUCATION
& INSTRUCTION


Get a Quality Education for a
New Career! Programs
FORTIS offered in Healthcare,
^ HVAC and Electrical Trades.
Call Fortis College Today!
888-202-4813.
COLLEGEI For consumer information
www.Fortis.edu


S" RESIDENTIAL
( _L_) REAL ESTATE FOR RENT

Clinton St. Large efficiency, util. incl. $395 also
rooms for $375 & 1BR avail. NOW 727-433-RENT
Edgewood Apartments in Cypress Area. Quiet,
Furnished 1BR 1BA.Cable & laundry included.
$440/mo + deposit. 850-573-60624-

1/1 Apartment for Rent. For info call 850-579-
8895
1/1 in Grand Ridge off Hwy 90
$400. mo. $200. dep. 850-272-8880



Beach Cottage for Rent: 3BR 1.5BA, Large
screened porch, Beacon Hill (Near Mexico
Beach) $550/wk 850-482-2539 or 201-888-2388

2BR/1BA, 2658 Railroad St. C'dale No Pets,
$300/mo. + $200 dep. (850) 352-4222
2BR/1BA Concrete block Rental in Marianna,
Tile floors, washer h/u, pets ok, $300/mo + $30
credit/bkgrnd ck. Additional houses and
apartments in Graceville 850-263-5753
3/1.5 Brick Home 2589 McClain St. C'dale
$700/mo + dep 334-714-9553
3/1 brick home, Malone/ Bascom area, Ig yard,
taking applications, available 9/1/11 $575/mo.
850-209-1265


3BR 1.5 BA, 2944 Noland St. Bonus room with
fireplace, 1 car garage, Central Heat & Air,
hardwood floors, kitchen appliances, no pets.
Deposit required, 1 year lease $700/month,
Available September 1st. Call 850-594-7525 af-
ter 6pm or leave message


FREE: UPRIGHT ANTIQUE PIANO. YOU PICK UP
CALL 850-482-8721 leave message
5 horsepower Troy Bil Tiller $300 Will Trade For
Old Fishing Tackle 850-579-4082/272-2875
Bar Stools, (4) White Wicker $40
Carpet Shampooer (Eurika) $45 850-573-4990


Bike: Diamondback Sport Mountain Bike white
*-t?;n U*A I 5 S111


Chest of Drawers all 592-2881


Concrete Dolphin, blue and gray, $45 850-
693-1600


Cookie Jars, Kitty Cat Collection $10/each 850-
526-3426
Corner Computer Desk, 2 pc, 38x58, great con-
dition $35 850-592-2507


Desk Set (4pc) Crystal Princess House,
olfdliw wers pattern old $30 850-557-0778


Desk w/sliding keyboard, small $8 850-573-
4990


Double Stroller, blue $45 850-693-1600
Elvis Plate (Heart Break Hotel) $35
Elvis Bust $25 850-573-4990
Fax/Copier/Scanner/Answering Service by
Bnth 1r O r,8 73--4990


3BR 2BA Block Home on 10 acres Compass
Lake area, Energy efficient, CH/A, Outdoor
pets ok, $850 + dep. 850-573-0466
Austin Tyler & Associates -
Quality Homes & Apartments
*- 850- 526-3355 4-
"Property Management Is Our ONLY Business"


HUNTING LEASES AVAILABLE
Plum Creek, the nation's largest hunting
lease provider, has approx. 150 properties
Available for Lease in AL and GA.
Small properties perfect for families.
Large properties ideal for larger hunting
clubs. Begin your new hunting adventure
at www.plumcreekrecreation.com.


1257 Gus Love Rd in Ashford 2/2
Mobile Home $475 Mo + Dep
6066 Victory Rd. Bascom Fl.
3/1 $ 675. mo + Dep
Call 334-797-1517 #
2/2 in Alford, window A/C, $380 + deposit
850-579-8882/850-209-1664/850-573-1851
2 & 3 bedroom mobile Homes in Cottondale.
$500 and up. H20, garbage, sewer included.
http:// www.charloscountry living. com.
850-258-4868/209-8847
2 & 3BR 2BA Mobile Homes in Cottondale no
pets,.Central Heat & Air $325-$450 850-258-
1594 leave message
2&3BRMH's in
Marianna & Sneads (850)209-8595.
Houses and trailers for rent starting at $300 per
month. (850) 593-4700


Fender Bassman 400 Bass Guitar Amp on
wheels, cost $1295 asking $500 850-352-2811
GE Refrigerator 18 cu. ft. White. Top freezer.
Like new. $300. 850-762-4038 or 850-573-6823
Movie Poster from Valentines Day movie 24X70
$20 with Free Taylor Swift Book 334-389-6069
Oak Works Massage Table $35 850-592-2881
Pool Sticks (3) $10 each 850-526-3426
Refrigerator, 18.2 frost free, white, clean good
condition, $175 850-592-1234
Rocker Recliner with stool $35 850-592-2881
Rolling Workbench, w/110 outlet, fiberglass
top, 30x48x36, $20 850-592-2507
Stuffed Chairs (2), fall colors, $40 each 850-
693-1600
Trench Coat, New medium Back Leather
$50.00 850-573-4990
WCW 3 piece set DVD $35. Nike tennis shoe sz.
11 $20. 850-482-5557.
Weight Bench $85 850-693-1600
Wicker Arched Shelf Unit, 46x20, $20 850-526-
3426
Wicker Cabinet with doors and 2 shelves, 28x32
$40 850-526-3426


Place a1n Ad Fast, easy, no press
24 hours a day, 7 da
Get live previews of your classified ads, receive price quotes
and make secure online payments.
wwjATAA? 71 ; fl rd a' n com TI


re
iys a week!


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WASABI SOLUTION
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BE SURE TO VISIT OUR
NEWEST GAME SITE

- (KEWLwcoM
- KEWLBOX.COM


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6 B Wednesday. July 27. 2011 Jackson County Floridan


CLASSIFIED


www.JCFLORIDAN.com


Rent to Own: 2 & 3BR Mobile Homes. National '98 Dolphin-
Lot rent included. Also available, 37ft sleeps 6, 32k miles,
1 & 2BR Apts & Houses. For details large slide, leveling jack,
4850-557-3432 or 850-814-6515 *4 back-up camera, Flatscreen
Small 2BR 1BA Located in Sneads TV, Sleep Number Bed,
$300/month 850-573-0308. awning, corian counter tops, $27,000.
Call 334-793-6691
Small Quiet Family Oriented Park- 2BR MH for Rent Call 334-793-6691
includes water, garbage, lawn care, No Pets 850-592- '^ K Trail Lite 2006 R-VISION

8129 COMMERCIAL 26 ft., fully loaded,
S COMMESTATE FOR RENT boughtnew, 13K miles
-) REA$49,995 334-616-6508

DO YOU NEED TO DOWNSIZE MOTOR HiOMS& VI
YOUR RENT & OFFICE SPACE?
960 sq ft Completely renovated, Dixie RV SuperStores
4 offices,1 reception,1 breakroom, Dixie RV Super
2 bathrooms, Off street parking lot 2846-B FL's Newest RV Dealer
South Green Street Marianna. Less than NOW OPEN!!!
$1.00 per sq ft per month. tO eHou s*
Call 850-326-0097 for info. *Store Hours*
Monday-Saturday
T ) RESIDENTIAL 8:00am-6:00pm
REAL ESTATE FOR SALE
21 Acres / 30 Brands New and Pre-Owned
Newmar Keystone Heartland u Jayco
By Owner: 3BR 2BA Country Style Home ilndian Fleetwood Prime Time 0 Coachmen
Springs, 2240 sf, 1.3 ac, $170,000, possible 0 Forest River
owner financing. 850-526-7827
IFOR SALE BY OWNER; Parts and Acces. Store
3BR/2BA 1102 Garden Lanes with 1600SF RV Collision Center
$91k Call 334-793-3086
Located off 1-10 Exit 70 / SR285
FSBO: 3 BR 2 BA (Shower only) 328 Green Acres Dr.
4980 Dogwood Heights off Hwy 71 N. De Funiak Springs, FL 32435
Large yard. REDUCED YO $116,400. Sales and Service: 850-951-1000
Call for appointment 850-482-7665 www.dixlerv.com DO 12756

GENERALSREAL ESTATEFLEETWOOD 2005 Prowler AX6, 5th wheel, 36
LAKE EUFAULA LOTS, 3 Contiguous Lake ft, 4 slides, large shower, 30/50AMP. $25,000
front Lots. Pricing from $70K, 404-213-5754 OBO Call 334-695-4995,334-687-7862.
www.keelproperties.com
MOBILEHOMESFORSALE TRANSPORTATION
Mobile Home with 9 acres of Land ANTIQUE & lL IICLES
1991 Palm Harbor, 16x80 2 bedrooms, 2 baths
with large.remodeled master bath, 10x12 cov- Chevrolet '81 Corvette
ered front porch, 15x30 cover back patio, out- Automatic 350 (Silver). Will
side of Slocomb. Recently reduced to $70,000. sell as is for $4,700. OBO
Can email pictures. 334-774-1915
Call 334-798-4863 or 334-798-3040

RECREATION
'02 Camero convertible 35th addition
G CA RT SGOL FAT S automatic V-6 new tires, stero & new top.
Four-Wheeler: 2007 Arctic Cat DVX 250 racing 129K miles $5600. n 334-596-9966 4
Four-wheeler. Liquid cooled 249cc engine, front 2004 Red Mitsubishi Outlander with 78,000
and rear hydrolic disc brakes, and like new miles. Vehicle is in'very good condition and has
tires. I serviced it recently and it runs and looks a new battery. $8,000. 205-602-8807
great. Excellent condition for a 2007 model. Buick '98 LeSabre
Asking $2,500. (334) 797-5611. Custom. loaded, clean,
Honda '04 Rancher ES 2WD. Great deal on a fun 90,000 miles, 30 MPG HY.
vehicle Asking price $2995. Garage kept with $4495. Call: 334-790-7959.
low miles. Excellent condition and serviced DO 12746
routinely. Call 334-692-4120 and leave mes- Cadillac'07 DTS fully loaded, leather interior
sage. tan in color, 29K mi. $19,000. 334-693-3980
John Deere '09 Gator TS 4X2 ... 72 hours on it.
Has Dump bed. Good condition $5900 OBO 334- Cadillac DTS 08' fully loaded, 35K miles,
886-2549 or 334-796-1777 immaculate condition, $23,000. OBO 334-792-
3089 or 334-618-1449.
Yamaha Rhino 660 4x4 side by side, clean ,
rebuilt engine, new roof, runs great.
$6000. OBO 334-790-7080


6 WANTED WRECKED OR JUNK VEHICLES
i PAY TOP DOLLAR DO 11930
o# DAY-334-794-9576 _4 NIGHT 334-794-7769 .

2 JET SKIES 2003 on dbl trailer seat look
recovered and look great! matching blue .
$3600. for both. 334-806-9920.
Bayline 89' Cabin Cruiser, GPS tracking
system, marine radio, frig, potty & sink,
bridge pumps blower, works well S .=ILT E-VIE
$4900. 334-726-0546
Bayliner Trophy,
22.5'. 2000 model, well GUNS
Many extras. $19,950.
334-794-0609 DO12632 (850) 203-2701

Procraft 03' 1650 vth 90hp Mercury, 42 lb.
thrust trolling motor, Procraft trailer, garage POSS- A & LT D
kept, like new $7000. OBO _____3____e.9 ____
850-593-5116 or 850-209-5934. B>[ C?
RHINO 2008, 18FT- 90 HP Suzuki, 55 LB 4 1 M;2J1 '!
Minnkota, Aluminum Trailer, Humminbird poot Maintenance & Repair from top to
Depth Finder, on Board Charger, Binini top, bottom! Also fiberglass tub installation!
$14,700 334-798-4175 (850) 573-6828
SSeacraft, '89,20 ft- Center
"' console, '95 225HP Johnson,
dual axle trailer w/brakes. I o
q,' .. Great condition, very clean.
$5,250 334-696-5505 I
WELLCRAFT '96 EXCEL 26'-Extra clean cruiser
w/trailer, gen w/ac, 5.7 mercruiser, w/single
prop, sleeps 6, galley, aft cabin, head, m/wave, Grader Pan Excavator
fridge, 2 radios, 2 depth finders, chart plotter, D u
GPS, always under cover. Located in Eufaula, Dump Truck Bulldozer
AL. $22,500 OBO Call 256-492-2488 or *Demolton.Gradng*StePrep
Jcpaltchlllotmal Debris Removal Retention Ponds Leveling
........., Top Soil Fill Dirt Gravel Land Clearing

2002 Winnebago Adventurer 35', 1 superslide
& 1 back bedroom slide, generator, water heat-
er, dual roof air,awning; exterior entertainment
center, rear view monitor system & automatic
hydraulic leveling jacks. 18k mi tires in good
condition recently rotated. Average retail price
ing $35,000, OBO, MUST SELL! 334-790-6758 Cl -y O 'Neals
99' Carr-ite Carriage md#29RK 5th wheel, Clay.ONeal 5 ,
1- 12 ft. slide, 19 ft. awning, sleeps 4, Land Clearing, inc. 'nla a
$11,500 * 229-395-6714. AiTHtt PLliB
W a M f COUGAR TRAVEL TRAILER 850-762-9402 3su 1
2004-30 foot, Cell 850-832-5055 as c
-- big rear window, I--- [ .rJ illJA i 1J.J imil-[ -
living/dining slide, excel- -_____ *II__ I____1 _
^i^Siwsi^^^^W~ ISnK I nr[i H -in- ~~rn nm^nf+iroc'


TS ORA.tSL


Chevrolet '07 Corvette
Twin Turbo, FAST FAST
FAST! $32,999. 2180 Mont-
gomery Hwy. Call 334-
671-7720 or 718-2121.
Chevrolet '95 Camaro,
"t .'. V-6, 5 speed, new tires,
cold air, 111,000 miles,
Excellent condition, $3995.
Call 334-790-7959.
Chevy "09 Silverado 1500 LT Crew Cab 4d,
Z71, 4 wheel-drive; 5.3 L V8. pick-up- Full-sized
truck for sale. GREAT Condition! Approximate-
ly 37,100 miles. Red Exterior and Black Leather
Interior. Upgraded Dual Exhaust, Towing pack-
age, and tool box included. Need to sell quick-
ly! Appraisal value $28,000 asking $25,000 or
best offer! Make an offer! Any reasonable of-
fer will be considered! Call 334-389-6920 for
more information.
Chrysler '06 Crossfire- roadster, 3.2L, 215HP,
20k mile, black on black convertible with dark
gray interior, cloth seats, alum wheels, AC, 6
speed, manual, 25MPG, like new tires, Retiring,
Enterprise $12,500. Call 334-393-4444
Chrysler '06 Town & Country LTD Excellent
Condition, 74K miles, Nagivation, DVD, Original
Owner $15,500 850-482-3441
Chrysler '07 Crossfire Convertible- Silver with,
dark gray leather interior, new tires, 30k miles,
like new condition, one owner "grandma" need
money for health reasons. PRICED TO SELL!
$22,500. Call 229-334-9945
DODGE '08 Grand Caravan
SE, remote engine start,
keyless entry, all power,
24 MPH, 3.3L, 6 cly., auto
trans, asking payoff
$15,000 very clean
334-689-9052


DO YOU KNOW ANYONE WITH BAD CREDIT?
I can get U Riding Today
Repos, Slow Credit, Past Bankruptcy OK!
$0 Down/ 1st Payment, Tax, Tag & Title
Push, Pull or Drag, Will Trade anything!
Warranty On Every Vehicle Sold!
$100 Referrals! Call Steve 800-809-4716
-WE- ,V Ford '01 Mustang
$4999.00.
Lot's of custom.2180
"'' Montgomery Hwy.
S Call 334-671-7720 or


GUARANTEED FINANCING!
CSI AUTO SALES
2180 MONTGOMERY HWY.
CALL: JAMES 334-718-2121.
Hyundia 06' Elentra tan in color, 101K miles, 4-
cyl. automatic, AC, pwr options, crusie,
AM/FM/CD, $6500. OBO 334-389-3071
Lincoln '85 Towncar- Dark Gray, 4 doors,
leather interior, 59k miles, Must see and Drive!
$12,500. Call 334-696-4765
Mazda '93 Miata White, 5-speed convertible in
excellent condition with sports package,
32MPG, fun little car $4,500. Call 334-699-7270
Mercury '99 Grand Marquis LS 104,300 mi.
Leather, CD changer, Alloy wheels, Dark Green
in color $4999 334-714-1977
Nissan '05 Altima- GREAT CAR! 116k miles,
silver, power windows and door locks, cloth
interior, $8000. Call 334-794-5296 or 596-5098
Pontiac '05 Grand Am,
4 door, automatic, V-6,
66,000 miles. like new con-
dition. $E6995. Call 334-790-
7959.


Digital Journalist

WRBL News 3 digital journalists will cover and report on local stories, issues and events.
Candidate must create branded content for our multi-platform newsroom and successfully
provide fair, balanced and accurate news coverage consistent with our brand. Must cultivate
and maintain both official and community-based news sources to achieve a high rate of
enterprise reporting. DJs must have strong verbal and written communications skills and
the ability to plan and coordinate news coverage, working with multi-platform producers
and news managers. Must have the ability to use (or be trained to use) digital video camera
and editing equipment and to appear on camera for taped and live news reporting. Must
have the necessary skills to achieve quality reporting for web, social media and broadcasts.
Digital journalists must be disciplined individuals who come to work prepared and make
strong contributions to news gathering daily. Must be personable and represent our station
in a professional manner at all times and have the ability to make sound journalistic judg-
ments. Must be well informed ofoverall state and local news stories and issues. Knowledge
and/or expertise in operating a Panasonic DVC Pro HD P2 camera and Adobe Premier Pro
and Elements editing software a plus.
Must have and maintain a good driving record and a valid drivers license.
EOE:M/F/D/V. Pre-employment Drug and Background screens required.







No phone calls please. -


i-A


- N.. .4


Bestway Portable Buildings
Largest Manufacturer of Portable
Buildings in North Florida
We have over 80
:-. different sizes.
You can choose
color and style.
SBuilt on site
Jl_ Mention this ad and
receive an Extra Window
Free with the purchase
of a building'
3614 Hwy 90 W. Marianna 850-482-8682




"Beautification of Your Home"
Carpentry/Painting Installations
Furniture Repair & Refinishing
General Repairs Insured




Custom Tile & Flooring, LLC
Natural Stone Ceramic Porcelain
Custom Showers Hardwood Laminate & More
No Job too Large or Srnal! Licensed & Insured
(850) 693-1423 or (850) 209-8099



For General House or
Office Cleaning
Call Debra
Free Estimates References Available
850-526-2336


must see to appreciate, CIIT'S AS EASY
$16,500 OBO, 334-687-6863,334-695-2161 YuL T AS 1 2 3
StarCraft9225ft -sleeps 6, veryclean, Yur source for selling and buying! 1 CALL 2 PLACE YOR AD 3 GETRESULTS
Microwave, CH&A, Stereo, $4,250. 334-791-4350 1 CALL 2. PLACE YOUR AD 3. GET RESULTS


Find jobs



fast and



easy!


ALL STRETCHEDo Tr
Limnousine & Taxi Service
I Al CARS EQUIPPED WITH CLOSED aRC T TV
FOR DRIVER PA5UEN6ER SECURIfTY
Stuv,iN ]~ Chso, wAnsrGon, HoES Hm






s89 down
33 Years in Business





Hall Roofing
Siding & Building LLC. -

SIDNEY HALL 4939 Hwy. 2
(850) 569-2021 Malone, ,
(850) 526-8441 Florida 32445



HAPPY .
HOME REPAIR
WE'LL BEAT ANY PRICE!!
Big Or Small Jobs WELCOME




Personal ToucK
Computer Repair
A+ AND NETWORK+ CERTIFIED
FREE PICKUP, DELIVERY, AND SET UP
WITHIN THE CITY LIMITS MARIANNAI
RICHARD REGISTER 850-557-6061


JACKSON COUNTY


FLORIDA

jcfloridan.com



monster

FIND LOCAL JOBS AT: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM/JOBS


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11












www.JCFLORIDAN.com CLASSIFIED


Jackson County Floridan *


Wey J 2 2 7 B


(6H1I TRANSPORTATION


SATURN '06 ION -129K miles asking $5,000
fully loaded, runs great 334-333-4957
Toyota '03 Camry, good condition, tan with
gray interior, approx. 155k miles, vehicle locat-
ed in Grand Ridge, FL $5500 850-209-4949
DO 12528
Toyota '03 Corolla LE- White with gold trim,
fully loaded with leather interior, sun roof, all
extras, 47k miles, like new $10,000.
Call 334-790-8725 or 334-699-7849
Toyota '07 Corolla LE- good condition, great
gas mileage, tan, approx. 81k miles, $11,000.
Call 251-300-1338
Toyota '08 Yarus- 23k miles, excellent condi-
tion, blue, 36 MPG in town, 5 speed $10,950.
Call 334-479-0099
Toyota '09 Tacoma Prerunner V6, 4 X 2 with
TRD Offroad Package Tow Package. Truck has
22,000 miles, under warranty, and clear title.
Included is an Undercover tonneau cover, nerf
bars, and bull bar. Drives great. 931-220-0118.

USED CARS FOR SALE
Ford '01 Escort ZxZ -
94k miles, 5 speed manual $2,900.
Volvo'91240-
ingnition problems $500.
Pontaic '93 Grand AM
124k miles, 4cyl. Auto $1,995.
Ford '02 Taurus Wagon
80k miles $2,995.
Ford '94 F150 XLT
4x4 Ext Cab, Transmission slipping $1,500.
Call 334-693-5159 or 334-618-5828


2006 Harley-Davidson Ultra Classic FLHTCUI,
vivid black, 7800 mi., one owner,l oaded, excel-
lent condition, jward3@netscape.com, $6,700,
206-984-4097
Harley Davidson '02 Sportster 1200 Custom 1lk
miles, Chromed Out, $5500. Call 334-691-3468
or 334-701-3855
Harley Davidson '10 Dyna-Super Glide Custom
96 Cubic Inch Motor, 6-spd transmission, only
21 Miles. 2 Brand New helmets included.
$9,000. Firm. Call Vicki 775-340-9795.
wZHarley Davidson '91
Sturgis Classic $7999.00.
2180 Montgomery Hwy.
Call 334-671-7720 or
718-2121.


Harley Davidson '96 Heritage Softtail FLSTN -
32k miles, emerald green/gun metal gray, lots
of extra chrome, new tires, extra parts and
bike cover. Harley Luggage with Purchase!
Price to SELL! S9500 OBO. Call 229-269-3834


Harley Davidson '99 Road King- good condition,
NEW pipes, tires, battery, backrest, and kick
stand. This deal won't last long!
$5900. Call 334-449-2794


HONDA '07 CBR,
600, loaded, 4,000
miles,stretch lowered,
2 brother exhaust, $6,000
N334-689-3518, 334-339-2352
Honda'07 Goldwing GL1800 Nav. comfort, amp,
many acc. ext. warr. 14K mi. blue in color
$15,500. 334-774-7230. Ready to Sell!


Kawasaki '08 Vulcan 900,
white and gold. Approx 5K
mi. FLAWLESS. $5995
334-797-0987

Kawasaki '09 KXF250
Motor by BPM, 2 brothers
performance pipe. Very
last bike for the motor-
crossing extremist
*334-726-3842
Kawasaki '96 800 Limited addition, lowered 5
inches, custom pipes, custom red python and
tribal paint, road gears, new tires, L-E-D lights
15K mi. Must hear and hear to appreciate.
$3500. 334-405-0928
Kawasaki Ninja '09 ZX-6E Monster. Less than
2500 miles, great condition, asking $8,000 obo.
Will include, blue medium Kawasaki female
jacket, and a large green male one, also a me-
dium blue size HJC helmet. Call 334-714-1758 or
email al scooby@yahoo.com
V-Star '07 1300 Tourer Windshield, engine
guard, hard saddlebag, 16k milbs, black,
$5,500. NEG Priced to SELL! Call 334-494-2736


2005 Honda Helix 250.
Great Shape, 4.800 Miles,
had adult rider, well main-
tained. 52,800. 334.793-
0192
Honda 1962 C102 super
cub 50, 4k miles, Black &
S- white, good condition,
electric start 3 speed,
W5$2.500. Firm. Call noon (M-
F) 334-347-9002
Yamaha 1976 Chappie Antique Scooter- yellow,
150CC, 1500 mile, runs, need carborator $595.
Call 334-793-3494


2003 Nissan Pathfinder SE: Tan, 3.5L, V6, 110K
miles, Cruise control, Power locks/windows, '
CD/cassette player, Tinted windows, Rear car-
go cover, Very Clean! $8,900, Call 334-702-7790.
Honda '03 CRV- gold, 124k
miles, power windows
and locks, excellent condi-
tion, good gas mileage,
58500. Call 786-223-2278
Hummer '06 SUT, Fully Loaded, Excellent
Condition, 106K miles, $24,000 For information,
call 334-726-1198 or 334-726-1199
Trail Blazer '03 LTZ 5 passenger, red in color
with gray leather int. DVD package. 133K
miles, $5500. exc. cond. 334-435-4177
SIJ: "11 1 : I .I JII J 1


'02 Dodge Ram 1500 4-wheel drive, quad cab,
P/U with 4.7 liter engine, cold air, chrome run-
ning boards, chrome rims, chrome tool box,
tow package and new tires. 149,698 miles.
Excellent condition. $8499. 334-790-6832.
Chevrolet '00 Silverado LS Z71 ext. cab, 4-door,
4x4, Red, 138K miles, all power, 5000 miles on
tires, tow package, Must see to appreciate.
$9500. 334-791-2781 or 334-677-3050
SChevrolet '02 S-10
regular cab, automatic,
4 cylinder, economical,
21,000 miles, 1 owner,
new tires, $6795. Call:
334-790n-7Q95q n 17747


Chevy 05' Silverado SLT 4x4 ext. silver beige in
color, cab, 88K miles $12,500. OBO 334-693-
0323.
Ford '02 F150 Harley
Davisdon Clean Truck,
$13,999. 2180
Montgomery Hwy. Call
334-671-7720 or 718-2121.

Ford '02 F250 XL, 4 door crew cab, 7.3 Itr diesel,
205,000 miles, diamond plated toolboxes,
$9,800 850-526-2507 no calls after 9pm
Ford '84 Ranger Pick-Up Truck, Runs good, Red
in color, Above average, Clean Truck $1295
334-793-2142


j Auto, $4,600 or reasonable
offer. Call 229-334-8520.

Ford '98 Ranger
regular cab, automatic,
V-6_1 owner, 24,000 miles,
LIKE NEW! $6795. Call:
334-790-7959. 'DO 12748
GMC '89 3500 Duramax
Diesel- work truck, long
wheel base, orange, re-
built engine, $1,950. OBO
Call 334-791-9099
KUHN KNIGHT Verti- Maxx
Mixer Model 5032 Twin
SAugers, knives have just
been replaced. $15,500.
Call 334-894-2315 or
334-464-3189
REDUCED FOR
QUICK SALE!
FORD '05 RANGER XLT -
4X4, 6cly., 4.0L, 4 doors, 5
passenger, ex. cond.
$10,600 0B0 334-689-9052
Toyota '07 Tacoma- Pre- runner SR5, fully load-
ed with leather interior. 45k miles, 6 cyl auto,
double cab, 2WD, dark blue, topper, 1 owner,
garage kept $20,500 OBO Call 850-482-8700


* TRACTOR IH1440 Combine,
Field Ready, Grain Head and Corn
Head. $8,500. 850-415-0438


TRACTOR '08-Massey Ferguson, 33HP, 200
Hours, like new, one owner, LOADED!
$25,000 OBO 334-687-3173,334-695-1802


02' VAN Venture blue is color, new engine,
$5000. 334-718-4912.
Chevrolet '97 Astro Van conversion Van raised
roof, loaded, new tires, 51K mi. $9,500. 334-897-
2054 or 334-464-1496
Ford '05 Work Van- one
owner, white, 80k miles,
no accidents, excellent
$9 condition,
$9000. Call 334-618-5019



Gaurenteed highest prices paid for your Junk
or unwanted vehicals & farming equipment,
Title or no Title 24 hrs a day,
also pay finders fee. n 334-596-0154 4.

Got a Clunker
*' r We'll be your Junker!
We buy wrecked cars
and Farm Equip. at a
fair and honest price! -
Average $ paid $225. :
L CALL 334-702-4323 D011208
mu..... U BU En i I i iUKEUUU i J


I also sell used parts
24 HOUR TOWING 4 334-792-8664 4=


WE PAY Ca$H
FOR JUNK CARS!!!!!!
334-818-1274 D012226


II


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WANTED JUNK
VEHICLES TOP PRICE!


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Wednesday, July 27, 2011- Br
Wednesday, July 27, 2011 7 B


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


i. ^ruas Super Sale!"


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Hot Dogs,
Hamburgers &
Sodas For Lunch
Fri. & Sat.


SALE NS
"ECI7130/11
''.'M -. ."ME JOIN US
C ;IT* GREAT SELECTION FRIENDLY STAFF ~
; YEARS OF SERVICE* GREAT PARTS &SERVICE DEPT
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All prices and discounts after any factory rebate, factory to dealer cash, plus tax, tag, title and registration and includes dealer fee. Subject to presale. 0.0%"
and 1.9% APR for 60 months, $500 bonus cash, with approved credit, S.E.T. finance only, Tier 1,2,3,4. '., '.. ... ." ... ,

IPIMIE-OIWNIEID VIEllHIlIlLIES SNUIPIElP AllhlE
10 CHRYSLER 09 DODGE 1500 SLT 08 GMC SIERRA SLT 08 CHEVY 07 MERCEDES 04 NISSAN XTERRA
300M DOUBLE CAB CREW CAB TRAL BLAZER LT Sunroof550 4x4
4 Door Sedan V-8, Automatic, V-8, Automatic Loaded! Leather Seats, Navigation, N* Nice!
Sharp! Nice Clean Truhck Nice Truck SPECIAL Sunroof Ma

Must Go! Come Get It! Priced To Go! I18,848 Luxury! Around


09 FORD FUSION
4 Door, Automatic,
Sharp Carl
REDUCED
$14,879

08 PONTIAC
TORRENT
Automatic,
Sharp Family Vehicle

Don't Miss It!

09 INFINITY
G37
Leather, Sunroof, Loaded,
Pearl White

Sharp!


09 HONDA
ACCORD EX-L
V-6, Leather,
Sunroof

Sharp!

07 CHEVY UPLANDER
Alloy Wheels, No Leather.
No Sunroof
Great Family
Vehicle


08 FORD
EDGE SEL
Automatic,
Great Utility Vehicle

Priced To Go!

07 FORD
F-150 REG. CAB
V-8,
Nice Truck

"Long Bed"


10 CHRYSLER
SEBRING
Automatic,
Sharp 4 Door Sedan

Hurry!


06 CHEVY COBALT
Automatic, Sunroof,
Sporty
SUPER DEAL
8,979


07 FORD 05 TOYOTA
MUSTANG SIENNA
Sporty! Sharp Family Van
PRICED TO GO PRICED TO GO

$11,888 11,879


09 LEXUS 10 CHEVY 09 CHEVY
RX350 IMPALA ,TAHOE LS
Leather, 4 Door Sedan, Sharp 3rd Seat, Alloy Wheels,
Sunroof SPECIAL! Tow Pkg.

Super Nice! $15,879 Come Get It!


07 FORD
EXPEDITION XLT
3rd Seat, V-8
Sharp SUVI


SAVE!


04 CHEVY
S-10 DOUBLE CAB
Automatic,
4x4

Come Get It!

10 NISSAN
MAXIMA
V-6,
Automatic

Sharp!

06 CADILLAC
CTS
Leather, Luxury,
Only 30K Miles

Don't Miss It!


I _MORE TO CHOOSE FROM!


* 7 Years, 100,000 Mile
Limited Warranty**
-7 Years, 100,000 Mile
Roadside Assistance
sWI I


10 TOYOTA
TUNDRA
Double Cab, V-8, 4x4,
Leather Seats
SPECIAL


09 TOYOTA
COROLLA LIE
4 Door,
Automatic
Nice Sharp Car!


7 Years


09 TOYOTA
CREW MAX 4x4
Sr5 V-8, Tow Pkg.,
Tool Box
SPECIAL


09 TOYOTA
AMRY LE
4 Door Sedan, Power Pkg.
Cruise Control


**


* 160 Point
Assurance
* Great Sele
Stock To C


Year 12,000 Mile Platinum Warranty
- 100,000 Miles Limited Powertrain Warranty
S,.-.EAT DEALS...COME AND GET


06 TOYOTA
LANDCRUInER
Leather, Sunroot, 4x4
WAS $33,949
SPECIAL


f1 TOYOTA
TACOMA EXT. tAD
4x4, Low Miles
Sharp Truck
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Quality
e inspection
actionn In
Choose From



THEM!


*.. ..*.-. .*** . ......... .. ,i .i , ; ... .. :^.r;. ,- ".- '-, .
IITOYOTA ^ ~1OTOYOTA if IOTOYOTA IOTOYOTA
4-RUNNER UNITED 4-RUNNE UNITED 4i IIDIHAIADR UNITED IIOOIA UNITED
V.6, Navigation, Leather V-6, Leather, Sunroof, Sunroof, Leather, Sunroot, Leather,
Seats, Sunroof, Tow Pkg., Navigation, WAS S43,747 DVD Player, 3nrd Seat, Tow Pkg.,
9K MIles SUPER DEAL Tow Pkg. Real Nice SUV!
cOME SEE IT! j ,949 LOADED! SHARP!

T I T..09 T 09 TOYOTA 07 TOYOTA W-, 0 TOYOTA
YARI VENZA CAMRYLE TUNDRAiRE&.CAB
Autlomatic, Automatic, 4 Door, Automatic, V-8 4x4
Alloy Wheels 38K Miles Low Miles
"A" REDUCED!
1~.~ ~ 94DON MISS IT SHARP!


David Chris Travis Ronnie Steve Vance Elliott Steven Brandon Lester r
Cumbie Farrar Russ Allen Hughes McGough Curry Adkison Baxley Tinsley
Sales Mgr. Sales Sales Sales Sales Sales Sales Sales Sales Sales Mgr.
All Prices and Discounts After Any Factory Rebate, Factory To Dealer Cash Incentives, Plus Tax and Tag. Subject to Presale.
Remember, If You
W-11Can't Come To
SUs, Just Give Us
S) 2961 Penn. Ave., Marianna, FL Cl, W'llrive
S; A Call, We'll Drive
-" Eaa -"..."it To You.


MORE TO CHOOS FROM!


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S8B WEDNESDAY, July 27 2011


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