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Jackson County Floridan
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028304/00614
 Material Information
Title: Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title: Sunday Floridan
Portion of title: Floridan
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Jackson County Floridan
Publisher: Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Marianna Fla
Publication Date: 7/13/2011
Frequency: daily (except saturday and monday)[<1979-1995>]
weekly[ former 1934-<1955>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates: 30.776389 x -85.238056 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note: "Independent."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID: UF00028304:00614
 Related Items
Preceded by: Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by: Marianna Floridan

Full Text





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Vol.88 No.133


Marianna workers get 3 percent raises


Will offset increase in retirement contributions


BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com

Marianna city employees will
get 3 percent raises to offset the 3
percent contribution they must
make to their own retirement


funds as members of the state
retirement system.
That contribution was man-
dated by the state legislature
earlier this year.
The Marianna City Commis-
sion voted unanimously to grant


the raises on Monday night. Be-
cause the city, as the employer,
will have to contribute 4 percent
less into the retirement system
of employees because of reforms
enacted by the legislature, the
expense of the raises will essen-


tially be "a wash" for city govern- age overall.
ment, City Manager Jim Dean He felt the state was "playing
said. with the numbers" at the ex-
Commissioner John Roberts pense of employees. He also said
had been a proponent of putting he was discouraged by decreases
city workers on the state retire- in the benefits to employees in
ment system when that move the state retirement system, and
was made a few years back. Rob- that he felt the changes "messed
erts said Monday he was both- up the integrity of the retirement
ered by the state's reform pack- system."


I.T.LEGAL GAMBLING OR NOT?



Marianna to study




banning Internet cafes

BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER ;. .' .-
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com . ':,', .. ...-:: .. .


So-called "Internet cafes" may or may
not be allowed in Marianna. There are
mixed opinions among city commis-
sioners, and they'll talk the issue out
in a special session in a few days. The
specific date for that session has not
yet been set.
Marianna Police Chief Hayes Baggett
and State Attorney Glenn Hess pleaded
with commissioners Monday to ban
the game parlors, saying they con-
sidered the businesses nothing more
than illegal gambling houses that draw
criminal elements into the city. They
two said the late-night game rooms in-
vite trouble.with so much money float-
ing around. They showed a videotaped
armed robbery which occurred at such
an establishment in another Florida
county.
However, most acknowledge that the
issue constitutes a "gray area" of the
law, and legislators have failed to take
action at the state-leyel.
Resident Kenneth Corder, who said
he has no connection to the cafes ex-
cept as a customer, appeared before'
the commission to offer a different
view. If large sums of money being in
play is the issue, he said the city might
want to consider a ban on convenience
stores, grocery stores and liquor stores.
He said the higher crime rates cited by
Hess and Baggett might be due to the
fact that the crime rates were occur-
ring in larger communities with larger
populations and naturally higher
crime rates.
He pointed out that many attempts
to prosecute operators of such cafes

ONLINE.
)) Listen to Glen Hess' arguments
against Internet game parlors at
jcfloridan.com


,l-' : il h l- I' HM LTI." I' 'l, 'I..,
State Attorney Glenn Hess (left) and Marianna Police Chief Hayes Baggett talk to the
Marianna City Commission Monday night about why they want the city to ban so-called
"Internet cafes."


have failed in other communities, and
that this should send a message to the
,city. Cordbr said the businesses of-
fer legal sweepstakes games involving
predetermined winning tickets, much
like the fast food scratch-off games.


Other supporters of the gaming sys-
tems have offered similar arguments,
saying they are not like casino-based
games in which the player takes his
See CAFES, Page 7A


Court


Man who


attempted


to flee gets


10 years

BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com

Ronald Nelson Brown was sentenced
to 10 years in prison Monday. Convict-
ed last month of fleeing or attempting
to elude police early this year, Brown
spoke to Circuit Court Judge Bill Wright
before sentence was passed.
"I know I made some mistakes,"
Brown said. "I came here in 2009 to help
family, but my alcohol I have a hang-
up with that. I relapsed, it has been hard
for me. But I do no drugs, and I ask you,
can you give me a chance?"
However, prosecutor Russ Wilson told
Wright that Brown has a criminal his-
tory which includes five felonies and
several misdemeanors.


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Ronald Nelson Brown talks to Circuit Judge
Bill Wright Monday, as defense attorney
Elizabeth Simpson looks on.


SCity rents space to Internet provider


DEBORAH BUCKHALTER/FLORIbAN
Dale Laney talks to the Marianna City Commission Monday
about the possibility of Atlanta-based Mainstreet Broadband
placing equipment on a city water tower.


BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER Mainstreet Broadband a five-year
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com contract with the right to renew for
four additional five-year terms.
An Internet service provider was It has an escalator clause that
given tentative permission to install could increase the city's rent over
eight antennas and -two 3-foot mi- time, in yearly 3 percent increments,
crowave dishes on the' upper-level according to Dale Laney, a site ac-
handrails of one of Marianna's wa- quisition specialist who brought the
ter towers. It will also build a six- proposal to the city. Laney works for
by-eight feet concrete pad on the Compass Technology Services, and
ground nearby for an equipment that company is under contract with
cabinet. The ground-level equip- Mainstreet Broadband to find suit-
ment supports the overhead tele- able tower sites. It is not an exclusive
communications system for wireless contract. Laney said the company
broadband. will be leaving plenty of room for
In exchange, the city will receive other renters who may want to re-
$500 a month in rent for the space. serve space on the city water tower.
The deal passed unanimously, sub- He expects that, once the lease is
ject to legal review of the contract by signed, the equipment could be up
city attorney Frank Bondurant. in 60 days.
The terms, as stated at the city "It gives everybody just another
commission's meeting Monday option for wireless Internet service,"
night, would give Atlanta-based he said. "We loop the connectiv-


ity between sites with microwave
technology rather than using under-
ground or fiber lines."
He said he didn't know exactly
when the system would go live, be-
cause Mainstreet Broadband has
several other contracts for other
sites that are in various stages of
readiness. Rather that putting them
each online piecemeal, Laney said
the company is going to wait until
the majority are ready to put most or
all into operation at once.
The coverage areas pan go from
three to about eight miles out, he
said, depending in part on barriers
that limit the signals. He said some
of the systems are up and running
in south Georgia and other parts of
north Florida.
"We're trying to blanket that por-
tion of the state and that region in
Georgia," he said.


> CLASSIFIEDS...5-7B


> ENTERTAINMENT...4B


) LOCAL...3A


> OBITUARIES...7A


> OFPFiJi0...4A


> SPORTS...1-3B


STVLISTINGS...3B


This Newspaper
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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


712A WEDNESDAY. JULY 13, 2011


Today Heat and Storms.
TO -Justin Kiefer WMBB


High- 970
Low -76


High 96
Low 770


STomorrow
Scattered Storms.


High- 93
Low 760


Saturday
Scattered Storms.


High 930
Low 76


Friday
Scattered Storms.



-j High 92
S^I. Low 740

Sunday
PM Thunder.


TIDES ULTRA VIOLET INDEX


Panama City Low -
Apalachicola Low -
Poit St. Joe Low -
Destin Low -
Pensacola Low -
RIVER READINGS
Woodruff
Blountstown '
Marianna
Caryville


8:04 PM
8:32 PM
7:30 PM
8:41 PM
9:15 PM


High
High
High
High
High


Reading
39.01 ft.
.63 ft.
S4.61 ft.
1.13 ft.


8:54 AM
6:07 AM
8:45 AM
9:18 AM
9:51 AM


Flood Stage
66.0 ft.
15.0 ft.
19.0 ft.
12.0 ft.


0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8-10 Very High, 11+ Extreme
0 1 2 3


,THE SUN AND MOON
Sunrise 5:47 AM
Sunset 7:46 PM
Moonrise 6:35 PM
Moonset 5:06 AM (Thu)


July July July Aug.
15 23 30 6


FLoRIDA'S 38R1.
PANHANDLE

MEDIA PARTNERS WJAQ 100.9
,a .. , , ..


JACKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN
Publisher Valeria Roberts
vroberts@jcfloridan.com

Managing Editor Michael Becker
mbecker@jcfloridan.com

Circulation Manager- Dena Oberski
doberski@jcfloridan.com



-I3


CONTACT US
Telephone: (850) 526-3614
FAX: (850) 482-4478
Email: editorial@jcfloridan.com
Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447
Street Address:
4403 Constitution Lane
Marianna, FL 32446
Office Hours:
Weekdays, 8 a.m,to 5 p.m.

MISS YOUR PAPER?
*You should receive your newspaper no later
than 6 a.m. If it does not arrive, call Circula-
tion between 6 a.m. and noon, Tuesday to
Friday, and 7 a.m:to 11 a.m. on Sunday. The
Jackson County Floridan (USPS 271-840)
is published Tuesday though Friday and
Sunday mornings. Periodical postage paid
at Marianna, FL.

SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Home delivery: $11.:23 per month; $32.83
for three months; $62.05 forsix months;
and $123.45 for one year. All prices include
applicable state and local taxes. Mail'
subscriptions must be paid in advance. Mail
subscriptions are: $46.12 for three months;
$92.24 for six months; and $184.47 for one
year.
ADVERTISING
The advertiser agrees that the publisher
shall not be liable for damages arising
out of errors and advertisements beyond
the amount paid for the space actually
occupied by that portion of the advertise-
ments in which the error occurred, whether
such error is due to the negligence of the.
publisher's employees or otherwise, and
there shall be not liability for non-inser-
tion of any advertisement beyond the
amount paid for such advertisement. This
newspaper will not knowingly accept or
publish illegal material of any kind. Advertis-
ing which expresses preference based on
legally protected personal characteristics is
.not acceptable.
HOWTO GETlYOUR
NEWS PUBLISHED
The Jackson County Floridan will publish
news of general interest free of charge.
Submit your news or Community Calendar
events via email, fax, mail, or hand delivery.*
Fees may apply for wedding, engagement,
anniversary and birth announcements.
Forms are available at the Floridan offices.
Photographs must be of good quality and
suitable for print. The Floridan reserves the
right to edit all submissions.
GETTING IT RIGHT
The Jackson County Floridan's policy
is to correct mistakes promptly. To
report an error, please call 526-3614
Monday-Friday.


Community Calendar


TODAY
Chipola College will hold early fall registra-
tion for new and returning students from 8 a.m. to
3 p.m. Call 718-2211; visit www.chipola.edu.
a Jackson County Habitat for Humanity
Warehouse hours: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open meeting, noon
to 1 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901
Caledonia St., Marianna, in the AA room.
)) "Cool Church" Ito 4 p.m. Monday-Friday in
the Marianna First United Methodist Church Fellow-
ship Hall (inside the Youth building). Stay cool with
free air conditioning. Call 482-4502.

THURSDAY, JULY 14
D Jackson County Farmers Market is open 6.30.
a.m. to noon (or until goods sell out) Tuesdays,
Thursday and Saturdays in Madison Street Park in
Marianna.
) Emerald Coast Hospice Summer Educa-
tion Series presents "Transitions: Home health
to Hospice" at 4374 Lafayette St. in Marianna.
Two sessions: 7 a.m. and 4 p.m. CEU (1) available
through Troy University. Health care workers, public
welcome. No charge. Call 526-3577.
) Chipola College will hold early fall registra-
tion for new and returning students from 8 a.m. to
3 p.m. Call 718-2211; visit www.chipola.edu.
) Orientation 1 to 4 p.m. at the Goodwill Career
Training Center, 4742 Highway 90 in Marianna. Reg-
ister for free job placement and computer training
classes offered to people with disadvantages/dis-
abilities. Call 526-0139.
) Free Summer Concert Series Going 4 Broke,
7 to 9 p.m. at Citizens Lodge Park in Marianna. Bring
lawn chairs, coolers. Presented by Jackson County
Parks department and Main Street Marianna.
Marianna Moose Lodge No. 1026 will sell jumbo
hot dogs, chips and drinks during the concert; net
proceeds benefit Moose charities. Call 718-5210 or
718-1022.
Alcoholics Anonymous Closed discussion, 8
to 9 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901 Cale-
donia St., Marianna, in the AA room. Attendance
limited to persons with a desire to stop drinking.

FRIDAY, JULY 15
International Chat-n-Sip 8:30 to 10 a.m. at
2929 Green St. in Marianna. Jackson County Public
Library Learning Center staff and their international


English learners invite the public for the exchange
of language, culture and ideas a relaxed environ-
ment. Light refreshments served. No charge. Call
482-9124.
D Blood Drive Southeastern Community Blood
Center's mobile unit will be at Hair by Heart in
Marianna, noon to 3 p.m.; and at Marianna Twin
Cinemas, 3:30 to 8 p.m.; or give blood 9 a.m. to
6 p.m. Monday-Friday at 2503 Commercial Park
Drive, Marianna. Call 526-4403.
) Celebrate Recovery Adult, teen meetings to
"overcome hurts, habits and hang-ups in a safe
environment," 7 p.m., Evangel Worship Center, 2645
Pebble Hill Road. Dinner: 6 p.m. (free for first-time
guests). Child care available. Call 209-7856.
D "Passing" Inspired by the story of Minerva
Roulhac, the play deals with the issues of race,
identity and interracial relationships. Curtain: 6 p.m.
at the Chipola College Theatre in Marianna. Tickets:
$25 at the door ($20 advance tickets available
online.at passing.eventbrite.com). Group, sponsor
rates available; call 482-3915 or 482-4201.
)) Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, 8 to
9 p.m. in the AA room at First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St., Marianna.

SATURDAY, JULY 16
D Jackson County Farmers Market is open 6:30
a.m. to noon (or until goods sell out) Tuesdays,
Thursday and Saturdays in Madison Street Park in
Marianna.
P Yard Sale, 7 a m to noon, rain or shine, at 3115
Main St. in Cottondale, to benefit Heaven's Garden
Worship Center and Food Pantry Outreach. New and
used items. Call 579-9963 or visit www.aidaspina.
org. ,
D Jackson County Health Department Closing
the Gap program offers a free Pilates class, 8:30
a.m. at Integras Wellness Center, 4230 Lafayette
St., Suite C, in Marianna. Call 482-6221.
n Alford Community Health Clinic is open 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. at 1770 Carolina St. in Alford. Free
healthcare available for income-eligible patients
without medical insurance. Appointments available
(call 263-7106 or 209-5501); walk-ins welcome.
Sign in before noon.
) Jackson County Coqrmunity Helpers Club
invites the public to an event with fun, food, gospel
music and surprises: "Lest We Forget,"' honoring
club founder Ora Mae Peterson is noon to 2 p.m. at
the club site: 4571 Dickson Road in Greenwood. Call


592-4649.
) Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, 4:30 to
5:30 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist,
Church, 2901 Caledonia St., Marianna.

SUNDAY, JULY 17
D Peacock Family Reunion Descendants of
James Kilnson Peacock and Mary Elizabeth Pierce
gather for their annual reunion at 10 a.m. in Frink
Gym at Sam Atkins Park's Panhandle Pioneer
Settlement, 17869 NW Pioneer Settlement Road,
Blountstown. Bring favorite dishes, serving utensils,
beverages for a noon lunch. Bring family photos,
stories to share. R.S.V.P. to ddpeacoc77@embarq
mail.com, 222-4787 or 482-3477.
)) 89th Gabe Morris Family Reunion Gather in
the Alford Civic Center at 10 a.m. Lunch is at noon.
Bring a well-filled basket (plates, drink furnished).
D Alcoholics Anonymous closed discussion, 6:30
p.m., 4349 W. Lafayette St., Marianna (in one-story
building behind 4351W. Lafayette St.). Attendance
limited to persons with a desire to stop drinking.

MONDAY, JULY 18
Free reading program "One World, Many
Stories," the Jackson County Public Library summer
reading program for children 12 and younger, will be
at the Sneads First Baptist Church July 18-21. Activi-
ties start at 9 a.m. for pre-school kids; 10:15 a.m. for
school-age. Call 482-9631 to reserve a spot.
n Orientation -10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Goodwill
Career Training Center, 4742 Highway 90 in Mari-
anna. Register for free job placement and computer
training classes offered to people with disadvan-
tages/disabilities. Call 526-0139,
) Alford Community Organization meeting in the
Alford Community Center, third Mondays, 6 p.m.
New members from Alford, surrounding communi-
ties invited to join. Call 579-4482 or 638-4900.
Jackson County Health Department "Closing
the Gap" program offers a free yoga class, 5:30 p.m.
at Integras Wellness Center, 4230'Lafayette St.,
Suite C, in Marianna. Mat provided.Call 482-6221.
) Concerned American Patriots of Jackson
County's monthly meeting is at 6 p.m. in the
Jackson County Agriculture Center on US 90
West. Author, professor, West Point grad and veteran
Dr. Leland Baker will present, "U.S. Government
Bankruptcy Facts for Citizens Who Don't Have a
Financial Degree." Free admission; public welcome.


The submission deadline for this calendar is two days before publication. Submit to: C omrnunity Calendar, Jackson County Floridan, P. 0. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447, *
email editorial@jcfloridan.com, fax (850) 482-4478 or bring items to 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.

Police Roundup


MARIANNA POLICE
DEPARTMENT.
The Marianna Police De-
partment listed the following
incidents for July 11, the latest
available report:
One accident 2 "--
with'no injuries, --.
two suspicious ME
vehicles, one 4. _
suspicious per-
son, one bur-
glary, one verbal disturbance,
one burglar alarm, seven traffic
stops, one criminal mischief
complaint, one trespassing
complaint; one found/aban-
doned property complaint,
three follow-up investigations,
one juvenile complaint, one
assist of another agency, two
public service calls and one
threat/harassment complaint.


JACKSON COUNTY


SHERIFF'S OFFICE
The Jackson County Sheriff's
Office and county Fire/Rescue
reported the following incidents
for July 11, the latest available
report. (Some of these calls may
be related to after-hours calls
taken on behalf of Graceville
and Cottondale police depart-
ments): One accident with
injury, one hospice death, three
abandoned vehicles, five suspi-
cious vehicles, one suspicious
incident, four suspicious per-
sons, one escort, one highway
obstruction, one burglary, two
physical disturbances, two
verbal disturbances, one power
line down, 17 medical calls, two
traffic crashes, three burglar
alarms, 23 traffic stops, one
larceny complaint, one criminal
mischief complaint, one found/
abandoned property report,
three follow-up investigations,
two juvenile complaints, two


assaults, two assists of motor-
ists or pedestrians, two assists
of other agencies, eight public
service calls and five threat/ha-
rassment complaints.

-JACKSON COUNTY
CORRECTIONAL FACILITY
The following persons were
booked into the county jail dur-
ing the latest reporting periods:
) Carl Menchion, 45, 3424
Poplar Springs Road, Marianna,
battery-domestic violence.
) KimberlyBlount, 34,3070
Carter's Mill Road, Apt. H2,
Marianna, battery-domestic
violence, criminal mischief less
than $200. '
)) Mikhael Mills, 23, 4988 Lau-
derdale Lane, Bascom, resisting
without violence.
) Katriel Houlihan, 20, 4600
Willow Way, Marianna, driving
under the influence under 21.


)) Margaret McNeil, 43,2300
North Sherman Ave., Apt. 44,
Panama City, violation of state
probation.
)) Josh Garrett, 23, 3124 Old
U.S. Road, Marianna, contempt
of court.
A Michelle Dixon, 33, 2925A
Albert St., Marianna, know-
ingly driving while license
suspended/revoked.
) Bennie Thompson, 28,201
Son-in-Law Road, Bonifay,
hold for court/hold for Dept. of
Corrections.
D Keith McMillian, 31,140
Magnolia Ave., Gretna, domes-
tic battery by strangulation, ag-
gravated assault with a deadly
weapon.

JAIL POPULATION: 212

To report a crime, call CrimeStoppers
at 526-5000 or a local law enforcement
agency. To report a wildlife violation, call
1-888-404-FWCC (3922).


WAIE-UP CALL










JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Jackson honored with appreciation


luncheon for her service as midwife


Special to the Floridan

Colleagues, friends and family
members gathered for an apprecia'-
tion luncheon honoring Annie Mae
Jackson on May24 at the Gazebo Cof-
fee Shdppe in downtown Marianna.
Attending the affair were Beverly
Hinson, former director of nurses
for the Jackson County Health De-
partment; Julie McKinney, JCHD's
current director of nurses; Bill Dean,
former environmental health direc-
tor; Elmore Bryant, Eulice Bryant,
Rick Bass and Robert Pender.
Also present were event sponsors
SRuth Bass and Sarah Pender, who
Worked as public health nurses for
JCHD when the guest of honor was
a midwife.
Jackson served the southwest sec-
tion of Marianna from 1961 to 1980.
She was supervised by Toi Morse,


PHN for the Marianna area, and Dr.
Glenn Padgett, her supervising M.D.
Accompanying the honoree was
her daughter, Eva Mae Holden.
There were kudos from Julie McK-
inney, who was amazed by some of
the history about the midwifery ser-
vices and the opportunity to meet
Jackson.
Jackson was congratulated for her
services to the county, and expres-
sions of gratitude were offered by
Elmore and Eulice Bryant.
The history of the midwifery pro-
gram and Well Child Services was
discussed by Bass and Pender.
William Long, administrator for
JCHD, said that he was delighted to
meet and congratulate Jackson for
her outstanding service to the de-
partment. Long said that it was dif-
ficult to imagine home deliveries, let
alone without complications, infec-


tions or sterilized supplies, and that
it is all amazing when they are com-
pared to present-day procedures.
He told the group about some of the
features of the new Jackson County
Health Department and offered to
give Jackson a personal tour of the
new facility when it is completed.
There were remarks by the honor-
ee, who reminisced about her time
as a midwife, expressed gratitude for
the event in her honor and to JCHD .
for the opportunity to become a
midwife arid serve the community, .
which she did cheerfully, without re-
gret, until she retired.,
A Dutch-treat meal was enjoyed
by all, and Jackson, a bird lover, re-
ceived a gift of a bird feeder. She was
also presented with flowers and a SUBMITTEDPHOTO
certificate of appreciation. Jackson Annie Mae Jackson, guest of honor at an appreciation luncheon
is an active member of the Jerusalem on May 24, was celebrated for her service as a midwife in
A.M.E. Church. Jackson County.


66-POUNDER


SUBMITTED PHOTO
The lingering drought didn't seem to affect this 66-pound watermelon produced in
Jackson County. It was purchased by John Smith, shown here with the melon, and
grown by a fellow Grand Ridge resident, Chris Stone."


Special to the Floridan

Life Management Center
will offer a training course
to individuals and families
interested in helping the
community's mostvulner-
able children.
The eight-week course is
comprised of 24 hours of
training.
During sessions, partici-
pants can expect to learn
more about the child wel-
fare system, gain an under-
standing of the behavioral
and emotional trauma that
can be encountered when
caring for a child who has


been abused or neglected,
and how to help that child
with their own loss and
grief issues.
Beginning at 6 p.m. on
Monday, July 18, sessions
will be conducted at Life
Management Center's
Marianna office, located at
4403 Jackson St.
According to, a press re-
lease from the organiza-
tion, there is a significant
need in the area for fami-
lies to step forward and
help these young citizens.
For more information,
contact Christie Bascetta
toll free at 1-866-769-9481.


GAS WATCH
Gas prices are going up. Here
are the least expensive places to
buy gas in Jackson County, as of
Tuesday afternoon.
L $3.55 Dar-bee's, Hwy 90,
Cypress
2. $3.55 McCoy's, Jefferson
Street, Marianna
3. $3.56 BP, River Road,
Sneads
4. $3.57 BP, Hwy 231, Alford
5. $3.57 Pilot, Hwy 71 near
1-10

It 3 r,.' 3ner (, 77


Bridge club results


Special to the Floridan

The Marianna Dupli-
cate Bridge Club plays
bridge on Monday after-
noons in the St. Luke's
Episcopal Church Parish
Hall. For the week of July
11, the winners were as
follows:
) First place Lois
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You can find us on Twitter and Facebook!
can uso


Hobbsjoins


Tallahassee law firm


Special to the Floridan

Commercial law firm
Becker & Poliakoff, with at-
torneys and lobbyists in 13
Florida offices, New York
City, New Jersey and Wash-
ington, D.C., announced
on July 11 that attorney
Ryan Hobbs has joined the
firm in the business litiga-
tion practice group in the
Tallahassee office.
A native of Marianna,
Hobbs focuses his practice
in the area of commercial
litigation, labor and em-
ployment law and election
law.
According to a press
release from the firm,
Hobbs' litigation experi-
ence includes the suc-
cessful representation of
Florida's secretary of state
in a statewide lawsuit chal-


lenging ballot placement
of referenda during the
2008 general
election. H6
also success-
fully repre-
sented a po-
litical party's

Hobbs committee,
as well as the
-party's Florida committee,
in a lawsuit involvingelec-
tion proceedings during
the 2008 general election,
the press release said.
Hobbs received his J.D.
from the University of
North Carolina School
of Law and his B.S. de-
gree from Florida State
University.
During law school he
clerked for North Carolina
Court of Appeals Judge
James A. Wynn.


Taylor earns medical degree


Special to the Floridan

Dr. Brandon A. Taylor
completed all necessary
requirements for a medi-
cal degree, and graduated
in the Class of 2011, from
the University of South
Alabama College of Medi-
cine in Mobile, Ala.
Dr. Taylor will begin his


residency in orthopedic
surgery at the University
of South Alabama Health
System.
He completed his pre-
medical course work at
USA and graduated in bio-
medical sciences.
Dr. Taylor is from Mari-
anna and is the son of Mar-
cellus and Vicki Taylor.


Special to the Floridan

Marriages and divorces
as reported for the week of
July 4-8.
Marriages
) Angie Denise Barnes
and Ernest Dwayne
Johnson.
) Jerad Glendon Johnson


Ora MFock, GRI
Broker/Associate


and Rylee Jean Redd.
) Keely Granger Bouron-
cle and Tony R. Mitchell.
) Brittny Cheri Dunn and
Richard Newton Dunnam.
) Bradley Thomas Good-
win and Tulae S. Scipper.
Divorces
None reported.


Call Ora For
All Your Real
Estate Needs In
Florida And/Or
Alabama!

Multi-Million
Dollar
Producer


Wgiy Cell: 850-526-9516 t
Office: 850-526-5260 '
E-Mail: oramock@embarqmail.com
4257 Lafayette St., Marianna, FL



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WEDNESDAY, JULY13, 2011 3AF


LOCAL















Publisher
VALERIA ROBERTS

Managing Editor
MICHAEL BECKER


Our Opinion


Linking.up with


the 21st Century
T hose who attended the most recent First
Friday breakfast put on by the chamber
of commerce, or who read the Floridan's
coverage of it, learned that high-speed Internet
is coming to this part of Florida in less than two
years.
However, don't get too excited just yet. What is
happening is the infrastructure to provide high-
speed broadband is coming to the Panhandle. It
will be up to phone, cable and cellphone compa-
nies to hook into that, and then provide it to their
customers.
Still, it is a step in the right direction, and not
just for those who want to play Farmville at home
all day. Schools, businesses and even municipal
governments will benefit from increased Internet
access and more options.
Like the rural electrification efforts of the 1930s,
jl940s and 1950s, expanding broadband access
will have ripple effects for the entire economy.
- Back in the day when rural communities were
added to the power grid, those families, bought
appliances and fixtures to make use of that new
service, which helped in part to spur the expan-
sion of industry in this country. Broadband isn't
quite the same while some may buy newer
computers, any economic expansion will be seen
in services, rather than industry.
Nbonetheless, giving residents of Jackson County
expanded Internet access will usher in new op-
portunities for consumers and businesses. And
any profits generated from the broadband expan-
sion will ploughed back into other infrastructure,
like water and sewer services, that may be needed
to attract more investment and hence create
more jobs. And not just on Farmville.


Letters to the Editor
Verdict not shocking,
but disappointing

When the news media released the results of the jury's
verdict in the Casey Anthony murder trial, I was not
shocked, but I was deeply disappointed.
I was not shocked because during this trial, it was
publicly announced that we had a judge declare
Florida's death penalty law unconstitutional. This dec-
laration is in violation of God's Word: "Whoso sheddeth
man's blood, by man shall his blood be shed: for in the
image of God made He man."
Due to the liberal status of many of our. citizens in
Florida; a high percentage in southern Florida would'
cause them to oppose the death penalty. Therefore,
members of this jury who hold this belief would oppose
the verdict.
I was not shocked because Casey Anthony's state-
funded lawyer is against the Florida death penalty.
I was disappointed because justice has not been
served for'Caylee Anthony. Someone took her life with
forethought. I was disappointed because the same jury
found Casey Anthony a repeated liar, which should
have caused anyone to want to know, why the lies?
If her lawyers knew she lied, they will have to answer
before God one day for their help in getting a guilty
person set free. Casey Anthony will also, before God,
answer for these lies. I was disappointed because mil-
lions of taxpayer's, dollars have been spent setting this
young lady free.
She will fever have to answer the questions as to why
she lied. Wake up, citizens of Florida, this will not be the
last time. When a murderer can be set free, that mur-
derer will do it again.
REV. DR. BILLY BRUNER, TH.D.
Cottondale

Letters to the Editor
Submit letters by either mailing to Editor, P.O. Box 520.
Marianna FL, 32447 or faxing to 850-482-4478 or send
email to editor ia@jcflondan.com. The Floridan reserves
the right to edit or not publish any letter. Be sure to
include your full address and telephone number. These
will only be used to verify the letter and will not be
printed. For more information call (850) 526-3614.


SJ S st. s
@ 2011 Jeff Stahler/Dist. by Universal UClick for UFS


P DOWN
OUKEDOW


That flip-flopping Mitt


BY DONNA BRAZILE

T nston Churchill once
\ called a political oppo-
V nent "the greatest living
master of falling without hurting
himself." GOP presidential aspi-
rant Mitt Romney has achieved a
similar feat. He has flip-flopped
more than once within a single
week breaking, or re-breaking,
an ankle each time.
If Romney's performance wasn't
so comical and misleading, I'd
almost pity him. Instead, I feel
sorry for Republicans who have
been disappointed by this crop of
candidates.
This group reminds me of a tweet
from a young pro-democracy Egyp-
tian I met recently while traveling
through Israel and the West Bank:
"Our candidates are disappointing
us even before they're elected."
Romney said recently of Presi-
dent Barack Obama, "He made the
recession worse and the recovery
,more anemic."
Romney's Republican audience
ate up his statement. But shortly
after spewing those words, he had
to eat them. Washington Post fact-
checker Glenn Kessler reminded
Romney that the National Bureau
of Economic Research officially
declared the recession over six
months after Obama took office.
And The Associated Press de-


cared that, "Obama did not, as
Romney alleged, make the econo-
my worse than it was when he took
office.",
Here are some more truths for
Romney:
) Private-sector employment
increased during the last 15 con-
secutive months. (Bureau of Labor
Statistics).
a Obama's policies have increase
the number of people employed
during the first quarter of 2011
(Congressional Budget Office).
) The Recovery Act added 2.4
to 3.6 million jobs during the first
quarter of 2011 (Council of Eco-
nomic Advisers).
Confronted with these facts,
Romney flipped, but not in the way
you might expect..He didn't retract
his original statement or com-
ments; he simply claimed never to
have made them.
"I didn't say that things are
worse," Romney told a reporter.
"What I said was that the economy
hasn't turned around."
Mr. Romney, you do know that
folks tend to take notes during
these kinds of events? You claimed
on the record more than once'
-that President Obama had made
the recession worse. By suggesting
he never made these comments,
Romney is pushing. the limits of the
GOP silliness.
Caught with his facts down, Rom-


ney flopped back on the Fourth of
July He claimed, before a group.
of voters, that, "the recession is
deeper because of our president."
As political columnist Steve
Benen observed, "Romney is argu-
ing, at the exact same time, that the
'recession' is worse and that there's
been an economic 'recovery."'
Another example: The Republican
I National Committee recently put
out a statement suggesting that the
stimulus cost thousands of dollars
per job created. Yet, at the same
time, Republican talking heads
suggested that the stimulus did not
create a single job.
Of course, among Republicans,
flip-flopping well is merely a venial
sin. Doing it badly is a cardinal one.
If Romney keeps flopping over his
flips, Republican primary voters
may begin to doubt his ability to
run against the.well-tuned Obama
campaign in 2012.
Say what you will about GOP pri-
mary voters, they know how to sniff
out a lack of authenticity. They also
recognize that the problems our
- country faces are serious ones. It
doesn't matter if you're a conserva-
tive Republican in Iowa or a liberal
Democrat in Nevada, you know
that we need more responsible
adults in the room to get things
done. If Candidate Rofiney wants
to be President Romney, he should
put hyper-partisan politics aside.


Let the good times commence


BY KATHRYN JEAN LOPEZ

W ant a little wisdom? Given
we're a culture that tends'
to be self-help hungry,
odds are that you and I aren't
hostile to a little good advice. Who
would be?
Well, May and June were months
populated by commencement
addresses. Some were memorable;
some were political; some were
self-indulgent. Some need to be
reread now that the parties are over,
internships are being settled into,
vacations are being enjoyed, or the
satisfactions of labor are giving way
to harsh realities about paychecks,
FICA and, well, don't ask Paul
Ryan how bright that future looks
about now.
During his speech at Ave Maria
University's commencement exer-
cises in Naples, Fla., the Rev. Robert
McTeigue, a philosophy professor
and director of discernment there,
encouraged students to respect
those who paid for their education,
or who otherwise supported ft and
them.
He told graduates: "Before you,
go out into the world, that great
landscape of the sacred and the
profane, I want you to do one thing
first. Take some time this sum-
mer to explain to your family, and
especially to your parents, what has
happened to you and within you
over the last four years; They need
you to do that for them because
they still remember you primar-
ily as the 18-year-old kid going off
to college ... They know, at least
vaguely, that you have been very
busy and that so much has been
happening in your world here, but
they don't know the details, and
they don't know what the past four
years have meant to you... Tell
them about how the good in you
has gotten better, and tell them
about how the not-so-good in you
has gotten better too."


Show them, in other words, that
you're adult enough to appreciate
a good thing that you're grateful
not just for the education, but for
the freedom you've been allowed.
He advised: "Sit down with your
family, and tell them the story,
semester by semester, of the educa-
tion you received here, both in and
out of the classroom. Tell them that
your fondest memory of biology is
the time that you played 'Pin the
flagellum on the euglena,' and then
tell them that your lasting memory
of biology is the wonder you felt at
seeing the staggering complexity
of even the smallest component of
life."
I confess I had no idea, before
this speech, what an euglena is;
but McTeigue is right to praise an
appreciation of it because, in our
coarse world, a reverence for life is
an endangered sensibility. When we
seem collectively outraged by the
injustice done to Caylee Anthony,
though, I have some hope.
"Tell them that you were forced
to learn more historical dates and
names than you ever thought that
you could remember, and then tell
them about the heroes and villains
of history you will never be able to
forget," McTeigue said. "Tell them
why you think that some dead po-
ets should stay dead, and then read
aloud for them the poems that you
wish to remain always alive in you
and in our culture." He added: "Tell
them that ... you have learned how
to be a learner, you have learned
how to be a friend, and that you
have learned how to find God in all
things."
McTeigue also encouraged three
bold things. Three things that,
outside of the campus of Ave Maria,
may sound not only radical but also
a bit insane. He encouraged close-
mindedness, judgmental views and
intolerance.
Closed-mindedness, because
"G.K. Chesterton said that the hu-


man mind is like the human mouth
both are meant to close down on
something solid."
Judgmental views, because we
have to know the difference be-
tween good and evil, the beautiful
and the ugly. We owe it to ourselves
and the people around us, arl we
owe it to the communities we live
in. "Yes, prejudice is wrong; but a
well-honed and hard-won habit
of good judgment is a hallmark of
moral and intellectual maturity,"
McTeigue said.
And, finally, intolerance, because
"Socrates was intolerant of the
Sophists. Moses was intolerant of
Pharaoh. Jesus was intolerant of the
Pharisees. Frederick Douglass was
intolerant of slavery. Blessed Rupert
Mayer was intolerant of the Nazis.
Blessed Mother Teresa was intoler-
ant of abortion. Blessed Pope John
Paul was intolerant of the culture of
death. Intolerance can be a beauti-
ful thing you just need to know
how to do it properly."
This does not mean a refusal to
listen. This does not mean you're
always right. But it is an affirmation
that there is truth out there, within
your grasp. With a little humility
and confidence, and a rooted-
ness in things eternal and even
historic and cultural, with friends
and teachers along the way, you
can keep building a culture that
seeks more for itself than watching
Snooki and playing hooky. Perhaps
you've heard about our culture of
adolescence. You can lead us into
something else.
You don't have to say "Ave Maria,"
you don't have to be a believer,
you don't have to be a 20some-
thing grad of a Catholic college in
Florida, to consider that the good
father may have left us all with a
little gift this summer. Wisdom is
not a college degree. It's having
' some idea what to do with what
we've been given, every morning
and every evening and all times.


_I__I(_~~___^I_____I__I___9


8 mm ...
xa-low

I *MW a







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Grocery
Outlet


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Prices EffectiefJly 13 19,
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20 pack, 12 oz. cans
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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Gitmo


photographer


gets deal in case


The Associated Press


MIAMI-A military pho-
tographer who served with
combat troops in Iraq and
had a secret-level clear-
ance at Guantanamo Bay
reached a deal Tuesday
with prosecutors to settle
charges of making a false
statement on a U.S. pass-
port application.
Prosecutors said Elisha
Dawkins, a 26-year-old cit-
izen of the Bahamas, took
elaborate steps to pose as
an American citizen, fool-
ing officials in Florida to
obtain a birth certificate
and later the U.S. military.
He falsely checked a box
on a 2006 passport appli-
cation, indicating he had
not applied before, pros-
ecutors said, but he had
actually sought the docu-
ment in 2005. That appli-
cation was stopped when
the verification process
"raised serious questions
about his citizenship,"
prosecutors said in court
papers.
Hundreds of military and
political supporters said
the charges should never
have been brought against
the photographer, who'
was awarded several mili-
tary decorations.
"This is a man we should
be celebrating," said U.S.
Rep. Frederica Wilson,
a Miami Democrat who
took up Dawkins' cause.
"He is all that is right with
America."
Under the deal, Dawkins
acknowledged checking
the wrong box but did not
admit to any crime, said
his attorney Clark Mervis.
He will likely be required to
perform community ser-
vice or something similar,
Mervis said,, and the case
will be officially dropped.
It is unusual for the Jus-
tice Department to offer
pretrial division, which is
much more common in
state courts. Olivia S. Choe,
an assistant U.S. attorney
handling the case, said the
offer was made "in recog-
nition of the defendant's
military service."
A key to the negotia-
tions was resolving an
open deportion order for
Dawkins, Mervis said. The


deal means federal immi-
gration authorities will not
detain Dawkins.
"They made a conces-
sion. I respect the govern-
ment for offering pretrial


diversion," Mervis said.
If Dawkins had been
convicted, he could have
been sentenced to a maxi-
mumn 10-year prison term.
His trial was scheduled to
begin Tuesday.
"I think this has been a
real learning experience,"
Dawkins said outside
the courtroom. "This will
make me a bigger and bet-
ter person."
Dawkins joined the Army
reserves in 2003 and was
on active duty as a combat
photographer in Iraq for
several months. Many of
his fellow soldiers posted
messages of support on a
Facebook page dedicated
to his case. The page had
more than 500 followers
this week.
In 2008, Dawkins
switched to the Navy re-'
serves and was sent to
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba,
where he photographed
life at the terrorist deten-
tion facilities and was giv-
en clearance to the base's
sensitive areas. He has
been awarded the Global
War on Terror Ribbon and
the Iraq Campaign medal,
among others.
Dawkins has maintained
that he always thought he
was born in Miami as part
of a family that emigrated
from the Bahamas. He ob-
tained what is known as
a "delayed" Florida birth
certificate in 2003 by fil-
ing various records with
the state, including school
records, a Social Security
number and medical re-
cords. The birth certificate
shows Dawkins was born
in Miami in 1984.
ProsecutorssaidDawkins
was actually born that year
in Nassau, Bahamas, and
carried a Bahamian pass-
port as late as 2001. They
insist he knew all along he
was not a U.S. citizen.
One friend, former Navy
pilot Gordon Schwartz,
said Dawkins never in-
tended to deceive anyone.
"I think he should nev-
er have been charged. It
was an honest mistake,"
Schwartz said.
Dawkins said he intends
to return to his home in
Jacksonville and completed
a nursing degree, then join
the Navy's nursing corps.
He also said he will begin
the process of becoming a
naturalized U.S. citizen.
"That's the next step," he


said.


Lawsuit: Chase Bank
declared woman dead
SANFORD A central
Florida woman says she
having numerous finan-
cial troubles because of
a bank error. Chase Bank
USA declared her dead last
November.
Wrenella Pierre has filed
a lawsuit and Chase of-
ficials said Monday they're
investigating how the
mistake happened.
When Pierre and her
husband, Curtis, built
their Oviedo home in
2007, they got two mort-
gages through Chase.
According to the law-
suit, the bank notified
credit-reporting agencies
last year that Pierre had
died. They sent a letter of
condolence to the fam-
ily, saying someone from
the bank would be in
touch about the mortgage
balance.
Pierre says she notified
bank officials that she was
alive and followed up by
going to a local branch to
correct the mistake.
A month later, the
lawsuit alleges, credit


agencies still reported her
dead.

Orange crop up
4 percent
LAKELAND Florida's
orange crop is expected to
be slightly higher than last
season's crop.
Federal agriculture of-
ficials said Tuesday that
Florida will produce 139
million boxes of oranges
during the 2010-2011
growing season.
The final forecast for
the season is down by 1
million boxes from the
estimate in June. But it is
still bigger than last year's
bounty.
The orange crop esti-
mate consists of 70 million
early and midseason
varieties and 69 million
Valencias.
The grapefruit estimate
remains 19.9 million
boxes, down 400,1000 boxes
from last season.
The tangelo estimate is
1.1 million boxes, and the
tangerine forecast is 4.6
million boxes.
From wire reports


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE
In this July 3 photo, defense attorney Jose Baez points and yells in the direction of the prosecution table during his closing
arguments in the Casey Anthony murder trial in Orlando.

Anthony lawyer rises from obscurity to fame


The Associated Press

ORLANDO Three years ago,
Jose Ba'ez's name was barely a blip
in the legal community.
This was a lawyer who made his
way to the profession after drop-
ping out of high school, getting
a GED and going into the Navy.
He tried several failed businesses
including two bikini companies
before he eventually enrolled
at Florida State University and St.,
Thomas University School of Law. It
took another eight years for him to
be admitted to the bar.
Now he's arguably one of the most
recognizable attorneys in the coun-
try after his client Casey Anthony
was acquitted in the death of her 2-
year-old daughter, Caylee, in a case
marked by a captivated national au-
dience and searing scrutiny of every
legal twist.
For the last three years since, Baez
faced questions from other. attor-
neys and TV commentators about
his lack of criminal law experience
and tactics. Now he's a legal celeb-
rity almost certain to be offered in-


terviews, book offers and possibly
movie deals that could bring hun-
dreds of thousands of dollars. '
"I think this is obviously life-alter-
ing for Jose Baez," said Terry Lena-
mon, a former member of Antho-
ny's defense team, who left the case
in 2008 after a disagreement over
strategy.
"It's not as big as (the) OJ (Simpson
verdict), but close to OJ and look at
all what happened to those lawyers
... I'm sure he's going to capitalize on
it. The issue is: Was that always the
plan?"
Baez, 42, took Anthony's case pro
bono in 2008, after getting a refer-
ral from a former client who shared
a cell with Anthony following her
initial arrest. He has handled the
case since then, operating on state
funds available to Anthony because
of her indigent status, and from an
early $200,000 she received from li-
censing photos and videos to ABC
News.
In an interview with Fox News'
Geraldo Rivera the night of the ver-
dict, Baez shrugged off a question
about whether his success in this


case will silence his detractors.
"I'think their competence argu-
ment has fallen," he said. "What
they want to say about me, well,
you know, they can say what they
want."
Baez, who was born in Puerto Rico
and raised in New York and Florida,
had to take a winding path to be-
coming a criminal lawyer, even after
he graduated law school. He passed
the written test for the Florida Bar,
but he was denied admission by the
Florida Board of Bar Examiners be-
cause of a list of complaints about
his personal and financial conduct.
The Florida Supreme Court up-
held the bar's decision in 2000
for not paying child support for a
daughter he had with his first wife
and for what it called "very seri-
ous doubts as to his respect for the
rights of others and for the law," like
writing worthless checks.
He eventually was able to prove
to the bar he was rehabilitated and
he was admitted to practice law in
2005. He has had no disciplinary
action taken against him by the bar
since then.


Witness tampering alleged at Anthony trial


The Associated Press

ORLANDO A Florida
sheriff announced on
Tuesday that authorities
were looking into witness
tampering allegations
during Casey Anthony's
murder trial, even as he
held a wide-ranging news
conference with his top in-
vestigators in what he said
was an effort to bring clo-
sure to a case that gripped
and polarized the entire
country.
Orange County Sheriff
Jerry Demings also re-
vealed that prosecutors
were considering perjury
charges against Anthony's
mother, but a. spokes-
woman for the state attor-
ney's office later said they
would not be pursued.
Casey Anthony was ac-
quitted a week ago on
charges of killing her 2-
year-old daughter Cay-
lee in 2008. Anthony
was found guilty on four
charges of lying to law
enforcement officers. She
is to be released from jail
Sunday.
The sheriff held the news
conference to defend his
investigation and because
his office had been be-
sieged with interview re-
quests since the verdict.
"The ultimate goal ... is
that our personnel can
get back to work doing the
business of the taxpayers
and residents of Orange


County," Demings said
"This is the only way that
we can move forward."
Demings wouldn't say
who was accused of wit-
ness tampering, but it
didn't involve Casey An-
thony's mother, Cindy.
She stunned prosecutors
during the trial when she
testified that she had done
searches for chloroform
on the family's computer.
Prosecutors believed,
along with sheriff's inves-
tigators, that Anthony had
performed the search.
Witnesses were ,later
called to challenge Cindy
Anthony's claim, and in
the days after the verdict,
prosecutors hinted at pos-
sibly charging her.
The government pre-
sented evidence at trial
that chloroform was found
in Anthony's car trunk and
insinuated that she could
have used it to render Cay-
lee unconscious.
As for the alleged witness
tampering, detective John
Allen would only say the
sheriff's office has inter-
viewed some witnesses.
"In regards to where we
will go, it really depends
on what information we
get and what people come
forward to provide addi-
tional information," Allen
said.
The investigators at the
news conference sat at a
table alongside a blown-
up picture of Caylee.


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The sheriff said it was a
reminder of what his in-
vestigators were pursu-
ing during the three-year
case that dominated his
resources.
"This is what this was all
about," Demings said. "It
was about a missing child.
That's what motivated our
staff and our community."
Demings said his office
followed up on more than
600 tips and worked with
more than 100 FBI agents.
He said he is still in the
process of working with
his accounting depart-
ment to total up substan-
tial investigative costs.
Prosecutors want An-
thony to incur those costs
because they said the lies
she was convicted of tell-
ing investigators directly
led to the expenditures.
"Obviously those were
resources that could have
been put toward finding
other missing children,"
Allen said.
Texas Equusearch, the
private group that con-
ducted several searches.
for Caylee in 2008, filed
a lawsuit against Antho-
ny on Tuesday, seeking
$15,000 for what it spent
on searches. The lawsuit


claimed Anthony made
misrepresentations to the
group's founder, caus-
ing extensive, costly and
time-consuming searches
for Caylee.
Allen and the case's lead
detective, Yuri Melich,
said they wouldn't do any-
thing differently in the
case, despite not winning
a conviction.











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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Obituaries
Linda Johnson
Miller


Mrs. Linda Johnson Mill-
er, 62, passed away in
Kissimmee during an an-
nual vacation, on Monday,
July 11, 2011.
She had resided in
Sneads for the past four
and a half years. She was
born in Montgomery, Ala.,
and grew up in Bay
Minette, Ala,. She loved
teaching; during the last
four school years she
served as an elementary
school teacher with the
Jackson County School
Board, assigned to the
Sneads Elementary School.
Mrs. Miller invested her
life, first in her husband
and son, and then in the
many students she has
taught over the years.
She was preceded in
death by her parents, Estel
C. and Nettie L. (Daniels)
Johnson of Bay Minette.
Survivors include her lov-
ing husband of 40 years,
William D. Miller of
Sneads; and her devoted
son, Michael J. Miller of
Memphis, Tenn.
The memorial service at
6 p.m. CDT Monday, July
18, at the First Baptist
Church of Sneads, will cel-
ebrate her life and service
as a wife, mother and
teacher. The service will
feature a slide presentation
of her life, and' the many
students she taught in the
Sneads area. Flowers are
not appropriate for this
event. I
She will be laid to rest
alongside her father and
mother in Bay Minette, in a
private ceremony at anoth-
er time and date.
Marianna Chapel
Funeral Home
3960 Lafayette St.
Marianna, FL 32446
526-5059

Shirley Elmina
Williams

Shirley Elmina Williams,
75, of Sneads passed away
Monday, July 11, 2011 in
Jackson Hospifal.
A memorial service for
Mrs. Williams will be held
at 10 a.m. Saturday, July 16,
at the Grand Ridge Church
of God, with the Rev. John
Jackson, Pastors Almer Wil-
liams and Charles Hewitt,
and friend Kirby Holt offi-
ciating.
The family asks for
friends to join them imme-
diately following the serv-
ice for lunch in the church
reception hall.
In lieu of flowers, dona-
tions may be made to the
Susan G. Komen for the
Cure Foundation, P.O. Box
650309, Dallas, TX 75265-
0309.
Expressions of sympathy
may be submitted online at
www.mariannachapelfh. co
m.
Marianna Chapel is in
charge of arrangements.


Brown
From Page 1A

At an earlier pre-sentencing court ap-
pearance, Brown indicated he felt his of-
fense was far less serious than those com-
mitted by others.
In court Monday, Wright responded to
those previous comments, reminding
Brown that he ran an officer off the road
and was driving at 70 mph in a neighbor-
hood, endangering others.
"It's not as simple as it seems," Wright
told him.,
Brown's mother appeared on her son's
behalf, telling Wright that Brown "basi-
cally is a good boy ... who came and got
me to reunite me with my family" some
time ago.
Brown's uncle, Frank Brown Jr., also
spoke on his nephew's behalf, saying the
defendant was, for a time, raised by his
grandmother and that he had done some
good things in his life. Brown Jr. said his


Republicans: Down with squiggly light bulbs


The Associated Press


WASHINGTON How
many government bu-
reaucrats does it take to
screw in a light bulb? A
lot of House Republicans
think the answer should
be "none." They say the
government, should just
stay out of it.
To .them, those new-
fangled curly fluorescent
light bulbs are the last
straw, another example of
an overreaching govern-
ment that's forcing people
to buy health insurance,
prodding them to get
more fuel-efficient cars
and sticking its nose into
too many places it doesn't
belong.
For most Democrats, it's
an exasperating debate
that, just like the old in-
candescent bulbs being
crowded out of the mar-
ket, produces more heat
than light.
Republicans in control of
the House moved toward a
vote late Tuesday on legis-
lation that would seek to
overturn light bulb en-
ergy-efficiency standards
and keep the marketplace
clear for the cheap, en-
ergy-wasting bulbs that
have changed little since
Thomas Edison invented
them in 1879.
The standards in ques-
tion do not specificallyban
the old bulbs but require a
higher level of efficiency
than the classics can pro-
duce, essentially nudging
them off store shelves over
the next few years. Four of


Cafes
From Page 1A

chances on a machine
with an infinite possible
set of combinations. In-
stead, the winning game
pieces are predetermined
and players are simply re-
vealing the information
when they game,
City Commissioner Rog-
er Clay said he'd like to see
the Internet cafes banned
at the city level. On the
other hand, City Com-
missioner Paul Donofro
Jr. said he feels a ban with
no clear direction from
the state on whether they
are legal may be inappro-
priate. Donofro said he
feels that, in banning the
outlets, the city might be
in effect trying to "legis-
late morality," something
he considers outside the


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE PHOTO
In this May 18 photo, a compact fluorescent light bulb is seen
in Philadelphia.


Edison's descendants said
the great inventor would
be mortified to s6e politi-
cians trying to get the na-
tion to hang on to an out-
dated technology when
better bulbs are available.
The standards have not
been particularly conten-
tious before now. They
were crafted in 2007 with
Republican participa-
tion and signed into law
by President George W.
Bush. People seem to like
the new choices and the
energy savings they bring,
polling finds.
But now they have be-
come a symbol of a much
larger divide in Washing-
ton over the size and reach
of government itself. The
new bulbs suggest to some


purview of the governing
body.
On Monday, despite this
difference of opinion, the
commission unanimous-
ly voted to authorize city
attorney Frank Bondu-
rant to draft a proposed
ordinance banning the
cafes. A workshop will be
set to discuss the matter
further.
Just last month, one
company whose games
are featured at these In-
ternet cafes, Specialized
Games LLC, filed a civil
suit against Hess and
county Sheriff Lou Rob-
erts over their attempts to
shut its operations down.
The company asked the
court to bring temporary
injunctions against Rob-
erts and Hess that would
prevent them from arrest-
ing the company's em-
ployees or confiscating its
equipment.


DEBORAH BUCKHALTER/FLORIDAN
Resident Kenneth Corder came to the defense of Internet
cafes as he spoke before the Marianna City Commission
Monday night.


nephew had come to his rescue when he
fell on hard times.
"Ron came down and worked to help
me, he paid my bills, he stood as a man
and kept a job," Brown Jr. said. "It's all
about the choices he made ... I'm ask-
ing for leniency and mercy for Ron's sake.
Give him a chance to live again."
According to a press release issued on
behalf of State Attorney Glenn Hess, an
officer first tried to pull Brown over on
Jan. 8 of this year, when "he passed a car
in a no-passing zone, ran a stop sign and
nearly hit a police cruiser head-on."
. The release went on to state that Brown
accelerated to 70 mph after driving
through the stop sign at Old Cottondale
Road and Orange Street in Marianna. He
then turned right on Harrison Street and
stopped the car at the intersection of Pine
Street.
He got out and ran into a residence in
that area. Police found him lying on a bed
in the house.
Brown, of St. Paul, Minn., was convicted
after a one-day trial in June.


conservatives that big gov-
ernment is running amok.
"Now, the government
wants to tell consumers
what type of light bulb
they use to read, cook,
watch television or liglht
their garage," said Rep.
Michael Burgess, R-Texas.
"I'm not opposed to the
squiggly tailed CFLs," said
Rep. Joe Barton, R Texas, a
driving force behind the
effort to save the old in-
candescents and sponsor
of the bill to overturn the
standards. But making the
old bulbs go away "seems
to me to be overkill by the
federal government."
Republicans said people
who now buy a bulb for 30
or 40 cents shouldn't be
forced to pay $6 for a fluo-


recent bulb or more for
LED (light-emitting diode)
lighting.
"If you are Al Gore and
want to spend $10 for a
light bulb, more power to
you," Barton said. He ex-
aggerated the cost of most
energy-efficient bulbs and
neglected to mention that
they last years longer than
old incandescent bulbs,
which give off about 90
percent of the energy they
consume as heat.
Republican presidential
contender Rep. Michele
Bachmann of Minnesota
complained earlier this
year 'that, under Presi-
dent Barack Obama, "we
bought a bureaucracy that
now tells us which light
bulbs to buy."
The Obama administra-
tion, which opposes Bar-
ton's bill, says the lighting
standards that are being
phased in will save nearly
$6 billion in 2015 alone.
The Energy Department
says upgrading 15 ineffi-
cietft incandescent bulbs
in a home could save a
homeowner $50 a year.
Lighting accounts for
about 10 percent of home
electricity use.
The White House says
the standards drive U.S.
innovation, create manu-
facturing jobs and reduce
harmful greenhouse gas
emissions.
Incandescent bulbs are
not disappearing. Today's
energy-savings choices
include incandescent
lighting that is more effi-
cient, and more expensive


"These raise urgent questions about whether today's children will have the
resources they need to help careforAmericas growingddeiypopulatio"
Willam P. O'Hm,
Senior consultant with the Annie E. Casey Foundation


Census: Share of children


in US Iits a record low


The Associated Press

WASHINGTON Children now make
up less of America's population than
ever before, even with a boost from im-
migrant families.
And when this generation grows up, it
will become a shrinking wbrk force that
will have to support the nation's expand-
ing elderly population even as the
government strains to cut spending for
health care, pensions and much else.
The latest 2010 census data show that
children of immigrants make up one in
four people under 18, and are now the
fastest-growing segment of the nation's
youth, an indication that both legal and
illegal immigrants as well as minority
births are lifting the nation's population.
Currently, the share of children in
the U.S. is 24 percent, falling below the
previous low of 26 percent of 1990. The
share is projected to slip further, to 23
percent by 2050, even as the percent-
. age of people 65 and older is expected to
jump from 13 percent today to roughly
20 percent by 2050 due to the aging of
baby boomers and beyond.
In 1900, the share of children reached
as high as 40 percent, compared to a
much smaller 4 percent share for seniors
65 and older. The percentage of children
in subsequent decades held above 30
percent until 1980, when it fell to 28 per-
cent amid declining birth rates.
"There are important implications for
the future of the U.S. because the in-
creasing costs of providing for an older
population may reduce the public re-
sources that go to children," saidWilliam
P. O'Hare, a senior consultant' with the
Baltimore-based Annie E. Casey Foun-
dation, a children's advocacy group.
Pointing to signs that many children
are already struggling, O'Hare added:
"These raise urgent questions about
whether today's children will have the
resources they need to help care for
America's growing elderly population."
The numbers are largely based on an
.analysis by the Population Reference
Bureau, a nonprofit research group in
Washington that studies global and U.S.
trends. In some cases, the data were
supplemented with additional census
projections on U.S. growth from 2010-
2050 as well as figures compiled by the
Annie E. Casey Foundation's Kids Count
project.
Nationwide, the number of children
has grown by 1.9 million, or 2.6 percent,
since, 2000. That represents a drop-off
from the previous decade, when even
higher rates of immigration by Latinos


- who are more likely than some other
ethnic groups to have large families -
helped increase the number of children
by 8.7 million, or 13.7 percent.
Percentages aside, 23 states and the
District of Columbia had declines in
their numbers of children in the centu-
ry's first decade, with Michigan, Rhode
Island, Vermont and D.C. seeing some of
the biggest drops.
On the other hand, states with some of
the biggest increases--Arizona, Florida,
Georgia, Nevada, North Carolina and
Texas also ranked in the bottom one-
third of states in terms of child well-being
as measured by the Kids Count project.
The project calculated child well-being
based on levels of poverty, single-parent
families, unemployment, high-school
dropouts and other factors.
The slowing population growth in the
U.S. mirrors to a lesser extent the situa-
tion in other developed nations, includ-
ing Russia, Japan and France which are
seeing reduced growth or population
losses due to declining birth rates and
limited immigration. The combined
population of more-developed coun-
tries other than the U.S. is projected to
decline beginning in 2016, raising the
prospect of prolonged budget crises as
the number of working-age citizens di-
minish, pension costs rise and tax rev-
enues fall.
Japan, France, Germany and Canada
each have lower shares of children under
age 15, ranging between 13 percent in Ja-
pan and 17 percent in Canada, while na-
tions in Africa and the Middle East have
some of the largest shares, including 50
percent in Niger and 46 percent inAf-
ghanistan, according to figures from the
United Nations Population Division.
In the U.S., the share of children under
15 is 20 percent.
Depending on future rates of immigra-
tion, the U.S. population is estimated to
continue growing through at least 2050.
In a hypothetical situation in which all
immigration both legal and illegal
- immediately stopped, the U.S. could
lose population beginning in 2048, ac-
cording to the latest census projections.
Since 2000, the increase for children in
the U.S. 1.9 million has been due to
racial and ethnic minorities.
Currently, 54 percent of the nation's
children are non-Hispanic white, com-
pared to 23 percent Hispanic, 14 percent
black, and 4 percent Asian. Over the past
decade, the number of non-Hispanic
white children declined 10 percent to
39.7 million, while the number of minor-
ity children rose to 34.5 million.


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to purchase, than the old
standbys.
Rep. Ed Markey, D-Mass.,
held up a new Sylvania
incandescent that meets
the efficiency standards
and costs $1.69. "You don't
have to buy one of those
funny-looking new light
bulbs," he said.
Under existing rules,
new bulbs will have to be
25 to 30 percent more ef-
ficient than traditional in-
candescent models.
As of Jan. 1, 2012, inef-
ficient 100-watt bulbs will
no longer be available at
most stores. Also on the
way out are traditional 75-
watt bulbs in 2013 and 40-
watt and 60-watt versions
in 2014.
The National Resourc-
es Defense Council said
that when the law is fully
implemented in 2020, en-
ergy costs will be reduced
by 7 percent or about $85
a household every year.
It said the more efficient
bulbs will eliminate the
need for 33 large power
plants.
The advocacy group
presented statements
from Edison's kin in sup-
port of the new standards
"Edison would certainly
have recognized that the
wave of the future prof-
its is to make it better,
cheaper and, yes, cleaner
and more efficient," said
Barry Edison Sloane, a
great-grandson.
Said Robert Wheeler, a
great-nephew: "The tech-
nology changes. Embrace
'it.










JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


GOP leader: Give Obama new debt power


The Associated Press

WASHINGTON With compro-
fnise talks at a vituperative standstill,
Senate Republicans unexpectedly
offered Tuesday to hand President
Barack Obama new powers to avert a
first-ever government default threat-
ened for Aug. 2.
Under a proposal outlined by
Sen. Mitch McConnell of Kentucky,
Obama could request increases of up
to $2.5 trillion in the government's
borrowing authority in three sepa-
rate installments over the next year,
as long as he simultaneously pro-
posed spending cuts of greater size.
The debt limit increases would
take effect unless blocked by Con-
gress upder special rules that would
require speedy action and even
then Obama could exercise his au-
thority to veto such legislation. Sig-
nificantly, the president's spending
cuts would be debated under nor-
mal procedures, with no guarantee
they ever come to a final vote.
In essence, McConnell's proposal
would greatly enhance Qbama's au-
thority to avoid a default, while also
virtually absolving Republicans of
responsibility if one occurred.


At the same time, it would allow
Republican lawmakers to avoid hav-
ing to support an increase in the
debt limit, something many of them
find odious.
"Republicans will choose a path
that actually reflects the will of the
people, which is to do the respon-
sible thing and ensure the govern-
ment doesn't default on its obliga-
tions," McConnell said in a speech
on the Senate floor. He also excori-
ated the administration for seeking
tax increases along with spending
cuts as part of an agreement to raise
the debt limit.
His plan drew criticism from GOP
presidential contender Newt Gin-
grich, who quickly tweeted it was
"an irresponsible surrender to big
government, big deficits and contin-
ued overspending."
There was no immediate response
to the GOP proposal from the White
House, where Obama hosted his
third meeting in as many days with
congressional leaders, struggling to
avert a financial crisis.
The talks have revolved around at-
tempts to meet Republican demands
for deficit cuts at least as large as any
increase in the debt limit. Negotia-


tors have grown testy in recent days
as Obama and Democrats pushed
for higher tax revenue as part of the
deal, a line Republicans say they will
not cross.
It was unclear whether McCon-
nell's proposal could show the White
House and congressional leaders.of
both parties a way out of a deadlock
that Obama and others said threat-
ened calamitous results for an econ-
omy still struggling to recover from
the worst recession in decades.
It would obligate Obama to outline
deep spending cuts, something Re-
publicans have been trying to force
him to do for months without much
success.
Reductions as large as $2.5 trillion
would almost certainly affect do-
mestic programs seen as important
by Democratic constituencies and
4y rank-and-file lawmakers, possi-
bly including Medicare and Medic-
aid. Even if the cuts never took ef-
fect, Republicans would be able to
call for votes, while identifying them
as sponsored by the White House.
Any such proposals could also be
used by Republicans in the 2012
campaigns, if only to blunt attacks
made by Democrats.


House Majority Leader Eric Cantor of Va. (right), accompanied
by House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio, speaks during a news
conference on Capitol Hill in Washington on Tuesday.


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Should parents lose custody '. TS"
ou s paeLASER VISION CORRECTION SEMINAR

of super obese children? Tuesday, July56


The Associated Press

CHICAGO Should parents of ex-
tremely obese children lose custody
for not controlling their kids' weight? A
provocative commentary in one of the
nation's most distinguished medical jour-
nals argues yes, and its authors are join-
ing a quiet chorus of advocates who say
the government should be allowed to in-
tervene in extreme cases.
It has happened a few times in the U.S.,
and the opinion piece in Wednesday's
Journal of the American Medical Associa-
tion says putting children temporarily in
foster care is in some cases more ethical
than obesity surgery.'
Dr. David Ludwig, an obesity specialist
at Harvard-affiliated Children's Hospital
Bpston, said the point isn't to blame par-
ents, but rather to act in children's best
interest.
State intervention "ideally will support
not just the child but the whole family,
with the goal of reuniting child and fam-


ily as soon as possible. That may require
instruction on parenting," said Ludwig,
who wrote the article with Lindsey Mur-
tagh, a lawyer and a researcher at Har-
vard's School of Public Health.
Roughly 2 million U.S. children are ex-
tremely obese. Most are not in imminent
danger, Ludwig said. But some have obe-
sity-related conditions such as Type 2
diabetes, breathing difficulties and liver
problems that could kill them by age 30. It
is these kids for whom state intervention,
including temporary custody, should be
considered, Ludwig said.
Ludwig said he starting thinking about
the issue after a 90-pound 3-year-old girl
came to his obesity clinic. Her parents
had physical disabilities, little money and
difficulty controlling her weight. "Out of
medical concern, the state placed this girl
in foster care, where she simply received
three balanced meals a day and a snack
or two and moderate'physical activity,"
he said. After a year, she lost 130 pounds,
he said.


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78A WEDNESDAY, JULY13,2011


NATIONAL

































DAVID ALDERSTEIN/APALACHICOLA TIMES
Sneads Ponytails pitcher KK Cain (middle) is congratulated by her teammates
after a play during last weekend's state tournament in Carrabelle.


Ponytails Softball


Sneads falls to Spring Hill


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com
The Sneads Ponytails All-Stars
fell just short of a state title this
weekend, falling to Spring Hill
14-4 in the Ponytails state tour-
nament title game in Carrabelle
on Monday.,
Sneads' finished the tourna-
ment with a record of 3-2, having
taken wins of 11-1 over Paxton,
8-0 over Okeechobee, and 9-6
over Belleview to get to the title
game.


Unfortunately for Sneads,
Spring Hill proved to be the one
mountain it couldn't climb.
Spring Hill also gave the Sneads
All-Stars their first defeat of the
tourney, beating them' 11-0 in
the first match-up.
The title game was far more
competitive, with Sneads jump-
ing out to a 4-0 first inning lead.
Spring Hill answered with two
runs in the bottom of the first,
and then hit a three-run home
run in the fifth inning to take a


5-4 lead.
That's when the rain came.
While all of the other fields
were cleared for the rain, the Po-
nytails continued to play on the
decision of the umpire, and the
game quickly became a sloppy
affair.
"The girls couldn't hold on to
the ball," Sneads coach Dan Gro-
ver said. "We couldn't throw it.
We couldn't pitch it. It was tough

See PONYTAILS, Page 2B


Darlings Softball


Marianna


make early


exit at State
BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

After winning their opening
game of the Darlings state tour-
nament, the Marianna All-Stars
lost two in a row to eventual
champion Holmes County to be
eliminated with a 1-2 record.
Marianna. defeated Frank-
'lin County 15-8 in Friday's first
ir6und game, but had to face the
powerful Holmes County squad
on Saturday and fell19-5 to drop
into the losers' bracket.
In a bit of bad luck, Holmes
County lost to West Pasco in its
third game to fall back into the
losers' bracket, setting up another
match-up with Marianna.
Holmes County won that game.
11-0 to put Marianna out of the
tournament.
"It was a tough break," Marian-
na coach Tory Hussey said of fac-
ing Holmes County back to back.
"We were hoping to get a little bit
better-lraw, butwe knewwe were
in the toughest side ofthe brack-
et. It was just a tough break. We
were probably the third best team
there behind Holmes County
and West Pasco. (Marianna) and
Belleview would've been a good
third-place game."
However, there was no third-
place game, so Marianna and Bel-
leview had to share third-place
honors.
Holmes County defeated West
Pasco twice in the title round to
claim the state championship.
"They were very strong," Hussey
said of Holmes County. "They're
just a good team, and they'll do
well at the World Series when they
get there. I think they'll be in the
top three or four if they don't win
it."
While the final match-up with
Holmes County wasn't very com-
petitive, the first one was at least
for a while.
Marianna scored three runs
in the top of the first inning to
take the early lead, with Holmes
County responding with five runs
in the bottom of the inning.
Marianna cut the deficit to one
with a run in the top of the sec-
ond inning, but Holmes County
fired back with seven runs in the
bottom of the inning to pull away
for good.
"We didn't play good defense
in Saturday's game, but we were
better defensively on Sunday,"
Hussey said. "Offensively, we hit
the ball right on the nose (Sun-
day), but (Holmes County) just
caught everything. They've got
a really strong infield and two
or three girls in the outfield that
could catch anything that came

See DARLINGS, Page 2B


ANGELS SOFTBALL





A solid showing


4-.-
i 'W..l .--M,,- *^ -


L :JM
b*i ^'^ A *5 ^ **.. ,..e -...-: "7': ; ^ ^ :


DAVID ALDERSTEIN/APALACHICOLATIMES
Marianna Angels All-Star Chloe Temples delivers a pitch during a state tournament game over the weekend in Carrabelle. The Marianna All-
Stars took second in the tournament.

Marianna Angels All-Stars finish second at state tournament


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com
The Marianna Angels All-
Stars finished second in the
Angels state tournament in
Carrabelle over the weekend,
falling to Wesley Chapel 4-0 on
Monday morning.
Marianna got off to a fast
start to' the tournament with
a 9-2 win over host Franklin'
County on Friday, and then
made it two in a row with a
6-5 win over Okeechobee on
Saturday.
Marianna suffered its first
loss against Wesley Chapel in a
game that started at 10:30 p.m.
due to a two-hour rain delay,
and ended with a 12-2 Wesley
Chapel win.
Needing a win Sunday to get
back to the title round, Mari-
anna got it with a 10-0 vic-
tory over Okeechobee in four
innings.
That set up a second match-
up with Wesley Chapel, but the
outcome was just as unfavor-
able for Marianna, as the All-
Stars had trouble keeping up


with a hard-throwing Wesley
Chapel hurler.
"The girl we were facing was
throwing around 53 to 54 miles
per hour, which was very im-
pressive when you're talking
about 11-year-old girls," Mari-
anna coach Stacy Goodson
said. "Alot of my girls had diffi-
culty picking up that speed. We
just couldn't get any hits."
Putting the ball in play
proved especially challenging,
as Marianna hitters fanned 12
times on the game and picked
up only three total hits.
Sydnee Goodson started in
the circle for Marianna and
was impressive in her own
right, going the distance and
striking out seven.
"It was a close game. We just
made a couple of errors and
gave up some runs, and we
couldn't get hits," the coach
said. "But we played well, and
(Wesley Chapel) didn't run-
rule us, They run-ruled every
team they played except us.
I'm pleased with the perfor-
mance of my girls."


Wesley Chapel took the lead
with a run in the bottom of the
second inning, and then add-
ed two more in the.third, and
another in the fourth.
Marianna had a pair of qual-
ity opportunities to get on the
board, putting runners on first
and second with one out in the
second inning, and runners on
second and third with one out
in the fifth.
Neither chance paid off.
However, Goodson said he
couldn't be more satisfied with
the effort put forth by his team
throughout the tournament.
"I'm very proud of these
girls," he said. "When we stat-
ed with this group six weeks
ago, I wasn't sure we'd win
any ballgames, but we ended
up winning district and going
to state. The girls played very
hard and very well."
In addition to their runner-
up trophy, the Marianna All-
Stars were also awarded the
tournament's sportsmanship
trophy voted on by the um-
pires and the state director of


Dixie Youth Softball.
Goodson said that was the
award that meant the most to
himself and his team.
"That's what I was most
proud of," he said. "I'm very
proud of the girls for getting
second place of course, but
I'm more proud of the sports-
manship trophy. I think that's a
credit to the coaches, as well as
the girls and their parents."
Goodson said he was grate-
, ful for all of the support that
the team received throughout
the All-Star process.
"I just want to thank all of
the businesses and civic clubs
and citizens of Jackson County
who supported us, and also
the Marianna Recreation De-
partment," he said. "Clay Wells
and Jeff Faircloth both came to
the tournament, and I thank
both of them personally for
what they do all year long in
getting the fields (at Optimist
Park) prepared, helping out
the coaches, and getting ev-
erything prepared to make this
possible for all of these girls."


Dizzy Dean Baseball


.7 Dizzy Dean 18U's play in title game


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Marianna's Chris Godwin makes a throw to first Monday during a Seniors
game against the North Florida Black Sox at the Dizzy Dean State
Tournament in Bonifay.


BY SHELIA MADER
Floridan Correspondent
The Marianna 18U Dizzy Dean
All-Stars took two of three games
to begin state tournament play
and advance to Tuesday night's
championship game.
The Marianna All-Stars defeat-
ed the North Florida Black Sox
4-3 on Saturday, with Sunday's
match-up with Team Tally post-
poned by weather with Marian-
na nursing an 8-3 lead.
Marianna went on to win the
game 19-6 to set up a rematch


with the Black Sox on Monday.
This time, it was North Florida
that took the win, rolling past
Marianna for a 19-1 victory to
set up a third and decisive game
on Tuesday.
In Saturday's game, Colby Ob-
ert started on the mound for
Marianna and held the Black
Sox at bay through five innings
before exiting with the bases
loaded in the sixth.
Will Bell came on in relief and
closed out the game, giving up
no runs on no hits and just one


walk.
Offensively for Marianna,
Dustin O'Hearn and Chris God-
win were each 2 for 3, with Bran-
don Burch and Tyler Hampton
each going 1 for 2.
In game two on Sunday, it
was Jae Elliott who got the call
for Marianna and gave up two
earned runs in four innings
before giving way to O'Hearn,
who gave up three runs in two
innings.

See DD-18, Page 2BL
,. .


_ ~III~L~ I_-~


. e










JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


MARIANNA BELLES


DAVID ALDERSTEIN/APALACHICOLATIMES


Sarianna Belles All-Stars' Kaleigh Temples delivers a pitch during a state tournament
game over the weekend in Carrabelle. The Marianna All-Stars went 1-2 in the
tournament.

Dizzy Dean Baseball


Dizzy Dean 16Us edge Holmes County


BY SHELIA MADER
Floridan Correspondent
The Marianna Dizzy Dean 16U1
All-Stars remained perfect in state
tournament action with a 6-5 extra
innings win over Holmes County on
Monday night in Bonifay.
Holmes County was also unbeaten
, in the tournamentheading into Mon-
day night's game.
For their third game, Marianna sent
Alex Gay to the mound, and Gay gave
up three runs on three hits and two
walks in 3 1/3 innings.
Jo Jo Durden came on in relief and
closed out the game and picked up
the win, giving up two runs on two
hits and a walk.
After failing to dot the scoreboard in
the first three innings, the Marianna
bats got going in the fourth with three
runs to tie the game.
Gay started it off'with a lead-off
single before moving to second on a
wild pitch.
David Black walked, another wild
pitch moved the runners to second
and third, and Andrew Shouse took
advantage of an error to score Gay.
Black then found home plate on
yet another wild pitch, with Reid
Long later tying the game on an RBI


Darlings
From Page 18

to them. We just couldn't
get the bats going."
The coach was proud of
what. his players accom-
plished in Marianna's sec-
ond year in the Darlings age
group,(7-8).
"I told the girls and their
parents that they have.
nothing to hold their heads
down for," Hussey said. "We


Ponytails
From Page 1B
to deal with. But I was
proud of the girls. They did
really well."
Autumn Avriett started
in the circle for Sneads


DD-18
From Page 1B ,
Bell pitched a perfect
seventh inning to close out
the game.
On Monday, the Marian-
na All-Stars were flat at the
plate and in the field, sur-


MARKSKINNER/FLORIDAN
Marianna's Devin Hayes gets a bunt for the 16U team during the Dizzy Dean State
Tournament Monday night in Bonifay.


double.
The score stayed that way into extra
innings, with Holmes County scoring
two runs to take a 5-3 edge into the
bottom of the ninth.
Devin Hayes led off Marianna's half
of the inning with a single and moved
to second on a walk to Long.


know we lost to the best
team in the tournament
twice. It was just unfortu-
nate we didn't get a break
with the draw. I said before
the tournament that if we
went out there and won a
game or two, I would be
happy, and I was.
"I'm glad we got the one
win on Friday. That is a
big stepping stone for us.
The'girls had a great time,
played good together, and
they worked hard to get
there."


and went four innings be-
fore giving way to Kaleigh
Bruner and Casey Grover
in the fifth.
That's when the game
started to slip away, but
the Sneads coach said
the final score doesn't
show how well his team


rendering the 19 runs on
numerous hits, walks, and
errors, while failing to put
the ball in play offensively.
Obert and Clayte Rooks
had the only hits of the
game for Marianna.
Results of the champion-
ship game were not avail-
able at press time.


Do you have 'Cute Kids'?
E-mail your 'Cute Kids*' photos to editorial@jcfloridan.com,
mail them to P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447 or bring them
by our offices at 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.
*12 years or under, with Jackson County ties. Include child's
full name, parents'name(s) and city of residence. This is a free
service. All entries subject to editing.
I


Mason Melvin was then hit by a
pitch to load the bases before con-
secutive walks to Myles Edwards and
Trent Nobles tied the game at 5-5.
JT Meadows followed with a bunt to
bring home the winning run.
Results for Marianna's Tuesday
game were unavailable at press time.


z



... .

It~ i



DAVID ALDERSTEIN/APALACHICOLA TIMES
A pair of Marianna Darlings All-Star infielders try to field a ball
during a state tournament game against Holmes County in
Carrabelle over the weekend.


played.
"We played good. The
game was a close game,".
Grover said. "The score
doesn't reflect the game at
all. The Spring Hill coach
even said that they didn't
think it was fair (to not
delay, the game), and they


didn't want to play in it like
that either. But Spring Hill
is a great ball team. There
were a lot of good teams
down there. We beat some
good teams. We hit the ball
well, fielded it well, and
pitched good. Everybody
did well."


JCFLORIDAN COM


Sports Briefs


MARIANNA
CROSS-COUNTRY/TF
Current Marianna
High School student
or incoming freshm
interested in running
on the Marianna Hif
School boys or girls
country or distance
team need to contact
Coach Allan Gibsoh
850 209-3403.
The team is practii
at 6 a.m. every morn
ing at Marianna Hig
School.
Please contact coa
Gibson before you sl
up for your first prac

ALFORD RECREATI(
BENEFIT -
A Night Under the
Stars, featuring mus
from Christian acts
thony Brothers and
ing Down Broken, st
at 6 p.m. in the Alfori
Ball Park, Park Avent
Alford on July 23.
Concessions are av
able. Bring lawn cha
Admission is $5 pe
person, with proceed
benefit the start-up
the Alford Recreatioi
Association's youth f
ball program.
Call 209-1031 or 57
1507 for more info.

CHIPOLA BASKETB/
CAMP
Chipola College wi
conduct a basketball
camp on July 25-281
8:30 p.m. to 12:30 p.r
every day for boys ai
girls ages 5-14.
Cost will be $50 pe
camper, and each ca
er will get'a free Chir
tee-shirt.
Walk-up registration
will be accepted, bui
campers can register
early by calling India
assistant coach Patri
Black at 812-589-321
or e-mailing blakepC
chipola.edu.

GOLFTOURNAMEN
The Marianna Hig]
School golf team wil
hold a tournament o
July 30-31 at Caverns
Golf Course to help r
money for new golf 1
and equipment for t
2011 season.
The event will be a
three-person scramb
with cost $50 per pla
Flights and payout
be determined on nu
ber of entries. Closes
the pin and longest p
prizes will be awarded
daily.
Lunch will be provi
on Sunday, and ties x
be settled by regressi
For more informati
contact Scott Wiggin,
573-7506 or Brian Mc
than at 482-4257.

SPEED, AGILITY, AN
CONDITIONING CAM
Bionic Sports will h


a Speed, Agility, and
RACK Conditioning camp on
Tuesday and Thursdays
ts at Integras Therapy &
en Wellness Center for
ig youth boys and girls ages
gh 9-17.
cross Cost is $40 a month, or
track $12 per week.
ct The,camp will continue
at for the entire summer,
focusing on becoming a
cing better athlete.
a- Please call Eric Pender
h for more information at
850-284-2368.
ich
how CHIPOLA
ctice. SWIMMING LESSONS
Chipola College will of-
ON fer programs for children
of all ages this summer.
Swimming lessons will
ic be offered for ages 4 and
An- up.
Fall- Lessons are based on a
arts combination of nation-
rd ally-recognized methods.
ue, The following sessions
are scheduled: Session 3:
vail- July 11-21 with registra-'
irs. tion deadline July 5; and
,r Session 4: Aug. 8-18 with
ds registration deadline
of August 1. '
n Classes are available at
foot- 9'a.m.,10 a.m., or 7 p.m.
Sessions are Monday
73- through Thursday for
two weeks of 45-minute
lessons.
ALL Cost is $45 for each
session. Pre-registration
is required with a $5 late
I registration fee.
For information, call
f.om pool manager Rance
n- Massengill at 718-2473.

MARIANNA
mp- VOLLEYBALL CAMP
pola Marianna High School
will have a volleyball
camp for grades 4-8 on
t July 11-13 at MHS.
tr The camp is $75 per
r student, an'd will run
ick from 9 a.m.,to 12 p.m.
13 each day.
For more information
and to register, go to the
Marianna High School
,IT web site.

h MARIANNA
I YOUTH WRESTLING
sn Team Dynamic Youth
raise Wrestling Team will con-
as tminue practicing on Tuies-
bags day and Thursday nights
at the wrestling room at
the old Marianna High
)le, School.
yer. Practice will be from 6
swill p.m. to 8 p.m.
Swill All kids in Jackson
Sto County from ages 6 and
tutt *up are welcome to join.
ut For further information
please contact Marianna
coach Ron Thoreson at
ded 272-0280.
will
on. SPORTS ITEMS
on, Send all sports items
s at to editorial@jcfloridan.
cKei-. com, or fax them to 850-
482-4478. The mailing
address for the paper is
D Jackson County Floridan
IP P.O. Box 520 Marianna,
old FL 32447.
A A I


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I


-2B WEDNESDAY, JULY 13, 2011


SPORTS


















scoreboard WEDNESDAY. JULY13. 2011 3B


SPRINT CUP POINTS
Through July 9
Points
1, Kyle Busch, 624. 2, Carl Edwards,
620. 3, Kevin Harvick, 614. 4, Kurt
Busch, 606. 5, JimmIe Johnson, 605. 6,
Matt Kenseth, 602. 7, Jeff Gordon, 553.
8, Dale Earnhardt Jr., 548. 9, Ryan New-
man, 538. 10, Denny Hamlin, 529.
11, Tony Stewart, 527. 12, Clint Bow-
yer, 514.13, Juan Pablo Montoya, 497.
14, Greg Biffle, 496. 15, David Ragan,
494.16, Paul Menard, 486. 17, Kasey
Kahne, 484. 18, A J Allmendinger, 483.
19, Mark Martin, 477. 20, Joey Logano,
469.
Money
1, Carl Edwards, $5,302,126. 2, Kyle
Busch, $3,536,676. 3, Kevin Harvick,
$3,427,596.4, Kurt Busch, $3,419,576.
5, Matt Kenseth, $3,411,461.6, Jimmie
Johnson, $3,277,386. 7, Cilnt Bowyer,
$3,098,782. 8, Jeff Gordon, $3,013,961.
9, Denny Hamlin, $2,971,293.10, Tony
Stewart, $2,874,457.
11, Juan Pablo Montoya, $2,812,907.
12, Ryan Newman, $2,757,323.13,
Bobby Labonte, $2,549,508.14,
Jamie McMurray, $2,530,065.15,
A J Allmendinger, $2,527,316.16,
Regan Smith, $2,495,998. 17, Marcos
Ambrose, $2,495,076.18, David Ragan,
$2,485,013.19, Brad Keselowski,
$2,469,408. 20, David Reutimann,
$2,398,332.
NATIONWIDE POINTS
Through July 8
1. Elliott Sadler, 641.
2. Reed Sorenson, 637.
3. Ricky Stenhouse Jr., 614.
4. Justin Allgaier, 598.
5. Jason Leffler, 568.
6. Aric Almirola, 553.
7. Kenny Wallace, 532.
8. Steve Wallace, 490.
*' 9. Michael Annett, 483.
10. Brian Scott, 483.
11. Mike Wallace, 422.
: 12. Josh Wise, 413.
13. Trevor Bayne, 409.
14. Mike Bliss, 409.
15. Joe Nemechek, 391.
16. Jeremy Clements, 345.
17. Timmy Hill, 338.
18. Derrike Cope, 302.
19. Eric McClure, 297.
20. Blake Koch, 289.
21. Morgan Shepherd, 280.
22. Ryan Truex, 249.
23. Scott Wimmer, 236.
24. Robert Richardson Jr., 224.
25. Danica Patrick, 178.
*26. Sam Hornish Jr., 159.
27. Dennis Setzer, 156.
28. Jennifer Jo Cobb, 150.
29. Kevin Lepage, 131.
30. Carl Long, 123.
31. Danny Efland, 122.


AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 55 35 .611 -
New York 53 35 .602 1
Tampa Bay 49 41 .544 6
Toronto 45 47 e.489 11
Baltimore 36 52 .409 18
Central Division
W L Pet GB
Detroit 49 43 .533 -
Cleveland 47 42 .528
Chicago 44 48 .478 5
Minnesota 41 48 .461 61
Kansas City 37 54 .407 11
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 51 41 .554 -
Los Angeles 50 42 .543 1
Seattle 43 48 .473 7
Oakland 39 53 .424 12
LMonday
No games scheduled


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Fernando Gago during a group A Copa America soccer match
in Cordoba, Argentina on Monday. Argentina beat Costa Rica
3-0.


Tuesday
All-Star Game at Phoenix, AZ, 8:05
p.m.
Wednesday
No games scheduled
Thursday
Cleveland at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m. ,
N.Y. Yankees at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
Kansas City at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m.
Texas at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 57 34 .626 -
Atlanta 54 38 .587 3%
New York 46 45 .505 11
Washington 46 46 .500 11%
Florida- 43 48 .473 14
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Milwaukee 49 43 533 -
St. Louis 49 43 .533 -
Pittsburgh 47 43 .522 1
Cincinnati 45 47 .489 4
Chicago 37 55 .402 12
Houston 30 62 .326 19
West Division
W L Pct GB
San Francisco 52 40 .565 -
Arizona 49 43- .533 3
Colorado 43 48 .473 8
Los Angeles 41 51 .446 11
San DiegO 40 52 .435 12
Monday
No games scheduled
Tuesday
AlI-Star Game at Phoenix, AZ, 8:05
p.m.
Wdnesday
No games scheduled
Thursday
Florida at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 p.m.
Milwaukee at Colorado, 8:40 p.m.
San Francisco at San'Diego, 10:05 p.m.


At Cannaux, France
10th Stage
A 982-mile hilly ride from Aurnllac to
Carmaux with two Category 3 climbs
1. Andre Greipel, Germany, Omega
Pharma-Lotto, 3 hours, 31 minutes, 21
seconds.
2. Mark Cavendish, Britain, HTC-
Highroad, same time.
3. Jose Joaquin Rojas, Spain, Movi-
star, same time. '
4. Thor Hushovd, Norway, Garmin-
Cervelo, same time.
5. Romain Feillu, France, Vacansoleil-
DCM, same time.
6. Daniel Oss, Italy, Liquigas-Cannon-
dale, same time.
7. Sebastien Hinault, France, AG2R La
Mondiale, same time.
8. Borut Bozlc, Slovenia, Vacansolell-
DCM, same time.
9. Geraint Thomas, Britain, Sky
Procycling, same time.
10. Samuel Dumoulin, France, Cofidis,
same time.
11. William Bonnet, France, Francaise
des Jeux, same time.
12. Tomas Vaitkus, Lithuania, Astana,
same time.
13. Grega Bole, Slovenia, Lampre-ISD,
same time.
14. Philippe Gilbert, Belgium, Omega
Pharma-Lotto, same time.
15. Edvald Boasson Hagen, Norway,
Sky Procycling, same time.
16. Danlo Hondo, Germany, Lampre-
ISD, same time.
17. Gianni Meersman, Belgium,
Francaise des Jeux, same time.
18. Alan Perez, Spain, Euskaltel-Eus-
kadi, same time.
19. Nicolas Roche, Ireland, AG2R La
Mondlale, same time.


(All times Eastern)
CYCLING
8am.
VERSUS Tour de France, stage"
11, Blaye-les-Mines to Lavaur,
France,
SOCCER
11:30 anm.
ESPN FIFA, Women's World Cup,
semifinal. France vs. United States.
at Moenchengladbach, Germany
2:15 p.m.
ESPN FIFA, Women's World Cup,
semifinal, Japan vs. Sweden, at
Frankfurt, Germany
8 p.m.
ESPN2 MLS/Premler League,
World Football Challenge, Manches-
ter United at New England



20. Kevin De Weert, Belgium, Quick
Step, same time.
Also
24. Cadel Evans, Australia, BMC,
same time.
25. Jakob Fuglsang, Denmark, Leop-
ard-Trek, same time.
31. Alberto Contador, Spain, Saxo
Bank Sungard, same time.
34. Tony Martin, Germany, HTC-High-
road, same time.
35. Frank Schleck, Luxembourg,
Leopard-Tiek, same time.
36. Thomas Voeckler, France, Europ-
car, same time.
38. Andy Schleck, Luxembourg,
Leopard-Trek, same time.
39. Tom Danielson, United States,
Garmin-Cervelo, same time.
42. Luls Leon Sanchez, Spain, Rabo-
bank, same time.
43. George Hincaple, United States,
BMC, same time.
45. Christian Vande Velde, United
States, Garmin-Cervelo, same time.
49. Peter Velits, Slovakia, HTC-High-
road, same time.
62. Andreas Kloeden, Germany,
RadloShack, same time.
70. Levi Leiphelmer, United States,
RadloShack, same time.
78. Tejay Van Garderen, United
States, HTC-Highroad, same time.
91. Brent Bookwalter, United States,
BMC, 5 minutes, 33 seconds behind
137. Tyler Farrar, United States,
Garmin-Cervelo, 5:59.
152. Danny Pate, United States, HTC-,
Highroad, same time.
Overall Standings
(After 10 stages)
1. Thomas Voeckler, France, Europ-
car, 42 hours, 6 minutes, 32 seconds.
2. Luis Leon Sanchez, Spain, Rabo-
bank, 1 minute, 49 seconds behind.
3. Cadel Evans, Australia, BMC, 2:26.
4. Frank Schleck, Luxembourg, Leop-
ard-Trek, 2:29.
5. Andy Schleck, Luxembourg, Leop-
ard-Trek, 2:37.
6. Tony Martin, Germany, HTC-High-
road, 2-38.
7. Peter Velits, Slovakia, HTC-High-
road, same time.
8. Andreas Kloeden, Germany,
RadloShack, 2:43.
9. Philippe Gilbert, Belgium, Omega
Pharma-Lotto, 2:55.
10. Jakob Fuglsang, Denmark, Leop-
ard-Trek. 3:08.'
11. Ivan Basso, Italy, Liquigas-Can-
nondale, 3:36.
12. Damiano Cunego, Italy, Lampre-
ISD, 3:37.
13. Nicolas Roche, Ireland. AG2R La
Mondiale, 3:45.
14. Kevin De Weert, Belgium, Quick
Step, 3:47.
15. Robert Gesink, Netherlands,
Rabobank, 4:01.
16. Alberto Contador, Spain, Saxo
Bank Sungard, 4:07.


17. Tom Danielson, United States,
Garmin-Cervelo, 4:22.
18. Rein Taaramae, Estonia, Cofidis,
4:52.
19. Christian Vande Velde, United
States, Garmin-Cervelo, 4:53.
20. Samuel Sanchez, Spain, Euskaltel-
Euskadi, 5:01.
Also
36. Levi Leipheimer, United States,
RadloShack, 7:16.
48. George Hincapie, United States,
BMC, 14:53.
50. Tejay Van Garderen, United
States, HTC-Highroad, 15:16.
130. Brent Bookwalter, United States,
BMC, 53:50.
139. Tyler Farrar, United States, MLS
(Top two nations In each group
advance)
GROUP
GP W D L GFGA Pts
x-Germany 3 3 0 0 7 3 9
x-France 3 2 0 1 7 4 6
Nigeria 3 1 0 2 1 2 3
Canada 3 0 0 3 1 7 0
x-advanced to quarterfinals
Sunday, June 26
At SInsheim, Germany
France 1, Nigeria 0
At Berlin
Germany 2, Canada 1
Thursday, June 30
At Bochum, Germany
France 4, Canada 0
At Frankfurt
Germany 1, Nigeria 0
Tuesday, July S
At Moenchengladbach, Germany
Germany 4, France 2
At Dresden, Germany *
Nigeria 1, Canada 0
GROUP B
GP W D L GFGA Pts
x-England 3 2 1 0 5 2 7
x-Japan 3 2 0 1 6 3 6
Mexico 3 0 2 1 3 7 2
New Zealand3 0 1 2 4 6 1
x-advanced to quarterfinals
Monday, June 27
At Bochum, Germany
Japan 2, New Zealand 1
At Wolfsburg, Germany
Mexico 1, England 1
Friday, July 1
At Leverkusen, Germany
Japan 4, Mexico 0
At Dresden, Germany
England 2, New Zealand 1
Tuesday, July 5
At Augsburg, Germany
England 2, Japan 0
At SInshelm, Germany
New Zealand 2, Mexico 2
GROUP C
GP W D L GFGA Pts
x-Sweden 3 3 0 0 4 1 9
x-U.S.A 3 2 0 1 6 2 6
North Korea 3 0 1 2 0 3 1 -
Colombia 3 0 1 2 0 4 1
x-advanced to quarterfinals
Tuesday, June 28
At Leverkusen, Germany
Sweden 1, Colombia 0
At Dreslden, Germany
United States 2, North Korea 0
Saturday, July 2
At Augsburg, Germany
Sweden 1, North Korea 0
At Sinshelm, Germany
United States 3, Colombia 0
Wednesday, July 6
At Wolfsburg, Germany
Sweden 2, United States 1
At Bochum, Germany
North Korea 0, Colombia 0
GROUP D
GP W D L GFGA Pts
x-Brazil 3 3 0 0 7 0 9
x-Australla 3 2 0 1 5 4 6
Norway 3 1 0 2 2 5 3
Eq. Guinea 3 0 0 3 2 7 0
x-advanced to quarterfinals
Wednesday, June 29
At Augsburg, Germany
Norway 1, Equatorial Guinea 0
At Moencbengladbach, Germany
Brazil 1, Australia 0
Sunday, July 3


At Bochum, Germany
Australia 3, Equatorial Guinea 2
At Wolfsburg, Germany
Brazil 3, Norway 0
Wednesday, July 6
At Frankfurt
Brazil 3, Equatorial Guinea 0
At Leverkusen, Germany
Australia 2, Norway 1
QUARTERFINALS
Saturday, July 9
At Leverkusen, Germany
England 1, France 1 (France wins 4-3
on penalty kicks)
At Wolfsburg, Germany
Japan 1, Germany 0, OT
Sunday, July 10
'At Augsburg, Germany
Sweden 3, Australia 1
At Dresden, Germany
Brazil 2, United States 2 (U.S. wins
5-3 on penalty kicks)
SEMIFINALS
Wednesday, July 13
At Moenchengladbach, Germany
France vs. United States, Noon
'A t Frankfurt
Japan vs. Sweden, 2:45 p.m.
THIRD PLACE
Saturday, July 16
At Sinsheim, Germany
Semifinal losers, 11:30 a.m.
CHAMPIONSHIP
Sunday, July 17
At Frankfurt
Semifinal winners, 2:45 p.m.


BASEBALL
American League
TORONTO BLUE JAYS Traded OF
Juan Rivera to the L.A. Dodgers for a
player to be named or cash consid-
erations.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
MINNESOTA TIMBERWOLVES Fired
coach Kurt Rambis.
FOOTBALL
Canadian Football League
EDMONTON ESKIMOS Released DB
SLaDarius Key.
WINNIPEG BLUE BOMBERS Signed
P Mike Renaud to a contract exten-
sion.
United Football League
OMAHA NIGHTHAWKS Signed QB
Eric Crouch.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS Extended
the contract of vice president/as-
sistant to the president Al Maclsaac
through the 2013-14 season.
EDMONTON OILERS Traded C An-
drew Cogliano to Anaheim for a 2013
second-round draft pick.
NEW YORK ISLANDERS Named
Eric Boguniecki assistant coach of
Bridgeport (AHL).
TORONTO MAPLE LEAFS Re-signed
C Mike Zigomanis to a one-year
contract
SOCCER
Major League Soccer
VANCOUVER WHITECAPS Signed F
Mustapha Jarju.
COLLEGE
NORTHEAST CONFERENCE Named
Erik Kaminski director of new media
and communications.
BUFFALO Named Jessica Borgia
women's assistant basketball coach.
GEORGETOWN Named Matt Ker-
wick men's associate head lacrosse
coach.
MOUNT ST. VINCENT Named
Jay Butler director of athletics and
recreation.
QUEENS (N.C.) Named Jon MacColl
men's and women's assistant swim-
ming coach.
Garmin-Cervelo, 1:01:32.
157. Danny Pate, United States, HTC-
Highroad, 1:02:07.


WEDNESDAY MORNING / AFTERNOON JULY 13, 2011

6:00 6:30 7:00 17:30 8:00 .8:30 9:00.930 100010:30 1: 11 A30 :0012 :30 Q00130 2:002:3 3:30 3003:30 4:00 4:30 5:00 5:30
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WEDNESDAY EVENING I'LATE NIGHT -. JULY 13, 2011

6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:0010:3011:0011: 012:0012:30 1:00 1:30 2:00 2:301300 3:30 4:00 4:305: 5:30
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KIT'N'CARLYLE BY LARRYWRIGHT HERMAN BY JIM UNGER


7.13 0 LaughingStock IntlenatonalInc. Dls by Universl Udlck forUFS, 2011
"We're running tests, but we think you're
from another planet."


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


NEA Crossword Puzzle


ACROSS'
1 Mongolian
desert
5 Henry Vlli's
six
10 Attractive-
ness
12 Attractive
but superfi-
clal display
13 In a gloomy
mood
14 Guitarist
Chet
15 Get better
16 Army off.
18 Under-
handed
19 Fire alarm$
22 West
Pointer
25 Biologist ,
Carson
29 Hunts for
food
30 Mercutio's
pal
32 Pop singer
Mann
33 Kayak cousin
34 Corridors
37 Plants with
fronds
38 Distant
(hyph.)
40 Make a wa-
ger


43 Curtain
hanger
44 Costa -
48 Trying expe-
rience
50 Meaning-
less talk "
52 RIpe old age
53 Goes at a
rapid rate
54 Barely
enough
55 Dept. store
inventory
DOWN


Answer to Previous Puzzle

T SPO L USO ALEE E
NAUTILUS N A P



ANNEDY TPESRE
S CR A ADDORE



TESS GEO MINN


1 Stick to- 17 Constantly,
gether to Poe
2 Clay pot 20 Pays for -
3 Targets 21 Nape
(hyph.) 22 IRS form
4 High dud- expert
geon 23 Tune for a
5 Soggy diva
6 Readies the 24 Half, in
press combos
7 Nun's ap- 26 Like some
parel potatoes
8 Counting- (hyph.)
out start 27 Qatar ruler
9 12th-grad- 28 Rangy
ers 31 Signs off
10 Blond on
shade 35 At sunup
11 Cal Tech 36 B'way post-
grad ing, once
12 Pat's cohost 39 Lotto info


40 -a-brac
41 Ferber or
Best
42 Babysitter,
often
45 Currier's
partner
46 Grant terri-
tory
47 Pacino and
Unser
48 Switch po-
sitions
49 Bar mem.
51 Engine
speed, for
short


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celeity Cipher cryplograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Esch letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: G equals C
"IVLS K' VLCHE VKM DKHMR MNSXM,
EFZCS ICM CSMILHKSX GLHRCKS
WOLMRKNSM RVCR K VCE CZZ PF
ZKDL YLLS CMAKSX PFMLZD." SCSC
PN 0 MANOHK
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "l.am an optimist... I want to change things for the
better... my optimism wears heavy boots and is loud!" Henry Rollins

(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 7-13


Dear Annie: I am 16 and regularly baby-
sit for a 2-year-old boy and his 5-year-old
sister. Both kids are very sweet, although
the boy has some minor behavior issues.
I have addressed them and made it clear
that they will not be tolerated while I'm
babysitting.
The problem is their father. He calls the
boy "a little devil" and tells him he is "too
feminine arid babyish," since he carries a
blanket around and plays with his sister's
dolls. But he's only 2! Am I overstepping
if I discuss this with him or the mother? I
don't want to lose this job, because I love
the kids. -Auburn, Mass.
Dear Auburn: Not all parents have an
enlightened attitude about child-rearing,
and some mistakenly confuse belittling
with good parenting. Most parents do
not appreciate parenting pointers from a
teenager. However, you are in a position
to counteract some of Dad's comments
by giving positive feedback to those chil-
dren when they are in your care. If it gets
worse, you might speak to the mother.
Dear Annie: This is a cautionary tale.
I was seeing a psychotherapist (let's call
him "Tim") to overcome a bad phase I
was in a loveless marriage and became
involved with a womanizer. During ther-
apy, I fell in love with Tim, a married man


A.N. Other said, "My wife says I never listen to
her. At least I think that's what she said."
It's lucky he stayed anonymous; otherwise,
she would have surely become his ex-wife.
But as I have been stressing this week, to find
the best opening lead, you must listen to the
bidding.
Look at the West hand. What would you lead
against four spades?
Your first thought might have been the club
jack. But analyze the auction for a few mo-
ments. North responded in diamonds and
South raised the suit. Together, they have eight
or nine diamonds.
Lead the diamond eight, hoping partner can
ruff immediately; but at the worst, he will have
a singleton, you will take the first trump trick,
and he will ruff the second diamond.
Why do you select the eight? Whenever you
hope you are giving partner a ruff, your card
sends a suit-preference signal, telling partner
which of the other two side suits to return.


4
4
4


who occasionally badmouthed his wife in
front of me.
Tim told me he could not ethically date
anyone until two years after her last ap-
pointment. The fact that he was married
didn't seem to matter. Because I loved
him, I stopped treatment so the two-year
waiting period could begin. We grew clos-
er, but were not intimate. I felt sorry for
his wife because she was suffering from a
grave illness and had undergone surgery.
Many months later, Tim's wife divorced
him. He'd been unfaithful with three other
women, one of whom was the mother of a
child he was counseling. I feel like such a
fooL I was heartbroken to realize that my
trusted counselor was himself a woman-
izer. We are, of course, no longer in touch.
I just want to let your readers know these
things happen. No Name, No City in
USA
Dear No Name: Every profession has
its bad apples. Most therapists are ethical
and upstanding, and it is not uncommon
for individuals to fall in love ("transfer-
ence") during treatment. But it is uncon-
scionable for a therapist to take advantage
of a client who is already in a vulnerable
state. If Tim hasn't been reported to his lo-
cal licensing board or the American Psy-
chotherapy Association, he should be.


North 07-13-11
K9 8
V K 10 4
4 A Q 7 6 3
45 2
West East
t A3 2 4 6 5
VAJ7 V986532
*8 5 4 2 -
*J 109 ,*Q8743
South
Q J 10 7 4
VQ
K J 10 9
AK6
Dealer: South
Vulnerable: East-West
South West North East
14 Pass 2 4 Pass
3 Pass 44 All pass

Opening lead: ??


---~11^"~------`--1'-----'--ll"~~`-"r


Horoscope

CANCER (June 21-July
22) -Treat everyone you're
around as someone special
and it'll add a luster to your
personality you couldn't
manufacture. Make popu-
larity your goal.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -
Lady Luck always tags onto
tenacity of purpose, so un-
less you don't want her in
your life, do whatever you
can to make what you want
happen. The harder you try,
the better your chances.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22) Good things hap-
pen when we get out and
do what we can to socialize
with others.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
- Some kind of better shift
in conditions is developing
for you, of which you might
not initially be aware. As
time passes, however, it
will become clear.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) There are strong in-
dications that something
you're tying.'to do cannot
be accomplished alone.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-
Dec. 21) By thinking
in positive terms or using
constructive measures to
fulfill a material hope or
expectation, a sizeable
profit can be realized.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19) You should try
to make things happen in-
stead of waiting for them
to occur.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) Even if you are a
trifle bit slow in revving up
some steam to get yourself
going, once you get start-
ed, there will be no holding
you back.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) There is likely to
be some strong justifica-
tion for you feeling a bit
fortunate.
ARIES (March 21-April
19) If you're designing
something you hope could
generate a profit, once your
plans are solidified.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20) Get out and mingle
if you can, because you
could run into someone
who belongs to a group.
GEMINI (May 21-June
20) Instead of trying to
make things happen, let
life take its own course of
events. Lady Luck is likely
to do a far better job for
you than you can yourself.


ENTERTAINMENT










www.JCFLORIDAN.com


CLASSIFIED


Jackson County Floridan *


Wednesday, July 13, 2011- 5
Wednesday, July 13, 2011 5 B


WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED




ARKETPLA


BY PHONE: (850) 526-3614 or (800) 779-2557
BY FAX! (850) 779-2557
ONLINE: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM


BY MAIL: WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE
P.O. BOX 520, MARIANNA, FL 32447
IN PERSON: 4403 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA


Publication Policy Errors and Omissions: Advertisers should check their ad the first day. This publication shall not be liable for failure to publish an ad or Yor a typographic error or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the ad for the -" d a s
insertion. Adjustment for errors Is limited to the cost of that portion of the ad wherein the error occurred. The advertiser agrees that the publisher shall not be liable for damages arising out of errors in advertisements beyond the amount paid for the space
actually occupied by that portion of the advertisement in which the error occurred, whether such error is due to negligence of the, publisher's employees or otherwise and there shall be no liability for non-insertion of any advertisement beyond the amount paid for
such advertisement. Display Ads are not guaranteed position. All advertising is subject to approval. Right is reserved to edit, reject, cancel or classify all ads under the appropriate classification. I


BB Fori5 [de[d in es calltoll-freeorvisitwwwjcfloridac [r

DOGS FRESH PRODCEZ


Blood Mountain Cabins
and Country Store Located
up high in the scenic
Appalachian Mountains in
North Georgia. The views are
Spectacular and the temperatures are cool.
www.bloodmountain.com 800-284-6866

G.M. Properties of PC Beach 800-239-2059
Fully furnished condos
& townhouses near Pier Park.
2bdrm Gulf front- starting @ $175 nt.
3bdrm Gulf front- starting @ $225 nt.
2bdrm Lake front- starting @ $100 nt.
Studios Lake front- starting @ $70 nt.
www.gmproperties.com


LAKE EUFAULA
WATERFRONT HOME
5BR/2BA, furnished,
large lot with 2
storage bldg., covered
porch, dock w/power. 3161 Calhoun Dr.
(fOR SALE) 4 334-792-7046



i* Owner Financing Possible **
Waterfront Lake Seminole GA
7671 Paradise Drive, 2/2,866 SF Furnished
$85,000 Reduced *334-805-0705


ANNOUNCEMENTS MERCHA ISE
() ANNOUNCEMENTS MERCHANDISE


TWO STORE LIQUIDATION AUCTION
OLD TOWN SQ. 3183 MAIN ST. COTTONDALE,
EVERY FRIDAY @ 6 PM STARTING JULY 15TH,
44 FOR INFO 850-303-3023 4-4.
AU LIC#AU667 AB LIC#2727
PLEA MARKET OPEN FRIDAY THRU SUNDAY


FREE SALVATION MESSAGE POSTCARDS!
"If you confess with your lips the Lord Jesus,
and believe in your Heart that God raised
Him from the dead YOU WILL BE SAVED, "
(Bible, Romans, Chapter .10:9-10).
FRIENDS DON'T LET FRIENDS DIE WITHOUT
JESUS. For FREE Post Cards, with Salvation
Message: Boxholder, P.O. Box 439,
Fairfax Station, VA 22039-0439
(Available in English, Spanish and/or Korean)


HUGE MOVING SALE: Market. St. Marianna look
for signs. Fri. 15th 8-2 & Sat. 16th 7-? H/H,
clothes, motorcycle, furn, dishes, toys, tools,
electronics, ALL MUST GO RAIN OR SHINE!

A-


Camo Clothes size XL youth, great condition,
six pieces, $10, 850-272-1842
, Women's Nike run shoes, great condition sz 6.
seven pair $5 each, 850-272-1842

WANTED/WILL BUY: OLD COINS, TOYS AND
COLLECTABLES CALL 850-693-0908

Consesion Trailer: 8x20 Wells Cargo, 2 side
service, propane restaurant style, fully equip-
ped. $15k May see at 2983 Sunset Dr. Marianna


Entertainment center is made of light oak
wood, Br6yhill, appx. 12ft wide, 6ft high and
2ft deep. upper part has glass shelves with
lights, bottom has storage for dvd/cd etc. $995
call Billy at 334-692-5023 or 334-596-5261.

Wanted: Old Coins, Gold, Diamonds,
Guns, And Tools West Main Jewelry & Loan
334-671-1440. DO 12717

Mission X3 Bow, 50# 25.5 inch, Includes Hard
Case, 7 Easton ST Epic arrows with Blazer
Fetching, Kwikee-3 Fixed Stem Quiver, QAD
Ultra-Rest Hunter Fall-Away Arrow Rest, Truglo
Tru-Site Xtreme Three-Pin Sight with Light,
Sims LimbSaver S-Coil Stabilizer, Peep Sight,
Loop, Camo Wrist Sling. Excellent bow for a be-
ginner or young person. All items are in excel-
lent condition. Call Chip 850-209-0921

1':

FOUND: tiny orange kitten in woods needs lov-
ing home. 850-592-4793
Free kittens Multi-colored, multi-hair length'
850-482- 5880/850-303-9727 after 3pm

AKC German Shepherd puppies for sale .
black/tan mom, and silver/black father are
both on premises for you to see. I've got 6
males $350 each, and 1 female.$400. All have
shots and ready to go. Please call or text Jason
334-618-4741 or 334-618-3586
AKC registered weimaraner puppies Ready to
go, tails docked and dew claws removed. I
have 3 males and 7 females left, will make
great pets. Asking $300, 334-657-8670
CKC MinPin puppies 6wks old, (2f/lm), ready
to go, first shots and wormed, sire and dam on
premises. $250/call leave msge 334-796-1406


FREE BUSINESS TRAINING FOR VETERANS AND
LAID OFF WORKERS!

The LEARN Program, sponsored by the US Dept. of Labor,
provides free business training & counseling to qualified
applicants. Training starts July 21st in Troy. For more info
contact us at 866-968-5525 or see our website:
www.learnala.org
Aux. aids & service available, dial. 711 for AL Relay Ctr. TTY.
Equal Opportunity Program.


Wednesday, July 13, 2011






0,

THE SUDOKU sAME WITH a KIC!I

HOW TO PLAY
Fill in he 9x9 grid with the missing
numbers so that each column, row and
3x3 box contains the digits 1-9 only once.
There is only one correct solution
T for each puzzle.
GET MORE WASABI .
PUZZLES ONLINE!
ARCHIVES AND MORE GREAT GAMES AT
BOXERJAM.COM


English Bulldog, AKC registration, current on
vaccinations, 10 weeks old, $450,
sheltonkayla73@yahoo.com, 850-482-4026
English Bulldog Puppy .Champion line and AKC
registered, fully shots, perfect Health, gets
along with kids, Fully trained, 11 weeks old,
$700. Contact: ayz235@live.com. (334) 792-2132
English Bulldog Puppy for sale champion line
and akc registered, all shots, perfect Health,
get along with kids, Fully trained, 11 weeks old,
$700, zyydot235@yahoo.com, .334-702-7210
FOUND: Male Black Lab/Bull Dog Mix w/green
collar, Hwy 69 Grand Ridge, FL 850-559-2922
FREE TO GOOD HOME: 3 yr old male Bird Dog,
all shots current, 850-663-4789 .
Friend for Life has Free Wonderful Rescued
Dogs shots, spayed, neutered. 334-791-7312
LOST: Male Red Coon Dog w/orange'collar,
Hwy 69 Grand Ridge, FL 850-559-2922

(*) lS' MAIVIARKF.T


FREIH OUeClEe--

FRESH
GREEN
PEANUTS
850-352-2199
OR 850-352-4423
Fresh Shelled Peas & Butter Beans
several varieties and Okra. 2307 Mayo Road,
(between Cypress & Grand Ridge) Bobby
Hewett (850) 592-4156
Now Open Jackson Farms U-Pick Tomatoes
& Peppers! Bring your own bucket!
7 days a week. 850-592-5579
Pea Sheller for Sale
in Ashford on Co. Rd. 55
334-796-1912













Fresh Peas, Tomatoes,
Squash, Cucumbers,
Snap Beans, New Potatoes,
Plenty of Canning Tomatoes
for $10 Box!
220 W. Hwy 52 Malvern
* 334-793-6690 *

CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
Your source for selling and buying!


Tuesday's
WASABI SOLUTION

783564219
5 60@2 7 3
4 5 1 912 ) ( 8
3 9 41 5 7
6 2 0 38 9 4(D
1 9 7
1 7 2 6 3 8 () 4


S|9 4 5 |( 7 8 1 3 6

BE SURE TO VISIT OUR
NEWEST GAME SITE

CKDOT KEWLBOX.COM
CKDOTCOM KEWLBOX.COM


U-Pick Slocomb Tomatoes

Hendri Farm
Produce
Slocomb Hwy. 52
n# 334-726-7646 4.


White's Produce
U-Pick Tomatoes &
Watermelon
Co. Rd. 28 off Co. Rd. 49
Next to Buffalo Farm *
334-726-5291 4

EMP.)PLOYMENT


Caregiver Wanted for Elderly Female: Room &
Board plus Salary Call for info: 850-482-5631


Campbellton-Graceville Hospital located in
Graceville, Florida is seeking qualified
persons for the following positions:
1 Fulltime RN (night shift) needed to work the
Emergency Department; must have prior
experience in an emergency environment, be
ACLS and PALS certified (or be able to obtain
certification within 90 days of hire), and have
a current Florida Nursing License.
Premium pay offered for these positions.
2 Fulltime RNs (night shift) needed to work
on the inpatient floor with acutely ill and
swingbed (long term care/rehab) patients.
Must be ACLS and PALS certified (or be able
to obtain certification with 90 days of hire),
and have a current Florida Nursing License.
1 Fulltime LPN (night shift) needed to work
on the inpatient floor with acutely ill and
swingbed (long term care/rehab) patients.
Must be ACLS and PALS certified (or be able
to obtain certification within 90 days of hire),
and have a current Florida Nursing License.
Qualified applicants may apply or inquire to
Campbellton-Graceville Hospital
www.c-ghospital.com or call (850) 263-4431
ext. 2012. Resume may be faxed to
(850) 263-3312, Attn: Personnel Director or
email to jaustin@i panhandle.rr.com
Drug Free workplace, EOE.





Northwest Florida Community Hospital,
Chipley, Florida, a leading healthcare
provider in the panhandle, is seeking:
Financial Analyst (FT)
Degree in Accounting/Finance required,
CPA 3-5 years hospital, revenue cycle and
CPSI experience preferred.
We offer competitive salary and benefits
and a "We Treat You Better Than Family"
working environment.
Applications available on line at NFCH.com;
apply in person or fax resume and/or
application to 850-638-0622; email
dblount0@nfch.org or call 850-415-8106
Drug and Smoke Free Work Place EOE
LICENSED HOME HEALTH AIDES & CNA'S
We are looking for mature & compassionate
people who enjoy spending time with the
elderly. Is this you? Flexible day, night and
weekend hours. Contact: Home Instead
Senior Care Mon-Fri 9am-3pm 850-526-2500
(^) EDUCATION
S & INSTRUCTION


Get a Quality Education for a
New Career! Programs
FORTIS offered in Healthcare,
HVAC and Electrical Trades.
Call Fortis College Today!
888-202-4813.
COLEG.(E For consumer information
www.Fortis.edu

RESIDENTIAL
CA9 REAL ESTATE FOR RENT


HOLLY HILL APARTMENTS
1 and 2 Bedroom Apartments
Monthly rent from $554 + utilities
For Rental Info & Applications
Call: 850-482-7150
Holly Hill Apartments
Located at: 4414 Holly Hill Drive, Marianna
Mon-Fri, 9:00 AM-5:OOPM
(TDD #1-800-955-8771)
Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer



AD EERTISE: IN
ITHE CLSSIFIEPDS L


__@_






@@@
@
G)0


02008 BLOCKDOT. INC. WWWBLO


__


*EESSS IQ-


I


015 .3












6 u wa-edi], 1.J.,1 111 -Ja 1cksIorn ourntv iFlridan


1/1 In Grand Ridge off Hwy 90
$400. mo. $200. dep. 850-272-8880


Edgewood Apartments in Cypress Area. Quiet,
Furnished 1BR 1BA.Cable & laundry included.
$440/mo + deposit. P 850-573-6062 4,

Beach Cottage for Rent: 3BR 1.5BA, Large
screened porch, Beacon Hill (Near Mexico
Beach) $550/wk 850-482-2539 or 201-888-2388


2BR/,BA: Marianna, new paint & carpet,
dishwasher, stove, & refrig. W/D hook-up,
garbage service & water included.
$500.Mo/$300.Dep 334-573-4772
I0 H SES]UNF lISHED


2Bt/1BA Concrete block Rental in Marianna,
Tile floors, washer h/u, pets ok, $300/mo + $30
credit/bkgrnd ck. Additional houses and
apartments in Graceville 850-263-5753


3 BR 2.5 BA, Ig den, living rm, dining rm, sun
porch, brkfst rm f washrm. 4612 Oakdale Dr.
$1000/mo + $1000 dep. for appt. call 800-239-
1267/334-797-8948 avail. 7/1/11
3BR 2BA Block Home on 10 acres Compass
Lake area, Energy efficient, CH/A, Outdoor
pets ok, $850 + dep. 850-573-0466
3BR 2BA Kynesville, CH/A, big yard, $650 +
dep. 850-638-1703
4BR 2Full BA 2, BA, 3000 sf, 1 acre, Compass
Lake in Hills, amenities, $950/mo. 850-832-
9577/850-832-9576
Austin Tyler & Associates *
Quality Homes & Apartments
-* 850- 526-3355 4w
"Property Management s Our ONLY Business"
Lovely 3BR 1BA House, Clean, in town, near.
schools, nice yard, quiet neighborhood, out-
door pets ok, $600/mo with $600 deposit 850-
482-6211

IMl? nsLove Rd In Ashford 2/2 Mobile Home
415 Mo + Dep 6066 Wctor Rd. Bascom Ft 3/1
$ 675.mo + Dep. Call 334-97-1517
2006 MH $200/mo
S1/1 Furnished to Qualified
Caretaker/Handyman to maintain 5 acre
Marianna Property until sold. 6 mos
renewable lease guaranteed. 850-592-2507
2/1.5 $450/mo, 2/1 $425/mo Quiet, well
maintained, water/sewer/ garbage/ lawn
included. Also 2/1 Duplex available $575
Joyce Riley RE 850-209-7825 4
2 & 3 bedroom mobile Homes in Cottondale.
$500 and up. H20, garbage, sewer included.
http:// www.charloscountry living, com.
850-258-4868/209-8847
2 & 3BR 2BA Mobile Homes in Cottondale no
pets, Central Heat & Air $325-$450 850-258-
1594 leave message
2 &3BRMH's in
Marianna & Sneads (850)209-8595.
3/2 Double wide on Lake Seminole in Sneads,
$600/mo, water included. 850-526-2183
3/2 Triplewide, Bear Paw Chipola River,
$625/mo + dep. 850-718-8088/482-6200
Rent to Own: 2 & 3BR Mobile Homes.
Lot rent included. Also available,
1 & 2BR Apts & Houses. For details
1*850-557-3432 or 850-814-6515 4
Small 2BR 1BA Located in Sneads
$300/month 850-573-0308.
Small Quiet Family Oriented Park- 2BR MH for Rent
Includes water, garbage, lawn care, No Pets 850-592-




By Owner: 3BR 2BA Country Style Home ilndian
Springs, 2240 sf, 1.3 ac, $170,000, possible
owner financing. 850-526-7827


CLASSIFIED


i WANTED WRECKED OR JUNK VEHICLES
i PAY TOP DOLLAR '00 93.
P DAY -334-794t9576 N__ 6HT334-794 7769

'92 Bumble Bee Bass boat 115hp, Yamaha mo-
tor, complete, good condition, $4000. OBO 334-
355-0809.
Bayllner '06 boat & trailer, like new, garage
kept, fully equipped, ready to go, Bimbi top,
135hp Merc. inboard. $8,500. 334-699-3044.
Bayliner '97 Ski Boat w/5.7 Merc. I/O, w/ S.S.
Prop (licenced for 8 person) has bow seating &
Includes trailer w/like new tires. $6500. OBO
334-797-8172 DO 12707
BOSTON WHALER, Center Console, 17ft.,
90 Nissan, Great Condition, Trailer Included
$7,500 334-687-3334
Seacraft, '89,20 ft- Center
.s.' =K' console,'95 225HP Johnson,
S dual axle trailer w/brakes.
" Great condition, very clean.
-$5;250 334-696-5505
TRITON 1546 CRAPPIE '05
All Welded aluminum 15
HP Mercury 4-stroke, (2)
12V batteries, 24V Motor
guide trolling motor. Built
in livewell, trailer and boat cover $5000 obo
850-643-7409
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING


WELLCRAFT '96 EXCEL 26'-Extra clean cruiser
w/trailer, gen w/ac, 5.7 mercrulser, w/single
prop, sleeps 6, galley, aft cabin, head, m/wave,
fridge, 2 radios, 2 depth finders, chart plotter,
GPS, always under cover, Located in Eufaula,
AL. $22,500 OBO Call 256-492-2488 or
icpamitchellnhotmail.com


99' Carrl-Ilte Carriage md#29RK 5th wheel,
1- 12 ft. slide, 19 ft. awning, sleeps 4,
$11,500 k 229-395-6714.
.. J COUGAR TRAVEL TRAILER
2004-30 foot,
I4I __ big rear window,
living/dining slide, excel-
lent condition, new tires,
must see to appreciate,
$16,500 OBO, 334-687-6863,334-695-2161
Dutchmen 40 ft. Travel Trailer
f.X s .,'06. 38B-DSL, Sleeps 8, Has 2
slideouts. Loaded, Like New.
ri $17,995. Call 334-406-4555

FLEETWOOD 2005 Prowler AX6, 5th wheel, 36
ft, 4 slides, large shower, 30/50AMP. $25,000
OBO Call 334-695-4995,334-687-7862.
National '98 Dolphin-
37ft sweeps 6, 32k miles,
large slide, leveling jack,
back-up camera, Flatscreen
awning, TV, Sleep Number Bed,
awning, corian counter tops, $27,000.


rour source Jor selling nLdU buyIni! IpIll d.7Q.-iQl


Production Operators
Michelin North America, Inc. has
opportunities available for
Production Operators In our
Dothan, Alabama facility.
Successful candidates must be able
to work In an empowered, quality-
driven environment. These positions
Invdive rotating shift work In a 7-day
per week operation.
Interested candidates must apply
In person at the
Dothan Area Career Center
787 Ross Clark Circle
Dothan, AL
Applications will be taken July 11 July 15, 2011
between the hours of 8:00 am and 4:00 pm.


ROOF ING&- RELATED


1 Hall Roofing
S- Siding & Building LLC. -
Lic. #RC29027412 RB29003513
SIDNEY HALL 4939 Hwy. 2
HEADLAND'S BEST KEPT SECRET! (850) 569-2021 Malone,
699 CO RD100, HEADLAND 850) 526-8441 Florida 32445 y .


Craftsman Design Approx 29ZO sq. ft.
S4 BR, 3 Baths Built in 2009 c 5.3 Acres
Slate and tile Hardwood floors
Granite Energy efficient
Formal DR 2 car garage 2 stall barn
Trey ceiling in master
S18 ft. ceiling in living area
Lennox Three Zone system
REACTORS WELCOME!





Four-Wheeler: 2007 Arctic Cat, DVX 250 racing
Four-wheeler. Liquid cooled-249cc engine, front
and rear hydrolic disc brakes, and like new
tires. I serviced it recently and itruns and looks
great. Excellent condition for a 2007 model.
Asking $2,500. (334) 797-5611.
Honda '04 Rancher ES 2WD. Great deal on a fun
vehicle. Asking price $2995. Garage kept with
low miles. Excellent condition and serviced
routinely. Call 334-692-4120 and leave mes-
sage.
Polaris '05 Ranger XP-700 4X4, Garage Kept,
Low Hours, Like New, Hard Top, Windshield,
Backseat, $6200 Call Mark 334-714-6999
Yamaha '07 Raptor 80, on-
ly 50 hours onait. New bat-
tery, helmet, has extend-
ed warranty. $1295. OBO,
SERIOUS INQUIRIES ONLY.
334-774-7783 DO 12303
Yamaha Rhino 660 4x4 side by side, clean,
rebuilt engine, new roof, runs great.
$6000. OBO 334-790-7080


Boat/RV Storage 984 Bruner Rd. (S. Park in
Taylor), 12w x 32d x 10h, Free water, power &
air, $75/month. Mgmt. lives on site, Upholstry
services available on site, 334-797-0523, 334-
792-8628, ddismukes@comcast.net


Grader Pan Excavator
Dump Truck Bulldozer
Demolition e Grading Site Prep
S*Debris Removal Retention Ponds Leveling
* Top Soil Fill Dirt Gravel Land Clearing


Clay O'Neal's
Land Clearing, inc.
ALTHA, PFL
850-762-9402
Cell 850-832-5055



IPo oal I1&Re

Pool Maintenance & Rel


WEOMFFECIEI








llr from top to
pair from top to


www.JCFLORIDAN.com


REDUCEDI! Montana '05 5th Wheel,
4 slides, king bed, excellent condition,
$25,500 OBO Call 850-547-2808
StarCraft '92 25ft sleeps 6, very clean,
microwave, CH&A, Stereo, $4,250. 334-791-4350
Trail Lite 2006 R-VISION
26 ft., fully loaded,
bought new, 13K miles
$49,995 334-616-6508


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Largest Manufacturer of Portable
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Natural Stone Ceramic Porcelain
Custom Showers Hardwood Laminate & More
No Job too Lar.e or Small! Lkensed & Insured
(850) 693-1423 or (850) 209-8099
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Dixie RV SuperStores
FL's Newest RV Dealer
NOW OPEN!!!
*Store Hours*
Monday-Saturday
8:00am-6:00pm

21 Acres / 30 Brands New and Pre-Owned

* Newmar Keystone Heartland Jayco
Fleetwood Prime Time Coachmen
Forest River

Service Department
Parts and Acces. Store
RV Collision Center

Located off 1-10 Exit 70 / SR285
328 Green Acres Dr.
De Funlak Springs, FL 32435
Sales and Service: 850-951-1000
www.dlxlbderv.com DO 12756


Dixie RV SuperStores
FL's Newest RV Dealer
NOW OPEN!!!
*Store Hours*
Monday-Saturday
8:00am-6:00pm

21 Acres / 30 Brands New and Pre-Owned

* Newmar Keystone Heartland Jayco
Fleetwood Prime Time U Coachmen
Forest River

Service Department
Parts and Acces. Store
RV Collision Center


I Located off 1-10 Exit 70/ SR285
328 Green Acres Dr.
De Funlak Springs, FL 32435
Sales and Service: 850-951-1000
www.dbdxlerv.com DO 12569


Private RV Site In Cottondale, includes elec-
tric, water, sewage, $375/mo. + $250 dep. 850-
209-7502





1 Chevrolet '81 Corvette
Automatic 350 (Silver). Will-
sell as is for $4,700. OBO
334-774-1915



'02 Camero convertible 35th addition
automatic V-6 new tires, stereo & new top.
129K miles $5600. 334-596-9966 4-
2001 Dodge Durango all leather, 3rd row flip
and fold, runs great, Black with silver trim,
roughly 170,000 miles, fully loaded. Moving do
not need and can not take, $4500. OBO, clear ti-
tle!!! 334-733-0307 -.

2WD Four Door 139"
Flareside Truck, Dark Gray
Clearcoat, Low Miles -
Approx 59,000, 4.6L EFI V8,
Auto, Air,4 Wheel ABS; Pwr Windows, Locks,
Mirrors; Cruise/Tilt, Premium Sound, Class III
Tow Package, Limited Slip Differential. Single
Owner. $12,900 or best reasonable offer. 334-
703-7685
2004 Red Mitsubishi Outlander with 78,000
miles. Vehicle is in very good condition and has
a new battery. $8,000. 205-602-8807
BBuick '98 LeSabre
Custom, loaded, clean,
90,000 miles, 30 MPG HY.
$4495.Call: 334-790-7959.
DO 12746


CadBlac '07 DTS fully
tan in color. 29K mi.
Chevrolet '09 Impala
ed, only one owner, I
$15,400 firm Call 334





Chevy "09 Slverado
Z71,4 wheel-drive; 5
truck for sale. GREA


DECLASSIFIED


miles, Black, alloy wheels,
Excellent Condition, CD,
MP3 Player, Gray Interior,
30 MPG $15,800 334-797-
3195
Toyota '09 Tacoma Prerunner V6, 4 X 2 with
TRD Offroad Package Tow Package. Truck has
22,000 miles, under warranty, and clear title.
Included is an Undercover tonneau cover, nerf
bars, and bull bar. Drives great. 931-220-0118.

USED CARS FOR SALE
Ford '01 Escort ZxZ -
94k miles, 5 speed manual $2,900.
Volvo'91 240-
Ingnition problems $500.
Pontaic '93 Grand AM
124k miles, 4cyl. Auto $1,995.
Ford '02 Taurus Wagon
80k miles $2,995,
Ford '94 F150 XLT
4x4 Ext Cab, Transmission slipping $1,500.
Call 334-693-5159 or 334-6185828


2004 HARLEY-DAVIDSON ULTRA CLASSIC
FLHTCUI, black, 9,885 miles, $5,900. Serious
buyers only! EGAN99@LIVE.COM, 206-203-2893
2006 Harley-Davidson Ultra Classic .FLHTCUI,
vivid black, 7800 mi., one owner,l oaded, excel-
lent condition, jward3@netscape.com, $6,700,
206-984-4097
2006 Honda CBR 1000 RR. Custom paint Job.
Brand new tires. Has approximately 9k miles.
Comes with 2 helmets. Call Josh @ 334-464-
0031, $5,899
Harley Davidson'02 Sportster 1200 Custom 11k
miles, Chromed Out, $5500. Call 334-691-3468
or 334-701-3855 *"
Harley Davidson '10 Dyna-Super Glide Custom
96 Cubic Inch Motor, 6-spd transmission, only
21 Miles. 2 Brand New helmets included.
$12,000 Firm. Call Thomas 334-791-6011
SHarley Davmon '96 HerItage Softtal FLSTN -
32k miles, emerald green/gun metal gray, lots
of extra chrome, new tires, extra parts and
bike cover. Harley Luggage with Purchase!
Price to SELL! $9500 OBO. Call 229-269-3834
Harley Davidson '99 Road King- good condition,
NEW pipes, tires, battery, backrest, and kick
stand. This deal won't last long!
$5900. Call 334-449-2794


Honda'06 CRF 100 Dirt BIke, used very little,
stored i garage, $1400. OBO 334-726-1206.
U HONDA'97 CBR,
600, loaded, 4,000
miles,stretch lowered,
2 brother exhaust, $6,000
334-689-3518, 334-339-2352
Honda'07 Godwng GLIO Nav. comfort, amp,
many acc. ext. warr. 14K ml. blua In color
$15,500. 334-774-7230. Ready to Se
IKawasald'09 KXF250
Motor by BPM, 2 brothers
performance pipe. Very
fast bike for the motor-
crossing extremist
334-726-3842
Kawasakl '96 800 Limited addition, lowered 5
Inches, custom pipes, custom red python and
tribal paint, road gears, new tires, L-E-D lights
15K mi. Must hear and hear to appreciate.
$3500. 334-405-0928
Kawasald Nna '09 ZX-6E Monster. Less than
2500 miles, great condition, asking $8,000 obo.
Will Include, blue medium Kawasaki female
jacket, and a large green male one, also a me-
dium blue size HJC helmet. Call334-714-1758 or
email alscooby@yahoo.com


2005 Honda Heix 250.
Great Shape, 4,800 Miles,
had adult rider, well main-
tained, $2,800, 334493-
0192


y loaded, leather interior Honda 1962 C102 super
$19,000. 334-693-3980 cub 50, 4k miles, Black &
19,000.white, good condition,
% silver, all star, fully load- electric start 3 speed,
like new, only 12,300 miles, $2,500. Firm. Call noon (M-
4-479-8678 F) 334-347-9002
Chevrolet'95 Camaro, Yamaha 1976 Chapple Antique Scooter- yellow,
V-6, 5 speed, new tires, 150CC, 1500 mile, runs, need carborator $595.
cold air, 111,000 miles, Call 334-793-3494
Excellent condition, $3995.
Call 334-790-7959. R
1500 LT. pcrewC ab 4d,.. Ford 05 ExploWrer LXT- 133k miles, 3rd row
5T Condition Approx-ime seating, towing package, very clean. $8400.
T Condition! Approximate- Call 334-393-9315 or .334-763-0117
iyrIUilI -aKu ~rinr aA 21aziu I an~hLaU I -al3433915r347301


ly 37,100 miles-. KURed Exterior and Black Luiieather
Interior. Upgraded Dual Exhaust, Towing pack-
age, and tool box included. Need to sell quick-
ly! Appraisal value $28,000 asking $25,000 or
best offer! Make an offer! Any reasonable of-
fer will be considered! Call 334-389-6920 for
more information.
Clrysler '6 Crossfire- roadster, 3.2L, 215HP,
20k mile, black on black convertible with dark .
gray interior, cloth seats, alum wheels, AC, 6
speed, manual, 25MPG, like new tires, Retiring,.
Enterprise $14,000. Call 334-393-4444
Chrysler '06 Town & Country LTD Excellent
Condition, 74K miles, Nagivation, DVD, Original
Owner $15,500 850-482-3441
DO YOU KNOWt ANYONE WITH BAD CREDIT?
I can get U Riding Today.
.', kepos, Slow Credit, Past Bai kriptay OKI-
$0 Down/ 1st Paymrent, Tax, Tag & Title
Push, Pull of Drag, Will Trade anything
Warranty On Every Vehl Soldl '
S$100 Referrals! Ca Steve 800M-8094716
Honda '97 Accord SE ,.4door, LOADED, Sunroof,
146K miles. Nice! $4500 334-790-9983
Mercedes '86 420SEL 4-door excellent
condition, light yellow In color.
205-493-0519 or 334-792-9429.
Mercury '99 Grand Marquis LS 104400 mi.
Leather, CD changer, Alloy wheels, Dark Green
in color $4999 334-714-1977
Nissan '05 Altima- GREAT CAR! 116k miles,
silver, power windows and door locks, cloth
interior, $8000. Call 334-794-5296 or 596-5098
SPontiac '05 Grand Am,
4 door, automatic, V-6,
66,000 miles, like new con-
dition. $6995. Call 334-790-
7959.
SATURN IN'06 ION-129K miles asking $5,000
fully loaded, runs great 334-333-4957
Toyota '03 Camry, good condition, tan with
gray interior, approx. 155k miles, vehicle locat-
ed in Grand Ridge, FL $5500 850-209-4949
DO 12528
Toyota '03 Corolla LE- White with gold trim,
fully loaded with leather interior, sun roof, all
extras, 47k miles, like new $10,000.
Call 334-790-8725 or 334-699-7849
Toyota '08 Yarus- 23k miles, excellent condi-
tion, blue, 36 MPG in town, 5 speed $10,950.
Call 334-479-0099


iHonda'03 CRV- gold, 12,
miles, power windows
and locks, excellent con(
tion, good gas mileage,
$8500. Call 786-223-2278


4120 John Deere Compact 4x4 Tractor- box
blade, bush hog and 20ft 6 ton trailer $21,500.
Call 334-803-7422


4k

di-



U


Chevrolet '00 LS Silverado ext. cab 4-door, Z71
4x4, Red, 138K miles, all power, 5000 miles on
tires, tow package, Must see to appreciate.
$9500. 334-791-2781 or 334-677-3050 DO 12067


Jackson County Floridan *


Wednesday, July 13, 2011- 7 B


_ __ ___I_________ ~ __


WE PAY CaSH
FOR JUNK CARS!.""'

334-818-1274 D012226





LF15374
NOTICE OF INTENDED ACTION
THE JACKSON COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD
Purpose and Effect: Pursuant to Chapter 120 of
the Florida Statute, the School Board of Jack-
son County will hold a rule adoption meeting in
conjunction with the regularly scheduled meet-
ing on August 16, 2011 for the purpose of
amending or adopting the following rules to
comply with the provisions of controlling laws,
administrative rules and guidelines.
PROPOSED POLICY AMENDMENTS
Code of Student Conduct and Discipline for
Jackson County Schools 2011-12 -
Revision of the Code of Student Conduct is pro-
posed to add language that includes sexting,
which has criminal and noncriminal penalties
and defines "appropriate dress".











Table: Oak Dining Table with leaf and 2 chairs.
$50 obo. 850-482-8290
Glass table for outside, 74x43, $40
850-526-4425
2 Comfy Chairs, light brown, carved back, on
casters. $35 for both 850-526-3426


SChevrolet '02 S-10 Barracudda, stuffed and mounted, 3 long
T 'regular cab, automatic, $30 850-573-4990
4 cylinder, economical, Black metal office desk $100. Good Condition.
21,000 miles, 1 owner, Standard size. 850-482-4691
S 334new es7959. Call: DOBoat Seats (2)" Wise" Worth $61 each,
334-790-7959. DO 1ASKING $20. each. 334-389-6069.
Chevy 1500 '07, white, ext cab with 4 doors Canon 35mm Camera w/ flash handle & flash,
4x4 with extra leaf springs. Extra bedllner, 28-80 auto lens & access. $250 850-482-7665
A/C, AM/FM/CD; Electric windows, running Canon 35mm Camera w/ flash handle & flash,
beard, new tires. $16,500.334-793-6281 Days 28-80 auto lens & access. $250 850-482-7665


Dodge '06 Quad Cab Sport 4X4- 5.7HEMI, red,
42k mile,'fully loaded, 100,000. mile warranty,
loan valued at $22k asking $17,500. OBO
PRICE TO SELL! Call 334-648-2002
Ford '02 F250 XL, 4 door crew cab, 7.3 Itr diesel,
205,000 miles, diamond plated toolboxes,
$12,500 850-526-2507 no calls after 9pm
FORD'05 RANGER
XLT- 4X4, 6cly., 4.0L,
4 doors, 5 passenger,
excellent condition,
$2,000 below
Blue Book $11,300
334-689-9052
Ford '08 F150 XLT 5A V8, 4 wheel drive, red In
color $20.500. 334-671-9770.


FORD'89 F150, 4wh,'4x4
Auto, $4,600 or reasonable
offer. Call 229-334-8520.


I Ford '98 Ranger
regular cab, automatic,
V-6, 1 owner, 24,000 miles,
LIKE NEW! $6795. Call:
334-790-7959. DO 12748


Canon Digital A590 Compact Camera, like new
$105 850-482-7665
Canvas Roof with pole frame, white, 10x10 $30
850-573-4990
Chest of Drawers with 3 drawerssolid wood,
1940's or 50's. $50 850-526-4425
Dining Table, seats 8, antique, Birch Wood,
claw foot legs $300 OBO 850-209-0830
Dining table, w/4 barstool chairs, mahogny fin-
ish $150 850-693-6645
Dooney & Bourke & Louis Vultton Purses -
Authentic new condition $35-$75,334-389-6069
Double bed RV mattress 74"x 52" w, comes
with padded cover, $45 850-526-2840
Dresser w/extra deep drawers, real mahogany
wood $75 850-693-6645
Drill Press Floor Model, 18 sp, 5/8 chuck, Oma-
ha Ind. Tool. $75. 850-482-4120
Exerciser, AB Doe r, Pro Model, $25 850-482-
8347
FREE Taylor Swift book with purchase of poster
$20. 24"x70" 334-389-6069
Frigldalre Refrigerator, 18 cu.ft. with ice maker,
excellent condition, $325 850-209-3970
Graco HIghchaIr, Navy Plaid, new condition
$20 850-526-3426


LF15358
On Wednesday, July 20,2011, at 10:00 a.m.
there will be a Tourist Development Council
meeting at the Jackson County Chamber of
Commerce Russ House, 4318 Lafayette Street,
Marianna, Florida.


Hummels, (6) From the Eighties $500 for All
Different sizes 334-898-7453
India Rug, small oval 4'x17" $20 850-573-4990
Leather clogging tennis shoes girls size 2. $20
850-482-6520
LG Flip Phone, Straight Talk, free web & text,
$40 Firm 850-376-9426
LITTLE TIKE YARD TOYS: WATER PLAY TABLE, 5
CARS (HIGH MILEAGE) 2 BASKETBALL GOALS,
JUNGLE GYM $5 EACH, SLIDE, HOUSE, STORE,
BOAT SAND BOX, JUNGLE GYM $10 EACH, CAS-
TLE, ROCKET, $15 EACH, ALL FOR $100, CALL
AFTER 4PM 850-526-4645
Mermaid Tables, (2) end, (1) coffee, $100 for all
850-573-4990
NASCAR Memorabllla, Dale Earnhardt Jr & Sr.
$5- $20 850-849-6481
Oriental Rugs (2), 4x6, $80 for both 850-573-
4990
Photography supplies 8x10 photographic pa-
per, satin finish 40+ sheets; Premium Dry
Mount Tissue; Flexipod Mini Tripod; Camera
Cleaning Kit; film, 2 rolls Black/white 2 rolls
color. $40 850-482-6520
Play Station $25
Play Station Games $4/ea 850-482-8347
Porch/Lawn Swing With Chains,
L W. ll Deliver. $85 334-794-5780 J
Radiator, new in box, fits '94 GMC or Chevy, 4.3
ltr $75 OBO 850-849-6481


Toddler Bed, white metal, nice condition, $20
850-526-3426


Used designer handbags, Agnair, $5/ea or one
price for all. 850-209-6977


Wheelchair $35, Bathtub Raiing $10, Bathtub
Seat $10 850-482-8347


Wheel Chair Loader for full size van, $500 080
850-209-0830
Wll Console Game (black) with extra pink con- .
troller. 4 games, like new. $250 850-592-1234
Wood Roll-top computer desk $150. Good Con-
dition. 850-482-4691


v -- .


I


I


--- --- ----


GMC '89 3500 Duramax
Diesel- work truck, long Student Progression Plan for Jackson County
wheel base, orange, re- Public Schools 2011-12 Revision of the Stu-
built engine, $2500. OBO dent Progression Plan is proposed to add lan-
Call 334-791-9099 guage to include civics as a mandatory course
Cll 334-791-a9for 7th graders with an end of course assess-
KUHN KNIGHT VerU- Maxx ment, reading intervention waivers, selection
E Mixer Model 5032 Twin of graduation option on a yearly basis, partici-
Augers, knives have just patron of non-public school athletes in public
been replaced. $15,500. school athletic programs.
Call 334-894-2315 or
334-464-3189 Cost to agency: None. Cost or benefit to those
affected: None. Impact on open market:
Massey Ferguson '95,240 Farming Tractor None. Origination and authorization: Lee W.
2WD, power steering, diesel, 519 hours, Good Miller, 7/11/11
Condition, $6950 334-596-9460 or 334-693-3725
Leave Message
NIssan '96 Frontier XE Pick up truck. Gray, IF REQUESTED, A HEARING WILL BE HELD:.
5-speed, good condition $3500 334-792-9230 DATE: August 16, 2011
Toyota '07 Tacoma- Pre- runner SR5, fully load- TIME: 4:00 P.M. Central Standard Time
ed with leather interior. 45k miles, 6 cyl auto, PLACE: Board room of the School Board of
double cab, 2WD, dark blued, topper, 1 owner, Jackson County, 2903 Jefferson Street, Marian-
garage kept $21,900 OBO Call 850-482-8700 na, FL 32446
TRACTOR '08-Massey Ferguson, 33HP, 200 THE ENTIRETEXT OF EACH PROPOSED RULE
Hours, like new, one owner, LOADED!! AND/OR REFERENCED DOCUMENT, AS WELL AS
$25,000 OBO 334-687-3173, 334-695-1802 A FULL LISTING OF RELEVANT STATUTES, CAN
BE INSPECTED AND/OR COPIES MADE BY THE
TRACTOR IH1440 Combine, PUBLIC, DURING OFFICE HOURS, MONDAY
Field Ready, Grain Head and Corn THROUGH FRIDAY, AT THE ADDRESS GIVEN
Head. $8,500. 850-415-0438 ABOVE.


02' VAN Venture blue is color, hew engine, LF15373
$5000. 334-718-4912.N .M e11
2003 Pontlac Montana Van -$6,000. White with Notice f Meet
Gray Interior. Looks Great and Runs Great! The Jackson County Board of County Commils-.
48,700 Miles. Perfect for Family or Business! sioners will meet the following dates in the
Extended version with 4 captains chairs and 1 Board Room of the Administration Building at
bench-- seats 7 with room to carry in back. 334- 2864 Madison Street, Marianna, Florida.
796-6729 or 334-701-8862
Chevrolet "97 Astro Van conversion Van raised Monday, July 18, 2011, 9:00 am-Budget Work-
roof, loaded, new tires, 51K mi. $9,500. 334-897- shop
2054 or 334-464-1496 Tuesday, July 19,2011,9:00 am-Budget Work-
Pontlac'99 Montana V-6, One owner. 145K shop
Wednesday, July 20,2011,9:00 am-Budget
miles, needs head gasket $2600. OBO CASH Workshop
Serious inquiries only call 334493-3141 Thursday, July 21, 2011, 9:00 am-Budget
9AM- 8PM ONLY. DO 12014 Workshop
IL *F o *WTuesday, July 25,2011, 9:00 am- Budget
Workshop
Tuesday, July 26,2011, 9:00 am-Budget Work-
shop
Tuesday, July 26,2011, 5:00 pm-Compass
Lake in the Hills MSTU Budget Hearing
Tuesday, July 26,2011,6:00 pm-Regular Boaro
..l..................... Meeting
Got a nker wednesday, July 27,2011, 9:00 am Budget
tot- a mun Workshop
We be your Junked Thursday, July 28,2011,9:00 am-Special
We buy wrecked cars Meeting to set proposed tentative millage,
and Farm Equip. at a rolled-back rate, and date, time, and place of
fair and honest price! tentative budget hearing for Jackson County
Average $ paid $225. Other matters may be addressed as pres d.
S CALL 14-7123 4ne0011 i
""' " ''" "'' "' '" = In accordance with the Americans with Disabil-
WANTED JUNK ltites Act, persons needing a special accommo-
WAT JUNK dation to participate in this meeting should
"'H (uiA contactt theAdministrator's assistant no later
VEHICLES TOPIC than 5 days prior to the meeting. The Adminis-
trator's assistant may be contacted at 2864
I aso Sell used parts Madison Street, Marianna, FL, 32448, (850) 482-
24 HOUR TOWING m 334-792-8664 9633, or (800) 955-8771 (TDD).






,. lC"7,'N COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


JULY


14-15-16


TTRAS "BONwi


Will be here on


Saturday, July


GUN & ARCHERY


s ~Great '
Savings &
Super
Specials!
PA TB AVA -IB
U_< U~^B^r^p ^^


Over $5,000 In Merchandise
Giveaway Drawings


SOW Bows.
IBOW, H ,N*
11l ,, . . . ,.V i


A


'7 a"3


Guns


BR

BERETTA.
i *I


Buggies


BO


SWAROVSKI.,
SP T I K ,


Tree Stands
^i.. @hWfrN6^ a
1'*fi~yeuft~


U MILLENIe


Sunglasses


Clothing
BROWNING

Coklumbia
. Sixoh e.t,,-(C.ll THERE WILL BE
MANUFACTURER VENDORS
ON-SITE


FINANCING
AVAILABLE
12 MONTHS
CA ME AC CAH M


LAYAWAY
AVAILABLE
'",


-- U .


SMcCoy's Outdoors
850-526-2082 Gun Shop 850-526-1024 Archery Shop
2O23 .effersnn RSt Marianna FI


JJ.~L :N~i


Find us on f
Facebook


p
j.


www.McCoysOutdoors.com Info@McCoysOutdoors.com facebook.com/McCoysOutdoors


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16!


Bear"


S REeTANDS


ZEISS


A K IL~r


1 8B WEDNESDAY, July 13, 2011


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TURMM


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COSTA


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