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Jackson County Floridan
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028304/00604
 Material Information
Title: Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title: Sunday Floridan
Portion of title: Floridan
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Jackson County Floridan
Publisher: Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Marianna Fla
Publication Date: 6/28/2011
Frequency: daily (except saturday and monday)[<1979-1995>]
weekly[ former 1934-<1955>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates: 30.776389 x -85.238056 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note: "Independent."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID: UF00028304:00604
 Related Items
Preceded by: Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by: Marianna Floridan

Full Text






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LIBIRARI OI FLORIDA HISTORY
1O BOX 117007 '
GAINESVILLE FL 32611i-7007



1. ^1LIDAN


to ask his opinion on weather
predictions, or how to identify
or deal with plant-threatening
diseases.
He would be stopped multiple
times, perhaps in the produce
aisle, the paper goods section,
or in the checkout line.
Brasher never seemed to
mind, and he spent countless
hours on the phone at night,
talking to small farm producers


about their problems, ideas and
plans for next year's crop.
Farmer Lury J. Gilbert said he
met Brasher when the exten-
sion agent first came to Jack-
son County in the early 1970s.
Brasher was assigned to help a
group of minority farmers in a
program that was just starting
at the time, and Gilbert was in
the group. He said he was sold
on Brasher from the start. Not


l Di.ie Darlings win
- district championship
O v l' \\-iVtahitchka. See

m* 4ore on page lB.


A Media (GeneralNewspaper
Crime


No seat belt ends in drug bust
From staff reports According to a Marianna Street. stance-methamphetamine,
Police Department press re- When they searched the possession of drug parapher-
A Chipley resident learned lease, Christopher Lynn Da- vehicle, they found metham- nalia, and tampering with .4
Monday it pays to wear a seat vis, 24, was behind the wheel phetamine, digital scales "and evidence.
belt after he was pulled over of a maroon Ford Explorer other items ofparaphernalia," Police said Davis allegedly .
for not wearing one and when officers pulled him according to the release. tried to pour out the meth-
was arrested on drug charges over near the intersection of Davis is charged with pos- amphetamine just before the
during the traffic stop. Milton Avenue and Lafayette session of a controlled sub- stop was made. Davis


DEDICATED SERVICE





A fond fare


ell


Jackson County Master Gardeners perform a satirical version of "My Favorite Things" for Charles Brasher's retirement party.

More than 100 turn out as extension agent ends 43-year career
BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER -
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com


Jackson County extension
agent Charles Brasher has re-
tired after 43 years of service to
farmers and gardeners.
Friends and associates did all
they could to keep the mood
light and fun at his farewell par-
ty Tuesday, but tears were well-
ing in a few eyes as the event
came to a close.
Brasher's quiet leadership,
temperament and tireless work
ethic made him a favorite of co-
workers and the public alike.
He had expected a modest lun-
cheon with just a few people,
but 124 guests turned out to
bid him farewell. His old boss,
retired Extension Director Ed
Jowers, was there, along with
former employees who worked
for him years ago. Several agri-
cultural producers also showed
up, along with colleagues from
other extension offices around
the state.
Co-workers recalled that go-
ing to the grocery store with
Brasher was an exercise in pa-
tience. It seem like everybody
knew him, and everyone felt
comfortable approaching him
anytime, anywhere, with a
question about a garden pest,
-VIDEO
) For video from the farewell
party for Charles Brasher, go to
jcfloridan.com


Vol. 88 No. 123


County


says 'no'


to adult


store
Frorh staff reports
The Jackson County
Commission denied a de-
velopment order sought by
a company that wants to
establish an adult novelty
store on U.S. Highway 231,
about two miles south of
the Cottondale city limits.
Commissioners made
no comment before taking
their vote Tuesday to fol-
low the recommendations
of county planning staff
and the planning advisory
board.
Both said the county
should deny the request,
on the. grounds that the
business would be an in-
compatible use in that
area. It would be located in
the same building as a Sub-
way restaurant.
Attorney Jeff Lathem,
who represents Hidden
Valley Management Ser-
vices LLC, disagreed that
the store was incompat-
ible, and asked the county
to make an "intellectually
honest" decision.
Jack Brock, a pastor,
-spoke Tuesday against the
development order be-
ing issued, and the coun-
ty commission meeting
room was filled with resi-
dents who agreed with the
minister.
The commission got a
round of applause after
taking the unanimous vote
to deny the order.


Gadsden

County

may get

solar farm

Would be the

world's largest
BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com
A solar power company
may build the world's larg-
est solar farm in neigh-
boring Gadsden County,
a project that would bring
400 construction jobs and
roughly 120 permanent po-
sitions to the community.
National Solar Power
announced Tuesday that
Gadsden and three other
Florida counties, along
with two municipalities in
Georgia and one in North
Carolina, have made the
short list of potential sites.
See SOLAR, Page 7A
Short List
The following counties are
under consideration for the
National Solar Polar solar
farm.
Gadsden County, Fla.
) Hardee County, Fla.
n Osceola County, Fla.
Suwannee County, Fla.
a Sumter County, Ga.
Tatnall County, Ga.
) Guilford County, NC


only was he respectful, he was
knowledgeable and more than
willing to share what he knew.
"He helped me figure out a lot
of things, and thanks to him,
that was the first year I had a
two ton per-acre yield on my
peanuts," Gilbert said. "I've
known him more than 35 years
and he's still a good friend."
See BRASHER, Page 7A


SCLASSIFIEDS...5-7B


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Service Manager Body Shop Manager I Parts Manager
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Retiring Jackson County extension agent Charles Brasher laughs as he is roasted at a retirement party
Tuesday.


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Facebook Twitter










JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


12A WEDNESDAY, JUNE 29, 2011


Weather Outlook


-n
"2


High.- 970
Low 730


Tomorrow
Isolated Thunder.


* .,


High 990
Low -750


Saturday


' High 990
Low -75

Friday


SHigh 990
Low -750

Sunday


TIDES ULTRA VIOLET INDEX


Panama City Low -
Apalachicola Low -
Port St. Joe Low -
Destin Low -
Pensacola Low -

RIVER READINGS
Woodruff
Blountstown
Marianna
Caryville


7:59 PM
8:49 AM
7:25 PM
8:36 PM
9:10 PM


Reading
39.17 ft.
.63 ft.
4.53 ft.
1.28 ft.


High
High
High
High
High


Flood Stage
66.0 ft.
15.0 ft.
19.0 ft.
12.0 ft.


0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8-10 Very High, 11+ Extreme
0 1 2 3 17 8 9


THE SUN AND MOON
Sunrise 5:41 AM
Sunset 7:48 PM
Moonrise 4:00 AM
Moonset 6:30 PM


July July July July
1 8 15 23


FLORIDA'S R1EAL

PANHANDLE JCR

MEDIA PARTNERS wJAQ 1o0.9"

LSEsNFOHYEATUD


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JACKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN
Publisher Valeria Roberts
vroberts@jcfloridan.com

Managing Editor Michael Becker
mbecker@jcfloridan.com

Circulation Manager- Dena Oberski
doberski@jcfloridan.com


-I



CONTACT US
Telephone: (850) 526-3614
FAX: (850) 482-4478
Email: editorial@jcfloridan.com
Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL32447
Street Address:
4403 Constitution Lane
Marianna, FL32446
Office Hours:
Weekdays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

MISS YOUR PAPER?
You should receive your newspaper no later
than 6 a.m. If it does not arrive, call Circula-
tion between 6 a.m. and noon, Tuesday to
Friday, and 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. on Sunday. The
Jackson County Floridan (USPS 271-840)
is published,Tuesday though Friday and
Sunday mornings. Periodical postage paid
at Marianna, FL.

SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Home delivery: $11.23 per month; $32.83'
for three months; $62.05 for six months;
and $123.45 for one year. All prices include
applicable state and local taxes. Mail
subscriptions must be paid in advance. Mail
subscriptions are: $46.12 for three months;
$92.24 for six months; and $184.47 for one
year.

ADVERTISING
The advertiser agrees that the publisher
shall not be liable for damages arising
out of errors and advertisements beyond
the amount paid for the space actually
occupied by that portion of the advertise-
ments in which the drror occurred, whether
such error is due to the negligence of the
publisher's employees or otherwise, and
there shall be not liability for non-inser-
tion of any advertisement beyond the
amount paid for such advertisement. This
newspaper will not knowingly accept or
publish illegal material of any kind. Advertis-
ing which expresses preference based on
legally protected personal characteristics is
not acceptable.

HOW TO GET YOUR
NEWS PUBLISHED
The Jackson County Floridan will publish
news of general interest free of charge.
Submit your news or Community Calendar
events via email, fax, mail, or hand delivery.
Fees may apply for wedding, engagement,
anniversary and birth announcements.
Forms are available at the Floridan offices.
Photographs must be of good quality and
suitable for print. The Floridan reserves the
right to edit all submissions.

GETTING IT RIGHT
Information provided to the Floridan for
the "Knights of Columbus Give Back"
on 3A of Tuesday's edition listed the
name of Sunland Center interim Super-
intendent Sandy Koon incorrectly.


Community Calendar


TODAY
n Blood Drive Southeastern Community Blood
Center's mobile unit will be at the Florida Depart-
ment of Revenue in Marianna, 9 to 11 a.m.; and at
the Jackson County Courthouse, 11:30 a.m. to 5:30
p.m.; or give blood 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday-Friday
at 2503 Commercial Park Drive, Marianna. Call
526-4403.
) Jackson County Habitat for Humanity
Warehouse hours: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
) Stroke Awareness Seminar noon to 1 p.m. at
the Jackson County Agricultural Complex on Penn-
sylvania Avenue in Marianna. Learn the signs/symp-
toms of a stroke. Call 526-2412, ext. 157.
D Alcoholics Anonymous Open meeting, noon
to 1 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901
Caledonia St., Marianna, in the AA room.

THURSDAY, JUNE 30
n Emerald Coast Hospice Summer Education
Series presents "Top 10 Ways to Connect with
People" at 4374 Lafayette St. in Marianna. Two ses-
sions: 7 a.m. and 4 p.m. CEU (1) available through
Troy University. Public welcome. Call 526-3577.
) Orientation --'to 4 p.m. at the Goodwill Career
Training Center, 4742 Highway 90 in Marianna. Reg-
ister for free job placement and computer training
classes offered to people with disadvantages/dis-
abilities. Call 526-0139.
n Free Summer Concert Series Sweat & Bul-
lets, 7 to 9 p.m. at Citizens Lodge Park. Bring lawn
chairs and coolers. Presented by Jackson County
Parks department and Main Street Marianna. Call
718-5210 or 718-1022.
) Alcoholics Anonymous closed discussion, 8
to 9 p.m. in theAA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St., Marianna. Attendance
limited to persons with a desire to stop drinking.

FRIDAY, JULY 1
First on the Second The Jackson County
Chamber of Commerce First Friday Power Breakfast
for July will be on the second Friday (July 8), 7 to
8:30 a.m.
International Chat-n-Sip Join Jackson
County Public Library Learning Center staff and,
English learners 8:30 to 10 a.m. at 2929 Green St.
in Marianna, as learners practice.new conversa-
tional English skills in a relaxed environment. Light
refreshments served. No charge. Call 482-9124.
)4th of July Celebration Students from F. M.
Golson Elementary School's Summer Enrichment
Program will present a patriotic program at 11 a.m.
on the front steps of the Jackson County Court-


house in Marianna. Call 482-9607.
a Smoked Ribs Fundraiser Veterans of Foreign
Wars Post 12046 of Marianna will be selling smoked
ribs in the lot on US 90 across from the Marianna
Winn-Dixie, starting at 11 a.m. Racks and plates
(with coleslaw, beans and tea) available. Call 372-
2500.
) "Cool Church" The Marianna First United
Methodist Church Fellowship Hall (inside the Youth
building), 2901 Caledonia St., is open to the public
1 to 4 p.m. Monday-Friday. Stay cool with free air
conditioning and ice cold water. Call 482-4502.
) Celebrate Recovery Adult, teen meetings to
"overcome hurts, habits and hang-ups in a safe
environment:' 7 p.m., Evangel Worship Center, 2645
Pebble Hill Road. Dinner: 6 p.m. (free for first-time
guests). Child care available.Call 209-7856.
) Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, 8 to
9 p.m. in the AA room at First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St., Marianna.

SATURDAY, JULY 2
a Jackson County Farmers Market is open 6:30
a.m. to noon (or until goods sell out) Tuesdays,
Thursday and Saturdays in Madison Street Park in
Marianna.
) Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, 4:30 to
5:30 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St., Marianna.

SUNDAY, JULY 3
n Annual Miles Family Reunion starts at 10 a.m.
in the Graceville Civic Center. Bring a covered dish.
Call 579-1070.
> Alcoholics Anonymous closed discussion, 6:30
p.m., 4349 W. Lafayette St., Marianna (in one-story
building behind 4351 W. Lafayette St.). Attendance
limited to persons with a desire to stop drinking.

MONDAY, JULY 4
n Blue Springs Recreation Area in Marianna
- Fourth of July hours are 9:30 a.m. t 6 p.m. for
the park; 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. for the water. Ameri-
can Red Cross-certified lifeguard on duty. Park fea-
tures slides, floating dock, diving board, playground,
beach volleyball court and picnic tables and grills.
To reserve a pavilion, call 482-2114 or 718-0437.
Concessions stand, plus paddleboat/canoe/kayak
rentals available. Park admission: $2 per person. No
refunds or re-entry.
) Blood donors will receive a free $10 gift card at
Southeastern Community Blood Center, 2503 Com-
mercial Park Drive in Marianna. Call 526-4403.


) Orientation -10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Goodwill
Career Training Center, 4742 Highway 90 in Mari-
anna. Register for free job placement and computer
training classes offered to people with disadvan-
tages/disabilities. Call 526-0139.
a Family Celebration & Fireworks Show Activi-
ties for the whole family begin at 5 p.m., fireworks
at 9 p.m. at the Orange Hill Fire Department at the
corner of Orange Hill Road and Alford Highway,
Alford. Entertainment from The Drummond Family
and Steve White. Presented by Cypress Creek Com-
munity Church and the Orange Hill VFD.
) 4th of July Fireworks,- The City of Marianna
will launch fireworks downtown at dark. Launch site:
Behind Mowery Elevator on US 90.
n Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, 8 to
9 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St., Marianna.

TUESDAY; JULY 5
Jackson County Farmers Market is open 6:30
a.m. to noon (or until goods sell out) Tuesdays,
Thursday and Saturdays in Madison Street Park in
Marianna.
) Blood Drive -' Southeastern Community Blood
Center's mobile unit willbe at Rahal Chevrolet in
Marianna, 8 to 11:30 a.m.; and at the VA Clinic in
Marianna, 1:30 to 4:30 p.m.; or give blood 9 a.m. to'
6 p.m. Monday-Friday at 2503 Commercial Park
Drive, Marianna: Call 526-4403.
) Optimist Club of Jackson County meeting,
noon, first and third Tuesdays, at Jim's Buffet & Grill,
Marianna.
) Free quilting, crocheting or knitting class led
by Christine Gilbert, 1 p.m. at Jackson County Se-
nior Citizens Center, 2931 Optimist Drive, Marianna.
Call 482-5028.
n Children's Swimming Lessons at Chipola
College (ages 4 and older). Session 3: July 11-21,
registration deadline: July 5. Cost: $45. Pre-registra-
tion required. Call 718-2473.
Marianna Sit-n-Sew presented by the Jackson ;
County Quilters Guild, Tuesdays, 6 to 8 p.m., First
United Methodist Church Youth Hall, Clinton Street,-
behind Marianna Post Office. Call 272-7068.
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open meeting, 8 to 9
p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901 Caledo-
nia St., Marianna, in the AA room.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 6
n Alcoholics Anonymous Open meeting, noon
to 1 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901
Caledonia St., Marianna, in the AA room.


The submission deadline for this calendar is two days before publication. Submit to: Community Calendar, Jackson County Floridan, P. O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447,
email editorial@jcfloridan.com, fax (850) 482-4478 or bring items to 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.

Police Roundup


MARIANNA POLICE
DEPARTMENT
The Marianna Police De-
partment listed the following
incidents for June 27, the latest
available report:
One drunk :
driver, four .-
accidents, one fCR M
stolen vehicle, C' ME
one abandoned
vehicle, two
suspicious vehicles, six suspi-
cious persons, one burglary,
two verbal disturbances, six
traffic stops, one larceny com-
plaint, one report of shooting in
the area, four trespassing com-
plaints, one found/abandoned
property report, one follow-up
investigation and one public
service call.


JACKSON COUNTY
SHERIFF'S OFFICE
The Jackson County Sheriff's
Office and county Fire/Rescue
reported the following incidents
for June 27, the latest avail-
able report. (Some of these
calls may be related to after-
hours calls taken on behalf
of Graceville and Cottondale
Police Departments): One
stolen tag, two stolen vehicles,
four abandoned vehicles, two
suspicious vehicles, one suspi-
cious incident, one suspicious
person, one highway obstruc-
tion, one burglary, two verbal
disturbances, four fire calls, one
burning complaint, 12 medical
calls, one traffic crash, one bur-
glar alarm, 20 traffic stops, five
larceny complaints, one crimi-


nal mischief complaint, two
civil disputes, two trespassing
complaints, one juvenile com-
plaint, one assault, one suicide
attempt, three animal com-
plaints, one assist of a motorist
or pedestrian, one retail theft,
three assists of other agencies,
one criminal registration, one
transport and two open doors/
windows discovered.

JACKSON COUNTY
CORRECTIONAL FACILITY
The following persons were
booked into the county jail dur-
ing the latest reporting periods:
) Christopher Davis, 24, 587
7th St., Chipley, possession of
controlled substance meth-
amphetamine, possession of
drug paraphernalia, tampering


with evidence.
) Joe Faircloth, 49, 19088
Dessiestone Road, Blount-
stown, driving under the
influence.
)) Kelly Reagan, 31, 2234 Wil-
mar Road, Cottondale, violation
of court order.
))William Brewer, 20, 2528
Park Ave., Alford, violation of
court order.
) William Hickman, 28,16834
Rollohome Road, Fountain,
non-payment of child support.

JAIL POPULATION: 209


To report a crime, call CrimeStoppers
at 526-5000 or a local law enforcement
agency.
To report a wildlife violation, call 1-888-
404-FWCC (3922).


TEAM RAHAL MILLER
:: ChevroIet-Buick-Cadillac-Nissan
\ 4204 Lafayette St. Marianna, FL

(850) 482-5051


- ~~--~---~-


WAKE-UP CALL









JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


LOCAL


SUIMI I tLUE UIU
The work of Grand Ridge artist Joel Scilley is featured in an exhibit case at the Jackson County Public Library in Marianna.


Jackson County Public Library


features artist entrepreneur's work


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 29, 2011 3AF



GAS WATCH
Gas prices are going up. Here
are the least expensive places to
buy gas in Jackson County, as of
Tuesday afternoon.
1. $3.46 Kmee II, Malone
2. $3.47 Pilot, Hwy 71 near
1-10
3. $3.7 Travel Center, Hwy
71 near 1-10
4. $3.49 Dixie Food, Alford
5. $3.49 BP, Hwy 231, Camp-
bellton
6. $3.49 McCoy's, Jefferson
Street, Marianna

jt u-,Jd,-ru31,,-,i: t l,, j ] ,-,-,m


Florida Lottery
CASH3 PLAY FANTASY


6/27 7-9-1 1-7-96
4-9-9 9-3-3.4


Tue. (E) 6/28 1-4-3 2-1-9-6 Not available


Special to the Floridan

The spirit of the Ameri-
can entrepreneur is alive
and well in Jackson Coun-
ty, and the Jackson County
Public Library has many
examples of their work on
display.
SThe works are part of the
2011 Summer Art in Public
Places Exhibit hosted by
the library and The Artists
Guild of Northwest Florida
Inc. The Artists Guild's Art
in Public Places Commit-
tee works with local busi-
nesses and organizations
to host ongoing art exhibits
such as the one currently
at the Jackson County Pub-
lic Library on Green Street
in Marianna.
"Many people do not
think that local and re-
gional artists are entre-
preneurs, but many of
them are managing small
businesses and studios
throughout the region,
and are nationally known,"
said Judy Brooten, exhibit
chairperson.
"I am especially excited
about this summer's ex-
hibit because we have a
wide variety of work on
display and much of it is
for sale," Brooten said.
Artists selling works) in
the exhibit donate 20 per-
cent of the sale to the Jack-
son County Public Library.
Visitors to the library can
view more than 30 pieces,
of art on display, includ-
S ing acrylic paintings by
Jesse Blanchette, and oil
paintings by Karen Roland,
Nancy. Zurenda, Ed Griggs
and Berit Jackson. Michele.
Tabor Kimbrough has a
duet of lovely watercolor
paintings entitled "Lotus
I" and "Lotus II". Bascom
artist, Sam Carnley's "Two
Egg in Monochrome", is a
pen and ink drawing of the
Jackson County icon, The
Two Egg Store.
New to the exhibit is
Lou Brown's framed pa-
per quilling assemblages.
She creates delicate pic-
tures with hundreds of
small strips of paper that
are rolled, shaped, and
glued .together to create
decorative designs. Quill-


Special to the Floridan

Marriages and divorces, as reported for
the week of June 20-24.
Marriages
) Chad R. Smith and Jamalynn Voncile
Thaxton.
Louis Don Barwick and Laurie Lynn
Griffey.
) Brandon Kyle Crews and Lauren No-
elleWegmann.
) Auston Wyatt Creel and Samantha
Lynn Harris.
) Patrick Brendan Hunt and Tabetha
Ann Smith.
) Emily Katherine Odom and Aaron
Bennett Taylor.
) Kimberly Ann Hall and Donny James
Long.
n Hubert Clayton Moore and Sarah Eliz-
abeth Watson.
) Latoya Denisha McLeroy and Ant-
wuan Devane Rudolph.
) James Darrell Clement and Darlene
Nancy Parag.
Divorces
: Patricia Elizabeth Bruzzese vs. John
Szymckec.
John Henry Long Jr. vs. Teya Michelle
Long.
) Michael S. Miller vs. Alexandra M.
Miller.
Brandon Shawn McCardle vs. Nicole


Scilley


tanner


ing or paper filigree is an
art form that dates back
to the Renaissance, when
French and Italian nuns
and monks used quilling
to decorate book covers
and religious items.
.Today, quilling has many
artistic applications in-
cluding decorative items,
'framed pictures, and
cards.
Other artists with work
in the exhibit include
photographers, Lois Jones
and Pat Crisp and colored
pencil artist, Judy Brooten.
Some art on display in the
exhibit belong to private
collections and are marked
"Not for Sale."
In addition to working
fulltime or running a busi-
ness, many artists donate
their time and talent to nu-
merous projects and orga-
nizations throughout the
area. One example is The
Artists Guild of Northwest
Florida Inc.'s committee,
led by Lois Jones, whose
task it is to work with the
Jackson County Public Li-
brary to bring -interesting
and diverse programs to
Jackson County through
collaboration with the
library.
Joel Scilley
Library patrons, when
they see the glass-encased
exhibit in the'main lobby,
will discover that tucked
away in Grand Ridge is na-
tionally recognized artist
Joel Scilley.
Scilley is a designer/
woodworker/carpenter
who, with his wife, relo-
cated to Jackson County.
His company, Audiowood,
specializes in unique audio
gear and home accessories
that combine high tech-
nology and the character
of traditional woodcraft.
Audiowood designs have
been featured in dozens of
national magazines and


design websites, and are
carried by select retailers
like Anthropologie. Several
press clippings featuring
Scilley's work are included
in the library display.
Scilley studied art, design
and architecture in New
York City and in Europe
with Hobart College and
Parsons School of Design.
He earned a Ph.D. in me-
dia studies from the Uni-
versity of Pittsburgh, and
has created various forms
of woodwork and highly
unique carpentry for more
than 15 years.
Scilley welcomes inqui-
ries about custom car-
pentry, woodworking and
audio equipment. More
information can be.found
at www.audiowood.com.
Lynwood Tanner
Lynwood Tanner of Cot-
tondale has two paintings
in the exhibit, "Amphora"
and "Egret."
The Florida native and
self-taught artist picked up
a brush and created his first
painting sometime around
1970, while still a student
at Cottondale High School.
Accepted .to art. school
with no feasible means of
paying for tuition, Tanner
chose to study electronics
and became an electrician.
But he never lost interest
in art, despite what some
may consider a visual
handicap.
Tanner, who is techni-
cally colorblind, was un-
deterred and began by ex-
perimenting with various
paint shadings and hues,
often unable to describe
the colors he created.
Featured in interviews
on WFSU-TV-Tallahassee,
Chipola College and pro-
grams on Comcast, Tan-
ner's award-winning works
have been recognized for
their simplified visions of
southern folk life, African-
American heritage, love,
work and detailed ren-
ditions of native Florida
wildlife.
Tanner's works express
his boyhood memories
and figments of his vivid
imagination.
Atypical of most acrylic


Danielle McCardle.
' Ruby Nell Saddler vs. Booker T.
Saddler.
) Jeneane Brown vs. Jeffrey Allen
Brown.
) William Robert Singer vs. Carolyn Re-
nee Singer.
n Vondora Deese Moss vs. Tracy Moss.
a Carolyn E. McGriff vs. Jessie McGriff.
n Stacy Diane Shaw vs. Michael Lee
Shaw.
) Shirley Livingston vs. Sean A.
Livingston.
n Randolph Pope Jr. vs. Dora D. Pope.
n Mark Gale Pennington vs. Jane Eliza-
beth Pennington.
n Daryl Jason Walbert vs. Dana Dawn
Deppe.
) Gary Mitchell Tice vs. Danielle Marie
Tice.
n Rosa Bell Singleton vs. Clarence
Singleton.
) Alisse Sims Walker vs. Adam Oneal
Walker.
n Kenneth B. Nelson vs. Amie Renee
Jones Nelson.
n Eric Dean Branch vs. Ashley Marie
Branch.
a Christen Heiter vs. James Heiter.
a Marcus L. Garcia vs. Kennecia L.
Garcia.
Roger Barnes vs. Agnes L. Barnes.
n Tiffany Elizabeth Simmons vs. Scotty
Levon Simmons.


artists, Tanner creates
colors using multiple ul-
tra-thin layers of paint
and dry brushing, a tech-
nique most often prac-
ticed by watercolor art-
ists. His paintings develop
in "rough draft" within a
matter of hours, and then
each work is meticulously
detailed with color, light
and shadow. The process
often takes him several
months to complete.
Still residing less than a
mile from where he was
born, Tanner counts art-
ists Jonathan Green and
Dean Mitchell among his
mentors.


Tell your story
The Jackson County Floridan
is asking readers to suggest
interesting and unusual jobs
and companies that can be
featured in an upcoming
edition of the paper. We are
looking for people who do
interesting or unusual things
for companies here in Jack-
son County that residents
may not even be aware exist.
,Please forward your sugges-
tions to editorial@jcfloridan.
cor or call 850-526-3614.


Tue
Wed.
Wed.
Thurs.


(M) 6-5-7 5-21-1
(E) 6/22 9-75 0-5-5-9 11-20-21-27-32
(M) 3-1-6. 7-0-0-6


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6/23 1-7-4 9-2-8-7 1-3-7-11-22
4-8-1 2-2-5-0


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E =.Eyening drawing. M =Midday drawing


Saturday 6/25 18-36-39-41-57
Wednesday 6/22- 12-15-19-46-59


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I4A


Publisher
VALERIA ROBERTS

Managing Editor
MICHAEL BECKER


Our Opinion

Reasons to celebrate
T his year, the Fourth of July falls on a
Monday.
Main Street Marianna will be pulling out
the stops to make the downtown area the place
to be. Over in Alford, the Orange Hill Volunteer
Fire Department and Cypress Creek Community
Church are hosting a "family celebration" and
fireworks show. -
In Marianna, a fireworks display has been ar-
ranged, and the best place to view it will be the
new Madison Street Park. The splash pad will be
available for the children and residents are being
encouraged to bring their lawn chairs and cool-
ers, and patronize the restaurants that will be
open that day, according to a news release from
Main Street Marianna. The fireworks display will
begin at 8:30 p.m.
In Alford, the activities start at 5 p.m. at Orange
Hill Road and Alford Highway. There will be live
music and entertainment, and the fireworks
begin at 9 p.m.
For those who have other plans, we again urge
everyone to be cautious this July 4. Despite the
recent rains, drought conditions persist. That
means the fire danger is still high, arid river and
lake levels are low. Whether you are boating, pic-
nicking or setting off your own fireworks display,
take extra precautions.
And let's not forget what we're celebrating. It
was on this day that the Declaration of Indepen-
dence was signed, marking the beginning of this
country's struggle to achieve self-government
and political freedom. Perhaps it's a good time
to rustle up a copy of that document and read it,
to remind ourselves of what we were fighting for
then, and what remains to be achieved now.

Contact representatives

Florida Legislature
Rep. Marti Coley, R-District 7
Marti.Coley@myfloridahouse.gov
Building A, Room 186 Chipola College
3094 Indian Circle
Marianna, FL 32446-1701

Rep. Brad Drake, R-District 5
Brad.Drake@myfloridahouse.gov
NWFL State-Chautauqua Campus #205
908 U.S. Highway 90 West
DeFuniak Springs, FL 32433-1436

Sen. Bill Montford. D-District 6
208 Senhte Office Building
404 South Monroe St.
Tallahassee, FL 32399-1100
montford.bill.web@ flsenate.gov

U.S. Congress
Rep. Steve Southerland, R-2nd District
1229 Longworth HOB
Washington, DC 20515
Phone: (202) 225-5235
Fax: (202) 225-5615

Sen. Bill Nelson (D)
Washington office
United States Senate
716 Senate Hart Office Building
Washington, DC 20510
(202) 224-5274

Sen. Marco Rubio (R)
Washington office
United States Senate
B40A Dirksen Senate Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20510
(202) 224-3041

Letters to the Editor
SLbmit letters by either mailing to Editor. P.O. Box 520.
,Marianna FL. 32447 or faxing to 850-482-4478 or send
e-mail to editoriali'ljcflorndan.com. The Flondan reserves
Sthe right to edit or not publish any letter. Be sure to
include your full address and telephone number. These
will only be used to verify the letter and will not be
Sprinted. For more information call.(850) 526-3614.


I'm HOPING FOR A DRUG TAT LETS

ME LIVE WITHOUT DISRUPTING MY

S STANARP OF LIVING


Get-tough laws hurt




more than immigrants


BY BILL MAXWELL
Scripps Howard News Service

ust north of Florida in the farm
fields of Georgia, the impact of
the nation's illegal immigration
debate is now taking shape. It's a
stark reminder that when so-called
solutions are fueled by partisan
politics and raw emotion, the out-
come is far from ideal.
Several states have passed laws
cracking down on illegal immi-
grants, and all mandate that em-
ployers with more than 10 employ-
ees confirm potential workers' legal
status using the federal E-Verify
database.
The new laws will have the most
impact on agriculture espe-
cially on labor-intensive fruit and
vegetable crops that require many
human hands and strong backs to
harvest and pack. These crops also
pay low piece wages.
In Georgia, we do not need to
speculate about the outcome of
these laws because enough time
has passed for some harsh evidence
to come in. The Georgia law, HB
87, which does not take effect until
July 1, already has had an effect,
as farm workers are staying away
for fear of racial profiling. Work-
ers caught with phony documents
could be fined up to $250,000 and
get 15 years in prison the same
sentence for murder in Georgia.
The la* also gives police, among
other powers, authority to check
the immigration status of criminal
suspects.
Growers now are scrambling to
find enough workers to keep their
crops from withering on the vine


and rotting on the ground. Each
spring and early summer, thou-
sands of undocumented work-
ers, mainly from Florida, travel to
Georgia and states further north to
work. Charles Hall, executive direc-
tor of Georgia Fruit and Vegetable
Association, said farmers are find-
ing only between 30 percent and 50
percent of the 11,000 farm hands
needed to the harvest their crops,
producing a labor shortage that will
hit the industry with a loss of $250
million.
The shortage clearly puts the lie
to the myth held by critics of U.S.
farming practices that desperate
unemployed U.S. citizens will do
farm work if it is available to them.
The Georgia Labor Department
released a survey showing that
unemployment in Irwin County,
where blackberries are a major
crop, is at 13 percent, yet very few
people went to the fields. Of those
who did, the overwhelming major-
ity walked away.
R.T. Stanley Jr., who has grown
prizedVidalia onions since 1970s,
told National Public Radio recently
that the law is ruining his business
because average residents are not
up to the demands of fieldwork:
"They just don't want to do this
hard work. And they'll tell you right
quick. I have 'em to come out and
work for two hours and they say,
'I'm not doing this. It's too hard.' I
got my livelihood on the line. If I
don't harvest these onions, I'll lose
my farm."
Florida's get-tough immigrant -
movement has not damaged
agriculture's bottom line yet, but
farm-worker advocates and many


growers believe it is just a matter of
time before conservative lawmak-
ers get their way as they have in
Alabama.
There, lawmakers enacted the
nation's strictest immigration law.
It bans illegal immigrants from
receiving any state or local public
benefits, enrolling in or attending
public colleges and even seeking
employment. It outlaws harbor-
ing and transporting illegal im-
migrants, renting them property
or "knowingly" hiring them for any
work.
Alabama legislators ignored an
incontestable reality: The United
States has an estimated 11.2 million
undocumented immigrants, mostly
Hispanics in agriculture.
What do we do with them? Im-
prison them? Send them en masse
back to their native countries?
Many of these hard-working people
have been here 15 years or more.
Many have children born here.
These kids are U.S. citizens. What to
do with these young citizens? Kick
them out of school? Deny them
health care?
Obviously, a newspaper colum-
nist does not have all the answers.
But I do know that the nation
would be smart, and humane,
to devise a way for hard-work-
ing illegal immigrants who pass
background checks to begin a
fair process of qualifying for legal
status. This is not blanket amnesty.
It is accepting reality for the greater
good.
My hope is that my home state of
Florida does not follow the unwise
examples of Alabama, Arizona and
Georgia.


Letters to the Editor


Compassion should lead us
to say'no'

I can remember as a young boy'
sitting on the front porch with the
family in the evenings to cool down
and watch a car go by every now
and then. It was a great time of the
day for all of us. The mosquitoes
would get kind of rough, but they
were plenty of them inside also so
we stayed where it was cooler (no
air conditioner).
Every car that would pass, we
knew who it was and something
about the family, and they also
knew us. Life seemed to slow down
while we sat on that porch. It was
times like this that the discussion
might lead to a family that had a
need. A decision would be made to
help the family in any way that we
could.
The great thing about this is there
were other families thinking the
same thing; people cared about
each other enough to sacrifice what
they could to help. I saw during
that time that it worked in reverse;
they helped my family during a
time of need.


Now, I don't believe this time was
called "the good old days" because
of the needs most of us had, but
maybe it was called that because of
the compassion for others we had.
There are many examples of gro-
ceries, money and labor that were
given to help. The elderly people
back then talked about barn raises
and such. I never saw one, but I did
see the same principle at work.
I believe the principle behind
the "good old days" is the compas-
sion. People thought of the welfare
of others just as it is taught in the
Bible. We are told of a Samaritan
who came across a certain man
who had been beaten and robbed.
The Samaritan bandaged his
wounds and carried him to safety
to receive more help, even paid for
the extra help.
I see compassion and sacrifice
in what the Samaritan did, and
whether you believe in the Bible or
not, most would admit what he did
was the right thing to do. I submit
to you that the principle behind the
actions of the Good Samaritan is
the same principle that made 'the
good old days' good.


How we do this is to show com-
passion on others and consider
their needs. We can do this by do-
nating to ministries that feed and
clothe people that have that type of
need. Also by contributing money
if possible to help with some other
type of need. We can also have this
compassion and caring for others
who have a need that is not appar-
ent at the time. We want this part
of "the good old days" back, but
are we willing to take the time or in
some cases make the sacrifice?
The time may be coming that we
have a chance to show this type
of caring by just one vote. One
vote may save a life or family from
abuse. Granted this vote will not
save all, but what if it saves just one,
would it not be worth it? Money is
not the object here, it is lives and
families. There are many things in
this world that destroys both, but
we may have the opportunity to do
something about them one at the
time. As far as the principle of "the
good old days," we get it back one
step at the time. Just say "no" to
liquor by the drink.
MILFORD C. TRUETTE


6/27 TAHER.
I 2011 Jeff Stahler/Dist. by Universal UClick for UFS






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Ir~-S~-~ LI II I I ` ` ~ i I-


- -- r --r I
I C- I-. ` ' ' I


I= la =-~ ,, Ld -I --


WEDNESDAY, June 29, 2011 5A -


199


194








JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Lady Elks crown


*2011 Lady Elks Springtime Queens


queens


. 1


i:-





II











SUBMfnr!' PHOTOS


Little Miss Springtime


Junior Miss Springtime


(From left) Shiley Dianne Coulliette, most photogenic and third runner-up; Zoe Christina Clikas,
winner; Kennedy Grace Wilkes, first runner-up; and Kimberly Grace Vinson, second runner-up.


New queens
were crowned
at the 26th
Annual
Lady Elks
Springtime
Beauty
Pageant,
Saturday,
May 21 in
the Malone
High School
Auditorium.
(From left,
first row) are
Little Miss
Springtime
Zoe Christina
Clikas,
Tiny Miss
Springtime
Shelby Kate
Askew and
Young Miss
Springtime
Laurena
Alexandria
Martin; and
(back row)
Junior Miss
Springtime
Holly Nicole
Askew, Miss
Springtime
Sarah Leigh
McAlpin and
Teen Miss
Springtime
Tori Lynn
Porter.




(From left)
Kaylee
Michelle
Hatcher;
Hannah
Newsome,
third runner-
up; Holly
Nicole Askew,
winner;
Addyson
Rayne Lewis,
first runner-up;
and Hannah
Elizabeth
Barfield, most
photogenic
and second
runner-up.


Young Miss Springtime


Teen Miss Springtime


Miss Springtime


(From left) Maddyson Ann Granger, third runner-up; Kinsey
Smith, most photogenic and first runner-up; Lauren Alexandria
Martin, winner; and Paige McKinnie, second runner-up.


Addison Shea' Hussey (left)
most photogenic and runner-
up; and Shelby Kate Askew,
winner.


ToIlarnmr abt p

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Akoya
Freshwater




wfatson
9 GEOLOGISTS
To learn more about pearls
www.watsonjewelers.com
Downtown Marianna
850.482.4037


(From left) Chelsea O'Bryan, second runner-up; Tori Lynn
Porter, winner; and Hanna Nicole Donofro, most photogenic
and first runner-up.

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4257 Lafayette St., Marianna, FL


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twitter.com/
jcfloridannews


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Facebook


Jackson County
Floridan


(From left) Alexandria Marie Watson, first runner-up; Sarah
Leigh McAlpin, most photogenic and winner; Paige Sellers,
second runner-up; and Leighanna Gray, third runner-up.
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LOOKING FOR MORE NEWS? VISIT

WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM


I .


Do you have'Cute Kids'?
Email your 'Cute Kids*' photos to editorial@
jcfloridan.com, mail them to P.O. Box 520, Marian-
na, FL 32447 or bring them by our offices at 4403
Constitution Lane in Marianna.
*12 years or under, with Jackson County ties. In-
clude child's full name, parents'name(s) and city of
residence. This is a free service. All entries subject
to editing.


II I ~-
I 1-DL _


LOCAL


-6A WEDNESDAY, JUNE 29, 2011








JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Lanier-Andler
Funeral Home
8261 Highway 90
Sneads, FL 32460-2504
593-9900

Joshua Lee
Jaworski

Joshua Lee Jaworski, 19,
a native of Port Charlotte,
passed away Sunday, June
26, 2011, in Marianna. He
was a member of the First
Assembly of God Church in
Sneads, and was a fish
farmer with the Blackwater
Creek Koi Fish Farm in Cal-
houn County.
Joshua is survived by his
father, Frank V. Jaworski,
and stepmom Denise of
Punta Gorda; his mother,
Shirley D. Jaworski of
Sneads; maternal grand-
mother Nethel Iverson of
Sneads; paternal grandpar-
ents Francis Jaworski of
Tampa, and Patricia
McCauley of Baltimore;
great-grandparents Robert
and Shirley Furry and Rob-
ert and Marge Gerdon;
step-grandparents Johnny
and Sandy Goldston and
Charles and Debbie Pridy;
three brothers, Andrew
Jelliff Jr. of Bristol, Brandon
Jelliff of Panama City, and
Luke Jaworski of Punta
Gorda; a sister, Lexus
Sheran of Punta Gorda; his
fiance, Audrianna Schae;
his loving and beloved dog,
Tanner; his aunts, Sara,
Mary, Cherie, Lorrie, Ranee
and Patty; his uncles, Rob,
Travis, John and Tom; and
many other family mem-
bers and friends.
Visitation with the family
will take place 6 to 8 p.m.
CDT Thursday, June 30, at .
Lanier-Andler Funeral
Home.
The funeral service will
be 10 a.m. CDT Friday, July
1, at the Sneads First As-
sembly of God Church,


Obituaries
2062 River Road, Sneads,
FL 32460, with the Revs. Ju-
no Douglas and Johnny
Fontenot officiating.
In lieu of flowers, contri-
butions can be made, "In
Memory of Joshua Lee
Jaworski," to The Street-
light Program Fund No.
F013347, P.O. Box 100243,
Gainesville, FL 32610-0243.
Lanier-Andler Funeral
Home of Sneads, 593-9900,
is in charge of arrange-
ments.
Marianna Chapel
Funeral Home
3960 Lafayette St.
Marianna, FL 32446
526-5059

Laura
Francine
Robbirds

Laura Francine Robbirds,
67, of the Cypress com-
munity, passed away at her
home on Tuesday, June 28,
2011, surrounded by fami-
ly.
Mrs. Robbirds retired
from Sunland in Marianna,
after 35 years of dedicated
service as a human service
worker, and was a faithful
member of the Cypress
Community Church. She
loved her family and tried
to nourish others spiritual-
ly and physically. She was
also commonly known to
the family as "Ziner," a
nickname her husband had
given her many years ago.
She was preceded in
death by her husband of 47
years, Roy Clifford
Robbirds; her parents, Lilli-
an Byrd Tharp and Robert
W. Wester; and her stepfa-
ther, Auglee Tharp.
Mrs. Robbirds is survived
by son Gregory Lee
Robbirds of Cypress, his
five children, Denea Ste-
phens, husband Wesley
and their daughter Allie, of
Bascom, and Logan, Abbie,


Solar
From Page 1A

A final decision is expected within a few
months, according to Ron Sachs, head of
the public relations firm handling all me-
dia inquires into the project.
Until then, company representative will
be going to the communities for site visits
and talks with their governmental, busi-
ness and community leaders.
The total build-out should take five to
six years, but the first segment, a 200-acre
farm, could be finished and operational
within six months of breaking ground.
The company plans to develop at total
of 20 such farms of equal size. The solar
farms would be made up of low-profile
solar panels, and the equipment needed
to store energy the panels capture from
the sun and convert to usable power. Ac-


Brasher
From Page 1A

Gilbert still treasures a handful of pic-
tures taken of Brasher and the group as
they posed in a field. He brought copies
of those to share with Brasher at the re-
tirement party.
Friends said Brasher dedicated his
working years to doing what he could to
help farmers keep their lands and opera-
tions profitable, so they could pass them
on to future generations of their families.
In times when manpower was short in
the office, co-workers said he also made
sure things got done whether it was his
responsibility or not.
He also began a program more than a
decade ago that succeeded beyond his
own dreams.
He started a Master Gardener program
' with just four people. Today, there are 40
master gardeners volunteering to help
residents with their home gardening


Katie and Colby Robbirds
of Cypress; son Charles
Clifford Robbirds, his wife
Beverly, and their two chil-
dren, Charli and Clay
Robbirds, of Shady Grove;
and daughter Julie Ann
Kressman, her husband
Karl, and their two sons,
Kade and Kaulder
Kressman of Bascom.
Mrs. Robbirds is also sur-
vived by sisters Elizabeth
"Liz" Alford and her hus-
band Eugene of Shady
Grove, and Marty Carr and
her husband Bennie of Cy-
press; and brothers Wal-
lace Wester and wife
Johnnie Ruth of Cypress,
and Dennis Tharp and his
wife Martha of Cypress;
and a host of nieces, neph-
ews, family, friends and
loved ones.
The funeral service for
Mrs. Robbirds will be 11
a.m. Thursday, June 30, in
the Cypress Community
Church with the Rev. Jerry
Mears and Brother Sharie
Mercer officiating. Inter-
ment will follow in the Cy-
press Community Church
Cemetery.
Serving as her
pallbearers will be Kade
Kressman, Kaulder
Kressman, Logan Robbirds,
Chad Carr, Adam Carr and
Jared Carr. Serving as hon-
orary pallbearers will be
Clay Robbirds, Colby
Robbirds and Wesley Ste-
phens.
A time of remembrance
will be 5 to 7 p.m. Wednes-
day, June 29, in the Ma-
rianna Chapel Funeral
Home.
In lieu of flowers, dona-
tions may be madeto the
Cypress Community
Church building fund.
Marianna Chapel Funer-
al Home is in charge of ar-
rangements. Expressions of
sympathy may be submit-
ted online at
www.mariannachapelfh.co


cording to a news release from Ron Sachs
Communications, the panels would be
less that seven feet tall, and surrounded by
vegetation to make them inconspicuous.
The company estimates it would even-
tually be able to generate enough power
to supply roughly 32,000 homes.
Each of the 20 segments represents a
$70 million investment, according to the
news release, for nearly $1.5 billion in
total.
The largest existing solar farm is under
100 megawatts, and is located in Ontario,
Canada. The project would be 400 mega-
watts, with each of the 20 plots generating
about 20 megawatts.
The other communities under consider-
ation are Hardee, Osceola and Suwannee
counties in Florida; Sumter and Tatnall
counties in Georgia; and Guilford County
in North Carolina.
Hensel Phelps Construction Company
would build and operate the farms.


A large crowd
1 1 of friends,
Te coworkers
and people

e,.f help with their
S agricultural
problems over
Sthe decades
l" -/ turned out to
,, make Charles
S' '. Brasher's
retirement a
grand event.
,, , Many of the
'.r l' i participants
left their
'' ''- signatures and
P well wishes on
this oversized
card.
MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
projects.
Master Gardener Sally Waxgiser said
Brasher was a genuine mentor who guid-
ed rather than dictated.
The party on Tuesday included a brief
summary of Brasher's life from childhood,
comedic skits about the Master Garden-
ing program, and a song about retirement
set to the tune of "My Favorite Things."
As symbols depicting some of Brasher's
most frequent duties, tables were deco-
rated with bunches of crepe myrtle in
Mason jars, and with baskets of produce.
At the end of the event, Brasher was
presented with a Troy-Bilt tiller.
He said he'll have ample opportunities
to use it; he's moving to Tallahassee to be
nearer his daughter, Alia Vincent, grand-
children and son-in-law Brian Vincent.
His wife, Melanie, said the grandchildren
are already making plans for their grand-
father. He's got a garden to plant with the
girls six-year-old Madelyn and nine-
year-old Kaylen and three-year-old
grandson J.D. is showing a keen interest
in lawn mowers already.


Family receives



outpouring of support


BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com

ShirleyJaworski said Tuesday that her
son's friends, on Facebook and in person,
are providing much comfort as she and
the rest of his family cope with his loss
and prepare to say their last goodbyes.
Joshua Lee Jaworski, 19, died in a traf-
fic accident early Sunday morning.
In addition to his mother, he leaves be-
hind his father, Frank Jaworski, his step-
mother Denise Jaworski, three brothers,
Andrew, Brandon and Luke, and a sister,
Lexus.
Shirley Jaworski said her son's Face-
book page is 'flooding with postings" as
his friends reach out to the family. She's
seeing pictures of him that she's not seen
before, and learning just how much he
was loved by others.
In addition, friends are. reaching out
in other ways to offer "an outpouring
of love and prayers and thoughts," his
mother said.
Diagnosed with cystic fibrosis when
he was 12, Joshua had been hospitalized
three times in the past year, but seemed
to be improving.
He was released on his 19th birthday
weighing 115 pounds and functioning
on one lung, but had gained 15 more


pounds. He was due for a check-up on
July 12, his'mother said, and he was
strongly determined to survive the de-
bilitating condition.
His improvements, and the hope that
came with them, made the fatal crash
that much more devastating to bear.
"He just wanted to live," she said. "Peo-
ple were encouraging him and his spirit
was strong. And then this happened."
Jaworski said, however, that the love
the family feels from his circle of friends
takes away a fraction of their pain, and
for that she is grateful..
She said some of the volunteers from
Streetlight, a support group for adoles-
cents, who helped him in Gainesville are
coming to the funeral, and that the effort
also means a great deal.,
"He touched so many people's hearts,
and so many people remembered him
for his smile," she said of the Facebook
posts. "It's just overwhelming, the things
that they're putting up and the loving
things they're saying."
She said those friends will all be wel-
comed with open arms at the visitation,
set for Thursday night from 6 to 8 p.m. at
Lanier-Andler Funeral Home in Sneads,
and at the funeral Friday morning at the
Assembly of God church on River Road
in Sneads.


Fla. says US judge erred


in



MIAM
Florida's
penalty
key legal
force a r
al's office
The d
trict Juc
pact all
be chan
Leslie C
The stat
own oph
temis p
row inm
"Becai
fest error
respect
ter or a
wrote.
As ofl
response
The ji
Florida's
late the
are not
ings on
sary to e
life in pr
Aggrav
as whet
heinous
gain.
Martin
which ji
mendat
violates
cision o


death sentence ruling

The Associated Press alty sentencing practices. The Florida
case involves death row inmate Paul H.
I-A federal judge who declared Evans, 39, who was sentenced to die for
s method of imposing the death killing a man in a 1991 murder-for-hire
unconstitutional made several plot in Vero Beach. If Martinez's ruling
l and factual errors that should stands, Evans will get a new sentencing
eversal, the state attorney gener- hearing.
:e said in a new court filing. In its filing, the state contends that
decision last week by U.S. Dis- Martinez misread the law on several
dge Jose E. Martinez could im- points and made factual errors regarding
Florida death cases and must the timing of Evans' latest appeal, which
iged, Assistant Attorney General affects what law should be applied. For
ampbell said in Monday's filing, example, the state says that Martinez was
te wants Martinez to overturn his incorrect in saying that Evans' claim re-
inion so that the sentencing sys- garding jury problems was not raised on
reserved and also to deny a death his first direct appeal in Florida courts.
late a chance at a life sentence. "This is simply untrue," Campbell
use this ruling represents mani- said, adding that it was considered and
>rs of both fact and law, the state rejected by the Florida Supreme Court a
fully requests that this court al- decade ago.
.mend its judgment," Campbell The state also saysthatMartinezshould
give deference to the Florida Supreme
Tuesday, Martinez had issued no Court in how state laws are interpreted,
e but could rule at any time. and the state court has concluded that
judge determined June 20 that the Arizona ruling does not apply to its
s death sentencing practices vio- death penalty sentencing scheme.
U.S. Constitution because jurors In Evans' case, the juryvoted 9-3 to rec-
required to make specific find- ommend the death penalty to the judge.
the aggravating factors neces- The state says that vote, and others like it
enhance a murder sentence from by juries around the state, are sufficient
prison to death, to show that there were aggravating fac-
vating factors include such things tors warranting the death sentence.
other the crime was particularly "The fact the jury voted nine-to-three
Sand cruel or done for monetary means that a majority of the jurors made
a factual finding that at least one aggra-
nez found Florida's system, in vator existed," Campbell wrote.
juries make death penalty recom- Attorney General Pam Bondi has said
ions to a judge by majority vote, the state will take its case to the 11th U.S.
a 2002 U.S. Supreme Court de- Circuit Court ofAppeals ifMartinez does
overturning Arizona's death pen- not alter his ruling.


State
Briefs


Tallahassee braces for state
employee layoffs
TALLAHASSEE Florida's capital
city is bracing for thousands of public
employee layoffs due to spending cuts
in the new state budget.
The city joined with other governmen-
.tal and private interests in the Tallahas-
see area Tuesday to launch a re-employ-
ment effort.
It features a website that includes
job, networking and unemployment
compensation information along with
retraining opportunities.
The site www.bigbendworks.
com also has contacts for financial.
resources and social services including
crisis counseling and food assistance.
Tallahassee Community College
President Jim Murdaugh said the effort
is aimed at private as well as public sec-
tor employees who lose their jobs as the
spending cuts reverberate through the
region.
Murdaugh said the cuts are expected
to have a negative financial effect of up
to $70 million in an eight-county area.

Powder scare empties Nelson's
Jacksonville office
JACKSONVILLE U.S. Sen. Bill Nel-
son's Jacksonville office had to be evacu-
ated after a white, powdery substance
was found inside a threatening letter.
Nelson's office said the powder dis-
covered Monday afternoon was deter-


mined to be corn starch. Six people in
the Democratic senator's office were
evacuated while firefighters evaluated
the powder.
Nelson was in Jacksonville on Monday
for a fundraiser and to discuss the future
of the Mayport Naval Station. He had al-
ready left his office when a staff member
opened the letter.

Man gets life for killing
Panhandle teen
SHALIMAR -A man has been
sentenced to life in prison for the 1988
murder of a Florida Panhandle high
school student.
An Okaloosa County judge sentenced
John R. McMasters-Wade on Monday af-
ter the man pleaded no contest to killing
18-year-old Ulai Sookruetai.
McMasters-Wade was already serv-
ing a life sentence for kidnapping and
sexual battery in a 1990 case when he
was indicted for Sookruetai's murder
last year.
The Niceville High School student
went missing in September 1988. Her
body was found about two months later
near Eglin Air Force Base. The medical
examiner determined that she had been
strangled.
McMasters-Wade was identified as
.a suspect early on but never charged.
Authorities reopened the case several
years ago.
From wire reports


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718A WEDNESDAY, JUNE 29, 2011


Obama,
The Associated Press

WASHINGTON--Atleast
they're still talking. While
President Barack Obama
and congressional Repub-
lican leaders have publicly
dug in their heels on criti-
cal debt-limit negotiations,
Obama's spokesman said
Tuesday the president and
Senate GOP leader Mitch
McConnell will continue
discussions.
Obama and Vice Presi-
dent Joe Biden spent more
time in the Oval Office on
Monday with McConnell
than they did with a fellow
Democrat, Senate Major-
ity Leader Harry Reid. The
president and vice presi-
dent have scheduled an-
other meeting to consult
with Reid and also invit-


Biden plan debt session with Senate Dems
ed Sens. Dick Durbin and must include some tax in- Republicans want an seated opposition to tax The president stepped
Charles Schumer, both creases on the wealthy or equal amount in deficit increases, then Obama up his personal involve-
members of the Demo- on corporations, mostly reduction over the next 10 needs to sacrifice as well ment in negotiations af-
cratic leadership team. through closed loopholes. years and say they can- by abandoning a major ter bipartisan talks led by
The White House did not But before McConnell not support increasing the campaign promise, such Biden stalled last week.
announce a new meet- even walked into the white debt ceiling without a bud- as his demand that Con- Republican lawmakers
ing with Republicans. But House, he had flatly reject- get deal at the same time. gress end Bush-era tax cuts abandoned the negotia-
'Obama spokesman Jay ed tax increases. "Compromise and an for wealthier Americans. tions, saying the issues still
Carney called the meeting "It's time Washington agreement will depend on Another option is for on the table had to be ad-
with McConnell "useful" take the hit," he said, "not each side being willing to Obama to propose his own dressed by the president.
and said that "important- the taxpayers." accept some tough choic- plan for further savings Obama already has
ly" they agreed to continue That would seem to put es," Carney said Monday. in Medicare. Republicans met privately with House
meeting. a damper on the conversa- Failure to raise the might find that appealing Speaker John Boehner,
"They will continue to tion. But the deal is crucial ceiling "would do seri- after the House Republi- R-Ohio, and with House
talk," McConnell spokes- to winning congressional ous damage," said Mark can plan ran into broad Democrats.
man Don Stewart had said support for raising the Zandi, chief economist at public opposition and be- Until Friday, Biden had
after the meeting. government's borrowing Moody's Analytics, whose came a campaign issue for held a series of meetings
But about what? To be limit, a step it must take by views are frequently cited Democrats. over several weeks with
sure, neither McConnell Aug. 2 to avoid a potential by the Obama administra- "The president needs to bipartisan teams from the
nor Obama is fond of small default. The current debt tion. "It will unhinge the take a chance himself, and House and Senate, focus-
talk. ceiling of $14.3 trillion already very fragile collec- do something that shows ing on areas where the two
Obama and Democrats would likely have to be tive psyche." h'e's willing to give up sides were amenable to
insist that for there to be a increased by $2.4 trillion But Zandi said that if Re- something that's very large cuts until the dispute over
dealonreducinglong-term to last through the end of publicans are being asked to move this forward," taxes led Republicans to
deficits, any agreement next year. to give up their deep- Zandi said in an interview, walk out.


S Adviser: Obama actinglawfully on Libya


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Hotshot crew members walk in line as they prepare to mop
up in Pajarito Mountain ski area near Los Alamos, N.M., on
Tuesday.


Wildfire swells


near New Mexico


nuclear laboratory


The Associated Press

LOS ALAMOS, N.M. A
vicious wildfire spread
through the mountains
above a northern New
Mexico town on Tuesday,
driving thousands of peo-
ple from their homes as
officials at a government
nuclear laboratory tried
to dispel concerns about
the safety of sensitive
materials.
The wildfire which has
swelled to about 93 square
miles sparked a spot fire
at the-Los Alamos National
Laboratory on Monday.
The fire was quickly con-
tained, and lab officials
said no contamination was
released and radioactive
materials stored at spots
on the sprawling lab were
safe.
No fires burned on lab
property overnight, but
teams from the National
Nuclear Security Admin-
istration's Radiological
Assistance Program were
headed to the scene to
help assess any nuclear or
radiological hazards, said
'Kevin Smith, Los Alamos
Site Office manager.
"The ... teams' work will
provide another level of
assurance that the com-
munity is safe from poten-
tial radiological releases as
the fire progresses," Smith
said in a statement.
The lab was closed
through at least Wednes-
day, with only essential
employees permitted back
onto laboratory property.
The wildfire has de-
stroyed 30 structures south
and west of Los Alamos,
for many stirring memo-
ries of a devastating blaze
in May 2000 that destroyed
hundreds of homes and
buildings in town. About
12,500 residents have been
evacuated from Los Ala-
mos, an orderly exit that
didn't even cause a traffic
accident.
Flames were just across
the road from the south-
ern edge of the famed lab,
where scientists developed
the first atomic bomb dur-
ing World War II. The facil-
ity cut natural gas to some
areas as a precaution.
The streets of Los Ala-
mos were empty Tues-
day with the exception of
emergency vehicles and
National Guard Humvees.
The neighborhoods were
quiet, but there were signs
that homeowners had left
prepared. Propane bottles
were placed at the front of
Driveways and cars were


left in the middle of park-
ing lots, away from any-
thing flammable.
Some residents decided
to wait out the fire, includ-
ing Mark Smith, a chemi-
cal engineer who works at
the lab. He's not concerned
about flames reaching the
lab's sensitive materials.
"The risk of exposure is
so small. I wouldn't sit here
and inhale plutonium. I
may be crazy but I'm not
dumb," he said.
The lab, which employs
about 15,000 people, cov-
ers more than 36 square
miles and includes about
2,000 buildings at nearly
four dozen sites.


The Associated Press

WASHINGTON Presi-
dent Barack Obama is act-
ing legally in ordering U.S.
military action against
Libya, a top State Depart-
ment lawyer insisted on
Tuesday, telling a Senate
panel sharply divided over
the commander in chief's
authority that the 3-
month-old conflict is nei-
ther a war nor full-blown
hostilities.
Harold Koh defended
the limited American role
in the NATO-led operation
and Obama's insistence
that he doesn't need con-
gressional authorization
for his actions. The legal
adviser also warned that
abandoning the mission
now would undermine
U.S. relationships with
allies and "permit an em-
boldened and vengeful
Moammar Gafhafi to re-
turn to attacking" Libyan
civilians.
He argued the admin-
istration's case a few
hours before the Senate
Foreign Relations Com-
mittee considered a reso-
lution that' would give
Obama authority for one
year to carry out the mis-
sion while barring U.S.
ground forces in Libya.
Last Friday, in a rebuke
of the president, the
House overwhelmingly
rejected that authoriza-


tion but stopped short of
cutting off funds for the
operation.
Senate Democratic lead-
ers have signaled that they
have the votes to pass the
bipartisan resolution in
the committee, though
several amendments were
likely.
Foreign Relations Com-
mittee Chairman John
Kerry, D-Mass., said the
bottom-line question was
whether to stop the op-
eration when Gadhafi was
"bunkered down in Trip-
oli" and facing an arrest
warrant from the Interna-
tional Criminal Court for
crimes against humanity.
He called passage of the
resolution a critical step
that would send a mes-
sage around the world.
Sen. Richard Lugar of
Indiana, the panel's top
Republican, expressed his
opposition when the U.S.
is at war in Iraq and Af-
ghanistan and the nation's


debt is inthe trillions.
At the morning hearing,
Koh faced Republicans
and Democrats who chal-
lenged his assertion that
air strikes and drone at-
tacks on Gadhafi's forces
do not constitute hostile
action.
Lawyers from the Pen-
tagon and Justice Depart-
ment declined the panel's
invitation to testify.
"The fact that we are
leaving most of the shoot-
ing to other countries does
not mean that the United
States is not involved in
acts of war," said Lugar. "If
the United States 'encoun-
tered persons performing
similar activities in sup-
port of al-Qaida or Taliban
operations, we certainly
would deem them to be
participating in hostilities
against us."
Sen. Jim Webb, D-Va., a
decorated Vietnam War
veteran, questioned the
administration's "narrow


and contorted definition
of hostilities," adding that
an operation that lasts for
months, costs millions of
dollars and involves com-
bat pay for troops offshore
amounts to hostilities.
Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn.,
called it a "cute argument"
that has undermined the.
administration.


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Summer Basketball



Bulldogs rally past Altha Wildcats


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Marianna Bulldogs
overcame a slow start
Tuesday afternoon to take
a 45-35 victory over the Al-
tha Wildcats in their final
Summer League action of
the summer.
Altha got off to a fast
start, scoring the first
seven points of the game
before Marianna finally
converted on a free throw
with 15:35 left in the first


half.
Shayne Blanton con-
verted the Bulldogs' first
bucket of the game mo-
ments later, and Marianna
was able to get to within
one on a pair of baskets
by Deontre Pringley-- the
first an offensive put-back,
and the second a pretty re-
verse lay-up in transition
-to make it 11-10.
However, Altha main-
tained an 18-17 lead at the
half, and stayed in front
until a pair of baskets by


Warren McCord gave Mar-
ianna its first lead midway
through the second half.
Trailing 22-19, McCord
scored with 11:50 to go,
and then added a 3-point-
er from the right corner on
Marianna's next posses-
sion to put the Bulldogs
ahead 24-22 with 11:03 to
play.
A free throw by Amp
Speights, a basket by Drew
Melvin, and a driving
bucket by Pringley com-
pleted a 10-0 Bulldogs run


to make it 31-22.
Altha fought back, how-
ever, getting a pair of 3-
pointers during an 8-2
spurt to cut it to 35-32
with 2:40 to play.
But Speights answered
with a floater in the lane
to push the lead to five,
and free throws by Chris
Bowers, DJ Granberry, and
Red Griffin helped seal the
win.
"Ithought we were better
in the second half," Mari-
anna coach Travis Blanton


said after the game. "We
struggled somewhat in
the first half. We didn't re-
bound defensively as well
as we needed to. Altha
got some second-chance
points in the first half."
"We picked up the in-
tensity defensively in the
second half, and that al-
lowed us to get some easy
baskets."
Granberry led Marianna
with nine points, while
Pringley added eight, and
Speights six.


MARKSKINNER/FLORIDAN
Marianna's Amp Speights
goes up for a two-point shot
against Altha Tuesday during
summer league basketball.


IVARIANNA SOFTBALL




Queens of the district


SUBMITTED PHOTO


The Marianna Dixie Darlings pose for a photo after winning both of their games at the Wewa District Tourney.


Dixie darlings defeat Wewahitchka to win championship


BY DUSTIN KENT
Floridan Sports Editor'

The Marianna Dixie Dar-
lings All-Stars are headed
to the state tournament
after wrapping up the
district championship on
Saturday in Wewahitchka.
Marianna took on the
home Wewahitchka All-
Stars in a best-of-three
series to determine the
league champion, win-
ning the first game 15-8
on Friday, and taking it
14-1 on Saturday to avoid
a deciding third game.
"The girls played good,"
Marianna coach Tory
Hussey said. "They got


some timely hits, some
big two-out hits with run-
ners on base. That was a
big thing for us. We also
played extremely good
defense, better than I
thought we would. Go-
ing into the tournament,
I thought we were a little
better offensive team than
defensive, but we played
real good defense in both
games.
"The girls just played
real well. They really came
together in the final week
of practice. They worked
hard to get to where
they're at, and that's what
I'm most proud of."
The team next travels


to Carrabelle on June 8
for the start of the state
tournament.
Hussey said he is well
aware that his team would
have a major challenge on
its hands at state, particu-
larly with a powerful Boni-
fay team in the mix.
"I know Bonifay has a re-
ally good team," the coach
said. "We saw them in a
tournament in Slocomb.
Slocomb put us out and
Bonifay run-ruled them,
so I know they've got a re-
ally good club."
"But if my girls play de-
fense the way they did (in
the district tournament),
that will give us a chance


to win a couple of games,
but I don't know what the
other competition will
look like.
"We're excited about our
chances. I hope every-
thing stays the way it was
against Wewa. Everything
went real smooth, and we
played good ball. All of the
coaches are real proud of
the girls."
Hussey said that the
team is currently solicit-
ing donations to help with
the team's travel for the
state tournament.
Anyone willing to con-
tribute can contact Hussey
at 850-209-7764, orAman-
da Clark at 850-212-0659.


O'Zone League


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Marianna's Logan Benefield slides into second against
Chipley during the Dixie Youth Ozone All Stars District
Tournament in Bonifay on Monday night.


Dixie Youth


starts strong


in district


BY SHELIA MADER
Floridan Correspondent

The Marianna Dixie
Youth O'Zone All-Stars
got off to a grand start
to district tournament
action on Monday night
in Bonifay, beating Chi-
pley 10-0 in their open-
ing game.
Marianna sent Bobby
Lewis to the mound,
and he went three in-
nings and allowed only
one base-runner in the
third before giving way
to Gage Parker, who re-
tired the side in order in
the fourth.
The game ended on
the 10-run mercy rule.
As the visiting team,
Marianna went on of-
fense first and got
a huge six-run first
inning.
Reece Dillard reached
on an error and moved
to third on a single.
Cody Gwin then dou-
bled home both run-
ners before scoring on
an RBI double by Maxx
Harrell. Zac Malone
took one for the team to
set up an RBI single by
Landon Tharpe.
With one out, Lewis
helped himself out with
ah RBI single to score
Malone.
Following a strikeout,


Logan Benefield took
advantage of an error to
score Tharpe.
A walk ito Seth Gilm-
ore went for nil as a
groundout ended the
inning. Marianna was
held off the board in the
second inning.
Harrell drew a walk,
but a fielder's choice
got him at second.
Marianna was not
able to score in the
third inning on a pair
of walks to Tharpe and
Lewis.
Malone came through
with a grand slam in the
fourth inning to put the
game out of reach.
With one out, Gray
and Gwin drew con-
secutive walks before
Harrell took advantage
of a bobbled ball at first
to load the bases.
Malone came through
with a shot over the
right center field fence.
A pair of outs ended
the inning, but Mari-,
anna had all the offense
they needed for the
win.
With Cottondale fall-
ing to Holmes County
in the second game of
the night, Marianna
was scheduled to go
head to head with Hol-
mes County on Tuesday
night.


Dizzy Dean State Tournament


Tri-City 14U places third after


narrow loss to Highland Park


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Tri-City 14U base-
ball team finished third
in the 14-team Dizzy
Dean state tournament
over the weekend, be-
ing eliminated by High-
land Park 7-6 on Tuesday
morning.
Tri-City finished the
tournament with a record
bf 5-2, and out-scored its
opponents by a total of 44
runs.
Tuesday's early morn-
ing game was particu-
larly tough for Tri-City,
which was coming off of
two games on Monday,
including a 12-inning
victory over Myrtle Grove
in the second game.
-- . .,


"That really took a lot
out of us," Tri-City coach
Holt Floyd said on Tues-
day. "We were a little flat
this morning, but that's
kind of to be expected af-
ter what we went through
(Monday). We just never
could get anything rolling
offensively. Everybody
was really flat."
Tri-City jumped out to
a 3-0 lead on Tuesday,
but Highland Park fought
back to tie the game, and
then went ahead 7-4, a
lead it took into the final
inning.
Tri-City answered with
a two-out rally to put two
runs across the board,
with the tying and go-
ahead runs on base.
However, ,the miracle


comeback fell short, and
Tri-City was eliminated.
Still, Floyd said he
couldn't have been hap-
pier with what he saw
from his team over the
weekend.
"The kids did outstand-
ing," he said. "We re-
ally had a difficult game
(Monday), and that made
it tougher."
"But even last year, this
group of kids finished
third in state in Dixie
Boys as 13 year olds, and
they've continued to im-
prove. They've by far ex-
ceeded any expectations.
They made some terrific
plays over the weekend.
They played some re-
ally good recreation
baseball."


PONYTAILS WIN DISTRICT


a. Et.


SUBMITTED PHOTO
District champion Sneads Ponytail All-Stars are, (front row,) Abigail Mclntosh and Emily Glover;
(middle row), Lauren Stewart; back row, Bree Davis, Shayla Johnston, Chloe Henry, Kaleigh
Bruner, Kaylee Cain, Casey Grover, Autumn Avriett, Haley Dime and Katie Mayes. Coaches are
Bubba Avriett, Dan Grover and Travis Bruner. The Sneads All-Stars defeated Calhoun County
17-0 on Friday, Marianna 3-2 on Saturday, and Wewa 6-0 on Monday night in the championship
game. With the win, Sneads advanced to the state tournament in Carrabelle on June 8. L


i ^^^^^^-wi









12B WEDNESDAY, JUNE 29, 2011


SPORTS


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


College World Series Notebook


iH i :': ,, n:H TL 'f I: : :,
South Carolina's Christian Walker, right, who played with a broken left wrist, is safe at third
base on a throwing error, as Florida third baseman Cody Dent waits for the ball, in the 1th
inning of an NCAA baseball College World Series best-of-three finals game in Omaha, Neb.,
Monday, June 27, 2011. Dent misplayed the ball and Carolina's Walker went on to score the
go-ahead run. South Carolina beat Florida 2-1 in 11 innings.



Walker plays through



broken wrist in CWS


OMAHA, Neb. In-
jured South Carolina
first baseman Christian
Walker was back in the
lineup for Game 2 of the
College World Series on
Tuesday night.
"I wasn't going to play
all year and get to this
point and not be able to
play," Walker said. "Of
course, if I wasn't going
to be able to give 100
percent, I wouldn't have
been in there.(Monday).
I don't want to hurt the
team in any way, but I felt
good enough like I could
give them everything I
had."
Walker, who went 2 for
5 and scored the winning
run in Monday's 2-1, 11-
inning win over Florida,
fractured tie hamate
bone in his left wrist dur-
ing his last at-bat against
Virginia on Friday.
Two physicians who
work with the Gamecocks
flew to Omaha to exam-
ine and treat Walker.
The doctors told him
he couldn't hurt his wrist
any worse if he played. He
wears a brace on his left
hand and wrist, and he
taped the knob of his bat
to reduce reverberation
when the bat hits the ball.
Walker decided after
hitting five home runs in
Monday's batting practice
that he could play.
"It just came down to
dealing with the pain," he
said. "I can't say enough
about the whole (medi-
cal) staff."
Walker probably will
require surgery after the


CWS, coach Ray Tanner
said..
Florida coach Kevin
O'Sullivan said he's glad
Walker is playing because
the .355 hitter is one of
the tnain reasons the
Gamecocks have reached
the finals.
"We've got a great deal
of respect for him, and
he obviously showed a
tremendous amount of
toughness," O'Sullivan
said.

Dent brings his bat
Cody Dent was put
in the lineup at the end
of the regular season to
shore up Florida's defense
at third base.
The sophomore has
given the Gators a good
glove and unexpected of-
fensive production.
The son of former major
leaguer Bucky Dent was
batting just .163 when he
replaced Zack Powers on
May 20. He's batting .300
since. His .364 average in
four CWS games was sec-
ond on the team enter-
ing Game 2 of the finals,
behind Bryson Smith's
.400. Dent has a double
and triple, he's beaten
out a bunt for a single
and had the sacrifice fly
for Florida's only run on
Monday.
"Just been trying to put
good at-bats together,
not be an easy out," Dent
said. "I do whatever I can
to get on base, work the
pitcher, do my job at the
time whether it's moving
the runner over or mov-


ing them in."

Watch party
South Carolina opened
its basketball arena Tues-
day night to allow fans to
watch on the big screens
as the baseball team
tried to win back-to-back
national titles.
The baseball team's
run through two College
World Series has been a
bright spot in a mostly
dreary run for the Game-
cocks in major sports.
Last year's national
championship was the
first in a men's sport.
The men's basketball
team hasn't won an
NCAA tournament game
in nearly four decades.
The football team's first
trip to the Southeastern
Conference title game last
season ended in a 56-17
loss to Auburn.

Spirit stick retired
,South Carolina's good
luck charm stayed home
this year. The Gamecocks
in 2010 kept their Avatar
Spirit Stick in the dugout
as the team rolled to the
title.
The stick was the brain-
child of senior catcher
Robert Beary, who taped
a baseball to a fungo bat
during a regional rain
delay.
The Gamecocks retired
the stick to the school tro-
phy case. The Gamecocks
won their first four CWS
games without it.
From wire reports


NFL Labor Talks


Goodell, Smith meeting


in Minnesota this week


The Associated Press

MINNEAPOLIS NFL
Commissioner Roger
Goodell and NFLPA execu-
tive director DeMaurice
Smith opened four days of
labor talks in Minnesota on
Tuesday, getting together
without players or owners
in the room.
Three people familiar
with the situation told The
Associated Press that the
two power brokers and
staff members resumed
negotiations aimed at
ending a lockout now in its
fourth month. The people
spoke on condition of ano-
nymity because no labor
developments are being
made public. People famil-
iar with the situation said
the executive committee
of the players' association
planned a conference call
later Tuesday to discuss
the negotiations. NFL.com
first reported that Goodell
Jand Smith were meeting.


Smith planned to go
to Florida by Wednesday
morning to attend a sym-
posium for rookies in Bra-
denton. The people told
the AP that the two sides
were planning to meet
through Friday.
The traditional start of
training camp is just three
weeks away and Chicago
and St. Louis are scheduled
to play the annual Hall of
Fame game on Aug. 7. Yet
Detroit Lions defensive
end Lawrence Jackson said
he believes there still isn't
enough urgency to reach
a deal on a new collec-
tive bargaining agreement
- not yet.
"From a business per-
spective, nobody is losing
anything right now," Jack-
son said at a youth sports
camp inWalled Lake, Mich.
"The owners haven't had
to pay offseason bonuses
- so they're making inter-
est on the money they're
not spending and most


of the players aren't used to
getting paid until we start
training camp in late July.
Until then, I don't think
we're missing much."
The lockout began on
March 12, and players
have not been allowed to
train at team facilities or
contact their coaches, with
the exception of a few days
in April when the lockout
was briefly lifted.
Players on several teams
have practiced on their
own, trying to keep in foot-
ball shape so they'll be pre-
pared to get back to busi-
ness on the field whenever
the labor impasse ends.
The key issue in the dis-
pute is how to divide rev-
enues after the league took
in about $9.3 billion last
year.
Previous "secret meet-
ings" have taken place in
suburban Chicago, New
York, the Maryland shore
and last week in Hull,
Mass., south of Boston.


Recreation Football
Alford Recreation Asso-
ciation will hold sign-ups
for tackle football and
cheerleading July 7 from
6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., and
July 12 from 6:30 p.m. to
7:30 p.m.
Registration will be
held at the concession
stand, and fees are $75
for football, and $65 for
cheerleading.
Age groups are 5-6,
7-9, and 10-12. For more
information, call Jason at
850-573-0900, Valerie at
850-209-1031, or Rhonda
at 850-573-1507.

Summer Baseball
Camp
There will be a summer
baseball camp through
Thursday at the MERE
Complex in Marianna
from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m.
The camp will be for
boys and girls ages 5-15.
Cost is $75, and water and
Gatorade will be provided.
Hitting, fielding, and
pitching techniques will
be performed.
Coosa Valley Academy
head coach Bobby Hughes
- a Marianna High School
and Chipola College alum
- will run the camp.
Registration will be from
8 a.m. to 8:45 a.m. on June
28. For more informa-
tion, contact Hughes at
bhughes@coosavalley-
academy.org.

Champ Camp
Former Graceville foot-
ball star Anthony "Champ"
Kelly will bring his
"Champ Camp" back to
Graceville for the second
straight year on Thursday
and Friday.


Sports Briefs
The camp will feature
football instruction from
high school coaches and
former players for cur-
rent high school football
players.
To register, go to www.
heartpower.inc, or e-mail
info@heartpowerinc.org.

Chipola Swimming
Lessons
Chipola College will of-
fer programs for children
of all ages this summer.
Swimming lessons will
be offered for ages 4 and
up.
Lessons are based on a
combination of nation-
ally-recognized methods.
The following sessions
are scheduled: Session 1:
June 6-16 with registration
deadline May 31; Session
2: June 20-June 30 with
registration deadline June
13; Session 3: July 11-21
with registration deadline
July 5; and Session 4: Aug.
8-18 with registration
deadline August 1.
Classes are available at 9
a.m., 10 a.m., or 7 p.m.
Sessions are Monday
through Thursday for
two weeks of 45-minute
lessons.
Cost is $45 for each
session. Pre-registration
is required with a $5 late
registration fee.
For information, call
pool manager Rance Mas-
sengill at 718-2473.

Marianna Swim Team
\ The 2011 season for the
Marianna Swim Team
starts Monday at the
Chipola College pool.
The Marianna Swim
Team invites boys and
girls ages 4-18 to join the


Do you have'Cute Kids'?
E-mail your'Cute Kids*' photos to editorial@jcfloridan.com,
mail them to P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447 or bring them
by our offices at 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.
*12 years or under, with Jackson County ties. Include child's
full name, parents'name(s) and city of residence. This is a free
service. All entries subject to editing.


team. Registration will be
open the first two weeks of
practice. Swimmers must
be able to swim one length
of the pool (25 yards).
Practices are held from 5
p.m. to 6:30 p.m., Monday
through Thursday.
Meets are held on
Saturday throughout the
summer.

Marianna Volleyball
Camp
Marianna High School
will have a volleyball camp
for grades 4-8 on July 11-
13 at MHS.
The camp is $75 per
student, and will run from
9 a.m. to 12 p.m. each day;
For more information
and to register, go to the
Marianna High School
web site.

Marianna Youth
Wrestling
Team Dynamic Youth
Wrestling Team will
continue practicing on
Tuesday and Thursday
nights at the wrestling
room at the old Marianna
High School.
Practice will be from 6
p.m. to 8 p.m.
All kids in Jackson
County from ages 6.and
up are welcome to join.
For further information
please contact Marianna
coach Ron Thoreson at
272-0280.

Sports Items
Send all sports items to
editorial@jcfloridan.com,
or fax them to 850-482- ,
4478. The mailing address,
for the paper is ackson
County Floridan PO. Box
520 Marianna, FL 32447.


JCFLOR3DAN..COM


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_
















_ _~ 1 ~ ~_~~~ _~ __~ ~


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 29, 2011 3B


WEDNESDAY MORNING / AFTERNOON JUNE 29, 2011

6:00 16:30 7:00 17:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:0010:30111:06011:3=0 2:0012:30R1:0011:30 2:0012:30 3:0013:30 4:00 4:30 5:00 5:30
-20 The Early Show (N) (In Stereo) 8 Griffth Family Fd Let's Make a Deal (N) ThePrice Is Right (N) News Young & Restless Bold The Talk (In Stereo) The Dr. Oz Show Oprah Winfrey News News News News
3 WTVY News 4 The Early Show (N) (InStereo) Oe Live Regis & Kelly The Price Is Right (N) Young & Restless ILve at Bold The Talk (In Stereo) Let's Make a Deal (N) Rachael Ray RE Oprah WInfrey News News
S NewsChannel 7 Today Today Patrick Dempsey and Josh Duhamel. (N) (In Stereo) BB 2011 Wimbledon Championships: Men's Quarterfinals. (In Stereo Live) Rachael Ray 0 The Doctors B Ellen DeGeneres Millionaire Jeopardy! News NBC News
(3 News 13 This Morning Good Morning America (N) M Live Regis & Kelly The View (in Stereo) The Dr. Oz Show All My Children I One Life to Live Or General Hospital (N) Dr. Phil (In Stereo) Oprah Winfrey News ABC News
40 E Auto Tech Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Aqua Kids Funniest Home Videos Chris Smarter Smarter Judge B. Housewlves/NYC New Life Church Judge Mathls N Justice Justice Nate Berkus The People's Court Jdg Judy Jdg Judy
1 I Arthur Martha Curious Catn the Super DInosaur Sesame Street SId WordWrld Between Barney Arthur Clifford Martha SId Electric Cyberch'e WlldKratt WordGirl Catn the Curious Dinosaur NewsHour
'SHOW "aSl Bi/r' (2009:)NR'.8 l Sellthe Deaf ** (2008) "Funy Vngeance" (2010)iTV. 'MyOneandOnly'** (2009)'PG-13' 'Color Me Kubilic ** 125 'The Times ofHrvwey Mk"'NR' 'A SirgleMafn'k*** (2009)'R' '"Gt** 128ai
4NICK Max,Ruby MaxRuby UmlzooI UmlzoomI Bubble Dora... Sponge. Sponge. Sponge. Sponge. Sponge. Sponge. Carly ICarly *BIgTIme BigTime Victorious Victorious BigTme ICarly Sponge. Sponge. ICady ICrly
6 TBS Home Imp. Home Imp, Saved/ Saved/ Yes, Dear Yes, Dear Prince Prince Prince Payne Payne Browns Amer. Dad Earl Raymond Jim Jim The Offce Friends Friends Raymond Raymond King King
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38 ESPN2 2011 Wimbledon Championships: Men's Quarterfinals. (N) (Live) 1E SportsCenter (N) (Live) ESPN First Take N SportsCenter (N) (Live) 12011 Wimbledon Championships: Men's Quarterfinals. (N) (Live) r NASCAR Football Around iPardon
19 ESPN SportsCenter B SportsCtr Women's Soccer SportsCenter (N)(Live) Women's Soccer SportsCenter (N) (Live) Report Football NFLLive Jim Rome Around Pardon SportsCenter (N) (Live)
20 CSS Mayhem In the A.M. SportsNIte Football Golf Lose LbsIl Paid Prog, Fast Makeover Pald Prog. SportsNIte Football College Football: 2005 Tennessee at Alabama. Oct. 22, 2005, College Football Whlstle SportsNIte (N) H
21 DISN Manny Agent Oso Mickey Pirates IMickey Mickey Phineas Phieas Phlneas Deck Good Random Shake it Wizards IGood Good Phlneas Deck Good F[ish [Shake It Wizards Phlneas iGood
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24 DISC TRIALaser IJ. Robison J. Meyer Pald Prog. Nazi UFO Conspiracy Area 51 Military base. 2012 Apocalypse Deadliest Catch 0 American Chopper American Chopper American Chopper American Chopper Cash Cab Cash Cab Cash Cab Cash Cab
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26 USA Royal Pains "Pit Stop" Royal Pains BB Royal Pains N Royal Pains N Royal Pains E House (In Stereo) House "Epic Fail" NCIS"Vanished" NCIS"Lt. Jane Doe" NCIS (In Stereo) B NCIS (In Stereo) B NCIS (in Stereo) EB
28FAM BWorld BoyWorld hatLike WhatLike Grounded 700 Club The700 Club E Full House Full House StillStnd SIllIStnd 8,Rules s8,Rules Mellssa Mellssa Mellssa Mellssa Melissa Mellssa Melssa Mellssa Mellssa IMellssa
29 LIFE The Balancing Act (N) Reba Reba Will/Grace Will/Grace Chris Chris How I Met How I Met Desp.-Wives Grey's Anatomy B, Grey's Anatomy MB Cold Case Fles 9E Cold Case Piles BB Unsolved Mysteries Unsolved Mysteries
30 A&E Dog Dog og Dog CSI: Miami (In Stereo) The Sopranos RD Criminal.Minds 0 The First 48 U The First 48 Dog Dog CSI: Miami (In Stereo) The Sopranos EB Criminal Minds EB The First 48 BB
32 SYFY S5e v Face i ;. S crit Moonli r,- .,,.:.| Mo rign h i.- I 1i.:.. o Moonligr,] i ;, :,:, |Moonlignr ,.i. M g ...... -, Mc.o'ignt ,:ii,,. Moongr t i 'g ..:'i |Haunted Collector DHollywood 7 tr,;.rro. ~Niie D -' r 1*99, Aciori
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36 TOON Bakugan Beyblade. Pok6mon Wheels Johnny T JohnnyT Garfield Garfleld Scooby Scooby Looney Tunes Tom & Jerry Garfield EdEdd Edd Sidekick Almost Adventure MAD Looney Scooby JohnnyT
39 HIST Modern Marvels 9 Last Stand of the 300 H After Armageddon (In Stereo) m Modern Marvels KM modern Marvels E Last Stand of the 300 B After Armageddon (In Stereo) Er Modern Marvels Ia
40 TVLND Paid Prog. Paid Prog. All-Family ISanford jeffersons IGoodTime Jeannle Jeannie ICleveland Divorced Gunsmoke E Gunsmoke E Bonanza Bonanza Bonanza GoodTime Jeffersons Sanford Sanford
43 CNN2 (5:00) Morning Express With Robin Meade (N) HLN News (N) Showblz Tonight (N) Prime News (N) Ga
45 CNN (5:00) American Morning (N) 9E CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) The Situation Room With Wolf Blltzer (N)
46 CW (5:00) The Daily Buzz B Steve Wllkos Show Browns Payne Cosby Cosby TBA Cops TBA TBA Steve Wllkos Show The Tyra Show 91 Lyricl ILyrical King IKIng '70s Show '70s Show
47 SPIKE Pald Prog. WEN Hair 10minGym Paid Prog. CSI:NY (In Stereo) CSI: Crime Scene CSI: Crime Scene CSI: Crime Scene UFC Countdown Gangland (InStereo) Gangland Women in gangs. Gangland (In Stereo) "Sar Wars:Ep. Ill
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WEDNESDAY EVENING / LATE NIGHT JUNE 29, 2011

6:00 6:30 707:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:0010:3011:0011:30112:0012:30 1:00 1:30 2:00 2:30 3:00 3:30 4:00 4:30 5:00 5:30-
12 Hurricane Jeopardyl Undercover Boss Criminal Minds CSI: Crime Scene News Late Show Letterman Late Late Show/Craig Wheel Extra (N) Up to the Minute (N) (In Stereo) AgDay INews Daybreak Good Morning Show
30 News Wheel Undercover Boss Criminal Minds CSI: Crime Scene News Late Show Letterman Late Late Show/Cralg Inslde Ed. Up to the Minute (N) (In Stereo) News r WTVYNews4
5 0 News Wheel The Voice (N) E America's Got Talent Love in the Wild BB News Updale Tonight Show w/Leno Late Night Carson Poker After Dark The Bankruptcy Hour IShepherd's Chapel Early Tdy NewsChannel 7 Today
8 g News Ent Middle Middle Family Happy Primetime Nightlne News Nightllne Jimmy KImmel Live- Lopez Jim Paid Prog. Pald Prog. Paid Prog. ABC World News Now (N) Morning News 13 This Morning
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14 NICK ICarly Sponge. MyWife My Wife Lopez Lopez 70s Show '70s Show The Nanny IThe Nanny The Nanny IThe Nanny My Wlfe My Wife Chris Chrls '70s Show '70s Show Ilopez Lopez Fam. Mat. TBA Fam. Mat. Fam. MaL
16 TBS Selnfeld Selnfeld Browns Browns Payne Payne Payne Payne Conan (N) Lopez Tonight (N) Conan Lopez Tonight 'Uilderlassmarrn* (2005, Comedy) Married Marred Married Marred
17 HBO Legend d Valentine's Day** (2010) Jessica Alba.'PG-13'-t3 True Blood (In Stereo) Real Time/Bill Maher Treme (In Stereo) McEnroe/Borg Jim Jefferies: I Swear Bravehearft*** (1995,'Historical Drama) Mel Gibson. R' 8M "Time Traveler'
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19 ESPN (5:00) SportsCenter (N) College Baseball SportsCente? (N) (Live) Baseball NFL Live SportaCenter (N) (Live) SportaCenter (N) (Live) MLB Baseball: Red Sox at Phlllies SportsCenter E .SportsCenter 9B
20 CSS College Football From Nov. 14,2010. IFootball SportsNIte (In Stereo) Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog; Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Pald Prog. Ahh Bra Focused
21 DISN Vampire ANT Farm Good IShake I emonade Mouth'(2011) BridgitMendler., Vampire Vampire Wizards Wizards Hannah Hannah Deck Deck Phneas Phlneas Chugging Babar Agent so Jungle Little Little
22 MAX The Devifs Own"R' 'CoppOut* (2010) Bruce Willis.'R'B 'RobinHood"** (2010) Russell Crowe. 'PG-13' Life on Top'N) (In Stereo) EB Femme Beasvis, Bu Kissing Jessica Stein"'*** (2001)'R' Leap Year"* (2010)'PG'
23 TNT The Mentaliat a The Mentallst 0 Franklin & Bash 2M Men of a Certain Age Franklin & Bash EK Men of a Certain Age Leverage e HawthoRNe O Cold Case "Joseph" NUMB3RS (in Stereo) NUMB3RS (In Stereo) Angel "Players"
24 DISC MythBusters 1 MythBusters B MythBusters (N) B The Supernaturalist MythBusters H The Supernaturalist MythBusters N MythBusters 311 Popoff Anxiety Teleworld ]Pad Prog. Pald Prog. Paid Prog. RIppedl Paid Prog.
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29 LIFE Pawn Pawn The First 48 EH The First 48 E Vanished, Both How I Met How I Met Chris Chris WIll/Grace WIIl/Grace Chris BeautyTip Acne Pald Prog. Hair Free Body Zumba Fit Paid Prog. WEN Hair Lose Lbsll
30 A&E The First 48 [ Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Dog Bountyuntnter Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Dog Bounty Hunter Paid Prog. Pald Prog. Gardening Paid Prog. Thin in 301 Paid Prog.
32 SYFY Ghost Hunters B Ghost Hunters BB Haunted Collector (N) Hollywood Hollywood Haunted Collector Hollywood Hollywood Stargate SG-1 Be Stargate Atlantis Kill Theory** (2009, Horror) Teddy Dunn WEN Hair Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog.
33 AMC (4:00) "Tre Ues"R' 'Die Har"f***X (1988, Action) Bruce Willis.'R' a "Die Hard'***k (1988, Action) Bruce Willis.'R' W Breaking Bad BB Breaking Bad &M Breaking Bad B Stooges Stooges Paid Prog. Pald Prog.
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35 BET 1061Park Allcla Tife,**% (1999, Comedy-Drama) E Crews Crews The Mo'Nique Show Wendy Williams Show Ulfe"* *X (1999, Comedy-Drama) B Hell Date Hell Date Inspiration Popoff Inspiration Popoff BET Inspiration
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39 HIST Modern Marvels E How the States Hillbilly: The Real Story WB Modern Marvels BN How the States Hillbilly: The Real Story 9C Modern Marvels a Wealth Anxiety Pald Prog. S Secrets Paid Prog. Pald Prog.
40 TVLND Sanford All-Famlly All-Family All-Famlly Raymond IRaymond Cleveland Dlvorced Divorced Cleveland The Nanny The Nanny Cleveland Divorced 3's Co. |3's Co. 3's Co. 3's Co. 3's Co. 3's Comp. Boston Legal &E Arthri-D Pald Prog.
43 CNN2 Jane Velez-Mitchell Nancy Grace (N) Dr. Drew (N) The Joy Behar Show Showbiz Tonight (N) Dr. Drew Nancy Grace Shcwbiz Tonight The Joy Behar Show ShowbIz Tonight Dr. Drew Momrning Express
45CNN John King, USA (N) In the Arena (N) Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 (N) OK Plers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 Anderson Cooper 360 Plers Morgan Tonight World Business Today AM: Wake Up Call (N) American Morning (N)
46 CW Selnfeld Selnfeld America's Next Model America's Next Model Payne [Browns IRoseanne IRoseanne South Pk South Pk Cops TBA Paid Prog. Memory Pald Prog. Pald Prog. Pald Prog. True Hollywood Story Paid Prog. The Dally Buzz B
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SPRINT CUP LEADERS
Through June 26
Points
1, Carl Edwards, 573. 2, Kevin Har-
vick, 548. 3, Jimmie Johnson, 540. 4,
Kurt Busch, 539. 5, Kyle Busch, 536. 6,
Matt Kenseth, 521.7, Dale Earnhardt
Jr., 508. 8, Clint Bowyer, 496.9, Jeff
Gordon, 480.10, Ryan Newman, 475.
11, Denny Hamlin, 463.12, Tony Stew-
art, 460. 13, Greg Biffle, 446. 14, Mark
Martin, 443. 15, A J Allmendinger,
433. 16, Juan Pablo Montoya, 432. 17,
Paul Menard, 429. 18, Martin Truex Jr.,
412. 19, Kasey Kahne, 411. 20, David
Ragan, 410.
Money
1, Carl Edwards, $5,037,194.2,
Kurt Busch, $3,157,901. 3, Kyle
Busch, $3,152,669. 4, Kevin Har-
vick, $3,141,574. 5, Matt Kenseth,
$3,050,514. 6, Jimmie Johnson,
$2,979,064.7, Clint Bowyer, $2,854,716.
8, Jeff Gordon, $2,742,764. 9, Denny
Hamlin, $2,696,893.10, Tony Stewart,
$2,610,791.
11, Juan Pablo Montoya, $2,554,216.
S12, Ryan Newman, $2,483,513.13,
Bobby Labonte, $2,337,418. 14,
Jamie McMurray, $2,292,912.15,
Regan Smith, $2,275,133. 16, A J
Allmendinger, $2,274,619. 17, Marcos
Ambrose, $2,261,519. 18, Brad
Keselowski, $2,231,867. 19, Trevor
Bayne, $2,183,463.20, David Gilliland,
$2,183,074.


COLLEGE WORLD SERIES
At TD Ameritrade Park Omaha
Omaha; Neb.
All Times EDT
Double Elimination
Sunday, June 19
Virginia 4, California 1
South Carolina 5, Texas A&M 4
Monday, June 20
North Carolina 3, Texas 0, Texas
eliminated
Florida 3, Vanderbilt 1, 5/ innings,
susp., rain
Tuesday, June 21
Florida 3, Vanderbilt 1, comp. of susp.
game
California 7, Texas A&M 3, A&M
eliminated '
South Carolina 7, Virginia 1
Wednesday, June 22
Vanderbilt 5, North Carolina 1, North
Carolina eliminated
Thursday, June 23
Virginia 8, California 1, California
eliminated
Friday, June 24
Florida 6, Vanderbilt 4, Vanderbilt
eliminated
South Carolina 3, Virginia 2, 13 in-
nings, Virginia eliminated
Championship Series
Best-of-3
x-if necessary
South Carolina 2, Florida 1, 11 in-
nings, South Carolina leads series 1-0
Tuesday, June 28 Florida (53-18) vs.
South Carolina (54-14), late
x-Wednesday, June 29 Florida vs.
South Carolina, 8 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 49 30 .620 -
Atlanta 45 35 .563 4'1
Washington 40 39 .506 9
;New York 39 39 .500 9%
Florida 34 44 .436 141%
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Milwaukee 44 35 .557 -
.St Louis 41 38 .519 3
Cincinnati 41 39 .513 3%
Pittsburgh 39 38 .506 4


(Worley 2-1), 7:05 p.m.
Milwaukee (Marcum 7-2) at N.Y. Yan-
kees (A.J.Burnett 7-6), 7:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Capuano 6-7) at Detroit
(Coke 1-7), 7:05 p.m.
St. Louis (C.Carpenter 2-7) at Balti-
more (Jakubauskas 2-0), 7:05 p.m.
Washington (Zimmermann 5-6) at L.A.
Angels (Haren 7-5), 7:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Maholm 4-8) at Toronto
(Morrow 3-4), 7:07 p.m.
Texas (C.Lewis 6-7) at Houston (Myers
3-6), 8:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Buehrle 6-5) at
Colorado (Jimenez 3-7), 8:40 p.m.
Florida (Nolasco 4-4) at Oakland
(Godfrey 1-1), 10:05 p.m.
Thursday
Boston at Philadelphia, 1:05 p.m.
Milwaukee at N.Y. Yankees, 1:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Detroit, 1:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Colorado, 3:10
p.m.
Florida at Oakland, 3:35 p.m.
St Louis at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
Texas at Houston, 8:05 p.m.


WIMBLEDON RESULTS
Eds: Completes.
Tuesday
At The All England Lawn Tennis &
Croquet Club
Wimbledon, England
Purse: $23.6 million (Grand Slam)
Surface: Grass-Outdoor
Singles
Women
Quarterfinals
Sabine Lisicki, Germany, def. Marion
Bartoli (9), France, 6-4, 6-7 (4), 6-1
Maria Sharapova (5), Russia, def.
Dominika Cibulkova (24), Slovakia,
6-1,6-1.
Petra Kvitova (8), Czech Republic,
def. Tsvetana Pironkova (32), Bulgaria,
6-3,6-7 (5),6-2.
Victoria Azarenka (4), Belarus, def.
Tamira Paszek, Austria, 6-3, 6-1.
Doubles
Men
Second Round
Jurgen Melzer, Austria, and Philipp
Petzschner (5), Germany, lead Scott
Lipsky and Rajeev Ram, United States,
6-4, 1-2, susp., rain.
Third Round
Colin Fleming and Ross Hutchins,
Britain; def. Ashley Fisher and Stephen
Huss, Australia, Q-3, 6-4,6-2.
James Cerretani, United States, and
Philipp Marx, Germany, def. Juan
Sebastian Cabal and Robert Farah,
Colombia, 3-6,7-6 (2), 6-4, 6-4.
Bob and Mike Bryan (1), United
States, vs. Simon Aspelin, Sweden,
and Paal Hanley, Australia, 6-3, 4-6, 6-7
(5), 6-3,3-3, susp., rain.
Michael Llodra, France, and Nenad
Zimonjic (6), Serbia, lead Carsten Ball,
Australia, and Santiago Gonzalez,
Mexico, 6-4, 6-6 (10-9), susp., rain.
Quarterhfinals
Arnaud Clement, France, and Lukas
Dlouhy, Czech Republic, lead Robert
Lindstedt, Sweden, and Horia Tecau
(8), Romania, 6-3, susp., rain.
Women
Third Round
Liezel Huber and Lisa Raymond (3),
United States, def. Angelique Kerber,
Germany, and Christina McHale,
United States, 6-1, 6-0.
Kveta Peschke, Czech Republic, and
Katarina Srebotnik (2), Slovenia, def.
Cara Black, Zimbabwe, and Shahar
Peer (14), Israel, 6-2,5-7,6-3.
Nuria Llagostera Vives and Arantxa
Parra Santonja, Spain, def. Sara Errani
and Roberta Vinci, Italy, 7-5, 6-4.
Sania Mirza, India, and Elena Vesnina
(4), Russia, def. Daniela Hantuchova,
Slovakia, and Agnieszka Radwanska
(13), Poland, 6-4,6-3.
Mixed
Second Round


49 HGTV
98 TLC


_ I I I I I I j


I r


I ~1~


I I L


(All times Eastern)
Schedule subject to change and/or
blackouts.
Wednesday, June 29
COLLEGE BASEBALL
8 pm.
ESPN World Series, finals, game
3, Florida vs. South Carolina, at
Omaha, Neb. (if necessary)
GOLF
3:30 p.m.
TGC PGA of America, PGA Pro-
fessional National Championship,
final round, at Hershey, Pa.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7 pn.
ESPN2 Boston at Philadelphia
8 pjn.
WGN San Francisco at Chicago
Cubs
SOCCER
8:45 anm.
ESPN FIFA, Women's World Cup,
Group D, Norway vs..Equatorial
Guinea, at Augsburg, Germany
Noon
ESPN FIFA, Women's World Cup,
Group D, Brazil vs. Australia, at
Moenchengladbach, Germany
TENNIS
7 a.m.
ESPN2 The Championships,
men's quarterfinals, at Wimbledon,
England
10 a.m.
NBC The Championships, men's
quartedi-nals, at Wimbledon, Eng-
land (live and same-day tape)
1p~m.
ESPN2 --The Championships,
men's quarterfinals, at Wimbledon,
England



Cleveland 41 36 .532 1
Chicago 38 41 .481 5
Kansas City 33 46 .418 10
Minnesota 32 45 .416 10
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 41 38 .519 -
Los Angeles 40 40 .500 1/2
Seattle 39 40 .494 2
Oakland 35 44 .443 6

Monday
Detroit 4, Toronto 2
Cincinnati 5, Tampa Bay 0
L.A. Dodgers 15, Minnesota 0
Cleveland 5, Arizona 4
San Diego 4, Kansas City 3
L.A. Angels 4, Washington 3, 10 innings
Atlanta 3, Seattle 1
Tuesday
Boston at Philadelphia, late
Milwaukee at N.Y. Yankees, late
N.Y. Mets at Detroit, late
St. Louis at Baltimore, late
Pittsburgh at Toronto, late
Cincinnati at Tampa Bay, late
Texas at Houston, late
L.A. Dodgers at Minnesota, late
Chicago White Sox at Colorado, late
Cleveland at Arizona, late
Florida at Oakland, late
Kansas City at San Diego, late
Washington at L.A. Angels, late
Atlanta at Seattle, late
Wednesday
Cincinnati (Volquez 4-3) at Tampa Bay
(Shields 8-4), 12:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (R.De La Rosa 3-2) at
Minnesota (S.Baker 5-5), 1:10 p.m.
Kansas City (Chen 4-1) at San Diego
(Stauffer 3-5), 3:35 p.m.
Atlanta (D.Lowe 3-6) at Seattle
(F.Hernandez 8-6), 3:40 p.m.
Cleveland (C.Carrasco 7-4) at Arizona
(Duke 1-2), 3:40 p.m.
Boston (Lackey 5-6) at Philadelphia


Martin Damm and Renata Vora-
cova, Czech Republic, def. Eduardo
Schwank, Argentina, and Alla Kudry-
avtseva, Russia, 6-7 (3), 7-6 (5), 6-3.
Invitational Doubles
Round Robin
Gentlemen
Group A
Donald Johnson and Jared Palmer,
United States, lead Goran Ivanisevic,
Croatia, and Richard Krajicek, Nether-
lands, 3-2, susp., rain.
Senior Gentlemen
Group B
Jeremy Bates, Britain, and Anders
Jarryd, Sweden, def. Vijay Amritraj,
India, and John Fitzgerald (2), Austra-
lia, 6-2, 6-2.
.Ladies
Group B
Magdalena Maleeva, Bulgaria, and
Barbara Schett, Austria, def. Tracy
Austin and Kathy Rinaldi (2), United
States, 6-3, 6-4.
Junior Singles
*Boys
Second Round
Jiri Vesely (1), Czech Republic, def.
Alexios Halebian, United States, 6-4,
6-4.
Robin Kern, Germany, def. Andrew
Whittington (9), Australia, 6-4, 6-4.
Filip Horansky (5), Slovakia, def.
Yaraslau Shyla, Belarus, 6-4, 6-4.
Mate Pavic (8), Croatia, def. Evan
Hoyt, Britain, 7-6 (3), 6-2.
Kimmer Coppejans, Belgium, def.
Jeson Patrombon (13), Philippines,
7-6 (1), 6-L
Dominic Thiem (7), Austria, def.
Joshua Ward-Hibbert, Britain, 6-2, 7-5.
Liam Broady (15), Britain, def. Math-
ias Bourgue, France, 6-1, 6-4.
Julien Cagnina, Belgium, def. Kyle
Edmund, Britain, 3-6, 7-6 (6), 6-4.
Frederjco Ferre Silva, Portugal, def.
Hassan Ndayishimiye, Burundi, 4-6,
7-5,6-4.
Jason Kubler, Australia, def. Oliver
Golding (4), Britain, 7-6 (7),6-2.
Marcos Giron, United States, def.
Pedja Krstin, Serbia, 6-4, 6-2.
Kaichi Uchida, Japan, def. Ben Wa-
gland, Australia, 7-6 (3), 4-6, 6-3.
Jorls De Loore, Belgium, def. Roberto
Carballes Baena (6), Spain, 1-6, 6-4,
6-4.
Sean Berman, United States, def.
George Morgan (10), Britain, 6-3, 6-4.
Oliver Hudson, Britain, leads Thiago
Moura Monteiro (2), Brazil, 2-0, susp.,
rain.
Luke Saville (16), Australia, leads
Evgeny Karlovskiy, Russia, 7-5, 5-5,
susp., rain.
Girls
Second Round
Madison Keys, United States, def.
Zarah Razafimahatratra, Madagascar,
6-2,6-1.
Petra Rohanova, Czech Republic,
def. Francesca Stephenson, Britain,
6-2,7-5.
Victoria'Duval (16), United States,
def. Beatriz Haddad Maia, Brazil, 6-1,
6-2.
Anett Kontaveit (13), Estonia, def.
Lucia Butkovska, Slovakia, 6-4, 6-1.
Daneika Borthwick, Britain, def. Je-
sika Maleckova (15), Czech Republic,
6-2,6-3.
Montserrat Gonzalez (6), Paraguay,
def. Sofiya Kovalets, Ukraine, 6-0, 6-2.
Kateryna Kozlova, Ukraine, leads
Ellen Allgurin, Sweden, 2-6,7-5, 1-0,''
susp., rain.
Risa Ozaki, Japan, vs. Ruth Seaborne,
Britain, 6-2, 3-6, susp., rain.
Indy de Vroome, Netherlands, leads
Aliaksandra Sasnovich, Belarus, 4-1,
susp., rain.
Eugenie Bouchard (5), Canada, leads
Barbara Haas, Austria, 6-0, 1-0, susp.,
rain.
Yulia Putintseva (7), Russia, leads
Nao Hibino, Japan, 6-2, 0-1, susp., rain.
Donna Vekic, Croatia, leads Barbora
Krejcikova, Czech Republic, 4-0 (40-
S40), susp., rain.


Cleveland (C.Carrasco 7-4) at Arizona
(Duke 1-2), 3:40 p.m.
Boston (Lackey 5-6) at Philadelphia
(Worley 2-1), 7:05 p.m.
Milwaukee (Marcum 7-2) at N.Y. Yan-
kees (A.J.Burnett 7-6), 7:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Capuano 6-7) at Detroit
(Coke 1-7), 7:05 p.m.
St. Louis (C.Carpenter 2-7) at Balti-
more (Jakubauskas 2-0), 7:05 p.m.
Washington (Zimmermann 5-6) at L.A.
Angels (Haren 7-5), 7:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Maholm 4-8) at Toronto
(Morrow 3-4), 7:07 p.m.
San Francisco (Lincecum 6-6) at Chica-
go Cubs (Dempster 5-6), 8:05 p.m.
Texas (C.Lewis 6-7) at Houston (Myers
3-6), 8:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Buehrle 6-5) at
Colorado (Jimenez 3-7), 8:40 p.m.
Florida (Nolasco 4-4) at Oakland
(Godfrey 1-1), 10:05 p.m.
Thursday
Boston at Philadelphia, 1:05 p.m.
Milwaukee at N.Y. Yankees, 1:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Detroit, 1:05 p.m.
San Francisco at Chicago Cubs, 2:20
p.m.
Chicago.White Sox at Colorado, 3:10
p.m.
Florida at Oakland, 3:35 p.m.
St. Louis at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
Texas at Houston, 8:05 p.m.'
AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB
New'York 45 31 .592 -
Boston 45 32 .584 H
Tampa Bay 44 35 .557 21/
Toronto 39 40 .494 7TV
Baltimore 35 40 .467 91/
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Detroit 43 36 .544


Chicago 32 47 .405 12
Houston 28 51 .354 16
West Division
W L Pct GB
San Francisco 45 34 .570 -
Arizona 43 37 .538 2 %
Colorado 38 40 .487 6'/2
Los Angeles 36 44 .450 9'Vz
San Diego 35 45 .438 10%

Monday
Chicago Cubs 7, Colorado 3
Cincinnati 5, Tampa Bay 0
L.A. Dodgers 15, Minnesota 0
Cleveland 5, Arizona 4
San Diego 4, Kansas City 3
L.A. Angels 4, Washington 3, 10 innings
Atlanta 3, Seattle 1
Tuesday
San Francisco 13, Chicago Cubs 7, 1st
game
Boston at Philadelphia, late
Milwaukee at N.Y. Yankees, late
N.Y. Mets at Detroit, late
St, Louis at Baltimore, late
Pittsburgh at Toronto, late
Cincinnati at Tampa Bay, late
San Francisco at Chicago Cubs, late
2nd game
Texas at Houston, late
L.A. Dodgers at Minnesota, late
Chicago White Sox at Colorado, late
Cleveland at Arizona, late
Florida at Oakland, late
Kansas City at San Diego, late
Washington at L.A. Angels, late
Atlanta at Seattle, late
Wednesday
Cincinnati (Volquez 4-3) at Tampa Bay
(Shields 8-4), 12:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (R.De La Rosa 3-2) at
Minnesota (S.Baker 5-5), 1:10 p.m.
Kansas City (Chen 4-1) at San Diego
(Stauffer 3-5), 3:35 p.m.
Atlanta (D.Lowe 3-6) at Seattle
(F.Hernandez 8-6), 3:40 p.m.


Hunters IHouse Properly Property Income Property House Hunters Property Property Income Property
Toddlers & Tiaras Toddlers & Tiaras Pregnant Pregnant Toddlers & Tiaras (N) Pregnant Pregnant Toddlers & Tiaras


louse Hunters Property Property
Toddlers & Tiaras Toddlers & Tiaras


Property Property Meaning Griddler GreatBra Pald Prog. Meaning Dream
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Car Warrors ICar Sci. CarScl. Car Warriors


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MotoGP Racing


NASCAR Racing Pald Prog. Wealth Pald Prog. IPaid Prog.


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"W ;M~


Florida second baseman Josh Adams can't reach a throw by
catcher Mike Zunino in the 11th inning of an NCAA baseball
College World Series finals against South Carolina, in Omaha,
Neb., on Monday.










JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


BORN LOSER BY ART AND CHIP SANSOM
YOUR CIOLE.STERKOL NUABE6 P|HA ,VEN'T '(OU ELUIAtNATED.YOUR 1 4l-E,-- COOK LL\W
HAVEN'T lfPRiOVE FROr~YOUR CONSUM5PTOlW OF RED' tEAT,A STEA4. AMD BUKgC&K5
LAST TET. 1 RECOWAE e- WE-LL tONIE
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BIG NATE BY LINCOLN PIERCE
BEFORE YOU LEAVE YOU SAID T WASN'T
FOR. THE SUMMER, CAPABLE OF GETTING
PEOPLE, I'M PASSING A HUNDRED ON THE
BACK YOUR FINAL! WELL, PREPARE
FINAL EXAMS. TO BE W-R-O-N-G!
AHSR GET l
READY, GINA!

S P I



SOUP TO NUTZ BY RICK STROMOSKI


ARLO & JANIS BY JIMMY JOHNSON
WHERE AREA MOSTOFIHEM ARE
ouRLASES I THme DIRTY-DISH HIDER.'




*




ALLEY OOP BY JACK AND CAROLE BENDER
D I BEHIND YOU THAT WE RAVE PAUD
,'a61 m)0oNill 16F MGNE1 FOR THS
II A1k'lyO CID IIE ALML *i tA' TO rcEP I
Ar IPP6LED OF -15 P406RESS.' -


MONTY BY JIM MEDDICK


COW & BOY BY MARK LEIKNES
WHY DOES THE FAT MAN IS A'
MORE MASS EQUAL MASSIVE STAR AND THE
MORE GRAVITY? TRAMPOLNE IS THE FABRIC
S WELL, I OF SPACE. THE FAT MAN'S
PICTURE A MASS BENDS
'FAT MAN I THE SPACE
SITTING AROUND
ON A ,. ,^, HIM,
TRAMPOLINE. /CAUSING
SSMALLER
OBJECTS
STO GRAVITATE
TOWARD HIM.


AND A STAR GOING SUPER-
NOVA AND COLLAPSING INTO
A BLACK HOLE IS A FAT
MAN VIOLENTLY JUMPING
ONA
TRAM- -t
POLINE, / /
BURSTING \ 7 /
INTO r i
FLAMES,
AND THEN
BUSTING -
A HOLLE


CAN YOU PLEASE STOP
EXPLAINING THINGS IN
TERMS OF FAT MEN ON
TRAMPOLINES?

\ NOi w


KIT'N'CARLYLE BY LARRY WRIGHT HERMAN BY JIM UNGER


S"I'lQ have water. Preferably 2011."
"I'll have water. Preferably 2011."


ACROSS 40 More than
most
1 Thin 41 Agrees
coatings silently
6 Hobby knife 45 Flowery
(hyph.) months
11 Mississippi 47 Sharpen
explorer 48 Letter
12 Chuckling answerer
13 Oval-nest (2 wds.)
builder 51 Frame
14 Snuggle of mind
15 Booth 52 Soul's
16 Lodging Franklin
places 53 Happy
17 Jekyll's 54 Long lock
alter ego 55 Motorized
18 Connec- bike
tions
19 Froze over DOWN
23 Good
fortune 1 XL
25 Exciting 2 Achilles'
26 Hip-hop story
music 3 Big name
29 In what in trains
way? 4 Pinochle
(2 wds.) combo.
31 Sz. choice 5 Sault
32 Novelist Marie
Levin 6 Mutant
33 "Kazaam" heroes
star of comics
34 Escorted (hyph.)
35 Waist size 7 Outback
37 Green dweller
fruit 8 Chicago
39 Rice wine hrs.


Answer to Previous Puzzle


9 Util. bill
10 Lyric poem
11 Kid around
12 Blyth and
Beattie
16 Bygone
desk
features
18 Click-on
item
20 Pay a visit
21 Threshold
22 Changed
color
24 Oops!
(hyph.)
25 lan of
"Alien"
26 Supplies
with gear
27 Opera tune


28 City grove
30 Lift anchor
36 Entices
38 Snare
40 Jean Auel
heroine
42 Address
the crowd
43 Meted out
44 Floored it
46 Sighs of
relief
47 Recital
piece
48 Reassure
Rover
49 Make
mistakes
50 Born as
51 Dues payer,
for-short


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


6-29 2011 UFS, Dist, by Univ. Uclick for UFS



CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: X equals K
"GHGOKDZTSP TC W UTOWRAG. TD
TC W UTOWRAG DZWD MSG IMGC SMD
ITCCMAHG TS MSG'C VWDZ ATXG W
AEUN MB 'CEPWO." NWVAM NTRWCCM

PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "This country has far more problems than it deserves
and far more solutions than it applies." Ralph Nader

(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 6-29


NEA Crossword Puzzle


Annie's Mailbox

Dear Annie: In no uncertain terms, my can and cannot contact, but that won't
son and his second wife have told me change their response. We don't recom-
that it is wrong to be in contact with my mend inviting your ex-daughter-in-law
son's ex-wife. They've said my ex-daugh- to any function where your son or his
ter-in-law should not be invited to my wife might be present. That is simply ask-
home or to family functions, and that ing for trouble and will be interpreted as"
including her shows a total lack of sup- a deliberate slap in.the face. We suggest
port for my son. less blatant ways to stay in touch with
I am not close to my ex-daughter-in- your ex-daughter-in-law, such as email
law, although I hold no animosity toward and phone calls.
her. But I've known her for 30 years, and
she is the mother of my grandchildren. Dear Annie: I want to respond to "Heart-
Shutting her out does .not seem reason- broken in Canada," whose children -
able, nor is it a good example for my ignored her on Mother's Day.
grandchildren. That was my eighth Mother's Day after
I see my son and his current wife very the sudden, tragic death of my only child
rarely. They do not invite me to their at age 14. Every breath I take is a struggle
home. They have a limited interest in without her. How does one celebrate
family gatherings. They say it's because Mother's Day after the death of a child?
I still see the ex. What is the best way to Gratitude. I am grateful for having the
handle this situation? opportunity to be a mom, even for only
DANGED IF I DO AND DANGED IF 14 years. If your children are alive and
I DON'T breathing, celebrate. Until you have
suffered a mother's worst nightmare, be
Dear Danged: Of course it is wrong for grateful.
your son and his wife to tell you who you AN ANGEL'S MOM


Bridge


Can you see the guaranteed line in'this deal?
South is in six hearts. Westleads the club queen.
After winning with dummy's ace and drawing
trumps in two rounds, how should declarer
continue? North's hand was worth a three-and-
a-quarter heartArebid. South, now knowing of
an 11-card heart fit, showed some slam inter-
est by control-bidding (cue-bidding) four dia-
monds. North took over with Blackwood.
South started with two potential losers: one
diamond and one club. He had only 11 win-
ners: one spade, seven hearts, two diamonds
and one club. He was guaranteed a second
spade trick, but that would not help if he lost
two tricks. Declarer could take the spade fi-
nesse. If it won, he would discard a minor-suit
loser on the spade ace. But if the finesse lost,
he would go down because East would cash the
club king.
Instead, South should play dummy's spade
ace, then call for the spade queen. If East could
cover with the king, declarer would ruff, lead a
diamond to dummy's king, and discard a loser
on the spade jack. And when East plays low,
South pitches his last club. West wins with the
king, but declarer's diamond loser disappears
on the spade jack. The ruffing finesse guaran-
tees the contract.


West
SK8 5 3
S96
*984
SQ J 10 6


North 06-29-11
A QJ
V KJ54
SK732
4A3
East
4109 6 4 2
T --
4 QJ 10
SK8 752
South
4 7


VA Q 10 8 7 3 2
*A65
,94

Dealer: North
Vulnerable; Neither


South


4,
5
64


West North
14
Pass 3 V
Pass 4 NT
Pass 5 NT
Pass 6V


East
Pass
Pass
Pass
Pass
All pass


Opening lead: Q


Horoscope
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
- It behooves you to keep
a low profile in all involve-
ments, especially with ca-
reer-related matters.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
- Associating with persons
who have a purpose in life,
not those who are merely
drifting, will make you feel
more secure about your
affairs.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
- Use your mental prowess
to meet and overcome any
obstacles you encounter.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
- It normally isn't too
smart to offer unsolicited
advice to others. Yet if you
can clearly see the answer.
to a problem that another
is encountering, speak up
and offer what you can.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) Don't let another
hurry you into making pur-
chase beyond your chosen
pace of consideration. Be
cautious.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-
Dec. 21) If you have to
make a decision regarding
something where your op-
tions appear to be of equal
value, keep in mind a simi-
lar method that you found
success with previously.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19). Better com-
munications can be es-
tablished if you work on
it a bit. Try to resolve any
misunderstandings.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) A recreational break
could provide a healthy
valve for preventing ten-
sion buildup in your life.
PISCES (Feb.20-March20)
- Several matters you've
been trying to resolve can
be concluded to your sat-
isfaction if you simply deal
with them one at a time.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
- You're curious, alert and
receptive to life itself, and
eager to both acquire and
impart knowledge about,
most everything.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
- Just in case you have to
improvise while under fire,
it will be important to keep
your wits about you at all
times concerning anything
financial.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
- It's the quality of effort
that determines the value
of rewards one can receive.
Make sure your methods
are industrious.


-4B WEDNESDAY. JUNE 29, 2011


ENTE-RkTMMEENT










ww.JCFLORIDAN.com


CLASSIFIED


Jackson County Floridan *


Wednesday, June 29, 2011- 5 B


WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED




ARKETPLA


BY PHONE: (850) 526-3614 or (800) 779-2557 BY MAIL: WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE
BY FAX: (850) 779-2557 P.O. BOX 520, MARIANNA, FL 32447
ONLINE: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM IN PERSON: 4403 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA
Publication Policy Errors and Omissions. Advertisers should check their ad the first day. This publication shall not be liable for failure to publish an ad or for a typographic error or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the ad for the first day's
insertion. Adjustment for errors is limited to the cost of that portion of the ad wherein the error occurred. The advertiser agrees that the publisher shall not be liable for damages arising out of errors in advertisements beyond the.amount paid for the space
actually occupied by that portion of the advertisement in.whic* the error occurred, whether such error is due to negligence of the publisher's employees or otherwise and there shall be no liability for non-insertion of any advertisement beyond the amount paid for
such advertisement. Display Ads are not guaranteed position. All advertising is subject to approval. Right is reserved to edit, reject, cancel or classify all ads under the appropriate classification.


Srd eaIn c.Si -or6wwj ria.co


* Blood Mountain Cabins
and Country Store Located
up high in the scenic
Appalachian Mountains in
North Georgia. The views are
spectacular and the temperatures are cool.
www.bloodmountain.com 800-284-6866
G.M. Properties of PC Beach 800-239-2059
Fully furnished condos
& townhouses near Pier Park.
2bdrm Gulf front- starting @ $175 nt.
3bdrm Gulf front- starting @ $225 nt.
2bdrm Lake front- starting @ $100 nt.
Studios Lake front- starting @ $70 nt.
www.gmproperties.com

) **S Owner Financing Possible **
Waterfront Lake Seminole GA
S7671 Paradise Drive, 2/2,866 SF Furnished
$85,000 Reduced *334-805-0705

(.I ANNOUNCEMENTS


FREE SALVATION MESSAGE POSTCARDS!
"If you confess with your lips the Lord Jesus,
and believe in your Heart that God raised
SHim from the dead YOU WILL BE SAVED,"
(Bible, Romans, Chapter 10:9-10).
FRIENDS DON'T LET FRIENDS DIE WITHOUT
JESUS. For FREE Post Cards, with Salvation
Message: Boxholder, P.O. Box 439,
Fairfax Station, VA 22039-0439
(Available in English, Spanish and/or Korean)

JACKSON COUNTY
FLORIDAN CLASSIFIED
JULY 4TH DEADLINES

SUNDAY 7/3/11

TUESDAY 7/5/11







(6) MERCHANDISE


WANTED/WILL BUY: OLD COINS, TOYS AND
COLLECTABLES CALL 850-693-4908

Consesion Trailer: 8x20 Wells Cargo, 2 side
service, propane restaurant style, fully equip-
ped. $15k May see at 2983 Sunset Dr. Marianna



** GUN SHOW a*
JULY 2ND AND 3RD
National Peanut Festival Building *
Hwy 231 S. Dothan, Alabama
Over 275 Tables *
Sat. 9-5 Sun. 10-4
Call 334-279-9895


Wanted: Old Coins, Gold, Diamqnds,
Guns, And Tools West Main Jewelry & Loan
334-671-1440. DO 12717

( }i) PETS & ANIMALS


FOUND KITTEN ON SEMINOLE TRAIL IN
INDIAN SPRING. YOUNG M/TABBY GREY &
BLACK. CALL 850-573-2471
Free kittens Multi-colored, multi-hair length
850-482- 5880/850-303-9727 after 3pm


LAKE EUFAULA
WATERFRONT HOME
5BR/2BA, furnished,
large lot with 2
storage bldg., covered
porch, dock w/power. 3161 Calhoun Dr.
(FOR SALE) 334-792-7046

LIQUIDATION SALE 4-
Panama City Beach Condo, 3 yrs. old, 2/2,
furnished, paid 400K now 125K, Must Close
within 10 days. VRBO# 253110 and
Laketownwharf.com Rick Gentry
865-805-9730 RICKGENTRYLCOMCAST.NET








FREE Kittens to a good loving home. 10 wks.
old, very playful, sweet, loving & litter box
trained. 1 black & white, 1 tiger-striped & 2
multi-colored with some tiger-stripes. Please
call 850-579-8811 or 209-1642.

AKC German Shepherd puppies for sale
black/tan mom, and silver/black father are
both on premises for you to see. I've got 6
males $350 each, and 1 female $400. All have
shots and ready to go. Please call or text Jason
334-618-4741 or 334-618-3586
* AKC LAB puppies Black or Yellow priced to
go. shots & wormed. Ready now!
229-308-0117 donnie@bekennel.com
r --------- ------------------------
AKC Male Poodles $200 Ready Now!
Now taking deposits on CKC Toy poodles
S $250. & up! Call 334-794-2854
AKC registered weimaraner puppies Ready to
go, tails docked and dew claws removed. I
have 3 males and 7 females left, will make
great pets. Asking $300, 334-657-8670
CKC Shih-tzu puppies. Ready now. $200.
Parents on premises.Call 334-792-0202
CKC Toy poodle puppies 1-M, 1-F, 1st. shotes &
wormed, litter pan trained. 4400. cash each
334-282-2214.
English Bulldog, AKC registration, current on
vaccinations, 10 weeks old, $450,
shelt6nkayla73@yahoo.com, 850-482-4026
English Bulldog Puppy for sale champion line
and akc registered, all shots, perfect Health,
get along with kids, Fully trained, 11 weeks old,
$700, zyydot235@yahoo.com, 334-702-7210
Free to GOOD home, 8-10 wk old Black Lab/
Chow mix. FM, VERY Friendly! 334-596-3429
T Lots of Summer Puppies ON SALE! V
Morkies $150, Chorkies $75,
Papi-Yorks, Hairless Chinese Crested,
Taking deposits: Morkies, Pomeranians,
Yorkies, Malti-Poos 334-718-4886


Wednesday, June 29, 2011









THE SUDOKU GAmE UIITH ~ KICK

HOW TO PLAY
Fill in the 9x9 grid with the missing
numbers so that each column, row and
3x3 box contains the digits 1-9 only once.
There is only one correct solution
for each puzzle.
GET MORE WASABI
PUZZLES ONLINE!
ARCHIVES AND MORE GREAT GAMES AT
BOXERJAM.COM


S6) FARMER'S


MARKET


U-Pick

Tomatoes
James Bedsole

334-886-2291
No Sunday Sales!!


Fresh Shelled Peas & Butter Beans
several varieties and Okra. 2307 Mayo Road,
(between Cypress & Grand Ridge) Bobby,
Hewett (850) 592-4156
Now Open Jackson Farms U-Pick Tomatoes
& Peppers! Bring your own bucket!
7 days week. 850-592-5579

Tomotoes $10. per box
in Ashford on Co. Rd. 55
334-796-1912 Pea Sheller


Futon Couch, wood arms, tan color, good con-
dition, $50. 850-482-4545
Wicker Rocker, Old, Tall Back, $40
850-526-3426
13" Color TV $10 850-605-6192
32" Color TV, Sharp, great condition, $30 850-
693-6645
Afghan, Grand Piano picture on it, extra large
$40 850-482-5215
Antique Trunk $60 850-482-5215
Carpet Cleaner by Bristol, with attachments,
built in heat, brand new $75 850-605-6192
Ceiling Fan, Black, no light, new in box, $50
850-526-4237
China cabinet from 40's $75. old Buffet $200.
kids VCR tapes $1.-$2. 850-209-4683
Club Accent Chair $200 850-526-4237
Coffee Table, Early American Maple Wood,
$100 850-482-5215
Cowboy Boots, Black, sz 2, for little boy $20
850-605-6192
Dry Wall Stilts- Marshal Town, like new condi-
tion $75. Call 850-482-8700
Entertainment Center with swivel top, $20 850-
693-6645
Fan Filter Pool Pump $400 OBO 850-849-6481
Free: Playful, cuddly, hand raised short & long
hair kittens need loving families! 334-393-9681
Jackson Base Guitar with RMS Base Amp.
$200.00 or best offer
Perform Wide Treadmill w/ Incline
6 programs. Pulse rate and calorie counter.
$200.00 or best offer
Call 334-796-5844


Lmu


l I *






,.-.,. --. "






Fresh Peas, Tomatoes,
Squash, Cucumbers,
Snap Beans, New Potatoes,
Plenty of Canning Tomatoes
for $10/Box!
220 W. Hwy 52 Malvern
* 334-793-6690 *


U PICK Peas: White peas, black eye peas, pur-
ple hull peas, and okra. Located at 721 Whitak-
er Rd., Ashford, AL. Call (334)791-4992,
(334)714-0318, or (334)791-6608 for more info.
DO 12617


Mink Coat, knee length, black & white, sz ig/xlg
$50 850-605-6192'
NASCAR Memorablilia, Dale Earnhardt Jr & Sr.
$5 -$20 850-849-6481
Porcelain Dolls, Little Women "Margaret" $40
850-482-5215
r-------------- -
Porch/Lawn Swing With Chains,
L Will Deliver. $85 334-794-5780
Radiator, new in box, fits '94 GMC or Chevy, 4.3
Itr $75 OBO 850-849-6481
Rocker, wood with green cushion $15
850-605-6192
Sofa, green/gold/cream pinstripe, very clean,
$80 OBO 850-482-2886/209-1344
Toddler Bed, white metal, nice condition, $25
850-526-3426
Trampoline with safety net, full size $75 OBO
850-482-3247
Typewriter Desk, Early American Maple Wood
$ 95 850-482-5215
Used designer handbags, Agnair, $5/ea or one
price for all. 850-209-6977
Wall Clock, very large 36" round, $30
850-526-3426
Wheel Chair Loader for full size van, $500 OBO
850-209-0830
White bassinet lacey basinet liner, floor length,
$20 850-482-5215
White Wicker Chest $60 850-482-5215
Wicker Dog Bed, looks like end table 18"x24"
$30 850-526-3426
Wlrd O L.R. Uf) orn-r7 A'B7


iV e oUUUc II UU Ae $40 80U 5 23 7
~1 11&


@2308 BLO KDOT INC M


Tuesday's
WASABI SOLUTION


BE SURE TO VISIT OUR
NEWEST GAME SITE


KEWLBOX.COM


a ce an A Fast, easy, no pressure
P lace an A d 24 hours a day, 7 days a week!
Get live previews of your classified ads, receive price quotes
and make secure online payments.

www.jcfloridan.com


S --- -

_ O
I I I I I
.@@1



@


\ \ \\ pr

_ ~ Yq~ _I. -


A i rviif ee


PLACEE ABE





I


I


I1 -










6 B Wednesday June 29 2 n


CLASSIFIED


www.JCFLORIDAN.com


"H EDUCATION
r --------------------------------- & INSTRUCTIONN
SSHL & INSTRUCTION
SSHIVERS
r Get a Quality Education for a
S 84 E~H New Career! Programs
Un Hwy 84" E. FORTIS offered in Healthcare,
HVAC and Electrical Trades.
I Nea5 1ri i Call Fortis College Today!
NeIr Gordon 888-202-4813.
SCOG www.fotiscollege.edu.
SHELLED D126
BUTTERBEANS REL ESTATE FOR RENT
small, young green
& tender, and peas: Edgewood Apartments in Cypress Area. Quiet,
Tender, ad pe Furnished 11BR BA.Cable & laundry included.
Open 8am 5pm $440/mo +deposit. 850-573-6062
Oe 334-522-3756
S334-522-3756 2BR/2BA TOWNHOUSES
Frsh Pe s DEPOSITWAIVED
,FreshPeas 4 850-482-1050/693-6879 4
Home Grown
L-...------.------------.------- J
1DR 1BA House
U-Pick Slocomb Tomatoes conveniently located in
Marianna, FL For details call
UVHendrix Farm -850-557-3432 or 850-814-6515 4m
Hendrix Farm cB 1 BAHouse
dPrf C conveniently located in
Produce Marianna, FL For details call
Slocomb Hwyo 52 850-557-3432 or 850-814-6515 4
So 3/1 House Dn 1 acre lot, $650/mo 2855 Owens
4 334-726-7646 1 St. Mar. 850-415-6995/638-1761
S 334-72 -7 NEW 3/2 house 4 rent. Compass Lk area on 1.5
ac corner lot. $750 mo +de 850-573-0625
White's Produce
U-Pick Tomatoes &
Watermelon
Co. Rd. 28 off Co. Rd. 49 Production Operators
Next to Buffalo Farm Michelin North America, Inc. has
Next to Buffalo Farm opportunities available for
= 334-726-5291 4w Production Operators in our
Dothan, Alabama facility.


(l)} EMPLOYMENT


EARN EXTRA
DOLLARS
Looking for mature, dependable,
newspaper carriers
SMALL ROUTE
Less than 3 hours per night
Earn an average of
$500 per month
after the cost of gas
Must have'dependable
transportation, liability insurance
and a valid driver's license.
if interested, fill out a Route Bid at the
Jackson County Floridan
4403 Constitution Lane, Marianna FL



Job opportunities in a manufacturing setting:
Requirements are 3 years work experience
and 1 year in a warehouse No felonies and no
theft or violence Must be able to pass a drug
screen, background check and fit test
Qualified applicants need to call
Personnel Resources at 334 794 8722



RN
RN needed for multiple outpatient wound
care clinics. Wound Care exp. a plus.
No nights/weekends. Competitive
salary and benefits.
MA/CNA
Wound Care Tech needed.for multiple
outpatient wound care clinics. No
nights/weekends. Some travel involved.
Competitive salary and benefits.
Please fax resume to (888) 835-6946 or
e-mail to jobs@woundcarespecialists.com


SSuccessful cc
to work in an
driven enviro
involve rotatl
per week op
Interested cc
in person at 1
Dothan A
787 Rc
D
Applications \
between the
NO PHONE C
Previous applic
Quality Peo









^^^^w~~rA A &


I~1
I


$500.00 BONUS *SUPERCUTS O
HIRING FUL, TIME UP TO 50% COMM.
GOOD WORK ENVIRONMENT
CALL LAURIE (850) 348-1285

City of Marianna has a Police Officer
position available. Call 718-1001 for details.
EOE/Drug Free Workplace Employer

The lassl5leis Work Uli
GOD OR EVIONEN


andldates must be able
I empowered, quality-
inment. These positions
Ing shift work in a 7-day
eration.
andldates must apply
the
rea Career Center
oss Clark Circle
Dothan, AL
will be taken July 11 July 15, 2011
hours of 8:00 am and 4:00 pm.
ALLS, PLEASE
:ants are encouraged to re-apply.
)pie Making Quality Products


3 BR 2.5 BA, Ig den, living rm, dining rm, sun
porch, brkfst rm & washrm. 4612 Oakdale Dr.
$1000/mo + $1000 dep. for appt. call 800-239-
1267/334-797-8948 avail. 7/1/11


3BR 2BA house on 10 acres Compass Lake
area, Energy efficient, CH/A, Outdoor pets ok,
$850 + dep. 850-573-0466


I


E i. I*


will attend public high school in
Marianna FL, Jackson School District.
Students will come on the Fl Student Visa.
They speak English, are insured and bring
their own spending money. Host families
provide room and board and receive a
.........------- I.- t-- ---- J*


ALL EMPLOYEES ON OUR TEAM
* receive competitive pay
* receive an excellent and extensive benefits package
* are offered free tires and rebates (subject to limitations)
* earn while learning new skills
* are considered for advancement and leadership
* can join the credit union
* receive life services, such as legal counseling
* can participate in-the employee activity association
* are offered a gym membership
* can receive tuition reimbursement
* are empowered and respected
* work in a friendly and professional
environment


tw'.-4-,


Michelin is an Equal Opportunity Employer


Hall Roofing iiI5 2t: i Bastway Portable Buildings
Siding & Building LLC. THS MONTH'S SPECIAL u
Lic. #RC29027412 RB29003513 10 16 2299tLarget Manufacturer of Potable
SIDNEY HALL 4939 Hwy. 2 .- 100U. -N.A.UILLBLE Buildings in North Florida
(850) 569-2021 Malone, fV 32 Years in Business
(850) 526-8441 Florida 32445 ? WE iMOVPOVRIA Bs ----._ We have over 80
different sizes.
l*AWNS___ _l__,_ _, R a You can choose
CA AO S D color and style.
CL D L C E Specializing In Residential & Commercial Business ,i -__ Built on site
"WE TREAT YOUR PROPERTY As IF IT WERE OUR OWN" 3 Ma0-42-
Quality Services JRPlayer 3614 Hwy 90 W. Marianna 850-482-8682
O Grader Pan Excavator Done a Affordable Prices! o0,er,,wN-
SGrader Paln Excavator \ F
o Dump Truck Bulldozer


*Top Soil Fill Dirt Gravel Land Clearing HOME REPAIR
"Beautification of Your Home" WE'LL BEAT ANY PRICE
Carpentry/Painting Installations Big Or Small Jobs WELCOME
Furniture Repair & Refinishing
General Repairs Insured


w w w ipc
ALTHA, FL Pl N G a Stonel Ceramic Porcelain





botol anltenanc rpair f rlogm t op n ta oI I BUY OLD GUNS! Will do light houseeeping & cooking.
o50-76s-94 CallDebr Custom Showers Hardwood Laminate & More
Cll 850-82-5055Free Estimates References Available No Job too Large or Srall! Licensed & Insured
850-526 2336 (850) 693-1423 or (850) 209-8099



4Poot Maintenance & Repair from top to I will sit with elderly. CNA Certified.
l Anteo nanrerga tepcurb nsn toi oi I BUY OLD GUNSI Will do light housekeeping & cooking.
bottom A(lso) -berglass tub installation al Jeter
(850) 5 88 (850) 263-2701 (850) 0-72 (800)693-617


Find jobs


fast and


easy!


JACKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN
jcfloridan.com


monster"
FIND LOCAL JOBS AT: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM/JOBS


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DECLASSIFIED


Jackson County Floridan *


Wednesday, June 29, 2011-7 B


(YK- ,- RESlDENTIAI
GIJ'i REAL ESTATE FOR RENT


Austin Tyler & Associates *
Quality Homes & Apartments
850- 526-3355 4=
"Property Management Is Our ONLY Business"
Lovely 3BR 1BA House, Clean, in town, near
schools, nice yard, quiet neighborhood, out-
door pets ok, $600/mo with $600 deposit 850-
482-6211



257 Gus Loe Rd in Ashford 2/2 Mobile
Home $475 Mo + Dep 606 Vidory Rd
Bascom F. 3/1 $ 675. mo + Dep
Call 334-797-1517
2006 MH $200/mo
1/1 Furnished to Qualified
Caretaker/Handyman to maintain 5 acre
Marianna Property until sold. 6 mos
renewable lease guaranteed. 850-592-2507
2/1 $425 & 2/1.5 $450 in Greenwood CH/A,
water/garbage/lawn included. 850-569-1015
2/1.5 $450/mo, 2/1 $425/mo Quiet, well
maintained, water/sewer/ garbage/ lawn
included. Also 2/1 Duplex available $575
4 Joyce Riley RE 850-209-7825 w


2 & 3 bedroom mobile Homes in Cottondale.
$500 and up. H20, garbage, sewer included.
http:// www.charloscountry living. com.
850-258-4868/209-8847


2&3BRMH's in
Marianna & Sneads (850)209-8595.
3/2 Double wide on Lake Seminole in Sneads,
$600/mo, water included. 850-526-2183
3/2 DW in Marianna $650 + dep Quiet, clean.
H20/ septic/lawn 850-209-1027
Houses and trailers for rent starting at $300 per
month. (850) 593-4700
Rent to Own: 2 & 3BR Mobile Homes.
Lot rent included. For details
850-557-3432 or 850-814-6515
Small Quiet Family Oriented Park- 2BR MH for Rent
includes water, garbage, lawn care, No Pets 850-592-
8129
C I' RESIDENTIAL
(LJ REAL _R$TATE' SA"


104 Sundance Lane, Midland City 1500 sq ft,
$145,000, 3br/2ba, Will pay up to $2,000 in clos-
ing costs, 20 minutes from Fort Rucker, 5 mi-
nutes from Dothan Pavilion, 7 minutes from
Troy University, contact (334)618-2075


Doublewide: 3 bedrooms, 2 bath mobile home
for sale. Includes all appliances (some new),
including washer/dryer, and some furniture.
1960 sq ft. Must be moved. $27,500
Call (850)557-3402 or (850)579-1251





Four-Wheeler: 2007 Arctic Cat DVX 250 racing
Four-wheeler. Liquid cooled 249cc engine, front
and rear hydrolic disc brakes, and like new
tires. I serviced it recently and it runs and looks
great. Excellent condition for a 2007 model.
Asking $2,500. (334) 797-5611.
Polaris '05 Ranger XP-700 ,4X4, Garage Kept,
Low Hours, Like New, Hard Top, Windshield,
Backseat, $6200 Call Mark 334-714-6999
Rugged 2004 Polaris ATP 330 4-stroke, air-
cooled engine with fan-assist oil cooler On de-
mand 'Turf-mode', 2WD or All Wheel Drive Turf
mode provides 20% tighter turns, less damage
to terrain Heavy duty dumping rear cargo box
with 2501b capacity Sealed front storage box
Recent Polaris Dealer complete tune up includ-
ing new battery. $1995.00 Must sell, price is
negotiable Call 334-347-9686. DO 12537
Yamaha '07 Raptor 80 on-
ly 50 hours on it. New bat-
tery, helmet, has extend-
ed warranty. $1295. OBO,
SERIOUS INQUIRIES ONLY.
334-774-7783 DO 12303
Yamaha '99 XVS1100 42K miles. REDUCED
$2,800. OBO 334-726-1215 or 334-477-3152
Yamaha Rhino 660 4x4 side by side, clean,
rebuilt engine, new roof, runs great.
$6000. OBO 4 334-790-7080


Boat/RV Storage 984 Bruner Rd. (S. Park in
Taylor), 12w x 32d x'lOh, Free water, power &
air, $75/month. Mgmt. lives on site, Upholstry
services available on site, 334-797-0523, 334-
792-8628, ddismukes@comcast.net


i WANTED WRECKED OR JUNK VEHICLES
i PAY TOP DOLLAR Do W
m DAY -334-794-9576 a NIGHT 334-794-7769


'92 Bumble Bee Bass boat 115hp, Yamaha mo-
tor, complete, good condition, $4000. OBO 334-
355-0809.
Bayllner '06 boat & trailer, like new, garage
kept, fully equipped, ready to go, Bimbi top,
135hp Merc. inboard. $8,500. 334-699-3044.
Bayliner '97 Sk Boat w/5.7 Mere. I/O, w/ S.
Prop (licenced for 8 person) has bow seating &
includes trailer w/like new tires. $6500. OBO
4 334-797-8172 4 DO 12707
Bayliner Trophy,
22.5', 2000 model, well
kept and clean.
Many extras. $19,950.
334-794-0609 DO 12632


G3 175 Eagle Bass Boat '07, 70 horsepower
Yahama OB, trolling motor, galv. trailer, less
than 20 hrs use, 9,800 FIRM 850-762-2065/372-
2503 DO 11230

Hydro Stream Bass Boat with 150 HP
Johnson Outboard, new trolling motor
new carpet & 2 props
$ 4500. 4 888-398-0137 4 DO 11868
Seacraft,'89, 20 ft- Center
Sconsole,'95 225HP Johnson,
dual axle trailer w/brakes.
-fl Great condition, very clean.
f $5,250 334-696-5505
Sun Catcher '08 Pontoon G3 Fish- 50HP Yamaha
motor. shower shall, AM/FM radio & CD, lights,
cruise control trolling motor, fish finder, 2 liver
wells, 40hrs, custom cover, $16,000. Call 334-
685-1929 or 334-598-2910 DO12662
WELLCRAFT '96 EXCEL 26'-Extra clean cruiser
w/trailer, gen w/ac, 5.7 mercruiser, w/single
prop, sleeps 6, galley, aft cabin, head, m/wave,
fridge, 2 radios, 2 depth finders, chart plotter,
GPS, always under cover. Located in Eufaula,
AL. $22,500 OBO Call 256-492-2488 or
jcpamitchell @hotmall.com


EXPRESS BASS BOAT-H-56
-'; '18' 115 HP Yamaha 4-
stroke engine, motor
-' >-wii guide trolling motor,
galvanized trailer, GPS & 3
fish finders, 2 stainless steel props, live well,
cooler & extra storage. Boat cover, life vests.
Rig has less than 20 hrs and has always been
stored under cover. In perfect condition,
$13,500 334-687-8937 DO 12238


23'8" Jayco 5th Wheel Camper sleeps 6, 1
slide out, hitch, excellent condition, $7500 850-
482-5090 DO 12598


COUGAR TRAVEL TRAILER
2004-30 foot,
S big rear window,
Sliving/dining slide, excel-
lent condition, new tires,
must see to appreciate,
$16,500 OBO, 334-687-6863,334-695-2161


Dutchmen 40 ft. Travel Trailer
i '06. 38B-DSL, Sleeps 8, Has 2
i L- slideouts. Loaded, Like New.
S17,995. Call 334-406-4555

FLEETWOOD 2005 Prowler AX6, 5th wheel, 36
ft, 4 slides, large shower, 30/50AMP. $25,000
OBO Call 334-695-4995,334-687-7862.
REDUCED!! Montana'05 5th Wheel,
4 slides, king bed, excellent condition,
$25,500 OBO Call 850-547-2808


Trail Lite 2006 R-VISION
26 ft., fully loaded, bought
new, 13K miles $49,995
334-616-6508


Western '03 Alpenlite 27' Travel Trailer $8000
OBO 334-446-0621 DO 12628



Dixie RV SuperStores
FL's Newest RV Dealer
NOW OPEN!!!
*Store Hours*
Monday-Saturday
8:00am-6:00pm

21 Acres / 30 Brands New and Pre-Owned

Newmar Keystone Heartland u Jayco
w Fleetwood a Prime Time Coachmen
Forest River

Service Department
Parts and Acces. Store
RV Collision Center

Located off 1-10 Exit 70 / SR285
328 Green Acres Dr.
De Funiak Springs, FL 32435
Sales and Service: 850-951-1000
www.dixierv.com DO 12569


Private RV Site in Cottondale, includes elec-
tric, water, sewage, $375/mo. + $250 dep. 850-
209-7502

) TRANSPORTATN



SChevrolet '81 Corvette
Automatic 350 (Silver). Will
sell as is for $4,700. OBO
334-774-1915



'02 Camero convertible 35th addition
automatic V-6 new tires, stereo & new top.
129K miles $5600; 4 334-596-9966 4
2001 Dodge Durango all leather, 3rd row flip
and fold, runs great, Black with silver trim,
roughly 170,000 miles, fully loaded. Moving do
not need and can not take, $4500. OBO, clear ti-
tle!!! 334-733-0307
2003 Ford F150 Supercrew
2WD Four Door 139"
Flareside Truck, Dark Gray
Clearcoat, Low Miles -
Approx 59,000, 4.6L EFI V8;
Auto, Air, 4 Wheel ABS; Pwr Windows, Locks,
Mirrors; Cruise/Tilt, Premium Sound, Class III
Tow Package, Limited Slip Differential. Single
Owner. $12,900 or best reasonable offer. 334-
703-7685
2004 Red Mitsubishi'Outlander with 78,000
miles. Vehicle is in very good condition and has
a new battery. $8.000. 205-602-8807
Buick '98 LeSabre
Custom. loaded, clean,
90,000 miles, 30 MPG HY.
$4495. Call: 334-790-7959.
DO 12746
Chevrolet '09 Impala silver, all star, fully load-
ed, only one owner, like new, only 12,300 miles,
$15,400 firm Call 334-479-8678
S ---i- CHEVY '88 CORVETTE, 350
engine, auto trans., color
blue. runs great, $3,500 firm
334-689-827 2 DO 12653
Chrysler '06 Crossfire- 20, 480 miles, MFG by
Mercedes Benz, black on black convertible
with dark gray interior, cloth seats, alum
wheels, AC, 6 speed, manual, 25MPG, like new
tires, Retiring, $16,000. Call 334-393-4444
DO12661
DO YOU KNOW ANYONE WITH BAD CREDIT?
I can get U Riding Today
Repos, Slow Credit, Past Bankruptcy OK!
$0 Down/ 1st Payment, Tax, Tag & Title
Push, Pull or Drag, Will Trade anything !
Warranty On Every Vehicle Soldl
$100 Referrals! DO 12252-Steve 800-809-4716

Honda'94 Accord
Tan Priced at $3,900.
2180 Montgomery Hwy.
Call 334-714-2700 or
334-671-7720. DO 11820
Honda '97 Accord SE, door, LOADED, Sunroof,
146K miles. Nice! $4500 334-790-9983
Mercedes '86 420SEL 4-door excellent
condition, light yellow in color.
205-493-0519 or 334-792-9429.
Mercedes '95 C220, Very good condition.,
White, 196k mi. Asking $3200 334-899-4248
After 5:30 pm DO 12566
Pontiac'01 Firebird AM/FM CD player. Cold
air 130,000 miles Well keptand very clean
car Asking $4,500 cash firm. Serious inquires
only Call anytime 334-790-4892
Toyota '03 Camry, good condition, tan with
gray interior, approx. 155k miles, vehicle locat-
ed in Grand Ridge, FL $5500 850-209-4949
DO 12528
Toyota '08 Yarus- 23k miles, excellent condi-
tion, blue, 36 MPG in town, 5 speed $10,950.
Call 334-479-0099


- -1


www.JCF LOR(IDANSlucom --- -


Toyota '07 Camry SE, 48K
miles, Black, alloy wheels,
Excellent Condition, CD,
MP3 Player, Gray Interior,
Sm:l 30 MPG $16,500 334-797-
3195

USED CARS FOR SALE
Ford '01 Escort ZxZ -
94k miles, 5 speed manual $2,900.

ingnitioo problems $500.
Pontaic '93 Grand AM
124k miles, 4cyl. Auto $1,995.
Ford '02 Taurus Wagon
80k miles $2,995.
Ford '94 F150 XLT
4x4 Ext Cab, Transmission slipping $1,500.
Call 334-693-5159 or 334-618-5828


2004 HARLEY-DAVIDSON ULTRA CLASSIC
FLHTCUI, black, 9,885 miles, $5,900. Serious
buyers only! EGAN99@LIVE.COM, 206-203-2893
2006 Honda CBR 1000 RR. Custom paint job.
Brand new tires. Has approximately 9k miles.
Comes with 2 helmets. Call Josh @334-464-
0031, $5,899
Harley Davidson '02 Sportster 1200 custom 1lk
miles, chromed out, $6500. Call 334-691-3468
or 334-701-3855
Honda '06 CRF 100 Dirt Bike, used very little,
stored in garage, $1400. OBO 334-726-1206.
HONDA'07 CBR,
600, loaded, 4,000
mil'es,stretch lowered,
2 brother exhaust, $6,000
334-689-3518,334-339-2352
DO 11146
Honda '07 VTX1300S Beautiful like new
w/3011 miles. Over $3000. extras: Vance &
Hines staggered pipes, Mustang seat, Custom
windshield, Adjustable chrome backrest,
Chrome rear Carrier traditional, Leather sad-
dlebags, Hypercharger, Kuryakyn passenger
foot pedals, Highway bars, 4" Riser handle-
bars). Great touring bike. $9600/080 $9000.
334-790-0334 or 334-585-2468 DO 12533
Honda '09 CRF 100 Dirt Bike, Used very little,
never been in the mud. $1800 OBO 334-655-
1092 DO 12611
Kawasaki'96 800 Limited addition, lowered 5
inches, custom pipes, custom red python and
tribal paint, road gears, new tires, L-E-D lights
15K mi. Must hear and hear to appreciate.
$3500. 334-405-0928
Yamaha '09 V Star 1300
Tourer- like new, 543 miles,
10 months warranty, red,
saddle bags, passenger
back rest, windshield
$8000. OBO Call 334-393-3824 DO12602


q Honda 1962 C102 super
_- cub 50. 4k miles, Black &
white, good condition,
electric start 3 speed,
$2,500. Firm. Call noon (M-
F) 334-347-9002


Ford '05 Explorer LXT 133k miles, 3rd row
seating, towing package, very clean. $8400.
Call 334-393-9315 or 334-763-0117
Honda'05 CRV Special Edition- 63k miles, 4WD,
fully loaded, sunroof, gold with tan interior,
great condition, very clean, one owner. $15,500.
Call 334-793-6790 or 718-7181 D012652
Honda'96 Passport,
5-speed, Power Steering,
A/C, very clean.,low Miles
$2500 OBO 334-691-7111
or 798-1768 DO 11893

Hummer '05 H2 4WD SUV.
Fully loaded with naviga-
tion, 3 row seat, all leath-
er, new rugged tires,
Sun/moon roof. Very
clean. Mileage 103,100. Color Desert Sand.
$20,000. Call 334- 671-4756. DO 12643
Lincoln Navigator '06 79K miles Quade seating ,
rear AC, back up sensor, 2 yr. warr. Payoff
$23,400 trad for small car or truck 334-596-9966
or 334-790-6410. DO 12538
Toyota'04 4-Runner SR5 Silver, Leather, Spoil-
er, 98k Mi. $12,900 334-791-9595 DO 12573


4120 John Deere Compact 4x4 Tractor- box
blade, bush hog and 20ft 6 ton trailer $21,500.
Call 334-803-7422
Chevrolet '00 LS Silverado ext. cab 4-door, Z71
4x4, Red, 138K miles, all power, 5000 miles on
tires, tow package, Must see to appreciate.
$9500. 334-791-2781 or 334-677-3050 DO 12067
SChevrolet '02 S-10
regular cab, automatic,
4 cylinder, economical,
21,000 miles, 1 owner,
new tires, $6795. Call:
334-790-7959. DO 12747
Chevrolet'02 Z71
$6999.00.
2180 Montgomery Hwy -
Call: 334-671-7720.
Guaranteed Financing!!
DO 12190

Chevy 1500 '07, white, ext. cab with 4 doors.
4x4 with extra leaf springs. Extra bedliner,
A/C, AM/FM/CD; Electric windows, running
hnarl naw tir.e C.lR 1oa ~laQ.c.ar .nIuc


Ford'08 F150 XLT 5.4 V, 4 wheel drive, red in
color $20,500. 334-671-9770.
Ford '08 F-350, Dually,
crew cab, 4WD, 6.4 Liter,
v8 Diesel, Blue and Silver
with leather interior. Has
a nav. system and Serius
radio. Tow package. 51K miles. Reese 5th
Wheel hitch. Excellent Condition! $34,500
334-446-0073 or 240-925-2757 DO 12676

FORD '89 F150, 4wh, 4x4
Auto, $4,600 or reasonable
offer. Call 229-296-8171.
DO 11892
BFord '98 Ranger
regular cab, automatic,
V-6, 1 owner, 24,000 miles,
LIKE NEW! $6795. Call:
334-790-7959. DO 12748
-- : KUHN KNIGHT Verti- Maxx
S"Mixer Model 5032 Twin
SAugers, knives have lust
been replaced. $15,500.
Call 334-894-2315 or
334-464-3189
Massey Ferguson '95, 240 Farming Tractor ,
2WD, power steering, diesel,.519 hours, Good
Condition, $6950 334-596-9460 or 334-693-3725
Leave Message
Toyota '03 Tacoma- V6, manual 4WD, silver
with topper, excellent condition, 85k miles
$13,000. Call 334-889-2259 D012709
Toyota '07 Tacoma- Pre- runner SR5, fully load-
ed with leather interior. 45k miles, 6 cyl auto,
double cab, 2WD, dark blue, topper, 1 owner,
garage kept $21,900 OBO Call 850-482-8700
TRACTOR '08-Massey Ferguson, 33HP, 200
Hours, like new, one owner, LOADED!!
$25,000 OBO 334-687-3173,334-695-1802
TRACTOR IH1440 Combine,
S' Field Ready, Grain Head and Corn
Head. $8,500. 850-415-0438
WANTED NISSAN FRONTIER 5 SPEED
TRANSMISSION, 1998-2002, 2WD, 4CYL
Call 334-598-2356 D012518


2003 Pontiac Montana Van -$6,000. White with
Gray Interior. Looks Great and Runs Great!
48,700 Miles. Perfect for Family or Business!
Extended version with 4 captains chairs and 1
bench-- seats 7 with room to carry in back. 334-
796-6729 or 334-701-8862
Ford '96 E-150 Conversion Van, Like new condi-
tion, Garage kept, 101K original miles, Runs
great, Handicap equipped, but can be convert--
ed back. Fully electric. $8900 OBO 334-673-9881
or 334-333-0115 DO 12519
Honda '96 Odyssey, Clean,
Runs Good, Front & Rear
air, VERY COLD! Automat-
ic, Power Steering, $2500
OBO 334-691-7111 or 798-
1768 DO 11893
Pontiac '99 Montana V-6, One owner. 145K
miles, blown head, $2600. OBO CASH Serious
inquiries only call 334-693-3141
9AM 8PM ONLY. DO 12014
WniYTD IAUTOS

Got a Clunker
We'll be your Junker!
We buy wrecked cars
and Farm Equip. at a
fair and honest price!
Average $ paid $225.
S CALL 334-702-4323 D011208

WANTED JUNK

S- VEHICLES TOP PRICE!

I also sell used parts
24 HOUR TOWING 334-792-8664 ,


WE PAY CaSH

FOR JUNK CARS!!!!!!

334-818-1274 D012226






LF15364
Notice under Fictitious Name Law
Pursuant to Section 865.09 Florida Statutes

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business under the ficti-
tious name of Sicx669 located at 3046 Bromas
Ln, Marianna, Florida 32446 in the County of
Jackson, in the city of MARIANNA, Florida
32446 intends to register said name with the
Division of Corporations of the Florida Depart-
ment of State, Tallahassee Florida, this 28th
day of July, 2011.
HARRELL ERVIN
P.O. BOX 507
COTTON DALE, FL 32431

CMcd a MeW Clome?

Check out the Classifieds


TrV-T-T nD-TkT ANM --


v


~DI








18B WEDNESDAY. JUNE 29, 2011


INTERNATIONAL


Violence in Afghanistan


Suicide bomber hits Kabul hotel


The Associated Press

KABUL, Afghanistan At least
one suicide bomber blew himself
up inside a Western-style hotel in
Kabul late Tuesday night and Af-
ghan police who rushed to the
scene fought other assailants with
machine guns and rocket-propelled
grenades.
Tracer rounds went up over the
blacked out Inter-Continental ho-
tel, which is frequented by Afghan
political leaders and foreign visitors.
Associated Press reporters at the
scene heard bursts of gunfire and
saw shooting from the roof of the
five-story building. Police ordered
bystanders to lay on the ground for
safety.
There was no immediate word
from Afghan officials on casualties
in the rare, nighttime attack in the
Afghan capital. Taliban spokesman
Zabiullah Mujahid claimed respon-
sibility in a telephone call to the AP
Mujahid later issued a statement
claiming that Taliban attackers
killed guards at a gate and entered
the hotel.
"One of our fighters called on a
mobile phone and said: 'We have
gotten onto all the hotel floors and
the attack is going according to the
plan. We have killed and wounded
50 foreign and local enemies. We
are in the corridors of the hotel now
taking guests out of their rooms -
mostly foreigners. We broke down
the doors and took them out one by
one.'"
The Taliban often exaggerate
casualties from their attacks. The
statement did not disclose the
number of attackers, but only said
one suicide bomber had died.
A few hours into the clashes, an
Afghan National Army commando
unit arrived at the scene.
The U.S.-led military coalition
said the Afghan Ministry of Interior
had not requested any assistance
from foreign forces.
A guest who was inside said he
heard gunfire echoing throughout
the heavily guarded building. The
hotel sits on a hill overlooking the
city and streets leading up to it were
blocked. The scene was dark as
electricity at the hotel and the sur-
rounding area was out.
Azizullah, an Afghan police offi-


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
This video image shows an Afghan security officer directing vehicles near the
Inter-Continentalhotel in Kabul Tuesday following a blast at the hotel. At least one
suicide bomber blew himself up late Tuesday night inside a Western-style hotel in
Kabul, police said.


cer who uses only one name, told
an Associated Press reporter at the
scene that at least one bomber en-
tered the hotel and detonated a vest
of explosives. Another police officer,
who would not disclose his name,
said there were at least two suicide
bombers.
Jawid, a guest at the hotel, said he
jumped out a one-story window to
flee the shooting.
"I was running with my family,"
he said. "There was shooting. The
restaurant was full with guests."
Earlier on Tuesday, officials from
the U.S., Pakistan and Afghanistan
met in the capital to discuss pros-
pects for making peace with Tal-
iban insurgents to end the nearly
decade-long war.
"The fact that we are discussing
reconciliation in great detail is suc-
cess and progress, but challenges
remain and we are reminded of
that on an almost daily basis by vio-
lence," Jawed Ludin, Afghanistan's
deputy foreign minister, said at a
news conference.
"The important thing is that we
act and that we act urgently and try
to do what we can to put an end to
violence."


The attack occurred nearly a
week after President Barack Obama
announced he was withdrawing
33,000 U.S. troops from Afghani-
stan and would end the American
combat role by the end of 2014.
It took place the day before a con-
ference was scheduled in Kabul to
discuss plans for Afghan security
forces to take the lead for securing
an increasing number of areas of
the country between now and 2014
when international forces are ex-
pected to move out of combat roles.
Afghans across the country were in
the city to attend, although it's not
known if any where staying at the
Inter-Continental.
The Inter-Continental known
widely as the "Inter-Con," opened in
the late 1960s, and was the nation's
first international luxury hotel. It
has at least 200 rooms and was once
part of an international chain. But
when the Soviets invaded Afghani-
stan in 1979, the hotel was left to
fend for itself. It was used by West-
ern journalists during the U.S.-led
invasion of Afghanistan in 2001.
On Nov. 23, 2003, a rocket explod-
ed nearby, shattering windows but
causing no casualties.


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com

Greece Financial Crisis


A demonstrator kicks a tear gas canister against police during a
demo in Athens on Tuesday. Greece's beleaguered government
is bracing for a 48-hour general strike a$ lawmakers debate a
new round of austerity reforms.


Protesters clash


with police in strike


The Associated Press

ATHENS, Greece A
general strike disrupted
services across Greece
and riots erupted once
more outside Parliament
Tuesday as demonstrators
protested more taxes and'
spending cuts essential
for the country to receive
critical bailout funds that'
will prevent a potentially
disastrous default.
Inside Parliament, law-
makers debated new aus-
terity measures which
must be passedWednesday
and Thursday if Greece's
international creditors are
to release the next 12 bil-
lion batch of the country's
110 billion bailout and
prevent a default that
could drag down European
banks and shake the Euro-
pean and world economy.
But the measures, which
include spending cuts
and tax hikes on even
those on minimum wages,
have caused widespread
outrage.
Unions embarked on
a two-day general strike
Tuesday, halting nearly
all public transport, forc-
ing airlines to reschedule
or cancel dozens of flights
and bringing public ser-
vices to a standstill.


A peaceful protest by
about 20,000 people
quickly degenerated into
violence, with riot police
firing volleys of tear gas
id stun grenades to keep
back hooded youths pelt-
ing them with thousands
of chunks of ripped up
paving stones and marble
chipped from building fa-
cades and steps.
Police said 37 police-
men were injured during
Tuesday's riots, while 14
protesters were arrest-
ed. Emergency services
.said nine protesters were
injured.
Greece is no stranger
to violent demonstra-
tions or strikes, and they
are not expected to derail
the parliamentary votes
- but they have added
to an atmosphere of deep
dissatisfaction.
Even some deputies
within Prime Minister
George Papandreou's
governing Socialists have
voiced dissatisfaction with
the measures, with two of
them indicating they might
not vote in favor. However,
the Socialists hold a five-
seat majority in the 300-
member Parliament, and
the bills should muster
the simple majority of 151
votes to pass.


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