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Jackson County Floridan
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028304/00594
 Material Information
Title: Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title: Sunday Floridan
Portion of title: Floridan
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Jackson County Floridan
Publisher: Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Marianna Fla
Publication Date: 6/15/2011
Frequency: daily (except saturday and monday)[<1979-1995>]
weekly[ former 1934-<1955>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates: 30.776389 x -85.238056 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note: "Independent."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID: UF00028304:00594
 Related Items
Preceded by: Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by: Marianna Floridan

Full Text







I 32N


A Media General Nei~paper


TOWN GOVERNMENT



Tempers flare at




Cottondale meeting


ULDUIAM BUUIMIALI LTR/LURIUDAN
Former Cottondale town council member Bert Greer airs his views about the performance of town clerk Karen Cook, who is seated at
the council table.
Fire chief, others speak out regarding town management


BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER then, Cook and James White have butt-
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com ed heads on various issues.
The friction at the town hall has been
Accusations and angry exchanges brewing for-several months.
punctuated the Cottondale Town Around the time Cook came on board
Council meeting Monday evening as late last year, Greer had termed out of
a former council member and the vol- his seated. Greer claims Cook was rude
unteer fire chief took issue with several to him when he went to the town hall
matters relating to town government, in an attempt to collect his last few
At one point, a current council mem- months pay as a council member. She
ber told the fire chief to "shut up" as reportedly refused to pay him.
the discussion grew more heated. The Cook, however, denies being rude
council member later apologized. and said she told Greer when he could.
Fire Chief Trey Bolton and former collect his money.
town councilman Bert Greer's main Greer had other complaints about
complaints were against new town Cook, as well. He claimed she has made
clerk Karen Cook, who was hired sev- critical and accusatory statements
eral months ago. about the former clerk's work, as well
Both also objected to the firing of as about the former clerk's relationship
long-time town employee James White, with another employee.
allegedly because of White's reported Overall, Greer said he felt Cook was a
unwillingness to work with Cook. negative presence at town hall and has
Cook had replaced White's ex-wife in "an attitude that is way out of line with
the clerk's job after she resigned. Since the citizens of Cottondale."


Council members defended Cook.
They said the financial statements she
prepares are the best they've seen in
many years from any clerk. They did
not ask her to answer the accusations
made at the meeting, but she gave her
side of the story regarding the money
Cook was still, owed from serving on
the council.
Cottondale Police Chief William
Watford was also pulled into the discus-
sion regarding his own future as chief,
should he in theory not be able to get
along with Cook. Watford explained he
had gone to bat for James White,.trying
to see if the council would give him an-
other chance, and that he'd asked the
question about his own future in the
course of a conversation he had with
council member. Bruce Lambert.
Watford said he was told "we'll see"
when he made the inquiry about his
See MEETING, Page 7A


Malone Tigers cruise to
a 48-31 victory over the
Graceville Tigers. See
more on page lB.

Vol. 88 No. 113
Murder Case


Trial date


set for Ford


murder


suspect
From staff reports
A Nov. 7 trial date has been set for
murder suspect John Wayne Lincoln
II, the man accused of stabbing Vivian
Ford to death in her home near Malone
on Nov. 27 of last year.
Lincoln is scheduled for .a pre-trial
hearing on Aug. 16 at 9
a.m., and trial is set to
begin at 9 a.m. on Nov. 7.
Those dates were set dur-
ing a brief pre-trial hear-
ing Monday, in which
Lincoln appeared with
Lincoln II his attorney, Clyde Taylor
of Tallahassee.
The state has said it will seek the death
penalty if Lincoln is found guilty of first
degree murder as charged.
Lincoln was arrested and charged with
the crime a few days after the slaying.

Hospital Theft

Woman

accused of

stealing drugs

during ER visit
From staff reports
A Blountstown woman is accused of
stealing drugs from a crash cart in the
Jackson Hospital emergency room.
The Marianna Police Department
said Crystal Ann Wooten came to the
ER complaining of an injury early last
Thursday morning, around 1:30 a.m.,
and was seen rummaging through cabi-
net drawers in the examination room.
After she left the hospital, staff discov-
ered that the crash cart used to move
equipment and medications had
been broken into, and that medications
had been taken.
Wooten is charged with grand theft
due to the amount and value, of the
medications taken, police said.
Marianna police learned during the
investigation that Calhoun County had
taken Wooten into custody that Friday
on an unrelated drug charge. Warrants
are being obtained for her arrest so that
'she can be extradited here to face the
local charges, the police department
stated.


Vandals try to burn bridge
*/b rn b Cd -geal.."^i ~~:*'^^'


Two other fires

set accidentally
BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridah.com

Three very different fires kept fire
crews and county employees busy
over the past two days.
Arson is suspected in a bridge fire
which will cost the county about
$5,000 to repair. A wooden bridge
on Hasty Pond Road was discov-
ered partially burned on one side
Tuesday morning. It may have been
set afire sometime Monday night.
Jackson County Road and Bridge Su-
perintendent Al Green said several
beer containers were found near the
charred bridge, and he speculates it
may have been a costly prank fueled


by alcohol consumption.
The road department blocked the
area with cones and tape until the
repairs can be made. Anyone with
information about that fire is asked
to call the Jackson County Sheriff's
Office.
On Monday around 5:30 p.m.,
crews were called out to a shed fire
on Wintergreen Road in Bascom.
According to Jackson County Fire
Marshal Chuck Sawyer, that fire was
accidentally set by a young boy who
was playing with a lighter. He caught
a cardboard box on fire which was
sitting on top of a pool table in the
shed.
The youngster, who Sawyer esti-
mated was six or seven years old,
ran from the shed into his grand-
parents house after the fire started.
His grandmother subsequently saw
the smoke and called forthe fire de-
partment, but they were unable to


save the structure. Sawyer said the
incident can serve as a reminder to
adults.
"Store matches and lighters out of
the reach of children," Sawyer said.
"Never use fire as a source of amuse-
ment for children; it may entice
them. He had probably made fires
before, and this one got out of hand.
The best prevention is to never leave
these kinds of things in areas where
kids may go without supervision."
On Tuesday afternoon, Grand
Ridge volunteer firefighters were
able to extinguish a small fire before
it got out of control on Shady Grove
Road, at the intersection of Edenfield
Drive. Sawyer said this fire started
when the top of a tractor trailer rig
encountered a power line. The ten-
sion on the wire caused the power
pole to break; the line dropped to the
See FIRES, Page 7A


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
A section of this single-lane wooden bridge on Hasty Pond
Road was damaged by a fire Monday night.


> CLASSIFIEDS...5-7B


> ENTERTAINMENT...4B


) LOCAL...3A


> OBITUARIES...7A


> OPINION...4A


> SPORTS...1-3B


> TV LISTINGS...3B


This Newspaper
Is Printed On
Recycled Newsprint



7 65 1 61 80050 9


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BILLY BAXLEY SEAB SUMMERS
Chevrolet-Buick-Cadillac-Nissan ""

4204 Lafayette St. Marianna, FL. a
" (850) 482 "317 L
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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


-12A WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15,2011


Weather Outlook


High: 101
Low: 73


i~ ^ .qL -*'. .^ '
\High: 1l .*High:
"'"5" "- i .ow:
:.,. ,.--.g0. -_- f-.: *? . :- -lo '

-%,


.-Low: 79


I,,
hi


High 101
Low 730


Tomorrow
Hot.



High 980
Low 740

Saturday
Isolated Storms.


', \-_ High 990
i Low 740

Friday
Hot.



S : High 980
W-y Low -740

Sunday
Isolated Storms.


24 hours
Month to date
Normal MTD

TIDES
Panama City
Apalachicola
Port St. Joe
Destin
Pensacola


0.00"
0.57"
2.51"


Year to daje
Normal YTD
Normal for year


ULTRA VIOLET INDEX


Low- -
Low -
Low -
Low -
Low -


RIVER READINGS
Woodruff
Blountstown
Marianna
Caryville


8:52 PM
9:39 AM
8:18 PM
9:39 PM
10:03 PM


Reading
38.66 ft.
.,07 ft.
4.52 ft.
.25 ft.


High 9:40 AM
High 6:47 AM
High 9:31 AM
High 10:04 AM
High 10:37 AM


Flood Stage
66.0 ft.
15.0 ft.
19.0 ft.
12.0 ft.


0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8-10 Very High, 11+ Extreme
0 1 2 3 4.: 0


THE SUN AND MOON


Sunrise
Sunset
Moonrise
Moonset


5:38,AM
7:45 PM
7:52 PM,
6:19 AM (Wed)


June June July July
15. 23 1 8


JACKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN.
Publisher Valeria Roberts
vroberts@jcfloridan.com

Managing Editor Michael Becker
mbecker@jcfloridan.com

Circulation Manager Dena Oberski
doberski@jcfloridan.com


-I



CONTACT US
Telephone: (850) 526-3614
FAX: (850) 482-4478
Email: editorial@jcfloridan.com
Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447
Street Address:
4403 Constitution Lane
Marianna, FL 32446
Office Hours:
Weekdays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

MISS YOUR PAPER?
You should receive your newspaper no later
than 6 a.m. If it does not arrive, call Circula-
tion between 6 a.m. and noon, Tuesday to
Friday, and 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. on Sunday. The
Jackson County Floridan (USPS 271-840)
is published Tuesday-though Friday and
Sunday mornings. Periodical postage paid
at Marianna, FL.

SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Home delivery: $11.23 per month; $32.83
for three months; $62.05 for six months;
and $123.45 for one year. All prices include
applicable state and local taxes. Mail
subscriptions must be paid in advance. Mail
subscriptions are: $46.12 for three months;
$92.24 for six months; and $184.47 for one
year. ,

ADVERTISING
The advertiser agrees that the publisher
shall not be liable for damages arising
out of errors and advertisements beyond
the amount paid for the space actually
occupied by that portion of the advertise-
ments in which the error occurred, whether
such error is due to the negligence of the
publisher's employees or otherwise, and
there shall be not liability for non-inser-
tion of any advertisement beyond the
amount paid for such advertisement. This
newspaper will not knowingly accept or
publish illegal material of any kind. Advertis-
ing which expresses preference based on
legally protected personal characteristics is,
not acceptable.

HOW TO GETYOUR
NEWS PUBLISHED
* The Jackson County Floridan will publish
news of general interest free of charge.
Submit your news or Community Calendar
events via email, fax, mail, or hand delivery.
Fees may apply for wedding, engagement,
anniversary and birth announcements.
Forms are available at the Floridan offices.
Photographs must be of good quality and
suitable for print. The Floridan reserves the
right to edit all submissions.

GETTING IT RIGHT
The Jackson County Floridan's policy
is to correct mistakes promptly. To
report an error, please call 526-3614,
Monday-Friday.


Cormmunity.f CaIendri


TODAY
D Blood Drive Southeastern Community Blood
Center's r obile unit will be at Chipola College In
Marianna, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.; or give blood at the
SCBC's Marianna office, 2503 Commercial Park
Drive (inside Park Centre on US 90). Call 526-4403.
) Jackson County Habitat for Humanity
Warehouse hours: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
n Alcoholics Anonymous Open meeting, noon
to 1 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901
Caledonia St., Marianna, in the AA room.

THURSDAY, JUNE 16
n Jackson County Farmers Market is open 6:30
a.m. to noon (or until goods sell out) Tuesdays,
Thursday and Saturdays in Madison Street Park in
Marianna.
) AARP Driver Safety Program 8:30 a.m. to
4:30 p.m. at the Jackson County Extension/Agricul-
ture Complex, 4271 Pennsylvania Ave. in Marianna.
Call 482-2230 to register.
Southeastern Community Blood Center
celebrates World Blood Donor Day today. Those
giving blood today at a crntir awll be. entered into
a drawing for a $200 VISA gift card. Winners will
be drawn June 15. SCBC.is open 9 a.m. to 6 p'm. at
2503 Commercial Park Drive in Marianna.
) St. Anne's Thrift Shop, located behind St.
Anne's Catholic Church, is having a sale June'7-16:
50,percent off all clothing. Hours: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Tuesday and Thursdays.
Chipola Area Board Of Realtors general
membership meeting is at noon in the CABR office.
Speaker Sara Applewhite (Carr, Riggs & Ingrarh,
LLC) will present "Realistic Expectations For Today's
Lending Environment.' R.S.V.P. to 526-4030.
) Orientation 1 to 4 p.m. at the Goodwill Career
Training Center, 4742 Highway 90 in Marianna. Reg-
ister for free job placement and computer training
classes offered to people with disadvantages/dis-
abilities. Call 526-0139.
) Fish Fry 4 to 7 p.m. at the Marianna Elks Lodge,
4607 Highway 90. Plates, $7 each, include catfish
fillet, cheese grits, coleslaw, hushpuppies and tea.
Proceeds benefit Elks charities. Tickets available
from the lodge or members of the House Commit-,
tee. Call 526-4992.
) The Jackson County School Board convenes
for a board workshop at 4 p.m. A closed executive
session follows. Call 482-1200.
) Jackson County NAACP meeting, 5:30 p.m. at
2880 Orange St., Marianna (behind Bryant Enter-
prises). Call 482-3766 or 569-1294.
) Free Summer Concert Series Chester's
Curve, 7 to 9 p.m. at Citizens Lodge Park. Bring lawn


chairs and coolers. Presented by Jackson County
Parks department and Main Street Marianna. Call
718-5210 or 718-1022.
)) Alcoholics Anonymous closed discussion, 8
to 9 p.m. in theAA room of First United Methodist,
Church, 2901 Caledonia St., Marianna. Attendance
limited to persons with a desire to stop drinking.'

FRIDAY, JUNE 17
n International Chat-n-Sip Jackson County
Public Library Learning Center staff and their in-
ternational English learners invite the public to join
them, 8:30 to.10 a.m. at the Marianna branch, 2929
Green St., as learners practice new conversational
English skills in a relaxed atmosphere. Light refresh-
ments served. No-charge. Call 482-9124.
n Celebrate Recovery Adult, teen meetings to
"overcome hurts, habits and hang-ups in a safe
environment,"' 7 p.m., Evangel Worship Center, 2645
Pebble Hill Road. Dinner: 6 p.m. (free for first-time
, guests). Child care available. Call 209-7856 or
573-1131.
) Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, 8 to
9 p.m. in the AA room at First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St., Marianna.

SATURDAY, JUNE 18
n Jackson County Farmers Market is open 6:30
a.m. tonoon (or until goods sell out) Tuesdays,
Thursday and Saturdays in Madison Street Park.
) 20th Annual Cloud Family Reunion Descen-
dants of James "Jim" Matthew and Annie "Vester'!
Sylvester Nowell Cloud meet at the Dellwood
Community Center, Dellwood. Meal served at noon
(paper goods, ice provided). Call 592-6525.
) Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, 4:30 to
5:30 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St., Marianna.

SUNDAY, JUNE 19
Alcoholics Anonymous closed discussion, 6:3b
p.m., 4349 W. Lafayette St., Marianna (in one-story
building behind 4351W. Lafayette St.).'

MONDAY, JUNE 20
Orientation 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Goodwill
Career Training Center, 4742 Highway 90 in Marl-
anna. Register for free job placement and computer
training classes offered to people with disadvan-
tages/disabilities. Call 526-0139.
) AARP Chapter 3486 of Marianna meeting in
the First Methodist Church Youth Center, third Mon-
days, noon. Members, bring a covered dish (chapter
provides meat).


SAlford Community Organization meeting in
the Alford Community Center, third Mondays, 6 p.m.
New members from Alford, surrounding communi-
ties invited to join. Call 579-4482, 638-4900 or
579-5173.
) Jackson County Community Helpers Club,
under.new leadership, meets at 6 p.m. at 4571
Dickson Road in Greenwood. Refreshments will be
served. New members sought. Dues: $5 monthly
($60 annually). Call 592-4649.
Alcoholics Anonymous open meeting, 8 to
9 p.m. in the AA room of First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St., Marianna,

TUESDAY, JUNE 21
Jackson County Farmers Market is open 6:30
a.m. to noon (or until goods sell out) Tuesdays,
Thursday and Saturdays in Madison.Street Park in
Marianna.
')) Free Basic Computer class, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
today at the Goodwill Career Training Center, 4742
Highway 90 in Marianna. Register for no-cost
services Mondays, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.; or Thursdays, 1
to 4 p.m. during orientation. Call 526-0139.
n Optimist Club of Jackson County meeting,
noon, first and third Tuesdays, at Jim's Buffet & Grill,
Marianna.
n Free quilting, crocheting or knitting class led
by Christine Gilbert, 1 p.m. at Jackson County Se-
nior Citizens Center, 2931 Optimist Drive, Marianna.
Call 482-5028.11
) The Jackson County School Board convenes
for its regular board meeting at 4 p:m. Call 482-
1200.
) The Jackson County Autism Support Group
meets at 6 p.m, in the Spivey House (Salvation
Army sign out front) next to the First Presbyterian
Church on Clinton Street in Marianna. Call 526-
2430.
Marianna Sit-n-Sew presented by the Jackson
County Quilters Guild, Tuesdays, 6 to 8 p.m., First
United Methodist Church Youth Hall, Clinton Street,
behind Marianna Post Office. Call 272-7068. -'
) Alcoholics Anonymous Open meeting, 8 to 9
p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901 Caledo-
nia St., Marianna, in the AA room.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22
Alcoholics Anonymous Open meeting, noon
to 1 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901
Caledonia St., Marianna, in the AA room.
)) Jackson Hospital Board of Trustees' monthly
finance and board meeting begins at 5 p.m. in the
Hudnall Building Community Room.


The submission deadline for this calendar is two days before publication. Submit to: Community Calendar, Jackson County Floridan, P. O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447,
e-mail eit:ri ''j,: ilori r, .:rm. I. (,.50, 4 -_.44k'. o:,r bring items to 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.

Police Roundup


MARIANNA POLICE
The Marianna Police De-
partment listed the following
incidents for June 13, the latest
available report:
One accident, -- 7 .. -.--
two suspicious -_ -J. --
vehicles, five -
suspicious CRIME
persons, two "
burglaries, one
verbal disturbance, 12 traffic
stops, one civil dispute, one
trespassing complaint, one
obscene/threatening phone
call, one follow-up investiga-
tion, four animal complaints,
one sex offense, one assist of
another agency and one public
service call.


JACKSON COUNTY -
SHERIFF'S OFFICE
The Jackson County Sheriff's
Office and county Fire/Rescue
reported the following incidents
for June 13, the latest available
report. (Some of these calls may
be related to after-hours calls
taken on behalf of Graceville
and Cottondale police depart-
ments): One hospice death, one
missing adult, two abandoned
vehicles, four suspicious inci-
dents, four suspicious vehicles,
one suspicious person, one
report of mental illness, three
verbal disturbances, three fire
calls, 18 medical calls, two
burglar alarms, one panic
alarm, eight traffic stops, one
larceny complaint, one crimi-


nal mischief complaint, one
civil dispute, one found/aban-
doned property report, one
juvenile complaint, two suicide
attempts, three animal com-
plaints, one assist of a motor-
ist or pedestrian, one assist of
another agency, three public
service calls and one threat/ha-
rassment complaint.

JACKSON COUNTY
CORRECTIONAL FACILITY
The following persons were
booked into the county jail dur-
ing the latest reporting periods:
) Erin Slay, 26, 1406 South
Berthe Ave., Apt. 63, Cal-
laway, driving while license
suspended/revoked.
)) James Spears, 33, 2920 Har-


rison St., Marianna, trespassing,
theft less than $300, loitering
and prowling.
) Timothy Granger, 41, 2366
El Bethel Road, Grand Ridge,
possession of a controlled
substance.
) Billy Harrison, 54, 2672
Wynn Road, Marianna; viola-
tion of county probation.
)) James Weeks, 29, 3427
Hickory Hill Drive, Marianna,.
felony driving while license
suspended/revoked.

JAIL POPULATION: 218


To report a crime, call CrimeStoppers
at 526-5000 or a local law enforcement
agency. To report a wildlife violation, call
1-888-404-FWCC (3922).


Chevrolet-Buick-Cadillac-Nissan
S 4204 Lafayette St. Marianna, FL

-.'(850) 482-3051
S'i' *T*,1 '- ...' ,.T ,-. ^ .


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com O


Marianna Lions Club learns about Haiti


Special to the Floridan

During the business session
of the Marianna Lions Club's
June 13 meeting, final plans
were made for the installation of
new officers: President Fauline
Mathis; First Vice President Ar-
Ion Stephens; Second Vice Presi-
dent Roland Rabon; Secretary
Scott Marsh; Treasurer Don Wil-
liams; Director, David Nicholson
(chair), Pat Ouzts, Stephen Toole
and John Mader; Tail Twister
Daun Crews; Lion Tamer Earl
Gilmore; Eye Glasses, Bill Powell
(chair) and Roland Rabon; and
Membership, Arlon Stephens
(chair), David Arnette, Daun
Crews and Marilyn Mabardy.
The Chipola Foundation also
recognized the Lions recent
contribution, as proceeds from
the club's Pancake Supper were
placed in the Lions/Jesse Hoy
Memorial Scholarship fund.


SUBMITTED PHOTOS
Marianna Lion and retired
Democratic Circuit Clerk of Jackson
County Daun Crews shares a moment
of inter-party harmony with Rep.
Marti Coley, R-Marianna, at a Lions
Club meeting in May, when Coley
updated the group on the recent
legislative session.
Guest speaker David Melvin
discussed and shared pictures of
his recent mission trip to Haiti,


for which the Lions had contrib-
uted several hundred pairs of
eyeglasses.
Melvin started with a geogra-
phy lesson on Haiti, which is in
the West Indies and shares the
island of Hispanola with the Do-
minican Republic.
Pictures showed the destruc-
tion caused by the recent earth-
quake, and the limited recon-
struction that has taken place in
the poorest country in the West-
ern Hemisphere.
The capital, Port-au-Prince, is
unsafe and the mission group
had to travel with armed guards.
The orphanage that Melvin's
group supports is on an aban-
doned sugar plantation outside
of the city.
The group's main task this trip,
besides eyeglasses distribution,
was digging a water well and
erecting a solar panel to power
the generator, which runs the


motor that pumps water. The
pump is necessary because of
sporadic utility service, which
operates only a few hours each
day.
Melvin discussed building
practices, noting that while most
buildings are concrete, there is
little use of rebar.
He also described corruption
in the Haitian government and
the tying up of warehouses filled
with donated food, which can
be seen as a two-edged sword
- the donations are needed by
many, but are curtailing the sale
of homegrown produce, creating
two different hardships for local
farmers.
A young Haitian who, while
attending Chipola College, has
spent two years with the Melvin's
was asked what about the U.S.
impresses him most.
His answer was the orderliness,
utilities that work as well as the


Maria Andromidas, owner of Jim's
Buffet and Grill in Marianna, accepts
plaques of appreciation from Vernon
Cook, event chairman, for her help
with a successful Marianna Lions
Club Pancake Supper.
ease of getting such documents
as driver's licenses.


Deputies and


troopers join


retailer for event


Special to the Floridan

Jackson County Sher-
iff's Office Deputy Jim
Hamilton, troopers Rusty
Sisk, K-9 Caesar and B.A.
Eldridge -. of the Florida
Highway Patrol, and rep-
resentatives from the City
of Marianna Fire Depart-
ment were for the Aaron's
Sales and Lease commu-
nity outreach event in
May.
Informational hand-


outs, coloring books and
crayons were distributed,
and guests were treat-
ed to free hot dogs and
hamburgers.
A bounce house was
available for the kids, the
sheriff's office provided
I.D. kits for fingerprinting
and DNA collection, and
there was a drawing for a
' 40-inch flat screen tele-
vision. Aaron's Sales and
Lease is at 4139 Lafayette
St. in Marianna.


Jackson County Deputy Jim Hamilton (left) joins store
manager Donald Barnes (center) and Regional Customer
Service Representative Kristin Brown, at the Aaron's Sales
and Lease community outreach event in May.


From left, Florida Highway Patrol Troopers B.A. Eldridge and
Rusty Sisk pause for a photo with Donald Barnes and Kristin
Brown of Aaron's Sales and Lease, during the retailer's May
community outreach event.

Florida Lottery


Mon. (E)
Mon. (M)
Tue. (E)
Tue. (M)


6/13 8-5-2,
3-3-5
'6/14 6-8-3


8-5 8 6 2-5 12-22-4
1-6-6-9
0-6-1-2 Not available


.9-4-5 2-5-3-5


Wed. (E) 6/8 9-2-2 6-1-4-8 414 22 34-36


VWed. .(M)
Thurs. (E)
Thurs. (M)
Fri. (E)
Fri. (M)


2-8-7
6/9 1-3-3
7-2-9
6/10 1-7-7


8-3-4-6
2-7-9-5 4-10-24-32-34
7-5-4-0
,2-0-9-3 2-15-16-19-28


5-3-9 2-6-2-0


Sat. (E) 6/11 8-0-5 2-9-5-1 7-8-15-22-36


Sat. (M)


3-6-4 5-0-7-1


Sun. (E) 6/12 6-2-9 1-9-8-0 9-16-27-28-35


Sun. (M)


6-0-9 7-3-7-6


E =Evening drawing, M = Midday drawing


Saturday 6/11
Wednesday 6/8


Saturday 6/11
Wednesday 6/8


rofniy rettolr oF o


16-18-27-36-50 PB8 PPx3
14-37-44-45-53 PB 29 PPx5,

4-10-27-41-52-53 xtra 3
5-30-34-44-47-49 xtra'3
on call (850) 487-7777 or (900)Q 737-7777 *


Special to the Floridan

Marriages and divorces
as reported for the week of
June 6-10.
Marriages
) Juan Antonio Ceballos
and Belinda Corena Jones
. ) Kim Wilkerson Oli-
ver and Robert Quinlon
Woodward
) Jerry Anthony Cezar
and Marscha Eva Griffin
n Stephanie L. Beck and
Ronald Eugene Robinson
) Latricia Jewel Hill-
mon and Ronald Timothy


WORKFORCE FLORIDA MEETS


AT CHIPOLA


From left, Chipola president Dr. Gene Prough, Workforce Florida Executive Assistant
Peggy Dransfield, and Workforce Florida President/CEO Chris Hart. The Florida Work-
force Board of Directors met at Chipola College on May 26. The Board, with representa-
tives from business, government, economic development and community-based organiza-
tions, is charged with overseeing the state workforce system. Visit www.workforceflorida.com.


GAS WATCH
I:a3 pri.:esar- goingup.Hereare
the 1,: .t penr ive places to buy
g 3 rn .1i,: i.:- n I county, as of
Tuesdav 3ater noorn.
1. $3.49 Murphy Oil, Hwy 71
near 1-10
2. $3.53 Pilot. Hwy 71 near 1-10
3. $3.53 Travel Center, Hwy 71
it 1-10
4. $3.54 McCoy's, Jefferson
Street, Marianna
5. $3.56 BP. Hwy 231,
Campbellton
6. $3.56 Kmee II, Malone
ift .:u ij ) !.. ro price,
,fj,:nt iw I H ,:ridan newsroom
3 lt-,.i rr l l.: rt.l ridan.com .
I


Patsy Sapp, & Tim Sapp,
Licensed Agent Broker/Owner,
Realtor




Tim Cell (850) 209-3595
Office (850) 526-5260
Fax (850) 526-5264
tji& LS 4257 Lafayette St. E1
Marianna, FL 32446 "
www.floridashowcaserealty.com


McDuffie
) Betty Joyce Henson and
Clifton Henson
)) Jackquelynne Jeannette
Jackson and Mark Alexan-
der Walden
Divorces
) David Cameron Hol-
mes vs. Brittany Danielle
Holmes
) Wendy N. Clemons vs.
Charles Clemons Jr.
) Thomas C. Woods vs.
DebraWoods
) Norma Jean Payne vs.
John Allen Payne


Tell your story
The Jackson County Floridan is asking readers to suggest
interesting and unusual jobs and companies that can be
featured in an upcoming edition of the paper. We are looking
for people who do interesting or unusual things for companies
here in Jackson County that residents may not even be aware
exist. Please forward your suggestions to editorial@jcfloridan.
com or call 850-526-3614. and ask to speak to someone in the
newsroom

flw^wwwwwwwwwwwBSliwpwSwa


Marriage, divorce

report


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1_1______^_1_~1__1__II~XI-_-___lllll -~-~_1__ 11111 11_~_1~11- 1 _1 _~11111~~


CII~III~LC- I ~-- ~LUllsPLII1~1~


WEDNESDAY, JUNE15, 2011 3AF


LOCAL


rui, luutly I I I IV[I I IdLIUI I I todll OUV) '4p/-[/// UVI)















Publisher
VALERIA ROBERTS
Managing Editor
MICHAEL BECKER


Our Opinion




Youth need




more to do

Marianna City Commissioner Rico Wil-
liams may be on to something.
The newest commissioner said he
would like to see a Boys and Girls Club formed in
Marianna. We think that is an excellent idea, and
would go even farther we think more needs
to be done to create activities for young people,
especially during the summer months.
There is Blue Springs, but one can't expect
young people to go there every day. There are
summer athletics programs, but not everyone
plays sports. There is the public library, but even
library staff wouldn't want to see young people
use it as an all-day hang-out.
And with the job market tight, there aren't many
opportunities for teenagers to find even part-
time work while school is out.
We don't expect the situation to improve imme-
diately. But Jackson County and here we don't
mean county government needs to do more to
create opportunities for young people. Churches,
service clubs, even businesses can and should
pitch in to ensure there are plenty of things for
the county's youngest residents to do, besides
watch TV play video games or just hang out.


Contact representatives
Florida Legislature
Rep. Marti Coley, R-District 7
Marti.Coley@myfloridahouse.gov
Building L, Room 108 Chipola College
3094 Indian Circle
Marianna, FL 32446-1701

Rep. Brad Drake, R-District 5
Brad.Drake@myfloridahouse.gov
NWFL State-Chautauqua Campus #205
908 U.S. Highway 90 West
DeFuniak Springs, FL 32433-1436

Sen. Bill Montford. D-District 6
208 Senate Office Building
404 South Monroe St.
Tallahassee, FL 32399-1100
montford.bill.web@ flsenate.gov

U.S. Congress
Rep. Steve Southerland, R-2nd District
1229 Longworth HOB
Washington, DC 20515
Phone: (202) 225-5235
Fax: (202) 225-5615

Sen. Bill Nelson (D)
Washington office
United States Senate
716 Senate Hart Office Building
Washington, DC 20510
(202) 224-5274

Sen. Marco Rubio (R)
Washington office
United States Senate
B40A Dirksen Senate Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20510
(202) 224-3041


Letters to the Editor
Submit letters by either mailing to Editor, P.O. Box 520.
Marianna FL, 32447 or faxing to 850-482-4478 or send
email to editorial@jcflondan.com The Floridan reserves
the right to edit or not publish any letter. Be sure to
incJude your full address and telephone number. These
will only be used to verify the letter and will not be
printed For more information, call (850) 526-3614.


0_L$V-


The Repi
BY COKIE AND STEVEN V. ROBERTS

it 1 urity is the enemy of
.Jvictory." Those are the
,L words of Gov. Haley
Barbour of Mississippi, who ear-
lier this year declined to seek the
Republican presidential nomina-
tion. But if the GOP doesn't listen
to him, they will make it much
easier for President Obama to win
a second term.
Seventeen months before an
election, polls are notoriously
unreliable. But they do describe the
current political landscape, and a
new found of surveys points to an
inescapable conclusion: Obama
is clearly vulnerable. In the ABC
News/Washington Post poll, the
bin Laden bounce is already gone.
The president's approval rating is
back to 47 percent, exactly what it
was before the terrorist chief was
gunned down in late April. And
any incumbent who rates below 50
percent is in serious trouble.
The reason can be summed up
in two words: the economy. Or two
numbers: 9 and 4. With the unem-
ployment rate at 9.1 percent and
gasoline near $4 a gallon (although
it has been dropping lately), virtu-
ally every American family is feel-
ing the sting of reduced purchasing
power and expectations. No won-
der that 59 percent in the ABC/Post
poll disapproves of how Obama is
handling the economy.
We could see and feel that
unhappiness this spring as a new
class of Steve's students at George
Washington University entered the
workforce. Parents at graduation
were panicked for their children.
Securing an internship for a mod-
est stipend was cause for celebra-


nblican purity test
tion. Getting a job at a living wage Boston, just before Romney's an-
- let alone with benefits has nouncement, 'Any mandate from
become an increasingly unrealistic government is not a good thing,
goal. so obviously ... there will be more
That helps explain why two out explanation coming from ... Rom-
of three Americans say the country ney on his support for government
is headed in the wrong direction. mandates."
And why ABC's "frustration index" '"Any mandate from government
(a combination of many polling is not a good thing." There's the
questions) stands at 68, just about purist creed in its plainest form.
where it was last fall before voters Does she include the minimum
deserted the Democrats in droves, wage? Workplace-safety rules?
This is where Barbour's warning Clean-water standards? It's not
comes into force. The 2012 election clear. What is clear is that hard-line
will not just be a referendum on Republicans like Palin will be sub-
Obama or. an expression of voter jecting candidates like Romney to
frustration. It will also be a choice: rigorous litmus tests. And that's just
between two individuals, parties, what Barbour is warning against.
platforms. And if Republicans As a governor, he knows that a
demand purity of their candidate, certain amount of pragmatism
they could alienate the indepen- goes with the job. Like Romney,
dent swing voters who usually former governors Tim Pawlenty
decide elections. of Minnesota and Jon Huntsman
Enter Mitt Romney, the former of Utah have posted records that
governor of Massachusetts who of- include a certain amount of com-
ficially announced his candidacy at promise: with legislatures, interest
a New Hampshire farm last week. groups, fiscal reality. In fact, that's
The good news for Romney: He one reason why Americans think
leads the field among Republican statehouse experience is the best
voters with 21 percent; the bad preparation for the White House;
news: Four out of five are still not before Obama, four of our last five
thrilled with him, and the purity presidents were governors.
test is a big part of their hesitancy. Romney is far from the per-
Some evangelical Christians fect candidate. His rating on the
remain suspicious of his Mormon warmth meter falls between frosty
faith, and he runs consistently and frozen solid. Trying to seem
better among non-evangelicals. Far more genial and relaxed, he ap-
more serious is Romney's support peared on CNN's "Piers Morgan To-
for a health care bill in Massachu- night" in an open-collar shirt while
setts that required individuals to a strand of hair threatened to break
buy insurance or face a penalty. free. It didn't work. Too transparent.
Until recently, many Republi- But he also knows how to raise
cans agreed that a mandate was money and run a business, and in
the only way to make sure that the ABC/Post poll, he ran even with
health care plans stayed solvent. Obama. So that's why Democrats
Now it has become heresy. As Sarah hope the Republicans don't listen
Palin pointedly told reporters in to Barbour.


Yes, I said Palin for


BY DONNA BRAZILE
Sarah Palin should not be dis-
missed as a presidential hope-
ful. I offer a cluster of reasons
below, starting with an important
one: She has time.
Palin can wait until the last pos-
sible moment to officially file her
intent to run. Others who have
already filed or are looking to file
need to start developing traction-
generating strategies now.
However, Palin has both name
recognition and the ability to
quickly raise the funds needed to
pull together a massive organiza-
tion in the key early states. This
media-savvy political professional
can decide when it is the right time
for her to file.
She voluntarily kept a low profile
after her response to the Arizona
shootings earlier this year brought
her so much negative publicity.
Prior to the tragedy, Palin on her
website had politically targeted
Rep. Gabrielle Giffords' (a victim of
the shootings) district and others,
using the crosshairs of a rifle sight.
She, somewhat gracefully, retired
from the public scene for a respect-
able time before re-emerging at the
Rolling Thunder rally in Washing-
ton, D.C.
Another reason Palin may get'the
GOP nod: She can get away with
stunts that would sink any other
politician. Can you imagine former
Gov. Mitt Romney crashing a
non-political event for our veter-
ans (Rolling Thunder) for obvious
political gain?
When Palin emerged from her
self-imposed media blackout, the


press folks behaved as if they were
starved for her. No other Repub-
lican contender can generate her
kind of excitement, positive or
negative.
A just-released Washington Post/
Pew Research Center poll found
that almost 4-in-10 Republicans are
unhappy with their party's current
choices for nominee. Results like
these lead to a perceived vacuum
that candidates such as Rick Santo-
rum and Michelle Bachmann feel
positioned to fill. Donald Trump
felt poised to fill it. He floated his
trial balloon only to see it popped
in short order.
The Republican Party has taken
a significant shift to the political
right. I can remember the days
when the party was an inclusive or-
ganization. But Republican legends
like former Vice President Nelson
Rockefeller, Sen. Jacob Javits of
New York and Clifford Case of New
Jersey are gone with history.
Palin certainly doesn't fill that
void, but she may be served by it.
Of all the people set to cash in if the
tea party retains its strength, Palin
maybe first among them.
Why? Let me explain: Moder-
ate Republicans are in danger of
extinction. After the 2008 election,
some polls showed the GOP barely
had the public's support. So, the
party decided to work with this fac-
tion. It concentrated on issues that
brought them storming to town
hall meetings and into the election
booth.
Unfortunately for the pragmatists
who run the party, they birthed the
tea party Republicans. Tea partiers
ran in the primaries and won.


president

Now they are strong enough to tell
Speaker John Boehner what his
limits are. And they do.
They aren't done. Tea party Re-
publicans are fielding candidates
against the handful of moderates
who remain in the party such as
Sens. Richard Lugar of Indiana and
Olympia Snowe of Maine.
Tea party Republicans toler-
ate no dissent from their political
orthodoxy.
They are out successfully, I
believe to purge the party of all
to their left, and even some to their
right.
Meanwhile, at the heart of the
Republican Party are leaders like
Bachmann whQ are eager to fill
the void and who see Palin as a
real threat. Ed Rollins, Bachmann's
campaign manager (a veteran strat-
egist), took a swipe at Palin (then.
retreated).
Whether we agree with them,
when Bachmann and Palin cam-
paign, you know they believe what
they are saying. Both can't help but
cut into each other's support be-
cause they appeal to the same base.
It is from that fractured base that I
imagine Palin ascending.
Palin is the candidate with the
most crossover appeal between
groups. She can talk to the tea par-
tiers, the radicals even the nearly
extinct moderates.
When scripted, she can be rather
convincing, especially compared
to other candidates. The others are
too drab in policy, in convic-
tions, in media smarts. They just
can't compete with her star power.
From here, 2012 looks like a slam-
dunk for Sarah Palin.


~-----






JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


16A WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 2011


State universities eye 7 percent tuition increase


The Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE Trustees at
six of Florida's 11 public universi-
ties have unanimously agreed to
seek 7 percent increases in their
in-state undergraduate tuition
rates. If approved, they would be
on top of an 8 percent tuition in-
crease ordered by the Legislature
for the next academic year.
Votes will be held by trustees at
the other five schools before the
Board of Governors considers
the requests at a June 23 meeting
in Tampa.
It's shaping up as a replay of
last yeAr.
Lawmakers then also raised tu-
ition by 8 percent, and the Board
of Governors approved 7 percent
differential increases for each of
the universities. That raised their
tuition rates-by a total of 15 per-
cent the annual limit set by
law.
The 8 percent legislatively or-
dered increase will add $229.50
to the base tuition for 30 credit
hours, considered a normal an-
nual course load, which then will


total to $3,099.60 per year.
The additional 7 percent would
affect the schools differently be-
cause some have raised their dif-
ferential tuition more than oth-
ers in the past.
On average, though, it would
increase the 30 credit hour an-
nual cost by $274.80 for a total of
$3,592.20.
The figures do not include fees
that differ among the universi-
ties. Raising tuition the full 15
percent would still leave Florida
as one of the nation's best higher
education bargains for in-state
undergraduates, but it will still
be a hardship for many students
and their parents.
"If we're going to pay more,'
we're going to have to receive
more," said Florida StudentAsso-
ciation Chairman Gallop Frank-
lin, also student body president
at Florida A&M University.
State University System of-
ficials say students are getting
more. An analysis shows the ad-
ditional 7 percent approved last
year saved or created 947 jobs
for faculty members and advis-


ers during the 2010-11 academic
year. It also enabled the schools
to save or add 4,318 course
sections.
The universities, though,
wouldn't need more tuition
money to save jobs and courses
if not for cuts in state funding to-
taling about 25 percent in recent
years.
"This tuition differential
doesn't come close to filling
'gaps' in state support," said
State University System spokes-
woman Kelly Layman.
She also noted the 7 percent
increase would raise $110 mil-
lion across the system, not even
enough to offset the loss of
$140 million in federal stimulus
money the universities received
during the current budget year,
which ends June 30.
Although the Legislature ap-
proved only an 8 percent tuition
increase, the state budget it
passed assumes the full 15 per-
cent. So, if a university doesn't
opt for the additional 7 percent.
it would be looking at a further
spending cut.


Franklin, also the outgoing
student member of the Board
of Governors, last year voted to
approve the differential increase
at nine schools but against it for
the other two.
He said he generally has sup-
ported the increases because
students have a voice in the re-
quests because they also have
members on the boards of
trustees at each campus. And
even with the spending cuts, he
said the Legislature hasn't re-
duced funding for universities as
much as it has many other state
agencies.
"We do get a good deal in refer-
ence to undergraduate in-state
tuition," Franklin said.
University of Florida Student
Body President Ben Meyers de-
fended his vote for the 7 percent
increase as the student trustee
in a statement published by the
campus newspaper, The Inde-'
pendent Florida Alligator.
Meyers wrote that a key factor
for him was a state requirement
that schools, with limited excep-
tions,.must use 30 percent of the


"If we're going to pay
more, we're going

to have to receive
more."
Gallop Franklin,
Florida Student Association Chairman

differential funds for need-based
scholarships. He also noted the
university has.a $9 million gap in
need-based financial aid.
"These are students who, with-
out this financial aid, would
likely be unable to attend our
university," Meyers wrote. He
added that failing to adopt the
increase "would result in a cut-
ting fiasco" that could devalue
students' degrees.
Other schools where trustees
so far have voted for the increase
are Florida A&M, Florida State
University, the University of
Central Florida, the University of
South Florida and the University
of West Florida.


Fair Districts Now calls redistricting hearings 'charade'


The Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE Upcoming
public hearings across Florida
on legislative and congressio-
nal redistricting are a "charade"
because lawmakers have yet to
draw up any proposed maps that
citizens can comment upon, a
coalition dedicated to prevent-
ing gerrymandering declared
Tuesday.
Fair Districts Now held a tele-
conference with reporters and
sent a letter urging leaders of the
Republican-controlled Legisla-
ture to include maps at the hear-
ings. It also asked them to speed
up the redistricting process so
a review by the U.S. Justice De-
partment and likely court ap-
peals can be completed before
candidates begin qualifying a
year from now.
"Show us the maps," said


Jorge Mursuli, president of Do-
mocracia, a Hispanic advocacy.
group that's part of the coalition.
"Where are these maps?"
The House- and Senate are
holding hearings in 26 cities and
towns starting Monday in Talla-
hassee and continuing through
Sept. 1 in Clewiston. Without
maps, they are a waste of time,
Fair Districts leaders said.
"Some might call the planned
hearings a 'charade' at taxpayer
expense," said Florida League of
Women Voters President Deidre
Macnab.
Other groups participating
in Fair Districts are Common
Cause and the National Associa-
tion for the Advancement of Col-
ored People. The coalition's let-
ter also asks legislative leaders to
lift a "gag order" they've put on
lawmakers for the hearings and
to stop using taxpayer money to


challenge a pair of state consti-
tutional amendments sponsored
by Fair Districts Now.
Voters last year approved the
amendments, one. each for
Congress and the Legislature,
that prohibit districts from be-
ing drawn to favor incumbents
or any particular political party.
Both chambers tried to keep the
amendments off the ballot and
the House has joined two mem-.
bers of Congress in a still-pend-
ing challenge of the congressio-
nal amendment.
Florida Senate President Mike
Haridopolos, R-Merritt Island,
responded through a statement
reiterating a prior challenge to
Fair Districts to submit its own
maps "so everybody can see their
concept of a 'fair district.'"
That's lawmakers' responsibil-
ity for which they are drawing
paychecks from taxpayers, said


State
Briefs


Macnab.
. "We call upon them to do their
job," she said.
Katherine Betta, spokeswom-
an for House Speaker Dean Can-
non, R-Winter Park, said it would
be inappropriate for lawmakers
to draw. maps before hearing
from the public.
"There is no gag order," Betta
wrote in an email. "These meet-
ings are about listening to the
public."
Fair Districts leaders cited a
letter from Senate Reapportion-
ment Committee Chairman Don
Gaetz, R-Niceville, to his col-
leagues saying leaders of both
chambers have agreed lawmak-.
ers "will not be recognized for
comments or discussion or even
for questions" at the hearings.
Former Democratic state Sen.
Dan Gelber, now an attorney for
Fair Districts, suggested legisla-


torg may be "lawyering up" -
avoiding comments that could
be used against them if the re-
districting maps are challenged
in court as expected.
As for hastening the process,
House Redistricting Commit-
tee Chairman Will Weatherford,
R-Wesley Chapel, said lawmak-
ers are following "a timeline set
in the Florida Constitution" and
the availability of Census data
and technology as well was put-
ting public comment first.
Gelber, though, said the .con-
stitution has no timeline for con-
gressional districts so they could
be drawn immediately and other
states already have done so. Leg-
islative maps could be approved
shortly after lawmakers convene
in regular session in January, but
they appear intent on waiting
until its last days in early.March,
he said.


FBI wants ex-Fla.
speaker's office,
travel records
TALLAHASSEE The
FBI wants to see former
Florida House Speaker
Ray Sansom's office
records, including travel,
documents.,
Subpoenas last week
were served on the offices
of the speaker in Tallahas-
see and Sansom's House
successor, Republican
Rep. Matt Gaetz, in Shali-
mar. A former Sansom
staffer, now working, for
Gaetz, also has been called
to testify before a federal
grand jury on June 21 in
Pensacola.
The FBI has been
interested in Sansom, a
Destin Republican, for an
investigation into lavish
spending of Republican
Party of Florida funds by
GOP leaders.
Sansom resigned as
speaker and then from the
House following allega-
tions he disguised a $6
million appropriation to
build an airplane hangar
for a political supporter.
Criminal charges were
dropped after Sansom
and two others each
agreed to pay $100,000 in
restitution.

Rubio to give first
speech from
Senate floor
WASHINGTON Sen.
Marco Rubio is prepar-
ing to give his first speech
from the floor of the U.S.
Senate.
The Florida Republican's
office says Tuesday's
speech will lay out the
lawmaker's vision for
America, its challenges
and its opportunities.
Rubio, who took office
in January, will discuss
how the United States can
maintain its position in
the world through the 21st
century.
Rubio's office gave part
of the speech early to The
Associated Press. It says,
"A new American century
is within our reach. There


is nothing wrong with our
people. Americans haven't
forgotten how to start a
business. They haven't run
out of good ideas."
The speech says the
United States is at a turn-
ing point in history and
that the wrong choices
could lead to America's
decline.

Bush still has most
Fla. Dems wearing
dunce caps
TALLAHASSEE For-
mer Gov. Jeb Bush's annual
legislative "report card"
still has most Democrats
wearing dunce caps and
Republicans getting gold
stars.
Bush's Foundation for
Florida's Future issued the
legislative grades Monday.
The grades are based
on how legislators voted
on education mea-
sures favored by Bush, a
Republican,
They include a new law
that eliminates tenure for
new teachers. It also calls
for merit pay that rewards
teachers based heavily on
student test results.
Bush also favored mea-
sures to expand vouchers
and charter schools.
Only two Democrats
earned A's: Sen. Gary Siplin
of Orlando and Rep. Leon-
ard Bembry of Greenville.
Most other Democrats
got F's while nearly all
Republican's got As.
The lowest-rated Repub-
licans were Sens. Evelyn
Lynn, a longtime educator
from Ormond Beach, and
Paula Dockery of Lake-
land. Both got C's.

Scott signs
bill creating
commerce agency
ORLANDO Gov.
Rick Scott has signed a
bill creating a new state
agency to promote Florida
business and economic
development.
Scott said the legislation
he signed Tuesday would
help him keep promises
to streamline government,


eliminate inefficien-
cies and grow Florida's
economy.
The agency will be called
the Department of Eco-
nomic Opportunity.
Scott signed the bill
while meeting with
Enterprise Florida lead-
ers in Orlando. Enterprise
Florida is an existing
public-private economic
development partnership
that will continue.
. It reduces the deadline
for acting on incentive
funding to 10 days instead
of as many as 42. The new
law also lets Scott ap-
prove incentives up to $2
million without legislative
approval.

11 rescued, 1 dead
after boat capsizes
DELRAY BEACH Elev-
en people were rescued
from a bcat that capsized
while being followed by
the U.S. Coast Guard off
Florida.
Petty Officer Nick Ameen
says a Coast Guard cutter
began following the 25-


foot boat around 2:30 a.m:
Tuesday because it did not
have its navigational lights
on. Ameen says the boat
tried to elude authorities
before stopping around
4:30 a.m. about a dozen
miles off Delray Beach.
That's when the boat
capsized.
Petty Officer Krystyna
Hannum says one person
was taken to a hospital.
A Palm Beach County
Sheriff's dive team found
one body beneath the
sunken boat.
The Coast Guard says
the 10 passengers being
questioned claim Jamai-
can nationality. Authori-
ties believe the boat was
part of a migrant smug-
gling operation.

Boyfriend of missing
woman now
called suspect
ST. PETERSBURG
-, Police in St. Petersburg
are now calling the boy-
friend of a missing police
cadet a suspect in her
disappearance.


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Thirty-five-year-old Kelly
Rothwell of Indian Rocks
Beach was last seen by a
friend on March 12 when
she said she was going to
break up her boyfriend,
David Perry. The 47-


year-old Perry then left
for Elmira, NY, the next
day, and he and family
members have repeatedly
refused to talk to investi-
gators about the case.
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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


jViaia- iuLa


I I i" I 'in lif i1: I/'"1 i
Hayes Robinson, Jerome Gray and Chris Smith work on repairing a broken water line on Sunset and.Circle drives Tuesday in Marianna.


Water line breaks; customers on boil-water notice


BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
dbuckhalter@jcfloridan.com

About 20 customers on Sunset
and Edgewood drives in Marian-
na were without water for about
half the business day Tuesday af-
ter a water main burst. The water
was turned back on after the line
repair was made and the line was


flushed, but the affected house-
holds will be on a boil-water no-
tice for the next several days.
The boil water notice was nec-
essary because the broken line
gave contaminants a potential
path into the water supply.
Tests for possible contamina-
tion must be conducted and
reviewed before the water is


cleared for consumption from called to complain of low water


the tap.
Marianna Water and Wastewa-
ter Superintendent Rick Harrell
said Tuesday that the line was
being returned to service around
1 p.m.
The break occurred around
8:30 a.m. City crews discovered
it after customers in the area


pressure.
Harrell said the broken main
was an old line made of an as-
bestos and cement blend, in-
stalled in the 1950s. The broken
section was replaced Tuesday
with PVC pipe. Harrell said there
is no danger related to the pres-
ence of asbestos in the old line.


"The danger with asbestos is
when it is dry and is disturbed
in the dry state, because it can
then become airborne. This was
wet material, and we cleaned up
all the debris from the site, so no
one is going to breathe this in,"
Harrell said.
Asbestos was commonly used
during the 1950s, he noted.


Obituaries
James & Sikes Funeral
Home Maddox Chapel
4278 Lafayette St.
Marianna, FL 32446
482-2332

Angel Victoria
Mickel

The funeral service for
Angel Victoria Mickel will
be 9 a.m. Wednesday, June
15, at.the Greenwood Bap-
tist Church, with interment
to follow in the church
cemetery.
James & Sikes Funeral
Home Maddox Chapel
4278 Lafayette St.
Marianna, FL 32446
482-2332

James
Montgomery

The graveside funeral
service for James Mont-
gomery will be 9 a.m. Wed-
nesday, June 15, at Friend-
ship Baptist Cemetery.
James & Sikes Funeral
Home Maddox Chapel
4278 Lafayette St.
Marianna, FL 32446
482-2332

Miss Jean
Morehouse



Miss Jean Morehouse,
79, of Marianna died Sun-
day, June 12, 2011, in Ma-
rianna.
She was born Jan. 30,
1932, in Norwich, Conn.
She served in the Women's
Army Corp for 20 years. Af-
ter her military service, she
worked for the Florida De-
partment of Corrections for
10 years. Jean was never
married and lived in Ma-
rianna for 39 years.
After retirement, she vol-
unteered for Habitat for
Humanity and worked at
the Habitat Thrift Shop.
She also did volunteer
work at the Jackson County
hospital. She was a long-
time member of the First
Presbyterian Church.
The memorial service
will be 10 a.m. Thursday,
June 23, at the First Presby-
terian Church, with Dr.
Huw Christopher officiat-
ing. A reception will follow.
Interment will be in Nor-
wich, alongside her pa-
rents.
James & Sikes Maddox
Chapel Funeral Home is in
charge of arrangements.
Memorial contributions
may be made to Partners
for Pets, 4011 Maintenance
Drive, Marianna, FL 32448.
Expressions of sympathy
may be made online at
www.jamesandsikesfuneral
home.com.


GOP candidates attack Obama, not each other


The Associated Press'

WASHINGTON If
Tim Pawlenty, Newt Gin-
grich and other Republi-
can presidential hopefuls
feel they need to close the
gap on front-runner Mitt
Romney, they didn't show
it at the New Hampshire
debate.
Romney, the former
Massachusetts governor
who leads in the early
polls and fundraising ef-
forts, had a surprisingly
easy two hours Monday
night. He looked calm and
steady, criticizing Presi-
dent Barack Obama on the
economy and health care
while rarely being forced
on the defensive despite
some well-known vulner-
abilities of his own.
With New Hampshire's
first-in-the-nation pri-
mary half a year away,
the seven GOP candi-
dates seemed more eager
to introduce themselves
to voters in the televised
event than to start ripping
each other. They rarely
differed on major policies.
All agreed that Obama.
has botched the economy
and doesn't deserve a sec-
ond term. Near the efind
of the debate, Romney
said anyone on the stage
would be a better presi-
dent than Obama. That
was high praise for little-
known candidate Herman
Cain, libertarian hero Ron
Paul and former Sen. Rick
Santorum, who badly lost
his last re-election bid in
Pennsylvania. It also re-
flected how friendly every-
one had been to Romney.
If any candidate had
nearly as pleasant an


Meeting
From Page 1A
own job.
The volunteer fire chief, Trey
Bolton, also has issues with Cook.
According to Bolton, Cook made
statements to him which implied
she might level a sexual harass-
ment accusation against him if he
didn't get on board with the goals
she has for the town. That accu-
sation brought more discussion
about James White's firing.
Lambert said White may have
spoken before "engaging his brain"
during discussions that led up to


evening as Romney, it
was Rep. Michele Bach-
mann of Minnesota. She
made maximum use of
CNN's live telecast to an-
nounce she was formally
entering the race. And she
showed a feisty but folksy
style, perhaps grabbing
an audience that many
once thought would go to
Sarah Palin, who was not
present.
Bachmann said Tues-
day she decided to jump
into the race at this time
because she felt she had
sufficient support and
it was "the right thing to
do." She said he wasn't
worried about whether
former Alaska Gov. Sarah
Palin was going to join
the race, saying there was
plenty of room for other
candidates.
Before the debate, there
were signs that Romney
might be pressed harder
on his record, especially
the Massachusetts health
care law that requires
people to obtain health
insurance. On Sunday,
Pawlenty had derided the
state law as "Obamney-
care," because it served
as a model for Obama's
2010 health care overhaul,
which many conservatives
detest.
Pawlenty, the former
Minnesota governor,
seemed loath to revisit the
issue Monday. CNN mod-
erator John King pressed
him three times to explain
why he had used the term
"Obamneycare." Finally,
Pawlenty replied some-
what weakly that it was
"a reflection of the presi-
dent's comments that he
designed Obamacare on


STHE ASSOCIATED PRESS
From left, former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum, Rep. Michele Bachmann, R-Minn.,
former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, Rep. Ron
Paul, R-Texas, former Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty and businessman Herman Cain stand on
stage before first New Hampshire Republican presidential debate at St. Anselm College in
Manchester, N.H., on Monday.


the Massachusetts health
care plan."
In a nationally broad-
cast television appearance
Tuesday morning, Pawlen-
ty denied he'd pulled his
punches in connection
with the "Obamneycare"
issue.
"No, it's a term I used on
a Sunday morning show
to make the point that
President Obama used the
Massachusetts health plan
as the blueprint," he said.
" ... When pressed by the
moderator, I did use that
term again."
King had no more luck
enticing the other six con-
tenders to comment on
Romney's former support
for legalized abortion, gay
rights and gun control. He
has switched his position
on all those issues since
his days as a Senate can-
didate and one-term gov-
ernor in liberal-leaning
Massachusetts.


his firing. Bolton and Lambert
occasionally interrupted each
other, as Bolton weighed in with
his thoughts on the matter. Dur-
ing their exchange, Lambert told
Bolton to "shut up," and pointed
out that Bolton was not himself a
town employee. Lambert eventu-
ally apologized.
Bolton suggested that Lambert
fire himself, indicating that Lam-
bert had perhaps just spoken be-
fore "engaging his brain," when
he'd said "shut up."
Greer also had more to say about
the circumstances leading White's
firing. Along the way, White had
been accused of making an inap-


King asked whether any-
one on the stage felt Rom-
ney's authenticity was "an
issue in the campaign."
After a pause, Cain said,
FCase closed," and the
discussion turned to other
topics. The crowded stage
and tight time constraints
made it difficult to tease
out meaningful differ-
ences between the candi-
dates. Bachmann said that
as president, she would
not interfere with states
that recognize same-sex
marriages.
Santorum and Romney
said they support a con-
stitutional amendment
limiting marriage in all
the states to one man.and
one woman. Bachmann
jumped back in, saying
she supported that too.
But she had been asked
earlier whether she would
try to challenge state laws
on a one-by-one basis, a
different question.


propriate comment to Cook.
Greer, who objected to White be-
ing let go, wanted to know why that
allegation had never been fully
investigated.
Council members pointed out
that White had been fired for his
unwillingness to say he would try
to work with Cook, not because of
the accusation, and that the com-
plaint against him therefore be-
came a moot point.
Some of these issues were also
aired at a special session that Cook
had called. The minutes from that
May 19 session can be viewed on
the Jackson County Floridan's web-
site, www.jcfloridan.com.


Get the latest news updates on your mobile device.

Subscribe today at jcfloridan.com


Gingrich, the former
House speaker who suf-
fered a wholesale cam-
paign staff defection last
week, appeared rather
grim and determined to
show his toughness. In the
opening greetings, when
most candidates said little
more than hello, Gingrich
vowed "to end the Obama
depression."
That set the tone for an
evening focused on the
president, leaving Rom-
ney and his fellow Repub-
licans unbruised.
"It was a very friendly
debate to say the least,
which helps Romney,"
Republican adviser Greg
Mueller said. "No one took
center stage and emerged
as the main challenger to
Romney."
A stiff challenge to Rom-
-ney from the right "is there
for the taking," Mueller
said, "but did not happen
tonight."


Fires
From Page 1A
ground and across the
truck as well. The line
sparked, which ignited a
fire in the roadside vegeta-
tion. The truck driver was
able to jump free of his
vehicle away from the line
and call for help.
Grand Ridge firefighters
arrived quickly and put out
the flames. Jackson County
Fire Rescue also respond-
ed as a back-up measure.
Customers in the area were
briefly without power, and
the caution light at State
Road 69 was out of service
for a time as the line and
pole were repaired and
replaced.


Jackson County Vault & Monuments
Quality Service at Affordable Prices

i 850-482-5041 L


Pinecrest


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WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 2011 7AF


LOCAL/NATIONAL








JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Gates urges patience with Pakistan


The Associated Press

WASHINGTON The
U.S. is disappointed and
suspicious that militants in
Pakistan apparently were
tipped off that American
intelligence officials had
discovered two of their
suspected bomb-making
facilities, Defense Secre-
,tary Robert Gates says.
But he stopped short of
concluding that Pakistani
officials leaked the infor-
mation to the al-Qaida-
linked Haqqani insurgents.
And Gates said such inci-
dents must not derail U.S.
relations with Islamabad.
A little over two weeks
before ending his 4 1/2-
year tenure as Pentagon
chief, Gates sat down in his
office Monday for an Asso-
ciated Press interview that
touched on a range of is-
sues, including his expec-
tation of a smooth handoff
to his designated succes-
sor, current CIA Director
Leon Panetta.
Gates will retire June 30;
Panetta's Senate confirma-
tion is expected shortly.
On Tuesday, the Senate


Armed Services Commit-
tee reported a unanimous
voice vote to send his
nomination to the floor of
the Senate. The Pakistan
intelligence breach has
only fueled unease in the
U.S., where officials worry
about links between the
intelligence service there
and some militant groups.
A U.S. official said Mon-
day that after telling Paki-
stani intelligence about
the location of the two
compounds, U.S. drones
and satellite feeds showed
the militants clearing out
the contents at both sites.
"We don't know the spe-
cifics of what happened,"
said Gates. "There are sus-
picions and there are ques-
tions, but I think there was
clearly disappointment on
our part."
As an act of faith to re-
store relations with Paki-
stan, U.S. intelligence in
recent weeks shared the
location of two such com-
pounds believed to contain
bomb material held by the
Haqqani network. But by
the time Pakistani authori-
ties reached the facilities,


they had been vacated.
The official, who spoke
on condition of anonymity
to discuss classified mat-
ters, said the assumption
was that the Pakistanis had
tipped off the Haqqanis.
Trust has been in short
supply in the U.S.-Paki-
stani relationship, high-
lighted most dramatically
by the U.S. decision not to
tell Islamabad in advance
of the May 2 Navy SEAL
raid on Osama bin Laden's
compound in Abbottabad,
Pakistan, out of fear that
they might tip off the al-
Qaida leader.
Daniel Benjamin, the
State Department's coun-
terterrorism coordinator,
said Tuesday that bin Lad-
en "obviously" benefited
from a support network
inside Pakistan.
Asked whether it was
time to take a harder line
with Pakistan, Gates coun-
seled patience and noted
that the Pakistanis have
not forgotten that the U.S.
abandoned them in the
late 1980s after the Soviets
pulled out of Afghanistan.
"We need each other,


and this relationship goes
beyond Afghanistan," he
said. "It has to do with re-
gional stability, and I think
we have to be realistic
about Pakistani distrust ...
and their deep belief that
when we're done with al-
Qaida that we'll be gone,
again."
Despite recurring ten-
sions between Washington
and Islamabad, and ques-
tions by some in Congress
about the wisdom of hav-
ing spent billions of dollars
on aiding Pakistan since
the Sept. 11, 2001, terror
attacks, Gates said the ef-
fort has paid off.
On other topics, Gates
said he sees no roadblocks
to ending the ban on open-
ly gay military service, and
if the top officers of each
service recommend mov-
ing ahead on the repeal be-
fore the end of the month,
he will endorse it.
More than a million U.S.
troops have been trained
on the new law that re-
pealed the 17-year-old ban
on gays serving openly in
the armed services, and
Gates said the instruction


I


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Secretary of Defense Robert Gates pauses as he speaks
during an interview with The Associated Press in his office at
the Pentagon on Monday.
has gone well. (Still, he noted that de-
"I think people are pretty cades after women entered'
satisfied with the way this military service, there are
process is going forward," still persistent problems
he said. "I think people with sexual assaults. So the
have been mildly and notion that there will be
pleasantly surprised at the no incidents when the ban
lack of pushback in the is-lifted is "unrealistic," he
training." said.


Cautious consumers could see lower prices ahead
The Associated Press temporary factors: Buyers matic swing in consumer sumers paid a year ago. the highest percentage a steep pullback in hiring.
received .fewer dealer in- sentiment." Higher gas prices have since the trade group'be- The unemployment rate
WASHINGTON Con- centives, and dealers ran Other signs emerged left consumers with less gan polling its members rose to 9.1 percent.
sumers are spending short on popular fuel-ef- that the economy could to spend on discretion- in 2002. The survey began ManpowerGroup, one of
cautiously in the face of ficient models. The natural strengthen in the second ary goods. Analysts think in mid-May and ended on the nation's largest staffing
still-high gasoline and disasters in Japan disrupt- half of the year espe- the economy will regain June 3, the day the gov- companies, said employ-
grocery-store prices and ed shipments of cars and cially the prospect of lower momentum in the second ernment released the May ers will hire at a modest
restraining the economy's component parts to the prices at grocery stores half of this year if gasoline jobs report, which showed pace through the summer.


growth.
But some relief could be
on the way: Wholesale food
prices dropped last month
by the most in a year. And
motorists are likely to face
lower gasoline prices this
summer. CEOs for the
nation's largest compa-
nies say they plan to step
up hiring over the next six
months.
Retail sales fell 0.2 per-
cent in May, the Com-
merce Department said
Tuesday. The first decline
in nearly a year occurred
mainly because Americans
bought fewer cars.
The drop in auto sales
was 2.9 percent, the sharp-
est drop in 15 months. But
it was largely because of


United States.
Excluding the drop in car
sales, retail sales rose 0.3
percent. That gain seemed
to please investors, who
were expecting broad de-
clines because of high gas
prices. The Dow Jones in-
dustrial average rose 136
points in midday trad-
ing. Broader indexes also
increased.
"The decline in headline
retail sales during May can
be chalked up to slumping
auto sales," said Alistair
Bentley, an economist at
TD Economics. "This was
to be expected follow-
ing the sharp rise in gas
prices and the tsunami in
Japan, and thus should not
be interpreted as a dra-


and gas stations. Food
costs at the wholesale level
fell by the most in a year,
according to a government
report on producer prices.
Fruit and vegetable prices
led the declines. Tomatoes
plummeted 47 percent,
the most since last June.
Spinach prices dropped 48
percent, and .watermelons
fell 74 percent.
Gas prices at the whole-
sale level rose by the
smallest amount in eight
months. Consumers had
been paying an average of
nearly $4.00 for a gallon of
gas in early May. On Mon-
day, the national average
was $3.70 a gallon, accord-
ing to AAA. Still, 'that's a
dollar more than what con-


prices fall further.
A majority of leaders for
the largest U.S. companies
appear to share that opti-
mism, according to a sur-
vey. The Business Round-
table, which represents
CEOs for the 200 biggest
U.S. companies, said 51
percent of chief executives
plan to step up hiring in
the second half of the year.
That's nearly in line with
last quarter's 52 percent


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A shopper looks at expensive jewelry at Costco in Mountain View, Calif., on Monday. Consumers
spent less on autos, furniture and food in May, sending retail sales down for the first time in
nearly a year.


Seniors face Medicare cost


barrier for cancer meds


The Associated Press

WASHINGTON -, Chemotherapy is
now available in a pill, but if you have
Medicare, you may not be able to afford
it.
That's what happened to Rita Moore
when she took her prescription for a
medication to treat kidney cancer to her
local drugstore. She was stunned when
the pharmacist told her a month's supply
of the pills would cost $2,400, more than
she makes.
Medicare prescription plans that cover
seniors like Moore are allowed to charge
steep copayments for the latest cancer
drugs, which can cost tens of thousands
of dollars a year. About 1 in 6 beneficiaries
are not filling their prescriptions, accord-
ing to recent research that suggests a wor-
risome trend.
Officials at Medicare say they're not sure
what happens to those patients wheth-
er they get less expensive older drugs that
sometimes work as well, or they just give
up. Traditionally, chemotherapy has been
administered intravenously at a clinic or
doctor's office. Pills are a relatively new
option that may represent the future of
cancer care.
Moore, 65, was operated on in February
for an advanced form of kidney cancer.
As she faced a life-and-death struggle,
both her cancer and kidney specialists
agreed a drug called Sutent offered the


best chance. It's a capsule you can take
at home. But Moore was unprepared for
what happened when she went to fill her
prescription.
"I cried," said Moore, who lives in the
small central California town of Corcor-
an. "What can you do when the only thing
out there that can maybe give you some
quality of life is unaffordable? I was dev-
astated. I didn't know what to do."
Private insurance companies that deliv-
er the Medicare prescription benefit say
the problem is that drug makers charge
too much for the medications, some of
which were developed from taxpayer-
funded research. The pharmaceutical in-
dustry faults insurers, saying copayments
on drugs are higher than cost-sharing for
other medical services, such as hospital
care. Some experts blame the design of
the Medicare prescription benefit itself,
because it allows insurers to put expensive
drugs on a so-called "specialty tier" with
copayments equivalent to 25 percent or
more of the cost of the medication. Medi-
care supplemental insurance Medigap
- doesn't cover those copayments.
For many seniors, the situation is not
as bleak as what Moore encountered,
Kelman suggested. For example, the pre-
scription plan is designed so beneficiaries
who are poor or near poverty face only to-
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-18A WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 2011


WASHING'TON

















































































































BY SHELIA MADER
Floridan Correspondent
Marianna baseball split a pair
of games with Sneads at Bulldog
Field on Monday evening, with
the Bulldogs taking a 3-1 vic-
tory behind the pitching of Jae
Elliott.
Elliot went three innings and
gave up just one unearned run
to pick up the win.
Austin Branch closed out the
final two innings.
Marianna scored their three
runs in the bottom of the third
inning
With one out, Jake 'Daffin
reached on a misplayed ball on
the mound, followed by Chris
Godwin taking advantage of an
error at third.
A single by Branch plated one
run, with Elliott sacrificing the


; 'r'


?'Ln.- -*A'- .*
'L_


Cottondale Basketball


Rebuilding effort


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
The Cottondale Lady Hornets squared off against Dothan on Monday night
in Poplar Springs in the Alabama-Florida Summer Shootout.

Lady Hornets 'starting from scratch,'

look to future with young players


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com
The Cottondale Lady Hornets
dropped three out of four games
Monday in the Alabama-Flori-
da Summer Shootout at Poplar
Springs High School.
Cottondale beat Rehobeth 20-
19 in its first game of the day, but
proceeded to lose to Houston
Academy and Dothan High by
scores of 25-8 and 62-27 in its fi-
nal two games.
The losses were tough for the
Lady Hornets. They lost their
two leading scorers from last
year's team, Shay Wright and Ja-
kia Grimsley, and are currently
without leading returning scorer
Khadejah Ward. But Cottondale
coach Shan Pittman said she ex-
pected some difficulties with a
virtually brand-new team.
"We had 13 girls (Monday), and
eight were junior high kids. We're
starting all over, and I get it," she
said. "We're just starting from
scratch. It's growing pains. I'm
not disappointed. It's just a young


group."
The Lady Hornets were sched-
uled to play again on Tuesday, but
injuries forced them to pull out.
.Cottondale will be back in ac-
tion in Poplar Springs on Friday
against Northview, Abbeville
Christian, and Providence. ;
Pittman said she understands
wins may be hard to come by
this summer, but the larger goal
for the Lady Hornets is to get the
rebuilding process started on the
right foot. '
"This is an opportunity for the
kids to get up and down the court
and'play some games," she said.
"They can get accustomed to
the game. A lot of them are sixth
and seventh graders who haven't
played much basketball. This is
an opportunity for them to get
better individually.
. "In a couple or three years from
now, we'll be in a pretty good
position because we'll have a lot
of kids with experience. They've
seen the worst; they can only get
better from here."


IattLONE BASof TALL



Battle of the Tigers


MARKSKINNER/FLORIDAN
Malone's Antwain Johnson gets ready to pass down court against Graceville on Tuesday night during a
summer league basketball game in Marianna.

Malone handles Graceville in summer league play


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com

The Malone Tigers cruised
to a 48-31 wire-to-wire vic-
tory over the Graceville Ti-
gers on Tuesday afternoon
in Marianna Summer League
action at Marianna High
School.
Austin Williams scored 16
points to lead a short-handed
Malone team that was with-
out Chai and Ty Baker, as well
as starting point guard Chris
Murff.


Antwain Johnson also
helped pick up the slack with
11 points.
Williams helped-Malone get
off to a fast start with a buck-
et and a 3-pointer to make it
7-3, and LaDarius McElroy's
3-point play off a feed from
Williams put Malone up 14-
8 with 13:21 left in the first
half.
A driving basket by Wil-
liams, a free throw by McEl-
roy, and an offensive put-
back gave Malone a 20-8 edge
to cap off a 13-2 spurt.


Malone led 23-12 at half-
time, with Williams taking
advantage of a Graceville
turnover to start the second
half with a 3-point play to
push the lead to 14.
Williams scored the first
nine Malone points, of the
second half, the last two com-
ing on a lay-up off of another
Graceville turnover to make
it a 32-15 game with 15:15 to
play.
Ali Williams' put-back for

See BASKETBALL, Page 2B


AA ALL-STARS


a- ~

/


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN

Deacon Temples gets a hit for the Marianna AA All-Stars team during its
district tournament match-up against Graceville Monday night in Boni-
fay. Marianna won 25 -10. Every Marianna player got a hit, scored a run
and batted in a run. Marianna played Holmes County for the district champion-
ship Tuesday night. I


second run home.
Michael Mader tripled to score
the final run of the inning.
In the second inning, BT John-
son and Drew Melvin took ad-
vantage of a pair of errors with
one out, but a double play ended
the inning.
Brandon Burch led off the third
with a single, and Kody Bryan
reached on an error at third,
but a fielder's choice ended the
inning.
A pair of two out walks in the
fourth to Elliott and Clayte Rooks
went for nil, as a fly out to cen-
terfield ended the inning.
In game two, Branch got the
starting nod and went three bat-
ters into the second inning be-
fore giving way to Trent Charles.


See BASEBALL, Page 2B


Prep Baseball


a: .' I.-.


', y l.'


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
The Bulldogs' Kody Bryan tags a Sneads' player at second during summer
baseball action in Marianna on Monday.


Marianna, Sneads


split 2-game series,


..r ;


..' .**


-~~ ME^\


xp


~,~i~







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


AIRU Basketball



Harambee Dragons go 2-2



at Chipola tournament


BY DUSTIN KENT
dkent@jcfloridan.com
The Harambee Dragons
17U girls basketball team
split four games at a tour-
nament at Chipola over
the weekend.
The Dragons lost to
Mosley before com-
ing back to beat Poplar
Springs and Bonifay, and
then fell again to Mosley
in the tournament's semi-
final game.
The Dragons were com-


ing off of a tough season
debut in Pensacola on
May 28-29, losing all three
games in the Reggie Evans
Southeast Jam.
Dragons program direc-
tor Darold Pope said the
girls made a lot of strides
in between their first and
second tournaments of
the summer.
"I think we showed
signs of improvement
and growth," he said. "We
did some things well. We


played good defense,
and we rebounded the
ball well defensively. We
got better as we went on
through the tournament.
They had some turnovers
that hurt early on, but
they got better at that as
the day went along."
While the improvement
is a good sign, Pope said
there was still a good deal
of room for growth.
"The No. 1 thing we
have to do is work on


the fundamentals as far
as passing the ball," he
said. "There are a couple
of things we need to cor-
rect with fundamentals,
like missing easy lay-ups.
We have to focus on those
things, but primarily we
need to improve the pass-
ing game."
The Dragons will next
play in the Albany State
South Georgia Shootout
on June 24-25 in Albany,


The Associated Press

MIAMI Everyone
wanted the circus to end.
That is, until the circus ac-
tually ended.
Such is life for the Mi-
ami Heat now, heading
into the offseason.
A season of intense
scrutiny, criticism, atten-
tion and intrigue ended
without a championship,
and while getting out of
the spotlight for a while
this 'summer may be of
some consolation to LeB-
ron James, Dwyane Wade
and Chris, Bosh, nothing
will completely soothe
the fact that Year One of
the Big Three ended with
a loss in the NBA finals.
"There was really no
way to prepare for a sea-
son like this," Heat coach


Basketball
From Page 1B
Graceville broke up a 9-3
Malone run, but Johnson
quickly, answered with a


Erik Spoelstra said Tues-
day, after Miami gathered
for its exit meetings.
Even 'at the end,
James fourd his some
of his words overly dis-
sected and, he said,
misinterpreted.
Hisoffseason beganwith
a clarification of some-
thing said after Sunday's
night's season-ending loss
to the new champion Dal-
las Mavericks, when part
of his answer to a ques-
tion about people being
happy to see the Heat lose
included the phrase "they
have to wake up tomor-
row and have the same
life that they had before
they woke up today. They
have the same personal
problems."
On Tuesday, James tried
to clean up the mess he


bucket of his own.
A terrific pass from McEl-
royto Johnson for a 3-point
play put Malone up 37-21,
with another bucket by
Johnson off of another dish
by McElrJ extended the


inadvertently created.
"Basically, I was saying,
at the end of the day, this
season is over and with all
the hatred not only my-
self, everyone else has to
move on with their lives
as well," James said. "They
have to move on with their
lives and their day-to-day,
good or bad, and I do, too.
At the end of the day, I've
got to move on with my
life. So it wasn't saying
that I'm superior or bet-
ter than anyone else, any
man or woman on this
planet. I'm not."
James' fourth-quarter
offensive struggles in the
finals are still a talking
point, even with the series
now over and Dallas cel-
ebrating its crown. There
were some reports Tues-
day that he had skipped


lead to 20 at 41-21 with
7:01 to play.
Marquise White scored a
pair of baskets for Gracev-
ille to get his team back to
41-25 with 5:12 to play, but
Johnson got an offensive


the team meetings for
a vacation in the Baha-
mas. Privately, some team
members told him at
times during the season
to stop paying attention
to news reports about the
team entirely..
"I always feel like LeB-
ron does a great job of
dealing with things,"
Wade said. "No one, no
athlete gets scrutinized
more than he does, for
good or bad things. And I
always commend him for
the way he handles it. A
lot of people can say a lot
of things about him, but
if you're not in his shoes,
if you don't go through
the things that he goes
through than you don't
understand, you don't
knowhowyou would react
to things and respond."


put-back, and Malone hit a
3-pointer to make it 46-27
with 3:30 remaining.
Malone was scheduled
to take on Bay High later
in the day, while Graceville
was set to face Port St. Joe.


Marianna
Summer League
Marianna Summer Bas-
ketball League will resume
Thursday at Marianna
High School.
Marianna will open
against Mosley at 4 p.m.,
with Sneads vs. Altha at 5
p.m., Marianna vs. Sneads
at 6 p.m., and Mosley vs.
Altha at 7 p.m.

Summer
Baseball Camp
There will be a summer
baseball camp from June
28-30 at the MERE Com-
plex in Marianna from 9
a.m. to 12 p.m.
The camp will be for
boys and girls ages 5-15.
Cost is $75, and water and
Gatorade will be provided.
Hitting, fielding, and
pitching techniques will
be performed.
Coosa Valley Academy
head coach Bobby Hughes
- a Marianna High School
and Chipola College alum
- will run the camp.
Registration will be from
8 a.m. to 8:45 a.m. on June
28. For more informa-
tion, contact Hughes at
bhughes@coosavalley-
academy.org.

Champ Camp
Former Graceville
football star Anthony
"Champ" Kelly will bring
his "Champ Camp" back
to Graceville for the sec-
ond straight year on June
30-July 1.
The camp will feature
football instruction from high
school coaches and former
players for current high
school football players.
To register, go to www.
heartpower.inc, or e-mail
info@heartpowerinc.org.

Chipola
Swimming Lessons
Chipola College will offer
programs for children of
all ages this summer.
Swimming lessons will
be offered for ages 4 and
up.
Lessons are based on a
combination of nationally-
recognized methods.
The following sessions
are scheduled: Session 1:
June 6-16 with registration
deadline May 31; Session
2: June 20-June 30 with
registration deadline June
13; Session 3: July 11-21
with registration deadline
July 5; and Session 4: Aug.
8-18 with registration
deadline August 1.
Classes are available at 9
a.m., 10 a.m., or 7 p.m.
Sessions are Monday
through Thursday for
two weeks of 45-minute
lessons.
Cost is $45 for each
session. Pre-registration
is required with a $5 late
registration fee.
For information, call
pool manager Rance Mas-
sengill at 718-2473.

Chipola
Baseball Camps
Chipola baseball will hold
three instructional camps for
ages 8-18 this summer.
There will be a pitching
camp on June 13-14, a hitting
camp on June 15-16, and a
skills camp on June 20-21,
all running from 9 a.m. to 12
p.m.
Cost is $100 per camp, but
$250 for those who attend all'


three camps.
There will also be a high
school showcase at Chipola
Field on May 14 at 9 a.m.
Those interested can go
to www.chipola.edu and *
go to the baseball web site
to get a brochure, or call
coach Addison at 850-718-
2243, or coach Johnson at
850-718-2302.
Cost for the showcase is
also $100.

Chipola
Softball Camps
Chipola Softball Coach
Belinda Hendrix will offer
two softball camps.
A Fielding, Hitting, and
Hustling Camp for all ages
will meet June 20-21, from
1-4 p.m. Cost is $50.
A Pitching Camp for all
ages will meet June 22,
from 1-4 p.m. Cost is $50.
For information, contact
Coach Hendrix at 718-2358.

'Marianna Swim Team
The 2011 season for the
Marianna Swim Team starts
Monday at the Chipola Col-
lege pool.
The Marianna Swim Team
invites boys and girls ages 4-
18 to join the team. Registra-
tion will be open the first two
weeks of practice.
Swimmers must be able to
swim one length of the pool
(25 yards). Practices are held
from 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.,
Monday through Thursday.
Meets are held on Saturdays
throughout the summer.

Marianna
Volleyball Camp
Marianna High School
will have a volleyball camp
for grades 4-8 on July 11-
13 at MHS.
The camp is $75 per
student, and will run from
9 a.m. to 12 p.m. each day.
For more information
and to register, go to the
Marianna High School
web site.

Fast-Pitch Softball
Fast-pitch softball club
team LA Smooth is looking
for a pitcher for its 10U travel
team.
The club is based out of
Ashford, Ala.
For further informa-
tion, call Stacy Harper at
334-726-1640.

Marianna
Youth Wrestling
Team Dynamic Youth
Wrestling Team will
continue practicing on
Tuesday and Thursday
nights at the wrestling
room at the old Marianna
High School.
Practice will be from 6
p.m. to 8 p.m.
All kids in Jackson
County from ages 6 and up
are welcome to join. For
further information please
contact-Marianna coach
Ron Thoreson at 272-0280.

Sports Items
Send all sports items to edi-
torial@jcfloridan.com, or fax
them to 850-482-4478. The
mailing address for the paper
is Jackson County Floridan
P.O. Box 520 Marianna, FL
32447.




wwwjloridan.com


Baseball
From Page 1B
Kody Bryan came on in
relief in the fourth inning
to close out the game.
Sneads picked up three
runs in the second inning,
two in the third, and two in
the fifth to seal the victory.
All five Marianna runs
came in the fifth inning.
Zac Davis led things off
with a walk, with Middle-


ton being hit by a pitch.
With one out, Godwin
drew a walk to set up an
RBI single by Rooks.
Burch and Mader drew a
pair of walks to plate two
runs.
Davis reached on a
dropped ball in center, but
a strikeout ended the rally
and the game.
Marianna was scheduled
to travel to Bristol on Tues-
day for Wood Bat Tourna--
ment action.


Do you have'Cute Kids'?
E-mail your 'Cute Kids*' photos to editorial@jcfloridan.com,
mail them to P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447 or bring them
by our offices at 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.
*12 years or under, with Jackson County ties. Include child's
full name, parents'name(s) and city of residence. This is a free
service. All entries subject to editing.
I


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Sports in Brief


On to theofNBA


On to the offseaso-n


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Miami Heat's LeBron James, left, and Dwyane Wade. arrive to a news conference after Game 6 of the NBA Finals against the
Dallas Mavericks on Sunday in Miami. The Mavericks won 105-95 to win the series.

LeBron James says he is 'not superior to anyone'


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12B + WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 2011


SPORTS















itrd


SPRINT CUP LEADERS
Through June 12
Points
I, Carl Edwards, 492. 2, Jimmie John-
son, 486. 3, Dale Earnhardt Jr., 482.4,
Kevin Harvick, 481.5, Kyle Busch, 467.
6, Kurt Busch, 457.7, Matt Kenseth,
448. 8, Clint Bowyer, 419.9, Tony Stew-
art, 417. 10, Ryan Newman, 417.
11, Jeff Gordon, 411. 12, Denny Ham-
lin, 408. 13, Juan Pablo Montoya, 395.
14, Greg Biffle, 394. 15, Mark Martin,
383. 16, David Ragan, 371. 17, Kasey
Kahne, 371. 18, A J Allmendinger, 371.
19, Paul Menard, 361.20, Martin Truex
Jr., 358.
Money
1, Carl Edwards, $4,693,687. 2,
Kevin Harvick, $2,876,377. 3, Kyle
Busch, $2,860,662. 4, Matt Kenseth,
$2,756,317. 5, Kurt Busch, $2,734,076.
6, Jimmie Johnson, $2,702,992.7,
Clint Bowyer, $2,545,800.8, Jeff
Gordon, $2,391,192.9, Denny Ham-
lin, $2,373,343. 10, Tony Stewart,
$2,364,975.
11, Juan Pablo Montoya, $2,320,000.
12, Ryan Newman, $2,234,363. 13,
Bobby Labonte, $2,133,618. 14, Trevor
Bayne, $2,102,913.15, Regan Smith,
$2,065,043. 16, Jamie McMurray,
$2,056,284. 17, A J Allmendinger,
$2,029,147.18, Brad Keselowski,
$2,012,726. 19, Marcos Ambrose,
$2,011,662. 20, Dale Earnhardt Jr.,
$2,006,738.


AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 39 26 .600 -
New York 36 28 .563 2
Tampa Bay 35 31 .530 41A
Toronto 32 34 .485 7/
Baltimore 30 33 .476 8
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Cleveland 35 29 .547 -
Detroit 36 30 .545 -
Chicago 33 35 .485 4
Kansas City 29 37 .439 7
Minnesota 26 39 .400 9%
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 36 31 .537 -
Seattle 34 33 .507 2
Los Angeles 32 36 .471 4
Oakland 28 39 .418 8

Wednesday
Cleveland (Calrmona 3-8) at Detroit
(Penny 5-5), 7:05 p.m.
Texas (D.Holland 5-1) at N.Y. Yankees
(Nova 5-4), 7:05 p.m.
Baltimore (Arrieta 8-3) at Toronto
(R.ROmero 5-6), 7:07 p.m.
Boston (Beckett 5-2) at Tampa Bay
(Hellickson 7-4), 7:10 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Buehrle 6-4) at
Minnesota (Blackburn 5-4), 8:10 p.m.
Kansas City (Hochevar 4-6) at Oakland
(Outman 1-1), 10:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels (E.Santana 3-6) at Seattle
(Bedard 3-4), 10:10 p.m.
Thursday
Baltimore at Toronto, 12:37 p.m.
Cleveland at Detroit, 1:05 p.m.
Texas at N.Y. Yankees, 1:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Minnesota,
1:10 p.m. ,
Kansas City at Oakland, 3:35 p.m.
Boston at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 40 26 .606 -
Atlanta 38 29 .567 2
Florida 32 33 .492 71/
New York 32 34 .485 8
Washington 30 36 .455 10
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Milwaukee 38 29 .567 -


Serena Williams, of the U.S., reacts during her singles
tennis match against Tsvetana Pironkova, of Bulgaria, at the
Eastbourne International grass court tennis tournament.


St. Louis 38 29 .567 -
Cincinnati 35 33 .515 3/2
Pittsburgh 32 33 .492 5
Chicago 26 39 .400 11,
Houston 25 42 .373 13
West Division
W L Pet GB
San Francisco 37 29 .561 -
Arizona 37 30 .552
Colorado 31 35 .470 6
Los Angeles 31 37 .456 7
San Diego 30 38 .441 8

Wednesday
Florida (Villanueva 0-0) at Philadelphia
(K.Kendrick 3-4), 1:05 p.m., 1st game
Cincinnati (Tr.Wood 4-4) at L.A. Dodg-
ers (Billingsley 5-5), 3:10 p.m.
San Diego (Latos 4-7) at Colorado
(Chacin 7-4), 3:10 p.m.
Florida (Ani.Sanchez 6-1) at Phila-
delphia (Halladay 9-3), 7:05 p.m., 2nd'
game
St Louis (McClellan 6-2) at Washing-
ton (L.Hernandez 3-8), 7:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Gee 7-0) at Atlanta
(T.Hudson 5-5), 7:10 p.m.
Milwaukee (Narveson 3-4) at Chicago
Cubs (Zambrano 5-3), 8:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Morton 6-3) at Houston
(Happ 3-8), 8:05 p.m.
San Francisco (Bumgarner 2-8) at
Arizona (J.Saunders 3-6), 9:40 p.m.
Thursday
Florida at Philadelphia, 1:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Houston, 2:05 p.m.
Milwaukee at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m.
St Louis at Washington, 7:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m.
San Francisco at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.


U.S. OPEN TEE TIMES
By The Associated Press
June 16-19
At Congressional Country Club (Blue


Course)
Bethesda, Md.
Purse: TBA ($7.5 million in 2010)
Yardage: 7,574; Par: 71 (36-35)
All Times EDT
(a-amateur)
Thursday-Friday
First hole-lo0th hole
7:00 a.m.-12:40 p.m. Dae-Hyun
Kim, South Korea; Chez Reavie, United
States, Shane Lowry, Ireland.
7:11 a.m.-12:51 p.m. Greg Chalm-
ers, Australia; Kirk Triplett, United
States; Brad Adamonis, United States.
7:22 a.m.-1:02 p.m. Marc Leishman,
Australia; Alex Cejka, Czech Republic;
Kevin Streelman, United States.
7:33 a.m.-1:13 p.m. Fred Funk,
United States; a-David Chung,
United States; Michael Campbell, New
Zealand.
7:44 a.m.-1:24 p.m. Matt Kuchar,
United States; Paul Casey, England;
K.J: Choi, South Korea.
7:55 a.m.-1:35 p.m. Graeme
McDowell, Northern Ireland; a-Peter
Uihlein, United States; Louis Oosthui-
zen, South Africa.
8:06 a.m.-:46 p.m. Henrik Stenson,
Sweden; Johan Edfors, Sweden;
Fredrik Jacobson, Sweden.
8:17 a.m.-1:57 p.m. Ernie Els, South
Africa; Davis Love III, United States;
Jim Furyk, United States.
8:28 a.m.-2:08 p.m. Justin Rose,
England; Tim Clark, South Africa;
Jason Day, Australia.
8:39 a.m.-2:19 p.m. Jeff Overton,
United States; Ryan Palmer, United
States; Gary Woodland, United States.
8:50 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Brandt Jobe,
United States; Nick O'Hern, Australia;
D.A. Points, United States.
9:01 a.m.-2:41 p.m. Christo
Greyling, South Africa; Adam Hadwin,
Canada; Joey Lamielle, United States.
9:12 a.m.-2:52 p.m. Michael Tobia-


(All times Eastern)'
Schedule subject to change and/or
blackouts.
Wednesday, June 15
CYCLING
7 p.m.
VERSUS Tour de Suisse, stage
5, Huttwil to Tobel-Taegerschen,
Switzerland (same-day tape)
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN Texas at N.Y. Yankees
NHL HOCKEY
8 p.m.
NBC Playoffs, finals, game 7,
Boston at Vancouver



son Jr., United States, Jesse Hutchins,
United States, Michael Smith, United
States.
12:40 p.m.-7:00 a.m. Ty Tryon,
United States; Maarten Lafeber, The
Netherlands; Scott Barr, Australia.
12:51 p.m.-7:11 a.m. Geoffrey
Sisk, United States; a-Cheng-Tsung
Pan, Chinese Taipei; Matt Richardson,
England.
1:02 p.m.-7:22 a.m. Bo Van Pelt,
United States; K.T. Kim, South Korea;
Ben Crane, United States.
1:13 p.m.-7:33 a.m. Mark Wilson,
United States; Martin Laird, Scotland;
Peter Hanson, Sweden.
S1:24 p.m.-7:44 a.m. Miguel Angel
Jimenez, Spain; Sergio Garcia, Spain;
Alvaro Quiros, Spain.
1:35 p.m.-7:55 a.m. Francesc Mo-
linari, Italy; Matteo Manassero, Italy;
Edoardo Molinari, Italy.
1:46 p.m.-8:06 a.m. Hiroyuki Fujita,
Japan; Todd Hamilton, United States;
Kevin Na, South Korea.
1:57 p.m.-8:17 a.m. Rickie Fowler,
United States; lan Poulter, England;
Hunter Mahan, United States.
2:08 p.m.-8:28 a.m. Camilo Vil-
legas, Colombia; Aaron Baddeley,
Australia; Brandt Snedeker, United
States.
2:19 p.m.-8:39 a.m. Kevin Chappell,
United States; Do-Hoon Kim, South
Korea; Robert Rock, England.
2:30 p.m.-8:50 a.m. Jon Mills,
Canada; Andreas Harto, Denmark;
a-Scott Pinckney, United States.
2:41 p.m.-9:01 a.m. .- a-Steve Irwin,.
United States; Ryan Nelson, United
States; Elliot Gealy, United States.
2:52 p.m.-9:12 a.m. Christopher De-
forest, United States; a-Chris Williams,
United States; Wes Heffernan, Canada.
Thursday-Friday
10th hole-First hole
7 a.m.-12:40 p.m. Chad Campbell,
United States; Harrison Frazar, United
States; Marc Turnesa, United States.
7:11 a.m.-12:51 p.m. Justin Hicks,
United States; Marcel Siem, Germany;
Sunghoon Kang, South Korea.
7:22 a.m.-1:02 p.m. Thomas Levet,
France; Brian Gay, United States;
Gregory Havret, France.
7:33 a.m.-1:13 p.m. Heath Slocum,
United States; a-Russell Henley,
United States; Nicolas Colsaerts,
Belgium.
7:44 a.m.-1:24 p.m. Padraig Har-
rington, Ireland; Angel Cabrera, Argen-
tina; Stewart Cink, United States.
7:55 a.m.-1:35 p.m. Ryo Ishikawa,
Japan; Anthony Kim, United States;
Y.E. Yang, South Korea.
8:06 a.m.-1:46 p.m. Luke Donald,
England; Lee Westwood, England;
Martin Kaymer, Germany.
8:17 a.m.-1:57 p.m. Jonathan Byrd,
United States; Bill Haas, United States;
Webb Simpson, United States.
8:28 a.m.-2:08 p.m. Bubba Watson,
United States; Adam Scott, Australian;
Robert Karlsson, Sweden.


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 2011 3B


8:39 a.m.-2:09 p.m. Sam Saunders,
United States; Tim Petrovic, United
States; Scott Piercy, United States.
8:50 a.m.-2:20 p.m. Matthew
Edwards, United States; a-Brad
Benjamin, United States; Zack Byrd,
United States.
9:01 a.m.-2:31 p.m. Bud Cauley,
United States; Adam Long, United
States; a-Michael Barbosa, United
States.
9:12 a.m.-2:42 p.m. Michael
Whitehead, United States; Will Wilcox,
United States; John Ellis, United
States.
12:40 p.m.-7:00 a.m. Alexandre
Rocha, Brazil; Andres Golzales; United
States; Bubba Dickerson, United
States.
12:51 p.m.-7:11 a.m. Michael Put-
nam, United States; a-Patrick Cantlay,
United States; Robert Dinwiddie,
England.
1:02 p.m.-7:22 a.m. John Senden,
Australia; Robert Garrigus, United
States; Scott Hend, Australia.
1:13 p.m.-7:33 a.m. Jason Dufner,
United States; Stephen Gallacher,
Scotland; S.Y. Noh, South Korea.
1:24 p.m.-7:44 a.m. Steve Stricker,
United States; Retief Goosen, South
Africa; David Toms, United States.
1:35 p.m.-7:55 a.m. Rory Mcllroy,
Northern Ireland; Dustin Johnson,
United States; Phil Mickelson, United
States.
1:46 p.m.-8:06 a.m. Charl Schwartz-
el, South Africa; Trevor Immelman,
South Africa; Zach Johnson, United
States.
1:57 p.m.-8:17 a.im. Nick Watney,
United States; Lucas Glover, United
States; Geoff Ogilvy, Australia.
2:08 p.m.-8:28 a.m. Ryan Moore,
United States; Robert Allenby, Austra-
lia; Rory Sabbatini, South Africa.
2:19 p.m.-8:39 a.m. David Howell,
England; Kenichi Kuboya, Japan; Briny
Baird, United States.
2:30 p.m.-8:50 a.m. Charley Hoff-
man, United States; Alexander Noren,
Sweden; Sangmoon Bae, South Korea.
2:41 p.m.-9:01 a.m. a-Brett Patter-
son, United States; Bennett Blakeman,
United States; Brian Locke, United
States.
2:52 p.m.-9:12 a.m. -' Chris Wilson,
United States; David May, United
States; a-Beau Hossler, United States.


NHL PLAYOFFS
STANLEY CUP FINALS
(Best-of-7)
Vancouver 3, Boston 3
Wednesday, June 1: Vancouver 1,
Boston 0
Saturday, June 4: Vancouver 3,
Boston 2, OT
Monday, June 6: Boston 8, Vancouver

Wednesday, June 8: Boston 4,
Vancouver 0
Friday, June 10: Vancouver 1, Boston
0
Monday, June 13: Boston 5, Vancou-
ver 2
Wednesday, June 15: Boston at
Vancouver, 8 p.m.


EASTBOURNE RESULTS
Tuesday
At Devonshire Park
Eastbourne, England
Purse: ATP, $663,000 (WT250); WTA,
S618,000 (Premier)
Singles
Men
First Round
Kevin Anderson (6), South Africa, def.
Alexander Slabinsky, Britain, 7-5, 6-3.
Donald Young, United States, def.
Daniel Cox, Britain, 6-1, 7-5.
Rainer Schuettler, Germany, def. Ser-
giy Stakhovsky (5) Ukraine, 6-3, 6-2.


Illya Marchenko, Ukraine, def. Fred-
erico Gil, Portugal, 6-1, 6-3.
Somdev Devvarman, India, def. Guill-
ermo Garcia-Lopez (4), Spain, 6-3, 6-4.
Kei Nishikori, Japan, def. Evgeny
Kirillov, Russia, 7-5, 6-1.
Olivier Rochus, Belgium, def. Lleyton
Hewitt, Australia, 6-2, 3-0, retired.
Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (1), France, def.
Denis Istomin, Uzbekistan, 6-2, 7-5.
Janko Tipsarevic (3), Serbia, vs.
James Ward, Britain, 6-3, 4-6, susp.,
darkness.
Women
First Round
Ana Ivanovic, Serbia, def. Julia
Goerges, Germany, 6-4, 6-3.
Elena Baltacha, Britain, def. Aravane
Rezai, France, 6-2, 6-1.
Ekaterina Makarova, Russia, def.
Mirjana Lucic, Croatia, 6-1, 3-6, 6-4.
Serena Williams, United States, def.
Tsvetana Pironkova, Bulgaria, 1-6,
6-3, 6-4.
Francesca Schiavone (4), Italy, def.
Kaia Kanepi, Estonia, 7-6 (7), 6-1.
Marion Bartoli (6), France, def. Lucie
Safarova, Czech Republic, 6-3, 3-6,
7-6 (7).
Bojana Jovanovski, Serbia, def.
Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova, Russia,
7-6 (9), 6-4.
Vera Zvonareva (1), Russia, def.
Heather Watson, Britain, 6-3, 6-3.
Daniela Hantuchova, Slovakia, def.
Zheng Jie, China, 6-4, 6-4.
Li Na (2), China, def. Tamira Paszek,
Austria, 7-5, 6-4.


BASEBALL
American League
BALTIMORE ORIOLES-Announced
the resignation of pitching coach Mark
Connor. Named Rick Adair pitching
coach and Terry Crowley interim
bullpen coach.
TORONTO BLUE JAYS-Optioned
RHP Kyle Drabek to Las Vegas (PCL).
Selected the contract of RHP Zach
Stewart from New Hampshire (EL).
National League
FLORIDA MARLINS-Activated SS
Hanley Ramirez from the 15-day DL.
Placed OF Scott Cousins on the 15-day
DL.
HOUSTON ASTROS-Fired pitching
coach Brad Arnsberg. Named Doug
Brocail pitching coach.
American Association
EL PASO DIABLOS-Released RHP
Matt Stone.
GRAND PRAIRIE AIRHOGS-Signed
LHP Jason Moody.
WICHITA WINGNUTS-Released OF
Jorge Cortes.
BASKETBALL
national Basketball Association
CHARLOTTE BOBCATS-Promoted
Rod Higgins to director of basketball
operations. Named Rich Cho general
manager.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
CALGARY FLAMES-Announced the
purchase of the Calgary Roughnecks
of the National Lacrosse League.
OTTAWA SENATORS-Named Paul
MacLean coach and signed him to a
three-year contract.
TORONTO MAPLE LEAFS-Re-signed
D Carl Gunnarsson to a two-year
contract.
SOCCER
Major League Soccer
D.C. UNITED-Waived D Rodrigo
Brasesco.
COLLEGE
ATLANTIC 10 CONFERENCE-An-
nounced the resignation of director of
communications Jason Leturmy.
BIG SOUTH CONFERENCE-Promoted
Chad Cook to assistant commissioner.
Named Sherika Montgomery assistant
director of compliance.


WEDNESDAY MORNING I AFTERNOON JUNE 15, 2011

6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:0010:3011:0011:3012:0012:30 1:00. 1:30 2:00 2:30 3:00 3:30 4:00 4:30 5:00 5:30
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3 WTVY News 4 The Early Show (N) (In Stereo) [E Live Regis & Kelly The Price Is Right (N) Young & Restless Live at Bold The Talk (In Stereo) Let's Make a Deal (N) Rachael Ray Oprah Winfrey News News
5 NewsChannel 7 Today Today Ryan Reynolds; nutrition mistakes. (N) (In Stereo) as Days of our Lives (N) News 7 at Noon Rachael Ray a The Doctors B Ellen DeGeneres Millionaire Jeopardy News NBC News
8 News 13 This Morning Good Morning America (N) E Live Regis & Kelly The View (In Stereo) The Dr. Oz Show All My Children a One Life to Live s General Hospital (N) Dr. Phil (In Stereo) Oprah WInfrey News ABC News
10 Auto Tech Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Aqua Kids Funniest Home Videos Chris Smarter Smarter Judge B. Housewives/NYC New Life Church Judge Mathls B Justice Justice Nate Berkus The People's Court Jdg Judy Jdg Judy
11 I Arthur Martha Curious Cat In the Super DInesaur Sesame Street Sid WordWrld Between Barney Arthur Clifford Martha SId Electric Cyberche WildKratt WordGirl Cat In the Curious Dinosaur NewsHour
7SHOW GreatExp. 'Below the Belway"(2010)'NR' "Reunio'* (2009) BrettCullen. 'NR' Motherhood'* (2009) "Lake Ciy"(20008) Sissy Spacek. ThDeal"** (2005)ChristianSlater./R' 'Leavesof Grass"'** (2009) 'R' Twilight(2008)
14 NICK Max,Ruby Max, Ruby Umizoomi Umizoomi Bubble Dora... Sponge. Sponge. Sponge. Sponge. T.U.F.F. Parents Sponge. Sponge. iCarly ICarly Victorious Victorous Big Time Big Time Sponge. Sponge. Penguins ICarly
16 TBS Home Imp. Home Imp. Saved/ Saved/ Yes, Dear Yes, Dear Prince Prince Prince Payne Payne Browns Amer. Dad Ear Raymond Jim Jim The Office Friends Friends Raymond Raymond King King
17 HBO Kung Pow 'BuryMy Heart at Wounded Knee"(2007) Inception X-Men Origins: Wolverine** (2009) The Time Travelers Wife"** (2009) 0 Conchords 'Petcy Jackson & the Olympians" "Anaconda"* (1997)'PG-13' %Men Origins'
18ESPN2 (5:00) Mike and Mike in the Morning (N) (Live) ESPN First Take (N) (In Stereo.Live) ESPN First Take (In Stereo) SportsCenter (N) (Live) Scott Van Pelt Show SportsNation (N) (Live) NASCAR Football Around Pardon
19 ESPN SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter N) (Live SportsCenter (N) (Live) Report otball NFL Live Jim Rome Around Pardon SportsCenter (N) (Live)
20 CSS Mayhem in the A.M. SportsNite Football Golf PaidProg. LoseLbsll Hair Free GetHotll BestBral SportsNiteFootball College Football: 2007 Alabama at Mississippi. College Football Coaches Champ Football SportsNite (N) I
21 DISN Manny Agent Oso Mickey Pirates Mickey Mickey Phineas Phineas Phineas Deck Good Good Shake It WWizards wizards Wizards Phineas [Deck Good Fish Shake It Wizards Phineas Good
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23 TNT Angel "Forgiving" Charmed (In Stereo) Charmed (In Stereo) Supernatural s Supernatural E Las Vegas (In Stereo) Las Vegas (In Stereo) The Closer 'Manhunt" Cold Case "Greed" Bones (In Stereo) Bones (In Stereo) Bones (in Stereo)
24 DISC Paid Prog. J. Roblson J. Meyer TRIALaser Chain Gang: Maricopa Gang Wars: Oakland I Gang Wars Deadliest Catch E American Chopper American Chopper American Chopper American Chopper Cash Cab Cash Cab Cash Cab Cash Cab
25 TWC Your Weather Today With Abrams and Bettes s Wake Up With Al Day Planner 0 Storms Storms Cantore Cantore
26 USA Law Order: CI "Licence to Kill'*** (1989, Action) Timothy Dalton. House "Not Cancer' House (In Stereo) House"Birthmarks" NCIS "Marine Down" NCIS "Eye Spy" NCIS (In Stereo) X NCIS (In Stereo) N NCIS (In Stereo) a
28FAM Boy World Boy Word What Like What Like Grounded 70 Club The700Club Full House Full House Still Std Still Stnd 8, Rules 8 Rules My Wife MyWife '70sShow '70s Show '70s Show 70sShow Gilmore Girls a Still Stn Still Stnd
29 LIFE The Balancing Act (N) Reba Reba Will/Grace Will/Grace Chris C' ihrs How I Met How I Met Desp.-Wives Grey's Anatomy s Grey's Anatomy s Cold Case Files 0 Cold Case Files BM Unsolved Mysteries Unsolved Mysteries
30 A&E The Sopranos a The Soprands a CSI: Miami (In Stereo) Criminal Minds Ba Dog Dog The First 48 B9 The First 48 Ia The Sopranos s CSI: Miami (In Stereo) Criminal Minds a Dog Dog The First 48 BE
32 SYFY Look Sexy Paid Prog. Face Off a Face Off Face Off 0 Face Off Face Off Face Off Face Off "Family Plot" Face Off Ghost Whisperer Stargate SG-1 M Star Trek: Enterprise
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35 BET (5:00)BETInspiration Chris Chris Bernie Bernie Bernie Bernie JamieF. Jamle F. Jamie F. amie F. Chris Cs Cs Chris Chris Chrs Chris Chris Chris 106 &Park:Top 10
36 TOON Bakugan Beyblade Pokemon Wheels Johnny T Johnny T Garfeld Garfeld Scooby Scooby Looney Tunes Tom & Jerry Garfield Ed, Edd Ed, Edd Sdekck Almost Adventure MAD Looney Scooby JohnnyT
39 HIST Modern Marvels 0 Ancient Discoveries Wild West Tech 0 Modern Marvels E American Pickers American Pickers American Pickers Ancient Discoveries Wild West Tech 0E Modern Marvels 0E American Pickers American Pickers
40 TVLND Paid Prog. Paid Prog. All-Family |Sanford Jeffersons Jeannle Jeannie All in the Family Saehford Gunsmoke s Gunsmoke "Lynott" Bonanza Bonanza Bonanza Good Jeffersons Sanford Sanford
43 CNN2 (5:00) Morning Express With Robin Meade (N)' HLNNews (N) Showbiz Tonight (N) Prime News (N) 00
45 CNN (5:00) American Morning (N) a CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) CNN Newsroom (N) The Situation Room With Wolf Blitzer (N)
46 CW (5:00) The Daily Buzz Steve Wilkos Show Browns Payne Cosby Cosby TBA ITBA TBA TBA Steve Wilkos Show The Tyra Show 0 Lyricsl LyricsI King King '70s Show '70s Show
47 SPIKE Baby WEN Hair Makeover Get Hot CSI: NY "Admissions" CSI: Crime Scene CSI: Crime Scene CSI: Crime Scene CSI: NY (In Stereo) CSI: Crime Scene Gangland (In Stereo) Gangland (In Stereo) Gangland (In Stereo) Gangland (In Stereo)
49 HGTV Super Hidden Cash Cash Cash, Carl Cash, Carl Get It Sold Get It Sold To Sell To Sell House Hunters Secrets Antonio Divine .D. Design Design Candce Design Design Get It Sold Get It Sold First Place First Place
98 TLC 19 Kids 19 Kids Baby Baby Baby Baby's lo & Kay Say Yes Say Yes Cake Kitchen Baby Baby Multiples Baby's Extreme Couponing Extreme Extreme Etreme Extreme Extreme Extreme
99 SPEED Monster Jam Seat Swap Record NASCAR Hall NASCAR Hall of Fame Paid Prog. Bosley NASCAR Racing: Sprint Cup: Pocono 500. Garage Truck U Barrett-Jackson Monster Jam Pass Time Pass Time


WEDNESDAY EVENING / LATE NIGHT JUNE 15, 2011

6:00 6:30 7:001 7:30 f&00 8:30 9:0019:30 10:0010:30111:0011:3012:0012:30 1:00 1:30 2:00 2:30 3:00 3:30 4:00 4:30 5:00 5:30
2 g Hurricane Jeopardyl Undercover Boss Criminal Minds Blue Bloods a News Late Show Letterman Late Late Show/Craig Wheel Extra (N) Up to the Minute (N) (In Stereo) AgDay News Daybreak Good Morning Show
3 1 News Wheel Undercover Boss Criminal Minds Blue Bloods as News Late Show Letterman Late Late Show/Craig Inside Ed. Up to the Minute (N) (In Stereo) News WTVY News 4
5 g News Wheel 2011 Stanley Cup Final: Boston Bruins at Vancouver Canucks. a News Tonight Show w/Leno Late Night Carson Poker After Dark (N) Extra (N) The Bankruptcy Hour Shepherd's Chapel Early Tdy NewsChannel 7 Today
8 0 News Ent Middle Middle Family jFamily ABC News Special (N) News Nightline Jimmy KImmel Live Lopez Jim The Law Show Paid Prog. ABC World News Now (N) E0 Morning News 13 This Morning
10 ED Two Men Two Men So You Think You Can Dance (In Stereo Live) News How I Met Law & Order: SVU Friends Friends King-Hill Scrubs Lewis and Jurnovoy The People's Court Paid Prog. Pald Prog. Shepherd's Chapel Paid Prog. Outdoor
11 I NewsHour Dimension Secrets of the Dead NOVA (In Stereo) Chaco Canyon Charlie Rose (N) 00 T. Smiley T. Smiley NOVA (In Stereo) Secrets of the Dead Independent Lens Frontline (In Stereo) Chaco Canyon Place Between
7 SHOW ,T..i T., '.:,r' U.S.,Tara Nra Jackie NASCAR 'Next Day Alr"* (2009)'R' NASCAR "We Were Soldiers"*** (2002) Mel Gibson.'R' "AlAmerican Orgy'(2009)'R' "Backstage"**h (2000)'R' The Loss ofa Teardrop Diamond'(2008)
14 NICK (5:30) iCarly (In Stereo) My Wife My Wife Lopez Lopez '70s Show '70s Show The Nanny The Nanny The Nanny IThe Nanny My Wife IMyWife ChrIs Chris '70s Show '70s Show Lopez Lopez Fam. Mat. TBA Fam. Mat. Fam. Mat.
16 TBS Seinfeld e Seinfeld Browns Browns Payne Payne Payne Payne Conan (N) Lopez Tonight (N) Conan Lopez Tonight "The PinkPanther"** (2006, Comedy) Married Married Married Married
17 HBO "X-Men Origins" Game of Thrones Game of Thrones Game of Thrones Real Time/Bill Maher Treme (In Stereo) "Hoodlum"**& (1997, Crime Drama) 'R' True 'Taking Woodstock'**t (2009) 'R'PI Watch 'Legend-Grdians'
18 ESPN2 Football NFL Live SportsNation E The Fab Five E SportsNation E0 NASCAR SportsNation BB Football SportsNation 0 SportsCenter Mt 0 SportsCenter 0 SportsNation 00 Mike and Mike
19 ESPN MLB Baseball: Texas Rangers at New York Yankees. Yankee Stadium. Baseball Tonight (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) Baseball NFL Live SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) MLB Baseball: Rangers at Yankees SportsCenter 0 SportsCenter 00
20 CSS College Football: Alabama at Tennessee. Oct. 21,2006. Boxing SportsNIte (In Stereo) Paid Prog. Pald Prog. Pad Prg. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Arthri-D Focused
21 DISN Deck Deck Good Shake It 'Enchanted'*** (2007) Amy Adams. 'PG' Deck Deck Wizards Wizards Hannah Hannah Deck Deck Phineas Phineas Chugging Babar Agent Oso Jungle title Little
22 MAX "Cirque ODu Freak' "It's Complicated' ** (200) 'R'8 '"Devil"* (2010)'PG-13' "'Wild Things"* h (1998) Kevin Bacon. Coed Confidential (In Stereo) Femme National Lampoon's Vacation'" ast Remake of Beau Geste' iagro
23 TNT The Mentalist 00 The Mentalist 0 Franklin & Bash 0 Men of a Certain Age Franklin & Bash go Men of a Certain Age HawthoRNe Leverage B0 Cold Case (In Stereo) NUMB3RS (In Stereo) NUMB3RS "Sabotage" Angel (In Stereo)
24 DISC MythBusters 00 MythBusters 00 MythBusters Keith Barry MythBusters 0E MythBusters Keith Barry MythBusters E Popoff Free $ Teleworld Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Pald Prog. Anderson |TrIVIta
25 TWC Weather Weather Twist Fate Twist Fate Weather Center EB Weather Weather Twist Fate |Twist Fate Weather Center IN Weather Weather Twist Fate Twist Fate First Outlook W] Wake Up With Al
26 USA NCIS "Bete Noir" NCIS "Mind Games" NCIS "Silver War" NCIS (In Stereo) NCIS "Marine Down" CSI: Crime Scene CSI: Crime Scene 'Children of Men"(2008, Science Fiction) Law & Order: SVU Paid Prog. Money Law Order: Cl
28 FAM Funniest Home Videos "Coyote Ugr* (2000, Romance-Comedy) Nine Lives The 700 Club 00 Whose? Whose? Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Sexy Abs The 700 Club BB Vacuum Sexy Abs Prince Life Today J. Meyer TriVita
29 LIFE Pawn Pawn The First 48 0 The First 48 0 Vanished, Beth How I Met How I Met Chris Chris Will/Grace Will/Grace Chris WEN Hair Oreck Pald Prog. TriVlta CarMD 3x Faster Arthri-D CelebHair Look Sexy


32SYFY Ghost Hunters 00


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45 CNN John King, USA (N)
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Income Property Brothers Hunters
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Car Warriors Car Scl. Car Scl.


Showbiz Tonight
Anderson Cooper 360
Paid Prog. Secrets


Crews
Fam. Guy Chicken
Modern Marvels clt


l' Co o


3's Co. 1's Co.
the Joy Behar Show


Piers Morgan Tonight
Profits Secrets


Most Amazing Videos Entourage MANswers


Hunters House
Extreme Extreme
NASCAR Race Hub


Property Property
tosley Recession
Motorcycle Racing


BET Inspiration
Boosh Squidbill
'ald Prog. Paid Prog.
3's Co. 3's Co.


Showbiz Tonight
Norld Business Today
Anxiety ,Vacuum
'aid Prog. Sexy Abs
beaning WEN Hair
'aid Prog. Pald Prog.
fASCAR Racing


Paid Prog.
Arthri-D
Stooges


Ix Faster Paid Prog.
Boston Legal IN]


/acuum Paid Prog.
Vtakeover Knife Set
'aid Prog. TrIlVta
IMTV: Morning
3ET Inspiration
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world One (N) American Morning (N)
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'aid Prog. Smoking Paid Prog. Get Hotl
rhln in 301 Acne TriVlta Ground
Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Couple Couple
Paid Prog. Sexy Paid Prog. Paid Prog.


30 A&E


The First 48 s0


"Balman Returns"


33 AMC


34 MTV
35 BET
36 TOON


Teen Wolf (In Stereo)
106/Park Award


40 TVLND
43 CNN2


Jane Velez-Mitchell


47 SPIKE
49 HGTV
98 TLC
99 SPEED


Gangland (In Stereo)


Hunters House
Extreme Extreme
NASCAR Race Hub


asr Warriors ln Car Warriors


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14B WEDNESDAY, JUNE15,2011


PEANUTS BY CHARLES SCHULTZ


BORN LOSER BY ART AND CHIP SANSOM
OK', TRkO~N PLELW-RO~EOFN 7 TKT O5K, CI-F-- OW 6bOUT WDE PIGS FLY ?



F07 TlOME t I FOR IU I
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BIG NATE BY LINCOLN PIERCE


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HUNDRED ON THE
SOCIAL STUDIES
FINAL, YOU'LL GET
A 3 FORP THE
SEMESTER.I WHY
NOT T?----
--j BECAUSE..


BECAUSE HE COULDN'T
GET A HUNDRED ON
AN EXAM IF HIS
LIFE. PEPEMDED
ON IT
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FRANK & ERNEST BY BOB THAVES


ARLO & JANIS BY JIMMY JOHNSON


IVE. ALWAYS HEARD A DOG'5
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^r-on


I'VEA.MVE.R HEARD Aft'HI
ABOUT A CAT'SMOUTH!



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ALLEY OOP BY JACK AND CAROLE BENDER
WHY WOULD YOU THINK THE WE'RE NOT
CREW WOULDN'T SURVIVE THE TRIP JUST TALKM6e
TO EARTH Z? SPACE TRAVEL 1 ABOUT SPACE
MONTYREDILY SAE JIM MEDDICIT? TRAVEL HERE








MONTY BY JIM MEDDICK


COW & BOY BY MARK LEIKNES
I HATE PEOPLE WHO AND THEIR CORRECTIONS
ALWAYS CORRECT AREN'T ABOUT HELPING'
YOUR GRAMMAR. YOU, IT'S MORE ABOUT
MAKING THEM FEEL
1/ i \ SUPERIOR TO YOU.
Y :zJ I


*THISISWHYYNO'
0 ONE LES YOUt
001.LENEBATIVB

-. _


KIT'N'CARLYLE BY LARRY WRIGHT HERMAN BY JIM UNGER


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


NEA Crossword Puzzle

ACROSS 40 Gear tooth Answer to Previous Puzzle
S43 Air-safety FLED ADO CA W
1 Dental org. LESEADOG AREA
photo 44 First-magni- A OMIE T G F
(hyph.) tude star
5 Extent 48 Deer's EINSUR
of activity refuge H YRA HEIED
10 Expressed 50 Got less ER NAMEL
derision tense D AN LIT ECRU
12 Apply 52 It may SHOD AKA SUES
mascara require R I EST BID
13 Request password R I T H YEINA
formally 53 Venus' LO ITER QUI
14 Toughens sister OMNI HOTSP OTS
up 54 Cook in LEGO N I E D I E
15 Voice below embers A N P SEA
baritone 55 Dept. store
16 Winter mo. inventory 11 vu 35 Boxing jabs
18 Channel-surf 12 Frankie 36 Hot spring
19 Brewing DOWN Avalon's. 39 Feedbag
need "DeDe -" filler
(2 wds.) 1 Warrior 17 Tummy 40 Designer
22 Abbot's princess muscles Chanel
underling 2 Gives it the 20 Blackboard 41 SeaWorld
25 -Threadbare gas need performer
29 Major blood 3 Plato's 21 Attic ends 42 Turns right
carrier pupil 22 Butter 45 Wool pro-
30 Razzed the 4 Up till now serving ducers
performer 5 Andreas 23 Chess 46 Trait carrier
32 Hoes and Fault piece 47 Oklahoma
rakes 6 Vera-, 24 Rust town
33 Sword Mexico component 48 Remote
thrust 7 Gumbo 26 Wide street 49 Former JFK
34 Pays homage veggie 27 Fillet a fish arrival
37 Mournful 8 Baby chick 28 B-movie 51 Dress
poem sound crook bottom
38 Peace of 9 USN rank 31 "L.A. Law"
mind 10 Crane arm co-star
Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


2011 UFS, Inc. Dist. by Universal Uclicl for UFS


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter.in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: S equals F
"0 CE B'H PUH CEXB EB BEMECN

UDKU SEJ 'CEOBP XZWHURUJ UDKU

HZUN CE. HE UWAZ ZOK EXB."

- DOHHDU JOAZWJC

PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "You're a grand old flag ... the emblem of the land I
love. / The home of the free and the brave." George M. Cohan
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 6-15


Horoscope
GEMINI (May 21-June
20) Generally, teaming
up with someone usu-
ally turns out to be rather
fortunate for you, but to-
day could prove to be an
exception.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
- If you find that you have
more responsibilities piling
up than you can handle, do
what you can without be-
coming frustrated.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
- Be careful how you han-
dle some shocking hearsay
conveyed by a talkative
friend. If you repeat it to
others without first having
its validity checked, trou-
ble could ensue.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22) Friends or associ-
ates won't think less of you
for avoiding problem ar-
eas that could cause you
trouble.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
- You're a person who
usually doesn't turn a deaf
ear to the advice or sug-
gestions of cohorts. Today,
you'll have little interest in
what others are saying.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.22)
- If there are persons in-
volved in your commercial
affairs with whom you've
never before dealt, tread
slowly.and cautiously.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-
Dec. 21) Avoid being
compelled to make an
important decision under
strong pressure, especially
if your judgment isn't run-
ning up to par.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) All those nasty jobs
you've been putting off
might catch up with you
and demand attention.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) It is never a good day
to champion an unpopular
cause, but now may be an
exceptionally bad time to
do so.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) The disorder you find
in your household may be
your doing more than any-
body else's.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
- Avoid making any com-
mitments. What people say
or even put in writing will
come back to haunt you.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
- If you need an emissary
or someone to represent
you in a matter that is of
great importance to you,
be extremely selective.


Annie's Mailbox


Dear Annie: Two years ago, my son
began dating "Layla," who then became
pregnant. I went out of my way to in-
clude her in our family. I bought mater-
nity clothes and baby outfits, took her
out for lunch and paid for her to join us
on a family cruise.
Layla emailed everyone to stay away
from the hospital the day of the baby's
birth, as she wanted "bonding time" I
asked my son if I could bring flowers. He
said "fine" and met me at the hospital.
He invited me to get a peek at the baby
through the window. I didn't see Layla,
but when she.heard I had been there, she
became extremely angry, and requests to
see my new grandson were rebuffed.
I sent an email apologizing for upset-
ting her. I also suggested we seek coun-
seling together. In response, she "un- '
friended" me from her Facebook page,
sent me a list of all of my "wrongdoings."
My son said he had to side with Layla
because she is the mother of his child.
My grandson is now a year old. I saw a
therapist who recommended I distance


Bridge
How should South play as safely as possible
in this three-no-trump contract? West leads his
fourth-highest heart and East puts up the jack.
North's three-diamond rebid guarantees at
least a six-card suit and promises a good 14 to a
so-so 17 high-card points.
The original declarer grabbed the first trick W
with his heart king and ran the diamond 10. A
East happily won with his king and returned Y
the heart twb (his original fourth-highest) and *
West took four tricks in the suit for down one.
South, as defeated declarers are wont to do,
grumbled about bad luck. But this gave North
his opportunity. "You know from the first trick
that West has the ace-10 of hearts hovering
over your queen-nine. If East had the ace, he
would have played it, third hand high. And if
East had the jack and 10, he would have put up
the 10, the lower of equal cards when playing
third hand high. To keep East off the lead, play
a club to dummy's king and run the spade 10.
It loses and West shifts to a diamond, but you
with dummy's ace, play a spade to your ace,
lead a club to dummy's ace, and play a spade
to your nine. You take three spades, one heart,
one diaihond and four clubs. Your chances are
77.6 percent, much better than the 50-50 dia-
mond finesse."


myself, which I have done. My son finally
called to say he is marrying Layla in-
two months. He said they want to meet
with me in a public place to discuss the
possibility of allowing me back into their
lives, but with strict conditions. I told my
son the only way I would do this is if both
of them first agreed not to keep me from
my grandchild without good reason.
He replied, "Our baby, our terms," and I
haven't heard from them sihce.
It has taken me months to get back
on an even keel, and I never want to go
through this pain again. Should I write
them out of my life? Is there anything
else I can do? NUMB IN NEVADA

Dear Numb: Layla sounds like a con-
trol freak, and your son has no spine.
However, as the parents, they get to set
the boundaries when it comes to their
child, like it or not. If you want to see
your grandson, you will have to play by
their rules. It won't be easy, but it can be
done. Only you can decide if it's worth
the price.


North 06-15-11
A 10 7 6
V 5
SA QJ 8 4 3
SAKJ
est East
J 3 A Q 5 4 2
SA 10 8 6 3 J 7 4 2
52 K 7 6
8 7 5 4 4 9 2
South
A AK 9 8
Y KQ 9
10 9
4 Q 10 6 3

Dealer: North
Vulnerable: Both
South West North East
1 Pass
1 A Pass 3 Pass
3 NT Pass Pass Pass

Opening lead: V 6


------------------








CLASSIFIED


Jackson County Floridan *


Wednesday, June 15, 2011- 5 B


WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED



MARKETPLACE


ANNOUNCEMENTS

LOST: Black Pre-pay slide phone with keyboard
at Marianna Walmart Friday nite. 850-482-7257
LOST: Wallet at Winn Dixie Friday night. Please
call 850-593-5753

($) FINANCIAL

Business For Sale: Established & Great
Location, Tanning Salon, everything set to
start working immediately. And Hair Salon
also, because of relocating, both businesses
fully equipped, to be SOLD AS ONE! Call Tami
Smith 850-482-4633 Tues-Fri 9-5. Only if
interested in whole thing. DO 12468
'(I) MERCHANDISE

Basic Pistol Training Course is a one day 8
hour instruction located in Clayton, AL. Local
Restaurants are available. Refreshments will be
provided-lunch on your own. Live fire will be re-
quired. Registration can be completed on-line
at the NRA Website. Training will be completed
by Certified NRA instructors. Course begins at
8 am sharp on June 18th, 2011. Other dates will
follow. Class is limited to 6 students. Instruc-
tion will be Power Point, Hands On, and demon-
stration. Topics covered will be proper firearm
handling, cleaning, and firing. POC is Michael
W. Canfield BSAH, RRT, EMT, NRA Pistol In-
structor. 334-379-0164 DO 12542


T Baby Things Store %
SALE/BUY your things with us new and
used toys, cribs, swings, walkers, formula,
Etc.. Also 30 day "u tag" avail. 1330 Hartford
Hwy Suite 1, Dothan Call 334-794-6692
Email babythingsstore@aol.com
Facebook Page- BabyThing Store
Coffee Table, Light Oak Wood
With Glass Top Pieces. $50.00.
Call: (334) 435-1242 or (334) 797-9184.
Go-Kart, Carter model 2575-3020, red, 2-seater,
5 HP Tecumseh engine, roll bar cage, seat
belts, good tires, kept in garage, only driven on
paved road. Like new, bought 2 years, ago, runs
perfectly, starts easily. Included in price is mo-
torcycle helmet which driver may use for add-
ed safety. Price for cart and helmet around
$1,000 originally. Price is firm and will only be
available until June 23rd when we are moving.
Serious inquiries only, $600, 334-618-0648. DO
12509
()PETS & ANIMALS

Free: Playful, cuddly, hand raised short & long
hair kittens need loving families! 334-393-9681

r---------------------------------I
AKC Male Poodles $300 Ready Now!
Now taking deposits on CKC Toy poodles
$250. & up! Call 334-794-2854
---------- 7-------------------
FOUND: Yellow Lab Puppy off 231 in
Campbellton. Call 850-532-7396
LOST: Grey Schnauzer, Off Hwy 73 near over-
pass. Call 850-209-5117
V Lots of Summer Puppies ON SALE! V
Morkies $150, Chorkies $75,
Papi-Yorks, Hairless Chinese Crested,
Taking deposits: Morkies, Pomeranians,
Yorkies, Malti-Poos 334-718-4886

I GOATS for Sale 19 nannies, 2 Billies & 25 I
kids. Don @ 334-899-5340 or 334-797-5230 I

( *) FARMER'S MARKET



U-Pick

Tomatoes
James Bedsole
334-886-2291
No Sunday Sales!!


Let Us Shell & Clean Your Peas!
$5/Hamper (2 or more $4/hamper)
Call for appointment 850-209-0895
U PICK Peas: White peas, black eye peas, pur-
ple hull peas, and okra. Located at 721 Whitak-
er Rd., Ashford, AL. Call (334)791-4992,
(334)714-0318, or (334)791-6608 for more info.
DO 12617


PANAA CIY BACH OND
2/1., PoTniCu os
Muh or'* uly urise
OnFotBahRod$2/ih


I ']] 'In] I,
FRESH PRODUC
SAWYER'SiPO
HASFviRESH HOME GROW
PRODiUCE

I ~^-a


Fresh Peas, Tomatoes,
Squash, Cucumbers Snap
Beans, New Potatoes & Home
Grown Peaches Are Readyl
220 W. Hy 52 Malvern
334-73-660 DO1200


r --------------------------------

SHI VERS

On Hwy 84 E.
Near Gordon

SHELLED

BUTTERBEANS
small, young green
& tender, and peas.
Open 8am 5pm
334-522-3756

Fresh Peas

Home Grown
L.----------------------L-------.


Wednesday, June 15, 201








TlTE SUDOKU GmE DWITH A/ KICKIC
HOW TO PLAY
Fill in the 9x9 grid with the missing
numbers so that each column, row and
3x3 box contains the digits 1 9 only once.
There is only one correct solution
for each puzzle.
GET MORE WASABI
PUZZLES ONLINE!
ARCHIVES AND MORE GREAT GAMES AT
BOXERJAM.COM


Get news and alerts on your

mobile device.., stay connected!






Gat Alerts




alerts'.


jcfloridan.com











will attend public high school in
Marianna FL, Jackson School District.
Students will come.on the F1 Student Visa.
They speak English, are insured and bring
their own spending money. Host families
provide room and board and receive a
*apnprn;u mnnthlv stinend*.


[ DO 12473



L^^/oil^


Shotgun: 12Ga SS Eastern Arms 101-1 Savage
94-A Metal Good, wood worn. $50. 850-482-4120
Shotgun: Barrel, Remington 1100, modified
choke, 2-3/4, w/rib $75.850-482-4120
12" TV, Antenna & Converter Box $70 850-
209-5198
13" Color TV $20 850-605-6192
3 CD Disc Changer by Magnavox with 2 small
speakers, new, $30 850-372-2419
Adult Wheel Chair with foot rests, good condi-
tion, $45 850-482-7443
Baby Bed & Changing Table (maple), used $45
Baby Bath Tub, good cond. $15 850-482-7443
Brinkman Smok'n Grill, excellent condition, $20
850-482-7443
Bunk Bed, full bottom, twin top, metal, white
$75 850-693-1600
Century Stroller $25 850-693-1600
Crutches, Aluminum, good condition $20
Wooden, used seldom $15 850-482-7443
Desktop Computer, all-in-one printer/desk/
chair,Grand Ridge, FL $150 for all 850-592-2656
Desktop Computer, all-in-one printer, desk, &
chair, $150 for all 850-272-2363
Dining Table w/4 oak chairs, formica top, light
in color, good condition $65 OBO 850-209-6977
Exercise Bike, high ratio fan resestant, good
condition, $25 850-482-7443
Homelite Pole Hedge Trimmer, 120 volt, elec-
tric. new condition $35 850-526-3426


Life Jackets (orange), 4 vest style, 1 belt, used,
$5 each 850-482-7443
Maple Storage Cabinet, Colonial style, 41" x
72" $225 850-693-1600
Oak Bookshelf with 5 shelves, new, already as-
sembled $20 850-372-2419
Porch/Lawn Swing With Chains,
Will Deliver. $85 334-794-5780
Purses Authentic Dooney & Bourke & Louis
Vuitton- new condition $35-$75,334-389-6069
Reclining Chair, floral print, good
condition $50 850-482-7933
Rocker, wood with green cushion $20
850-605-6192
Rocking Chair, heavy wood, dark maple, used
$75 850-482-7443
Round glass tabletops,(2) 1/2"x 5' w/ 1" edge,
Cost $850 will take $300 OBO 850-593-5361
Scooter Wheelchair Go-Go Elite Traveller,
Needs charger & battery $200 .334-389-6069.
Sleep Number 7000 Mattress Pad, Queen $40
850-526-3426
Standing Cherry Mirrored Jewelry Armoire,
excellent condition $60 850-482-7443
Wall Clock, very large 36" round, $30
850-526-3426
Wicker Dog Bed, looks like ena table 18"x24"
$30 850-526-3426
XBOX 360, with hard drive, wireless remote & 5
games, $200 850-209-8040


_ __ __
__ _





0








(


2008 BLOCKDOT INC. WWW.BLOCKDOTCOM


Tuesday's
WASABI SOLUTION
6 1s5 71 013 I||


01


(1)4 1@@ 5 8 3 7 2
7 3 2 ( 9 4 (g)( 6
-...2 7 D41...81.4 8 1 (D 9
0 58__ 8 174

3-9 6 9 7


00


5 | 2 6 1() 3 (Z) 4 11 8

BE SURE TO VISIT OUR
NEWEST GAME SITE
KEWLBOX.COM
KEWLBOX.COM


-I I --------I.


VACATION HOMES ON LAKE EUFAULA
3BR/2BA Fully furnished with guest house
& 3 storage buildings Abbeville $375,000.
3BR/2BA Fully furnished on Cowikee
Creek 350FT water front $150,000.
Call 334-618-8296 or 334-673-1778


GIVE US A RING...


Call today to place

, your item in the

classified.


(850) 526-3614

(800) 779-2557



,: "ifarketplace


- -- - -- -











6 -" \\rnetda_ ..Ine 1 ; 20111 .lackson Counht Floridan


IT) EMPLOYMENT


SA C K S 0 U N


FLORIDAN

has an opening for a

Full-Time

Reporter

The reporter is expected to cover events
and write stories for print and the Web,
generate their own story ideas, and will
be asked to take photos, shoot video and
assist with the newspaper's website and
social media sites. Candidates must
possess good writing and reporting
skills; must be able to develop and
maintain coverage on their beat; and
must be able to generate story ideas in
addition to handling assignments. '
Photography and video skills are a plus.

This is an opportunity for recent college
graduates, or reporters at a weekly or
small daily looking to move on to a
bigger challenge. Experience on
college publications and/or internships,
and a degree in communications
field is required.

The Floridan is a five day a week
(Tues.-Ffi., Sunday) community paper.

Please submit resume and cps to
MedlaGeneraLcom



EARN EXTRA

DOLLARS

Looking for mature, dependable,
newspaper carriers

SMALL ROUTE
Less than 3 hours per night
Earn an average of
$500 per month
after the cost of gas

Must have dependable
transportation, liability insurance
and a valid driver's license.

if interested, fill out a Route Bid at the
Jackson County Floridan
4403 Constitution Lane, Marianna FL






SPRINGS


www.iceriversprings.com

Ice River Springs takes great pride in
producing the highest quality spring water
in North America from our protected
natural springs. Since our
inception in 1995,
Ice River Springs has grown rapidly
by offering a high quality, competitive
product with excellent
customer service. Ice
River Springs now operates eight facilities
in North America. Each of these
facilities is dedicated to the community in
which it operates. We are now,
seeking qualified candidates for the
following position in our
Marianna Florida facility:


Quality Assurance
Technicians

Qualified candidates are
invited to
submit their resume's to
hrmarianna
iceriversprings.com

We thank all applicants; however only
those selected for an interview will be
contacted. Ice Springs is an EOE


o *3***** S S* * s ***sary. ***


( EDUCATION
) & INSTRUCTION


^ Get a Quality Education for a
New Career! Programs
FORTIS offered in Healthcare,
^ HVAC and Electrical Trades.
Call Fortis College Today!
888-202-4813.
COLLEGE www.fortiscollege.edu.
DO 12622

..RESIDENt ..



Edgewood Apartments in Cypress Area. Quiet,
Furnished 1BR 1BA.Cable & laundry included.
$440/mo + deposit 850-573-6062 4


Beach Cottage for Rent: 3BR 1.5BA, Large
screened porch, Beacon Hill (Near Mexico
Beach) $550/wk 850-482-2539 or 201-888-2388


2BR/2BA TOWNHOUSES
Chipola River Townhouses
DEPOSIT WAIVED
850-482-1050/693-6879 4.


1BR 1BA House
conveniently located in-
Marianna, FL For details call
850-557-3432 or 850-814-6515 4m
1BR 1BA House
conveniently located in
Marianna, FL For details call
*850-557-3432 or 850-814-6515 4m
3/1.5 brick home for rent or sale: 1 country
acre, 1/4 mile SW of Cottondale, $650 + dep &
references 850-579-4317
3/1 House on 1 acre lot, $650/mo 2855 Owens
St. Mar. 850-415-6995/638-1761
3 bedroom, 2 bath brick home on farm near
Graceville. References required $550 / month,
No Pets. Call 334-445-2441.

3BR 1 BA House, 3222 Bobkat Rd
(Dogwood Hts) 1 car garage, fenced
S $695 +dep. 850-217-1484
3BR 2BA house on 10 acres, Compass Lake
area, Energy efficient, CH/A, Outdoor pets ok,
$850 + dep. 850-573-04668
Austin Tyler & Associates *
Quality Homes & Apartments
4 850- 526-3355 4-
"Property Management Is Our ONLY Business"
Lovely 3BR 1BA House, Clean, in town, near
schools, nice yard, quiet neighborhood, out-
door pets ok, $600/mo with $600 deposit 850-
' 482-6211
NEW 3/2 house 4 rent. Compass Lk area on 1.5
ac lot. $800/mo +dep. 850-573-0625


70ruiLow i InAshford 2/2 Mobile Home
$475 Mo + Dep 6066 Victory Rd. Bascomr Ft 3/1
$ 675. mo + Dep Call 334-797-1517
1BR 1BA MH near Bascom $300 + dep CH/A,
porch, storage room, Washer & Dryer, water
included. 850-569-5628
2006 MH $250/mo
1/1 Furnished to Qualified
Caretaker/Handyman to maintain 5 acre
Marianna Property until sold. 6 mos
renewable lease guaranteed. 850-592-2507
2/1 $425 & 2/1.5 $450 $400 dep in Greenwood ,
CH/A, water/garbage/lawn included. 850-569-
1015-
2 & 3 bedroom mobile Homes in Cottondale.
$500 and up. H20, garbage, sewer included.
http://www.charloscountry living. com.
850-258-4868/209-8847
2&3BRMH's in
Marianna & Sneads (850)209-8595.
2BR/1BA Off Cornsilk Rd. (at stop sign) Near
Trading Post $350/mo + sec. water/sewer/
garbage inc. (850) 214-6039
3/2 DW in Marianna $650 + dep Quiet, clean.
H20/ septic/lawn 850-209-1027
Houses and trailers for rent starting at $300 per
month. (850) 593-4700
Lg 2/1.5 $425/mo Quiet, well maintained. New
paint & new vinyl, water/sewer/ garbage/
lawn included. Lots for owner owned MH's
$175/mo m# Joyce Riley RE 850-209-7825 41
Rent to Own: 2 & 3BR Mobile Homes.
Lot rent included. For details
850-557-3432 or 850-814-6515
Small Quiet Family Oriented Park- 2BR MH for Rent
includes water, garbage, lawn care, No Pets 850-592-
8129




Car Repair Shop for Rent. 3 lifts, large fenced
yard, located in Marianna. Upgraded, ready to
go. Call Dutch 850-579-2821




104 Sundance Lane, Midland City, 1500 sq ft,
$145,000, 3br/2ba, Will pay up to $2,000 in clos-
ing costs, 20 minutes from Fort Rucker, 5 mi-
nutes from Dothan Pavilion, 7 minutes from
Troy University, contact (334)618-2075


Doublewide: 3 bedrooms, 2 bath mobile home
for sale. Includes all appliances (some new),
including washer/dryer, and some furniture.
1960 sq ft. Must be moved. $27,500
Call (850)557-3402 or (850)579-1251




(2) MDI ATVs 150CC and 110CC used less than
10 hours. Paid $2400. asking $1000. OBO
Call 334-493-0024 DO 12444


Hammerhead Dune Buggy, 150cc, 2 seater,
great condition, $1600, 850-482-3581 after 4pm
DO 12512


Rugged 2004 Polaris ATP 330 4-stroke, air-
cooled engine with fan-assist oil cooler On de-
mand 'Turf-mode', 2WD or All Wheel Drive Turf
mode provides 20% tighter turns, less damage
to terrain Heavy duty dumping rear cargo box
with 2501b capacity Sealed front storage box
Recent Polaris Dealer complete tune up includ-
ing new battery. $1995.00 Must sell, price is
negotiable Call 334-347-9686. DO 12537
Yamaha '99 XVS1100 42K miles. REDUCED
$2,800. OBO 334-726-1215 or 334-477-3152


Boat/RV Storage 984 Bruner Rd. (S. Park in
Taylor), 12w x 32d x 10h, Free water, power &
air, $75/month. Mgmt. lives on site, Upholstry
services available on site, 334-797-0523, 334-
792-8628, ddismukes@comcast.net


2005 Rhino Stick Steering 17'-6", w/70 HP Suzu-
ki four stroke, electric anchors, trolling motor,
AM/FM/CD stereo, depth finder, aluminum
trailer, 12 gallon tank, new batteries, etc. This
boat is like new, very low hours. Only selling
cause I bought a new ski boat! Roger 334-798-
2181 DO 12694


Bayliner '97 Ski Boat w/5.7 Merc. I/O, w/ S.S.
Prop (licenced for 8 person) has bow seating &
includes trailer w/like newtires. $6500. OBO
334-797-8172 4 DO 12707
Bayliner Trophy.
22.5'. 2000 model, well
r- -_ kept and clean.
Many extras. $19,950.
334-794-0609 DO 12632


G3 175 Eagle Bass Boat '07, 70 horsepower
Yahama OB, trolling motor, galv. trailer, less
than 20 hrs use, 9,800 FIRM 850-762-2065/372-
2503 DO 11230
Hydro Stream Bass Boat with 150 HP
Johnson Outboard, new trolling motor
new carpet & -2 props
$ 4500. 4 888-398-0137 4+ DO 11868
seacraft, '89,20 ft- Center
console, '95 225HP Johnson,
i dual axle trailer w/brakes.
Great condition, very clean.
$5,250 334-696-5505
Sun Catcher '08 Pontoon G3 Fish- 50HP Yamaha
motor, shower shall, AM/FM radio & CD, lights
cruise control trolling motor, fish finder, 2 live
wells, 40hrs, custom cover, $16,000. Call 334-
685-1929 or 334-598-2910 D012662
EXPRESS BASS BOAT-H-56
Ri 18-ean 115 HP Yamaha 4-
stroke engine, motor
-0i-inmw-wmq ,. guide trolling motor,
galvanized trailer, GPS.& 3
fish finders, 2 stainless steel props, live well,
cooler & extra storage. Boat cover, life vests.
Rig has less than 20 hrs and has always been
stored under cover. In perfect condition,
$13,500 334-687-8937 DO 12238


2006 Fleetwoo.d Toy Hauler -18 ft. Self-
contained. Room for 2 large bikes. Sleeps 4.
Bath, Fridge, Stove, Micro, TV/DVD combo,
AM/FM/CD, 2 prop tanks, awning. Wt. dist
hitch and swaybar incl. REDUCED! $11,900. 334-
498-6932. DO 12486
23'8" Jayco 5th Wheel Camper, sleeps 6, 1
slide out, hitch, excellent condition, $7500 850-
482-5090 DO 12598
25ft Travel Trailer- with 1 slide, queen bed,
dining bed, double bed and big shower!
30ft Trailer Trailer- with 2 slides sleeps 9,
queen and double bed. Westgate Pky onto
Harrison Rd. 3 mile Call 334-685-0649
COUGAR TRAVEL TRAILER
-'---, 2004-30 foot,
big rear window,
living/dining slide, excel-
lent condition, new tires,
must see to appreciate,
$16,500 OBO, 334-687-6863,334-695-2161
DO 11156
Damon '02 Challenger Sleeps 6,13K miles,
automatic, 2 slides, back-up camera and 2 TVs.
Excellent condition! Call 334-596-2312 DO 12502
FLEETWOOD 2005 Prowler AX6 5th wheel, 36 ft,
4 slides, large shower, 30/50AMP. $25,000 OBO
Call 334-695-4995, 334-687-7862. DO 11065
Keystone '10 bullet M-278 RLS 32ft.Travel Tri.
-w/ 1 slide $24,995 or with '07 GMC Yukon SLT
44K mi. $49,500. 334-693-5454 DO 12493
REDUCED!! Montana '05 5th Wheel,
4 slides, king bed, excellent condition,
$25,500 OBO Call 850-547-2808
Scottsman '04 Sport- 25ft electric with LP frig
and freezer, microwave, 5CD stereo, 13 inch
TV, new water heater, new cover!! D012455
PRICED REDUCED $7000. Call 334-494-9516
Viking '10 Pop-up Camper 1706 AC and
Heating, Frig, Sink, 201bs Propane, spare tire,
dinette table, sleeps 6, almost new!


www.JCFLORTDAN.com


Western '03 Alpenlite 27' Travel Trailer $8000
OBO 334-446-0621 DO 12628



Dixie RV SuperStores
FL's Newest RV Dealer
NOW OPEN!!!
*Store Hours*
Monday-Saturday
8:00am-6:00pm
21 Acres / 30 Brands New and Pre-Owned
Newmar Keystone Heartland Jayco
n Fleetwood w Prime Time Coachmen
Forest River
Service Department
Parts and Acces. Store
RV Collision Center
Located off 1-10 Exit 70 / SR285
328 Green Acres Dr.
De Funiak Springs, FL 32435
Sales and Service: 850-951-1000
www.dixierv.com DO 12569
National '98 Dophin-
37ft sleeps 6, 32k miles,
large slide, leveling jack,
back-up camera, TV, awn-
ing, corian counter tops,
$27,000. Call 334-793-6691 D012506


Trail Lite 2006 R-VISION
26 ft., fully loaded, bought
new. 13K miles $49,995
334-616-6508


Private RV Site in Cottondale, includes elec-
tric, water, sewage, $375/mo. + $250 dep. 850-
209-7502

(1 TRANSPORTATION


FORD 2008 F350 4x4 DRW CREW CAB6. 4 L V8
Diesel, Dark Blue/Silver Lariat, Leather, Nav
System, Sirus w/o service, Towing Pkg, 1 Own-
er, Reese 5th Wheel Hitch, 51K miles $34,500.
Exc. cond. 240-925-2757; 334-446-0073. D012678



Automatic 350 (Silver). Will
sell as is for $4,700. OBO
334-774-1915



2003 Ford F150 Supercrew 2WD Four Ddor 139"
Flareside Truck, Dark Gray Clearcoat, Low
Miles Approx59,000, 4.6L EFI V8, Auto, Air, 4
Wheel ABS, Pwr Windows/Locks/Mirrors,
Cruise/Tilt, Premium Sound, Class III Tow
Package, Limited Slip Differential. Single Own-
er. $12,900 or best reasonable offer. 334-703-
7685
Camery '98 gold in color $2000;.334-685-1645
DO 12508
Chevrolet '03 Cavalier 146k miles, great,
condition, white, CD player $3500.
Call 334-671-1227 or 334-648-8333 D012437
N .'-i CHEVYY '88 CORVETTE, 350
engine, auto trans., color
-- blue. runs great, $3,500 firm
334-689-8272 DO 12653
Chrysler '06 Crossfire- 20, 480 miles, MFG by
Mercedes Benz, black on black convertible
with dark gray interior, cloth seats, alum
wheels, AC, 6 speed, manual, 25MPG, like new
tires, Retiring, $16,000. Call 334-393-4444 '
DO012661
DO YOU KNOW ANYONE WITH BAD CREDIT?
I can get U Riding Today
Repos, Slow Credit, Past Bankruptcy OK!
$0 Down/ 1st Payment, Tax. Tag & Title
Push. Pull or Drag, Will Trade anything!
Warranty On Every Vehicle Sold!l
$100 Referrals! DO 12252 Steve 334-803-9550
Honda'94 Accord
Tan Priced at $3,900.
2180 Montgomery Hwy.
Call 334-714-2700 or
334-671-7720. DO 11820
Mercedes '04 E320- 118k
miles, complete service
records, 1 owner, pewter
fully loaded, $13,500.
334-798-4385 D012429
Mercedes '86 420SEL 4-door excellent
condition, light yellow in color.
205-493-0519 or 334-792-9429.
Mercedes '95 C220, Very good condition.,
White, 196k mi. Asking $3200 334-899-4248
After 5:30 pm DO 12566
P ontiac '00 Sunfire,
2 Door. Automatic,
4 Cylinder, 71,000 miles,
'.al COLD AIR! $3,950. Call:


IM M"- 5,.


CLASSIFIED


20 ft. Sunbird '94 Corsair, open bow, mercury
5.0 liter, 235hp, fuel injected, I/O, sunlounger
deck, ski platform, easy loader trailer, to
many options to list, less than 150 hrs. garage
kept, exc. cond. MUST SEE!!
READY for summer! Hook and go!
$7,800 OBO e 334-790-7738 DO 12503


Sales Professionals
If you have what it takes to guide local businesses successfully through multi-platform
marketing campaigns, always follow-up on deals and are happiest getting new clients
signed-on, WRBL News 3 wants you On Our Side!

CBS affiliate in Columbus, Georgia seeks client focused, goal-oriented sales professional.
Successful candidate will be organized and self-motivated with proven record of superior
relationship management and selling success. One year sales experience required with one
year of media or mobile sales preferred. Proficiency with Microsoft Word and Excel required.
Experience with Powerpoint and Matrix Plus preferred.
EOE M/F/D/V Pre-employment Drug Screening and Background Check required.

Qualified candidates may apply online at WWW.Mediageneral.com.
No phone calls please.


VY __~Y_~IIVI_ __


-7


4












www.JTCFLORIDAN.com CLASSIFIED


Toyota '03 Camry, good condition, tan with
gray interior, approx. 155k miles, vehicle locat-
ed in Grand Ridge, FL $5500 850-209-4949
DO 12528
Toyota '07 Camry SE 48K
miles, Black, alloy wheels,
Excellent Condition, CD,
MP3 Player, Gray Interior,
-_-: 30 MPG $16,500 334-797-
3195
TOYOTA '10 COROLLA- White, fully loaded,
refinance or take over payments 334-559-
0480 DO 12491



new tires $2500. OBO
4 931-572-7380
DO 12419


Harley Davidson '02 Sportster 1200 custom 11k
miles, chromed out, $6500. Call 334-691-3468
or 334-701-3855
Harley Davidson '10 Heritage Softail Classic
with 2500 Miles on it. VERY pretty bike. Garage
kept, Adult driven. Never Been Dropped.
$16,500 334-791-5061 DO 12431
HONDA'07 CBR,
600, loaded, 4,000
miles,stretch lowered,
2 brother exhaust, $6,000
334-689-3518,334-339-2352
DO 11146
Honda '07 VTX1300S Beautiful like new
w/3011 miles. Over $3000. extras: Vance &
Hines staggered pipes, Mustang seat, Custom
windshield, Adjustable chrome backrest,
Chrome rear Carrier traditional, Leather sad-
dlebags, Hypercharger, Kuryakyn passenger
foot pedals, Highway bars, 4" Riser handle-
bars). Great touring bike. $9600/OBO $9000.
334-790-0334 or 334-585-2468 DO 12533
Honda '09 CRF 100 Dirt Bike, Used very little,
never been in the mud. $1800 OBO 334-655-
1092 DO 12611
Kawasaki '06 Eliminator
125., Royal Blue, 130
miles, Like New. Electric
start. Great Commuter
bike. $1,800 OBO 334-796-
6613 DO 12436
Yamaha '09 V Star 1300
Tourer- like new, 543 miles,
10 months warranty, red,
saddle bags, passenger
back rest, windshield
$8000. OBO Call 334-393-3824 D012602


Jalon '03 JT500T-15 Scoot-
':4 er, ideal for youngsters or
he f adult $400. OBO 334-796-
( -a 6613. No title DO 12436


**NEW** 2010 SCOOTERS, 50CC & 150 CC $980
-$2700 850-482-4572 DO 12463


CHEVY '04TRAILBLAZER, NON-SMOKER,
PEWTER, CLOTH INT, ALL POWER OPTIONS,
DUAL AIR, ONLY 117K MILES $9210.
850-482-4572 DO 12460
Ford '05 Explorer LXT 133k miles, 3rd row
seating, towing package, very clean. $8400.
Call 334-393-9315 or 334-763-0117
Honda '05 CRV Special Edition- 63k miles, 4WD,
fully loaded, sunroof, gold with tan interior,
great condition, very clean, one owner. $15,500.
Call 334-793-6790 or 718-7181 D012652
Honda '96 Passport,
5-speed, Power Steering,
A/C, very clean ,low Miles
$2500 OBO 334-691-7111
or 798-1768 DO 11893

3Hummer '05 H2 4WD SUV .
Fully loaded with naviga-
tion, 3 row seat, all leath-
er, new rugged tires,
Sun/moon rodf. Very
clean. Mileage 103,100. Color Desert Sand.
$20,000. Call 334- 671-4756. DO 12643
Lincoln Navigator '06 79K miles Quade seating ,
rear AC, back up sensor, 2 yr. warr. Payoff
$23,400 trad for small car or truck 334-596-9966
or 334-790-6410. DO 12538
LTZ'03 Red Trail Blazer gray leather interior,
DVD package, excellent condition, 130K miles
$5,900.334-393-0571. DO 12476
Toyota '04 4-Runner SR5 Silver, Leather, Spoil-
er, 98k Mi. $12,900 334-791-9595 DO 12573


'05 Chevy Avalanche 1500LS V8, 2WD, Red,
gray cloth int fixed running boards, bed liner,
towing package. very clean good condition,
91K miles $14,900. 334-791-5235 DO 12425
2007 Nissan Frontier -Crew Cab, This truck is a
one owner with less than 28K miles and is in
immaculate condition. V6 with power package,
tow hitch package, andlhigh utility bed pack-
age. Asking $19,000, call 334-493-7700 evening
or 334-504-2779 during day. DO 12438
4120 John Deere Compact 4x4 Tractor- box
blade, bush hog and 20ft 6 ton trailer $21,500.
Call 334-803-7422
Chevrolet '02 Z71
$6999.00.
2180 Montgomery Hwy -
Call: 334-671-7720.
Guaranteed Financing!!
DO 12190
Chevrolet '96 5-10 Regular
Cab, Automatic, 4.3 Liter,
V-6. 114,000 miles. CLEAN!
$3,995. Call: 334-790-7959.
DO 12499
Ford '03 F-150 XL,
-l 4 Wheel Drive, Automatic,
V-8, 4.6 liter, Regular Cab.
101,000 miles. $7,495
Call: 334-790-7959. DO 12498

FORD'04 F- LARIAT SUPERCREW 4WD,
BLACK, TAN LEATHER, 4 DR, RUNNING BOARDS,
BEDLINER, FIBERGLASS CAP & TOWING PKG




with leather interior. Has
a nav. system and Serius
radio. Tow package. 51K miles. Reese 5th
Wheel hitch. Excellent Condition! $34,500
334-446-0073 or 240-925-2757 DO 12676

-'h FORD'89 F150, 4wh, 4x4
Auto, $4,600 or reasonable
offer. Call 229-296-8171.
DO 11892
Ford '94 3930 Tractor, 45 HP
1818 hours, Great condition.
ASKING 8800. Call:334-797-2656. DO 12452


Ford '99 Ranger XLT
2 super cab 4-door,
5 speed, V-6, 114,000
miles, excellent, $5595.
Call: 334-790-7959. D01249

Toyota '03 Tacoma- V6, manual 4WD, silver
with topper, excellent condition, 85k miles
$13,000. Call 334-889-2259 DO12709
j TRACTOR IH1440 Combine,
Field Ready, Grain Head and Corn
Head. $8,500. 850-415-0438
WANTEDJNISAN FRONTIER 5 SPEED
TRANSMISSION, 1998-2002, 2WD, 4CYL
Call 334-598-2356 D012518


Ford '96 E-150 Conversion Van, Like new condi-
tion, Garage kept, 101K original miles, Runs
great, Handicap equipped, but can be convert-
ed back. Fully electric. $8900 OBO 334-673-9881
or 334-333-0115 DO 12519
GMC '90 Handicap Van- 2500 Heavy Duty
Series, all power, excellent wheel chair lift,
clean, good condition $4500. Call 334-794-3412
D012668
S Honda '96 Odyssey, Clean,
Runs Good, Front & Rear
air, VERY COLD! Automat-
ic, Power Steering, $2500
OBO 334-691-7111 or 798-
1768 DO 11893
Pontiac'99 Montana V-6, One owner. 145K
miles Quad seating, $3600. OBO CASH Serious
inquiries only call 334-693-3141
9AM 8PM ONLY. DO 12014



Got a Clunker
:i ..- We'll be your Junker!d
N iWe buy wrecked cars .
and Farm Equip. at a
fair and honest price!
-. LAverage $ paid $225.
CALL 334-702-4323 D011208

& WANTED WRECKED OR JUNK VEHICLES
I PAY TOP DOLLAR DO 11930
DAY -334-794-9576 *- NIGHT 334-794-7769

WE PAY Ca$H

FOR JUNK CARS!!!!!!

334-818-1274 D012226


(~)


LEGALS


LF15353
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN BY THE JACKSON
COUNTY PLANNING COMMISSION OF ITS IN-
TENT TO CONDUCT A PUBLIC HEARING TO RE-
VIEW THE FOLLOWING AND OTHER BUSINESS:
The Jackson County Planning Commission will
consider:
1. Hidden Valley Management Services, LLC A
request to operate a business to offer products
of an adult nature and is limited to persons 18
years of age or older. The development is pro-
posed to be located on the east side of US
Highway 231 north of Interstate-10 and south
of Barber Road (vacant half of building located
at 2670 Hwy 231) in unincorporated Jackson
County.
2. Grice's Mobile Home Rentals (MHP11-0001) -
A request for a 5-lot mobile home park located
approximately 1 mile east of the Grand Ridge
City Limits at 2107 Ventage Lane on the south
side of Hwy 90 in unincorporated Jackson
County.
3. Other Business: Discussion of proposed
changes to the Jackson County Code of Ordi-
nances, Section 80-3, Exempt Signs, and Sec-
tion 80-7, On-Premises Sign Standards.
The public hearing will be held in the Jackson
County Commission Board Room of the
Administration Building located at
2864 Madison Street, Marianna, Florida


Grader Pan Excavator
Dump Truck Bulldozer

Demolition Grading Site Prep
* Debris Removal Retention Ponds Leveling
* Top Soil Fill Dirt Gravel Land Clearing





CLA ING&HO SKEPN


Jackson County Floridan *


on the 20th of June, 2011 at 7:00 p.m.
Anyone desiring information may contact the
Community Development Department between
7:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday
at 4487 Lafayette Street, Marianna, Florida or
contact by phone at (850) 482-9637.
In accordance with the Americans with Disabil-
ities Act, persons needing a special accommo-
dation to participate in this meeting should
contact the Planning Secretary at Jackson.
County Community Development no later than
5 days prior to the meeting. The Planning Sec-
retary may be contacted at 4487 Lafayette
Street, Marianna, FL, 32448, (850) 482-9637, or
(800) 955-8771 (TDD).



LF15351
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
14th JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 32-2008-CA-000436CA
WACHOVIA MORTGAGE, FSB f/k/a WORLD
SAVINGS BANK, FSB
Plaintiff,
vs.
WILLIAM J. COPLEY,
Defendants, .
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Sum-
mary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated
6/1/2011, and entered in Case No. 32-2008-CA-
000436CA of the Circuit Court of the 14th Judi-
cial Circuit, in and for JACKSON County, Flori-
da, where in WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., ALSO
KNOWN AS WACHOVIA MORTGAGE, A DIVI-
SION OF WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., FORMERLY
KNOWN AS WACHOVIA MORTGAGE, FSB, FOR-
MERLY KNOWN AS WORLD SAVINGS BANK,
FSB, Defendant, I will sell to the highest bidder
for cash on 6-30-11, at 11:00 A.M. CST at 4445
Lafayette Street, Marianna, FL 32446, the fol-
lowing described property as set forth in said
Summary Final Judgment lying and being sit-
uate in JACKSON County, Florida, to wit:
Blocks 15 & 16 in the TOWN OF GREENWOOD,
according Greenwood Investment Company
Map of Greenwood, Florida, as recorded in the
Public Records of Jackson County, Florida.
Less and except parcel conveyed to Evans as
described in Deed Book 511, Page 409 and par-
cel conveyed to Teague as described in Official
Records Book 61, Page 69, Public Records of
Jackson County, Florida.
Less and except any part of land in highways
or streets.
ALSO KNOWN AS THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED:
Commence at an existing Iron Rod marking the
Southeast corner of the NE '/ of Section 6,
Township 5 North, Range 9 West of Jackson
County, Florida; thence run N 89 57'54"W along
the South line of said NE/4, 432.18 feet to an
existing Iron Rod (PSM No. 2142) marking a
point on the Easterly right of way line of State
Road No. 71, thence continue N 89 o57'54"W
along said South line, 70.77 feet to a point on
the Westerly right of way line of said State
Road No. 71; thence continue N 89 57'54" W,
260.07 feet to an existing Iron Pipe and call this
the Point of Beginning; thence continue along
said South line on a bearing of N 89 57'54" W,
262.26 feet to a set Iron Rod (PSM No. 6111.);
thence departing said South line on a bearing
of N 150'23" E along the East line of an platted
unopened street, 368.25 feet to a set Iron Rod
(PSM No. 6111); thence S 89 o17'19" E along the
South line of a platted unopened street, 544.41
feet to a set Iron Rod (PSM No. 6111) marking a
point on the Westerly right of way line of afore-
said State Road No. 71; thence S 05 o20'58" W
along said Westerly right of way line,. 84.39
feet to a set Iron Rod (PSM No 6111); thence
departing said right of way line on a bearing of
N 8302'10" W, 259.05 feet to an existing Angle
Iron; thence S 05 o20'58" W, 310.19 feet to the
Point of Beginning.
Property Address: 4113 Bryan Street, Green-
wood, FL 32443

NOTICE: ANY PERSON WITH A DISABILITY RE-
QUIRING SPECIAL ACCOMMODATIONS TO PAR-
TICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING SHOULD CON-
TACT 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); 1-800-955-8770 (V),
VIA FLORIDA RELAY SERVICE, NOT LATER THAN
SEVEN (7) DAYS PRIOR TO THE PROCEEDING.


*00a
C a ll" ,.,-....


i '7::';'

to.lae..urad


Hall Roofing
Siding & Building LLC. -
Lic. #RC29027412 RB29003513
SIDNEY HALL 4939 Hwy. 2 3.
(850) 569-2021 Malone, .
(850) 526-8441 Florida 32445



H IMPROVEMENT

HAPPY

HOME REPAIR
WE'LL BEAT ANY PRICE!!
Big Or Small Jobs WELCOME






J&K'S PRESSURE CLEANING,
HANDYMAN & MOBILE
HOME REPAIR SERVICE
wr Mo dBest Pressure IVasher
Handymah Seri i t in 2006
8506) 630-9459 Ja1
,, ,,James Carter/Owner


VCYVI >AYPIENYT BPiR11xif-
Pool Maintenance & Repair from top to l
bottom! Also fiberglass tub installation! I will sit with elderly. CNA Certified.
(850) 573-6828 Will do light housekeeping & cooking.
- (80) 592-753 (800) 69 517te
T E C SS FI (850) 592-7253 (800) 693-6517


Wednesday, June 15, 2011- 7 B


ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE
SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE
OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. THE CLERK
SHALL RECEIVE A SERVICE CHARGE OF UP TO
$70 FOR SERVICES IN MAKING, RECORDING,
AND CERTIFYING THE SALE AND TITLE THAT
SHALL BE ASSESSED AS COSTS. THE COURT, IN
ITS DISCRETION, MAY ENLARGE THE TIME OF
THE SALE. NOTICE OF THE CHANGED TIME OF
SALE SHALL BE PUBLISHED AS PROVIDED
HEREIN.
DATED this 1ST day of June, 2011.
DALE RABON GUTHRIE
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By: /s/Tammy Bailey
Deputy Clerk
LF15354
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 2010-1107-CA
GREEN TREE SERVICING LLC,
3500 Blue Lake Dr. Suite 360
Birmingham, AL 35243
Plaintiff,
vs
CHARLES M. DOWNS, CATHERINE DOWNS,
COMMONWEALTH FINANCIAL SYSTEMS, INC.,
assignee of Citibank Credit Card, and WELLS
FARGO BANK N.A. d/b/a WELLS FARGO AUTO
FINANCE,
Defendants
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT pursuant to
Plaintiff's Final Summary Judgment Re-
Establishing and Foreclosing Note and Mort-
gage entered in the above-captioned action, I
will sell the property situated in Jackson Coun-
ty, Florida, described as follows, to wit: I
BEGIN AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE
SOUTH HALF OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF
THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 1,
TOWNSHIP 4 NORTH, RANGE 8 WEST OF JACK-
SON COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE RUN N89
10'21" W ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SAID SV
OF NW'AOF SE1/, 1354.87 FEET TO THE NORTH-
WEST CORNER OF THE SV2 OF NW/4 OF SEA4,
THENCE S01 38'05" W ALONG THE WEST LINE
OF SAID S2-OF NW/4 OF SE/4, 160.09 FEET
THENCE S89 10'20"E, 1356.14 FEET; THENCE N01
10'50" E ALONG THE EAST LINE OF AFORESAID
SVz OF NW'/4 OF SE/4, 160.68 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO ROAD
RIGHT OF WAY ALONG THE EAST LINE BEING IN
SALEM CHURCH ROAD
TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 2002, 80X28
1045 MOBILE HOME, SERIAL NUMBER
HOGA20K03056AB
Commonly known as: 2873 Salem Church Road,
Sneads, Florida 32460
at public sale, to the highest and best bidder,
for cash on the lobby of the Jackson County
Courthouse,.4445 Lafayette Street, Marianna,
Jackson County Florid, 32446, at 11:00 AM
(CST), on the 30th day of June, 2011.
If you are a subordinate lien holder claiming a
right to funds remaining after the sale, you
must file a claim with the Clerk of Court no lat-
er than 6 days after the sale. If you fail to file
claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining
funds.
Notice to Persons With Disabilities: If you are a
person with a disability who needs any accom-
modation in order to participate in this pro-
ceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you to
the provision of certain assistance. Please con-
tact the Court Administrator's office not later
than seven days prior to the proceeding.
DALE RABON GUTHRIE
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
/s/TAMMY BAILEY
DEPUTY CLERK

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18B WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15. 2011


War


Nervous Iraqis buying weapons
The Associated Press .. .


BAGHDAD Saadoun
al-Sahil already had an
AK-47 assault rifle at
home but just didn't feel
safe. The furniture mer-
chant was worried about
violence in Baghdad and
the impending U.S. with-
drawal of troops. So he
bought two pistols and
some more ammunition.
Iraqis are facing a chang-
ing and uncertain future,
and they're dealing with it
by arming up. .
"These weapons are for
the protection of myself
and my family..I fear that
things will get as worse as
it was in 2005 and 2006.'
We cannot predict what
will happen tomorrow
or after tomorrow," said
al-Sahil...
Weapons are an every-
day part of the Iraqi land-
scape. Nearly every home
has at least one weapon,
often an AK-47 assault
rifle. At many buildings,
residents and bodyguards
can be seen checking
their pistols with security
before they're allowed to
go inside.
Political figures are pro-
tected by bodyguards of-
ten carrying a pistol and
an assault rifle.
Only people with cer-


--- -- ." --


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
This June 8 photo shows weapons and munitions on display at the house of a weapons
dealer in Baghdad. Iraqis are facing a changing and uncertain future, and they're dealing
with it by arming up.


tain jobs or positions that
might make them need a
weapon are allowed to le-
gally own them and only
with a license. Jewelry
store owners who often
find themselves attacked
or doctors who are tar-
geted for kidnapping can
apply for a license.
For years following the
,2003 invasion, the Iraqi
government followed the


basic policy of allowing
one gun per household.
Iraq military units search-
ing a house would often
tell people that if they had
one weapon it was OK,
but additional weapons
would be confiscated.
But the top military
spokesman in Baghdad,
Maj. Gen. Qassim, al-
Moussawi, said authori-
ties were now moving


away from that unofficial
policy and had recently
started a campaign to dis-
arm Iraqi cities.
But that's not stopping
the stockpiling of guns
and ammo. A senior offi-
cial in Iraq's military intel-
ligence department said
in recent months illegal
arms sales have jumped,
specifically AK-47 assault
rifles and pistols.


Israel

Palestinian state vote could be dangerous


The Associated Press
RAMALLAH, West Bank
- A unilateral Palestinian
move toward statehood
could be "dangerous," the
president of the EU parlia-
ment said Tuesday during
a visit to the West Bank.
Frustrated by a long-
standing impasse in peace
talks with Israel, the Pal-
estinians have mounted
a campaign for interna-


tional recognition at the
U.N. General Assembly in
September.
European support
would be critical, but EU
parliament chief Jerzy
Buzek sounded cool to
the idea.
Speaking in Ramallah,
Buzek said he "under-
stood" the Palestinian po-
sition but added it could
complicate peace efforts.
Achievingpeace through


negotiations would be
"excellent," he said, "but
unilateral declaration
could be sometimes even
dangerous."
Israel has denounced
the move and has urged
the Palestinians to return
to peace negotiations
instead.
Concerned about the
possibility of Palestinian
riots in September, Israeli
police conducted a drill


Tuesday simulating large-
scale disturbances. Hun-
dreds of police in riot gear
took part.
Bentzi Sau, commander
of the police Central Dis-
trict, told reporters that
police were aware that a
unilateral declaration of
statehood by the Palestin-
ians "could cause distur-
bances of the kind we've
seen in neighboring Arab
countries."


Syria


ITHE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Newly arrived Syrian refugees are led by Turkish soldiers in
a camp, in Boynuyogun, Turkey, Tuesday. According to the
Turkish Prime Minister's office the number of Syrian refugees
in Turkey stands at more than 8,500 people.


Tanks, troops try


to snuff uprising


The Associated Press
'BOYNUYOGUN, Turkey
- Syrian tanks and the
government's most loyal
troops pushed into more
towns and villages Tues-
day, trying to snuff out any
chance that the uprising
against President Bashar
Assad could gain a base for
a wider armed rebellion.
Facing the most serious
threat to his family's 40-
year ruling dynasty, Assad
has abandoned most pre-.
tenses of reform as his
military seals off strategic
areas in the north and east
- including the town of
Jisr al-Shughour, which
was spinning out of gov-
ernment control, before
the military moved in on
Sunday.
"The (Syrian forces) dam-
age homes and buildings,
kill even animals, set trees
and farmlands on fire,"
said Mohammad Hesnawi,
26. He fled Jisr al-Shughour
over the weekend and
spoke to The Associated
Press from this border area
of Turkey, where some
8,000 Syrians are seeking


refuge in camps.
Pro-democracy activists,
citing witnesses, said the
military also surrounded
al-Boukamal, along the
Iraqi border, an area that
was a major smuggling
route for insurgents and
weapons into Iraq in the
2000s. Syrian officials have
expressed concern over a
reverse flow of arms into
Syria, and in March secu-
rity forces seized a large
quantity of weapons hid-
den in a truck coming from
Iraq.
Activists say more than
1,400 Syrians have died
and some 10,000 have
been detained in the gov-
ernment crackdown since
the popular uprisingbegan
in mid-March, inspired by
the revolutions in Tunisia
and Egypt. Assad initially
responded with vague
promises of reform, but
the increasingly deadly
government crackdown
has only added fuel to the
movement.
Thousands of protest-
ers across the country
now vow to continue until
Assad leaves power.


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