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Jackson County Floridan
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028304/00524
 Material Information
Title: Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title: Sunday Floridan
Portion of title: Floridan
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Jackson County Floridan
Publisher: Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Marianna Fla
Publication Date: 3/9/2011
Frequency: daily (except saturday and monday)[<1979-1995>]
weekly[ former 1934-<1955>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates: 30.776389 x -85.238056 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note: "Independent."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID: UF00028304:00524
 Related Items
Preceded by: Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by: Marianna Floridan

Full Text











C n 2 JobSeq 85 PkgSeq 003
F ****-*****ORIGIN MIXED -DC 325
LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-7007
A Media (Gnerad Newapapae


Chipola baseball team

wins doubleheader. See-

more on page IB.


Vol.88 No. 48


Road contractors suing county


BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
Floridan Staff Writer
As the county gets started on a
$10 million paving project, it al-
ready faces a lawsuit and a pos-
sible work delay because of the
suit.
Two paving contractors have
subd Jackson County, alleging
the- county, circumvented the
required competitive bidding
process when it piggybackedd"
some of the projects on an exist-


ing contract two other compa-
nies had with different counties.
The suit concerns a series of
roads the county wants to chip
seal, a paving option that is gen-
erally cheaper than full-blown
paving.
Anderson Columbia and Jones
Construction Co. filed their joint
suit several days ago.
Shortly after that; the contrac-
tor who was given one of the two
contested jobs filed a motion to


intervene in the civil suit, since it
has a stake in the outcome.
A hearing on a portion of the
suit is set for this Thursday at 2
p.m. before Circuit Judge John L.
Fishel II. The suing parties have
asked the judge to issue an in-
junction to prevent any more
work being done on the proj-
ects until the court can hear the
case.
The court has set aside two and
a half hours for the hearing.'


In that hearing, the judge will
also entertain the intervention
motion from Asphalt Paving
Systems. That contractor was
awarded the job of chip-sealing
Lynch, Burbank, Willis, Cen-
tury, Lotus, Pelican, Maridale,
Springfield, Jerusalem Church,
Colonial, Lovett, Unity, Vista and
Bellamy Bridge roads, along with
Tulsa, Maple, Leland, Petunia
and Plantation lanes.
Asphalt Paving Systems was


awarded the job in February
this year for a sum not to exceed
$1.3 million. Jackson County's
contract was awarded as a "pig-
gyback" on Asphalt Paving Sys-
tem's existing road improvement
contract with Marion County.
The lawsuit alleges Jackson
County's manner in awarding
the contract was flawed. The suit
claims the terms and conditions
See COUNTY, Page 7A


OFrcoiTr FrOUL



Two Chipola players spend



night injail before tournament


MARKSKINNER/FLORIDAN
Chipola's Geron Johnson and Elijah Pittman wait on the referees during the Indians' FCCAA championship matchup against Tallahassee Community
College Saturday night. Johnson and Pittman were picked up on warrants Feb. 28 for violating their conditional release, and both were sentenced to
30 days in jail starting April 1. Both men were originally arrested for misdemeanor possession of marijuana inOctober.


Ordered to go back in April


BY MORGAN CARLSON
Floridan Staff Writer

Two Chipola College basket-
ball players who started during
the state FCCAA tournament
last week were taken to jail'days
before the tournament and
are set to go back on April 1.
Geron Johnson, 18, and Elijah
Pittman, 19, allegedly violated
their conditional release from
arrests last year. The two were
picked up on Feb. 28 and spent
the night in jail. On March 1, the
two were sentenced to 30 days
in jail, to start on April 1.
Pittman was arrested in Au-


gust for misdemeanor posses-
sion of marijuana; Johnson was
arrested on the same charge in
October. Both men were placed
in a Pre Trial Intervention Pro-
gram, or PTI.
PTI is a program of the State
Attorney's Office, available for
people who do not have a prior
criminal record. It is similar to
probation. There is no adjudi-
cation and people on thepro-
gram don't enter a plea, accord-
ing to Tim Ham, Johnson and
Pittman's PTI officer.
On PTI, individuals must meet
obligations set by the court.
When those obligations are


met, the. charge doesn't stay on
a person's record. The purpose
of PTI is to clear up a mistake
and not ruin an individual's re-
cord, Ham said.
Under the orders, Johnson
and Pittman agreed to submit
supervision payments, pay
fines, attend substance abuse
*counseling and report to the
Jackson County Probation Of-
fice once a month. According
to the warrant affidavits, both
men violated these conditions.
On March 1, Judge Woodrow
Hatcher amended Johnson and
Pittman's PTI to include.30 days
in jail to begin April 1 by 6 p.m,
The men will still have to pay
the fines, pay supervision fees,
and their counseling has been


intensified, according to Ham.
Ham said he doesn't know
why the date April 1 was cho-.
sen, but said it was probably to
let the men play in the basket-
ball tournament. Ham added
he's not trying to ruin the play-
ers' education, career or schol-
arships. He just wants them to
be accountable.
The jail time was added be-
cause "if you tell somebody
you're going to do something,
you have to do it," Ham said.
He said the two are dn the right
track and know they need to
follow through with the obliga-
tions they made to the, court.
Chipola basketball coach Jake
See PLAYERS, Page 7A


Man,


Bonifay


woman


killed


during


home


invasion
From staff reports
Bonifay police continue
to investigate the deaths
of a Bonifay woman, and
the man who apparently
invaded the home of the
slain woman and her hus-
band early Tuesday morn-
ing.
Bonifay Police Chief
Chris Wells gave a prelimi-
nary account Tuesday of
what is -believed to have
happened, but cautioned
that the scene was still
being processed and au-
topsies were still pending.
The Florida Department of
Law Enforcement's crime
*scene unit is assisting in
the case.
No names of-those in-
volved were immediately
released, 'pending notifi-
cation of next of kin. Wells
described the woman and
her husband as middle-
aged. The gunman was not
related to them.
Wells said the husband
reportedly returned fire on.
the gunman, who shot his
wife during the home inva-
.sion.
The male gunman was
found outside the home,
the woman who lived there
was found inside.Wells said
police were summoned to
the dwelling just before 2
a.m. Several neighbors and
the husband of the slain
woman called in to report
the incident.


Police search for illegal bath salts at Chipola Mart


From staff reports
Several law enforcement
agencies served a search
warrant at the Chipola
Mart in Marianna to search
for illegal bath salts.
According to Marianna
Police Department press
release, bath salts were
recently purchased at the
store during an under-
cover law enforcement
operation. Cloud. 9 bath
salts, or methylenedioxy-
pryrovalerone, were re-


cently added to Schedule
I of Florida statutes, which
lists the drugs that have a.
high potential for' abuse
and addiction, or which
have no recognized me-
dicinal value.
The possession or sale of
these substances can carry
the same penalty as that
of cocaine. A person of in-
terest has been developed
and charges are pending
the completion of the in-
vestigation, according to
the release.


"The public needs to be
aware that these substanc-
es are very dangerous, and
that there are other brands
witH various colorful pack-
aging and catchy names
which seem to be targeted
the youth in our society,"
the release stated.
Despite their packaging
as bath salts, they are often
used as a substitute for co-.
caine or meth, hence the
state's decision to crimi-
nalize their possession and
sale.


MARK SKINNLR/F LUKIUAN
The Marianna Police Department cordons off the area around Chipola Mart while serving a
search warrant Monday night. The store was reportedly selling banned bath salts that can be
used as a substitute for meth.


This Newspaper .
Is Printed On '*
Recycled Newsprint




7 65161 80050 9


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Weather Outlook


Sj Cloudy, breezy, warm and
To ay humid. Scattered showers
and thunderstorms. Some
heavy.
.Y" 'C -Justin Kiefer / WMBB


High 75

Low 530


O"t High 660
b 1 Low 390

Tomorrow
Morning clearing. Breezy
and cooler.



St High 73
Low -460

Saturday
Mostly sunny and mild.


High 730
Low -440


Friday
Mostly sunny and mild.



High 750
-' r Low -50

Sunday
Partly cloudy and mild.


47,
*.:, '^ *^ *---;.-- < A '..B^>;71
~.
*' ^ *, -s- '
*-*., -^ -'-. ^ _0:J^


SHigh: 73
-, ~ Low: 48


r


SHigh: 75
iib' Low: 51


Sigh73 .. High: 75

S'... .. "l- - = .7. Low: 53 .
- , . ^ B r . ._ .
Low: 49

PRECIPITATION

24 hnnurs 000" Year to date ." .,


Month to date
Normal MTD

TIDES
Panama City
Apalachicola
Port St. Joe
Destin
Pensacola


1.41"
1.60"


Low -
Low -
Low -
Low -
Low -


RIVER READINGS
Woodruff
Blountstown
Marianna
Caryville


Normal YTD
Normal for year


10:35 PM High
11:38 AM High
10:01 PM High
11:12 PM High
11:46 PM High

Reading-
46.68 ft.
8.81 ft.
6.52 ft.
6.78 ft.


12.20"
58.26"


- 12:05
- 7:10
- 11:56
- 12:29
- 1:02


Flood Stage
66.0 ft.
15.0 ft.
19.0 ft.
12.0 ft.


llnC'^.t^- 7j
*Wii74'
t'o:; 57

.* .** '


ULTRA VIOLET INDEX


0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8-10 Very High, 11+ Extreme

0 1 2 3' .i '
_____ .,-.^B^H BBBBBBBB~


THE SUN AND MOON


Sunrise
Sunset
Moonrise
Moonset


5:58 AM
5:45 PM
8:14 AM
10:16 PM


Mar. Mar. Mar. Apr.
12 19 26 3


FLORIDA'S iEAL

PANHANDLE

MEDIA PARTNERS WJAQ 100.9 "

" "JLISTEIFIJ:IIET RUP


JACKSON COUNTY

FLORIDAN

Publisher Valeria Roberts
vroberts@jcfloridan.com

Managing Editor Michael Becker.
mbecker@jcfloridan.com

Circulation Manager Deria Oberski
doberski@jcfloridan.com







CONTACT US
Telephone: (850) 526-3614
FAX: (850) 482-4478
E-mail: editorial@jcfloridan.com
Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447
Street Address:
4403 Constitution Lane
Marianna, FL 32446
Office Hours:
Weekdays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

MISS YOUR PAPER?
You should receive your newspaper no
later than 6 a.m., but if for some reason it
does not arrive call the Floridan's customer
service representatives between 8 a.m. and
5 p.m. Monday-Friday and 7-11 a.m. on Sun-
day. The Jackson CountyFloridan (USPS
271-840) is published Tuesday through
Friday and Sunday mornings. Periodical
postage paid at Marianna, Fla.

SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Home delivery: $11.23 per month; $32.83
for three months; $62.05 for six months;
and $123.45 for one year. All prices include
applicable state and local taxes. Mail
subscriptions must be paid in advance. Mail
subscriptions are: $46.12 for three months;
$92.24 for six months; and $184.47 for one
year.

ADVERTISING
The advertiser agrees that the publisher
shall not be liable for damages arising
out of errors and advertisements beyond
the amount paid for the space actually
occupied by that portion of the advertise-
ments in which the error occurred, whether
such error is due to the negligence of the
publisher's employees or otherwise, and
there shall be not liability for non-inser-
tion of any advertisement beyond the
amount paid for such advertisement. This
newspaper will not knowingly accept or
publish illegal material of any kind. Advertis-
ing which expresses preference based on
legally protected personal characteristics is
not acceptable.

HOWTO GETYOUR
NEWS PUBLISHED
The Jackson County Floridan will publish
news of general interest free of charge.
Submit your news or Community Calendar
events via e-mail, fax, mail, or hand delivery.
Fees may apply for wedding, engagement,
anniversary and birth announcements.
Forms are available at the Floridan offices.
Photographs must be of good quality and
suitable for print. The Floridan reserves the
right to edit all submissions.

GETTING IT RIGHT
The Jackson County Floridan's policy
is to correct mistakes promptly. To
report an error, please call 526-3614
Monday-Friday.


CorrRmunity Calendar


WEDNESDAY, MARCH 9
) Blood drive, 8 to 10:30 a.m. at Tri-States
Automotive Warehouse in Marianna; and 1:30 to
4:30 p.m. at the VA Marianna Clinic. Look for the
Southeastern Community Blood Centermobile unit,
or give blood at the Center's Marianna location,
2503 Commercial Park Drive, Monday-Friday, 9 a.m.
to 6 p.m. Call 526-4403.
) Jackson County Early Childhood Center
convenes a School Advisory Council meeting, 8 a.m.
in building A. Call 482-9698.
n AARP Tax-Aide free tax preparation/e-filing for
low- or middle-income persons (with emphasis on
seniors over 60), Wednesdays, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.; and
Thursday, 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Jackson County
Agriculture offices, 2741 Penn Ave., Marianna. Ap-
pointments only; call.482-9620.
) Jackson,County Habitat for Humanity Ware-
house hours: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
) Free tax preparation/electronic filing
(individual tax returns only), provided by Chipola
College business instructor Lee Shook and student
volunteers, Wednesdays, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., through
early April. Other times by appointment; call 718-
2368. For faster refunds, bring personal check with
routing information.
Chipola retirees meet for lunch at 11:30 a.m. in
the Gazebo Coffee Shoppe & Deli in downtown Mari-
anna. All retirees and friends are welcome.
a Alcoholics Anonymous Open meeting, noon
to 1 p.m., First United Methodist Church, 2901
Caledonia St., Marianna, in the AA room.
) Mark Hinson, senior writer arid columnist for the
Tallahassee Democrat, will speak at the Chipola
College Honors seminar, 1 p.m., in Jackson Hall
in the Literature Language Building. The public is
invited.
) Marianna One Stop Center offers the free skills
workshop, "Budgeting More Money, More Money,
More Money:' 3 to 4 p.m. each Wednesday in March.
Call 718-0326 to enroll.
) "Little Shop of Horrors" The Chipola College
Theatre production begins a five-day run today.
Shows are 7 p.m. nightly, with a 2 p.m. Sunday
matinee. Call 718-2220.

THURSDAY, MARCH 10
Blood drive, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Federal
Correctional Institution in Marianna. Look for the
Southeastern Community Blood Center mobile unit,
or give blood at the Center's Marianna location,
2503 Commercial Park Drive, Monday-Friday, 9 a.m.
to 6 p.m. Call 526-4403.
) St. Anne Thrift Shop $4 Bag Sale March 1-10


at 4287 Second Ave., Marianna. Selected cups/
glasses are four for 50 cents. Shop hours: 9 a.m. to
1 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday.
) Networking Healthcare Professionals monthly
luncheon (Dutch treat) meeting, 11a.m. at the Ga-
zebo Coffee Shoppe & Deli in downtown Marianna.
Organization spotlight: Select Specialty of Tallahas-
see. Call 850-674-5464.
Jackson County School Board workshop is at 4
p.m. Call 482-1200.
) AARP Tax-Aide free tax preparation/e-filing for
low- or middle-income persons (with emphasis on
seniors over 60), Wednesdays, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.; and
Thursday, 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Jackson County
Agriculture offices, 2741 Penn Ave., Marianna. Ap-
pointments only; call 482-9620.
The Town of Grand Ridge convenes its regular
monthly council meeting at 6 p.m. in Grand Ridge
Town Hall. Call 592-4621.
Chipola Regional Workforce Development
Board Audit/Finance Committee meeting is at 5
p.m., followed by a general meeting at 6 p.m., both
in the community room, 4636 Highway 90 West,
Suite K, Marianna. Call 718-0456: ext. 101.
a Game night, 6 to 9 p.m. at the Washington
County Agricultural Center, 1424 State 90 West,
Chipley. Tickets: $10. Fundraiser for Friends of
the Washington County Library featuring bridge,
canasta, dominoes and more, plus door prizes and
refreshments. Call 850-638-1703 or 850-638-1314.
) Line, ballroom and singles' dance classes by
Marianna's Gatherirg Place Foundation, 7 p.m. on
second and fourth Tuesdays; and 3 p.m. Thursday.
Donations accepted; proceeds fund area charitable
endeavors. Call 526-4561 for locations.
n Malone FFA is selling strawberries, $16 per flat,
which will arrive March 23. Call 482-9930, ext. 234.
Pre-orders will be taken until Thursday, March 10.

FRIDAY, MARCH 11
a Blood drive, 3 to 6 a.m. Family Dollar Distribu-
tion Center in Marianna. Look for the Southeastern
Community Blood Center mobile unit, or give blood
at the Center's Marianna location, 2503 Commer-
cial Park Drive, Monday-Friday, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Call
526-4403.
) Chipola College webinar,"Are You Missing Tax
Deductions?," 8:30 to 10:30 a.m. The seminar,
"Ultimate Business Plan:' meets 11:30 a.m. to 1:30
p.m. Each seminar is $30 and meets in the Busi-
ness and Technology building, room M-108. Register
at http://bit.ly/sbdc2011. Call 718-2413, or e-mail:
frohj@chipola.edu.
) Chipola Healthy Start Board of Directors


meeting, 9 a.m. in the community room of Marian-
na's One Stop Career Center. Call 482-1236.
) Marianna One Stop Center offers the free skills
workshop, "Employ Florida Marketplace," 10 to 11
a.m. each Friday in March. Call 718-0326 to enroll.
) Better Breathers helping meet the challenges
of chronic lung disease meets 2 to 3 p.m. in the
Hudnall Building community room, Jackson Hospi-
tal campus, 4230 Hospital Dr., Marianna. Jackson
Hospital management team presents, "Growing a
Healthier Community." Bring a friehd or caregiver.
No cost. Light refreshments served. Call 718-2849.
) Celebrate Recovery Adult, teen meetings to
"overcome hurts, habits and hang-ups in a safe
environment," 7 p.m., Evangel Worship Center, 2645
Pebble Hill Road. Dinner at 6 p.m. (free for first-time
guests). Child care available. Call 209-7856 or
573-1131.

SATURDAY, MARCH 12
Malone Joy Club fundraiser Pancake break-
fast (two pancakes, sausage and coffee or orange
juice), $5, and yard sale start at 6 a.m.
.) St. Patrick's Pirate Prowl'5k Run/Walk and
Kids' Fun Run, a fundraiser for Sneads High School
Project Graduation, is at Sneads Landing Park.
Registration: 7 a.m. 5K start: 8 a.m. Fun Run follows.
Pre-registration fee: $17 for adults; $15 for 18 and
under; $8 for the Kids' Fun Run. Race day registra-
tion: $20. Dress in green. T-shirt for those pre-regis-
tered a week in advance; first come, first served on
remaining shirts.
) Jackson County Health Department Relay for
SLife Team hosts a yard sale/bake sale, 7 a.m. to
noon in the parking lot of Farm Bureau, 4379 Lafay-
ette St., Marianna, with drinks, clothes, toys, shoes,
electronics, dishes and more for sale. All proceeds
go to Relay for Life. Call 526-2412, ext. 179 or 276.
) The Artists Guild of Northwest Florida
presents metal/jewelry artist Kristin Anderson
(following the 9 a.m. guild meeting), at The Russ
House (Jackson County Chamber of Commerce) in
Marianna. Public welcome. Call 526-5977 or e-mail
nancyz0l@embarqmail.com.
) Free Senior Citizens Car Wash (60 and up)
at Auto Zone, 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. Sponsored by
Marianna Alumnae Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta
Sorority Inc., in conjunction with Omega Psi Phi
Fraternity and Jeru's Barbershop.
))St. Patrick's Day Downtown Celebration 3
to 8 p.m. on Madison Street, with a bed race, pony
rides, art and crafts, food'vendors, green beer and
music from Bare Bones. Presented by Main Street
Marianna. Call 718-1022.


The submission'deadline for this calendar is two days before publication. Submit to: Community Calendar, Jackson County Floridan, P. 0. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447,
e-mail editorial@jcfloridan.com, fax (850) 482-4478 or bring items to 4403 Constitution Lane in Marianna.


MARIANNA POLICE
The Marianna Police
Department listed the.
following incidents for
March 7, the latest avail-
able re- __
port: One :
hospice --.
death, C~R E
one
missing
juvenile,
one abandoned vehicle,
two reckless drivers, one
suspicious vehicle, three
suspicious persons, two
information reports,
one funeral escort, one
physical disturbance,
one verbal disturbance,
one burglar alarms, 10


traffic stops, two juve
complaint, one assau
three assists of other
agencies, one public
service call and one
fingerprints taken.


JACKSON COUN
SHERIFF'S OFFI(
The Jackson Count
Sheriff's Office and
county Fire/Rescue
reported the following
incidents for March 7
the latest available re
port (Some of these c
may be related to after
hours calls taken on
behalf of Graceville a
Cottondale Police De


Police Roundup
mnile partmehts): One drunk alarr
lit, pedestrian, one accident one
with injury, one acci- comr
dent with no injury, one serv(
accident with unknown pute
injury, one missing corn
juvenile, three aban- one
doned vehicles, three horse
TY suspicious vehicles, four child
CE suspicious persons, four publ
information reports, crim
Y one funeral escort, one one t
highway obstruction,
one vehicle burglary, JAl
g two verbal disturbances, C
7, two hitchhiker/pedes-
Strian complaints, one
single residential fire, Thi
er- 12 medical calls, two were
traffic crashes, two bur- coun
nd glar alarms, two panic lates
alarms, one robbery En


n, 15 traffic stops,
criminal mischief
plaint, two papers
ed, one civil dis-
, four trespassing
plaints, one asasult,
cow complaint, one
e complaint, one
I abuse report, three
ic service calls, one
inal registration and
transport .

CKSON COUNTY
CORRECTIONAL
FACILITY
e following persons
booked into the
ity jail during the
t reporting period:
mily Johnson, 20,


2640 Lovewood Road,
Cottondale, aggravated
assault.
>, Steven Baxter, 35,
1010 Corbin Road,
Cottondale, failure to
comply with sex offender
registration.
,> Dennis Register, 35,
820 White Ave., Gracev-
ille, hold for Holmes
County.
> Michael Giswell, 45,
828 White Ave., hold for
Broward County.

JAIL POPULATION: 199

To report a crime, call CrimeStop-
pers at 526-5000.
To report a wildlife violation, call
1-888-404-FWCC (3922).


12A WEDNESDAY, MARCH 9, 2011


WAKE-UP CALL


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


DCA celebrates Dr. Seuss Week


I5 -


Yi~3jj ~.


S.- . k4. .


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Dayspring Christian Academy kicked off its Dr. Seuss Week celebration with a trivia contest. Class representatives from each grade are, from left, seated, Benjamin Roach, Olivia Yount, Lindsey
Blaylock, Zachary Ford, Joshua Wynn; and standing, Cassie Brown, Chase Maddox and Carylee Sapp, along with Tameka Larry, coordinator. Fourth-grader Zachary Ford was the winner.
11111111 111111 ... ~------11__1__11.-____1____


Foran is top employee


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Laurel Foran, left, is congratulated by Chipola College President Dr. Gene Prough for being named Chipola College Career
Employee for February. Foran serves as a staff assistant in accounts payable in the Business Office and has worked at the
college since 1996.


Marianna student wins Optimist Club Essay Contest


Special to the Floridan

Bobby Gause, a junior at Mari-
anna High School, recently won the
Optimist Club of Jackson County's
essay contest based on a theme of
"How My Education is the Key to a
Successful Future."
Gause was awarded a medallion
and certificate for the honor. In ad-
dition, the essay will be sent to the
district level to be judged along with
winners from other Optimist Clubs
in the district. College scholarships


are available for top winners at the
district level. The winner of the dis-
trict competition will be sent to the
international-level contest. One in-
ternational winner will be chosen
and will receive an engraved plaque
and recognition in The Optimist
magazine.
"Bobby did a wonderful job of
articulating this year's theme. He
expressed himself well through the
essay and deserved the honor of
first place," club President Brigitta
Nuccio said.


Miss Panhandle

Pageant calls for entries


Special to the Floridan

The 2011 Miss Panhandle
Pageant will be held Sat-
urday, March 26 at 2 p.m.
in the Blountstown High
School Auditorium.
Age divisions include:
Tiny Miss, 4-6
> Little Miss, 7-8 (as of
Nov. 1,2011)
Young Miss, 9-10
Junior Miss, 11-12
Teen Miss, 13-16 (as of
Nov. 1, 2011)
> Miss, 17-24 (as of Nov.
1,2011).
This is not a "glitz style"
pageant no hair falls,
wigs, false lashes, nails,


flippers or other outside
physical attachments are
allowed under the age of
13


Winners in the Little Thurs.
Miss, Teen Miss and Miss Thurs
age divisions will go on to Fri
represent the Panhandle at Fri.
the 2012 Miss Northwest a
Sat.
Florida Pageant in Novem-
ber 2011. Sat
The deadline to enter the Sun.
2011 Miss Panhandle Pag- Sun.
eant is March 18. For more
information or .an entry
form, contact director Jami
Daniels at jlynn4966@aol. Saturday
com or 334-300-1671, or Wednesd
visit missnorthwestflorida.
com. Saturday


Wednesd
Forl


Mon. (E)


The Optimist Club of Jackson
County has been participating
in the Optimist Essay Contest for
many years and has been active in
the community since 1989. Other
programs and service projects that
the Club is involved in include Ora-
torical Contest, Respect for Law,
Childhood Cancer Campaign, Teen
of the Month, Just Say No Poster
Contest, and much more.
To learn more about Optimist
International, please call 314-371-
6000 or visit www.optimist.org.


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Special to the Floridan

Marriages
a Jacoby Borders and
Viccie Ann Holmes
David Wayne Jackson
Jr. and Amanda Renee
Shirey
>> Christina Marie
Condon and Daniel Craig
Johns
Christopher A. Bofo
and Joy Teresa Long
>> Tracy Anthony Bradley
and Victoria White Jordan

Divorces
> Lloyd Jason Hand vs.
Brandy Denise Hand


) Wilson Angus Hall Jr.
vs. Phyliss Ruth McDonald
Hall
Patrick L. Wilkinson vs.
Monica A. Frascona
Sharon Lynette
Brunson vs. Tyrus Oneal
Beckwith
, Tammy Joan Thomp-
son vs. John Charles
Thompson
, Eric Lee Gilley vs. An-
drea Leona Eudy
> Latresha McCail
Pittman vs. Roger Isaac
Pittman
, Timothy Alexander
McDonald vs. Tasha Jo
McDonald
> Anna Hudson Varna-
dore vs. RodneyVarnadore


S Sordanco


BCF Preview Day


schedule announced


Special to the Floridan

The Baptist College of
Florida in Graceville has
announced plans for its
semi-annual Preview Day
on March 11,.
Preview Day is for pro-
spective students hop-
ing to get a glimpse of the
day-to-day activities of a
BCF student. Interested
students and their fami-
lies will register for the
day's events at 9 a.m. in
the R.G. Lee Chapel, and
select which opportunities
they want to participate in
throughout the day.
Campus visitors will be
welcomed by BCF Presi-
dent Thomas A. Kinchen
beginning at 9:30 a.m.
in the chapel. Music and
Worship Division Chair
Bill Davis will direct a time
of student-led praise and
worship, followed by a
meet-and-greet in the ex-
hibit area.
Prospective students
can visit with professors


and school representa-
tives and learn about de-
gree programs offered at
BCF, as well as collegiate
sports and mission oppor-
tunities. Students will then
be able to tour the cam-
pus and dorms, and have
lunch while the jazz band
performs.
After lunch, there will be
a chance to visit a class in
session or attend a finan-
cial aid briefing. Preview
Daywill conclude with stu-
dent entertainment from
the Baptist Collegiate Min-
istry group and a drawing
for two $500 scholarships.
Prospective students who
attend are entered into the
scholarship drawing. Any
student that actually ap-
plies on Preview Day will.
have their $25 application
fee waived.
For more information
about Preview Day, or
to register for the event,
please call 800-328-2660,
ext. 460, or visit www.bap-
tistcollege.edu.


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WEDNESDAY, MARCH 9, 2011 & 3AF


ifordaSowas Xa(t, C


LOCAL









%o Ir I


Publisher
VALERIA ROBERTS *

Managing Editor
MICHAEL BECKER


Our Opinion



Time to take care

As spring break approaches, Jackson County's
high school students at least those old enough
o drive and who have access to a car will be
thinking about heading to the beach.
As they prepare to do so, we feel the need to urge stu-
dents and parents to take extra care on the road.
Often, the focus of this effort is on drinking and driv-
ing. The best approach students should take is don't.
But let's be honest, some will chose to drink. If they do
drink, they should not plan on driving.
But alcohol isn't the only danger. Young drivers live on
their cell phones, and are apt to talk and/or text while
driving. This is dangerous even for experienced driv-
ers, and is even more so for those who have only just
obtained their license.
In short, whoever the designated driver is, they
should steer clear of drinking, and should never be tex-
ting and calling while behind the wheel. The only thing
worse than a spring break trip ending in tragedy is the
agony parents, relatives and friends go through.
Parents, meanwhile, need to set the right example.
They should make it clear to their children that drink-
ing and driving is neither cool nor acceptable. But they
should also make it clear that if their child does drink,
or finds themselves in a situation where they have to
hitch a ride with someone who is drunk, the parents
will be there to pick them up or make other arrange-
ments for them.
Students should not be so scared of the consequences
that they choose to get into a car or drive, rather than
face mom or dad's wrath.
Better safe than sorry.


Letters to the Editor

Keep Sunland in state hands
I'm writing in response the letter to the editor by Dr.
Bruner published in your paper on Feb. 20. I am so
grateful Dr. Bruner visited Sunland and saw for himself-
that clients are receiving proper training and care.
I have spent time there over recent years visiting my
24-year-old daughter, a resident there who is severely
autistic and needs intense support. Based on my per-
sonal experience as a parent, I can testify that not only
does Sunland do training right, they provide compre-
hensive and deeply compassionate care. Sadly, this level
of genuinely compassionate care will be lost if Sunland
is turned over to a private company.
Because of the community of caring professionals and
well-trained direct care staff at Sunland, my daughter's
severe autistic behaviors are considerably improved.
Although she lacks speech and can't take care of her
basic needs without consistent supervision, at Sunland
she gets to be part of rehl life working at the recycling
center, dancing at the gym, visiting the library and
walking in the park.
My stomach churns at what "for profit" would look
like for her at Sunland: over-extended and poorly
trained staff, limited life experiences outside four walls,
and a daughter over-drugged for easier control. We've
seen this repeatedly at privately owned facilities. I ache
for my daughter and all the clients at Sunland. Privatiz-
ing Sunland would make a few people rich, but it would
devastate the quality of life for my daughter and many
others like her.
Let me say again that I am grateful that Dr. Bruner
visited Sunland and recognized what would be lost with
privatization. I hope and pray that Sunland will always
remain the publicly owned, deeply caring place that it
is now.
ANNA COTTON
Lakeland

Letters to the Editor
Submit letters by either mailing to Editor, P.O. Box 520.
Marianna FL, 32447 or faxing to 850-482-4478 or send
Semail to editorial@jcfloridan.com. The Floridan reserves
the right to edit or not publish any letter. Be sure to
include your full address and telephone number. These
Swill only be used to verify the letter and will not be
printed. For more information call (850) 526-3614.


Overview


Obama does not walk his talk


BY DONALD LAMBRO

ASHINGTON President
Barack Obama is coming
under increasing fire for
being a passive, reactive com-
mander in chief, who all too often
stands on the sidelines instead of
entering the arena during the great
policy battles of our time.
As protests'mounted in Libya
last month to topple Moammar
Gadhafi's evil dictatorship, Obama *
was muting his words, pleading for
an end to the violence, yet reluctant
to fully side with the rebels who
were fighting to remove the Gadhafi
regime from power.
The Washington Post in a blis-
tering'editorial, sternly lectured
Obama for his timidity and wait-
and-see passiveness at a time when
the only moral position was to be
immediately on the side of the Lib-
yan democracy movement, which
has swept across North Africa and
the Middle East.
Soon after that editorial, the
White House toughened some of its
rhetoric against Gadhafi's regime
and in behalf of the rebels who are
fighting a war to free themselves
from tyranny.
But the White House's response to
the Post's editorial and other critics
was a litany of weak, namby-pamby
excuses that only made Obama's
presidency seem impotent. He
couldn't speak out more force-
fully because of potential repri-
sals against Americans who were
trapped there, the White House told


reporters.
Obama came into office promis-
ing to strengthen America's image
in the world, especially in the fiery
cauldron of the Middle East. He has
deliberately toned down the rheto-
ric in the midst of the war on terror,
reaching out to engage despots in
a "dialogue" that has produced no
fruit and weakened our reputation
abroad.
Indeed, Secretary of State Hillary
Rodham Clinton confessed before
the Senate Foreign Relations Com-
mittee Wednesday that the Obama
administration was losing the war
for world opinion. "
"We are in an information war,
and we're losing that war," Clinton
told Sen. Richard G. Lugar, of Indi-
ana, the ranking Republican.
But the foreign policy arena isn't
the only place where Obama is
being criticized. He's being taken
to task for his reluctance to roll up
his sleeves and get his hands dirty
in the budget debates and other
domestic policy battles on Capitol
Hill. And some of that criticism is
coming from his allies in the news
media.
"For a man who won office talk-
ing about change we can believe in,
Barack Obama can be a strangely
passive president," writes Washing-
ton Post columnist Ruth Marcus,
who also says she "generally
shares the president's ideological
perspective."
"There are a startling number of.
occasions in which the president
has been missing in action un-


willing, reluctant or late to weigh
in on the issue of the moment. He
is, too often, more reactive than
inspirational, more cautious than
forceful," she said.
Take, for example, Obama's
arms-length- no, make that
football-field-length posture
in this week's rough-and-tumble
budget debate to avoid a govern-
ment shutdown. Obama wanted
nothing to do with it, staying on the
sidelines, hoping House and Senate
leaders would work things out by
themselves,
The White House feared a shut-
down for a number of reasons, but
first and foremost for the political
fallout that could rain down on it.
AWashington Post poll released
this week showed that Americans
were evenly split over who would
be at fault if a budget extension
deal could not be reached. Thirty-
five percent said they would fault
Obama, while 36 percent would
blame the Republicans,
But if Democrats were looking to
the White House to help design a
potential compromise.or at least
help in the negotiations, they were
sorely disappointed.
In the end, thenews stories said
the stopgap measure was the result
of both parties on Capitol Hill.
In fact, the two-week spending
extension that easily passed the
House and Senate with $4 billion
in budget cuts was the work of
Senate Republican leader Mitch
McConnell and House Speaker
John Boehner.


GOP torches America's 'seed corn


BY MORTON KONDRACKE

Tea party torch carriers and
the Republican leaders who
won't stand up to them are
threatening to burn America's seed
corn. It's simple-minded madness.
The seed corn is federally funded
basic scientific research that pro-
duces the discoveries and trains
the scientists that eventually create
millions of skilled jobs.
But heedless of the consequenc-
es, the House Republicans' fiscal
2011 spending bill, H.R. 1, slashes
funding for federal scientific re-
search and agencies by as much as
33 percent, threatening to furlough
thousands of top scientists, stop
their work and force corporations
using them to conduct their proj-
ects overseas.
This at a time when report after
blue-ribbon, business-backed
report has warned that the United
States is falling seriously behind
its competitors in investment in
research and science education.
It's bad enough that the GOP is
trying to restore its frayed reputa-
tion for fiscal responsibility by
hacking at domestic discretionary
spending- about 16 percent of
the federal budget but it's tak-
ing a meat ax to research, which
amounts to about 0.04 percent of
all spending but pays huge long-
run dividends.
Specifically, the bill calls for an
$886 million cut for the Depart-
ment of Energy's Office of Science
- an 18 percent reduction from
2010 levels but 33 percent if applied
to the seven months remaining in
the fiscal year.
Republicans evidently intend to
thwart climate-control research,
but the Office of Science also
oversees America's seven national


laboratories, which do some of
America's most advanced work in
nuclear physics, super-computers,
new-materials science and nano-
technology.
The bill actually eliminates
all funding for the newest U.S.
research project, the Advanced
Research Projects Agency, which is
dedicated to finding the 21st-cen-
tury equivalent of lasers and the
Internet, developed by the De-
fense Advanced Research Projects
Agency.
Whether Republicans believe
that global warmingis a real threat,
their actions will torpedo research
designed to make U.S. energy use
more efficient even facilitating
cheaper oil refining to limit use
of imported energy.
H.R. 1 also cuts the National
Science Foundation the source
of funding for most "hard science"
university research by nearly 9
percent for the rest of the year, and
it clobbers its program for training
math and science teachers by 28
percent.
It would also cut the National
Institute of Standards and Tech-
nology by 19 percent, curtailing
contracts for research in cyberse-
curity, "smart grids" for electricity
transmission and health informa-
tion technology.
The GOP also proposes a 5 per-
cent cut from 2010 levels for the
National Institutes of Health at a
time when the agency is mount-
ing an effort to cross the "valley of
death" between basic biomedical
discoveries and products that phar-
maceutical companies will develop
and sell to the world.
Republican priorities represent
not just a repudiation of President
Barack Obama's proposed increases
for science 10 percent for energy,


13 percent for the NSF, 15 percent
for NIST but of a bipartisan
process started in 2005 to secure a
doubling of hard science research.
That year, Sens. Jeff Bingaman,
D-N.M., and Lamar Alexander, R-
Tenn., and then-Reps. Bart Gordon,
D-Tenn., and Sherwood Boehlert,
R-N.Y., asked the National Academy
of Sciences to study what the U.S.
had to do scientifically to keep up
with international competition.
The result was a report, "Rising
Above the Gathering Storm," by a
commission led by retired Lock-
heed Martin Chairman Norman
Augustine declaring that America
would "lose our privileged position"
without significant increases in
research investment and education
performance.
"While only 4 percent of the
nation's workforce is composed
of scientists and engineers," the
report said.
It cited federally backed research
that decoded the human genome,
leading to biotechnology break-
throughs, and integrated circuits
and GPS, leading to computers,
cell phones, iPods, CT scans and
electronic books.
A reauthorization passed last
year after the Augustine commis-
sion updated its 2005 report and
said that the "gathering storm" was
"approaching Category 5," with the
U.S. ranking 27th among developed
nations in the percentage of college
students receiving degrees in sci-
ence and engineering.
At the moment, Obama gets the
need to invest in education and
research. House Republicans don't.
For former Rep. John Porter, R-Ill.,
this is "deja vu all over again." In
1995, the then-new GOP majority
proposed a five-year, 25 percent cut
in NIH funding.


S3/7


2011 Jeff Stahler/ Dist. by UFS, Inc..











Taylor argues against budget proposals


BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
Floridan Staff Writer

A day before Florida legislators
assembled for their 2011 session,
Jackson County got a visit from
District 27 Rep. Dwayne Taylor,
D-Daytona. He was in Marianna
Monday to talk with state em-
ployees about Gov. Rick Scott's
proposed budget and how it
might negatively affect them.
Jackson County was his last
stop in a series of such town
meetings around the state.
Taylor, who has experience as a
long-time pension plan trustee,
said he and all state employees
should be concerned about the
changes Scott is proposing to a
number of the retirement provi-
sions for state workers.
Scott wants employees to start
contributing 5 percent of their
paycheck to their bwn retire-
ment fund. Currently, the state
pays it all.
Scott wants to end the DROP
program, which allows employ-
ees to officially retire at the age
of eligibility but re-enter the


state workforce for a period of
five years after that. During the
five-year period, the retirement
income they earned in their ini-
tial years of employment is held
in a state-controlled fund and
earns 6.5 percent interest. The
retirement benefit is frozen dur-
ing the last five years, but they
do get a 3 percent cost of living
increase each year. They receive
the lump sum when they again
exit the workforce, and have
various options as to how it is
distributed to them.
In addition to proposing an
end to the program altogether
for anyone hired after July of this
year, the governor also wants to
change the cost of living provi-
sion for retirees after July 1, ac-
cording to Taylor.
Taylor said he is mystified as to
why the governor wants to drop
DROP. According to Taylor, it is
working so well that it should
serve as a model for other states.
According to him, it is 88 percent
funded, far above the 80 percent
level considered healthy for a
pension plan.


Keeping the retirement ac-
counts in a special state fund
while employees continue to
work for up to five years helps
the state, he said. While employ-
ees earn 6.5 percent, the state
is earning more than 1 percent
on the money, and is investing
it multiple times. That, he said,
is income the state would lose
without DROP.
He expects a mass exodus of
employees leaving the DROP
program early, and others leav-
ing state employment entirely if
these and other Scott proposals
pass.
Scott is also proposing a $5,000
cap on-the amount of insurance
coverage the state will pay for
each employee.
If that happens, Taylor predicts
the DROP program will be in
trouble, because there won't be
enough new DROP participants
coming in to help fund system,
while payouts will increase.
Taylor said state employees
need to mobilize as a group and
that individuals must begin their
own efforts to make legislators


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
State Rep. Dwayne Taylor answers questions during a'meeting with-public
sector employees Monday at Jim's Buffett and Grill.


understand how the changes
would negatively affect them.
According to Taylor, 39 legisla-
tors stand with him in his ef-
fort to fight the changes, but he
needs 61 votes for a majority. He
thinks people should write their
own letters, rather than simply
forwarding an identical letter
that thousands of people are
asked to send.


Legislators need to see the
real-world effects of the pro-
posed budget and to also feel the
impact their votes on the matter
will have with constituents, he
said.
Taylor also spoke briefly about
his support of a bill that could
give Floridians the right to re-
calktheir governor. Several states
have such statutes.


U'T dietician address ; t.:3 *-i .: 4


i.


SUBMITTED PHOTO
Chipola College alumna Christy Thomas, center, is welcomed by honors students, from left, Megan Dady, Marybeth Alderman, Charity Newsom and Caitlyn Prichard. Thomas, a registered
dietician with the University of Florida, recently spoke to the Chipola Honors program about the field of dietetics and Fisheries Improved for Sustainable Harvest, or FISH, a nutrition project in
Haiti. She is the daughter of Ronnie and Gail Hartzog of Marianna.


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LOCAL


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


1







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Gov. Scott: Florida can lead nation as job creator


The Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE Florida Gov.
Rick Scott told lawmakers in his
first State of the State speech
Tuesday that his plans to reshape
government, cut corporate taxes
and other moves to make the
state more business-friendly can
make it a national model for job
creation.
Scott acknowledged critics
who say his proposals to reduce
the size of government, get rid
of regulations and streamline
government functions go too
far. Scott is also being criticized
by state workers who protested
outside the Capitol because he
wants them to begin paying into
their pension plans while cutting
other benefits.
"Government grewwaybeyond
its ability to pay for its prom-
ises, and the jobs disappeared,"
Scott said. "The first step to bet-
ter times is acknowledging that
government cannot afford what
some have come to expect. Do-
ing what must be done will not
make me most popular, buti'm
determined to make Florida
most likely to succeed."
The emphasis on Scott's speech'
was jobs a word he used more
than 20 times.
"Every day since elected, I've
gone job-hunting for the peo-
ple of Florida," he said. "In my
business career I was never shy


about picking up the phone and
making a cold call to try to make
something good happen. As gov-
ernor, I've been making those
calls every day to recruit job cre-
ators."
He encouraged lawmakers to
do the same and asked them to
be "jobs ambassadors."
"Ask ... business owners, 'What
can we do to help you expand
your business?' Ask business
leaders around the world, 'Why
wouldn't you move to Florida?'"
he said.
Scott, a millionaire former
hospital chain CEO who had
never served in office, also said
the state needs to make changes
to civil lawsuits.
"We can't allow frivolous suits
and unreasonable awards to give
our state a reputation that fright-
ens away new jobs," he said.
His speech received mixed re-
views, though Senate President
Mike Haridopolos praised him
for sticking with the conserva-
tive theme he campaigned on.
"It's right on," said Haridopo-
los, a Merritt Island Republican
who is running for U.S. Senate.
"This is how he campaigned
for governor, making sure we
tighten our own belt as a govern-
ment first, and it's impressive he
not only campaigned as a con-
servative, he's going to govern
as.a conservative. I think that's
what's everyone's looking for


right now."
Scott asked lawmakers to
promptly pass his budget pro-
posal, which calls for about $5
billion in spending cuts in-
cluding $3.3 billion for educa-
tion and eliminating 8,645
state jobs. The cuts go beyond
the projected $3.6 billion budget
shortfall so he can include $1.7
billion in tax and fee reductions,
mostly through cutting corpo-
rate'income and property taxes.
Legislative leaders have said
their focus is first to make cuts to
meet the shortfall, and only then
will they consider the governor's
tax cut proposals.
"I don't think there's much of'
an appetite in the Legislature to
cut as much as he was cutting on
education. It was a little interest-
ing that he focused so much on a
world-class education yet cut so
much out of the. education bud-
get," Sen. Paul Dockery, R-Lake-
land, said after the 27-minute
speech.
Scott also called for changes in
the school system that would al-
low more school vouchers, more
charter schools and higher pay
for teachers who perform better.
"Educators, like other profes-
sionals, should be rewarded
based on the effectiveness of
their work, not the length of
their professional life. That's why
Florida needs to pay the best ed-
ucators more and end the prac-


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Florida Gov. Rick Scott delivers the state of the state speech to the Florida
legislature in Tallahassee on March 8.


tice of guaranteeing educators
a job for life regardless of their
performance," Scott said.
Democrats aren't happy that
many of Scott's proposals would
affect state workers, teachers
and vulnerable citizens.
"If he can get people back to
work and make Florida the most
exciting place to work and play
without doing it on the back of
seniors, universities, k-12, state
workers and retirees, then I'm
all for it. But if he does it on the
backs of those folks then I can't
support it," said Rep. Alan Wil-


liams, D-Tallahassee.
Scott closed his speech by say-
ing other states will be watch-
ing to see if Florida can succeed
through lowering taxes and
shrinking government.
"We are a state that has regular-
ly done the impossible. We build
magic kingdoms. We launch
ships that fly to the moon. Flor-
ida can be the state where the
American dream continues to be
a reality," Scott said. "The world
Sis watching, and God is watching
over us. Our success will be the
model for the nation."


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Thomas Wlison, lower right, leads members of Florida's tea party in singing "God Bless America" during a rally on the steps of
the Old Capitol during the opening sessions of the 2011 Florida legislative session in Tallahassee on March 8.


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Muted rallies lead up to


Legislature's opening


The Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE --A few
hundred demonstrators
lined either side of the
street in front of Florida's
Capitol to voice opposing
views about government
services and spending as
legislators kicked off their
regular 2011 session Tues-
day.
The crowds were en-
thusiastic, but fewer than
expected. On one side,
pro-union demonstrators
waved signs such as, "Stop
the War on the Middle
Class."
On the other, Florida tea
partiers held signs that
read, "I Support Governor
Rick Scott" and "Fiscal Re-
sponsibility is a Must."
The pro-union rally,
sponsored by the Awake
The State coalition, was
held in the front yard of the
Leon County Courthouse.
Jan Wright, a high-school
teacher from Sarasota,
traveled to Tallahassee
to protest cuts in school
funding.
"The students of today
are the future of tomorrow
and we need to protect
education," she said. "I felt
it was important to protest
right outside the front door
(of the Capitol) so that they
see we're serious."
C.C. Fearson of Fort
Walton Beach sat on a
ledge listening to a group
of.speakers that included
state Rep. Irv Slosberg, D-
Boca Raton, and others.
"I'm here because I work
with the homeless; and we
know there's plans to cut
the dollars for homeless
programs," Fearson said.
"Without the dollars to
give them the support they
need, they'll increase the
_J problem (ofhomelessness)


'rather than decrease it."
Outside the old Capitol,
tea party supporters like
Mabel Ryan, a right-to-
life activist frpm Ocala,
were enjoying an opening
prayer and the singing of
"God Bless America." An
alliance of Florida tea par-
ties organized that gather-
ing.
"We're winning," Ryan
said. "Last November was
a tremendous boost for
all of us. We won, and they
lost" she pointed across
the street at the pro-union
crowd "and we're gonna
win again."
Gov. Rick Scott "is on the
right message and we sup-
port him," she added. "We
cannot keep spending the
way we're spending. I can't
do it at my house, they
can't do it in Washington,
we can't do it in Tallahas-
see."
Scott and Lt. Gov. Jen-
nifer Carroll then made a


surprise appearance at the
tea party rally, thanking at-
tendees for their support.
"You are changing the
country," Scott told a
crowd of about 300. About
the same number was
across the street.
Similar rallies took place
across the state, from Key
West to Pensacola. Local
police in Tallahassee re-
ported no arrests or inci-
dents at Tuesday's rallies at
the .Capitol.

Check out

local events

on the

Community

Calendar on

Page 2A


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JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Victim tracks down thieves; standoff in Graceville


From staff reports

Two men suspected in the theft
of antique farm equipment were
followed by the Holmes Coun-
ty victim into Jackson County
Monday, where one of the men
was captured by police.
But the other took refuge un-
der his own home in Graceville;
and multiple law enforcement
agencies were called out to help
in his capture.
It took them about an hour and
a half to coax him out.
The theft victim alerted au-
thorities that he was follow-
ing the men, and that the truck
had pulled up to a Graceville
residence. Several agencies re-
sponded to the scene, by which
time one of the two had barri-
caded himself.
Michael Wayne Griswell, of
828 White Avenue, eventually
emerged from under his home
after police told him they were
about to send in a Florida High-
way Patrol canine. Graceville po-


lice said they did not have to de-
ploy the mace they had available
to subdue Griswell, and did not
have to fire their weapons.
Police said Griswell was want-
ed in Broward County for sus-
pected possession of metham-
phetamine.
Holmes County authorities
said he and Dennis Jerome Reg-
ister will be charged in Holmes
County with some a theft-relat-
ed offense, but they didn't have
the particulars worked out as of
early Tuesday afternoon.
According to a press release
from the Graceville Police De-
partment, Holmes County also
holds a warrant for Register, for
alleged non-payment of child
support.
The Brown Ford Ranger truck
they were traveling in Monday
was pulling a trailer, and the sto-
len items were in plain view on
the trailer, police said. The items
included an old-style peanut
picker, an old hog trough and
other vintage farm equipment.


t. .-V I ,..-.
PHOTOS BY MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Left: Law enforcement from the Jackson and Holmes County sheriffs' offices, as well as the Graceville Police De-
partment, Florida Highway Patrol and the Holmes Correctional Institution, surround a home in Graceville Monday
in response to reports of man who had allegedly barricaded himself in a crawlspace under a house. Right: Law
enforcement took a man in to custody after a standoff on White Avenue near the Holmes County line in Graceville
Monday.


Stage role a workout for 'Little Shop' puppeteer


BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
Floridan Staff Writer

When D.R. Forrester was seven years
old, he saw "Little Shop of Horrors"
for the first time. It was produced at
Dothan High School, and Forrester
remembers his fascination with the
puppeteer's manipulation of "Audrey
II," the bloodthirsty plant featured in
the play.
Years passed, Forrester grew up and
started school at Chipola College. He's
a theater major there and a veteran of
the program. He's been in a few shows,
but spends most of his time on be-
hind-the-scenes tasks like carpentry
for scenery.
But when Theater Director Charles
Sirmon announced that they'd be
taking on Little Shop this spring, For-
rester knew he wanted a role. He cam-
paigned to be the puppeteer, and was
soon busy in rehearsal.
With the puppets still not delivered
when rehearsals started, Forrester
used his time carefully watching the
actor who would provide the voice
of Audrey II. He knew he wouldn't be
able to see what was going on.when
he was inside two of the three puppets
- there are three versions of the Au-
drey II for various scenes so he had
to essentially memorize his timing to
match his puppets' movements to the
actor's voice.
Forrester also made the most of his
time in the gym. He's always worked
out, and he'll need all the muscle he's
got to manage the puppets.
SThe heaviest of the three Audrey IIs


is about the size of a small car and
weighs more than 600 pounds. The
next heaviest exceeds 300 pounds.
Forrester was taken aback when he
first saw the uncrated pieces on stage
after they arrived last Wednesday.
"I had really forgotten the scale," he
said.
Still, he forged ahead, and soon
found his way around the big pup-
pets.
"It came with some instructions, and
I jumped in and started learning how
to maneuver them. I've pretty much
got it going on now," Forrester said. "It
gets really hot inside the big one, and
in one of the plants I have to stay com-
pletely still for 20 minutes, then re-
ally get a workout. The last one's really
heavy. It's all body and arm work."
All the hard work hasn't dimmed his
appreciation of Little Shop. Of all the
plays he's been a part of at Chipola,
this one is his favorite.
The show opens tonight, and there
are still seats for the first evening. Sell-
outs are likely for the other nights, so
Wednesday may be the best opportu-
nity for those who haven't yet obtained
tickets. Chipola shows typically draw a
full house, but one of the actors, Chris
Holloway, did something extra to
bring the show even more attention;
he literally took his promotion to the
streets.
Several days ago, Holloway decorat-
ed his hatchback with a set of lips that
look a lot like Audrey IIs, and added
greenery to make the car look more
plant-like. It may be in the parking lot
Wednesday evening.


MARKSKINNER/FLORIDAN
Plant manipulator D.R. Forrester has the sizeable task of operating the Audrey II puppets for the
Chipola College Theater Department's performance of "Little Shop of Horrors:'


Players
From Page 1A
Headrick went to the player's court ap-
pearance bn March 1.
Prior to the tournament, he was aware
the judge ordered the men to 30 days in
jail. Headrick said he had a conversa-
tion with Chipola Athletic Director Dale
O'Daniel and college President Gene
Prough about the court appearance, and
everyone was aware of the new terms
of the PTI including the 30 dayjail sen-
tence.
O'Daniel said he didn't find out about
the 30-day jail sentence until he was
contacted by the Floridan on Tuesday.
O'Daniel was under the impression the
new terms of the PTI were the same as
the original PTI. Prough was out of the of-
fice Tuesday and couldn't be reached for
comment.


O'Daniel said in a conversation later
Tuesday, "the message did not get deliv-
ered to me."
He added Headrick tried to convey the
information about the 30-day jail sen-
tence, but the information was misun-
derstood or O'Daniel didn't hear it.
O'Daniel said Headrick was not with-
holding the information "because it's
difficult to withhold a public record."
O'Daniel also said he assumed he
would've found out about the 30-day sen-
tence "very soon."
Headrick said he, O'Daniel and Prough
had a conversation and decided to allow
the men to play during the tournament.
Headrick said the decision was ultimately
up to him, and the reason the men played
is because he didn't want to penalize their
teammates, the team and the communi-
ty.
Headrick said he penalized the. play-
ers after their initial arrests by not allow-


ing them to participate with the team for
two to two and a half weeks. When asked
if the men were penalized last week after
spending the night in jail, Headrick said,
"There really wasn't any time."
Headrick'said he doesn't tolerate what
happened and it's all about second
chances.
"We expect them to learn from this and
move forward," Headrick said.
O'Daniel said if the men had actually
been convicted on their original charges,
there would've been a recommendation
that "they were no longer with us."
He also said the men didn't violate col-
lege rules he's aware of, because they
weren't caught using drugs. There will be
determination as to what the college's re-
action to the 30-day jail sentence will be,
O'Daniel said.
Johnson and Pittman are both fresh-
man and on scholarships.
This was not the first brush with the law


for one of the players. Geron Johnson was
arrested for attempted burglary in high
school, according to a Dayton Daily News
story published Feb. 4.
Johnson was atop recruit in high school,
but the arrest greatly affected his career,
according to the story.
Headrick reportedly knew about the
attempted burglary arrest. Headrick was
quoted in the story saying, "I know kids
make. mistakes when they're young. I
didn't even look into it."
Johnson was quoted in the Dayton Dai-
ly News story saying he learned his lesson
and "I haven't been in trouble since."
According to the story Jake Headrick
"so desperately wanted Geron Johnson to
join his basketball program that he made
eight trips to Dayton, driving 9 V2 hours
each way, to woo him."
Headrick was quoted in the Dayton
Daily News story saying, "It's probably the
hardest I've ever worked to get a player."


County
From Page 1A
from the original Marion County
contract changed materially when
Jackson County piggybacked on it.
The suit also claims the prices on
the contract were arrived at behind
closed doors, rather than through a
public bidding process. The lawsuit
also alleges that the additional work
was not properly advertised.
None of the work on the Asphalt
Paving Systems projects has yet
been done. However, some prelimi-
nary work has been done on most
of the roads in the other contested
contract.
Jackson County had contracted
with Florida Highway Products in
November of last year on the other
'set of roads, piggybacking on a con-
tract Florida Highway Products had
with Sun n' Lakes, a subdivision of
the Sebring community.
The roads to be covered by that
contract are Cecil, Girlsey, Arbor,
New Bethel, Sanders, Everett, Cliff,
Satellite, Little Valley, Shamrock,


Forehand, Mineral, Woodberry,
Wynn, and Willow roads, along
with Gray Lane, Oregon Trail, Misty
Trail, Fieldstone Court, and Emer-
ald Drive. However, county records
indicate that Cliff Road was subse-
quently removed, and Pooser and
Layton roads were added.
The county has paid one invoice
of $113,144 to Florida Highway
Products, and another, smaller in-
voice is pending. County Engineer
Larry Alvarez said the work on most
of the roads has been confined to
mixing and grading, in preparation
for the chip seal asphalt product.
The lawsuit asks that the court
make Jackson County recover any
money it has already spent on the
projects. Jackson County's attor-
ney, Frank Baker, said the reason
the county commission decided to
award the contracts the way it did is
clear and defensible.
"The board's real interest in any
bid process is to get the best value
possible for county tax dollars,"
Baker said. "In this case, the board
believed that the best way to use
county money was to take advan-


tage of a good price, obtained by
bidding, by another government:
It's the county's position that the
board is entitled to the benefit of
the doubt, absent some showing
of fraud, or intentional miscon-
duct, and there's no evidence that
the board did anything other than
watch out for the county's best in-
terests.'o
Baker reacted to a claim in the
lawsuit that prices charged to Jack-
son County changed from what was
in the original contract on which
Jackson County piggybacked.
"All the line times, the unit prices,
were transported over at the same
amounts, with one exception,"
Baker said. "The price for the base
preparation for the Sun n' Lakes
contract was for 12 inches, which
is what that entity needed. But our
county needs only six inches, so
there was a price reduction to fit the
county's particular needs.
"Just one of those items was
changed, that's one item in a stack
of items. You don't throw out the
whole deal just because the county
got a better deal on this item."


James & Sikes Funeral
Home Maddox Chapel
4278 Lafayette St.
Marianna, FL 32446
482-2332

Vonnie
Phillips

The funeral service for
Vonnie Phillips will be 2
p.m. Wednesday, March 9,
2011, at Maddox Chapel.
Interment will follow at
Marvin Chapel Cemetery
in Graceville, with James &
Sikes Funeral Home Mad-
dox Chapel directing.
The family will receive
friends from 1 p.m. until
funeral time at Maddox
Chapel.


James & Sikes Funeral
Home Maddox Chapel
4278 Lafayette St.
Marianna, FL 32446
482-2332

Joseph
Whitworth

The funeral service for Jo-
seph Whitworth will be 10
a.m. Thursday, March 10,
2011, at United Chapel at
Sunland. Interment will
follow at Riverside Ceme-
tery, with James & Sikes
Funeral Home Maddox
Chapel directing.


Obituaries


Subscribe today at


jcfloridan.com


-------------------------


___~._~_____.______~__~--1~111 -- 1_1_11~111_ 1~_~


LOCAL







JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


coming plagued by big-city problem: Smog


The Associated Press

CHEYENNE, Wyo. -Wyoming,
famous for its crisp mountain air
and breathtaking, far-as-the-
eye-can-see vistas, is looking
a lot like smoggy Los Angeles
these days because of a boom in
natural gas drilling.
Folks who live near the gas
fields in the western part of this
outdoorsy state are complain-
ing of watery eyes, shortness of
breath and bloody noses because
of ozone levels that have exceed-
ed what people in LA. and other
major cities wheeze through on
their worst pollution days.
"It is scary to me personally. I
never would have guessed in a
million years you would have
that kind of danger here," Deb-
bee Miller, a manager at a Pine-
dale snowmobile dealership,
said Monday.
In many ways, it's a haze of
prosperity: Gas drilling is going
strong again, and as a result, so
is the Cowboy State's .economy.
Wyoming enjoys one of the
nation's lowest unemployment
rates, 6.4 percent. And while
many other states are running


up monumental deficits, law-
makers are projecting a budget
surplus of more than $1 billion
over the coming year in this state
of a half-million people.
Still, in the Upper Green River
Basin, where at least one daycare
center called off outdoor recess
and state officials have urged
the elderly to avoid strenuous
outdoor activity, some wonder if
they've made a bargain with the
devil. Two days last week, ozone
levels in the gas-rich basin rose
above the highest levels record-
ed in the biggest U.S. cities last
year.
"They're trading off health
for profit. It's outrageous. We're
not a Third World country," said
Elaine Crumpley, a retired sci-
ence teacher who lives just out-
side Pinedale.
Preliminary data show ozone
levels last Wednesday got as high
as 124 parts per billion. That's
two-thirds higher than the En-
vironmental Protection Agency's
maximum healthy limit of 75
parts per billion and above the
worst day in Los Angeles all last
year, 114 parts per billion, ac-
cording to EPA records. Ozone


levels in the basin reached 116
on March 1 and 104 on Satur-
day.
The Wyoming Department of
Environmental Quality urged
the elderly, children and people
with respiratory conditions to
avoid strenuous or extended ac-
tivity outdoors.
The Children's Discovery Cen-
ter in Pinedale set up indoor ob-
stacle courses and turned kids
loose on computers instead of
letting them out on the play-
ground in the afternoon.
High levels of ozone happen
in the Upper Green River Basin
only during the winter. They
result from a combination of
gas industry emissions, snow
on the ground, bright sunshine
and temperature inversions, in
which cool air near the ground
is covered by a layer of warmer
air. Pollution builds up during
the day and becomes visible
along the horizon as a thin layer
of brown smudge smog by
midafternoon.
.People have noticed the air just
isn't as clear as it once was.
"It's like maybe when you're
not wearing your glasses when


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE PHOTO
In this Jan. 22, 2010 photo, antelope graze not far from gas drilling rigs in
western Wyoming's Upper Green River Basin.


you ought to be," said Miller,
whose daily commute from her
log home includes an eight-mile
snowmobile ride just to get to a
plowed road.
The gas industry has drilled
hundreds of wells in the basin
over the past decade and made
the basin one of the top gas-pro-
ducing areas in the U.S.
"Ultimately it comes down to
accountability," said Linda Bak-


er, director of the Upper Green
River Alliance. "It doesn't seem
to me the companies are being
very accountable to the residents
here." High ozone, she said, gave
her a constant nosebleed three
days last week.
'Crumpley, 68, reported having
difficulty on walks. "You feel a
tightness in your chest. My eyes
burn and water constantly, and
I've had nosebleed problems."


Wis. governor's budget goes beyond unions


The Associqted Press

MADISON, Wis. The
showdown over collective
bargaining rights for pub-
lic employees is just the
first step in a contentious
debate over how to solve
Wisconsin's budget woes,
with newly elected Re-
publican Gov. Scott Walker
also seeking to dismantle
an array of social policies
enacted under his Demo-
cratic predecessor.
On the chopping block in
Walker's two-year budget
proposal are early release
programs for prisoners, in-
state college tuition for the
children of illegal immi-
grants, mandatory insur-
ance coverage of contra-
ceptives, college financial
aid for high school grads
who are good citizens and
public financing for Su-
preme Court campaigns.


All were enacted under
former Democratic Gov.
Jim Doyle some after
the promise to save the
state money, others after
years of lobbying from in-
terest groups who now find
themselves on the wrong
side of Wisconsin's politi-
cal power.
"It just looks like they
want to erase what hap-
pened in the last two
years," said Mike McCabe,
directoroftheindependent
watchdog group the Wis-
consin Democracy Cam-
paign. "It's just so striking
how divided the two par-
ties are right now and how
Wisconsin is flipping back
and forth wildly from one
extreme to another. There
doesn't seem to be any
political middle that's able
to moderate these violent
mood swings." :':
Walker's spokesman Cul-


len Werwie said the gov-
ernor's proposed cuts are
needed as the state strug-
gles to balance its budget.
"This budget proposal
maintains funding for core
government services, insti-
tutes cost saving reforms
and brings the overall cost
of government back in line
with taxpayer's ability to
pay," Werwie said..
The changes sought in
Walker's budget released
earlier this month are sep-
arate from the proposal in
Walker's emergency bud-
get bill to take away col-
lective bargaining rights,
except over salary up to
inflation, for nearly all
public workers. That pro-
,'posal motivated all 14 state
Senate Democrats to flee
to Illinois, where they re-
mained on Tuesday as.the
Senate *met without them.
Until at least one comes


back, there can be no vote
on the collective bargain-
ing bill.
. "I'm convinced that we'll
eventually be back and
we'll be working on. the
budget and other matters,
but I can't tell you when,"
said Democratic Sen. Fred
Risser.
The governor's office on
Tuesday released e-mails
that show communication
with Democratic senators
over possible changes to
the bill, including remov-
ing any limits on bargain-
ing over salary and allow-
ing other items to be part
of the bargaining process.
The state faces a $3.6 bil-
lion budget shortfall that'
Walker points to as the
rationale for many of the
cuts he's proposing. But
not everything he wants
to do would save the state
money.


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker addresses the media re-
garding a letter received from Sen. Mark Miller, D- Monona, on
March .



WE BUY GOLD
YOUR TRUSTED JEWELER
FOR ALMOST 40 YEARS

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Congress examines Islam


The Associated Press

WASHINGTON The
wreckage of the World
Trade Center still smol-
dered after the 2001 ter-
rorist attacks when a voice
rose above the pain and
suspicion to demand that
American Muslims not
be blamed or mistreated.
"Islam is peace," declared
George W. Bush, speaking
from a mosque and sound-
ing almost like an imam.
As a storm gathers over
hearings this week on radi-
cal Muslims in the U.S.,
it seems of another time
to recall that it was Presi-
dent Bush the bullhorn-
wielding avenger who
wanted Osama bin Laden
dead or alive, who warned
the world "you're either
with us or against, us" -


who told Americans their
Muslim neighbors were
with us. Not just that, he
said, but theyWERE us.
Nearly 10 years and one
president later, suspicions
persist. The nation hasn't
figured out how to accom-
modate a sizable and long-
established religious mi-
nority while pressing full
throttle against growing
extremist elements and an
increase in allegations of
homegrown terrorist plots.
Now comes New York
Rep. Peter King, forcing
the issue with congressio-
nal hearings about radical
Islam in the U.S.
SThe first is on Thursday,
and the protests have al-'
ready started. Among his
fiercest critics, compari-
sons to McCarthyism, the
era of hunting communist


sympathizers, are being
heard.
"We see no productive
outcome in singling out a
particular community for
examination in what ap-
pears to be little more than
a political show trial," a co-
alition of 50 liberal groups
said in a letter to King on
Tuesday.
He told The Associated
Press that radical Islam is
a distinct threat that must
be investigated regardless
of whose sensibilities are
offended. Of the current
situation, he said in an in-
terview, ""You have a vio-
lent enemy from overseas
which threatens us and
which is recruiting people
from a community living
in our country. That's ...
what this hearing's going
to be."


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If you are an area church that would like to
be featured in this years edition contact the
advertising department of the Jackson County
Floridan at (850) 526-3614
or email salesjcfloridan.com.

Deadline for advertising is April 1, 2011.


~II Ir I I- rll


I _~I -I ___ ___,


"8SA WEDNESDAY, MARCH 9, 2011


NATIONAL







:,I
r ~~ 'jii'-..;.
1 .i ,

I~
I_


Graceville Tigers Baseball




Losing streak





reaches six games


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Connor Renihan pitches for the Graceville Tigers during a recent
home game against Vernon.


BY DUSTIN KENT
Floridan Sports Editor

The Graceville Tigers dropped
their sixth straight game on Mon-
day night in Wewahitchka, falling
to the Gators 4-3.
Graceville led 3-1 through four
innings. The Gators answered with
three runs in the bottom of the fifth
to go ahead for good.
After each team put up a run in
the first inning, the Tigers went
ahead thanks to RBIs by Hunter
Forsyth in the second inning and
Jacky Miles in the third.
The Gator offense was finally able
to break through in the fifth off of
Graceville reliever Forsyth, taking
advantage of two Graceville errors
and one walk, adding two hits of
their own to plate the three runs.


Forsyth took the loss, striking out
four in three innings, and holding
the Gators scoreless in his final two
innings of work.
"Hunter threw really well,"
Graceville coach Travis Miller
said. "We didn't help him out with
ground balls. The other two in-
nings, he did a good job of getting
outs."
Devin Cassidy started on the
mound for the Tigers and. went-
four innings, before leaving due to
arm soreness.
The two Graceville pitchers com-
bined to give a pretty solid perfor-
mance, making this loss even more
difficult, according to Miller.
"Yeah, it was pretty hard because
we played well," the coach said.
"It's just one of those games that
come down to whoever makes that


one bad error. We made two, and
they didn't. That was the difference
in the game.
"It's hard to lose like that. We
played well enough to win."
The Tigers had one last chance to
break through and regain the lead
in the sixth inning, but they left the
bases loaded.
"That stuff makes it hard to pull
out those close wins," Miller said.
"But I think good things came out
of (the loss).
"It's the first time that Hunter
has thrown for us this season, and
if you take away the two errors, he
actually threw really well. That will
help us down the road."
Graceville will next go on the
road Thursday to take on the Chi-
pley Tigers, before ending the week
Friday at home against Malone.


CHIPOLA BASEBALL TERIW WINS



Indians take two from Grand Rapids


BYDUSTIN KENT
Floridan Sports Editor

The Chipola Indians swept a
doubleheader with Grand Rap-
ids on Monday at Chipola Field,
winning by scores of 9-3 and 8-4
to run their winning streak up to
four games.
The Indians got a solid per-
formance from starting pitcher
Matt Marsh in the first game. ;
The sophomore right-hander
went the full seven innings and
allowed three earned runs on six
hits, two walks and seven strike-
outs. ",
Derrick Pitts got the Chipola
offense going in the second in-
ning with a two-run home run
that made it 3-0.
After Grand Rapids added two
runs in the top of the fifth to cut
the margin to 5-3, the Indians
answered back with two runs of
their own in the bottom of the

Mike Boddicke'r singled and
scored on an error, and Michael
Revell later singled to score Geno
Escalante to make it a 7-3 game, '
A two-run double by Dillon Vi-
tale in the sixth inning pushed
the Chipola lead to six runs.
Revell, Boddicker and Edgar Chipola's Garison Boston lobs the ball to second for an easy out Monday night against Grand Rapids.
Delgado all had two hits each for
the Indians. four strikeouts, night. Chipola scored three, in the
Vitale started the second game LJ Hollins and Timothy Mota The Indians' offense gave more first inning, with Boddicker get-
on the mound and went five in- pitched the final two innings for than enough support, scoring ting things started with an RBI
nings for the win, allowing just the Indians, as Chipola pitchers seven runs through the first four single to score Sasha LaGarde.
one run on one hit, one walk and -allowed just three hits on the innings. A pair of RBI sacrifice flies by


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN


Pitts and Mack Harrison scored
the final two runs, and an RBI
double by LaGarde in the second

See BASEBALL, Page 2B


Lady Tigers fall to Lady Bobcats


BY DUSTIN KENT
Floridan Sports Editor

The Malone Lady Tigers
dropped their fourth straight
game to start the season Mon.
day, as they fell 10-6 to the ilun-
roe Lady Bobcats in Malone.
It was the second loss to Mun-
roe in less than a week. The Lady
Tigers lost 9-2 to the Lady Bob-
cats on Thursday in Quincy.
In that game, it was a five-l un
sixth inning that put the game
away for Munroe.
On Monday night, it was a si -
run seventh that doomed the
Lady Tigers.
"We're just having that one in-
ning that is hurting us," Malone
coach Greg Ford said. "It was the
sixth inning last time, and the
seventh this time. Other than
that, we played pretty error- tree
ball. All of my girls played won-
derful defense. The girls battled
and gave it all they had. We ILust
came up a little short."
Haleigh Corbally started in the
circle for Munroe and picked up
yet another win over Malone,
limiting the Lady Tigers to just
six hits in seven innings.

See LADY TIGERS, Page 2B


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Malone's Shakira Smith dodges a tag on her way to third base against
Aucilla Christian.


Childs leads Lady


Pirates to victory


BYDUSTIN KENT
Floridan Sports Editor


Karissa Childs 'delivered an-
other dominant pitching per-
formance Monday night to lead
the Sneads Lady Pirates to a 5-0
win over North Florida Chris-
tian in Sneads.
Childs was coming off of a
seven-inning, 13-strikeout no-
hitter of Blountstown on Friday
night. She pitched another gem
Monday, allowing just three hits
and one walk in seven innings of
work.
"She's really starting to find
her rhythm," Sneads coach Kel-
vin Johnson said of his senior
pitcher. "She's starting to pitch
like she's supposed to. Whatever
we call, she's hitting her spots.
She really had those girls guess-
ing. It's hard to hit when you're
throwing three or four pitches
for strikes. She had her pitches
working well, and we need her
to do that. If she keeps pitching
like this, we'll be very success-
ful."


"We said before the season
that if we scorefive runs, we
should win."
Kelvin Johnson,
Sneads coach


The Sneads offense gave
Childs all the support she would
need. in the first inning, with
Cambridge Chason delivering
a two-RBI single to score Kayla
Kelly and Childs, who both
reached on walks.
In the third, Childs doubled
and scored on an error to make
it 3-0, and Ashlen Wilson hit
.into a fielder's choice to score
DeAnne Berry, who also reached
on an error.
Chason came to the plate on
yet another NFC error to give
Sneads the 5-0 advantage.
The Lady Pirates finished
with only six hits on the night,
a much tamer offensive effort
from a lineup that has been on


See CHILDS, Page 2B


=r==~-~=Z==I~=======~__


7LI~;
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12B WEDNESDAY, MARCH 9, 2011


SPORTS


Bullpups bite Indians, 6-2


BY SHELIA MADER
Floridan Correspondent

The Marianna Middle
School Bullpups baseball
"A" team improved its re-
cord to 7-2 Monday eve-'
ning with a solid 6-2 win
over the visiting Grand
Ridge Indians at Optimist
Park.
Hunter Eddins took the
mound for the Bullpups
and went the distance to
pick up the win, allowing
two unearned runs on just
two hits and one walk.


Trent Moats took the loss
for Grand Ridge, going two
innings before being re-
lieved by Blake Johnson.
Marianna picked up
three runs in the second
inning. Trent Charles led
off with a single, but was
out on a double play.
Walks to Jeremiah Eman-
uel, Hampton Jordan, Aus-
tin Torbett and Matthew
Shouse were capitalized
when 'Ethan Strickland
added a key two-RBI sin-
gle.
Grand Ridge scored its


runs in the third inning. A
hit by Dustin Sneads led
things off. Following two
strikeouts, Colton McIn-
tosh reached on an error,
with Johnson following
with an error to allow two
runs to score.
Marianna added three
runs in the third inning to
go up 6-2. With two outs,
Emanuel took one for
the team, stole second,
and scored on a single by
Strickland. Johnson tri-
pled, and Eddins followed
with a walk. Both scored


on passed balls.
AJ Johnson singled for
Grand Ridge in the fourth,
but was unable to cross the
plate. N
Hunter Johnson picked
up a single in the fifth, but
was left stranded at first.
In the "B" team game, the
Bullpups picked up a 14-0
shutout over the Indians.
Maxx Harrell started on
the mound and picked up
the win, going two innings
before being relieved by
Jack Craven, who closed
out the game.


Lady Indians split A 'B' games


BY SHELIA MADER
Floridan Correspondent

The Marianna Middle
School Lady Bullpups
softball team traveled to
Grand Ridge to take on the
Lady Indians on Monday
afternoon, splitting a pair
of games.
The Lady Indians showed
no mercy orn the Bullpup
"A" team, as they sent
them home with a 9-1 loss.
Brooke Williams was in the
circle for the Lady Indians,
and picked up the win,
while Kayleigh Temples
took the loss for Marianna.
Marianna defeated
Grand Ridge 6-4 in "B"
team action. The win im-
proves Grand Ridge to 11-1
on the season.
In the "A" team game,
Marianna was three up,
three down in the top
of the first inning, with
Grand Ridge plating two
runs in the bottom half of-
the frame. Williams helped
.herself out with a lead-
off single, and then stole
second to make way for
Riley Ba'chelier, who drew
a walk. Casey Grover dou-
bled home both runners.
Taniyah Robinson had
a two-out double in the
third inning, but a strike-
out ended the inning with
her on second.
Grand Ridge added a run
in the third. Glover singled
and scored on a double by
Lindsie Eubanks.
Marianna's only run
came in the fourth in-
ning, when Bonnie Bigale
- singled, stole second, and
scored on an error at sec-
Sond.
Grand Ridge added six
runs in the bottom of
the fourth. Casey Grover
walked, stole second and


MARK SKINNER/FLORIDAN
Marianna Middle School's Hannah Spooner gets a grounder during a recent game against
Grand Ridge.


moved to third on a single
by KK Cain. Care Pyke sin-
gled home a run with Kris-
ten Suber picking up an
RBI on a hit. Emily Glover
had an RBI single, followed
by Williams singling home
a run. Eubanks walked,
with Amy Hand following
with a two-RBI single.
Marianna went down in
order in the top of the fifth,
ending the game.

Bullpups pull past
Freeport 10-6
The Bullpups picked up
a huge victory Thursday
afternoon at Optimist Park
witl a 10-6 win over Free-
port.
Marianna coach Hunter
Nolen sent Hunter Ed-
dins to the mound for the
Bullpups. Eddins went five
innings, giving up three


runs on seven hits, two er-
rors and two walks.
Ethan Strickland closed
out the final two innings of
work, allowing three runs
on four hits and striking
out five.
Freeport picked up three
runs in the top of the first
inning, with Marianna an-
swering with one run. With
two outs, Eddins helped
himself out with a single
and stole second. Trent
Charles and Jake Daffin fol-
lowed with a pair of singles
to score Eddins, before a
fly out to right field ended
the inning.
Marianna added five
runs in the second inning
to take a 6-3 lead. Hamp-
ton Jordan led things off by
reaching on an error, and
then stole second and third
before scoring on a single
by Jeremiah Emanuel.


Matthew Shouse picked up
an RBI and moved to third
on an error. With one out,
BT Johnson singled home
Shouse, before scoring on
a triple by Eddins. Charles
plated Eddins when he
reached on an error.
A two-out single by
Shouse was the only of-
fense in the third inning,
but Marianna added three
in the fourth.
Johnson and Eddins sin-
gled, with Charles drawing
a walk to load the bases.
Daffin walked to plate a
run. A passed ball scored
two before Strickland drew
a walk, but three strikeouts
ended the inning.
Marianna added its fi-
nal run in the fifth inning.
Johnson singled and stole
to third, Eddins walked,
and Charles scored John-
son.


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Lady Tigers


From Page 1B
"Haleigh is a heck of a
pitcher," Ford said. "She's
one of the best we've
faced this year."
Malone trailed 4-0 go-
ing into the bottom of
the fifth, when a series
of walks and hit batters
opened the door for a
four-run frame for the
Lady Tigers.
Cailyn Haight and
Venisha Hearns were
hit by pitches, and Cara
McCormic and Shakira
Smith were each walked
to bring the first Malone
run to the plate.
Starting pitcher Sara
Newsom was also hit by
a pitch to score another
run, and Kayla. Lewis
added a two-RBI single
to tie the game 4-4.
The Lady Bobcats of-
fense broke through
against Newsom in the
seventh, starting the in-


Baseball
From Page 1B
inning made it 4-0 Chipo-
la..
A two-run double by
Revell in the fourth in-
ning gave Chipola a 7-0
lead.
Grand Rapids answered
with three runs in the top
of the fifth, taking advan-
tage of a walk, an error
and a wild pitch.
The visitors added an-


Childs
From Page 1B
fire early this season.
But Johnson said that as
long as his team pitches
and plays defense like it
has lately, five runs should
be more than enough on
most nights.
"We said before the sea-


ning off with three con-
secutive hits, followed by
a pair of bean balls be-
fore Ford brought Shey-
anna Chambliss out of
the bullpen.
"I probably left Sara in a
little too long," the coach
said. "When I pulled her,
the damage was done."
Chambliss got out of
the inning by striking out
a batter, and getting an-
other to hit into a fielder's
choice.
In the bottom of the
seventh, three straight
walks loaded the bases
for Jakivia Hearns' two-
RBI single for the final
runs of the game.
Jakivia Hearns finished
the game 2 for 3 with a
triple and two RBI.
Newsom gave up 10
earned runs on 12 hits,
four walks, three hit bat-
ters and two strikeouts.


other, rin in the sixth to
make it 7-4.
The Indians got it back
in the bottom of the
frame on an RBI single by
Adam Bigale.
Revellfinishedthe game
2 for 3 with a run and two
RBIs, Boston went 2 for 2
with two runs, and Bos-
ton and Boddicker each
were 2 for 3 with a run
and an RBI.
Chipola improved to
15-11 on the season with
the wins.


son that if we score five
runs, we should win," the
coach said. "We've only
made one error in the
last three games, and I
can live with that. We're
making teams earn runs.
When you don't give away
runs, it's hard to score in
this game."
The Lady Pirates are
now 8-3 on the season.


CHIPOLA COLLEGE
CRIMINAL JUSTICE TRAINING CENTER

Basic Law Enforcement &
Crossover from Corrections
to Law Enforcement
Day Academy starts: April 11, 2011

Basic Corrections Academy
Day Academy starts: May 11, 2011

AL & GA residence: NO out of state tuition
Call (850) 718-2479 or (850) 718-2286

Read more at www.jcfloridan.com


Sports Briefs


High School Baseball
Thursday FAMU at
Malone, 5 p.m.; Bain-
bridge at Marianna, 4:30
p.m.; Graceville at Chipley,
4 p.m., and 6 p.m.
Friday- Malone at
Graceville, 4 p.m., and 6
p.m.; Marianna at Chipley,
6:30 p.m.; Sneads at Boze-
man, 4 p.m., and 6 p.m.

High School Softball
Thursday Sneads at
Bozeman, 4 p.m., and 6
p.m.; Malone at FAMU, 3
p.m.; Cottondale at Hol-
mes County, 4 p.m., and 6
p.m.; Marianna at Chipley,
6p.m.
Friday Marianna at
Graceville, 6 p.m.; Blount-
stown at Sneads, 4 p.m.,
and 6 p.m.

Chipola Baseball
The Indians host Grand
Rapids today at 3 p.m.,
and begin Panhandle
Conference play on Satur-
day against Gulf Coast in
Panama City at 1 p.m.

Chipola Softball
The Lady Indians will
return home Friday to take
on Middle Georgia at 2
p.m., and St. Petersburg at
6p.m.

Pirate Prowl 5K
The St. Patrick's Day
Pirate Prowl 5K run will
take place on Saturday at
Sneads Landing Park.


Race day registration will
be at 7 a.m., with the 5K
run starting at 8 a.m., and
the Fun Run starting after
the 5K.

5K Fun Run
Carr FFA presents a 5K
and Mile Fun Run at the
Train Depot on North Pear
Street in Blountstown on
April 9.
Registration will be from
7 a.m. to 7:45 a.m.
The 5K begins at 8 a.m.,
and the Mile Fun Run
follows.
Registration fee (in-
cludes a T-shirt) is $15 for
the 5K, and $10 for the
Mile Fun Run.
'Medals will be awarded
for division winners,
plaques for overall win-
ners.
Call 850-674-5395 for
more information, or visit
www.carrschool.org.

Golf Tournament
Tri-County Home Build-
ers Association golf tour-
nament will be April 9 at
Indians Spring Golf Club.
Shotgun start will be at
8:30 a.m. Lunch, awards
will follow.
Format: Four-person/
select shot. Entry fee: $60
per person.
Proceeds go to schol-
arships and commu-
nity service projects. Hole
sponsorships available
for $100. Call 482-8802 for
more information.


10K Run
The 34th Annual Rose
City 10K Run will by
sponsored by the city of
Thomasville/Thomasville
YMCA on April 23.
The 10,000 meter run be-
gins at 8 a.m. Pre-registra-
tion ends April 9, and the
pre-registration fee is $15.
Race day registration'is
from 6:30 a.m. to 7:30 a.m.
Late registration is $17.
Individuals 13 years and
older can participate.
For more information,
call 229-226-9878, or 229-
413-2501.

Marianna Youth
Wrestling
Team Dynamic Youth
Wrestling Team will
continue practicing on
Tuesday and Thursday
nights at the wrestling
room at the old Marianna
High School. Practice will
be from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.
All kids in Jackson
County from ages 6 and up
'are welcome to join. For
further information please
contact Marianna coach
Ron Thoreson at 272-0280.

Sports Items
Send all sports items to
editorial@jcfloridan.com,
or fax them to 850-482-
4478. The mailing address
for the paper is Jackson
County Floridan P.O. Box
520 Marianna, FL 32447.
From Staff Reports


TABLES ARE AVAILABLE FOR RENT
REGISTER ONLINE AT
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---------------
MAKE CHECK PAYABLE TO DOTHAN EAGLE
Dothan Eagle
Attn: Yard Sale P.O. Box 1968, Dothan, AL 36302
OR DROP OFF AT: 227 North Gates Street, Dothan, AL
Name: Phone:


Address: City: State: Zip:
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Please charge my credit card Card number:
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NOT TO BE SOLD BY VENDOR:
fircanus, lie aniiuls, pRcatie materials
lthacco0drug paraphernalia, li ordrink. or
exp. any oilier gxois hatl he Evclns Managemenl
,, '1. 1 i,; h ,, .. i .


c l


I


I








JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


Chipola softball win streak ends


BY DUSTIN KENT
Floridan Sports Editor

The No. 5 Chipola Lady Indians
saw their 17-game winning streak
come to a close on Saturday night in
Panama City, as the Gulf Coast Lady
Commodores dealt Chipola its worst
loss of the season, a 9-1, five-inning
defeat at Frank Brown Park.
Michaela Hamilton started and
picked up the win for Gulf Coast, al-
lowing just one run on two hits and
no walks with five strikeouts.
Brittany Black started and took the
loss for Chipola, giving up six earned


runs on seven hits and four walks in
four innings.
Taylor Nicolosi and Kathleen Vo-
gler each had big offensive days for
Gulf Coast, with Nicolosi's three-run
home run off of Black in the second
inning getting the Lady Commo-
dores on the board first.
After Black hit a solo homer in the
top of the third inning, Gulf Coast
came back with three more runs in
the bottom of the frame, on a three-
run double byVogler to make it 6-1.
Brooke Rackel came on in relief of
Black in the fifth inning, but her luck
in retiring Lady Commodore hitters


was no better.
A walk and two singles loaded the
bases with one out, and Rackel hit
the next two batters to make it 8-1.
Vogler came home on a wild pitch
to make it an eight-run lead and end
the game on the mercy rule.
Nicolosi was 3 for 3 with three runs
and three RBI, and Vogler was 3 for
3 with a run and three RBI. Hannah
Lovestrand and Black had the only
two hits of the day for Chipola.
The Lady Indians will be back in
action on Friday. They return home
to take on Middle Georgia at 2 p.m.
and St. Petersburg at 6 p.m.


MARKSKINNER/FLORIDAN


Chipola's Hannah
Lovestrand gets
ready to throw to
first during a re-
cent home game.


Track teams participate in invitational


BY DUSTIN KENT
Floridan Sports Editor

All four Jackson County
track programs were in ac-
tion in Tallahassee over the
weekend. Marianna com-
peted at the Chiles Track
And Field Championships;
Cottondale, Graceville,
and Sneads competed at
the Jesse Forbes Middle
School and High School
Invitational.
The Marianna boys fin-
ished eighth out of 10
teams at Chiles, with the
Bulldogs' best finisher
Charles Barnes taking
fourth in the long jump
with a mark of 19 feet, 8.5
inches.
Barnes also placed fifth
in the triple jump with a
mark of 38 feet, 4 inches.
Quay Brigham tied
Barnes for the best indi-
vidual finish to an event for
Marianna, taking fourth in
the 300-meter hurdles with
a time of 43.81 seconds.
Larry Bush gave the Bull-
dogs a sixth-place finish
in the boys' discus with a
throw of 111 feet, 8 inches.


The Marianna 4 x 100 re-
lay team took fifth with a
time of 46.06 seconds, with
the 4 x 400 team and the
4 x 800 team each placing
sixth.
In the Jesse Forbes In-
vitational at Godby High
School, the Graceville Ti-
gers boys' team had the
best finish, taking ninth
overall out of 18 teams.
Sneads boys took 13th,
while Graceville girls also
placed 13th out of 20
teams, Sneads girls 18th,
and Cottondale girls 20th.
Individually, Graceville's
Kevin Potts had the best
finish in a single event,
taking second in the 800-
meter run with a time of
1:58.07.
Potts also took nifith in
the 200-meter dash with a
time of 23.6 seconds, while
Hunter Potts took fourth in
the boys' 3200-meter run
at 10:35.09
Jessica McClendon also
.gave Graceville a top fin-
isher by taking third in the
girls' shot put with a mark
of 35 feet, 1 inch, while Re-
becca Delgado took third


in the 3200-meter run for
the Graceville girls, with a
time of 13:45.31.
Graceville girls Brittany
Smith, Jalisa McSwain,
,Cierra Mack, and, Trinity
Boston took fifth in the 4
x 100-meter relay with a
time of 53.32 seconds.
Sneads girls took sixth at
54.08.
Cottondale's best finish-
er was Kehdriece Gardner,
who took seventh in the
girls' 100-meter hurdles
with a time of 20.11 sec-
onds.
Gardner also placed 10th
in the 300-meter hurdles.
'Michael Cassidy led the
Sneads team with a third
place finish in the boys'
shot put with a mark of
47 feet, 1 inch. Graceville's
Leander Ford took fifth in
the event with a mark of 45
feet.
Cassidy also took third in
the boys' discus throwwith
a mark of 139 feet, 11.5
inches, with Ford again
coming in fifth at 126 feet,
3 inches, and fellow Tiger
Allante Oliver-Barnes sixth
at 118 feet, 10 inches.


WEDNESDAY MORNING / AFTERNOON


Delontre Keys also took
an eighth-place finish in
the boys' long jump for
Sneads with a mark of 20
feet, 3.5 inches.
In the boys' triple jump,
Graceville's CJ Miller took
sixth with a mark of 40 feet,
6.5 inches, while Rasheed
Campbell placed eighth
for the Tigers at 40 feet, 5.5
inches.
In the middle school
competition, Mack won
the girls' 100-meter dash
with a time of 13.15 sec-
onds, placed fourth in the
200-meter dash (28.47),
and second in the girls'
high jump at 4 feet.
Grand Ridge's Jeremy
Wert finished first in the
boys' 800-meter run with
a time of 2:10.84, while fel-
low Indian Erick McWhite
took second in the boys'
200-meter dash (24.91)
and third in the 100-meter
dash (11.93).
The Grand Ridge boys
took sixth overall out of 16
teams, while the Gracev-
ille girls took 10th out of
18 teams, and Cottondale
girls 15th.


Union still wants more

financial info from NFL


The Associated Press

WASHINGTON Ze-
roing in on the crux of
the NFL's labor dispute
- how to split $9 billion
in revenues players'
union executive commit-
tee member Scott Fujita
said Tuesday the finan-
cial information turned
over by the league so far
"hasn't been sufficient."
Fujita, a Cleveland
Browns linebacker, said
the NFL Players Associa-
tion has retained an in-
ternational investment
bank to help interpret
what data the league
does provide.
Fujifa attended media-
tion sessions last month
as part of the NFLPA ne-
gotiating team. He was
not present Tuesday, the
13th day that Commis-
sioner Roger Goodell and
union executive director
DeMaurice Smith went
to the Federal Mediation
and Conciliation Service
office for talks on a new
collective bargaining


agreement.
The current CBA origi-
nally was set to expire
last week, but two exten-
sions now have pushed
the cutoff to the end of
Friday.
While progress has
been made between the
sides, both have stuck
to their stances when it
comes to some central
issues: The NFLPA has
not agreed to any major
economic concessions
- and the NFL has not
agreed to the union's
long-held demand that
the league completely
open its books.
One key question is
what cut team owners
should get up front to
help cover costs such as
stadium construction
and improvement. Under
the old deal, owners re-
ceived more than $1 bil-
lion off the top. They en-
tered these negotiations
seeking to add another
$1 billion to that amount,
before other revenues are
divided with players.

MARCH 9, 2011


6:00 6:30 7:0017:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 110:0010:3011:0011:3012:0012:30 1:00 1:30 2:00 2:30 3:00 3:30 4:00 4:30 5:00 5:30
2 0 The Early Show (N) (In Stereo) 0 Griffith Family Fd Let's Make a Deal (N) The Price Is Right (N) News Young & Restless Bold TheTalk (In Stereo) The Dr. Oz Show Oprah Wnfrey News News News News
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5 NewsChannel7 Today Today Suze Orman; Giada De Laurentiis, (N) (In Stereo) t Days of our Lives (N) News7 at Noon Rachael Ray (N) 0 The Doctors o Ellen DeGeneres Millionaire Jeopardyl News NBC News
(8 News 13 This Morning Good Morning America (N) E Live Regis & Kelly The View (In Stereo) The Dr. Oz Show All My Children 3 One Life to Live General Hospital (N) Dr. Phil (N) (In Stereo) Oprah Winfrey News ABC News
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20 CSS Mayhem In the A.M. SportsNite (In Stereo) Whitetail Hook Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Heal Power-Juicing College Baseball Coastal Lee Basketball Basketball Ole Miss Hurricane SportsNite 0
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24 DISC Younger J. Roblson J. Meyer PaldProg. Sec.of Interrogation County Jail (In Stereo) Behind Bars "Ohio" Biker Build-Off American Chopper American Chopper American Chopper American Chopper Cash Cab CashCab CashCab CashCab
25 TWC Your Weather Today With Abrams and Bettes 00 Wake Up With Al Day Planner 0 Storms Storms Weather/History
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29 LIFE The Balancing Act (N) Desp.-Wives Grey's Anatomy 1 WilllGrace Will/Grace Kids Kids Chris HowI Met How I Met How IMet American Justice Cold Case Files 00 Unsolved Mysteries Unsolved Mysteries Intervention 0
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35 BET (5:00) BET Inspiration The Mo'Nique Show Bernie Berne Berni e Bernie. Jamle F. Jamie F. Chris Chris "Cinderia'"*** (1997, Musicacl) B The Game TheGame The Game The Game Chris Chris 106 & Park: Top 10
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43 CNN2 (5:00) Morning Express With Robin Meade Morning Express Showbiz Tonight HLN News Showbiz Tonight Prime News a0
45 CNN (5:00) American Morning (N) 00 Newsroom (N) Newsroom (N) Newsroom (N) Newsroom (N) The Situation Room With Wolf Blitzer (N)
46 CW (5:00) The Dally Buzz B Steve Wilkos Show Browns Browns Cosby Cosby TBA Cause TBA TBA Steve Wilkos Show The Tyra Show 11M Roseanne Roseanne Payne Payne Lyricsl Lyrics!
47 SPIKE Baby Paid Prog. SexyAbs Paid Prog. CSI: NY (In Stereo) CSI: Crime Scene CSI: Crime Scene CSI: Crime Scene CSI: NY (In Stereo) CSI: Crime Scene Ways Die Ways Die Ways Die WaysDie Ways Die WaysDie Ways Die WaysDie
49 HGTV CashAttic Cash Attic Potential Potential Stagers Stagers Get it Sold Get It Sold To Sell To Sell House Hunters Wasted Income Antonio Antonlo D. Design Design Design Design Get It Sold Get It Sold income To Sell
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99 SPEED Monster Jam Trucker ticket Barrett-Jackson Spec. Bubba Bubba Paid Prog. CarD NASCAR Racing: Sprint Cup Series: Kobalt Tools 400. Garage ruck U Barrett-Jackson Monster Jam Pass Time Pass Time

WEDNESDAY EVENING / LATE NIGHT MARCH 9, 2011
6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:0010:3011:0011:3012:0012:30 1:00 1:30 2:00 2:3013:00 3:30 4:00 4:30 5:00 5:30
2 a Wheel Jeopardyl Survivor: Redemption Criminal Minds [2 C.M.: Suspect News Late Show Letterinan Late Late Show/Cralg Extra (N) Up to the Minute (N) (In Stereo) AgDay News Daybreak Good Morning Show
3 1 News Wheel Survivor: Redemption Criminal Minds 0 C.M.: Suspect News Late Show Letterman Late Late ShowlCraig Inside Ed. Up to the Minute (N) (In Stereo) WTVY This Morning
5 News Wheel Minute to Win It 0a Minute to Win It 0 Law & Order: SVU News Tonight Show w/Leno Late Night Carson Poker After Dark Extra (N) The Bankruptcy Hour IShepherd's Chapel Early Tdy NewsChannel 7 Today
8 News Ent Middle Middle Family Sunshlne Off the Map (In Stereo) News Nightllne Jimmy Kimmel Live Lopez Jim The Law Show. Pald Prog. ABC World NewsNow (N) E Morning News13 ThisMoming
10 ( Two Men Two Men American Idol Finalists perform live. 0[ News How I Met Law & Order: SVU King-Hill Seinfeld Friends Friends Lewis and Jurnovoy Scrubs Selnfeld Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Shepherd's Chapel Paid Prog. Outdoor
11 w NewsHour Dimension Rock, Pop and Doo Wop (My Music) Yoga-Arthritis Capitol Charlie Rose (N) 0] Rick Steves' Viva Espanal (In Stereo) 80 Rock, Pop and Doo Wop (My Music) Yoga-Arthritis Houseboat Place Between
7SHOW Adventrld 'Youth inRevolt"**AX (2009) NASCAR Callforn. ShamelessaO NASCAR 1 Hope TheyServeBeerin Helf(2009)'R' "' SorotyRow"*' (2009)'R' 'SarahSlvernan: Magic" 'TheTrolsky"* (2009) JayBaruchel.'NR' li'sea Frm
14 NICK Anubis Sponge. My Wife My Wife Lopez LLopez opez George Lopez Lopez Lopez ILopez oLopez Lopez Lopez Lopez Lopez Lopez Lopez Lopez Lopez Lopez Full House Full House
16TBS King King Browns Browns There There Payne Payne Conan (N) Lopez Tonight (N) Conan Lopez Tonight 'Road Tri'BeerPong'(2009, Comedy) 0 Married Married Married Married
17HBO (5:45)The Losers'** (2010) "ODateNightl'**)t (2010)(E Big Love (In Stereo) RealTime/Bill Maher Thurgood"(2011) Laurence Fishbume. I :Funny, Die Cathouse I'ewBestFliend'* (2002)'R' 'LoveandaBuller'** (2002J "Squeakque
18 ESPN2 College Basketball College Basketball SportsCtr Final NFLLIve NASCAR NBA SportsNation 0 NFL Live NBA Nation Final NBA SportsNation Ba Mike and Mike
19 ESPN College Basketball College Basketball SportsCenter (Live) 10 SportsCenter (Live) SportsCenter (Live) SportsCenter (Live) SportsCenter [] SportsCenter N0 SportsCenter 0
20 CSS College Baseball: Alabama at Georgia. (Live) In the Huddle SportsNite (In Stereo) Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Pald Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid'Prog. Focused Arthri-D
21DISN Wizards Wizards "CampRock2:TheFinalJam'(2010)'NR' Wizards Wizards Sonny Sonny Hannah Hannah Wizards Wizards SuiteLife SulteLlfe Phineas Phineas Little Little Jungle Timmy Chugging AgentOso
22MAX "Night-Smithsonian" The Time Travelers Wde"** (2009) i "ToothFaiy'** (2010)'PG' Co-Ed-4 'CodeofSilence"t**a (1985)'R'1 Life-Top 'Controm***, (2007)SamRiley.'R' "WhataWaytoGo!"'** (1964)'NR' American
23 TNT Bones (In Stereo) Bones (In Stereo) Bones (In Stereo) Bones (In Stereo) Southland (In Stereo) CSI: NY (In Stereo) CSI: NY (In Stereo) Leverage a Ctold Case (In Stereo) NUMB3RS (In Stereo) NUMB3RS "Scorched' Angel "Reunion"
24 DISC MythBusters E Sons Sons Sons Sons Desert Car Kings (N) Sons Sons Sons Sons Desert Car Kings Overhaulln' (In Stereo) Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Teleworld Paid Prog. Meaning Paid Prog. Paid Prog. MathMind
25 TWC Weather Center 0 a Weather Weather Weather Weather Weather Center BW Weather Weather Weather Weather Weather Center 00 Weather Weather Weather Weather First Outlook Weather. 0 Wake Up With Al
26 USA NCIS "Sea Dog" NCIS "Light Sleeper' NCIS "Head Case"' NCIS "Family Secret Fairly Legal 00 CSI: Crime Scene CSI: Crime Scene 'Crank"**t (2006, Action) 0 Law & Order: SVU Makeover Get Rich Monk Ba
28 FAM (5:30) "MissCongenialiy"(2000, Comedy) Two Weeks Nolice'*** Sandra Bullock. The 700 Club 0E Whoge? Whose? Paid Prog. Take it Pald Prog. Paid Prog. The 700 Club 0 Celeb Scrt Twist Prince Life Today J. Meyer Paid Prog.
29 LIFE Pawn Pawn American Justice Nostradamus: 2012 Predictions of cataclysm. How IMet How IMet Chris How Met Will/Grace Will/Grace Reba WEN Hair Halr Free Paid Prog. BeautyTIp Oreck Vac Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Meaning Hair Free
30 A&E Dog Dog Dog Bounty Hunter Dog Bounty Hunter Storage Storage Storage Storage Dog Bounty Hunter Dog Bounty Hunter St Storag e t Storage storage Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. FreeBullet Paint Money
32 SYFY Face Off Ghost Hunters 00 Ghost Hunters 0l Face Off"Family Plot" Ghost Hunters Bl Face Off "FamilyPlot" Stargate SG-1 0 Stargate Atlantis "Haunted Prison(2006. Horror) Jake Busey. Paid Prog. Pald Prog. Get Rich Paid Prog.
33 AMC (4:30) TheSpecialist" "Once Upon a Time in Mexico"(2003) R' Sl Wounds"w' (2001) Steven Seagal.'R' Breaking Bad Ea Breaking Bad 0 "48HRS."*** (1982) Nick Nolte.'R' 1 -"Another48 HRS." * (1990, Action) 'R' CarMD Bed
34 MTV Si. Library SII. Library Life, Liz Life, Liz Teen Mom 2 The Real World 00 The Real World 0a Jersey Shore N Teen Mom 2 The Real World 0 AMTV (In Stereo) AMTV: Morning
35 BET 106 & Park: Top 10 Crews The Game 'Lockdown'** (2000, Drama) ] The Mo'Nlque Show Wendy Williams Show ILockdown'** (2000, Drama) Hell Date Hell Date Inspiration Popoff Inspiration Popoff BET Inspiration
36TOON Titan Hole/Wall Dude Destroy King-Hill King-Hill Amer.Dad Amer.Dad Fam.Guy Fam.Guy Chicken Aqua Awesome Amer. Dad Amer. Dad Fam.Guy Fam.Guy Chcken Sealab Awesome KIng-Hill King-Hill Hero 108 Ben10
39 HIST Modern Marvels 0 Ancient Aliens a Underwater Universe Underwater Universe MysteryQuest H Ancient Aliens a Underwater Universe Underwater Universe MysteryQuest 0a Prostate eBay Take It Profit Younger Million$
40 TVLND All-Family All-Family All/Family All/Family Raymond Raymond Cleveland Retiredat Cleveland -Retiredat Raymond IRaymond Cleveland Retired at 3's Co. 3's Co. 3' Co. 3' Co. Home Imp. Homelmp. M'A'S'H M'A'S'H Removal Paid Prog.
43CN2 Jane Velez-Mitchell Nancy Grace Nancy Grace The Joy Behar Show Showbiz Tonight Nancy Grace The Joy Behar Show Showbiz Tonight Nancy Grace Jane Velez-Mitchell Showbiz Tonight Morning Express
45 CNN John King, USA (N) In the Arena (N) Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 (N) B0 Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 Anderson Cooper 360 Piers Morgan Tonight World Business Today World One American Morning (N)


46 CW
47 SPIKE
49 HGTV


70s Show 70s Show
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Hunters House


4merica's Next Model Shedding for


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Free $ Lose Lbsl IMeaning Dual Saw


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99 SPEED NASCAR Race Hub The10(N) The10 Car Warriors (N) Car Sc. Car Sci. ThelO |The 10 Car Warriors Car Scl. Car Sc. NASCAR Race Hub Targa Newfoundland Ultimate StreetCar n Pal


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WEDNESDAY, MARCH 9, 2011 3BF


[I---------








74B WEDNESDAY, MARCH 9, 2011


PEANUTS BY CHARLES SCHULTZ


BORN LOSER BY ART AND CHIP SANSOM
AFTER ACL TIArE5EAR 5 ER. AOH, i t> 'T NTEAM AVE
I TOINK I'A FINALLY STATING TE" ANSWERS, YET...
To &GET -T !-- ---


BIG NATE BY LINCOLN PIERCE
COME ON. FRANCIS' .1
GETTING A DETENTION S. 1 AL
ISN'T GOING TO OU HAVE
KILL YOU! TA ATTABOYVTO D0 I5
S 6ET IN
WELL..OKAY. I* TR^SL
:0111,


FRANK & ERNEST BY BOB THAVES


GRIZZWELLS BY BILL SCHORR


ARLO & JANIS BY JIMMY JOHNSON


600D, FINALLY WE'LL BE
RENDERED N'A DETAIL
THAT JUXTAPOSES OUR
MUNDANE EXISTENCE...
...HEY, WHAT
ARE YOU C.
DOING?


JACKSON COUNTY FLORIDAN www.jcfloridan.com


THAT 'DONTIMY'
zfT'S BACK HEAD'LU:
I THINK I EXPLODE-
CAN6ETIT /AGAINI-
THIS TIME. .


A r<


NEA Crossword Puzzle


YOU NEED A BLANKET
LIKE YOUR BROTHER


'1 --


ACROSS 45 Days before Answer to Pr
47 Tennessee pSI T
1 Skirt the Ford IININ EU
issue 48 Caterwauled N
6 Wahines' 51 Shrink back T
dances in fear A PO0 LIL
11 Lifted 52 Mars OER
12 Mostrational explorers CUB ED S
13 Turn into 53 Spoiled A R EIS S
bone rotten L A S OT
14 Cheap 54 Not legit L|O0AIDIE
15 Wrinkled 55 Guide P 0 T
16 Without FIR IARSS
feeling DOWN ROOT O
17 Too OAT|H N
18 Respond to 1 Gauguin's G RIT A
an SOS prop
19 Clump of 2 Travel 20 "--Old
fluff papers Cow Hand"
23 Battery 3 "1, Robot" 21 Unclad
word author 22 Kind of sur-
25 Protest 4 Resist geon
26 Just a taste 5 Ben & Jerry 24 Curved
29 Aquarium rival molding
fish 6 Damage 25 Did Easter
31 Fruity drink 7 Powerless eggs
32 Turmoil 8 "- Girls" 26 Money
33 Writer Zola 9 Tool handle repository
34 Before mar- wood 27 Casually
riage 10 Shoat's 28 Reallycome
35 Lucky break home down
37 Cows' 11 Santa-, 30 Extra
mouthfuls Calif. 36 Capsized,
39 Bronte gov- 12 Cuff link with "over"
erness 16 Finds fault 38 Book copi-
40 Yr. parts 18 Baking- er of old
41 Lynx and powder in- .40 Joins in
ocelot gredient matrimony


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


2011 by UFS, Inc.


Horoscope

PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) Rather than focusing
on the ambitions of anoth-
er, put your mind to devel-
oping your own hopes and
desires.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
- Things will work out far
better for you if you don't
advertise your intentions
to anybody.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
- It's to your advantage to
look ahead so that you can
begin to blend your pres-
ent interests with what you
hope to accomplish.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
- Be sure that what you
say and do leaves a favor-
able impression on your
companions.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
- Because your mental
processes will be operating
at full speed, you could be
bombarded with construc-
tive thoughts.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
- Finding solutions could
be easy for you, because
you'll have a special apti-
tude for ferreting out the
root causes of problems.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22) Keep an open mind
when talking to your mate
or special someone. S/he
will have suggestions to
offer that will be advanta-
geous for you.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
- A frustrating problem
concerning your work or
career that has been plagu-
ing you lately could sud-
denly make a major shift
for the better.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) If you hang out with
certain people who act and
think in progressive terms,
it will have a marvelous af-
fect on your outlook.
SAGITIARIUS (Nov. 23-
Dec. 21) There is no rea-
son to settle for the status
quo. If you have a different
way of doing something,
don't hesitate to give it a
try.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) Rely as much on your
mental abilities as you do
your physical ones if you
find yourself in some kind
of competitive activity.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) Although most things
should turn out favorably
for you, you're likely to be
luckiest in activities that
involve material affairs.


Annie's Iailbox


Dear Annie: Are there any signs to look
for to determine whether someone is a-
sexual predator? I have heard that when it
comes to children being sexually abused,
it is usually a close relative or friend. I
have a 6-month-old daughter who has
five uncles. I am scared to leave her with
any man other than her father, so I refuse
to allow any male to baby-sit her. Is this
irrational? I feel bad, but I'd rather be safe
than sorry. How do I explain this politely
to my brothers and brothers-in-law when
they ask about baby-sitting her? PRO-
TECTIVE MOM

Dear Mom: We understand your fears,
but most men are perfectly responsible
with children. There is no specific profile
of a pedophile. In fact, many of the same
qualities that would make a man an ex-
cellent father also describe pedophiles
- those who are terrific with children
and engage them in.fun activities. Pedo-
philes are usually friendly and charming.
They tend to gravitate toward areas that
put them in close contact with children.
Children of single mothers are particu-
larly vulnerable because pedophiles of-
ten cozy up to Mom in order to get close
to children who need a father figure. You
can get out of baby-sitting offers by say-


Bridge

Whenever you reach a grand slam, there is no
point counting losers you can't afford any.
Instead, find 13 winners. Well, which 13 catch
your eye in this seven-spade contract?
I like North's two-no-trump response be-
cause it describes a balanced hand with at least
eight high-card points. I know this is out of fa-
vor because if the final contract is in no-trump,
the wrong hand might be playing it. However, )
suppose the bidding starts two clubs two
diamonds three clubs. What would happen
after that? A lot of confusion, it seems to me.
Remember, if North now bids three hearts, that
shows a five-card suit.
You start with 12 top tricks: four spades, one
heart, two diamonds and five clubs. You could
try the diamond finesse, but there is a much
better option: a heart ruff in your hand. Win
with dummy's heart ace and trump a heart with
your spade three. Cash your top trumps, play a
club to dummy's 10, draw East's last spade, dis-
carding your diamond jack, and claim the last
six tricks with your diamonds and clubs. -


ing, "That's sweet of you, but it's too soon.
Maybe when she's a little older." The best
way to protect your children is to keep
a close eye on them, and when they are
old enough, help them protect them-
selves. Teach them that they can talk to
you about anything, to come to you when
something doesn't seem right, and that
no adult with good intentions would ask
them to keep secrets from their parents.

Dear Annie: My wife and I were married
last summer. Because her family lives in
Eastern Europe, we. had the ceremony
there. Only my immediate family attend-
ed. My extended family is relatively well
off. By Christmas, we had only received
one gift.from any of them. Their absence
has convinced my wife that my family is
full of selfish misers who dislike her. Is
there anything I can do to avoid a perma-
nent chasm between my wife and my ex-
tended family? TOM IN TRENTON

Dear Tom: Were these relatives sent invi-
tations to the wedding? If not, they may
feel no obligation to give a gift, and it is
poor manners to demand one. If you
think something else is going on, ask one
of your parents to contact the relatives
and find out.


42 "- Get
Your Gun"
43 Striped ani-
mal
44 Farmer's
purchase
46 Exceed-
ingly
47 Latin I verb
48 Mo.
multiples
49 Awesome!
50 Ky. neigh-
bor
51 "60
Minutes"
network


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: P equals J
"AYGK F,D KWY KFLY CSI KIFLLFGE

KWY DSRA ZGT DHIZOOFGE KWY

DARTEY SCC Z AFCY KRIGYT

DAFODWS'T ." DFDKYI PSZG

HWFKKFDKYI
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "If the point is sharp, and the arrow is swift, it can
pierce through the dust no matter how thick." Bob Dylan
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 3-9


MONTY BY JIM MEDDICK


KIT'N'CARLYLE BY LARRY WRIGHT HERMAN BY JIM UNGER


3:9 LaughngStock IntlBnaonl Inc /ds by UFS 20M I
"I heard you say, 'There's
some old bat waiting'!"


North 03-09-11
A 5 4 2
VA 7 6 3
S852
S10 3
Vest East
S10 9 8 7 6
SK Q 109 V J 8 5 2
SQ 7 6 4 10 9 3
8 6 5 2 4 9 4
South
A KQJ3
V 4
*AKJ
4 AK QJ 7
Dealer: South
Vulnerable: North-South
South West North East
2 4 Pass 2 NT Pass
3 Pass 3 V Pass
3 A Pass 4 A Pass
4 NT Pass 5 V Pass
7 A Pass Pass Pass
Opening lead: V K








www.JCFLORIDAN.com


CLASSIFIED


Jackson County Floridan *


Wednesday, March 9, 2011- 5 B


WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED




ARKETPLAC


BY PHONE: (850) 526-3614 or (800) 779-2557 BY MAIL: WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE
BY FAX: (850) 779-2557 P.O. BOX 520, MARIANNA, FL 32447
ONLINE: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM IN PERSON: 4403 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA
Publication Policy Errors and Omissions: Advertisers should check their ad the first day. This publication shall not be liable for failure to publish an ad or for a typographic error or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the ad for the first day's
insertion. Adjustment for errors is limited to the cost of that portion of the ad wherein the error occurred. The advertiser agrees that the publisher shall not be liable for damages arising out of errors in advertisements beyond the amount paid for the space
actually occupied by that portion of the advertisement in which the error occurred, whether such error is due to negligence of the publishers employees or otherwise and there shall be no liability for non-insertion of any advertisement beyond the amount paid for
such advertisement. Display Ads are not guaranteed position. All advertising is subject to approval. Right is reserved to edit, reject, cancel or classify all ads under the appropriate classification.


S OdiS 5 5 00. 0^^^^^^^ wl^^^^^^^^^^


IL /A


ANNOUNCEMENTS


I CAN PROVIDE IN-HOME SENIOR CARE
Including meal preparation, house cleaning,
laundry & transportation. Sneads/Grand
Ridge. Call Lovida 850-593-0043 DO 11239



CA) CHARLESTON
Auctions & aUqudations
HUGE 2-DAY ONSITE AUCTION
Motors Facility Closing:
General Electric Company
1371 Hodgesville Rd, Dothan
Wednesday & Thursday
March 9th & 10th at 9AM
Preview Inspection:
Tue., March 8th 9AM-5PM
Featured Equipment: Fabrication & Ma-
chine Shop Equipment, Various MILLER
Welders, CINCINNATI Shear, NIAGRAR
Press Brake, Material Handling & Plant
Servicing Equipment, Various Electric Fork
Trucks, Over (20) Fork Truck Battery
Chargers, More Than (60) Various Bridge &
Jib Cranes, Huge Qty. of Pallet Racking, &
Much More!
Alabama Auctioneer License # 5086
Call (877) 357-8124
www.CharlestonAuctions.com

(i) MERCHANDISE


2004 John Deere 4410 with loader $2950, diesel,
590hrs, 35HP, R4 tires, contact
mrshanl@msn.com / 321-549-6183. DO 11152


GM Bed Mat: Excellent shape!! 5-Ft long X 4.6'
feet wide at widest part. $50. Also a factory
Chevy 5 lug rim. Excellent shape, only used for
a spare! New $270. Sell for'$100. 850-579-2801.
2 Night stand/end tables with 2 drawers, excel-
lent condition, $15/each 850-272-1089
Antique Church Windows from 1940's, different
size's & styles. $25 -$75/each 850-482-3005
Antique Dining Room Table, diamond shaped
$50 850-592-2403
Baby Clothes, various sizes, like new, $5-$10
ler bag, 850-693-4189
Bicycle. 15 speed. Needs chain. Only $ 20.00
Marianna (850)482-2636
Books-P. Cornwell, A. Greeley, S. Turow, hard &
soft back; $5-$10, 850-482-3780
Cart on rollers for TV or microwave $10 850-
526-3365
Denim Couch, Chair & Ottoman, good condition
$125 850-693-4189


Wednesday, March 9,.2011









THE SUDKU GAME WITH A KICK!

HOW TO PLAY
Fill in the 9x9 gnd with the missing
numbers so that each column, row and
3x3 box contains the digits 1- 9 only once .
There is only one correct solution
for each puzzle.
GET MORE WASABI
PUZZLES ONLINEI
ARCHIVES AND MORE GREAT GAMES AT
BOXERJAM.COM


Wanted: Old Coins, Gold, Diamonds, Guns, And
Tools West Main Jewelry & Loan 334-671-1440.
DO 11144

r ."'"" ........... "'" .....
S RON WHITE LIVE
in Panama City 3/25
two great seats close to stage in Orchestra
SC section, near center aisle, Sold out show,
L ...$340 obo. Call 334-714-9819.


UTILITY TRAILER, Tilt8X20 tandem axle, goose
neck, all metal with electric brakes, $2,500 OBO
334-687-6056 or 695-5936

PETS & ANIMALS


AKCBOXER PUPS five brindle/four fawn.
ready 3/15/11. both parents on site. $300.00.
call 334 692-5335. DO 11253
Beautiful Female Boxer Puppy with white
markings. Tails docked & Dew Claws
removed. Will be 6wks old Sat. 3/5/11. $250
Call 850-573-1109
FOUND: 3 Black Lab puppies near Chipola Col-
lege. 850-526-3132
FOUND: Small brown dog off Nortec Blvd (Com-
pass Lk in Hills) 850-579-8881
Rainbow Kennels Offering 2 Different Basic
Obedience Classes. 4 weeks start Mon @ 5:30
3/28th or 2nd class start Sat 9:30 4/2nd
Call Betty 334-793-3264 or Margaret 334-794-2291
Rescued dogs for very loving home-
lab mixes, terriers; pit-bulls, great dane
mixes and more. All need responsible and
loving pet owners. Call 334-791-7312


Diaper Changing Table, nice condition $35
850-526-3426
Dinette Table, good condition $20 850-693-
4189

Hasting Spinnet Piano- Like new condition,
You won't find this price anywhere!! Paid
over $2000. Asking $500. Call 706-833-8577

Leopard Print Large Suitcase with wheels $20
850-526-3426
Metal Bunk Bed Frame, Red, top is twin, bot-
tom is full, $200 850-482-3334-
Ozark TrailTents, 2 joined together $75
850-526-3426
Tazmanian Devil Piggy Bank 19" $20
850-526-3426
Vintage Mohagany Dresser 5 drawers,
44x20x36, $295 850-526-3365


@000


(7)\ I.n


(')


FARMER'S MARKET


1500 Tons broiler litter $20 per ton. FOB Echo,
AL 334-701-2592,237-4219,795-3056, 795-6698

( E$) EMPLOYMENT


WOOF Inc.
has an immediate opening for an


This opening is to fill an almost 2 decade
long held position due to retirement
Prior experience in electronic media is
preferred.

Apply in person Monday through Friday,
9 to 5, at our main studio office located
at 2518 Columbia Highway in Dothan.
Deadline for applications is 5pm on
Friday March 18th, 2011.


NEW TMH Cardiology Practice Marianna
Full time Office Coordinator needed.
Apply at www.tmh.rrg DFWPEOE

( Green Circl

NOW HIRING hIdustrial Electricians
Responsible for plant electrical power
systems and control equipment and
systems and to ensure these are in proper
working condition for maximum production
of wood pellets under the direction and
review of the Shift Team Leader.
Journeyman Electrician preferred; will
consider a recognized electrical apprentice
with at least 5 years demonstrated
experience in the industrial maintenance
field.
Must be NFPA 70E certified or can become
certified and have extensive knowledge of:
GE medium and low voltage switchgear
Allen Bradley motor controls, VFDs, PLCs
Rockwell Software applications, Control
Net, Device Net, RS View, RS Logix
480 and 4160 volt AC motors
480 and 4160 volt transformers,
switchgears, generators, and circuit
breakers, 3-phase and basic control
systems, Basic machinery functions
Low and High voltage transformers,
switchgears, generators, circuit breakers.
Blueprints and schematics, Multi-mode ST
and SC Fiber Optic Cables, Digital and
analog control systems, Calibrating and
maintaining electrical equipment and
devices, Ethernet Cables
All job offers are contingent upon the
successful completion of a drug and
alcohol screen, physical, and background
check. Please senl re s e to
rweawver reeorteircioicorm

hleed a memw Come?
ChecK out the Classifieds


Tuesday's
WASABI SOLUTION


3 9 5 8 7 1( 4 7

O1 958 @(71 6906
679 4 2 185
. -- 1 6 7 49 () 4 2 (1 8 5
@0Z3 2 6 5 Q )I


s5 4 0@(i 1 3 7 6 I 8

BE SURE TO VISIT OUR
NEWEST GAME SITE


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[(D I


2008 BLOCKDnOT INC WWW RI n tKlTnn-TOM


0 l( W ^KtwcoM


KEWLBOX.COM


Covenant Marianna
CoveOSPIt Hospice
auwo( slM '!'W IQ" Aide FT
Great FT Benefits
Drug-Free Workplace. EOE
Apply/Mail to: 4215 Kelson Ave. Suite E
Call: 850-482-8520 Fax: 850-482-8985
APPLY ONLINE! www.covenanthospice.org



rCoordinator


Working with people with
Developmental Disabilities
BA/BS + 2 yrs professional work
experience in human services.
Full Time
Good Benefits,
Flexible Schedule.


Newspaper Advertising
Sales Position
The Dothan Eagle, a Media General owned
newspaper, is looking for an ambitious,
customer-focused and goal-oriented per-
son to join our Retail Advertising Sales
Team covering the entire Wiregrass area.
This individual is expected to gain an
understanding of their customers'
businesses and recommend advertising
and marketing solutions that help them
increase their competitive advantage in the
marketplace through newspaper, online
and mobile products.
The successful candidate will:
Desire to work in a professional
inside/outside sales environment
Be energetic, motivated and have
aggressive sales skills
Have excellent oral and written
communication skills
i Be familiar with Microsoft office
programs
Have a high school diploma or equivalent
Media General Newspapers offers a
competitive compensation
and benefits package.

Qualified candidates
should send a resume to:

Regional Sales Director,
246 North Oates Street, Dothan, AL 36303
or apply on line at
www.mediageneral.com.

EDUCATION
3& INSTRUCTION


Get a Quality Education for a
New Career! Programs
FORTIS offered in Healthcare,
1 HVAC and Electrical Trades.
Call Fortis College Today!
888-202-4813.
(:01L..liE www.fortiscollege.edu.
DO 11231

RESIDENTIAL
REAL ESTATE FOR RENT




2BR/2BA TOWNHOUSES
Chipola River Townhouses
DEPOSIT WAIVED
4 850-482-1050/693-6879 -
3 bedroom 1 bath brick home in Marianna;
freshly remodel new cabinets/floors. Central
heat/air. HUD Section 8 Welcome. 2941 Hannah
St. $595 month/$500 deposit. 850.209.2943


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
Your source for selling and buying!



Roommate Wanted. Furnished room $375 + Vz
utilities. Located in Cottondale 850-209-5550


* M
'm I..


lac an Ad '-~
SFast, easy, no pressure
P lace an 24 hours a day, 7 days a week!
Get live previews of your classified ads, receive price quotes
and make secure online payments.

www.jcfloridan.com


'es ub is wfoeitf


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B Wednesday March 9 2011 n


J'Ml RESIDENTIAL
GJA REAL. ESTATE FOR-RENT


COTTONDALE VILLAGE APARTMENTS
Now accepting applications for 2 bedroom
units. Rental assistance. No application fee.
We pay water, sewer, and trash service.
4052 Old Cottondale Road, Marianna, FL
32448. 850-526-4062, TDD/TTY 711.
"This institution is an equal opportunity
provider,.and employer."

S a



2BR 1BA house 3163 Hwy 71 N close to Sun-
land & FCI, CH/A, water included, $600/mo.
850-526-3914
3/1 brick & vinyl house, 6066 Victory Rd.
Bascom Fl. in the country, stove furnished,
CH&A $ 675. mo, $675. dep. 334-797-1517.
1 3/1 Country Home for rent, 6 miles South of
Marianna, stove & fridge, $635 + deposit
fm 407-443-9639
3/1 House & 1BR Apartment for Rent. For info
call 850-209-8759


*- Austin Tyler & Associates *
Quality Homes & Apartments
850- 526-3355 4-
"Prooertv Manaoement Is Our ONLY Business"


Cottondale: 2 BR 1 BA. Beautiful, stylish and
newly renovated home for rent. $650/mo.Quiet
and friendly neighborhood. Nice size yard.
Must see! By appt. only (478)508-9502.


2/1 at Millpond $495 + dep.very nice,water/
sewer/lawn maintenance included, access to
water, 850-209-3970
2/2 in Alford, window A/C, $375 + deposit
850-579-4622/850-209-1664/850-573-1851
2/2 Mobile Homes in Marianna, No pets, secur-
ity and references required. $400 & $500 per
month. 850-482-8333
2 & 3 bedroom mobile Homes in Cottondale.
$500 and up. H20, garbage, sewer included.
http:// www.charloscountry living, com.
850-258-4868/209-8847 -
2&3BRMH's in
Marianna & Sneads
(850)209-8595.
3BR 2BA in Cottondale, no pets, Central Heat &
Air $500 850-258-1594 leave message
Edgewood Apartments in Cypress Area. Quiet,
Furnished 1BR 1BA.Cable & laundry included.
$440/mo + deposit. k 850-209-13514-
Large 3/2 $550, 2/1 $395/month,
2/1.5 $425/month Quiet, well maintained.
water/sewer/ garbage/ lawn included.
Monthly RV Lots $200+elec.
Joyce Riley RE 850-209-7825 4
Rent to Own: 2 & 3BR Mobile Homes.
Lot rent included. For details
850-557-3432 or 850-814-6515
PRESIDENTIAL
( jm REAL ESTATE FOR SALE


oI'FSBO: 3BR 2.5 BA All brick
Some in Marianna near
Chipola College on 5th St.
2816 sf. H & C. Complete-
ly remodeled, new every-
thirg, appraised $180k asking $172k, make
offer 850-209-8848
FSBO: Completely Updated 3/2, Brick
in Chestnut Ridge Sub. $167,500.
www.2405stonewooddrive.com


YE RECREATION


ATV Yamaha '09 Grissley 30, 4x4, camo, new
condition, adult owned, new price $600. sell
for $4500. 334-441-5580 DO 11129
Honda 2007 TRX 90 Youth 4 wheeler.
Almost New! Elec. Start, Red, Low hrs,
Garage Kept. $1.500. OBO. 334-796-3721
Honda '9 TRX90 4-wheeler Like New Cond.
$1300. 334-792-8018 DO 11023
Polaris 500, '06 4x4 Automatic, low hours &
miles, $4,200. 850-482-8717.
Yamaha '04 Bruin- 4wd, extra low hours, cam
ouflage. $4,000. Call 334-795-6743
Yamaha '07 TTR90 excellent condition, low
hours, priced to sell. $1500. Call 229-308-4154
D011191


16FT GLASS STREAM BOAT 28HP Johnson,
trolling motor, depth finder $2,300
232-4610 DO 11168
16ft Pioneer fiberglass fishing boat, 40 hp,
stick steer, trolling motor, fish finder and much
more $4800 334-618-4862 DO 11195
1988 Astroglass Fish & Ski Boat: 115 Mercury
0/B motor. Tilt/Trim. Front and rear live well.
Boat is in great shape. Ready for water. Xtra
brand new stainless 22p prop included. Floor
and transom reworked 4 years ago, very stur-
dy. Foot control trolling motor. Humming Bird
depth finder, batteries in good condition. Clear
coat in good shape. Selling due to new boat
purchase. Cell# 256-452-2372 Hm #334-445-
3652 Please leave message. DO 11200
Fisher '01 Hawk- 18 'ft Class 2, with 115 Mercu
ry outboard motor with trailer, 2 fish finders,
trolling motor, access ladder, Bemini, AM/FM
radio, on board charge, cover, very well kept in-
door shelter. $14,000. Call 334-685-7319
G3 175 Eagle Bass Boat '07, 70 horsepower
Yahama OB, trolling motor, galv. trailer, less
than 20 hrs use, 11,800 FIRM 850-762-2065/372-
2503 DO 11230
Sailboat '76-Catalina 30', 2
'-. *; cycle Yarmar diesel engine.
Very low hours; less than
- 250. Roller furling, bimin,
bF i 1fiB head, micro, fridge. Good
condition Docked @ Snug
Harbor slip B-6.334- 673-0330. REDUCED to $12K
Seacraft,'89, 20 ft- Center
S console, '95 225HP Johnson,
dual axle trailer w/brakes.
SGreat condition, very clean.
$5,500.334-791-4891 DO 11020
Seado RXP'05 ,Jet Ski, 60 hrs. Very clean, life
jacket and cover included. $5,500. 850-527-4455
STRATOS '00 22FT Tourriament Ready, 225 HP
motor. Kept inside, $11,900 Must see! Call 229-
321-9047
Stratos '95 285 Pro XL- Dual console. Johnson
Fastrike 175 2 depth finders, GPS, deck exten-
sion $6,000. Call 334- 671-9770


Carriage '02 Cameo 30 ft. 2 slides well kept.
Includes super slide hitch $15,000. 334-687-9983

f...... JAYCO '09 35 ft., Like New, 2
EI--' ~ i~- slides, 27" flat TV, loaded,
very nice, $19,000. 334-687-
3606, 334-695-1464.D010976


2009 Nissan Frontier, SE Crew Cab. One owner,
18,700 miles. Automatic Transmission 5 speed
with overdrive, ABS, A/C, AM-FM Stereo, CD
(Single Disc), Dual Air bags, Bed liner. Excel-
lent Condition. Price $20,400. Call (334) 796-
5036. DO 11167
SBMW '96 Convertible
NICE CAR!
Priced at $4999.
2180 Montgomery Hwy.
Call: 334-714-2700
or 334-671-7720
Acura'97 RL 3.5 Sedan
L' Clean Car!
priced at $4500.00
2180 Montgomery Hwy.
Call: 334-671-7720 or
334-714-2700. DO 11165


Buick '00 LeSabre Limited,
loaded, 1 owner,
'91K miles, LIKE NEW!,
Priced at $5800.
334-790-7959

Buick'03 Sabre limited, loaded, excellent con-
dition ligh5 blue, 2nd owner, 160K miles, $4,700.
334-237-1039 DO 11794 Will Finance


; ,-' Copper Canyon '07 34' 5th
wheel, excellent cond. rear
l living room, 2-slides,
J awning,cabinets galore,
dinette, kitchenette, large.
bedroom, private bath,
super deal to serious buyer.334-792-0010 or
805-0859
Dutchmen 40 ft. Travel Trailer
19w- '06. 38B-DSL, Sleeps 8, has 2
slideouts. Loaded, Like new.
. 17,995. Call 334-406-4555

FLEETWOOD'05 Prowler AX6, 5th wh, 36ft, 4
slides, large shower, 30/50AMP. $22,000 OBO
334-695-4995, 334-687-7862 DO 11065
FORD'02 LARIAT F250 Diesel, Crew Cab,
123K miles $16,000 334-687-9983
Fourwinds '06, 30' Travel trailer Double slide-
out 2BR, microwave, stereo, CH&A., Loaded.
Like new. Must sell immediately, $11,500 OBO.
Cell: 585-269-0244
Jayco '08 Flight 27' with super slide, large bath,
used 2 times, $10,500. 850-482-8717
PILGRIM '05, 28 FT., 5TH WHEEL, kept under
cover, 1 slide, excellent condition, $15,500
334-695-4366 or 334-695-4365
REDUCED!! Montana '05 5th Wheel,
4 slides, king bed, excellent condition,
$27,000 OBO Call 850-547-2808


Concord Coachman '05 Motor Home- 23' long
2700 miles. Take over payments. 850-593-5103
Conquest 05' 29ft. sleeps 8,
lots of extras, 11K mi.
l.. L- Refinance 334-798-4462
Warranty


Dixie RV SuperStores
FL's Newest RV Dealer
NOW OPEN!!!
*Store Hours*
Monday-Saturday
8:00am-6:00pm

21 Acres / 30 Brands New and Pre-Owned

Newmar Keystone n Heartland Jayco
a Fleetwood a Prime Time Coachmen'
Forest River

Service Department
Parts and Acces. Store
RV Collision Center

Located off 1-10 Exit 70 / SR285
328 Green Acres Dr.
De Funlak Springs, FL 32435
Sales and Service: 850-951-1000
www.dixierv.com DO 11828


Dixie RV SuperStores
FL's Newest RV Dealer
NOW OPEN!!!
*Store Hours*
Monday-Saturday
8:00am-6:00pm

21 Acres / 30 Brands New and Pre-Owned

Newmar Keystone Heartland Jayco
Fleetwood Prime Time a Coachmen
Forest River

Service Department
Parts and Acces. Store
RV Collision Center

Located off 1-10 Exit 70 / SR285
328 Green Acres Dr.
De Funiak Springs, FL 32435
Sales and Service: 850-951-1000
www.dixierv.com DO 11108

Ford '84 Class C 24 ft Motor Home excellent
condition with lots of storage, fully loaded, flat
screen TV, sleeps 5, barely used, 10,750 miles.
$10,500. 850-482-3477/209-7274 DO 11781
R-VISION 2006 Trail Lite, 26
ft., fully loaded, like new,
low mileage $35,000 OBO
334-616-6508



2005 Yamaha VX1100 Deluxe Waverunner.
Great condition. Galvanized trailer. 2 Yamaha
life vests. $6500. 334-796-0056 DO 11788

(1 T) TRANSPORTATION



Ford '01 F250 Crew cab, 7.3 Powerstroke diesel
custom shell, new shocks, rear brakes, rear
tires, and windshield. Tow Package with brake
controller,4X4, Custom Rims. Front end leveling.
kit, extra rear leaf. XM radio ready. 153,700
miles, $14,200 334-798-9343 DO 11205


U Corvette '81- Automatic 350
(Silver). Will sell as is for
$4,900. OBO 334-774-1915


Mercedes 1983- Collector 240D in very good
condition, rare 4-speed manual transition,
very smooth shifting, a dream to drive, a
bargain at $6,800 Call 334-797-4883


1994 Jeep Wrangler SE Sport 1 owner, ordered
new in '94. 114,000 miles, 4.0L 6cyl, A/C, auto,
blue w/black hardtop, splash decal, sound bar,
leather steering wheel, 4whl antilock brakes,
chrome pkg, side steps, new tires, free bikini
top. Must sell. call Steve Hodges, 334.796.1724
anytime, or 334.702.8102 evenings. DO 11247
2007 Toyota 4Runner 64k miles. one owner. Ex-
cellent condition. Gray/stain free interior. Pwr
locks/windows. Tow Package. Sirius Radio
Equiped. V6 Engine. Running Boards. $20,900,
334-618-8217, DO 11196


Cadillac'99 Deville white with tan leather
interior, new tires, air & front end. good
condition $3,600. 334-774-5333


Camaro'87 Z28- High proforance motors, runs,
with '92 Camaro RS parts car that does not run
$4500. Call 334-299-6273 leave a message
D011825
Chevrolet '07 Corvette C6 Coup. Automatic,
Both Tops, Low Miles, Victory Red. Excellent,
$32000 334-678-2131 DO 11201
_fTAN Chevrolet '71 Chevelle
SMalibu, New 452 HP
Engine. 450 lbs of torque,
'-l''m Red with black racing
stripes. Very Good
Condition. Must See! 334-470-9828 DO 11161


*,* -


Chevrolet 74 El Camino-
Good condition but needs
minor work. $5,500 OBO
334-699-1366 or 797-6925


Chevy 00' Monte Carlo $475. DOWN 0% interest
850-215-1769 9am-9pm DO 11249
Chevy '08 Corvette Convertible, Black, loaded,
excellent condition, garage kept $40,000.
334-692-5624
Chevy 97 Suburban- great condition, 1500
series, leather $3000. Call 303-906-3683
S r Chrysler '66 300C with -
-- J Hemi, Custom Paint, Rims,
H'Sunroof, Rockford Fosgate
H l Stereo System.
334-494-7312 DO 11125
Chrysler '07 PT Cruiser Touring Edition- black
exterior with gray interior, 17k mi, $11,900
Call 334-648-1828 or 334-792-5151 after 5pm
Corvette 94'- 85K mi. blue, original car like new
condition REDUCED $9,995.00 OBO 334-618-9322
or 334-596-1790 MUST SEE!!!!
Corvette '96 Collector Edition. Silver, 2 tops,
Bose, 1381 made. Best offer. 334-677-7796
Dodge 2003 Grand Caravan EX. One owner, 7
passenger seating, fully loaded, leather seats,
power side passenger doors and power
liftgate. $6800. 334-671-4753. DO 11199
Ford '014X4 V-10 Reduced Price single cab,
71K Miles $6500 229-220-0456
SFORD'89 F150, 4wh, 4x4
.. .. Automatic $4.600 or reason-
able offer 229-334-8520, or
229-296-8171

GMC '10 Acadia SLT- Crossover, tan bought
new from dealer, loaded, 3 rows of seat, great
for large family, non smoker, Only $35,000. 334-
585-2331 day M-F or 334-585-5948 DO 11839
S7 Honca '94 Accord Tan
Priced at $3,900.
2180 Montgomery Hwy.
Call 334-714-2700 or
334-671-7720. DO 11820


Hundai'04 Accent GT,
2 door, Auto, 4 cylinder,
1 owner, 69K miles,
excellent, Priced at $4995.
Call: 334-790-7959


rl Hyundai'09 Sonata- bur-
gundy. 1 owner, excellent
condition, over 31MPG,.
must see! $9.900 Call
334-714-1531 D011228
Jeep 1979 CJ7- rebuilt 304
engine, new paint, mild
cam, headers, aluminum
intake 600 Holley Carb.,
rebuilt transmission, 1 ton
Chevy Axles with 456 Chevy gears in rear with
Detroit locker and Dana 60 in front. Mickey
Thompson 16x12 rims with new 37x12.5 R16,5
LT tires $8,000. 334-266-5248
Lexus'07 RX400 Hybrid- Well kept and fully
loaded, has 62k miles, get 31 City & 27 Hwy
mpg, asking $28,000. 334-308-1112 D011112
LINCOLN MKS 2009,4 door, red, 28K miles, Ex-
tra Clean 334-703-1210 DO 11151
Wanted Junk- Vehicles top price, I also sell
used parts. Call 334-792-8664 ,


www.JCFLORIDAN.com


Lail III UIUI, 4ft 111- -P41,V--- --04 --O V m


CLASSIFIED


D,, I


cadilac'07 DTS fully loaded, leather interior
n in at color 29K mi $21 000 334-69 0


11 AIPE: S & i TRALR


Mazda '06 Miata MX5- Grand Touring Edition,
blue with ground effects, one owner, garage
kept, only 7330 miles, Auto, Bose stereo/CD,
Like new. $15,900. Call 334-393-8864.
Mazda '93 Miata convertible, excellent condi-
tion, sports package, fun little car $4500. 334-
699-7270 DO 11124
Mercedes '06 E-350, Silver, New Tires, LEATHER
& LOADED, Excellent Condition 53,140 miles,
$23,000 334-435-3988 or 435-3098
Serious Inquiries Only, Please. DO 11846
Mercury'05 Grand Marquis LS white, leather
wood dash trim, 170,780 mi. $5500. DO 11786
Polyengineering, Inc. 334-793-4700 ext. 134
Mercury '05 Grand Marquis LS white, leather
eats, wood dash trim, 170,780 mi. $5500. Call
Polyengineering, Inc. 334-793-4700 ext. 134
SPlymouth '65 Valiant.Con-
Nvertible, Automatic, A/C,
273 V8, Good Condition!
$10,900 OBO 850-263-4563

Pontiac '02 Montana Extend-
ed AWD Excellent Condition
Blue, leather interior,dvd,
iii tv. Fully loaded $7000
334-796-1602
Pontiac'07 G-6 GT- convertible, black, 31K
miles, all leather, loaded, garage kept.
$14,000. OBO 334-796-6613
Pontiac '97 Grand Prix
White. Priced at $2,300.
2180 Montgomery Hwy.
Call: 334-714-2700 or
33S4-671-7720. DO 11819

Pontiac '99 Firebird 1-owner, red, Wife's car,
79K Miles, Good Condition $6000 334-790-4244
or 334-677-5193 DO 11816
Toyota 03' Corolla LE AC/AT, power steering,
windows, locks & sunroof, tilt wheel AM/FM
stereo cassette/cd player, crews, delayed
wipers, leather seats, wood trim int. tinted
Windows, vent shades, mud guards, front bra,
bug deflector, 2 tone paint, gold trim, pin
stripes, alloy wheels, michelin tires, 45K like
new $11,990. 334-792-2938 or 334-701-5129
DO 11832
TOYOTA '08 FJ CRUISER with 45000 miles.
Very nice SUV. Like new insie and out. Burgun-
dy exterior with dary gray interior. All standard
power options. All trades accepted. Please call
334-695-0953 OR 334-687-4400. DO 11131
Toyota'09 Corolla Sport. Charcoal gray 31k
miles. Warranty. 5-spd. 16" wheels, power
locks, windows, CD, $12,000. 334-475-3370
or 334-464-1709.
Volkswagen '05 Beetle
Convertible GLS- 5-speed,
Leather, loaded, only 19K
K '.1 miles. Excellent condition.
$13.900. Call 334-714-4001



1997 Kawasaki KZ1000 This Motorcycle would
be a great restore project for a collector. Need
to sell due to not having time to work on it.
Great bike and was a former California High-
way Patrol Bike. Very collectible and comes
with many spare parts that are chrome and
hard to find. 1000cc 4 cylinder. Needs radio
carrier for complete look but easy to find on
ebay. Call 912-306-0656 for more info! $2,000
OBO, DO 11149
2004 HARLEY-DAVIDSON ULTRA CLASSIC .
FLHTCUI, black, 9885 miles, $5800. Serious buy-
ers only! MACKLEM@LIVE.COM DO 11233
2008 Harley Davidson Nightster XL1200NLow
mileage (540), excellent condition, transferable
warranty, Only $6000. Call 334-718-6465 or 334-
790-5651 DO 11802'
Dirt Bike.- 01 HQNDA CR80 Expert Dirt Bike Less
than 50 HRs. $1399. YAMAHA TTR125 Dirt Bike
$900. 334 797-6001 DO 11186
Goldwing, '92 60k miles, Red. Excellent paint
and running condition. $7,000. Call 850-445-
2915 leave message
Harley 06 Sportser XL-
S 1200C, 3940k mi, 2 seat
screaming eagle, pipes,
windshield $6900
Call 334-806-6961
Harley Davidson '01 Sportster 883 ,8700 miles,
spitfire windshield, screaming eagle 2 pipes,
highway bar, brake & shift comfort package,
$4500 OBO 813-846-9090 DO 11211
Harley Davidson '02 Sportster 1200 custom 1lk
miles, chromed out, $6500. Call 334-691-3468
or 334-701-3855
Yamaha '99 XVS1100 42K miles. REDUCED
$2,800. OBO 334-726-1215 or 334-477-3152










wwwJCFLORIDANcom


CLASSIFIED


Jackson County Floridan *


Wednesday, March, 2011
Wednesday, March 9, 2011 7 B


Harley Davidson '05 1200C Sportster 11K mi.
$3000. in extras, clean. Asking $6000 OBO
S Call 334-449-3713
Harley Davidson '06 Sportser 1200, 13,400 miles
detachable windshield & back rest $6,000. 334-
685-3214
;... r, Harley Davidson '08- Ultra
Classic Screaming Eagle An-
niversary Edition. Very low
Smiles $26900. 334-685-0380

Harley Davidson 1986 FLTC w/ side car. exc.
cond. $10,500. OBO 334-794-2665 or 334-805-
0810
Harley Davidson 1992 Sporster 1200 custom
mid 50's K/KH exc. cond. $5,500. OBO 794-2665
334-805-0810
Harley-Davidson of Dothan


Not riding? Got one in the barn?
Spring is here and we are interested in
purchasing used Harley motorcycles.
Give us a call for information. DO 11826
HONDA'06 Shadow, 2.8 miles, NEW dealer
road tested only, $5,200, 229-334-8520 or
229-296-8171
Honda'06 VTX 1300C Burgundy, high per
formance exhaust, switch blade windshield,
8,400 miles, sissy bar, excellent condition.
$4900. 334-671-0776 DO 11251
S Honda 1962 C102 super
-L cub 50, 4k miles, Black &
y- white, good condition,
S electric start 3 speed,
S$2500. Firm. Call noon (M-
F) 334-347-9002
Honda 82' Goldwing GL1100. Complete Bike.
Runns, but needs work. $900. OBO
4 334-790-5217 4 DO 11248
KTM '00 300 EXC less than 20 hours ridden,
raced twice, been in storage 6 yrs. MFM fatty
pipe, skid plate, devol radiator guards, shark
fin, bark busters, fast & great cond. $1200.
4 334-718-3081 4 DO 11818
VW'02 Custom made VW
Power Trike. All chromed
I engine.Custom, one of a
k kind paint job and wheels,
Adult ridden. Fire engine
red. 23K miles. New tires,
garage kept, custom cover, AM/FM CB. RE-
DUCED $17,995. OBO $44,000 invested. Call
239-410-4224 for more details.
Yamaha'091300 V-Star,
-i' touring package, bought
new last year, only 1700
miles, still
under full factory warr.
asking $8000.
334-796-8174. DO 11212


DO 11154


S-- YAMAHA V-STAR 650 '03,
._ blue w/silver flames, cus-
_j___ tom paint job, Vance Hine
j pipes, windshield, 14k
Smiles, excellent cond.
$4,000 OBO 334-695-3488


Mojo'05 Motor Scooter 200mi, Blue, $1650
850- 258-1638


2008 Jeep Wrangler Sahara 4X4 asking, $4899, 4
doors, Automatic, Hard top, send your ques-
tions to dnlvvl5@msn.com / 321-200-0081. DO
11842
~~ Chevrolet'06 Tahoe LT,
9 LOADED, tan Leather,
I lAI bucket seats, sunroof, tow
-..- package, tv. dvd, 78k
miles, white, Dual Climate
Control, Excellent condition $18K 334-699-5903
DO 11822I
Chevrolet'85 K5 Blazer Fully restored, 450 hp
engine, 411 rear end, 1000K miles since re-
stored. $9500. 4 407-353-3629
Dodge 01' Durango $995. DOWN, No interest
850-215-1769 9am -9pm DO 11252
Ford '06 Explorer Limited, leather, 6 change CD,
3rd row seats, V8,chrorne wheels, light beige
with tan interior, 50k miles,.like new, $16,400
850-814-0155 DO 11109
GMC'07 Yukon SLT- white with tan
leather interior, 63k miles $26,500 334-118-6836


Ford'98 Expedition
Black 3rd Row Seating,
Leather, Priced at $2,900.
S2180 Montgomery Hwy.
Call: 334-714-2700 or
334-671-7720. DO 11823
GMC'08 Acadia- blue, gray leather interior,
power seats, moon roof, Boss stereo, $22,000
Call 334-718-7555 D011209


p --r -"'-_- "09 Toyota Tacoma 4-
Al- door, dbl. cab, V-6, auto-
matic, loaded, TRD-Off
R Rd. pack. 2-wh. dr. 12K
mi. 1-owner Only
O" $25,500. 334-792-2724
DO 11207
SChevrolet '99 3500
Service body work truck,
V-8, automatic, 44K miles,
1 owner, Priced at $6500.
Call: 334-790-7959


Chevy 97' Silverado $675. DOWN 0% interest
850-215-1769 9am 9pm DO 14250
Chevy Silverado '99 white, 1500 P/U 4.8 liter
engine, Good Condition. $4600. 334-794-5776 or
790-4006 DO 11238
Dodge '013500 Dually, 146K miles, great condi-
tion, 4 WD, extended cab, automatic $12,500.
334-791-7312 DO 11801
DODGE '02 RAM 1500, 167K Miles, 5 SP Manuel,
Retrax Bed Cover, A/C, In Good Condition,
$3,500 OBO 334-355-0491 DO 11829
Dogde Ram '03 1500 regu-
'- ... lar cab, excellent condi-
tion, 92K miles, 4.7 engine,
$7,800. OBO 334-796-8174.
DO 11073
Ford '02 FX4 F-150, Black, Chrome Toolbox,
Running Boards, Great Tires and More Extras,
133k Miles, $9,950. OBO 334-618-7502 DO 11153
-L' Ford '05 Sports Track
10. Priced at $9,800. 2180
Montgomery Hwy.
Call: 334-714-2700 or
334-671-7720. DO 11824

Ford 350'06 Lariet Super Duty 2x4, Power
Stroke, Turbo diesel V-8, crew cab, long bed,
Dually, black with tan interiors towing package
$20,000. 334-718-1901. DO 11236
Ford '97 F350 Dually Diesel
Vsl Rebuilt Transmission
priced at $4500.00
S2180. Montgomery Hwy.
Call: 334-714-2700 or
334-671-7720. DO 11169.
Ford Tractor 600- New
paint, Runs good, Must Sell,
$3500 334-797-6925,

Freightliner'00, 500 Detroit engine, 10 speed
ranger, 355 rearance, good condition, sacrifice
for $12,500. 850-569-2625 DO 11245
.. Freight Liner'92 double
bunk, Detroit engine.
re-built 2 years ago.
$6,000. 334-691-2987 or
334-798-1768

GMC 02' Sierra SLE ext. cab. tool box, new tires
& brakes, silver in color, Great condition. 120K.
miles, new tires and brakes, $7500. 334-797-
5249 DO 11789
Interstate '96 Flat bed trailer, heavy duty, 3
axles, new brakes, 20X8, 22,000 pounds. $3000.
OBO 334-718-1901. DO 11237
John Deere 4230, 105 horsepower Tractor,
$8,000 OBO 850-209-5694/850-593-2213
DO 11204'
Massey Ferguson 240, good tractor, power
starring, needs paint. $4500. Day-334-792-3466
or night & Sundays 334-693-3725. DO 11179
Silverado'08 1500 LT Sport ext-cab, loaded,
with remote start, 30K miles, $20,000. 334-791-
2781. DO 11176
Tractor Equipment, 6' Box Blade, good condi-
tion $350. 334-792-8018
IT'S AS EASY
AS 1 -2-3
1. CALL 2. PLACE YOUR AD 3. GET RESULTS


Chrysler '03 Town & Country LX Silver in color
33LV-6 engine 45K miles, cruise, pwr. dr. locks
& windows, keyless entry, rear AC, luggage
rack, exc. cond. $9,700. 334-596-1134 DO 11805


Honda'96 Passport- V6, 5-
speed, 134k miles, great
condition $2500.OBO Call
334-691-2987 or 334-798-
,- 1768 0011128


JUNK VEHICLES *
Highest priced paid gauranteed for your
unwanted vehicles, title or no title, running or
not We also buy unwanted farming equipment
4 334-596-0154 4 DO 11240

WANTED: We buy your Junk and wrecked
cars $150. and up. 334-702-4323
Immediate Pick-up Service DO 11208


( "


LEGALS


LF15251

On Wednesday, March 16, 2011, at 10:00 a.m.,
there will be a Tourist Development Council
meeting at the Jackson County Chamber of
Commerce (The Russ House), 4318 Lafayette
Street,tMarianna, Florida.



LF15249
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 2008-390-CA
JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A.,
Plaintiff,
BILLY W. GRICE, ET AL,
Defendant (s)
NOTICE OF SALE
F NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the
Final Judgement entered in this case now pending in
said Court, the style of whice is indicated above:
I will sell to the highest and best bidderfor
cash at the JACKSON COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 4445 La-
fayette St. Marianna, Florida 32446 on the 17th of
March 2011 at 11:00 am CST the following described
property as set forth in Order of Final Judgement to- -
wit:
PARCEL 1:
A LOT OF PARCEL OF LAND IN JACKSON COUNTY FLOR-
IDA AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS
FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT.SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE
NW /4 OF THE SE /4 OF SECTION 31, TOWNSHIP 7
NORTH, RANGE 8 WEST AND RUN THENCE NORTH
88"19'22 EAST 146.87 FEET TO THE WEST SIDE OF
NINTH STREET; THENCE NORTH 32'20'30" EAST ALONG
THE WEST SIDE OF.NINTH STREET 1005.13 FEET TI THE
STARTING POINT; THENCE NORTH 02'20'30" EAST
ALONG THW WEST SIDE OF NINTH STREET 100 FEET;
THENCE SOITH 87'39'30" EAST 190.0 FEET TO THE
STARING POINT, SAID PARCEL BEING IN THE NE A4 OF
THE SE '/ OF SECTION 31, TOWNSHIP 7 NORTH, RANGE
9 WEST.
PARCEL
.A LOT OR PARCEL OF LAND IN JACKSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED
AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT SOUTHEAST CORNER OF
THE N/W 'A OF THE SE 'A OF SECTION 31, T7N,'R9W
AND THENCE N88'19'22"E, 146.87 FEET TO THE WEST
SIDE OF NINTH STREET; THENCE N2'20'30E, ALONG THE
WEST SIDE OF NINTH STREET 905.13 FEET TO THE
STARING POINT; THENCE N2'20'30"E ALONG THE WEST
SIDE OF NINTH STREET 100.00 FEET;THENCE
S87'39'30"E, 190.00 FEET TO THE STARING POINT. SAID
PARCEL BEING IN THE NE1 /4 OF THE SE '/4 OF SECTION
31, T7N, R9W.
PARCEL 3
A LOT OR PARCEL OF LAND IN JACKSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED
AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT SOUTHEAST CORNER OF
THE. N/W '/4 OF THE SE '/4 OF SECTION 31, T7N, R9W
AND THENCE N88'19'22"E, 146.87 FEET TO THE WEST
SIDE OF NINTH STREET; THENCE N2'20'30E, ALONG THE
WEST SIDE OF NINTH STREET 805.13 FEET TO THE
STARING POINT; THENCE N2'20'30"E ALONG THE WEST
SIDE OF NINTH STREET 100.00 FEET;THENCE
S87'39'30"E, 190.00 FEET TO THE STARING POINT. SAID
PARCEL BEING IN THE NE '/4 OF THE SE '/4 OF SECTION
31, T7N, R9W.
Property Address: 5489 9th STREET, MALONE,
FLORIDA, 32445
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS
FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY
OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST
FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
ENTERED at JACKSON County, Florida, this 15th day of
February, 2011.
DALE RABON GUTHRIE
CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT
BY: /s/Tammy Bailey
Deputy Clerk


LF15254

INVITATION TO BID
JACKSON COUNTY BOARD OF
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS

NOTICE is hereby given to all interested per-
sons or firms that sealed bids will be accepted
at the Jackson County Purchasing Department,
2864 Madison Street Marianna, Fl. 32448 until
2:00 PM CST on 3/18/2011 for the following
project:
BID NUMBER: 0910-45RB
BID NAME: Relocation of metal structure at
the Farmers Market site.
PROJECT DESCRIPTION : Re-location of the
structure to the county property located at the
County Road & Bridge site 2828 Owens'St. Ma-
rianna FI. some construction involved with this
project
BID OPENING: Shall be held at 2864 Madison St.
Marianna Fl. In the Jackson County BOCC
Board Room by the Purchasing Department on
3/18/2011 at 2:00PM CT

Information may be obtained from Al Green.
Monday through Friday. Phone 850-482-9629. A
complete copy of the bid packet may be ac-
quired through the Jackson County Purchasing
Web site (www.jacksoncountyfl.us click oh the
Purchasing site then click on current bids and
RFP's to obtain a copy).

Bids SHALL be submitted in a sealed envelope
marked: SEALED BID and identified by the
NAME OF THE FIRM, BID NUMBER 0910-45RB,
ALONG WITH THE DATE AND TIME OF OPENING
3/18/2011 2:00PM CT

Dale Rabon Guthrie
CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT

Board of County Commissioners
By: Chuck Lockey
BOARD CHAIRMAN

EEO STATEMENT
Jackson County is committed to assuring equal
opportunity in the award of contracts and,
therefore, complies with all laws prohibiting
discrimination on the basis-of race, color, reli-
gion, national origin, ae and sex.
LF15253

INVITATION TO BID
JACKSON COUNTY GRANTS DEPARTMENT

Notice: Is hereby given to all general contrac-
tors, licensed by the State of Florida, that
sealed bids will be accepted at the Grants
Dept. located at 4487 Lafayette St. until
3/31/11 at 12 PM CST for the following project:
Bid Name: SHIP Rehab
Bid Number: 1011-15RB-E, R, S
Description: The Jackson County Board of Com-
missioners (JCBCC) is seeking qualified general
contractors to participate in work involving
various forms of rehabilitation of single-family
pre/postl978 homes.
Pre-qualifications: Each contractor must pro-
vide pre-qualifying data concerning their eligi-
bility to participate in the SHIP Program 5 cal-
endar days prior to walk thru. Contractor
packets may be picked up at the Grants Dept.
Special Note: The walk thru of homes will be
on 3/24/11 all contractors must meet at 9 AM
CST in the Conference Room, 4487 Lafayette St.
Qualifications and General Conditions will be
handed out prior to beginning the walk thru.
Contractors must participate in the walk thru
to bid on homes.
Submission Deadline: 3/31/11 at 12 PM CST
Bids SHALL be submitted in a sealed envelope
marked: SEALED BID, FIRM-NAME, BID NAME &
NUMBER, DATE & TIME of OPENING.
Bid Opening: 3/31/11 at 2 PM CST at the JCBCC
Board Room, 2864 Madison St. Bids will be
awarded during a JCBCC's meeting. Bids will
be made to the best bidder, as determined by
the JCBCC; the right is reserved to reject any
and all bids.
Information: Contact the Grants Dept. 850-482-
9083

Dale Rabon Guthrie, CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT
By: Chuck Lockey, BOARD CHAIRMAN, JCBCC
EEO STATEMENT
Jackson County is committed to assuring equal
opportunity in the award of contracts and,
therefore, complies with all laws prohibiting
discrimination on the basis of race, color, reli-
gion, national origin, age and sex.

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18B WEDNESDAY. MARCH 9, 2011


Gadhafi forces hammer rebels on eastern front


The Associated Press


RAS LANOUF, Libya Forces
loyal to Moammar Gadhafi ham-
Smered rebels with rocket barrag-
es and airstrikes Tuesday, trying
to check their advance out of the
opposition-held east of Libya to-
ward the capital Tripoli. At least
26 were wounded, some of them
seriously.
On another front, government
forces were reportedly battering
down resistance in the closest
rebel-held city to Tripoli, Zawiya.
A government official claimed
Gadhafi loyalists had recaptured
the city, but some residents re-
ported that rebels still held the
city's main square amid a heavy
barrage of residential areas. The
city was sealed off and phone
lines have been cut, making it
impossible to verify the account.
All told, the government seems
to have gained the upper hand
for now in its counteroffensive
against the rebels over the past
few days. But the battle is far
from over and could be drawn
out into a long and bloody civil
war.
Gadhafi's forces have brought
overwhelming force from the
air to try to beat back the rebels
in the east seeking to march on
Tripoli and on the ground to try


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Libyan volunteers gesture as they raise a pre Gadhafi flag on the outskirts
of the eastern town of Ras Lanouf, Libya on Tuesday. Forces loyal to Moam-
mar Gadhafi have scored a significant victory, recapturing the closest city
to the capital to have fallen in rebel hands.


to retake control of Zawiya, just
30 miles west of Tripoli.
The one thing that seems to
hold potential to tip the scales in
the rebel's favor is international
intervention. The U.S. says it has
not ruled out using some type
of military force against Gadhafi
and with its allies, it is consider-
ing imposing a no-fly zone over
the North African country to
stop air attacks on the rebels.
In the east on Tuesday, govern-
If


ment forces unleashed a heavy
barrage of rockets on a rebel
contingent that tried to move
out from their position at the
oil port of Ras Lanouf. At least
26 wounded were rushed to the
hospital in the town, some of
them with legs lost and other se-
rious injuries, according to doc-
tors there.
"I was hit in the arm and leg,
my friend was wounded in the
stomachh" Momen Mohammad,


31, said.
The fighting began when the
rebel forces advanced west out
of Ras Lanouf toward Bin Jaw-
wad, a small town 375 miles (600
kilometers) east of the capital,
fighters said.
Earlier in the day, warplanes
launched at least five new air-
strikes near rebel position in Ras
Lanouf, one hitting a two-story
house in a residential area, caus-
ing some damage. None of the
strikes appeared to cause casu-
alties, suggesting they wete in-
tended to intimidate the fighters,
according to an Associated Press
reporter who saw the strikes.
The anti-regime forces were not
taking any. chances and were
spreading out deep inside the
desert around the area in small
groups.
Over the past few days, rebels
moved out of their stronghold in
the east, capturing with relative
speed the oil ports of Brega and
Ras Lanouf. But they were met
with superior firepower and air-
strikes when they tried to push
westward and beat a fast retreat
to Ras Lanouf over the past two
days.
The rebels seem to have
reached a point of their cam-
paign where they need to figure
out how they could organize re-


-~--- --


Four civilians killed in


The Associated Press

ABIDJAN, Ivory Coast
- In an act of bold defi-
ance, thousands of women
converged Tuesday on the
bloodstained pavement
where seven.of their sisters
fell last week, even as the
army backing this coun-
try's rogue leader killed
four more civilians.
The brutal slaying last
week occurred when sol-
diers in armored person-
nel carriers opened fire on
a crowd of female demon-
strators who were armed
with nothing more than
tree branches, symbolizing
peace.
The attack has further
galvanized the interna-
tional community against
strongman Laurent Gbag-
bo, who has refused to
yield power three months
after being declared the
loser of his country's elec-
tion.


I iTEL AUOIAI TLU D IP L
Thousands of supporters of Alassane Ouattara take to the
streets on International Women's Day with a rally protesting
against violence linked to the nation's ongoing political crisis,
in the Abobo district of Abidjan, Ivory Coast on Tuesday.


ders. "They wouldn't let
me look at her face," he
said. "So I had to identify'
her feet," he said. Then he
broke down.


The women had tried to ;The video's grainy foot-
march everyday since the age clearly shows that the
attack Thursday only to 34-year-old had been de-
lose their nerve in the face capitated. Her brother-in-
of an army that has shown: law was the first to arrive
no restraint, including by and recognized her by the
breaking the long-stand-; color of her T-shirt. Bones
ing code that has always, were protruding from her
protected. women. They, neck. Beyond there was
refused to be cowed on nothing.: The survivors
Tuesday, however, because brought wooden carts
it was International Worn- from: the nearby market
men's Day. and used thento transport
Hours after several hun- the dead to the hospital.
dred women marched in Bamara had encouraged
Treichville, a downtown her to go to the march,
neighborhood, the, army just as so many other hus-
burst in and killed at least bands and fathers had.
four civilians. Reporters "That morning she asked
saw the bodies of three my permission to go. I
men and one woman on said, 'Be careful.' Since
the blood-splattered floor they are women, I thought
of a clinic. they would never shoot."
Thousandsofotherwom- At the hospital, the dead
en demonstrating near the women were laid side
site of last week's killings by side, and at one point
in the Abobo district were a mobile phone started
protected by men who had ringing inside the pocket
formed a wall across the of one of the other lifeless
mouth of a freeway by lin- women.
ing cars end-to-end. Bamara's brother lifted
Mariam Bamba, 32, the cloth coveringher body
picked up a limp branch and retrieved it out of her
Tuesday next to one of the pocket. On the other end
blood stains on pavement, was the dead girl's frantic
"This:leaf is all they were father, Gnelle Gnon Ouat-
carrying," she said of the tara, who could not reach
victims. his 21-year-old daughter
The seven women are Rokiya. He rushed to the
just a fraction of the more hospital and saw his child,
than 400 people killed in part cfhernecksheared off
the three months since this by the large-caliber bullet.
country's disputed elec- "In Africa we say that it's
tion. Because 'they were the child that must bury
unarmed women, their the father," said Ouattara.
deaths have prompted in- "When it's the father that
ternationalcondemnation, buries the child, some-
including from the U.S. thing isn't right."
State Department which The women march-
called Gbagbo "morally ing Tuesday wore T-shirts
bankrupt." bearing the smiling por-
A video obtained by The trait of 'ADO' Alassane
Associated Press shows the Dramane Ouattara, the
joyful crowd blowing whis- democratically elected


ties and waving branches
moments before the wom-
en are mowed down.
When Sako Bamara ar-
rived at the hospital last
Thursday, his relatives told
him not to lift the cloth
covering his wife's body. At
Least not above the shoul-
s~iaaa ssslk~ra fWa saismjws


president who has been
prevented from governing
the country by Gbagbo.
He has spent the first three
months of his term inside
a resort hotel under day-
and-night United Nations
protection, and was to
leave the grounds for the
S^ ,3 ..'. .- .


Ivory Coast
tempting to find a solution
to the crisis. Ouattara has
called on the international
community to launch an
armed intervention in or-
der to oust Gbagbo, who
appeared of state televi-
sion last week to say that
he is "hanging in there."
'"I heard someone say
that God has left Africa,"
said Yacouba Ouattara, a
relative of one of the dead
women.


B


B.


first time Tuesday night at
the invitation of the Afri-
can Union.
Both Ouattara and Gbag-
bo have been invited to
:travel to AddisAbaba, Ethi-
opia to hear the verdict of
the AU's. Peace and Secu-
rity Coimcil, which was at-


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IEN RNRIPIONAIL


supply lines and avoid becom-
ing easy targets for warplanes in
their march across the open des-
ert region with little cover. The
extent of their westward reach is
a checkpoint about six miles (10
kilometers) west of Ras Lanouf.
Zawiya, on Tripoli's western
doorstep, is the most significant
position the opposition has held
in the largely Gadhafi-controlled
northwest of the country. After
repelling several attacks the past
week, the city has come under
the heaviest onslaught yet since
the weekend, believed to be an
elite brigade commanded by one
of Gadhafi's sons, Khamis.
One resident, who fled the city
on Monday, reported that pro-
Gadhafi forces had taken the
city's main square, Where rebels
and protesters had been camped
out for weeks, after bombard-
ment that caused heavy dam-
age.
An adviser in Libya's Foreign
Ministry in Tripoli who is origi-
nally from Zawiya, said Tuesday
that government forces were in
control, raising the green flag of
Gadhafi's rule in the square. He
said he was trying to mediate a
cease-fire with remaining rebel
fighters. The adviser spoke on
condition of anonymity because
of the sensitivity of the talks.,