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Jackson County Floridan
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028304/00504
 Material Information
Title: Jackson County Floridan
Alternate title: Sunday Floridan
Portion of title: Floridan
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Jackson County Floridan
Publisher: Chipola Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Marianna Fla
Publication Date: February 10, 2011
Frequency: daily (except saturday and monday)[<1979-1995>]
weekly[ former 1934-<1955>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Marianna (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jackson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jackson -- Marianna
Coordinates: 30.776389 x -85.238056 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 8, no. 13 (Sept. 7, 1934)-
General Note: "Independent."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ACA5476
oclc - 33284558
alephbibnum - 000366625
lccn - sn 95047182
System ID: UF00028304:00504
 Related Items
Preceded by: Times-courier (Marianna, Fla. : 1947)
Preceded by: Marianna Floridan

Full Text


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A MEDIA GENERAL NEWSPAPER


2 LORIDAN


*1


Cracked road will be tested


BY DEBORAH BUCKHALTER
FLORIDAN STAFF WRITER
A paving contractor is trying to
help Jackson County figure out why
El Bethel Church Road has so many
cracks and ruts just 16 years after it
was re-surfaced.
The problems began nearly nine
years ago. Today, at least one of the
cracks is an estimated one-foot wide,
according to Jackson County
Engineer Larry Alvarez. He said it's
the biggest he's ever seen in a road.
Florida Highway Products has


offered to cut out a 650-foot section
of the road, analyze it, and likely
rework the section's base below the
pavement. The base is the suspected
root of the problem.
. The county will pay for the asphalt
overlay material that will be installed
after the fix, at a cost of roughly
$13,500 for the materials. The com-
pany is providing the labor free of
charge, worth an estimated $15,000
to $20,000.
At Tuesday's county commission
meeting, a representative of a rival


paving


contractor, Anderson-


Columbia, initially expressed some
concern over the arrangement, but
then offered to do the same thing for
the county.
Anderson-Columbia's Gene
Strickland said that, while he thinks
it's a good idea to have the test done,
he wanted to make sure that Florida
Highway Products wouldn't auto-
matically get the job if the county
decides to repave El Bethel, simply
because it's going to do the test for
free.

See ROAD, Page 5A >


Grass grows
into this
crack, one of
many, in the
pavement on
El Bethel
Church Road
between
Grand Ridge
and Sneads.
Mark
Skinner/
Floridan


School district faces cuts


Under Gov. Rick Scott's newly announced budget, the Jackson County School District would lose about $4.8 million in fund-
ing. Superintendent Lee Miller said there might be things that will have to be put on hold due to the funding cuts, such as buy-
ing new buses, staff development, travel and field trips. Mark Skinner/Floridan


Governor's proposal means $5M less


BY MORGAN:CARLSON
FLORIDAN STAFF WRITER
Under Gov. Rick Scott's recommended
budget, the Jackson County School
District would lose about $4.8 million in
funding; or 10 percent of the $48 million
the district received, this year.
The governor has recommended $4.6
billion in budget cuts for next year; almost
72 percent of the cuts would be to educa-
tion, a total of $3.3 billion.
For the Jackson County School District,
the proposed cuts would mean a loss of
$682 of state funding per student. This
year, the base funding per student was
$3,623.76, according to district Interim
Finance Director Kathy Sneads.
Based on the average salary of a
teacher, the funding cuts equal about 92
teachers in Jackson County, Sneads said.
But the district can't afford to lose any
teachers. In fact, 10 to 12 teachers were
hired this year at an extra cost of about


half a million dollars to meet the state's
class size requirements, according to
Jackson County School District
Superintendent Lee Miller.
Miller said he thinks the district could
have gotten by without hiring the addi-
tional teachers, but in order to meet the
law, the district had to hire them. In some
cases, it was for situations where, there
was one.or t\vwo extra students in a:class,'
Miller said.'
Miller' said 'the proposed cuts are
"tremendous." He has asked district direc-
tors to look at their budgets and trim them
10 percent.
"Every area is going to be cut back,"
Miller said.'
Principals have also been asked to
watch their spending from now until the
end of the school year.
Miller said there might be things that
will have to be put on hold, such as buying
new buses, staff development, travel and
field trips. He doesn't want these cuts to


deny anything from students, however.
"We don't want to harm our classroom.
We want to make sure our children get all
that they've always gotten," Miller said.
If the governor's budget passed, Sneads
said the district might be forced to pull
from its reserves, especially if the district
still has to meet class size requirements.
The district ended last year with about
$1':6 million in general funds, Sneads
said.
"We are fortunate we' have the reserves
we do t6 fall back on," Sneads said.
But Miller said he hopes the district will
be able to make ends meet without dip-
ping into savings.
"We will cross that bridge when we
come to it," he added.
Miller' hopes this budget is the worst-.
case scenario and eventually, through
negotiations with legislators, the cuts
won't be so drastic. But he knows there
will be cuts no matter what, and "it's
going to be tough."
The school district will start the budget-
ing process after spring break.


Malone


family


gets aid


from Red


Cross


after fire
SrAFF REPORT
Red Cross Disaster Action Team members
were in Malone Wednesday to assist a single
mother and four children whose mobile
home sustained electrical damage in a fire.
Jackson County Fire Rescue was dis-
patched to the residence, at 5360 11th St.
around 10;22*p. dncsday. according to
Jackson CourityTire Chief Tony Wesley.
Sharori Thomas and her 2-year-old daugh-
ter and niece "ere in the honie during the
fire. Thomas' other children were at school.
A Town of Malone employee saw the fire
and informed the landlord, according to
Thomas.
Thomas said she couldn't tell there was a
problem from inside the home, but she is "so
fortunate" the Malone employee noticed and
was able to notify them to get out.
Wesley said the fire started in a fireplace.
The fire chief estimated there was about
$10,000 worth of damage to the mobile
home. Power was shut off to the home. The
Red Cross is assisting with temporary lodg-
ing and food, according to a press release.


Red Cross Disaster Action Team members
were on the scene of a fire in Malone
Wednesday to assist the victims of a mobile
home fire. Jackson County Fire Rescue was
dispatched to the residence at 5360 11th
St. around 10:22 Wednesday morning,
according to Jackson County Fire Chief
Tony Wesley. Mark Skinner/Floridan


Budget chief says Scott flexible on spending


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
TALLAHASSEE Florida
Gov. Rick Scott's budget chief
Wednesday told lawmakers his
boss will be flexible about his
$65.9 billion spending proposal
for the next fiscal year after a
Senate panel offered some praise
but picked apart many of the gov-
ernor's recommendations.
Budget director Jerry
McDaniel, a holdover from for-
mer Gov. Charlie Crist's adminis- -
tration, offered that assurance
during his appearance before the


Senate Budget Committee.
"He is not suffering under the
idea that everything we have pro-
posed here will pass," McDanielt
said. "He'd like a lot of it to pass.,
He believes it's a good budget for
the state of Florida."
Scott on Monday rolled out his
proposed "jobs budget" saying it
would help keep his campaign
promise of creating, 700,000 new
jobs over seven years. It would
chop state spending by about $5
billion the biggest cut in
Florida's history and provide


$1.7 billion in tax and fee reduc-
tions mostly to businesses and"
property owners.
The deepest cut of $3.3 billion
would be in education, which
also would be hit with a reduction
in local property taxes that sup-
port public schools.
Both of those recommenda-
tions drew opposition and
McDaniel agreed they would lead
to teacher layoffs. He said educa-
tion was hardest hit because Scott
is philosophically opposed to
using state money to replace


more than $1 billion in federal
stimulus funds that public
schools, colleges and universities
are receiving during the current
budget year ending June 30.
Sen. David Simmons, R-
Maitland, said Scott's across-the-
board property tax cut won't help
create jobs because much of the
relief will go to existing home-
owners who already pay relative-
ly low taxes. That's because the
state's Save Our Homes
Amendment limits annual assess-
ment increases to no more than 3


percent.
As a result, though, newcomers
can pay thousands more in taxes
for an identical home and that
discourages people from coming
to'. Florida, which depends on
growth to fuel its economy,
Simmons said.
Simmons also objected to
Scott's plan to make state and
local government employees
including teachers contribute 5
percent of their salaries to

See BUDGET, Page 5A >


- .


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2A- Thursday, February 10, 2011 Jackson County Floridan


Weather Outlook

T Morning clouds and rain
Today areas. Breezy and Cool.
-Justin Kiefer / WMBB


hl % High 49

^" Low 320


WAKE-UP CALL


www.JCFLORIDAN.com


High 550
Low 290


Tomorrow
Mostly sunny and warmer.


O High 590
Low 34

Saturday
Sunny and Mild.




High 67
Low -42

Monday
Sunny and mild.


TIDES ULTRA VIOLET INDEX
Panama City Low 1:13 AM High 2:44 PM
Apalachicola Low 12:54 PM High 9:50 AM .0-2 Low, 3-5 Moderate, 6-7 High, 8-10 Very High, 11+ E
Port St. Joe Low 12:39 AMHigh 2:35 PM
Destin Low 1:50 AM High 3:08 PM 0 () 2
Perisacola Low 2:24 AM High 3:41 PM


RIVER READINGS
Woodruff
Blountstown
Marianna
Caryville


Reading
52.49 ft.
13.96 ft.
8.53 ft.
9.48 ft.


Flood Stage
66.0 ft.
15.0 ft.
19.0 ft.
12.0 ft.


Sunrise
Sunset
Moonrise
Moonset


6:26 AM
5:24 PM
10:14 AM
12:24 AM (Fri)


FLORIDA'S 1mL

PANHANDLE OJUNo Y

MEDIA PARTNERS WJAQ 100.9r

IEN oi YE HE RUPiES


JACKSON COUNTY
FLORIDAN
Publisher Valeria Roberts
vroberts@jcfloridan.com
Managing Editor Michael Becker
mbecker@jcfloridan.com
Circulation Manager Dena Oberski
doberski@jcfloridan.com

Gea*
Contact Us
Telephone: (850) 526-3614
FAX: (850) 482-4478
E-mail: editorial@jcfloridan.com
Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 520, Marianna, FL 32447
Street Address:
4403 Constitution Lane
Marianna, FL 32446
Office Hours:
Weekdays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Miss your paper?
You should receive your iwspa-
per no later than 6 a.m., but if tor
some reason it does not arrive call
the Floridan's customer service rep-
resentatives between 8 a.m. and 5
p.m. Monday-Friday and 7-11 a.m.
on Sunday. The Jackson County
Floridan (USPS 271-840) is pub-
lished Tuesday through Friday and
Sunday mornings. Periodical
postage paid at Marianna, Fla.
Subscription Rates
Home delivery: $11.23 per month;
$32.83 for three months; $62.05 for
six months; and $123.45 for one
year. All prices include applicable
state and local taxes. Mail subscrip-
tions must be paid in advance. Mail
subscriptions are: $46.12 for three
months; $92.24 for six months; and
$184.47 for one year.
Advertising
The advertiser agrees that the
publisher shall not be liable for dam-
ages arising out of errors and adver-
tisements beyond the amount paid
for the space actually occupied by
that portion of the advertisements in
which the error occurred, whether
such error is due to the negligence
of the publishers employees or oth-
erwise, and there shall be not liabili-
ty for non-insertion of any advertise-
ment beyond the amount paid for
such advertisement. This newspaper
will not knowingly accept or publish
illegal material of any kind.
Advertising which expresses prefer-
ence based on legally protected per-
sonal characteristics is not accept-
able.
How to get your
news published
The Jackson County Floridan will
publish news of general interest free
of charge. Submit your news or
Community Calendar events via e-
mail, fax, mail, or hand delivery. Fees
may apply for wedding, engagement,
anniversary and birth announce-
ments. Forms are available at the
Floridan offices. Photographs must
be of good quality and suitable for
print. The Floridan reserves the right
to edit all submissions.


Thursday, Feb. 10
Grand Ridge School, 6925 Florida St.,
Grand Ridge, presents a Black History pro-
gram at 9 a.m. in the school gym, with guest
speaker Attorney La'Dray Gilbert.
St. Anne Thrift Shop, 4287 Second Ave.,
Marianna, is having its February Sale: Half-
price women's/children's shoes and women's
purses; buy one, get one free on
women's/children's clothes; and select
cups/glasses, four for 50. cents. Shop hours:
Tuesday and Thursday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Emerald Coast Hospice hosts Valentines
Trivia and Relaxation at the Jackson County
Senior Center in Marianna at 10 a.m. Test
your knowledge about the holiday and love,
and learn some simple ways to relax and
stretch. Call 526-3577.
Networking Healthcare Professionals'
monthly luncheon meeting is 11 a.m. at the
Gazebo Coffee Shoppe & Deli in Marianna.
Lunches are Dutch treat. This month's organ-
ization spotlight: Select Specialty of Panama
City. Call 850-674-5464.'
Jackson County Library Board convenes a
workshop at 1:30 p.m. in the Jackson County
Commission chambers. Agenda items include
an upcoming fundraiser and other projects.
Public welcome.
Marianna's Gathering Place Foundation
conducts line, ballroom and singles' dance
classes at 3 p.m. each Thursday. Donations
accepted; proceeds fund area charitable
endeavors. Call 526-4561 for class location.
Marianna Lions Club Pancake Supper 4-7
p.m. at Jim's Buffet and Grill; $5 donation.
Call 209-2016 or contact any Lions Club
member. Proceeds benefit Chipola scholar-
ship, local projects.
AARP Tax-Aide offers free tax preparation
and e-filing to low- or middle-income persons
(with emphasis on seniors over 60) at the
Jackson County Agriculture offices, 2741
Penn Ave. in Marianna, Wednesdays, 9 a.m.
to 1 p.m.; and Thursdays, 4:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Appointments only. Call 482-9620.
Chipola Regional Workforce Development
Board Inc. convenes an executive committee
meeting at 5:15 p.m. in the Workforce Board
community room. A general meeting follows
at 6 p.m. Call 800-382-5164.
The Chipola River Greenway Support
Group meets, 5:30 p.m. in the City
Commission chambers of Marianna City Hall,
2897 Jefferson St. Those interested in pro-
tecting the Chipola River and promoting con-
servation and eco-tourism are encouraged to
get involved. Call 482-2786.
Jackson Hospital Board of Trustees con-
venes a Building and Grounds Committee
meeting at 5:30 p.m. in the hospital board
room.
The Town of Grand Ridge will hold its reg-
ular monthly council meeting at 6 p.m. in the


Grand Ridge Town Hall. Public welcome. Call
592-4621.
Friday, Feb. 11
The Jackson County Chamber of
Commerce will conduct a ribbon cutting cere-
mony for the Goodwill Industries Career
Training Center and expanded store in The
Oaks Shopping Center, 4741 Hwy. 90 East,
Marianna; refreshments start at 8:30 a.m.,
ribbon cutting at 9 a.m. Public welcome. Call
832-7938 or 482-8060.
One Stop Career Center offers the free
skills workshops, "Employ Florida
Marketplace," 10 to 11 a.m., and "Business
Etiquette," 3:15 to 4:15 p.m. at 4636 Hwy. 90
in Marianna. Anyone looking to improve
workplace skills is welcome. Call 718-0456,
ext. 114.
Today is the registration deadline for the
University of Florida/Jackson County
Extension Service 2011 Master Gardener
Volunteer Training Program, a 54-hour
course designed for those interested in
becoming a Master Gardener Volunteer.
Program runs Feb. 16-April 13 in Marianna.
Cost: $150 per person (discount available for
couples taking the course together). Plant
knowledge helpful, but not required. Call 482-
9620 or stop by 2741 Penn Ave., Suite 3, in
Marianna.
Celebrate Recovery hosts adult and teen
meetings to "overcome hurts, habits and hang-
ups in a safe environment" at Evangel Worship
Center, 2645 Pebble Hill Road. Dinner, 6 p.m.
(free for first-time guests); meeting, 7 p.m.
Child care available.:Call 209-7856 or 573-1131.
St. Luke's Episcopal Church Family Game
Night Friday begins at 7:30 p.m. in the parish
hall, at 4362 Lafayette St. across from Video
Warehouse; park in the back. Bring a game, if
you wish, and snacks or drinks to share with
your table. Call 482-2431.
Saturday, Feb. 12
*The City of Chattahoochee, Chattahoochee
Rotary Club and Running Moms Inc. present
The Chattahoochee Smoochie inaugural 5K
Run, starting at 9 a.m. EST (registration at 8
a.m.) at the Angus Gholson Nature Park, 400
Park St. (off Morgan Ave behind Woman's
Club) and end at the same location. Race pro-
ceeds benefit Rotary Youth Camp Inc. and
Running Moms charities. Call 209-8391 or
663-4475. Registration: $15 by Feb. 7, $20
after.
A free ESOL Basic Literacy Tutor training
workshop is offered, 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. in
the conference room of the Jackson County
Public Library, 2929 Green St., Marianna; no
foreign language skills/teaching experience
necessary. Pre-registration required; call 482-
9124 or e-mail literacycoordlc@jcplfl.org.
Charles Carman Pierce will demonstrate
portrait painting techniques following The
Artists Guild of Northwest Florida monthly


meeting, which begins at 9,a.m. at The Russ
House, 4318 Lafayette St., Marianna. Public
welcome. Free admission. Call 526-5977.
An orientation meeting for families inter-
ested in partnering with Jackson County
Habitat for Humanity to build a house begins
at 10 a.m. in the First United Methodist
Church Youth Center on Caledonia Street,
Marianna. Call 482-2187.
Jackson County Master Gardeners pres-
ent the 'Gourds for Birdhouses' workshop, 10
a.m. to noon at the Jackson County Extension
Office, north entrance, room B, 2741 Penn
Ave., Marianna. Cost: $15 per person (light
lunch included). Registration at 9:30 a.m.;
lunch is noon to 12:30 p.m. Space is limited;
early registration recommended. Call 482-
9620.
Partners for Pets hosts an open house, 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. at 4011 Maintenance Drive, in
Marianna. Meet the furry-legged friends and
have some refreshments. Call 482-4570.
The 2011 Miss. Black History Pageant
starts at 2 p.m. in the Blountstown High
School Auditorium. Call 850-674-3449. or
850-674-5548.
The 11th Annual Miss Tri City Pageant is
6 p.m. at the Sneads High School Auditorium.
Proceeds raised benefit the Special Olympics
of Florida. Call 850-762-4561 after 4 p.m. or
209-0641.
Black History Banquet, 7 p.m. at
Blountstown's W. T. Neal Civic Center. Dress:
Church attire/semi-formal. Cost: $10 dona-
tion (single); $15 donation (couple). Call 850-
674-8683 or 850-674-3449.
Sunday, Feb. 13
A county-wide Save the Children Black
Awareness Program will be presented during
the 11 a.m. service at the Pope Chapel A.M.E.
.Church, Blue Springs Highway, Marianna.
Recipients of the Save the Children scholar-
ship will be recognized. Athletes from all
county schools are invited as special guests.
Call 482-3020 or 209-4310.
Monday, Feb. 14
Lions Club of Marianna meets every sec-'
ond and fourth Monday of the month, at noon
at Jim's Buffet & Grill. Call 482 2005.
One Stop Career Center offers the free
skills workshop, "The Key to Career and Job
Happiness," 3:15 to 4:15 p.m. at 4636 Hwy.
90 in Marianna. Anyone looking to improve
workplace skills is welcome. Call 718-0456,
ext. 114.
Cottondale city officials convene their reg-
ular monthly meeting at 6 p.m. in the
Commission room. Call 352-4361.
This month's Jackson County Democratic
Party meeting has moved from Feb. 14 to Feb. 17.
Alcoholics Anonymous (open meeting), 8
to 9 p.m. at the First United Methodist
Church, 2901 Caledonia St., Marianna, in the
AA room.


Getting It
Right!

The Jackson County
Floridan's policy is to cor-
rect mistakes promptly. To
report an error, please call
526-3614 Monday-Friday.


POLICE ROUNDUP


MARIANNA POLICE
The Marianna Police
Department listed the fol-
lowing incidents for Feb. 8
the latest
available -y-
report: Two -YP r
accidents ---
with no 'C iME
injury, two
suspicious
vehicles, one suspicious
incident, three suspicious
persons, one highway
obstruction, two verbal dis-
turbances, 18 traffic stops,
one criminal mischief com-
plaint, one obscene or
threatening call and three
fingerprints taken.


JACKSON COUNTY
SHERIFF'S OFFICE
The Jackson County
Sheriff's Office and coun-
ty Fire/Rescue reported
the following incidents for
Feb. 8 the latest available
report (Some of these
calls may be related to
after-hours calls taken on
behalf of Graceville and
Cottondale Police
Departments): One hos-
pice death, one abandoned
vehicle, four suspicious
vehicles, four suspicious
persons, three information
reports, one highway
obstruction, one verbal
disturbance, two fire and


police responses, one
vehicle fire, one residen-
tial fire, one woodland
fire, one vehicle fire, two
drug offenses, one power
line down, 19 medical
calls, one burglar alarm,
one fire and police alarm,
one power line down, 17
traffic stops, one criminal
mischief complaint, four
papers served, one
obscene or threatening
call, two follow up inves-
tigations, one assault, one
cow complaint, two
assists of a motorist or
pedestrian, three assists of
other agencies, three pub-
lic service calls, two


transports, one
request and
threat/harassment
plaints.


patrol
one
com-


JACKSON COUNTY
CORRECTIONAL
FACILITY
The following persons
were booked into the
county jail during the lat-
est reporting period:
Meriniecer Lewis, 26,
3192 Oblong Circle,
Marianna, driving while
license suspended or
revoked.
William Finefrock,
42, 5506 Friendship
Church Road, Malone,


failure to appear.
Lasidney Norwood,
30, 3111 Willow St. Apt.
516, Cottondale, driving
while license suspended
or revoked.
Charles Peterson, 42,
3070 Carters Mill Road
Apt. H-9, Marianna, sale
and delivery of
propoxyphene.
JAIL POPULATION: 205
To report a crime, call
CrimeStoppers at 526-
5000.
To report a wildlife vio-
lation, call 1-888-404-
FWCC (3922).


extreme

M


THE SUN AND MOON *n- m


Feb. Feb.
11 18


Feb. Mar.
24 4


Community Calendar








www.JCFLORIDAN.com LOCAL


Jackson County Floridan Thursday, February 10, 2011 3A


Feb. 18 dance to benefit Chipola honors program


SPECIAL TO THE FLORIDAN

The Chipola College Honors
Dance is scheduled for Friday,
Feb. 18 in the Art Center.
The $10 a ticket dance is the
main fundraiser for the Honors
program, which recruits students
from its five-county district. The
Ivey Brothers have again volun-
teered their talent and time for
the event.
The Honors program recruits
the top high school students from
Chipola's five-county district.
Students must have a 3.5 GPA
and a minimum ACT of 23.
Honors adviser Bonnie Smith
noted, "The Honors program rep-
resents the brightest and most
involved students from our local
high schools. Many will return to
become leaders in their own com-
munities."
The students are not provided
scholarships to attend Chipola as
part of the benefits of completing
the Honors program, but most
have earned academic scholar-
ships and are required to pay for
the one-hour honors seminar
each semester.
Honors students work one-on-
one with a faculty member to
complete a research project each
semester. The projects are
designed with input from the stu-


dent and the instructor. Projects
range from chemistry experi-
ments that determine an
unknown substance, to a differ-
ential calculus project in knot
theory. At the end of each semes-
ter, students present their findings
in a research paper and through a
multimedia presentation to their
peers.
The Honors program now
offers opportunities for travel
with the addition of the field
trips.
"Since Chipola is viewed as
the cultural and academic hub of
a large rural district, this seems
an appropriate way to invest in
the lives of the college's most
promising students," Smith said.
"These field trips allow our
Honor students more access to
the arts and a chance to travel to
places they have only read
about."
Some examples of past trips
include travel to the Exploreum
in Mobile, Ala. to view the Dead
Sea Scrolls exhibit; a trip to
Jamestown, Va., to view the exca-
vation of the original colonial
site; and another to New York to
visit museums and attend a
Broadway play. Honors students
also have had the opportunity to
earn college credit while they
travel abroad.


The Honors program also
includes a lecture series featuring
experts in their field. Guest
speakers, student seminars, and
community debates are 'part of
this effort. The primary goal of
the lecture series is to provide an
appealing vehicle for interdisci-
plinary learning, skill-building
and career development. Past lec-
tures have included discussions
on West Nile virus and other
infectious diseases, religion and
the war in Iraq, the role of
advanced mathematics in biolo-
gy, and a lecture on genetics and
stem cell research. Many of the
lectures are open to all Chipola
students, faculty and to the pub-
lic.
Community service is an inte-
gral component of the Honors
program. Students lead fundrais-
ing efforts with local schools for
many good causes. Honors raised
$5,000 for the tsunami victims in
Asia with funds distributed
through United Way. Other. serv-
ice activities have included work-
ing with Habitat for Humanity,
volunteering with the Red Cross
after hurricanes, assisting -the
WINGS program at local middle
schools and providing reading
assistance to at-risk children. The
group has worked with local
schools to fight malaria and to


The Ivey Brothers band will play at the Chipola College Honors
Dance, scheduled for Friday, Feb. 18 in the Art Center. The $10-a
-ticket dance is the main fundraiser for the Honors program, which
recruits students from its five-county district. The Ivey Brothers have
again volunteered their talent and time for the event. Tickets are
available from students in the program, or by calling Bonnie Smith
or Robert Ivey at 526-1761, ext. 3247. Contributed photo illus-
tration


help with the Haiti relief effort.
Many of the past activities
have been funded in part by the
college and the Chipola
Foundation. Due to the expansion
of the program and increases in
travel costs, the program is look-
ing to the community for addi-
tional support. Donations may be
made to Honors endowment
through the Chipola Foundation.


The endowment provides some
of the funding for the cost of the
seminars, travel and speaker fees,
as well as support materials for
student research and presenta-
tions.
Tickets for the Friday, Feb. 18,
Honors Dance are available from
students in the program, or by
calling Bonnie Smith or Robert
Ivey at 526-1761, ext. 3247.


Student Support Services program selects students


SPECIAL TO THE FLORIDAN
A select group of
Chipola College students
has been selected to partic-
ipate .in the college's
Student Support Services
program.
A total of 140 students
will be selected based on
their potential to achieve
their academic and career
goals. The main objective
of the program is to provide
students the support needed
to earn an Associate of Arts
degree and transfer into an
upper level program to earn
a bachelor's degree.
Students will receive
support in the areas of aca-
demics, career planning
and personal finance,
including workshops on
study, skills and test-taking.
Through the college ACE
lab, students will receive
individual and group tutor-
ing and supplemental
instruction.


Students in the program
will visit area colleges and
universities and receive
support with completing
college and university
applications.. Students also
will get direction in seek-
ing scholarships and grant
opportunities.
Several college employ-
ees are serving students in
the program, including:
Judy Riviere, SSS director;
Sarah Gambill, SSS advi-
sot; Bonnie Smith, ACE
academic coordinator;
Debbie Davis, SSS admifl-
istrative assistant and
Angie Tyler, ACE lab
assistant.
For their participation
students, will earn the right
to register early for classes
and may be eligible for
financial awards for books
and other expenses.
For information about
the Student Support
Services program, call Judy
Riviere at 718-2363.


Boy Scouts' Alabama Florida Council
announces the new Scout Executive


SPECIAL TO THE FLORIDAN

Jerry Freyberg has been
named the new Scout
Executive of the Alabama
Florida Council Boy Scouts
of Amnerica.
Freyberg has 28 years of
professional service and
comes from the Great Lakes
Council, where he was
responsible for council fiscal
management and fundrais-
ing efforts as director of
finance services. Prior to his
role as director of finance
services, Freyberg served in
a number of staff positions
in the Detroit Area Council.
In addition to serving met-
ropolitan Detroit, Freyberg
has also served' rural
Indiana, coal mining towns

sALI


in West Virginia and agricul-
tural communities in Iowa.
He previously served as
Assistant Scout Executive of
the Illowa Council, a com-
bined council of western
Illinois and eastern Iowa
along the Mississippi River.
The Freyberg family is a
Scouting family, with
Scouting being an integral
part of their lives. The rela-
tionship between Jerry and
his wife Tammy, has been
filled with Scouting activi-
ties since the beginning, and
has continued through their
31-year marriage. Both
sons, Brad and Mark, earned
the rank of Eagle Scout.

On the web:
www.alflcouncilbsa.org


The Freyberg family (not in order) Jerry, Tammy,
Brad and Mark in the Valle Vidal Wilderness, just
north of New Mexico's Philmont Scout Ranch. Jerry
Freyberg was recently named Scout Executive for the
Boy Scouts of America Alabama Florida Council. -
Contributed photo

FLORIDA LOTrERY
Cash Ply4 an


Mon. (E)
Mon. (M)
Tue. (E)
Tue. (M)
Wed. (E)
Wed. (M)
Thurs. (E)
Thurs. (M)
Fri. (E)
Fri. (M)
Sat. (E)
Sat. (M)
Sun. (E)
Sun. (M)


3-2-7
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PIS 'BIAL


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Not available


PB 5 PPx5
PB X PPxX


Saturday 2/5 4-5-20-23-38-48 xtra 4
Wednesday 2/9 Not available xtra X
For lofttry information, call (850) 487-7777 or (900) 737-7777


Chipola College student Becky Hart, right, discusses
her classes with Chipola ACE Academic Coordinator
Bonnie Smith. A select group of Chipola students has
been chosen to participate in the college's Student
Support Services program based on their potential to
achieve their academic and career goals. The objec-
tive of the program is to provide students the support
needed to earn an AA degree and transfer into an
upper level program to earn a bachelor's degree. -
Contributed photo


Covenant Hospice

seeks volunteers for

Garden Gala event


SPECIAL TO THE FLORIDAN

Covenant Hospice will
host the 6th' Annual
Garden Gala from 6 to 9
p.m. Saturday, June 11, at
the Agricultural Center,
located at 2741 Penn
Ave., in Marianna. The
Garden Gala Committee
is currently seeking vol-
unteers to help plan, pre-
pare and present the
event. Volunteers are
needed for all areas of the.
event. The Garden Gala
committee will be hold-
ing its monthly meeting
at noon on Thursday, Feb.
17 at the Covenant
Hospice branch, located
at 4215 Kelson Ave.,
Suite E, and lunch will be
provided.
"The Garden Gala is
our signature fundraising
event of the year.
Proceeds from the gala
will help further the mis-
sion of Covenant Hospice
in Calhoun, Jackson,
Holmes and Washington
counties," said Jennifer
Griffin, Development
Manager for Covenant
Hospice.
Covenant Hospice is a


not-for-profit organiza-
tion dedicated to provid-
ing comprehensive com-
passionate service to
patients and their loved
ones during times of life
limiting illnesses, based
on need, regardless of
ability to pay.
The Garden Gala is
critical to furthering
Covenant's mission in the
Marianna service area.
"Proceeds from the
Garden Gala help off set
the $1.6 million of indi-
gent care; along with
contributing to the pro-
grams not reimbursed by
Medicare, such as
bereavement and social
services, chaplain servic-
es, children support serv-
ices and volunteer pro-
grams," said Griffin.
To volunteer for the
.Garden Gala committee
or for more information,
contact Jennifer Griffin
or Angela Jackson at 482-
8520 or 209-0221, or
with an e-mail to jen
nifer. griffin @covenan
thospice.org or to
angela.jackson @covenan
thospice.org.


CUTE KIDS


Malayna Monitti is. the daughter of Mike and Melissa
Monitti of Dothan Ala., and great-grandaughter of
Arthur and Maxine Shaw of Marianna. She is the 2011
Dothan March of Dimes Ambassador. Contributed
photo


WE BUY GOLD
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4A Thursday, February 10, 2011 Jackson County Floridan


STATE www.JCFLORIDAN.com


Ex-DC school chief Rhee defends teacher firings


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

TALLAHASSEE Former
District of Columbia public
schools chancellor Michelle Rhee
on Wednesday defended her deci-
sion to fire 75 teachers even
though an arbitrator overruled
her.
Rhee, now an informal educa-
tion adviser to Florida Gov. Rick
Scott, commented on the arbitra-
tion ruling after appearing before
a Florida Senate education com-
mittee to discuss her ideas for
improving instructional quality.
She became nationally known
for closing schools and firing


about 1,000 teachers deemed to
be ineffective during her 3 1/2-
year tenure in Washington.
Arbitrator Charles Feigenbaum
on Tuesday ordered 75 fired
teachers reinstated because they
were never told why they were
being fired and had been given no
chance to dispute claims they
were ineffective.
"The arbitrator, if you look at
the ruling yesterday, said a lot of
these teachers were ineffective
and should have been fired," Rhee
said. "The school district is going
to appeal the decision. They're
very, very confident in their legal


standing and are confident that it
will be overturned."
Rhee also spoke in support of
legislation that would do away
with tenure for new teachers in
Florida. It also would set up a
merit pay system for teachers
based heavily on test scores. The
Legislature passed a similar bill
last year but it was vetoed by
then-Gov. Charlie Crist after
protests across the state by teach-
ers, their unions and parents. The
new legislation, though, mirrors
Florida's proposal for its $700
million federal "Race to the Top"
grant that was drafted in consulta-


tion with union officials.
Most teachers are "doing a great
job," Rhee said, but she cited a
Stanford University study that
concluded the United States would
rise to the top among nations in
student achievement if the lowest
performing 5 percent to 8 percent
of teachers were replaced with
those who are average.
"As long as we have practices
in place that protect ineffective
teachers, we are not going to be
able to significantly move student
achievement levels," Rhee said.
"It drives effective teachers
crazy when there is somebody


working next to them that is not
pulling their own weight and
when they inherit a group of kids
the following year that are several
grade levels behind because
somebody didn't do their job,"
she added.
Rhee, though, said education
schools are not "preparing teach-
ers well for the rigors that they are
going to see every single day in
the classroom."
Rhee made appearances before
the Senate Prekindergarten-12
Education Cormnittee and later
the House Kindergarten-12
Competitiveness Subcommittee.


Crist, Sink to unite against offshore drilling


BY BRENDAN FARRINGTON
ASSOCIATED PRESS

TALLAHASSEE Former Gov.
Charlie Crist and last year's
Democratic gubernatorial nominee
Alex Sink were back at the Capitol
Wednesday to launch a petition drive
seeking to add a ban on oil drilling in
state waters to Florida's constitution.
While they're also supporting legis-
lation pushed by Democratic lawmak-
ers that would put the ban on.the ballot,
they know Republican lawmakers
aren't likely to support the idea. Such a
measure would make it on the ballot if
the Legislature puts it there, or if
enough citizens sign petitions.
"We tried legislatively last time,
and that didn't work out so well," said
Crist, a lifelong Republican before
going independent last spring. "So
now it has to be in the hands of the
people to make this happen."
Republicans criticized Crist for
calling a special legislative session
last summer that sought to put the
same measure on last November's


ballot. Republican leaders said that
the proposed amendment wasn't
needed because state law already
banned drilling. They opened the ses-
sion and quickly closed it without
taking a vote.
A ban that's part of a constitutional
amendment would be harder to
change than state law.
Crist, at the time, angrily said, "I'm
going to give them hell for it."
He and Sink, the former state chief
financial officer, stood with
Democratic lawmakers and anti-
drilling advocates outside the old
Capitol to announce the petition
drive. Behind them, people stood
with signs, some showing Florida's
-pristine beaches and others showing
turtles and birds covered in oil from
last year's BP spill.
"It just tears at your heart when you
think about what happened in the
Gulf of Mexico just last spring and
summer and the prospect that some-
thing like that could happen again
even closer to Florida's shore if we
don't ban this," said Crist.


Before the BP oil spill last year,
Republican lawmakers were pushing
to allow drilling in state waters, which
extend 10 miles from the coast. While
that talk has stopped for now,
Republican Gov. Rick Scott, who
defeated Sink in November, has said
he's open to drilling as long as it's safe.
"It's only a matter of time before
Republican leadership in the House
and Senate again decide that oil
drilling within eyesight is a good
idea," said Rep. Rick Kriseman, D-St.
Petersburg, who is sponsoring the
resolution that would put the ban on
the ballot. "It's not a good idea. It's a
terrible idea and it makes no sense."
Even though very little oil reached
Florida shores, the threat alone drove
'tourists away from Panhandle beach-
es during peak season. Some waters
off Florida's coast were closed to
fishing, hurting commercial and char-
ter fishing businesses.
Sink recalled talking to people,
tears in their eyes, who were on the
verge of losing businesses they
worked years to grow.


US opens new front in Colombian drug battle


BY CURT ANDERSON
AP LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER


MIAMI The U.S. is opening a
new front in the battle against
Colombian cocaine producers
focused on about 30 emerging groups
seeking to replace once-powerful
drug cartels that have largely been
dismantled, Miami U.S. Attorney


Willy Ferrer said Wednesday.
The new investigation of so-called
Bandas Criminales, or BACRIM for
short, will be run by a first-in-the-
nation unit of three prosecutors in
Ferrer's office along with agents from
the Drug Enforcement
Administration, FBI, Immigration
and Customs Enforcement and
Colombian authorities.


Ferrer announced a key indictment
on drug trafficking charges of the
leader of one of the organizations, 39-
year-old Diego Perez Henao, who is
also known as Diego Rastrojo and
whose Rastrojos group is among
Colombia's most powerful and vio-
lent. Nine other BACRIM members
and associates have also been charged
in South Florida in recent months.


"You realized the real
human toll and impact that
the crisis we experienced
last year was having on
hundreds of thousands of


Floridians," Sink said. "If
there's one little thing that
we Floridians can do, it is
to maintain control of our
own state waters."


Florida
agency
receives bids
to sell last two
state planes
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

TALLAHASSEE -
Fifteen bids have been sub-
mitted on Florida's two
remaining state planes.
Nine bids ranging
between $1.1 million and
$1.9 million were received
by the state Wednesday for
a 2003 jet-powered Cessna
Citation Bravo. Six bids
between $1.1 million and
$1.765 million were put on
a 2000 King Air 350. All
were accompanied by
cashier's checks for at least
10 percent of the bid
amount.
The bids were accepted
by Department of
Management Services offi-
cials, who now have 48
hours to notify rejected bid-
ders.
Florida once had a fleet
of three planes, but sold one
in 2008.
Gov. Rick Scott uses his
personal jet to travel on
state business at his own
expense. He wanted to sell
off the state-owned aircraft
as a cost-savings measure.


Florida land
developer is
considering sale
THE ASSORTED PRESS

WATERSOUND -
Panhandle land developer
St. Joe Co. says it has hired
Morgan Stanley & Co. to
look at various options,
including a possible merger
or sale of the company.
St. Joe Co. made the
announcement late Tuesday
night. The company says its
board of directors also
voted to have Morgan
Stanley look at possible
partnerships, joint ventures
and strategic alliances.
The former timber com-
pany owns about 570,000
acres of Panhandle land.
The company donated
4,000 acres for develop-
ment of a recently opened
international airport near
Panama City and it owns
72,000 acres surrounding
1 the airport.


THURSDAY MORNING /AFTERNOON FEBRUARY 10, 2011
6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:0010:3011:0011:3012:0012:30 1:00 1:30 2:00 2:30 3:00 3:30 4:00 4:30 5:00 5:30
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THURSDAY EVENING / LATE NIGHT FEBRUARY 10, 2011
6:00 6'30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:0010:3011:0011:3012:0012:30 1:00 1:30 2:00 2:30 3:00 3:30 4:00 4:30 5:00 5:30
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wwwJCORIDAN.com LOCALNATIONAL


Jackson County Floridan Thursday, February 10, 2011 5A


House GOP chairman outlines spending cuts


BY ANDREW TAYLOR
ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON House
Republicans proposed ending
more than 60 government pro-
grams and cutting hundreds of
others Wednesday in a $35 bil-
lion down payment on their
promise to rein in federal
deficits.
Funding for AmeriCorps, fam-
ily planning assistance and the
Corporation for Public
Broadcasting would be wiped out,
under the proposal, presented to
the GOP rank-and-file at a closed
door meeting.
As outlined by Rep. Harold
Rogers, R-Ky., the chairman of
the House Appropriations
Committee, cuts would range
widely across the face of govern-
ment, including aid to education,
food safety and inspection serv-
ices, and high-speed rail, which
President Barack Obama' wants
to increase.
The legislation is expected to
reach the House floor next week.
While the political focus is on the
cuts demanded by Republicans,
the bill also is needed to allow
the government to continue nor-


mal operations when its funding
authority expires on March 4.
Many Republicans, especially
freshmen lawmakers elected with
tea party support, promise to seek
deeper cuts.
Rogers also called for deep
cuts to the Environmental
Protection Agency 18 percent
from 2010 levels as well as
elimination of a program that
helps local police departments
hire new officers. An EPA pro-
gram that gives localities money
for clean water projects is going
. to be hit especially hard.
The package of cuts totals $43
billion taken from domestic
agency and. foreign aid budgets
when compared with 'levels
enacted for 2010. Once increases
for the Pentagon are accounted
for, those savings are $35 billion:
They are smaller than promised
in last year's campaign because
the budget year is already almost
five months under way.
Rogers warns that further cuts
sought by conservatives could
lead to furloughs of federal work-
ers at the FBI and the Drug
Enforcement Agency, or politi-
cally wrenching cuts to health
research, special education grants
to local school districts, or Pell


Grants to disadvantaged college
students.
A veteran Democrat also
warned against some of the
reductions.
"We need to cut spending, but
we need to do it by focusing on
waste," said Sen. Charles
Schumer, D-N.Y. "This proposal
would get rid of cops that keep
our streets safe, food inspectors
that keep our food safe and cut
home heating oil for seniors."
Eliminating AmeriCorps a
signature initiative of- former
President Bill Clinton would
save $373 million. Ending police
hiring grants would save $298
million.
The federal subsidy for the
Corporation for Public
Broadcasting would be eliminat-
ed, saving $531 million. The cor-
poration funds a small portion of
the budget for National Public
Radio, which is deeply unpopular
with conservatives. But an effort
to cut the public broadcasting
budget a few years back also
under GOP control of Congress
- was rejected after strong
objections from the public.
The day after Obama called for
a six-year, $53 billion investment
in high speed rail, Republicans


proposed eliminating the subsi-
dies altogether.
Republicans also propose cut-
ting Amtrak's budget back to
2008 levels to save $224 million,
or 14 percent. They tried deeper
cuts a few yedrs ago, but those
were rejected on the floor.
"We have taken a wire brush to
the budget and scoured every
program to find real savings that
are responsible and justifiable to
the American people," Rogers
said in a statement. "Make no
mistake, these cuts are not low-
hanging fruit."
Rogers only issued a partial
roster of cuts. He didn't outline
cuts to heating and-housing sub-
sidies for the poor, Indian health
care, road construction or transit
subsidies. And there was no,
detail on the relatively small cuts
to Congress' own budget, which
was largely spared.
Republicans account for their
larger reduction amounts by .peg-
ging their recommended cuts to
Obama's requests. They claim
$58 billion in savings through the
end of the year, compared with
Obama's proposals for domestic
agencies. That' amount increases
to $74 billion after defense cuts
are folded in.


The list of cuts contains
numerous winners and losers -
and seeks to steer clear of politi-
cal land mines. NASA would
absorb a cut of less than 1 percent
cut from current levels. And the
National Park Service would be
largely spared.
In fact, the FBI would receive a
4 percent increase over current
levels, as would the U.S.
Marshalls Service. The health
research budget would be frozen
at 2010 levels ($31 billion). And
while Republicans are advertis-
ing cuts to community develop-
ment programs of $530 million
from Obama's budget, those cuts
equal a freeze at current levels of
almost $4 billion.
But renewable energy and
energy efficiency programs
would be slashed by about half,
while a weatherization program
for homes, factories and office
buildings would be terminated.
The Women, Infants and
Children program, which pro-
vides food for low-income preg-
nant women, mothers and young
children, would receive a $758
million cut, about 10 percent. But
with money left over from last
year, the impact should be mod-
est.


Road
Continued From Page 1A
He said his company was
perfectly capable of doing
the same type of test as well.
Commissioners assured
him that any paving work
would go through the nor-
mal bidding process, in
which the county generally
accepts the low bid. Then,
commission Chairman
Chuck Lockey said
Anderson-Columbia was
welcome to do similar test
projects for the county, per-
haps even a second test
block on El Bethel.
Strickland said the com-
pany would be willing to


entertain the idea, and that
he would be getting back
with county staff about the
proposition.'
El Bethel has five inches
of asphalt and was repaved
around 1994. Around 2002,
extensive cracks and ruts
began to appear. Some of the
cracks cross, both lanes of
traffic; some are confined to
one lane or the edge of the
pavement. Alvarez specu-
lates that the real problem
lies in the base work under
the asphalt, .and that's what
Florida Highway Products
will try to confirm and fix in
the small section it's testing.
Alvarez said the county
will probably want to con-
sider repaving all or most of
El Bethel within the next


few years.
The road crosses U.S.
Highway 90, but is known
by three different names in
its various sections. South of
U.S. 90, it's called Inwood.
North of U.S. 90, it's El
Bethel for a distance of
about six miles. After a hard
turn, it becomes Sand Ridge
Church Road.
Altogether, it runs a dis-
tance of about 10 miles. Of
the total, about six miles are
showing extensive deteriora-
tion. Most of the damage is
on the Inwood section and
on El Bethel, before it turns
into Sand Ridge 'Church
Road. Florida Highway
Products is testing a section
north of U.S. 90 before the
road turns into Sand Ridge.


OBITUARIES


James & Sikes Funeral
Home Maddox Chapel
4278 Lafayette St.
Marianna, FL 32446
482-2332
www.jamesandsikes
funeralhomes.com

Clara Mae
Bludworth

-Clara Mae Bludworth, 85,
of Marianna died Tuesday,
Feb. 8, 2011, in Marianna.
Arrangements will be an-
nounced by James & Sikes
Funeral Home Maddox
Chapel of Marianna.
James & Sikes Funeral
Home Maddox Chapel
4278 Lafayette St.
Marianna, FL 32446
482-2332

Howard
Thompson

Howard Thompson, 86,
of Marianna died Wednes-
day, Feb. 9, 2011, at his res-
idence.
Funeral arrangements
will be announced later by
James & Sikes Funeral
Homes Maddox Chapel.
Expressions of sympathy
may be made online at
www.jamesandsikesfuneral
homes.com.

James & Sikes Funeral
Home Maddox Chapel
4278 Lafayette St.
Marianna, FL 32446
482-2332

Jerry Naamon
Mannon

Jerry Naamon Mannon,
64, of Alford died Wednes-
day, Feb. 9, 2011, at Jack-
son Hospital.
A native of Manchester,
Tenn., he lived most of his
life in Jackson County and
was employed with Jackson
County A.R.C.
He was preceded in
death by his parents, Ber-
nard and Anna Cheney
Mannon.
Survivors include his sis-
ter, Sherry Elaine Peacock
and husband Donnie, of
Alford; niece and nephew,
Don Peacock (Ginger) and
Shelaine Davis (Justin); and
grandnieces and
grandnephews, Brianna
Davis, Zander Nix, Tanner
Nix, Brooke Peacock and
Connor Peacock.
The funeral service will
be 10 a.m. Friday, Feb. 11,
at the Alford Baptist
Church, with the Revs. Bob
Johnson and Donnie Pea-


cock officiating. Burial will
follow in Alford City Ceme-
tery with James & Sikes Fu-
neral Home Maddox Chap-
el directing.
The family will receive
friends from 9 a.m. until
the funeral service at the
church.
Expressions of sympathy
may be made online at
www.jamesandsikesfuneral
homes.com.
James & Sikes Funeral
Home Maddox Chapel'
4278 Lafayette St.
Marianna, FL 32446
482-2332
www.jamesandsikes
funeralhomes.com

Bruce W.
Monroe

Bruce W. Monroe, 62, of
Grand Ridge died Tuesday,
Feb. 8, 2011, at his resi-
dence.
Funeral arrangements
will be announced by
James & Sikes Funeral
Home Maddox Chapel of
Marianna.
James & Sikes Funeral
Home Maddox Chapel
4278 Lafayette St.
Marianna, FL 32446
482-2332

Alyne
McQuagge
Pitman

Alyne McQuagge Pitman,
88, died Monday, Feb. 7,
2011.
Alyne's family, including
her late husband, Robert
"Bud" Pitman, brother A.E.
"Eugene" McQuagge M.D.,
and parents Thelma and
Will McQuagge, has been
an integral part of Jackson
County for generations. Af-
ter serving as a military
court reporter for Graham
Air Base, she hosted the
popular daily radio broad-
cast "News Along the Party
Line," while also becoming
society editor for the Jack-
son County Floridan.,
In 1960, Alyne was elect-
ed Supervisor of Elections
for Jackson County, a posi-
tion she held for nearly 30
years. During 'her tenure,
she held memberships in
the Florida State Supervi-
sors of Elections and the
National Association of
Elections Officials. She was
also a registered lobbyist
who fought to secure con-
stitutional equality for
elected officials. She was
loved and respected by lo-
cal politicians, Florida gov-


emors, and even U.S. pres-
idents.
Alyne's social service was
as extensive as her political
life. She served as presi-
dent of the Marianna Jun-
ior Woman's Club and was
named Woman of the Year.
She was a member of the
Chipola Regional Arts As-
sociation and the Chipola
Historical Trust. She re-
ceived the Good Govern-
ment Award presented by
the Junior Chamber of
Comnierce, and was the
Celebrity Honoree selected
by the Jackson County
Chamber of Commerce to
receive the key to the city
of Marianna.
Since early childhood,
the church was a funda-
mental part of Alyne's life.
She and her siblings, Eu-
gene and Lottie, joined the
First Presbyterian Church
of Marianna in 1930. Alyne
went on to be ordained a
deacon of the church, then
an elder, and also served as
a Sunday school teacher,
circle chairman, historian,
and adult leader of the Se-
nior High Fellowship. Ad-
ditionally, she served on
the executive board of the
Women of the Church of
Florida Presbytery.
Alyne's happiest times
were spent with relatives
and friends at her family
beach house, the "Nest of
Kin," as well as traveling
the globe. She was 'an avid
Gator fan, a lifelong Demo-
crat, and a friend to anyone
she ever met.
She is survived by her
daughters, Bobra Palmer
and Alyne Farrell; son Rob-
ert Pitman Jr.;
granddaughters Jennifer
Farrell and Carlton-Jane
Beck; great-grandsons
Tycen and Lleyton Beck;
sister Lottie McQuagge
Fite; nieces Eugenia
McQuagge Tyus and Don-
na Fite Moore; and neph-
ews Bill McQuagge, Burton
Fite, and Mac Fite.
Services will be 2 p.m. Fri-
day, Feb. 11, at the First
Presbyterian Church of
Marianna, the Rev. Dr.
Huw Christopher officiat-
ing. Interment will follow
at Riverside Cemetery.
In lieu of floral arrange-
ments, donations may be
sent to the First Presbyteri-
an Church,. 4437 Clinton
St., Marianna, FL 32446, in
memory of Alyne Pitman,
or to the American Lung
Association.
Expressions of sympathy
may be made online at
www.jamesandsikesfuneral
homes.com.


Cars drive through the snow near the University of Tulsa in Tulsa, Okla., on
Wednesday Feb. 9, 2011. The second winter storm in just more than a week to hit
the state has dropped up to 16 inches of snow on parts of northeastern Oklahoma.
- AP Photo/The Tulsa World, Mike Simons

Second large blizzard howls

through snow-weary Midwest


BY TIM TALLEY
ASSOCIATED PRESS

OKLAHOMA CITY -
Another powerful blizzard
howled through the
nation's Midwest states on
Wednesday, piling up to 2
feet of new snow on parts
of Oklahoma and Arkansas
still struggling to clean up
from last week's epic
storm.
The blowing snow
brought traffic to a halt, and
the National Guard was


Budget
Continued From Page 1A
the Florida Retirement
System, saving govern-
ment an equal amount.
Simmons said a teacher
struggling to make ends
meet on a $40,000 salary
would 'in effect take a
$2,000 pay cut. He sug-
gested, instead, that contri-
bution rates be put on a
sliding scale so that
younger employees would
pay a smaller percentage
than older ones.
The panel's chairman,
Sen. JD Alexander, called
Scott's proposal "a good
starting point" and predict-
ed lawmakers would use
many of his ideas, but
passing a two-year instead
of annual budget isn't one
of them. He noted the
.Florida Constitution calls
for annual budgets.
"We feel the budget
authority of the


summoned to rescue
stranded motorists.
Subzero wind chills forced
ranchers to work desperate-
ly to protect their herds.
As the storm barreled out
of the Plains, it took aim at
the Deep South, whiqh. was
expected to get up to five
inches of snow. At least two
traffic deaths were blamed
on the system.
The fresh snow was
especially troublesome in
Tulsa, where many roads
were still impassable from


Legislature is a principal
constitutional authority
and the way that we under-
stand what's going on in
state government," said the
Lake Wales Republican.
Sen. Mike Fasano, R-
New Port Richey, took
issue with Scott's plan to
cut $200 million in trans-
portation spending. He
said that. would mean
fewer construction jobs,
just the kind of private sec-
tor employment Scott says
he wants to stimulate.
Sen. Eleanor Sobel, D-
Hollywood, asked if
McDaniel could guarantee
businesses would use sav-
ings from Scott's proposal
to cut Florida's corporate
income tax to create jobs
rather than just pocket the
money.
"I'm not here, senator,
to guarantee anything,"
McDaniel replied, but he
argued that "mostly busi-
nesses are concerned about
taxes."


'last week's record 14-inch
snowfall. The previous
storm kept students out of
school for at least six days.
Mail, bus and trash service
were only recently restored.
Five more inches of
snow 'fell Wednesday in
Tulsa, according to the
National Weather Service.
That raised the city's total
for the winter to 25.9 inch-
es, breaking the previous
seasonal record of 25.6
inches, set during the win-
ter of 1923-24.


There's disagreement,
though, on that point. Matt
Murray, a professor of
economics at the
University of Tennessee
who studies state finance,
says tax concerns are over-
stated compared to labor
costs, education and infra-
structure as business
attractors. '
Alexander also ques-
tioned how Scott arrived at
his claim of cutting $5 bil-
lion. He pointed out, and
McDaniel agreed, that fig-
ure includes only $3.5 bil-
lion in actual spending cuts
because Scott removed uni-
versity tuition and court
clerk expenses from his
proposal money that
would still be spent but out-
side the budget.
Scott also didn't count
the loss of almost $2 bil-
lion in federal stimulus
funding, Alexander said.
That would bring his total
back to more than $5 bil-
lion.


Who you gonna call?


Ghost hunter Scott Tepperman checks a digital camera for signs of spectral activi-
ty while on a ghost hunt in the Russ House with ALPHA, the Association for
Locating Paranormal and Haunted Activity. Among the arsenal of cameras and
sensors the group brought to the house was a laser that projected a grid of green
lights on a wall in an attempt to show the presence of ghosts. Tepperman is an
investigator with the TV show "Ghost Hunters International" and co-founder of
ALPHA. Mark Skinner/Floridan i








6A Thursday, February 10, 2011 Jackson County Floridan


INTERNATIONAL www.JCFLORIDAN.com


Strikes erupt as Egypt protesters defy VP warnings


BY MAGGIE MICHAEL
AND TAREK EL-TABLAWY
ASSOCIATED PRESS

CAIRO Thousands of state
workers and impoverished
Egyptians launched strikes and
protests around the country on
Wednesday over their economic
woes as anti-government activists
sought to expand their campaign
to oust President Hosni Mubarak
despite warnings from the vice
president that protests won't be
tolerated much longer.
Some 8,000 protesters, mainly
farmers, set barricades of flaming
palm trees in the southern
province of Assiut, blocking the
main highway and railway to
Cairo to complain of bread short-
ages. They then drove off the gov-
ernor by pelting his van with
stones. Hundreds of slum dwellers
in the Suez Canal city of Port Said
set fire to part of the governor's
headquarters in anger over lack of
housing.
Efforts by Vice President Omar
Suleiman to open a dialogue with
protesters over reforms have bro-
ken down since the weekend, with
youth organizers of the movement
deeply suspicious that he plans
only superficial changes far short
of real democracy. They refuse
any talks unless Mubarak steps
down first.
Showing growing impatience
with the rejection, Suleiman
issued a sharp warning that raised
the prospect of a renewed crack-
down. He told Egyptian newspa-
per editors late Tuesday that there
could be a "coup" unless demon-
strators agree to enter negotiations.
Further deepening skepticism of
his intentions, he suggested Egypt
was not ready for democracy and
said a government-formed panel
of judges, dominated by Mubarak
loyalists, would push ahead with
recommending its own constitu-
tional amendments to be put to a
referendum.
"He is threatening to impose
martial law, which means every-
body in the square will be
smashed," said Abdul-Rahman


Samir, a spokesman for a coalition
of the five main youth groups
behind protests in Cairo's Tahrir
Square. "But what would he do
with the rest of the 70 million
Egyptians who will follow us
afterward."
Suleiman is creating "a disas-
trous scenario," Samir said. "We
are striking and we will protest
and we will not negotiate until
Mubarak steps down. Whoever
wants to threaten us, then let them
do so," he added.
Nearly 10,000 massed in Tahrir
on Wednesday in the 16th day of
protests. Nearby, 2,000 more
blocked off parliament, several
blocks away, chanting slogans for
it to be dissolved. Army ,troops
deployed in the parliament
grounds.
For the first time, protesters
were calling forcefully Wednesday
for labor strikes, despite a warning
by Suleiman that calls for civil dis-
obedience are "very dangerous for
society and we can't put up with
this at all."
Strikes broke out across Egypt
as many companies reopened for
the first time after closing for
much of the turmoil because of
curfews. Not all the strikers were
responding directly to the protest-
ers' calls but the movement's
success and its denunciations of
the increasing poverty under near-
ly 30 years of Mubarak's rule
clearly reignited labor discontent
that has broken out frequently in
recent years.
The farmers in Assiut voiced
their support of the Tahrir move-
ment, witnesses said, as did the
Port Said protesters, who set up a
tent camp in the city's main
Martyrs Square similar to the
Cairo camp.
In Cairo, hundreds of state elec-
tricity workers stood in front of the
South Cairo Electricity company,
demanding the ouster of its direc-
tor. Public transport workers at
five of the city's roughly 17
garages also called strikes, calling
for Mubarak's overthrow, and
vowed that buses would be halted
Thursday, though it was not clear


if they represented the entire bus
system.
Also, dozens of state museum
workers demanding higher wages
staged a protest in front of the
Supreme Council of Antiquities,
crowding around antiquities chief
Zahi Hawass when he came to talk
to them.
Several hundred workers also
demonstrated at a silk factory and
a fuel coke plant in Cairo's indus-
trial suburb of Helwan, demanding
better pay and work conditions.
Two protesters were killed
Tuesday-when police opened fire
on hundreds who set a courthouse
on fire and attacked a police sta-
tion in .the desert oasis town of
Kharga, southwest of Cairo, in two
days of rioting, security officials
said Wednesday. The protesters
are demanding the removal of a
senior local police commander
accused of abuse. The army was
forced to secure a number of gov-
ernment buildings including pris-
ons. The officials spoke on condi-
tion of anonymity because they
were not authorized to talk to the
press.
Strikes entered a second day in
the city of Suez on Wednesday.
Some 5,000 workers at various
state companies including tex-
tile workers, medicine bottle man-
ufacturers, sanitation workers and
a firm involved in repairs for ships
on the Suez Canal held separate
strikes and protests at their facto-
ries. Traffic at the Suez Canal, a
vital international waterway that is
a top revenue earner for Egypt,
was not affected.
"We're not getting our rights,"
said Ahmed Tantawi, a Public
Works employee in Suez. He said
workers provide 24-hour service
and are exposed to health risks but
get only an extra $1.50 a month in
hardship compensation. He said
there are employees who have
worked their entire lives in the
department and will retire with a
salary equivalent to $200 a month.
In Tahrir, organizers of the cen-
tral anti-Mubarak demonstrations
called for a new "protest of mil-
lions" for Friday similar to those


Suez Canal Company workers protest as they began an open-
ended strike in front of the company's headquarters in Ismailia
City, Egypt on Wednesday, Feb. 9. The canal stayed open as sev-
eral hundred workers demonstrated, demanding the resignation of
their immediate boss Admiral Ahmed Fadel, the chairman of the
Suez Canal Authority. Workers also wanted a pay raise and social
equality. AP Photo


that have drawn the largest crowds
so far. But in a change of tactic,
they want to spread the protests
out around different parts of Cairo
instead of only in downtown
Tahrir Square where a permanent
sit-in is now in its second week,
said Khaled Abdel-Hamid, one of
the youth organizers.
A previous "protest of millions"
last week drew at least a quarter-
million people to Tahrir their
biggest yet, along with crowds of
tens of thousands in other cities. A
Tahrir rally on Tuesday rivaled that
one in size, fueled by a renewed
enthusiasm after the release of
Wael Ghonim, a Google market-
ing manager who helped spark the
unprecedented protest movement.
Still, authorities were projecting
an image of normalcy. Egypt's
most famous tourist attraction, the
Pyramids of Giza, reopened to
tourists on Wednesday. Tens of
thousands of foreigners have fled
Egypt amid the chaos, raising con-
cerns about the economic impact
..of the protests. Mubarak met
Wednesday with a Russian envoy.


Suleiman's interview Tuesday
evening was a tough warning to
protesters that their continued
demonstrations would not be toler-
ated for a long time and that they
must get behind his program for
reform. The U.S. has given a
strong endorsement to Suleiman's
efforts but insists it want to see real
changes. Vice President Joe Biden
spoke by phone with Suleiman on
Tuesday, saying Washington
wants Egypt to immediately
rescind emergency laws that give
broad powers to security forces -
a key demand of the protesters.
Officials have made a series of
pledges not ,to attack, harass or
arrest the activists in recent days.
But Suleiman's comments sug-
gested that won't last forever.
"We can't bear this for a long
time," he ,said of the Tahrir
protests. "There must be an end to
this crisis as soon as possible." He
said the regime wants to resolve
the crisis through dialogue, warn-
ing: "We don't want to deal with
Egyptian society with police
tools."


Berlusconi: Sex trial aims to discredit my rule


BY ALESSANDRA RIZZO
AND COLLEEN BARRY
ASSOCIATED PRESS
MILAN Premier Silvio
Berlusconi faced the most seri-
ous challenge yet to his grip on
power as Italian prosecutors
sought to put him on trial in a
seamy prostitution scandal
involving a 17-year-old
Moroccan girl that has both titil-
lated and divided the nation.
The prosecutors filed a
request Wednesday for
Berlusconi to be tried quickly in
Milan, on charges the 74-year-
old leader had sex with the girl
and then tried to cover it up by
using his power.
Moments later, speaking in
Rome, Berlusconi accused them
of seeking to topple his govem-
ment, saying they had "offended
the dignity of the country" with
a smear campaign and ground-
less allegations.
Though Berlusconi is no
stranger to legal cases, this is the
first judicial action against the
three-time premier and media
billionaire to impugn his person-
al conduct, rather than his busi-
ness dealings. The case raises
questions about Berlusconi's
ability to govern effectively
under mounting legal pressure,
and comes at a time when he has
been weakened by a fight with
an ex-ally.
The scandal has splashed
salacious details and allegations
of wild, sex-fueled parties at his
villas across newspaper front
pages for weeks and drawn the
ire of the Catholic Church. Still,
polls suggest the damage to
Berlusconi has been limited and
his supporters remain as devout
as ever in a sign of Italy's politi-
cal polarization.


NATO offers

troops after
Mideast

peace deal
THE- ASSOCIATED PRESS

HERZLIYA, Israel -
NATO would offer peace-
keeping services to Israelis
and Palestinians if both par-
ties request it in a peace deal,
the alliance's secretary gen-
eral said Wednesday
Anders Fogh Rasmussen
said NATO would intervene
if a future peace treaty was
broken or if the two sides
needed assistance.
Until then, NATO would
"not (become) involved in
the Mideast peace process
and is not seeking a role in
it," Rasmussen said.
The NATO leader spoke at
an annual security confer-
ence in the Israeli city of
Ij Herzliya, north of Tel Aviv.


"His popularity is down,
but not out," said political
analyst Roberto D'Alimonte,
a professor of political sci-
ence at Rome's LUISS uni-
versity. "One of the main rea-
sons is a lack of clear alterna-
tive. On the other side, there
is not a single credible coali-
tion, there is not a single
credible leader and not a sin-
gle credible program."
A judge now must decide
whether to dismiss the pros-
ecutors' request or go ahead
with a trial which would
add to the premier's already
substantial legal worries. A
decision is expected within
two weeks, just as two unre-
lated trials and one prelimi-
nary legal hearing are about
to resume in Milan. These
corruption trials are resum-
ing after Italy's
Constitutional Court
watered down a law that had
briefly shielded the premier.
The prosecutors assert
that Berlusconi paid for sex
with the girl, nicknamed
Ruby, who has since turned
18, then used his influence
to get her out of police cus-
tody when she was detained
for the unrelated suspected
theft of 3,000 ($4,103).
They say Berlusconi
allegedly feared her relation-
ship to him would be
revealed. Ruby was released
into the custody of a
Berlusconi aide, who also is
under investigation with two
other confidantes.
Paying for sex with a
prostitute is not a crime in
Italy, but it is if the prostitute'
is younger than 18. The age
limit was raised up from 16
in 2006 during a campaign
against underage prostitu-
tion by a previous
Berlusconi government.


Italian premier Silvio Berlusconi talks to journalists dur-
ing a press conference following a cabinet meeting at
Rome's Chigi palace, Wednesday, Feb. 9. Italian
prosecutors requested Wednesday that Premier Silvio
Berlusconi. stand trial over accusations he paid for sex
with a 17-year-old Moroccan and then used his influ-
ence to try to cover it up. AP Photo/Pier Paolo Cito


Prosecutors are seeking
an immediate trial a sped-
up procedure that would
skip the preliminary hearing
- because they believe they
have sufficient evidence
against the premier. They
have forwarded a 782-page
document to Judge Christina
Di Censo to back up their
indictment request.
A defiant Berlusconi held
a press conference
Wednesday to announce
new measures aimed at
boosting Italy's moribund
economy but also answered
a question about the prostitu-
tion case.
"It's shameful, really,"
Berlusconi said of the prose-
.cutors' move. "It's shameful
and disgusting."
"I wonder who's going to
pay for these activities,
which, in my humble view,
only have a subversive aim,"
Berlusconi added.


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THURSDAY


Big third spurs Sneads past Graceville, 66-54


BY DUSTIN KENT
FLORIDAN SPORTS EDITOR
The Sneads Pirates ended
the Graceville Tigers' season
Tuesday night in Bonifay,
using a big third period per-
formance to take a 66-54 win
in the quarterfinals of the
District 2-2A tournament.
Graceville led 27-25 at the
half, but the Pirates dominat-
ed the third quarter 22-11 to
move ahead by 10 points at
47-37.
After the Tigers pulled to
within nine early in the fourth
quarter, Sneads proceeded to
push the lead up to 15 points,
and kept it at double figures
the rest of the way.
John Whittington led the
Pirates with 16 points, with
Daryll Johnson adding 15,
and Josh Rogers 12, all com-
ing in the second half.
"We were a little sluggish
in the first half. I didn't think
we played well," Sneads


coach Kelvin Johnson said
after the game. "We were
standing around a little bit on
offense, but I thought we real-
ly picked it up in the second
half. I was proud of the boys.
We've been up 8, .10 points
two or three times this year
and squandered the lead. This,
time, we didn't give it up, and
we kept adding on to it."
Graceville got 17 points
from Marquise White, with
Jacky Miles adding 15, and
Kevin Potts 11.
Potts came in as the leading
scorer for the Tigers, and the
Sneads coach said that keep-
ing him under wraps was a
key component of an overall
solid defensive effort.
"We were really focused on
keeping Potts from scoring,
and we did a pretty good job
of that," Johnson said. "I
thought our defense was a
key in the second half. We did
a good job of limiting them to
one shot, and keeping a hand


in the face of their shooters."
The Tigers' season ends at
a disappointing 9-16, with
coach Thomas Register say-
ing his team's inconsistency
simply caught up to it.
"We came out flat in the
third quarter," the coach said.
"We lost our man defensively
several times, didn't rebound,
couldn't finish ... we dug
ourselves a hole that we
couldn't dig out. We weren't
stopping the ball. They pene-
trated all the way to the 'bas-
ket, and we had no one com-
ing over to help. We had two
keys to win the game, and
that was one, stopping pene-
tration. We just had some
mental lapses that you can't
have in a big game like that."
Sneads will next take on
the top-seeded Holmes
County Blue Devils on
Friday night in the district
semifinals at 7:30 p.m.
The championship game
will be Saturday at 7 p.m.


Sneads' Daryll Johnson breaks past Graceville defenders during the District
2-2A tournament in Bonifay on Tuesday night. Mark Skinner/Floridan


Unanswered questions


Tigers face
long road back
to playoffs

BY DUSTINKENT
FLORIDAN SPORTS EDITOR
The Malone Tigers saw
their run of three straight
district championships
come to an end in 2010, and
they'll have plenty of work
to do to get back to a place
of league prominence in
2011.
Malone finished 14-10
last season, losing to
Munroe in the District 2-1A
tournament to be knocked
out of the playoffr-for-the
first time since 2005.
The Tigers lost three key
seniors from that team in
second baseman Jeffrey
Pittman, catcher Blake
Henson, and pitcher Will
Dunnaway.
With those players gone,
others still playing basket-
ball, and a pair of other
returnees nursing injuries,
the Tigers and coach Max
Harkrider have found
preparation for the new sea-
son to be more than a small
challenge.
"I really don't know what
we've got yet because we
haven't had much practice,"
the coach said. "We've had
guys hurt, guys sick, we've
been dodging the rain ...
it's a mess. We've been
behind. It could be pretty
ugly early. We have to get it
figured out soon and get
some chemistry going."
Malone does return six
regulars from last year's
team, led by senior ace
Derek Orshall, who was
dominant as a sophomore in
2009 before battling nag-
ging injury issues last sea-
son.
The big lefty still finished
with a 6-1 record and a 1.79
Earned Run Average last
season, while also batting
.317 at the plate.
"Orshall is obviously a
big part of everything,"
Harkrider said. "He's the
No. 1 pitcher and our best
hitter. We're going to have
to count on him to have a
big year, especially with
him being a senior. He'll be
our go-to guy."


...... -w





- Mark Skinner/Floridan


Pittman and Henson were
the two leading hitters for
the Tigers last season, com-
bining for 50 hits and 28
RBI, with Henson adding a
team best four home runs.
No other Malone hitter
hit over .300 'last year, and
the Tigers will have to
depend on mostly under-
classmen to step up and fill
the production void offen-
sively.
"We'll be real young,"
Harkrider said. "Some of
these younger guys from
last year will be hitting up
in the order this year. It will
be a wait and see approach.


I've honestly got no clue
about the batting order yet,
so we've got to get that fig-
ured out."
The only thing that's cer-
tain is that Orshall will bat
third. Everything after that
is still to be decided, with
junior Nick Breeden, soph-
omore Hunter Dillard, and
freshmen Jonathan Sikes
and Robert Orshall all can-
didates to hit up in the order.
"It will be real fluid,"
Harkrider said of the lineup.
"We'll mix it up until we
find a combination that
works."
With offense still a mys-


tery, the Tigers will have to
rely on pitching and defense
to win games, just as it often
did last season.
"With Derek on the
mound, we'll be OK, and I
think we'll be OK defen-
sively," Harkrider said. "I
just don't know how we're
going to score. We're not
going to score eight or nine
runs per game. We'll have
to pitch and play defense,
play some small ball, move
runners around, and hope
other teams make mis-
takes."
See TIGERS, Page 6B


Grand Ridge girls take two over Malone


BY SHELIA MADER
FLORIDAN CORRESPONDENT
The Grand Ridge Lady
Indians picked up their first
win of the season Tuesday
afternoon on the road
against county rival Malone.
The 'A' team won handily
16-1 against a very young
Malone team, while the 'B'
team picked up a 10-2 victo-
ry.
In game one, Brooke
Williams got the nod in the
circle for the Lady Indians,
going two innings, facing
six batters with four strike-
outs, no hits, and no walks.


Lindsey Eubanks closed
out the game, facing six bat-
ters, allowing two hits, two
walks, with one run scored.
Alisha Jackson scored the
lone Lady Tigers run when
she drew a walk and scored
on a single by Sabra
Cullifer.
Caroline Floyd picked up
the other hit for Malone.
For Grand Ridge,
Williams was 2 for 2 with
two walks and three runs
scored, followed by Emily
Edge, who was 2 for 3 with
two runs scored.
Lindsey Eubanks was 3
for 4 with three runs scored,


while Casey Grover drew a
walk, reached on an error,
and scored twice.
Kailee Cain was 1 for 2
with a run scored, while
Brandi Walton was 1 for 3
with two runs scored.
* Christin Suber reached on
an error and drew a walk,
scoring one run, followed by
Cara Pyke, who drew a pair
of walks and scored twice.
In 'B' team action,
Makayla Durden started in
the circle for the Lady
Indians, giving up two runs
in the first inning before
being relieved by Bailee
Childs in the second to close


out the game.
Childs went three innings,
gave up no runs, one hit, and
fanned five.
Following the game,
Grand Ridge coach Tony
Gurganus praised his team's
effort.
"Our hitting was really
impressive," he said. "Out of
30 at-bats, we only had three
strikeouts. I'm really proud
of the girls."
Grand Ridge will travel to
Graceville today to take on
the Lady Tigers, while
Malone will take their game
on the road to Graceville
Feb. 15.


Lady Tigers hope

for home cooking


against Baker


BY DUSTIN KENT
FLORIDAN SPORTS EDITOR
The Graceville Lady
Tigers' playoff run ended
right after it started last sea-
son, falling to Ponce De
Leon 49-45 in the first round
of the 2A playoffs.
Tonight, the Lady Tigers
will look to take the first
step towards a deep tourna-
ment run when they host the
Baker Lady Gators at 7 p.m.


Graceville (21-5) made it
to the regional finals two
years igo before being
knocked out by FAMU 62-
52 in Tallahassee.
The Lady Tigers played
the first two games that
postseason at home, and
they're hoping that being
back in their home gym will
make the difference this sea-
son.
See HOME, Page 6B >


Graceville's Mychea Williams heads down court
against Holmes County in the District 2-2A champi-
onship game in Grand Ridge Saturday night. -
Mark Sldnner/Floridan




Malone mauls


Aucilla, gets


set for FAMU


BY DUSTINKENT
FLORIDAN SPORTS EDITOR
The Malone Tigers
coasted past Aucilla
Christian 55-20 on Tuesday
night in Quincy in the
semifinals .of the District 2-
1A tournament.
The Tigers started slow,
leading only 8-4 after one
period.
But the tournament's No.
2 seed kicked it into high
gear in the second quarter,
out-scoring the Warriors
17-4 to go up 25-8 at the
half, then winning the third
'period 22-4 to build a 35-
point advantage.
"In the first quarter, we
had a slow start. We missed
some. easy ones, and they
made some easy ones,"
Tigers coach Steven Welch
said. "Being 8-4 at the end
of the first quarter makes
you think about some
things, but we loosened up
and put them away."
Ty Baker led Malone
with 11 points, with Austin
Williams and Marcus
Leonard adding 10 each,
Chai Baker nine, and


Antwain Johnson seven.
The win sets' up a
rematch of last year's
championship game
against the FAMU Baby
Rattlers on Friday at 7 p.m.
FAMU defeated Malone
for last season's district
title, and the two teams
split their regular season
match-ups this year, each
winning on the other's
home court.
"I think it's a battle of
two pretty evenly matched
teams," Welch said. "Both
games (in the regular sea-
son) came down to the
wire. They're long, strong,
athletic, and they've got a
bunch of seniors. I think we
shoot it a little better than
they do, but maybe they're
a little quicker. I anticipate
it being a really good one."
Malone swept the two
regular season meetings
before last year's title
game. However, Welch said
that after losing to the Baby
Rattlers in two of the last
three meetings, FAMU is
not sneaking up on anyone.

See MALONE, Page 6B OL


SPORTS









-2B Thursday, February 10, 2011 Jackson County Floridan


ENTERTAINMENT


PEANUTS BY CHARLES SCHULTZ


BORN LOSER BY ART AND CHIP SANSOM
REG615 PIL61N 15 SE\ETY- R ROPE I'A. STILLGOI0G5TRON6
[ NMINE.? OWI! .RE!'5 N W REArt Nt'TT A.GE.
so ACTIVE.! .o


WHY, BECAUSE YOU
DON'T LIKE THE
FACT THAT I'M FAT?
WHAT? NO, r
DON'T CARE
ABOUT THAT


01 '-


SOUP TO NUTZ BY RICK STROMOSKI


FRANK & ERNEST BY BOB THAVES


ARLO & JANIS BY JIMMY JOHNSON


ALLEY OOP BY JACK AND CAROLE BENDER


KIT 'N' CARLYLE BY LARRY WRIGHT


HIAT'LMAK.

* VA MOTRE.
IF TAT'6 &000
R 5OAD.


THAT, AND I BET
THEY'RE CHANGING'
THE LOCKS, TOO.
THANKS.(2^


HERMAN BY JIM UNGER


"He's not very sociable."


NEA Crossword Puzzle


ACROSS
1 Zoo heavy-
weight
6 Narrow fis-
sure
10 Aloud
12 Naturally
bright
14 Ten Roman
soldiers
15 Coveted
awards
16 Population
survey
18 Elf-sized
19 Dregs
21 Sheet-mu-
sic symbol
23 "Bali -"
24 Reception
26 Tex-Mex
snack
29 Longish skirt
31 Country
addr.
33 Kapow!
35 Two-color
cookie
36 Windhoek's
cont.
37 Vintage ve-
hicle
38 Trounce
40 Popeye's
Olive -
42 Shriner's
hat


43 Apply caulk
45 Switch posi-
tions
47 Mouse
catcher
50 Infer
52 More
diluted
54 Hurt
58 The Great
Caruso
59 Paper fas-
tener
60 Cool and
damp
61 Illinois town
DOWN
1 Mortar
trough
2 Vexation
3 Snow boot
4 Put
5 Most
ancient
6 Kind of
potato
7 Financial
mag
8 Defect
9 Become
fatigued
11 Itch
12 Kind of
mate
13 Mao--
tung


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com .I


2-10 2011 by UFS, Inc.



CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: G equals C
"KR'M KPTNHRCSR RN RCZA CYNOR
ZNJKSX FNOHMLZD CSE ZNNAKSX CR
FNOH RHCXLEKLM CSE RVL MRODD
RVCR PCALM FNO XHNI." CSSL
VL G V L
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "I am ... a mushroom; on whom the dew of heaven
drops now and then." John Ford
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 2-10


Answer to Previous Puzzle






P17 Mural 39 AdornF Y

19 Landowner dynamicES


25 Baseball DE










husks 55 Auto-stick-
32 Not rainyWS RES


34 Peaintiumer's 41 Pinpoint
frameas. 44 Prefix for


Stuck in so-called marriage


Dear Annie: I am 26 and have been living
with my "husband" for a year. We had a reli-
gious ceremony, but didn't file the legal
paperwork. Now I realize it was a huge mis-
take. I desperately want out of this so-called
marriage.
"Justin" lied about completing his college
education and was unemployed for the first
six months we were together. He told me he
was applying for jobs, but in n
reality, he spent his days playing
video games and eating junk"
food. Justin finally found part-
time minimum-wage *
employment, but I still do the L ~.1,- e
cleaning, bill-paying and
cooking despite working 50
hours a week compared to his
20. I have asked, begged and -
nagged him to help more, but he refuses
to lift a finger. When I insist, he whines
and takes an hour to do a 20-minute task.
Justin suffers from depression.
Whenever I bring up the idea of an amica-\
ble separation, he either becomes enraged
and throws the furniture, or dissolves into a
sobbing mess and threatens suicide. I, too,
have fought and won my own battle with
depression through therapy, medication and a
wonderful support network. I feel the need to


provide a stable environment for Justin, but
he refuses to seek treatment.
If I leave him, I am terrified he will harm
himself. Justin's parents are less than sympa-
thetic, and he cannot support himself. I have
moved into the second bedroom, and we
haven't haa sex for months. Justin insists we
are married and everything is fine. Our
friends and family have no clue that it's not
legal and our relationship is in shambles. We
live in a small religious community.
> A messy breakup could cost me
\ / my career. Please help. -
Cornered in Kansas
S Dear Kansas: As much as you
want to help Justin, you are not
responsible for his mental health
or his unwillingness to seek treat-
S \ment. At some point, his depend-
, \ ence is self-destructive to both of
you. You could tell him you will
consider staying if he gets ther-
apy immediately. But also talk to
your local clergyperson about your "mar-
riage." Kansas recognizes common-law mar-
riages, and you could, in fact, be legally
bound to Justin. If walking out is not possible,
you may need to file the legal paperwork and
then get an actual divorce or have the mar-
riage annulled.


BRIDGE


Michael Crichton, who was best known as an
author of science fiction, medical fiction and
thrillers, said, "I am certain there is too much
certainty in the world."
At the bridge table, I am certain it is best to
find a line of play or defense that is a certainty.
Can you see one here? You are in six
spades. West leads the heart seven.
East's opening bid showed a good seven-
card suit and some 6-10 high-card points. You
might have overcalled thrpe no-trump, expect-
ing to be able to keep East out of the game by
holding up your heart ace. But bidding your
good suit could not be considered an error.
Here it hit a big fit with partner, who used two
doses of Blackwood before signing off in six
spades.
A good line is to draw the missing trump, ruff
a heart in the dummy, cash the club ace, play a
club to your king, ruff your last heart, cash the
diamond ace, lead a trump to your hand, and
play a diamond to dummy's queen. Here,
though, East would win with his king and return
his last diamond down one.
However, there is a certainty. After drawing
the trump, ruffing one heart, and cashing the
two club winners, do not ruff your third heart.
Instead, discard the diamond five from the
board. East takes the trick but is endplayed. If
he returns a diamond, it is away from his king
into dummy's ace-queen. And if he leads a
heart or a club, South ruffs in one hand and
sluffs his diamond loser from the other hand.


West
S5
S7 4
* J 10 9
4 QJ 10


North
4 Q 9 8 7
S5
SAQ 5
4 A 7


East
4 -
V K QJ 10 9 6 2
K 8 2
5 2 46 9 4 3
South
SA K J 10 4
A 8 3
S74 3
* K 6


Dealer: East
Vulnerable: Both
South West North East
3V
3 A Pass 4 NT Pass
5 V Pass 5 NT Pass
6 V Pass 6 4 All pass

Opening lead: V 7


www.JCFLORIDAN.com


HOROSCOPE

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) Keep a cool head if you
are being pressured to have
closure on a project you start-
ed. If you move too impulsive-
ly, a mishap is likely that will set
you back even further.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20)
- Don't let the thoughtless
behavior of a friend anger you.
If you realize that everybody
has bad moments at times, you
might be able to get past this
misstep and forgive and forget.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
- Just because somebody
asks, doesn't mean you have to
comply with this person's wish-
es. Don't let anybody pressure
you into loanirtg out something
you hold dear.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
- Making demands on some-
one else's time or property
could put you in a bad light
with those who have to work
with you. You might get what
you want now, but at what
price?
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
- Before losing your temper
with someone, make sure it
isn't your own behavior that is
out of line. It will only make you
look worse if blow over selfish-
ly wanting your own way.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
- Don't feel compelled to
respond to questions that are
too personal or none of any-
body's business. Just because
a friend is curious is not a good
enough reason to comply.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -
Strive to keep your wits about
you in all of your one-on-one
dealings with others, especially
if you have to deal with some-
one who is unduly hostile or
argumentative.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
- The least thing you should
expect is automatic compliance
if you are too bossy or dictato-
rial with any of your to-work-
ers. If you want a favor, ask
nicely.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -
Be careful not to get drawn into
the thoughtless actions of a
friend. This person could draw
you into a situation where you'll
be held equally accountable for
his/her reckless behavior.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22)
- Stick-to-itiveness is essen-
tial if you hope to be successful
in what you attempt to do. If
you're not prepared to follow
things through to the finish,
don't start the project.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec.
21) Be particularly attentive
to any task you take on, espe-
cially those you consider to be
routine. If you're mind is not on
what you're doing, you could
easily have a mishap.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) Unless you closely mon-
itor your financial affairs or the
handling of a prized posses-
sion, a mishap could occur
when you're not looking.
Protect what is yours.


MONTY BY JIM MEDDICK


02-10-11
6 3 2








CLASSIFIED


www..ICFLORIDAN.com


Jackson County Floridan Thursday, February 10, 2011- 3 B


WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED





ARKETPLA


BY PHONE: (850) 526-3614 or (800) 779-2557 BY MAIL: WIREGRASS CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE
BY FAX: (850) 779-2557 P.O. BOX 520, MARIANNA, FL 32447
ONLINE: WWW.JCFLORIDAN.COM IN PERSON: 4403 CONSTITUTION LANE, MARIANNA
Publication Policy Errors and Omissions: Advertisers should check their ad the first day. This publication shall not be liable for failure to publish an ad or for a typographic error or errors in publication except to the extent of the cost of the ad for the first day's
insertion. Adjustment for errors is limited to the cost of that portion of the ad wherein the error occurred. The advertiser agrees that the publisher shall not be liable for damages arising out of errors in advertisements beyond the amount paid for the space
actually occupied by that portion of the advertisement in which the error occurred, whether such error is due to negligence of the publisher's employees or otherwise and there shall be no liability for non-insertion of any advertisement beyond the amount paid for
such advertisement. Display Ads are not guaranteed position. All advertising is subject to approval. Right is reserved to edit, reject, cancel or classify all ads under the appropriate classification.


i MERCHANDISE'


V Diamond Cluster PendAnt, 1KT, Tear Drop V
Shaped on 18 inch gold chain. Paid $999 new
at Kay's, Will Sell For $600 cash firm.
Serious Inquiries Only. Call 334-790-4892
Wanted: Old Coins, Gold, Diamonds, Guns, And
Tools West Main Jewelry & Loan 334-671-1440


WANTED TO BUY Silver or Gold Coins no later
than 1964, or Coin Collections. 850-200-6665
DO 11114







PETS & ANIMALS


S'~ Beautiful 8 week old AKC
Champion Sired Bulldog.
brindle/white male. Show
A prospect. Pup comes with
S, a pedigree of 40 cham-
i pions in 5 generations. Se-
rious inquiries only. 334-
572-4292 or 334-488-0745..ask for Jennifer.
DO 110602
FOUND: Small black & white dog near Sea Shut-
ters on Hwy 71 call 850-526-1940
Rescued dogs for very loving home-
lab mixes, terriers, pit-bulls, great dane
mixes and more. All need responsible and
loving pet owners. Call 334-791-7312
Schutzhund titled,KKL show ring pedigree pup-
pies for sale 1 male $900,1 female $900 .AKC
registered with health certificates,please call
Ben Yates 850-596-2361 or e-mail
ben@yatesgermanshepherds.com DO 11119
Shih-tzu puppies, two boys, one girl. Girl is
black and white, males are brown and white.
$250 cash only. Puppies were born Jan. 16th.
Will be available in 10 weeks. [March 27th].
Please call in advance. 334-714-5600. Mother is
brown and white. Father is black and white. DO
11110
Toy/Mini Aussie Puppies have 1st shots and
wormed. Red Tri and red merles. Registered.
Email for further details, (229) 891-3530 or
ephilyaw7@windstream.net. DO 11098[
P Valentines Babies Are Ready! t
Pomeranians Shih-apoo, Chorkie, Morkie,
Chinese Crested Powder Puffs and Malti-poos.
Now Taking deposits on Yorkies 334-718-4886


"' ;aw i 17yo trained/shown
Jt youth/adult western
t Vl pleasure 'english 'trail
i horse, no special needs/
C.hi. e-s. . .-.- feed, no health issues,
15'1 hands, Doc O'Lena
granddaughter, has lots of go left, $2000 obo
334-889-9024 DO 11126
FREE: To good home, 14 month old Donkey, not
kid friendly 334-695-7354 leave message

' FARMER'S MARKET


Peanut Hay, large rolls, barn kept and
wrapped. $35-$40 per roll. 850-209-5694
850-209-1580 DO 11067

$ EMPLOYMENT
-AF





Looking for a high-energy ,responsible
detail oriented individual for a career
in an optometric practice. Duties include
frame styling and counseling patients on
their optical needs. Training provided.
Excellent people and PC skills
required Mail resume to: Jackson County
Floridan,P.O.Box 520, ATTN: Box 967,
Marianna, FL 32447. EOE


Want Your Ad

To Stand Out?

Use An Attractor

Or Use Bold Print

In Your Ad


Local Sales Manager
WRBL-TV, the CBS affiliate in Columbus,
GA is looking for a local Sales Manager
to manage, train and motivate a staff of ac-
count executives in order to meet or exceed
local revenue goals. Successful candidates
should be dynamic leaders with a minimum
of three (3) years television sales experi-
ence (preferably in management), including
some rep firm experience. This position will
be involved in all aspects of the sales opera-
tion with an emphasis on new business
development. Must be highly organized,
with excellent communication skills and a
working knowledge of Matrix, IBMS (Pilat)
and Sharebuilder.
Please apply online or
send resume and references to:
WRBL-TV Human Resources,
1350 13th Avenue, Columbus, GA 31901
or email to lthomas@alsmg.com.
Please mention "Local Sales Manager"
on any submission. EOE M/F/D/V
Pre-employment drug test and background
screening required. e-Verify is used upon
hire to confirm eligibility for employment in
the U.S.

)-, RESIDENTIAL
i,_jj REAL ESTATE FOR RENT


1/1 Furnished Effiency Apartment near 1-10.
Swimming pool available, carport. NO PETS/
SMOKING $425 850-544-0440, Iv msg


1/1 & 2/1 apartments in town, $450 per month.No
pets. 850-573-0598
2BR/2BA TOWNHOUSES
Chipola River Townhouses
DEPOSIT WAIVED
4 850-482-1050 -


2/2 cabin style house in Cottondale with office,
large wrap around deck $700/month 850-209-
7502
3/1 Home for rent, 6 miles S. of Marianna, stove
& fridge, $635 + deposit 407-443-9639
Austin Tyler & Associates *
Quality Homes & Apartments
850- 526-3355 4-
"Property Management Is Our ONLY Business"
Brick 4 BR rural home Graceville, Bonifay,
Chipley area $600/m6. Realty Exchange 954-
366-1230/561-702-6543.
For Rent 3BR 2B home on .65 acres in Dellwood
on Blue Springs Rd, newer carpet and
paint,nice appliances,carport and back
patio,nice shaded yards and plenty of room for
kids $650/mo and $500 deposit, 1 yr lease. Call
718-6019
Huge 7/4 Home for rent in Marianna, 2 kitch-
ens, 2 dining rooms, 3 living rooms, plenty of
storage, will consider separating into individual
apartments. 850-544-0440
Near College 3BR/2BA CH/A, 4345 Seventh Ave
$750 + deposit. 850-526-3538 or 850-209-0480



Roommate Wanted. Furnished room $375 + 1h
utilities. Located in Cottondale 850-209-5550


Thursday, February 10, 2011










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There is only one correct solution
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RESIDENTIAL
S REAL ESTATE FOR RENT

2/1 and 3/2 Mobile Home- in a family oriented park,
water, garbage, lawn care, No Pets 850-592-8129
2/1 in Greenwood, $425 + $400 deposit. CH/A,
water/garbage/lawn included. 850-569-1015
2/2 clean Dbl-wide, no pets or smoking, lyr
lease, family of 3, $500 + dep 850-718-8158
2/2 Mobile Homes in Marianna, No pets, secur-
ity and references required. $400 & $500 per
month. 850-482-8333
2 & 3 bedroom mobile Homes in Cottondale.
$500 and up. H20, garbage, sewer included.
http:// www.charloscountry living. com.
850-258-4868/209-8847
2&3BRMH's in
Marianna &,Sneads
(850)209-8595.
3/2,2/2 in Cottondale, no pets, CH/A $425-
$500 850-258-1594 leave message
3/2 Double wide on Lake Seminole in Sneads,
$600/mo, water included. 850-526-2183
3/2 Mobile Home on Ham Pond Rd in Sneads
CH/A, lawn care incl. $550 +dep. 850-592-4625
Edgewood Apartments in Cypress Area. Quiet,
Furnished 1BR 1BA.Cable & laundry included.
$440/mo + deposit. 4 850-209-13514
Large 3/2 $550/month. Quiet, well maintained.
water/sewer/ garbage/ lawn included.
Monthly RV Lots $200+elec.
m- Joyce Riley RE 850-209-7825
Rent to Own: 2 & 3BR Mobile Homes.
Lot rent included. For details
850-557-3432 or 850-814-6515

RECREATION


ATV Yamaha '09 Grissley 350, 4x4, camo, new
condition, adult owned, new price $6000. sell
for $4500. 334-441-5580 DO 11129
Honda '02 XR250R Dirt Bike. Excellent condition
$2200 Firm. Please Call 8PM-11PM 334-684-9129
Honda '07 Rancher ATV TRX-420TM 4-speed,
hunter green. Low hours. Like new condition.
$3,100. 334-796-0056 or 334-712-1975
DO 11133


r.. ..... ""............ "'
2010 Mazda3 Rims and
S j Tires- 4 stock rims and
tires, great condition,
PRICE TO SELL!!
$100 OBO
d 1"b Call 334-333-1380 or
f 334-432-5334

2 pieces of round glass tabletop, 1/2" thick by 5
feet with beveled edge, $350 each 850-593-5361
2 Sets of full size bed railings $35 each
850-272-4305 serious inquiries only
357 Magnum Rossi- snub nose revolver, nice
shape, works great $400 Call 850-569-2194
Antique Piano- beautifully made JF Corl
upright, good condition, $400 OBO 850-209-0096
Coffee & Tea Set, 7 piece, Sterling Silver, $250
850-573-5997


Honda'08 TRX250 4-wheeler Red. Excellent
condition. New cost $4,399. Will sell $2,500.
334-798-2337
Honda 2007 TRX 90 Youth 4 wheeler.
Almost New! Elec. Start, Red, Low hrs,
Garage Kept. $ 1,500. OBO. 334-796-3721
Honda '97 TRX90 4-wheeler Like New Cond.
$1300. 334-792-8018 DO 11023
Kawasaki '08 Kfx 90 ATV Kid's model 36345
(334)726-2168 jqwcpa@live.com $1500.00
Polaris 500, '06 4x4 Automatic, low hours &
miles, $4,200. 850-482-8717.
Yamaha '04 Bruin- 4wd, extra low hours, cam
ouflage. $4,000. Call 334-795-6743
Yamaha '08 Grizzly 700 ATV- Red, chrome rims,
wench, stereo, only 200 hours, power steering
must see!! $6000. Call 334-726-4361 DO 11052


16 FT GLASS STREAM BOAT 28HP Johnson,
trolling motor, depth finder $2,300. Call
334-232-4610
24' Pontoon Boat '95- Runs great, $7,500 OBO
Call 850-573-1920
y **'. Bass Tracker '09 Pro 160
; .--. 16 Ift. 30HP Mercury with
i -. power trni. trolling motor,
depth and fish finder, only 5
ours or motor. Is in like
new condition. $8,300. Call 334-493-7700
Chinew- 14 ft. with 4HP motor and new trailer.
Excellent condition, $1,450. 334-596-1738
Cruise Master LE, '05, 36ft workhorse chassis
8.1 gas engine, 22k mi., no smk, 7kw gen. 3 sl,
SAT, 2 TV, 2 A/C, auto leveling, R cam.
Roadmaster tow/brake system, '05 Jeep
Wrangler Unlimited, 41k mi, Auto air, 6 cyl,
,$75k w/jeep, $60k without jeep, both in great
cond. selling due to health. 850-352-2810 DO
10984
Fisher '01 Hawk- 18 'ft Class 2, with 115 Mercu
ry outboard motor with trailer, 2 fish finders,
trolling motor, access ladder, Bemini, AM/FM
radio, on board charge, cover, very well kept in-
door shelter. $14,000. Call 334-685-7319
Gheenoe Camo 13' with trailer 2HP motor. 32 #
thrust trolling motor. $1,500 Firm. 334-793-3432
Night: 334-677-5606


Full size bed with mattress & box springs, $50
850-272-4305 serious inquiries only
Full size mattress $10. 850-272-4305 serious
inquiries only
HP 6005 Desktop w/22"LCD mon. Great for
work/gaming. $500.Call for specs.334-790-5981.
Large Dog House, Any Color, Shingle Roof,
L Will Deliver. $120,334-794-5780
Pistol- taurus 9m 92AF, $300 (850)352-2553
Porch/Lawn Swing With Chains,
L Will Deliver. $80 334-794-5780 -
Refrigerator, good shape $200 OBO 850-557-
3404
Washer and Dryer, Fridgidaire, good condition
$300 for both 850-557-3404


Wood Frame Sofa/Chair $125. Large Desk
w/side arm, $100. 482-6600


G@ '0







---(Z)--





0 D@@ @




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--- --- ---- I --- --- ---- I










4 A Thursday February 10 2 y Floridan


CLASSIFIED


www.JCFLORIDAN.com


Sailboat 76-Catalina 30', 2
.-_ ..8.ey cycle Yarmar diesel engine.
Very low hours; less than
Jm- .250. Roller furling, bimin,
head, micro, fridge. Good
condition Docked @ Snug
Harbor slip B-6.334- 673-0330. REDUCED to $12K
Seacraft, '89,20 ft- Center
-- 1 console. '95 225HP Johnson,
Sdual a\le trailer w/brakes.
Great condition, very clean.
$5,500.334-791-4891 DO 11020
Seado RXP '05 ,Jet Ski, 60 hrs. Very clean, life
jacket and cover included. $5,500. 850-527-4455
STRATOS '00 22FT Tournament Ready, 225 HP
motor. Kept inside, $11,900 Must see! Call 229-
321-9047
Stratos '95 285 Pro XL- Dual console. Johnson
Fastrike 175 2 depth finders, GPS, deck exten-
sion $6,000. Call 334- 671-9770
Yamaha '08 G3 Eagle Bass Boat- 175PF, 17ft '08
trailer, 75 HP motor. Still under warranty til
April, used only 4x, very low hours. Paid $17,900
new and asking $8000 Firm Call 334-588-0333
Do11103


2006 Wildcat 5th Wheel Super Slid e, 2 Bed-
rooms, 4 Bunks, Lots of storage, Excellent con-
dition. $19,500 Call 334-792-1109 DO 11032
27 ft. Jayco 08' only used 1 time. NEW, large
slide out, large shower by it's self.cable hook-
up, lots of extras. $10,500. 334-393-1558
Copper Canyon '07 34' 5th
wheel, excellent cond. rear
".*... _, living room. 2-slides,
awning,cabinets galore,
dinette, kitchenette, large.
bedroom, private bath,
super deal to serious buyer.334-792-0010 or
805-0859
Dutchman '02 5th Wheel- 2 slides, like new,'
many extra, $16,000 Call 334-794-4917 DO 11027
Dutchmen 40 ft. Travel Trailer
S'06, 38B-DSL, Sleeps 8, has 2
S'A i slideouts. Loaded, Like new.
,. pL. i $18.750. Call 334-406-4555

FLEETWOOD'05 Prowler AX6, 5th wh, 36ft, 4
slides, large shower, 30/50AMP. $24,000 OBO
334-695-4995, 334-687-7862 DO 11065
Fourwinds '06,30' Travel trailer Double slide-
out 2BR, microwave, stereo, CH&A., Loaded.
Like new. Must sell immediately, $11,500 OBO.
Cell: 585-269-0244
Jayco '08 Flight 27' with super slide, large bath,
used 2 times, $10,500. 850-482-8717
.- 5JAYCO '09 35 ft., Like New, 2
t *, slides, 27" flat TV, loaded,
very nice, $19,000. 334-687-
3606, 334-695-1464.DO10976
Sunny Brook 5th wheel '02 2750SL 28' w/slide
out. Q-bed, Like New, kepted under shelter
compare to showrm. price $30K, Will sell $12K
334-447-5001


if


Trail -Lite '02 RV Class B,
Like New, 23K miles, Easy
Sto drive and Easy to park.
1$21,500. 4 334-791-5235
S DO 11145


Allegro '99 Bay with 330
Cummins on a Freightliner
Nr Chlassey 38" Superslide,
Weatherpro awnings,
in-motion sattelite, duel
ducted air, new hardwood
floors, new tires, 54k miles $47,500 Call Scott
334-685-1070 DO 11022
Concord Coachman '05 Motor Home- 23' long
2700 miles. Take over payments. 850-593-5103

Dixie RV SuperStores
FL's Newest RV Dealer
NOW OPEN!!!
*Store Hours*
Monday-Saturday
8:00am-6:00pm

21 Acres / 30 Brands New and Pre-Owned

Newmar Keystone Heartland Jayco
Fleetwood Prime Time n Coachmen
E Forest River

Service Department
Parts and Acces. Store
RV Collision Center

Located off 1-10 Exit 70 / SR285
328 Green Acres Dr.
De Funiak Springs, FL 32435
Sales and Service: 850-951-1000
www.dixierv.com DO 11108
R-VISION 2006 Trail Lite, 26
ft.. fully loaded, like new,
low mileage $35,000 OBO
334-616-6508


nAf TRANSPORTATION



Buick '98 LeSabre (BY OWNER) fow miles,
leather, loaded, new tires, tune-up, new rad.
$3,495 OBO. 850-592-2832 or 693-6835
Chevy '74 Nova. 350 V8. Auto Tranny. California
car. 85% restored. 334-470-7260. $9500 obo. DO
11015
Mercedes 1983- Collector 240D in very good
condition, rare 4-speed manual transition,
very smooth shifting, a dream to drive, a
bargain at $6,800 Call 334-797-4883


1995 Nissan Infinity J30 Replaced motor, good
air/heat, new tires, runs good. $2,295 OBO, 334-
678-4819, DO 11132
,I BMW'96 Convertible
NICE CAR! $6,995.
Call: 334-714-2700



BMW '96 NICE CAR!
Trades Considered! $5,995.
Call: 334-714-2700


Buick '00 LeSabre Limited ,
loaded, 1 owner,
91K miles, LIKE NEW!,
j Priced at $5800.
334-790-7959

Cadillac '05 CTS, loaded 149K miles., reliable
luxary transportation, below nada value at
$ 8995. OBO 334-678-5959 or 334-797-7293
DO 11102
Cadillac '99 Deville white with tan leather
interior, new tires; air & front end. good
condition $3.600. 334-774-5333
Chevy '08 Impala Excellent Condition Loaded
128K Mi. 1-Owner Auto. V6 $12,500 334-237-1039


A FOR6SALE AUTOS F ORSA. LE0UO, FRSAi


Cheverlot '11 Z71 LT- 4x4, 4 door, 1850 miles,
5.3L V8, 6 speed auto, white truck, dark inte-
rior. Make offer Call 334-403-0249 DO 11061
Chevrolet '09 Impala LT- 4 door, power every-
thing, white, excellent condition $12,900.
Call 334-494-0460 DO 11070
P -- Chevrolet 74 El Camino-
Good condition but needs
minor work. $5,500 OBO
334-699-1366 or 797-6925

S -' Chevrolet '85 Camaro V6
; Automatic transmission,
runs good $2750 Call 334-
'" 791-4218 after 3pm or text
any time.
Chevy '04 Impala
RUNS GOOD! Newly Built
~-- Transmission! $3,950
i i Call: 334-714-2700.


Chevy'08 Corvette Convertible, Black, loaded,
excellent condition, garage kept $45,000.
334-692-5624

.. "Chevy 91 S10 Z6- Auto, 20"
Schihrome rims, new tires, AC,
95 $2,800. Call 334-691-2987
or 334 798-1768
Chevy 97 Suburban- great condition, 1500
series, leather $3000. Call 303-906-3683
i Chrysler '06 300C with
Hemni. Custom Paint, Rims,
Sunrool, Rockford Fosgate
Stereo System.
S 334 494-7312 DO 11125
Chrysler '07 PT Cruiser Touring Edition- black
exterior with gray interior, 17k mi, $11,900
Call 334-648-1828 or 334-792-5151 after 5pm
U Corvette '81- Automatic 350
(Silver). Will sell as is for
$4,900. OBO 334-774-1915


Corvette '92 Convertible 121K miles, extra
clean, $9500. 334-671-1430. DO 11091
Corvette '96 Collector Edition Silver, 2 tops,
Bose, 1381 made. Best offer. 334-677-7796
i FORD Mustang '98 GT
Automatic,
NICE CAR! $4,850.
Call: 334-714-2700

S" Dodge '04 Grand Caravan,
H ^ Excellent condition $7300
850-526-2055 or 850-272-
8933 DO 11002

FORD -'03 Mustang GT, 96000 miles, CD,
leather, power locks, power windows. $8,500
334-494-6480
"' Ford 06 F250 diesel king
Ranch Lariet. Leather seats,
-4WD, heated seats. All
power. Low miles. Excellent
condition. Asking $31,900.
obo. 334-393-0343
Ford '10 F150 XLT- 4 doors with all the toys
including tow package, beige with beige and
brown interior, 23k miles, $22,900. 334-494-0460
DO 11071
Sr- FORD '89 F150, 4wh, 4x4
Automatic $4,600 or reason-
able- offer 229-334-8520, or
9A n i 229-296-8171


Ford '98 Explorer
RUNS GOOD!
Priced at $2,195
Call: 334-714-2700
for more info


Honda Civic CLEAN NICE
CAR! RUNS GOOD! $3,495
Call: 334-714-2700.


S_ Pontiac '02 Montana Extend-
l . ed AWD Excellent Condition
Blue, leather interior ,dvd,
tv. Fully loaded $7000
334-796-1602


Hundai '04 Accent GT ,
2 door, Auto, 4 cylinder,
1 owner, 69K miles,
excellent, Priced at $4995.
.-. : Call: 334-790-7959


Jeep 1979 CJ7- rebuilt 304
:. engine, new paint, mild
cam, headers, aluminum
intake 600 Holley Carb.,
-, -- rebuilt transmission, 1 ton
Chevy Axles with 456 Chevy gears in rear with
Detroit locker and Dana 60 in front. Mickey
Thompson 16x12 rims with new 37x12.5 R16,5
LT tires $8,000. 334-266-5248
Land Rover '02 Discovery, Silver. Good condi-
tion, $6,500. Call 334-792-1109 DO 11033
BE! -_19 Lexus '07 RX350 Bamboo
S' pearl color, V6, 4WD, fully
l- loaded, 50k miles. $26,000.
Call 334-333-1824
Lexus '07 RX400 Hybrid- Well kept and fully
loaded, has 62k miles, get 31 City & 27 Hwy
mpg, asking $28,500. 334-308-1112 D011112
Lexus'98 LS400 114K mi.
Gold with tan leather interi-
or heated seats. Excellent
wm"u 0- condition $9,800. 334-333-
3436 or 334-671-3712.
LINCOLN MKS 2009, 4 door, red, 28K miles, Ex-
tra Clean 334-703-1210 DO 11151
Mazda '01 626 LX 158K Mi. Loaded! Pwr every-
thing, cd player, White, tan interior,
$3999. 334-692-4084 334-797-9290 DO 11057
Mazda '06 Miata MX5- Grand Touring Edition,
blue with ground effects, one owner, garage
kept, only 7330 miles, Auto, Bose stereo/CD,
Like new. $15,900. Call 334-393-8864.
Mazda'07 Mazda3- Sunroof, gold, 120k miles,
$9000. Call 334-794-4917 leave message
DO 11026
Mazda '93 Miata convertible, excellent condi-
tion, sports package, fun little car $4500., 334-
699-7270 DO 11124
Mercedes '73 450 SL Convertible (hard/soft
top) $12,000 OBO. 904-368-1153 Leave message
Mercury '05 Grand Marquis LS white, leather
seats, wood dash trim, 170,780 mi. $5500. Call
Polvengineering, Inc. 334-793-4700 ext. 134
Mitsubishi '09 Galant Fully loaded,
Pwr. window, pwr. doorlocks, cruise control
C.D. Great Fuel Mileage, $300 down $250 per
mo. Call Steve Hatcher at 334-791-8243.
DO 11076
^.:. Nissan '05 350Z Convertible
STouring Edition. Auto. Exc.
SCond. $16,500 Pearl White
334-793-3686; 334-790-9431
__-_ '.' ..;' Nissan '05 Z350 Roadster
Convertible. Nice Car!!!
Priced at $16,900. Call for
more information about
extras. 334-714-2700

Nissan '06 Altima SE
,,- SUPER NICE CAR!
PRICED TO SELL!
$10,988.
L^. &^ Call: 334-714-2700

Nissan'06 Maxima, 121Kmi. loaded, leather,
heated seats, sunroof, new tires, excellent con-
dition, $11,500. 791-3081. DO 11029
Nissan 06' Maxima, white, loaded, leather,
moon roof, 86k miles, excellent condition,
$13,300 OBO 850-209-2358 DO 11101
I Nissan '10 Rogue SL Black,
4. excellent tires, power seat,
& windows, 4dr, 2wd, 15K
miles. Excellent condition.
$20,500 OBO. 334-791-6485
Pontiac '07 G-6 GT- convertible, black, 31K
miles, all leather, loaded, garage kept.
$14,000. OBO 334-796-6613
Pontiac '08 G6 SUPER SHARP! LIKE NEW!
$200 down, $229 per month.
Call: Ron Ellis at 334-714-0028. DO 11080
TOYOTA '08 FJ CRUISER with 45000 miles.
Very nice SUV. Like new insie and out. Burgun-
dy exterior with dary gray interior. All standard
power options. All trades accepted. Please call
334-695-0953 OR 334-687-4400. DO 11131
Toyota '09 Corolla, auto transmission, red in
color, loaded. 34 mpg, 58K miles. $13,500.
334-794-2927. DO 11038


Toyota'09 Corolla Sport. Charcoal gray 31k
miles. Warranty. 5-spd. 16" wheels, power
locks, windows, CD, $12,000. 334-475-3370
or 334-464-1709.
Toyota '09 Corolla UNDER WARRANTY!
LIKE NEW! $200 down $249 per month.
Call: Ron Ellis at 334-714-0028. DO 11081
Volkswagen '03 Beetle Convertible Low miles,
Fully Loaded, Great fuel economy $200 down,
$200 per mo. Call Steve Hatcher 334-791-8243.
DO 11077
--'a Volkswagen '05 Beetle
Convertible GLS- 5-speed,
^ a *leather, loaded, only 19K
mile-. E excellent condition.
C $13.900. Call 334-714-4001

,.1.- !-,Mwa T Volkswagen '06 Jetta TDI.
'- Grey w gray leather. Diesel,
sunroof, heated seats,
aluminum wheels, satellite
radio 40 mpg. 120K miles
$11,800 334-685-6233
Wanted Junk- Vehicles top price, I also sell
used parts. Call 334-792-8664


2008 Honda 750 Shadow Spirit Motorcycle. Low
miles. Like new $4,000. Call 334-899-4224
Goldwing '05 1800, Anniv. Edi Metalic Grey, Ga-
rage kept w/ cover, under 20k mi, many acces-
sories. $15K 850-482-7357
Goldwing,'92 60k miles, Red. Excellent paint
and running condition. $7,000. Call 850-445-
2915 leave message
arley 06 Sportser XL-
120(0C. 3940k' mi. 2 seat
creaming eagle, pipes,
windshield $6900
Call 334-393-34163
Harley Davidson '00 Electra Glide, short wind-shield,
solo & stock seats, very dependable, $8,500. 334-774-
2036 or 334-237-0677. DO 11059
Harley Davidson '02 Sportster 1200 custom 11k
miles, chromed out, $6500. Call 334-691-3468
or 334-701-3855
Harley Davidson '06 883 Sportster 18,300 miles
With extras. $4000 334-803-7422 DO 11095
Harley Davidson '06 Sportser 1200, 13,400 miles
detachable windshield & back rest $6,000. 334-
685-3214
---""-2 Harley Davidson '08- Ultra
S- Classic Screaming Eagle An-
niversary Edition. Very low
miles $26900. 334-685-0380

Harley Davidson 1986 FLTC w/ side car. exc.
cond. $10,500. OBO 334-794-2665 or 334-805-
0810
Harley Davidson 1992 Sporster 1200 custom
mid 50's K/KH exc. cond. $5,500. OBO 794-2665
334-805-0810
HONDA '06 Shadow, 2.8 miles, NEW dealer
road tested only, $5,200, 229-334-8520 or
229-296-8171
HONDA '07 CBR, 600, load-
S ed, 4,000 miles,stretch low-
ered. 2 brother exhaust,
$6,000 334-695-5055, 334-
339-2352 DO 11146
Honda '08 Shadow 750.
Excellent condition. Low
miles 5-year service plan
included. $5K OBO
334-701-2329

Honda 1962 C102 super
,,, cub 50,4k miles, Black &
white, good condition,
electric start 3 speed,
1 $2500. Firm. Call noon (M-
F) 334-347-9002
HONDA '98 Valkyrie Tourer all original,
low miles, runs great asking $5,900. OBO 334-
693-5454
Suzuki '05 Boulevard Black/Gray 2,000 miles on
it. Garage Kept. Lots of extras! $3,800. Call 334-
798-4751
Suzuki'08 BLVD S83 1400cc, Black, 1-owner.
Garage kept, helmet and jacket included, 900
miles $5,800. Asking $5000 OBO. 334-718-6338.
Yamaha '05 V-star 650 Silverado, Saddle bags,
windshield, back-rest. 1K mi. Garage kept.
$3,750 OBO. 334-701-7552


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VW '02 Custom made VW
I ~power Trike. All chromed
engine. Custom, one of a
O -K kind paint job and wheels,
Adult ridden. Fire engine
red. 23K miles. New tires, garage kept, custom
cover, AM/FM CB. $19,995. OBO $44,000 invest-
ed. Call 239-410-4224 for more details.
Yamaha '06 R6 Raven Edition Track Ready. Lots
of Extras excellent condition $5500 OBO 334-
432-5800 Call for details
Yamaha '06 YZ250F- excellent mechanical con-
dition, lots of extras runs great but has to go.
$2400 OBO Call 334-432-5800 D011078
YAMAHA'08 V-star 250, Burgundy,
Low miles! Like new!
* REDUCED $2,250. 334-693-5454
Yamaha 2004 V-Star 1100 Classic. Black &
chrome, excellent condition. $4000 OBO
334-618-7525


Mojo '05 Motor Scooter 200mi, Blue, $1650
850- 258-1638
1 an > U.M. 08 250 cc. Seats 2, 2
-2 helmetst. Lg Scooter. 80mi
iy per gallon. 1000mi Fac.
Warranty $2000 OBO.
-a Call 334-445-6302



Eddie Bauer '07 Expedition EL 93K miles, white with tan
trim, leather interior, dvd player, satellite radio, navi-
gation system, 4 bucket seats & 3rd row automatic.
$26.900. 334-797-1855 or 334-797-9290. DO 11057
Ford '02 Explorer Sport Trac- 4 door, V6, 110k
miles, 2 wheel drive, am/fm, cassette, and CD
player, excellent condition $8900. OBO Call 334-
723-4066 after 6PM bailyfam@hotmail.com for
more info D011074
Ford '06 Explorer Limited, leather, 6 change CD,
3rd row seats, V8, chrome wheels, light beige
with tan interior, 50k miles, like new, $16,400
850-814-0155 DO 11109
.M Ford '95 Explorer
EXTRA CLEAN!
NEW TIRES! $2,950
Call: 334 714-2700


GMC '00 Jimmy, great condition, $4,200 OBO
Call 850-526-2491 ask for Tom.
GMC '07 Yukon SLT- white with tan
leather interior, 63k miles $26,500 334-718-6836
Honda '04 CRV LX. Black, Excellent condition
77,800 miles. Power windows. $9,300 Negotia-
ble. Reduced!!! 334-333-2239
Jeep '06 Commander, black in color, 3 seater,
excellent condition, gray interior, back up sen-
sor. 91K miles, $13,000 OBO 334-268-0770.
DO 11051
Jeep '06 Wrangler, both tops, AC, automatic,
loaded, 22K miles $17,000 OBO. 334-726-1530
Jeep '95 Cherokee
Till S NICE CAR!
SDPRICED AT $2,195.
Call: 334-714-2700


Jeep '95 Grand Cherokee
g RUNS GREAT! Trades
Considered $2,950
,- Call: 334-714-2700


Nissan '03 Pathfinder SE, 110,990 miles, V6, 4
wheel drive, black leather interior, Bose 6 CD
changer, $10,900. Call Anthony 334-797-1342.
S". .. Nissan '05 Murano

$10.900 Call: 334-714-2700



Nissan '05 Murano
NICE CAR! MUST SELL!
$10.900 Call: 334-714-2700





Chevrolet '85 K5 Blazer. Fully restored, 450 hp
engine, 411 rear end, 1000K miles since re-
stored. $12,900. 407-353-3629
Chevrolet '99 3500
Service body work truck,
V-8, automatic, 44K miles,
1 owner, Priced at $6500.
Call: 334-790-7959


Chevy '91 Cherokee pickup, lift gate
$1,500. 850-352-4724
Chevy '96 Silverado- 2500 V8, Auto air. Runs
great $2,800 OBO. 334-691-2987_
Dogde Ram '03 1500 regular cab, excellent con-
dition, 92K miles, 4.7 engine, $8,500. OBO 334-
796-8174. DO 11073
Ford '02 FX4 F-150, Black, Chrome Toolbox,
Running Boards, Great Tires and More Extras,
133k Miles, $10,500 OBO 334-618-7502 DO 11153
FORD '02 LARIAT F250 Diesel, Crew Cab,
123K miles $16,000 334-687-9983
Ford '98 F150. Great condition, 165K miles. New
brakes, alternator and battery. Cold air, elec-
tric windows & door locks. $4800 OBO. 334-701-
7552
Ford Tractor 600- New
paint. Runs good, Must Sell,
$3500 334-797-6925

Ford Tractor model# 640 36 Horse power, gas
engine, 95% restored. $3,300. 850-545-9771
Freightliner '01 FL60 Sport Chassis 4-dr.
leather interior, Allison auto transmission,
124K mi. $45,000. 334-791-7152

bunk, Detroit engine.
re-built 2 years ago.
$6,000. 334-691-2987


IH 1440 Combine, Field Ready, Grain Head and
Corn Head. $9,000. OBO 850-415-0438


Chevy '95 Astro Cargd Van 4.3 engine A/C, runs
good, white in color, $2000. 334-718-9617.
DO 11127
GMC '95, Conversion Van. New AC. Runs great.
$2,500. S & M Auto Sales, 850-774-9189 or 850-
774-9186


S. Honda '96 Passport- V6, 5-
:''" speed, 134k miles, great
condition $3000. Call 334-
' l 691-2987 or 334-798-1768'
D011128


Jackson County Floridan Thursday, February 10, 2011- 5 B


Wanted: Toyota Tacoma 2000-2004
automatic Call 334-793-6054 D011034

() LEGALS


LF15225

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN ANb FOR JACKSON
COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION
DIVISION

CASE NO.: 32-2010-CA-001045

JAMES B. NUTTER & COMPANY
Plaintiff,
vs.
THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES,
OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST HUGH M.
RAWLS, DECEASED, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS,
TRUSTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING
BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST HUGH M.
RAWLS, DECEASED
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: UNKNOWN
CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN

ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING
BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE
HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS)
WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY
CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSE, HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS

LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: UNKNOWN
CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a
mortgage on the following property in JACK-
SON County, Florida:
ALL OF LOT 3; AND A STRIP OF LAND 10 FEET IN
WIDTH ON THE SOUTH SIDE OF LOT 4 OF THE
PHILLIPS ADDITION TO THE PLAN OF THE CITY
OF MARIANNA, DESCRIBED AS BEGINNING AT
THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SAID LOT 4 AND
RUNNING NORTH ALONG THE WEST SIDE OF
RUSS STREET A DISTANCE OF 10 FEET; THENCE
WEST PARALLEL WITH THE SOUTH LINE OF THE
SAID LOT 4,209 FEET TO AN ALLEY; THENCE
SOUTH ALONG THE EAST LINE OF SAID ALLEY,
10 FEET TO THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SAID
LOT 4; THENCE EAST ALONG THE SOUTH LINE
OF LOT 4,209 FEET TO THE BEGINNING; ALL BE-
ING IN PHILLIPS ADDITION TO THE CITY OF MA-
RIANNA, JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA

has been filed against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written defenses within
30 days after the first publication, if any, on
Florida Default Law Group, P.L., Plaintiffs attor-
ney, whose address is 9119 Corporate Lake
Drive, Suite 300, Tampa, Florida 33634, and file
the original with this Court either before serv-
ice on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately there-
after; otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded in the
Complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for two consecutive weeks in the


Jackson County Floridian.

WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court on
this 27th day of January, 2011
Dale R. Guthrie
Clerk of the Court
By: Tammy Bailey
As Deputy Clerk


LF15223
IN THE CIRCUIT COUR FOR
JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO: 10-249PR

IN RE: ESTATE OF LONNIE THOMAS BARNES
Deceased

NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
LONNIE THOMAS BARNES deceased, File Num-
ber 10-249PR, is pending in the Circuit Court for
Jackson County, Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is Jackson County Courthouse,
4445 Marianna, Florida 32446. The names and
addresses of the personal representatives and
the personal representatives' attorney are set
forth below.
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands against
decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice
is served within three (3) months after the date
of the first publication of this notice must file
their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER
OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY
(30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and persons having claims or demands against
the decedent's estate must file their claims with
this Court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.

The date of first publication of this Notice is Jan-
uary 3, 2011.

Attorney for Personal Representative:
Charles A. Costin
Post Office Box 98
Port St. Joe, FL 32457
Telephone: 850-227-1159
Florida Bar No. 699070

Personal Representative
Shannon Barnes
132 Woodmere Dr.
Wewahitchka, FL 32465








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S6B Thursday, February 10, 2011 Jackson County Floridan


SPORTS


www.JCFLORIDAN.com


SPORTS BRIEFS

High School
Boys Basketball
District tournaments con-
tinue this week for all five
county teams.
In District 2-2A in
Bonifay, the semifinals will
be Friday night at 6 p.m.
and 7:30 p.m.
The 6 p.m. will pit
Cottondale vs.
Blountstown, with Holmes
County and Sneads facing
off at 7:30 p.m.
The championship game
will be Saturday night at 7
p.m.
In District 1-3A in
Pensacola, Marianna will
play Friday in the semifi-
nals against the winner of
Pensacola Catholic and
Arnold.
The championship game
will be Saturday night at 7
p.m.
In District 2-1A in
Quincy, Malone will play
FAMU in the championship
game Friday at 7 p.m.

High School Softball
Thursday Marianna at
Cottondale, 4 p.m., and 6
p.m.; Arnold at Graceville,
4 p.m., and 6 p.m.
Friday Cottondale at
Graceville, 4 p.m., and 6
p.m.; Marianna at Mosley,
4 p.m., and 6 p.m.

Sneads Recreation
Sign-ups
Sign-ups for Sneads
Recreation sign-ups for
baseball, softball, and T-
ball will continue today
from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. at
Adam Wilson Tucker
Pavilion.
The next two sign-up
dates will be Feb. 14, and
17 from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m.
Final sign-up will be Feb.
19 from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m.
Registration is for ages 4
and up, and costs $70. Birth
certificate must be brought
the day of registration.
Coaches that coached
last year please contact
Daryl Tyus.

Malone Softball League
The Bascom/Malone
Softball League will hold
softball sign-ups on Feb. 15
from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. at
Marys Childcare in
Bascom.
For more information,
please call 569-5664.

Chipola Basketball
The Chipola men's and
women's basketball will hit
the road Saturday night to
take on Gulf Coast.
The women will play at
5:30 p.m., and the men will
follow at 7:30 p.m.



Home
Continued From Page 1B
"We're excited and happy
to be back home,"
Graceville coach Jon Habali
said Wednesday. "I think
we've won 14 straight home
games, and we're 9-0 at
home this year. We're excit-.
ed to get the home crowd on
our side. Hopefully, we'll
put on a good show."
Baker comes into the
game with a record of 11-9,
having lost to Ponce De
Leon 46-19 in the District 1-
2A championship game.
The Lady Gators did
come within five points of
PDL late in the regular sea-
son, and Habali said he
knows that they're capable
of playing his team tough.
"They're aggressive, and
they deserve to be in the
playoffs. They're a playoff
team," he said. "We're going
to have to come to play to
beat them."
The Lady Tigers are com-
ing off of a dominant per-
formance against Holmes
County on. Saturday, win-
ning 54-32 in the district
title game.
The game was tied 9-9 in
the first quarter, but
Graceville went on an 18-2
run to blow the game open.
It was an impressive
effort for the Graceville
girls, who just a night earli-


er had to rally from a 16-3
early deficit to beat
Cottondale in the semifi-
nals.
"We feel great right now
because the girls know that
when we play four quarters
of basketball like we did
Saturday, especially on the
defensive end, we can play
with pretty much anybody,"
Habali said. "The tempo
was there at the start of the
game. That was something
we hadn't seen in the four or
five games prior to the dis-
trict championship. I hope
that carries over throughout
the playoffs. We need it to."


Tigers
Continued From Page 1B
The Tigers also wiltlhave
to find answers on the
mound when Orshall isn't
pitching, as Dunnaway and
Pittman and Henson com-
bined for nearly 74 innings
of work last year.
Breeden pitched 27 2/3
innings last year with a 4.05
ERA, while Sean Henry
pitched 7 1/3 innings.
As the only pitchers other
than Orshall with significant
experience, both will battle
it out for the second pitcher
spot, according to
Harkrider.


Sikes could also con-
tribute on the mound.
Raising the degree of dif-
ficulty even more is an
improved district that
Harkrider said makes a
postseason berth a major
accomplishment.
"The district will be very
tough. You know that you
have to play at least one real
tough game just to get into
the district championship'
game," the coach said.
"Munroe's got a good team
with some good pitching,
John Paul has got a real
good lefty, Aucilla has got
good pitching and is a solid
team. It's a tough little dis-
trict."


The Tigers sputtered
early last season before
going on a run of six wins in
seven games leading up to
their district loss to Munroe.
Harkrider said he could
envision a similar arc to this
season for his team.
'That's kind of the way it
worked out last year, where
we started clicking around
the middle of the year," he
said. "Sometimes, it just
works that way. I hope it
will be that way again this
year. I just don't know
because we haven't been on
the field enough to see."
The Tigers will open the
season Tuesday against
West Gadsden in Malone.


Malone "We're definitely


Continued From Page 1B
"We're definitely not
going in overconfident," the
coach said. "I don't know if
that was the case last year,
but it's definitely not this
year. We respect them, and
we know what they're capa-
ble of. If we don't do what
we're supposed to do, we'll
lose. We've got to be real
focused. They've got our
attention, so we'll see what
we can do with them."
Welch said the key for his
team Friday will be to keep
an even keel, and not be
overwhelmed by any big


not going in
overconfident."
-Steven Welch,
Tigers head coach
FAMU runs.
"I felt like we matched up
with them pretty good last
year, but in the title game
they made some shots early
and got us on our heels," the
coach said. "The difference
will be getting off to an
early start. We have to main-
tain our composure if things
don't necessarily go our
way."


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1