Citation
The Herald-advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Herald-advocate
Portion of title:
Herald advocate
Place of Publication:
Wauchula, FL
Publisher:
Herald-Advocate Publishing Co. Inc., James R. Kelly - Publisher\Editor
Creation Date:
January 6, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Weekly
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Wauchula (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hardee County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Hardee -- Wauchula
Coordinates:
27.546111 x -81.814444 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
55th year, no. 31 (Sept. 2, 1955)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Herald Advocate. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000579544 ( ALEPH )
33886547 ( OCLC )
ADA7390 ( NOTIS )
sn 95047483 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Hardee County herald
Preceded by:
Florida advocate (Wauchula, Fla.)

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Florida Digital Newspaper Library

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PAGE 1

H eraldA dvocate H ARDEE C OUNTY ’ S H OMETOWN C OVERAGE Thursday, May 3, 2018 THE 118th Year • No. 23 • 2 Sectionswww.TheHeraldAdvocate.com 70¢ Plus 5¢ Sales Tax Discus ThrowersHead To State B1 UnderclassmenCollect Awards A8 W EATHER DATE HIGH LOW RAIN 04/2483700.1004/2581550.1004/2683530.0004/2785570.0004/2884530.0004/2988530.0004/3086590.00 Rainfall to 04/30/2018 5.96 Same period last year 4.58 Ten Year Average 49.17 Source: Univ. of Fla. Ona Research Center I NDEX Classifieds...........B10 Courthouse Report....B13Crime Blotter.........A4Entertainment........B8Hardee Living.........B3Information Roundup..B3Obituaries............A5Puzzles..............A10Save The Date.........A2Solunar Forecast.......A7 Child-Porn Videos Net 20 Years Crash Claims ZS Man, 37 National Day Of Prayer Thursday Theme For This Year’s Event: Unity … And The Race Is On! Annual SendMeMissions 5K Steps Off Friday Barringer By CYNTHIA KRAHL Of The Herald-Advocate A 37-year-old Zolfo Springs man was killed early Fridaynight in a two-vehicle collisionon State Road 66, the FloridaHighway Patrol said. According to a report filed by crash investigator Tpr.Wilker Amaral and homicideinvestigator Cpl. RandalSlocum, the wreck occurred at7:39 p.m. at the intersectionwith Merle Langford Road. Jose Jimenez Rodriguez was driving his 1966 Chevrolet S10pickup southbound on MerleLangford Road at the time.When he reached SR 66, heproceeded into the intersectionand directly into the path of anoncoming vehicle, the reportsaid. The westbound 2007 Dodge Ram pickup driven by HugoMojica-Palacios, 52, of ZolfoSprings, struck the left side ofRodriguez’ Chevy. The impact carried both ve hicles off the pavement, through a barbed-wire fence and into a pasture on the south west corner of the intersectionof SR 66 and Merle Langford Road, the FHP said. Both vehicles caught on fire and were fully engulfed in flames, investigators added. Rodriguez was transported to Florida Hospital Wauchula, where he was pronounced de ceased. Mojica-Palacios suffered no injuries, the troopers said, nordid a passenger in his truck,Victor Sanchez Trejo, 40, also of Zolfo Springs. All were wearing seatbelts, the report said. Whether alcohol was in volved in the collision remains under investigation. Any possible charges in the crash are pending completionof the crash investigation, the FHP said. Rodriguez became the sec ond person to die on HardeeCounty roadways so far this year. By CYNTHIA KRAHLOf The Herald-Advocate A corrections officer who videotaped child pornographyis now on the other side of thebars. Margaret Barringer, 37, for merly of 807 Honolulu Dr.,Wauchula, is currently beingheld in close custody at theFlorida Women’s ReceptionCenter in Ocala. Her release date is Aug. 19, 2036, according to Florida De partment of Corrections data. Barringer was arrested on Aug. 25, 2016, after a suicidenote left by Paul GeoffreyArmstead, 46, then manager ofthe CVS store in Wauchula,implicated Barringer in thefilming of sexual acts involv ing a young child. Initially charged with five counts of sexual battery andthree counts of use of a child ina sexual performance, Bar ringer later agreed to plead “no contest” to a single count of useof a child in sexual perform ance and three counts of the re duced charge of lewd orlascivious battery. She was sentenced to 20 years in prison. Circuit Judge Marcus J. Ezelle also ordered her desig nated as a sexual offender. Further, the judge granted her credit for the time she spentin jail since her 2016 arrest. The case against Barringer began simply enough, withwhat is termed a “welfarecheck” at Best Western Her itage Inn & Suites in BowlingGreen. Hotel staff had reportedto the Hardee County Sheriff’sOffice that a man who was sup posed to check out a day earlierhad not done so. They said a “Do Not Dis turb” sign hung on the door knob of his third-floor room,and that he did not respond totheir knocks or calls. Entry was gained into the room, where deputies foundArmstead’s body in the bath room. One end of a rope waswrapped around his neck, Capt.Eddie Davis of the Sheriff’sOffice said. The other end waswrapped around the door han dle to a closet. Davis said two pill bottles were on a nightstand and a bot tle of vodka was in the refrig erator.See 20 YEARSA2 By TOM STAIK Of The Herald-Advocate More than 300 runners are expected to take to the streetsof downtown Wauchula on Fri day for the seventh annualSendMeMissions 5K. Staging for the event will be at the courtyard of the HardeeCounty Courthouse. The evening’s event will begin at 6 for a Fun Run foryoungsters. As of Monday, 20 youth – those ages 12 and under – had been registered for the FunRun, according to JamieSamuels, president of the boardthat oversees the non-profit. The Fun Run will step off from the intersection of MainStreet and Ninth Avenue, trav eling east. The youngsters willthen turn south onto Eighth Av enue and then turn west ontoOrange Street. The junior run ners will then continue to 10thAvenue, where they will turnnorth. The runners will thenturn east back onto Main Street for the final leg to the finishline at Heritage Park. Nearly 300 runners were reg istered as of Monday for themain 5K event that is slated tostep off at 7 p.m. “We have 19 teams partici pating in the 5K. The oldestrunner we have registered as ofApril 30 is 72, the youngest is2,” Samuels said The race starts from the in tersection of Orange Street andNinth Avenue, heading westbefore turning south onto South Florida Avenue. The racethen takes another westwardturn onto Stenstrom Road. Atthe intersection of HancheyRoad, runners will turn north,then east onto Main Street forthe final stretch to the finishline at Heritage Park. The Wauchula Police De partment will be assisting withtraffic control and providing anescort at the head and rear ofthe race. Organizers are asking resi dents along the route to take extra care to “keep their petstied up, in a fenced-in area, orinside their homes during the duration of the race.” Motorists are also asked to use extreme caution. “Any drivers along these roads are being asked to drivecautiously and watch out forrunners and walkers,” Samuels said. The main race is expected to last approximately two hours and end by 8:30.See 5K A3 CHAMPS AGAIN COURTESY PHOTO BY STACY SMITH The Lady ‘Cats celebrate after winning Hardee Senior High School’s fifth consecutive district softball titleon Friday night. With the win, Hardee advances to regional competition. See B1 for story and photos. By CYNTHIA KRAHL Of The Herald-Advocate Only two incumbents remain unopposed this week as a trio of other candidates has jumped into the fray. Up for election this year are two seats on the Hardee County Commission, districts 2 and 4, three seats on theHardee County School Board, districts 1, 4 and 5, and twojudicial posts. County commissioners earn $32,545 a year. School Board members are paid $27,656 annually. A county judgedraws $151,822 a year, and a circuit judge $160,688. And it is the School Board slots that have generated all of the interest this past week. District 1 incumbent Paul Samuels faces a challenge from Melony Cureton. District 5, being vacated by ThomasTrevino, has drawn candidates Mark Gilliard and MindyCastillo. Garry McWhorter of District 4 remains unopposed.The County Commission races saw no changes this past week. Sue Birge of District 2 has drawn a challenge fromNoey Flores. District 4’s incumbent, Russell Melendy, hasno opponents as yet. For county judge, Kenneth Evers, David Horton and James Pyle will do battle for the post of retiring CountyJudge Jeff McKibben. Two Polk County residents have filedfor retiring Circuit Judge Marcus Ezelle’s position. The official qualifying period is not until summer. By TOM STAIKOf The Herald-Advocate Faithful from across Hardee County will gather today(Thursday) to pray for unity ina triad of events in observanceof The National Day of Prayer. The Hardee County Ministe rial Association is coordinatingthe local observances that will crisscross the county. “Prayer brings people to gether. Prayer builds bridgesbetween opposing persons andeven political parties … Prayerbrings unity,” said Pastor Wen dell Smith, chairman of thisyear’s local events. The day-long call to prayer will begin at 9 a.m. in BowlingGreen with a breakfast serviceat First Baptist Church.Lunchtime services will followat 11:30 a.m. in Zolfo Springsat First Baptist Church. The observances will con clude at 6 p.m. at Heritage Parkin downtown Wauchula. Praise and worship music will be offered beginning at 6.The service is scheduled tobegin at 6:30. Smith, pastor of Faith Tem ple Church of God, is slated to provide the welcoming re marks and conduct the openingprayer. The Hardee Senior High School Junior ROTC will thenprovide an honor guard prior tothe recitation of the Pledge ofAllegiance by U.S. Air Forceveteran Marlene Rickels Hyde,chaplain of American LegionPost 2. Prayers will focus on seven centers of influence: govern ment, church, military, family,education, media, and business. Wauchula Mayor Keith Nadaskay is scheduled to offerthe prayer for cities, CountyCommissioner Sue Birge willoffer the prayer for HardeeCounty, and Pastor DanielleUpton of First UnitedMethodist Wauchula will offerthe prayer for the state of Florida. Capt. Eddie Davis of the Hardee County Sheriff’s Officeis slated to offer the prayer forthe armed forces and law en forcement. The prayer for families will be offered by David LeeAdams, student pastor atFlorida’s First Assembly. Melanie Smith, a teacher at Zolfo Springs ElementarySchool, has been tapped tooffer the prayer for publicschools. The prayer for media will be offered by Pastor Eugene Hol limon Jr., of St. Paul’s Mission ary Baptist Church, ZolfoSprings. Kenny Sanders, a local lay minister and businessman, willoffer the prayer for business.See PRAYER A2

PAGE 2

The ceremony will also offer prayers for Is rael by Pastor Rod Cannon of New Vision Worship Center, Zolfo Springs, and for Amer ica by Pastor Jim Harrison of Riverview Heights Missionary Baptist Church. Pastor Lyndsay Naranjo, minister of music at Floridas First Assembly of God, will then offer a special song. Closing remarks and prayer will be offered by Jim Davis, president of the Hardee County Ministerial Association and pastor of Oak Grove Baptist Church. Those planning to attend the Heritage Park event are encouraged to bring a lawn chair or blanket. The National Day of Prayer was established in 1952 under President Harry S. Truman. In 1988, President Ronald Regan signed legisla tion designating the first Thursday in May as the official observance. For information on The National Day of Prayer visit nationaldayofprayer.org. A2 The Herald-Advocate, May 3, 2018 Herald-Advocate HARDEECOUNTYSHOMETOWNCOVERAGE JOANM. SEAMAN Sports Editor Emeritus TOM STAIK Sports Editor NOEY DeSANTIAGO Production Manager DARLENE WILLIAMS Assistant Production Manager DEADLINES: Hardee Living Thursday 5 p.m. School News & Photos Thursday 5 p.m. Sports Thursday 5 p.m. (Weekend Events, Monday Noon) General News Monday 5 p.m. Ads Tuesday Noon SUBSCRIPTIONS: Hardee County 6 months, $21 1 year, $39 2 years, $75 Florida 6 months, $25 1 year, $46 2 years, $87 Out of State 6 months, $29 1 year, $52 2 years, $100 Online 1 month, $5 6 months, $19 1 year, $37 2 years, $70 LETTERS: The Herald-Advocate welcomes letters to the editor on matters of public interest. Letters should be brief, and must be written in good taste, signed and include a daytime phone number. MICHAEL R. KELLY Co-Publisher and Editor JAMES R. KELLY Co-Publisher CYNTHIA M. KRAHL Managing EditorTHE115 S. Seventh Ave. P.O. Box 338 Wauchula, FL 33873 Phone: (863) 773-3255 Fax: (863) 773-0657 Ads@TheHeraldAdvocate.com Publisher@TheHeraldAdvocate.com Sports@TheHeraldAdvocate.com Published weekly on Thursday at Wauchula, Florida, by the HeraldAdvocate Publishing Co. Inc. Periodical Postage paid at U.S. Post Office, Wauchula, FL 33873 and additional entry office (USPS 578-780). Postmaster, send address changes to: The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338, Wauchula, FL 33873.MAY 3 Knitting & Crochet/ HC Public Library/315 N. 6th Ave., Wauchula/ 10 am 3 Storytime/HC Public Library/315 N. 6th Ave., Wauchula/ 10 am 3 Fitness in the Park/ Yoga/Heritage Park/5:30 pm 3 Overdrive/HC Public Library/315 N. 6th Ave., Wauchula/ 10:30 am 4 SendMeMissions RunWalk/West Main Street, Wauchula/ 6 pm 7 Fitness in the Park/ Yoga/Heritage Park/5:30 pm 9 Adult Coloring/HC Public Library/ 10 am 10 Knitting & Crochet/ HC Public Library/10 am 10 Storytime/HC Public Library/10 am 10 Fitness in the Park/ Yoga/Heritage Park/5:30 pm 11 Mothers Day Crafts/ HC Public Library/10 am 14 Fitness in the Park/ Yoga/Heritage Park/5:30 pm 14 Bacculareate/First Baptist Church Wauchula/7:30 pm 15 Devotion & Lunch/ Hardee Help Center/Noon 16 Adult Coloring/HC Public Library/ 10 am 17 Knitting & Crochet/ HC Public Library/10 am 17 Storytime/HC Public Library/10 am 17 Fitness in the Park/ Yoga/Heritage Park/5:30 pm 19 Graduation/ Cattlemans Arena/ 9 am 21 Fitness in the Park/ Yoga/Heritage Park/5:30 pm 23 Adult Coloring/HC Public Library/ 10 am 24 Knitting & Crochet/ HC Public Library/10 am 24 Storytime/HC Public Library/10 am 24 Lunch & Learn/ HC Chamber of Commerce/Noon 24 Fitness in the Park/ Yoga/Heritage Park/5:30 pm 24 Z.S. Town Commission Meeting/6 pm 25 How To Use Your Device/HC Public Library/10:30 am 26 HC School Board Meeting/5 pm 28 Fitness in the Park/ Yoga/Heritage Park/5:30 pm 30 Adult Coloring/HC Public Library/ 10 am 31 Knitting & Crochet/ HC Public Library/10 am 31 Storytime/HC Public Library/10 am 31 Fitness in the Park/ Yoga/Heritage Park/5:30 pm Save The Date will keep residents informed of upcoming community happenings. To have your non-profit meeting or event posted for free, e-mail features@theheraldadvocate. com as far ahead as possible. SAVETHEDATE Have an entry for Save The Date? See contact info below. At The Herald-Advocate, we want accu racy to be a given, not just our goal. If you believe we have printed an error in fact, please call to report it. We will review the in formation, and if we find it needs correction or clarification, we will do so here. To make a report, call Managing Editor Cynthia Krahl at 773-3255. Corrections Kellys ColumnBy JimTwo major business closings are occurring this week in Hardee County. Joe L. Davis Real Estate Inc. will officially close this Friday, but there will be some loose ends tied up in the coming weeks. The late Joe L. Davis Sr. established the company in 1960, hav ing started out in real estate in 1955 with H.L. Chambers. Torrey Oaks Golf Course closed Monday. It was established in 1991 west of U.S. 17 in the Torrey community between Wauchula and Bowling Green. It opened as nine holes and later expanded to 18 holes. Bill Lambert is the owner. The first golf course in Hardee County was Little Cypress west of Zolfo Springs along State Rd. 64. It closed years ago. The only one left is Brookside Bluffs Golf Course east of U.S. 17 south of Charlie Creek near Gardner. It is my understanding that there are too many golf courses in America, and some are closing due to fewer people playing the sport. Joe L. Davis Jr. said the real estate company specialized in the sale of orange groves and pastureland. The citrus industry has declined in recent years. Joe Jr. remains in the citrus business and will continue his citrus office on U.S. 27 south of Avon Park. He and Gloria have three daughters, each with their careers, and none planned to move back here to run the real estate company. Savannah is in Houston and has a daughter. Laurel is in Boston and has a son. Ashley lives in New York City and deliv ered a son on Tuesday, May 1. Joe Jr. had a fall in late February on a trip abroad and broke his upper right arm and had surgery over there. He had a second surgery in mid-April in Florida and is now doing rehab therapy. Joe has learned to use his left hand and arm in the meantime. I had an interesting turkey hunting trip late last week to Georgia with Mike Heine and landowner Loran Cogburn. He is a great host and cook. On that property the turkeys are eating corn, buckoats and acorns. We managed to bag two gobblers. It was my first turkey har vested outside the state of Florida. Hunting those big birds has been a life-long passion. There are probably worse vices to have. It was fun hearing Mike and Loran trading verbal barbs. Georgia has always been my second favorite state next to Florida. My father was born in Cordele, Ga. My family used to see Atlanta Braves games before Major League Baseball expanded into Miami and later St. Petersburg. We have visited former Pres ident Jimmy Carter's hometown of Plains, Ga., several times and heard him teach his Sunday School class at Maranatha Baptist Church there. We saw a lot of young corn fields, planted pines, pecan groves, cattle, and some olive groves and chicken/egg farms. There will be a lot of peanut plots and cotton fields growing in Georgia this summer. Georgia's Top 5 agricultural commodities by value in 2015, according to the Atlanta Constitution Journal and the University of Georgia, were: 1. Broiler chickens, $4.4 billion. 2. Eggs, $937 million. 3. Beef, $923 million. 4. Cotton, $713 million 5. Peanuts, $685 million. The Top 5 states producing cotton are Texas, 6.3 million bales; Georgia, 2.6 million bales; Mississippi, 1.1 million; Arkansas, 800,000; and California, 685,000, reports the U.S. De partment of Agriculture. HAIRSALON773-5665116 Carlton St. Wauchula Hours: Tuesday Friday 9-6 Saturday 9-3 5:3c Stephanie Gugle Computer Tech (863) 781-9720s.gugle@guglescomputerservices.com www.GuglesComputerServices.com 5:3c INHOMESERVICEAuthorities Search River For BodyBy CYNTHIA KRAHLOf The Herald-AdvocateLaw enforcement officers were on high alert early this week after receiving a report of a dead body in the Peace River. Hardee County Sheriffs Of fice deputies and Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Com mission officers initiated a search of the river Sunday night. It continued well into Monday morning before being halted. According to the Sheriffs Office, a man and his son were canoeing down the river on Sunday when the boy said he saw a body. The father re turned the boy to his mother, in Sarasota, and he repeated his sighting to her. She, in turn, called the Sher iffs Office here and reported what her son said he had seen. The search spanned the waterway from Heard Bridge Road to Crews Riverside Park in Riverview. The river is shal low in this area, and a body would not have gotten past the rocks at Riverview, the Sher iffs Office said. An airboat was used in the search. Later Monday morning, the hunt was discontinued. No body was found. 20 YEARS Continued From A1 A note on the counter in the bathroom, written on the hotels notepad, read: Do not try to bring me back. Davis said a second note, on the rooms desk, detailed the mans reason for committing sui cide. It also provided the passcode for his cell phone. When we opened the phone and saw what we saw, we stopped as soon as we saw it, the captain described. He explained that a city of Wauchula location was visible in a video on the phone, so the Wauchula Police Department was immediately called in. Leading the ensuing investigation for the Wauchula Police Department was Lt. Matthew Whatley. He said the WPD obtained a search warrant and then examined the cell phone. What detectives found were three videos recorded on Armsteads iPhone over a period of several months. The scenes showed multiple persons, Whatley said, and depicted sexual acts on a child. Barringer, who was employed as a corrections officer for the Sheriffs Office at the time, was arrested just hours after Armsteads body was discovered at the inn along with the suicide note and videos implicating Barringer. She was booked into the Hardee County Jail, but was quickly moved to the DeSoto County Jail rather than being placed in the jail popula tion with the same inmates she previously had been tasked with guarding. Following her sentencing in Hardee Circuit Court, Barringer remained in jail while a number of other court cases involving her were cleared from the docket. PRAYER Continued From A1The easiest and most common plastics to recycle are made of polyethylene terephthalate, or PETE. You can recognize them by the chasing-arrows recycling symbol with the number 1 and PETE on it, usually at the bottom. To recycle, just lightly rinse and remove all lids. FROSTY CAPPUCCINO Better than store-bought! A deceptively rich blender coffee drink that's ready in just 5 min utes. 1 cup low-fat (1 percent) milk 1 tablespoon chocolate syrup 1 teaspoon instant espressocoffee powder 2 ice cubes Sugar (optional) Ground cinnamon 1. In blender, combine milk, chocolate syrup, espresso powder and ice, and blend until mixture is smooth and frothy. Add sugar to taste, if you like. 2. Pour into 2 chilled glasses. Sprinkle with cinna mon for garnish. For thousands of triple-tested recipes, visit our Web site at www.goodhousekeeping.com/r ecipes/.(c) 2018 Hearst Communications, Inc. All rights reserved Recipes FromGood Housekeeping On This Day:In 1936 NY Yankee Joe DiMaggio makes his major-league debut, gets 3 hits In 1956 A new range of mountains discovered in Antarctica (2 over 13,000') In 1971 Nixon administration arrests 13,000 anti-war protesters in 3 days In 1973 Chicago's Sears Tower, world's tallest building (443 m), topped out In 1978 First unsolicited bulk commercial email ("spam") is sent by a Digital Equipment Corporation marketing representative to every ARPANET address on the US west coast In 1988 4,200 kg Colombian cocaine in seized at Tarpon Springs Florida In 2000 The sport of geocaching begins, with the first cache placed and the coordinates from a GPS posted on Usenet. In 2007 British girl Madeleine McCann dis appears from her bed in a holiday apartment in Praia da Luz, Portugal Someone Will Listen RUNAWAY HOTLINE1-800-621-4000 Encourage your children to make reading the newspaper a part of their everyday routine for lifelong learning. Newspapers are living textbooks, helping students develop reading, math, social studies and language skills while exploring the issues affecting our world today. Herald-AdvocatePrinters & PublishersTheP.O. Box 338 115 S. 7th Ave., Wauchula, FL 33873(863) 773-3255

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May 3, 2018, The Herald-Advocate A3 COURTESY IMAGES The route for the seventh annual SendMeMissions 5K run/walk through Wauchula. This shorter route marks the path of the Fun Run in downtown Wauchula. WORD WARRIORS COURTESY PHOTO Bowling Green Elementary presents its 2018 version of the Battle of the Booksteam. Each team member has read all 15 Sunshine State Books and is ready to goto battle, answering contest questions concerning the content they have read. TheBGE Battle of the Books team is led by Sharon Ekhoff and assisted by ChristinaButler and Brittany Derringer. Battlers are (from left) Brenda Lopez-Ramos, teamcaptain Ezmeralda Alamia, Jazmin Reyes-Ochoa, Milgros Covarrubias Valencia,Makaelah Sanchez and Fermin Velasco Martinez. Registration, team photos and volunteercheck-in will be held at the courthouse court yard. Samuels said around 80 volunteers are ex pected to help with the event. Registration is available online at smm5k.com The cost is $25 for adults and $15 for children ages 12 and under. Registration will be accepted for the 5K until 6:55 p.m. the day of the race. An awards ceremony will follow at Heritage Park. 5K Continued From A1 1. FOOD & DRINK: What is a manzanilla? 2. SCIENCE: At what temperature are the Celsiusand Fahrenheit scales equal? 3. U.S. CURRENCY: Which non-president's imageis on the $100 bill? 4. LANGUAGE: What word represents the letter Q inthe international phonetic al phabet? 5. MUSIC: How many strings does a pedal harp have? 6. LITERATURE: In which novel does the characterQuasimodo appear? 7. GENERAL KNOWL EDGE: How many points does a snowflake have? 8. HISTORY: Where was Napoleon exiled after his de feat at Waterloo? 9. BIBLE: Where did Moses receive the Ten Com mandments? 10. GEOGRAPHY: What city claims to be the mostnorthernmost in Europe? ANSWERS 1. A type of sherry2. -40 degrees3. Benjamin Franklin4. Quebec5. 40-476. "The Hunchback of Notre-Dame" 7. Six points8. Saint Helena, an island off the African coast 9. Mount Sinai 10. Hammerfest, Norway (c) 2018 King Features Synd., Inc. Trivia Test By Fifi Rodriguez DEAR PAW'S CORNER: I received a notice from a citydepartment that I have tobuy a license for each of mycats. I get them vaccinatedregularly, and they're purelyindoor cats, so why should Ibother to pay for two licensetags? —Kate J., via email DEAR KATE: As I've writ ten before, indoor pets can es cape to the outdoors, which iswhy it's a good idea to vacci nate them on schedule, asyou've done. In cities and mu nicipalities that require them,license tags provide additionalidentification in case your catsdo get out. Financially, it's a good idea to go ahead and get the licensetags. Several cities are crackingdown on pet licensing. For ex ample, Sacramento fines own ers up to $300 for ignoringnotices to license their pets —a steep increase over the initialcost of the license tags: $20 peryear for dogs, $10 for cats. Broward County, Florida, also has a $300 fine in place. Chicago is sending out no tices, as registration purchasesdropped from 27,000 in 2011to less than 13,000 in 2017. Itoffers licenses for 1or 3-year terms. And Seattle fines unli censed owners $125, with ad ditional fines possible foroffenses like "failure to displaypet license tags" (an additional $54). Cities locate unlicensed pets through vaccination records.It's a bureaucratic necessity,and annoying, but the tagsaren't that expensive, while the fines for not doing so can be. Find out how to register andpay for your cats' licenses atyour city's website. You may beable to do it all online. Checkwith your cats' veterinarian aswell to see if the vet's office can help you obtain licenses. Send your questions, commentsor tips to ask@pawscorner.com. (c) 2018 King Features Synd., Inc. Paw’s Corner By Sam Mazzotta South Florida State College was awarded $500,000 through a special funding allocation by the Florida Legislature to create amobile welding lab that will provide low-cost, high-demandworkforce training to the residents of Hardee, Highlands andDeSoto counties. “The governor’s budget was titled ‘Securing Florida’s Future’ and that’s exactly what this special funding initiative does forour region,” said Dr. Thomas C. Leitzel, president of SFSC. “Welding is a core skill for various jobs and industry sectors. We’re thrilled to be able to offer this specialized training in aninnovative and convenient delivery method for the residents ofour district. Bringing the classroom to our students for short-term training makes sense,” he continued. Leitzel went on to say, “SFSC is extremely grateful to Sen. Denise Grimsley and Rep. Ben Albritton, who both sponsoredthe legislation that led this important funding initiative throughtheir respective chambers.” With no formal welding training programs available in Florida’s rural Heartland region, this mobile welding lab has thepotential to train more than 150 students annually and offershort-term training options with significant income and earningpotential to the tri-county region. “South Florida State College is excited to have the opportun ity to expand technical training opportunities throughout our servicearea,” said Dr. Sidney E. Valentine Jr., vice president for aca demic affairs and student services at SFSC. “The addition of the mobile welding lab will allow SFSC to not only reach students at our four campuses, but also area highschools and industry locations throughout the region,” he said.“This training will vary in length from degree, certif icate and diploma programs to just-in-time workforce development train ing through SFSC’s Corporate & Community Education Depart ment.” Welding is one of the most in-demand workforce skills with 3.4 percent annual growth in the Heartland region and an esti mated 800 welders needed annually in Central Florida. According to CareerSource Florida, trained welders can earn a starting salary of $17 per hour with a possible future salary of$30 per hour, or $60,000 annually, which is more than the aver age salary for someone who possesses a vocational certificate. “We are eager to support the needs of businesses in our service district with a mobile welding lab,” said Erik N. Christensen,dean of applied sciences and technology at SFSC. “The newwelding program will greatly complement many of the programscurrently offered and help satisfy a need with our local employ ers. “Virtually every company has a need for welding; some busi nesses need full-time welders while others may just need one oftheir employees to be able to weld as the need arises. The mobilelab will enable us to provide the right training anywhere, any time,” he added. The lab will be housed in a large trailer with both simulator and live-welding units. Trainers and equipment will be includedto facilitate arc welding (MIG, TIG, and Stick Welding). The labwill continuously travel throughout the tri-county region, asneeded. With a pool of trained welders available locally, Hardee, High lands and DeSoto counties will be positioned to attract new em ployers and industry leaders to the region. For more information about the mobile welding lab, contact Christensen at (863) 784-7424 or Erik.Christensen@south florida.edu SFSC To Offer Mobile Welding Lab COURTESY PHOTO Announcing the new trailer designed to teach welding in the tri-county area are (from left) Derek Whitis, leg islative consultant; Cindy Alexander; Sen. J.D. Alexander, principal for Silver Palm Consulting LLC; and KeatonAlexander, legislative consultant. G RADUATION K EEPSAKE E DITION 2018 It’s that time of year again—our seniors are ready for graduation—and we are ready with our CONGRATULA TIONS! Every year The Herald-Advocate publishes a special issue recognizing all our graduating seniors, the speeches are in cluded, along with advertisements from local businesses, par ents, and our churches. If your church has graduating seniorsthis year and you would like to recognize them in this gradua tion special, please come by our office at 115 S. 7 th Avenue or call 773-3255 from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday throughFriday. You may include an individual or group picture, alongwith words of wisdom and encouragement from your youthpastor or pastor. Prices vary according to size—starting as low as $38. The deadline for placing an ad is May 10—but we encourage youto make it sooner if possible. Herald-Advocate Hardee County’s Hometown Coverage 115 S. 7th Ave. • Wauchula, FL • 773-3255 4:12-5:3nc The

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Crime BlotterDuring the past week, sheriffs deputies and city police officers investigated the following incidents and made the following arrests: COUNTY April 29, Scottie Dale Boyles, 39, of 632 Green St., Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Christopher Bandy on a charge of withholding support of children. April 29, Jesus M. Apolinar, 35, of 117 S. Third Ave., Wauchula, was arrested by Sgt. Todd Souther and charged with five counts of lewd and lascivious behaviormolesting a child under 12. April 29, a vehicle stolen on U.S. 17 South, criminal mischief on John Holt Road and on U.S. 17 South, and a theft on Hickory Street were reported. April 28, a residential burglary on Oak Hill Road, a business burglary on Airport Road and burglary of a conveyance on Myrtle Street were reported. April 27, Darrell Antron Hines, 34, of 360 Cracker Lane, Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Bryant Ovalles on a charge of violation of probation. April 27, Cole Freeman Zengri, 27, of 605 E. Oak St., Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Cierra Johnson and charged with larcenypetit theft. April 27, a residential burglary on Lake Branch Road, criminal mischief on Fish Branch Road and a theft on U.S. 17 North were reported. April 26, Andrew Reyna, 23, of 818 Redding St., Zolfo Springs, was arrested by Dep. Christopher Bandy and charged with possession of methamphetamine, possession of drug paraphernalia and violation of probation. April 26, Daniel Braddock, 46, of 4071 CR 665, Ona, was arrested by Dep. Joseph Austin and charged with three conservation rule taking game fish with a suspended license, taking deer or turkey illegally, and violation of Rule 2, and possession of a weapon/ammo by a convicted felon. April 26, a vehicle stolen on South Sixth Avenue (U.S. 17 South) and a theft on Lisa Drive were reported. April 25, Adam Robert Acuna, 46, of 615 Saunders St., Wauchula, was arrested by the Drug Task Force (DTF) and charged with possession of methamphetamine, two counts pos session of obscene photographs, sexual assault, possession of methamphetamine and violation of probation. April 25, Jessica Hurst, 38, of 2114 Bishop St., Arcadia, was arrested by Dep. Kim Pfeiffer on a charge of withholding support of children. April 25, Victoria Karleen Farrell, 21, of 4048 Sunset Dr., Zolfo Springs, was arrested by DTF and charged with possession of methamphetamine and possession of drug paraphernalia. April 25, Steven Lamar Skinner, 30, of 5549 Lake Denton Rd., Avon Park, was arrested by Dep. Christopher Bandy on a charge of failure to appear in court. April 25, Christopher Shelton, 31, of 937 Sabal Palm Dr., Zolfo Springs, was arrested by Det. Shane Ward and charged with domestic battery by strangulation, aggravated assault with a deadly weapon and battery causing bodily harm. April 25, a residential burglary on Hyde Street, burglary of a conveyance on U.S. 17 North, and a theft on Tuskegee Street were reported. April 24, Daniela Martinez, 26, General Delivery, Wauchula, was arrested by Cpl. Chris Albritton and charged with contempt of courtviolation of an injunction for protection. April 24, William Sherman Freeman, 39, of 817 S. French Ave., Fort Meade, was arrested by Dep. Bryant Ovalles and charged with possession of cocaine, failure to obey an officer by fleeing, driving with knowledge of a suspended license and pos session of drug paraphernalia. At the jail, Freeman was detained on a pair of out-of-state fugitive warrants. April 24, Cierra Jewel Lee, 20, of 250 Maxwell Dr., Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Joseph Austin and charged with battery. April 24, a fight on Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard and a theft on U.S. 17 North were reported. April 23, a residential burglary on Will Duke Road was re ported. WAUCHULA April 29, Leonardo Lopez-Santiago, 32, of 709 Oak St., Wauchula, was arrested by Ptl. Christopher Gicker and charged with DUI. April 29, a business burglary on North Sixth Avenue (U.S. 17 South) was reported. April 28, Jarvise A. Baker, 29, of 834 Pleasant Way, Bowling Green, was arrested by Ptl. Christopher Gicker and charged with DUI. April 28, Roberto Zurita, 31, of 3042 Stansfield Ave., Wauchula, was arrested by Det. Shane Ward and charged with DUI and no valid license. April 27, a residential burglary on North Eighth Avenue was reported. April 26, Kenneth Gallegos, 53, of 1309 BriarWood Circle, Sebring, was arrested by Det. Sgt. Chris LeConte and charged with crimes against or abuse of an elderly person. April 25, Dakota Alderman, 18, of 125 Dixie Dr., Bowling Green, was arrested by Ptl. Michael Barry and charged with un armed burglary of an unoccupied conveyance and larcenypetit theft. April 25, burglary of a conveyance on Carlton Street and a theft on East Townsend Street were reported. April 23, a theft on South Florida Avenue was reported. BOWLING GREEN April 29, a theft on Dixiana Street was reported. April 28, Antonio Guajardo Jr., was arrested by Sgt. Edward Coronado and charged with aggravated assault with a deadly weapon, battery and possession of drug paraphernalia. April 28, criminal mischief on West Main Street was re ported. April 26, a fight on Grove Street was reported. April 23, criminal mischief on Pleasant Way was reported. NoticesADVERTISEMENT FOR SEALED BIDSThe School Board of Hardee County will accept sealed bids for the purpose of selling used school vehicles. Vehicles may be inspected and/or vehicle descriptions may be obtained by contacting the Hardee County Schools Transportation Office at (863) 773-4754, 1277 West Main Street, Wauchula, Florida 33873. Bids will be received up to and including Thursday, May 17, 2018 at 2:00 P.M. and shall be opened and read aloud at the office of the Superintendent of Schools. Bid forms may be obtained and vehicles and surplus items may be inspected by contacting the Hardee County Schools Transportation Office at (863) 7734754, 1277 West Main Street, Wauchula, Florida 33873. Bid forms may be obtained on the District Web site: www.hardee.k12.fl.us Bids must be submitted to the Office of the Superintendent of Schools, Attention: Rob Krahl, P.O. Box 1678, Wauchula, Florida 33873, on or before 2:00 P.M., Thursday, May 17, 2018. Envelopes must be sealed and marked as follows: BID: May 17, 2018 Used Vehicles Unsealed or fax transmissions will not be accepted. The School Board of Hardee County reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids. Bob Shayman Superintendent of Schools 5:3c______________________________ IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA FILE NO.: 252018CP000042 IN RE: ESTATE OF CHARLES WHALEY a/k/a CHARLES E. WHALEY a/k/a C. E. WHALEY, Deceased. _____________________________/ NOTICE TO CREDITORS You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Administration has been entered in the estate of CHARLES WHALEY a/k/a CHARLES E. WHALEY a/k/a C. E. WHALEY, deceased, File Number 252018CP000042, by the Circuit Court for Hardee County, Florida, Probate Divi sion, the address of which is 417 W. Main Street, Wauchula, FL 33873, and that the decedent's date of death was NOVEMBER 24, 2016; that the total value of the estate is $70,000.00, and the name and address of those to whom it has been assigned by such order are: NAME & ADDRESS KATHLEEN WHALEY, 3346 PLATT ROAD, WAUCHULA, FL 33873 ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for full payment was made in the Order of Summary Administra tion must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702, FLORIDA STATUTES. ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOR EVER BARRED. NOTWITH STANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DEATH IS BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is April 26, 2018. Attorney for Person Giving Notice: ABLES & CRAIG, P.A. 551 South Commerce Avenue Sebring, Florida 33870 Telephone: (863) 385-0112 Fax: (863) 385-1284 Email: service@heartlandfloridalaw.com BRANDON S. CRAIG Florida Bar Number 0085800 Person Giving Notice: MARY ANN WILSON 3299 Platt Road Wauchula, FL 33873 MARY ANN WILSON4:26,5:3c______________________________ESCUELAS DEL CONDADO DE HARDEE 2018-2019 AVISO DE SOLICITUD DE OPCIN ESCOLARAtencin: Todos Los Padres de los Nios de la Escuela Primaria Ventana de aplicacin de eleccin: Mayo 1-31Las solicitudes de OPCIN ahora se pueden obtener en lnea en www.hardee.k12.fl.us en la seccin de Servicios Acadmicos Estudiantiles bajo Departamentos. Tambin se pueden obtener y devolver a la Oficina de School Board ubicada en 1007 N. 6th Ave. O la Oficina de Servicios Acadmicos para Estu diantes ubicada en 230 S. Florida Ave. LOS ESTUDIANTES QUE FUERON APROBADOS PARA EL AO ESCOLAR 2017-2018 NO TENDRN QUE COMPLETAR UNA SOLICITUD PARA EL AO ESCOLAR 2018-2019.Para los propsitos de la continuidad de la Opcin educativa, un estudiante que transfiere puede per manecer en la escuela escogida por el padre hasta que el estudiante complete el nivel ms alto de grado en la escuela. Las solicitudes NO sern requeridas anualmente en el ao de aprobacin inicial en la escuela. Los padres de los nuevos inscritos en el distrito, para incluir a los estudiantes de kinder o estudiantes que no participaron en el proceso de inscripcin de eleccin en 2016-2017, debern completar una so licitud si desea que su hijo / a asista a una escuela fuera de la escuela asignada Zona para el ao 20182019. Tenga en cuenta que el transporte es responsabilidad de los padres. Las Solicitudes de Opcin no se aprueban por orden de llegada, pero se aprobarn segn el espacio disponible y otros criterios establecidos. Por favor, pngase en contacto con Servicios Acadmicos Estudiantiles al 767-0662 Si podemos ser de cualquier otra ayuda. Todas las solicitudes de Opcin de escuela deben ser Oficina de Servicios Acadmicos Estudiantiles Antes del 31 de mayo de 2018 @ 4:30 pm 5:3cHARDEE COUNTY SCHOOLS 2018-2019 SCHOOL CHOICE ANNOUNCEMENTAttention: All Parents of Elementary School Age Children Choice Application window: May 1-31, 2018CHOICE applications are now available online at www.hardee.k12.fl.us in the Student Academic Serv ices section under Departments. They can also be obtained and returned to the School Board Office lo cated at 1007 N. 6th Ave. or the Student Academic Services Office located at 230 S. Florida Ave. STUDENTS WHO WERE APPROVED FOR THE 2017-2018 SCHOOL YEAR, WILL NOT NEED TO COMPLETE AN APPLICATION FOR THE 2018-2019 SCHOOL YEAR.For purposes of continuity of educational choice, a student who transfers may remain at the school chosen by the parent until the student completes the highest grade level at the school. Applications will NOT be required on an annual basis upon the initial approval year at the school. Parents of new enrollees to the district, to include kindergarten students, or students who did not participate in the choice enrollment process in 2017-2018 will need to complete an application if you would like your child or children to attend a school outside your assigned school zone for the 2018-2019 year. Please note that transportation is the parents responsibility. These choice application requests are not approved on a first-come-first-serve basis, but will be approved according to space available and other established criteria. Please contact Student Academic Services at 767-0662 if we can be of any further assistance. All school choice applications must be turned in to the office of Student Academic Services by May 31, 2018 @ 4:30 pm 5:3cNOTICE The regular meeting of the Hardee County School Board scheduled for Thursday, May 10, 2018 has been changed to Tuesday, May 8, 2018 at 5:00 p.m. The meeting will be held in the School Board Meeting Room, 230 South Florida Avenue Wauchula, Florida. 5:3c A4 The Herald-Advocate, May 3, 2018

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ABOUT...ObituariesObituaries are published free of charge as a public service, but must be submit ted through a funeral home. A one-column photo of the deceased may be added for $15. Obituaries contain the name, age, place of resi dence, date of death, occupation, memberships, immediate survivors and fu neral arrangements. The list of survivors may include the names of a spouse, par ents, siblings, children and chlildrens spouses and grandchildren, and the number of great-grandchildren. If there are no immediate survivors, consideration of other relation ships may be given.Funeral homes can sub mit obituaries to obits @theheraldadvocate.com. Obituaries In MemoryELOUISE D. ROANElouise D. Roan, 93, went to be with the Lord on Fri day, April 27, 2018, in Arcadia. She was born on Feb. 14, 1925, in Wauchula, to the late Ed and Addie Barker. Elouise has made DeSoto County her home for over 75 years. She was Baptist and a member of N. Hillsborough Baptist Church in Arcadia. Elouise was a very ener getic loving and giving mother, grandmother and friend she will be sorely missed by all. In her younger days she enjoyed playing softball, bowling with the ladys or going dancing. She is survived by one son, W.L. Bushrod (Pamela) Duncan, of Arca dia; daughters, Jacqueline Condo and Joyce (Robert) Blackmon, all of Arcadia; one granddaughter, Sorrel (Carl Wayne) Pickle; and two great-grandchildren, Pacyn Pickle and Paysleigh Pickle, of Arcadia. Elouise was preceded in death by her parents; son-inlaw, Matt Condo; and three sisters, Ruth Moore, Serena Webb and Patsy Barker. A Celebration of Elouises life will be held on Saturday, May 19, at 10 a.m. at N. Hillsborough Baptist Church, 253 N. Hillsbor ough Ave., Arcadia with Rev. Ellis Cross officiating. In lieu of flowers the fam ily request donations to N. Hillsborough Baptist Building Fund, 416 N. Brevard Ave., Arcadia, FL 34266 or Tidewell Hospice House, 919 N. Arcadia Ave., Arca dia, FL 34266. Online condolences may be made at pongerkaysgrady.comPonger-Kays-GradyFuneral Home & Cremation Services Arcadia MARION MONROE MILLER Marion Monroe Miller, 69, died Friday, April 27, 2018, at his home in Fort Meade. He was born July 16, 1948, in Harlan, Ky., and moved to Fort Meade 31 years ago from Lake Wales. He was a retired maintenance mechanic. He was preceded in death by his parents, Hughie and Oneida Stevens Miller; daugh ter, Michelle Young; and sister, Patricia Miller. He is survived by his wife, Charlotte S. Miller, of Fort Meade; daughter, Candice Hutchinson (Bryan), of Winter Haven; step-daughters, Kris tine Bridges, of Fort Meade, Cynthia Durrant (Rick), of Bradenton; step-sons, Steve Winters, of Fort Meade, Ron Winters, of Alabama; son-inlaw, David Porter, of Fort Meade; brother, Eugene Miller (Mary), of Vero Beach; sister, Barbara Herndon (Tommy), of Fellesmere; 15 grandchildren; and several great-grandchil dren. A visitation was held Tuesday, May 1 at Hancock Fu neral Home, Fort Meade. Funeral services followed. Arrangements were by Hancock Funeral Home, Fort Meade.In MemoryARLIN K. McAFEEArlin K. McAfee, 79, passed away on April 24, 2018, at his winter residence in Wauchula. Arlin was born on March 19, 1939, and was a lifelong resident of Wells County, Ind. Arlin worked as a heavy rigger with G&L Crane Service in Ft. Wayne, Ind. He attended Murray Missionary Church and was also an ac tive Mason and Shriner. Arlin enjoyed woodworking and building dollhouses for friends and family. He also enjoyed gardening, canning vegetables, baking cookies and making break fast for friends and family. Most of all he enjoyed spend ing time with family and friends both in Indiana and Florida. He is survived by his wife of 28 years, Sally McAfee; one son Michael (Becky) Shannon, of Ft. Wayne, Ind.; two daughters; Deborah (Mike) Plasterer, of Ossian, Ind., and Malinda (Tony) Goodman, of Hardy, Ark; five grandchildren; six greatgrandchildren; and many nieces and nephews. A celebration of life will be held at a later date. Online condolences may be made at pongerkaysgrady.comPonger-Kays-GradyFuneral Home & Cremation Services Wauchula 5:3cPreplan Todayfor the sake of your loved onesPonger-Kays-GradyFuneral Homes & Cremation Services205 N. 9th Ave. Wauchula, Florida 33873 (863) 773-6400 www.PongerKaysGrady.com Because We Care...Superior Service Guaranteed Lowest CostAfter all, we are a family just like yours. We know what it feels like to lose someone you love. View Obits at robartsfuneralhome.com529 West Main Street Wauchula, Florida33873 863-773-9773 5:3c Thank You The words Thank You do not seem large enough for the gratitude we feel to our friends, neighbors, and total strangers that have supported our family this past week with food, cards, flowers, visits, thoughts, prayers, and much more. We are blessed and extremely thankful to all of you. With gratitude and thanks, The Christian Martinez Family 5:3pMARGARET JANE HENDREN Margaret Jane Hendren, 76, of Zolfo Springs, died Sunday, April 8, 2018, at her home. She was born June 2, 1941, in Dobson, N.C., and moved to Hardee County in 1982 from Dayton, Ohio. She worked in the hospitality industry and was a Baptist. She was a member of the Elks and Moose. She is survived by husband, Billy E. Hendren, of Zolfo Springs, son, William (Kathy) Hendren, of Lakeland; sister, Debbie White, of Greer, S.C.; sister, Carol Wilmoth, of Elkin, N.C.; and brother, William Kimmer, of Morgan ton, N.C. Funeral services will be at a later date. Internment was at Bushnell National Cemetery. Arrangements were by Zippers Funeral Home, Ruskin. In MemoryNAOMI MARSH PEARSONNaomi Pearson, 92, died on Tuesday, May 1, 2018, in her home, with her family beside her. This date marked the 76th anniversary of Naomis marriage to Walter Pearson. He preceded her by death in December 2014. We know there is great rejoicing in heaven as these two dear ones are together again! Naomi was born in Wauchula, to Andrew and Addie Marsh. She was the 8th of their children. Naomi was preceded in death by her parents; and her siblings, Voncile Whitehead, Cecil Marsh, Luther Marsh, Mae Frank Himrod, Doris Gough, Ruth Smith, A.M. Marsh; and half-brother, Winston Marsh. She is survived by daugh ters, Brenda Raabe (Rob), of Naples, Liz Pearson, of At lanta, Ga.; grandson, Mike Raabe (Ashleigh), of Naples; and great-grand sons, Felix and Miles Raabe. Also, surviving is a half-sister, Juanita Herd, of Con necticut. Naomi was a woman of strong faith, which was nur tured from childhood at Oak Grove Baptist Church in Hardee County. She was baptized at age 8, in Charlie Creek, in Hardee County. Naomi was also very active at First Baptist Church in Wauchula where she sang alto in the choir, and, also, served as Sunday School teacher, and a leader in W.M.U. In 1972, Naomi and Walter moved to Lakeland, where they both served Gap way Baptist Church in various roles of service to Sunday School, music, and others. They frequently sang duets in the church. One of Naomis proudest accomplishments was earn ing her Bachelor of Arts Degree in Education from the University of South Florida in Tampa. She was 49 years old at that time. She then proceeded to teach elemen tary school for 17 years, most of which were at Combee Elementary in Lakeland. Naomi will always be remembered for her faith, and her love and devotion to her family and friends. She will be greatly missed. Services will be on Fri day, May 4, at Gapway Baptist Church in Lakeland. Visitation will be at 10 a.m., followed by service at 11 a.m. Burial will be at 3 p.m. at Wauchula Cemetery. Marion Nelson Funeral Home handling arrange ments. Condolences may be sent to the family at www.marionnelson.com. DELI MACARONI SALAD What better to take on a picnic than a macaroni salad. As simple as this one is, people will think you stopped at the deli. 1/3 cup fat-free Ranch dress ing 1/3 cup fat-free mayonnaise 2 tablespoons sweet pickle relish 1/2 cup small curd fat-free cottage cheese 2 cups cooked elbow maca roni, rinsed and drained 2 teaspoons dried onion flakes 1 teaspoon dried parsley flakes 1/8 teaspoon black pepper 1. In a medium bowl, combine Ranch dressing, mayon naise, pickle relish and cottage cheese. Add macaroni, onion flakes, parsley flakes and black pepper. Mix well to combine. Cover and refriger ate for at least 1 hour. Gently stir again just before serving. Serves 4. TIP: Usually 1 1/3 cups uncooked elbow macaroni cooks to about 2 cups. Each serving equals: 173 calories, 1g fat, 7g protein, 34g carbs, 558mg sodium, 32mg calcium, 1g fiber; Diabetic Ex changes: 1 1/2 Starch/Carb, 1/2 Meat; Carb Choices: 2.(c) 2018 King Features Synd., Inc.Comfort Foods Made Fast And HealthyBy Healthy Exchanges HAM AND CHEDDAR STRATA Whatever the cause for cel ebration Mother's Day, a graduation, the fact that it's (finally!) the weekend this ham and cheddar breakfast strata will start the day off with deliciousness. Serve it with a light salad. 8 ounces thinly sliced deli ham 3 cups reduced-fat (2 per cent) milk 7 large eggs 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard 1 teaspoon chopped fresh thyme leaves Salt Pepper 1 loaf French bread, sliced 8 ounces Cheddar cheese 1 tablespoon snipped fresh chives 1. Spray 2-quart baking dish with cooking spray. Line dish with ham. 2. In large bowl, whisk together milk, eggs, mustard, thyme, 1/4 teaspoon salt and 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper until wellblended. 3. Arrange half of bread slices, overlapping slightly, on bottom of prepared dish. Pour half of milk mixture over bread. Sprinkle with half of Cheddar. Repeat layering. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate at least 1 hour or up to overnight. 4. Heat oven to 350 F. Remove plastic wrap and bake strata 50 to 55 minutes or until golden and knife inserted in center comes out clean. Let stand 5 minutes. Garnish with chives. Serves 6.(c) 2018 Hearst Communications, Inc. All rights reserved Recipes FromGood Housekeeping 1. In the Bible's King James translation there are more than how many references to gems and precious stones? 100, 500, 1,700, 2,200 2. Which book recounts the story of the Israelites wander ing in the desert for 40 years? Titus, Hebrews, James, Ro mans 3. From 2 Samuel 14, how many shekels did Absalom's hair weigh after he cut it off? 2, 10, 50, 200 4. Where did Jesus attend a wedding where the wine was exhausted? Sardis, Antioch of Syria, Joppa, Cana of Galilee 5. In Mark 6:9, Jesus tells his disciples not to put on two ...? Sandals, Coats, Head dresses, Girdles ANSWERS: 1) 1700; 2) Hebrews; 3) 200; 4) Cana of Galilee; 5) Coats Comments? More Trivia? Visit www.TriviaGuy.com(c) 2018 King Features Synd., Inc.Bible TriviaBy Wilson Casey How Low Will Some People Go? Report Exploitation of the Elderly1 (800) 96 Abuse 1 (800) 962 2873 May 3, 2018, The Herald-Advocate A5

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4:26,5:3c Heartland Pharmacy “We put our into our service” DON’T LET YOUR INSURANCE CHOOSE YOUR PHARMACY, CALL US! We take all Rx Insurance including Medicare Part D, Tricare, Express Scripts, Medco, CVS Caremark, Medicaid, & Many More. Free Delivery • Fast & Friendly Service Certified Mastectomy Fitter Certified Diabetic Shoes Fitter Medical Equipment & Supplies 116 Heartland Way • Wauchula • (863) 767-8920 Monday-Friday 9 am to 6 pm • Saturday 9 am to 1 pm5:3c BOXED BOUNTY COURTESY PHOTO Cutting Edge Ministries and Faith Temple Church of God in Wauchula recently gaveevery student at Zolfo Springs Elementary School a box of food to bring home toshare with their families. STREEEETCH LIMO COURTESY PHOTOS Wauchula Elementarykindergarten through fifth-grade students whoearned $200 or more forthe Go Take a Hikefundraiser were rewardedwith a limo ride to PizzaHut. The luxury ride was afun experience, as was allthe pizza they could eat!The funds raised with GoTake a Hike are used forincentives for the stu dents as well as materialsfor school activities. Stu dents earn money for thenumber of laps that theyrun or walk. CANDID(ATE) CONVERSATION PHOTO BY TOM STAIK Bowling Green Mayor Sam Fite (standing) delivers opening remarks during a town hall-style forum on schoolsafety organized by student activist JaKevis Brown as part of the continuing March For Our Lives movement.Held at the Greater Macedonia Primitive Baptist Church, the afternoon event garnered 23 spectators. Moderatedby Hallendele City Commissioner Daniel Sohn, the forum lasted well over two hours. Candidates for Florida’s17th Congressional District present at the event were: Democrats April Freeman and Bill Pollard and RepublicanJohn Sawyer. Also present was Catherin Price, a Democrat running for the Florida Senate seat currently heldby Denise Grimsley. The panel included no incumbents. PLAAAY BALL! COURTESY PHOTO Cavel Myers invites everyone to come to the HardeeCounty Public Library to register to win four tickets tosee the Charlotte Stone Crabs play. Entry in the give away, donated by the Minors team, is free. Take aswing at winning by heading to the library, located inthe Curtis Ezelle Government Complex on U.S. 17 atOak Street in Wauchula. C C e e l l e e b b r r a a t t i i n n g g T T h h i i s s D D a a y y : : • World Press Freedom Day • Garden Meditation Day • Lumpy Rug Day • National Chocolate Custard Day • National Paranormal Day • National Raspberry Popover Day • National Specially-Abled Pets Day • National Day of Prayer • World Password Day A6 The Herald-Advocate, May 3, 2018

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5/3/2018Sun Data Rise: 6:46 AM Set: 8:02 PM Day Length 13 hrs. 16 mins. Moon Data Rise: 11:27 PM Set: 9:31 AM Overhead: 4:05 AM Underfoot: 4:29 PM Moon Phase 87% Waning Gibbous Major Times 4:05 AM 6:05 AM 4:29 PM 6:29 PM Minor Times 9:31 AM 10:31 AM 11:27 PM 12:27 AM Prediction Hunting or Fishing Average Time Zone UTC: -45/4/2018Sun Data Rise: 6:45 AM Set: 8:02 PM Day Length 13 hrs. 17 mins. Moon Data Rise: --:-Set: 10:17 AM Overhead: 4:53 AM Underfoot: 5:18 PM Moon Phase 80% Waning Gibbous Major Times 4:53 AM 6:53 AM 5:18 PM 7:18 PM Minor Times --:---:-10:17 AM 11:17 AM Prediction Hunting or Fishing Average Time Zone UTC: -4 5/5/2018Sun Data Rise: 6:44 AM Set: 8:03 PM Day Length 13 hrs. 19 mins. Moon Data Rise: 12:16 AM Set: 11:06 AM Overhead: 5:42 AM Underfoot: 6:06 PM Moon Phase 72% Waning Gibbous Major Times 5:42 AM 7:42 AM 6:06 PM 8:06 PM Minor Times 12:16 AM 1:16 AM 11:06 AM 12:06 PM Prediction Hunting or Fishing Average Time Zone UTC: -45/6/2018Sun Data Rise: 6:44 AM Set: 8:03 PM Day Length 13 hrs. 19 mins. Moon Data Rise: 1:03 AM Set: 11:57 AM Overhead: 6:30 AM Underfoot: 6:54 PM Moon Phase 63% Waning Gibbous Major Times 6:30 AM 8:30 AM 6:54 PM 8:54 PM Minor Times 1:03 AM 2:03 AM 11:57 AM 12:57 PM Prediction Hunting or Fishing Average Time Zone UTC: -4 5/7/2018Sun Data Rise: 6:43 AM Set: 8:04 PM Day Length 13 hrs. 21 mins. Moon Data Rise: 1:46 AM Set: 12:48 PM Overhead: 7:17 AM Underfoot: 7:40 PM Moon Phase 50% Last Quarter Major Times 7:17 AM 9:17 AM 7:40 PM 9:40 PM Minor Times 1:46 AM 2:46 AM 12:48 PM 1:48 PM Prediction Hunting or Fishing Average+ Time Zone UTC: -45/8/2018Sun Data Rise: 6:42 AM Set: 8:05 PM Day Length 13 hrs. 23 mins. Moon Data Rise: 2:26 AM Set: 1:41 PM Overhead: 8:03 AM Underfoot: 8:26 PM Moon Phase 44% Waning Crescent Major Times 8:03 AM 10:03 AM 8:26 PM 10:26 PM Minor Times 2:26 AM 3:26 AM 1:41 PM 2:41 PM Prediction Hunting or Fishing Average Time Zone UTC: -4 5/9/2018Sun Data Rise: 6:41 AM Set: 8:05 PM Day Length 13 hrs. 24 mins. Moon Data Rise: 3:05 AM Set: 2:35 PM Overhead: 8:49 AM Underfoot: 9:11 PM Moon Phase 35% Waning Crescent Major Times 8:49 AM 10:49 AM 9:11 PM 11:11 PM Minor Times 3:05 AM 4:05 AM 2:35 PM 3:35 PM Prediction Hunting or Fishing Average Time Zone UTC: -45/10/2018Sun Data Rise: 6:41 AM Set: 8:06 PM Day Length 13 hrs. 25 mins. Moon Data Rise: 3:42 AM Set: 3:30 PM Overhead: 9:34 AM Underfoot: 9:57 PM Moon Phase 26% Waning Crescent Major Times 9:34 AM 11:34 AM 9:57 PM 11:57 PM Minor Times 3:42 AM 4:42 AM 3:30 PM 4:30 PM Prediction Hunting or Fishing Average Time Zone UTC: -4 Solunar ForecastProvided courtesy of solunarforecast.com To Your Good Health By Keith Roach, M.D. DEAR DR. ROACH: My husband will be 82 in July. About three years ago, I became aware of his sudden movements during the night. We were renting in Florida, and the bed was smaller than our bed at home. His body would jerk, sometimes strongly. These movements would not wake him; he just seemed asleep. He does not remember any thing about it in the morning. We went to see his doctor at home, who said that he is in very good shape. He did not know what caused the movements. We are once again staying in Florida, and his body movements are the same, sometimes strong enough to shake the bed. I find it hard to believe that this is normal. Do you have any advice? B.N.S. ANSWER: This is a classic description of a condition called periodic limb movements of sleep. These usually involve the legs, and typi cally involve pointing the toe while flexing the ankle, knee and sometimes the hip. Each move ment lasts a few seconds and repeats every 30 seconds or so. Your story that he doesn't remem ber them is very typical: It's usually the sleeping partner who notices them. PLMS is more com mon in older adults. PLMS by itself is not a disease and does not need treatment; however, it is often associated with other conditions, especially restless leg syndrome (Willis-Ekbom disease), rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (which in cludes sometimes violent movements) and nar colepsy. Since your husband apparently has no symp toms, he does not need treatment. However, he should be specifically asked about symptoms like an urge to move the legs while awake, ab normal feelings in the legs, difficulty falling asleep and sleepiness during the day. These would be likely to indicate RLS or its close rel ative, periodic limb movement disorder. DEAR DR. ROACH: What can an 80year-old woman expect to have checked as part of an annual physical examination? H.M. ANSWER: The annual physical exam has gotten some bad press lately. Some of it is welldeserved: The actual physical exam occasionally finds some unsuspected problems, but this is quite uncommon and there is no proof that the annual physical saves lives. This argument misses the point, in my opinion. The "annual physical" is a scheduled time for important conversations about screening and prevention. These include checking blood pres sure and considering cholesterol screening (cho lesterol is a less-important risk factor in 80-year-old women than it is in men or in younger adults). Similarly, it's time to come to a mutual decision on whether a mammogram should be done (again, the evidence at age 80 is unclear). Most importantly, your doctor or provider should be doing a depression screen, thinking about ways to reduce fall risk, assessing osteo porosis and giving good advice on diet and ex ercise. People at high risk may need other labs checked or advice given (for example, people with high blood pressure should be screened for diabetes). It's a long list, and that's why a dedicated visit for health promotion makes sense to me. Dr. Roach regrets that he is unable to answer in dividual letters, but will incorporate them in the column whenever possible. Readers may email questions to ToYourGoodHealth@ med.cor nell.edu. To view and order health pamphlets, visit www.rbmamall.com, or write to Good Health, 628 Virginia Drive, Orlando, FL 32803.(c) 2018 North America Synd., Inc. All Rights Reserved May 3, 2018, The Herald-Advocate A7 Crop UpdateApril 30, 2018 General: According to the National Agricultural Statistics Service in Florida, there were 6.4 days suitable for fieldwork for the week ending Sunday, April 29, 2018. Precipitation estimates ranged from no rain in multiple locations to 5.9 inches in Juno Beach (Palm Beach County). The average mean temperature ranged from 64.9F in Milton (Santa Rosa County) to 80.0F in Marathon (Monroe County). Citrus: Temperatures were typically warm for this time of the year in the citrus growing region. Most days were in the low to high 80s. The highest temperatures were in Arcadia (Desoto County) and Ortona (Glades County) at 90F. Avon Park (Highlands County) and Plant City (Hillsborough County) both reached 89F. Rainfall was very sporadic. Several stations in citrus pro ducing counties recorded between one and two inches of rainfall, while other stations in the same counties recorded less than half an inch. The most rainfall was in the Arcadia (Desoto County) at 2.43 inches. In Polk County, the most rainfall was in Polk City at 0.74 inches, and in Hendry County, Clewiston had the most rainfall at 0.90 inches. According to the April 26, 2018 U.S. Drought Monitor, conditions were the same as the previous week. All citrus producing counties south of Lake Okeechobee were affected by moderate to severe drought. In the northern, central, and Indian River District citrus areas, moderate drought conditions continued in Orange, Osceola, Brevard, Indian River, St. Lucie, and Martin counties. Several of the remaining citrus producing counties were abnormally dry. Valencia harvest hit the peak of its season. During April, harvesting amounts were between two and a half to three million boxes per week. Based on the tentative closing dates of processing plants, harvest should begin to slow in the next week or two. Scheduled closing dates for plants are from the first week to the third week of May. Packinghouses continue to pack fresh Valencia oranges as quality fruit becomes available. According to the Market News Bulletin, dated April 23, 2018, Storage fruit will most likely run until mid-June if the supply lasts. Next seasons fruit is progressing well. Oranges, on average, are as large as marble size on most trees, and some are slightly larger. Fieldwork picked up with caretakers pushing old trees and putting them in burn piles. Grove owners also ground sprayed, fertilized, and conducted general grove maintenance. Irrigation ran regularly. Fruits and Vegetables: Crops planted included bitter melon, boniato, malanga, and okra. Crops harvested included blueberries, cucumber, eggplant, green beans, malanga, okra, peaches, peppers, radishes, squash, sweet corn, tomatoes, and watermelons. Livestock and Pastures: Pasture quality varied across the state, but in general, livestock continued to require feed supple ments. Producers in Jackson and Volusia counties planted pas tures. Field Crops: Producers in Jackson County harvested rye grass, hay, and baleage. Potato harvest began. Sugarcane harvest continued in Glades and Hendry counties with an extended har vest expected due to delays earlier in the season. 1. Who was born Robert Allen Zimmerman? Name the first single he wrote and re leased. 2. Led Zeppelin ran into a small snag when the band flew into Singapore to do a concert. What happened? 3. Name the singer-song writer who had a hit with "Crying." 4. Which group released "Do You Remember Rock 'n' Roll Radio?" 5. Name the album with these two songs: "Being for the Benefit of Mr. Kite!" and "Fixing a Hole." 6. Name the song that contains this lyric: "I'm rolling thunder, pouring rain/ I'm coming on like a hurricane." ANSWERS 1. Zimmerman was Bob Dylan's birth name. His first single, "Mixed-Up Confusion" backed with "Corrina, Cor rina," was released in 1962. 2. Singapore officials wouldn't let them off the plane because of their long hair. The concert, in 1972, was can celed. 3. Roy Orbison, in 1961. His song ranks No. 69 in Rolling Stone magazine's 500 Greatest Songs of All Time. 4. The Ramones, in 1980. All members of the group took on "Ramone" as their last name, starting with Douglas Colvin, who became Dee Dee Ramone. 5. The Beatles album "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band" in 1967. 6. "Hell's Bells," by AC/DC in 1980. A 2,000-pound cast bronze bell rings 13 times at the start of the song.(c) 2018 King Features Synd., Inc.Flash BackBy Chris Richcreek New details on eligibility for a new U.S. Department of Agriculture disaster relief plan, the 2017 Wildfires and Hurricanes Indemnity Program, were announced Tuesday by U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue. Additionally, USDA will provide $340 million through a block grant to the state of Florida for Hurricane Irma losses to citrus production ex pected during the 2018 through the 2020 crop years, reim bursement for the cost of buy ing and planting replacement trees including resetting and grove rehabilitation, and for re pair of damages to irrigation systems among other things. In total, USDAs Farm Serv ice Agency will deploy the up to $2.36 billion that Congress appropriated through the Bi partisan Budget Act of 2018 to help producers with recovery of their agricultural operations in at least nine states with hur ricane damage and other states impacted by wildfire. Last year our nation expe rienced some of the most significant disasters we have seen in decades, some back-toback, at the most critical time in their production year. The Florida citrus industry was likely hit the hardest, and with such a high-value crop, they face a steeper financial burden and, as a whole, have less cov erage through our traditional insurance options, Perdue said. Under the direction of President Trump, my office has been working directly with Governor Scott and Commis sioner Putnam in Florida to put a process in place that will en sure the Florida citrus industry maintains its infrastructure and can continue to be the signa ture crop for the state, he added. Our team is working as quickly as possible to make this available to farmers in need and continues to provide excellent customer service, which began the day the storm hit through a successful recovery within local communities, Perdue concluded. Following the announce ment, Gov. Rick Scott and Commissioner of Agriculture Adam Putnam issued the fol lowing statements: Said Scott, Since Hurricane Irma hit our state, I have been fighting for Floridas citrus growers to get the relief they need to rebuild their liveli hoods, including taking imme diate steps to provide relief from the state. Our citrus growers have had many challenges over the last few years, including fighting citrus greening, which was compounded by the ravaging effects of Hurricane Irma, he continued. Florida prides it self on our incredible and iconic citrus industry, and this funding will help ensure that Florida remains synonymous with citrus. Putnam said, While no amount of relief can make the farmers who suffered damages from Hurricane Irma whole, this much-needed disaster re lief will help Florida agricul ture get back on its feet. I thank Secretary Perdue, Governor Scott, our federal leaders and the agriculture industry for their collaborative efforts to provide this relief. Floridas $120 billion agriculture industry is a pillar of our economy, and we must con tinue to give our farmers and ranchers the support they need to thrive. Putnam concluded. USDA Plans $340 Million For Citrus Hurricane Losses C C e e l l e e b b r r a a t t i i n n g g I I n n M M a a y y : : Date Your Mate Month Foster Care Month Lupus Awareness Month National Barbecue Month National Bike Month National Blood Pressure Month National Hamburger Month National Photograph Month National Salad Month Older Americans Month National Asparagus Month World Stroke Month National Military Appreciation Month National Motorcycle Awareness Month 'JEWELED' PORCELAIN The "jeweled" Coalport porcelain of the late 19th cen tury attracts buyers with its beauty and unfamiliar beading, but few know the history of the porcelain. Coalport porcelain was first made in England in 1795. In the late 19th century, a new type of porcelain vases, teaware, boxes and other ornamental wares were created. It was hand decorated with small colored "beads" of glaze, as well as sections with simulated gems like moonstones or emer alds. These pieces were very expensive when compared to the useful wares made before that time. In 1895, Coalport was able to make the jeweled porcelains by a less-expensive method, and more pieces were sold. Collectors have favored these pieces since the 1950s, and prices are high today. At a 2016 Skinner auction in Boston, which included over 60 pieces of this type of Coalport, a round covered box, just 2 1/2 inches in diameter, brought $461. The box has turquoise beading and a central medallion. A two-handled shaped bowl with a cover sold for about $1,000 at the same sale. *** Q: Back in the day, many brides selected a pattern of sterling-silver flatware. Today those sets of silver aren't used and are a prob lem for the families that in herit them. This is the dilemma I am facing. How do we get rid of the flatware? I have two sets of sterling sil ver flatware and additional items. How do I find a reli able and safe way to sell the flatware, either for the value of the set or for the value of the silver? I have a set of Meadow Rose by Wallace and a set of Oneida's Damask Rose. I also have miscella neous pieces such as salt and pepper, candlesticks and cutlery. A: Sterling silver is always worth at least the meltdown value, and there are shops that buy silver and gold to melt down, but you also can sell silver flatware to a matching serv ice. Many are listed online. Search for "matching service silver" or "matching service sil ver plate." Expect to get about half what it will sell for be cause dealers have to make a profit. Wallace introduced Meadow Rose pattern in 1907. It sells for more than Oneida's Damask Rose, which was first made in 1946. Monograms lower the price. CURRENT PRICES Bottle stopper, kissing cou ple, carved wood, push lever, heads turn and kiss, Anri, c. 1950, 6 1/2 inches, $20 Golf club, Brassie, brass sole plate, lead back weight, blonde fruitwood head, Epsom golf club, marked, McWatt, 1800s, 42 inches, $100. Stringholder, cylindrical, Planters Cocktail Peanuts, fig ural Mr. Peanut, chalkware, turquoise and yellow paint, 1950s, $455. Cloisonne Teapot, brass and copper, green enamel, lotus flower petals, loop handle, carved frog finial, lid, 1900s, 5 x 8 inches, $1,500. TIP: American carousel figures are more heavily carved on the right side, because they went around counterclockwise. The left side is more ornate for European figures, because the carousel turned the other way. American figures sell for more money. For more collecting news, tips and resources, visit www.Kovels.com(c) 2018 King Features Synd., Inc.Kovels Antiques & Collecting By Terry & Kim KovelThis round Coalport box with a lid may have been made to hold powder. It has turquoise "jewels" and a medallion. Price at auction, $461.

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A8 The Herald-Advocate, May 3, 2018

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May 3, 2018, The Herald-Advocate A9 Principal’s Overall Achievement — 9th Grade: Haven Gray, Owen Schraeder, Emma McGuckin, Joseph Peters,Alyssa Gonzalez, Karson Goodwyn, Riley Justiss, MonikaPoucher, Ethan Duncan, Jace Bryan and Daisy Chavez10th Grade: Dylan Davis, Hugh Pate, Kein Knight, Griffin Clark, Rachel Garland, Shelby Buzzard, Jesus Jurado,Quintin Lindsey, Isabella Adams and Mackenzie McCoy11th Grade: Roman Almaguer, Daniela Villalva, Tara Hines, Patricia Deloera, Ashlee Patterson, Amari Deleon, ClaireCarlton, Anthony Webb, Shelby Spencer and Matt TysonDistinguished Social Sciences: Paul Davis, Samantha McMillan, Owen Skinner, Renell Herrera, Roman Alma guer, Eduardo Arroyo, Anahi Cano, Ismael Bautista, Des tiny Fields and Maricela Garcia-PazDistinguished Science: Jessica Pascual, Rachel St. Fort, Sandra Paniagua, Kimberly Walton, Kein Knight, RomanAlmaguer, Kyle Poling, Franklin Lee, Rachel Shaw, CarsonKelly, Hermelinda Leon, Marixa Bermudez, Marilu Anto nio-Rivera, Makayla Ann Otero, Alyssa Gonzalez, JosephPeters, Miranda Adame-Pearson, Jacqueline Rodriguez-Suarez and Hannah BandyEnglish Excellence: Tyresha McIvery, Jorge Valencia, Jes sica Wilkerson, Jasmine Gutierrez-Montes, Issac Estrada,Veronica Sanchez, Hallee Lopez, Yovani Bautista Salazar, Marilu Antonio Rivera, Liztsi Flores-Flores, Enrique Ve lazquez, Rosalba Salazar-Barbosa, Abby Duke, Paul Davis,Marixa Bermudez, Brittany Cruz, Chastady Flores andAmber McCallReading Excellence: Handorich Martinez, Joni O’Bryan, Jennifer Aguirre, Kasandra Gallardo, Ashwanta Price,Veronica Sanchez, Shaddai Santellan-Mendez, Jessica Vil legas, Mike Cruz and Josh YarbroughDistinguished Math: Alisa Arce, Rebecca Hinojosa, Ashawnta Price, Marilu Antonio-Rivera, LoganCartwright, Liliana Mata, Gabriel Brennen Arguelles,Kiara Coronado, Jasmin Serapio, Rafael Valdez-Garcia,Roman Almaguer, Lily Franco, Jasmin Arreola, LarzaroCardozo, Kein Knight, Dylan Davis, Amber Jones, BriannaFranks, Carolina Ramirez-Santiago, Joe Anthony Byersand Amber Kate McCallPhysical Education: Savannah Giddens, Oren Crawford, Jace Bryan, Gabriella Ancelmo, Ramiro Guerrero, AngieCeron, Katelynn Bolin, Marc Pierre, Ariel Whiters andChristian TurnerVisual Arts: Kylie Chapman, Aracely Sanchez, Neda Alqabsi and Bryon AdlerOutstanding Culinary: Franklin Lee and Abby Duke Health Sciences: Miguel Isadoro Velasco Gonzalez and Mia SaldivarExcellence in Business: Vasilios Diakomihalis and Alexis KerseyEarly Childhood: Erica Martinez and Shelby Buzzard Construction Awards: Javier Chavez-Chaidez and Joshua McQuaigAuto Tech: Marc Flores and Alejondro Gonzales Agriculture: J.C. Thomas and Sarah Carlton Foreign Languages: Jessica Pascual, Jessica Rodriguez, Rachel St. Fort and Makayla WilsonMedia Reading: Omar Guevara, Ty Smith and Nicholas CunninghamBand: Elias Ramirez and James Neel Chorus: Adriana Arana and Shaddai Santellan-Mendez Academic Team: James Neel and Enrique Velazquez Effort in Education: Janelly Calderas, Destiny Fields, Nicholas Cunningham, Christopher Castaldi, JhordySanchez-Leal and Jose Yanes.Leadership: Travon Lee Thomas, Alyssa Gonzalez, Emma McGuckin and Marley UresteAFJROTC: Carson P. Terrell and Itzel Magana-Navarette SFSC Academic: Claire Carlton, Jansen Walker and KryaWilson

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CITY OF WAUCHULA COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY NOTICE TO THE PUBLICThe Board of Directors of the City of Wauchula Community Redevelopment Agency (the Board) will hold the regular scheduled workshop Monday May 7, 2018 immediately following the City Commission workshop which will convene at 5:00 pm or as soon thereafter as it reasonably can be held. The agenda can be viewed at 126 S. 7th Avenue or www.cityofwauchula.com The meetings will be held at the Commission Chambers located at 225 East Main Street, Wauchula, FL 33873. Pursuant to Section 286.0107, Florida Statutes, as amended, the Board hereby advises that if any interested person decides to appeal any decision made by the Board with respect to any matter considered at the proceedings, he will need a record of the proceeding and that, for such purposes, he may need to insure that a verbatim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. The Board does not discriminate upon the basis of any individuals disability status. This non-discriminatory policy involves every aspect of the Boards functions, including ones access to, participation, employment or treatment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable accommodation as provided for in the Amer icans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26, Florida Statutes, should contact the City Clerk at (863) 773-3131. CITY OF WAUCHULA S/Keith Nadaskay Chairman Community Redevelopment Agency ATTEST S/Holly Smith City Clerk 5:3cNOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING & INTENTION TO CONSIDER ADOPTION OF A MUNICIPAL ORDINANCEPLEASE TAKE NOTICE that a public hearing will be held and thereafter Ordinance Number 2018-03 will be presented to the City Commission for adoption upon the sec ond reading at City Hall, 225 East Main Street, Wauchula, Florida 33873, on the 14th day of May 2018, at 6:00 P.M., or as soon thereafter as it reasonably can be held. A copy of the proposed Ordinance can be obtained from the office of the City Clerk, 126 South Seventh Avenue, Wauchula, Florida 33873. Any person may appear and be heard with respect to the proposed Ordinance. The proposed Ordinance is entitled as follows: ORDINANCE 2018-03 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF WAUCHULA, FLORIDA, PROVIDING FOR THE DATES FOR THE PRIMARY AND THE RUN-OFF ELECTIONS FOR THOSE CERTAIN COMMISSION DISTRICT SEATS TO BE FILLED BY ELECTION TO COINCIDE WITH THE FLORIDA PRIMARY AND GENERAL ELECTION DATES; PROVIDING FOR THE PERIOD OF TIME FOR CANDIDATES TO QUALIFY; PROVIDING FOR THE COMMISSION DIS TRICT SEATS TO BE ELECTED; PROVIDING FOR CONFLICT; PROVID ING FOR SEVERABILITY; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE. Pursuant to Section 286.0107, Florida Statutes, as amended, the City Commission hereby advises that if any interested person decides to appeal any decision made by the City Commission with respect to any matter considered at the proceedings, he will need a record of the proceeding and that, for such purposes, he may need to en sure that a verbatim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes the tes timony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. The City Commission of the City of Wauchula, Florida does not discriminate upon the basis of any individuals disability status. This non-discriminatory policy involves every aspect of the Commissions functions, including ones access to, participation, em ployment, or treatment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable accommodation as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26, Florida Statutes, should contact the City Clerk at (863) 773-3131. s/Holly Smith HOLLY SMITH, City Clerk City of Wauchula Thomas A. Cloud 301 East Pine Street, Suite 1400 Orlando, Florida 32801 Attorney for the City of Wauchula 5:3cCITY OF WAUCHULA NOTICE TO THE PUBLICThe City Commission of the City of Wauchula will hold the regular sched uled workshop Monday, May 7, 2018 at 5:00 pm or as soon thereafter as it rea sonably can be held. The agenda can be viewed at www.cityofwauchula.com The meetings will be held at the Commission Chambers located at 225 East Main Street, Wauchula, FL 33873. Pursuant to Section 286.0107, Florida Statutes, as amended, the City Commission hereby advises that if any interested person decides to appeal any decision made by the City Commission with respect to any matter considered at the proceedings, he will need a record of the proceeding and that, for such purposes, he may need to insure that a verbatim record of the proceeding is made, which record in cludes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. The City Commission of the City of Wauchula, Florida does not discriminate upon the basis of any individuals disability status. This non-discriminatory policy in volves every aspect of the Commissions functions, including ones access to, partic ipation, employment or treatment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable accommodation as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26, Florida Statutes, should contact the City Clerk at (863) 773-3131. CITY OF WAUCHULA S/ Richard K. Nadaskay Jr. Mayor ATTEST S/Holly Smith City Clerk 5:3c My brothers and I were given the chore of cleaning out the horse stalls. Steve was 17, Bobby was 14 and I was 10. Over time, the horse stalls fill up with processed horse feed. My step-father Lawrence, never one to waste a resource, wanted us to shovel it onto the truck and then shovel it out into a sandy section of the or ange grove to build up the soil. My brothers made it their mission in life to let me know where I stood in the pecking order. When they were left in charge, I would have to run around the house three times before I could have one potato chip (I was a lot thinner then). When the three of us were as signed chores, they tried to arrange things so they did the supervision and I did the labor. This chore was no different. The problem, however, with them supervising and me shoveling was that a scrawny 10-year-old boy cant shovel very much. They soon realized they would have to work as well. Much colorful language ensued as we piled the con tents of the horse stalls onto the truck. We all three crammed into the seat (this was before super crewcabs) and drove over to the sandy place in the grove. A fight ensued about who would drive the truck and who would shovel. My brothers realized that if I shoveled, wed be there all afternoon. Thats when the miracle occurred they let me drive. To those of you aghast at the idea of a 10-year-old driving a truck, I should explain we were all taught to drive early. In the country, driving a truck or a tractor was an essential skill. I learned to drive in a 1959 Willys Jeep truck three-speed when I was 5. Nobody worried about me running into some thing. There were only orange trees and cows. The trees would stop me, and the cows had enough sense to get out of the way. My brothers climbed in the back with the shovels, giving me strict instructions that I was to ease forward, then stop. They would shovel out the soil enrichment material, and then I would ease forward again. I put the truck in first gear, let out the clutch slow as I had been taught and eased forward. After about five minutes, boredom had set in. A bored 10-year-old mind is a danger ous thing. I began to remember all the times my brothers made me run around the house for a potato chip. I remembered them telling me about the monsters that only lived under my bed, be cause they liked young, tender meat. I remembered when they told me I was adopted (Im not and I have the pictures to prove it). Then temptation came to me. I cant say where the idea formed, only that it sprang to life in my consciousness. What would happen if the next time they yelled pull forward, I popped the clutch and plopped them into the load of processed horse feed? They would be covered in revenge. A small voice in my head said, Love your enemy, do good to those who persecute you. Another voice said, Its time to get even. Can you tell which voice belonged to God and which belonged to Satan? Steve yelled out pull for ward. I popped the clutch. They plopped into the pile of processed horse feed, revenge covering their faces. I had enough sense not to stick around. I opened the door of the truck and ran for the house. I had a good head start but forgot they had the truck. I looked over my shoulder to see Steve gripping the steering wheel, wiping the processed horse feed out of his eyes, bearing down on me. Bobby was still floundering in the back of the truck, unable to get his footing. I zig-zagged around orange trees, trying to shake them. Steve was grinding gears, making those four cylinders whine. I reached the house just as the truck skidded to a halt. Mamma came out to see what all the fuss was about. I can still see her, looking at one son, panting, out of breath, then looking at her other sons, covered with processed horse feed. She covered her mouth and tried to look disapproving, but she broke into laughter instead. She did not punish me. Steve and Bobby, however, got their revenge a few days later. This time we were in the grove pruning trees. They found a black snake, a harm less little thing. Then a tempting thought entered their mind. They waited until my back was turned and threw the snake at me. I dont know who was more traumatized, the snake or me. The snake went one way, and I went the other. The war of the brothers continued most of that summer. Its been a long time since I thought about that summer and a long time since I was tempted to get revenge on my brothers. My mind focused on different things. Your battles, your wars al ways continue until you say no to temptation, no to revenge. The best way to defeat temptation is to focus your soul elsewhere. Focus on what God wants for you, not on put ting people in their place. Funny, though. Suddenly I have this urge to call my broth ers and pretend to be an agent of the IRS, telling them they have a tax audit. Time for me to refocus again.Temptations I Have Known W agon Wheel Spoke ... The after noon breeze was welcome following the heat of the day. Johnny and I had to keep a sharp eye out for trouble sure to come. With vehicles not able to run and only 10 gallons of ration stamps left for the month, we had to take the horse and wagon to town for animal feed. With nearly a ton on this old wagon, stress was gaining on us. One wheel had a broken spoke, and the wheel had begun to wobble with still a mile to go. These little Baptist boys were learning to pray. We had no extra wheel. As we turned a corner I spotted a small hickory sapling straight as an arrow. It was now or never. We had to repair the wheel, hopefully without unloading the wagon. Taking a hatchet I cut the tree down and measured, adding enough to fit in the spoke holes, allowing a halfinch extra for tension. An hour later we had whittled out a new spoke and forced it into place and headed for home. Dad met us at the barn, and after telling why we were late he checked the wheel. He could not believe what he saw, but not showing any expres sion he asked who did this, pointing to the spoke. Both of us being afraid he was angry gave all the credit to the other. He started laughing and said he wanted to show us something. He bought three spokes to replace with but had forgotten to do so. He said the one we made was as good as the ones he bought. Our chest grew with pride for days as he told everyone what we did. I think before that summer was over we had made a dozen more for our neighbors. Dad had a way of making you feel special, especially when you did a good job or made a decision on our own like when the spoke broke out of the wagon wheel. Then there was the time one of our cows got stuck in the pond. This was before we had a tractor on the farm so it was me and the mule. I ran to the house to get the mule and rope. After several attempts and failures I finally set up like a block and tackle, without ei ther, and tossed the rope over a limb about 10 feet high and around another tree. It took longer to set up than it did to get her out. When I got her to the house I used the water hose to wash her off. Just then Dad drove up. You would have thought that cow was worth $2,000 the way he carried on, most of it to build me up. Then there was the time I wrecked his '40 Ford. It rolled three times and landed on its wheels. The driver who forced me off the road kept going, but the one he was meeting headon stopped. After verifying I was OK he drove two miles to let Dad know. Dad came up, and he too checked on me, then he took out a penny. Handing it to me he said, "Well, you are the youngest but the first to total one." After we cut the top off I mounted a buck-saw to the front and would drive it into the woods to get firewood, jack the rear wheels up, put on a long sixinch wide belt and saw the wood up before loading it to take home. The Apology from a Gun ... I'm sorry. I thought you would be appreciative of the freedoms I have protected. I did not know you would turn your hate on me. Yes, I am an AR-15, just like the one the bad kid was using in the Florida school. I am glad I could help stop the murderer. Who knew I could become the hated one. After all, the AR-15 was not the killer. It was the bad guy using an AR-15. He could have used a car. Vehicles kill thousands of young people every year, but you don't hate the car. I am a .38 special used to stop a rapist. Now you hate me, not the rapist. I am protected by the U.S. Constitution. The car and Iphone are not, but you hate me. The Founding Fathers wanted me in your home just in case the government turned on you. Now you are willing for kids (who have never read the history of countries that took guns from the people) to dictate the destruction of me so I cannot protect you. Why do you hate me so? I stop robbers, rapists, home invasions, etc., but you hate me more for protecting you. As Seen From This SideBy Jerry Gray Wolf PhillipsWauchula 'JEWELED' PORCELAIN The "jeweled" Coalport porcelain of the late 19th cen tury attracts buyers with its beauty and unfamiliar beading, but few know the history of the porcelain. Coalport porcelain was first made in England in 1795. In the late 19th century, a new type of porcelain vases, teaware, boxes and other orna mental wares were created. It was hand decorated with small colored "beads" of glaze, as well as sections with simulated gems like moonstones or emer alds. These pieces were very expensive when compared to the useful wares made before that time. In 1895, Coalport was able to make the jeweled porcelains by a less-expensive method, and more pieces were sold. Collectors have favored these pieces since the 1950s, and prices are high today. At a 2016 Skinner auction in Boston, which included over 60 pieces of this type of Coalport, a round covered box, just 2 1/2 inches in diameter, brought $461. The box has turquoise beading and a central medal lion. A two-handled shaped bowl with a cover sold for about $1,000 at the same sale. Q: Back in the day, many brides selected a pattern of sterling-silver flatware. Today those sets of silver aren't used and are a problem for the families that in herit them. This is the dilemma I am facing. How do we get rid of the flatware? I have two sets of sterling silver flatware and additional items. How do I find a reli able and safe way to sell the flatware, either for the value of the set or for the value of the silver? I have a set of Meadow Rose by Wallace and a set of Oneida's Damask Rose. I also have miscella neous pieces such as salt and pepper, candlesticks and cut lery. A: Sterling silver is always worth at least the meltdown value, and there are shops that buy silver and gold to melt down, but you also can sell sil ver flatware to a matching serv ice. Many are listed online. Search for "matching service silver" or "matching service sil ver plate." Expect to get about half what it will sell for because dealers have to make a profit. Wallace introduced Meadow Rose pattern in 1907. It sells for more than Oneida's Damask Rose, which was first made in 1946. Monograms lower the price. TIP: American carousel fig ures are more heavily carved on the right side, because they went around counterclockwise. The left side is more ornate for European figures, because the carousel turned the other way. American figures sell for more money. For more collecting news, tips and resources, visit www.Kovels.com(c) 2018 King Features Synd., Inc.Kovels Antiques & CollectingBy Terry & Kim Kovel May 3, 2018, The Herald-Advocate A11

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5:3c OF 2018 HARDEE HIGH SCHOOL SENIORS ADS START AS LOW AS $38 Herald-AdvocateHardee County’s Hometown Coverage115 S. 7th Ave. • Wauchula • 773-3255 ATTENTION PARENTS The Herald-Advocate will soon be publishing our Annual Graduation Keepsake Edition honoring all Hardee High School graduating seniors. Place an ad in this keepsake edition personally congratulating your senior on his/her accomplishments, with either a recent photo or one from his/her past, or both. DEADLINE • THURSDAY, MAY 10 4:12-5:3nc The By TOM STAIKOf The Herald-Advocate Rotary Freedom Flight will depart Wauchula on Saturdaywith 25 area veterans for awhirlwind two-day trip to thenation’s capital. Sponsored by the Hardee County Rotary Club, thisyear’s event honors 25 veter ans from across Hardee andHighlands counties. Each of the veterans is part nered with a “guardian” – alocal Rotarian – who will serveas a companion during the trip. “It is a full-packed week end,” said Sue Birge, co-chairof the effort. Veterans from Highlands County will assemble Satur day at the Bert J. Harris Centerin Sebring at 3 a.m. The group will be escorted to the Hardee County line bythe Sebring Police Departmentand Highlands County Sher iff’s Office along with a dele gation of motorcyclists fromthe Legion Riders of the Amer ican Legion. The law enforcement escort will be handed to the HardeeCounty Sheriff’s Office oncethe motorcade passes intoHardee County. The Highlands County dele gation — with the full escortof some 25-50 motorcycles —will arrive at the First BaptistChurch of Wauchula around 4a.m., where the veterans andguardians will meet with theirlocal counterparts. “That’s quite a sight when they start coming in the middleof the night with the flags ontheir bikes,” Birge said. The veterans and guardians will then be feted with a break fast provided by the Men’sFellowship at First Baptist. John Gill, a veteran serving in conflicts since Vietnam,serves as the medical directorof Freedom Flight and will be the featured speaker at thebreakfast reception. “It’s a good sendoff,” Birge said The veterans and guardians will then board a chartered busat 6 a.m. to travel to Tampa In ternational Airport for an 8:55a.m. departure to Washington,D.C. Organizers are hoping the community will help line WestMain Street and the parking lotof the church for the departure. “It’s early, but we hope peo ple will come out and showtheir support,” Birge said. The veterans will again be honored at the airport with areception sponsored by South west Airlines. Once landing in Washing ton, the veterans and guardianswill begin a tour of many ofthe high points of the capital. Tour stops will include: the World War II Memorial, Viet nam Wall, Korean Memorial, Jefferson Memorial, LincolnMemorial, the Changing of theGuard at Arlington NationalCemetery, and the WhiteHouse. Following dinner, the group will lodge at the Hilton Dou bletree across from the Penta gon on Saturday eveningbefore returning to Wauchulaon Sunday. Rotary Freedom Flights evolved from the HonorFlights, a one-day tour of thecapital for veterans. “Three years ago, Hardee County Rotary Club createdthe Rotary Freedom Flights,”Birge said. “We get our ownsponsors and make it a two-day weekend trip.” Hardee County Rotary Club heads the initiative with part nerships with the seven RotaryClubs in Highlands County. The event is held annually in May. Each veteran also receives a handmade quilt crafted byquilters in Hardee County. “The Rotary Club of Hardee County is thankful for theservice and sacrifice of all ofour veterans,” said Olivia Min shew, president of HardeeCounty Rotary Club. “Free dom Flights, while a large un dertaking for a club of our size,is only a small token of our ap preciation for our veterans.We are honored to be able toserve them.” Any veterans interested in applying for next year’s tripcan contact Birge at (863) 781-3536. Rotary Freedom Flight Departs Saturday In Other ActionZS Town Commission The Zolfo Springs Town Com mission considered the follow ing items during its 30-minutemeeting on April 24. All fivecommissioners were present. —announced that meetings for the next few months will beat old Granger Building(Recreation Center) at PioneerPark (just west off the mainparking lot). This because ren ovations at Town Hall are be ginning shortly. —announced the Fair Hous ing public hearing and work shop would be continued tonext month’s meeting. —held final hearing of a pair of ordinances changing thetown code on vacating prop erty and approving vacating anunnamed alleyway betweenPear Street and U .S. 17 so Cir cle K can build its new CircleK. Rodney Fields of Circle K saidunifying the property and wentaround the commission show ing a description of the newbuilding and what it will looklike. It will have gas pumpsand a sandwich shop. Comingwest on SR 64, drivers willneed to turn on Pear Street andenter the lot from the east en trance. There will also be anentrance off U.S. 17. —approved a resolution for the annual commercial and res idential water and sewer rates. —received the accounts payable sheet showing monthly payments. —accepted the monthly sheriff’s report for March, showing seven offenses han dled, 32 requests for informa tion and 15 tickets issued. —accepted the monthly re port of 34 work orders com pleted and 21 extra work assignments, included trim ming and hauling brush, mow ing and weed-eating. —heard a complaint from a landlord about a $1,000 bill(over several months) forwater/sewer services on a pairof his properties, one of whichis a vacant lot. At his requestthe meters will be removedfrom the vacant lot, which wasoriginally a business for whichthe owner paid impact fees andhad services installed. (He has since moved to another loca tion in town). The landlord was unhappy when town attorney Gerald Buhr explained the responsibil ity for everyone to pay a basiccapacity fee in order to be ableto get water/sewer services.They may not have a usage feeif they don’t use anywater/sewer. The landlord saidhe was going “to Tallahassee”to report this way of doing business. The next Zolfo Springs TownCommission meeting will beTuesday, May 22, at 6 p.m. at the Recreation Building at Pi oneer Park. Puerto Rico Meets the American South My choice for the perfect Mother's Day gift is a copy of"Coconut and Collards," abeautifully written and pho tographed new memoir andcookbook by Von Diaz. It hasall the elements of my favoritetype of cookbook, part heart-warming memoir and part in novative recipe collection. "Coconuts and Collards" is a sensory journey into Von Diaz'sworld of food. She captures thesights and sounds of herbeloved childhood home inPuerto Rico and her life therewith her grandmother (calledTata), her mother and her sis ters; her soulful roots in theSouth; and her new life in NewYork as a writer and radio pro ducer. Diaz has taken the fla vors and aromas from eachplace and created a new type ofunique, flavor-infused cuisinethat also is satisfying for vege tarians. "Coconuts and Collards" cel ebrates the best ingredients,spice blends and techniquesfrom Puerto Rico and mixedthem with the best of the Amer ican South. There are severaldelicious examples of Diaz'scross-cultural creations in eachchapter. My favorites are therecipes that celebrate theAfrican-influences on PuertoRican cuisine. I also love heruse of traditional Puerto Ricanspice blends and island ingre dients to create new versions ofAmerican recipes. Diaz liberally uses adobo — a mixture of garlic, oregano,olive oil and lemon juice — asa marinade for her recipe forfried chicken; oven-roastedpork ribs are slathered with abarbeque sauce made withguava; plantain chips arecrushed and used as a crust forbroiled shrimp; chayote squashis added to a green bean salad;and fresh Brussels sprouts arecombined with chorizo andsofrito, a mixture of peppers,garlic, onion and the herbs cul natro and cilantro. When asked about her fa vorite recipe in the book, Diazreplied, "I love collards and,like all other greens, want themto be a bright color and havesome texture. My Coconut-Braised Collards is a quick,simple recipe that highlightsthe strong collard funkinessand tastes deceptively rich fora vegetarian dish." Make Mother's Day extra special and serve these deli cious recipes for Pescado enEscabeche (White Fish Es cabeche) and Coconut-BraisedCollards. WHITE FISH ESCABECHE (PESCADO EN ESCABECHE) Marinade 1 cup olive oil1/2 cup white vinegar1/4 teaspoon ground blackpepper1/2 teaspoon salt1 bay leaf2 large white onions, slicedinto thin rounds Fish 1 1/2 pounds grouper steaks 1/4 cup fresh lemon juice(about 1 large lemon) 2 teaspoons salt, or to taste1/4 cup all-purpose flour1 cup olive oil 1. Combine the marinade in gredients in a large bowl. 2. Line a large plate with paper towels and set it aside. 3. Rinse the fish well and pat dry with paper towels.Place the fish in a large bowland pour the lemon juice overit. Sprinkle with the salt andtoss well. 4. Pour the flour onto a large plate. One by one, dredge eachfish steak in flour and transferthem to a separate plate. 5. Heat the oil in a large skillet over medium-high heatuntil just simmering, about 1minute. Do not overheat theoil, or it will burn and turn bit ter. Reduce the heat to medium,add the fish steaks and fry for10 minutes, turning every 2minutes or so to make sure theybrown evenly. 6. Transfer the fish to the prepared plate and let sit for 5minutes to drain excess oil,then transfer the fish to a largecasserole dish with a lid. 7. Pour the marinade over the fish, cover and refrigerateovernight. Taste, add more saltif needed, and serve chilled.Serves 4. COCONUT-BRAISED COLLARDS 1 large bunch collards, rinsedwell in several changes ofwater 1 bunch scallions 1 tablespoon unsalted butter(optional: to make the recipevegan, omit the butter anddouble the coconut oil) 1 tablespoon coconut oil 1 1/2 cups coconut milk, freshor canned 1 tablespoon soy sauce1/2 teaspoon salt, or to taste Freshly ground black pepper 1. Cut off the bottoms of the collard stalks, then coarselychop the leaves and stems and set aside. 2. Cut off the bottoms of the scallions, then thinly slice thewhites and greens. 3. Melt the butter with the oil in a large wok or skillet overmedium-high heat. Add thescallions and saute for 1minute. 4. Add greens and saute for another minute, stirring well toincorporate, then add the co conut milk and soy sauce andbring to a simmer. 5. Lower the heat to medium-low and simmer, un covered, stirring frequently,until the collards reach your de sired doneness, 7 to 10 min utes, or longer if you like yourgreens more tender. Seasonwith salt and pepper and serve.Serves 4 as a side. Recipes from "Coconuts and Collards: Recipes and Storiesfrom Puerto Rico to the DeepSouth" by Von Diaz(Gainesville: University Pressof Florida, 2017). Reprinted bypermission of the UniversityPress of Florida. Angela Shelf Medearis is anaward-winning children's au thor, culinary historian and theauthor of seven cookbooks. Hernew cookbook is "The KitchenDiva's Diabetic Cookbook."Her website is www.diva-pro.com. (c) 2018 King Features Synd., Inc., and Angela Shelf Medearis Kitchen Diva By Angela Shelf Medearis A12 The Herald-Advocate, May 3, 2018

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CHURCHSCHEDULE APOSTOLIC LIGHTHOUSE UNITED PENTECOSTAL CHURCH 310 Orange Street 773-1017 Sunday Service .................10:00 a.m. Wednesday Service ............7:00 p.m. CHESTER GROVE MB CHURCH 708 W. Grape Street Sunday Morn. Worship .......8:00 a.m. Sunday School ....................9:30 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study Night Chidren & Youth ................4:30 p.m. Adult Class .........................6:00 p.m. CHRISTIAN BIBLE FELLOWSHIP 3950 Aurora Avenue 375-2864 Morning Worship ..............10:30 a.m. Youth Group Sunday ........6:00 p.m. CHURCH OF GOD 121 West Broward St. 375-2231 Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m. Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m. Evening Worship ............... 6:30 p.m. Wednesday .........................7:30 p.m. NEW LIFE POWER OUTREACH CHURCH 725 Palmetto Street Sunday School ....................9:45 a.m. Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m. Wednesday Night Empowerment Class ............................ 7:30 p.m. Evening Worship 1stSunday .....................5:00 p.m. FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH Bowling Green 4531 Hwy. 17 N 375-2253 SUNDAY: Bible Study .........................9:30 a.m. Morning Worship ..............10:45 a.m. Childrens Church ............10:45 a.m. Evening Worship ....... .........6:00 p.m. WEDNESDAY: Youth (7th-12th grade) .......6:00 p.m. Adult Discipleship Train. ...6:30 p.m. TeamKID (ages 4-3rd grade)6:30 p.m. BOLD (4th-6th grade) ........6:30 p.m. FORT GREEN BAPTIST CHURCH 2875 Baptist Church Road 773-9013 Sunday School ....................9:45 a.m. Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m. Sunday Evening .................6:00 p.m. Wednesday Supper ............6:00 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study .....7:00 p.m. FOX MEMORIAL HOLINESS CHURCH 140 E. Main Street 836-273-7576 Sunday Morning Worship .10:00 a.m. Sunday Night Worship .......6:00 p.m. Wednesday Service ............7:30 p.m. GATEWAY CHURCH(formerly Faith Assemly of God)4937 Hwy. 17 N. 375-4000 Sunday School ....................9:30 a.m. Morning Worship ..............10:30 a.m. Evening Worship ................6:30 p.m. Wednesday Service ...........7:00 p.m. GREATER MACEDONIA PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH 607 Palmetto Street 375-3226 Church School ....................9:30 a.m. Morning Service ...............11:00 a.m. Evening Service .................7:00 p.m. Wed. Bible Study/Prayer ....7:00 p.m. Communion-2nd Sun. Eve. 6:00 p.m. HOLY CHILD SPANISH CATHOLIC MISSION 4315 Chester Avenue 773-4089 Misa (Espanol) Sunday ......7:00 p.m. IGLESIA DEL DIOS VIVO 105 Dixiana Street 375-4191 Domingo De Predicacion .11:00 p.m. Martes Estudio Biblico .......7:00 p.m. Miercoles Estudior Juvenil .7:00 p.m. Jueves De Predicacion .......7:00 p.m. IMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH 210 E. Broward Street 445-0290 Sunday School ....................9:45 a.m. Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m. Evening Worship .............. 6:00 p.m. Wednesday Prayer ........... ....6:00 p.m MT. PISGAH BAPTIST CHURCH 6210 Mt. Pisgah Rd. 375-4409 Sunday School ....................9:45 a.m. Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m. Disciples Training ..............5:00 p.m. Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m. Wednesday Prayer Time .....7:00 p.m. NEW BEGINNINGS 4810 Sally Blvd. 781-5887 Sense Sunday ....................11:00 a.m. Making Sense of the Non-Sense Sunday Bread of Life .........3:15 p.m. 2nd Sunday Communion ..11:00 a.m. NEW BEGINNINGS WORSHIP CENTER 230 E. Lemon St. 375-3208 Sunday ..........10:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. Wednesday ..............................7 p.m. Friday ......................................7 p.m. (Service with Fellowship to follow) PRIMERA MISION BAUTISTA 3920 Murray Road 375-2295 Domingos Escuela Dom. ....9:45 a.m. Servicio de Adoracion ......11:00 a.m. Servicio de Predicacion ......5:00 p.m. Miercoles Servico ..............6:30 p.m. REAL LIFE CHURCH 3365 US Hwy 17 375-4032 Morning Service ...............10:30 a.m. Wednesday Study/Learning6:30 p.m. ST. JOHN A.M.E. CHURCH 513 W. Orange Street Sunday Church School .......9:30 a.m. Sunday Morning Worship .11:00 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study .....6:30 p.m. VICTORY PRAISE CENTER 128 E. Main Street Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m. Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m. Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m. Thursday Night Services, Evening Worship. ...............7:00 p.m. Kidz Club. ..........................7:00 p.m. IGLESIA PENTECOSTES VISION POR LAS ALMAS 149 Badger Loop 448-2831 Martes: Oracion ..................7:00 p.m. Jueves: Ensenaza Biblica ...7:00 p.m. Domingo: Servicio ...........10:30 a.m. LIMESTONE BAPTIST CHURCH 4868 Keystone Ave. Limestone 863-242-2855 Sunday School ....................9:45 a.m. Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m. Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m. Wednesday Prayer ..............6:00 p.m. NEW ZION BAPTIST CHURCH 202 Sidney Roberts Road 735-0123 Sunday School ....................9:45 a.m. Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m. Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m. Wednesday Prayer Meeting 6:30 p.m. ONA BAPTIST CHURCH 131 Bear Lane 863-245-2371 Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m. Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m. Thursday Prayer .................7:00 p.m. UNION BAPTIST CHURCH 5076 Lily Church Rd. 494-5622 Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m. Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m. Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m. Wednesday SHINE for Kids ..............6:00 p.m. Wednesday Prayer Time.......7:00 p.m. APOSTOLIC ASSEMBLY 640 Apostolic Road 773-3052 Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m. Englishg Service ...............11:30 a.m. General Worship Service ....1:30 p.m. Tuesday Prayer ...................7:00 p.m. Wednesday Service ............7:00 p.m. BAYSIDE COMMUNITY CHURCH HARDEE COUNTY CAMPUS 615 Rainey Blvd. 941-755-8600 Mybayside.church Sunday Services .................8:15 a.m. ....................10:00 a.m. & 11:45 a.m. Fusion (6th 8th grade) ..................... ................Duing all Sunday Services Wednesday Epic (9th 12th grade) ... ............................................6:30 p.m. CELEBRATION FELLOWSHIP 773-0427 Celebration Service ..........10:30 a.m. Wednesday Evening Cell Groups Adult Cell Group ................7:00 p.m. Youth Cell Group ...............7:00 p.m. Childrens Cell Group ........7:00 p.m. Call for locations CHARLIE CREEK FAITH BAPTIST CHURCH 6885 State Rd. 64 East 773-3447 Sunday School ....................9:45 a.m. Morning Worship ....... .......11:00 a.m. Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m. Wesnesday Childrens Ministry ......... ............................................5:00 p.m. Wednesday Worship ...........6:30 p.m. CHURCH OF CHRIST 240 Will Duke Road 773-2249 Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m. Sunday Morning Worship .11:00 a.m. Wed. Night Bible Class ......7:00 p.m. CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS 630 Hanchey Rd. 773-3532 Sacrament Meeting .............9:00 a.m. Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m. Priesthood .........................11:00 a.m. ELEVATE COMMUNITY CHURCH 529 West Main Street (Robarts Funeral Home Chapel) Sunday Service .................11:00 a.m. Weekly Life Groups ENDTIME CROSSROAD MINISTRY 908 Martin Luther King Ave 773-0160 Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m. Morning Service ...............11:30 a.m. Evening Service .................7:30 p.m. Wed. Bible St. & Yth. Gath 7:30 p.m. Friday (Holy Ghost Night) .7:30 p.m. FAITH PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 114 N. 7th Avenue 773-2105 Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m. Sunday Worship ................11:00 a.m. Wednesday Supper .............6:15 p.m. Wed. Youth Fellowship ......7:00 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study .....7:00 p.m. FAITH TEMPLE CHURCH OF GOD 701 N. 7th Avenue 773-3800 Sunday School ....................9:30 a.m. Sunday Worship ................10:30 a.m. Childrens Chuch ..............10:40 a.m. Evening Service .................6:00 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study .....7:00 p.m. FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 1570 W. Main Street 773-4182 SUNDAY: Bible Study for all ages ......9:45 a.m. Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m. Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m. WEDNESDAY: Childrens Chiors (PK-Grade 4) .................. 5:30 p.m. Mid-Week Prayer Meeting 6:00 p.m. NEST Backyard (PK-Grade 4) .................. 6:30 p.m. Club 56 .............................. 6:00 p.m. Youth Group (Grades 7-12)6:00 p.m. Church Orchestra .............. 5:15 p.m. Adult Choir ....................... 6:30 p.m. FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH 1121 W. Louisiana St. 773-9243 SUNDAY: Generations Caf Open ..... ................ .................................9:00-10:20 a.m. Kids World Check-In for Nursery-5th Grade ...........10:15 a.m. Pre-K Blast .......................10:30 a.m. Kids World B.L.A.S.T. (K-5th) ..........................10:30 a.m. Worship Service ...............10:30 a.m. WEDNESDAY: Generations Caf Opens .................... ....................................5:15-6:15p.m. Check-In begins for Nursery-5th grade ..............5:45 p.m. Classes for children ages PreK-12th grade .........6:30-7:30 p.m. Adutl Bible Studies ....6:00-7:30 p.m. FIRST CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 511 W. Palmetto Street Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m. Morning Service ...............11:00 a.m. Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m. Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m. FIRST MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH 1347 Martin Luther King Avenue 773-6556 Sunday School ....................9:30 a.m. Morning Service ...............11:00 a.m. Evening Worship ................4:00 p.m. Wed. Prayer/Bible Study ....7:00 p.m. FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 207 N. Seventh Avenue 773-4267 Coffe and Fellowship .........9:15 a.m. Sunday School ............. .......9:45 a.m. Blended Sunday Worship .10:55 a.m. Wednesday Night Dinner ...6:00 p.m. Youth (0-18) & Adult Programming ............................................7:00 p.m. FLORIDAS FIRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD CHURCH 1397 South Florida Avenue 773-9386 www.flfirstag.org Sun. Community Groups ....9:30 a.m. Sunday Worship ................10:30 a.m. Family Night Wednesday ...7:00 p.m. Ministry for all ages! FOUNTAIN OF LIFE CHURCH IGLESIA FUENTE DE VIDABilingual Services / Servicios Bilinges311 Goolsby St. 832-9914 Sunday/Domingo ..............10:30 a.m. Wednesday/Mircoles ........7:30 p.m. THE GOSPEL TABERNACLE 810 Tennessee St. 781-2708 Sunday Morning Service ..10:00 a.m. Sunday Night Service .........6:00 p.m. Wednesday Service ............7:00 p.m. HIGHER GROUND INTERNATIONAL MINISTRY 1258 West Main Street Sunday School Adult & Youth .......... ..........................................10:00 a.m. Sunday Morning Worship .11:00 a.m. Wed. Night in the Word ..7:00 p.m. Wed. Extreme Kids ............7:00 p.m. Thursday Prayer .................6:00 p.m. IGLESIA ADVENTISTA DEL SEPTIMO DIA 1819 Dishong Road 767-1010 IGLESIA CHRISTIANA EL REMANENETE 318 W. Main Street Martes Oracion ................7:00 p.m. Jueves Clase Biblica ........7:00 p.m. Viernes Servicio ...............7:30 p.m. Domingo Servicio ..........11:00 a.m. IGLESIA de DIOS ALFA Y OMEGA 1909 Stanfield Road Sunday School .................10: 00 a.m. Evening Service .................6:00 p.m. Tuesday (Bible Study & Prayer Night) ..............................7:30 p.m. Friday Worship Service ......7:30 p.m. IGLESIA HISPANA PRESENCIA DE DIOS 511 West Palmetto Street Domingos ...........................6:00 p.m. Miercoles..............................7:00 p.m. IGLESIA MINISTERIOS CRISTIANO DIOS ES AMOR 807 S. 8th Ave. 773-4576 Domingos Escuela Dominica ......................10:00 a.m. Servicio .............................11:00 a.m. Lunes Oracion ....................6:00 p.m. Miercoles Servicio .............7:00 p.m. KINGDOM HALL OF JEHOVAHS WITNESSES 155 Altman Road 767-1131 ENGLISH Sunday Service ...................2:00 p.m. SPANISH Sunday Service .................10:00 a.m. LIGHT OF THE WORLD MINISTRIES Womans Center 131 N 7th Ave. Friday Evening ...................6:00 p.m. LAKE DALE BAPTIST CHURCH 3102 Heard Bridge Rd. 773-6622 Sunday School ....................9:45 a.m. Morning Service ...............11:00 a.m. Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m. Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.MINISTERIO INTERNACIONALCambriadores de Mundo 704 W. Main Street Wednesday Service ............7:30 p.m. MY NEW LIFE IN CHRIST CHURCH 117 West Palmetto St. 773-2929 Sunday Service .................10:00 a.m. Sunday Evening Service ....6:00 p.m. Wednesday Service ............7:00 p.m. Children Ministries for all services NEW BEGINNINGS 1002 S. Florida Avenue 781-5887 Sense Saturday ...................3:00 p.m. Making Sense of the Non-Sense The Bread of Life ...............3:15 p.m. NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH 1999 State Rd. 64 East 773-2101 Sunday School ....................9:45 a.m. Morning Worship Service .11:00 a.m. Evening Worship Service ...6:30 p.m. Wednesday Night Supper ...6:00 p.m. Wednesday Activities (All Ages) .......................7:00 p.m. NEW INSPIRATION CHURCH OF GOD BY FAITH 917 S. 6th Avenue 863-657-2253 Sunday School ....................9:00 a.m. Morning Worship ..............10:00 a.m. Thursday Praise ..................7:00 p.m. NEW MT. ZION A.M.E. CHURCH 1615 Martin Luther King Jr Ave. 767-0023 Morn. Worship (1st & 3r Sun.) ...............8:00 a.m. Sunday School ....................9:45 a.m. Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m. 2nd Sunday Youth Service .4:00 p.m. Allen Christian Endeavor ...4:00 p.m. Wed. & Fri. Bible Study .....7:00 p.m. NEW PHILADELPHIA WORSHIP CENTER 1652 Old Bradenton Road Sunday .............................10:30 a.m. Wednesday .........................6:30 p.m. NORTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH 912 N. 8th Avenue 773-6947 Sunday School ....................9:45 a.m. Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m. Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m. Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m. OAK GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH 4350 W. Main Street 735-0321 www.ogbcwauchula.org Sunday Schedule: Bible Study for All Ages ....9:30 a.m. Morning Worship ..............10:45 a.m. Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m. Wednesday Schedule: M&M Kids Klub ...............6:00 p.m. Youth Group .......................6:00 p.m. Prayer Meeting & Bible Study .......... ............................................6:30 p.m. PEACE VALLEY LUTHERAN CHURCH 1643 Stenstrom Road 773-2858 1st& 3rdSun. Worship/Communion .....9:00 a.m. 2nd& 4thSun. Divine Worship ...............9:00 a.m.** Fellowship each Sunday after servicePROGRESSIVE MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH 149 Manley Road 452-1281 Sunday School ....................9:30 a.m. Worship Service ................11:00 a.m. Wed. Evening Prayer ..........7:00 p.m. RIVERVIEW HEIGHTS MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH 1321 SR 636 East 773-3344 Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m. Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m. Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m. Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m. ST. MICHAEL CATHOLIC CHURCH 408 Heard Bridge Road 773-4089 Saturday Mass (English) ....5:00 p.m. (Spanish) .....7:00 p.m. Sunday(English) .................8:30 a.m. (Spanish) ................11:30 a.m. (Creole) ...................1:30 p.m. Catecismo ...........................9:45 a.m. Daily Mass in English ........8:30 a.m. SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST CHURCH 440 Carlton Street 773-9068 Sabbath School ...................9:30 a.m. Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m. Wed. Prayer Meeting ..........6:30 p.m. SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH 505 South 10th Avenue 773-4368 Sunday School .......... ..........9:45 a.m. Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m. Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m. Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m. TABERNACLE OF PRAISE & JOY 1507 MLK Avenue Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m. Morning Worship ..............11:30 a.m. Evening Worship ................7:00 p.m. Tues. Bible Stdy. & Child Train .................7:00 p.m. Friday Prayer Service .........7:00 p.m. WAUCHULA CHURCH OF GOD 1543 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave. 773-0199 Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m. Morning Worship ..............11:15 a.m. Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m. Wed. Night Fam. Training ..7:30 p.m. Thurs. Youth Bible Study ...7:00 p.m. Friday Night Worship .........7:30 p.m. WAUCHULA HILLS SPANISH CHURCH OF GOD 1000 Stansfield Rd. Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m. Evening Worship ................7:30 p.m. Tuesday Prayer ...................7:30 p.m. Thursday Worship ..............7:30 p.m. Saturday Worship ...............7:30 p.m. CREWSVILLE BETHEL BAPTIST CHURCH 8251 Crewsville RoadChurch 735-0871 Pastor 385-7867Sunday School ....................9:45 a.m. Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m. Evening Worship ................6:30 p.m. Wednesday Prayer ..............6:30 p.m. FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF ZOLFO 320 E. 4th Street 735-1200 Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m. Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m. Training Union ...................5:00 p.m. Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m. Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m. FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCHCorner of 6th & Suwanee 735-1544Gospel Music ....................10:30 a.m. Worship Service ................11:00 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study .....7:00 p.m. GARDNER BAPTIST CHURCH 8660 US Highway 17 S Zolfo Springs, FL 33890 Sunday Worship ................11:00 AM LIFE CHANGING WORSHIP CENTER 3426 Oak Street 863-832-9808 Sunday Worship .................2:30 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study .....6:30 p.m. MARANATHA BAPTIST CHURCH 2465 Oxendine Road 832-7829 Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m. Worship .............................11:00 a.m. Evening ..............................1:00 p.m. Wed. Bible & Prayer Meet .7:00 p.m. NEW BEGINNINGS 3704 U.S. Hwy. 17 S. 781-5887 M-F Family Services ..........8:00 a.m. Sense Friday .......................3:00 p.m. Making Sense of the Non-Sense Friday Bread of Life ...........3:15 p.m. NEW VISION WORSHIP CENTER 64 E. & School House RoadChurch 735-8585 Childcare 735-8586Morning Worship ..............10:00 a.m. Childrens Church ............10:00 a.m. Wed. Youth & F.T.H. ..........7:00 p.m. BOWLING GREEN ONA WAUCHULA WAUCHULA WAUCHULA WAUCHULA ZOLFO SPRINGS ZOLFO SPRINGS Printed as a Public Service byThe Herald-AdvocateDeadline for changes or additions: Thursday 5 p.m. PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF GOD FAITH TEMPLE Oak Street Sunday Worship ................10:00 a.m. Evening Worship ................7:00 p.m. Tuesday Worship ................7:30 p.m. Thursday Worship ..............7:30 p.m. Saturday Worship ...............7:30 p.m. PRIMERA MISSION BAUTISTA HISPANA 518 8th Avenue East Escuela Dominical ............10:00 a.m. Servicio del Domingo .......11:00 a.m. ............................................7:00 p.m. Servicio del Miercoles .......7:30 p.m. PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH Pioneer Park 2nd Sunday .......................10:30 a.m. Evening Service .................6:30 p.m. 5th Sunday ..........................6:00 p.m. REALITY RANCH COWBOY FELLOWSHIP 2-1/2 Miles east on Hwy. 66 863-781-1578 Sunday Service .................11:00 a.m. ST. PAULS MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH 3676 U.S. Hwy. 17 S. 735-0636 Sunday School ....................9:30 a.m. Morning Worship ...................11 a.m. Wed. Prayer Service ...........7:00 p.m. SAN ALFONSO MISSION 3027 Schoolhouse Lane 773-4089 Domingo, Misa en Espano10:00 a.m. SPANISH MISSION 735-8025 Escuela Dominica .............10:00 a.m. Servicio .............................11:00 a.m. Pioneer Club .................. .....6:30 p.m. Servicio de la Noche ..........7:00 p.m. Mierecoles Merienda ..........6:00 p.m. Servicio ..............................8:00 p.m. Sabado Liga de Jovenes .....5:00 p.m. Peace River GrowersWholesale Nursery Donnis & Kathy Barber Hwy. 66 East P.O. Box 760 (863) 735-0470 Zolfo Springs, FL BOWLING GREEN The road to spiritual, mental and physical healing is often long and difficult. Sometimes it takes us through long periods of dark days and long nights when it seems as though we are left to sur vive on our own. We struggle and strain and worry and work but it seems as though we will be left to our own abilities. There is great advice in todays verse: When I said, My foot is slipping, Your love, O Lord, supported me. Before the Psalmist fell, he recognized that he was facing a situation, having to solve a problem or make a decision that could have been disastrous to his well-being. So, he did not wait until calling on God was too late that his testimony and witness to the grace of God would be too late he out maneuvered Satan. When he realized that his foot was slipping he called on God and Gods love supported him! He did not need to ask for forgiveness he asked God to intervene immediately and sustain him. As Paul brought his second letter to Timothy to a close, he must have had this verse in mind. Tim othy, he wrote, the Lord stood at my side and gave me the strength that I needed, so that through me the message might be fully proclaimed and that all the Gentiles might hear it. Paul recognized how important it was for him to depend on Gods strength and not his own. He knew that the battle was not his but the Lords. So, rather than let his witness be destroyed, He called on God. Visit us at: SowerMinistries.orgGuido Evangelistic Association Metter, Ga. SeedsofHop eMay 3, 2018, The Herald-Advocate A13

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5:3-17c GOT TALENT? COURTESY PHOTOS Zolfo Springs Elementaryheld its annual talentshow on Thursday. Theaudience was treated tosinging, dancing and anassortment of other tal ents. It was students onstage for a fun time! Pho tos here show a portion ofthe exciting entertainmenton hand for the event. FULL OF FUN! COURTESY PHOTOS • MONTAGE BY DARLENE WILLIAMS Students at Zolfo Springs Elementary recentlyenjoyed an evening playing board and cardgames with their friends, families and teach ers. The games were followed by a movie inthe cafeteria, complete with popcorn and na chos, blankets and pajamas. A14 The Herald-Advocate, May 3, 2018

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Herald-AdvocateThursday, May 3, 2018 B THE By TOM STAIK Of The Herald-Advocate Two Wildcat throwers have earned a ticket to Jacksonvilleto compete in the Florida HighSchool Athletic Association(FHSAA) Class 2A Track &Field State Tournament. Tyler Steedley and Alexis Benjamin-Graham will becompeting Saturday (May 5)at the University of NorthFlorida at Jacksonville. Steedley, a junior, earned his slot after finishing third inthe boy’s discuss competitionlast Wednesday (April 25) atthe FHSAA Class 2A Region3 tournament at CypressCreek (Wesley Chapel) HighSchool. Steedley threw 129-09.50 as he earned the third placespot. Benjamin-Graham, a senior, earned her shot at state aftersecuring dual individual re gional titles in girl’s shot put –in which she set a new HardeeSenior High School record —and discus. “Alexis once again bettered her own school record in theshot winning the event fairlyeasily,” said Coach RodBeatty. Benjamin-Graham won the discus with a throw of 113-07.75. She set the new school record in shot put with a 41-10.00 throw. Two other Wildcats finished just short of the cutoff forstate. The top four finishers in each regional event are auto matic qualifiers, and there arean additional eight at-largebids spread across the four re gions. Collin Barton, a senior, fin ished sixth in the discus finalswith a 122-05.25 throw. Also coming close to a state bid was Sophie Allen. She fin ished sixth in the pole vaultwith a height of 7-04.50. INDIVIDUAL RESULTS Girls 400m Dash: 11th, Jes sica Pascual, 1:04.82. Girls 3200m Run: 10th, Ta tiana Mier, 13:24.96. Girls 100m Hurdles: 12th, Mercades Cisneros, 18.76. Girls 300m Hurdles: 8th, Ebony Lami, 52.07; and 15th,Kaitlynn Brandeberry, 57.95. Girls 4x400m Relay: 10th, Hardee, 4:29.77. Girls 4x800m Relay: 9th, Hardee, 10:59.54. Girls Triple Jump: 14th, Je sula Charles, 29-04.25. Girls Pole Vault: 6th, So phie Allen, 7-04.50; and 9th,Mariela Badillo, 6-04.75. Girls Discuss: 1st, Alexis Benjamin-Graham, 113-07.75. Girls Shot Put: 1st, Alexis Benjamin-Graham, 41-10.00. Boys 110m Hurdles: 14th, Samuel Louis, 18.04. Boys 4x400m Relay: 12th, Hardee, 3:40.21. Boys 4x800m Relay: 9th, Hardee, 9:13.62. Boys Pole Vault: 12th, Oscar DeJesus, 8:04.50. Boys Discus: 3rd, Tyler Steedley, 129-09.50; and 6th,Collin Barton, 122-05.25. Throwers Headed To State PHOTO BY TOM STAIK Alexis Benjamin-Graham and Tyler Steedley will represent Hardee Senior HighSchool on Saturday in Jacksonville at the Florida High School Athletic Association’s Track & Field State Tournament. Steedley will be throwing discus. Benjamin-Gra ham, fresh off a pair of regional titles, will be throwing discuss and shot put. By TOM STAIKOf The Herald-Advocate The Lady Wildcats powered their way to a fifth consecutivedistrict softball title on Fridaynight as they blanked McKeel(Lakeland) Academy 10-0 inthe Florida High School Ath letic Association’s Class 5ADistrict 10 tournament. “It's surreal,” said coach Caitlin Bliss. “I got home Fri day night at 11:30 and couldn'tfall asleep till almost 2 a.m.” The title game remained scoreless until the bottom ofthe second inning when theLady Wildcats struck with afour run effort. Lillian Salazarand Makayla Benavidezcrossed home plate following aline drive to right field off thebat of Sarah Carlton. A fly ballto right field off the bat of Des tinee Jackson sent Carltonacross home plate. The finalrun of the inning came fromJackson after Alayna Carrancoknocked a line drive to leftfield, bringing the score to 4-0. Two more Hardee runs fol lowed in the bottom of thefourth inning. Carlton capital ized on a wild pitch to stealhome as Carranco was ondeck. Another wild pitch, thistime with Deborah Figueroa atbat, allowed Jackson to capital ize with another stolen run tobring the score to 6-0. The Lady Wildcats went up 7-0 in the bottom of the fifth asAmari DeLeon scored on anerror by the catcher as Jacksonheld the plate. Hardee sealed the win with three runs in the bottom of thesixth inning. Derringer andFigueroa scored following aline drive to right field off thebat of DeLeon. The final run ofthe game came from DeLeon, bringing the score to 10-0, fol lowing a line drive to left fieldoff the bat of Ashlee Patterson. The Lady Wildcats recorded 10 runs and 16 hits in 33 at batduring the outing. Carlton, Jackson, and DeLeon each had two runs,and Stephanie Derringer,Salazar, Figueroa, and Be navidez each had one run. Carlton, Jackson, and DeLeon each had three hits,Carranco had two hits, andPatterson, Salazar, Figueroa,Benavidez, and Trinity Herreach had one hit. Carranco held the mound for Hardee through all six inningsas she lobbed 76 pitches andallowed three hits and no runswhile striking out six batters. The title game win followed a 13-0 win over the TenorocHigh School Titans on April 24in the opening round of thetournament. The Lady Wildcats got on the board with a stunning two-run homer off the bat of Carl ton in the bottom of the firstinning that also allowed Patter son to score, giving Hardee a2-0 lead. A staggering nine more Wildcat runs followed in thebottom of the second inning.McBride got the scoringstarted as she crossed homeplate following a line drive tocenter field off the bat of Pat terson. Marisa Rodriguez andPatterson scored in the next atbat following a line drive toleft field off the bat of Carlton.As Derringer held the plate,Carlton capitalized on an errorby the Tenoroc center fielder tocross home plate. Benavidez, acourtesy runner for Derringer,scored in the next at bat fol lowing a hard ground ball to left field off the bat of DeLeon. A grand slam by McBride topped the inning’s effort andallowed DeLeon, Jackson, andSalazar to cross home plateand bring the score to 11-0. The final two runs of the game came for the Wildcats inthe bottom of the third inning.Derringer scored following ahard ground ball to center fieldoff the bat of Salazar. The finalrun, advancing the score to 13-0, came from Jackson as sheadvanced following a groundball to center field off the batof Carranco. Hardee recorded 13 runs and 17 hits in 29 at bats during the outing. Patterson, Carlton, Jackson, and McBride each had tworuns, and Benavidez, Der ringer, DeLeon, Salazar, andRodriguez each had one run. Carlton had three hits, Pat terson, Figueroa, Salazar, andRodriguez each had two hits,and Gough, Derringer,DeLeon, Jackson, McBride,and Carranco each had one hit. Derringer held the mound for the Lady Wildcats throughall five innings as she lobbed67 pitches to allow two hitsand no runs while striking outfive batters. With the tournament wins, Hardee advanced to 18-12 forthe season. Bliss says she credits the success to a Lady Wildcatsquad that has jelled into a for midable team in the weeksheading into playoff season. “I've been very blessed with talented players over the yearsbut the greatest feeling is theteam chemistry among thesegirls, if we have a few mistakesor have a bad inning hitting be fore I can even open my mouththey are already talking to eachother saying: ‘We got this.’,‘We're still in it.’, or ‘Come onladies let’s keep hitting, can'tleave runners on base.’ It's that kind of stuff that you just can'tteach anymore. It’s an instinctand they know when to turn iton, we are playing some of ourbest ball right now and whatbetter time than now playoffseason.” Hardee was scheduled to play Wednesday (May 2) athome in the Class 5A Region 3quarterfinal against CocoaHigh School. Results were notavailable as of press time. Thewinner will advance to the re gional semifinal next Tuesday(May 8) to face the winner ofthe match between McKeelAcademy and Space CoastHigh School. VARSITY SOFTBALL ‘Cats Take 5th Straight Title Sarah Carlton celebrating her homerun against the Tenoroc Titans last Tuesday inthe opening round of the Florida High School Athletic Association Class 5A District 10 Softball Tournament. COURTESY PHOTOS BY STACY SMITH The 2018 varsity softball team from Hardee Senior High School poses with the Class 5A District 10 trophy onFriday night after the school won its fifth straight title. Pictured are: Front row (from l) Lillian Salazar, AshleePatterson, Alayna Carranco, Destinee Jackson, Deborah Figueroa; and Back Row (from l) assistant coach JulianGarcia, Mallory Gough, Sarah Carlton, Trinity Herr, Amari DeLeon, Makayla Benavidez, Marisa Rodriguez, Alexis McBride, Stephanie Derringer, and head coach Caitlyn Bliss. The Lady ‘Cats celebrate after winning Hardee Senior High School’s fifth consecu tive district softball title on Friday night. With the win, Hardee advances to regionalcompetition.

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By TOM STAIKOf The Herald-Advocate The Wildcats slid into the first round of the Class 5ADistrict 10 baseball tourna ment this week. The boys in orange and blue from Hardee Senior HighSchool were scheduled totravel to Lakeland to face thesquad from McKeel Academyon Tuesday evening in theopening round of the tourna ment. Results from the game were not available at press timeTuesday evening. A win would advance the Wildcats (16-9, 4-2) to the dis trict title game on Friday (May4) where they would poten tially face the winner of thefirst round match between topseed Avon Park (6-1) andMulberry (1-6). Hardee Bests Miners, 5-2 The Wildcats finished the regular season on April 26with a 5-2 win over the Minersof Fort Meade High School. The Miners struck first as they went up 1-0 in the bottomof the first inning. Fort Meade advanced their lead to 2-0 in the bottom of thethird. A strong effort in the top of the fourth inning would shiftmomentum in Hardee’s favor. Dawson Hanchey crossed home plate on a steal as Logan Cartwright waited to bewalked. A fly ball to right fieldoff the bat of Kaleb Floyd inthe next at bat allowed IvanBadillo to score the tying run.Logan Cartwright scored on asteal in the next at bat. DylanDavis provided the final run ofthe inning after Mason Blockknocked a hard ground ball toleft field to give the Wildcatsa 4-2 lead. The final run of the game came in the top of the fifth in ning as Badillo scored follow ing a ground ball off the bat ofDavis. Hardee recorded five runs and five hits in 25 at bats dur ing the outing. Badillo had two runs, and Hanchey, Cartwright, andDavis each had one run. Block, Quinton Lindsey, Hanchey, Badillo, and Floydeach had a hit. Pitching duties were shared by Hanchey, Lindsey, andFloyd. Lindsey threw 43 pitches as he held the mound for threeinnings and allowed two hitsand one run while striking outthree batters. Hanchey pitched two in nings and threw 26 pitches ashe allowed three hits and onerun while striking out one bat ter. Floyd pitched two innings while throwing 37 pitches andallowing one hit and striking out four batters. Highlanders Best Wildcats, 5-1 Hardee suffered a 5-1 loss to the Highlanders of LakeWales High School on April23. Lake Wales struck first as they went up 1-0 in the top ofthe first inning. The Wildcats answered, tying the game 1-1, in the bot tom of the second inning asCartwright crossed home platefollowing a ground ball off thebat of Davis. The game remained tied until the top of the fifth inningwhen the Highlanders retookthe lead as they added anotherrun to shift the score to 2-1. Lake Wales’s final three runs came in the top of thesixth inning as they bested theWildcats, 5-1. The boys in orange and blue recorded one run and two hitsin 25 at bats during the homeouting. Cartwright recorded the sole run. Hits were recorded by Adrian DeLeon and Floyd. Pitching duties were shared by DeLeon, Weston Schrader,and Floyd. DeLeon pitched five in nings as he threw 77 pitches,allowed two hits and two runs,and struck out four batters. Schrader pitched one inning and threw 28 pitches as he al lowed three hits and threeruns. Floyd pitched one innings as he threw 24 pitches whileallowing no hits or runs andstriking out two batters. VARSITY SOFTBALL Wildcats Slide Into Playoff Season The Peace River Pirates 10U travel baseball team opened the summer season in Bradentonwith wins over Heartland Select (Lake Placid)17-7 and the Legends from Tampa 10-6 beforelosing a heartbreaker to the St. Pete NorthwestHurricanes in a two-inning Texas Tie Breaker,11-10. In the first game against Heartland Select, the Pirates bats were booming with Austin Hillardsetting the tone with a booming homerun overthe center field fence in the first inning. Trailing 5-4 going into the bottom of the third inning, the Pirates erupted for 13 runs whilewatching every player score a run in that in ning. That would be the last inning at the platefor the Pirates as they won by the 10-run-rule.As a team, they hit for a .650 average going 15for 23 in the game. The second game featured a 10-6 win over a very well coached and disciplined team in theTampa Legends. After scoring three in the top of the first, the Pirates fell behind 5-3 before going back up 6-5. Hits by Shaun Solis and Piddy Cabrera, and Bilal Shweil reaching first after being hit by apitch loaded the bases. Hagan Bryan groundedout to the first baseman while sending Solishome with the first run. Tegan Van Sickle thendoubled home the other two runners. The Legends tied the game at 6-6 but the fifth inning saw the bases loaded when Leo Marreroblasted a triple off the right field fence clearingthe bases. He later scored to put the Pirates up10-6. Closer Piddy Cabrera came in to pitch the final two innings allowing only one base runnerpreserving the 10-6 victory. The last game was a “classic “as the Pirates battled back after trailing 7-1 to the Hurricanesfrom St. Pete. The third inning saw Ashton Bass take first on an interference call. Then with two outs, Gage Cartwright was hit by a pitch putting runners at first and second. Singles by Braden DeLuca and Austin Hillard eventually saw all four score to cut the score to7-5. In the last inning, the Hurricanes scored two more to go up 9-5 and things looked bleak forthe Pirates. However, the bottom of the last inning saw leadoff batter Bilal Shweil single to center field,and then Hagan Bryan singled through the in field followed by a base on balls to AshtonBass. Bases are now loaded for Teagan VanSickle. He hit a hard ground ball down the thirdbase line that goes deep into the outfield scor ing all three. He scored and the game is tied at9-9. The Pirates had runners on the corners with two outs after Braden DeLuca and AustinHillard both singled. Leo Marrero came to the plate with a chance to drive in the winning run. He belted a shot toward right field but the first baseman reached high and made the rob bing catch to send the game to overtime. The first overtime inning sees both teams go three up and three down. The Hurricanes score two the next inning. The last hope comes up short after Piddy Cabrera scored when Bilal Shweil groundedout cutting the lead to one. The Pirates had run ners in scoring position with two outs whenDeLuca hit a ball that looked destined to go upthe middle into center field when the secondbaseman made a great play and throw to first toend the game. The Pirates may have lost butplayed a truly classic game in their history. Other notable performances were turned in by Ryan Rivas who went 4-for-6 at the platewith one double but also played some greatshortstop making several good throws to firstbase from deep in the hole between short andthird. Rene Reyes went 4-for-7 with a doubleand three singles. Braden DeLuca went 7-for10 while Austin Hillard went 7-for-9 including a towering home run. Peace River Pirates 10U Open Season 5:3c O PEN 24 H OURS 526 N. 6th Ave (Across from Nicholas Restaurant) 112 W. Palmetto Open: 7 days (Yellow bldg. behind old carwash) NEW MACHINES • CLEAN • A/C 2 LOCATIONS www.supermattlaundries.com 24 hr. Customer Service 877-394-0173 2:8tfc 1. Name the last Detroit Tigers pitcher before JustinVerlander in 2017 to record 10strikeouts on opening day. 2. Who was the first third baseman to be elected to theBaseball Hall of Fame? 3. When was the last time before 2014-16 that Alabama'sfootball team won threestraight Iron Bowl gamesagainst rival Auburn? 4. Who is the only player in NBA history with 25,000points, 10,000 rebounds, 5,000assists, 1,500 steals and 1,500blocked shots for his career? 5. When was the last time before the 2017-18 NHL sea son that the Colorado Ava lanche won at least nine gamesin a row? 6. Name the first rookie to win the NASCAR midsummerAll-Star race. 7. Who was the last tennis player before Roger Federer in2017 to capture the men's sin gles title at Wimbledon with out losing a set in thetournament? ANSWERS 1. Mickey Lolich, in 1970.2. Jimmy Collins, in 1945.3. It was 1990-92.4. Kevin Garnett, who played in the NBA for 21 sea sons. 5. It was the 2000-01 sea son. 6. Dale Earnhardt Jr., in 2000. 7. Bjorn Borg, in 1976. (c) 2018 King Features Synd., Inc. SportsQuiz By Chris Richcreek Are You Concerned Your Child Is Going Down The Wrong Path? DEPARTMENT OF JUVENILE JUSTICE PREVENTION HELPLINE 1-866-757-0634 It pays to advertise in your Hometown Newspaper We are saving this space just for YOU! The Herald-Advocate Hardee County’s Hometown Coverage 115 S. 7th Ave. Telephone: 773-3255 www.TheHeraldAdvocate.com On This Day:• In 1851 Sixth major fire in San Francisco de stroys 1500-2000 buildings• In 1861 Lincoln asks for 42,000 Army Volun teers and another 18,000 seamen• In 1901 Fire destroys 1,700 buildings in Jack sonville, Florida• In 1921 West Virginia imposes 1st state sales tax• In 1922 Mayor Hylan closes streets for build ing of Yankee Stadium• In 1923 1st nonstop north American transcontinental flight (NY-San Diego) com pleted• In 1942 Nazis require Dutch Jews to wear a Jewish star• In 1944 Meat rationing ends in US • In 1952 1st landing by an airplane at geo graphic North Pole• In 1960 The Anne Frank House opens in Am sterdam, The Netherlands• In 1965 1st use of satellite TV, Today Show on Early Bird Satellite B2 The Herald-Advocate, May 3, 2018 OF2018 HARDEE HIGH SCHOOLSENIORS The Herald-Advocate will soon be publishing our annual Graduation Keepsake Edition honoring all Hardee High School graduating seniors. Place an ad in this keepsake edition, personally congratulating your senior on his/her accomplishments, with either a recent photo or one from his/her past, or both. Herald-Advocate Hardee County’s Hometown Coverage 115 S. 7th Ave. • Wauchula • 773-3255 ATTENTION PARENTS Marcus We are so proud of you Love, Mom & Dad Katherine, We love you and your family is so proud of you. Enjoy Your Moment & God Bless You DEADLINE • THURSDAY, MAY 10 ADS START AS LOW AS $38 Picture Here$38 Picture Here $ 38 The 4:12-5:3nc

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Fort Green NewsBy Rilla Cooper 773-6710 H ARDEE L IVING Carlton Care Chiropractic C Ch hi ir ro op pr ra ac ct ti ic c L La as se er r M Mu us sc cu ul la ar r T Th he er ra ap py y D Di ig gi it ta al l X X-R Ra ay y Dr. Maria Carlton, DCCall Today To Schedule Your Appointment 863-473-4732Medicare & Most Insurance Accepted 105 South 9th Av. Wauchula, FL 33873Back Pain Neck PainI Can Help! Also treating Headaches Siatica Leg /Hip Pain Shoulder/Arm/Wrist Pain Muscle Pain and Arthritis Chronic or Acute Painsoc5:3c COURTESY PHOTO The Wauchula Wednesday Musicale invites its members and the public to a special meeting this Monday featuring music from around the world. The short business meeting and program begin at 5 p.m. at First United Methodist Church of Wauchula, 207 N. Seventh Ave. The performers are talented local musicians, with selections by composers and musicians from England, Cuba, France, Germany, Italy, Austria and Brazil. The organ, piano, American and Portuguese guitars, and voice will be the instruments of choice. Shown are (from left) Ginny Clancy, choir director at the church, and her music students Allyson Johnson and Aubree Carnley, who will sing Edelweiss. For more information, call Margaret Hodges Blanco at 735-0287 or Ar nell Waldron at (863)781-3416. GOING GLOBAL WANT TO UNDERSTAND THE GREAT CONTROVERSY AND THE BATTLE THAT'S TAKING PLACE RIGHT NOW FOR YOUR SOUL?Attend:A Study In The Great Controversy In Light of Present Truth. Beginning Wednesday, May 9 6:30 p.m.At The Wauchula Seventh Day Adventist Church 440 Carlton Street, Wauchula Florida soc5:3,10p $10,000 DONATION COURTESY PHOTOA gift of $10,000 has been given to Hardee Senior High Schools Health Science Academy for its nursing assistant program. The show of support came from VITAS Healthcare, a local provider of palliative, hospice and endof-life services headquartered in Miami and serving 16 states. The money will be used to purchase training equipment and supplies. VITAS nurse educator Briana Justiss also gave a recent presentation to the students on hospice services. Looking forward to the new instructional materials are (front, from left) students Kasie Powell and Kyra Wilson; (back) check presenter Linda Martinez of VITAS and an alumni of the class, school dis trict Director of Career & Technical Education Meredith Durastanti, Justiss, VITAS General Manager Renee Fol lowell, Health Sciences Academy teacher Tracy Napier and student Heather Coronado. Homecoming atFriendship Church(Moffitt Rd. ~ Zolfo Springs)Sunday May 6thService at 10:30 a.m.Guest Speaker: Marcus Shackelford Music By: David Spencerwith Dinner On The Grounds Following For more info(863) 735-0014 soc5:3p Roundup Firefighters To Host TourneyThe inaugural Hardee County Firefighter Golf Tournament is slated for May 12 at 8 a.m. at The Bluffs Golf Course, 8037 U.S. 17 South, Zolfo Springs. Sponsorship deadline is Friday, May 4. Registration deadline is May 9. Cost is $75 per person or $300 for a four-man team. Chicken dinner is included. The tournament is dedi cated to the memory of Francisco Paco Figueroa. There will be mulligans and raffle tickets, prizes for first, second and third place, longest drive and closest to the pin. Sponsors can vary from $25 up to title sponsor a $2,500. Sponsors/ regis tration can be paid at The Bluffs or H. C. Professional Firefighters, P. O. Box 157, Wauchula, FL 33873. For information, call The Bluffs at 863-993-4310 or David Morales at 863-443-0367. Jocie Wright Celebrates Her 5th BirthdayJocie Lynn Wright, the daughter of Mitchell and Ali cia Wright of Wauchula and Kari Treadway of Wauchula, turned 5 years old on March 1. She celebrated the occasion on Saturday, March 3, with a birthday party at Chuck E. Cheese in Lakeland. Theme for the festivities was Alena of Avalor. Guests were served pizza, cake and ice cream. Joining in the celebration were grandparents Robert and Michelle Wright, brother Kaleb Wright, uncle Robert Wright Jr., cousins Sawyer Rose Wright, L.J. Wright and Hayden and Logan Starnes, great-grandparents Ronnie and Peggy Starnes and many other family members and friends. Jocie Greetings from Fort Green! The senior ladies luncheon was just as nice as always last Thursday. The ladies do a re ally great job with the table decorations, flowers and deli cious meal with a super dessert. We have some good cooks, and these ladies are the cream of the crop. Carmen Durrance always makes a take-home gift for everyone in attendance, and Carol Brown does a good devotion. For the young ladies, this is something to look for ward to in your advancing years! There were two beautiful old oaks in front of the church but we had to have them cut down a few months ago be cause of disease. This left the steeple visible from quite a dis tance away, and it was dirty from the mold that the trees contributed, Mosaic was the good neighbor and came out with a bucket truck and cleaned it for us. We had told them we wanted it before Homecoming, which is this coming Sunday. We really appreciate Mosaic. The graduates were recog nized last Sunday morning at church. We have several stu dents graduating from high school and four from college. A good crowd was in attendance, and most stayed for lunch im mediately after the service. Our Homecoming service will begin at 10:30, and there is no Sunday School and no evening service. There is a cov ered-dish dinner immediately after the morning service. The meat is furnished by the church. We would love to have you come and enjoy the day with us. There will be special music, and Brother Steve will preach the Homecoming mes sage. Our sincere sympathy is ex tended to the family of Neva Howard. She was a beautiful and talented lady. If you dont remember her, she was the wife of Dr. Howard, and it is possi ble you may have gotten your glasses from him in days gone by. She will be missed. Mary Bargeron was plan ning on attending the luncheon last week but it was her birth day and her daughter took her out for lunch. They had a good time. This is going to be a short news column. Believe it or not, I was a patient in the hospital from Thursday night until Sun day morning with pneumonia. You never know when you are sick if you dont feel bad, and I sure didnt know it! I can tell you the doctors are superior, nurses in the ER all RNs and plenty of RNs on the floor. Each room is private, and has a little fridge and mi crowave and, of course, couch and chairs. We are lucky to have such a beautiful and wellequipped hospital. I have beautiful wild petu nias that the Lord just gives me. They come up every year, and smell wonderful. I dont really have to do anything, but do give them a little water! I thank the Lord for them every day. Probably you have seen the black hose advertised on TV that after it is extended draws itself back up to a pocket size when you turn off the water. We bought one and it is light weight and does not kink, but it does not draw itself up to a pocket size. On the TV they al ways show it on concrete, and we use it to water the flowers so it is on grass. It does shrink back some but not pocket size. It is one thing that we have tried that was so highly adver tised and are happy to have it. The one bad thing is since we live in the country, it can look like a black snake if you are not remembering it is a hose! We do have the cookbooks and they are very pretty but the committee has not decided on the price. The price should be decided by Homecoming, and they will be available on that day. Please pray for each other and our nation. May 3, 2018, The Herald-Advocate B3

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H ARDEE L IVING R R e e s s t t h h a a v v e e n n A A s s s s i i s s t t e e d d L L i i v v i i n n g g F F a a c c i i l l i i t t y y Private, semi-private and shared rooms. We are a licensed facility that offers Limited Nursing Services and have many different programs to fit your needs including long term care, adult day care services and short term respite care. Visit our website at www.resthavenassistedliving.com or contact Jessica Garneradministration at (863) 773-6000 or (863) 832-0634. soc4:19-5:10cAL5073Learn to SwimDear Parents, Drowning is the number 1 cause of death for kids 5 years old and younger Each year over 300 kids under age 14 die by accidental drowning 5,200 kids require treatment in emergency rooms with swimming related injuries Drowning is silent and happens quickly! The Hardee County Community Recreation Center offers an opportu nity for your child to learn personal safety and water survival skills in a closely supervised environment just in time for summer vacation. Our program is totally committed to teaching swimming skills to individuals from the age of 24 months and up. We ensure the finest in aquatic programming by maintaining a trained and qualified staff.An infant drown-proofing class age 6 months to 24 months is also available.Class registration will be held at the Recreation Complex Pool next to Hardee High School on the following date and time. Be sure to sign up early to get the class and time you desire Cost for each registration is $60 Cost for students with family hardships is $40 (Will be verified)Open swim begins on Saturday, May 26 at 1:00 PM. Open swim Monday Saturday, 1-4 PM. Sunday, 2-5 PM For more information, call 863-773-3173 Swim Lesson Sessions#1 #2 #3 May 29 June 7 June 11 21 June 25 July 6 REGISTRATION DATE Saturday, May 5, 2018 9 am to 11 amsoc5:3c 10thYear Anniversary Party Sunday, May 6 Live Music starting at noon CRUSH Nashville Rocker Jasmine CainFood By Robert & Sonja Mott Beef Brisket & Pulled Pork dinner available for take out.3515 Hwy 64 West Wauchula 863-735-8887 soc5:3cDont forget the Bowling Green Parks and Recreation Committee hosting its first Swap Meet Rummage Sale, May 12, Saturday 8-2pm. To have a space the fee is 420, must register by Friday May 11. Pray for America UNITY May 3, 2018. Congratulation to Bowling Green Elementary Proud Panthers Students for your chal lenging work on being honored for the 3rd Quarter (Nine-week grading period). Shout out to Wesley Wright, Klowie Rodriquez, Eboni Baker and Canyla Simmons were among the other 37 stu dents, Go Panthers. Polk County Wide Annual Revival Ft. Meade area was at Beulah M.B. Church, last week. Congratulation to Mayor Robert Samuel Fite of Bowl ing Green, whos President of the FL League of Cities. Was presented a Home Rule Hero Award for his advocacy in Tallahassee, at the FL League of Cities meeting in Lake Alf read last Thursday evening April 12. Jessie Pearl Davis of Palm Coast and son Jerry Davis of Bartow were Saturday visitors in Bowling Green with Colette Greene and Henrietta Benson and Stacey Mosley and others in Ft. Meade. Bro. Taplin and wife Louise Taplin, W.M., John Corbett, Bro. Willie Outley and wife Bessie Outley members of Geraldine Chpt No. 110, O.E.S. Wauchula, FL attended The Grand Lodge Annual Meeting in Jacksonville of Jerusalem Grand Chapter Order of Eastern Star and the Masonic Lodge, State of FL jurisdiction Prince Hall Affiliated. M.W.U.G.L. at the Hyatt Regency Jacksonville River front Hotel. Annual Grand Session April 13-16, 2018. Theme Its all About Love. Lillian Carter Grand Worthy Matron, Rev. Ronald C. Williams, Sr. Grand Worthy Patron, The Honorable Walter Gulley, Jr. most Worship Grand Master. The Events were: Meet and greet, O.E.S. Queen Constant Black and White Gala with all other business, worship serv ice, District Deputies and Asst. Deputies Meetings. Well en joyable meetings and enjoy able time reported. The Grand Lodge is located 410 Broad street, Jacksonville, Geraldine O.E.S. Chapter 110, recently added four new members to their Wauchula O.E.S. Tommy Jones Fun Day at Mary Holland Park at Pavil ion, 2015 Shumate Dr. Bartow FL, followed Sunday A.M. Worship at Essential Truth Ministries, Pastor Richard W. Sams, Sunday April 29, Sunday school at 9:30am, 1078 North Broadway Ave, behind Amscot Bartow Centre North. Today of enjoyment after church for fun, games, food and fellowship. Family Unity Day Service convene at Mt. Gilboa Mis sionary Baptist Church, Inc. 1205 Dr. Martin L. King, Jr. Blvd, Bartow, Pastor J. Louis Holloway, all was welcome. Night in White at 7:00pm was The Gussie Outley Mis sion Society Service at new Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church, Rev. Willie Hayes, Pastor. Hold the Line Lively Lakeland District Convoca tion (District Revival) Worship services convened Sunday April 22, 4:00pm and Monday April 23, 2018 at 7:00pm at New Bethel A.M.E. Church, Winter Haven, 4:00pm Rev. O. Smith, (preach) 7:00pm Rev. Ronnie Clark, (preach) Monday evening, Tuesday evening April 24 Speaker Rev. Ella Ed wards 7:00pm and Wednesday Rev. Eddie Lake both nights at St. Paul A.M.E. Church, Theme: Ready-Set-Go! There was Powerful preaching, anointed signing and fellow ship. Rev. Greta Walker, Host Pastor, Rubin Ancrum Host Pastor, Rev. Jimmy J. Thompson Host Presiding Elder. Greater Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church 256 S. Orange Ave. in Arcadia annual Black and White Banquet, Rev. Etta Denise Owens Guest Speaker. Theme: The Overflow! Where Souls are Filled, and Faith is Abundant John 10:10b was April 27, at 6:00pm at the turner Center. Happy Birthday to you Eva Mae Tomlinson White on your 76 Big Day. EMBC, Pastor Dr. Jerry B. Alexander render fellowship service during Church An niversary with Shiloh M.B. Church Rev, Matthew Red mon, Pastor on Wednesday April 25, at 7:00pm Arcadia. Sunday at EMBC April 29 was Sacrificial Sunday and dress down Sunday. Freedom Fellowship Christian Ministries, Inc. Rev. Dr. Sharon T. Goodman, Pastor celebrated its Annual Family and Friends Day Sunday April 22. Chester Grove M.B. Church and Pastor Timothy L. Lan caster render morning worship Sunday April 29, 2018 at First Baptist Church in Bowling Green, while the Ecuador team was on its trip, they are Jane Long, Pastor Scott Tharp and Janice Durrance, they will return May 2. Chester Grove M.B. Church and Rev. Lancaster join in service at family and Friends Day Celebration in Arcadia Sunday April 22 at 3:00pm at Elizabeth M.B. Church, Rev. Dr. Jerry Alexander Pastor/ Teacher. Sis Debbie Richard son welcome/occasion, Rev. Lancaster message The Lord Can Still Turn It Around for You Job 9:1-2, vs. 10, 20-22. The attendance was very large with family and friends. American Cancer Society Relay for Life of South Polk representing Bartow, Frost proof, Ft. Meade and Lake Wales was April 27, 2018 at 4:00pm starting time at Mosaic Park, 2250 South Floral Ave, Bartow. Hardee Relay for Life Group meted Thursday April 26, at 6:00pm for its monthly meeting to discuss plans dur ing the following months in getting ready for November 17, 2018 day of Celebrating Relay for Life in Zolfo Springs at Pioneer Park, (Plans include fundraising, survivor dinner, ideas for games, working to get sponsors, list of Luminaria and much more. Pray list: James Gray III, Goldia Ford, Viola Daniels, Ronnie Rivers, Jr., Mrs. E. Matthews, Thelma Blakley, Daisey Spann and Elder Spann. May 5, 2018 will be a day of food, games, fun of prizes at the Cricket, with celebration of Cinco De Mayo in Wauchula, 10:00am-7:00pm. The Hat Program was Sat urday April 28, at 5:00pm at the House of God Church in Arcadia. It was started by the Late Elder Mary Greene who passed last September 24, 2017, Miss you much. A great prosperous day was reported. Thursday May 3, 2018 will be National Day of Prayer 9:00am at First Baptist Church of Bowling Green will be at Fellowship Hall (prayer and breakfast, please bring a breakfast item to share). 11:30am at First Baptist Church of Zolfo Springs, prayer and lunch, last worship service 6:00pm at Heritage Park Main Street Wauchula at 6:30pm, prayer Ephesians 4:3. 4-City NewsBy Henrietta Benson 448-6737 Chapter FL2-H of the Gold Wing Road Riders Association is doing its part to promote May as National Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month. The chapter is actively ask ing motorists to DoubleCheck, Look Twice to Save a Life. Motorcycles have smaller profiles than other vehicles, making it more difficult to judge the distance and speed of one approaching you, chapter members note. Statistics have shown that about 75 percent of motorcycle crashes involve another vehi cle, with 66 percent of those being caused by a driver who failed to yield the right of way to the motorcyclist. These collisions are most likely to occur at an intersection where a motorist is making a left-hand turn. The Gold Wing Road Riders advise motorists to actively look for motorcycles, increas ing their awareness of them and making the highways safer for all.Bikers Remind: Double-Check, Look Twice & Save A Life Dear Editor, In today's time, so much is going on in the world. Just like the incident in Toronto where the pedestrians were run over in the car that went wild, people take their problems out on others, perhaps blaming any body and everybody on why their life is falling apart. I ask the question, "Where is the sacredness in life?" I've been in the church all of my life learning about God's love and loving others, and when I see how many shootings and killings there are in this world I often wonder didn't anyone take their kids to church? Did n't anyone hear about God's love while growing up? Well Jesus said the way is narrow to Eternal life and the way is broad to destruction. Also the Bible talks about the end times where life on Earth will get worse instead of better. It just shows that prophecy is coming true, and the Bible is coming up with the truth. Yes, in my eyes life is pre cious and must be handled with care because we do not know when it will be taken from us. Life is like riding the bumper cars in amusement parks, in my opinion. The less we bump into things the more enjoyment we will get out of life. So to wrap this all up, I would say we all would get along better with each other and have a better lifestyle if we would live a happy go lucky and stress free life if we could not cause conflict with our neighbors or anyone else in our lives. My motto is love thy neighbor as thyself and of course have God in the forefront, and you just can't go wrong. Of course, this is my opinion, and everyone will have to come up with their own words to live by. I hope everyone is enjoying the nice weather right now before the humidity sets in. Connie Rowe WauchulaLetter To The Editor Loving God, Neighbors Is Good Motto For Life CHILD ABUSE HOTLINE1-800-422-4453 B4 The Herald-Advocate, May 3, 2018

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–H ARDEE L IVING – Come Join Us At REALITY RANCH COWBOY CHURCH 1980 State Road 66 Zolfo Springs, Florida S S u u n n d d a a y y , M M a a y y 6 6 1 1 1 1 : : 0 0 0 0 a a . m m .Frank and Peggy Giblin Frank is an accomplished cowboy poet and has competed in some of the largest poetry competitions including the National Cowboy Poetry Gathering held annually in Elko, Nevada. Peggy is an accomplished musician and has roots in the Texas Swing-style of music. She is an inspirational country western artist. Come hear Frank and Peggy’s testimonies and enjoy a time of worship. Everybody Welcome! F F o o r r m m o o r r e e i i n n f f o o r r m m a a t t i i o o n n c c a a l l l l R R a a n n d d y y a a t t ( ( 8 8 6 6 3 3 ) ) 7 7 8 8 1 1 1 1 5 5 7 7 8 8 soc5:3c soc5:3-17cV V i i c c t t o o r r y y P P r r a a i i s s e e a a n n d d W W o o r r s s h h i i p p C C e e n n t t e e r r 132 East Main Street Bowling Green Gospel Sing Soldiers Of The Cross S S a a t t u u r r d d a a y y , M M a a y y 5 5 • • 7 7 p p . m m . Pastor Belinda Murphy welcomes everyone soc5:3p Dear Mr. Kelly, After having the end of the final season banquet for "TheStory of Jesus," I can't sleep,thinking about the 31 years ofthis remarkable play, alongwith "The Story of Noah" and"The Story of Moses" that hasbrought hundreds of thousandsof people to Wauchula, so I de cided to get up and write toyou hoping my thoughts cango out to our community. Although he didn't write the story, Mike Graham wrote thelive screen play of "The Storyof Jesus." Being lead by theLord to do so, he has taken itand put it into action to tell thestory in a powerful way. I'm thrilled that my family has been a part of it from thebeginning. We have had threegenerations involved in theplay, and I know George Gar land had four generations ofhis family and possibly thereare others with as many. My brother Randy Whaley has worked with Mike Grahamfrom the beginning to build theset that filled the Cattleman'sArena all these years. My sis ters, Chris Price and JudyWhaley, painted the originalset and did touch-up for manyyears. They also did specialmakeup for the cast, which issomething that I had the privi lege of doing these past twoseasons under the leadership ofChris' daughter (second gener ation), Amber, who took overthe Special Makeup depart ment years ago. My siblings, their spouses, their children and their grand children have all played partsin this production, from babyJesus to Jesus being hung onthe cross, from little demons toSatan, from crowd people tomain characters. It has been apart of my entire family's life,not to mention a major part ofthe history of Wauchula. The play brought people from not only other cities inFlorida but from all over the United States and even fromoutside our country. Therehave been people here fromNew York Times, TV andRadio stations from all over.There have been many profes sionals, even California movieproduction people come toWauchula to see this play. I don't know of anybody who wasn't impressed andmoved by it. And to think thatthis was a little country townin the center of Florida witheveryday working peoplecoming together to accomplishperforming the greatest storyever told in such a fantasticand professional way. It's stillhard to believe that our littletown could do such a thing.This has put Wauchula on themap. More than what it has done for Wauchula and HardeeCounty, the play has broughtthousands to know the Lordand broaden His Kingdom. Avery special "thank you" needsto go out from this communityto Mike Graham for beingobedient to his calling and tothe hundreds of peoplethroughout the past 31 yearsthat sacrificed their time andefforts through months ofpractice, weeks of performingalong with the weeks of setupand days of tear down to ac complish all of this. Liveswere changed and peoplesaved. So "thank you, MikeGraham and the cast and crewof The Story of Jesus." The thought of not doing the play again leaves me with avery empty feeling, but know ing that there will be other pro ductions through MikeGraham and Power & LightProductions gives us hope.Unfortunately, they will prob ably be done in other townsand cities. Wauchula is bound to miss "The Story of Jesus." I knowmy family and I certainly will. Karen Whaley TibbsSarasota Letter To The Editor ‘The Story Of Jesus’ Ends31-Year Run In Wauchula Dear Editor: Life has value.Many young Democrat vot ers in the last presidential elec tion did what our Foundersnever would have done: theyvoted for socialism. Socialism offers many at tractive freebies. The problemis socialists don't have whatthey offer; they have to get itfrom those who do. It is nor mal for people not to want togive up their possessions andliberty. During the last century,the left murdered millions of their own citizens. We haveseen this in countries likeNorth Korea, China, Russia,Venezuela, and Cuba. To justify murder, they deny God. Any person who willmurder another human willhave no problem with lyingand stealing. For communists,murder is not evil, but owningpersonal property is. Commu nism is a close relative to so cialism; both take ownershipof property and place it undercontrol of government. Taxescan be a form of stealing;America did not have federalincome tax until 1913. What a contrast to our Founders’ statement that “allare created equal.” All have God-given rights in cluding “life, liberty, and thepursuit of happiness.” Dr.Ravi Zacharias notes that thisis a Biblical worldview, not Is lamic, Buddhist, Hindu, etc.With the God of the Bible,everyone has value. Marriage,family, the baby in the womb--all of life is sacred. Early America promoted ed ucation so everyone could readand be knowledgeable of theBible. The left has progressively and stealthily achieved majorvictories in America over thelast century with the censoringof the Bible in schools and inour culture. They have alsopromoted porn, abortion, sex ual immorality, and drugs. Toadvance the left's agenda, theyunderstood the need to removethe major obstacles presentedby a Biblical worldview, in cluding marriage and family. The Democrat Party contin ues to take us down the road tosocialism with its support forabortion, which destroys inno cent lives, and its support ofsexual immorality, which sup plants healthy marriages andfamilies. Life has God-given value. Live and vote prayerfully. Virgil Ullom, D.D.S.Babson Park Letter To The Editor Democrats Support Socialism,Oppose Biblical Worldview What were Hardee Countiansthinking and talking about inthe 1960s, or maybe the ‘30s?Each issue, we will revisit thatcorresponding week and yearin a decade past, using oldcopies of The Florida Advo cate, the Hardee County Her ald or The Herald-Advocate.This week, the decade of … The ‘50s May 2, 1958 Fruity Felony: To Hardee County law enforcement offi cers, stealing oranges is likestealing horses to Texans. Withthree cases of fruit theft beingcommitted in less than sixweeks, Hardee Sheriff OdellCarlton said it’s time to gettough. The penalty for stealingfruit is one to two years in thestate prison, up to 10 years ifthe thief is carrying a weapon. –––––– Dream Home: Nicholson Supply Co. wants to makeyour dream home a reality inthis advertisement. “If you’vegot the dream, we’ve got thehome to match it! Come, seehow completely we’ve antici pated all your ideas of what areal home looks like … add toyour homeowning pride andpleasure through all the yearsahead.” –––––– Touching Tale: Like any normal housewife, Mrs. ByrdLafon of Bowling Greenwakes up at 6 a.m. She sets thetable for breakfast and sews.But unlike your averagehousewife, Lafon has beencompletely blind for 20 years.Despite this handicap, Mrs.Birdie is very capable of com pleting most normal householdchores, except frying food andcutting material. She keeps herhome immaculately neat andrelies on her sense of touch foreverything, even cooking. –––––– Polio Cases: Vaccinations against polio are beingstrongly urged after three casesof the disease have been diag nosed in just over a week.Today, Hardee County’s De partment of Health will hold aspecial immunization clinicfrom 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Mrs. He lene Connor said the clinic willmainly be for those who havenot yet received the third shotafter seven months, but thefirst and second sets will beprovided as well. –––––– Sea Princess: Your daughter might not be wearing glassslippers, but J.W. Earnest &Co. Inc. is advertising a newnautical fashion for summerfun. “Cinderella’s smart newyachting look for playtime”will give young girls a touchthat makes them feel likeprincesses. “Available as seenin ‘Harper’s Bazaar.’ ” Decades • Viking longships could travel up to 200 kilometers perday and could carry at leastsixty men. NOTICE OF MEETING The Hardee County Economic Development Author ity will meet on Monday, May 14, 2018, at 8:30 a.m. in the County Commission Chambers, 412 West Or ange Street, Room 102, Wauchula, Florida. For more information call the County Manager’s of fice at 863/773-9430.This is a Disabled-Accessible facility. Any disabled per son needing to make special arrangements should con tact the County Commissioner’s office at leastforty-eight (48) hours prior to the public meeting.This notice is published in compliance with FloridaStatutes 286.0105.Interested parties may appear at the public meeting andbe heard. If a person decides to appeal any decisionmade by the members, with respect to any matter con sidered at such meeting or hearing, he will need arecord of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose,he may need to ensure that a verbatim record of theproceeding is made, which record includes the testi mony and evidence upon which the appeal is to bebased.Lexton H. Albritton, Jr. County Manager 5:3c ______________________________ IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 25-2018-CA-000057 CITY OF WAUCHULA, Plaintiff, vs.GENE EDWARD COGBURN, Defendant. _____________________________/ NOTICE OF ACTION TO: GENE EDWARD COGBURN YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose aclaim of lien regarding the fol lowing described real propertylocated in Hardee County,Florida: Lot 7, Block 2, SeminoleHeights, according to themat or plat thereof, asrecorded in Plat Book 2,Page(s) 264, of the PublicRecords of HardeeCounty, Florida with the following street ad dress: 709 8th Avenue South, Wauchula, FL 33873 (the “Prop erty”) has been filed by thePlaintiff, City of Wauchula,against Defendant, Gene Ed ward Cogburn, in the CircuitCourt of the Tenth Judicial Cir cuit in and for Hardee County,Florida.Gene Edward Cogburn is re quired to serve a copy of hiswritten defenses, if any, to theComplaint on the attorney forthe Plaintiff, Maureen A. Pate man, whose address is 301 EastPine Street, Suite 1400, Orlando,Florida 32801, on or before thirtydays from the first date of publi cation and to file the originalwith the Clerk of this Court ei ther before service on the Plain tiff’s attorney or immediatelythereafter. Otherwise, a defaultwill be entered against Defen dant Cogburn for the relief de manded in the Complaint.WITNESS my hand and the sealof this Court, this 26 day of April,2018. VICTORIA L. ROGERS, Clerk of the Court By: Connie Coker Deputy Clerk 5:3,10c __________________________________ The Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission hasannounced a 40-day recre ational red snapper season forboth Gulf state and federal wa ters. A 24-day season was origi nally proposed. “Florida is an important ac cess point throughout the na tion and world for recreationalred snapper fishing,” saidFWC Chairman Bo Rivard.“With other Gulf states settinglonger seasons than whatFlorida had initially proposed,it was important for us to finda fair resolution that wouldprovide equal access to redsnapper in Florida. “FWC worked collabora tively with NOAA Fisheries tocome up with a season thatwould provide access to all of those that choose Florida astheir fishing destination. Weappreciate the leadership fromGov. Rick Scott and U.S. Con gressman Neal Dunn and weare excited to announce thatextension today.” The 2018 proposed season would be June 11 to July 21. This recreational season will include those fishing for redsnapper from private recre ational vessels. For-hire oper ations that do not have afederal reef fish permit are alsoincluded but are limited to tar geting reef fish in Gulf statewaters only. To share your comments or input on Gulf red snapper, visitmyfwc.com and click on “Fish ing” the “Public Comments”under “Saltwater.” FWC Will Expand Red Snapper Season I'm home from the hospital but was sent home with a midline and have to do an IV once a day. The nurse taught me how to do it myself. I only have four more days and I'll be free of allthe IV treatments. During this time I guess you could say I have taken up bird watching. Sitting in the living room looking out my front door Ikept seeing the birds fly down and get the babies' cat food outof the dish. There is a five-gallon bucket turned over a post at the steps to the porch. My granddaughter put it there to drain after mop ping my kitchen. It looked like a good place to feed the birdsand gives me a good view to observe them. I have seen blue jays, red headed woodpeckers, a black bird, and a pair of cardinals, also known as redbirds. The male redbird is a bright red with a black face around a reddish bill. The fe males are light brown with a reddish tint in their wings, tail, andcrest. They also have black on their face and the red-orange billthe same as the male. Unlike most other birds cardinals mate for life, and they don't migrate but stay in the same area all of their lives. So, ifyou are seeing them now, it means they have been around forsome time. The red cardinal has long been known as a spiritual mes senger by ancient cultures, and even in today's society there arethose who still believe if they see a cardinal it is the spirit of aloved one that is there to watch over them or to bring them amessage. Some believe the cardinal is a sign of good health,happiness and protection. If you are one who believes cardinals are messengers from a loved one, try to remember what you were thinking at the time you saw the cardinal. Allow the sightings to bring you a feeling of peace. Let their visits remind you that a higher spirit is lookingout for you and protecting and guiding you. Enjoy your feathered friends and remember they are all God's creatures and God is looking out for them, just as He doesfor us.Editor’s Note: Jonell Peavy lives in Avon Park and can bereached at 863-453-3589. Peavy’s Ponderings By Jonell Peavy Sugar Possum of the late Truman Thomas May 3, 2018, The Herald-Advocate B5

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C O L O R ! ! “You look good in blue!” The Herald-Advocate offers full color to our advertisers.Call our office at (863) 773-3255 for more information. D D o o n n ’ ’ t t F F o o r r g g e e t t R R e e c c e e i i v v e e y y o o u u r r p p a a p p e e r r W W e e d d n n e e s s d d a a y y N N o o M M a a t t t t e e r r W W h h e e r r e e Y Y o o u u L L i i v v e e a a t t www.TheHeraldAdvocate.com Online Subscription Rates$5 for 1 Month $19 for 6 Months $37 for 1 Year $70 for 2 Years Herald-Advocate Hardee County’s Hometown Coverage The B6 The Herald-Advocate, May 3, 2018

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Fort Meade, Florida 205 N. Charleston(863) 773-2530 (863) 285-8131VISITUS24 HOURSA DAYATwww.directchevy.com NEW 2017 CHEVROLETCRUZ LTAuto, Air, PW/PLStk.#H161$17,995 NEW 2018 CHEVROLETCOLORADOEXT. CABAir, PW/PL, Tilt/CruiseStk.#J1239$24,995 NEW 2017 CHEVROLETCAMARO COUPEV6, Auto, Air, PW/PLStk.#H117$26,995 NEW 2017 CHEVROLETSILVERADODOUBLE CABAuto, Air, PW/PL, Tilt/CruiseStk.#H1293$26,995 NEW 2018 CHEVROLETEQUINOX LSAuto, Air, PW/PL, Tilt/CruiseStk.#J1088$23,995 NEW 2018 CHEVROLETMALIBU LSAuto, Air, PW/PLStk.#J120$21,995 *All rebates and incentives assigned to dealer. APR is W.A.C. for up to 60 months. All prices are plus tax, tag and $249.90 dealer fee. Our selection of trucks, prices and customer service makes it worth the drive to Bob Elliotts Greenwood Chevrolet! We are here to handle all your GM Service, Parts and Body Shop needs. 5:3c Financing Available at Greenwood Chevrolet 2012 CHEVROLETVOLTLeather, Auto, Air, PW/PLStk.#F103A$15,995 2016 CHEVROLETSPARKAuto, AirStk.#H195A$10,995 2013 CHEVROLETSILVERADO 1500CREW CAB LT 4X4V8, Auto, Air, PW/PL, Tilt/CruiseStk.#J109A$30,995 2015 CHEVROLETEQUINOX LTZLeather, Auto, Air, PW/PLStk.#J1043A$18,995 2015 NISSANALTIMAAuto, Air, PW/PL, LeatherStk.#H145A$14,995 2015 CHEVROLETSILVERADO 2500HD LTZ DBL CAB 4X4Dura Max Diesel, Alison Auto, Leather Interior, PW/PLStk.#K100A$45,995 2015 CHEVROLETSUBURBAN LTLeather, 3rd Row Seat, Dual Air, PW/PL, Tilt/CruiseStk.#H1044B$38,995 2013 GMC YUKON DENALI V8, Auto, Dual Air, Leather, LoadedStk.#J1212A$27,995 2015 CHEVROLETTRAVERSE LT7 Passenger, Dual Air, PW/PL, Tilt/CruiseStk.#H1243A$22,995 When we look for a used car, we often ask for the Car fax. It tells you the history of the vehicle and gives you a vi sion of what potential issues you may run into in the future. The same precautionary principle should be used in purchasing a group of sheep or goats: ask for the history of these animals and inspect them thoroughly. There are some diseases that are increasingly more common since many hobby and small producers have lim ited information on the impor tance of biosecurity measures to avoid having pathogens take over their herds. In this article we will talk about Caseous Lymphadenitis (CL), a common pathogen people often acquire when purchasing sheep and goats as replace ments. Pathogen Introduction Caseous Lymphadenitis is a bacterial infection that affects lymph nodes of sheep and goats. The bacterium is highly contagious and resilient under Florida climatic conditions. It survives in the soil for months to years, even in direct sun light. The pathogen causes the development of lymph node abscesses two weeks after ini tial exposure in most cases, but these can appear several months after exposure in some animals. Economic losses associated with CL include death of in fected animals, condemnation of carcasses and loss due to trimming infected areas in the carcass, hide and wool loss, loss of sales for breeding ani mals, and premature culling of infected animals. External Form Seen most commonly on goats. Infected lymph node abscesses are visible (en larged) under the skin. Ab scesses can grow to a size of 1-2 inches in diameter. Most commonly, infected animals will have abscessed lymph nodes on the jaw, in front of the shoulder and in the flank. Eventually the skin sur rounding the abscess will break and release thick greenishwhite pus. When this happens, the potential for herd contami nation increases dramatically. Internal Form Lymph nodes deep within the body become infected. The nodes in the thoracic cavity are most commonly involved. Swelling and abscessing of nodes create discomfort to the animal to the point that the an imal will start losing weight (in older animals) or slow to minimal weight gain (in younger animals). At slaughter, the carcasses of these ani mals are condemned. Contamination Caseous lymphadenitis can spread via contact with bodily fluids of infected animals, par ticularly nasal discharges, which can contaminate sur faces in common areas such as feeders and waterers. Shearing equipment, combs and other tack contaminated with pus from the abscesses can also spread the bacterium. Aside from sheep and goats, this disease can some times be transmitted to other farm animals such as horses, cattle, swine, camelids and even deer. It is considered zoonotic as well, since it can be contracted by humans. Treating CL This is not considered a curable disease. Treatment of this disease requires the help of a veterinarian who will design a program to reduce the spread of CL. Culling and iso lating infected animals, treat ing abscesses and the use of antibiotics are key strategies to eliminate this disease from your farm. Invest In Biosecurity Create a quarantine area in the farm. This area should be used to place new arrivals under observation before re leasing them into your herd/flock. Do not share feed ers, waterers and other equip ment with general flock equipment. Know what you are pur chasing. Screen newly pur chased animals for signs of CL. Examine them by looking for previous scarring from healed abscesses around jaw, shoulder and flank regions. Control your fly popula tions. Flies feed on bodily flu ids and can spread CL around the herd/flock. Disinfect equipment that is used for common mainte nance shearing equipment, combs, milking equipment, etc. Vaccinate against CL the vaccine will not eliminate infections, but will reduce the incidence of abscesses in in fected animals. Isolate animals with ab scesses until the infection is resolved. Work with your veterinarian on a plan for re-entry of infected animals to the gen eral population. Remove barbed wire, nails and other potentially hazardous items from com mon areas to decrease injury and potential transmission of CL by abscess ruptures. Give Us A Call! For more information on sheep and goat diseases or management of your herd/ flock, contact us at 773-2164. Avoid Disease In Your Sheep Flock, Goat Herd Do you feel that heat beating down on you? Is your iced tea just tea now? Its here! Summer. Better run into a nice cold building and take cover! I have just the place you should go. Its cool, its free, it has many fun events and there are books! What more could you ask for? Maybe win the Lotto, but youve got to play to win, right? You are in luck! The place you should be is, drum roll, please The library! Many people may not know this but the Hardee County Public Library is a great place to visit. There are so many different events and fun activities that you can join in. We have a great summer program planned this year. Our director, Dee Shackelford, has been hard at work planning for it, and this year it is called Libraries Rock! So, put on your blue suede shoes and come rock with us! To kick off this summer, we are having the Scholastic Book Fair and some creepy crawlies. Stay tuned for dates on these events! Also, during the summer we will have movies, crafts, cooking with Danni, stories at the BG Depot and more. Come by the library and pick up a schedule. Come Rock the Library with us! Our executive assistant, Rhonda Bodiford, has some new informational magazines about Florida out for everyone to take: Explore Par adise, Visit Florida and Camp Florida. They are great magazines for our traveling pa trons. We also have maps of Florida available. Mothers Day is coming up and we would like to invite you to come to the library on May 11 at 3 p.m. to make a Mothers Day card. If you would like to help transform the li brary, contact us at 773-6438 or come see us. For updates and exciting things to come, check out our Facebook page.A Cool Place For Summer? The Library, Of Course! Job stress, job loss, credit-card debt, student loans, low income, poverty, foreclosures, bank ruptcy, health insurance, family problems, single-parent families, poor lifestyle choices, obesity, hurricanes you name it, and all of these can cause stress and hypertension, or high blood pressure, the single biggest risk factor for stroke. Hypertension also plays a significant role in heart attacks and cardiovascular disease. Statistics show that 35.5 percent of the adults in Hardee County have been told that they have hypertension, which represents 2,493 adults. There are probably many more adults who have hypertension but have not yet been diagnosed. Hypertension is a serious health problem in Hardee County as well as in the state of Florida. Dr. Linda Bobroff, professor of food and nutrition, University of Florida Extension, developed an eight-week, evidence-based curricu lum, Keeping the Pressure Down, to educate people regarding the serious chronic health condition of hypertension. Through the efforts of Florida Hospitals CREATION Health De partment, it has been available in Highlands County and will be available in Hardee County. Melissa Helms, RN at Florida Hospital Heartland, and I will be conducting the eightweek series of classes beginning May 17 at Central Florida Healthcare, 115 K.D. Revell Road in Wauchula. May is National High Blood Pressure Education Month, so take advantage of this free educa tional opportunity. Incentives will be awarded for attending. To register or for further information, contact Helms at (863) 386-6421 or Melissa.Helms@ahss.org. Carolyn Hendry Wyatt holds a Masters Degree in family and consumer science education. She has 30 years of experience in this field, and served for 22 years as a county agent for the University of Floridas Institute of Food & Agricultural Sciences Hardee County Exten sion Office.The Pressure Is Up! May 3, 2018, The Herald-Advocate B7 ATTENTIONGRADUATING SENIORS Pictures are unavailable for the following seniors. If you would like your picture included in the 2018 Graduation Edition of The Herald-Advocate, please provide photo by Friday, May 11 at 5 p.m. Herald-Advocate Hardee Countys Hometown Coverage115 S. 7th Ave.773-3255production@theheraldadvocate.com Hannah Abel Charles Adams Stephen Aguilar Lorena Arana-Gonzalez Rigoberto Armenta Leonardo Bautista-Martinez Miguel Benitez Ricardo Delecruz Jose DeLaRosa-Rodriguez William Derringer Jose Espinoza Esther Eugene Jose Gonzalez Giovanni Gutierrez Christian Hernandez Juanito Herrera Rebecca King Sylas Kirkland Juan Lazaro Lovely Lee Francisco Luna Zaria Luna Gerardo Martinez Hunter Meadows Mariela Miramontes Maria Paniagua Alexis Camacho Malik Polk Gabriela Reyes Maria Reyes Sarai Santana Anderson Severe Alyssa Shoemaker Jose Sustaita Janessa Tamayo Jamari Taylor Oscar Trevino Julia Vargas Adelina Villafranca Joshua Yarbrough Ricardo Zuniga 4:26-5:10nc The

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GATORHEATING& AIRCONDITIONINGREFRIGERATION& ICEMACHINES THINK GREEN • SAVEENERGY• SAVE MONEY 863-832-3399LOCALLYOWNEDSALEONALLNEWUNITS Call For Service Today • All Makes Call For Service Today • All Makes Goodman –A Member of Daikin Group Daikin Industries, Ltd. (DIL) is a Fortune 1000 company with more than 49,000 employees worldwide, making it the number one residential and commercial HVAC manufacturer in the world. Daikan is engaged primarily in the development, manufacture, sales and aftermarket support of heating, ventilation, air conditioning and refrigeration equipment, refrigerants and other chemicals, as well as oil hydraulic products. Licensed & Insured CAC 1815095 5:3c Q: I was watching "Bridge to Terabithia" the other daywith my kids, and it made mewonder whatever happenedto the young actress whoplayed May Belle. She was sogood! —Katie R., via email A: Bailee Madison has been a busy actress since the family-adventure film of 2007. She'sbeen in tons of stuff, including"Wizards of Waverly Place,""Trophy Wife" and "The Fos ters." Presently you can catchher in the "Good Witch" serieson Hallmark (which airs Sun day nights at 9/8c), where sheplays Catherine Bell's daugh ter, Grace. I spoke with her re cently, and she told me aboutthe joy of co-starring in ablockbuster like "Terabithia,"as well as how much fun it is to play a witch's daughter on"Good Witch." Of "Terabithia," Bailee raved: "I was in New Zealandfor over six months, and it'sone of the most beautifulplaces I've visited. The blacksand beaches and just the cul ture — it was such a special time for me. That movie is soiconic to so many people on somany levels, and I got to be apart of bringing a book to life.Now that I'm older, I've readthe book and I've talked to kidswho are reading the book —it's such a beautiful thing that Igot to be a part of it. I'm sograteful." She's also grateful to be costarring in the hit show "GoodWitch," and she told me a bitabout this season. "I have tosay without a doubt this is my favorite journey for Grace.She's a very good girl; shedoesn't go out. She's that pic ture-perfect daughter whoevery mother dreams of hav ing. But she's also a teenagerwho's dealing with newfoundinsecurities. She's in love forthe first time. I think what'scool is she's a lot more imper fect. I found it really refreshingto get to play that." *** Q: Can you give me any news about the next season of"Stranger Things"? Celebrity Extra By Cindy Elavsky PICKS OF THE WEEK "Peter Rabbit" (PG) — Beatrix Potter's adorable wood land creatures are given an ir reverent update in "PeterRabbit," starring James Corbenas the voice of the cocky, con fident Peter. Sure of his placein Bea's(RoseByrne)heart andat the topof hisveg etable-stealinggame,Petermanagesto escapethe clutches of Old Man Mc Gregor when the farmer unex pectedly dies. His nephew -afussy, exacting departmentstore supervisor, played de lightfully by Domnhall Glee son -inherits the property. Theyounger McGregor moves inand shuts out Peter. The twothen begin an escalating battlefor control of the garden andBea's affection. It's fast-pacedfun with a great soundtrack,and plenty of laughs and"aww" moments for kids andadults alike. "12 Strong" (R) — This is a war movie set in modern timesand based on real-life 21st cen tury events, but it looks andfeels like a throwback to WorldWar II-era portrayals or even aWestern — the soldiers ride in,guns-blaring, on horses. MitchNelson (Chris Hemsworth) andHal Spencer (Michael Shan non) head a small covert forcethat descend on Mazar-i-Sharifin Afghanistan in the days fol lowing the Sept. 11 attacks inNew York. Their goal is to lib erate the city from the clutchesof the Taliban, with the guid ance and assistance of Afghanirebel forces. The combinationof technologically advancedmilitary might in a rugged, un developed country is initiallyjarring, but at its soul this filmis representative of the indefati gable, vociferously supportiveAmerican spirit of the times. "Winchester" (PG-13) — Sarah Winchester (Helen Mir ren) is the lone heir to the Win chester Rifle fortune — and,unfortunately, legacy of death.She and her remaining familymembers are allegedly torturedby visions of ghosts. This muchis true, and even today you can visit the Win chesterMysteryHouse.Thisfantasyfilm bytheSpierigbrothersattempts to ex pand on the legend and codify the mad ness of Sarah Winchester's ob sessive decades-long buildingspree: a supernatural prison forthe souls who mean to avengetheir deaths at the hands of aWinchester rifle. Jason Clarkeplays Dr. Price, who comes to assess Mrs. Winchester's men tal stability, and unintentionally joins her battle against the un known. "Please Stand By" (PG-13) — Dakota Fanning heads asWendy, a young autisticwoman living in a group home,whose overriding interest is inwatching "Star Trek" moviesand writing fan fiction set inthe Trekkie world. She lives areasonably structured life witha job and a small dog namedPete, and is supported by asympathetic caregiver namedScottie (Toni Collette). Thenews broadcasts a contest forwriting a Star Trek script, and this small, unworldly but deter mined young lady sets out on ajourney to hand in her script inLos Angeles. It's predictable, but it is also very sweet and up lifting. While you might see theending coming, the good feels are still there. Bonus perform ance by Patton Oswald as a beat cop turned Klingon trans lator. NEW TV RELEASES "Broken" miniseries"Dear Murderer" Series 1 "When Calls the Heart: Hearts and Minds" (c) 2018 King Features Synd., Inc. Couch Theater DVDPreviews By Sam Struckhoff DVDs reviewed here are available in stores the week of April 30. "Black Panther" has dis placed "Star Wars: The LastJedi" as the No. 9 top-grossingfilm of all time and has itssights set on No. 8 "Harry Pot ter and the Deathly Hallows:Part 2" (2011) and No. 7"Avengers: Age of Ultron"(2015). It's interesting to notethat "Black Panther" starChadwick Boseman also isone of the stars of "Avengers:Infinity War," which openedApril 27 (sureto challenge"Panther")."Panther's"Michael B.Jordan, cur rently filmingthe sequel"Creed II" fora Nov. 9 open ing, again withSly Stallone,also stars inthe HBO re boot of RayBradbury'ssci-fi classic"Fahrenheit451" (1966), with MichaelShannon and Keir Dullea, and"Raising Dion" for Netflix. "Twelve Years a Slave" Oscar-winner Lupita Nyong'ohas co-starred in three "StarWars" films: "The ForceAwakens" (2015), "The LastJedi" (2017) and the upcoming"Episode IX," due December2019. She also stars in "LittleMonsters" (a zombie film),with Josh Gad and AlexanderEngland of "Alien: Covenant"(2017), and a new "Charlie'sAngels" film, with "Twilight"saga star Kristen Stewart, di rected by "Hunger Games" starElizabeth Banks. *** Five-time "Mike & Molly" Emmy-nominee Melissa Mc Carthy (she won in 2012) anda three-time Emmy nomineefor hosting "Saturday NightLive" (she won in 2017) hasmade 26 films, was nominatedfor an Oscar for "Bridesmaids"(2011) and has had two top-grossing films: "Tammy"(2014) and "The Boss" (2016),which she produced and wrote with husband Ben Falcone(who di rected). She'sup next in"Life of theParty," writ ten and pro duced bythem and star ring her, withMayaRudolph andJulie Bowen(out May 11).McCarthy isin the comedy "Puppet," di rected by Brian Henson —which she, Falcone and Hen son co-produced — with MayaRudolph, Joel McHale and Elizabeth Banks, opening Aug.17. McCarthy also is taking aserious dramatic plunge as cel ebrated 1960s-80s writer LeeIsrael, famous for profilingKatharine Hepburn, TallulahBankhead, Estee Lauder andDorothy Kilgallen, to namesome, with Richard E. Grantand Jane Curtin, due out Oct.19. *** Twelve-time Emmy nomi nee Jon Hamm, who finallywon one for his last year in"Mad Men" (2015), is donewith those often funny, some times annoying H&R Blockads now that tax season isover. He's receiving rave re views for "Beirut," withRosamund Pike, and he alsohas two more films comingout: "Tag," with Ed Helms, ar riving June 15, and "BadTimes at the El Royale," withJeff Bridges, Chris Hems-worth, Dakota Johnson andRussell Crowe, hitting screensOct. 5. Surviving tax ads andrebounding with rave film re views proves he's not just a"Hamm" actor ... ouch! (c) 2018 King Features Synd., Inc. Hollywood By Tony Rizzo Top10 Movies Inside 1. A Quiet Place (PG-13) Emily Blunt, John Krasinski 2. Rampage (PG-13) Dwayne Johnson, NaomieHarris 3. I Feel Pretty (PG-13) Amy Schumer, MichelleWilliams 4. Super Troopers 2 (R) Jay Chandrasekhar, Kevin Heffer nan 5. Truth or Dare (PG-13) Lucy Hale, Tyler Posey 6. Ready Player One (PG13) Tye Sheridan, OliviaCooke 7. Blockers (R) Leslie Mann, John Cena 8. Black Panther (PG-13) Chadwick Boseman, MichaelB. Jordan 9. Traffik (R) Paula Patton, William Fichtner 10. Isle of Dogs (PG-13) an imated (c) 2018 King Features Synd., Inc. —Kyle T., via Twitter A: As you wish, Kyle. Season three brings us Wesley/TheDread Pirate Roberts (of "ThePrincess Bride") himself whenCary Elwes joins the cast asMayor Kline. He's described as"handsome, slick and sleazy ...your classic '80s politician."Also coming aboard is JakeBusey, playing Bruce, "a jour nalist for 'The Hawkins Post'with questionable morals and asick sense of humor." This newseason also will bring us eightbrand-new episodes; however,there is talk that Netflix mightnot drop the series until early2019 instead of its usual Hal loween release. I'll keep youposted on that. *** Q: I need more "GLOW"! —Jennie F., via email A: You're gonna get more "GLOW," and soon! The 10-episode season two drops June29 on Netflix. And if the show'spremiere-reveal video is anyindication, season two will bejust as fun and outrageous asthe first. Write to Cindy at King Fea tures Weekly Service, 628 Vir ginia Drive, Orlando, FL32803; or e-mail her at let ters@cindyelavsky.com. (c) 2018 King Features Synd., Inc. HARDEE COUNTY FOOD PANTRIES Alpha & Omega Freedom Ministries 113 N 7th Ave Wauchula, FL 33873Tele: 863-773-5717 Requirements: Identification, Social Security cardWhen: Wednesday ONLY | 10 am – 12 noon Bowling Green Church of God 121 W. Broward Bowling Green, FL 33834Tele: 863-375-2231 Requirements: Identification When: 3rd Saturday of the month | 8 am –noon Cutting Edge Food Ministry 3059 Elm Street Zolfo Springs, FL 33890Tele: 863-773-2484 Requirements: Identification When: Tuesday & Friday 10 am – noon & 1 – 3 pm First United Methodist Church of Wauchula 207 N. 7th Ave Wauchula, FL 33873Tele: 863-773-4267 Requirements: ID & Physical address (Light Bill, Lease etc.)When: 2nd & 4th Thursdays of the month1:00 –3:00 pm (first come, first serve) Other Program: Bagged Lunch M, W, F 8 am –12 pm for pre-school age kids & adults.Wednesday Night Free Community Dinner:5:30 –6:30 pmHardee Help Center 713 E. Bay Street, Wauchula, FL 33873Tele: 863-773-0034 Requirements: Application with proof of hardshipPrograms: Emergency & Homelessness AssistanceFor more information, Contact the HardeeHelp CenterSt. Michael’s Catholic Church Food Pantry 408 Heard Bridge Rd, Wauchula, FL 33873Tele: 863-773-4089 Requirements: Identification or Light Bill When: Every Saturday 6:00 – 8:00 am Rev. 12/19/2017 • Famous rhythm-and-blues singer and pianist Ray Charles began his career playing dance-hall gigs in Tampa, Florida. In1990, Charles received an honorary degree in music from the University of South Florida in Tampa. On This Day:• In 1654 Bridge at Rowley, Massachusetts begins charging tolls for ani mals• In 1765 1st North American medical college opens in Philadelphia • In 1802 Washington, D.C. is incorporated as a city • In 1830 1st regular steam train passenger service starts • In 1845 1st African American lawyer, Macon B Allen, admitted to the bar in Massachusetts B8 The Herald-Advocate, May 3, 2018

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5:3c SENSATIONAL SCIENCE COURTESY PHOTOS First graders at ZolfoSprings Elementary experi enced science firsthandon Friday as Hardee HighSchool's Alpha Zeta PiClub and teacher SusanBarton visited the classesof Sharon Ussery, JuliaRoberts, Kay Crews, HelenNeal, Kerry Mushrush andKelly Daane. High school ers Avery Bunch, TaylorBone, Daisy Badillo,Michaela Klein, Sarah Carl ton, Tony Webb andRoman Almageur kept theyounger students mesmer ized with hand motions tohelp remember the watercycle of life, making a"genie” come out of a bot tle using chemical reactions, learning why trees are important, singing about theEarth's rotation, and a chemical reaction that made "elephant toothpaste." Some ofthe classes were treated to extra special guests from Mosaic, who videotaped theclub. Shown are elephant toothpaste, the genie in a bottle and a camera crew. DONATE LIFE COURTESY PHOTOS The Tree of Life at the Hardee County Tax Collector’s Office has added many leavesover the past year, each one representing someone who has signed up as an organand tissue donor. The above photo, taken last year, shows the family of TylerRoberts -for whom the tree is named – who died in 2003: (from left) father MonkRoberts, grandmother Tulie Roberts, mother Kim Roberts and brother SidneyRoberts. From March of 2017 to February of this year, the Tax Collector’s Officehas processed 4,186 driver license and identification cards, with 1,145 of them reg istering as donors. More than 5,800 Floridians and 115,000 people nationwide arewaiting for lifesaving transplants. One organ and tissue donor can potentially savethe lives of eight people and enhance the lives of dozens more. Don’t rule yourselfout because of age, even if you have a medical condition; you still may be able tohelp save lives, says Tax Collector Jacki Johnson. Register as a donor online at Do nateLifeFlorida.org or at the Tax Collector’s Office, 110 W. Oak St., Wauchula. ATTENTIONChurches, Pastors and Youth Pastors It’s time to recognize your Seniors at this special time in their life. Deadline is May 10 To be part of our 2018 Graduation Tab, call us at 773-3255. 4:12-5:3nc COURTESY PHOTOS Fourth-grade students in Ashley Smith’s class at ZolfoSprings Elementary solved math problems to find thecombination to a box where their teacher “acciden tally” locked their field-trip tickets but “forgot” its com bination! Good thing they were all on hand to help! MATH MYSTERY If YouSeeSomethingSaySomething Report Suspicious Activity 1 (855) Fla Safe 1(855)3527233 May 3, 2018, The Herald-Advocate B9

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T HE C LASSIFIEDS ABOUT ... ClassifiedsDEADLINE ....Tuesday noon RATES ..........Minimum of $5.00 for up to 10 words. Each additional word is 25. Ads in all capitals are 35 per word. Headlines are $2 a line. Blind ad box numbers are $5 extra. BILLING ........Ads must be pre-paid. CLASSIFICATIONS:Agriculture Mobile Homes Appliances Notices Automobile Personal Boats Pets Furniture Plants/Produce Guns Real Estate Help Wanted Recreational Houses Rentals LivestockRentals, CommercialLost & Found Services Miscellaneous Wanted Motorcycles Yard Sales Large metal building on over acre in town. Over 5,600 sf with most heated/cooled. Had been previously used for gymnastics & has still has the foam pit. Zoned C-1. Great commercial property located on Florida Avenue. Asking $150,000 1.19 ac metal warehouse with an office. 9,600 total square feet. Zoned A-1. Shallow well. $130,000 MAKE AN OFFER! VERY MOTI VATED SELLER! 40 acres Presently used for farming & has a well. $360,000 5 acres with a pond. Currently fenced & being used for cattle. $65,500 RV space for sale at Torrey Oaks Golf & RV Many improvements made. Located next to golf course. $64,900 Large 4,800+ sf Commercial building Close to the McDonalds intersection in Wauchula Asking $125,000 15 acres with 2 mobile homes Located in Ft Green Asking $800,000 5.43 ac vacant land in town on Florida Avenue South. Zoned C-1. $320,000 206 North 6th Avenue, Wauchula, FL 33873 Office (863)773-0060 Evening (863)781-1338 www.jimseerealty.com James V. See, Jr., Broker Jim SeeRealtor Associates Rick Knight (863) 781-1396 Dusty Albritton (863) 781-0161 Shane Conley (863) 781-9664 Justin Smith 863-781-3432 cl5:3c Lacey Webb863-773-4101204 N. 6th Ave., Wauchula, 33873 Do you have the best coverage for your home?We have over 15 companies to offer you the right coverage for your home and lifestyle.cl5:3c Frank Vasquez Realty Inc. (863) 781-4133 Frank Vasquez, BrokerRESIDENTIAL 109 North Bridle Path, Arcadia 2BR 1B Large corner lot, concrete block, central heat and air. $80,000 3BR 2B Newly built home on corner lot, 793 West County Line Rd. Bowling Green $134,000 UNDER CONTRACT 411 4th St. West, Zolfo Springs 3BR 1B block, central air on 1 acre. $77,500 UNDER CONTRACT 628 Terrell Rd., Wauchula Lg. 4BR 3B frame house on 2.14 acres Price Reduced $80,000 4520 Fair Ave. Bowling Green 3BR 2B stucco block home $99,000 3BR 2B stucco block home on 8th Ave. Zolfo Springs. This home is beautiful inside and has all been updated. $135,000 314 Walton Ave. Wauchula 3BR 2B stucco house $89,000 Frank Vasquez Realty, Inc. for more listings 116 Carlton St. Suite A Wauchula, FL 33873 SALESASSOCIATES Miguel A. Santana 863-245-1758 Nancy Craft 863-832-0370cl5:3c NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE 1999 CHEVY METRO 3 DOOR RED VIN: 2C1MR2269X6710047 9:00 AM, MAY 19, 2018 HILLS TOWING, INC. 4205 US HWY 17 N. BOWLING GREEN, FL 33834 cl5:3c Advantage Realty #1 743 US 27 S. Sebring, FL 33872 Office: 863-386-0303 Fax: 863-386-1112VISIT US AT www.advantagehighlands.comMark LambertLicensed Realtor863-832-0401mark33862@gmail.com cl1:11tfc Agricultural-Commercial-Residential REVELLAUTOSALES BUYHEREPAYHERE8 86 63 3-3 37 75 5-4 41 11 13 3A A f f t t e e r r H H o ou u r r s s C C a a l l l l : :Travis Revell Sandra Miller863-245-0383 863-781-45775220 Hwy 17N Bowling Green (across from BP)Se Habla EspaolWE ACCEPT CREDIT CARDS cl1:4tfc FREE ESTIMATES By Hour or ContractH. KIKER Tree Surgery 40 Years Full Time Service INSURED863-453-4942 863-453-4272 Cell: 863-664-9091 Tree Trimming Tree Removal Stump Grinding3601 E. Ramsey Way Avon Park, FL 33825cl5:4tfcNOTICE OF SALE MAY 8, 2018 at 2:00 P.M. Personal property in the following units will be sold to the highest bidder to satisfy rental liens in accordance with Florida Statute 83.801 through 83.809. Contents may include household items, clothing, closed cartons, etc. The sell will take place on May 8, 2018 at Convenient Mini Storage, 5106 U.S. Highway 17 N., Bowling Green, FL. Unit 5 Unknown Unit 25 Edward Hendrickson Unit 26 Edward Hendrickson Unit 45 Heather Lillie Unit 53 Janann Lee Unit 54 Aimee Smith cl4:19-5:3c DIESEL INJECTION REPAIR Pumps, turbos and injectors. Re moval and instillation available. 863-381-0538. 2:8-1:17p DETAILERS AND TECHNICIANS needed at Alan Jay Chevrolet/Chrysler/Jeep/Dodge/ Ram. Apply in person at 1405 Hwy. 17 S., Wauchula. Ask for Robert Austin. 5:3,10c BIKE REPAIR, 10-3 Thursday. Heaven Sent. Send resume jenny@newfocus.org. 5:3-31c WANTED: Experienced Lever man Maintenance Mechanic Foreman/Supervisor Experi enced Boatman Deckhand for local dredging company with several years of work with proj ects for Mosaic. MSHA training a plus. Must pass background/ drug test. EOE/DFW Contact by email: guy@floridadredge.com 813-634-2517. 4:12-5:3c Help Wanted Agriculture HEARTLAND PEDIATRICS is looking for part-time CNA, M.A. Apply in person 120 Heartland Way. 4:12-5:10p FLORIDA FERTILIZER IS hiring a warehouse employee who can operate a forklift and is computer literate. Apply in person, 194 Will Duke Road. 3:15tfc LEARN TO DRIVE A TRUCK! Get your Commercial Driver's Li cense today at South Florida State College. Scholarships available to eligible participants. 863-784-7033. 3:1-9:20p MECHANIC NEEDED. MUST have own tools. Apply in person at BG Small Engine, 4702 US Hwy. 17 N., BG. 12:21tfc HAVE YOU LOST A PET? Contact animal control in Bowling Green at 863-375-2255 to see if we have your cat or dog. We also have pets for adoption. 4:16dh/tfc Lost/Found Help Wanted HARDEE COUNTY QUOTA Liquor License for Sale 3PS/4COP Quota Liquor License for sale in Hardee County, FL. No liens or debt. No transfer fee. Financing is available. Rare oppor tunity! Only one available in the county! Contact 813-374-9287 if interested. 4:26-5:24p ADOPT A PET! If you have lost a pet or are looking for a new one, the City of Wauchula invites you to come and see if you can find the pet youre looking for. The Wauchula Animal Control is lo cated at 685 Airport Road. Please call 863-773-3265 for more infor mation. tfc-dh ATTENTION! State Statutes 828.29 requires that all cats and dogs sold in Florida be at least 8 weeks old, have an official health certificate, have necessary shots and be free of parasites. tfc-dh Pets Miscellaneous ULLRICHS STORAGE UNITS, several sizes, corner of 9th Ave. & Goolsby St., 863-773-6448 or 863-773-9291. 5:3c 2 RESTAURANTS, SALVAGE yard, beer tavern, storefronts, pasture, 863-773-6616, 863-4450915 4:26-5:24p 2 BEDROOM HOUSE, large yard, $200 weekly. 863-773-6616, 863445-0915. 4:19-5:17p ATTENTION! The Federal Fair Housing Act prohibits advertis ing any preference or limitation based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or the intention to make such a preference or limi tation. Familial status includes children under 18 living with par ents or guardians and pregnant women. tfc-dh Rentals REDLETTERS MARINE SERVICES863-832-0127Licensed and InsuredFiberglass Repair and Fabrication Decks, Transom, Stringer Replacement Awl Grip and Interlux Perfection Paint Jobs Marine Welding Specializing in Stainless and Aluminum cl5:3p HOMEINSPECTIONS Inspections For The Heartland And Beyond863-990-4019www.waynecollierinspections.com collwayne4019@gmail.comLic# HI5099 NACHI 11120910 cl5:3tfc GENERAL MAINTENANCE MECHANICPAY RATE: $28,128.45 ($13.52/hr.) $38,775.38 ($18.64/hr.)Wanted for the Hardee County Facilities Department. Responsible for general and specialized tasks in the construction, renovation, modification, installation and repair of buildings, equipment, apparatus and facilities. This is skilled maintenance and construction work in various trades. Two (2) years experience in building/repair in one or more trades. Must have a High School Diploma or GED. May be required to possess a valid Florida Class B Commercial Driver's license. Complete job description and Application forms posted on County website @ www.hardeecounty.net Applica tions accepted in the Human Resources Department @ 205 Hanchey Road, Wauchula, FL 33873, Phone: (863) 773-2161. Position is open until filled. Excellent Benefits including State Retirement. EOEF/M/V. cl4:26,5:3cGreat Location For FOR RENT 111 E. Main Street, Wauchula Office Space Retail Store Approx. 954 sq. ft.For Information ContactStephen Southwell, PA 863-773-4449cl2:8tfcHARDEE CO. BOCC PUBLIC WORKS DIVISION Senior Mechanic (FL BCDL) $15.74-$21.70/hr. Equipment Operator (FL DL) $11.13-$15.35/hr. Courier (FL DL) $9.62 $13.26/hr. Job descriptions @ www.hardeecounty.net w/application. Submit: HR, 205 Hanchey Rd Wauchula, FL 33873, Ph: (863) 773-2161. Positions open until filled. cl5:3c NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE1996 CHEV VIN: 1GNDM19W4TB145898 8:00 A.M., MAY 18, 2018 CLIFFS WRECKER SERVICE 1071 U.S. Hwy 17 N. Wauchula, FL cl5:3c Want to sell, rent or hire?CLASSIFIEDS DEADLINE IS TUESDAY AT NOON B10 The Herald-Advocate, May 3, 2018

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Michelle Williamson Broker Michelle@thewilliamsongrouprealty.com Everything We Touch Turns To $old West Grape Street, Bowling Green, FL 33834 JUST REDUCED ... SELLER IS MOTIVATED. NICE BUILDING LOT in Bowling Green, Florida. City utilities are available. 1007 E. Oak St. Arcadia, FL 34266863-494-9009thewilliamsongrouprealty.com 614 Coolidge Ave NE, Lake Placid, FL 33852 DREAMER'S PARADISE! This 5.5 acre parcel is cleared and ready for your dream home. You will love that you can live in the country but only be minutes from town and shopping. This property is zoned for all of your agricultural needs, so bring your animals, plant your garden/farm, live off the land and even farm to table. The property does have paved road frontage and the owner is motivated to sell. Perfect place at the Perfect Price!cl5:3c 1625 Kazen Road, Wauchula, FL 33873 DREAMER'S PARADISE! This 5.5 acre parcel is cleared and ready for your dream home. You will love that you can live in the country but only be minutes from town and shopping. This property is zoned for all of your agricultural needs, so bring your animals, plant your garden/farm, live off the land and even farm to table. The property does have paved road frontage and the owner is motivated to sell. Perfect place at the Perfect Price! Brandi Long Real Estate Agent 863-990-7256 Brandi@thewilliamsongrouprealty.com Erica Bautista Sales Associate 863-244-1957 Erica@thewilliamsongrouprealty.com $6,250 $10,000 $65,000 102 Carlton Street, Wauchula, FL 33873 GREAT OPPORTUNITY IN THE HEART OF HARDEE COUNTY! This property has excellent signage and sits just feet away from the extremely busy Highway 17! Ideal for professional, retail, industrial or service business. This building could possibly hold up to 4 businesses. Whether you are looking for an investment property or a place to operate your own business, you won't find a better site for the price $149,000 MOWING SERVICE & P ressure washing. Perseverance Property Services. 863-781-0593. 5:3-31p I, JOE, WILL PICKUP for FREE old stoves, refrigerators, mi crowaves, freezers, lawn mowers and other metals. Call 863-2459898. 4:26,5:3p CANCER SURVIVOR MEETING Wednesday at the new hospital. Go through maintenance. For more information call Billy 239821-4184. 4:12tfcdh VITAS INNOVATIVE HOSPICE Care offers a bereavement walkin support group for those that have experienced the loss of a love one. Beginning 9/2/16 every Friday at 1 p.m. in the VITAS of fice, 113 W. Main Street, Wauchula, 863-583-7100. 8:18tfc-dh ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS, Thursday 7:00 p.m., Grace Fel lowship Church, 131 S. 8th Ave., Wauchula. Bill 727-326-3816. tfc-dh *** NEED A WELL OR HAVE PUMP TROUBLE? CALL ULLRICHS PITCHER PUMP For complete well, sales, service and installation, call 863-773-6448. 7:18tfc THE WAUCHULA LIONS CLUB collects NOT broken prescription eyeglasses, cases and sun glasses. Please drop off at 735 N. 6th Ave. tfc-dh IS ALCOHOL CAUSING a prob lem? Call Alcoholics Anonymous in Hardee county at 863-7816414. Several weekly meetings. tfc-dh DO YOU HAVE a problem with drugs? Narcotics Anonymous meets Monday, Thursday and Friday night 7:00 p.m. at First United Methodist Church, at the corner of Palmetto and 7th Ave., Wauchula. tfc-dh Services ATTENTION! State Statutes 489119 Section 5 Paragraph B and Hardee County Ordinance 87-09 Section 10 Paragraph D require all ads for any construction-re lated service to carry the con tractors licence number. tfc-dh WANTED A FULL-BLOODED Doberman Pinscher 2123 years old, female. 863-832-3318. 5:3-31p LOOKING FOR SMALL female dog. No bigger than 4-5 lbs., 863767-1074. 4:12-5:10p FRIDAY, SATURDAY, 8-2, 2215 Ralph Smith Rd., Wauchula. 5:3p 3 FAMILY (More since last Saturday) Saturday, 8-?. 185 Myrtle Drive, Wauchula. 5:3p 4 Family, Friday May 4, Saturday May 5, 8-4, 1395 Dansby Road, Wauchula. Clothing, purses, lug gage, many house items, glass, furniture, and horse riding equip ment. 4:26-5:3p Yard Sales Wanted ServicesPERMITTING CONTRACTOR LICENSING TECHNICIANPAY RATE: $24,369.88 ($11.72/hr.) $33,594.15 ($16.15/hr.)Wanted for the Hardee County Building & Code En forcement Department. Ability to assist both contractors and property owners in the completion of forms for con struction permitting. Require knowledge and skill in computer operation. Must have a High School Diploma or GED Complete job description and Application forms posted on County website @ www.hardeecounty.net Applications accepted in the Human Resources Department at 205 Hanchey Road, Wauchula, FL. Phone: (863) 773-2161. Position is open until filled. EOE F/M/V cl5:3-24cHARDEECARCOMPANY(Across From First National Bank) B Bu uy y H He er r e e P P a ay y H He er r e e773-6667 cl5:25tfc YOURTIREHEADQUARTERS 5101 N. Hwy 17 Bowling Green 375-4461New Tire Changer & Balancer Can Do 26 WheelsMONDAYSATURDAY8 am6 pm BOWLING GREEN QUICK LUBE& AUTO REPAIR Foreign and Domestic Cars Diesel Engines Gas or Diesel Manual or Automatic Transmissions TERRYMIKE Licensed and Insured Reg.# MV-40625 cl6:21tfc T HE C LASSIFIEDS 5 temporary farmworkers needed for common field labor in tobacco, cotton, corn, soy beans, sweet potatoes and other diversified crops in Johnston County, North Carolina, Hill Top Farms, Inc. with work beginning on or about 06/30/2018 and ending on or about 11/09/2018. The job offered is for an experienced farmworker and requires min imum 1 month verifiable work experience in the crop activities listed. The minimum offered wage rate that workers will be paid is $11.46 per hour, and piece rates may be offered. Workers must commit to work the entire contract period. Workers are guaranteed work for 3/4 of the contract period, beginning with the first day the worker arrives at the place of employment. All work tools, supplies and equipment are provided at no cost to the worker. Housing will be provided to those workers who cannot rea sonably return to their permanent residence at the end of each working day. Transportation and subsistence will be provided by the employer upon completion of 50% of the work contract, or earlier, to workers who are recruited outside the area of in tended employment. Applicants must provide documentation that they are eligible legally to work in the United States. Applicants should report or send resumes to NCWorks Career Center Johnston County, 8998 U.S. Hwy 70 West, Suite 100, Clayton, NC 27520, (919) 553-0953, or the nearest local office of their State Workforce Agency, and reference job order #NC10853381. EOE. H-300-18110-270561. cl5:3cSandoval Produce, Inc. is hiring 16 farmworkers to cultivate and harvest veg etable crops in Transylvania County, NC for a temporary period starting on 05/19/2018 and ending on 10/20/2018. One (1) month of verifiable work experience harvesting vegetables is required. The wages offered are the highest of $11.46/hr. or applicable piece rates. This job requires prolonged standing, bend ing, stooping, and reaching. Job is outdoors and continues in all types of weather. Workers may be requested to submit to pre-hire drug or alcohol tests at no cost to the worker. Workers must be able to lift 70lbs. to shoulder height repetitively throughout the workday and able to lift and carry 70lbs. in field. Employer guarantees work will be available for at least three-quarters of the period stated. Required tools supplies, and equipment will be provided at no cost to worker. Housing will be available for workers who cannot reasonably return home after each working day. Transportation and subsistence expenses will be provided, or reimbursed after 50% of the work contract is completed, if appropriate. Applicants should apply for the position at their local State Workforce Agency office. Job Order Number: NC10841185. cl5:3p16 temporary Christmas tree and hand harvest vine-ripe tomato workers needed in Avery County, North Carolina for Tehandon Nursery with work beginning on or about 06/09/2018 and ending on or about 12/15/2018. The job offered is for an experienced farmworker and requires minimum 1 month verifiable work experience in the crop activities listed. The minimum offered wage rate that workers will be paid is $11.46 per hour. Workers must commit to work the entire contract period. Workers are guaranteed work for 3/4 of the contract period, beginning with the first day the worker arrives at the place of employment. All work tools, supplies and equipment are provided at no cost to the worker. Housing will be provided to those workers who cannot reasonably return to their permanent residence at the end of each working day. Transportation and subsistence will be provided by the em ployer upon completion of 50% of the work contract, or earlier, to workers who are recruited outside the area of intended employment. Applicants must provide doc umentation that they are eligible legally to work in the United States. Applicants should report or send resumes to NCWorks Career Center Avery County, 428 Pineola Street, Newland, NC 28657, (828) 737-5419, or the nearest local office of their State Workforce Agency, and reference job order #NC10849497. EOE. H-30018109-475468. cl5:3cOscar Gonzalez and Sons Harvesting, Inc. is hiring 40 farmworkers to harvest vegetables in Lexington County, SC for a temporary period starting on 5/28/18 and ending on 7/27/18. Two (2) months verifiable experience harvesting veg etables is required. The wages offered are the highest of $10.95/hr. or applicable piece rates. This job requires prolonged standing, bending, stooping, and reach ing. Job is outdoors and continues in all types of weather. Workers may be requested to submit to random drug or alcohol tests at no cost to the worker. Drug testing and background checks will occur during the interview process and will be conducted at the sole discretion of the employer. Workers must be able to lift and carry 50lbs. repetitively throughout the workday. Employer guarantees work will be available for at least three-quarters of the period stated. Required tools supplies, and equipment will be provided at no cost to worker. Housing will be available for workers who cannot reasonably return home after each work ing day. Transportation and meal expenses will be provided, or reimbursed after 50% of the work contract is completed, if appropriate. Applicants should apply for the position at their local State Workforce Agency office. Job Order Number: SC779638. cl5:3p 49 temporary farmworkers needed for common field labor in cucumbers, banana, bell peppers, jalapeo, cabbage, tomato, corn, pumpkin in Wood County, OH, for Fran cisco Valadez, Jr., LLC, farm labor contractor, with work beginning on or about 06/20/2018 and ending on or about 10/31/2018. The job offered is for an experienced farmworker and requires minimum 1 month verifiable farm work experience hand harvesting mixed vegetables. The minimum offered wage rate that workers will be paid is $12.93 per hour. Workers must commit to work the entire contract period. Workers are guaranteed work for 3/4 of the contract period, beginning with the first day the worker arrives at the place of employment. All work tools, supplies and equipment are provided at no cost to the worker. Housing will be provided to those workers who cannot reasonably return to their permanent residence at the end of each working day. Transportation and subsistence will be provided by the employer upon completion of 50% of the work contract, or earlier, to workers who are recruited outside the area of intended employment. Applicants must provide documentation that they are eligible legally to work in the United States. Applicants should report or send resumes to OMJ Center Wood County, 1928 E. Gypsy Lane Rd., Bowling Green, OH 43402, (419) 352-4172, or the nearest local office of their State Workforce Agency and reference job order #OH3619513. EOE. H-300-18113-962794. cl5:3cEufemio Avila Harvesting is hiring 75 farmworkers to harvest watermelon crops in Colquitt County, GA for a temporary period from 06/01/2018 to 07/15/2018. Two (2) months verifiable experience harvesting watermelons is required. The wages offered are the highest of $10.95/hr. or applicable piece rates. This job requires prolonged standing, bending, stooping, and reaching. Job is outdoors and continues in all types of weather. Workers may be requested to submit to random drug or alcohol tests at no cost to the worker. Drug testing and background checks will occur during the interview process and will be conducted at the sole discretion of the employer. Workers must be able to lift 70lbs. to shoulder height repetitively throughout the workday and able to lift and carry 70lbs. in field. Employer guarantees work will be available for at least three-quarters of the period stated. Required tools supplies, and equipment will be provided at no cost to worker. Housing will be available for workers who cannot reasonably return home after each working day. Transportation and subsistence expenses will be provided, or reimbursed after 50% of the work contract is completed, if appropriate. Applicants should apply for the position at their local State Workforce Agency office. Job Order Number: GA2152001923. cl5:3p80 temporary farmworkers needed for common field labor hand-harvesting blueberry, watermelon, flue-cured tobacco, sweet potato and other diversified crops in Sampson, Pender Cumberland, and Duplin Counties, North Carolina, for Ruben V. Serna DBA Serna Harvesting, with work beginning on or about 05/01/2018 and ending on or about 11/17/2018. The job of fered is for an experienced farmworker and requires minimum 1 month verifiable work experience in the crop activities listed. The minimum offered wage rate that workers will be paid is $11.46 per hour, and piece rate may be offered depending on crop activity. Workers must commit to work the entire contract period. Workers are guaranteed work for 3/4 of the contract period, beginning with the first day the worker arrives at the place of employment. All work tools are provided at no cost to the worker. Housing will be provided to those workers who cannot reasonably return to their permanent residence at the end of each working day. Trans portation and subsistence will be provided by the employer upon completion of 50% of the work contract, or earlier, to workers who are recruited outside the area of intended employ ment. Applicants must provide documentation that they are eligible legally to work in the United States. Workers may be required to submit to random drug and alcohol testing. Applicants must provide documentation that they are eligible legally to work in the United States. Applicants should report or send resumes to NCWorks Career Center Sampson County, 115 North Boulevard, Clinton, NC 28328 (910) 592-5756, or the nearest local office of their State Workforce Agency, and reference job order #NC10832134. EOE. H-300-18065361659. cl5:3c99 temporary farmworkers hand harvesting melons in George County, Mississippi, for Francisco Valadez Jr., LLC with work beginning on or about 05/30/2018 and ending on or about 08/04/2018. The job offered is for an experienced farmworker and requires minimum 3 months verifiable work experience in the crop activities listed. The minimum offered wage rate that workers will be paid is $10.73 per hour. Workers must commit to work the entire contract period. Workers are guaranteed work for 3/4 of the contract period, beginning with the first day the worker arrives at the place of employment. All work tools, supplies and equipment are provided at no cost to the worker. Housing will be provided to those workers who cannot reasonably return to their permanent residence at the end of each working day. Transportation and subsistence will be provided by the employer upon completion of 50% of the work contract, or earlier, to workers who are recruited outside the area of intended employment. Applicants must provide documentation that they are eligible legally to work in the United States. Applicants should report or send resumes to Mississippi Unemployment Center 1604 Denny Ave, Pascagoula, MS 39567, (228) 762-4713, or the nearest local office of their State Workforce Agency, and reference job order #MS255131. EOE. H-300-18099-510372. cl5:3c It was influential Ameri can science-fiction author Philip K. Dick who made the following sage observation: "Sometimes the appropriate re sponse to reality is to go in sane." The skin of the African elephant, the largest living land animal in the world, weighs 2,000 pounds by itself, and there are more than 60,000 muscles in its trunk alone. You've almost certainly heard of narcolepsy, a medical condition that causes sufferers to sleep excessively, some times up to 18 hours a day. You're probably not familiar with philagrypnia, though. People with this condition I won't call them "sufferers" require only three or four hours of sleep a day. What would you do with all that extra time? If you're like most people, the length of your footprint is approximately 15 percent of your height. While at a Turkish bath in San Francisco, Samuel Clemens better known to us as Mark Twain got involved in a chat with a local fireman. This may not seem at all inter esting until you learn the name of that long-ago firefighter: Tom Sawyer. The author liked the name so much that today, American schoolkids all know it. There is a law on the books in Maine that prohibits having your shoes untied in public. I assume that this one is not much enforced. Ever had to make a large claim to your insurance com pany? If you thought it was a pain to fill out all the paper work and explain what hap pened, consider the plight of the poor soul who had to han dle the claim in 2006 when a guard dog mauled a teddy bear that once belonged to Elvis Presley the stuffed animal was valued at $80,000. You might be surprised to learn that there are people who study how air quality, humid ity, the hardness of the water and pollution affect people's hair. According to these re searchers, the worst American cities for your tresses are Cor pus Christi, Texas; Olympia, Washington; and Pittsburgh. *** Thought for the Day: "What this country needs is more free speech worth listen ing to." Hansell B. Duckett(c) 2018 King Features Synd., Inc.Strange But TrueBy Samantha Weaver Looking to sell, rent or hire? CLASSIFIEDS DEADLINE IS TUESDAY AT NOON YOUR BUSINESS COULD APPEAR HERE TOO!!Contact Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels At The Herald Advocate773-3255www.TheHeraldAdvocate.com May 3, 2018, The Herald-Advocate B11

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Solomon’s Castle Has Tours, Food, Gifts 4533 Solomon Road, Ona, Fl 33865 • (863) 494-6077 5:3c B12 The Herald-Advocate, May 3, 2018

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Courthouse ReportCOUNTY COURT The following marriage li censes were issued recently in the office of the county court: Christopher Vincent Ybarra, 28, Zolfo Springs, and Ana C. Heredia Estrada, 28, Zolfo Springs. Levi Aaron Boyette, 19, Bowling Green, and Katlyn Elaine Forrester, 19, Bowling Green. Stephen William Burton, 25, Wauchula, and Ariana Michelle Waldee, 28, Wauchula. The following small claims case was disposed of recently by the county judge: Midland Funding vs. Adam Torres, default judgment. The following misde meanor cases were disposed of recently in county court: Cierra Aaliyah Denise Jones, affray, transferred to pretrial diversion program, re turn May 30. Russell Graylin Smith, do mestic battery, completed pre trial diversion program, not prosecuted. Kerry A. Barrientos, posses sion of cannabis and posses sion of drug paraphernalia, transferred to pretrial diversion program, return June 27. Mathew Lee Carroll, disor derly intoxication, time served (27 days), $700 fines, costs and fees placed on lien. Rene Gonzalez, domestic battery, transferred to pretrial diversion program, return June 27. Deshawndre Louis McMil lian, violation of county noise ordinance, transferred to pre trial diversion program, return June 27. David Cordero, possession of drug paraphernalia, $590 fines, costs and fees placed on lien. Briana Jo Hardy, possession of drug paraphernalia and mis use of wireless 911 system, 60 days in jail, $590 fines, costs and fees placed on lien; viola tion of probation (original charge petit theft), time served, $150 fee placed on lien; do mestic battery, no registration certificate, attaching tag not assigned and possession of cannabis, not prosecuted. Andrew Michael Rupert, vi olation of probation (original charge possession of drug paraphernalia), probation re voked, 60 days in jail, last 30 on weekends, outstanding fines, costs and fees placed on lien. Melissa Bree Todd, retail theft, transferred to pretrial di version program, return June 27. CIRCUIT COURT The following civil actions were filed recently in the of fice of the circuit court: Angella Louisjeune and Bethel Louisjeune, divorce. Audelia Hernandez and the state Department of Revenue (DOR) vs. Marcos Hernandez, petition for administrative child support order. Guadalupe S. Prieto and Ro drigo S. Prieto, divorce. Drema Reyna vs. Ashley Diaz, petition for injunction for protection. Chelsea Lindsey Webb and DOR vs. Shawn Curtis Rhymes, petition for adminis trative child support order. Noemi Martinez vs. Andrew Martinez, petition for injunc tion for protection. Interamerican Bank vs. Desiderio Gerardo Gonzalez and Maria R. Gonzalez, peti tion for mortgage foreclosure. Carlonica Brown vs. Cierra Jones, petition for injunction for protection. Linn Whisman vs. Shellie Hunt, petition for injunction for protection. Shirley Annmarie Hamilton and DOR vs. Daren Jean Hen derson, petition for administra tive child support order. Jocelyn Saez and DOR vs. Emier Durades, petition to en force administrative child sup port order. The following decisions on civil cases pending in the cir cuit court were handed down recently by the circuit court judge: Victorino Serviano Gomez vs. Cynthia McIvery Spann, dismissed. Matthew J. G. George and Kristine George, divorce. Carlos Segura Aleman and DOR vs. Wendy Renee Toledo, amended order on child sup port contempt. Jackie L. Bandy and Ricky J. Bandy, dismissed. Ilaiza M. Borrego as guardian vs. Hardee County, dismissed. Annie B. Small and DOR vs. Calvin L. Greer, termina tion of child support arrears. Monte Carlton vs. Marcie Talio, order. William G. Bergens vs. Bet tina Farrell, voluntary dis missal. Kathleen Hooper Dimock and James Dimock, motion for child support contempt order denied. Donald Ray King vs. Erica Anderson, motion to dismiss granted. Hardee County Tax Collec tor vs. Rapid Systems Inc., judgment for Rapid Systems Inc. Andrea Brenchley vs. Joyce Annette Grace, dismissed. The following felony crim inal cases were disposed of recently by the circuit judge. Defendants have been adju dicated guilty unless noted otherwise. When adjudica tion is withheld, it is pending successful completion of pro bation. Sentences are pur suant to an investigative report by and the recommen dation of the state probation office and also state sentencing guidelines. Final discre tion is lef to the judge. Bethany Lorine Albritton, possession of methampheta mine, possession of drug para phernalia and a traffic offense, transferred to drug pretrial di version programinpatient at Harvest House, return May 22. Christopher Lee Baker, vio lation of probation (original charge possession of metham phetamine), probation revoked, Florida State Prison three years with credit for time served, $350 fees and costs added to outstanding fines, costs and fees and placed on lien; posses sion of methamphetamine and possession of drug parapherna lia, not prosecuted. Jeremy Franks, possession of methamphetamine, adjudi cation withheld, and two counts possession of drug para phernalia, drug offender proba tion three years, substance abuse evaluation, $1,456 fines, costs and fees; posses sion of methamphetamine, not prosecuted. Josue David Fuentes, grand theft, transferred with pretrial diversion program with restitu tion paid, return June 15. Miranda Gayla Maness, possession of a fraudulent or unlawfully issued license, transferred to pretrial diversion program, return July 24. Christopher Lamont Mintz, possession of cannabis, posses sion of cocaine, possession of drug paraphernalia and DUI, 364 days in jail with credit for time served, license suspended one year, DUI evaluation, DUI school, $1,320 fines, costs and fees placed on lien. Heather Michelle Oakley, possession of methampheta mine, adjudication withheld, and possession of drug para phernalia, drug offender proba tion 12 months, substance abuse evaluation, $1,432 fines, costs and fees. The following real estate transactions of $10,000 or more were filed recently in the office of the clerk of court: Elliot A. Roberts as trustee to Delmas Gough, $100,000. Michael W. and Marsha H. Brown as trustees to Rush and Victoria McKee, $19,500. Joao B. Vendramini and Maria L. A. Silveira to Richard Joseph Amener and Steffen Maerdian, $270,000. Randall Marvin Mink to Cipriano Herrera-Andres, $18,000. Michael A. and Kara W. Sanders to Anthony V. Moon, Leslie L. Moon, Trenton V. Moon and Lindsay D. Moon, $225,000. David Glenn Gillis Jr. and James Lawson to Albert J. Sr. and Diane L. Deibler, $50,000. Fing II Inc., to Estrada & Sons Inc., $100,000. Tony Lee Bridwell to Tomas and Radana Jasek, $126,000. Judy A. and Richard M. Russell to Farr Groves, $1,958,900. Larry Willis Beatty as trustee to Farr Groves, $1,958,900. Daniel G. Albritton and Albritton Development to Judy A. and Richard M. Russell, $720,000. Notices NoticesHARDEE COUNTY PUBLIC NOTICEThe Hardee County Board of County Commissioners adopted Ordinances Nos. 02-17 and 04-01, which authorize a financial hardship exemption to the solid waste disposal and fire rescue portions of the special assess ment fees. Property owners qualifying for this exemption will receive a refund or a credit in the amount of the current tax years approved nonad valorem taxes toward the special assessment fees for solid waste dis posal and fire rescue assessment fees. If you are interested in applying for this exemption, or if you have any questions pertaining to this issue, please contact Bonnie Heggie at the Office of Management and Budget at 863/773-3199. Applications will be accepted until May 31, 2018.Russell Melendy, Chair Board of County Commissioners Hardee County, Florida 5:3-24c NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEEDPursuant to F.S. 197.512 Victoria L. Rogers Hardee County, Clerk of the Circuit Court and Comptroller Tax Deed File: 252017TD030XXXX Date: 04/04/2018 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED WARNING THERE ARE UNPAID TAXES ON THE PROPERTY WHICH YOU OWN OR IN WHICH YOU MAY HAVE LEGAL INTEREST. The property will be sold at a public auction on the 16th day of May, 2018, at 11:00 a.m., unless the back taxes are paid. To make payment or for ques tions concerning real property taxes, contact the Hardee County Tax Collectors Office at (863) 7739144 (PO Box 445, Wauchula, FL 33873) To receive further information regarding the Tax Deed Sale, contact the Hardee County Clerk of the Courts, immediately, at (863) 773-4174 (P.O. Drawer 1749, Wauchula, Florida, 33873). The holder of the following tax certificate has filed the certificate for a tax deed to be issued. The certificate number and year of issuance, the de scription of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are: CERTIFICATE NO.: 862 YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010 NAME(S) IN WHICH ASSESSED: Margrene Lamp ley Description of Property: Parcel Identification Number 10-34-25-0840-0000I0003 DESCRIPTION: LOT 3 BLK I SUBURBAN ACRES 143P68 217P241 SUBJECT TO RESERVATIONS, COVENANTS, RE STRICTIONS, AND EASEMENTS OF RECORD. All of the property is in HARDEE County, Florida. Unless the certificate or certificates are redeemed according to law, the property described in the certificate or certificates will be sold to the highest bidder on May 16, 2018, at 11:00 a.m. By: Norma M. Juarez, Deputy Clerk 4:12-5:3c NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEEDPursuant to F.S. 197.512 Victoria L. Rogers Hardee County, Clerk of the Circuit Court and Comptroller Tax Deed File: 252018TD001XXXX Date: 03/19/2018 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED WARNING THERE ARE UNPAID TAXES ON THE PROPERTY WHICH YOU OWN OR IN WHICH YOU MAY HAVE LEGAL INTEREST. The property will be sold at a public auction on the 16th day of May, 2018, at 11:00 a.m., unless the back taxes are paid. To make payment or for ques tions concerning real property taxes, contact the Hardee County Tax Collectors Office at (863) 7739144 (PO Box 445, Wauchula, FL 33873) To receive further information regarding the Tax Deed Sale, contact the Hardee County Clerk of the Courts, immediately, at (863) 773-4174 (P.O. Drawer 1749, Wauchula, Florida, 33873). The holder of the following tax certificate has filed the certificate for a tax deed to be issued. The certificate number and year of issuance, the de scription of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are: CERTIFICATE NO.: 1024 YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2015 NAME(S) IN WHICH ASSESSED: IRVING WECH SLER AND VIVIAN WECHSLER Description of Property: Parcel Identification Number 25-34-27-0000-082400000 DESCRIPTION: .95 AC COM AT SW COR OF SE1/4 OF SE1/4 OF SE1/4 OF SW1/4 RUN E 625 FT FOR POB E 125 FT N 331.11 FT W 125 FT S 331.11 FT TO POB SUBJ TO S 25 FT FOR RD EASEMENT 25 34S 27E 212P169 SUBJECT TO RESERVATIONS, COVENANTS, RE STRICTIONS, AND EASEMENTS OF RECORD. All of the property is in HARDEE County, Florida. Unless the certificate or certificates are redeemed according to law, the property described in the certificate or certificates will be sold to the highest bidder on May 16, 2018, at 11:00 a.m. By: Norma M. Juarez, Deputy Clerk 4:12-5:3c______________________________ IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF SARASOTA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2016-CA-002095 NC WILL FERRELL, as Trustee of the 5911 Olive Ave. Family Land Trust, WILL FERRELL, As Trustee of the 2502 Robinson Avenue Family Land Trust, and WILL FERRELL, as Trustee of the 5413 Carmen Avenue Family Land Trust, Plaintiff Vs. DALE SEXTON, Individually, SUNSTATE ROOFING & REPAIRS, LLC, A Florida Limited Liability Company, and WINSTON TILLEY, individually, Defendant _____________________________/ NOTICE OF SHERIFFS SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY given that pursuant to a Writ of Execution issued in the Circuit Court, of Sarasota County, Florida, on the 20 day of March, 2018, in the cause wherein WILL FERRELL, as Trustee of the 5911 Olive Ave. Family Land Trust, WILL FER RELL,As Trustee of the 2502 Robinson Avenue Family Land Trust, and WILL FERRELL, as Trustee of the 5413 Carmen Avenue Family Land Trust, is plain tiff and DALE SEXTON, Individually, SUNSTATE ROOF ING & REPAIRS, LLC,A Florida Limited Liability Company, and WINSTON TILLEY, individually is defendant, being Case No.2016CA-002095 NC in, I, Arnold Lanier, Sheriff of Hardee County, Florida, have levied upon all right said Court, title, and interest of the defendant, in and to the following described real property to wit: LOT 31 GILLARD FARMS, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THERE OF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 60, PAGE 4, PUBLIC RECORDS OF HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA HARDEE COUNTY PROP ERTY APPRAISER ID # 13-34-25-0100-000010031 Said real property shall be viewable to the public at the Hardee County Property Ap praisers Website. All bidders must have Drivers License with them and must register with Hardee County Sheriffs Of fice/Civil Unit at location of sale prior to start time of sale. I shall offer this property for sale, at the front lobby of the Hardee County Sheriffs Office located at 900 East Summit St. Wauchula, Fl. 33873 in the County of Hardee, State of Florida, on the 10 day of May, 2018 at the hour of 11:00 AM, or as soon thereafter as possible. I will offer for sale all of the said defendants right, title, and inter est in the aforesaid real property at public auction and will sell the same subject to all taxes, prior liens, encumbrances and judg ments, if any, to the highest and best bidder for CASH IN HAND. The proceeds to be applied as far as may be to the payment of costs and the satisfaction of the above described execution as prescribed by Fla. Stat. 56.27. Dated at Wauchula, Hardee County, Florida this 5 day of April 2018. Arnold Lanier, Sheriff of Hardee County, By: Sgt. Danny OBryan Deputy Sheriff In accordance with the Ameri cans with Disabilities Act, per sons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to par ticipate in this proceeding should contact Civil Department no later than seven days prior to the proceeding at 863-773-0304 ext 208.4:12-5:3c______________________________ ______________________________ IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No. 252018DR000164 Angella Louis-Jeune, Petitioner, and Bethel Louis-Jeune, Respondent _____________________________/ NOTICE OF ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE TO: Bethel Louis-Jeune 1548 Lincoln Street Wauchula, FL YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for dissolution of mar riage has been filed against you and that you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to Angella LouisJeune whose address is 1548 Lincoln Street, Wauchula, FL on or before May 25, 2018, and file the original with the clerk of this Court at 417 W. Main St., Room 202 Wauchula, FL 33873 before service on Petitioner or immediately thereafter. If you fail to do so, a default may be entered against you for the relief de manded in the petition. Copies of all court documents in this case, including orders, are available at the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office. You may review these documents upon request. You must keep the Clerk of Circuit Courts office notified of your current address. (You may file Designation of Current Mailing and E-Mail Address, Florida Supreme Court Approved Family Law Form 12.915.) Future papers in this lawsuit will be mailed to the address on record at the clerks office. Warning: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law Rules of Procedure, requires certain automatic dis closure of documents and information. Failure to comply can result in sanctions, including dismissal or striking of plead ings. Dated: April 23, 2018 Victoria L. Rogers, Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Connie Coker Deputy Clerk4:26-5:17p______________________________ May 3, 2018, The Herald-Advocate B13

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Dont be a party to teenage drinking. Its against the law. Tri-County Human Services Prevention Department 863-382-2228Parents Who Host, Lose The Most: Dont be a party to teenage drinking is a registered trademark of Drug Free Action Allicae5:3c B14 The Herald-Advocate, May 3, 2018