Citation
The Herald-advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Herald-advocate
Portion of title:
Herald advocate
Place of Publication:
Wauchula, FL
Publisher:
Herald-Advocate Publishing Co. Inc., James R. Kelly - Publisher\Editor
Creation Date:
January 6, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Weekly
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Wauchula (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hardee County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Hardee -- Wauchula
Coordinates:
27.546111 x -81.814444 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
55th year, no. 31 (Sept. 2, 1955)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Herald Advocate. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000579544 ( ALEPH )
33886547 ( OCLC )
ADA7390 ( NOTIS )
sn 95047483 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Hardee County herald
Preceded by:
Florida advocate (Wauchula, Fla.)

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Florida Digital Newspaper Library

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PAGE 1

W EATHER DATE HIGH LOW RAIN 04/0390600.0004/0489550.0004/0585560.0004/0689520.0004/0785590.2104/0881620.0304/0990680.00 Rainfall to 04/09/2018 3.74 Same period last year 4.52 Ten Year Average 49.17 Source: Univ. of Fla. Ona Research Center I NDEX Classifieds............B3 Courthouse Report.....B7Crime Blotter..........B7Entertainment........B10 Hardee Living.........A9Information Roundup.B13Obituaries............A5Puzzles.............. B11 Save The Date.........A2School Lunch Menus..B13Solunar Forecast.......A7 No One Hurt In School Bus Crash H eraldA dvocate H ARDEE C OUNTY ’ S H OMETOWN C OVERAGE Thursday, April 12, 2018 THE 118th Year • No. 20 • 2 Sectionswww.TheHeraldAdvocate.com 70¢ Plus 5¢ Sales Tax 3 More ChimpsJoin The Family B1 Cuban By Birth,American By Choice A8 Pioneer Park Days Crowds, Cash Up BOSTON BOUND By TOM STAIKOf The Herald-Advocate Speedwork sessions on the track.Strength and core exercises with a personal trainer.A combination of slow long distance and shorter runs.In total, Regan Davenport’s course has trekked across more than 1,000 miles in the past six months. Davenport, 45, will put her work to the test on Monday when she competes in the 122nd running of the BostonMarathon. “Running the Boston Marathon has pretty much always been a dream of mine, a bucket list item,” Davenport said. A resident of Bowling Green, Davenport has been a run ner since her days in elementary school after being intro duced to the sport at Bowling Green Elementary by CoachCliff Lunn. “I fell in love, and have been doing it for most of my life,” Davenport said. The Boston Marathon was established in 1897 and today draws crowds of more than 500,000 spectators as an aver age of 30,000 runners compete annually. Davenport’s journey to the streets of the City on a Hill, began in earnest in January of 2017 as she entered the Cel ebration Marathon with hopes of turning in a run that could qualify her for Boston. She handily exceeded expectations. “I beat the qualifying time by 11 minutes for my age group,” Davenport said. Then followed eight months of waiting until registration See BOSTONA3 By MICHAEL KELLYOf The Herald-Advocate The 50th anniversary of Pi oneer Park Days saw and in crease in both attendance andrevenue, but registered a slightloss after the county’s billingfor the event’s use of its equip ment and employee time. Attendance figures revealed 10,444 people visited the parkduring the three-day festival,up 621 from 2017 figures of9,823. Revenues totaled $85,585 while operating costs were$26,128, showing a nearly$60,000 profit before factoringin transfers to other countyfunds utilized by the event. That, on paper, leaves the event with a $1,269 loss for theyear. Last year, Pioneer Park Days posted a $46,025 loss after thecounty was reimbursed for allits employee time and re sources required to prepare the area and staff the event. A total of $26,106 is pro posed to be transferred fromthe Pioneer Park Days fund toreimburse the general fund,transportation trust and HardeeCounty Fire Rescue. Personnel services, which include salaries for hourlyworkers, overtime pay,Medicare, retirement and por tions of life and health insur ance costs, were $14,205 forthe three days. Last year the county racked up $45,472 in the personnelservices line item. Labor for salaried workers was $8,730 compared to$10,910 the previous year. Utilities at the park for the week are estimated at $3,400,nearly the same figures as theprevious year. Volunteers, who receive a week of free camping at thepark for each day they work,totaled a $8,284 loss in camp ing revenue compared to$17,272 in 2017. A total of 28 county employ ees were used to staff the eventand assist with preparationsand cleanup afterward, downfrom 36 employees used theprevious year. The county relied on more local volunteers this year,which included people fromVisit Hardee, the local LionsClub, various communitymembers and the committee that was formed to help im prove Pioneer Park Days. Andrea Thompson said more than 850 volunteer hourswere logged by Visit Hardee,which handled the marketing and promotions for the event. She said the group targeted Lee County and the Fort Myersarea, and saw a good responseof visitors traveling to Hardee County to attend the event. County commissioners See PARKA2 By CYNTHIA KRAHL Of The Herald-Advocate No one was injured in a twovehicle crash involving a schoolbus at one of Hardee County’smost notorious intersections. The U.S. 17 and REA Road wreck occurred on Monday atabout 3:42 in the afternoon, theHardee County Sheriff’s Officesaid. One child was inside the school bus at the time. She wasnot hurt. Further, neither driver re ported any injuries, the Sher iff’s Office said. According to a report filed by sheriff’s Dep. Bryant Ovalles,Krystyna Csuk, 65, ofWauchula, was traveling north bound on U.S. 17 when she al legedly failed to stop for a redtraffic light and struck a west bound Hardee District Schoolsbus. School bus driver Charlene Rokosh, 54, of Zolfo Springs,had been on the east side ofU.S. 17 and had the green lightto cross the highway, thedeputy said. Ovalles said Csuk described driving northbound and“not paying much attention”before colliding with theschool bus. A witness to the crash, who also was northbound but wasstopped in the left-turn lane,confirmed the statements madeby both drivers. Ovalles said the front of Csuk’s Jeep struck the left sideof the bus behind the frontwheel. The Jeep sustained about $4,000 in damages, he esti mated, while the bus damagewas placed at about $3,000. Both vehicles were able to See CRASH A2 IN FLIGHT PHOTO BY TOM STAIK The pilot of this gyrocopter looks toward the aircraft carrying the photographer asthis picture was snapped over the rural Hardee County landscape on Thursday. Itwas all part of the 45th annual Bensen Days Fly-In at the Wauchula Municipal Air port. The event, named after father of gyrocopters” Igor Bensen, was open to thepublic and offered plenty thrill-seeking rides. For more on the action, see B6.

PAGE 2

Kelly’s Column By Jim My mother Anna Mildred Walker Kelly lived for 102 years, passing away in July 2010. She was born in Norborne, Missouri,a town that sits on 415 acres and had a 2016 population of 672,down from 708 in 2010. The town was founded in 1868 by Norborne B. Coates, a civil engineer for the railroad. Located in Carroll County 60miles north of Kansas City, Norborne has one traffic light (sameas Bowling Green), one main store and is big in agriculture, es pecially soybeans. Her father was a farmer, never finished high school and wanted his kids to go to college, so the family moved to Kansasand farmed there. My mother graduated from nearby KansasState University. –––––– Congratulations to the Town of Zolfo Springs, which now has two traffic lights, twice that of Bowling Green. In addition--like Atlanta and Jacksonville--Zolfo Springs now has a highway bypass to avoid the traffic of downtown.Having lived in Wauchula and now Bowling Green (as well asfour other Florida cities out of Hardee County), my life wouldbe more complete had I lived in Zolfo Springs for a few years. Among other attributes, the Town of Zolfo Springs can brag about having the county's only tractor dealership (selling JohnDeere), a large pepper processing plant (Mancini), and a concretemixing plant (Jhana). The U.S. Highway Bypass looks first class. –––––– Congratulations to the Tampa Bay Rays who won a game Monday after eight straight losses. The win improved the Rays'record to 2-8. –––––– A recent news report showed China exports three times the value of goods to the U.S. than it buys from us. This is a mainreason President Trump wants a more fair balance of trade withChina. –––––– The Herald-Advocate rain gauge after Tuesday's heavy rain showed 3.0 inches. The only trouble is there may have beensome water in the gauge before the rain. –––––– It is interesting to follow the Florida orange crop a nd annual orange juice consumption per capita in the U.S. Both have beenin serious decline. Here's a look: 1998 – The per capita consumption of orange juice in the U.S. was 5.8 gallons a person. Florida produced 244 millionboxes of oranges that year. 2008 – Per capita consumption of orange juice in the U.S. was 3.8 gallons a person. Florida produced 170 million boxes oforanges. 2018 – The Florida orange crop is estimated at 45 million boxes, thanks to diseases and the hurricane. The latest per capitaconsumption of orange juice (2016) in the U.S. was 2.6 gallonsa person. Now Florida is not producing enough orange juice for the U.S. Imports are needed from other countries, mainly Brazil. Reasons for the declining consumption of orange juic e in the U.S. include other juices, many types of bottled water, price,etc. Just look at the wide array of juices, waters and other bev erages in the grocery store aisles. –––––– Winona Hansen of Wauchula has a 2018 calendar from Newt Gingrich and his wife Callista entitled "Redisc overing God In America." Gingrich was speaker of the U.S. House of Rep resentatives from 1995 to 1999. Gingrich said "Praise be to God" is inscribed on the cap stone of the Washington Monument. "Preserve me, God, for inThee do I put my trust" is inscribed in a window of the U.S.Capitol's Chapel. The National Archives has an image of the Ten Command ments engraved in bronze on the entrance floor. Clearly, ourFounding Fathers wanted God in the public square, said Gin grich. "Yet for the last 50 years, ACLU lawyers and left-wing judges have been outlawing God in our culture. They insist that'separation of church and state' means 'under God' must be re moved from the Pledge of Allegiance...'In God We Trust'stripped from U.S. currency...and all references to God erased from American history books and national monuments. Butthey're wrong," said Gingrich. "America's children will benefit from having God in the public square. The Founding Fathers built America on their faithin God. Our young people should be influenced by their sameJudeo-Christian morals in this day and age." Herald-Advocate H ARDEE C OUNTY ’ S H OMETOWN C OVERAGE JOAN M. SEAMAN Sports Editor Emeritus TOM STAIK Sports Editor NOEY DeSANTIAGO Production Manager DARLENE WILLIAMS Assistant Production Manager DEADLINES: Hardee Living — Thursday 5 p.m. School News & Photos — Thursday 5 p.m. Sports — Thursday 5 p.m. (Weekend Events, Monday Noon) General News — Monday 5 p.m. Ads — Tuesday Noon SUBSCRIPTIONS: Hardee County — 6 months, $21 • 1 year, $39 • 2 years, $75 Florida — 6 months, $25 • 1 year, $46 • 2 years, $87 Out of State — 6 months, $29 • 1 year, $52 • 2 years, $100 Online — 1 month, $5 • 6 months, $19 • 1 year, $37 • 2 years, $70 LETTERS: The Herald-Advocate welcomes letters to the editor on matters of public interest. Letters should be brief, and must be written in good taste, signed and include a daytime phone number. MICHAEL R. KELLY Co-Publisher and Editor JAMES R. KELLY Co-Publisher CYNTHIA M. KRAHL Managing Editor THE 115 S. Seventh Ave. • P.O. Box 338 Wauchula, FL 33873 Phone: (863) 773-3255 • Fax: (863) 773-0657 Ads@TheHeraldAdvocate.com Publisher@TheHeraldAdvocate.com Sports@TheHeraldAdvocate.com Published weekly on Thursday at Wauchula, Florida, by the HeraldAdvocate Publishing Co. Inc. Periodical Postage paid at U.S. Post Office, Wauchula, FL 33873 and additional entry office (USPS 578-780). “Postmaster,” send address changes to: The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338, Wauchula, FL 33873. A2 The Herald-Advocate, April 12, 2018 At The Herald-Advocate, we want accu racy to be a given, not just our goal. If youbelieve we have printed an error in fact,please call to report it. We will review the information, and if we find it needs correc tion or clarification, we will do so here. To make a report, call Managing Editor Cynthia Krahl at 773-3255. Corrections APRIL 12 –HC School Board Meeting/230 S. Florida Ave., Wauchula/5 pm 12 –Fitness in the Park/ Strong/Heritage Park/5:30 pm 13 –Story of Jesus/HC Cattleman's Arena/ 507 Civic Center Dr., Wauchula/7:30 pm 14 –Story of Jesus/HC Cattleman's Arena/ 507 Civic Center Dr., Wauchula/7:30 pm 17 –Devotion & Lunch/ Hardee Help Center/713 E Bay St, Wauchula/Noon 16 –Fitness in the Park/ Yoga/Heritage Park/5:30 pm 19 –Financial Fitness Class/Hardee Help Center/713 E Bay St, Wauchula/10 am 19 –Fitness in the Park/ Yoga/Heritage Park/5:30 pm 20 –Story of Jesus/HC Cattleman's Arena/ 7:30 pm 21-22 –Wildcat Golf Tourney/The Bluffs/ 8 am 21 –Story of Jesus/HC Cattleman's Arena/ 7:30 pm 21 –Mr. Hardee High/ Wauchula Auditorium//7 pm 23 –Fitness in the Park/ Yoga/Heritage Park/5:30 pm 26 –Fitness in the Park/ Yoga/Heritage Park/5:30 pm 29 – Gardening Workshop/ Extension Service/5:30 pm 30 –Fitness in the Park/ Yoga/Heritage Park/5:30 pm MAY 4 – SendMeMissions RunWalk/6 pm 14 –Bacculareate/First Baptist Church/7:30 pm 15 –Devotion & Lunch/ Hardee Help Center/Noon 19 –Graduation/ Cattleman’s Arena/9 am 24 – Z.S. Town Commission Meeting/6 pm 24 –Lunch & Learn/ HC Chamber of Commerce/Noon 26 –HC School Board Meeting/5 pm Save The Date will keep resi dents informed of upcomingcommunity happenings. Tohave your non-profit meetingor event posted for free, e-mailfeatures@theheraldadvocate.com as far ahead as possible. SAVETHEDATE Your event could appear here.For free! See submission in structions below. Your event could appear here.For free! See submission in structions below. Have an entry for Save TheDate? See contact info below. How can you get your eventposted on this community cal endar? Check out the instruc tions at the end of this column. Hosting a community-widenon-profit event? List it here!It’s free and it’s easy. See in structions below. Hosting a community-widenon-profit event? List it here!It’s free and it’s easy. See in structions below. Strange But True By Samantha Weaver PARK Continued From A1 seemed pleased with the im provements that have beenmade, and the consensusseemed to be the event willcontinue in the future. “I think it deserves another shot,” Commissioner MikeThompson said. Thompson said the county has to get out of handling themoney and get the human re sources department out of op erating it, but does not mindthe county staff assisting withmapping out the park and set ting it up. Chairman Russell Melendy called it a “step in the right di rection,” and felt there was abuzz back in the community. Commissioner Colon Lam bert questioned about $20,000in “subjective costs” chargedto the event by the county, butfelt overall the event was backon the right track. “Considering the limited amount of time the committeehad to work on this, I feel it’sdefinitely moving in the rightdirection,” he said.be driven from the scene. School Transportation Di rector Rob Krahl was at thecrash site Monday afternoon,along with other district per sonnel. He said the bus was carrying just one student, a sixth-gradegirl, at the time. Krahl described damage to the bus as minor. He said the bus driver was able to continue driving, andremains on her usual route.The bus, too, he said, hasstayed in service. By TOM STAIK Of The Herald-Advocate Seven months after Hurri cane Irma lashed the regionwith wind and rain, theauditorium at Hardee SeniorHigh School remains “unus able.” “(The damage) was severe enough that it made the audi torium unusable,” said RobKrahl, director of education fa cilities. Plagued by years of water intrusion, the auditorium –built below ground level – suf fered “major damage in thebelow-ground area in front ofthe stage.” Krahl has been working since October to develop aplan to address flooding con cerns. The plan, the result of months of engineering studies,will be presented to the SchoolBoard tonight (Thursday) at 5p.m. Krahl is requesting authori zation to put the repair projectout to bid. According to Superintend ent of Schools Bob Shayman,the cost is likely to be substan tial. “It is easily going to costupwards of six figures,” Shay man said. Funding, according to Krahl, will be allocated fromreserve funds in the capitaloutlay account. The project now faces a time crunch if crews are going to beable to complete the project bythe start of the new school yearin August. If approved for bid, Krahl plans to return to the SchoolBoard on May 24 for contractapproval. “We need to get this done, along with the associated inte rior work, in order to start thenew school year with an audi torium at Hardee SeniorHigh,” Krahl said. HSHS Auditorium Remains Unusable By TOM STAIKOf The Herald-Advocate The topic of trash gained lit tle talk Monday night as theWauchula City Commissionmoved forward with financingthe acquisition of a side-armgarbage truck and roadside col lection bins as part of a reor ganization of the householdcollection system. The $332,000 investment was approved without discus sion in a 5-0 vote of the boardfollowing a motion by Com missioner Ken Lambert andsecond from CommissionerNeda Cobb. The action followed a related vote earlier in the meeting toadopt an ordinance authorizingthe issuance of up to $300,000in bonds to bankroll the project. The bond vote, too, was without discussion and was ap proved 5-0 following a motionby Cobb and a second by Com missioner Russell Smith. The revenue bond will be backed by a revenue pledgefrom the city’s solid waste de partment as part of a largerfunding deal with the U.S. De partment of Agriculture. The USDA has agreed to purchase up to $279,500 of thebond issuance under its ruralcommunities development pro gram. The remaining cost of the project will be directly fundedby the city. The garbage truck — equipped with side load arms— will be used to collect refusefrom collection bins. The bins,which were also authorized forpurchase, will be distributed tohomes within the municipallimits. Financing Approved For New Garbage Pickup Plan CRASH Continued From A1 COURTESY PHOTOS A Hardee County school bus was struck while crossingU.S. 17 at REA Road on Monday. The driver of this Jeep allegedly failed to stop for a red light on U.S. 17, striking aschool bus. • In Germany in the 1500s, a court physician by the nameof Oswaldt Gabelthouer wrotea medical book full of reme dies that he guaranteed wouldbe effective. For insanity, thepatient must cut his or her hairclose to the head, then tie twohalves of a ram's liver to thehead. A severe case of epilepsy,he claimed, could be cured ifthe patient wore the right eyeof a wolf and the left eye of ashe-wolf on a thong about theneck for three months; also, thepatient had to forgo bathingduring that time. There's nomention in the record at handof how a patient would goabout redeeming the guarantee. • According to the MerriamWebster dictionary, a mump simus is "a stubborn personwho insists on making an errorin spite of being shown that itis wrong." (c) 2018 King Features Synd., Inc.

PAGE 3

April 12, 2018, The Herald-Advocate A3 COURTESY PHOTOS Exceptional Student Education teacher Regan Davenport stands in front of a sign at Zolfo Springs Elementary School that honors her upcoming participation in the Boston Marathon. Students at Zolfo Springs Elementary hold a sign read ing “#laserfocus” at a pep rally honoring teacher andmarathon runner Regan Davenport. The “Dedication” of teacher Regan Davenport in her efforts to earn a slot at the Boston Marathon were honored at a pep rally last Friday at Zolfo Springs Elementary. Regan Davenport posed for a picture surrounded with family following a pep rally in honor of her plans to com pete in the Boston Marathon. Pictured (front row, from left) are Davenport and son Zander Durastanti; (back)mother Betty Durastanti, son Zack Durastanti, fellow Boston Marathon runner Sean Brown, and father David Durastanti. Regan Davenport makes her way through a tunnel of cheering, pint-sized fans atZolfo Springs Elementary School during a pep rally last Friday. Davenport, an Ex ceptional Student Education teacher, will be competing Monday in the Boston Marathon. for the Beantown run openedin September of 2017. Having a qualifying time, even one that beat the mark bymore than 10 minutes, was noguarantee the local educatorwould earn a coveted slot. “Once everyone registers, they rank each age group fromfastest to slowest. They have acertain number of spots foreach age group and once theyhave met that number, no oneelse gets in. So, you can run aqualifying time and still not beselected,” Davenport said. Less than a month from ap plying, word finally came:Davenport had officiallyearned her chance to competeat the iconic event. “I have never been more ready for anything in my life,”Davenport said. The Zolfo Springs Elemen tary School teacher will takeoff from the starting line at10:50 a.m. under bib number21181. NBC Sports will be provid ing televised coverage of theevent. A pre-race show will airon Sunday at 8 p.m. on theOlympic Channel. Live racecoverage will be offered from8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. on NBCSports Network. For thosemissing the live telecast, theevent will be rebroadcast onUniversal HD at 8 p.m. onMonday. Davenport, though, is not the only Hardee Countian toearn a spot at the BostonMarathon. Sean Brown, 45, of Wauchula, will compete in thesecond wave under bib num ber 10788. His portion of therace begins at 10:25 a.m. Davenport was scheduled to fly to Boston this Wednesday.Accompanying the pavement-pounding educator is heryoungest son, Zander Duras tanti, and best friend JuliaRoberts and her son, Nolan.Both youngsters are membersof the Hardee County SoleCrushers, a travel track teamheaded by Davenport. Davenport’s oldest son, Za ckary Durastanti – a standouton the Hardee High SeniorHigh School cross country andtrack and field teams – is ex pected to travel to Boston onFriday following today’s(Thursday) district track com petition in Wesley Chapel. Zackary will be traveling with Brown to the event. The delegation will get in some running time of theirown on Saturday as they com pete in the Boston 5K. “The boys and Julia will be competing in the Boston 5Kon Saturday morning,” Daven port said. “We will also be at tending a Red Sox game,going whale-watching, spend ing a lot of time sightseeing,hanging out at the pre-raceexpo, and soaking it all in. Wewill also be attending a specialshowing of the Boston Docu mentary movie.” The days leading up to her departure have been emo tional. Last week, Davenport was feted to a pep rally by the fac ulty, staff and students of ZolfoSprings Elementary School. “They kept it secret from me for over a month, and I trulyhad no idea,” Davenport said.“It was impossible to containmy emotions. “What a special place to work,” she added. “I am sothankful for the people I sur round myself with every day.Knowing that everyone will betracking me and cheering meon will be in the forefront ofmy mind while running … Icannot wait to representHardee County next Monday.” BOSTON Continued From A1

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– CHURCHSCHEDULE– APOSTOLIC LIGHTHOUSE UNITED PENTECOSTAL CHURCH 310 Orange Street • 773-1017 Sunday Service.................10:00 a.m.Wednesday Service............7:00 p.m. CHESTER GROVE MB CHURCH 708 W. Grape Street Sunday Morn. Worship .......8:00 a.m. Sunday School....................9:30 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study Night Chidren & Youth ................4:30 p.m. Adult Class.........................6:00 p.m. CHRISTIAN BIBLE FELLOWSHIP 3950 Aurora Avenue • 375-2864 Morning Worship ..............10:30 a.m. Youth Group Sunday........6:00 p.m. CHURCH OF GOD 121 West Broward St. • 375-2231 Sunday School..................10:00 a.m.Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m. Evening Worship ...............6:30 p.m. Wednesday.........................7:30 p.m. NEW LIFE POWER OUTREACH CHURCH 725 Palmetto Street Sunday School....................9:45 a.m.Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m. Wednesday Night Empowerment Class............................7:30 p.m. Evening Worship 1 st Sunday.....................5:00 p.m. FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH Bowling Green 4531 Hwy.17 N • 375-2253 S UNDAY : Bible Study.........................9:30 a.m.Morning Worship ..............10:45 a.m. Children’s Church............10:45 a.m.Evening Worship ....... .........6:00 p.m. W EDNESDAY : Youth (7th-12th grade).......6:00 p.m.Adult Discipleship Train. ...6:30 p.m. TeamKID (ages 4-3rd grade) 6:30 p.m. BOLD (4th-6th grade)........6:30 p.m. FORT GREEN BAPTIST CHURCH 2875 Baptist Church Road 773-9013 Sunday School....................9:45 a.m.Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m. Sunday Evening.................6:00 p.m. Wednesday Supper ............6:00 p.m.Wednesday Bible Study.....7:00 p.m. FOX MEMORIAL HOLINESS CHURCH 140 E. Main Street • 836-273-7576 Sunday Morning Worship .10:00 a.m. Sunday Night Worship .......6:00 p.m. Wednesday Service............7:30 p.m. GATEWAY CHURCH (formerly Faith Assemly of God) 4937 Hwy. 17 N. • 375-4000 Sunday School....................9:30 a.m.Morning Worship ..............10:30 a.m. Evening Worship ................6:30 p.m. Wednesday Service ...........7:00 p.m. GREATER MACEDONIA PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH 607 Palmetto Street • 375-3226 Church School....................9:30 a.m.Morning Service...............11:00 a.m.Evening Service.................7:00 p.m.Wed. Bible Study/Prayer....7:00 p.m.Communion-2nd Sun. Eve.6:00 p.m. HOLY CHILD SPANISH CATHOLIC MISSION 4315 Chester Avenue • 773-4089 Misa (Espanol) Sunday......7:00 p.m. IGLESIA DEL DIOS VIVO 105 Dixiana Street • 375-4191 Domingo De Predicacion.11:00 p.m.Martes Estudio Biblico.......7:00 p.m.Miercoles Estudior Juvenil.7:00 p.m.Jueves De Predicacion.......7:00 p.m. IMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH 210 E. Broward Street • 445-0290 Sunday School....................9:45 a.m.Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m. Evening Worship ..............6:00 p.m. Wednesday Prayer........... ....6:00 p.m MT. PISGAH BAPTIST CHURCH 6210 Mt. Pisgah Rd. 375-4409 Sunday School....................9:45 a.m.Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m. Disciples Training ..............5:00 p.m. Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m. Wednesday Prayer Time .....7:00 p.m. NEW BEGINNINGS 4810 Sally Blvd. • 781-5887 Sense Sunday....................11:00 a.m. “Making Sense of the Non-Sense” Sunday Bread of Life.........3:15 p.m.2nd Sunday Communion..11:00 a.m. NEW BEGINNINGS WORSHIP CENTER 230 E. Lemon St. • 375-3208 Sunday..........10:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m.Wednesday..............................7 p.m.Friday......................................7 p.m. (Service with Fellowship to follow) PRIMERA MISION BAUTISTA 3920 Murray Road • 375-2295 Domingos Escuela Dom.....9:45 a.m.Servicio de Adoracion ......11:00 a.m. Servicio de Predicacion......5:00 p.m.Miercoles Servico..............6:30 p.m. REAL LIFE CHURCH 3365 US Hwy 17 • 375-4032 Morning Service...............10:30 a.m.Wednesday Study/Learning6:30 p.m. ST. JOHN A.M.E. CHURCH 513 W. Orange Street Sunday Church School.......9:30 a.m.Sunday Morning Worship .11:00 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study.....6:30 p.m. VICTORY PRAISE CENTER 128 E. Main Street Sunday School..................10:00 a.m.Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m. Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m. Thursday Night Services, Evening Worship. ...............7:00 p.m. Kidz Club...........................7:00 p.m. IGLESIA PENTECOSTES VISION POR LAS ALMAS 149 Badger Loop • 448-2831 Martes: Oracion..................7:00 p.m.Jueves: Ensenaza Biblica...7:00 p.m.Domingo: Servicio...........10:30 a.m. LIMESTONE BAPTIST CHURCH 4868 Keystone Ave. • Limestone 863-242-2855 Sunday School....................9:45 a.m.Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m. Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m. Wednesday Prayer..............6:00 p.m. NEW ZION BAPTIST CHURCH 202 Sidney Roberts Road 735-0123 Sunday School....................9:45 a.m.Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m. Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m. Wednesday Prayer Meeting6:30 p.m. ONA BAPTIST CHURCH 131 Bear Lane • 863-245-2371 Sunday School..................10:00 a.m.Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m. Thursday Prayer.................7:00 p.m. UNION BAPTIST CHURCH 5076 Lily Church Rd. • 494-5622 Sunday School..................10:00 a.m.Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m. Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m. Wednesday SHINE for Kids..............6:00 p.m. Wednesday Prayer Time.......7:00 p.m. APOSTOLIC ASSEMBLY 640 Apostolic Road • 773-3052 Sunday School..................10:00 a.m.Englishg Service...............11:30 a.m.General Worship Service ....1:30 p.m. Tuesday Prayer...................7:00 p.m.Wednesday Service............7:00 p.m. BAYSIDE COMMUNITY CHURCH HARDEE COUNTY CAMPUS 615 Rainey Blvd. • 941-755-8600 Mybayside.church Sunday Services.................8:15 a.m. ....................10:00 a.m. & 11:45 a.m. Fusion (6th 8th grade)..................... ................Duing all Sunday Services Wednesday Epic (9th 12th grade)... ............................................6:30 p.m. CELEBRATION FELLOWSHIP 773-0427 Celebration Service..........10:30 a.m. Wednesday Evening Cell Groups Adult Cell Group................7:00 p.m.Youth Cell Group...............7:00 p.m.Children’s Cell Group........7:00 p.m. Call for locations CHARLIE CREEK FAITH BAPTIST CHURCH 6885 State Rd. 64 East • 773-3447 Sunday School....................9:45 a.m.Morning Worship ....... .......11:00 a.m. Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m. Wesnesday Children’s Ministry......... ............................................5:00 p.m. Wednesday Worship ...........6:30 p.m. CHURCH OF CHRIST 240 Will Duke Road 773-2249 Sunday School..................10:00 a.m.Sunday Morning Worship .11:00 a.m. Wed. Night Bible Class......7:00 p.m. CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS 630 Hanchey Rd. • 773-3532 Sacrament Meeting.............9:00 a.m.Sunday School..................10:00 a.m.Priesthood.........................11:00 a.m. ELEVATE COMMUNITY CHURCH 529 West Main Street (Robarts Funeral Home Chapel) Sunday Service.................11:00 a.m. Weekly Life Groups ENDTIME CROSSROAD MINISTRY 908 Martin Luther King Ave 773-0160 Sunday School..................10:00 a.m.Morning Service...............11:30 a.m.Evening Service.................7:30 p.m.Wed. Bible St. & Yth. Gath7:30 p.m.Friday (Holy Ghost Night).7:30 p.m. FAITH PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 114 N. 7th Avenue • 773-2105 Sunday School..................10:00 a.m.Sunday Worship ................11:00 a.m. Wednesday Supper.............6:15 p.m.Wed. Youth Fellowship ......7:00 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study.....7:00 p.m. FAITH TEMPLE CHURCH OF GOD 701 N. 7th Avenue • 773-3800 Sunday School....................9:30 a.m.Sunday Worship ................10:30 a.m. Children’s Chuch..............10:40 a.m.Evening Service.................6:00 p.m.Wednesday Bible Study.....7:00 p.m. FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 1570 W. Main Street • 773-4182 S UNDAY : Bible Study for all ages......9:45 a.m.Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m. Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m. W EDNESDAY : Children’s Chiors (PK-Grade 4)..................5:30 p.m. Mid-Week Prayer Meeting6:00 p.m.NEST Backyard (PK-Grade 4)..................6:30 p.m. Club 56..............................6:00 p.m.Youth Group (Grades 7-12)6:00 p.m.Church Orchestra..............5:15 p.m.Adult Choir.......................6:30 p.m. FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH 1121 W. Louisiana St. • 773-9243 S UNDAY : Generations Caf Open..... ................ .................................9:00-10:20 a.m. Kids World Check-In for Nursery-5th Grade...........10:15 a.m. Pre-K Blast.......................10:30 a.m.Kids World B.L.A.S.T. (K-5th)..........................10:30 a.m. Worship Service...............10:30 a.m.W EDNESDAY : Generations Caf Opens.................... ....................................5:15-6:15p.m. Check-In begins for Nursery-5th grade..............5:45 p.m.Classes for children ages PreK-12th grade.........6:30-7:30 p.m.Adutl Bible Studies....6:00-7:30 p.m. FIRST CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 511 W. Palmetto Street Sunday School..................10:00 a.m.Morning Service...............11:00 a.m.Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m. Wednesday Prayer..............7:00 p.m. FIRST MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH 1347 Martin Luther King Avenue 773-6556 Sunday School....................9:30 a.m.Morning Service...............11:00 a.m.Evening Worship ................4:00 p.m. Wed. Prayer/Bible Study....7:00 p.m. FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 207 N. Seventh Avenue • 773-4267 Coffe and Fellowship.........9:15 a.m.Sunday School............. .......9:45 a.m. Blended Sunday Worship .10:55 a.m. Wednesday Night Dinner...6:00 p.m.Youth (0-18) & Adult Programming. ............................................7:00 p.m. FLORIDA’S FIRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD CHURCH 1397 South Florida Avenue 773-9386 www.flfirstag.org Sun. Community Groups....9:30 a.m.Sunday Worship ................10:30 a.m. Family Night Wednesday ...7:00 p.m. Ministry for all ages! FOUNTAIN OF LIFE CHURCH IGLESIA FUENTE DE VIDA Bilingual Services / Servicios Bilinges 311 Goolsby St. • 832-9914 Sunday/Domingo..............10:30 a.m.Wednesday/Mircoles........7:30 p.m. THE GOSPEL TABERNACLE 810 Tennessee St. • 781-2708 Sunday Morning Service..10:00 a.m.Sunday Night Service.........6:00 p.m.Wednesday Service............7:00 p.m. HIGHER GROUND INTERNATIONAL MINISTRY 1258 West Main Street Sunday School Adult & Youth.......... ..........................................10:00 a.m. Sunday Morning Worship .11:00 a.m. Wed. “Night in the Word”..7:00 p.m.Wed. Extreme Kids............7:00 p.m.Thursday Prayer.................6:00 p.m. IGLESIA ADVENTISTA DEL SEPTIMO DIA 1819 Dishong Road • 767-1010 IGLESIA CHRISTIANA EL REMANENETE 318 W. Main Street Martes Oracion................7:00 p.m.Jueves Clase Biblica........7:00 p.m.Viernes Servicio...............7:30 p.m.Domingo Servicio..........11:00 a.m. IGLESIA de DIOS ALFA Y OMEGA 1909 Stanfield Road Sunday School.................10: 00 a.m.Evening Service.................6:00 p.m.Tuesday (Bible Study & Prayer Night)..............................7:30 p.m. Friday Worship Service ......7:30 p.m. IGLESIA HISPANA PRESENCIA DE DIOS 511 West Palmetto Street Domingos...........................6:00 p.m.Miercoles..............................7:00 p.m. IGLESIA MINISTERIOS CRISTIANO DIOS ES AMOR 807 S. 8th Ave. • 773-4576 Domingos Escuela Dominica......................10:00 a.m. Servicio.............................11:00 a.m.Lunes Oracion....................6:00 p.m.Miercoles Servicio.............7:00 p.m. KINGDOM HALL OF JEHOVAH’S WITNESSES 155 Altman Road • 767-1131 ENGLISH Sunday Service...................2:00 p.m. SPANISH Sunday Service.................10:00 a.m. LIGHT OF THE WORLD MINISTRIES Womans Center • 131 N 7th Ave. Friday Evening...................6:00 p.m. LAKE DALE BAPTIST CHURCH 3102 Heard Bridge Rd. • 773-6622 Sunday School....................9:45 a.m.Morning Service...............11:00 a.m.Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m. Wednesday Prayer..............7:00 p.m. MINISTERIO INTERNACIONAL Cambriadores de Mundo 704 W. Main Street Wednesday Service............7:30 p.m. MY NEW LIFE IN CHRIST CHURCH 117 West Palmetto St. • 773-2929 Sunday Service.................10:00 a.m.Sunday Evening Service....6:00 p.m.Wednesday Service............7:00 p.m. Children Ministries for all services NEW BEGINNINGS 1002 S. Florida Avenue • 781-5887 Sense Saturday...................3:00 p.m. “Making Sense of the Non-Sense” The Bread of Life...............3:15 p.m. NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH 1999 State Rd. 64 East • 773-2101 Sunday School....................9:45 a.m. Morning Worship Service .11:00 a.m. Evening Worship Service ...6:30 p.m. Wednesday Night Supper...6:00 p.m.Wednesday Activities (All Ages) .......................7:00 p.m. NEW INSPIRATION CHURCH OF GOD BY FAITH 917 S. 6th Avenue • 863-657-2253 Sunday School....................9:00 a.m.Morning Worship ..............10:00 a.m. Thursday Praise..................7:00 p.m. NEW MT. ZION A.M.E. CHURCH 1615 Martin Luther King Jr Ave. 767-0023 Morn. Worship (1st & 3r Sun.) ...............8:00 a.m. Sunday School....................9:45 a.m.Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m. 2nd Sunday Youth Service.4:00 p.m.Allen Christian Endeavor...4:00 p.m.Wed. & Fri. Bible Study.....7:00 p.m. NEW PHILADELPHIA WORSHIP CENTER 1652 Old Bradenton Road Sunday .............................10:30 a.m.Wednesday.........................6:30 p.m. NORTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH 912 N. 8th Avenue • 773-6947 Sunday School....................9:45 a.m.Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m. Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m. Wednesday Prayer..............7:00 p.m. OAK GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH 4350 W. Main Street • 735-0321 www.ogbcwauchula.org Sunday Schedule:Bible Study for All Ages ....9:30 a.m. Morning Worship ..............10:45 a.m. Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m. Wednesday Schedule:M&M Kid’s Klub...............6:00 p.m.Youth Group.......................6:00 p.m.Prayer Meeting & Bible Study .......... ............................................6:30 p.m. PEACE VALLEY LUTHERAN CHURCH 1643 Stenstrom Road 773-2858 1 st & 3 rd Sun. Worship/Communion.....9:00 a.m. 2 nd & 4 th Sun. Divine Worship ...............9:00 a.m. ** Fellowship each Sunday after service PROGRESSIVE MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH 149 Manley Road • 452-1281 Sunday School....................9:30 a.m.Worship Service................11:00 a.m.Wed. Evening Prayer..........7:00 p.m. RIVERVIEW HEIGHTS MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH 1321 SR 636 East 773-3344 Sunday School..................10:00 a.m.Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m. Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m. Wednesday Prayer..............7:00 p.m. ST. MICHAEL CATHOLIC CHURCH 408 Heard Bridge Road • 773-4089 Saturday Mass (English)....5:00 p.m. (Spanish).....7:00 p.m. Sunday(English).................8:30 a.m. (Spanish)................11:30 a.m.(Creole)...................1:30 p.m. Catecismo...........................9:45 a.m.Daily Mass in English........8:30 a.m. SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST CHURCH 440 Carlton Street • 773-9068 Sabbath School...................9:30 a.m.Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m. Wed. Prayer Meeting..........6:30 p.m. SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH 505 South 10th Avenue • 773-4368 Sunday School.......... ..........9:45 a.m. Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m. Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m. Wednesday Prayer..............7:00 p.m. TABERNACLE OF PRAISE & JOY 1507 MLK Avenue Sunday School..................10:00 a.m.Morning Worship ..............11:30 a.m. Evening Worship ................7:00 p.m. Tues. Bible Stdy. & Child Train .................7:00 p.m. Friday Prayer Service.........7:00 p.m. WAUCHULA CHURCH OF GOD 1543 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave. 773-0199 Sunday School..................10:00 a.m.Morning Worship ..............11:15 a.m. Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m. Wed. Night Fam. Training..7:30 p.m.Thurs. Youth Bible Study...7:00 p.m.Friday Night Worship .........7:30 p.m. WAUCHULA HILLS SPANISH CHURCH OF GOD 1000 Stansfield Rd. Sunday School..................10:00 a.m.Evening Worship ................7:30 p.m. Tuesday Prayer...................7:30 p.m.Thursday Worship ..............7:30 p.m. Saturday Worship ...............7:30 p.m. CREWSVILLE BETHEL BAPTIST CHURCH 8251 Crewsville Road Church 735-0871 • Pastor 385-7867 Sunday School....................9:45 a.m.Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m. Evening Worship ................6:30 p.m. Wednesday Prayer..............6:30 p.m. FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF ZOLFO 320 E. 4th Street • 735-1200 Sunday School..................10:00 a.m.Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m. Training Union...................5:00 p.m.Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m. Wednesday Prayer..............7:00 p.m. FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Corner of 6th & Suwanee • 735-1544 Gospel Music....................10:30 a.m.Worship Service................11:00 a.m.Wednesday Bible Study.....7:00 p.m. GARDNER BAPTIST CHURCH 8660 US Highway 17 S Zolfo Springs, FL 33890 Sunday Worship ................ 11:00 AM LIFE CHANGING WORSHIP CENTER 3426 Oak Street • 863-832-9808 Sunday Worship .................2:30 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study.....6:30 p.m. MARANATHA BAPTIST CHURCH 2465 Oxendine Road • 832-7829 Sunday School..................10:00 a.m.Worship.............................11:00 a.m.Evening..............................1:00 p.m.Wed. Bible & Prayer Meet.7:00 p.m. NEW BEGINNINGS 3704 U.S. Hwy. 17 S. • 781-5887 M-F Family Services..........8:00 a.m.Sense Friday.......................3:00 p.m. “Making Sense of the Non-Sense” Friday Bread of Life...........3:15 p.m. NEW VISION WORSHIP CENTER 64 E. & School House Road Church 735-8585 Childcare 735-8586 Morning Worship ..............10:00 a.m. Children’s Church............10:00 a.m.Wed. Youth & F.T.H...........7:00 p.m. BOWLING GREEN ONA WAUCHULA WAUCHULA WAUCHULA WAUCHULA ZOLFO SPRINGS ZOLFO SPRINGS Printed as a Public Service by The Herald-Advocate Deadline for changes or additions: Thursday 5 p.m. PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF GOD FAITH TEMPLE Oak Street Sunday Worship ................10:00 a.m. Evening Worship ................7:00 p.m. Tuesday Worship ................7:30 p.m. Thursday Worship ..............7:30 p.m. Saturday Worship ...............7:30 p.m. PRIMERA MISSION BAUTISTA HISPANA 518 8th Avenue East Escuela Dominical............10:00 a.m.Servicio del Domingo.......11:00 a.m. ............................................7:00 p.m. Servicio del Miercoles.......7:30 p.m. PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH Pioneer Park 2nd Sunday.......................10:30 a.m.Evening Service.................6:30 p.m.5th Sunday..........................6:00 p.m. REALITY RANCH COWBOY FELLOWSHIP 2-1/2 Miles east on Hwy. 66 863-781-1578 Sunday Service.................11:00 a.m. ST. PAUL’S MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH 3676 U.S. Hwy. 17 S. • 735-0636 Sunday School....................9:30 a.m.Morning Worship ...................11 a.m. Wed. Prayer Service...........7:00 p.m. SAN ALFONSO MISSION 3027 Schoolhouse Lane • 773-4089 Domingo, Misa en Espano10:00 a.m. SPANISH MISSION 735-8025 Escuela Dominica.............10:00 a.m.Servicio.............................11:00 a.m.Pioneer Club.................. .....6:30 p.m. Servicio de la Noche..........7:00 p.m.Mierecoles Merienda..........6:00 p.m.Servicio..............................8:00 p.m.Sabado Liga de Jovenes.....5:00 p.m. Peace River GrowersWholesale Nursery Donnis & Kathy BarberHwy. 66 EastP.O. Box 760 (863) 735-0470 Zolfo Springs, FL BOWLING GREEN “This is going to hurt me more than it does you,” said the fatherto his young son as he took himfrom the family room for inter rupting our conversation. I’dheard that statement many timesand always wondered what theparent wanted the child to under stand when it was used. If it was used to redirect a child’s behavior and teach him or her an importantlesson about life, why not say so.That’s what the author of Psalm94 meant when he wrote, “If Goddisciplines you, consider yourselfblessed” or “full of blessings!” To discipline means “to teach.” Discipline is not punishment aswe understand it though it mayinvolve suffering and loss, disap pointment and feelings of rejec tion. When God disciplines us, itis His method to bring us back tolive within His commandmentsand laws and the teachings ofJesus. It is about “getting our at tention” when we are overcomeby temptation and fall into sin. It’sabout being confronted by Godwhen He corrects us for allowingthe “things or the people or the at tractions of this world” to take Hisplace. It is about worshiping thosethings rather than the Creator ofthose “things.” One of the blessings of disci pline is that it has long term ben efits for the Christian. If in Hismercy He brings loss or sufferingto teach us a lesson today, and ifwe are willing to learn from theloss or suffering when it happens,we will be spared from greaterlosses or more suffering in the fu ture and bring more honor toHim. Visit us at: SowerMinistries.org Guido Evangelistic Association Metter, Ga. SeedsofHop eA4 The Herald-Advocate, April 12, 2018

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Obituaries STANLEY R. KIRKLAND Stanley R. Kirkland, 52, of Wauchula, died on Tuesday, April 3, 2018, at Lakeland Regional Health Medical Center. He was born in Orlando, and lived most of his life in Hardee County. He is survived by his wife, Denise Hagwood; mother, Barbara Kirkland; father, William Kirkland; children, Angela (Franshua) Kirkland, Bryan (Tyre) Hagwood, Brandy Hagwood and Michelle (Sevena) Kirkland; sister, Peggy (Grant) Bonds; brother, Travis (Amy) Kirk land; eight grandchildren. Arrangements were by Fountain Funeral Home, Avon Park. MARIAN HAND BURSANI Marian Hand Bursani, 91, of Wauchula, died on Friday, April 6, 2018. A native Floridian, she had resided in Wauchula most of her lifetime. She is survived by her sons, Charles "Eddie" Hand and Randall Hand; sister, Peggy Wilhelm; eight grandchildren; several great-grandchildren and one great-great-grand child. Funeral services were held Tuesday, April 10, at Southern Funeral Care, Riverview. In terment followed at Hillsboro Memorial Gardens, Brandon. Arrangements were by Southern Funeral Care, Riverview. In MemoryROY CARLTON R.C. WEEKSRoy Carlton R.C. Weeks, of Lake Placid, passed away on March 28, 2018. He was born Nov. 28, 1932, in Lemon Grove, FL, to Roy Weeks and Willa Mae (Green) Weeks. After graduating from Hardee High School, R.C. joined the U.S. Air Force where he was a staff sergeant in the Korean War. When he was discharged from active duty he came home and began his career as a builder and general contractor in the Hardee County area. R.C. married Ada Merle Collins in 1960. The couple had two children, Jed Weeks, of Wauchula, and Krista Weeks Peterson, of Tampa. R.C. has gone to heaven to be with the Lord, his mother, father, and brothers, Hoyt Weeks and J.W. Weeks, and many lifelong friends and relatives. R.C. was an active member of Faith Baptist Church in Lake Placid. He is survived by his wife of 57 years, Ada Merle; son, Jed and daughter-in-law, Robin (Clenney) Weeks, of Wauchula; daughter, Krista and son-in-law, Bob Peter son, of Tampa; and sister-inlaw, Zola Collins Truitt. In his later years, R.C. was renamed Pop by his four granddaughters, Leah and Audra Weeks, of Wauchula, and Lauren and Alexandra Peterson, of Tampa. Pop was a wonderful hus band, father, and grandfa ther. When he wasnt spoiling his granddaughters, he enjoyed fishing, shooting, riding his motorcycle, and barbequing for friends and family. Visitation and service was held Good Friday at First Baptist Church of Wauchula on March 30. In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations be made to Good Shepherd Hospice, Sebring, or Florida Sheriffs Boys Ranch, Live Oak. In Loving Memory G G L L O O R R I I A A S S I I L L V V I I A A D D E E M M A A R R T T I I N N E E Z Z Gloria Silvia De Mar tinez, 67, of Wauchula, died on Sunday, April 8, 2018, at Somers Hospice House, in Sebring. Born April 5, 1951, in Mexico, she came to Hardee County from Mexico 10 years ago. She was a homemaker, a Christian, and member of Family Life Min istries. Survivors include her husband, Habacud Martinez, of Wauchula; two sons, Habacuc Martinez and Ri cardo Martinez, both of Hardee County; two daughters, Xochitl Martinez, of Mexico, and Gloria Mar tinez, of North Carolina; two brothers, Omero Sanchez, of Texas, and Mauro Balderas, of Mexico; one sister, Veron ica Franco, of South Car olina; 10 grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren. Expressions of comfort may be made at robartsfh.com.Robarts FamilyFUNERAL HOME WAUCHULAProvided as a courtesy of Robarts Family Funeral Home In MemorySHARON LEE MOSELEY PURECO MORALESSharon Lee Moseley Pureco Morales, 63, of Fort Meade, passed away Tues day, April 3, 2018, at her home. She was born in Wauchula on Feb. 17, 1955. She was a homemaker. She was preceded in death by father, Sherrod E. Moseley; mother, Dorothy Roberts Moseley; brothers, Donald Moseley and Fred Moseley; son, Jose Encinias; and daughter, Bar bara Pureco. She is survived by hus band, Teodulo Pureco Morales; brothers, Sherrod Wayne Moseley and Ken neth Moseley; sisters, Bar bara Moseley Aleman and Carlene Moseley Hunter; daughters, Tabitha Torres, Olivia Encinias Rodriguez, and Jessica Johnston; and son, Kenneth Torres. A celebration of life will be held May 5 at 2 p.m. at 3100 Mt. Pisgah Road, Fort Meade. Cremation arrangements were by J.L. Locke and Company Cremation Serv ices. Ponger-Kays-GradyFuneral Homes & Cremation Services205 N. 9th Ave., Wauchula PongerKaysGrady.com 863-773-6400 Our caring staff are working hard to plan for the future needs of Hardee County residents! During our construction we would like to offer a s s p p e e c c i i a a l l d d i i s s c c o o u u n n t t for our Prearranged Funeral Plans. Call our friendly staff for details. 4:12c Windham (Pete Rodriguez), of North Port, Flora Estella Alvarado (Steven), and Ros alva Galan (Antonio), all of Bowling Green; three brothers, Roy Elisondo, of Cali fornia, Samuel Elisondo, of Texas, and Reuben Elisondo Jr., of Zolfo Springs; four sisters, Mary Lou Gonzalez, of Bowling Green, Simona Rentoria (Robert), of Texas, Irma Velez (Frank Velez, Jr.), of Zolfo Springs, and Mary Jane Elisondo, of Ar cadia; 13 grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren. Visitation was Tuesday, April 10 from 6-8 p.m. at Robarts Garden Chapel. Funeral services were Wednes day, April 11 at 10 a.m. at St. Michael Catholic Church with Father Rolando offici ating. Burial was at Wauchula Cemetery. Expressions of comfort may be made at robartsfh.com.Robarts FamilyFUNERAL HOME WAUCHULAProvided as a courtesy of Robarts Family Funeral Home In Loving Memory E E R R L L I I N N D D A A E E . W W I I N N D D H H A A M M Erlinda E. Windham, 66, of Zolfo Springs, died on Friday, April 6, 2018, at Somers Hospice House in Sebring. Born Dec. 28, 1951, in Victoria, Texas, she came to Hardee County from Texas in 1960. She was a home maker and a member of St. Michael Catholic Church. Survivors include her companion and significant other, Jose Martinez, of Zolfo Springs; two sons, Joel Wayne Windham (Patri cia), and Jose Carlos Mar tinez, all of Zolfo Springs; three daughters, JoAnn band, Charles Curran, in 1999; son, Mark Curran; and four brothers, Glenn, Gerald, Lloyd, and J. Wesley. Survivors include two sons, Kurt Curran, of Wauchula, and Kent Curran (Vicki), of Euless, Texas; one daughter, Ruth Howard (Dave), of Duquesne, Pa.; eight grandchildren; and seven great-grandchildren. Funeral services will be held today (Thursday), April 12, at 3 p.m. at Oak Grove Baptist Church with Rev. Jim Davis officiating. Visitation is 2-3 p.m. Interment will be at Jefferson Memo rial Park in Pittsburgh, Pa. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to ones favorite charity. Expressions of comfort may be made at robartsfh.com.Robarts FamilyFUNERAL HOME WAUCHULAProvided as a courtesy of Robarts Family Funeral Home In Loving Memory F F A A Y Y L L a a R R U U E E C C U U R R R R A A N N Fay LaRue Curran, 89, of Wauchula, died on Saturday, April 7, 2018, at Somers Hospice House, in Sebring. Born in McKeesport, Pa., on Aug. 31, 1928, to Lewis A. and Elmira Saxon, she moved to Hardee County in 1989 from Pennsylvania and had been a winter resident for the previous nine years. She was a member of Oak Grove Baptist Church and had worked at Sears and Roebuck as an office clerk. Fay was preceded in death by her parents; hus Guaranteed Lowest Prices4:12cDeath NoticeDR. MAX FOLSOM MORRIS Dr. Max Folsom Morris, of Winter Park, died April 9, 2018. He was born on Nov. 3, 1928. Friends will be received today (Thursday), April 12 at 6 p.m. at Christ Church of Or lando. Services will be Friday, April 13, at 10 a.m. at Christ Church of Orlando. Burial will be at Midway Cemetery, Crewsville. Arrangements were by Newcomer Cremations and Funerals, Orlando. April 12, 2018, The Herald-Advocate A5In Loving Memory R R A A L L P P H H E E D D W W A A R R D D H H I I L L L L Ralph Edward Hill, 59, of Sebring, died at Highlands Regional Medical Center in Sebring on Saturday, April 7, 2018. Born in Walterboro, S.C., on May 13, 1958, he moved to Highlands County from Hardee County in 2013. He was a drywall finisher and Pentecostal by faith. Ralph loved the Lord, his family, and fishing. He had a tender heart and would give someone the shirt off his back; if one needed help, he was there for them. This small town Southern man was silly and happy. Survivors include his wife, Deeda Boyles, of Se bring; one brother, Gene Hill, of Mullins, S.C.; three sisters, Renea Hill, of Mullins, S.C., Judy Brown, of Marion, S.C., and Darlene Hill, of Wauchula; and sev eral cousins. Funeral services will be held at 11 a.m. on Thursday, April 12, at Robarts Garden Chapel with Mr. Brett Dowden officiating. Visitation will be one hour prior to services. Burial is at Friend ship Cemetery. Expressions of comfort may be made at robartsfh.com.Robarts FamilyFUNERAL HOME WAUCHULAProvided as a courtesy of Robarts Family Funeral Home 1. Is the book of Judges in the Old or New Testament or neither? 2. By Roman reckoning, what time of day did Jesus meet the Samarian woman at the well? Daybreak, Noon, Mid-afternoon, Dusk 3. On the island of Patmos, to whom was the book of Rev elation given? John, Paul, Matthew, Luke 4. Who hid 100 prophets in two caves and supplied them food and water? Solomon, Philemon, Obadiah, Hosea 5. On what day did God create the evening and the morning? 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th ANSWERS: 1) Old; 2) Noon; 3) John; 4) Obadiah; 5) 4th Visit Wilson Casey's new Trivia Fan Site at www.pa treon.com/triviaguy.(c) 2018 King Features Synd., Inc.Bible TriviaBy Wilson Casey OBITUARY POLICYThe Herald-Advocate publishes obituaries free of charge as a public service. Forms showing the information which may be included in a free obituary are available at local fu neral homes or at our office. Paid obituaries may include additional information and re memberances. All obituaries, however, must be submitted by a funeral home. No personal submissions will be accepted. Funeral homes can submit obituaries to obits@the her aldadvocate.com.

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Main Street Wauchula Paints The Town Volunteer Teams Wauchula Kiwanis Wauchula State Bank Main Street Wauchula Hardee County Professional Firefighters #BETHECHURCH (First Christian Church) City of Wauchula Rotary Club of Hardee County Mosaic 1 Peter 4:10 (First Baptist Church Wauchula Youth) New Hope Baptist Church COURTESY PHOTOS Main Street Wauchula Inc. held its sixth annual Paint The Town event on Saturday. More than 180 volunteers showed up, willing and ready to put a fresh new coat ofpaint on nine eligible homes in the Turner and Diana avenue, Heard Bridge Road and Oak Street areas. Volunteers from New Hope Baptist Church and from Mosaic happily paint the town. Paintbrush and bucket in hand, Main Street Wauchulavolunteer Frank Gibbs brings a wide smile to a home ownerÂ’s face. All sorts of prep work was required before paint couldbe applied. Here, young Cooper Graham lends a lastminute landscaping hand. Main Street Wauchula Inc. Executive Director JessicaNewman does brushwork while husband Shannon is ona roll. The team #BETHECHURCH tackles a home within municipal limits as part of theprogram by Main Street Wauchula Inc. and the Community Redevelopment Agency. Homes were pressure-washed, scraped, taped andsanded as needed before and during the big volunteerevent. A pleased homeowner inspects the new paintjob. A6 The Herald-Advocate, April 12, 2018

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______________________________ IN AND FOR THE CIRCUIT COURT OF HARDEE COUNTY PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO.: 25-2018-CP-000016 IN RE: ESTATE OF BARBARA J. RHODEN, DECEASED _____________________________/ NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the es tate of Barbara J. Rhoden, de ceased, File Number 25-2018CP-000016, is pending in the Circuit Court for Hardee County, Florida, Probate Division, the ad dress of which is: Clerk of Circuit Court for Hardee County, 417 W. Main Street, Wauchula, Florida 33873. The names and addresses of the personal repre sentative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice has been served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE TIME OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA TION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of the first publica tion of this Notice is April 12, 2018. Attorney for Personal Representative: Michael G. Moore Florida Bar No. 0970514 711 5th Avenue South, Ste. 200 Naples, Florida 34102 (239) 398-6103 MichaelGMoore@comcast.net Personal Representative: John S. Rhoden 5340 Goodson Road West Jefferson, OH 431624:12,19c______________________________NOTICE OF MEETING FLORIDA UTILITY DEBT SECURITIZATION AUTHORITY BOARD OF DIRECTORSThe Florida Utility Debt Securitization Authority ("FUDSA") announces its initial public meeting to which all interested persons are invited. FUDSA is a legal entity and public body created pursuant to the provisions of Sections 163.01 and 163.09, Florida Statutes, and an Interlocal Agreement among Lee County, Florida; Collier County, Florida; and the Florida Governmental Utility Authority (FGUA). The meeting will be held on April 23, 2018 at 1:00 p.m. at the Lee County Attorney's Office, 2115 Second Street, 6th Floor, Conference Room 621, Fort Myers, FL 33901. At this meeting, the FUDSA board members (the "FUDSA Board") will address general organizational and operating issues of FUDSA. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the FUDSA Board with respect to any matter considered at the meeting, such person will need a record of the proceedings and may need to ensure that a verbatim record is made, including the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be made. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing special accommoda tions or an interpreter to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk to the FUDSA Board at (407) 629-6900, at least three business days prior to the date of the meeting. If you have any questions, please contact the Clerk to the FUDSA Board at (407) 629-6900. 4:12cNOTICEThe Hardee County School Board will hold a special meeting on Tuesday, April 17 at 9:00 a.m. The Board will consider approval of teacher contract negotiations. The meeting will be held in the School Board Meeting Room located at 230 South Florida Avenue, Wauchula, Florida. 4:12c S ST TO OR RT TS S T TA AX XE ES S& &B BO OO OK KK KE EE EP PI IN NG G, I IN NC C. .O Ov ve er r 4 40 0 y ye ea ar rs s o of f C Co om mb bi in ne ed d E Ex xp pe er ri ie en nc ce e F Fa as st t E El le ec ct tr ro on ni ic c F Fi il li in ng gMonday Friday 9:30am 6pm1 12 20 0 W W. O Or ra an ng ge e S St tr re ee et t(next to Great Florida Insurance)7 77 73 3-2 22 20 00 0 Se Habla Espaol Irma Garcia863-606-8846 BRING IN THIS AD FOR$15.00 OFF Storts Taxes & BookkeepingGreater Florida Ins.Hwy. 17 SouthHwy. 17 NorthWauchula State Bank 4:12p Danielle, Deborah & Irma 4/12/2018Sun Data Rise: 7:05 AM Set: 7:50 PM Day Length 12 hrs. 45 mins. Moon Data Rise: 5:08 AM Set: 4:47 PM Overhead: 10:56 AM Underfoot: 11:19 PM Moon Phase 13% Waning Crescent Major Times 10:56 AM 12:56 PM 11:19 PM 1:19 AM Minor Times 5:08 AM 6:08 AM 4:47 PM 5:47 PM Prediction Hunting or Fishing Average Time Zone UTC: -44/13/2018Sun Data Rise: 7:04 AM Set: 7:51 PM Day Length 12 hrs. 47 mins. Moon Data Rise: 5:45 AM Set: 5:43 PM Overhead: 11:42 AM Underfoot: --:-Moon Phase 7% Waning Crescent Major Times --:---:-11:42 AM 1:42 PM Minor Times 5:45 AM 6:45 AM 5:43 PM 6:43 PM Prediction Hunting or Fishing Good Time Zone UTC: -4 4/14/2018Sun Data Rise: 7:03 AM Set: 7:51 PM Day Length 12 hrs. 48 mins. Moon Data Rise: 6:21 AM Set: 6:40 PM Overhead: 12:29 PM Underfoot: 12:06 AM Moon Phase 2% Waning Crescent Major Times 12:06 AM 2:06 AM 12:29 PM 2:29 PM Minor Times 6:21 AM 7:21 AM 6:40 PM 7:40 PM Prediction Hunting or Fishing Better Time Zone UTC: -44/15/2018Sun Data Rise: 7:02 AM Set: 7:52 PM Day Length 12 hrs. 50 mins. Moon Data Rise: 6:59 AM Set: 7:39 PM Overhead: 1:17 PM Underfoot: 12:53 AM Moon Phase 0% NEW MOON Major Times 12:53 AM 2:53 AM 1:17 PM 3:17 PM Minor Times 6:59 AM 7:59 AM 7:39 PM 8:39 PM Prediction Hunting or Fishing Best Time Zone UTC: -4 4/16/2018Sun Data Rise: 7:01 AM Set: 7:52 PM Day Length 12 hrs. 51 mins. Moon Data Rise: 7:38 AM Set: 8:40 PM Overhead: 2:07 PM Underfoot: 1:42 AM Moon Phase 0% Waxing Crescent Major Times 1:42 AM 3:42 AM 2:07 PM 4:07 PM Minor Times 7:38 AM 8:38 AM 8:40 PM 9:40 PM Prediction Hunting or Fishing Best++++ Time Zone UTC: -44/17/2018Sun Data Rise: 7:00 AM Set: 7:53 PM Day Length 12 hrs. 53 mins. Moon Data Rise: 8:20 AM Set: 9:43 PM Overhead: 3:00 PM Underfoot: 2:33 AM Moon Phase 3% Waxing Crescent Major Times 2:33 AM 4:33 AM 3:00 PM 5:00 PM Minor Times 8:20 AM 9:20 AM 9:43 PM 10:43 PM Prediction Hunting or Fishing Better Time Zone UTC: -4 4/18/2018Sun Data Rise: 6:59 AM Set: 7:53 PM Day Length 12 hrs. 54 mins. Moon Data Rise: 9:05 AM Set: 10:46 PM Overhead: 3:55 PM Underfoot: 3:27 AM Moon Phase 8% Waxing Crescent Major Times 3:27 AM 5:27 AM 3:55 PM 5:55 PM Minor Times 9:05 AM 10:05 AM 10:46 PM 11:46 PM Prediction Hunting or Fishing Good Time Zone UTC: -44/19/2018Sun Data Rise: 6:58 AM Set: 7:54 PM Day Length 12 hrs. 56 mins. Moon Data Rise: 9:55 AM Set: 11:49 PM Overhead: 4:52 PM Underfoot: 4:23 AM Moon Phase 16% Waxing Crescent Major Times 4:23 AM 6:23 AM 4:52 PM 6:52 PM Minor Times 9:55 AM 10:55 AM 11:49 PM 12:49 AM Prediction Hunting or Fishing Average Time Zone UTC: -4 Solunar ForecastProvided courtesy of solunarforecast.com Leadercast, a one-day leadership conference broad cast live from Atlanta and simulcast to hundreds of locations globally, will be hosted at South Florida State College campuses next month. This year marks the 18th year of the annual leadership conference, but the first year that SFSC will be hosting the event at its Hardee, Highlands and DeSoto campuses. The simulcast is Friday, May 4, from 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. The theme of this years conference is Lead Yourself. What does it look like to lead yourself? How can you intentionally develop your own leadership skills and style? What qualities do you hope to embody as a leader? The Leadercast Live stage will highlight leaders who will answer these questions and ex plain the power and impor tance of leading yourself first so you can lead others well. Top leadership experts will inspire more than the 300 people attending the local event, and the more than 100,000 people at hundreds of other simulcast locations in more than 20 countries. The leadership experts speaking this year are: Jen Bricker Acrobat, aerialist, author and speaker. Kate Cole Top female business leader and and president of Focus Brands, North America. Ian Cron Bestselling author, psychotherapist, ennea gram teacher and speaker. Michael Hyatt author, speaker and CEO of Michael Hyatt & Co. Mae Jemison NASA astronaut, engineer and physi cian. Jim Loehr Co-founder of the Human Performance In stitute. Carey Lohrenz The first female F-14 pilot, a speaker and trainer. Andy Stanley Best selling author and communica tor. Joe Torre Hall of Fame baseball manager. For more information and to purchase your ticket or spon sorship for the Leadercast South Florida State College event, visit sfscarts.org and click on Shows & Tickets and then Leadercast Live. SFSC To Host Leadercast Dear Editor: Roxie Bentley told you she would add to the rest of the story about why she chose Florida Southern College in Lakeland. Her Daddy's brother R.C. Bentley and family plus her cousins lived in Winter Haven which was just a "jump" from Lakeland. She would be a able to visit them on Saturdays and Sun days when she kept her grades up so she could see them on weekends sometimes. I didn't have much time for visiting because of all the "study time" required for math, English, history, athletics, etc. These are requirements. I did not mind going to English classes and athletics, but Boy Howdy math and history-even the "birds" would have had trouble. I liked history, but it was hard to remember who did "what and when and why." Math has always been a "Booger" for me. I also had a class in art. That was O.K. as long as I could draw, but there was not very much drawing in volved. That first year at Florida Southern was extremely hard. I have a feeling it may not have been so hard if I had had one more year in high school, but there were only 11 grades to finish high school in South Carolina. I have been told that schools in Georgia and North Carolina had 11 grades at the time. I have heard that all high schools now have 12 grades. I was promoted at the end of my Freshman year "by the skin of my teeth." I did a little better in my second and third year. My head was set to be a high school teacher until I saw how large and tall those football players were. I could just see those fellows pick me up and throw me around like a foot ball. (At that time I was only five feet tall and about 168 pounds.) When I told my uncle I wanted to change my major to elementary age children he had a "hissy with a fringe on top." That is when we parted ways. I waited several days after I that so I could get my thoughts together. Then I sat down and told my Uncle how much I ap preciated his financial help for my three years at Florida Southern College and how sorry I was in disappointing him in changing my mind from teaching high school age stu dents to elementary age stu dents. I just felt I was better suited for teaching younger students. I repeat, I am very thankful for the financial help you have given me. Several days or weeks passed by. Then one day my Uncle sent his second son to talk to me about my situation and to see if I would change my mind. When my cousin saw there was no way I was changing my mind he said, "What will you do?" My reply was, "I don't know." This leaves more of my story to come. It leaves room for you to guess or think "what will she do?" Put on you "thinking caps." See you later. Roxie Bentley WauchulaLetter To The Editor Why I Changed My Major To Elementary Education 1. Who holds the Texas Rangers record for career batting average? 2. Name the only catchers elected on the first ballot to the Baseball Hall of Fame. 3. Who was the last Wash ington Redskins quarterback before Kirk Cousins in 2016 to throw for at least 350 yards in consecutive games? 4. Entering 2018, who were the last two men's basketball coaches to lead their team to an NCAA championship without having ever coached in a Final Four before that year? 5. Name the first NHL player to record a hat trick for the Vegas Golden Nights? 6. Who was the first driver to win in races in Formula One, IndyCar and NASCAR? 7. When was the last time before 2017 that two American female tennis players were in the final of the U.S. Open? ANSWERS 1. Al Oliver, with a .319 av erage (1978-81). 2. Johnny Bench (1989) and Ivan Rodriguez (2017). 3. Jay Schroeder, in 1986. 4. Tubby Smith (1998) and Kevin Ollie (2014). 5. William Karlsson, in 2017. 6. Dan Gurney. 7. It was 2002, when Serena Williams defeated Venus Williams.(c) 2018 King Features Synd., Inc.Sports QuizBy Chris Richcreek The national average price for regular unleaded gasoline hit its highest point of 2018 on Saturday at $2.663 per gallon. That average is a half-cent more than last week, 13 cents more than a month ago, and 28 cents more than last year. Gas prices edged higher fol lowing the Energy Information Administrations latest weekly report that showed gasoline stock dropped by 1.1 million barrels last week. Additionally, demand for gasoline continues to remain robust at 9.2 million barrels a day as the spring driv ing season kicks off, which saw demand measured at 9.25 million barrels a day at the same time in 2017. Drivers are likely to continue seeing prices increase as sta tions across the country begin to switch over to the more ex pensive summer blend ahead of the busy driving season. Florida gas prices decreased by nearly three cents compared to a week ago. On average, Florida motorists are paying nine cents more for a gallon of unleaded regular than one month ago, and 19 cents more compared to last year. Sunday's state average of $2.61 is just six cents below the highest price of 2018. "Supply and demand are the biggest factors driving the price at the pump," said Josh Carrasco of AAA/The Auto Club Group. "More motorists on the roadways, tight supply and record crude exports have the potential for higher prices as we head into the spring." At the close of Fridays for mal trading session on the NYMEX, West Texas Interme diate crude oil decreased $1.48 to settle at $62.06. WTI has taken a hit along side the equities market in the U.S. According to EIA reports, crude exports hit a record high of 15.2 million barrels last week. Domestic crude produc tion also hit a record high 10.5 million barrels a day last week, which contributed to the U.S. shipping more oil to other countries.Expect Higher Gas Prices This Spring Go To The Head Of The Class! SCHOOL NEWS DEADLINE IS THURSDAY AT 5 PM Think Someone Needs Help?NATIONALHUMANTRAFFICKINGHOTLINE1-888-373-7888orText Help or Info to 233733 April 12, 2018, The Herald-Advocate A7

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By ANNETA STANTON KRAUS For The Herald-Advocate Romero Del Dagado of Moore Haven is the most pa triotic person I have met. He loves the United States ofAmerica with a particular passion that simply flows fromhis intense dark eyes along with his fervent words. Thosewords are spoken with a Spanish accent because Romerois a Cuban by birth, an American by choice. Those of us who have had the privilege to be born in the U.S. have no idea the sacrifices some of our naturalizedAmericans have made. Many of those who chose to leavetheir native countries to come here have endured extensiveloss financially, socially and educationally. Families wereoften torn apart. They risked their lives to be free. Romero, in his 70s, relates how beautiful, productive and free Cuba was as relatedby his grandmother. Cubawas an island paradise. Hisgrandfather farmed sugarcane, sweet potatoes, pineap ples, pigs, chickens and any thing else the family needed.He was free to sell and keephis harvest. He was free tovote and express his politicalviews. Carlos Prio-Socarros served dully elected as pres ident of Cuba from October1948 until March 1952. Car los was overthrown by a mil itary coup led by FulgencioBatista with fellow revolu tionaries Raul Castro andChe Quevara. Fulgencio Batista y Zal divar became the electedpresident of Cuba from 1940to 1944. He turned into a dic tator backed by America be cause he exhibitedpro-American sympathiesand policies. America sup ported his regime until it wasobvious that gross misman agement, corruption and out right theft were rampant. Thedictator Batista was in con trol of Cuba from 1952 untilhe was overthrown in theCuban Revolution of 1959. Things changed for the citizens of Cuba, and it was not good. The Cuban people were not happy at all. They did not know how bad things could be until the military revolutionist Fidel Castro with his communistregime grabbed power from Batista. The promise of a bet ter life was shattered. There is an expression “Power cor rupts and absolute power corrupts absolutely,” which fitsthis story like a glove. Batista took $600 million of Cuba’snational treasury funds with him when he fled Cuba toSpain. Romero was seven years old when Batista strongarmed his way to the top and 14 when Castro’s revolutionoccurred. He recalled a speech Castro made the next dayon the radio when he described himself as a watermelonbeing green (fatigues) on the outside and red (communist)on the inside. Civil rights were simply ignored as the communists began their plan to control every aspect of a Cuban’s life. A Cuban citizen had to have a pass from the commu nist committee to travel outside their designated area. IfRomero wanted to visit a relative in a nearby designatedarea he had to apply and explain his intentions as to when,what, why, where and for how long. If the committee be came at all suspicious of his intentions they would denythe pass. Should a citizen harvest potatoes it had to be reported. If a farmer slaughtered a pig it must be reported. The com munists would take more than half. Romero’s father was an outspoken person. The family greatly feared he would be arrested any day. He spent 40days in jail during the Bay of Pigs Invasion on charges hewas a “sympathizer.” Neighbors, friends and even family would turn on an individual in a red hot minute reporting the smallest in fraction to gain favor from the communists, avoid disfavorfrom them, or because they were communist sympathizers.Fear was pervasive with everyone, even the communistwho did not trust anyone, even their own comrades! Romero lived in the countryside with his mother and father and eight siblings. His father worked on a railroadand did some farming. Education was offered thru the sixth grade in most of the country, but Romero only finished the fifth grade be cause as the oldest he felt a duty to help his father supportthe large family. When Romero was 20 he and his father covertly built a boat in a secret location inside a swamp. It took them anhour and a half to walk to their work place in the swamp.They had to traverse only after midnight and before day break with no light to guide the way. Supplies were securedone board and one nail at a time to prevent detection. The Del Dagado family needed lots of gas. Gas was like liquid gold on the island. Small portions were ekedout of their allotment and smuggled to the swamp location,one half-cup at a time. A particularly strong thunderstormcaused water to infiltrate the cache making it unusable. They had to pour it out andstart over again. Romero and his father were the only ones whoknew the location of thework place or its purpose. Itwas too dangerous for any one else to know includingother family members. In the late summer of 1965 during the hurricaneseason the communist boatdrivers patrolling the watersfor escapees were busy as sessing the weather. Theywould not be observing thecoastline. It was a perfecttime for the family to maketheir move. The rickety boat was barely finished. The menfloated it under the platformholding the large containerof gas. The legs of the plat form were cut off so thestructure and large containerof the gas would fall onto theboat. The platform made aflimsy shelter of sorts. In the cover of dead night with only the moon tohelp navigate the family gathered for the dangeroustrek through the swamp.Cuban swamps are full ofpoisonous snakes and caimans (relatives of alligators). The youngest childr en had to be gagged to prevent themfrom crying which wouldalert neighbors. Should theybe caught most likely theadults and older childrenwould be shot or taken to alabor camp. Three other refugees were allowed to join the des perate Del Dagado family.One added passenger boughthis way with an old compassthat was badly needed for thehazardous 95-mile journeyto Florida. Sadly they had toleave the grandparents inCuba. All of the passengers left their homeland with nothingbut the clothes on theirbacks. There was somestored water and a half dozencans of condensed milk forthe little ones, the youngestbeing but 2 years old. The boat was heavily loaded, floating low in the water. Mr. Del Dagado was a skilled waterman having lived hislife as an islander near the ocean, but everyone knew andaccepted the extreme risk of their undertaking. They wereat the mercy of the weather and the constant surveillanceof the communist authorities. The makeshift craft was all of 19 feet long with the legless platform being the only shelter from the sun andrain for the youngest children and their mother who wasnot well. An old decrepit washing machine motor “powered” the boat at about three miles an hour. God greatly favored the Del Dagados. After around 50 miles one of Romero’s younger brothers spotted smoke.They thought it was coming from an island. It was in fact a British ship although the adults were not aware of wh ose ship it was. Cuban citizens were not allowed to learn theflags of other nations at that time. Fate could deliver themright back into communist hands if they did not make theright decisions. Mr. Del Dagado had no choice but to trust that the ship was from a friendly nation. The treasured old compass hadproven to be faulty. They did not know where they were. The British came to their rescue. Romero related how kind and generous the British sailors were as they sailedtoward Key West, Florida. The ship’s doctor and nursechecked out the children and the mother. They were al lowed to go to the ship’s pantry to pick out anything they wanted. Upon landing in Key West the refugees were taken to the U.S. Navy Base by the consulate staff. Romero was as tounded at the sight of hundreds of automobiles of everytype in the base parking lot and so much food in the PX. The family was taken to a hotel in Miami for three days then given three months rent for an apartment.Romero got a job that paid $1 an hour. Through the Cuban grapevine the family learned that neighbors had observed that there was no activity at theDel Dagado home when the sun came up after their depar ture. This observance was dutifully reported to the com munist authorities. An extensive manhunt was immediatelyunderway to retrieve them. The Del Dagados were blessedly safe in their new country. The family made several moves before they landed in Glades County. The men worked in the sugar mill. PapaDel Dagado being 65 years old could not sustain the paceof lifting huge bags of sugar so he had to take other lessstrenuous work on a farm. Romero received legal immigrant status within months but it took 10 years to become a United States citizen. Hestruggled to learn English and to become acclimated to theAmerican way of life. Every spare penny was saved forhis future. Romero became a skilled mechanic working at that trade for more than 40 years. His strong work ethic pro vided for his family and now affords him a comfortable re tirement. Romero has read the King James Version of the Bible twice in English and twice in Spanish. He is fluent in Eng lish. He reads well but laments that he cannot write well. He loves America passionately but fears that the coun try is headed in the wrong direction to say the least.Romero believes that we are becoming too liberal. We takeour freedom for granted so much that we are in danger oflosing that hard-won freedom. Think of the lives lost, families devastated, fortunes lost, injuries incurredthroughout our history –allin the pursuit of freedom!Freedom Is Not Free! Romero does not believe that those who can and butdo not work should receivegovernment assistance. Hebelieves in legal immigra tion. He stated that a wall be tween Mexico and the U.S.is not only a good idea but isessential for our future. The drug culture is ap palling to him. He cannot un derstand why U.S. laws areflagrantly ignored by natu ral-born citizens, as well asillegal and legal immigrants.Laziness and a sense of enti tlement by our citizens are agreat danger to our country’sexistence. He feels that thecountry of liberty for all asbrought forth by our found ing fathers is gradually being eroded. Romero knows of which he speaks. He has lived through the demise of a beautiful abundant island paradise.He has seen that paradise turn into a land of fear, lack, andloss of freedom. He prays fervently that his beloved UnitedStates will wake up before it, too, digresses into fear, lack,and loss of freedom. Great civilizations have fallen before throughout his tory. Many of them fell for the vary same reasons of greed,laziness, indifference, sense of entitlement, lack of pursu ing education, and unwillingness to support their country. Will the United States of America be next? What are you and I going to do about it? (Editor’s Note: Anneta Stanton Kraus grew up in Hardee County and now lives in Lake Placid.) A Cautionary Tale: Cuban By Birth, American By Choice Romero enjoys America’s freedom of religion at hishome in Moore Haven. COURTESY PHOTOS At least fishing in Florida brings back memories of hisCuban homeland for Romero Del Dagado. QUALITY~ AFFORDABLEPRINTINGFORALLYOURGRADUATIONSUPPLIES Herald-Advocate Hardee County’s Hometown Coverage 115 South 7th Avenue • Wauchula, FL 33873 • (863) 773-3255 Quality printing services at competitive prices! ATTENTIONSENIORS25 PERSONALIZEDINVITATIONSwith Envelopes 4:12-5:3nc $45 PLUSTAX 2018 The Class of 2018 The G RADUATION K EEPSAKE E DITION 2018 It’s that time of year again—our seniors are ready for graduation—and we are ready with our CONGRATULATIONS! Every year The Herald-Advocate publishes a special issue rec ognizing all our graduating seniors, the speeches are included,along with advertisements from local businesses, parents, and ourchurches. If your church has graduating seniors this year and youwould like to recognize them in this graduation special, pleasecome by our office at 115 S. 7 th Avenue or call 773-3255 from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday. You may include anindividual or group picture, along with words of wisdom and en couragement from your youth pastor or pastor. Prices vary according to size—starting as low as $38. The deadline for placing an ad is May 10—but we encourage you tomake it sooner if possible. Herald-Advocate Hardee County’s Hometown Coverage 115 S. 7th Ave. • Wauchula, FL • 773-3255 4:12-5:3nc The A8 The Herald-Advocate, April 12, 2018

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ABOUT... Hardee Living Hardee Living prints your news onpeople, clubs and or ganizations, includingmeeting summaries,births, children’s andsenior citizens’ birth days, engagements,weddings, silver orgold anniversaries,church events andmilitary assignments. Forms are avail able at our office. Forengagements andweddings, a photoshould be included. Publication is free of charge. Coverageof weddings overthree months old willbe limited to a photoand brief announce ment. Deadline is 5 p.m. on Thursday. –H ARDEE L IVING – Heartland Gold 1102 South 6th Ave., Wauchula, Florida 33873 S S p p r r i i n n g g I I n n t t o o S S u u m m m m e e r r Storewide Sale 10% up to 60% OFF Diamonds and Gold Sale Ends Saturday, April 14 Hours: Mon. Fri. 9am 5pm Sat. 9am 2pm 863-773-4466 In store purchases only. 60% discount on select items. Don’tMissIt! soc4:12c soc4:12c I Can Help! Neck pain • Back pain Headaches • hip pain Sciatica / leg Shoulder / arm / wrist pain Muscle pain Arthritis Chronic or Acute pain Auto injuries 863-473-4732 Medicare & Most Insurance Accepted Hours: Monday Friday • 8:30 am 6:00 pm Saturday and earlier or later appointments always available by request. Dr. Maria Carlton, DC Carlton Care Chiropractic C C h h i i r r o o p p r r a a c c t t i i c c • • L L a a s s e e r r • • M M u u s s c c u u l l a a r r T T h h e e r r a a p p y y • • D D i i g g i i t t a a l l X X R R a a y y 105 South 9th Avenue • Wauchula, FL 33873 (Corner of Main & 9th Avenue) www.CarltonCareChiropractic.com soc4:12c COURTESY IMAGE Trust Quartet will be performing in concert this Sunday at 10:30 a.m. at Faith TempleMinistries Church of God in Wauchula. The Nashville-recorded and Okeechobee-based group is recognized for its close harmony and enthusiastic approach whileusing a unique ministering presentation of Southern gospel's finest songs. FaithTemple is at 701 N. Seventh Ave. SUNDAY CONCERT The year in review cannot be done in this article but lookingback is interesting. Startingwith Hurricane Irma and thedevastation she left behind, Italked to some of the folks whostayed in our park and enduredher wrath. They then pitched in to help restore the damage. It was allvery enlightening. It would beimpossible to list everyone whostayed here, but I can tell someof what happened. For sureable-bodied men were in greatdemand and that is not to di minish all that our ladies ac complished. Making things a lot worse was the fact that our backupgenerators failed to work whenthey were desperately needed.That made a bad situation muchworse. Just imagine survivingthe nasty hurricane, then nothaving any water or electricity. Jerry Williams was president at the time, and he stayedthrough it all. His commentwas “never again.” ... Surpris ingly, as forceful as Irma was,she did minimal damage to ourpark. Those of us not here andI am sure those who stayedfeared for the safety of every one. As it turned out, it revealed a lot of what makes BrooksideBluff a great park, neighborshelping neighbors and every one pitching in was the norm inthose dark days. It is trulyamazing that we had 52 resi dents brave that wicked stormwith no injuries reported. Wewere very blessed. Bill and Barbra Jorgensen have been renters in our parkfor many years. What many ofus don’t know is that Bill wasat one time a New York radioand TV reporter and not justany reporter. His salary was es timated to be over $200,000 inthe early 1970’s. His no-non sense reporting was knownacross the nation and was a tar get of many jealous newscast ers. While he never won any popularity contests, he wasgenerally considered one of, ifnot the best, TV reporter in the nation. He regularly earned more than the folks he workedfor. He was a real student of histrade and was compared withthe likes of Walter Cronkite. Bill often told folks that he wrote about you like we werehaving a beer together. Bill andBarbara have left our park forthis year, but they plan to returnnext fall. Now you can say heis the reporter guy that Jerrywrote about in the paper. COURTESY PHOTOS Some of the Hurricane Irma survivors. Bill Jorgenson’s mug. COURTESY PHOTO The University of Florida Institute of Food & AgriculturalSciences has recognized Julie Warren with the Supe rior Accomplishment Award in the Community Serviceawards category. Warren was recognized at a specialreception on March 27 in Gainesville, and received a$200 check, a certificate, a commemorative mug anda gift bag. She is now eligible to be considered for theUniversity of Florida campus-wide award in that cate gory. June will mark her fifth year at the UF/IFAS RangeCattle Research & Education Center in Ona as a bio logical scientist supporting Philipe Moriel’s Animal Sci ence Program. In her time off, Warren is very activewith 4-H, SendMeMissions and her church. She is pic tured with her husband, Matt. CONGRATULATIONS! Brookside Bluff News By Jerry Smith 517-930-1524 If YouSeeSomethingSaySomething Report Suspicious Activity 1(855) 3527233 April 12, 2018, The Herald-Advocate A9

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One hundred years ago, on Nov. 7, 1917, in Arcadia, a little girl was born to Ivey and Pearl Royall. They namedher Virginia and gave her no middle name. Her father worked for the telephone company and was mayor of Arcadia. When Virginia was 3, her family moved to Bowling Green, where her dad owned a hardware store and was amember of the Hardee County School Board. When Virginia was 6, Ivey “Grayson” Royall Jr. joined the family. He was her only sibling. As a little girl, Virginia liked playing with her dolls, buggy and cradle. She also had fun playing hopscotch,jumping rope and skating. Her mom taught her to embroi der, sew and cook. She also enjoyed letting Virginia haveparties — ice cream churnings and boy/girl prom parties. Life in Bowling Green was good and the family pros pered. Virginia attended Bowling Green Elementary School and graduated from Wauchula High School in 1935. After high school, Virginia and five of her cousins at tended Florida Southern College, where Virginia stu died elementary education. Upon graduation, she returned toHardee County and accepted a job teaching fifth grade atWauchula Elementary School, earning $70 per month. During this time, N.D. Bryan came into the picture.N.D. and Virginia both grew up in Bowling Green and even attended the same Methodist church, but did not re ally know each other then. Fortunately, N.D. worked at the grocery store next to the hardware store Virginia’s father owned. He finally got hischance one day when she came into the grocery store and,being the bashful guy he was, N.D. slipped Virginia a noteand asked her for a date. She said yes and a romancebegan, with a first date to the movies in Fort Meade. Their romance had twists and curves due to World War II and her mother’s early death to cancer. N.D. and Vi rginia had decided to marry, but to wait until the war was over. Her dad remarried, however, and moved away. Her brother also moved away, to Virginia and ultimately to col lege at Dartmouth. Left in Bowling Green with no family, N.D. decided it was time to take Virginia as his bride so she could go withhim as much as possible while he traveled with the U.S.Army. N.D. and Virginia became husband and wife on Feb.20, 1943, at his parents’ home. As the couple traveled, they lived in Gainesville; Colum bia, S.C.; Columbus, Ohio; Tacoma, Wash.; and Alabama.N.D. was then sent to France, so Virginia returned to Bowl ing Green where his parents, Travis and Melvina Bryan,and sister, Margaret, became her family. Virginia resumed her teaching career.In January 1946, N.D. was released from the Army and he and Virginia moved to Pierce, where he worked for hisuncle in the commissary. Not wasting much time, their firstchild, Ruth, was born in October 1946. Their seconddaughter, Mary Ann, was born in 1950. In December 1950, the Bryans moved to Lakeland as N.D. accepted a job with the H.J. Heinz Co. They boughttheir first and only home at this time, which Virginia stillowns. Since N.D. thought Virginia should be at home with their daughters, she did not return to teaching for quite a fewyears. Instead, she ran a preschool out of their home andgrew daisies in the backyard, selling them to Publix for 15cents a bunch. As the children grew older, Virginia served as a substi tute teacher all over Lakeland, well known by many prin cipals and very popular with them. She returned to workfull-time in 1969 at Highland City Elementary School asan assistant teacher in kindergarten, working 10 years untilshe retired in 1980. After retirement, N.D. and Virginia enjoyed a quiet life working in the church, N.D. teaching Bible studies and aSunday School class. They also enjoyed babysitting theiryoungest grandchild, Allison. They lived 64 happy yearstogether. The celebration of Virginia’s centennial was two-fold. Highland Park Nazarene Church honored her on Sunday,Nov. 5. She also was the guest of honor at a 100th birthdayparty later that same day. Virginia revealed some of the highlights of her life to date: Her favorite president was George W. Bush.She met a celebrity, Bob Barker. He was hosting a show where she won an iron. A big event was World War II, and the greatest changes include a man landing on the moon and all the curren t tech nology. If she could relive a period of her life, it would be the 1950s as she was raising her family. Her favorite tradition is the family gathering for celebra tions, and her favorite season is Christmas. Her secret to happiness and fulfillment is creating a happy home, attending church and living a pure life. She would like to be remembered for her love of and prayers for her family, and for her love for Jesus C hrist, her Savior. Mary Ann Tallman of Lakeland, Virginia Bryan’s daughter,provided these photos and this information in recognitionof her mother’s milestone birthday last fall. Reflecting On 100 Years: Jesus, Family & Bob Barker! COURTESY IMAGES Siblings Virginia and Ivey “Grayson” Royall Jr. Virginia as a small child on her tricycle, with parents Annie Pearl and Ivey Grayson Royall. Virginia Royall Bryan entertains the crowd of well-wish ers as she gives a speech at her birthday celebration. Married in Bowling Green on Feb. 20, 1943, N.D. andVirginia Bryan are shown on their first anniversary, Feb.20, 1944, in Gainesville. Former Hardee County resident and teacher Virginia Royall Bryan with her children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren during her 100th birthday party in Lakeland.–H ARDEE L IVING – Perhaps you sent a lovely card, Or sat quietly in a chair. Perhaps you sent a funeral spray, If so we saw it there. Perhaps you spoke the kindest words, As any friend could say; Perhaps you were not there at all, Just thought of us that day. Whatever you did to console our hearts, We thank you so much whatever the part. The Ruth Driggers Moye FamilyDoug, Bubby, Linda, Jerry & Family soc4:12p A10 The Herald-Advocate, April 12, 2018

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H ARDEE L IVING THANK YOUThe City Wide Mission Committee of Bowling Green would like to say "THANK YOU" to everyone who helped make the 4th Annual Resurrection Weekend a huge success. Because of you our Easter egg hunt, parade and program was a great success. soc4:12c Family Fun For EveryoneSwimming Miniature golf Trails&Camping$29 9 +tax (up to 6 per night).Thousand Trails 2555 US Hwy 17 South, Zolfo Springs 863-735-8888soc4:12cSpring Revival: Pastor Bernita Campbell delivered the revival message on March 26, introduced by Prophetess Stephanie Stoudemire. Song of praise was by the Peaceful Believer Praise Team. Pastor Campbell was born Oct. 20, 1966, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Campbell, and the youngest of three daughters. She attended junior and senior high at Fort Meade, Class of 1984, and college at Southern Bible College and Warner Southern. She worked for the state of Florida as a so cial worker and Publix Super markets as a call analyst for technical support. She is cur rently working at her passion as a day trader in the Foreign Exchange Market, and is a member of iMarketsLive, Team Royal Covenant and Rich Girls Trade. She accepted Christ at the age of 17 during a Fellowship of Christian Athletes meeting in high school. Shes a li censed minister and ordained pastor, currently an associate pastor of Glorious Church in Lakeland, under the leadership of Pastor/Prophet Jean and Lady Joann Domoraud. She has held numerous roles in ministry: senior pastor, out reach director, director of min istries, praise and worship leader, and nursing home and homeless ministry. Tuesday evening, March 27, the message was by Pastor Andre Camp, introduced by Bro. James Williams. Song of praise by Acts of Praise and Worship Praise Team, of which he served as the senior pastor, located in Bartow, for the past 25 years. He also is the founder and president of Action Ministries Inc. and Andre Camp Ministries Inter national. Pastor Camp was licensed into the gospel ministry under the pastorate of Pastor S.D. Pollard at Peaceful Baptist Church in Fort Meade. Hes been preaching for 25 years, bringing the Good News of Jesus Christ to everyone he meets. This includes multiple trips to Jamaica, the Philippines, Tanzania and East Africa. Pastor Camp and First Lady Tamala have been married for more than 25 years. Children are Jonathan, Aundrea and Teaundra. They reside in Fort Meade. Pastor Camp is the seventh of 11 children born to parents Andrew and Betty Camp Sr. Pastor Camp is a pastor, teacher and evangelist. He is a student of the Bible. His favorite Scripture is II Chronicles 7:14. Bro. Lance Fulse presided over all three Spring Revival orders of service during the high worship time. Closing remarks were by Pastor Rubin Ancrum. Happy birthday to you with an April birthday. The eighth annual Youth/ Parent Summit was Friday at Carver Recreation Center in Bartow, with a free movie, Woodlawn, The Day of Fun was Saturday. There was a cookout, guest speakers, skits, archery, horseback rid ing, breakout sessions, science experiments, the Fire Depart ment, and free T-shirts to the first 100 to arrive. The Union Foreign Mis sionary Baptist Associations annual tea will be April 21 at 11 a.m. at New Bethel MB Church in Winter Haven. Mis sion statement: Congress of Christian Workers. The Rev. Dr. Frank OHarrell Sr. is pas tor and current moderator. He has served as Bethels senior pastor for 25 years. He is in his second year as moderator. Progressive MB Churchs the Rev. Arthur Powell Jr. of Wauchula will be in service on Sunday in Davenport at the Friendship Baptist Church an niversary, the Rev. Leroy Sims, pastor. Tommie Underwood is in Lakeland Regional Medical Center. April 9, happy birthday to my former classmate, James A. White, formerly of Zolfo Springs now living in St. Petersburg with relatives along with his mother, Lottie Mae White. Belated happy birthday to you also for your birth day in January, we miss you both. Community kickball after Easter afternoon of fun was at Bowling Green Pyatt Park on Main Street. Yes, we have local people who are in all areas of Florida reading The Herald-Advocate news. They tell me this is how they know whats happening in Hardee, and they miss it when theres no news. The Mother-Daughter Brunch is April 21 at 10:30 a.m. at Fort Meade Mobile Home Parks Activity Center, 208 Edgewood Dr. S. The at tire will be sundresses and sandals. The theme is Pearls of Wisdom, guest speaker Teresa Timmons, ARNP-BC, of Winter Haven. Tickets can be purchased from Minister Lorenzo McCutchen at Peace ful Believers Church, 510 S. Charleston Ave., Fort Meade, or by calling Petrina McCutchen (863) 797-6327. They are $15 each, advance sale only. Remember the sick: Ida M. White, Stanley Davis in Bar tow Nursing Center, Thelma Blakley and others at the dif ferent care centers, Ollie B. Budgess at home. Well, happy wedding an niversary wishes to long-time friends Mr. and Mrs. Bobby Brown on their 55th celebration on April 1, and Mr. and Mrs. Freddie Harris on April 4 of over 38 years. Happy anniversary to all. The Hines family and friends gathered Friday evening after the visitation for their loved one, Mary Ann Hines, for the fish fry at her Cracker Lane home. Happy birthday to Walter Daniels. April 2 was his 75th. 4-City NewsBy Henrietta Benson 448-6737 Greetings from Fort Green! Our church was devastated Sunday morning when our pastor, Brother Steve, an nounced that Sunday, May 20, would be his last day. He is resigning to return to college. He is the best pastor, I think, that we have ever had and I cer tainly think he is smart enough and can just stay at Fort Green forever, but he feels he must do the Lords bidding. The Cloverleaf 4-H Foun dation cooked the meal for the Range Cattle Station meeting. I always enjoy going and working because you always see someone you have not seen in a long time. Edgar Davis was there and in conversation with Jim Kelly and me. The fact came out he will celebrate a birthday in April and will turn 92. He cer tainly gets around good and is sharp as ever. He did call me this week and I am going to put the question to everyone who reads this column. He wanted to know if there was an old homestead on the property his son, Larry, bought from Frank Hart. Go to the Oak Grove Bap tist Church and the road imme diately past it, turn north and go for a mile and half and just before the end of the road there is an old above-the-ground well, the type you drew water from. (I might not have my directions correct.) I suggested Wilson Pump might know but he thought he just drilled wells. Edgar said he didnt think he had ever seen another well because our soil is so sandy, but Shermans grand daddy had the same type of well at their place in Fort Green. We had one in Georgia and my grandpa always said if we had a flood, he would get in the water bucket because it was always empty. For those of you who have never experienced drawing water from a well, you draw a bucket and then pour it into the bucket that sits in the house and everyone uses a common dipper! And imagine, I wont even drink after anyone today! It was great to see Neda Cobb and Vera Morales at the funeral last week. Neda still works at the school system in the computer section but Vera retired. I always thought a lot of both of them, and you just dont see friends enough anymore. This past weekend it seems like all I did was go to funer als! Gay Albrittons funeral was well attended, which al ways makes the family feel better if that is possible. Jane Kennedy said in Sunday School last Sunday that the church was filled with Albrit tons as they came from near and far, and she knew a lot of them. It was also filled with lots of school personnel and other friends from here. It was good to see Eleanor Thomas, as she drove up from Okeechobee. The middle daughter, Temptie, lives in Dawsonville, Ga., and Gay lived with her. Temptie did not recognize me but Beth sure did. Of course Marie lives down here and I see her more often. Some say we used to favor, and the little children at Zolfo Springs Elementary would say to me Hey, Mrs. Dasher when I would go over and get breakfast for the students at Pioneer Career Academy. Of course, Marie was the assistant principal, and she being so young, it always pleased me. Of course now she has her hair cut different! Trudy Hendry passed on April 4 and her funeral was at Bethany last Sunday after noon. That church was full, and it is a big church. It was a joyous home-going for she had been sick for some time. Our sympathy is still extended to the family. Randy Perry came through his surgery well, but the doc tors have told him to rest for a month, and that will be hard for him to do! Destiny Fields is doing well and was at church last Sunday with stitches, but moving careful. Evelyn Thomas is in the Okee chobee hospital and is in very serious condition. It was announced in Sunday School that Jenny Revell was in the Tampa hospital. Dee Oisten, who used to live here, has pneumonia and has been quarantined for some time with it and is trying to get well. She needs some of our Florida sunshine because she moved several months ago to the North to live in a retirement home. Please pray for these and others you may know about. Joe and Dollene Fields said if our church collected more than $400 for the drop a dime for the shoebox ministry, they would cook breakfast for the church. Well, now they must plan on a lotta work because everyone will come for break fast! Please pray for each other, our nation and President Trump. Fort Green NewsBy Rilla Cooper 773-6710 HARDEE COUNTY FOOD PANTRIES Alpha & Omega Freedom Ministries 113 N 7th Ave Wauchula, FL 33873 Tele: 863-773-5717 Requirements: Identification, Social Security card When: Wednesday ONLY | 10 am 12 noon Bowling Green Church of God 121 W. Broward Bowling Green, FL 33834 Tele: 863-375-2231 Requirements: Identification When: 3rd Saturday of the month | 8 am noon Cutting Edge Food Ministry 3059 Elm Street Zolfo Springs, FL 33890 Tele: 863-773-2484 Requirements: Identification When: Tuesday & Friday 10 am noon & 1 3 pm First United Methodist Church of Wauchula 207 N. 7th Ave Wauchula, FL 33873 Tele: 863-773-4267 Requirements: ID & Physical address (Light Bill, Lease etc.) When: 2nd & 4th Thursdays of the month 1:00 3:00 pm (first come, first serve) Other Program: Bagged Lunch M, W, F 8 am 12 pm for pre-school age kids & adults. Wednesday Night Free Community Dinner: 5:30 6:30 pm Hardee Help Center 713 E. Bay Street, Wauchula, FL 33873 Tele: 863-773-0034 Requirements: Application with proof of hardship Programs: Emergency & Homelessness Assistance For more information, Contact the Hardee Help Center St. Michaels Catholic Church Food Pantry 408 Heard Bridge Rd, Wauchula, FL 33873 Tele: 863-773-4089 Requirements: Identification or Light Bill When: Every Saturday 6:00 8:00 amRev. 12/19/2017 April is Florida Volunteer Month, and the Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commis sion is celebrating its many volunteers and is seeking more. Volunteers contribute time and energy to help conserve fish, wildlife and habitats and to help improve public access and skills related to hunting, fishing, boating and wildlife viewing. More than 5,000 volunteers assisted FWC staff with 85 projects around the state last year. We value our volunteers. The positive power of volunteers strengthens our efforts, said FWC Executive Director Eric Sutton. If you want to combine being in Floridas beautiful outdoors with volunteering, we encourage you to get involved as an FWC volunteer. Some current projects involving volunteers are: Collecting data to increase knowledge of Floridas imperiled species. Instructing youth, residents and visitors on how to become responsible outdoor recreators. Rescuing marine mammals. Monitoring and restoring oyster reef habi tat. Constructing, installing and monitoring nest boxes for southeastern American kestrels and wood ducks. Helping construct and maintain a gravityfed irrigation system for plants used in scrub habitat restoration. Helping improve visitors experiences at many of the FWCs wildlife management areas. Helping organize scientific data. Go online to MyFWC.com and click on Get Involved at the very top of the webpage to see FWC volunteer opportunities available statewide and by region. Additionally, volunteers can sign-up for proj ects by clicking on Calendar, where a wide range of volunteer opportunities is advertised.Become A Volunteer For The Fish & Wildlife CommissionThe South Florida State Col lege Museum of Florida Art & Cultures annual Juried Stu dent Art Show opened Wednesday and runs through May 3 in the museums gallery on the Highlands Campus in Avon Park. The exhibition features works created by SFSC art stu dents. The month-long show features painting, drawing, pottery, sculpture design, and graphics. An awards ceremony and re ception will be held on Thurs day, April 19, at 5 p.m. in the MOFAC gallery. Awards will be bestowed for outstanding achievement in each art medium. The Tanglewood Art League will present a scholarship to an outstanding art student. The Max Gooding Award also will be announced, and used to purchase an excep tional student art piece for the SFSC Student Art Collection. MOFAC is open to the public Wednesdays through Fri days, from 12:30 to 4:30 p.m.Florida Art & Culture Museum Presents Student Art Show What were Hardee Countians thinking and talking about in the 1960s, or maybe the s? Each issue, we will revisit that corresponding week and year in a decade past, using old copies of The Florida Advo cate, the Hardee County Her ald or The Herald-Advocate. This week, the decade of The sApril 9, 1998 Life Lesson: A Wisconsin man has been sentenced to life in prison after being found guilty of suffocating his eld erly mother with his bare hands while she was a patient at Florida Hospital Wauchula. Arnold John Didrickson, 58, claimed that his mother, Olene Didrickson, 78, of Avon Park, asked him to assist her in ending her life. He said he considered doing so, but never followed through. Didrickson accused the jury, judge and po lice officers of false accusa tions without evidence. Truck Troubles: Zolfo Springs police officers will begin cracking down on the abuse of a 35-mph speed limit following two separate vehicle accidents involving semitrac tor-trailers, Police Chief Charles Tillman said. No Spitting! A 95-year-old town charter will be getting a facelift as Zolfo Springs councilors reflect on past laws that are no longer applicable. Such laws prohibited spitting on sidewalks, nonmarital cohabitation, and tying a horse to a shade tree. The charter also uses Senate rules for conduct ing a meeting, and nobody does that anymore, said attor ney Gerald Buhr. A special act of the Legislature or approval by voter referendum is re quired to activate any charter revisions. Grades First: More than a dozen Hardee High School athletes were recognized for prioritizing their academics over chosen sports. Making the grades before playing were Craig Trotter, Heather Martin, Christina Anderson, Keith Nadasky, Jennifer Spears, Jessica Franks, Kristen New some, Kristina Weis, Davina Nuccio, Heather Potter, Seth Stephenson, Ronnie Clark, Caleb Skitka and Josh Harvey. Decades April 12, 2018, The Herald-Advocate A11

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Wauchula 735 N. 6th Ave. Arcadia 2442 NE Hwy 70 Sebring 363 US Hwy 27S Lake Placid 27 US Hwy 27S Monday-Friday 8am-5pm 24 Hour Emergency Care Available www.7eEye.com 4:12c 863-259-3777 • Single Vision plastic lenses $49• Frames $30• Buy one get one 1/2 OFF STACKING UP COURTESY PHOTOS Anyone could build a tower out of Styrofoam cups. But without touching them?Armed with a pipe cleaner each and one rubber band, teams of teachers at ZolfoSprings Elementary set about that task as a team-building exercise during a recentstaff meeting. With grit and grins, they proved it can be done! Crop Update April 9, 2018 General: According to the National Agricultural Statistics Service in Florida, there were 6.7 days suitable for fie ldwork for the week ending Sunday, April 8, 2018. Precipitation estimatesranged from no rain in multiple locations to 3.0 inches inAuburndale (Polk County). The average mean temperatureranged from 60.5F in Milton (Santa Rosa County) to 79.6F inMarathon (Monroe County). Citrus: Temperatures were well above average in the citrus growing region with most days in the mid to upper 80s. Night time lows were in the 60s and 70s. Labelle (Hendry County)reached 94F on its warmest day. Avon Park (Polk County)reached 91F. Precipitation was spotty all week in citrus produc ing counties. The greatest rainfall amount was in Polk Countywhere four stations had over two inches. Other than Polk County,the most rainfall was in Duette (Manatee County) at 1.61 inches,followed by Zephyrhills (Pasco County) at 1.05 inches. Accord ing to the April 5, 2018 U.S. Drought Monitor, moderate droughtconditions in the northern area covered Osceola, Orange, andSeminole counties, and in the southern area covered Collier andHendry counties. Abnormally dry conditions covered the major ity of the remaining citrus counties. Only Pasco, Hernando, Cit rus, and Marion counties were drought free. Grove operations included hedging and topping after har vest. Pea-size and larger fruit was present on all varieties of cit rus trees. Initial fruit drop continued on early varieties as thetrees set next season’s crop. Growers sprayed nutritionals andfertilizers as needed for the health of the fruit and trees. Irrigationran on a regular basis. Harvest is relatively over on all citrus except Valencia or anges. Weekly orange utilization of the later varieties of Valenciaoranges is leveling out. Maturity levels have been a problem thisseason, so harvesting is being adjusted to compensate for thesmaller crop size and quality of fruit. Livestock and Pastures: Scattered showers across the state improved pasture condition. Livestock producers continued tofeed supplements. TO A T COURTESY PHOTO These first-grade teachers at Zolfo Springs Elementary not only support autismawareness, they’ll wear it on their sleeves! With April established as National AutismAwareness Month, they are giving the cause recognition with their matching T-shirts, which also read “It’s OK To Be Different.” Lending support are (from left)teachers Julia Roberts, Kerry Mushrush and Jaklynne Carlton, ZSE Principal TammyPohl and teachers Kelly Daane, Sharon Ussery and Kay Crews. DESIGN CONTEST COURTESY PHOTOS The Hardee County PublicLibrary is currently host ing a “Bookmark Chal lenge” to design abookmark for library pa trons. The contest endsFriday, April 20. Winningdesigns will be printed asbookmarks for the publicto pick up at the library,keep and use. Youngstersworking on entries are(above, clockwise fromboy at left) Corin, Eva andJulie Palacious, Madelineand Jocelyn Albritton, andAdie Drake. Below aresome of the entries. Herald-Advocate Hardee County’s Hometown Coverage PRINTERS • PUBLISHERS Telephone (863) 773-3255 www.TheHeraldAdvocate.com The R OBBY E LLIOTT invites all his friends and neighbors to come see him at 205 N. Charleston • Fort Meade 1-800-673-9512 • www.directchevy.com 4:12c A12 The Herald-Advocate, April 12, 2018

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PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE TOWN OF ZOLFO SPRINGS TOWN COMMISSION The Zolfo Springs Town Commission will hold a public hearing on Tuesday, April 24, 2018, at 6:00 P.M. or soon thereafter in the Town Commission Chambers at 3210 US Highway 17 S, Zolfo Springs, Florida to consider the following Ordinance: ORDINANCE NO. 2018-02 AN ORDINANCE OF THE TOWN OF ZOLFO SPRINGS, HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA, PERTAINING TO THE VACATING OF AN UNNAMED RIGHT-OF-WAY BETWEEN LOTS 2 8, and LOTS 11 13, OF THE WILLIAMS AND CHILDS ADDITION TO ZOLFO SPRINGS PLAT AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 27, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HARDEE COUNTY RUNNING OVER PROPERTY IDENTIFIED AS PARCEL ID 27-34-25-0750-00004-0002 FOR CONSTRUCTION OF A CIRCLE K STORE; PROVIDING FOR NOTICE TO POTENTIALLY INTERESTED PERSONS, EMERGENCY SERVICES AND UTILITIES; PROVIDING SEVERABILITY AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE. The public hearing will be held on the date and time noted above. The meeting will be held in the Town Commission Chambers at 3210 US Highway 17 South, Zolfo Springs, Florida. Any interested persons who feel they are affected by these changes are encouraged to attend the public hearing and be heard. At said hearing any per son, his Agent or Attorney, may appear and be heard. Any person(s) wishing to view relevant information in advance of the public hearing may view said documents at the Zolfo Springs Town Hall, 3210 US Highway 17 South, Zolfo Springs, Florida, weekdays from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. In compliance with the American Disabilities Act (ADA), anyone who needs a special accommodation for this meeting should contact the Town Clerks Office at (863) 735-0405 ext. 222 at least 48 hours in advance of this meeting. 4:12c STATE OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION NOTICE OF PETITIONThe Department announces receipt of a petition for a variance (File No. MMR_0142476-076) under Section 378.2212, Florida Statutes (F.S.), and Rule 62C16.0045, Florida Administrative Code (F.A.C.) from Mosaic Fertilizer, LLC (Mosaic). Mosaic is requesting a variance for the Fort Green Mine from the requirements of Rule 62C-16.0051(12)(b)4, F.A.C. to complete reclamation on all areas not under mine op erations within two years. The Fort Green Mine was temporary shut down in 2006. The project site is located north and south of SR 62 and east of SR 37 in Polk, Hardee, and Manatee Counties. The Fort Green Mine includes all or portions of Sections 20, 22, 27-29 Township 32 South, Range 23 East; Sections 3-5, 9-10, 29-32, Township 33 South, Range 23 East; 5-8, 18 Township 34 South, Range 23 East; and Sections 13-14, Township 34 South, Range 23 East. The mine is located within the landward extent of the folloing Class III waters: Gum Swamp Branch, Horse Creek, Myakka River, Payne Creek, and the West Fork of Horse Creek. The permit file is available online and can be accessed through the Departments In formation Portal at: https://depedms.dep.state.fl.us:443/Oculus/servlet/shell?command=hitlist&[free Text=]&[folderName=]&[profile=Reclamation]&[creator=]&[entityType=any]&[cre atedDateTo=]&[catalog=26]&[searchBy=Profile]&[sortBy=Document+Date]&[creat edDate=]&{County=_EQ_HARDEE}&{District=_EQ_SWD}&{FacilitySite+ID=_EQ_MMR_142476} Please address any comments or objections to the address above or to MiningAndMitigation@dep.state.fl.us or contact our office at 850.245.8336; please include the file number in your request. Comments or objections should be submitted as soon as possible to ensure that there is adequate time for them to be considered in the De partment decision on the application. 4:12cThe latest report by United States Department of Agricul ture holds Florida Orange pro duction steady with a slight decrease in Grapefruit produc tion, according to a release Tuesday. The USDAs March report estimates Florida Orange pro duction for 2017-18 to remain at 45 million boxes, a 35 per cent decrease over last season and the lowest crop size in more than 75 years. Florida Grapefruit production reduced by 650,000 boxes to 4 million boxes, a decrease of 49 percent over last season. There was a small increase in Florida specialty fruit, which includes tan gerines and tangelos. After a season of crisis, our industry finds hope in a new bloom, a new crop, disaster relief on the horizon and the op portunity a new season brings, said Shannon Shepp, executive director of the Florida Depart ment of Citrus. Hurricane Irma had a devas tating impact on the Florida Citrus industry. Florida growers reported 30 to 70 percent crop loss after Hurricane Irmas landfall on September 10, with the southwest region of the state receiving the most damage. The hurricane uprooted trees and left many groves sit ting in standing water for up to three weeks, potentially damaging the root systems and impacting future seasons growth. In October, the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services announced that Florida Citrus sustained more than $760 million in dam ages due to Hurricane Irma. The U.S. Senate and House of Representatives passed federal disaster recovery relief as part of a larger spending bill in Feb ruary. In April, the USDA an nounced it will begin implementing disaster payments of up to $2.36 billion in response to 2017 hurricanes and wildfires. Prior to Hurricane Irma, Florida was expected to produce about 75 million boxes of oranges this season, according to private estimates. About the Florida Department of Citrus The Florida Department of Cit rus is an executive agency of Florida government charged with the marketing, research and regulation of the Florida citrus industry. Its activities are funded by a tax paid by growers on each box of citrus that moves through commercial channels. The industry employs 45,000 people, provides an annual economic impact of $8.6 billion to the state, and contributes hundreds of millions of dollars in tax revenues that help support Floridas schools, roads and health care services. For more information about the Florida Department of Citrus, please visit FloridaC itrus.org.USDA Estimate Of Florida Oranges Is 45 Million BoxesWe moved away from the ranch when my mother mar ried my stepfather. For ten years, I lived in Largo, an ex ploding suburb of St. Peters burg. It was at the First Baptist Church of Largo that I made my profession of faith and was baptized. Because Baptists believe in the priesthood of believers, at that time baptized church members no matter their age could attend church conference and vote. At 8 years old, my vote carried the same weight as my parents. I was a weird kid; church conference fascinated me. Nor mally calm men would get red in the face as they struggled to hold back words. I think I knew what words they wanted to say; Id heard them in the cowpens. Timid women would forget Pauls injunction to keep silent in church and would stand up to lambast Deacons, Music Di rectors, and the Preachers wife. If you didnt have a dog in the fight, a Baptist business meeting in late s was better than anything on television for raw entertainment value. I must have been about 11 when I sat with Mama at a church conference one Wednesday night. Pop was there too, which was unusual; that should have been my first clue that something was up. Roy Attaway, a good friend of my parents, went forward to make a motion declaring noconfidence in the preacher. Id never heard this phrase before. I wasnt sure what no-confi dence meant, but I could tell by Mr. Roys tone he didnt like the preacher. I leaned over to ask Mama what no-confidence meant, and she shushed me. When Mama shushed, she meant it. So, I leaned over to my friend Charles Brown and whispered my question to him. Before he could answer me, Mama grabbed my ear and yanked me back to her side (which is why to this day, my left ear lobe is longer than my right). People got up and said nice things about the preacher, fol lowed by people who got up and said not-so-nice things about the preacher. As best I could follow, some folks were upset that the preacher was al ways insisting on his way, and they didnt like his way. I looked at my parents and could tell by their nodding, they were on the side of people who didnt like the way the Preacher was doing things. When Baptists get up a head of steam, a church conference can last a long, long time. The meeting had started at 6:30; it was drawing close to 9:30, way past my bedtime. Still the en tertainment value was high. The drama was better than The NBC Mystery Theater on TV that night. Someone finally called for the vote. It was carefully ex plained by the Preacher (who was the moderator awkward) that a yes vote meant a vote of no-confidence, and a no vote meant you approved of the preacher (Baptists would later go on to write many parts of the IRS tax code). My par ents raised their hands to vote yes. It was then I realized I could vote, too. I didnt particularly like the preacher, but I didnt dislike him either. To my 11-year old mind, I knew he wasnt per fect, but I didnt think he ought to be fired. It wasnt like he was caught sniffing glue, or sneaking a peek at a Playboy. It was just that he and the other grownups didnt agree. I understood that. I didnt agree with grownups very much ei ther. My mother reached over and tried to raise my hand for me. I snatched it away. When the vote for the nos occurred, I raised my hand. My mother gave a me look that said, Wait till we get home, young man. As I recall the vote ended up failing by five votes. On the way home, my mother said, Why did you vote the same way Charles Brown voted? Dont you think I know more than he does? I recognized the danger in those questions, and wisely left them unanswered. Then I spoke the truth, I voted the way I voted because it seemed right to me. I mark that night as the first time I learned some people think church is about winning and losing. Maybe my parents had a point; maybe the Preacher was a little hardheaded. Still, I wondered then, and wonder now, why didnt they just get together and talk about it? Maybe even pray about it? Why did it have to come down to winning and losing? Too many churches make dumb decisions because they think every decision must have winners and losers. Funny, I dont remember Jesus talking much about winning and losing in the church. I remember a lot of stuff about love, and serv ing, and making sure we fol low Jesus. Maybe if we stuck to that, wed be a lot better off. My parents are gone now; the Preacher in question is still alive and is my friend on Face book; and First Baptist Largo no longer exists. I myself nar rowly escaped a group that wanted to fire me at a church in Kentucky for some reason or other. Still, I think back to the night they wanted to fire the Preacher. The biggest lesson I learned? You can be all grown up and still not really do what Jesus wants you to do.The Night They Tried To Fire The Preacher To Your Good Health By Keith Roach, M.D. DEAR DR. ROACH: You have written many articles about high blood pressure, but I want to know about low blood pressure. What is nor mal? What is low, and what is dangerously low? I have a heart issue for which I take medication. I want to know if my blood pressure is too low. Anon. ANSWER: Among young adults, only 5 percent of men will have a blood pressure below 110/60 or so, and for young women, it's 90/46. Blood pressure tends to go up with age, so low blood pres sure numbers are higher for older adults. For people with healthy hearts, the only time we worry about low blood pressure is if there are symptoms, and the most common symptoms are lightheadedness and fainting. In people with congestive heart failure, low blood pres sure usually is not concerning in itself, but because it might indicate that the heart is get ting weaker. However, many of the medications used for CHF reduce blood pressure, which can even limit the amount of medication that can be used. In people with block ages in their arteries, too low a blood pressure can cause inad equate blood flow to parts of the heart and cause angina symptoms. The blood pressure is dan gerously low when a disease process is causing the low blood pressure. In extreme cases, low blood pressure is one of the most dangerous signs of shock. But in general, for healthy people, low blood pressures are not worrisome. DEAR DR. ROACH: I would like to know about warts. I know they are com mon in both children and adults. I have one on my thumb. I am 50 years old. Where can the warts spread to? I heard you can find them only on your hands and feet. Is that true? J.S. ANSWER: Warts are raised round or oval growths, caused by the human papilloma virus. Although they most commonly occur on the hands and feet, some strains of HPV are more likely to cause warts in the genital region. Warts can ap pear on any part of your body, and you can spread them from one part of your body to an other, as well as from person to person. Warts are more likely to occur in areas of skin that are irritated, such as cuts, scrapes and even areas that are shaved. For this reason, it's a good idea to treat the wart quickly, preferably before it gets bigger and harder to treat. Over-the-counter wart treat ments are most commonly sal icylic acid. A nail file or pumice stone to get rid of dead skin first increases effective ness. Liquid medicine is used for thinner warts, and a plaster is more effective for thicker warts. One home remedy is as fol lows: Apply silver duct tape to the wart and leave it on for six days. Follow up by soaking the wart and removing any dead skin, then leave the tape off overnight. Repeat the process by applying duct tape for an other six days. This is effective in some people. You should see your doctor if these home remedies don't work. Dr. Roach regrets that he is un able to answer individual let ters, but will incorporate them in the column whenever possible. Readers may email ques tions to ToYourGoodHealth@ med.cornell.edu. To view and order health pamphlets, visit www.rbmamall.com, or write to Good Health, 628 Virginia Drive, Orlando, FL 32803.(c) 2018 North America Synd., Inc. All Rights Reserved YOUR BUSINESS COULD APPEAR HERE TOO!!Contact Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels 773-3255www.TheHeraldAdvocate.com April 12, 2018, The Herald-Advocate A13

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4:12c Original Mosaic Truck Route Concerns Aired By JIM KELLYOf The Herald-Advocate The Bowling Green City Commission on March 13 helda discussion on Mosaic haul ing many truckloads a monthof phosphate from its FortGreen plant (the former CFmine) from State Rd. 62, northon U.S. 17 through the city,and east on County Line Roadto the South Fort Meade Mine.(Editor's Note: Since the dateof this meeting, Mosaic haschanged the proposed 62-17-County Line Rd. route. Now,the trucks to go west on 62from Fort Green to the FourCorners Mine processing planton the Manatee-Hillsboroughcounty line. The mine was se lected because it is located atthe corner of Hardee/Polk/Hillsborough/Manatee countylines.) "My opinion is this board (Bowling Green City Commis sion) is scared to death" to putthis issue on the agenda. Thiswould ruin your town. Youcould pass a measure to notallow these trucks," said HenryKuhlman. "Manatee County has a twohour standdown on thesetrucks during school hours.The Hardee County Commis sion does not. Ralph Arce ofthe Hardee County Planningand Zoning Board wanted atime to carve out while schoolbuses were running." City Mayor Sam Fite said the Florida Department ofTransportation controls trafficon U.S. 17 (State Rd. 35) andState Rd. 62. "The city has nojurisdiction." Fite said the intersection of U.S. 17 and County Line Roadis not adequate for hundreds ofextra heavy truck loads. Mark Mercer said, "There are already a lot of big truckson 62 and 17 such as fruittrucks. U.S. and state high ways cannot deny access touse the highways." Don McClellan said he was concerned with traffic safety. Dee Williams-Tatis said she, too, was concerned about childsafety and wear and tear on theroads. Frank Kirkland said Mosaic has closed a plant in Plant Citythat used to accept phosphateby rail from Fort Green. Heand Kuhlman said over 250truck round trips a day couldoccur. Kuhlman said the hearing at the Hardee County Commis sion was not well publicizedahead of time and that Bowl ing Green was not notified. One resident expressed con cern that the County Linebridge over Peace River might not hold up over hundreds ofextra truck trips a day. An alternative was men tioned to route the trucks southfrom State Rd. 62 to REARoad, then North on HeardBridge Road through Mosaic'smining area to the plant. Mayor Fite said he heard the FDOT is looking at the situa tion. In other action Chiquita Robinson said an Easter Pa rade would be held March 31on the west side of the city. City Commissioner Steve Spinks and City Manager JerryConerly said they were con cerned that yellow rope hadbeen stolen and some play ground structures such as theslide had been defaced at thenew Commerce Park Play ground on Lake Branch Road. The second reading was ap proved of an ordinance annex ing property at 4103 U.S. 17owned by GEO Food Store atthe south city limits. Another ordinance was ap proved on second reading ofannexing two parcels ownedby Mayor Fite adjacent to theGEO Food Store property.Fite abstained from voting. The commission approved a 2017 audit of the city done byCS&L CPAs. The auditor saidthe city had a good year, hadgood records and was in goodfinancial condition. A supplemental agreement was approved to replace about30 water valuves for about$150,000 through Envisors en gineers. A wastewater (sewer) proj ect will cost $25,000 for gritremoval which will help outtanks, pumps and valves. Aheadworks project at thewastewater plant is approvedfor $450,000. A water treatment plan has been approved which will treat75 percent of the city's water tobring the city in compliancewith state-mandated standardsfor levels of sulfates and totaldissolved solids. On Feb. 13 the commission approved an ordinance toamend the unified land devel opment code regarding modu lar homes and permitted signs. The commission approved an ordinance to annex land at530 Lake Branch Road. A state grant for the Main Street Park should be termi nated so the park can be en larged. The commissionauthorized a letter be written tothat effect to the state. The Iglesia de Dios Pente costal Movimiento Interna tional Church will celebrate itssecond anniversary Saturday,April 21, at 4831 Martin Luther King Drive. There willbe free food for the communityand a band from 5 to 7 p.m. Anoise waiver was approved. In the new city budget gen eral fund revenues are esti mated at $1.7 million. Thisincludes administrative, policedepartment, physical environ ment and recreation. Enterprise fund revenues are estimated at $10.3 million.This includes sanitation, water,sewer, miscellaneous revenue,and grant/loan proceeds. CenState Contractors' low bid of $1.733 million was ap proved for water plant im provements to reduce sulfatesand total dissolved solids. To replace water valves the city's share will be $35,000, re ported the engineering firm ofPennoni in Winter Haven. The commission has bought the Otallah property (Ellen'sThrift Store) for $20,000 at4709 N. Central Ave. to ex pand Main Street Park. PHOTOS BY LESLIE LONG From left are Mayor Sam Fite, Iglesia de Dios Pentecostal Movimiento InternacionalPastor Danny Girona, and Commissioner Steve Spinks. City Manager Jerry Conerly congratulates Mayor SamFite for completing Florida League of Cities University-Institute for Municipal Elected Officials Level 4. Thecourse was about leadership and management ofcities and their staffs. Mayor Sam Fite congratulates city employee WaynePrine for 5 years of service. A14 The Herald-Advocate, April 12, 2018

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Herald-AdvocateThursday, April 12, 2018 B THE In an immediate need, three young chimpanzees who wereonce rented out for use in tele vision, films, ads and eventswere moved to the Center forGreat Apes in Wauchula a fewweeks ago. Hannah, who is 17, Kenzy, 13, and Bentley, 9, startedtheir lives working for a chimptrainer living in Missouri andNevada. For most of their in fancy, they were movedaround in small, single cratecages inside a van while thetrainer tried to get work usingthe chimpanzees in Los Ange les, New Jersey and LasVegas. A friend of the trainer once told KLAS News in Nevadathat the “chimps were kept incages inside a darkened, bru tally hot recreational vehicleand were rarely allowed out.‘He would absolutely hit thematop the head with his knuck les’ … ‘(The RV) was horri ble. I wouldn't stay in there. Iwouldn't let my worst enemystay in there.” This friend went on to say, “He would pound on the cage,yell, take a stick and hit thecage, or not feed them untilthey stop making noise.” With very little “work” for his chimpanzees coming hisway, the trainer then adver tised them for sale about fiveyears ago. A private owner in north Florida bought these chim panzees, so the trainer broughtthem into Florida for the sale.He brought them into the stateillegally, however, withoutpermits. He was arrested bythe Florida Wildlife Commis sion, and the chimpanzeeyoungsters were sent to aholding facility for some timebefore going on to the newowner. As they’ve grown, their most recent owner decided thechimpanzees needed to besomewhere where they couldreceive dedicated care and beintegrated into a larger groupof chimpanzees, with im proved outdoor space, allthings the Center for GreatApes could offer them. Chimpanzees with these early-life experiences havemany difficulties to overcome. We know that with patience and compassionate care, thesechimpanzees will becomemore confident and normal intheir interactions with othersof their own species. No funding came to the cen ter for the care of these young chimpanzees. At the cost ofover $20,000 a year for eachgreat ape at the sanctuary, wehave just taken on an addi tional $60,000 in operating ex penses. But we could not turnthese precious chimps down. Right now, Hannah, Kenzy and Bentley are housed to gether in our new chimpanzeenighthouse until they completetheir veterinary checks to de termine their health status.And, they’re learning to trusttheir caregivers and eat the nu tritious food given to them. They will soon be intro duced to other chimpanzees atthe sanctuary, and we look for ward to providing them withlong happy lives in sanctuarycare.The Center for Great Apes inWauchula is the sole accred ited orangutan sanctuary andone of a few accredited chim panzee sanctuaries in the na tion. As a 501(c)(3) nonprofitorganization, donations aretax-deductible. Visit Center forGreatApes.org, call 767-8903, or mail to P.O. Box 488,Wauchula, FL 33873. COURTESY PHOTOS Hannah is the oldest. She is 17 years old. Kenzy is a teenager now, at 13. Bentley, 9, is the youngest. Bentley really enjoys lounging in his hammock. With the growth in technology comes an increase in demand for computer codingskills. To serve that need, South FloridaState College is offering its first summerCode Academy, beginning Monday, May 7,at the Highlands Campus in Avon Park. Through the academy, students can reg ister for three college-credit computer pro gramming courses and learn sixprogramming languages in six weeks at sixhours a day. They can earn a total of nine college credits. “There’s a growing need for computer programming, or ‘coding,’” said Dr. CherieStevens, professor of computer science atSFSC. “The use of computer technology isuniversal, not just in computers” she said.“Home appliances and cars have electroniccomputer chips. All of that hardware has to be programmed and coded. Someone has totell the chips what to do.” Stevens continued, “Throughout the country, for-profit, expensive ‘coding bootcamps’ have sprung up to train people tocode. To answer the need for more program mers, we decided to offer a low-cost codingboot camp at SFSC.” SFSC’s Code Academy schedule offers flexibility. Students can take the full sixweeks of programming languages Python,SQL, C++, HTML/CSS, and JavaScript ortake two weeks to focus on one or two ofthese coding languages. Python and SQL areoffered May 7-17; C++ is May 21-June 1;and HTML/CSS and JavaScript are June 4-14. To register for the SFSC Code Academy, visit the Welcome Center at the Hardee Cam pus on U.S. 17 south of Bowling Green. SFSC Offers 6-Week Coding Academy Family Has Grown To 50 Apes New Kids In Town!

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By TOM STAIKOf The Herald-AdvocateThe Wildcats defeated the Bulldogs of DeS oto County High School in varsity baseball ac tion in a 12-7 game held April 6. The boys in orange and blue from Hardee Senior High School jumped out to an impres sive 7-0 lead in the top of the first inning. Hardee got on the board when Mason Block crossed home plate as Dawson Hanchey was walked with bases loaded. Cade Alexy was walked in the next at bat sending Matt Tyson across home plate. Logan Cartwright knocked a ground ball to first base that allowed Adrian DeLeon to score. Hanchey eventually scored after Gunner Leonard was walked with bases loaded. A line drive to center field by Dylan Davis allowed Alexy to score. The final run of the inning came from Leonard who scored on a pop out to right field off the bat of Tyson. The score remained unchanged until the top of the third inning when a pair of Wildcat runs brought the score to 9-0. Alexy scored follow ing a fly ball to right field off the bat of Leonard. A line drive to left field off the bat of Block allowed Leonard to score. DeSoto got on the board in the bottom of the third inning with a six run rally to cut Hardees lead to 9-6. The score remained unchanged until the top of the seventh inning when Hardee added three runs to take the 12-7 win. Cartwright crossed home plate following a line drive to center field off the bat of Davis. Davis eventually scored following a line drive to right field off the bat of Quinton Lindsey. The final run of the game came from Block who scored on the throw fol lowing Lindseys hit. Hardee had 12 runs and nine hits in 31 at bats during the outing. Block, Alexy, Cartwright, and Leonard each had two runs, and Tyson, DeLeon, Hanchey, and Davis each had one run. Block had three hits, Davis had two hits, and Lindsey, Tyson, DeLeon, and Leonard each had one hit. Pitching duties were shared by DeLeon and Hanchey. DeLeon held the mound for three in nings as he threw 63 pitches, allowed three hits and six runs, and struck out four batters. Hanchey held the mound for four innings as he threw 48 pitches and allowed one hit and one run and struck out five batters. With the win, Hardee improved to 10-7. Wildcats Tame Panthers, 9-1 The Panthers of Mulberry High School were tamed by the Wildcats during a 9-1 game held April 3. Mulberry took the early lead as they jumped out 1-0 in the bottom of the first inning. The score remained unchanged until the top of the fourth inning when Hardee scored four runs to take a 4-1 lead. Lindsey and Tyson scored after Hanchey knocked a line drive to right field. DeLeon stole home plate while Alexy held the plate. Alexy eventually singled on a line drive to center field that allowed Hanchey to score. Bringing the score to 6-1, Hardee added a run in the top of the sixth when Hanchey scored on a wild pitch as Alexy held the plate. The final three runs came in the top of the seventh inning. Davis scored following a ground ball to left field off the bat of Block. Block and Lindsey scored on a pop fly to cen ter field off the bat of DeLeon. Hardee recorded nine runs and 10 hits during 29 at bats in the effort. Lindsey, DeLeon, and Hanchey each had two runs, and Block, Tyson, and Davis each had one run. DeLeon had three hits, Tyson had two hits, and Block, Lindsey, Hanchey, Alexy, and Davis each had one hit. The Wildcat mound was shared by Weston Schrader and Lindsey. Schrader held the mound three innings and threw 53 pitches as he allowed three hits and one runs and struck out four batters. Lindsey held the mound for four innings as he threw 58 pitches and allowed one hit and struck out nine batters. Hardee Downs Frostproof, 14-4 The Wildcats defeated the Frostproof Mid dle/Senior High School Bulldogs in a 14-4 game held April 2. Frostproof took an early 2-0 lead in the top of the second inning. Hardee answered in the bottom of the third inning as the squad tied the game 2-2. Block scored after tagging up following a fly out to center field off the bat of Tyson. Lindsey cored following a fly ball to right field off the bat of Cartwright. The Bulldogs retook the lead in the top of the fifth inning to bring the score to 4-2. The Wildcats answered in the bottom of the inning in spectacular fashion as they sent up 10 runs to take a 12-4 lead. Tyson and DeLeon scored after Hanchey singled on a hard ground ball to center field. Hanchey then scored on an error by the catcher before Alexy was walked. Coy Gough grounded into a fielders choice to first base that allowed Alexy to score. Leonard scored on an error before Block pops out to right field, allowing Davis to score. Lindsey scored following a triple on a line drive off the bat of Tyson. Tyson scores following a pop fly by DeLeon. Deleon scored on a line drive to center field by Hanchey. The final run of the inning came from Cartwright who scored fol lowing a pop fly to right field off the bat of Alexy. Hardee added two more runs in the bottom of the sixth inning. Davis scored following a double on a line drive to center field off the bat of Lindsey. The final run came from Lindsey who scored on an error as Griffin Clark held the plate. Hardee had 14 runs and 11 hits in 26 at bats. Lindsey had three runs, Tyson, DeLeon, and Davis each had two runs, and Block, Cartwright, Hanchey, Alexy, and Leonard each had one run. Lindsey, Hanchey, and Leonard each had two hits, and Block, Tyson, DeLeon, Cartwright, and Alexy each had one hit. Pitching duties were shared by Ivan Badillo and Kaleb Floyd. Badillo held the mound four innings and threw 72 pitches as he allowed four hits and four runs and struck out five batters. Floyd held the mound a little over one inning and threw 37 pitches as he allowed no runs or hits and struck out two batters. VARSITY BASEBALL Wildcats Defeat BulldogsBy TOM STAIKOf The Herald-AdvocateThe Lady Wildcats upended the Titans of Tenoroc High School in a 13-3 match April 6 in varsity softball action. The ladies in orange and blue from Hardee Senior High School jumped out to an early 4-0 lead in the top of the first inning. Ashlee Patterson scored following a line drive off the bat of Destinee Jack son. Jackson and Lillian Salazar crossed home plate following a ground ball off the bat of Stephanie Derringer. Derringer eventually scored following a hard ground ball to third base off the bat Deborah Figueroa. Hardee continued to push ahead in the top of the second inning as Patterson crossed home plate on a fly ball to cen ter field off the bat of Salazar that brought the score to 5-0. An error allowed another Hardee run in the top of the third, as Amari DeLeon crossed home plate to bring the score to 6-0. Makayla Benavidez crossed home in the top of the fourth to bring the score to 7-0 as she capitalized on a series of passed balls as Alexis McBride held the plate. Tenoroc answered with a run in the bottom of the fourth to cut the Wildcat lead to 7-1. Hardee continued to capital ize on fielding errors in the top of the fifth inning as it added two more runs. Marisa Ro driguez scored on an error and Salazar scored on a wild pitch while Alayna Carranco waited to be walked from the plate, bringing the score to 9-1. Tenorocs final two runs, cutting the Hardee lead to 9-3, came in the bottom of the fifth. A four-run rally in the top of the seventh inning sealed the win for Hardee. Patterson scored after Salazar singled with a ground ball to second base. Salazar scored after Car ranco knocked a fly ball to right field. Carranco scored on a passed ball as Sarah Carlton held the plate. The final run came from Carlton after a ground out off the bat of Der ringer. Hardee had 13 runs and nine hits in 34 at bats during the outing. Patterson and Salazar each had three runs, and Jackson, Carranco, Carlton, Der ringer, Benavidez, DeLeon, and Rodriguez each recorded a run. Salazar had three hits, Rodriguez had two hits, and Patterson, Carlton, Derringer, and Figueroa each had one hit. Pitching duties were shared by Benavidez and Derringer. Benavidez held the mound for three innings as she threw 49 pitches, allowed two hits and two runs, and struck out three batters,. Derringer held the mound for four innings as she threw 62 pitches, allowed two hits and one run, and struck out three batters. With the win, the Wildcats improved to 12-11 for the season. Hardee Bests Jenkins, 4-3 Hardee bested the Eagle squad from George Jenkins (Lakeland) High School in a 43 game on April 4. The Lady Wildcats jumped to an early 1-0 lead in the top of the first inning when Carl ton homered on a fly ball to left field. Hardee continued to push forward in the top of the sec ond inning. Alexis McBride and Benavidez both scored fol lowing a line drive to right field off the bat of Carlton to bring the score to 3-0. The score remained un changed until the top of the fifth inning when Carranco scored following a hard ground ball to center field off the bat of Salazar that brought the score to 4-0. George Jenkins scored its three runs in the bottom of the fifth to bring the score to 4-3. Hardee had four runs and 11 hits in 36 at bats. Carlton, Car ranco, McBride, and Be navidez each had runs. Carlton and Salazar each had two hits, and Patterson, Jackson, Der ringer, McBride, and Benavidez each had one hit. Carranco held the mound for Hardee through all seven in nings as she lobbed 94 pitches, allowed four hits and three runs, and struck out one batter. Lady Cats Blank Panthers The Lady Wildcats blanked the Panthers of Mulberry High School in a 10-0 game held April 3. The game remained score less until the bottom of the third inning when Hardee go on the board when Benavidez crossed home plate folloing a line drive to left field off the bat of Carlton. Carlton eventu ally scored following a bunt by Carranco to bring the score to 2-0. Five more Hardee runs came in the bottom of the fifth in ning. The effort started when Paterson scored folloing a hard ground ball off the bat of Jack son. Carlton and Jackson (tagging home on the throw) both scored following a ground ball to center field off the bat of Derringer. Carranco and Azaria Rivers scored next following a ground ball off the bat of DeLeon to bring the score to 7-0. Three more Wildcat runs followed in the bottom of the sixth inning. Carlton scored following a hard ground ball to center off the bat of Derringer. A ground out to second off the bat of Mallory Gough allowed Carranco to score. The final run came as Rivers crossed home palte following a fly ball to left field off the bat of Ro driguez. Hardee had 10 runs and 11 hits in 32 at bats in the outing. Carlton had three runs, Car ranco and Rivers each had two runs, and Patterson, Jackson, and Benavidez were each credited with runs. Carlton had three hits, Derringer had two hits, and Patterson, Jackson, Carranco, Salazar, Rodriguez, and Benavidez each had one hit. VARSITY SOFTBALLLady Cats Upend TitansBy TOM STAIKOf The Herald-AdvocateThe Wildcats marched to an easy victory April 5 over Moore Haven High School in the Terrier Track Meet. The Lady Wildcats posed a seemingly unstoppable force as they won the meet 103 to 29. The Wildcats, too, were im pressive as they managed 73.67 points against Moore Havens 57.33 points. The ladies took 15 first place finishes in the meet. Acheline Delhomme was first in the 200m dash with a time of 29.96, and Jessica Pas cual was first in the 400m dash with a time of 1:06.96. Tatiana Mier was first in the 1600m run with a time of 6:30.14 and first in the 3200m run with a time of 14:34.67. Mercades Cisneros was first in the 100m hurdles with a time of 18.78 and Ebony Lami was first in the 300m hurdles with a time of 52.86. Hardee also took first in the 4x100m, 4x400m, and 4x800m relays. In the field events, Miracle Thompson was first in the triple jump with a distance of 8.96m. Alexis Benhamin-Gra ham was first in the shot put with a distance of 11.64m and in the discus with a distance of 35.24m. Sophie Allen and Nubia Gomez tied for first in the pole vault with a height of 7-0. The boys in orange and blue took 11 first place finishes. Dalton Kiella was first in the 400m dash with a time of 56.90 and Zack Durastanti was first in the 800m dash with a time of 2:24.17. Gage Camacho was first in the 1600m run with a time of 6:16.16, and Roberto Gutierrez was first in the 3200m run with a time of 11:48.56. Samuel Louis was first in the 110m hurdles with a time of 17.56 and Colen Oakes was first in the 300m hurdles with a time of 45.27. Hardee also took first in the 4x400m and 4x800m relays. In the field events, Louis took first in the high jump with a height of 1.57m. Tyler Steed ley was first in the discus with a distance of 35.40m. Oscar DeJesus was first in the pole vault with a height of 10-0. Individual Results: Girls 100m Dash: 2nd, Marisela Duran, 14.28; 4th, Rola Hijaz, 14.48; 5th, Stephanie Louis, 15.37; 6th, Yacquelin Villalva, 15.78; 7th, Maria Martinez, 15.86; 8th, Maria Gutierrez, 15.90; 9th, Adela Rojas, 16.04; and 10th, Ivette Gonzalez, 16.77. Girls 200m Dash: 1st, Acheline Delhomme, 29.96; 3rd, Ja lynn Thompson, 30.97; 5th, Rola Hijaz, 31.65; 7th, Maria Gutierrez, 32.73; 8th, Yac quelin Villalva, 33.59; 9th, Stephanie Louis, 34.20; 10h, Adela Rojas, 34.44; and 11th, Maria Martinez, 35.22. Girls 400m Dash: 1st, Jessica Pascual, 1:06.96; 2nd, Javia Thompson, 1:09.48; 3rd, Nubia Gomez, 1:10.02; 9th, Marisela Duran, 1:20.24; 10th, Marley Ureste, 1:23.16; 11th, Ivette Gonzalez, 1:30.85. Girls 800m Dash: 2nd, In grid Mendoza, 2:54.42; 3rd, Yennifer Nunez, 2:56.15; and 4th, Laura Ramos, 3:14.04. Girls 1600m Run: 1st, Tatiana Mier, 6:30.14. Girls 3200m Run: 1st, Tatiana Mier, 14:34.67; 3rd, Amy Gutierrez, 16:00.95; and 4th, Kareli Plata, 16:17.15. Girls 100m Hurdles: 1st, Mercades Cisneros, 18.78; 2nd, Jennifer Lopez, 18.95; 3rd, Kaitlynn Brandeberry, 20.36; and 4th, Veronica Molina, 21.76. Girls 300m Hurdles: 1st, Ebony Lami, 52.86; 2nd, Jen nifer Lopez, 58.57; 3rd, Kaitlynn Brandeberry, 59.78; and 4th, Mercades Cisneros, 1:03.79. Girls 4x100m Relay: 1st, Hardee, 55.00. Girls 4x400m Relay: 1st, Hardee, 4:45.50; and 2nd, Hardee, 4:46.34. Girls 4x800m Relay: 1st, Hardee, 12:57.81. Girls High Jump: 1st, Javia Thompson, 1.27m; and 1st, Kaitlynn Brandeberry, 1.27m. Girls Long Jump: 2nd, Jalynn Thompson, 4.60m; 3rd, Acheline Delhomme, 4.29m; 4th, Jennifer Lopez, 4.23m; 6th, Jesula Charles, 3.88m; 7th, Ebony Lami, 3.87m. Girls Triple Jump: 1st, Miracle Thompson, 8.96m; 2nd, Jesula Charles, 8.24m; 3rd, Mercades Cisneros, 7.91m; 4th, Jennifer Lopez, 7.86m; and 5th, Vernoica Molina, 6.85m. Girls Shot Put: 1st, Alexis Benjamin-Graham, 11.64m; 2nd, Brilyance Augustus, 7.90m; 4th, Lilliana Ramos, 6.52m; 5th, Maria Deloera, 6.27m; and 7th, Alisa Arce, 5.25m. Girls Discus Throw: 1st, Alexis Benjamin-Graham, 35.24m; 2nd, Kassidy Wallace, 16.16m; 5th, Maria Deloera, 13.94m; and 6th, Alisa Arce, 13.20m. Girls Pole Vault: 1st, Sophie Allen, 7-0; 1st, Nubia Gomez, 7-0, 3rd, Mariela Badillo, 6-6; and 4th, Daisy Badillo, 6-0. Boys 100m Dash: 9th, Jozie St. Louis, 12.93; 10th, Marcelin Cimeus, 12.98; 11th, Man Rivera, 13.29; 12th, Gabriel Arguelles, 13.32; and 13th, Paul Mares, 14.90. Boys 200m Dash: 4th, Israel Lopez, 26.02; 5th, Jozie St. Louis, 27.29; 6th, Man Rivera, 27.54; 7th, Angel Conejo, 28.10; 8th, Carlos Lopez, 29.69; and 9th, Elias Ramirez, 31.46. Boys 400m Dash: 1st, Dalton Kiella, 56.90; 3rd, Sanon Nerlensky, 1:01.60; 4th, James Pearson, 1:02.20; and 7th, Elias Ramirez, 1:09.72. Boys 800m Dash: 1st, Zack Durastanti, 2:24.17; 2nd, Ivan Rodriguez, 2:24.63; and 4th, Miguel Velasco, 2:44.35. Boys 1600m Run: 1st, Gage Camacho, 6:16.16. Boys 3200m Run: 1st, Roberto Gutierrez, 11:48.56; and 2nd, Jaime Chagoya, 13:21.61. Boys 110m Hurdles: 1st, Samuel Louis, 17.56; 2nd, Aaron Cook, 17.71; 3rd, Colen Oakes, 17.77; and 6th, Adrian Alvarez, 22.60. Boys 300m Hurdles: 1st, Colen Oakes, 45.27; 2nd, Samuel Louis, 47.78; 3rd, Aaron Cook, 48.77; and 6th, Carlos Lopez 53.55. Boys 4x100m Relay: 2nd, Hardee, 48.57; and 4th, Hardee, 50.78. Boys 4x400m Relay: 1st, Hardee, 3:50.12. Boys 4x800m Relay: 1st, Hardee, 9:23.98; and 2nd, Hardee, 9:31.43. Boys High Jump: 1st, Samuel Louis, 1.57m; 2nd, Jozie St. Louis, 1.52m; 2nd, Myron Refoure, 1.52m; 5th, Jaime Chagoya, 1.42m; 6th, Josh Ward, 1.37m. Boys Long Jump: 4th, Myron Refoure, 5.21m; 5th, Josh Ward, 5.18m; and 6th, Terrence White, 4.69m. Boys Triple Jump: 3rd, Aaron Cook, 10.06m; 4th, Ter rence White, 9.99m; and 5th, Carlos Lopez, 9.46m. Boys Shot Put: 3rd, Marcus Sambrano, 11.19m; 5th, Dustin Willis, 10.55m; 6th, Ariel Whiters, 9.76m; 8th, Adrian Alvarez, 9.44m; and 9th, Mario Gomez, 9.13m. Boys Discus: 1st, Tyler Steedley, 35.40m; 2nd, Collin Barton, 35.18m; 3rd, Marcus Sambrano, 33.70m; 4th, Ariel Whiters, 33.14m; 6th, Mike Trevino, 28.00m; and 9th, Thomas Cardoza, 24.22m. Boys Pole Vault: 1st, Oscar DeJesus, 10-0; 2nd, Noah Tor res, 9-6; 2nd, Zack Durastanti, 9-6; and Roberto Gutierrez, 70. VARSITY TRACK & FIELD Hardee Wins Moore Haven Meet NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEEDPursuant to F.S. 197.512 Victoria L. Rogers Hardee County, Clerk of the Circuit Court and Comptroller Tax Deed File: 252017TD030XXXX Date: 04/04/2018 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED WARNING THERE ARE UNPAID TAXES ON THE PROPERTY WHICH YOU OWN OR IN WHICH YOU MAY HAVE LEGAL INTEREST. The property will be sold at a public auction on the 16th day of May, 2018, at 11:00 a.m., unless the back taxes are paid. To make payment or for ques tions concerning real property taxes, contact the Hardee County Tax Collectors Office at (863) 7739144 (PO Box 445, Wauchula, FL 33873) To receive further information regarding the Tax Deed Sale, contact the Hardee County Clerk of the Courts, immediately, at (863) 773-4174 (P.O. Drawer 1749, Wauchula, Florida, 33873). The holder of the following tax certificate has filed the certificate for a tax deed to be issued. The certificate number and year of issuance, the de scription of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are: CERTIFICATE NO.: 862 YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010 NAME(S) IN WHICH ASSESSED: Margrene Lamp ley Description of Property: Parcel Identification Number 10-34-25-0840-0000I0003 DESCRIPTION: LOT 3 BLK I SUBURBAN ACRES 143P68 217P241 SUBJECT TO RESERVATIONS, COVENANTS, RE STRICTIONS, AND EASEMENTS OF RECORD. All of the property is in HARDEE County, Florida. Unless the certificate or certificates are redeemed according to law, the property described in the certificate or certificates will be sold to the highest bidder on May 16, 2018, at 11:00 a.m. By: Norma M. Juarez, Deputy Clerk 4:12-5:3cTech Tower Properties, LLC proposes to construct a 260 lattice communications tower with the required dual red and white FAA lighting located near 3065 SR 66, Zolfo Springs, FL 33890. You may review the application by going to www.fcc.gov/asr/applications and enter Form 854 file number A1098894. The FCC encour ages any interested party to raise environmental concerns by filing a Request for Environ mental Review with the FCC. Filing Instructions can be found at www.fcc.gov/asr/environ mentalrequest or a paper copy can be mailed to: FCC Requests for Environmental Re view, Attn: Ramon Williams, 445 12th St SW, Washington, DC 20554. 4:12c B2 The Herald-Advocate, April 12, 2018

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T HE C LASSIFIEDS ABOUT ... ClassifiedsDEADLINE ....Tuesday noon RATES ..........Minimum of $5.00 for up to 10 words. Each additional word is 25. Ads in all capitals are 35 per word. Headlines are $2 a line. Blind ad box numbers are $5 extra. BILLING ........Ads must be pre-paid. CLASSIFICATIONS:Agriculture Mobile Homes Appliances Notices Automobile Personal Boats Pets Furniture Plants/Produce Guns Real Estate Help Wanted Recreational Houses Rentals LivestockRentals, CommercialLost & Found Services Miscellaneous Wanted Motorcycles Yard Sales We Are Looking To HireSevigny and Associates Eye Care is seeking an aspiring optical lab technician to join our team. The ideal candidate would be experienced in the field, although we are HAPPY to train as well. Basic mathematical skills as well as basic hands-on mechanical skills are required. Primary responsibilities include precision eyeglass lens manufacturing, adjusting and repairing eyeglasses, maintaining the lab area including equipment, lens inventory, lens return credits, and auditing lab orders in progress. Secondary duties would include a supporting customer service role including dispensing and troubleshooting eyeglass orders and other office duties as necessary. We value people who have a passion for quality and work well within a team environment. Our preference is to promote from within and appreciate career oriented individuals interested in personal and professional growth. Benefits include: Medical insurance, vision care, retirement plan, and vacation. Please submit resume careers@7eeye.com .Sevigny Associates Eye Care735 North 6th Ave., Wauchula 863-259-3777 cl4:12c228 6th Ave N Wauchula Fl 33873 Office: 863-473-4544 Website: www.HotFLRealEstate.com Colon Lambert Broker/Owner Licensed Real Estate Broker Colon LambertBroker/OwnerRESIDENTIAL 965 Stenstrom Rd Wauchula. $469,000. 3 Bedroom 2.5 Bath. 8.31 Acres. 1912 Hwy 17 Wauchula. $249,000. 8 Acres Peaches. 1269 NW Girl Scout Rd Arcadia. $247,500. 3 Bedroom 3 Bath. 2.61 Acres on Peace River 6748 Ashton Dr Sebring. $750,000. 4 Bedroom 3.5 Bath. .89 Acres. Canal Frontage. 3001 Country Lake Dr Sebring. $564,900. 2 Bedroom 2.5 Bath. .33 Acres. Canal Frontage. 1093 Steve Roberts Special Zolfo Springs. $90,000. 3 Bedroom 2 Bath. .75 Acres. Vacant Land 3052 Oaks Bend Bowling Green. $22,000, Lot .285 Acres. 6127 US 98 Sebring. $29,000. .85 Acres. Cecil Durrance Rd Zolfo Springs. $52,000. 5.93 Acres. 975 Farm Rd Sebring. $350,000. 25 Acres. HWY 17 N Wauchula. $245,000. 11 Acres. Bostick Rd Bowling Green. $200,000. 29 Acres. 4321 Hwy 98 Lorida. $124,000. 10.81 Acres. 1032 Lakeside Way Sebring. $16,000. .21 Acres. Seven Mile Point. $10,000. .365 Acres. 1245 Blue Jay Rd Wauchula. $6800. .229 Acres. 739 St Rd 66 Sebring. $559,000. 43.99 Acres. Canal Frontage. Lake Rosalie. Camp Mack Rd Lake Wales. $1,823,712. 207.24 Acres. Lake front with 3 barns. Epps Ave Bowling Green. $10,000. .24 Acres.cl4:12c Lacey Webb863-773-4101204 N. 6th Ave., Wauchula, 33873 cl4:12c Shopping around for car insurance? Don't.Let your local independent agent shop for you, and find the coverage you need. (863) 382-3887www.HeartlandRE.net Hometown Professional Real Estate! cl4:12cROSE ABBOTT863-781-0846 roseabbott@ hotmail.comFOR MORE PROPERTIES, SEE OUR WEBSITE @ WWW.HEARTLANDRE.NET 32.4 ACRE Hamlin & Valencia Grove, 6 well, Mineral Branch Road frontage. Asking price $175,000. 1150+/PRIME AGRICULTURAL LAND With 1 mile road frontage on State Road 66, this current cattle ranch has excellent soil types perfect for farming. Included on the property is a 4000 sq ft home overlooking a stocked pond, 6 various size wells, 46 X 80 barn, cross fencing throughout. Asking price $6,000,000. MIKEY COLDING863-781-1698 MColding@ HeartlandRE.net GREAT LOCATION & MOTIVATED SELLER! Well maintained commercial building with many business possibilities. Finish work inside includes 9 rooms & 2 full baths. New roll up front door, metal roof, rear parking for 35 vehicles, fenced on sides. Asking price $129,900. INVESTOR ALERT 7.8 ACRES located in the heart of Wauchula, this is the largest undeveloped parcel in the city. Partially zoned R2, perfect for duplexes. NEW PRICE $145,000. NEW LISITNG 198 AC, Highway 17 North of Bowling Green, several small lakes. $792,000. PRICE REDUCED!!This spacious 4 BR / 2BA home on 5 acres close to Peace River has a large basement with plenty of room for storage. $199,000. New listing 22AC grove lo cated in Avon Park overlooking River Greens Golf course. $264,000. (863) 773-2128REALTORS JOE L. DAVIS, JR. JOHN H. ONEALSee more listings at www.joeldavis.comREAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS REALTOR ASSOCIATES AFTER HOURS KENNY SANDERS...............781-0153 KAREN ONEAL........... 781-7633 JESSICA PRESCOTT...941-737-6502 KEVIN SANDERS..........368-1926 MONICA REAS....................781-0888 DAVID ROYAL................781-3490 BRANDI MALDONADO........ 414-3349 BRITTANY NICKERSON THURLOW..............446-2735HIGHWAY 17 SOUTH, WAUCHULA, FL 33873 cl4:12c 89 acs fronting Peace River & includes cabin, barn, 3 wells, & 35 ac grove. Excellent pasture & majestic live oaks w/plenty of deer & turkey. $735,000! 150 ACS Triple road frontage, excellent land and location. Close to Town. $1,500,000. Lot located on beautiful Lake Byrd in Highlands County. $50,000.00 REALTOR John ONealUNDER CONTRACT UNDER CONTRACT 4/3 CB home on 1st Ave in Wauchula$199,000 3/2 CB home on Torrey Oaks golf course$178,500 2/1 home on Central Ave in Bowling Green$28,000 3 unit commercial building on US Hwy 17$249,900 2/1 CB home on Turner Ave in Wauchula$99,000 3/2 mobile home in Charlie Creek Estates$39,500 4 lots on Myrick Ave in Bowling Green$14,499 .5 ac lot in Briarwood Sub in Wauchula$29,000 5 ac Deer Run in Zolfo Springs$25,000 SANDY LARRISON, Broker/Owner212 W Main Street, Wauchula 33873 863-767-0565 office/863-832-0130 cellwww.AshbrookRealty.comJohn Freeman 863-781-4084 Rhoda McCoy-Niesz 863-245-0753 Brook Larrison 863-832-0565 Donna Steffens 863-781-3627 Jennifer Larrison 813-215-2915 James Stallings 863-412-4379 cl4:12cNOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE 2001 FORD WINDSTAR LX 4D GRAY VIN: 2FMZA51421BA46704 9:00 AM, APRIL 23, 2018 HILLS TOWING, INC. 4205 US HWY 17 N. BOWLING GREEN, FL 33834 cl4:12cNOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE 2014 CHEVY SONIC LS 4D WHITE VIN: 1G1JA6SH8E4175287 9:00 AM, APRIL 26, 2018 HILLS TOWING, INC. 4205 US HWY 17 N. BOWLING GREEN, FL 33834 cl4:12c NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE2007 FORD VIN: 3FAHP06Z87R224895 8:00 A.M. April 23, 2018 CLIFFS WRECKER SERVICE1071 U.S. Hwy 17 N. Wauchula, FL cl4:12c DIESEL INJECTION REPAIR Pumps, turbos and injectors. Removal and instillation avail able. 863-381-0538. 2:8-1:17p 312TON MH AC UNIT, 4 pedestal, wiring cut off box, 60 amp, breaker funs great, blows ice cold, $600, 863-832-3327. 4:12nc REFRIGERATOR 18 cu. ft. freezer on top, $85; chest freezer, $55. 863-245-1496. 4:12p FIRST UNITED METHODIST Church is seeking a part-time administrative assistant. Submit resume by Wednesday, April 18 to 207 North 7th Ave., Wauchula. Contact Pastor Danielle Upton at 863-773-4267 for any additional information. 4:12c Help Wanted Appliances Air Conditioners Agriculture WANTED: Experienced Leverman Maintenance Mechanic Foreman/Supervisor Experi enced Boatman Deckhand for local dredging company with several years of work with projects for Mosaic. MSHA training a plus. Must pass background/ drug test. EOE/DFW Contact by email: guy@floridadredge.com 813-634-2517. 4:12-5:3c HEARTLAND PEDIATRICS is looking for part-time CNA, M.A. Apply in person 120 Heartland Way. 4:12-5:10p LOOKING FOR YARD worker in Zolfo, 863-735-9509. 4:5,12p DETAILERS AND TECHNICIANS needed at Alan Jay Chevrolet/Chrysler/Jeep/Dodge/ Ram. Apply in person at 1405 Hwy. 17 S., Wauchula. Ask for Robert Austin. 4:5,12c FLORIDA FERTILIZER IS hiring a warehouse employee who can operate a forklift and is com puter literate. Apply in person, 194 Will Duke Road. 3:15tfc LEARN TO DRIVE A TRUCK! Get your Commercial Driver's Li cense today at South Florida State College. Scholarships available to eligible participants. 863-784-7033. 3:1-9:20p Help Wanted MECHANIC NEEDED. MUST have own tools. Apply in person at BG Small Engine, 4702 US Hwy. 17 N., BG. 12:21tfc HAVE YOU LOST A PET? Con tact animal control in Bowling Green at 863-375-2255 to see if we have your cat or dog. We also have pets for adoption. 4:16dh/tfc PERSONAL PROPERTY OF Dustin Calbaro, Rust Thomason, Marla McDonald, Ashley White, German Bacerra, Jay Grimsley, Troy Weiss, Rhonda Cofield, David Bailey, Bertha Cerantes, Therika Anderson, James Royal, Christina Rodriguez, Chris Wingate, Jesus Leal, Kelly Pace, Keivey Johnson, Henry White, Janise Lopez, Christina Crowthers, Danille Tucker, Davon Dye, Dennise Lake, will be sold by warehousemans lien said sale will be at B&J Self Storage, 667 South 5th Ave., Wauchula, Florida at 11:00 am, April 24, 2018. 4:5,12p Notices Lost/Found Help Wanted NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE2004 CHEV VIN: 1GCEK19T14E222252 8:00 A.M. April 27, 2018 CLIFFS WRECKER SERVICE 1071 U.S. Hwy 17 N. Wauchula, FL cl4:12c NOTICE OF PUBLIC Sale Public Notice is herby given, that we will sell or otherwise dispose of the contents of the following self storage units in order to satisfy the delinquent storage lien placed in accordance with the State of Florida Statute 83.806. Unit # 2 Victoria Gonzalez Household Goods; Unit #s 3 & 6 Elmer Willy Household Goods; Unit # 9 Karen Walker Household Goods Unit #s 13, 14 & 27 Barbara Brissette Household Goods; Unit # 20 Kim Underwood Household Goods; Unit # 24 Joy & David Spencer Household Goods; Unit # 36 Cindy Yeomans Household Goods; Unit # 54 Bob Trinidad Household Goods. The public sale will be conducted at Zolfo Storage, 721 ST RD 66 Zolfo Springs Fl, 33890 at 4:00 p.m. on Thursday, April 26th, 2018. Units will be sold to the highest bidder. Open door sale, cash only. A cleaning deposit will be taken. (863) 7811103. 4:12,19c Notices April 12, 2018, The Herald-Advocate B3

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NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE2008 HYUN VIN: KMHDU46D48U311924 8:00 A.M. April 23, 2018 CLIFFS WRECKER SERVICE1071 U.S. Hwy 17 N. Wauchula, FL cl4:12c Michelle Williamson Broker Michelle@thewilliamsongrouprealty.com Everything We Touch Turns To $old W. Grape St., Bowling Green, FL 33834 Nice building lot in Bowling Green! Seller is motivated! 1007 E. Oak St. Arcadia, FL 34266863-494-9009thewilliamsongrouprealty.com 614 Coolidge Ave NE, Lake Placid, FL 33852 Great cleared building lot in the beautiful area of Placid Lakes!cl4:12c 1625 Kazen Rd., Wauchula, FL 33873 5.5 acre parcel cleared and ready for your dream home! Brandi Long Real Estate Agent 863-990-7256 Brandi@thewilliamsongrouprealty.com Erica Bautista Sales Associate 863-244-1957 Erica@thewilliamsongrouprealty.com $6,250 $10,000 $65,000 2982 Whippoorwill Ln, Wauchula, FL 33873 Wonderful 4 bedroom, 2 bathroom 2007 home on acre! $169,900 Dusty AlbrittonMAKE AN OFFER! VERY MOTI VATED SELLER! 40 acres Presently used for farming & has a well. $360,000 BACK ON THE MARKET! 5 acres with a pond. Currently fenced & being used for cattle. 65,500 15 acres with 2 mobile homes Located in Ft Green Asking $800,000 Realtor Associates Rick Knight (863) 781-1396 Dusty Albritton (863) 781-0161 Shane Conley (863) 781-9664 cl4:12cRV space for sale at Torrey Oaks Golf & RV Many improvements made. Located next to golf course. $64,900 Large 4,800+ sf Commercial building Close to the McDonalds intersection in Wauchula Asking $125,000 206 North 6th Avenue, Wauchula, FL 33873 Office (863)773-0060 Evening (863)781-1338 www.jimseerealty.com James V. See, Jr., Broker Advantage Realty #1 743 US 27 S. Sebring, FL 33872 Office: 863-386-0303 Fax: 863-386-1112VISIT US AT www.advantagehighlands.comMark LambertLicensed Realtor863-832-0401mark33862@gmail.com cl1:11tfc Agricultural-Commercial-Residential HARDEECARCOMPANY(Across From First National Bank) B Bu uy y H He er r e e P P a ay y H He er r e e773-6667 cl5:25tfcGreat Location For FOR RENT 111 E. Main Street, Wauchula Office Space Retail Store Approx. 954 sq. ft.For Information ContactStephen Southwell, PA 863-773-4449cl2:8tfc REVELLAUTOSALES BUYHEREPAYHERE8 86 63 3-3 37 75 5-4 41 11 13 3A A f f t t e e r r H H o ou u r r s s C C a a l l l l : :Travis Revell Sandra Miller863-245-0383 863-781-45775220 Hwy 17N Bowling Green (across from BP)Se Habla EspaolWE ACCEPT CREDIT CARDS cl1:4tfc T HE C LASSIFIEDS ADOPT A PET! If you have lost a pet or are looking for a new one, the City of Wauchula invites you to come and see if you can find the pet youre looking for. The Wauchula Animal Control is lo cated at 685 Airport Road. Please call 863-773-3265 for more information. tfc-dh ATTENTION! State Statutes 828.29 requires that all cats and dogs sold in Florida be at least 8 weeks old, have an official health certificate, have neces sary shots and be free of para sites. tfc-dh LOT FOR SALE! 617 Saunders St., Wauchula, $5,000, 941-7372601. 3:22-4:19p ATTENTION! The Federal Fair Housing Act prohibits advertis ing any preference or limitation based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or the intention to make such a preference or limitation. Familial status in cludes children under 18 living with parents or guardians and pregnant women. tfc-dh Rentals Real Estate Pets I, JOE, WILL PICKUP for FREE old stoves, refrigerators, mi crowave, freezers, lawn mowers and other metals. Call 863-2459898. 4:5,12p CANCER SURVIVOR MEETING Wednesday at the new hospital. Go through maintenance. For more information call Billy 239821-4184. 4:12tfcdh MIKES LAWN CARE. Free esti mate. Call 863-735-2862 or 863245-1315. 3:22-4:19p CONTACT TRACY FOR ALL your $5 jewelry needs, 863-773-7181, www.paparazziaccessories.com /149498. 3:15-4:12p BUY, SELL, OR FUNDRAISER Avon has it all. Call Pam Mer chant, your local Avon lady. 863245-7000. 3:15-4:12p VITAS INNOVATIVE HOSPICE Care offers a bereavement walkin support group for those that have experienced the loss of a love one. Beginning 9/2/16 every Friday at 1 p.m. in the VITAS office, 113 W. Main Street, Wauchula, 863-583-7100. 8:18tfc-dh *** NEED A WELL OR HAVE PUMP TROUBLE? CALL ULLRICHS PITCHER PUMP For complete well, sales, service and installation, call 863-773-6448. 7:18tfc Services ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS, Thursday 7:00 p.m., Grace Fel lowship Church, 131 S. 8th Ave., Wauchula. Bill 727-326-3816. tfc-dh THE WAUCHULA LIONS CLUB collects NOT broken prescrip tion eyeglasses, cases and sunglasses. Please drop off at 735 N. 6th Ave. tfc-dh DO YOU HAVE a problem with drugs? Narcotics Anonymous meets Monday, Thursday and Friday night 7:00 p.m. at First United Methodist Church, at the corner of Palmetto and 7th Ave., Wauchula. tfc-dh IS ALCOHOL CAUSING a prob lem? Call Alcoholics Anony mous in Hardee county at 863-781-6414. Several weekly meetings. tfc-dh ATTENTION! State Statutes 489119 Section 5 Paragraph B and Hardee County Ordinance 87-09 Section 10 Paragraph D require all ads for any construction-related service to carry the con tractors licence number. tfc-dh LOOKING FOR SMALL female dog. No bigger than 4-5 lbs., 863-767-1074. 4:12-5:10p Wanted Services HUGE YARD SALE for Missions. Friday, Saturday, 7 am noon. Clothes, toys, tools, etc. New Hope Baptist Church, 1999 SR 64 East, Wauchula. 4:12c MOVING SALE! SATURDAY, 7 am ?. Furniture, dishes, gas grill, porch furniture & more. 4650 Johntson Rd. off of Hwy. 66 and Johnston Rd. 4:12c HUGE YARD/GARDEN Sale, 8-?, Friday, Saturday, 8567 Schinook Rd., Gardener. 4:12p MOVING SALE, FRIDAY, Satur day, 8-?. 625 East Bay Street. Large furniture and misc. items. 4:12p Yard SalesCALL TODAY!FURNITURE!! La-Z-Boy recliner ETHAN ALLEN upholstered sofa w/pull-out bed & matching loveseat Executive office desk Must see to appreciate 2 plush upholstered chairs southwestern themeCALL863-307-7014 OR 863-412-4379(Between 9 a.m. & 8 p.m.) For Prices & Location to See cl4:12nc YOURTIREHEADQUARTERS 5101 N. Hwy 17 Bowling Green 375-4461New Tire Changer & Balancer Can Do 26 WheelsMONDAYSATURDAY8 am6 pm BOWLING GREEN QUICK LUBE& AUTO REPAIR Foreign and Domestic Cars Diesel Engines Gas or Diesel Manual or Automatic Transmissions TERRYMIKE Licensed and Insured Reg.# MV-40625 cl6:21tfc It was Edna St. Vincent Millay, a playwright and the first woman to win the Pulitzer Prize for poetry, who made the following observation: "A per son who publishes a book appears willfully in public with his pants down." I don't know who studies such things, but those who do say that over the course of a lifetime, you'll probably spend about three years in the rest room. Despite numerous arrests and trials, famed 19th-century outlaw Frank James was never convicted of anything and never went to prison. He died in 1915, at the age of 72, of natural causes.(c) 2018 King Features Synd., Inc.Strange But TrueBy Samantha Weaver Herald-AdvocateHardee Countys Hometown CoveragePRINTERS PUBLISHERS Telephone (863) 773-3255www.TheHeraldAdvocate.com TheReyna Harvesting is hiring 26 farmworkers to harvest and pack watermelon and blue berry crops in Bowling Green and Auburndale, FL for a temporary period from 05/01/2018 to 06/01/2018. The wages offered are the highest of $11.29/hr. or applicable piece rates. Prolonged standing, bending, stooping, and reaching. Job is outdoors and continues in all types of weather. Workers may be requested to submit to random drug or alcohol tests at no cost to the worker. Drug testing and background checks may occur during the interview process and will be conducted at the sole expense and discretion of the employer. Must be able to lift 50lbs. to shoulder height repetitively throughout the workday and able to lift and carry 50lbs. in field. Employer guarantees work will be available for at least three-quarters of the period stated. Required tools supplies, and equipment will be provided at no cost to worker. Housing will be available for workers who cannot reasonably return home after each working day. Transportation and subsistence expenses will be provided, or reimbursed after 50% of the work contract is completed, if appropriate. Applicants should apply for the position at their local State Workforce Agency office. Job Order Number: FL10664135. cl4:5,12p99 temporary farm-workers needed for hand harvesting blueberries, and general farm labor in Weeki Wachie and Inverness, FL. for 5 G Harvesting LLC. work will be beginning on or about 04/03/2018 and ending on or about 05/15/2018. this job offer is for farm labor. the minimum offered wage rate that workers will be paid is $11.29 per hour or piece rate may be offered depending on the crop activity. workers must commit to work the entire contract period. workers are guar anteed work for 3/4 of the contract period, beginning with the first day the worker arrives at the place of employment. All work tools are provided at no cost to the worker. Housing will be provided to those workers who cannot reasonably return to their permanent residence at the end of each working day. Transportation and subsistence will be provided by the employer upon completion of 50% of the work contract, or earlier, to workers who are recruited outside the area of in tended employment. applicants should report or send resumes to Career Source Center @ 7361 Forest Oaks Blvd, Spring Hill, FL 34606@ (352)200-3020. In ref erence of job order number FL 10659830. Prior to contacting the employer. EOE H-300-18051-827090 cl4:5,12c 10 temporary farmworkers needed for work in sweet potato, corn, soybeans, tobacco and cotton in Sampson County, North Carolina for Hobbs Farming, Inc., and S & G Farms, Inc., with work beginning on or about 06/07/2018 and ending on or about 10/31/2018. The job offered is for an experienced farmworker and requires minimum 1 month verifiable work experience in the crop activities listed. The minimum offered wage rate that workers will be paid is $11.46 per hour and piece rate may be offered depending on crop activity. Workers must commit to work the entire contract period. Workers are guaranteed work for 3/4 of the contract period, beginning with the first day the worker arrives at the place of employment. All work tools, supplies and equip ment are provided at no cost to the worker. Housing will be provided to those workers who cannot reasonably return to their permanent residence at the end of each working day. Transportation and subsistence will be provided by the employer upon completion of 50% of the work contract, or earlier, to workers who are recruited outside the area of intended employment. Applicants must provide documentation that they are eligible legally to work in the United States. Applicants should report or send resumes to NCWorks Career Center Sampson County, 115 North Blvd, Clinton, NC 28328 (910) 592-5756, or the nearest local office of their State Workforce Agency, and reference job order #NC10844470. EOE. H-300-18088-760355. cl4:12c B4 The Herald-Advocate, April 12, 2018

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4 temporary agricultural equipment operators needed for work in corn, soybeans, peanuts, wheat, oats, rye, tobacco and cotton and other diversified crops in Martin County, NC for Conoho Farms, Inc., with work beginning on or about 06/09/2018 and ending on or about 10/06/2018. The job offered is for a skilled operator and requires minimum 3 months verifiable work experience operating 200+ hp farm equipment. Applicants must possess proper and current driver license. The minimum offered wage rate that workers will be paid is $11.46 per hour. Workers must commit to work the entire contract period. Workers are guaranteed work for 3/4 of the contract period, beginning with the first day the worker arrives at the place of employment. All work tools, supplies and equipment are provided at no cost to the worker. Housing will be provided to those workers who cannot reasonably return to their permanent residence at the end of each working day. Transportation and subsistence will be provided by the employer upon completion of 50% of the work contract, or earlier, to workers who are recruited outside the area of intended employment. Applicants should report or send resumes to NCWorks Career Center Martin County, 407 East Blvd., Williamston, NC 27892 (252) 792-7816, or the near est local office of their State Workforce Agency, and reference job order #NC10844577. EOE. H-300-18088-079567. cl4:12c5 temporary farmworkers needed for common field labor in flue-cured tobacco in Martin County, North Carolina, for Manning & Carson Farms, LLC, with work beginning on or about 05/28/2018 and ending on or about 10/15/2018. The job offered is for an experienced farmworker and requires minimum 1 month verifiable work experience in the crop activities listed. The minimum offered wage rate that workers will be paid is $11.46 per hour. Workers must commit to work the entire contract period. Workers are guaranteed work for 3/4 of the contract period, beginning with the first day the worker arrives at the place of employment. All work tools, supplies and equipment are provided at no cost to the worker. Housing will be provided to those workers who cannot reasonably return to their permanent residence at the end of each working day. Transportation and subsistence will be provided by the employer upon completion of 50% of the work contract, or earlier, to workers who are recruited outside the area of intended employment. Applicants must provide documentation that they are eligible legally to work in the United States. Applicants should report or send resumes to NCWorks Career Center Martin County, 407 East Blvd., Williamston, NC 27892, (252) 792-7816, or the nearest local office of their State Workforce Agency, and reference job order #NC10843306. EOE. H300-18087-309385. cl4:12c6 temporary farmworkers needed for common field labor in corn, cotton, soy beans, flue-cured tobacco and other diversified crops in Lenoir County, North Carolina, for L.E. Rouse Farms, LLC with work beginning on or about 05/31/2018 and ending on or about 10/31/2018. The job offered is for an experienced farmworker and re quires minimum 1 month verifiable work experience in the crop activities listed. The minimum offered wage rate that workers will be paid is $11.46 per hour. Workers must commit to work the entire contract period. Workers are guaranteed work for 3/4 of the contract period, beginning with the first day the worker arrives at the place of employment. All work tools, supplies and equipment are provided at no cost to the worker. Housing will be provided to those workers who cannot reasonably return to their permanent residence at the end of each working day. Transportation and subsistence will be provided by the employer upon completion of 50% of the work contract, or earlier, to workers who are recruited outside the area of intended employment. Applicants must provide documentation that they are eligible legally to work in the United States. Applicants should report or send resumes to NCWorks Career Center Lenoir County, 231 Hwy 58 South, Kinston, NC 28501, (252) 7756021, or the nearest local office of their State Workforce Agency, and reference job order #NC10842680. EOE. H-300-18087-826310. cl4:12c6 temporary farmworkers needed for common field labor in strawberries, sweet potato, squash, sweet corn, mixed vegetables and other diversified crops in Harnett County, North Carolina for Nicolas Bahema, farm labor contractor, with work beginning on or about 05/21/2018 and ending on or about 11/25/2018. The job offered is for a skilled farmworker and requires minimum 1 month verifiable prior work experience hand harvesting vegetables. The minimum offered wage rate that workers will be paid is $11.46 per hour and piece rate may be offered depending on crop activity. Workers must commit to work the entire contract period. Workers are guaranteed work for 3/4 of the contract period, beginning with the first day the worker arrives at the place of employment. All work tools, supplies and equipment are provided at no cost to the worker. Housing will be provided to those workers who cannot reasonably return to their permanent residence at the end of each working day. Transportation and subsistence will be provided by the employer upon completion of 50% of the work contract, or earlier, to workers who are recruited outside the area of intended employment. Applicants must provide documentation that they are eligible legally to work in the United States. Applicants should report or send resumes to NCWorks Career Center Sampson County, 115 North Boulevard, Clinton, NC 28328 (910) 592-5756, or the nearest local office of their State Workforce Agency, and reference job order #NC10842577. EOE. H-300-18085-636795. cl4:12c6 temporary farmworkers needed for common field labor in flue-cured tobacco in Johnston County, North Carolina, for Triple B Farms, Inc. with work beginning on or about 06/02/2018 and ending on or about 10/27/2018. The job offered is for an experienced farmworker and requires minimum 1 month verifiable work experience in the crop activities listed. The minimum offered wage rate that workers will be paid is $11.46 per hour. Workers must commit to work the entire contract period. Workers are guaranteed work for 3/4 of the contract period, beginning with the first day the worker arrives at the place of employment. All work tools, supplies and equipment are provided at no cost to the worker. Housing will be provided to those workers who cannot reasonably return to their permanent residence at the end of each working day. Transportation and subsistence will be provided by the em ployer upon completion of 50% of the work contract, or earlier, to workers who are recruited outside the area of intended employment. Applicants must provide doc umentation that they are eligible legally to work in the United States. Applicants should report or send resumes to NCWorks Career Center Johnston County, 8998 U.S. Hwy 70 West, Suite 100, Clayton, NC 27520, (919) 553-0953 or the nearest local office of their State Workforce Agency, and reference job order #NC10843268. EOE. H-300-18087-963602. cl4:12c8 temporary farmworkers needed for common field labor to pull weeds/chop, cultivate and harvest cotton, flue-cured tobacco, corn, and soybeans in Johnston County, North Carolina, for Pope Brothers & Son, LLC, with work beginning on or about 05/28/2018 and ending on or about 10/27/2018. The job offered is for a skilled farmworker and requires minimum 1 month verifiable work experience in the crop activities listed. The minimum offered wage rate that workers will be paid is $11.46 per hour and piece rates may be offered depending on crop activity. Workers must commit to work the entire contract period. Workers are guaranteed work for 3/4 of the contract period, beginning with the first day the worker arrives at the place of employment. All work tools, supplies and equipment are provided at no cost to the worker. Housing will be provided to those workers who cannot reasonably return to their permanent residence at the end of each working day. Transportation and subsistence will be provided by the employer upon completion of 50% of the work contract, or earlier, to workers who are recruited outside the area of intended employment. Applicants must provide documentation that they are eligible legally to work in the United States. Applicants should report or send resumes to NCWorks Career Center Johnston County, 8998 U.S. Hwy 70 West, Suite 100, Clayton, NC 27520, (919) 553-0953, or the nearest local office of their State Workforce Agency, and reference job order #NC10842997. EOE. H-30018087-612749. cl4:12c9 temporary farmworkers needed for common field labor in corn, cotton, soybeans, tobacco, and other diversified crops in Lenoir County, North Carolina, for Faulkner Farms, LLC with work beginning on or about 05/31/2018 and ending on or about 10/31/2018. The job offered is for an experienced farmworker and requires minimum 1 month verifiable work experience in the crop activities listed. The minimum offered wage rate that workers will be paid is $11.46 per hour. Workers must commit to work the entire contract period. Workers are guaranteed work for 3/4 of the contract period, beginning with the first day the worker arrives at the place of employment. All work tools, supplies and equipment are provided at no cost to the worker. Housing will be provided to those workers who cannot reasonably return to their permanent residence at the end of each working day. Transportation and subsistence will be provided by the employer upon completion of 50% of the work contract, or earlier, to workers who are recruited outside the area of intended employment. Applicants must provide documentation that they are eligible legally to work in the United States. Applicants should report or send resumes to NCWorks Career Center Lenoir County, 231 Hwy. 58 South, Kinston NC 28501, (252) 7756021, or the nearest local office of their State Workforce Agency, and reference job order #NC10842711. EOE. H-300-18087-381256. cl4:12c10 temporary farmworkers needed for common field labor in cucumbers, corn, to bacco, soybeans, wheat and other diversified crops in Warren County, North Carolina, for Hight Family Farms, LLC with work beginning on or about 06/09/2018 and ending on or about 11/17/2018. The job offered is for a skilled farmworker and requires minimum 1 month verifiable work experience in the crop activities listed. The minimum of fered wage rate that workers will be paid is $11.46 per hour, and piece rates may be offered. Workers must commit to work the entire contract period. Workers are guar anteed work for 3/4 of the contract period, beginning with the first day the worker arrives at the place of employment. All work tools, supplies and equipment are provided at no cost to the worker. Housing will be provided to those workers who cannot rea sonably return to their permanent residence at the end of each working day. Transportation and subsistence will be provided by the employer upon completion of 50% of the work contract, or earlier, to workers who are recruited outside the area of in tended employment. Applicants must provide documentation that they are eligible legally to work in the United States. Applicants should report or send resumes to NCWorks Career Center Warren County, 309 N. Main St., Room 123, Warrenton, NC 27589, (252) 257-3230, or the nearest local office of their State Workforce Agency, and reference job order #NC10844589. EOE. H-300-18088-932479. cl4:12c17 temporary farmworkers needed for work in sweet potato, flue-cured tobacco, corn, soybeans, oats, rye, wheat, and cotton in Sampson County, North Carolina for Hobbs & Peterson Farms, Inc., with work beginning on or about 06/07/2018 and ending on or about 10/31/2018. The job offered is for an experienced farmworker and requires minimum 1 month verifiable work experience in the crop activities listed. The minimum offered wage rate that workers will be paid is $11.46 per hour and piece rate may be offered depending on crop activity. Workers must commit to work the entire contract period. Workers are guaranteed work for 3/4 of the contract period, beginning with the first day the worker arrives at the place of employment. All work tools, supplies and equipment are provided at no cost to the worker. Housing will be provided to those workers who cannot reasonably return to their permanent residence at the end of each working day. Transportation and subsistence will be provided by the employer upon completion of 50% of the work contract, or earlier, to workers who are recruited outside the area of intended employment. Applicants must provide documentation that they are eligible legally to work in the United States. Applicants should report or send resumes to NCWorks Career Center Sampson County, 115 North Blvd, Clinton, NC 28328 (910) 592-5756, or the nearest local office of their State Workforce Agency, and reference job order #NC10844483. EOE. H-300-18088-333398. cl4:12c24 temporary farmworkers needed for common field labor in tobacco and other diversified crops in Harnett and Johnston Counties, North Carolina for Brad Barefoot and Ronnie E. Wood, joint employers, with work beginning on or about 06/01/2018 and ending on or about 10/25/2018. The job offered is for a skilled farmworker and requires minimum 1 month verifiable work experience in the crop activities listed. The minimum offered wage rate that workers will be paid is $11.46 per hour. Workers must commit to work the entire contract period. Workers are guaranteed work for 3/4 of the contract period, beginning with the first day the worker arrives at the place of employment. All work tools, supplies and equipment are provided at no cost to the worker. Housing will be provided to those workers who cannot reasonably return to their permanent residence at the end of each working day. Transportation and subsistence will be pro vided by the employer upon completion of 50% of the work contract, or earlier, to work ers who are recruited outside the area of intended employment. Applicants must provide documentation that they are eligible legally to work in the United States. Applicants should report or send resumes to NCWorks Career Center Harnett County, 1137 E. Cornelius Harnett Blvd, Lillington, NC 27546, (910) 814-4042, or the nearest local office of their State Workforce Agency, and reference job order #NC10843071. EOE. H-300-18087-200826. cl4:12c41 temporary farmworkers needed for common field labor in blueberries in Bladen County, North Carolina, for Antonio Sanchez, farm labor contractor, with work beginning on or about 05/05/2018 and ending on or about 07/23/2018. The job offered is for an experienced farmworker and requires minimum 1 month verifiable work experience in the crop activities listed. The minimum offered wage rate that workers will be paid is $11.46 per hour and piece rate may be offered. Workers must commit to work the entire contract period. Workers are guaranteed work for 3/4 of the contract period, beginning with the first day the worker arrives at the place of employment. All work tools, supplies and equipment are provided at no cost to the worker. Housing will be provided to those workers who cannot reasonably return to their permanent residence at the end of each working day. Transportation and subsistence will be provided by the employer upon completion of 50% of the work contract, or earlier, to workers who are recruited outside the area of intended employment. Applicants must provide documentation that they are eligible legally to work in the United States. Applicants should report or send resumes to NCWorks Career Center Bladen County, 401 Mercer Mill Rd., Elizabethtown, NC 28337, (910) 862-3255, or the nearest local office of their State Workforce Agency, and ref erence job order #NC10832857. EOE. H-300-18073-440465. cl4:12c48 temporary farmworkers needed for common field labor in long green cukes, bell pepper, eggplant, squash and other diversified crops in Sampson County, North Carolina, for DL&B Enterprises, Inc., with work beginning on or about 05/26/2018 and ending on or about 10/27/2018. The job offered is for an experienced farmworker and requires minimum 1 month verifiable work experience in the crop activities listed. The minimum offered wage rate that workers will be paid is $11.46 per hour, and piece rates may be offered depending on crop activity. Workers must commit to work the entire contract period. Workers are guaranteed work for 3/4 of the contract period, beginning with the first day the worker arrives at the place of employment. All work tools, supplies and equipment are provided at no cost to the worker. Housing will be provided to those workers who cannot reasonably return to their permanent residence at the end of each working day. Transportation and subsistence will be provided by the employer upon completion of 50% of the work contract, or earlier, to workers who are recruited outside the area of intended employment. Applicants must provide doc umentation that they are eligible legally to work in the United States. Applicants should report or send resumes to NCWorks Career Center Sampson County, 115 North Boulevard, Clinton, NC 28328 (910) 592-5756, or the nearest local office of their State Workforce Agency, and reference job order #NC10842619. EOE. H-300-18087429753. cl4:12c70 temporary farmworkers needed for common field labor in flue-cured tobacco and sweet potatoes in Wilson County, North Carolina, for Oasis Harvesting, Inc. with work beginning on or about 05/12/2018 and ending on or about 11/23/2018. The job offered is for an experienced farmworker and requires minimum 1 month verifiable work experience in the crop activities listed. The minimum offered wage rate that workers will be paid is $11.46 per hour, and piece rate may be offered. Workers must commit to work the entire contract period. Workers are guaranteed work for 3/4 of the contract period, beginning with the first day the worker arrives at the place of employment. All work tools, supplies and equipment are provided at no cost to the worker. Housing will be provided to those workers who cannot reasonably return to their permanent residence at the end of each working day. Transportation and subsistence will be provided by the employer upon completion of 50% of the work contract, or earlier, to workers who are recruited outside the area of intended employment. Applicants must provide documentation that they are eligible legally to work in the United States. Applicants should report or send resumes to NCWorks Career Center Wilson County, 302 Tarboro St. Wilson, NC 27893 (252) 234-1129, or the nearest local office of their State Workforce Agency, and reference job order #NC10836097. EOE. H-300-18073-490142. cl4:12c108 temporary farmworkers needed for common field labor in flue-cured tobacco and sweet potatoes in Wilson County, North Carolina, for JFT Harvesting, Inc., Farm Labor Contractor, with work beginning on or about 04/07/2018 and ending on or about 11/23/2018. The job offered is for an experienced farmworker and requires minimum 1 month verifiable work experience in the crop activities listed. The minimum offered wage rate that workers will be paid is $11.46 per hour and piece rates may be offered depending on crop activity. Workers must commit to work the entire contract period. Workers are guaranteed work for 3/4 of the contract period, beginning with the first day the worker arrives at the place of employment. All work tools, supplies and equip ment are provided at no cost to the worker. Housing will be provided to those workers who cannot reasonably return to their permanent residence at the end of each working day. Transportation and subsistence will be provided by the employer upon completion of 50% of the work contract, or earlier, to workers who are recruited outside the area of intended employment. Applicants must provide documentation that they are eligible legally to work in the United States. Applicants should report or send resumes to NCWorks Career Center Wilson County, 302 Tarboro St. West, Wilson, NC 27893 (252) 234-1129, or the nearest local office of their State Workforce Agency, and reference job order #NC10816703. EOE. H-300-18045-314439. cl4:12c344 temporary farmworkers needed for hand harvesting blueberries, cukes, cherry tomatoes, and sweet potatoes in Sampson, Duplin, Harnett, Johnston, Pender, and Greene Counties, North Carolina, for Francisco Valadez, Jr., LLC, with work beginning on or about 05/08/2018 and ending on or about 11/28/2018. The job offered is for an experienced farmworker and requires minimum 1 month verifiable farm work experience in the crop activities listed. The minimum offered wage rate that workers will be paid is $11.46 per hour and piece rates may be offered. Workers must commit to work the entire contract period. Workers are guaranteed work for 3/4 of the contract period, beginning with the first day the worker arrives at the place of employment. All work tools, supplies and equipment are provided at no cost to the worker. Housing will be provided to those workers who cannot reasonably return to their permanent residence at the end of each working day. Transportation and subsistence will be provided by the employer upon completion of 50% of the work contract, or earlier, to workers who are recruited outside the area of intended employment. Applicants must provide doc umentation that they are eligible legally to work in the United States. Applicants should report or send resumes to NCWorks Career Center Johnston County, 8998 U.S. Hwy 70 West, Suite 100, Clayton, NC 27520, (919) 553-0953, or the nearest local office of their State Workforce Agency and reference job order #NC10836722. EOE. H-30018082-332827. cl4:12c Hills Auto World Dan 735-01 883505 US HWY17 S ZOLFOSPRINGS375-4441 4205 US HWY17 N BOWLINGGREEN cl1:12tfc Sandra Jimmy FREE ESTIMATES By Hour or ContractH. KIKER Tree Surgery 40 Years Full Time Service INSURED863-453-4942 863-453-4272 Cell: 863-664-9091 Tree Trimming Tree Removal Stump Grinding3601 E. Ramsey Way Avon Park, FL 33825cl5:4tfc T HE C LASSIFIEDS As Seen From This SideBy Jerry Gray Wolf PhillipsWauchula I've heard the expression "it's raining cats and dogs." I have never seen that, but I did get hit with a fish one day as I made a wild dash from the barn to the house. It was alive, and I kept it in a cow trough for over a year. My brother said it had been 99 days (3-18-18) since they had a drop of rain. He heard of a rural church that had a revival with several new members who joined during the revival that ended on Friday. The baptism was on Sunday, and the preacher had to immerse them in dust. One old ranch hand said according to that he got baptized every day. It is so dry in west Texas the kids grow to six feet and better. That way mud don't splatter in their eyes when it does rain. Their dishwasher is a slow sandblaster, and the only Dawn they know is about 15 minutes before sunrise. Being raised on a peanut farm in south Georgia we kids did not have a lot of money to spend, but we still had fun legally (most of the time). Johnny and I would go to town to see our girlfriends. (His wife Cindy was my girlfriend's best friend.) One Saturday we were going on a double-date to the river so we just took his truck. We got to town just as the theater movie had ended, and all these couples were walking out. One couple was hugging and kissing as they got to the parking lot. I told Johnny to slow down, and as we got even with them I stuck my head out of the window and in as sad a voice as I could muster said, "Honey, you told me you were not going to see him anymore." From two blocks down the street we could see them in our rear view mirror, standing about five feet apart screaming at each other. Johnny said it was too bad we did not know who they were. Mom's oldest brother lived on the farm joining ours. One July 4th we were having a family gathering to celebrate their 50th anniversary at their house. We were across the road with a BBQ pit under some very large oak trees. My brother Stanley saw several squirrels in the trees so my uncle told him to go get his shotgun and some shells. We could BBQ them, too. Stanley came back with a 12-gauge long-Tom (36-inch bar rel). He was used to our 20-gauge. He had never shot a 12-gauge, much less a long barrel. He shot one squirrel, the gun kicked, he rubbed his shoulder. Just then he saw two squirrels almost over head and without thinking shot both with one shot. He picked himself up off the ground where the gun had kicked him, shoulder already turning blue. For three days he could not lift his right arm enough to eat. It's a wonder his collar bone was not broken. That gun kicked harder than a mule. He never used that gun again, and so far as I know never shot a 12-gauge again. He later bought a 410/.22 rifle over-under but not a 12-gauge. Too bad Barney is no longer here. Although he was laid back, Mom said he was like the center part of her washing ma chine, the agitator. When you least expected it he would surprise you, like the time he brought Mom a live six-foot snake already coiled, or when he tried but failed to make friends with a skunk...two hours and two gallons of tomato juice. She don't like to tell of him taking a strike from a rattler meant for her, but he did. He was very sick for three days and laid up for a week. Boy, did he love ice cream. He was like a kid. Mom had me to fix him a gallon the third day (we shared it). He wanted more, and that was my job every afternoon. Vanilla is still my favorite. Mom would have had a fit if she knew I got half of it. Dad said there were times you kept your mouth shut while it was open for ice cream. It seems like every time you turn on the TV all you see are shootings or where someone was involved in an accident and left the scene not knowing if someone was injured or not. It makes you wonder what has happened to the society we live in. To me, guns are not the problem. A gun just can't harm someone just because it's a gun. Someone has to pick it up and pull the trigger---which leads me to ask, why do we need more gun laws? My husband was an avid hunter, therefore there were always guns in the home. He taught me how to shoot a gun after we moved out to an isolated area out in the country. When the chil dren were very young he taught them to respect a gun, that it was not a toy, and that it could kill. He taught our son as well as our daughters how to shoot a gun, so for me it's all about what they are taught at home as they are growing to adulthood. I love to work on things. I figure that if they don't work, I can't hurt them anyway. I just got my daughter's sewing machine fixed so she can do some sewing. My tablet quit working about two years ago so I just let the great-grands play games on it. I decided to try to fix the problems it was having so I could use it, too. It took several weeks of trial and error, but I persevered and had to redo everything. Now it works like it is supposed to, and I can get on the internet with it. We didn't always have the money to get things fixed so you either worked on them yourself or you just put them aside until you could afford to get them fixed. Everything doesn't always get fixed, but every time I take something apart I learn something about it so next time it's a little easier to figure out what went wrong. Like I said, if it's broke I can't do any more damage. Editors Note: Jonell Peavy lives in Avon Park and can be reached at 863-453-3589. Peavys PonderingsBy Jonell PeavySugar Possum of the late Truman Thomas ATTENTION SUBSCRIBERSIf you are moving or changing your address, please let our subscription department know as soon as possible so your service will not be de layed. 863-773-3255 Looking to sell, rent or hire? CLASSIFIEDS DEADLINEIS TUESDAY AT NOON April 12, 2018, The Herald-Advocate B5

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By TOM STAIKOf The Herald-AdvocateAviation enthusiasts trav eled from across the SunshineState last week for the 2018edition of the Bensen DaysFly-In at the Wauchula Munic ipal Airport. The four-day event cele brated the gyrocopter. The craft, which comes in oneor two-seat variations,was first developed by Dr.Igor Bensen in North Carolinain 1952. Wauchula’s annual celebra tion drew visitors, hobbyistsand professionals from wideand far. Raven Morgan drove to the event last Thursday fromNaples to check out the craftwith her husband. “Before hebuys one, I want to ride inone,” Morgan said. Morgan hitched a ride with Chris Lord, a manufacturer of gyroplanes with Sebring-based Pictaio Aerospace. Hepiloted Morgan’s maiden trip,a 15-minute trek aboveHardee County’s pastures,groves and mines. “It was an incredible expe rience,” Morgan said. The rides were a coveted commodity as waiting listsfilled up quickly. Greg Spicola, of Brooksville, was another pilotexhibiting at the festival. Spicola, who flies out of Zephyrhills, is a certified gy roplane flight instructor whoworks with the manufacturingfirm SilverLight Aviation. Flying an American Range I model two-seater gyroplane,Spicola treated The Herald-Advocate to an aerial trekacross the countryside. Spicola piloted his craft on a low pass through a cow pas ture. Flying approximately six feet off the ground, overbarbed-wire fences and lowgrowing brush at around 60mph, the pasture excursionprovided a unique look at theparched landscape of earlyspring. Spicola took time to act as tour guide while piloting thecraft. The journey over the nearby phosphate mine northwest ofthe airport provided plenty ofwildlife as dozens of alligatorsdotted the water line below. “Look at that gator,” Spi cola said, gesturing to the leftof the plane. “It must be 14feet.” Circling back for a better angle, the sun-bathing gator infact dwarfed the shadow castby the plane. “I promise to try to land on the road, if we have to land,”Spicola quipped. “I don’t wantto outswim a gator.” Bensen Days Fly-In Draws Crowds To Wauchula PHOTOS BY TOM STAIK Bensen Days at the Wauchula Municipal Airport was held last week. A pair of gyroplanes glide above the tree line near the Wauchula Municipal Airportlast Thursday. Citrus trees seen from the bird’s-eye view offered by the open cab of a gyroplane. This giant gator was spotted while he took a sun bath at the mine northwest of theWauchula Municipal Airport. An aerial view from a gyroplane gave a glimpse at the dry conditions across HardeeCounty. Guests at Bensen Days inspect a line of gyroplanes on the tarmac of Wauchula Mu nicipal Airport last Thursday. A line of gyroplanes drew a pack of interested onlookers. A pilot prepares for a flight by topping off his tank. Greg Spicola, a certified flight instructor, fills his tank before taking to the air atBensen Days. B6 The Herald-Advocate, April 12, 2018

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Crime Blotter During the past week, sheriff’s deputies and citypolice officers investigatedthe following incidents andmade the following arrests: COUNTY April 8, Carlos PerezRios, 36, of Marion St., ZolfoSprings, was arrested by Dep.John Layport on two counts ofwithholding support of chil dren. April 8, Vianca Vilareal, 25, of 4802 Epps Ave., was ar rested by Dep. Donny Ever sole on a charge of contemptof court. April 8, a residential bur glary on Briar Patch Road andcriminal mischief on LambertRoad were reported. April 7, Estevan Vincente Ramirez, 24, of 3864 FussellRd., Bowling Green, was ar rested by Dep. John Layportand charged with battery,criminal mischief with prop erty damage and resisting/ob structing an officer withoutviolence. April 6, Hilario Dorantes Ortiz, 33, of 133 Lang Dr.,Wauchula, was arrested bySgt. Mark McCoy and chargedwith battery. April 6, Oliver Stuart Brophy, 32, of 169 WoodstorkWay, Frostproof, was arrestedby Cpl. Chris Albritton andcharged with false or misuseof E-911 system. April 6, Becky Ann Smith, 49, of 159 ShackelfordRd., Wauchula, was arrestedby Det. Lyle Hart on a chargeof violation of probation. April 6, Julian Windell Keen, 54, of 1371 NE ViolaRd., Avon Park, was arrestedby the Drug Task Force (DTF)and charged with possessionof methamphetamine and pos session of drug paraphernalia. April 6, vehicles reported stolen on Fifth Street East andon Tom Bryan Road, criminalmischief on Polk Road and atheft on Fairfax Drive were re ported. April 5, Steven Howell Richardson, 24, of 114Franklin St., Bowling Green,was arrested by Det. Lyle Harton two counts of violation ofprobation. April 5, Dustin Dewayne Rimes, 36, of 812 S. EighthAve., Wauchula, was arrestedby DTF and charged with pos session of methamphetamine,possession of drug parapher nalia and driving with knowl edge of a suspended license. April 5, Shyann Mariah Baker, 23, of 2425-21st St.,Sarasota, was arrested by DTFon three counts of violation ofprobation and a traffic offense. April 5, Michael Jerome Youngblood, 40, of 1030Makowski Rd., Wauchula, wasarrested by Sgt. Mark McCoyon a charge of violation of pro bation. April 5, a residential bur glary on Fifth Street East wasreported. April 4, Arcos Macario Vasquez, 23, General Delivery,Plant City, was arrested byDep. Kim Pfeiffer on a chargeof aggravated battery with adeadly weapon. April 4, Jason Lee Skip per, 44, of 3349 E. Hwy 98,Fort Meade, was arrested byDep. Kim Pfeiffer on a chargeof withholding support of chil dren. April 4, Carlos Velasco Gutierrez, 30, General Deliv ery, Bartow, was arrested byDep. Kim Pfeiffer on a chargeof violation of probation. April 4, Andrew Michael Rupert, 30, of 920 Altman Rd.,Wauchula, was arrested bySgt. Danny O’Bryan on acharge of violation. April 4, Carolina Luna, 34, of 4632 Pine Ave., Bowl ing Green, was arrested byDTF and charged with posses sion of methamphetamine andpossession of drug parapher nalia. April 4, Jeremy Franks, 19, of 1568 Colson Rd.,Wauchula, was arrested byDTF and charged with posses sion of methamphetamine andpossession of drug parapher nalia. April 4, Yolanda Dawn Kersey, 18, and William GradyNoel, 38, both of 5165 DeerRun, Zolfo Springs, were ar rested by DTF and eachcharged with possession ofmethamphetamine and posses sion of drug paraphernalia. April 4, burglary of a conveyance on WilkersonRoad, and a theft on WilkersonRoad were reported. April 3, Monte Tyrell Carlton, 24, of 813 PleasantWay, Bowling Green, was ar rested by Dep. Steve Ahrensand charged with criminalmischief—damage to prop erty. April 3, Juan Madrigal, 39, of 3994 Sunset Dr., ZolfoSprings, was arrested by Cpl.Chris Albritton and chargedwith battery. April 3, Amanda Leigh Griffin, 40, and Manuel Mar tinez, 31, both of 804 S. NinthAve., Wauchula, were arrestedby DTF and each charged withpossession of methampheta mine and possession of drugparaphernalia. She was alsocharged with destroying/tam pering with evidence and hewas also charged with a trafficoffense. April 3, a residential bur glary on South Sixth Avenue (U. S. 17 South), burglary of aconveyance on OxendineRoad and a theft on ShawRoad were reported. April 2, Lashonda Barbitt Baker, 43, of 838 PleasantWay, was arrested by Dep.Ryan Abbott and charged withburglary with assault or bat tery. At the jail, Dep. ChrisBandy also charged her withviolation of probation. WAUCHULA April 6, Mikey Retana, 24, of 4616 Chester Ave.,Bowling Green, was arrestedby Ofc. Kaleigh Anderson andcharged with possession ofsynthetic cannabis, smugglingcontraband into a detention fa cility, possession of drug para phernalia and driving withknowledge of a suspended li cense. April 6, a theft on South Sixth Avenue (U. S. 17 South)was reported. April 5, John Manuel Juarez, 19, of 2114-60th Ave.W., Bradenton, and AngelicaSalas, 18, of 1044 Sumner Rd.,Wauchula, were arrested byOfc. Kaleigh Anderson andeach charged with possessionof marijuana and possession ofdrug paraphernalia. April 5, criminal mischief on South Ninth Avenue, andthefts on LaPlaya Drive and onSouth Ninth Avenue were re ported. April 4, a residential bur glary on Green Street was re ported. April 2, a theft on River Chase Circle was reported. BOWLING GREEN April 3, a theft on Chester Avenue was reported. April 2, Donnell Terrell Patton, 41, of 605 SR 66,Zolfo Springs, was arrested byOfc. Breanna Locke andcharged with battery. Courthouse Report COUNTY COURT The following marriage li censes were issued recently inthe office of the county court: Mario Lopez Perez, 31, Wauchula, and Abelita RamosBautista, 35, Wauchula. Patrick James Zadai, 43, Ona, and Sabrina EleanorFreeman, 28, Ona. Andre Terron Louis, 31, Bowling Green, and CindyElisondo, 35, Wauchula. The recent small claims cases were unavailable be cause the state computer sys tem was being updated. The following criminal traffic and misdemeanorcases were disposed of re cently in county court: Sabrina Brown, affray, time served, $625 fines, costs andfees placed on lien. Christian Eric Guyer, DUI with property damage/personalinjury, probation 12months,drug/alcohol abuseevaluation, license suspendedsix months, tag impound 10days, 50 hours communityservice, $1,103 fines, costs andfees placed on lien; DUI withproperty damage/personal in jury, not prosecuted. Sharon Michelle Carr, do mestic battery, trespassing onan occupied structure/con veyance and battery, trans ferred to pretrial diversionprogram, return May 2.Timothy Gregg Mushrush, as sault, not prosecuted. Melanie Dawn Peter, do mestic battery and trespass onan occupied structure/con veyance, transferred to pretrialdiversion program, return May2. Myrna Jean Platt, domestic battery, trespass on an occu pied structure/conveyance andbattery, transferred to pretrialdiversion program, return May2. Susan Leshaune Rau, bat tery, transferred to pretrial di version program, return May 2. Tiko Severe, resisting/ob structing arrest without vio lence, 26 days in jail withcredit for time served, $550fines, costs and fees placed onlien; domestic battery and do mestic assault, not prosecuted. Austin Todd Nellis, petit theft and resisting a merchant,30 days in jail on each charge,$12.97 restitution; $500 fines,costs and fees. CIRCUIT COURT The following civil actions were filed recently in the of fice of the circuit court: Lorenza Alamia vs. George Alamia, petition for injunctionfor protection. Rajeeni Faulk vs. Donnell Terrell Patton, petition for in junction for protection. Gladys W. Craycraft and Gregory Alan Craycraft, di vorce. Cassandra McCafferty and James Edward McCafferty, di vorce. Tracie A. King and the state Department of Revenue(DOR) vs. Leia Corean Mc Call, petition for child support. There were no decisions recorded on civil cases pend ing in the circuit court as thestate computers were beingupgraded. The following felony crim inal cases were disposed ofrecently by the circuit judge.Defendants have been adju dicated guilty unless notedotherwise. When adjudica tion is withheld, it is pendingsuccessful completion of pro bation. Sentences are pur suant to an investigativereport by and the recommen dation of the state probationoffice and also state sentenc ing guidelines. Final discre tion is left to the judge: Adam Robert Acuna, viola tion of probation (originalcharge sale of methampheta mine), probation modified toinclude new drug abuse evalu ation, $250 fines and costsadded to outstanding fines,costs and fees. Luis Banda, possession of drug paraphernalia, timeserved, $1,220 fines, costs andfees placed on lien; threecounts possession of metham phetamine, two counts posses sion of drug paraphernalia anda traffic offense, not prose cuted. Sabrina Ann Brown, posses sion of methamphetamine, ad judication withheld, sevencounts petit theft, seven countsuttering a forged check, sevencounts forgery and possessionof drug paraphernalia, timeserved, drug offender proba tion five years, $879.49 restitu tion, $1,470 fines, costs andfees. Monte Carlton, aggravated battery with a deadly weaponwith great bodily harm— amended to battery, probationone year, anger managementclass, no use or possession offirearm, restitution to be set,$1,672 fines, costs and fees. Diana Angelica Chavez, possession of methampheta mine, possession of cannabisand possession of drug para phernalia, transferred to drugpretrial diversion program, re turn April 17. Margaret Beatrice Howell, battery on a law enforcementofficer and resisting/obstruct ing an officer without violence,time served, drug offender pro bation four years, substanceabuse evaluation, 50 hourscommunity service, $1,572fines, costs and fees. Christopher Lynn King, vi olation of probation (originalcharge fraudulent use of acredit card), and driving whilelicense suspended, probationrevoked, community control—house arrest two years withcondition of 180 days in jailwith credit for 61 days served,$350 fees and costs added tooutstanding fines, costs andfees and placed on lien. Emily Erin Slone, posses sion of alprazolam, adjudica tion withheld, drug offenderprobation five years, substanceabuse evaluation, $1,020 fines,costs and fees. Raymond Mark Medrano, violation of probation (originalcharge burglary of structure),probation revoked, FloridaState Prison twenty-fourmonths with credit for timeserved, $300 fees and costsadded to outstanding fines,costs and fees and placed onlien. Mackinson St. Fort, two counts selling cocaine within1,000 feet of a church/school,Florida State Prison four yearsfollowed by drug offender pro bation two years, substanceabuse evaluation, $1,670 fines,costs and fees placed on lien;aggravated assault with afirearm—amended to improperexhibition of a dangerousweapon and possession ofcannabis, time served;twocounts possession of cocainewith intent to sell within 1,000feet of a school, possession ofa structure for trafficking/saleor manufacture of a controlledsubstance and owning/rentinga structure/vehicle known tosell drugs, child abuse and pos session of drug paraphernalia,not prosecuted. Sergio Felipe TroncosoAguirre, possession ofmethamphetamine, possessionof heroin and possession ofdrug paraphernalia, transferredto misdemeanor court. Lee Edward Woods, posses sion of synthetic cannabis, ad judication withheld, possessionof drug paraphernalia and vio lation of probation (originalcharges possession of syntheticcannabis and possession ofdrug paraphernalia), probationrevoked, time served, newdrug offender probation threeyears with condition of newsubstance abuse evaluation,$1,451 fines costs and fees; vi olation of probation (originalcharge driving while licensesuspended), probation re voked, 15 days in jail, $175fines, costs and fees. There were no real estate transactions recorded as thestate computers were beingupgraded. The Southwest Florida WaterManagement District(SWFWMD) announces the fol lowing public meeting to whichall interested persons are in vited:Peace River Manasota Re gional Water Supply AuthorityAnnual Regional Meeting.Topic is continuing need forinvestment in water infrastruc ture. One or more GoverningBoard members may attend.DATE/TIME: Friday, April 27,2018; 11:30 a.m.PLACE: 8998 SW County Road769 (Kings Highway), Arcadia,FL 34269A copy of the agenda may beobtained at http://www.regional water.org/mydocs/MiscDocu ments/INVITEBBQ2018.pdf.For more information, you maycontact: Cara.martin@water matters.org; 1(800)423-1476 (FLonly) or (352)796-7211, x4636(Ad Order EXE0615) 4:12c Notices Notices 4:12c 4:12c ______________________________ IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF SARASOTA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2016-CA-002095 NC WILL FERRELL, as Trustee ofthe 5911 Olive Ave. FamilyLand Trust, WILL FERRELL,As Trustee of the 2502 Robinson Avenue Family LandTrust, and WILL FERRELL, asTrustee of the 5413 Carmen Avenue Family Land Trust, PlaintiffVs.DALE SEXTON, Individually,SUNSTATE ROOFING & REPAIRS, LLC, A Florida Limited Liability Company, and WINSTON TILLEY, individually,Defendant_____________________________/ NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY given that pursuant to a Writ of Execu tion issued in the Circuit Court,of Sarasota County, Florida, onthe 20 day of March, 2018, in thecause wherein WILL FERRELL,as Trustee of the 5911 Olive Ave.Family Land Trust, WILL FER RELL,As Trustee of the 2502Robinson Avenue Family LandTrust, and WILL FERRELL, asTrustee of the 5413 Carmen Av enue Family Land Trust, is plain tiff and DALE SEXTON, Individu ally, SUNSTATE ROOFING &REPAIRS, LLC,A Florida LimitedLiability Company, and WIN STON TILLEY, individually is de fendant, being CaseNo.2016-CA-002095 NC in, I,Arnold Lanier, Sheriff of HardeeCounty, Florida, have leviedupon all right said Court, title,and interest of the defendant, inand to the following describedreal property to wit: LOT 31 GILLARD FARMS,ACCORDING TO THEMAP OR PLAT THERE OFRECORDED IN PLATBOOK 60, PAGE 4, PUB LIC RECORDS OFHARDEE COUNTY,FLORIDAHARDEE COUNTY PROP ERTY APPRAISER ID #13-34-25-0100-00001-0031 Said real property shall be viewable to the public at theHardee County Property Ap praiser’s Website. All biddersmust have Drivers License withthem and must register withHardee County Sheriff’s Of fice/Civil Unit at location of saleprior to start time of sale. I shall offer this property for sale, at the front lobby of theHardee County Sheriff’s Officelocated at 900 East Summit St.Wauchula, Fl. 33873 in theCounty of Hardee, State ofFlorida, on the 10 day of May,2018 at the hour of 11:00 AM, oras soon thereafter as possible. Iwill offer for sale all of the saiddefendant’s right, title, and inter est in the aforesaid real propertyat public auction and will sell thesame subject to all taxes, priorliens, encumbrances and judg ments, if any, to the highest andbest bidder for CASH IN HAND.The proceeds to be applied asfar as may be to the payment ofcosts and the satisfaction of theabove described execution asprescribed by Fla. Stat. 56.27.Dated at Wauchula, HardeeCounty, Florida this 5 day ofApril 2018. Arnold Lanier, Sheriff of Hardee County, By: Sgt. Danny O’Bryan Deputy Sheriff In accordance with the Ameri cans with Disabilities Act, per sons with disabilities needing aspecial accommodation to par ticipate in this proceedingshould contact Civil Departmentno later than seven days prior tothe proceeding at 863-773-0304ext 208. 4:12-5:3c ______________________________ April 12, 2018, The Herald-Advocate B7

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HARDEE COUNTY SCHOOLS KINDERGARTEN REGISTRATIONRegistration for Kindergarten students will begin ac cording to the schedule below. Bowling Green Elementary School May 3, 2018 5:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m. Hilltop Elementary School May 7, 2018 5:30 p.m. 6:30 p.m. North Wauchula Elementary School May 9, 2018 5:30 p.m. 7:00 p.m. Wauchula Elementary School May 3, 2018 5:30 p.m. 7:00 p.m. Zolfo Springs Elementary School May 3, 2018 5:30 p.m. 6:30 p.m.Kindergarten students must be five years old on or before September 1, 2018.Parents are required to bring the following documents: An original birth certificate Current physical Shot recordStudents who have not met the above requirements will not be permitted to enter school in the fall. Ac cording to Florida Law, no student will be permitted to enter first grade unless he/she has completed an approved public or private kindergarten program. 4:5-26cESCUELAS DE CONDADO DE HARDEE REGISTRO DE KINDERRegistro para estudiantes de Kinder comenzar con la fecha que aparece a continuacin. Bowling Green Elementary 3 de Mayo del 2018 5:00 p.m. 6:00p.m. Hilltop Elementary 7 de Mayo del 2018 5:30 p.m. 6:30 p.m. North Wauchula Elementary 3 de Mayo del 2018 5:30 p.m. 7:00 p.m. Wauchula Elementary 3 de Mayo del 2018 5:30 p.m. 7:00 p.m. Zolfo Springs Elementary 3 de Mayo del 2018 5:30 p.m. 6:30 p.m.Los estudiantes de Kinder deben tener cinco aos de edad en o antes del 1 de septiembre del 2018.Los padres deben llevar los documentos siguientes: Un certificado de nacimiento original Fisico corriente Registro de vacunasNo se permitir a los estudiantes que no han cumplido los requisitos anteriores a entrar a la es cuela en el otoo. Segn en acuerdo con la ley de Florida, no se permitir ningn estudiante para entrar en primer grado a menos que ha completado un pro grama aprobado de Kinder pblicos o privados. 4:5-26cQ: I was so excited to read in your column that Helena Bonham Carter will be join ing "The Crown" for seasons three and four. Do you have any more casting news? Katie F., via email A: As you know, we have our new Queen Elizabeth, Olivia Colman, and our new Princess Margaret, Helena Bonham Carter. Now get ready for your new Prince Philip: "Outlander" and "Game of Thrones" star Tobias Menzies. As I wrote previously, the roles are being re cast because the char acters themselves are aging, and producers wanted slightly older actors in stead of relying on prosthetics, age makeup and the like. I am a fan of this decision because that kind of stuff often takes me out of the story. I'm also excited to see what this new crop of ac tors will bring to their roles. And don't feel bad for the original actors. They knew going into the project that they would be recast after season two, and they all agreed with the logic of the decision. For season three, we'll catch up with the Royal Family in the '70s. We'll also get to meet Camilla Parker Bowles, who, as you know, dated Prince Charles before he was be trothed to Princess Diana. Early word has it that producers are on the hunt for Diana and Margaret Thatcher, both of whom will be heavily featured in sea son four (not season three, as previously speculated). According to the BBC, filming won't begin until this summer, with season three premiering some time in 2019. But don't despair: Seasons three and four will be filmed back to back, so there won't be quite as long a wait after the third installment. *** Q: I know George Clooney's twins have proba bly been keeping him pretty busy, but when will I get to see his handsome face on screen again? Kyle R., Boston A: George makes his return to series television soon as di rector, executive producer and star of the original Hulu series "Catch 22," a six-part limited series based on the seminal novel of the same name by Joseph Heller. "The Sinner" star Christopher Abbott will portray the lead character of Capt. John Yossarian, with George playing Col. Cathcart and Hugh Laurie as Major de Coverley. No word yet on when the series will premiere. *** Celebrity ExtraBy Cindy Elavsky PICKS OF THE WEEK "The Greatest Showman" (PG) Witness the rise and drive behind America's original sanguine starmaker, P.T. Bar num (Hugh Jackman). His story runs from his roots in poverty, through a series of failed busi ness opportunities, to his all-in gamble collecting what were the dregs of society, and duding them up to be displayed as jew eled rarities ... and it does so with original music and dance numbers! Jackman plays Bar num as relentlessly positive and captivating, and Michelle Williams is a real sweetheart as Barnum's wife Charity. The music alone is wonderful: You can feel the confidence bloom ing in "This Is Me," and the but terflies in your stomach during "Rewrite the Stars," the ropeswinging love song between Philip Carlyle (Zac Efron) and Anne Wheeler (Zendaya). "My Friend Dahmer" (R) This dark little film is a portrait of a young Jeffrey Dahmer told from the perspective of his reallife high-school pal Derf (Alex Wolff). Ordered by his clueless dad (Dallas Roberts) to "get some friends," Dahmer takes up with a small cadre of kids who form a Dahmer fan club, insert ing Dahmer into a variety of pranks and hijinks. But alone, he's a young man on the fringe weird, fixated on a local jog ger, vulnerable and detached. He slowly mutates into a killer, as his unhinged mother (Anne Heche) battles mental illness. If you are a fan of Ross Lynch from his "Austin and Ally" days on Disney, be prepared for a sudden, disturbing turnabout. "The Phantom Thread" (R) Set in the high-fashion world of London in the early 1950s, Reynolds Woodcock (Daniel Day-Lewis) rules as a couturier to the elite. His fash ion house is managed by his sis ter Cyril (Lesley Manville). He is highly organized, strictly controlled by routine and a con firmed bachelor. While deliver ing a piece to a client of great esteem, he is captivated by a waitress in a countryside restau rant. He woos Alma (Vicky Krieps), and she becomes his lover, muse, and ultimately, wife, but not before their tor mented wills unfurl and collide: Stitched together in one place, the seams are ripped apart in another. The film, which re ceived six Oscar nominations, is another rousing success for director Paul Thomas Ander son. "Braven" (R) "Big and beautiful" describes both the mountain scenery in this stan dard but well-done action feast and its star, Jason Momoa. He plays gentle giant Joe Braven father, husband and loggingcompany owner. He heads up to his cabin in the woods with his good old dad to button it up for the season, when lo and behold, they come across a giant bag of cocaine, which was stashed in the cabin by some drug traffick ers. While there's only one gun and a bow and arrows in the cabin, you get the idea that Mr. Braven is skilled in the art of defense -and you won't be dis appointed to see how. Garret Dillahunt does a wonderful turn as the villainous bad guy Kassen. NEW TV RELEASES "The Coroner" Season 1 "Outlander" Season 3 "Vice Principals" The Com plete Series(c) 2018 King Features Synd., Inc.Couch TheaterDVD PreviewsBy Sam Struckhoff DVDs reviewed here are available in stores the week of April 9. Ben Affleck will star for Netflix in "Triple Frontier," along with this year's bestactor Oscar nominee Oscar Isaac, who is upcoming in the thriller "Operation Finale," with Sir Ben Kingsley; "Life Itself," with Antonio Banderas (both films open Sept. 21); and "At Eternity's Gate," with an other of this year's Oscar nom inees, Willem Dafoe. Also starring with Affleck in "Triple Frontier" are Charlie Hunnam and Garrett Hedlund, of last year's "Mudbound" and the upcoming "Burden," with For est Whitaker. Affleck was the executive producer of "Justice League," which cost $300 mil lion and grossed $658 million. Affleck's ex-wife, Jennifer Garner, currently in "Love, Simon," is returning to series television in the new Lena Dunham HBO comedy series "Camping," with former "Doc tor Who" David Tennant (2005-2010). The show is an adaptation of the hit British TV series of the same name. Tennant soon will be seen in "Mary, Queen of Scots," with two of this year's best-actress nominees, Saoirse Ronan and Margot Robbie, due Nov. 2. Meanwhile, "Will & Grace" is such a ratings hit for NBC that execs have extended sea son two's 13-episode order to 18 episodes and have already greenlighted a third season for 23 episodes. *** Tom Hardy, Marvel's "Spi der-Man" adversary "Venom," will hit screens Oct. 5 in his own film (with Michelle Williams). He's currently filming "Fonzo," in which he plays the aging gangster Al Capone, with Linda Cardellini as his wife Mae, plus Kathrine Narducci ("The Sopranos"), and Matt Dillon ("Crash") and Kyle MacLachlan ("Twin Peaks") as henchmen. Fandango reports the up coming "Avengers: Infinity War" has outsold both "Bat man v Superman" and "The Black Panther" in advance sales in the first 24 hours tickets became available. The film doesn't open until April 27. Chris Pine, currently in "A Wrinkle in Time" (slowly building at the box office), is set for the Netflix Scottish his torical action drama "Outlaw King," due Nov. 23, with "Nocturnal Animals" Golden Globe-winner Aaron TaylorJohnson. Pine also is produc ing and starring in the TNT limited series "One Day She'll Darken." Three-time Oscar nominee Edward Norton for "Primal Fear" (1996), "American History X" (1998) and "Birdman" (2014) currently is shooting "Motherless Brooklyn," which he wrote and is produc ing, directing and star ring in, with Willem Dafoe, Alec Baldwin and Bruce Willis. He's also lent his voice to Wes Ander son's animated film "Isle of Dogs." *** Disney is launching its own streaming service in the fall of 2019. One of the first films an nounced is a live-action reboot of "Lady and the Tramp." Meanwhile, Disney CEO Bob Igor, who put his retirement off until 2021, will make up ward of $423 million for the additional four years. And how much will you earn in the next four years? LOL(c) 2018 King Features Synd., Inc. HollywoodBy Tony Rizzo Top 10 Movies Inside 1. Ready Player One (PG13) Tye Sheridan, Olivia Cooke 2. Tyler Perry's Acrimony (R) Taraji P. Henson, Lyriq Bent 3. Black Panther (PG-13) Chadwick Boseman, Michael B. Jordan 4. I Can Only Imagine (PG) J. Michael Finley, Brody Rose 5. Pacific Rim: Uprising (PG-13) John Boyega, Scott Eastwood 6. Sherlock Gnomes (PG) animated 7. Love, Simon (PG-13) Nick Robinson, Jennifer Gar ner 8. Tomb Raider (PG-13) Alicia Vikander, Dominic West 9. A Wrinkle in Time (PG) Storm Reid, Oprah Winfrey 10. Paul, Apostle of Christ (PG-13) James Faulkner, Jim Caviezel(c) 2018 King Features Synd., Inc.READERS: I know many of you have been waiting with bated breath to find out whether your favorite CW shows have been renewed. Without further ado, let me announce with glee that my favorite CW show, "Crazy Ex-Girlfriend," will re turn for a fourth season. Al though I am bummed to hear that it will be the show's final season, creator and star Rachel Bloom had it planned for four seasons from the beginning. Also returning are "Supernat ural," "Arrow," "Supergirl," "Riverdale," "The Flash," "DC's Legends of Tomorrow," "Black Lightning," "Dynasty" and "Jane the Virgin." Come May, we'll learn the fates of "iZombie," "The 100," "Life Sentence" and "Valor." Write to Cindy at King Fea tures Weekly Service, 628 Vir ginia Drive, Orlando, FL 32803; or e-mail her at let ters@cindyelavsky.com.(c) 2018 King Features Synd., Inc. LLOYDHALLinvites all his friends and neighbors to come see him at205 N. Charleston Fort Meade1-800-673-9512 www.directchevy.com 4:12c B10 The Herald-Advocate, April 12, 2018

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April 12, 2018, The Herald-Advocate B11

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4:12,19c OF 2018 HARDEE HIGH SCHOOL SENIORS ADS START AS LOW AS $38 Herald-AdvocateHardee County’s Hometown Coverage115 S. 7th Ave. • Wauchula • 773-3255 ATTENTION PARENTS The Herald-Advocate will soon be publishing our Annual Graduation Keepsake Edition honoring all Hardee High School graduating seniors. Place an ad in this keepsake edition personally congratulating your senior on his/her accomplishments, with either a recent photo or one from his/her past, or both. DEADLINE • THURSDAY, MAY 10 4:12-5:3nc The DEPUTY DELIGHT COURTESY PHOTO Stacey Powell's class at Bowling Green Elementary created a welcoming message,complete with their artwork, for Hardee County sheriff’s Dep. Alice Simandl. Theywanted to welcome her to their school, and to say thank you and that they love herfor coming around to check on them each day. Simandl also was stationed at BGEduring Hurricane Irma, assisting with the emergency shelter. Happy for her return,BGE also gives a big shoutout to Sheriff Arnold Lanier for making this possible. BRAINY BREAKFAST COURTESY PHOTOS A sweet surprise greeted honor-roll students at Bowling Green Elementary. Young sters who made the honor roll for the third nine-week grading period were cele brated and congratulated, and treated to doughnuts and juice. Each young scholaralso receives a ribbon and recognition. Aztec Chili Adds Hint of Cocoa I absolutely love all things chocolate! I particularly enjoyusing cocoa in savory dishesfrom barbeque spice rubs andsauces to pots of fiery black-bean chili. The story of choco late begins with cocoa treesthat grew wild in the tropicalrainforests of the Amazonbasin and other areas in Centraland South America. The Maya Indians and the Aztecs recognized the value ofcocoa beans hundreds of yearsbefore cocoa was brought toEurope. It was the Maya Indi ans, an ancient people whosedescendants still live in CentralAmerica, who first discoveredthe delights of cocoa as longago as 600 AD. The Mayanpeople lived on the YucatanPeninsula, a tropical area inwhat is now southern Mexico,where wild cocoa trees grew.At first they harvested cocoabeans from the rainforest trees,then cleared areas of lowlandforest to grow their own cocoatrees in the first known cocoaplantations. A drink called "chocolatl" — made from roasted cocoabeans, water and a little spice— was their primary use, butcocoa beans also were valuedas currency. An early explorervisiting Central America foundthat four cocoa beans couldbuy a pumpkin; 10 could buy arabbit. Because cocoa beans were valuable, they were given asgifts at ceremonies such as achild's coming of age and onreligious occasions. Merchantsoften traded cocoa beans forcommodities such as cloth,jade and ceremonial feathers.Mayan farmers transportedtheir cocoa beans to market bycanoe or in large basketsstrapped to their backs.Wealthy merchants traveledfurther, employing porters to carry their wares, as there wereno horses, pack animals orwheeled carts in Central Amer ica at that time. Some venturedas far as Mexico, the land ofthe Aztecs -introducing themto the much-prized cocoabeans. The Aztecs were an an cient nomadic people whofounded a great city in the Val ley of Mexico in 1325 --Tenochtitlan. "Chocolatl" was consumed in large quantities by theAztecs as a luxury drink. TheAztec version of this much-prized drink was described as"finely ground, soft, foamy,reddish, bitter with chilli water,aromatic flowers, vanilla andwild bee honey." Because of the dry climate, the Aztecs were unable to growcocoa themselves, so they ob tained supplies of cocoa beansfrom trade or "tribute," a formof taxation paid by provincesconquered by the Aztecs. By the time the Spanish in vaded Mexico in the 16th cen tury, the Aztecs had created apowerful empire: Their armieswere supreme in Mexico. Trib utes in the form of food, clothand luxury items such as cocoabeans flowed into Tenochtitlan.When the Spanish defeated theAztecs, they destroyed much ofTenochtitlan and rebuilt it asMexico City, the capital ofmodern-day Mexico. Thelegacy of the highly civilizedand sophisticated Aztecs re mains, however, in the form oftheir indigenous language,Nahuatl — which is still spo ken by more than 2 millionpeople — their archaeologicalruins and extraordinary tem ples and cities, skilled and sen sitive art, an advancedcalendar, and their inventiveuse of cocoa beans. AZTEC CHILI 1 tablespoon olive oil1 1/2 pounds ground beef (80/20) 2 medium-large yellow onions, chopped 1 large green bell pepper, chopped6 large cloves garlic, minced 1 (28-ounce) can crushed, fire-roasted tomatoes1 cup water 1 1/2 tablespoons instant espresso powder 1 tablespoon dark brown sugar 1 tablespoon unsweetened cocoa powder2 tablespoons ancho or regu lar chili powder1 tablespoon dried oregano1 1/2 teaspoons Kosher salt 1/4 teaspoon smoked sweet paprika1 teaspoon ground black pep per 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper 2 bay leaves 2 (15.5 ounce) cans no-salt-added black beans, rinsed and drained Optional garnishes: avocado,chopped parsley or cilantro,shredded or crumbled cheese, sour cream 1. Heat the oil in a 5-quart pot over high heat. Add thebeef, onion, bell pepper andgarlic. Cover the pot and cookuntil the meat is browned,about 8 to 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. 2. Add the crushed tomatoes (with juices), water, espressopowder, brown sugar, cocoapowder, chili powder, oregano,salt, paprika, black pepper,cayenne pepper and bay leaves.Cover the pot and bring up to aboil, then turn the heat downand simmer 10 minutes. Stir inthe beans during the final 3minutes of cooking. 3. Servetopped with garnishes. Makes 6 servings. TIP: You can freeze this fabulous chili in an airtight container for up to 3 months. Angela Shelf Medearis is an award-winning children's au thor, culinary historian and theauthor of seven cookbooks. Hernew cookbook is "The KitchenDiva's Diabetic Cookbook."Her website is www.diva-pro.com. To see how-to videos,recipes and much, much more,Like Angela Shelf Medearis, The Kitchen Diva! on Face book. Recipes may not bereprinted without permission from Angela Shelf Medearis. (c) 2018 King Features Synd., Inc., and Angela Shelf Medearis Kitchen Diva By Angela Shelf Medearis On This Day:• In 1606 England adopts the Union Flag, replaced in 1801 by current Union Flag the Union Jack• In 1811 1st US colonists on Pacific coast arrive at Cape Disappointment, Washington• In 1861 Fort Sumter in South Carolina is attacked by the Confederacy, beginning the American Civil War• In 1869 North Carolina legislature passes anti-Ku Klux Klan Law • In 1877 Catcher's mask 1st used in a baseball game • In 1892 George C Blickensderfer patents portable typewriter B12 The Herald-Advocate, April 12, 2018

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______________________________ IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 252018CA000119 SOUTH FT. MEADE LAND MANAGEMENT, INC., a Florida corporation Plaintiff, vs. IDOB, INC., a dissolved Florida corporation, and its officers, directors, stockholders, creditors, and all other parties claiming by, through, under or against it, Defendants. _____________________________/ NOTICE OF ACTION TO THE DEFENDANTS: IDOB, INC., a dissolved Florida corporation, and its officers, directors, stockholders, creditors, and all other parties claiming by, through, under or against it. Unknown address YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action has been filed against you to quiet title on the following described property in Hardee County, Florida: Parcel ID No. 15-34-240000-00160-0000 Tract B-12, IDO, INC., CITRUS GROVES, more par ticularly described as: Begin at the NW corner of said Section 15, Township 34 South, Range 24 East, Hardee County, Florida, and run thence S. 89'41" E. and along the North line of said Section 15, 73.91 feet; thence S.0'30"W, 1679.95 feet to the P.O.B.; thence continue same line, 385.0 feet; thence S. 89'32" E, 86.00 feet; thence S. 0'30" W, 55.00 feet; thence S. 89'32" E, 744.0 feet; thence N 0'30" E, 385.0 feet; thence N 89'32" W, 682.0 feet; thence N 0'30" E, 55.0 feet; thence N 89'32"W, 148.0 feet P.O.B. Subject to a 10 ft. road and mainte nance easement along East side. AND Commence at NW corner of Section 15, Township 34 South, Range 24 East, Hardee County, Florida, and run thence S. 89'41" E, and along the North line of said Section 15 a distance of 73.91 feet; thence S. 0'30" W, 2064.95 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence con tinue S 0'30" W, 55.00 feet; thence S 89'32" E, 86.00 feet; thence N 0'30" E, 55.00 feet; thence N. 89'32" W, 86.00 feet to the Point of Beginning. and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to JOHN W. H. BURTON of John W. H. Burton, P.A., Post Of fice Drawer 1729, Wauchula, FL 33873-1729, on or before the 27 day of April, 2018, and file the original with the Clerk of the Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immedi ately thereafter, or a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the com plaint or petition. WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on this 21 day of March, 2018. VICTORIA L. ROGERS Clerk of Courts By Connie Coker Deputy Clerk 3:29-4:19c __________________________________ ______________________________ IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT FOR HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 252018CA000137 MARIA GARCIA, Plaintiff, v. The ESTATE OF DELFINO GARCIA, deceased the unknown heirs of DELFINO GARCIA, LOUELLA JEAN PICH, the unknown heirs of LOUELLA JEAN PICH, Defendant(s). _____________________________/ NOTICE OF ACTION TO: Delfino Garcia and unknown heirs of Delfino Garcia and Louella Jean Pich and unknown heirs of Louella Jean Pich YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Reformation of Deed related to the following property in Hardee County, Florida: Lot 30, Block I, Charlie Creek Mobile Estates, ac cording to plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 3, page 37, Public Records of Hardee County, Florida, Together with a 1973 SKYLI mobile home ID#01611817G/Title # 5263626 (the Subject Property) has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on J. STEVEN SOUTHWELL, Plaintiff's attorney, whose address is Post Office Box 1748, Wauchula, Florida, 33873, on or before the 4th day of May, 2018 and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; other wise a default will be entered against you for the relief de manded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court on the 29th day of March, 2018. VICTORIA L. ROGERS, As Clerk of the Circuit Court By: J. Wingo Deputy Clerk4:5,12c __________________________________ ______________________________ LEGAL NOTICE Ms. Ileana Zamudio Arciniega (Rivera), mother and Jose Ri cardo Cervantes, father of the minor Yuliana Cervantes Zamudio. In the city of Wauchula, Hardee County, Florida, Mr. Emmanuel Rivera, husband of Ileana Zamudio Arciniega (Rivera) is petitioning for the Adoption of the minor, in the Family Court of the 10th Judicial Circuit, Case# 2016-DR-000255. Please note that the Court has granted a period of forty-one days (41) from the date of publication of this Notice to plead your arguments before the above-named Court at 417 West Main Street, Room B, Suite 309, Wauchula, Florida 33873. In the event that these arguments are not brought before the Court within the time period allowed, the Court shall proceed by de fault against any and all prospective, interested parties. Leonardo Viota Sesin, Esq. Attorney-at-Law Miami Office: 1275 W. 47th Place, Suite 440 Hialeah, Florida 33012 Telephone: (305) 231-7767 Port Charlotte Office: 2616 Tamiami Trail, Suite 1 Port Charlotte, Florida 33952 Telephone: (941) 625-1414 Facsimile: (941) 875-9230 Email: lviota@aol.com4:5-26c __________________________________OPEN24 HOURS526 N. 6th Ave(Across from Nicholas Restaurant)112 W. PalmettoOpen: 7 days(Yellow bldg. behind old carwash)NEW MACHINES CLEAN A/C 2 LOCATIONS www.supermattlaundries.com 24 hr. Customer Service 877-394-01732:8tfc 4:26c April 12, 2018, The Herald-Advocate B13 Roundup Food Dispersal This SaturdayThe New Jerusalem Church of God will be dis tributing free U.S. Depart ment of Agriculture foods on Saturday from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at 1514 Lincoln St. in Wauchula. Everyone is welcome. A single-page application, which maintains your eligi bility for one year, is re quired. Sign-in is also a must. Contact Juanita Wright at 781-0982 for more information. REVERE SILVER Paul Revere's name is known to every American school child because of his part in the Rev olutionary War and Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's poem with the memorable words, "Listen, my children, and you shall hear of the midnight ride of Paul Revere." But few young students know that Re vere was a military man, silver smith, engraver and an entrepreneur who made and sold iron castings of bells and canons, forged copper bolts, and the first rolled copper sheets. He was married twice and had 16 children. Eighteenth-century silver smiths were important, trusted citizens who turned silver coins into teapots and other objects for customers. Since there were no banks, these identifiable ob jects were safer forms than coins. It would have been easy to steal some of the silver, and a few silversmiths were caught and jailed for the crime. A porringer made by Paul Revere Jr. sold at a Skinner auction in 2016, for $39,975. It was marked with the name Revere and engraved "P/DB over BP." It matched another por ringer, now in a Massachusetts museum, that originally be longed to David and Betiah Pearce. That one was engraved "MP" for Mary Pearce, probably a sister of "BP." The family history plus the fame of Revere led to the high price. *** Q: I inherited a small alarm clock stamped "LeCoultre 59" on the base. "LeCoultre 8" and "Swiss" are printed on the face. It has a gold dial with black Roman numerals and is set in a brass and rosecolored mirrored case. The clock has a music feature, but it's overwound. The clock is 3 inches high and 2 inches wide. What is it worth? A: LeCoultre & Cie was founded in 1833 by Antoine LeCoultre, a watchmaker in Le Sentier, Switzerland. The company became Jaeger-LeCoultre in 1937 and is still in business. Your clock is an eight-day clock and only needs to be wound once every eight days. It was made about 1950 in both musical and non-musical ver sions. The musical version plays "The Blue Danube." The clock case could look black or red. Red is rarer. The value of your clock is reduced because the musical feature isn't working. In perfect condition the red clock is worth about $300, but your clock needs to have the musical parts repaired and is worth less. CURRENT PRICES Board game, Batman, Milton Bradley, 1966, 10 x 19 inches, $40. Hummel figurine, No. 217, Boy with Toothache, scarf tied around head, below chin, 1950s, 5 1/2 inches, $110. Mailbox, cast iron, em bossed, Pull Down, Letters, red, white and blue, side door opening, lock and key, 1908, 20 x 13 inches, $725. Golf ball marker, stamping machine, cast iron and brass, dial with numbers and letters, press handle, Omnes, c. 1910, 8 x 11 inches, $1,000. TIP: Always keep firearms locked up, even antique ones. Old guns should have the bar rels filled so it is impossible to accidentally discharge them. For more collecting news, tips and resources, visit www.Kovels.com(c) 2018 King Features Synd., Inc.Kovels Antiques & Collecting By Terry & Kim Kovel Paul Revere, Jr. made this silver porringer with a cut-out handle about 1770. It sold at a Skinner auction in Massachusetts for $39,975. DEAR PAW'S CORNER: To save money, I take my two cats, "Betty" and "Wilma," to a local shot clinic that is held every spring. This year, the tech asked if I wanted my cats microchipped. I said no, because they're indoor cats and it seems like an unneces sary expense. He looked at me like I was almost a criminal for not saying yes! What do you think? Dottie in Knoxville, Tennessee DEAR DOTTIE: It's en tirely your decision whether to microchip your pets, so there was no need for the tech to get all judgmental about it. Since I have your attention, though, allow me to throw some statistics your way. A 2009 study cited by the Ameri can Veterinary Medical Associ ation found that dogs without microchips were returned to their owners 22 percent of the time, whereas microchipped dogs were returned 52 percent of the time. Cats without mi crochips were reunited with their owners less than 2 percent of the time, whereas mi crochipped cats went back home 38 percent of the time. Now, I know Betty and Wilma are purely indoor cats, which vastly improves their chances for healthy, long lives. However, accidents happen. Doors get left ajar. Thunder storms roll in. And indoor cats ... get outside. Your cats probably have col lars and tags and that's great. But cats are notorious for slip ping their collars. While a mi crochip doesn't guarantee your cats will be found and reunited with you, it does greatly im prove the odds. Microchips have been standardized and data networks greatly improved over the past decade. So, while it is always your choice to microchip your cats, I do think it's worth the extra cost to do so. Send your questions, tips or comments to ask@pawscorner.com.(c) 2018 King Features Synd., Inc.Paws CornerBy Sam Mazzotta CHICKEN WITH CARIBBEAN PECAN SAUCEApril is National Pecan Month, and it's one of the good-for-you nuts. The pecan lends this recipe some real tropical magic. 16 ounces skinned and boned uncooked chicken breast, cut into 4 pieces 1/2 cup unsweetened orange juice 2 tablespoons cornstarch 1/3 cup Splenda Granular 1 (8-ounce) can crushed pineapple, packed in fruit juice, undrained 1 (11-ounce) can mandarin oranges, rinsed and drained 2 tablespoons chopped pecans 1 1/2 teaspoons dried parsley flakes 1 1/2 teaspoons dried onion flakes 1. In a large skillet sprayed with butter-flavored cooking spray, brown chicken pieces for 4 to 5 minutes on each side. Meanwhile, in a covered jar, combine orange juice, corn starch and Splenda. Shake well to blend. Pour mixture into a medium saucepan sprayed with butter-flavored cooking spray. Stir in undrained pineapple. Cook over medium heat until mixture thickens, stirring constantly. 2. Remove from heat. Add mandarin oranges, pecans, parsley flakes and onion flakes. Mix well to combine. Evenly spoon sauce mixture over browned chicken pieces. 3. Lower heat and simmer for 5 minutes. When serving, evenly spoon sauce over chicken pieces. Serves 4.(c) 2018 King Features Synd., Inc.Comfort Foods Made Fast And HealthyBy Healthy Exchanges CORKSCREW PASTA WITH SPRING VEGGIES Toss sauteed asparagus and leeks with pasta and creamy goat cheese. Yum! 1 bunch (about 1 pound) leeks 1 package (16 ounce) corkscrew or bow-tie pasta 1 tablespoon margarine or butter 1 pound asparagus, trimmed and cut diagonally into 2inch pieces 1 package (4 ounces) soft goat cheese, cut into small pieces 1. Cut off roots and leaf ends from leeks. Discard any tough outer leaves. Cut each leek lengthwise in half, then crosswise into 1/4-inch-wide slices. Place leeks in large bowl of cold water; with hand, swish leeks around to remove any sand. Transfer leeks to colander. Repeat process, changing water several times, until all sand is removed. Drain well. 2. In large saucepot, pre pare pasta in boiling salted water as label directs. 3. Meanwhile, in nonstick 12-inch skillet, melt margarine or butter over medium heat. Add leeks and cook until al most tender, about 5 minutes, stirring often. Stir in aspara gus, 3/4 teaspoon salt and 1/4 teaspoon coarsely ground black pepper; cook 5 minutes longer, stirring often. Add 1/3 cup water; cover and cook 3 to 5 minutes, until asparagus is tender-crisp. 4. Drain pasta, reserving 3/4 cup pasta cooking water. Return pasta to saucepot. Add asparagus mixture and pasta cooking water; toss well. Spoon into large serving bowl; sprinkle with goat cheese and coarsely ground black pepper. Serves 4. Each serving: About 580 calories, 11g total fat (5g saturated), 23g protein, 96g carbohydrate, 6g fiber, 13mg cholesterol, 705mg sodium. For thousands of triple-tested recipes, visit our website at www.goodhousekeeping.com/r ecipes/.(c) 2018 Hearst Communications, Inc. All rights reserved Recipes FromGood Housekeeping SPRING RAMEN CHICKEN SOUP 5 cups water 2 packages (3 ounces each) chicken-flavor ramen noodle soup mix (substitute Orien tal-flavor) 2 cups (about 6 ounces) snow peas 2 green onions 1 large carrot 1 pound chicken breasts, skinless and boneless 1 teaspoon Asian sesame oil 1. In 4-quart saucepan, heat water with seasoning packets from ramen soup mix to boiling over high heat. Meanwhile, remove strings from snow peas and cut each diagonally in half. Slice green onions and shred carrot. Cut chicken into 3/4-inch pieces. Break ramen noodle block into 2 layers. 2. When water mixture boils, add snow peas, green onions, carrot, chicken and noodles. Cook 3 to 5 minutes over high heat or until chicken just loses its pink color throughout. Remove saucepan from heat. Stir in sesame oil. Each serving: About 355 calories, 11g total fat (4g saturated), 32g protein, 32g carbohydrate, 3g fiber, 66mg cholesterol, 920mg sodium. For thousands of triple-tested recipes, visit our website at www.goodhousekeeping.com/r ecipes/.(c) 2018 Hearst Communications, Inc. All rights reserved Recipes FromGood Housekeeping MONDAY Breakfast: cereal, donuts, chorizo, egg & cheese taco, juice, fruit and milk Lunch: cherry blossom chicken (K-5), PB&J (k-12), cheese sticks (k-12), popcorn chicken (6-12), pan pizza (612), broccoli, sweet potato wedges, garden salad (6-12), ham & cheese salad, fruit and milk TUESDAY Breakfast: cereal, poptarts, biscuit & sausage, juice, fruit and milk Lunch: fried chicken (k-12), PB&J (k-12), nachos (k-12), pizza (6-12), spicy chicken sandwich (6-12), garden salad (k-12), tuna salad, pinto beans, fruit and milk WEDNESDAY Breakfast: cereal, yogurt parfait, pizza, juice, fruit and milk Lunch: chicken tender wrap (k-12), PB&J (k-12), pizza (k12), fajita chicken salad, chicken sandwich (6-12), pan pizza (6-12) ,green beans, cucumbers, garden salad (6-12), fruit and milk THURSDAY Breakfast: cereal, bread, chicken biscuit, juice, fruit and milk Lunch: chicken alfredo (k12), chicken salad, PB&J (k12), feistada pizza (k-12), cheeseburger (6-12), spicy chicken sandwich (6-12), car rots, corn, garden salad (6-12), fruit and milk FRIDAY Breakfast: cereal, poptarts, eggs w/cheese & bacon, fruit and milk Lunch: chicken nuggets (k12), yogurt, muffin platter, PB&J (k-12), quesadilla (k-12), pan pizza (6-12), french fries, cole slaw, fruit and milk School Menu Notices Be Water Wise: To recycle without wasting water, rinse your recyclables in leftover dish water or place them in unused spaces in your dishwasher. 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NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Pursuant to F.S. 197.512Victoria L. RogersHardee County, Clerk of the Circuit Court andComptrollerTax Deed File: 252018TD001XXXXDate: 03/19/2018 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED WARNING THERE ARE UNPAID TAXES ON THE PROPERTY WHICH YOU OWN OR IN WHICH YOU MAY HAVE LEGAL INTEREST. The property will be sold at a public auction on the16th day of May, 2018, at 11:00 a.m., unless theback taxes are paid. To make payment or for ques tions concerning real property taxes, contact the Hardee County Tax Collector’s Office at (863) 7739144 (PO Box 445, Wauchula, FL 33873) To receive further information regarding the Tax Deed Sale,contact the Hardee County Clerk of the Courts, im mediately, at (863) 773-4174 (P.O. Drawer 1749,Wauchula, Florida, 33873).The holder of the following tax certificate has filedthe certificate for a tax deed to be issued. Thecertificate number and year of issuance, the de scription of the property, and the names in which itwas assessed are:CERTIFICATE NO.: 1024YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2015NAME(S) IN WHICH ASSESSED: IRVING WECH SLER AND VIVIAN WECHSLERDescription of Property:Parcel Identification Number 25-34-27-0000-08240-0000DESCRIPTION: .95 AC COM AT SW COR OFSE1/4 OF SE1/4 OF SE1/4 OFSW1/4 RUN E 625 FT FOR POBE 125 FT N 331.11 FT W 125FT S 331.11 FT TO POB SUBJTO S 25 FT FOR RD EASEMENT25 34S 27E212P169 SUBJECT TO RESERVATIONS, COVENANTS, RE STRICTIONS, AND EASEMENTS OF RECORD.All of the property is in HARDEE County, Florida.Unless the certificate or certificates are redeemedaccording to law, the property described in thecertificate or certificates will be sold to the highestbidder on May 16, 2018, at 11:00 a.m.By: Norma M. Juarez, Deputy Clerk 4:12-5:3c 4:12c BGE ROYALTY COURTESY PHOTOS Bowling Green Elemen tary crowned its royaltyduring the Proud Panthercelebration on Friday. Asis tradition at the school,each fifth-grade classpresents a representativefor king and queen. Thestudents vote on theirclassmates to decide whowill be their royalty toreign over the annualFifth-Grade Banquet. Dis playing royal readinesswere (top photo, from left)Esmeralda Alamia,Brooke Johnson, Natha nia Lopez, German Covar rubias Valencia, DallasRodriquez, Michael Lum ley and Ferman ValscoMartinez. Taking thethrones were (below)Queen Esmeralda Alamiaand King Dallas Ro driquez. HAPPY HUNTING COURTESY PHOTOS … And they’re off! Zolfo Springs Elementary staff members head out into the play ground for their very own Easter egg hunt courtesy of the school’s Parent TeacherOrganization. The PTO did a crafty job of hiding the eggs and of knowing just whatprizes would put a big smile on faces. PLANT PUPILS COURTESY PHOTO First graders in Julia Roberts’ class at Zolfo Springs Elementary have been studying the parts of a plant. To il lustrate the lessons, the children planted and grew lima beans. They are shown here with their projects. Angel(second from left in back) raised the largest plant. C C e e l l e e b b r r a a t t i i n n g g T T h h i i s s D D a a y y : : • National Grilled Cheese Sandwich Day • National Licorice Day • "Wear a Star" Day • Drop Everything and Read Day • International Day of Human Space Flight • International Day for Street Children • National Only Child Day • Russian Cosmonaut Day • Walk on Your Wild Side Day B14 The Herald-Advocate, April 12, 2018