Citation
The Herald-advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Herald-advocate
Portion of title:
Herald advocate
Place of Publication:
Wauchula, FL
Publisher:
Herald-Advocate Publishing Co. Inc., James R. Kelly - Publisher\Editor
Creation Date:
January 6, 2005
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Weekly
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Wauchula (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hardee County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Hardee -- Wauchula
Coordinates:
27.546111 x -81.814444 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
55th year, no. 31 (Sept. 2, 1955)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Herald Advocate. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000579544 ( ALEPH )
33886547 ( OCLC )
ADA7390 ( NOTIS )
sn 95047483 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Hardee County herald
Preceded by:
Florida advocate (Wauchula, Fla.)

UFDC Membership

Aggregations:
Florida Digital Newspaper Library

Downloads

This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

H eraldA dvocate H ARDEE C OUNTY ’ S H OMETOWN C OVERAGE Thursday, March 8, 2018 THE 118th Year • No. 15 • 2 Sectionswww.TheHeraldAdvocate.com 70¢ Plus 5¢ Sales Tax I NDEX Classifieds...........A12 Courthouse Report...A19Crime Blotter........A17Hardee Living........A14Information Roundup.A14Obituaries............A9Save The Date.........A2Solunar Forecast......A13Wildcat Scratches.....B10 A RMED & E DUCATED The Marjory Stoneman Douglas High SchoolPublic Safety Act, the most massive overhaul ofmental health and gun safety regulations indecades, was approved by the Florida Senate onMonday and now heads to the Florida House. Itsets the minimum age to purchase a gun at 21,strengthens the Baker Act, and gives local lawenforcement authority to arm school employees. –––––––––– F our out of seven Hardee County school have a gun in them on any given day. The weapons are tightly controlled.The handlers – lawmen all – are highly trained.The guns serve as the measure of last resort for the four school resource officers tasked with the mission to protect andserve Hardee County’s seven schools. Yet, the number of armed individuals on local campuses may soon explode. The Florida Legislature stands poised to adopt what has been termed the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School PublicSafety Act. The widely controversial bill passed the Florida Senate on Tallahassee Takes Aim At School Safety W EATHER DATE HIGH LOW RAIN 02/2785600.0002/2885570.0003/0184620.0003/0282650.0003/0378410.0003/0476360.0003/0578380.00 TOTAL Rainfall to 02/26/2018 3.24 Same period last year 3.16 Ten Year Average 49.17 Source: Univ. of Fla. Ona Research Center Text & Photos By TOM STAIK Will local schools be under perpetual lock-and-key?Local officials are trying to figure out an answer as theychart a course for school safety. Monday in a 20-18 vote and now heads to be taken up by theFlorida House, where it is expected to be heard prior to the closeof the Florida’s legislative session on Friday. The bill is the Legislature’s response to the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in the Parkland com munity of Broward County on Feb. 14 that left 17 students andfaculty dead. Fourteen others were injured, several with life-threatening wounds. The Senate’s action comes less than three weeks after the tragic events that have sparked a cultural shift across the Sun shine State as accused murdered Nickolas Cruz sits behind bars. Cruz, a 19-year-old former student at the Parkland school, stands charged with 17 counts of premediated murder. Students and survivors from the massacre have been credited with igniting the #NeverAgain movement, which has includedwidespread school walkouts and demonstrations across th e nation calling for the enactment of a ban of military-style rifles. Cruz, it is alleged, used an AR-15 military-style rifle in the Valentine’s Day death bath. It is believed the attacker reloaded the weapon as many as 10 times during the assault. The bullet barrage ended only after thegun jammed. The AR-15 is one of many rifles that can be purchased by adults at the age of 18 in the state of Florida. Survivors clamoredfor that law to change as they pushed for an all-out ban of mili tary-style weaponry. The Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School Public Safety Act does not address the issue of the legal sale of military-styleweaponry but does take aim at elevating firearm safety. Under the provision, a three-day waiting period would be re quired for the purchase of all firearms – not just handguns as cur rent law provides. Exceptions are included for concealedweapons permit holders, individuals with a valid Florida huntinglicense, and active members of the military or law enforcementand corrections officers. Also included is a ban on specific gun accessories often used to turn a legal weapon into an illegal weapon. Bump-fire stocks – a gun accessory that allows a semi-auto matic rifle to act like an automatic rifle – are banned outrightunder the bill. The accessory cannot be “imported, transferred, distributed, sold, keeping for sale, offering for sale, possessing, or givingaway within the state,” according to a statement released by theFlorida Senate following Monday night’s vote. A bump-fire stock was used by the shooter to rain nearly au tomatic fire from a hotel room in Las Vegas that left 58 nearby concert goers dead last October. The most sweeping change to state gun law in decades, the measure also bans the sale of all weapons to anyone under 21 years of age. Current law allows rifles and shotguns to be purchased by anyone 18 years of age. Persons under 21 years of age are already prohibited from purchasing a handgun under federal law. Additionally, the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School Public Safety Act adds teeth to Florida’s Baker Act, creates a sys tem for the confiscation of weapons by law enforcement under certain conditions, allows for the arming of certain non-law en forcement school employees, and provides more than $400 mil lion in funding for additional school resource officers, campus safety improvements, and increased juvenile mental health treat ment.See GUNSA3 Livestock Section Inside! March 11

PAGE 2

COURTHOUSE REPORT The “Marriages” sec tion of the Courthouse Re port published in lastweek’s edition containedan error. The correct entryis: Andrew “Andy” Mar tinez Jr., 23, Wauchula,and Noemi Cabrera, 17,Bowling Green. ——— At The Herald-Advo cate, we want accuracy tobe a given, not just ourgoal. If you believe wehave printed an error infact, please call to reportit. We will review the infor mation, and if we find itneeds correction or clarifi cation, we will do so here. To make a report, call Managing Editor CynthiaKrahl at 773-3255. Corrections MARCH 8 –Walk-n-Talk/Peace River Park/322 E. Main St,Wauchula/9 a.m. 8 –HC School Board Meeting/230 S. Florida Ave., Wauchula/5 p.m. 12 –Wauchula City Commission Regular Meeting/ 6 p.m. 13 –Financial Fitness Class/Hardee Help Center/2 p.m. 13 –Healthy Eating Class/ Hardee Help Center/713 E Bay St, Wauchula/2 p.m. 13 –Fitness in the Park/Yoga/Heritage Park/5:30 p.m. 13 –B.G. Commission Meeting/104 E. Main St.,Bowling Green/6 p.m. 15 –HC Commission Meeting/BOCC Office/412 W. Orange St., Room 103, Wauchula/6 p.m. 16 –Movies in the Park/ Heritage Park/6 p.m. 17 –Heirlooms & Originals Student Business Fair/Heritage Park/9 a.m. 19 –Open Mic Night/ Heritage Park/6 p.m. 20 –EDA Meeting/HC Commission Chambers/8:30 a.m. 20 –Devotion & Lunch/ Hardee Help Center/Noon 20 –Fitness in the Park/Yoga/Heritage Park/5:30 p.m. 21 –IDA/EDC Meeting/ HC Commission Chambers/8:30 a.m. 22 –HC School Board Meeting/5 p.m. 23 –Leadership Luau/ Leadership Hardee/Wauchula Train Depot/6 p.m. 23 –Story of Jesus/ 7:30 p.m. 24 –Story of Jesus/ 7:30 p.m. 27 –Fitness in the Park/Yoga/Heritage Park/5:30 p.m. 27 – Z.S. Town Commission Meeting/6 p.m. APRIL 2 –Wauchula City Commission Workshop/5 p.m. 4-7 –Bensen Days/ Wauchula Municipal Airport/8 a.m. 6 –Story of Jesus/ 7:30 p.m. 7 –Story of Jesus/ 7:30 p.m. 13 –B.G. Commission Meeting/6 p.m. 12 –HC School Board Meeting/5 p.m. 12 –Wauchula City Commission Regular Meeting/ 6 p.m. 13 –Story of Jesus/ 7:30 p.m. 14 –Story of Jesus/ 7:30 p.m. 19 –Financial Fitness Class/Hardee Help Center/10 a.m. Save The Date will keep resi dents informed of upcomingcommunity happenings. Tohave your non-profit meetingor event posted for free, e-mailfeatures@theheraldadvocate.com as far ahead as possible. SAVETHEDATE Kelly’s Column By Jim Florida Commissioner of Agriculture Adam Putnam re cently said unfair trade agreements threaten Florida agriculture,citing cheap strawberries from Mexico that compete with Floridastrawberry growers. –––––– Hardee County Fair President Terry Atchley said the recent county fair set a modern day attendance record. The total atten dance was about 16,000. This figure includes paid, free and mul tiple attendance. –––––– Attendance at the recent 114th Annual Florida State Fair in Tampa was about 425,000, reported Fair Chairman Doyle E.Carlton III. Attendance is audited by the state. –––––– 3 Generation Marine in Zolfo Springs will have to leave its location soon due to a pending land sale, and owner Mike Shawis looking for a new site. Otherwise he may have to move hisbusiness to Highlands County. –––––– There is a big orange blossom bloom underway in Hardee County, keeping honey bees busy. –––––– Regular unleaded gasoline in Wauchula was $2.449 a gallon on Tuesday. –––––– The Florida high school boys' basketball tournament is going on this week at the RP Funding center in Lakeland. –––––– The Tampa Bay Bucs currently have the No. 7 overall pick in the upcoming NFL draft. The Bucs fell to 5-11 last season fol lowing a 9-7 mark in 2016. –––––– March Madness is named for basketball tournaments bu t can also include turkey hunting. In the photo below is Michael Kelly who shot this 18-pound gobbler Monday morning at Fisheating Creek. I am glad the state prevailed some years back to make the creek a hunt management area available for the public to enjoythrough a quota system. Herald-Advocate H ARDEE C OUNTY ’ S H OMETOWN C OVERAGE JOAN M. SEAMAN Sports Editor Emeritus TOM STAIK Sports Editor NOEY DeSANTIAGO Production Manager DARLENE WILLIAMS Assistant Production Manager DEADLINES: Hardee Living — Thursday 5 p.m. School News & Photos — Thursday 5 p.m. Sports — Thursday 5 p.m. (Weekend Events, Monday Noon) General News — Monday 5 p.m. Ads — Tuesday Noon SUBSCRIPTIONS: Hardee County — 6 months, $21 • 1 year, $39 • 2 years, $75 Florida — 6 months, $25 • 1 year, $46 • 2 years, $87 Out of State — 6 months, $29 • 1 year, $52 • 2 years, $100 Online — 1 month, $5 • 6 months, $19 • 1 year, $37 • 2 years, $70 LETTERS: The Herald-Advocate welcomes letters to the editor on matters of public interest. Letters should be brief, and must be written in good taste, signed and include a daytime phone number. MICHAEL R. KELLY Co-Publisher and Editor JAMES R. KELLY Co-Publisher CYNTHIA M. KRAHL Managing Editor THE 115 S. Seventh Ave. • P.O. Box 338 Wauchula, FL 33873 Phone: (863) 773-3255 • Fax: (863) 773-0657 Ads@TheHeraldAdvocate.com Publisher@TheHeraldAdvocate.com Sports@TheHeraldAdvocate.com Published weekly on Thursday at Wauchula, Florida, by the HeraldAdvocate Publishing Co. Inc. Periodical Postage paid at U.S. Post Office, Wauchula, FL 33873 and additional entry office (USPS 578-780). “Postmaster,” send address changes to: The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338, Wauchula, FL 33873. A2 The Herald-Advocate, March 8, 2018 HAIRSALON773-5665116 Carlton St. • Wauchula Hours: Tuesday Friday 9-6 Saturday 9-3 3:8c NEW ROAD OPENS PHOTO BY TOM STAIK Traffic backed up on Monday as a host of Department of Transportation workersprepared to officially open a portion of the new U.S. 17 corridor through ZolfoSprings. The new concrete road has curbs and gutters, a raised median, sidewalksand a seven-foot bike lane. State troopers were on hand to assist with traffic rerout ing and there is new signage, pavement markings and a traffic light at U.S. 17 andSR 66. By Tuesday afternoon, drivers were adjusting. This trucker is turning ontoU.S. 17 from SR 66. HARDEE COUNTY FOOD PANTIRES Alpha & Omega Freedom Ministries 113 N 7th Ave Wauchula, FL 33873Tele: 863-773-5717 Requirements: Identification, Social Security cardWhen: Wednesday ONLY | 10 am – 12 noon Bowling Green Church of God 121 W. Broward Bowling Green, FL 33834Tele: 863-375-2231 Requirements: Identification When: 3rd Saturday of the month | 8 am –noon Cutting Edge Food Ministry 3059 Elm Street Zolfo Springs, FL 33890Tele: 863-773-2484 Requirements: Identification When: Tuesday & Friday 10 am – noon & 1 – 3 pm First United Methodist Church of Wauchula 207 N. 7th Ave Wauchula, FL 33873Tele: 863-773-4267 Requirements: ID & Physical address (Light Bill, Lease etc.)When: 2nd & 4th Thursdays of the month1:00 –3:00 pm (first come, first serve) Other Program: Bagged Lunch M, W, F 8 am –12 pm for pre-school age kids & adults.Wednesday Night Free Community Dinner:5:30 –6:30 pmHardee Help Center 713 E. Bay Street, Wauchula, FL 33873Tele: 863-773-0034 Requirements: Application with proof of hardshipPrograms: Emergency & Homelessness AssistanceFor more information, Contact the HardeeHelp CenterSt. Michael’s Catholic Church Food Pantry 408 Heard Bridge Rd, Wauchula, FL 33873Tele: 863-773-4089 Requirements: Identification or Light Bill When: Every Saturday 6:00 – 8:00 am Rev. 12/19/20177 Crop Update March 5, 2018 General: According to the National Agricultural Statistics Service in Florida, there were 6.8 days suitable for fie ldwork for the week ending Sunday, March 4, 2018. Precipitation estimatesranged from no rain in multiple locations to 2.3 inches in Perry(Taylor County). The average mean temperature ranged from62.4F in Bloxham (Leon County) to 75.8F in Key Largo(Monroe County). Citrus: Temperatures were slightly cooler this past week in the citrus region, but still warmer than normal. Afternoon highswere in the mid-70s to the mid-80s; nighttime lows were in the50s over the weekend and in the 60s the remainder of the week.Rainfall was still lacking in the complete citrus belt. Most mon itored citrus stations recorded less than a tenth of an inch to norainfall for the week. According to the March 1, 2018 U.S.Drought Monitor, all of Orange, Seminole and Collier Counties,about half of Osceola County, and the southern portion ofHendry County are experiencing abnormally dry condit ions. The remainder of the citrus region is drought free. Grove operations included fertilizing, spraying, applying herbicides, disking, and brush removal. Irrigation is still beingrun regularly. Citrus bloom on oranges is in various stages fromblossoms beginning to pop out to full and open bloom. Grape fruit has not yet begun its normal bloom period. Mandarin harvest included Royals and Honey tangerines and Minneola tangelos. Grapefruit harvest is continuing to slowdown. The majority of what is being harvested is go ing to the processed market. At least two processing plants are running Va lencia oranges, with a few more planning on opening this week.Some operations are waiting for higher ratios and better juicequality before getting started. Fruits and Vegetables: Watermelon planting started in Levy County. Limited rainfall has many producers using irriga tion. The high temperatures in February caused many crops tobe at least a week ahead of schedule. A wide range of crops cameto market, including avocados, beans, boniatos, cabbage, egg plant, green beans, herbs, leafy greens, malangas, peppers,squash, sweet corn, and tomatoes. • It was English theologian Edwin Abbott Abbott whomade the following sage obser vation: "Men are divided inopinion as to the facts. Andeven granting the facts, they ex plain them in different ways." • You may be surprised to learn that hot and cold runningwater has been around for thou sands of years. Members of theupper class in ancient Egyptused copper tubing to pipe itinto their homes. • If you take a close look at New Hampshire's ConstitutionBill of Rights, you'll find "theright of revolution" enshrinedtherein. • GPS is a powerful tool that has changed the way we navi gate the world. Of course, it'snot without its problems. Take,for instance, the case of the 23-year-old Canadian woman driv ing through the Ontario town ofTobermory. She was a strangerthere, so -—as most of uswould — she was using herGPS. Evidently, she was so in tent on following the directionsprovided to her that she wasn'tpaying attention to where thosedirections were taking her —that is, until she ended up inGeorgian Bay. She made it toshore safely, but her car didn't. • It seems that artist Leonardo da Vinci pioneeredthe paint-by-numbers style ofart. He would sketch a piece,then number certain sectionsfor his assistants to paint. • Before the middle of the 18th century, it was not unusualfor members of a play's audi ence to be seated onstage, justa few feet from the perform ance. If viewers thought anactor's performance was partic ularly bad, they might even tryto bump the performer off thestage. (c) 2018 King Features Synd., Inc. STRANGE BUT TRUE By Samantha Weaver

PAGE 3

March 8, 2018, The Herald-Advocate A3 Certain School Staff Can Be Armed Local school officials are concerned about thepossibility the Marjory Stoneman Douglas HighSchool Public Safety Act could disrupt cam puses. The law bans teachers from being armed,but opens the door for other school employees –administration and support staff – to carry a con cealed weapon after training and completing amental-health screening. –––––––––– Support of the bill in the Senate was not overwhelming, nor did support follow traditional party lines. State Sen. Denise Grimsley (R-Lake Placid) was one of a handful of Republicans to cross party lines to join the majorityof Democrats who opposed the bill. “At the end of the day, there were good school safety meas ures in the bill, but I wasn’t convinced that restricting law-abidingcitizens’ access to guns would solve the problem,” said Grimsley,a Hardee County native. “We also miss a big part, and that is prevention,” Grimsley added. “The shooter had a trou bled life, and most children likehim are lost before they everreach kindergarten. How do weprevent our children fromgrowing up to be angry adults?That is a question yet to be an swered. We need more concernfor human life in this society,and that can’t be legislated.” Yet, legislate the Legislature continues. This week’s Senate ap proval of the bill came with an11th-hour compromise to tonedown one of the Act’s more de bated provisions – armingschool staff. The bill’s original language would have given local sheriffs wide authority to arm classroomeducators in a program that would mirror an initiative by PolkCounty Sheriff Grady Judd that has provided “sentinels” – armedand trained school employees – to protect the campus of South eastern University. A second Polk County school, Babson Park’s Webber Inter national University, has also announced plans to implement theprogram. Monday’s floor debate saw the language toned-down to limit the sentinel program – termed the Coach Arron Feis GuardianProgram – to include only non-classroom teachers. Feis, an assistant football coach at Marjory Stoneman Dou glas, lost his life protecting students during the massacre. The bill language would allow Junior Reserve Officers’ Training Corps staff, teachers who are current service members,and instructors who are current or former law enforcement offi cers to participate. Participation in the Guardian Program would be entirely vol untary. Staff would not be forced to participate and each of the67 counties would be allowed to either opt in or out of the pro gram. “Guardians” would have to complete 132 hours of compre hensive firearm safety and proficiency training. The bill includes $67 million – $1 million per county – to fund the program. Arming school staff – particularly teachers – has proven a di visive point across the state and locally. “I have spoken to many schools employees, and there seems to be just as many in favor as there are opposed to the proposal,”said John Eason, chief of the Wauchula Police Department. Area principals seem to be widely opposed.Bowling Green Elementary School Principal Kathy Clark is against the measure. “I am not sure that arming teachers is the answer. I feel that it is too much of a responsibility and burden for teachers,” Clarksaid. Tammy Pohl, principal of Zolfo Springs Elementary School, also has reservations. “At this time, I do not feel as though having guns on campus is a solution. We are educators of children,” said Pohl. More Resource Officers Coming The legislation also requires that every school beserviced by a full-time school resource officer. Amove welcomed by school administrators, it willcome at a sizeable financial cost to the Sheriff’sOffice and the Wauchula Police Department. –––––––––– Zolfo Springs and Bowling Green are two of the three schools not currently served by a full-time resource officer. The schools, along with North Wauchula Elementary School, will likely see a full-time law enforcement presence if and whenthe Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School Public Safety Actbecomes the law of the land. The Act requires each district school board and school district superintendent to “cooperate with law enforcement agencies toassign one or more safe-school officers at each school.” The legislation includes $97 million in additional safe-school funding that typically supports school resource officers. The requirement, though supported by educators, is likely going to come at a signifi cant cost to local govern ment. Sheriff Arnold Lanier told the Hardee CountyBoard of County Commis sioners last week that theycould expect a $300,000 in crease in his budget in thenext fiscal year if the legis lation moves forward. The funding, the sheriff said, would allow theHardee County Sheriff’s Of fice to hire and outfit – in cluding a marked patrolvehicle – three school re source officers. Zolfo Springs school administrators say they are optimistic about getting a full-time officer. “I am very open to having a full-time school resource officer on campus at Zolfo Springs Elementary School,” Pohl said. “Thisis something that I feel our parents, community, and staff mem bers have been wanting for quite some time. We cu rrently share a resource officer with other schools in the district, so the timespent at ZSE is very minimal but extremely valuable to me.” GUNS Continued From A1 Wauchula officials are also planning for additional staffi ng costs. “Right now I am looking at budgeting for another full-time officer,” Eason said. The additional officer, the chief said, would allow Wauchula Elementary to have a full-time officer on duty during all schoolhours, even if the current officer takes vacation or is out sick. The full extent of the implications of the resource officer mandate remains unclear. Not directly addressed in the legislation is if a resource of ficer would be required at all on-campus events and not just the regularschool day. “There are unknowns,” Eason said. “What do we do for ‘Meet Your Teacher Night’ or anything else that goes on afterhours?” “It all comes with a cost,” added Bob Shayman, superintend ent of schools. Yet, as Parkland learned last month, school resource officers are not a perfect solution. Scot Peterson, now retired, was the school resource officer assigned to Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School on thattragic February day. Peterson, who was armed, sought shelter outside the building as the shooting spree raged, according to numerous accounts. The Broward County Sheriff’s Office said Peterson had spent 27 of his 32 years in law enforcement as a school resource offi cer. Broward County Sheriff Scott Israel allowed Peterson to re tire following the incident, but at a press conference said the for mer deputy – trained to take down an active shooter – shouldhave “addressed the killer. Killed the killer.” Broward County Superin tendent of Schools Robert W.Runcie was direct in his publicstatement. “I’m in shock and I’m out raged to no end that he couldhave made a difference in allthis,” Runcie said. “It’s reallydisturbing that we had a law en forcement individual therespecifically for this reason, andhe did not engage. He did not dohis job. It’s one of the most un believable things I’ve everheard.” Peterson, and the Broward sheriff’s response, are the subjectof multiple ongoing investiga tions. Still, local officials stand behind the county’s four school re source officers. Asked if he had any doubt his officer would confront an ac tive shooter, Eason replied: “None at all.” Shayman, too, was unflinching in his support.“Three out of the four I have absolutely, no doubt, would con front the shooter, and the fourth I am sure would do the verysame,” Shayman said. Hardee Senior High School principal Dr. Michele Polk, whose school is routinely patrolled by two school resource offi-cers, is equally confident in the lawmen tasked with protectingher students and staff. “I am confident in the ability of our school officers to respond appropriately to any critical situation that might arise requiringlaw enforcement intervention,” Polk said.Schools Scouted For Schools Scouted For Security Improvements District school staff and local law enforcementhave begun the task of preparing a master planfor providing additional security at local schools.Fencing, cameras and door locks are being con sidered. Securing Hardee Senior High Schooland Wauchula Elementary School will likely bethe most intensive of the projects. –––––––––– High-profile by its nature, armed security measures remain only one piece of a much larger puzzle in safeguarding schools. Another string in the web is the potential “hardening” of school campuses. Legislators have included $98 million earmarked for a grant program for “improving and hardening the physical security ofschool buildings.” The meaning and definition of the physical security improve ments remains nebulous. Hardee High principal Polk says the lack of clear definition ishelpful in avoiding a one-size-fits-all approach to school safety. “A blanket response is generally not going to be the best fit for everyschool,” Polk said. “Each school fa cility is designed differently and re quires a different plan to limitaccess and ensure the safety of stu dents. Across Florida, it is commonto see high school campuses de signed as ‘open plans’ that provideunique challenges in this effort.” Hardee High is one such “open” campus. Entry onto the grounds can be gained by any number of points.The band practice field borders a citrus grove. Front gates nearvisitor parking provide open access to the campus. Athletic fa cilities lay just outside the main gates. “It is one of our hardest schools to secure because it is so spread out,” Shayman said. Security concerns at the county’s largest school have prompted several onsite inspections by school administrators and law enforcement. “We are currently working with the sheriff's department anddistrict office to reassess our needsand consider changes that will im prove the security of our studentsand staff,” Polk said. Deputy Superintendent of Schools Todd Durden has beenleading the security inspections forthe district. “We are continuing to meet with the Sheriff’s Office to developa workable plan,” Durden said. “Wehave had a couple of walk-throughs at the senior high, and hopefully willmake it through the other schools byFriday,” Durden said. Wauchula Elementary is another campus of concern.Though largely more secured than the senior high, Wauchula Elementary poses its own set of challengers for administrationand the Wauchula Police Department. “There are a lot of ways to gain access to the campus,” Eason said. Visitors to the School Board chambers and the old junior high complex – the district Exceptional Student Education offices and the old gymnasium – have access to the elementary school. Thecampuses and offices are intertwined. Once a person is on the old junior high campus, he can easily travel to just about any where on the elementary campus. “Anybody going to the football stadium has access,” Eason added. “It is a difficult campus to fully secure.” Limiting access, though possible in some form, remains costly. Alternative means of protecting classrooms are a more likely option. According to Eason, one such option would be the installation of steel hinge blocks on classroom doors. The steel sleeves, hesaid, slide over door mechanisms quickly and prevent entry from the outside. Though every school could benefit on some level from secu rity hardening, others have less pressing logistical challenges to overcome. “We have security measures in place, but working to upgrade measures on our campus is something that I will always support,” Pohl noted. Clark, who met with Bowling Green Police Chief John Scheel on Tuesday to discuss security plans, believes some sim ple solutions would go a long way to adding security at the cam pus. “We could benefit from cameras, doors that lock from the in side, maybe a buzzer system in the office to buzz people in,” Clark said. “We already have many barriers and safety precautions in place at Bowling Green Elementary,” Clark added. “For example,we are a fenced campus and we require all of our teachers to keeptheir doors locked all day. All visitors are required to comethrough the office and must produce a photo ID. Children arenot allowed to leave campus with anyone that is not on their emergency card.” The Act also requires schools to designate a “district school safety specialist” to serve as a point of contact for all public safety matters. Baker Act Gets Teeth, Mental Health Addressed Schools will likely see additional funding to pro vide mental health services for students, and lawenforcement will get the ability to take weaponsfrom those held involuntarily under the Baker Act.A court process is being established to create aRisk Protection Order. The order, enforceable upto a year, strips guns away from those deemed a public safety threat under very specific condi tions. –––––––––– Mental health legislation is also included in the Act through broadening the scope of the state’s Baker Act. A law enforcement officer who takes a person into custody for an involuntary evaluation under the Baker Act would be al lowed to seize the person’s firearms for up to 24 hours after they are released from examination. Lawmen would further be allowed to petition the court for a “risk protection order” against individuals deemed a “high risk”of harming themselves or others through possession of a firearm. Qualifying “high risks” would include drug and alcohol abuse, a mental health crisis, or documented violent behavior. Those orders would be issued through the court system and could be enforceable for up to 12 months, and later extended on a case-by-case basis. Without a court-mandated “Risk Protection Order,” lawmen would likely not have many direct opportunities to remove guns under a Baker Act. At the Wauchula Police Department, for example, lawmen worked 15 Baker Act cases in 2017. In the majority of those cases– 12 total – officers acted as a transportation service from a local medical facility to the Peace River Center in Bartow. Medical personnel, and not lawmen, issued the Baker Act.Only three of the 15 cases were actually conducted by offi cers. Those three law enforcement Baker Acts are the only such involuntary commitments that would qualify under the law. If lawmen were concerned about the threat of one of the Baker Act patients certified by medical officials, they would haveto petition the courts for a “Risk Protection Order” in order to proceed. “There is a lot we just do not know yet of how the process may work,” Eason said. “I can’t think of a time in recent years that we have had that concern,” the chief added. The mental health compo nent of the legislation alsoincludes an earmark of morethan $69 million for the Florida Department of Edu cation to fund mental health programs. The Hardee County School District currently employ ees, directly or through con tract, three school psychologists. Priority for school-based mental health assessments isgiven to emergent cases where students exhibit vari ous red flags that become a concern for staff. “If there is an emergency concern, we try to make sure that there is not a wait time for the students to get evaluated,” Superintendent Shayman said. The communication network operates around the clock. Staff – from administration and teachers to custodians and bus drivers – are encouraged to report any tidbit of informationthat can potentially have a negative impact on a student’s mental health. “If a student’s home burns down over the weekend, we are sharing that information and getting them support,” Shaymansaid. “If a family member is involved in a tragedy, we share thatinformation. If a family is going through a divorce, we make surethe appropriate people know the information so they can be there to help the student cope.” At Parkland, school officials were aware of red flags in the shooter’s behavior, too. To what extent that information was acted on remains the sub ject of ongoing review, but according to public records, law en forcement and school officials were notified of concerns overCruz’s behavior no less than 40 times in a three-year span leading up to the massacre. Taking action on early warning signs, local officia ls say, is critical to preventing tragedy. “If we can do early identification, it is key to preventing tragedy,” Eason said. A stumbling block remains overcoming the “stigma” of men tal health issues. “We miss red flags because people are afraid of reporting them because they are afraid of the community finding out,” Eason said. Baker Acts, the chief stressed, are not subject to public dis closure. “The important thing is to share information, no matter how small,” the chief said. A “Make Schools Safe Zones” banner hangs on thefence outside the drop-off exit at Zolfo Springs Elemen tary School. A school resource officer’s patrol vehicle sits outsideHardee Junior High School. School resource officers at Hardee Senior High Schooluse marked patrol vehicles to make their presenceknown.

PAGE 4

Citizens Challenge Mosaics Increased Truck TripsReclamation Plan and approv ing a Mining Major Special Exception Use but did not specifically notice the increase in trips moving phosphate rock between the two mines. The lawsuit contends the quasi-judicial disclosures failed to satisfy constitutional procedural due process be cause it did not adequately notice the subject matter to the public. The suit also questions whether essential requirements of the law have been observed and whether the administrative findings and judgement were supported by competent sub stantial evidence during the proceeding. Mosaic requested the in creased truck trips after mak ing the decision to idle or close its Plant City fertilizer plant for at least one year. That location had been used to process all the raw rock produced by the South Pasture Mine, which was transported by railroad. In November, Mosaic spokesperson Heather Nedley said the rock from the South Pasture Mine would be either trucked or railed to other Mosaic processing plants in re sponse to the Plant City facility closing. Mosaic CEO Joc ORourke said Plant City is the highestcost facility amongst our Florida operations, and it re quires a disproportionate amount of sustaining capital each year, when the company announced the closing. He said Mosaic would consider reopening the facility, which employed 430 workers, in the future if phosphate de mand increased. Commissioners and Plan ning and Zoning board members approved the increased trips for a temporary two-year period. The trucks were to travel on Mine View Road in Fort Green and turn east on S.R. 62 before turning north onto U.S. 17 traveling through Bowling Green and turning east onto County Line Road to the South Fort Meade Mine. Petitioners in the lawsuit in clude Henry and Dorothy Kuhlman, Donald Chancey, Brooks and Nancy Armstrong, Robert and Rhonda Cole, Don ald McClellan, Larry McClellan, William Frank Kirkland, Darnea A. Williams-Tatis, Travis Clay, Amy Kirkland, Horst Witschonke, Nancy Craft, Billy Hill, Janice Hill, James Hill and Donald Samuels. The case has been assigned to Circuit Judge Marcus Ezelle. A hearing date had not been set by press time. Nedley said Tuesday the county observed all required processes and Mosaic is confi dent the decision will stand. By MICHAEL KELLYOf The Herald-AdvocateSeveral local citizens have filed a lawsuit in Circuit Court challenging the recent decision of the Hardee County Com mission and the Planning and Zoning Board allowing Mo saic to haul up to 268 loads of rock per day from its South Pasture Mine located in Fort Green to the South Fort Meade Mine east of Bowling Green off of County Line Road. The lawsuit, filed Mar. 2 by 19 local residents, claims the county failed to provide ade quate public notice of the proposed change, which increased the number of allowed truck trips per day between the two mines from 68 to 268. Plaintiffs request an order from this court quashing and reversing the decisions of Hardee County, and rendering null and void the quasi-judicial approval of Resolution 18-06 for failure to provide adequate due notice, constitutional procedural due process, and es sential requirements of law as contained in the Hardee County Code, the lawsuit reads. The meeting was advertised in The Herald-Advocate to amend the Master Mining and Fort Meade, Florida 205 N. Charleston(863) 773-2530 (863) 285-8131VISITUS24 HOURSA DAYATwww.directchevy.com NEW 2017 CHEVROLETCRUZ LTAuto, Air, PW/PLStk.#H161$17,995 NEW 2018 CHEVROLETCOLORADOEXT. CABAir, PW/PL, Tilt/CruiseStk.#J1239$24,995 NEW 2017 CHEVROLETMALIBU LSAuto, Air, PW/PLStk.#H179$18,995 NEW 2017 CHEVROLETSILVERADODOUBLE CABAuto, Air, PW/PL, Tilt/CruiseStk.#H1293$26,995 NEW 2018 CHEVROLETEQUINOX LSAuto, Air, PW/PL, Tilt/CruiseStk.#J1088$23,995 NEW 2017 CHEVROLETIMPALA LSV6, Auto, Air, PW/PL, Tilt/CruiseStk.#H167$24,995 *All rebates and incentives assigned to dealer. APR is W.A.C. for up to 60 months. All prices are plus tax, tag and $249.90 dealer fee. Our selection of trucks, prices and customer service makes it worth the drive to Bob Elliotts Greenwood Chevrolet! We are here to handle all your GM Service, Parts and Body Shop needs. 3:8c Financing Available at Greenwood Chevrolet 2016 CHEVROLETSILVERADO 1500CREW CAB LT 4X4V8, Auto, Air, PW/PL, Tilt/CruiseStk.#H1687A$35,995 2016 CHEVROLETSPARKAuto, AirStk.#H195A$10,995 2013 CHEVROLETSILVERADO 1500CREW CAB LT 4X4V8, Auto, Air, PW/PL, Tilt/CruiseStk.#J109A$30,995 2013 CHEVROLETTRAVERSE LTZLeather, Dual Air, PW/PL, Tilt/CruiseStk.#J1291A$23,995 2015 NISSANALTIMAAuto, Air, PW/PL, LeatherStk.#H145A$14,995 2009 CHEVROLETSILVERADO 2500CREW CAB LTZDura Max Diesel, Allison Auto, Leather, Full PowerStk.#J1156A$29,995 2016 CHEVROLETSILVERADO LT 1500CREW CAB 4X4V8, Auto, Air, PW/PL, Tilt/CruiseStk.#H1687A$36,995 2015 CHEVROLET TAHOE LTZ Leather, Dual Air, Third Seat, PW/PL, Tilt/CruiseStk.#J1235A$40,995 2015 CHEVROLETCAMARO LSV6, Auto, Air, PW/PLStk.#H1601AA$18,995 OPEN24 HOURS526 N. 6th Ave(Across from Nicholas Restaurant)112 W. PalmettoOpen: 7 days(Yellow bldg. behind old carwash)NEW MACHINES CLEAN A/C 2 LOCATIONS www.supermattlaundries.com 24 hr. Customer Service 877-394-01732:8tfc High Cholesterol? The creator of Gatoradecan help.Gainesville, FL If youre one of the millions of Americans that have been diagnosed with high cholesterol, Natural help is now available from the creator of Gatorade! The highly regarded late Dr. Robert J. Cade, while at the University of Florida, did extensive clinical trials utilizing a special formula he developed containing soluble fiber (Acacia Gum). This formula Choles terAde proved to lower cholesterol in the human blood by over 17% during an 8 week period. Not only is this special soluble fiber proven to lower cholesterol naturally, but other positive effects showed weight loss and improving bowel functions which can help reduce the chances of many forms of cancer. Dr. Richard Goldfarb, the medical director for the company states, Statins and other drugs can create as many health problems as what they are developed to cure. Soluble fiber is one of the most important natural ingredients you can consume for over all good health. For the first time, Dr. Cades original delicious tasting formula CholesterAde is now available at these select retailer or call 877-581-1502.www.drinkcholestorade.comEckerds Pharmacy 518 S. 6th Ave. Wauchula, FL 33873 863-774-3536 3:8pHancheys Carpets You dont need to come to us . We come to you!!! Est. 1968 Jimmy HancheyWe Carry: Carpet Vinyl Plank Wood . all at GREAT Reduced Prices!863-781-4027 MobileWe Move Furniture Serving the ENTIRE Heartland AreaLow Prices Quality Workmanship Free Estimates We Install What We Sell 3:8cBy NAOMI EREKSONHerald-Advocate InternSonnis Pediatrics in Wauchula has been recog nized for the second time in three years for its work in the Vaccinations For Children program. Karen Fowler, a representa tive of the program, recently presented the staff at Sonnis Pediatrics with two certifi cates for outstanding service. Fowler said this pediatrics office was the only one in her district to have received both certificates, one for service to 2-year-olds and one for serv ice to adolescents. Her area covers Polk, Osceola, Okee chobee, Hardee and Highlands counties. The certificates recognized Sonnis Pediatrics as a gold level provider by the Florida Department of Health for the Vaccinations For Children program. One certificate rec ognized the staff for adminis tering the Human Papillomavirus (HPV) to 90.4 percent of its eligible patients as of Oct. 1, 2017. The set goal was 90 percent. The other recognized staff for complet ing the 2-year-old vaccination series for 90.1 percent of its eligible patients. Again the goal was 90 percent. The 2-year-old series of vaccines includes four sets of DTaP, three sets of Polio, one set of MMR, three sets of Hep B, one set of varicella (also known as chickenpox) and four sets of the Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV). DTaP prevents the three deadly diseases of diphtheria, tetanus and whooping cough; MMR prevents measles, mumps and rubella; and PCV prevents 13 different diseases caused by streptococcus pneu moniae bacterium. VFC is a program that is funded by the federal govern ment, providing vaccines to children who would otherwise not receive required vaccines due to their familys inability to afford them. Vaccines are purchased at a discount by the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention and are then dis tributed to state health depart ments or local public health agencies. These facilities then distrib ute the vaccines free of charge to private physician offices and public health clinics that are registered as VFC providers. Sonnis Pediatrics is one of those providers. Health-Care Provider Earns Vaccination Program Awards PHOTO BY NAOMI EREKSONThe staff at Sonnis Pediatrics was recognized for outstanding service in the federal Vaccines For Children program. Pictured (from left) are office manager Daffne Woodward, Selena Cruz, Key Marie Cruz, Sara Rudnik ARNP, Dr. Raji Sonni, Dr. Maria Perez, VFC Coordinator Karen Fowler, Keyra Diego, and assistant manager Reyna Molina. What were Hardee Countians thinking and talking about in the 1960s, or maybe the s? Each issue, we will revisit that corresponding week and year in a decade past, using old copies of The Florida Advo cate, the Hardee County Her ald, or The Herald-Advocate. This week, the decade of The sMarch 6, 2008 Main Makeover: On both sides of U.S. 17 and all along Main Street, a new streetscap ing project is taking place. Stretching from Fourth Avenue to Sixth Avenue, the $1.4 million project has begun with the removal of portions of side walk in front of the historic Wauchula City Hall. Improvements will consist of inlaid walkway pavers and ramps, bright new benches and trash receptacles. The project will go as far west on Main Street as funds allow. Vice Vandal: The second of two boys is waiting to serve his sentence after vandalizing the new Hardee Junior High School. The 15-year-old will owe $33,834.76 in restitution to the Hardee County School Board, which must be paid off by his 19th birthday. He was also assessed another $440 in additional fines and will be required to work 300 hours of community service. He has been given a 7 p.m. to 6 a.m. home detention curfew until room is made for him at the Department of Juvenile Jus tices detention center. No Neckties: Dr. Ross A. Hendrys Over the Fence column for the week talks about his early days in veterinary school and how he was determined to dress professionally in a shirt and tie. He learned a rough lesson about wearing ties in veterinary prac tice when he tried tubing a horse that had colic. The result went from having a bloody tie to a green tie when he at tempted to soak his favorite blue and yellow accessory in cold water. He never wore a tie in his practice again. Decades A4 The Herald-Advocate, March 8, 2018

PAGE 5

3:8c By TOM STAIKOf The Herald-Advocate The Hardee Senior High School boy’s tennis squad haslobbed its way to a 4-1 record. The squad opened the sea son with a 6-1 win over AvonPark on Feb. 12. Action continued on Feb. 15 as the squad bested LakePlacid, 7-0. The Wildcats downed the DeSoto Bulldogs on March 1,7-0. The most recent win came March 2 as the boys bested Van guard School with a 7-0 score. The only loss of the season came on Feb. 13 as the Wildcatsquad lost 0-7 to the SebringBlue Streaks. Players, in rank order, are: 1. Rawson Aubry; 2. Lane Parks;3. JC Thomas; 4. Isaiah Torres;5. Joshua Albritton; 6. OwenSchraeder; 7. Hugh Pate; and8. Roman Almaguer. Parks is the only season. “We have a strong team this year and hope to return to re gionals,” said head coach Den nis Aubry. VARSITY BOYS TENNIS Wildcats On Win Streak COURTESY PHOTO Member of the Hardee Senior High varsity boys tennis team are (from left) Owen Schraeder, Isaiah Torres,Roman Almaguer, Rawson Aubry, Lane Parks, Hugh Pate, Joshua Albritton and JC Thomas. By TOM STAIKOf The Herald-Advocate The Lady Devils were screaming for mercy afterthree innings following a visitlast week with the Lady Wild cats that saw a pitch-perfectperformance by Hardee hurlerStephanie Derringer. The girls in orange and blue from Hardee Senior HighSchool unleashed a resounding15-0, three-inning smack-down of the ladies from AvonPark High School on Feb. 27. “It felt really good,” said Derringer, a sophomore on theHardee squad. It was the first perfect game of the season for the LadyWildcats and the first perfectgame for Derringer. The first run for Hardee came in the bottom of the firstinning following a triple flyball to center off the bat ofDestinee Jackson that allowedAshley Patterson to score.Jackson crossed home in thenext at bat following a groupoff by Alayna Carranco. Der ringer provided the final run ofthe inning following a fly ballby Amari DeLeon, bringingthe score to 3-0. Scoring on steal, Sarah Carl ton provided Hardee with itsfirst run in the bottom of thesecond/ Marissa Rodriguezwas next to score following ahard ground ball off the bat ofMallory Gough. Patterson andJackson both scored on a linedrive to center field off the batof Caranco. A triple fly ball toright field by Stephanie Der ringer allowed Carranco toscore. Derringer crossed homeon a fly ball to left field off thebat of Lillian Salazar. Salazarthen scored on a ground ball tocenter off the bat of Ro driguez, bringing the score to11-0. Carranco started the scoring in the bottom of the third in ning following a bunt by Be navidez. A double line drive toleft field off the bat of Carltonallowed Derringer, Benavidez,and Alexis McBride to score.The game ended with a 15-0score under the mercy rule atthe end of the third inning. Hardee had 15 runs off 13 hits. Derringer led the teamwith three runs, Patterson,Jackson, and Carranco hadtwo runs, and Gough, Salazar,Benavidez, McBride, Carlton, and Rodriguez each recordedone run. Derringer had threehits, Rodriguez and Salazarhad two hits, and Patterson,Jackson, Carranco, Benavidez,DeLeon, and Carlton each hadone hit. Derringer held the mound for the Wildcats all three in nings and gave up no hits orruns. Hardee Downs Mulberry, 10-2 The Lady Wildcats deliv ered a 10-2 defeat of the Mul berry High School LadyPanthers on the road last Fri day (March 2). Hardee took a 2-0 lead in the top of the first inning. Goughgot the scoring started whenshe reached home on an errorfrom the Panther pitcher. Pat terson scored next following aground out by Jackson. The Lady Wildcats extended their lead to 7-0 in the top ofthe fourth inning thanks to aspectacular five-run rally.McBride and Figueroa struckfirst following a single groundball off the bat of Benavidez.Carlton and Benavidez scoredin the next at-bat when Goughknocked a fly ball to rightfield. Gough would eventu ally score following a groundball off the bat of Jackson. Three more Wildcat runs came in the top of the sixth in ning. A single line drive off thebat of Salazar allowed Goughto cross home plate. A hardground ball off the bat ofMcBride in the next at bat al lowed Patterson and Derringerto score, bringing the score to10-0. Mulberry’s only runs came in the bottom of the sixth,bringing the score to 10-2. Hardee had 10 runs and 13 hits in the outing. Gough andPatterson each had four hits,and Jackson, Salazar,McBride, Figueroa, and Carl ton each had one hit. Goughhad three runs, Patterson hadtwo runs, and Derringer,McBride, Figueroa, Carlton,and Benavidez each had onerun. Pitching duties were shared by Carranco and Derringer.Carranco pitched five inningsand allowed five hits and tworuns. Derringer allowed onehit and no runs in her 2 inningson the mound. VARSITY GIRLS SOFTBALL Pitch Perfect Lady Cat Has Perfect Game In 15-0 Mercy Win Over Devils PHOTO BY TOM STAIK Stephanie Derringer, a 10th grade student at HardeeSenior High School, pitched a perfect game against theAvon Park High School Red Devils last week. 3:8c March 8, 2018, The Herald-Advocate A5

PAGE 6

Hardee Wildcat Football Awards 2017 COURTESY PHOTOS Alex Hernandez was named 2017 Mr. Wildcat. Theaward is acknowledging the student-athlete that bestdisplays the characteristics of a Wildcat football playerin the classroom, on the field and in the community. Kai Washington was recognized as the 2017 Most Out standing Offensive Player. The award is acknowledgingthe student-athlete with the most outstanding contribu tions on offense. Matt Tyson was named the 2017 Most Outstanding De fensive Player. The award is acknowledging the stu dent-athlete with the most outstanding contributions on defense. Leo Duarte was named the 2017 Most OutstandingSpecial Teams Player. The award is acknowledging thestudent-athlete with the most outstanding contributionson special teams. Quintin Lindsey was named the 2017 Most OutstandingReceiver. The award is acknowledging the student-ath lete with the most outstanding contributions as a re ceiver. Isaac Moreno was named the 2017 Most OutstandingLinebacker. The award is acknowledging the student-athlete with the most outstanding contributions as a linebacker. Damar Harris was named the 2017 Most OutstandingDefensive Back. The award is acknowledging the stu dent-athlete with the most outstanding contributions asa defensive back. Marcelin Cimeus was named the 2017 Most ImprovedOffensive Player. The award is acknowledging the stu-dent-athlete that showed the most improvement on of fense. Griffin Clark and Dylan Davis were honored with the2017 Academic Awards. The award acknowledges thestudent-athlete with the highest GPA during the football season. Samuel Louis was namedthe 2017 Most ImprovedDefensive Player. Theaward is acknowledgingthe student-athlete thatshowed the most improve ment on defense. Myron Refoure was named the 2017 Rookie of the Year. The award is acknowledging the performance of a stu dent-athlete in their first year of varsity competition. Rob Davis was named the 2017 Coach of the Year. Theaward acknowledges the coach whose efforts greatly exceeded expectations. Four Wildcats were honored as the 2017 Unsung Heroes. Lane Parks was recog nized for ‘Character.’ Renton Roberson was recognized for ‘Attitude.’ Floyd Rice IIIwas recognized for ‘Trust.’ Dustin Willis was recognized for ‘Strength.’ The awardacknowledge the student-athlete with unnoticed but key contributions in the areasof Character, Attitude, Trust, and Strength – CATS. Also recieving awards were Bo Villarreal who was named the 2017 Most Outstanding Lineman. The award isacknowledging the Student-Athlete with the most outstanding contributions on the offensive/defensive line.And Randy McLeod who was named the 2017 Most Outstanding Offensive Back. The award is acknowledgingthe student-athlete with the most outstanding contributions as an offensive back. A6 The Herald-Advocate, March 8, 2018

PAGE 7

SHOW AND TELL As best I remember, it began the day Mark brought his new football to Zolfo Springs Elementary. Suddenly, he was the most popular boy in first grade. I had previously held the title (at least, in my memory), but Mark usurped my position. All the kids gathered around Mark at recess. He was the new king of the playground. I went home that afternoon and demanded my mother buy me a new football. I wanted to reclaim my position, and I was sure a new football would do it. My mother was old school. You could threaten to hold your breath until she gave into your demands, and she would briskly say, Go right ahead. Im cooking fried chicken tonight and your brother will get both legs. Ma nipulating a kid with threats of fried chicken is cruel and unusual punishment, and I caved every time. The agony of recess continued. Mark was the king of the playground, and I was a has-been. It was a long fall and winter. Spring came, the orange trees were in bloom, and it was baseball season. Mama in a spurt of generosity bought me a baseball. Im not sure why. We lived a mile from the nearest neighbors, so there was no one to throw it to. My dog Moe just ran off with it when I threw it to him. Lying in bed that night, it hit me: I could bring my baseball to school! Maybe my baseball was my chance to regain the recess throne. It worked like a charm. Marks football was forgotten, and we played baseball (or a firstgrade version of it) all through recess. Once again, I was the king. Arent you glad we grow out of such childish thinking? Arent you glad no adult is ever envious? Arent you glad adults dont compete with each other? Arent you glad no one measures self-worth based possession comparison? Reality is we compare the size of our houses, the newness of our cars, and achievements of our children. Adults havent come that far from recess. Salvation, among many other things, means you no longer have to play the comparison game. Jesus comes to teach us a dif ferent way to live. Its not wrong to want nice things or have nice things. It is toxic to base your human value on what you own. Thats why the Apostle Paul said to us, I know both how to make do with little, and I know how make do with a lot. In any and all circumstances I have learned the secret of content ment whether well fed or hungry, whether in abundance or in need. I can do all things through Him who strengthens me. Your worth is not based on what you have, but who you have. If you have Jesus, you have everything you need. Is it time for you to get off the comparison treadmill and be content with Jesus? Hardee County native Clay Smith is lead pastor at Alice Drive Baptist Church in Sumter, S.C. He and his brother and sister still own the family ranch in the Lemon Grove community east of Wauchula. You can follow him at unlikelyclay.com. Carlton Care ChiropracticChiropractic Laser Muscular Therapy Digital X-Ray863-473-4732 Dr. MariaCarlton, DC 3:8cI Can Help!Neck pain Back pain Headaches Sciatica / leg Shoulder / arm / wrist pain Muscle pain Arthritis Chronic or Acute pain Auto injuries hip pain Medicare & Most Insurance Accepted Monday Friday 8:30 am 6:00 pmSaturday and earlier or later appointments always available by request. 105 South 9th Avenue (Corner of Main & 9th Avenue) Wauchulawww.CarltonCareChiropractic.com COUNTY FAIR WINNERS PHOTO BY MICHAEL KELLYThe Hardee County Commission honored local youths who won a blue ribbon, best of breed, showmanship or pageant awards at the recent Hardee County Fair during their meeting last week. Chairman Russell Melendy congratulated all the winners who were able to attend, telling them they set goals and worked hard to accom plish them. 3:8cO O v v e e r r 4 4 0 0 y y e e a a r r s s o o f f C C o o m m b b i i n n e e d d E E x x p p e e r r i i e e n n c c e e F F a a s s t t E E l l e e c c t t r r o o n n i i c c F F i i l l i i n n g gMonday Friday 9:30am 6pm1 12 20 0 W W. O Or ra an ng ge e S St tr re ee et t W Wa au uc ch hu ul la a(next to Great Florida Insurance)7 77 73 3-2 22 20 00 0 Se Habla Espaol Irma Garcia863-606-8846 BRING IN THIS AD FOR$15.00 OFF 3:1-29p Danielle, Deborah & Irma DirectionsBy Clay SmithHardee County Native For all you strawberry lovers, the fields are open. Since I am unable to get out in the sun my son, daughter and grand daughter loaded up containers and went strawberry picking. I spent Saturday evening washing and stemming the ones they picked for me and getting them in the freezer. I kept plenty out of the freezer just to eat and we also share with family and friends. I'm enclosing the address and phone number if anyone of you want to get strawberries. They are huge, bright red, and very juicy and sweet. They are $3 for a one gallon bucket. The address is 3875 West Lake Buffum Road and the phone number is 863797-5527. They are open six days a week and my son said they have strawberry ice cream this season, and they all said it was delicious. We usually make at least two trips to get more berries. I put enough in the freezer to make strawberry preserves, to have enough to last until next season. Since they are frozen I can make them anytime. It's so nice to have family that cares enough to take time out of their busy schedule to come just to visit. Saturday my niece and her children came over bringing lunch and stayed for a long visit. Then on Sunday my daughter and son-in-law came over and brought lunch for the three of us. They all look after my welfare, and my children, grandchil dren, sister, brother, and niece don't wait for me to call them, they just seem to know when I need something done and they come do it. I know I am blessed to have the love and support of all of them, and I only wish everyone could have that needed support as they get older. Keep me in your prayers, and a blessed day to all of you. Editors Note: Jonell Peavy lives in Avon Park and can be reached at 863-453-3589. Peavys PonderingsBy Jonell PeavySugar Possum of the late Truman Thomas Save Your Lungs Save Your $$$ CALL 1 (877) U Can Now ForA Personal Quit CoachFromTobacco-Free Florida March 8, 2018, The Herald-Advocate A7 ARCADIA RODEOPHOTO BY KATHY ANN GREGGThe 90th annual Arcadia All-Florida Championship Rodeo runs today (Thursday) through Sunday in its new home, the Mosaic Arena. This Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association competition features traditional roughstock events of bareback, saddlebronc and bull riding along with timed events of tie-down and team roping and steer wrestling. The women's and junior barrel racing are sponsored by the Women's Profes sional Rodeo Association. Each day's performance be gins with the Shoot-Out Gang and the mutton bustin'. Locals who may be competing are Pat Carlton and Charles W. "Trae" Adams III in the tie-down roping, Corey Fussell in saddlebronc riding, Parker Carlton in steer wrestling, and Jamie Rewis in barrel racing. Sat urday morning at 10 is a parade through Arcadia. The rodeo grounds open at 11, with rodeo action starting each day at 2. Advance tickets are highly recom mended, and can be obtained online or by calling (863) 494-2014.

PAGE 8

A8 The Herald-Advocate, March 8, 2018

PAGE 9

Obituaries Change Is in the air Ponger-Kays-GradyFuneral Homes & Cremation Services205 N. 9th Ave. • Wauchula, FL 33873(863) 773-6400PongerKaysGrady.com 3:8c 529 WESTMAINSTREET• WAUCHULA, FLORIDA33873 • 863-773-9773“They were wonderful.”We hear kind words consistently. We’re proud that people feel comfortable enough with us to openly tell us how much they appreciate what we did for them. In fact, it’s this appreciation that drives us to offer the very best in comfort, compassion and service. View Obits at robartsfuneralhome.com3:8c In Loving Memory M M A A R R Y Y L L I I N N D D A A A A L L B B R R I I T T T T O O N N K K I I N N G G K K I I L L P P A A T T R R I I C C K K Mary Linda Albritton King Kilpatrick, 98, ofBowling Green, went hometo be with the Lord on Mon day, March 5, 2018, at thehome of her son Donald,surrounded by her family. She was born Saturday, Feb. 21, 1920, in Ft. Green,and moved to BowlingGreen in 1943. She was preceded in death by her parents Niramand Priscilla Albritton; hus bands, James King and Irold“Pat” Kilpatrick; daughter,Polly Naomi King; andgreat-grandson, EzekielDrasdo. Survivors are: son, Dou glas King (Kathy), of Lake land; daughter, Mary LindaReas, of Ft. Meade; son,Ronald Kilpatrick, of Bowl ing Green; son, Donald Kil patrick (Cathy), of BowlingGreen; daughter, SharonElise Bearce (Robert), of St.Petersburg; son, Alton Au gusta “Boogie” Kilpatrick(Stacey), of Bowling Green;19 grandchildren, 46 great-grandchildren and 24 great-great-grandchildren.Expressions of comfortmay be made atrobartsfh.com. Robarts Family FUNERAL HOME WAUCHULA Provided as a courtesy of Robarts Family Funeral Home In Loving Memory M M A A R R Y Y L L O O U U I I S S E E M M A A D D I I S S O O N N Mary Louise Madison, 78, of Zolfo Springs, died onFeb. 27, 2018, at South BayHospital, in Sun City Center. She was born in Clarks dale, Miss., on Dec. 4, 1939,and moved to HardeeCounty from Apopka, inMarch 1974. She was ahomemaker and a memberof St. Paul Missionary Bap tist Church. She was preceded in death by a daughter, MarilynMadison-Knuckles. Survivors include her son, Berlin Madison, of Washing ton DC; daughter, SaundraMadison, of Riverview; sis ter, Virgie Mae Morton, ofMound Bayoo, Miss.; sevengrandchildren, Evelyn andVictoria Madison, KeshiaChambers, Jaleesa and Brit tany Knuckles, JoshuaGause, and Sierra TateMadison; and seven great-grandchildren. Funeral services will be held on Saturday, March 10,at 11 a.m. at St. Paul Mis sionary Baptist Church,Zolfo Springs. Burial is inLakeview Memorial Gar dens, Sebring.Expressions of comfortmay be made atrobartsfh.com. Robarts Family FUNERAL HOME WAUCHULA Provided as a courtesy of Robarts Family Funeral Home LURENA BLANDIN Lurena Blandin, 79, of Wauchula, died Feb. 28, 2018. She was born Oct. 28, 1939, in South Bay. Visitation will be Saturday, March 10 at 1 p.m. Funeralwill follow at 2 p.m. Serviceswill be at Magnolia ManorCemetery, Wauchula. Arrangements by Williams Funeral Home. In Loving Memory K K R R I I S S T T A A L L Y Y N N N N J J O O H H N N S S T T O O N N Krista Lynn Johnston, 52, of Wauchula, died at herhome on Friday, March 2,2018. She was born in Hardee County on July 22, 1965,and had been a lifelong resi dent of Hardee County.Krista was Baptist by faith.She worked as a supervisorfor TLC. She was preceded in death by her son, AndyJohnston. She is survived by her fa ther, Donald Albritton;mother, Judith Allen Albrit ton and Mama 2 SheilaHarper; her loving husband,Ricky Johnston ofWauchula; sons, Michael(Renee) Johnston, of Ft.Meade and Josh (Temple)Johnston, of Wauchula;brother, Mike (Tonya)Albritton; and three grand children. Visitation was March 6 at Roberts Garden Chapel,with funeral services onMarch 7 in the GardenChapel. Duane Porter offi ciated. Burial was at Mt.Pisgah Cemetery. Expressions of comfortmay be made atrobartsfh.com. Robarts Family FUNERAL HOME WAUCHULA Provided as a courtesy of Robarts Family Funeral Home In Memory DANIEL JONATHAN WILLIAMS Daniel Jonathan Williams, of Brandon,passed away on Wednesday,Feb. 28, 2018. Born May 11, 1936, in Hardee County, to Broadusand Elsie Williams, he wasthe 5th of 7 children. Heserved five years in the USNavy, graduated from theUniversity ofFlorida with anAgriculturalEngineeringdegree, was a registeredProfessional Engineer and amember of the First BaptistChurch of Brandon. Hisfamily was his life. He was preceded in death by his parents; three sib lings; and granddaughter,Lauren Phillips. He is survived by his wife, Audrey JonesWilliams; daughters, Okle(Richard) Miller, ElizabethWilliams and Kimberly(Kevin) Jahn; granddaugh ter, Audrey Miller and sib lings, Marilyn Ford, ShirleyPauley and David Williamsand their families. Funeral services were March 7, at the First BaptistChurch of Brandon, withthe family receiving friendsone hour prior to services.Interment followed atBloomingdale Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, please make donations to Gideon'sInternational. Please sign guestbook at SouthernFuneralCare.com. Arrangements by Southern Funeral Care Brandon Death Notice DIANE GRUEBEL Diane Greubel died March 6, 2018. Visitation is today(Thursday), March 8, at Ro barts Garden Chapel, from6-8 p.m. Services are at4 p.m. on Friday (March 9) atFirst Baptist Church, Bowl ing Green. Arrangements by Robarts Family Funeral Home. They Deserve Better! ELDER ABUSE HOTLINE 1 (800) 962 2873 ABOUT... Obituaries Obituaries are published free of charge by The Her ald-Advocate as a public service, but must be submittedthrough a funeral home. A one-column photo of the de ceased may be added for $15. Obituaries contain the name, age, place of residence, date of death, occupation, memberships, immediate sur vivors and funeral arrangements. The list of survivors mayinclude the names of a spouse, parents, siblings, childrenand chlildren’s spouses and grandchildren, and the num ber of great-grandchildren. If there are no immediate sur vivors, consideration of other relationships may be given. Funeral homes can submit obituaries to obits@the heraldadvocate.com. CHEESY CABBAGE OVER MASHED POTATOES If this doesn't make your Irish eyes smile, nothing will!6 cups purchased coleslawmix1/4 cup Land O Lakes FatFree Half & Half1 1/2 cups diced VelveetaLight processed cheese1/8 teaspoon black pepper1 1/3 cups instant potatoflakes1 1/2 cups boiling water2 tablespoons Land O Lakesno-fat sour cream1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoonI Can't Believe It's Not But ter Light Margarine 1. In a large skillet sprayed with butter-flavored cookingspray, saute coleslaw mix for6 to 8 minutes. Lower heat.Stir in half and half. AddVelveeta cheese and blackpepper. Mix well to combine. Continue cooking over lowheat until cheese melts, stir ring often. 2. Meanwhile, in a medium bowl, combine dry potatoflakes and water. Mix well tocombine. Stir in sour creamand margarine. For each serv ing, place 1/2 cup potatoes ona plate and spoon about 1/2cup cabbage mixture over top.Makes 4 servings. TIPS: 1) 5 cups shredded cabbage and 1 cup shreddedcarrots may be used in place ofpurchased coleslaw mix. 2) Tomake into a main dish, stir 1full cup 97 percent fat-freeham into mixture when addingcheese. • Each serving equals: 178 calories, 6g fat, 11g protein,20g carb., 986mg sodium,301mg calcium, 2g Fiber; Di abetic Exchanges: 1 1/2 Meat,1 1/2 Vegetable, 1 Starch, 1/2Fat; Carb Choices: 1. (c) 2018 King Features Synd., Inc. Comfort Foods Made FAST AND HEALTHY! By Healthy Exchanges 1. Who released "Every Which Way But Loose," andwhen? 2. Which duo released the 1980 version of "All Out ofLove"? 3. Name the group that re leased "Paloma Blanca." 4. Who released "Levon"?5. Name the song that con tains this lyric: "You take thegrey skies out of my way, Youmake the sun shine brighterthan Doris Day." ANSWERS 1. Eddie Rabbit, in 1978. It was on the soundtrack of thefilm of the same name, starring Clint Eastwood. Eastwoodplayed a trucker with a petorangutan named Clyde. 2. Air Supply. The song went to No. 2 in the U.S. butreached only No. 9 in their na tive Australia. 3. The George Baker Selec tion, in 1975. It appeared onBillboard's Easy Listening andHot 100 charts and has beentranslated into versions allover the world. 4. Elton John, in 1971.5. "Wake Me Up Before You Go-Go," by Wham! in1984. Songwriter GeorgeMichael says the idea for thesong came to him when An drew Ridgeley (the other halfof Wham!) left a "wake meup" note for his parents. He'dinadvertently penned in an ad ditional "go" in the sentence. Itbecame the song's title. (c) 2018 King Features Synd., Inc. Flash Back By Chris Richcreek March 8, 2018, The Herald-Advocate A9 In Other ActionZS Town Commission The Zolfo Springs Town Com mission considered the follow ing items during its 1-hour and23-minute regular meeting lastTuesday. Commissioners DidiWhite, Sara Schofield, VirginiaIrby, Rod Cannon andGuadalupe DeLeon were pres ent. Commissioner Schofieldwas later dismissed for work. —listened to a citizen com plaint from Mark Burrus re garding his utility bill for ahome he had been renting out. —listened to information on a water expansion project mappresented by Hardee CountyEconomic Development Coun cil member Sarah Pelham.Project updates were ap proved. —listened to the town’s 2017 audit report delivered byCS&L CPA members RandyBillingham and Jeff Gelhard.The report noted no non-com pliance issues or financialstates of emergency. —proclaimed the month of April as Water ConservationMonth. —appointed town office employee Maria Rodriguez asa member for the CommunityAdvisory Task Force. —heard Mayor White’s comment regarding citizenMark Burrus’ complaint. Shesaid the town bills landlords in order to maintain utilities. —listened to Town Attorney Gerald Buhr’s comments re garding an ethics class he will teach. This event was sched uled for the day of the town’sregular meeting in April. Theclass will be on April 24 from1 to 5 p.m., and the regular meeting will be at 6 p.m. —heard Town Manager Linda Roberson’s comments regarding the repair of a man hole and the purchase of a newtown company vehicle. A FordFusion will be purchased for$17,776 and a manhole onDiana Street will be repaired for $12,250. —accepted the Sheriff’s sta tistic report for the month ofJanuary. The report noted 11 offenses, 30 calls for informa tion, 17 tickets and no drivingunder influence. Offensesrecorded were two batteries,one battery on LEO, a businessburglary, a child abuse, onecriminal mischief, one drivingwith a suspended license, anidentity theft,one illegal use of a credit card, one invalid dri ver’s license and one posses sion of cocaine.The next Zolfo Springs Com mission meeting will be Tues day, March. 27, 6 p.m., at theZolfo Springs City Hall, 3210 U.S. 17. Zolfo Springs. NEED HELP TO QUIT? CALL THE SUBSTANCE ABUSE HOTLINE 1 (800) 662 4357

PAGE 10

Pioneer Park Days Celebrates 50 Years PHOTOS BY NAOMI EREKSON • MONTAGE BY DARLENE WILLIAMS A10 The Herald-Advocate, March 8, 2018

PAGE 11

Pioneer Park Days 2018 PHOTOS BY JEAN KELLY Roger Nickerson, brother of Earle Nickerson, repre senting the Nickerson Family receives a plaque inrecognition of the 50th Anniversary of Pioneer ParkDays. Earle was a co-founder of Pioneer Park Daysalong with Tony Ullrich. Joey Rugenstein of Sebring, an avid Flywheeler, hasbeen an exhibitor all 50 years of Pioneer Park Days(PPDs). He was only 15 years old when he began. NowJoey's son Ricky is an exhibitor alongside his Dad, andthey hope to be there another 25 years. A Rumley Oil Pull Tractor from PPDs of years past. Antique John Deere tractor. Antique International tractor. Old McCormick-Deering tractor. Dr. Elver Hodges and his daughter Margaret Blanco ofWauchula attended the Patrick D. Smith presentation.Dr. Hodges will be 106 on Aug. 2. Representing the Ullrich family Friday night at the awards ceremony are (left toright) Ami Ullrich Willis, daughter of the late Tony Ullrich, one of the founders ofPPDs in 1968; Jenny Ullrich, Tony's wife; Barbara Sutton, Tony's sister; Sarina Ull rich Paris, niece; and (front row) Tanner Willis, Tony's grandson. Hardee County Commissioner Mike Thompson accepts PPDs' 50th Anniversaryplaque on behalf of the Board of Hardee County Commissioners from Sam Fite, Mayor of Bowling Green. Rick Smith, son of author Patrick D. Smith, gave his 241st program on his late father's writing career Satur day at Pioneer Park Days. Rick and his wife Kim, wholive in California, sold and autographed books, themost famous being "A Land Remembered" followed by "Forever Island." Representing the Nickerson family at the ceremony were (left to right) Triston Montgomery, Ryan Moore, KevinMoore, Lauren Moore, Roger Nickerson (son of Earle Nickerson, Pioneer Park Day founder), Leanne Moore,Wyatt Montgomery, Judy Nickerson, Connie Montgomery, Rod Montgomery, Norm Nickerson (son of Earle Nick erson), Hixon Thurlow, Brittany Thurlow, Jeremy Thurlow, Melinda Nickerson, Stella Thurlow and Ted Wheeler. On This Day:• In 1929 US worker union commission reports of slavery in Liberia• In 1936 The first stock car race is held in Day tona Beach, Florida.• In 1939 Lenore Coffee & William Joyce Cowan's "Family Portrait" premieres• In 1941 1st baseball player drafted into WW II (Hugh Mulcahy, Phillies)• In 1943 Limited gambling legalized in Mex ico• In 1943 US Ladies' Figure Skating champi onship won by Gretchen Merrill• In 1943 US Men's Figure Skating champi onship won by Arthur Vaughn• In 1945 International Women's Day is 1st ob served March 8, 2018, The Herald-Advocate A11

PAGE 12

CITY OF WAUCHULAAccepting applications for a Lineman journeyman position. Skilled journeyman work, with frequent work on high-voltage lines during poor weather. Climb poles, operate electrical installation equipment. Ability to serve on-call required. High school diploma or GED equivalency required. Requires a valid Florida "CDL Class "B" drivers license. Job description is available upon request. Apply at 126 S 7th Ave., The City of Wauchula complies with EEO, ADAAA, & Veterans Preference. The City of Wauchula is a Drug Free Workplace. Accepting applications until position is filled. cl3:8c T HE C LASSIFIEDS ABOUT ... ClassifiedsDEADLINE ....Tuesday noon RATES ..........Minimum of $5.00 for up to 10 words. Each additional word is 25. Ads in all capitals are 35 per word. Headlines are $2 a line. Blind ad box numbers are $5 extra. BILLING ........Ads must be pre-paid. CLASSIFICATIONS:Agriculture Mobile Homes Appliances Notices Automobile Personal Boats Pets Furniture Plants/Produce Guns Real Estate Help Wanted Recreational Houses Rentals LivestockRentals, CommercialLost & Found Services Miscellaneous Wanted Motorcycles Yard Sales Lacey Webb863-773-4101204 N. 6th Ave., Wauchula, 33873 cl3:8c 15+ acres with 2 mobile homes in Ft. Green Zoned Commercial. Call for de tails. BACK ON THE MARKET! 5 acres with a pond. Currently fenced & being used for cattle. $65,500 40 acres Presently used for farming & has a well. $360,000 Realtor Associates Rick Knight (863) 781-1396 Dusty Albritton (863) 781-0161 Shane Conley (863) 781-9664 cl3:8cRV space for sale at Torrey Oaks Golf & RV Many improvements made. Located next to golf course. $64,900 Large 4,800+ sf Commercial building Close to the McDonalds intersection in Wauchula Asking $125,000 206 North 6th Avenue, Wauchula, FL 33873 Office (863)773-0060 Evening (863)781-1338 www.jimseerealty.com James V. See, Jr., Broker Rick KnightCNA's Positions Now Available New Wage Scale Sign On Bonus Caring Environment Team Members With 15+ Years Come Join Our 5 StarTeam! 401 Orange Place Wauchula, Florida 33873(863) 773-3231www.HardeeManorHealthcare.com cl3:8,15cHARDEECARCOMPANY(Across From First National Bank) B Bu uy y H He er r e e P P a ay y H He er r e e773-6667 cl5:25tfc NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE2004 Dodge VIN: 1D4HD48N54F158645 8:00 A.M. March 20, 2018 CLIFFS WRECKER SERVICE 1071 U.S. Hwy 17 N. Wauchula, FL cl3:8cHardee Countys largest automobile dealer is looking to fill the following positions:Sales ProfessionalsNO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY! We will train the right people. Great benefits and more! Sign on bonus after 90 days. Stop by the dealership at 1405 U.S. Hwy 17 S. in Wauchula.DRESS FOR IMMEDIATE INTERVIEW. EOE/DFWP Chevrolet / Chrysler Jeep / Dodge / RamIs EXPLODING with new sales! cl10:5tfcOlvera Trucking Corp. is hiring 70 farmworkers to cultivate and harvest watermelon crops in Hendry County in Florida for a temporary period starting on 04/01/2018 and ending on 05/20/2018. The wages offered are the highest of $11.29/hr. or ap plicable piece rates. This job requires prolonged standing, bending, stooping, and reaching. Job is outdoors and continues in all types of weather. Workers may be requested to submit to random drug or alcohol tests at no cost to the worker. Work ers must be able to lift 70lbs. to shoulder height repetitively throughout the workday and able to lift and carry 70lbs. in field. Employer guarantees work will be available for at least three-quarters of the period stated. Required tools supplies, and equip ment will be provided at no cost to worker. Housing will be available for workers who cannot reasonably return home after each working day. Transportation and subsistence expenses will be provided, or reimbursed after 50% of the work contract is completed, if appropriate. Applicants should apply for the position at their local State Workforce Agency office. Job Order Number: FL10616294. cl3:1,8p REVELLAUTOSALES BUYHEREPAYHERE8 86 63 3-3 37 75 5-4 41 11 13 3A A f f t t e e r r H H o ou u r r s s C C a a l l l l : :Travis Revell Sandra Miller863-245-0383 863-781-45775220 Hwy 17N Bowling Green (across from BP)Se Habla EspaolWE ACCEPT CREDIT CARDS cl1:4tfc YOURTIREHEADQUARTERS 5101 N. Hwy 17 Bowling Green 375-4461New Tire Changer & Balancer Can Do 26 WheelsMONDAYSATURDAY8 am6 pm BOWLING GREEN QUICK LUBE& AUTO REPAIR Foreign and Domestic Cars Diesel Engines Gas or Diesel Manual or Automatic Transmissions TERRYMIKE Licensed and Insured Reg.# MV-40625 cl6:21tfc26 temporary farmworkers needed for common field labor in hand-harvesting seasonal fruits and vegetables in Hanover County, Virginia, for Kirby Farms, LLC with work beginning on or about 05/01/2018 and ending on or about 11/12/2018. The job offered is for an experienced farmworker and requires minimum 3 months verifiable work experience in the crop activities listed. The minimum offered wage rate that workers will be paid is $11.46 per hour. Workers must commit to work the entire contract period. Workers are guaranteed work for 3/4 of the contract period, beginning with the first day the worker arrives at the place of employment. All work tools, supplies and equipment are provided at no cost to the worker. Housing will be provided to those workers who cannot reasonably return to their permanent res idence at the end of each working day. Transportation and subsistence will be pro vided by the employer upon completion of 50% of the work contract, or earlier, to workers who are recruited outside the area of intended employment. Applicants must provide documentation that they are eligible legally to work in the United States. Applicants should report or send resumes to Crater Career Center, 22 West Washington St., Petersburg, VA 23803, (804) 862-6155, or the nearest local office of their State Workforce Agency and reference job order #VA1294609. EOE. H300-18054-330922. cl3:8c HOMEINSPECTIONS Inspections For The Heartland And Beyond863-990-4019www.waynecollierinspections.com collwayne4019@gmail.comLic# HI5099 NACHI 11120910 cl1:4tfc FREE ESTIMATES By Hour or ContractH. KIKER Tree Surgery 40 Years Full Time Service INSURED863-453-4942 863-453-4272 Cell: 863-664-9091 Tree Trimming Tree Removal Stump Grinding3601 E. Ramsey Way Avon Park, FL 33825cl5:4tfcGreat Location For FOR RENT 111 E. Main Street, Wauchula Office Space Retail Store Approx. 954 sq. ft.For Information ContactStephen Southwell, PA 863-773-4449cl2:8tfc REDUCED! This spacious 4 BR / 2BA home on 5 acres close to Peace River has a large basement with plenty of room for storage. $199,000. 89 acs fronting Peace River & includes cabin, barn, 3 wells, & 35 ac grove. Excellent pasture & majestic live oaks w/plenty of deer & turkey. $735,000! (863) 773-2128REALTORS JOE L. DAVIS, JR. JOHN H. ONEALSee more listings at www.joeldavis.comREAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS REALTOR ASSOCIATES AFTER HOURS KENNY SANDERS...............781-0153 KAREN ONEAL........... 781-7633 JESSICA PRESCOTT...941-737-6502 KEVIN SANDERS..........368-1926 MONICA REAS....................781-0888 DAVID ROYAL................781-3490 BRANDI MALDONADO......... 414-3349 BRITTANY NICKERSON THURLOW..............446-2735HIGHWAY 17 SOUTH, WAUCHULA, FL 33873 cl3:8c Lovely home with barn on 4 ACS close to town. $285,000. 36 ac with 8 well and micro jet irrigation. $6,250 per AC! 2 ac commercial lot w/office & garage buildings fronts Hwy 17 & 2 side streets. $145,000! House, pool, barn with horse stalls and flowing creek on 16 acs. $425,000. REALTOR Karen ONeal (863) 781-7633 DIESEL INJECTION REPAIR Pumps, turbos and injectors. Removal and instillation avail able. 863-381-0538. 2:8-1:17p LOOKING FOR ELECTRICIAN/ electrician helper. 941-400-4849. 3:1-3:29p Help Wanted Agriculture 1ST UNITED METHODIST Church is seeking a part time worship leader. Will pay travel stipend if necessary. Email resumes by March 23 to wauchulachurch@gmail.com. For questions please call pastor Danielle Upton at 863-773-4267. 3:8,15c BECOME A LICENSED Insur ance Agent or Adjuster. Online training is available at sfsc.olt training.com. 863-784-7033. 2:15-3:8c Help Wanted CNA POSITIONS NOW Avail able. New wage scale, sign-on bonus, caring environment, team members with 15+ years. Come join our 5 star team! Hardee Manor Healthcare Cen ter, 401 Orange Place, Wauchula. 863-773-3231. 3:8,15c LEARN TO DRIVE A TRUCK! Get your Commercial Driver's Li cense today at South Florida State College. Scholarships available to eligible participants. 863-784-7033. 3:1-9:20p Help Wanted MECHANIC NEEDED. MUST have own tools. Apply in person at BG Small Engine, 4702 US Hwy. 17 N., BG. 12:21tfc HELP WANTED: SERVICE Technician. Apply at Ullrichs Water Conditioning, 409 Goolsby Street, Wauchula. 10:19tfc FOR SALE BY OWNER 3/2 Riverview, Wauchula, $123,900. 786-547-6110. 3:1-29p LOST BULL MASTIFF Cur. Please call 863-245-8291 or 941321-6840. 3:8nc HAVE YOU LOST A PET? Con tact animal control in Bowling Green at 863-375-2255 to see if we have your cat or dog. We also have pets for adoption. 4:16dh/tfc JAZZY ELECTRIC POWER Chair, $650 OBO. 863-781-9628. 3:8-15nc Miscellaneous Lost/Found Houses Help Wanted A12 The Herald-Advocate, March 8, 2018

PAGE 13

THECLASSIFIEDS Advantage Realty #1 743 US 27 S. Sebring, FL 33872 Office: 863-386-0303 Fax: 863-386-1112VISIT US AT www.advantagehighlands.comMark LambertLicensed Realtor863-832-0401mark33862@gmail.com cl1:11tfc Agricultural-Commercial-Residential Hills Auto World Dan 735-01 883505 US HWY17 S ZOLFOSPRINGS375-4441 4205 US HWY17 N BOWLINGGREEN cl1:12tfc Sandra Jimmy 6 temporary farmworkers needed for common field labor in hand-harvesting seasonal fruits and vegetables in Mahoning County, Ohio, for Mario L. Angiuli dba Angiuli Farm with work beginning on or about 04/15/2018 and ending on or about 11/10/2018. The job offered is for an experienced farmworker and requires minimum 3 months verifiable work experience in the crop activities listed. The minimum offered wage rate that workers will be paid is $12.93 per hour. Workers must commit to work the entire contract period. Workers are guaranteed work for 3/4 of the contract period, beginning with the first day the worker arrives at the place of employment. All work tools, supplies and equipment are provided at no cost to the worker. Housing will be provided to those workers who cannot reasonably return to their permanent residence at the end of each working day. Transportation and subsistence will be provided by the employer upon completion of 50% of the work contract, or earlier, to workers who are recruited outside the area of intended employment. Applicants must provide documentation that they are eligible legally to work in the United States. Applicants should report or send resumes to OMJ Center Mahoning County, 141 Boardman Canfield Rd., Boardman, OH 44512, (330) 9651787 ext. 7150, or the nearest local office of their State Workforce Agency and reference job order #OH3580771. EOE. H-300-18054-329417. cl3:8c7 temporary farmworkers needed for common field labor in tobacco, cotton, and other diversified crops in Bertie County, North Carolina, for TIDEWATER AG, LLC with work beginning on or about 04/20/2018 and ending on or about 12/04/2018. The job offered is for an experienced farmworker and requires minimum 1 month verifiable work experience in the crop activities listed. The minimum offered wage rate that workers will be paid is $11.46 per hour. Workers must commit to work the entire contract period. Workers are guaranteed work for 3/4 of the contract period, beginning with the first day the worker arrives at the place of employment. All work tools, supplies and equipment are provided at no cost to the worker. Housing will be provided to those workers who cannot reasonably return to their permanent res idence at the end of each working day. Transportation and subsistence will be pro vided by the employer upon completion of 50% of the work contract, or earlier, to workers who are recruited outside the area of intended employment. Applicants must provide documentation that they are eligible legally to work in the United States. Applicants should report or send resumes to NCWorks Career Center Bertie County, 128 East Granville Street., PO Box 570, Winsor, NC 27983, (252)7945616 or the nearest local office of their State Workforce Agency, and reference job order #NC10826125. EOE. H-300-18053-870258. cl3:8c10 temporary farmworkers needed for common field labor in blackberries in Pender County, North Carolina, for Riverside Farms of Eastern NC, Inc. with work beginning on or about 05/05/2018 and ending on or about 08/17/2018. The job offered is for an experienced farmworker and requires minimum 3 months verifiable prior work experi ence pruning/shearing field grown blackberry plants. The minimum offered wage rate that workers will be paid is $11.46 per hour and piece rates may be offered. Workers must commit to work the entire contract period. Workers are guaranteed work for 3/4 of the contract period, beginning with the first day the worker arrives at the place of employment. All work tools, supplies and equipment are provided at no cost to the worker. Housing will be provided to those workers who cannot reasonably return to their permanent residence at the end of each working day. Transportation and subsistence will be provided by the employer upon completion of 50% of the work contract, or earlier, to workers who are recruited outside the area of intended employment. Applicants must provide documentation that they are eligible legally to work in the United States. Applicants should report or send resumes to NCWorks Career Center Pender County, 904-A S. Walker St. Burgaw, NC 28425, (910) 259-0240, or the near est local office of their State Workforce Agency and reference job order #NC10827643. EOE. H-300-18054-041751. cl3:8c20 temporary Christmas tree workers needed in Avery County, North Carolina for Tehandon Nursery with work beginning on or about 04/01/2018 and ending on or about 12/15/2018. The job offered is for an experienced Christmas tree workers and requires minimum 1 month verifiable work. The minimum offered wage rate that workers will be paid is $11.46 per hour. Workers must commit to work the entire contract period. Workers are guaranteed work for 3/4 of the contract period, beginning with the first day the worker arrives at the place of employment. All work tools, supplies and equipment are provided at no cost to the worker. Housing will be provided to those workers who cannot reasonably return to their permanent res idence at the end of each working day. Transportation and subsistence will be pro vided by the employer upon completion of 50% of the work contract, or earlier, to workers who are recruited outside the area of intended employment. Applicants must provide documentation that they are eligible legally to work in the United States. Applicants should report or send resumes to NCWorks Career Center Avery County, 428 Pineola Street, Newland, NC 28657, (828) 737-5419, or the near est local office of their State Workforce Agency, and reference job order #NC10818720. EOE. H-300-18044-604889. cl3:8c50 temporary farmworkers needed for field labor in sweet corn, broccoli and onions in Toombs County, GA for BG Williams Farms, LLC with work beginning on or about 04/02/2018 and ending on or about 05/26/2018. The job offered is for an experienced farmworker and requires minimum 3 months verifiable work experience in the crop ac tivities listed. The minimum offered wage rate that workers will be paid is $10.95 per hour and piece rates may be offered depending on crop activity. Workers must commit to work the entire contract period. Workers are guaranteed work for 3/4 of the contract period, beginning with the first day the worker arrives at the place of employment. All work tools, supplies and equipment are provided at no cost to the worker. Housing will be provided to those workers who cannot reasonably return to their permanent residence at the end of each working day. Transportation and subsistence will be pro vided by the employer upon completion of 50% of the work contract, or earlier, to work ers who are recruited outside the area of intended employment. Applicants must provide documentation that they are eligible legally to work in the United States. Applicants should report or send resumes to GA DOL, 148 Andrew Young Intl Blvd. suite 450, Atlanta GA, 30303, (404) 232-3500 or contact the nearest local office of their State Workforce Agency/One-Stop Career Center and reference job order #GA2019340818. EOE. H-300-18044-199034. cl3:8c FREE PUPPIES & DOGS, 863445-0028. 3:8nc ADOPT A PET! If you have lost a pet or are looking for a new one, the City of Wauchula invites you to come and see if you can find the pet youre looking for. The Wauchula Animal Control is lo cated at 685 Airport Road. Please call 863-773-3265 for more information. tfc-dh ATTENTION! State Statutes 828.29 requires that all cats and dogs sold in Florida be at least 8 weeks old, have an official health certificate, have neces sary shots and be free of para sites. tfc-dh ATTENTION! The Federal Fair Housing Act prohibits advertis ing any preference or limitation based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or the intention to make such a preference or limitation. Familial status in cludes children under 18 living with parents or guardians and pregnant women. tfc-dh Rentals Pets HOUSES 200/wk, offices, store fronts, restaurants, industrial shops, 863-773-6616, 863-4450915, 863-773-4567. 2:8-3:8p NEED PART-TIME WORK, I am a responsible person. Call 863512-8686. 3:8,15p VITAS INNOVATIVE HOSPICE Care offers a bereavement walkin support group for those that have experienced the loss of a love one. Beginning 9/2/16 every Friday at 1 p.m. in the VITAS office, 113 W. Main Street, Wauchula, 863-583-7100. 8:18tfc-dh ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS, Thursday 7:00 p.m., Grace Fel lowship Church, 131 S. 8th Ave., Wauchula. Bill 727-326-3816. tfc-dh *** NEED A WELL OR HAVE PUMP TROUBLE? CALL ULLRICHS PITCHER PUMP For complete well, sales, service and installation, call 863-773-6448. 7:18tfc Services Rentals THE WAUCHULA LIONS CLUB collects NOT broken prescrip tion eyeglasses, cases and sunglasses. Please drop off at 735 N. 6th Ave. tfc-dh DO YOU HAVE a problem with drugs? Narcotics Anonymous meets Monday, Thursday and Friday night 7:00 p.m. at First United Methodist Church, at the corner of Palmetto and 7th Ave., Wauchula. tfc-dh IS ALCOHOL CAUSING a prob lem? Call Alcoholics Anony mous in Hardee county at 863-781-6414. Several weekly meetings. tfc-dh ATTENTION! State Statutes 489119 Section 5 Paragraph B and Hardee County Ordinance 87-09 Section 10 Paragraph D require all ads for any construction-related service to carry the con tractors licence number. tfc-dh Services NEED 3/4 ACRE POND dug, in exchange for free fill, 305-5622051. 2:22-3:22p FRIDAY, SATURDAY, 6 am 1 pm. Moving/yard sale, 216 Riverside Drive, Riverview, Wauchula. 3:8p SATURDAY, 7 am ? Multi-family, 114 North 2nd Ave., Wauchula. 3:8p 906 N. 9TH AVE. Clean-out sale. Everything goes including house with large lot and 3 out buildings. Friday & Saturday. Early birds welcome on Thurs day. 3:8p INDOOR MOVING SALE! Every Wednesday Saturday (2/213/31), 9 am 6 pm. No early birds! 4544 Seminole Trail, Wauchula, 33873. Questions? 954-658-6870. 2:22-3:22p Yard Sales Wanted I am not your preacher. I only hope to help you become a better person tomor row than you were yester day. Today is the only day you have to accomplish this. It is not a New Years resolution. Do you think you are a good person? Answer these four questions. First question. Have you ever told a lie? Any kind about anything. Second question. Have you ever stolen anything? A piece of bubble gum, candy, a pen cil or picked up some money you know someone dropped? Third question. Have you ever lusted after some man or woman you have seen? Fourth question. Have you ever hated someone whom you still havent forgiven? Based on these four questions, you have admitted you are a thief, you have admitted you are a liar, you have admitted you committed adultery, and you have admitted you are a mur derer in your heart. Are these signs of a good person? The Bible says there is not one good person. No, not one, except Jesus Christ. Now, what are your plans to correct your life? From what I am reading between the lines, I think President Trump is turning into a good ringmaster for this D.C. circus season. Im getting impatient with Sessions. When is he going to start popping the whip to make those cats come to attention? I know we are in it for the long haul but I had expected to have this train moving at track speed by now. Oh well, Im a libertarian who expects everyone to respect and follow our constitution. Its a living, breathing document. It doesnt need a bunch of full-time idiots trying to change it every three months or so. I look forward to when they are back home campaigning. At least they arent legislating. What we really need is a part-time Congress. Let Trump handle it in the offseason. Really. Look at it. The president is the only one we elect for a full-time job. Congress and the Supreme Court are all elected to serve parttime. Even you dont expect your wife to stay in the kitchen cooking 24/7. I appreciate Congress taking a fishing or hunting trip. They aint in your pocket then. Remem ber when that old typesetter melted the lead into words for you to print then re-melt that type for another press time? Weve gotten away from destroying our words. We are too busy trying to keep everyone for the exclusive opportunity to use them against us. The Nixon tapes and J. Edgar Hoovers pa pers are enough to tell us we have to destroy all we said. When pigs fly, we are going to keep em, twist em, omit some to use to our advantage to topple anyone whom we think is trying to set up a monarchy here. Englands queen has only one responsibility and that is to squander taxpayer money. Id be rich too, if I had someone paying me to spend their money, but not spend any of our own. Hey! We have someone like that. They are called democrats. I hate to try talking facts and common sense with a democrat. Its like ex plaining creation to an atheist. You think they will ever change? When pigs fly! One of my readers asked where Manches ter is. Most everyone knows where Jack Daniels is. From Huntsville north on U.S. 231 to Fayetteville, Tenn. then east following 50 past J. Daniels through Tullahoma to Manchester. I24 from Nashville to Chattanooga, you are at Exit 114 in Manchester. This is considered the foothills of the Cum berland Mountains, even though you have been climbing mountains to get here from anywhere. To me, this climb all the way to Crossville (Cumberland Plateau) is far more beautiful than the Dollywood area and Gatlinburg. If you love the mountains, plan your drive or camping for early spring (still cold then) and late fall when the leaves are turning. Sounds like I love these mountains. I dont. Too cold and wet when it snows. Curves may fit you lady, but mountain roads will make you hate curves. I was told one time a guy saw these taillights ahead, but knew he was the only man on the road. Turned out the road was so crimpled, he was seeing his own taillights. As Seen From This SideBy Jerry Gray Wolf PhillipsWauchula 3/8/2018Sun Data Rise: 6:44 AM Set: 6:31 PM Day Length 11 hrs. 47 mins. Moon Data Rise: 12:09 AM Set: 11:17 AM Overhead: 5:45 AM Underfoot: 6:09 PM Moon Phase 57% Waning Gibbous Major Times 5:45 AM 7:45 AM 6:09 PM 8:09 PM Minor Times 12:09 AM 1:09 AM 11:17 AM 12:17 PM Prediction Hunting or Fishing Average Time Zone UTC: -53/9/2018Sun Data Rise: 6:43 AM Set: 6:32 PM Day Length 11 hrs. 49 mins. Moon Data Rise: 1:02 AM Set: 12:00 PM Overhead: 6:33 AM Underfoot: 6:57 PM Moon Phase 50% Last Quarter Major Times 6:33 AM 8:33 AM 6:57 PM 8:57 PM Minor Times 1:02 AM 2:02 AM 12:00 PM 1:00 PM Prediction Hunting or Fishing Average Time Zone UTC: -5 3/10/2018Sun Data Rise: 6:42 AM Set: 6:32 PM Day Length 11 hrs. 50 mins. Moon Data Rise: 1:53 AM Set: 12:45 PM Overhead: 7:20 AM Underfoot: 7:44 PM Moon Phase 38% Waning Crescent Major Times 7:20 AM 9:20 AM 7:44 PM 9:44 PM Minor Times 1:53 AM 2:53 AM 12:45 PM 1:45 PM Prediction Hunting or Fishing Average+ Time Zone UTC: -53/11/2018Sun Data Rise: 7:41 AM Set: 7:34 PM Day Length 11 hrs. 53 mins. Moon Data Rise: 3:42 AM Set: 2:33 PM Overhead: 9:08 AM Underfoot: 9:32 PM Moon Phase 30% Waning Crescent Major Times 9:08 AM 11:08 AM 9:32 PM 11:32 PM Minor Times 3:42 AM 4:42 AM 2:33 PM 3:33 PM Prediction Hunting or Fishing Average Time Zone UTC: -4 3/12/2018Sun Data Rise: 7:40 AM Set: 7:34 PM Day Length 11 hrs. 54 mins. Moon Data Rise: 4:28 AM Set: 3:24 PM Overhead: 9:56 AM Underfoot: 10:20 PM Moon Phase 22% Waning Crescent Major Times 9:56 AM 11:56 AM 10:20 PM 12:20 AM Minor Times 4:28 AM 5:28 AM 3:24 PM 4:24 PM Prediction Hunting or Fishing Average Time Zone UTC: -43/13/2018Sun Data Rise: 7:39 AM Set: 7:35 PM Day Length 11 hrs. 56 mins. Moon Data Rise: 5:13 AM Set: 4:15 PM Overhead: 10:44 AM Underfoot: 11:08 PM Moon Phase 14% Waning Crescent Major Times 10:44 AM 12:44 PM 11:08 PM 1:08 AM Minor Times 5:13 AM 6:13 AM 4:15 PM 5:15 PM Prediction Hunting or Fishing Average Time Zone UTC: -4 3/14/2018Sun Data Rise: 7:38 AM Set: 7:35 PM Day Length 11 hrs. 57 mins. Moon Data Rise: 5:54 AM Set: 5:09 PM Overhead: 11:31 AM Underfoot: --:-Moon Phase 8% Waning Crescent Major Times --:---:-11:31 AM 1:31 PM Minor Times 5:54 AM 6:54 AM 5:09 PM 6:09 PM Prediction Hunting or Fishing Good Time Zone UTC: -43/15/2018Sun Data Rise: 7:37 AM Set: 7:36 PM Day Length 11 hrs. 59 mins. Moon Data Rise: 6:33 AM Set: 6:03 PM Overhead: 12:18 PM Underfoot: --:-Moon Phase 4% Waning Crescent Major Times --:---:-12:18 PM 2:18 PM Minor Times 6:33 AM 7:33 AM 6:03 PM 7:03 PM Prediction Hunting or Fishing Better Time Zone UTC: -4 Solunar ForecastProvided courtesy of solunarforecast.com The Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission is hoping Florida residents and visitors to take an active role in conservation by using a new app to report fish and wildlife observations. From fish kills to exotic species to trapped or injured wildlife, the FWC Reporter app connects citizens to FWC experts directly from their Apple or Android devices. This app strengthens our relationship with the public by engaging people and streamlining communication with our staff, said Gil McRae, director of FWCs Fish & Wildlife Re search Institute. This is a great opportunity to incorpo rate citizen participation into our research and management efforts. The FWC often relies on reports from citizens to protect and manage Floridas diverse fish and wildlife. To make a report, users select a category from the menu, provide relevant infor mation, and submit photos if available. Download the free FWC Reporter app and become a partner in conservation. Its available from the App Store or Google Play.Use Free App To Report Sightings Peace River GrowersWholesale Nursery Donnis & Kathy Barber Hwy. 66 East P.O. Box 760 (863) 735-0470 Zolfo Springs, FL March 8, 2018, The Herald-Advocate A13 DONT BE A VICTIM, BE A SURVIVOR RAPE CRISIS LINE1 (888) 956 7273 or 863-413-2707

PAGE 14

–H ARDEE L IVING – soc3:8cPutnam Attends Friends Of Florida Ag Dinner In ZS PHOTOS BY KATHY ANN GREGG Gubernatorial candidate Adam Putnam with Friends ofFlorida Agriculture BBQ host Ben Hill Griffin. The eventwas held at Griffin’s Peace River Ranch in ZolfoSprings. COURTESY PHOTO Rodeo writer and photographer Kathy Ann Gregg withAg Commissioner Adam Putnam, who is running for Florida governor. Local law enforcement officers present at the event were (from left) sheriff’s K-9 of ficer Cpl. David Cruz, Hardee County Sheriff Arnold Lanier and Dep. Donald Ever sole. Candidate Adam Putnam (third from left) with David and Tanya Royal and their son,Kalan. Buddy and Brie Putnam with daughter Paislee. He isthe son of the late Will Putnam; the family ranch is inWestern Hardee County. The Hardee County Cattle men’s Association selected anew sweetheart just in time forthe 77th running of the HardeeCounty Fair. Brianna Waters, 17, of Bowling Green, was selected. Brianna is a senior at Hardee Senior High School and is thedaughter of Dustyn andTammy Waters. For applicants to be eligible for the Cattlemen’s Sweethearttitle, young single womenmust be a high-school senioror up to the age of 23. Theymust also have a parent who isa member of the HardeeCounty Cattlemen’s Associa tion. Brianna’s father is a mem ber, allowing her to be consid ered for this honor. The new sweetheart has al ready participated in numerousevents, primarily at the CountyFair, including the livestockshows and auction. “Cattle is really big in this county, and I thought it would be really neat to represent it inthis way,” she said. “I hope to represent our county in a positive way andbe a good role model for any one else who wants to apply(for this title in the future),” she added. After high school, Brianna plans to attend South FloridaState College and earn her de gree from the dentistry pro gram there, as she aspires tobecome a dental hygienist. Brianna Waters Takes Crown As Cattlemen’s Sweetheart PHOTO BY MARIA TRUJILLO The Hardee County Cattlemen’s Sweetheart for 2018 isBrianna Waters of Bowling Green. W W e e s s t t P P l l a a c c e e A A p p a a r r t t m m e e n n t t s s Saturday March 10th 2pm 4pm Corner of 7th & Main Wauchula soc3:8c Roundup Sign Up For Garden Workshop The Hardee County Ex tension Service is planninga vegetable gardeningworkshop on Thursday,Mar. 29, from 5:30 to 8 p.m.Dinner and educational ma terials will be provided. Feeis $10 and can accompanypre-registration. The workshop is on com mon pest problems, goodand bad critters and polli nator protection, presentedby extension service agentsJonael Bosques and DavidAustin. For more informa tion, call 773-2164 or emailmwa@ufl.edu. A14 The Herald-Advocate, March 8, 2018

PAGE 15

–H ARDEE L IVING –Elsa V. GonzalezIncome Tax Service & Notary Authorized e-filer 404 Wisconsin Ave. • Wauchula 863-781-3631 elsavg@embarqmail.com 23 Years of Experience23 aos de experiencia soc3:8,15p LOST DOG Bull Mastiff Cur very playful and sweet,very loving. He was lost between SteveRoberts Special and Hwy. 66 in ZolfoSprings, he has no collar but he is vacci nated, his name is Hercules and will cometo a whistle and clapping. He belongs tomy 4 year old granddaughter. Please contact me at 863-245-8291 or my son at 941-321-6840 soc3:8p Join Us Friday, March 9th 4 – 7pm 406 East Bay Street, Wauchula A Christian home/program for women coming out of destructive lifestyles. Drop by for a tour of the house. Enjoy delicious homemade refreshments provided by our local community friends. For more information call 863-773-0877 Historic home built in 1906 soc3:8c SPECIAL SERVICES COURTESY PHOTO The Wylers on Wheels will be appearing at Maranatha Baptist Church in all servicesthis Sunday. Evangelist Douglas Wyler preaches in a powerful yet practical way thathas challenged people in churches nationwide. The Wylers on Wheels have inspiredand encouraged people across the United States and Canada through messageand music. Services are at 10 and 11 a.m. and at 1 p.m. Maranatha Baptist Churchis at 2465 Oxendine Road in Zolfo Springs. • 5% of the world population lives in the US but 22% of theworld's prisons population areheld in the US. Top10 Movies 1. Black Panther (PG-13) Chadwick Boseman, MichaelB. Jordan 2. Game Night (R) Jason Bateman, Rachel McAdams 3. Peter Rabbit (PG) ani mated 4. Annihilation (R) Natalie Portman, Jennifer Jason Leigh 5. Fifty Shades Freed (R) Dakota Johnson, Jamie Dor nan 6. Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle (PG-13) Dwayne John son, Karen Gillan 7. The 5:17 to Paris (PG13) Alek Skarlatos, AnthonySadler 8. The Greatest Showman (PG) Hugh Jackman, MichelleWilliams 9. Every Day (PG-13) An gourie Rice, Justice Smith 10. Early Man (PG) ani mated (c) 2018 King Features Synd., Inc. Letter To The Editor How Roxie Bentley Chose Her College Greetings from Fort Green!Pioneer Park was wonderful with the weather cooperating.There was a light breeze andplenty of sunshine. I always try and get some thing at Lorraine and JohnGillespie’s booth, and this yearwas no exception. Jane Kleinwas there with her deliciousjams and jellies. I missed thevegetable booths, but later readthey were way back at the farend of the flea market near theNickerson building. It wouldbe great if the special part ofthe paper telling about thefunctions could be publishedthe week before. I went onThursday and did not get mypaper until Thursday after noon, so of course I did notread the paper until I got home.If I had known of all the spe cial activities going on Thurs day, I would have enjoyedseeing them. As it was I had the best swamp cabbage I have eaten inmy life outside of the museum.The lady cooking said she wasnot demonstrating how to cookbut to taste. Some Northernladies were sampling and didnot appreciate the wonderfultreat. The cook said she putreal cream in hers and notcanned cream, which I have al ways used in the past. Nomore! I can certainly learn andwill always use whippingcream in the future and cut thepieces real small. There was a lady showing how to cut them up, and theyhad some cabbage heads ondisplay. The music was realgood in this area. Ida Mary Haney was hold ing the fort down in theClarence Bryant BlacksmithShop. Bryant’s wife was aBlackburn, so some call it theBlackburn Blacksmith Shopand I don’t know the proper name. Ida Mary said she wasone of the few last generations.I thought this added somethingto the shop. It was moved fromBowling Green to the park. I saw George Wilson and he was dressed in railroad attireand said he was driving thetrain but, leave it to me, Ithough he meant one of thetrams to give people rides untilI read the paper. I would havegone Friday after learning allthe important things going onbut had too much to do athome. Sandy Scott outdid herself on all the stories in the paperabout how the train got to Pio neer Park, how it first started,and the barefoot mailman andso much more you need to readthe entire article. I am savingmine to read again someday! They tried to make this 50th anniversary a memorable dayand very good, and I say theyhit the nail on the head! It would probably be too ex pensive but it would be nice ifeveryone was given a programupon entering, with the differ ent types of vendors located onparticular rows. I never foundany cane syrup, and it is possi ble there was not any, but witha program I would have knownwhere to look. I hope it contin ues. It is a good outreach forHardee County. Our sincere sympathy is ex tended to the family of BraveNoah, as he made his finaljourney early in the morningon Feb. 26. His memorial serv ice is planned for Fort GreenBaptist on March 24. Call thechurch for the time, as it hadnot been decided when I typedthis. Sympathy is also extended to the family of Kris AlbrittonJohnston. She is young, as sheand my daughter were inBowling Green Elementary at the same time. I am so sorryfor her family. I did not evenknow she had been sick. Danny Keene came through his surgery with flying colorsas did little Eli Samuels. Nancy McQuaig has some relatives who were injured in afour-wheeler accident whenthe gas tank blew up. They arestill in the hospital. Jessica GillRuiz has a broken ankle andthey had to put in rods and, Ibelieve, a bone graft. She issuffering a lot. Judy Miller isstill in need of prayer as isKenny Lambert. Please prayfor these and others you mayknow about. Our niece and husband, Dale and Kay SilvermanBurch, are visiting their aunt,Avis Sasser, for a few days.They live in Macon and it is al ways great to see them. Holly Brown was at church last Sunday morning. She iscelebrating “Spring Break,”but had to return as she has apart-time job. She said she haslearned to manage her timebetter and I am saying if noth ing else that is quite an accom plishment, but she alwaysmade good grades. She and hersister, Hannah, are two beauti ful young ladies. Shirley Searcy called me and told me she heard thatFran Sayre died last week inValdosta, where she lived. Shedid not know any particularsbut drove to the cemetery andthere was a new grave in theSearcy plot. I’m not sure if Eli nor was her sister or not, butshe died some time ago. I usedto see her daughter, Paula, buthave not in some time. O’Taters will be celebrated at church on March 18 imme diately after the morning serv ice. Please pray for each other and our nation. Dear Editor: My name is Roxie Bentley. Do you remember where I toldyou Frampton Hill is located?Is it in Florida? Georgia? SouthCarolina? Think about it. One afternoon, when we were almost through with ourchores, my brothers and I no ticed lots of Army trucks andGIs were on the highway infront of our home. They wereparked on the far side of High way 17. There must have beena hundred or more Army trucksand more recruits. Daddy told us to stay on our side of the highway and leavethe soldiers alone, keep on withwhat we were supposed to bedoing. We were told by our parents those fellows were onmaneuvers. The next day they were gone. I went on snoopingaround and found severalthings my Daddy could use.Oil cans full of oil, a canteen,etc. After this, it was getting close to Christmas. I was in the11th grade. My daddy heardfrom the man whom he hadbeen working for. He wantedus to move during the Christ mas holidays to a small countrytown named Ehrhardt, S.C. The house was located in a grove of pecan trees. Some ofthe pecans were huge, somevery small, very delicious. My oldest brother Caswell was in the Army stationed inFort Jackson, soon to beshipped overseas. My brothersJack and Levic and my sisterMae were enrolled in the highschool in Ehrhardt. I could not go to school there. I was taking shorthand,bookkeeping, and typing, plusEnglish, history, literature, etc.These courses were taught in amuch smaller town thanEhrhardt, called Lodge. Daddy made arrangements for me to go with two teachersand two other young people toLodge, S.C. There were 13young people in my class. One of the boys in my class dropped out because he said heknew he could not graduate, so12 of us graduated in June. I knew we did not have money for me to go to college.I wanted to join the Wacks, theWaves or something like thatand let Uncle Sam pay for therest of my education. My par ents said “no way. You won’tknow how to take care of your self. There are fellows whowould take advantage of you.” My daddy’s brother and his wife wanted to help, to let mechoose where I wanted to go.In the meantime, my mama hadan aunt and cousin who lived inCleveland, Ohio, who werecoming to Homestead, Fla., tovisit my grandmother andsome of Mama’s brothers. AuntLill and cousin Sylvia took meto Homestead with them. They seemed to understand our circumstances and wantedto help. When we left Home stead, Sylvia stopped at thecourthouse in Miami to let USgo into the boardroom of edu cation to see if I might be hiredfor a teaching position. Thatdid not turn out because I didnot have a degree—no collegeat all at that time. My parents finally let my daddy’s brother and his wifehelp me go to the college of mychoice. That is the reason I chose Florida Southern College inLakeland. I’ll leave the rest of the story for later. Roxie Bentley Wauchula Fort Green News By Rilla Cooper 773-6710 ABOUT... Hardee Living Hardee Living prints your news on people, clubs andorganizations, includingmeeting summaries, births,children’s and senior citi zens’ birthdays, engage ments, weddings, silver orgold anniversaries, churchevents and military assign ments. Forms are available at our office. For engage ments and weddings, aphoto should be included. Publication is free of charge. Coverage of wed dings over three months oldwill be limited to a photoand brief announcement. Deadline is 5 p.m. on Thursday. March 8, 2018, The Herald-Advocate A15

PAGE 16

4-City News By Henrietta Benson 448-6737 – H ARDEE L IVING – Hardee C.I. Happy Birthday Robert Martinez “Smiley” I Love You Baby Love Your Baby soc3:8p Bowling Green’s First Black History was celebratedwith a program Feb. 24 atGreater Macedonia PrimitiveBaptist Church, ElderEmanuel Reed, pastor. Bro.Leonard McGill, emcee; NickJones, Scripture; OveidaBerrien, dance. The Oldest Mothers were: Inez S. Hill and Bertha L.Fulse. Mother Hill was 101and mother Fulse 105 at thetime of their deaths. Fourchurches were honored:Chester Grove MB, 115 years;Greater MPB Church, 105years; St. John AME, 110years; and New Life PowerOutreach Ministry, 19 years. The four Oldest Family Es tates in Bowling Green are theParrishes, Jacksons, Snellingsand Browns. The descendantsare: Tillmans, Ball/Woodall,Bakers, McCrays, Greens,McIverys, Ervin, Hill, Brown,Bryant, Snelling, Fulse, Ryals,Jackson and Shaw. Presentations were given to Mary Alice Tucker as the firstblack mayor; Dee William-Tatis, postmaster; JamesAtanda, first pharmacist; Dr.Sheryl B. Mosley, first youngblack principal; Joann Mc Cray, the longest SchoolBoard worker; Jewell Fulse,RN of Bowling Green; Henri etta Benson, news correspon dent; Lester Fulse, contractor;Brian Kemp, first black headcoach of Hardee County;Diane Smith, elected supervi sor of elections; Mae Robin son principal in HardeeCounty during the 1990s-2000; Garry McWhoter, firstblack School Board member;Shirlyon McWhorter, judge inDade County, from HardeeCounty; Zeke Mowatt fromHardee County as an NFLplayer with the Giants footballteam; Ciera White, first run ner-up Class of 2004 JuniorMiss of Hardee County; ArissaCamel as Miss Hardee ofClass of 2014; Sherry L.Matthew Williams, first TVnews anchor from HardeeCounty; and Tommie Under wood, longest pioneer teacherin Hardee County. The oldest living are Betty Snelling and George Ryals. Next generation present wereNaomi Lindsey and HenryJames McIvery. This was the first black his tory of Bowling Green. If any one has black historyinformation, feel free to partic ipate next year. Hats off to thecommittee that put this eventtogether. True Miracle Church of the Living God, Overseer DollyM. Cook, pastor, at 313 W.Pine St. in Arcadia, celebratedits church anniversary. Theme:A Church Still Standing on theWord of God. Services wereMarch 2-4 and continue thisSunday at 11 a.m. All wel come. St. Paul AME church will host an evening of GraceSplendor Excellence this Sat urday. Special guests: Elder J.Burrows and CWP, KatinaWillis, Mia Lomax, GingerShiver, many more, all at theFort Meade Community Cen ter. Deepest sympathy to the Burns family in the passing ofLurena B. Blandin, who was atHardee Manor. City-Wide Mission Society of Bowling Green convenedMonday evening, Feb. 26, atGreater MPB Church. Sis.Barbara Barnes, president,spoke on “Prayer ExpressThanksgiving,” Psalm 100 andPsalm 103. Remember the sick: Rosie Lee Clark, Daisy Spann, SamBerrian, Thelma Blakley, Ron nie Rivers and E. Martin. Congratulation to Larissa North on being crowned the2018 Kindergarten Princess.She’s a student at Hilltop Ele mentary School. The Youth Take Over will be in services March 20-22 atGreater Works Ministry inWinter Haven. The 100 Women in Pink convened at Greater WorksWomen’s Ministry. Thespeaker will be Co-Pastor Di anne Watson this Saturday at 7p.m. St. Paul AME Church, the Rev. Rubin E. Ancrum, pastor,of Fort Meade, 31 S.E. Dr.M.L. King Ave., will hold Re vival 2018 “Receive Your Bet ter” at 7 nightly, 5 Sunday. Guest pastor Wayne Howard,March 25; pastor BerniteCampbell on March 26; andPastor Andre Camp, March27. All welcome. March 16-17 at Greater Works Ministry, Youth &Young Adults Take Back. Thespeaker Friday evening at 7:30will be Shena Livingston. Sat urday, March 17, speaker willbe Korey Mickie at 7 p.m.Tarry Service. Deepest sympathy to the Madison family on the home-going of Mary Louise Madi son of Zolfo Springs. She was78, passed away Feb. 27. Bornin Clarksdale, Miss., on Dec.4, 1939, she came to HardeeCounty from Apopka in 1974and was a homemaker. Funeralservices will be Saturday at 11a.m. at St. Paul MB Church. Weather was very good Thursday-Saturday for PioneerPark Days. Endtime Crossroad Min istry’s annual Women’s Con ference will convene March 16and 17 nightly at 7:30. Theme:Diamond in the Rough. Fea tured speakers will be overseerDeloris Williams and SherriWhite. For information, con tact Minster Patricia Camel at(863) 781-6788. Coming soon: Bowling Green will be having its EasterWeekend Celebration.Class Of ‘65Reunion ThisSaturday The Hardee High School Class of 1965 will be holdingits annual picnic this Saturdayat Pioneer Park in ZolfoSprings. The gathering begins at 11 a.m. and will run until about 6p.m. It will be held in the his toric pool pavilion. Classmate Pete Marovich will be cooking chicken on thegrill. All others are asked tobring covered-dish picnicfoods and desserts to share. Attendance is free. A dona tion box will be available toanyone wishing to share in thecosts of renting the pavilionand other incidentals. RSVP to Donna Scott at (704) 617-4255. NEW RODEO ARENA PHOTO BY KATHY ANN GREGG Attending last Thursday’s ribbon-cutting ceremony for the new Mosaic Arena in Ar cadia were (from left) Kim Welch Strickland, Carl McKettrick and Nancy Higgin botham. Strickland, who grew up in Wauchula, was Miss Rodeo Florida 1982 andregularly helps with one of the refreshment tents at the annual Arcadia Rodeo. McK ettrick is co-owner of Arcadia Stockyards, one of the sponsors of the Peace RiverPro Rodeo Classic that held its fourth annual event in Wauchula in late January.Higginbotham is a Member of the Rodeo Association, and her husband, Alfred, ison the Board of Directors. 3:8c CAT IN HAT COURTESY PHOTO To celebrate Dr. Seuss’ birthday, which was Friday, former Bowling Green Elemen tary teacher Pam Roberts came to the school dressed as the famed and belovedCat in the Hat. She read to all the kindergarten students. The students had beenstudying Seuss and his literary works all week! HONOR BAND COURTESY PHOTO Ten Hardee Junior High band students recently participated in Heartland HonorBand. They rehearsed for two days with other top band students from counties inthe Heartland Educational Consortium, and then presented a public concert. Thetalented musicians are (front row, from left) Adrian Navarro, Crystal Wingate andGiselle Zuniga; (middle) Angielita Casso, David Orta and Jaqueline Jurado; (back)Acacia Brinkmann, Chris Sosa, Caleb Ybarra and Marisa Mendieta. Don’t Be Left Out! HARDEE LIVING DEADLINE IS THURSDAY AT 5 PM A16 The Herald-Advocate, March 8, 2018

PAGE 17

Crime BlotterDuring the past week, sheriffs deputies and city police officers investigated the following incidents and made the following arrests: COUNTY Mar. 4, Tiffany Marie Dianne Nikel, 25, of 3011 Logue Rd., Myakka City, was arrested by Dep. Joseph Austin and charged with battery and resisting/obstructing an officer without vio lence. Mar. 3, a residential burglary on Popash Road and criminal mischief on CR 664 were reported. Mar. 2, Matthew Carroll, 18, of 852 Pleasant Way, Bowling Green, was arrested by Dep. Kim Pfeiffer on a charge of con tempt of court. Mar. 2, Rodney Allen Smith, 39, of 3395 N. Nursery Rd., Zolfo Springs, was arrested by Dep. Ryan Abbott on an out-ofstate fugitive warrant. Mar. 2, burglary of a conveyance on Honeysuckle Street and a theft on U.S. 17 North were reported. Mar. 1, Shannon Lee Stewart, 41, of 1734 Cape Coral Park way, Cape Coral, was arrested by the Drug Task Force (DTF) and charged with possession of methamphetamine, possession of drug paraphernalia and a traffic charge. Mar. 1, criminal mischief on U.S. 17 North was reported. Feb. 28, Derek Dempsey Alday, 34, of 7156 Cloud Nine Ranch Rd., Ona, was arrested by Dep. John Layport on a charge of contempt of courtviolation of an injunction for protection. Feb. 28, a theft on U.S. 17 North was reported. Feb. 27, Timothy Nekada Burks, 50, of 689 Chamberlain Blvd., Wauchula, was arrested by Sgt. Danny OBryan on five counts of failure to appear in court. Feb. 27, criminal mischief on Finch Drive was reported. Feb. 26, James Anthony Reynolds, 49, of 3891 Edison Ave., Bowling Green, was arrested by Cpl. Chris Albritton and charged with possession of methamphetamine and possession of drug paraphernalia. Feb. 26, thefts on two locations on U.S. 17 North and on Old Bradenton Road were reported. WAUCHULA Mar. 4, Jesus Venegas Montoya, 37, of 616 N. Ninth Ave., Wauchula, was arrested by Ofc. Bryanna Lott and charged with misuse of E911 system and resisting/obstructing an officer with out violence. Mar. 3, Sabrina Ann Brown, 47, of 316 E. Palmetto ST., Wauchula, and Jennie Marie Smith, 36, of 346 River Chase Cir., Wauchula, were arrested by Ofc. Michael Barry and each charged with disorderly conductaffray. Mar. 3, a fight on River Chase Circle was reported. Mar. 2, burglary of a conveyance on South Sixth Avenue (U. S. 17 South) was reported. Mar. 1, a vehicle stolen on North Third Avenue and a theft on South Seventh Avenue were reported. Feb. 26, Abul Kalam Azad, 40, of 1086 Downing Cir., Wauchula, was arrested by Ofc. Kaleigh Anderson and charged with battery. Feb. 26, Miranda Gayle Maness, 20, of 1731 S. Duette Rd., Myakka City, was arrested by Ofc. Christopher Gicker and charged with frauddisplaying a stolen forged check. Feb. 26, a theft on East Main Street was reported. BOWLING GREEN Mar. 4, Jose Lopez, 58, of 350 Manatee St., Bowling Green, was arrested by Ofc. Breanna Locke and charged with disorderly intoxication. Mar. 4, a fight on East Main Street and a vehicle stolen on Pleasant Way were reported. Mar. 3, a theft on First Street was reported. Mar. 2, Maria Del Carmen Lopez Delgado, 26, of 4512 Mason-Dixon Ave., Bowling Green, was arrested by Ofc. Breanna Locke and charged with battery and aggravated assault with a deadly weapon. Feb. 27, a theft on Hardee Street was reported. NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEEDPursuant to F.S. 197.512 Victoria L. Rogers Hardee County, Clerk of the Circuit Court and Comptroller Tax Deed File: 252017TD023XXXX Date: 02/20/2018 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED WARNING THERE ARE UNPAID TAXES ON THE PROPERTY WHICH YOU OWN OR IN WHICH YOU MAY HAVE LEGAL INTEREST. The property will be sold at a public auction on the 4th day on April, 2018, at 11:00 a.m., unless the back taxes are paid. To make payment or for ques tions concerning real property taxes, contact the Hardee County Tax Collectors Office at (863) 7739144 (PO Box 445, Wauchula, FL 33873) To receive further information regarding the Tax Deed Sale, contact the Hardee County Clerk of the Courts, immediately, at (863) 773-4174 (P.O. Drawer 1749, Wauchula, Florida, 33873). The holder of the following tax certificate has filed the certificate for a tax deed to be issued. The cer tificate number and year of issuance, the descrip tion of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are: CERTIFICATE NO.: 259 YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2014 NAME(S) IN WHICH ASSESSED: TC 10U LLC Parcel ID Number: 27-33-25-0000-42320-0000 Description of Property: 20 AC MINERAL RIGHTS E1/2 OF NW1/4 OF NE1/4 27 33S 25E 272P521 SUBJECT TO RESERVATIONS, COVENANTS, RE STRICTIONS, AND EASEMENTS OF RECORD. All of the property is in HARDEE County, Florida. Unless the certificate or certificates are redeemed according to law, the property described in the cer tificate or certificates will be sold to the highest bid der on April 4, 2018, at 11:00 a.m. By: Norma M. Juarez, Deputy Clerk3:1-22c NOTICE OF FINAL AGENCY ACTION BY THE SOUTHWEST FLORIDA WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT Notice is given that the Dis trict's Final Agency Action is approval of the application for a Water Use Permit to serve agricultural activities. The total authorized withdrawal is 617,000 GPD, Peak Month is 2,147,000 GPD, and Maximum is 6,268,400 GPD. The project is located in Hardee County, Section(s) 3, 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 31. 32 and 33 Township 36 and 35 South, Range 23 East. The permit applicant is Quail Creek Farms, Inc. whose address is P.O. Box 329, Wimauma, FL 33598 The Permit No. is 20003514.005 The file(s) pertaining to the project referred to above is available for inspection Monday through Friday except for legal holidays, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., at the Southwest Florida Water Management District, 7601 US Highwav 301, North, Tampa, Florida 336376759 NOTICE OF RIGHTS Any person whose substantial interests are affected by the District's action regarding this matter may request an administrative hearing in accordance with Sections 120.569 and 120.57, Florida Statutes (F.S.), and Chapter 28-106, Florida Administrative Code (F.A.C.), of the Uniform Rules of Procedure. A request for hearing must (1) explain how the substantial interests of each per son requesting the hearing will be affected by the District's ac tion, or proposed action; (2) state all material facts disputed by each person requesting the hearing or state that there are no disputed facts; and (3) otherwise comply with Chapter 28-106, F.A.C. A request for hearing must be filed with and received by the Agency Clerk of the District at the District's Brooksville address, 2379 Broad Street, Brooksville, FL 34604-6899 within 21 days of publication of this notice. Failure to file a request for hearing within this time period shall constitute a waiver of any right such person may have to re quest a hearing under Sec tions 120.569 and 120.57, F.S. Because the administrative hearing process is designed to formulate final agency ac tion, the filing of a petition means that the District's final action may be different from the position taken by it in this notice of agency action. Per sons whose substantial inter ests will be affected by any such final decision of the District in this matter have the right to petition to become a party to the proceeding, in accordance with the requirements set forth above. Mediation pursuant to Section 120.573, F.S., to settle an administrative dispute regarding the District's action in this mat ter is not available prior to the filing of a request for hearing. 3:8c ______________________________ IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA FILE NO.: 252018-CP000018 IN RE: ESTATE OF ROLAND LEE SKIPPER a/k/a ROLAND L. SKIPPER Deceased. _____________________________/ NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Roland Lee Skipper, de ceased, whose date of death was December 22nd, 2017, is pending in the Circuit Court for Hardee County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 417 West Main Street, Wauchula, FL 33873. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attor ney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's es tate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court ON OR BEFORE THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLI CATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the dece dent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN FLORIDA STATUTES SEC TION 733.702 WILL BE FOR EVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is March 1, 2018. J. Michael Swaine SWAINE & HARRIS, P.A. Attorneys for Personal Representatives 425 South Commerce Avenue Sebring, FL 33870 Telephone: (863) 385-1549 Florida Bar No. 95615 E-Mail Address: mike@heartlandlaw.com Personal Representatives Margaret R. Dunaway 5176 Sweetwater Road Zolfo Springs, FL 338903:1,8c______________________________ ______________________________ IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO.: 25-2018-CP-000019 IN RE: ESTATE OF ANTONIO RODRIGUEZ Deceased. _____________________________/ NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the es tate of Antonio Rodriguez, de ceased, whose date of death was October 9, 2017, is pending in the Circuit Court for Hardee County, Florida, Probate Divi sion, the address of which is 417 West Main Street, Wauchula, Florida 33873. The names and addresses of the personal repre sentative and the personal representative's attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court ON OR BEFORE THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLI CATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the dece dent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN FLORIDA STATUTES SECTION 733.702 WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is March 8, 2018. Attorney for Personal Representative: Logan Elliott, Attorney Florida Bar Number: 86459 Elliott Law, P.A. 5105 Manatee Avenue West, Suite 15A Bradenton, FL 34209 Telephone: (941) 792-0173 Fax: (941) 240-2165 E-Mail: logan@elliottelderlaw.com Personal Representative: Robert M. Elliott 5105 Manatee Avenue West Suite 15 Bradenton, Florida 342093:8,,15c______________________________ ______________________________ IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No. : 252018DR000069 Jerry Lee King, Petitioner, and Jennifer Lynn Corbin, Respondent _____________________________/ NOTICE OF ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE (NO CHILD OR FINANCIAL SUPPORT) TO: Jennifer Lynn Corbin 10521 Fincher Road Waleska, GA 30183 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for dissolution of mar riage has been filed against you and that you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Jerry Lee King whose address is 220 Strickland Street on or before March 30, 2018, and file the orig inal with the clerk of this Court at Hardee County Clerk of Courts, 417 W. Main St., Room 202, Wauchula, FL 33873 before service on Petitioner or immediately thereafter. If you fail to do so, a default may be entered against you for the relief de manded in the petition. The action is asking the court to decide how the following real or personal property should be divided: N/A. Copies of all court documents in this case, including orders, are available at the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office. You may review these documents upon request. You must keep the Clerk of Circuit Courts office notified of your current address. (You may file Designation of Current Mailing and E-Mail Address, Florida Supreme Court Approved Family Law Form 12.915.) Future papers in this lawsuit will be mailed to the address on record at the clerks office. Warning: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law Rules of Procedure, requires certain automatic dis closure of documents and information. Failure to comply can result in sanctions, including dismissal or striking of plead ings. Dated: February 23, 2018 Victoria L. Rogers, Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Edwina Cumbee Deputy Clerk3:1-22p______________________________ ______________________________ IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 252016CA000488 CAMILO MORILLO and ROSA MORILLO, husband and wife, Plaintiffs, vs. MANUEL A. FORMOSO AND MANUEL FORMOSO; UNKNOWN TENANT(S); VICTORIA L. ROGERS, CLERK OF COURTS FOR HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA; STATE OF FLORIDA; HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA; and CITY ELECTRIC SUPPLY COMPANY, a Florida corporation, Defendants. _____________________________/ NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that pur suant to Final Default Judgment and Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure and for Attorneys Fees and Costs entered by the Court on February 26, 2018, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the second floor hallway outside of room 202 of the Hardee County Courthouse located at 417 West Main Street, Wauchula, Florida, on the 21 day of March, 2018, at 11:00 a.m., the following-described prop erty: The E of SW of Block 16, LESS the North 55.0 feet thereof, of the Original Survey of the Town of Wauchula, in Section 3, Township 34 South, Range 25 East, according to the map or plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 1, page 29, of the public records of Hardee County, Florida. DATED this 26 day of February, 2018. VICTORIA L. ROGERS, Clerk of Courts Hardee County, Florida By: Connie Coker Deputy Clerk3:8,15c______________________________ Notices Notices ______________________________ FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF LAW ENFORCEMENT, Petitioner, vs. RICHARD A. WORLEY, Case #40921 & 41004, Respondent _____________________________/ NOTICE OF ACTION TO: RICHARD A. WORLEY, Residence Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an Administrative Complaint has been filed against you seeking to revoke your CORRECTIONAL Certificate in accordance with Section 943.1395, F.S., and any rules promulgated thereunder. You are required to serve a written copy of your intent to re quest a hearing pursuant to Section 120.57, F.S. upon Dean Register, Director, Criminal Jus tice Professionalism Program, Florida Department of Law En forcement, P. O. Box 1489, Tal lahassee, Florida 32302-1489, on or before April 22, 2018. Fail ure to do so will result in a de fault being entered against you to Revoke said certification pur suant to Section 120.60, F.S., and Rule 11B-27, F.A.C. Dated: February 22, 2018 Dean Register, Professionalism Director FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF LAW ENFORCEMENT By: -s-Ashley Balck, Division Representative3:1-22c ________________________________________________________________ IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 25-2018DR000046 Blanca Flor Aquino Salas Petitioner, and Luciano Villar Cevilla, Respondent. _____________________________/ NOTICE OF ACTION FOR ADOPTION TO: Luciano Villar Cevilla 2049 Rigdon Rd., Wauchula FL 33873 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for stepparent and adoption has been filed against you and that you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Blanca Flor Aquino Salas whose ad dress is 314 Walton Ave., Wauchula FL 33873, on or be fore March 16, 2018 and file the original with the clerk of this Court at 417 W. Main St. Room 202, Wauchula FL before service on Petitioner or immediately thereafter. If you failed to do so, a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the petition. Copies of all court documents in this case, including orders, are available at the Clerk of the Cir cuit Courts office. You may re view these documents upon request. You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office notified of your current address. (You may file Designation of Current Mailing and E-Mail Address, Florida Supreme Court Approved Family Law Form 12.915.) Future papers in this lawsuit will be mailed or e-mailed to the ad dresses on record at the clerks office. WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law rules of Procedure, requires certain automatic dis closure of documents and information. Failure to comply can result in sanctions, including dismissal or striking of plead ings. DATE: February 8, 2018 VICTORIA L. ROGERS, Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Christine Freijosio Deputy Clerk IF A NONLAWYER HELPED YOU FILL OUT THIS FORM, HE/SHE MUST FILL IN THE BLANKS BELOW: This form was prepared for the Petitioner. This form was completed with the assistance of: Daniel Rodriguez, 1573 N. Florida Ave., Wauchula FL 33873, 863-245-51012:15-3:8p __________________________________ Herald-AdvocateHardee Countys Hometown CoveragePRINTERS PUBLISHERS 115 S. 7th Ave. Wauchula, FL 33873 Telephone (863) 773-3255www.TheHeraldAdvocate.comThe March 8, 2018, The Herald-Advocate A17

PAGE 18

THANK YOU OUR BELOVED, FRANCISCO J. FIGUEROA, 28, BETTER KNOWN AS PACO, passed away in a tragic accident February 18, 2018.A Firefighter/EMT of Hardee County Local 3471, AMarine in the United States Marine Corp and in ac tive reserves, served his country and his communitythat he loved. The family of Paco would like to thank Hardee County, the Fire Department (both local and fromsurrounding counties), Law Enforcement, The UnitedStates Marine Corp, and the community of familyand friends for the outpouring love and support thatwas extended to us during our time of grief. We will be forever grateful for the overwhelming acts of kindness to us. REST IN PEACE OUR BELOVED PACO! Jesus said to her, “I am the resurrection and the life. Whoever believes in me, though he die, yet shall he live. John 11:25 3:8c 12/11/89—2/18/18 BOOKISH BIRTHDAY COURTESY PHOTOS • MONTAGE BY DARLENE WILLIAMS Kindergarten pupils in LeAnne Buzzard and AshleyRigney’s classes at Hilltop Elementary School held abookish birthday bash in memory of children’s author Dr.Seuss. Dressing in honor of some of the beloved booksare Rigney’s students Casyn Arguelles, Rolaina Ellis andRigdon Cornelius as “The Cat in the Hat”; Felipe Herreraas “How the Grinch Stole Christmas”; and Gabriel Beizaas Sam I Am from “Green Eggs and Ham.” Later, class mates Ivan Bruno, Jayden Trejo and Gabriel enjoy thecolorful breakfast staple. GREEN EGGS & HAM COURTESY PHOTOS • MONTAGE BY DARLENE WILLIAMS In honor of Dr. Seuss' birthday on Friday,Meghan Graham's kindergarten class atWauchula Elementary School held a specialbreakfast with a theme matching one of theauthor’s children’s books. Yes, they ate greeneggs and ham! A18 The Herald-Advocate, March 8, 2018

PAGE 19

Courthouse ReportCOUNTY COURT The following marriage li censes were issued recently in the office of the county court: Andrew Andy Martinez Jr., 23, Wauchula, and Noemi Cabrera, 17, Bowling Green. Alejandro Alvarez-Ortega, 35, Fort Meade, and Shanteria Reeshay Flowers, 33, Fort Meade. Alexses Palacios Sanchez, 24, Wauchula, and Liliana Iniquez, 23, Bowling Green. Perfecto Morales-Gutierrez, 33, Bowling Green, and Aurora Lopez-Velasco, 32, Bowl ing Green. The following small claims cases were disposed of recently by the county judge: Valencia Garden Apart ments vs. Ivery Davis, judg ment of tenant eviction. Midland Funding vs. Ken neth Harris, default judgment. Liberty Acres Fertilizer Corp. vs. Central Florida Produce, voluntary dismissal. The following criminal traffic and misdemeanor cases were disposed of re cently in county court: Damian Efrain Fuentes, DUI, probation 12 months, license suspended 10 months, ignition interlock six months, 50 hours community service, $1,653 fines, costs and fees. Otis Downs, criminal mis chief, 26 days in jail with credit for time served, $450 fines, costs and fees. Christian Wabanimkee, trespass on an occupied structure/conveyance, 35 days in jail with credit for time served, $450 fines, costs and fees. Mercedes Cisneros, petit theft, completed pretrial diver sion program, not prosecuted. Peregino Mendoza Cortez, domestic battery, completed pretrial diversion program, not prosecuted. Charles Kevin Franklin, taking wildlife on roads or rights-of-way and illegal tak ing or possession of deer or wild turkey, transferred to pretrial diversion program, return Mar. 7. Amy Rodriguez Iacino, possession of drug paraphernalia, adjudication withheld, pro bation 12 months, 25 hours community service, $540 fines, costs and fees; posses sion of marijuana, not prose cuted. Raul Martinez Jr., petit theft, 25 days in jail with credit for time served, $520 fines, costs and fees. Eric Treyvon Nelson, pos session of drug paraphernalia, adjudication withheld, proba tion 12 months, 30 hours community service, $540 fines, costs and fees; possession of cannabis, not prosecuted. Ashley M. Ramirez, posses sion of drug paraphernalia, ad judication withheld, $540 fines, costs and fees; posses sion of marijuana, not prose cuted. Chad Richardson, possession of cannabis, adjudication withheld, and possession of drug paraphernalia, probation 12 months, 30 hours commu nity service, $540 fines, costs and fees. Jessica Ruiz, possession of drug paraphernalia, adjudica tion withheld, $540 fines, costs and fees; possession of mari juana, not prosecuted. CIRCUIT COURT The following civil actions were filed recently in the office of the circuit court: Jerry Lee King and Jennifer Lynn Corbin King, divorce. Wilner Charles and Movi ette Charles, divorce. Rosalba Sanchez and the state Department of Revenue (DOR) vs. Norberto Juarez Colorado, petition to register child support order from the state of Washington. Makayla Brooke Williams and DOR vs. Dylan R. Mar tinez, petition for administra tive child support order. Lisa Cuglietta vs. Derek Dempsey Alday, petition for injunction for protection. Jose Gonzalez and Carla Gonzalez, divorce. Kelly Louise Purser and Michael David Purser, di vorce. Teather D. Swearingen and DOR vs. Jane Marie Williamson, petition for child support. The following decision on civil cases pending in the cir cuit court were handed down recently by the circuit court judge: Camilo and Rosa Morillo vs. Manuel A. Formoso and Manuel Formosa and others default judgment of mortgage foreclosure. Jacqueline Faulk vs. Angel Simmons, dismissal of injunction for protection. Environs De Valores Na cional Corp. vs. Maria Elena Flores d/b/a Flores Multiser vices, order. Peachtree Settlement Funding vs. H. Moore, order on set tlement payment rights. Spring Home Consultants vs. Skye Cotton, order on settlement payment rights. Kelly Vang vs. Ramiro Trevino, order. Triest Irrigation vs. Central Florida Produce, voluntary dismissal. Progressive American In surance Co. a/s/o Gordon Allen vs. Michael C. Selvey and Timothy Nevins Jr., volun tary dismissal of defendant Timothy Nevins Jr. Heide Sharp and Michael David Sharp, divorce. Linda Christine Reyna Howell and Rufus Howell, divorce. Monica Young and David Duane Young, divorce. J&J Sports Productions Inc. vs. Tex-Mex Winghouse Inc. and others, petition for sum mary judgment denied. The following felony criminal cases were disposed of recently by the circuit judge. Defendants have been adju dicated guilty unless noted otherwise. When adjudication with withheld, it is pend ing successful completion of probation. Sentences are pursuant to an investigative report by and the recom mendation of the state pro bation office and also state sentencing guidelines. Final discretion is lef to the judge. Saul Alamia, possession of methamphetamine, possession of cocaine, possession of cannabis and possession of drug paraphernalia, drug of fender probation three years, license suspended one year, $1,628.52 fines, costs and fees. Jose Luis Castillo, resisting an officer without violence, probation 12 months, $45 restitution, $1,182 fines, costs and fees. Saul Castillo, violation of community controlhouse ar rest (original charge posses sion of methamphetamine), probation revoked, 364 days in jail with credit for time served, $300 fees and outstanding fines, costs and fees placed on lien. James Lamar Matthews, burglary of structure, grand theft and grand theft auto, pro bation four years, $2,969.40 restitution, $1,418 fines, costs and fees; two counts of bur glary of conveyance, grand theft and grand theft auto not prosecuted. Ricky Minaker, violation of community control (original charge battery on a pregnant woman), community control revoked, Florida State Prison 60 months, $300 fees added to outstanding fines, costs and fees and placed on lien. Pedro Pasquera, violation of community control (original charge possession of synthetic cannabis), community control modified to add one year drug offender probation, $300 fees added to outstanding fines, costs and fees. Adrian Rodriguez, violation of probation (original charges two counts possession of methamphetamine), probation revoked, Florida State Prison 22 months, $300 fees added to outstanding fines, costs and fees and placed on lien. Cecilio Rojas Jr., false im prisonmentamended to criminal mischief, adjudica tion withheld, probation 12 months, anger management class, $1,232 fines, costs and fees. Ossie Elliott Sambrano, grand theft auto, not prose cuted. Daniel Jenkins, violation of probation (original charge pos session of synthetic cannabi noids, cathinones or synthetic phenethylamines, probation revoked, Florida State Prison nine months with credit for time served, $300 fees added to outstanding fines, costs and fees and placed on lien. Terry Lamar Pelham, criminal mischief and violation of probation (original charge aggravated child abuse), 364 days in jail, probation rein stated with additional two years, $625 fines, costs and fees plus $300 fee added to outstanding fines, costs and fees placed lien. Charity Flynn, two counts burglary of structure, battery on a law enforcement officer, robbery, aggravated assault with a deadly weapon, two counts trespass in structure/conveyance, criminal mischief, grand theft of a firearm, resisting an officer without violence and petit theft, found not guilty by reason of insanity. Dione Shanta Graham, re sisting an officer with vio lenceamended to resisting an officer without violence, adjudication withheld, 25 hours community service, $1,032 fines, costs and fees; battery on a law enforcement officer, not prosecuted. Juan Hernandez-Hernan dez, trespass on property other than structure/conveyance, ad judication withheld, anger management class, $169.01 restitution, $1,032 fines, costs and fees; criminal mischief, battery, domestic battery and aggravated assault with a deadly weapon, not prosecuted. Lewis James Richardson, possession of methampheta mine, possession of drug paraphernalia, petit theft and resisting arrest without vio lence, Florida State Prison 36 months with credit for time served, $1,320 fines, costs and fees placed on lien. Jason Steinbery, possession of cannabis, possession of cocaine, possession of lysergic acid diethylamide and posses sion of drug paraphernalia, transferred to drug pretrial in tervention program. The following real estate transactions of $10,000 or more were filed recently in the office of the clerk of court: Jose L. Bautista to Joel Sanchez Cruz and Reynaldo David Sanchez Bautista, $20,000. Wayne Collier to Johnny M. and Connie W. Trammell, $73,500. Daniel B. and Jessalyn M. Christenson to Yolanda Christine Hernandez, $153,000. Martha D. Ladwig to Robert C. Brown, $50,000. Albert Wiesbauer as trustee to Thor and Naphou See, $67,500. Kelli L. and Corey Richard son to Marilyn K. Peterson, $80,900. William H. and Sharon A. Carter to Harry W. and Gloria J. Linehart and Harry N. Linehard Jr., $49,000. William Wyatt to Edrigue Virgile, $15,000. Amy S. Crews as co-trustee to Bayside Community Church of Sarasota Inc., $375,000. James A. Corliss and Betty L. Brown-Corliss to Jimmy Russell Hayes and Bonnie Presley, $24,000. Dion Fisher to Ivan Santos Rodriguez and Odelys Alvarez Medina, $55,000. Charles J. and Marlene Isom to Jesse R. Pruitt Jr. and Shirley A. Gearhart-Pruitt, $23,500. Lloyd Monroe Coleman Jr. as trustee to Ricardo and Edna Blas, $55,000. Billy Ray Owens Jr. to Equity Trust Co., $60,000. Robert L. Shiver to Higher Development, $18,000. Johny Lee and Cheryl T. Baker and Jeffrey Baker to Johny Lee and Cheryl T. Baker, $62,000. Bennett E. Weed and Joshua Weed and Tina K. Leconte as trustee to Jimmy D. and Eve lyn J. DeLarosa, $209,900. J. David and Phyllis T. Fitzgerald to Thomas A. and Pamela E. Berry, $27,700. CITY OF WAUCHULA NOTICE TO THE PUBLICThe City Commission of the City of Wauchula will hold a General Em ployee Pension Meeting Monday, March 12, 2018, during the regular scheduled City Commission Meeting which begins at 6:00 p.m. The meetings will be held at the Commission Chambers located at 225 East Main Street, Wauchula, FL 33873. Pursuant to Section 286.0107, Florida Statutes, as amended, the City Commission hereby advises that if any interested person decides to appeal any decision made by the City Commission with respect to any matter considered at the proceedings, he will need a record of the proceeding and that, for such purposes, he may need to insure that a verbatim record of the proceeding is made, which record in cludes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. The City Commission of the City of Wauchula, Florida does not discriminate upon the basis of any individuals disability status. This non-discriminatory policy involves every aspect of the Commissions functions, including ones access to, partic ipation, employment, or treatment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable accommodation as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26, Florida Statutes, should contact the City Clerk at (863) 773-3131. CITY OF WAUCHULA S/Richard Keith Nadaskay Jr. Mayor ATTEST S/Holly Smith City Clerk 3:8cCITY OF WAUCHULA NOTICE TO THE PUBLICThe City Commission of the City of Wauchula will hold a regular quarterly Police Pension Meeting Monday, March 12, 2018 at 5:45pm, or as soon thereafter as it reasonably can be held. The meetings will be held at the City Administrative Building located at 126 S. 7th Avenue, Wauchula, FL 33873. Pursuant to Section 286.0107, Florida Statutes, as amended, the City Commission hereby advises that if any interested person decides to appeal any decision made by the City Commission with respect to any matter considered at the proceedings, he will need a record of the proceeding and that, for such purposes, he may need to insure that a verbatim record of the proceeding is made, which record in cludes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. The City Commission of the City of Wauchula, Florida does not discriminate upon the basis of any individuals disability status. This non-discriminatory policy in volves every aspect of the Commissions functions, including ones access to, partic ipation, employment or treatment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable accommodation as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26, Florida Statutes, should contact the City Clerk at (863) 773-3131. CITY OF WAUCHULA S/Richard Keith Nadaskay Jr. Mayor ATTEST S/Holly Smith City Clerk 3:8cCITY OF WAUCHULA NOTICE TO THE PUBLICThe City Commission of the City of Wauchula will hold the regular sched uled meeting Monday, March 12, 2018 at 6:00pm, or as soon thereafter as it reasonably can be held. The agenda can be viewed at 126 South 7th Avenue or www.cityofwauchula.com The meeting will be held at the Commission Chambers located at 225 East Main Street, Wauchula, FL 33873. Pursuant to Section 286.0107, Florida Statutes, as amended, the City Commission hereby advises that if any interested person decides to appeal any decision made by the City Commission with respect to any matter considered at the proceedings, he will need a record of the proceeding and that, for such purposes, he may need to insure that a verbatim record of the proceeding is made, which record in cludes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. The City Commission of the City of Wauchula, Florida does not discriminate upon the basis of any individuals disability status. This non-discriminatory policy involves every aspect of the Commissions functions, including ones access to, partic ipation, employment or treatment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable accommodation as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26, Florida Statutes, should contact the City Clerk at (863) 773-3131. CITY OF WAUCHULA S/Richard Keith Nadaskay Jr. Mayor ATTEST S/Holly Smith City Clerk 3:8cPUBLIC NOTICECitizens Advisory Task Force MeetingThe Town of Zolfo Springs CDBG Citizens Advisory Task Force (CATF) will hold a public meeting on Monday, March 19, 2018 at 6:00 PM. The meeting will be conducted in the Zolfo Springs Town Hall / Civic Center, 3210 US Highway 17 S., Zolfo Springs, FL 33890. The purpose of the meeting will be to discuss community needs and to provide recommendations to the local governing body as to the program area, activities or funding category that should be considered when drafting the Town of Zolfo Springss FFY2017 Small Cities Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) application. The CATF is being conducted in a handicapped accessible location. Any handicapped person requiring an interpreter for the hearing impaired or the visually impaired should contact Amanda Wallace at (863) 735-0405, at least five calendar days prior to the meeting and an interpreter will be provided. Any non-English speaking person wishing to attend the CATF should contact Amanda Wallace at least five calendar days prior to the meeting and a language interpreter will be provided. To access a Telecommunication Device for Deaf Persons (TDD) please call (800) 955-8771. Any handicapped person requiring special accommodation at this meeting should contact Amanda Wal lace at least five calendar days prior to the meeting. THE TOWN OF ZOLFO SPRINGS IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER, HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE AND FAIR HOUSING JURISDICTION. THIS LOCAL GOVERNMENT SUPPORTS THE EMPLOYMENT OF SECTION 3 & W/MBE PERSONS. 3:8c Notices Herald-Advocate Hardee Countys Hometown CoveragePRINTERS PUBLISHERSTelephone (863) 773-3255www.TheHeraldAdvocate.comThe March 8, 2018, The Herald-Advocate A19

PAGE 20

3:8c Pioneer Park Days Parade Returns! Photos ByMARIA TRUJILLO & PANG GILLIARD • Montage ByDARLENE WILLIAMS A20 The Herald-Advocate, March 8, 2018

PAGE 21

PHOTO BY DARREN DANIELS Best of Show Poultry Grand Champion and Best ofClass Grand Champion Bantam Division went to Samuel Hughes with his B.B. Red Old English. PHOTO BY DARREN DANIELS Rebekah Erekson won Best of Show, Best of Breed and First Place Senior Division Showmanship with her Eng lish Lop rabbit. PHOTO BY MARIA TRUJILLO GRAND CHAMPION STEER Exhibitor: Griffin Clark Sale Price: $5.50 Buyer: Circle C PHOTO BY MARIA TRUJILLO GRAND CHAMPION SWINE Exhibitor: Riley Kate Albritton Sale Price: $8.50 Buyer: B-2 Farms Herald-AdvocateThursday, March 8, 2018 B THE 2018 Hardee County Fair 4-H & FFA Shows & Sale PHOTO BY DARREN DANIELS Mady Tyson (FFA Jr) won Grand Champion Commercial, Supreme Champion Fe male, and second place in the intermediate showmanship division. Rabbit, Fowl, Beef/Dairy/Heifer, Swine Shows Photos by Darren Daniels Market Steer Show Photos by Naomi Erekson Swine Showmanship Photos by Tom Staik Livestock Auction Photos by Naomi Erekson & Maria Trujillo

PAGE 22

Dean Clark was chosen as Reserve Champion Commercial Heifer and first place in intermediate showmanship. RESERVECHAMPION STEER Exhibitor: Kara Durrance Sale Price: $5.00 Buyer: Vandolah Power RESERVECHAMPION SWINE Exhibitor: Jamie Walker Sale Price: $5.50 Buyer: All Creatures Animal Hospital Cade Deemer received the titles of Grand Champion and Best of Breed for his Flemish Giant rabbit The titles of Reserve Champion and Best of Breed went to Janelle McDuffie for her Dutch rabbit. PHOTO BY NAOMI EREKSON GRAND CHAMPION CITRUS Exhibitor: Peyton Lambert Sale Price: $3,200 Buyer: Dr. Barbara Carlton B2 The Herald-Advocate, March 8, 2018 PHOTO BY DARREN DANIELS Best of Show Poultry Reserve Champion, Best of Class Reserve Champion Bantam Division and first place sen ior showmanship division went to Scottie Meeks with his Black Old English.

PAGE 23

*Chrysler Capital bonus cash with approved credit through Chrysler Capital. Prices exclude tax, tag, title and $699 dealer fee. See dealer for availability and completedetails on all special offers. Offer expires 3/31/2018. Hurry in for our best selection. Dealer not responsible for typographical errors. Photos are for illustration purposesonly; vehicles may be different color. WE BUY CARS! 3:8c DODGE JOURNEY SE Blacktop Package (17” Aluminum Rims, Black Headlamp Bezels, Gloss Black Grille), Keyless Go, 3rd Row Seat, Keyless Entry, Touch Screen Audio, Power Windows & LocksMSRP $ 23,985 ALAN JAY DISCOUNT700FACTORY REBATES4,000 $19,285* E183446 200 LIMITED PLATINUM Leather-trimmed bucket seats, Back-up Camera, U-Connect8.4, Voice command w/ Bluetooth, SiriusXM, Power seats w/ LumbarMSRP $ 25,705 ALAN JAY DISCOUNT5,000 $20,705* E509140 JEEP PATRIOT SPORT Customer Preferred Package (U-Connect8.4 w/Bluetooth, SiriusXM, 17” Aluminum Rims), Power Value Group (Power/heated Mirrors, Power Windows, Keyless Entry), AutoStickAutomatic TransmissionMSRP $ 25,230 ALAN JAY DISCOUNT-4,000 $21,230* E131305 JEEP COMPASS LATITUDE Remote Start, Back-up Camera, Cruise Control, Automatic Transmission, Power Windows & LocksMSRP $ 26,285 ALAN JAY DISCOUNT-5,000 $21,285* E141441 DODGE CHARGER SXT PLUS ParksenseRear Park Assist, Parkview Rear Back-up Camera, Remote Start System, Uconnect , Apple CarPlayCapable, Power Heated Driver/Passenger Seats, SiriusXM, 20” Gloss Black Aluminum Rims, Sport Suspension MSRP $ 32,885 ALAN JAY DISCOUNT1,500FACTORY REBATES3,000 $28,385* E163786 JEEP WRANGLER SPORT 2-Door, Power Windows, Power Locks, V-6 Engine, Hard Top, Tow PackageMSRP $ 32,995 ALAN JAY DISCOUNT2,000 $30,995* FHL572326 NEW 2018 NEW 2017 NEW 2017 NEW 2017 NEW 2018 NEW 2017DODGE DURANGO SXT Customer Preferred Package (Power/Lumbar/Heated Front Seats, U-Connect w/Bluetooth, ParkSensePark Assist w/Stop, ParkView Rear Back-up Camera, 3rd Row/7 Passenger Seating, Navigation, SiriusXM )MSRP $ 36,090 ALAN JAY DISCOUNT5,600 $30,490* E724393 RAM 1500 SLT CREW CAB 4X4 Trailer Tow w/4 Pin Connector Wiring, Remote Keyless Entry, Locking Tailgate, Uconnect 5.0, Integrated Voice Command w/ Bluetooth, SiriusXM , Big Horn Package (KatzKin Leather Seats, Parkview Rear Back-up Camera, ParksenseRear Park Assist)MSRP $ 50,730 ALAN JAY DISCOUNT4,510FACTORY REBATES6,750 $39,470* E714136 NEW 2017 NEW 2017 March 8, 2018, The Herald-Advocate B3

PAGE 24

Savanna Willis won Best of Breed in the mini rex divi sion. Best of Breed in the polish division went to Laney KateJohnson. The title of Best of Breed in the holland lop solid divi sion went to Jake Harvey. This jersey wooly rabbit won Best of Breed for Natalie Hines. Another Best of Breed Award went to Addilyn Hilton forher lionhead rabbit. Best of Breed in the netherland dwarf division went toAlice Walkington. Josiah Burch won Best of Breed Assorted Division andthird place Showmanship in the Junior Division with his Dwarf Hotot rabbit. Winning Best of Breed in the assorted breeds divisionwith his silver fox rabbit is Christopher Castaldi. He alsowon second place showmanship in the senior division. This little one holds his rabbit close as he waits his turn. Children patiently wait for their rabbits to be judged. Sometimes the waiting is the hardest part. Numerous rabbits are examined one by one as part ofthe judging process. Also winning Best of Breed was Adriyana Avalos for herhimalayan rabbit. Rabbits Not Pictured Best of Breed –Holland Lop Broken Payton May Showmanship Awards Cloverbud Division 1st Caroline Cornell 2nd Ryland Smith Junior Division 1st Jackson Shoffner2nd Jaymie Chancey Intermediate Division 1st Christian Avalos 2nd Hailey Bryant B4 The Herald-Advocate, March 8, 2018

PAGE 25

Fowl Winning Grand Champion in the turkey divison was Larit Vansickle. The Grand Champion and Reserve Grand Champion in the waterfowl division was Abigail Erekson with her rouen ducks.Pictured above in no particular order are the Best of Class bantam division Cham pion Samuel Hughes with his B.B. Red Old English and Reserve Champion ScottieMeeks with his Black Old English; Best of Class Single Comb Clean Legged DivisionChampion and Reserve Champion Warren Bryant with his Dutch; Best of Class RoseComb Clean Legged Division Champion and Reserve Champion Ashlynn Parrishwith her Golden Seabrights; and Best of Class Feather Legged Division ChampionLarit Vansickle with his Mille Fleur Belgian Bearded DÂ’uccle and Reserve Champion Caleigh Deese with her Buff Silkie. The Standard Grand Champion and Best of Class standard game division, JaydenBurch (left), is shown with his Ameraucana. The Standard Reserve Grand Championand Best of Class standard mediterranean division was Chelsea Deese (right) withher Buff Leghorn. Showmanship secondplace junior division win ner was Jewel Sockalosky. Receiving third in show manship junior division was Ashlynn Parrish. This little guy answers the judges questions in the hopes of placing in the showmanship division. Showmanship secondplace senior division wentto Noah Reese. Senior division third placeshowmanship winner was Kylie Shenefield, Receiveing first placeshowmanship mini divi sion was Lily Southwell. Second place showman ship mini division wasReid Miller. Placing third in showman ship mini division wasCade Deemer. Warren Bryant receivedfirst place showmanshipjunior divison. Intermediate division firstplace showmanship win ner was Chelsea Deese. Second place showman ship intermediate divisionwas Paige Justice. Jordyn Southall receivedthird place showmanshipintermediate division. Placing first in showman ship senior division wasScottie Meeks. Pictured above in no particular order are the Standard Division winners American Best of Class Champion JillianThompson with her Blue Ladd Wyandotte and Reserve Champion Christian Avalos with Silver Laced Wyandotte;English Best of Class Champion Braddock Dickey with his Buff Orpington and Reserve Champion Paige Justicewith her Australorp; Best of Class Continental Champion Christopher Castaldi with his Polish Golden Laced andReserve Champion Jacey Patterson with her Polish Golden Laced; Best of Class Mediterranean ChampionChelsea Deese with her Buff Leghorn and Noah Deese with his White Leghorn; and Best of Class Game Cham pion Jayden Burch with his Ameraucana and Reserve Champion Khale Dickey with his Ameraucana. March 8, 2018, The Herald-Advocate B5

PAGE 26

BeefBreeding/Dairy/Heifer Heath Hendry earned the title of Reserve Supreme Champion Heifer, Grand Cham pion in the charolais female division, and third place in the intermediate showman ship division. Julia Ribaudo earned the title of Grand Champion in the dairy division. Kipp Cooper earned several titles including: Grand and Reserve Champion in thebrahman female division, Grand and Reserve Champion in the brahman bull section,Grand Champion in the braham influence heifer portion, as well as taking first place in the senior showmanship division. Grand Champion in the simmental female division went to Hardee FFA Sr.Wyatt Haney won first place in the junior showmanship division. Hardee FFA Sr took Reserve Champion in the simmental female division. Bridgette Conley earned third place in the senior showmanship division. Alyssa Beers received second place in the senior showmanship division. Making up games was a great way for these princesses to stay occupied during the long waiting periods between events. Samantha Shackelford was named the Reserve Champion in the dairy division aswell as Reserve Champion in the braham influence heifer show. Not Pictured Austin Chapman Second Place — Junior Showmanship B6 The Herald-Advocate, March 8, 2018

PAGE 27

March 8, 2018, The Herald-Advocate B7

PAGE 28

B8 The Herald-Advocate, March 8, 2018

PAGE 29

Senior 3rd Griffin Clark Intermediate 3rd Drew Beattie Junior 2nd Josslyn Richardson Not Pictured Steer Showmanship March 8, 2018, The Herald-Advocate B9 Grooming Contest First Place Kaylee Barberee, Emery Smith, Lane Warren Second Place Griffin Clark, Aubrey Bragg, Dean Clark Third Place Alyssa Beers, Kara Durrance, Kellon Lindsey Photos By NANCY DAVIS • Montage By MARIA TRUJILLO

PAGE 32

Exhibitor: Sydnie Steiner Sale Price: $4.25 Buyer: Wauchula State Bank Exhibitor: Avery Bunch Sale Price: $3.50 Buyer: Dr. Barbara Carlton Exhibitor: Jake Henderson Sale Price: $5.75 Buyer: Bar Crescent S Ranch Exhibitor: FFA Jr. (Faith Davis) Sale Price: $5.50 Buyer: Miles Judah Exhibitor: Alexis Crews Sale Price: $4.00 Buyer: Fl Fence Post Exhibitor: Quintin Lindsey Sale Price: $4.00 Buyer: Veg King Exhibitor: Drew Beattie Sale Price: $4.00 Buyer: Vandolah Power Exhibitor: FFA Sr. (Kaylen Barringer) Sale Price: $4.75 Buyer: Chapman Fruit Exhibitor: Kellon Lindsey Sale Price: $4.00 Buyer: Veg King Exhibitor: Ellie Palmer Sale Price: $3.00 Buyer: Lefty Durando Exhibitor: 4H Foundation (Alyssa Beers) Sale Price: $5.50 Buyer: Mosaic Exhibitor: Emery Smith Sale Price: $6.00 Buyer: Bar Crescent S Ranch/Susan Smith Exhibitor: Hunter Sellers Sale Price: $3.00 Buyer: Vandolah Power Exhibitor: Cason Gough Sale Price: $3.00 Buyer: Jay Belflower Exhibitor: Seth Durrance Sale Price: $3.00 Buyer: Durrance & Son, LLC Exhibitor: Dean Clark Sale Price: $3.50 Buyer: Florida Fertilizer Exhibitor: Jansen Walker Sale Price: $3.50 Buyer: Everglades Equipment Exhibitor: Kipp Cooper Sale Price: $3.50 Buyer: Arcadia Stock Yard Steer B12 The Herald-Advocate, March 8, 2018

PAGE 33

Exhibitor: Josslyn Richardson Sale Price: $3.75 Buyer: Arcadia Stock Yard Exhibitor: Brody Prescott Sale Price: $3.75 Buyer: Dr. Barbara Carlton Exhibitor: Sam Palmer Sale Price: $3.75 Buyer: Doyle & Debbie Carlton Exhibitor: Clay Hancock Sale Price: $3.75 Buyer: Ground Level Exhibitor: Aubrey Bragg Sale Price: $4.00 Buyer: Mosaic Exhibitor: Jess Scarbrough Sale Price: $4.00 Buyer: Hardee Ranch Supply Exhibitor: Lane Parks Sale Price: $3.75 Buyer: Farr Groves & Cattle Steer March 8, 2018, The Herald-Advocate B13 PHOTO BY MARIA TRUJILLO This young man proudly shows off his steer at the auction in hopes of a high bid. PHOTO BY NAOMI EREKSON The long waiting periods during the auction weresometimes hard to fill for 2017 Little Miss CarliMushrush (left) and 2017 Second Grade PrincessKhale Dickey. PHOTO BY MARIA TRUJILLO The adults werenÂ’t the only ones keeping an eye on theexhibitors and their animals. PHOTO BY MARIA TRUJILLO The auctioneer stopped a moment to praise the ex hibitors for how well they dress up for the occasion. PHOTO BY MARIA TRUJILLO This little girl was all smiles when showing off her steer. PHOTO BY NAOMI EREKSON This yearÂ’s scholarship winners.

PAGE 34

Born in Bartow Bowling Green Elementary Fourth grade ELA • 6 years teaching experience High School Diploma — Hardee Senior High A.A. — South Florida State College • B.S. — University of South Florida I am married to Cameron Durham. Hobbies/Interests: I enjoy reading, crafting, and cooking. Shopping at Hobby Lobby is always a bonus!!!!!!!!!!!!! I became a teacher because I knew from an early age that I wanted to work with children. I’ve always loved babysitting and because of that I knew I needed to work with kids. I realized that looking back. I had many influential teachers growing up. I, like many others thought it would be an easy choice, because teaching “is so easy”! I quickly learned that was not true. I learned that those teachers I had were trying their best to make learning fun and engaging. I hope I can make a difference in a child’s life like they did mine. My most rewarding moment as a teacher was when my student, who was the lowest in my class and probably the whole grade level, had this “Aha!” moment. He was able to tell me the answer to a question I had. He then said, “Oh, I get it!” He did! It made me feel like I was actually making a difference. Knowing he had understood something that is a struggle for him, and for him to surpass that frustration level was a wonderful feeling for me and also him. Something that most people don’t know about me is that I was born with a cleft foot and I also have a horseshoe kidney. Born in Winter Haven North Wauchula Elementary Second grade • 17 years teaching experience High School Diploma — Hardee Senior High AA Degree — South Florida Community College Bachelor of Science Degree in Elementary Education — USF (Lakeland Campus) Hobbies/Interests: I love to travel and go shopping. I am a MAJOR Dale Earnhardt, Jr. fan and love watching NASCAR races. I also love to read Christian romance books (Love Inspired Series) and do word search puzzles. But, the most important thing I love to do is spend time with my family, especially my 3 nieces and 1 nephew, who are the lights of my life. I became a teacher because I wanted to make a difference in the lives of children. I had several teachers growing up who really impacted my life. I want to show my students that they can be and do anything they want with a lot of hard work and devotion. Through teaching, I want to watch them to grow and develop into wonderful, amazing, and responsible members of the community. Over the past 17 years, I have had many rewarding moments as a teacher. But, the one that sticks out the most in my mind is when I was teaching third grade. I had several students who were struggling a great deal at the beginning of the year. So, throughout the year, both of the students worked really hard, and as the year progressed, I could see the “light bulbs” going off in their heads. That brought so much joy to my heart, and when their scores (FCAT at the time) came back, they had both passed with flying colors! I was so proud of them and the accomplishments they had made. It is one of the highlights of my teaching career! Most people probably don’t know that I have a major fear of all creepy, crawly animals! I can’t stand them!!! Born in Avon Park Zolfo Springs Elementary Kindergarten • 2 years teaching experience High School Diploma — Hardee Senior High. Go Cats! BS in Business Administration — Warner University. I am married to Glenn Thornton and have two children, Gatlin, 12 and Gairyn, 9. Hobbies/Interests: Spending time with my family and friends, fishing with my husband, teaching, reading, crafting, traveling to the mountains. I became a teacher because every child deserves a champion! I love seeing children learn and grow! I strive to instill a love for learning in children and encourage them to be the best that they can be! Most rewarding moment(s) as a teacher: 1. The big, excited smiles in the mornings, waves in the hallways and the running hugs that almost knock you down from both current and former students are truly so rewarding to me! 2. We learn at the beginning of the year that we “celebrate” the big and small accomplishments in our class! Many times I will hear one of my students say “it’s time to celebrate”... It’s rewarding knowing that they know the importance of celebrating their successes! Something most people don’t know about me: I do not watch TV, I’d rather surf the internet and read blogs! I love to fish, but I do not eat fish or any kind of seafood! I am afraid of frogs! Born in Bradenton Hardee Senior High Environmental Science • 14 years (8 of which have been in Hardee County) High School Diploma — Palmetto High School, Palmetto AA in Music — Manatee Community College • BA in Sociology — University of Florida I am married to Ian Trott and have three children, Weston, 11, Cohen, 8, and Jamison, 3. Hobbies/Interests: My favorite thing to do is sing. I grew up singing in the children’s choir at my church and have never stopped. I also enjoy sewing and crafting. I became a teacher because when I was in middle school, I had a teacher that inspired me to be more than I thought I could be. She was brash, loud, and I loved her. I always knew that I wanted to do something to impact young people in a positive way. There is nothing I would rather do than spend my days investing in the youth of Hardee County. The most rewarding moments for me as a teacher have been seeing those students that we didn’t know if they’d make it or not, walk across that stage to receive their diploma. When they come back and tell you, “Mrs. Trott, you were hard on me, but I appreciate it because it made me work harder,” it’s all worth it. Something that not many people may know is that I started smocking and heirloom sewing in college. Unfortunately, with three boys, I don’t really get to do much of that anymore…not just because of time, but my boys don’t exactly want smocked collars on their church shirts! Born in Everglades City Hardee Junior High Sixth grade math • 11 years teaching experience High School Diploma — Everglades City High School B.A. Elementary Education — Florida Gulf Coast University Master’s, Teaching and Learning (Elementary Mathematics) — NOVA University I am married to April Wood and have three children, Dustin, 28, Joseph, 15, and Jakey, 13. Hobbies/Interests: Hunting, fishing, building play toys ieg. airboats. I have been a boat captain, commercial fisherman, alligator skinner, welder/mechanic, then I married a teacher. After helping her in her classroom, I realized my calling, helping kids. Teaching is truly a calling. Most rewarding moment(s) as a teacher: The first students I taught in Hardee are in 11th grade now. Going to Burger King, Walmart, and Winn Dixie I see the kids I taught in fifth grade working now. I am so proud of them. Something most people don’t know about me: I have traveled the Yucatan of Mexico, seen the Pacific Ocean from the shores in Costa Rica, and been to Havana Cuba. Meet Our Teachers Hardee County School District Courtney Durham Amanda Crawford Kim Davis Blaire Thornton James ‘Red’ Wood Kim Trott Born in Lakeland Hilltop Elementary Second grade • 12 years teaching experience I have taught Kindergarten, first, second and third grades over the years. High School Diploma — Hardee Senior High School, June 1, 1990 A.S. Degree in Business Management, May 2000 — South Florida State College B.A. Degree in Elementary Education, May 2006 — Warner University M.A. Curriculum and Instruction with an Emphasis in Elementary Reading, July 2012 — Grand Canyon University I have three children, Jacob (Jake) Willis, 25, William (Willie) Godwin, 22, and David Godwin, 21. Hobbies/Interests: I love to read, go fishing, work in my yard and visit state parks. I became a teacher because I taught in a Christian preschool for years when my boys were little. I loved watching the children learn and grow each year. My college advisor encouraged me to become a teacher when I finished getting my associates degree. She said, "We need people like you to teach our children." Once my youngest started school, I decided to go back for my bachelor's degree in education. I have loved every minute of it! Most rewarding moment(s) as a teacher: I love watching the students grow academically throughout the school year. They come in August not knowing so many things and leave you with a wealth of knowledge for the next year. It is especially rewarding when you help a child overcome a difficulty in their learning. Those that struggle to read, write or do math and finally have success are the ones that tug at your heart strings. Something most people don’t know about me: I just received my first passport. I will be going on a mission trip with my church in March to the Dominican Republic. It will be my first time out of the country and only second time flying in a plane. So I am excited and nervous! Amy Abbott Franks Sponsored by: Sevigny Associates Eye Care 735 North 6th Ave., Wauchula • 863-773-3322 3:8c Born in Lakeland Wauchula Elementary Second grade • 15 years teaching experience High School Diploma — Hardee Senior High Troy University, Alabama I am married to Robert Davis and have three children, Dylan Davis, 15, Faith Davis, 13, and Tyson Davis, 9. Hobbies/Interests: Spending time with my kids, shopping and listening to music. I became a teacher because I love working with students and giving them a desire to want to learn. My most rewarding moments are not the ones that happen right away. The moments I cherish the most are the times when a student comes back years later to tell you what kind of an impact you had on them. Something most people don’t know about me: When I was in twelfth grade I was voted Most Fun. For those that didn’t know me then find this shocking since I am currently defined as just the opposite. B14 The Herald-Advocate, March 8, 2018

PAGE 35

Steer & Swine Show Dean Clark took third place overall in the Market Steer show and second place inthe intermediate showmanship division. Fourth overall with her steer is Jansen Walker. Kipp Cooper received the fifth overall title for his market steer and placed secondin the senior showmanship division Brody Prescott won first place in the market steer junior showmanship division.Winning the first place senior showmanship ribbon is Hunter Sellers. Cason Gough took first place in the showmanshipÂ’s intermediate division. Russell Bryant received fifth place overall for his market swine. Macy Tyson took third place overall in the market swine show. Earning the top three titles in the junior division are (left to right) Kayleigh Harris with second place, Carter Gor don taking first and Ava Roberts earning third place. Christian Avalos (center) earned first place in the inter mediate showmanship division. Macy Tyson (left) andLane Warren (right) took second and third place re spectively. In the senior showmanship division, Shelby Gibson(middle) won first place, Raymond Lazorko (left) tooksecond and Jamie Walker (right) left with third place. Taking fourth overall for his market swine is Raymond Lazorko. March 8, 2018, The Herald-Advocate B15

PAGE 36

Swine Exhibitor: Cohen Trott Price: $4.50 Buyer: Hood Citrus Exhibitor: Desiree Spiker Price: $3.75 Buyer: Everglades Equipment Exhibitor: Gracyn Thomas Price: $4.50 Buyer: Binky & Ralene Graham Exhibitor: Seela Albritton Price: $5.25 Buyer: Jim See Realty Exhibitor: Justin Shenefield Price: $4.00 Buyer: Johns On Wheels Exhibitor: Blake Tinsley Price: $4.50 Buyer: Singletary Family Prop LLC Exhibitor: Courtney Vickers Price: $4.25 Buyer: Burnett Farms Exhibitor: Teagan VanSickle Price: $4.00 Buyer: All Creatures Animal Hospital Exhibitor: Ashlynn Parrish Price: $3.75 Buyer: D3 Cattle Exhibitor: Ryder Thomas Price: $4.50 Buyer: Lacey McClintock/State Farm Exhibitor: Zander Durastanti Price: $4.25 Buyer: First National Bank Exhibitor: Gracie Albritton Price: $5.50 Buyer: Jim See Realty Exhibitor: Coy Knight Price: $4.25 Buyer: Joe L. Davis Groves Exhibitor: Morgan Parks Price: $4.25 Buyer: Everglades Equipment Exhibitor: Ben Rewis Price: $4.75 Buyer: Coldwell Bankers Exhibitor: BJ Johnson Price: $5.75 Buyer: Florida Fuel Exhibitor: Kylie Burnett Price: $5.00 Buyer: Burnett Farms Exhibitor: Marti Edenfield Price: $5.00 Buyer: David Singletary Exhibitor: Shelby Gibson Price: $4.75 Buyer: Crop Production Services Exhibitor: Taylor Hays Price: $5.50 Buyer: Dr. Barbara Carlton Exhibitor: Micah Lambert Price: $4.00 Buyer: Bunch Ag Co Exhibitor: Austin Barker Price: $4.00 Buyer: Roberson Farms Exhibitor: Madisyn Hines Price: $4.00 Buyer: Mosaic Exhibitor: Cody Knight Price: $4.50 Buyer: Robert and Miranda Sunday Exhibitor: Adam Guerrero Price: $3.25 Buyer: Vision Ace Hardware Exhibitor: Destiny Walker Price: $3.50 Buyer: George Wadsworth Insurance Exhibitor: Kayleigh Harris Price: $5.50 Buyer: Alair Homes Exhibitor: Logan Cartwright Price: $3.75 Buyer: Conley Grove Service Exhibitor: Jr High FFA (Macy Tyson) Price: $3.75 Buyer: Mosaic Exhibitor: Raymond Lazorko Price: $3.75 Buyer: Jacki Johnson, Tax Collector Exhibitor: Russell Bryant Price: $3.50 Buyer: Kelly Durrance Livestock Hauling Exhibitor: Hugh Pate Price: $4.50 Buyer: Joe L. Davis Groves B16 The Herald-Advocate, March 8, 2018

PAGE 37

Swine Exhibitor: Haylie Norman Price: $3.75 Buyer: Heartland Growers Exhibitor: Cason Bryan Price: $4.75 Buyer: Burnett Farms Exhibitor: Jasmine Lanier Price: $4.00 Buyer: Eli Western Wear Exhibitor: Emma Hays Price: $5.75 Buyer: David Singletary State Farm Exhibitor: Gairyn Thornton Price: $3.75 Buyer: Binky & Ralene Graham Exhibitor: Eli Hayes Price: $8.00 Buyer: Jay Belflower Exhibitor: Gage Gough Price: $6.00 Buyer: Eli Western Wear Exhibitor: Ashton White Price: $4.25 Buyer: Florida Fuel Exhibitor: Jacob Brandeberry Price: $4.50 Buyer: Nickerson Bar 3 Exhibitor: Savannah Sperry Price: $4.75 Buyer: Durrance Groves Exhibitor: Payton Lambert Price: $4.50 Buyer: Florida Fertilizer Exhibitor: Dylan Davis Price: $4.50 Buyer: Clark, Palmer & Pohl Exhibitor: Bailey Tinsley Price: $6.00 Buyer: Only Moso USA Exhibitor: Cody Rieder Price: $4.50 Buyer: Joe L. Davis, Inc. Exhibitor: Kyle Waters Price: $5.25 Buyer: Jay Bryan Farm Bureau Exhibitor: Tyler Harris Price: $3.75 Buyer: Conley Grove Service Exhibitor: Claire Carlton Price: $10.00 Buyer: Gourley Plastering Exhibitor: Lizzie McCoy Price: $4.00 Buyer: David Singletary State Farm Exhibitor: Alyssa Beers Price: $4.50 Buyer: B-2 Farms Exhibitor: Warren Bryant Price: $4.25 Buyer: Mosaic Exhibitor: Aiden Thomas Price: $5.00 Buyer: Vandolah Power Exhibitor: Clayton Harris Price: $5.00 Buyer: Joe L. Davis Groves Exhibitor: Parker Sasser Price: $4.50 Buyer: 5G Farms Exhibitor: Kamren Deluca Price: $4.25 Buyer: Mosaic Exhibitor: Chase Bryant Price: $4.25 Buyer: Gopher Hill Hunt Club Exhibitor: Katie Henderson Price: $6.75 Buyer: Florida Fuel Exhibitor: Ryland Beumel Price: $5.50 Buyer: Ground Level Exhibitor: Trista Miller Price: $5.25 Buyer: PRECO Exhibitor: Preston Barringer Price: $4.00 Buyer: Linda & Dan Smith Exhibitor: Carter Gordon Price: $10.50 Buyer: Syfrett Feed Company Exhibitor: Christian Avalos Price: $6.00 Buyer: Smith Automotive/David Singletary Exhibitor: Kale Henderson Price: $6.75 Buyer: Veg King March 8, 2018, The Herald-Advocate B17

PAGE 38

Swine Exhibitor: Brian McQuaig Price: $3.50 Buyer: CatÂ’s On Main Exhibitor: Brody Waters Price: $4.00 Buyer: Heartland Growers Exhibitor: Elijah Duncan Price: $3.50 Buyer: Crop Production Services Exhibitor: Rysen Whiteside Price: $3.50 Buyer: Norman Sutton Exhibitor: Colton Knight Price: $4.00 Buyer: Friendship Foliage Exhibitor: Gaige Cartwright Price: $4.25 Buyer: George Wadsworth Insurance Exhibitor: Joseph Wood Price: $3.50 Buyer: Farr Groves & Cattle Exhibitor: Jonathen Pippin Price: $3.75 Buyer: Mosaic Exhibitor: Jay Southwell Price: $8.00 Buyer: PapaÂ’s Pride Guavas Exhibitor: Caleb Hughes Price: $6.00 Buyer: Crop Production Services Exhibitor: Maddox Blas Price: $5.00 Buyer: Johnson Harvesting Exhibitor: Gatlin Thornton Price: $4.00 Buyer: Coastal Fertilizer Exhibitor: Hagen Bryan Price: $4.75 Buyer: Only Moso USA Exhibitor: Maddisson Cowart Price: $4.25 Buyer: Walter & Carol Farr Exhibitor: Daniel Sockalosky Price: $8.75 Buyer: Barry Fogle Exhibitor: Jordan Sperry Price: $4.25 Buyer: Other Side Sod LLC Exhibitor: William Cornell Price: $4.75 Buyer: George Wadsworth Insurance Exhibitor: Hunter Parker Price: $4.00 Buyer: Vision Ace Hardware Exhibitor: Damon Carraway Price: $5.50 Buyer: David Durando Exhibitor: Joelynn Carver Price: $5.50 Buyer: PRECO Exhibitor: FFA Sr (Destiny Keen) Price: $5.75 Buyer: PRECO Exhibitor: JC Thomas Price: $4.00 Buyer: Coker Fuel Exhibitor: Lane Warren Price: $4.50 Buyer: Durrance & Son, LLC Exhibitor: Carlie Knight Price: $4.25 Buyer: Double H Equipment Exhibitor: Nathan Hughes Price: $6.50 Buyer: David Singletary State Farm Exhibitor: Ava Roberts Price: $4.75 Buyer: Calvin Roberts Exhibitor: Abigail Eures Price: $4.50 Buyer: All Creatures Animal Hospital Exhibitor: Hailey Bryant Price: $4.25 Buyer: Buckhorn Nursery Exhibitor: Oren Crawford Price: $6.00 Buyer: Jet Harvest Solution/Kalan Royal Exhibitor: Gavin Prescott Price: $5.00 Buyer: Circle C Exhibitor: Emma Tyson Price: $8.25 Buyer: Wayne Faulkner Tree Service Exhibitor: Gavin Tubbs Price: $5.00 Buyer: Main Gate Enterprise B18 The Herald-Advocate, March 8, 2018

PAGE 39

Swine Exhibitor: Alize Sullivan Price: $3.25 Buyer: Smith Automotive Exhibitor: Michaella Walker Price: $3.25 Buyer: Crop Production Services Exhibitor: Rylan Thomas Price: $4.50 Buyer: Lacey McClintock/State Farm & 5G Farms Exhibitor: 4H Foundation (Elizabeth Weeks) Price: $4.75 Buyer: All Creatures Animal Hospital Exhibitor: Jacob Wood Price: $4.00 Buyer: Double H Equipment Exhibitor: Zackary Durastanti Price: $3.25 Buyer: Heartland Growers Exhibitor: Summer Cartwright Price: $3.50 Buyer: Binky & Ralene Graham Exhibitor: Jayden Hays Price: $3.25 Buyer: Farr Groves & Cattle Exhibitor: Alissa Gicker Price: $3.75 Buyer: Crop Production Services Exhibitor: Mackenzie Burch Price: $4.00 Buyer: ATP Logistics Exhibitor: Jack Clarke Price: $4.75 Buyer: Lambert Realty Exhibitor: George Harvey Price: $4.00 Buyer: Kelly Durrance Livestock Hauling Exhibitor: Rieken Rickett Price: $5.25 Buyer: Veg King Exhibitor: Jordan Miller Price: $6.00 Buyer: David Singletary State Farm Exhibitor: Daniel Clarke Price: $3.75 Buyer: CooperÂ’s Flowers Exhibitor: Kylie Shenefield Price: $3.25 Buyer: Heartland Growers Exhibitor: Rafael Zamora Price: $3.25 Buyer: Johnson Harvesting Exhibitor: Cayden Albritton Price: $3.25 Buyer: Burnett Farms Exhibitor: Judson Hays Price: $3.25 Buyer: Lacey McClintock/State Farm Exhibitor: Warren Cornell Price: $3.50 Buyer: Mosaic Exhibitor: Rachel Garland Price: $4.00 Buyer: Steven Southwell Exhibitor: Kassidy Deluca Price: $3.00 Buyer: Kelly Durrance Livestock Hauling Exhibitor: Abby Burnett Price: $8.25 Buyer: Chapman Fruit Exhibitor: Cooper Graham Price: $5.25 Buyer: Graham Farms Exhibitor: Madison McCoy Price: $3.25 Buyer: D&S Cattle Exhibitor: Kaylie Carver Price: $4.50 Buyer: Farr Groves & Cattle Exhibitor: Lyric Rickett Price: $5.00 Buyer: Veg King Exhibitor: Emma Johnson Price: $3.75 Buyer: Mosaic Exhibitor: Gavyn VanSickle Price: $3.50 Buyer: Linda & Dan Smith Exhibitor: Timothy Cowart Price: $3.25 Buyer: Chapman Fruit Exhibitor: Colton Norman Price: $3.00 Buyer: Heartland Growers Exhibitor: Conner Patterson Price: $5.00 Buyer: Mosaic March 8, 2018, The Herald-Advocate B19

PAGE 40

Swine Exhibitor: Madi McGee Price: $4.00 Buyer: Other Side Sod LLC Exhibitor: Quentin VanSickle Price: $5.25 Buyer: Jed Weeks/CPS Exhibitor: Bryce Rucker Price: $4.25 Buyer: Other Side Sod LLC Exhibitor: Taylor Mosley Price: $4.50 Buyer: RLG Fabrication Exhibitor: Emma Eures Price: $3.00 Buyer: Albritton Mowing Exhibitor: Haleigh Johns Price: $4.75 Buyer: ATP Logistics Exhibitor: Madilyn Baker Price: $3.75 Buyer: CRS Cattle Exhibitor: Kaison Rickett Price: $3.50 Buyer: Smith Automotive Exhibitor: Hedi Smith Price: $3.50 Buyer: Bunch Ag Co Exhibitor: Lyndsey Welch Price: $3.00 Buyer: Henderson Farms Exhibitor: Jack Driskell Price: $3.00 Buyer: Heartland Growers Exhibitor: Heath Hendry Price: $3.75 Buyer: Linda Clark Exhibitor: Kein Knight Price: $3.25 Buyer: Double H Equipment Exhibitor: Jensey Hays Price: $3.00 Buyer: Joseph & Tara Vickers Exhibitor: Aryanna Burch Price: $3.25 Buyer: Jed Weeks Exhibitor: Greyson Weeks Price: $3.25 Buyer: Heartland Growers Grateful and Thankful The Hardee County Youth Livestock Commi ee and the Hardee County Fair Inc. would like to thank the buyers and those that did Add-ons towardthe youth exhibitors. Your investment in these students is very muchappreciated and these students are our future. We would also like to thank the buyers that donated many animals to charities. What a blessing it is for their ministries and will help many lives. The passion and love for our young people is amazing and very much appreciated. We are so thankful that we live in Hardee County. YOU truly make a difference in our community. 3:8c B20 The Herald-Advocate, March 8, 2018 PHOTO BY MARIA TRUJILLO The annual auction attracts old and young, such as thislittle cowboy who was helping corral the swinethroughout the night. PHOTOS BY NAOMI EREKSON From young elementary aged kids ... ... to teenagers, all were thankful to the buyers whoshowed up to purchase their animals and show theirsupport for the local youth.