The Herald-advocate

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Title:
The Herald-advocate
Portion of title:
Herald advocate
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Wm. J. Kelly
Place of Publication:
Wauchula Fla
Publication Date:

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Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Wauchula (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hardee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Hardee -- Wauchula
Coordinates:
27.546111 x -81.814444

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Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
55th year, no. 31 (Sept. 2, 1955)-

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University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000579544
oclc - 33886547
notis - ADA7390
lccn - sn 95047483
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UF00028302:00483

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Preceded by:
Hardee County herald
Preceded by:
Florida advocate (Wauchula, Fla.)


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The Herald-Advocate Hardee County’s Hometown Coverage 114th Year, No. 173 Sections, 28 Pages 70¢ Plus 5¢ Sales Tax Thursday, March 27, 2014 S UBSCRIBE O NLINE A T T HE H ERALD A DVOCATE COM IDA Expulsion Hearing Delayed . Story 7A BG Offers Free Junk Pickup . Details 2A ‘Noah’ Sails This Weekend AllegedDealersJailed By JOAN SEAMANOf The Herald-Advocate It’s not at all like the recently proclaimed movie, “Noah.” The local production of the “Story of Noah” which beginsFriday night, is biblical and re alistic. It has a cast of 200 andabout 100 live animals, includ ing several exotic ones. The movie portrays God as a vindictive judge, uses inflatedanimals so as to not upset animalrights enthusiasts and showsNoah as a drunkard trying to livewith his guilt of surviving theflood and taking it out on hissons. The two-hour local drama shows God as a just judge of thewickedness of Noah’s times, yeta loving Father who protects Hisown and continues the world for them. Throughout the Bible, thetheme of good vs. evil contin ues, with God ultimately re warding the faithful for alleternity and condemning the un righteous. The last scene showsthe Revelation story of the finalbattle between good and evil. In its rotation of “The Story of Jesus” and “The Story of Noah”a cast of men, women and chil dren from many local churcheshave spent hours rehearsing for this year’s production of the lifeof Noah. Before the actual performance begins at 7:30 p.m., there is a pa triotic extravaganza people willwant to see. The moving por trayal of freedom pays tribute toveterans from native Americans,the American Rev-olution andevery war since. It honors veter ans and active military person nel in Wauchula and in thesurrounding areas as their entry on a troop carrier highlights theprogram. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. and people can stop by the conces sion catered by Beef ‘O Brady’sand other local concessions topick up supper. The freedom pa triotic presentation beginspromptly at 7 p.m., so peopleneed to be in their seats early.Then, there’s a 15-minute breakwhile the cast changes cos tumes, time enough to get a soda and relieve the tension. “The Story of Noah” begins at 7:30 and continues to 10:30 withabout a half hour intermission.See Noah follow God’s instruc tion to build a huge floating zoo,using only the bronze and ironand other materials of his day, inspite of the ridicule of the peoplearound him. The ark, roughly 450 feet long, 75 feet wide and 45 feethigh, would withstand the rigorsof the 40-day, 40-night flood asNoah’s faith carried him throughthat experience to a new worldand new life. Its procession of animals in cludes the usual birds, pigeons,See NOAH 2A WEATHER DATE HIGH LOW RAIN 03/1981500.0003/2082570.0003/2184580.0003/2283560.00 03/2383600.06 03/2469640.84 03/2575510.23 TOTAL Rainfall to 03/25/2014 8.08 Same period last year 1.89 Ten Year Average 47.79 Source: Univ. of Fla. Ona Research Center INDEX Classifieds.....................6BCommunity Calendar..11BCourthouse Report.......7CCrime Blotter.................6CEntertainment...............4C Hardee Living................2BInformation Roundup...4AObituaries......................4APuzzles..........................4CSchool Lunch Menus...5CSolunar Forecast..........3C PHOTO BY MARIA TRUJILLO Some of the 100-member cast of “The Story of Noah” are seen during a recent rehearsal as Noah and his sons take animals into the ark. The presentation at the Hardee County Cattlemen’ s Arena at Stenstrom and Altman roads in Wauchula debuts Friday for a five-weekend run. Find more rehearsal phot os inside. PHOTO BY MARIA TRUJILLO The second and final part of the Mr. HHS competition will take plac e on Saturday. Here, Tristen Lanier and Tyler Dunlap are determined to finish the cross-fit challenge, which consisted of running the Wildcat Stadium track, throwing a 14pound ball over their heads for length of the field, running half of the tra ck with the ball, standing straight up on the bench 24 times while holding the ball and, finally, running back to the start of the race. A trainer made sure the exer cises were completed correctly. By JOAN SEAMANOf The Herald-Advocate Surveillance again paid off for the Hardee County Sheriff’s Of fice in the arrest of a pair of re ported drug dealers lastWednesday. According to law enforcement reports, purchase of a gram ofmethamphetamine was ob served, starting the chain that ledto the arrests of Albert Franquiand Lisa Jo Whitby on a varietyof charges. After observing the alleged drug sale by Whitby, officersstopped the vehicle in which shewas riding with Franqui, whonow possessed the drug money.Whitby allegedly had anothermarijuana joint inside her walletready for sale. The pair was taken to a rented trailer, where a search located ascale, several differently sizedbaggies of methamphetamine,two baggies of cocaine and a cutstraw. Also in the unit were aglass pipe and a marijuana jointon the dresser. All items reportedly tested positive for the named drugs.The methamphetamine weighed7.7 grams and the cocaineweighed 0.2 grams. The quan tity and multiple baggiesshowed the intent to sell the nar cotics. Whitby, 53, of 2370 U. S. 17 North, Wauchula, was chargedwith two counts sale of meth-amphetamine, second degreefelonies, plus possession of mar ijuana and possession of drugparaphernalia, both misde meanors. She remained in jail inlieu of $11,000 bond. Franqui, 47, of 1040 MaSee DEALERS2A By MARIA TRUJILLOOf The Herald-Advocate Farmers work hard to provide food for the billions of people onthe planet. The farmers and ranchers here are Hardee County’s foun dation, and to thank them, MainStreet Wauchula Inc. will host a“Slice of Life” event this Satur day. Fresh produce, animals andmusic will fill Main Street Her itage Park and the surroundingarea to help celebrate as well. Local farmers will be selling strawberries, corn, green beans,beef, honey, jelly, peppers andmore. While parents are busypicking out fruits and vegeta bles, kids can enjoy themselvesat one of the many activities setup throughout Main Street. There will be bounce houses, farm-themed games and a pet ting zoo that will have calvesand other animals. Exhibits onagriculture and arts and craftssuch as jewelry, paddleboards,kids’ accessories also will be onhand. Farm equipment will be set up and working, such as an or ange juicer that actually showsthe process of juicing and canteach everyone how orange juiceis made. Musicians The Pick Up Artists are serving as the live en tertainment. They promise toplay “some boot-stompingmusic.” Slice of Life will be held Sat urday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. atHeritage Park, at the corner ofMain Street and Seventh Avenuein downtown Wau-chula. Afterbuying the veggies, petting theanimals and listening to theband, don’t forget to visit the Celebrate Ag At ‘Slice Of Life’ other local stores and restaurantsdowntown. This event comes as the 41st annual National Ag Week, whichis March 23-30, comes to a close.This week acknowledges thehard work farmers put in to pro vide food, fiber and fuel for America. Agriculture is America’s num ber one export, and just inFlorida it represents $130 billionin revenue and two million jobs.Today, each American farmerfeeds more than 144 people. Florida farmers are the na tion’s top producers of citrus,sugar cane, winter vegetables, or namental plants and sod. Agriculture consistently ranks second in supporting Florida’seconomy, tourism being numberone. By MARIA TRUJILLOOf The Herald-Advocate Looking for a fun family night? Then look no further because the first Mr. HHS competition isthis Saturday at 7 p.m. at theHardee County Agri-Civic Cen ter in Wauchula. Competing for the crown are Timmy Steedley, Joshua Al-maraz, Dustin Goodwyn, StevenCrews, Nelson Bethea, TristenLanier, Tyler Dunlap, MichaleAllison, Kramer Royal andWyatt Maddox. This new competition was created as an alternative forHardee High School senior boyswho wanted to participate in anevent, but did not aspire to theMiss Project Graduation title. Andrea Dunlap, who has a son participating in the contestand is one of the main organiz ers of Mr. HHS, says she wantedto see a competition where theyoung men are able to showcasewho they are. She went on to say there are exceptional students at HardeeSee MR. HHS 2A Who WillBecomeMr. HHS?

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2A The Herald-Advocate, March 27, 2014 The Herald-Advocate Hardee County’s Hometown Coverage JAMES R. KELLY Publisher/Editor CYNTHIA M. KRAHL Managing Editor JOAN M. SEAMANSports Editor115 S. Seventh Ave.P.O. Box 338Wauchula, FL 33873 RALPH HARRISON Production Manager NOEY DE SANTIAGO Asst. Prod. Manager Phone: (863) 773-3255 Fax: (863) 773-0657 Published weekly on Thursday at Wauchula, Florida, by The Herald-AdvocatePublishing Co. Inc. Periodical Postage paid at U.S. Post Office, Wauchula, FL33873 and additional entry office (USPS 578-780), “Postmaster,” send addresschanges to: The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338, Wauchula, FL 33873. DEADLINES: Schools – Thursday 5 p.m. Sports Monday noon Hardee Living – Thursday 5 p.m. General News – Monday 5 p.m. Ads – Tuesday noon SUBSCRIPTIONS: Hardee County 6 months – $21; 1 yr. – $39; 2 yrs. – $75 Florida 6 months – $25; 1 yr. – $46; 2 yrs. – $87 Out of State 6 months – $29; 1 yr. – $52; 2 yrs.– $100 LETTERS:The Herald-Advocate welcomes letters to the editor on matters of public in terest. Letters should be brief, and must be written in good taste, signed andinclude a daytime phone number.SUBMISSIONS:Press releases on community matters are welcome. Submissions should betyped, double-spaced and adhere to the above deadlines. All items are subjectto editing. Kelly’s Column By Jim The new federal farm bill guarantees $125 million to be spent for citrus greening research during the next five years. The new pro posed state budget has $4 million for citrus research. Florida has 47 citrus tree nurseries that will produce about 4.5 million trees this year, wrote Ernie Neff, editor of the Citrus Industrymagazine. ——— Mr. and Mrs. Bill Bartlett enjoy living in rural Zolfo Springs part of the year and their home area in Ogdensburg, N.Y. He is 80,a political conservative, and retired as a hospital mechanic and op erator of construction work equipment. One of his jobs was unload ing coal with a crane. ——— Syndicated columnist Kathleen Parker on March 3 wrote outof-wedlock births are 29 percent among whites, 53 percent amongLatinos, and 72 percent among African-Americans. President Barack Obama is encouraging two-parent homes. In 1966 Daniel Patrick Moynihan, U.S. assistant labor secretary, wrote,“A community that allows a large number of young men to grow upin broken homes, dominated by women, never acquiring any stablerelationship to male authority, never acquiring any set of rationalexpectations about the future — that community asks for and getschaos.” Parker wrote, “A nation cannot long flourish without the com mitment of fathers to raise their sons — and, yes, their daughterstoo.” President Obama encourages male mentors for young childrenwithout a father figure in the home. He grew up in large part without a father in his daily life. ——— The local Toastmasters Club meets the first and third Thursdays at noon at the Riverview Heights Missionary Baptist Church inWauchula. Members learn to speak in public. Toastmaster member Peter Hansen told the Wauchula Kiwanis Club recently that people often fear the unknown, pain, ridicule, re jection and failure. “The opposite of fear is confidence. You buildconfidence by confronting your fears and overcoming them. Toast masters helps people gain confidence over fears.” Members include Jamey and Loraine Braddock and Dave and Amy Harper. ——— Alabama head football coach Nick Saban, who has also been a head coach in the National Football League, was quoted by Forbesmagazine, “In the NFL you get one first-round draft pick if you’relucky. You couldn’t really outwork anybody else. In college I canrecruit 10 players with first-round talent every year.” ——— Florida commissioner of agriculture Adam Putnam last year said Spanish explorer Ponce de Leon arrived in St. Augustine onApril 2, 1513, looking for the legendary fountain of youth. In 1565Spanish settlers shared a harvest meal with Native Americans inFlorida. Indians had lived in Florida for centuries before 1513. Putnam said Florida was the first place in the New World to have horses and cows, brought from the Old World. They are knownas cracker cows and cracker horses. Florida put the first man on themoon. The state has 18 international airports and 15 deepwater ports, bringing in $71 billion in goods and shipping out $66 billion ofAmerican-made products every year. Florida’s sunny weather, beaches, theme parks and state and na tional parks attracts “snowbirds, spring breakers, eco-tourists and Orlando-bound families.” Florida has 2 million small businesses and16 Fortune 500 companies. “Today, Florida is still the place foryoung and old to pursue their own personal fountain of youth.” ——— C.B. Harden Jr., 73, of Golfview Subdivision in Zolfo Springs operated C.B.’s Coffee Shop in Wauchula until 1984. Sonny’s fatheropened the business in 1945. They served hamburgers, chili, friedchicken and shrimp, and French fries. They sold beer and had a poolroom in the back. Sonny worked 16 years in the kitchens of the state prisons in Arcadia and Fort Green, retiring in 2001. He remembers movie starLash LaRue performing on stage at the Wauchula movie theatreowned by Reuben Moore. ——— Connie Rowe of Wauchula congratulations Ken (Keeno) Jin wright for his 40 years of service with the Wauchula Post Office.“He is just right for his job. So nice to see him smiling every day. Itcheers me up just seeing and talking to him.” ——— Lt. Clebe McClary, highly decorated Vietnam veteran, will be guest speaker at the 11 a.m. Sunday worship service at Oak GroveBaptist Church. He suffered major injuries from an explosive de vice. ——— Per capita consumption in the U.S. of milk and orange juice has declined over recent decades. Milk consumption has dropped 25percent since 1975. Orange juice consumption has dropped about40 percent from its peak 20 to 25 years ago. Both of these products remain very healthy. There are so many competing drinks such as sodas, teas, juice drinks, sports drinks, andnumerous water products. Milk is a great source of calcium, protein and vitamin D. Or ange juice has lots of vitamin C and other healthy ingredients. Bothindustries are trying hard to reverse the trends. The consumption ofcheese, made from milk, has greatly increased in recent years. ——— Joseph Messick of Royal Oaks Mobile Home Park in Dundee is very healthy at age 97, reports the Lakeland Ledger. He says hedoes not take any pills, eats a pound of sugar a week, drinks a littlewater but mostly tea and sodas, his favorite vegetable is macaroniand cheese, and he has a big love of music and sense of humor. Heplays the organ and sings. Mary Cannaday wrote Messick was married to his late wife Ruth for 70 years, currently has a lady friend who is a widow, at tends the First Christian Church in Winter Haven, grew up on aranch in South Dakota, at age 18 signed up with the Civilian Con servation Corps and planted trees in Florida, joined the NationalGuard, in World War II was in the Navy’s construction force calledSeabees, a PT boat trainer in Panama, a motor machinist, got a com mercial pilot’s license through the G.I. bill, flew local cargo planes,and then worked fro Delphi Limestone in Indiana for 34 years, re tiring as a manager. ——— Troy Moon of the Pensacola News Journal reports Joe Brown of that city is 98 and is still cutting hair for over 70 years. He is theoldest barber in Florida. His uncle in Milton was a barber. As a barber he loves meeting a variety of people, including re tirees, military folks, politicians, lawyers and judges. ——— State Rep. Ben Albritton of Wauchula has filed a bill that would help foster children get a driver’s learning permit and license. Thiswould help them become more independent. The bill would alsohelp resolve the high cost of insurance, reported Lloyd Dunkelbergerof the Lakeland Ledger. ——— Former Wauchula resident Joe Escourido, 89, an award-winning artist and cartoonist, passed away in Lakeland Saturday. His funeralservice will be today (Thursday) at 3 p.m. at First United MethodistChurch in Lakeland. He worked 14 years with the Lakeland Ledger.He was a commercial artist with an ad agency and in Wauchula drewsome artwork for The Herald-Advocate. MR. HHS Continued From 1A High and this was a good wayfor the community to be able tosee a few of them. Dunlap hopesthis “labor of love” will be pos itive for the community and be agood source of family entertain ment for years to come. The Mr. HHS title features a two-part competition. The first part was completed on March 15. It consisted of ashooting challenge and a cross-fit challenge. Each of these testscounts as 10 percent of a contes tant’s total score. A presentationhighlighting that day’s resultswill be given at the event on Sat urday. The main event is more of a showcase. In order to becrowned Mr. HHS, the seniorswill model casual clothing andprofessional wear and will talkabout their interests or hobbies.Each of these three segments isworth 20 percent of the overallscore. The last 20 percent comes from an interview with thejudges. The contestants canhighlight their personalities inthese segments by showing theaudience and judges who theyare. Other titles the senior boys can strive for in addition to Mr.HHS are People’s Choice andMr. Internet Photogenic. For People’s Choice, a jar will be stationed at the back ofthe Agri-Civic Center for eachcontestant. Anyone attending the competition on Saturday candrop money, including changeand checks, into a favorite con testant’s jar. The contestant withthe most money in his jar at theend of the night will be given thetitle. For Mr. Internet Photogenic, anyone with a Facebook page ore-mail can vote. To vote onFacebook, go to Mr. HHS Pho togenic, click on the 2014 Vot ing For Mr. HHS Photo-genicalbum, click on the picture of theyoung man and “like” his pic ture. To vote by e-mail put theword Vote in the subject line andput the contestant’s name in thebody of the e-mail, then send tovote@shackelfordphotography.com. Voting for more than onecontestant is allowed. Other winners on Saturday will receive prizes for the shoot ing challenge, cross-fit chal lenge, Mr. Photogenic, Mr.Congeniality, and as firstthrough fourth runner-ups to Mr.HHS. All contestants will alsoget an extra goody bag for tak ing part in the competition. The competition committee is hoping to give Mr. HHS a schol arship. Dunlap says she is seek ing to give at least $300. Todonate money to the winner ofthe competition, make out acheck to Project Graduationwith the footnote Mr. HHSScholarship. Contributions canbe dropped off with Jo Smith,treasurer of Project Graduation,at Cat’s on Main. For morequestions concerning the schol arship for Mr. HHS, contactSmith at 773-6565. A rifle raffle will also be held during the night. The rifle is aBush Master AR 15, .223-cal iber. Tickets are $10 each. If youbuy 10 tickets, you get one ticketfree. Refreshments can also bepurchased. Money raised fromthe raffle and refreshments willgo to Project Graduation. All of the money raised will go straight to providing the sen ior class with a fun, alcoholanddrug-free graduation celebra tion. Parking for the event will be beside the Agri-Civic Center.Dunlap has been assured it willnot be a problem even though“The Story of Noah” will also beon the same night. Admis-sion is$5 and there are no reservedseats, so get there early for agood spot. DEALERSContinued From 1A kowski St., Wauchula, facescharges of sale of cocaine, de-livery/distribution of metham phetamine, two counts of saleof methamphetamine and threecounts owning/renting a struc ture/vehicle to sell drugs, bothsecond degree felonies, twocounts use of a two-way com munication device to commit acrime, a third degree felony, andtwo misdemeanor charges ofpossession of drug parapherna lia. He remained in jail in lieu ofbonds totaling $46,000. F F r r a a n n q q u u i i W W h h i i t t b b y y YOUR BUSINESS COULD APPEAR HERE TOO!!CNancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels 773-3255 www.TheHeraldAdvocate.com INFORMATION Roundup BG Cleans Up On Wednesday April 2 is designated “Chunk Your Junk Day” inBowling Green, an opportu nity for residents to disposeof unwanted items for freepick-up. Residents can place up to two tires, furniture, large andsmall appliances, beddingand other unwanted items atcurbside. It does not includehazardous waste materials,such as paint, batteries,chemicals and asbestos. Firefighters Ousted Firefighters in Zolfo Springs are eating out these days asthey cannot use their fire sta tion until mold removal iscompleted. Residents are urged to be supportive as they see fire fighters out in the communitymuch more often than usual. NOAHContinued From 1A eons, chickens and ducks, twotame turkeys, rabbits, hogs, 60sheep, a dozen goats, quarterhorses and draft horses, anddogs. But there’s more, some an imals never seen here before. There are miniature horses and donkeys, some no biggerthan a large dog. There’s a giantbrown Swiss ox pulling awagon. There’s Highlandercows, the Scottish longhairs,white donkeys, a pair of Zebus(miniature Brahma), the Z don key (a zebra-donkey with stripesonly on the legs), alpacas, lla mas, camels and the Jacobsheep, a four-horned extremelyold breed believed to date backto the early Bible times of Jacoband his fight with his uncleLaban. This year’s presentation of Noah is similar to the 2012 pro duction, but has drastic im-provement in the sound andlighting, which are now state-of-the-art. “It makes it more profes sional, more effective,” saysRev. Mike Graham, the tirelesswriter and organizer of the mas sive productions. Tickets are $21 for adults, or $19 for seniors, children 2 to 12and large groups. Children under2 are free, held by an adult.Tickets can be obtained atwww.storyofnoah.org or by call ing 375.4031. There is a $1.50charge for website orders toprocess credit cards, etc. Performances are each Friday and Saturday night from March28-29, through April 4-5, 11-12,18-19 and 25-26. There’s time to pick your per formance. It’s more than a sim ple story, it’s a narrative of faith. 1. LANGUAGE: What is the dot on top of the letters “i”and“j” called? 2. GEOGRAPHY: In what body of water can the island ofMykonos be found? 3. ACRONYMS: What does the acronym CAD stand for? 4. GENERAL KNOWL EDGE: What is a shillelagh used for? 5. POLITICS: What was the emblem of the Progressive Partyof 1912? 6. ANATOMY: Where is the skin the thinnest on the humanbody? 7. ACADEMIA: What does a vexillologist study? 8. MOVIES: What movie featured the tagline “Thank Godit’s only a motion picture”? 9. TELEVISION: What was the name of the town that wasthe setting for “Mary Hartman,Mary Hartman”? 10. GAMES: How many body parts do you have to re move in order to be successful inthe game “Operation”? ANSWERS 1. A tittle2. Aegean Sea3. Computer-aided design4. Irish in origin, it is a cudgelthat can be used as walking stickor a weapon5. Bull Moose6. Eyelids7. Flags8. “Airplane!”9. Fernwood, Ohio10. Twelve (c) 2014 King Features Synd., Inc. TRIVIA TEST By Fifi Rodriguez 1. In 1990, two major-league pitchers, one in each league,tossed a no-hitter on the sameday (June 29). Name the pitch ers. 2. How many times has a Kansas City Royals player ledthe American League in battingaverage for a season? 3. Name the first college football bowl game in whichtwo Heisman Trophy winnersfaced each other. 4. In 2013, Paul George be came the fourth Indiana Pacer tobe named the NBA's Most Im proved Player. Name two of thefirst three. 5. When was the last time be fore the 2012-13 season that thePhiladelphia Flyers missed theNHL playoffs? 6. In 2013, Austria's Marlies Schild became the all-timeleader in World Cup slalom vic tories (35). Who had she beentied with? 7. Which golfer had the low est four-round score in winningthe Masters during the 1970s? ANSWERS 1. Dave Stewart (Oakland) and Fernando Valenzuela (LosAngeles Dodgers). 2. Four times — George Brett three times (1976, '80, '90),and Willie Wilson once (1982). 3. The 2005 Orange Bowl featured Southern Cal's MattLeinart and Oklahoma's JasonWhite. 4. Jalen Rose (2000), Jer maine O'Neal (2002) and DannyGranger (2009). 5. It was the 2006-07 season.6. Switzerland's Vreni Schneider. 7. Ray Floyd had a 271 total in 1976. (c) 2014 King Features Synd., Inc. Sports Quiz By Chris Richcreek IDA MEMBER During a Mar. 6 discus sion of possible expulsionof a member of the HardeeCounty Industrial Develop-ment Authority (IDA), a mo-tion was made to schedulethe matter for the April 3Commission meeting. That motion passed on a 3-2 vote with commission ers Grady Johnson andRick Knight opposing it. ——— At The Herald-Advocate, we want accuracy to be agiven, not just our goal. Ifyou believe we have printedan error in fact, please callto report it. We will reviewthe information, and if wefind it needs correction orclarification, we will do sohere. To make a report, call Managing Editor CynthiaKrahl at 773-3255. C ORRECTIONS & LARIFICATIONS It pays to advertise in your Hometown Newspaper We are saving this space just for Y Y O O U U !The HeraldAdvocate 115 S. 7th Ave. 773-3255 www.TheHeraldAdvocate.com 10 HOURS A MONTH!That’s all it takes to speakup for a child. Volunteer tobe a Guardian Ad Litem.773-2505(If office unattended, please leavemessage.) The Herald-Advocate Hardee County’s Hometown Coverage K ; ; 115 S. 7th Ave. Wauchula, FL 33873 Telephone (863) 773-3255 www.TheHeraldAdvocate.com

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The Herald-AdvocateO O N N L L I I N N E E !D D o o n n ’ ’ t t W W a a i i t t O O n n T T h h e e P P o o s s t t O O f f f f i i c c e e T T o o D D e e l l i i v v e e r rThe Herald-AdvocateR R e e c c e e i i v v e e y y o o u u r r p p a a p p e e r r W W e e d d n n e e s s d d a a y y N N o o M M a a t t t t e e r r W W h h e e r r e e Y Y o o u u L L i i v v e e a a t tw w w w w w . T T h h e e H H e e r r a a l l d d A A d d v v o o c c a a t t e e . c c o o m m Subscription Rates$5 for 1 Month $19 for 6 Months $37 for 1 Year $70 for 2 YearsThe Herald-AdvocateHardee County’s Hometown CoverageSee Website For Details. The Herald-Advocate Online is Not Free. March 27, 2014, The Herald-Advocate 3A

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4A The Herald-Advocate, March 27, 2014 D D O O L L O O R R I I S S J J O O S S M M I I T T H H Doloris Jo Smith, 82, of Wauchula, passed away Fri-day, March 21, 2014, at TheOaks in Avon Park. She was born on April 8, 1931, in Wauchula, where shewas a lifelong resident. Do-loris was a third grade teacherat Wauchula ElementarySchool and a member of FirstBaptist Church of Wauchula. Survivors include her hus band, Robert Ray Smith ofWauchula; one son, BobbySmith and wife Melanie ofZolfo Springs; one daughter,Cathy Jahna and husband Fredof Avon Park; one sister,Sharon Watson and husbandTim of Sebring; three grand children, Erin Stivender andhusband Travis, Lindsey RaeSmith and Kayla Allen Smith;and four great-grandchildren,August and Tatum Stivenderand Cameron and JoshuaWhite. Visitation was Monday, March 24, 2014, at First Bap tist Church of Wauchula from10 to 11 a.m., with FuneralServices at 11 a.m. with theRev. Scott Waldron and KenSanders officiating. Intermentwas at Hart Cem-etery.Expressions of comfort maybe made at robartsfh.com. Robarts Family FUNERAL HOME WAUCHULAWAUCHULA In Memory NANCY ROSE GOLDEN Nancy Rose Golden, 78, born in Wauchula, graduatedfrom Hardee County HighSchool, passed away Sat-urday, March 15, 2014. She was preceded in death by her mother, FlorenceKeller; her father, JohnKeller; her brother, JackKeller; her sister, CatherineKeller and her sister, MarionTwiss. Nancy is survived by her children Kevin (Cheryl)Golden and Tom (Elise)Golden; and three grandchil dren, Hayden Golden, Madi-son and Ava Free. She is alsosurvived by her sister, ElsieFort. She had many niecesand nephews who she loveddearly. Nancy committed her life to raising her family andbeing a nurse. She graduatedfrom the Gordon Keller Nurs ing School and received hernursing license in 1957. Shespent over 30 years in thenursing field and loved everyminute of it. A special thanks to Juliana Johnson for the care you gaveNancy in the last couple yearsof her life. She will be misseddearly by her family. Thefamily will have a service at alater date. In lieu of flowers, those choosing may make a dona tion to a charity in Nancy’shonor. In Memory HILLIARD BLACKMON Hilliard Blackmon, age 92, passed away Wednesday,March 19, 2014, in Jackson-ville. Hilliard was born April 23, 1921, in Live Oak, and movedto Wauchula in his early twen ties. He moved to Jacksonvilleonly 11 months ago to be withhis daughter, after having takena fall resulting in injuries. Aftermoving to Wauchula, Hilliardwas an appliance repairman forseventy years. He was a dedi cated repairman throughout theHardee County community. Hilliard was still active in his trade at the age of 91. Hehad a very strong work ethicand his customers knew hewould do a good job at a fairprice. He enjoyed fishing andhunting, however working onappliances was what gave himthe most enjoyment. Hilliardloved his family and enjoyedspending quality time withthem. He wasa veteran ofWorld War II,serving from1942 until 1946 with the U. S. Army AirCorp and the U.S. Air Force.He was a member of the FirstUnited Methodist Church,Wauchula. Survivors are his beloved wife, Kate Blackmon of Jack-sonville; one daughter, JuneElizabeth James of Lakeland;daughter-in-law, Dale Black-mon of Jacksonville; fivegrandchildren, Kelly Brown,Garrett (Samantha) Brown,Myra (Parker) James, Rebecca(Chris) Mayberry and Ryan(Ginger) Blackmon; and 10great-grandchildren. Hilliard is preceded in death by his parents, R. A. Blackmonand Lillian Southerland Black-mon; and a son, Harry AlbertBlackmon in 2013. Visitation was from 2 until 3 p.m., Saturday, March 22,2014, at the First UnitedMethodist Church, Wauchula.Funeral Services immediatelyfollowed with the Rev. Dan-ielle Upton officiating. Burialwith military honors renderedby the DeSoto Honor Guardwas in Wauchula City Cem-etery, Saturday, March 22,2014. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to either the FirstUnited Methodist Church, 207N. Seventh Ave., Wauchula, FL33873 or the United MethodistChildren’s Home, 51 Chil dren’s Way, Enterprise, FL32725. Online condolences may be made at pongerkaysgrady.com Ponger-Kays-Grady Funeral Home & Cremation Services Wauchula In Memory HERMAN EUGENE COOPER JR. Herman Eugene Cooper Jr., known by family and friendsas “Junior Cooper,” 85, passedaway Wednesday, March 19,2014, in Lakeland. Junior was born March 11, 1929, at home in BowlingGreen. Junior began workingat the age of 16 as a packer forM.E. Brown, Inc. PackingHouse. Over the course of 59years, he also worked for TroyCobb and Gail Starett. As theseasons and crops changed,Junior traveled and worked inFlorida, Georgia and NorthCarolina. When he wasn't working in the packing houses, Juniorcould be found pushing hismower in Bowling Green. Heenjoyed mowing, lawn main tenance and going to church.Junior was proud to say thatall of his life he lived withinthree blocks of the home inwhich he was born. In 2004,Junior moved to Oak BridgeNursing Home in Lakeland. Junior is survived by his two brothers, Ernest (Sheryl)Cooper of Fort Meade andDon Cooper of Webster; onesister, Beverly Cooper Lord(Eric) Hines of Lakeland; onesister in law, Peggy CooperBranch of Lake Placid; threenephews, Donnie Cooper ofPanama City, Matt (Sara)Cooper of Bartow and Mark(Kristen) Cooper of NeptuneBeach; six nieces, Debbie(David) Weeks of Naples,Barbara Wilson of LakePlacid, Kim (Art) Martinez ofLakeland, Amy (Jamie) Hill ofBartow, Jenny (Corey) Bakerof Bartow and Jean Cooper ofSebring; and seven grand-nieces, four grand-nephews,three great-grand-nieces, twogreat-grand-nephews andmany cousins. Junior was preceded in death by his parents, Avis andHerman Cooper; birth mother,Myrtle Jean Osteen Coop-er;brother, Bobby Cooper; andnephew, Drew Cooper. A visitation was held Sun day March 23, 2014, from 4 to6 p.m. in the chapel of PongerKays Grady Funeral Home,Wauchula. Funeral Serviceswere Monday, March 24,2014, at 11 a.m. at BowlingGreen Church of God. Burialfollowed in Bowling GreenCemetery. In lieu of flowers, contribu tions in Junior's name may bemade to Bowling GreenChurch of God. Online condolences may be made at pongerkaysgrady.com Ponger-Kays-Grady Funeral Home & Cremation Services Wauchula In Loving Memory Obituaries ELTON OLIN COWART Elton Olin Cowart, 64, of Banks, Ala., died on Thursday,March 20, 2014, at his resi dence. He was born April 18, 1949, in Wauchula. He served in theU.S. Army in Okinawa and wasan author. He haswritten a bookand started theDixie LivingMagazine nine years ago wherehe also wrote articles. He wasalso a deer and hog hunter. He was preceded in death by his father, Olin Cowart; and abrother, Harvey Cowart. Survivors include his wife of 42 years, Donna Dee DowningCowart of Banks, Ala.; twosons, Ronald Lamar (Ron) Cow art of Cocoa and Brian PatrickCowart of Troy, Ala.; two grand sons, Alex Cowart of Air ForceBase in Okinawa, Japan andEthan Marshall Daniels of Troy,Ala.; mother, Frances CrewsStickle of Wauchula; one sister,Elizabeth Black of Bradenton;one brother, Harmon Cowart ofMon-ticello, Ark.; and two half-brothers. The family will accept flow ers from Jeans Florist and Flow ers by Harold in Union Springs.Memorials may be made toWounded Warriors Project atskeenfuneralhome.-com ormailed to Wounded WarriorsProject, P.O. Box 758517,Topeka, Kansas 66675. Memorial Services will be held at 3 p.m. Sunday, March30, 2014, at Skeen FuneralHome Chapel in Troy, Ala. Vis itation will be held from 2 until3 p.m., Sunday at the funeralhome one hour prior the service. Arrangements by Skeen Fu neral Homes, Inc. In Memory SUSAN B. TATZIN Susan Betty Tatzin, 66, of Silver City, N. M., and for merly of Wauchula, died inher home on March 20, 2014. Born in Baltimore on June 17, 1947, to Georgine andLew Tatzin, Susan lived mostof her life in Florida and theSouthwest. She graduatedfrom Cocoa Beach HighSchool, class of 1965, andFlorida State University, classof 1969, where she majored inmusic. Susan’s love of all things melodic led her to a lifelongjourney of teaching, song, andperformance. She taught ele mentary school music for 30years, primarily in the Bowl ing Green and Zolfo SpringsElementary Schools in theHardee County School Dis trict. In addition, she con ducted private pianoinstruction. Susan sang inmany church choirs, and oftenprovided the musical accom paniment. She played Frenchhorn in the Melbourne Munic ipal Orchestra and the ConcertBand of the Southwest. Additionally, Susan played in the Desert Larks recordergroup and was a board mem ber of the Grant County (NM)Community Concert Associ-ation. During her teachingyears, Susan resided inWauchula and developedmany lasting friendships there.After retiring from her teach ing career to care for her agedmother for 10 years in thefamily home in Cocoa Beach,Susan moved to New Mexico,a state she fondly rememberedfrom childhood. In addition to music, Susan especially loved dogs and vol unteered at animal welfare or ganizations. After moving toSilver City, Susan joined theConcert Band of the South west and took up new interestsincluding rock collecting. She is survived by her brother Don Tatzin and sister-in-law Ellen Reintjes ofLafayette, Calif., and herbeloved dog Mindy. Services will be held Thursday March 27, 2014, at2 p.m. at the First PresbyterianChurch, 1915 No. Swan St.,Silver City, N.M. in lieu offlowers, please send contribu tions in Susan’s memory toFirst Presbyterian Church,1915 Swan Street, Silver City,NM 88061, Our Paws’ CauseThrift Shop, 108 No. Bullard,Silver City, NM 88061, orFaith Presbyterian Church,P.O. Box 1480, Wauchula, FL,33873. Terrazas Funeral Chapel Santa Clara, N. M. INFORMATION Roundup Pizza Vouchers Help Homeless Anyone with a voucher can eat in-house, order online oruse take-out at WauchulaPizza Hut, 1498, U.S. 17North (Wal-Mart Plaza),Wauchula, and help feed thehomeless. Vouchers are available at www.hardeehelpcenter.org,or by calling 773-0304. Folkswanting to just make a dona tion can do so at the abovewebsite. Tax Assistance Available Free The AARP Tax-Aide Program has an assistant at theHardee County Library, 315N. Sixth Ave. (U.S. 17 andOak Street), Wauchula, onMondays from 2 to 6 p.m. The fee tax assistance pro gram is aimed at people over60 but is available for otherlow-income people and is ona first come, first servedbasis. People must bring allproof of identification, house hold income, and other infor mation necessary tocomplete an income tax form. BIBLE TRIVIA By Wilson Casey 1. Is the book of Deuteronomy in the Old or New Testa ment or neither? 2. In which book's 10:30 does it say that God keeps numberedthe very hairs of your head?Genesis, Exodus, Matthew,Mark? 3. From Leviticus 11, which of these were Israelites permit ted to eat? Camel, Hare, Swine,Cow? 4. Who tried to take a Beer sheba well away from Abra ham? Abimelech, Samson,Ezekiel, Pekahiah? 5. From biblical and current times, what type of creature is aconey? Donkey, Rabbit, Viper,Locust 6. According to Proverbs 16, what is it better to get than gold?Mate, Health, Wisdom, Saved ANSWERS: 1) Old; 2) Matthew; 3) Cow; 4) Abim elech; 5) Rabbit; 6) WisdomComments? More Trivia? Visitwww.TriviaGuy.com (c) 2014 King Features Synd., Inc. HARDEE COUNTY KIDS NEED HARDEE COUNTY HELP! Ease a dependent child’sway through the court sys tem. Volunteer to be aGuardian Ad Litem. 773-2505 (If office unattended, please leavemessage.) 3:27c Hardee County’s Funeral Home for over 80 years! Offering Affordable Funeral Services, Cremation Services and Cemetery Markers! Locally Owned & Operated by Licensed Funeral Directors 00=73232,*6&62*7;2*6?);&6)32,*6;2*6 Floyd O. Rice, Jr, LFD Location Manager *0137*;731*?-6.78..00 Officer Manager Ginger L. Rice 92*6&0773(.&8*7*36,*#.0732?3''=63;2?0&6/*&6732?-&60*7!.0 01&2 3'*68*.2*?&(59*0=2*&:*00 Ponger-Kays-Grady Funeral Home & Cremation Services %./"()%//+/-%%/3 "0#'0("r3r3 111+*&%-"2.-"$2#+)3:6-27c

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March 27, 2014, The Herald-Advocate 5A Pages From The Past From The Florida AdvocateOf Friday, March 25, 1955 Front-Page Headlines: Cucumbers Averaged $9.58 Per Bushel James H. Waters Died In Hospital Tuesday Wauchula Moose Form Emergency Blood Bank Mrs. Nora Crunkelton Hurt Monday Morning PHOTO BY JIM KELLY L. Clebe McClary, a United States Marine Corps veteran who was severely woundedduring the Vietnam War, will share his experiences and testimony Sunda y morning at 11 a.m. at the Oak Grove Baptist Church. McClary lost an arm below the elbow, an eye and suffered a severe leg wounds when a grenade exploded near him. He contin ued to fight after sustaining the injuries and was awarded a Bronze Star. He w ent on to be a motivation to others and wrote a book “Living Proof” about his life and experiences. McClary is shown above on left with Joe L. Davis Sr. and Col. Donnell Ma thews outside the Pioneer Restaurant in Zolfo Springs last year. VIETNAM HERO SPEAKING AT OAK GROVE Your Business Could Appear Here!Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels The Herald Advocate 773-3255 or www.TheHeraldAdvocate.com Your Business Could Appear Here!Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels The Herald Advocate 773-3255 or www.TheHeraldAdvocate.com Pioneer Creek RV News By Andie McCosco OMITTED FROM MARCH 20 EDITION CHAPEL Dick and Rosie Reno and Herb and Martha DeHaan wel comed 160 to chapel. Harry andJoyce Gould were welcomedback. Devotions were led byHoward LaLone, who spoke on“Faith.” The choir anthem was“God Will Hear Your Prayer,”directed and accompanied onpiano by Sandy Feeser. BobParke sang a solo, “Let There BePeace on Earth.” Pastor David spoke on “Fear” using 2 Chronicles 20:1-5. Allyou need is a word from God.Jehoshaphat’s enemies weregathering to make war on hispeople and he was afraid. Heprayed to God for help and or dered a fast throughout the land.He and his people offered uppraises to God and marched tomeet their enemies. When theycame upon them, all were dead.God had answered Je hoshaphat’s prayers. Fear is our greatest enemy. It steals our joy. We need to faceour fears. God gives us thepower to conquer those fears.Never be too proud to cry out toGod. Praising God releases Hispower. Just one word from Himcan turn away your fears. It willopen doors you never knewabout. Allow God to move inyour life. SCOREBOARD Bowling: For the men, Dave Thompson, high score 212 andhigh series 520. For the women,Arlene Sebright, high score 163and high series 419. FrankFeeser had a 7/6 split and DaveThompson had a 9/10 split. Shuffleboard: Congratulations to winners of the PioneerCreek RV singles tournament.Those placing were Nancy Sin gleton, first in main event; Roger Bell, second; LynneShick, third; and Herb DeHaan,fourth in main event. RichardLa Course was first in consola tion; Cathy Renwick, second;DeWayne Renwick, third; andCathy Payne, fourth in consola tion. SPOTLIGHT Vickie Keegsta was born in Newton, Iowa. She had taughtschool since 1969. While she was trying to de cide on a major in college, sheflipped a coin, either biology orphysical education/dance. Shewent into physicaleducation/dance and taughtschool in West Liberty, Iowa, forthree years and went to graduateschool in Kalamazoo, Mich. After graduation, she taught at Missouri Western State in St.Joseph, Mo., for 13 years. Shenow lives in Traverse City,Mich., where her ex-husband isfrom, and retired from teachingafter 41 years lastly with theTraverse City public schools. She has two daughters, four grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Interests includeold movies, musical theater, gar dening (but she hates to weed),painting, and quilting. A friend, who was the secre tary where she taught, buggedher to come down to check outthe park. She came down for sixweeks three years ago, thenstayed three months the next twoyears, and became a residenthere last year. Something no one knows is that she has a second Master’sDegree, in theater arts. Whileteaching at Missouri WesternState, she had her own dancecompany. Vickie is a wonderful addi tion to the park. Perry & PerryCustom Cut and WrapBeef, Pork, Venison2218 W. Main St., Wauchula 33873(863) 832-0332(863) 245-4359 soc3:27c Robert L. Shiver Jr. Sales Manager (863) 508-2400 x8430 YOURFRIENDINTHECARBUSINESSFOROVER17 YEARS 863-508-2400 r Paying Top Dollar For Your Trade-InRates A Low As .9% Payments As Low As $149 per month Pre-Owned Cars As Low As $2,000Plus Tax, Tag & Title For Secure Credit Approval nr Se Habla Espaol *Rates and payments vary per model and term. Does not include tax, tag, title or dealer fee. 3:27c Madness March

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6A The Herald-Advocate, March 27, 2014 CHICKEN CACCIATORE Food prepared alla cacciatora, "hunter-style," includes mush rooms in the sauce. This dish is representative of the kind of home cooking that found its way first into Italian restaurants and then into American kitchens. Serve over wide, flat noodles. 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 (3 1/2 pounds) chicken, cut into 8 pieces and skin removed from all but wings 3 tablespoons all-purpose flour 1 medium onion, finely chopped 4 cloves garlic, crushed with garlic press 8 ounces mushrooms, trimmed and thickly sliced 1 can (14 to 16 ounces) tomatoes 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 tablespoon dried oregano, crumbled 1/4 teaspoon dried sage 1/8 teaspoon ground red pepper, like cayenne 1. In nonstick 12-inch skillet, heat oil over medium-high heat until very hot. On waxed paper, coat chicken with flour, shaking off excess. Add chicken to skillet and cook until golden brown, about 3 minutes per side. With tongs, transfer chicken pieces to bowl as they are browned. 2. Add onion and garlic to skillet. Reduce heat to mediumlow and cook, stirring occasionally, until onion is tender, about 5 minutes. Add mushrooms and cook, stirring frequently, until just tender, about 3 minutes. 3. Add tomatoes with their juice, breaking them up with side of spoon. Add salt, oregano, sage, ground red pepper and chicken, and heat to boiling over high heat. Reduce heat; cover and simmer until juices run clear when thickest part of chicken is pierced with tip of knife, about 25 minutes. 4. Transfer chicken to serving bowl. Spoon sauce over chicken. Makes 4 main-dish servings. calories, 13g total fat (3g satu rated), 133mg cholesterol, 608mg sodium, 18g total carbs, 44g protein. For thousands of triple-tested recipes, visit our website at www.goodhousekeeping.com/re cipefinder/.(c) 2014 Hearst Communications, Inc. All rights reserved Good HousekeepingQ: With "Games of Thrones" starting back up, it got me wondering what Sean Bean is up to. Can you tell me what he'll be in next? Alicia W., via email stars in the new TNT actionthriller series "Legends," which is set to premiere Wednesday, story centers on Sean's character, Martin Odum, who plays a deepbe losing his grip on reality. Mar tin has the ability to transform himself into a com pletely differ ent person for each job, but he begins to question his own identity when a mysterious stranger suggests that he isn't the man he believes himself to be. The series comes from "Homeland" executive producers Howard Gordon and Alexander Cary, and "Fringe" co-executive producer David Wilcox, and costars Ali Carter, Morris Chestnut, Amber Valletta, Steve Harris and Tina Majorino. Q: I was happy to read in your column that Kiss will be inducted into the Rock 'n' Roll Hall of Fame. Will they be touring to support their induction? Gary T., Cleveland barking on a joint project this summer, co-headlining with hard-rock superstars Def Leppard in a 42-city summer sta dium tour, which will run from June 23 to Aug. 31. Def Leppard mons first discussed the idea of the two bands touring together when they played some South American dates two years ago as part of a rock-and-roll all-stars tour. "It's finally happened, which is fantastic," Joe said. Also, a dollar from each ticket sold on the tour will go to the other military nonprofits. (Go to livenation.com for ticket info.) Q: Starz canceled "Magic City" just as season two ended. What a disappointment. The show was never given much publicity, but it was wonder fully done. I love it and miss it so much, and so do my friends. Is there any chance of "Magic City" going to another cable network? Dale P., Fort Worth, Texas (see "Scrubs" and "Cougar Town" for examples), there hasn't been much talk about the series continuing. Set in 1959 in Miami shortly after the Cuban Revolution, "Magic City" cenplayed by Jeffrey Dean Morgan, who owned Miami's most glamI do have slightly good news for siode "Magic City" series will be released by Starz and Anchor on May 13. Q: Can you tell me if "Un forgettable" will be back? Tom V., The Villages, Fla. rie Wells, a woman with hyperthymesia a rare medical condition that gives her the abil ity to visually remember every thing will return with a 13-episode third season begin ning in June. Write to Cindy at King Features Weekly Service, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 328536475; or e-mail her at letters@cindyelavsky.com. CelebrityExtraBy Cindy Elavsky OMITED FROM MARCH 13 EDITION AROUND THE PARK Our last breakfast was wellGaylog and Lucy and Leonard Starr do the cooking every other Saturday. Jenny Johnson did a fine welcome. Jeff Riggs did the made sure the juice cups were filled. Our ice cream social celebrat ing the birthdays and an-niver saries in March turned into a Mardi Gras celebration. Head ing it up were Mike and Carol Yaw. Helping were Jack and Linda Moore. The tables were decorated, with beads and masks. Cakes were provided by Grant, Charlene Hooper, Fuller. Celebrating birthdays were Dave Mills, Forrest Grooms, missed someone, please forgive. It was a hard count with 64 at tending. after his stay in the hospital. Jerry Riggs is back home after his surgery. We were sorry to see early. BINGO went to Mike Waldach and Sylvia Nicklow went home with the jackpot. playing. Four shared the cover Akelian, Janelle Reid and Nora Tipton. The speedy was won by Joyce Longueuil. March 3 saw 31 playing, with and six merchant certificates were given out to other players who yelled bingo. Linda Moore won the coverall. SHUFFLEBOARD We had 10 people shuffling, and never in our days of shuf fling have we seen such freak shots as we experienced on Tuesday the 3rd.The freak shot was where one puck landed di rectly on top of another. The next person who shot hit the bot tom puck out from under and left the top one where it was. Audrey Semler, thinks that's called "a two master trick shot! wins and one loss. POKENO Monday, March 3, there were six players and Shirley Hyde tried to clean everyone out, and that she did, not only on Mon day but Wednesday as well. Is it the luck of the Irish, Shirley? CORNHOLE ting heads it up on Wednesday morning at 10. We had 12 players, with beating out Charlene Hooper and me for the win. EXERCISE Cline doing the exercise. What a great job they do at helping oth ers revitalize their bodies. LADIES LUNCHEON As we entered the recreation hall, Connie Swanson had the tables decorated with green cloths and shamrocks. Connie opened with prayer before we ent salad. After lunch, we al ways have a few games that bring back memories we enjoy. Changes Things." This was our last ladies luncheon for the season, and there was hardly a dry eye in the place as Connie read a true story. Oasis RV News Stop by and see why I have won Fords customer service award several times. Gene DavisSales Manager 1031 U.S. Highway 17 N. Wauchula, Florida 33873 (863) 781-1947 www. 3:27c Every Thursday Night8pm CloseK Ka ar ra ao ok ke e & & D DJ Ji in ng gwithD DJ J A Ad da am m N Ne ew wm ma an n Beer Food Fun UE soc3:27c & & G Gr r i il ll le e 863-773-2007H Ho ou ur rs s: : M Mo on n. S Sa at t. 1 11 1a am m 9 9p pm mB Ba ar r O Op pe en n U Un nt ti il l 1 1a am m C Cl lo os se ed d S Su un nd da ay ys s Saturday, April 12Pacquiao vs. BradleyLIVE on HBO PPVSaturday, April 26UFC 172 Jones vs. TeixeiraSaturday, May 3Mayweather vs. MaidanaLIVE on Showtime PPV Every Wednesday5 50 0 W Wi in ng gs s(minimum of 6)ALL DAY TUESDAYS T T E E X X A A S S H H O O L L D D E E M M Saturdays @ Noon Freeroll Win aGift Card* $252014 SCHEDULE OF MEETINGS FOR HARDEE COUNTY COMMISSION AND APPOINTED BOARDSMeetings to be held in County Commission Chambers, Room 102 Courthouse Annex, 412 W. Orange Street, Wauchula, Florida unless otherwise noted BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS Regular meetings first Thursday at 8:30 a.m. & third Thursday at 6:00 p.m. MONTH OF April 03rd at 8:30 a.m. and 24th at 6:00 p.m. Planning Session 03/14/14 at 8:30 a.m. Good Friday 04/18/14 County Offices Closed Advanced County Commissioner Class Gainesville 04/17-04/18/14 ****PLEASE NOTE BOARDROOM UNDER RENOVATIONSAPRIL 3RD AND 14TH (PLANNING SESSION) TO BE HELD IN SCHOOL BOARD MEETING ROOM APRIL 24TH MEETING TO BE HELD AT CIVIC CENTER. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY INDEPENDENT BOARD MONTH OF April No meeting scheduled. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL/INDUSTRIAL DEVELOP MENT AUTH. Meets on second Tuesday of each month at 8:30 a.m. MONTH OF April th Utilities Conf. Room Commerce Park PLANNING AND ZONING BOARD meets first Thursday night of each month at 6:00 p.m. MONTH OF April 03RD 230 SOUTH FLORIDA AVENUE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY LICENSING BOARD Meets on the second Monday night of each month at 6:00 p.m. in Building Department Conference Room, 401 West Main Street MONTH OF April 14th COUNTY PARKS AND RECREATION BOARD Meets first Monday of each month at 6:00 p.m. MONTH OF April No meeting scheduled LIBRARY ADVISORY BOARD Meetings called as needed at Library in Annex II MONTH OF April No meeting scheduled HOUSING AUTHORITY Meets quarterly on the third Thursday at 1:30 p.m. at 701 LaPlaya Drive, Wauchula MONTH OF April No meeting scheduled. HEALTH CARE TASK FORCE Meets quarterly at Hardee County Health Department Auditorium at Noon MONTH OF April No meeting scheduled. HARDEE COUNTY INDIGENT HEALTH CARE BOARD Usually meets third Tuesday of each month at 5:30 p.m. MONTH OF April 15th at 5:30 p.m. This is a Disabled-Accessible facility. Any disabled person needing to make special arrangements should contact the County Commissioners office at least forty-eight (48) hours prior to the public meeting. This notice is published in compliance with Florida Statutes 286.0105. Interested parties may appear at the public meeting and be heard. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the members, with respect to any matter con sidered at such meeting or hearing, he/she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he/she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the ap peal is to be based. 3:27nc

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March 27, 2014, The Herald-Advocate 7A By MARIA TRUJILLOOf The Herald-Advocate Need Some Guidance? Then a new office on Main Street is agood place to go. Sherry White Ministries has opened a Wauchula office thatnow serves as a one-stop head quarters for all the divisions theministry operates. Sherry White,founder of SWM, says the for mer headquarters was in herhouse. The new office is a more vis ible place where people can gowhen looking for help in comingout of a difficult lifestyle. At thenew space, SWM offers assis tance to people who are comingout of prison or battling addic tions and to families of peoplegoing through hard times. SWM has three separate loca tions where men and womenhoping for a better life can live,free of charge. They are Lydia’sHouse, Mercies of David and Pi oneer Village. This ministry is a 501c3 nonprofit organization and does nottake government funding. All ofthe people who run SWM arevolunteers. The ministry sur vives on donations and faith. White says SWM came to be shortly after her marriage in2001, when she and husbandMark would “share the gospel ofJesus Christ” with convictedfelons. They would take turnspreaching and teaching, andfound this work to be very re warding. They believed the mes sages they brought the menwould transform their lives, ifthey wanted. Some time later, while on va cation, White said she wasawakened with a vision. “I wasseeing pictures of abused, aban doned and neglected children.”She said the pictures were sographic and vivid in her mindthat she begged the Lord forthem to stop because there wasnothing she could do about it. The next night, White had an other vision, this time it was ofa late 1800s-style farm with car riages and horses, a barn, veg etable gardens and more.Although she didn’t understandthe meaning of these visions,White said she knew it was atool the Lord wanted her to useto help the neglected children. “I knew it was my mission in life to have such a place for fam ilies to be healed,” she said. In 2007, Lydia’s House was born. It was a home for womencoming out of destructivelifestyles. Soon after, they pur chased a farm where familiescan meet to begin to heal and re store their relationships. The men’s program, Mercies of David, then brought on newinsight. “Through it the Lordshowed me how desperately thefamilies needed to be educatedon co-dependency and en-abling. I have yet to see an ad dict that didn’t have a co-dependent enabler by theirside. Addiction is a family prob lem!” said White. SWM’s mission to help oth ers has also now extended to theDominican Republic. In partner ing with a pastor there, the or phanage now provides food andshelter from newborn babies topre-teens. At the new office, classes on co-dependency are given once amonth. They are for people andtheir families struggling withdrug and/or alcohol issues. Reg istering for upcoming re-treatscan also be done there. The 10th annual Ladies Re treat will be from April 4 to 6,and guest speakers JenniferBeckham and Lesa Hendersonwill be attending. The retreatwill be at the Lake Placid Con ference Center. The first annual Men’s Re treat will also be April 4 to 6 atthe center, and guest speakerTerrell Rowland from DunklinMemorial Camp will attend. SWM urges the community to drop by the new office to takea look and see how the ministryhelps people. The office is lo cated at 313 W. Main St. and isopen from Monday through Fri day, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Those wanting to volunteer are more than welcome to call773-0523 or drop by the office.White says “there is somethingeverybody can do.” Ministry Opens New Office To Help People PHOTO BY MARIA TRUJILLO Here are just a few of the volunteers for Sherry White Ministries. The new offic e location is at 313 W. Main St. and is open to the public. SPRUCING UPCOURTESY PHOTOS A vacant planter in front of the Hardee County Library came alive after wo rk done over the weekend by the Hardee County Castaways Sportfishing 4-H Club. Lead ers Rex and Patricia Richey spearheaded the work to put new bedding and flowers to give the library entrance a welcoming appearance. COURTESY PHOTOS “To Protect & To Serve.” That law-enforcement motto becomes literal in a new way on Saturday as members of the Hardee County Sheriff’s Office work as servers for morning diners at the Double J Restaurant on U.S. 17 South in Wauchula. D ishing up smiles for a good cause will be (from left) Dep. Kim Pfeiffer, warrants clerk Sa ra Moore and Dep. Alice Simandal, along with Lt. Rosie Wendell (not pictured). The ti ps they receive will go to support Special Olympics and the annual National Law En forcement Special Olympics Torch Run. They will be “on duty” at the popular eatery f rom 8 to 11:30 a.m. TIP-A-COP SATURDAY Commissioner Grady Johnson asked if hiring the attorneyis to prosecute Witschonke. Evers said it was not to pros ecute him but to lay out all theevidence so commissioners candetermine whether there is a rea son to remove him from theboard. In order to be ousted from the IDA, commissioners must deter mine whether Witschonke com mitted misfeasance,mal-feasance or willful neglectof his duties while serving onthe board. Witschonke has been a mem ber of the IDA for less than ayear. He faces this potential re moval after the IDA passed amotion to have the CountyCommission evaluate all themembers of the IDA. Several IDA members have expressed displeasure recentlyover Witschonke bringing upmatters not on the agenda or off topic and old issues which al ready had been passed. Witschonke asked County Commissioners what the accu sations are against him. Headded that he is ready for the“witch-burning trial.” He feels he has done nothing wrong, and said he works as besthe can to protect public money. Evers said all the evidence would be presented at the hear ing. Commissioner Johnson called the issue “outrageous andunbelievable,” and felt it shouldbe stopped. Citizens Frank Kirkland and Hank Kuhlman spoke in de-fense of Witschonke. Kuhlman asked if the com mission would pay forWitschonke’s attorney fees.Evers replied he did not thinkthe board would be responsiblefor those expenses. By MICHAEL KELLYOf The Herald-Advocate A hearing originally set for next week before the CountyCommission to decide if an In dustrial Development Au-thoritymember should be removedfrom the volunteer board hasbeen moved to the end of April. Horst Witschonke was origi nally set to have his fate deter mined on April 3, but thecommission has decided to havean outside attorney present thefacts regarding the situation andneeded to allow time for thecounty manager to hire one. Ken Evers, who serves as the attorney for the County Com-mission and the IDA, told thecommission he felt hiring anoutside attorney “would affordHorst a better case of dueprocess.” Evers said he expects hiring the attorney to cost between$4,000 and $6,000. Expulsion Hearing For IDA Member Delayed CONGRATULATIONS!!! It is a great pleasure to announce our Employee Of The Month Rec ipient for February 2014 Todd McKinnish Todd began his employment with the City of Wauchula on January 06, 1997. Todd hired in as a Water Treatment Plant/Waste Water Treatm ent Plant Operator #02. In November2009 he received his WTP/WWTPOperator #01 license and in Sep tember 2012 Todd was promoted tothe WTP/WWTP Plant Manager.Todd is required to keep his certifi cations current to stay compliantwith the State of Florida. Todd doesa great job managing hisstaff of 5 and makingsure his departmentis run effectively andefficiently. Way to GO!!! 3:27c YOUR BUSINESS COULD APPEAR HERE TOO!!Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels 773-3255 www.TheHeraldAdvocate.com The Herald-AdvocateHardee County’s Hometown Coverage!"$"#?!%#"##:.<+?&';).;2'rrrrrr===$.++8'2**<5)':+)53

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T he Herald-Advocate Hardee County’s Hometown Coverage r'n P.O. BOX 338 WAUCHULA, FL 33873 Telephone (863) 773-3255 Quality printing services at competitive prices! 1.,$(!,,+ 1--$)(!+0 1),-+ 1!&, 1$%!+2,$%!-, 1$%!+2,+ 1&0!+, 1(/)$!, 1.,$(!,,)+', 1(/$--$)(, 1r(().(!'!(-, 1!--!+#! 1(/!&)*!, 1&!( +, 1"(!-$$"(,rrrrrr rrr 8A The Herald-Advocate, March 27, 2014

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The Herald-Advocate(USPS 578-780)Thursday, March 27, 2014 PAGE ONE %+/+.23+*/$"2 MR. HHS 3:27c REGISTERNOW!%""1 1 2 2 0 0 ++/(( 6 6 0 0**"//"0*&$Cheer President)".-"1.Football Commissioner For more information call Annette Zunigaat 863-781-0859 or James Crews at 863-559-4774 HARDEE soc3:27p Football & Cheer Sign UpSa t. March 29 9am –2pm""*"*/"-*$"/30 %0(New President Elias Richardson863-990-6546 N No oR Re e g gi i s s t t r r a a t t i io o n nF Fe e e e Cracker Trail 4-H Caladium Sale at The Slice of Life Event in Wauchula "# &' r 10 am 2 pm %*'./+r-2"*!"-.+*1&/%(..& (!&0). #+-!+*/&*$/%".",(*/. Stop by and support this great group of 4-H kids and get some Caladiums for around your yard. soc3:27p B

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2B The Herald-Advocate, March 27, 2014 Grammy award-winning tenor Larry Ford will present a mu sical concert at First UnitedMethodist Church, 135 Broad-way, Fort Meade, on Sunday at6 p.m. Ford has been singing since he was a five-year-old in Le-vel land, Texas, and has performedin 49 states and 30 foreign coun tries. Trained in classical music,he is a graduate of Eastern NewMexico State University and hasbeen a featured soloist with TheDownings, the Dixie Echoes andthe James Blackwood Quartet aswell as on the Gaither FamilyHomecoming recordings. He and his wife, Sherryl, have pastored churches in Texas andFlorida. He recently decided toreturn to the full-time musicministry. They are the parents offive sons and a daughter andgrandparents of seven grandchil dren. Although his music min istry, which includes over 100concerts a year, is important to him, he values his family andservice to God in the homechurch, First Assembly of God-Central. For further information, call the church office at 863-385-9059 or Chuck Hancock at 863-581-6101. Ford Sings In Fort Meade Ford Words To Live By A Daily ThoughtTHURSDAY It was two days before thePassover, and the Feast ofUnleavened Bread. And thechief priests and the scribeswere seeking how to arrestHim by stealth, and kill Him.For they said, “not during thefeast lest there be a tumultamong the people.”MnF F R R I I D D A A Y Y Tr the twelve disciples, went tothe leading priests andasked, “How much will youp you?” And they game himthirty pieces of silver. Fromr t looking for an opportunity to b M !"# $ $ %&' S S A A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y Now the day of the Passovercelebration arrived, when thePassover lamb was killedand eaten with the unleav b e r r place to prepare thePassover meal … They wentoff to the city and found(r t ) rsaid, and prepared the Pass-over supper.& L *+,'& .S S U U N N D D A A Y Y N/ / p0 bled and He exclaimed, “I tellyou the truth; one of your00 s 12 sponded, “It is the one towhom I give the bread that Idip in the bowl.” And whenHe had dipped it, He gave it as, son of Simon Iscar b 2 i 0 going out into the night.J3 4-, $ *,-+ %&' M M O O N N D D A A Y Y During the meal, Jesus tookand blessed the bread, brokeit and gave it to His disciples,“Take, eat. This is My body,which is broken for you.”M !"# $ $ M5T T U U E E S S D D A A Y Y Taking the cup and thankingG 6 t ( r“Drink this, all of you. This iss 0 G 7 / ( 8enant poured out for manypeople for the forgiveness ofsins.”M !"# $ *M5W W E E D D N N E E S S D D A A Y Y Jesus said, “I’ll not be drink ing wine from this cup againuntil the new day when I’lldrink it with you in the king dom of My Father.” Theysang a hymn and went di -0 r s r0( b M !"# $ 9+M5 All verses are excerpted from:;< =>?@ ABC?R Z H [\ Q :;R Z H _\ AQ < ` \ RSlish Bible; (NIV) NewInternational Version; (NLT)New Living Translation (RSV)Revised Standard Version;Ha [\ Q a;B??Bc W [ >d< X R \ RSflish; and (TLB) The LivingBible. —Hardee Living— COURTESY PHOTO The Midtown Men will close out the South Florida State College Artist Series in a per formance on Monday at 7:30 p.m. at the college Theatre for the Performi ng Arts, 600 W. College Dr., Avon Park. Tickets are $33, 40 or 45 and can be obtained at www.perfor mances.southflorida.edu or by calling 863-784-7184. The Jersey Bo ys (shown above) Christian Hoff, Daniel Reichard, J. Robert Spencer and Michael Longoria take the stage as the Midtown Men to bring the sounds of the 60s, including the B eatles, The Beach Boys, Motown, the Four Seasons and more. Folks can come to the concert early and visit the Museum of Florida Art and Culture’s Wild and Places Between, featuring paint ings by Dennis Aufiery. MIDTOWN MUSIC B;>*:;1,.6;<9@92;2:1 author and social reformer JohnRuskin who made the following:*0.7+:.9=*;276D679-.9;1*;people may be happy in theirwork, these three things areneeded: they must be fit for it;they must not do too much of it;and they must have a sense ofsuccess in it.” B./79.;1..4.5.6;1.42<5 was known to exist on Earth,scientists discovered that it ex isted on the sun. The newly dis covered element was thereforenamed helium after the Greekgod of the sun, Helios. B/@7<:>*:76,.8<9,1*:.at auction for $1.3 million. /@7<*9.423.;1.*=.9*0. adult, you will be cheated onone time before you find the per son you settle down with. Also,at some point during your datinglife you’ll be the cheater. ——— Thought for the Day: “A per son usually has two reasons fordoing something: a good reasonand the real reason.” — Thomas Carlyle ,n260.*;<9.:&@6-6, STRANGEBUT TRUE By Samantha Weaver Rose Mitchell-Freeman Reading Instruction Specialist (863)773-6141 Your Child Will Learn to Read! Free Evaluation Internationally Acclaimed Method Children, Teens & Adults ghjklmnj www.jazzercise.com Jazzercise Heartland Summer Body?Jazzercise, Fusion, Core & Strike Come see what we’re all about oquvwxyu SUPER MATTCoin LaundryLarge Washers & DryersUp To 125 lbs. WashersSPECIAL/ESPECIALMONDAY-FRIDAY6AM-6PMN NO O R R M M A A L L/ / N NO O R R M M A A L L E E N Nz zE ES SP P E E C C I I A A L L/ / E ES S P P E E C C I I A A L L$ $2 2{ { | |D DO O} } ~ ~L L E E/ / D DO O~ ~L L E E$ $ 2 2 $ $€ € | | | |M MA A / / M MA A I I$ $2 2‚ ‚ ‚ ‚$ $6 6| | | |L LA A R Rƒ ƒE E/ /„ „R R A A N N D D E E$ $3 3‚ ‚ ‚ ‚$ $… … | | | |S S} }P P E E R R/ /„ „R R A A N N D D E E$ $3 3 ‚ ‚ †w‡ˆ‰Šu nrr ABOUT ... Hardee Living Hardee Living prints your news on people, clubs andorganizations, includingmeeting summaries, births,children’s and senior citi zens’ birthdays, engage ments, weddings, silver orgolden anniversaries, churchevents and military assign ments. Forms are available at our office. For engagements andweddings, a photo shouldbe included. Publication is free of charge. Coverage of wed dings over three months oldwill be limited to a photo andbrief announcement.‹ŒŽ‘Œ ’ “ ”•–• —‘Thursday. It pays to advertise in your Hometown Newspaper We are saving this space just for Y Y O O U U !The HeraldAdvocate 115 S. 7th Ave. 773-3255 www.TheHeraldAdvocate.com If Nostradamus would have written anything close to this! Consider Testimonies Volumn 9 beginning on Page 11 by E.G. White Must Reads: Desire of Ages & The Great Controversy Download entire E.G.W. App. from the E.G. White Estate oquxwx™†wxˆš GB’s Ladies & Men’s Formal Wear #9759.::.:B&17.:B,,.::792.: Last Year’s Dresses 1/2 off Night Moves by Allure Kasey J vwxyu Gini Beth HendersonOwner Cell: 863-873-1858r863-402-1902rr!"""'r$ #""&!%!#'!#&##!&!" Jovani Blush off New DressWith Coupon $ 30 oquvwxyu

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March 27, 2014, The Herald-Advocate 3B 2014 Wildcat INVITATIONAL Golf Tournament Individual Stroke Play * A A l l l l P P r r o o c c e e e e d d s s B B e e n n e e f f i i t t H H a a r r d d e e e e H H i i g g h h S S c c h h o o o o l l A A t t h h l l e e t t i i c c s s *To R gg at or at sstag Registration forms also available at Torrey Oaks Golf Course Sponsored by: 3:13-27c Torrey OaksGolf Courser*-.%&* 3*1'%)#,!!)S S a a t t r r a a A A r r i i 5 5a a S S a a A A r r i i 6 6T *,.,!!)!1By Rilla Cooper 773-6710 Greetings from Fort Green!As I was typing the news on Sunday afternoon it was tryingto rain and we sure do needsome out our way. The creeksouth of our home is about dry,with just one side running. Our sincere sympathy is ex tended to all the family of JuniorCooper. He was Sher-man’s firstcousin and always delighted inasking Sherman if he knew howold he was. Sherman alwaysknew because Junior was 10years older than Sherman. WhenJunior was born the doctors saidhe wouldn’t live to ten and Jun ior liked telling people the doc tors did not know! Lots ofpeople will remember Juniorand remember him holding hiswalker over his head when hecrossed the street! He was ahard worker, mowing yards witha push mower and running to thenext yard to mow and when hegot older working at the pack inghouses. He did not takemoney from the public purse asso many do without near theproblems Junior was born with.He made his final journey lastWednesday. I saw a horse trailer with about four saddled horses com plete with the yellow slicker tiedbehind the saddle one day lastweek. I don’t know where theywere going to work but this isnearly a thing of the past, but isa delightful sight, cowboysworking cows with horses. Fort Green’s “posse” rode again last week as the ladies allwent to dinner honoring JoyceCoker’s birthday. Joyce is a fewmonths older than me. Theposse is a group of widows whoenjoy eating out together andanything else that is fun. Quite a few people in the county have Peace River Elec-tric Coop, which I still call theREA for their electricity. At oneof the district meetings they an nounced they would have adrawing for a mini I pad after allthe districts had met. The luckywinner was Iris Gilliard. Iristold me the REA representativetook her picture and informationwhen she learned the good news and told her it would be in themonthly magazine. Well, every one does not get the magazineand I thought everyone loves tohear good news and more get theHerald than the PRECOmonthly magazine! Congratulations to Hunter Reid on turning 16 and gettinghis driver’s license! The times Ihave seen him driving he hasbeen cautious and a good driver. Our sympathy is extended to the family of Hill Blackmon ashe made his final journey. Hillhas probably been in morehomes in the county than anyoneelse. He was a terrific repairmanfor any appliance. He will bemissed. Our sympathy is also ex tended to the family of DolorisJo Smith as she made her finaljourney. I knew her sister,Sharon, better but it always hurtswhen a member of the familypasses. I never had any sistersbut both brothers have alreadypassed. Dennis Sasser sang a special Sunday morning and I told himI believed it was the best ever.He always does a good job andis also our song leader at church. Jake Willis will graduate from the army soon. His final testwill be walking 10 miles with allhis gear on his back. His grand mother said he had gained 10pounds but this walk may take itaway! Betty Waters was at church Sunday, as was Gary Oden.They are a blessing to all of usas they have battled cancer forsome time. Norma Alejandrowill have a procedure Thursday.Kitty Oden is having a proce dure one day this week. Bettyand Clint Walker still are notable to attend church and Bettyis one person who loves to go tochurch. Harriet Hendry is notdoing well and neither is DoniaHughes. Please pray for all ofthese. I had a tree man out and he worked on the avocado tree inour yard. The one in the groveis totally gone. The laurel leafbug from China is the culpritthat is killing the bay trees andavocados. So many of the dis eases we have come from theforeign countries. Please pray for each other and our nation. $ %&#"*#$& n*((( rectchevy.com L LOYD H ALL "'&% %$"%""#$% &##!%!& 3:27c Two Of T visit www.amazingfacts.org or www.amazingdiscoveries.org soc2:20-5:29p www.thebulbbin.com 8 8 6 6 3 3 4 4 7 7 1 1 B B L L B B The Bulb B )) Fan & Lighting Showroom r (!" FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED SINCE 1989 Join Us For Our25THANNIVERSARYSALE!1 DAY ONLYSaturday, March 29 10am 2pm STOREWIDEEverything In Store is On Sale! 2 2 5 5 O O F F F F !J nn r n Rnn n C C C! "# C! $%&#%!C!' We are a one stop shop for all your lighting and home improvement needs. 0-%+0#%#'!'+0&)"+ 0%%+,+0#**(*+0++(*#+ 0-*#,/#!",#'!0%%((*&)+0#%#'!%%#('+ 0',-*'#,-*0%-(*+',#.,-*+0#!",#.,-*+ 0&))#*0#!","*&+ (*#.,-*+&)+ r! !rn more WE ARE A HGTV HOME AND ELK LIGHTING RETAIL SHOWROOM soc3:27c $%-1!!&%)$%-.*,2-,! searched from the archival+#!-*"$!'*,% 0* .!.$!, !!*/).2!, ) $!!,' 0*.! n The Wildcat netters were de feated in Mulberry by the highschool team of that city Wednes day evening by the score of 7 to2. ——— W.C. King, former county commissioner, received a wirethat a contract was let Thursdayby the state Road Departmentfor the completion of the roadrunning from Zolfo to Griffin’sCorner. The surface is to be con structed of a mixed-in-placetype of oil and soil. ——— The Royal Theatre is showing “Kentucky Moonshine” on Fri day; “Devil’s Island” on Satur day; “Cowboy and the Lady” onSunday and Monday; “TheyMade Me A Criminal” on Tues day and Wednesday; and“Trooper Takes A Trip” onThursday and Friday. Comingsoon will be “Stable Mates,”“Five of a Kind,” “That CertainAge,” “My Lucky Star” and“Kentucky.” ——— The B&B is advertising 24 pounds of self-rising flour for 49cents; half a gallon can of figsfor 39 cents; one pound of cof fee, 15 cents; five gallons ofkerosene, 39 cents; three poundsof bananas for 10 cents; and afree balloon with the purchase ofone pound of mixed candies for19 cents. n Hardee County commission ers Friday awarded contracts for County. Keri succeeds JessicaGough as Junior Miss. ——— Six teachers were honored for the school year 1988-89 at theSchool Board meeting heldWednesday, March 22, whenSuperintendent Lee Burns con gratulated each of the teachersand presented them with plaquesand pins. Those recognized asTeacher of the Year are MaryNell Masterson at Hardee JuniorHigh, Judy Terrell at HardeeSenior High, Anne Taylor atZolfo Springs Ele-mentary, Bil lie Custer at Wau-chula Elemen tary, Marilyn Best at BowlingGreen Elementary and RoyShaw at North Wau-chula Ele mentary. Hardee CountyTeacher of the Year was BillieCluster. A 46-year-old Fort Green woman has been accused of set ting fire to her own home. ——— Two senior high school boys involved in two separate fightshave been expelled from school. ——— Each year, children with dis abilities are recognized for theiraccomplishments through the in ternational “Yes I Can!” awardsprogram. This year, HardeeCounty nominee Justin Sauveywas nominated in the area ofself-advocacy, and he has beenselected as one of 27 “Interna tional Yes I Can!” winners. He isa fourth-grade student at ZolfoSprings Elemen-tary School. ——— Little Eliana Esmeralda En riques was third runner-up in therecent Sunburst Beauty Pageantwhere she won Prettiest Smileand will advance to the Maypageant to be held in Orlando.The 6-month-old is the daughterof Leticia Ann Enriquez andgranddaughter of Leticia andJose C. Enriquez hospitalization insurance forcounty employees and for metalroofing, authorized closing of anold county road, and took aroundhouse swing at state RoadBoard member Warren Carson. ——— Twenty-eight Hardee County Junior High School studentswere tapped for membership inthe Elmo Roberts Chapter of theNational Honor Society Tuesdaymorning. ——— Political candidates in Hardee County were served notice lastweek by the state Road Depart-ment that violation of the state’soutdoor advertising law is a mis demeanor carrying a possiblefine of $330 a month for each vi olation. ——— Wauchula’s new $40,000 water main and $41,000 storagetank were placed in service thisweek after sterilization and stateapproval of water samples. n Two men convicted of escape and other crimes were beingtransported from prison back toWauchula early Tuesday morn ing to face additional escape andrelated charges when, ap-par ently, they did it again. One,however, was “recaptured al-most immediately,” according toAssistant State Attorney StephenHouchin, while the other re mains at large. ——— Two carnival workers were arrested during the HardeeCounty Fair last week after al legedly purchasing cocaine froman undercover officer, recordssaid. ——— Keri Schrader was chosen as the 1989 Junior Miss Hardee /$"' COURTESY PHOTOSD() *+(,+(+ -+(./01 +12 34( 5(+126017 8+93 :9-.4..+127 /4+;42 <= 01 + (4941/ /<(>4? 3<1/ +12 4+93 ,+5542 +1 @ 6940.+ 50,,.4() :9-.4..+12 A 6 j <1 A 0( +/ -.4;601 B 1 AE 4(6 A /?and spent part of his spring break visiting Wauchula and hunt ing with his 5(+12;0/34() SFGHIK SLMMNSS

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Photos By MARIA TRUJILLO KAYLA ELMORE Story Of Noah 4B The Herald-Advocate, March 27, 2014

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March 27, 2014, The Herald-Advocate 5B r(*#%./+!+# / (863) 767-8920(Road North of Aaron’s Rental. Next to Heartland Pediatrics) 3:27c May be covered completely or in part by insurance — contact the pharmacy to see if you may qualify. HeartlandPharmacy 0'+*&+("%*&&+()(,"1 &(% &($*"&%## 863-773-4161 Ext. 157 or Ext. 176 3:27c Hardee County YOUR BUSINESS COULD APPEAR HERE TOO!!Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels 773-3255 www.TheHeraldAdvocate.com COURTESY PHOTOS The Wildcat division (ages 11-13), coached by James Cranford and Christopher Parks, barely beat the North Manatee Storm 8-6 in Saturday’s opening of the Hardee Youth Football Spring Flag season. Flag scoring is one point for a t ouchdown or extra point (no kicks). The Storm was last year’s divisional flag football c hampion. In the Bobcat Division (ages 8-10) Hardee split a double-header and has a 1-1 record The Cub Division (ages 5-7) and girls Panther Division (ages 14-16) drew a bye o n opening week. Regis tration for the fall football and cheerleading begins Friday night a t the football field house at the Hardee Junior High campus at 5 p.m. FOOTBALL FLAGGED By JIM KELLYOf The Herald-Advocate Wauchula’s Community Redevelopment Agency, which en compasses 1,579 acres and isfunded with over $400,000 oflocal property taxes annually,had a busy 2012-13 fiscal year,director Jessica Newman toldthe Wauchula Kiwanis ClubTuesday, March 18, at the PandaRestaurant. There is a grant program for commercial revitalization and a Paint The Town project, whichlast year painted five Wauchulahomes at no charge using about100 volunteers. An initial 2011 Environmenttal Protection Agency Brown-field grant of $400,000 resultedin $88,714 this year for 101-105West Maine Street Phase 1 andPhase 2 assessments for haz ardous substance removal, withremediation cost recommenda tions. Further remediation planning was conducted for 226 WestMain Street. A $55,000 grantfrom Central Florida RegionalPlanning Council was secured tobe used in conjuction with a$75,000 grant from the FloridaDepartment of EnvironmentalProtection for source removaland clean-up of harmful sub stances, which can be petro leum, asbestos and lead paint. The CRA continued the monthly Curb Appeal Awardwith the help of Main Street Wauchula. The CRA was estab lished in Wauchula in 1997under the leadership of then-cityclerk Steve Wofford. The CRA this past year reno vated four downtown parkinglots, including landscaping anddrainage improvements. Theyare at Town Center shoppingplaza, U.S. 17 Southbound andMain Street, between South 7thAve. and South 8th Ave, andnorth of the Train Depot. The Train Depot restoration project was completed. TheCRA received a Hardee Eco-nomic Development Agencygrant in 2011 of $400,000. Re ceptions, dinners and specialevents are held there. PeaceRiver Explorations has the depotopen on Fridays and Saturdays. The CRA works with the city, economic development, Indus-trial Development Authority,Main Street Wauchula, and theChamber of Commerce to createpartnerships to grow the localeconomy. The CRA this pastyear gave out residential grantsof $13,677 and commercialgrants of $17,112. Expenses included $371,654 for the parking lot projects forTrain Depot rehabilitation. Totalexpenses, including spending of grants were $1.28 million, in cluding $81,438 for Christmasdecorations and $130,718 trans ferred to the city’s general fund. The Paint The Town event will be held Saturday, May 10,with a rainout date of May 17. Property tax income to the CRA peaked at $646,879 in2008 and due to lower tax valu ations has been $638,119 in2009, $521,182 in 2010,$498,048 in 2011, $447,740 in2012, and $428,052 in 2013,Newman reported. Newman runs the CRA and also Main Street Wauchula Inc. +!+# +).n( Elton Cowart is originally from Wauchula. He was in theclass of 1967 at Hardee HighSchool. When he got out of theArmy, he married Donna DeeDowning, and they were to gether almost 43 years. Memo rial services will be held at 3:00p.m. Sunday, March 30, 2014 atSkeen Funeral Home Chapel inTroy, Ala.. The guest book maybe signed, words of condolencesmay be expressed and memori als to Wounded Warriors Projectmay be made at www.skeenfu neralhome.com. or mail directlyto Wounded Warriors Project,P.O. Box 758517, Topeka,Kansas 66675. Elton Cowart, 64, editor and publisher of “Dixie Living”magazine, died Thursday, March20, at his home in the Tanyardcommunity in Bullock County,Ala. Cowart believed that “every body likes something for free,”especially if it brings fun andlaughter to their lives. For morethan 10 years, Cowart’s home spun writing entertained thosewho read his magazine. “Elton believed if you can give people reason to laugh andforget about their troubles for a while, then that was worthsomething,” said Kenny May, aclose friend. May had coffeewith Cowart Thursday morningand said he was in good spirits. “Elton was fussing a bit be cause they didn’t have the kindof tomato plants he wanted atthe co-op,” May said.“ButDonna said he went home andplanted the tomatoes he boughtand had a real good day gettinghis garden going.” May saidCowart found his way to thearea from Florida about 12 yearsago. “Elton was a policeman down around Lakeland and he cameup this way hunting,” May said.“He got to liking it up here so heand Donna pulled up stakes and moved to Tanyard.” Cowartbought a store in the Tanyardcommunity and ran it for awhile. Then, he accepted the editor’s position at the Union SpringsHerald. “At the Herald, Eltonwrote a column called, “A Viewfrom Tanyard,” and everybodygot a kick out of it,” May said. “Elton had this knack. He could write about anything andmake it interesting. His columnwas the first thing I looked forwhen I got the newspaper. A lotof people were the same way.” Cowart penned a book titled “I Don’t Look Good NakedAnymore” and it generated a lotof interest. “People just liked toread what Elton wrote,” Maysaid. “He had the gift …Whether people knew him per sonally or through his writing,he brought a lot of laughter intotheir lives. We’ll all miss thelaughter.” May said Cowart had told him when he died, he wanted peopleto come together at Tanyard andcelebrate his life. “He didn’twant anything sad,” May said.“Elton loved to laugh and that’sthe way I’ll remember him,laughing and loving life.” Wauchula Native Elton Cowart Was Publisher of ‘Dixie Living’ Elton Cowart

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6B The Herald-Advocate, March 27, 2014 ABOUT ... ClassifiedsDEADLINE ....Tuesday noon RATES ..........Minimum of $4.50 for 10 words. Each additional word is .25 cents. Ads in all capitals are .35 cents per word. Headlines are $2 a line. Blind ad box numbers are $3 extra. BILLING ........Ads must be pre-paid. CLASSIFICATIONS:Agriculture Mobile Homes Appliances Notices Automobile Personal Boats Pets Furniture Plants/Produce Guns Real Estate Help Wanted Recreational Houses Rentals Livestock Rentals, CommercialLost & Found Services Miscellaneous Wanted Motorcycles Yard Sales The Classifieds DIESEL INJECTION repairs, pumps, turbo, injectors, remove and install available, 863-3810538. 3:27p NOW PURCHASING citrus fruit for the 2014 season for Chapman Fruit Co. Call Frank Vasquez, 863781-4133. 1:9-5:29p CLEAN, FERTILIZED Hemarthria hay for sale, $30 per roll. Call 863781-0104 or 863-559-7545. 11:14-4:10p L. DICKS INC. is now purchasing citrus fruit for the 2013/14 season and beyond. Call Mark Manuel @ 863-781-0384. 7:8tfc 17 KEY WEST w/trailer, 90h John son, trolling motor, bimini top, very good condition, $5,500, 863773-6424. 3:27,4:3p 13 FIBERGLASS BOAT with 7 1/2 HP Mercury, new tires and bear ings, trolling motor and depth recorder, $1,095. 863-781-3202. 3:20-4:3c Boats Agriculture PART TIME SECRETARIAL Re ceptionist VOLUNTEER for Do mestic Violence & Counseling Services. Must be computer-liter ate, know how to file, and be able to handle confidential matters. 863-773-5717 ext, #1 or come to 113 N. 7th Avenue, Wauchula, FL 33873. 3:20,27c POLITICAL SCIENCE INSTRUC TORS (PT) Open until filled. Please visit http://sfsc.inter viewexchange.com for detailed position posting. 863-784-7132. EA/EO 3:20,27c DIRECT SUPPORT STAFF NEEDED. Qualified applicants must meet the following: 18 yrs. or older, High School Diploma or equiva lent, Valid Florida Drivers License. 1 yr. verifiable experience in DD Field, Medical or Child Care Set ting. Must pass Law Enforcement background screening and drug test. Apply in person at Sunrise Community Inc., 1014 6th Ave. South in Wauchula. 3:13-4:10p Help WantedFOSTER CARE WORK from home as part of an innovative team to provide a safe nurturing environ ment for young persons with dis abilities, also receive great reimbursement, training and sup port. Contact us at: www.keyas setsflorida.com or call 863-5125977. 3:6-4:3p CNA, BILINGUAL, apply in person along with resume at Bowling Green Medical Center, 302 West Main Street, 375-2214. 2:27-3:27c UNITED COUNTY WOLF LAKE Realty, 390 CR 17A East, Avon Park, Florida 33825. Guy Willard, Broker, 863-452-2299. Agricultural and land specialist needed. Rewarding future income. Please call James Watson, Associate Broker Man ager, 863-465-1549 or 863-4415173. 3:27-4:27p CDL CLASS A, local and OTR truck driver, 2 yrs. experience needed, clean driving record, drug free, 863-414-8842. 3:27-4:24p Help WantedDREDGE OPERATOR, Oiler, Me chanic, Welder, Labor. Experience and MSHA training a plus. DFW/EOE 813-634-2517. 3:20,27p NTERACTIVE CAREGIVING is what separates COMFORT KEEPERS from other caregivers. Our focus is on engaging the mind, body, and safety of our clients. CNA, HHA and Homemaker Companion posi tions are available in the Hardee County area. Flexible, full-time or part-time. Learn more about a re warding career enriching the lives of others with COMFORT KEEP ERS. Apply online: ck381.ersp.biz/employment or call 863-385-8558. HHA#299992766. 2013 CK Franchising, Inc. Most offices independently owned and op erated. 3:6tfc 2010 CALICO BUMPER Pull horse trailer, 863-245-3972. 3:27,4:3p Miscellaneous Help Wanted (863) 773-2128REALTORS JOE L. DAVIS JOE L. DAVIS, JR. JOHN H. ONEAL REALTOR See more listings at www.joeldavis.com REAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS 89 acs fronts Peace River & includes cabin, barn, 3 wells, & 35 ac grove. Excellent pasture & majestic live oaks w/plenty of deer & turkey. $735,000! 4BR/3BA home & Hamlin grove on 20 acs. 2 pole barns, inground pool and ac fish pond. $499,000! 5 acs. w/mature trees in Desoto Co. Homesite or farm. Owner fi nance. $35,000! PRICE REDUCED! 20 acs zoned industrial on Hwy 17. $399,000! PRICE REDUCED! 200 ac excellent pasture for hunting deer & turkey. Will divide! NOW $2,950/ac! 4BR/2BA CB home on Hawaiian Dr in Wauchula. $75,000! PRICE REDUCED! 37 acs Jessica Prescott (941) 737-6502 REALTOR ASSOCIATES AFTER HOURS KENNY SANDERS...............781-0153 KAREN ONEAL........... 781-7633 JESSICA PRESCOTT...941-737-6502 KEVIN SANDERS..........368-1926 MONICA REAS....................781-0888 DAVID ROYAL................781-3490HIGHWAY 17 SOUTH, WAUCHULA, FL 33873 cl3:27c w/3 250 well has perimeter fencing & dble paved rd frontage. NOW $90,000! 3/2 home in Wauchula close to business area w/3 sheds & a barn for your storage needs. $39,000! 1.3 ac commercial lot w/3,766SF restaurant & drivethru has 130+ ft frontage on N&S bound Hwy 17. $357,000! 9 ac grove on Main Street East, 4 well, micro-jet irrigation. $60,000! PRICE REDUCED! 9.8 acs fronts SR 64 near Popash. Great for homesite or agriculture. NOW $80,000! Commercial lot (zoned C-2) in side Wauchula City Limits. $14,000 RealtorsNOEYA. FLORES, BROKER228 N. 6th Ave. Wauchula, Florida 33873 Flores & Flores, Inc.!!!!SPECIAL OF THE WEEK!!!! WAUCHULA 4BR/2BA Mobile Home on 2.5 acres with central air & heat. Big open hallway, lots of storage space, front and back porch, metal roof and pasture fenced-in for cattle or horses. Property sits on a dead-end county maintained road. Offered at $135,000 WESHARETHESAMEMLSWITHHIGHLANDSCOUNTY!Remember, Our listings are on the Internet.Anyone with a computer can access them anytime! After Hours JASON JOHNSON Sales Associate (863) 781-3734 !!!WE BUY HOUSES!!! !!!CALL FOR AN OFFER!!! cl3:27c (863) 773-3337 Fax: (863) 773-0144 www.floresrealty.net WAUCHULA HILLS 3BR/1BA Frame home in Wauchula Hills with a extra building lot. Home is currently licensed for labor housing. Priced at $59,900 WAUCHULA 3BR/2BA Home with central air & heat, corner lot across from the court house, totally remodeled with fresh paint, new windows and new fencing. Property is zoned commercial and would make a great location for Professional office. Priced at $116,900 for a quick sale.Noey A. Flores, Broker (863) 781-4585 Oralia D. Flores, Broker Associate (863) 781-2955 Michael D. Boyett, Sales Associate (863) 781-2827 Jason Johnson, Sales Associate (863) 781-3734 Doris Lambert G.R.I, Broker Kenneth Lambert Broker Delois Johnson Associate 781-2360 Steve Johnson Associate 781-0518 Beverly Allen Associate 863-448-6610 Sue Birge Associate 781-3536 Colon Lambert Associate 781-1103 LA M B E RTREALTY INC.105 West Summit Street Wauchula, FL 33873Bus. (863) 773-0007 Fax: (863) 773-0038 NEW LISTING 5.62 acres close to town. commercial possibilities plus residence 4B/3Bth, pool, 3800 sq. ft. Call for an appointment. NEW LISTING 10 acres excellent buliding location. Close to town with a pond. $109,500 3B/2Bth plus bonus room on almost one acre in country setting; screened porch, metal roof, carpet and hardwoods. $105,000 Thinking of building your home? Choose one or all three lots in gated, golf course community. $16,000 per lot. Fantastic Home Site! 7.31 acres with small creek running through property. $63,000 Hwy 17 frontage! See this 1B/1Bth, frame with metal roof home located in Bowling Green. $50,000 30 Acre Tract! Pasture and woods, secluded and fenced. $170,000 Income property! 2B/1Bth home and 3 apartments all within walk ing distance of schools, shopping in Wauchula. $120,000 Seven (7) vacant lots in small subdivision, road frontage; various prices ranging from $25,000 to $30,000; perfect location for building your new home! New kitchen cabinets, countertops and updated bathrooms in this 3B/2Bth home close to Peace River; hurricane shutters and extra insulation recently added. Make an appointment to see today! $89,000 Single Wide M/H; 3B/2Bth, central H/A, laminate floors; all furniture in home. $45,000 414 +/Ac in Duette Area; improved pasture being operated as cat tle ranch; located on dead end road. Call Colon for details. INCOME PRODUCING PROPERTY! 20 Acres with 19.5 acre cit rus grove, Earlies and Hamlins; 30 amp pump on timer; 6 inch well; house located on property has potential rental income of $850 per month. $425,000 SEMINOLE HEIGHTS 3 VACANT LOTS. $21,000 Nice trees on this lot in exclusive subdivision; underground utilities, convenient location. $30,000 5.23 acre tract located on main road; some woods. $35,000 WATERFRONT 5 acre tract, Charlie Creek frontage, wooded. $50,000 Briarwood Estates! Beautiful .49 Acre lot. Perfect for building your new home! $35,000 STRATEGICALLY LOCATED COMMERCIAL 3.19 Ac. Hwy. 17 across from Walmart; 4B/3Bth main house with caged, in ground pool and 2 apartments; ideal for small shopping center or multi-tenant park. $695,000 Lovely 2B/2Bth home located on golf course; excellent location and move-in ready. $124,900 SERVICE YOU CAN COUNT ON DORIS S. LAMBERT, G.R.I., Broker KENNETH A. LAMBERT, Broker cl3:27c H Ha ar rd de ee e C Co ou un nt ty y: : Ceilto Lindo Nearly 2 acres on Hwy 17 9200 sq. ft. building for auction center, retail, flea market or agri culture business. North and South bound exposure. $299,000. Additional 1.78 acres available. 61 acres Abundance of deer and turkey. 65% im proved pasture with flowing creek. Joins Highlands Hammock State Park. Beautiful high and dry home site. Price REDUCED! $475,500 Lets make a deal! H Hi ig gh hl la an nd ds s C Co ou un nt ty y: : 5 acres in Venus excellent for hunting camp on county maintained road. Great for a weekend get away or permanent residence. $19,500 79 acres on Lake Josephine. 4 homes, horse barn, dog kennel. 3 acre+-, 10' high training pen, deer, turkey and other wildlife. Income producing. Asking $1,127,000. Will Divide. REDUCED TO $927,000. 151 acres on Lake Istokpoga 1800'+frontage, Arbuckle Creek 3000'+frontage, and over 1000' Hwy 98 frontage. REDUCED TO $1,450,000!!! Lets make an offer! P Po ol lk k C Co ou un nt ty y: : 211.41 acres with 6+ acre lake and creek. Currently used for cattle. One mile from Fort Meade city limits and Peace River. $675,512 only $3,200 per acre. 451 acres on paved Singletary Rd. 31+ acres in citrus, 345+ boxes per acre. 2 wells 10" and 12", 65%+improved, excellent pasture can be used for citrus or farming. Asking $2,000,000 P PR R O OP PE ER R T TI IE ES S F FO OR R S SA AL LE E Advantage Realty743 US 27 S.Sebring, FL 33872Office: 863-386-1111Fax: 863-3861112Private and Confidential Listings and SalesVISIT US AThttp://www.erahighlands.com/ OR http://www.era.com/worldwide/Mark LambertRealtorCell: 863-832-0401Email: mark33862@gmail.com cl3:27c Over $35,000,000in sales for Hardee and Highlands County area in 2013. And 21 Realtors at your service for all of your real estate needs. ERA Real Estate offices located world wide! Staton Auto SalesLarge Selection of Cars to Choose From Bill Staton Theresa Hamilton863-781-4460 863-781-9084 30 Day Guarantee on Motor & Transmission Onlycl2:13tfc Se Habla Espanol THE BEST DEALFROM ANY ANGLE No matter how you look at it, theres no better place to shop for your next car. NOW ACCEPTING ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS Sam Albritton Electrical Services, Inc.863-767-0313 Office 863-781-0377 Mobile Residential and Commercial Wiring Electrical Inspections Electrical Preventative Maintenance Ground Testing Lightning ArrestorServing Hardee County Since 199411:7tfc EC13002737 24 Hour Emergency Service cl1:12tfcI BUYHOUSES781-1062CALLBILLYHILLAT

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March 27, 2014, The Herald-Advocate 7B —The Classifieds— PS4 USED 1 1/2 months. $1,700 ofgames/software downloaded. Asking $700, 863-773-4358. 3:27cSEVERAL UTILITY POLES for sale.4639 St. Rd. 62, Bowling Green, 863-245-8659.3:27pNEW 2 HP Water Pump. Paid over$400, make offer. Call 773-9179 or to see 711 Crosby Lane. 3:27p 1995 COBRA 37’ Park model with25 x 10 gated deck, furnished, lo cated in Peace River RV Park,2555 U.S. Hwy. 17 South, lot C-28,Wauchula. $7,500, 863-558-9042. 3:13-4:10p PARK MODEL 12x35 with 8 x 25screened room, new 10 x 12 stor age shed. Little Charlie Creek RVPark, lot 270. 814-226-9697. 2:27-3:27p Mobile Homes Miscellaneous HARDEE FAMILY MEDICINE, lo cated at 522 Carlton StreetWauchula, Florida 33873 will beclosing effective March 28, 2014.In order to facilitate a smooth tran sition and ensure continuity ofcare, medical records can be re quested in person at 522 CarltonStreet Wauchula, Florida 33873 orby fax at (863) 773-2456. AfterMarch 28, 2014, medical recordscan be requested in person atFlorida Hospital Heartland Med ical Center Health Partners lo cated at 4421 Sun N Lake Blvd.Suite C Sebring, FL or by fax at(863) 382-1433. If you are a pa tient of Dr. Kathleen Welch–Wilsonand would like your records for warded to another physician,please call us at (863) 382-6183. 3:6-27c ATTENTION! State Statutes 828.29 requires that all cats and dogssold in Florida be at least 8 weeksold, have an official health certifi cate, have necessary shots and be free of parasites. tfc-dh Pets Notices ADOPT A PET! If you have lost apet or are looking for a new one,the City of Wauchula invites you tocome and see if you can find thepet you’re looking for. TheWauchula Animal Control is lo cated at 685 Airport Road. Pleasecall 863-773-3265 for more infor mation. tfc-dh 3 BR, 2 BA MH in country. 863735-9284.3:27p3 BR, 2 BA LARGE C arport, $800 month, $800 deposit, no pets, nosmoking. 419-656-2777, 419-6563246. 3:27p2 BR, 2 BA Large 2 car carportgarage, not smoking, no pets al lowed, $650 month, plus $650 de posit. 419-656-3246. 3:27p1 BR, 1 BA DUPLEX apartment 507 N. 9th Ave., Wauchula, centralair and heat, $500 month, 863-7811282 or 863-781-0514. 3:20tfc *RENT-TO-OWN* MOBILE HOMES 1, 2, 3 Bed rooms. Cheaper than paying rent.Close to schools and hospital. Lotrent $300. Se habla espanol. 863-698-4910 or 863-698-4908. Call today. 7:5tfc Rentals Pets 3 BR, 2 BA, central air, $850 plus deposit, 863-832-1984. 3:27pATTENTION! The Federal Fair Housing Act prohibits advertisingany preference or limitation basedon race, color, religion, sex, hand icap, familial status or national ori gin, or the intention to make sucha preference or limitation. Familialstatus includes children under 18living with parents or guardians and pregnant women. tfc-dh HARDEE ROOFING, owner RichieEvans, License #CCC1326969, 773-0377.3:6-5:8pEAGLE LAWN CARE, no con tracts, mowing, weeding, treetrimming, 863-399-8967. 2:27-3:27p ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS,Thursday 7:00 p.m., Grace Fellow ship Church, 131 S. 8th Ave.,Wauchula. Bill 727-326-3816. tfc-dh *** NEED A WELL OR HAVE PUMP TROUBLE? CALL ULLRICH’S PITCHER PUMP For complete well, sales, service and installation, call 863-773-6448. 7:18tfc THE WAUCHULA LIONS CLUBcollects NOT broken prescriptioneyeglasses, cases and sun glasses. Please drop of at 735 N. 6th Ave.tfc-dhDO YOU HAVE a problem withdrugs? Narcotics Anonymousmeets Monday and Thursdaynight 7:00 p.m. at First UnitedMethodist Church, at the corner ofPalmetto and 7th Ave., Wauchula. tfc-dh IS ALCOHOL CAUSING a prob lem? Call Alcoholics Anonymousin Hardee county at 863-781-6414. Several weekly meetings. tfc-dhATTENTION! State Statutes 489119 Section 5 Paragraph B andHardee County Ordinance 87-09Section 10 Paragraph D require allads for any construction-relatedservice to carry the contractor’s li cence number.tfc-dh Services Rentals 1979 OR OLDER Ford truck F100-F150, 2-wheel drive, but will con sider all, 863-781-3227. 3:6-4:3pBUYING COINS. I would like tobuy your coins. Call 863-781-2452. 3:13-4:10p FRIDAY, SATURDAY, 7:30-?, 1409Lost Acres Dr., Wauchula Hills. 3:27p ONE DAY ONLY, Saturday, March29, 2014, 9 am 3 pm, 473 DansbyRd., Wauchula, FL. Furniture,housewares, linens, small appli ances, kitchen utensils, floralarrangements, knick knacks, books, ladies clothes. 3:27pSTREET SALE (Multi-family) Fri day/Saturday Oak Hill Park, Hwy.64 West. Clothing, dishes, tools,guns, sewing machine in cabinet,beds, some antiques, lots of household items! 3:27pSATURDAY, 8 am ?, 902 S. 10th Ave., Wauchula.3:27p Yard Sales Wanted MULTI-FAMILY, Friday, Saturday,124 Bill Woods Rd., Ona. Misc. 3:27p MOVING SALE. Friday, Saturday,3924 Sunset Dr., Zolfo off Hwy. 66,9 am ?, two households. Furni ture, clothes, tools, appliances, decor, much more. 3:27pSATURDAY, 8 am ?, 712 W. Pal metto St, Wauchula. Lots of furni ture. 3:27p ESTATE SALE, Friday, Saturday,2928 Oak Hill Park, Wauchula. 52” TV, 2 beds, tools, misc. 3:27pSATURDAY, 8-1, 706 East Pal metto St., Wauchula. 3:27pCHARLIE CREEK CO-OP Commu nity yard sale April 5th 7 am 1pm. 1235 Blue Jay Rd., Hwy. 64. 3:20-4:3p CHARLIE CREEK CURIOSITYShoppe plant sale March 27-29, 10am 4 pm. 1235 Blue Jay, Hwy. 64. 3:20,27p Yard Sales 735-01883505 US HWY17 S ZOLFOSPRINGSMon. –Wed. 10am –6pm Fri. & Sat. 10am –7pmCLOSEDTHURSDAY& SUNDAYDANHILL Hill’s Auto WorldB BU U Y YH HE E R R E E! P PA A Y YH HE E R R E E! NOINTERESTORFINANCECHARGES cl2:6tfc Family Owned & Operated“Serving Central Florida For Over 20 Years”Owner Robert Spurlock FREE ESTIMATES $50 Off Any Job $500 or More Licensed & Insured C CC 1325523 NOT VALID WITH ANY OTHER OFFER cl3:13tfc 863-453-5565 NOW HIRING VPK TEACHERS At Applications being accepted atr!"# 863-773-3754 cl3:27,4:3c REDUCED! 3BR/3.5B two-story home on 2 ac in Wauchula.$177,0002.6 ac on paved road, beautiful oak trees. $28,0002BR/1B home in Wauchula, possible 3rd bedroom, fenced. $64,900REDUCED! 25 ac on paved road in Gardner, 3 wells, septic, elec tric. $125,000TIP OF THE DAY: A recent survey revealed thatbuying is better than renting after 5 years,saving an average of $1,700 each year. JOHN FREEMAN (863) 781-4084 Associate SANDY LARRISON, Broker (.:; *26%;9..;@(*<,1<4*rrr nr7//2,.@rn7//2,. (863) 832-0130 cell >>>*:1+97739.*4;?,75@:*6-?*:1+97739.*4;?,75cl3:27c NEWLY LISTED!! BRIARWOOD NEIGHBOR HOOD!! This lovely 3 bedroom, 2 bath CB/Stucco home is offered in Briarwood Es tates. Large living room, 2 car gaage,screened porch and over 2000 SF of livingarea. Briarwood is the most desirable neigh borhood in Wauchula.LOG CABIN LOCATED IN FORT MEADE!!This 3 bedroom 2 bath home has a greatrustic charm of a country home in the city.Wood laminate floors, wood burning fire place, metal roof and an open porch in back.Priced at $49,900 PRICED REDUCED!!! PERFECT HOME FORYOU!! This 2 bedroom, 1 bath frame home is located in urban Wauchula. Not far fromMain Street. This home includes a 2 car car port, front and back porch, and an upstairsloft for a possible 3rd bedroom. Great op portunity for a starter home or investmentfor rental. Priced at $42,000 to $38,000 NEWLY LISTED!! This 3 bedroom, 2 bathhome is located in Wauchula, FL withinwalking distance of Main Street. Includesback screened poarch, 2 car carport andfenced back yard. Priced at $69,900. GREAT FOR STARTER FAMILY OR WINTERRESIDENT!!!! This 3 bedroom 1 bath home is perfect for a new family. Plumbing andelectric has been totally updated, kitchenhas a new stainless steel stove, roof was re placed in 2004 and hot water heater is new.Has a very nice brick fireplace. Priced atonly $65,000 NATURAL LAND!!! Nice wooded 2.25 acresin Fort Green, FL. Out in the country a get away from the city life. Owner financingavailable. Priced at $25,000 HOME LOCATED IN FORT MEADE!!This 3bedroom, 2 bath CB home in historic Ft.Meade has large family room, dining room,living room with wood laminate flooring. Ashort drive to US Hwy 17 for access to Bar tow and Lakeland. A large back yard for fam ily entertaining. Priced at $42,750 VERY NICE MOBILE HOME!! This 2005 2bedroom 1.5 bath mobile home is move inready with furniture. Perfect for a new cou ple or someone looking to escape the coldweather up north. Priced at $70,000 A FAMILY HOME!This 3 bedroom, 2 bathbrick home is on a quiet no traffic road out side of city limits. Large oaks in yard, out buildings, and alarm system. Priced at$159,900 GO TO: HomePath.com For More Fannie Mae Properties NEWLY LISTED!!!! 3 bedroom, 2 bath largehome, has a storage shed, double carportand large bonus room. The property does in clude the vacant lot next to the home. Pricedat $173,000 NEWLY LISTED LAKELAND DEAL!!! Spa cious 3 bedroom 2 bath home with one cargarage. Freshly painted interior, new stoveinstalled. Sliding glass doors go out to brandnew deck in an enclosed back yard with pri vacy fence. Home located in South Lakeland,close to shopping malls and local dining.Priced at $89,900 GREAT BUY!!!This 3 bedroom, 2 bath homehas a lot of space with plenty to spare,kitchen is huge with a moveable island. Thishome is in the very back of Sunset Park apeaceful neighborhood. Priced at $95,000 INVESTMENT PROPERTY! 9.55 acres used to be a nursery. Has very large metal build ing and a mobile home that could be usedfor storage. With some TLC property can beup and running again. Priced at $67,999 PROPERTY!! Two lots, 55’ X 119’ and 25’ X 118’ totaling 80’ road frontage on US Hwy 17in Bowling Green, FL. Lot 10 is zoned R-2and lot 9 is zone C-2. Both lots are sold to gether. Priced at $18,000 GREAT STARTER HOME!! This 3 bedroom, 2 bath modular home is located in BowlingGreen, FL. Has large yard, metal roof andfront porch. Carport with storage room.Priced at $34,900. PRISTINE MOBILE HOME!!This 3 BR, 1 1/2Bath, kitchen/dining, LR, 12/30 AdditionW/3rd BR. Wonderful play area or greatroom, 2 car carport, screened porch andlarge work/storage/playroom. Totally re done. Certainly a must see! Priced at$49,000. GREAT NEIGHBORHOOD CLOSE TOPEACE RIVER!! This 4 bedroom, 2 bath con crete block home located just outside oftown. Upgrade in kitchen with new countertops and stainless steel appliances. Priced at $135,000 A REAL BARGAIN!! 3 BR-2B mobile home with lots of amenities. In ground screenedswimming pool-great place for relaxing afterhard days of work. Furnished, includingwasher & dryer, all kitchen equipment, in cluding tables and chairs, entertainmentpiece center w/TV, love seat, hot tub andmore. Great storage for your extras and allfor $38,000. 702 SOUTH6th AVENUE, WAUCHULAn1rn Gary Delatorre – Brokerwww.cbhardee.com————— Each office independently owned and operated. Robert Hinerman 227-0202 Nancy Craft 832-0370 Richard Dasher 781-0162 Victor Salazar 245-1054 cl3:27c

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8B The Herald-Advocate, March 27, 2014 REVELLAUTOSALESrnn;<=4;103.6,,3=r After Hours Call: 863-245-0383 orSandra Miller 863-781-4577Se Habla EspaolWE ACCEPT CREDIT CARDS A A l l l l V V e e h h i i c c l l e e s s$ $ 6 6 5 5 A A W W e e e e k k !(<&(66(38<3#6(372077434846 cl2:20tfc Apartment For Rent H H a a n n n n a a h h ’ ’ s s H H o o u u s s e e C C o o m m p p l l e e x x For Women and Children Only One-Bedroom –Will accommodate 3 or 4 women and children. This is a special program, with security fence. Rent is percentage of income and includes electric. Phone 863-773-5717 ext. 2 cl3:27c Your Business Could Appear Here!Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels The Herald Advocate 773-3255 or www.TheHeraldAdvocate.com —The Classifieds— BOWLING GREEN QUICK LUBE& AUTO REPAIR Foreign and Domestic Cars Diesel Engines Gas or Diesel Manual or Automatic Transmissions %DFG=D:8<6?44< 375-4461TERRYMIKE YOURTIREHEADQUARTERS Licensed and Insured Reg.# MV-40625 M ONDAY S ATURDAY 8 am6 pm cl6:21tfc New Tire Changer & Balancer Can Do 26” Wheels 954 sq ft Commercial Office Space For Rent Great Location Just Across From WS Bank Address: 111 East Main Street ; Wauchula, Fl. $800.00 Monthly plus applicable sales tax Contact: Elene Salas @ 836-735-0999 8:8tfc Got a Pool Green or Clean? Need Your Pool Repaired? cl11:7tfcC Carol’s Pool Service for weekly pool service 863-449-1806 Equal Housing Opportunity Employer & Provider THE PALMS 701 La Playa Drive, Wauchula (863) 773-3809 TDD 800-955-8771 $99 Move In Special through Mar. 31st Plus $1200 FREE RENT (*One year lease @$100/mo reduction)0 Spacious 2, 3 & 4 BR Garden Apts. Rental Office Hours Monday –Friday 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM cl3:6-27c H HA A R R D D E E E EC CA A R RC CO O M M P P A A N N Y YYOUR#1 CARDEALER (Across From First National Bank) 773-6667 Billy Hill OwnerMonday –Saturday 9AM–7PMSunday 1PM–6PM $ $TAX TIME SALE$ $Come See Us For Great Deals During Our cl3:27c W W e e o o w w a a e e u u y y e e r r e e P P a a y y e e r r e e n n L L a a t t e e M M o o d d e e e e h h e e 2008 Chevy HHR2006 Chrysler PT Cruiser 2006 Chevy Aveo (80,000 Actual Miles)2006 Kia Spectra 2006 Chevy Cobalt(4 Door)2005 Saturn Relay Van2005 Cadillac DeVille 2003 Chevy Monte Carlo (Red) 30 Day WarrantyMotor & TransmissionNOINTERESTORFINANCECHARGES3 3 7 7 5 5 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 1US HWY17 S GBOWLINGGREENnrrrn Sandra Jimmy Hill’s Auto WorldB BU U Y YH HE E R R E E! P PA A Y YH HE E R R E E! $ #'rorr rrnncl3:13tfc Heartland Real Estate Corp.3200 US Hwy 27 S, Suite 201 Sebring, Florida 33870(863) 382-3887 ()%3-*$(,'rr5 MColding@HeartlandRE.net &%$'!"!!%"='#' #4%0,;:(01()1, 645,680,7%070896&,)708,www.HeartlandRE.net cl3:27c MULTI-FAMILY HOME ON 10 ACRES Built in 2001, located in Hardee County and close to town. $298,000 Call the Lovett’s for more information Will (863) 781-0610 Rachel (863) 381-0051 School Crossing Guard Wanted Part Time — $10.00 Hour The Hardee County Sheriff’s office is taking applicationsfor part time school crossing guards. No experience ne-cessary. Must be 18 or older, possess a valid Florida driv ers license, be willing to be fingerprinted, pass a drug testand work shifts. You must have never been convicted ofa felony or a misdemeanor and pass a background inves tigation. Applications may be obtained and returned at the sheriffs office, 900 E. Summit St. Wauchula, FL by 4:00 p.m., March 31, 2014. Help Wanted cl3:20,27c HELP WANTED TELECOMMUNICATIONS SPECIALISTS Full Time $24,356 00 The Hardee County Sheriff’s Office is taking ap plications for full time Telecommunication Spe cialists. You must be at least 19 years of age,have a high school diploma or equivalent, neverbeen convicted of a felony or a misdemeanor, bewilling to be fingerprinted, pass a drug test, passa typing test and work shifts. Applications maybe obtained and returned by 4 p.m., March 31,2014, at the Sheriff’s Office, 900 E. Summit St.,Wauchula, FL. If other arrangements are neces sary, call 863-773-0304 ext. 211. EOE cl3:20,27c WE HAVE OVER 1,000 NEW & USED TIRES IN STOCK ANY SIZE, MAKE & MODEL1 1 8 8 ” ” & & 1 1 9 9 ” ”T T I I R R E E S S A A S S L L O O W W A A S S$ $ 2 2 6 69 9 5 5F F a a s s t t Q Q u u a a l l i i t t y y S S e e r r v v i i c c e e Y Y o o u u C C a a n n D D e e p p e e n n d d O O n n7 7 7 7 3 3 7 7 7 7 7 7O7 7 7 7 3 3 7 7 2 2 7 7 nrr – !!+ &(9*/91((*6477-642&(1(68 BILLYBOB’STIRES cl3:27c MECHANICWORKNOWAVAILABLE NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE 2002 CADILLAC VIN: IG6KD54Y92U262432 8:00 a.m., April 9, 2014 Mr. E Pre-Owned Autos & Towing 1093 Hwy. 17 N. Wauchula, FL 33873 cl3:27c ROSE ABBOTT, REALTOR Call Direct: 863-781-0846 Member of the Bryan Team RE/MAX REALTY PLUS RESIDENTIAL Grr&098::'0?9Hr)0A7=;4Grr0@A$08<*A?44AHr)0A7=;4=< Acres Detached 3 Car Garage $175,000 VACANT LAND Gr:B4!0F)=03$=18:4=;4#=AGr*>0??=D)=03r$=18:4=;4#=A@G0?<4@An0??8@n"44A=H)4@834
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March 27, 2014, The Herald-Advocate 9B For years I never knew why we wore a Maltese Cross as our badge, or why the Fire Service had Dalmatians. These were just The way things were and you figured it was just cool. It wasnt until years later that I became informed as to the why. The Maltese Cross originated with the Knights of Saint John when they fought with the Knights of the Crusades to win back the Holy Land from the Muslim Saracenes. The Knights were faced with a new weapon from the Muslims. It was Naptha, like napalm. The Muslims would throw down the naptha followed by flaming torches setting the Knights ablaze. This is when the Knights of St. John stepped into action. Using their crimson colored capes they threw them over their brother Knights and removed them from the fire. The Knights were later awarded a medal, the original Maltese Cross. This was originally a star that had eight points that pointed to the eight beatitudes in Matthew 5:3-10, and became the symbol The FiresideBy James StillwagonHardee County Fire-Rescue Chief for the Knights of Saint John flag. The Knights of St. John actually originated as the Knights Hos pitaller founded by a Benedictine Monk. They served as care providers in Jerusalem in the 12th Century. Now, on to the Dalmatians. Not a great transition, but its good information. The Dalmatian was originally a coach dog, running with coach drivers, protecting the horses from other dogs that would try to attack the horses. Because the Dalmatian was able to develop close relationships with horses, they were a natural fit with the horses that pulled the fire engines, providing companionship and protection of the horse and the fire engine and equipment at a fire scene. The Dalmatian became a permanent fixture in the fire service and is still a part of the family in many fire houses today. These are only two brief examples of the whys in the fire serv ice, and there are many, many more that you can find. These, with the traditions of the fire service, are interesting, informative, and his torical. Speaking of historical, the firefighters of the United States come from a very long line of those that desire to serve their community. This can be recognized in the history of our own Nation as some of our founding fathers were Volunteer Firemen with Benjamin Franklin, John Hancock, Samuel Adams, Paul Revere, Alexander Hamilton, John Jay and Aaron Burr to name a few. Also, the idea of fire prevention dates back to the 1600s when it was realized that firefighting and fire prevention were important, and thus began the development of the first fire codes. Just some information I hope you will enjoy. In closing I would like to say that if you have any questions please do not hesitate to come by the office or call me at the number listed. Thank you for your time. Sincerely, Jim Stillwagon Fire Chief H.C.F.R (863) 773-4362. Florida Crop Update Week Ending: March 13, 2014 Planting Resumes as Rain Slackens Weather Summary: According to Floridas Automated Weather Network (FAWN), over half of the State received between one and four inches of rain. Bronson (Levy County) received the most rain with 4.06 inches. Maximum temperatures were in the upper 70s to 90 degrees, with the highest temperature in Fort Laud erdale (Broward County) with 90 degrees. The lowest temperatures in the State ranged from 32 degrees in Quincy (Gadsden County) to 63 degrees in Fort Lauderdale (Broward County). Field Crops: Field corn planting has started in Jackson County. Some farmers in the Panhandle are two weeks behind on preparing for planting due to rain. Levy County farmers hope to start planting peanuts. Sugar cane harvest was nearing its finish. Fruit and Vegetables: Flagler and Putnam farmers have fin ished planting potatoes and continued to harvest cabbage. Dixie and Suwannee county farmers have started planting watermelons, and Levy County has finished planting watermelons. Miami-Dade County farmers were harvesting green beans, squash, sweet corn, and tomatoes. Vegetables coming to market in the southwest were beets, collards, cucumbers, eggplant, green beans, peppers, radishes, tomatoes and specialty items. Citrus: Rain was widespread in the citrus area this past week. Sixteen stations recorded more than an inch of rainfall. Nine recorded more than two inches. All stations received at least a trace of precipitation. The most recorded was in Citra (Marion County) at 3.63 inches. Daytime temperatures were unseasonably warm, reaching the mid 80s in all citrus producing counties. As per the U.S. Drought Monitor, last updated March 18, 2014, no drought exists within the citrus growing area. Grove activity included irrigating on several days during the week, hedging, topping and spraying. Growers were continuing to plant new trees in existing groves. Full bloom was evident in all areas on both oranges and grapefruit. Some trees were bearing very small fruit already for next seasons crop. Several processing plants have closed temporarily and are wait ing for Valencia oranges to start coming in. A few plants were run ning grapefruit only. All but four packing houses were open and were shipping fruit in limited quantities; some have transitioned to gift fruit packing only. Livestock and Pastures: Warmer temperatures have im-proved pasture quality, however, some pasture remains wet in the Panhandle from recent heavy rain. Pasture in the southwest was aided by timely rains and warm temperatures. The cattle condition for the State pri marily ranged from fair to good but the pasture condition was mostly fair. HIGH-TECH GADGETS TRACK OUR HEALTH Kaiser Health News took a look recently at some of the pos sibilities of remote monitoring by high-tech health gadgets. These devices can fit into your cellphone and allow your doctor keep track of your health, even if you're not in his office. For example, if your heart rate accelerates while you're doing your daily errands, the doctor will know it when he reads the information. Some devices can tell whether we're taking pills on time. Others fit under the mat tress on our bed to check breath ing and heart rate. Still others can check our glucose levels or blood pressure. That's not to say most doctors are jumping on these devices as being the latest and greatest. While they like the information that can be gathered, some doctors are concerned about patient privacy. The information doesn't go straight into patient records, but the day eventually will come when it will. At this point, patients must give permission for their infor mation to be taken and must go into the doctor's office to have the data transferred. Soon pa tients will be able to send it themselves over the Internet. In a preview of coming events, one device developer already is hooked up with adver tisers and labs. Insurance companies are encouraging pa tients to upload their informa tion from other devices. Many of the devices aren't yet ap proved by the Food and Drug Administration. Are you nervous about this yet? What if you knew your information would go over the Internet, or if you knew it wasn't always covered by health pri vacy laws? If you're asked to wear one of these new gadgets, ask questions about where the information goes ... lots and lots of questions. Matilda Charles regrets that she cannot personally answer reader questions, but will incor porate them into her column whenever possible. Send email to columnreply2@gmail.com.(c) 2014 King Features Synd., Inc. SENIORNEWSLINEby Matilda Charles Albritton Insurance Services, LLC Robertson Farms Nickerson Brothers, LLC Wandas Hair and Nails Joe L. Davis Inc. Fish Branch Tree Farm Shops on the Corner Orange Street Market Ellis and Abramowitz Orthodontics JLC Farms Inc. Dr. Gregorio Medalle, M.D.P.A. Jans Tanning Putnam Ag Services Safeguard Security, Inc. Bar Crescent S Ranch Conley Grove Service Inc. Mid-State Machine & Fabricating Corp. Farr Groves, LLC Val Patarini Bob Claman Jim Davis Kenny Miller Torrey Oaks Golf Course/ Bill Lambert Hardee Ranch Supply Winn Dixie WalMart Dunkin Donuts Darrin & Misty Hughes Big T Tire Henderson Tire Center Guilles Place Hair Cuts and Style Linda Valdez Heartland Gold Klassix Lisas Hair Salon Java Caf Golf Hammock Surburban Propane Cats on Main Idea Golf Shops on the Corner Senior ParentsPeace River Electric Cooperative, Inc. Florida Fuel Veg-King Anonymous Donor THANKYOU The 2014 Project Graduation Golf Tournament Committee would like to say Thank You to our sponsors and players for making this years event a success. Your generosity and participation raised over $17,000 for the Class of 2014s post-graduation event. A special thanks to the staff at Torrey Oaks Golf Course for hosting the tournament and to all the others who gave of their time to make the event run smoothly. TOURNAMENT SPONSOR SILVER SPONSORS SPECIAL THANK YOU TO HOLE SPONSORS Caroline Mackay Lambert Realty Himrod Citrus Nursery Paul Samuels Utilitech Inc. Jones Cattle and Citrus, LLC Bayport Valve and Fitting Inc. State Farm Insurance Certified Slings, Inc. Ashbrook RealtyEnvironment Consulting & Technology Inc. Dr. Barbara Carlton D & S Cattle Co. 1st Place Jay Belflower Hunter Prescott Scott Dickson Greg Moye2nd Place Gerry Lindsey D.R. Harris D. Ray Harris West Palmer3rd Place George Heine Ryn Heine Will Bennett Bradley Brewer 3:27c Overall Winners Lamar Gilliard Home: (863) 735-0490 Zolfo Springs Mobile: (941) 456-6507cl4:19tfc GILLIARDFILLDIRTINC. 3:27c 3:27-4:3cPaynes Creek Historic State Park Bowling Green, Florida Division of Recreation and Parks Department of Environmental ProtectionNOTICE The Florida Park Service is receiving proposals until 5:00 p.m. EST, Monday, April 21 2014, for the award of a Short Term Concession Agreement for the operation of a canoe/kayak rental and pick-up service within Paynes Creek Historic State Park, located at 888 Lake Branch Road, Bowling Green, FL 33834. Applicants may obtain additional information or a proposal packet by contacting the park at 863-375-4717. To discover more information about the park go to the link below. http://www.floridastateparks.org/paynescreek/default.cfm

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Sponsored By 10B The Herald-Advocate, March 27, 2014

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March 27, 2014, The Herald-Advocate 11B Local farmers and ranchers from across Florida will cometogether to celebrate the 41st an nual National Ag Week. This se ries of events is hosted by FarmCredit of Florida and serves as atime to say “thank you” for thehard work it takes to providefood, fiber and fuel for all Amer icans. Agriculture is America’s #1 export and, in Florida alone, rep resents $130 billion dollars inrevenue along with nearly 2 mil lion jobs. Today’s farmers areworking harder than ever, and itshows. Today, each American farmer feeds more than 144 people,which is one reason why it's im portant — particularly duringthis special week — to show ourgratitude to the many men andwomen who make agriculturepossible. Florida’s farmers produce 280 different commodities and arethe nation’s top producer of cit rus, sugar cane, winter vegeta bles, ornamental plants and sod. Agriculture consistently rankssecond in the state only totourism in supporting Florida’seconomy. National Ag Week marks a na tionwide effort to tell the truestory of American agricultureand remind citizens that agricul ture is a part of all of us. A num ber of producers, agriculturalassociations, corporations, stu dents and government organiza tions involved in agriculture areexpected to participate. Supported by the Agriculture Council of America, The Na tional Ag Week program encour ages every American to: L Understand how food and fiber products are produced. L Appreciate the role agricul ture plays in providing safe,abundant and affordable prod ucts. L Value the essential role of agriculture in maintaining astrong economy. L Acknowledge and consider career opportunities in the agri culture, food and fiber industry. Agriculture: 365 Sunrises And 7Billion Mouths To Feed Top 10 Pop Singles This Week Last Week 1. Pharrell Williams No. 1 "Happy" 2. Katy Perry No. 2 "Dark Horse" 3. John Legend No. 4 "All of Me" 4. Jason Derulo feat. 2 Chainz No. 3 "Talk Dirty" 5. Bastille No. 5 "Pompeii"6. Lorde No. 6 "Team"7. Beyonce feat. Jay Z No. 7 "Drunk in Love" 8. One Republic No. 8 "Counting Stars" 9. Idina Menzel No. 17 "Let It Go" 10. Pitbull feat. Ke$ha No. 10 "Timber" Top 10 Albums 1. Rick Ross new entry "Mastermind" 2. Pharrell Williams new entry "Girl" 3. Soundtrack No. 2 "Frozen"4. Lea Michele new entry "Louder" 5. Eli Young Band new entry"10,000Towns" 6. Beck No. 3 "MorningPhase" 7. Lorde No. 11 "Pure Hero ine" 8. ScHoolboy Q No. 1 "Oxy moron" 9. Eric Church No. 7 "The Outsiders" 10. Ashanti new entry "Braveheart" Top 10 Hot Country Singles 1. Brantley Gilbert No. 1 "Bottoms Up" 2. Florida Georgia Line feat. Luke Bryan No. 13 "This IsHow We Roll" 3. Blake Shelton No. 6 "Doin' What She Likes" 4. Jason Aldean No. 2 "When She Says Baby" 5. Dierks Bentley No. 3 "I Hold On" 6. Keith Urban No. 8 "Cop Car" 7. Lady Antebellum No. 7 "Compass" 8. Eric Church No. 9 "Give Me Back My Hometown" 9. Jerrod Niemann No. 11 "Drink to That All Night" 10. Scotty McCreery No. 10 "See You Tonight"Source: Billboard (c) 2014 King Features Synd., Inc. TOPOf TheCharts as of Mar. 24, 2014 F F a a s s t t F F r r e e e e z z e e r r F F o o o o d d I consider my freezer my cold pantry. I keep it stocked with in-dividual, quick frozen (IQF) fish,shrimp, beef and pork that I washand season immediately aftercoming home from the grocerystore. (This marinates the meatand saves time). I also stockfrozen vegetables — both pre-packaged and blanched veggiesfrom spring and summer months— "planned ahead" casserolemeals for busy days, leftovers inold-school "TV dinner" plasticcontainers (perfect for the mi crowave), extra loaves of breadand sale items that are too muchfor the two of us to eat, but toogood to pass up. I also prepare and freeze appe tizers for unexpected company,strawberries macerated in sugar,balsamic vinegar, vanilla andcinnamon to spoon over warmpound cake, and cookie and cakecrumbs to sprinkle on ice creamfor quick desserts. Frozen food is a delicious way to capture the best flavors ofeach season. Although manypeople developed innovativefood-freezing techniques, it wasClarence Birdseye who in 1924invented the quick freezingmethod known as IQF that pro duces the frozen foods that weknow today. While working as a fur trader in Labrador, Canada, Birdseyediscovered that the fish that heand the local Inuit caught frozealmost immediately after beingpulled from the water. He wasdelighted to discover that the fishwas just as delicious whenthawed out months later. From this experience, he theo rized that food must be frozenvery quickly in order to retain itstaste and texture. Birdseye wasright. Before quick-freezingcame along, foods were frozen ata fairly slow rate. This causedlarge ice crystals to form, whichruptured the cell membranes ofthe food. When the food was de frosted, the ice crystals meltedand water would leak out, takingwith it the food's flavor and tex ture. KitchenDivaBy Angela Medearis Birdseye developed two meth ods for quick freezing foods,both of which employed the in novation of packaging the foodbeforehand. In the more populartechnique, the packaged foodwas held under pressure betweentwo hollow metal plates thatwere chilled to -25 F by theevaporation of ammonia. Usingthis method, a 2-inch-thick pack age of meat could be frozen to 0F in about 90 minutes, whilefruits and vegetables took about30 minutes. Birdseye's quick-freezing process ended up creating 168patents! These covered not onlythe freezing technique, but alsothe packaging, type of paperused and related innovations.Frozen foods are a delicious wayto prepare a variety of dishesusing fruits and vegetables thathave been frozen at their peak offreshness. This recipe for VeggieBreakfast Cupcakes is the perfect"on the go" breakfast. It's also adelicious way to incorporate veg etables into a breakfast dish. VEGGIE BREAKFAST CUPCAKES 1 can (16.3 ounces) refriger ated biscuits (8 biscuits)1 bag (12 ounces) SteamfreshBroccoli Florets, cooked ac cording to package directions1 bag (12 ounces) SteamfreshMixed Vegetables, cooked ac cording to package directions3 ounces cream cheese, soft ened1/2 cup plain yogurt or sourcream 1 1/2 cups shredded Swisscheese2 eggs1/2 tablespoon garlic powder1 teaspoon salt1 teaspoon black pepper1/2 teaspoon honey1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper 1. Preheat oven to 375 F.2. Evenly press biscuits into bottom and up sides of a 12-cupmuffin pan; set aside. 3. In large bowl, combine the cooked vegetables with creamcheese, yogurt, 1 cup shreddedcheese, eggs, garlic powder, salt,pepper, honey and cayenne pep per. 4. Evenly spoon vegetable mixture into prepared muffincups. Bake 15 minutes. Evenlysprinkle with remaining cheeseand continue baking, 5 minutesor until golden brown. Serves 4. Tips: Try substituting Birds Eye Steamfresh Baby Broccoli,Italian or Broccoli Cauliflowerblends in place of Mixed Vegeta bles.Angela Shelf Medearis is anaward-winning children's author,culinary historian and the authorof seven cookbooks. Her newcookbook is "The Kitchen Diva'sDiabetic Cookbook." Her web site is www.divapro.com. To seehow-to videos, recipes and much,much more, Like Angela ShelfMedearis, The Kitchen Diva! onFacebook and go to Hulu.com.Recipes may not be reprintedwithout permission from AngelaShelf Medearis. (c) 2014 King Features Synd., Inc., and Angela Shelf Medearis HARDEE COUNTY KIDS NEED HARDEE COUNTY HELP! Ease a dependent child’sway through the court sys tem. Volunteer to be aGuardian Ad Litem. 773-2505 (If office unattended, please leavemessage.) COMMUNITY Calendar THURSDAY, MAR. 27 Hardee County School Board, regular meeting,Board Room, 230 S. FloridaAve., Wauchula, 5 p.m. THURSDAY, APR. 3 Hardee County Commission, regular monthlymorning meeting, temporarymeeting location, SchoolBoard meeting room, 230 S.Florida Ave., Wauchula, 8:30a.m. _______________________________ IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 25-2012-CA-000296 DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONALTRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEEOF INDYMAC LOAN TRUSTMORTGAGE BACKED CERTIFI-CATES SERIES 2004-L1 UNDERTHE POOLING AND SERVICINGAGREEMENT DATED JUNE 1,2004 Plaintiff, v.ARIE FURMAN ANY AND ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMINGBY, THROUGH, UNDER, ANDAGAINST THE HEREIN NAMEDINDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S)WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BEDEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHERSAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAYCLAIM AN INTEREST ASSPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES,GRANTEES, OR OTHERCLAIMANTS; UNKNOWNSPOUSE OF ARIE FURMANDefendant(s).______________________________/ NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur suant to an Order of Final Judg ment of Foreclosure dated March5, 2014, entered in Civil Case No.25-2012-CA-000296 of the CircuitCourt of the Tenth Judicial Circuitin and for Hardee County, Florida,wherein the Clerk of the CircuitCourt will sell to the highest bid der for cash on the 16th day ofApril, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. on the2nd Floor Hallway, outside Room202 of the Hardee County Court house, 417 West Main Street,Wauchula, Florida 33873, relativeto the following described prop erty as set forth in the Final Judg-ment, to wit: LOT 3, PHASE 2, PINE-CREST FARMS AS RE-CORDED IN PLAT BOOK61, PAGE 4, HARDEECOUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest inthe surplus from the sale, if any,other than the property owner asof the date of the Lis Pendensmust file a claim within 60 daysafter the sale.MORRIS, HARDWICK, SCHNEI DER, LLCBy: Susan Sparks, Esq., FBN: 33626 9409 Philadelphia RoadBaltimore, Maryland 21237Mailing Address:Morris, Hardwick, Schneider, LLC5110 Eisenhower Blvd., Suite 302ATampa, Florida 33634Customer Service (866)-503-4930MHSinbox@closingsource.netAMERICANS WITH DISABILITIESACT. If you are a person with adisability who needs any accom modation in order to participate inthis proceeding, you are entitled,at no cost to you, to the provisionof certain assistance. Please con tact the Office of the Court Admin istrator, 255 N. Broadway Avenue,Bartow, Florida 33830, (863) 534-4686, at least 7 days before yourscheduled court appearance, orimmediately upon receiving thisnotification if the time before thescheduled appearance is lessthan 7 days; if you are hearing orvoice impaired, call 711. 3:27,4:3c _______________________________ The Southwest Florida WaterManagement District (SWFWMD)announces the following publicmeeting to which all interestedpersons are invited:Public meeting for residents todiscuss the Lake Lena portionof the Lake Hancock project.The purpose of the meeting isto inform residents about theproject and activity that mayoccur on the neighborhoodroads. The meeting is an openhouse format. One or moreGoverning Board membersmay attend.DATE/TIME: Wednesday, April 9,2014; 6:30 – 8 p.m.PLACE: Polk Nature DiscoveryCenter, 4399 Winter Lake Road,Lakeland, FL 33803Pursuant to the provision of theAmericans with Disabilities Act,any person requiring reasonableaccommodations to participate inthis workshop/meeting is askedto advise the agency at least 5days before the workshop/meet ing by contacting SWFWMD'sHuman Resources Bureau Chief,2379 Broad Street, Brooksville,Florida 34604-6899; telephone(352) 796-7211, ext. 4703 or 1-800-423-1476 (FL only), ext.4703; TDD (FL only) 1-800-231-6103; or email to ADACoordina-tor@swfwmd.state.fl.usFor more information, you maycontact: michael.peck@water matters.org; 1(800)423-1476 (FLonly) or (352)796-7211, x4404(Ad Order EXE0315) 3:27c The Southwest Florida WaterManagement District (SWFWMD)announces the following publicmeeting to which all interestedpersons are invited:Roundtable discussion be-tween the SWFWMD Boardmembers and the SRWMDBoard members to discussWater Use Caution Areas(WUCAs) and Minimum Flowsand Levels (MFLs). All or partof this meeting may be con ducted by means of communi cations media technology inorder to permit maximum par ticipation of Governing Boardmembers.DATE/TIME: Tuesday, April 8,2014 at 3:00 p.m.PLACE: SWFWMD Tampa Ser-vice Office, 7601 US Highway 301North, Tampa FL 33637Pursuant to the provision of theAmericans with Disabilities Act,any person requiring reasonableaccommodations to participate inthis workshop/meeting is askedto advise the agency at least 5days before the workshop/meet ing by contacting SWFWMD'sHuman Resources Bureau Chief,2379 Broad Street, Brooksville,Florida 34604-6899; telephone(352) 796-7211, ext. 4703 or 1-800-423-1476 (FL only), ext.4703; TDD (FL only) 1-800-231-6103; or email to ADACoordina-tor@swfwmd.state.fl.usFor more information, you maycontact: Cara.Martin@watermat ters.org; 1(800)423-1476 (FLonly) or (352)796-7211, x4636(AdOrder EXE0316) 3:27c Now Accepting New PatientsOur office will also be accepting a wide variety of insurance including:Assurant, Ameritas, Guardian, Florida Combined Life, Aetna, & Cigna Dental.We are located atnn165+5+7(;#$6&+6.$Formerly Dr. Giroux’s OfficeMonday – 3,'$:;$/ –5pmwww.wauchuladental.comDisclaimer: The patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refus e to pay, cancel payment, or be reimbursed for any other service, examination, or treatment that is performed as a result of and wit hin 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee, or reduced fee service, examinat ion or treatment. 3:27c Kevin J. Krause, DMD Free Consultations Sedation Available YOUR BUSINESS COULD APPEAR HERE TOO!!Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels 773-3255 www.TheHeraldAdvocate.com The Herald-Advocate Hardee County’s Hometown Coverage #$!&$%C#'%$% Telephone (863) 773-3255 www.TheHeraldAdvocate.com

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12B The Herald-Advocate, March 27, 2014 GATORHEATING& AIRCONDITIONINGREFRIGERATION& ICEMACHINES THINKGREENB SAVEENERGYB#AVEMONEY 863-832-3399LOCALLYOWNED 3:27c Licensed & Insured CAC 1815095 C ALL F OR S ERVICE T ODAY LL M AKES S ALEON C HANGE O UTS I N S TOCK S ALE ON ON ON ON FREEESTIMATES ONCHANGEOUTS Special To The Herald-Advocate Earlier this year, I got to sit down with Peggy Rodriguez, my grandmother,and learn about her past. It was reallyinteresting to learn about some of thethings she did when she was my age,which is in-describablydifferentcompared towhat I do,like playing on electronics and gamingsystems. My grandmother worked and even had to walk everywhere, unlike mostkids nowadays who have their parentsdrive them everywhere. Back then itwas OK for you to walk anywhere. Nowit’s hard to walk down your street with-out the fear of being kidnapped! Peggy was born on May 27, 1953, in Dade City, Florida. The schools she at-tended were Pasco Elementary, PascoJunior High and Pasco ComprehensiveHigh School. Her favorite thing to do when she was my age was to work, can you be-lieve it? She worked at a dime store inthe candy department, where sheworked every day after school for fouryears, from when she was in seventhgrade till 11th grade. “It was a long wayfrom school, probably about a mile,” shesays. However, it was worth it; shemade 50 cents an hour. This was a greatamount back then. Almost everyone when they were in school had a best friend. My grand-mother’s best friend was Dorthy Tipton.They were good friends all throughoutjunior high and high school, but then in1979 she was involved in a fatal car ac-cident that took her life. However, shewill remain a best friend in my grand-mother’s heart. When my grandmother was younger she used to entertain herself by going tothe movies. The movie theater she E LVIS P RESLEY W AS T HE I DOL O F T HE D AY would always go to was the JoylanDrive-In. “You could get a whole car-load in for $1,” she said. “When I was ateen, Elvis Presley was a very popularidol, so about once a month the theaterwould play an Elvis Presley movie. Myfriends and I would always try to go seethem.” When she was my age her community was not as violent as it is today.“Everyone was so nice and polite toeveryone,” she exclaims. They didn’thave the drugs and everything like wedo now. So, that was why it was OK forpeople to walk wherever they needed togo. We have a variety of electronics like iPhones, computers, iPods and tablets,but my grandmother did not have all ofthese things. The only thing electronicthey had back then were TVs and radios.When the first color TV came out, herneighbor had bought one. All the kids inthe neighborhood would go to theirhouse on Sunday nights at 7 to watchthe only color show, which was WaltDisney. The most memorable thing my grandmother went through was her gradua-tion. She graduated from high school in1971. After graduation she hung outwith her two friends, Dorthy and Rita.“We were like the Three Musketeers,”she said First, they went to Rita’s house where Rita’s mom made refreshments for thegirls. Then they went to Dorthy’s housewhere her mom did the same. Last, theywent back to my grandmother’s house,and just hung there. “Yep, that was thegood ole days,” she says as she remem-bers. Everyone wants to become something when they get older. My grand-mother wanted to become an Englishteacher. She always loved English inhigh school, but she never did becauseshe wanted to take a year off after shegraduated to work. She worked at a Stop ‘N’ Go and made about $80 a week andthen she met my granddaddy and gotmarried. Then I asked would she like to change anything about her life and herresponse was simply, “No.” She has noregrets. She had a memorable child-hood, a lovely marriage, her own chil-dren are grown now, and she haswonderful grandchildren. She would not change a thing about her life.Back In Time is the result of a class as-signment given to ninth graders atHardee Senior High School. Each student is asked to interview an olderperson. Selected interviews are pub-lished here as an encouragement to thestudents and for the enjoyment of ourreaders. Back Back In In Time TimeDEAR DR. DONOHUE: My 13-year-old son went to bandcamp for five days. On daythree, he had terrific stomachpain and started to vomit. Theinstructors were alarmed andtook him to the local hospital,where doctors diagnosed ap pendicitis. We had to givephone permission for him tohave an operation. Everythingwent fine, and he recoveredquickly. My wife and I have a few questions. Could he have eatensomething that caused appen dicitis? What does not havingan appendix do to people? Noone in my wife's or my familyhas had such an operation.We're ignorant about all this. —G.G. ANSWER: The appendix dan gles from the first part of thecolon in the lower-right side ofthe abdomen. It looks like a slen der worm, and has an averagelength of 3 inches (8 cm). Thefunction of the appendix isn'tclearly defined, but it might havea role in body immunity. Lifewithout an appendix goes on asnormally as life with one. The appendix has a hollow core, which is lined with lym phoid tissue, the same kind oftissue found in lymph nodes.Bacteria from the colon can in vade the hollow core and cause the lymph tissue to swell.Swelling cuts off blood supply,and the appendix begins to disin tegrate — appendicitis. Undi gested food or hard fecalmaterial also can block the ap pendix's core and lead to thesame situation. Nothing your sonate is likely thecause. All the othercampers ate the samefood as he, but hewas the only one todevelop this prob lem. The pain of appen dicitis most oftenstarts in the area ofthe navel (bellybut ton) and works its way towardthe lower-right corner of the ab domen. Temperature rises. Vom iting is common, and sometimesdiarrhea is part of the picture. Adoctor, by what he or she hearsfrom the patient, along with theexamination of the abdomen,usually can make the diagnosis.In confusing circumstances, anultrasound is most helpful. Millions of people worldwide live without an appendix. Theydo quite well. So will your son. DEAR DR. DONOHUE: When I was about 10 years old,I got the mumps. Now I am 30and have been married forthree years. My wife and Iwant to have a family, but we aren't having any luck. Do you think the mumps made me infertile? —J.Z. ANSWER: In around 40 per cent of men who get the mumpsafter puberty, the virus also trav els to the testicles. That results in impaired fertility in only13 percent. Sterility al most never happens. Ifboth testicles are infected,then sterility might be aproblem. Before puberty, testicu lar involvement is rare,and infertility isn't a prob lem. You were only 10. It's highly unlikely that the mumpscaused you to be infertile. You and your wife shouldn't have to handle this problem onyour own. Why not consult adoctor so both of you can be ex amined? An answer to the ques tion why you aren't having thefamily you want will be found,and a solution, if possible, willbe suggested.Dr. Donohue regrets that he isunable to answer individual let ters, but he will incorporate themin his column whenever possible.Readers may write him or re quest an order form of availablehealth newsletters at P.O. Box536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475. (c) 2014 North America Synd., Inc. All Rights Reserved Good Health D D o o n n o o h h u u e e By Dr. Paul G. Donohue To Your

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C The Herald-Advocate(USPS 578-780)Thursday, March 27, 2014 PAGE ONE COURTESY PHOTO Although the Paralympics are over, that doesn’t mar k the end of Olympic season. In mid-April, the annual Law Enforcement Torch Run will be taking pla ce in Hardee County. This run is in celebration of the Special Olympics Florida summer g ames in Orlando. In order to raise money for the games, local law enforcement is selling tshirts for $12 and hats for $10. Raffle tickets for a cruise are also being sold. T ickets are $5 for one, $10 for three, and $20 for eight tickets. The drawing will take place on May 17 at the closing ceremony of the Special Olympics, but you do not have to be present to win. Showing off the shirts and hats are Sheriff Arnold Lanier, Gary Harrison and Majo r Randy Dey. The Law Enforcement Torch Run will take place on April 15 at 10:30 a.m., they will finish the run at Heritage Park. For more information on the run or to purc hase tickets or mer chandise contact Kim Pfeiffer or Sara Moore with the Hardee County Sheriff ’s Office at 773-4144. TORCH RUN BuildingPermits The following permits were ap plied for or issued by the HardeeCounty Building De-partmentduring the week of March 16-22.Listings include the name of theowner or contractor, the addressfor the project, the type of workto be done, and the cost in volved. Only projects valued at$1,000 or more are listed. ISSUED Michael R. Alexander, Manley Road, mechanical, $3,862. Bradford T. Bowen, Cross Road 663, roofing, $7,641. Robert L. Spurlock, Cross Road 665, roofing, $14,500. Robert L. Spurlock, Cracker Lane, roofing, $8,950. Michael William Jack, Sunshine Lane, roofing, $4,400. Avalos, Eighth Avenue, shed, $6,460. By JOAN SEAMANOf The Herald-Advocate Peoples Gas will be able to operate in the Zolfo Springstown limits. After the second, and final, hearing on the matter, a 15-yearfranchise was granted for a nat ural gas distribution line in thecommunity. It does not automatically give Peoples, a division of TampaElectric Co., permission to usethe public rights of way. Thecompany will still need to obtainpermits for any digging it doesand have to restore any streets,sidewalks, etc. which were dis turbed. Commissioner Virginia Irby had several questions, most ofwhich, she noted, had been an swered by Town Manager LindaRoberson earlier in the day. Irbywanted to clarify that this wasfor natural gas supply and not propane or bottled gas. She alsoexpressed concern that protect ing the health and welfare of thecitizens should come first. Town Attorney Gerald Buhr said the agreement had goneback and forth several times andhe had used franchises fromsimilar sized communities. “It’spretty fair, most of what wewanted,” he said. He also said the agreement was only for 15 years, not 30 ormore as some franchises, andcould be amended, if needed. The franchise details the use of streets and rights of way to bethe least disturbing to residents,maintenance, laying of pipe,construction work, ac-counts,records, insurance and indemni fication and termination forcause. The franchise fee will be six percent of the company’smonthly gross revenue. Gas Franchise Approved In Zolfo Springs Pet Care Centern MONTHLYSPECIAL$10 Rabies Shots CHECK OUT OUR PET VET VACCINATION PRICES(Dog & Cat Packs Start At $ $ 4 48 8(with Heartworm Test 5 5 5 5) )(Kitten & Puppy Packs $ $ 4 4 4 4Save Money On Your Favorite Heartworm And Flea Products Such As: Trifexis, Comfortis, Revolution & HeartguardWe Accept All Major Credit Cards 3 By JOAN SEAMANOf The Herald-Advocate More than a dozen of the best Hardee County track and fieldathletes went to Disney Show-case on Mar. 15. Competing with hundreds of high school athletes from allover the state and Canada,Hardee participants did well.Some of their events had 50 or60 entrants, some as many as100. Next up for the Hardee teams is a trip to Lake Placid on April1, and several will go to theFlorida Relays on April 4-5 asHardee prepares for the districtcompetition, which is April 11 at Sarasota Booker. The regionalsare April 16 at Tampa BerkeleyPrep and the state meet on May2 at the University of NorthFlorida campus. Competition was keen, with teams from all levels and abili ties participating. Miami North ern won the girls division atDisney, followed by WinterPark, Starr’s Mill, Haines City,Colonial, Boyd Anderson, Car dinal Gibbons, Nova Scotia,Bishop Kenny and Stephenson.Others included Rye CountryDay, Key West, Dr. Krop, CoralGables and Harry S. Truman aswell as Auburndale, Ridge Com munity. Boyd Anderson won the boys division, with Stephenson,Starr’s Mill, Colonial, BishopKenny, Cardinal Gibbons, West minister Academy, Or-landoFreedom, Auburndale and NovaScotia. The Saugeen Royals,Chaminade, McCallie Schooland Windemere Prep were in it,with Lakeland, Lake Region,Winter Haven, Bartow andRidge contestants as well. Hardee soph Maria Munoz had the most success of localtracksters. She placed ninth of46 girls in the 800-meter run,completing it in 2:45.13. CrystalAvila was 17th and Angel Man cillas and Araceli Ramos fol lowed along. Munoz also placed 10th in the 1,600-meter run, coming inagain under the six-minute markat 5:59.38. Avila was 30th, fol lowed by Mancillas and Ramos.The girls 4x800 relay team ofAvila, Munoz, Mancillas andErica DeLoera placed 11th in11:53.35. Erica DeLoera also partici pated in the triple jump, 100 hur dles and 300 hurdles. MaribelDeLoera was in the shot put anddiscus. Brooke Faulk was in thehigh jump. On the boys side of the ledger, the best of the day was the4x800 relay team of TylerSmith, Dustin Smith, BrandonBeatty and Tyler Helms, placingninth in a time of 8:59.63. Tyler Smith was 15th in the boys800 and Beatty was 16th in the2,000-meter steeplechase.Adrian Briones was 23d of the28 entrants. Devonte Greer was tied for 16th of 38 in the high jump, withDustin Smith in 27th place.Helms was 17th in the triplejump. Robert Torres was in the shot put and discus. Briones was alsoin the 100-meter and 200-meterdashes and the steeplechase. Tracksters Go To Disney * Est. Mortgage Rate 4.25%Principle andInterest Only $@*74?.D$.+;270 c3 Pet Of The Week Adoption fees are $45 and include a rabies vaccination and spaying or neu tering of the animal. Contact 773-2320 if you are interested in adoptingany cats or dogs that desperately need a loving home. The kennel locationis 685 Airport Road, Wauchula, at the county landfill. This is a male Cur mix. He is white and brown with a short coat and long tail and he has glass eyes. His adoption fee is $45. 1 1 s s t t A A n n n n u u a a l l 5 5 K KO O r r a a n n g g e e & & B B l l u u e e C C o o l l o o r r R R u u n n / / W W a a l l k k Hosted by Hardee Youth Football League '/@A>2/EG=>79G/: (Plan to arrive by 8:30 am to receive pack) Pioneer Park, Zolfo Springs Cost: $30 per person if entry form received by March 20t h –$35 per person for any late entries –Teams welcome (min. 4 max. 6) an d team cost is $100 (must register at same time) 537B7?7<;?r/;2A;23>rr /;2 There will be first and second place awarded in each category. Entry Form – %93/?3>3@A>;@<,!%$
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APOSTOLIC LIGHTHOUSE UNITED PENTECOSTAL CHURCH 310 Orange St. 773-1017 Sunday Meet & Greet .......... 10:15 a.m. Sunday School .................... 11:00 a.m. Sunday Service .................... 12:00 p.m. Tuesday Prayer Meeting ........ 6:30 p.m. Wednesday Service ................ 7:00 p.m. CHESTER GROVE MB CHURCH 708 W. Grape St. 375-3353 Sunday School ...................... 9:30 a.m. Sunday Worship .................... 8:00 a.m. Sun. Eve. Worship 1st & 3rd4:00 p.m. Tues. Prayer/Bible Study ...... 6:00 p.m. CHRISTIAN BIBLE FELLOWSHIP Hwy. 17 South Morning Worship ................ 10:30 a.m. Youth Group Sunday .......... 6:00 p.m. CHURCH OF GOD 121 West Broward St. 375-2231 Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m. Evening Worship .................. 6:30 p.m. Wednesday............................ 7:30 p.m. CHURCH OF GOD TRUE HOLINESS OUTREACH 725 Palmetto St. 375-3304 Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m. Tues. Night Bible Study ...... 7:30 p.m. Evening Worship 1 st Sunday...................... 5:00 p.m. COMMUNITY CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP M ain & W. Centra. Sunday AM Worship ............ 10:30 a.m. Sunday Evening .................... 6:00 p.m. Wed. Prayer Meeting ..... ....... 7:00 p.m. FAITH ASSEMBLY OF GOD 4937 Hwy. 17 N. 375-4206 Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m. Disciples Train & Choirs ...... 5:30 p.m. Evening Worship .................. 6:30 p.m. Wednesday Prayer ................ 7:00 p.m. FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH Bowling Green 4531 Hwy. 17 N 375-2253 S UNDAY : Bible Study ............................ 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship ................ 10:45 a.m. Evening Worship .................. 6:00 p.m. W EDNESDAY : Discipleship Training Youth & Adult .................. 6:00 p.m. TeamKID (ages 3-5th grade) .. 6:00 p.m. FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Grape & Church Streets 375-2340 Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m. Evening Worship .................. 6:00 p.m. Wed. Bible Study .................. 6:00 p.m. FORT GREEN BAPTIST CHURCH Baptist Church Road 773-9013 Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m. Sunday Evening .................... 6:00 p.m. Wednesday Supper .............. 6:00 p.m. Wednesday B ible Study ........ 7:00 p.m. HOLY CHILD SPANISH CATHOLIC MISSION Misa (Espanol) Sunday ........ 7:00 p.m. IGLESIA DEL DIOS VIVO 105 Dixiana St. 375-4191 Domingo De Predicacion .... 11:00 p.m. Martes Estudio Biblico .......... 7:00 p.m. Miercoles Estudior Juvenil .... 7:00 p.m. Jueves De Predicacion .......... 7:00 p.m. IMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH 210 E. Broward St. 445-0290 Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m. Evening Worship ................ 6:00 p.m. Wednesday Prayer .................. 7:00 p.m MACEDONIA PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH 607 Palmetto St. Church School ...................... 9:30 a.m. Morning Service .................. 11:00 a.m. Evening Service ............... ..... 7:00 p.m. Wed. Bible Study/Prayer ...... 7:00 p.m. Communion-2nd Sun. Eve. .. 6:00 p.m. MT. PISGAH BAPTIST CHURCH 6210 Mt. Pisgah Rd. 375-4409 Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m. Disciples Training .................. 5:00 p.m. Evening Worship .................. 7:00 p.m. Wednesday Prayer Time ........ 7:00 p.m. OPEN DOOR FULL GOSPEL PRAISE CENTER E. Broward St. Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m. Sunday Service ...................... 6:00 p.m. Wednesday Service ................ 7:30 p.m. PRIMERA MISION BAUTISTA Murray Road off Hwy. 17 375-2295 Domingos Escuela Dom. ...... 9:45 a.m. Servicio de Adoracion .......... 11:00 a.m. Servicio de Predicacion ........ 5:00 p.m. Miercoles Servico .................. 6:30 p.m. REAL LIFE CHURCH 3365 South US Hwy 17 Morning Service .................. 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Study/Learning .. 6:30 p.m. ST. JOHN A.M.E. CHURCH 513 W. Orange St. 375-2911 Sunday Church School .......... 9:30 a.m. Sunday Morning Worship .... 11:00 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study ........ 6:30 p.m. VICTORY PRAISE CENTER 128 E. Main St. Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m. Evening Worship .................. 6:00 p.m. Thursday Night Services, Evening Worship. .................. 7:00 p.m. Kidz Club. .............................. 7:00 p.m. IGLESIA PENTECOSTES VISION POR LAS ALMAS 149 Badger Loop 448-2831 Martes: Oracion .................... 7:00 p.m. Jueves: Ensenaza Biblica ...... 7:00 p.m. Domingo: Servicio .............. 10:30 a.m. LIMESTONE BAPTIST CHURCH r1C=>:91@1E581=>:91 Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m. Evening Worship .................. 6:00 p.m. Wednesday Prayer ................ 7:00 p.m. NEW ZION BAPTIST CHURCH 202 Sidney Roberts Road Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m. Disciples Training .................. 6:00 p.m. Evening Worship .................. 6:00 p.m. Wednesday Prayer .............. .. 6:00 p.m. ONA BAPTIST CHURCH 131 Bear Lane 773-2540 Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m. Wednesday Prayer ................ 7:00 p.m. UNION BAPTIST CHURCH 5076 Lily Church Rd. 494-5622 Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m. Evening Worship .................. 6:00 p.m. Wednesday AWANA for Kids .............. 6:30 p.m. Wednesday Prayer Time.........7:00 p.m. APOSTOLIC ASSEMBLY Martin Luther King and Apostolic Rd. Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m. Englishg Service .................. 11:30 a.m. General Worship Service ...... 1:30 p.m. Tuesday Prayer ...................... 7:00 p.m. Wednesday Service ................ 7:00 p.m. CELEBRATION CHURCH Rainey Blvd. 863-781-1624 hardee.celebration.org Sunday Morning Service .... 11:00 a.m. Sunday Evening Service ........ 6:00 p.m. Wednesday Youth Service .... 5:30 p.m. Childcare provided at all services CELEBRATION FELLOWSHIP 773-0427 Celebration Service .............. 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Evening Cell Groups Adult Cell Group .................. 7:00 p.m. Youth Cell Group .................. 7:00 p.m. Children’s Cell Group .......... 7:00 p.m. Call for locations CHARLIE CREEK BAPTIST CHURCH 6885 State Road 64 East 773-3447 Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m. Evening Worship .................. 6:00 p.m. Wednesday Worship .............. 6:30 p.m. CHURCH OF CHRIST 201 S. Florida Ave. Sunday Bible Study .............. 9:00 a.m. Sunday Worship Service ...... 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study ........ 7:00 p.m. CHURCH OF CHRIST Will Duke Road 773-2249 Sunday Morning Worship ...... 9:30 a.m. Sunday Bible Class .............. 11:30 a.m. Sunday Evening Worship ...... 6:00 p.m. Wed. Night Bible Class ........ 7:00 p.m. Men’s Leadership & Training Class 2nd Sunday of Month ........ 4:00 p.m. CHURCH OF GOD Martin Luther King Blvd. 767-0199 CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS 630 Hanchey Rd. 773-3532 Sacrament Meeting ................ 9:00 a.m. Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m. Priesthood............................ 11:00 a.m. COMMUNITY BAPTIST CHURCH OF WAUCHULA HILLS (SPANISH) 615 Rainey Blvd. 257-3950 Sunday Bible Study ............ 10:00 a.m. Sunday Morning Worship .... 11:00 a.m. Sunday Evening Service ........ 7:00 p.m. Wednesday Service ................ 7:00 p.m. DIOS ES AMOR 807 S. 8th Ave. 773-4576 Domingos Escuela Dominica .......................... 10:00 a.m. Servicio................................ 11:00 a.m. Lunes Oracion ...................... 6:00 p.m. Miercoles Servicio ................ 7:00 p.m. EL REMANENTE IGLECIA CRISTIANA 318 W. Main St.. Martes Oracion ...................... 7:00 p.m. Jueves Servicio ...................... 7:30 p.m. Viernes Servicio .................... 7:30 p.m. Domingo Servicio ................ 10:30 a.m. ENDTIME CROSSROAD MINISTRY 501 N. 9th & Georgia St. 773-3470 Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m. Morning Service .................. 11:30 a.m. Evening Service .................... 7:30 p.m. Wed. Bible St. & Yth. Gath .. 7:30 p.m. Friday (Holy Ghost Night) .... 7:30 p.m. FAITH PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 114 N. 7th Ave. 773-2105 Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m. Sunday Worship .................. 11:00 a.m. Sunday Worship .................... 6:00 p.m. Wednesday Supper ................ 6:15 p.m. Wed. Youth Fellowship .......... 6:50 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study ........ 7:00 p.m. FAITH TEMPLE CHURCH OF GOD 701 N. 7th Ave 773-3800 Sunday School ...................... 9:30 a.m. Sunday Worship .................. 10:20 a.m. Children’s Chuch ................ 10:40 a.m. Evening Service .................... 6:00 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study ........ 7:00 p.m. FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 1570 W. Main St. 773-4182 S UNDAY : Bible Study for all ages ........ 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m. Evening Worship .................. 6:00 p.m. W EDNESDAY : Sr. Adult Bible Study .......... 10:00 a.m. Children’s Chiors (PK-Grade 4) .................... 5:30 p.m. PRAISE 57 – Jr High Chior .. 5:30 p.m. Mid-Week Prayer Meeting .. 6:00 p.m. Kids On Missions (PK-Grade 4) .................... 6:00 p.m. Club 56 ................................ 6:00 p.m. Youth Group (Grades 7-12) 6:00 p.m.Family Life Ministry & Discipleship .................. 6:00 p.m. Church Orchestra .................. 6:00 p.m. Adult Choir .......................... 7:00 p.m. FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH 1121 W. Louisiana St. 773-9243 S UNDAY : Generations Caf Opens........9:30 a.m.Kids World Check-In for Nursery-5th Grade Begins..10:15 a.m. Pre-K Blast .......................... 10:45 a.m. Kids World B.L.A.S.T. (K-5th)............................ 10:45 a.m. Worship Service .................. 10:45 a.m. W EDNESDAY : Check-In begins for Nursery-5thgrade.................. 6:15 p.m. Classes for children ages PreK-12th grade ............ 6:30-8:00 p.m. FIRST CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 511 W. Palmetto St. Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m. Morning Service .................. 11:00 a.m. Evening Worship .................. 6:00 p.m. Wednesday Prayer ................ 7:00 p.m. FIRST MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH 1347 Martin Luther King Ave. 773-6556 Sunday School ...................... 9:30 a.m. Morning Service .................. 11:00 a.m. Evening Worship .................. 6:00 p.m. Tues. Youth Ministry Meeting/ Bible Study ........................ 6:00 p.m. Wed. Prayer/Bible Study ...... 7:00 p.m. FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 207 N. Seventh Ave. 773-4267 Coffe and Fellowship ............ 9:15 a.m. Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m. Blended Sunday Worship .... 10:55 a.m. Wednesday Night Dinner ...... 6:00 p.m. Youth (0-18) & Adult Programming .... .............................................. 7:00 p.m. FLORIDA’S FIRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD CHURCH 1397 South Florida Avenue 773-9386 Sunday School ...................... 9:00 a.m. Morning Worship ................ 10:00 a.m. Wed. Family Night ................ 7:00 p.m. Adult, Children & Radiate Youth Church FLORIDA GOSPEL 511 W. Palmetto 223-5126 Sunday Morning Worship ... 11:00 a.m. Wednesday Worship .............. 7:30 p.m. THE GOSPEL TABERNACLE 810 W. Tennessee St. 863-735-1158 Morning Service .................. 10:00 a.m. Wednesday Service ................ 7:00 p.m. HEARTLAND COMMUNITY CHURCH 1262 W. Main St. 767-6500 Coffee & Donuts .................... 9:00 a.m. Sunday School ...................... 9:30 a.m. Worship................................ 10:30 a.m. Wed. Night Dinner ................ 6:00 p.m. Wed. Bodybuilders Adult Cl. Crossroads & Lighthouse Min. ................ 7:00 p.m. HIGHER GROUND INTERNATIONAL MINISTRY 1258 W. MAIN STREET WAUCHULA, FL Sunday Morning Worship .... 11:00 a.m. Wed. Night Bible Study ........ 6:30 p.m. IGLESIA ADVENTISTA DEL SEPTIMO DIA Old Bradenton Road 767-1010 IGLESIA de DIOS ALFA Y OMEGA 1909 Stanfield Rd. Sunday School .................... 10: 00 a.m. Evening Service .................... 6:00 p.m. Tuesday (Bible Study & Prayer Night)................................ 7:30 p.m. Friday Worship Service ........ 7:30 p.m. IGLESIA HISPANA FUENTE DE VIDA 501 N. 9 th Ave. Martes.................................. 7: 30 p.m. Jueves.................................... 7:30 p.m. Domingo.............................. 10:30 a.m. IGLESIA HISPANA PRESENCIA de Dios 511 W. Palmetto St. Domingos.............................. 6:00 p.m. Miercoles...............................7:00 p.m. JEHOVAH’S WITNESSES ENGLISH 155 Altman Road 1131 Sunday Service ...................... 2:00 p.m. JEHOVAH’S WITNESSES SPANISH Sunday Service .................... 10:00 a.m. LIGHT OF THE WORLD MINISTRIES Womans Center 131 N. 7th Ave. Wauchula, FL Friday Evening ...................... 6:00 p.m. LAKE DALE BAPTIST CHURCH 3102 Heard Bridge Road 773-6622 Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m. Morning Service .................. 11:00 a.m. Evening Worship .................. 6:00 p.m. Wednesday Prayer ................ 7:00 p.m. MINISTERIO INTERNACIOAL Cambriadores de Mundo 704 W. Main St. 773-0065 Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m. MY NEW LIFE IN CHRIST CHURCH 117 W. Palmetto St. 773-2929 Sunday Service .................... 10:00 a.m. Sunday Evening Service ........ 6:00 p.m. Wednesday Service ................ 7:00 p.m. Children Ministries for all services NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH 1999 State Road 64 East Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship Service ... 11:00 a.m. Evening Worship Service ...... 6:30 p.m. Wednesday Night Supper ...... 6:00 p.m. Wednesday Activities (All Ages) .......................... 7:00 p.m. NEW BEGINNING CHURCH Georgia & 9th Avenue 781-5887 Sunday Worship .................. 11:00 a.m. 2nd Sunday Communion .... 11:00 a.m. Bread of Life Sunday ........ 12:15 p.m. T.H.E. Meeting Tuesday .... 7:00 p.m. NEW MT. ZION A.M.E. CHURCH 10 Martin Luther King Ave. 767-0023 Morn. Worship (1st & 3r Sun.) .................. 8:00 a.m. Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m. 2nd Sunday Youth Service .... 4:00 p.m. Allen Christian Endeavor ...... 4:00 p.m. Wed. & Fri. Bible Study ........ 7:00 p.m. NORTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH 912 N. 8th Ave. 773-6947 Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m. Evening Worship .................. 6:00 p.m. Wednesday Supper ................ 6:00 p.m. Wednesday Prayer ................ 7:00 p.m. OAK GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH 4350 W. Main St. 735-0321 Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m. Evening Worship .................. 6:00 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study ........ 6:30 p.m. PEACE VALLEY LUTHERAN CHURCH 1643 Stenstrom Road 773-2858 1 st & 3 rd Sun. Communion.................... 10:00 a.m. 2 nd & 4 th Sun. Divine Worship ........ ........ 10:00 a.m. Bible Study .......................... 11:15 a.m. ** Fellowship each Sunday after service PROGRESSIVE MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH 149 Manley Road East Main 773-5814 Sunday School ...................... 9:30 a.m. Worship Service .................. 11:00 a.m. Wed. Evening Prayer ............ 7:00 p.m. REAL LIFE CHURCH 3365 North US Hwy 17 Morning Service .................. 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Study/Learning .. 6:30 p.m. RIVERVIEW HEIGHTS MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH 1321 S.R. 636 East 773-3344 Radio Program WZZS Sundays .................. 9:00 a.m. Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m. Evening Worship .................. 6:00 p.m. Wednesday Prayer ................ 7:00 p.m. SOUL HARVEST MINISTRY 1337 Hwy. 17 South, Wauchula Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m. Evening Service .................... 6:00 p.m. Wednesday Service ................ 7:00 p.m. ST. ANN’S EPISCOPAL CHURCH 204 N. 9th Ave. 773-6418 Sunday.................................. 9:30 a.m. Holy Days ............................................ ST. MICHAEL CATHOLIC CHURCH 408 Heard Bridge Road 773-4089 Saturday Mass (English) ... ... 5:00 p.m. (Spanish)...... 7:00 p.m. Sunday(English).................... 8:30 a.m. (Spanish).................. 11:30 a.m. (Creole)...................... 1:30 p.m. Catecismo.............................. 9:45 a.m. Daily Mass in English .......... 8:30 a.m. SEVENTH DAY ADVENTIST CHURCH 205 S. 11th Ave. 773-9927 Sabbath School .................... .9:30 a.m. Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m. Tues. Prayer Meeting ............ 7:00 p.m. SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH 505 S. 10th Ave. 773-4368 Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m. Evening Worship .................. 6:00 p.m. Wednesday Prayer ................ 7:00 p.m. SPIRIT WIND TABERNACLE 1652 Old Bradenton Road Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m. Evening Worship .................. 6:00 p.m. Wednesday Worship .............. 7:30 p.m. TABERNACLE OF PRAISE & JOY 1507 MLK Avenue Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship ................ 11:30 a.m. Evening Worship .................. 7:00 p.m. Tues. Bible Stdy. & Child Train .................... 7:00 p.m. Friday Prayer Service ............ 7:00 p.m. WAUCHULA CHURCH OF GOD 1543 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave. 773-0199 Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship ................ 11:15 a.m. Evening Worship .................. 6:00 p.m. Wed. Night Fam. Training .... 7:30 p.m. Thurs. Youth Bible Study ...... 7:00 p.m. Friday Night Worship ............ 7:30 p.m. WAUCHULA HILLS HARVEST TEMPLE ASSEMBLY OF GOD 210 Anderson Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m. Church...................... ............ 10:00 a.m. Youth Service ........................ 6:00 p.m. Evening Service .................... 7:00 p.m. Wednesday Service ................ 7:30 p.m. WAUCHULA HILLS SPANISH CHURCH OF GOD 1000 Stansfield Rd. Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m. Evening Worship .................. 7:30 p.m. Tuesday Prayer ...................... 7:30 p.m. Thursday Worship .................. 7:30 p.m. Saturday Worship .................. 7:30 p.m. WAUCHULA REVIVAL CENTER (Full Gospel) 501 N. 9th Ave. Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m. Youth & Child. Church .......... 6:00 p.m. Evening Worship .................. 7:00 p.m. Wed. Bible Study .................. 7:00 p.m. Men’s Fri. Prayer .................. 7:00 p.m. COMMUNITY WESLEYAN CHURCH Gardner Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m. Evening Worship .................. 7:00 p.m. Wednesday Service ................ 7:00 p.m. CREWSVILLE BETHEL BAPTIST CHURCH 8251 Crewsville Road Church 735-0871 Pastor 773-6657 Sunday School ............ .......... 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m. Evening Worship .................. 6:30 p.m. Wednesday Prayer ................ 6:30 p.m. EVANGELISTIC HOLINESS CHURCH INC Corner of 6th and Hickory Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m. Evening Worship .................. 7:00 p.m. Wednesday............................ 7:30 p.m. FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF ZOLFO 320 E. 4th St. 735-1200 Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m. Training Union ...................... 5:00 p.m. Evening Worship .................. 6:00 p.m. Wednesday Prayer ................ 7:00 p.m. FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Corner of 6th & Suwanee 735-1544 Gospel Music ...................... 10:30 a.m. Worship Service .................. 11:00 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study ........ 7:00 p.m. FOX MEMORIAL HOLINESS CHURCH #1-<%>En Sunday Morning Worship .... 10:00 a.m. Sunday Night Worship .......... 6:00 p.m. Wednesday Service ................ 7:30 p.m. GARDNER BAPTIST CHURCH South Hwy. 17 494-5456 Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship .............. .. 11:00 a.m. Wednesday Prayer ................ 7:00 p.m. LIFE CHANGING WORSHIP CENTER 3426 Oak St. 863-832-9808 Sunday Worship .................... 2:30 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study ........ 6:30 p.m. MARANATHA BAPTIST CHURCH 2465 Oxendine Rd. (863) 832-9292 Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m. Worship................................ 11:00 a.m. Evening.................................. 1:00 p.m. Wed. Bible & Prayer Meet....7:00 p.m. NEW VISION WORSHIP CENTER 64 E. & School House Road Church 735-8585 Childcare 7358586 Morning Worship ................ 10:00 a.m. Children’s Church ................ 10:00 a.m. Evening Worship .................. 6:00 p.m. Wed. Youth & F.T.H. ............ 7:00 p.m. PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF GOD FAITH TEMPLE Oak Street Sunday Worship .................. 10:00 a.m. Evening Worship .................. 7:00 p.m. Tuesday Worship .................. 7:30 p.m. Thursday Worship .................. 7:30 p.m. Saturday Worship .................. 7:30 p.m. PRIMERA MISSION BAUTISTA HISPANA 518 8th Ave. E. Escuela Dominical .............. 10:00 a.m. Servicio del Domingo .......... 11:00 a.m. .............................................. 7:00 p.m. Servicio del Miercoles .......... 7:30 p.m. PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH Pioneer Park 2nd Sunday .......................... 10:30 a.m. Evening Service .................... 6:30 p.m. 5th Sunday ............................ 6:00 p.m. REALITY RANCH COWBOY FELLOWSHIP 2-1/2 Miles east of Zolfo Springs on Hwy. 66 863-781-1578 Sunday Service .................... 11:00 a.m. ST. PAUL’S MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH 3676 U.S. Hwy. 17 South 735-0636 Sunday School . ................ 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship ...................... 11 a.m. Wed. Prayer Service .............. 7:00 p.m. SAN ALFONSO MISSION 3027 Schoolhouse Lane Domingo, Misa en Espano .. 10:00 a.m. Catecismo............................ 11:00 a.m. SPANISH MISSION 735-8025 Escuela Dominica . ........ 10:00 a.m. Servicio................................ 11:00 a.m. Pioneer Club .......................... 6:30 p.m. Servicio de la Noche ............ 7:00 p.m. Mierecoles Merienda ............ 6:00 p.m. Servicio.................................. 8:00 p.m. Sabado Liga de Jovenes ........ 5:00 p.m. BOWLING GREEN BOWLING GREEN ONA WAUCHULA WAUCHULA WAUCHULA WAUCHULA Peace River GrowersWholesale Nursery Donnis & Kathy BarberHwy. 66 EastP.O. Box 760 (863) 735-0470 Zolfo Springs, FL — Schedule of Weekly Services — ZOLFO SPRINGS ZOLFO SPRINGS Printed as a Public Service by The Herald-Advocate Wauchula, Florida Deadline: Thursday 5 p.m. 2C The Herald-Advocate, March 27, 2014

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March 27, 2014, The Herald-Advocate 3C 3:27c It is that time of year again. If you find that these little bugshave invaded your home, please give us a call. Since 1998,The Bug Doctor has treated hundreds of homes here in Hardee County for these subterranean termites and we have had no re treats. The reason is simple. We use the best chemical, we mix it at the proper rate, and we put it everywhere it belongs. The reason termite treatments fail is one or more of these 3 factors are compromised in order to get the lowest price. We never com promise and we always kill the termites. If you find swarm ers in your home, call us. Use this ad to get$100 OFFtreatment of your home. Termites Are Swarming! 863-773-5969 3:27c O O v v e e r r 3 3 0 0 y y e e a a r r s s o o f f C C o o m m b b i i n n e e d d E E x x p p e e r r i i e e n n c c e e F F a a s s t t E E l l e e c c t t r r o o n n i i c c F F i i l l i i n n g gStorts Taxes& Bookkeeping, Inc. "'-+4)*'5'%3".$1##*,!863-832-4733 BRING IN THIS AD FOR$15.00 OFF Storts Taxes &BookkeepingGreater Florida Ins.Hwy. 17 SouthHwy. 17 NorthWauchula State Bank nnnrr nnnr1 1 2 2 0 0 W W . O O r r a a n n g g e e S S t t r r e e e e t t(next to Great Florida Insurance)7 7 7 7 3 3 2 2 2 2 0 0 0 03:27p Danielle & Deborah 2:27-3:27c New Furniture For Less New Furniture For Less Support Local Economy Support Local Economy Mattress SALE."&n1,$$ Queen $229" n r Highpoint Furniturenr(across from Home Depot)3 3 8 8 2 2 0 0 6 6 0 0 0 0 )-.). "'%0",2 NO HIGH PRESSURE SALESMAN! ."(-(2)*." -%(%',.*+% ./,"3:27c RANCH-STYLE DILL FISH FILLETS I think you'll be very pleased with this unusual (and easy) wayto prepare fish — especially thesauce!16 ounces fresh or frozenwhite fish, thawed and cut into4 pieces1/2 cup fat-free Ranch dress ing2 tablespoons fat-free mayon naise1 teaspoon dried dill weed1/8 teaspoon black pepper 1. Preheat oven to 350 F. Spray an 8-by-8-inch bakingdish with butter-flavored cook ing spray. 2. Rinse fish pieces in cold water and pat dry. Evenlyarrange fish pieces in preparedbaking dish. Lightly spray topsof fish with butter-flavoredcooking spray. Bake for 15 min utes. 3. In a small bowl, combine Ranch dressing, mayonnaise,dried dill weed and black pep per. Evenly spoon sauce mixtureover partially baked fish. Con tinue baking for 10 minutes oruntil fish flakes easily. Makes 4servings. J027B4AE8=64@D0;Br calories, 7g fat, 23g protein, 12gcarb., 424mg sodium, 0g Fiber;8014C82G270=64B%40CStarch. (c) 2014 King Features Synd., Inc. Comfort Foods Made FAST AND HEALTHY! By Healthy Exchanges 3/27/2014 Sun Data )8B4% *4C(% Day Length 12 hrs. 19 mins. Moon Data )8B4% *4C(% 'E4A7403r% ,=34A5>>C(% Moon Phase Solunar Table Moon Phase is 13% percent waning 13% Waning Crescent Major Times r%n(% (%n% Minor Times %n% (%n(% Prediction Solunar Prediction is 5>A0E4A06430H>5 Hunting or Fishing E4A064 Time Zone ,+n 3/28/2014 Sun Data )8B4% *4C(% Day Length 12 hrs. 21 mins. Moon Data )8B4r% *4C(% 'E4A7403% ,=34A5>>Cnnnn Moon Phase Solunar Table Moon (70B48B?4A24=C waning Waning Crescent Major Times nnnnnnnnn %n(% Minor Times r%nr% (%n(% Prediction Solunar Prediction is for a Better day of Hunting or Fishing Better Time Zone ,+n 3/29/2014 Sun Data )8B4% *4C(% Day Length 12 hrs. 22 mins. Moon Data )8B4% *4Cr(% 'E4A7403(% ,=34A5>>Cr% Moon Phase Solunar Table Moon Phase is 2% percent waning 2% Waning Crescent Major Times r%nr% (%n(% Minor Times %n% r(%nr(% Prediction Solunar Prediction is for a Better day of Hunting or Fishing Better Time Zone ,+n 3/30/2014 Sun Data )8B4r% *4C(% Day Length 12 hrs. 24 mins. Moon Data )8B4r% *4C(% 'E4A7403(% ,=34A5>>C% Moon Phase Solunar Table Moon Phase is 0% percent new 0% NEW MOON Major Times %n% (%n(% Minor Times r%nr% (%n(% Prediction Solunar Prediction is for a Best day of Hunting or Fishing Best Time Zone ,+n 3/31/2014 Sun Data )8B4% *4C(% Day Length 12 hrs. 25 mins. Moon Data )8B4% *4C(% 'E4A7403(% ,=34A5>>C% Moon Phase Solunar Table Moon Phase is 1% percent waxing 1% Waxing Crescent Major Times %n% (%n(% Minor Times %n% (%n(% Prediction Solunar Prediction is for a Better day of Hunting or Fishing Better Time Zone ,+n 4/1/2014 Sun Data )8B4% *4C(% Day Length 12 hrs. 28 mins. Moon Data )8B4r% *4C(% 'E4A7403r(% ,=34A5>>C% Moon Phase Solunar Table Moon Phase is 4% percent waxing 4% Waxing Crescent Major Times %n% r(%nr(% Minor Times r%nr% (%nr(% Prediction Solunar Prediction is for a Better day of Hunting or Fishing Better Time Zone ,+n 4/2/2014 Sun Data )8B4% *4C(% Day Length 12 hrs. 29 mins. Moon Data )8B4% *4Crr(% 'E4A7403r(% ,=34A5>>C% Moon Phase Solunar Table Moon Phase is 10% percent waxing 10% Waxing Crescent Major Times %n% r(%nr(% Minor Times %nr% rr(%nr(% Prediction Solunar Prediction is for a Good day of Hunting or Fishing Good Time Zone ,+n 4/3/2014 Sun Data )8B4% *4C(% Day Length 12 hrs. 31 mins. Moon Data )8B4rr% *4C(% 'E4A7403(% ,=34A5>>C% Moon Phase Solunar Table Moon Phase is 17% percent waxing 17% Waxing Crescent Major Times %n% (%n(% Minor Times rr%nr% (%n% Prediction Solunar Prediction is 5>A0E4A06430H>5 Hunting or Fishing E4A064 Time Zone ,+n Solunar Forecast Why is it that in the movies the snob is always versus the slob? ——— What is the opera to a country boy? Well, I’ll tell you what the opera is to some old country boy. It is where he will go to fool him self into believing that he has cultivated a rare taste like all thosefuddy-duddys that he is surrounded by for hollering and screamingat an embarrassing price. ——— C;0BC"BD??>B4"2>D;3B0H20;5D=4A0;7><4>5>DAchoice. ——— My mother-in-law Harpoon’s driving is the kind that only life support could appreciate. ——— I gave her my heart, and she and her attorney took the rest. ——— I have said it before and I’ll say it again, I would get along with everyone if it were not for people. ——— Why wouldn’t they let Pinnochio navigate an airplane? Because they were afraid he would go into a nose dive. ——— If you think looking for a needle in a haystack is bad, try look ing for a haystack in a needle. ——— My cousin, the one we call Four-Door, has his own auto car lot that he has named Pushum and Pullum Used Car Lot Sales. Whiletrying to be like General Motors Company, he too recalls his vehi cles, at least two a year. However, Four-Door, unlike GM which re calls thousands in a given year, he recalls at most only up to twovehicles, for either a defective horn or a blown fuse. ——— When the U.S. placed the first man on the moon, astronaut Neil A=6BC0C43>=C4;4E8B8>=5>A0;;C74F>A;3C>740AL'=4B<0;;step by man, one giant step for mankind.” But he could have said8=BC403L'=4B<0;;BC4?1H<0=>=4680=CBC4?5>A<0=:8=30=3one gigantic bill for the U.S. taxpayers.” ——— CA8=6B834C741A>0320BC0=27>A8BC4;;8=678B1>G8=650=BC70C Champion Bruno is being beaten into a pulp by the challenger,known as Napoleon, and further, they have just removed the Cham pion Bruno’s personal doctor from his corner and replaced him with0=D=34AC0:4ACC78B?>8=CH>D383=>C=443C>;8BC4=F0C27>AE84Fthe fight to know its outcome.Truman A. Thomas, 77, is an Avon Park resident with many friendsand associates in Hardee County. He is the father of Sherry Whiteof Wauchula, and is a retired salesman and former ra dio disc jockey whose morning show topped the Nielsen Ratings. A self-described“little boy captive in an old man’s body,” he can be reached at 453-3589 or by writing 1098 Memorial Dr., Avon Park, FL 33825. *&"-$%'*-*+$%"%.$r%..'"#*((*)")-" By Truman A. Thomas ZOLFO SPRINGS The Zolfo Springs Town Councilalso approved the fooling itemsduring its 40-minute meeting onMar. 17. Mayor Juan Otero wasabsent. All other members werepresent. 9 approved a proclamation of ?A8;0B.0C4A>=B4AE0C8>=Month. J0??A>E43C74022>D=CB ?0H01;4B7>F8=6rwas spent by the various depart ments in February. J0224?C43C74DC8;8CHB4AE824B report and the Sheriff’s Officemonthly report on activity in thetown. J0??>8=C43)414220;;8B>= to the Planning & Zoning Board. J740A3028C8I4=NB2>>3A4?>ACB>=?D1 lic works supervisor Russell Gar ner and agreed to move him offprobation to full-time status.Many feel more is getting done,he listens to suggestions, and allhydrants are being checked out,a project which has been wantedfor some time. J0??>8=C430CC>A=4H0=3024 Preston as special magistrate forC74?A8;740A8=6 J740A30@D4BC8>=5A>F=CC>A=4H 4A0;3D7A said there should be a statementposted and on the agenda that cit 8I4=B20=B?40:>=0=8BBD40=H time by raising their hands andF08C8=6C>14A42>6=8I43The next Town Council meetingwill be on April 21 at 6 p.m. inTown Hall, 3210 U.S. 17 North,Zolfo Springs. SGROPPINO Sgroppino is a classic afterdinner beverage from the Venetoregion in Northern Italy. It's usu ally made by whipping uplemon sorbet and Prosecco; asplash of vodka is sometimesadded. Here we've left the sorbetintact as a light and refreshingfloat -a luscious and low-calend to dinner. 1 pint lemon sorbet2 cups Prosecco (Italiansparkling wine)Fresh mint sprigs for garnish E4=;HB2>>?B>A14C8=C> wineglasses or dessert bowls.(>DA2D?(A>B422>8=C>4027glass; garnish with mint. Serve8<<4380C4;H*4AE4B J027B4AE8=61>DC calories, 0g total fat, 0mg cho lesterol, 10mg sodium, 22g totalcarbs.For thousands of triple-testedrecipes, visit our website atwww.goodhousekeeping.com/recipefinder/. (c) 2014 Hearst Communications, Inc. ;;A867CBA4B4AE43 Good Housekeeping &"'(%$,%&( n,***! rectchevy.com R OBBY E LLIOTT !$)!('"" !'&!$'$$! %&' (%%#' !#( 3:27c

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T T O O P P F F I I V V E E M M O O V V I I E E S S 1. Mr. Peabody & Sherman (PG) animated 2. 300: Rise of an Empire (R) Sullivan Stapleton, Eva Green 3. Need for Speed (PG-13) Aaron Paul, Dominic Cooper 4. Non-Stop (PG-13) Liam Neeson, Julianne Moore 5. The Single Mom's Club (PG13) Nia Long, Wendi McLendon-Covey 4C The Herald-Advocate, March 27, 2014

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March 27, 2014, The Herald-Advocate 5C MONDAY Breakfast: Apple Jacks, Turkey Sausage, GrahamCrackers, Strawberry Poptart,Whole Grain Waffles, AppleSlices, Condiments and Milk Lunch: BBQ Rib Patty on Bun, Oven Roasted Chicken,Roll, Turkey & Cheese Wrap,Broccoli w/Dip, Baked Beans,Fruit Cup, Condiments and Milk TUESDAY Breakfast: Trix, Chicken & Biscuit, Buttery Toast, YogurtParfait w/Fruit, Apple Juice,Condiments and Milk Lunch: Chicken Bite Meal, Mini Cheeseburgers, PBJamwich, Wowbutter & JellySandwich, Carrot Sticks w/Dip,Sweet Yellow Corn, Apples,Condiments and Milk WEDNESDAY Breakfast: Breakfast Pizza, Brown Sugar Cinnamon Poptart,Golden Grahams, GrahamCrackers, Strawberry Cup,Condiments and Milk Lunch: Nachos w/Meat & Cheese, Pepperoni Pizza, Yo gurt Parfait w/Fruit, GardenSalad, Vegetable Blend, FruitCocktail, Condiments and Milk THURSDAY Breakfast: Frosted Flakes, Sausage Biscuit, Buttery Toast,Orange Juice, Condiments andMilk Lunch: Chef Salad w/Turkey & Roll, Chicken Quesadilla,Sloppy Joe on Bun, Roasted Po tatoes, Lemon & Blue RaspberryFrozen Treat, Condiments andMilk FRIDAY Breakfast: Cheerios, Turkey Sausage Pizza, Buttery Toast,Blueberry Glazed Pancakes,Cinnamon Glazed Pancakes,Fruit Cocktail, Condiments andMilk Lunch: Breaded Chicken Sandwich, Turkey & Gravy, Roll,Bean Burrito, Mashed Potatoes,Spinach, Apple Slices, Condi-ments and Milk MONDAY Breakfast: Apple Jacks, Turkey Sausage, GrahamCrackers, Strawberry Poptart,Whole Grain Waffles, AppleSlices, Condiments and Milk Lunch: BBQ Rib Patty on Bun, Oven Roasted Chicken,Roll, Turkey & Cheese Wrap,Broccoli w/Dip, Baked Beans,Fruit Cup, Condiments and Milk TUESDAY Breakfast: Trix, Chicken & Biscuit, Buttery Toast, YogurtParfait w/Fruit, Apple Juice,Condiments and Milk Lunch: Chicken Bite Meal, Mini Cheeseburgers, PBJamwich, Wowbutter & JellySandwich, Carrot Sticks w/Dip,Sweet Yellow Corn, Apples,Condiments and Milk WEDNESDAY Breakfast: Breakfast Pizza, Brown Sugar Cinnamon Poptart,Golden Grahams, GrahamCrackers, Strawberry Cup,Condiments and Milk Lunch: Nachos w/Meat & Cheese, Pepperoni Pizza, Yo gurt Parfait w/Fruit, GardenSalad, Vegetable Blend, FruitCocktail, Condiments and Milk JUNIOR HIGH ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS What’s For Lunch? THURSDAY Breakfast: Frosted Flakes, Sausage Biscuit, Buttery Toast,Orange Juice, Condiments andMilk Lunch: Chef Salad w/Turkey & Roll, Chicken Quesadilla,Sloppy Joe on Bun, Roasted Po tatoes, Celery Sticks w/Dip,Lemon & Blue Raspberry FrozenTreat, Condiments and Milk FRIDAY Breakfast: Cheerios, Turkey Sausage Pizza, Buttery Toast,Blueberry Glazed Pancakes,Cinnamon Glazed Pancakes,Fruit Cocktail, Condiments andMilk Lunch: Breaded Chicken Sandwich, Turkey & Gravy, Roll,Bean Burrito, Mashed Potatoes,Spinach, Apple Slices, Condi-ments and Milk MONDAY Breakfast: Apple Jacks, Turkey Sausage, Buttery Toast,Strawberry Poptart, Whole GrainWaffles, Apple Slices, Condi ments and Milk Lunch: BBQ Rib Patty on Bun, Oven Roasted Chicken,Roll, Turkey & Cheese Wrap,Tuna Salad w/Bread Bowl, Broc coli w/Dip, Baked Beans, FruitCup, Pear, Condiments and Milk TUESDAY Breakfast: Trix, Chicken & Biscuit, Buttery Toast, YogurtParfait w/Fruit, Apple Juice,Condiments and Milk Lunch: Cheese Pizza, Chicken Bite Meal, Mini Cheese burgers, Taco Salad, PBJamwich, Cheese Stick, Wow butter & Jelly Sandwich, CarrotSticks w/Dip, Sweet YellowCorn, Banana, Grape Juice,Condiments and Milk WEDNESDAY Breakfast: Breakfast Pizza, Brown Sugar Cinnamon Poptart,Golden Grahams, Super Donut,Buttery Toast, Strawberry Cup,Condiments and Milk Lunch: Breaded Chicken Chef Salad w/Breadstick, MiniCheeseburgers, Nachos w/Meat & Cheese, Cheese Pizza,Yogurt Parfait w/Fruit, GardenSalad, Vegetable Blend, FruitCocktail, Oranges, Condimentsand Milk THURSDAY Breakfast: Frosted Flakes, Sausage Biscuit, Buttery Toast,Yogurt Parfait w/Fruit, OrangeJuice, Condiments and Milk Lunch: Breaded Chicken Sandwich, Chef Salad w/Turkey, Roll, Chicken Quesa-dilla, Sloppy Joe on Bun,Roasted Potatoes, Celery Sticksw/Dip, Lemon & Blue RaspberryFrozen Treat, Apples, Condi-ments and Milk FRIDAY Breakfast: Cheerios, Turkey Sausage, Buttery Toast, WholeGrain Pancakes, Fruit Cocktail,Condiments and Milk Lunch: Breaded Chicken Sandwich, Grilled Chicken ChefSalad w/Breadstick, Turkey &Gravy, Roll, Bean Burrito,Cheese Sticks, Mashed Pota toes, Spinach, Apple Slices, Yo gurt Parfait w/Fruit, Peaches,Condiments and Milk SENIOR HIGH Q: My next-door neighbor informed me yesterday that heintends to set up a beehive inhis yard. Is he even allowed todo this in a populated area?We both have half-acre lots,and he says the hive likely willbe located in a far corner, but Isee nuisance and even disasterahead. What if the beesswarm? What if they sting achild and, God forbid, thatchild is allergic? Should I con tact the city about this? —Claire S., via e-mail A: Believe it or not, beekeep ing can and does take place insuburban areas — and even inthe middle of the city. I under stand your concern, however. Take heart in the fact that your neighbor came over to tell youabout the planned hive before itarrived. That gives you the op portunity to ask some questionsabout the hive, the type of beesand so on. I encourage you tokeep it polite. For now, just askquestions and listen to yourneighbor. There's a very goodchance that he has been research ing beekeeping for some timeand that he even knows the mu nicipal ordinances regarding theactivity. If he already has some home steading activities going on, suchas keeping a few chickens, andthose activities haven't been anuisance to you or others, it'slikely that the beehive will makelittle to no difference in theneighborhood — other than theflowers in your garden perhapsblooming bigger and better than ever before, thanks to nature'sbest pollinators living nearby. After talking to your neighbor, do some research of your own.MAAREC (Mid-Atlantic Api cultural Research & ExtensionConsortium) has a good pam phlet available to download as aPDF about suburban beekeeping,and a number of websites areavailable under that search term.There are many ways for bee keepers to reduce the possibilityof nuisance and stings in theneighborhood. You also can contact your mu nicipality about whether bee keeping is allowed. If it isspecifically permitted, there areusually rules about how big thehive can be and whether it needsto be registered with the state'sagricultural office. Above all, give it a chance. The dwindling bee populationworldwide is greatly concerningresearchers, so homesteaders'beekeeping can be a small buthelpful contribution toward solv ing the problem. And, being onfriendly terms with a successfulbeekeeper can have the positiveside effect of receiving an occa sional, and perhaps steady, gift ofhoney. HOME TIP: Interested in beekeeping but don't have a lotof money or space? Look uplocal beekeeping groups onlineor consider starting one at a com munity garden or other openspace.Send your questions or home tipsto ask@thisisahammer.com. (c) 2014 King Features Synd., Inc. This Is A Hammer By Samantha Mazzotta Collecting Q: I have a large opaque bowl that hasbeen identified as apiece of Paden CityGlass. I can't find thistype of glass men tioned in any of myreference books. Canyou help me? —Dot, Hammond, La. A: The glass company was established in Paden City,W.Va., sometime during the earlydecades of the past century. Dur ing the 1920s, the company ex panded its production to includecolored wares in crystal andopaque glass in a variety of pat terns and styles. The Paden GlassCompany built a reputation forits high standards of homemadewares until about 1950, whenunder new management, theplant was automated. PadenGlass later closed due to finan cial problems. One of the bestsources is "Glass A to Z" byDavid Shotwell and published byKrause Books. Q: I have a series of maps, mostly from the 1870s and1880s, and all documenting re gions in North and SouthAmerica. I would like to havethem appraised. —Brett, Weston, Conn. A: Kevom James Brown, ownerof Geographicus Fine AntiqueMaps, appraises maps for about$50 each. He does not purchasemaps that he appraises, as hesees that practice as a clear con flict of interest. Contact forBrown and Geographicus is 201W. 105th Street, New York, NY 10025; http://www.geo graphicus.com; and646-320-8650. Q: I have a planter that features a poodledesign. It was made byHull Pottery and givento me as a gift. —Susan, Mason City, Iowa A: I found your planter refer enced in "Warman's Hull Pot tery: Identification and PriceGuide" by David Doyle and pub lished by Krause Books. Accord ing to Doyle, your planter isvalued in the $20 to $40 rangeand was a "novelty" product ofHull. Q: I have a copy of "A Christmas Carol" by CharlesDickens published in 1935 byDodd, Mead & Company. Canyou tell me how much it isworth? —Lillian, Marion, Ind. A: I contacted several used book dealers about your novel,and they seem to agree it is prob ably worth about $35. The valueof a book is determined by sev eral factors including condition,rarity and edition.Write to Larry Cox in care ofKing Features Weekly Service,P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL32853-6475, or send e-mail toquestionsforcox@aol.com. Dueto the large volume of mail he re ceives, Mr. Cox is unable to per sonally answer all readerquestions. Do not send any ma terials requiring return mail. (c) 2014 King Features Synd., Inc. By Larry CoxAll services are free of charge. Contact Angela Hendry, Certified Navigator at 8 8 6 6 3 3 4 4 5 5 2 2 6 6 5 5 3 3 0 0 e e x x t t . 3 3 0 0 3 3 Funding for this material was made possible by Grant # D04RH23580 from HRSA. The views expressed in written materials do not necessarily reflect the official polic ies of HRSA or the Department of Health and Human Services. Are you and your family covered?A local certified navigator is available to: Answer your questions about the Affordable Care Act’s Healt hcare Marketplace Provide in-person enrollment help for you and your family Heartland Rural Health Network, Inc. 2:26-4:23c 3:27c DEAR PAW'S CORNER: Every summer, my cats getfleas. It's agony for them andfor me, because I have fleabites on my ankles all throughthe warm season when I wantto wear sandals. The problemgoes away in late fall throughwinter, but comes back withwarm weather. How can I stopthe constant re-infestation? —Trudy in Evanston, Ill. DEAR TRUDY: Fleas actually are a year-round problem, evenin colder climates. They may notbe as active in the winter, buteven if dormant or dead, theireggs usually are still in the in fested areas, waiting for the rightconditions to hatch. During the winter, it's impor tant to keep dusting and vacuum ing the entire house at least oncea week, with particular attentionpaid to the areas your cats inhabitthe most. Treat the house with aflea-stopping preventative — anumber of products are availableat the pet store, such as sprinkle-on treatments for the carpet, fur niture and drapes. Or, research alternative repellents made withnatural or household items suchas lemon-juice sprays or essen tial oils. Comb the cats' fur daily if pos sible, and go through it with aflea comb once a week. Asspring rolls around, start regulartreatment with a flea preventa tive. Once-a-month topical treat ments can be very effective inreducing or eliminating fleas, butmany pet owners are againstusing them. Talk to the veterinar ian about the most effective op tions. It's also important to keep your cats indoors. There are a numberof safety reasons to do this any way, and it prevents fleas fromdropping onto their fur as theybrush through grass or greenery.Start now with a flea-preventionprogram, before you even feel anitch, and this summer can bemuch more comfortable.Send your questions or com ments to ask@pawscorner.com.My booklet, "Fighting Fleas," isnow just 99 cents at the Kindlestore. Download it today! (c) 2014 King Features Synd., Inc. Paw s Corner By Sam Mazzotta

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6C The Herald-Advocate, March 27, 2014 Crime Blotter During the past week, sheriff’s deputies and city police of ficers investigated the following incidents and made the follow ing arrests: COUNTY Mar. 23, Kevin Eugene Richardson, 39, of 115 Seventh St. W., Zolfo Springs, and Lee Edward Woods, 20, of 2631 John Gill Road,Bowling Green, were arrested by Cpl. Todd Souther. Richardsonwas charged with an Open Party violation and contri buting to the delinquency of a minor. Woods was charged with possession ofliquor under 21 and resisting/obstructing an officer without violence. Mar. 23, Miguel Angel Arriago-Garcia, 28, of 1195 W. Polk St., Bartow, was arrested by Cpl. Todd Souther and charged withDUI and no valid license. Mar. 22, Jose Alberto Garcia, 19, of U.S. 17, Bowling Green, was arrested by Cpl. Todd Souther and charged with possession ofmethamphetamine, possession of drug paraphernalia andresisting/obstructing an officer without violence. Mar. 22, Brian Richard Yake, 21, of 4547 Alderman Rd., Bowl ing Green, was arrested by Dep. Jeremy Brandeberry and chargedwith battery. Mar. 22, Patricia Ann Obrien-Penzes, 27, of 63 Cookes Rdg., Torrington, Conn., was arrested by Dep. Chris Albritt on and charged with aggravated battery causing bodily harm. Mar. 21, Pedro Luis Bonet, 49, of 915 Sandpiper Dr., Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Steven Ahrens and charged withbattery. Mar. 21, Morris Kilpatrick, 45, of 3667 Fussell Rd., Bowling Green, was arrested by Dep. Polly Bissette on three out-of-countywarrants. Mar. 21, a theft on North CR 663 was reported. Mar. 20, Travis Carson Quinn, 24, of 290 S. Hollandtown Rd., Wauchula, was arrested by Ofc. Henderson and charged with larceny— petit theft. Mar. 20, Vernon Kenneth Greene, 22, of 2612 Heard Bridge Rd., Wauchula, was arrested on a charge of burglary of adwelling/structure/conveyance and larceny — petit theft. Mar. 20, Eva Carrizales Ornelas, 35, of 4117 Captiva Ave., Bowling Green, was arrested by Dep. David Cruz on a charge offailure to appear in court. Mar. 20, a vehicle stolen on Sandpiper Drive and thefts on Magnolia Street and on U.S. 17 North were reported. Mar. 19. Samuel Rivera, 22, of 290 Old Bowling Green Rd., Bowling Green, was arrested by Cpl. Todd Souther and charged withlarceny — petit theft. Mar. 19, Julian Jermaine Williams, 29, of 2194 Ninth Court Rd., Bartow, was arrested on a charge of withholding support ofchildren. Mar. 19, Donald Allen Rapp, 45, of 2698 Buck Dr., Zolfo Springs, was arrested by Dep. Daniel Arnold and charged with pos session of methamphetamine and possession of drug paraphernalia. Mar. 19, Albert Franqui, 47, of 1040 Makowski St., Wau-chula, and Lisa Jo Whitby, 53, of 2370 N. U.S. 17, Wauchula, were arrestedby the Drug Task Force (DTF) and each charged with two countssale of methamphetamine, possession of marijuana, possession ofmethamphetamine and possession of drug paraphernalia. Franquiwas also charged with delivery/distribution of methamphetaminewithin 1,000 feet of a church/school, etc., two counts criminal mis use of a two-way communication device, two counts owning/rentinga structure/vehicle to sell drugs, and sale of cocaine. Mar. 19, a residential burglary on SR 64 East, vehicles stolen on Lake Branch Road and on Shaw Road, a tag stolen on Chamber lain Boulevard, criminal mischief on Hickory Court, and a theft onU.S. 17 North were reported. Mar. 18, Henry Aaron Williams, 49, of 614 E. Bay St., Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Steven Ahrens on a charge of violationof probation. Mar. 18, Jamaine Deanthony Brown, 31, and April Marie Kenyon, 22, both of 1216 David Ct., Wauchula, were arrested byDep. Alice Simandol and each charged with simple assaul — threatto do violence. Mar. 18, Clenton Preston Judah, 31, of 158 Oak Meadow Lane, Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Cesar Medina and charged withcriminal mischief — damage to property. Mar. 18, thefts on Evergreen Drive and on Wilkerson Road were reported. Mar. 17, Justin Orlando Luna, 23, of 812 E. Fifth St., Zolfo Springs, was arrested by Dep. Ryan Abbott on an out-of-county war rant. Mar. 17, Mark Anthony Garcia, 24, of 710 E. Main St., Bowl ing Green, was arrested by Dep. Kim Pfeiffer on a charge of failureto appear in court. Mar. 17, Gilbert Carmona, 45, of 1417 Lisa Dr., Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Steven Ahrens on a charge of violation of proba tion. Mar. 17, Ashley Lynn Mollenkopf, 20, of 1260 Mockingbird Rd., Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Cesar Medina and chargedwith battery. Mar. 17, a residential burglary on Fifth Street East, a tag stolen on Appaloosa Lane, criminal mischief on Magnolia Boulevard, andthefts on Center Hill Road and on Moffitt Road were reported. WAUCHULA Mar. 22, Jose Bermudez, 45, of 700 E. Townsend St., Wauchula, was arrested by Cpl. Robert Spencer on an out-of-county war rant. Mar. 21, Roland Lopez Arguijo, 38, of 713 Eason Dr., Wauchula, was arrested by Ofc. Jonathan Corwin and charged withpossession/sale/manufacture of a synthetic narcotic, possession ofdrug paraphernalia, failure to obey a police officer by fleeing anddriving with knowledge of a suspended license. Mar. 20, Britni Danielle Gamble, 23, of 1347 SR 64 E., Wauchula, was arrested by Ofc. Jereme Bridges on a charge of violationof probation. Mar. 20, Christopher Lee Woods, 26, of 2631 John Gill Rd., Bowling Green, was arrested by Ofc. Pablo Bermudez and chargedwith cruelty toward a child without great harm, depriving avictim/witness of communication and criminal mischief — damageto property. Mar. 18, criminal mischief on Georgia Street was reported. Mar. 17, a residential burglary on South Seventh Avenue was reported. BOWLING GREEN Mar. 20, Oscar Cisneros, 21, of 817 Pleasant Way, Bowling Green, was arrested by Sgt. Edward Coronado on two out-of-countywarrants. Mar. 18, a theft on Pine Avenue was reported. INVITATION FOR SEALED BIDS RENOVATIONS TO PRESS BOX HARDEE WILDCAT FOOTBALL STADIUM Sealed bids will be received by The School Board ofHardee County, at the Superintendent’s Office, 1009 North6th Ave., Wauchula, Florida 33873 until 2:00 p.m. on Mon day, April 21, 2014, at which time all bids shall be publiclyopened for furnishing all labor and material and performingall work necessary for Renovations to the Press Box atHardee Wildcat Football Stadium, Wauchula, FL. Each bid shall be submitted to the Office of the Superin tendent of Schools, Hardee County School Board, P.O. Box 1678, Wauchula, FL 33873. Bids shall be Sealedand plainly marked: BID – RENOVATIONS – PRESS BOX APRIL 21, 2014 2:00 P.M. The Board reserves the right to reject any and all bids re ceived and to waive any and all irregularities in regardthereto. Unsealed bids, e.g., fax transmissions, will not beaccepted. No bids may be withdrawn after the scheduledclosing time for receipt of bids for a period of thirty (30)days.MANDATORY PRE-BID CONFERENCE: April 2, 3:00p.m. Hardee County School Board Educational Facilities Department, 1015 SR 66, Zolfo Springs, FL Telephonenumber (863)735-2055. Bid documents and specificationswill be issued at this time.All bidding contractors shall attend the pre-bid conferencein order to have a valid bid proposal considered for thisproject. Bid Proposals from Contractors NOT in atten dance of the mandatory pre-bid conference will be consid ered unresponsive.Bid tabulations with recommended awards shall be pos ted for review by interested parties at the Hardee CountySchool Board office and web site, www.hardee.k12.fl.us. Failure to file a protest within the time prescribed by Sec tion 120.53(5), Florida Statutes, shall constitute a waiver ofproceedings under Chapter 120, Florida Statutes.David Durastanti Superintendent of Schools 3:20,27c NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that PENDER NEWKIRK CUSTODIAN F/B/O TC 10U, LLC, the holder of the fol lowing certificate has filed said certificate for a taxdeed to be issued thereon. The certificate number a nd year of issuance, the description of the property, andthe names in which it was assessed are as follows:CERTIFICATE NO.: 875 YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010Parcel ID Number: 10-34-25-0843-00001-0020Description of Property: LOT 20HARLEM HEIGHTS159P387 78P316 82P213466P536 (NC) SUBJECT TO RESERVATIONS, COVENANTS, RE STRICTIONS, AND EASEMENTS OF RECORD.Name in which assessed: WILLA HARRIS AND WILLIE HARRISSaid property being in the County of HARDEE, Stateof Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemedaccording to law, the property described in such cer tificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at theHardee County Courthouse, 417 West Main Street,second floor hallway outside of Room 202, Wauchula,FL 33873 on the 9 TH day of APRIL, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 26 th day of FEBRUARY, 2014. Victoria L. RogersClerk of Circuit CourtHardee County, FloridaAD No: 1By: LAURA L. BARKER, Deputy ClerkTax Deed File No.: 252013TD052XXXXPursuant to F.S. 197.512 3:6-27c NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that RALEIGH E. OR DI ANNE K. OR STEVEN E. HORNE, the holder of the fol lowing certificate has filed said certificate for a taxdeed to be issued thereon. The certificate number a nd year of issuance, the description of the property, andthe names in which it was assessed are as follows:CERTIFICATE NO.: 808 YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2011Parcel ID Number: 13-34-25-0100-00001-0010Description of Property: LOT 10GILLIARD FARMS SUBDLOCATED IN SEC 24 34S 25E311P504P512 314P96 SUBJECT TO RESERVATIONS, COVENANTS, RE STRICTIONS, AND EASEMENTS OF RECORD.Name in which assessed: LONG VAN NGUYEN ANDKIM THOA THI NGUYENSaid property being in the County of HARDEE, Stateof Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemedaccording to law, the property described in such cer tificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at theHardee County Courthouse, 417 West Main Street,second floor hallway outside of Room 202, Wauchula,FL 33873 on the 9 TH day of APRIL, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 25 th day of FEBRUARY, 2014. Victoria L. RogersClerk of Circuit CourtHardee County, FloridaAD No: 1By: LAURA L. BARKER, Deputy ClerkTax Deed File No.: 252013TD072XXXXPursuant to F.S. 197.512 3:6-27c Around the park March is "Irish month" and what a parade and dinner we hadfor the "IRISH.” Our GrandMarshall was Jack Shanower,who gave a tribute to "Bill Har tigan.” a true-blooded Irish-man,who started the "IRISH PA RADE.” here at the Oasis manyyears ago. May he rest in peace. Winners were: best dressed: Lynsey Gillespie, granddaugh ter of Les and Ann Day; FrankHuiet and Peaches, his dog Cart;Lucy and Leonard Starr, Trike;and Carol Yaw. Judges were: Becky DeWitt, Kathy Gaylog and Junior Ri neck. Helping decorate the ta bles were Tom Longueuil andBecky and Kathy. Winnie De Witt did a great job of or-ganiz ing this wonderful event. RayTuttle was the auctioneer. The Red Hatters had a won derful luncheon and day out onthe town with 17 attending. Oh,what they can't think of to getinto. Ladies Bible Study Connie Swanson does an excel lent teaching of the Bible. Thisweek’s lesson was, Matthew 28,"The Lord is Coming." Our last "Bedazzling" saw new designs and new faces.Diane Mominee headed up the sparkle. Our Pot Luck breakfast was Saturday at 9:00 A.M. at therecreation hall. Bingo 3/13. Audrey Semler won the 50/50, then won the jackpot andshared it with Tom Lon-gueuil.Seven merchant certificateswere given. 3/17, the 50/50 was won by Alicia Orndas. Ralph Pavey wonthe jackpot. Shuffleboard What a gorgeous day for 13 shufflers. Ann Day and CharlieGaylog took the honors. Pokeno 3/17. We are thinning out with only three players andJoyce Longueuil was the bigwinner. 3/19 there were five players and Shirley Hyde had the luck ofthe Irish again. That makes fourpots she has won and gleamingfrom ear to ear! Way to go,Shirley. Wii bowling Mike Yaw had high game with 256 and high average 238. Exercise The gals are still holding true to their exercise. Way to go girls. Until we meet again, here in The Herald-Advocate, may Godbless you and yours. Oasis RV News By Georgianna Mills _______________________________ IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 252013CA000562 WAUCHULA STATE BANK Plaintiff, vs.JESUS VALERIO, a/k/a JESUSVALERIO ACOSTA, and BRENDATREVINO a/k/a BRENDA L.TREVINO-VALERIO Defendants. ______________________________/ NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that pur suant to a Final Judgment enteredin the above entitled case in theCircuit Court of Hardee County,Florida, the Clerk of the Courtshall sell the property situated inHardee County, described as: Lot 12 Block 14 of Wau-chula Hills, a subdivision inHardee County, Florida, asper Plat Book 3, page 1.Together with a 2006CLAYTON HS,Serial Iden-tification number WHC-015826GA, Title Number97073004. This public sale shall be con ducted at 417 West Main St. Sec ond Floor Hallway outside ofRoom 202, Wauchula, FL to thehighest and best bidder for cashafter giving notice as required bySection 45.031, Florida Statutes,at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern StandardTime) on April 2, 2014.IF YOU ARE A SUBORDINATELIENHOLDER CLAIMING A RIGHTTO FUNDS REMAINING AFTERTHE SALE, YOU MUST FILE ACLAIM WITH THE CLERK NOLATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTERTHE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE ACLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTI TLED TO ANY REMAININGFUNDS. VICTORIA L. ROGERS Clerk of Court Hardee County By: Connie Coker Deputy Clerk IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH ADISABILITY WHO NEEDS AC COMMODATION IN ORDER TOPARTICIPATE IN THE PROCEED ING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NOCOST TO YOU, TO THE PROVI SION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE.PLEASE CONTACT THE OFFICEOF THE COURT ADMINISTRA TOR, 255 NORTH BROADWAY AV ENUE, BARTOW, FLORIDA 33830(863) 534-4686, AT LEAST 7 DAYSBEFORE YOUR SCHEDULEDCOURT APPEARANCE, OR IMME DIATELY UPON RECEIVING THISNOTIFICATION IF THE TIME BE FORE THE SCHEDULED APPEAR ANCE IS LESS THAN 7 DAYS; IFYOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IM PAIRED, CALL 711. 3:20,27c _______________________________ _______________________________ IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 252013CA000565 WAUCHULA STATE BANK Plaintiff, vs.JESUS VALERIO ACOSTA, a/k/aJESUS VALERIO, and wifeBRENDA TREVINO-VALERIO,and State of Florida, Departmentof Economic Opportunity Unem-ployment Compensation Serv-ices, and Unknown Tenant(s) Defendants. ______________________________/ NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that pur suant to a Final Judgment enteredin the above entitled case in theCircuit Court of Hardee County,Florida, the Clerk of the Courtshall sell the property situated inHardee County, described as: Lot 11 of Block 14 ofWauchula Hills, a subdivi sion in Hardee County,Florida, as per Plat Book 3,page 1. This public sale shall be con ducted at 417 West Main St. Sec ond Floor Hallway outside ofRoom 202, Wauchula, FL to thehighest and best bidder for cashafter giving notice as required bySection 45.031, Florida Statutes,at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern StandardTime) on April 2, 2014.IF YOU ARE A SUBORDINATELIENHOLDER CLAIMING A RIGHTTO FUNDS REMAINING AFTERTHE SALE, YOU MUST FILE ACLAIM WITH THE CLERK NOLATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTERTHE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE ACLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTI TLED TO ANY REMAININGFUNDS. VICTORIA L. ROGERS Clerk of Court Hardee County By: Connie Coker Deputy Clerk IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH ADISABILITY WHO NEEDS AC COMMODATION IN ORDER TOPARTICIPATE IN THE PROCEED ING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NOCOST TO YOU, TO THE PROVI SION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE.PLEASE CONTACT THE OFFICEOF THE COURT ADMINISTRA TOR, 255 NORTH BROADWAY AV ENUE, BARTOW, FLORIDA 33830(863) 534-4686, AT LEAST 7 DAYSBEFORE YOUR SCHEDULEDCOURT APPEARANCE, OR IMME DIATELY UPON RECEIVING THISNOTIFICATION IF THE TIME BE FORE THE SCHEDULED APPEAR ANCE IS LESS THAN 7 DAYS; IFYOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IM PAIRED, CALL 711. 3:20,27c _______________________________ YOUR BUSINESS COULD APPEAR HERE TOO!!CNancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce DanielsAt The Herald Advocate773-3255www.TheHeraldAdvocate.com The Herald-AdvocateHardee County’s Hometown Coverage Telephone (863) 773-3255 www.TheHeraldAdvocate.com

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March 27, 2014, The Herald-Advocate 7C Courthouse Report COUNTY COURT The following marriage li censes were issued recently in the office of the county court: Jacob Daniel Trew, 28, of Wauchula, and Kaitlyn Renee Eagerton, 21, of Wauchula. Thomas C. Kimmerley, 68, of Marmoa, N. J., and Cindy Kay Holloway-McCleary, 63, of Port Deposit, Md. William Richard Reynolds, 45, and Barbara Ruth Allen, 38, of Wauchula. The following small claims cases were disposed of recently by the county judge: Reginald Brown vs. Brancas Air Conditioning/Frank Branca, dismissed. Valencia Garden Apartments vs. Anthony Huntley and Tyreisha Huntley, judgment of eviction. Capital One Bank vs. Aislynn Holt, judgment. There was no misdemeanor court report as it was trial week. The following case was settled: Kevin Dewayne Ray, domestic battery, dismissed. CIRCUIT COURT The following civil actions were filed recently in the office of the circuit court: Wells Fargo Bank vs. Isaac Maldonado et al, petition for mortgage foreclosure. Abraham Mejia and Cindy Mejia, divorce. Brandy D. Taylor and the state Department of Revenue (DOR) vs. Ray A. Arredondo, petition for administrative child support order. Delida Ann Alvarado and Emmanuel Rojas-Fernandez, di vorce. First National Bank of Wauchula vs. Ida Mendoza, petition for mortgage foreclosure. Amber Emily Carrion and DOR vs. Victor Hugo Lopez, petition for child support. Daniel Garcia and Amber Denise Goodman, divorce. Mary Moore vs. Reuben David Moore, petition for in junction for protection. Brittany Driskell and DOR vs. Ray A. Arredondo, petition for administrative child support order. PHH Mortgage Corp. vs. Jacob P. Shultz, Melissa G. Shultz et al, petition for mort gage foreclosure. Rachel Yvonne Manley and DOR vs. Jon Michael Birt, petition for administrative child sup port order. The following decisions on civil cases pending in the cir cuit court were handed down recently by the circuit court judge: Mary Elizabeth Rosales and DOR vs. Jesus L. Torres Jr., vol untary dismissal. Kayla Smith vs. Cody Rawls, injunction for protection. Florida Institute for Neu-ro logic Research Inc. vs. Hardee County, Florida, dismissed. Maria Ernestina Garza vs. Elias R. Torres, order. Sebastian Juarez Jr. and DOR vs. Cynthia Sue Short, order on child support contempt. Aron Shane Thomas and DOR vs. Linda Oleane Thomas, order on child support contempt. Jessica Nicole Guevara and DOR vs. Eliazar Garcia, order on child support contempt. Karla F. Glisson and DOR vs. Greg B. Glisson, order on child support contempt. State of Florida Department of Transportation vs. Thomas E. and Lorraine G. Brauckhoff et al, voluntary dismissal. Mabeline Mariner and DOR vs. Jose Antonio Bermudez, vol untary dismissal. Sharon Leigh Sockalosky Smith and Toby Jon Smith, order. Amber Price and DOR vs. Joe S. Lopez, order on child sup port contempt. Crystal Gayle Birge Barnwell and DOR vs. Randy Leon Gillis, order on child support contempt. Patricia Grandos and DOR vs. Rene Ricardo Martinez, child support order. Karen D. Glowacki and DOR vs. Nermin Besic, child support order. Alicia Lara and DOR vs. Gin ger Gallegos, order on child sup port contempt. Latika Sharell Williams and DOR vs. Ryan Alfonso Glinton, order on child support contempt. Miranda Nichole Black and DOR vs. Terry Lamar Pelham, child support order. Jahna Concrete Inc. vs. Lib erty Mutual Insurance Co., dis missed. Ivory Fischer vs. Regina Allmon, injunction for protection. Suncoast Schools Federal Credit Union vs. James Massey, Shelly P. Massey et al, order. Melissa Woodrum vs. David King, petition for injunction for protection denied. There was no felony crimi nal court last week as it was trial week. The following cases were settled: Noe Macedo interfering with custody, lewd molestation, lewd or lascivious exhibition over computer online and traveling to meet minor, 10 years Florida State Prison with credit for 284 days served, followed by probation 10 years, $1,044 fines, costs and fees placed on lien; lewd molestation, use of computer to seduce a child and resisting ar rest without violence, not prose cuted. Frank Williard Johns, viola tion of probation (original charges, manufacturing of methamphetamine and unlawful possession of listed chemicals), probation revoked, 50 months Florida State Prison with credit for 409 days served, $400 fees and costs added to outstanding fines, fees and costs and placed on lien. The following real estate transactions of $10,000 or more were filed recently in the office of the clerk of court: Paul E. Jr. and Amy Davis to David D. Durastanti and Stuart D. Durastanti (two properties), $20,000 Paul E. Jr. and Amy Davis to Craig Blas, $31,500. Paul E. Jr. and Amy Davis to Robert S. Fite Jr., $14,000. David Ybarra to Jethro Mc Call and Casey Lee McCall, $15,000. John C. Gordon to Matthew V. and Ivy Knight, $112,500. Matthew V. and Ivy Knight to Jose and Tabatha Hernandez, $40,000. FBI Homes to Jose Maria Figueroa-Escobar, $45,000. Jimmy and Barbara Turner to Hege-Desiree Gillman, $28,700. FBI Homes to Jose Luis Patino-Romero, $20,000. Ronald G. and Dessie L. Byarlay to John G. and Karen D. Yanity, $18,500. Deborah Barker to Patricia Elabed, $80,000. NOW PURCHASING CITRUS FRUIT For the 2013-14 Citrus Crop Frank VasquezCitrus Broker781-4133 Chapman Fruit Co.Est. 19563:27c Pioneer Creek RV NewsBy Andie McCosco CHAPEL Tom and Janit Apple and Larry and Nancy Willey wel comed 172 to chapel. De-vo tions were led by Janit Apple who read a poem on Hope. The anthem Standing of the Solid Rock was sung by the choir and the Mens Group sang Hallelujah! We Shall Rise, both directed by Sandy Feeser and accompanied by Cheryl Conkle on the piano. Pastor David spoke from Acts 2: 2233. SCOREBOARD Bowling: For the men, Dave Thompson high score of 184 and a high series of 489. For the women, Marilyn Achard high game of 148 and a high series of 416. Rod Faris and Jim Noble had 5/7 splits. Jim Ach-ard had a 3/10 split. Arlene Sebright had a 3/5/7/10 split. SPOT LIGHT The Womens Veterans Luncheon was held on Mar. 8 at a Bowling Green restaurant. This is a yearly event and an opportunity for military women to share a special time and also share their experience while serving their country. In atten dance were: Jackie Gauger and Rhea Heckler, Army veterans; Linda Gray, Lorrie Coleman and Connie Combs, Air Force veter ans; Dora Morgan, Marine vet eran; and Terry Stamm, Navy Waves. Bernice English, Canadian Air Force was unable to attend. Starting in World War II, most have served during mili tary conflicts. The ladies are al ways looking for other Women Veterans to join them for lunch, local or snowbirds. Contact the Pioneer Creek RV park office and leave your name and phone number. Pioneer Creek RV Resort is at the forefront of the Central Floridas Shuffleboard Association. On Saturday, Mar. 15, the Pioneer Creek Shuffleboard Association held its annual banquet honoring several outstanding shufflers of the 2013-14 season. In team shuffle, the Wannabees, came in first place. Team members were: DeWayne Renwick, Captain, Lou Faulkner, Richard Lacourse, Irene Lunney, Cathy Payne and Bart Wesseling. Second place was taken by team Rinky Dinks. Team members were: Lynn Shick, Captain, MaryAnn Fisher, Chris Grove, Terry Keinath, Sheridan Leslie and Ginnie Merriman. Wauchula State Bank sponsored the team shuffle. In the Central District, several shufflers from Pioneer Creek were acknowledged for their success this winter in district tournaments. Qualifying for the Reiny Schleier Masters (Top 8) Invitational Tournament were: Catherine RenwickState Am.; Lou Faulkner-State Am.; Richard Lacouse-District Am. (Alternate); and DeWayne Ren-wick-State Am. Each of these shufflers is among the top eight shufflers in their respective categories. The Masters tourna ment will take place in Lakeland on Mar. 2021. Recognition was given to Catherine Renwick for earning enough points this year to move from District Am. to State Am. and to DeWayne Renwick for earning enough points this year to move from State Am. to State Pro. status. Don Merillat led the prayer at Koffee Klatch on March 19, with Paul Vaughan leading the U.S. Pledge and I led the Canadian Pledge. The 50/50 winners were Pam and Gene Norris; Lot 324; Norm and Heather Lemke; Lois and Paul Conley; and Lot 297. CRAFT FAIR Our Craft Fair, Bake Sale and Luncheon on March 10 was a great success. We had 21 tables with people selling their own crafts. We had several people from other parks participating in our Craft Fair. The winners of the raffle were Doris Griffith, Jeanne Carney, Kay Dale and Nancy Ellman. Next years craft fair is scheduled for March 2. SATURDAY DANCES Steve Baker played for our St. Patricks Dance on March 15. The winners of the door prizes were Sharron Noble, Cindy Johnson, Marianne Phillips, Michelle, Linda Lane, Elnora MacNaughton, Claire Tremblay, Jeannette Jacques, Sharon Wilson and Wendy Green. Our last dance for this season is our Farewell Dance on March 29. There will be some door prizes and also a 50/50. SHUFFLING BANQUET The banquet was held on March 18. Heather Lemke and Eliane Lamarche were in charge of the Tuesday shuffling. Don Merillat is in charge of Horse Collar and Out-of-Park Shuffling. The mens winners this year were Don Merillat, first; Ron Storm, second; and Bob Beshel, third. For the ladies, Eliane Lamarche was first; Lor raine Howerter was second and Sherry Chamberlain was third. BINGO Sylvia Baker won the large jackpot on March 3 and Barbara George won the small jackpot. On March 7, Pam Norris won both the large and small jack pots. March 10 saw Mary Kessler win the large jackpot and Mary Boehk win the small jackpot. On March 15, Sylvia Baker again won the large jack pot while Shirley ONeal won the small jackpot and the special jackpot was split between Gert Brayton and Don Smith. The last night of bingo for this sea son is March 28. GOLF The three leagues golfed in our golf tournament today. The first place team consisted of Larry Murphy, Larry Gum and Jacques Tremblay. There is still golf to be played. Just show up and you will be put on a team. The golf banquet was held March 20. BOCCE The first-place team for the year was Bob Bundy, Sherry Bundy, Myrna Wilday and Gene Norris. Crystal Lake RV NewsBy Joyce Taylor CareerSource Heartland: Committed to the CommunityFebruary 10th marked the official activation of the new CareerSource Heartland brand, and along with the launch of the new brand comes a new website with a fresh new look! Our commitment to our core missions re mains firm, and our top priority continues to be connecting job seekers and employers. Check out www.careersourceheartland.com today for your workforce needs employers and job seekers alike! As a member of the new statewide CareerSource Florida network, CareerSource Heartland formerly Heartland Workforce is helping to ensure businesses and job seekers anywhere in Florida can easily find employment and hiring assistance, connecting with services and resources to help them succeed. We appreciate the support of our customers and community as we implement our brand transition! How job seekers and businesses will benefit Our top priority is helping Floridians enter, remain and advance in the workforce. We do this by connecting employers with qualified, skilled talent and Floridians with employment and career development opportunities. The unified brand will improve customer and market awareness and use of the systems services and resources to address the current and future workforce needs of our employers, job seekers, and workers. The new unified brand is designed to minimize the confusion among job seekers and businesses who were trying to navigate the old system comprised of 25 different board names and logos throughout the state. As CareerSource Heartland we will continue to offer valuable services to connect job seekers and businesses in the most strategic, comprehensive manner possible, to ensure the regions demands for talent and training are met. As CareerSource Heartland we still retain our flexibility to design and deliver programs that best meet local needs. CareerSource Heartland is an equal opportunity employer program. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities. All voice telephone numbers may be reached by persons using TTY/TDD equipment via the Florida Relay Service at 711.Stop in today or contact us at any one of our three Centers in DeSoto, Hardee, or Highlands. Employers let us show you what we can do to help you be more successful! Job Seekers let us match you up with that next great job! DeSoto County 2160 NE Roan Ave. Arcadia (863) 993-1008 Hardee County 324 6th Avenue North Wauchula (863) 773-3474 Highlands County 5901 US Hwy 27 S, Suite 1 Sebring (863) 385-36723:27c 3:20,27c Sebring Podiatry Center6801 US 27 North, Suite D3 Sebring, FL 33870863-314-8600Dr. Dale C. AndersonPodiatric Physician & Surgeon Wauchula & Lake Placid Appointments Available!Toenail Fungus?Laser Solution!Sebring Podiatry CenterRequest a complementary consultation!Call 863-314-8600 Laser Nail Fungus Treatment kills the fungus that lived in and under the toenail. The laser light passes through the toenail without causing damage to the nail or surrounding skin. There is a warming sensation and some patients may feel a pinprick. Just walk in and walk out. The laser nail fungus procedure only takes 15-20 minutes. Shoes and nail polish can be worn immediately after the treatment.10:18tfc



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The Herald-Advocate H ardee Countys Hometown Coverage 114th Year, No. 17 3 S ections, 28 Pages 70 P lus 5 Sales Tax Thursday, March 27, 2014 SUBSCRIBE ONLINE AT THEHERALD ADVOCATE .COM IDA Expulsion He aring Delayed . Story 7A BG Offers Free J unk Pickup . Details 2A Noah Sails This Weekend Al leged Dealers Jailed By JOAN SEAMAN Of The Herald-Advocate Its not at all like the recently proclaimed movie, Noah. The local production of the Story of Noah which begins Friday night, is biblical and re alistic. It has a cast of 200 and about 100 live animals, includ ing several exotic ones. The movie portrays God as a vi ndictive judge, uses inflated animals so as to not upset animal rights enthusiasts and shows Noah as a drunkard trying to live with his guilt of surviving the flood and taking it out on his sons. The two-hour local drama shows God as a just judge of the wickedness of Noahs times, yet a loving Father who protects His own and continues the world for them. Throughout the Bible, the t heme of good vs. evil contin ues, with God ultimately re warding the faithful for all eternity and condemning the un righteous. The last scene shows the Revelation story of the final battle between good and evil. In its rotation of The Story of Jesus and The Story of Noah a cast of men, women and children from many local churches have spent hours rehearsing for this years production of the life of N oah. Before the actual performance begins at 7:30 p.m., there is a pa triotic extravaganza people will want to see. The moving por trayal of freedom pays tribute to veterans from native Americans, the American Rev-olution and every war since. It honors veterans and active military person nel in Wauchula and in the surrounding areas as their entry on a troop carrier highlights the progra m. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. and people can stop by the conces sion catered by Beef O Bradys and other local concessions to pick up supper. The freedom pa triotic presentation begins promptly at 7 p.m., so people need to be in their seats early. Then, theres a 15-minute break while the cast changes cos tumes, time enough to get a soda and relieve the tension. The Story of Noah begins at 7:30 and continues to 10:30 with about a half hour intermission. See Noah follow Gods instruction to build a huge floating zoo, using only the bronze and iron and other materials of his day, in spite of the ridicule of the people around him. The ark, roughly 450 feet long, 75 feet wide and 45 feet high, would withstand the rigors of the 40-day, 40-night flood as Noahs faith carried him through that experience to a new world and new life. Its procession of animals in cludes the usual birds, pigeons, See NOAH 2A WEATHER D ATE HIGH LOW RAIN 03/1981500.00 0 3/2082570.00 03/2184580.00 03/2283560.00 03/2383600.06 03/2469640.84 03/2575510.23 TOTAL Rainfall to 03/25/2014 8.08 Sa me period last year 1.89 Ten Year Average 47.79 Source: Univ. of Fla. Ona Research Center INDEX C lassifieds.....................6B Community Calendar..11B Courthouse Report.......7C Crime Blotter.................6C Entertainment...............4C Hardee Living................2B Information Roundup...4A Obituaries......................4A Puzzles..........................4C School Lunch Menus...5C Solunar Forecast..........3C PHOTO BY MARIA TRUJILLO So me of the 100-member cast of The Story of Noah are seen during a recent rehearsal as Noah and his sons take animals into the ark. The presentation at the Hardee County Cattlemens Arena at Stenstrom and Altman roads in Wauchula debuts Friday for a five-weekend run. Find more rehearsal photos inside. PHOTO BY MARIA TRUJILLO T he second and final part of the Mr. HHS competition will take place on Saturday. Here, Tristen Lanier and Tyler Dunlap are determined to finish the cross-fit challenge, which consisted of running the Wildcat Stadium track, throwing a 14pound ball over their heads for length of the field, running half of the track with the ball, standing straight up on the bench 24 times while holding the ball and, finally, running back to the start of the race. A trainer made sure the exercises were completed correctly. By JOAN SEAMAN Of The Herald-Advocate Surveillance again paid off for the Hardee County Sheriffs Office in the arrest of a pair of reported drug dealers last Wednesday. According to law enforcement reports, purchase of a gram of methamphetamine was ob served, starting the chain that led to the arrests of Albert Franqui and Lisa Jo Whitby on a variety of charges. After observing the alleged drug sale by Whitby, officers stopped the vehicle in which she was riding with Franqui, who now possessed the drug money. Whitby allegedly had another marijuana joint inside her wallet ready for sale. The pair was taken to a rented trailer, where a search located a scale, several differently sized baggies of methamphetamine, two baggies of cocaine and a cut straw. Also in the unit were a glass pipe and a marijuana joint on the dresser. All items reportedly tested positive for the named drugs. The methamphetamine weighed 7.7 grams and the cocaine weighed 0.2 grams. The quan tity and multiple baggies showed the intent to sell the nar cotics. Whitby, 53, of 2370 U. S. 17 North, Wauchula, was charged with two counts sale of methamphetamine, second degree felonies, plus possession of mar ijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia, both misde meanors. She remained in jail in lieu of $11,000 bond. Franqui, 47, of 1040 MaSee DEALERS2A By MARIA TRUJILLO Of The Herald-Advocate Farmers work hard to provide food for the billions of people on the planet. The farmers and ranchers here are Hardee Countys foundation, and to thank them, Main Street Wauchula Inc. will host a Slice of Life event this Saturday. Fresh produce, animals and music will fill Main Street Heritage Park and the surrounding area to help celebrate as well. Local farmers will be selling strawberries, corn, green beans, beef, honey, jelly, peppers and more. While parents are busy picking out fruits and vegeta bles, kids can enjoy themselves at one of the many activities set up throughout Main Street. There will be bounce houses, farm-themed games and a pet ting zoo that will have calves and other animals. Exhibits on agriculture and arts and crafts such as jewelry, paddleboards, kids accessories also will be on hand. Farm equipment will be set up and working, such as an or ange juicer that actually shows the process of juicing and can teach everyone how orange juice is made. Musicians The Pick Up Artists are serving as the live en tertainment. They promise to play some boot-stomping music. Slice of Life will be held Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Heritage Park, at the corner of Main Street and Seventh Avenue in downtown Wau-chula. After buying the veggies, petting the animals and listening to the band, dont forget to visit the Celebrate Ag At Slice Of Life other local stores and restaurants downtown. This event comes as the 41st annual National Ag Week, which is March 23-30, comes to a close. This week acknowledges the hard work farmers put in to provide food, fiber and fuel for America. Agriculture is Americas num ber one export, and just in Florida it represents $130 billion in revenue and two million jobs. Today, each American farmer feeds more than 144 people. Florida farmers are the nations top producers of citrus, sugar cane, winter vegetables, or namental plants and sod. Agriculture consistently ranks second in supporting Floridas economy, tourism being number one. By MARIA TRUJILLO Of The Herald-Advocate Looking for a fun family night? Then look no further because the first Mr. HHS competition is this Saturday at 7 p.m. at the Hardee County Agri-Civic Center in Wauchula. Competing for the crown are Timmy Steedley, Joshua Almaraz, Dustin Goodwyn, Steven Crews, Nelson Bethea, Tristen Lanier, Tyler Dunlap, Michale Allison, Kramer Royal and Wyatt Maddox. This new competition was created as an alternative for Hardee High School senior boys who wanted to participate in an event, but did not aspire to the Miss Project Graduation title. Andrea Dunlap, who has a son participating in the contest and is one of the main organizers of Mr. HHS, says she wanted to see a competition where the young men are able to showcase who they are. She went on to say there are exceptional students at Hardee See MR. HHS 2A Who Will Become Mr. HHS?

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2A The Herald-Advocate, March 27, 2014 The Herald-Advocate H ardee Countys Hometown Coverage JAMES R. KELLY Publisher/Editor CYNTHIA M. KRAHL Managing Editor JOAN M. SEAMAN S ports Editor 115 S. Seventh Ave. P.O. Box 338 Wauchula, FL 33873 RALPH HARRISON P roduction Manager NOEY DE SANTIAGO Asst. Prod. Manager Phone: (863) 773-3255 Fax: (863) 773-0657 Published weekly on Thursday at Wauchula, Florida, by The Herald-Advocate P ublishing Co. Inc. Periodical Postage paid at U.S. Post Office, Wauchula, FL 33873 and additional entry office (USPS 578-780), Postmaster, send address changes to: The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338, Wauchula, FL 33873. DEADLINES: S chools Thursday 5 p.m. Sports Monday noon Hardee Living Thursday 5 p.m. General News Monday 5 p.m. Ads Tuesday noon SUBSCRIPTIONS: H ardee County 6 months $21; 1 yr. $39; 2 yrs. $75 Florida 6 months $25; 1 yr. $46; 2 yrs. $87 Out of State 6 months $29; 1 yr. $52; 2 yrs. $100 LETTERS: T he Herald-Advocate welcomes letters to the editor on matters of public interest. Letters should be brief, and must be written in good taste, signed and include a daytime phone number. SUBMISSIONS: Press releases on community matters are welcome. Submissions should be typed, double-spaced and adhere to the above deadlines. All items are subject to editing. Kellys Column B y Jim The new federal farm bill guarantees $125 million to be spent for c itrus greening research during the next five years. The new pro posed state budget has $4 million for citrus research. Florida has 47 citrus tree nurseries that will produce about 4.5 million trees this year, wrote Ernie Neff, editor of the Citrus Industry magazine. Mr. and Mrs. Bill Bartlett enjoy living in rural Zolfo Springs part of the year and their home area in Ogdensburg, N.Y. He is 80, a political conservative, and retired as a hospital mechanic and operator of construction work equipment. One of his jobs was unloading coal with a crane. Syndicated columnist Kathleen Parker on March 3 wrote outof-wedlock births are 29 percent among whites, 53 percent among Latinos, and 72 percent among African-Americans. President Barack Obama is encouraging two-parent homes. In 1966 Daniel Patrick Moynihan, U.S. assistant labor secretary, wrote, A community that allows a large number of young men to grow up in broken homes, dominated by women, never acquiring any stable relationship to male authority, never acquiring any set of rational expectations about the future that community asks for and gets chaos. Parker wrote, A nation cannot long flourish without the commitment of fathers to raise their sons and, yes, their daughters too. President Obama encourages male mentors for young children without a father figure in the home. He grew up in large part without a father in his daily life. The local Toastmasters Club meets the first and third Thursdays at noon at the Riverview Heights Missionary Baptist Church in Wauchula. Members learn to speak in public. Toastmaster member Peter Hansen told the Wauchula Kiwanis Club recently that people often fear the unknown, pain, ridicule, rejection and failure. The opposite of fear is confidence. You build confidence by confronting your fears and overcoming them. Toastmasters helps people gain confidence over fears. Members include Jamey and Loraine Braddock and Dave and Amy Harper. Alabama head football coach Nick Saban, who has also been a head coach in the National Football League, was quoted by Forbes magazine, In the NFL you get one first-round draft pick if youre lucky. You couldnt really outwork anybody else. In college I can recruit 10 players with first-round talent every year. Florida commissioner of agriculture Adam Putnam last year said Spanish explorer Ponce de Leon arrived in St. Augustine on April 2, 1513, looking for the legendary fountain of youth. In 1565 Spanish settlers shared a harvest meal with Native Americans in Florida. Indians had lived in Florida for centuries before 1513. Putnam said Florida was the first place in the New World to have horses and cows, brought from the Old World. They are known as cracker cows and cracker horses. Florida put the first man on the moon. The state has 18 international airports and 15 deepwater ports, bringing in $71 billion in goods and shipping out $66 billion of American-made products every year. Floridas sunny weather, beaches, theme parks and state and na tional parks attracts snowbirds, spring breakers, eco-tourists and Orlando-bound families. Florida has 2 million small businesses and 16 Fortune 500 companies. Today, Florida is still the place for young and old to pursue their own personal fountain of youth. C.B. Harden Jr., 73, of Golfview Subdivision in Zolfo Springs operated C.B.s Coffee Shop in Wauchula until 1984. Sonnys father opened the business in 1945. They served hamburgers, chili, fried chicken and shrimp, and French fries. They sold beer and had a pool room in the back. Sonny worked 16 years in the kitchens of the state prisons in Arcadia and Fort Green, retiring in 2001. He remembers movie star Lash LaRue performing on stage at the Wauchula movie theatre owned by Reuben Moore. Connie Rowe of Wauchula congratulations Ken (Keeno) Jin wright for his 40 years of service with the Wauchula Post Office. He is just right for his job. So nice to see him smiling every day. It cheers me up just seeing and talking to him. Lt. Clebe McClary, highly decorated Vietnam veteran, will be guest speaker at the 11 a.m. Sunday worship service at Oak Grove Baptist Church. He suffered major injuries from an explosive de vice. Per capita consumption in the U.S. of milk and orange juice has declined over recent decades. Milk consumption has dropped 25 percent since 1975. Orange juice consumption has dropped about 40 percent from its peak 20 to 25 years ago. Both of these products remain very healthy. There are so many competing drinks such as sodas, teas, juice drinks, sports drinks, and numerous water products. Milk is a great source of calcium, protein and vitamin D. Orange juice has lots of vitamin C and other healthy ingredients. Both industries are trying hard to reverse the trends. The consumption of cheese, made from milk, has greatly increased in recent years. J oseph Messick of Royal Oaks Mobile Home Park in Dundee is very healthy at age 97, reports the Lakeland Ledger. He says he does not take any pills, eats a pound of sugar a week, drinks a little water but mostly tea and sodas, his favorite vegetable is macaroni and cheese, and he has a big love of music and sense of humor. He plays the organ and sings. Mary Cannaday wrote Messick was married to his late wife Ruth for 70 years, currently has a lady friend who is a widow, attends the First Christian Church in Winter Haven, grew up on a ranch in South Dakota, at age 18 signed up with the Civilian Conservation Corps and planted trees in Florida, joined the National Guard, in World War II was in the Navys construction force called Seabees, a PT boat trainer in Panama, a motor machinist, got a com mercial pilots license through the G.I. bill, flew local cargo planes, and then worked fro Delphi Limestone in Indiana for 34 years, retiring as a manager. Troy Moon of the Pensacola News Journal reports Joe Brown of that city is 98 and is still cutting hair for over 70 years. He is the oldest barber in Florida. His uncle in Milton was a barber. As a barber he loves meeting a variety of people, including retirees, military folks, politicians, lawyers and judges. State Rep. Ben Albritton of Wauchula has filed a bill that would help foster children get a drivers learning permit and license. This would help them become more independent. The bill would also help resolve the high cost of insurance, reported Lloyd Dunkelberger of the Lakeland Ledger. Former Wauchula resident Joe Escourido, 89, an award-winning artist and cartoonist, passed away in Lakeland Saturday. His funeral service will be today (Thursday) at 3 p.m. at First United Methodist Church in Lakeland. He worked 14 years with the Lakeland Ledger. He was a commercial artist with an ad agency and in Wauchula drew some artwork for The Herald-Advocate. MR. HHS Continued From 1A High and this was a good way for t he community to be able to see a few of them. Dunlap hopes this labor of love will be positive for the community and be a good source of family entertainment for years to come. The Mr. HHS title features a two-part competition. The first part was completed on March 15. It consisted of a shooting challenge and a crossfit challenge. Each of these tests counts as 10 percent of a contes tants total score. A presentation highlighting that days results will be given at the event on Sat urday. The main event is more of a showcase. In order to be crowned Mr. HHS, the seniors will model casual clothing and professional wear and will talk about their interests or hobbies. Each of these three segments is worth 20 percent of the overall score. The last 20 percent comes from an interview with the judges. The contestants can highlight their personalities in these segments by showing the audience and judges who they are. Other titles the senior boys can strive for in addition to Mr. HHS are Peoples Choice and Mr. Internet Photogenic. For Peoples Choice, a jar will be stationed at the back of the Agri-Civic Center for each contestant. Anyone attending the competition on Saturday can drop m oney, including change and checks, into a favorite contestants jar. The contestant with the most money in his jar at the end of the night will be given the title. For Mr. Internet Photogenic, anyone with a Facebook page or e-mail can vote. To vote on Facebook, go to Mr. HHS Photogenic, click on the 2014 Vot ing For Mr. HHS Photo-genic album, click on the picture of the young man and like his pic ture. To vote by e-mail put the word Vote in the subject line and put the contestants name in the body of the e-mail, then send to vote@shackelfordphotography.c om. Voting for more than one contestant is allowed. Other winners on Saturday will receive prizes for the shooting challenge, cross-fit chal lenge, Mr. Photogenic, Mr. Congeniality, and as first through fourth runner-ups to Mr. HHS. All contestants will also get an extra goody bag for tak ing part in the competition. The competition committee is hoping to give Mr. HHS a schol arship. Dunlap says she is seeking to give at least $300. To donate money to the winner of the competition, make out a check to Project Graduation with the footnote Mr. HHS Scholarship. Contributions can be dropped off with Jo Smith, treasurer of Project Graduation, at Cats on Main. For more questions concerning the scholarship for Mr. HHS, contact Smith at 773-6565. A rifle raffle will also be held during the night. The rifle is a Bush Master AR 15, .223-cal iber. Tickets are $10 each. If you buy 10 tickets, you get one ticket free. Refreshments can also be purchased. Money raised from the raffle and refreshments will go to Project Graduation. All of the money raised will go straight to providing the senior class with a fun, alcoholand drug-free graduation celebra tion. Parking for the event will be beside the Agri-Civic Center. Dunlap has been assured it will not be a problem even though The Story of Noah will also be on the same night. Admis-sion is $5 and there are no reserved seats, so get there early for a good spot. DEALERSContinued From 1A kowski St., Wauchula, faces c harges of sale of cocaine, delivery/distribution of metham phetamine, two counts of sale of methamphetamine and three counts owning/renting a struc ture/vehicle to sell drugs, both second degree felonies, two counts use of a two-way communication device to commit a crime, a third degree felony, and two misdemeanor charges of possession of drug parapherna lia. He remained in jail in lieu of bonds totaling $46,000. F F r r a a n n q q u u i i W W h h i i t t b b y y YOUR BUSINESS COULD APPEAR HERE TOO!!C)-300(Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels 773-3255 www.TheHeraldAdvocate.com INFORMATION R oundup BG Cleans Up O n Wednesday April 2 is designated Chunk Your Junk Day in Bowling Green, an opportu nity for residents to dispose of unwanted items for free pick-up. Residents can place up to two tires, furniture, large and small appliances, bedding and other unwanted items at curbside. It does not include hazardous waste materials, such as paint, batteries, chemicals and asbestos. Firefighters Ousted Firefighters in Zolfo Springs are eating out these days as they cannot use their fire station until mold removal is completed. Residents are urged to be supportive as they see fire fighters out in the community much more often than usual. NOAHContinued From 1A eons, chickens and ducks, two t ame turkeys, rabbits, hogs, 60 sheep, a dozen goats, quarter horses and draft horses, and dogs. But theres more, some an imals never seen here before. There are miniature horses and donkeys, some no bigger than a large dog. Theres a giant brown Swiss ox pulling a wagon. Theres Highlander cows, the Scottish longhairs, white donkeys, a pair of Zebus (miniature Brahma), the Z donkey (a zebra-donkey with stripes only on the legs), alpacas, lla mas, camels and the Jacob sheep, a four-horned extremely old breed believed to date back to the early Bible times of Jacob and his fight with his uncle Laban. This years presentation of Noah is similar to the 2012 production, but has drastic improvement in the sound and lighting, which are now state-ofthe-art. It makes it more profes sional, more effective, says Rev. Mike Graham, the tireless writer and organizer of the massive productions. Tickets are $21 for adults, or $19 for seniors, children 2 to 12 and large groups. Children under 2 are free, held by an adult. Tickets can be obtained at www.storyofnoah.org or by call ing 375.4031. There is a $1.50 charge for website orders to process credit cards, etc. Performances are each Friday and Saturday night from March 28-29, through April 4-5, 11-12, 18-19 and 25-26. Theres time to pick your performance. Its more than a simple story, its a narrative of faith. 1. LANGUAGE: What is the dot on top of the letters iand j called? 2. GEOGRAPHY: In what body of water can the island of Mykonos be found? 3. ACRONYMS: What does the acronym CAD stand for? 4. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: What is a shillelagh used for? 5. POLITICS: What was the emblem of the Progressive Party of 1912? 6. ANATOMY: Where is the skin the thinnest on the human body? 7. ACADEMIA: What does a vexillologist study? 8. MOVIES: What movie featured the tagline Thank God its only a motion picture? 9. TELEVISION: What was the name of the town that was the setting for Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman? 10. GAMES: How many body parts do you have to re move in order to be successful in the game Operation? ANSWERS 1. A tittle 2. Aegean Sea 3. Computer-aided design 4. Irish in origin, it is a cudgel that can be used as walking stick or a weapon 5. Bull Moose 6. Eyelids 7. Flags 8. Airplane! 9. Fernwood, Ohio 10. Twelve (c) 2014 King Features Synd., Inc. TRIVIA T EST By Fifi Rodriguez 1. In 1990, two major-league pi tchers, one in each league, tossed a no-hitter on the same day (June 29). Name the pitch ers. 2. How many times has a Kansas City Royals player led the American League in batting average for a season? 3. Name the first college football bowl game in which two Heisman Trophy winners faced each other. 4. In 2013, Paul George be came the fourth Indiana Pacer to be named the NBA's Most Im proved Player. Name two of the first three. 5. When was the last time be fore the 2012-13 season that the Philadelphia Flyers missed the NHL playoffs? 6. In 2013, Austria's Marlies Schild became the all-time leader in World Cup slalom victories (35). Who had she been tied with? 7. Which golfer had the lowest four-round score in winning the Masters during the 1970s? ANSWERS 1. Dave Stewart (Oakland) and Fernando Valenzuela (Los Angeles Dodgers). 2. Four times George Brett three times (1976, '80, '90), and Willie Wilson once (1982). 3. The 2005 Orange Bowl featured Southern Cal's Matt Leinart and Oklahoma's Jason White. 4. Jalen Rose (2000), Jer maine O'Neal (2002) and Danny Granger (2009). 5. It was the 2006-07 season. 6. Switzerland's Vreni Schneider. 7. Ray Floyd had a 271 total in 1976. (c) 2014 King Features Synd., Inc. Sports Qu iz By Chris Richcreek IDA MEMBER Du ring a Mar. 6 discus sion of possible expulsion of a member of the Hardee County Industrial Development Authority (IDA), a motion was made to schedule the matter for the April 3 Commission meeting. That motion passed on a 3-2 vote with commission ers Grady Johnson and Rick Knight opposing it. At The Herald-Advocate, we want accuracy to be a given, not just our goal. If you believe we have printed an error in fact, please call to report it. We will review the information, and if we find it needs correction or clarification, we will do so here. To make a report, call Managing Editor Cynthia Krahl at 773-3255. C ORRECTIONS & L ARIFICATIONS It pays to a dvertise in your Hometown Newspaper We are saving this space just for Y YO OU U! !The HeraldAdvocate 115 S. 7th Ave. 773-3255 www.TheHeraldAdvocate.com 10 HOURS A MONTH!Thats all it takes to speak up for a child. Volunteer to be a Guardian Ad Litem.773-2505(If office unattended, please leave message.) The Herald-Advocate H ardee Countys Hometown Coverage 115 S. 7th Ave. Wauchula, FL 33873 Telephone (863) 773-3255 www.TheHeraldAdvocate.com

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The Herald-AdvocateO ON NL LI IN NE E! !D Do on n t t W Wa ai it t O On n T Th he e P Po os st t O Of ff fi ic ce e T To o D De el li iv ve er r The Herald-Advocate R Re ec ce ei iv ve e y yo ou ur r p pa ap pe er r W We ed dn ne es sd da ay y N No o M Ma at tt te er r W Wh he er re e Y Yo ou u L Li iv ve e a at t w ww ww w. .T Th he eH He er ra al ld dA Ad dv vo oc ca at te e. .c co om m S ubscription Rates$5 for 1 Month $19 for 6 Months $37 for 1 Year $70 for 2 YearsThe Herald-Advocate Hardee Countys Hometown CoverageSee Website For Details. The Herald-Advocate Online is Not Free. March 27, 2014, The Herald-Advocate 3A

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4A The Herald-Advocate, March 27, 2014 D D O O L L O O R R I I S S J J O O S S M M I I T T H H Doloris Jo Smith, 82, of W auchula, passed away Friday, March 21, 2014, at The Oaks in Avon Park. She was born on April 8, 1931, in Wauchula, where she was a lifelong resident. Doloris was a third grade teacher at Wauchula Elementary School and a member of First Baptist Church of Wauchula. Survivors include her hus band, Robert Ray Smith of Wauchula; one son, Bobby Smith and wife Melanie of Zolfo Springs; one daughter, Cathy Jahna and husband Fred of Avon Park; one sister, Sharon Watson and husband Tim of Sebring; three grand children, Erin Stivender and husband Travis, Lindsey Rae Smith and Kayla Allen Smith; and four great-grandchildren, August and Tatum Stivender and Cameron and Joshua White. Visitation was Monday, March 24, 2014, at First Baptist Church of Wauchula from 10 to 11 a.m., with Funeral Services at 11 a.m. with the Rev. Scott Waldron and Ken Sanders officiating. Interment was at Hart Cem-etery. Expressions of comfort may be made at robartsfh.com. Robarts Family FUNERAL HOME WAUCHULA WAUCHULA In Memory N ANCY ROSE GOLDEN Nancy Rose Golden, 78, born in Wauchula, graduated from Hardee County High School, passed away Saturday, March 15, 2014. She was preceded in death by her mother, Florence Keller; her father, John Keller; her brother, Jack Keller; her sister, Catherine Keller and her sister, Marion Twiss. Nancy is survived by her children Kevin (Cheryl) Golden and Tom (Elise) Golden; and three grandchil dren, Hayden Golden, Madison and Ava Free. She is also survived by her sister, Elsie Fort. She had many nieces and nephews who she loved dearly. Nancy committed her life to raising her family and being a nurse. She graduated from the Gordon Keller Nurs ing School and received her nursing license in 1957. She spent over 30 years in the nursing field and loved every minute of it. A special thanks to Juliana Johnson for the care you gave Nancy in the last couple years of her life. She will be missed dearly by her family. The family will have a service at a later date. In lieu of flowers, those choosing may make a dona tion to a charity in Nancys honor. In Memory H ILLIARD BLACKMON Hilliard Blackmon, age 92, passed away Wednesday, March 19, 2014, in Jacksonville. Hilliard was born April 23, 1921, in Live Oak, and moved to Wauchula in his early twenties. He moved to Jacksonville only 11 months ago to be with his daughter, after having taken a fall resulting in injuries. After moving to Wauchula, Hilliard was an appliance repairman for seventy years. He was a dedi cated repairman throughout the Hardee County community. Hilliard was still active in his trade at the age of 91. He had a very strong work ethic and his customers knew he would do a good job at a fair price. He enjoyed fishing and hunting, however working on appliances was what gave him the most enjoyment. Hilliard loved his family and enjoyed spending quality time with them. He was a veteran of World War II, serving from 1942 until 1946 with the U. S. Army Air Corp a nd the U.S. Air Force. He was a member of the First United Methodist Church, Wauchula. Survivors are his beloved wife, Kate Blackmon of Jacksonville; one daughter, June Elizabeth James of Lakeland; daughter-in-law, Dale Blackmon of Jacksonville; five grandchildren, Kelly Brown, Garrett (Samantha) Brown, Myra (Parker) James, Rebecca (Chris) Mayberry and Ryan (Ginger) Blackmon; and 10 great-grandchildren. Hilliard is preceded in death by his parents, R. A. Blackmon and Lillian Southerland Blackmon; and a son, Harry Albert Blackmon in 2013. Visitation was from 2 until 3 p.m., Saturday, March 22, 2014, at the First United Methodist Church, Wauchula. Funeral Services immediately followed with the Rev. Danielle Upton officiating. Burial with military honors rendered by the DeSoto Honor Guard was in Wauchula City Cemetery, Saturday, March 22, 2014. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to either the First United Methodist Church, 207 N. Seventh Ave., Wauchula, FL 33873 or the United Methodist Childrens Home, 51 Chil drens Way, Enterprise, FL 32725. Online condolences may be made at pongerkaysgrady.com Ponger-Kays-Grady Funeral Home & Cremation Services Wauchula In Memory H ERMAN EUGENE COOPER JR. Herman Eugene Cooper Jr., known by family and friends as Junior Cooper, 85, passed away Wednesday, March 19, 2014, in Lakeland. Junior was born March 11, 1929, at home in Bowling Green. Junior began working at the age of 16 as a packer for M.E. Brown, Inc. Packing House. Over the course of 59 years, he also worked for Troy Cobb and Gail Starett. As the seasons and crops changed, Junior traveled and worked in Florida, Georgia and North Carolina. When he wasn't working in the packing houses, Junior could be found pushing his mower in Bowling Green. He enjoyed mowing, lawn main tenance and going to church. Junior was proud to say that all of his life he lived within three blocks of the home in which he was born. In 2004, Junior moved to Oak Bridge Nursing Home in Lakeland. Junior is survived by his two brothers, Ernest (Sheryl) Cooper of Fort Meade and Don Cooper of Webster; one sister, Beverly Cooper Lord (Eric) Hines of Lakeland; one sister in law, Peggy Cooper Branch of Lake Placid; three nephews, Donnie Cooper of Panama City, Matt (Sara) Cooper of Bartow and Mark (Kristen) Cooper of Neptune Beach; six nieces, Debbie (David) Weeks of Naples, Barbara Wilson of Lake Placid, Kim (Art) Martinez of Lakeland, Amy (Jamie) Hill of Bartow, Jenny (Corey) Baker of Bartow and Jean Cooper of Sebring; and seven grandnieces, four grand-nephews, three great-grand-nieces, two great-grand-nephews and many cousins. Junior was preceded in death by his parents, Avis and Herman Cooper; birth mother, Myrtle Jean Osteen Coop-er; brother, Bobby Cooper; and nephew, Drew Cooper. A visitation was held Sun day March 23, 2014, from 4 to 6 p.m. in the chapel of Ponger Kays Grady Funeral Home, Wauchula. Funeral Services were Monday, March 24, 2014, at 11 a.m. at Bowling Green Church of God. Burial followed in Bowling Green Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contribu tions in Junior's name may be made to Bowling Green Church of God. Online condolences may be made at pongerkaysgrady.com Ponger-Kays-Grady Funeral Home & Cremation Services Wauchula In Loving Memory Obituaries ELTON OLIN C OWART Elton Olin Cowart, 64, of Banks, Ala., died on Thursday, March 20, 2014, at his resi dence. He was born April 18, 1949, in Wauchula. He served in the U.S. Army in Okinawa and was an author. He has written a book and started the Dixie Living Magazine nine years ago where he also wrote articles. He was also a deer and hog hunter. He was preceded in death by his father, Olin Cowart; and a brother, Harvey Cowart. Survivors include his wife of 42 years, Donna Dee Downing Cowart of Banks, Ala.; two sons, Ronald Lamar (Ron) Cow art of Cocoa and Brian Patrick Cowart of Troy, Ala.; two grand sons, Alex Cowart of Air Force Base in Okinawa, Japan and Ethan Marshall Daniels of Troy, Ala.; mother, Frances Crews Stickle of Wauchula; one sister, Elizabeth Black of Bradenton; one brother, Harmon Cowart of Mon-ticello, Ark.; and two halfbrothers. The family will accept flowers from Jeans Florist and Flow ers by Harold in Union Springs. Memorials may be made to Wounded Warriors Project at skeenfuneralhome.-com or mailed to Wounded Warriors Project, P.O. Box 758517, Topeka, Kansas 66675. Memorial Services will be held at 3 p.m. Sunday, March 30, 2014, at Skeen Funeral Home Chapel in Troy, Ala. Visitation will be held from 2 until 3 p.m., Sunday at the funeral home one hour prior the service. Arrangements by Skeen Fu neral Homes, Inc. In Memory S USAN B. TATZIN Susan Betty Tatzin, 66, of Silver City, N. M., and for merly of Wauchula, died in her home on March 20, 2014. Born in Baltimore on June 17, 1947, to Georgine and Lew Tatzin, Susan lived most of her life in Florida and the Southwest. She graduated from Cocoa Beach High School, class of 1965, and Florida State University, class of 1969, where she majored in music. Susans love of all things melodic led her to a lifelong journey of teaching, song, and performance. She taught ele mentary school music for 30 years, primarily in the Bowl ing Green and Zolfo Springs Elementary Schools in the Hardee County School Dis trict. In addition, she con ducted private piano instruction. Susan sang in many church choirs, and often provided the musical accom paniment. She played French horn in the Melbourne Munic ipal Orchestra and the Concert Band of the Southwest. Additionally, Susan played in the Desert Larks recorder group and was a board mem ber of the Grant County (NM) Community Concert Association. During her teaching years, Susan resided in Wauchula and developed many lasting friendships there. After retiring from her teaching career to care for her aged mother for 10 years in the family home in Cocoa Beach, Susan moved to New Mexico, a state she fondly remembered from childhood. In addition to music, Susan especially loved dogs and vol unteered at animal welfare organizations. After moving to Silver City, Susan joined the Concert Band of the South west and took up new interests including rock collecting. She is survived by her brother Don Tatzin and sisterin-law Ellen Reintjes of Lafayette, Calif., and her beloved dog Mindy. Services will be held Thursday March 27, 2014, at 2 p.m. at the First Presbyterian Church, 1915 No. Swan St., Silver City, N.M. in lieu of flowers, please send contributions in Susans memory to First Presbyterian Church, 1915 Swan Street, Silver City, NM 88061, Our Paws Cause Thrift Shop, 108 No. Bullard, Silver City, NM 88061, or Faith Presbyterian Church, P.O. Box 1480, Wauchula, FL, 33873. Terrazas Funeral Chapel Santa Clara, N. M. INFORMATION R oundup Pizza Vouchers H elp Homeless Anyone with a voucher can eat in-house, order online or use take-out at Wauchula Pizza Hut, 1498, U.S. 17 North (Wal-Mart Plaza), Wauchula, and help feed the homeless. Vouchers are available at www.hardeehelpcenter.org, or by calling 773-0304. Folks wanting to just make a donation can do so at the above website. Tax Assistance Available Free The AARP Tax-Aide Program has an assistant at the Hardee County Library, 315 N. Sixth Ave. (U.S. 17 and Oak Street), Wauchula, on Mondays from 2 to 6 p.m. The fee tax assistance pro gram is aimed at people over 60 but is available for other low-income people and is on a first come, first served basis. People must bring all proof of identification, household income, and other information necessary to complete an income tax form. BIBLE T RIVIA By Wilson Casey 1. Is the book of Deuteronomy in the Old or New Testament or neither? 2. In which book's 10:30 does it say that God keeps numbered the very hairs of your head? Genesis, Exodus, Matthew, Mark? 3. From Leviticus 11, which of these were Israelites permit ted to eat? Camel, Hare, Swine, Cow? 4. Who tried to take a Beer sheba well away from Abra ham? Abimelech, Samson, Ezekiel, Pekahiah? 5. From biblical and current times, what type of creature is a coney? Donkey, Rabbit, Viper, Locust 6. According to Proverbs 16, what is it better to get than gold? Mate, Health, Wisdom, Saved ANSWERS: 1) Old; 2) Matthew; 3) Cow; 4) Abim elech; 5) Rabbit; 6) Wisdom Comments? More Trivia? Visit www.TriviaGuy.com (c) 2014 King Features Synd., Inc. HARDEE COUNTY K IDS NEED HARDEE COUNTY HELP! Ease a dependent childs way through the court sys tem. Volunteer to be a Guardian Ad Litem. 773-2505 (If office unattended, please leave message.) 3:27c Hardee Countys Funeral Home for over 80 years! O ffering Affordable Funeral Services, Cremation Services and Cemetery Markers! Locally Owned & Operated by Licensed Funeral Directors Floyd O. Rice, Jr, LFD Location Manager Officer Manager Ginger L. Rice Ponger-Kays-Grady Funeral Home & Cremation Services 3:6-27c

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March 27, 2014, The Herald-Advocate 5A Pages From The Past From The Florida Advocate O f Friday, March 25, 1955 Front-Page Headlines: Cucumbers Averaged $9.58 Per Bushel James H. Waters Died In Hospital Tuesday Wauchula Moose Form Emergency Blood Bank Mrs. Nora Crunkelton Hurt Monday Morning PHOTO BY JIM KELLY L Clebe McClary, a United States Marine Corps veteran who was severely wounded during the Vietnam War, will share his experiences and testimony Sunday morning at 11 a.m. at the Oak Grove Baptist Church. McClary lost an arm below the elbow, an eye and suffered a severe leg wounds when a grenade exploded near him. He continued to fight after sustaining the injuries and was awarded a Bronze Star. He went on to be a motivation to others and wrote a book Living Proof about his life and experiences. McClary is shown above on left with Joe L. Davis Sr. and Col. Donnell Mathews outside the Pioneer Restaurant in Zolfo Springs last year. VIETNAM HERO SPEAKING AT OAK GROVE Your Business Could Appear Here!Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels The Herald Advocate 773-3255 or w ww.TheHeraldAdvocate.com Your Business Could Appear Here!Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels The Herald Advocate 773-3255 or w ww.TheHeraldAdvocate.com Pioneer Creek RV News By A ndie McCosco OMITTED FROM M ARCH 20 EDITION CHAPEL Dick and Rosie Reno and Herb and Martha DeHaan wel comed 160 to chapel. Harry and Joyce Gould were welcomed back. Devotions were led by Howard LaLone, who spoke on Faith. The choir anthem was God Will Hear Your Prayer, directed and accompanied on piano by Sandy Feeser. Bob Parke sang a solo, Let There Be Peace on Earth. Pastor David spoke on Fear using 2 Chronicles 20:1-5. All you need is a word from God. Jehoshaphats enemies were gathering to make war on his people and he was afraid. He prayed to God for help and or dered a fast throughout the land. He and his people offered up praises to God and marched to meet their enemies. When they came upon them, all were dead. God had answered Je hoshaphats prayers. Fear is our greatest enemy. It steals our joy. We need to face our fears. God gives us the power to conquer those fears. Never be too proud to cry out to God. Praising God releases His power. Just one word from Him can turn away your fears. It will open doors you never knew about. Allow God to move in your life. SCOREBOARD Bowling: For the men, Dave Thompson, high score 212 and high series 520. For the women, Arlene Sebright, high score 163 and high series 419. Frank Feeser had a 7/6 split and Dave Thompson had a 9/10 split. Shuffleboard: Congratulations to winners of the Pioneer Creek RV singles tournament. Those placing were Nancy Singleton, first in main event; Roger Bell, second; Lynne S hick, third; and Herb DeHaan, fourth in main event. Richard La Course was first in consolation; Cathy Renwick, second; DeWayne Renwick, third; and Cathy Payne, fourth in consolation. SPOTLIGHT Vickie Keegsta was born in Newton, Iowa. She had taught school since 1969. While she was trying to de cide on a major in college, she flipped a coin, either biology or physical education/dance. She went into physical education/dance and taught school in West Liberty, Iowa, for three years and went to graduate school in Kalamazoo, Mich. After graduation, she taught at Missouri Western State in St. Joseph, Mo., for 13 years. She now lives in Traverse City, Mich., where her ex-husband is from, and retired from teaching after 41 years lastly with the Traverse City public schools. She has two daughters, four grandchildren and two greatgrandchildren. Interests include old movies, musical theater, gar dening (but she hates to weed), painting, and quilting. A friend, who was the secretary where she taught, bugged her to come down to check out the park. She came down for six weeks three years ago, then stayed three months the next two years, and became a resident here last year. Something no one knows is that she has a second Masters Degree, in theater arts. While teaching at Missouri Western State, she had her own dance company. Vickie is a wonderful addi tion to the park. Perry & PerryCustom Cut and WrapBeef, Pork, Venison2218 W. Main St., Wauchula 33873 (863) 832-0332 (8 63) 245-4359 soc3:27c Robert L. Shiver Jr. Sales Manager (863) 508-2400 x8430 YOURFRIENDINTHECARBUSINESSFOROVER17 YEARS 863-508-2400 Paying Top Dollar For Your Trade-InRates A Low As .9% Payments As Low As $149 per month Pre-Owned Cars As Low As $2,000 Plus Tax, Tag & Title For Secure Credit Approval Se Habla Espaol *Rates and payments vary per model and term. Does not include tax, tag, title or dealer fee. 3:27c Madness March

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6A The Herald-Advocate, March 27, 2014 CHICKEN CACCIATORE Food prepared alla cacciatora, "hunter-style," includes mushrooms in the sauce. This dish is representative of the kind of home cooking that found its way first into Italian restaurants and then into American kitchens. Serve over wide, flat noodles. 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 (3 1/2 pounds) chicken, cut into 8 pieces and skin removed from all but wings 3 tablespoons all-purpose flour 1 medium onion, finely chopped 4 cloves garlic, crushed with garlic press 8 ounces mushrooms, trimmed and thickly sliced 1 can (14 to 16 ounces) tomatoes 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 tablespoon dried oregano, crumbled 1/4 teaspoon dried sage 1/8 teaspoon ground red pepper, like cayenne 1. In nonstick 12-inch skillet, heat oil over medium-high heat until very hot. On waxed paper, coat chicken with flour, shaking off excess. Add chicken to skillet and cook until golden brown, about 3 minutes per side. With tongs, transfer chicken pieces to bowl as they are browned. 2. Add onion and garlic to skillet. Reduce heat to mediumlow and cook, stirring occasionally, until onion is tender, about 5 minutes. Add mushrooms and cook, stirring frequently, until just tender, about 3 minutes. 3. Add tomatoes with their juice, breaking them up with side of spoon. Add salt, oregano, sage, ground red pepper and chicken, and heat to boiling over high heat. Reduce heat; cover and simmer until juices run clear when thickest part of chicken is pierced with tip of knife, about 25 minutes. 4. Transfer chicken to serving bowl. Spoon sauce over chicken. Makes 4 main-dish servings. calories, 13g total fat (3g satu rated), 133mg cholesterol, 608mg sodium, 18g total carbs, 44g protein. For thousands of triple-tested recipes, visit our website at www.goodhousekeeping.com/re cipefinder/.(c) 2014 Hearst Communications, Inc. All rights reserved Good HousekeepingQ: With "Games of Thrones" starting back up, it got me wondering what Sean Bean is up to. Can you tell me what he'll be in next? Alicia W., via email stars in the new TNT actionthriller series "Legends," which is set to premiere Wednesday, story centers on Sean's character, Martin Odum, who plays a deepbe losing his grip on reality. Mar tin has the ability to transform himself into a com pletely differ ent person for each job, but he begins to question his own identity when a mysterious stranger suggests that he isn't the man he believes himself to be. The series comes from "Homeland" executive producers Howard Gordon and Alexander Cary, and "Fringe" co-executive producer David Wilcox, and costars Ali Carter, Morris Chestnut, Amber Valletta, Steve Harris and Tina Majorino. Q: I was happy to read in your column that Kiss will be inducted into the Rock 'n' Roll Hall of Fame. Will they be touring to support their induction? Gary T., Cleveland barking on a joint project this summer, co-headlining with hard-rock superstars Def Leppard in a 42-city summer sta dium tour, which will run from June 23 to Aug. 31. Def Leppard mons first discussed the idea of the two bands touring together when they played some South American dates two years ago as part of a rock-and-roll all-stars tour. "It's finally happened, which is fantastic," Joe said. Also, a dollar from each ticket sold on the tour will go to the other military nonprofits. (Go to livenation.com for ticket info.) Q: Starz canceled "Magic City" just as season two ended. What a disappointment. The show was never given much publicity, but it was wonder fully done. I love it and miss it so much, and so do my friends. Is there any chance of "Magic City" going to another cable network? Dale P., Fort Worth, Texas (see "Scrubs" and "Cougar Town" for examples), there hasn't been much talk about the series continuing. Set in 1959 in Miami shortly after the Cuban Revolution, "Magic City" cenplayed by Jeffrey Dean Morgan, who owned Miami's most glamI do have slightly good news for siode "Magic City" series will be released by Starz and Anchor on May 13. Q: Can you tell me if "Un forgettable" will be back? Tom V., The Villages, Fla. rie Wells, a woman with hyperthymesia a rare medical condition that gives her the abil ity to visually remember every thing will return with a 13-episode third season begin ning in June. Write to Cindy at King Features Weekly Service, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 328536475; or e-mail her at letters@cindyelavsky.com. CelebrityExtraBy Cindy Elavsky OMITED FROM MARCH 13 EDITION AROUND THE PARK Our last breakfast was wellGaylog and Lucy and Leonard Starr do the cooking every other Saturday. Jenny Johnson did a fine welcome. Jeff Riggs did the made sure the juice cups were filled. Our ice cream social celebrat ing the birthdays and an-niver saries in March turned into a Mardi Gras celebration. Head ing it up were Mike and Carol Yaw. Helping were Jack and Linda Moore. The tables were decorated, with beads and masks. Cakes were provided by Grant, Charlene Hooper, Fuller. Celebrating birthdays were Dave Mills, Forrest Grooms, missed someone, please forgive. It was a hard count with 64 at tending. after his stay in the hospital. Jerry Riggs is back home after his surgery. We were sorry to see early. BINGO went to Mike Waldach and Sylvia Nicklow went home with the jackpot. playing. Four shared the cover Akelian, Janelle Reid and Nora Tipton. The speedy was won by Joyce Longueuil. March 3 saw 31 playing, with and six merchant certificates were given out to other players who yelled bingo. Linda Moore won the coverall. SHUFFLEBOARD We had 10 people shuffling, and never in our days of shuf fling have we seen such freak shots as we experienced on Tuesday the 3rd.The freak shot was where one puck landed di rectly on top of another. The next person who shot hit the bot tom puck out from under and left the top one where it was. Audrey Semler, thinks that's called "a two master trick shot! wins and one loss. POKENO Monday, March 3, there were six players and Shirley Hyde tried to clean everyone out, and that she did, not only on Mon day but Wednesday as well. Is it the luck of the Irish, Shirley? CORNHOLE ting heads it up on Wednesday morning at 10. We had 12 players, with beating out Charlene Hooper and me for the win. EXERCISE Cline doing the exercise. What a great job they do at helping others revitalize their bodies. LADIES LUNCHEON As we entered the recreation hall, Connie Swanson had the tables decorated with green cloths and shamrocks. Connie opened with prayer before we ent salad. After lunch, we al ways have a few games that bring back memories we enjoy. Changes Things." This was our last ladies luncheon for the season, and there was hardly a dry eye in the place as Connie read a true story. Oasis RV News Stop by and see why I have won Fords customer service award several times. Gene DavisSales Manager 1031 U.S. Highway 17 N. Wauchula, Florida 33873 (863) 781-1947 www. 3:27c Every Thursday Night8pm CloseK Ka ar ra ao ok ke e & & D DJ Ji in ng gwithD DJ J A Ad da am m N Ne ew wm ma an n Beer Food Fun UE soc3:27c & & G Gr r i il ll le e 863-773-2007H Ho ou ur rs s: : M Mo on n. S Sa at t. 1 11 1a am m 9 9p pm mB Ba ar r O Op pe en n U Un nt ti il l 1 1a am m C Cl lo os se ed d S Su un nd da ay ys s Saturday, April 12Pacquiao vs. BradleyLIVE on HBO PPVSaturday, April 26UFC 172 Jones vs. TeixeiraSaturday, May 3Mayweather vs. MaidanaLIVE on Showtime PPV Every Wednesday5 50 0 W Wi in ng gs s(minimum of 6)ALL DAY TUESDAYS T T E E X X A A S S H H O O L L D D E E M M Saturdays @ Noon Freeroll Win aGift Card* $252014 SCHEDULE OF MEETINGS FOR HARDEE COUNTY COMMISSION AND APPOINTED BOARDSMeetings to be held in County Commission Chambers, Room 102 Courthouse Annex, 412 W. Orange Street, Wauchula, Florida unless otherwise noted BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS Regular meetings first Thursday at 8:30 a.m. & third Thursday at 6:00 p.m. MONTH OF April 03rd at 8:30 a.m. and 24th at 6:00 p.m. Planning Session 03/14/14 at 8:30 a.m. Good Friday 04/18/14 County Offices Closed Advanced County Commissioner Class Gainesville 04/17-04/18/14 ****PLEASE NOTE BOARDROOM UNDER RENOVATIONSAPRIL 3RD AND 14TH (PLANNING SESSION) TO BE HELD IN SCHOOL BOARD MEETING ROOM APRIL 24TH MEETING TO BE HELD AT CIVIC CENTER. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY INDEPENDENT BOARD MONTH OF April No meeting scheduled. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL/INDUSTRIAL DEVELOP MENT AUTH. Meets on second Tuesday of each month at 8:30 a.m. MONTH OF April th Utilities Conf. Room Commerce Park PLANNING AND ZONING BOARD meets first Thursday night of each month at 6:00 p.m. MONTH OF April 03RD 230 SOUTH FLORIDA AVENUE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY LICENSING BOARD Meets on the second Monday night of each month at 6:00 p.m. in Building Department Conference Room, 401 West Main Street MONTH OF April 14th COUNTY PARKS AND RECREATION BOARD Meets first Monday of each month at 6:00 p.m. MONTH OF April No meeting scheduled LIBRARY ADVISORY BOARD Meetings called as needed at Library in Annex II MONTH OF April No meeting scheduled HOUSING AUTHORITY Meets quarterly on the third Thursday at 1:30 p.m. at 701 LaPlaya Drive, Wauchula MONTH OF April No meeting scheduled. HEALTH CARE TASK FORCE Meets quarterly at Hardee County Health Department Auditorium at Noon MONTH OF April No meeting scheduled. HARDEE COUNTY INDIGENT HEALTH CARE BOARD Usually meets third Tuesday of each month at 5:30 p.m. MONTH OF April 15th at 5:30 p.m. This is a Disabled-Accessible facility. Any disabled person needing to make special arrangements should contact the County Commissioners office at least forty-eight (48) hours prior to the public meeting. This notice is published in compliance with Florida Statutes 286.0105. Interested parties may appear at the public meeting and be heard. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the members, with respect to any matter con sidered at such meeting or hearing, he/she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he/she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the ap peal is to be based. 3:27nc

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March 27, 2014, The Herald-Advocate 7A By MARIA TRUJILLO Of The Herald-Advocate Need Some Guidance? Then a new office on Main Street is a good place to go. Sherry White Ministries has opened a Wauchula office that now serves as a one-stop head quarters for all the divisions the ministry operates. Sherry White, founder of SWM, says the for mer headquarters was in her house. The new office is a more visible place where people can go when looking for help in coming out of a difficult lifestyle. At the new space, SWM offers assistance to people who are coming out of prison or battling addic tions and to families of people going through hard times. SWM has three separate loca tions where men and women hoping for a better life can live, free of charge. They are Lydias House, Mercies of David and Pi oneer Village. This ministry is a 501c3 nonprofit organization and does not take government funding. All of the people who run SWM are volunteers. The ministry sur vives on donations and faith. White says SWM came to be shortly after her marriage in 2001, when she and husband Mark would share the gospel of Jesus Christ with convicted felons. They would take turns preaching and teaching, and found this work to be very re warding. They believed the mes s ages they brought the men would transform their lives, if they wanted. Some time later, while on vacation, White said she was awakened with a vision. I was seeing pictures of abused, abandoned and neglected children. She said the pictures were so graphic and vivid in her mind that she begged the Lord for them to stop because there was nothing she could do about it. The next night, White had an other vision, this time it was of a late 1800s-style farm with car riages and horses, a barn, veg etable gardens and more. Although she didnt understand the meaning of these visions, White said she knew it was a tool the Lord wanted her to use to help the neglected children. I knew it was my mission in life to have such a place for fam ilies to be healed, she said. In 2007, Lydias House was born. It was a home for women coming out of destructive lifestyles. Soon after, they pur chased a farm where families can meet to begin to heal and re store their relationships. The mens program, Mercies of David, then brought on new insight. Through it the Lord showed me how desperately the families needed to be educated on co-dependency and enabling. I have yet to see an ad dict that didnt have a co-dependent enabler by their s ide. Addiction is a family problem! said White. SWMs mission to help oth ers has also now extended to the Dominican Republic. In partner ing with a pastor there, the or phanage now provides food and shelter from newborn babies to pre-teens. At the new office, classes on co-dependency are given once a month. They are for people and their families struggling with drug and/or alcohol issues. Registering for upcoming re-treats can also be done there. The 10th annual Ladies Re treat will be from April 4 to 6, and guest speakers Jennifer Beckham and Lesa Henderson will be attending. The retreat will be at the Lake Placid Conference Center. The first annual Mens Re treat will also be April 4 to 6 at the center, and guest speaker Terrell Rowland from Dunklin Memorial Camp will attend. SWM urges the community to drop by the new office to take a look and see how the ministry helps people. The office is lo cated at 313 W. Main St. and is open from Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Those wanting to volunteer are more than welcome to call 773-0523 or drop by the office. White says there is something everybody can do. Ministry Opens New O ffice To Help People PHOTO BY MARIA TRUJILLO Here are just a few of the volunteers for Sherry White Ministries. The new office location is at 313 W. Main St. and is open to the public. SPRUCING UPCOURTESY PHOTOS A vacant planter in front of the Hardee County Library came alive after work done over the weekend by the Hardee County Castaways Sportfishing 4-H Club. Leaders Rex and Patricia Richey spearheaded the work to put new bedding and flowers to give the library entrance a welcoming appearance. COURTESY PHOTOS To Protect & To Serve. That law-enforcement motto becomes literal in a new way on Saturday as members of the Hardee County Sheriffs Office work as servers for morning diners at the Double J Restaurant on U.S. 17 South in Wauchula. Dishing up smiles for a good cause will be (from left) Dep. Kim Pfeiffer, warrants clerk Sara Moore and Dep. Alice Simandal, along with Lt. Rosie Wendell (not pictured). The tips they receive will go to support Special Olympics and the annual National Law Enforcement Special Olympics Torch Run. They will be on duty at the popular eatery from 8 to 11:30 a.m. TIP-A-COP SATURDAY Commissioner Grady Johns on asked if hiring the attorney is to prosecute Witschonke. Evers said it was not to prosecute him but to lay out all the evidence so commissioners can determine whether there is a rea son to remove him from the board. In order to be ousted from the IDA, commissioners must deter mine whether Witschonke committed misfeasance, mal-feasance or willful neglect of his duties while serving on the board. Witschonke has been a member of the IDA for less than a year. He faces this potential removal after the IDA passed a motion to have the County Commission evaluate all the members of the IDA. Several IDA members have expressed displeasure recently over Witschonke bringing up matters not on the agenda or off topic and old issues which al re ady had been passed. Witschonke asked County Commissioners what the accu sations are against him. He added that he is ready for the witch-burning trial. He feels he has done nothing wrong, and said he works as best he can to protect public money. Evers said all the evidence would be presented at the hearing. Commissioner Johnson called the issue outrageous and unbelievable, and felt it should be stopped. Citizens Frank Kirkland and Hank Kuhlman spoke in defense of Witschonke. Kuhlman asked if the commission would pay for Witschonkes attorney fees. Evers replied he did not think the board would be responsible for those expenses. By MICHAEL KELLY Of The Herald-Advocate A hearing originally set for next week before the County Commission to decide if an In dustrial Development Au-thority member should be removed from the volunteer board has been moved to the end of April. Horst Witschonke was origi nally set to have his fate deter mined on April 3, but the commission has decided to have an outside attorney present the facts regarding the situation and needed to allow time for the county manager to hire one. Ken Evers, who serves as the attorney for the County Commission and the IDA, told the commission he felt hiring an outside attorney would afford Horst a better case of due process. Evers said he expects hiring the attorney to cost between $4,000 and $6,000. Expulsion Hearing For I DA Member Delayed CONGRATULATIONS!!! It is a great pleasure to announce our Employee Of The Month Reci pient for February 2014 Todd McKinnish T odd began his employment with the City of Wauchula on January 06, 1997. Todd hired in as a Water Treatment Plant/Waste Water Treatment Plant Operator #02. In November 2009 he received his WTP/WWTP Operator #01 license and in Sep tember 2012 Todd was promoted to the WTP/WWTP Plant Manager. Todd is required to keep his certifications current to stay compliant with the State of Florida. Todd does a great job managing his staff of 5 and making sure his department is run effectively and efficiently. Way to GO!!! 3:27c YOUR BUSINESS COULD APPEAR HERE TOO!!Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels 773-3255 w ww.TheHeraldAdvocate.com The Herald-AdvocateHardee Countys Hometown Coverage

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T he Herald-Advocate H ardee Countys Hometown Coverage P.O. BOX 338 WAUCHULA, FL 33873 Telephone (863) 773-3255 Quality printing services at competitive prices! 8A The Herald-Advocate, March 27, 2014

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The Herald-Advocate(USPS 578-780)Thursday, March 27, 2014 PAGE ONE MR. HHS 3:27c REGISTER NOW! 1 12 20 0 6 60 0Cheer PresidentFootball Commissioner For more information call Annette Zunigaat 863-781-0859 or James Crews at 863-559-4774 HARDEE soc3:27p Football & Cheer Sign UpSa t. March 29 9am 2pm New President Elias Richardson863-990-6546 N No oR Re eg gi is st tr ra at ti io on nF Fe ee e Cracker Trail 4-H C aladium Sale at The Slice of Life Event in Wauchula 10 am 2 pm Stop by and support this great group of 4-H kids and get some Caladiums for around your yard. soc3:27p B

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2B The Herald-Advocate, March 27, 2014 Grammy award-winning tenor L arry Ford will present a musical concert at First United Methodist Church, 135 Broadway, Fort Meade, on Sunday at 6 p.m. Ford has been singing since he was a five-year-old in Le-vel land, Texas, and has performed in 49 states and 30 foreign coun tries. Trained in classical music, he is a graduate of Eastern New Mexico State University and has been a featured soloist with The Downings, the Dixie Echoes and the James Blackwood Quartet as well as on the Gaither Family Homecoming recordings. He and his wife, Sherryl, have pastored churches in Texas and Florida. He recently decided to return to the full-time music ministry. They are the parents of five sons and a daughter and grandparents of seven grandchil dren. Although his music ministry, which includes over 100 concerts a year, is important to him, he values his family and s ervice to God in the home church, First Assembly of GodCentral. For further information, call the church office at 863-3859059 or Chuck Hancock at 863581-6101. Ford Sings In Fort Meade Ford Words To L ive By A Daily Thought T HURSDAY It was two days before the P assover, and the Feast of Unleavened Bread. And the chief priests and the scribes were seeking how to arrest Him by stealth, and kill Him. For they said, not during the feast lest there be a tumult among the people.M)400( btnfF F R R I I D D A A Y Y Tr the twelve disciples, went to the leading priests and asked, How much will youp you? And they game him thirty pieces of silver. Fromr t looking for an opportunity to b M)]TJ 0 Tw 78 1 Td [( !"# $ $ b %&' fS S A A T T U U R R D D A A Y Y Now the day of the Passover c elebration arrived, when the Passover lamb was killed and eaten with the unleav b e r r place to prepare the Passover meal They went off to the city and found(r t ) rsaid, and prepared the Passover supper.& L *+,-b '& .fS S U U N N D D A A Y Y N/ / p0 bled and He exclaimed, I tell you the truth; one of your00 s 1 2 sponded, It is the one to whom I give the bread that I dip in the bowl. And when He had dipped it, He gave it as, son of Simon Iscar b 2 i 0 going out into the night.J3 4-, $ *,-+b %&' fM M O O N N D D A A Y Y During the meal, Jesus took an d blessed the bread, broke it and gave it to His disciples, Take, eat. This is My body, which is broken for you.M)]TJ 78 1 Td [( !"# $ $ bM5fT T U U E E S S D D A A Y Y Taking the cup and thankingG 6 t ( rDrink this, all of you. This iss 0 G 7 / ( 8enant poured out for many people for the forgiveness of sins.M)]TJ 0 Tw 78 1 Td [( !"# $ *bM5fW W E E D D N N E E S S D D A A Y Y Jesus said, Ill not be drinki ng wine from this cup again until the new day when Ill drink it with you in the king dom of My Father. They sang a hymn and went di -0 r s r0( b M)]TJ 0 Tw 78 1 Td [( !"# $ 9+bM5f All verses are excerpted from:;< =>?@ ABC?R Z H [\ Q :;R Z H _\ AQ < ` \ RSlish Bible; (NIV) New International Version; (NLT) New Living Translation (RSV) Revised Standard Version;Ha [\ Q a;B??Bc W [ >d< X R \ RSflish; and (TLB) The Living Bible. Hardee Living COURTESY PHOTO T he Midtown Men will close out the South Florida State College Artist Series in a performance on Monday at 7:30 p.m. at the college Theatre for the Performing Arts, 600 W. College Dr., Avon Park. Tickets are $33, 40 or 45 and can be obtained at www.performances.southflorida.edu or by calling 863-784-7184. The Jersey Boys (shown above) Christian Hoff, Daniel Reichard, J. Robert Spencer and Michael Longoria take the stage as the Midtown Men to bring the sounds of the 60s, including the Beatles, The Beach Boys, Motown, the Four Seasons and more. Folks can come to the concert early and visit the Museum of Florida Art and Cultures Wild and Places Between, featuring paintings by Dennis Aufiery. MIDTOWN MUSIC a uthor and social reformer John Ruskin who made the following people may be happy in their work, these three things are needed: they must be fit for it; they must not do too much of it; and they must have a sense of success in it. was known to exist on Earth, scientists discovered that it ex isted on the sun. The newly discovered element was therefore named helium after the Greek god of the sun, Helios. phobia, youre afraid of teeth. nant (or known someone who has), you might be familiar with a condition sometimes known as seems pretty common for pregnant women to forget names, misplace keys and sometimes even make it to work while still wearing their fuzzy slippers. Y ou might be surprised to learn that there is science to support the existence of this phenome non: Brain scans show that during pregnancy, some of the blood flow in a womans brain shifts from the forebrain, re sponsible for short-term mem ory and multitasking, to the hindbrain, which takes care of the basics of survival. So the next time you see a pregnant woman in the grocery store wearing bunny slippers, give her a break; shes building a new person. at auction for $1.3 million. adult, you will be cheated on one time before you find the per son you settle down with. Also, at some point during your dating life youll be the cheater. Thought for the Day: A person usually has two reasons for doing something: a good reason and the real reason. Thomas Carlyle STRANGEBUT TRUE By Samantha Weaver Rose Mitchell-Freeman Rea ding Instruction Specialist (863)773-6141 Your Child Will Learn to Read! Free Evaluation Internationally Acclaimed Method Children, Teens & Adults ghjklmnj www.jazzercise.com J azzercise Heartland Summer Body?Jazzercise, Fusion, Core & Strike Come see what were all about o q u v w x y u SUPER MATTCoin LaundryLarge Washers & DryersUp To 125 lbs. WashersSPECIAL/ESPECIALMONDAY-FRIDAY 6 AM-6 PM N N O O R R M M A A L L / / N N O O R R M M A A L L E E N Nz zE E S S P P E E C C I I A A L L / / E E S S P P E E C C I I A A L L$ $2 2{ {| |D D O O} } ~ ~L L E E / / D D O O~ ~L L E E$ $ 2 2 $ $ | || |M M A A / / M M A A I I$ $2 2 $ $6 6| || |L L A A R R E E / / R R A A N N D D E E$ $3 3 $ $ | || |S S} }P P E E R R / / R R A A N N D D E E$ $3 3 w u ABOUT ... Ha rdee Living Hardee Living prints your news on people, clubs and organizations, including meeting summaries, births, childrens and senior citi zens birthdays, engage ments, weddings, silver or golden anniversaries, church events and military assign ments. Forms are available at our office. For engagements and weddings, a photo should be included. Publication is free of charge. Coverage of wed dings over three months old will be limited to a photo and brief announcement. Thursday. It pays to a dvertise in your Hometown Newspaper We are saving this space just for Y YO OU U! !The HeraldAdvocate 115 S. 7th Ave. 773-3255 www.TheHeraldAdvocate.com If Nostradamus would have written a nything close to this! Consider Testimonies Volumn 9 beginning on Page 11 by E.G. White Must Reads: Desire of Ages & The Great Controversy Download entire E.G.W. App. from the E.G. White Estate o q u x w x w x GBs Ladies & Mens Formal Wear Last Years Dresses 1/2 off Night Moves by Allure Kasey J v w x y u Gini Beth HendersonOwner Cell: 863-873-1858863-402-1902 Jovani Blush off New Dress W ith Coupon $ 30 o q u v w x y u

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March 27, 2014, The Herald-Advocate 3B 2014 Wildcat I NVITATIONAL Golf Tournament Individual Stroke Play * A A l l l l P P r r o o c c e e e e d d s s B B e e n n e e f f i i t t H H a a r r d d e e e e H H i i g g h h S S c c h h o o o o l l A A t t h h l l e e t t i i c c s s *To R gg at or at sstag Registration forms also available at Torrey Oaks Golf Course Sponsored by: 3:13-27c Torrey Oaks Golf CourseS Sa a t t r r a a A A r ri i 5 5a a S S a a A A r ri i 6 6T By R illa Cooper 773-6710 Greetings from Fort Green! A s I was typing the news on Sunday afternoon it was trying to rain and we sure do need some out our way. The creek south of our home is about dry, with just one side running. Our sincere sympathy is ex tended to all the family of Junior Cooper. He was Sher-mans first cousin and always delighted in asking Sherman if he knew how old he was. Sherman always knew because Junior was 10 years older than Sherman. When Junior was born the doctors said he wouldnt live to ten and Junior liked telling people the doctors did not know! Lots of people will remember Junior and remember him holding his walker over his head when he crossed the street! He was a hard worker, mowing yards with a push mower and running to the next yard to mow and when he got older working at the pack inghouses. He did not take money from the public purse as so many do without near the problems Junior was born with. He made his final journey last Wednesday. I saw a horse trailer with about four saddled horses complete with the yellow slicker tied behind the saddle one day last week. I dont know where they were going to work but this is nearly a thing of the past, but is a delightful sight, cowboys working cows with horses. Fort Greens posse rode again last week as the ladies all went to dinner honoring Joyce Cokers birthday. Joyce is a few months older than me. The posse is a group of widows who enjoy eating out together and anything else that is fun. Quite a few people in the county have Peace River Electric Coop, which I still call the REA for their electricity. At one of the district meetings they announced they would have a drawing for a mini I pad after all the districts had met. The lucky winner was Iris Gilliard. Iris told me the REA representative took her picture and information when she learned the good news and told her it would be in the m onthly magazine. Well, every one does not get the magazine and I thought everyone loves to hear good news and more get the Herald than the PRECO monthly magazine! Congratulations to Hunter Reid on turning 16 and getting his drivers license! The times I have seen him driving he has been cautious and a good driver. Our sympathy is extended to the family of Hill Blackmon as he made his final journey. Hill has probably been in more homes in the county than anyone else. He was a terrific repairman for any appliance. He will be missed. Our sympathy is also ex tended to the family of Doloris Jo Smith as she made her final journey. I knew her sister, Sharon, better but it always hurts when a member of the family passes. I never had any sisters but both brothers have already passed. Dennis Sasser sang a special Sunday morning and I told him I be lieved it was the best ever. He always does a good job and is also our song leader at church. Jake Willis will graduate from the army soon. His final test will be walking 10 miles with all his gear on his back. His grandmother said he had gained 10 pounds but this walk may take it away! Betty Waters was at church Sunday, as was Gary Oden. They are a blessing to all of us as they have battled cancer for some time. Norma Alejandro will have a procedure Thursday. Kitty Oden is having a procedure one day this week. Betty and Clint Walker still are not able to attend church and Betty is one person who loves to go to church. Harriet Hendry is not doing well and neither is Donia Hughes. Please pray for all of these. I had a tree man out and he worked on the avocado tree in our yard. The one in the grove is totally gone. The laurel leaf bug from China is the culprit that is killing the bay trees and avocados. So many of the dis eases we have come from the foreign countries. Please pray for each other and our nation. rectchevy.com L LOYD HALL 3:27c Two Of T visit www. amazingfacts.org or www.amazingdiscoveries.org soc2:20-5:29p www.thebulbbin.com 8 86 63 3-4 47 71 1-B B L LB B The Bulb B Fan & Lighting Showroom FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED SINCE 1989 Join Us For Our25THANNIVERSARY SALE!1 DAY ONLYSaturday, March 29 10am 2pmSTOREWIDE Everything In Store is On Sale!2 25 5 O OF FF F! !J)-800( )-800( btnfn r )-800(n Rnn )]TJ 137 0 Td [( )200()-800( n C C C! "# C! $%&#%!C!' We are a one stop shop for all your lighting an d home improvement needs. more WE ARE A HGTV HOME AND ELK LIGHTING RETAIL SHOWROOM soc3:27c s earched from the archival The Wildcat netters were de feated in Mulberry by the high school team of that city Wednes day evening by the score of 7 to 2. W.C. King, former county commissioner, received a wire that a contract was let Thursday by the state Road Department for the completion of the road running from Zolfo to Griffins Corner. The surface is to be con structed of a mixed-in-place type of oil and soil. The Royal Theatre is showing Kentucky Moonshine on Fri day; Devils Island on Satur day; Cowboy and the Lady on Sunday and Monday; They Made Me A Criminal on Tuesday and Wednesday; and Trooper Takes A Trip on Thursday and Friday. Coming soon will be Stable Mates, Five of a Kind, That Certain Age, My Lucky Star and Kentucky. The B&B is advertising 24 pounds of self-rising flour for 49 cents; half a gallon can of figs for 39 cents; one pound of cof fee, 15 cents; five gallons of kerosene, 39 cents; three pounds of bananas for 10 cents; and a free balloon with the purchase of one pound of mixed candies for 19 cents. Hardee County commission ers Friday awarded contracts for County. Keri succeeds Jessica G ough as Junior Miss. Six teachers were honored for the school year 1988-89 at the School Board meeting held Wednesday, March 22, when Superintendent Lee Burns con gratulated each of the teachers and presented them with plaques and pins. Those recognized as Teacher of the Year are Mary Nell Masterson at Hardee Junior High, Judy Terrell at Hardee Senior High, Anne Taylor at Zolfo Springs Ele-mentary, Billie Custer at Wau-chula Elemen tary, Marilyn Best at Bowling Green Elementary and Roy Shaw at North Wau-chula Elementary. Hardee County Teacher of the Year was Billie Cluster. A 46-year-old Fort Green woman has been accused of setting fire to her own home. Two senior high school boys involved in two separate fights have been expelled from school. Each year, children with dis abilities are recognized for their accomplishments through the in ternational Yes I Can! awards program. This year, Hardee County nominee Justin Sauvey was nominated in the area of self-advocacy, and he has been selected as one of 27 Interna tional Yes I Can! winners. He is a fourth-grade student at Zolfo Springs Elemen-tary School. Little Eliana Esmeralda En riques was third runner-up in the recent Sunburst Beauty Pageant where she won Prettiest Smile and will advance to the May pageant to be held in Orlando. The 6-month-old is the daughter of Leticia Ann Enriquez and granddaughter of Leticia and Jose C. Enriquez hospitalization insurance for c ounty employees and for metal roofing, authorized closing of an old county road, and took a roundhouse swing at state Road Board member Warren Carson. Twenty-eight Hardee County Junior High School students were tapped for membership in the Elmo Roberts Chapter of the National Honor Society Tuesday morning. Political candidates in Hardee County were served notice last week by the state Road Department that violation of the states outdoor advertising law is a mis demeanor carrying a possible fine of $330 a month for each vi olation. Wauchulas new $40,000 water main and $41,000 storage tank were placed in service this week after sterilization and state approval of water samples. Two men convicted of escape and other crimes were being transported from prison back to Wauchula early Tuesday morn ing to face additional escape and related charges when, ap-par ently, they did it again. One, however, was recaptured almost immediately, according to Assistant State Attorney Stephen Houchin, while the other re mains at large. Two carnival workers were arrested during the Hardee County Fair last week after al legedly purchasing cocaine from an undercover officer, records said. Keri Schrader was chosen as the 1989 Junior Miss Hardee COURTESY PHOTOSD() *+(,+(+ -+(./01 +12 34( 5(+126017 8+93 :9-.4..+127 /4+;42 <= 01 + (4941/ /<(>4? 3<1/ +12 4+93 ,+5542 +1 @ 6940.+ 50,,.4() :9-.4..+12 A 6 j <1 A 0( +/ -.4;601 B 1 AE 4(6 A /?and spent part of his spring break visiting Wauchula and hunting with his 5(+12;0/34() SFGHIK SLMMNSS

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Photos By MARIA TRUJILLO KAYLA ELMORE Story Of Noah 4B The Herald-Advocate, March 27, 2014

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March 27, 2014, The Herald-Advocate 5B (863) 767-8920 (Road North of Aarons Rental. Next to Heartland Pediatrics) 3:27c May be covered completely or in part by insurance c ontact the pharmacy to see if you may qualify. HeartlandPharmacy 8 63-773-4161 Ext. 157 or Ext. 176 3:27c Hardee County YOUR BUSINESS COULD APPEAR HERE TOO!!Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels 773-3255 w ww.TheHeraldAdvocate.com COURTESY PHOTOS T he Wildcat division (ages 11-13), coached by James Cranford and Christopher Parks, barely beat the North Manatee Storm 8-6 in Saturdays opening of the Hardee Youth Football Spring Flag season. Flag scoring is one point for a touchdown or extra point (no kicks). The Storm was last years divisional flag football champion. In the Bobcat Division (ages 8-10) Hardee split a double-header and has a 1-1 record. The Cub Division (ages 5-7) and girls Panther Division (ages 14-16) drew a bye on opening week. Registration for the fall football and cheerleading begins Friday night at the football field house at the Hardee Junior High campus at 5 p.m. FOOTBALL FLAGGED By JIM KELLY Of The Herald-Advocate Wauchulas Community Redevelopment Agency, which encompasses 1,579 acres and is funded with over $400,000 of local property taxes annually, had a busy 2012-13 fiscal year, director Jessica Newman told the Wauchula Kiwanis Club Tuesday, March 18, at the Panda Restaurant. There is a grant program for commercial revitalization and a Paint The Town project, which l ast year painted five Wauchula homes at no charge using about 100 volunteers. An initial 2011 Environmenttal Protection Agency Brownfield grant of $400,000 resulted in $88,714 this year for 101-105 West Maine Street Phase 1 and Phase 2 assessments for haz ardous substance removal, with remediation cost recommenda tions. Further remediation planning was conducted for 226 West M ain Street. A $55,000 grant from Central Florida Regional Planning Council was secured to be used in conjuction with a $75,000 grant from the Florida Department of Environmental Protection for source removal and clean-up of harmful sub stances, which can be petro leum, asbestos and lead paint. The CRA continued the monthly Curb Appeal Award with the help of Main Street Wauchula. The CRA was establ ished in Wauchula in 1997 under the leadership of then-city clerk Steve Wofford. The CRA this past year renovated four downtown parking lots, including landscaping and drainage improvements. They are at Town Center shopping plaza, U.S. 17 Southbound and Main Street, between South 7th Ave. and South 8th Ave, and north of the Train Depot. The Train Depot restoration project was completed. The CRA received a Hardee Economic Development Agency grant in 2011 of $400,000. Re ceptions, dinners and special e vents are held there. Peace River Explorations has the depot open on Fridays and Saturdays. The CRA works with the city, economic development, Industrial Development Authority, Main Street Wauchula, and the Chamber of Commerce to create partnerships to grow the local economy. The CRA this past year gave out residential grants of $13,677 and commercial grants of $17,112. Expenses included $371,654 for the parking lot projects for Train Depot rehabilitation. Total expenses, including spending of grants were $1.28 million, in c luding $81,438 for Christmas decorations and $130,718 transferred to the citys general fund. The Paint The Town event will be held Saturday, May 10, with a rainout date of May 17. Property tax income to the CRA peaked at $646,879 in 2008 and due to lower tax valuations has been $638,119 in 2009, $521,182 in 2010, $498,048 in 2011, $447,740 in 2012, and $428,052 in 2013, Newman reported. Newman runs the CRA and also Main Street Wauchula Inc. Elton Cowart is originally f rom Wauchula. He was in the class of 1967 at Hardee High School. When he got out of the Army, he married Donna Dee Downing, and they were together almost 43 years. Memo rial services will be held at 3:00 p.m. Sunday, March 30, 2014 at Skeen Funeral Home Chapel in Troy, Ala.. The guest book may be signed, words of condolences may be expressed and memori als to Wounded Warriors Project may be made at www.skeenfuneralhome.com. or mail directly to Wounded Warriors Project, P.O. Box 758517, Topeka, Kansas 66675. Elton Cowart, 64, editor and publisher of Dixie Living magazine, died Thursday, March 20, at his home in the Tanyard community in Bullock County, Ala. Cowart believed that every body likes something for free, especially if it brings fun and laughter to their lives. For more than 10 years, Cowarts home spun writing entertained those who read his magazine. Elton believed if you can give people reason to laugh and forget about their troubles for a while, then that was worth s omething, said Kenny May, a close friend. May had coffee with Cowart Thursday morning and said he was in good spirits. Elton was fussing a bit be cause they didnt have the kind of tomato plants he wanted at the co-op, May said.But Donna said he went home and planted the tomatoes he bought and had a real good day getting his garden going. May said Cowart found his way to the area from Florida about 12 years ago. Elton was a policeman down around Lakeland and he came up this way hunting, May said. He got to liking it up here so he and Donna pulled up stakes and moved to Tanyard. Cowart bought a store in the Tanyard community and ran it for a while. Then, he accepted the editors position at the Union Springs Herald. At the Herald, Elton wrote a column called, A View from Tanyard, and everybody got a kick out of it, May said. Elton had this knack. He could write about anything and make it interesting. His column was the first thing I looked for when I got the newspaper. A lot of people were the same way. Cowart penned a book titled I Dont Look Good Naked Anymore and it generated a lot of interest. People just liked to read what Elton wrote, May said. He had the gift Whether people knew him per sonally or through his writing, he brought a lot of laughter into their lives. Well all miss the laughter. May said Cowart had told him when he died, he wanted people to come together at Tanyard and celebrate his life. He didnt want anything sad, May said. Elton loved to laugh and thats the way Ill remember him, laughing and loving life. Wauchula Native Elton Cowart W as Publisher of Dixie Living Elton Cowart

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6B The Herald-Advocate, March 27, 2014 ABOUT ... ClassifiedsDEADLINE....Tuesday noon RATES..........Minimum of $4.50 for 10 words. Each additional word is .25 cents. Ads in all capitals are .35 cents per word. Headlines are $2 a line. Blind ad box numbers are $3 extra. BILLING........Ads must be pre-paid. CLASSIFICATIONS:AgricultureMobile Homes AppliancesNotices AutomobilePersonal Boats Pets FurniturePlants/Produce Guns Real Estate Help WantedRecreational Houses Rentals LivestockRentals, CommercialLost & FoundServices MiscellaneousWanted MotorcyclesYard Sales The Classifieds DIESEL INJECTION repairs, pumps, turbo, injectors, remove and install available, 863-3810538. 3:27p NOW PURCHASING citrus fruit for the 2014 season for Chapman Fruit Co. Call Frank Vasquez, 863781-4133. 1:9-5:29p CLEAN, FERTILIZED Hemarthria hay for sale, $30 per roll. Call 863781-0104 or 863-559-7545. 11:14-4:10p L. DICKS INC. is now purchasing citrus fruit for the 2013/14 season and beyond. Call Mark Manuel @ 863-781-0384. 7:8tfc 17 KEY WEST w/trailer, 90h John son, trolling motor, bimini top, very good condition, $5,500, 863773-6424. 3:27,4:3p 13 FIBERGLASS BOAT with 7 1/2 HP Mercury, new tires and bear ings, trolling motor and depth recorder, $1,095. 863-781-3202. 3:20-4:3c Boats Agriculture PART TIME SECRETARIAL Re ceptionist VOLUNTEER for Do mestic Violence & Counseling Services. Must be computer-liter ate, know how to file, and be able to handle confidential matters. 863-773-5717 ext, #1 or come to 113 N. 7th Avenue, Wauchula, FL 33873. 3:20,27c POLITICAL SCIENCE INSTRUC TORS (PT) Open until filled. Please visit http://sfsc.inter viewexchange.com for detailed position posting. 863-784-7132. EA/EO 3:20,27c DIRECT SUPPORT STAFF NEEDED. Qualified applicants must meet the following: 18 yrs. or older, High School Diploma or equiva lent, Valid Florida Drivers License. 1 yr. verifiable experience in DD Field, Medical or Child Care Set ting. Must pass Law Enforcement background screening and drug test. Apply in person at Sunrise Community Inc., 1014 6th Ave. South in Wauchula. 3:13-4:10p Help WantedFOSTER CARE WORK from home as part of an innovative team to provide a safe nurturing environ ment for young persons with dis abilities, also receive great reimbursement, training and sup port. Contact us at: www.keyas setsflorida.com or call 863-5125977. 3:6-4:3p CNA, BILINGUAL, apply in person along with resume at Bowling Green Medical Center, 302 West Main Street, 375-2214. 2:27-3:27c UNITED COUNTY WOLF LAKE Realty, 390 CR 17A East, Avon Park, Florida 33825. Guy Willard, Broker, 863-452-2299. Agricultural and land specialist needed. Rewarding future income. Please call James Watson, Associate Broker Man ager, 863-465-1549 or 863-4415173. 3:27-4:27p CDL CLASS A, local and OTR truck driver, 2 yrs. experience needed, clean driving record, drug free, 863-414-8842. 3:27-4:24p Help WantedDREDGE OPERATOR, Oiler, Mechanic, Welder, Labor. Experience and MSHA training a plus. DFW/EOE 813-634-2517. 3:20,27p NTERACTIVE CAREGIVING is what separates COMFORT KEEPERS from other caregivers. Our focus is on engaging the mind, body, and safety of our clients. CNA, HHA and Homemaker Companion posi tions are available in the Hardee County area. Flexible, full-time or part-time. Learn more about a re warding career enriching the lives of others with COMFORT KEEP ERS. Apply online: ck381.ersp.biz/employment or call 863-385-8558. HHA#299992766. 2013 CK Franchising, Inc. Most offices independently owned and op erated. 3:6tfc 2010 CALICO BUMPER Pull horse trailer, 863-245-3972. 3:27,4:3p Miscellaneous Help Wanted (863) 773-2128REALTORS JOE L. DAVIS JOE L. DAVIS, JR. JOHN H. ONEAL REALTOR See more listings at www.joeldavis.com REAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS 89 acs fronts Peace River & includes cabin, barn, 3 wells, & 35 ac grove. Excellent pasture & majestic live oaks w/plenty of deer & turkey. $735,000! 4BR/3BA home & Hamlin grove on 20 acs. 2 pole barns, inground pool and ac fish pond. $499,000! 5 acs. w/mature trees in Desoto Co. Homesite or farm. Owner fi nance. $35,000! PRICE REDUCED! 20 acs zoned industrial on Hwy 17. $399,000! PRICE REDUCED! 200 ac excellent pasture for hunting deer & turkey. Will divide! NOW $2,950/ac! 4BR/2BA CB home on Hawaiian Dr in Wauchula. $75,000! PRICE REDUCED! 37 acs Jessica Prescott (941) 737-6502 REALTOR ASSOCIATES AFTER HOURS KENNY SANDERS...............781-0153KAREN ONEAL........... 781-7633 JESSICA PRESCOTT...941-737-6502KEVIN SANDERS..........368-1926 MONICA REAS....................781-0888 DAVID ROYAL................781-3490HIGHWAY 17 SOUTH, WAUCHULA, FL 33873 cl3:27c w/3 250 well has perimeter fencing & dble paved rd frontage. NOW $90,000! 3/2 home in Wauchula close to business area w/3 sheds & a barn for your storage needs. $39,000! 1.3 ac commercial lot w/3,766SF restaurant & drivethru has 130+ ft frontage on N&S bound Hwy 17. $357,000! 9 ac grove on Main Street East, 4 well, micro-jet irrigation. $60,000! PRICE REDUCED! 9.8 acs fronts SR 64 near Popash. Great for homesite or agriculture. NOW $80,000! Commercial lot (zoned C-2) in side Wauchula City Limits. $14,000 RealtorsNOEYA. FLORES, BROKER228 N. 6th Ave. Wauchula, Florida 33873 Flores & Flores, Inc.!!!!SPECIAL OF THE WEEK!!!! WAUCHULA 4BR/2BA Mobile Home on 2.5 acres with central air & heat. Big open hallway, lots of storage space, front and back porch, metal roof and pasture fenced-in for cattle or horses. Property sits on a dead-end county maintained road. Offered at $135,000 WESHARETHESAMEMLSWITHHIGHLANDSCOUNTY!Remember, Our listings are on the Internet.Anyone with a computer can access them anytime! After Hours JASON JOHNSON Sales Associate (863) 781-3734 !!!WE BUY HOUSES!!! !!!CALL FOR AN OFFER!!! cl3:27c (863) 773-3337 Fax: (863) 773-0144 www.floresrealty.net WAUCHULA HILLS 3BR/1BA Frame home in Wauchula Hills with a extra building lot. Home is currently licensed for labor housing. Priced at $59,900 WAUCHULA 3BR/2BA Home with central air & heat, corner lot across from the court house, totally remodeled with fresh paint, new windows and new fencing. Property is zoned commercial and would make a great location for Professional office. Priced at $116,900 for a quick sale.Noey A. Flores, Broker (863) 781-4585 Oralia D. Flores, Broker Associate (863) 781-2955 Michael D. Boyett, Sales Associate (863) 781-2827 Jason Johnson, Sales Associate (863) 781-3734 Doris Lambert G.R.I, Broker Kenneth Lambert Broker Delois Johnson Associate 781-2360 Steve Johnson Associate 781-0518 Beverly Allen Associate 863-448-6610 Sue Birge Associate 781-3536 Colon Lambert Associate 781-1103 LA M B E RTREALTY INC.105 West Summit Street Wauchula, FL 33873Bus. (863) 773-0007 Fax: (863) 773-0038 NEW LISTING 5.62 acres close to town. commercial possibilities plus residence 4B/3Bth, pool, 3800 sq. ft. Call for an appointment. NEW LISTING10 acres excellent buliding location. Close to town with a pond. $109,500 3B/2Bth plus bonus room on almost one acre in country setting; screened porch, metal roof, carpet and hardwoods. $105,000 Thinking of building your home? Choose one or all three lots in gated, golf course community. $16,000 per lot. Fantastic Home Site! 7.31 acres with small creek running through property. $63,000 Hwy 17 frontage! See this 1B/1Bth, frame with metal roof home located in Bowling Green. $50,000 30 Acre Tract! Pasture and woods, secluded and fenced. $170,000 Income property! 2B/1Bth home and 3 apartments all within walk ing distance of schools, shopping in Wauchula. $120,000 Seven (7) vacant lots in small subdivision, road frontage; various prices ranging from $25,000 to $30,000; perfect location for building your new home! New kitchen cabinets, countertops and updated bathrooms in this 3B/2Bth home close to Peace River; hurricane shutters and extra insulation recently added. Make an appointment to see today! $89,000 Single Wide M/H; 3B/2Bth, central H/A, laminate floors; all furniture in home. $45,000 414 +/Ac in Duette Area; improved pasture being operated as cat tle ranch; located on dead end road. Call Colon for details. INCOME PRODUCING PROPERTY! 20 Acres with 19.5 acre cit rus grove, Earlies and Hamlins; 30 amp pump on timer; 6 inch well; house located on property has potential rental income of $850 per month. $425,000 SEMINOLE HEIGHTS 3 VACANT LOTS. $21,000 Nice trees on this lot in exclusive subdivision; underground utilities, convenient location. $30,000 5.23 acre tract located on main road; some woods. $35,000 WATERFRONT 5 acre tract, Charlie Creek frontage, wooded. $50,000 Briarwood Estates! Beautiful .49 Acre lot. Perfect for building your new home! $35,000 STRATEGICALLY LOCATED COMMERCIAL 3.19 Ac. Hwy. 17 across from Walmart; 4B/3Bth main house with caged, in ground pool and 2 apartments; ideal for small shopping center or multi-tenant park. $695,000 Lovely 2B/2Bth home located on golf course; excellent location and move-in ready. $124,900 SERVICE YOU CAN COUNT ON DORIS S. LAMBERT, G.R.I., Broker KENNETH A. LAMBERT, Broker cl3:27c H Ha ar rd de ee e C Co ou un nt ty y: : Ceilto Lindo Nearly 2 acres on Hwy 17 9200 sq. ft. building for auction center, retail, flea market or agri culture business. North and South bound exposure. $299,000. Additional 1.78 acres available. 61 acres Abundance of deer and turkey. 65% im proved pasture with flowing creek. Joins Highlands Hammock State Park. Beautiful high and dry home site. Price REDUCED! $475,500 Lets make a deal! H Hi ig gh hl la an nd ds s C Co ou un nt ty y: : 5 acres in Venus excellent for hunting camp on county maintained road. Great for a weekend get away or permanent residence. $19,500 79 acres on Lake Josephine. 4 homes, horse barn, dog kennel. 3 acre+-, 10' high training pen, deer, turkey and other wildlife. Income producing. Asking $1,127,000. Will Divide. REDUCED TO $927,000. 151 acres on Lake Istokpoga 1800'+frontage, Arbuckle Creek 3000'+frontage, and over 1000' Hwy 98 frontage. REDUCED TO $1,450,000!!! Lets make an offer! P Po ol lk k C Co ou un nt ty y: : 211.41 acres with 6+ acre lake and creek. Currently used for cattle. One mile from Fort Meade city limits and Peace River. $675,512 only $3,200 per acre. 451 acres on paved Singletary Rd. 31+ acres in citrus, 345+ boxes per acre. 2 wells 10" and 12", 65%+improved, excellent pasture can be used for citrus or farming. Asking $2,000,000 P PR R O OP PE ER R T TI IE ES S F FO OR R S SA AL LE E Advantage Realty743 US 27 S.Sebring, FL 33872Office: 863-386-1111Fax: 863-3861112Private and Confidential Listings and SalesVISIT US AThttp://www.erahighlands.com/ OR http://www.era.com/worldwide/Mark LambertRealtorCell: 863-832-0401Email: mark33862@gmail.com cl3:27c Over $35,000,000in sales for Hardee and Highlands County area in 2013. And 21 Realtors at your service for all of your real estate needs. ERA Real Estate offices located world wide! Staton Auto SalesLarge Selection of Cars to Choose From Bill Staton Theresa Hamilton863-781-4460 863-781-9084 30 Day Guarantee on Motor & Transmission Onlycl2:13tfc Se Habla Espanol THE BEST DEALFROM ANY ANGLE No matter how you look at it, theres no better place to shop for your next car. NOW ACCEPTING ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS Sam Albritton Electrical Services, Inc.863-767-0313 Office 863-781-0377 Mobile Residential and Commercial Wiring Electrical Inspections Electrical Preventative Maintenance Ground Testing Lightning ArrestorServing Hardee County Since 199411:7tfc EC13002737 24 Hour Emergency Service cl1:12tfcI BUYHOUSES781-1062CALLBILLYHILLAT

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March 27, 2014, The Herald-Advocate 7B T he Classifieds PS4 USED 1 1/2 months. $1,700 of g ames/software downloaded. Asking $700, 863-773-4358. 3:27c SE VERAL UTILITY POLES for sale. 4639 St. Rd. 62, Bowling Green, 863-245-8659. 3:27p N EW 2 HP Water Pump. Paid over $400, make offer. Call 773-9179 or to see 711 Crosby Lane. 3:27p 1995 COBRA 37 Park model with 2 5 x 10 gated deck, furnished, located in Peace River RV Park, 2555 U.S. Hwy. 17 South, lot C-28, Wauchula. $7,500, 863-558-9042. 3:13-4:10p PAR K MODEL 12x35 with 8 x 25 screened room, new 10 x 12 storage shed. Little Charlie Creek RV Park, lot 270. 814-226-9697. 2:27-3:27p Mobile Homes Miscellaneous HARDEE FAMILY MEDICINE, lo c ated at 522 Carlton Street Wauchula, Florida 33873 will be closing effective March 28, 2014. In order to facilitate a smooth tran sition and ensure continuity of care, medical records can be re quested in person at 522 Carlton Street Wauchula, Florida 33873 or by fax at (863) 773-2456. After March 28, 2014, medical records can be requested in person at Florida Hospital Heartland Med ical Center Health Partners lo cated at 4421 Sun N Lake Blvd. Suite C Sebring, FL or by fax at (863) 382-1433. If you are a pa tient of Dr. Kathleen WelchWilson and would like your records for warded to another physician, please call us at (863) 382-6183. 3:6-27c ATTENTION! State Statutes 828.29 r equires that all cats and dogs sold in Florida be at least 8 weeks old, have an official health certificate, have necessary shots and be free of parasites. tfc-dh Pets Notices ADOPT A PET! If you have lost a p et or are looking for a new one, the City of Wauchula invites you to come and see if you can find the pet youre looking for. The Wauchula Animal Control is lo cated at 685 Airport Road. Please call 863-773-3265 for more information. tfc-dh 3 BR, 2 BA MH in country. 863735-9284. 3:27p 3 BR, 2 BA LARGE C arport, $800 month, $800 deposit, no pets, no smoking. 419-656-2777, 419-6563246. 3:27p 2 BR, 2 BA Large 2 car carport garage, not smoking, no pets al lowed, $650 month, plus $650 deposit. 419-656-3246. 3:27p 1 BR, 1 BA DUPLEX apartment 507 N. 9th Ave., Wauchula, central air and heat, $500 month, 863-7811282 or 863-781-0514. 3:20tfc *R ENT-TO-OWN* MOBILE HOMES 1, 2, 3 Bedrooms. Cheaper than paying rent. Close to schools and hospital. Lot rent $300. Se habla espanol. 863698-4910 or 863-698-4908. Call today. 7:5tfc Rentals Pets 3 BR, 2 BA, central air, $850 plus deposit, 863-832-1984. 3:27p AT TENTION! The Federal Fair H ousing Act prohibits advertising any preference or limitation based on race, color, religion, sex, hand icap, familial status or national ori gin, or the intention to make such a preference or limitation. Familial status includes children under 18 living with parents or guardians and pregnant women. tfc-dh HARDEE ROOFING, owner Richie E vans, License #CCC1326969, 773-0377. 3:6-5:8p E AGLE LAWN CARE, no con tracts, mowing, weeding, tree trimming, 863-399-8967. 2:27-3:27p ALC OHOLICS ANONYMOUS, Thursday 7:00 p.m., Grace Fellow ship Church, 131 S. 8th Ave., Wauchula. Bill 727-326-3816. tfc-dh *** N EED A WELL OR HAVE PUMP TROUBLE? CALL ULLRICHS PITCHER PUMP For complete well, sales, service and installation, call 863-773-6448. 7:18tfc T HE WAUCHULA LIONS CLUB collects NOT broken prescription eyeglasses, cases and sun glasses. Please drop of at 735 N. 6th Ave. tfc-dh DO YOU HAVE a problem with drugs? Narcotics Anonymous meets Monday and Thursday night 7:00 p.m. at First United Methodist Church, at the corner of Palmetto and 7th Ave., Wauchula. tfc-dh I S ALCOHOL CAUSING a prob lem? Call Alcoholics Anonymous in Hardee county at 863-781-6414. Several weekly meetings. tfc-dh AT TENTION! State Statutes 4891 19 Section 5 Paragraph B and Hardee County Ordinance 87-09 Section 10 Paragraph D require all ads for any construction-related service to carry the contractors li cence number. tfc-dh Services Rentals 1979 OR OLDER Ford truck F100F 150, 2-wheel drive, but will con sider all, 863-781-3227. 3:6-4:3p B UYING COINS. I would like to buy your coins. Call 863-781-2452. 3:13-4:10p FRIDAY, SATURDAY, 7:30-?, 1409 Los t Acres Dr., Wauchula Hills. 3:27p ON E DAY ONLY, Saturday, March 29, 2014, 9 am 3 pm, 473 Dansby Rd., Wauchula, FL. Furniture, housewares, linens, small appli ances, kitchen utensils, floral arrangements, knick knacks, books, ladies clothes. 3:27p ST REET SALE (Multi-family) Friday/Saturday Oak Hill Park, Hwy. 64 West. Clothing, dishes, tools, guns, sewing machine in cabinet, beds, some antiques, lots of household items! 3:27p SAT URDAY, 8 am ?, 902 S. 10th Ave., Wauchula. 3:27p Yard Sales Wanted MULTI-FAMILY, Friday, Saturday, 1 24 Bill Woods Rd., Ona. Misc. 3:27p MOVI NG SALE. Friday, Saturday, 3924 Sunset Dr., Zolfo off Hwy. 66, 9 am ?, two households. Furni ture, clothes, tools, appliances, decor, much more. 3:27p SAT URDAY, 8 am ?, 712 W. Palmetto St, Wauchula. Lots of furniture. 3 :27p ESTATE SALE, Friday, Saturday, 2928 Oak Hill Park, Wauchula. 52 TV, 2 beds, tools, misc. 3:27p SAT URDAY, 8-1, 706 East Pal metto St., Wauchula. 3:27p C HARLIE CREEK CO-OP Commu nity yard sale April 5th 7 am 1 pm. 1235 Blue Jay Rd., Hwy. 64. 3:20-4:3p C HARLIE CREEK CURIOSITY Shoppe plant sale March 27-29, 10 am 4 pm. 1235 Blue Jay, Hwy. 64. 3:20,27p Yard Sales 735-01883505 US HWY17 S ZOLFOSPRINGSMon. Wed. 10am 6pm Fri. & Sat. 10am 7pmCLOSEDTHURSDAY& SUNDAYDAN HILL Hills Auto WorldB BU UY YH HE ER RE E! P PA A Y YH HE ER RE E! NO INTERESTOR FINANCE CHARGES cl2:6tfc Family Owned & OperatedServing Central Florida For Over 20 YearsOwner Robert Spurlock FREE ESTIMATES $50 Off Any Job $500 or More Licensed & Insured CCC 1325523NOT VALID WITH ANY OTHER OFFER cl3:13tfc 863-453-5565 NOW HIRING V PK TEACHERS At Applications being accepted at863-773-3754 cl3:27,4:3c REDUCED! 3BR/3.5B two-story home on 2 ac in Wauchula. $177,000 2.6 ac on paved road, beautiful oak trees. $28,000 2BR/1B home in Wauchula, possible 3rd bedroom, fenced. $64,900 REDUCED! 25 ac on paved road in Gardner, 3 wells, septic, electric. $125,000 TIP OF THE DAY: A recent survey revealed that buying is better than renting after 5 years, saving an average of $1,700 each year. JOHN FREEMAN (863) 781-4084 Associate SANDY LARRISON, Broker (863) 832-0130 cell cl3:27c NEWLY LISTED!! BRIARWOOD NEIGHBOR H OOD!! This lovely 3 bedroom, 2 bath CB/Stucco home is offered in Briarwood Es tates. Large living room, 2 car gaage, screened porch and over 2000 SF of living area. Briarwood is the most desirable neigh borhood in Wauchula. LOG CABIN LOCATED IN FORT MEADE!! This 3 bedroom 2 bath home has a great rustic charm of a country home in the city. Wood laminate floors, wood burning fire place, metal roof and an open porch in back. Priced at $49,900 PRICED REDUCED!!! PERFECT HOME FOR YOU !! This 2 bedroom, 1 bath frame home is located in urban Wauchula. Not far from Main Street. This home includes a 2 car carport, front and back porch, and an upstairs loft for a possible 3rd bedroom. Great op portunity for a starter home or investment for rental. Priced at $42,000 to $38,000 NEWLY LISTED!! This 3 bedroom, 2 bath ho me is located in Wauchula, FL within walking distance of Main Street. Includes back screened poarch, 2 car carport and fenced back yard. Priced at $69,900. GREAT FOR STARTER FAMILY OR WINTER R ESIDENT!!!! This 3 bedroom 1 bath home is perfect for a new family. Plumbing and electric has been totally updated, kitchen has a new stainless steel stove, roof was re placed in 2004 and hot water heater is new. Has a very nice brick fireplace. Priced at only $65,000 N ATURAL LAND!!! Nice wooded 2.25 acres in Fort Green, FL. Out in the country a getaway from the city life. Owner financing available. Priced at $25,000 HOME LOCATED IN FORT MEADE!!This 3 b edroom, 2 bath CB home in historic Ft. Meade has large family room, dining room, living room with wood laminate flooring. A short drive to US Hwy 17 for access to Bartow and Lakeland. A large back yard for fam ily entertaining. Priced at $42,750 VERY NICE MOBILE HOME!! This 2005 2 b edroom 1.5 bath mobile home is move in ready with furniture. Perfect for a new couple or someone looking to escape the cold weather up north. Priced at $70,000 A FAMILY HOME!This 3 bedroom, 2 bath b rick home is on a quiet no traffic road outside of city limits. Large oaks in yard, out buildings, and alarm system. Priced at $159,900 GO TO: HomePath.com For More Fannie Mae Properties NEWLY LISTED!!!! 3 bedroom, 2 bath large ho me, has a storage shed, double carport and large bonus room. The property does in clude the vacant lot next to the home. Priced at $173,000 NEWLY LISTED LAKELAND DEAL!!! Sp acious 3 bedroom 2 bath home with one car garage. Freshly painted interior, new stove installed. Sliding glass doors go out to brand new deck in an enclosed back yard with privacy fence. Home located in South Lakeland, close to shopping malls and local dining. Priced at $89,900 GREAT BUY!!!This 3 bedroom, 2 bath home has a lot of space with plenty to spare, kitchen is huge with a moveable island. This home is in the very back of Sunset Park a peaceful neighborhood. Priced at $95,000 I NVESTMENT PROPERTY! 9.55 acres used to be a nursery. Has very large metal building and a mobile home that could be used for storage. With some TLC property can be up and running again. Priced at $67,999 PROPERTY!! T wo lots, 55 X 119 and 25 X 118 totaling 80 road frontage on US Hwy 17 in Bowling Green, FL. Lot 10 is zoned R-2 and lot 9 is zone C-2. Both lots are sold together. Priced at $18,000 GREAT STARTER HOME!! T his 3 bedroom, 2 bath modular home is located in Bowling Green, FL. Has large yard, metal roof and front porch. Carport with storage room. Priced at $34,900. PRISTINE MOBILE HOME!!This 3 BR, 1 1/2 B ath, kitchen/dining, LR, 12/30 Addition W/3rd BR. Wonderful play area or great room, 2 car carport, screened porch and large work/storage/playroom. Totally re done. Certainly a must see! Priced at $49,000. GREAT NEIGHBORHOOD CLOSE TO PE ACE RIVER!! This 4 bedroom, 2 bath concrete block home located just outside of town. Upgrade in kitchen with new counter tops and stainless steel appliances. Priced at $135,000 A REAL BARGAIN!! 3 BR-2B mobile home with lots of amenities. In ground screened swimming pool-great place for relaxing after hard days of work. Furnished, including washer & dryer, all kitchen equipment, in cluding tables and chairs, entertainment piece center w/TV, love seat, hot tub and more. Great storage for your extras and all for $38,000. 702 S OUTH 6th AVENUE, W AUCHULA Gary Delatorre Brokerwww.cbhardee.com Each office independently owned and operated. Robert Hinerman 2 27-0202 Nancy Craft 8 32-0370 Richard Dasher 7 81-0162 Victor Salazar 2 45-1054 cl3:27c

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8B The Herald-Advocate, March 27, 2014 REVELL A UTO S ALES After Hours Call: 863-245-0383 orSandra Miller 863-781-4577Se Habla EspaolWE ACCEPT CREDIT CARDSA A l l l l V V e e h h i i c c l l e e s s $ $6 65 5 A A W W e ee ek k! cl2:20tfc Apartment For Rent H H a a n n n n a a h h s s H H o o u u s s e e C C o o m m p p l l e e x x For Women and Children Only O ne-Bedroom Will accommodate 3 or 4 women and children. This is a special program, with security fence. Rent is percentage of income and includes electric. Phone 863-773-5717 ext. 2 cl3:27c Your Business Could Appear Here!Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels The Herald Advocate 773-3255 or w ww.TheHeraldAdvocate.com The Classifieds BOWLING GREEN QUICK LUBE& AUTO REPAIR Foreign and Domestic Cars Diesel Engines Gas or Diesel Manual or Automatic Transmissions 375-4461TERRYMIKE YOURTIREHEADQUARTERS Licensed and Insured Reg.# MV-40625 MONDAY SATURDAY 8 am6 pm cl6:21tfc New Tire Changer & Balancer Can Do 26 Wheels 954 sq ft Commercial Office Space For Rent G reat Location Just Across From WS Bank Address: 111 East Main Street ; Wauchula, Fl. $800.00 Monthly plus applicable sales tax Contact: Elene Salas @ 836-735-0999 8:8tfc Got a Pool Green or Clean? Need Your Pool Repaired? cl11:7tfcC Carols Pool Service for weekly pool service 863-449-1806 Equal Housing Opportunity Employer & Provider THE PALMS 701 La Playa Drive, Wauchula (863) 773-3809 TD D 800-955-8771 $99 Move In Special through Mar. 31st Plus $1200 FREE RENT (*O ne year lease @$100/mo reduction)0 Spacious 2, 3 & 4 BR Garden Apts. Rental Office Hours M onday Friday 9:00 AM 5:00 PM cl3:6-27c H H A A R R D D E E E E C C A A R R C C O O M M P P A A N N Y YYOUR #1 CAR DEALER (Across From First National Bank) 773-6667 Billy Hill OwnerMonday Saturday 9AM7PMSunday 1PM6PM $ $TAX TIME SALE$ $Come See Us For Great Deals During Our cl3:27c W W e e o o w w a a e e u uy y e er r e e P P a ay y e er r e e n n L La a t te e M Mo od de e e eh h e e 2008 Chevy HHR 2006 Chrysler PT Cruiser 2006 Chevy Aveo (80,000 Actual Miles)2006 Kia Spectra 2006 Chevy Cobalt(4 Door)2005 Saturn Relay Van 2005 Cadillac DeVille 2003 Chevy Monte Carlo (Red) 30 Day WarrantyMotor & TransmissionNOINTERESTORFINANCECHARGES3 37 75 5-4 44 44 41 1US HWY17 S BOWLINGGREEN Sandra Jimmy Hills Auto WorldB BU UY YH HE ER RE E! P PA A Y YH HE ER RE E! or cl3:13tfc Heartland Real Estate Corp.3200 US Hwy 27 S, Suite 201 Sebring, Florida 33870(863) 382-3887 M Colding@HeartlandRE.net www.HeartlandRE.net cl3:27c MULTI-FAMILY HOME ON 10 ACRES Built in 2001, located in Hardee County and close to town. $298,000 Call the Lovetts for more information Will (863) 781-0610 Rachel (863) 381-0051 School Crossing Guard Wanted Par t Time $10.00 Hour The Hardee County Sheriffs office is taking applications for part time school crossing guards. No experience necessary. Must be 18 or older, possess a valid Florida driv ers license, be willing to be fingerprinted, pass a drug test and work shifts. You must have never been convicted of a felony or a misdemeanor and pass a background inves tigation. Applications may be obtained and returned at the sheriffs office, 900 E. Summit St. Wauchula, FL by 4:00 p.m., March 31, 2014. Help Wanted cl3:20,27c HELP WANTED T ELECOMMUNICATIONS SPECIALISTS Full Time $24,356 00 The Hardee County Sheriffs Office is taking applications for full time Telecommunication Spe cialists. You must be at least 19 years of age, have a high school diploma or equivalent, never been convicted of a felony or a misdemeanor, be willing to be fingerprinted, pass a drug test, pass a typing test and work shifts. Applications may be obtained and returned by 4 p.m., March 31, 2014, at the Sheriffs Office, 900 E. Summit St., Wauchula, FL. If other arrangements are necessary, call 863-773-0304 ext. 211. EOE cl3:20,27c WE HAVE OVER 1,000 NEW & USED TIRES IN STOCK ANY SIZE, MAKE & MODEL1 18 8 & & 1 19 9 T TI IR RE ES S A AS S L LO OW W A AS S $ $2 26 6 9 95 5F Fa as st t Q Qu ua al li it ty y S Se er rv vi ic ce e Y Yo ou u C Ca an n D De ep pe en nd d O On n7 77 73 37 77 77 7O)Tj /TT9 7.5 Tf 1.8263 0 0 1 376.184 399.454 Tm (7 77 73 37 72 27 7 B ILLY B OBS TIREScl3:27c MECHANIC W ORK NOW AVAILABLE NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE 2002 C ADILLAC VIN: IG6KD54Y92U262432 8:00 a.m., April 9, 2014 Mr. E Pre-Owned Autos & Towing 1093 Hwy. 17 N. Wauchula, FL 33873 cl3:27c ROSE ABBOTT, REALTOR C all Direct: 863-781-0846 Member of the Bryan Team RE/MAX REALTY PLUS RESIDENTIAL Acres Detached 3 Car Garage $175,000 VACANT LAND Living Quarters Fenced $154,000 COMMERCIAL Kitchens $149,000 Call Me For More Information On These Properties! 3:27cBill & Cyndee Bryan, Realtors 809 US 27 South, Sebring, FL 38370 863-381-4092 & 863-381-6574 OWNER SAYS SELL! 3 Br 2 Ba cedar sided home in Wauchula Large detached garage, wrap around porch. MANY UPGRADES! $179,500 MAKE AN OFFER! 4,600 sf building on over 1 acre of land in town. Full kitchen with commercial appliances. Possible uses include church, service club or restaurant. REDUCED to $99,500 10.96 ac building site. Scattered trees & well. Fenced for cows. Manatee County $192,500 33 Acres 2 BR 2 BA mobile home. Partially wooded with creek branch. 2 wells, greenhouse, 2 tractors & various equipment. $230,000 Commercial property! 1.5 ac just North of Bowling Green in Polk County. Highway 17 frontage. Price reduced to $199,500 Church building! C orner of Florida Ave & Orange St, Wauchula 5,011 sf building. Large parking area with street on 3 sides. $275,000 Mini-warehouse 19 units $155,000. Call for de tails. Commercial building Over 4,800 sf located just off Highway 17 Southbound. Frontage on 2 roads with parking. Great opportunity for your business. $149,000 Own a piece of MAIN STREET! 2 story building on the corner of Main and 7th Avenue. Completely remodeled and upgraded. $250,000 Highway 17 frontage! LOT Zoned C-2 City water and sewer available. $86,500 206 North 6th Avenue, Wauchula, FL 33873 www.jimseerealty.com James V. See, Jr., Broker Jim See R ealtor Associates Rick Knight (863) 781-1396 John H. Gross(863) 273-1017 cl3:27c

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March 27, 2014, The Herald-Advocate 9B For years I never knew why we wore a Maltese Cross as our badge, or why the Fire Service had Dalmatians. These were just The way things were and you figured it was just cool. It wasnt until years later that I became informed as to the why. The Maltese Cross originated with the Knights of Saint John when they fought with the Knights of the Crusades to win back the Holy Land from the Muslim Saracenes. The Knights were faced with a new weapon from the Muslims. It was Naptha, like napalm. The Muslims would throw down the naptha followed by flaming torches setting the Knights ablaze. This is when the Knights of St. John stepped into action. Using their crimson colored capes they threw them over their brother Knights and removed them from the fire. The Knights were later awarded a medal, the original Maltese Cross. This was originally a star that had eight points that pointed to the eight beatitudes in Matthew 5:3-10, and became the symbol The FiresideBy James StillwagonHardee County Fire-Rescue Chief for the Knights of Saint John flag. The Knights of St. John actually originated as the Knights Hos pitaller founded by a Benedictine Monk. They served as care providers in Jerusalem in the 12th Century. Now, on to the Dalmatians. Not a great transition, but its good information. The Dalmatian was originally a coach dog, running with coach drivers, protecting the horses from other dogs that would try to attack the horses. Because the Dalmatian was able to develop close relationships with horses, they were a natural fit with the horses that pulled the fire engines, providing companionship and protection of the horse and the fire engine and equipment at a fire scene. The Dalmatian became a permanent fixture in the fire service and is still a part of the family in many fire houses today. These are only two brief examples of the whys in the fire serv ice, and there are many, many more that you can find. These, with the traditions of the fire service, are interesting, informative, and his torical. Speaking of historical, the firefighters of the United States come from a very long line of those that desire to serve their community. This can be recognized in the history of our own Nation as some of our founding fathers were Volunteer Firemen with Benjamin Franklin, John Hancock, Samuel Adams, Paul Revere, Alexander Hamilton, John Jay and Aaron Burr to name a few. Also, the idea of fire prevention dates back to the 1600s when it was realized that firefighting and fire prevention were important, and thus began the development of the first fire codes. Just some information I hope you will enjoy. In closing I would like to say that if you have any questions please do not hesitate to come by the office or call me at the number listed. Thank you for your time. Sincerely, Jim Stillwagon Fire Chief H.C.F.R (863) 773-4362. Florida Crop Update Week Ending: March 13, 2014 Planting Resumes as Rain Slackens Weather Summary: According to Floridas Automated Weather Network (FAWN), over half of the State received between one and four inches of rain. Bronson (Levy County) received the most rain with 4.06 inches. Maximum temperatures were in the upper 70s to 90 degrees, with the highest temperature in Fort Laud erdale (Broward County) with 90 degrees. The lowest temperatures in the State ranged from 32 degrees in Quincy (Gadsden County) to 63 degrees in Fort Lauderdale (Broward County). Field Crops: Field corn planting has started in Jackson County. Some farmers in the Panhandle are two weeks behind on preparing for planting due to rain. Levy County farmers hope to start planting peanuts. Sugar cane harvest was nearing its finish. Fruit and Vegetables: Flagler and Putnam farmers have fin ished planting potatoes and continued to harvest cabbage. Dixie and Suwannee county farmers have started planting watermelons, and Levy County has finished planting watermelons. Miami-Dade County farmers were harvesting green beans, squash, sweet corn, and tomatoes. Vegetables coming to market in the southwest were beets, collards, cucumbers, eggplant, green beans, peppers, radishes, tomatoes and specialty items. Citrus: Rain was widespread in the citrus area this past week. Sixteen stations recorded more than an inch of rainfall. Nine recorded more than two inches. All stations received at least a trace of precipitation. The most recorded was in Citra (Marion County) at 3.63 inches. Daytime temperatures were unseasonably warm, reaching the mid 80s in all citrus producing counties. As per the U.S. Drought Monitor, last updated March 18, 2014, no drought exists within the citrus growing area. Grove activity included irrigating on several days during the week, hedging, topping and spraying. Growers were continuing to plant new trees in existing groves. Full bloom was evident in all areas on both oranges and grapefruit. Some trees were bearing very small fruit already for next seasons crop. Several processing plants have closed temporarily and are wait ing for Valencia oranges to start coming in. A few plants were run ning grapefruit only. All but four packing houses were open and were shipping fruit in limited quantities; some have transitioned to gift fruit packing only. Livestock and Pastures: Warmer temperatures have im-proved pasture quality, however, some pasture remains wet in the Panhandle from recent heavy rain. Pasture in the southwest was aided by timely rains and warm temperatures. The cattle condition for the State pri marily ranged from fair to good but the pasture condition was mostly fair. HIGH-TECH GADGETS TRACK OUR HEALTH Kaiser Health News took a look recently at some of the pos sibilities of remote monitoring by high-tech health gadgets. These devices can fit into your cellphone and allow your doctor keep track of your health, even if you're not in his office. For example, if your heart rate accelerates while you're doing your daily errands, the doctor will know it when he reads the information. Some devices can tell whether we're taking pills on time. Others fit under the mat tress on our bed to check breath ing and heart rate. Still others can check our glucose levels or blood pressure. That's not to say most doctors are jumping on these devices as being the latest and greatest. While they like the information that can be gathered, some doctors are concerned about patient privacy. The information doesn't go straight into patient records, but the day eventually will come when it will. At this point, patients must give permission for their infor mation to be taken and must go into the doctor's office to have the data transferred. Soon pa tients will be able to send it themselves over the Internet. In a preview of coming events, one device developer already is hooked up with adver tisers and labs. Insurance companies are encouraging pa tients to upload their informa tion from other devices. Many of the devices aren't yet ap proved by the Food and Drug Administration. Are you nervous about this yet? What if you knew your information would go over the Internet, or if you knew it wasn't always covered by health pri vacy laws? If you're asked to wear one of these new gadgets, ask questions about where the information goes ... lots and lots of questions. Matilda Charles regrets that she cannot personally answer reader questions, but will incor porate them into her column whenever possible. Send email to columnreply2@gmail.com.(c) 2014 King Features Synd., Inc. SENIORNEWSLINEby Matilda Charles Albritton Insurance Services, LLC Robertson Farms Nickerson Brothers, LLC Wandas Hair and Nails Joe L. Davis Inc. Fish Branch Tree Farm Shops on the Corner Orange Street Market Ellis and Abramowitz Orthodontics JLC Farms Inc. Dr. Gregorio Medalle, M.D.P.A. Jans Tanning Putnam Ag Services Safeguard Security, Inc. Bar Crescent S Ranch Conley Grove Service Inc. Mid-State Machine & Fabricating Corp. Farr Groves, LLC Val Patarini Bob Claman Jim Davis Kenny Miller Torrey Oaks Golf Course/ Bill Lambert Hardee Ranch Supply Winn Dixie WalMart Dunkin Donuts Darrin & Misty Hughes Big T Tire Henderson Tire Center Guilles Place Hair Cuts and Style Linda Valdez Heartland Gold Klassix Lisas Hair Salon Java Caf Golf Hammock Surburban Propane Cats on Main Idea Golf Shops on the Corner Senior ParentsPeace River Electric Cooperative, Inc. Florida Fuel Veg-King Anonymous Donor THANKYOU The 2014 Project Graduation Golf Tournament Committee would like to say Thank You to our sponsors and players for making this years event a success. Your generosity and participation raised over $17,000 for the Class of 2014s post-graduation event. A special thanks to the staff at Torrey Oaks Golf Course for hosting the tournament and to all the others who gave of their time to make the event run smoothly. TOURNAMENT SPONSOR SILVER SPONSORS SPECIAL THANK YOU TO HOLE SPONSORS Caroline Mackay Lambert Realty Himrod Citrus Nursery Paul Samuels Utilitech Inc. Jones Cattle and Citrus, LLC Bayport Valve and Fitting Inc. State Farm Insurance Certified Slings, Inc. Ashbrook RealtyEnvironment Consulting & Technology Inc. Dr. Barbara Carlton D & S Cattle Co. 1st Place Jay Belflower Hunter Prescott Scott Dickson Greg Moye2nd Place Gerry Lindsey D.R. Harris D. Ray Harris West Palmer3rd Place George Heine Ryn Heine Will Bennett Bradley Brewer 3:27c Overall Winners Lamar Gilliard Home: (863) 735-0490 Zolfo Springs Mobile: (941) 456-6507cl4:19tfc GILLIARDFILLDIRTINC. 3:27c 3:27-4:3cPaynes Creek Historic State Park Bowling Green, Florida Division of Recreation and Parks Department of Environmental ProtectionNOTICE The Florida Park Service is receiving proposals until 5:00 p.m. EST, Monday, April 21 2014, for the award of a Short Term Concession Agreement for the operation of a canoe/kayak rental and pick-up service within Paynes Creek Historic State Park, located at 888 Lake Branch Road, Bowling Green, FL 33834. Applicants may obtain additional information or a proposal packet by contacting the park at 863-375-4717. To discover more information about the park go to the link below. http://www.floridastateparks.org/paynescreek/default.cfm

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Sponsored By 10B The Herald-Advocate, March 27, 2014

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March 27, 2014, The Herald-Advocate 11 B Local farmers and ranchers from across Florida will come together to celebrate the 41st an nual National Ag Week. This se ries of events is hosted by Farm Credit of Florida and serves as a time to say thank you for the hard work it takes to provide food, fiber and fuel for all Amer icans. Agriculture is Americas #1 export and, in Florida alone, rep resents $130 billion dollars in revenue along with nearly 2 mil lion jobs. Todays farmers are working harder than ever, and it shows. Today, each American farmer feeds more than 144 people, which is one reason why it's important particularly during this special week to show our gratitude to the many men and women who make agriculture possible. Floridas farmers produce 280 different commodities and are the nations top producer of citrus, sugar cane, winter vegeta bles, ornamental plants and sod. Agriculture consistently ranks s econd in the state only to tourism in supporting Floridas economy. National Ag Week marks a na tionwide effort to tell the true story of American agriculture and remind citizens that agricul ture is a part of all of us. A number of producers, agricultural associations, corporations, stu dents and government organizations involved in agriculture are expected to participate. Supported by the Agriculture Council of America, The Na tional Ag Week program encour ages every American to: Understand how food and fiber products are produced. Appreciate the role agriculture plays in providing safe, abundant and affordable prod ucts. Value the essential role of agriculture in maintaining a strong economy. Acknowledge and consider career opportunities in the agriculture, food and fiber industry. Agriculture: 365 Sunr ises And 7 Billion Mouths To Feed Top 10 Pop Singles T his Week Last Week 1. Pharrell Williams No. 1 "Happy" 2. Katy Perry No. 2 "Dark Horse" 3. John Legend No. 4 "All of Me" 4. Jason Derulo feat. 2 Chainz No. 3 "Talk Dirty" 5. Bastille No. 5 "Pompeii" 6. Lorde No. 6 "Team" 7. Beyonce feat. Jay Z No. 7 "Drunk in Love" 8. One Republic No. 8 "Counting Stars" 9. Idina Menzel No. 17 "Let It Go" 10. Pitbull feat. Ke$ha No. 10 "Timber" Top 10 Albums 1. Rick Ross new entry "Mastermind" 2. Pharrell Williams new entry "Girl" 3. Soundtrack No. 2 "Frozen" 4. Lea Michele new entry "Louder" 5. Eli Young Band new entry "10,000 Towns" 6. Beck No. 3 "Morning Phase" 7. Lorde No. 11 "Pure Heroine" 8. ScHoolboy Q No. 1 "Oxymoron" 9. Eric Church No. 7 "The Outsiders" 10. Ashanti new entry "Braveheart" Top 10 Hot Country Singles 1. Brantley Gilbert No. 1 "Bottoms Up" 2. Florida Georgia Line feat. Luke Bryan No. 13 "This Is How We Roll" 3. Blake Shelton No. 6 "Doin' What She Likes" 4. Jason Aldean No. 2 "When She Says Baby" 5. Dierks Bentley No. 3 "I Hold On" 6. Keith Urban No. 8 "Cop Car" 7. Lady Antebellum No. 7 "Compass" 8. Eric Church No. 9 "Give Me Back My Hometown" 9. Jerrod Niemann No. 11 "Drink to That All Night" 10. Scotty McCreery No. 10 "See You Tonight" Source: Billboard (c) 2014 King Features Synd., Inc. TOP Of Th e Charts as of Mar. 24, 2014 F F a a s s t t F F r r e e e e z z e e r r F F o o o o d d I consider my freezer my cold pa ntry. I keep it stocked with individual, quick frozen (IQF) fish, shrimp, beef and pork that I wash and season immediately after coming home from the grocery store. (This marinates the meat and saves time). I also stock frozen vegetables both prepackaged and blanched veggies from spring and summer months "planned ahead" casserole meals for busy days, leftovers in old-school "TV dinner" plastic containers (perfect for the mi crowave), extra loaves of bread and sale items that are too much for the two of us to eat, but too good to pass up. I also prepare and freeze appe tizers for unexpected company, strawberries macerated in sugar, balsamic vinegar, vanilla and cinnamon to spoon over warm pound cake, and cookie and cake crumbs to sprinkle on ice cream for quick desserts. Frozen food is a delicious way to capture the best flavors of each season. Although many people developed innovative food-freezing techniques, it was Clarence Birdseye who in 1924 invented the quick freezing method known as IQF that pro duces the frozen foods that we know today. While working as a fur trader in Labrador, Canada, Birdseye discovered that the fish that he and the local Inuit caught froze almost immediately after being pulled from the water. He was delighted to discover that the fish was just as delicious when thawed out months later. From this experience, he theorized that food must be frozen very quickly in order to retain its taste and texture. Birdseye was right. Before quick-freezing came along, foods were frozen at a fairly slow rate. This caused large ice crystals to form, which ruptured the cell membranes of the food. When the food was defrosted, the ice crystals melted and water would leak out, taking with it the food's flavor and texture. Kitchen Div a By Angela Medearis Birdseye developed two meth ods for quick freezing foods, both of which employed the in novation of packaging the food beforehand. In the more popular technique, the packaged food was held under pressure between two hollow metal plates that were chilled to -25 F by the evaporation of ammonia. Using this method, a 2-inch-thick pack age of meat could be frozen to 0 F in about 90 minutes, while fruits and vegetables took about 30 minutes. Birdseye's quick-freezing process ended up creating 168 patents! These covered not only the freezing technique, but also the packaging, type of paper used and related innovations. Frozen foods are a delicious way to prepare a variety of dishes using fruits and vegetables that have been frozen at their peak of freshness. This recipe for Veggie Breakfast Cupcakes is the perfect "on the go" breakfast. It's also a delicious way to incorporate veg etables into a breakfast dish. VEGGIE BREAKFAST CUPCAKES 1 can (16.3 ounces) refriger ated biscuits (8 biscuits) 1 bag (12 ounces) Steamfresh Broccoli Florets, cooked ac cording to package directions 1 bag (12 ounces) Steamfresh Mixed Vegetables, cooked ac cording to package directions 3 ounces cream cheese, soft ened 1/2 cup plain yogurt or sour cream 1 1/2 cups shredded Swiss cheese 2 eggs 1/2 tablespoon garlic powder 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon black pepper 1/2 teaspoon honey 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper 1. Preheat oven to 375 F. 2. Evenly press biscuits into bottom and up sides of a 12-cup muffin pan; set aside. 3. In large bowl, combine the cooked vegetables with cream cheese, yogurt, 1 cup shredded cheese, eggs, garlic powder, salt, pepper, honey and cayenne pepper. 4. Evenly spoon vegetable mixture into prepared muffin cups. Bake 15 minutes. Evenly sprinkle with remaining cheese and continue baking, 5 minutes or until golden brown. Serves 4. Tips: Try substituting Birds Eye Steamfresh Baby Broccoli, Italian or Broccoli Cauliflower blends in place of Mixed Vegeta bles. Angela Shelf Medearis is an award-winning children's author, culinary historian and the author of seven cookbooks. Her new cookbook is "The Kitchen Diva's Diabetic Cookbook." Her web site is www.divapro.com. To see how-to videos, recipes and much, much more, Like Angela Shelf Medearis, The Kitchen Diva! on Facebook and go to Hulu.com. Recipes may not be reprinted without permission from Angela Shelf Medearis. (c) 2014 King Features Synd., Inc., and Angela Shelf Medearis HARDEE COUNTY K IDS NEED HARDEE COUNTY HELP! Ease a dependent childs way through the court sys tem. Volunteer to be a Guardian Ad Litem. 773-2505 (If office unattended, please leave message.) COMMUNITY C alendar THURSDAY, MAR. 27 Hardee County School Bo ard, regular meeting, Board Room, 230 S. Florida Ave., Wauchula, 5 p.m. THURSDAY, APR. 3 Hardee County Commi ssion, regular monthly morning meeting, temporary meeting location, School Board meeting room, 230 S. Florida Ave., Wauchula, 8:30 a.m. _______________________________ I N THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 25-2012-CA-000296 DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE OF INDYMAC LOAN TRUST MORTGAGE BACKED CERTIFICATES SERIES 2004-L1 UNDER THE POOLING AND SERVICING AGREEMENT DATED JUNE 1, 2004 Plaintiff, v. ARIE FURMAN ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ARIE FURMAN Defendant(s). ______________________________/ NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur suant to an Order of Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 5, 2014, entered in Civil Case No. 25-2012-CA-000296 of the Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial Circuit in and for Hardee County, Florida, wherein the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bid der for cash on the 16th day of April, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. on the 2nd Floor Hallway, outside Room 202 of the Hardee County Court house, 417 West Main Street, Wauchula, Florida 33873, relative to the following described prop erty as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 3, PHASE 2, PINECREST FARMS AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 61, PAGE 4, HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. MORRIS, HARDWICK, SCHNEI DER, LLC By: Susan Sparks, Esq., FBN: 33626 9409 Philadelphia Road Baltimore, Maryland 21237 Mailing Address: Morris, Hardwick, Schneider, LLC 5110 Eisenhower Blvd., Suite 302A Tampa, Florida 33634 Customer Service (866)-503-4930 MHSinbox@closingsource.net AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accom modation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of the Court Admin istrator, 255 N. Broadway Avenue, Bartow, Florida 33830, (863) 5344686, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. 3:27,4:3c _______________________________ The Southwest Florida Water Man agement District (SWFWMD) announces the following public meeting to which all interested persons are invited: Public meeting for residents to discuss the Lake Lena portion of the Lake Hancock project. The purpose of the meeting is to inform residents about the project and activity that may occur on the neighborhood roads. The meeting is an open house format. One or more Governing Board members may attend. DATE/TIME: Wednesday, April 9, 2014; 6:30 8 p.m. PLACE: Polk Nature Discovery Center, 4399 Winter Lake Road, Lakeland, FL 33803 Pursuant to the provision of the Americans with Disabilities Act, any person requiring reasonable accommodations to participate in this workshop/meeting is asked to advise the agency at least 5 days before the workshop/meeting by contacting SWFWMD's Human Resources Bureau Chief, 2379 Broad Street, Brooksville, Florida 34604-6899; telephone (352) 796-7211, ext. 4703 or 1800-423-1476 (FL only), ext. 4703; TDD (FL only) 1-800-2316103; or email to ADACoordinator@swfwmd.state.fl.us For more information, you may contact: michael.peck@water matters.org; 1(800)423-1476 (FL only) or (352)796-7211, x4404 (Ad Order EXE0315) 3:27c The Southwest Florida Water Man agement District (SWFWMD) announces the following public meeting to which all interested persons are invited: Roundtable discussion between the SWFWMD Board members and the SRWMD Board members to discuss Water Use Caution Areas (WUCAs) and Minimum Flows and Levels (MFLs). All or part of this meeting may be conducted by means of communi cations media technology in order to permit maximum par ticipation of Governing Board members. DATE/TIME: Tuesday, April 8, 2014 at 3:00 p.m. PLACE: SWFWMD Tampa Service Office, 7601 US Highway 301 North, Tampa FL 33637 Pursuant to the provision of the Americans with Disabilities Act, any person requiring reasonable accommodations to participate in this workshop/meeting is asked to advise the agency at least 5 days before the workshop/meeting by contacting SWFWMD's Human Resources Bureau Chief, 2379 Broad Street, Brooksville, Florida 34604-6899; telephone (352) 796-7211, ext. 4703 or 1800-423-1476 (FL only), ext. 4703; TDD (FL only) 1-800-2316103; or email to ADACoordinator@swfwmd.state.fl.us For more information, you may contact: Cara.Martin@watermatters.org; 1(800)423-1476 (FL only) or (352)796-7211, x4636(Ad Order EXE0316) 3:27c Now Accepting New PatientsOur office will also be accepting a wide variety of insurance including:Assurant, Ameritas, Guardian, Florida Combined Life, Aetna, & Cigna Dental.We are located at Formerly Dr. Girouxs Office Monday 5pm www.wauchuladental.comDisclaimer: The patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment, or be reimbursed for any other service, examination, or treatment that is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee, or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. 3:27c Kevin J. Krause, DMD Free Consultations Sedation Available YOUR BUSINESS COULD APPEAR HERE TOO!!Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels 773-3255 w ww.TheHeraldAdvocate.com The Herald-Advocate H ardee Countys Hometown Coverage Telephone (863) 773-3255 www.TheHeraldAdvocate.com

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12B The Herald-Advocate, March 27, 2014 GATORHEATING& AIRCONDITIONINGR EFRIGERATION & I CE M ACHINESTHINKGREEN SAVEENERGYAVEMONEY863-832-3399LOCALLY OWNED 3:27c Licensed & Insured CAC 1815095 CALL FOR SERVICE TODAY LL MAKES SALEON CHANGE OUTS IN STOCK SALE ON ON ON ON FREEESTIMATES ONCHANGEOUTS Sp ecial To The Herald-Advocate Earlier this year, I got to sit down with Peggy Rodriguez, my grandmother, and learn about her past. It was really interesting to learn about some of the things she did when she was my age, which is indescribably different compared to what I do, like playing on electronics and gaming systems. My grandmother worked and even had to walk everywhere, unlike most kids nowadays who have their parents drive them everywhere. Back then it was OK for you to walk anywhere. Now its hard to walk down your street without the fear of being kidnapped! Peggy was born on May 27, 1953, in Dade City, Florida. The schools she attended were Pasco Elementary, Pasco Junior High and Pasco Comprehensive High School. Her favorite thing to do when she was my age was to work, can you believe it? She worked at a dime store in the candy department, where she worked every day after school for four years, from when she was in seventh grade till 11th grade. It was a long way from school, probably about a mile, she says. However, it was worth it; she made 50 cents an hour. This was a great amount back then. Almost everyone when they were in school had a best friend. My grandmothers best friend was Dorthy Tipton. They were good friends all throughout junior high and high school, but then in 1979 she was involved in a fatal car accident that took her life. However, she will remain a best friend in my grandmothers heart. When my grandmother was younger she used to entertain herself by going to the movies. The movie theater she E LVIS P RESLEY WAS THE I DOL O F THE D AY would always go to was the Joylan D rive-In. You could get a whole carload in for $1, she said. When I was a teen, Elvis Presley was a very popular idol, so about once a month the theater would play an Elvis Presley movie. My friends and I would always try to go see them. When she was my age her community was not as violent as it is today. Everyone was so nice and polite to everyone, she exclaims. They didnt have the drugs and everything like we do now. So, that was why it was OK for people to walk wherever they needed to go. We have a variety of electronics like iPhones, computers, iPods and tablets, but my grandmother did not have all of these things. The only thing electronic they had back then were TVs and radios. When the first color TV came out, her neighbor had bought one. All the kids in the neighborhood would go to their house on Sunday nights at 7 to watch the only color show, which was Walt Disney. The most memorable thing my grandmother went through was her graduation. She graduated from high school in 1971. After graduation she hung out with her two friends, Dorthy and Rita. We were like the Three Musketeers, she said First, they went to Ritas house where Ritas mom made refreshments for the girls. Then they went to Dorthys house where her mom did the same. Last, they went back to my grandmothers house, and just hung there. Yep, that was the good ole days, she says as she remembers. Everyone wants to become something when they get older. My grandmother wanted to become an English teacher. She always loved English in high school, but she never did because she wanted to take a year off after she graduated to work. She worked at a Stop N Go and made about $80 a week and t hen she met my granddaddy and got married. Then I asked would she like to change anything about her life and her response was simply, No. She has no regrets. She had a memorable childhood, a lovely marriage, her own children are grown now, and she has wonderful grandchildren. She would not change a thing about her life. B ack In Time is the result of a class assignment given to ninth graders at Hardee Senior High School. Each student is asked to interview an older person. Selected interviews are published here as an encouragement to the students and for the enjoyment of our readers. Back Back In In Time TimeDEAR DR. DONOHUE: My 13-year-old son went to band camp for five days. On day three, he had terrific stomach pain and started to vomit. The instructors were alarmed and took him to the local hospital, where doctors diagnosed ap pendicitis. We had to give phone permission for him to have an operation. Everything went fine, and he recovered quickly. My wife and I have a few questions. Could he have eaten something that caused appen dicitis? What does not having an appendix do to people? No one in my wife's or my family has had such an operation. We're ignorant about all this. G.G. ANSWER: The appendix dan gles from the first part of the colon in the lower-right side of the abdomen. It looks like a slen der worm, and has an average length of 3 inches (8 cm). The function of the appendix isn't clearly defined, but it might have a role in body immunity. Life without an appendix goes on as normally as life with one. The appendix has a hollow core, which is lined with lym phoid tissue, the same kind of tissue found in lymph nodes. Bacteria from the colon can in vade the hollow core and cause the lymph tissue to swell. Swelling cuts off blood supply, and the appendix begins to disin tegrate appendicitis. Undi gested food or hard fecal material also can block the ap pendix's core and lead to the same situation. Nothing your son ate is likely the cause. All the other campers ate the same food as he, but he was the only one to develop this prob lem. The pain of appen dicitis most often starts in the area of the navel (bellybut ton) and works its way toward the lower-right corner of the abdomen. Temperature rises. Vomiting is common, and sometimes diarrhea is part of the picture. A doctor, by what he or she hears from the patient, along with the examination of the abdomen, usually can make the diagnosis. In confusing circumstances, an ultrasound is most helpful. Millions of people worldwide live without an appendix. They do quite well. So will your son. DEAR DR. DONOHUE: When I was about 10 years old, I got the mumps. Now I am 30 and have been married for three years. My wife and I want to have a family, but we aren't having any luck. Do you think the mumps made me infertile? J.Z. ANSWER: In around 40 per cent of men who get the mumps after puberty, the virus also travels to the testicles. That results in impaired fertility in only 13 percent. Sterility al most never happens. If both testicles are infected, then sterility might be a problem. Before puberty, testicular involvement is rare, and infertility isn't a problem. You were only 10. It's highly unlikely that the mumps caused you to be infertile. You and your wife shouldn't have to handle this problem on your own. Why not consult a doctor so both of you can be examined? An answer to the question why you aren't having the family you want will be found, and a solution, if possible, will be suggested. Dr. Donohue regrets that he is unable to answer individual letters, but he will incorporate them in his column whenever possible. Readers may write him or re quest an order form of available health newsletters at P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 328536475. (c) 2014 North America Synd., Inc. All Rights Reserved Good Health D D o o n n o o h h u u e e By Dr. Paul G. Donohue To Yo ur

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C The Herald-Advocate(USPS 578-780)Thursday, March 27, 2014 PAGE ONE COURTESY PHOTO A lthough the Paralympics are over, that doesnt mark the end of Olympic season. In mid-April, the annual Law Enforcement Torch Run will be taking place in Hardee County. This run is in celebration of the Special Olympics Florida summer games in Orlando. In order to raise money for the games, local law enforcement is selling t-shirts for $12 and hats for $10. Raffle tickets for a cruise are also being sold. Tickets are $5 for one, $10 for three, and $20 for eight tickets. The drawing will take place on May 17 at the closing ceremony of the Special Olympics, but you do not have to be present to win. Showing off the shirts and hats are Sheriff Arnold Lanier, Gary Harrison and Major Randy Dey. The Law Enforcement Torch Run will take place on April 15 at 10:30 a.m., they will finish the run at Heritage Park. For more information on the run or to purchase tickets or merchandise contact Kim Pfeiffer or Sara Moore with the Hardee County Sheriffs Office at 773-4144. TORCH RUN Building Pe rmits The following permits were appl ied for or issued by the Hardee County Building De-partment during the week of March 16-22. Listings include the name of the owner or contractor, the address for the project, the type of work to be done, and the cost in volved. Only projects valued at $1,000 or more are listed. ISSUED Michael R. Alexander, Manley Road, mechanical, $3,862. Bradford T. Bowen, Cross Road 663, roofing, $7,641. Robert L. Spurlock, Cross Road 665, roofing, $14,500. Robert L. Spurlock, Cracker Lane, roofing, $8,950. Michael William Jack, Sunshine Lane, roofing, $4,400. Avalos, Eighth Avenue, shed, $6,460. By JOAN SEAMAN Of The Herald-Advocate Peoples Gas will be able to operate in the Zolfo Springs town limits. After the second, and final, hearing on the matter, a 15-year franchise was granted for a natural gas distribution line in the community. It does not automatically give Peoples, a division of Tampa Electric Co., permission to use the public rights of way. The company will still need to obtain permits for any digging it does and have to restore any streets, sidewalks, etc. which were dis turbed. Commissioner Virginia Irby had several questions, most of which, she noted, had been an swered by Town Manager Linda Roberson earlier in the day. Irby wanted to clarify that this was for natural gas supply and not propane or bottled gas. She also e xpressed concern that protect ing the health and welfare of the citizens should come first. Town Attorney Gerald Buhr said the agreement had gone back and forth several times and he had used franchises from similar sized communities. Its pretty fair, most of what we wanted, he said. He also said the agreement was only for 15 years, not 30 or more as some franchises, and could be amended, if needed. The franchise details the use of streets and rights of way to be the least disturbing to residents, maintenance, laying of pipe, construction work, ac-counts, records, insurance and indemnification and termination for cause. The franchise fee will be six percent of the companys monthly gross revenue. Gas Franchise Approved I n Zolfo Springs Pet Care CenterMONTHLY SPECIAL $10 Rabies Shots CHECK OUT OUR PET VET VACCINATION PRICESDog & Cat Packs Start At $ $4 48 8(with Heartworm Test )Tj T* ()Tj /TT6 6.107 Tf 1.0558 0 0 1 478.88 729.426 Tm (5 55 5) )Kitten & Puppy Packs $ $4 44 4Save Money On Your Favorite Heartworm And Flea Products Such As: Trifexis, Comfortis, Revolution & HeartguardWe Accept All Major Credit Cards 3 By JOAN SEAMAN Of The Herald-Advocate More than a dozen of the best Hardee County track and field athletes went to Disney Showcase on Mar. 15. Competing with hundreds of high school athletes from all over the state and Canada, Hardee participants did well. Some of their events had 50 or 60 entrants, some as many as 100. Next up for the Hardee teams is a trip to Lake Placid on April 1, and several will go to the Florida Relays on April 4-5 as Hardee prepares for the district competition, which is April 11 at Sarasota Booker. The regionals a re April 16 at Tampa Berkeley Prep and the state meet on May 2 at the University of North Florida campus. Competition was keen, with teams from all levels and abili ties participating. Miami Northern won the girls division at Disney, followed by Winter Park, Starrs Mill, Haines City, Colonial, Boyd Anderson, Car dinal Gibbons, Nova Scotia, Bishop Kenny and Stephenson. Others included Rye Country Day, Key West, Dr. Krop, Coral Gables and Harry S. Truman as well as Auburndale, Ridge Com munity. Boyd Anderson won the boys di vision, with Stephenson, Starrs Mill, Colonial, Bishop Kenny, Cardinal Gibbons, West minister Academy, Or-lando Freedom, Auburndale and Nova Scotia. The Saugeen Royals, Chaminade, McCallie School and Windemere Prep were in it, with Lakeland, Lake Region, Winter Haven, Bartow and Ridge contestants as well. Hardee soph Maria Munoz had the most success of local tracksters. She placed ninth of 46 girls in the 800-meter run, completing it in 2:45.13. Crystal Avila was 17th and Angel Mancillas and Araceli Ramos fol lowed along. Munoz also placed 10th in the 1,600-meter run, coming in again under the six-minute mark at 5:59.38. Avila was 30th, fol lowed by Mancillas and Ramos. The girls 4x800 relay team of Avila, Munoz, Mancillas and Erica DeLoera placed 11th in 11:53.35. Erica DeLoera also partici pated in the triple jump, 100 hur dles and 300 hurdles. Maribel DeLoera was in the shot put and discus. Brooke Faulk was in the high jump. On the boys side of the ledger, the best of the day was the 4x800 relay team of Tyler Smith, Dustin Smith, Brandon Beatty and Tyler Helms, placing ninth in a time of 8:59.63. Tyler Smith was 15th in the boys 800 and Beatty was 16th in the 2,000-meter steeplechase. Adrian Briones was 23d of the 28 entrants. Devonte Greer was tied for 16th of 38 in the high jump, with Dustin Smith in 27th place. Helms was 17th in the triple jump. Robert Torres was in the shot put and discus. Briones was also in the 100-meter and 200-meter dashes and the steeplechase. Tracksters Go To Disney * *Est. Mortgage Rate 4.25% Principle and Interest Only c3 Pet Of The Week Adoption fees are $45 and include a rabies vaccination and spaying or neu te ring of the animal. Contact 773-2320 if you are interested in adopting any cats or dogs that desperately need a loving home. The kennel location is 685 Airport Road, Wauchula, at the county landfill. This is a male Cur mix. He is white and brown with a short coat and long tail and he has glass eyes. His adoption fee is $45. 1 1s s t t A An nn nu ua al l 5 5K KO Or r a an ng g e e & & B Bl lu ue e C Co ol lo or r R R u un n/ /W W a al lk k Hosted by H ardee Youth Football League (Plan to arrive by 8:30 am to receive pack) Pioneer Park, Zolfo Springs Cost: $30 per person if entry form received by March 20th $35 per person for any late entries Teams welcome (min. 4 max. 6) and team cost is $100 (must register at same time) There will be first and second place awarded in each category. Entry Form Name:___________________________________________________________Age:________ What is your T-shirt size? (Please Circle) Small Medium Large XL Address:__________________________________ City_____________ State___ Zip_______ Daytime Phone:____________________ Email______________________________________ _____________________________________________________ _______________________ Signature Date 3 I know that participation in this event is a potentially hazardous activity. I will not enter and participate unless I am medically able. I agree to abide by the decision of any race official as to my ability to safely complete the event. I assume all risks associated with this event. Including but not limited to falls, contact with other participants, effects of weather including high heat, traffic and condition of the road, all such risks being known and appreciated by me. Having read this waiver and knowing these facts and in consideration of you accepting my entry, I for myself and anyone entitled to act on my behalf waive and release the city of Zolfo Springs, Pioneer Park, Hardee Youth Football League, race officials and volunteers and all sponsors from all claims or liabilities of any kind arising out of my participation in this event. I grant permission to all of the foregoing to use any photographs, motion pictures, recording or any other record of this event for any legitimate purposes. Presentation of medals will be given as winners in each category cross the finish line. Each participant will receive a participation pack which will include a commemorative T-shirt to wear during the race. Visit our website at www.hardeeyouthfootball.com for more details

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APOSTOLIC LIGHTHOUSE U NITED PENTECOSTAL CHURCH 310 Orange St. 773-1017 Sunday Meet & Greet..........10:15 a.m. Sunday School....................11:00 a.m. Sunday Service....................12:00 p.m. Tuesday Prayer Meeting........6:30 p.m. Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m. CHESTER GROVE MB CHURCH 708 W. Grape St. 375-3353 Sunday School......................9:30 a.m. Sunday Worship....................8:00 a.m. Sun. Eve. Worship 1st & 3rd4:00 p.m. Tues. Prayer/Bible Study......6:00 p.m. CHRISTIAN BIBLE FELLOWSHIP Hwy. 17 South Morning Worship................10:30 a.m. Youth Group Sunday..........6:00 p.m. CHURCH OF GOD 121 West Broward St. 375-2231 Sunday School....................10:00 a.m. Morning Worship................11:00 a.m. Evening Worship.................. 6:30 p.m. Wednesday............................7:30 p.m. CHURCH OF GOD TRUE HOLINESS OUTREACH 725 Palmetto St. 375-3304 Sunday School......................9:45 a.m. Morning Worship................11:00 a.m. Tues. Night Bible Study......7:30 p.m. Evening Worship 1 st Sunday......................5:00 p.m. COMMUNITY CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP Main & W. Centra. Sunday AM Worship............10:30 a.m. Sunday Evening....................6:00 p.m. Wed. Prayer Meeting..... .......7:00 p.m. FAITH ASSEMBLY OF GOD 4937 Hwy. 17 N. 375-4206 Sunday School......................9:45 a.m. Morning Worship................11:00 a.m. Disciples Train & Choirs......5:30 p.m. Evening Worship..................6:30 p.m. Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m. FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH Bowling Green 4531 Hwy. 17 N 375-2253 S UNDAY : Bible Study............................9: 30 a.m. Morning Worship................10:45 a.m. Evening Worship..................6:00 p.m. W EDNESDAY : Discipleship Training Y outh & Adult..................6:00 p.m. TeamKID (ages 3-5th grade) ..6:00 p.m. FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Grape & Church Streets 375-2340 Sunday School......................9:45 a.m. Morning Worship................11:00 a.m. Evening Worship..................6:00 p.m. Wed. Bible Study..................6:00 p.m. FORT GREEN BAPTIST CHURCH Baptist Church Road 773-9013 Sunday School......................9:45 a.m. Morning Worship................11:00 a.m. Sunday Evening....................6:00 p.m. Wednesday Supper ..............6:00 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study........7:00 p.m. HOLY CHILD SPANISH CATHOLIC MISSION Misa (Espanol) Sunday........7:00 p.m. IGLESIA DEL DIOS VIVO 105 Dixiana St. 375-4191 Domingo De Predicacion....11:00 p.m. Martes Estudio Biblico..........7:00 p.m. Miercoles Estudior Juvenil....7:00 p.m. Jueves De Predicacion..........7:00 p.m. IMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH 210 E. Broward St. 445-0290 Sunday School......................9:45 a.m. Morning Worship................11:00 a.m. Evening Worship................ 6:00 p.m. Wednesday Prayer..................7:00 p.m MACEDONIA PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH 607 Palmetto St. Church School......................9:30 a.m. Morning Service..................11:00 a.m. Evening Service............... .....7:00 p.m. Wed. Bible Study/Prayer......7:00 p.m. Communion-2nd Sun. Eve...6:00 p.m. MT. PISGAH BAPTIST CHURCH 6210 Mt. Pisgah Rd. 375-4409 Sunday School......................9:45 a.m. Morning Worship................11:00 a.m. Disciples Training..................5:00 p.m. Evening Worship..................7:00 p.m. Wednesday Prayer Time........7:00 p.m. OPEN DOOR FULL GOSPEL PRAISE CENTER E. Broward St. Sunday School....................10:00 a.m. Sunday Service......................6:00 p.m. Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m. PRIMERA MISION BAUTISTA Murray Road off Hwy. 17 375-2295 Domingos Escuela Dom.......9:45 a.m. Servicio de Adoracion..........11:00 a.m. Servicio de Predicacion........5:00 p.m. Miercoles Servico..................6:30 p.m. REAL LIFE CHURCH 3365 S outh US Hwy 17 Morning Service..................10:30 a.m. Wednesday Study/Learning..6:30 p.m. ST. JOHN A.M.E. CHURCH 513 W. Orange St. 375-2911 Sunday Church School..........9:30 a.m. Sunday Morning Worship....11:00 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study........6:30 p.m. VICTORY PRAISE CENTER 128 E. Main St. Sunday School....................10:00 a.m. Morning Worship................11:00 a.m. Evening Worship..................6:00 p.m. Thursday Night Services, Evening Worship...................7:00 p.m. Kidz Club...............................7:00 p.m. IGLESIA PENTECOSTES VISION POR LAS ALMAS 149 Badger Loop 448-2831 Martes: Oracion....................7:00 p.m. Jueves: Ensenaza Biblica......7:00 p.m. Domingo: Servicio..............10:30 a.m. LIMESTONE BAPTIST CHURCH Sunday School......................9:45 a.m. Morning Worship................11:00 a.m. Evening Worship..................6:00 p.m. Wednesday Prayer................7:00 p.m. NEW ZION BAPTIST CHURCH 202 Sidney Roberts Road Sunday School....................10:00 a.m. Morning Worship................11:00 a.m. Disciples Training..................6:00 p.m. Evening Worship..................6:00 p.m. Wednesday Prayer.............. ..6:00 p.m. ONA BAPTIST CHURCH 131 Bear Lane 773-2540 Sunday School....................10:00 a.m. Morning Worship................11:00 a.m. Wednesday Prayer................7:00 p.m. UNION BAPTIST CHURCH 5076 Lily Church Rd. 494-5622 Sunday School....................10:00 a.m. Morning Worship................11:00 a.m. Evening Worship..................6:00 p.m. Wednesday AWANA for Kids..............6:30 p.m. Wednesday Prayer Time.........7:00 p.m. APOSTOLIC ASSEMBLY Martin Luther King and Apostolic Rd. Sunday School....................10:00 a.m. Englishg Service..................11:30 a.m. General Worship Service......1:30 p.m. Tuesday Prayer......................7:00 p.m. Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m. CELEBRATION CHURCH Rainey Blvd. 863-781-1624 hardee.celebration.org Sunday Morning Service....11:00 a.m. Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m. Wednesday Youth Service....5:30 p.m. Childcare provided at all services CELEBRATION FELLOWSHIP 773-0427 Celebration Service..............10:30 a.m. Wednesday Evening Cell Groups Adult Cell Group..................7:00 p.m. Youth Cell Group..................7:00 p.m. Childrens Cell Group..........7:00 p.m. Call for locations CHARLIE CREEK BAPTIST CHURCH 6885 State Road 64 East 773-3447 Sunday School......................9:45 a.m. Morning Worship................11:00 a.m. Evening Worship.................. 6:00 p.m. Wednesday Worship..............6:30 p.m. CHURCH OF CHRIST 201 S. Florida Ave. Sunday Bible Study..............9:00 a.m. Sunday Worship Service......10:30 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study........7:00 p.m. CHURCH OF CHRIST Will Duke Road 773-2249 Sunday Morning Worship......9:30 a.m. Sunday Bible Class..............11:30 a.m. Sunday Evening Worship......6:00 p.m. Wed. Night Bible Class........7:00 p.m. Mens Leadership & Training Class 2nd Sunday of Month........4:00 p.m. CHURCH OF GOD Martin Luther King Blvd. 767-0199 CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS 630 Hanchey Rd. 773-3532 Sacrament Meeting................9:00 a.m. Sunday School....................10:00 a.m. Priesthood............................11:00 a.m. COMMUNITY BAPTIST CHURCH OF WAUCHULA HILLS (SPANISH) 615 Rainey Blvd. 257-3950 Sunday Bible Study............10:00 a.m. Sunday Morning Worship....11:00 a.m. Sunday Evening Service........7:00 p.m. Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m. DIOS ES AMOR 807 S. 8th Ave. 773-4576 Domingos Escuela Dominica ..........................10:00 a.m. Servicio................................11:00 a.m. Lunes Oracion......................6:00 p.m. Miercoles Servicio................7:00 p.m. EL REMANENTE I GLECIA CRISTIANA 318 W. Main St.. Martes Oracion......................7:00 p.m. Jueves Servicio......................7:30 p.m. Viernes Servicio....................7:30 p.m. Domingo Servicio................10:30 a.m. ENDTIME CROSSROAD MINISTRY 501 N. 9th & Georgia St. 773-3470 Sunday School....................10:00 a.m. Morning Service..................11:30 a.m. Evening Service....................7:30 p.m. Wed. Bible St. & Yth. Gath..7:30 p.m. Friday (Holy Ghost Night)....7:30 p.m. FAITH PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 114 N. 7th Ave. 773-2105 Sunday School....................10:00 a.m. Sunday Worship..................11:00 a.m. Sunday Worship....................6:00 p.m. Wednesday Supper................6:15 p.m. Wed. Youth Fellowship..........6:50 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study........7:00 p.m. FAITH TEMPLE CHURCH OF GOD 701 N. 7th Ave 773-3800 Sunday School......................9:30 a.m. Sunday Worship..................10:20 a.m. Childrens Chuch................10:40 a.m. Evening Service....................6:00 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study........7:00 p.m. FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 1570 W. Main St. 773-4182 S UNDAY : Bible Study for all ages........9: 45 a.m. Morning Worship................11:00 a.m. Evening Worship..................6:00 p.m. W EDNESDAY : Sr. Adult Bible Study..........10: 00 a.m. Childrens Chiors (PK-Grade 4)....................5:30 p.m. PRAISE 57Jr High Chior..5:30 p.m. Mid-Week Prayer Meeting..6:00 p.m. Kids On Missions (PK-Grade 4)....................6:00 p.m. Club 56................................6:00 p.m. Youth Group (Grades 7-12) 6:00 p.m. Family Life Ministry & Discipleship..................6:00 p.m. Church Orchestra..................6:00 p.m. Adult Choir..........................7:00 p.m. FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH 1121 W. Louisiana St. 773-9243 S UNDAY : Generations Caf Opens........9:30 a.m. K ids World Check-In for Nursery-5th Grade Begins..10:15 a.m. Pre-K Blast..........................10:45 a.m. Kids World B.L.A.S.T. (K-5th)............................10:45 a.m. Worship Service..................10:45 a.m. W EDNESDAY : Check-In begins for N ursery-5thgrade..................6:15 p.m. Classes for children ages PreK-12th grade............6:30-8:00 p.m. FIRST CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 511 W. Palmetto St. Sunday School....................10:00 a.m. Morning Service..................11:00 a.m. Evening Worship..................6:00 p.m. Wednesday Prayer................7:00 p.m. FIRST MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH 1347 Martin Luther King Ave. 773-6556 Sunday School......................9:30 a.m. Morning Service..................11:00 a.m. Evening Worship..................6:00 p.m. Tues. Youth Ministry Meeting/ Bible Study........................6:00 p.m. Wed. Prayer/Bible Study......7:00 p.m. FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 207 N. Seventh Ave. 773-4267 Coffe and Fellowship............9:15 a.m. Sunday School......................9:45 a.m. Blended Sunday Worship....10:55 a.m. Wednesday Night Dinner......6:00 p.m. Youth (0-18) & Adult Programming.... ..............................................7:00 p.m. FLORIDAS FIRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD CHURCH 1397 South Florida Avenue 773-9386. Sunday School......................9:00 a.m. Morning Worship................10:00 a.m. Wed. Family Night................7:00 p.m. Adult, Children & Radiate Youth Church FLORIDA GOSPEL 511 W. Palmetto 223-5126 Sunday Morning Worship. ...11:00 a.m. Wednesday Worship..............7:30 p.m. THE GOSPEL TABERNACLE 810 W. Tennessee St. 863-735-1158 Morning Service..................10:00 a.m. Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m. HEARTLAND COMMUNITY CHURCH 1262 W. Main St. 767-6500 Coffee & Donuts....................9:00 a.m. Sunday School......................9:30 a.m. Worship................................10:30 a.m. Wed. Night Dinner................6:00 p.m. Wed. Bodybuilders Adult Cl. Crossroads & Lighthouse Min.................7:00 p.m. HIGHER GROUND INTERNATIONAL MINISTRY 1258 W. MAIN STREET WAUCHULA, FL Sunday Morning Worship....11:00 a.m. Wed. Night Bible Study........6:30 p.m. IGLESIA ADVENTISTA DEL SEPTIMO DIA Old Bradenton Road 767-1010 IGLESIA de DIOS ALFA Y OMEGA 1909 Stanfield Rd. Sunday School....................10: 00 a.m. Evening Service....................6:00 p.m. Tuesday (Bible Study & Prayer Night)................................7:30 p.m. Friday Worship Service........7:30 p.m. IGLESIA HISPANA F UENTE DE VIDA 501 N. 9 th Ave. Martes..................................7: 30 p.m. Jueves....................................7:30 p.m. Domingo..............................10:30 a.m. IGLESIA HISPANA PRESENCIA de Dios 511 W. Palmetto St. Domingos..............................6:00 p.m. Miercoles...............................7:00 p.m. JEHOVAHS WITNESSES ENGLISH 155 Altman Road 1131 Sunday Service......................2:00 p.m. JEHOVAHS WITNESSES SPANISH Sunday Service....................10:00 a.m. LIGHT OF THE WORLD MINISTRIES Womans Center 131 N. 7th Ave. Wauchula, FL Friday Evening......................6:00 p.m. LAKE DALE BAPTIST CHURCH 3102 Heard Bridge Road 773-6622 Sunday School......................9:45 a.m. Morning Service..................11:00 a.m. Evening Worship..................6:00 p.m. Wednesday Prayer................7:00 p.m. MINISTERIO INTERNACIOAL Cambriadores de Mundo 704 W. Main St. 773-0065 Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m. MY NEW LIFE IN CHRIST CHURCH 117 W. Palmetto St. 773-2929 Sunday Service....................10:00 a.m. Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m. Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m. Children Ministries for all services NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH 1999 State Road 64 East Sunday School......................9:45 a.m. Morning Worship Service... .11:00 a.m. Evening Worship Service......6:30 p.m. Wednesday Night Supper......6:00 p.m. Wednesday Activities (All Ages)..........................7:00 p.m. NEW BEGINNING CHURCH Georgia & 9th Avenue 781-5887 Sunday Worship..................11:00 a.m. 2nd Sunday Communion....11:00 a.m. Bread of Life Sunday........12:15 p.m. T.H.E. Meeting Tuesday....7:00 p.m. NEW MT. ZION A.M.E. CHURCH 10 Martin Luther King Ave. 767-0023 Morn. Worship (1st & 3r Sun.) ..................8:00 a.m. Sunday School......................9:45 a.m. Morning Worship................11:00 a.m. 2nd Sunday Youth Service....4:00 p.m. Allen Christian Endeavor......4:00 p.m. Wed. & Fri. Bible Study........7:00 p.m. NORTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH 912 N. 8th Ave. 773-6947 Sunday School......................9:45 a.m. Morning Worship................11:00 a.m. Evening Worship..................6:00 p.m. Wednesday Supper................6:00 p.m. Wednesday Prayer................7:00 p.m. OAK GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH 4350 W. Main St. 735-0321 Sunday School......................9:45 a.m. Morning Worship................11:00 a.m. Evening Worship..................6:00 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study........6:30 p.m. PEACE VALLEY LUTHERAN CHURCH 1643 Stenstrom Road 773-2858 1 st & 3 rd Sun. Communion....................10:00 a.m. 2 nd & 4 th Sun. Divine Worship........ ........10:00 a.m. Bible Study..........................11:15 a.m. ** Fellowship each Sunday after service PROGRESSIVE MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH 149 Manley Road East Main 773-5814 Sunday School......................9:30 a.m. Worship Service..................11:00 a.m. Wed. Evening Prayer............7:00 p.m. REAL LIFE CHURCH 3365 North US Hwy 17 Morning Service..................10:30 a.m. Wednesday Study/Learning..6:30 p.m. RIVERVIEW HEIGHTS MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH 1321 S.R. 636 East 773-3344 Radio Program WZZS Sundays..................9:00 a.m. Sunday School....................10:00 a.m. Morning Worship................11:00 a.m. Evening Worship..................6:00 p.m. Wednesday Prayer................7:00 p.m. SOUL HARVEST MINISTRY 1337 Hwy. 17 South, Wauchula Sunday School....................10:00 a.m. Morning Worship................11:00 a.m. Evening Service....................6:00 p.m. Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m. ST. ANNS EPISCOPAL CHURCH 204 N. 9th Ave. 773-6418 Sunday..................................9:30 a.m. Holy Days............................................ ST. MICHAEL CATHOLIC CHURCH 408 Heard Bridge Road 773-4089 Saturday Mass (English)... ...5:00 p.m. (Spanish)......7:00 p.m. Sunday(English)....................8:30 a.m. (Spanish)..................11:30 a.m. (Creole)......................1:30 p.m. Catecismo..............................9:45 a.m. Daily Mass in English..........8:30 a.m. SEVENTH DAY ADVENTIST CHURCH 205 S. 11th Ave. 773-9927 Sabbath School.....................9:30 a.m. Morning Worship................11:00 a.m. Tues. Prayer Meeting............7:00 p.m. SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH 505 S 10th Ave. 773-4368 Sunday School......................9:45 a.m. Morning Worship................11:00 a.m. Evening Worship..................6:00 p.m. Wednesday Prayer................7:00 p.m. SPIRIT WIND TABERNACLE 1652 Old Bradenton Road Sunday School....................10:00 a.m. Morning Worship................11:00 a.m. Evening Worship..................6:00 p.m. Wednesday Worship..............7:30 p.m. TABERNACLE OF PRAISE & JOY 1507 MLK Avenue Sunday School....................10:00 a.m. Morning Worship................11:30 a.m. Evening Worship..................7:00 p.m. Tues. Bible Stdy. & Child Train....................7:00 p.m. Friday Prayer Service............7:00 p.m. WAUCHULA CHURCH OF GOD 1543 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave. 773-0199 Sunday School....................10:00 a.m. Morning Worship................11:15 a.m. Evening Worship..................6:00 p.m. Wed. Night Fam. Training....7:30 p.m. Thurs. Youth Bible Study......7:00 p.m. Friday Night Worship............7:30 p.m. WAUCHULA HILLS HARVEST TEMPLE ASSEMBLY OF GOD 210 Anderson Sunday School....................10:00 a.m. Church...................... ............10:00 a.m. Youth Service........................6:00 p.m. Evening Service....................7:00 p.m. Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m. WAUCHULA HILLS SPANISH CHURCH OF GOD 1000 Stansfield Rd. Sunday School....................10:00 a.m. Evening Worship..................7:30 p.m. Tuesday Prayer......................7:30 p.m. Thursday Worship..................7:30 p.m. Saturday Worship..................7:30 p.m. WAUCHULA REVIVAL CENTER (Full Gospel) 501 N. 9th Ave. Sunday School....................10:00 a.m. Morning Worship................11:00 a.m. Youth & Child. Church..........6:00 p.m. Evening Worship..................7:00 p.m. Wed. Bible Study..................7:00 p.m. Mens Fri. Prayer..................7:00 p.m. COMMUNITY WESLEYAN CHURCH Gardner Sunday School....................10:00 a.m. Morning Worship................11:00 a.m. Evening Worship..................7:00 p.m. Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m. CREWSVILLE BETHEL BAPTIST CHURCH 8251 Crewsville Road Church 735-0871 Pastor 773-6657 Sunday School............ ..........9:45 a.m. Morning Worship................11:00 a.m. Evening Worship..................6:30 p.m. Wednesday Prayer................6:30 p.m. EVANGELISTIC HOLINESS CHURCH INC Corner of 6th and Hickory Sunday School....................10:00 a.m. Morning Worship................11:00 a.m. Evening Worship..................7:00 p.m. Wednesday............................7:30 p.m. FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF ZOLFO 320 E. 4th St. 735-1200 Sunday School....................10:00 a.m. Morning Worship................11:00 a.m. Training Union......................5:00 p.m. Evening Worship..................6:00 p.m. Wednesday Prayer................7:00 p.m. FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Corner of 6th & Suwanee 735-1544 Gospel Music......................10:30 a.m. Worship Service..................11:00 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study........7:00 p.m. FOX MEMORIAL HOLINESS CHURCH Sunday Morning Worship....10:00 a.m. Sunday Night Worship..........6:00 p.m. Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m. GARDNER BAPTIST CHURCH South Hwy. 17 494-5456 Sunday School....................10:00 a.m. Morning Worship.............. ..11:00 a.m. Wednesday Prayer................7:00 p.m. LIFE CHANGING WORSHIP CENTER 3426 O ak St. 863-832-9808 Sunday Worship....................2:30 p.m. Wednesday Bible Study........6:30 p.m. MARANATHA BAPTIST CHURCH 2465 Oxendine Rd. (863) 832-9292 Sunday School....................10:00 a.m. Worship................................11:00 a.m. Evening..................................1:00 p.m. Wed. Bible & Prayer Meet....7:00 p.m. NEW VISION WORSHIP CENTER 64 E. & School House Road Church 735-8585 Childcare 7358586 Morning Worship................10:00 a.m. Childrens Church................10:00 a.m. Evening Worship..................6:00 p.m. Wed. Youth & F.T.H.............7:00 p.m. PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF GOD FAITH TEMPLE Oak Street Sunday Worship..................10:00 a.m. Evening Worship..................7:00 p.m. Tuesday Worship..................7:30 p.m. Thursday Worship..................7:30 p.m. Saturday Worship..................7:30 p.m. PRIMERA MISSION BAUTISTA HISPANA 518 8th Ave. E. Escuela Dominical..............10:00 a.m. Servicio del Domingo..........11:00 a.m. ..............................................7:00 p.m. Servicio del Miercoles..........7:30 p.m. PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH Pioneer Park 2nd Sunday ..........................10:30 a.m. Evening Service....................6:30 p.m. 5th Sunday............................6:00 p.m. REALITY RANCH COWBOY FELLOWSHIP 2-1/2 Miles east of Zolfo Springs on Hwy. 66 863-781-1578 Sunday Service....................11:00 a.m. ST. PAULS MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH 3676 U.S. Hwy. 17 South 735-0636 Sunday School . ................9:30 a.m. Morning Worship......................11 a.m. Wed. Prayer Service..............7:00 p.m. SAN ALFONSO MISSION 3027 Schoolhouse Lane Domingo, Misa en Espano..10:00 a.m. Catecismo............................11:00 a.m. SPANISH MISSION 735-8025 Escuela Dominica . ........10:00 a.m. Servicio................................11:00 a.m. Pioneer Club..........................6:30 p.m. Servicio de la Noche............7:00 p.m. Mierecoles Merienda............6:00 p.m. Servicio..................................8:00 p.m. Sabado Liga de Jovenes........5:00 p.m. BOWLING GREEN BOWLING GREEN ONA WAUCHULA WAUCHULA WAUCHULA WAUCHULA Peace River GrowersWholesale Nursery Donnis & Kathy Barber H wy. 66 East P.O. Box 760 (863) 735-0470 Zolfo Springs, FL S chedule of Weekly Services ZOLFO SPRINGS ZOLFO SPRINGS Printed as a Public Service b y The Herald-Advocate Wauchula, Florida Deadline: Thursday 5 p.m. 2C The Herald-Advocate, March 27, 2014

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March 27, 2014, The Herald-Advocate 3C 3:27c It is that time of year again. If you find that these little bugs have invaded your home, please give us a call. Since 1998, The Bug Doctor has treated hundreds of homes here in Hardee County for these subterranean termites and we have had no re treats. The reason is simple. We use the best chemical, we mix it at the proper rate, and we put it everywhere it belongs. The reason termite treatments fail is one or more of these 3 factors are compromised in order to get the lowest price. We never compromise and we always kill the termites. If you find swarmers in your home, call us. Use this ad to get$100 OFFtreatment of your home. Termites Are Swarming! 863-773-5969 3:27c O Ov ve er r 3 30 0 y ye ea ar rs s o of f C Co om mb bi in ne ed d E Ex xp pe er ri ie en nc ce e F Fa as st t E El le ec ct tr ro on ni ic c F Fi il li in ng gStorts Taxes& Bookkeeping, Inc. 863-832-4733 BRING IN THIS AD FOR$15. 00 OFF Storts Taxes & BookkeepingGreater Florida Ins.Hwy. 17 SouthHwy. 17 NorthWauchula State Bank 1 12 20 0 W W. O Or ra an ng ge e S St tr re ee et t(next to Great Florida Insurance)7 77 73 3-2 22 20 00 03:27p Danielle & Deborah 2:27-3:27c New Furniture For Less New Furniture For Less Support Local Economy Support Local Economy Mattress SALE Queen $229 Highpoint Furniture(across from Home Depot)3 38 82 2-0 06 60 00 0 NO HIGH PRESSURE SALESMAN! 3:27c RANCH-STYLE DILL FI SH FILLETS I think you'll be very pleased with this unusual (and easy) way to prepare fish especially the sauce! 16 ounces fresh or frozen white fish, thawed and cut into 4 pieces 1/2 cup fat-free Ranch dressing 2 tablespoons fat-free mayonnaise 1 teaspoon dried dill weed 1/8 teaspoon black pepper 1. Preheat oven to 350 F. Spray an 8-by-8-inch baking dish with butter-flavored cook ing spray. 2. Rinse fish pieces in cold w ater and pat dry. Evenly arrange fish pieces in prepared baking dish. Lightly spray tops of fish with butter-flavored cooking spray. Bake for 15 minutes. 3. In a small bowl, combine Ranch dressing, mayonnaise, dried dill weed and black pep per. Evenly spoon sauce mixture over partially baked fish. Con tinue baking for 10 minutes or until fish flakes easily. Makes 4 servings. calories, 7g fat, 23g protein, 12g carb., 424mg sodium, 0g Fiber; Starch. (c) 2014 King Features Synd., Inc. Comfort Foods Made F AST AND HEALTHY! By Healthy Exchanges 3/27/2014 S un Data Day Length 12 hrs. 19 mins. Moon Data Moon Phase Solunar Table Moon Phase is 13% percent waning 13% Waning Crescent Major Times Minor Times Prediction Solunar Prediction is Hunting or Fishing Time Zone 3/28/2014 Sun Data Day Length 12 hrs. 21 mins. Moon Data Moon Phase Solunar Table Moon waning Waning Crescent Major Times Minor Times Prediction Solunar Prediction is for a Better day of Hunting or Fishing Better Time Zone 3/29/2014 S un Data Day Length 12 hrs. 22 mins. Moon Data Moon Phase Solunar Table Moon Phase is 2% percent waning 2% Waning Crescent Major Times Minor Times Prediction Solunar Prediction is for a Better day of Hunting or Fishing Better Time Zone 3/30/2014 Sun Data Day Length 12 hrs. 24 mins. Moon Data Moon Phase Solunar Table Moon Phase is 0% percent new 0% NEW MOON Major Times Minor Times Prediction Solunar Prediction is for a Best day of Hunting or Fishing Best Time Zone 3/31/2014 S un Data Day Length 12 hrs. 25 mins. Moon Data Moon Phase Solunar Table Moon Phase is 1% percent waxing 1% Waxing Crescent Major Times Minor Times Prediction Solunar Prediction is for a Better day of Hunting or Fishing Better Time Zone 4/1/2014 Sun Data Day Length 12 hrs. 28 mins. Moon Data Moon Phase Solunar Table Moon Phase is 4% percent waxing 4% Waxing Crescent Major Times Minor Times Prediction Solunar Prediction is for a Better day of Hunting or Fishing Better Time Zone 4/2/2014 S un Data Day Length 12 hrs. 29 mins. Moon Data Moon Phase Solunar Table Moon Phase is 10% percent waxing 10% Waxing Crescent Major Times Minor Times Prediction Solunar Prediction is for a Good day of Hunting or Fishing Good Time Zone 4/3/2014 Sun Data Day Length 12 hrs. 31 mins. Moon Data Moon Phase Solunar Table Moon Phase is 17% percent waxing 17% Waxing Crescent Major Times Minor Times Prediction Solunar Prediction is Hunting or Fishing Time Zone Solunar Forecast Why is it that in the movies the snob is always versus the slob? W hat is the opera to a country boy? Well, Ill tell you what the opera is to some old country boy. It is where he will go to fool himself into believing that he has cultivated a rare taste like all those fuddy-duddys that he is surrounded by for hollering and screaming at an embarrassing price. with Dunn and Bradstreet because I borrowed 20 bucks from this guy, and finally he dunned me and I did not have the money so he bradded my nose and threw me out in the street, so aint that Dunn and Bradstreet? The planners of our 50th high school reunion have come up choice. My mother-in-law Harpoons driving is the kind that only life support could appreciate. I gave her my heart, and she and her attorney took the rest. I have said it before and Ill say it again, I would get along with everyone if it were not for people. Why wouldnt they let Pinnochio navigate an airplane? Because they were afraid he would go into a nose dive. If you think looking for a needle in a haystack is bad, try looking for a haystack in a needle. My cousin, the one we call Four-Door, has his own auto car lot that he has named Pushum and Pullum Used Car Lot Sales. While trying to be like General Motors Company, he too recalls his vehicles, at least two a year. However, Four-Door, unlike GM which recalls thousands in a given year, he recalls at most only up to two vehicles, for either a defective horn or a blown fuse. When the U.S. placed the first man on the moon, astronaut Neil step by man, one giant step for mankind. But he could have said one gigantic bill for the U.S. taxpayers. Champion Bruno is being beaten into a pulp by the challenger, known as Napoleon, and further, they have just removed the Champion Brunos personal doctor from his corner and replaced him with the fight to know its outcome. Truman A. Thomas, 77, is an Avon Park resident with many friends and associates in Hardee County. He is the father of Sherry White of Wauchula, and is a retired salesman and former radio disc jockey whose morning show topped the Nielsen Ratings. A self-described little boy captive in an old mans body, he can be reached at 4533589 or by writing 1098 Memorial Dr., Avon Park, FL 33825. By Truman A. Thomas ZOLFO SPRINGS T he Zolfo Springs Town Council also approved the fooling items during its 40-minute meeting on Mar. 17. Mayor Juan Otero was absent. All other members were present. approved a proclamation of Month. was spent by the various departments in February. report and the Sheriffs Office monthly report on activity in the town. to the Planning & Zoning Board. about a utility bill adjustment which had not been fully made after a meter change-out. It was deferred to staff. Town Manager Linda Roberson said she would thoroughly check it out and call the resident in the next day or two. lic works supervisor Russell Gar ner and agreed to move him off probation to full-time status. Many feel more is getting done, he listens to suggestions, and all hydrants are being checked out, a project which has been wanted for some time. Preston as special magistrate for audience on how people are appointed. Roberson said it is al ways hard to get candidates for various boards and encouraged people to fill out an application of interest. When an opening is available, they will be inter viewed to see if they still want to serve. said there should be a statement posted and on the agenda that cit time by raising their hands and The next Town Council meeting will be on April 21 at 6 p.m. in Town Hall, 3210 U.S. 17 North, Zolfo Springs. SGROPPINO S groppino is a classic afterdinner beverage from the Veneto region in Northern Italy. It's usu ally made by whipping up lemon sorbet and Prosecco; a splash of vodka is sometimes added. Here we've left the sorbet intact as a light and refreshing float -a luscious and low-cal end to dinner. 1 pint lemon sorbet 2 cups Prosecco (Italian sparkling wine) Fresh mint sprigs for garnish w ineglasses or dessert bowls. glass; garnish with mint. Serve calories, 0g total fat, 0mg cho lesterol, 10mg sodium, 22g total carbs. For thousands of triple-tested recipes, visit our website at www.goodhousekeeping.com/re cipefinder/. (c) 2014 Hearst Communications, Inc. Good Housekeeping rectchevy.com R OBBY E LLIOTT 3:27c

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T T O O P P F F I I V V E E M M O O V V I I E E S S 1. Mr. Peabody & Sherman (PG) an imated 2. 300: Rise of an Empire (R) Sullivan Stapleton, Eva Green 3. Need for Speed (PG-13) Aaron Paul, Dominic Cooper 4. Non-Stop (PG-13) Liam Neeson, Julianne Moore 5. The Single Mom's Club (PG13) Nia Long, Wendi McLendonCovey 4C The Herald-Advocate, March 27, 2014

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March 27, 2014, The Herald-Advocate 5C MONDAY Breakfast: A pple Jacks, Turkey Sausage, Graham Crackers, Strawberry Poptart, Whole Grain Waffles, Apple Slices, Condiments and Milk Lunch: BBQ Rib Patty on Bun, Oven Roasted Chicken, Roll, Turkey & Cheese Wrap, Broccoli w/Dip, Baked Beans, Fruit Cup, Condiments and Milk TUESDAY Breakfast: T rix, Chicken & Biscuit, Buttery Toast, Yogurt Parfait w/Fruit, Apple Juice, Condiments and Milk Lunch: Chicken Bite Meal, Mini Cheeseburgers, PB Jamwich, Wowbutter & Jelly Sandwich, Carrot Sticks w/Dip, Sweet Yellow Corn, Apples, Condiments and Milk WEDNESDAY Breakfast: B reakfast Pizza, Brown Sugar Cinnamon Poptart, Golden Grahams, Graham Crackers, Strawberry Cup, Condiments and Milk Lunch: Nachos w/Meat & Cheese, Pepperoni Pizza, Yo gurt Parfait w/Fruit, Garden Salad, Vegetable Blend, Fruit Cocktail, Condiments and Milk THURSDAY Breakfast: Fros ted Flakes, Sausage Biscuit, Buttery Toast, Orange Juice, Condiments and Milk Lunch: Chef Salad w/Turkey & Roll, Chicken Quesadilla, Sloppy Joe on Bun, Roasted Potatoes, Lemon & Blue Raspberry Frozen Treat, Condiments and Milk FRIDAY Breakfast: C heerios, Turkey Sausage Pizza, Buttery Toast, Blueberry Glazed Pancakes, Cinnamon Glazed Pancakes, Fruit Cocktail, Condiments and Milk Lunch: Breaded Chicken Sandwich, Turkey & Gravy, Roll, Bean Burrito, Mashed Potatoes, Spinach, Apple Slices, Condiments and Milk MONDAY Breakfast: A pple Jacks, Turkey Sausage, Graham Crackers, Strawberry Poptart, Whole Grain Waffles, Apple Slices, Condiments and Milk Lunch: BBQ Rib Patty on Bun, Oven Roasted Chicken, Roll, Turkey & Cheese Wrap, Broccoli w/Dip, Baked Beans, Fruit Cup, Condiments and Milk TUESDAY Breakfast: T rix, Chicken & Biscuit, Buttery Toast, Yogurt Parfait w/Fruit, Apple Juice, Condiments and Milk Lunch: Chicken Bite Meal, Mini Cheeseburgers, PB Jamwich, Wowbutter & Jelly Sandwich, Carrot Sticks w/Dip, Sweet Yellow Corn, Apples, Condiments and Milk WEDNESDAY Breakfast: B reakfast Pizza, Brown Sugar Cinnamon Poptart, Golden Grahams, Graham Crackers, Strawberry Cup, Condiments and Milk Lunch: Nachos w/Meat & Cheese, Pepperoni Pizza, Yo gurt Parfait w/Fruit, Garden Salad, Vegetable Blend, Fruit Cocktail, Condiments and Milk JUNIOR HIGH ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS Whats For L unch? THURSDAY Breakfast: Fros ted Flakes, Sausage Biscuit, Buttery Toast, Orange Juice, Condiments and Milk Lunch: Chef Salad w/Turkey & Roll, Chicken Quesadilla, Sloppy Joe on Bun, Roasted Potatoes, Celery Sticks w/Dip, Lemon & Blue Raspberry Frozen Treat, Condiments and Milk FRIDAY Breakfast: C heerios, Turkey Sausage Pizza, Buttery Toast, Blueberry Glazed Pancakes, Cinnamon Glazed Pancakes, Fruit Cocktail, Condiments and Milk Lunch: Breaded Chicken Sandwich, Turkey & Gravy, Roll, Bean Burrito, Mashed Potatoes, Spinach, Apple Slices, Condiments and Milk MONDAY Breakfast: A pple Jacks, Turkey Sausage, Buttery Toast, Strawberry Poptart, Whole Grain Waffles, Apple Slices, Condi ments and Milk Lunch: BBQ Rib Patty on Bun, Oven Roasted Chicken, Roll, Turkey & Cheese Wrap, Tuna Salad w/Bread Bowl, Broc coli w/Dip, Baked Beans, Fruit Cup, Pear, Condiments and Milk TUESDAY Breakfast: T rix, Chicken & Biscuit, Buttery Toast, Yogurt Parfait w/Fruit, Apple Juice, Condiments and Milk Lunch: Cheese Pizza, Chicken Bite Meal, Mini Cheese burgers, Taco Salad, PB Jamwich, Cheese Stick, Wow butter & Jelly Sandwich, Carrot Sticks w/Dip, Sweet Yellow Corn, Banana, Grape Juice, Condiments and Milk WEDNESDAY Breakfast: B reakfast Pizza, Brown Sugar Cinnamon Poptart, Golden Grahams, Super Donut, Buttery Toast, Strawberry Cup, Condiments and Milk Lunch: Breaded Chicken Chef Salad w/Breadstick, Mini Cheeseburgers, Nachos w/ Meat & Cheese, Cheese Pizza, Yogurt Parfait w/Fruit, Garden Salad, Vegetable Blend, Fruit Cocktail, Oranges, Condiments and Milk THURSDAY Breakfast: Fros ted Flakes, Sausage Biscuit, Buttery Toast, Yogurt Parfait w/Fruit, Orange Juice, Condiments and Milk Lunch: Breaded Chicken Sandwich, Chef Salad w/ Turkey, Roll, Chicken Quesadilla, Sloppy Joe on Bun, Roasted Potatoes, Celery Sticks w/Dip, Lemon & Blue Raspberry Frozen Treat, Apples, Condiments and Milk FRIDAY Breakfast: C heerios, Turkey Sausage, Buttery Toast, Whole Grain Pancakes, Fruit Cocktail, Condiments and Milk Lunch: Breaded Chicken Sandwich, Grilled Chicken Chef Salad w/Breadstick, Turkey & Gravy, Roll, Bean Burrito, Cheese Sticks, Mashed Pota toes, Spinach, Apple Slices, Yogurt Parfait w/Fruit, Peaches, Condiments and Milk SENIOR HIGH Q: My next-door neighbor i nformed me yesterday that he intends to set up a beehive in his yard. Is he even allowed to do this in a populated area? We both have half-acre lots, and he says the hive likely will be located in a far corner, but I see nuisance and even disaster ahead. What if the bees swarm? What if they sting a child and, God forbid, that child is allergic? Should I contact the city about this? Claire S., via e-mail A: Believe it or not, beekeeping can and does take place in suburban areas and even in the middle of the city. I under stand your concern, however. Take heart in the fact that your neighbor came over to tell you about the planned hive before it arrived. That gives you the op portunity to ask some questions about the hive, the type of bees and so on. I encourage you to keep it polite. For now, just ask questions and listen to your neighbor. There's a very good chance that he has been research ing beekeeping for some time and that he even knows the municipal ordinances regarding the activity. If he already has some homesteading activities going on, such as keeping a few chickens, and those activities haven't been a nuisance to you or others, it's likely that the beehive will make little to no difference in the neighborhood other than the flowers in your garden perhaps blooming bigger and better than ever before, thanks to nature's best pollinators living nearby. After talking to your neighbor, do some research of your own. MAAREC (Mid-Atlantic Apicultural Research & Extension Consortium) has a good pam phlet available to download as a PDF about suburban beekeeping, and a number of websites are available under that search term. There are many ways for bee keepers to reduce the possibility of nuisance and stings in the neighborhood. You also can contact your municipality about whether bee keeping is allowed. If it is specifically permitted, there are usually rules about how big the hive can be and whether it needs to be registered with the state's agricultural office. Above all, give it a chance. The dwindling bee population worldwide is greatly concerning researchers, so homesteaders' beekeeping can be a small but helpful contribution toward solv ing the problem. And, being on friendly terms with a successful beekeeper can have the positive side effect of receiving an occasional, and perhaps steady, gift of honey. HOME TIP: Interested in beekeeping but don't have a lot of money or space? Look up local beekeeping groups online or consider starting one at a com munity garden or other open space. Send your questions or home tips to ask@thisisahammer.com. (c) 2014 King Features Synd., Inc. This Is A Hammer By Samantha Mazzotta Collecting Q: I have a large opaque bowl that has been identified as a piece of Paden City Glass. I can't find this type of glass men tioned in any of my reference books. Can you help me? Dot, Hammond, La. A: The glass company was established in Paden City, W.Va., sometime during the early decades of the past century. During the 1920s, the company ex panded its production to include colored wares in crystal and opaque glass in a variety of patterns and styles. The Paden Glass Company built a reputation for its high standards of homemade wares until about 1950, when under new management, the plant was automated. Paden Glass later closed due to finan cial problems. One of the best sources is "Glass A to Z" by David Shotwell and published by Krause Books. Q: I have a series of maps, mostly from the 1870s and 1880s, and all documenting regions in North and South America. I would like to have them appraised. Brett, Weston, Conn. A: Kevom James Brown, owner of Geographicus Fine Antique Maps, appraises maps for about $50 each. He does not purchase maps that he appraises, as he sees that practice as a clear conflict of interest. Contact for Brown and Geographicus is 201 W. 105th Street, New York, NY 10025; http://www.geographicus.com; and 646-320-8650. Q: I have a planter that features a poodle design. It was made by Hull Pottery and given to me as a gift. Susan, Mason City, Iowa A: I found your planter referenced in "Warman's Hull Pot tery: Identification and Price Guide" by David Doyle and pub lished by Krause Books. Accord ing to Doyle, your planter is valued in the $20 to $40 range and was a "novelty" product of Hull. Q: I have a copy of "A Christmas Carol" by Charles Dickens published in 1935 by Dodd, Mead & Company. Can you tell me how much it is worth? Lillian, Marion, Ind. A: I contacted several used book dealers about your novel, and they seem to agree it is prob ably worth about $35. The value of a book is determined by several factors including condition, rarity and edition. Write to Larry Cox in care of King Features Weekly Service, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475, or send e-mail to questionsforcox@aol.com. Due to the large volume of mail he re ceives, Mr. Cox is unable to personally answer all reader questions. Do not send any ma terials requiring return mail. (c) 2014 King Features Synd., Inc. By Larry CoxAll services are free of charge. Contact Angela Hendry, Certified Navigator at 8 8 6 6 3 3 4 4 5 5 2 2 6 6 5 5 3 3 0 0 e e x x t t . 3 3 0 0 3 3 Funding for this material was made possible by Grant # D04RH23580 from HRSA. T he views expressed in written materials do not necessarily reflect the official policies of HRSA or the Department of Health and Human Services. Are you and your family covered?A local certified navigator is available to: Answer your questions about the Affordable Care Acts Healthcare Marketplace Provide in-person enrollment help for you and your family Heartland Rural Health Network, Inc. 2:26-4:23c 3:27c D EAR PAW'S CORNER: Every summer, my cats get fleas. It's agony for them and for me, because I have flea bites on my ankles all through the warm season when I want to wear sandals. The problem goes away in late fall through winter, but comes back with warm weather. How can I stop the constant re-infestation? Trudy in Evanston, Ill. DEAR TRUDY: Fleas actually are a year-round problem, even in colder climates. They may not be as active in the winter, but even if dormant or dead, their eggs usually are still in the in fested areas, waiting for the right conditions to hatch. During the winter, it's impor tant to keep dusting and vacuum ing the entire house at least once a week, with particular attention paid to the areas your cats inhabit the most. Treat the house with a flea-stopping preventative a number of products are available at the pet store, such as sprinkleon treatments for the carpet, furniture and drapes. Or, research alternative repellents made with natural or household items such as lemon-juice sprays or essen tial oils. Comb the cats' fur daily if pos sible, and go through it with a flea comb once a week. As spring rolls around, start regular treatment with a flea preventa tive. Once-a-month topical treat ments can be very effective in reducing or eliminating fleas, but many pet owners are against using them. Talk to the veterinar ian about the most effective options. It's also important to keep your cats indoors. There are a number of safety reasons to do this anyway, and it prevents fleas from dropping onto their fur as they brush through grass or greenery. Start now with a flea-prevention program, before you even feel an itch, and this summer can be much more comfortable. Send your questions or com ments to ask@pawscorner.com. My booklet, "Fighting Fleas," is now just 99 cents at the Kindle store. Download it today! (c) 2014 King Features Synd., Inc. Paw s Corner By Sam Mazzotta

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6C The Herald-Advocate, March 27, 2014 Crime Blotter During the past week, sheriffs deputies and city police offi cers investigated the following incidents and made the following arrests: COUNTY Mar. 23, Kevin Eugene Richardson, 39, of 115 Seventh St. W., Zolfo Springs, and Lee Edward Woods, 20, of 2631 John Gill Road, Bowling Green, were arrested by Cpl. Todd Souther. Richardson was charged with an Open Party violation and contributing to the delinquency of a minor. Woods was charged with possession of liquor under 21 and resisting/obstructing an officer without violence. Mar. 23, Miguel Angel Arriago-Garcia, 28, of 1195 W. Polk St., Bartow, was arrested by Cpl. Todd Souther and charged with DUI and no valid license. Mar. 22, Jose Alberto Garcia, 19, of U.S. 17, Bowling Green, was arrested by Cpl. Todd Souther and charged with possession of methamphetamine, possession of drug paraphernalia and resisting/obstructing an officer without violence. Mar. 22, Brian Richard Yake, 21, of 4547 Alderman Rd., Bowl ing Green, was arrested by Dep. Jeremy Brandeberry and charged with battery. Mar. 22, Patricia Ann Obrien-Penzes, 27, of 63 Cookes Rdg., Torrington, Conn., was arrested by Dep. Chris Albritton and charged with aggravated battery causing bodily harm. Mar. 21, Pedro Luis Bonet, 49, of 915 Sandpiper Dr., Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Steven Ahrens and charged with battery. Mar. 21, Morris Kilpatrick, 45, of 3667 Fussell Rd., Bowling Green, was arrested by Dep. Polly Bissette on three out-of-county warrants. Mar. 21, a theft on North CR 663 was reported. Mar. 20, Travis Carson Quinn, 24, of 290 S. Hollandtown Rd., Wauchula, was arrested by Ofc. Henderson and charged with larceny petit theft. Mar. 20, Vernon Kenneth Greene, 22, of 2612 Heard Bridge Rd., Wauchula, was arrested on a charge of burglary of a dwelling/structure/conveyance and larceny petit theft. Mar. 20, Eva Carrizales Ornelas, 35, of 4117 Captiva Ave., Bowling Green, was arrested by Dep. David Cruz on a charge of failure to appear in court. Mar. 20, a vehicle stolen on Sandpiper Drive and thefts on Magnolia Street and on U.S. 17 North were reported. Mar. 19. Samuel Rivera, 22, of 290 Old Bowling Green Rd., Bowling Green, was arrested by Cpl. Todd Souther and charged with larceny petit theft. Mar. 19, Julian Jermaine Williams, 29, of 2194 Ninth Court Rd., Bartow, was arrested on a charge of withholding support of children. Mar. 19, Donald Allen Rapp, 45, of 2698 Buck Dr., Zolfo Springs, was arrested by Dep. Daniel Arnold and charged with possession of methamphetamine and possession of drug paraphernalia. Mar. 19, Albert Franqui, 47, of 1040 Makowski St., Wau-chula, and Lisa Jo Whitby, 53, of 2370 N. U.S. 17, Wauchula, were arrested by the Drug Task Force (DTF) and each charged with two counts sale of methamphetamine, possession of marijuana, possession of methamphetamine and possession of drug paraphernalia. Franqui was also charged with delivery/distribution of methamphetamine within 1,000 feet of a church/school, etc., two counts criminal misuse of a two-way communication device, two counts owning/renting a structure/vehicle to sell drugs, and sale of cocaine. Mar. 19, a residential burglary on SR 64 East, vehicles stolen on Lake Branch Road and on Shaw Road, a tag stolen on Chamberlain Boulevard, criminal mischief on Hickory Court, and a theft on U.S. 17 North were reported. Mar. 18, Henry Aaron Williams, 49, of 614 E. Bay St., Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Steven Ahrens on a charge of violation of probation. Mar. 18, Jamaine Deanthony Brown, 31, and April Marie Kenyon, 22, both of 1216 David Ct., Wauchula, were arrested by Dep. Alice Simandol and each charged with simple assaul threat to do violence. Mar. 18, Clenton Preston Judah, 31, of 158 Oak Meadow Lane, Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Cesar Medina and charged with criminal mischief damage to property. Mar. 18, thefts on Evergreen Drive and on Wilkerson Road were reported. Mar. 17, Justin Orlando Luna, 23, of 812 E. Fifth St., Zolfo Springs, was arrested by Dep. Ryan Abbott on an out-of-county war rant. Mar. 17, Mark Anthony Garcia, 24, of 710 E. Main St., Bowling Green, was arrested by Dep. Kim Pfeiffer on a charge of failure to appear in court. Mar. 17, Gilbert Carmona, 45, of 1417 Lisa Dr., Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Steven Ahrens on a charge of violation of probation. Mar. 17, Ashley Lynn Mollenkopf, 20, of 1260 Mockingbird Rd., Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Cesar Medina and charged with battery. Mar. 17, a residential burglary on Fifth Street East, a tag stolen on Appaloosa Lane, criminal mischief on Magnolia Boulevard, and thefts on Center Hill Road and on Moffitt Road were reported. WAUCHULA Mar. 22, Jose Bermudez, 45, of 700 E. Townsend St., Wauchula, was arrested by Cpl. Robert Spencer on an out-of-county war rant. Mar. 21, Roland Lopez Arguijo, 38, of 713 Eason Dr., Wauchula, was arrested by Ofc. Jonathan Corwin and charged with possession/sale/manufacture of a synthetic narcotic, possession of drug paraphernalia, failure to obey a police officer by fleeing and driving with knowledge of a suspended license. Mar. 20, Britni Danielle Gamble, 23, of 1347 SR 64 E., Wauchula, was arrested by Ofc. Jereme Bridges on a charge of violation of probation. Mar. 20, Christopher Lee Woods, 26, of 2631 John Gill Rd., Bowling Green, was arrested by Ofc. Pablo Bermudez and charged with cruelty toward a child without great harm, depriving a victim/witness of communication and criminal mischief damage to property. Mar. 18, criminal mischief on Georgia Street was reported. Mar. 17, a residential burglary on South Seventh Avenue was reported. BOWLING GREEN Mar. 20, Oscar Cisneros, 21, of 817 Pleasant Way, Bowling Green, was arrested by Sgt. Edward Coronado on two out-of-county warrants. Mar. 18, a theft on Pine Avenue was reported. INVITATION FOR SEALED BIDS RENOVATIONS TO PRESS BOX HARDEE WILDCAT FOOTBALL STADIUM Sealed bids will be received by The School Board of Hardee County, at the Superintendents Office, 1009 North 6th Ave., Wauchula, Florida 33873 until 2:00 p.m. on Monday, April 21, 2014, at which time all bids shall be publicly opened for furnishing all labor and material and performing all work necessary for Renovations to the Press Box at Hardee Wildcat Football Stadium, Wauchula, FL. Each bid shall be submitted to the Office of the Superin tendent of Schools, Hardee County School Board, P.O. Box 1678, Wauchula, FL 33873. Bids shall be Sealed and plainly marked: BID RENOVATIONS PRESS BOX APRIL 21, 2014 2:00 P.M. The Board reserves the right to reject any and all bids received and to waive any and all irregularities in regard thereto. Unsealed bids, e.g., fax transmissions, will not be accepted. No bids may be withdrawn after the scheduled closing time for receipt of bids for a period of thirty (30) days. MANDATORY PRE-BID CONFERENCE: April 2, 3:00 p.m., Hardee County School Board Educational Facilities Department, 1015 SR 66, Zolfo Springs, FL Telephone number (863)735-2055. Bid documents and specifications will be issued at this time. All bidding contractors shall attend the pre-bid conference in order to have a valid bid proposal considered for this project. Bid Proposals from Contractors NOT in atten dance of the mandatory pre-bid conference will be considered unresponsive. Bid tabulations with recommended awards shall be posted for review by interested parties at the Hardee County School Board office and web site, www.hardee.k12.fl.us. Failure to file a protest within the time prescribed by Sect ion 120.53(5), Florida Statutes, shall constitute a waiver of proceedings under Chapter 120, Florida Statutes. David Durastanti Superintendent of Schools 3:20,27c NOTICE OF APPLICATION F OR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that PENDER NEWKIRK CUSTODIAN F/B/O TC 10U, LLC, the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: CERTIFICATE NO.: 875 YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2010 Parcel ID Number: 10-34-25-0843-00001-0020 Description of Property: LOT 20 HARLEM HEIGHTS 159P387 78P316 82P213 466P536 (NC) SUBJECT TO RESERVATIONS, COVENANTS, RE STRICTIONS, AND EASEMENTS OF RECORD. Name in which assessed: WILLA HARRIS AND WILLIE HARRIS Said property being in the County of HARDEE, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the Hardee County Courthouse, 417 West Main Street, second floor hallway outside of Room 202, Wauchula, FL 33873 on the 9 TH day of APRIL, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 26 th day of FEBRUARY, 2014. Victoria L. Rogers Clerk of Circuit Court Hardee County, Florida AD No: 1 By: LAURA L. BARKER, Deputy Clerk Tax Deed File No.: 252013TD052XXXX Pursuant to F.S. 197.512 3:6-27c NOTICE OF APPLICATION F OR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that RALEIGH E. OR DI ANNE K. OR STEVEN E. HORNE, the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: CERTIFICATE NO.: 808 YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2011 Parcel ID Number: 13-34-25-0100-00001-0010 Description of Property: LOT 10 GILLIARD FARMS SUBD LOCATED IN SEC 24 34S 25E 311P504P512 314P96 SUBJECT TO RESERVATIONS, COVENANTS, RE STRICTIONS, AND EASEMENTS OF RECORD. Name in which assessed: LONG VAN NGUYEN AND KIM THOA THI NGUYEN Said property being in the County of HARDEE, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the Hardee County Courthouse, 417 West Main Street, second floor hallway outside of Room 202, Wauchula, FL 33873 on the 9 TH day of APRIL, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 25 th day of FEBRUARY, 2014. Victoria L. Rogers Clerk of Circuit Court Hardee County, Florida AD No: 1 By: LAURA L. BARKER, Deputy Clerk Tax Deed File No.: 252013TD072XXXX Pursuant to F.S. 197.512 3:6-27c Around the park M arch is "Irish month" and what a parade and dinner we had for the "IRISH. Our Grand Marshall was Jack Shanower, who gave a tribute to "Bill Hartigan. a true-blooded Irish-man, who started the "IRISH PA RADE. here at the Oasis many years ago. May he rest in peace. Winners were: best dressed: Lynsey Gillespie, granddaugh ter of Les and Ann Day; Frank Huiet and Peaches, his dog Cart; Lucy and Leonard Starr, Trike; and Carol Yaw. Judges were: Becky DeWitt, Kathy Gaylog and Junior Ri neck. Helping decorate the ta bles were Tom Longueuil and Becky and Kathy. Winnie De Witt did a great job of or-ganizing this wonderful event. Ray Tuttle was the auctioneer. The Red Hatters had a won derful luncheon and day out on the town with 17 attending. Oh, what they can't think of to get into. Ladies Bible Study Connie Swanson does an excellent teaching of the Bible. This weeks lesson was, Matthew 28, "The Lord is Coming." Our last "Bedazzling" saw new designs and new faces. Diane Mominee headed up the sparkle. O ur Pot Luck breakfast was Saturday at 9:00 A.M. at the recreation hall. Bingo 3/13. Audrey Semler won the 50/50, then won the jackpot and shared it with Tom Lon-gueuil. Seven merchant certificates were given. 3/17, the 50/50 was won by Alicia Orndas. Ralph Pavey won the jackpot. Shuffleboard What a gorgeous day for 13 shufflers. Ann Day and Charlie Gaylog took the honors. Pokeno 3/17. We are thinning out with only three players and Joyce Longueuil was the big winner. 3/19 there were five players and Shirley Hyde had the luck of the Irish again. That makes four pots she has won and gleaming from ear to ear! Way to go, Shirley. Wii bowling Mike Yaw had high game with 256 and high average 238. Exercise The gals are still holding true to their exercise. Way to go girls. Until we meet again, here in The Herald-Advocate, may God bless you and yours. Oasis RV News By G eorgianna Mills _______________________________ I N THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 252013CA000562 WAUCHULA STATE BANK Plaintiff, vs. JESUS VALERIO, a/k/a JESUS VALERIO ACOSTA, and BRENDA TREVINO a/k/a BRENDA L. TREVINO-VALERIO Defendants. ______________________________/ NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that purs uant to a Final Judgment entered in the above entitled case in the Circuit Court of Hardee County, Florida, the Clerk of the Court shall sell the property situated in Hardee County, described as: Lot 12 Block 14 of Wauchula Hills, a subdivision in Hardee County, Florida, as per Plat Book 3, page 1. Together with a 2006 CLAYTON HS,Serial Identification number WHC015826GA, Title Number 97073004. This public sale shall be con ducted at 417 West Main St. Second Floor Hallway outside of Room 202, Wauchula, FL to the highest and best bidder for cash after giving notice as required by Section 45.031, Florida Statutes, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Standard Time) on April 2, 2014. IF YOU ARE A SUBORDINATE LIENHOLDER CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTI TLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. VICTORIA L. ROGERS Clerk of Court Hardee County By: Connie Coker Deputy Clerk IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS AC COMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THE PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVI SION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT THE OFFICE OF THE COURT ADMINISTRA TOR, 255 NORTH BROADWAY AV ENUE, BARTOW, FLORIDA 33830 (863) 534-4686, AT LEAST 7 DAYS BEFORE YOUR SCHEDULED COURT APPEARANCE, OR IMME DIATELY UPON RECEIVING THIS NOTIFICATION IF THE TIME BE FORE THE SCHEDULED APPEAR ANCE IS LESS THAN 7 DAYS; IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IM PAIRED, CALL 711. 3:20,27c _______________________________ _______________________________ I N THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 252013CA000565 WAUCHULA STATE BANK Plaintiff, vs. JESUS VALERIO ACOSTA, a/k/a JESUS VALERIO, and wife BRENDA TREVINO-VALERIO, and State of Florida, Department of Economic Opportunity Unemployment Compensation Services, and Unknown Tenant(s) Defendants. ______________________________/ NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that purs uant to a Final Judgment entered in the above entitled case in the Circuit Court of Hardee County, Florida, the Clerk of the Court shall sell the property situated in Hardee County, described as: Lot 11 of Block 14 of Wauchula Hills, a subdivi sion in Hardee County, Florida, as per Plat Book 3, page 1. This public sale shall be con ducted at 417 West Main St. Second Floor Hallway outside of Room 202, Wauchula, FL to the highest and best bidder for cash after giving notice as required by Section 45.031, Florida Statutes, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Standard Time) on April 2, 2014. IF YOU ARE A SUBORDINATE LIENHOLDER CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTI TLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. VICTORIA L. ROGERS Clerk of Court Hardee County By: Connie Coker Deputy Clerk IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS AC COMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THE PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVI SION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT THE OFFICE OF THE COURT ADMINISTRA TOR, 255 NORTH BROADWAY AV ENUE, BARTOW, FLORIDA 33830 (863) 534-4686, AT LEAST 7 DAYS BEFORE YOUR SCHEDULED COURT APPEARANCE, OR IMME DIATELY UPON RECEIVING THIS NOTIFICATION IF THE TIME BE FORE THE SCHEDULED APPEAR ANCE IS LESS THAN 7 DAYS; IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IM PAIRED, CALL 711. 3:20,27c _______________________________ YOUR BUSINESS COULD APPEAR HERE TOO!!C)-200(Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce DanielsAt The Herald Advocate773-3255 www.TheHeraldAdvocate.com The Herald-AdvocateHardee Countys Hometown Coverage Telephone (863) 773-3255 www.TheHeraldAdvocate.com

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March 27, 2014, The Herald-Advocate 7C Courthouse Report COUNTY COURT The following marriage li censes were issued recently in the office of the county court: Jacob Daniel Trew, 28, of Wauchula, and Kaitlyn Renee Eagerton, 21, of Wauchula. Thomas C. Kimmerley, 68, of Marmoa, N. J., and Cindy Kay Holloway-McCleary, 63, of Port Deposit, Md. William Richard Reynolds, 45, and Barbara Ruth Allen, 38, of Wauchula. The following small claims cases were disposed of recently by the county judge: Reginald Brown vs. Brancas Air Conditioning/Frank Branca, dismissed. Valencia Garden Apartments vs. Anthony Huntley and Tyreisha Huntley, judgment of eviction. Capital One Bank vs. Aislynn Holt, judgment. There was no misdemeanor court report as it was trial week. The following case was settled: Kevin Dewayne Ray, domestic battery, dismissed. CIRCUIT COURT The following civil actions were filed recently in the office of the circuit court: Wells Fargo Bank vs. Isaac Maldonado et al, petition for mortgage foreclosure. Abraham Mejia and Cindy Mejia, divorce. Brandy D. Taylor and the state Department of Revenue (DOR) vs. Ray A. Arredondo, petition for administrative child support order. Delida Ann Alvarado and Emmanuel Rojas-Fernandez, di vorce. First National Bank of Wauchula vs. Ida Mendoza, petition for mortgage foreclosure. Amber Emily Carrion and DOR vs. Victor Hugo Lopez, petition for child support. Daniel Garcia and Amber Denise Goodman, divorce. Mary Moore vs. Reuben David Moore, petition for in junction for protection. Brittany Driskell and DOR vs. Ray A. Arredondo, petition for administrative child support order. PHH Mortgage Corp. vs. Jacob P. Shultz, Melissa G. Shultz et al, petition for mort gage foreclosure. Rachel Yvonne Manley and DOR vs. Jon Michael Birt, petition for administrative child sup port order. The following decisions on civil cases pending in the cir cuit court were handed down recently by the circuit court judge: Mary Elizabeth Rosales and DOR vs. Jesus L. Torres Jr., vol untary dismissal. Kayla Smith vs. Cody Rawls, injunction for protection. Florida Institute for Neu-ro logic Research Inc. vs. Hardee County, Florida, dismissed. Maria Ernestina Garza vs. Elias R. Torres, order. Sebastian Juarez Jr. and DOR vs. Cynthia Sue Short, order on child support contempt. Aron Shane Thomas and DOR vs. Linda Oleane Thomas, order on child support contempt. Jessica Nicole Guevara and DOR vs. Eliazar Garcia, order on child support contempt. Karla F. Glisson and DOR vs. Greg B. Glisson, order on child support contempt. State of Florida Department of Transportation vs. Thomas E. and Lorraine G. Brauckhoff et al, voluntary dismissal. Mabeline Mariner and DOR vs. Jose Antonio Bermudez, vol untary dismissal. Sharon Leigh Sockalosky Smith and Toby Jon Smith, order. Amber Price and DOR vs. Joe S. Lopez, order on child sup port contempt. Crystal Gayle Birge Barnwell and DOR vs. Randy Leon Gillis, order on child support contempt. Patricia Grandos and DOR vs. Rene Ricardo Martinez, child support order. Karen D. Glowacki and DOR vs. Nermin Besic, child support order. Alicia Lara and DOR vs. Gin ger Gallegos, order on child sup port contempt. Latika Sharell Williams and DOR vs. Ryan Alfonso Glinton, order on child support contempt. Miranda Nichole Black and DOR vs. Terry Lamar Pelham, child support order. Jahna Concrete Inc. vs. Lib erty Mutual Insurance Co., dis missed. Ivory Fischer vs. Regina Allmon, injunction for protection. Suncoast Schools Federal Credit Union vs. James Massey, Shelly P. Massey et al, order. Melissa Woodrum vs. David King, petition for injunction for protection denied. There was no felony crimi nal court last week as it was trial week. The following cases were settled: Noe Macedo interfering with custody, lewd molestation, lewd or lascivious exhibition over computer online and traveling to meet minor, 10 years Florida State Prison with credit for 284 days served, followed by probation 10 years, $1,044 fines, costs and fees placed on lien; lewd molestation, use of computer to seduce a child and resisting ar rest without violence, not prose cuted. Frank Williard Johns, viola tion of probation (original charges, manufacturing of methamphetamine and unlawful possession of listed chemicals), probation revoked, 50 months Florida State Prison with credit for 409 days served, $400 fees and costs added to outstanding fines, fees and costs and placed on lien. The following real estate transactions of $10,000 or more were filed recently in the office of the clerk of court: Paul E. Jr. and Amy Davis to David D. Durastanti and Stuart D. Durastanti (two properties), $20,000 Paul E. Jr. and Amy Davis to Craig Blas, $31,500. Paul E. Jr. and Amy Davis to Robert S. Fite Jr., $14,000. David Ybarra to Jethro Mc Call and Casey Lee McCall, $15,000. John C. Gordon to Matthew V. and Ivy Knight, $112,500. Matthew V. and Ivy Knight to Jose and Tabatha Hernandez, $40,000. FBI Homes to Jose Maria Figueroa-Escobar, $45,000. Jimmy and Barbara Turner to Hege-Desiree Gillman, $28,700. FBI Homes to Jose Luis Patino-Romero, $20,000. Ronald G. and Dessie L. Byarlay to John G. and Karen D. Yanity, $18,500. Deborah Barker to Patricia Elabed, $80,000. NOW PURCHASING CITRUS FRUIT For the 2013-14 Citrus Crop Frank VasquezCitrus Broker781-4133 Chapman Fruit Co.Est. 19563:27c Pioneer Creek RV NewsBy Andie McCosco CHAPEL Tom and Janit Apple and Larry and Nancy Willey wel comed 172 to chapel. De-vo tions were led by Janit Apple who read a poem on Hope. The anthem Standing of the Solid Rock was sung by the choir and the Mens Group sang Hallelujah! We Shall Rise, both directed by Sandy Feeser and accompanied by Cheryl Conkle on the piano. Pastor David spoke from Acts 2: 2233. SCOREBOARD Bowling: For the men, Dave Thompson high score of 184 and a high series of 489. For the women, Marilyn Achard high game of 148 and a high series of 416. Rod Faris and Jim Noble had 5/7 splits. Jim Ach-ard had a 3/10 split. Arlene Sebright had a 3/5/7/10 split. SPOT LIGHT The Womens Veterans Luncheon was held on Mar. 8 at a Bowling Green restaurant. This is a yearly event and an opportunity for military women to share a special time and also share their experience while serving their country. In atten dance were: Jackie Gauger and Rhea Heckler, Army veterans; Linda Gray, Lorrie Coleman and Connie Combs, Air Force veter ans; Dora Morgan, Marine vet eran; and Terry Stamm, Navy Waves. Bernice English, Canadian Air Force was unable to attend. Starting in World War II, most have served during mili tary conflicts. The ladies are al ways looking for other Women Veterans to join them for lunch, local or snowbirds. Contact the Pioneer Creek RV park office and leave your name and phone number. Pioneer Creek RV Resort is at the forefront of the Central Floridas Shuffleboard Association. On Saturday, Mar. 15, the Pioneer Creek Shuffleboard Association held its annual banquet honoring several outstanding shufflers of the 2013-14 season. In team shuffle, the Wannabees, came in first place. Team members were: DeWayne Renwick, Captain, Lou Faulkner, Richard Lacourse, Irene Lunney, Cathy Payne and Bart Wesseling. Second place was taken by team Rinky Dinks. Team members were: Lynn Shick, Captain, MaryAnn Fisher, Chris Grove, Terry Keinath, Sheridan Leslie and Ginnie Merriman. Wauchula State Bank sponsored the team shuffle. In the Central District, several shufflers from Pioneer Creek were acknowledged for their success this winter in district tournaments. Qualifying for the Reiny Schleier Masters (Top 8) Invitational Tournament were: Catherine RenwickState Am.; Lou Faulkner-State Am.; Richard Lacouse-District Am. (Alternate); and DeWayne Ren-wick-State Am. Each of these shufflers is among the top eight shufflers in their respective categories. The Masters tourna ment will take place in Lakeland on Mar. 2021. Recognition was given to Catherine Renwick for earning enough points this year to move from District Am. to State Am. and to DeWayne Renwick for earning enough points this year to move from State Am. to State Pro. status. Don Merillat led the prayer at Koffee Klatch on March 19, with Paul Vaughan leading the U.S. Pledge and I led the Canadian Pledge. The 50/50 winners were Pam and Gene Norris; Lot 324; Norm and Heather Lemke; Lois and Paul Conley; and Lot 297. CRAFT FAIR Our Craft Fair, Bake Sale and Luncheon on March 10 was a great success. We had 21 tables with people selling their own crafts. We had several people from other parks participating in our Craft Fair. The winners of the raffle were Doris Griffith, Jeanne Carney, Kay Dale and Nancy Ellman. Next years craft fair is scheduled for March 2. SATURDAY DANCES Steve Baker played for our St. Patricks Dance on March 15. The winners of the door prizes were Sharron Noble, Cindy Johnson, Marianne Phillips, Michelle, Linda Lane, Elnora MacNaughton, Claire Tremblay, Jeannette Jacques, Sharon Wilson and Wendy Green. Our last dance for this season is our Farewell Dance on March 29. There will be some door prizes and also a 50/50. SHUFFLING BANQUET The banquet was held on March 18. Heather Lemke and Eliane Lamarche were in charge of the Tuesday shuffling. Don Merillat is in charge of Horse Collar and Out-of-Park Shuffling. The mens winners this year were Don Merillat, first; Ron Storm, second; and Bob Beshel, third. For the ladies, Eliane Lamarche was first; Lor raine Howerter was second and Sherry Chamberlain was third. BINGO Sylvia Baker won the large jackpot on March 3 and Barbara George won the small jackpot. On March 7, Pam Norris won both the large and small jack pots. March 10 saw Mary Kessler win the large jackpot and Mary Boehk win the small jackpot. On March 15, Sylvia Baker again won the large jack pot while Shirley ONeal won the small jackpot and the special jackpot was split between Gert Brayton and Don Smith. The last night of bingo for this sea son is March 28. GOLF The three leagues golfed in our golf tournament today. The first place team consisted of Larry Murphy, Larry Gum and Jacques Tremblay. There is still golf to be played. Just show up and you will be put on a team. The golf banquet was held March 20. BOCCE The first-place team for the year was Bob Bundy, Sherry Bundy, Myrna Wilday and Gene Norris. Crystal Lake RV NewsBy Joyce Taylor CareerSource Heartland: Committed to the CommunityFebruary 10th marked the official activation of the new CareerSource Heartland brand, and along with the launch of the new brand comes a new website with a fresh new look! Our commitment to our core missions re mains firm, and our top priority continues to be connecting job seekers and employers. Check out www.careersourceheartland.com today for your workforce needs employers and job seekers alike! As a member of the new statewide CareerSource Florida network, CareerSource Heartland formerly Heartland Workforce is helping to ensure businesses and job seekers anywhere in Florida can easily find employment and hiring assistance, connecting with services and resources to help them succeed. We appreciate the support of our customers and community as we implement our brand transition! How job seekers and businesses will benefit Our top priority is helping Floridians enter, remain and advance in the workforce. We do this by connecting employers with qualified, skilled talent and Floridians with employment and career development opportunities. The unified brand will improve customer and market awareness and use of the systems services and resources to address the current and future workforce needs of our employers, job seekers, and workers. The new unified brand is designed to minimize the confusion among job seekers and businesses who were trying to navigate the old system comprised of 25 different board names and logos throughout the state. As CareerSource Heartland we will continue to offer valuable services to connect job seekers and businesses in the most strategic, comprehensive manner possible, to ensure the regions demands for talent and training are met. As CareerSource Heartland we still retain our flexibility to design and deliver programs that best meet local needs. CareerSource Heartland is an equal opportunity employer program. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities. All voice telephone numbers may be reached by persons using TTY/TDD equipment via the Florida Relay Service at 711.Stop in today or contact us at any one of our three Centers in DeSoto, Hardee, or Highlands. Employers let us show you what we can do to help you be more successful! Job Seekers let us match you up with that next great job! DeSoto County 2160 NE Roan Ave. Arcadia (863) 993-1008 Hardee County 324 6th Avenue North Wauchula (863) 773-3474 Highlands County 5901 US Hwy 27 S, Suite 1 Sebring (863) 385-36723:27c 3:20,27c Sebring Podiatry Center6801 US 27 North, Suite D3 Sebring, FL 33870863-314-8600Dr. Dale C. AndersonPodiatric Physician & Surgeon Wauchula & Lake Placid Appointments Available!Toenail Fungus?Laser Solution!Sebring Podiatry CenterRequest a complementary consultation!Call 863-314-8600 Laser Nail Fungus Treatment kills the fungus that lived in and under the toenail. The laser light passes through the toenail without causing damage to the nail or surrounding skin. There is a warming sensation and some patients may feel a pinprick. Just walk in and walk out. The laser nail fungus procedure only takes 15-20 minutes. Shoes and nail polish can be worn immediately after the treatment.10:18tfc