The Herald-advocate

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Material Information

Title:
The Herald-advocate
Portion of title:
Herald advocate
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Wm. J. Kelly
Place of Publication:
Wauchula Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Wauchula (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hardee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Hardee -- Wauchula
Coordinates:
27.546111 x -81.814444

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
55th year, no. 31 (Sept. 2, 1955)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000579544
oclc - 33886547
notis - ADA7390
lccn - sn 95047483
System ID:
UF00028302:00469

Related Items

Preceded by:
Hardee County herald
Preceded by:
Florida advocate (Wauchula, Fla.)

Full Text















The


Herald-Advocate


Hardee County's Hometown Coverage


700
Plus 5v sales Tra


113th Year, No. 9
3 Sections, 28 Pages


Thursday, January 31, 2013


BENEVOLENT BUST!


PHOTO BY MARIA TRUJILLO
"You're under arrest for computer espionage!" At least that's what Jim Kelly, publisher
of The Herald-Advocate, -was told last Thursday as sheriff's Dep. Sylvia Hendrickson
showed up at his office to-take him into custody. Kelly who still uses a typewriter -
protested, proclaiming his innocence and trying to shift suspicion to others. Still, Hen-
drickson led him away. Luckily for Kelly, it was all part of the town of Zolfo Springs'
fundraiser for the annual cancer Relay For Life. "Arrests" occurred after a donor paid to
have someone named on a "warrant." Hendrickson then went out and served the war-
rants, bringing the detainees to Town Hall, where they had to call someone to bring bail
money. In the end, the town raised $1,050 for Relay For Life with its creative crime spree,
For more victims of the philanthropic fun, see 5A.




Judge Halts Auction


By MICHAEL KELLY
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Florida Rural Broad-
band Alliance LLC was award-
ed a temporary injunction in
Hardee Circuit Court Friday to
stop the planned auction of its
broadband equipment by Rapid
Systems.
Rapid Systems filed for a
construction lien against the
FRBA equipment installed on
five Rapid Systems poles to
carry Internet bandwidth wire-


WEATHER
*, HIGH LOW RAIN
01123 72 43 0.00
01/24 74 38 0.00
01/25 76 42 0.00
01/26 77 43 0.00
01/27 79 48 0.00
01128 82 57 0.00
01129 82 58 0.00
ITOTA Rainfall tfo 01/29/13 42.98
Same period last year 52.10
Ten Year Average. 50.25
Source- Univ. of Ra. Ona Research Cent

INDEX
Classifieds..................6B
Community Calendar....6A
Courthouse Report.......7A
Crime Blotter................5C,
Hardee Living................2B
Information Roundup... 6A
Obituaries...................4A



II 1 111I I
8 33913 00075 7


lessly across Rapid Systems'
network from the ILA pop in
Ona through Hardee County
and connect into other net-
works.
Rapid Systems had planned
on selling the equipment in a
Monday auction to settle an'
unpaid $1.15 million debt the
company feels it is owed by
FRBA for installing the FRBA
equipment on its poles and cre-
ating the "midldle-mile net-


zs


work" to allow counties to the
east and.south to connect.
Rapid Systems planned on
immediately replacing the
equipment with its own, and its
president said last week that
nobody in Hardee County
would lose Internet service or
be affected.
The equipment in question
only pertains to the middle-mile
connectivity and not last-mile
See JUDGE 2A 1*


Hosts Youth


Valentine Dance


By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
Teens and tweens, ask your
parents and maybe even ask a
date.
The town of Zolfo Springs'
cancer Relay For Life team,
known as the Tozmanian Devils
- yes, that's "toz" for town of
Zolfo is hosting a Valentine
Dance for the county's youth on
Saturday, Feb. 9.
The dance will be held at
Town Hall, 3210 .U.S. 17 S.,
from 6 to 10 p.m. Students from
sixth to 12th grades are wel-
come.
Admission is $5 per person or
$8 for a couple. Organizers
have 200 tickets available.
Money raised from the dance
will go toward the Tozmanian
Devils' donation to the annual


cancer Relay For Life event,
sponsored by the Hardee
County Unit of the American
Cancer Society.
Organizers plan for a safe and
clean night of fun for students
to celebrate upcoming Valen-
tine's Day. In fact, that holiday
features prominently in the
fundraiser, as flowers will be
sold at the dance as well as by
order for a Feb. 14 delivery.
The fun will include a disc
jockey spinning sounds from
rock to country to rap.
There will also be raffle tick-
ets on sale, with prizes of vary-
ing gift cards.
It's all for a good cause, mom
and dad. Tickets can be pur-
chased in advance at Town Hall
or at the door on the night of the
dance. -


1 Mom Gets Probation




In Infant's Death


By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
A Wauchula mother arrested
for murder in the 2010 death of
her 4-month-old baby girl has
pleaded to a reduced charge.
Brandy Elizabeth Battey, 22,
of 2370 U.S. 17 N., had been
charged with second-degree
murder for what the Medical
Examiner's Office termed
blunt-force head trauma, or
"shaken baby syndrome."
Instead, earlier this month in
Hardee Circuit Court she plead-
ed to a lesser charge of neglect
of a child causing great bodily
harm.
For that crime, Circuit Judge
Marcus J. Ezelle sentenced her
.to 10 years of supervised proba-


tion.
Battey also voluntarily
agreed to give up parental rights-
for her two surviving children.
In the meantime, however,
Ezelle prohibited her from hav-
ing any unsupervised contact
with those children, but did say
she could travel to Highlands
County to visit with friends or
family after obtaining prior
approval from. a judge or her
probation officer.
Further, Ezelle assessed $520
in fines and court costs, $400 in
prosecution fees, $400 in inves-
tigative expenses, $120 in pro-
bation fees, and $151 for the
Crimes Against Minors fund.
If Battey successfully meets
all terms of her probation for


eight years, Ezelle said the
court would consider an early
termination of her probation.
See PROBATION 2A


Schools Name Top



Teachers, Workers


By MARIA TRUJILLO
Of The Herald-Advocate
A night full of inspiring
words and people turned into an
even better pight for two
women working within the
Hardee County School District.
.Last Thursday the Teacher
and School Related Personnel
of the Year Banquet took place
at the Agri-Civic Center. This
banquet serves as a way to rec-
ognize those people who work
hard to give students the best
learning environment they can
offer.
Honored as Teacher of the
Year for their respective schools
were Kari Gicker at Zolfo
Springs Elementary, Gloria
Flores at Bowling Green Ele-
. mentary, Kristen Rivas at
Wauchula Elementary, Joy
Roberts at North Wauchula
Elementary, LaDonna Perry at
Hilltop Elementary, Marie Price
at Hardee Junior High and Rob
Beatty at Hardee Senior High.
Earning the titles of School-
Related Personnel of the Year
for their respective worksites




1 ,. '


were Lisa Boehm at Zat, Bob
Yeager at BGE, Queen Lee at
WES,'Carol Dickey at NWE,
Linda Strickland at HES,
Beverly Moseley at HJH, Chela
Calves at HHS, Sherry Morris-
Hollimon at Pioneer Career
Academy, Jim Smith at Educa-
tional 'Facilities and Chiquita
Robinson at Transportation.
Kristen Rivas also earned the
title of District Teacher of the
Year and Beverly Moseley
earned District School-Related
Person of the Year.
The evening began with
Superintendent of Schools
David Durastanti welcoming
the crowd and introducing the
Hardee County School Board
vice chairman and' master of
ceremonies for the night,
Thomas Trevifio.
Lt. Col. Anthony Hingle,.
2012 District Teacher of the
Year, then presented the Air
Force Junior Reserve Officer
Training Corps Color Guard
from HHS. Under command of
Cadet Capt. Michael Ramirez
were Cadet Maj. Savannah


Vasquez, Cadet Capt. Ana
Maria Saldivar, Cadet 2nd Lt.
Taylor Mueller and Cadet 2nd
Lt. Juan Sanchez,
Leading in the Pledge of
Allegiance was senior and
National Honor Society Pres-
ident Kaylee Mancillas, while
senior and 'member of HHS'
varsity choir, Cassie Reyna,
sang the National Anthem.
School Board Chairman Paul
Samuels made the invocation.
Everyone in attendance was
then able to enjoy the refresh-
ments provided by Elaine
Pearce's culinary operations
class and the meal prepared by
the 4-H Foundation. 4-H and
National Honor Society mem-
bers were also there to set-up,
serve and clean-up the meals.
The night then continued
with honoring the teachers and
SRPs and hearing about their
accomplishments and willing-
ness to help students improve.
Rivas is teaching kinder-
garten at Wauchula Elementary
School. She said earning Dis-
See TEACHERS 10A


I J nu 1 tO ivYfirIl I nuJILLOJ
District School-Related Person of the Year Beverly Moseley (middle) and Teacher of the
Year Kristen Rivas are congratulated by Schools Superintendent David Durastanti.


Elvis Has Left

The Building

.. Column 8C


Stadium Adds

A New Name?

... Story 1B


Online Predator

SGets Prison
d ... Story 10A





2A The Herald-Advocate, January 31, 2013


The Herald-Advocate
Hardee County's Hometown Coverage
JAMES R. KELLY
Publisher/Editor
CYNTHIA M. KRAHL
Managing Editor


JOAN M. SEAMAN
Sports Editor



115 S. Seventh Ave.
P.O. Box 338
Wauchula, FL 33873


RALPH HARRISON
Production Manager


NOEY DE SANTIAGO
V Asst. Prod. Manager
1riotS J Phone: (863) 773-3255
Fax: (863) 773-0657


Published weekly on Thursday at Wauchula, Florida, by The Herald-Advocate
Publishing Co. Inc. Periodical Postage paid at U.S. Post Office, Wauchula, FL
33873 and additional entry office (USPS 578-780), "Postmaster," send address
changes to: The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338, Wauchula, FL 33873.


f DEADLINES:
Schools -Thursday 5 p.m.
Sports Monday noon
Hardee Living Thursday 5 p.m.
General News Monday 5 p.m.
\ Ads Tuesday noon


SUBSCRIPTIONS:
Hardee County
6 months $21; 1 yr. $39; 2 yrs. $75
Florida
6 months S-25; I yr.- $46; 2 yrs. f S
Out of State
6 months $29; 1 yr.-.i 52. 2%. I1o


LETTERS:
The Herald-Advocate welcomes ieters to ihe editor on mailer. .t public
interest. Letters holdd be brief. and must be unuen in good taste. si ed
and include a daiyume phone number.
SUBMISSIONS:
Press releases on cormmnit) [maulers are welcome Submissions should be
tyed. dLouble-.spaced .nd adhere to the above de.dhnes. All eiris are sub.
ject to edging
<___________________


Kelly's Column
By Jim


Main Street Wauchula did an outstanding job Friday night in
presenting the Historical Ghost Tour.
Four times a trolley loaded with 27 to 30 people left Heritage
Park for the tour. About 110 attended. Tour guides were Judy
Terrell, Peter Preston and Krystin Robertson Chapman.
Ken Lambert portrayed Gov. Carey Hardee, whom our county
is named after. Hardee became a county in 1921.
Gayle Knight portrayed her grandmother "Miss sook" who ran
the family's boarding house which today is Robarts Funeral Home.
Jerold Knight and Oneita Revell portrayed A.G. Smith and his
wife. Smith was a big landowner dand operated the train depot,
which at one time had eight train stops daily.
Merilyn Strickland and Brenda Knight gave a history of the
old Publix and later Red and White Grocery at the comer of Main
St. and S. 7th Ave. where the Sears store is today.
Jim Beckley gave a history of banking from the 1920s and
1930s. Several banks closed in Hardee County during the Great
Depression and after the stock market crash. After a run on the
banks depleted money supplies many families lost their life sav-
ings. This was before the FDIC program was adopted to protect
customers' bank accounts.
Kayton Nedza portrayed the life of Wauchula. Dr. M.C.
Kayton.
Bill Lambert in front of the old Wauchula City Hall portrayed
attorney L. Grady Burton who was mayor when the city hail and
auditorium was built. He later ran for governor.
Jim Stallings portrayed W. B. Beeson who established
Beeson's Drug Store at the corner of Main St. and Hwy 17.
Beeson's was Florida's oldest Rexall drug store.
DeSoto County in 1921 was divided into five counties -
DeSoto, Hardee, Charlotte, Highlands and Glades. Hardee's popu-
lation in 1921 was 8,755, slightly less than DeSoto's, but more than
Charlotte, Highlands and Glades.

Wauchula Kiwanis Club will hold its 17th annual sporting
clays shoot on Saturday, Feb. 9, at Square One. The cost to shoot is
$50, which includes a BBQ lunch and refreshments.
To participate, call Bob Hanchey or Lee Hawthorne at
Wauchula State Bank.

Red Henderson, 73, who owned Henderson's Tire Store, was a
business icon in Wauchula. He passed away Monday. He had
worked on the same corner since the age of 17, and loved to bowl.

I made a mistake in one of my writings last week and called
Juan Otero the mayor of Bowling Green. Of course, he is the mayor
of Zolfo Springs. Shirley Tucker is the mayor of Bowling Green,
the city where I live. My brain must have slipped into neutral for a
moment. Could it be I recently turned 69 and an early sign of
dimentia or Alzheimers had set in? Hopefully not.

William Bartlett of rural Zolfo Springs retired from New York
state 20 years ago after a career as a mechanic and machinist. He
does not like the liberal policies of our president and the
Democratic Party. He wanted Ron Paul to be president.
Bartlett does not believe in excessive welfare and foreign aid
spending. He believes strongly in the U.S. Constitution ahd its
rights.
Bartlett does not believe in gun control. "Criminals don't obey
any laws so nothing will change, except good citizens will have
more restrictions. I agree with Wayne LaPierre (NRA spokesman)
that the only thing that will stop a bad guy with a gun is a good guy
with a gun."
Bartlett is very concerned about the rising national debt in
America. He says foreign aid should be cut out, and Congress
should spend money to help rebuild America instead. He is afraid
the continued excessive federal spending will "devalue the dollar
until it is worth nothing and you and I have no savings left. Wake
up people or we won't have a country or a Constitution."

AARP reports 36 percent of the federal.budget is consumed by
Social Security and Medicare. The average Social Security benefit
is $1,261 a month. Most people have their Medicare premiums
deducted from their Social Security checks.
Medicare recipients spend an average of $4,500 a year out of
pocket on health care, according to the nonprofit Medicare Rights
Center.

Pat Summitt, the legendary women's basketball head coach at
the University of Tennessee, shared some of her life lessons in a
recent AARP Bulletin. She grew up on a dairy farm in Henrietta,
Tenn. Her lessons or advice include ...
-Actions speak louder than words.
-Make hard work your passion.
-Don't just work hard, work smart.
-In seeking out new challenges and to endure setbacks,
understand that change is a must.
-Handle success like you handle failure. Embrace learning,
bettering yourself and maintaining a positive attitude.
-You must make winning an attitude.
-Put the team. before yourself. Teamwork allows common
people to obtain uncommon results.
Pat Summitt today is using her life experiences and her faith in
her fight against Alzheimer's disease. She won eight NCAA titles
at Tennessee.


SIGN OF SUPPORT


COURTESY PHOTO
After years of saving their hard-earned "Go Take A Hike" walkathon money, Wauchula Elementary School students
found themselves just short of reaching the goal of purchasing an electronic sign for their school. Students had
annually collected pledges and raised funds for the sign project, many student and staff incentives, physical edu-
cation equipment, and technology. CF Industries then made the donation that helped the students meet their goal.
Pictured here with several proud WES students are (from left) Richard Ghent of CF Industries, Principal Sonja
Bennett and Callie Ward of CF Industries. Students are (front row, from left) Brin Conerly, Kellon Lindsey, Boone
Pazzaglia, Carson Monts De Oca, Madi Hall, Savvy Conerly, Mia Camilo-Taylor and Emily Worden; (back row) Dalton
Johnson, Dylan Davis, Griffin Clark, Quintin Lindsey, Dean Clark, Maddie Jane Schraeder, Macy Grace Tyson, Mady
Tyson, Drew Beattie and Faith Davis.


-PIOBATION
Continued From 1A
Four-month-old Mariah Bat-
tey died on Sept. 28, 2010. *
According to Maj. Randy
Dey of the Hardee County
Sheriff's Office, the infant's
grandmother was babysitting
her on Sept. 27 while Brandy
Battey worked. Then, sometime
between 5:30 and 6 p.m. that
day, Battey picked up her baby
and took her home for the night.
The next morning, Mariah
was unconscious.
Battey told investigators the
baby was fine when she picked
her up at her grandmother's
house, but became "restless"
and "would not go to sleep"
later that night, Dey relayed.
She said she laid on her bed
and placed Mariah on her chest,
hoping to calm her and lull her
to sleep. She fell asleep, Dey
said Battey told detectives, and
later awoke to find her daughter
lying unconscious next to her.
The infant's body was taken
to the Medical Examiner's
Office, where several tests were
conducted over a period of
months before the determina-
tion was made that the death
was a murder.
The baby, Dey said, was
shaken, and "at some point, the
baby's head hit something also,
a hard surface."
Dey said the medical examin-
er concluded the injuries Ma-
riah sustained would have
caused "an immediate change
in the child, causing the child to
become lethargic, disoriented
and nauseated."
Battey was arrested and
charged with murder on May
25,2011.


BROADBAND
A Page One story last
week misspelled the name
of Rapid Systems presi-
dent and CEO Dustin
Jurman.

BUILDING PERMITS
A column last week
should have stated a build-
ing permit is required for
replacement of a window.
The Herald-Advocate
apologizes for the errors
and is pleased to set the
record straight.

At The Herald-Advocate,
we want accuracy to be a
given, not just our goal. If
you believe we have print-
ed an error in fact, please
call to report it. We will
review the information, and
if we find it needs correc-
tion or clarification, we will
do so here.
To make a report, call
Managing Editor Cynthia
Krahl at 773-3255.






oll[863-781,9140[ 8
m,^ PSSrmm ESatr


Continued From 1A
Continued From 1A


or local service. Systems.
Circuit Judge Marcus Ezelle She went on to say a settle-
granted FRBA's motion Friday ment agreement was reached
to halt the sale of the equipment between the two companies
at issue until a "decision is around March of 2012, but
reached by the court after addi- FRBA has yet to pay Rapid
tional hearings regarding appli- Systems so the company moved
cation of the lien statutes." to have a construction lien
Denise Hamilton, vice presi- placed on the equipment to sell
dent and CFO of Rapid Sys- it and recoup some of the
teams, said the company and money.
FRBA had a memorandum of Rapid Systems and the
understanding for the equip- Hardee County Economic De-
ment to be put on Rapid velopment Authority each
Systems' poles to tap into the agreed to commit $2 million to
Hardee County network. build the Hardee County broad-
Hamilton alleged FRBA has band network in early 2010.
broken some of the provisions The Hardee County Indus-
in the MOU and has not paid trial Development Authority
for its obligations to Rapid was awarded the agreement



Don't Wait When ]

The Flu: A Mom'
There are three important flu. Because the flu affects chil-
questions to which every parent dren in different ways, it is
should have the answer: How always advisable to sdek'med-
do you: know if your child has ical attention as quickly as pos-
the flu and not a cold? Should sible."
you wait to see if his or her How to Prevent the Flu
symptoms improve before call- According to the Centers for
ing the doctor? What if symp- Disease Control and Preven-
toms worsen? tion, everyone 6 months and
Influenza, "the flu," can come older should get vaccinated for
on quickly, typically from one the flu each and every year-and
to four days after a person is it's not too late in the season to
exposed to the virus, and, im- do so. -
portantly, some symptoms can "Getting an annual flu vac-
be similar to the common cold. cine is the single best preventa-
The flu, however, is much tive measure that parents should
worse. Each year, more than take to help protect children
20,000 children under the age from the flu," said Laura Scott,
of 5 are hospitalized dud to the executive director of Families
flu and, tragically, most years, Fighting Flu. "Members of our
more than 100 children die organization include families
from this disease. whose children have suffered
Signs To Watch For serious medical complications
So how can you tell if it's the or died from influenza, and we
flu? Symptoms usually include: share our stories to raise aware-
Fever ness about this potentially dev-
Headache stating disease in the hopes
Extreme tiredness that others won't have to endure
Dry cough similar hardships."
Sore throat One Mom's Story
Runny or stuffy nose "My husband and I were so
Muscle aches excited for Charlie's second
In children: nausea, vomit- birthday party," recounts Jen-
ing and diarrhea. nifer, a Families Fighting Flu
Doctor's Advice member. "A few days before
"It's difficult for young chil- her party, we started noticing a
dren to communicate exactly change in her normally chipper
what or how they're feeling," personality. She became very
said Dr. Matthew J. Cory, pedi- quiet, listless and tired and ulti-
atrician and medical director at mately developed a fever over
Lakeside Pediatrics in Lake- 100 degrees. Fearful that she
land, Florida and medical might miss her birthday party,
adviser to Families Fighting we took her to the pediatrician
Flu, a national nonprofit organ- right away. We were expecting
ization. "As a result, it's up t6 her doctor to say she 'just had a
parents to be alert to notice little bug' and would be fine in a
when their child's activity level day or two. We were shocked
or behaviors change, signaling when the doctor came back
the possible symptoms of the with a diagnosis of the flu. We


from the EDA to manage and
oversee the project.
Hamilton said Rapid Sys-
tems has now contributed more
than $3.7 million to the project,
and completely built out its
Hardee'network.
"We are very proud of the
network we built in Hardee
County and feel the EDA/IDA
were great partners," she said.
More court hearings are
expected to resolve the dispute
between Rapid Systems and
FRBA, Hamilton said.
A call seeking comment from
FRBA's attorney, Joseph Neg-
ron Jr., was not returned by
press time.




Fighting


s Story
didn't even know anyone who
had the flu.
v' ineditely, her- d;otor
ga*ve he--TaTiffliT. sincerh-ehWhd
been diagnosed early efi6ugh,
but over the next week, Charlie
hardly moved, not even to
watch cartoons. Her tempera-
ture never went below 100
degrees but would reach as high
as 103 degrees. I could just tell
how much her body ached
because she would moan and
cry when I changed her.
"Charlie's birthday party wa3
canceled. I know it sounds triv-
ial now, but at the time I was so
disappointed; however, I'm
thankful because" we, aren't a
family that typically rushes off
to the doctor for every sniffle.
Having grown up with a 'tough
it out' mentality, we normally
would have given Charlie some
over-the-counter medicine and
waited it out. Charlie has since
made a full recovery but had it
not been for her getting sick
right before her birthday party.
chances are we may not have
taken her to the doctor so quick-
ly. I urge all parents to not only
get your family vaccinated
against the flu every year but
always pay close attention to
your child's behaviors, which
can give you important clues
about his or her overall health."
More Information
Flu vaccines are available in
a variety of places like doctor's
offices, pharmacies and' super-
markets. Essential resources
about flu prevention, including
a flu clinic locator and an edu-
cational toolkit, are available at
www.FamiliesFightingFlu.org.


A wise prince will seek means by which his subjects will always and in every possible
condition of things have need of his government, and then they will always be faithful
to him.
-Niccolo Machiavelli
The smallest bone in the human body is the stapes or stirrup bone located in the mid-
dle ear. It is approximately 1/10 of an inch long. Shaped like a stirrup on a saddle, it
transmits sound vibrations through the hearing system.














ii S. 7h I =e. 'Wau hi" II ', F 3 8


'! ,L


I


I

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k






January 31, 2013, The Herald-Advocate 3A


Wauchula Keeps Busy ULTI-ETHNICEVENT


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Wauchula accomplished a lot
in the past fiscal year and has
already begun completing some
of the projects it started last
year.
"As with past years, our hard-
working and dedicated employ-
ees have stepped up to help face
multiple challenges as a united
team," said city manager Terry
Atchley in completing his first
year at the helm of the city.
With the support and active
participation of the commis-
sion, the city looks to enhance
the quality of life, pave the way
for a prosperous future and pro-
mote 'diversity in economic
development and physical
changes in the city and make it
"a great place to live and work."
Members of the City Com-
mission are Patti Detwiler,
Russell Smith, Ken Lambert,
Gary Smith, Dr. Peter Preston,
Mayor pro-tem John Freeman
and Mayor Keith Nadaskay.
Key city staff includes Atchley;
Olivia Minshew, assistant city
manager/director of community
development; Holly Smith, city
clerk; James Braddock, finance
director; Ray McClellan, super-
intendent of public works;
Jessica Newman, CRA and
Main Street director; Thomas
Harris, police captain; former
attorney Cliff Ables; and new
attorney Tom Cloud.
The 16-page annual report
covers the period from Oct. 1,
2011 through Sept. 30, 2012
and is broken down to include
Atchley's cover letter and each
of the departments.
Several of the projects started
last year continue. For instance,
installation of remote-read elec-
trical meters and construction
of the East Bay Street sidewalk
were nearly completed. New
supplies make it possible to
repair or replace 24 non-work-
ing city fire hydrants.
The updated geographic in-
formation system (GIS) allows
the city to map its utility sys-
tems (water, sewer, electricity)
and add the city cemetery. The
city now knows where every
water, sewer and electric line is
without depending on only a
few people who may be aware
of it. Also, much of the city's
data is automatically updated
,daily and is sent to backup
servers and a disaster recovery
location, with enhanced securi-
ty of all information.
In the last fiscal year, Clerk
Holly Smith and assistant
Victoria Thompson began the
massive job of reviewing
mountains of records and
destructing 'those no longer
needed. By the end of the fiscal


year, that amounted to 235
cubic feet, 12,980 pounds and
3,776 gallons of materials
cleaned up and out. When they
finish, the city's Records
Retention Room will be thor-
oughly organized and electronic
filing of the needed data will
begin.
Smith completed her certified
municipal clerk certificate and
Thompson joined the Florida
Association of Clerks. Between
them they attend all city meet-
ings and transcribe minutes and
prepared documentation to go
with the commission packets.
Keeping track of the city's
budget, revenue and expendi-
tures is a big job, last year in the
$18 million range. This entails
keeping all funds separate,
whether utilities, pensions, air-
port or general funds and ensur-
ing there is enough money in
,each to do the jobs needed and
pay the personnel in those
department. After a dip during
the worst of the recession, the
city's general employee and
police employee pension funds
are recovered and well balanced
and able to meet the coverage
and benefits of the "baby-
boom" retirees.
The city's personnel depart-
ment, called human resources,
worked on the successful con-
version of the health insurance
program, making sure premi-
ums for payroll deductions,
family insurance, workman's
compensation claims, salary
changes, etc. were accurately
kept. That department also
arranged safety and health
training, updated personal rules
and regulations and a new safe-.
ty manual.
Refinancing of the city's util-
ity revenue bonds saved the city
$1.9 million in long-term debt.
On all debts, the city reduced its
responsibility to just over $6
million, with loans for vehicles,
building, t-hangar construction,
electric substation and other
renovations..
The city's population grew
from 4,568 to just over 5,000 in
the decade ending with the
2012 census. Considering it, the
commission held the line and
did not increase ad valorem or
property taxes.
A change from Tampa Elec-
tric Co. to Florida Power &
Light for bulk electrical service
saved residents 15 percent on
their utility bills. Wauchula
remains in the lowest third in
the state in comparison with 32
other municipal electric servic-
es. Installation of remote-read
electrical meters for all residen-
tial and commercial customers
gives greater accuracy in col-
lecting meter readings and less


complaints of billing problems.
The city's public works de-
partment responded to over 300
service requests, repairing
leaks, replacing meters, in-
stalling new water taps and
meter boxes, unstopping sewer
and water lines, and demolish-
ing three dilapidated structure
obtained under code enforce-
ment liens.
Lightning and other storms
caused replacement of 20 pole-
mount transformers and a three-
phase pad-mount transformer.
The line crew responded to 123
work tickets for all kinds of out-
age problems, also fixing 35
street lights, eight traffic lights,
six crosswalk lights and seven
walkway lights. In addition, the
electrical department cut four-
and-one-half miles of right of
way and cut down 90 trees of
all sizes, most of them interfer-
ing with electrical service in
some way.
There were similar work
loads at the water and waste-
water treatment plants, where
replacements and upgrades
were frequent, especially on the
digester, generators, lift stations
and pumps.
) The community development
department handled a variety of
annexations, special exceptions;
and Comprehensive Land Use
Plan changes. There were 250
code enforcement cases opened
and 223 closed during the year,
with fines of $9,662.76, five
liens and two foreclosures.
There were over 50 construc-
tion permits as well as sign and
fence permits. Work on re-
design of the city's website was
begun.
The police department
worked 7,955 complaints in the
fiscal year ending Sept. 30.
These resulted in 1,890 cita-
tions, 19 DUI, 656 misde-
meanor and 174 felony arrests.
Officers and supervisors partic-
ipated in about 20 different
training events, from use of
firearms and tasers to bicycle
safety and public records man-
agement. The staff participated
in more than a dozen communi-
ty affairs in support of youth
and older residents as well as 30
crime prevention activities.
The Community Develop-
ment Agency (CRA) and Main
Street Wauchula had a variety
of activities from awarding,res-
idential, commercial ,,and
Brownfield contamination eval-
uation grants to planning and
construction for the historic
train depot, the Main Street,
city and American Legion park-
ing lots to a host of marketing
and revitalization activities
including monthly Friday Night
Live events.


This may come as a pleasant
surprise: The nation's solid
waste and recycling industry-
the same companies that pick
up household trash and haul it
away may'also be lighting
and heating your home.
That's because they're turning
garbage into "green energy."
Here's How
Trash decomposes and pro-
duces gases such as methane.
Innovative technology devel-
oped by solid waste manage-
ment companies captures the
gas and pipes it to utilities,
where it's turned into electricity
or transported -directly to manu-
facturing plants, schools or
other buildings and used to
power heating and cooling sys-
tems. The entire process is care-
fully managed to prevent leaks
or odors.
Through this process, the
.solid waste industry provides
clean, low-cost, renewable en-
ergy to 1.8 million homes a
year. Landfill energy projects
save hundreds of thousands of
dollars per year for schools and


government agencies-including
* NASA, which uses landfill-gas
energy to heat buildings at the
Goddard Space Flight Center in
Maryland; and the University of
New Hampshire, which uses a
pipeline from a neighboring
landfill to provide the school
with as much as 80 percent of
its energy. Big companies such
as Honeywell and Dell also
save millions of dollars by
using power generated from
landfill gas for offices and man-
ufacturing sites.
What's more, lots of trash that
doesn't get landfilled instead
gets converted directly to ener-
gy at waste-to-energy plants,
which produce enough addi-
tional electricity to power 1.6
million homes. In fact, waste-
based energy from trash and
biomass produces more of
America's renewable energy
than any other source.
Many Benefits
Waste-based energy saves
money and helps advance
national security by reducing
reliance on foreign oil.


Plus, according to the En-
vironmental Protection Agency,
waste-based energy projects
save more than hundreds of
millions of barrels of oil a year
- the equivalent of eliminating
air pollution from nearly 20
million cars.
"People will be surprised
when they learn about our
industry's role in producing
affordable 'green energy' and
helping to reduce our depend-
ence, on foreign oil," says
Sharon H. Kneiss, president and
CEO of the National Solid
Wastes Management Associa-
tion.
"This is a truly significant
environmental achievement. It
makes us feel very proud of our
people and the commitment of
the thousands of companies,
large and small, that make up
our industry."
Learn More
Further facts are. at
www.environmentalistsevery-
day.org.


The stegosaurus was a large, plant-eating dinosaur that lived about 150 million years
ago in what is now the western United States. It had two rows of bony plates shaped
like huge arrowheads sticking out of its back.


COURTESY PHOTO
A registration booth will be set up at Main Street Heritage Park in downtown Wauchula
on Saturday, Feb. 9, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. for children 4-18 who would like to partici-
pate in the Tri-County Area Magnolia Manor Co-Ed Pageant. Welcome are boys and
girls of all ethnicities from Hardee, DeSoto, Highlands and Polk counties. Final appli-
cation deadline will be Feb. 15, with rehearsals starting Feb. 16 at Wauchula City Hall.
The second annual pageant will be held on Saturday, Feb. 23, in Wauchula. Here (from
left), pageant director Kenuated Clarke talks with prospective contestants Ashely Faulk
and Alizebeth Pace during an orientation at the park last week. For more information,
call her at (863) 521-1410, Sharica Jackson at 245-8666 or LaRosha McLeod at 781-
2450.



From Garbage Can To Power Grid


Financial Fraudsters

Exploit Relationships


From your family to your
social networks, the people
around you often have the most
influence on your life. But
according to experts, fraud
artists can also use those bonds
to convince you to invest in a
scam.
"This tactic is called affinity
fraud, and it is one of the most
common types of investor
fraud, because it exploits the
bonds you share with others:"
said Gerri Walsh, president of
the FINRA Investor Education
Foundation. "A fraudster will
create a common bond strongly
shared with community mem-
bers like in a church or the
military-and then use this bond
to take advantage of their trust.
luring multiple investors in the
community."
Worst-Case Example
One of the worst cases of
affinity fraud in recent history
is the case of the "Three
Hebrew Boys." These three
scam artists used an angle of
faith and camaraderie to target
church groups and military
service members. Ultimately.
they conned their victims out of
$82 million.
The Hebrew Boys created
relationships with high-ranking
military officials, who were
then used as salespeople to sign
on their subordinates like
Joyce Adams, a retired Navy
officer who lost almost $40,000
to the scam.
SAdams assumed the officials


had already done their research
on the investment and did not
hesitate to invest because the
bond with other military per-
sonnel gave her "a sense -of
trust."
Like many fraud experts,
Walsh warns investors that just
because everyone else is doing
something, it doesn't mean it's
okay. When it comes to
finances, you should take more
than trust into consideration.
Helpful Tips
Walsh suggests that you fol-
low these simple steps when
considering an investment
proposition:
Ask questions and
expect answers. Even if the
person who first told you about
the investment is a friend, there
may be others involved who are
not. Ask the seller if he/she is
licensed and if the investment is
registered.
Double-check. Verify that
the seller is licensed and the
investment is registered at
www.SaveAndlnvest.org/Learn
More.
End the conversation.
Practice saying "no." Even if
you trust the seller, give your-
self -time to think about the
investment. Take steps to make
sure your money is in safe
hands.
For more tips on spotting
investment fraud and protecting
yourself, visit www.SaveAnd-
Invest.org/LearnMore.


Your Business Could Appear Here!

Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels
At The Herald Advocate


D


C:






4 A The Herald-Advocate, January 31, 2013


91 qotng &/memo/n
MOISES CORONA
GODINEZ
Moises Corona Godinez,
51, of Bowling Green, passed
away on Friday, Jan. 25, 2013,
at Florida Hospital Sebring.
Born on Oct. 22, 1961, in
Mexico, he came to Hardee
County 10 years ago from
Pennsylvania.
He worked maintenance at
McDonald's restaurant and
was a member of St. Michael
Catholic Church.
Survivors include his wife,
Maria DeLourdes, of Bowling
Green; two sons, Moises
Corona of Arcadia and Miguel
Corona of Wauchula; two
daughters, Maria Luria of Ft.
Meade and Ana Liset Corona
of Bowling Green; two
daughters-in-law, Adilene
Corona and Patricia Garcia;
one son-in-law, Manolo Luria;
and three grandchildren.
Expressions of comfort may
be made at robartsfh.com.


FUNERAL HOME
WAUCHULA






At Lou0 g 'enoi/mOty
MERLE URED"
HENDERSON
Merle "Red" Henderson,
73, of Wauchula, passed away
on Monday, Jan. 28, 2013, at
Good Shepherd Hospice in
Sebring.
He was born Sept.. 13,
1939, in Wauchula and was a
lifelong resident of Wauchula.
He was in the U.S. Army and
was co-owner of Henderson
Tire.
He was preceded in death
by his parents, Phillip and
Myrtle Hen4erson and three
brothers, the Rev. Albert
Bergens, James T. Bergens
and Phillip J. Henderson.
Survivors include his wife,
Helen Henderson of
Wauchula; one son, ,Scott
Henderson of Lutz; one
daughter, Dena Henderson of
North Port; one sister, Louise
Baucom of Wauchula; and
several nieces and nephews..
Visitation will be on
Friday, Febl 1, from 6 to 8
p.m. at Robarts Garden
Chapel. Graveside services
and interment will be on
Saturday, Feb. 2, at 10:30. a.m.
at Wauchula Cemetery.
Expressions of comfort may
be made at robartsfh.com.


FUNERAL HOME
WAUCHULA

ywf


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Hardee junior varsity
girls hoop team had mixed
results in their final four games.
The girls ended the 2012-13
season with a pair of wins f61-
lowed by a pair of losses. Their
overall record was 9-5.
Playing under Coach Andy
Maddox were junior Aundra
Pace, sophs Jakaysha Lindsey,
Catherine "Cat" Jackson, Alexi
Santana, Hailey Williams and
Makayla Faulk, along with
freshmen Brooke Faulk,
Annabel Retana and Desira
Martinez. Santana, Retana and
the Faulk sisters moved up to


9 ^'ouiO g Melno/g













FLOYD WAYNE
ABBEY
Floyd Wayne Abbey, 73, of
Wauchula, passed away on
Sunday, Jan. 27, 2013, at his
home.
Born on Nov. 30, 1939, in
Houston, Texas, he has been a
resident of Hardee County for
45 years.
He was a mechanic with
Chapman Fruit Company for
43 years and a member of My
New Life In Christ Church.
Survivors include his wife,
Dorothy Abbey, of Wauchula;
three daughters, Starr Richey
of Bowling Green, Pamela
Dillon of Tampa and Patty
Hensley of Fort Meade; one
son, Scott Nutter of Fort
Meade; and several grandchil-
dren and great-grandchildren.
Visitation was Tuesday,
Jan. 29, from 6 to 8 p.m. at
Robarts Garden Chapel.
Funeral services were on
Wednesday, Jan. 30, at 10
a.m. in the Chapel with Matt
Dillon officiating. Interment
was in Bowling Green
Ceme ei y- -7-.. ;:-- -',,
In mieu-of flowers, memori-
als may be made to Comrner-
stone Hospice, 2590 Haven-
dale Blvd., Winter Haven, FL
33881.
Expressions of comfort may
be made at robartsfh.com.


FUNERAL HOME
WAUCHULA


play with the varsity during the
post-season playoffs.
Backtracking to the Jan. 15
home game against Teneroc,
Hardee fashioned a 40-9 win
over the junior Lady Titans.
Martinez had the hot hand,
scoring five deuces and adding
a fourth-quarter-trey to finish-
with 13 points. Pace added
eight points, Jackson a half
dozen, Santana five, and
Williams and Lindsey each four


points.
The Jan. 17 home game
against Fort Meade was a varsi-
ty-only night. The JV's next
game was on Jan. 18 against
Frostproof, a 46-9 win. It was a
total team effort, with Lindsey
putting up nine points, and
Santana and Retana with eight
apiece. Martinez had seven,
while Makayla Faulk and Wil-
liams each had six, and Brooke
Faulk added a deuce.


Letter To The Editor

Country Club Lounge

Prayers For Morris Family


Dear Editor:
I, Sheila Kuyrkendall, and the
employee's here at the Bowling
Green Country Club would like
to send our condolences and
prayers out to the family and
friends of a beloved patron.
Kelvin Lee Morris, age 43,
passed away January 11, 2013.
He was loved here by many.
The Polk Sheriff's Office
continues to investigate his.
death, and we are not at liberty
to go into detail on this matter.
The Country Club would like to
note that there was "NO" dis-
turbance of any kind between
Mr. Kelvin Lee Morris and
other patrons of the bar prior to
closing the night of the incident.
The only thing I will state at
this time is that the Bowling
Green Country Club's bartender


Obituaries

EDWIN "ED" DONALD
CHANCE, SR.
Edwin "Ed" Donald Chan-
cey, Sr., 73, of Wauchula, died
on Sunday, Jan. 20, 2013, at
Somers Hospice House in
Sebring.
Born on May 28, 1939, in
Hendry County, owned citrus
and cattle and was a construc-
tion manager.
He was preceded in death by
his parents, Marcus and Louise
Chancey, and four infant sib-
lings, Estell, Earl,. Charles and
one.unnamed infant.
-.Survivors include one son,
Donald Chancey and wife
Adela; one brother, Leonard
Chancey and wife Geraldine;
three sisters, Lena Collins,
Betty Jo Brosky and husband
Jim and Linda Swilley and hus-
band Wayne; and three grand-
children, Ciara Chancey,
Marcus Chancey and Marissa
Chancey.
A memorial service will be
announced at a later date.
Arrangements made by Gen-
try-Morrison Funeral Homes.


had already closed and was
unaware of any disturbance in
the parking lot until another
patron and co-worker of Mr.
Morris alerted her to call for
help and she attempted CPR on
Mr. Kelvin Morris.
The Polk County Sheriff's
Office continues to work the
case, and we trust that they will
bring justice if warranted in this
matter for his friends and fami-
ly. The Bowling Green Club's
employee is working with
PCSO in any way possible with
the investigation.
The Bowling Green Country
Club and employees do every-
thing within our means to
ensure that our employees and
our patrons feel safe and com-
fortable while in our bar. The
Bowling Green Country Club is
a place that we want our cus-
tomers and friends to come and
relax and enjoy the company of
family, friends, co-workers, and
other patrons and have a great
time.
The PCSO is continuing to
investigate this case, and it
remains open and ongoing. We
believe that they will be thor-
ough and delicate in this matter
and the family and friends will
have the closure that they need
after the investigation is con-
cluded.
Sheila Kuyrkendall
Country Club Liquor
& Lounge
Bowling Green


JV Girls Split Final Games


The Lady 'Cat JV didn't play
on Jan. 22, a varsity-only clash
with Walker Academy. Next up
was a trip to Lake Placid on Jan.
24, with Hardee coming up
short in the 38-23 final tally.
Brooke Faulk was high for
Hardee with 10 points, close to
the 13 of Reilly and game-high
15 of Nyasha for Lake Placid.
Faulk was the only Hardee
player in double digits. Jackson
and Retana each finished with
three points, while Makayla
Faulk and Pace each had two
and Santana hit on one-of-two
free throws.
The JV finale was in the last
scheduled night of the season,


THANK You


The Town of Zolfo's Relay for Life Team
would like to send a special THANK YOU
to Mr. Gerald Shackelford & Deputy Sylvia
Hendrickson for helping us with our Send
your Boss to Jail Day! We appreciate
everything you did to help us! Also to
everyone who had your boss arrested & to
all of our jailers. We thank you, because of
you all we passed our goal.
soci:31c





SUTTON MONUMENTS



Locally Owned and Operated



Relocated To Better

Serve Our Community"

Now located just north of Wauchula Cemetery
Beside Heartland Gold Across from Sweetbay

SCall today to schedule your appointment.

863-245-7449
1102 S. 6th Avenue Wauchula 1:31i


Our Family Serving Your Family!:.






40
ii1




FrI. 1925
BRYANT L. COKER


Arcadia Chapel
50 N. Hillsborough Ave.
Arcadia, FL 34266
PHI. (863) 494-4101


Wauchula Chapel
404 West Palmetto Street
Wauchula, Florida 33873
P11. (863) 773-6400


Locally Owned and Operated by

Licensed Funeral Directors



Funeral Directors
Edward R. Ponger, LFD, Owner -FDIC Arcadia
Allyson Ponger Karnes, LFD, Owner -FDIC Wauchula
Delmos L. Newsome, LFD Location MNanager-Arcadia
Floyd 0. Rice, Jr., LFD Location NManager-Wauchula
Christi A. Gill, LFD


Office Managers
Joyce Lyle- Arcadia
Ginger Rice Wauchula

Funeral Associates
Robert Hiene Jacquelyn Leavell Ray Baucom
Steie Griffin Bill Nickelwarth Roy Jaquez, Jr. George Wilson -
Bobby Brown Clark Pearson



www.PongerKaysGrady.com
1 31C


on Jan. 25, at Sebring, where
Hardee seemingly could do lit-
tle right in the 40-19 loss.
Retana topped Hardee with
eight points, while Makayla
Faulk had five, and Jackson,
Santana and Brooke Faulk each
two points.


During the ancient 12-day
Christmas celebration, the
log burned was called the
"Yule log." Sometimes, a
piece of the Yule log would
be kept to kindle the fire the
following winter, to ensure
that the good luck carried
on from year to year.


11




January 31, 2013, The Herald-Advocate 5A


Town Hosts 'Jailbirds' In Cancer Fund Raiser


PHOTOS BY TRAYCE DANIELS
Evelyn Frazier, from the Hardee County School Board's
Transportation Department, was surprised to learn she
was being charged with "falsifying documents." She,
along with the other jailbirds at the Town of Zolfo Springs
fund raiser last Thursday, had her mugshot taken after
being fingerprinted.


1 II


Melanie Henderson, principal at Zolfo Springs Elementary,
.as also arrested that day, for impersonating an elf. When
Irpturning to her schq opfter being released from jail; she
nd Pohl were surprised to see "Wanted" flyers with their
faces on them had been posted around the school.


Law enforcement officers were not spared as the "culprits
for the day" were dragged to jail. Lt. Rosie Wendell of the
Hardee County Sheriff's Office was brought to booking
and charged with "over-age drinking."
1 !


Karen Walker, also of the Transportation Department, Not even school administrators were safe from being ar-
ended up in the slammer with her unborn child after Matt' rested as the town's Relay For Life team raised money to
Scott, the "suspect" who originally was supposed to be fight cancer. Here, Zolfo Springs Elementary Assistant
"arrested," threw her under the bus. Scott is a bus routing Principal Tammy Pohl was arrested for impersonating a
specialist for the Transportation Department. nun.


Bubba Bass,swho works toW the town of Zolfo Springs, had
ari unusual Way of paying' iis bond. He was released with
the promise of returning with three pecan pies.


Dep. Sylvia Hendrickson brings in "suspect" Roy Car-
ranco, who works at Carranco & Son Tires & Mufflers, after
"arresting" him for "dealing in stolen property."


'II


Li


The county's David Spencer went in front of the "judge," Town Manager Linda Roberson,
and bailiff Janie Ayala to find out what his bond was.


Jack Logan, of Hardee County's Purchasing Department,
is seen here beginning the process of being booked into
the makeshift "jail" by getting his fingerprints taken.


Bill Lambert, executive director of the Industrial Develop-
ment Authority, was just one of the people who helped the
town raise over $1,000 for Relay For Life. Each "suspect"
was picked up at his place of work, taken to "Town Jail,"
fingerprinted, dressed in jailbird stripes, photographed,
and given an appearance before the judge to learn what
bail amount would win his release. Despite the good
laughs and bag of goodies provided to each, all were anx-
ious to win their freedom and contribute to the cause!


EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY


FAIR HOUSING / EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
It is illegal to discriminate based on race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age,
disability, or familial status when renting, selling or financing a home or property.
The City of Bowling Green is a Fair Housing Advocate as explained in the City's Fair Hous-
ing Ordinance which outlines steps that can be taken locally to report housing discrimina-
tion.
A copy of this ordinance can be obtained at the Bowling Green City Hall. Additional infor-
mation on Fair Housing arid Fair Housing Law can be obtained by contacting the Housing
Discrimination Hotline at 1-800-669-9777 (Voice) 1-800-927-9275 (TTY) or online at
http://www.hud.gov/offices/fheo/index.cfm
You Have Rights!! If you feel you have been discriminated against when buying or renting
a home please contact the City of Bowling Green's City Manager at (863) 375-2255.
1:31


L-


SI1. 19)114


'^/


TO W ('()IN(






6A The Herald-Advocate, January 31, 2013


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The season's over and Hardee
is playing this week in Class
5A, District 10 playoffs at
Teneroc.
The Lady 'Cats tackled Ten-
eroc on its court on Tuesday
night, but results were unavail-
able by press time.
Hardee, with a 2-4 district
record is seeded third for the
tournament, playing against
second-seeded Teneroc, with its
4-2 district record. Lake Wales
was top-seed with its 6-0 dis-
trict record and played Au-
burndale with an 0-6 district
record on Monday night. Lake
Wales cruised to a 73-6 victory
and awaits the winner of the
Hardee-Teneroc matchup for
the district championship game
on Friday night at 7.
JV players Makayla Faulk,
Alexi Santana, Annabel Retana
and Brooke Faulk have moved
.up to assist the varsity which
often faces difficulty without a
deep bench. The JV girls join


varsity seniors Robin Tanksley,
Stephanie Perez and Adna
Metayer, juniors Bailey Carl-
ton, Alyssa Casso and Carleigh
Coleman, sophs Allison Smith
and Destiny Thompson and
freshman Florence Lee.
Backtracking over the last
two weeks of competition,
Hardee hosted Teneroc, on Jan.
15. As in recent games, Hardee
seriously narrowed the gap
between its first game against
Teneroc, a 21-55 loss on Dec.
14. Hardee lost this game 42-
33, not able to contain Emerald
Bell and her 24 points for the
Lady Titans.
For Hardee, a furious 17-
point fourth-quarter rally cut
seven points off the Teneroc
advantage. Carlton paced Har-
dee with 14 points and Tanksley.
added 11 to put two Lady Wild-
cats in double digits. Perez,
Casso and Lee each added two
points.
On Jan. 17, Hardee gave
good effort against visiting Fort
Meade in a varsity-only game.


4w


Lady 'Cats In District Action


After losing 51-33 at Fort
Meade on Dec. 17, Hardee
showed its improvement in a
39-38 loss, which could easily
have been a victory. The Lady
'Cats were down one point at
halftime, three at the end of the
third period and almost claimed
the win.
Tanksley had one of the best
nights in her career with 22
points on nine deuces and four-
of-five from the charity stripe.
Carlton added eight points,
Casso five and Smith a deuce.
Hardee hosted Frostproof for
the Jan. 18 Senior Night honor-
ing Tanksley, Perez and Met-
,ayer. Hardee had won 29-28 at
Frostproof earlier in the season
and dominated this game
behind Tanksley's senior ef-
forts. Winning 39-13, Hardee
was able to clear the bench and
get everyone in the action.
Carlton led all players with
11 points, while Casso and
Tanksley each had nine.


Thompson had six and Lee four
points.
Hardee started a trio of road
cames with a Jan. 22 varsity-
only trip to play Walker
Academy. The Nov. 13 game
at Hardee ended with a 36-30
loss. This game was closer, as
Hardee narrowed the gap to 45-
42.







MONDAY, FEB. 4
VWauchula City Com-
mission, planning session,
City Hall, 225 E. Main St.,
Wauchula, 5 p.m.

THURSDAY, FEB. 7
VHardee County Com-
mission, monthly morning
meeting, Room 102, Court-
house Annex I, 412 W.
Orange St., Wauchula, 8:30
a.m.


PHOTO BY MARIA TRUJILLO
The senior trio leading Hardee into the district playoffs
are (from left) Adna Metayer, Stephanie Perez and Robin
Tanksley.


PUBLIC NOTICE
You are hereby notified that on
Thursday, March 7, 2013, at 9:00 a.m., the
Hardee County Board of County.
Commissioners
will hold a public bearing for the adoption of a
Resolution vacating and closing the road/easement
known as

Simtrobar Rd., Oil Well Rd., Prairie Rd. and Paul Rd.

being legally described as: The maintained right of way of
Simtrobar Road in it's entirety lying in Sections 7 and 18,
Township 33 S, Range 26 E, Hardee County, Florida, as
recorded in Plat Book 4, Page 105, also known as Plat Bar
82, Cabinet A of the official Public Records of Hardee
County, Florida
and
The maintained right of way of Oil Well Road in it's entirety
lying in Section 26, Township 35 S, Range 23 E, Hardee
County, Florida, as recorded in Plat Book 4, Page 105, also
known as Plat Bar 82, Cabinet A of the official Public
Records of Hardee County, Florida
and
The maintained right of way of Prairie Road in it's entirety
lying in Sections 26 and 27, Township 35 S, Range 23 E,
Hardee County, Florida, as recorded in Plat Book 4, Page
105, also known as Plat Bar 82, Cabinet A of the official
Public Records of Hardee County, Florida
and
The maintained right of way of Paul Road in it's entirety
lying in Section 26 Township 35 S, Range 23 E, Hardee
County, Florida, as recorded in Plat Book 4, Page 105, also
known as Plat Bar 82, Cabinet A of the official Pubic
Records of Hardee County, Florida

The public hearing will be held in the Hardee County Board
of County Commissioners Board Room, 412 West Orange
Street, Room 102, Wauchula, Florida.

This procedure shall be in accordance with the provisions
of Section 336, Florida Statutes.
A petition for the closing and vacating, of the above-refer-
enced shall be considered by the Board of County Com-
missioners after required publication of this Notice. Copies
,of the documents relating to this proposal are available for
public inspection during weekdays between the hours of
.8:30 A.M. and 3:00 P.M. in the Hardee County Public
Works Department, 205 Hanchey Road, Wauchula, Florida.
This is a Disabled-Accessible facility. Any disabled person
needing to make special arrangements should contact the
Board of County Commissioners' office at least five (5) days
prior to the public hearing.
All persons are invited to attend and be heard. Although
minutes of the Public Hearing will be recorded, anyone
wishing to appeal any decision made at the public hearing
will need to ensure a verbatim record of the proceedings
is made by a court reporter.
Sue Birge, Chairperson, Board of County Commissioners
1:31c


UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT

Director Holly Newman

We serve ages 6 weeks to 5th grade, .. .
VPK, after school & School Readiness.

We help children with homework, reading/A.R., and activities.

We also offer a Summer Program which includes .
educational field trips, hands on activities, and


other educational opportunities.
Parent involvement is encouraged!


Now Accepting New Enrollment

Limited Spots Available


Pick Up From:

North Wauchula, Wauchula & Hilltop Elem.


Schools


S 2915 SCHOOLHOUSE RD ZOLFO SPRINGS


ai 735-8586 Lic. C10HA0516
Isaiah 54:13 All your children shall be taught by the LORD, and great shall be the peace of your children.


Carlton was nearly unstop-
pable with her 20 points on
eight deuces and a perfect four-
-for-four at the foul line. Casso
chipped in with 11 points,
Smith had a half dozen, Lee two
and Tanksley just one-of-two at
the free throw line as the
defense collapsed on her.
The final two games of the
season, both on the road, were
an exercise in frustration for
coaches Jeanne Myrie and Rod
Smith.
Hardee lost 26-54 at Lake
Placid on Jan. 24. Carlton sank
a half dozen deuces, with Smith
getting four points, Tanksley
three, and Casso, Lee and
Metayer each two points.
It was nearly the same in the
season finale at Sebring on Jan.
25, a 49-14 loss.
Carlton had five points,
Tanksley four, Smith three and
Casso two points.

They change their climate,
not their soul, who rush
across the sea.
-Horace


I *


Rotary Club
Seeks Vets
The Hardee County Rotary
Club is seeking World War II
veterans interested in going
on an all-expense paid
Honor Flight to see their
respective war memorials in
Washington, D.C.
The trip will be sometime
in May. Prospective veterans
or anyone that knows an
interested veteran should
call Rotarian Sue Birge to be
included. Her cell phone
number is 863-781-3536.


No one realizes how beauti-
ful it is to travel until he
comes home and rests his
head on his old, familiar pil-
low.
-Lin Yutang






January 31, 2013, The Herald-Advocate 7A


COUNTY COURT
There were no marriage
licenses issued last week in the
office of the county court:

The following small claims
cases were disposed of recent-
Jy by the county judge:-
Midland Funding LLC vs.
Rachel Cook, judgment.
Citibank vs. Shelly P.
Massey, voluntary dismissal.
Midland Funding LLC vs.
Willis R. Smith Jr., judgment.
Dell Financial Services vs.
Michelle L. McCreery, judg-
ment.
Bureaus Investment Group
vs. Jessica K. Gray, consent
judgment.

There was no misdemeanor
court last week as it was trial
week. The following case was
settled.
Tyler Lee Richardson, pos-
session of marijuana, adjudica-
tion withheld, $325 fine and
court costs, $50 cost of prosecu-
tion.
CIRCUIT COURT
The following civil actions
were filed recently in the
office of the circuit court:
Elizabeth Colon and the state
Department of Revenue (DOR)
vs. Jose A Bermudez, petition
for child support.
Lichelle Nicole Griffis and
Billy Joe Griffis, divorce.
Wauchula State Bank vs.
Darrell Ellis, Pamela J. Ellis et
al, petition for mortgage fore-
closure.
Gloria Perla Hernandez and
DOR vs. Jaime Vidaurri, peti-
tion for child support.
Cheryl Treadway vs. Ethan
Nickerson, petition for injunc-
tion for protection.
Wauchula State Bank vs.
Darrell Ellis, petition for mort-
gage foreclosure.
Randall Solner and Cath-
erine D. Parr, divorce.
Wells Fargo Bank vs. John
Hogue, Janai Morales Hogue, et
al, petition for mortgage fore-
closure.
Bobbie Jayne Pleger and
Jonathan Howard Pleger, di-
vorce. -

The following decisions on
civil cases pending in the cir-
cuit court were handed down
,recently by the circuit court
judgo:. "- --
April Reri'ee Weem' and
DOR vs. Matthew A. DeWolfe,
order on child support con-
tempt.
Wells Fargo Bank vs.
Deborah K. Douglas et al, vol-
untary dismissal.
Charlie Joe Ray III vs. Kevin
Dwaine Ray, injunction for pro-


tection.
Darius Saldivar vs. Brooklyn
Porter, petition for injunction
for protection denied.
Clarence C. Taylor and
Angela C. Taylor, divorce.
Landon Douglas Cassell and
Miranda Nicole Smith, order.
Sarah Cisneros vs. Adrian
Rios, dismissal of injunction for
protection.
Robert L. Mushrush III and
Erica Alvarez, order.
Adel Marie Travis Towns
and James Patrick Towns,
divorce.
Citigroup Global Markets
Realty Inc. vs. Sandra K. Craig,
judgment of mortgage foreclo-
sure.
Stacy M. Mendoza and DOR
vs. Gilbert J. Garcia, order on
child support contempt.
Rachel Suazo and DOR vs.
John Cisneros, order on child
support contempt.
Christina M. Smith and DOR
vs. Reynaldo Olvera, order on
child support contempt.
Tomasa Selph and Timothy
M. Selph, order on child sup-
port contempt.
Kimberly Hernandez vs.
James Black, order.
Carolina M. Luna and DOR
vs. Santos Luna, order on child
support contempt.
Patrice Baker and DOR vs.
Aaron Markeeia Cook, order on
child support contempt.
Cynthia Marie Deanda
Gavigan and DOR vs.
Christopher Brent Saldivar,
order on child support con-
tempt.
Vanessa Guadalupe Gon-
zalez and Jose Humberto
Gonzalez Jr., order on child
support contempt.
Romell C. Parks and DOR
vs. Stephanie Lynell Richard-
son, order on child support con-
tempt.
Leigh A. Trammell and DOR
vs. Kevin W. Bartel, order on
child support contempt.
Catherine Marie Pelham and
DOR vs. Jesus Alamia Rod-
riguez, order on child support
contempt.
Conlar vs. Stephone D.
Carlton, Patricia S. Carlton et
al, voluntary dismissal.

Court-ordered certificates
of child support delinquency
were filed recently in the
office of the circuit court clerk
I'ni the following cases:
Carolina Maldonado vs.
Ricky Trevino.
Katherine S. Esquivel vs.
Cristina N. Kersey.
Blanca Ordonez vs. Cirilo
Perez.
Autney L. Hyder vs. Kenneth
L. Dick. /
'Alicia Esquivel vs. Jose A.


Esquivel.
Annabel M. Luna vs. Tocory
N. Daniels.
Amy C. Evans vs. Ricky L.
Gillis.
Carolyn Heredia vs. Greg 0.
Trevino.
Anita Thomas vs. Amado
Garcia Jr.
Marcela Melendez vs. Luis
M. Rodriguez.
Florina Delatorre vs. Jaime
Chagoya.
Samantha M. Juarez vs.
Adam D. Alvarado.
Monique S. Pritchard vs.
Joseph K. Pritchard.
Dienatann Darceus vs.
Wendell Parker.
Phuc Than Bach vs. Mai Thi
Tuyet Bach.
Elida Loza vs. Vicente
Chaidez.
Fabiola Perado vs. Amado
Garcia Jr.
Amanda K. Kersey vs.
Martin J. Morales Jr.
Michelle B. Jones and Calvin
L. McLeod.

There was no felony crimi-
nal court last week as it was
trial week. The following
cases were settled.
Tyler Lee Richardson, viola-
tion of probation (original
charge possession of a short
barreled shotgun), probation
-modified to add two years, $150
cost of prosecution added to
outstanding fines and fees.
Brandy Elizabeth Battey,
neglect of a child causing great
bodily harm, probation 10
years, $520 fines and court
costs, $400 cost of prosecution,
$400 investigative costs, $151
crimes against a minor fee,
$120 First Step probation fees;
murder in the second degree,
not prosecuted.

There were no real estate
transactions of $10,000 or
more filed recently in the
office of the clerk of court.


ABOUT ...
School News
The Herald-Advocate en-
courages submissions from
Hardee County schools.
Photos and write-ups
should be of recent events,
and must include first and
last names-for both students
and teachers. Identify pho-
tos front to back, left to right.
Deadline for submissions
is 5 p.m. on Thursday.
Please include the ,name
and phone number of a con-
tact person. Qualifying
items will be published as
space allows.


CITY OF WAUCHULA

COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC

in accordance with S. 163.356(3)(c), Florida Statutes, the City of Wauchula CRA has
developed the annual report of its activities for the preceding fiscal year. The Annual
Report and a complete financial statement setting forth assets, liabilities, income,
and operating expenses as of the end of'fiscal year 2012 has been filed with the City
ofWauchula City Clerk, and is available for inspection during business hours in the
office of the Clerk, located at 126 S. 7th Avenue, Wauchula, FL 33873, phone number
863-773-3131. In addition, the report is available for inspection during business hours
in the office of the CRA, located-at 107 E. Main Street, Wauchula, FL 33813, phone
number 863-767-0330 or by visiting www.cityofwauchula.com.

Keith Nadaskay, Chairperson
Jessica Newman, Coordinator
City of Wauchula Community Redevelopment Agency
107 E. Main Street
.Wauchula, FL 33873
863-767-0330 c
1:31c



CITY OF WAUCHULA
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC

The Board of Directors of the City of Wauchula Community Redevelopment
Agency (the Board) will hold a workshop on Monday, February 4, 2013 immediately
following the City Commission workshop which will convene at 5:00 pm or as soon
thereafter as it reasonably can be held. The agenda can. be viewed at www.city-
ofwauchula.com.

The meetings will be held at the Commission Chambers located at 225 East Main
Street, Wauchula, FL 33873.

Pursuant to Section 286.0107, Florida statutes, as amended, the Board hereby advises
that if any interested person decides to appeal any decision made by the Board with re-
spect to any matter considered at the proceedings, he will need a record of the proceeding
and that, for such purposes, he may need to insure that a verbatim record of the proceed-
ing is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is
to be based.
The Board does not discriminate upon the basis of any individual's disability status.
This non-discriminatory policy involves every aspect of the Board's functions, including
ones access to, participation, employment or treatment in its programs or activities. Any-
one requiring reasonable accommodation as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities
Act or Section 286.26, Florida Statutes, should contact the City Clerk at (863) 773-3131.
CITY OF WAUCHULA
S/Keith Nadaskay
Chairman
Community Redevelopment Agency
ATTEST
S/Holly Smith
City Clerk 1:31 c


/ From The Herald-Advocate
Of Thursday, February 3, 2000

Front-Page Headlines:
S152-Acre Park Coming To Peace River
Schools May Add Grades
i BG Bazaar Saturday
Grandfather Faces Fondling Charges


Toenail Fungus?

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Sebring Podiatry Center

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Laser Nail Fungus Treatment kills the fungus that
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CITY OF WAUCHULA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC

The City Commission of the City of Wauchula will hold the regular scheduled
workshop Monday February 4, 2013 at 5:00pm, or as soon thereafter as it reasonably
can be held. The agenda can be viewed at 126 South 7th Avenue or www.city-
ofwauchbulacom.

The meeting will be held at the Commission Chambers located at 225 East Main
Street, Wauchula, FL 33873.
Pursuant to Section 286.0107, Florida Statutes, as amended, the City Commission
hereby advises that if any interested person decides to appeal any decision made by the
City Commission with respect to any matter considered at the proceedings, he will need a
record of the proceeding and that, for such purposes, he may need to insure that a verba-
tim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to be based.-

The City Commission of the City of Wauchula, Florida does not discriminate upon the
basis of any individual's disability status. This non-discriminatory policy involves every as-
pect of the Commission's functions, including ones access to, participation, employment
or treatment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable accommodation
as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26, Florida Statutes,
should contact the City Clerk at (863) 773-3131.
CITY OF WAUCHULA
S/ Richard K. Nadaskay Jr.
Mayor
ATTEST
S/Holly Smith
City Clerk


Courthouse Report


RFflIgs 7frim hePst I





8A The Herald-Advocate, January 31, 2013
LIE MISS PAGEANT


READY READERS
v El '


COURTESY PHOTO
Twenty young ladies are vying for the title of ULF Miss Hardee County 2013 at the Hardee
County Fair. Contestants, in random order, are Kate Melendy, Sidney Steiner, Summer
Bond, Alyssa Irlandi, Isabella Adams, Jerica Pierce, Hallie Poucher, Rachel Garland,
Promise Nichols, Hannah Brown, Taleia Moreno, Savannah Valetutti, Sophia Allen,
Elizabeth Dixon, Hunter Boyette, Jessica Rodriguez, Alyssa Smallwood, Brenda
Castillo, Kyle Shenefield and Stephanie Derringer, all shown with 2012 queen Aubrey
Stark. The Hardee County Fair opens on Saturday, Feb. 16, and runs through Feb. 23.
The Lil' Miss Pageant will be on Friday, Feb. 22.


FWC To Soon Vote On


FIunting
WMAs, to better accommodate
guest hunters.
Other changes would allow a
quota permit holder the flexibil-
ity to take a different guest each
day of a quota hunt. Currently,
the rule allows for only one
guest permit during a quota
hunt.
Another proposed change to
the quota system is that hunters
would receive reinstatement ot
their preference points only if
they electronically returned
their unused quota permit 10
days or more prior to the first
day of their quota hunt.
This would allow such
returned permits to be reissued
to other hunters on a weekly
basis, instead of once a month.
The change would ensure that
more hunters are able to partic-
ipate in the hunts.


A new rule that would expand
hunting opportunities on private
lands and on nearly six million
acres of public wildlife manage-
ment areas will soon be consid-
ered by the Florida Fish & Wild-
life Conservation Commission.
Also in draft stages are sever-
al quota improvements.
The seven-member commis-
sion in December directed staff
to advertise the modified pro-
'posals in the Florida
Administrative Register, for
final consideration at its
February commission meeting.
Such proposals include allow-
ing the use of air guns to take
rabbits and gray squirrels, and
making a slight modification to
the boundary line between hunt-
ing zones C and D, south of
Tallahassee.
"Once again I would like to
congratulate staff on changes


that address how we can make
wildlife management more per-
missible and avoid user con-
flicts," said Chairman Kenneth
Wright. "This is about public
access for public lands."
Two new WMAs in the
Southwest Region of the state
are being proposed for the
2013-14 hunting season. Both
properties are owned by the'
Southwest Florida Water
Management District and
would offer a suite of hunting
and other outdoor recreational
opportunities.
Lower Hillsborough WMA in
Hillsborough County is 2,775
acres, and Weekiwachee WMA
is a 2,850-acre tract within
Hernando County.
Approved draft changes to
the quota system would adjust
the bag limit on deer and spring
turkey quota hunts on 39


/ COURTESY PHOTO
Fifth graders Rosa Guerrero, Savannah Valletutti and Christina Lopez-Rojas (left to
right) hammed it up a bit as they became the first North Wauchula Elementary School
students to have read all 15 of the Sunshine State Young Reader Award books. The
feat is sure to get them ready for the Battle of the Books team tryouts coming up this
month.


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New Boosts To









Mosaic Unveils Streamsong Resort


By MICHAEL KELLY
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Mosaic Company offi-
cially -opened its two world-
class golf courses Saturday on
16,000 acres of formerly mined
land just north of Fort Green in
southern Polk County.
Both 18-hole courses the
Blue course designed by world-
renowned architects
Renaissance Golf Design (Tom
Doak) and Streamsong Red by
Ben Crenshaw and Bill Coore -
are unlike any other courses in
the world.
The property was minded
mostly in the 1960s and 1970s,
before reclamation was made
mandatory by the state.
The land was left in that state
for decades and features major
elevation changes, rolling ter-,


rain, large lakes and tall sand
dunes all across the property,
which looks absolutely nothing
like Florida.
Going along with the natural
setting, the courses feature dirt
cart paths. Cut pieces of the old
train tracks that hauled phos-
phate off the property many
years ago mark the tee boxes.
"This is such a good piece of
land for golf," Doak said. "The
variety of contours created by
the mining process allowed us
to create a layout unlike any
other."
Coore said, "The property
has some of the most unusual,
interesting and dramatic land
forms we have ever encoun-
tered."
The former two-time Mas-
ters champion turned architect


Crenshaw said, "The land at
Streamsong was naturally con-
ducive to uncovering great golf
holes."
Rich Mack, Mosaic's execu-
tive vice president and general
counsel, said Streamsong was
dreamed up in 2008 as a way to
showcase what can be done on
formerly mined land in Florida.
"Streamsong is a powerful
site," Mack said. "Mosaic is
excited to introduce this venue
to the world's golf community
as a world-class model for eco-
nomic and environmental sus-
tainability."
Mack said once the 216-
room luxurious main lodge
opens later this year, the com-
pany will have created more
than 200 permanent jobs.
The Red course was named,


the best new U.S. course you
can play by "Golf' magazine,
and the Blue course was the
third rated new course built in
the United States.
The golf clubhouse features
12 guest rooms, 4,500 square-
feet of meeting space, a steak-
house with private dining,
lounge and golf shop.
The main lodge, expected to
be open in November, will fea-
ture a conference center, full-
service spa, lakeside pool, casu-
al and fine dining, hiking and
birding trails, tennis, guided
bass fishing and a sporting
clays range.
Mosaic hopes the golf cours-
es and resort will attract people
from all over the United States
and internationally to visit the
truly unique destination.


January 31, 2013, The Herald-Advocate 9A


The golf clubhouse sits between two giant sand hills overlooking a large lake and features a fine-dining restaurant, lounge,
conference room and golf shop.


Keeping true to the Scottish origins of golf, a bag piper
played during the grand opening ceremonies.


large sand dunes and the varying landscape can be seen in the background.


Mosaic executive vice president and general counsel Rich
Mack hits an opening tee shot Saturday.


PHOTOS BY MICHAEL KELLY
Course designers (from left) Tom Doak, Ben Crenshaw and Bill Coore talked about how much they enjoyed working with
the truly one-of-a-kind landscape while building the Streamsong Courses.


Former two-time Masters champion and one of the design-
ers of the course Ben Crenshaw hits a ceremonial first tee
shot
The compass plant is called that because its lower
leaves tend to line up in a north-south direction.

There is no class so pitiably wretched as that which pos-
sesses money and nothing else.
-Andrew Carnegie:


LLOYD HALL invites all
his friends and neighbors
to come see him at


11 9 CHEVHILET Olarsmnateal
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,10A The Herald-Advocate, January 31, 2013


The 2013 School-Related Personnel of the Year are (front, from left) Linda Strickland,
Beverly Moseley, Lisa Boehm and Chela Calves; (back) Jim Smith, Sherry Morris-Hol-
limon, Chiquita Robinson, Carol Dickey and Bob Yeager. Queen Lee also won, but was
unable to attend.


The 2013 Teachers of the Year are (front, from left) Kari Gicker, Kristen Rivas, Marie
Price and LaDonna Perry; (back) Joy Roberts, Gloria Flores and Rob Beatty, with Su-
perintendent David Durastanti.


National Honor Society and 4-H members were present to help serve guests, and to set-
up and clean-up at the banquet.


[ .- ,, ..
By the end of the night, the room was filled with educators and others who work hard
every day to keep students safe and help them learn.


Volunteers are seen here preparing dinner plates. The meal consisted of either beef or
pork with mashed potatoes, green beans, salad and cheesecake.


Man Gets 5 Years In

Prison In Internet Sting


By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
A Fort Myers man who
engaged in online solicitation of
an underage girl is now serving
,time behind bars.
Eric Joseph Lentovich, 37,
was arrested by the Hardee
County Sheriff's Office in
November of 2011 as part of a
local Internet sting targeting
sexual predators. The child they
thought they were seducing was
instead a detective.
Lentovich was one of seven
men who drove here to meet up
with that "child."
For that crime, Circuit Judge
Marcus J. Ezelle sentenced him
to five years in state prison.
Further, the judge declared
Lentovich a sexual offender, a
designation which will stay
with him for life.
Ezelle also assessed $520 in
fines and court costs, $100 in
prosecution costs, and $533 in
investigative expenses.
The sting operation, dubbed


"Trick or Treat." was conducted
over a period of 10 days in late
October of that year. Under-
cover detectives logged onto
websites and chat rooms typi-
cally visited by children,
searching for and then convers-
ing with predators, according to
sheriff's Maj. Randy Dey.
In all, a dozen suspects were
taken down in the sting.
Lentovich, a six-year veteran
of the Naples Fire Department
at the time, was one of them.
Lentovich, Dey said,
arranged to travel to Hardee
County for what he thought
would be sex with an underage
girl. His online chats, however,
were with Det. David Drake.
Dey said Lentovich drove to
the pre-arranged location, a
vacant house that a local bank
had allowed officers to use for
the sting.
When he arrived for the tryst,
he was arrested.
Dey said the men came to the
house expecting to have sexual


Lentovich
relations with children they
thought were 10, 11 or 14 years
old. "Hopefully, they and others
like them will always meet up
with an undercover law
enforcement officer instead," he
said.
Dey further cautioned parents
to monitor their children's com-
puter use, and to especially be
aware of who their children are
talking to online.


TEACHES _
Continued From 1A


trict Teacher of the'Year was an
"unexpected honor."
That honor, she claimed,
could not have been accom-
plished by herself. Rivas went
on to thank Principal Sonja
Bennett and Assistant Principal
Jessica Gray for their leadership
and guidance, and said that she
is happy to be at a job that she
loves and gets to work with
people that she also loves and
respects.
Rivas is married to Ray
Rivas and they have two sons,
Ryan and Ross. She has been
teaching within the Hardee
District for eight years. So far
she has taught first grade for
three years, fourth grade for one
year and she is now in her
fourth year of teaching kinder-
garteners.
She has a bachelor of arts
degree in,elementary education
from the University of West
Florida, is a grade level co-
chairman, and.is a member of
the leadership team and
WBOB, the TV news program
atIWES>iRivas has also been the.
Hardee :County Fair Kinder-
garten Pageant chairwoman for
five years.
When asked what teacher
influenced or inspired her,
.Rivas mentioned two teachers
who she felt played a major role
.in her school career,, Marie
Lambert, her fifth-grade
teacher, and Linda Shayman,
her dual-enrollment English
teacher..
District SRP winner Moseley
is currently the guidance secre-
tary at HJH.
She is married to Sherrod
"Wayne" Moseley and they
have three children, Allan,
Jeannie and Sherrod, and six
grandchildren.
Moseley has a bachelor of.
science degree' in elementary
education from Nova Universi-
ty. She has 30 years of experi-
ence in education; most of
which has been spent in the
Hardee school system.
She has been a migrant pull-
out tutor, classroom tutor, gen-
eral aide and Child Find spe-
cialist. She has also attended
many training that are perti-
nent to her job.
When asked who her favorite
teacher was, Moseley respond-
ed Mr. Kenny, who taught alge-
bra. Her favorite philosophy to
live by is "There's no I in
.team."
Others recognized through-
out the night for being named
Teacher of the Year at their
respective schools were:
Kari Gicker of ZSE. She
has been a second-grade teacher
there for. eight years. She is
serving as the Realizing
Excellence through Advanced
Academic Curriculum of
Hardee teacher for second
grade, is involved with Feed
5,000 Ministry and helps with
Kids World.
Gloria Flores at BGE. She
is currently a third-grade
teacher and has taught at BGE
for 11 years. She has her
English for Speakers of Other
Languages endorsement and is
one of the teachers responsible
for creating a Pep Squad at the
school.
Joy Roberts at NWE. She
is in her seventh year of teach-
ing second grade, but has been a
teacher for. 11 years. She has
served on the Cool Cat and
yearbook committees, as well
as being the leader of the
Country Clovers 4-H Club for
six years.
LaDonna Perry at HES.


She is teaching third grade and
has been a teacher with the
Hardee district for five years.
She is serving as the Accelerat-
ed Reader Committee chair-
woman, and is the third-grade
after-school program teacher.
She is Nationally Board
Certified, and is currently
working on her reading en-
dorsement.
Marie Price at HJH. She is
in her second .year of teaching
. eighth-grade math and has been
a teacher for six years in the
Hardee school system. She is
part of the Literacy Leadership
Team and the math and science
group at the Heartland
Consortium. She has also
served as the math department
co-chairwoman as well as with
the National Junior Honor
Society.
Rob Beatty at HHS. He,
teaches honors biology and
* physical science. He also co-
teaches honors and regular biol-
ogy students in biotechnology
with Brett Wheeler. He has
been a teacher for 2.4 years,
eight of which have been at
HHS. He is the science depart-
ment chairman, boys track and
field head coach, and the high
school Science Fair coordina-
tor.
School Related Personnel of
the Year were also honored.
These include:
Lisa Boehm at ZSE. She
was recently promoted to cafe-
teria manager there and current-
ly is in her 20th year of working
in food service for the Hardee
school district. She has re-
ceived certification from the
School Food Service Associ-
ation and has Saf Pac and,
Culinary Techniques training.
Boehm also works summers
with the Summer Feeding
Program.
Bob Yeager at BGE. He
has worked within the Hardee
district for six years. He com-
pleted vocational tech school


and has his certificate, in auto
mechanics. He has participated
in training pertinent to his job.
Queen Lee at WES. She
has been employed with the dis-
trict for 34 years. She has
worked in the Migrant Pro-
gram, Prep Program and Ex-
ceptional Student Education.
Carol Dickey at NWE. She
has worked in food service in
Hardee schools for 22 years, 12
of which have been at NWE.
She developed "Grab and Go"
breakfast, which feeds many
children who would otherwise
not receive breakfast.
Linda Strickland at fES.
She has been part of the school
system for 21 years. She has
worked in several areas
throughout those years and has
completed many classes and
. training that are pertinent to
the jobs.
Chela Calves at HHS. She
has been a part of the district
schools for 19 years and attend-
ed many training that were rel-
evant to the job. She has ESOL
training and has served as a jun-
ior and senior, sponsor
Sherry Morris-Hollimon at
Pioneer Career Academy. She
has been employed with the dis-
trict for 17 years and has gone
to training that were related to
her job.
Jim Smith at the Educa-
tional Facilities Department. He
has worked with the district for
nine years. He has 50 years'
experience in the construction
industry, and has had a State
Residential Contractor License
for 20 years. He helps to
improve school and office
buildings.
Chiquita Robinson at the
Transportation Department. She
has six years of experience as a
school bus tutor. She is a
Certified Nurse Assistant, has
First Aid and CPR training and
has her Child Development
Associate Certificate.


What To Look For On The Label


Making sure you and your
family are getting the nutrients
you need doesn't have to be
confusing. What may be the
best way to figure out if a food
is good for you can actually be
pretty easy check out the
Nutrition Facts Panel. Found on
the side or back of a food pack-.
age, it gives the details about
the amount of calories, fat, car-
bohydrates, protein, vitamins
and minerals found in the food.
How to Read A Food Label
When looking at the label,
start with the number of serv-
ings per container. If it says
there are two servings in the
container but you plan on eating
the whole thing, you need to
multiply all the values listed on
the label by two to find out
what you're really going to get.
Next, check out the calories.
Is it the amount you want to
eat? Your body needs calories
for energy, but eating more than
you need can lead to weight
gain.
Look for lots of fiber, vitamin
A, vitamin ,C and calcium.
These nutrients will help you
stay in good health and help
reduce the risk of certain health
problems, yet most Americans
don't get enough of them.
In fact, the gap between how
much fiber Americans should
eat and how much they do eat is


so big that experts now recom-
mend people eat both fiber-rich
and fiber-fortified foods. Foods
that provide a good source of
fiber should contain 10 percent
or more of the Daily Value for
fiber.
To find foods that have fiber,
look for such ingredients as:
Arabinoxylan
Beta-glucan
Carboxymethylcellulose
Cellulose
Chicory Root Fiber
Fructo-oligosaccharides
Galacto-oligosaccharides
Hydroxypropyl-
Methylcellulose
Inulin
Methylcellulose
Resistant maltodextrin
Oligofructose
Pectin
Polydextrose
Polyfructans
Resistant starch.
It is important to eat a wide
range of dietary fibers from dif-
ferent sources to get all the ben-
efits that fiber can provide. In
addition, you should try to limit
saturated fat, trans fat and sodi-
um.
Learn More
You can find more informa-
tion about nutrition labels at
www.fda.gov and further facts
about fiber at www.fiberfacts.-
org.




January 31, 2013, The Herald-Advocate 11A


in Business
By Jessica Brewer


*




I


*;RETAIL READY Goodwill Manasota hosted a grand-
opening celebration in Wauchula earlier this month.
,While it already had been open for months as a donation
dropoff center, the grand opening marked the beginning of a
Goodwill retail store at the U.S. 17 North site.
The store offers a variety of items, such as books, jewelry, fur-
niture, electronics, household goods' and clothing. All items are
displayed in conveniently marked and organized sections, just as
one would see in a department store. There are even dressing
rooms.
All items donated to or purchased at Goodwill contribute to its
many programs designed to help those with barriers to employ-
ment.
One such program, Job Connection, is being made available to
Hardpe County residents. It is a free community service available
to anyone looking for a job -- for job assistance.
Job Connection teaches .n basics as how to build skills and
prepare for job interviews. It also teaches computer skills and other
employment-enhancing abilities.
People are then assisted in obtaining a job, through Goodwill's
own connections and through community employers.
There currently is no Hardee County Job Connection center,
however. The closest location for this service is in Arcadia.
Interested individuals can go to the local Goodwill store or call
Arcadia's Goodwill at (863) 491-1445 for further information.
Meanwhile, Goodwill is looking for a space to bring the program
here.
The Goodwill retail store and dropoff center is located at 1511
U.S. 17,. across from Windn-Dixie. It's open Monday to Saturday
from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
New business or management? Remodeling or relocating? Call
Jessica Brewer at 773-3255 with your business news.


COURTESY PHOTO
Goodwill kicked off its new retail operation here with a grand
opening on Jan. 9.


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 252013CP000002

IN RE: ESTATE OFP ...
THOMAS GRAHAM JOHNSON,
SR.
Deceased.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the
estate of THOMAS GRAHAM
JOHNSON, SR., deceased,
whose date of death was October
2, 2012; File Number 252013-
CP000002, Is pending in the
Circuit Court for Hardee County,
Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is Post Office
Drawer 1749, Wauchula, Florida
33873. The names and addresses
of the personal representative
and.the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims
or demands against decedent's
estate, on whom a copy of this
notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
,COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM;
All other creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons having
claims or demands against the
decedent's estate, must file their
claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of first publication of
*this notice is: January 31, 2013.
Personal Representative:
DELOIS JOHNSON
P.O. Box 36
Wauchula, FL 33873
'Attorney for Personal
lRepresentative:
Derek B. Alvarez, Esquire -
FBN:114278
dba@gendersalvarez.com
Anthony F. Diecidue, Esquire -
FBN: 146528
afd@gendersalvarez.c6m
GENDERS, ALVAREZ, DIECIDUE,
P.A. f
2307 West Cleveland Street
Tampa, Florida 33609
Phone: (813) 254-4744
Fax: (813) 254-5222
1:31,2:7c


By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
A Wauchula man who agreed
to provide an undercover offi-
cer with counterfeit identifica-
tion cards has been sentenced in
Hardee Circuit Court.
Angel Diaz Hernandez, 37, of
305 Keeton Road, avoided
prison by entering into plea
negotiations with the prosecu-
tion. Instead, he was sentenced
to three years of supervised pro-
bation.
In a hearing before Circuit
Judge Marcus J. Ezelle, Her-
nandez pleaded to charges of
offering to sell counterfeit IDs
and unlawful use of a two-way
communication device. The
state dropped a charge of pos-
session of a fraudulent driver's
license.
Ezelle imposed the probation
term along with $520 in fines
and court costs, $200 for the
cost of prosecution, $150 in
investigative expenses and a
$36 probation fee.
Hernandez had been arrested
on March 29 by the Hardee
County Sheriff's Office follow-
ing an undercover probe into
the forged ID trade. Hernandez,
Maj. Randy Dey said, set up a


Hernandez


deal over the phone, agreeing to
meet his "customer" at a con-
venience store at the corner of
U.S. 17 and North Florida
Avenue.'
There, the major said, took a
$60 deposit toward the total'
cost of $100 to create a fake
Social. Security card and a
phony Resident Alien card.
Hernandez promised to deliv-
er the completed cards the next
day.
It was at that point, Dey
described, that take-down offi-
cers moved in and arrested
Hernandez.


Wine, Shop &,



Dine On Feb.
Main Street Wauchula Inc. shopping and good company.
Will help spark some romance For every $10 spent during the
with its upcoming Wine, Shop event, participants will receive
& Dine event in downtown an entry in a. drawing for a
Wauchula. romantic getaway, just in time
Set for Friday, Feb; 8, there for Valentine's Day!
will be a wine-tasting and the Tickets are available for pur-
kickoff for the King & Queen of chase at the Main Street Wau-
Main Street competition. chula office, located at 107 E.
Event registration and the Main St., or online. at
introduction of king and 'queen www.mainstreetwauchula.com.
candidates begins at 5:30 p.m. in Tickets are $10 a person or $15
Heritage Park on Main Street, for two, and Main Street Wau-
and will be directly followed by chula members receive a $5 dis-
a delectable wine tour. count.
The Wine, Shop & Dine event Join Main Street Wauchula
consists of 10 participating on Feb. 8 for the Wine, Shop &
Main Street businesses an-d fea-tdf ine event. Bring your valen-
tures wines from 'Central "tine, friend or just yourself, but
Florida. be ready for a whole new Main
Wine, Shop & Dine will pro- Street experience!
vide an evening of valentine


10 HOURS A MONTH!

That's all it takes to speak up for a child. Volunteer to be a
Guardian Ad Litem.

773-2505
(If office unattended, please leave message.)


Pioneer Creek RV News
By Reggie DeSmet


Phony ID Cards


Buy Probation


COURTESY PHOTO:
Dressed to celebrate shuffleboard's 100th anniversary
with an Olde Tyme Tournament.




Your Business Could Appear Here!
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels
At The Herald Advocate


CHAPEL
Enos and Willodean Yoder,
Ginnie Merriman and Cathie
Raveling greeted 170. Wayne
welcomed any new residents in
the park, and Twonia Edwards
gave the devotion, She spoke
from Hebrews 13:5, giving us
hope knowing that God will not
leave us, He. is' always there.
The choir sang "Them Bones,
Gonna Rise Again," directed by
Sandy Feeser and with piano by
Cheryl Conkle. Special music
was sung by Bob Parks, "Just A
Closer Walk With Thee" and
"There's Something In That
Name"; piano by Sandy.
Pastor David spoke from
James 1:2-3, "Reality TV" is'
not reality at all, and. many see
the world either through the'
eyes of unbelief oi eyes of faith.
A reality check list is by three
ways, having a problem and
dealing it with a benefit or
begrudgingly, through wisdom'
we make right choices, and
knowing God is not out to get
you, He is here to give to you.
Through endurance we, will
know we have favor with God.
COFFEE HOUR ,
'Gerry welcomed 251 for
doughnuts and coffee. .She led
the pledge and prayer then sang
"Happy Birthday" .to Herb
DeHaan, pur pancake leader,
and also Goldie Vranckx.
All Florida Roofing &
Weatherproofing came to speak
and tell us about, the company.
They also gave away lottery
tickets to thank us as well as
giving us a donation to the
activities.
Gerry reminded us of many
activities coming up, one of
which was not on the calendar.
On Sunday, Jan. 27, Weaver
Believers, a gospel group that


ABOUT...
Letters To
The Editor
The Herald-Advocate wel-
comes letters to the editor
on matters of public interest.
Letters should be brief, and
must be written in good
taste and include the
writer's full name, address
and daytime telephone
number for verification.
Letters must be received
by 5 p.m. on Monday to be
considered for that week's
edition. Submissions should
be typed or legibly written.
Send letters to: Letters to
the Editor, The Herald-
Advocate, P.O. Box 338,
Wauchula, FL 33873. Fax
.letters to (863) 773-0657.


CONCERNED CITIZENS MEETING.











Double J Restaurant

(next to Alan Jay Chevrolet)

Public Invited Bipartisan

Questions Please Call 767-0771


PUBLIC NOTICE
You are hereby notified that on
Thursday, March 7, 2013, at 9:15 a.m., the
Hardee County Board of County
Commissioners
will hold a public hearing for the adoption of a
Resolution vacating and closing the road/easement
known as
Glen Bowen Road

being legally described as: The maintained right of way of
Glen Bowen Road in its entirety lying in Section 7, Town-
ship 36 S., Range 26 E., Hardee County, Florida, as
recorded in Plat Book 4, Page 105, also known as Plat Bar
82, Cabinet A, of the official' records of Hardee County,
Florida

The public hearing will be held in the Hardee County Board
of County Commissioners Board Room, 412 West Orange
Street, Room 102, Wauchula, Florida.

This procedure shall be in accordance with the provisions
of Section 336, Florida Statutes.

A petition for the closing and vacating, of the above-refer-
enced shall be considered by the Board of County Com-
missioners after required publication of this Notice. Copies
of the documents relating to this proposal are available for
public inspection during weekdays between the hours of
8:30 A.M. and 3:00 P.M. in the Hardee County Public
Works Department, 205 Hanchey Road, Wauchula, Florida-

This is a Disabled-Accessible facility. Any disabled person
needing to make special arrangements should contact the
Board of County Commissioners' office at least five (5) days
prior to the public hearing.

All persons are invited to attend and be heard. Although
minutes of the Public Hearing will be recorded, anyone
wishing to appeal any decision, made at the public hearing
will need to ensure a verbatim record of the proceedings
is made by a court reporter.

Sue Birge, Chairperson, Board of County Commissioners
1:31c


^PE ------






Raji Sonni Marcela Ja
M.D., F.A.A.P. M.D., F.A.
W CbldrL 6 AS oBoard Certified Pediatricians


A l
ativa
A.P.


Attention Parents: We are pleased to announce we are
now open on Saturdays for sick children.
We are open from 9:00 am to 12:00 pm
(863) 767-1616

Please feel free to call the office or walk-in before 11:00 am.
1125 S. 6th Avenue, Wauchula (Sweetbay Complex)
Monday Friday 8:30 am 5:00 pm and Saturday 9:00 am 12:00 pm


has won many awards and
played in Nashville, Tenn.,i
came and played and sang.
Italian Dinner & Unique,
Fashion. Show was a big suc-
cess, Garry and.Diane Delves
with all their helpers are all
appreciated for an evening of
fun.
ACTIVITIES
The Olde Tyme Shuffle at
Pioneer Creek held a shuffle-.
board tournament, a fun game
for all ages, on Saturday, Jan.
19, dressed in 1913-era clothing
in honor of the 100th-year cele-
bration of shuffleboard in,
Florida.
Shuffleboard was introduced
in St. Petersburg in 1913, and
hag continued to grow through-
out the state with memberships
of about 13,600, with many
'shufflers who play daily and
organized competitions held
weekly at different locations for
all skill levels.
Results of Olde Tyme Tourn-
ament: Main Event first.
place, Bob Conkle and Wayne
Shick; second place, Joan Bell
and Bob Hoskins; third place,
Cathy. Payne and Nancy!
Singleton; and fourth place,
Mamie Morton and Frank
Feeser.
How fun it was seeing all the
gang dressed in this attire and
talented, too!
In bowling, high game for
the men was 214 and high.
series 523, with Dave
Thompson bowling, both. For
the women, high game- was
Marilyn Achard 146 and high
series was Arlene Sebright 400.
Steve McIntire picked up 3-
6-7-10 and a 2-5-7 split, and
Dave picked up a 4-5 split.
Great bowling, gang!




12A The Herald-Advocate, January 31, 2013


* Business Cards




* Picker- 's Cards

Flyers
SI nvoi'ces

* Business Forms
Invitations
*Announcements
Letterheads
Envelopes
Calendars
* Magnetic Sians


ALL YOUR PRINTING NEEDS IN ONE CON-
VENIENT LOCATION!








PAGE ONE


PHOTO BY MARIA TRUJILLO .
This senior quartet gave leadership to the 2012-13 Hardee girls soccer team, from left,
Joane Gonzalez, Alejandra Castaneda, Andrea Castaneda and Gaby Montero.

Soccer Teams End At Districts


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Both Hardee soccer teams
competed well but came up
short in district competition.
The boys were the last to go.
Hosting the Class 2A, District
10 soccer tournament last week,
Hardee had to sit by and watch
the Friday .night finale.
Third-seeded DeSoto caught
fire in district play, beating
sixth-seeded Avon Park, sec-
ond-seeded Hardee and top-.
seed Frostproof in three district
playoff games. DeSoto hosted
the, first round of regionals
against St. Petersburg Catholic,
.while district runnerup Wenltto
Tampa to face Berkeley Prep.
After a bye in the first round,
Hardee went 'into. the district
semi-final battling illness and
injury as well as the DeSoto
Bulldogs.
"Our ball touches were not
'on' and we had some missed
shot opportunities, said
Hardee Heac) Coach Dennis
. Aubry. Hardee was called off-"
sides an uncharacteristic 12
times. Hardee's lone score in
the 4-1 loss came by senior
Mark Gomez with 5:11 remain-
ing in the second period on a


nice feed from classmate
Miguel Garcia.
They were among II players
in their final game for the
Wildcats. Other seniors suiting
up for the last time were Alexis
Palacios, Oscar Palacios,
Campbel Aubry, Armando
Alvarez, Carlos Deloera, Luis
Luna, Octavio Alvarez, Martin
Lucatero and Jesus Zuniga.
Other varsity players are jun-
iors Ruben Velasquez, Luis
Alonzo and Gustavo Toledo and
sophs Gilberto Cardoza,
Manuel Palacios and Alexis
Arenas.
Together they fashioned a 12-
6-1 season- record, and came in
second in the districts with a 6-
2-1; record. The lone tie was a
I-1 game with" DeSoto on Dec.
6. The only district losses were
to top-seed Frostproof.
Hardee had a JV for the first
time this season, with players
Ezequiel Perez, Frederik
Torres, Rolando Aleman,
Kenneth Vargas and Fillistin
Luis Michael ready to move up
as well as freshmen Rodrigo
Rodriguez, Gabariel Garcia,
Eduardo Lopez, Ricardo
DeSantiago, ,Oscar Duarte,
Francisco Salgado, Alexix


Chavez, Gustavo Salizar, Mateo
Gomez, Ben Tamayo, Jose
Padilla and Fabian Perada.
It's a similar scene for girls
soccer which finished in the
district quarterfinals against
Mulberry at Lake Placid in
which the senior quartet of.
Alejandra Castaneda, Andrea
Castaneda, Joane Gonzalez and
Gaby Montero played their.
final high school game.
Other Lady Wildcat varsity
players are Addison Aubry,
Ashley Baker, Diana Chavez,
Brooke Conley, Ana Galvez,
McKenzie Garcia, Farrah
Muntz, Rurya Olivares, Amaliax
Rivera, Martha Valdez and
Elizabeth Alvarez, coached by
Nicole Aubry and Peyton
Sullivan.
The girls also had a JV squad
this season, with Crystal
Huerta, Isabel Abel, Marisela
Ramoj, Veronica Rivera, Silvia
Alvarez, Jazmin Alvarez,
Savannah Aubry, Tiffany
Flores, Vanessa Miranda,
Jacqueline Perez, Erika
Ramirez, April Solis, Ana
Toledo, Maria Zamora,
Valentina Cordoza, Senida
Garcia and Lurdes Hernandez.


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A New Name At



Wildcat Stadium?


By MARIA TRUJILLO
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Wildcat Stadium press
box to get a new name?
This just might happen if the
Mosaic Company Foundation
approves a funding request that
the Hardee Athletic Foundation
has made.
The request from HAF was
for a one-time contribution of
$400,000 from Mosaic. If
Mosaic approves, the money
will go to removing the existing
track and installing a new syn-
thetic track that meets the
requirements of the Florida
High School Athletic Associa-
tion, renovating the press box,
and removing the visitor
bleachers and installing new
aluminum bleachers.
In exchange for the monetary
contribution, Mosaic will then
be granted naming rights to the
press box for a 10-year period
beginning in August of 2013
and ending in July of 2023.
The School Board at its last
meeting granted the naming
rights to Mosaic if it decides to
approve the request.
Also at its meeting, the
' School Board heard .a special
presentation from Olivia Min-
shew, director of community
development, and Terry Atch-
ley, city manager, from the city
of Wauchula. They spoke on
annexing properties.
As the city was working on
"cleaning its municipal bound-
aries," it found that two proper-
ties owned by the School Board
are next to or within the city
limits. These properties are the
bus garage and the west side of
the football field.
The city requested the annex-
ation of these properties in an'
"effort to comply with .new
laws and cleanup municipal


boundaries."
Minshew assured that there
is no charge for annexation, no
new taxes and there is nothing
negative that will come of the
change.
The board unanimously
voted to approve annexation.
The last thing on the action
agenda was the approval of a
Zolfo Springs' Elementary roof
replacement change order for
$1,396. The beginning bid was
for $62,100.
The members then continued
to approve items from the con-
sent agenda, which are grouped
together in a single vote without
a need for discussion.
In one action, the board
approved:
-the use of the local base-
ball practice fields by Hardee
County Youth Sports Inc. from
Jan. 21 to June 30.
the use of the football sta-
dium for the First Christian
Church on Feb. 3.
-purchase orders of 7,452
gallons of diesel for transporta-
tion buses' from Glover Oil for
$26,480.
-the removal of nine com-
puters and one scanner valued
'at $15,644 from property inven-
tory.
-the Hardee English Lan-
guage Learner Plan for 2012-
13.
-the retirement of Donald
Gray from Hardee.Senior High.
-leaves of absence for
Jeannette Lopez from Wauchula
Elementary and Josefina Reyes,
from Zolfo Springs Elementary.
-the return from leaves of
absence for Heather Birch to
HHS, Angela loannidis to WES
and Amanda Crawford to
Hardee Junior High.
-hiring. Jacob Benavides to


replace Bryan Pelham at Hilltop
Elementary, Sonya Jacob re-
placing Ralene Bates at WES
and Amy Rutledge to HHS.
-new substitutes Kristin
Bergens, Jessica Garcia, Aman-
da Graham, Miranda Helms and
William Shackelford.
Before the meeting closed,
board member Teresa Crawford
mentioned that she conducted
interviews for Teacher of the
Year and School-Related Per-
sonnel of the, Year, and that they
were great choices.
She inquired about the safety
issues in schools. Superinten-
dent David Durastanti said the
police department has been
patrolling the .schools and he is
mfortable with work they
have done.
Ciwford also mentioned she
would lie to get a facilities use
policy put in place.



ABOUT ...
-Hardee Living
Hardee Living prints your
news on people, clubs and
organizations, including
meeting summaries, births,
children's and senior citi-
zens' birthdays, engage-
ments, weddings, silver or
golden anniversaries,
church events and military
assignments.
Forms are available at our
office. For engagements
and weddings, a photo
should be included.
Publication is free of
charge. Coverage of wed-
dings over three months old
will be limited to a photo and
brief announcement.
Deadline is 5 p.m. on
Thursday.


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5:00 PM

7:00 PM

7:30 PM


Noon
4:00 PM
4:00 PM
7:00 PM


Schedule of Events

Saturday, February 16th
Gates & Midway Open (Armbands $20)
Miss Hardee County Pageant


Sunday, February 17th
Gates Open
Midway Opens (Armbands $20)
Kindergarten Princess Pageant
Grooming Contest

Monday, February 18th
Gates & Midway Open (Students Get In Free-Armbands $15)
Rabbit Show
Dairy Show
Breeding Animals & Heifer Show
Junior Miss Hardee County Pageant

Tuesday, February 19th
Gates Open ($2 Tuesday-Everything is $2!)
Poultry Showmanship
Midway Opens
Swine Show

Wednesday, February 20th
Gates & Midway Open (Seniors 55+ Get In Half-Price!)
Steer Show followed by Beef Showmanship

Thursday, February 21st
Gates & Midway Open (Armbands $15 with Coupon)
Livestock Supporters' Dinner
FFA & 4-H Livestock Sale

Friday, February 22nd
Gates & Midway Open (Free Entry fromr8pm 'til Midnight
with purchase of a $20 Armband)
Rodeo including Ranch Bronc Riding, Bull Riding,
Double Mugging, and Mutton Busting
Lil' Miss Pageant

Saturday, February 23rd
Gates & Midway Open (Armbands $20)
Prince & Princess Pageant
Mexican Band
Mexican Bull Riding


Blue Ribbon Sponsors = CF Industries & Mosaic
www.HardeeCountyFair.org


Civic Center

Civic Center


Civic Center
Arena



Arena
Arena
Arena
CMc Center



Arena

Arena



Arena



Civic Center
Arena





Arena

Civic Center



Civic Center
Arena
Arena


31lOll


The Herald-Advocate
(USPS 57&780)

Thursday, January 31, 2013


February 16-23, 2013

Hardee County Fair
,Puttjnq New TWists On Native Traditions ,or 72 Years!


Samuel Colt, inventor of the Colt revolver, "the gun that won the West," worked on the
prototype in his father's textile plant. Colt once earned a living touring the country per-
forming laughing gas demonstrations.







If you're ready to quit tobacco, we're ready to

help with a six-session program.

There is no charge to enroll or for materials.


1 -8 7 52 6094 or0 w w *h ec ob a co o m0


I


1 31,2:7c


m






2B The Herald-Advocate, January 31, 2013





Hardee


/ 4"/-,,' ~ /
COURTESY PHOTO
Left to right: Charlesbridge Publishing E-book Distribution Manager Gina Choe, author
Jayne Jaudon Ferrer, and Charlesbridge Publishing Associate Director of Special Sales
Kim Courchesne at the recent Atlanta Gift Mart.

Former Wauchulan To Celebrate

New Book In Tampa Feb. 10


Jayne Jaudon Ferrer has]
passionate about words fo
long as she can remember
and she credits Lola Dietz
first librarian she ever knev
for that wonderful gift.
hometown church, First Ba
in Wauchula, was blessed
have an exceptional library
a full-time librarian when I
growing up," the author rec
"Mrs. Dietz introduced n
A Child's Garden of Verses
other classic children's bo
She taught me the joy of r
ing and the satisfaction
good story when I was ju
toddler."
Ferrer also credits a han
of teachers who recognized
encouraged her gift with w
for leading her to a career
writing. "Billie Wadsworth
us stories from Little Hous
.the Prairie every '"day
lunch, Lina Ertzberger mad
'outline- everything' we w
Agnes Moore made us v
and share stories every Fr
Bill Ferguson stretched
composition and vocabu
skills to the max, Diane Ki
-made poetry a focal point o
ninth grade English class,
John Masterson cut us no s
whatsoever. 'The Class of
was blessed with a terrific f
dation in reading and wri
I've been grateful foi- that
entire life."
Ferrer, who was born
Wauchula, lived here until
was a senior in highschool
whose parents owned,
Western Auto and Lila's 1
ing Center for many years
fond memories of her tim
Hardee County.


been "I tell people I grew up in a www.
:r as combination of 'Leave -It to websi
r Beaver' and 'The Andy Griffith share
, the Show.'It was a golden'time of'poe
w sweet, safe',serene. In a small poetry
"My town, everybody knows every- "Anyo
iptist body, of course, so you couldn't boring
d to get aja\ 'ith a thing, but the right
and affection,., Aid support was to ha'
.was amazing. I HAD'to be success- can c
;alls. fUll; I couldn't let all those pec- their
ne to ple.down!" in reti
and Working initially as an adver- satisf,
)oks. tising copywriter, then as a free- takes
read- lance journalist,,Ferrer began enjoy.
of a 'writing books after the birth of For
ust a her first child. Her four collec- Ferrer
tions of poetry about the bliss games
idful and bedlam ofnmotherhood and Skipp
and the diterse.r les and responsi- Time
iords biliiies- o6f women have been favor
er in published in multiple editions, able i
read including two in Spanish. in boi
e on But Ferrer's westet book forma
itfert tapes rer a~ frds antq 10, ,F
Ie us a ling Qo-style of wriP Books
rote, ing into--the nonnction arena; graph
write The Art of Stone Skipping and sharir
iday, Other Fun Old-Time Games is a played
our how-to full of fascinating facts, chula.
ilary step-by-step detail, and fun triv- Arme
night ia. .1 love technology as much ber is
f our as anyone," says the author, "I u
and "but no generation should grow after
slack up without knowing how to Harde
'74 have fun when the power goes all the.
foun- out." and ta
ting; While more nonfiction proj- outsic
f my ects are in the wo ks, along %%ith Green
io novels, Fetrer'" enihusianmi I?' TT
n in foId poelr. lemnains strong. "Too woulc
I she' mmanN people tk rile off poetry as for I
I and boi ig .',iu.,e some, teacher ..'shake
the cimmed' Wol't orth .and- "Thos
Sew- 'Yeatl do%\if their Ithoii andd ;-sure."
, has never introduced them to Fer
ie in Hilaire Belloc or Ogden Nash." ville,
in 2009; .Ferrer launched 1994.


YourDailyPoem.com, a
te specifically designed to
the pleasure and diversity
etry. "I consider myself a
y missionary," she says.
)ne who thinks poetry is
g simply hasn't found the
poet. My goal for YDP is
ve people realize poetry
contribute something to
life without asking much
urn. A good poem is very
ying and generally
less than. a minute to

the time being, however,
r's focus is on fun and
s. The Art of Stone
ing and Other Fun Old-
Games is already getting
ible reviews and is avail-
n bookstores everywhere
th paperback and e-book
t. On Sunday, February
errer will be at Inkwoo0
s in Tampa at 2 p.m., auto-
ing bo6ks'"and perhaps'
ig memories of games
d growing up in Wau-
. The address is 216 S.
nia Ave. The phone num-
813-253-2638.
used to love Sunday nights
church," the former
ee Countian says. "While
e grown-ups stood around
ilked, we kids would dash
de to play 'Red Light,
i Light' or 'Mother, May
'hen everyone's family
I head down to Knight's
hamburgers and milk-
s." She smiles broadly.
se were good times, for

rer has lived in Green-
South Carolina since


FINE ARTS COMPETITION RULES
General Information minimum to allow for display. No glue should


= Entries must be submitted by Hardee County
residents or winter residents. Those residing in
the county for less than six months must sub-
mit under the winter resident category.,
- Entries must be dropped off Saturday, Febru-'
ary 9th from 9:00-12:00 at the Agri-Civic Cen-
ter on Altman Rd.
Categories
- Winter Residents-Mixed media
= Adults-charcoals, penlink/pastels./'oils/
acrylic/watercolor/ photography 7 abstract,
floral, landscape, animal, and people. -
= Juniors-Grades 3-5, 6-8, 9-12- Mixed media,
drawing, painting and photography
= Beginners-(Pre-k, K, and 1st and 2nd) Mixed
media, painting, photography and drawing


be used to adhere 'photos to black material.
Exhibitors must include name and contact
information on the b'ack-of all work.
= Exhibitors are limited to three entries total in
-all' categories. Exhibitors should be non-
professional artists. No entries will be accept-
ed from anyone selling work professionally.
= All Junior, Intermediate and Beginner entries
will be selected by teachers at the students'
respective schools and should be submitted
on February ?9! as well. Schools are limited to
not more ,than three of any type project (i.e.
.. 3 watercolors landscape, 3.,watercolor ani-
mals)
Judging
'Judging will be'done under the supervision of
the Fair Board by an out-of-county judge.


Guidelines
- Paintings-must be original work, not repririts' AWer'ds
Should be unframed and mounted on = First, second, and third place ribbons will be
stretcher Frame with hanging wire on back. awarded in each judged category.
Both oil and water will be accepted. '. Honorable mention awards are given at the
- Photography-must be matted on, heavy .discretion of the.judge.
black material. Border should'be ohe inch'--. ."Best'16f Show" ribbons will be awarded.
FOR MORE INFO. CALL RAY GILL (863) 773-3553 OR EMAIL HARDEECOUNTYFAIR@GMAIL.COM so,1:31c


Living -



Crystal Lake RV News
rBy Joyce Taylor


Klowie
'Sunshine' The

Theme For
First Birthday


Klowie N. Rodriguez, the
daughter of Krystal Rodriguez
and Shermaine Baker of
Bowling -Green, had her very
first birthday on Jan. 13.
She celebrated this special
occasion with a birthday party
at her grandparents' house in
Bowling Green. Theme for the
party was "Sunshine."
Joining in on the fun were
grandparents Maurice and
Charlie Rivers, godmother.
Kym Johnson, sisters, aunts,
cousins and friends.



WWII Vets

Sought For

Honor Flight
The Hardee County Rotary
Club is seeking World War II
veterans interested in going on
an all-expenses-paid trip to
Washington, D.C., to visit their
war memorial there.
The trip is planned for May,
and will include Rotary escorts
to assist each honored veteran.
Interested WWII vets or any-
one who knows of such a veter-
an should call Rotarian Sue
Birge at 781-3536.


KOFFEE KLATCH
Don Merillat led the prayer
on Jan. 23, with Jerry Lauer
leading the U.S. Pledge and
Linda Harrison leading the
Canadian Pledge. The 50/50
winners were Doug and I,
Marilyn and Dave Catlin, Jean
Willis, Bill and Diann Dilley,
and Don and Judy Ahearn.
The annual auction will be
Saturday, March 2. Keith
Stephens will be doing the auc-
tioning again. Keith will auc-
tion off anything except bowl-
ing balls. Think of some fun
stuff that Keith can auction off.
There will be a sit-down dinner
before the auction. Tickets for
the dinner will be given out at
Koffee Klatch.
BINGO
Sylvia Baker won the large
jackpot on Jan. 18 while Donna
Prillmayer won the small jack-
pot. Kay Dale won the large
jackpot on Jan. 21 and Shirley
Johnson won the small jackpot.
DESSERT & FASHION
SHOW
Ladies, mark your calendars
for Monday, Feb. 4, at 1 p.m. as
the Craft Club will be hosting
its seventh annual Ladies Only
Dessert & Fashion Show.
Ladies from other parks are
welcome to attend. Come and
support a good cause.
SCORES
Men's Golf, Jan. 17: Team
Net winners were Jean Delisle,
Larry Cahill, Fred Leverone
and Paul Vaughan.
Shuffling, Jan. 21: Three-
game winners were Charlene
Baker, Gary Chamberlain, Bob


Funkhouser, Marilyn Funk-
houser, Steve Gray, Al Johnson,
Bob Jones, Elaine Lemarche,
Carol Merillat, Doug Taylor
and Arlie Thompson.
Bowling, Jan. 23: first, Team
2; second, 3 Guys & 1 Gal; and
third, Lucky Number 7.
Bocce, Jan. 23: Tied for first
place are Team Lilac and Team
Orange.

CHURCH NEWS
By Shirley Glessner
Our congregation continues
to grow as the prime season in
our park is here.
Maxine Stromme greeted us
on Jan. 20 as hymns were
played by Linda Gray on organ
and Carole Jones on piano.
Pastor Bob Winne opened the
service with everyone singing
"He is Lord."
Pastor Winne explained how
the song "Take My Hand,
Precious Lord" was written by
Thomas A. Dorsey from
Chicago. He then played it on
his trombone accompanied by
Linda on piano.
Hymns that were sung were
"I Am Thine, 0 Lord," "When
the Roll Is Called up Yonder"
and "Jesus Loves Me." The
choir, under the direction of
Beth Frisbie, sang "Tis So
Sweet to Trust in Jesus."
Don Merillat gave the offer-
ing prayer and all sang the
"Doxology" after the -offering
was taken. Our service closed
with prayer and the singing of
"God Be with You Till We Meet
Again."


J I.I..i jwfc w i


RICHARD J. DEASE
2/6/22 1/5/13


FROM GRITS AND GREASE
TO SEEDLESS WATERMELONS
Written By Great-Granddaughter Bridgette Conley

There are not many people still living in my family that I would call a pioneer.
The first thing that I thought of when given this assignment was, "What exactly is
a pioneer?" I had always thought of pioneers as people who came to this country
from afaraway land and settled. I kept thinking of the people I've seen on televi-
sion in wagon trains going out west, fighting hunger, cold temperatures, big
mountains and Indians. I never really thought about someone in my family being
a pioneer.
Part of the definition of a "pioneer" in Webster's Dictionary is, ... a person
or group that originate or help open up a new line of thought or activity or a new
method of development." With that information, I decided I should write about
:my great-grandfather, Richard Dease. My Papa Dease lives right here in Hardee
County, Fl and will be 90 years old in February of 2012! He was born in Frost-
proof, in Polk County and grew up there raised by his grandparents. His mother
was a 25% Cree Indian girl who was only 14 when he was born. He only went to
the third grade in school,, but learned to read and write from his grandmother.
Although he had no formal education, he became a very wise and successful
businessman and is still very sharp today. He lived thru the Great Depression
and had many days with only one meal. He loves to tell us how he never had
meat to eat, just grits and grease. I love to hear him tell stories of how he had to
walk to school and how he didn't have any shoes until he was 13 years old. He
always starts a new story with, "Now pay attention; I'm fixing to tell you some-
thing."
My Papa Dease married at 21 and had seven children. My grandmother is
his third daughter. He was a vegetable farmer and has worked as a farmer all of
his life. He actually started farming in the Heartland area over 60 years ago and
had an active farm until he was forced to retire when his health started to decline
in 2011. Papa Dease usually planted about 100 acres of vegetables every year.
He has grown all sorts of things including squash, cucumbers, peppers and can-
taloupe, but his biggest producer was watermelons. Several years ago my Papa
started producing the "seedless" watermelon. Since these watermelons don't
grow on their own, he had to use special "tricks" to produce these melons. These
melons have become very popular in recent years, even though I prefer the ones
with the seeds! Papa has grown some of the best watermelons in the state of
Florida and has helped many other younger farmers get started. I'm sure if you
talk to anyone in the watermelon business in central
Florida, they will agree that my Papa Dease is a pio-
neer when it comes to watermelon farming.
If you see my Papa Dease now, he looks very
much like the Indians you see on television. His dark
skin is scarred with wrinkles from the sun; His hair is
still thick and white as cotton. Although his dark eyes
are getting cloudy, he can still pierce you with a single ,' '
look. He walks a little slower these days, but his head
is still held high like that of a proud warrior going off '
to battle. I am proud to call him my Papa, a true Pio-
neer of Hardee County.


Your Business Could Appear Here!l
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels
At The Herald Advocate






January 31, 2013, The Herald-Advocate 3B


This week in history, as
researched from the ar-chival
pages of The Flor-ida
Advocate, the Hardee County
Herald and The Herald-Ad-
vocate ...
75 YEARS AGO
Hardee County residents will
tonight celebrate the birthday
anniversary of President Fran-
klin Delano Roosevelt with a
President's Birthday Ball to be
held at Hote.l Simmons on
South Fifth Avenue.

Pat Lynn, veteran Oklahoma
promoter who staged corking-
good wrestling matches among
some of the best men in the mat
sport from Holdenville, Okla.,
to Eureka, Calif., during his 20
years as a matchmaker, promis-
es to bring the best wrestlers the
state of Florida has to offer to
the Wauchula ball park tonight
in a wrestling card being spon-
sored under the auspices of the
local American Legion post.

The number of tons of fertil-
izer used monthly by Hardee
County farmers took a sudden
leap during December as a total
of 1,103 tons were used,
according to a report from the
Department of Agriculture, Tal-
lahassee.

An appeal for funds to be
used for .he relief of millions of
suffering men, women and chil-
dren in China was made today
byL.C. Farr, chairman of the
Hardee Red Cross Chapter, who
announced that at the sugges-
tion of President Roosevelt,
chapters throughout the country
were joining in the appeal.

50 YEARS AGO
Members of Explorer Scout
Post 410 have received a cita-
tion from the Florida State


Stephanie


Museum for the mastodon fos-
sil they discovered and gave to
the museum.

The Wildcats travel to Dade
City tonight to see who will
stay in the running for the con-
ference championship. A win
for the Cats would place them
in a solid second place over the
Pasco Pirates. A win for Pasco
would tie- the two teams for sec-
ond.

The American Legion has
accepted the county's offer for
the fairgrounds with only one
dissenting vote. All that re-
mains now to assure the future
of the Hardee County Fair is the
commissioners' formal agree-
ment to the lease-purchase ar-
rangement.

Further improvements to
downtown Wauchula were
added this week as the city
erected new mercury vapor
street lights on Seventh Avenue
and installed wastepaper hold-
ers on Main Street.

25 YEARS AGO
North Wauchula Elementary
School will hold a memorial
ceremony in honor of the space
shuttle Challenger today, Jan.
28, at 9 a.m. Seven oak trees
planted by the students will be
dedicated and a plaque com-
memorating the event will be
presented.

A lawsuit has been filed
against the Hardee County
Commission by a Wauchula
evangelist and his wife, who are
seeking a special exception to
continue running their business
at their home in rural Hardee
County.

Henry Armstrong had his best
night ever /for the Hardee


MAY 4, 2013
Humphrey & William Pruett


JUNE 8, 2013
Marti Hancock & Ross Simon


Cats Oa9gain
Gifts Since 1970
^d^ ; -117 East Main St. Wauchula t
w w9s na7 s(863)c773-6565
www.catsonmain.corn
__._soc1:31c ,


Jayvees as he hit the hoops for
32 points to lead the way for his
team. This fine performance,
however, fell two points short
of a regulation tie, and Hardee
went down to defeat by a score
of 85 to 83.

The Adult Education Depart-
ment of South Florida Com-
munity College will be offering
a Motorcycle Defensive
Driving Course on Monday,
Feb. 22, 1988.

10 YEARS AGO
A junior-high math teacher
and an elementary computer-
lab tutor were honored as the
Hardee County District's best at
a recognition banquet held
Tuesday night. Doug Herron, of
Hardee Junior High School,
was named districtwide Teacher
of the Year. Judy Southwell, of
Zolfo Springs Elementary
School, was selected as School-
Related Employee of the Year.

Steve Futch, multi-county
citrus agent of the Extension
Service, will be conducting two
"Worker Protection Standards,
Train-the-Trainer" classes for
nursery producers who have
operations in DeSoto and
Hardee counties.

Both Hardee Junior High
School basketball teams put a
pair of victories on the record
last week. In back-to-back
home games, the junior Cats
and Lady Cats claimed wins
over DeSoto and Lack Placid.

Believing that infrastructure
is the key to the county's future,
the county recently applied for
a $5 million loan.




Hardee County

CattleWomen

Need You!
Anyone interested in joining
the Hardee County Cattle-
Women is invited to a meeting
tonight (Thursday) in Wau-
chula.
The group and its guests will
gather. at the Wildcat Grill at
902 S. Sixth Ave. (U.S. 17.)-at
6:30..The club is actively seek,
ing new members, and meets
every quarter.
For more information, con-
tact Michelle Crosby Taylor at
gandm@wildblue.net or Gwen
Shaw at 781-5302.


Greetings from Fort Green!
We are certainly having some
unusual weather. It was down to
39 degrees one day last week
and then in the high 70s later on
in the week.
Congratulations to Lynda and
Charles Abbott on celebrating
their 53rd wedding anniversary
last week. They' enjoyed dinner
at Red Lobster, their favorite
place to eat when celebrating.
If memory serves me correctly,
they eloped when they were
only 18 and it was one of those
marriages that the adults said
will never last, shouldn't have
eloped. etc.!
I had to go to Lakeland for a
test last week and stopped and
visited with Mrs. Walker for a
few minutes. She looks good
and it is remarkable how well
she gets around.
Thelma and Ray Langston
were winter visitors to Hardee
County and attended our church
until their health got bad and
they could no longer drive.
Recently their grandson, only
31, died during open-heart sur-
gery. Our sincere sympathy is
extended to them. It is possible
other people remember them, as
they stayed in one of the RV
parks.
Sherman's son killed an
eight-point buck when visiting
in Alabama. We talked to Newt
Murdock, and he said this was
his last year to hunt in Alabama
as he has been there for four
years and has not seen any kind
of deer! Christine Murdock is
beginning more treatments, so
please put her on your prayer
list.
Betty Waters is recovering
from her recent back surgery
but is experiencing a lot of pain.
Betty Walker is feeling better
but still not well enough to
attend church. Sherry Smith has
been sick.with kidney problems
and will have a procedure
Friday. A.O. Hendry is finally
out of the hospital but is very
weak. Grayson Braddock is
recovering well from his recent
surgery and stay in the hospital.
Sherman Cooper is still having
neck problems.
Gary Oden looked like he felt
t good last Sunday. He said he is
t off the medicine for four days.
and does feel good, but when he
begins the medicine again it
will make him sick. Most
everyone has heard about the
Perrys, a Southern singing gos-
pel quartet. Their base singer,
Tracy, who is married to Libby,
had a stroke. Everyone is re-
quested to pray for him and all
the above.


This year will fly by if the
first month is any indication.
The chicken and dumplings
dinner went very well. They
had to go to town and try and
find additional green beans, and
at 5 p.m. were busy rolling out
more dumplings! They are
scheduling another sometime in
March. and the proceeds will
benefit the five who are going
to Malawi, Africa, in June.
There will be a yard sale at the
church this Friday and Saturday
from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. to benefit
the same cause.
It is hard to believe, but our
spring revival will begin Feb.
10, which is only two weeks
from last Sunday! Brother Ran-
dy Perry will be preaching, and
the night services will be 6 on
Sunday and then 7 on Tuesday
and Wednesday, with a cov-
ered-dish dinner on Wednesday.
Feb. 10 Will be the annual
Valentine banquet, immediately
after the morning services, and
the GA girls will entertain us
with a fashion show. Our Feb-
ruary business meeting will be
Feb. 6, early because of the re-
vival. We have a lot of shut-ins,


and this column lets them know
what is going on in Fort Green!
John and Essie Deer are
enjoying the company of
daughter Valerie and husband
from Alabama. It was nice that
John 'sang a special Sunday
morning and his daughter was
here to listen to her dad and he
did 4 good job as usual.
Our church was fortunate
enough to be able to purchase
some of the property across the
street from the church, and
there will be a dedication for
this immediately after the
morning service this Sunday.
CF had a delicious supper for
the C.A.P. members last week.
I am confident everyone there
felt the way I did when Nick
advised he was retiring. We met
his replacement, Bob May. CF
has really done a lot for our
community and I feel sure Mr.
May will be just as good, once
we get to know him. The old
saying is no one likes change,
and we will surely miss Nick.
Please pray for one another
and our nation. Troublesome
times are here.


On the day the rest of the nation commemorates Col-
umbus Day, the citizens of Berkeley, Calif., celebrate
Indigenous People's Day, in honor of those living in
America before Columbus.


Sue began her real estate

career with us in 1996.


We are pleased that Sue

has returned to real estate

in the Hardee County Market.


Contact Sue today for all of

"-,your real estate needs.


S 863-773-0007 or

863-781-3536


E-Mail:

suebirge45@gmail.com









.L (REALTY INC.)-





Come Visit us at our new expanded location:

105 Summit Street, Wauchula
soc1:31c


Fort Green News
By Rilla Cooper
773-6710


Thursday february 14
Order Early For Best Service



We deliver to all schools and local communities.

(863) 773-4864
WWW.WdcersWaytidefIowers.com
(American Express, Visa, Mastercard, Discover)


COOPER'S
WAYSIDE FLOWERS
\ 107 W. Summit Street Wauchula /


Now is the time to buy!


I FEBRUARY 16, 2013






FEBRUARY 9C 2013
Chelsee Watson & Wesley Mullinax


Cassandra Wadsworth & Shaddai Mendez

FEBRUARY 23, 2013
Tori Gurganus & Adrian Gamez
Julie Poucher & Clay Taylor

MARCH 9, 2013
Jodie Skitka & Ford Deloach

MARCH 17, 2013
Keather Bennett & Stephen Judah

MARCH 23, 2013
Katelyn Tinsley & Kenny Coggins


I Wa Bak Wen I






4B The Herald-Advocate, January 31, 2013


Your Business Could Appear Here!
Nancy Davis, Him Reas or Trayce Daniels
At The Herald Advocate

Victory Praise Center
132 E. Main Street Bowling Green




Everyone Is Invited To Come & Worship With Us! g


George Washington's false te th Were maC. of whale-
bone. t .




Getting RESULTS is FUN!
Amy started lazzercise January 7th and has lost 5 Ibs.
Come see what everyone is talking about ...
Real Results-Pure fun
am + pm + weekend classes
Schedule and location www.jazzercise.com ,
Ann Marie 863-767-0613 facebook/Jazzercise Heartland
/ ,-,'


COME & EXPE




iiA "

hke.


I,
'Id;
4


r J


Greg & Robyn Hubbard

February 10-13
Sunday: 10AM & 6PM

Monday Wednesday
@7PM
Nursery Provided for up to 3 years.


first
A ASSEMBLY 0 F GOD
1397 S. Florida Ave. Wauchula
(863) 773-9386
floridasfirstassembly.com


*76a^t


A special "thank you" to Dr. Kathy Lee
and her staff, Sharon McCrary, Erica,
Deborah, Shelia, Kate and Dixie, at
Wauchula Hospital for their wonderful
care during my stay.

Raafat Zakhary
soc1:31c


RIENC^
...
,. .
*A
".* *"*1
, :-. ,


with Evangelists


1:31-2:7c


11 1 1 h A I





January 31, 2013, The Herald-Advocate 5B


CHAPEL
Enos and Willodean Yoder,
Ginnie Merriman and Cathie
Raveling greeted 170. Wayne
welcomed any new residents in
the park, and Twonia Edwards
gave the devotion. She spoke
'from Hebrews 13:5, giving us
hope knowing that God will not
leave us, He is always there.
The choir sang "Them Bones
Gonna Rise Again," directed by
Sandy Feeser and with piano by
Cheryl Conkle. Special music
was sung by Bob Parks, "Just A
Closer Walk With Thee" and
"There's Something In That
Name"; piano by Sandy.
Pastor David spoke from
James 1:2-3, "Reality TV" is
not reality at all, and many see
the world either through the
eyes of unbelief or eyes of faith.
A reality check list is by three
ways, having a problem and
dealing it with a benefit or
begrudgingly, through wisdom
we make right choices, and
knowing God is not out to get
you, He is here to give to you.
Through endurance we will
know we have favor with God.
COFFEE HOUR
Gerry welcomed 251 for
doughnuts and coffee. She led
the pledge and prayer then sang
"Happy Birthday" to Herb
DeHaan, our pancake leader,
and also Goldie Vranckx.
All Florida Roofing &
Weatherproofing came to speak
and tell us about the company.
They also gave away lottery
tickets to thank us as well as
giving us a donation to the
activities.
Gerry reminded us of many
activities coming up, one of
which was not on the calendar.
On Sunday, Jan. 27, Weaver
Believers, a gospel, group that


has won many awards and,
played in Nashville, Tenn.,
came and played and sang.
Italian Dinner & Unique
Fashion Show was a big suc-
cess, Garry and Diane Delves
with all their helpers are all
appreciated for an evening of
fun..
ACTIVITIES
The Olde Tyme Shuffle at
Pioneer Creek held a shuffle-
board tournament, a fun game
for all ages, on Saturday, Jan.
19, dressed in 1913-era clothing
in honor of the 100th-year cele-
bration of shuffleboard in
Florida.
Shuffleboard was introduced
in St. Petersburg in 1913, and
has continued to grow through-
out the state with memberships
of about 13,600, with many
shufflers who play daily and
organized competitions held
weekly at different locations for
all skill'levels.
Results of Olde Tyme Tourn-
ament: Main Event first
place, Bob Conkle and Wayne
Shick; second place, Joan Bell
and Bob Hoskins; third place,
Cathy Payne and Nancy
Singleton; and fourth place,
Mamie Morton and Frank
Feeser.
How fun it was seeing all the
gang dressed in this attire and
talented, too! .
In bowling, high game for
the men was 214 and high
series 523, with Dave
Thompson bowling both. For
the women, high game was
Marilyn Achard 146 and high
series was Arlene Sebright 400.
Steve Mclntire picked up 3-
6-7-10 and a 2-5-7 split, and
Dave picked up a 4-5 split.
Great bowling, gang!


- Pri


COURTESY PHOTO
Dressed to celebrate shuffleboard's 100th anniversary
with an Olde Tyme Tournament.


Conversation is an art in which a man has all mankind for
competitors.
-Ralph Waldo Emerson


ROBBY ELLIOTT invites all,
his friends and neighbors
S -- to come see him at



205 N. Charleston Fort Meade
1-800-673-9512 *
www.directchevv.com V


MEETING NOTICE

HARDEE COUNTY CATTLEWOMEN

Thursday, January 31 at 6:30pm
Wildcat Grill
902 Hwy 17 S., Wauchula
Have you ever thought about getting involved?
Please come and see what we are all about. We
meet every quarter. For more information contact
Michelle Crosby Taylor by email at: gandm@wild-
blue.net or Gwen Shaw 781-5302.
soc1:31c



wLIDwEl
L.',L E. M.AP.Xt' O EIOBE* LIKVS CK E, (
.. MA, 'r L iEr-
s--

Sales:
Monday at 12 p.m.
Tuesday at 11 a.m.






Weekly Market Report:
www.OkeechobeeLivestockMarket.com
soc1:24tfc


Pioneer Creek RV News
By Reggie DeSmet


A Daily Thought
THURSDAY
My people, hear My teach-
ing; listen to the words of My
mouth. I will open My mouth
in parables. I will utter hid-
den things from of old." ...
Jesus spoke all these things
to the crowd in parables. He
did not say anything to them
without using a parable.
Psalm 78:1-2, Matthew 13:34 (NIV)
FRIDAY
Therefore, the Lord Himself
will give you a sign: the vir-
gin will be with child and will-
give birth to a Son, and will
call Him Immanuel God
with us. ... the angel of the
Lord said to Joseph, ..."She
will give birth to a son, and
you are to give Him the
name Jesus, Savior, be-
cause He will save His peo-
ple from thpir sins."
Isaiah 7:14, Matthew 1:20,23 (NIV)'
SATURDAY
He had no beauty or majesty
to attract us to Him, nothing
in His appearance that we
should value Him.... He was
despised and rejected by
men, a man of sorrows, and
familiar with suffering.
Isaiah 53:2b,3a (NIV)
SUNDAY
Surely, He took up our infir-
mities and carried our sor-
rows; yet we considered
Him stricken by God, smit-
ten by God and afflicted.. But
He was pierced for our trans-
gressions, He was crushed
for our iniquities; the punish-
ment that brought us peace
was upon Him, and by His
wounds, we are healed.
Isaiah 53:4-5 (NIV)
MONDAY
We all, like sheep, have
gone astray, each of us has
turned to his own way; and
the Lord God has laid on
Him the iniquity of us all.
Isaiah 53:6 (NIV)
TUESDAY
He was oppressed and
afflicted, yet He did not open
His mouth; He was led as a
lamb to9the.slaught.er, and as
a sheep before her'shearers
is silent, so He did not open
His mouth.
Isaiah 53:7 (NIV)


1 .7hA ve.g auchaF




7 HADESNIRHG SCHOOL
VAETN AY FLWRPLC


WEDNESDAY
For the transgression of My
people, He was stricken. He
was assigned a grave with
the wicked, and with the rich
in His death, though He had
done no violence, nor was
any deceit in His mouth.
Isaiah 53:8b-9 (NIV)


* Sign ups


* Friday February 1



* 4:30 to 7:30 pm

* HYFL Headquarters

(behind old junior high

gym)


(863) 245,1579


FLORISTS will ONLY deliver until
12 NOON, so please plan ahead.

No OTHER DELIVERIES_ FROM PARENTS
OR FRIENDq WILL BE PERMITTED!

NO DELIVERIES WILL BE TAKEN
WITHOUT ,TUDENT'P FULL NAME
AND ID NUMBER.


soc1:31,2:7: : ,


Hydr$


Hydroponic (Growers.


STRAWBERRIES

U-PICK

NO BENDING NO KNEELING

U-PICK VE Gees!!!
MANATEE COUNTY'S ONLY HYDROPONIC U-PICK FARM
Tuesday Saturday 10am 5pm
Sunday 11am -5pm
Closed Monday
FREE CLASSES ON "HOW TO START YOUR GARDEN"
CALL AND MAKE YOUR RESERVATION NOW!


Phone (941) 322-0429
7308 Verna Bethany, Myakka City, Fl 34251
TAKE SR 70 EAST 12 MILES FROM 1-75.
www.hydrotaste.com


Spring Football





Hardee Youth Football League

is proud to present the first

annual Spring Flag Football

season for

ages 5-16!!







Cost $75.00


Find Hardee Youth

Football on


1:24,31c


Hardee Senior High School will ONLY be taking
deliveries from FLORISTS for Valentine's Day.

Flowers will ONLY be allowed
on Thursday, February 14th, 2013.


. 4


Taste


soc1:31c


I





6B The Herald-Advocate, January 31,2013





-The



ABOUT ... Classifieds
DEADLINE ....Tuesday noon
RATES ..........Minimum of $4.50 for 10 words. Each addi-
tional word is .25 cents. Ads in all capitals
are .35 cents per word. Headlines are $2 a
line. Blind ad box numbers are $3 extra.
BILLING ........Ads must be pre-paid.

CLASSIFICATIONS:


Agriculture
Appliances
Automobile
Boats
Furniture
Guns
Help Wanted.
Houses
Livestock
Lost & Found
Miscellaneous
Motorcycles


Mobile Homes
Notices
Personal
Pets
Plants/Produce
Real Estate
Recreational
Rentals
Rentals, Commercial
Services
Wanted
Yard Sales


SUBSTITUTE SCHOOL
BUS DRIVERS WANTED








CONTACT
HARDEE COUNTY SCHOOL
TRANSPORTATION DEPARTMENT
1277W. MAIN ST.
WAUCHULA, FL 33873
(863) 773-4754


L AMBER
REALTY INC. T
404 South 6th Avenue
Wauchula, FL 33873
Move-In-Ready! 3B/4Bth CB/Stucco home with
new kitchen, large rooms, wet bar, wine cellar, in
ground pool, spa and many more amenities.
5836 total sq. ft. situated on .87 acre. Call to see!
$240,000
BE THE FIRST TO SEE! Nice 3B/1.5Bth home
located west Zolfo Springs, large family room,
central A/C, all appliances included. $112,000
Lovely setting with grandfather oaks fo" this
2B/lBth, CB home located on 5 lots in Zolfo
Springs. $40,000

( SERVICE YOU C
DORIS S. LAMBERT, G.R.I., Broker
ASSOC
DELOIS JOHNSON 781-2360
STEVE JOHNSON 781-0518
SUE BIRGE 781-3536


Classifieds


NOW PURCHASING citrus fruit
for the 2012/13 season for
Chapman Fruit (C Call Frank
Vasquez 781-4133. 12:13-5:30p
L. DICKS INC. is now purchasing
citrus fruit for the 2012/13 season
and beyond. Call Mark Manuel @
781-0384. 7:8tfc


WE PAY TOP $$$ for junk cars,
863-245-1351. 1:31-2:28p


FOR SALE OR TRADE $10,000
OBO 1990 International & 20 ton
tilt trailer, new tires, floor, lights &
paint. 864-359-9024 or 863-735-
0241. 1:31 p
2004 IMPALA $2,200 cash, 781-
1062. 1:31c
2000 PT CRUISER $3,000 cash,
781-1062. 1:31c


REVELL dIIVTo SaLES












HELP WANTED
DETENTION DEPUTY
$34,66000

The Hardee County Sheriff's Office is seeking
Florida Certified Correction Officers. Applicants
must possess a current certification in Corrections
and meet the requirements set forth by the Florida
Department of Law Enforcement Training and
Standards Commission. Applicants must success-
fully complete the personnel selection process set
forth by the Sheriff's Office.
Applications may be obtained and returned to the
Sheriff's Office at 900 E. Summit St., Wauchula, FL,
By 5 p.m., Feb. 15, 2013. If other accommodations
are necessary, call the Sheriff's Office, 863-773-
0304 to make arrangements. EOE
cl1 :31,2:7c


Bus. (863) 773-0007 '
Fax: (863) 773-0038
www.lambertrealty.net
Sue Birge
2B/2Bth M/H, carpet floors, inside utility and
storage shed. $35,000
Plenty of space in this large home! 3B/2.5Bths,
screened patio, living, dining, family rooms,
inside utility, outside utility bldg. Potential 4th
bedroom and office. $139,000
Executive Home in lovely neighborhood!
4B/3Bth built in 2006 with all modern conve-
niences, tile and carpet floors, fireplace, 3 car
garage, wood deck; great curb appeal. $284,900

7AN COUNT ON [
KENNETH A. LAMBERT, Broker
IATES
CHARLOTTE TERRELL 781-6971
BEVERLY ALLEN 863-448-6610
-c


U


JIM SEE REALTY, INC.

206 North 6th Avenue, Wauchula, FL 33873
Office (863)773-0060 Evening (863)781-1338
www.jimseerealty.com
James V. See, Jr., Broker


FOR RENT!
2 BR/I BA apartment.
2 BR/2 BA apartment.
Very secure apartments in Wauchula.
CONTRACT PENDING! 3 Bedroom, 1 Bath
frame home in Zolfo Springs. Adorable, well
taken care of home. Fully furnished! $41,900
Mini-warehouse for sale in town. 19 units that
are all rented. $155,000. Call for details.
Convenience store located on Martin Luther
King Jr Avenue. Great cash flow potential. 2 cool-
ers, I freezer and all shelving included. Good
return on investment. $289,000
UNDER CONTRACT! 2 Bedroom, 2 Bath home
in Golfview on 2.1 acres. Nice barn with concrete
floor, garden tub and screened porch. Listed at
$159,500
2 Bedroom, 2 Bath mobile home with a 1 bed-
room, I bath detached mother in law apartment.
Fenced 2 '4 acres with a pole barn. Asking
$69,500


Jim See


ltor Associates
Calvin Bates (863) 381-2242
Dusty Albritton (863) 781-0161
Parker Keen (813) 523-1523


cl1:31c


FARM WORKER gathering and
processing produce, to include
cleaning, packaging and ship-
ping. 40 hr/wk @ $16,910/yr; days
& hrs. vary; no exp. req. Call Mr.
Alan Hall, Wauchula, FL of Severt
& Sons Produce, Inc. (Mon & Frl.
ONLY, 3-5 PM) at 863-773-5708.
1:31,2:7p
EXPERIENCED RANCH HAND
needed for citrus & cattle ranch in
Hardee & DeSoto, FT or PT. Send
resume to: RO. Box 338,
Wauchula, FL 33873. Attn: ND
1:24-2:14c
F/T PERMANENT BOOKKEEPER
position, experience preferred,
MUST BE bilingual. Apply in per-
son at 120 N. 4th Avenue,
Wauchula. 1:24,31c
INTERN. Bilingual, English and
Spanish Assisted Living Facility,
must pass step 2 drug test, 863-
773-6829. 1:24-2:21p
ISLAND OF ADVENTURE now hir-
ing. Inquire in person, 1258 West
Main St., Wauchula, 863-767-
0800. 1:24,31c


AM-SOUTH REALTY
Each office independently owned and operated.


IP I F. \


Robert Hinerman Nancy Craft
227-0202 832-0370


LOOKING FOR A PREMIER HOME ON 5
ACRES? 4BR, 2 1/2 Bth, Formal LR, DR, FR,
Ultra Modern Kitchen w/Breakfast RM,
Vaulted Ceilings. Laundry Room has ample
cabinetry, sink, w/tank-less hot water
heater, w/working space. 3 Car Garage
w/storage areas. Separate 2 BR, 1 Bth
Mother-in-Law Suite. The property features
a two stall horse barn with tack room. The
Home and Mother-In-Law Suite overlooks
lovely pond and acreage.

A QUIET FAMILY HOME! This 3 bedroom, 2
bath brick home is on quiet no traffic road
outside of city limits. Large oaks in yard,
outbuildings, and alarm system. Priced 0
$159.900

SIMPLY PEACEFUL!! only S60.000 for this 3
BD, 2Bth MH on 9.54 acres located in a
country setting.

PRICE REDUCTION!! Check out these 5
acres of peacefulness Paradisel Property Is
secluded and yet only 10 minutes from
town. S75.000

COMFORT HOME!! 3/2 home built in 2007
In Avon Park Lakes. The home has stain-
less steel appliances, laminated wood
floors, double car garage, and much more.
Priced @ S89.900.

HOME ON CUL-DA-SAC! 3 Bedroom 2 Bath
Family House. New insulation in attic, well
water, septic tank, electric by Progress
Energy, oversized LNDRY RM. W/Outside
entry, doubles as office. New 5 TN air han-
dler & HT pump, LGE 2 car carport, Extra
storage BLD.

AUTOMOTIVE MECHANIC SHOP! Shop Is
on .6 Acres includes 3 lifts and large air
compressor. 2400 SF In mechanic building,
624 SF in office building. Close to US HWY
17. Great Investment potential. $169.900

RENTAL AVAILABLE!!

BEAUTIFUL 2 BEDROOM, 2 1/2 BATH
TOWNHOUSE APARTMENT, $650. MONTH-
LY, WITH $650 DEPOSIT. 1051 DOWNING
CIRCLE, WAUCHULA CALL 773-2122

GO TO: HomePath.com For More Fannie


713 N. 9th Ave., Wauchula, 4/2
$79,000 OBO. Carol's Realty, 863-
412-8932. 1:31c
609 W. Main St, Wauchula, 3/2
$60,000, make offer. Carol's
Realty, 863-412-8932. 1:31c


FOUND: LAKE DALE area cow
with D5 brand. Call to claim 863-
448-2950. 1:31 nc
LOST: 2 bulls, 1 Cha. and 1
Angus, Steve Roberts Special
area, 863-773-3757. 1:31,2:7p

0==.
HANDICAP SCOOTER, good con-
dition, with charger, $300, 863-
832-0181. 1:31,2:7p
GOT ROACHES? GOT BED-
BUGS? Kill them all with famous
Harris Roach and Bedbug prod-
ucts. Available at: Ace Hardware,
222 E. Oak St., Wauchula, 863-
773-3148 and Ace Hardware, 320
N. Charleston Ave., Ft. Meade,
863-285-8158. 1:31p-2:21 p


702 SOUTH 6th AVENUE, WAUCHULA
(863) 773-2122 FAX (863) 773-2173
Gary Delatorre Broker
www.cbhardee.corn


Richard Dasher Victor Salazar
781-0162 245-1054


MOBILE HOME W/ ACREAGE! Take a look at
this cute 3 BD, 2Bth mobile home located on
5.14 acres in Zolfo Springs. Priced at
$134.900
GREEN ACRES INDEED!! 40 acres on the
corner of Vandolah Rd. and Dink Albritton
with 12 acres of plastic, ready to farm! The
remaining acreage is cleared with a one acre
POND on the back corner. Asking $7.500 per
acre.
ACRES!! 10 acres on Vandolah Rd. that cur-
rently has some producing orange trees.
This piece of land can be purchased alone or
with a 40 acre parcel nearby. Asking price
S60.000.
COMMERCIAL PROPERTY!! This is a PRIME
location right on Highway 17 In Bowling
Green. Priced at $39.500
GREAT NEIGHBORHOOD! This 3 BR, 2 BTH
customs home has great amenities for com-
fortable living. Screen back porch w/hot tub,
34 FT. screen pool and patio, master
Bedroom French doors open to this area of
relaxation and recreation. Family RM
w/wood burning fireplace and vaulted ceil-
ing. Must see this home to appreciate the
beauty and comfort.
HOME SWEET HOMEI this 3 bedroom, 2
bath mobile home is almost brand new,
everything inside is SPOTLESS. Come by
and take a LOOK!! Asking Price S64.900
LOOKING FOR HOME W/WORKSHOP? Look
no further than this 4 Bedroom, 2 Bath
charming CB home with central heat/air,
tile/carpet flooring, shed/workshop all within
City of Wauchula. This home is priced at sell
@ $85.000
NEWLY LISTED!! This home is ready for youl
Fully FURNISHED with everything you need
to make yourself at home, perfect for a cou-
ple from up north or a newlywed from down
south. This home has granite countertops In
the kitchen and the bathrooms, there are
also two sheds outside with plenty of stor-
age space. $53.000
GREAT STARTER HOME! This 3 bedroom 1
bath concrete home is a must see. Owner
has renovated in and expanded living area
into what used to be the garage. The bath-
room and kitchen has new tile floors and the
whole interior has been painted, the roof
was replaced after hurricanes and there is a
very large shed/workshop in the back.
Priced at $75.000
POSSIBLE OWNER FINANCING on newly
renovated 2 Bedroom, 1 1/2 Bath Town home
located on East Oak Street with 10% down..
cl :31c


HELP WANTED

MIDFLORIDA Credit Union is seeking part time teller
candidates for our Wauchula branch location.
Responsibilities include serving members, performing
transactions, and cross selling credit union products and
services. Qualified candidates will possess excellent
customer service, communication, cash handling and
computer skills. Applicants must be available to work any
assigned shift between 7:00 am and 7:00 pm Monday
through Friday as well as every Saturday between 8:30 am
and 1:00 pm. High school diploma/equivalency required,
Bilingual helpful. Apply on-line at www.midflorida.com.
Drug Free Workplace





afOur community credit union
cl :24,31c


U


NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
1999 GMC
ID#1GTCS19X4X8500784
8:00 a.m., Feb. 12,2013
Mr. E Pre-Owned Autos & Towing
1093 Hwy. 17 N. Wauchula, FL 33873
cl :31c


33 acre pasture with scattered trees. Close in to
Wauchula. 1156 ac can be purchased separately.
Total price $360,000.

Beautiful home located in Briarwood
Subdivision. 3 Bedroom, 2 1/ Bath house with
wrap around porch, detached 2 car garage with
office and full bath. Reduced to $339,000!

AVON PARK ESTATES! Beautiful 4 Bedroom, 2
!A Bath Home on over an acre of land! 2 car
garage, large screened porch and many more
upgrades. Asking $165,000

Commercial building with over 4,800 sf located
just off Highway 17 Southbound. Frontage on 2
roads with parking. Great opportunity for your
business. $149,000

NEW LISTING! 15 acres of pasture with scat-
tered trees, creek, barn & recessed entrance.
Located West of Wauchula on a paved road.
$90,000


Real
Rick Knight (863) 781-1396
John H. Gross (863) 273-1017
Shane Conley (863) 781-9664


C-


~115






January 31, 2013, The Herald-Advocate 7B


The


Classifieds


4X8 UTILITY TRAILER. Lights
work, fair condition, $250 OBO,
863-448-3058. 1:31p


UKC REGISTERED Redbone
Coonhounds, 8 wks., $450/
female, $500/male, 864-448-3048.
1:31,2:7p
ADOPT A PETI If you. have lost a
pet or are looking for a new one,
the City of Wauchula invites you
to come and see if you can find
the pet you're looking for. The
Wauchula Animal Control is locat-
ed at 685 Airport Road. Please
call 773-3265 or more informa-
tion. tfc-dh
ATTENTION State Statutes
828.29 requires that all cats and
dogs sold in Florida be at least 8
weeks old, have an official health
certificate, have necessary shots
and be free of parasites. tfc-dh


UTH


SOUTH
SS tLORIDA
1 -State College


MUSTARD, COLLARD GREENS,
Griffin Road, East of River. 1:31p


COUNTRY CEDAR Home, 5 acres,
3BR/2BA, $175,000. 863-375-
2389, 781-9470. 1:17-2:14p
1/4 ACRE MH lot at Charlie Creek
Estates, $10,000 firm, 863-899-
1714. 1:10tfc


3/2 MH, 5 Acres, East of town,
$800 monthly, $800 deposit, 863-
832-0562. 1:31p
MOBILE HOME, BG, 2BR SW,
$400 deposit, $550 month, 863-
781-1390. 1:31p
2BR/1BA in country with carport
and workshop area, $650 a
month, deposit $650, 863-832-
1000. 1:31c


600 West College Drive
Avon Park, FL 33825
(863) 784-7132
http://sfsc.interviewexchange.cbm


3/2 HOME, 501 North 7th,
Wauchula, $700/month, plus
deposit, 773-6998. 1:31p
2 BEDROOM 1 BATH, Duplex,
$550 month, $550 deposit, 773-
0100. 6:21tfc
*RENT-TO-OWN*
MOBILE HOMES 1, 2, 3
Bedrooms. Cheaper then paying
rent. Close to schools and hospi-
tal. Lot rent $300. Se habla
espanol. 863-698-4910 or 863-
698-4908. Call today. 7:5tfc
ULLRICH'S STORAGE UNITS,
several sizes, corner of 9th Ave. &
Goolsby St., 773-6448 or 773-
9291. 3:22tfc
ATTENTION The Federal Fair
Housing Act Prohibits advertising
any preference or limitation
based on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial status or
national origin, or the intention to
make such a preference or limita-
tion. Familial status includes chil-
dren under 18 living with parents'
or guardians and pregnant
women. tfc-dh.


SHOP AREA/LARGE STORAGE
Unit with office, all total 1,500 sq.
ft. for $596.50 monthly, includes
tax and electric. Call 773-3839
and ask for Ezzy. 1:31c


LYDIA'S HOUSE CLEANING
Services available. Call 863-773-
0877. 1:31tfc


COORDINATOR PUBLIC RELATIONS
Full-time, year-round position to provide professional support in
the Community Relations and Marketing Department for
external and internal public relations and marketing
communications. Bachelor's degree in the area of public
relations, journalism, communications, or related field required.
At least two years of directly related experience required.
Creative thinker with exceptional public relations writing skills.
Knowledge of Associated Press editing style. Computer skills,
particularly in desktop publishing (Adobe InDesign and
Photoshop) and, word processing required. Ability to meet
deadlines and perform appropriate level and quantity of work in
specified time. Starting salary range: $28,000-$30,000, plus a
comprehensive benefits package, including retirement,
health/life insurance, and vacation/sick leave. Application
deadline: February 19, 2013. Please visit our website to apply.
SFSC IS AN EQUAL ACCESS/EQUAL OPPORTUNITY INSTITUTION
cI1:31.2:7c




HARDEE CAR COMPANY
(across from First National Bank)

BUY HERE PAY HERE









Billy Hill, Owner

Mon.-Sat. 9am 7pm Sun. 1pm- 6pm

773-6667
-Also--


1ii.Iio IIfi o

11%;: Wau aCa W hnxt S


CARROLL'S TRUCKING We haul
heavy equip and farm machinerly.
We will beat any competitors
price. We haul it all 864-359-9024
or 863-735-0241. 1:31p
4,000 SQ. FT. ROOM available for
special events, 863-832-3438.
1:24tfc
GOT IRRIGATION? New Installa-
tion, repairs. Clean Cut Lawn
Care & Irrigation Service 863-781-
8215. 1:3-31 p
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS,
Thursday 7:00 p.m., Grace
Fellowship Church, 131 S. Bth
Ave., Wauchula. Bill 727-326-
.3816. 6:7tfc-dh
OVERCOMERS MEETINGS
(Gillesple), Woman's Club on
Wednesday, 7pm Kenny
Sanders is the facilitator. For
more information call 773-5717.
2:16tfc

NEED A WELL OR HAVE PUMP
TROUBLE? CALL
ULLRICH'S PITCHER PUMP
For complete well, sales,
service and Installation,
call (863) 773-6448.
7:18tfc
THE WAUCHULA LIONS CLUB
collects NOT broken prescription
eyeglasses, cases and sunglass-
es. Please drop off at 735 N. 6th
Ave. tfc-dh
DO YOU HAVE a problem with
drugs? Narcotics Anonymous
meets Mpnday and Thursday
nights 7:00 p.m. at First United
Methodist Church, at the corner
of Palmetto and 7th Ave., Wau-
chula. tfc-dh


Women, do you

need lower rent?

See if you qualify call

735-2222 or 773-5717|



BEAUTIFUL LAKEFRONT










3/2 2300 sq ft CB on Lake Carrie in Lake Placid.
Has canal leading to famous Lake June.
Totally Renovated. Will trade for improved
pasture land in Hardee or Highlands counties. q
$239,900
Call 863-699-0220 Email bljbarb@yahoo.com


Joe Lem avis


John O'Neal


R E A


L T 0 RS
(863) 773-2128


REALTORS
S;|JOE L. DAVIS
B JOE L. DAVIS, JR.
REALTOR JOHN H. O'NEAL
See more listings at
www.joeldavis.com
REAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS


PRICE REDUCED! 20 acs PRICE REDUCED! Paradise:
zoned industrial on Hwy 17. Little Gasparilla Island-Beach
$399,000! Condo. 2BR/2BA, Gulf front.
$220,000!
PRICE REDUCED! 10 ac
w/paved rd frontage. Great for PRICE REDUCED! Triple-
pasture, farming or homesite. wide MH of 3,314 square feet.
$49,500! This home has many amenities
PRICE REDUCED! 50 acs in and sits on a nice 5 acre tract.
NE Desoto Co; deer, turkey, $95,000!
wild hogs, beautiful live oaks,
improved pasture, pond & PRICE REDUCED! Wow!
creek. NOW $190,000! Great home in Popash area on
2.5 acs. 2 miles from town.
PRICE REDUCED! 38.5+ acs1380
on the Peace River w/lots of $138,000!
beautiful oaks, pines & palmet-
tos! Pole barn & 2BR/2BA MH. PRICE REDUCED! 3BR/2BA
$420,000! MH on 5- acs w/frontage on SR
62. NOW $60,000!
PRICE REDUCED! Commer-
cial property on US17! 38 stor- 9.8 acs fronts SR 64 near
age units w/partial roof, city Popash. Great for homesite or
utilities, zoned C-2, sold "as is"! agriculture. $89,000!
NOW $200,000!
RFAI TOR ASSOCIATES AFTER. HOURS
KENNY SANDERS......781-0153 KAREN O'NEAL.....-.. 781-7633
KEVIN S.NDERS......_990-309 MONICAREAS ..- 71-0888
DAV'ID RO.AL ............781-3490 JIMUNl EDENFIELD.-..448-2821
HIGHWAY 17 SOUL'H, WAUCHULA. FL 33873 ci:3


Enter this weeks discount code

64770=
and receive your discount
Expires: Feb. 14, 2013


2 BEAUTIFUL King pillow top mat-
tresses. New in plastic. $4,000
new will take $450, includes
frame. Refrigerators and all kinds
of furniture on sale this weekend.
Also digital T.V. box. Ms. Edna's
Place next to Double J. 1:31c
SATURDAY, 9-? 1520 Old Polk
Road, Wauchula. Electric guitar'
and amp., garden tiller, china cab-
inet, tools, toys, dining room set.
1:31p
FRIDAY/SATURDAY, 8 am-? 3221
Myrtle Street, Zolfo. Furniture,
jewelry, etc. 1:31p
IS ALCOHOL CAUSING a prob.
lem? Call Alcoholics Anonymous
in Hardee County at 781-6414.
Several weekly meetings.
tfc-dh
ATTENTIONI State Statutes 489-
119 Section 5 Paragraph B and
Hardee County Ordinance 87-09
Section 10 Paragraph D require,
all ads for any construction-relat-
ed service to carry the contrac-
tor's license number., tfc-dh



MISSION THRIFT STORE INC.
123 N. 7th Ave. All donations
appreciated. Pick-up available for
large Items. 773-3069. 1:12tfc
HEAVEN SCENT THRIFT STORE
Helping Sherry White Ministries
help others! 912 Hwy. 17 South
(across from McDonalds)
Wauchula, 863-773-9777.
11:15ffc
LYDIA'S HOUSE THRIFT STORE
Helping ladies overcome 1.02
Carlton Street (directly behind
Heaven Scent), Wauchula, 863-
773-3034. 11:15tfc
THE MUSTARD SEED THRIFT
Store. Helping Sherry White
Ministries help others Donations
appreciated/ volunteers wel-
come! 132 Hwy 17 South
Wauchula, 863-773-6153.
11:15tfc


ATTIC SALE 131 N. 8th Ave.
Friday Noon, Saturday 7-3, Feb 1
and 2. Sofas, chest of drawers,
tables, clothes. Something for
everyone. 1:31p
8TH ANNUAL APARTMENT Com-
plex. Forest Glade Apartments,
700 East Townsend St. and River
Chase Apartments, 316 River
Chase Circle (off East Oak Street)
Wauchula. Saturday, 8 am 1 pm.
Lots of men, women, and children
clothes. Toys, and lots of misc.
Items. Something for everyone.
1:31p
SATURDAY, 8-Noon, 1229
Vandolah Road. Boys and girls
power wheels, twin and toddler
beds, toys clothes. 1:31p
SATURDAY ONLY 8am-? 2851
Schontag Road., Wauchula. Over
100 DVDs, clothing for babies,
children, juniors and adults, baby
items, household items, decor
and much more. 1:31c
SATURDAY, 8-? 614 E. Saunders
Street, Wauchula. 2 families.
1:31p
FRIDAY/SATURDAY, 8 am noon.
312 Riverside Drive, Wauchula.
Women, men and junior size
clothes (some junior size still
have tags), shoes, other Items.
1:31c
RUMMAGE SALE, Feb. 1-2.
Friday, 8 am 4 pm, Saturday, 8
am 12 noon. St. Michael Church
Parish Hall, 408 Heard Bridge
: Road, Wauchula. I 1:31p
-SATURDAY, 8'-?, 1144 Sparrow
Rd. (in the Village of Charlie
Creek). 1:31p
SATURDAY ONLY Truck rims,
boat, German Shepard, apple and
palm tree, decorations, clothes,
nicknacks. Lots of misc. Hanchey
Rd., Wauchula. 1:31p
SALE- FRIDAY, SATURDAY. New
Philadelphia Worship, 140 E.
Main Street, Bowling Green.
1:31p
FRIDAY, SATURDAY, 8-? 1621
Dena Circle, Golfvlew, Hwy. 64 W.
1:31p


Realtors
NOEY A. FLORES, BROKER
310 Court St. .
Wauchula, Florida 33873
(863) 773-3337 Fax: (863) 773-0144 NoN A. ores


www.florcsrealty.net


863-781-4585


SPECIAL OF THE WEEK!



-7




WAUCHULA 3BR/2BA CB Home with a pool. Central air &
heat, ceramic tile thought out, large 27x24 family room with
fireplace and fenced backyard. Priced at $109,000
WAUCHULA 3BR/2BA Home on a % acre corner lots, built in
2003. 1206 Sqft total. Asking $59,900. Ask us about qualifying for
$25,000 down payment assistance.
WAUCHULA 4BR/2BA Mobile Home on 20+/- acres with cen-
tral air & heat on a private road. Completely fenced for cattle or
horse, large open living area, garden tub, carport, and front
porch. Home sits to the back of the property for lots of privacy.
Offered at $175,000
WAUCHULA 3BR/1.5BA CB home Central Air & Heat -
Fresh paint inside and out Just outside the city limits. -Asking
$69,900
WAUCHULA Wooded vacant lot! 2.75 +/- acres on St Rd 64
West, great residential building lot with lots of big oaks. Priced to
sell at $29,900

WE SHARE THE SAME MLS WITH HIGHLANDS COUNTY!
F1 Remember, Our listings are on the Internet. d,
Anyone with a computer can access them anytime! r J
0I After Hours





Oralia D. John D. Jason Michael D. Jamle
Flores Freeman Johnson Boyett Spurlock
Broker Sales Sales Sales Broker
Associate Associate Associate Associate Associate
863-781-2955 863-781-4084 863-781-3734 863-781-2827 863.835-1611
WHY RENT WHEN YOU CAN BUY AND BUILD EQUITY!!! cl1:31c


Billy & nice's Rentals Bowling Green Flea Market
Houses & Apartments cl11:31c


ffL6q ffY

Chevrolet / Chrysler / Jeep / Dodge
Ram Trucks / Ford
Is EXPLODING with new sales!

.Hardee County's largest automobile
dealer needs THREE sales
professionals to keep up
with the demand!

NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY!
We will train the right people.
Great benefits and more!
Call Kevin Hanchey at
(863) 773-4744
or stop by the dealership
at 1405 U.S. Hwy 17 S. in Wauchula

DRESS FOR IMMEDIATE INTERVIEW.
EOE/DFWP ci :0otfc


-]I


/ .-^.M^f^.lHlHir^M *


mssss





8B The Herald-Advocate, January 31,2013


The


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Classifieds


Letter To The Editor

Pursuing Positivity in 2013


I


0


MimilMS AT !ALEMI S


Large
Cars to


Selection of
Choose From


Buy Here Pay Here
MB o &30 Day rGuarantee '
^ By on Motor & Transmission Only
BI L TTN TEEAHMLO


Investment Fraud

Can Hit Close To Home


If


Dear Editor:
As we embark on 2013 let us
step in cadence with one anoth-
er creating an atmosphere of
camaraderie for corrupting
words are detrimental to the
success of our community.
Instead, we should dwell on
positivity, encouraging one
another. While our paths may
not constantly align and philos-
ophy may differ, together we
shall work to build a kinship of
good.
Each organization and inde-
pendent mind must abandon
hasty words and loose tongues.
Debate is always welcome and
necessary for democracy; how-
ever, accusations and harsh ver-
biage only limit true discussion.
Economic development is
composed of discourse and
boasts abundant success. The
Auditor General started the
process of an Operational Audit
for the Hardee County Indus-
trial Development Authority in
2012, as he did in every special
district throughout Florida.
Throughout 2012, the Florida
Auditor General completed 195
audits of universities, local gov-:,
ernments, school boards etc.
According to the "Tentative and
Preliminary Findings," the
auditor general's interpretation,
of the statutes regarding eco-
nomic' development differs
from those of the IDA and its
legal counsel.
At the most recent meeting,
The Industrial Development
Authority (IDA) has united to
formulate answers to the Audit-
or General's "Tentative and
Preliminary Findings." Through
further conversation and expla-
nation it is hoped that both par-
ties will work together to gain
understanding of all positions
and philosophies involved.
The IDA has celebrated the
accomplishment of the Mosaic
Agreement which has laid the
foundation to recruit economic
development. The funding from
the Mosaic Agreement has
allowed jobs to be created, as
seen in the Hardee County
Commerce Park. Take a drive
through the Commerce Park on
any week day and see the num-
ber of people who have found
their careers.
Credited to the IDA, Hardee
County, unlike any rural com-
munity in central Florida, can
provide broadband, wireless
internet to every home. The
IDA has also dove into the
process of creating an entirely
new industry with the recruit-


ment of Continuum Labs, Inc.
and the establishment of
TechRiver.
The Community Redevelop-
ment Agency (CRA) has com-
pleted the construction of the
south half of the Train Depot
and is currently financing the
construction of the north half.
The Historic Train Depot is
housing Peace River Explor-
ations and will be serving the
community as a tourist center,
museum and art gallery. The
CRA was also awarded the
Brownfield Grant from the EPA
and is dispersing it into the
community in the forms of
grants. The CRA is preparing
for the four phase construction
plan to improve and create
parking in downtown Wauchu-
la.
Main Street Wauchula is
serving the community and
downtown businesses by host-
ing three new events in the first
of the year. January 25th will be
the Historical Ghost Tour and
will allow you to meet voices
from the past! February 8th,
Wine, Shop & Dine will be fea-
tured in businesses along Main
Street. March 8th and 9th is the
inaugural Slice of Life Heritage
Festival, where we will be hon-
oring our roots and our culture!
The Chamber of Commerce
is working diligently to create
an environment of opportunity
for business owners in Hardee
County. Initiatives are being
taken, including a lobbying trip
to Tallahassee, the formation of
a Business Advocacy Commit-
tee and taking on the responsi-.
bility of vetting potential busi-
nesses for 'the Economic
Development Council.
Chamber has purchased new
website software, Chamber
Nation, which allows each,
member to set up an independ-
ent webpage. The new website
www.hardeecc.com is more
user friendly and allows
browsers to access the member-
ship directory through cate-
gories. The website also has
.upgraded features including a
commrqpijy calepnar, blog and
broadcast messages.
2013 is sure to be the most
productive year yet; together
we are encouraging each other
and striving for a healthy
Hardee County.
Krystin Chapman
Communication Coordinator
Hardee County Economic
Development Office
Wauchula


REAL SATE
-- Heartland Real Estate Corp.
3200 US FIwy 27 S, Suite 201
Sebring, Forida 33870
y(863) 382-3887


WE HAVE BUYERS FOR GROVES
CALL MIKEY TODAY!
11.65 ACRES READY FOR YOUR DREAM HOME.
2 miles from town, paved road, large oaks, pond, fenced, & 4" well.
Call Mikey $99,000
EAST HARDEE COUNTY HOME ON 2.24 ACRES
4 bedroom, 2 bath, beautiful ranch style home, fenced, mature
oaks, feeding barns, 40 x 40 barn, great kitchen.
Call Pam Cooper @863-414-4970 for more information!
To View Available Properties Visit Our Website @
www.HeartlandRE.net cd:sci


U.S. Hwy. 17 Bowling Green 375-4441
$'Huge Discounts for Cash Deals $
24 Hour Towing'Service Lowest Possible Rates Fast and Reliable
781-3090 or 781-3091 cI: otfc


Billy Ayers
Tire Technician
773-0777 773-0727
116 REA Rd., Wauchula
CI] (across from Wal-Mart)


YARD SALE

TIWhen:

Friday, 02/01/13

and Saturday, 02/02/13

8 a.m.- 3 p.m.

Where:

Ft. Green Baptist Church
2875 Baptist Church Rd.

Ft. Green Community
(off St Rd 62)

Proceeds to benefit a Mission Group from
the Church to Malawi Africa during the
summer of 2013 cl .31c
___ c11:31c


When it comes to investing,
experts caution against blindly
trusting social contacts.
They also say it can be sur-
prising to find out who is really
a wolf in sheep's clothing. The
good news is there are steps you
can take to protect yourself.
According to Gerri Walsh,
president of the FINRA In-
vestor Education Foundation,
fraudsters will often invest their
tjme to develop relationships
and credibility in a particular
community. Typically, a scam
artist may pose as a financial
expert and a friend.
When rnraking any kind of
financial investment, even
amongst friends, Walsh sug-
gests you always exercise cau-
tion. Here are some simple
steps to avoid becoming a vic-
tim of investment fraud.
Learn to spot the "source
credibility" fraud tactic. Is the
seller trying to build credibility.
by claiming he is from a rep-
utable firm or is well estab-
lished in the neighborhood?
Beware if emphasis is placed on
the relationship you have with
the seller rather than on critical'
specifics -- such as why the
investment is the right fit for
your financial objectives, how
the investment makes money
and how it can lose money.
Learn to spot the "social
consensus" fraud tactic. The
seller may try to convince you
that everyone else is doing it.
Even if that's true, the populari-
ty of the investment should not
be your deciding factor.
Ask and check before in-


vesting. Ask the seller about his
license to sell securities and
check with authorities to verify
the information even if you
know him.
A Cautionary Tale
Unfortunately, it is( possible
that someone you trust and
socialize with could defraud
you. That's what happened to
Ruth and Len Mitchell, who
were victims of an $11 million
Ponzi scheme run by their
neighbor and friend, Barry
Korcan.
Korcan kept the books for
Len's business, was in Ruth's
skating club and did the
Mitchells' personal taxes. So
when Korcan came to them
with an opportunity to invest
$130,000 in real estate bonds,
the Mitchells did not think to
question the legitimacy of the
investment.
The Mitchells were not the
only ones to fall into Korean's
investment fraud scheme. Over
time, many of the Mitchells'
friends and business associates
also started investing 'with
Korcan, believing in the
Mitchells' trust that Korcan was
a legitimate seller.
The IRS finally uncovered
Korcan's Ponzi scheme and
convicted him for mail fraud
and tax evasion. The bad news'
is that the Mitchells and their
friends had already lost their
money.
For more tips on protecting
yourself from fraud, visit the
FINRA Foundation's website at
www.SaveAndlnvest.org/Learn
More.


No collection of people who are all waiting for the same
thing are capable of holding a natural conversation.
Even if the thing they are waiting for is only a taxi.
-Ben Elton


KELLER WILLIAMS
RA ... Y

Do you h pe to
Buy, Sell or Rent?

I can help!

M,' V'., (863)781-3627 o
Donna Steffens -




ZOLFO SPRINGS B HERE
'- 735-0188 pA


Pan Ft w n
Mon. Wed. 10am- 6P-; Fri. & Sat. 10..-7,m/Closed Thursday & Sunday
3505 US HwY 17 S ZOLFO SPRINGS cii:lotfc










I Golf Cart Batteries
I (Set Of 6 PowerTron Six Volt)
I Pick-up & Delivery not Included with this offer.
I Must bring coupon to receive offer. I
I Ti I NST,,,ATON H-OW -AALAB- E
ON SITE INSTALLATION NOW AVAILABLE


I






s.,CH 3-DIG!T 326
4P 4S
S050-08-03
,.'ESITY OF FLORlOA
cR o E VORY
GA1j E FL 32611-0oo0
ES1LL


The Herald-Advocate
(USPS 578-780)
Thursday, January 31, 2013


Special Athletes On Track!


Hardee County adult athletes
with disabilities participated in
a track-and-field event organ-
ized by Special S.T.A.R.S. on
Dec. I at Wildcat Stadium.
About 40 local athletes with
various disabilities participated.
"The purpose of this event
today was to demonstrate that
everyone can participate in
track and field no matter what
their abilities are," said Special
S.T.A.R.S. Coordinator Cindy
Marshall. "It taught the volun-
teers to think outside the box
and find a way to help an athlete
to participate. Athletes don't
have to be sprint runners to do
track and field in Special
S.T.A.R.S. We just want them
to get out in the sunshine and
get some exercise."
They first competed in a soft-
ball throw. For those who were
unable to throw the softball,
they threw a tennis ball. They
each got three throws which
were measured. Kevin Wyche
:he best throw at 95 feet,
inches.
think we got some poten-
or a good softball team,"
.ee County Special
k.R.S. Director Missy
.-gl1er said.
The rest of the athletes took
their turns to try to beat Wyche.
"Back way up because I am
going to throw it far," special
athlete Jessie Miranda warned
the volunteers during the event.
"I did it!" screamed Christa
Haege as she threw the ball.
SAthletes then headed for the
track. Events were set up for
athletes to either walk, run or be
pushed in wheelchairs for 50
yards. One athlete who is visu-
ally impaired was really excited
when he learned that he would
be able walk down the track on
his own.
"I can't wait to try this," siid
special athlete Kenneth Krantz.
At first he was a little skepti-
cal, but after volunteers gave
him a test run he felt reassured
that he could handle it. A rope
was strung from the starting
line to the finish line for the 50-
._. yard walk:The.rope was thread-
ed through ap pl;.e of PV3 pipe,
which is what Krantz held onto
as he guided it down the rope.
Although Krantz was not the
fastest racer on the track, he fin-
ished the walk with a smile and
did it in 1:59.32. Wyche was the
fastest runner by finishing the
race in 5.10 seconds, while Jack
Garnett was right behind him


Four athletes in wheelchairs are lined up on the track by their running partners as they
prepare to race.


ehiny Krantz gets some last-minute pointers from volunteo-s as he prepares to walk
.0 meters down the track on his own. Krantz is visually impaired and this was the first
time for him to attempt this event.


with a 5.67. The fastest time for
walking was recorded by Gloria
Himelright at 11.38.
There were four athletes in
wheelchairs who recruited able-
bodied athletes to push them in


The Doctrine of Signatures was an ancient belief that
plants, by the shape or form of their parts, indicated to
man their medicinal uses.


Stop by and see why I have
won Ford's customer service
award several times.


1031 U.S. Highway 17 N.
Wauchula, Florida 33873
(863) 781-1947 Gene Davis
www. flWHJ)n0fY.OM Sales Manager


a race. Even those who were
unstable in walking were able
to have a volunteer walk beside
. them for balance to complete
the race.
Special S.T.A.R.S. stands for
Sports Training And Recrea-
tional Services, and is a pro-
gram for adults and children
with physical and mental dis-
abilities. Currently, Hardee
offers bowling and will be
adding a track and field pro-
gram. Swimming may also be
added next year. There is also
a social recreational club of-
fered for those who want to
enjoy dances and other fun
events.
To learn more about the pro-
gram, contact Ziegler at (863)
445-0407 or Marshall at (863)
452-1295, extension 124. Ap-
plications are available for ath-
letes, and volunteers are always
needed as well as donations.


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'I.
'S


Christa Haege winds up to throw the softball during the
special track.and-field event in Wauchula on Dec. 1.


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PAGE ONE


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1.3-31c :


1:24-4:3c







2C The Herald-Advocate, January 31, 2013





Schedule of Weekly Services


Printed as a Public Service

.-Mhg eiald-Advocate" `
Wauchulo, Florida

deadline: Thursday 5 p.m.

BOWLING GREEN
APOSTOLIC LIGHTHOUSE
UNITED PENTECOSTAL
CHURCH
310 Orange St.
375-3100
Sunday Morning ................ 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening .............:......6:00 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting........ 7:00 p.m.
Thursday Service ................ 7:30 p.m.

CHESTER GROVE MB CHURCH
708 W. Grape St. 375-3353
Sunday School .................... 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship ...... ........ 8:00 a.m.
Sun. Eve. Worship 1st & 3rd 4:00 p.m.
Tues. Prayer/Bible Study ......6:00 p.m.

CHRISTIAN BIBLE
FELLOWSHIP
Hwy. 17 South
Morning Worship .............. 10:30 a.m.
Youth Group Sunday ..........6:00 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
121 West Broward St. 375-2231
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .......... :... 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday .......................... 7:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
TRUE HOLINESS OUTREACH
725 Palmetto St.
375-3304
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Tues. Night Bible Study ...... 7:30 p.m.
Evening Worship
Ist Sunday .................... 5:00 p.m.

COMMUNITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Main & W. Centra.
Sunday AM Worship............10:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening ....................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer Meeting ............7:00 p.m.

FAITH ASSEMBLY OF GOD
4937 Hwy. 17 N. 375-4206
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Disciples Train & Choirs ......5:30 p.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Bowling Green
S. Hwy. 17. 375-2253

Bible Study .......................... 9:30 a.m .
Morning Worship ................0:45 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6:30 p.m.
WEDNESDAY:
Discipleship Training
Youth & Adult ................ 6:30 p.m.
AWANA (ages 3-5th grade) ....6:30 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Grape & Church Streets 375-2340
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship .............. 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study .................. :00 p.m.

FORT GREEN BAPTIST
CHURCH
Baptist Church Road 773-9013
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship .............. 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening .................. 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ..............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

HOLY CHILD
SPANISH CATHOLIC MISSION
Misa (Espanol) Sunday ........7:00 p.m.

IGLESIA DEL DIOS VIVO
105 Dixiana St. 375-4191
Domingo De Predicacion ....11-:00 p.m.
Martes Estudio Biblico..........7:00 p.m.
Miercoles Estudior Juvenil ....7:00 p.mn.
Jueves De Predicacion ..........7:00 p.m.

IMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH
210 E. Broward St. 375-4681
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ............ 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m

MACEDONIA PRIMITIVE
BAPTIST CHURCH
607 Palmetto St.
Church School ......................9:30 a.m.
Morning Service ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Service .................7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study/Prayer ......7:00 p.m.
Communion-2nd Sun. Eve. ..6:00 p.m.

MT. PISGAH BAPTIST CHURCH
6210 Mt. Pisgah Rd. 375-4409
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.nm.
.Morniing Worship .......:........11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training........... ....5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time.......7:00 p.m.
NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
Mason Dixon & County Line Rd.
781-5887
Sunday Worship ..................1 1:00 a.m.
2nd Sunday Communion ....11:00 a.m.
Bread of Life Sunday........12:15 p.m.
T.H.E. Meeting Tuesday ....7:00 p.m.

OPEN DOOR FULL GOSPEL
PRAISE CENTER
E. Broward St.


Sunday School ...............10:00 a.m.
Sunday Service..................... 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.


BOWLING GREEN

PRIMERA MISSION BAUTISTA
Murray Road off Hwy. 17
375-2295
Domingos Escuela Dom. ......9:45 a.m.
Servicio de Adoracion..........11:00 a.m.
Servicio de Predicacion ........5:00 p.m.
Miercoles Servico................6:30 p.m.

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 South US Hwy 17
Morning Service ................ 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.

ST. JOHN A.M.E. CHURCH
513 W. Orange St.
375-2911
Sunday Church School ..........9:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship ....11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

VICTORY PRAISE CENTER
128 E. Main St.
Sunday School ..... .........10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .... ........6:00 p.m.
Thursday Night Services,
Evening Worship.................. 7:00 p.m.
Kidz Club......................... :.....7:00 p.m .

ONA

IGLESIA PENTECOSTES
VISION POR LAS ALMAS
149 Bedger Loop 448-2831
Servicio Domingos ..............7:30 p.m.
Jueves (Ensefianza Biblida) ..................
.............................................. 7 :30 p .m .

LIMESTONE BAPTIST CHURCH
4868 Keystone Ave. Limestone
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.

NEW ZION BAPTIST CHURCH
202 Sidney Roberts Road
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training................ 6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ............... 6:00 p.m.

ONA BAPTIST CHURCH
131 Bear Lane 773-2540
Sunday School ................ 10:00 a.;n.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

UNION BAPTIST CHURCH
5076 Lily Church Rd. 494-5622
Sunday School ..............10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................. 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday
AWANA for Kids ..............6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time.........7:00 p.m.

WAUCHULA

APOSTOLIC ASSEMBLY
Martin Lute,]gling.and Apostolic Rd.
Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
English Service ................11:30 a.m.
General Worship Service ......1:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer .................... 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

CELEBRATION CHURCH
Rainey Blvd.
863-781-1624
hardee.celebration.org
Sunday Morning Service .... 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Youth Service ....5:30 p.m.
Childcare provided at all services

CELEBRATION FELLOWSHIP
773-0427
Celebration Service.............. 10:30 a.m.
Weduiesday Evening Cell Groups
Adult Cell Group ................ 7:00 p.m.
Youth Cell Group ................ 7:00 p.m.
Children's Cell Group ..........7:00 p.m.
Call for lcationsis

CHARLIE CREEK
BAPTIST CHURCH
6885 State Road 64 East 773-3447
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ......... 11:00 a.m.
.Evening Worship ...............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............6:30 p.m.
CHURCH OF CHRIST
201 S. Florida Ave.
Sunday Bible Study ..............9:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship Service......10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

CHURCH OF CHRIST
Will Duke Road
773-2249
Sunday Morning Worship......9:30 a.m.
Sunday Bible Class............. 11:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening Worship ......6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Bible Class ........7:00 p.m.
Men s Leadership & Training Class -
2nd Sunday of Month ........4:00 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
Martin Luther King Blvd.
767-0199

CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST "
OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS
630 Hanchey Rd. 773-3532
Sacrament Meeting..............9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Priesthood............................ 1 1:00 a.m .

COMMUNITY BAPTIST
CHURCH OF WAUCHULA HILLS
(SPANISH)
615 Rainey Blvd.
257-3950
Sunday Bible Study ............10:00 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship.... 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........7:00 p.m.


Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.


WAUCHILA
DIOS ES AMOR
807 S. 8th Ave.
773-4576
Domingos Escuela
Dominica ........... .......... 10:00 a.m.
Servicio .............................. 11:00 a.m .
Lunes Oracion ........ ......... 6:00 p.m.
M iercoles Servicio ... ...........7:00 p.m.

EL REMANENTE
IGLECIA CRISTIANA
318 W. Main St..
Martes Oracion .................... 7:00 p.m.
Jueves Servicio ......... ........ 7:30 p.m.
Viernes Servicio ..... ........... 7:30 p.m .
Domingo Servicio.... .......... 10:30 a.m.

ENDTIME CROSSROAD
MINISTRY
501 N. 9th & Georgia St. 773-3470
Sunday School ..... ..........10:00 a.m.
Morning Service .... .......... 11:30 a.m.
Evening Service.................. 7:30 p.m.
Wed. Bible St. & Yth. Gath ..7:30 p.m.
Friday (Holy Ghost Night) ....7:30 p.m.

FAITH PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
114 N. 7th Ave. 773-2105
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship .................. 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper .............6:15 p.m.
Wed. Youth Fellowship..........6:50 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

FAITH TEMPLE CHURCH
OF GOD
701 N. 7th Ave 773-3800
Sunday School .................... 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship .................. 10:20 a.m.
Children's Chuch ................10:40 a.m.
Evening Service ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
1570 W. Main St. 773-4182

Bible Study for all ages ........9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6:00 p.m.

WEDNESDAY:
Sr. Adult Bible Study ..........10:00 a.m.
Children's Chiors
(PK-Grade 4) ................. 5:30 p.m.
PRAISE 57-Jr High Chior .. 5:30 p.m.
Mid-Week Prayer Meeting .. 6:00 p.m.
Kids On Missions
(PK-Grade 4) ................. 6:00 p.m.
Club 56 ................. 6:00 p.m.
Youth Group (Grades 7-12) 6:00 p.m.
Family Life Ministry
& Discipleship ............... 6:00 p.m.
Church Orchestra............... 6:00 p.m.
Adult Choir ....................... 7:00 p.m.

FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH
1121 W. Louisiana St. 773-9243
SUNDAY:
Generations Cafe Opens........9:30 a.m.
Kids World Check-In for
Nursery-5th Grade Begins..10:15 a.m.
Pre-K Blast ........................ 10:45 a.m .
Kids World B.L.A.S.T.
(K-5th) .......... .......... 10:45 a.m.
Worship Service ................ 10:45 a.m.
WEDNESDAY:
Check-In begins for
Nursery-5thgrade ................ 6:15 p.m.
Classes for children ages ,
PreK-12th grade............6:30-8:00 p.m.
FIRST CHURCH OF
THE NAZARENE
511 W. Palmetto St.
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Service ............1....11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.

FIRST MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
1347 Martin Luther King Ave.
773-6556
Sunday School ........ ......... 9:30 a.m.
Morning Service ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6:00 p.m'.
Tues. Youth Ministry. Meeting/
Bible Study .............6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer/Bible Study ......7:00 p.m..

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH '
207 N. Seventh Ave. 7,73-4267
Sunday School ...........:........:9;45 a.m.
Traditional Sunday Worship I 1:00 a.m.
Casual Sunday Worship..........6:00 p.m
Tuesday Bible Study............10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Activities ............6:00 p.m.

FLORIDA'S FIRST ASSEMBLY
OF GOD CHURCH
1397 South Florida Avenue
773-9386.
Sunday School ......................9:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................10:00 a.m.
SWed. Family Night ................7:00 p.m.
Adult, Children & Radiate Youth Church

FLORIDA GOSPEL
511 W. Palmetto
223-5126
Sunday Morning Worship ....11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............7:30 p.m.

THE GOSPEL TABERNACLE
810 W. Tennessee St. 863-735-1158
Morning Service ........... ....10:00 a:nt.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
HEARTLAND
COMMUNITY CHURCH
1262 W. Main St. 767-6500
Coffee & Donuts............ .....9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m .
Worship.............................. 10:30 a.m.
Wed. Night Dinner ................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bodybuilders Adult Cl.
Crossroads &


Lighthouse Min................ 7:00 p.m.

HIGHER GROUND
INTERNATIONAL MINISTRY
1258 W. MAIN STREET
WAUCHULA, FL
Sunday Morning Worship....l 1:00 a.m.
Wed. Night Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

IGLESIA ADVENTISTA DEL
SEPTIMO DIA
Old Bradenton Road
767-1010


WAUCHULA
IGLESIA de DIOS
ALFA Y OMEGA
1909 Stanfield Rd.
Sunday School .................. 10: 00 a.m.
Evening Ser ice ..................... 6:00 p.m.
Tuesday (Bible Study & Prayer
N ight) .............................. 7:30 p.m .
Friday Worship Service ........7:30 p.m.

IGLESIA HISPANA
FUENTE DE VIDA
501 N. 9'" Ave.
M artes ........:.......................7: 30 p.m .
Jueves .................................. 7:30 p.m .
Domingo ............................ 10:30 a.m .

IGLESIA HISPANA
PRESENCIA de Dios
511 W. Palmetto St.
Domingos ............................ 6:00 p.m.
M iercoles............................. 7:00 p.m .

JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
ENGLISH
155 Altman Road 1131
Sunday Service .................... 2:00 p.m.

JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
SPANISH
Sunday Service .................. 10:00 a.m.

LIGHT OF THE WORLD
MINISTRIES
Womans Center 131 N. 7th Ave.
Wauchula, FL
.Friday Evening .................... 6:00 p.m.

LAKE DALE BAPTIST CHURCH
3102 Heard Bridge Road
773-6622
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Service .................. 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

MINISTERIO INTERNATIONAL
Cambriadores de Mundo
704 W. Main St. 773-0065
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.
NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH
1999 State Road 64 East
Sunday School ......................9:45 'a.m.
Morning Worship Service .... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship Service ......6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Night Supper ......6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Activities
(All Ages) ........................ 7:00 p.m .

NEW LIFE CHURCH
117 W. Palmetto St.
773-2929
Sunday Service ..................10:00-a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
Children Ministries for all services

NEW MT. ZION A.M.E. CHURCH
10 Martin Luther King Ave.
767-0023
Morn. Worship
(lst & 3r Sun.) .................. 8:00 a.m.
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
2nd Sunday Youth Service ....4:00 p.m.
Allen Christian Endeavor ......4:00 p.m.
Wed. & Fri. Bible Study........7:00 p.m.

NORTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
912 N. 8th Ave. 773-6947
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ..............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.

OAK GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
4350 W. Main St. 735-0321
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
.Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ............ 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

PEACE VALLEY LUTHERAN
CHURCH
1643 Stenstrom Road 773-2858
1l & .3" Sun.
Communion .................. 10:00 a.m.
2" & 4.h Sun.
Divine Worship .............. 10:00 a.m.
Bible Study .......................... 1:15 a.m.
** Fellowship each Sunday after service
PROGRESSIVE MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
149 Manley Road East Main
773-5814
Sunday School .................... 9:30 a.m.
Wolship Service ............1...11:00 a.m.
Wed. Evening Prayer ............7:00 p.m.
REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 North US Hwy 17
M morning Service ..................10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.
RIVERVIEW HEIGHTS
MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1321 S.R. 636 East 773-3344
Radio Program
WZZS Sundays...............9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

SOUL HARVEST MINISTRY
1337 Hwy. 17 South, Wauchula
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .............. 11:00 a.m.
Evening Service ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

ST. ANN'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
204 N. 9th Ave.- 773-6418
Sunday ................................. 9:30 a.m .
H oly D ays ....................................

ST. MICHAEL
CATHOLIC CHURCH
408 Heard Bridge Road 773-4089
Saturday Mass (English) ......5:00 p.m.


(Spanish) ......7:00 p.m.
Sunday(English) ....................8:30 a.m .
(Spanish) .............1...1 :00 a.m.
(Creole).................... 1:00 p.m .
Catecismo ........................9...9:45 a.m .
Daily Mass in English ..........8:30 a.m.

SEVENTH DAY
ADVENTIST CHURCH
205 S. llth Ave.- 773-9927
Sabbath School ....... ........ 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship ................1 1:00 a.m.
Tues. Prayer Meeting ............7:00 p.m.


WAUCHULA-
SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH .
505 S. 10th Ave. 773-4368
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m..
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.

SPIRIT WIND TABERNACLE
1652 Old Bradenton Road
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .......... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ... .............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............7:30 p.m.
TABERNACLE OF
PRAISE & JOY
1507 MLK Avenue
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:30 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 7:00 p.m.
Tues. Bible Stdy.
& Child Train ....................7:00 p.m.
Friday Prayer Service ............7:00 p.m.
WAUCHULA CHURCH OF GOD
1543 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.
773-0199
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..........11:15 a.m.
Evening Worship ............6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Fam. Training ...'7:30 p.m.
Thurs. Youth Bible Study ......7:00 p.m.
Friday Night Worship............7:30 p.m.
WAUCHULA HILLS HARVEST
TEMPLE ASSEMBLY OF GOD
210 Anderson
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Church................................ 10:00 a.m .
Youth Service..........................6:00 p.m.
Evening Service .................. 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.
WAUCHULA HILLS
SPANISH CHURCH OF GOD
1000 Stansfield Rd.
Sunday School ..........1..........0:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer .................... 7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship................7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ................7:30 p.m.
WAUCHULA REVIVAL CENTER
(Full Gospel)
501 N. 9th Ave.
Sunday School ..............10100 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Youth & Child. Church..........6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ..................7:00 p.m.
Men's Fri. Prayer ...:..............7:00 p.m.

ZOLFO SPRINGS
COMMUNITY WESLEYAN CHURCH
Gardner
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
CREWSVILLE BETHEL
BAPTIST CHURCH
8251 Crewsville Road
Church 735-0871 Pastor 773-6657
Sunday School ..................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ..'..............11:00 a.m.
EFvening Worship ....*.......... 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............6:30 p.m.
EVANGELISTIC HOLINESS
CHURCH INC
Corner of 6th and Hickory
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday .......................... 7:30 p.m.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
OF ZOLFO
320 E. 4th St. 735-1200
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................1:00 a.m.
Training Union .................... 5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.
FIRST UNITED
/ METHODIST CHURCH
Corner of 6th & Suwanee 735-1544
Gospel Music ...... .....10:30 a.m.
Worship Service ................11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.
FOX MEMORIAL
HOLINESS CHURCH
2344 Merle Langford Rd.
Sunday Morning Worship....10:00 a.m.
Sunday Night Worship ..........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.

GARDNER BAPTIST CHURCH
South Hwy. 17 494-5456
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer ...............7:00 p.m.

LIFE CHANGING WORSHIPCENTER
3426 Oak St. 863-832-9808
Sunday Worship ....................2:30 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.


ZOLFO SPRINGS
MARANATHA BAPTIST CHURCH
2465 Oxendine Rd.
(863) 832-9292
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
W orship ................................ 1:00 a.m .
Evening............................... 1:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible & Prayer Meet....7:00 p.m.
NEW VISION WORSHIP CENTER
64 E. & School House Road
Church 735-8585 Childcare 735-
8586
Morning Worship ..............10:00 a.m.
Children's Church..............10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.`
Wed. Youth & F.T.H. ............7:00 p.m.
PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF I
GOD FAITH TEMPLE
Oak Street
Sunday Worship ................ 10:00 a.m.(
Evening Worship ................7:00 p.m.
Tuesday Worship ................7:30 p.m.1
Thursday Worship..................7:30'p.m.
Saturday Worship ................7:30 p.m
PRIMERA MISSION
BAUTISTA HISPANA
518 8th Ave. E.
Escuela Dominical ..............10:00 a.m. I
Servicio del Domingo..........11:00 a.m.
.............................................. 7:00 p .m .
Servicio del Miercoles ..........7:30 p.m.
PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH
Pioneer Park
2nd Sunday .....................:....10:30 a.m .
Evening Service .................. 6:30 p.m.
5th Sunday .......................... 6:00 p.m.
REALITY RANCH
COWBOY FELLOWSHIP
2-1/2 Miles east of
Zolfo Springs on Hwy. 66
863-781-1578
Sunday Service ...................11i,00 a.m.
ST. PAUL'S MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
3676 US. Hwy. 17 South 735-0636
Sunday School ................. 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship ................... I I a.m.
Wed. Prayer Service ..............7:00 p.m.
SAN ALFONSO MISSION
3027 Schoolhouse Lane
Domingo, Misa en Espanol ..9:30 a.m.
Catecismo ....... .............. 11:00 a.m.
SPANISH MISSION
735-8025
Escuela Dominica ........10:00 a.m. f
Servicio .......... :.................1... 1:00 a.m i
Pioneer Club ........................ 6:30 p.m.
Servicio de la Noche ............7:00 p.m.
Mierecoles Merienda ............6:00 p.m.
Servicio................................ 8:00 p.m .
Sabado Liga de Jovenes ........5:00 p.m.


Aminer struck it rich. Everytime)
he disappeared into the hills, hel
came up with a vein that was bigger
and better.
"What's the secret?" asked hisi
friends.
"I keep digging," he ahswered.
Too many start, but they stop. "
"Oh," you say, "I've been afraid."
Stop yourfears or your fears will
stop you.
"But," you add, "I've been
abused."
There's nogain without pain.
St. Paul was pounded, pained
and persecuted. Buthe said, "I can
do all things through Christ who
.strengthens me." And he added,
so "I press on." .,
Won't you?

Visit us at: www.TheSower.com


*Peace "iioer Growers

Wholesale Nursery

Donnis & Kathy Barber (863) 735-470
Hwy. 66 East (863) 735-0470
P.O. Box 760 Zolfo Springs, FL





January 31, 2013, The Herald-Advocate 3C


'Cats Win



A Pair


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
. In a tough two weeks of bas-
ketball, the Hardee Wildcats
managed a pair of victories.
Unfortunately, they were not
district wins, as Hardee lost to
Teneroc twice, Lake Wales and
Auburndale, to finish the sea-
son with an 0-4 district record.
The Wildcats will have to
tackle one of the top two Class
5A teams in the state in district
playoffs next week. The District
10 playoffs are at Teneroc. Har-
dee is seeded fourth, Teneroc
third and Auburndale and Lake
Wales tied for the top/second
spot. A coin flip will decide
who is seeded first for the play-
offs, but whichever team
Hardee plays it will be uphill all
the way. Lake Wales is number
one in Class 5A and Auburndale
number 2.
Hardee Head Coach Vance
Dickey is only hopeful that
redistricting in the off-season
can take Hardee away from the
Polk County competition and,
perhaps, move Hardee down to
a more competitive Class 4A,
with Avon Park, DeSoto and
other teams with which it could
have an even chance.
Before districts hext' week,
Hardee had a trio of games this
week to finish up the regular
season. All three are home
encounters, making it possible
to finish' with a winning season.
The 'Cats are currently 8-8.
Tuesday's home game was
against Avon Park. The game
today (Thursday) is against
northern rival Fort Meade and
will be Hardee's Senior Night,
honoring Christian Moralez and
Alonzo "Kane" Casso.
Tomorrow's season finale is
against Sebring when Hardee
hopes to avenge its Dec. 11 66-
64 overtime loss to Sebring on
its court.
Hardee's biggest weakness is
inconsistency, said Dickey. "We
have good nights, but if anyone
is 'off,' there's just not enough
depth on the bench to pick it up.
Overall, our record doesn't
show how hard we've played,".
commented Dickev
T Teneroc 63. Hardee 5
Hardee-'s lait two weeks bNan
with a game at Teneroc, with
Hardee losing to the 10-9 Titans
63-53. Junior Steve Metayer
took the Wildcat Player of the
Game honors with 21 points,
including seven-of-eight at the
charity stripe. He also had four
rebounds, three assists and a
pair of steals.
Casso had 14 points, includ-
ing five-of-seven at the free
throw line. He added five
rebounds, two steals and four
assists. Moralez had a team-
high 11 rebounds to go with his
twin assists and four points.
Junior Keyon Brown and soph
Derrick Graham each had seven
points. Brown added a pair of
blocked shots, eight rebounds
and a pair of assists, while
Graham had a blocked shot and
five rebounds. Luke Palmer and
Lucious Everett also helped on
the rebounding.
Hardee 55, Fort Meade 36
At Fort Meade on Jan. 17,
Hardee benefitted from Brown
dominating on the boards to
take team Player of the Game
honors. He finished with 10
points, but had a whopping 22
rebounds, four blocked shots,
two assists and a steal.
Metayer and Casso had 15
points, Moralez a half dozen
with eight rebounds, Devin
Pearson four, Everett three, and
Palmer and Jordan Jones each
two points.
Lalse Wales 88, Hardee 63
A Friday game at Lake Wales


was an exercise in frustration.
The highlight was the play of
sophomore reserve guard Jones,
who replaced Casso, who sat
down quickly with three fouls.
Jones finished the night with 11
points, hitting deuces, treys and
free throws, while adding three
rebounds, three assists and a
steal.
Metayer, as usual, was Har-
dee high scorer with 25 points,
adding a blocked shot, four
rebounds and a pair of thefts.
Brown was held to five points,
but had a dozen rebounds, a. pair
apiece of blocked shots, steals
and assists. Moralez and Casso
finished with six points apiece.
Casso had seven rebounds and
Moralez grabbed a half dozen.
Graham had four points, and
James Greene, Everett and
Palmer had two points apiece.
Auburndale 79, Hardee 41
Hardee's tough road trip
ended on Jan. 22 with a game at
18-2 Auburndale. Everett took
Player of the Game honors with
six points, seven rebounds and
taking a charge.
Metayer again was Hardee
high scorer with 18 points,
including seven-of-eight at the
foul line, a pair each of assists
and rebounds, a steal and a
deflection. Graham had eight
points, Brown seven and Casso
two points. Deshawndre "De-
bo" McMillan moved up from
the JV and added four rebounds
and a pair of deflections.
Palmer, Marco DeLeon and
Jones helped on the rebound-
ing.
Hardee 70, Frostproof 56
Hardee got back on the win-
ning track with a home 70-56
victory over Frostproof. Casso
was Wildcat Player of the game,
with 23 points, a blocked shot,
two assists, two steals and three
rebounds.
. Metayer was held to 12
points, including 10-of-ll11 free
throws, adding six assists, five
steals, three rebounds and a
blocked shot. Freshman De-
Leon came in to score a trio of
treys for nine points. Morales
had 10, Brown seven, Giaham
five, and McMillan and Everett
each two points. 'Everett had
nine rebounds and Greene,
Palmer and McMillan also
assisted on rebounding.
Teneroc 69, Hardee 52
It was back to the tough Polk
county district opposition in a
home game last Friday, with
Hardee coming up on the short
end of the 69-52 score. Graham
had 10 points, including four-
of-five on free throws, along
with seven rebounds and twin
assists.
Metayer had 18 points,
Brown a dozen, Casso Five,
Moralez three, and McMillan
and Palmer two apiece. Metayer
tied Graham with seven
rebounds and Moralez had six.
JV
The Hardee junior varsity has
been improving all season, but
had been able to win only two
games as of last Friday. Head
Coach Alex Myrie and assistant
Onel Virgile have seen more
and more team cohesiveness.
The team includes sophs
Blaiaine Molitor, Dustin Smith,
Tyler Smith and Devin Pearson,
who will join the varsity after
Friday's game so they can help
the varsity and get some experi-
ence during the playoffs.
Other JV players, are Nick
Johnson, Robert Torres, Ryan
Ramirez, C. K, Douglas,
Devante Greer, Ryan Moore
and Alan Brown.

A journey is best measured
in friends, rather than miles.
-Tim Cahill


PHOTOS.BY RALPH HARRISON
The junior varsity Wildcats have improved all season with (seated from left) Ryan Ramirez, Tyler Smith, Dustin Smith,
Nick Johnson, Devin Pearson and Devante Greer; (standing) Robert Torres, Ryan Moore, Head Coach Alex Myrie, As-
sistant Coach Onel Virgile, Blaiaine Molitor and C. K. Douglas.


f-
Suiting up for this year's varsity basketball team. are (front row, left to right) Alonzo "Kane" Casso, Steve Metayer,
Marco DeLeon, Lucious Everett, Jordan Jones, Deshawndre "Debo" McMillan and Christian Moralez; (back) James
Greene, Keyon Brown, Assistant Coach Carl Brown, Head Coach Vance Dickey, Derrick Graham and Luke Palmer.
P ",; f- -^^^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^^__ _. .
.. ow """


2 SLICES OF

PEPPERONI PIZZA
PLUS A SODA

21 $f ZOLFO
SPRINGS
735-2100
Limited time offer At Participating locations. 1:31


YOUR BUSINESS COULD

APPEAR HERE TOO!!
Contact
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels
At The Herald Advocate
115 S. 7th Ave. Wauchula

773-3255


HEARTLAND PHARMACY

H E A aro "Rl xod iatri



"We put our V into our service"
If you are visiting we will gladly transfer your prescriptions and
keep them on file then transfer them back when you go home.

"-


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Sue Lobato, Pauline Ochoa, Julian Garcia, Red Camp Pha
Bob Duncan Pharmacist Sandra Garcia (missing)

DELIVERY SERVICES
Monday-Friday 9:00 am to 6:00 pm.*'
h-~.- ,'. -,----_ _. a ~


Photos!


* Christmas Parade

*And Others

Check Out

www.hardeepix.com
Questions: hardeepix@gmail.com
"Photos ... Memories You Can See"
Photos By:
Ralph Harrison and Maria Trujillo
11-8tfc







4C The Herald-Advocate, January 31, 2013


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA

CASE NO.:25-2012-CA-000564

BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST
COMPANY, a North Carolina
banking corporation, successor-
In-interest to COLONIAL BANK
(f/k/a Colonial Bank, N.A.), by
acquisition of assets from the
F.D.I.C- as Receiver for Colonial
Bank,

Plaintiff,

vs.

WAUCHULA HARDWARE PROP-
ERTIES, L.L.C., a Florida limited
liability company; FRED BILOW-
IT; ISRAEL SZMIGA; ERIC WOLF;
STEVEN WOLF; WINTER HAVEN
COMMERCIAL PROPERTIES,
L.L.C.; and JOHN DOE #1,
UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSES-
SION; .

Defendants.

NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT F.S. CHAPTER 45

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to a Final Judgment of
Foreclosure dated the 23rd day of
January, 2013, entered in Case
No.: 25-2012-CA-000564 of the
Circuit Court of the 10th Judicial
Circuit in and for Hardee County,
Florida wherein BRANCH BANK-
ING AND TRUST COMPANY is the
Plaintiff and WAUCHULA HARD-
WARE PROPERTIES, L.L.C., a
Florida limited liability company,
FRED BILOWIT, ISRAEL SZMIGA,
ERIC WOLF, STEVEN WOLF and
WINTER HAVEN COMMERCIAL
PROPERTIES, L.L.C. are the
Defendants, the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Hardee County,
Florida will sell to the highest bid-
der for cash in the full amount of
the bid payable on the same day
of sale at 417 W. Main Street,
Second Floor Hallway, outside of
Room 202, Wauchula, FL 33873,
in accordance with Section
45.031, Florida Statutes, at public
sale on February 20, 2013 at
11:00 a.m., the following
described real and personal
property to wit:

That part of Sections 9 and
10, Township 34 South,
Range 25 East, Hardee
County, Florida, described
as follows:
Commence at the
Northwest corner of the
South 1/2 of the Southwest
1/4 of the Northwest 1/4 of
Section 10; thence run
West along the North line
of said South 1/2 a dis-
tance of 23.60 feet to a
point on the Northeasterly
right-of-way line for U.S.
Highway 17 and to the
Point of Beginning; thence
Northwesterly along said
right-of-way line a distance
of 253.93 feet to a point on
the North line of Lot 12,
Block B of R.F. Foster's
Addition to the Town of
Wauchula, as shown on
the plat thereof recorded
in Plat Book 3, Page 3-3, of
the Public Records of
Hardee County, Florida;
thence East, along the
North line of Lots 12 and
13 of said Block B and
their Easterly extension,
83.59 feet to a point on the
West line of Lot 16 of
Foster's Addition to the
Town of Wauchula, as
shown on the plat thereof
recorded in Plat Book 1,
Page 2 through 41, of the
Public Records of Hardee
County, Florida; thence
North along the West line
of Lot 16, a distance of
8.60 feet to the Northwest
corner of Lot 16; thence
East, along the North line
of Lot 16, a distance of
109.85 feet to the North-
east corner of Lot'16;
thence Southeasterly,
along the Easterly line of
Lot 16 and its Southerly
extension, 58.71 feet to the
Northwest corner of Lot 8
of Foster's Addition;
thence East along the
North line of Lot 8, a dis-
tance of 120 feet, more or
less, to the Westerly right-
of-way line for U.S.
Highway 17 (formerly the
Seaboard Coast Line
Railroad Company);
thence Southeasterly,
along said right-of-way
line, 576.70 feet, more or
less, to the North line of
the South 291.72 feet of
the South 1/2 of the
Southwest 1/4 of the
Northwest 1/4 of Section
10; thence West, along
said North line, parallel
with the North line of the
South 1/2 of the Southwest
1/4 of the Northwest 1/4 of
Section 10, a distance of
203.00 feet; thence
Northwesterly 149.95 feet
to a point which lies 148.00
feet East of the
Northeasterly right-of-way
line for U.S. Highway 17;


thence East, parallel with
said North line, 20.00 feet;
thence Northwesterly
143.45 feet to a point lying
168.00 feet East of said
right-of-way line; thence
West, parallel with said
North line, 168.00 feet to
said right-of-way line;
thence Northwesterly,
along said right-of-way
line, 75.10 feet to the Point
of Beginning.
And that certain alley run-
ning East and West
between Lots 7 and 8 of
Foster's Addition to the
Town of Wauchula, as
shown on the plat thereof
recorded in Plat Book 1,


f the
rdee


interest
sale, if
property
the Lis
m within


Page 2 through 41 of
Public Records of Ha
County, Florida.

Any person claiming an
in the surplus from the
any, other than the f
owner as of the date of
Pendens, must file a clain
60 days after the sale.

VICTORIA L. ROGERS,
Clerk of the Circu

By: Conni
Depu


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRC
AND FOR HARDEE CO
FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION

CASE NO.: 25-2012-CA-'

Wells Fargo Bank N.A., as
Trustee for the Certificate
of Carrington Mortgage L
Trust, Series 2007-FRE1 A
Backed Pass-Through
Certificates
Plaintiff,

vs.

Sandra P. McWhorter a/k/
Sandra McWhorter and Jlu
McWhorter a/k/a Juan
McWhorter, Wife and Hus
et all.
Defendant(s).


NOTICE OF ACTION
FORECLOSURE PROCEE
PROPERTY '

TO: Sandra P. McWhbrti
Sandra McWhorter; AD
UNKNOWN BUT WHOSI
KNOWN ADDRESS IS
Alabama Street, Wauch
33873 and Juan K. Mc
a/k/a Juan McWhorter; AD
UNKNOWN BUT WHOSI
KNOWN ADDRESS IS
Alabama Street, Wauch
33873

Residence unknown, i
inn including anv unkn


,1 w, "a"7 ally -..-...*
spouse of the said
Defendants, if either has
remarried and if either or
both of said Defendants are
dead, their respective
unknown heirs, devisees,
grantees, assignees, credi-
tors, lienors, and trustees,
and all other persons claim-
ing by, through, under or
against the named Defen-
dant(s); and the aforemen-
tioned named Defendant(s)
and such of the aforemen-
tioned unknown Defendants
and such of the aforemen-
tioned unknown Defendants
as may be infants, incompe-
tents or otherwise not sui
juris.

YOU ARE-HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action has been com-
menced to foreclose a mortgage
on the following real property,
lying and being and situated in
Hardee County, Florida, more
particularly described as follows:

EAST 1/2 OF LOTS 6 AND 7,
BLOCK 5, AVALON PARK
SUBDIVISION, CITY OF
WAUCHULA, AS PER PLAT
BOOK. 1, PAGES 2
THROUGH 75, ALSO IN
PLAT BAR A-26, IN THE
OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF
THE COURT OF HARDEE
COUNTY, FLORIDA.

more commonly known as 908
Alabama Street, Wauchula, FL
33873.

This action has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defense, if any, upon SHAPIRO,
FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP,
Attorneys for Plaintiff, whose
address is 4630 Woodland
Corporate Blvd., Suite 100,
Tampa, FL 33614, within thirty
(30) days after the first publica-
tion of this notice and file the
original with the clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiff's attorney or immediately
there after; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on the 24 day of
January, 2013.

VICTORIA L. ROGERS, CLERK
Circuit and County Courts

By: Connie Coker
Deputy Clerk
IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A
DISABILITY WHO NEEDS'ANY
ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER
TO PARTICIPATE IN THE PRO-
CEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED,
AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE
PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSIS-
TANCE. PLEASE CONTACT THE
COURT ADMINISTRATOR, (863)
534-4488 WITHIN 2 WORKING
DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF
THIS NOTICE. IF YOU ARE
HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED,
CALL TDD (863) 534-7777 OR
FLORIDA RELAY SERVICE 1-800-
955-8770.
1:31,2:7c


Museum Matters
Marlene Rickels Hyde
Cracker Trail Museum Curator


CLERKAND THE WINNER IS ...
uit Court When you hear those words, you usually think of an awards
show such as the Miss America Pageant or the Academy Awards.
ie Coker Chances are you don't think of a museum!
ity Clerk But, in this case, the winner is the Cracker Trail Museum ...
because of the wonderful people of Hardee County.
1:31.2:7c As I reflect back on my first year as curator of the Cracker
OF THE Trail Museum, I feel so fortunate and blessed to have met and
UUNTY worked with so many wonderful people. As with any award, there
comes the time to recognize those who helped make the award pos-
sible.
I believe the Cracker Trail Museum is the best small historical
000432 museum because so many people care about its success.-
I'm sure I will forget to mention someone, so please forgive
holders me in advance. First and foremost, my sister, Sandy Scott, encour-
oan aged me to pursue my dream and, as she trained me to take over, I
Asset-. grew more confident with each passing day because of her guid-
ance. Next, Diana Youmans and Mosaic have provided so much for
the museum, whether through providing refreshments or gift
prizes. Friends of the Park Inc. has helped provide refreshments for
several events, too.
I couldn't ask for nicer people to work for than Danny Weeks
a and David Spencer. They have endured my enthusiasm for some
uan K. ideas I've had and always been there whenever I've needed to vent
a little, too! It feels so good to work for people who support and
band; encourage you, who listen and respect your ideas, and who are
friends, too that's why this truly doesn't feel like a job!
/ On a day-to-day basis, I have to mention two very special peo-
ple who have become like brothers to me, Randall Solner and Steve
N Conner. Randall, the recently-retired park manager, and Steve, the
DINGS-


er a/k/a The Southwest Florida Water What do we live for, if it is
IDRESS Management District (SWFWMD) not to make life less diffi-
E LAST announces the following public cult for each other?
S: 908 meeting to which all interested -George Eliot
ula, FL persons are invited:
Whorter
)DRESS Cooperative Funding Public In every marriage more
E LAST Meeting: Governing Board than a week old, there are
S: 908 members will discuss, evaluate grounds for divorce. The
ula, FL and prioritize fiscal year 2014 trick is to find, and contin-
requests for project fundingin ue to find, the groundsfor
Polk, Highlands and Hardee to find, the grounds for
f liv- counties of SWFWMD. marriage.
nown -Robert Anderson


DATE/TIME: Wednesday, Feb-
ruary 13, 2013; 1 pm

PLACE: SWFWMD Bartow
Service Office, 170 Century
Boulevard, Bartow, FL 33830

A copy of the agenda may be
obtained by contacting: Water-
Matters.org Boards, Meetings &
Event Calendar; 1(800)423-1476
(FL.only) or (352)796-7211.

Pursuant to the provision of the
Americans with Disabilities Act,
any person requiring reasonable
accommodations to participate-in
this workshop/meeting is asked
to advise the agency at least 5
days before the workshop/meet-
ing by contacting SWFWMD's
Human Resources Bureau Chief,
2379 Broad Street, Brooksville,
Florida 34604-6899; telephone
(352) 796-7211, ext. 4702 or 1-
800-423-1476 (FL only), 'ext.
4702; TDD (FL only) 1-800-231-
6103; or email to ADACoordinator
@swfwmd.state.fl.us:

If any person decides to appeal
any decision made by the
Board/Committee with respect to
any matter considered at this
meeting or hearing, he/she will
need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceeding is
made, which record includes the
testimony and evidence from
which the appeal is to be issued.

For more information, you may
contact: Lori.Manuel@watermat-
ters.org 1 (800)423-1476 (FL only)
or (352)796-7211, x4606 (Ad
Order EXE0246) 1:31



The Southwest Florida Water
Management District (SWFWMD)
announces the following public
meeting to which all interested
persons are invited:

Cooperative Funding Public
Meeting: Governing Board
members will discuss, evaluate
and prioritize fiscal year 2014
requests for project funding in
Hillsborough, Pasco and
Pinellas counties of SWFWMD.

DATE/TIME: Tuesday, February
12, 2013; 10 am

PLACE: SWFWMD Tampa
Service Office, 7601 US Highway
301 North, Tampa FL 33637

A copy of the agenda may be
obtained by contacting: Water-
Matters.org Boards, Meetings &
Event Calendar; 1(800)423-1476
(FL only) or (352)796-7211.

Pursuant to the provision of the
Americans with Disabilities Act,
any person requiring reasonable
accommodations to participate in
this workshop/meeting is asked
to advise the agency at. least 5
days before the workshop/meet-
ing by contacting SWFWMD's
Human Resources Bureau Chief,
2379 Broad Street, Brooksville,
Florida 34604-6899; telephone
(352) 796-7211, ext. 4702 or- 1--
800-423-1476 (FL only), ext.
4702; TDD (FL only) 1-800-231-
6103; or email to ADACoordinator
@swfwmd.state.fl.us.

If any person decides to appeal
any decision made by the
Board/Committee with respect to
any matter considered at this
meeting or hearing, he/she will
need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceeding is
made, which record includes the
testimony and evidence from
which the appeal is to be issued.

For more information, you may
contact: Lori.Manuel@watermat-
ters.org 1 (800)423-1476 (FL only)
or (352)796-7211, x4606 (Ad
Order EXE0245)1:31


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION

CASE NO. 252012CA000426

CITIBANK, N.A. AS SUCCESSOR
TRUSTEE TO US BANK NATION-
AL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE
FOR MASTER. ADJUSTABLE
RATE MORTGAGES TRUST
2007-HF1, MORTGAGE PASS-
THROUGH CERTIFICATES,
SERIES 2007-HF1,

Plaintiff,

vs.

SANDRA L. HERNANDEZ A/K/A
SANDRA HERNANDEZ, et al.,

Defendants.
/

NOTICE OF ACTION

TO: UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
SANDRA L. HERNANDEZ
A/K/A SANDRA HERNANDEZ
Last Known Address
Unknown
Also Attempted At: 1054 SE
9 AVE, ARCADIA, FL 34266;
1230 DAVID CT, WAUCHULA,
FL 33873; 2402 NE SNOW
ST, ARCADIA, FL 64266; PO
BOX 443, ZOLFO SPRINGS,
FL 33890
Current Residence Unknown

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mort-
gage on the following described
property:

LOT 109, PEACE RIVER
HEIGHTS, UNIT #3, A SUB-
DIVISION ACCORDING TO
THE PLAT THEREOF AS
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK
3, PAGE 48, PUBLIC
RECORDS OF HARDEE
COUNTY, FLORIDA

"has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy
of your written defenses, if any, to
it, on Choice Legal Group,
Attorney for Plaintiff, whose
address is 1800 NW 49th STREET,
SUITE 120, FT. LAUDERDALE FL
33309 on or before February 25,
2013, a date which is within thirty
(30) days after the first publica-
tion of this Notice in THE HERALD
ADVOCATE and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiff's attor-
ney or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a ,default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint.

If you are a person with a disabil-
ity who needs assistance in order
to participate in a program or
service of the State Courts
System, you should contact the
Office of the Court Administrator
at (863) 534-4686 (voice), (863)
534-7777 (TDD) or (800) 955-8770
(Florida Relay Service), as much
in advance of your court appear-
ance or visit to the courthouse as
possible. Please be prepared to
explain your functional limitations
and suggest an auxiliary aid or
service that you believe will
enable you to effectively partici-
pate in the court program or serv-
ice.

WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 15 day of
January, 2013.

VICTORIA.ROGERS
As Clerk of the Court

By Connie Coker
As Deputy Clerk

1:24,31c


~ZI Pet Of jThe Wek .


This adult male mixed-breed dog is very friendly. He
loves to play fetch, and would do well in a home with
other dogs. His adoption fee is $45.

Adoption fees are $45 and include a rabies vaccination and spaying or
neutering of the animal. Contact 773-2320 if you are interested in adopt-
ing any cats or dogs that desperately neeLta losing hoaie. The kennel
location is 685 Airport Road, Vauchula, at the county landfill.


2013
SCHEDULE OF MEETINGS FOR HARDEE COUNTY COM-
MISSION AND APPOINTED BOARDS
Meetings to be held in County Commission Chambers.
Room 102 Courthouse Annex. 412 W. Orange Street.
Wauchula. Florida unless otherwise noted

BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
Regular meetings first Thursday at 8:30 a.m. & third Thursday at
6:00 p.m.
MONTH OF February 07th at 8:30 a.m. & 21st at 6:00 p.m.
February 07th at 6:00 p.m. joint with Planning & Zoning Mosaic
Annual Rev.
Planning Session February 15th at 8:30 a.m.

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY "INDEPENDENT
BOARD"
MONTH OF February 26th at 8:30 a.m.

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL/INDUSTRIAL DEVELOP-
MENT AUTH.
Meets on second Tuesday of each month. EDC -9:00 a.m. IDA-
10:00 a.m.
MONTH OF February -12th

PLANNING AND ZONING BOARD meets first Thursday night of
each month at 6:00 p.m.
MONTH OF February 07th

CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY LICENSING BOARD
Meets on the second Monday night of each month at 6:00 p.m.
in Building Department Conference Room, 401 West Main Street
MONTH OF February 11th

COUNTY PARKS AND RECREATION BOARD
Meets first Monday of each month at 6:00 p.m.
MONTH OF February 04th

LIBRARY ADVISORY BOARD
Meetings called as needed at Library in Annex II
MONTH OF February 25th at 5:30 (Friends)

HOUSING AUTHORITY
Meetings called as needed at 701 LaPlaya Drive, Wauchula
MONTH OF February To be announced.

HEALTH CARE TASK FORCE
Meets quarterly at Hardee County Health Department Auditorium
at Noon
MONTH OF February No meeting scheduled.

HARDEE COUNTY INDIGENT HEALTH CARE BOARD
Usually meets third Tuesday of each month at 5:30 p.m.
MONTH OF February-19th at 5:30 p.m.

This is a Disabled-Accessible facility. Any disabled person need-
ing to make special arrangements should contact the County
Commissioner's office at least forty-eight (48) hours prior to the
public meeting.
This notice is published in compliance with Florida Statutes
286.0105.
Interested parties may appear at the public meeting and be
heard. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the
members, with respect to any matter considered at such meeting
or hearing, he/she will need a record of the proceedings, and that,
for such purpose, he/she may need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceeding is made, which record includes the tes-
timony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.

Sue Birge, Chairwoman
1:31nc


HARDEE COUNTY
KIDS NEED
HARDEE COUNTY
HELP!
Ease a dependent child's
way through the court sys-
tem. Volunteer to, be a
Guardian Ad Litem.
773-2505
(if office unattended, please leave
message.)


assistant park manager, have seen me feeling my best and my
worst. They've always lent a helping hand when needed, and I've
always felt quite protected with my "brothers" close by!
I haven't met all the county employees, but of the ones I have
met, I do appreciate the kindness they've shown me and the help
offered whether it was with an over-flowing toilet or hauling a
desk here, it's all been appreciated!-
My "neighbor" in the park, Carmen Soles, provided under-
standing when I'd forgotten to tell her about a group coming to
visit the Wildlife Refuge one day! Kayton Nedza provided pa-
tience as I learned to stay on the time schedule during the Outdoor
Classroom sessions!
Chuck Ferrara and the Southwest Florida Fossil Club donated
shark teeth so that our students can go "fossiling" in our gravel pit.
Joe Filice, the county technology man, has helped me with com-
puter problems and always with a smile in his voice while guiding
me through various glitches!
I appreciate the help that Larry Pelton and Joe, my American
Legion buddies, provide as I continue to improve the military sec-
tion of the museum! I appreciate the Park Board for occasionally
letting me give my report early so I can attend my American
Legion meetings.
Sue and "the ladies" help out during Pioneer Park Days in the
museum; I couldn't make it without them! Noreda and Jack Bow-
man provide help, encouragement and friendship.
We made the news when WTVT Fox 13 did a feature story on
the Cracker Trail Museum. I truly appreciate Cynthia Krahl and
The Herald-Advocate for allowing me flexibility in writing this
article and sharing my thoughts about the museum.
My husband, Roger, has continued to provide love and support
as I enjoy being the curator of the museum!
I truly appreciate the citizens of Hardee County for continuing
to support the Cracker Trail Museum with their donations and for
entrusting their treasured memories with us for all to see and enjoy.
Hope to see you soon!






January 31, 2013, The Herald-Advocate 5C


Signed Penny
By Penny Johnson
Q&A With A Biblical Perspective


DUMPING THE DIETS
Q: I have been trying to lose weight for a long time. I start
a diet, and then I quit. What will help me stick to a diet? Help
me find a way to not give up.
Signed, Diet Failure

A: First of all, you should talk to your doctor before starting
any diet. Some diets are dangerous and some diet pills can cause
more damage than good. So, be careful and explore what is best for
you before you begin. New diets come out all the time. Each one
guarantees it is the best, but don't get sucked into a get-thin-quick
scheme.
Then, set a goal. Make it realistic, something you can achieve
within a reasonable time. Also, think about getting something real-
ly pretty in a size you would like to see yourself. This will become
your goal. Again, make sure it's not a ridiculous size, maybe some-
thing two sizes smaller than what you are now.
When I turned 40, my body decided it was going to have a
mind of its own and I began to gain weight. It wasn't anything sud-
den but a gradual process. I bought clothes with elastic, that would
expand. I honestly had no idea how much I had gained until it was
too late. I was three pants sizes bigger before I realized it.
My turning point was when I looked in the mirror and I saw a
stranger looking back at me. I hardly recognized myself. Then one
Sunday I was getting ready for church and nothing in my closet
would fit me.
So, I decided to go on a 1,200-calorie diet; cut back on sweet
drinks, no snacking on high-calorie items, eat salads and a sensible
supper. Before I knew it, I had lost almost 30 pounds and dropped
back down to my normal pants size. I did this without any exercise,
just watching what I eat.
I think the biggest shock to me was when I realized that a big
glass of sweet tea was 300 calories. We honestly have no idea what
we are eating, or drinking, until we stop and read labels.
You can do it. Get determined in your mind and stick to it. Set
short-term goals that you can reach and then reward yourself for
meeting those goals. Nothing is impossible, if we only believe. If I
can do it, anyone can.
Signed, Penny
Penny Johnson is an ordained minister and has an associate of arts
degree in psychology. To ask Penny a question, send a message to
signedpenny@yahoo.com. Read more from her on her blog at
www.pennykeepingitreal.wordpress.com.



YOUR BUSINESS COULD

APPEAR HERE TOO!!
Contact
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels

At The Herald Advocate

115 S. 7th'Ave. Wauchula

773-3255


During the past week, sheriff's deputies and city police
> officers investigated the following incidents and made the fol-
lowing arrests:
I


COUNTY
Jan. 27, a business burglary on SR 62, a tag stolen on South
10th Avenue and criminal mischief on Farrell Road were reported.

Jan. 26, Juan Augustin Clemente, 38 3557 Myrtle St.,
Zolfo Springs, was arrested by Dep. Manuel z.uniga and charged
with battery.
Jan. 26, Lewis Anthony Butler, 39, of 431 Manatee St.,
Bowling Green, was arrested by Dep. Steven Ahrens and charged
with aggravated assault with a deadly weapon.
Jan. 26, Jesus Lopez, 29, P.O. Box 55, Fort Meade, was arrest-
ed by Dep. Steven Ahrens and charged with DUI, fraud giving
a false ID to a law enforcement officer, possession of a counter-
feited license and two other traffic offenses.
Jan. 26, a fight on Badger Loop, and thefts at Pine Cone Park
and on U.S. 17 North were reported.

Jan. 25, Ronnie Wayne McCormick, 46 of 213 Keeton Road,
Wauchula, was arrested by Det. Russell Conley and charged with
larceny and trespassing on property not a structure or conveyance.
Jan. 25, Robert Lee White, 54, of 713 S. Oak Ave., Fort
Meade, was arrested by Dep. Ryan Waters on a charge of failure to
appear in court.
Jan. 25, Jose Luis Figueroa, 20, of 1335 S. Floral Ave.,
Bartow, was arrested by Dep. Ryan Waters on three counts of vio-
lation of probation.
Jan. 25, A residential burglary on Moffitt Road, a vehicle
stolen on Morgan Grice Road, and thefts at Gregory Lane and at
Knight Road were reported.

Jan. 24, burglary of a conveyance on Marion Street, and thefts
on U.S. 1-7 North and on Doc Coil Road were reported.

Jan. 23, Rodolfo Balentin Torres, 39, of 2268 Merle Langford
Road, Wauchula, was arrested by Capt. Andrew Rigney on a charge
of withholding support of children.
Jan. 23, Lela Mae Jackson, 55, of 700 E. Townsend St.,
Wauchula, was-arrested by Dep. Chris Albritton on a charge of vio-
lation of probation.
Jan. 23, thefts on Alderman Road, U.S. 17 North and Keene
Road were reported.

Jan. 22, Gerardo Garcia, 26, of 1527 Friendship Lane, Zolfo
Springs, was arrested by Dep. Kim Pfeiffer on three counts of vio-
lation of probation.
Jan. 22, Mark Anthony Gradilone, 33, of 157 Will Duke Road,
Wauchula, was arrested by Det. Andrew McGuckin and charged
with grand theft of a vehicle.
Jan. 22, a theft on Apple Blossom Lane was reported.

Jan. 21, Frank Troy Mendoza, 40, of 3493 Marion St., Zolfo
Springs, was arrested by Dep. Kim Pfeiffer on a charge of violation
of probation.
Jan. 21, a business burglary on CR 665, and thefts on Hibiscus
Lane, Redge Rainey Road and Park Drive were reported.

WAUCHULA
Jan. 27, Jerry Glen Johnston, 31,401 S. 11th Ave., Wauchula,
was arrested by Cpl. Justin Wyatt and charged with battery.
* Jan. 27, criminal mischief on S. Sixth Ave. (U.S. 17 South)
and a theft on East Palmetto Street were reported.


Jan. 24, thefts on Carlton Street and on Illinois Avenue were
reported.

Jan. 23, Ernesto DeSantiago, 28, of 4621 Pine Ave., Bowling
Green, was arrested by Pfc. Aron Thomas and charged with battery
and a traffic violation.
Jan. 23, a theft on East Main Street was reported.

Jan. 21, thefts on South Seventh Avenue and on River Chase
Circle were reported.

BOWLING GREEN
Jan. 26, a residential burglary on Pleasant Way and a theft at
Middle Drive were reported.

Jan. 23, a theft on West Main Street was reported.

Jan. 22, a theft on Dixiana Drive was reported.




H nigFs hing Frecas


1/31/2013
Sun Data
Rise: 7:14 AM
Set: 6:07 PM
Day Length
10 hrs. 53 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 10:35 PM
Set: 9:42 AM
Overhead: 3:43 AM
Underfoot: 4:07 PM
Moon Phase
80%
Waning Gibbous
Major Times
3:43 AM 5:43 AM
4:07 PM 6:07 PM
Minor Times
9:42 AM -10:42 AM
10:35 PM-11:35 PM
Solunar Rating
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -5
2/1/2013
Sun Data
Rise: 7:13 AM
Set: 6:08 PM
Day Length
10 hrs. 55 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 11:35 PM
Set: 10:20 AM
.Overhead: 4:31 AM
Underfoot: 4:56PM
Moon Phase
70%
Waning Gibbous
Major Times
4:31 AM 6:31 AM
4:56 PM 6:56 PM
Minor Times
10:20 AM-11:20 AM
11:35 PM-12:35 AM
Solunar Rating
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -5


2/2/2013
Sun Data
Rise: 7:13 AM
Set: 6:09 PM
Day Length
10 hrs. 56 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: --:--
Set: 11:02 AM
Overhead: 5:22 AM
Underfoot: 5:48 PM
Moon Phase
60%
Waning Gibbous
Major Times
5:22/AM 7:22 AM
5:48 PM 7:48 PM
Minor Times
11:02 AM-12:02 PM
Solunar Rating
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -5
2/3/2013
Sun Data
Rise: 7:12 AM
Set: 6:09 PM
Day Length
10 hrs. 57 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 12:36 AM
Set: 11:49AM .
Overhead: 6:15 AM
Underfoot: 6:43 PM
Moon Phase
50%
Last Quarter
Major Times
6:15 AM 8:15 AM
6:43 PM 8:43 PM
Minor Times
12:36 AM -1:36 AM
11:49 AM-12:49 PM
Solunar Rating
Average+
Time Zone
UTC: -5


2/4/2013
Sun Data
Rise: 7:12 AM
Set: 6:10 PM
Day Length
10 hrs. 58 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 1:39 AM
Set: 12:39 PM
Overhead: 7:11 AM
Underfoot: 7:41 PM
Moon Phase
37%
Waning Crescent
Major Times
7:11 AM- 9:11 AM
7:41 PM 9:41 PM
Minor Times
1:39 AM 2:39 AM
12:39 PM 1:39 PM
Solunar Rating
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -5
2/5/2013
Sun Data
Rise: 7:11 AM
Set: 6:11 PM
Day Length
11 hrs. 00 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 2:41 AM
Set: 1:37 PM
Overhead: 8:10 AM
Underfoot: 8:40 PM
Moon Phase.
27%
Waning Crescent
Major Times
8:10 AM -10:10 AM
8:40 PM 10:40 PM
Minor Times
2:41 AM 3:41 AM
1:37 PM 2:37 PM
Solunar Rating
Average+
Time Zone
UTC: -5


2/6/2013
Sun Data
Rise: 7:10 AM
Set: 6:12 PM
Day Length
11 hrs. 02 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 3:42 AM
Set: 2:37 PM
Overhead: 9:11 AM
Underfoot: 9:41 PM
Mon Phase
17%
Waning Crescent
Major Times
9:11 AM- 11:11 AM
9:41 PM- 11:41 PM
Minor Times
3:42 AM 4:42 AM
2:37 PM 3:37 PM
Solunar Rating
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -5 -
2/7/2013
Sun Data
Rise: 7:10 AM
Set: 6:13 PM
Day Length
11 hrs.03 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 4:39 AM
Set: 3:42 PM
Overhead: 10:11 AM
Underfoot: 10:40 PM
Moon Phase
9%
Waning Crescent
Major Times
10:11 AM-12:11 PM
10:40 PM-12:40 AM
Minor Times
4:39 AM 5:39 AM
3:42 PM 4.'42 P.M
Solunar Rating
Good
Time Zone
UTC: -5


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C The Herald-Advocate, January 31, 2013



0]^^E &:BViLUE13 H IEW


Skills Needed for Career Success in the 21st Century
by Martha Shiver, HHS Reading Coach


What was needed to be a
skilled person in the 19th or 20th
century is far different in today's
society. The emphasis has moved
from 19th century "horse power"
to 21st century "brain power."
Literacy has become the ultimate
tool for education. Reading, writing,
and speaking across all curricula
has become a factor which drives
every classroom on the HHS
campus. In each classroom, a
variety of hands-on activities are
being incorporated into the learning
process while concentrating on
higher order rigorous thinking.
HHS teachers are utilizing a variety
of methods, particularly the gradual
release model for instruction, in
order to build student understanding
through real world applications
and interactions with their peers in
many cooperative group activities.
This involves the "I do, We do, You
do" model for instruction. Teachers
guide and facilitate student learning
to improve our students' ability to
communicate their own ideas, listen
to and comprehend the ideas of
others, and integrate and evaluate
information from multiple sources.
One of the best ways to achieve
literacy is through communication,


collaborative learning, research, and
problem solving. Technology helps
tremendously in these areas, so it is a
great tool to use in the classroom. Not
only that, but it will help the students to
find more relevance in school as well.
Many of our classrooms have
installed promethean learning
systems. Students experience a
more hands on approach to their
learning through the use of this tool.'
Responders, used for texting, are often
used to evaluate and track student
performance and learning. This
method is more interactive and gives
immediate reinforcement to students
as well as quick feedback to teachers.
Computer labs are available for
progress monitoring of all students.
These labs are used for practice and
benchmark testing. They are also
used for state mandated testing of
all students. With upcoming ,state
and national demands for reading,
writing, and communication, com-
puters will be needed to capture
students' ability to comprehend texts
in authentic ways that have been
difficult to score by just a machine.
Students will be expected to drag
and drop, cut and paste, shade text,
and move items to show relationships
when explaining their understanding


Who knew that growing silver crystals could be so much fun! From L to R, Ser-
gio Jimenez, Holly Hughes, Ashley Baker and Eric Klein are pictured here en-
gaged in a cooperative hands-on activity in Mrs. Amy Rutledge's Chemistry class.


while reading.. Students are being
encouraged to read deeply instead of
racing through passages. They are
learning to discuss, cite, and write
evidence from the text as they move
through the reading process whether using
the computer or using their notebooks
across all disciplines and classes at HHS.
Critical and creative thinking,
collaboration, digital age literacy, and
high productivity are the learning and
communication skills needed for career


success and work performance in the 21st
century. In order to meet the demands
of the 21st century, our teachers must
prepare students for jobs that have not.;
yet been created, for the new products
that have not yet been invented, and for
new skills to build towards creativity and
innovation. Teachers at HHS are working
to ensure that our graduates have the
knowledge and skills .most demanded
by not only colleges but careers.


IIN PIC[UTURi ESBt


Mosaic supports the Career and Technology Program at HHS by pro-
viding a grant for the purchase of much needed equipment. Here,
Carol Ackerly and Diana Yeomans, Mosaic Representatives, join
Dr. Michele Polk and Mrs. Elaine Pearce, Culinary Arts Teach-
er, in front of a newly purchased commercial convection oven.


In January, some teachers get the opportunity to begin anew with % credit
courses they are scheduled to teach. This was the case for culinary arts teach-
er, Elaine Pearce, who is pictured here welcoming student, Ramiro Ramirez,
to the Baking and Pastry class on the first day of the second semester.


Air Force Junior ROTC Cadet Staff Sergeant Cesar Fimbres (right) leads an im-
pressive group of second year cadets in a 30-Step Drill routine demonstration.
The cadets were showcasing drill proficiency for the school principal as part
of their annual unit evaluation.


Calendar of Upcoming ,,

Events

2/1 Staff In-Service Day


I.
r


2/5
2/6


2/9
2/9


2/11

. 2/12

2/15
2/18


No school for Students
Reading Rumble
Senior Scholarship Meetings
All Day in the Media Center
ACT Test
Sadie Hawkins Dance
Sophomore Class Ring Meeting
During 1st Period
National Honor Society Meeting
7:00pm @ The Block
All Day Sign
Holiday (No School)


09 j
sv1o


.\


.


I

Ii










1;;


1W 7








The Food Supply Was


Safe, Grown At Home


By RAYNA PARKS
Special To The Herald-Advocate
Q: What is your full name?
A: Sara Lee Tedder. My name did
originally have an H on the end of Sara,
but I didn't like it so I just took it off.
Q: When were you born?
A: June 10, 1938-.
Q: Where were you born?
A: Oldtown, Florida.
Q: When you were growing up,
what was your house like?
A: It was a three-bedroom house. We
had'a kitchen, a dining room, a living
room, a fireplace, and a front porch
which ran all along the front of the
house. We lived out on a farm, away
from town.
Q: What was it like living on a
farm?
A: My dad grew lots of stuff. He
grew sugarcane, tobacco and other
things, too. Most of the food we ate, he
grew. My daddy grew all of the vegeta-
bles we ate. My daddy raised pigs and
cows for meat as well. But stuff we
needed that he didn't grow, we went
shopping for."
Q: When you did have to go gro-
cery shopping, where did you go?
A: We went into town for groceries.
Oldtown wasn't a very big shopping
place back then. Our grocery stores
were called supermarkets, and weren't
very large. We would go in my dad's
big pickup truck.
Q: How did you guys prepare your
food?
A: We had a wood stove back then.
You just have to throw wood into it to
keep it hot. You couldn't really control
the temperature. There was a box above
the stove where you could put meat and
bread to keep it warm. We didn't have
refrigerators, we had iceboxes. With the
iceboxes, you had to hope that the ice
would last until the ice man came back
to fill it up again.
Q: Food has changed a lot. Has the
change been for better or for worse?
A: Honestly, for the worse. We never
had to worry about all the chemicals
and stuff. Our dad grew everything, so
we knew it was safe.
Q: What was your family like?
A: I had two sisters, and one brother.
My daddy was a farmer. My stepdad
was a chicken farmer as well.
Q: What was your favorite toy?
A: I loved puzzles and numbers. I
had this one toy where you had to move
number tiles until they were in order.
Q: What did you do for fun when
you were young?
A: I mostly played hide-n-seek, and
spin the bottle. I also rode my bicycle,
jumped rope, and sometimes I would
just roll a tire around for fun. We had a
lot of square dances. I always had
something to do, because my dad grew
sugar cane, so there would be a lot of


visitors coming by to get syrup from
him. Other than that, we typically went
to football games, and invited friends
over.
Q: What were square dances like?
A: At square dances, we had a band
that would just play old square-dancing
music. Always country. We never had
the pop stuff you do now. Just classic
country.
Q: How did you learn to square
dance?
A: Well, we learned to square dance
in school. Instead of having a band
class, we had a class dedicated solely
for square dancing.
Q: What did you guys do when you
were over at-each other's houses?
A: We always played games. If it was
dark, our favorite thing to do was to
play hide-n-seek. We also rode our
bikes.
Q: What was school like?
A: There was no kindergarten; you
started out in first grade at 6 years old.
After elementary school, the rest of the
grades were in high school. First thing
in the morning, we would, do prayer,
then the pledge, then the typical home-
room. We didn't change rooms for class
until we got into junior-high grades. On
certain days, we would be let out early
and taken to the Tampa fair.
Q: What were the fairs like?
A: They had all the rides they do
now, as well as all of the different
foods. But the main thing was 4-H.
Everyone just had to go see that. Once
you went and saw the 4-H exhibits, you
were free to do whatever, and eat what-
ever.
Q: What did you do around
Halloween time?
A: My family never went trick or
treating, because we didn't live in town.
We mainly did stuff at school. Our
school had haunted houses and stuff. No
one ever really dressed up. We didn't
have many costumes.
Q: What
was your -. .
first g 1
school? .. *,, .
A: First I
went to Oldtown Elementary. Then I
went to Dixie County High School. My
high school's mascot was the Bears.
Q: What was the main sport in
your school?
A: We had baseball and basketball,
but our main sport was football, just
like today. And everyone had to go see
the high-school football games!
Q: How much has school changed
since?
A: It has changed quite a bit. I can't
even keep up with it now. For one, we
used to have to bring our lunch to
school because they didn't cook for us.
When we built a new school, then they
started cooking for the students.


Q: How did you get your clothes?
A: For school clothes, my parents
would take us into town and buy us new
shoes and clothes at the beginning of
every year.
Q: What was the general style peo-
ple wore?
A: Well, the girls never really wore
jeans for one. We would always wear
dresses. The guys typically wore what
they do today, jeans and T-shirts.
Q: What was the worst change in
fashion you have seen?
A: Definitely when the boys started
growing their hair out and wearing their
pants low. Boys never dressed like that
when I was in school. Now, when I go
down the street, I see boys' pants drag-
ging on the ground.
Q: When you were a teenager, what
did you want to be when you grew
up?
A: When I was a teenager, I didn't
look far enough ahead to really think
about what I wanted to do. But I did
know that I wanted to go to college. But
when I got out of high school, I got
married and changed my mind about
college.
Q: Where was your first job?
A: When I was 15,1 I got a job as a
waitress at a hamburger joint in town. I
was paid 50 cents an hour. Which, I
thought was big money then! It typical-
ly took $2 or $3 to fill a car up with
gas, but that was hard to find.
Q: If you could go back and give
your teenager-self advice, what would


January 31, 2013, The Herald-Advocate 7C
you say?
A: I would go back and tell myself to
go to college and be a nurse. I didn't ,''
realize I wanted to be a nurse until I ,
was much older and wiser.
Q: How much has technology
changed?
A: Tremendously. Way too much for
me to keep up with. The biggest tech-
nology I had was a radio. I never really
had anything bigger than that until I
was married. Then I got a television to
put in my house.
Q: What was your wedding like?
A: We had a small wedding. Nothing
like the ones today. The only people
there was me, my soon-to-be husband,
and our mothers. That was the proudest
moment of my life, getting married.
After getting married, my second
proudest moment would be having my
first.little girl, Willene.
Q: What was most exciting thing
you did?
A: Back then, everything was excit-
ing. I guess the most exciting thing I
did was leaving home. I wanted to
move, so I left home when I was 15. I
got married at 16.

Back In Time is the result of a class
assignment given to ninth graders at
Hardee Senior High School. Each stu-
dent is asked to interview an older
person. Selected interviews are pub-
lished here as an encouragement to
the students and for the enjoyment of
our readers.


City of Bowling Green
Notice of Public Hearing
The City of Bowling Green will hold a public hearing to consider the following proposed
Ordinance on Tuesday, February 12, 2013 at 6:30p.m.
ORDINANCE 2013-01
AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF BOWLING GREEN,
FLORIDA, PROVIDING FOR THE RENAMING OF A PORTION OF ORANGE STREET
BETWEEN BOOKERTEE AVENUE AND DOYLE PARKER AVENUE, TO "BERTHA
FULSE STREET;" PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; PROVIDING
FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
The proposed Ordinance will be considered at a public hearing before the City Commission
on Tuesday, February 12, 2013 at 6:30p.m., or as soon thereafter as the matters may be
heard. The public hearing will be held at the Bowling Green City Hall, 104 E. Main Street,
Bowling Green, Florida.
The proposed Ordinance and a copy of this notice may be inspected by contacting the
City Clerk at (863)375-2255 during normal business hours, Monday through Friday.
All interested parties may appear at the public hearing and be heard with respect to the
proposed Ordinance. Comments may also be submitted in writing prior to the hearings t4
the City Clerk, Bowling Green City Hall, 104 E. Main Street. Bowling Green, Florida, 338341
or during the public hearing. Persons with disabilities requiring special accommodations
in order to participate in the public hearings should contact the City Clerk at (863)375-2255
at least 48 hours in advance of the public hearing to request such accommodations.
PURSUANT TO SECTION 286.0105, FLORIDA STATUES, IF ANY PERSON DECIDES TO
APPEAL ANY DECISION MADE BY THE CITY COMMISSION WITH RESPECT TO ANY
MATTER CONSIDERED AT THIS PUBLIC HEARING, SUCH PERSON WILL NEED A
RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS AND FOR SUCH PURPOSE, SUCH PERSON MAY
NEED TO ENSURE THAT A VERBATIM RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS IS MADE, IN-
CLUDING THE TESTIMONY AND EVIDENCE UPON WHICH THE APPEAL IS TO BE
BASED.
Pamela S. Northup,
City Clerk 1:31c


INVITATION FOR SEALED BIDS
REMOVE AND REPLACE EXISTING 130 TON
WATER COOLED SCREW CHILLER
WAUCHULA ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
Sealed bids will be received by The School Board of Hardee County, at the Superintend-
ent's Office, 1009 North 6th Ave., Wauchula, Florida 33873 until 2:00 p.m. on February 25,
2013, at which time all bids shall be publicly opened for furnishing all labor and material
and performing all work necessary for the Removal and Replacement of-existing 130 Ton
Water Cooled Screw Chiller at Wauchula Elementary School, 400 South Florida Avenue,
Wauchula, FL.

Each bid shall be accompanied by a Bid Bond and shall be written on the form of Bid Bond
satisfactory to the Board or a Cashier's Check in an amount no less than five percent (5%)
of the total amount of the base bid as a guarantee that the Bidder shall, if awarded the con-
tract, enter into a written contract with the Board, satisfactory in form to the Board, con-
taining a liquidated damages clause, requiring Worker's Compensation and Public Liability
Insurance as required by the Board. The successful bidder shall give a Performance Bond
and Payment Bond satisfactory in form to the Board in the full amount of the Contract price
within ten (10) days after acceptance of the bid by the Board. Bidder must be a licensed
Florida Contractor ("Contractor") unless otherwise set forth in these bid documents.
Each bid shall be submitted to the Office of the Superintendent of Schools, Hardee County
School Board, P.O. Box 1678, Wauchula, FL 33873. Bids shall be Sealed and plainly
marked:
BID REMOVE AND REPLACE CHILLER WES
February 25, 2013 2:00 P.M.
The Board reserves the right to reject any and all bids received and to waive any and all ir-
regularities in regard thereto. Unsealed bids, e.g., fax transmissions, will not be accepted.
No bids may be withdrawn after the scheduled closing time for receipt of bids for a period
of thirty (30) days.
MANDATORY PRE-BID CONFERENCE: February 11, 2013, 10:00 a.m., Wauchula El-
ementary School, 400 S. Florida Ave, Wauchula, FL Telephone number (863)773-3141.
Bid documents and specifications will be issued at this time.
All bidding contractors shall attend the pre-bid conference in order to have a valid bid pro-
posal considered for this project. Bid Proposals from Contractors not in attendance of the
mandatory pre-bid conference will be considered unresponsive.
Bid tabulations with recommended awards shall be posted for review by interested parties
at the Hardee County School Board office and web site, www.hardee.k12.fl.us. Failure to
file a protest within the time prescribed by Section 120.53(5), Florida Statutes, shall con-
stitute a waiver of proceedings under Chapter 120, Florida Statutes.
David Durastanti
Superintendent of Schools
1:31c


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
BEFORE THE CITY OF WAUCHULA CITY
COMMISSION TO AMEND THE CITY OF
WAUCHULA CODE OF ORDINANCES.
Notice is hereby given that the City Commission of the City of Wauchula, Florida will hold
a public hearing for second reading on Monday the 11TH day, February, 2013, at 5:45
p.m. in the Commission Chambers, City Hall, in said City, for the purpose of adopting a
new Ordinance as follows:
Ordinance No. 2012-14, amending the City of Wauchula Code of Ordinances related to
the City of Wauchula General Pension Plan. The proposed Ordinance is entitled:
AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF WAUCHULA, FLORIDA:
ORDINANCE 2012-14
AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF WAUCHULA,
FLORIDA, AMENDING SECTION (f)(1)(A) OF ARTICLE VII OF THE CITY OF
WAUCHULA PENSION PLAN TO MODIFY THE BENEFIT LIMIT PROVISIONS
AS REQUESTED BY THE INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE; PROVIDING FOR
SEVERABILILTY; PROVIDING FOR CONFLICT; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EF-
FECTIVE DATE.
Any interested parties may inspect the proposed Ordinance at the Office of the City Clerk
in City Hall of the City of Wauchula, Florida, from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. weekdays.
At said hearing any person, his/her agent or attorney, may appear and be heard. If a per-
son decides to appeal any decision made by the.City Commission with respect to any mat-
*ter considered at such hearing, he/she will need a report of the proceedings, that, for such
purpose, he/she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made,
which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is based (F.S.
286.105).
In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act and F.S. 286.26, persons with dis-
abilities needing special accommodations to participate in this proceeding should contact
the Deputy City Clerk prior to the proceedings at (863) 773-3535 for assistance; if hearing
impaired, telephone the Florida Relay Service numbers (800) 955-8771 (TDD) OR (800)
955-8770 (voice) for assistance.
City Clerk's-Office
Dated in Wauchula, Hardee County, Florida,
this 23rd day of January, 2013.
1:31 c






8C The Herald-Advocate, January 31, 2013


Week Ending: January 27, 2013
Weather Summary: Dry weather across Florida continued
with Ona reporting the most rain at 0.27 of an inch as reported by
the Florida Automated Weather Network (FAWN). According to
the U.S. Drought Monitor, 68 percent of the State was abnormally
dry and 9 percent had moderate drought conditions. Maximum
temperatures ranged from 72 degrees at Jay to 81 degrees at Belle
Gladce. Minimum temperatures ranged from 29 degrees at Alachua
to 56 degrees at Fort Lauderdale.

Field Crops: Winter crops were still in decent shape, but lim-
ited rainfall has reduced growth. Sugarcane harvesting continued
on schedule.

Fruits & Vegetables: Vegetable growers were enjoying good
growing conditions and decent markets compared to last year.
Some tomato growers were battling late blight. Crops coming to
markets included eggplants, peppers, squash, tomatoes and various
specialty items. Watermelon planting was nearly complete in
Glades, Collier, Lee, and Hendry counties. Potatoes were still
being planted and harvesting of cabbage continued.

Livestock and Pastures: Statewide, the pasture condition
ranged from very poor to excellent, with most in fair condition
again this week. Drought was the first limiting factor to forage
growth, followed .by seasonal cold temperatures in some areas.
However, forage in some locations, especially the southwest, ben-
efited from a few days of warm temperatures. Livestock owners
were feeding hay as needed. In the Panhandle, the pasture condi-
tion ranged from poor to excellent, with most in fair condition.
Most cattle were in fair condition. In the northern area, the pasture
condition was very poor to good. The cattle were in fair condition.
In the central area, the pasture condition was very poor to good
with most in poor condition. In the southwest area, the pasture con-
dition varied from very poor to good, with the majority in fair con-
dition. The condition of the cattle was poor to good with over half
in fair condition.

Citrus: Seasonal daily high temperatures were in the upper
70s and lower 80s. Lows reached the low 30s in Citra. Rainfall was
very light and scattered. Seven of the 24 FAWN stations in the cit-
rus area recorded .some precipitation last week. Four stations
recorded a tenth of an inch or more. Ona was the only station to
record more than a quarter of an inch, with 0.27 inches. Drought
measurements as per the U.S. Drought Monitor, last updated
January 22, 2013, indicated that the drought increased in northern,
central, southern, and Indian River areas of the citrus region this
week, leaving the western area the only remaining drought free
region. Growers were irrigating one to two times a week to keep
moisture in the ground and on the trees. Harvest of early and mid-
season varieties continued at a heavy pace. Other grove activity
included general grove maintenance and fertilizer application.
Forty-one packinghouses and 18 processors were open and ship-
ping. Shipment of fresh fruit was moderate. Varieties be-ing packed
primarily included early oranges, colored grapefruit, and tanger-
ines.



Your Business Could Appear Here!
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels
At The Herald Advocate


Inside Out
By Chip Ballard


A TRIBUTE TO THE KING PART 3
This is the third, and final, installment in a series of columns on
Elvis Presley, the king of rock 'h' roll, whose birthday was Jan. 8,
1935.
So what's the point, one might ask, of all the palaver about an
overweight drug-addicted singer who's been dead more than 30
years and on whose short life enough already has been written to
fill a library?
The point is Elvis was not just another music maker from
Memphis; he was a phenomenon, a walking contradiction, a
breathing irony whose ghost-continues to draw legions of fans like
no other entertainer in history.
Before the Sun release'of "That's All Right" in June of 1954,
'Elvis was mostly unknown outside of Memphis, although every-
where he played he left crowds screaming for more.
The Presley appeal was not lost on a shrewd talent agent
named Tom Parker, who called himself "Colonel" and had man-
aged such entertainers,as Eddie Arnold and Hank Snow. Parker was
an ex-carnival huckster whose top billing once had been dancing
chickens, birds that did indeed dance a jig once Parker surrepti-
tiously shot juice to the bottoms of their electrically wired cages.
Parker promised Presley to make him his sole client, told him
he had a million dollars' worth of talent and if he'd sign, he'd have
a million dollars. Presley went for it, but had to convince his par-
ents to sign the contract with'him because he was not yet of legal
In the months fdllowilng the success of'"That's All Right,"
Elvis toured vigorously and cut several more records for Sun,
including "Baby, Lef's Play House," "Mystery Train," "I Don't
Care if the Sun Don't Shine," "I'm Left, You're Right, She's Gone"
and "I Forgot to Remember, to Forget."
Although these recordings sold faster than tickets to Colonel
Parker's dancing chicken spectacle, by the end of 1955 Elvis was
still largely unknown outside the South. That changed quickly
though when in January of 1956, just after his 21st birthday, Elvis
left Sun and signed with RCA Victor for $40,000, the largest sum
at that time ever paid to a country artist.
His first release for RCA was "Heartbreak Hotel," which,
soared to number one on the charts and quickly was followed by
more million sellers such as "Don't Be Cruel," "Hound Dog," and
"I Want You, I Need You, I Love You." It was becoming apparent
that Elvis was not a flash in the pan as many had predicted.
In August of 1956, shooting began on "Love Me Tender,"
Elvis's first movie. Critics panned it, but fans swarmed to it like
bees to honey. Riding the film's commercial success, three more
followed in quick succession: "Loving You," "Jailhouse Rock" and
"King Creole." Even the most acidic anti-Elvis critics admitted
these films demonstrated signs of artistic integrity, and even
allowed that Elvis showed promise of becoming a fine dramatic
actor.
That promise, however, was rendered null and void when
Elvis was drafted into the Army before shooting on "King Creole"
was wrapped up. He was granted a stay to finish filming then he
was off to serve Uncle Sam.
When he returned two years later the famous sideburns were
gone along with the attitude and rebel image that the Colonel had
so carefully cultivated. His boy was now packaged as so squeaky
clean and all-American he made Neil Armstrong look like a
Communist.
But while he was serving his country, two things happened
that led to the King of Rock 'n' Roll's downfall and ultimate'


destruction. His beloved mother died, severing the link closest to-
whatever normalcy was left in his life, and he got addicted to
speed, which his sergeant dispensed like candy when his boys had'
to be up all night. Elvis figured it was legal, so what harm could it
do?
With his anchor, his mother, gone, Elvis was free to indulge in
wine, women, song, and peanut butter and banana sandwiches fried
in pure butter to his heart's content.
In the 1960s he became the highest paid actor in Hollywood
even though the formula movies he was churning out became silli-
er and sillier. Nothing Elvis ever did, on screen or off, was as good
as his pre-Army output, and after a while he became little more
than a parody of himself. Elvis was the first Elvis imitator.
After his death iri 1977, ex-Beatle John Lennon was quoted as
saying, "Elvis died the day he went into the Army."
Elvis was larger than life. His fame enslaved him, his myth
consumed him, his appetites and coterie of yes-men destroyed him.
Or maybe it was irony that killed him, the irony of having risen
from humble beginnings to impossible heights of glory.
In his later years he became reclusive and more and more
uncomfortable with the unquenchable adoration lavished upon
him. Despite having everything he'd ever dreamed of, Elvis didn't
want to be Elvis anymore.
He was a phenomenon such as the world had never seen and
in all probability never will again.
E-mail Chip at chipkyle746@embarqmail.com or visit his website
at www.chipballard.com.





Letter To The Editor
Hardee County Commission
Complimented For Prayers


Dear Editor:
I endorse the action taken by
the BOCC to enable all church
ministers and chaplains in
Hardee County to be included
in delivering the invocation at
the BOCC meetings. I also want
to thank the BOCC for the near-
ly 14-year ministry they made
available for me. The last
BOCC meeting in March
(2013) would have been 14
years for me.
This ministry started with
BOCC members Benny Albrit-
ton, Chairman (1999), Minor
Bryant, Milton Lanier, Walter
Olliff Jr., and Nick Timmer-
.mann, and continuing with
Gordon Norris, Dale Johnson,
Bill Lambert, Bobby Ray
Smith, Terry Atchley, Grady
Johnson, Rick Knight, Colon
Lambert, Mike Thompson, and
Sue Birge, Chairwoman (2013).
'I can confidently say that no
other minister has had a min-
istry where the people that he or
she served has had nothing but
kind words to say in supporting
the minister. That has been my


experience with every commis-
sioner. Thank you!
I took this ministry seriously.
Each invocation (twice, and
sometimes three times, per
month) was a rare opportunity
to bring the top leaders of the
county, and those in the audi-
ence, to .focus on God and ask
for His wisdom and guidance.
My strategy was to have a
prepared invocation, starting
with asking God what I was to
address for the meeting. Once
God gave me direction, I started
with acknowledging the Creator
with a Scripture quote from
God's divinely inspired Word-
the Bible.
I would end the invocation
with a statement about God
from Scripture. My favorite
ending was: "We pray in Your
name, Lord God, the Almighty,
who was, who is, and who is
coming. Amen."
My prayer is for everyone in
Hardee County to know, and,
intimately embrace, that reality.
DeWayne Wyatt
Wauchula


p


Er -1-, FUsIS
10-5,


Montry Tiompson of Wauchu(a


JUDGES
JANE LONG PIONEER PARK DAYS DIRECTOR
SUSAN W. ROBERTS SENIOR CIRCUIT JUDGE FOR IOTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT AND SEVENTH-GENERATION FLORIDIAN
MYSTERY JUDGE WISHES To REMAIN ANONYMOUS


PIONEER PARK DAYS



COYER ART CONTEST

The Herald-Advocate is seeking original artwork for the
front and back covers of its annual special tabloid section on
Hardee. County's most popular festival. It could be yours!


ADULT DIVISION

First place: $100 Cash.
Publication of your work on the front cover.
Your photo and biographical story inside.

Second place: $50 Cash.
Publication of your winning entry inside the special section.

Third place: $25 Cash.
Publication of your winning entry inside the special section.

CHILDREN'S DIVISION (12 AND UNDER)
A week-long pass to Pioneer Park Days, publication of the artwork, plus ...

First place: $25 Cash.
Publication on the back cover.

Second place: $15 Cash.

Third place: $10 Cash.


RULES:

1) Open to all ages. Artist need not be a resident of Hardee County to enter.
2) Artwork must be original.
3) The festival theme of antique engines, farm machinery or pioneer life must
be depicted.
4) Pen and ink, charcoal, dark pencil or black marker.
5) Art MUST fill an area 8.5 inches wide by 11 inches high, including lettering
which reads "Pioneer Park Days 2013." (Drawing must be VERTICAL!)
6) Deadline is Friday, Feb. 15, at noon.

TO ENTER:
Make sure the division, name, address and daytime phone number of the artist are attached to the drawing.
Bring entries in person to the newspaper office at 115 S. Seventh Ave. in Wauchula, or mail to Cover Art
Contest, The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338, Wauchula, FL 33873. 1:17-2:14nc