The Herald-advocate

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Herald-advocate
Portion of title:
Herald advocate
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Wm. J. Kelly
Place of Publication:
Wauchula Fla
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Wauchula (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hardee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Hardee -- Wauchula
Coordinates:
27.546111 x -81.814444

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
55th year, no. 31 (Sept. 2, 1955)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000579544
oclc - 33886547
notis - ADA7390
lccn - sn 95047483
System ID:
UF00028302:00467

Related Items

Preceded by:
Hardee County herald
Preceded by:
Florida advocate (Wauchula, Fla.)

Full Text



Golf Tourney

Fights Cancer

... Column 8B


The


Series On County

Economy Concludes

... Stories 1B


Herald-Advocate


Hardee County's Hometown Coverage


113th Year, No. 7
3 Sections, 28 Pages


Thursday, January 17, 2013


HCSO Uproots $0.5-Million Pot Farm


By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
A multi-million-dollar mar-
ijuana grow operation was
unearthed in southern Hardee
County last week.
Combined, the hundreds


upon hundreds of illegal plants
weighed 319 pounds.
Two Cape Coral men were
arrested.
According to Maj. Randy
Dey of the Hardee County
Sheriff's Office, the illicit farm


was discovered by members of
the local Drug Task Force after
receiving information regarding
its possible existence from the
DeSoto County Sheriff's
Office.
Detectives here were able to


find the grow operation at 156
Bronco Lane, which is well
south of Zolfo Springs pn U.S.
17, between Sweetwater and
Fish Branch roads.
What they found startled
them.


Described simply enough as a
"large-scale cannabis grow
operation" in Drug Task Force
reports, the property held a sin-
gle-wide mobile home and an
outdoor plot of plants. In all,
1,563 plants in various stages, of
growth were seized.
Two men attempted to flee
from the property as a search
warrant was being served. Both
men were arrested.
Jailed on Tuesday of last
week were Dianko Torres, 36,
and Osvaldo Torna, 39, both of
Cape Coral.
Both suspects are charged
with production of marijuana,
trafficking in excess of 25


pounds of marijuana, and pos-.
session of narcotics equipment.
Bail has been set at $50,500
for each man. Both remained in
custody as of early Wednesday
morning.
In describing the extensive
grow operation, De.y said all
plants were set in black plastic
pots containing potting soil.
They were in various stages of
growth, from seedling to har-
vest-ready, he said.
The mobile home's interior
was fully outfitted for produc-
tion 'of the illicit plant, and was
divided into halves. The south
half held eight 1,000-watt light
See POT FARM 2A


School $$$


Up For Vote


'Flexible Funding' Plan

Requires New Approval


This marijuana farm in southern Hardee County contained 1,563 plants.


Health Fair Offers Free Tests


By JESSICA BREWER
For The Herald-Advocate
Wanting to help people
accomplish their New Year's
Resolution toward a healthier
lifestyle,'a church has joined
with the hospital in hosting a
Community Health Fair today.
Hosted by Florida Hospital
Wauchula's Faith Community
Nursing and the First United
Methodist Church of Bowling
Green, the fair opens to every-
one this morning (Thursday) at
9.
"We're hoping to help people
assess where they are health-
wise," Faith Community coor-
dinator Suzanne Crews ex-
plained.
Visitors can receive tests for
blood pressure, body mass
index, oxygen levels, and non-
fasting glucose levels. Many
health screenings are free. Also

WEATHER
BDAT HG LOW B
01109 86 68 0.00
01o10 84 65 0.00
0111 3 62 0.00
01/12 83 62 0.00
01/13 83 61 0.00
01114 03 58 0.02
01115 82 56 0.00
TOTAL Rainfall to 01 15/13 42.69
Same period last year -51.73
Ten Year Average. 50.25
Source: Unv. of la. Ona Research Centef

INDEX
Classifieds..................6B
Community Calendar....4A
Courthouse Report....... 7C
Crime Blotter................10B
Hardee Living................2B
Information Roundup... 4A
Obituaries ..................4A
School Lunch Menus.1OB



II Il5II7 I
8 3391 00075 7


offered is a $10 lipid profile,
which checks cholesterol and
triglyceride levels. For lipid
profiles, individuals need to
have been fasting.
All lab work and test results
will be given to participants for
their doctor's use.
Information will be provided
on many topics, such as heart
disease, breast cancer, estate
planning, and elder law. There
will be demonstrations on new
safe, at-home exercises.
Attendance at the fair will



Offices

Observe

MLK Day

By MARIA TRUJILLO
Of The Herald-Advocate
There will be no local festiv-
ities or parade this year for one
great activist.
As some government offices
and all of Hardee County
schools are set to close in obser-
vance of Martin Luther King Jr.
Day, no public celebrations are
set to take place in the county.
Closed this Monday will be
the Zolfo Springs Town Hall,
the Hardee County Courthouse
and the post offices. Bowling
Green City Hall and Wauchula
City Hall will remain open.
School will not be in session.
The Magnolia Manor Com-
mittee, which is in charge of the
MLK Day Parade every year, is
in the process of reorganizing
and getting new officers. Be-
cause of this, it was unable to
plan for festivities for Dr. King
this year.
The committee will regroup
See MLK DAY 2A


include representatives from
Women's Heart Lifeline, En-
core Respiratory, Highlands
Breast & Imaging, Heartland
Pharmacy, and other health-care'
providers and educators.
Every visitor will receive a
ticket for raffles at 9:30 and
10:30 for door prizes, provided


MANLY MISSES'


by each company participating.
Refreshments offered in-
clude juice and muffins.
The Community Health Fair
will be held at the First United
Methodist Church, 4910
Church Ave. in 'Bowling Green.
For more information, call
(863) 386-6420.


By MARIA TRUJILLO
Of The Herald-Advocate
A new year brings a new
election.
This time, however, the bal-
lots won't feature any candi-
dates.
Instead, voters will make the
decision whether or not to con-
tinue to allow flexible funding
for Hardee County schools.
Balloting is tentatively set for
this spring.
Back in 2009, Hardee Coun-
tians voted to -approve this
issue, and it has been in place
ever since. But the approval
local voters gave will soon
expire. The School Board must
once again hold another special
election to continue with flexi-
ble funding for another four.
years, otherwise it would end
on June 30 of this year.
If approved in a referendum


vote, this plan will allow the
school district to shift the tax
millage going to capital outlay
by one mill, moving that money
over for 'use in general opera-
tions.
This means that about $1.6
million per year will be taken
from the capital outlay account
and placed into the general
operating account.
Greg Harrelson, finance
director, said that because of
state cuts, the money is helpful
in the general fund because it
can be used to help to maintain
class sizes and the level of oper-
ation in schools.
Though the money is placed
in the general operations fund,
if necessary capital outlay pur-
chases such as buses and equip-
ment can still be made, he said.
The money can also be help-
See SCHOOL 2A


COURTESY PHOTO
Ready for a night of boys in tights, bright makeup and struggling to walk in heels? Then you won't want to miss the
annual Miss Project Graduation Pageant. This Saturday, these 24 young men will strut their stuff across the stage to
the theme of Hollywood Glam. Other performers will be Bailey's Dance Academy and senior Cassie Reyna. Tickets
are $5, with proceeds going directly to the Class of 2013 and a safe and alcohol- and drug-free celebration after grad-
uation. Contestants are (front, from left) Enrique Zamora, Brandon Vargas, Cristian Sustaita, Martin Lucatero, Zane
Whiteside, Dorian Mejia-Flores, Ramiro Ramirez, Cole Choate, Anthony Maldonado and Floyd Addison; (middle)
Michael Moreno, Rufino Gabriel, Randy Trevino, Luis Luna, Tyler Gomez, Kalob Rickett, Justin Forrester, Will Bennett,
Paul Gough and Justin Rickett; (back) Daniel Boehm, Hunter Collins, Sid Crews and Kane Casso. Come and see
Hardee Senior High's macho celebrities beginning at 6:30 p.m. at the Agri-Civic Center in Wauchula.


A NW NO Habitat Builds

Another Home
j.. Story 6,7A


' COURTESY nPHOIO


700
Plus 5c Sal2 'F'a







2A The Herald-Advocate, January 17, 2013


SThe Herald-Advocate
Hardee County's Hometown Coverage
JAMES R. KELLY
Publisher/Editor
CYNTHIA M. KRAHL
Managing Editor


JOAN M. SEAMAN
Sports Editor



115 S. Seventh Ave.
P.O. Box 338
Wauchula, FL 33873


RALPH HARRISON
Production Manager

l NOEY DE SANTIAGO
1 Asst. Piod. Manager

roN Phone: (863) 773-3255

Fax: (863) 773-0657


S DEADLINES:
Schools Thursday 5 p.m.
Sports Monday noon
Hardee Linmg Thursday 5 p.m.
Germtal News Monday 5 p.m.
Ads Tuesday noon


SUBSCRIPTIONS:
Haudee County
6 months $1; I ,r.- $39. 2 rs.- $75
Rond&
6 morlhs $25. I yr $4b6; 2 yr; 587
Out of State
6 months $2Q. I yr S52: 2 yri llO>


LETTERS:
The Herald-Advocate welcomes letters 10to the editor on matters of pubbc
mteresL Leners should be bnef, and must be written in good taste. signed
and include a dayrune phone number.
SUBMISSIONS:
Pros release.s on cornmrunrtr, mailers are welcome. Submissions shouJd be
typed. double-spaced and adhere to the above deadlnes. All item are sub.
jeci toediung
,.


The illicit plants were in various stages of growth, from seedlings to those ready to harvest.

POTfAIM
Continued From 1A


Kelly's Column
By Jim


Leslie M. Oldt, a Winter Haven educator and community
leader, died Jan. 8 at age 107. His father was a pastor.
Oldt was a high school teacher, stockbroker and helped estab-
lish Traviss Career Center. He was active in, civic clubs or other
community organizations, Little Theatre, and the First Presbyterian
Church. He was kind, helped people and loved to cook, work in a
garden, hike and do yoga.

Haywood Mack Griffin, 94, of Plant City passed away Jan. 9
after a long and successful career in farming. He and his wife grew
strawberries, hot peppers and other vegetables and established
Sunny Acre Farm.
They helped over 100 area FFA students learn about agricul-
ture and were active in the First Presbyterian Church. His survivors
include daughter Linda Clark of Wauchula.

Waymon H. Harward Jr., 88, of Bowling Green died Dec. 14.
He was retired from the phosphate industry and enjoyed jogging
and his First Baptist Church. Officiating his funeral service were
former Bowling Green Baptist Church pastors Roland Davis and
Blake Albritton.
Rev. Davis said Harward was kind, meek, soft-spoken, loved
his church and family, jogged all over-town fo ryears, fought the
good fight, and finished the course. Junior was a personal friend,
neighbor anid jogging partner.

The Wauchula Kiwanis Club will have its annual sporting
clays shoot Saturday, Feb. 9, at Square One east of Arcadia on SR-
70. Coordinators are Bob Hanchey and Lee Hawthorne of
Wauchula State Bank.

Reality Ranch Ministries on SR-66 east of Zolfo Springs hosts
various barrel races, rodeo events, therapeutic horseback riding,
instruction and outings and has Cowboy Church services every
Sunday at 11:00 a.m. Rev. Randy Johnson is founder and director.
This is an excellent ministry in Hardee County.



Medicare Open Enrollment:

Seize Your Opportunity


When it comes to Medicare,
open enrollment is the time for
people to compare their health
and prescription drug coverage.
People with Medicare have
from October 15th until De-
cember 7th to make changes to
their health and prescription
drug plans.
Your health and medication
needs can change from year to
year and health plans may also
change theirbenefits and costs.
That's why' it's important to
evaluate your Medicare choices
during open enrollment. A good
first step is to learn more about
the available plans and how
they can best meet your current
and future prescription drug and
health needs.
Use the Medicare Plan Finder
at www.medicare.gov/find-a-
plan to help yourself research
prescription drug and health
plans. After reviewing available
plans, AARP encourages every-
one with Medicare to consider
three essential items when con-
sidering options during open
enrollment:
1. Costs: which include the
monthly premium, the annual
deductible and cost sharing;
2. Coverage: for the doctors
and pharmacies included in the
plan and the prescription drugs
and other services you need;
and
3. Quality Ratings: which
are provided for most Medicare
Advantage and Part D plans.


Through the Medicare Five-
.Star Quality Rating System,
these ratings are based on qual-
ity measures that include mem-
ber satisfaction, customer serv-
ice and pharmacy services.
Plans are rated on a scale from
1 to 5 stars, with 5 stars indicat-
ing the highest quality.
Visit www.aarp.org/openen-
rollment to find easy-to-under-
stand guidance on the choices
available to you during open
enrollment, and questions to
consider .When choosing a
Medicare plan. Spanish lan-
guage open enrollment re-
sources are available at
www.aarp.org/espanol/salud/m
edicare-y-el-seguro.
AARP has several additional
resources to help people with
Medicare:
, If you are enrolled in a
Medicare drug plan, the
Doughnuit Hole Calculator may
help you lower your drug costs.
You can learn how to reduce
your drug costs in the prescrip-
tion drug coverage gap, or
avoid it entirely, by finding
lower-cost medication options.
Go to www.aarp.org/doughnut-
hole or www.aarp.org/calcu-
ladoramedicare.
A comprehensive guide to
Medicare prescription drug
coverage can be found at
www.aarp.org/health/medicare-
insurance/medicare_partD_
guide.


It is generally agreed, that few men are made better by
affluence or exaltation.
-Samuel Johason

Mycophobia is the fear of mushrooms, while
lachanophobia is the fear of vegetables.


bulbs hanging on reflectors,
transformers to run those bulbs,
reflective Mylar material on the
walls, electrical supplies for
powering the transformers and
bare floors. +
The central air-conditioning
unit was diverted to vent to this
area only, he added.
The north half of the mobile
home, Dey said, was outfitted
much the same as the south
side, but with an individual
window air-conditioning unit
furnishing the cool ventilation.
Further, the major described,




MIKI1AY
Continued From 1A
and start to immediately plan
what activities and events it
wants to accomplish throughout
the year, making sure that next.
year's MLK Day will be "dyna-
mite."
King has officially had lis
own national day since Jan. 20,
1986. Since then, MLK Day has
been, observed every third
'Monday in January in honor of
his birth.
He was an intelligent man,
graduating high school at the
age of 15. He then went on to
Morehouse College and ob-
tained a bachelor of arts degree
in 1948. He received a bachelor
of divinity from Crozer The-
ological Seminary in 1951, and
in 1955 earned his doctorate
degree from Boston University.
King later married Coretta
Scott and had four children, two
girls and two boys.
Throughout the years, King
attended and organized several
rallies where he fought for the
right for everyone to be equal.
According to Nobelprize.org,
"between 1957 and 1968, King
traveled over 'six million miles
and spoke over 2,500 times,
appearing wherever there was
injustice, protest, and action."
On April 4, 1968, a sniper
assassinated the famed civil-
rights leader outside of his hotel
room in Memphis, Tenn. He
was 39 years old.




SCHOOL
Continued From 1A
ful when it comes to simpler
things such as new uniforms.
Last year, the Hardee Senior
High School band program was
able to purchase new uniforms.
The program would have been
unable to make this purchase
through the capital fund.
But under the plan, if need
be, money can be transferred
back to the capital fund.
Harrelson said he has not
seen many real downsides to
this plan, and that he believed it
has worked very well in the pre-
vious four years.
If approved, flexible funding
will go into effect beginning.
July I of this year and end in'
2017.
If voters reject the flexible.
funding extension, the School
Board can hold another elec-
tion, but only after a 12-month
period.
This proposal will not create
new taxes.
Voting is tentatively set for
April 30. It will be scheduled
through the Supervisor of Elec-
tions Office. In 2009, the
School Board paid $24,421 for
the special election.


loose marijuana was found in
the carport, along with cigar
wrappers as might be used in
order to smoke the product.
Dey said that in interviews
with detectives, the suspects
admitted to their contributions
to the marijuana grow opera-
tion. Torna said he was hired by
the property's caretaker to
install the lighting. Torres
allegedly was hired to install
the air conditioning.
Investigation into the mari-
juana farm continues, Dey
noted.
Meanwhile, sheriff's detec-
tives and deputies, and Sheriff
Arnold Lanier himself, spent
roughly eight hours last


Tuesday dismantling the site.
"I'm very proud of the way
our people all pitched in to
help," said Dey. "Some of them
were scheduled to get off duty
at 5, yet 'they stayed to get the
job done."
He said all Sheriff's Office
personnel were involved in one
aspect or another.
* "It required a lot of manual



Death Notice
Jeffery Surrency, 62, of
Bowling Green, died Jan. 14,
2013. Funeral services are cur-
rently being planned. Call
Robarts Family Funeral Home
for the date and times.


labor, tearing this down. Every
single plant and every single
piece of equipment had to be
taken up and loaded up. We did
not want. to leave one thing
behind, so that no one could
show up later to get it and use it
at another grow operation else-
where," he noted in explaining
the thoroughness of the day's
efforts.
Dey said 70 pounds of pot-
ting soil were removed from the
site as well, and will be donated
to the school system for its agri-
culture programs.
Meanwhile, Dey added,
every plant and every item large
or small had to be catalogued
and stored. The-farm, he said,
was left empty.


Department Of Health


Ei courage Flu Vaccinations


Floridians are catching
infltienza (flu) across the state.
Symptoms include:
Fever
Cough
Sore throat
Runny Nose
Headache
Muscle ache

Key messages:
It is not too late to get a flu
shot
The flu vaccine is effective
(the strains in circulation match
those covered in the vaccine)
For many, a flu infection
will mean lost work or school
days
Flu shots are recommended
for all individuals older than six
months, and are particularly
important for people in the high


risk groups and for people who
care for individuals at high risk
for serious flu complications.
Certain individuals are at
risk for serious complications
like pneumonia and even death
(including):
People 65 or older
Children'5 or younger
Pregnant women
People with underlying
illnesses including
Chronic respiratory dis-
ease, chronic heart disease and
diabetes.

Prevention Messages:
Get re-vaccinated every flu
season because flu viruses
change each year.
Persons who are sick with
flu-like illness should stay
home for at least 24 hours after


fever has subsided without the
use of fever-reducing medicine,
except to get medical care.
Persons with a chronic ill-
ness, or who are pregnant,
should contact their health care
provider if they suspect their ill-
ness that might be influenza.
Health care providers can pre-
scribe antiviral medication.
Everyone should cover his
or her nose and mouth with a
tissue when coughing or sneez-
ing and throw the tissue in the
trash after use. It is advisable to
avoid touching one's eyes, nose
and mouth.
Despite being sick or in
good health, everyone should
wash his or her hands with soap
and water often. If soap and
water are not available, use an
alcohol-based hand sanitizer.


Helping And Advocating For Bliaded Veterans


Helping deserving veterans
secure the" benefits they are
entitled to through the Depart-
ment of Veterans Affairs (VA)
can be a daunting task. Such
was'the experience of an Army
vet who fought in the -Battle of
the Bulge and in the Korean
conflict. ,
"For 'several years, we were
totally on our own and didn't at
all know to whom or to where
we should turn," said Margaret
Fredmonski of Moosic, Penn-
sylvania.
Mrs. Fredmonski's late hus-
band, Adam, was a former bus
driver. Later in life, he became
legally blind over the 'span of
about onie year due to macular
degeneration. He 'eventually
sought additional disability
compensation for an osteo-
arthritic condition connected to
his military service.
"We would complete the
paperwork and get the process
started, only to be frustrated by
repeatecq denials," said Mrs.
Fred4noiski. On the advice of a
VA social worker, the Fred-


monskis contacted a gentleman
at a VA regional office in
* Philadelphia a man she calls
a godsend.
Edward Eckroth, a Field
Service Representative of the
Blinded Veterans Association
(BVA), provided the assistance
the Fredmonskis. needed to
increase the percentage of serv-'
ice-connected disability com-
pensation he had earned
through his service.
"Ed not only helped us navi-
gate the VA bureaucracy with
his knowledge and competence
of the system that approves or
.denies these disability claims,
he also became our advocate
and our friend through his kind-
ness and understanding," said
Mrs. Fredmonski.
Eckroth is one of seven BVA
Field Service Representatives
strategically placed throughout
the United States. The Field
Reps and several additional
Volunteer National Service
Officers (VNSOs), all blind
individuals, make themselves
accessible to blinded veterans,


helping them take the first steps
in adjusting to blindness. They
provide inspiration, encourage-
ment and practical help in
working with VA claims and
benefits, even when the claim
might not be directly tied to
blindness.
There is no fee for the servic-
es of BVA Field Reps and
VNSOs, regardless of whether
the blinded veterans seeking the
help have ever joined the organ-
ization as members.
As an organization, BVA also
represents the interests of blind-
ed veterans as a whole before
Congress and at the VA Central
Office in Washington. In addi-
tion to its role as a medium of
communication for and about
blinded veterans and the issues
that affect them, BVA promotes
access to technology and the .
practical use of the latest
research.
To learn more, visit
www.bva. org or call 800-669-
7079.


PRITER 9 UBLSHERgS

11 S 7h v. WucuaIFL337


Published weekly on Thursday at Wauchula, Florida. by The HeralI-Advocare
Publishing Co Inc Penodical Postage paid at U.S Post Office. Wauchula, FL
33873 and additional entrn ohfie tUSPS 5178780t. '"Postmaster," &end address
changes to: The Herald-Advocate. P.O Box 338. Wauchula. FL 33873.


v






January 17, 2013, The Herald-Advocate 3A


'Green' Schools Enhance Learning:


5 Tips On How To Green
When it comes to education, ramento) are working full time
where children learn can be as for three years to provide
important as what they learn. expertise in building, operating
Why? The physical condition of and maintaining healthy and
an actual school building sustainable school buildings to
affects the bottom line for every faculty, administration and stu-
school. Money spent to heat or dents. Both are working with
cool a poorly maintained school their school districts to pinpoint
building is money that could areas where the school district
instead be directed to' student can improve, such as increasing
needs, such as more books or energy efficiency, often involv-
teachers. ing students in the planning and
The math doesn't add up. implementation.
Take one example: California. This partnership is an impor-
It has the largest school system tant part of the company's long-
in the country and more than term education and sustainabili-
half of the state's school build- ty missions. Helping transform
ings are at least 30 years old. America's schools can make
California school districts them better for the environ-
spend approximately $700 mil- ment, less expensive to operate
lion each year on energy. and healthier places to learn and
It doesn't stop there. Studies work. I
also show that children are less Want to get involved in the
distracted and more alert in movement? Here are five tips to
classrooms with better acou- help you engage your school
stics and ventilation, more com- district:
fortable indoor temperatures 1. Ready, set how do we
and exposure to natural light, begin?
Across the U.S., parents, Start by making a list of
teachers, and school adminis- potential changes that affect the
trators are joining a national school's indoor air quality and
"green schools" movement to learning environments. Beierle
improve the energy, efficiency suggests asking questions, such
and "health" of the nation's pub- as: "What sort of policies are in
lic school facilities. At the fore- place, (green cleaning, integrat-
front of this initiative is The ed pest management, tempera-
Center for Green Schools at the ture set points) and so on and
U.S. Green Building Council how are they being implement-
(USGBC) which is supported ed? Which schools have the
by United Technologies Corp. oldest heating and cooling
(UTC). equipment? What kind and how
The Center for Green Schools much waste does your school
is sponsoring two UTC Fellows generate?" These issues show
to help drive sustainability where improvements can .be
efforts for the Sacramento City made and where money is being
Unified School District and the wasted. Knowing these will
Boston Public School System. help you pick a starting point.
Under the program, UTC 2. Give the kids the reins.
Fellows Phoebe Beierle (Bos- "Once you pick a starting
ton) and Farah McDill (Sac- point, involve the students,"


Your School
says McDill of adding energy
efficiency to the school curricu-
lum. "Explain to them the rea-
son you are trying to make
changes, get their ideas and
help them create 'green school'
projects. Involving students can
really help drive awareness of
potential solutions."
3. Do the math.
Understand how and why a
school building can hinder or
help every student and teacher.
"For instance," notes McDill.
The Center for Green Schools
has resources, research and sta-
tistics that can be used to devel-
op the "business case" for the
investment and potential
savings from green schools.
4. Turn off the lights.
One way to make a simple
yet powerful change is by turn-
ing off the lights. Electricity
accounts for more than 2.5 per-
cent of a school's energy use.
"Starting a school-wide lighting
retrofit or a 'Turn Out the
Lights' campaign can make an
impact riot only on the environ-
ment but also on the school's
energy bills," notes Beierle.
5. Spread the word.
Education doesn't just happen
in a classroom. Meet with
school officials and board
members to help them under-
stand how 'greening' your
school will have positive effects
on your child's well-being as
well as the school's budget. In
the end, it benefits all stu-
dents and parents, as well as
administration.
For more information on the
Fellows program and to access
the Center for Green Schools'
resources, visit www.centerfor-
greenschools.org.


Small-time gamblers who place a small bet in order to prolong the excitement of a
game are called "dead fish" by game operators because the longer the playing time,
the greater the chances of losing.

The NASDAQ stock exchange was totally disabled one day in December 1987 when a
squirrel burrowed through one of the exchange's telephone lines.

The triangle is a percussion instrument that is made by bending a steel rod into a tri-
angle shape that has an opening at one corner. It is then suspended by a string and
struck with a steel beater to produce a tone.



YOUR BUSINESS COULD APPEAR HERE TOO!!
Contact
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels,

__773-3255


Eat Better, Risk Less, Reduce

Cruelty: An "Eggs" -planation


The next time you eat an egg,
you may care to spare a thought
for the hen which laid it-and
what you can do to make her
life and your own a bit better.
The Problem
At this ..very moment,
throughout the U.S. ang Can-
ada, more than 300 million hens
are living lives of intense pain
and suffering as they labor to
produce one of our most basic
food staples eggs.
Some 95 percent of egg-lay-
ing hens in this part of North
America live 'their entire lives
in small cages that they share
with five or six other birds, in
rows and stacks that fill dark
warehouses. These chickens -
intelligent, social animals -
cannot spread their wings or
even turn around. Their bones
become brittle and they are
bruised, battered and some can-
not even stand.


The practice is banned in
many countries, and it's. not
only bad for the hens, it's also
bad for the people who eat the
eggs. "The extraordinary levels
of stress the hens experience,
along with their deplorable liv-
-ing conditions, suppress their
immune systems and make
them highly vulnerable to infec-
tions and bacteria, including
Salmonella," points .out Execu-
tive Director, World Society for
the Protection of Animals US
(WSPA) one of the world's
leading animal welfare organi-
zations.
Art Answer
Fortunately, there is another
way. Hens don't need to be. kept
in cages to produce lots of eggs.
'Cage-free farming provides sig-
nificantly improved living con-
ditions for hens and a safer,
more wholesome .product for
consumers.


g 4 $Soup Kitchen
(For the homeless and needy.
Eat in or take out.)
/ f\ Serving Chicken Alfredo,

vegetable, bread,
tea and dessert.

National Day of Service
i. I Saturday, January 19
;11am- 1:30pm
at

First United Methodist Church
Fellowship Hall
207 N. 7th Avenue Wauchula

For more information,
contact Julie Ellis at 773-6370
To volunteer, go to: www.2013pic.org/service


What You Can Do
You can help by trying to set
- and eat at only humane
tables at the holidays and all
through the year. Four things to
do are:
1.. Whenever you yuy ,eggs
you can chbAse the age-free
kind I they're available at
most grocery stores.
2. Encourage others to do so
too, supporting the farmers who
do things right.
3. Ask your favorite restau-
rants if they use cage-free eggs
in their kitchens.
4. Look for labels that say
cage-free, free range or certified
organic.
Learn More
You can visit www.choose-
cagefree.org to get more .infor-
mation on how you can join the
flock.


Need Help
Getting Out Of An
Abusive Situation?

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE
HOTLINE

1 (800) 500-1119
tfc-dh



ABOUT ...
School News
The Herald-Advocate en-
courages submissions from
Hardee County schools.
Photos and write-ups
should be of recent events,
and must include first and
last names for both students
and teachers. Identify pho-
tos front to back, left to right.
Deadline for submissions
is 5 p.m. on Thursday.
Please include the name
and phone number of a con-
tact person. Qualifying
items will be published as
space allows.


A2013 HARDEE COUNTY FAIR

FINE ARTS COMPETITION--AND- ARTS & CRAFTS CONTEST
There are two separate contests at the 2013 Hardee County Fair. the Fine Arts Competition sponsored by the Hardee County Fair.
and the Arts & Crafts Contest sponsored by the Hardee County Extension Office.
Separate rules apply for each contest and the same piece cannot be entered in both contests
For the Hardee County Fair's Fine Arts Competition. work must be submitted on February 9th between 9:00 AM and Noon at the
AqrI-Clvlc Center For details, visit our website or call Ray 11 (863) 773-3553.
For the Hardee County Extension Office's Arts & Crafts Contest work must be submitted on February 14th between 9-00 AM
and 4-00 PM at the Exhibit Hall For details, visit our website or call the Extension Office ,i (863) 773-2164.

----------------www HardeeCountyFair orq ''1-







4A The Herald-Advocate, January 17, 2013


MARGARET W. CLARDY
Margaret W. Clardy, 100, of
Naples, died on Tuesday, Dec.
18, 2012.
She was bom Nov. 24, 1912
and had been living at Barring-
ton Terrace Assisted Living
Facility for the past two years.
She was preceded in death by
her husband Alonzo Clardy of
67 years.
Survivors include one son,
Roy Clardy and wife Carolyn of
Brooksvil(e; one daughter,
Margaret Ingram and husband
Bud of Naples; four grandsons,
Douglas Ingram and wife Holli,
David Ingram and wife Yvonne,
Matthew Clardy and wife Sarah
and Stephen Clardy and four
great-grandchildren Thomas
Alonzo Ingram, Skylar Ingram,
Fisher Ingram and Kendall
Ingraim.
She will receive a graveside
service on Saturday, Jan. 12,
2013, at 11 a.m. at Wauchula
Cemetery.
Arrangements were by
Hodges Funeral Home at
Naples Memorial Gardens.




REBECCA ANN
"BECKY" NAYLOR
Rebecca Ann "Becky" Nay-
lor, 63, of Fort Meade, died on
Tuesday, Jan. 1, 2013 at her
home.
Born in Detroit, Mich., on
July 9, 1949, she was a long-
time resident of Fort Meade.
She worked for the Polk County
School Board in the cafeteria at
Fort Meade High School, and
was also a member of the First
Church of God of Fort Meade.
She is survived by her hus-
band, Owen Naylor of Fortf
Meade; son Don "Bumper"
Naylor of Valrico; daughter
Tamara K. Fountain and hus-
band Charlie of Fort Meade;
sister Linda Hill of Capac,
Mich.; grandchildren, Chris-
topher Rhoden, Austen Rhoden,
Trey Rhoden, Emma Naylor,
Megan Naylor, Jason Naylor
and Tabitha Eblen; great-grand-
daughter Adelyn Grace Rhoden
and several other great-grand-
children.
\ Memorial services were held
at 6 p.m. on Monday, Jan. 7,
2013, at the First Church of
God in Fort Meade with the
Rev. Travis Risner officiating.
In lieu of flowers, those wishing
may make contributions to the
Youth Group of First Church of
God of Fort Meade. Con-
dolences may be sent to the
family at www.hancockfh.com.
Arrangements are by Hancock
Funeral Home of Fort Meade.


9n 'oUig JVeinofy













NETTLE L. CRISWELL
Nettie L. Criswell, 68, of
Wauchula, passed away on
Friday, Jan. 11, 2013, at her
home.
She was born on Oct. 5,
1944, in Moultrie, Ga., and
has lived in Hardee County
most of her life. She was a
homemaker and a member of
the church Spirit Wind Tab-
ernacle.
She was preceded in death
by one son Billy Woods.
Survivors include her hus-
band, Deloney Criswell, 'of
Wauchula; one son, Jamie
Woods of Arlington, Texas;
four daughters, Joyce Chas-
tain and husband Glenn of Ft.
Pierce, Mary Windham of.
Wauchula, Regina Kidd of
Charleston, W.Va., and Me-
linda Turner Lott of Tifton,
Ga.; three stepchildren, John,
Douglas, and Sheila Criswell
of Panama City; two brothers,
Worley Ledford of Ft. Pierce
and Ray Ledford of Ray City,


NEW HARDEE GOP OFFICERS


Obituariesi


WILTON "RAY" TURNER
Wilton "Ray" Turner, 78, of
Mount Dora, died on Friday,
Jan. 4, 2013, in Mount Dora.
Born on April 28, 1934, in
Wauchula, he was a Hardee
High graduate and later earned
a doctorate in educational
administration and supervision
from the University of Miami.
He worked for the Miami Dade
County Public School system
for over 30 years. He was a
member of the First Presbyter-
ian Church of Mount Dora and
served as an elder and choir
member.
Survivors include his wife of
56 years, Susan Baymiller
Turner, of Mount Dora; two
sons, Scott Turner of Miami,
and David Turner and wife
Kathy of Savannah, Ga.; two
daughters, Sharon Turner of
Tallahassee and Karen Turner
of Miami; one brother, Rege
Anderson of Avon Park; one
sister, Cyndee Bryan and hus-
band Bill of Sebring; and five
grandchildren, Jandee Turner,
Rege Turner, Cameron Turner,
Gabrielle Turner and Luke
Turner.
Services were Sunday, Jan.
6, at 2 p.m. at the First Presby-
terian Church of Mount Dora.
In lieu of flowers the family
asks for contributions to be
made to the music fund at the
First Presbyterian Church of
Mount Dora or Cornerstone
Hospice in Tavares.

If a nation values anything
more than freedom, it will
lose its freedom; and the
irony of it is that if it is
comfort or money that it
values more, it will lose
that, too.
-W. Somerset Maugham



C-0-
C oving &UeInovy













VETRES V. JUSTISS
Vetres V. Justiss, 91, of
Wauchula, died on Tuesday,
Jan. 15, 2013, at Good Shep-
herd Hospice, Sebring.
Born on July 23, 1921, in
Suwannee County, she came
to Hardee County from Live
Oak in 1949. She was a home-
maker and member of Bow-
ling Green Church of God.
She was preceded in death
by a son, Gene B. Justiss; and
brother Leon Simmons.
Survivors include three
sons, John E. Justiss and wife
Deborah of Wellington, James
B. Justiss and wife Diane of
Wauchula, and Jerry D. Justiss
of Wauchula; two daughters,
Jane Smith and husband
Edward of Starke, and Linda
Scaffe and husband Richard
of -Winter Haven; two broth-
ers, Quincy Simmons of Live
Oak and Bobby Simmons of
Auburndale;. four sisters,
Vernice Prescott of Cleveland,
Tenn., Louise Smith of
Bartow, Clarice Jones of
Cleveland, Tenn:, and Lavon
Anderson of Mulberry; 17
grandchildren; and 34 great-
grandchildren.
Visitation is Thursday, Jan.
17, from 6 to 8 p.m. at Robarts
Garden Chapel. Funeral serv-
ices are Friday, Jan. 18, at 10
a.m. at Robarts Garden
Chapel with the Rev. Mark
Smith and the Rev. Bobby
Simmons officiating. Inter-
ment follows in Wauchula
Cemetery.
Expressions of comfort may
be made at robartsfh.com.


FUNERAL HOME
WAUCHULA


The following permits were
applied for or issued by the
Hardee County Building
Department during the week of
Jan. 6- Jan. 12. Listings include
the name of the owner or con-
tractor, the address for the proj-
ect, the type of work to be done,
and the cost involved. Only
projects valued at $1,000 or
more are listed.
ISSUED
Shawn Rimes, State Road 62,
demolitions, $1,000.
Michael Scheipsmeier,
Sweetwater Road, addition/
remodel, $11,250.
Stevin W. Lott, U.S. 17
South, signs, $30,100.
BUILDING BLOCKS
A permit is not- required
when clearing a stoppage or.
repairing leaks in pipes, valves
or fixtures when a repair does
not require a replacement of
fixtures.


Holiday Changes
Garbage Pickup
There will be some
changes in garbage pickup
for the Martin Luther King Jr..
Day on Monday. The county
landfill will be closed. -For
Hardee Disposal customers,
Monday's garbage will. be
collected next Thursday,
Jan. 24.
In Bowling Green and
Wauchula, there will be no
change. Garbage will be
picked up as usual. In fact,
Wauchula is moving toward
a change to picking up both
the north and south routes in
the city on Mondays and
Thursday, and eliminating
the south routes on
Tuesday and Fridays.

Relay For Life
Teams To Meet
Anyone who wants to help
cancer patients continue to
celebrate their birthdays can
come to the Relay For Life
team meeting today (Thurs-
day) at 5:30 p.m.
Find out how to form 'or
join a team by coming to the
meeting at the Hardee
County Training Facility, 230
S. Florida Ave. (adjacent to
the School Board meeting
office), Wauchula.

Church Fundraiser
Two Weekends
There will be a fundraiser
for New Creation & Family
Resource Center Inc. this
weekend and next, Jan. 17-
19 and Jan. 24-26 at the cor-
ner of Washington Street
and Will Duke Road.
In addition to accepting
contributions, there will be
chicken and fish sandwiches
and barbecue ribs with sides
available. For more informa-
tion, call 863-781-0982 or
863-202-6247.
Heartland Closes
Workforces Offices
All Heartland Workforce
One-Stop Career Centers
will be closed on Monday in
observance of Martir Luther
King Jr. Day.
Offices will resume regular
hours on Tuesday.

Service Day Meals
On Saturday
As part of the Dr. Martin,
Luther King Jr. Day and pre-
inaugural day activities,
there will be special meal
served to the 'homeless and
anyone else in need.
Those in need are encour-
aged to visit the fellowship
hall at First United Methodist
Church, 207 N. Seventh
'Ave., Wauchula, on Sat-
urday from 11 a.m. to 1:30
p.m. Anyone who wants to
help can call Julie Ellis at
863-773-6370.

Baseball player Roger
Maris, who hit 61 home
runs in 1961, won only one
home run title.
The first woman to hold the
office of Chief of Protocol
in the U.S. Department of
State was former child star
Shirley Temple Black in
1976.


PHOTOS BY JIM KELLY
Officers for the Hardee County Republican Party Executive Committee for the 2013-
2014 term are, from left, Chet Huddleston, state committeeman and Congressional
District 17 caucus chair; David Durastanti, treasurer; Sue Birge, vice-chairman;. David
Singletary, chairman; Patty Clark, state chairwoman; and Thomas Trevino, secretary.
The Republican Party meets the first Tuesday of each month at 6:30 p.m. at The Panda
Restaurant, 806 Hwy. 17 South, Wauchula.


THURSDAY, JAN. 17
VHardee County Com-
mission, evening .meeting,
Room 102, Courthouse
Annex I, 412 W. Orange St.,
Wauchula, 6 p.m.
THURSDAY, JAN. 24
VHardee County School
Board, regular meeting,
Board Road, 230 S. Florida
Ave., Wauchula, 5 p.m.


Don't Be Left Out!
HARDEE LIVING
DEADLINE
IS THURSDAY AT 5 P.M.




YOUR

BUSINESS

COULD

APPEAR

HERE

TOO!!
Contact
Nancy Davis,
Kim Reas or
Trayce Daniels
At
773-3255


-P


4050 U.S. Hwy 17 Bowling Green

ALL-U-CAN-EAT
*\ PIZZA & SALAD BAR
Mn ONLY $6.99

Mon. thru Wed. 11-2 & 5-8
.:1c


bs hat type of service is

best for me and my family?

i Church, chapel, graveside

or personalized?



Call today and set an appointment
with one of our funeral directors to '
discuss this important matter.





Funeral Homes





404 W. Palmetto St. Wauchula
(863) 773-6400
PongerKaysGrady.com
Affordable Funeral & Cremation Services


Ga.; one sister, Bertha Myers
of Bartow; 10 grandchildren;
and nine great-grandchildren.
Graveside services were
Sunday, Jan. 13,. at 4 p.m. at
Friendship Cemetery. Offi-
ciating were the Rev. Glenn
Chastain and the Rev. James
Fox.
Expressions of comfort may
be made at robartsfh.com.


FUNERAL HOME
WAUCHULA


Blding
Perit


IOM


.





January 17,2013, The Herald-Advocate 5A


If you've ever had a flooded
basement or other area, you're
not alone. Flooding is the most
frequent severe weather threat
and the costliest natural disaster
in the United States. Fortun-
ately, while there's little you can
do to combat Mother Nature,
there are ways to protect your-
self.
Regardless of whether the
source is rain, snow or other
disaster, it affects people all
over the country and at any time
of year. In fact, according to
FEMA, 90 percent of all natural
disasters in the U.S. involve
some degree of flooding and
cost homeowners millions of
dollars in damage. One of the
areas most often damaged in
homes and businesses by flood-
ing is the basement, where
water can destroy electrical and
HVAC systems.
What To Do
Once safety from fire and gas
leaks has been assured, consid-
er these helpful tips for protect-
ing your valuable possessions
and critical HVAC systems.
Water Removal: High-
efficiency portable utility
pumps are now available for
emergency water removal.
They're designed as an alterna-
tive to gas or diesel-powered
portable pumps and can even
work from your vehicle's 12-
volt battery. They excel in envi-


ABOUT ...
Letters To
The Editor
The Herald-Advocate wel-
comes letters to the editor
on matters of public interest.
Letters should be brief, and
must be written in good
taste and include the
writer's full name, address
and daytime telephone
number for verification.
Letters must be received
by 5 p.m. on Monday to be
considered for that week's
edition. Submissions should
be typed or legibly written.
Send letters to: Letters to
the Editor, The Herald-
Advocate, P.O. Box 338,
Wauchula, FL 33873. Fax
letters to (863) 773-0657.


ronments requiring fast, effi-
cient removal of concentrations.
of standing or floodwater. Visit
www.getwaterout.com for more
information.
Water Heating: Whether a
water heater uses gas, oil or
electricity, if the ignition or
burner elements were exposed
to floodwater, the unit should
be replaced. Contact a trusted
contractor before activating the
system. Learn more at
www.ahrinet.org.
Waterproofing: This is
always a good strategy, and
adding a sump pump and
drainage system, and sealing
the perimeter, can provide
peace of mind. You can learn
more by visiting www.bitly.-
com/basementtips.
Furnaces and Boilers:
Even if water doesn't reach your
HVAC system, the moisture and
dampness can affect the con-
trols, valves and other equip-
ment. Inspect these components
or have a contractor do so
before use. Find information at
www.naohsm.org.
Heat Pumps and Air-
Conditioning: If floodwater
has repositioned either the
indoor or outdoor units of a
split system, there's a potential
for refrigerant leaks. Consult a
qualified 'professional. Find one
at www.phccweb.org.
Although dealing with a
flood can be a very traumatic
experience, smart homeowners
can turn misfortune into oppor-
tunity by replacing their dam-
aged HVAC systems with new,
energy-efficient products that
can lower energy bills. The util-
ity may know what federal tax
credits or state energy rebates
are available for installing new,
energy-efficient heating and
cooling equipment. Visit www.-
xylemappliedwater.com for
information on energy-efficient
equipment.
Where To Turn
Websites to have available in
case of a natural disaster in-
clude:
FEMA Emergency Pre- r
paredness: www.ready.gov
American Red Cross:
www.redcross.org
CDC Emergency Prepared-
ness: www.emergency.cdc.gov.


The Squeezin's
By Barbara Carlton
Peace River Valley Citrus Growers


GROWERS CELEBRATING 20TH ANNIVERSARY
Regional citrus growers will celebrate 20 years of organiza-
tional cooperation through their grower association, the Peace
River Valley Citrus Growers Association. The 2 "iation is cele-
brating 20 years in existence as the advocate for ,i growers.
In 1993, growers from Hardee and DeSoto counties deter-
mined they needed an organization to shepherd their interests. The
result of the' meeting was creation of the association, which now
has grown to represent commercial citrus growers in Charlotte.
DeSoto, Hardee, Manatee and Sarasota counties.
With about 300 grower members and over 100 associated or
business-related members, the association tackles a wide range of
activities from educating the public to water quality and usage.
The anniversary will feature a stroll down memory lane look-
ing at the many achievements of the association, as well as sharing
some enjoyable memories of trips, activities and members.
Members of the association have conducted many excursions
to help educate legislators in Tallahassee and Washington regard-
ing the citrus industry. During these trips, growers have had the
opportunity to take a "Dome Tour" with then-Congressman
Charles Canady, traveling inside the walls of the Capitol dome to
exit at the spire overlooking all of Washington, D.C. On another
trip to Washington, member growers were led by a grower mem-
ber/CIA agent in an after-hour's tour of the White House.
The Lakewood Ranch FFA will again cater the meal, which is
always a treat! It is a great learning experience for them and a great
opportunity for us to support their ag education.
The annual elections for the Board of Directors are complete,
where growers elected six new board members to replace term-lim-
ited directors. Elected to serve a two-year term are Bryan Belcher
of Davis Citrus Management Inc., Bryan Beswick of Blue Goose
Growers, Cliff Coddington of Longino Ranch Inc., Wes Soria of
Sorrells Grove Care Inc., Justin Smith of Hardee County and Mac
Turner of Phil Turner Family Groves.
They will join directors serving the second year of a two-year
term, Roger Conley of Conley Grove Service Inc., V.C.
Hollingsworth III of VCH Ranch, Jimmy Keen of Keen Farm &
Grove Service Inc., David Terrell of A-DAB and Pam Vowels of
Sunny South Packing Co.
Officer elections will take place at the January Board of
Directors 'meeting to be held at First National Bank in Wauchula.
Sponsorships for the annual meeting celebration, that include
reserved seating, are available. Each level will offer varying ben-
efits. To find out more, please contact the association office.
The association will continue to attend to grower needs in the
future, as well as provide a full schedule of educational opportuni-
ties. In the upcoming months, growers can look forward to addi-
tional legislative trips, grower educational luncheons and a watch-
ful eye on issues of concern..





YouP Business Could Appear Here!
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels
At The Herald Advocate


Pioneer Creek RV News
By Reggie DeSmet


CHAPEL
Wayne and Lynn Shick made
it back from their holiday in
Michigan, and Wayne wel-
comed 152 for the first chapel
service for 2013. Bob Conkle
led hymns with Sandy Feeser
on organ and Cheryl Conkle on
piano.
Pastor David led devotions,
stating we are all ships repre-
senting what type of Christains
we are, like a rowboat or a sail-
boat Christian.
The choir sang "All Because
of God's Amazing Grace"
directed by Sandy. The offering
hymns were played by Dale
Gourely, Carolyn Hetzel, Bob
and Cheryl Conkle, and Bob
and Ardeth Johns on dulcimers.
Pastor David brought the
message, knowing God through
faith. We will know God will
bring blessings to us all.
Communion followed with the
elements of bread representing
the body of Christ and the wine
representing the blood He shed
for us.
Ushers serving were Curtis
and Jean Chaffin and Milt
Bement and Nancy Singleton.

COFFEE HOUR
Gerry, sporting yet another
scarf, led the pledge and prayer
for 257 enjoying coffee, dough-
nuts and fellowship. She recog-
nized all the newcomers for the
season and we also sang happy
birthday and happy anniversary
to those who were celebrating
for the- months of January and
June.
Our speaker was from
"Absolutely Cool," who gave
us information regarding how
and why prices will reflect all
the- changes in the field of


coolants and refrigeration.
Our 2013 King Keith and
Queen Sheila Banister were
presented with white shirts with
red maple leaves, Canada's
logo, and their title, name and
year embroidered on them.
They will be wearing them for
our Cancer Survivor Celebra-
tion, being our grand marshals
leading the parade on Feb. 15 at
1 p.m. as well as our St
Patrick's Day parade on March
15 with a golf-cart relay race to
follow in the picnic area, organ-
ized by Bill Coutcher.
We had so much fun last year
with the driver being blind-
folded and the spouse telling
where to drive, while being
timed, and we had microphones
on them so we could hear the
directions being given, a sound
and vision to behold! We had
over 20 participants, and it is
amazing how poorly people
take direction' on driving with-
out being able to see; and some
giving directions, you wonder
how they get their sense of
direction.

SCOREBOARD
Bowling: For the first week
of January, high series for the
men was 452 by Ron Drumm
and high game 190 by Bob
Gregoire. For the women, high
series was 450 and high game
167 by Arlene Sebright. Great
bowling, team!
Horseshoes: Pioneer Shines
in Last Two Weeks Outings!
Craig's RV Park scored 9 versus
Pioneer Creek scoring 23.
Pioneer scored 24 versus Good
Life scoring 8, fellowship with
dinners for both followed at
local restaurants. Fun was had
by all and congrats, gang!


4.


PIONEER PARK DAYS



f COVER ART CONTEST

P MThe Herald-Advocate is seeking original artwork for the
front and back covers of its annual special tabloid section on
Hardee County's most popular festival. It could be yours!


ADULT DIVISION

SFirst place: $100 Cash.
Publication of your work on the front cover.
Your photo and biographical story inside.

Second place: $50 Cash.
Publication of your winning entry inside the special section.


Third place:


* $25 Cash.
* Publication of your winning entry Inside the special section.


CHILDREN'S DIVISION (12 AND UNDER)
A week-long pass to Pioneer Park Days, publication of the artwork, plus...


First place:


Second place:

Third place:


Montry Thompson of Wauckula


JUDGES
JANE LONG PIONEER PARK DAYS DIRECTOR
SUSAN W. ROBERTS SENIOR CIRCUIT JUDGE FOR 10TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT AND SEVENTH-GENERATION FLORIDIAN
MYSTERY JUDGE WISHES To REMAIN ANONYMOUS


RULES:
1) Open to all ages.. Artist need not be a resident of Hardee County to enter.
2) Artwork must be original.
3) The festival theme of antique engines, farm machinery or pioneer life must
be depicted.
4) Pen and ink, charcoal, dark pencil or black marker.
5) Art MUST fill an area 8.5 inches wide by 11 inches high, including lettering
which reads "Pioneer Park Days 2013." (Drawing must be VERTICAL!)
6) Deadline is Friday, Feb. 15, at noon.


TO ENTER:
Make sure the division, name, address and daytime phone number of the artist are attached to the drawing.
Bring entries in person to the newspaper office at 115 S. Seventh Ave. in Wauchula, or mail to Cover Art
Contest, The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338, Wauchula, FL 33873. 1:17-2:14nc


Flooding: America's

No. 1 Natural Hazard


ROBBY ELLIoTr invites all
his friends and neighbors
S to come see him at


IREENWOOI
205 N. Charleston Fort Meade
1-800-673-9512 *
www.iirectchew.com :


* $25 Cash.
* Publication on the back cover.

* $15 Cash.

* $10 Cash.






6A The Herald-Advocate, January 17, 2013

11th Habitat For Humanity Home In Hardee Is Nearing Completion


PHOTOS BY JIM KELLY
Mary Kay Johnson and her husband Ray Johnson from St. Louis, Mo., have been super-
vising this Habitat for Humanity Home on East Main Street in Bowling Green. Construc-
tion began Nov. 2, and completion is expected by Feb. 1.


Ramon Romero of Bowling Green and Nate Wyman of Michigan are installing a ceiling
fan. The home is being built for Robert Hill, a widower with three children. Hill is em-
ployed with Hardee Ranch Supply.


Terry Kidd of Illinois is shown sanding the kitchen counter
top. The home is four bedrooms and two baths. The
square footage is 1,250. This is the 11th HFH home in
Hardee County and No. 5 in Bowling Green.





7"-


Jim spencer or Georgia lOOKS over me nouse plans. un
HFH homes the occupant must put in a certain amount of
"sweat equity" hours and makes mortgage payments on the
principle only, with no interest changed. Mortgage pay-
ments help fund new home projects for HFH, the largest
homebuilder in the world.


Kari Crawley, a New York resident who is deaf and had no
building experience until coining here seven weeks ago,
is installing baseboard. Crawley, 39, has a civil engineer-
ing degree but has chosen a career in social work.


Betty Spencer of Georgia is doing caulking. Most pof the
workers are members of RV Care-A-Vanner, a 24-year-old
organization that is a division of HFH. They are mainly re-
tires and perform the work as a public service. A roadside sign calls attention to the new residence.


John Cushing is shown by a 12 by 9-foot shed next to the house. N


New HFH home in Bowling Green will be complete by Feb. 1.














By Kathleen Roehm
For The Herald-Advocate
An exciting partnership
developed in Bowling Green. In
September the Habitat for
Humanity International News-
letter "Care-A-Vanner" had a
small article about the need for
a volunteer construction man-
ager to help the Hardee County
affiliate build a house.
Mary Kay and Ray Johnson
from Missouri called about the
article the very first day the
newsletter was distributed.
They made the over 2000-mile
trip to meet the board of the
local Habitat Affiliate and
decided to take on the'position
Mary Kay and Ray had been
involved in the Habitat Care-A-
Vanner program for many
years. They have packed their
fifth wheel up to help build
homes in South Carolina,
Michigan and the Northeast.
Mary Kay and. Ray arrived in
Bowling Green at the first of
November. In the meantime
CarerA-Vanner coordinator
Mary Vandeveld had linedup
additional, volunteers for two-
week shifts to work with Mary
Kay and Ray. Habitat for
Humanity of Hardee County
has a unique situation because
after acquiring the Bryant estate
in Bowling Green and turning
the historic home into an
office/dormitory it has also
installed 4 RV spots on the east
side of the house. i
Since the week of November
4 the spots next to the office
have been filled, except during
the holidays. The CAV's are so
efficient that house number 11'
is expected to be completed the
end of January! The CAV's
have built a wonderful home for
Robert Hill and his children.
Robert and his family have
been working- alongside the


CAV's.
The group has even had time
to landscape the front of the
office with donated plants from
Sandhill Native Growers and
repaint the porch. Anyone
interested in the CAV's can
check out information at
www'habitat.org/rv.
Send Me Missions, a local
Christian-based mission group
started by Jamie Davis
Samuels, has partnered with
Habitat to provide meals once a
week for the volunteers. Send
Me Missions posted the volun-
teer opportunity on the website,
and each Saturday a meal is
brought to the build site.
Habitat for Humanity of
Hardee County has been build-
ing houses in Hardee County
' since 2002 and has successfully
built 10 homes for low income
families that otherwise could
not otherwise afford homeown-
ership. The first step in the
process is land acquisition (ide-
ally the land is donated to help
Habitat. keep the costs low).
Homeowners pay back Habitat
for the cost of construction and
the land at a 0% mortgage.
Each house is built with
sweat equity by the homeown-
ers and volunteer labor by local
volunteers. Since 2002 Kermit
Stevens has volunteered as the
construction manager, and he
has ensured the houses were
built according to state require-
ments. Due to some recent ill-
ness Kermit has had to cut back
his volunteer' hours, but he has
contributed ,his time when .he
could on house number 11.
If you are willing to volunteer
for the local Habitat affiliate
please check out the website at
www.hardeehabitat.org or send
an email to hardeehabitat@hot-
mail.com.


In Business
By Jessica Brewer


REAL BIG STEP Buying a home can be a big step in any-
one's life, and Sandy Larrison of Ashbrook Realty wants to be
there to help you with this monumental experience.
Larrison, a Wauchula resident for the last 18 years, was born
and raised in Toledo, Ohio. She went to the University of Toledo,
where she majored in business administration/marketing.
She lived in the states of New York, Illinois and Montana
before arriving in Florida at Wauchula in June of 1995.
After working four years as a secretary and then 10 years as a
salesperson at Joe L. Davis Inc. Realty, Larrison got her broker's
license in September of last year and then independently started
Ashbrook Realty in November.
For Larrison, serving others is a passion, and working in real
estate is an ideal way to give back to the community.
"There is great satisfaction in helping a first-time buyer real-
ize their dream of homeownership, helping seniors sell their prop-
erty in order to move closer to family, and finding the perfect
,investment property," says Larrison.
Since becoming a Realtor, Larrison has closed over $10.mil-
lion in sales, and with the encouragement and support of her previ-
ous employer, Joe L. Davis, branching off as an independent bro-
ker "was the logical next step.".
Larrison buys and sells homes all over Central Florida. "There
is lots of variety," she says. "Some days I am showing homes, oth-
ers I am in boots walking through a pasture."
For more information, go to www.ashbrookreality.com or con-
tact Ashbr'ook Realty at 767-0565 or call (888) 660-6693 toll-free.
New business or management? Remodeling or relocating? Call
Jessica Brewer at 773-3255 with your business news.


January 17,2013, The Herald-Advocate 7A


Crystal Lake RV News
By Joyce Taylor


Habitat For Humanity

Home Is Joint Effort


KOFFEE KLATCH
Ron Ackermann filled in for
Joe Bennitt on Jan. 9. Don
Ahearn led the U.S. Pledge,
Don Merillat led the prayer and
Chuck and Barb Ellis led the
Canadian Pledge. The 50/50
winners were Betty Staley,
Linda and Harold Lockett and
Bob and Carole Jones.
CRAFTS
Crafts will be hosting the
seventh annual Ladies Only
Dessert & Fashion Show on
Monday, Feb. 4, at 1 p.m.
Ladies from other parks are
welcome to attend. On Friday,
Feb. 15, at 1, crafts will be host-
ing Studs for Your Duds. Other
parks are welcome to attend.
*DANCES
The Line Dancers are hosting
a regular dance this Saturday at
7 p.m. On Jan. 26 at 8, there
will be a regular Saturday Night
Dance with Buddy Canova pro-
viding the music:.
BINGO
Bruce Kendorski won the
large jackpot on Jan. 4 and Judy
Fisher won the small jackpot.
On Jan. 7, Cal Gadsby won the
large jackpot, Leslie Bryson
won the small jackpot and
Wilma Behymer won the spe-
cial jackpot.
SCORES
Men's Golf, Jan. 3:
Individual Points first, Doug
Taylor; second, Fred Leverone;
and third, a tie among Larry
Murphy, Larry Demers and
Mike Johnson.
: Ladies Golf, Jan. 3: Net Score


PHOTO BY MARIA TRUJILLO
Sandy Larrison of Wauchula works from home buying
and selling property all over Central Florida.



The Boy Scout movement was founded by Lord Baden-
Powell of England. His army experiences convinced him
that British boys needed more physical training and
experiences in outdoor life.


A Proud Partner with the Mulberry Phosphate Museum














The Mulberry Phosphate Museum -
where Florida's History comes alive! .


'Admission is free and donations are gladly accepted.


Museum Hours
-Tuesday Saturday
10:00 a.m. 4:30 p.m.


CF Industries' CaJli Ward presents a check to
George Hatch, Mayor of Mulberry and Jessie
Ward, Curator of the Mulberry Phosphate Museum


The Museum is located one block south of.State Highway 60 on
State Highway 37 in downtown Mulberry.

Special tours are available by calling the Museum at (863) 425-2823.
www.mulberryphosphatemuseum.org


1:17c


winners were Marilyn Funk-
houser, Jan Bricker, Nancy
Ellman and Margaret Walter.

CHURCH NEWS
By Shirley Glessner
As we entered for worship on
the first Sunday of 2013, we see
-that our congregation is grow-
ing as residents return from hol-
idays spent with family. Pastor
Bob Winne opened the service
with everyone singing "You
Have Given Life to Me."
He read an interesting article
on'after-Christmas giving. He
also read an article written by
Erma Bombeck about not hav-
ing time for many things,
reminding each of us to take
time for the important things in
life: Spending time with family
and doing things together. You
should make time, 'for the
important things in your life.
Each person has the same
amount of time and how you
use it is totally up to that per-
son.
The choir, under the direc-
tion of Beth Frisbie, sang "In
Remembrance" accompanied
by Linda Grey on piano.
Holy Communion was cele-
brated today. Communion
servers were Gary Householder,
Lee Roy Behymer and Steve
Gray. Pastor Winne gave the
reasons for the breaking of the.
bread and the drinking of the
cup. The service was closed
with the singing of "Hallelu-
jah."


Your Business Could Appear Here!
Nancy Davis, Him Reas or Trayce Daniels
At The Herald Advocate




8A The Herald-Advocate, January 17, 2013


Business Cards
Stationery
Postcards
Labels
Picker's Tickets
Picker's Cards
*Flyers
Invoices
Business Forms
Invitations
Announcements
Letterheads
Envelopes
Calendars
Magnetic Signs
ALL YOUR PRINTING NEEDS IN ONE CON-


VENIENT LOCATION!







PAGE ONE


Economic Development: How Things Get Done


This is the final in a series of articles on various economic development activities in the county.


By JOAN SEAMAN
* Of The Herald-Advocate
The Hardee County Eco-
nomic Development Authority
and the Hardee County Ec-
onomic Development Council
are related organizations which
work together on economic
development in the county.
Over the years, they have
accomplished quite a bit that
largely goes unnoticed because
of the furor over seemingly
unacceptable achievements.
The IDA operates under
Florida Statutes governing spe-
cial economic districts, whereas
the EDC has a set of bylaws,
which are updated periodically:
For instance, the EDC bylaws
have an updated clause allow-
ing a director to be removed
from office "when such action
will serve the best interest of
the Corporation by majority
vote of the Board of Directors."
There can also be removal from
office for missing three consec-
utive meetings.
Most of the recent tentative
report of Auditor General's
office concerned methods of
operation, verification that con-
tracts with potential businesses
were or could be fulfilled, and
that they met all criteria and
expended funds according to
agreements. There was some
question that all documentation
was in order to prove or sub-
stantiate the use of public
monies for a particular project.
When all is said and done, the
key question overlooked seems
to be what the IDA/EDC has
accomplished. A comparison
with the visioning/economic
development plans of the last
decade show a correlation
between what the residents said
were their choices for economic
development and what has actu-
ally been accomplished.
The Best Western Hotel and
South Florida State\ College are
outgrowths of citizen interest.
The same goes for four-laning
of U.S. 17 which is in its final
stages over the next few years.
A short drive in the
Commerce Park off SR 62
about a mile west 'of U.S. 17
shows much done. The busi-
nesses there employ about 160
people, whether in NutraPure
(which' started as Organix
South), Pacer Marine, Howard
Fertilizer International whole-
sale and retail company, Scosta


Truss Co., KeyPlex which
blends plant nutrition, and most
recently, Production & Fab-
rication Manufacturing, and a
new Sheriff's Office substation.
Lightning Bay, a constructions
pneumatics plant, hopefully,
will come in shortly.
A grant helped Easy Products
get needed certification for
national and international sales
of its clothing and equipment
tag systems. Once wanting to
locate on West Main Street next
to Oakwood Construction, it
now operates on North Florida
Avenue.
IDA/EDC funded an eco-
tourism study by the University
of South Florida and has adds
grants dollars to make the his-
toric Wauchula Train Depot
become an ecotourism center of
activity. Along with that is con-
tribution to the 50 RV campsites
under construction at Hardee
Lakes Park.
Work has begun on developing
the western corridor along CR
663 (Fort Green-Ona Road),
where not only power plants
north and south of SR 62 are
apparent, but new development
such as Fort Green Storage liq-
uid gas production and
BioNitrogen high nitrogen fer-
tilizer plant are in the works.
National Solar plans on prop-
erty on the eastern regions of
the county are progressing and
should be accomplished in this
next year.
The Rapid Systems broad-
band has brought key technolo-
gy to all parts of the county. A
subsequent activity involved
development of technology to
allow people to store their med-
ical information in a secure sys-
tem accessible only to them,
their families, doctors and
emergency personnel. Now'
called Tech River, first employ-
ees are training at the temporary
center on West Main Street (the
o,ld driver's license building)
until,renovations are completed
in the old Peace River Electric
Corp. building, the site of an
eventual technology. industrial
park at U.S. 17 and REA Road.
Much has been accomplished
and there are several projects in
the works. Interested citizens
are welcome to attend the
monthly meetings of the
IDA/EDC, which are at 9a.m.
on the' second Tuesday of the
month.


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The county began a visioning
plan in January 2011 with a
huge kickoff meeting.
Over the following months a.
steering team was appointed
and focus group meetings were
held in five divisions:.economic
development; land use/-recre-
ation/open space/environment;,
quality of life; education/work-,
force; and infrastructure.
The aim was to develop'
short-term and long-term goals,
what people wanted to see hap-
pen in Hardee County.
There were similar plans in
1999/2000 'and again in 2004-
05 with the Hurricane Recovery
Plan completed under the fund-
ing and cooperation of FEMA
(the Federal Emergency Man-
agement Agency). Both plans
focused on transportation,
downtown revitalization, im-
proved technology, and jobs
and education.
Some of the goals under
those plans have happened or
are happening. Broadband has
brought access to even the most
remote homes in the county.
Four-laning of U.S. 17 through-
out Hardee County is under
way, with the north half of the
Zolfo Springs to the DeSoto
County line to be completed by
this summer and the south half
beginning the engineering/-
right-of-way process.
A new fire station/law en-
forcement office is in place at
Zolfo Springs and the Bowling
Green station hopes to move
out of temporary quarters soon.
Most of the 1,400 homes de-
stroyed and 5,000 damaged
during the 2004 hurricanes have
been repaired or replaced.
The Cattlemen's Arena and
Resthaven were repaired. The
Pioneer Park museum 'was
restored and expanded, includ-
ing Hart Cabin and Bryant
Blacksmith shop. The Wildlife'
Refuge was also enhanced.
There has been a good start
on completing the Wauchula
Hills water/wastewater facili-
ties and extending service to
over 80 residences in Wauchula
Hills subdivision where high
nitrates adversely affect the
groundwater.
One project which never got
beyond the planning stages was


a proposed mega-airport in
northwest Hardee County,
which bogged down over fund-
ing and land accessibility after
its options expired.
But, there were many re-
sponses in the new 78-page
"Sustainable Hardee" Plan, too.
Residents expressed their likes
and dislikes, the strengths and
weaknesses, realistic and unre-
alistic goals. The plan is to be a
"living" document, reviewed at
least annually. For now, there
needs to be more work, said
Hardee County Commissioners,
who asked for more public
input and a report at the Feb. 15
planning session.
Mostly, they want to maintain
Hardee County's rural and
small town character and its
quality of life, while developing
positive core industries to pro-
vide good-paying jobs so youth
do not move elsewhere. They
want housing and business
development concentrated to
protect natural resources and
the environment. Add trans-
portation, utilities and public
services along with excellence
in educational, medical, em-
ployment and recreational op-
portunities.
Most of those contributing
during the focus meetings want
to continue to be involved in
decision-making about the bal-
ancing of available funding
with achieving long-range
goals. Industrial development
should be limited to corridors of
already available rail and truck
traffic and other infrastructure.
Finally, they want an ambi-
tious, diversified economy to
stimulate growth and sustain-
ability of the county, attracting
positive industry to avoid the
decline experienced by some
communities. They, want im-
provements to the broadband
connectivity for worldwide
access.
Ecotourism, enhanced by
rural bikeways and pedestrian
pathways, would enhance the
county's scenic back roads.
Proactive code enforcement
would add to this. Ensure prop-
erty rights while establishing
proper zoning and land use
codes.
Make sure there are good
post-mining plans and reclama-
tion to return land to usefulness.


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The 2011-12 annual report
presented to County Commis-
sioners shows where its $31
million last year.
Janice Williamson, director
of management and budget,
brought the final draft of the
2011-12 report to the Hardee
County Commission at its Jan.
3 meeting. The report covers
the period from Oct. 1, 2011
through Sept. 30, 2012.
It'shows revenue, which was
anticipated to generate $32.9
million, actually came in at.
$29,619,092. This was less than
was spent in the last fiscal year,
$31,383,809, as. there was car-
ryover of grant monies from the
previous fiscal year.
The 40-page annual report,
which is available on the coun-
ty's website, www.hardeecoun-
ty.net, is replete with photos,
information and snippets of
miscellaneous. interesting "did
you know" comments.
The report divides the county
information into five depart-
ments: administrative services;
public safety; public works;
growth management; and com-
munity services, plus a special
section on capital projects in
transportation, parks and recre-
ation, and utilities.
There is also a county direc-
tory, organizational chart and
two-page matrix showing all
the subspecialities involved in
the local government, including
all constitutional officers, the
Sheriff's Department, Property
Appraiser, Tax Collector, Su-
pervisor of Elections and Clerk
of Courts, who provides the
internal auditing and recording
keeping for the commission as
well as the courts.
Finally, there are two pages
listing all the resolutions arid
ordinances the commission ap-
proved last year.
County Administrative Ser-
vices "is responsible for the
smooth operations of the coun-
ty managerial services," said
William-son. It starts with the
County Commission, which
sets policy and direction and
includes the county manager,
human re-sources (personnel),
budgeting and finance, and.
information technology servic-
es.
County Manager Lex Albrit-
ton and his administrative assis-
tant Sandy Meeks are responsi-
ble for development of legisla-
tive programs and legislative
interaction, access to legal re-
search, and administrative sup-
port for all five commissioners.
Under the administrative um-
brella are purchasing (vendors,
bids, inventory and stockroom);
human resources (job inter-
views, benefits, payrolls, work-
er's compensation and liability
claims, auto accidents, union
negotiations and personnel
records); management and
budget (preparing a balanced
budget, financial report, rev-
enue forecasting, debt sched-
ules, solid waste and fire con-
trol assessment rolls, and ac-
counting and inventory of the


county's fixed assets); and:
information technology (track-
ing all roads, utilities and rivers,
wireless connectivity and fiber
optics, redistricting mapping,
aerial photography, census and
other information).
Public safety encompasses
emergency management, the E-
911 system, fire rescue and
emergency medical services
and animal control services.
This is anything to safeguard.
and protect the lives arid prop-
erty of thecounty's residents,
responding to natural and man-
made disasters, threatening or
abandoned animals, and all-
hazards training and updates,
addressing for E-911, and man-
agement of the county's three
fire-rescue stations, which
responded to 4,016 calls in the
past fiscal year.
Public works is a broad
department, everything from
road and bridge repairs and
replacements, to ensuring that
all county vehicles, from
graders to fire trucks and every-
thing in between is in working
order. There is the facilities
department, responsible for the
county's five parks, and all
county buildings, from 'the
courthouse and its two annexes.
to the health department, and a
lot of smaller buildings too.
Utilities includes both the
Wauchula Hills and Vandolah
wastewater plants, and extend-
ing water and sewer to 116 res-
idences and mobile home parks,
and ensuring all force mains are
in working order. Also a part of
public works is the landfill and
recycling programs, which han-
dled 165 tons of materialslast
year, and 21 tons of household
hazardous waste materials col-
lected and safely disposed of.
Growth management in-
cludes planning and develop-
ment, building inspections and
code enforcement, and mining
reviews and reports.
Finally, there are a host of
community services, such as
the county extension services
with its 4-H, nutrition, pesti-
cide and other classes,- county
probation, Pioneer Park and the
Wildlife Refuge, the library,
soil and conservation district
offices, veterans services,
health department services, the
Civic Center, and the communi-
ty development office which
handles a host of housing, law
enforcement, and many other
grants and financial programs
for the citizens.
Capital projects in the past
fiscal year went from surface
treatment on 16 roads to drain-
age replacements, and road
work on Moffitt, Sweetwater,
Walker Avenue Extension and
Scarborough roads. There was
rewiring and preparing for rest-
room upgrades at Resthaven,
and. wastewater treatment plant
construction.
It takes about 190 employees
to keep all the county depart-
ments running efficiently, each
doing their part to ensure that
everything runs smoothly and
the needs of county citizens are
being met.


The Herald-Advocate
(USPS 57&- 7.1)

Thursday, January 17, 2013


IDA/EDC


Visioning


Annual Report


S..HEARTLAND PHARMACY







"We put our into our service"

If you are visiting we will gladly transfer your prescriptions and

keep them on file then transfer them back when you go home.


f ..i fr d -


Sue Lobato, Pauline Ochoa, Julian Garcia, Red Camp Pharmacist,
Bob Duncan Pharmacist Sandra Garcia (missing)

DELIVERY SERVICE AVAILABLE

Monday-Friday 9:00 am to 6:00 pm Saturday 9:00 am to 1:00pm


Ribs, Chicken, Pork
or Beef Brisket
w/ 2 sides & salad bar
(feeds two)
$15.95

Lg. Pork Sandwich Platter
w/ 2 sides
$5.99

Grilled Chicken Breast Platter
w/ 2 sides
$5.99


4050 U.S. Hwy 17 Bowling Green
(863) 375-4422 or (863) 832-9128
Open 7 Days A Week 11am 9pm





2B The Herald-Advocate, January 17, 2013





Hardee


Living


COURTESY PHOTO
Mr. and Mrs. Bryan Benton

Becky Bishop Becomes

Bride Of Bryan Benton


Becky Bishop of Arcadia
became the bride of Bryan
Benton of Wauchula on the
afternoon of Saturday, Dec. 15.
The bride is the daughter of
John and Blanche Shackelford
of Arcadia. The groom is the
son of Ed and Karen Benton of'
Wauchula.
The couple exchanged mar-


riage vows at the Bohemian
Hotel in Celebration, with Tina
Mansfield officiating.
Tending to the bride as maid
of honor was Mikayla Bishop
of Arcadia, the bride's daughter.
The groom was assisted by best
man Ed Benton, his father.
The newlyweds are now at
home in Mims. *


Famed Christian Pianist

To Appear In Fort Meade
Huntley Brown, pianist for Ireland, Israel, Italy, Indonesia,
The Billy Graham Crusade, will Japan, Jordan, Latvia, Lithua-
be in concert at 7 p.m. this nia, Palestine, South Korea,
Saturday at the First United Romania, Russia, Singapore,
Methodist Church, 135 East South Africa, Spain, St. Ma-
Broadway, Fort Meade. arten, St. Vincent, Slovakia,
The First United Methodist Switzerland, Taiwan, Ukraine
Church and the Peaceful Be- and Wales.
lievers Baptist Church, both of In the United States, he has
Fort Meade, are hosting this performed from coast to coast,
area-wide event, with ministry opportunities at
Brown grew up in a Christian churches of every size and
home on the island of Jamaica. denomination, from the Crystal
His parents, Myrtle and Al- Cathedral, to Living Word
pheus Brown, taught him what Christian Center, to Willow
it, means to be a Christian, and Creek Community Church, to
at an early age he accepted Big Rock Baptist Church.
Christ. He recently performed at one
Without knowing how to read of Bill Gaither's popular
music, he learned to play the "Homecoming" concerts. He
piano by imitating his brothers, was also the regular crusade
His father, who played the'ac- pianist for the recently retired
cordion and a little piano, also Dr. Ralph Bell, an associate
gave him some basic instruc- evangelist with the Billy
tions, as did Paul Tucker, a fam- Graham Association. He is now
ily friend. the pianist for Ruth Graham &
Mostly, though, he learned by Friends Ministries and also
listening to different recordings. ministers with the Franklin
Brown's music ministry has Graham team.
taken him all over the world, For further information, con-
with TV, radio and concert taci Chuck Hancock at 863-
appearances in Austria, Ba- 581-6101, the First United
hamas, Barbados, Canada, Methodist Church office at 863-
China, England, Estonia, 285-9059 or Peace Believers
France, Germany, Grenada,' Church at 863-285-7350.
Holland, Hong Kong, Hungary,



Luncheon Set For Bell

Ringers Of Kettle Drive
A volunteer appreciation fellowship hall of the First
luncheon will be held early next United Methodist Church of
-week for the bell ringers from Bowling Green, located at 4910
the 2012 Salvation Army N. Church Ave. in that city.
Christmas Kettle Drive. A meal will be served and
The luncheon is set for this certificates will be presented to
coming Monday at noon in the volunteers.


Youth Baseball
On County View
A portion of the Hardee
County Commission meeting
tonight (Thursday) at 6 will
concern the youth baseball
fields it constructed in 2011-
12.
To meet expenses of it, the
county proposes a fee for
each child in the program.
Interested people are invited
to comment on the proposal.


"This was a very good year
for the kettle drive, and we want
to recognize all of the volun-
teers who gave countless hours
of their titie to this worthy
,qau.e," noted Mary Alderman;
ilai dlee County kettle drive
coordinator.
If you have any questions,
contact Alderman at 773-2164.

Don't Be Left Out!
HARDEE LIVING
DEADLINE
IS THURSDAY AT 5 RM.


Arts & Crafts Rules For


County Fair
It's time to prepare for the
2013 Hardee County Fair,
scheduled for Feb. 16-23.
For those wishing to compete
in the variety of Arts & Crafts
competitions, the following cat-
egories and rules have been
announced:
Categories include Breads,
Quick/Yeast; Cakes (plain or
decorated), Cookies & 'Pies;
Canning; Sewing; Candy;
Quilting; Needlepoint; Latch-
Hook Items; Crochet, Knit and
Embroidery Items; Pottery/-
Ceramics; Painting (Oil, Wat-
ercolor or Charcoal); Photo-
graphy (must be framed); and
Woodworking.
Participation is open to any-
one living in Hardee County.
All exhibits should 1be
brought to the exhibit hall'
between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. on
Thursday, Feb. 14. All exhibits
will be required to remain on
display until Sunday, Feb. 24.
Exhibits must be picked up
prior to 4 p.m. that day.
Each entry should be labeled
with the name of the person
who made it. All entries must be
clean and in good condition.


Announced
All canned products must be
in standard canning jars: half-
pint, pint or quart. Jars must be
clean and no rust apparent on
rings or lids.
Bread categories must consist
of four muffins or one loaf, on a
plate and covered with clear
plastic wrap. Judging will be
based on taste, texture and
appearance.
Cookies must be on a plate,
covered with plastic wrap, and
can be accompanied by an
attached 3x5 recipe card.
Judging will be based on taste,
appearance and texture.
Exhibitors in the youth divi-
sion must be school-age and be
residents of the county and/or
enrolled in the Hardee County
school system. Youth exhibits
will be judged separately from
the adult division.
A modified Danish System of
judging will be used, and deci-
sions of the judges are final.
Judging will begin at 9 a.m. on
Friday, Feb. 15.
Contact the Hardee County
Extension Office at 773-2164
for more information.


(Hli f
Ron Beldin
Sue Birge
Katrina Blandi
Irene Castanon
Larry Cook
Kathy Crawfo.
Gloria Davis
Daniel Estrada
Pauline, Evans
Amparo Islas
Fernando Islas
Kimberly Islas


Take Stock In Children
Would like to thank some of the
busiest people in Hardee County
for taking the time to mentor.
our scholars:

Sharri Knight
Gayle Knight
in Joe Kohan
n Caroline Mackay
Patty Lynn Murray
rd Rita Rodriguez
Kathleen Roehm
Stacy Sharp
Kiiaberly Smith
Jeffery Ussery
Tereta White
s Raafat Zachary


soc1:17ncj


The Wauchula Lion's Club wishes to-thank
Mosaic for partnering with us and the
following companies for their continued
support of our Annual Lion's Day.

CF Industries
Albritton Insurance
Flores & Flores, Inc.

Giovanni's Main Street Kitchen
First National Bank of Wauchula
Wauchula State Bank Solomon's Castle
JP's Smokehouse BBQ Beef O' Bradys


Florida Fuel *. Java Caf6
Kelly's Magnolia Tree


* Sears Jelly Bearis
* Cats on Main Street


- vsocl:17c


jj "E Now Selling Ads for th


Hardee County Fair i

Ad Deadline Extended To: Wednesday,

Contact Info:


e 2013


Program

January 23, 2013


I Shannyn Robertson 781-7873 Sheena Deemer 245-1273

/ See Our Website: hardeecountyfair.org


d~ip i


pSi eila


soc1:17c


You can take part by donating one hour a week as a
mentor. For more information, please call the South
Florida State College Foundation at 863-453-3133.
em'SOUTH

SSFLORIDA
State College


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and enjoy the best FREE Party in Wauchula!

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Il 63 ol t v.9WuhlF 37


U I


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to a tolerance of 0.0002 inches, less than 1/17 the thick-
ness of a human hair.


t





January 17, 2013, The Herald-Advocate 3B


IAIWay BckWhen
UUIUBIH~ ~ ~~IIHHB i^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^


A TRIBUTE TO THE KING: PART 2
Because Elvis' appearance was so different than his peers, he
.was considered an oddity, a rebel.
At Memphis' Humes High School, which Elvis attended from
1948 to 1953, most boys wore flat-top haircuts, jeans and plaid
shirts. But Elvis wore his light-brown hair long with sideburns
down to his earlobes (he dyed it black when he started making
movies), pink shirts, and thin, baggy, black slacks.
He often took his guitar to school. Occasionally he was asked
to sing and he never turned down an opportunity to do so. In his
senior year he won first place in the annual talent show.
Elvis might have looked like a rebel, but he wasn't. He was
quiet, shy, insecure and polite. Despite his good manners, his
appearance brought him much ridicule and made him a target for
bullies. One time six jocks, their scalps shining in the overhead
light, cornered Elvis in a hallway bathroom; five of them held him
as the sixth pulled out a pocketknife to cut his hair. Red West, who
later became a member of the "Memphis Mafia," came in just in
the nick of time and crashed the party, and Elvis kept his hair.
Elvis had fans even before he became famous. Knox Phillips,
son of SUN Studio owner Sam Phillips, remembers that Elvis used
to come to their home on occasion to play pool. Knox, 9 at the time,
and his 6-year-old brother, Jerry, thought Elvis was the coolest
thing they'd ever seen. "Just the way he'd pad around the pool
table with that slinky kind of grace that you'd see on stage made us
want to imitate him," Knox said in an interview. "We started wear-
ing our hair like Elvis' right away and when -we bought our
clothes at Lansky's, we had black velvet added to the top of our
sportscoat lapels just so we could look a little more like him."
And that was before "That's All Right, Mama" tore through
the Memphis airwaves making Elvis an instant local sensation.
Knox Phillips remembers the night his father, Sam Phillips,
brought home a 45 rpm pressing of "That's All Right" and "Blue
Moon of Kentucky." .
"I'd neyer seen my dad so excited," Knox says. "He wanted
my mother and Jerry and me to hear it right away. I don't remem-
ber if he'd played us the acetate first, but the sight of that little yel-
low label going round and round on our vinyl-covered black-and-
white High Fidelity record changer, the sound that was generated
by that SUN 45 and the sheer excitement on my father's face, as if
this was the summation of everything he had been working for so
long, as if this was the differentness that he had b6en preaching -
I can't divide it, it's all encapsulated in that one moment. And in
that moment, I think, everything changed."
Sam Phillips took the acetate of "That's All Right" to
Memphis disk jockey Dewey Phillips (no relation to Sam).
Dewey's show, "Red Hot & Blue," was the first major radio show
by a white disk jockey to play rhythm and blues; Dewey integrat-
ed the airwaves in 1952. He also has the distinction of being the
first DJ ever to play anElvis Presley record.
When "That's All Right" hit the airwaves for the first time that
historic evening in June. of 1954, Dewey's phone lines .were
jammed with calls asking.about the singer and wanting to hear the
song again. Dewey claims to have played the song no less than 12
times that night.
But 18-year-old Elvis was unaware of the commotion he was
causing. He was so nervous about his song being played on the air,
and so afraid it would flop, that he went to a movie and sat through
several showings of the same film. When the theater closed, he
drove home in his Crown Electric truck, found his mom and dad
asleep, and went to bed.
When the sun came up over Memphis the next day it shone on
the boy who would be king, though in his wildest dreams he could
not have imagined the heights of celebrity to which he would
ascend.
Next week, Part'3, the conclusion.
E-mail Chip at chipkyle746@embarqmail.com or visit his website
at www.chipballard.com.

LLOYD HALL invites all
his friends and neighbors
to come see him at

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205 N. Charleston Fort Meade
1-800-673-9512 *
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Sales:
Monday at 12 p.m.
Tuesday at 11 a.m.






Weekly Market Report:
www.OkeechobeeLivestockMarket.com


This week in history, as
researched from the archival
pages of The Florida Ad-
vocate, the Hardee County
Herald and The Herald-Ad-
vocate ...
75 YEARS AGO
For the second consecutive
year, the city of Wauchula has
been awarded first prize for the
community booth at the annual
Hardee County Strawberry
Festival at Bowling Green.
Zolfo Springs was awarded sec-
ond prize for her booth.
The amusement-loving pub-
lic of Wauchula was treated to
one of the most finished enter-
tainments ever presented local-
ly last Friday night when Jim-
mie Page's studio of dancing,
assisted by local and out-of-
town artists, appeared in a spec-
tacular revue of dance and
music.
Three Wauchula dry goods
stores begin their big January
clearance sales today, offering
to the people of Wauchula and
Hardee County a large number
of bargains; quality merchan-
dise at low prices reigning
supreme.
The newly-repaired home of
J.D. Preston on North 10th
Avenue was virtually destroyed
by flames early on Sunday
morning when the interior of
the structure was gutted by fire.
Fire Chief C.A. Barker stated
that the fire apparently started
from an oil stove in the kitchen
which was believed to have
been lit about 4 a.m.
50 YEARS AGO
Two members of the famous


Billy Graham Crusade team,
one an evangelist and the other
a singer, will be here for the
week-long Hardee County
Evangelistic Crusade.
Hardee's hustling Wildcats
will face a busy week beginning
tonight with a conference clash
with the Haines City Hornets
here at Joel Evers Gym. The
Cats well remember last year
when the Hornets edged them
out of the district tournament
and a one-point loss to the
Haines City team knocked the
Cats out of first place in the
conference race.
Maurice Paige of Wauchula,
Boy Scouts of America field
executive, was honored at the
annual Gulf Ridge Council
Recognition Dinner Tuesday
night at the civic center in
Lakeland.
Hardee Countians took a sec-
ond look at their thermometers
this week and wondered if the
calendar was wrong. It seemed
more like early summer than
midwinter. The mercury
climbed to 86 degrees Sunday
for one of the-warmest days this
winter.
25 YEARS AGO
The Hardee County Sheriff's
Office announced Tuesday the
arrest of five people suspected
in a string of burglaries in the
county dating back to April
1987, and the recovery of over
$6,000 worth of stolen property
from the thefts.
Hardee boys' basketball
teams, both the varsity and the
jayvees, were very happy after
Monday night's twin bill at


Frostproof. The jayvees after
going 0 and 4 thus far for the
season came forth with a
sparkling 66 to 54 win over
Frostproof. The varsity, not to
be outdone, came through with
an-equally electrifying overtime
81 to 74 win over the Bulldogs.
South Florida Community
College will be offering a three
credit-hour course in engineer-
ing drawing beginning Jan. 12.
The class will meet Tuesdays at
7 to 10 p.m. for 15 weeks.
Crosscut, the youth group at
the Lord's Church in Wauchula,
and church members presented
a play, "Where All Paths Meet,"
on Dec. 12 and 13. Due to a full
house each night of the perfor-
mance, with standing room
only, the play was presented an
additional time on the following
Wednesday evening.
10 YEARS AGO
Hardee County can now
boast five nationally-certified
teachers. At a recent School
Board meeting, Elaine Cook
was honored as she joined the
other four elite teachers, Liqda
Shayman, Michelle Shepard,


Chris Neff and Merflyn Strick-
land. All have achieved nation-
al certification from the Na-
tional Board for Professional
Teaching Standards.
Hardee County and the nation
will pause Monday in obser-
vance of Dr. Martin Luther
King Jr. Day. A communitywide
celebration is planned in the
Magnolia Manor neighborhood
south of Wauchula, kicking off
on Sunday night with a dramat-
ic and meaningful candlelight
service in honor of the slain
civil rights leader.
South Florida Community
College's Office of Enrollment
Management/College Reach
Out Program (C.R.O.P.) will
sponso a financial aid/scholar-
ship w rkshop for Highlands,
Hardee and DeSoto high school
seniors nd their parents.
Plans are under way for the
seventh annual Wauchula Ki-
wanis Club Sporting Clays
Shoot to be held Feb. 8 at
Charlie Matheny's in Zolfo
Springs, where the course con-
sists of eight stations/80 shots.


,bwit miss te-28tkAnnual

1"FORTMYERS

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JAN. 24*25 26 *27
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10 AM-5 PM: Thurs., Fri., & Sat.
10 AM-4 PM: Sunday


AREA DEALERS
DISPLAYING HUNDREDS
OF NEW RVS

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A.D.I.Sl $8.00 -:i 3.00B.IIJTHURSAY CHILDREN UNDER,16 FRE


ardee


Hardee County Youth Sports, Inc.
I


Baseball

Where: HCYS Complex
(Baseball Fields)
450 Rodeo Dr., Wauchula

When: Thursday, January 17 &
Friday, January 18
5 pm to 8 pm


Who:





Draft:


All boys age 4-15
Must be 4 by registration
and 15 or under before
May 1st.

Saturday, Jan 19th
At baseball fields
Times: 9 am, 11 am,
1 pm, 3 pm, & 5 pm


Where:





When:




Who:

Draft:


George Heine Fields
(Softball Fields)
810 S. Florida Ave,
Wauchula

Thursday, January 17 &
Friday, January 18
5 pm to 8 pm

All girls age 5-16

Saturday, Jan 26th
At softball fields
Times: TBA


For More Informationi on both baseball and softball registrations, please visit


www.facebook.com/HardeeCountyYouthSports


soc1:17c


SHERRY WHITE MINISTRIES, INC.
A Florida Non-Profit Corporation
is willing to accept commercial, residential
or agriculture property that may be unwanted
or unused. Or stocks, bonds and other
investments that may be assigned to this
ministry for the benefit of:
Lydia's House Home/Program for Women
Mercies of David Home/Program for Men
Pioneer Village Farm used to benefit both
. ) .Ilprograms and their families.
oi Ar Ta I -Ddcil


Contact Information:
Sherry White, P.O. Box 2566
Wauchula, FL 33873
863-773-0523 or 863-773-0877


womw


a
2013 Baseball & Softball Registration


I faceb


11:15ffc






4B The Herald-Advocate, January 17, 2013


Fort Green News
By Rilla Cooper
773-6710


Greetings from Fort Green'
The Herald-Advocate had a
lot of obituaries this past week;
people if I had known about I
would have gone to the visita-
tion or funeral. I still miss the
Tribune. Jack Hayman was
county acent when I became a
4-H leader in the Bowling
Green school simply because he
told me they needed a leader. I
met Lenore Vanderlaan when I
worked for Dr. Palmer, and
have her chocolate peanut
candy recipe and think of her
every time I make the candy. It
wasn't over a month ago that I
saw Ray Grimes and told him
that I thought he did such a
good job helping his wife. I
believe Richard Dease was a
good farmer. I probably would
not have known about these
people in time to attend, but one
always thinks if they still deliv-
ered the Tampa Tribune they
could keep up with what is
going on in the world!
There are still plenty of peo-
ple battling this flu or virus or
whatever names you want to
give it. Lory Durrance is im-
proving but still in the hospital.
Pat Gugle was well enough to
return to church this past
Sunday. Nancy McQuaig is still
under the weather. Beth Sasser
has had a relapse just when she
thought she was about well.
Betty Walker is not feeling
good, but her daughter said she
had taken a round of antibiotics
and always was sick after that.
Betty Waters is facing back
surgery this month. Betty Ab-
bott has a bad case of the flu.
Sherry Smith was unable to
attend church, as she is sick.
Wesley had it a few weeks ago,
and it seems to go from family
member to family member.
Brother A.O. Hendry is having
tests Monday and Alice Faye
Moye is having a procedure on
Tuesday. Hazel Nicholson is
slowly regaining her strength.
They announced in Sunday
School that Stephanie ,Rhoden
Lee is under hospice care in
Sebring and Nona Dasher is
taking chemo. There are so
many that are seriously sick and
need all our prayers.
Obamacare has already hurt
my grandson! The way I under-
stand it, if you work 40 hours
then your company might have


to furnish health insurance. Of
course the solution that some of
those companies will take is to
reduce the number of hours for
a part-time worker, and that is
what happened! He works part-
time as he goes to college and
the reduction hit home hard. He
still has the same number of
bills regardless if he no longer
can work 40 hours.
About 14 men attended the
Men's Fellowship last Sunday
and enjoyed a good breakfast
and fellowship. They always
have someone give his testimo-
ny or present a short program.
On Monday, a group of ladies
from Fort Green Baptist will
make chicken and dumplings,
green beans, dessert and a roll
to make money for the Malawi
Africa missionary trip. The
meal will require a donation of
$7, and the meal will be ready
' from 12 to 6 p.m. You can eat in
the fellowship hall or take it
with you. Then Feb. 1 and 2
there will be a yard sale at the
church to benefit the same trip,
so people will be busy at Fort
Green.
I have two grown cats that
would like a home where they
would be loved and petted. I
just tolerate -and feed them.
They need someone who will
pet them and enjoy their
purring! They both have been
fixed. I just prefer dogs.
Brianna Waters furnished the
special music last Sunday
morning. She has a good strong
voice and always does a good
job.
Jim Sasser is visiting his son,
Dennis and family. Jim lives in
Blairsville, Ga. I was talking to
Dennis and he advised that
Harriet Hendry's birthday was
the 13th. I hope she'ha,': many
more.
Kaylee Hogenauer was visit-
ing me the other day and I told
her to see how pretty my yard
looked, with the red roses and
white Cherokee roses, the pur-
ple bougainvillea, and the white
trumpet lily blooming. Leave it
to the young; she said your
grass is dead! My neighbor,
Faye Chancey, always plants
winter rye grass in her yard so it
looks pretty all winter.
Please pray for one another:
and our nation.


Fun & Effective
Workouts Do Exist!
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____ ___ ______________________________1:17c


Rough And Tumble Play

Can Be Good, Clean Fun


Most parents have seen it
before-their kids begin playing
so hard that it looks as if thev
are becoming aggressive. How-
ever, this kind of intense physi-
cal activity can actually be good
for a child's physical., social and
emotional development.
Called Rough and Tumble
play by the experts. this activity
is a positive and necessary form
of play for children. especially
boys. says Rae Pica. a children's
physical activity specialist.
"Rough and Tumble play
gives boys an opportunity to
learn their power and bound-
aries, develop competence in
their motor skills and imitate
their role models," Pica said.
Rough and Tumble play can


be perplexing for parents. who
have to gauge when it turns to a
form of aggression. The differ-
ence lies in the intent: During
appropriate Rough and Tumble
play. there is less risk of injury"
than .with combative play
because there's an understand-
ing between the players.
For boys. the closer the
friendship, the more intense the
Rough and Tumble play can be.
so children should collaborate
and agree on limits.
Parents can help reinforce
those limits by following these
tips:
1. Set some basic rules, such
as "no touching of faces" and
"no shoes."
2. Let children be in charge


When Is LASIK

A Smart Investment?


If you are looking into LASIK
eye surgery but have been put
off by the high price tag, here
are some facts you may want to
consider. Although the initial
cost of LASIK may be signifi-
cant, it could actually be a good
investment and save you money
in the long run once you realize
you will be wearing, and paying
for, glasses or contacts for the
next 20 years or more.
It's a smart idea to do the math
and see if the procedure makes
sense for you. The American
Refractive Surgery Council
notes that the investment in
LASIK can benefit both your
vision and your wallet. Consider
these facts:
If you wear contacts for at
least $70 a box, a six-month
supply would cost $280.
If you pay for vision insur-
ance, it may only cost you $10 a
month, but it's only worth it if
you get money back on contacts
or glasses. Regular checkups are
usually free after LASIK sur-
gery.
If you get a new pair of
glasses every year, they could
cost you $150 a pair or more. If
you need more than one (dis-
tance and reading), that could be
$300.
Contact lens supplies also
add up over 10 years, the
expense of contact lens mainte-
nance can be well over the cost
of the LASIK procedure.
In addition to learning if the
procedure is right for your
vision, you can also research
ways to pay for the procedure,
with options that include
financing through a health care
financing company, financing
through a LASIK surgeon or
using a flexible spending
account. Some financing plans
give you up to five years to pay
off the procedure.


of making some of the rules and
enforcing them.
3. Intervene only when the
play turns combative; if parents
intervene too often or too soon,
children won't learn conflict
resolution on their own.
4. Not sure if it's playing or
fighting? Ask the participants if
they see the difference and if
everyone agrees.
5. Parents should also en-
gage in Rough and Tumble play
with their children-whether it's
wrestling with Dad or "tickle
fights" with Mom. The physical
contact helps kids build rela-
tionships.
If play turns combative, par-
ents can redirect the children's
energy by inviting them to race
outside as fast and for as long as
they can. as well as provide pil-
lows or soft toys such as
Mattel's new Brawlin' Buddies
with which they can wrestle.
"Brawlin' Buddies offer kids a
toy to actively engage with
alone or with other children to


foster physical connection,"
said Pica.
Modeled after WWE Super-
stars such as John Cena, She-
amus and Rey Mysterio, the 16-
inch plush figures are built
tough to take a pounding that
will trigger one of 10 signature
. phrases recorded by these ath-
letic stars. Kids can flip, toss or
throw down the figures, go one
on one or form a tag team
Superstar battle.
Toys such as Brawlin' Bud-
dies encourage children to safe-
ly re-create action-packed story
lines and experiment with
speed. force, cause and effect,
balance and spatial relation-
ships. "The open-ended, heroic
play lets children create their
own stories while also fostering
the kind of active play that kids
need," said Pica. "Rough and
Tumble play, when directed
properly, can be a very positive
experience for kids-and their
parents."


I1


The IRS considers LASIK to
be a tax-deductible medical
expense, and while your med-
ical expenditures may have to
exceed a certain percentage of
your income, the procedure
may help you reach that
amount.
So don't let financial consid-
erations keep you from invest-
ing in your quality of life.
LASIK can deliver great vision,
making activities more enjoy-
able and eliminating the worry
and frustration of losing glass-
es, as well as potential eye irri-
tation and infections related to
contact lens use.
You can find more informa-
tion about considering LASIK
and download a refractive sur-
gery checklist by visiting the
American Refractive Surgery
Council at www.americanre-
fractivesurgery council.org.


Vla. *- s




,wArs. Cb:re ,S Aokn t


-p
H


Now is the time to buy!




:


fI



HACHY ARPET

I 0Es. an. tet auh
(83)77-79 -(63734738


Raji Sonni Marcela Jativa
M.D., F.A.A.P. M.D., F.A.A.P.
Board Certified Pediatricians


Attention Parents: We are pleased to announce we are
now open on Saturdays for sick children.
We are open from 9:00 am to 12:00 pm

(86.3) 767-1616

Please feel free to call the office or walk-in before 11:00 am.
1125 S. 6th Avenue, Wauchula (Sweetbay Complex)
Monday Friday 8:30 am 5:00 pm-and Saturday 9:00 am 12:00 pm E


1





January 17, 2013, The Herald-Advocate 5B


Boys, Hos
By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Hardee Wildcat soccer will
host the Class 2A-District 10
tournament next week.
The 'Cats get a bye on
Tuesday evening, and play their
first district playoff next Thurs-
day, Jan. 24, at 8 p.m., against
the winner of the DeSoto/Avon
Park game on Tuesday.
Tuesday game feature a 6
p.m. game between fourth-
seeded Mulberry (3-4-3) and
fifth-seeded Lake Placid (2-62).
Hardee won over Lake Placid
twice, lost to Mulberry early in
the season and won 4-0 on Dec.


Soccer Districts


20. Top-seeded Frostproof (9-0-
1)
The second game on Tuesday
is the 8 p.m. encounter between
third-seeded Desoto (5-2-3)
and sixth-seeded Avon Park (0-
10-0). Hardee defeated Avon
Park twice and won over De-
Soto on Nov. 15 and tied 1-1 on
Dec. 6. Hardee (6-3-1) is seed-
ed second and hopes to advance
to the district championship
game at 5 p.m. next Friday.
As of last Friday, Hardee was
12-5-1 overall, after picking up
wins over Sebring and Lake
Wales. The season finale was
Senior Night on Wednesday,


Jan. 16, with a visit from
Lakeland Kathleen. Hardee will
honor 11 seniors. Alexis Pa-
lacios, Mark Gomez. Oscar
Palacios, Campbel Aubry. Mi-
guel Garcia, Armando Alvarez,
Martin Lucatero, Carlos De-
loera, Luis Luna, Octavio
Alvarez and goalie Jesus
Zuniga.
Hardee's twin wins last week
began with a rescheduled Tues-
day game at Lake Wales, which
was 3-0 victory. The Wildcats
took 22 shots on goal while lim-
iting the Highlanders to just a
dozen. Garcia scored for Har-
dee in the first period on a


penalty. Oscar Palacios scored
early in the fourth period and
Gustavo Toledo added a score
with 3:27 remaining in the
game.
Last Thursday. Hardee went
to Sebring for a hard-fought
encounter and came home with
the 3-2 win. Again, the Wildcats
had more shots on goal, 15, to
Sebring's eight. Garcia scored
the first Hardee goal at 30:19 of
the first period on a long break-
away pass from Octavio Al-
varez. Garcia scored again in
the third period at 37:30 on a
long power shot. The final score
was at 19:43 in the third period
on a header off a corner kick by
Garcia.
"Hardee controlled the ball
and moved it well. We had quite
a lot of time of possession,"
summarized Head Coach Den-
nis Aubry.
Other varsity players are
Gilberto Cardoza, Ruben Ve-


lasqauez, Manuel Palacios, Luis
Alonzo. Alexis Arenas.
Against Lake Wales, the JV
Wildcats dominated the game,
winning 8-1. Fred Torres put in
four goals, while Mateo Gomez
had twin tallies, and both
Rodrigo Rodriguez and Ben
Tamayo added a goal.
The JV boys lost at Sebring
1-0, "but kept playing hard and
showing improvement and
understanding of the game."


commented Aubry. The JV is
coached by Daniel Estrada and
Aubry.
Other JV players are Ezequiel
Perez, Gabriel Garcia, Eduardo
Lopez, Ricardo DeSantiago,
Oscar Duarte, Francisco Sa-
Igado, Alexis Chavez, Rolando
Aleman, Kenneth Vargas,
Gustavo Salizar,' Filistin Luis
Michael, Jose Padilla and
Fabian Perada.


PHOTOi B' MfARIA TRUIJILLO
Leading the Wildcats into district playoffs are seniors (seated, from left) Oscar Palacios,
Miguel Garcia, Carlos Deloera and Luis Luna; (back row) Alexis Palacios, Armando
Alvarado, Campbel Aubry and Octavio Alvarez; (missing) Mark Gomez, Jesus Zuniga
and Martin Lucatero.


WELLS .OERc

MOTOR COMPANY je
SINCE 1931,


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2013 CHRYSLER 200
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Excludes APV & SE models. Plus tax & tag, resident restrictions apply. 1:17c
IIIIA R Offer expires 1/31/13

U*Fw EN m sJeep W
www.WellsMC.com /
MOTOR COMPANY 1600 US 27 South, Avon Park, FL 33825 ..
453-6644 1-888-896-5846 .


LARGE
2-TOPPING PIZZA
PLUS 8 WINGS WITH CAJUN BREAD & DIPPING SAUCE

$ ZOLFO
SPRINGS
105 SR 64 East
SInside BP
S. 735-2100
Limited time offer. At participating locations. 1:17c


-,: i : I J,
F-MMMOMMMMPM
I. Awl






6B The Herald-Advocate, January 17, 2013


The


ABOUT ... Classifieds
DEADLINE ....Tuesday noon
RATES ..........Minimum of $4.50 for 10 words. Each addi-
tional word is .25 cents. Ads in all capitals
are .35 cents per word. Headlines are $2 a
line. Blind ad box numbers are $3 extra.
BILLING........Ads must be pre-paid.
CLASSIFICATIONS:


Agriculture
Appliances
Automobile
Boats
Furniture
Guns
Help Wanted
Houses
Livestock
Lost & Found
Miscellaneous
Motorcycles


Mobile Homes
Notices
Personal
Pets
Plants/Produce
Real Estate
Recreational
Rentals
Rentals, Commercial
Services
Wanted
Yard Sales


IREVELL dvTo SaLES


30 Day Warranty
Motor or Transmission
Bu y HERE! |u fIinsHR
| Sandra v risRevlB l* nd 1 iHmly
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK SE HABLA ESPANOL
U.S. Hwy. 17 Bowling Green,* 375-4441
$ Huge Discounts for Cash Deals $
* 24 Hour Towing Service Lowest Possible Rates Fast and Reliable
781-3090 or 781-3091 ci:1Aofc




WAU U A HLS O ATIO
(arosfrm amat


As Low As $499 Down!

Call Billy Hill
S- if you have
any questions
ly Hill, 7814062
Billy Hill, Owner S, Habla Espanol


L AMBER AT
REALTY INC. T
404 South 6th Avenue
Wauchula, FL 33873
BE THE FIRST TO SEE! Nice 3B/1.5Bth home
located west Zolfo' Springs, large family room,
central A/C, all appliances included. $112,000
Executive Home in lovely neighborhood!
4B/3Bth built in 2006 with all modern conve-
niences, tile and carpet floors, fireplace, 3 car
garage, wood deck; great curb appeal. $284,900
Lovely setting with grandfather oaks for this
2B/lBth, CB home located on 5 lots in Zolfo
Springs. $40,000

S SERVICE YOU
DORIS S. LAMBERT, G.R.I., Broker
ASSO
DELOIS JOHNSON 781-2360
STEVE JOHNSON 781-0518


C


Classifieds


NOW PURCHASING citrus fruit
for the 2012/13 season for
Chapman Fruit Co. Call Frank-
Vasquez 781-4133. 12:13-5:30p
L. DICKS INC. is now purchasing
citrus fruit for the 2012/13 season
and beyond. Call Mark Manuel @
781-0384. 7:8tfc


ADJUSTABLE XL twin bed, mas-
sage, wireless remote, head-
board, excellent condition, $899,
773-5901. 1:17p


MECHANIC'S HELPER part-time.
Apply in person Heartland Auto
Clinic 214 N. Florida Ave. 1:17c


DIRECT SUPPORT STAFF need-
ed. Qualified applicants must
*meet the following: 18 years or.
older, H.S. Diploma, 1 year VERI-
FIABLE experience, pass level 2
* screening and drug test. Apply in
person at Sunrise Community,
1014 South 6th Avenue,
Wauchula, FL. 1:17.24p
NOW HIRING AT The Madison
Salon & Spa, hair stylist, massage
therapist, esthetician. Great
atmosphere and opportunity for
advancement. Call Crystal at 781-
0702. 1:17,24c
F/T BOOKKEEPER, experience
preferred. Apply at 120 N. 4th
Avenue, Wauchula. 1:10,17c


2 BR 2 FULL BATH built- in 06,
$69,900,.773-6667. 1:17c


Women, do you
need lower rent?
See if you qualify call

735-2222 or 773-5717|




YOUR TIRE HEADQUARTERS
5101 N. Hwy 17 Bowling Green
S3A5-44-
New Tire Changer& Balancer
Can Do 26" Wheels
Trm" MONDAY SATURDAY 8 am 6 pm
/ Foreign and Domestic Cars / Diesel Engines
/ Gas or Diesel Manual or Automatic Transmissions



GILLIARD L

FILL DIRT INC.

Fill D i Zo lf

Lamar Gilliard Zolfo Springs
Home: (863) 735-0490 ci4:i9f Mobile: (941) 456-6507


Sink The Winner!
SPORTS NEWS
DEADLINE
IS NOON MONDAY


Bus. (863) 773-0007
Fax: (863) 773-0038
www.lambertrealty.net
Steve Johnson
2B/2Bth M/H, carpet floors, inside utility and
storage shed. $35,000
Move-In-Ready! 3B/4Bth CB/Stucco home with
new kitchen, large rooms, wet bar, wine cellar, in
ground pool, spa and many more amenities.
5836 total sq. ft. situated on .87 acre. Call to see!
$240,000
Plenty of space in this large home! 3B/2.5Bths,
screened patio, living, dining, family rooms,
inside utility, outside utility bldg. Potential 4th
bedroom and office. $139,000
AN COUNT ON [
KENNETH A. LAMBERT, Broker


CIATES
CHARLOTTE TERRELL 781-6971
BEVERLY ALLEN 863-448-6610


CRAFTSMAN 4" Jointer $100,
wood hathes $125, 10" belt drive
table saw $300, scroll saw $200,.
781-3637. 1:10,17p


ADOPT A PETI If you have lost a
pet or are looking for a new one,
the City of Wauchula Invites you
to come and see If you can find
the pet you're looking for. The
Wauchula Animal Control Is locat-
ed at 685 Airport Road. Please
call 773-3265 or more informa-
tion. tfc-dh
ATTENTION State Statutes
828.29 requires that all cats and
dogs sold In Florida be at least 8
weeks old, have an official health
certificate, have necessary shots
and be free of parasites. tfc-dh


Lic

Lic#


w E COM
Home & Insurance Inspections
863-990-4019
Wind Mitigation Four Point Roof Certification
Bowling Green, FL
SHI5099 collwayne4019@gmail.com cll:17c


I A 9 9 V
I I..~ -- A........~....


I Dan "' LiNA it
Mon. Wed. 10.m- 6p.; Fri. & Sat. 10..-7,./Closed Thursday'& Sunday
3505 US HwY 17 S ZOLFO SPRINGS d:ciiotc




We offer the BEST and MOST AFFORDABLE
computer services in Wauchulal Free Diagnosis!
-Computer, Cell Phone, TV & Electronics Repair
*Electronics Sales & Installations
*Security Cameras & Systems
*Fax & Notary Services -Computer Classes
863-767-1520 www.PcEmpire.Org A
748 N. 6th Ave., Wauchula


Large Selection of
Cars to Choose From

Buy Here Pay Here
onoo30 Day Guarantee
on Motor & Transmission Only



1531 Hw~~~~i,1NOT ACIA


JIM SEE REALTY, INC.
206 North 6th Avenue, Wauchula, FL 33873
Office (863)773-0060 Evening (863)781-1338
www.jimseerealty.com
James V. See, Jr., Broker


FOR RENT!
2 BR/1 BA apartment.
2 BR/2 BA apartment.
Very secure apartments in Wauchula.
3 Bedroom, 1 Bath frame home in Zofo Springs.
Adorable, well taken care of ho e. Fully fur-
nisbed! $41,900
Mini-warehouse for salein town. 19 units that
are all rented. $155,000. Call for details.
Convenience store located on Martin Luther
King Jr Avenue. Great cash flow potential. 2 cool-
ers, 1 freezer and all shelving included. Good
return on investment. $289,000
2 Bedroom, 2 Bath home in Golfview on 2.1
acres. Nice barn with concrete floor, garden tub
and screened porch. Listed at $159,500
2 Bedroom, 2 Bath mobile home with a 1 bed-
room, 1 bath detached mother in law apartment.
Fenced 2 'i acres with a pole barn. Asking
$69,500


=l


Shane Conley


33 acre pasture with scattered trees. Close in to
Wauchula. 1156 ac can be purchased separately.
Total price $360,000.
Beautiful home located in Briarwood
Subdivision. 3 Bedroom, 2 % Bath house with
wrap around porch, detached 2 car garage with
office and full bath. Reduced tO $339,000!
AVON PARK ESTATES! Beautiful 4 Bedroom, 2
Bath Home on over an acre of land! 2 car
garage, large screened porch and many more
upgrades. Asking $165,000
Commercial building with over 4,800 sf located
just off Highway 17 Southbound. Frontage on 2
roads with parking. Great opportunity for your
business. $149,000
55 acre grove All earlies. Diesel power unit &
micro-jet irrigation. NE Hardee County.
$7,500/acre


Realtor Associates
Rick Knight (863) 781-1396 Calvin Bates (863) 381-2242
John H. Gross (863) 273-1017 Dusty Albritton (863) 781-0161
Shane Conley (863) 781-9664 Parker Keen (813) 523-1523


I1:17
cf1:17c 1


SFLORIDA HOSPITAL
WAUCHULA
RN-FT- Day
Med Swing
$2,500 Sign-On bonus
with at least 1 year ex-
perience: A rewarding
opportunity is waiting
for you. Join our grow-
ing and highly skilled
team. Apply online at
www.fhheartland.org.
Preferred. To learn
more please call our
Recruiter at 863-386-
6464.
EOE
cl1:10,17c


I0Im III


I


I






January 17, 2013, The Herald-Advocate 7B


The


Classifieds


U.
1/4 ACRE MH lot at Charlie Creek
Estates, $10,000 firm, 863-899-
1714. 1:10tfc


COUNTRY CEDAR Home, 5 acres,
38R/2BA, $175,000. 863-375-
2389, 781-9470. 1:17-2:14p


TRAILOR One bedroom For
Rent. $350 monthly, $100 securi-
ty. Quiet neighborhood on
Chancey Road, 773-4726. 1:17p
4/2 FENCED 1 1/2 acre, fence 8'
high, 245-1351. 1:17-2:14p
3/2 MH, 5 Acres, East of town,
$800 monthly, $800 deposit, 863-
832-0562. 1:17p
3/2 MH, $650 month, $350 deposit
also 2/1 MH, $500 month, $250
deposit, in Zolfo city limits, 735-
0733. 1:17c
THREE BEDROOM HOUSES plus
two bedroom apartments, no
pets, 832-1984. 1:10-2:8p
2/1, $600 MONTH, 816 South 9th
Ave., Wauchula, 863-781-9140.
1:10,17p
3 BR, 2 FULL BATH, garage, cen-
tral air & heat, large lot, BG,
$750/mon. plus utilities, 407-929-
6491. 1:10-17c


U
3/1 IN TOWN BG. $550 month,
first, last, 863-245-7060.
1:17,24p
.2 APARTMENTS FOR RENT: 2
bedroom, 2 bath, appliances fur-
nished 875 sq ft, very nice-built In
2012. New reduced rental rate
from $850 to $650. Deposit nego-
tiable. 117 North 7th Ave,
Wauchula. Located downtown
Wauchula. call Clay Cobb at 863-
781-0702. 12:20tfc
*RENT-TO-OWN*
MOBILE HOMES 1, 2, 3
Bedrooms. Cheaper then paying
rent. Close to schools and hospi-
tal. Lot rent $300. Se habla
espanol. 863-698-4910 or '863-
698-4908. Call today. 7:5tfc
ULLRICH'S STORAGE UNITS,
several sizes, corner of 9th Ave. &
Goolsby St., 773-6448 or 773-
9291. 3:22tfc
ATTENTION The Federal Fair
Housing Act Prohibits advertising
any preference or limitation
based on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial status or
national origin, or the Intention to
make such a preference or limita-
tion. Familial status Includes chil-
dren under 18 living with parents
or guardians and pregnant
women. tfc-dh


U
2 BEDROOM 1 BATH, Duplex,
$550 month, $550 deposit, 773-
0100. 6:21tfc





Rentals at 773-3839 and ask for
Esmeralda. 1:17.24c



NEED A WELL OR HAVE PUMP
TROUBLE? CALL
ULLRICH'S PITCHER PUMP
For complete well, sales,
service and installation,
call (863) 773-6448.
7:178tfc
THE WAUCHULA LIONS CLUB
collects NOT broken prescription
eyeglasses, cases and sunglass-
es. Please drop off at 735 N. 6th
Ave. tfc-dh


ATTENTIONI State Statutes 489-
119 Section c Paragraph B and
Hardee Cou-., ordinance 87-09
Section 10 Pmagraph D require
all ads for any construction-relat-
ed service to carry the contrac-
tor's license number. tfc-dh
DO YOU HAVE a problem with
drugs? Narcotics Anonymous
meets Monday and Thursday
nights 7:00 p.m. at First United
Methodist Church, atAthe corner
of Palmetto and 7th Ave., Wau-
chula. tfc-dh
IS ALCOHOL CAUSING a prob-
lem? Call Alcoholics Anonymous
in Hardee County at 781-6414.
Several weekly meetings.
tfc-dh
GOT IRRIGATION? New installa-
tion, repairs. Clean Cut Lawn
Care & Irrigation Service 863-781-
8215. 1:3-31 p
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS,
Thursday 7:00 p.m., Grace
Fellowship Church, 131 S. 8th
Ave., Wauchula. Bill 727-326-
3816. 6:7tfc-dh


-i
- OVERCOMERS' MEETINGS
(Gillespie), Woman's Club on
Wednesday, 7pm Kenny
Sanders is the facilitator. For
more information call 773-5717.
2:16tfc


MISSION THRIFT STORE INC.
123 N. 7th Ave. All donations
appreciated. Pick-up available for
large items. 773-3069. 1:12tfc
HEAVEN SCENT THRIFT STORE
Helping Sherry White Ministries
help others! 912 Hwy. 17 South
(across from McDonalds)
Wauchula, 863-773-9777.
11:15tfc
LYDIA'S HOUSE THRIFT STORE
Helping ladies overcome 102
Carlton Street (directly behind
Heaven Scent), Wauchula, 863-
773-3034. 11:15tfc
THE MUSTARD SEED THRIFT
Store. Helping Sherry White
Ministries help others! Donations
appreciated/ volunteers wel-
comel 132 Hwy 17 South
Wauchula, 863-773-6153.
11:15tfc


.6 .
FRIDAY, SATURDAY, 8-? Lots of
clothes and misc. 2924 & 2932
Oak St.,-Zolfo Springs. 1:17p
FRIDAY, SATURDAY, 518 E. 5th
Street, Zolfo. In backyard. 1:17p
SATURDAY, 8-3. 208 S. 4th Ave.,
Wauchula. Misc. household
Items. 1:17p
SATURDAY, 8-1. 2915 School-
house Road, Zolfo. Furniture,
clothes, TV and misc. Fundralser
for AMPD Youth Group. 1:17p
FRIDAY, SATURDAY. 5165 MLK,
Bowling Green. Lots of every-
thing. 1:17p
FRIDAY, SATURDAY, 8-12. 647
Cypress Street, Wauchula. Rain
or shine. Baby clothes, toys,
books, lots more. 1:17p
SATURDAY, 8-? 1875 Mt. Pisgah
Rd., Ft. Meade. 863-285-8416.
Huge Sale: drinks including
Pepsi, Mt. Dew, Gatorade, Orange
Crush, Red Bull, Flavored Waters,
cat food, dog food, dog treats,
shampoo, deodorant, perfumes,
toothpaste, toothbrushes, laun-
dry detergent, fabric softeners,
candy, crackers, beef jerky, cof-
fee, diapers, razors, razor blades
and lots more. 1:17c


Since There Is 14o Substituition Since
1971 For Experience 1971

ALLEMPS
Mobile Home
Transport & Set-Ups
Relevels
Retro-fits FHA-VA Inspections

Ron 8'13-1186-596'1,fcKu I
rt


HELP WANTED
Immediate .opening for qualified Childcare Coordinator
with the Hardee Co. YMCA.
Applicant is required to have current Florida Child Care
Director Credentials.
Is responsible for front line communication with parents
and children, ensuring the general safety and health of
children per established guidelines.
Must have knowledge of and meet all state / federal
regulations and certification 30 hour childcare course, 10
hour behavioral.
Must complete state and local licensing, training and
medical requirements within required time frame.
Associate Degree in Child Development or equivalent
experience preferred. Childcare
experience required.
Apply online at .
www.thesarasotay.org or e-mail the
resume to mogles@thesarasotay.org.




HE LR WANTED
TELECOMMUNICATIONS SPECIALISTS

Full Time $24,35600
The Hardee County Sheriff's Office is
taking applications for full time Telecom-
munication Specialists. You must be at
least 19 years of age, have a high school
diploma or equivalent, never been
convicted of a felony or a misdemeanor,
be willing to be fingerprinted, pass a drug
test, pass a typing test and work shifts.
Applications may be obtained and
returned by 4 p.m., Jan. 21, 2013, at the
Sheriff's Office, 900 E. Summit St.,
Wauchula, FL. If other arrangements are
necessary, call 863-773-0304 ext. 211.
EOE cl1:10,17c

. .. ..


Chevrolet / Chrysler / Jeep / Dodge
Ram Trucks / Ford
Is EXPLODING with new sales!

Hardee County's largest automobile
dealer needs THREE sales
professionals to keep up
with the demand!

NO EXPMIWC J E NECESSARY!
We will train-the right people.
Great benefits and more!
Call Kevin Hanchey at
(863) 773-4744
or stop by the dealership
at 1405 U.S. Hwy 17 S. in Wauchula

DRESS FOR IMMEDIATE INTERVIEW.
EOE/DFWP c 1:10foc






J!oe LDmvis


IN C., R E A




REALTOR
See mo
John O'Neal www.jc
J6hnO'Neal REAL ESTAI


PRICE REDUCED!
zoned industrial on
$399,000!


20 acs
Hwy 17.


PRICE REDUCED! 10 ac
w/paved rd frontage. Great for
pasture, farming or homesite.
$49,500!
PRICE REDUCED! 50 acs in
NE Desoto Co; deer, turkey,
wild hogs, beautiful live oaks,
improved pasture, pond &
creek. NOW $190,000!
PRICE REDUCED! 385 acs
on the Peace River w/lots of
beautiful oaks, pines & palmet-
tos! Pole barn & 2BR/2BA MH.
$420,000!
PRICE REDUCED! Comm-
ercial property on US17! 38
storage units w/partial roof, city
utilities, zoned C-2, sold "as is"!
NOW $200,000!


L T 0 R 8
(863) 773-2128
REALTORS
JOE L. DAVIS
JOE L. DAVIS, JR.
JOHN H. O'NEAL
ore listings at
Oeldavis.com
TE INVESTMENTS


PRICE REDUCED! Paradise:
Little Gasparilla Island-Beach
Condo. 2BR/2BA, Gulf front.
$220,000!
PRICE REDUCED! Triple-
wide MH of 3,314 square feet.
This home has many amenities
and sits on a nice 5 acre tract.
$95,000!
PRICE REDUCED! Wow!
Great home in Popash area on
2.5 acs. 2 miles from town.
$138,000!
PRICE REDUCED! 3BR/2BA
MH on 5 acs w/frontage on SR
62. NOW $60,000!
9.8 acs fronts SR 64 near
Popash. Great for homesite or
agriculture. $89,000!


REACTOR ASSOCIATED AFTER HOURS
KENNY SNDERS--......781-0153 KAREN O'NE.AJ......781-7633
KEVIN SANDERS.......990-3093 MONICA REAS-.........781-0888
DAVID ROYAL.............781-3490 JIM MIY EDENFIELD...448-2821
s HIGHWAY 17 SOUTH. WALICHULA. FL 33873
.j 17c


The earliest type of timekeeper, dating from as far back
as 3500 B.C., was the shadow clock, or gnomon, a verti-
cal stick or obelisk that casts a shadow. An Egyptian
shadow clock of the eighth century B.C. is still in exis-
tence.


'S


TIRES


New & Used Tires


Best
prices
in Town!


Bil!y Ayers
Tire Technician.
773-0777 773-0727
-16 REA Rd., Wauchula
EIJ (across from Wal-Mart)


VISA
visa,..^g -


lalores & Floresflnc.
r ^ ^ ^ ^I [M1M


Realtors
NOEY A. FLORES, BROKER
310 Court St.
Wauchula, Florida 33873
(863) 773-3337 Fax: (863) 773-0144
www.floresrealty.net


SPECIAL OF TH


WAUCHULA 4BR/2BA Frame Ho
Wauchula. Hardwood floors, grand
detached carport. Offered


WAUCHULA SHORT SALE 2BR/1
tral air & heat. Large lot, utility shed
$49,900
WAUCHULA 3BR/2BA Home on a
2003. 1206 Sqft total. Asking $59,900. A
$25,000 down payment assistance.
BE YOUR OWN BOSS Come see th
Bowling Green right on Hwy 17. Curre
shop with lots of parking and 3 covered


Noey A. Flores
BROKER
863-781-4585


E WEEK!









., ., ,,n ,
>me in the city limits of
nite counter-tops and
d at $67,000.
IBA frame home with cen-
d and carport. Offered at

2 acre corner lots, built in
ksk us about qualifying for

is commercial property in
ntly used as mechanic/tire
I lifts. Offered at $100,000


WE SHARE THE SAME MLS WITH HIGHLANDS COUNTY!
Remember, Our listings are on the Internet.
Anyone with a computer can access them anytime! LW
After Hours





Oralia D. John D. Jason Michael D. Jamle
Flores Freeman Johnson Boyett Spurlock
Broker Sales Sales Sales Broker
Associate Associate Associate Associate Associate
863-781-2955 863-781-4084 863-781-3734 863-781-2827 863-835-1611


I WHY RENT WHEN YOU CAN BUY AND BUILD EQUITY!!! cl1:17c
Ir


$2.II0If fnjI et sn

Wachy?7afWrhyxytgi^r


Enter this weeks discount code

44880
and receive your discount
Expires: Jan. 31, 2013


BILLY BOB


HELP WANTED

Accepting applications for a Part Time Customer Service
Delinquent Accounts Specialist position. High School
Diploma or GED equivalency is required, Job description
is available upon request. Closing date: 1/22/2013 @ 5:00
pm.
Accepting applications' for a Maintenance Worker position
in the Parks and Grounds department. Performs mainte-
nance on City Property., High School Diploma or GED
equivalency desirable, but not required. Requires valid
Florida driver's license. Job description is available upon
request. Closing date: 1/22/2013 @ 5:00 pm.
Accepting applications for a Customer Service Specialist
position. Offers competitive wages, and an excellent ben-
efits package. High School Diploma or GED equivalency
is required. Job description is available upon request. Clos-
ing date: 1/22/2013 @ 5:00 pm.
Apply at Wauchula Administrative Complex at 126 S 7th
Ave., Wauchula. The City of Wauchula complies with
EEO, ADAAA & Veterans Preference. The City of
Wauchula is a Drug Free Workplace. c:17c


.1






8B The Herald-Advocate, January 17, 2013





The


Classifieds


Upgrading To Geothermal


GOLF TOURNAMENT
I cannot think of a better way to spend a Florida Saturday in
January than getting out and helping support your local American
Cancer Society Relay for Life.
In one way or another, we have been touched by cancer in our
small community. I lost my dad, other family members, and friends
to cancer. We have a number of people right now who are fighting
for their next birthday because of cancer.
There are so many ways that we can help support our commu-
nity in fighting this battle. This month we will hold our second
annual Golf Tournament to benefit the American Cancer Society
Relay For Life. Presented by Vandolah Power Co., it is Saturday,
Jan. 26, at The Bluffs Golf Course south of Zolfo Springs on U.S.
17 in Hardee County. Registration begins at 7 a.m.
There will be cash prizes, door prizes, a 50/ 50 drawing and
much more.
Entry fee is $50 per player.
Contact Calvin Bates at 773-2277 for more information.
Sharon Ussery is a board member for the Hardee Unit of the
American Cancer Society, located on West Main Street in down-
town Wauchula. For more information, call local Executive
Director Denise Benavides at (866) 739-5288, extension 5802.


S, OLIRTESY PHOTO
School Board member Paul Samuels takes a swing at
last year's tournament.


I. --
I... '. ....... .. ,

Per Alan Jay Automotive, "A Hole-Ini-One Wins a Car!"



YOUR BUSINESS COULD

APPEAR HEE E TOO!!
Contact
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels

773-3255


Homeowners who are plan-
ning to replace a worn-out, inef-
ficient heating :': cooling sys-
tem may want to consider
installing a new geothermal
system. According to the ex-
perts at WaterFurnace, most
geothermal units are easy to
install, especially when they are
replacing another forced-air
system. And in many cases, the
monthly savings that an energy-
efficient geothermal system
offers will be greater than any
payments associated with the
installation of the new system.
During the heating cycle, a
geothermal heat pump uses a
series of pipes (an earth loop)
buried in the ground to extract
heat from the ground. As the
system pulls heat from the loop,
it distributes it as warm air
through the home using a con-
ventional duct system. The
same heat energy can also be
used for a radiant floor system
or domestic hot water heating.
In the cooling mode, the heating
process is reversed -, heat is
extracted froi the air'ini the
-. home and either moved' back
into the earth loop or used to
preheat the water in 'a hot water
tank.
Installation of a geothermal
system begins with a visit from
your local geothermal dealer.
The dealer will measure your
house, calculate your heating
and cooling requirements and
examine your property to deter-
mine the best loop system for.
your location. If you own a
home that does not have an
existing duct system, your geot-
hermal dealer can easily retrofit
your home to include one.


Geothermal systems can also
be installed in areas that are
unsuitable for fossil fuel fur-
naces, because there is no com-
bustion and therefore no need to
vent exhaust gases. These sys-
tems do particularly well when
replacing propane or fuel oil
systems. And because a geot-
hermal system uses no fossil
fuel and emits no greenhouse'
gases, homeowners can reduce
their carbon footprints, add
comfort, and improve indoor air
quality with less noise.
Lower utility bills increase
the list of benefits that a geot-
hermal system offers the home-
owner. In fact, a geothermal
system delivers an astounding
four units of energy for every
one unit of electrical energy
used. That translates to a 400
percent efficiency rating and
savings of up to 70 percent for
heating, cooling and hot water
costs. Additionally, geothermal
systems require 'less mainte-
nance than conventional heat-
ing and cooling systems,.
Homeo%&ners who'`install a
geothermal system prior to Dec.
I31, 2016, can talne advantage of
a federal renewable energy tax
credit that offers a tax incentive
of 30 percent of the' installed
cost of the system. The credit
.can be used along with utility
rebates and state tax incentives,
where available, to make geot-
hermal systems more affordable
than ever.
To find a geothermal system
that fits your needs, visit
www.waterfurnace.com or talk
to a WaterFurnace expert at
(800) GEO-SAVE.


g!1 Thera f&i l niY H


SEEDS
FROM
/ I ETHE- E
SOWER


It had-been a dayof-rain ......' '^'..- .
and wind. After theciouidsyitij h""' '*
gave way to the sunshine, a
mother decided to take' her
two sons for a walk. As they
passed a large mud puddle,
the older son pushed his'
smaller brother into it. Aston-
ished, the mother asked, AM-SOUTH REALT
"Why did you do that?" "Be-
cause," he replied, "I was Each office independently own
tricked." "What do you mean
tricked?" she asked. "Well,"
he replied, "when the idea
first came to my mind, it felt
so good that I thought the .'.
Lord was talking to me and
telling me to do it. But I guess
it was the devil.-" ..
It is not always safe to go Robert Hinerman
by our feelings. It is not al- 227-0202
ways wise to go by the wis-
dom of this world. And it is
not always smart to go by the PRICE REDUCTION!! This
sayings of others. But it is priced right and ready to mi
'safe to put our faith and trust close to shopping and s
in God and to follow His Price $47,000
Word. Faith has no value of J LISTED! 10 acres o
its own unless it is accompa- that currently has some pr
nied by works that honor trees. This piece of land ca
God. We read inthe Bible that alone or; with a 40 acre
His Word is true and useful Asking price $60.000.
and will show us what is right ..
or wrong in our livds that it A QUIET FAMILY HOME! Th
will always put our faith in bath brick home is on quie
God ahead Of our'feelings. outside ofucity limits. Larg
Visit us at: www.SowerMinistries.orIg outbuildings, and alarm


ElO Kc onf in
147I wnkA-.eSernjF 387


(863) 38548649

COMMERCIAL


RESIDENTIAL
CONSTRUCTION
Let our highly qualified staff develop your commercial
property, build your dream home, or do your remodeling.




Discount Good Uo To $ 1.000


II Mail: Kochconf(strato.net


I-


' .


State Certified Ucense #(C


Myths About Diabetes:

Injecting Is Complicated
According to the American (BMI). Longer needles could
Diabetes Association, diabetes go too deep into the patient's
affects 25.8 million Americans. body and actually deliver
Type 1 diabetes can occur at insulin into the muscle, where
any age but is most often diag- absorption could be unpre-
nosed in children, teens or dictable and potentially create
young adults. Type 2 most often unanticipated hypoglycemic
occurs in adulthood. Treatment (low blood sugar) conditions.
options can include diet, exer- Not having to "pinch up" also
cise and medication that may enables patients to use just one
require multiple -injections a hand when administering their
day, such as insulin and GLP-1 injection *treatments, which
incretins. For many people with allows for more discreet injec-
diabetes, the idea of injecting tions. A one-handed injection
insulin may seem complicated- technique also makes it possible
but it doesn't have to be. New to rotate to additional injection
injection, options and recom- sites such as the upper arms and
mendations are helping to sim- buttocks. Proper site rotation
plify the injection process. helps prevent lumps often
Shorter pen needles are one called'"lipos" from develop-
innovation that is making injec- ing under the skin, which can
tion therapy easier and more occur when frequently injecting
comfortable. Available with into the same site.
thinner gauges and modified Recommendations from the
needle tips, 4mm needles make American Association of Dia-
it easier for patients to inject betes Educators emphasize the
insulin, as most patients don't importance of selecting the
need to "pinch up" the skin shortest needle possible for
when injecting a technique insulin injections. To find out
that is needed when using more about your options, ask
longer needles to avoid hitting your doctor about shorter nee-
the muscle with the needle. dles. Visit www.bd.com/nano to
Needles as short as 4mm are see new needle innovations that
effective for children as well as improve the ease and comfort
adult patients, including those of injections.
with a high body mass index





I--- - - -- --- q ======"
I 7 plus tax I

I I
I Golf Cart Batteries .
I (Set Of 6 PowerTron SixVolt)
Pick-up & Delivery not Included with' this offer.
I Must bring coupon to receive offer.
O---- -T INST-O-- OW-----VAIBLE
ON SITE INSTALLATION NOW AVAILABLE
829 BOSTICKR -BWINGGRE
7 3= 40 RadRus esd Trry akGof ous


eY
ed and operated.


Nancy Craft
832-0370


s 3/1 home is
ove into, located
schools. Asking

n Vandolah Rd.
oducing orange
in be purchased
parcel nearby.

his 3 bedroom, 2
et no traffic road
ie oaks In yard,
system. Call


RICHARD to see this lovely home. Priced 0
$159.900
OWNER SAYS SELL 3BR, 1BTH HOME
located on 11 acres w/lrge LR w/FIRE
PLCE, Porch, new appliances, outside stor-
age, 11 ac. Fenced w/dog alarm, and so
much more. $140.000
NEWLY LISTED!! 3/2 home built in 2007 In
Avon Park Lakes. The home has stainless
steel appliances, laminated wood floors,
double car garage, and much more. Priced
@ $89.900.
SIMPLY PEACEFUL!! only $60.000 for this 3
BD, 2Bth MH on 9.54 acres located in a
country setting.
PRICE REDUCTION! this 3 bedroom, 2 bath
mobile home is almost brand new, every-
thing inside is SPOTLESS. Come-by -nd-
take a LOOK!! Asking Price $69.900
S64.900
POSSIBLE OWNER FINANCING on newly
renovated 2 Bedroom, 1 1/2 Bath Town
home located on East Oak Street with 10%
down.
RENTAL AVAILABLE!!
BEAUTIFUL 2 BEDROOM, 2 1/2 BATH
TOWNHOUSE APARTMENT, $650. MONTH-
LY, WITH $650 DEPOSIT. 1051 DOWNING
CIRCLE, WAUCHULA CALL 773-2122
GO TO: HomePath.com For More Fannie
Mae Properties


702 SOUTH 6thAVENUE, WAUCHULA
(863) 773-2122 FAX (863) 773-2173
Gary Delatorre Broker
www.cbhardee.com


Richard Dasher Victor Salazar
781-0162 245-1054


LOOKING FOR HOME W/WORKSHOP? Look
no further, than this 4 Bedroom, 2 Bath
charming CB home with central heat/air,
tile/carpet flooring, shed/workshop all within
City of Wauchula. Call VICTOR today! This
home is priced at sell @ $85,000
GENUINE COUNTRY FEEL! On 5 AC., with
countless amenities. A must see 4BR, 21/2 B,
Formal LR, DR, FR, Women's dream kitchen,
Laundry RM, 3 Car Garage, separate 2 BR;
1 BTH mother in law suite. The 5 AC. W/Barn,
Stalls and so much more.
MOBILE HOME W/ ACREAGE! Take a look at
this cute 3 BD, 2Bth mobile home located on
5.14 acres in Zolfo Springs. Priced at
$134.900
COMMERCIAL PROPERTY!! This is a prime
location right on Highway 17 In Bowling
Green. Priced at $39,500
PRICE REDUCTION!! Check out this 5 acres
of peaceful Paradise! Property Is secluded
and yet only 10 minutes from town. $75.000
OWNER UPDATED!! 3 BR 2 Bath Family
Home on cul-da-sac. New insulation in attic,
well water, septic tank, electric by Progress
Energy, oversized LNDRY RM. W/Outside
entry, doubles as office. New 5 TN air han-
dler & HT pump, LGE 2 car carport, Extra
storage BLD.
GREEN ACRES INDEED!! 40 acres on the
corner of Vandolah Rd. and Dink Albritton
with 12 acres of plastic, ready to farm! The
remaining acreage is cleared with a one acre
POND on the back corner. Asking $7.500 per
acre.
DON'T LIMIT YOUR OPPORTUNITY!
Automotive Mechanic shop on .6 Acres
includes 3 lifts and large air compressor.
2400 SF in mechanic building, 624 SF in
office building. Close to US HWY 17. Great
investment potential. $169.900
NEW LISTING! Beautiful 3 BR, 2 BTH custom
home, great amenities for comfortable living.
Screen back porch w/hot tub, 34 FT. screen
pool and patio, master BR French doors
open to this area of relaxation and recre-
ation. Family RM w/wood burning fireplace
paneled w/tongue and groove cypress,
vaulted ceiling. Must see this custom built
home to appreciate the beauty and comfort
of this home. cn1:17c


"ITT
ell


I


1. 3t31





January 17, 2013, The Herald-Advocate 9B


Inside Out
By Chip Ballard


A TRIBUTE TO THE KING: PART 2
Because Elvis' appearance was so different than his peers, he
was considered an oddity, a rebel.
At Memphis' Humes High School, which Elvis attended from
1948 to 1953, most boys wore flat-top haircuts, jeans and plaid
shirts. But Elvis wore his light-brown hair long with sideburns
down to his earlobes (he dyed it black when he started making
movies), pink shirts, and thin, baggy, black slacks.
He often took his guitar to school. Occasionally he was asked
to sing and he never turned down an opportunity to do so. In his
senior year he won first place in the annual talent show.
Elvis might have looked like a rebel, but he wasn't. He was
quiet, shy, insecure and polite. Despite his good manners, his
appearance brought him much ridicule and made him a target for
bullies. One time six jocks, their scalps shining in the overhead
light, cornered Elvis in a hallway bathroom; five of them held him
as the sixth pulled out a pocketknife tocut his hair. Red West, who
later became a member of the "Memphis Mafia," came in just in
the nick of time and crashed the party, and Elvis kept his hair.
Elvis had fans even before he became famous. Knox Phillips,
son of SUN Studio owner Sam Phillips, remembers that Elvis used
to come to their home on occasion to play pool. Knox, 9 at the time,
and his 6-year-old brother, Jerry, thought Elvis was the coolest
thing they'd ever seen. "Just the way he'd pad around the pool



Seed Treatment Products Offer
New-Generation Fungicide


Fungal diseases- such as
Pythium, Phytophthora, Fusar-
ium and Rhizoctonia are major
causes of poor emergence and
stand development in soybeans.
But farmers will have a stronger
line of defense in 2013 with a
new-generation fungicide for
soybeans and cotton.
Acceleron Seed Treatment
Products will offer multiple
modes of action to deliver more
complete and consistent disease
protection, including a new fun-
gicidal active ingredient. In ad-
dition to continuous protection
from seed and seedling dis-
eases, they offer an insecticide
as well for early-season insect
pressure such as bean leaf bee-
tle and early-season soybean
aphids.
"These seed treatment prod-
ucts with the new-generation
fungicide, in combination with
other management practices,
can help protect against these
damaging seedling diseases,
enabling farmers to achieve
more uniform stands, higher
yield potential and better return
on investment," said Davie


Wilson, Monsanto Seed Treat-
ment Product Development
Manager.
"It's a new class of fungicide
and a new mode of action that's
new to the industry," he added.
"It brings us another level in
disease protection from what
we have had in the past.
Farmers will see a difference."
These seed treatment prod-
ucts are selected to complement
and help maximize the perform-
ance potential of Genuity
Roundup Ready 2 Yield soy-
beans. They provide an early-
season advantage of improved
early-season vigor and stand
establishment with superior
protection from seed and
seedling diseases and early-
season insect pests.
For additional information
about Acceleron(r) Seed Treat-
ment Products, farmers can
contact their seed representative
or ag retailer or visit acceleron-
sts.com. Individual results may
vary. You should always read
and follow grain marketing and
all other stewardship practices
-and pesticide label directions.


Three Ways To


Help Sa
Ordinary people can do the
extraordinary: Help save a life.
Your marrow donation, your
financial contribution, your
time and energy-any and all of
these gifts can result in a cure
for someone like Valaria
Fenderson.
Just 12 years old, Valaria's
been admitted to the hospital
more than most people. The
reason: sickle cell anemia. This
inherited blood disorder has
plagued Valaria since birth,
causing frequent bouts of debil-
itating pain in her legs, back
and chest.
Valaria longs foi the day-
when this pain is gone-a day
when she can feel normal-and a
marrow transplant is the only
way this dream can come true.
However, no one in her fami-
ly is a matching donor. Her doc-
tors have turned to the Be The
Match Registry the world's
largest listing of potential mar-
row donors to search for one
selfless stranger who could save
her life.
A marrow transplant can cure
someone with sickle cell ane-
mia or life-threatening blood
cancers, but like Valaria. most
patients do not have matching
donors within their families;
that's why Be The Match's mis-
sion is so vital. The nonprofit
organization connects patients
with donors and facilitates life-
saving transplants.
Adding more potential don-
ors to the registry is crucial. If
you're between the ages of 18
and 44, you're especially need-
ed. Research shows that such


ve A Life
donors provide the greatest
chance for transplant success.
You can join the registry at a
registry drive or sigh up online
at BeTheMatch.org. Potential
donors must meet age and
health guidelines and be willing
to donate to any patient in need.
Each registrant completes a
health history form and pro-
vides a swab of cheek cells.
Registering isn't the only way
you can help. Financial dona-
tions help patients afford med-
ical procedures, fund clinical
research to improve transplant
outcomes and bring a patient a
step closer to a cure.
Volunteering is a third way to
help. You could organize a reg-
istry drive and recruit donors at
your school, church or civic
center or consider volunteering
at a Be The One Run fundrais-
ing run-walk event.
The bottom line: Every reg-
istry member, every contributor
and every volunteer increases
the odds that a critically ill per-
son will have a second chance
at life.
Valaria is still looking for that
second chance. '"She's in less
pain now but she still needs a
transplant," her mother said.
"I'm confident that Valaria's
match is out there-just an ordi-
nary person who realizes that he
or she can become the cure for
someone battling sickle cell
anemia and blood cancers." Are
you that person?
To find out how you can help,
visit www.BeTheMatch.org or
call (800) MARROW2.


1


table with that slinky kind of grace that you'd see on stage made us
want to imitate him," Knox said in an interview. "We started wear-
ing our hair like Elvis' right away and when we bought our
clothes at Lansky's, we had black velvet added to the top of our
sportscoat lapels, just so we could look a little more like him."
And that was before "That's All Right, Mama" tore through
the Memphis airwaves making Elvis an instant local sensation.
Knox Phillips remembers the night his father, Sam Phillips,
brought home a 45 rpm pressing of "That's All Right" and "Blue
Moon of Kentucky."
"I'd never seen my dad so excited," Knox says. "He wanted
my mother and Jerry and me to hear it right away. I don't remem-
ber if he'd played us the acetate first, but the sight of that little yel-
low label going round and round on our vinyl-covered black-and-
white High Fidelity record changer, the sound that was generated
by that SUN 45 and the sheer excitement on my father's face, as if
this was the summation of everything he had been working for so
long, as if this was the differentness that he had been preaching -
I can't divide it, it's all encapsulated in that one moment. And in
that moment, I think, everything changed."
Sam Phillips took the acetate of "That's All Right" to
Memphis disk jockey Dewey Phillips (no relation to Sam).


2422 HIBiscus LANE


Dewey's show, "Red Hot & Blue," was the first major radio show
by a white disk jockey to play rhythm and blues; Dewey integrat-
ed the airwaves in 1952. He also has the distinction of being the
first DJ ever to play an Elvis Presley record.
When "That's All Right" hit the airwaves for the first time that
historic evening in June of 1954, Dewey's phone lines were
jammed with calls asking about the singer and wanting to hear the
song again. Dewey claims to have played the song no less than 12
times that night.
But 18-year-old Elvis was unaware of the commotion he was
causing. He was so nervous about his song being played on the air,
and so afraid it would flop, that he went to a movie and sat through
several showings of the same film. When the theater closed, he
drove home in his Crown Electric truck, found his morn and dad
asleep, and went to bed.
When the sun came up over Memphis the next day it shone on
the boy who would be king, though in his wildest dreams he could
not have imagined the heights of celebrity to which he would
ascend.
Next week, Part 3, the conclusion.
E-mail Chip at chipkyle746@embarqmail.com or visit his website
at www.chipballard.com.


2441 BEGONIA


2011 Homes of Merit 2 Bedroom, 2 Bath 2013 Champion 2 Bedroom, 2 Bath
Back Porch, HVAC Morning Room Front Porch, HVAC Island Kitchen
Carport, Irrigation Lot Rent $250 Carport, Irrigation Lot Rent $250
W/ Modified Lifetime Lease W/ Modified Lifetime Lease


$71,995


$89,995


1:17p


MI

/he M A I N ve
STREET WAUCHULA AP




WntoQWLW a ul


i tore hoToUr'a.
0 ,yJIS

Exploor Downtown Wauchula with visits from patron.

of the past. njoy approximately 1 1/2 hours of;.

intgrtaining Wauchula history on this guided outl

tour. paee is limited so reserve ygour.seat today


Tours TDhpart

friday. January 25,2013 .

flzritagepark, D)own.ton Wauchula



Toarsh ehzd .i

6:30pm 6:45pm

8:00pm 8:15pm



Tour Cost

i.$10 1rr person
:.:*' 15 for 2.
"' ($5 Discount for Main Sfreet Wauchula MezmbeirsU

... To purehasgtick~Ms visit www.mainstrtlwauchuhla.com or stop bg the z .
'in Atret WV ueuhfa offle at 107 e. Main Street. for questions call (863) 767P-


House


CRYSTAL LAKE VILLAGE

and RV RESORT

237 Maxwell Dr., Wauchula.


Friday, Janary 189&.S atray.wanay

11 a^m. -3 p0m. (63)773-3582


YOUR BUSINESS COULD

APPEAR HERE TOO!!
Contact
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels

773-3255


*******= A--


-AL-


-%L


Ilk-





10B The Herald-Advocate, January 17, 2013




During the past week, sheriff's deputies and city police
officers investigated the following incidents and made the fol-
lowing arrests:
COUNTY
Jan. 13, Juan Lopez, 27, and Jorge Lopez, 24, both of 501 E.
Fifth Ave., Zolfo Springs, were arrested by Dep. Steven Ahrens and
each charged with burglary with assault or battery. Juan Lopez was
also charged with aggravated assault with a deadly weapon and
Jorge Lopez was also charged with reckless driving.
Jan. 13, Kimberly Ann Murphy, 51, of 855 N. 70th Ave.,
Okeechobee, was arrested by Sgt. Lyle Hart and charged with
smuggling contraband into a controlled facility.
Jan. 13, a fight at SR 66 and U.S. 17, and thefts on Park Drive
and Peeples Road were reported.
Jan. 12, Jose Ricardo Juarez, 28, of 731 La Playa Dr., Wau-
chula, was arrested by Dep. Steven Ahrens on an out-of-county
warrant.
Jan. 12, a residential burglary on Poplar Street, and thefts on
Lois Lane, Redbird Lane and on U.S. 27 South were reported.
Jan. 11, Brandy Elizabeth Battey, 22, of 2370 U.S. 17 South,
Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Kim Pfieffer and charged with
neglect of child causing great harm.
Jan. 11, Mya Torres, 32, of 702 Sandpiper Dr., Wauchula, was
arrested by the Drug Task Force (DTF) and charged with posses-


sion of methamphetamine, possession of drug paraphernalia and
cruelty toward a child without great harm.
Jan. 11, a tag was reported stolen on South Ninth Avenue.
Jan. 10, a tag stolen on U.S. 17 North and a theft on Keeton
Road were reported.
Jan. 9, Henry Aaron Williams, 48, of 2495 Hibiscus Lane,
Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Cesar Medina and charged with
possession of methamphetamine, possession of drug paraphernalia,
possession of weapons, contempt of court violation of an in-
junction for protection and three traffic offenses.
Jan. 9, a residential burglary on Old Bradenton Road, criminal
mischief on Makowski Road and a theft on U.S. 17 North were
reported.
Jan. 8, Sara Jane Vasquez, 28, of 3190 Hart Road, Wauchula,
was arrested by DTF and charged with selling methamphetamine
within 1,000 feet of a specified location, possession/manufacture/-
delivery of drug paraphernalia, owning/renting a vehicle for traf-
ficking in drugs and use of a two-way communication device in a
crime.
Jan. 8, Dianko Torres, 36, of 4103 Beach Parkway Place,
Cape Coral, and Osvaldo Torres, 39, General Delivery, Cape Coral,
were arrested by DTF and each charged with producing marijuana,
trafficking in marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia.
Jan. 8, a theft on Heard Bridge Road was reported.
Jan. 7, a residential burglary on Dena Circle and a vehicle
stolen on U.S. 17 South were reported.
WAUCHULA
Jan. 13, Alexander Elijah Sanders, 35, of 716 N. Seventh Ave.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Cpl. Justin wyatt and charged with bat-


tery.
Jan. 12, criminal mischief on Tulane Avenue was reported.
Jan. 11, a fight on South Florida Avenue, and thefts on East
Main Street, South Florid Avenue and U.S. 17 South were report-
ed.
Jan. 10, Kevin john McQueeney, 52, of 157 Will Duke Road,
Wauchula, was arrested by Ofc. William Smith and charged with
trespassing failure to leave property upon request.
Jan. 10, burglary of a conveyance on La Playa Drive and a
fight on River Chase Circle were reported.
Jan. 7, Matthew Aaron Ramirez, 28, of 3515 Virginia Lane,
Wauchula, was arrested by Ofc. David Cruz on a charge of viola-
tion of probation.
Jan. 7, thefts on Briarwood Drive and on East Main Street
were reported.
BOWLING GREEN
Jan. 11, Tammy Lee Anderson, 29, of 111 Cliett St., Bowling
Green, was arrested by Chief John Scheel on an out-of-county war-
rant.
Jan. 11, a theft on U.S. 17 North was reported.
Jan. 10, Elizabeth Nichole Miller, 22, of 329 River Chase
Circle, Wauchula, was arrested by Ofc. Ben Franklin on an out-of-
county warrant.
Jan. 9, a residential burglary on U.S. 17 North was reported.
Jan. 7, a residential burglary on Maple Avenue and burglary of
a business on U.S. 17 North was reported.


ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS


MONDAY
Holiday
TUESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Lucky
Charms, Graham Crackers,
Breakfast Pizza, Applesauce,
Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Alternate Meal,
Chicken Patty on Bun, Hotdogs,
Lettuce & Tomato, Green
Beans, Yellow Cake, Ice Cream,
Grape Juice, Condiments and
Milk
WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Frosted
Flakes, Graham Crackers,
Cinnie Minies, Pineapple,
Condiments and Milk ,
Lunch: Alternate Meal,
Cowboy Macaroni, Wheat Rolls,
Ham & Cheese Wrap,
Carroteenies, Steamed Broccoli,
Applesauce, Condiments and
Milk
THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Lucky
Charms, Graham Crackers,
Waffles, Sausage Patty, Mixed
Fruit, Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Alternate Meal,
Shredded Turkey w/Gravy,
Wheat Rolls, Fish Sandwich,
Mashed Potatoes, Lettuce &
Tomato, Fresh Grapes, Condi-
ments and Milk
FRIDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Honey
Nut Cheerios, Graham
Crackers, Breakfast Stick,
Peaches, CQndiments and Milk
Lunch: Alternate Meal,
Burrito, Corndog, Cucumbers,
Mixed Vegetables, Orange
Juice, Condiments and Milk

JUNIOR HIGH
MONDAY
Holiday
TUESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Variety,
Graham Crackers, Breakfast
Pizza, Applesauce, Condiments
and Milk
Lunch: Chicken Patty w/Bun,
Hotdog w/Bun, Pepperoni
Pizza, Alternate Meal, Lettuce &
Tomato, Garden Peas, Diced
Pears, Yellow Cake w/
Chocolate Icing, Ice Cream
Cups, Condiments and Milk
WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Variety,
Graham Crackers, Waffle,
Sausage Patty, Diced Pears,
Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Cowboy Macaroni,
Rolls, Deli Ham & Cheese
Wrap, Cheese Pizza, Alternate
Meal, Lettuce & Tomato,'
Broccoli, Applesauce, Condi-
ments and Milk


THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Variety,
Graham Crackers, Breakfast
Cinnies Minies, Fruit Cocktail,
Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Baked Deli Turkey
Roast, Turkey Gravy, Rolls, Fish
Sandwich, Pepperoni Pizza,
Alternate Meal, Lettuce &
Tomato, Mash Potatoes, Fresh
Whole Apples, Fresh Pears,
Condiments and Milk
REBIDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Variety,
Graham Crackers, Breakfast
Rounds, Peaches, Condiments
and Milk
Lunch: Beef & Bean Burrito,
Corndog, Cheese Pizza,
Alternate Meal, Lettuce &
Tomato, Mixed Vegetables,
Juice, Condiments and Milk

SENIOR HIGH
MONDAY
Holiday
TUESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Sausage
Pizza, Applesauce, Condiments
and Milk .' .
Lunch: Chicken Breast Fillet
on Bun, Ham, Macaroni &
Cheese, Broccoli, Cornbread,
Tossed Salad, Applesauce,
Condiments and Milk
WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Pancakes,
Sausage Patty, Peaches, Condi-
ments and Milk
Lunch: Hamburger on a Bun,
Garlic Breadstick, Potato
Rounds, Broccoli, Tossed
Salad, Peaches, Condiments
and Milk
THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Cinnamon
Toast, Oatmeal, Fruit Mix,
Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Hamburger on a Bun,
Chicken Nuggets, Fresh
Potatoes, Broccoli, Tossed
Salad, Fruit Mix, Condiments
and Milk
FRIDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Breakfast
Stick, Orange Juice, Condi-
ments and. Milk
Lunch: Tacos, Pinto Beans,
Corn, Pineapple Chunks,
Tossed Salad, Orange Juice,
Condiments and Milk
Individclc menus are subject to
change.


Don't Hesitate!
HARDEE LIVING
DEADLINE
IS THURSDAY AT 5 PM.


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January 17, 2013, The Herald-Advocate 11B


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
A couple of close losses and a
drubbing were the start-back
week for the Hardee varsity
girls basketball squad.
There are three home games
this week, a visit from Teneroc
on Tuesday, a varsity-only en-
tounter with Fort Meade in a 6
p.m. start today (Thursday), and
Senior Night tomorrow when
Frostproof visits.
The regular season ends next
week. The varsity goes to
Walker Academy in Avon Park
for a 6 p.m. varsity-only game
on Tuesday. Then, there are
trips to Lake Placid Thursday


and Sebring on Friday to finish
up the 2012-13 schedule.
District 10 playoffs are at
Lake Wales Jan. 28 through
Feb. 1. The schedule hasn't
been set yet, but Hardee will
probably end up playing top-
seed Lake Wales on Jan. 28.
In last week's action, Hardee
lost 36-27 at home against Avon
Park on Jan. 7. Taryana Jones
was high with 11 points for the
Lady Devils, but Hardee junior
Bailey Carlton was close with
10 points, including six from
the free throw line. Robin
Tanksley had eight points, Adna
Metayer four, Alyssa Casso
three and Stephanie Perez two


points. Other varsity players are
Destiny Thompson, Florence
Lee, Allison Smith, Endreina
Martinez and Carleigh Cole-
man.
It was even closer on Jan. 8 at
DeSoto, a game Hardee lost by
just four points, 37-33. Tan-
ksley provided the senior lead-
ership with 13 points. Carlton
added seven, Thompson five,
Casso four, and Smith and
Metayer each two points.
At Lake Wales, on the Lady
Highlanders court, Hardee
could do little right in the 55-11
loss. Tanksley, Smith and Met-
ayer each had three points and
Perez added two more.


PHOTOS BY MARIA TRUJILLO
Varsity basketball girls suited up this season are (front row, from left to right) Adna
Metayer, Alyssa Casso, Stephanie Perez, Bailey Carlton and Destiny Thomspon; (back
row) Robin Tanksley, Endreina Martinez, Carleigh Coleman, Florence Lee and Allison
Smith, who are coached by Jeanne Myrie and Rod Smith.

The great trouble with baseball today is that most of the players are in the game for
the money and that's it, not for the love of it, the excitement of it, the thrill of it.
-Ty Cobb

Inaction breeds doubt and fear. Action breeds confidence and courage. If you want to
conquer fear, do not sit home and think about it. Go out and get busy.


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Hardee Junior Varsity
girls swept opponents in the
first week back from the holi-
day break.
The junior Lady 'Cats fash-
ioned wins over Avon Park,
DeSoto and Lake Wales in last
week's action.
This week, the JV has only
two games. Tuesday's was a
visit from Tenoroc and tomor-
row's is against visiting Frost-
proof. The middle game on
Thursday night is a varsity-only
game against Fort Meade.
The JV season closes next
week with a pair of road games,
Jan. 24 at Lake Placid and Jan.
25 at Sebring.


With wins already over Frost-
proof and Teneroc, it is likely
the JV girls can finish a winning
season. At the end of last week,
the girls were 7-3 overall.
At home last Monday against
Avon Park, Hardee was in con-
trol. leading 11-4 after the first
period and 20-9 at halftime. It
was 28-19 at the end of the third
and finished with a 41-27
Hardee win.
Soph Annabell Retana led all
scores with 13 points, including
a pair of treys. Alexi Santana
chipped in with nine points,
while Jakaysha Lindsey had
eight, Desira Martinez and
Brooke Faulk each four, Ma-
kayla Faulk two points and
Catherine "Cat" Jackson a free


throw. Other JV players are
Aundra Pace and Hailey
Williams.
Last Tuesday, Hardee trav-
eled to DeSoto and came home
with a 50-29 win. Again,
Retana led all scores, making a
dozen points on a pair of treys,
a deuces and four-of-four from
the charity stripe. Santana
added 11, Lindsey, Martinez
and Makayla Faulk each six,
Jackson four and Brooke Faulk
three points.
The week's finale was at
Lake Wales in a 35-24 victory.
In this game, Martinez had the
hot hand, sinking four treys and
a deuce for 14 points. Makayla
Faulk added 10, Lindsey five,
Santana four and Jackson two
points.


PHOTO BY MARIA TRUJILLO
Taking the court for the junior varsity girls hoop squad are (first row, from left) Desira
Martinez, Hailey Williams, Alexi Santana and Jakaysha Lindsey; (back) Aundra Pace,
Anabel Retana, Brooke Faulk, Catherine "Cat" Jackson, Makayla Faulk and coach Andy
Maddox.

Music is your own experience, your own thoughts, your wisdom. If you don't live it, it
won't come out of your horn. They teach you there's a boundary line to music. But,
man, there's no boundary line to art.
-Charlie Parker


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12B The Herald-Advocate, January 17, 2013


Today's Youth Should


Be More Committed


By BERENICE ARANA
Special To The Herald-Advocate
Charlene Julianna Nubern was born
Qn Nov. 2, 1932, in Micanopy, Florida
Q: What is your earliest childhood
memory?
A: I remember walking to school. i
This was in the time when families had
one car. We had a music program at
school and I was a part of that. Mostly,
I remember going to church and school,
having piano lessons in fifth grade, and
getting a piano for Christmas.
Q:. What kind of games did you
play growing up?
A: I remember playing Hide & Seek,
Kick the Can, and we played Bobbing
for Apples at Halloween, jump rope, tag
of some kind, and sometimes softball.
Q: What school did you attend?
A: I graduated Tarpon Springs in
Florida.
Q: What school activities and
sports did you participate in?
A: I was in the marching band, Glee
Club, NFL which was a speech club,
Forensic League. Our church also had a
music and mission group, and I Was a
part of that. I really didn't participate in
any sports.
Q: What kind of music did you-
like?
A: Classical music since I took piano.
I played all kinds of music.
Q: What was your first job?
A: I worked for my father. He had a
real estate office that I helped out in. I
also worked at Woolworth's.
Q: What accomplishments are you
most proud of?
A: I was in the band, I liked that. I
graduated from college to earn my mas-
ter's degree, did some music too. Queen
Regent, it was in mission organizations
in the Baptist church; my husband was
a Baptist pastor for many years. My son
graduated from FSU with a degree in
music education.
Q: What advice would you give to
my generation?
A: Well, I think today we need to be


more committed. We need to be serious
about things and work hard. Try to fol-
low God's will, love each other more
rather than being critical and putting
them down.
Q: Has your outlook on life
changed from when you were a young
adult?
A: I think everybody changes as you
get older. Yes, it has changed. I think
I've learned to understand people more
in their
point of
view. I 1C1 *1 ,
don't think '.
from a reli-
gious point of view I've changed. My
faith has stayed the same.
Q: What was your profession and
how did you choose it?
A: I was an elementary school
teacher. I didn't go to college till after I
got married. My husband encouraged
me to get a degree in education.
Q: During your life, what invention
or new discovery have you enjoyed
the most?
A: Well, the one that I dsed the most
is the computer. The automatic washer
machines and dryer were the most help-
ful.
Q: Of all things you learned from
your parents, which do you feel was
the most valuable?
A: I learned to study, work hard, and
make good grades. We had a very lov-
ing family. They took me to church
, when I was a baby, so I guess my faith
in God started from them.
Q: What is the one thing you want
most people to remember about you?
A: That I was faithful to do God's
will in my life, or I tried to.
Back In Time is the result of a class
assignment given to ninth graders at
Hardee Senior High School. Each stu-
.dent is asked to interview an older
person. Selected interviews are pub-
lished here as an encouragement to
the students and for the enjoyment of
our readers.


'Cat Hoopsters Split Games


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Starting the second season,
the Hardee Wildcat basketball
boys split games, winning
strong at home against Lake
Placid and losing a tight one to
Lake Wales.
The season continued this
week, with a road trip to
Teneroc on Tuesday. at Fort
Meade today (Thursday) and a
return game against Lake
Wales. Next week begins with a
trip to Auburndale on Tuesday.
a visit from Frostproof on
Thursday and another from
Teneroc on Friday.
Lake Placid did even more
poorly against Hardee last
Tuesday in the Wildcat gym
than the -Panthers did in their
home opener against Hardee
back on Dec. 4. Then, Hardee
won 67-42. This time it was 62-
27.
Steve Metayer was high for
Hardee with 20 points a quartet
apiece of treys and deuces, plus


seven assists and a steal. Der-
rick Graham chipped in with 16
and Keyon Brown added 13.
Luke Palmer and Kane Casso
each had five points and Marco
DeLeon added a trey. Graham
had eight rebounds, while
Christian Moralez had seven
and Brown six in a game which
featured a running clock most
of the second half.
We pulled them back to half
court. didn't press the ball. I just
let them play," said Coach
Vance Dickey.
On Thursday. at home against
Lake Wales. the number one
team in Class 5A in the state, it
was a different story. Hardee
played hard and kept even for a
while. It was 17-17 at the end of
a fast-paced first quarter. By
halftime, the Highlanders had a
five-point advantage, and drew
that to nine by the end of the
third. Hardee outscored Lake
Wales in the final period but the
Highlanders won 88-80.
Metayer topped Hardee with


a game-high 33 points. Casso
had a hot hand, nailing five
three-pointers, a couple of
deuces and half dozen free
throws for 25 points. Lake
Wales concentrated on stopping
Graham and Brown, who fin-
ished with eight, and seven
points respectively. Moralez
had five points and Lucious
Everett added two. Graham
grabbed 14 rebounds and has
seven blocked shots.
Other varsity players are
Jordan Jones and James
Greene.
The JV won at Lake Placid
and lost to Lake Wales. Tyler
Smith sank a trio of treys to get
Hardee going against Lake
Placid. DeShawndre "Debo"
McMillian also had a strong
game. Other JV players are
Ryan Moore, Blaiaine Molitor,
Dustin Smith, Nick Johnson,
Robert Torres, Ryan Ramirez,
Deandre Holley, C.K. Douglas,
Devante Greer, Alan Brown and
Devin Pearson.


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SCHi 3 DIGIT 326
935 05-08-03 14P 4S
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
404 LIBRARY WEST
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-0001

L


The HAdvocate


Thursday, January 17,2013


By JO,
Of The I
"Smo
trend."
Erik
Prevent
Hardee
ment, r
ing pre
countyy
ist wee
Casta
Jers she
moving
complex.
was an
sion, as
the coi
action.
The
complex.
Palms,
pie in V
Green.
it is up I
a smoke
might h
.Enforce
landlord
Casta
people I


Tobacco Less Popular
AN SEAMAN from second-hand smoke. county boards. Since the
Herald-Advocate When handicapped people with Construction Industry Licens-
)king is no longer the a breathing problem, and possi- ing members have to meet cer-
bly on oxygen, live next door to tain criteria, including being in
Castanon of the Tobacco a person who smokes, the the construction industry, Tom-
tion Program at the smoke coming through the my Bostick, Jimmy Jernigan
County Health Depart- walls and the vents aggravates and Calvin Roberts were reap-
nade this statement dur- their condition. pointed. Other boards and their
sentation at the Hardee Castanon said it costs an members will continue to serve
Commission meeting average of $570 to clean an until the Feb. 7 commission
ek. apartment when a person meeting. Interested parties are
anon and Patricia Saun- leaves, but to make it smokefree asked to complete and submit
owed a short video pro- when a smoker leaves, it costs an application (See related
smoke-free apartment $4,000 because of removing story).
xes in Hardee County. It carpeting, bums in the wood- -renewed the lease with the
informational discus- work and countertops, etc. Office of Criminal Conflict and
s they were not asking Colon Lambert and Grady Civil Regional Counsel of the
mission to take any Johnson spoke of their reluc- Second District.
tance to add any government -accepted a $17,750 grant
only public housing ruling or interference, but real- from Homeland Security for
x in the county is The ized it was a means to protect Emergency Management.
although there are a cou- people in unfortunate circum- -.approved a minor subdivi-
Vauchula and in Bowling stances and would leave it up to sion certificate of compliance to
But, wherever they are, apartment managers to regulate. separate a 6.12-acre property
to the management to set In other action, the commis- off Sauls Road with the re-
e-free policy, just as they sion: quired public road frontage.
have a "no pets" policy. -heard a presentation on the The remainder of the 45.0-acre
-ment would be up to the Fiscal Year '2011-2012 annual parcel is not included in the
d. report. minor subdivision.
dn id nr 000 t dnLJeA LJ i i.-


111on11 i Ua over UI A
have died in the last year


--IU lUI lUtU b UI
postone os esons
on appointments to various


By JESSICA THERRIAULT
Special To The Herald-Advocate
Ever wonder what digs those cone-
shaped indentations in sandy areas of
your yard? It is an insect called an ant
lion.
The ant lion is neither an ant nor a
lion. It is a harmless (to people)
insect that looks more like a sci-
fi movie monster than a real- `i
life backyard critter. It has an
appetite to match its fero-
cious appearance, and its
name has everything to do BAC
with its favorite meal: ants!
There are roughly 2,000
species of ant lions found through-
out the world, mostly in warm climates.
Florida has 22 species throughout the
state.
Also called a doodlebug when in its
immature or larval stage, the ant lion is
unique not only because of how it looks
and what it eats but also how it catches
its prey. As its nickname suggests, this
bug doodles, or makes squigglylines,
while moving backward in the sand.
Using its jaws to flick away sand, it
digs out a cone-shaped pit to trap its
prey: ants and other small arthropods
that wander too close. It is almost
impossible for an ant to climb on the
pit's slope of loose sand, or to escape
before falling to the bottom of the pit to
become the ant lion's next meal. Sand
pits are about the size of a silver dollar
(some smaller, some larger, depending
on the size of the maker) and an inch or
more deep.
To view ant lion behavior, search for
sandy soil in your yard and keep your
peepers open for small, cone-shaped
indentations in the soil. You may find
several in one spot. Favorite pit sites are
places protected from the rain, such as
beneath a raised building, overhanging
eaves or other sheltering object.
If you can carefully catch an ant,
preferably not a fire ant (we don't want
you to get hurt), drop it into the lPit and


the ant lion should react quickly. The
ant lion waits for its prey under the soil
at the bottom of the pit.
If you wish to view one of these
insects even closer, scoop it out of the
pit with a spoon. Start at one side,
scooping under the cone and lift the
entire pit in one scoop. Gently dump
the pile of sand onto a white

sand until you spot the ant
lion. It is camouflaged and
hard to see. It took me three
< R D pits to find one!
If you see it and it appears
motionless, just wait; it should
soon flip over and try to rebury
itself in the sand.
Up close, the young ant lion is
brownish or grayish in color with a
plump body, short legs and a large head
dominated by spiny jaws, called
mandibles, that stick out. These jaws
have tiny, needle-like teeth that inject
their soon-to-be meal with venom. They
are usually harmless to touch and rarely
bite.
If you do find one, it is best not to
handle it, and never pick it up with your
fingers because its body is super soft
and you could hurt it. Simply watch it
for a while and then place it gently back
on the sand where you found it.
Being an ant bully is only a part of
the ant lion's life cycle. This monster-
looking insect transforms into a hand-
some, winged insect similar to a drag-
onfly and spends its adult life flying in
forested areas, usually in summer
months and at night.
So, grab your spoon and Get
Outdoors Florida! For more information
about ant lions, visit
www.ifas.ufl.edu.Kids, Jessica Basham
knows all about animals! She works for
the state Fish & Wildlife Conservation
Commission. Look for her Backyard
Safari every month. You can ask her
questions at
Jessica.Basham@MyFWC.com.


PAGE ONE


Kids: The Ferocious


Ant Lion Is A Bully!







2C The Herald-Advocate, January 17, 2013





-Schedule of Weekly Services-
Y/


nteas r a!blic Service



ch .,Florida

-'Th- -

BOWLING GREEN
APOSTOLIC LIGHTHOUSE
UNITED PENTECOSTAL
CHURCH
310 Orange St.
S 375-3100
Sunday Morning ..................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening ....................6:00 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting........7:00 p.m.
Thursday Service ................ 7:30 p.m.

CHESTER GROVE MB CHURCH
708 W. Grape St. 375-3353
Sunday School .................... 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship .................. 8:00 a.m.
Sun. Eve. Worship 1st & 3rd 4:00 p.m.
Tues. Prayer/Bible Study ......6:00 p.m.

CHRISTIAN BIBLE
FELLOWSHIP
Hwy. 17 South,
Morning Worship ..............10:30 a.m.
Youth Group Sunday ..........6:00 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
121 West Broward St. 375-2231
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship.................. 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday .......................... 7:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
TRUE HOLINESS OUTREACH
725 Palmetto St.
375-3304
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Tues. Night Bible Study ...... 7:30 p.m.
Evening Worship
1st Sunday ....................5:00 p.m.

COMMUNITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Main & W. Centra.
.Sunday AM Worship............10:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer Meeting ............7:00 p.m.

FAITH ASSEMBLY OF GOD
4937 Hwy. 17 N. 375-4206
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Disciples Train & Choirs ......5:30 p.m.
Evening Worship ................6:30 p.m.
.Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Bowling Green
S. Hwy. 17 375-2253

Bible Study .......................... 9:30 a.m.'
Morning Worship ......... 10 45 a.m
Evening Worship .............. 6 30 p m
,WEDNESDAY: ... .. ..
'Discipleship Training
Youth & Adult ................6:30 p p.
AWANA (ages 3-5th grade) ....6:30 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Grape & Church Streets 375-2340
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ................ 6:00 p.m.

FORT GREEN BAPTIST
CHURCH
Baptist Church Road 773-9013
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
,Sunday Evening .... .............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

) HOLY CHILD
SPANISH CATHOLIC MISSION
Misa (Espanol) Sunday ........ 7:00 p.m.

IGLESIA DEL DIOS VIVO
105 Dixiana St. 375-4191
Domingo De Predicacion .... 11:00 p.m.
Martes Estudio Biblico..........7:00 p.m.
Miercoles Estudior Juvenil ...7:00 p.m.
Jueves De Predicacion ..........7:00 p.m.

IMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH
210 E. Broward St.- 375-4681
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ............. 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m

MACEDONIA PRIMITIVE
BAPTIST CHURCH
607 Palmetto St.
Church School ......................9:30 a.m.
Morning Service ..................11:00 a.m.
Evening Service ....................7:00 p.im.
Wed. Bible Study/Prayer .....7:00 p.m.
Communion-2nd Sun. Eye...6:00 p.m.

MT. PISGAH BAPTIST CHURCH
6210 Mt. Pisgah Rd. 375-4409
Sunday School .....................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship .............11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training.............5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time........7:00 p.m.
NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
Mason Dixon & County Line Rd.
781-5887
Sunday Worship .................11:00 a.m.
2nd Sunday Communion ....11:00 a.m.
Bread of Life Sunday........12:15 p.m.
T.H.E. Meeting Tuesday ....7:00 p.m.

OPEN DOOR FULL GOSPEL
PRAISE CENTER
E. Broward St.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.


Sunday Service ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.


Donnis & Kathy Barber
Hwy. 66 EaSt
P.O. Box 760


BOWLING GREEN
PRIMERA MISSION BAUTISTA
Murray Road off Hwy. 17
375-229.5
Domingos Escuela Dom. ......9:45 a.m.
Servicio de Adoracion..........11:00 a.m.
Servicio de Predicacion ........5:00 p.m.
Miercoles Servico..................6:30 p.m.

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 South US Hwy 17
Morning Service .... ............10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m..

ST. JOHN A.M.E. CHURCH
513 W. Orange St.
375-2911
Sunday Church School ..........9:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship ....11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

VICTORY PRAISE CENTER
128 E. Main St.
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.mi.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................:.6:00 p.m.
Thursday Night.Services,
Evening Worship.................7:00 p.m.
Kidz Club..........................7:00 p.m.

ONA
IGLESIA PENTECOSTES
VISION POR LAS ALMAS
149 Bedger Loop 448-2831
Servicio Domingos ...............7:30 p.m.
Jueves (Ensefanza Biblica) ..................
............................ ...............7:30 p .m .

LIMESTONE BAPTIST CHURCH
4868 Keystone Ave. Limestone
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ...............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

NEW ZION BAPTIST CHURCH
202 Sidney Roberts Road
Sunday School ..............10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training..................6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ........'..........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................6:00 p.m.

ONA BAPTIST CHURCH'
13.1 Bear Lane 773-2540
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
'Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.

UNION BAPTIST CHURCH
5076 Lily Church Rd. 494-5622
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .............1...1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday
AWANA for Kids ..............6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time.........7:00 p.m.

WAUCHULA

APOSTOLIC ASSEMBLY
Martin Luther King and Apostolic Rd.
Sunday School ....................0:00 a.m.
, English Service ..................11:30 a.m.
General Worship Service ......1:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer .................... 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

CELEBRATION CHURCH
Rainey Blvd.
863-781-1624
hardee.celebration.org
Sunday Morning Service .... 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Youth Service ....5:30 p.m.
Childcare provided at all services

CELEBRATION FELLOWSHIP
773-0427
Celebration Service..............10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Evening Cell Groups
Adult Cell Group ................7:00 p.m.
Youth Cell Group ................. 7:00 p m
Children's Cell Group ..........7:00 pm
Call for locations

CHARLIE CREEK
BAPTIST CHURCH ,
6885 State Road 64 East -*773-3447'.
Sunday School ..................... ;45 a ..
Morning Worship ................ :00 a. ni.
,Evening Worship .........:.........600 p.m.
Wednesday Worship ............... 6:30'p.m
CHURCH OF CHRIST ,.
201 S. Florida Ave.
Sunday Bible Study .............. 9:00 a.r,,
Sunday Worship Service......10:30 a.m .'
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

CHURCH OF CHRIST ,
Will Duke Road :
773-2249'
Sunday Morning Worship ..:.9:30 a.m.
Sunday Bible Class..............11:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening Worship ......6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Bible Class .......7:00 p.m. '
SMen's Leadership & Training Class -
2nd Sunday of Month........4:00 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
Martin Luther King Blvd.
767-0199

CHURCH OF JESI4S CHRIST
OF LATTER-lDAY SAINTS
630 Hanchey Rd. 773-3532
Sacrament Meeting ................9:00 a.m.
"Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
Priesthood ............. ....I.. ...11:00 a.m .

COMMUNITY BAPTIST
CHURCH OF WAUCHULA HILLS
(SPANISH)
615 Rainey Blvd.
257-3950
Sunday Bible Study ............10:00 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship....I1:00 a.m.


Sunday Evening Service.....:..7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service ............... .7:00 p.m.


(863) 735-0470
Zolfo Springs, FL


WAUCHULA
DIOS ES AMOR
807 S. 8th Ave.
773-4576
Domingos Escuela
Dominica ...................1...:10:00 a.m.
Servicio ................................11:00 a.m .
Lunes Oracion .... .............6:00 p.m.
Miercoles Servicio ..............7:00 p.m.

EL REMANENTE
IGLECIA CRISTIANA
318 W. Main St..
Martes Oracion ........... 7:00 p.m.
Jueves Servicio .................... 7:30 p.m.
Viemes Servicio ....................7:30 p.m.
Domingo Servicio..............10:30 a.m.

ENDTIME CROSSROAD
MINISTRY
501 N. 9th & Georgia St. 773-3470
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Service ................11:30 a.m.
Evening Service.................. 7:30 p.m.
Wed. Bible St. & Yth. Gath ..7:30 p.m.
Friday (Holy Ghost Night) ....7:30 p.m.

FAITH PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
114 N. 7th Ave. 773-2105
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ..................11:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ..............6:15 p.m.
Wed. Youth Fellowship..........6:50 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

FAITH TEMPLE CHURCH
OF GOD
701 N. 7th Ave 773-3800
Sunday School .................... 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship ......:..........10:20 a.m.
Children's Chuch ..............10:40 a.m.
Evening Service .................. .6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
1570 W. Main St. 773-4182
SUNDAY:
Bible Study for all ages ........9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.

WEDNESDAY:
Sr. Adult Bible Study ..........10:00 a.m.
Children's Chiors
(PK-Grade 4) ................. 5:30 p.m.
PRAISE 57-Jr High Chior .. 5:30 p.m.
Mid-Week Prayer Meeting .. 6:00 p.m.
Kids On Missions
(PK-Grade 4) ................. 6:00 p.m.
Club 56 ............................. 6:00 p.m .
Youth Group (Grades 7-12) 6:00 p.m.
Family Life Ministry
& Discipleship ............... 6:00 p.m.
Church Orchestra............... 6:00 p.m.
Adult Choir ......................... 7:00 p.m .

FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH
1121 W. Louisiana St. 773-9243
SUNDAY:
Geinei tions Cafe Opens........9:30 a.m.
Kids World Check-In for
Nursery-5th Grade Begins..10:15 a.m.
Pre-K Blast ....... ............. 10:45 a.m .
Kids World B.L.A.S.T. ,
(K-5th) ...... ................10:45 a.m.
Worship Service ................10:45 a.m.
WEDNESDAY:
Check-In begins for
Nursery-5thgrade .................6:15 p.m.
Classes for children ages
PreK-12th grade............6:30-8:00 p.m.
FIRST CHURCH OF
THE NAZARENE
511 W. Palmetto St.
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
Morning Service .................. 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.

FIRST MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
1347 Martin Luther King Ave.
773-6556
Sunday School ..............9:30 a.m.
Morning Service .."...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .........6:00 p.m.
Tues; Youth Ministry Meeting/
Bible Study ..:................:....6:00 p.m .
Wed. Prayer/Bible Study ......7:00 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH '
.207 N. Seventh Ave. 773-4267
Sunday School ...................9:45 a.m.
Traditional Sunday Worship 11:00 a.m.
Casual Sunday Worship.;........6:00 p.m
Tuesday Bible Study............10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Activities ............6:00 p.m.

FLORIDA'S FIRST ASSEMBLY
OF GOD CHURCH
1397 South Florida Avenue
773-9386.
Sunday School ......................9:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ........'......10:00 a.m.
Wed. Family Night ...............7:00 p.m.
Adult, Children & Radiate Youth Church

FLORIDA GOSPEL
511 W. Palmetto
223-5126
Sunday Morning Worship....11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Worship .............7:30 p.m.

THE GOSPEL TABERNACLE
810 W. Tennessee St. 863-735-1158
Morning Service ..............10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
HEARTLAND
COMMUNITY CHURCH
1262 W. Main St. 767-6500
Coffee & Donuts...............9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m.
Worship................................ 10:30 a.m.
Wed. Night Dinner ................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bodybuilders Adult Cl.
Crossroads &


Lighthouse Min................ 7:00 p.m.
HIGHER GROUND
INTERNATIONAL MINISTRY
1258 W. MAIN STREET
WAUCHULA, FL
Sunday Morning Worship....11:00 a.m.
Wed. Night Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

IGLESIA ADVENTISTA DEL
SEPTIMO DIA
Old Bradenton Road
767-1010


WAUCHULA
IGLESIA de DIOS
ALFA Y OMEGA
1909 Stanfield Rd.
Sunday School .................. 10: 00 a.m.
Evening Service .... ............ 6:00 p.m.
Tuesday (Bible Study & Prayer
Night) .............................. 7:30 p.m .
Friday Worship Service ........7:30 p.m.

IGLESIA HISPANA
FUENTE DE VIDA
501 N. 9- Ave.
M ates ......... : .......................7: 30 p.m .
Jueves .................................... 7:30 p.m.
Domingo ............................ 10:30 a.m.

IGLESIA HISPANA
PRESENCIA de Dios
511 W. Palmetto St.
Domingos ............................ 6:00 p.m .
M iercoles............................. 7:00 p.m .

JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
ENGLISH
155 Altman Road 1131
Sunday Service..... ............. 2:00 p.m.

JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
SPANISH
Sunday Service .................. 10:00 a.m.

LIGHT OF THE WORLD
MINISTRIES
Womans Center 131 N. 7th Ave.
Wauchula, FL
Friday Evening .... .........6:00 p.m.

LAKE DALE BAPTIST CHURCH
3102 Heard Bridge Road
773-6622
Sunday School ....................9:45 a.m.
Morning Service ..................1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

MINISTERIO INTERNATIONAL
Cambriadores de Mundo
704 W. Main St. 773-0065
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.
NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH
1999 State Road 64 East
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship Service ....11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship Service ......6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Night Supper ......6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Activities
(All Ages) ....... ............. 7:00 p.m .

NEW LIFE CHURCH
117 W. Palmetto St.
i 773-2929
Sunday Service ..... ............10:00-a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
Children Ministries for all services

NEW MT. ZION A.M.E. CHURCH
10 Martin Luther King Ave.
767-0023
Morn;:Worsihip ,i, ;... '
(1 st-&.3r;Sun.) ..... ...8:00 am.
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
2nd Sunday Youth Service ....4:00 p.m.
Allen Christian Endeavor......4:00 p.m.
Wed. & Fri. Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

NORTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
912 N. 8th Ave. 773-6947
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

OAK GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
4350 W. Main St. 735-0321
Sunday School ........ ........9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ....:...6:30 p.m.

PEACE VALLEY LUTHERAN
CHURCH
1643 Stenstrom Road 773-2858
l" & 3"'Sun.
Communion ....................10:00 a.m.
2T & 41' Sun.
Divine Worship ...............0:00 a.m.
Bible Study ..........................11:15 a.m.
** Fellowship each Sunday after service
PROGRESSIVE MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
149 Manley Road -East Main
773-5814 ,
Sunday School : 9:30i m.
Worship Service' ... I1:00 a m
Wed. Evening Prayer ............7:06 p.m'.
'REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 North US Hwy 17
Morning Service ..................10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.
RIVERVIEW HEIGHTS
MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1321 S.R. 636 East 773-3344
Radio Program
WZZS Sundays...............9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

SOUL HARVEST MINISTRY
1337 Hwy. 17 South, Wauchula
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .............. 11:00.a.nt.
Evening Service ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service.:..............7:00 p.n.

ST. ANN'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
204 N. 9th Ave. 773-6418
Sunday ..................................9:00 a.m .
Holy Days .....................................

ST. MICHAEL
CATHOLIC CHURCH
408 Heard Bridge Road 773-4089
Saturday Mass (English) ......5:00 p.m.


(Spanish) ......7:00 p.m.
Sunday(English) ...:.............8... :30 a.m.
(Spanish) ................ 11:00 a.m.
(Creole)...................1... :00 p.m .
Catecismo ............................ 9:45 a.m.
Daily Mass in English ..........8:30 a.m.

SEVENTH DAY
ADVENTIST CHURCH
205 S. 11th Ave. 773-9927
Sabbath School ........:.......9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Tues. Prayer Meeting ........... :7:00 p.m.


WAUCHULA
SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH _
505 S. 10th Ave. 773-4368
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.

SPIRIT WIND TABERNACLE
1652 Old Bradenton Road
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............7:30 p.m.
TABERNACLE OF
PRAISE & JOY
1507 MLK Avenue
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:30 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Tues. Bible Stdy.
& Child Train .................... 7:00 p.m.
Friday Prayer Service ............7:00 p.m.
WAUCHULA CHURCH OF GOD
1543 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.
773-0199
Sunday School .............. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:15 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Fam. Training ....7:30 p.m.
Thurs. Youth Bible Study ......7:00 p.m.
Friday Night Worship ............7:30 p.m.
WAUCHULA HILLS HARVEST
TEMPLE ASSEMBLY OF GOD
210 Anderson
Sunday School .......;............10:00 a.m.
Church........................ .... 10:09 a.m .
Youth Service .............6:00 p.m.
Evening Service ................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.
WAUCHULA HILLS
SPANISH CHURCH OF GOD
1,000 Stansfield Rd.
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.,
Evening Worship ................7:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer.................... 7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship................. 7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship .................7:30 p.m.
WAUCHULA REVIVAL CENTER
(Full Gospel)
501 N. 9th Ave.
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .............1.. 1:00 a.m.
Youth & Child. Church..........6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ..................7:00 p.m.
Men's Fri. Prayer ..................7:00 p.m.

ZOLFO SPRINGS
COMMUNITY WESLEYAN CHURCH
Gardner
Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................. 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
CREWSVILLE BETHEL
BAPTIST CHURCH
8251 Crewsville Road
Church 735-0871 Pastor 773-6657
Sunday School ....'..................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............6:30 p.m.
EVANGELISTIC HOLINESS
CHURCH INC
Corner of 6th and Hickory
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00.a.m.
Evening Worship .................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday .......................... 7:30 p.m.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
OF ZOLFO
320 E. 4th St. 735-1200
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.,
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Training Union .................... 5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.
FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Corner of 6th & Suwanee 735-1544
Gospel Music ..................... 10:30 a.m.
Worship Service .........1........1:00 a.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ....... 7:00'p.m. -
FOX MEMORIAL
HOLINESS CHURCH
2344 Merle Langford Rd.
Sunday Morning Worship....10:00 a.m.
Sunday Night Worship ..........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.

GARDNER BAPTIST CHURCH
South Hwy. 17 494-5456
Sunday School ......... .....10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ........11:00 a.m.
Wednesday, Prayer .............7:00 p.m.

LIFE CHANGING WORSHIPCENTER
3426 Oak St. -. 863-832-9808
Sunday Worship...................2:30 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.


ZOLFO SPRINGS
- MARANATHA BAPTIST CHURCH
2465 Oxendine Rd.
(863) 832-9292
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Worship........ ..............1... 1:00 a.m.
Evening.... ........................ 1:00 p.m .
Wed. Bible & Prayer Meet....7:00 p.m.
NEW VISION WORSHIP CENTER
64 E. & School House Road
Church 735-8585 Childcare 735-
8586
Morning Worship ................10:00 a.m.
Children's Church................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ...............6:00 p.m.
Wed. Youth & F.T.H .............7:00 p.m.
PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF
GOD FAITH TEMPLE
Oak Street
Sunday Worship ..............:...10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................7:00 p.m.
Tuesday Worship ................7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship................7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ................7:30 p.m.
PRIMERA MISSION
BAUTISTA HISPANA
518 8th Ave. E.
Escuela Dominical ..............10:00 a.m.
Servicio del Domingo..........11:00 a.m.
..............................................7:00 p.m .
Servicio del Miercoles ..........7:30 p.m.
PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH
Pioneer Park
2nd Sunday ......................... 10:30 a.m.
Evening Service ..............6:30 p.m.
5th Sunday .........................6:00 p.m.
REALITY RANCH
COWBOY FELLOWSHIP
I 2-1/2 Miles east of
Zolfo Springs on Hwy. 66
863-781-1578
Sunday Service ....................11:00 a.m.
ST. PAUL'S MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
3676 US. Hwy. 17 South 735-0636
Sunday School . ................. 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship ......... ......I11 a.m.
Wed. Prayer Service ..............7:00 p.m.
SAN ALFONSO MISSION
3027 Schoolhouse Lane
Domingo, Misa en Espanol ..9:30 a.m.
Catecismo ............................ 1:00 a.m.
SPANISH MISSION
735-8025
Escuela Dominica ...........10:00 a.m.
Servicio ....................;...........11:00 a.m .
Pioneer Club .................6:30 p.m.
Servicio d la Noche ...........7:00-p.m.
Mierecoles Merienda .:..........6:00 p.m.
Servicio................................ 8:00 p.m .
Sabado Liga de Jovenes ........5:00 p.m.


SEEDS
FROM
THE
SOWER'
Machad A. Guido



He's a fellow that's going far -
always one step ahead of his
creditors.
One day the doctor said to him,
"I'm sorry to tell you, but you have
a contagious disease scarlet
fever."
"Great," he answered. "Now I
have something to give- my
creditors."
But the Living Bible says, "Pay
all your debts except the debt of
love for others -never finish paying
-that. For if you love them, you will
be obeying all of God's laws,
fulfilling all of His requirements."
"If you love your neighbors you
love yourself you will not want to
harm or cheat him, or kill him or
steal from him. Love does no wrong
to anyone."


"-Peace- Eiver Growers

Wholesale Nursery











On The Agenda

HARDEE COUNTY COMMISSION
The Hardee County Commission will hold its regular
evening session today (Thursday), beginning at 6 p.m. in Room
102, Courthouse Annex I, 412 W. Orange St., Wauchula. The
meeting can be followed on computer by going to www.hard-
eeclerk.com and following the link just above the picture of the
courthouse.
It, and past meetings, can also be seen at that link at any
time. Each contains an information packet for the items dis-
cussed during the meeting. The following is a synopsis of agen-
da topics for this meeting that may be of public interest. Times
are approximate except for advertised public hearings.
-Youth Sports baseball complex, 6:05 p.m.
-Resolution on invocations, 6:20 p.m.
-Resurfacing of Center Hill Road, non-permitted pipe/-dri-
veway, and engineering for road projects, 6:50 p.m.
-Discussion of Florida Statutes, 7:35 p.m.
-Resolution on an Enterprise Zone project, 7:50 p.m.
-Appoint a citizen to the Value Adjustment Board.
This agenda is provided as a public service of The
Herald-Advocate and the Hardee County Commission for
those who may wish to plan to attend.

H nigFs hingForcas


1/17/2013.
Sun Data
Rise: 7:18 AM
Set: 5:56 PM
Day Length -
10 hrs. 38 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 11:03 AM
Set: --:-
Overhead: 5:32 PM
Underfoot: 5:10 AM
Moon Phase
37%
Waxing Crescent
Major Times
5:10 AM-7:10 AM
5:32 PM 7:32 PM
Minor Times
11:03 AM-12:03 PM
Solunar Rating
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -5
1/18/2013
Sun Data
Rise: 7:18 AM
.-Set: 5:57 PM
Day Length
10 hrs. 39 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 11:40 AM
Set: 12:04 AM
Overhead: 6:18 PM
Underfoot: 5:55 AM
Moon Phase
50% ..
First Quarter
Major Times.
5:55 AM 7:55 AM
6:18 PM 8:18 PM
Minor Times
12:04 AM -1:04 AM
11:40 AM-12:40 PM
Solunar Rating
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -5


1/19/2013.
Sun Data
Rise: 7:18 AM
Set: 5:58 PM

Day Length
10 hrs. 40 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 12:17 PM
Set: 12:58 AM
Overhead: 7:03 PM
Underfoot: 6:40 AM
Moon Phase
57%
Waxing Gibbous
Major Times
6:40 AM -8:40 AM
7:03 PM 9:03 PM
Minor Times
12:58 AM -1:58 AM
12:17 PM- 1:17 PM
Solunar Rating
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -5
1/20/2013
Sun Data
Rise: 7:18 AM
Set: 5:59 PM
Day Length.
10 hrs. 41 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 12:57 PM
Set: 1:51 AM
Overhead: 7:50 PM
Underfoot: 7:27 AM
Moon Phase
66%
Waxing Gibbous
Major Times
7:27 AM 9:27 AM
7;50 PM 9:50 PM
Minor Times
1:51 AM-2:51 AM
12:57 PM- 1:57 PM
Solunar Rating
Average.
Time Zone
UTC; -5


1/21/2013
Sun Data
Rise: 7:18 AM
Set: 5:59 PM
Day Length
10 hrs. 41 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 1:40 PM
Set: 2:43 AM
Overhead: 8:37 PM
Underfoot: 8:13 AM
Moon Phase
75% ,
Waxing Gibbous
Major Times
8:13 AM -10:13 AM
8:37 PM 10:37 PM
Minor Times
2:43 AM 3:43 AM
1:40'PM 2:40 PM
Solunar Rating
Average+
Time Zone
UTC: -5
1/22/2013
Sun Data
Rise: 7:17 AM
Set: 6:00 PM
Day Length
10 hrs. 43 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 2:25 PM
Set: 3:34 AM
Overhead: 9:25 PM
Underfoot: 9:01 AM
Moon Phase
82%
Waxing Gibbous
Major Times
9:01 AM -11:01 AM
9:25 PM 11:25 PM
Minor Times
3:34AM 4:34 AM
2:25"PM 3:25 PM
Solunar Rating
"Average
Time Zone
UTC: -5


1/23/2013
Sun Data
Rise: 7:17 AM
Set: 6:01 PM
Day Length
10 hrs. 44 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 3:15 PM
Set: 4:23 AM
Overhead: 10:14 PM
Underfoot: 9:49 AM
Moon Phase
89%
Waxing Gibbous
Major Times
9:49 AM -11:49 AM
10:14 PM-12:14AM
Minor Times
4:23 AM 5:23 AM
3:15 PM 4:15 PM
Solunar Rating
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -5
1/24/2013
Sun Data
Rise: 7:17 AM
Set: 6:02 PM
Day Length
10 hrs.45 mins.-
Moon Data
Rise: 4:05 PM
Set: 5:10 AM
Overhead: 11:02 PM
Underfoot: 10:38 AM
Moon Phase
94%
Waxing Gibbous
Major Times
10:38 AM-12:38 PM
11:02 PM 1:02 AM
Minor Times
5:10 AM-6:10 AM
4:05 PM 5:05 PM
Solunar Rating
Better I
Time Zone
UTC: -5


This is a female German Shepherd mix.
She is an adult. She is black and tan with a medium
smooth coat and long tail.


Adoption fees' are $45 and include a rabies vaccination and spaying or
neutering of the animal. Contact 773-2320 if you are interested in adopt-
ing any cats or dogs that desperately need a loving home. The kennel
location is 685 Airport Road, Wauchula, at the county landfill.





Arbor Day Foundation Offers

5 Free Crapemyrtle Trees


Residents of Florida can ring
in the New Year with 5 free
crapemyrtle trees by joining the
Arbor Day Foundation any time
during January 2013.
"These small flowering trees
will provide any landscape in
Florida with a splash of color
for much of the year," said John
Rosenow, founder and chief
executive of the Arbor Day
Foundation. "Members will
experience pink and red flowers
in the spring, green flowers in
the summer and a mix of red,
orange and yellow during
autumn."
The free trees are part of the
nonprofit Foundation's Trees
for America campaign.
The trees -will' be shipped

It's believed that there is
the same amount of water
on Earth as there was
when the Earth was
formed. Some say- the
water that came from your
faucet could containtrmote-
cules that Neahtdertials
drank.


_-- ----- ___________ ---------' ----



Toenail Fungus?

Laser Solution!

Sebring Podiatry Center

Request a complementary consultation!

Call 863-314-8600


Laser Nail Fungus Treatment kills the fungus that
lived in and under the toenail. The laser light passes ~
through the toenail without causing damage to the nail
or surrounding skin. There is a warming sensation and
some patients may feel a pinprick. Just walk in and
walk out. The laser nail fungus procedure only takes
15-20 minutes. Shoes and nail polish can be worn
immediately after the treatment.




-, -i e trasg wil l







NOTICE


CITY OF WAUCHULA CUSTOMERS


Effective Monday, February 4, 2013, the City of

Wauchula will pick up ALL City residential

customers household garbage on Mondays and

Thursday. This notice applies ONLY to

customers whose garbage is currently being

picked up on Tuesday and Friday. Please note

yard trash will con-

tinue to be picked up

on Wednesday for all W

residential customers

who receive garbage

services.1:10-2:7c
1:10-2:7c


postpaid at the right time for
planting, between Feb. 1 and
April 30, with enclosed plant-
ing instructions. The 6- to 12-
inch tall trees are guaranteed to
grow, or they will be replaced
free of charge.
.Members will also receive a
subscription to the Foundation's
colorful bimonthly publication,
Arbor Day, and The Tree Book,
which includes information
about tree planting and care.
To receive the free trees, send
a $10 membership contribution
to 5 CRAPEMYRTLES, Arbor'
Day Foundation, 100 Arbor
Avenue, Nebraska City, NE
68410, by Jan. 31, 2013..
Florida residents can also join
online at arborday.org/january.


Apples and blueberries are
90 percent pollinated by
honeybees.


4
~.* r~ ~
a'


Pet Of The Week


,. ., ,..,t,.',!*,.,*-. ^ SOT --- ..-....



Your New Year



Off Right!


\\e hear stories ofl .OUin ter] lpleI I .Ihlvn L' the 1 ,nli
dvinsitv of folks in llti u'eitie s ;ii id ,.t il' iit t.ir usi'
of a number of f;icton. ini iCIli ii lI g IA i1h1 K iLl
activity. Although I'm only 41-. sith mv dek job

aindl hectic scheduIl, t-li vwa.s :i concern M ut mint so,
1 chose to lxx)k ;ui appointneit tiI rtlghny doctor
with Manlatee Diagno.tic Center in Arculdu The
experience I had at Mana;itee f)i;iagntic Centcer in
Arcadia was wonderful. So convenient, :anid I was
literally done in 5 minutes. The staf are upbeat
and efficient and a copy was sem to my physician.
Thanks to the team at Manatee Diagnostic Center for
their wamr and friendly treatment and making my
experience one 1 would recommend to everyone to
help miniltain good health, "-CASEY WILi.IAMS


BONE DENSITYTE "
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863-491-9970
833 North Robert Ave.
Arcadia, FL


January 17, 2013, The Herald-Advocate 3C





Week Ending: January 13, 2013
Weather Summary: The National Climatic Data Center
reported that 2012 was officially the warmest year on record in the
contiguous U.S. since the previous record set in 1998. Palm Beach
International Airport recorded another record-high minimum tem-
perature on Saturday of 73 degrees; the old mark of 72 degrees was
set in 1993. The maximum average temperatures ranged from 73
degrees in Carrabelle to 87 degrees in Dover. Minimum average
temperatures ranged from 35 'degrees in Jay to 66 degrees in Fort
Lauderdale. The U.S. Drought Monitor reported, that Florida was
46 percent abnormally dry compared to 43 percent last week and
91 percent the previous year. Jay had the most rainfall with an aver-
age of 0.31 of an inch and the rest of the State had almost no rain-
fall.

Field Crops: Seasonal activity continued in preparation for
spring planting: Oats were being planted for grazing and seed in
Columbia County. Growers were planting potatoes in Flagler
County.

Fruits & Vegetables: Soil preparation was underway for
watermelons and corn in Suwannee County. In Gilchrist County,
growers prepared land for watermelon planting. Avocado and veg-
etable growers were busy harvesting their crop in Miami-Dade
County. Strawberries were doing well, but budding early due to
warm weather. Vegetable growers were planting spring watermel-
ons and continued to harvest tomatoes, peppers, eggplants, squash,
cucumbers, and a variety of specialty items.

Livestock and Pastures: Statewide, the pasture condition
ranged from very poor to excellent, with most in fair condition.
Drought limited forage growth. Cattlemen were feeding hay. The
condition of the cattle ranged from very poor to excellent, with
most in either fair or good condition. In the Panhandle, the pasture
condition ranged from very poor to. excellent, with most in poor to
good condition. Cattlemen were feeding hay. The winter grazing
crops were looking good due to the warm temperatures, but rain
was needed. Most cattle were mostly in fair to good condition. In
the northern area, the pasture condition was very poor to godd. The
cattle were in fair to good condition. In the central area, the pasture
condition was mostly poor to fair. Oats were being planted for
grazing and seed. Cool season forages were growing well. Most
cattle were in fair condition In the southwest area, the pasture con-
dition varied from very poor to good, with most in fair condition.
The cool season pastures were not progressing because of the
unusually warm temperatures and lack of rainfall. The condition of
the cattle was very poor to good with most in fair to good condi-
tion.

Citrus: Seasonal, daily high temperatures ranged from the
low, 70s to the low 80s. Lows reached the mid-30s in places.
Rainfall was very light and occurred in the first portion of.the
week. Seventeen of the 24 FAWN stations in the citrus area record-
ed some precipitation. Avalon recorded the most, with 0.25 of an
inch. Drought measurements per the U.S.-Drought Monitor, last
updated January 8, 2013 indicate that the drought increased in the
southern area of the citrus region, with the area west of Lake
Okeechobee becoming abnormally dry. Growers irrigated one to
two times a week to keep moisture in the ground and on the trees.
Harvest of early and midseason varieties continued at a heavy pace.
Other grove activity included general.grove maintenance and fer-
tilizer applications. Forty-one packinghouses and 18 processors
were open and shipping. Shipment of fresh fruit was moderate.
Varieties being packed primarily included early oranges, colored
grapefruit, and. tangerines.


,f
do







4C The Herald-Advocate, January 17, 2013


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January 17, 2013, The Herald-Advocate 5C


LIONS CLUB DONATES LUNCHES

I --t- A"


Bob Miller, a member of Wauchula Lions Club, gives a
meal to World War II Marine veteran Dexter Barkley, who
will be 92 in February, and his ladyfriend Mary Grace.
Barkley lives on Heard Bridge Road on four acres north-
east of Wauchula. He was part of the invasion of low Jima
in the Pacific Theatre with the 4th Division. Barkley stuck
his head out of a foxhole and a bullet from a Japanese sol-
dier struck his arm and shoulder which became infected,
and he was later sent to an Army hospital in Hawaii. A
nurse said Barkley looked like her little brother and gave
him special attention with extra ice cream and cake.
Barkley was in mobile home sales in Wauchula and
founded Orange Blossom RV Park. He and Mary have
seen deer, turkeys, bobcats, a bear and a panther in his
back yard.


Beverly Miller gives a meal to Alice Waechter, 88, who
lives at SKP Resort east of Zolfo Springs. She is a retired
elementary school teacher from Fort Lauderdale. Her hus-
band Gene, a furniture salesman, passed away in 2002.
They retired in 1986 and were full-time RVers for years and
visited most states in the U.S.


PHOTOS BY JIM KELLY
Bob Miller, 80, hands a meal to Barry Graese, 61, a retired telephone company employee living in Zolfo Springs. In
middle is Barry's mother Charlotte Graese, 81, who is caregiver to her son. She is a retired cook for Zolfo Springs
Day Care. Miller and his wife Beverly have lived at SKP Resort, which has 125 homesites, for 12 years. Miller spent
two years in the Army in the Aviation Section and was in Civilian Air Traffic Control for 31 years. He worked in the
CATC center in Aurora, Ill, which covered airports in a 200,000 square mile area-


Cuckoo clocks, containing carved wooden birds, which
emerge and "sing" to tell the time, were made in the
Black Forest of Germany as early as 1730 and are still
popular.


PUBLIC NOTICE
The Office of Hardee County Emergency Management has
scheduled a Local Mitigation Strategy (LMS) meeting on
January 23, 2013, at 9:30 a.m., located at the Emergency
Operations Center, 404 West Orange Street, Wauchula, FL
$3873.
The purpose of a local mitigation strategy is to reduce the
human, environmental, and economic costs of disasters.
Mitigation is any action taken to permanently reduce or
eliminate long-term risks to people and their property from
the effects of disasters.
The goal of the LMS meeting will be to identify specific
steps to be taken to reduce the impacts of various natural
hazards, the timing of those steps, potential funding
sources, their priority within the community, and the entities
responsible for implementing each of them.
Please come participate in this informative and important
public meeting.
For more information, please call the Emergency Manage-
ment Office at 863/773-6373.
1:17c


Large Washers & Dryers
Up To 125 Ibs. Washers

SPECIAL [ESPECIAL

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S17 South Across from Nicholas Restaurant


Stop in and see why we will not be R
undersold! Selling 14 brands of
different new vehicles -.
is just the beginning.

1031 U.S. Highway 17 N.
Wauchula, Florida 33873 _
(863) 781-1947 Gene Davis.
www. RLRNMJRY.COM S me: Mar na,r
1 1 7 ,". ____________


Beverly Miller gives a meal to Vern Hixson, 95, who has
lived at SKP Resort since 1986. He served in the U.S. Army
Post Office in World War II, following Gen. George Patton
across Europe and was in the battle of the Bulge. He was
in the 8th Armored Division and later was a rural mail car-
rier for 30 years in Whatcheer, Iowa. His wife Wanda
passed away in 2007. His hobbies were boating and
water-skiing on the Mississippi River. Hixson and his wife
attended 31 of the 50 Army Division re-unions across the
nation. He does not know why he has lived to 95, saying
his brother died at 70 and his dad at 72. He and his son
Ken attended numerous University of Iowa football
games. Hixson was pulling for Alabama to win Jan. 7 over
Notre Dame who has defeated Iowa twice recently in
close games.


Legal Holiday Notice

We will be closed
Monday, January 21
in observance of



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Pleasf transact your business
with us with that in mind.





First National Bank of

WAUCHULA
Goveringyurbanking.needs.
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6C The Herald-Advocate, January 17. 2013







Volunteering : From High School to Whole Community
by Meagan Shivers


The altruistic act of volunteering
has been a main concern of multiple
groups of people for generations. In
Hardee County, high school students
are giving back more than ever before.
Clubs and associations such as
AFJROTC, Key Club, Lionettes,
and National Honor Society make
it possible for students of all ages
to open doors for opportunities
to volunteer in the community.
Whether they are freshmen or se-
niors, students are having joyous time
helping others out. The members of
Key Club, Lionettes, and AFJROTC
all came together on December 6th to
wrap Christmas gifts for the students
of Wauchula Elementary School.
Savannah "Beanie" Vasquez, a
junior at HHS and an AFJROTC
cadet who attended this event,
had a wonderful time at Wauchula
Elementary School. "We wrapped
presents for the students and made
the teachers cards," said Beanie.,
"Knowing it was for the children
made the experience even better."
As well as giving back, stu-
dents also receive some great
experiences from the volunteer work
they have done within their high
school years. Mercedes Cisneros,
a senior at Hardee Senior High, has


accumulated 228 volunteer hours.
"I help organize, set up, feed people,
help with games, prepare food,
supplies, give away stuff," Cisneros
said when asked about the activities she
volunteers for. Cisneros has learned
responsibility and the joy of helping
others through her volunteer work.
Senior Daniel Boehm has enjoyed
volunteering through the National
Honor Society and Key Club. Even
though his tasks included raking,
laying mulch, and clearing paths,
Boehm stated volunteering at the
Great Ape Sanctuary was his favorite.
Boehm says, "It was a great
experience. It was cool knowing that I
was next to animals that once belonged
to famous people and NASA and
things like that. Plus, it was cool being
close to animals that lived on the other
side of the world from us, animals
that had been house pets or worked
in show business all their lives."
With all the volunteering they are
doing, it is no doubt that HHS students
will have multiple opportunities
for scholarships and other such
rewards for their generosity.
High school students are getting
involved with the community and
taking the initiative to help others.


Alpha Zeta Pi is one of many clubs at HHS that provide student volun-
teers for community service projects. Here, 10th grade Alpha Zeta Pi mem-
ber Meagan Shivers files rough edges on new walking shoots at the Cen-
ter for Great Apes. The center has over a mile of walking shoots that allow
the chimpanzees and orangutans the freedom to move about the property.


SINPICETURESIL_


The Hardee High School Class of 1962 recently made a generous
$1,800 donation to HSHS that provided for the purchase of water cool-
ers for the school gymnasium and 10 entrance mats to be placed
in common areas throughout the school facility. Pictured here with
one of the mats are Class of '62 graduates, Judy Albritton (left) and
James Deal (right) along' with school principal, Michele Polk (center).


Air Force Junior ROTC cadets Major Alex Pierstorff and Captain Michael
Ramirez present the Unit Mission Briefing to Hardee Senior High School prin-
cipal,- Dr. Michele Polk. The briefing, encompassing the status of unit goals
and activities over the course of the past 12 months, is a required part of the
unit's annual evaluation.


HSHS Students who meet strict academic, attendance and disci-
pline standards may apply for a limited number of semester exam ex-
emptions. Pictured here (L to R), Adna Metayer, Kenia Villalva, and
Mayra Ramirez proudly display the exam exemption approvals they
received for the 1st semester's exams that wrapped up this week.


CF


w.~ -- --- '- -)


Calendar of Upcoming .

Events

7 Boys Basketball @ Ft. Meade
7 Girls Basketball v. Ft. Meade
8 Boys Basketball @ Lake Wales
8 Girls Basketball v. Frostproof
1I Martin Luther King Jr Holiday (No School)
2 Boys Basketball @. Auburndale
2 Girls Basketball @ Walker Academy
4 Girls Basketball @ Lake Placid
4 Science Fair


1/1

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January 17, 2013, The Herald-Advocate 7C


COUNTY COURT
.The following marriage
licenses were issued recently
in the office of the county
court:
Ralph Williams, 27, of Wau-
chula, and Janice Asiason
Ellis6n, 23, of Wauchula.
George Alamia, 27, of
Bowling Green, and Lorenza
Salazar, 28, of Bowling Green.
Gonzalo Hernandez Oliva,
23, of Zolfo Springs, and Sofia
Alarcon, 41, of Wauchu'la.
Arturo Honario Diaz Mejia,
25, Arcadia, and Guadalupe
Odilia Domingo Ajpop, 25,
Arcadia.

The following small claim
cases were disposed of recer'
ly in county court:
Valencia Garden Apartments
vs. Jarrod Oliver and Christina
Perez, voluntary dismissal.
Bison Properties LLC vs.
Latoya Jones, dismissed for
lack of progress.
Hardee Manor Health Care
Center vs. Mildren M. Bush and
James F. Hensley, dismissed of
lack of progress.
Joe Vance vs. Stacey Mlen-
doza, dismissed for lack of
progress.
Valencia Garden Apartments
vs. Sabrina Irvin, dismissed for
lack of progress.

The following misde-
meanor cases were disposed
'of recently in county court:
Heather Elizabeth Sconyer's,
obtaining property by worthless
check, not prosecuted.
Randy Lee Fugate, misuse of
wireless 911 system, probation
one 'year, $325 fine and court


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
- File No. 252012CP000104


IN RE: ESTATE OF
ALICE JEAN CATHCART POLK
a/k/a JEAN C. POLK
a/k/a JEAN POLK

Deceased.


NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(summary administration)
TO"" ALL PERSONS ..VING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST
THE ABOVE ESTATE:

You are hereby notified that an
Order of Summary Administration
has been entered in the estate of
Alice Jean Cathcart Polk, a/k/a
Jean C. Polk a/k/a Jean Polk
deceased, File Number 252012-
CP000,104, by the Circuit Court
for Hardee County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of
which is Post Office Box 1749,
Wauchula, FL 33873; that the
decedent's date of death was
October 29, 2012; that the total
value of the estate is exempt
property and that the names and
addresses of those to whom It
has been assigned by such order
are:

Name and Address
John E. Polk
3090 Lakevlew Drive
Sebring, FL 33870

Timothy A. Polk
718 Oak Forrest Drive
Wauchula, FL 33873

Jeanie Polk Walker
111 Tanglewood Drive
Carrier, MS 34926

ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE
NOTIFIED THAT:

All creditors of the estate of the
decedent. and.. persons. having
claims or demands against the
estate of the decedent other than
those for whom provision for full
payment was made in the Order
of Summary Administration must
file their claims with this court
WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREV-
ER BARRED. NOTWITHSTAND-
ING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE
TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE.
OF DEATH IS BARRED.

The date of first. publication of
this Notice is January 10, 2013.

Persons Giving Notice:
John E. Polk
3090 ikakeview Drive
Sebring, FL 33870

Timothy A. Polk
718 Oak Forrest Drive
Wauchula, FL 33873

Jeanie Pglk Walker
111 Tanglewood Drive
Carrier, MS 34926

BREED & NUNNALLEE, P.A.
Attorneys for Persons Giving
Notice
325 North Commerce Avenue
Sebring, FL 33870-3206
Telephone (863) 382-3154
By: E. MARK BREED III
Florida Bar No. 338702
Email Address:
service@bnpalaw.com
t 1:10,17c


costs, $50 public defender fees,
$50 cost of prosecution, $50
investigative costs, 25 hours
community service.
Choulykor Vue, possession
of marijuana and possession of
.drug paraphernalia, adjudica-
tion withheld on first charge,
probation one year, fines and
court costs in related traffic
case, $50 public defender fee,
$50 cost of prosecution.

CIRCUIT COURT
The following civil actions
were filed recently in the
office of the circuit court:
Paula M. Luna vs. Miguel G.
Rodriguez and Florida Beef
Inc., damages auto negli-
gence.
Wells Fargo Bank vs.
Josephine Garza, petition to
foreclose mortgage.
Jewel E. Andrews and
Pamela Andrews, divorce. '
Mindy L. Hernandez vs.
William Buell and Swift Trans-
portation Co., damages auto
negligence.
HSBC Bank USA vs.
Donnell T. Patton, petition to'
foreclose mortgage. ,
Henry Kuhlman vs. Hardee
County Industrial Development
Authority, petition for order to
review records.
MidFirst Bank vs. Richard S.
Shepard, petition to foreclose
mortgage.
Charlie Joe Ray III vs. Kevin
Dwaine Ray, petition for in-
junction for protection.
Raisa R'. Miller and the state
Department of Revenue DOR)
vs. Joshua' Barrington Hilton,
petition for child support.
Lydia Borjas and DOR vs.-'
Josephine Torres, petition for
child support.
Bradley Scott Patterson and
Melinda Ray Patterson, di-
vorce.
Candice Danielle Dubose


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND
FOR HARDEE COUNTY
CIRCUIT CIVIL
CASE NO. 25-2010-CA-000164

WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.,
SUCCESSOR BY MERGER WITH
WACHOVIA BANK, N.A.,
Plaintiff,
v.

UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MARY-
LOU H. HENNIS, DECEASED; et
al.
Defendants.

NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to a Summary Final
Judgement of Foreclosure dated
November 12, 2012, and entered
in Case No. 25-2010-CA-000164,
of the Circuit Court for Hardee
County, Florida, I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash
at the Hardee County Court-
house, 417 West Main Street, 2nd
Floor Hallway outside of Room
202, Wauchula, FL 33873, at 11:00
a.m. and on the 30 day of
SJanuary, 2013, the following
described property as set forth in
said Summary Final Judgment:

The NW 1/4 of SE 1/4 of
SW 1/4 of Section 21,
Township 34 South, Range
26 East, according to .the
plat thereof as recorded in
Plat Book 687, Page 1480,
of the Public Records of
Hardee County, Florida.

TOGETHER WITH all the
improvements, now or
hereafter erected on the
property, and all ease-
ments, rights, appurte-
nances, rents, royalties,
mineral, oil and gas rights
and profits, water rights
and stock and all fixtures
now or hereafter attached
to the property.

Property address: 2416
Oxendine Road, Zolfo
Springs, FL 33890.

ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN
INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS
FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN SIXTY (60) DAYS AFTER
THE SALE.

WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court on Jan. 3, 2013.

In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act, persons with
disabilities needing a special
accommodation to participate in
this proceeding should contact
the individual or agency sending
this notice no later than seven (7)
days prior to the proceeding. If
hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-
955-8771, or Voice (V) 1-800-955-
8770, via Florida Relay Service.
VICTORIA L. ROGERS
Clerk of the Circuit and County
Court
By: Connie Coker
Deputy Clerk
1:10.,17c


I ortosfRpr
S M i. l~- S.


and DOR vs. Jose Andres
Esquivel Jr., petition for child
support.
Krystal Renee Rodriguez'
and DOR vs. Shermaine
Reshay Baker, petition for child
support.
Asset Acceptance LLC vs.
James K. Evans, damages -
contracts and indebtedness.
Darius Saldivar vs. Brooklyn
Porter, petition for injunction
for protection.
Polly Keen o/b/o minor child
vs. Stephen Hutchison, petition
for injunction for protection.
Michelle B. Westerook and
DOR vs. Steve Cole Albritton,
petition for child support.

The following decisions on
civil cases pending in the cir-
cuit court were handed down
recently by the circuit court
judge:
Harold C. Howze and
Connie J. Howze, voluntary
dismissal.
Mayra Alejandra Castillo
and DOR vs. Jose Luis
Navarro, child support order.
Sara Yaya Ybarra Valdez and
DOR vs. Frankie Reyna Jr.,
child support and arrears sus-
pended.
DOR vs. Raymond 'Mark
Medrano, order.
Victoria Lynn Outten vs. Joe
Edward Carroll, dismissal of
temporary injunction for pro-
tection.
Esmeralda Cruz Calderon vs.
David Cruz Jr., injunction for
protection.
Mark Harvey vs. The Man-
cini Packing Co., voluntary dis-
missal.
Ashley Tineal Brown and
DOR vs. Ernest Mitclhell
Graham Jr., modification, of.
child support.
Juan D. Gonzalez and
Priscilla Torres, divorce.
Amanda Juarez and DOR Vs.


Mark Hernandez, order.
Angelita Valdez and DOR
vs. Enrique M. Carranza, child
support order.
Michelle Pintello and DOR
vs. Victor Scott Williams, child
support order.
Maricpla Hernandez and
DOR vs. Antonio Cabrera, child
support order.
Cherie A. Rivers and DOR
vs. Willie D. Roe, order on
child support contempt.
Tanya Sue Webb Sexton and
DOR vs. Heath William
Reschke. order on child support
contempt.
Nakkia White and DOR vs.
Willie Kilpatrick, order on child
support contempt.
Crecencio Cardoza and DOR
vs. Sandra Botello Cardoza,
order on child support con-
tempt.
Wells Fargo Bank vs. Estate
of Mary Lou H. Hennes, judg-
ment of mortgage foreclosure.
William H.. Morace and
Yvonne Jones Morace, divorce.
Katherine S. Esquivel Valdez
and DOR vs. Joe Valdez, child
support order.
Astaccia Hardesty and DOR
vs. Alexander Jacakson Jr.,
child support order.
Cierra Letice Melton and
DOR vs. Arrell Bridges III,
child support order.
MidFlorida Credit Union vs.
David Moralez, default judg-
ment.
MidFlorida Credit Union vs.
Darrell Lynn Henderson and
Billie Nicole Henderson,
default judgment.
Blake Medical Center vs.
Judy E. Nobles, Voluntary dis-
missal.
Mary Lee Cook and DOR vs.
Eddie J. Cofield, order on child
support contempt.
Janet Dickey and DOR vs.
Kathy Joe Dickey Liles, order
on child support contempt.'


Maria Natividad Dominguez
and DOR vs. Jevon Lee Burks,
voluntary dismissal.
Shauntee Deann Hines and
DOR vs. Javohn Dewayne
Camel, order on child support
contempt.
Lynne Juanita Johnson and
DOR vs. Jason B. Arledge,
order on child support con-
tempt.
Samantha Valdez and DOR
vs. Johnny Rodriguez Jr., order.
Amanda Kae Sunday and
DOR vs. Homer Curtis Kirk,
order on child support con-
tempt.
Samantha Michelle Ivery
and DOR vs. Anthony C.
Singleton, order on child sup-
port contempt.

The following inactive civil
cases were dismissed for lack
of prosecution.
Pickett & Associates Inc. vs.
Peaceful Horse LLC et al.
Palisades Collection vs. Jay
Wells.
Nancy H. Mizrahi as trustee
vs. Barry R. Edgley et al.
Miranda Gisel vs. Melinda
Reyna Silva.
Anibel Soto vs. Melinda
Reyna Silva et al.
Shirley Mahoney vs. Ken-
tucky Fried Chicken et al. *
Debra Brandon Collie vs.
Troy Brant et al.
Countrywide Home Loans
Inc. vs. Jesus P. Rojas et al.
Chase Home Finance vs.
Marie Martin et al.
Armando Gonzalez as. Pegar
Bulder Inc. et al.
James Kelly Cloud vs.
Chrysler LLC.
Chase Bank USA vs. David
Albritton Jr. a
Bank of America vs. Tracy
R. Kersey et al.
Deutsch Bank National Trust
Co., as trustee vs. Juanita
Wright.
Citimortgage Inc. vs. Ralene
R. Graham.
BAC Home Loans Servicing
LP vs. William C. Bergens et al.
Steve Reas and Coosaw Ag
LLC vs. Florida Fertilizer Co.
Inc.
Alejandro Alvarando Sr. vs.
Crystal Lopez.
Gail 'Starratt vs. Ronald
Moye and Moye Farms Inc.
George Neel and Judith Neel
vs. Wal-Mart Stores Inc.
Banco Popular North
America vs. Well Protective
Coatings LLC.
ABC Turf Inc. %s. Sun State
Landscaping of Bradenton Inc.
Richard W. Gonzales Jr afid
Berta Ann Gonzales.
Celia Ortiz and DOR vs.
Nathan Morgan.
Jennifer Knox Wilson and
DOR vs. Christopher' J.
Albritton.
Asset Acquisition Group
LLC vs. Jenny Cabrera and
'Vincente Cabrera.


Suntrust Bank vs. Deborah
Naranjo and Israel Naranjo.
Regions Bank vs. Isidro
Medrano.
Patricia M. Wright vs. Gov-
ernment Employees Insurance'
Co.

'There was no felony crimi-
nal court because of the New
Year's Day holiday.

The following real estate
transactions of $10,000 or
more were filed recently in
the office of the clerk of court:
CMS Corp. of Winter Haven
Inc. to Tammy Epperson,
$23,000.
FTFG Investments Inc. to
Muros Ranch., $45,000.
CBC Affilliates LLC to
Alejandro .and Rosa A.
Alvarado, $42,000.
ATP Groves LLC to
Southern Sisters Family
Limited Partnership, $5.5 mil-
lion.
Marie H. Boley to Maria
Diaz and Rigoberto Diaz,
$43,700.
Billy and Janice Hill to
Alejandro Arroyo, $83,000.
Deborah K. Douglas to
Secretary, Health and Urban
Development, $41,200.
Linda Faye Yeomans to Ben
Hill Griffin Inc., $285,000.
E. L. Davis Jr. to Bio-
Nitrogen Plant FL I LLC,
$1,010,000.
E. L. Davis Jr. to Bio-
Nitrogen Plant 1 LLC,
$8,648,000.
Lorita Viola Thacker to pen
Hill, Griffin Inc., $294,100.
Arthur Long and Teresa Ann
Young to Rodger Everett
Brissel, $69,900.
Ridge Resources Inc. to
Ridge Ranch LLC, $767,500.
Hasenhof Enterprises to Dale
C. Chlumsky Jr. and Nicholas
D. Chlumsky, $35,000.
The Latt Maxcy Corp. to 734
LMC Groves LLC, $3,690,000.
Pat Wilson Inc. to 734 LMC
Groves LLC, $341,736.
Great Harvest Corp to 734
LMC Groves LLC, 2231,393.
Mitzi Joy Powell to John and.
Candice W. Bozeman, $35,000.


HARDEE COUNTY
KIDS NEED
HARDEE COUNTY
HELP!
Ease a dependent child's
way through the court sys-
tem. Volunteer to be a
Guardian Ad Litem.
773-2505
(If office unattended, please leave
message.)


PUBLIC NOTICE

The BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
will hold a

PUBLIC HEARING on
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 07, 2013
9:00 A.M.
or as soon thereafter
in the County Commissioners' Board Room
Room 102, 1 floor Courthouse Annex
412 West Orange St., Wauchula, FL

to adopt ORDINANCE NO. 2013-01
An Ordinance Amending the Hardee County
Comprehensive Plan Future Land Use Map to
change the Mining Overlay Map-Map 2 by 640
acres more or less to include land beyond the
current Mining Overlay Map boundary that is
owned by mining interest; providing for
severability; for repeal of conflicting ordinances;
and for an effective date
1934230000037500000
273+/-ac-SW114 & 51/2 of NW1/4 of S19, T34S, R23E
and
3034230000025000000
362+/-ac-.W112 of S30 T34S, R23E
and
283423020000001 0004
5.0+/- ac-Lot 04, BIk 01, New Zion Scrub, according to plat as
recorded In Plat Bk B-48, Pg. 1, public records of Hardee County, FL
S28, T34S, R23E

On or abt N of SR64 adjacent to Hardee-Manatee
County line and N of SR64 apprx. 2.5 mi E of Hardee-
Manatee County line




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S J Uj






/


to adopt ORDINANCE NO. 2013-02
An Ordinance of Hardee County, Florida amending
the Hardee County Comprehensive Plan, as
amended; amending Policy L8.1 of the Future
Land Use Element; providing for title; providing
for severability and providing for an effective date

Sue Birge, Chairman

This is a Disabled-Accessible facility. Any disabled person needing
to make special arrangements should contact the County Manager's
Office at least two (2) working days prior to the Public Hearing.

This Public Notice is published in accordance with the Hardee
County Unified Land Development Code.

Prior to the Public Hearing, documents relating to the proposals
are available for public inspection during weekdays between the
hours of 8:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. at the Planning and Development
Department, 110 S. 9th Ave., Wauchula, Florida. If you wish to
discuss the proposals, please call 863 767 1964 to schedule an
appointment with Hardee County Planning and Development
Director prior to the public hearing,

All interested persons shall have the right to be heard.

In rendering its recommendation to the Board of County Commis-
sioners, the Planning/Zoning Board shall rely solely on testimony
that is relevant and material.

Although minutes of the Public Hearipg will be recorded, anyone
wishing to appeal any decision made at the public hearing will need
to ensure a verbatim record of the proceedings is made by a court
reporter. 01:10,17c


Phone and Internet Discounts Available to
CenturyLink Customers

The Florida Public Service Commission designated
CenturyLink as an Eligible Telecommunications Carrier
within its service area for universal service purposes.
CenturyLink's basic local service rates for residential
voice lines are $19.50 per month and business services
are $28.00-$32.50 per month. Specific rates will be
provided upon request.

CenturyLink participates in a government benefit
program (Lifeline) to make residential telephone service
more affordable to eligible low-income individuals and
families. Eligible customers are those that meet
eligibility standards as defined by the FCC and state
commissions. Residents who live on federally recognized
Tribal Lands may qualify for additional Tribal benefits if
they participate in certain additional federal eligibility
programs. The Lifelifie discount is available for only one
telephone per household, which can be either a wireline
or wireless telephone. A household is defined for the
purposes of the Lifeline program as any individual or
group of individuals who live together at the same
address and share income and expenses. Lifeline service
is not transferable, and only eligible consumers may
enroll in the program. Consumers who willfully make
false statements in order to obtain Lifeline telephone
service can be punished by fine or imprisonment and can
be barred from the program.

Lifeline eligible subscribers may also qualify for reliable
home high-speed Internet service up to 1.5Mbps for $9.95I
per month for the first 12 months of service. Further details
are available at centurylink.com/intemetbasics.

If you live in a CenturyLink service area, please call
1-800-201-4099 or visit centurylink.com/lifeline with
questions or to request an. application for the Lifeline
program.

*CenturyLink Internet Basics Program Residential customers only who qualify based on meeting income
level or program participation eligibility requirements. and requires remaining eligible for the entire offer period.
First bill will include charges for the .irst full month of service billed in advance. prorated charges for service
from the darte of installation to bill date, and one-time charges and fees described above. Qualifying customer
ma) keep this program for a maximum of 60 months after servicee activation provided customer still qualifies
during that tinm. Listed High-Speed Internet rate of S'9.95mo. applies for first 12 months of service (after which
the rate reverts to $14.95-mo. for the next 48 months of service), and requires a 12-monhb term agreement.
Customer must either lease a moden'roiuter from CentluryLink for an addilional monhly charge or independently
purchase a modcmsrouter. and a one-time High-Speed Internet activation fee applies. A one-ltime professional
installation charge (if selected by cusiomeri and a one-time shipping and handling fee applies to customer's
modemirouter. General Services not available everywhere. CenturyLnk may change or cancel services or
substitute similar services at its sole discretion without noice. Offer, plans, and sated rates arce subject to change
and may vary by service area. Deposit may be required. Additional restrictions apply. TenLs and Conndtiomn -
All products and services listed are governed by tariffs, terms of service. or terms and conditions posted at
centurylink.com. Taxus. Fees, and Surcharges Applicable taxes, fees, and surcharges include a carrier
Universal Service charge, carrier cost recovery surcharges. state and local fees that vary by area and certain in-
state surcharges. Cost recovery fees are not tuaes or govemrnment-required charges for use. Taxes, fees, and
surcharges apply based on standard monthly, not promotionaL races.




CenturyLink-

1:17c


/








8C The Herald-Advocate, January 17, 2013


Understanding Neuroendocrine Tumors:

Key Things You Should Know About NETs


Worldwide NET Cancer
Awareness Day (WNCAD) was
established in 2010 by patient
advocacy groups from around
the world to increase under-
standing of neuroendocrine
tumors (NETs), an uncommon
and frequently misdiagnosed
type of cancer, to honor those
affected by the disease and to
recognize advancements made
in the. management of NETs.
To help raise awareness and
increase understanding of this
cancer, Grace Goldstein, patient
advocate and Chief Operating
Officer of the Carcinoid Cancer
Foundation, and Al Benson,
MD, a Professor of Medicine in
the Division of Hematology/-
Oncology at the ,Feinberg
School of Medicine and As-
sociate Director for Clinical
Investigations at the Robert H.
Lurie Comprehensive Cancer


The Southwest Florida Water
Management District (SWFWMD)
announces the following public
meeting to which all interested
persons are invited:

Joint Agricultural and Green
Industry Advisory Committee
meeting: To discuss committee
business including FARMS
program contract elements.
Governing Board Members and
FARMS workgroup members
may attend.

DATE/TIME: Thursday, January
31, 2013; 9 a.m.

PLACE: SWFWMD Tampa
Service Office, 7601 US Highway
301 North, Tampa FL p3637

A copy of the agenda may be
obtained by contacting:
WaterMatters.org Boards,
Meetings & Event Calendar;
1(800)423-1476 (FL only) or
(352)796-7211.

Pursuant to the provision of the
Americans with Disabilities Act,
any person requiring reasonable
accommodations to participate in
this workshop/meeting is asked
to advise the agency at least 5
days before the workshop/meet-
ing by contacting SWFWMD's
Human Resources Bureau Chief,
2379 Broad Street, Brooksville,
Florida 34604-6899; telephone
(352) 796-7211, ext. 4702 or 1-
800-423-1476 (FL only), ext.
4702; TDD (FL only) 1-800-231-
6103; or email to ADA-
Coordinator@swfwmd.state.fl.us.

If any person decides to appeal
any decision made by th'e
Board/Committee with respect to
any matter considered at this
meeting or hearing, he/she will
need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceeding is
made, which record includes the
testimony and evidence from
which the appeal is to be issued.

For more information, you may
contact: Debby.Weeks@water-
matters.org 1(800)423-1476 (FL
only) or, (352)796-7211, x4751
(Ad Order EXE0242).
1:17c


The Southwest Florida Water
Management District (SWFWMD)
announces the following public
meeting to which all interested
persons are.invited:

Governing Board Financial
Investments Ad Hoc Comm-
ittee: Evaluate SWFWMD's
current investment portfolio
and discuss potential future
investment opportunities. All or
part of this meeting may be
conducted by means of com-
munications media technology
in order to permit maximum
participation of Committee
members.

DATE/TIME: Monday, January 28,
2013; 1 p.m. -

PLACE: SWFWMD Tampa
Service Office, 7601 US Highway
301 North, Tampa FL 33637

A copy of the agenda may be
obtained by contacting:
WaterMatters.org Boards,
Meetings & Event Calendar;
1(800)423-1476 (FL only) or
(352)796-7211.

Pursuant to the provision of the
Amerjcans with Disabilities Act,
any person requiring reasonable
accommodations to participate in
this workshop/meeting is asked
to,advise the agency at least 5
days before the workshop/meet-
ing by contacting SWFWMD's
Human Resources Bureau Chief,
2379 Broad Street, Brooksville,
Florida 34604-6899; telephone
(352) 796-7211, ext. 4702 or 1-
800Q-423-1476 (FL only), ext.
4702; TDD (FL only) 1-800-231-
6103; or email to ADA-
Coordinator@swfwmd.state.fl.us.

If any person decides to appeal
any. decision made by the
Board/Committee with respect to
any matter considered at this
meeting or hearing, he/she will
need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceeding is
made, which record includes the
testimony and evidence from
which the appeal is to be issued.

For more information, you may
contact: Luanne.Stout@water-
matters.org 1(800)423-1476 (FL
only) or (352)796-7211, x4605
(Ad Order EXE0240)
1:17c


Center of Northwestern Uni-
versity, discuss key things to
know about NETs.
Q: What are Neuroendo-
crine Tumors (NETs)?
Dr. Benson: Neuroendocrine
tumors (NETs) are an uncom-
mon type of cancer that can
develop throughout the body,
most commonly in the gastroin-
testinal tract, pancreas and
lungs. Signs and symptoms of
NETs can vary depending on
the type, size and location of the
tumor. Unfortunately, many
types of NETs will not cause
any symptoms or may cause
nonspecific symptoms which
are often confused with other
conditions. For example, some.
symptoms of NETs include
abdominal pain, flushing, and
diarrhea, which can be misdiag-
nosed as ulcers, irritable bowel
syndrome or other gastrointesti-
nal conditions.
Because of the absence of
symptoms or .vague symptoms
associated with NETs, the can-
cer is difficult to detect and the
estimated time to diagnosis is
five to seven years, during
which a patient may have,seen
several doctors before arriving
at the appropriate specialist. For
this reason, NET patients are
often diagnosed at an advanced
stage when the cancer has
already spread to other parts of
the body.
Q: Who is affected by
NET?
Grace: According to the lat-
est statistics, there are some-
what more than five cases of
NETs reported each year per
100,000 people. However, the




IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA'
CASE NO. 25-2012-CA-000389
MIDFLORIDA CREDIT UNION
F/K/A MIDFLORIDA FEDERAL
CREDIT UNION,
Plaintiff,
v.
RONALD BROWN A/K/A
RONALD KENT BROWN; ANITA
BJpWN A/,J .,ANITA CHERYL
BPOWN; MICPLORIDA CREDIT
UNION F/K/A MIDFLORIDA FED-
ERAL CREDIT UNION;
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
RONALD BROWN A/K/A
RONALD KENT BROWN;
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ANITA
BROWN A/K/A ANITA CHERYL
BROWN; TENANT #1; TENANT
#2; and ANY AND ALL
UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING
BY THROUGH, AND UNDER,
AND AGAINST THE HEREIN-
NAMED DEFENDANTS WHO ARE
NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR
ALIVE, WHETHER SAID
UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM
AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES,
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
OR OTHER CLAIMANTS,


Defendants. /

NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
pursuant to a Final Judgment
entered In this case in the Circuit
Court of Hardee County, Florida,
the real property described as:
LOTS 8 & 9, Block 10,
ORIGINAL SURVEY .OF
BOWLING GREEN, a sub-
division according the plat
thereof recorded at Plat
Book 1, Page 3-29, in the
Public Records of Hardee
County (formerly a part of
DeSoto County), Florida.
ADDRESS: 4710 Mason
Dixon Ave, Bowling Green,
FL 33834-7034
will be sold at public sale, to the
highest and best bidder for cash,
at the Hardee County Court-
house, 417 West Main St, Second
Floor Hallway outside of Room
202, Wauchula, Florida 33873, on
January 30, 2013 at 11:00AM.
Any person claiming an inter-
est in the surplus from the sale, if
any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the IIs
pendens must file a claim within
60 days after the sale.
. DATE: January 8, 2013
VICTORIA L. ROGERS, CLERK
Clerk of Court
By: Connie Coker
Deputy Clerk
If you are a person with a disabil-
ity who needs any accommoda-
tion in order to participate in this
proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Please con-
tact the Office of the Court
Administrator, 255 N. Broadway
Avenue, Bartow, Florida 33830,
(863) 534-4686, at least 7 days
before your scheduled court
appearance, or Immediately upon
receiving this notification if the
time before the scheduled
appearance is less than 7 days; if
you are hearing or voice
Impaired, call 711.


incidence of NETs is increasing
dramatically, having more than
quadrupled in the past 30 years.
People with a family history of
cancer, women and those with
diabetes are at an increased risk
of developing a NET.
Q: How can people with
NETs manage their condi-
tion?
Dr. Benson: The first step in
managing NETs is receiving an
accurate diagnosis from a
physician as early as possible.
Thanks to advances in research,
doctors now have a deeper
understanding of NETs and
more. resources are available to
help people with NETs better
manage the disease after they've
been diagnosed. Currently,
there are numerous therapeutic
options available for patients
with NETs including surgery,
radiation therapy, chemothera-
py and medical therapies.
It is also important that peo-
ple with NETs see a multidisci-
plinary team, including oncolo-
gy specialists, endocrinologists,
gastroenterologists, patholo-
gists, interventional radiolo-
gists, surgeons and nurses, to
- help manage all aspects of their
condition.
Q: Are there resources
available for people living
with NETs? How can I pro-
vide support to the NET com-
munity?
Grace: Having access to sup-
port services is vital to families
affected by NETs, as living with
an uncommon type of cancer
can take an emotional toll on
both patients and their care-
givers. Also important is ensur-
ing patients have access to edu-
cational information so they are
well-informed and can advocate
for their care. Organizations,
such as the Carcinoid Cancer
Foundation, www.carcinoid.org,
and programs like the NET
Alliance, provide patients and
caregivers with resources,
including access to full-time
advocates available by tele-
phone and email and compre-
hensive websites which provide
free publications and videos,
designed to educate and provide
patients with support.
Supporting initiatives, such
as Worldwide NET Cancer
Awareness Day on November,
10th, is a great way to become



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 25-2010-CA-000048
DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL
TRUST COMPANY, AS INDEN-
TURE TRUSTEE, ON BEHALF OF
THE HOLDERS OF THE
ACCREDITED MORTGAGE LOAN
TRUST 2007-1 ASSET BACKED
NOTES,

Plaintiff,
v.
PEDRO VENTURA, JR.; CAPITAL
-ONE BANK (USA), NATIONAL
ASSOCIATION; DEER RUN OF
HARDEE, INCORPORATED
PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIA-
TION; MARIA GLORIA VENTURA;
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF PEDRO
VENTURA, JR.; UNKNOWN TEN-
ANT(S); IN POSSESSION OF
THE SUBJECT PROPERTY,

Defendant(s), /

CLERK'S NOTICE OF SALE
UNDER F.S. CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in
accordance with the Amended
Uniform Final Judgment of
Foreclosure dated Jan. 9, 2013, in
the above-styled cause, the Clerk
of Circuit Court shall sell the sub-
ject property at public sale on the
30 day of January, 2013, at
11:00AM to the highest and best
bidder for cash, at the Hardee
County Courthouse, on the sec-
ond floor hallway outside Room
202, at the Hardee County
Courthouse located at 417 West
Main Street, Wauchula, Florida,
on the following described prop-
erty:
ALL THAT PARCEL OF
LAND IN BOROUGH OF
ZOLFO SPRINGS, HARD-
EE COUNTY, STATE OF
FLORIDA, AS MORE
FULLY DESCRIBED IN
DEED BOOK 660, PAGE
650, ID#:
2534260100000010S24
BEING KNOWN AND DES-
IGNATED AS SOUTH %
TRACT 24, DEER RUN.


FILED IN PLAT BOOK 62,
PAGE 2.

Property Address: 2708
SNIPE DRIVE, ZOLFO
SPRINGS, FLORIDA 33890.
Dated: January 10, 2013.
VICTORIA L. ROGERS, CLERK
Clerk of Court
By: Connie Coker
Deputy Clerk


1:17,24c 1:17,24c


involved with the NET commu-
nity, showing both patients and
their caregivers they are not
alone.
Posting online resources,
such as www.thenetalliance.-
com and www.netcancerday.-
org, on Worldwide NET Cancer
Awareness Day via Twitter and
Facebook, can help to raise crit-
ical awareness of the disease.


A Daily Thought
THURSDAY
Investigate my life, 0 God,
find out everything about
me; cross-examine and test
me, get a clear picture of
what I'm about; see for
Yourself whether I've done
anything wrong then
guide me on the road to
eternal life.
Psalm 139:23-24 (ME)

FR
This letter is to assure you
that you have eternal life. It is
addressed to those of you
who give their first allegiance
to the Son of God (Jesus
Christ). We can approach
God with confidence (in
prayer) for this reason, if we
make requests in accord
with His will, He listens to us.
I John 5:13-14a (NEB)

SATURDAY
The path of the upright leads
away from evil; whoever fol-
lows that path is safe. Pride
goes before destruction, and
hautiness before a fall.
Proverbs 10:17-18 (NLT)

SUNDAY
Such is the confidence that
we have through Christ
toward God. Not that we are
sufficient of, ourselves to
claim anything is of us; our
sufficiency is from God.
1 Corinthians 3:4-5 (RSV)

MONDAY
Then the Lord God said,
"Now man has become like
one of us; he knows good
and evil." ... People on earth
did what God said was evil,
and violence was every-
where.
Genesis 3:22,6:11 (NCV)

TUESDAY
But you must understand
that .from, the outset, no
prophecy of Scripture arose
from an individual's interpre-
tation of the truth. None
came because a man want-
ed it to; men of God spoke
because they were inspired
to by the Holy Spirit.
II Peter 1:20-21 (PME)

WEDNESDAY
(The Lord says,) "Heaven is
My throne and the earth is
My footstool, what temple
can you build for Me as
good as that? My hand has
made both earth and skies,
and they are Mine. Yet, I will
look with mercy on the man
who has a humble and con-
trite heart, who trembles at
My Word.
Isaiah 66:1-2 (TLB)

All verses are excerpted from
The Holy Bible: (KJV) King
James Version; (ME) The
Message; (NCV) New Cen-
tury Version; (NEB) New
English Bible; (NIV) New
International Version; (NLT)
New Living Translation (RSV)
Revised Standard Version;
(PME) Phillips Modern Eng-
lish; and (TLB) The Living
Bible.


When children grab an ob-
ject, there's no telling where
their imagination will take
them. Suddenly, they're creating
a rocket ship, repurposing it
into princess attire or using it as
the first building block of a
make-believe- world. Children
often see things for what they
can be, not as what they are,
allowing them to concoct a new
reality with its own set of rules.
To them, it's all in the name of
having fun, but this fun also
serves an important function.
According to early literacy
and children's literature special-
ist Sue McCleaf Nespeca, play
is not time spent away from
learning; rather; play is the way
young children learn. Through
play, children develop motor
skills, problem-solving abilities
and sensory perception. What
many people don't realize, how-
ever, is that play also helps to
lay the foundation for literacy.
According to "Every Child
Ready to Read," a research-
based toolkit created by the
Association for Library Service
to Children and Public Library
Association, divisions of the
American Library Association,
play is actually one of the best
ways for children to learn lan-
guage and literacy skills.
To play is to engage. The
more young children engage,
the more they absorb, so parents
should consider adding fun
interactive elements to story
time. To help, a pioneer in cre-
ative play, LEGO DUPLO, has
created a series of Read &
Build sets that combine colorful
building bricks with short-story
board books, that can create a
rich and engaging experience.
As parents read the books, chil-
dren can get deeply involved in
the story by building the char-
acters and objects they're hear-
ing about. At the end of the
book, children can use the
bricks to further explore the
story or invent.new ones; either
way, McCleaf Nespeca says,
they will be on the way to
developing the aural and oral
skills that are essential to early
literacy.
"I am always looking for new


ways to excite my son to read,"
says one mother. "The combi-
nation of reading and building
is perfect as it is something we
can do together and is an activ-
ity that truly keeps his atten-
tion."
McCleaf Nespeca. recom-
mends reading a story through
once to familiarize children
with the story and characters.
She then suggests rereading it,
adding in ways for children to
engage and better understand
the story, such as with the build-
ing blocks or with simple songs
and finger games, to lay the
foundation for a love of story-
telling and reading.
As children develop an early
connection to reading, it pro-
pels them to explore other types
of play that are also believed to
improve early childhood litera-
cy, such as socio-dramatic play-
when children create their own
stories within pretend realities.
By storytelling in their imag-
ined world, they have a forum
to express themselves verbally
and make a stronger connection
to letters, words, language and
story.
To encourage this. form of
play, parents can designate an
area of the playroom and stock
it with versatile materials, such
as books, props, costumes, con-
struction toys, books, empty
boxes, paper towel tubes and
craft supplies.
By inventing more opportuni-
ties for them to play with lan-
guage and by interspersing play
with story time, parents can
help their children acquire the
essential building blocks for
early literacy and develop a
lifetime love of learning.


Build Early Literacy

Skills A Fun Way


DOMESTIC VIOLENCE
Don't Know Where
To Turn For Help?

CALL THE CRISIS LINE

1 (800) 500-1119


PUBLIC NOTICE
The BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSiONERS
will hold a public hearing on
February 07,2013, at 8:35 a.m.
or as soon thereafter
in the County Commission Chambers, Room 102,
Courthouse Annex, 412 West Orange Street, Wauchula,
Florida 33873 to consider adoption of the following
ordinance:
ORDINANCE NO. 13-05
An Ordinance of Hardee County, Florida, amending the
Hardee County Comprehensive Plan, as amended,
amending the Capital Improvements Element;
amending the Five-Year Schedule of Capital Improve-
ments; providing for title; providing for severability and
providing for an effective date.

This is a Disabled-Accessible facility. Any disabled
person needing to make special arrangements should
contact the County Commissioners Office at least two
(2) working days prior to the public hearing.

This Public Notice is published in compliance with
Florida Statues 125.66(2)(a) and 286.0105.

Copies of this ordinance are available for public
inspection during regular office hours at 412 West
Orange Street, Room 103, Wauchula, Florida 33873,
telephone 863/773-9430.

Interested parties may appear at the public hearing and
be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance.

If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the
Commission, with respect to any matter considered at
such meeting or hearing, they will need a record of the
proceedings, and that, for such purpose, they may
need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceed-
ings is made, which record includes the testimony and
evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.

Sue Birge, Chairperson 1:17c


NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC

The City of Wauchula Planning and Zoning Board will meet on Monday, January 21, 2013
at 5:30 p.m. in the Wauchula Commission Chambers located at 225 E Main St, Suite 105,
Wauchula. The agenda can be viewed at .126 S. 7th Avenue, Wauchula or online at
www.cityofwauchula.com.

Any interested persons) will be heard at this meeting. If any person decides to appeal
any decision made by the Board with respect to this request for which he will need a
verbatim record of the proceedings, he will need to ensure that such verbatim record is
made.

The City Commission of the City of Wauchula, Florida does not discriminate upon the
basis of an'y individual's disability status. This non-discriminatory policy involves every
aspect of the Commission's functions, including ones access to, participation,
employment or treatment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable
accommodation as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26,.
Florida Statutes, should contact the City Clerk at (863) 773-3131.

CITY OF WAUCHULA
Richard K. Nadaskay, Jr.
Mayor

ATTEST:
Holly Smith
City Clerk
1:17c