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 Material Information
Title: The Herald-advocate
Portion of title: Herald advocate
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Wm. J. Kelly
Place of Publication: Wauchula Fla
Publication Date: 12/13/2012
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Wauchula (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hardee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Hardee -- Wauchula
Coordinates: 27.546111 x -81.814444
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: 55th year, no. 31 (Sept. 2, 1955)-
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579544
oclc - 33886547
notis - ADA7390
lccn - sn 95047483
System ID: UF00028302:00461
 Related Items
Preceded by: Hardee County herald
Preceded by: Florida advocate (Wauchula, Fla.)

Full Text

















The


Herald-Advocate

Hardee County's Hometown Coverage


113th Year, No. 1
4 Sections, 52 Pages


Thursday, December 6, 2012


70
Plus 5c Sales Ta%


9 Onboard As


By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
'A crash early Monday mbrn-


ing' between a gasoline tanker
and a school bus ended without
serious incident.


Tanker Hits Bus


School Transportation De- onboard when a semi hit the bus
apartment officials said a bus from behind, sending it into a
driver and eight students were clockwise rotation before over-


turning onto its side.
There were no significant
injuries.
Students inside helped free
the driver, who was seat-belted
and pinned into her seat, before
exiting the bus themselves,
routing specialist Matt Scott
said on Tuesday as he and rout-
ing specialist Sophie Smith
applauded the actions of the
driver and the passengers.
There were four Hardee
Junior High and four Hardee
Senior High students on the
eastbound 1993 Bluebird bus
being driven by Octavia Walker
Caldwell when it was struck by
a 2001 International tanker
driven by Pierre Nicolson
Desrosiers, officials said.
According to Tpr. John N.


Paikai of the,Florida Highway
Patrol, the crash occurred on
7:17 a.m. on State Road 66 at
its intersection with Sunset
Drive.
Paikai said the school bus had
been stopped, picking up pas-
sengers, when an eastbound
fuel tanker collided with it.
Scott explained Tuesday that
Caldwell was on her secondary
run and had just made a stop
when she "canceled her lights
and began to roll" again.
Desrosiers, 43, of Tampa,
told the trooper the glare from
the rising sun prevented him
from being able to see the bus
which had been stopped in front
of him.'
He was charged with failure
See SCHOOL BUS 2A


School, City Leader



Faces Misdemeanor



Charge In Sign Theft


-.... tl II.4 A hUJILLU
A Hardee County school bus lies on its side Monday following a crash. All students safely exited the overturned bus.


Weeken
By MARIA TRUJILLO
Of The Herald-Advocate
Once the music starts play-
ing, you know 'it's almost
Christmas.
That's why the Heartland
Chorale's ninth annual "Treas-
ures of Christmas" has become
such a beloved event in this
community. The concert brings
100 Heartland vocalists accom-
panied by 45 Imperial Sym-
phony Orchestra instrumental-
ists here.
Director and conductor
Sherry Miller will also present
as special guests "The Rock"
youth praise team, "The Rock"
interpretive dancers, and mop-
pets Kermie, Gizzie and Miss
Pigly along with children's nar-
rators, Christmas sing-a-longs.
and memorial tributes.
Soloists for the night include
Leslie Loughlin, Tanya Dub-
berly, Melanie Carnley, Belinda
Anderson, Esmeralda Arana,
Jill Southwell, Georgeanne
Paris, Brenda Knight. Ken
Lambert. Dusty Mendoza. the
Rev. Spencer Decker. Jim
Beckley and Austin Stoner.
The concert will take place at
the First Baptist Church of


WEATHER
DA.TE IfGH LMW 8N
11128 76 56 0.00
11729 78 53 0.00
11i30 78 56 0.00
12101 79 52 0.00
12102 1 S60 0.00
12103 81 59 0.00
12104 78 56 0.00
TOTAL Rainfall to 12,04112 41.42
Same period last year 51.53
kft Year Average 52.81
Source- Ul of Fla One Researcn cpCrte

INDEX
Classifieds.....................6B
Community Calendar....4A
Courthouse Report.......8C
Crime Blotter...............12B
Hardee Living................2B
Information Roundup....4A
Obituaries......................4A
School Lunch Menus....9B




III33913 0l II
8 33913 00075 7


C


I Brings
Wauchula tomorrow (Friday) at'
7 p.m. Tickets may still be
available at the door or at the-
heartlandchorale.org.
Caroling in the Park
The next night will also be
filled with music when. you
head to Paynes Creek Historic
State Park'in Bowling Green.
A few entertainers, choirs
and, of course, carolers will be
in attendance.
There will be lots of refresh-
ments and-baked goods for sale
and a chance to see and take a
picture with Santa Claus.
Admission is free.
Caroling will take place at
the state park from 6 to 9 p.m.
on Saturday. The park is located
at 888 Lake Branch Road.
Live Christmas
Meanwhile in Limestone.


Christmas Cheer


Christmas will appear to come
to life as you drive on through.
Limestone Baptist Church is
hosting a live Christmas Nativ-
ity display with well-known
Christmas scenes. ,
There will be people acting
out the scenes as you drive
through in your vehicle. Every-
one will be permitted to stop at
the scenes to watch them a little
longer.
Christmas music will, of
course, accompany the live
scenes as well...
The live nativity display will
appear'tomorrow (Friday) and
Saturday and will return next
Friday and Saturday, Dec. 14
and 15, running from 7 to 9
each night. The display is locat-
ed at 4868 Keystone Ave.
Flywheeler Park


If you get a chance, you can
also drive to Fort Meade for a
great night of fun.
Starting tomorrow, the
Florida Flywheelers will host
Christmas in the Village It
promises to be a delight for kids
of all ages.
There will be carolers in
period costumes, a tram which
will take you a step back in
' time, Santa so you can get a
photo with him, refreshments,
and gift shops that you can buy
goodies in all of this in a vil-
lage that will be decorated as a
Winter Wonderland.
Admission is an unwrapped
toy, canned food, monetary
donation or, if you're feeling
extra generous, all three!
SProceeds will go to local chari-
See CHRISTMAS 3A


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate. ....
A local official has been
charged with a second-degree
misdemeanor for allegedly
stealing campaign signs.
Stuart Durastanti; vice mayor
of Bowling Green and assistant
principal at Bowling Green
Elementary School, was issued
a summons oh Nov. 5. His
attorney, Robert B. Peddy Jr.,
submitted a written "not guilty"
plea in lieu of his client appear-
ing in court for the Nov. 9
arraignment.
Durastanti, 30, was also
granted a waiver of appearance
at the Nov. 21 status conference
at which a pretrial hearing was
setfor Jan. 2, 2013, at 8:45 a.m.
before Hardee Circuit Judge
Marcus J. Ezelle.
The case is now in the dis-
covery stage in which the State
Attorney's Office must provide
the defense attorney with all
information for the case.
The over 60 pages of docu-
ments includes many inter-
views, photographs, measure-
ments and property records


where the alleged- theft took
place ....
The main evidence to sub-
stantiate the charge against
Durastanti is a video allegedly
showing the school leader at
9:30 p.m. on Oct. 8 entering the
Bryan Avenue grove property
of Joe Jones and pulling up
campaign signs of Richard
"Dick" Daggett, an opponent of
Durastanti's father, David Dur-
astanti, in the schools superin-
tendent race.
The video was brought to the
Bowling Green Police Depart-
ment, which reportedly recog-
nized Durastanti, the assistant
principal and member of the
Bowling Green City Commis-
sion and turned the investiga-
tion over to the Florida Depart-
ment -of Law Enforcement to
avoid any suggestion of a con-
flict of interest.
When investigators inter-
viewed him at his school on
Oct. 16, Durastanti at first
denied any knowledge of the
missing campaign signs from
behind the school in the orange
See MISDEMEANOR 2A


HCSB, HEA/United Begin Contract Negotiations

By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Hardee Education Associa-
tion/United and the School/-
Board/administration teams met i. .l ,i
for over five hours on Tuesday '
of this week before breaking to ..
give each group time to gather .
information for the next ses- '
sion. : .T
Contract negotiations will
continue at 8 a:m. either Friday
or next Tuesday.
Which date is next depends
on the schedules of the adminis-
tration team of Woody Caligan,
George Kelly and Marie Dasher ,I -
and those of union representa-
tives Heather Lane, Angela
Spornraft, Selden Spencer and
Juan Coronado and their re-
gional Florida Education As-
sociation representative, Sharon
Sutherland.
Three issues are on the table:
the sick leave pool and insur-
ance; the Value Added Model
(VAM) to be used in teacher
evaluations; and a flattening or
overhaul of the step ranges by
which teachers are paid.
Sutherland opened with a PHOTO BY MARIA TRUJILLO
lengthy statement of the union's Gathered as negotiations between the school employees union and school administration team began on Tuesday
concerns and Caligan replied morning were (clockwise from back left) union representatives Selden Spencer, Angela Spoonraft, Juan Coronado,
with a shorter statement of regional union spokeswoman Sharon Sutherland and Heather Lane, and administrative team members (backs to
See NEGOTIATIONS 3A camera) George Kelly and Woody Caligan, and Marie Dasher.


SHOPPING DAYS

19 TIL CHRISTMAS!


Special Dairy

Section Inside








2A The Herald-Advocate, December 6, 2012


The Herald-Advocate Take Strides For Strays"
Hardee County's Hometown Coverage

JPubl/Edtor In Saturday Run/Walk
'VITHIA M KRAHL I


Managing Editor


JOAN M. SEAMAN
Sports Editor



115 S. Seventh Ave.
P.O. Box 338
Wauchula, FL 33873


RALPH HARRISON
Production Manager
A NOEY DE SANTIAGO
I? Asst. Prod. Manager

O JPhone: (863) 773-3255
Fax: (863) 773-0657


Published weekly on Thursday at Wauchula. Florida, by The Herald-Advocate
Publishing Co. Inc. Periodical Postage paid at U.S. Post Office, Wauchula, FL
33873 and additional entry office (USPS 578-780), "Postmaster," send address
changes to: The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338, Wauchula, FL 33873.


f DEADLINES: "
Schools-Thursday 5p.m.
Spon'. Monday nc in
Hardee LAi L ng Thurda) 5 pm
General New.& rMonday 5 pmn.
S Ads Tue.da noun


SUBSCRIPTIONS:'
Hardee County
6 months -$21: yr.- $39; 2 yrs -$75
Flonrida
6 months 525 I -.'';rs -
iOu of State
6 monthi- $29. I r i$2. 2 i 51.SI


LETTERS:
The Heraid.Advocaile eicomes lener5 to the edior on manlter': ,Lf public
interest. Lenier should be brief. and nmuil be written in good tasle. signed
and include a daytime phone number.
SUBNMSSIONS:
Pre. releCa3. on corrLmnnitl[ maireri. are vwelcomne Silmnsiontn hohuld te
l)ped. double ."paced and Jdnere to Ihe abo.e deadljne'i All temit are sub.
jei to ediung
h -..


H Kelly's Column
By Jim


Inside this issue is a 20-page tabloid section'saluting the dairy
industry in Hardee County. Hardee has 10 dairies and about 11,300
dairy cows.
A highlight is a Page I story written for us by renowned author
Patrick Smith who wrote "A Land Remembered" and other won-
derful novels. He lives in Melbourne and has been -to Wauchula
several times. His books should be required reading for those want-
ing to learn about Florida's history..
SWauchula artist Oneita.Revell drew a Page 1 illustration to
accompany Patrick Smith's article.
S Lauren Moore, a University of Florida student, and her father
Kevin Moore helped make this dairy section possible, along with
staff members of The Herald-Advocate,
The Nickerson Family, starting with the late Earle and Clara
Nickerson who came here from New York in 1954 with 20 Jersey
cows and their sons, is synonymous with dairy, cows and milk.
Roger Nickerson is still active in the local dairy industry. Brother
Norman Nickerson and his sons Joe and Chris own four local
dairies with 5,000 cows.
Norm's home west of Wauchula is like a shrine to the dairy
industry, with pictures, butter churns and other artifacts. He is a
huge John Deere fan.
Norm, 73, says milk comes out of a cow at 98 degrees and is
quickly cooled to 40 degrees. One cow can produce 16,000 pounds
of milk a year.
The cow manure is spread on grasslands or goes into lagoons
where it is broken down by microbes into brown water which evap-
orates.
Norm remembers their milk .sold in 1960 at $5 a hundred
pounds, reached a high of $27 a hundredweight in 2008, dropped
to $15 in the 2009 recession and since then has ranged from $15 to
$23. A gallon of milk in the store sells for about $3.79 a gallon and
weighs 8.6 pounds.
Bull calves are generally sold to Amish people in Indiana and
grown to 600 pounds for veal or from 800 to' ,200 pounds for more
mature beef.
A dairy cow produces milk 10 months a year, is used for four
years, and then sold at auction in Arcadia and often sent to South
Carolina where the beef goes to fast-food chains.
The Nickerson milk goes to Publix and Winn-Dixie stores.
You can eat the older cows as part of your fast-food burger.
A lot of citrus pulp from the juice companies are eaten by the
dairy cattle.
Finally, why does Norm usually anser his phone with "Ho, ho,
ho!"? When he was in his mid-20s Hardee County Farm Bureau
President Doyle Parker asked him to be Santa Claus at a big event.
Parker told Norm to say "Ho, ho, ho!" a lot.
Milk, cheese, pizza, yogurt, butter, ice cream, chocolate milk,
puddings, buttermilk, biscuits these are products made with
Hardee County milk, and don't forget veal and hamburgers from
the dairy cattle.

Rev. Juanita Wright reports the New Creation and Family
Resource Center, a 501C-3 organization, is now feeding over 60
families in Hardee County. They give out food every second and
fourth S.iui'd.,y fi'omi 9 to 11 a.m. at 1514 Lincoln 'Street in
Wauchula.
She is seeking donations and community partners and can be
reached at 863-781-0982. She buys food at Agape Food Bank in
Lakeland for 20 cents a pound and gets free food from the U.S.
Department of Agriculture.

Larry Hagman, 81, was quite a TV star, playing ruthless oil baron
J.R. Ewing on the night-time sdap opera "Dallas" from 1978 to
1991. The show was revived last year when Hagman was battling
cancer. He was born in Fort Worth, Texas. His father was a district
attorney and his mother a Broadway actress.
Hagman earlier was an actor.on the day-time soap opera "Edge
of Night" and on the TV sitcom "I Dream of Jeannie." A former
heavy smoker he was chairperson of the American Cancer Society
Great American Smokeout from 1981 to 1992. In 1995 Hagman
received a liver transplant after developing cirrhosis of the liver
from drinking alcohol. I always liked Larry Hagman.

Congratulations to State Rep. Ben Albritton of Wauchula for
being named chairman of the Agriculture and Natural Resources
Subcommittee in the Florida House of Representatives.
He is also a member of the Economic Development and
Tourism Committee, Business and Professional Regulation
Subcommittee, and State Affairs Committee. This will be his sec-
ond two-year term as state representative.

Congratulations to State Sen. Denise Grimsley, a Wauchula
native, for her.Nov. 6 election win and being appointed chair of the
Florida Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Health and
Human Services:
The Highlands County resident is also a member of the Select
Committee on Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act;
Agriculture: Children, Families and Elder Affairs: Appropriations
Subcommittee on Criminal and Civil Justice; Health Policy;
Environmental Preservation and Conservation: and
Appropriations, reported the Lakeland Ledger on Nov. 29.
Grimsley served eight years in the Florida House of
Representatives, leaving because of term limits.


By MARIA TRUJILLO
For The Herald-Advocate
Do you love animals?
Then put on some sneakers
this Saturday and run! Thanks
to the Hardee Animal Rescue
Team. running will be a great


way to help animals as it is
hosting its first annual run/walk
called "Strides for Strays."
The 5k run/walk begins at
9:30 a.m. by the Wildlife Ref-
uge at Pioneer Park in Zolfo
Springs.


SCHOOL BUS
Continued From 1A
to stop for a school bus, Paikai said.
said. Caldwell carried out policy in
The right front of the semi radioing the station, assessing
collided with the left rear of the the situation, and assuring the
bus, causing it to rotate and students' safety while directing
head southeast onto the shoul- them from the bus. Students
der of the highway, the trooper stopped to free her, Scott noted,
described. It overturned onto its and she then remained onboard
left side. until the last student was off the
Meanwhile, the fuel tanker bus.
also traveled onto the south Then, he added, she made
shoulder, its cab demolished, certain the students stayed to-
Caldwell, 35, of Wauchula, gether as help arrived.
was pinned to her seat yet per- First on the scene happened
formed all crash procedures to be a Transportation Depart-
flawlessly, Scott and Smith ment employee, shop foreman


"She stayed very cajm," Scott
noted, adding, "Some people
would have been hysterical."
Despite the crash 'with a
tanker, no fuel was spilled. "We
really avoided a disaster," he


MISOEMEANOll
Continued From A A
grove. He said he hadn't felt
well on Oct. 8, left school early,
skipped his usual exercise pro-
gram and went to the home of
his parents where he resides,
later watching a football game
and going to bed early:
Shown still photos from the
video, Durastanti denied he was
the individual.
Then, nearly 50 minutes into
the interview, Durastanti admit-'
ted he drove over to the grove.
and pulled up three signs, act-
ing alone and not directed by
anyone else. He said he would
make restitution, but was wor-
ried about losing his job arid his
sister losing her job if Daggett
won the election.
As is usual in similar situa-
tions, Durastanti remains at
work pending outcome of the
charge against him. He also
remains as a city commissioner.
If convicted of the charge,
Durastanti could lose his cre-
dentials and administrative
position within the school sys-
tem. Gov. Rick Scott could also
remove him from his commis-
sion seat, as happened to
Wauchula city commissioners a
couple of years ago.


Gary Day, who had been driv-
ing eastbound on State Road 66
about one-half mile behind the
bus.
"The driver told us as soon as
she got out of the bus, she saw
him, he was right there," Scott
said.
Hardee County Fire-Rescue
responded immediately, he said.
"We are so thankful for our
Fire-Rescue guys," he added. '
Caldwell and a 15-year-old
boy were transported to Florida
Hospital Wauchula, as was
Dosrosiers, Tpr. Paikai said. All'
only 'had minor injuries and
were treated and released.
Scott said no students were
occupying the back seats when
the crash occurred. "The bus
took the hit well. The bus
stayed together like it's
designed to do.
"The kidswent out the door
after helping her get out of her
seat," he added.
Scott and Smith checked the
two schools, and all eight stu-
dents were back in classes on
Tuesday. Caldwell, they said,
was instructed by- -a doctor to
'-.1t home' frQm worklfor a cou-
ple days r.n. s ,' -.1, ....'
"She did an excellent job,
calling out to the kids to make
sure they were OK, telling them
she .was pinned, radioing us,"
said Scott. "We want to applaud
them all for how well they did
under the circumstances."
It was a scenario which could
have. ended tragically, but
miraculously did not, Scott and
Smith concluded.


COURTESY PHOTOS LOCKIE GARY
Norm Nickerson is shown with employee Linda Sandoval
in this 2005 photo.


Holstein cows are shown on a Stargrass pasture at Norm
Nickerson's dairy.


HART. a non-profit, is dedi-
cated to helping rescue animals
in Hardee County as well as
providing a trap/neuter/release
program.
Event coordinator Leigh
Sockalosky says this 5K idea
came from one of the group's
newest members. This new
member previously saw how an
event such as this brought in
large crowds who were enjoy-
ing themselves and were also
able to help a good cause.
Sockalosky is hoping the
funds raised will help the ani-
mals get treatments or other
necessary items required to
keep caring for them. She wants
to continue to be the voice to
for the animals.
Although it is a 5K race,
there will be other things for
non-runners and animals to
enjoy as this event is pet-friend-
ly. Vendors will be selling food,
shirts, crafts and other items.
There will also be face pairt-
ing and a disc jockey who will
play a variety of music from
country to rock-and-roll, and




FHP Seeks

Driver Of"

Dump Truck

By MARIA TRUJILLO
For The Herald-Advocate
An accident on Nov. 27 has
left troopers in search of a
dump truck.
The incident involved April
Stiles, 32, of Lakeland, who
was driving a 2007 Chrysler
300 and an unknown person
driving a dump truck.
According to a Florida
Highway Patrol report, the acci-
dent happened when the other
driver and Stiles were stopped
at the stop sign northbound on
Church of God Road.
The report also notes that a
disabled vehicle was in front of
the dump truck, which, in turn,
was in front of Stiles.
The dump truck then improp-
erly reversed and the rear por-
tion of the truck collided with
the front of Stiles' vehicle, said
Tpr. Mario Alarcon.
The truck then continued
north on Church of God Road
and made a left turn onto State
Road 62. It was last seen travel-
ing west.
Stiles was Wearing a seatbelt
and was left uninjured.
Anyone who witnessed the
crash or who may know the
identity of the driver of the'
dump truck is urged to contact
Alarcon at 941-751-8350.


also Jazzercise. This will be a
great way to warm-up.the run-
ners before the 5K.
Thinking about adopting a
cute and cuddly companion?
Chances are at least one furry
little guy will "meow" or
"woof' into your heart, since
HART will have a few. animals
at the event that are available
for adoption.
While at the event, the
Hardee County Wildlife Refuge
will be open for $1 to all visi-
tors.
This will also be the start and
finish points of the race for run-
ners. There will be two loops
around the park, including
paved roads and grass trails.
Any person can enter into the
seven age categories, which
include 13 and under through
60 and over. The first male and
female from each category will
win an award.
This event was put together
by volunteers, therefore 100
percent of the money raised 'will
go to help the animals through
HART.
Registration can be, made
online at hardeenanimalres-
cueteam.weebly.com or,by call-
ing 773-9898.


SEEDS
FROM
?" ". THE
SOWER


His family must have,spent
a'fortune on his education.
He studied under the greatest
teachers of-his day. He -was
thoroughly trained in law. Be-
came a well-recognized war-
rior. '.Traveled extensively.
Enjoyed athletic competition
so much.that he knew allthe
rules and measures used to
evaluate athletes. One day
God spoke to him in a dra-
matic way and his life was
changed forever, He put his
complete trust in'God and de-
cided to follow Him com-
pletely. Eventually, things
changed..Life did. not be-
come easy-for him, but diffi-
cult. As a result of ..his
obedience, he suffered ship-
wrecks and stoning. He faced
death from maddening, mobs
and whips that lashed his
body. Even though he vwas
thrown into prison, 1iis.spitit
was never;shattered. orihis
faith flawed; "' :. : ::'
How did Paul endure these
hardships? He turned his
dungeon into a mine of dia-
monds. He wrote some of the
world's finest letters, inspired
early church leaders,;formed
the theological foundation of
Christianity and endured
hardships as a good soldier
of Jesus Christ. .,
While in prison' he wrote,
"We know that all things work
together for good.". ,
Visit us at: www.SowerMinistries.org


Parade Winners

Non-profit:
First Place
First Christian Church
Second Place
Hardee Correctional Institution
Third Place
Florida's First Assembly of God


Business:
First Place
CF Industries
Second Place
Mosaic
Third Place
Bailey's Dance Academy .








Photos!


SChristmas Parade


SAnd Others

Check Out

www.hardeepix.cdm
Questions: hardeepix@gmail.com
"Photos ... Memories You Can See"
Photos By:
Ralph Harrison and Maria Trujilld'

l-8tfc


I I








December 6, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 3A


NEGOnAfION
Continued From 1A


SERIOUS INJURIES


commitment to providing edu-
cation and protection for
Hardee County students.
Sick Leave Bank
As the union's one item of
contract language to be dis-
cussed, it chose the sick leave
bank.
*About 200 of the 740 possi-
ble employees belong to the
sick leave bank, which is set up
to help one another during a
time of catastrophic illness,
accident or injury, not for rou-
tine or even prolonged flu, a
broken bone, etc,
A committee of three union
and three administrative mem-
bers review applications. Bank
sick leave cannot be used until
an employee has depleted
his/her own sick leave. Donor
employees may not give more
than two days per school year to
each recipient he or she chooses
and must retain a balance of at
least 10 days for personal use.
Recipients, whether for family
or non-family sick leave, can-
not receive more than 10 days
in one school year.
VAM
The union also asked the
validity of the VAM scores and
impact on teacher evaluations
be discussed.
Teachers receive an annual
Evaluation by the principal of
their school. Under new leg-
islative or VAM rules, the prin-
cipal appraisal would be worth
40 percent of a teacher's score.
Lesson study plans are 20 per-
cent. VAM data scores are the
final 40 percent and are based
on the Florida Comprehensive
Assessment Test scores for stu-
dents assigned to a teacher.
The problem is the state's
assignment of test scores to cer-
tain teachers, even ones they
never had as students. Caligan.
said the state now has a student
verification tool that is sup-
posed to correct this problem.
Under state statutes, another
corrective factor is to use test
scores available within 90 days
of the annual evaluation: But
most evaluations are done
before the end of the school
year the beginning of June.
Ninety days later translates to
late August or early September.
New scores, which may better
reflect a teacher's performance,
are not available until late
September.
'Contract 'language' i' could
ensure that VAM inf6ination
will not negatively impact a
teacher's overall score and
heavier weight could be given
to a principal's assessment. An
alternative would be to use a
three-year trend of student
scores for a particular teacher.
Pay Ranges
The union is asking to have a
pay by performance' salary
schedule in place by the 2014
school year. The lower steps or
ranges are compressed, with
wider pay ranges at all levels,
not just for the first few years of
teaching.
The union has not asked for a
specific pay raise this year.
Instead, it is asking for'a long-
term change in pay parameters
which it feels would be more
equitable for all staff.
A chart Sutherland provided
compares starting teacher sal-
aries for the eight local service
unit counties, DeSoto, Glades,
Highlands, Hillsborough, Man-
atee, Okeechobee, Sarasota and
Hardee. For new teachers with a
bachelor's degree, master's.
special enhancements or doc-
torate, Hardee ranks lowest in
all but the master's category,
where it is seventh, slightly
above Glades County.
At Step 25, for the same four
categories, Hardee ranks eighth
on doctorate leaves, seventh on
special enhancements and mas-
ter's and sixth on bachelor
level-employee pay levels.
Opening Statement-Union
The four-page Sutherland
presentation starts on a friendly
note and becomes increasingly
"aggressive. Following are
excerpts.
"It is a pleasure to meet with .
you today to work together to
find solutions to improving
education for the students of
Hardee County School District
through staff negotiations.
"It is also important to
acknowledge that you have
agreed to meet with us to reach


an agreement utilizing the col-
laborative principles ofInterest-
Based-Barganiing. We believe
this is a significant move for
this District as we agree to set
inside the more contentious tra-
ditional style of bargaining, to
rcotgnii/c and understand the
underlying issues each party
brings to the table and to work
to find ways to address the con-
cerms of each side as we reach
agreement on that issue."
Sutherland addressed the sick
leave and VAM issues, then
continued.


"Economic issues are always
'high value,' and by its very
nature, causes everyone to
become a bit less collaborative
and tend to start drawing lines
in the sand. We are committed,
however, to working WITH you
to not only understand the prac-
ticalities and realities you must
deal with, but to also help you
to understand the same practi-
calities and realities we experi-
ence.
"I am reminded that our
School District house certainly
must be kept in order. We must
maintain and improve it as
needed to make certain it is
strong and will withstand
attacks both from inside and
outside that house. But we must
acknowledge that while -the
house looks pretty good from
the outside, we have neglected
the infrastructure of the house,
and it is weakening.
"That infrastructure is the
staff of this District in partic-
ular, the teachers and the sup-
port personnel. While Hardee
boasts experienced staff who
have been loyal to this school
District, we are seeing an
alarming trend of great
turnover, with many teachers
coming in new to the District
who are also new to the teach-
ing profession.
"This is taking a toll on the
District Grade. We are simply
unable to attract the best and the
brightest and. most creative
teachers to this District. Even
veteran teachers are being
pulled to surrounding Districts
'that provide better salaries than
Hardee County. If I read your
Training and Experience scat-
tergram correctly, we had over
52 teachers new to the District
this year alone an alarming
and significant number with a
teaching staff of about 350.
"So how do we stack up to
these other counties? Sadly, we
are dead last among surround-
ing counties and counties
against which we compete for
new teachers," noting the data
seen above on salaries.
Sutherland continues," We
recognize there are many fac-
tors that have contributed to this
educationally dangerous pre-
cipice, but as we look at the
budget figures, ability to pay is
surprisingly not one of those
factors! In fact, this District has
-eemmgl, been in the bankifig
business, building one of the
heftiest Fund Balances in the
State. Last year along, the
District held a 30 percent Fund
Balance. Typically, a fiscally
sound School District will have
a 4-9 % Fund Balance, with 9%
being quite high.
"But we are not running the
'Hardee Schools Savings and
Loan.' We are in the business of
educating our most precious
p9ssessions-our children. The
state and federal government'
have determined that to provide
the best education, each School
District must spend a certain
amount of money for curricu-
lum, for supplies, for adminis-
tration, and for the teaching and
support staff. We receive that
money and we are expected to
wisely spend it to provide the
best education for our children.
"Unfortunately, the 'C' rating
this District currently holds
clearly shows we are not doing
a good job recruiting and retain-
ing the best educators and sup-
port staff to help bur children
learn. And sadly, the grades
pending for this District are
continuing to slip.
"The infrastructure of our
School District is shaky, at best.
The only way we can strength-
en it is to spend the money
needed to make our house
stronger. We can't put in cheap
plumbing .or wiring and expect
it to last. Nor can we skimp on
having a strong salary schedule
that will cause the best and the
brightest to decide to come to
Hardee County, Florida to teach
our children. We are being
bypassed by those who have the
most to give because we are not,
willing to ante'up the money
necessary to make them take a
second look at our school sys-
tem.
"We are here today to roll up
our sleeves and work with you
to not simply throw money at
the teachers and support staff to
get them by another year and
walk away with a bonus that


might take us through the holi-
days with a few extra much-
needed dollars. We are here
today to really attack this prob-
lem and take some of the
money that is sent to this
District by the taxpayers of this
state and county to use for the
purpose for which it is intended
- to pay for the best education
possible for our children. And
that starts with not just "ade-
quately" paid staff, but compet-
itive, strong salaries that can be
used to aggressively recruit the


best."
Sutherland concludes,
"Thank you for your willing-
ness to sit with us and approach
these negotiations in a collabo-
rative manner. We look forward
to the discussions as profession-
al educators and education
employees-together working
to improve the education for the
students of Hardee County."
Administration Response
Deputy Superintendent Cal-
igan responded, "The Super-
intendent and School Board
appreciate Hardee Education
Association/United's willing-
ness to work together on diffi-
cult educational issues. The
Administration wants .HEA/U
to remain a partner in making
significant decisions that affect
the continued revitalization of
our schools.
"I wish to thank each
employee for your extraordi-
nary effort to provide quality
educational opportunity for our
children. Your efforts are evi-
dent in the success of our stu-
dents.
"The Superintendent and the
Board remain committed to not
only providing quality educa-
tion for our children, but also
supporting our employees. We
face challenges of performance
based funding as well as per-
formance based pay.
"The employees are fortunate
to have a strong contract, in
which many of you were
involved in crafting, that pro-
vides a safe and healthy work-
ing environment. We hope to
continue the cooperation and
collaboration upon which that
contract was built," says the
opening administration state-
ment.
It concludes, "Let us all
remember that public ,schools
exist solely for children and not
for us: We must educate and
protect them to the best of all
our collective abilities."



CHRISTMAS
Continued From 1A
ties, food banks and Toys for
Tots.
This celebration will be in
Flywheeler Park Friday and
Saturday, and continuing on
Dec. 14 and 15 from 6' to 9r p.m:
The park: is located at: 7000"
Avon Park Cut-Off Roadcin Fort-
Meade.
Toys
Another great place to take
new and unwrapped toys is, to
the Hardee County Sheriff's
Office at 900 Summit St. in
Wauchula.
The last day to drop off the
toys will be Monday.
These toys will be sure to
make it to needy and thankful
Hardee County kids for
Christmas.
For questions, call Dep.
Maria Hall at 773-0304 exten-
sion 201.


PHOTO BY MARIA TRUJILLO
Two people were left seriously injured on Monday after an accident on the intersection
of U.S. 17 and REA Road in Wauchula, involving a 1997 Freightliner semi-truck and a
2011 Chevrolet C1500. According to a Florida Highway Patrol report, the crash occurred
at 10:25 a.m. when the semi Thomas A. Everett, 69, of Tampa was driving collided with
the Chevy Dagoberto Cordovi, 72, of Wauchula was driving. The report says Everett was
approaching the intersection of REA Road in the right lane of U.S. 17 South while Cordovi
was attempting to make a right onto U.S. 17 from REA Road. FHP said witnesses at the
scene alleged Everett fail to stop for the red light. The semi hit the left front of Cordovi's
vehicle with its right front. Cordovi's vehicle came to a final rest 6n its roof. Both wore
seatbelts and were transported to Florida Hospital Wauchula, said the report. Charges
were filed against Everett for running a red light, Cpl. Larry H. McClellar Jr. said.


The Herald-Advocate
Hardee1 Contyl's HomI towt'nl Cov'erage


will be

CLOSING at NOON

on the Mondays of Dec. 24 & Dec. 31

and will be

CLOSED ALL DAY

on the Tuesdays of Dec. 25 & Jan. 1



DEADLINES for ALL

advertising and news will be

THURSDAY AT NOON

on Dec. 20 & Dec. 27

0_6T (@0. i-


HE RTLAND PHARMACY






S(We pit our into our service"

If you are visiting we will gladly transfer your prescriptions and

keep them onfile then transfer them back when you go home.


Sue Lobato, Pauline Ochoa, Julian Garcia, Red Camp Pharmacist,
Bob Duncan Pharmacist Sandra Garcia (missing)

DELIVERY SERVICE AVAILABLE

Monday-Friday 9:00 am to 6:00 pm Saturday 9:00 am to 1:00pm
I P I--


__TI








4A The Herald-Advocate, December 6, 2012


MILDRED RUBY
GILL YAZELL
Mildred Ruby Gill Yazell,
70, of Nashville, Tenn., died on
Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2012, at
Glen Oakes Nursing Home in
-Shelbyville, Tenn.
Born on Aug. 26, 1942, she
was retired and was a Christian.
She was preceded in death by
her father, Elam Emory Gill;
mother Vida Skinner; step-
mother Velma Smith; and half-
sister Esther Womble.
Survivors include daughters
Elizabeth D'Ree Cotton Harris
and Areca D'Nese Cotton-
Nicolosi and husband Salvatore
Nicolosi of Unionville, Tenn;
son Jason Cotton of Denver,
Colo.; half-sister Florida Elder
of Lithia; step-sister Phillis
Smith of Fort Meade; grand-
children Shasta Hedgecock,
Amber and James Hunter,
Raymond Cotton and Amanda
Nicolosi, and Jessica, Aaliyah,
Jalissah, Jason, Thomas,
Sophia, Gabriel and Elijah
Cotton; and two great-grand-
children.
Per her request, Ms. Yazell
was cremated with arrangement
to be determined at a later time
in Florida. Arrangements were
by Music City Mortuary of
Nashville, Tenn.



MARY L. DURRANCE
Mary L. Durrance, 82, of
Lake Placid, and formerly of
Bowling Green, died on Friday,
Nov. 30, 2012 at the Kenilworth
Care and Relab Center in
Sebring.
Born on March 22, 1930 in
Bowling Green, she moved to
Lake Placid in 1971 and was a
member of the First Presby-
terian Church of Lake Placid.
She was preceded in death by
husband Rodney; daughter
Denise Mote; and son Rev. Joe
F. Choate Jr.
Survivors include son David
Thomas Choate and wife Car-
roll, and Renee Choate, all of
Lake Placid; brothers Joe Jones
and wife Gretta of Bowling
Green, and. John Jones of
Riverview; 13 grandchildren;
and 17 great-grandchildren.
A graveside service to cele-
brate her life was held at 2 p.m.
on Monday, Dec. 3, 2012, at
Lakeview Memorial Gardens of
Avon Park with the Rev. Ray
Cameron officiating.
Funeral arrangements were
made by Scott Funeral Home of
Lake Placid.
S .*


ELDER MARVIN P.
WINGATE
Elder Marvin P. Wingate,
58, of Wauchula, passed away
on Friday, Nov. 30, 2012, at-
Winter Haven Hosital.
The son of the late J. Merl
and Waynoka Wingate, he
was born Sept. 10, 1954, in
Wauchula and was a lifelong
resident.
Marvin worked for many
years for Mosaic in South
Fort Meade in the mainte-
nance department. He was a
Primitive Baptist Elder and
served Mt. Zion Primitive
Baptist Church in Felda, and
assistant pastor at Gethse-
mane Primitive Baptist
Church in Fort Myers.-He
was a member of Paynes
Creek Primitive Baptist
Church.
He is survived by his
beloved wife Sylvia Wingate
of Wauchula; two sons,
Rickey Hansen of Fort Myers
and Christopher Wingate of
Tampa; two daughters Sharon
Wilson and husband Jeff of
LaBelle, and Melanie Seals
and husband Ron, also of
LaBelle; one sister, Linda
DeVane of ,Wauchula; eight
grandchildren; and four great-
grandchildren.
Visitation was from 6 to 8
p.m. Sunday, Dec. 2, 2012, in
the Chapel of Ponger-Kays-
Grady Funeral Home, 404 W.
Palmetto St., Wauchula. Ser-
vices were at 10'a.m. on Mon-
day, Dec. 3', in the Chapel of
Ponder-Kays-Grady Funeral
Home with Elder Hollis
Albritton officiating. Burial
followed in Hart Cemetery.
.On-line condolences


JOHNNY CLAYTON
VANDIVER
Johnny Clayton Vandiver,
67, of Wauchula, died on Thurs-
day, Nov. 22, 2012, at his home.
He was born in Franklin
County, Alabama, on Oct. 10,
1945.
He was preceded in death by
his parents, Drewey and Arellia
Vandiver; brothers Lloyd Ray
Vandiver and Drewey Clay
Vandiver; and sisters Marie
Holland and June Kathryn.
Hulett.
Survivors include wife
Martha Brewer Vandiver of
Wauchula;. sons John. Cody
Vandiver of Wauchula, and
Gregory Kirk Vandiver and
wife Juli of Indiana; daughter
'Lisa Gail Hillman and husband
Dean of New Jersey; brothers
James Wilson Vandiver and
wife Glenda, David Lee
Vandiver and Tim Vandiver of
Russellville, Ala.; sisters Annie
Ruth Cook of Russellville, Ala.,
and Peggy Diane Whitson of
Decator, Ala.;. brother-in-law
James Holland; and grand-
daughter Addison Blake
Vandiver.
Visitation was from 12 to 2
*p.m. Thursday, Nov. 29, 2012,
at Akins Funeral Home in
Russellville, Ala., where service
es were in the' funeral home
chapel at..2 p.m. with Brother
David Motes officiating. Inter-
ment followed in Gravel Hill
Cemetery in Russellville,
Arrangements were by Akins
Funeral Home of Russellville,
Ala.




ABOUT ..
School News
The Herald-Advocate en-
courages submissions from
Hardee County schools.
Photos and write-ups
should be of recent events,
and must include first and
last names for both students
and teachers. Identify pho-
tos front to back, left to right.
Deadline for submissions
is 5 p.m. on Thursday.
Please include the name
and phone number of a con-
tact person. Qualifying
items will be published as
space allows.


Obituaries


Skyweather Class
Next Week
A skywarn Weather
Spotter Training will be held
Monday from 2 to 4 p.m. at
the Hardee County Emer-
gency Operations Center,
404 W. Orange St., Wau-
chula. Reservations are
needed. Call 773-6373 or
e-mail Jill.Newman@c&,-d-
eecounty.net.
People encouraged to
attend are individuals affiliat-
ed with .hospitals, schools,
churches, nursing homes,
utilities, dispatchers, ama-
teur radio operators and
emergency response offi-
cials.

Free Phones For
Handicapped
Hearing impaired persons
or'those with a speech loss
can get a free amplified tele-
phone next Thursday by
making an appointment with
Hearing Impaired Persons
Inc. at 941-743-8347.
The phones will be distrib-
uted to Florida residents at
the Catheryn McDonald
Center, 310 N. Eighth Ave.,
Wauchula, between 12:30
and 2:30 p.m. on Dec. 13.

Workforce Closes
For Holidays
Heartland Workforce will
close its One-Stop Career
Centers during the upcoming
holidays.
The offices will close on
Dec. 21, Dec. 24-25, and
Jan. 1.


LINDA RUTH
SHERIDAN
Linda Ruth Sheridan, 67,-of
Fort Meade, died on Saturday,
Dec. 1; 2012, at her home.
Born Sept. 27, 1945, in
Miami Beach, she was a house-
wife and was one of Jehovah's
Witnesses.
Survivors include her hus-
band of 31 years, Daniel Earl
Sheridan of Fort Meade; three
daughters, Vicky Kissick and
husband Bob of Avon. Park,
Tina Huntsman and husband
Chuck of Wauchula, and Tender
Richard of Fort Meade; mother
and father, Ruth and Jerry Lee
of Fort Meade; sisters Gayle
Ling of North Carolina and
Kathy Kendrick of North Port;
and four grandchildren, Clayton
Ebersole of Bartow, Erik Al-
varado of Wauchula, Brandon
Alvarado of Wauchula and
Nathan Ebersole of Sebring.
Arrangements were handled
by Cremation Service of Mid-
Florida. A memorial service
will be held at the Kingdom
Hall of Jehovah's Witnesses,
1810 Davis St., Bartow on
Saturday, Dec. 15, 2012, at 2
p.m.

Chains do not hold a mar-
riage together. It is
threads, hundreds of tiny
threads, which sew people
together through the
years.
-Simone Signoret

The first duty of love is to
listen.
-Paul Tillich


FAMILY FUNERAL HOME


A Trusted Family Name


Since 1906


ROBARTS FAMILY FUNEI
www. RobartsFuneralt
529 West Main Street Wauchula, Flori
12:6c


Letter To The Editor
Recent Dance Helped Hardee
Junior High Band, Chorus


THURSDAY. DEC. 6
VHardee County Com-
mission, regular meeting,
Room 102, Courthouse
Annex I, 412 W. Orange St.,
Wauchula, 8:30 a.m.
VHardee County Com-
mission and Planning &
Zoning Board, joint meeting
on CF Industries Annual
Review, Room 102, Court-
house Annex I, 412.W.
Orange St., Wauchula, 6
p.m.

MONDAY. DEC. 10
VWauchula City Com-
mission, regular meeting,
City Hall, 225 E. Main St.,
Wauchula, 6 p.m.

TUESDAY, DEC. 11
VBowling Green City
Commission, regular meet-
ing, City Hall, 104 E. Main
St., Bowling Green, 6:30
p.m.

THURSDAY. DEC. 12
VHardee County School
Board, .regular meeting,
Board Room, 230 S. Florida
Ave., Wauchula, 5 p.m.


thank TJ and the Cruisers,
Armando Sanchez y Su Ley Del
Norte. and DJ Energia Musical
for providing music for the
event.
Finally, I would like to thank
the Hardee County Sheriff's
Department. Thank you to all of
those who helped to make this a
successful event.
Shayla Bryan
Wauchula
Hardee Jr. High School
Band/Choral Director


Courtesy Photos
Armando Sanchez Band


Every artist dips his brush in his own soul and paints his
own nature into his pictures.
-Henry Ward Beecher
To live a creative life, we must lose our fear of being
wrong.


IN 1 IIItK


TIME OF NEED



Over /

AL HOME, Inc. LO
Home.corn
da 33873 863-773-9773


Dear Editor:
The Hardee Jr. High Music
Program recently hosted a
Donation Dance. This event
was successful in helping raise
money for the band and chorus
programs.
I would like to thank the
Cielito Lindo Club for hosting
the event. I would also like to
thank, WAUC-1310 Radio
Mexicana for advertising and
promoting the dance.
Additionally. I would like to


s, c pfoL g /iemnof
DOROTHY L
ROBERTS
Dorothy L. Roberts, 78, of
Wauchula, passed away at
Florida Hospital in Sebring on
Monday, Dec. 3, 2012.
Born on April 19, 1934, in
Wauchula, she had been a life-
long resident of Hardee Coun-
ty and a homemaker. She was
a member of Florida's First
Assembly of God. She will be
fondly remembered for her
creativity, humor, boundless
energy, love of children and
sewing.
Dorothy is reunited in
death with her husband, Jason
E. Roberts, with whom she
shared 37 years of marriage;
and her daughter Sherry Lynn
Seybert.
Survivors include sons
Richard Roberts and wife
Linda of Lakeland, and
Marcus Roberts of Zolfo
Springs; sister Sylvia Wil-
liams of Troy, Ala.; nine
grandchildren; and 19 great-
grandchildren.
Visitation will be held on
Friday, Dec. 7, 2012, at 10
a.m., with services to follow
at 11 a.m. at Robarts Garden
Chapel with the Rev. Jeff
Fowler officiating. Interment
is in Oak Grove Cemetery.
Expressions of comfort may
be made at robartsfh.com.


FUNERAL HOME
WAUCHULA

fcwiP'


or


C(hould I prepay


prearrange my

final wishes?


Call today and set an appointment
with one of our funeral directors to
discuss this important matter.




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(863) 773-6400
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MARY OWEN
CARTER,
Mary Owen Carter, 62, of
Wauchula, died on Sunday,
Nov. 25, 2012.
.Born on Dec. 11, 1949, at
Ocala, she came to Hardee
County from Alabama a year
ago.
'Survivors include her
mother Dora Bozeman of
Wauchula; step-father John
Ray Bozeman of Fort Meade;
husband Lloyd Carter of
Alabama; daughter Crystal
McCollum of Wauchula;
brother Jimmy Hiatt of Wau-
chula; sisters Martha Godwin
of Wauchula and Betty True-
blood of Savannah, Ga.:
grandchildren Adara and
Declan McCollum: several
cousins and extended family.
Expressions of comfort may
be made at robartsfh.com.
e04"Ij 4 an,,di
FUNERAL HOME
WAUCHULA

wL~iw


WE ARE


HONORED TO BE


STHE CONTINUED CHOICE


OF HARDEE COUNTY'S



ROBARTS WONDERFUL COMMUNITY


may be made at
PongerKays-Grady.com.
CPoigeki--oyts-Qtodt
Funeral Home &
Cremation Services
Wauchula
-VI -
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*~CC- ,


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December 6, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 5A


HHS Christmas


Concert Dec. 13


The Hardee Senior High
School Band and the Hardee
Senior High School Chorus will
combine efforts for their annual
Christmas Gala next Thursday,
Dec. 13.
'The concert will begin at 6:30
p.m., and will be held in the
Hardee Senior High School
Auditorium on Altman Road in
Wauchula.
The concert will be packed
with holiday hits such as
"Coming Home for Christmas,"
"FaLaLaLaLa," and a mix of
favorites called "Jingle All the
Way Medley."
Also included are traditional
Christmas favorites like "God
Rest Ye, Merry Gentlemen,"
"Bring a Torch, Jeannette,
Isabella" and "In the Bleak
Midwinter."
The band will perform selec-
tions such as "Yuletide Cheer,"
"The Polar Express" and "Silent
Night," and will close with "The
Child and the Kings."
The concert will conclude
with a medley of. carols called
"It's the Holiday Season" per-
formed by the combined efforts


of the band and combined
choirs.
The concert will feature the
Hardee Senior High School
Dance Team, Percussion
Ensemble, Symphonic Band,
Chorus and Varsity Chorus.
The band is under the direc-'
tion of Michael Hill, while the
chorus is directed by David
Radford.
Admission to the concert will
be $2 per.-person, and will be
collected at the, door. The
money collected will help cover
the cost of the concert.
A limited number of tickets
are still available for the buffet-
style meal that will be served at
5:30 in the Hardee Senior High
School Media Center, provided
by the Hardee Senior High
School .Culinary Arts Depart-
ment. Tickets are available for
$15 and include the dinner and
the concert.
Please contact Culinary Arts
Instructor Elaine Pearce, Band
Director Michael Hill, or
Chorus Director David Radford
at the high school (773-3181)
for tickets.


Smithsonian Institution 'Journey
Stories' In Sebring Dec. 8-Jan 19


The Florida Humanities
Council, in partnership with the
Smithsonian Institute, is, spon-
soring -the Florida tour of
Journey Stories an exhibit
that uses images, audio and arti-
facts to illustrate the critical
roles that traveling and move-
ment have played in building
our diverse American society.
The Highlands Art League's
Museum of the Arts (MOTA)
will host an opening reception
on Friday, Dec. 7, from 5-7 P.M.
for the traveling Smithsonian
Institution exhibition, 'Journey
Stories' that will be housed in
the downtown Sebring museum,
which is located behind the
library and next to Highlands
Little Theatre (351 W. Center
Ave.) from Dec. 8-Jan. 19,2013,


that will be free for the public to
attend. Stop by prior to the
Christmas Parade to welcome
the Smithsonian Institution to
SHighland County.
Inside the nearby Thakkar
Pavilion at Highlands Little the-
atre, local residents will- be in
attendance to share their fami-
ly's Journey Story to the
Heartland area. Speakers will
include: Sebring CRA Chair
Kelly Cosgrave, Sebring City
Council Chair John Griffin,
Senator Denise Grimsley,
Mayor George Hensley & Mrs.
Nancy Hensley, Mr. Claude
Howerton, Mr. and Mrs.
Marvin Kahn, and Mr: John
Skipper. There will also be a
ribbon cutting ceremony at
MOTA's front door.


Outta The Woods
I By Tony Young
-.... Florida Fish & Wildlife Commission

HOLIDAY HUNTING TRADITIONS
There's finally a chill and certain festiveness in the air as most
of us try to take time off from work to enjoy spending quality time
with family and friends and reflect on the passing year. Children
will be out of school on winter break soon, and while the holiday
season is upon us, so are several traditional hunting opportunities.
The second phase of waterfowl and coot season comes in
statewide on Saturday and runs through Jan. 27. In addition to the
usual hunting license and, permit requirements, duck hunters also
must have a Florida waterfowl permit ($5) and a federal duck
stamp ($15).
The daily bag limit on ducks is six, but you need to know your
ducks before you pull the trigger, because there are different daily
limits for each species. For instance, within the six-bird limit there
may be only one black duck, one mottled duck, one fulvous
whistling-duck and one canvasback.
Only two of your six-bird limit may be pintails or redheads,
and three may be wood ducks. And you may have no more than
four scaup, four scoters or four mallards (of which only two may
be female) in your bag. All other species of ducks can be taken up
to the six-bird limit, except harlequin ducks.
The daily limit on coots is 15, and there's a five-bird limit on
mergansers, only two of which may be hooded.
When hunting waterfowl, hunters may use only nontoxic shot-
gun shells. Only iron (steel), bismuth-tin and various tungsten-
alloys are permissible.
For something different, try woodcock hunting. Woodcock
season runs Dec. 18-Jan. 31. Woodcocks are excellent game birds
because they hold well for pointing bird dogs and provide a chal-
lenging shot when flushed. The daily bag limit is three.
The third phase of mourning and white-winged dove season
opens Saturday and runs through Jan. 6. The daily bag limit is 15
birds.
From November on, the shooting hours for all migratory birds
are one-half hour before sunrise to sunset. However, you must get
a no-cost migratory bird permitwhere you purchase your hunting
license before you hunt any of these birds.
The only firearm you can use to hunt migratory game birds is
a shotgun, no larger than 10-gauge. Shotguns must be plugged to a
three-shell capacity (magazine and chamber combined). Bows also
are legal.
Retrievers and bird dogs can be useful in hunting migratory
game birds. Artificial decoys and manual or mouth-operated bird
calls also are legal and essential gear for duck hunters.
You may hunt migratory game birds over an agricultural field
if the crop was planted by, regular agricultural methods. However,
don't even think about "sweetening" the field by scattering agri-
cultural products over it or anywhere near it or you could,
wind up in serious, trouble. It doesn't matter if you aren't the one
who scattered the bait. If you knew or should have known that such
Sbait was present, you're accountable under federal law.
Some other things you can't do while hunting migratory game
birds include using rifles, pistols, crossbows, traps, snares, nets,
sinkboxes, swivel guns, punt guns, battery guns, machine guns,
fish hooks, poisons, drugs, explosive substances, live decoys and
recorded bird calls, sounds or electrically amplified bird-call imita-
tions. It is also against the law to shoot from a moving automobile
or boat and herd or drive birds with vehicles or vessels.
Bobcat and otter hunting season runs to March 1, and there's
no daily bag or season limit on either species.
Like foxes, bobcats maybe chased year-round with dogs, but


possessing firearms during the closed season, between March 2 and
Nov. 30, is prohibited. On a few wildlife management areas, bob-
cats and otters may not be taken, so please consult the specific area
brochure before you hunt.
December has the hunting opportunities you're looking for,
whether you are upland-bird hunting with friends and family,
shooting ducks on the pond with your favorite lab or taking that big
cat as he slips up behind an unsuspecting fawn.
Here's wishing you happy holidays and a successful hunting
season. If you can, remember to introduce someone new to our
great sport. As always, have fun, hunt safely and ethically, and
we'll see you in the woods!
Tony Young is the media relations coordinator for the FWC's
Division of Hunting and Game Management. You can reach him
with questions about hunting at Tony.Young@MyFWC.com.



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6A The Herald-Advocate. December 6, 2012


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8A The Herald-Advocate, December 6, 2012


HES Names First 9 Weeks 'Leading Lions'


At the end of the first nine weeks of the school year, Hilltop Elementary School recog-
nized its students with the "Leading Lions" award. Kindergarteners recognized were
(front row, from left) Allysen Reschke, Madison Miller and Jesus Valerio-Trevina; (back)
Olivia Gonzalez, Austin Walker, Fabian Galvan, Marcelino Rios and Ariareli Roig.


COURTESY PHOTOS
First graders named as Leading Lions were (front, from left) Liliana Martinez, Alberto
Sosa, Jesus Torres-Aguirre and Dulce Hernandez; (back) Dionisio Ramirez, Alex Garcia,
Damian Silva and Luz Edith Perez.


Students in second grade receiving their awards were (from front left) Ruby Flores, Emil-
iano Zapata and Yuridia Rojas; (back) Alexandra Mondragon, Jose Ibanez, Amaris Reyes
and Joel Santana.


oIuoenis in Peg risseii s class also receiving me Leading Lions award were (from lett)
David Sotelo and Filiberto Gutierrez


Acknowledged as Leading Lions in third grade were (front, from left) Jennifer Garcia.
Daniela Salgado, Alex Torres and Eli Bertrand: (back) Genesis Silva, Ryan Newman,
Jorge Guerrero,and Lorena Villa.


Fifth graders who earned the Leading Lions award were (front) Blake Fontana and Herika:
Lopez; (back, from left) Bias Aleman, Miguel Velasco-Gonzalez, Rocio Ramos and
Maricela Garcia-Paz.


Leading Lions in fourth grade were (front) Jozie St. Louis and Daysi Hernandez-Garcia;
(back, from left) Ana Ibanez, Minerva Santiago, Huriel Cortez-Olivera and Sara Spires.
If people will not speak up for other people's rights, there will come a day when they
will lose their own.
-Tony Lawrence
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December 6,2012, The Herald-Advocate 9A


MY STINT ON A FEDERAL JURY
It appears in my mailbox Tuesday. I toss it on the table. "More
junk," I think.
Friday afternoon a voice whispers: "Open it." It is a summons
to appear for federal jury duty at the Sam Gibbons Federal
Courthouse in downtown Tampa at 7:30 Monday morning.
I park in the Poe Parking Garage, as instructed in the sum-
mons. Walk four blocks to the courthouse. I'm early. Courthouse
locked. I walk on, noting a cluster of no less than 20 homeless peo-
ple camped on a sidewalk half a block from the courthouse.
A huge herd of prospective jurors is ushered into a room on the
third floor, where we are indoctrinated into the responsibilities, and
reminded of the honor, of serving our country as jurors. The entire
judicial system would crumble, we are told, were it not for men and
women like us who'graciously. volunteer time out of their busy
livs to serve as jurors.
We are also informed.we can be fined up to $1,000 for failure
to show up.
Two criminal trials and one civil case are to begin today.
Thirty names are called to line up for the first criminal case, 30
more for the second: Eighteen are called for the civil case. After 17


names, none of them mine, I begin to feel the sting of being denied
an opportunity to serve my country. Then "Leland Ballard" blasts
through the P.A. I put my car keys back in my pocket.
We are escorted to the 17th floor to a courtroom where the
attorney for the plaintiff is seated at a table with another man and a
woman; the. defense attorney and two associates sit behind another
table. We are instructed t6 rise. Judge Susan Brantley enters the
courtroom.
The plaintiff, Tony Degaso, she explains, is suing Fred's
Stores for $750,000 claiming he slipped in a puddle of water and
injured his knee. Degaso's ex-wife is asking for $50,000 because,
she says, the trauma of the injury broke up their marriage.
The attorneys state their cases and question us for most of the
morning. When I'm asked if I-can be impartial, I reply truthfully,
saying I doubt it because I have an aversion to frivolous lawsuits,
and name a couple.
I am surprised when I am one of the eight selected to serve.
Three days of testimony from doctors, friends of Degaso,.
Degaso himself, and his ex-wife ensue. The performances are fas-
cinating.
Degaso, 65, is dark with thick black hair slicked straight back.
I notice the juror beside me scribbled on his note pad, "Mobsters?"
Indeed Degaso, his ex, and their attorney look as if they might have
stepped out of an episode of "The Sopranos."
We learn Degaso filed an identical lawsuit, involving his other
knee, 25 years ago, and won. When he'd taken that fall, he'd been
drunk.
After the alleged fall at Fred's, he had not gone to a doctor for
2-1/2 years although he claimed to have been in excruciating pain
every day. His ex-wife, we find out, is actually his fourth ex-wife,
and on the stand she lets it slip that two weeks after the injury
Degaso had resumed drinking and carousing till 4 or 5 every morn-
ing with pals, two of whom testify, bleary-eyed, to Degaso's ster-


ling character.
The store where he said he'd fallen had gone out of business
five years ago. None of the former employees could be located.
Judge Brantley gives each juror 17 typed pages of instructions,
to refer to in our deliberation. The first item asks, "Do you believe
Fred's Stores is liable?" If the answer is no, we are told, we need
go no further.
Deliberation takes less than a minute.
When it is all over, Brantley comes to the jury room to thank
us for our service. I ask if Fred's Stores had offered Degaso a set-
tlement before the case came before her. She nods.
Oh, the disappointment must be bitter, I think, if he'd been
offered a nice chunk of change only to reject it and wind up with
nothing.
Can we talk about the case now? You can write a book, if you
want. Why was this case in federal court? Fred's Stores are scat-
tered throughout Tennessee, Georgia and parts of Florida.
Judge Brantley focuses on me. "You must have been surprised
you were selected for this jury." Shocked, I say. She explains that
ith an eight-panel jury each attorney can dismiss only so many,
and if Degaso's attorney could have dismissed one more, I'd have
been gone, although the defense would have fought tooth and nail
to keep me.
Driving home I think about the huge expense this three-day
farce must have cost. It dawns on me more clearly than ever how
in today's society anyone can sue anybody, for anything.
Then, remembering sticking my finger with my "Juror" pin
when I'd re-entered the courthouse after lunch, I wonder who I can
sue, and how much I might get. I mean, after all, since jurors are
forced to wear those pins, shouldn't they come with a warning that
if you poke yourself with the point, it will smart and draw blood?
E-mail Chip at chipkyle746@embarqmail.com."or visit his website
at www.chipballard.com.


CHRISTMAS CONCERT SATURDAY
The holidays are rapidly approaching, and the Friends of
Highlands Hammock have scheduled a choral concert to celebrate
the Christmas season for this Saturday beginning at 7 p.m. in the
park's picnic area.
This outdoor concert will provide a variety of seasonal
favorites and surely help everyone get into the holiday spirit. While
enjoying the music, plan to drop in to The Hammock Inn and meet
the new concession operators.
Longtime resident Deborah Reeves and son Benjamin Hulitt
have softly opened their business, keeping the rustic feel and fla-
vors that have made The Hammock Inn so popular over the years.
Reeves lives in Hardee County and has thought about operat-
ing the park concession for a very long time. When her son,
Benjamin, relocated from South Bend, Ind., this-summer, the time
seemed right. Hulitt says he considers this a divine appointment, as
he has dreamed of operating his own restaurant for nearly two
decades.
Hulitt had spent his snowy winter seasons working as a chef
and dping construction in the summer months. Now that he has
relocated to Florida, he decided it was time to jump into his dream.
"I consider myself a Picasso of culinary.arts," he says. "I like to
create a food experience that makes people happy and doesn't cost
too much."
Local folks will probably be very happy to try his gator-Philly-
cheesesteak or gator sausage, egg and cheese biscuit. "I make my
own gator sausage,;' says Hulitt, who clearly has a passiort for
something just a bit different. "We are going to have a variety of
unique items and classic favorites on the menu. Right now We are
having a soft opening, but plan to have all our menu.items avail-
able by the first week of January."
On tha menu, will be the ever-popular wild orange pie that has
been ubiquitous with Highlands Hammock State Park since the
1940s.
On Saturday, the inn will have a limited event menu for the
concert, but looks forward to meeting park goers. We hope you will
stop in for some holiday music and refreshments at Highlands
Hammock State Park.


Signed Penny
By Penny Johnson
Q&A With A Biblical Perspective


IS CHURCH MANDATORY?
Q: Do you believe that you have to go to church to make it
to heaven? People are always telling me that church is manda-
tory and we must attend to go to heaven. But, I pray at home,
read my Bible and watch inspiring things on television. Do you
think I have to go to church?
Signed, Non-Attender

A: In. the Bible they did not have a church per se to attend,
rather a tabernacle, temple and synagogue. The Lord wanted a cen-
tral place that was consecrated holy so He could meet with His peo-
plei.Today we call these meeting places by different names depend-
ing on what religious denomination you are. Since you mentioned
church, that is what we will address.
'."Church" has many different meanings; everyone interprets
church in a different way...To some, it's a place to attend on the
Sabbath out of obedience, while others only attend on special hol-
idays. Others find it a joyful place to gather a few days a week to
worship the Lord, learn His Word and pray.
God's people have also been called the church or temple of
God; meaning God dwells in them. Some denominations -believe
the church is referred to as a body of believers, not a building.
I personally do not believe a church building is mandatory to
make it to heaven. The'Bible says, "Where two or three are gath-
ered together there I Am in the midst of them."
But, once you have accepted Christ into your heart you need
to assemble yourselves with other Christians so you can stay strong
in the faith. When we are alone it is easier to drift away and be
tempted by the enemy. There is protection and comfort in numbers.
Hebrews 10:25, "Let us not give up meeting together, as some are
in the habit of doing, but let us encourage one another ... ."
David was a man-after God's own heart and he found it a priv-
ilege and his desire to go to church. In Psalms 122:1 David said,
"I was glad when they said unto me, let us go into the house of the
Lord." Psalms 27:4, "One thing have I desired of the Lord, that will
I seek after; that I may dwell in the house of the Lord all the days
of my life." This isn't saying you can't go to heaven, but attending
God's house makes the journey more fulfilling.
Inspirational television is wonderful, thank God for it, but I
tlon't think it should take the place of assembling yourself with
other believers. In some cases television is the only church some
people can experience, but if possible, find you a good church and
plant yourself there.
Penny Johnson is an ordained minister and has an associate of arts
degree in psychology. To ask Penny a question, send a message to
signedpenny@yahooo.conm.


Pre-service Instrumental Concert 5:30pm


Connie Albritton and Dot Bell Organ

Special Guest Ben Norris, Trumpet




"Christmas Eve Service


Carols, Scriptures and Candlelight Closing


December 24th 5:00pm



OAKGROVE PT




For mo e-ftll








10A The Herald-Advocate, December 6,2012


Is There Time To Go Back To School? Tips For Parents:


Going back to school is a big
decision, one that can ultimately
pay off in terms of future
income and career 6pportuni-
ties. Many working adults -
especially parents and man-
agers-would love to finish their
degree, get a certificate or even
earn an advanced degree, but are
convinced that they just don't
have the time. They would like
to put themselves in a position
to earn a promotion or become
an authority in their field but
they feel there just aren't enough
hours in the day.
The reality is that, while
going back to school is not
always going to be'easy, it does
not have to mean neglecting
your job or family or even being
an "al or nothing" proposition.
First, weigh the payoffs with
the sacrifices. How would your
life be different if you pursued
more education? Will you have
regrets if you continue to put off
pursuing this education? What
kind of example would you like
to set for your family, your col-
leagues and others in your life?
You may have to give up a little
time now but down the road you
may save time you would have
spent worrying, working addi-
tional jobs or distressing over
lack of advancement in your
career.
If you have decided that
returning to school is the right
path for achieving your goals,
much like many students do by
using Bellevue University's
www.makeithappennow.org, set
a game plan for making the jour-
ney doable. You are ultimately
seeking, to improve yourlife, not
make things harder on yourself.
Some tips to factor in while
determining this plan include:
Save yourself both time


and money. When you enroll,
make sure to inquire about
every source of transfer credit
the school accepts. This will
save you repeating (and paying
for) courses covering knowl-
edge you already possess.
Sources of credit could include
military training, standardized
testing, life experience or credit
from previous schools (includ-
ing community college or tech-
nical school).
Consider studying online.
First, depending on your prox-
imity to the college or universi-
ty, you could save yourself
many minutes driving round-
trip. Second, opening your
search up to online options
expands your range of schools
and gives you a better chance of
finding the school that works
best with you to accomplish
your goals.
Determine what your
schedule can realistically
accommodate. Work with an
academic adviser at the school
you will be attending to set real-
istic goals. For example, if your
schedule allows you to take
classes only part-time right
now, do not pressure yourself
int? taking a full course load
with. expectations of a perfect
grade point average. Remem-
ber, no step is too small in walk-
ing toward your goals; do it at
your own pace.
"Many online programs are
asynchronous, which means
you do not have to turn in your
coursework or, attend lectures at
a set time," said Dr. Mary
Hawkins, president of Bellevue
University. "Our online stu-
dents have the fullest, most hec-
tic lives you can imagine and
many of them tell us they could
not have accomplished their


goals any other way. From serv-
ice members deployed overseas
to working parents submitting
coursework after putting the
children to bed, our graduates
tell us time and again that going
back to school was worth every
sacrifice they had to make to do
so."
Assess your support sys-
tem. Make sure your employer
-is aware of and supportive of
your efforts. Ask about sched-
ule flexibility; for example,
may you use your lunch hours
for study time? Can you work a
different schedule-go in an hour
earlier or work four 10-hour
days instead of five eight-hour
days to accommodate your
schoolwork? Also, ask if your
employer offers any sort of
tuition remission-this may save
you time figuring out how to
pay for your new endeavor.
Equally important in your
support system, if not more so,
are your friends and family.
Everyone is willing to provide
support in different ways. Talk
to your, friends, your spouse,
.your co-workers, your siblings
and your parents. Know up
front whom you can call,when
you need someone to help with
the kids, lend an ear or run an
errand you just don't have time
to get to. Most people are will-
ing to help, especially when you
are pursuing a worthwhile goal,
but they will not know how to
help if you do not ask.
Once you have a plan in
place, it is time to put it into
action. Before you know it, you
should. have adjusted your time
management .and reached your
goal. You can move on to big-
ger and better things as a result.
Learn more at www.makeithap-
pennow.org.


Chris O'Donnell Educates Adults On Seriousness
Of The Flu, Annual Vaccination Options
Actor Chris O'Donnell, starof revealed that 53 percent of influenza disease caused by
"NCIS: Los Angeles," knows adults 18 through 64 years of influenza virus subtypes A and
the single most important thing age who were vaccinated annu- type B contained in the vaccine.
adults can do to help prevent ally reported that their vaccina- Safety Information
getting or spreading the flu is to tion experience would be better Redness, firmness, swelling
receive their annual flu vaccina- if the needle was much smaller, and itching at the injection site
tion. However, Chris admits get- and 65 percent said their experi- occur more frequently with
ting a flu shot can sometimes ence would be better if access Fluzone Intradermal vaccine
make him a little anxious. He to the flu shot was more con- than with Fluzone vaccine..
may not be the only one. On ..eenien. Other common side effects to
:Average, only a third of adults "When my doctor and 'I Pluzone' Intradermal vaccine'
I8 through 64 years of age get a "talked this"l'bhr about what may include pain, headache, fatigue,
flu shot, despite the fact that make my experience a good and muscle aches. Side effects
each year in the U.S., one in five one, we determined Fluzone(r) other than those listed above
people, or up to 20 percent of Intradermal vaccine was the may occur. Fluzone Intradermal
the population gets the flu. On best option for me. The device vaccine should not be adminis-
average, influenza and its relat- has a needle smaller than a tered to anyone with a severe.
ed complications result in grain of rice, which for me, allergic reaction to any vaccine
approximately 226,000 hospital- made a 'big difference," said .component, including eggs, egg
izations. O'Donnell. products, or to a previous dose
"Living in a household with Fluzone Intradermal vaccine of any influenza vaccine. Tell
five kids, I understand the im- is the only FDA approved the doctor if you have ever
portance of getting my flu shot," intradermal flu vaccine for experienced Guillain-Barr6
said O'Donnell. "Getting vacci- adults 18 through 64 years of syndrome (severe muscle weak-
nated is the single most impor- age in the 'United States. The ness) after a previous dose of
tant thing adults can do to help microneedle has an ultrathin tip influenza vaccine. If you notice
prevent getting or spreading the only 1.5mm long-the same as any other problems or symp-
flu. However, many adults re- the thickness of a U.S. penny,, toms following vaccination,
main unprotected from this seri- To find out where Fluzone please contact your health care
ous disease. My hope is that Intradermal vaccine is available professional immediately.
through increased awareness in your area, visit www.Flu- Vaccination with Fluzone
and education, more adults will zone.com or talk to your health 'Intradermal vaccine may. not
take steps to help protect them- care provider or pharmacist for protect all individuals.
selves and their loved ones by, more information. For more information about
getting their flu shot." Fluzone Intradermal vaccine,
Chris joined Sanofi Pasteur to About Fluzone talk to your health care profes-
help raise awareness about vac- Intradermal Vaccine sional and see complete Patient
cine options available for adults Indication Information.
to address the historically low Fluzone Intradermal vaccine Said actor Chris O'Donnell,
immunization rates among this is an inactivated influenza virus "Getting vaccinated is the sin-
population. vaccine given to people 18 gle most important thing adults
Results from a recent tele- through 64 years of age for can do to help prevent getting
phone survey of 663 adults. active immunization against or spreading the flu."


On Track For Success


If you're looking for a profes-
sion that's growing in demand,
consider professional coaching.
There are currently almost
50,000 professional coaches
worldwide and as the de-
mand grows that number
continues to increase.
According to a recent ICF
Global Coaching Study by the
International Coach Federation
(ICF), there's a diverse distribu-
tion of coaches across the globe,
with areas of rapid expansion
and growth potential. The year-
long study, which covered 117
countries in Africa, Asia, Au-
stralia, Europe and North Amer-
ica, found that the total world-
wide revenue generated by
coaching nears $2 billion.
Why is the need for coaches
growing? People always seek
ways to maximize their personal
and professional potential, but
in tough economic times, the
need to succeed can be even
more acute. "Achieving an
unprecedented level of re-
sponse, this wide-reaching in-
dustry study reveals the global
scale of the profession of coach-
ing as well as amazing growth in


the number of practicing coach-
es," said Janet M. Harvey, a
master certified coach and glob-
al president of ICF, a leading
global organization for coaches.
In general, coaches who
responded to the study viewed
their prospects over the next
year in a positive light. Almost
six in 10 coaches said they
experienced an increase in
clients and 55 percent reported
an increase in revenues.
Earning credentials remains
an important step in gaining
clients and is reflected in earn-
ing potential. On average, cre-
dentialed coaches earn 41 per-
cent more per year ($65,318)
than do coaches who are not
($46,399).
ICF is dedicated to advancing
the coaching profession by set-
ting high ethical standards, pro-
viding independent certification
and building a worldwide net-
work of credentialed coaches.
To learn more about the Global
Coaching Study, or for more
information about coaching and
credentialing programs, visit
www.coachfeder ation.org.


Circle The Date!
COMMUNITY CALENDAR
DEADLINE
IS MONDAY AT 5 PM.


Discussing Underage Drinking


There's welcome news for
parents who have yet to have a
discussion with their son or
daughter about underage drink-
ing.
There's a free program that's
designed to help parents begin
the conversation and maintain
an ongoing dialogue with their
kids.
According to a recent study,
67 percent of parents feel that
they have influence on their
teens' decisions about underage
drinking and they think their
teens listen to what they have to
say. Additionally, the parenting
poll revealed that parents
who've already talked to their
teens about underage drinking
this back-to-school season be-
lieve they're, getting through to
their kids, with 88 percent say-
ing their teens were receptive.
The survey was conducted by
Impulse Research for Anheuser-
Busch.

A Program to Help Parents
First launched more than 20.
years ago, Family Talk was


revamped in 2011 and now
focuses on parenting stages-
teacher, facilitator and coach-
that help parents use and adapt
their influence to help prevent
underage drinking as their chil-
dren grow and mature.
The program was recently
renovated and expanded with
help from certified parent coach
MJ Corcoran to be a compre-
hensive resource for parents of
kids of all ages.
The program guide, which
can be downloaded for free
from the program's Facebook
page, offers parents a number of
tips for having more meaning-
ful conversations with their
children about drinking, includ-
ing:
Asking open-ended ques-
tions, such as "If there's drink-
ing at the party, what will you
do?" or "What do you think
about kids who drink?"
Listening with an open
mind. In other words, stay
focused on what your child is
saying right then, not on what
he or she has said in'the past, or


what parents think their child
should be saying.
Setting consistent, clear
boundaries.
In addition to downloading
the guide, when visiting the
Facebook page, parents can
interact with a parent-coach
expert and other parents to
share tips and advice on han-
dling real-world situations.
Maintaining a Dialogue
"Our Family Talk About
Drinking program is designed
to help parents begin the con-
versation and maintain an ongo-
ing dialogue, whether their
child is in elementary, middle or
high school, or even headed to
college," said Kathy Casso, vice
president of Corporate Social
Responsibility for Anheuser-
Busch.
To learn more, visit
www.facebook.com/ABFamily
Talk.
When discussing drinking,
parents should Ask open-ended
questions, such as "If there's
drinking at the party, what will
you do?"


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December 6,2012, The Herald-Advocatfe 1A


Pump Up Your Heart Health


One in three adults in the
QnitedStates 80 million peo-
ple has some form of heart
disease, stroke or other cardio-
vascular condition, but you can
reduce your risk of these disor-
ders.
'Researchers, with the Preven-
tioh Research Centers (PRC)
"Program, a nationwide network
of 37 academic research part-
hers funded by the Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention
(CDC) to find ways to keep peo-
ple healthy, offer the following
tips.
"Eat high-quality carbohy-
drates and fats," advises Tom
Keyserling, M.D., M.P.H., re-
searcher at the University of
North Carolina at Chapel Hill
PRC' Dr. Keyserling says tb,
latest public health researL.
indicates that for heart health,
people should .pay attention to
the quality, not just the quantity,
of fats and carbohydrates they
eat. "High-quality carbs include
whole grains instead of refined
grains, whole wheat bread
instead of white bread, brown
rice instead of white rice and, in
gerieral, nonstarchy fruits and
vegetables, such as citrus and
broccoli," he says. "And chdose
nuts, fish, and vegetable oils for
thiir high-quality polyunsaturat-
ed fat." He is researching how
well 'the new dietary findings
work to improve heart health.
"One key element of heart
health is physical activity, which
,helps people control their
-weight and blood pressure,"
.says Tracy Battaglia, MiD.,
M.P.H., of the Boston Uniyer-
S.sity PRC. "High blood pressure
is a critical risk factor for car-
'diovascular disease. It's impor-
.'tant to keep your blood pressure
lee than 1.40/90, and less than
.120/80 is considered normal."
She is investigating strategies to
,connect public housing resi-
$dents, who often have, insuffi-
cient health insurance, with
4. *:


health care services.
'Reducing the amount of salt
you eat can help reduce blood
pressure. adds Alwyn Cohall,
M.D., of the Columbia Univer-
sity PRC. "It's not so much
what you add to your food with
the saltshaker, but what's
already in your food." he says.
"Processed food is the leading
culprit. Eat more fresh fruits
and vegetables." Dr. Cohall is
researching strategies for low-
ering blood pressure in New
York's Harlem community,
which is largely African Amer-
ican a population more like-
ly to have high blood pressure
than the white population.
Dr. Cohall also recommends
not smoking, limiting alcohol,
and taking medications as pre-
scribed to control blood pres-
sure. "High blood pressure may
have no symptoms," he says.
"The unfortunate first warning
sign may be stroke or heart
attack. Don't wait for symptoms
before taking action to protect
your heart."
The PRC researchers' recom-
mendations are in line with
Million Hearts(tm), an initiative
of the Department of Healthi
and Human Services to prevent
a million heart attacks and
strokes by, 2017 through
improvements in clinical and
community prevention. Clinical
prevention focuses on the
"ABCS":
A Appropriate Aspirin
Therapy
B Blood Pressure Control
C Cholesterol Management
S Smoking Cessation.
Community prevention fo-
cuses on reducing salt and trans
fats in Americans' diets and pre-
venting tobacco use. Learn
more at www.millionhearts.-
hhs.gov.
For more information about
CDC's Prevention Research
Centers Program, visit www.-
cdc.gov/prc.


. 7 -.
I-, *


and other persons having claims
or demands against decedent's
estate, including unmatured, con-
tingent or unliquidated claims, on
whom a copy of this notice Is
served must file their claims with
the court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons having
claims or demands against this
decedent's estate, Including
unmatured, contingent or unliqui-
dated claims, must file their
claims with this court WITHIN~3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THEIR FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
WITHIN WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
The date of the first publication
of this Notice is 'December 6,
2012.
Personal Representative:
Deborah Harrell Lake
c/o Steven F. Squire, Chartered
625 Northeast Third Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33304
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Steven F. Squire, Esquire
Fbn 121181
Steven F. Squire, Chartered
625 Northeast Third Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33304
Steven@stevesquire.com
954-832-0885
12:6,13c


Itlop bLoo N GcLeabDfziTe


VISIT THieE PIRTICITIN6
DOWNTOWN WR UCtilla
zime5omC e


December I Deeember 14th

Giovanni's Main Street Kitchen 212 W. Main Street
Java Caf6 202 W. Main Street
JP's Smokehouse BBQ 103 E. Main Street
Kairos Mexican Restaurant 218 W. Main Street
That Sub Shop 109 W. Main Street
Hanchey's Carpets 110 E. Main Street
Hannah's Hope Chest 121 W. Main Street
S Jan's 215 W. Orange Street
SJellybeans Children's Boutique 106 N. 6th Avenue
Kelly's Magnolia Tree 110 N. 6th Avenue
Shops On The Corer 130 W. Main Street
Wauchula State Bank 106 E. Main Street

find out what great deals they are having by visiting
. W"w.MainitreetWauehula.com or find us on faegbook!


emphasize the importance of
annual vaccination for older
adults.
"A flu vaccine is recommend-
ed for everyone 6 months of age
and older," said Dr. Bridges.
"It's critical for adults 65 and
older to get vaccinated because
they are at greatest risk for
developing severe complica-
tions of influenza when they get
infected. Adults in this age
group have two available op-
tions the traditional flu shot
and a higher dose flu shot,
which is designed to address the
decline of the imntune system
with:age. Both of these vaccines&
Are covered by Medicare.!' -
The higher dose shot triggers


Older Adults At H


A Leading Cause (
Over the next decade. mil- complications than younger
lions of baby boomers will adults, nearly 30 percent of
begin their well-earned transi- Americans age 65 and older
tion into retirement. This unique remained unvaccinated this past
stage in life allows retirees time flu season.
to do more of the things they As people age. the immune
love like enjoy time with friends system weakens, which puts
and family, but it also comes adults 65 and older at increased
with the added responsibility of risk for flu. In fact, each year in
keeping a closer eye on health to the United States, more than
maintain an active lifestyle. nine out of 10 flu-related deaths
It may then come as a surprise and six out of 10 flu-related hos-
to learn that despite the fact that pitalizations occur in adults 65
older adults are over 16 times and older. Annual flu vaccina-
more likely to be hospitalized tion is the safest and most effec-
due to the flu and its related tive way to protect against the
flu each season.
To help increase awareness
about the dangers flu poses to
older adults, the National
Council on Aging (NCOA) has
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR CouncilonAgig (NCOA) has
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA launched the Flu + You cam-
PROBATE DIVISION paign. This educational pro-
gram aims to educate older
File No. 252012CP000093 Americans, their caregivers,
and family members about the
IN RE: ESTATE OF seriousness of influenza in
older adults, the importance of
John W. Harrell, Sr. annual vaccination, and the
Deceased. available vaccine options for
/ adults 65 and older.
A recent survey of middle-
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
age and older adults found that
The administration of the almost 90 percent would seek
estate of John W. Harrell, Sr., vaccination after getting infor-
deceased, File Number. 25- mation from their doctor and
2012CP000093, whose date of two-thirds also noted that
death was May 1, 2012, is pend- friends and family could influ-
ing in the Circuit Court for Hardee ence their vaccination decision.
County, Florida, Probate Division, their vaccination decision.
the' address of which is PO To help bring a health pro-
Drawer 1749, Wauchula,' Florida vider's perspective, Dr. Carolyn
33873. The names and addresses B. Bridges, Associate Director
of the personal representative for Adult Inimuniza-tions at thd
and the personal representative's Centers for Disease Control and
attorney are set forth below. Prevention (CDC), has joined
All creditors of the decedent the Flu + You campaign to


CITY OF WAUCHULA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC
The City Commission of the City of Wauchula will hold the regular scheduled
meeting Monday December 10, 2012 at 6:00pm, or as soon thereafter as it reasonably
can be held. The agenda can be viewed at 126 South 7th Avenue or www.city-
ofwauchula.com.

The meeting will be held at the Commission Chambers located at 225 East Main
Street, Wauchula, FL 33873.

Pursuant to Section 286.0107, Florida Statutes, as amended, the City Commission
hereby advises that if any interested person decides to appeal any decision made by the
City Commission with respect to any matter considered at the. proceedings, he will need a
record of the proceeding and that, for such purposes, he may need to insure that a verbatim
record of the proceeding is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon
which the appeal is to be based.

The City Commission of the City of Wauchula, Florida does not discriminate upon the
basis of any individual's disability status. This non-discriminatory policy involves every as-
pect of the Commission's functions, including ones access to, participation, employment
or treatment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable accommodation as
provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26, Florida Statutes,
should contact the City Clerk at (863) 773-3131.

CITY OF WAUCHULA
S/ Richard K. Nadaskay Jr.
Mayor
ATTEST
S/Holly Smith
City Clerk
12:6c


CITY OF WAUCHULA
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC
The City Commission of the City of Wauchula will hold a General Employee
Pension Meeting Monday December 10, 2012 at 5:45pm, or as soon thereafter as it
reasonably can be held.

The meetings will be held at the Commission Chambers located at 225 East Main
Street, Wauchula, FL 33873.

Pursuant to Section 286.0107, Florida Statutes, as amended, the City Commission
hereby advises that if any interested person decides to appeal any decision made by the
City Commission with respect to any matter considered at the proceedings, he will need a
record of the proceeding and that, for such purposes, he may need to insure that a verbatim
record of the proceeding is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon
which the appeal is to be based.

The City Commission of the City of Wauchula, Florida does not discriminate upon the
basis of any individual's disability status. This non-discriminatory policy involves every
aspect of the Commission's functions, including ones access to, participation, employment
or treatment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable accommodation as
provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26, Florida Statutes,
should contact the City Clerk at (863) 773-3131.

CITY OF WAUCHULA
S/Richard Keith Nadaskay Jr.
Mayor
ATTEST
S/Holly Smith
City Clerk

12:6c


Li' Miss Hardee County 2013

Attention 5th grade girls:
The initial parent meeting and
sign up for the 2013 Lil' Miss
SHardee County will take place
Thursday, December 6, 2012
at thI HJH/Hilltop auditorium,
Meeting will begin promptly at
6:00 p.m.

In order to participate you must
1. B. a resident of Hardee Coupty or a non-
resident who attends Hardee County
Schools.
2. Be a 5th grader.
3. Be a student who is enrolled in a public,
private, or home school with a current grade
point average of 2.5 (C average).
4. Contestant must not have two or more office
r, referralss or have been suspended during
the school year or any time during the
course of Little Miss Hardee County
preparation.
For questions contact
Donna Parks at 863-245-1579
I 12:6c


Contact Information:
Sherry White, P.O. Box 2566
-., hula, L 33873 .
863-773-0523 or 863-773-0877


:3 t


igh Risk For Flu,


)f Hospitalization
the body to produce more anti- national materials available for
bodies against the flu virus than download. Flu + You is a pro-
would be produced by the tradi- gram of the National Council
tional shot. Antibodies are the on Aging in collaboration with
soldiers of the immune system Sanofi Pasteur.
that help respond and protect
against infection.
"No matter how healthy or
youthful you may feel or
appear, older adults are highly
susceptible to the flu," said
Richard Birkel, PhD, MPA, act- O
ing senior vice president of Y OU R
Healthy Aging and director of
NCOA's Self-Management Al- BUSINESS
liance, while stressing the spe-
cific danger the flu poses to CO
older adults. "NCOA hopes that
through education, older adults
will realize how serious the flu AA
is and make vaccination a prior-
ity."
Speak with your health care
provider about the dangers of H ER E
the flu, the benefits of vaccina-
tion, and the best vaccine optionTOO
to meet your needs. And re-
member, getting your flu vacci- Cotact
nation not only helps protect
you, but helps to prevent the Nancy Davis,
spread of the flu to friends and. es
family. Ki Rea or
To learn more about these Trayce Daniels
important health messages,
please visit www.NCOA.org/- At
Flu where you'll find access to
more information on the Flu + 773-3255
You campaign, as well as edu-



SHERY WHITE MINISTRIES, INC.

A Florida Non-Profit Corporation
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PAGE ONE


Soccer Girls Down Red Devils


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The improving Lady Wildcat
soccer squad won two of three
matches last week.
The girls prevailed against
Fort Meade and Avon Park to
get on the winning track before
clashing with powerful Lake
Placid on Thursday night. Re-
sults from the Friday games at
Sebring were unavailable at
press time.
The girls went Saturday to
Warner Southern University at
Lake Wales for training with the
'coach there, a great opportunity.
The first year of Hardee girls
soccer there were 22 girls, last
year 50 and this year 60, sever-
al of whom had to, be turned
away.
This week, the girls went to
Mulberrn Tuesday and are at
DeS, to today (Thursday), They
greet Lakeland Kathleen tomor-
row, Next week, it is a pair of
home games, against Fiostproof
on Tuesday and Lake Placid on
Friday The girls continue with
additional games on Dec. 17 at
home against Fort Meade, a
varsity-only home encounter
against Avon Park at 6 p.m. on
Dec. 18 and a visit from
Mulberry on Dec. 20.
After the Christmas holiday
break, there are only two
matches, both at home, Jan. 10
vs. Sebring and Jan. 11 vs. Lake
Wales on Senior Night for
Alejandra McKenzie Garcia,
Joane Gonzalez and Gaby
Montero.
After dropping early games,
the varsity girls have started to
gel and claimed victories in two
of three matches after the
Thanksgiving break.
The season opened with a
varsity-only trip to Bradenton
Southeast, a scoreless encount-
er until the last minute of the
game, when a hand ball foul
resulted in a direct kick with. 43
seconds'left in the game.
The first district encounter
was Nov. 13 at Frostproof,
which was 7-0 and another dis-


trict game was lost at home
against district foe DeSoto 7-0
on Dec. 15.
Cut for the Thanksgiving
break and come back rejuvenat-
ed. Hardee took the short jour-
ney up to Fort Meade and
brought home a 1-0 victory
with freshman Martha Valadez,
who has played summer ball,
getting the first Hardee goal of
the season. Junior goalie.Ana
Galvez stopped all Lady Miner
attempts.
On Nov. 27, the Lady 'Cats
joined with the boys squad for a
varsity-only double-header at
Avon Park. Hardee won 3-1,
with soph Elizabeth Alvarez
picking up a pair of goals and
Valadez adding another.
Last Thursday, Hardee went
to another strong district oppo-
nent, Lake Placid and lost 5-1.
"We should have done better;
one was scored on a handball
foul in the box," said Head
Coach Nicole Aubry.
Other varsity players are jun-


iors Amalia Rivera, Farrah
Muntz, Brooke Conley, Andrea
Castaneda, Ashley: Baker and
Addison Aubry, sophs Diana
Chavez, Rurya Olivares.
Conley, Muntz and Baker are
also cheerleaders and work hard
at both sports.
The new JV.team played its
first-ever game at Frostproof on
Nov. 13, with the girls battling
to a 0-0 tie. It was also a score-
less tie in the Nov. 15 visit from
DeSoto.
Freshman Senaida Garcia
made history with the team's
first-ever tally in a 1-0 victory
at Fort Meade on Nov. 26. The
.JV didn't play on Nov. 27, but
returned to action against Lake
Placid on Nov. 29 in suffering
their first-ever loss 2-0.
Others on the JV squad are
junior Cristal Huerta, sophs
Silvia Alvarez, Veronica
Rivera, Marisela Ramos, Isabel
Abel, and freshmen Jazmin
Alvarado, Savannah Aubry,
Tiffany Flores, Vanessa Mir-
anda, Erika Ramirez, April
Soliz,. Ana Toledo, Maria
Zamora, Valentina Cordoza,
Lurdes Herandez, and Jacque-
line Perez, who has caught on
quickly as goalie.


2012-13 Lady Wildcat Soccer
Nov. 6 V. only Southeast Away 6 p.m.
Nov. 13 Frostproof* Away 6/7:30 p.m.
Nov. 15 Desoto* HOME 6/7:30 p.m.
Nov. 26 Fort Meade Away 6/7:30 p.m.
Nov. 27 V. only Avon Park* Away 6 p.m.
Nov. 29 Lake Placid* Away 6/7:30 p.m.
Nov. 30 Sebring Away 6/7:30 p.m.
Dec. 4 Mulberry* Away 6/7:70 p.m.
Dec. 6 DeSoto* Away 6/7:30 p.m.
Dec. 7 Kathleen HOME 6:7:30 p.m.
Dec. 11 Frostproof* HOME 6:7:30 p.m.
Dec. 14 Lake Placid* HOME 6/7:30 p.m.
Dec. 17 Fort Meade HOME 6/7:30 p.m.
Dec. 18 V. only Avon Park* HOME 6 p.m.
Dec. 20 Mulberry* HOME 6/7:30 p.m.
Jan. 10 Sebring HOME 6/7:30 p.m.
Jan. 11 Lake Wales HOME 6/7:30 p.m.
*District Games
District Tournament at Lake Placid Jan. 14-18
Head Coach: Nicole Aubry
Assisstants: Peyton Sullivan
Manager: Amalia Arista
Maria Anselmo, Julian Garcia


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The culmination of "doing
what she's supposed to do on
and off the. field" is a dream
come true for Hardee Lady
Wildcat Kayla Knight.
-The pitcher/infielder for the
'Cats has been a leader on and
off the field, even though side-
lined a bit last season with knee
surgery, from which she made a
complete recovery.
Daughter of Doug and Shari
Knight of Wauchula, Kayla was
lauded by Athletic Director
Andy Judah who made the
opening comment about the
senior who has played travel
ball for two different area teams
while keeping up her school-
work.
Palm Beach Atlantic Univer-
sity (PBA) head coach Kimmy
Bloemmers, daughter of pro


player Gary Carter and a four-
year starting catcher for Florida
State University, saw Kayla
playing in a college showcase
tournament with her travel team
and invited her to visit PBA.
The visit and tour of the.four-
year Christian college on the
East Coast, tuned into a scholar-
ship offer. One of the "perks" is
that the team goes on an annual
mission trip, which Kayla is
looking forward to. She is
expected to play middle infield-
er for the Sailfish.
PBA plays some fall ball, but
its primary schedule is. in the
spring. The 2013 schedule starts
Feb. 5 with a double-header
against Nova Southeastern.
There are tournaments at
Eckerd College and the
University of Alabama at
Huntsville before the season
starts with a trio of home games


against Northwood University,
Flagler College and Mercyhurst
University.
It continues with other games
against Lynn University, Cler-
mont, Rollins, Florida Tech,
Florida Southern, St. Thomas,
Northwood, Barry and Saint
Leo University, where she may
meet another former Wildcat,
Chelsey Steedley.
Before all that excitement,
Kayla has some unfinished
business in completing her sen-
ior season at Hardee High, con-
tinuing to play travel ball with
sophomore teammate Alex
Ullrich, and the upcoming Lady
Wildcat season under her moth-
er/head coach Shari Knight and
assistants Julian Garcia, Kaitlyn
Bliss and Max Ullrich. Kayla
has been unstoppable on the
mound and also plays shortstop
when Alex Ullrich is pitching.


The normal static electricity shock that zaps your finger when you touch a doorknob
is usually between 10,000 and 30,000 volts.

The great trouble with baseball today is that most of the players are in the game for
the money and that's it, not for the love of it, the excitement of it, the thrill of it.


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Hardee Wildcat soccer pock-
eted four big wins last week.
Two of them were district
victories, making Hardee 3-1 in
the district. The Wildcats host
the district tournament this sea-
son.
This week will be slightly
easier, with only three games,
starting at home Tuesday
against Mulberry, and greeting
DeSoto today (Thursday). The
JV play at 6 p.m. and the varsi-
ty about 7:30: Tomorrow's
game is at Teneroc, a varsity-
only encounter at 6:30 p.m.
Next week, there's a trip to
Frostproof on Tuesday, hoping
to avenge the only district loss.
Then, there's a trip to Lake
Placid next Friday.
The varsity boys began last
week with a lot of intensity,
well-rested after the holiday
break. They were first to the
ball and controlled it for most
of the game at home against
northern rival Fort Meade. The
.Wildcats made 20 shots on goal
while limiting the Miners to just
nine, all saves for Hardee senior
Jesus Zuniga. However, a
penalty shot slipped in. Wildcat
senior Mark Gomez made a
penalty kick in the first period
and Miguel Garcia added a
score in the second period.
In a varsity only, girls-boys
trip to Avon Park last Tuesday,
the Hardee boys dominated the
action, taking 33 shots on goal
to just four for the Red Devils,
which managed to get one in.
"The boys were quick to the
ball, made better passes and had
no yellow cards," commented



HARDEE COUNTY
KIDS NEED
HARDEE COUNTY
HELP!
Ease a dependent child's
way through the court sys-
tem. Volunteer to be a
Guardian Ad Litem.
773-2505
(If office unattended, please leave
message.)


Coach Dennis Aubry. Garcia
made two of the scores, Gomez
added two more and junior Luis
Alonzo and senior Armando
Alvarez each scored once in the
6-1 victory;:
SOn Thursday evening,
Hardee hosted Lake Placid,
which scored in the first half,
but Hardee came back to win 2-
1. Garcia fed Gustavo Toledo.
and Oscar Palacios for the
Wildcat scores. Zuniga had a
dozen saves.
SThe week ended with a visit
from Sebring, with Hardee win-
ning 1-0.
"We controlled the ball well
and were able to go our pace the
entire game. Passes were better
as they worked the field,"
reported Coach Aubry.
The lone score was an outside
power shot from Gomez just
before the 'first water break.
Hardee outshot Sebring with 23
shots on. goal to just 8 for
Sebring.
Other varsity players are
Gilberto Cardoza, Manuel
Palacios, Ruben Velasquez,
Luis Luna, Alexis Palacios,
Carlos DeLoera, Martin
Lucatero, and Campbel Aubry.
The JV squad had only three
games last week, battling oppo-
nents and the flu.
On Monday they lost 1-0 to
Fort Meade and seemed out of
sync and not in control of the
ball all the time. The JV did not
play on Tuesday
On Thursday, with only a
dozen players because of the
flu, the JV played well and won
3-0. Wildcat goals were score
by Eduardo Lopez in the second
period. Filistin Michael in the
third and Mateo Gomez in the
fourth.
By Friday's game, the JV had
dropped to just 10 players
because of the flu, and although
they played hard, they lost 2-0
to Sebring.
, Other JV players are Ezequiel
Perez, Frederik Torres, Rolando
Aleman, Alexis Arena, Junverto
Lopez, Kenneth Vargas, Alex
Chavez, Ricardo DeSantiago,
Oscar Duarte, Fabian Perado,
Benjamin Tamayo, Jose
Padillo, Gustavo Salizar,
Rodrigo Rodriguez, Gabriel
Garcia and Francisco Salgato.


-E3


PHOTO BY MARIA TRUJILLO
It was a proud group gathered on Friday morning when senior softball standout Kayla
Knight officially announced her choice to play college softball for the Palm Beach
Atlantic University Sailfish. On hand for the occasion were (from left) assistant coach
Julian Garcia, Doug and Shari Knight flanking their daughter, and assistant coach
Kaitlyn Bliss; in back Athletic Director Andy Judah and Principal Dr. Michele Polk.


Knight To Become A Sailfish


Soccer Boys Pick


Up 4 Wins


The Herald-Advocate
(USPS 578780)

Thursday, December 6,2012








2B The Herald-Advocate, December 6,2012





Hardee


This week in history, as
researched from the archival
pages of The Florida Ad-
vocate, the Hardee County
Herald and The Herald-Ad-
vocate ...
75 YEARS AGO
The Wauchula Wildcats,
fresh from a 6 to 0 victory over
the DeSoto Bulldogs, of Ar-
cadia High School, will pack
their togs tonight and journey
eastward into Highlands Coun-
ty for a post-season game with
the Avon Park Red Devils.
Ray Marsh, recorder at
Wauchula Farmers' State Mark-
et, reported yesterday afternoon
that the first pint of strawberries
to be sold through the auction.
brought the sum of $3. The
berries were brought in by W.L.
Waters, of the Bowling Green
community, and were sold
about 2:30 yesterday afternoon:
after the regular weekly market
report had been written.
Hardee County is ranked 17th
among tie 100 leading counties'
in the United States in the pro-
duction of the number of
oranges, according to the 1934
report.
50 YEARS AGO
The Board of County
Commissioners has let a con-
tract for the paving of a parking
lot and driveway on the court
house square. The lot, which
will be started immediately, will
be back of the new jail addition
and the health center and will
accommodate those two offices
plus court house officials.
Mr. and Mrs. Judy Alderman
will celebrate their golden wed-
ding anniversary with open
house Sunday, Dec. 16, at their
home in Fort Green from 2 until
5 o'clock.
Increases in customers served
are being reported bN Inter-


County Telephone & Telegraph
Co. in Wauchula and Bowling
Green as new telephone direc-
tories are distributed. The com-
pany reports an increase of 10
percent during the past year in
Phones served by the Wauchula
exchange and six percent in
Bowling Green.
25 YEARS AGO
As of Oct. 22 Hardee County
had 7,914 registered voters. Of
the total 7,066 were Democrats,
741 were Republicans and 107
were Independents.
A legally blind seventh-grade
boy bitten by a rattlesnake last
Friday is doing fine. He-said he
was checking his elephant ear
plants in the yard of his home in
Zolfo last Friday at 4 p.m. when
the six-foot snake bit him on the
finger of his left hand.
Charles Bass received the
Farmer of the Year Award from
the Soil & Water Conservation
District Monday night at the
annual banquet at the Hardee
Agri-Civic Center.
10 YEARS AGO
The oHoHhhh Christmas hol-
iday is rapidly approaching, and
Hardee County is gearing up for
the celebration with numerous
events scheduled for this
Saturday. Main Street On Ice
will begin at 1 p.m. A snow
mountain, made from 25 tons of
snow, will be a highlight for
youngsters to slide down.
Games and rides will be open
from 1 to 5:30 p.m.
On Sunday, Dec. 8, an open
house will honor Christine
Triebwasser on her 100th birth-
day.
Candace R. Singletary was
recently elected to "Who's Who
Among Students in American
Universities & Colleges" for
outstanding merit and accom-
plishment as a student.


Stop in and see why we will not be
undersold! Selling 14 brands of ,
different new vehicles
is just the beginning. 1


1031 U.S. Highway 17 N.
Wauchula, Florida 33873
(863) 781-1947 Gene Davis
2 WWW6.flLN]RY.COM Sales Manager
1 2 6 ,_____________________________________


-r
I


r


IWayBackWenI


Need your Christmas


presents wrapped?


Alpha & Omega Freedom Ministry
will be wrapping presents
Thursday, Dec. 6 through Monday, Dec. 24
at 113 N. 7th Ave., Wauchula
Monday Friday 10 am 4 pm
(will close at Noon on Christmas Eve, Dec. 24)
Donations Only
Bring your own wrapping paper or
wrapping paper available for purchase.


All proceeds will go toward the Hannah House Homeless &
Domestic Violence Shelter for Women and Children.
Questions? Call 773-5717
:lc os


k


6 13c


Living


Heartland Chorale 'Treasures Of

Christmas' Dec. 7 Will Honor 6
The ninth annual musical event will be held at First Baptist Church of Wauchula at 1570
W. Main Street on Friday, Dec. 7, at 7 p.m. Tickets are $15 and available at the door or in
advance at several locations in the community. (See ad elsewhere in this issue.)


In Loving Memory of
Hazel Mary Grace Alexander
(3/9/11 10/20/12)


Barber Joins

The Angus

Association
Rebecca Barber of Zolfo
Springs is a new member of the
American Angus Association,
reports Bryce Schumann, CEO
of the national breed organiza-
tion headquartered in Saint
Joseph, Mo.
The American Angus Asso-
ciation, with more than 25,000
active adult and junior mem-
bers, is the largest beef breed
association in the world. Its
computerized records include
detailed information on more
than 17 million registered
Angus.
The association records an-
cestral information, keeps pro-
duction records on individual
animals, and develops industry-
leading selection tools for its
members.
Angus Association programs
and services help members
select and mate the best animals
in their herds to produce quality
genetics for the beef cattle
industry and quality beef for
consumers.




Vote For

New Tag

Design
The website for public voting
on Florida's license plate,
www.Vote4FloridaTag.com, is
open!
The Department of Highway
Safety & Motor Vehicles wants
to upgrade the basic Florida
plate to a design that increases
readability and features a
seven-character configuration.
The flat plate can be better
"read" by red-light and toll-
road cameras.
A committee of more than 20
stakeholders, including state
agency personnel, law enforce-
ment, tax collectors and affiliat-
ed'associations, participated in
the development of the final
license plate: designs.
DHSMV's in-house graphics
artist created the proposed
designs.
It would replace the metal*
raised-stamp Versions on the
road today.
Floridians can vote online
through Dec. 14.



ABOUT ...
School News
The Herald-Advocate en-
courages submissions from
Hardee County schools.
Photos and write-ups
should be of recent events,
and must include first and
last names for both students
and teachers. Identify pho-
tos front to back, left to right.
Deadline for submissions
is 5 p.m. on Thursday.
Please include the name
and phone number of a con-
tact person. Qualifying
items will be published, as
space allows.


In Loving Memory of
Charles & Josephine Steffens
(9/13/09 2/13/00) (7/18/13 2/18/09)


In Loving Memory of
Judy Knight Wadsworth
(8/23/43- 12/15/11)


Chains do, not hold a marriage together. It is threads, hundreds of tiny threads, which
sew people together through the years.
--Simone Signoret

I


Hydry
dI-I Y7^ r
nycir


a Taste


Sidropi.unuic ul rwcrs


STRAWBERRIES


U-PICK

NO BENDING NO KNEELING

U-PICK VEGEES!!!
MANATEE COUNTY'S ONLY HYDROPONIC U-PICK FARM:
Tuesday Saturday 10am 5pm
Sunday 11am -5pm
Closed Monday
FREE CLASSES ON "HOW TO START YOUR GARDEN"
CALL AND MAKE YOUR RESERVATION NOW!


Phone (941) 322-0429
7308 Verna Bethany, Myakka City, Fl 34251
TAKE SR 70 EAST 12 MILES FROM 1-75.
www.hydrotaste.com


socl2:6c


Need Help With Stress?

There is a remedy that's become more popular in recent time that
dates back to the first week of Creation even 2500 years before the
Jewish race. At the end of the week our Maker established a period
of time whereby. all of His children could enjoy special
companionship With Him for it is written that God sanctified (set
apart for holy use) the seventh day,or the one we now call Saturday.
Our Eternal Father even went so far as to bless the day itself
(Genesis 2:3), so you can be sure that by partaking of this precious
time you will receive a blessing yourself. On every Saturday you can
supernaturally (by God's grace) be relieved of stress associated
with secular duties and obligations. You can be recharged by the
Great Healer Jesus Christ. You can enter the new week ahead with
miraculous results. If you think that you would like to experience the
benefits of this Holy blessing you must first by faith ask God to help
make it happen. Since the nature that we have all inherited is notih
subjection to Godly spiritual principles, the first miracle that will be
realized is the one that made you willing to partake of the blessing
in the first place.

If you would like some more information you can write to:
Bible Studies Unlimited RO. Bpx 2385,
Wauchula, FL 33873.
-12:6pi


In Loving Memory of
Hank & Mary Howard
(7/31/20- 1/1/93) (12/10/29- 9/20/10)


~8n~a~s~b~ lb--


I~e~iS;


""''"


OP








December 6, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 3B


Greetings from Fort Green,
and congratulations to our
neighbor, CF Industries, for
placing first in the business cat-
egory of the Christmas parade.
The announcer said this was six
in a row! Mosaic was also in
the top three.
One of the spectators at the
parade told me they had been to
Fort Meade for their parade and
then came on down and, natu-
rally, Wauchula's was the best!
A local nursery brought out
four tree-type hibiscus and
placed them in front of the
columns at our church along
with beautiful pots of crotons
around the trees. They really
were beautiful and made the
church look so special for Julia
Faye Davis' home-going cele-
bration, They looked so good I
am going to suggest the church
purchase them.
There are lots of people in;
our area with cold symptoms.
Trish Richey had bronchitis and
all the Daniel Duke family has
been sick, along with Pat
Albrition and Jean Sadler. They
all had improved sufficiently to
be at church last Sunday, but the
cough lingers.
Helen Nicholson was trans-'
ferred to a rehab in Sarasota.
Brody Waters is sick. Hazel
Nicholson is still in Tampa
General. Carrie Crawford was
added to our prayer list last
.Wednesday. Tom Lynn will
need a stent as soon-as other
problems are cleared. Buck is
home. Brother A.O. Hendry
and Trudy were at church last
Sunday night: .He was in the
hospital five weeks but thank-
fully is better.. I was told Ford
was the last name of Edith,
whose home burned. Please
pray for all of these.
Now for the good news:
Katlyn Oden along with her
family went to northwest
Alabama over the Thanksgiving
holidays and she killed two
deer! In keeping with the tradi-
tion in their family, she had to
skin and "gut" her first deer.
Her dad said she went right to
work Without any qualms!
Susan Thomas, her maiden
name, lives in Piaeon Forge and
her son is in Atghan_-t.ii He
whs expected home for Thanks-
giving but did not make it and
they are hoping for Christmas.
His best friend, Chris, was sent
to a more dangerous location in


that area and Evelyn Thomas
requested prayer for both of
them. It is great when friends
who no longer live in Hardee
County remember that our
county as a whole believes in
prayer.
A large crowd went to
Orlando last Saturday night to
attend the "Wondrous Night"
program at Sea World. Youth
attending were Hunter and
Bowen Davis, Dustin,Tyler and
Austin Smith, Kaylee and Ga-
vin Hogenauer, Holly Brown,
Brianna Waters, Courtney
Alexander, Makayla Chancey,
Hunter Reid, Jordan Chancey,
Russell Terry, Andrew and
Joshua McQuaig, Kasie Powell,
K-Lyn Simpson, Ken and
Kaitlyn Oden, Daniel Oritz, and
Dalton Richey.
Adults were Mike, Pam,
Randy and Faye Davis, Avie
and Allen Eures, Tara and
Brother Steve McGaughey,
Roberta Alexander and
Elizabeth Powell. Even though
a late night, most all the youth
were at Sunday School and
church!
Charles Abbott's Sunday
School class will have the
Christmas party tomorrow
(Friday) beginning at 6 p.m.
Everyone is reminded to bring a
gift, not to exceed $5! The bad
thing about this date is the
.Heartland Chorale is the same
night.
Our Christmas dinner at
church.will be Dec. 12, and we
will eat as soon as we complete
the business meeting, which
will begin at 6 p.m. Randy
Davis and Sherman Cooper % ill
fry the turkeys, so the ladies
who make good dressing need
to make sure they have all the
ingredients! We always have
plenty of good food but two of
our ladies make delicious dress-
ing.
Lauren and West Chester are
expecting a new bundle of joy,
and the young man will be
named.Tanner. He is expected
before Christmas, A lovely
shower was held at the home of
Jean Sadler and Pat Albritton
last Saturday. Lauren received
lots of nice items, and daughter,
Emmalyn enjoyed helping her
mother open the gifts!
:Please pray for one another
and our country. Remember the
reason we celebrate Christmas.


Fort Green News
By Rilla Cooper
773-6710


Week Ending: December 2, 2012
Weather Summary: Dryness and drought increased across
Florida; the U.S. Drought Monitor reported the State was 29 per-
cent abnormally dry and 3 percent with a drought rating. Only a
few spotty showers were recorded. Mariana had the most with 0.98
of an inch of rain. Water levels continued to decline in most areas.
Minimum temperatures ranged from 28 degrees in Quincy to 57
degrees in Fort Lauderdale. Maximum temperatures were mainly
in the 70s to 80s. Jay recorded the lowest high temperature at 74
degrees and Immokalee.the highest at 83 degrees.
Field Crops: Many of the State's cattle producers were feed-
ing hay due to continued dry weather and cool nights. Sugarcane
harvest continued on schedule. Cotton harvest continued in
Gadsden County and was 85 percent complete in Santa Rosa
County. Some areas were planting winter forages and cover crops.
Emerged forages were stressed by dry conditions.
Fruits & Vegetables: Vegetable harvest has been slowed by
cool temperatures over the past few weeks. Irrigation was neces-
sary due to seasonable, dry soil moisture conditions. In Miami-
Dade County, harvesting and replanting of winter vegetable con-
tinued. In Glades and Hendry counties, growers were harvesting
tomatoes, sweet corn, green beans, squash, cucumbers, and pep-
pers.
Livestock and Pastures: Statewide, pasture condition was
mostly fair, down slightly from the previous week as dry weather


(


Hardee

Car Company


2hristmas Party


Sunday, December 23
at 2:00 p.m.


Lots of Food
Toys. Cash & Gifts

Wauchula
U.S. 17 South Bound
(across from First National Bank)

ALL PREVIOUS CUSTOMERS INVITED


SOC1vd:BC "


SUPER MATT

Coin Laundry


Large Washers & Dryers

Up To 125 Ibs. Washers


SPECIAL/ESPECIAL

MONDA Y-FRIDA Y

6AM-6PM 50% OFF


NORMALNNORMALENTE
$250 DOUBLEIDOBLE
s400 MAX/MAXI
600 LARGEIGRANDE
$7" SUPER/GRANDE


SPECIAL/ESPECIAL
$125

$200
$ oo
$ 00
$350


^w^. -^s -)



tmas Carols


- /in


I


the Park


Paynes Creek Historic State Park
888 Lake Branch Road
Bowling Green, Florida 33834
863-375-4717

December 8th, 2012

-6:00 P.M. until 9:00 P.M.


Free
Admission
r----S i i -


Presented by: a"


Refreshments
and baked goods
will be for sale


,?eJ esej~iekZi~ rcm~ JPLC ~Zice. .w


. 1 2 :6 c


~3 Y 17South Across from Nicholas Restaurant


and cooler temperatures reduced forage growth. Most cattle were
in good condition about the same as the previous week. Feeding of
hay and/or supplements has started in much of the State. In the
Panhandle, the pasture condition ranged from very poor to good
with most in poor to fair condition. Pastures continued to deterio-
rate from dry conditions, with some locations impacted by a hard
frost. Feeding of hay was ongoing as the winter forage had not
reached grazing height. In the northern area, the pasture conditions
ranged from poor to good with most in fair condition. The cattle
were in fair to excellent condition with most in fair condition. In
the central area, the pasture conditions ranged from very poor to
excellent with most in poor to good condition. Most cattle were in
fair to good condition. In the southwest area, the pasture ranged
from poor to excellent with most in fair condition. Shorter days,
dry soils, and cool nights have stopped the growth of warm season
grasses in Brevard County. Stock pond water levels- continued to
decline. The condition of the cattle was poor to excellent with most
in good condition.
Citrus: Seasonal, daily high temperatures ranged from the
mid-70s to the lower 80s. For the past several weeks there has been
very little rain recorded in the citrus growing areas. Only the east
coast had measureable rainfall this week at just under one-half of
an inch. Trees in some areas were struggling to keep the abundant
fruit set healthy and growing. Growers irrigated one to two times a
week to keep moisture in the ground and on the trees. Other than
mowing before harvest and general grove maintenance, there was
little grove activity. Most juice plants were open and fruit being
processed continue to increase. Shipment of fresh fruit was moder-
ate, but expected to increase with fundraising programs ramping up
before Christmas. Varieties being packed included early oranges
(mostly Navels), colored grapefruit, and Sunburst tangerines.


r -


1. ----. ------ _r_;-----~i~Y


|


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11


(








4B The Herald-Advocate, December 6, 2012


Weightlifting Starts


Thl- hI'll. tinag permits were
appIhJ .htr or issued by the
Hlaide C,-,unr Building De-
parionr Jiiring the week of
,V'. /- I2-' Listings include the
Ilnarli Ci itic owner or contrac-
tor lc a address for the project,
tie ipt Le oi ork to be done, and
rli Lost iii htclved. Only projects
iiol,/iJ Li S/,000 or more are
li 'letJ

ISSUED
James R Daniel. U.S. 17,
interior 5_.5.000.
Dad L Scott, South Sixth
A enue mechanical, $2,684.
Kurt .Allen, College Lane,
mobile home, $10,000.
Trjils A Fulford, East
Bro ard Street, roofing,
5.2,xS.
\i anI Sanchez, Chamberlain
Boule% ard. shed, $2,000.
Ouner Builder, Schontag
Road. shed. $7,500.
Charles F. Ogle, U.S. 17
North. signs. $1,000.


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Girls weightlifting got started
just before the Thanksgiving
holiday.
Second-year coach John
Sharp has a blend of returnees
and rookies on his 11-girl
squad, still a small group
against other schools which
may have 25-30 girls and are
able to fill most weight classes.
Hardee, on the other hand,
may have more than one in a
weight class and none in others,
conceding points. So, the girls
focus on technique and prepara-


Newbomt, Childen &F AdoesIents


Raji Sonni
M.D., F.A.A.P.


tion for the sub-regional or
qualifier meet at LaBelle on
Jan. 11.
Those who can qualify
advance to the regional meet at
Port Charlotte on Jan. 25, and
hopefully even to the state meet
in Kissimmee on'Feb. 9.
Returnees, mostly juniors,
include Rachel Burton, Die-
unide "Dee Dee" Metayer,
Anjelica Jackson, Merislene
Cimeus, Briana Gardner, Erica
Roberts and Summer Sisum.
Newcomers are Sylvia Mar-
tinez, April Garland, Marissa
Chancey and Rosy Lopez.


Marcela Jativa
MD., F.A.A.P.


Board Certified Pediatricians


Nos complace information que a partir
De Diciembre 1 de 2012 hasta Marzo 31 de 2013
Abriremos neustrea oficina Sabado
Para tender a lospacientes enfermos.

(863) 767-1616
1125 S. 6th Avenue, Wauchula
(Sweetbay Complex)
Horario Lunes -Viernes 8:30 am 5:00 pm y Sabado 9:00 am 12:00 pm
" ^ *"''"S.1


ilui lin JMcrmrnu tlrrtirrnnv nr I~r :ov rc u IjI I ric .'. .*AAr.
in' A I Uo RViS AVAILASilAl t OU
S.^: v *n uMooio NOSOFYP- VULLNJESScS
4 -. -vs-D21m _Af
r RE1it: ; ;-n rJO ,TCOMMIuSS-ON ACATII........ .. ,

0dRvertosi d er. 2 :u-dton : R:rntA i':ew
300 Riverside Dr. 1. 22?1 :i.St-:i$t0|i.t St t.sW 1:
*.. .,.' _. : '. i. .-^'.. "".. . ;....


Girls Weightlifting,
Nov. 15 DeSoto HOME
Dec. 3 DeSoto HOME
Dec. 13 Sebring Away
Dec. 15 Avon Park Away
Jan. 11 LaBelle** Away
Jan. 25 Port Charlotte* Away
Feb. 9 Kissimmee*** Away
** Subregional qualifier
*Regional Meet
***State Meet


IPgsFo ThePt








December 6, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 5B


Fish Busters
By Bob Wattendorf
Florida Fish & Wildlife Commission


FISHING FOR A GIFT IDEA?
Holiday season is upon us. Whether you celebrate Christmas,
Hanukkah, Kwanzaa or having a few extra days with family and
friends, coming up with appropriate presents can be a challenge.
The key to gift-giving is matching the gifts to the individuals, mak-
ing sure it is something they'll enjoy, is hopefully good for them
and not too expensive. And if it helps Mother Nature too, maybe
that's the perfect gift!
With that in mind, the Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation
Commission has several suggestions for your holiday shopping.
To start, how about planning a nature hike or fishing trip?
"Perhaps more than any other form of recreation, fishing and
boating are critical to the health and well-being of America's out-
door heritage," according to the Outdoor Foundation. "By boat and
on land, the first outdoor experience for many Americans is fish-
ing, introducing tens of millions of people each year to the wonders
of nature. Fishing also serves as an important bridge and top 'gate-
way' activity that leads participants to other outdoor passions."
So why not invite your family and friends on a fun fishing trip,
right here in Florida the Fishing Capital of the World? An annu-
al resident fishing license is easy to obtain at License.My-
FWC.com, by calling 888-Fish-Florida or by visiting a local retail-
er that sells fishing tackle and licenses.
A five-year freshwater fishing license makes an especially
great gitr. An annual freshwater fishing license costs just $17.
Since the average angler fishes 17 times a year (U.S. Census
Bureau research) and enjoys four to five hours on a typical trip, the
cost is less than a quarter per hour of fun and healthy recreation.
When you purchase a license you are also providing a gift to nature
and iutule generations of anglers and outdoor enthusiasts.
While itiiing a fishing-related gift pack together, you can find
lots of iniormlation about fishing tips and gear at MyFWC.com/-
Fi\hing. along with fishing sites and up-to-date forecasts.
One of the most fun tips is to have everyone register for
Florida's freshwater angler recognition programs, including
TIroph'C'itch and Big Catch, at TrophyCatchFlorida.com. When
you register, you become eligible for a Phoenix 619 Pro bass boat
and trailer, with a Mercury outboard and Motor Guide trolling
motor. That drawing will be in October 2013.
Another great gift that will help anglers boast about their sport
while supporting conservation is a "Go Fishing" largemouth bass
specialty license plate for their'vehicle or trailer. Simply go to'
Buyaplate.com, or purchase a gift certificate at an authorized motor
vehicle office.
Enjoy your holidays and a lifetime of active nature-based
recreation. "Get Outdoors, Florida!"


Hardeeconomy
By Krystin Robertson
Economic Development Office


What is the future of Hardee County: "rural America" or
"ghost town?"
Our greatest hope is for the first instead of the latter, and a
prosperous future is from within ourselves. There is a frightening
pattern of depopulation in rural communities, creating ghost towns
that have no local economy to support themselves and no popula-
tion to support local economy. A prosperous local economy is
essential to a rural town.
Unfortunately, so many of us are focused on preserving our
"small town" that we balk at change and economic diversification;
we are destining ourselves to become a ghost town.
So what does successful economic development look like for
a small county?
Richard E. Wood, author of "Saving Rural America: Small
Victories and Bitter Harvests," said in an interview at the
University of Kansas, "Buffalo Hunting, going after a big compa-
ny and attracting them to your little town, doesn't work by and
large. Occasionally it has worked but most often the towns in the
book (rural towns) it came from the ground up."
The Hardee County Economic Development Office has been
working with this realization and often recruits startup companies
with sustainable concepts.
Wood also said that it takes small-town citizens to unify, say-


f! Ir` -
r .


Letter To The Editor

Children Should Not

Be In Nursing Homes


Dear Editor:
Ridge Area Arc was saddened
to learn that Florida may have
institutionalized .hundreds of
children with intellectual and
developmental disabilities
'(/DD0 in nursing hon2m, for
>ears The Justice Department's
latest letter accuses Florida of
refusing to cooperate with its
investigation and threatens to
file a lawsuit against the state.
While visiting .facilities
across Florida, the Justice
Department discovered families
who felt they had no choice but
to place their children in nurs-
ing homes. The state will pay
for their institutionalization, but
it will not provide enough fund-
ing to support less expensive
programs that would allow
them to remain in their homes.
Isolating children with I/DD
in nursing homes is a violation
of their Civil Rights. In 1999
the Supreme Court affirmed
that people with I/DD are pro-
tected from being institutional-
ized by the Americans with
Disabilities Act (ADA).
The Arc believes the healthi-
est environment for an individ-
ual with I/DD is to live in their


community. Keeping children
with I/DD in nursing homes and
institutions increases their risk
for physical and emotional
health problems.
The investigation by the U.S.
Department of.. Justice shows
the State of Florida could sa\e
money by moving children with
I/DD out of nursing homes. As
Ridge Area Arc can attest, the
state has made significant cuts
to community based programs
that would allow people with
I/DD to live outside institu-
tions, while increasing the
funding to warehouse these
individuals'in nursing homes.
Although these problems are
not the fault of the current
administration, it has the oppor-
tunity to correct them: We hope
the Florida legislators will take
action to ensure that Floridians
with.I/DD do not have their
civil rights violated. These are
children! They must be moved
out of,nursing homes and back
into their communities where
they belong.
Rhonda Beckman
Ridge Area Arc, CEO
120 W. College Drive
Avon Park


LARGE PIZZA
CHEESE OR PEPPERONI ANY SPECIALTY


Photos!
S2012 Graduation Photos
SFriday Night Live
SFootball Action
SHomecoming Parade
SAnd Others

Check Out

www.hardeepix.com

Questions: hardeepix@gmail.com
"Photos ... Memories You Can See"
Photos By:
Ralph Harrison and Maria Trujillo
11-8tfc
I I


ing, "I'm not going to take it anymore." Then, small towns have a
chance of survival. "One of the keys I have come up with is a small
group of people, and it is a small group of people, five or six peo-
ple who decide they are going to make it work, they just make it
work," stated Wood.
The economic development boards, Industrial Development
Authority and Economic Development Council, are made up of a
small number of dedicated Hardee County citizens. The boards are
pro-active, in creating opportunities for economic development
diversity, in our economy. Public comments are welcomed and
received with consideration for all citizens.
Wood says that "the bad news is when little towns get differ-
ent political factions and different groups that are at each other's
throats, little towns can't afford that luxury."
It is critical that we as a county work together to save our
beautiful community. I encourage you to attend Industrial
Development Authority and Economic Development Council
meetings the second Tuesday of the month at 9 a.m. at the County
Commission board room.
I, like most Hardee County citizens, take pride in my small
town. I boast that I have had the fortune of being raised in rural
America. Yet, I have to ask: What is the future of Hardee County?
Will future generations claim Hardee County as being rural
America or will your children say they were raised in a ghost town?
Let us cling to our small town, to rural America; together let
us work diligently to save our home from becoming a ghost lown!


The history of the world is full of men who rose to lead-
ership, by sheer force of self-confidence, bravery and
tenacity.
-Mahatma Gandhi






6B The Herald-Advocate, December 6, 2012


The


ABOUT ... Classifieds
DEADLINE ....Tuesday noon
RATES ..........Minimum of $4.00 for 10 words. Each addi-
tional word is 22 cents. Ads in all capitals
are 32 cents per word. Headlines are $2 a
line. Blind ad box numbers are $3 extra.
BILLING........Ads must be pre-paid.
CLASSIFICATIONS:


Agriculture
Appliances
Automobile
Boats
Furniture
Help Wanted
Houses
Livestock
Lost & Found
Miscellaneous


Mobile Homes
Notices
Pets
Plants/Produce
Real Estate
Recreational
Rentals
Services
Wanted
Yard Sales


We offer the BEST and MOST AFFORDABLE
computer services in Wauchula! Free Diagnosis!
*Computer, Cell Phone, TV & Electronics -Repair
*Electronics Sales & Installations
*Security Cameras & Systems
*Fax & Notary Services *Computer Classes
863-767-1520 www.PcEmpire.Org
748 N. 6th Ave., Wauchula




HARDEE CAR COMPANY
(across from First National Bank)

BUY HERE PAY HERE


Mon.- Sat. am 7p S
Mon.- Sat. 9am 7pni Suli.


illy Hill, Owner
1pm- 6pm


773-66671
-Also-
Billy a 3anice's Rentals Bowling Green Flea market
Houses & Apartments rn: ..



P1 1 N, ,'


HTRE ST f EA. L 'No matter how you look at it,
THi BEST DiA L there's no better place to shop
FROM ANY ANGLE for your next car.


113AT ,AT AE


Large Selection of
Cars to Choose From

Buy Here q Pay Here
fln ~30 Day Guarantee
.spIaf on Motor & Transmission Only


But STATON THERESA4 HAMF~i~ i ITO
86-71-40 863-781-904
153 Hy 7 ORH WUCUI '


Classifieds


LOOKING FOR PASTURE land to
lease, 375-2966, leave message.
11:1-29p
DIESEL INJECTION repairs,
pumps, turbo, injectors, remove
and install, 863-381-0538.
1:19-1:10(13)p
L. DICKS INC. is now purchasing
citrus fruit for the 2012/13 season
and beyond. Call Mark Manuel @
781-0384. 7:8tfc


98' CHEVY VENTURE VAN, $1,600
cash, 781-1062. 12:6c
95' FORD PICKUP, $1,500 cash,
781-1062. 12:6c


I BILLY BOB'


II


USED GUNS, Shotguns, long
rifles and pistols. Ammo at dis-
counted prices. 375-2121.
11:8-12:6p


FINANCIAL SERVICES SALES
Career: Build a business for your-
self, not by yourself, with: unlimit-
ed income potential. Extensive
benefits package. Solid backing
from a financial services provider,
over a century old. We're looking
for self motivated individuals in
the Central Florida area. Call 863-
604-4393 or send resume to John
Friend, Suite 3, 625 Schoolhouse
Road, Lakeland,. FL. 33813,
www.moden-men.org.
-"12:6,13c


TIRES I


--------------------*
9 sqplus tax U


I Gblf Cart Batteries I
* (Set Of 6 PowerTron Six Volt)
Pick-up & Delivery not Included with this offer.
I Must bring coupon to receive offer.

ON SITE INSTALLATION

NOW AVAILABLE


jot
I N C,




, Karen O'Neal
781-7633


6' CHAIN-LINK FENCE with poles,
covers 2% acres, $2,500, 863-781-
0982. 12:6p
1 %Y H.P SKILL ROUTER handheld
and/ or fixed base, 52 bits,
Instruction book. All like new,
$125, Jim 863-781-1005.
12:6,13p
FREE 32" TV, 8 years old, picture
ok, slight tint, 375-4797. 12:6nc
WILL TRAP wild hogs for free. I
keep hogs. 863-781-5755.
11:29,12:6nc
CARGO TRAILER 5' X 9', 1 7/8"
ball hook-up aluminum frame and
sides, fiberglass roof, 15" tires.
$800 OBO. Call Bob 863-223-
5561. 12:6p
2 4 ft. PICNIC TABLES; Robi
3000 table saw, 10"; Cub Cadet
lawn mower, self-propelled, 6.75
HP, 24"; 48" door for shed, new,
aluminum; 518-569-9411.
11:29-12:6p


0f-.
GOLD & SILVER Pawn shop pay-
ing top dollar for gold, silver and
guns now. 375-2121. -11:8-12:6p


ADOPT A PETI If you have lost a
pet or are looking for a new one,
the City of Wauchula Invites you
to come and see if you can find
the pet you're looking for. The
Wauchula Animal Control is locat-
ed at 685 Airport Road. Please
call 773-3265 or more informa-
tion. tfc-dh
ATTENTION State Statutes
828.29 requires that all cats and
dogs sold in Florida be at least 8
weeks old, have an official health
certificate, have necessary shots
and be free of parasites, tfc-dh


Hearn's Auto Cleaning Service


(863) 735-1495


c112:6c


RE A


Hwy. 17 & S.R. 66
Zolfo Springs


NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION
You are hereby notified that Wauchula State Bank
will sell the vehicle described below "As Is" to the
highest bidder for cash, free of prior liens, to satis-
fy legal obligations.
2006 Ford F250 Tk Id 1FTSW21P26EB54218
Contact Linda or Shannon for details at Wauchula
State Bank 863-773-4151. The sale will be held on
Thursday December 13, 2012 at 10:00 a.m. at the
Wauchula State Bank parking lot located at 106
East Main Street, Wauchula, FL. c112:6,13



Ji~lo & Flores, Inc.,


Realtors
NOEY A. FLORES, BROKER
310 Court St.
Wauchula, Florida 33873
(863) 773-3337 Fax: (863) 773-0144
www.floresrealty.net


Noey A. Flores
BROKER
863-781-4585


SNEW LISTINGS!


BE YOUR OWN BOSS Come see this commercial property
in Bowling Green right on Hwy 17. Currently used as
.mechanic/tire shop with lots of parking and 3 covered lifts.
Offered at $100,000
I 1


LTO R S
(863) 773-2128


JI REALTORS
JOE L. DAVIS
JOE L. DAVIS, JR.
REALTOR JOHN H. O'NEAL
See more listings at
www.joeldavis.com
REAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS


NEW LISTING! 9.8 acs fronts PRICE REDUCED! Commer-
SR 64 near Popash. Great for cial property on US17! 38 stor-
homesite or agriculture. age units w/partial roof, city
$89,000! utilities, zoned C-2, sold "as is"!
NOW $200,000!
PRICE REDUCED! 3BR/2BA
MH on 5+ acs w/frontage on SR PRICE REDUCED! 385 acs
62. NOW $60,000! on the Peace River w/lots of
beautiful oaks, pines & palmet-
PRICE REDUCED! Wow! tos! Pole barn & 2BR/2BA MH.
Great home in Popash area on $420,000!
25 acs. 2 miles from town. PRICE REDUCED! 50 acs in
$138,000! NE Desoto Co; deer, turkey,
PRICE REDUCED! Triple wild hogs, beautiful live oaks,
wide MH o improved pasture, pond &
wide MH of 3,314 square fe creek. NOW $190,000!
This home has many amenities
and sits on a nice 5 acre tract. PRICE REDUCED! 10 ac
$95,000! w/paved rd frontage. Great for
pasture, farming or homesite.
PRICE REDUCED! Paradise: $49,500!
Little Gasparilla Island-Beach
Condo. 2BR/2BA, Gulf front. PRICE REDUCED! 20 acs
$220,000! zoned industrial on Hwy 17.
$399,000!
REACTOR ASSOCIATES AFTER HOURS
KENNY SANDERS......781-0153 KAREN O'NEAL-._ 781-7633
KEVIN SANDERS......-990-3093 MONICA REAS .....781-0888
DAVID ROYAL...........781-3490 JIMMY EDENFIELD.A.48-2821
HIGHWAY 17 SOUTH, WAUCHULA, FL 33873 c2:6c
IS J______________ _____________ell26


WAUCHULA 3BR/2BA Log home on 29.6 Acres with large
metal barn. Central air & heat, hardwood floors, front and
back porches, large eat-in kitchen, and large 31X25 family
room. Priced sell at $250,000
FT MEADE 3BR/1BA Frame home on Lake Buffum. Get away
on the weekends for fishing'and just plain relaxing. Fenced yard,
canal access and metal roof. Priced at $100,000
WAUCHULA 3BR/1BA CB Home with central air & heat,
fenced yard, easy access to schools and shopping. Listed at
$79,995
WAUCHULA 3BR/2BA CB Home with a pool. Central air &
heat, ceramic tile thought-out, large 27x24 family room with fire-
place and fenced backyard. Priced at $109,000

WE SHARE THE SAME MLS WITH HIGHLANDS COUNTY!
LT Remember, Our listings are on the Internet.
Anyone with a computer can access them anytime! lI
SAfter Hours

ji i

Oralla D. John D. Jason Mlchael D. Jamle
Flores Freeman Johnson Boyett Spurlock
Broker Sales Sales Sales Broker
Associate Associate Associate Associate Assoc
863-781-2955 863-781-4084 863-781-3734 863-781-2827 !863-835-1611
WHY RENT WHEN YOU CAN BUY AND BUILD EQUITY!!! c112:6c


S" ZOLFO SPRINGS HI
735-0188 HpIIZ
iwnig Over $599 Do"- No ITR L
PfeTn.TiteA8ia .T OR


t Uan F a c aL, -u s I
.Mon. Wed. 1 Om -6,pm; Fri. & Sat. 10.m-7p,/Closed Thursday & Sunday
3505 US HwY 17 S ZOLFO SPRINGS cil:5tfc


- - -- I


Car Wash and Wax
Carpet and Seat Cleaning
Buff Compounding
Headliners Replaced
Vinyl Top
Motor Cleaning


I1


S

-,I


4/2 CB Home, Nice Wooded Lot,
C/A/H, New Kitchen Appliances,
Washer/Dryer, New Paint Inside and
Out. 713 N. 9th Ave., Wauchula
$79,000 OBO


Carol's Realty
1534 Yancy St., Port Charlotte, FL 33952
Call James Collie for appointment
(863) 412-8932
(941) 627-2769 10
: ^. ^.: :: ::],>,....-.. ,,- ^ ..tiH, ,,,"'" x. < ;, ." _, *i', .z c "; -!. 7:-yj."^ ..L-:-


I


--I


-11


11


I


I















The


December 6, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 7B






Classifieds


ORDER YOUR SWAP CABBAGE
for the holidays, $10/bag (or
head), whole or dressed, 863-
375-4201 (home), 863-512-2634
(cell). 11:29-12:6c



LAND FOR SALE: water wells,
power & septic tanks. 5 acres,
$35,000 OBO, 863-399-3333.
1 1 12:6,13p
2 LOTS IN Briarwood Estates for
sale. 863-773-6112. 11:29-12:31 p



2004 HOLIDAY RAMBLER 5th
wheel, 29' Savoy RLS, 1 slideout
all aluminum, $5,000 on upgrades
in 2012, $9,800, 863-832-0547.
.12:6,13c



2 APARTMENTS FOR RENT: 2
bedroom, 2 bath, appliances fur-
nished 875 sq ft, very nice-built in
2012. 117 North 7th Ave,
Wauchula. Located downtown
Wauchula $850 a month call Clay
Cobb at 863-781-0702. 12:6c
2BR/2BA MH in country by a
creek. Needs some repairs. If.
Interested call 863-781-3536.
.12:6c
HOUSE IN COUNTRY 3 miles
from town. 3BR/1Ba w/ screened
porch. Quiet and peaceful, 863-
781-3536. 12:6c
2BR/1BATH, central air, Happy
Home Apartments, located in a
great neighborhood, call Sheila,
863-214-5645. 12:6c
3B/2BA, DOUBLEWIDE MH,
Zolfo, Acreage, $650/mon., 651-
717-5049. 12:6,13p
MH for rent, 2 BR, 2 B, $550
month, $500 deposit, 863-781-
3570. 11:29,12:6c
2 BR, 1 B in city, fenced yard,
$600 per month, 863-990-8292.
11:22-12:20p


2 BEDROOM 1 BATH, Duplex,
$550 month, $550 deposit, 773-
0100. 6:21tfc
*RENT-TO-OWN*
MOBILE HOMES 1, 2, 3
Bedrooms. Cheaper then paying,
rent. Close to schools and hospi-
tal. Lot rent $300. So habla
espanol. 863-698-4910 or 863-
698-4908. Call today. 7:5tfc
ULLRICH'S STORAGE UNITS,'
several sizes, corner of 9th Ave. &
Goolsby St., 773-6448 or 773-
9291, 3:22tfc
ATTENTION The Federal Fair
Housing Act Prohibits advertising
any preference or limitation
based on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial status or
national origin, or the intention to
make such a preference or limita-
tion. Familial status includes chil-
dren under 18 living with parents
or guardians and pregnant
women. tfc-dh



FOR LEASE OR RENT 2 acres
commercial property, Hwy 17 N.
across from Winn Dixie. 941-457-
9142. 11:8-12:6p
LARGE COMMERCIAL OFFICE
space. Approx. 1,780 sq. ft. Heavy
traffic area corner of Main & Hwy
17 (101 East Main) call Elene
Salas, 735-0999. 8:9tfc



NEED CAREGIVER? Honest,
Dependable, References, 863-
773-0421. 12:6p
ALUMINUM CONSTRUCTION
additions, screen rooms, car-
ports, glass rooms, pool enclo-
sures, rescreening, decks, con-
crete. Harold Howze Construc-
tion, 781-2708. RR0050181
10:25-12:27p
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS,
Thursday 7:00 p.m., Grace
Fellowship Church, 131 S. 8th
Ave., Wauchula. Bill 727-326-
3816. 6:7tfc-dh


YOUR TIRE HEADQUARTERS
5101 N. Hwy 17 Bowling Green L ,
37 S-4 4G1 .
New Tire Changer & Balancer
Can Do 26" Wheels
, TERRY AbmF
Sw- S() S I)'m 8 6pm a ,m-
/ Foreign and Domestic Cars / Diesel Engines
/ Gas.or Diesel Manual or Automatic Transmissions


AM-SOUTH HEALTHY
Each office independently owned and operated.








Robert Hinerman Nancy Craft
227-0202 832-0370


NEW LISTING!! 40 acres on the corner of
Vandolah Rd. and Dink Albritton with 12
acres of plastic, ready to farm! The remain-
ing acreage is cleared with a one acre pond
on the back corner. Asking $7.500 per acre,
call Jessica Smith at 863-781-1186 for more
information.

NEW LISTING!! 10 acres on Vandolah Rd.
that currently has some producing orange
trees. This piece of land can be purchased
alone or with a 40 acre parcel nearby,
Asking price $60.000. For more information,
please call Jessica Smith @ 863-781-1186

LE DEAL!! In any language, this 3 Bedroom,
2 Bath CB home with One car carport, cen-
tral h/a and front porch in Bowling Green isa
fantastic buy at Only( 79,001 To translate
into ownership, CALL today.

AFTER THE SUN GOES DOWN Crickets sing
and pine trees whisper in gentle setting of
9.54 Acres of country living with a 3/2
Double Wide Mobile Home and Work shop.
Priced a $60.000

NEW LISTING11 4 Bedroom, 2 Bath charming
CB home with central heat/air, tile/carpet
flooring, shed/workshop all within City of
Wauchula. $85.000

Automotive Mechanic shop on .6 Acres
Includes 3 lifts and large air compressor.
2400 SF in mechanic building, 624 SF in
office building. Close to US Hwy 17. Great
investment potential. $169.900

Beautiful 3/2 CB home in Knollwood, with a 2
car garage, central h/a, 3,079 SF under roof.
Great neighborhood! Asking price of
$139.900. Call Today!


GO TO: HomePath ncm Fnr Mnre Fannie


OVERCOMERS MEETINGS
(Gillespie), Woman's Club on
Wednesday, 7pm Kenny
Sanders is the facilitator. For
more information call 773-5717.
2:16tfc

NEED A WELL OR HAVE PUMP
TROUBLE? CALL
ULLRICH'S PITCHER PUMP
For complete well, sales,
service and installation,
call (863) 773-6448.
7:18tfc
THE WAUCHULA LIONS CLUB
collects NOT broken prescription
eyeglasses, cases and sunglass-
es. Please drop off at 735 N. 6th
Ave. tfc-dh
DO YOU HAVE a problem with
drugs? Narcotics Anonymous
meets Monday and Thursday
nights 7:00 p.m. at First United
Methodist Church, at the corner
of Palmetto and 7th Ave., Wau-
chula. \ tfc-dh
IS ALCOHOL CAUSING a prob-
lem? Call Alcoholics Anonymous
in Hardee County at 781-6414.
Several weekly meetings.
tfc-dh
ATTENTION! State Statutes 489-
119 Section 5 Paragraph B and
Hardee County Ordinance 87-09
Section 10 Paragraph D require
all ads for any constructiQn-relat-
ed service to carry the contrac-
tor's license number. tfc-dh



WANTED MAKEUP VANITY in real
good condition & reasonably
priced, 863-445-0430. 12:6nc
PAYING TOP DOLLAR for junk
cars 863-245-1351. 11:8-12:6p


SATURDAY ONLY 9-1, Lazy Acres
RV Park, Zolfo Springs. 12:6p.
SATURDA'- 9-1, children
clothes, other items, 665 Hanchey
Road, Wauchula. 12:6p
SATURDAY ONLY, toy hunters,
G.I. Joes, Teddy Ruspkin in origi-
nal box. 1980's toys, end tables,
lamps, 802 Seminole St. 12:6p
SATURDAY 8:30-?, 501 South
Florida Ave., children clothes,
toys, bunk bed, misc. 12:6p
SKP RESORT GARAGE & CRAFT
sale, Clubhouse, Sat., 8-2, Hwy
64, 2 miles east of 17. 12:6p
FRIDAY 8-2/ SATURDAY 8-noon, 2
family, 380 Boyd Cowart Road.
Christmas tree, Christmas deco-
rations, car seats, exercise equip-
ment, toys, clothes, shoes, lots of
misc. 12:6p
SATURDAY, 362, Altman Rd.,
Wauchula, recliner, TV and more.
12:6p
SATURDAY 7-12, furniture, bed-
ding, baby items, books, 1062
Aspen Lane, Wauchula. 12:6p
SATURDAY, 301 Georgia Street,
Wauchula, gas stove, round bed,
clothes. 12:6p
SATURDAY 7-?, 701 North Florida
Ave. 12:6p
SATURDAY 8-1, Myrtle Dr.
Wauchula, portable basketball
system, drums and much more.
12:6p
SATURDAY 8-12, 218 Indiana
Ave., Wauchila. Toys, baby stuff,
kid's, baby, women's & men's
clothes, women's suits, furniture.
12:6p
SAT./SUN. 8-4, 2495 E. Main
Street, across from the Helena
Chemical. Formals, wedding
gowns, cake decorating items,
toys and misc. 12:6dh


MISSION THRIFT STORE INC.
123 N. 7th Ave. All donations
appreciated. Pick-up available for
large items. 773-3069. 1:12tfc
HEAVEN SCENT THRIFT STORE
Helping Sherry White Ministries
help others! 912 Hwy. 17 South
(across from McDonalds)
Wauchula, 863-773-9777.
11:15tfc
HHC THRIFT STORE accepting
furniture consignment. 1085 Hwy
17. 773-0550. 11:1612:6
LYDIA'S HOUSE THRIFT STORE
Helping ladies overcome 102
Carlton Street (directly behind
Heaven Scent), Wauchula, 863-
773-3034. 11:15tfc
SATUR DAY ONLY 8-7 --318
-Riverside Drive, Wauchula, junior
clothes, toys, queen size sleigh-
bed frame, household, lots of
misc. 12:6p
FRIDAY/SATURDAY, 4540 Semi-
,nole Trail, close to 7 mile point.
Antique table & 6 chairs, antique
buffet, 2 washers, 1 dryer,
refrigerator, port-a-crib, home-
made trailer, 3 riding lawn mow-
ers, girls clothes 3t & 4t, some
pots and pans, some tools,
PlayStation & games, antique mir-
ror, big with gold trim. Cleaning
out house and shed, too much
stuff to list. 12:6p
FRIDAY/SATURDAY 7-2, 706 East
Palmetto St., Wauchula. 12:6p
DEC. 7th & 8th GARAGE SALE
Friday/Saturday 8-2,: on 3466 S.
Hickory St., Zolfo Springs. Some
furniture, baby clothes and lots
more. 12:6p
THUR./FRI./SAT. 9-1, 2370 Hwy 17
N., Wauchula, books, DVDs,
clothes and many baby items.
12:6p


I S. ae I


THE MUSTARD SEED THRIFT.
Store. Helping Sherry White
Ministries help others! Donations
appreciated/, volunteers wel-
come! 132 Hwy 17 South
Wauchula, 863-773-6153.
11:15tfc
Clothing racks With clothes
included. Each one $40, also bed
& lots of livingroom furniture on
sale, beside Double J. 12:6c
SATURDAY 7-2, 749 64E, north of
Schoolhouse Road. Adult
clothes, dishes, small appliance,
home decor., sewing machine,
misc. 12:6p
SATURDAY 8am-noon, The Oasis
at Zolfo Springs RV Park, corner
of Rt. 66 anl. Schoolhouse Rd.
.I 12:6c,,
SATURDAY-?, 3 family, 747
Popash Rd., Wauchula. 12:6p


702 SOUTH 6thAVENUE, WAUCHULA

(863) 773-2122 FAX (863) 773-2173
Gary Delatorre Broker

www.cbhardee.com









Richard Dasher Victor Salazar,
781-0162 245-1054


NEW LISTING!! 9 acres to develop in
Highlands County on Karen Blvd. The prop-
erty is zoned and platted for 20+ homes and
is located near the incoming Sebring
Parkway Phase III. Asking price is $120.000.
For more information, call Jessica Smith @
781-1186

NEW LISTING!! 3/2 home built in 2007 in
Avon Park Lakes. The home has stainless
steel appliances, laminated wood floors,
double car garage, and much more. Priced
@ $82,.Q0. Call Jessica Smith @ 863-781-
1186 for more information.

NEW LISTINGII Beautiful 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath
one owner home, designed and built by
owners, beautiful cypress tongue and
groove in family room, wood burning fire-
place, and porch to pool area w/hot tub. All
located in very desirable location, small
family subdivision close to town, schools
and medical. Call Nancy for a showing
today. Listed Price $189.000

PREMIER HOME!! built by builder/owner,
beautiful home with 4 bedrooms, 2.5 bath,
vaulted ceilings, appliances, double hung
windows, 2 bedroom, 1 bath Mother-In-Law
suite attached to barn, storage and horse
stalls, so much to enjoy and all sitting on 5
Acres of beautiful country. $339.000 Call
today!

Call for an Appointment today to see this 3
Bedroom, 3 Bath country home with large
living, dining, kitchen areas. Beautiful brick
fireplace, 2 car garage, shed/workshop with
apartment, all this and more sitting on
fenced 5 acre tract. Priced c $199.000

BEAUTIFUL 3 BR, 2 Bath Country Home on
10 Acres. Perfect if you are looking for that
"Country Lifestyle" where the beautiful
scenery of the countryside is just in your
backyard. Priced @ $)252,500

RENTAL AVAILABLE!!
BEAUTIFUL 2 BEDROOM, 2 1/2 BATH
TOWNHOUSE APARTMENT, $650 MONTHLY,
WITH $650 DEPOSIT. 1051 DOWNING CIR-
CLE, WAUCHULA. CALL 773-2122. c2:6c
c112:6c


HARDEE CAR COMPANY


BIG YARD SALE

H Saturday Dec. 8th ,8am
(across from First National Bank)

=-'3 4-Family Yard Sale
; 4-Wheelers, Tools, Windows, Paint & Much More

For More Information Call 781-1062 '



j 9 9


REVELL ERIlR SALES









Aftr Hor al








FI I' I,=



IaI
Ta vi' evel 0 Sn r ilrC


A Daily Thought
THURSDAY
This is how the birth of Jesus
Christ came about. His
mother, Mary, was pledged
to be married to Joseph, but
before they came together,
she was found to be with
child through the Holy Spirit.
Matthew 1:19 (NIV)

FRIDAY
God sent the angel Gabriel
to Nazareth, a town in
Galilee, to a virgin pledged
to be 'married to a man
named Joseph, a descen-
dant of David. The virgin's
name was Mary,
Luke 1:26 (NIV)

SATURDAY
"Do not be afraid, Mary, you
have found favor with God.
You will be with child and will
give birth to a Son, and you
are to give Him the name
Jesus. He will be great and
will be called the Son of the
Most High God."
Luke 1:30-32a (NIV)

SUNDAY
The angel answered, "The
Holy Spirit will come upon
you, and the power of the
Most High will overshadow
you. So the Holy One to be
born will be called the Son of
God." ... "I am the Lord'
servant," Mary answered,
"May it be to me as you have
said." Then the angel left
her.
Luke 1:35,38 (NIV)

MONDAY
Because Joseph, her hus-
band, was a righteous man,
and did not want to expose
her to public disgrace, he
had in mind -to divorce her
quietly. But after he had con-
sidered this, an angel of the
Lord appeared to.him in a
dream, and said, 'Joseph,
son of -David, do not be
afraid to take Mary home as
your wife, because what is
conceived in her is from the
Holy Spirit."
Matthew 1:19-20 (NIV)

TUESDAY
(The angel said,) "She will
give birth to a son, and you
are to give Him the name
Jesus, because He will save
His people from their sins."
Matthew 1:21 (NIV)

WEDNESDAY
When Joseph woke up, he
did what the angel of the
Lord had commanded him,
and took Mary home as his
wife. But he had no union
with her until'she gave birth
to a son. And he gave Him
the name Jesus.
Matthew 1:24-25 (NIV)

All verses are excerpted from
The Holy Bible: (KJV) King
James Version; (ME) The
Message; (NCV) New Cen-
tury Version; (NEB) New
English Bible; (NIV) New
International Version; .(NLT)
New Living Translation (RSV)
Revised Standard Version;
(PME) Phillips Modern Eng-
lish; and (TLB) The Living
Bible:


I -


ol


JIM SEE REALTY, INC.

206 North 6th Avenue. Wauchula, FL 33873
Office (863)773-0060 Evening (863)781-1338
www.jimseerealty.com
James V. See, Jr., Broker


Pk





Parker Keen


58 acres of gorgeous fenced property close to
town. Well & septic from old homesite. Scattered
old Oaks & Pines. Offered at $287,100
33 acre pasture with scattered trees. Close in to
Wauchula. 11.56 ac can be purchased separately.
Total price $360,000.
Beautiful home located in Briarwood
Subdivision. 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath house with
wrap around porch, detached 2 car garage with
office and full bath. Reduced to $339,000!
AVON PARK ESTATES! Beautiful 4 Bedroom, 2
Bath Home on over an acre of land! 2 car
garage, large screened porch and many more
upgrades. Asking $165,000


Realtor Associates
Rick Knight (863) 781-1396 Calvin Bates (863) 381-2242
John H. Gross (863) 273-1017 Dusty Albritton (863) 781-0161
Shane Conley (863) 781-9664 Parker Keen (813) 523-1523


c112:6c


I I


30 Day Warranty
Motor Transmission ._ ;
B % HLRE! Nu iRIvi R -
P.% Hu .I Ir,
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OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK SE HABLA ESPANOL
U.S. Hwy. 17 Bowling Green 375-4441
$ Huge Discounts for Cash Deals $
S24 Hour Towing Service Lowest Possible Rates Fast and Reliable
781-3090 or 781-3091 cli:5tfc


Mae Properties


FOR RENT!
2 BR/1 BA apartment. $800/month
2 BR/2 BA apartment. $850/month
Very secure apartments in Wauchula.
$500 deposit.

2 Bedroom, 2 Bath home in Golfview on 2.1
acres. Nice barn with concrete floor, garden tub
and screened porch. Listed at $159,500

2 Bedroom, 2 Bath mobile home with a 1 bed-
room, 1 bath detached mother in law apartment.
Fenced 2 acres with a pole barn. Asking
$77,900





L-


1


I1


i







8B The Herald-Advocate, December 6, 2012


BGE Names 1st Quarter 'Proud Panther' Winners


COURTESrf PorTOS
First graders receiving the Proud Panther title for good citizenship were (front, from
left) Estrellita DeJesus-Martinez, Jose Roque Gutierrez, Jeremiah Alcantar and Randall
IOwnby; (back) Gabriel Sanchez, Daniel Castro-Bautista, Carlos Trujillo, Mkenzy Stew-
art and Ezequiel Lopez. Not pictured was Jasmine Castillo.


As the first nine weeks came to an end, achievement awards were handed out to several
students at Bowling Green Elementary School. Kindergarteners earning the Proud Pan-
ther award were (front row, from left) Lane Abbott, Nathania Lopez, Juan Jimenez-
Castillo and Jessica Bautista-Lopez; (back) Zander Cranford, Crystal Ramirez, Emmanuel
Felix, Giselle Esquivel, Ezmeralda Alamia and Joselyn Abrego.


Fourth graders demonstrating leadership and good behavior were (front, from left) Irvin
Campos, Sariah Alamia, Jacqueline Rodriquez-Suarez and Kimberly Walton; (back) Siera
Lozano, Brennen Arguelles, Marissa Calderon and Bryan Huerta.


Students in fifth grade acknowledged as Proud Panthers for their good citizenship were
(from left) Angel Jaimes, Dorian Pulido, Jasmine Castaneda, Justin Rivera, Jack Wilkins
and Michelle Avila..Not pictured were Ishmael Martinez and Lorena Perez-Alvarado.


Named as Proud Panthers were third graders (from front left) Anika Retana, Matthew
Gonzalez, Jennifer Chavez and Juan Garza; (back) Nayeli Navarro, Leonardo Gayton, Al-
fredo Reyes-Sanchez, ,Nevaeh Arguelles, Eric Ontiveros and Litzy Abrego-Ambriz.


Proud Panther achievers in second grade were (from front left) Luisa DeLaRosa, Hailey
Lee, Caroling NavarrQ-Solis, 'Guillermo DeLuna, Makayla Herrera and Jaylen Daniels-
Johnson; (back) Lydia Valadez, Cristian Lopez, Yadira Sanchez, Bernabe Gallardo, Amy
Farias and David McQuaig.


SEEDS
FROM
*"- THE
SOWER


"Mommy," asked a small
child, "how long did Baby
Jesus stay in the manger?"
SPuzzled, the mother an-
swered. "Not too long, I
would imagine."
Unfortunately, there are far
too many individuals who
leave Jesus in the stable, see-
ing His birth as an end, not
the beginning. Not everyone
realizes that this day is the
day that the journey to the
cross actually began on
earth. This One who was born
on this day of days isoften
left wrapped in swaddling.
clothes, lying in a manger. It
seems that many have no un-
derstanding of the spiritual
significance or importance of
Christmas.
But for those of us who ac-
cept and acknowledge Christ
as our Savior, we rejoice and
say witn ime Apostle Paul,
"Thank God for His Son a
gift too wonderful to de-
scribe!"
This Gift is the gift of God
Himself: His only begotten'
Son. It is the source of His
grace, the expression of His
mercy, the revelation of His
plan, the meaning of His pur-
pose, the passion of His love,
the assurance of His pres-
ence and the provision for our
salvation. He knew what we
needed then and what we
need now. In Him we have
faith to fight our fears and
hope for a life in His pres-
ence. "Too wonderful" in-
deed.
Visit us at: www.SowerMinistries.org




SEEDS
FROM ,
TE THE
>-' SOWER
,.r., .- .. L

An elderly man noticed a
young boy who was walking
his rather strange looking
dog. Puzzled, he asked,
"What kind of dog is that?"
"A genuine police dog,"
came the quick reply.
"He doesn't look like a po-
lice dpg to me," said the man.
"Of course not! He works
undercover so no one will
recognize him," answered the
boy.
During these turbulent
times when we are fearful of
terrorists, our government
needs people who work
"under cover." But not the
Lord Jesus Christ, our Savior.
Those who are Christians
begin their new life in Him
with a confession of faith.
Being saved begins with a
confession followed by be-
coming a disciple. Being a
disciple demands that others
see the life of Christ lived.
through us.
Confession is not only
something that the Christian
says; it is also something that
a Christian does.
Do others see the love of
Jesus in your life?
Visit us at: www.SowerMinistries.org


GILLIARD

FILL DIRT INC.


Pond DI gging D itch Clean I


Lamar Gilliard
Home: (863) 735-0490


Zolfo Springs
c14:19tfc Mobile: (941) 456-6507


Women, do you
need lower rent?
See if you qualify call

735-2222 or 773-5717.








ASHBROOK REALTY
Your home. Your land. Our specialty.
QUAINT 2BR, 1B CB HOME in Wauchula w/large screened back
porch. $53,000
COMMERCIALLY ZONED LOTS: One near downtown
Wauchula, one on US 17 in Bowling Green, both w/driveways & con-
crete slabs. $35,000 each
TIP OF THE DAY: Adding curb appeal is easy!
House numbers and light fixtures add style, a
freshly painted front door and hardware add in-
terest, simple landscaping enhances.
Post Office Box 37 Wauchula 33873
(888) 660-6693 office (863) 832-0130 cell
www.ashbrookrealty.com SAND
sandy@ashbrookrealty.com BrSoer





(THE PALMS I









701 La Playa Drive, Wauchula


Monday Friday
9:00 AM 5:00 PM

(863) 773-3809
TDD 800-955-8771
Equal Housing Opportunity N
S.- Employer & Provider


Stephanie Gugle Computer Tech


Phone (863) 781-9720
www.GuglesComputerServices.com


s.uale(aauqlescomputerservices.com


I








December 6,2012, The Herald-Advocte 9B


Our Thanksgiving dinner
was a great success. Feeding
,155, in six minutes they had
everyone served with turkey,
stuffing, gravy and rolls. It
works out great for 11 to pre-
.pare the turkeys and slice them
and bring them to the clubhouse
for all to eat, and the helpers to
get the entrees prepared. All the
residents then bring their own
dish of specialties for their table
to enjoy .
We also appreciate Wilder
Corpl. and Wauchula State Bank
for the turkeys and gift certifi-
cates. Our home away from
home is the best place to be for
this blessed day.
CHAPEL
Wayne welcomed 82 for
.chapel service, after being
greeted by Fred and Nancy
Thompson and Jim and Sharon
Magee. Ardeth Johns led the
opening prayer with a reading
of "A Better Understanding Of
Prayer." Special music was
sung by Judy Perkins accompa-
nied by Cheryl Conkle on
piano. The hymns-were led by.
Bob Conkle, Cheryl on the
piano and Sandy Feeser on the
-organ.
Pastor David spoke from Ec-
clesia~rese 1:1-7. "There Is A
Purpose" for our creation and
\w hy we are here.
COFFEE HOUR
SGerry welcomed 123 for
pledge, prayer and coffee hour.
So great to see many returning
after Thanksgiving.
We had Jason from Blood
.Net USA speak and tell us
about' the changes regarding
'who can give blood that were


not on the list before that may
have been issues but are no
longer. Each person has about
12 pints of blood in their body,
and as a donor you have a
chance to save three lives with
one pint of blood.
The Perkins pie, merchants
coupons, and 50/50 were raffled
off.
I SPOTLIGHT
Dave and Shirley Duncan
have been in the park for one
season, haling from Albany,
Ky., and have been married six.
years. They have two sons,
seven grandchildren and one
great-grandchild.
Dave has just retired from his
own mechanics business, and is
interested in fixing up things,
basically a fix-it man, and fish-
erman. Shirley retired from the
Keebler Co., interested in
bingo, music and reading.
They both love their two
dogs, Shiloh and Diesel, camp-
ing, deer hunting, and hanging
decorations for a housing area
in Kentucky. They had to leave
before Thanksgiving so they
can get this housing develop-
ment beautiful for the holidays.
They came to our park after
bringing a friend down to visit
our park, and found they liked it
so well-they decided to camp
here last season and have now
purchased and will be snow-
birds. A draw to our park was
the activities, friendliness of the
managers and all the people
here.
We are welcoming them to
our park, and have found them
to be wonderful new friends.


a s

'Lunch?


ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS
MONDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Golden
Grahams, Graham Crackers,
Blueberry Pop Tarts, Orange
Juice, Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Alternate Meal,
Pepperoni Pizza, Hamburgers.
Baked Beans,' Lettucp &
Tomato, Mixed Fruit, Condi.
ments and Milk
TUESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Lucky
Charms, Graham Crackers,
French Toast, Sausage Patty,
Oranges, Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Alternate Meal,
Macaroni & Cheese, -Corn-
bread, Deli Turkey Sandwich,
Carroteenies, Steamed Brocc-
oli, Peaches, Condiments and
Milk
WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal,' Frosted
Flakes, Graham Crackers,
Cinnamon Cereal Snack Bar,
:Pineapple,. Condiments and
Milk
I Lunch: Alternate, Meal,
Corndog, Chicken Nuggets,
Rolls, Cucumbers, Green
Beans, Applesauce, Condi-
ments and Milk
THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Honey
Nut Cheerios, Graham
Crackers, Oatmeal, Buttered
Toast, Bananas, Condiments
and Milk
Lunch: Alternate Meal,
Shredded Turkey w/ Gravy,
Rolls, Fish Sandwich, Mashed
Potatoes, Lettuce &, Tomato,
Orange Wedges, Cranberry
Sauce, Red Velvet Cake,
Condiments and Milk
FRIDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Lucky
Charms, Graham Crackers,
Breakfast Stick, Applesauce,
Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Alternate Meal, Chili
Con Carme & Beans,
Cornbread, Wildcat Combo,
Carrots, Lettuce & Tomato,
Grape Juice, Condiments and
Milk


I JUNIOR HIGH
MQNDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Variety,
Graham Crackers, Pop Tarts
Variety, Juice, .,or-riirm nts and
Milk
Lunch: Chcroe Pizza,
Hamburger on Bun, Alternate
Meal, Lettuce & Tomato, Baked
Beans, Fruit Cocktail, Condi-
ments and Milk
TUESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Variety,
Graham Crackers, French
Toast, Sausage Patty, Oranges,
Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Ham, Mac & Cheese,
Cornbread, Deli Turkey
Sandwich, Cheese Pizza,
Alternate Meal, Lettuce'
Tomato, Broccoli, Peaches,
Condiments and Milk
WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Variety,
Graham Crackers, Cinnamon


Toast Cereal Bar, Pineapple
Tidbits', Condiments and Milk
SLunch: Chicken Nuggets,
Rolls, Fish Sandwich,
Pepperoni Pizza, Alternate
Meal, Lettuce & Tomato, Green
Beans, Applesauce, Condi-
ments and Milk
-: THURSDAY.-,'
Breakfast: Cereal Variety,
Graham Crackers, Buttered
Cinnamon Toast, Oatmeal,
Peaches, Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Baked Turkey Deli
Roast, Turkey Gravy,. Rolls,
Cornbread, Corndog, Pepper-
oni Pizza, Alternate Meal,
Lettuce & Tomato, Mash
Potatoes, Sweet Potato Souffle,
Fresh Whole Apples & Pears,
Red 'Velvet Cake, Condiments
and,Milk
FRIDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Variety,
Graham Crackers, Breakfast
Rounds, Applesauce, Condi-
ments and Milk
Lunch: Chili w/ Crackers,
Cornbread, Combo Sub,
Alternate Meal, Lettuce &
Tomato, Buttered Carrots,
Juice, Condiments and Milk

SENIOR HIGH
MONDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Super
Donut, Peaches, Condiments
and Milk
Lunch: Hamburger on a Bun,
Popcorn Chicken, Potato
Rounds, Broccoli, Tossed
Salad, Applesauce, Condi-
ments and Milk
TUESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Jumbo
Waffles, Sausage Pizza, Fruit
Mix, Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Hamburger on a Bun,
Cowboy Macaroni, Broccoli,
Pineapple Chunks, Tossed
Salad, Condiments and Milk
WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Cheese
Grits, Buttered Toast, Peaches,
Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Cheeseburger on a
Bun, Pig in a Blanket, French
Fries, Baked Beans, Buttered
Carrots, Tossed Salad, Condi-
ments and Milk
THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Sausage
Pizza, Applesauce, Condiments
and Milk
Lunch: Hamburger Gravy,
Corndog, Mashed Potatoes,
Summer Squash, Tossed
Salad, Peaches, Orange Juice,
Rolls, Condiments and Milk
FRIDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Sausage
Pizza, Applesauce, Condiments
,and Milk
Lunch: Nachos w/ Ground
Beef, Beef Burrito, Corn,
Mexican Rice, Pinto Beans,
Tossed Salad, Orange Juice,
Condiments and Milk
Individual menus are subject to
change .


Pioneer Creek RV News
By Reggie DeSmet


(


I


I


I


Best wishes to everyone cel-
ebrating a birthday or anniver-
sary in December.
KOFFEE KLATCH
On Nov. 28, Steve Gray led
the prayer, Paul Vaughan led the
U.S. Pledge and Peggy Ralph
led the Canadian Pledge. The
50/50 winners were Lot 76,
Rosalie and Earl Folnsbee and
Ellen Gilson.
DANCES
There was a small turnout for
the Welcome Back Dance, but
everyone had a great time.
Door prizes were won by
Nancy Morrison, Aurele Du-
four, Sharron Noble, Barbara
Ellis, Marilyn Catlin and Pam
Norris.
The next dance will be our
Christmas Dance on Dec. 15
with Chrissy Harriman.
BINGO
Joe Bennitt won the large
jackpot on Nov. 23 and Nancy
Morrison won the small jack-


Crystal Lake RV News
By Joyce Taylor


Bennitt and Don Bennitt.
Shuffling, Nov. 27: three-
game winners were Bob
Beshel, Deby Bricker, Bob
Bundy. Lowell Gordon, Gary
Householder, Charlie Molett
and Nancy Morrison.
CHURCH NEWS
By Shirley Glessner
Pastor Bob Winne's message
on Nov. 25 was on giving and
goals in our life. Using several
Bible verses, he relayed to us
the importance of giving, set-
ting goals and keeping our eyes
on the goal. Be thankful for all
things God gives you.


I
n


I

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Best Names In Car a udio & plife I
Also Available I
SCar Alarms Amplifiers Car TV's Car DVDs Car Kits & Wire ss

Open 7 Days A Week 10 a.m. 8
r as r I II


pot. Sharron Noble on Nov. 26
won the large jackpot and Steve
Gray won the small jackpot.
CRAFTS
Crafts will again be hosting
the annual Cookie Exchange,
on Monday at 1 p.m. Everyone
in our park is welcome to par-
ticipate. There is a signup sheet
in the screen room.
Also, some of our residents
will be selling their crafts that
day. If you are looking for some
Christmas gifts, you might find
some items here.
SCORES
Men's Golf,Nov. 23: A or C
+ B or D Best Ball winners
were Ron Lapier, Harold
Lockett and Fred Kessler.
Ladies Golf, Nov. 23: first,
Mary Kessler; second, a tie
between Rita Delisle and Nancy
Morrison.
Mixed Golf, Nov. 26: Team
Net winners were Jean
Delisle, Larry Murphy, Joe


Members and guests were
greeted by Maxine Stromme as
Linda Gray on the organ and
Carole Jones on the piano
played hymns. The congrega-
tion sang "Oh Say but I'm
Glad," "Sweet Hour of Prayer"
and "Make Me a Blessing."
Nancy Morrison directed our
choir as they sang "Bring Your
Vessels" accompanied by Linda
Gray on the piano. Nancy
accompanied herself on the gui-
tar as she sang a solo, "''ve Got
More to Go to Heaven For."
All are welcome to come and
worship with us.


Frankie's
HAIR SALON

773-5665
116 Carlton St. Wauchula
Now Accepting
-i -- T Hours:
-. Tuesday Friday 9-6; Saturday 9-3


Welcome Back>



Winter Visitors
anks Reqalifi ce

a. Tanks RequalifiedaRecertif1ed


Valves Replaced


:i
~
ZI
t
.1


r
I


Herndon' LP Gas


Sr2890 E. Main St Wauchula
::':,'OC',-S W a uch\:u",la ,-' "- ....


773-6868,



Mon Fri 8:00am 4:30pm / Sat 8:00am-12.00pm


12.6c




Sm i I i I Itmm m i I I



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See us for all your car stereo sys ms.

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n







10B The Herald-Advocate, December 6, 2012


Volunteers Serve 500 Free Thanksgiving Meals


Photos by Nancy Davis
Helping coordinate the Thanksgiving dinner were from left Judith George, executive di-
rector of the Hardee Help Center, Ester Alvarado, Rev. Jim Davis, president of the Hardee
County Ministerial Association, Jamie Davis-Samiuels, President of SendMeMission and
her husband Paul.


Approximately 100 volunteers formed an assembly line to fill more than 300 meals that
were delivered throughout Hardee County on Thanksgiving day.


Volunteers of all ages pitched in to help including young Emily Sheffield.


S1- _


After dinner was served at the Wauchula Methodist Church children were entertained
by coloring with Linda Hernandez, center.


Music is your own experience, your own thoughts, your wisdom. If you don't live it, it
won't come out of your horn. They teach you'there's a boundary line to music. But,
man, there's no boundary line to art.
-Charlie Parker


NOTICE
REQUEST FOR VARIANCE
All interested persons are hereby notified that Anchor Sign, Inc., as agent for Hardula S.C.
Company, Ltd, is requesting a variance to install a 171.67 square foot sign for tenant located
within the Hardee County Centre, which exceeds the Land Development Code size
restriction by 134 67 square feet. The property is legally described as:
COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 10, TOWNSHIP 34 SOUTH,.
RANGE 25 EAST, HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA, AS A POINT OF REFERENCE; RUN
THENCE NORTH 89 44'56" EAST, ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION
10, 50.0 FEET TO A POINT ON THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE, OF U.S. HIGHWAY
NO. 17; THENCE NORTH 00 23'00" WEST ALONG SAID EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE,
526.50 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 00 23'00"
WEST ALONG SAID EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE 796.86 FEET TO THE NORTH
BOUNDARY OF THE SOUTHWEST 1 OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/ OF, SAID SECTION 10;
THENCE NORTH 89 45'48" EAST, ALONG SAID NORTH BOUNDARY, 660.07 FEET TO A
POINT ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF SEABOARD COASTLINE RAILROAD;
THENCE SOUTH 12 04'38" EAST ALONG SAID WESTERLY RAILROAD RIGHT-OF-WAY
LINE, 645.40 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89 44'56" WEST PARALLEL WITH THE SOUTH
BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 10, 510.87 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 00 23'00" EAST,
PARALLEL WITH THE SAID EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 17,
165.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89 44'56" WEST, PARALLEL WITH THE SAID SOUTH
BOUNDARY OF SECTION 10, 280.00 FEET TO A POINT ON THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-
WAY LINE OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 17, AND THE POINT OF BEGINNING, LESS ROAD
RIGHT-OF-WAY DESCRIBED IN ORDER OF TAKING RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS
BOOK 614, PAGE 1056, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA.
The proposed variance request will be considered by the Wauchula Planning and Zoning
Board on Monday, December 17, 2012 at 5:30 p.m. and the Wauchula City Commission
on Monday, January 14, 2013 at 6:00 p.m., at the City Commission Chambers, 225 E. Main
Street,.Suite 1.05, Wauchula, Florida. Any interested persons) will be heard at these
meetings. If any person decides to appeal any decision made by the Board or Commission
with respect to this request for which he will need a verbatim record of the proceedings, he
will need to ensure that such verbatim record is made.
CITY OF WAUCHULA
s/Richard K. Nadaskay, Jr.
Mayor, City Commission
ATTEST:
s/Holly Smith
City Clerk
12:6c


Matt Warren and Mardi Sumner prepare a large pot of green beans.






The Hardee County Ministerial Association would like to thank
the following churches, organizations, and approximately 100
volunteers for helping to provide 500 meals on Thanksgiving
Day.
First United Methodist Church, Wauchula
Faith Presbyterian Church
First Christian Church
Oak Grove Baptist Church
Real Life Church
First Baptist Church, Wauchula
First United Methodist Church, Bowling Green
Faith Temple Church of God
Florida's First Assembly of God Church
St. Michael Catholic Church
Northside Baptist Church
New Hope Baptist Church
First Baptist Church, Zolfo Springs
New Vision Worship Center
First Baptist Church, Bowling Green
Crewsville Bethel Baptist Church
New Zion Baptist Church
Cornerstone Hospice
Florida Hospital
Parish Nursing
Hardee Help Center
Sweetbay
SendMeMissions
Feed 5000

A Special Thank You goes to the Hardee County Suncoast
Spurs NWTF Chapterfor donating the turkeys. Pictured below,
from left, are John Platt, Allen Widener, and George
Wadsworth, Jr.


L --


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12B The Herald-Advocate, December 6, 2012



Pet Of The- Week


4. -.!, JS 9.
Rex is a male Pitbull Terrier.
He is a red & white puppy with a short coat and
long tail. His adoption fee is $45.
Adoption fees are $45 and include a rabies" vaccination and spaying or
neutering of the animal. Contact 773-2320 if you are interested in adopt-
ing any cats or dogs that desperately need a loving home. The kennel
location is 685 Airport Road, Wauchula, at the county landfill.


The universe is change; our life is what our thoughts
,make it.
-Marcus Aurelius Antoninus

Change your thoughts and you change your world.
-Norman Vincent Peale


PUBLIC NOTICE

SPECIAL MEETING DATE

The Hardee County Housing Authority will meet for a
Special Meeting on.Tuesday, December 11, 2012, at
6:00 p.m. at 701 LaPlaya Drive, Wauchula.
12:6c



Notice

The Hardee County Board of County Commissioners and
some Staff will be participating'in a Wind Mitigation Work-
shop sponsored by the Florida Counties Foundation on
Thursday, December 13, 2012, from 9:30 a.m. until 12:30
p.m. in the Hardee County Commissidn Chambers, 412 W.
Orange Street, Room 102, Wauchula. Commissioners/
Staff from other counties may attend workshop also.

For more information, please call 863/773-9430.

Lexton H: Albritton, County Manager
12:6c


During the past week, sheriff's deputies and city police
officers investigated the following incidents and made the fol-
lowing arrests:

COUNTY
Dec. 2, a fight at Pine Cone Trailer Park and thefts on Manlev
Road and on East Main Street were reported.

Dec. 1, Cinthia Karina Arcos. 21. of 1239 SR 64 W.. Zolfo
Springs, was arrested by Dep. Cesar Medina and charged with bat-
tery.
Dec. 1, Adreinne Alvarado, 24. of 1030 Makowski Road.
Wauchula. was arrested by Sgt. Lyle Hart and charged with misuse
of 911 or E-911.
Dec. 1, Joshua Brian Klein, 23, of 207 Short St.. Wauchula,
was arrested by Dep. Steven Ahrens and charged with battery.
Dec. 1, residential burglaries on Carlton Street and on SR 62,
burglary of a conveyance on U.S. 17 South. a tag stolen on Summit
Street and a theft on U.S. 17 North were reported.

Nov. 30, Jose Noel Bentancourt-Leon, 28,'of 3546 SR 66,
Zolfo Springs, was arrested by Sgt. Matt Tinsley and charged with
battery.
Nov. 30, a residential burglary on Poplar St., a vehicle stolen
Son U.S. 17 South and a theft on U.S. 17 North were reported.

Nov. 29, Gabriel Rodriguez, 22, of 4655 Maple Ave., Bowling
Green, was arrested by the Drug Task Force (DTF) and charged
with selling methamphetamine, possession of drug paraphernalia
and illegal use of a two-way communication device.
Nov. 29, Christina Rodriguez, 30, of 3080 Hickory Court,
Zolfo Springs, was arrested by Dep. Ryan Abbott and charged with
battery.
Nov..29, a vehicle stolen on Poplar Street and a theft on
Peterson Street were reported:

Nov. 28, Gilbert St. Ville, 40, of 1557 Washington St., Wau-
chula, was arrested by Dep. Polly Bissette and charged with bat-
tery.
Nov. 28, Jason Michael Swain, 31, of 228 Airport Road,
Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Chris Albritton on a charge of vio-
lation of probation.
Nov. 28, Clayton James Choate, 20, of 1701 Louisiana St.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Michael Lake and charged with
larceny petit theft.
Nov. 28, Jesus Lawrence Torres, 62, of 296 Old Crewsville
Road, Zolfo Springs, was arrested by Dep. Bradford Merkel on a
charge of withholding, support of children.
Nov. 28, Stacy Lynell Wilkins,'41, of 3809 Dixiana Dr.,
Bowling Green, was arrested and charged with possession of mar-
ijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia, possession of prescription
drugs without a prescription, simple assault threat to do vio-
lence, and two traffic offenses.
Nov. 28, a residential burglary on East Broward Street and a
theft on U.S. 17 North were reported.

Nov. 27, Elizabeth Lynn Buffalo, 24, of 1110 Old Fort Green
Road, Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Steven Ahrens and charged
with larceny petit theft.
Nov. 27, a residential burglary on Sally Place, burglary of con-
veyances on Azalea Lane and on Apple Blossom Lane, a tag stolen
on Merle Langford Road and a theft on U.S. 17 North were report-
ed.

Nov. 26, Mark Allern Justice, 35, of 1304 Sparrow Road,


Wauchula. was arrested by Sgt. Lyle Hart on an out-of-state fugi-
tive warrant.
Nov. 26, residential burglaries on SR 66 and on North
Hollandtown Road, criminal mischief on Dansby Road, a vehicle
stolen on Golden Oaks Road and a theft on Doc Coil Road were
reported.

WAUCHULA
Dec. 2, criminal mischief on North Seventh Avenue was
reported.

Dec. 1, burglary of a conveyance on U.S. 17 South was report-
ed.

Nov. 30, Cipriano Ibarra. 28, of 2446 Taylor Dr., Zolfo
Springs. was arrested by Ofc. Justin Wyatt on an .out-of-county
warrant.

Nov. 29, a residential burglary on Shelton Avenue was report-
ed.

Nov. 27, criminal mischief on Court Street was reported.

BOWLING GREEN
Dec. 1, Pedro Salazar-Perez, 32, of 4229 Central Ave.,
Bowling Green, was arrested b- Cpl. Robert Ehrenkaufer and
charged with battery.

Nov. 29, criminal mischief on Doyle Parker Avenue was
reported.

Nov. 27, a theft on U.S. 17 North was reported.





HJHS Starts B-Ball


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
.The Hardee Junior High
School. basketball teams took
the floor earlier this week.
The teams got going on Mon-
day when they hosted Avon
Park. The girls play at 5:30 p.m.
and the boys next, after appro-
priate warm-up times.
.There will be three more
games in the Monday and
Thursday format before the
Christmas break. The games
today (Thursday) are at Hill-
Gustat Middle School in Se-
bring. Next week's game are
Monday at home against De-
Soto and Thursday against vis-
iting Lake Placid.
Play resumes Jan. 10 with a
visit from Sebring. Hardee
plays at Avon Park on Jan. 14,
greets Hill-Gustat on Jan. 17
and finishes the season with. a
trio of road games, at DeSoto
on Jan. 24, at Lake Placid on
Jan. 18 and at Sebring on Jan.
31.
Rashad Faison and Sean


Brown are coaches of the boys
team, while Brown co-coaches
the girls team with Tiffany
Robertson.
Suiting up for the boys squad
are .returning eighth graders
Willie Baker, Jammal Carlton,
Jarrett Carlton, Kyle Choate,
Keith Choate, Isaac Flores,
Aaron Harrison, Livenson Met-
ayer, Alejandro Rodriguez and
Djes Youtes.
Joining them are 'Boone
Paris, Santiago Ramos, Rodrigo
Rojas, Adrian DeLeon, Damar
Harris, Zachary Hooks and
Nicklaus'Nichols.
On the distaff side of the
ledger are eighth grade re-
turnees Ellen Bivens, Rayann
Kulig, Annett Mondragon and
Fernanda Ramos. Also on the
squad are Emily Boyette,
Louisha Saint Louis, Kalisa
Snell, Taniquia Blandin, Jai-
lenne Figueroa, Alexis Garza,
Mary Macedo, Savannah Mul-
lins, Mahlie Sampson and
Layla Santoyo. i


BBT~IB)IIIX~6








*****e**is,****,,,, SCH 3-DIGIT 326
935 05-08-03 13P 3S
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
404 LIBRARY WEST
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-0001


The Herald-Advocate
(usPS 578-70)

Thursday, December 6,2012


Every Home Had A Radio


& Sewing Machine, Too


By ANGELICA MONTANEZ
Special To The Herald-Advocate
Q: What's your full name?
A: William Eugene Holland.
Q: When were-you born?
A:Jan. 24, 1934.
Q: Where were you born?
A: Du Quoin, Ill.
Q: Where did you go to school?
A: I went to school in Du Quoin, Ill.
Q: Did you have to walk to school?
A: My elementary school was a mile
away, so I had to walk. In high school I
had to use the bus because it was three
miles away from home.
Q: What were your favorite pas-
times when you were young?
A: I liked to go hunting rabbits and
fishing with my dad. I usually did that a
lot.
Q: Was there any popular hangout
spot for teens where you lived?
A: Many of us went to the local skat-
ing rink and just hung out, skated, and
had a good time after school or week-
ends.
Q: When did you get your first job
and what was it?
A: I was 15 when I got my first job. I
worked at.a service station in town
where I put gas in cars and cleaned
windshields.
Q: What did you like most about
high school?
A: I really enjoyed reading books,
history, woodshop class, and math. I
didn't really enjoy English.
Q: Did you play any sports?
A: No, I didn't have time for sports.
Q: What was your first car like?
A: It was a 1937 Ford Coupe. It was
very small and only had a front seat, no
back seats.
Q: Do you have any brothers or sis-


ters?
A: I have two brothers and four sis-
ters.
Q: What were some popular toys
during your childhood?
A: Our family didn't have much
money to spend on toys, so we rarely
got any.
Q: How much did it cost to go to
the movies?
A: In the afternoons on Saturdays it
was 10 and on regular weekdays it was
25 cents.
Q: Did you attend church?
A: Yes, I was. a Baptist and went to
church.
Q: What were the gas prices?
A: Gas was 25 cents a gallon.
Q: Did you have any pets?
A: Yeah, I had a lot of dogs.
Q: What technology was available
back then?
A: Mostly just the radio. We had tele-
vision, but not many stations were
available and cable wasn't invented yet.
Q: What kind of music did you lis-
ten to?
A: Country or Western music.
Q: Did you have your own bed-
room?
A: No, I slept mostly on the couch or
anywhere that was available. My sisters
were the ones who had their own bed-
rooms.
Q: Were there any extreme fashion
trends?
A: ,
Women,' l
didn't wear \ ,
pants, they 'A i t
wore skirts
or dresses. Men wore jeans.
Q: What was the popular form of
entertainment?


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A: There was a lot of dancing,
rollerblading, and going to drive-in
movies.
Q: What were your parents' jobs?
A: My mom didn't work, she stayed
at home, and my dad was a coal miner.
Q: What did you do after you fin-
ished high school?
A: I immediately went to St. Louis to
get a job at a warehouse.
Q: What did you do for a living?
A: I worked at a telephone company
installing offices. After a few years of
that I entered the Army and got sent to
Germany for three years. Then I went
back to the telephone company.
Q: What is your favorite childhood.
memory?
A: When my family and I would all


go to the drive-in movies after church
with all the kids.
Q: What do you think has been the
greatest technological advance since
you were a kid?
A: The Internet and computers.
Q: Describe the house you lived in?
A: I lived on top of a mountain in a
farmhouse that had many animals. Our
nearest neighbor was half a mile away.
There were woods all over the place.
Q: When did you graduate?
A: I graduated in 1951.
Q: What was a common household
item?
A: A.radio. Pretty much every house
had a radio and probably a sewing
machine, too.


BOOK BINGO
u.


COURTESY PHOTO
Zolfo Springs Elementary School recently hosted a Literacy Night for students and their
families. This event gave parents new ways of working with their children at home.
While parents were learning in the classrooms, students played "Book Bingo" with the
teachers in the cafeteria. Students took home new books as prizes for the evening.
CIS-CO NETWORKIN


Ryan Rawlings
SFSC Cisco Networking Academy, 2011
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computer skills for 2013, says ComputerWorld magazine.
When Ryan Rawlings wanted to become part of this growing
profession, he enrolled in South Florida State College's Cisco
Networking Academy. He got solid training in the infrastructure
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453-6661, 773-2252, 465-5300, or 494-7500.
View the Spring 2013 Schedule of Classes at
www.southflorida.edu.


S SOUTH Academic Classes
SFLORIDA Begin Jan. 7
State College Occupational Classes
Begin Jan. 3
Discover a New World Begi Jan. 31
Discover a New World Financial aid is available
600 West College Drive, Avon Park, FL 33825 to those who qualify.
South Florida State College is an equal access:'equal opportunity institution. SFSC is accredited by die Commission on Colleges o the Southern Association
of Colleges and Schools to award baccalauieale and associate degrees. Contact the Comrissiun on Colleges at 1866 Southern Lane, Decatur. Georgia 30033-
1007 or call 404--o79-4501 for questions about the accreditation of SFSC Inquiries about SFSC, such as admission requirements, financial aid, or educational
progurms. should be directed to the college and not the Commuission on Colleges. 12:6C


PAGE ONE


1prog aIn.










2C The Herald-Advocate, December 6, 2012





Schedule of Weekly Services-


,Printed as a Public Service

:'Th&Je(aid-Advoca te
S Wauchul, Florida

Deadline: Thursday 5 p.m.

BOWLING GREEN
APOSTOLIC LIGHTHOUSE
UNITED PENTECOSTAL
CHURCH
310 Orange St.
375-3100
Sunday Morning ...............10:00 a.m,
Sunday Evening ....................6:00 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting........7:00 p.m.
Thursday Service ..................7:30 p.m.

CHESTER GROVE MB CHURCH
708 W. Grape St. 375-3353
Sunday School .....................9:30 aim.
Sunday Worship ....................8:00 a.m.
Sun. Eve. Worship Ist & 3rd 4:00 p.m.
Tues. Prayer/Bible Study .....6:00 p.m..

CHRISTIAN BIBLE
FELLOWSHIP
Hwy. 17 South.
Morning Worship ............10:30 a.m.
Youth Group Sunday .........6:00 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
121 West Broward St. 375-2231
Sunday School ................:.10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................. 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday ............................7:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
TRUE HOLINESS OUTREACH
725 Palmetto St.
375-3304 ;- ,
Sunday School .........:........ 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ........'....:..I I:00:a.m.
Tues. Night Bible Study .. ... 7:30 p.m.
Evening Worship.
1st Sunday 5 00 p.m.

COMMUNITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Main & W. Centra..
Sunday AM Worship..........10:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening ....................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer Meeting ............7:00 p.m.

FAITH ASSEMBLY OF GOD
4937 Hwy. 17 N. 375-4206
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship .................11:00 a.m.
Disciples Train & Choirs ......5:30 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Bowling Green
S. Hwy. 17 -375-2253
SUNDAY:
Bible Study ...................:...... 9:30 a.m.
M'6rning Worship ............. 10:45 a.m.
Evening, Worship, ,..?:.... !6:3.O9pmny:
WEDNESDAY:
Discipleship Training
Youth &Adult 6.30 p.m.
AWANA(ages 3.5th grade h6 3u p m

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Grape & Church Streets 375-2340
Sunday School .....................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship .............1I 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ..................6:00 p.m.

FORT GREEN BAPTIST
CHURCH
Baptist Church Road 773-9013
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................1: 00, .m.
Sunday Evening ....................6:00 p.im .
Wednesday Supper ...........6:.00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

HOLYN* I CHILD l ',
SPANISH CATHOLIC MISSION
Misa (Espanol) Suhday 7 00 p rh

IGLESIA DEL.DIOS VIVO
105 Dixiana St.- 375-4191 -
Domingo De Predicacion....,l I :Q0 p.m. ,
Martes Estudio Biblico ..........7:00 p.m.
Miercoles Estudior Juvenil ....7:00 p.m.
Jueves De Predicacion ....... ..7:00 p,m.

IMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH
210 E. Broward St. 375-4681 :
Sunday School ...... ..............9:45'a.m .
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m:.
Evening Worship .............. 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ........... .....7:00 p.m

MACEDONIA PRIMITIVE
BAPTIST CHURCH
607 Palmetto St.
Church School ......................9:30 a.m.
Morning Service ................. 1:00 a.m.
Evening Service ....................7:00 p.mi.
Wed. Bible Study/Prayer ......7:00 p.m.
Communion-2nd Sun. Eve. ..6:00 p.m.

MT. PISGAH BAPTIST CHURCH
6210 Mt. Pisgah Rd. 375-4409
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............. 11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training................. .5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ...............7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time........7:00 p.m.
NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
Mason Dixon & County Line Rd.
781-5887
Sunday Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
2nd Sunday Communion ....11:00 a.m.
Bread of Life Sunday........12:15 p.m.
T.H.E. Meeting Tuesday ....7:00 p.m.

OPEN DOOR FULL GOSPEL
PRAISE CENTER
E. Broward St.


Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Service ..................... 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7i30 p.m.


BOWLING GREEN

PRIMERA MISSION BAUTISTA
Murray Road off Hwy. 17
375-2295
Domingos Escuela Dom. ......9:45 a.m.
Servicio de Adoracion..........11:00 a.m.
Servicio de Predicacion ........5:00 p.m.
Miercoles Servico..................6:30 p.m.

'REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 South US Hwy 17
Morning Service ..................10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.

ST. JOHN A.M.E. CHURCH
513 W. Orange St.
S375-2911
Sunday Church School ..........9:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship .....1:00 a.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

VICTORY PRAISE CENTER
128 E. Main St.
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Thursday Night Services,
Evening Worship ..............7:00 p.m.
Kidz Club..............................7:00 p.m.

ONA

IGLESIA PENTECOSTES
VISION POR LAS ALMAS
149 Bedger Loop 448-2831
Servicio Domiligos ................7:30 p.m.
Jueves (Ensefianza Biblica) .................
........................................7:30 p.m .

LIMESTONE BAPTIST CHURCH
4868 Keystone Ave. Limestone
Sunday School ... ........:.......9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship .. ...1I 00 a.m.
-Evening Worship .................6:00 p.m.
.Wednesday Prayer .............7:00 p.m.

NEW ZION BAPTIST CHURCH
202 Sidney Roberts Road
Sunday School ....................0:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training..................6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship .................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ...............6:00 p.m.

ONA BAPTIST CHURCH
131 Bear Lane 773-2540
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer ...............7:00 p.m.

UNION BAPTIST CHURCH
5076 Lily Church Rd. 494-5622
Sunday School ....................10:00'a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday
AWANA for Kids ..............6:30 p.m.
SWednesday Prayer Time.........7:00 p.m..

,,, WAWICHULA

APOSTOLIC ASSEMBLY
,Martin Luther King and Apostolic Rd.
Sunday School li 0t0 a m
Enghlshg Ser\ ice ................ 11:30 a.m.
'General Worilltp Ser\ ie ......1:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer.............:.7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

CELEBRATION CHURCH
Rainey Blvd.
863-781.1624
hardee.celebration.org
Sunday Morning Service ,....1:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service .......6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Youth Service ....5:30 p.m.
Childcare provided at all services

CELEBRATION FELLOWSHIP,
773-0427
CelebratiownService ............10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Evening Cell Groups
. 'Adult Cell Group ::;.............,7:00 p.m.
Youth .Cell Group .................7:00 p.m.
Children's CellGroup .....r....7:00 p.m.
Call fotrlocatiions

CHARLIE CREEK
BAPTIST CHURCH
6885 State Road 64 East 773-3447
Sunday School .....................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
Evenhig Worship .............'..6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Worship ...........6:30 p.m.
CHURCH OF CHRIST
201 S. Florida Ave.
Sunday Bible Study .............9:00 a.m.'
Sunday Worship Service......10:30 a.m._
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

CHURCH OF CHRIST
Will Duke Road
773-2249
Sunday Morning Worship......9:30 a.m.
Suliday Bible Class'...,...:......11:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening Worship .....6:00 p.m..
Wed. Night Bible Class ........7:00 p.m.
Men's Leadership & Training Class -
2nd Sunday of Month........4:00 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
Martin Luther King Blvd.
767-0199

CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST
OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS
630 Hanchey Rd. 773-3532
Sacrament Meeting ............9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Priesthood ........................... 11:00 a.m .

COMMUNITY BAPTIST
CHURCH OF WAUCHULA HILLS
(SPANISH)
.; : 615 Rainey Blvd.
257-3950
Sunday Bible Study ............10:00 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship....l 1:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........7:00 p.m.


Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.


WAUCHULA
DIOS ES AMOR
807 S. 8th Ave.
773-4576
Domingos Escuela
Dominica .......................... 10:00 a.m.
Servicio .............................. 1:00 a.m .
Lunes Oracion .....................6:00 p.m.
Miercoles Servicio................7:00 p.m.

EL REMANENTE
IGLECIA CRISTIANA
318 W. Main St..
Martes Oracion .....................7:00 p.m.
Jueves Servicio ...................... 7:30 p.m.
Viernes Servicio ..................7:30 p.m.
Domingo Servicio...............10:30 a.m.

ENDTIME CROSSROAD
MINISTRY
501 N. 9th & Georgia St. 773-3470
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
Morning Service ..................11:30 a.m.
Evening Service....................7:30 p.m.
Wed. Bible St. & Yth. Gath ..7:30 p.m.
Friday (Holy Ghost Night)....7:30 p.m.

FAITH PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
114 N. 7th Ave.- 773-2105
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ...................11:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ..:............6:15 p.m.
Wed. Youth Fellowship..........6:50 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ......7:00 p.m.

FAITH TEMPLE CHURCH
OF GOD
701 N. 7th Ave 773-3800.
Sunday School ...........:....... .9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship ..................10:20 a.m.
Children's Chuch' ............1..0:40 a.m.
Evening Service ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible.Study,.......:00,pm,

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
1570 W. Main St. 773-4182
SUNDAY:
Bible Study for all ages ......:.9:45 a m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ......... ........6:00 p:m.

WEDNESDAY:
Sr. Adult Bible Study ..........10:00 a.m.
Children's Chiors
(PK-Grade 4) .................... 5:30 p.m.
PRAISE 57-Jr High Chior .. 5:30 p.m.
Mid-Week Prayer Meeting ., 6:00 p.m.
Kids On Missions
(PK-Grade 4) ................... 6:00 p.m.
Club 56 ................................ 6:00 p.m .
Youth Group (Grades 7-12) 6:00 p.m.
Family Life Ministry-
& Discipleship ................. 6:00 p.m.
Church Orchestra.................. 6:00 p.m.
Adult Choir .......................... 7:00 p.m.

FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH
1121 W. Louisiana St. 77-9243
SINDAY: "* '* '.' '' Pr
Generations Caf6 Opens.......9:30 a.m.
Kids World Check-In for
Nursery-5th Grade Begins..10:15 a.m.
Pre-K Blast .......................10:45 a.m
Kids World B.L.A.S.T.
(K-5th) ........................... 10:45 a.m .
Worship Service ....i.............0:45 a.m.
WEDNEiSdAY:
Check-In begins for
Nursery-5thgrade ...............6:15 p.m.
Classes for children ages
PreK- 12th grade ......:...6:30-8:00 p.m.
FIRST CHURCH OF
THE NAZARENE
511 W. Palmetto St.
Sunday School .................10:00 a.m.
Morning Service .................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

FIRST MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH,
1347 Martin Luther King Ave. ,
773-6556
Sunday School ...................9:30 a.m.
Morning Service ..................11:00 a.m.
Eveining Worship ..... .:...:..6:00 p.m:
Tues. Youth Ministry Meeting/
,Bible Stud'f.. 0' 0 p m.
Wed. Prayer/Bible Study r...,.7:00 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHLIURCH'
207 N. Seventh Ave. 773-4267
Sunday School- ..... ....:9k45 ,a.m
Traditional Sunday Worship 11:00 a.m.
Casual Sunday Worship...:.....600 'p.m
Tuesday Bible Study....:.......10:Ob a.m.
Wednesday Activities .....i.:..6:00 p.m.

FLORIDA'S FIRST ASSEMBLY
OF GOD CHURCH
1397 South Florida Avenue
773-9386.
Sunday.School .....................9:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................10:00 a.m.
Wed. Family Night ................7:00 p.m.
Adult, Children & Radiate Youth Church

FLORIDA GOSPEL
511 W. Palmetto
223.5126
Sunday Morning Worphip.;::;l 1':00 a.m:
Wednesday Worship ..............7:30 p.m.

THE GOSPEL TABERNACLE
810 W. Tennessee St. 863-735-1158
Morning Service .................10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Service.:....:;.......7:00 p.m.
HEARTLAND
COMMUNITY CHURCH
1262 W. Main St, 767-6500
Coffee & Donuts................... 9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ........<.... ......9:30 a.m.
W orship....................... ...10:30 a.m.
Wed. Night Ditlner ............'...6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bodybuilders Adult Cl. '
Crossroads &


Lighthouse Min. ...............7:00 p.m.

HIGHER GROUND
INTERNATIONAL MINISTRY
1258 W. MAIN STREET
WAUCHULA, FL
Sunday Morning Worship.... 11:00 a.m.
Wed. Night Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.


IGLESIA ADVENT
SEPTIMO D
Old Bradenton
767-1010


WAUCHULA
IGLESIA de DIOS
ALFA Y OMEGA
1909 Stanfield Rd.
Sunday School ...................10: 00 a.m.
Evening Service ...... ............ 6:00 p.m.
Tuesday (Bible Study & Prayer
Night) ................................730 p.m.
Friday Worship Service ........7:30 p.m.

IGLESIA HISPANA
FUENTE DE VIDA
501 N. 9" Ave.
M anes ............... ..... .......7: 30 p.m .
Jueves ...................................7:30 p.m .
Domingo ............................ 10:30 a.m.

IGLESIA HISPANA
PRESENCIA de Dios
511 W. Palmetto St.
Domingos ............................. 6:00 p.m.
M iercoles............................ 7:00 p.m.

JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
ENGLISH
155 Altman Road 1131
Sunday Service ......................2:00 p.m.

JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
-SPANISH
Sunday Service .................... 10:00 a.n.

LIGHT OF THE WORLD
MINISTRIES
Womans Center 131 N. 7th Ave.
Wauchula, FL
Friday Evening ....................6:00 p.m.

LAKE DALE BAPTIST CHURCH
-3102 Heard Bridge Road
773-6622
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Service .................. 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
.Wednesday Prayer ..................7:00 p.m..

MINISTERIO INTERNATIONAL
Cambriadores de Mundo ,
: 704 W. Main St. 773-0065
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.
NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH
1999 State Road 64 East
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
'Morning Worship Service.... 11:00 a.m.
,Evening Worship Service ......6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Night Supper......6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Activities
(All Ages) .......................7:00 p.m.

NEW LIFE CHURCH
117 W. Palmetto St.
773-2929
Sunday Service ....................10:00-a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
Children Ministries for all services

NEW MT. ZION A.M.E. CHURCH
,. 10 Martin Luther King Ave.
..... 1. 767".QQ .I ; :.. .*:
)'orn Worship
(1st & 3r Sun.) ................8:00 a.m.
'Sunday School .....................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...................11:00 a.m.
:2nd Sunday Youth Service ..:.4:00 p.m.
Allen Chrilian Endeasor 4.1) p.m.
Wed. & Fr Bible Study. 7 ,. 'p.m.

NORTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
912 N. 8th Ave. 773-6947
Sunday School ...................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

OAK GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
4350 W. Main St. 735-0321
Sunday School ............... .....9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ........:.......11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

PEACE VALLEY LUTHERAN
CHURCH,
1643 Stenstroin Road 773-2858
I" & 3" Sun.
"Cobrdrirfnion .......... ......:10"00 a.m.
2" & 4 Sun.
Divine Worship ....!. ........ :00 a.m.
Bible Study .......................... 11:15!a.m
'" Fellk." r..p e.cn SunJrjy after service
PROGRESSIVE MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
149 Manley Road East Main
S773 5814
Sunday School ....................9:30 a.m.
Worship Service ...............1...11:00 a.m.
Wed. Evening Prayer ............7:00 p.m.
REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 North US Hwy 17
' "Morning-Sgeivice ...........10:30 a:m
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m
RIVERVIEW HEIGHTS
MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1321 S.R. 636 East 773-3344
Radio Program
WZZS Sundays..................9:00 a.m
Sunday- School ....................10:00 a.m
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m
.Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m

SOUL HARVEST MINISTRY
1337 Hwy. 17 South, Wauchula
- Sunday School ...................1.O00 na.m
Morning Worship .........;...:11:00 a.m
Evening Service ...................6:00 p.m
Wednesday Service .............7:00 p.m

ST. ANN'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
204 N. 9th Ave. 773-6418
Sunday .....:.........................9:00 a.m
Holy Days .:....... ............ ...............

ST. MICHAEL
CATHOLIC CHURCH
408 Heard Bridge Road 773-4089
Saturday Mass (English) ......5:00 p.m


.(Spanish) ......7:00 p.m
Sunday(English) ..................8:30 a.m
(Spanish) ..................11:00 a.m
(Creole) .......:.......... 1:00 p.m
Catecisrho ...........................9:45 a:m
Daily Mass in English ..........8:30 a.m


-- SEVENTH DAY


ISTA DEL ADVENTIST CHURCH
)IA 205 S. llth Ave. -773-9927
Road Sabbath School .....................9:30 i.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
.. TueS. Prayer Meeting ............7:00 p.m.


WAUCHULA
SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH .
505 S. 10th Ave. 773-4368
SundaySchool ....................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ...............7:00 p.m.

SPIRIT WIND TABERNACLE
1652 Old Bradenton Road
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............7:30 p.m.
TABERNACLE OF
PRAISE & JOY
1507 MLK Avenue
Sunday School .........;..........10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:30 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Tues. Bible Stdy.
& Child Train ....................7:00 p.m.
Friday Prayer Service ............7:00 p.m.
WAUCHULA CHURCH OF GOD
1543 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.
773-0199
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:15 a.m.
Evening Worship .................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Fam. Training ....7:30 p.m.
Thurs. Youth Bible Study ......7:00 p.m.
Friday Night Worship ............7:30 p.m.
WAUCHULA HILLS HARVEST
TEMPLE ASSEMBLY OF GOD
210 Anderson
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Church..................................10:00 a.m .
Youth Service ........................ 6:00 p.m.
Evening Service ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.
WAUCHULA HILLS
SPANISH CHURCH OF GOD
1000 Stansfield Rd.
Sunay School ..................10:00 a.m.
E ng Worship .............7..30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer ......................7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship..................7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship .......'..........7:30 p.m.
WAUCHULA REVIVAL CENTER
(Full Gospel)
501 N. 9th Ave.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .........:0.....11:00 a.m.
Youth & Child: Church..........6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ..................7:00 p.m.
Men's Fri. Prayer .................7:00 p.m.

ZOLFO SPRINGS
COMMUNITY WESLEYAN CHURCH
Gardner
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
CREWSVILLE BETHEL
BAPTIST CHURCH
8251 Crewsville Road
urch 3-4-0871 Pasior 773-665'
Sunday School ..........9.......4....9 .5 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .,..............6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................6:30 p.m.
EVANGELISTIC HOLINESS
CHURCH INC
Corner of 6th and Hickory
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday ..................... 7:30 p.m.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
OF ZOLFO
320 E. 4th St. 735-1200
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Training Union ......................5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.
FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Corner of 6th & Suwanee 735-1544
Gospel Music ....... ........... 10:30 a.m.
Worship Service ................ 1:00 a.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.
FOX MEMORIAL
HOLINESS CHURCH
2344 Merle Langfbrd Rd.
Sunday Morning Worship....10:00 a.m.
S Sunday Night Worship .........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service. .........:...7:30 p.m.

SGARDNER BAPTIST:CHURCH
South Hwy. 17 494-5456
Sunday School ...q.............,.10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .......,... :11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer '.........7:00 p.m.

LIFE CHANGING WORSHIPCENTER
3426: Oak St. 863-832-9808
Sunday Worship ............... ..,2:30 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.


ZOLFO SPRINGS
MARANATHA BAPTIST CHURCH
2465 Oxendine Rd.
(863) 832-9292
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
W orship .............................. 1:00 a.m.
Evening ................................ 1:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible & Prayer Meet....7:00 p.m.
NEW VISION WORSHIP CENTER
64 E. & School House Road
Church 735-8585 Childcare 735-
8586
Morning Worship ................10:00 a.m.
Children's Church.............10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Youth & F.T.H. ............7:00 p.m.
PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF
GOD FAITH TEMPLE
Oak Street
Sunday Worship ..................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ...............7:00 p.m.
Tuesday Worship ..................7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship................7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ..................7:30 p.m.
PRIMER MISSION
BAUTISTA HISPANA
518 8th Ave. E.
Escuela Dqminical ...........:..10:00 a.m.
Servicio del Domingo.......... 1:00 ani.
.............................................. 7:00 p.m .
Servicio del Miercoles ..........7:30 p.m.
PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH
Pioneer Park
2nd Sunday .........................10:30 a.m.
Evening Service ....................6:30 p.m.
5th Sunday ............................6:00 p.m.
REALITY RANCH
COWBOY FELLOWSHIP
2-1/2 Miles east of
Zolfo Springs on Hwy. 66
863-781-1578
Sunday Service ..................11:00 a.m.
SST. PAUL'S MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
3676 US. Hwy. 17 South 735-0636
Sunday School ................9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship ....................11 a.m.
Wed. Prayer Service ..............7:00 p.m.
SAN ALFONSO MISSION
3027 Schoolhouse Lane
Domingo, Misa en Espanbl ..9:30 a.m.
Catecismo .......................... 1:00 a.m.
SPANISH MISSION '
735-8025'
Escuela Dominica ... ........10:00 a.m.
Servicio .............................. 1:00 a.m .
Pioneer Club ..........................6:30 p.m.
Servicio de la Noche ............7:00 p.m.
Mierecoles Merienda ............6:00 p.m.
Servicio............................... 8:00 p.m.
Sabado Liga de Jovenes ........5:00 p.m.


SEEDS
FROM
THE V
SSOWER



Four-year-old Mary liked
the story, The Three Little
Pigs. She begged her father
to read it to her every night.
One day he taped the story
and when she asked him to
read it to her he said, "Dear,
please turn on the tape
recorder. I made a recording
especially for you."
"But," she protested, "it
can't hug me."
When someone wraps
their arms around, us we feel
safe and loved, wanted and
important.
Love has eyes to see the
misery of others, ears to hear
the cries of others, feet that
hurry to help others, hands
that can lift the burdens of
others and a heart to feel the
pain of others.
The Bible urges, "Dear
Friends, let us practice loving
each other, for love comes
from God and those who are
loving and kind show that
they are the children of God,
and that they are getting to
know Him better."
Visit us at: www.SowerMinistries.org


"Peace iioer Growers

Wholesale Nursery

Donnis & Kathy Barber (8.3)
Hwy. 66 East (863) 735-0470
P.O. Box 760 Zolfo Springs, FL


'-- 4-






TAI
%











\e don't ehatob n ice that sininng sensaton
known as "skating on thin ce" When we live front day to day feeling
sure that our future is becoming increasingly uncertain then we must
act We can move in the direction of dependable support as we cry
for help In Psalm 28:6, David proclaims, "Blessed be the Lord, for
He hath heard the voice of my supplications'. When you feel you
Jre "skating on thin ice," call upon the Lord Begin by worshipping
Him each week with faith and thanksgiving and He will help with
-hai lies ae d.

Weekly Scripture leading
Luke Psalm Psalm P salm Psalm Psabl
21:5-38 95 96 97 98 99 00
Imn2plim Irerc td. B thA7 tn sr B a I O
-N01; I Mriir t .ll r ssm e per ervcn Pk Bo.o 818v (nr C ine wiie. VA2MW 6 w kwinewsterm


-_








December 6, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 3C


12/6/2012
Sun Data
Rise: 7:04 AM
Set: 5:32 PM
Day Length
10 hrs. 28 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: --:--
Set: 12:25 PM
Overhead: 6:13 AM
Underfoot: 6:36 PM
Moon Phase
50%
Last Quarter
Major Times
6:13 AM- 8:13 AM
6:36 PM 8:36 PM
Minor Times
12:25 PM 1:25 PM
Solunar Rating
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -5
127/2012
Sun Data ,
Rise: 7:05 AM
Set: 5:33 PM
Day Length
10 hrs. 28 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 12:51 AM
'Set: 1:02 PM
Overhead: 7:00 AM
Underfoot: 7:24 PM
Moon Phase
39%
Waning Crescent
Major Times
7:00 AM 9:00 AM
7:24 PM 9:24 PM
Minor Times
12:51 AM -1:51 AM
1:02 PM 2:02 PM
Solunar Rating
Average,
Time Zone
UTC: -5


12/8/2012
Sun Data
Rise: 7:05 AM
Set: 5:33 PM /
Day Length
10 hrs. 28 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 1:50 AM
Set: 1:42 PM .
Overhead: 7:49 AM
Underfoot: 8:15 PM
Moon Phase
28%
Waning Crescent
Major Times
7:49 AM 9:49 AM
8:15 PM- 10:15 PM
Minor Times
1:50 AM 2:50 AM
1:42 PM 2:42 PM
SSolunar Rating!
Average+
Time Zone
UTC: -5
12/9/2012
Sun Data
Rise: 7:06 AM
Set: 5:33 PM
Day Length
10 hrs. 27 mins.
Moon Data
'Rise: 2:53 AM
Set: 2:24 PM
Overhead: 8:42 AM
Underfoot: 9:10 PM
Moon Phase
19%
Waning Crescent
Major Times
8:42 AM -10:42 AM
9:10 PM- 11:10 PM
Minor Times
2:53 AM 3:53 AM
2:24 PM 3:24 PM
Solunar Rating
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -5


12/10/2012
Sun Data
Rise: .7:07 AM
Set: 5:33 PM
Day Length
10 hrs. 26 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 3:58 AM
Set: 3:13 PM
Overhead: 9:38 AM
Underfoot: 10:08 PM
Moon Phase
10%
Waning Crescent
Major Times
9:38 AM -11:38 AM
10:08 PM-12:08 AM
Minor Times
3:58 AM 4:58 AM
3:13 PM 4:13 PM
Solunar Rating
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -5
12/11/2012
Sun Data
Rise: 7:07 AM
Set: 5:34 PM
Day Length
10 hrs. 27 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 5:05 AM
Set: 4:07 PM
Overhead: 10:39 AM
Underfoot: 11:10 PM
Moon Phase
4%
Waning Crescent
.Major Times
10:39 AM-12:39 PM
11:10 PM 1:IOAM
Minor Times
5:05 AM 6:05 AM
4:07 PM 5:07 PM'
Solunar Rating
Better
Time Zone
UTC: -5


12/12/2012,.
Sun Data'
Rise: 7:(08 AM
Set: 5:34 PM
Day Length
10 hrs. 26 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 6:12 AM
Set: 5:08 PM
Overhead: 11:42 AM
Underfoot: -:-
Moon Phase
1%
Waning Crescent
Major Times
.`- ~ -- .:--
11:42AM- 1:42 PM
Minor Times
6:12 AM -7:12 AM
5:08 PM 6:08 PM
Solunar Rating
Best
Time Zone
UTC: -5
12/13/2012
Sun Data
Rise: 7:09 AM
Set: 5:34 PM
Day Length
10 hrs. 25 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 7:18 AM
Set: 6:13 PM
Overhead: 12:46 PM
Underfoot:12:14 AM
Moon Phase
0%
NEW MOON
Major Times
12:14AM- 2:14 AM
12:46 PM 2:46 PM
Minor Times
7:18 AM 8:18 AM
6:13 PM 7:13 PM
Solunar Rating
SEASONS BEST
Time Zone
UTC: -5


NOTICE OF APPLICATION

FOR TAX DEED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that PENDER NEWKIRK
CUST TC09 LLC, the holder of the following certificate
has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance,
the description of the property, and the names in
which it was assessed are as follows:

CERTIFICATE NO.: 1040 YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2009

Description of Property:

LOTS 12 & 13 BLK 19
R & S RE-SUB OF R & S ADD
LOCATED IN 26-3S4-25E
200825003951/DC-NM, SR

SUBJECT TO RESERVATIONS, COVENANTS,
RESTRICTIONS, AND EASEMENTS OF RECORD.
S .A
Name in which assessed: ELENA MENDOZA AND
HEIRS OF N R

Said property being in the County of HARDEE, State
of Florida.

Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according
to law, the property described in such certificate shall
be sold to the highest bidder at the Hardee County
Courthouse, 417 West Main Street, second floor hall-
way outside of Room 202, Wauchula, FL 33873 on the
19TH day of DECEMBER, 2012, at 11:00 a.m.

Dated this 9th day of November, 2012.

B. Hugh Bradley
Clerk of Circuit Court
Hardee County, Florida
AD No: 1
By: Alicia C. Albritton, Deputy Clerk
Tax Deed File No.: 252012TD014XXXX
Pursuant to FS. 197.512 11:15-12:6c




NOTICE OF APPLICATION

FOR TAX DEED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that PENDER NEWKIRK
CUST TC09 LLC, the holder of the following certificate
has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance,
the description of the property, and the names in
which it was assessed are as follows:

CERTIFICATE NO.: 1431 YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2009

Description of Property:

5 AC S1/2 OF NE1/4 OF SW1/4 OF
SE1/4 SUBJECT TO W 30 FT FOR
RD EASEMENT 3-34S-27E
OR224P424 409P421 411P574
QC-692P75

SUBJECT TO RESERVATIONS, COVENANTS,
RESTRICTIONS, AND EASEMENTS OF RECORD.

Name in which assessed: JOSE ANTONIO MARTINEZ

Said property being in the County of HARDEE, State
of Florida.

Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according
to law, the property described in such certificate shall
be sold to the highest bidder at the Hardee County
Courthouse, 417 West Main Street, second floor hall-
way outside of Room 202, Wauchula, FL 33873 on the
9TH day of January, 2013, at 11:00 a.m.

Dated this 26"h day of November, 2012.

B. Hugh Bradley
Clerk of Circuit Court
Hardee County, Florida
AD No: 1
By: Alicia C. Albritton, Deputy Clerk
Tax Deed File No.: 252012TD010XXXX
Pursuant to F.S. 197.512 12:6-27c


Letter To The Editor

Hardy Hardee A

Place To Call Home


Dear Editor:
The former Hardee Livestock
Auction held every Monday
tipped the scales for me. There.
the timeless rural rhythm of pro
cattle buyers, seated at the rail
in their appointed padded
chairs, evoked memories from
way back. Each buyer distin-
guished by their almost imper-
ceptible bidding signs two
fingers to the hat; a folded pro-
gram tipped to the side; a slight
nod of the head.
Although strangers to me, the
monotony of the predictable
parts played by the same auc-
tion workers on Mondays made
them seem like old friends. As
one' might watch the movie,
"Vacation" many times, so I
went to the livestock auction.
Never a friendlier bunch nor a
finer cheeseburger. Sadly, the
end of the auction was the end
of an era.
Never a finer place than.
Hardee Lakes Park in Fort
Green. Last Monday, Dorothy.
and I took the three-mile walk
around Lake #1. Hard to resist
looking for sharks teeth on the
trail conditioned with mine tail-
ings. HLP is a beauty and a
treasure. Expertly maintained,
this friendly retreat is a wildlife
paradise with playgrounds, boat
ramps, picnic shelters and 1,300
acres of peace.
On Wednesday, while driving


north on Old Fort Green Road
to Lakeland, we stopped for an
alligator crossing the road. That
morning, a fox the size of a col-
lie was outside our kitchen win-
dow, and my neighbor got a
nice buck down by Paynes
Creek. He saved us some
sausage and a loin chop. His
dogs catch wild hogs all around
Fort Green. I go with them
sometimes when they ask me.
Nothing quite like it.
On Thanksgiving Day, we
floated down the Peace River
from County Line Road to
Paynes Creek State Park.
Another treasure of a park at the
confluence of the Peace and
Paynes. Except for the park
ranger, we saw not one person
all day. An entire river all to
ourselves.
On Friday morning we flew
my small plane from Wauchula
to visit friends at an air-park
called Indian Hammock north
of Okeechobee. Flying only
500 feet above the ground, wild
pigs and deer occasionally
mixed with grazing cattle. With
a population density in central
Florida as thin as New Mexico,
wide, open spaces offer therapy
costing $100 per hour in New
York. To experience the County
from above is simultaneously
disturbing and breathtaking.
Every citizen and leader should
see the Good, Bad, and our


NOTICE OF APPLICATION

FOR TAX DEED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that PENDER NEWKIRK
CUST TC09 LLC, the holder of the following certificate
has filed said certificate for a tax deed to' be issued
thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance,
the description of the property, and the names in
which it was assessed are as follows:

CERTIFICATE NO.: 514 YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2009

Description of Property:

LOT 11 BLK,13
WAUCHULA HILLS SUBD
28 33S 25E
486P484 200825005014

SUBJECT TO RESERVATIONS, COVENANTS,
RESTRICftiNS, M, D EASEMENTS OF RECORD.

Name in which assessed: KEVIN E. CHRISTMAS

Said property being in the County of HARDEE, State
'of Florida.

Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according
to law, the property described in such certificate shall
be sold to the highest bidder at the Hardee County
Courthouse, 417 West Main Street, second floor hall-
way outside of Room 202, Wauchula, FL 33873 on the
19Tday of DECEMBER, 2012, at 11:00 a.m.

Dated this 8th day of November, 2012.

B. Hugh Bradley
Clerk of Circuit Court
Hardee County, Florida
AD No: 1
By: Alicia C. Albritton, Deputy Clerk
Tax Deed File No.: 252012TD012XXXX
Pursuant to F.S. 197.5121
11:15-12:6c




NOTICE OF APPLICATION

FOR TAX DEED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that PENDER NEWKIRK
CUST TC09 LLC, the holder of the following certificate
has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued
thereon.The certificate number and year of issuance,
the description of the prftrty, and the names in
whiCh it was assessed are aS follows:

CERTIFICATE NO.: 840 YEAR OFISSUANCE: 2009

Description of Property:

LOT 7 BLK D
SUBURBAN ACRES
210P210

SUBJECT TO RESERVATIONS, COVENANTS,
RESTRICTIONS, AND EASEMENTS OF RECORD.

Name in which assessed: HEIRS OF JOHNNY
CHEEKS

Said property being in the County of HARDEE, State
of Florida.

Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according
to law, the property described in such certificate shall
be sold to the highest bidder at the Hardee County
Courthouse, 417 West Main Street, second floor hall-
way outside of Room 202, Wauchula, FL 33873 on the
9S day of January, 2013, at 11:00 a.m.

Dated this 28th day of November, 2012.

B. Hugh Bradley
Clerk of Circuit Court
Hardee County, Florida
AD No: 1
By: Alicia C. Albritton, Deputy Clerk
Tax Deed File No.: 252012TD013XXXX
Pursuant to F.S. 197.512 12:6-27c


1 .H u ni n g /Fi i s hia n f g F o r e c astI


Ugly from up on high.
Friday afternoon as we left
Tractor Supply, where I buy
corn for wild turkey and treats
for our livestock, a young man
and his lassie passed by. Both
were wearing spurs on old
boots. Not the boots you buy in
Orlando nor spurs from LL
Bean. Real boots and real spurs.
They looked happy.
I recently called our school
superintendent, to offer use of a
pasture to a deserving FFA
youngster for a livestock proj-
ect. Like theAir Force ROTC
program. FFA and 4-H are


L/Lan1-pr rnmu
Henry and Dorothy Kuhlman of Fort Green pose by his
ultra-light airplane. He is a jumbo jet pilot and flight cap-
tain for UPS.


NOTICE OF APPLICATION

FOR TAX DEED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that PENDER NEWKIRK
CUST TC09 LLC, the holder of the following certificate
has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate number and year of isuance,
the description of the property, and the names in
which it was assessed are as follows:

CERTIFICATE NO.: 692 YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2009

Description of Property:

W1/2 OF LOTS 8 TO 10 INC
BLK 31. CARLTON & MCEWEN ADD
PRO-77-56 339P18 564P829
630P664 642P858

SUBJECT TO RESERVATIONS, COVENANTS,
RESTRICTIONS, AND EASEMENTS OF RECORD.

Name in which assessed: ADELA 0. CHANCEY

Said"property brig in the County of HARDEE, State
of Florida.

Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according
to law, the property described in such certificate shall
be sold to the highest bidder at the Hardee County
Courthouse, 417 West Main Street, second floor hall-
way outside of Room 202, Wauchula, FL 33873 on the
19" day of DECEMBER, 2012, at 11:00 a.m.

Dated this 9th day of November, 2012.

B. Hugh Bradley
Clerk of Circuit Court
Hardee County, Florida
AD No: 1
By: Alicia C. Albritton, Deputy Clerk
Tax Deed File No.: 252012TD015XXXX
Pursuant'to F.S. 197.51211:15-12:6c





NOTICE OF APPLICATION

FOR TAX DEED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that PENDER NEWKIRK
CUST TC09 LLC, the holder of the following certificate
has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate number and year.of issuance,
the description of the property, and the names in
which it was assessed are as follows:

CERTIFICATE NO.: 910 YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2009

Description of Property:

LOT 3 BLK 8
MAGNOLIA MANOR
85P307 AFF&DC-288P307P308
AFF&DC-411 P117&118 DC-461 P531P
532 PR94-010 PMR2/94 623P931
725P744-LP 200725008486
200725008806

SUBJECT TO RESERVATIONS, COVENANTS,
RESTRICTIONS, AND EASEMENTS OF RECORD.

Name in which assessed: GEORGE E. PATTERSON

Said property being in the County of HARDEE, State
of Florida.

Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according
to law, the property described in such certificate shall
be sold to the highest bidder at the Hardee County
Courthouse, 417 West Main Street, second floor hall-
way outside of Room 202, Wauchula, FL 33873 on the
19THday of DECEMBER, 2012, at 11:00 a.m.

Dated this 7th day of November, 2012.

B. Hugh Bradley
Clerk of Circuit Court
Hardee County, Florida
AD No: 1
,By: Alicia C. Albritton, Deputy Clerk
Tax Deed File No.: 252012TD011XXXX
Pursuant to F.S. 197.512 1
11:15-12:6c


exemplary for building confi-
dence and developing leader-
ship.
Today, Sunday, I flew to New
York for another week of flying
for UPS 25 years of being
gone half the time. Having
moved 20+ times since college
and now able to live anywhere
we want, we are proud to say,
we finally found Hardy Hardee
- A Place to Call Home.

Henry Kuhlman
First Generation Fort Green
(with fifth generation
neighbors)






4C The Herald-Advocate, December 6,2012


W


e. I NI
I* as a 1"1


GLORIA JEAN'S
NEUROMUSCULAR & MASSAGE THERAPY
114 W. Orange Street Wauchula
773-5646
7 J- = 'i-A :--K: -- i- .. .'-
Neuromuscular Therapy
Massage Therapy
Body Scrubs & Wraps
,33289 Gift Certificates ,,, ,',
" *" "*"*-*-'- ~ *Tr^?- .' : :' -*- '. ": ......


IAltman Saddlery
George Altman
2196 W. Main Street Wauchula
767-1073


Whips and Saddles
Made & Repaired





BOWING GREEN
COUNTRY CLUB
245 Hwv 17
S375-9988

Visit our package store for all
of your party & gift giving needs we have
;,:a large selection of Beer, Liquor and Wine
S OPEN NOON DAILY
p : ..y ... .." .-- .-- j:--- .-


4,il


Ideal

Hair Salon
U.S 17 & County Line Rd., BG
375-2618

Hair For The Holidays
Women, Men & Children


HARDEE CAR COMPANY


Wauchula
(across from First
National Bank)
773-6667


Wauchula Hills
Corner of Hwy 17
and REA Rd.
773-2011


ooto Appliance
.1 i, i. ; Ropair
SALES SERVICE
108 Carlton Street Wauchula
773-3573


( N Appliances & More!
Parts Service
:' -" .-__


4 ..~. 4


k


a i~
ri~'~ '~ii~


mI


I


HEARTLAND GOLD
"FROM OUT HE ARTS TO YOURS
1102 S. 6'h Ave. Wauchula
773-4466
.. ._ -*: .- .._* .- : ;, !
Fine Jewelry & Watches
For Men & Women
Costas Repairs Engraving


HARDEE RANCH
SUPPLY, INC ^
1309 Hwy. 17 S. Wauchula
773-4322

Hunting Supplies, Ammo
Green Lights, Columbia,
Ladies "Bling",
Maul Jim Sunglasses
-'. ... !_ "::..": i '


Bowling Green
Small Engine
4702 US Hwy 17 N. Bowlng Green

375-4056


Lawnmowers Chainsaws
Weedeaters Repairs


Cars that make great
Christmas Gifts


Bowl-Of-Fun
Lanos
943 Coufh 6th Avo Wauehula
773-6391


Order Your Wings Here!


Ca46 ()n 9)OIn
Gifts Since 1970
117 East Main St. Wauchula
www.catsonmain.com
773-6565

Vera Bradley
Pandora
Kringle Candles


;
1
~


do00 klw


IT


... '.. ..
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.v1'
- ,
.... ..: ? ..':'


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December 6,2012, The Herald-Advocate 5C


l_
rrerr-

i.


ZI


E L LY 8 E A N S
a childreh'5 boutique
North 6th AVe., Wic nla
S\'\\ shopellybcans .com
goA


I w&.4arm-i


B


Stocking Stuffers Toys
iGames Holiday Clothing
' r. i 3 ,.'-. R-


110 N. 6' Ave. Wauchula
773-9684

Brighton & Kameleon Jewelry,
Miss Me, Lilly Pulitzer, Womens
Apparel, Gifts & Acces.
keIllk~mrgnoliaree com


Sears
Authorized Retail Dealer


I.,


131 W. Main St. Wauchula
767-0022

Lawn & Garden Electronics
Appliances Tools
r _'I


C.rnrr oi "ih and M.r.n Downtonr n Wauclhula
767-9004

Holiday Catering
& Banquet Room Available


W. Main St., Wauchula
767-5300


Nicholas'
Family Restaurant
15 Hwy. 17 North Wauchula

773-2333
m
Breakfast
Lunch Dinner





Linda Ray Travel

735-0222
LRTRAVEL.AGENTHUB.NET


For All of Your
Holiday Travel Needs





Ridge Area Arc
Resale Store
1010 S. 6th Ave
50% OFF with ad
-Ll- '- j.
Clothing Jewelry
Furniture Household


Peace River

(( I Bee a
www.peaceriverbees.com
735-1679
cra U~


Raw Honey
Royal Jelly *


( r


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106

41


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Skincare


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til
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.
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*~111
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-. ._ ;, ;. ,
, ,i i h

1 iIII


902 Hwy17S
WILDCAT Wauchula

S.. 773-2337
Neighborhood Grill

Breakfast
Weekdays 7am Sat. & Sun Bam [
ll* ll l laI


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6C The Herald-Advocate, December 6, 2012







CN Technology in Education
Sby Filomeny Atchley, HHS Teacher


In the generation of smart
phones, iPods, iPads and other
portable electronic devices we
wonder as teachers how can
we keep students attention. The
answer is easy, we can join in,
by using the same technology
that students love in their
personal lives, in the classroom.
This task requires that the entire
educational system commits to
technology. In Hardee schools,
teachers and administrators are
working hard, through, grants
and public ,private partnerships
to modernize classrooms
offering our students enhanced
technological opportunities.
In the last ten years, most
classrooms have been equipped
with Promethean boards, Smarts
boards, learner response systems
and world-wide web access to
learning and collaborative sites.
What is all this? You may ask.
Well, Promethean arid Smart
boards are large ; interactive
display boards that connect
to a computer and a projector.
On the board surface you can
project the computer's desktop,
where users control the computer
using a-pen, finger, stylus or
other device. However, the most
interesting feature of all is the
responders, which take student
interaction to the next level.
Students use their responders


to answer, give opinions, choose
a response or text comments to
the teacher in real time. Many
students participate just to use the
responder or even to text faster
than their friends so their data can
appear on the board first. This is a
great way for teachers to increase
the students focus in a way they
do not even notice. Students feel
like they are just testing and
having fun, while they are really
using what they just learned.
At Hardee Senior High, technol-
ogy often stimulates teachers to
present more complex tasks and
students to produce better quality
projects. Students are producing
multimedia, not just consuming it.
One example can be found in
the Spanish 2 classroom where
students are creating video, music
and graphics to explain language
skills to fellow students in Spanish
I. Having students create their own
content elevates student's phones,
web enabled Play Stations, XBox,
Wii's and cameras to allies of
education instead of enemies.
Hardee Senior High classrooms
are starting to look like 21st
century learning hubs and the
modernization is just beginning.
Soon we will have Kindles
to 'hold textbooks, tablets for
every student and classrooms
that allow students to interact
with other students across


W. OWE. W-' -t,.VIlM
Spanish teacher, Mrs. Filomena Atchley, utilizes a student response system in her class-
es which allows her to quickly assess the level of understanding of all students. Pic-
tured here using the tool are Joane Gonzalez (L) and Marisol Sustaita (R) responding to
comprehension questions to the story "Bajo la Misma Luna" (Under the Same Moon).


the school, the nation and the world.
The- challenge for the community,
the district and our school is. great,


but step by step we are enhancing our
technological capability and preparing
students for a technology based world.


INI & I -B


Students in Mrs. Brutus' Life Skills classes kept with their annual tradition of
providing a Thanksgiving Luncheon for students and staff. Students prepared
the food, set tables and served guests throughout the lunches. Pictured here,
(L) Steve Hall whips up a batch of mashed potatoes for the event and (R)
Christina Lerma enjoys a dessert.


I A& AIII- -- /bj' I _011 d
HHS students participated in Teen Read Week a national program that pro-
motes literacy. Throughout the week, students were invited to participate
in a variety of activities in the school's media center. HHS also took the op-
portunity to promote literacy to younger students. Pictured here, Wildcat
Willie and HHS Homecoming Queen Shelby Lambert read to a group of kin-
dergarten students at WES and encourage them to become good readers.


-0 cop'1-i^


The annual AFJROTC Thanksgiving luncheon has become a favorite tradi-
tion with the ROTC cadets and an event that staff and invited guests have
come to enjoy. Pictured here, cadets Lesa Camel and Blert Camili are ready
to serve their fellow cadets and invited guests at this year's special feast.
at I I' CI I


-

Calendar of Upcoming :

Events

ACT Test


Starts at 8:00am in the HHS Cafeteria
12/11 Boys Basketball @ Sebring
Boys Soccer @ Frostproof
Girls Basketball v. Auburndale
Girls Soccer v. Frostproof
12/13 Christmas Gala
Buffet Style Dinner in the HHS Media Center at 5:30pm. Tickets are avail
.ablefor $15 from any Culinary Arts, Band, or Chorus student The Music
Department concert will begin at 6:30 pm in the HHS Auditorium (Tickets
are available for $2 at the door)
12/21 Early Release Day for Students
12/24 Winter Break Begins
12/28 SAT Test Registration Deadline
Online registration with uploaded photo must be completedby midnight
EST. (HSH School Code is 101-805, Test Center Code is 10-728)


1~ ;


CF


----~--'.


/r
f-


12/8


I,


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sll


B


-


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4










December 6, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 7C


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION

CASE NO.: 252009CA000708

BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING,
LP F/K/A COUNTRYWIDE HOME
LOANS SERVICING LP,
Plaintiff,

vs.

JOSE M. QUEZADA; LAURA
ESPARZA LKA; UNKNOWN TEN-
ANT(S); IN POSSESSION OF
THE SUBJECT PROPERTY,
Defendants.


NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to a Final Judgement of
Foreclosure dated the 27 day of
Nov., 2012, and entered in Case
No. 252009CA000708, of th.
Circuit Court of the 10Ti7 Judicial
Circuit in and for Hardee County,
Florida, wherein BAC HOME
LOANS SERVICING, LP F/K/A
COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS
SERVICING LP is the Plaintiff and
JOSE M. QUEZADA LKA, LAURA
ESPARZA LKA and UNKNOWN
TENANTS) IN POSSESSION OF
THE SUBJECT PROPERTY are
defendants. The Clerk of this
Court shall sell to the highest and
best 'bidder for cash at 2nd floor
hallway outside Room 292,
HARDEE : COUNTY COURT-
HOUSE, 417 W. MAIN STREET,
WAUCHULA, FL 33873, 11:00 AM
on the 19 day of December, 2012,
the following described property
as set forth in said Final
Judgment, to wit:

BEGIN AT THE SE COR- r
NER OF SE 1/4 OF NE 1/4
AND RUN NORTH ON
SECTION LINE 549 FEET ,
TO POINT OF BEGINNING;
THENCE RUN NORTH 68
FEET; THENCE )WEST 192
FEET; THENCE SOUTH 68
FEET; THENCE EAST 192
'FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING, ALL LYING IN
SECTION 4, TOWNSHIP 34
SOUTH, RANGE 25 EAST,
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORI-
DA

ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN
INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS
'FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.

If you are a person with a disabil-
ity who needs assistance in order
to participate in a program or
service of the State Courts
System, you should contact the
Office of the Court Administrator
atr>(863) 534-4686 (voice); 1863)
534-7777 (TDD) or (800) 955-8770
(Florida Relay Service), as much
in advance of your court appear-
ance or visit to the courthouse as
possible. Please be prepared to
explain your functional limitations
and suggest an auxiliary aid or
service that you believe will
enable you to effectively partici-
pate In the court program or serv-
Ice.

Dated this 28 day of November,
2012.

B. HUGH BRADLEY
Clerk Of The Circuit Court

By: Connie Coker
Deputy Clerk


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT C
TENTH JUDICIAL ClRCU
AND FOR HARDEE COU
FLORIDA

CASE NO. 25-2012-CA40(

BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.

Plaintiff,

v.

GRACIE MCCUMBER AKA
GRACY MCCUMBER, et al

Defendant(s).


NOTICE OF ACTION
FOR FORECLOSURE
PROCEEDING-PROPERTY

Td: RAMIRO RAMIREZ,
ADDRESS UNKNOWN BUT
WHOSE LAST KNOWN
ADDRESS IS: LAST KNOWN
ADDRESS 611 EAST JONES
STREET BOWLING GREEN,
FL 33834

NEOMI RAMOS, ADDRESS
UNKNOWN BUT WHOSE ,
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS IS:
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS 30
GARFIELD STREET
ASHEVILLE, NC 28803

Residence unknown, if liv-
ing, including any unknown
spouse of the said Defen-
dants, if either has remar-
ried and if either or both of
said Defendant{s) are dead,
their respective unknown
'heirs, devisees, grantees,
assignees, creditors, lie-
nors, and trustees, and all
other persons claiming by,
through, under or against
the named Defendant(s);
and the aforementioned
named Defendant(s) and
such of the aforementioned
unknown Defendants and
such of the aforementioned
unknown Defendant(s) as
may be Infants, imcompe-
tents or otherwise not sui
juris.

YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action has been com-
menced to foreclose a mortgage


on the following real property,
lying and being and situated in
HARDEE County, Florida, more
particularly described as follows:

EAST 1/2 OF THE FOLLOW-
ING = COMMENCE AT THE
SW CORNER OF THE NE
1/4 OF SECTION 4, TOWN-
SHIP 33 SOUTH, RANGE 25
EAST, THENCE RUN
NORTH 2* 04' 59" WEST
ALONG THE WEST LINE OF
NE 1/4 FOR A DISTANCE
OF 305.53 FEET FOR POINT
OF BEGINNING; THENCE
CONTINUE NORTH 2 04'
59" WEST FOR A DIS-
TANCE OF 119.42 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 88 05' 34"
EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF
300.05 FEET; THENCE
SOUTH 2* 05' 43" EAST
FOR A DISTANCE. OF
119.42 FEET; THENCE
SOUTH 88* 05' 34" WEST
FOR A DISTANCE OF
300.08 FEET TO POINT OF
BEGINNING, HARDEE
COUNTY, FLORIDA.

COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 611
JONES STREET E, BOWLING
GREEN, FL 33834

This action has been filed against
you and you are required to serve
a copy of your written defense, if
any, such Morris Hardwick
Schneider, LLC, Attorneys for
Plaintiff, whose address is 5110
Eisenhower Blvd, Suite 120,
Tampa, FL 33634 on,or before
December 28, 2012 and file the
original with the clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiff's attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint.

WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on the 27 day of
November, 2012.

SB.HUGH BRADLEY'
Clerk of the Circuit Court

By: Connie Coker
SDeputy Clerk

If you are a person with a disabil-
ity who needs any accommoda-
tion in order to participate in this
proceeding, ypu are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Please' con-
tact the Office of the Court
Administrator at (863) 534-4686,
at least 7 days before your sched-
uled court appearance, or imme-
diately upon receiving this notifi-
cation if the time before the
scheduled appearance is less
than 7 days; if you are hearing or
voice impaired, call 711.
11:29-12:6c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
HARDEE COUNTY

-CASE NO'252012CP000087

IN RE: THE ESTATE OF GRACE
E. SULLIVAN, a/k/a GRACE N.
SULLIVAN, deceased,


NOTICE OF ACTION

TO: LEO F. SULLIVAN, JR.
Address & Residence
Unknown

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a
Petition for Establishment and
Probate of Lost Will has been
filed in this Court. You are
required to service a copy of your
written defenses, if any, on
Petitioner's attorney, whose name
and address are:


12:6.13c John W. H. Burton, of
F THE JOHN W. H. BURTON, PA.
IT IN Post Office'Drawer 1729
NT Wauchula, FL 3373-1729
on or before the 13th day of
00346 December, 2012, and to file the
original of the written defenses
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service or immediately
thereafter! Failure to serve and
file written defenses as required
may result In a judgment or order
for the relief demanded, without
further notice.

First publication on November 14,
2012


B.HUGH BRADLEY
Clerk of Courts

By: B. Reed
Deputy Clerk

11:22-12:13c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA

CASE NO. 252011CA000502

WAUCHULA STATE BANK,

Plaintiff,

vs.

BAO XIONG, ET AL,

Defendants. /

NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO FLORIDA
STATUTES CHAPTER 45

- NOTICE IS GIVEN that pur-
suant to SUMMARY FINAL
JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE
AND TAXATION OF ATTORNEY'S
FEES AND: COSTS dated
November 19, 2012, in the above
styled cause! I will sell to the
highest and nest bidder for cash
at the Hardee County Court-
house, on the Second Floor
Hallway Outside of Room 202,
417 West Main Street, Wauchula,
FL 33873, AT 11:00 A.M. on
December 26, 2012, the following
described property as set forth in
said SUMMARY OF FINAL JUDG-
MENT OF FORECLOSURE AND


TAXATION OF ATTORNEY'S FEES
AND COSTS, to wit:

W 1/2 of NW 1/4 of NE 1/4 of
SW 1/4 Section 6, Township
35 South, Range 26 East.
Together with a private road
easement from ingress and
egress and for the supply
and maintenance of utilities,
ditches and drainage over
the following described:
Begin 30 feet North SW cor--
ner of NW 1/4 of NW 1/4 of
SW 1/4 thence; East to a
point 842.00 feet West of
center line of Section 6,
Township 35 South, Range
26 East, thence South to
North line of NW 1/4 of SE
1/4 of SW 1/4, thence West
60 feet along North line of
said NW 1/4 of SE 1/4 of SW
1/4 thence North to a point
30 feet South of North line
of SW 1/4 of NE 1/4 of SW
1/4, thence West to West
line of said section, thence
North 60 feet to Point of
Beginning, The easement
herein provides shall be an
easement running with the
land and shall be binding
upon the parties hereto and
their successors in the own-
ership or interest in and to
the respective parcels of
land herein referred to.
Together with a 1989 EAGL
mobile home ID #
GAFLJ35A01014ET Title #
18140905 and GAFLJ35B-
01014ETTItle # 18140906

Subject to Easement for
ingress and egress across
South 30 feet of W 1/2 of
NW 1/4 of NE 1/4 of SW 1/4
of Section 6, Township 35
South, Range 26 East,
Hardee County, Florida;
Declaration of Restrictive
Covenants and Conditions
as recorded in O.R. Book
430, page 140 and recorded
in to correct ownershiprand
legal O.R. Book 430, page
326.

Parcel Id: 06-35-26-0000-
05110-0000

Commonly known as: 1547
Friendship Lane, Zolfo
Springs, FL 33890

Dated this 20 day of November,
2012.

B. HUGH BRADLEY
Clerk of Court

By: Connie Coker
Deputy Clerk
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE
AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES
ACT: If'you are a person with a
disability who needs any accom-
modation in order to participate in,
this proceeding, you are entitled,
at no cost to you, to the provision
of certain assistance. Please gan-
tact the Ofge of ;. Court'.
Administrator, 255 N. Bifadway
,Avenue, Bartow, Florida 33830,
(863) 534-4686, at least 7 days
before your scheduled court
appearance, or immediately upon
receiving this notification if the
time before the scheduled
appearance isr less than seven
Says; If you are hearing or voice
impaired, call 711.


ANY PERSON CLA
INTEREST IN THE
FROM THE SALE, IF At
THAN THE PROPERTY
AS OF THE DATE OF
PENDENS MUST FILE
WITHIN SIXTY (60) DA
THE SALE.


uon' i e LefT UUt!
HARDEE LIVING
DEADLINE
IS THURSDAY AT 5 PM.




NOTICE OF PROPOSED RULE:
The Southwest Florida Water
Management District is proposing
to repeal the following ruless:
40D-2.322, F.A.C.

The purpose of this rulemaking is
to repeal Rule 40D-2.322, F.A.C.,
to be consistent with Section
373.236, F.S., and other water
management districts rules. The
effect is to reduce the regulatory
burden on a permitted when its
reporting period demands are
less than the projected demands
when its permit application was
issued.

The Notice of Proposed Rule-
making appeared in the Florida
Administrative Register, Vol. 38,
No. 76, on November 21, 2012.
A copy of the proposed rule can
be viewed on the District's web-
site at http://www.swfwmd.state.
fl.us/rules/proposed/.

Pursuant to the provisions of the
Americans with Disabilities Act,
any person requiring special
accommodations to provide com-
ments on this rulemaking is
asked to contact SWFWMD
Human Resources Director, (352)
796-7211, ext. 4702; 1-800-423-
1476 (FL only), ext. 4702; or
ADACoordinator@swfwmd.state.f
I.us. If you are hearing or speech
impaired, please contact the
agency using the Florida Relay
Service, 1(800)955-8771 (TDD) or
1(800)955-8770 (Voice).

THE PERSON TO BE CONTACT-
ED REGARDING' THE PRO-
POSED RULES AND TO OBTAIN
A COPY IS: Sonya White, 7601
Highway 301 North, Tampa, FL
33637-6759, (813) 985-7481 (Ext.
4660), e-mail: sonya.white@swf-
wmd.state.fl.us. (Ref OGC #
2012019)
12:6(


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA

CASE NO. 252012CA000480

MIDFLORIDA CREDIT UNION
F/K/A MIDFLORIDA FEDERAL
CREDIT UNION,

Plaintiff,

v.

CHRISTOPHER R. YEOMANS;
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
CHRISTOPHER R. YEOMANS;
TENANT #1; TENANT #2; and
ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PAR-
TIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH,
AND UNDER, AND AGAINST THE
HEREIN-NAMED DEFENDANTS
WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE
DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER
SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY
CLAIM AN INTEREST AS
SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, OR OTHER
CLAIMANTS,

Defendants.
/

NOTICE OF ACTION

TO: ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN
PARTIES CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, AND UNDER,
AND AGAINST THE HEREIN-
NAMED DEFENDANTS WHO
ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE
DEAD OF ALIVE, WHETHER
SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES
MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST
AS SPOUSES, HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR
OTHER CLAIMANTS

YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action to foreclose on the
following real property in Polk
County, Florida:

The West 30 feet of Lot 7
and Lot 8, Block 6, SUNSET
PARK ADDITION, a subdivi-
sion according to the plat
thereto recorded at Plat
Book 3, Page 9, in the
Public Records of Hardee
County, Florida.

ADDRESS: 820 Honolulu
Drive, Wauchula FL 33873

has been filed against you in the
Circuit Court of the Tenth Judicial
Circuit, Polk County, Florida, and
you are required to serve a copy
of your written defenses to the
Complaint, if any, to Gregory A.
Sanoba, Esq., 422 South Florida
Avenue, Lakeland, Florida 33801,
on or before January 4, 2013, and
file the original with the Clerk of
this Court either before service
on Plaintiff's attorney or immedi-
ately thereafter, otherwise, a
default will bb en-teTed against
you for relief demanded in the
Corimplaint.

DATE: 11-30-12

B.HUGH BRADLEY
Clerk of the Court

By: Connie Coker
Deputy Clerk


If you are a person with a disabil-
Ity who needs any accommoda-


tion in order to participate in this
IMING AN proceeding, you' are entitled, at
SURPLUS no cost to you, to the provision of.
NY, OTHER certain assistance. Please con-
Y OWNER tact the office of the. Court
THE LIS Administrator, 255 N. Broadway
A CLAIM Avenue, Bartow, FL 33830, (863)
YS AFTER 534-4686, at least 7 days before
your scheduled appearance, or
11:29-12:6c immediately upon receiving this-
notification if the time before the
scheduled appearance is less
than 7 days; if you are hear or
voice Impaired, call 711.
I 12:6.13c


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA

CASE NO. 25-2012-CA-000364

GREEN TREE SERVICING LLC, A
FOREIGN LIMITED LIABILITY
COMPANY AUTHORIZED TO DO
BUSINESS IN THE STATE OF
FLORIDA

Plaintiff,

vs.

LUCIANO VILLAFRANCA A/K/A
LUCIAN VILLAFRANCA; ORLAN-
DA VILLAFRANCA; JOHN DOE
N/K/A ORIANA MARTINEZ;

Defendant(s).J

NOTICE OF SALE

NOTICE IS GIVEN THAT, PUR-
SUANT TO THE JUDGMENT OF
FORECLOSURE ENTERED IN
THE ABOVE CAUSE, I WILL SELL
THE PROPERTY SITUATED IN
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA,
DESCRIBED AS:

Commence at the NW
Corner of the NW 1/4 of the
SE 1/4 of Section 10,
Township 34 south, Range
25 East, Hardee County,
Florida. Thence South a
-distance of 210 feet;
thence East a distance of
950 feet; to the point of
Beginning, thence contin-
ue East a distance of 100
feet; thence South a dis-
tanoe 175 feet; to point in
the South bank of a small
branch; Thence South
Westerly along the
Southerly edge of the
above mentioned small
branch 100 feet; thence
North a distance of 175
feet to the point of begin-
ning, Less road eight of
way off North side. Subject
to easements, reserva-
tions and restrictions of
record.

AT PUBLIC SALE, TO THE HIGH-
EST AND BEST BIDDER, FOR


CASH, ON DECEMBER 19, 2012,
AT 11:00AM AT Hardee County
Courthouse, 417 West Main
Street, The 2nd Floor Hallway,
Outside Room 202, Wauchula,
Florida.

ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN
INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS
FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.

IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A
DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY
ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER
TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PRO-
CEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED,
AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE
PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSIS-
TANCE. PLEASE CONTACT THE
OFFICE OF THE COURT
ADMINISTRATOR AT (863) 534-
4686, AT LEAST SEVEN (7) DAYS
BEFORE YOUR SCHEDULED
COURT APPEARANCE, OR
IMMEDIATELY UPON RECEIVING
THIS NOTIFICATION IF THE TIME
BEFORE THE SCHEDULED
APPEARANCE IS LESS THAN
SEVEN (7) DAYS; IF YOU ARE
HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED,
CALL 711.

Dated this 27 day of Nov., 2012.

B. HUGH BRADLEY
CLERK OF THE COURT
Hardee County, Florida

By: Connie Coker
Deputy Clerk

12:6,13c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN
AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIRCUIT CIVIL DIVISION

CASE NO.: 25-2011-CA-000564

BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUC-
CESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC
HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP;
S Plaintiff,

vs.

CURTIS RUSH BELL AKA CUR-
TIS R. BELL, et.at.,
Defendants.


NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in Case No.
25-2011-CA-000564 of the Circuit
Court of the TENTH Judicial
Circuit in and for HARDEE
County, Florida, wherein BANK
OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR
BY MERGER TO BAC HOME
LOANS SERVICING, LP, Plaintiff
and CURTIS RUSH BELL AKA
CURTIS R. BELL,. eZ.at., are,
Defendants. I will sell td the high-
est bidder for cash at '7 W. Main
St, 2nd floor hallway outside
Room 202, Wauchula Florida, at
the hour of 11:00 a.m., on the 19
day of December, 2012, the fol-
lowing described property:

BEGIN AT THE NORTH-
EAST CORNER OF BLOCK
27 OF THE ORIGINAL
SURVEY OF THE CITY OF
WAUCHULA, FLORIDA
AND RUN IN A WESTERLY
DIRECTION ALONG THE
NORTH BOUNDARY OF
THE BLOCK APPROXI-
MATELY 77 1/2 FEET TO
THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING; THENCE RUN IN A
SOUTHERLY DIRECTION
PARALLEL WITH .THE
EAST BOUNDARY LINE OF
SAID BLOCK, 125 FEET;
THENCE RUN IN A WEST-
ERLY DIRECTION PARAL-
LEL WITH THE NORTH
BOUNDARY LINE OF SAID
BLOCK, 77 1/2 FEET;
THENCE IN A NORTHERLY
DIRECTION PARALLEL
WITH THE WEST, BOUND-
ARY LINE OF SAID
BLOCK, 125 FEET;
THENCE EASTERLY 77 1/2
FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING, ALL LYING
AND BEGIN IN BLOCK 27
OF ORIGINAL SURVEY OF
THE CITY OF WAUCHULA,
FLORIDA, AS PER PLAT
RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 1 AT PAGE 29 OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS
OF HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA.

Any person claiming an inter-
est in the surplus from the sale, if
any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the LIs
Pendens must file a claim within
60 days after the sale.

Dated this 27 day of November,
2012.

B. HUGH BRADLEY
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT

By: Connie Coker
Deputy Clerk

if you are person with a disability
who needs any accommodation
in order to participate in this pro-
ceeding, you are entitled, at no
cost to you, to provisions of cer-
tain assistance. Please contact
the Court Administrator, (863)
534-4690, within (2) working days
of your receipt of this notice; if
you are hearing impaired, call
TDD' (863) 534-7777 or Florida
Relay Service 711. 12:6,13c


Go To The Head Of The Class!
SCHOOL NEWS
DEADLINE
IS THURSDAY AT 5 PM.


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND
FOR HARDEE COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION

CASE NO. 25-2010-CA-000485

U.S BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIA-
TION

Plaintiff,

vs.

UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CRED-
ITORS, LIENORS, TRUSTEES OF
ARMANDO ORTIZ, DECEASED;
ACELIA D. SUAREZ, HEIR; JOSE
ORTIZ; IF LIVING, INCLUDING
ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
SAID DEFENDANTSS, IF
*REMARRIED, AND IF
DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE
UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CRED-
ITORS, LIENORS, AND
TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST
THE NAMED DEFENDANTSS;
SHAMISCK, INC.; WHETHER
DISSOLVED OR PRESENTLY
EXISTING, TOGETHER WITH
ANY GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES,
CREDITORS, LIENORS, OR
TRUSTEES OF SAID DEFEN-
DANT(S) AND ALL OTHER PER-
SONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH,
UNDER, OR AGAINST DEFEN-
DANT(S); UNKNOWN TENANT
#1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2;

Defendant(s)

NOTICE OF SALE

Notice is hereby given that pur-
suant to Final Summary
Judgment of Foreclosure entered
in the above-styled cause, in the
Circuit Court of Hardee County,
Florida, I will sell the property sit-
uate in Hardee County, Florida,
described as:

THE EAST 1/2 OF THE
NORTHWEST 1/4 OF THE
SOUTHEAST 1/4 LESS
BEGIN AT THE NORTH-
EAST CORNER OF THE
NORTHEAST 1/4 OF THE
NORTHWEST 1/4 OF
SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF SEC-
TION 29, TOWNSHIP 35
SOUTH, RANGE 27 EAST,-
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORI-
DA, 'FOR -POINT OF
BEGINNING; THENCE
SOUTH 0005'15" EAST
ALONG EAST LINE OF
TRACT 661.73 FEET TO
THE SOUTHEAST COR-
NER; OF SAID TRACT;
THENCE NORTH 89053'34"
WEST ALONG SOUTH
LINE OF SAID TRACT,
329.17 FEET; THENCE
NORTH 0005'15" WEST
AND PARALLEL TO EAST
LINE. OF SAID -TRACT,
661.62 FEET TO NORTH
LINE OF' SAID' TRACT;i
THENCE SOUTH 89055'45"
EAST ALONG SAID
NORTH LINE, 329.17 FEET
TO POINT OF BEGINNING.
TOGETHER WITH A PER-
PETUAL, NONEXCLUSIVE,
UNOBSTRUCTED EASE-
MENT FOR INGRESS,
EGRESS, ROADWAY, UTIL-
ITIES, DRAINAGE AND
ANY OTHER LAWFUL
PURPOSE INCLUDING
MAINTENANCE OF SAID
EASEMENT, OVER AND
ACROSS THE NORTH 15
FEET OF THE NORTH-
EAST 1/4 OF SOUTHEAST
1/4 OF SECTION 29,
TOWNSHIP 35 SOUTH,
RANGE 27 EAST, HARDEE
COUNTY, FLORIDA.

at public sale, to the highest and
best, bidder, for cash, On the
Second Floor Hallway outside
Room 202, in the Hardee County
Courthouse, 417 WEST MAIN
STREET, WAUCHULA, FL 33873
at 11:00 a.m., on Dec. 19, 2012.

DATED THIS 27 DAY OF NOV.,
2012.

Any person claiming an Inter-
est in the surplus from the sale, if
any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the lis
pendens, must file a claim within
60 days after the sale.
Witness, my hand and seal of
this court on the 27 day of Nov.,
2012.
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT

By: Connie Coker
Deputy Clerk

If you are a person with a disabil-
ity who needs assistance in order
to participate in a program or ser-
vice of the State Courts System,
you should contact the Office of
the Court Administrator at (863)
534-4686 (voice), (863) 534-7777
(TDD) or (800) 955-8770 (Florida
Relay Service), as much in
advance of your court appear-
ance or visit to the courthouse as
possible. Please be prepared to
explain your functional limitations
and suggest an auxiliary aid or
service that you believe will
enable you to effectively partici-


pate in the court program or ser-
vice.
12:6,13c



Need Help
Getting Out Of An
Abusive Situation?


DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

HOTLINE


1 (800) 500-1119
tfc-dh








8C The Herald-Advocate, December 6, 2012


COUNTY COURT
The following marriage
licenses were issued recently
in the office of the county
court:
James Ervin Paugh, 61,
Bowling Green, and Barbara
Ann Spears, 52, Bowling
'Green.
Carlos Avalos, 32, Wauchula,
and Lacey Leighann Avalos, 25,
Wauchula.
Juan Gabriel Calderon, 26,
Wauchula, and Jennifer
Guerrero, 24, Wauchula.
Michael Dale Grills, 40,
Wauchula, and Dena Lynell
Cash, 42, Wauchola.
Misal Ibarra, 47, Bowling
Green, and Rosa M. Herrera,
40, Elizabeth, N.J.
The following small claims
cases were disposed of recent-
ly by the county judge:
Midland Furiding LLC vs.
Maurice Bailey, voluntary dis-
missal.
Suncoast Schools Federal
Credit Union vs. Lisa J.
Cisneros and Ernesto Cisneros,.
voluntary dismissal.
Florida Fence Post Co. Inc.
vs. Austin Growers Inc., volun-
tary dismissal.
Morrell, Watson & South-
well PA vs. Alan Andress, dis-
missed.
Capital One Bank vs. Jack F.
Hennig, judgment.
LVNV Funding vs. Maria D.
Ruiz, default judgment.
Florida Fertilizer Co. Inc. vs.
Steve Reas, voluntary dis-
missal.
Misdemeanor court results
were not yet available by
press time because of the long
holiday weekend.
CIRCUIT COURT
The following civil actions
were filed recently in the
office of the circuit court:
Margaret Herrera vs. Ben-
jamin Herrera, petition for
injunction for protection..
First National Bank of
,Wauchula vs. Tyrone Roman,
Sheila Roman et al, petition for
mortgage foreclosure.
Linda Darlene Ratliff and
Clyde Thomas Ratlilff, divorce.
Lea N.' Saunders vs. Mar-


tsen/THC Modular Leasing et
al, damages auto negligence.
Herminio Aguilar and Laura
Aguilar, divorce.
Jenny Lynn Dickey vs.
Donna Jean Granado, petition
for injunction fbr protection.
Stephanie Grimes vs. Donna
Jean Granado, petition for in-
junction for protection,
Sarah Cisneros vs. Adrian
Rios, petition for injunction for
protection.
The following decisions on
civil cases pending in the cir-
cuit court were handed down
recently by the circuit court
judge:
Stephanie Nichole Collins
Pierson and William Scott
Collins, order.
Daniel Morgan vs. D.W.
Lawrence, Hardee Correctional
Institution et al, inmate petition
for review of gain time granted.
Kelli Latrelle McClelland
Fay and Joel Dafiel Fay,
divorce.
Rebecca Darlene Ankrom
Hernandez and Sanches Miguel
Hemandez, divorce.
Bianca Lobato vs. Daniel
Farias, injunction for protec-
tion.
Melissa Peve vs. Keshia
Watkins, dismissal of injunction
for protection.
Mildred .Dempsey vs.
Timothy Carter, dismissal of
injunction for protection.
BAC Home Loans Servicing
vs. William G. Bergens, Raina
Bergens et al, voluntary dis-
missal.
Arturo Hernandez. vs. Kris-
tina Santos, order.
, Wauchula State Bank vs.
Gerald. Howard Olier, judg-
ment.
Bison Properties vs. Latoya
Jones, voluntary dismissal.
Wauchula State Bank vs.
Bao Xiong et al, judgment of
mortgage foreclosure.
The following felony crimi-
nal cases were disposed of
recently by the circuit judge.
Defendants have been adjudi-
cated guilty unless noted oth-
erwise. When adjudication is
withheld, it is pending suc-
cessful completion of proba-
tion. Sentences are pursuant


eH0 o ti


to an investigative report by
and the recommendation of
the state probation office and
also state sentencing guide-
lines. Final discretion is left to
the judge.
Erica Denise Alvarez. felony
driving while license suspended
and trespass after warning,
transferred to county criminal
traffic and misdemeanor court.
Pablo Ortuno Posadas, ag-
gravated assault with a deadly
weapon,one month in jail. S520
fine and court costs, S150 pub-
lic defender fees and S100 cost
of prosecution placed on lien.
Nicole Renee Smith, posses-
sion of methamphetamine, five
years Florida State Prison with
credit for time served, $520 fine
and court costs,. $350 public
defender fees and $100 cost of
prosecution placed on lien; pos-
session of drug paraphernalia,
time served.
Maria Guadalupe Turru-
biates, grand theft, adjudication
withheld, probation one year
six months, $520 fine and court
costs, $,100 cost of prosecution,
$150 investigative costs, $18
First Step probation fees.
Jose Fernando Aguirre, sexu-
al battery with a deadly weapon
and burglary while armed with
assault or battery, 20 years
Florida State Prison with credit
for time served, $520 fine and
court costs, $100 cost of prose-
cution and $151 crimes against
a minor costs placed'on lien;
failure to register as a sexual
offender, not prosecuted.
.Erasmo Perez, possession of
methamphetamine,. possession
of marijuana and possession of
drug paraphernalia, adjudica-
tion withheld, probation three
years, $520 fine and court costs,
$100 cost of prosecution, $36
First Step probation fees.
Pedro Pesquera, two counts
..sale of marijuana within 1,000
,feet of a church, possession of
mJ ijuana within intent to sell
'and possession of drug para-
phernalia, two years communi-
,ty control house arrest, $520
fine and court costs, $100 cost
of prosecution, $150 investiga-
tive costs, $100 Florida De-
partment of Law Enforcement
drug fee, $24 First Step proba-
tion fees; contributing to the
delinquency or dependency of a
child, not prosecuted.

The following real estate


transactions of $10,000 or
more were filed recently in
the office of the clerk of court:
Michele Lynn Martin Cobb
and Joel T. Cobb Sr. to Joel T.
Sr. and Michele Lynn Cobb.
S35.000.
Torrey Oaks RV & Golf
Resort to DJS Properties Inc.
(four properties). S 100,000.
Torrey Oaks RV & Golf
Resort to Robert Jr. and
Sharlaine H. Weir, 530,000.
Torrey Oaks RV & Golf
Resort to Lynn D. and Susan B.
Morrow. S35,000.

I had rather be on my farm
than be emperor of the
world.
-George Washington
It takes 63 feet of wire to
make a Slinky.
Success seems to be
largely a matter of hanging
on after others have let
go.
-William Feather


IDOTIOI of


PUIBU


KSiOP


The HARDEE COUNTY BOARD OFCOUNTY COMMISSIONERS

invites the Public to a


WORKSHOP


for the



VISIONING PLAN





FRIDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2012, 8:30 A.M.




COUNTY COMMISSIONERS BOARD ROOM

412 W. Orange St., Rm. 102, Courthouse Annex, 1st floor,

Wauchula, Florida /

19 21
For more information:
Call the County Planning Department at (863) 767-1964
Email kevin.denny@hardeecounty.net o
Visit www.hardeecounty.net/visioning
12:6c


CITY OF WAUCHULA
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC
The Board of Directors of the City of Wauchula Community Redevelopment
Agency (the Board) will hold the regular scheduled meeting Monday, December 10,
2012 immediately following the City Commission meeting which will convene at 6:00
pm or as soon thereafter as it reasonably can be held. The agenda can be viewed at
126 S. 7th Avenue or www.citvofwauchula.com.

The meetings will be held at the Commission Chambers located at 225 East
Main Street, Wauchula, FL 33873.
Pursuant to Section 286.0107, Florida Statutes, as amended, the Board hereby
advises that if any interested person decides to appeal any decision made by the Board
with respect to any matter considered at the proceedings, he will need a record of the pro-
ceeding and that, for such purposes, he may need to insure that a verbatim record of the
proceeding is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the
appeal is to be based.
The Board does not discriminate upon the basis of any individual's disability status.
This non-discriminatory policy involves every aspect of the Board's functions, including
ones access to, participation, employment or treatment in its programs or activities. Any-
,ne requiring reasonable accommodation as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities
Act or Section 286.26, Florida Statutes, should contact the City Clerk at (863) 773-3131.

CITY OF WAUCHULA
S/Keith Nadaskay
Chairman
Community Redevelopment Agency
ATTEST
S/Holly Smith
City Clerk
12:6c


On The Agenda

HARDEE COUNTY COMMISSION
The Hardee County Commission will hold its regular ses-
sion today (Thursday), beginning at 8:30 a.m. in Room 102,
Courthouse Annex 1,412 w. Orange St., Wauchula. The meet-
ing can be followed on computer by boing to www.hard-
eeclerk.com and following the link just above the picture of the
courthouse.
It, and past meetings, can also be seen at that link any time.
Each contains and information packet for the items discussed
during the meeting. The following is a synopsis of agenda top-
ics that may be of public interest. Times are approximate
except for advertised public hearings.
-State five-year transportation program for 2014-1018, 8:35
a.m.
-Review commission assignments. 9 a.m.
-Fire-Rescue antenna site lease, 9:05 a.m.
-Review packet for Legislative meeting on Dec. 11, 9:20
a.m.
-Road surface programs pending, 9:35-10:15 a.m.
-Work order on landfill expansion, 10:30 a.m.
-Employee uniforms for public works staff, 10:45 a.m.
-Amendments on state description of Economic Develop-
ment Authority, 11 a.m.
-County e-mail, 11:15 a.m
-Adquisition of Aqua Amenca water and wastewater utility
in Magnolia Manor.
This agenda is provided as a public service of The Herald-
Advocate and the Hardee County Commission for those who
may wish to plan to attend.


I