The Herald-advocate

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Material Information

Title:
The Herald-advocate
Portion of title:
Herald advocate
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
Wm. J. Kelly
Place of Publication:
Wauchula Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Wauchula (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hardee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Hardee -- Wauchula
Coordinates:
27.546111 x -81.814444

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
55th year, no. 31 (Sept. 2, 1955)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000579544
oclc - 33886547
notis - ADA7390
lccn - sn 95047483
System ID:
UF00028302:00459

Related Items

Preceded by:
Hardee County herald
Preceded by:
Florida advocate (Wauchula, Fla.)

Full Text
















The


Herald-Advocate


Hardee County's Hometown Coverage


112th Year, No. 51
3 Sections, 28 Pages


Thursday, November 22,2012


City Kills


Friday Night Live


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Bluegrass Jubilee on
Friday night may have signaled
the end of an era.
Main Street Wauchula is-con-



Winners


Take


Office
By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
It was standing room only on
Tuesday morning as the Hardee
County Commission met.
After the full board was seat-
ed, county attorney handled the
elections. Rick Knight and Sue
Birge were nominated for chair-
person, with Birge taking the
seat on a 3-2 vote. Knight was
unanimously selected as vice
chairman.
County Judge Jeff McKibben
did the honors in installing
recently elected commissioners
Rick Knight, Colon Lambert
and Mike Thompson. McKib-
ben invited Jan Knight, Shawna
Lambert and little Jillian
Thompson to join them, provid-
ing Bibles for the first two cou-
ples. The little Thompson girl
had brought her own little pink
Bible for her father.
McKibben administered the
oath of office, then left for the
School Board meeting to do the
same thing there for re-elected
Superintendent of Schools
David Durastanti, and Board
members Mildred Smith and
Teresa Crawford. Paul Samuels
was elected chairman and
Thomas Trevino was chosen to
serve as vice chairman.
Meanwhile, the new commis-
sioners spent a few moments
sharing congratulations with
their well-wishers.
Once that was over, the
Board convened, selected chair-
woman Birge and vice chair-
man Knight and approved
bonds for the three newly elect-
ed members of the commission.
Birge said she had missed the
Nov. 15 commission meeting
because she was in Tallahassee
attending a Small County Coa-
lition meeting where she was
appointed to the executive
board.
As chair, she will assume
most of the commission mem-
berships formerly held by Dis-
trict Commissioner/chairman
Minor Bryant. Beside the Small
See WINNERS 2A


WEATHER
DATIE HIGH L LW RAIN
11/14 o80 62 0.00
11115 75 62 0.00
11/16 69 58 0.00
11/17 80 58 0.00
11/18 75 55 0.00
11/19 66 50 0.00
11/20 75 54 0.00
TOTAL Rainfall to 11/20/12 41.39
Same period last year. 51.36
Ten Year Average 52-81
Source: Univ. of Fla. Ona Research Center

INDEX
Classifieds ..................... 6A
Courthouse Report.......5C
Crime Blotter.................7C
Hardee Living................ 2B
Information Roundup...6C
Obituaries....................4A
School Lunch Menus....8C




8 -33913 00075 7


sidering moving in a different
direction and is seeking input
from the community.
Main Street director Jessica
Newman, who is also Wau-
chula's Community Develop-
ment Agency director, told the
Wauchula City Commission at
its rescheduled meeting last
Tuesday, that the event has
become tedious for some of
-those involved, business people
and volunteers who put a lot of
hours into such monthly events.


Newman said although Fri-
day Night Live has been a treas-
ured event, there could be other
ways to attract people to down-
town.
In a brochure printed in last
week's edition, Newman says
committees have decided to
have a more flexible schedule
for downtown events in 2013.
They want to retain the -most
favorite Friday Night Live
events but not strictly hold to
the third Friday of the month. It


sometimes conflicts with other
events, especially home sport
events.
She asks that people submit
ideas for changes for the down-
town Main Street Wauchula
events. People can do so by
calling 863-773-0330 or email-
ing mainstreetwauchulainfo@-
gmail.com.
As of last week, the tentative
2013 calendar for "The Main
Event" included a historic ghost
tour sometime in January; both


the Wine. Shop and Dine event
and the Main Street King &
Queen rally on Feb. 8 to coin-
cide with Valentine's Day; the
Citrus & Cattle heritage festival
and BBQ Cook-Off on March 8
and 9; another Wine, Shop and
Dine about July 19; a back-to-
school Tailgate Party some time
in August; a fall festival in
October; the Hometown Heroes
event just before Veterans Day;
and the December 6 Wine-Shop
and Dine and Christmas Tree


PHOTO BY MARIA TRUJILLO
A trio of Hardee County commissioners took the oath of office on Tuesday morning, assisted by members of their
families. They are (from left) Rick Knight and wife Jan; Colon Lambert and wife Shawna; and Mike Thompson and
daughter Jillian.


Fertilizer Plant


Wins F
By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The proposed urea fertilizer
plant off CR 663 got final coun-
ty approval last week.
At its regular evening meet-
ing and zoning session, the
Hardee County Commission
gave 4-0 approval for the pro-
posed S150 million project 750
feet north of \Vandolah Road.
Commissioner Sue Birge was at
a meeting in Tallahassee. com-
missioners Minor Bryant and
Dale Johnson were in their final
meetings. and commissioners
Grad\ Johnson and Rick Knight
were settling in for the balance
of their terms.
The group heard Planning
Departments staff report and a
presentation b\, Steven South-
well. representing Doral-based


final OK
BioNitrogen Corp. before pro-
ceeding to questions from the
commission and audience.
There was little new informa-
tion from the previous meetings
on the subject, but one of inter-
est was the proposed rail spur
connecting the property to the
CSX line which runs along the
west side of CR 663.
Bill Lambert. executive di-
rector of the Industrial Devel-
opment Authority explained its
involvement. Basically. IDA
has agreed to advance draws for
the rail spur up to S2 million, an
investment of a little over one
percent of the S150 million
BioNitrogen project.
The spur will remain under
the control of the IDA and will
loop around the fertilizer plant
See FERTILIZER 2A


Rows of marijuana plants fill a bedroom.


Lighting.
Mike Rouse, chairman of the
planning committee for Main
Street Wauchula, said that once
a month commitment wears out
See CITY KILLS 3A




Grower



Harvests



Arrest
By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
He readily admitted his occu-
pation.
But it was one that put him in
jail.
Alsibiaoes Aguilera, 50, of
3994 Sunset Dr., Zolfo Springs,
was charged with three felonies
and two misdemeanors after
authorities conducted a search
warrant at his home last week.
What they found, Maj. Randy
Dey, a spokesman for the Drug
Task Force said, were rooms
filled with marijuana plants but
only scant living essentials.
Aguilera, he said, admitted he
was a self-employed marijuana
farmer.
Detectives from the Drug
Task Force first arrived at the
mobile home in rural Zolfo
Springs at around 3 p.m. on
Wednesday of last week in
response to intelligence infor-
mation implicating the resi-
dence in suspected drug activi-
ty.
Aguilera, Dey said, reported-
ly told the officers he was grow-
ing marijuana, and that he was
stealing electricity from the
power company in order to do
so.
Further, he said the mobile
home was not his main resi-
See GROWER 2A


COURTESY PHOTO


Enter Now For

Preview Show

... Story 3A


IDA Courts

Manufacturer

.. Story 4B


Animal Ordinance

Gets More Bite
.. .Story 4B


70
Plus 5c Sales Tax







2A The Herald-Advocate. November 22, 2012


SThe Herald-Advocate
Hardee County's Hometown Coverage
JAMES R. KELLY
Publisher/Editor
CYNTHIA M. KRAHL
Managing Editor
JOAN M. SEAMAN RALPH HARRISON
Sports Editor ORIt, Production Manager
SrEo Y NOEY DE SANTIAGO
N I5 't g .Asst. Prod. Manager
115 S. Seventh Ave. *17I. .)- phone: (863) 773-3255
P.O. Box 338
Wauchula, FL 33873 Fax: (863) 773657
Publishet-weekly on Thursday at Wauchula, Florida, by The Herald-Advocate
Publishing Co. Inc. Periodical Postage paid at U.S, Post Office, Wauchula, FL
33873 and additional entry office (USPS 578-780). "Postmaster," send address
changes to: The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338. Wauchula, FL 33873.


f DEADLINES: ^\
Schools Thursday 5 p.m.
Sports Monday noon
Hardee Living Thursday 5 p.m. I
General News Monday 5 pin.
SAds Tuesday noon I


SUBSCRIPTIONS:
Hardee County
6 months $21; 1 yr. $39; 2 yrs. S75
Florida
6monhs-S$25; I yr.-$S46; 2 yrs.- $87
Out of State
6 months $29; 1 yr. $52; 2 yrs.- $100


LETTERS:
The Herald-Advocate welcomes letters to the editor on matters of public
interest. Letters should be brief, and must be written in good taste, signed
and include a daytime phone number.
SUBMISSIONS:
Press releases on community matters are welcome. Submissions should be
typed, double-paced and adhere to the above deadlines. All items are sub-
ject to editing.
L. .4J


PHOTO BY MARIA TRUJILLO
Re-elected to their positions (from left) Hardee County School Board members Teresa
Crawford and Mildred Smith and Superintendent of Schools David Durastanti took the
oath of office on Tuesday.


Kelly's Column
By Jim


Congratulations to the Tampa Bay Bucs for a 6-4 record so far
after a 4-12 mark last year. New head coach Greg Schiano is doing
a good job.

Gasoline in Wauchula on Tuesday was $3.26 a gallon for reg-
ular unleaded..

Hardee High had a rough 3-7 record this year, but there were
strong wins over Bradenton Bayshore and archrival Arcadia
DeSoto.

Congratulations to UF and FSU for their 10-1 records, with
both teams to meet in Tallahassee on Saturday. In thb BCS poll the
Gators are No. 4 and FSU No 10.
If the Gators win and No. I Notre Dame is upset by Southern
Cal Saturday, the Gators could reach the national title game, as No.
2 Alabama and No. 3 Georgia will play for the SEC title. FSU also
has a chance at the national title game with a big win over UF, a
Notre Dame loss,.and anACC title`, iTS ..

At a Monday lunch Joe L. Davisg'. and I came up with 16 rea-
sons Hardee County can give thanks at this Thanksgiving season.
Later, Bess Stallings helped us by adding No. 17.
I. The elections are over. Final outcomes of the winners and
their policies over the next few months and years are unknown.
2. The county's citrus production, No. 5 in the state, is the
backbone of our economy. There is no cure yet for greening and
canker, but there is splendid research, and growers are learning
how to live with the diseases and still grow oranges.
3. Local phosphate mining is helping to produce phosphorus
for fertilizer to feed the world and produce millions of dollars in
severance taxes. Reclamation may include land and lakes for hous-
ing and recreation.
4. FINR. (Florida Institute for Neurological Rehabilitation)
has a huge presence in Hardee and has over 450 employees, and we
wish them well.
5. Our beef and dairy cattle industries are big. Beef prices
have remained high for several years. The Range Cattle Station at
Ona is growing again and does vital research on forages and land
management to help the cattle business. Land was donated decades
ago for this University of Florida center, which opened in 1942.
6. Row crops that produce cucumbers, watermelons, straw-
berries, cantaloupes, peas, squash and other healthy foods. The
Wauchula State Farmers Market is an asset.
7. Civic organizations such as the Kiwanis Club, Rotary Club,
Lions Club, Wauchula Garden Club, Veterans of Foreign Wars,
American Legion, Wauchula Woman's Club, The Wednesday
Musicale, Masonic Lodge, Order of Eastern Star and Hardee
Cattlemen's Association. We miss the Elks Lodge and hope the
Moose Lodge can continue. Heartland Chorale is important,too.
8. Churches and ministries. There are 96 churches listed on
our weekly church page. A statewide survey several years ago list-
ed Hardee as the No. 1 religious county in Florida, followed by
Palm Beach at No. 2. Hardee has many ministries including Sherry
White Ministries, Alpha and Omega, Caring People Recovery
Center, the Catholic Church, Methodist Church, and Faith
Assembly of God's Cutting Edge Ministries. The Hardee County
Ministerial Association is active. Wauchula is home to "The Story
of Jesus" and the current "Story of Noah."
9. Good, effective, hard-working law enforcement agencies.
Hardee has always been a good place to raise a family.
10. Central geographic location. We are 90 minutes from three
major airports-Tampa, Orlando and Sarasota. About the same for
Walt Disney World, Sea World, Busch Gardens, Florida Aquarium,
the Tampa Bay Rays, and the Tampa Bay Bucs. Lego Land is an
hour away. Solomon's Castle and Center for Great Apes are in our
county.
11. The Wauchula campus of South Florida State College and
our many dedicated public school teachers, staff and programs.
12. Florida Hospital Wauchula and its outstanding rehab cen-
ter and emergency room. At one time our local hospital was closed
briefly after Crest Medical took over. Thankfully, the Seventh Day
Adventist Health Care System has done a wonderful job. Hardee
Manor and Resthaven do a fine job.
13. Our many youth sports programs and other youth activi-
ties such as 4-H, Future Farmers of America. Boy Scouts and Girl
Scouts.
14. Paynes Creek State Historic Park. Pioneer Park. Hardee
Lakes Park. and our beautiful Peace River and its tributaries.
15. Strong efforts on economic development to diversify our
economy and provide good-paying jobs for the post-mining era.
There have been some successes, such as Pacer Marine. Rapid
Systems, NutraPure. and Keyplex. There are several projects
underway and planned, so a final grade is premature and years
awav. The economic boards and economic development director
are working hard.
16. The Hardee Correctional Institution houses 1.913 inmates
and provides about 313 jobs.
17. The generosity of our citizens is a wonderful asset. There
are many very caring people in Hardee.
18. Wauchula has adopted as its official bird, the sandhill
crane. Wauchula is supposed to be an Indian name for cr, of the
sandhill crane. Another less preferred translation is buzzard's roost.


COURTESY PHOTO
This mobile home on Sunset Drive was used as a marijuana grow house, authorities al-
lege.


dence, and that he paid $800 a
month in rent. He stole electric
ity, he allegedly explained, to
avoid paying high electric bills
for the power usage involved in
cultivating his crop.
Dey said detectives then
obtained a search warrant for
the trailer, and allegedly found
13 large marijuana plants in the
south bedroom, 13 medium-
sized marijuana plants in the
north bedroom, and 21 seedling
marijuana plants in an outdoor
room attached to the mobile
home.
The bedrooms, he added,
were each outfitted with 1,000-
watt light bulbs and air-condi-
tioning units. An unauthorized
tap diverted electricity above
the power meter, the major also
alleged.
Moreover, detectives found a
marijuana cigarette in the kitch-
en, which Aguilera allegedly
admitted he was smoking just
prior to the arrival of detectives.
In all, Dey said, 82.5 pounds
of marijuana were found at the
home and seized.
Aguilera was charged with


trafficking in excess of 25
,pounds of marijuana, posses-
sion of"'"structure"for the pur-
pose of manufacturing drugs,
manufacturing drugs, theft of
utilities and possession of drug
paraphernalia.
Additionally, the suspect is
wanted on an arrest warrant
from Palm Beach County, Dey
noted.
Aguilera was booked into the
Hardee County Jail at 4:52 p.m.
last Wednesday, and remains
there in lieu of $101,500 bond.


Aguilera


The two-bedroom, two-bath home of George and July Wheeler
at 2646 Bailes Road off Steve Roberts Special in southeastern
Hardee County was destroyed by fire on Sept. 28. George was
watching the homecoming parade in Wauchula when the fire start-
ed. His wife July was visiting her home country of the Philippines.
The house was a total loss. Fire cause was not determined but could
have been a pot left on the stove.
The couple are staying at a home five miles away owned by
Dr. John and Liby Corpus. July and Liby are first cousins and grew
up together in the Philippines. George would like to sell his 40
goats. Call him at 863-832-0713.

Joanna Pearce, a retired widow who lives in Zolfo Springs, is
upset with the small type in the new CenturyLink Peace River
Valley phone book. Last year's book had 11 printed lines per inch
and the new book 14 lines per inch, 27 percent smaller type size.
She said people should complain to the phone company and pub-
lisher (1-877-243-8339).

The Wauchula Moose Lodge has been closed for a couple of
weeks, but a new slate of officers will meet Tuesday at 7 p.m. at the
lodge to discuss the financial situation and hopefully be able to
reopen the civic facility on Saturday. Dec. I, reported trustee
Dennis Lake on Tuesday.
The Moose Lodge is located east of Wauchula off Main Street
just past Peace River. The civic organization offers dinners.
karaoke, fundraisers, pool and dart tournaments, bingo, and an
atmosphere where members can socialize, said Lake. The public is
invited to drop bN Tuesday evening or the afternoon of Dec. 1 to
offer advice. He can be reached at 781-1154.

County 4-H Clubs are collecting food for Hardee Help Center
from October through May by having green buckets at Tractor
Supply. Hardee Ranch Supply. First Baptist Church of Wauchula,
Florida's First Assembly of God, Winn Dixie. Florida Hospital
Wauchula. PRECO and Hardee County Library. This is a Youth
Against Poverty Food Drive sponsored by the Hardee 4-H County
Council


WINNERS
Continued From 1A
County Coalition, it will also
include local transportation liai-
son, legislative liaison and rep-
resentative to the Central Flor-
ida Regional Planning Council,
where Bryant was vice-chair-
man of the board.
Birge switched duties with
Commissioner Lambert, who
will serve on the airport Author-
ity, Homeless Coalition, Hous-
ing Authority, Conummunity Rec-
reation Complex, Crimestop-
pers. Health Care Task Force
and as Economic Development
Liaison.
Commissioner Rick Knight,
who had been appointed to the
Commission 3 seat, and was
recently elected to a four-year
term, will continue as Mining
and Agriculture Liaison, alter-
nate to the Central Florida
Regional Planning Council and
Small County Coalition, and
serve on the Heartland Cooper-
ative Library Board.
Commissioner Grady John-
son traded and will now be liai-
son to the Florida Heartland
Rural Economic Development
Initiative (FHREDI) board, and
also liaison to the Community
Traffic Safety Team, Transpor-
tation Disadvantaged and the
Charlotte Harbor National
Estuary Program.
Commissioner Mike Thomp-
son will be Industrial Develop-
ment liaison as well as public
safety and municipal liaison,
Heartland Workforce Invest-
ment Board representative and
on the Alliance for Drug
Prevention and Teen Pregnancy
Prevention.
As is done after elections, the
commission viewed the Sun-
shine Law video before opening
for comments from the audi-
ence, which included comments
from Frank Kirkland and Henry
Kuhlman on the limitations on
the time for public speaking.



Be A Headliner!
HARDEE LIVING DEADLINE
IS THURSDAY AT 5 PM.


FERTlIZER
Continued From 1A


and be available for other
industries which may local on
the 600-acre property. The ini-
tial fertilizer plant will take a
little over 40 acres of it.
BioNitrogen will use the
CXS line for bringing in and
exporting. In off-seasons, when
there may not be enough vege-
tative biomass locally to keep
the plant running, such as wood
chips from cane fields or lum-
ber plants. In turn, if there is
excess nitrogen-rich fertilizer
not used by local markets, some
could be transported to other
parts of Florida or nearby states.
Florida humidity dictates that
much of the vegetative material
will have to pass through a
dryer to reduce to the 6.4 per-
centage moisture level neces-
sary for the plant to operate. It
is also set for chips less than 8
milometers so even pelletized
material may have to be re-
duced in size. The company
may have or hire mulching
equipment such as tub grinders
to pelletize material to bring to
the plant.
The plant will run 24-7 for
245 days a year, with two 10-
day closures to clean equip-
ment. This plant will cost ap-
proximately $150 million,
one/tenth of plants which oper-
ate on natural gas and can cost a
half billion dollars. The local
plant will be modular with sys-
tems patent pending and can be
fine tuned seasonally to accom-
modate citrus tree waste, oak
trees from development or land
clearing, etc.
Asked if the fertilizer pro-
duced would be less expensive,
Frank Segredo, BioNitrogen
corporate development officer,
said, "We can tell you costs for
power, water, payroll and oth-
ers, but the variable cost is get-
ting the product to the plant."
The company is considering
several avenues, including con-
tracting with local services in
hauling materials to the plant.
When all the discussion was
over, the commission approved
the Special Exception with
eight conditions.
First, and foremost, answers
the concern of most residents,
'This approval shall only for
the Major Special Exception
and the accompanying Concept
Development Plan which de-.
picts a biomass-fed urea fertil-
izer manufacturing plant. Bio-
mass materials shall be restrict-
ed to residual agricultural and
vegetative biomass solid waste.
This shall not include general


municipal solid waste.
Next, the proposed project
shall have public road frontage
and approved access to CR 663
N. prior to beginning any land
clearing or development activi-
ty on the property. (Segredo
said additional permits from
Southwest Florida Water Man-
agement District and the state
Department of Transportation
rail crossing permits are in the
works).
Third is except for safety pur-
poses, lighting may. be used
only to illuminate buildings,
landscaping, signs, parking and
loading areas. There shall be no
bright, direct illumination upon
the adjacent properties or any
right of way.
Fourth, all perimeter fencing
may be opaque and shall be
interior to the required vegeta-
tive buffering (trees and
shrubs). Fencing material shall
not solely consist of barbed or
razor wire fencing materials.
The minimum height for fenc-
ing shall be six feet from finish
to grade.
Fifth, other than for safety
purposes, there shall be no bulk
storage of any chemicals, ex-
plosive gases, or other similar
products not identified in this
application without prior ap-
proval of the Hardee County
Board of County Commission-
ers.
Sixth, there shall be a 30-foot
Type C. vegetative buffer (trees
and shrubs) along CR 663 N,
and the buffer shall be main-
tained.
Seventh, the plant shall be
connected to county-provided
central potable water once it is
available.
Finally, the building permit
or approval expires if it is not
utilized within two years.
Segredo said with all permits
approved by January, the com-
pany hopes to begin construc-
tion and be completed in 12 to
14 months.



Need Help
Getting Out Of An
Abusive Situation?

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE
HOTLINE

1 (800) 500-1119


GROWER
Continued From 1A





November 22, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 3A


RED RIBBON WEEK


Hardee County will again
pla) host to one of the most
highly anticipated cattle shows
of the ,ear.
The fourth annual event.
sponsored by Peace River
Electric Cooperative will be
held Dec. 7-8. in Wauchula.
Highlights include a free barbe-
cue dinner and a much-antici-
pated free Stock Show
University clinic on Friday
night.
And the entry deadline is
approaching.
The family-friendly show
provides an opportunity for all
ages to hone their skills in
preparation for their local coun-
ty and state fairs. To give partic-
ipants more experience, the
Preview Show proudly uses
only out-of-state national-level
judges. Due to the show's grow-
ing popularity, two national
level judges will be on hand to
evaluate cattle in two show
rings.
"I was very impressed with
both the high quality of cattle
and young people who partici-
pated in the event," said John


Grimes. an Ohio State Univer-
sity Extension Service beef
coordinator. The Hillsboro,
Ohio. rancher and nationally
ranked exhibitor judged the
2011 two-day show.
"The exhibitors who attended
this show will be much better
prepared for their local county
and state fairs," Grimes added.
The co-op has sponsored the
show since it was first con-
ceived in 2009 as a way of sup-
porting young people involved
in Future Farmers of America
and the 4-H Youth Develop-
ment Organization. Since then,
co-op staffers have worked with
other community volunteers to
raise money for prizes and other
expenses.
"Volunteers and community
sponsors make the show possi-
ble," said Jeff Cornelius,
PRECO's manager of energy
services. "Because of their sup-
port, we are able to offer a free
clinic and meals, plus return
100 percent of the entry fees
back to the show winners."
A wide range of Divisions
and Classes are available,


including Purebred Ring
One: Division 2 Zebu; Division
2A Brahman, Brangus, Brah-
man influence; Division 3
French Simmental, Gel-
bvieh, Charolais, Limousin;
Division 4 English Angus,
Hereford, Shorthorn; and
Division 5 Maine, Maine influ-
ence, Chi influence.
Also. Commercial Ring
Two: Division 1 (Steers):
Division 6 Commercial Heifers
- Maine Influence Commer-
cial Bulls Maine Influence;
Division 6A Commercial
Heifers Brahman influence;
Commercial Bulls Brahman
influence.
The entry deadline is Mon-
day, Nov. 26.
Late entries will be charged a
$10 per head late fee if post-
marked after the 26th. Late
entries will be accepted at
check-in, but must be paid in
cash.
For more information about
the Hardee County Preview
Show or to download an appli-
cation, log on to www.preco.-
coop or call 863-767-4606.


CITY mLLS
Continued From 1A


Fall is an active tirmec of year
for Florida black bears ,ar (they
stock up on calories for the com-
ing winter.


^nzdtlemn~y

(/ ^^ ...

f .s y. 'f^


1







FRANCES SPIVEY
Frances Spivey, 77, of
Zolfo Springs, passed away
on Tuesday, Nov. 20, 2012, in
Sebring.
She was born on Feb. 9,
1935, in Wauchula, and was a
lifelong resident. She enjoyed
reading, listening to Blue
Grass music and playing Nin-
tendo.
Frances was preceded in
death by her beloved hus-
band, C. W. Spivey; an infant
son, David "Leonard" Spiv-
ey; her parents, Luther and
Jessie Roberts Harrelson; and
two sisters, Jeanette Williams
and Shirley Crowell.
She is survived by two
daughters, Cathy Selkowitz
and husband Robert of Ar-
cadia. and Deborah Owens
and husband Mike of Wau-
chula; sister Betty Howze of
Zolfo Springs: six grandchil-
dren. Sharman, Becky, Te-
resa, Matt. Christ) and Bryan:
and eight great-grandchil-
dren.
Services vw ill be at 11 a.m.
on Saturday, Nov. 24. 2012,
in the Chapel of Ponger-
Kays-Grady Funeral Home.
404 W. Palmetto St., Wau-
chula. Burial will be in
Wauchula Cemetery.
On-line condolences
may be made at
PongerKaysGrady.com.
Pontgct-LKoijs-Q'toch
Funeral Home &
Cremation Services
Wauchula
2,
,A-x,~-7,-'


Though black bears don't
really need to put on pounds to
survive the state's usually mild
winters, they behave as' if they
do need to eating about three
times as much as usual.
Because bears now are busy
filling their bellies, the Florida
Fish & Wildlife Conservation
Commission asks people to be
extra diligent in securing food
sources around their homes and
businesses that can attract bears
and create problems.
"If you are a Florida black
bear, raiding a garbage can to
eat stale doughnuts and the left-
overs from last night's spaghetti
may be more appealing than for-
aging in the woods for palmetto
berries and acorns," said David
Telesco, the FWC's bear man-
agement program coordinator.
"Preventing bears' access to
food is the most important thing
people can do to keep bears and
other wild animals out of neigh-
borhoods," he added.
In autumn, bears begin a nat-
ural process called hyperpha-
gia, which means they are put-
ting on fat for the winter. They
will consume around 25,000
calories a day and eat almost
anything that's convenient.
The easier a food item is to
get. the more likely it is that a
bear will take advantage of it -
and a bear's sense of smell is so
keen it can detect food more
than a mile away.
Bear-related calls to the FWC
are up this year in many parts of
the state. Since January in
Central and South Florida. the
FWC has documented the high-
est number of calls per month
on record for six of the past nine
months. Calls in other parts of
the state also are relatively high
this year.
To keep bears away from
your home. follow these tips
Feed your pets indoors or
bring in dishes after feeding.
Secure household garbage
in a shed. garage or a wildlife-


resistant container.
Put household garbage out
on the morning of pickup, not
the night before.
Secure commercial gar-
bage in bear-resistant Dump-
sters consisting of metal lids or
metal-reinforced plastic lids
and lock bars.
Clean grills and store them
in a locked, secure place.
Remove wildlife feeders or
make them bear-resistant.
Protect gardens, apiaries,
compost and' livestock with
electric fencing.
Pick ripe fruit from trees
and remove fallen fruit from the
ground. ,
Go to MyFWC.com/Bear to
learn more about living in bear
Country.

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE
Don't Know Where
To Turn For Help?

CALL THE CRISIS LINE
1 (800) 500-1119



ABOUT ...
Letters To
The Editor
The Herald-Advocate wel-
comes letters to the editor
on matters of public interest.
Letters should be brief, and
must be written in good
taste and include the
writer's full name, address
and daytime telephone
number for verification.
Letters must be received
by 5 p.m. on Monday to be
considered for that week's
edition. Submissions should
be typed or legibly written.
Send letters to: Letters to
the Editor, The Herald-
Advocate, P.O. Box 338,
Wauchula, FL 33873. Fax
letters to (863) 773-0657.


even the best of volunteers and
the committee was hoping to
have events that would also
draw in people from Fort
Meade, Avon Park and Arcadia.
Other comments reported
included problems with teens
disrupting Friday Night Live by
blocking sidewalks and being
rude to older downtown visitors
so that some were staying away.
It was suggested that having a
teens and tweens event at the
city tennis courts on Oak Street
would occupy them and keep
them off the streets. Events for
younger kids could also be
staged, so parents could have
"date night" type events with-
out having to get babysitters or


risk having children running up
and down the streets.
Newman was honored at the
Oct. 20 annual membership
meeting of the Hardee County
Chamber of Commerce. She
received the 2012 Mosaic
Business Person of the Year
award. She has been Main
Street director for four years.
During that time, the agency
has garnered 20 statewide
awards.
Main Street was begun in
1995 as an arm of the Com-
munity Redevelopment Agency
designed to help develop and
attract downtown business
while retaining the historical
flavor of it. It was said that


since Newman developed the
success of Friday Night Live,
the attendance has grown to
1,000 people coming to the
Heritage Park area.
Newman said more than $8
million of Community Rede-
velopment Agency money has
helped revitalize downtown and
more than 20,000 volunteer
hours have been logged on
events. Some of that is wearing
thin, and new avenues of activi-
ty and developing interest in
downtown Wauchula are need-
ed.
Residents are asked to have
their say and give their ideas, as
noted above.


S A *


U!)

~JiJt L)ULI~3J


V l3 VW

women will suffer from an osteoporotic
fracture during their lifetime.*
*Nationol Osteoporosis Foundation
Osteoporosis is a disease that gradually weakens bones, causing them to
become brittle and prone to fractures. With our Dual Energy X-Ray
Absorption (DEXA) bone density scanning your physician receives the
maximum information for assessing your bone health.
Bone density tests are recommended for the following:
Postmenopausal women under age 65 with one or more risk factors for osteoporosis
*'Men ages 50 to 70 with one or more risk factors foi osteoporosis
Women age 65 or older, without any risk factors, a man age 70 or older,
even without any risk factors or a woman or man ofter age 50 who has broken a bone. .


DEXA Bone Density Test
Expires December 31,2012 ....
Special pricing for non-insured patients only
Payment due at time of service Prescription rred

To schedule an appointment ca

(863) 491-9970 Todayl

Ogt Dotors ,
A nau' W Graham Jr MO . \ ,

iafriii R Chathamn. PA
..l..itanl 4,Jieatcdi reu ir.r
Mel.sra R Themar-Gedk. MOD ., ,
Lori K Tay-lor PAD (' y< <
Janzavi P Pasture. MD
Ad U*vnaly Bo 6 3491-8970 3 3s3 Nodth RoetAwmcarm

3DIM


,fd u o 1: ..-. .


3re id.D1/,
300 NO ft /


a FL


Deadline For Preview


Show Is This Monday


Florida Black Bears


Hyperactive In Fall


lROBBY ELLIOTT invites all
his friends and neighbors
to come see him at


G REE1WOOI D~ .ll I 4


- 205 N. Charleston Fort Meade
1-800-673-9512 *
www.directchevy.com


- -- - --- ____j





4A The Herald-Advocate, November 22. 2012


Don't Hesitate!
HARDEE LIVING
DEADLINE
IS THURSDAY AT 5 P.M.
Make The Winning Score'
SPORTS NEWS DEADLINE
IS MONDAY AT NOON












WILLIAM SCOTT
"SCOTTY" COLLINS
William Scott "Scotty"
Collins, 39, of Live Oak,
passed away on Tuesday,
Nov. 13,2012.
The Wauchu!a native
worked for 'ie City of Live
Oak Fire Department and was
a member of the First United
Methodist Church in Live
Oak.
He loved music, was a
member of River Ranch, and
was lead vocals and guitar in
"Monroe Station." He also
loved the outdoors, hunting
and big trucks.
He is survived by his
mother Janet Collins of Live
Oak; one daughter Ashley
Collins of Indianapolis, Ind.,
one son, William Knox Col-
lins of Navarre; one sister,
Leslie Locklar of Wauchula;
two brothers Daniel "Mic-
key" Collins of Pennsylvania
and David Collins of Mon-
ticello; nieces and nephews,
Charles Collins, Robert Lock-
lar, Lisa Collins, Savannah
Chancey and Steven Locklar;
great-nieces and nephews,
Taylor Hays, Jaymie Chancey
and Ryan Collins; and girl-
friend Kartin Howell and son
William James Howell of
Live Oak.
Visitation was on Monday,
Nov. 19, from 6 to 8 p.m. at
Daniels Funeral Home.
Services for Scott were held
at II a.m. on Tuesday, Nov.
20, at First United Methodist
Church of Live Oak with Dr.
William M. Finnin Jr. officiat-
ing. Interment followed in the
Live Oak Cemetery.
In lieu of flowers, the fam-
ily asks that donations be
made to the Professional
Firefighters of Live Oak, 200
N.E. Duval St., Live Oak, FL
32604.
Daniels Funeral Homes
And Crematory, Inc.
Live Oak


HARDEE COUNTY
KIDS NEED
HARDEE COUNTY
HELP!
Ease a dependent child's
way through the court sys-
tem. Volunteer to be a
Guardian Ad Litem.
773-2505
(ff office unattended, please leave
message.)













MORRIS C. MANLEY
Morris C. Manley, 77, of
Thonotosassa, died on Mon-
day, Nov. 19, 2012.
Born Nov. 5, 1935, at
Frostproof, he came to Thon-
otosassa from Tampa two-
and-one-half years ago. He
served in the National Guard,
was an engineer for GTE
Telephone, retiring after 40
years, and a member of West
Hillsborough Baptist Church.
He is survived by his wife
of 57 years, Naomi Manley of
Thonotosassa; three daugh-
ters, Anita Clarice Cook and
husband Bill of Thonotosassa,
Pamela Ann Manley of
Seffner, and Beverly Jewesak
and husband Timothy of
Tampa; three brothers, Neil
Manley of Tampa, Larry
Manley of Gainesville and
Wayne Manley of Avon Park;
and two grandchildren, Dana
Marie and Andrew Caleb
Jewesak.
Visitation is Saturday, Nov.
24th, from 4 to 5 p.m. at the
Chapel of Fijst Baptist
Church of Brandon, followed
by Memorial Services at 5
p.m. Graveside services and
interment will be at 2 p.m.
Sunday, Nov. 25th at Wauc-
hula Cemetery.
In lieu of flowers, dona-
tions may be made to the
American Heart Association
or the American Cancer So-
ciety.
Expressions of comfort may
be made at robartsfh.com.

FUNERAL HOME
WAUCHULA

iwwif


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KfB~pee^^


i 5 9 H ..S.' ... ...a ..k .., Flri j....7.. S63-~.. .3-9773 2.2.. ':' 2
529 fcl M' 3ain St-cct l u/., Florrda 3.3S,-.3 S6J- T37 -9,-,-j c'R.'J ,',,.,/lr:.:.


The stegosaurus was a large, plant-eating dinosaur that lived about 150 million years
F o in what is now the western United States. It had two rows of bony plates shaped
huge arrowheads sticking out of its back.

i mmmmmmm mmmmmn%


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I


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~SVaX\C


A STEREO SOUND!
:)s (next to Beall's Outlet) a 0


\


773o5877


'We guarantee the lowest prices around!
See us for all your car stereo systems.


I ALL NAME BRAND CAR RADIOS! I


FLIP DOWN SCREEN
10" or 10" wl DVD Player


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i S.- 7 t A. W u.c ,,g ., F L 3387



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.... .-',..: .-'s.K < < ^. -" y---^ .... "" ,, -. -. .. :.. ....,,.


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RECOGNIZE
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OUFI BLESSINGS



but it also

UNLOCKS THE

DOORS OF



President Thofnas S. Monson



YPo ge -%kayj-Qkady

Funeral Homes





404 W. Palmetto St. Wauchula
(863) 773-6400
PongerKaysGrady.com


Obituaries


AM/FM DVD
3.2" 3.6" 7"


^.9 ^oL/~g Uf/(C14i04
ANNIE MAE PERRY
Annie Mae Perry, 89, of
Wauchula, died on Tuesday,
Nov. 13, 2012, at Hardee
Manor Care Center.
Born on Jan. 31, 1923, in
Sevier County, Tenn., she was
a resident of Hardee County
most of her life. She was a
homemaker and member of
Oak Grove Baptist Church.
She was preceded in death
by her husband Charles Perry;
and son, Roy Collier Sr.
Survivors include son and
daughter-in-law Edgar W. and
Debbie Perry of Ona; daugh-
ter-in-law Kate Collier of
Zolfo Springs; sister Ruby
Stephens and husband Dickie
of Sebring; five grandchil-
dren, Roy Collier Jr., Tiffany
Collier, Dawnya Alamia and
husband Mike, James An-
drews, and William Perry and
wife LaDonna; and seven
great-grandchildren.
Visitation was Friday, Nov.
16, 2012, from 9 to 10 a.m. at
Oak Grove Baptist Church
where funeral services were at
10 a.m. with the Rev. Jim
Davis and Duck Smith offici-
ating. Interment followed in
Wauchula Cemetery.
Expressions of comfort may
be made at robartsfh.com.

FUNERAL HOME
WAUCHULA


YOUR BUSINESS COULD

APPEAR HERE TOO!!
Contact
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels
At The Herald Advocate
115 S. 7th Ave. Wauchula

773-3255







November 22, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 5A


NWES Selects P.A. W. & Cool Cat Award Winners


COURTESY PHOTOS
Third through fifth graders who worked hard for their P.A.W. awards were (front) Cristina
Saldana, Azavie Calhoun, Alexia Martinez, Arika Perez, Trenity Morales and Oscar Lopez;
(middle) Ellis Hodges, Abelardo DeJesus- Leon, Brett Bennett and Andrew Leal; (back)
Katie Teran, Leeanna Reas and Lyndsey Welch.


North Wauchula Elementary School recently announced the winners of the Positively
Awesome Worker award for the first nine weeks. Receiving this award from kindergarten
through second grade were (front row, from left) Jaylen Gomez, Felix Rubinos, Angel
Ortega, Alicia Smith and Justin Torres; (middle) Kortni Bryant, Julissa Botello, Slee
Gutierrez, Kaitlyn Howell and Genaro Martinez; (back) Kyri Grantham, Alexis Lopez, Pete
Torres and Anabella Gomez. Not pictured were Rogelio Lopez and Leanna Bryant.


Third graders acknowledged as Cool Cats were (front) Yesaily Martinez, Khloe Smith,
Andon Whaley, Jayden Hays, David Orta and Kaylie Grice; (middle) Tomas Hernandez,
Annalise Terrell, Joanna Mier, Jose Fernandez, Ricky Sanchez and Dora Santoyo; (mid-
dle) Karina Valadez, Diego Rojas, Emma Hays, Lahna Christian and Rose Tavarez. Not
pictured is Alyvia DriskelL


First graders named as Cool Cats were (front) Belen Gomez, Alex Servin, Rogelio Luna,
Jocelyn Willis and Romi Rivas; (middle) Andrea Garcia- Lopez, Domingo Pineda, Dallas
Howell, Paige Justice, Jake Hays and Rio Tillman; (back) Ivan Torres, Lynda Centeno,
Carli Mushrush, Daisy Consuegra, Justin Marinelarena and Camryn Rodriguez. Not pic-
tured is Jenna Goodwyn.


NWES also named the recipients of the Cool Cat awards for the first nine weeks of the
school year. Kindergarteners were (front) Brooke Hall, Rene Reyes, Aly Servin, Cody
Rieder, Yadhira Macedo and Gracey Hays; (middle) Benjamin Trevino, Landon Smith,
Gracyn Thomas, Abigail Eures and Hayden Cobb; (back) Diego Orta, Subham Patel,
Stonzion Shine, Braxton Rucker, Cori Smith and Natalie Quintana.


Students recognized as Cool Cats in second grade were (front) Tyson Pace, Rolant
Simon, Kaelea Bryant, Apolinar Almaguer and Samara Arreola; (middle) Chase Sanders,
Serenity Walters, Jayden Cabrera, Martin McClenithan and Desmas Davila; (back) Jaidyn
Newman, Trinity Vansickle, Briana Tambunga, Blake Rucker, Aiden Thomas and Emma
Eures.


S

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---~,~--- -~
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Jamie Walker was also awarded the Spirit of Community Award from Mosaic's Four Cor-
ners Mine. She was selected for being an outstanding student and for her commitment
to helping others achieve. Walker is seen holding her plaque and gift card, flanked by a
representative from Mosaic and Assistant Principal Dale Wolgast.


NWES fifth graders announced as Cool Cats were (front) Brianna Valadez, Trista Miller,
Diana Paulino, Mario Lopez and Alyssa Beers; (back) Jason Garcia, Daylin Parker, Tyler
Abel, Samantha Jimenez and Carina Deloera. Not pictured were Jesston Collum and
Isaac Estrada.


Fourth graders receiving the Cool Cat award were (front) Desirae Cabrera, Roxanna
Araujo, Able Servin, Marilu Antonio-Rivera, Jamie Walker and Oscar DeSantiago; (back)
Joseph Peters. Isabel Calvillo, Matthew Peters, Richard Torres, Caleb Arana, Adrianna
Consuegra and Christopher Castaldi.


'^..LX > ... *





S) l 'I e Hei-rald- Advocate, November 22, 2012


The


ABOUT ... Classifieds
DEADLINE ....Tuesday noon
RATES ..........Minimum of $4.00 for 10 words. Each addi-
tional word is 22 cents. Ads in all capitals
are 32 cents per word. Headlines are $2 a
line. Blind ad box numbers are $3 extra.
BILLING ........Ads must be pre-paid.
CLASSIFICATIONS:


Agriculture
Appliances
Automobile
Boats
Furniture
Help Wanted
Houses
Livestock
Lost & Found
Miscellaneous


Mobile Homes
Notices
Pets
Plants/Produce
Real Estate
Recreational
Rentals
Services
Wanted
Yard Sales


Stephanie Guqle Computer Tech


Phone (863) 781-9720 |
www.GuQlesComputerServices.corn


l---V---c-u-er---serv-ce co-
gujIN H/~cifsoM uEr SERVICEsc


S8 R- AL No matter how you look at it,
HE BEST DEACL there's no better place to shop
FROM ANY ANGLE for your next car

M I


Large
Cars to

Buy Hei


Selection of
Choose From

re Pay Here


Classifieds


Agriulur
LOOKING FOR PASTURE land to
lease, 375-2966, leave message.
11:1-29p
DIESEL INJECTION repairs,
pumps. turbo, injectors, remove
and install, 863-381-0538.
1:19-1:10(13)p
L. DICKS INC. is now purchasing
citrus fruit for the 2012 13 season
and beyond. Call Mark Manuel @
781-0384. 7:8tfc


2003 DODGE Dakota V6 automat-
ic, $4,850 OBO 139,000 actual
miles, 781-1062. 11:22c


2003 GMC $3,500 cash, 781-1062.
11:22c


USED GUNS, Shotguns, long
rifles and pistols. Ammo at dis-
counted prices. 375-2121.
11:8-12:6p


DRIVER: LOCAL, great pay & ben-
efits. Home every day. Pd.
HolidaysNac., 401k, CDL-A, w/X
end. School grads. accepted.
866-358-3937. 11:8-29c


Her s uoCenigevc
Hwy.17 & S.R. 6,ZofoSprns -(6)7519


Car Wash and Wax
Carpet and Seat Cleaning
Buff Compounding
Headliners Replaced
j Vinyl Top and Motor Cleaning


cll 1:22c


Women, do you
need lower rent?
See if you qualify call

735-2222 or 773-5717"




ZOLFO ZoLFO Spi iSHERE
.. 735-0188 "
Nothing Over $599 Down Noj
^an PKus Ta Tie iT& l OR
Dan fww~iB,nii) FlJNANCHARMt
Mon. Wed. 10-.- 6,.; Fri. & Sat. 10.m-7p/Closed Thursday & Sunday
3505 US HWY 17 S ZOLFO SPRINGS c :5stfc
:i r '
I '1 -
NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION
You are hereby notified that Wauchula State Bank
will sell the vehicle described below "As Is" to the
highest bidder for cash, free of prior liens, to satis-
fy legal obligations.


Type
John Deer 6415 Tractor
Kubuto Articulated Wheel Loader
Hustler Mower
2009 Polaris 4 Wheeler
Black Custom Utility Trailer
200 Gal. Chemical Container Sprayer


Model
L06415B370247
JKUR5202E01 H10158
927988A Serial 07033223
4XAWH68A992707741
CCIT10062579


Contact Thomas Trevino for details at Wauchula
State Bank 863-767-5022. The sale will be held on
Friday, November 23, 2012. at 10:00 a.m. at the
Wauchula State Bank parking lot located at 106
East Main Street, Wauchula, FL.
cd1 1.15,22c






Joe LDUaL8


I N C.,






John O'Neal


R E A


L T
(863)


0 R S
773-2128


REALTORS
| |JOE L. DAVIS
E,, JOE L. DAVIS, JR.
REALTOR JOHN H. O'NEAL
See more listings at
www.joeldavis.com
REAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS


PRICE REDUCED! Wow!
Great home in Popash area on
2.5 acs. 2 miles from town.
$138,000!
PRICE REDUCED! Paradise:
I ittilp Ganarilla TIland-Roach


PRICE REDUCED! 50- acs in
NE DeSoto Co; deer, turkey,
wild hogs, beautiful live oaks,
improved pasture, pond &
creek. NOW $190,000!


Condo. 2BR/2BA. Gulf front. PRICE REDUCED! Commer-
$220,000! cial property on US 17! 38 stor-
age units w/partial roof, city
PRICE REDUCED! 38.5 acs utilities, zoned C-2, sold "as is"!
on the Peace River w/lots of NOW $200.000!
beautiful oaks. pines & palmet-
tos! Pole barn & 2BR/2BA MH. PRICE REDUCED! Triple-
S420000!' wide MH of 3.314 square feet.
PRICE REDUCED! 10 ac This home has many amenities
w/paved rd frontage. Great for and sits on a nice 5 acre tract.
pasture, farming or homesite. $95.000!
S-49.500:
PRICE REDUCED! 20 acs PRICE REDUCED! 3BR/2BA;
oPRICE REDUCEDsa o 0n acs MH on 5 acs w/frontage on SRW
zoned industrial on Hwv 17.,.62 N1-0,00i
S399.000" 62. NO S60.000!I
REALTOR ASSOCtIATES AFTR HOLRS
KENNY SANDERS--_781-0153 KAREN O'NEAL---..- 781-7633
KEVIN SANDERS.--998-3093 MONICA REAS---- 7814-8
DAVID ROYAL._.781-349 JIMMY EDENFIELD_44&-2821
01 HIGHWAY 17 SOUTH, WAUCHULA, FL 33873 C11


SECRETARY FOR CHURCH
office, part-time, 9 a.m. to 12 p.m.,
Monday-Thursday. Must be profi-
cient in Quickbooks and
Microsoft Office (Word, Excel,
Powerpoint, Publisher), and have
excellent telephone skills. Mail
cover letter and resume to
Bowling Green Methodist Church,
P.O. Box 236, Bowling Green, FL
33834, by Friday, Nov. 23. 11:22c
LICENSED COSMETOLOGIST 2
Dye 4 Hair Salon. Liz 832-0067.
11:8-29p
CREW LEADERS WANTED:
Taking applications, must have
CDL with passenger endorse-
ment. Contact Robert Abbott 863-
781-0657. 11:8-22p
SOUTHERN OAKS now accepting
applications for caregiver. CPR
required, experience a plus.
Apply In person at 157 Will Duke
Rd. 10:25-11:22c


3 BEDROOM, large family room,
utility room,, 2 car garage with
lots of storage, on over 1/2 acre
land. Bowling Green. $65,000.
863-328-6220, 863-375-2560.
~~________10:25-11:22p


FOUND: MALE CHIHUAHUA,
white with tan markings. Found In
Vandolah Rd. area. 773-9588.
11:22nc


7 FOOT LIGHTED Christmas tree.
Very good condition $75. Call
Marie 773-0008. 11:22,29p
GOLD & SILVER Pawn shop pay-
ing top dollar for gold, silver and
guns now. 375-2121. 11:8-12:6p


We offer the BEST and MOST AFFORDABLE
computer services in Wauchula! Free Diagnosis!
-Computer, Cell Phone, TV & Electronics Repair
*Electronics Sales & Installations
*Security Cameras & Systems
-Fax & Notary Services -Computer Classes
863-767-1520 www.PcEmpire.Org
748 N. 6th Ave., Wauchula





('THE PALMS

$I atN I





701 La Playa Drive, WGard lAp

701 La Playa Drive, Wauchula


Monday Friday
9:00 AM 5:00 PM


LJ


Realtors
NOEY A. FLORES, BROKER -.
310 Court St. _
Wauchula, Florida 33873
(863) 773-3337 Fax: (863) 773-0144 Noey A. Flores
www.floresrealty.net BROKER
R863-781-4585

I REDUCED!


BOWLING GREEN 3BR/1BA Frame Home on a dead-in
street. Hardwood floors, large metal shop, large lot, large
family room addition. Priced at $65,000.00
ON A DEAD-END ROAD 3BR/2BA 1997 Double-Wide Mobile
Home on 5 acres with Central Air & Heat & Pole Barn. 1492 Total
Sq Ft. Priced to sell at $99,900
WAUCHULA SHORT SALE 2BR/1BA frame home with cen-
tral air & heat. Large lot, utility shed and carport. Offered at
$49,900
WAUCHULA 7.43 Acres on MLK Blvd Zoned Farm
Residential Close to town Priced at $37,900
ZOLFO SPRINGS Get away for the weekend on 8 +/- acres,
great for recreation or livestock. Offered at $32,000

WE SHARE THE SAME MLS WITH HIGHLANDS COUNTY!
IF Remember, Our listings are on the Internet. ^
S Anyone with a computer can access them anytime! =
I ILU After Hours =




SOr alia D John D. n Michael D. Jamie
S Fioes Freeman John~on Boyett Spurlock1
Flors JJah son Boye~t
Broker Sales Saes Sales Broker
IAssoc ate \ Associale \ Associate Associate Associate
I863-.81 .295 '863-781-4084 1863-781-3734 863-781-2827 S63-835-1611
WHY RENT HEN YOU CAN BUVYAND BUILD EQUITY!!! c11:22c


A l 30 Day Guarantee
on Motor & Transmission Only
BIL SATO TEREA AMITO
86-71-46 6378-98
151Hwy 7bORH WACHLAoi


(863) 773-3809
TDD 800-955-8771
Equal Housing Opportunity


0


4 2 CB Home, Nice Wooded Lot,
SC A H, New Kitchen Appliances,
SWasher/Dryer, New Paint Inside and
SOut. 713 N. 9th Ave., Wauchula
; $79,000 OBO


Carol's Realty
S1534 Yancy St., Port Charlotte, FL 33952
SCall James Collie for appointment
S(863) 412-8932


(941) 627-2769


10 25rfc


0 wo, b


t


I ,


C-2)l







November 22, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 7A


The


Classifieds


QHIHUAHUA PUPPIES $125
each, 407-929-6491. 11:15,22c
ADOPT A PET! If you have lost a
pet or are looking for a new one,
the City of Wauchula invites you
to come and see if you can find
the pet you're looking for. The
Wauchula Animal Control is locat-
ed at 685 Airport Road. Please
call 773-3265 or more informa-
tion. tfc-dh
ATTENTION' State Statutes
828.29 requires that all cats and
dogs sold in Florida be at least 8
weeks old, have an official health
certificate, have necessary shots
and be free of parasites, tfc-dh


LAND FOR SALE: water wells,
power & septic tanks. 5 acres,
$35,000 OBO, 863-399-3333.
____________11 :22,29p


$75 A WEEK plus $25 a week for
electric & cable. Roommate want-
ed to share expenses for large
house near Walmart. 832-3042.
11:22p


2 BR 1 B in city. fenced yard, S600
per month, 863-990-8292.
11:22-12:20p
HOUSE FOR.RENT. 1 1 2 bed-
room. S550 includes utilities.
4808 Bowling Green. Call Jesse
anytime: 863-781-4967. 11:22,29p
ROOM FOR RENT. $425 monthly,
utilities included, no deposit, 863-
303-3570. 11:22,29p
*RENT-TO-OWN*
MOBILE HOMES 1, 2, 3
Bedrooms. Cheaper then paying
rent. Close to schools and hospi-
tal. Lot rent $300. Se habla
espanol. 863-698-4910 or 863-
698-4908. Call today. 7:5tfc
ULLRICH'S STORAGE UNITS,
several sizes, corner of 9th Ave. &
Goolsby St., 773-6448 or 773-
9291. 3:22tfc
ATTENTION! The Federal Fair
Housing Act Prohibits advertising
any preference or limitation
based on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial status or
national origin, or the intention to
make such a preference or limita-
tion. Familial status includes chil-
dren under 18 living with parents
or guardians and pregnant
women, tfc-dh


~YOUR TIRE HEADQUARE [te
5101 N. Hwy 17 Bowling Green
3"/' 37S-4461 t^
New Tire Changer & Balancer ,
Can Do 26" Wheels
TERRY MONDAY SA'[URDAY 8 nam 6 pm MIKE
/ Foreign and Domestic Cars / Diesel Engines
/ Gas or Diesel Manual or Automatic Transmissions



| T h30 Isy *Wraty -ui 'A^ESi
1971 ForExpeienc1197





I g1"i I -]J~r







Motor ( Transmission

i H. /
HadH r I El!a Jimmy

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK SE HABLA ESPANOL
U.S. Hwy. 17 Bowling Green 375-4441
$ Huge Discounts for Cash Deals $
S24 Hour Towing Service Lowest Possible Rates Fast and Reliable
781-3090 or 781-3091 cn :5tfc


Wishing you & your family a

Happy Thanksgiving

from all of u, here at

JIM SEE REALTY, INC.
206 North 6th Avenue, Wauchula, FL 33873
Office (863)773-0060 Evening (863)781-1338
www.jimseerealty.com James V. See, Jr., Broker 11:22c









S4 79 plustax I
$ 7


S Golf Cart Batteries I
(Set Of 6 PowerTron Six Volt)
Pick-up & Delivery not Included with this offer.
I Must bring coupon to receive offer.


ON SITE INSTALLATION

NOW AVAILABLE


1BR. 1 BATHROOM includes all
utilities, 863-781-5246. 11:15,22p
2BR 1BA in country with carport
and workshop area, $650 a
month, deposit $650, 832-1000.
11:15,22c
THREE BEDROOM houses plus
two bedroom apartments. No
pets. 832-1984. 10:25-11:22p
2 BEDROOM 1 BATH, Duplex,
$550 month, $550 deposit, 773-
0100. 6:21tfc



FOR LEASE OR RENT 2 acres
commercial property, Hwy 17 N.
across from Wlnn Dixie. 941-457-
9142. 11:8-12:6p
COMMERCIAL 400 sq.ft. to 6000
sq. ft. retail/office location High-
way 17/Main St. 832-1984.
10:25-11:22p
LARGE COMMERCIAL OFFICE
space. Approx. 1,780 sq. ft. Heavy
traffic area corner of Main & Hwy
17 (101 East Main) call Elene
Salas, 735-0999. 8:9tfc


ALUMINUM CONSTRUCTION
additions, screen rooms, car-
ports, glass rooms, pool enclo-
sures, rescreening, decks, con-
crete. Harold Howze Construc-
tion, 781-2708. RR0050181
10:25-12:27p
LAWN SERVICES, mowing, weed
eating, edging and more. $30 per
hour (1 hour min.) 863-735-2801,
1-914-204-0481. 11:1-29p
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS,
Thursday 7:00 p.m., Grace
Fellowship Church, 131 S. 8th
Ave., Wauchula. Bill 727-326-
3816. 6:7tfc-dh
OVERCOMERS MEETINGS
(Gillespie), Woman's Club on
Wednesday, 7pm Kenny
Sanders is the facilitator. For
more information call 773-5717.
2:16tfc
NEED A WELL OR HAVE PUMP
TROUBLE? CALL
ULLRICH'S PITCHER PUMP
For complete well, sales,
service and installation,
call (863) 773-6448.
7:18tfc
THE WAUCHULA LIONS CLUB
collects NOT broken prescription
eyeglasses, cases and sunglass-
es. Please drop off at 735 N. 6th
Ave. tfc-dh
DO YOU HAVE a problem with
drugs? Naricotics 'Anonymous
meets Monday and Thursday
nights 7:00 p.m. at First United
Methodist Church, at the corner
of Palmetto and 7th Ave., Wau-
chula. tfc-dh


IS ALCOHOL CAUSING a prob-
lem? Call Alcoholics Anonymous
in Hardee unty at 781-6414.
Several ..ekly meetings.
tfc-dh
ATTENTIONI State Statutes 489-
119 Section 5 Paragraph B and
Hardee County Ordinance 87-09
Section 10 Paragraph D require
all ads for any construction-relat-
ed service to carry the contrac-
tor's license number, tfc-dh


PAYING TOP DOLLAR for junk
cars 863-245-1351. 11:8-12:6p


I Yardae


MISSION THRIFT STORE INC.
123 N. 7th Ave. All donations
appreciated. Pick-up available for
large items. 773-3069. 1:12tfc
HEAVEN SCENT THRIFT STORE
Helping Sherry White Ministries
help others! 912 Hwy. 17 South
(across from McDonalds)
Wauchula, 863-773-9777.
11:15tfc
HHC THRIFT STORE accepting
furniture consignment. 1085 Hwy
17. 773-0550. 11:1-12:6
LYDIA'S HOUSE THRIFT STORE
Helping ladies overcome! 102
Carlton Street (directly behind
Heaven Scent), Wauchula, 863-
773-3034. 11:15tfc
THE MUSTARD SEED THRIFT
Store. Helping Sherry White
Ministries help others! Donations
appreciated/ volunteers wel-
comel 132 Hwy 17 South
Wauchula, 863-773-6153.
11:15tfc
BEDS ALL SIZES, hide a beds,
frames all sizes, Christmas items,
appliances. Come In and we'll
give you a good deal. 11:22c
SATURDAY, Manager's storage
sale. Stove, furniture, drums,
tools. 210 N. 3rd, Wauchula.
11:22p
717 EAST OAK STREET. 8-?
Saturday. Lots of stuff. 11:22p
FRIDAY, SATURDAY, 5165 Martin
Luther King Drive, Bowling
Green. 11:22p

HARDEE COUNTY
KIDS NEED
HARDEE COUNTY
HELP!
Ease a dependent child's
way through the court sys-
tem. Volunteer to be a
Guardian Ad Litem.
773-2505
(If office unattended, please leave
message.)


o GILLIARD

FILL DIRT INC.

Fill irtoRokoSado hl


Lamar Gilliard
Home: (863) 735-0490


Zolfo Springs
C14:19tfc Mobile: (941) 456-6507


BILLY BOB'S TIRES

New& Used
Brand Named Tires

Semi & Trailer Tires

773-0777
or
773-0727
116 REA Rd., Wauchula
(across from Wal-Mart)
Billy Avers VISA ...
Tire Technician A d9:13tfc








ASHBROOK REALTY
Your home. Your lord. Oujr speciacity.
HAPPY THANKSGIVING!
TWO STORY 4BR. 2;B HOME in Knollwood w/1962 SF has brick
fireplace, stainless appliances, oak cabinets. $178,000
USDA FINANCING; AVAILABLE for this 3BR. 2B CB home in
Zolfo Springs built in 2008. on large lot. S130.)00
HISTORIC 4BR. 2B HOME with brand new second floor master
suite. garden tub. wood floors sits on corner lot. $89.000
LEX EL. CLEARED 5 ACRES is perfect for
cattle or homesite. Corner lot on graded road
is Greenbelt qualified for taxes. S35.000

Post Office Box 37 Wauchula 33873
18881 6601-6693 office (863) 832-01134)0 cell
ww vw.ashbrookrealty.com
sand@ ashbrookrealtN.com vD LPRIO.


Safe Routes To School


According to an old Spanish
proverb, you "make the road by
walking it." Now. millions of
Americans have added a new
meaning to that phrase. They're
walking and biking to help cre-
ate safer routes and paths for
walking and bicycling.
Why It's Needed
With childhood obesity rates
at record highs and school sys-
tems offering fewer gym class-
es, recess time and school-fund-
ed sports programs, the com-
mute to school can be a great
way to get kids active. Consider
this: In 1969. about 50 percent
of schoolchildren walked or
bicycled to school, while today.
fewer than 15 percent do. Over
the years, obesity rates have
soared among children of all
ages in the United States and
approximately 25 million chil-
dren and adolescents-more than
33 percent-are now overweight
or obese or at risk of becoming
so.
What's To Be Done
The National Association for
Sport and Physical Education
(NASPE) recommends that ele-
mentary school students have
150 minutes of instructional
physical education per week
while middle and high school
students have 225 minutes per
week of instructional physical
education. Since kids are only
receiving a portion of that phys-
ical exercise time in school, they
must seek alternate activities to
meet these and the Surgeon
General's recommended levels
of physical activity in daily life.
To help, Safe Routes to School
National Partnership has created


a diverse national community
of organizations that advocates
for safe bicycling and walking
to and from schools throughout
the United States.
Travel Safely
Ways to increase the safety of
a child's walking or biking trip
to school include:
Teach children to cross
streets at marked crossings and
to always look left-right-left.
Young bicyclists should
practice the route to school with
a parent and know the rules of
the road, how to signal and
when it is safest to walk their
bike.
Tie and tuck. Don't let
shoelaces or pant legs get
caught in the spokes.
Make sure the bike's tires
have enough air, the brakes and
gears work, the chain isf't loose
and bolts are tight.
Bicyclists should wear
light-colored clothing and
reflective gear.
Young riders should always
wear their helmets. It should be
properly adjusted, fitted and
buckled.
See that the community
provides, safe, well-maintained
,walkways separate from vehi-
cles and that it installs curb
ramps at every intersection and
at mid-block crossings.

Learn More
For further information, go to
www.saferoutespartnership.org.
Walking or riding a bike to
and from school can be a great
way for kids to keep fit-as long
as the route they take is safe and
they know the rules of the road.


Anecdotes and maxims are rich treasures to the man of
the world, for he knows how to introduce the former at fit
place in conversation.
-Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe




REVELL dvTo SaLEs












|TREES UNLIMITED 1
I Commercial Residential Licensed & Insured I


We Take Credit Cards
Environmentally RExponstht
Storm Damage & Emergency Specialists


Randy Garland

781-70271


Gold & Silver

Pawn Shop
Paying up to $1,700 per ounce for gold.
Pawn your valuables now for Christmas cash!


Mon., Tue., Wed., Fri., 10Oam-6pm -Thurs. & Sat. 10Oam-3pm
(863)375-2121
North Hwvy 17 Bowling Green c11i1:22c




HARDEE CAR COMPANY
(across from First National Bank)

BuY HERE PAY HERE
We Pay Cash for Cars & Trucks



Happy Thanksgiving!

We Will Be CLOSED Thursday
& Reopen on Friday








L BiltyJ mm[owner
Mon.-Sat. 9am 7pm* Sun. lpm-6pm

773-6667
-Also-
Billy & Janice's Rentals Bowling Green Flea market
Houses & Apartments


829 Boom t Bmmo Gum


773-4400fl


r






8A The Herald-Advocate, November 22. 2012


ZSE Names Cool Cats For The First Quarter


COURTESY PHOTOS
Recently Zolfo Springs Elementary named its Cool Cats for the first nine weeks of the
2012-13 school year. Kindergarteners were (front, from left) Hynesea Black, Trista
Gilliard, Cayden Albritton, Alexa Mendez-Galvan, Makayla Hardin and Trigo Juarez;
(back) Aracely Molina-Navarro, Emily Villalva-Moreno, Jasmine Valdez-Garcia, Bryan
Vera, Arissa Alderman and Angel Romero-Vazquez.


Cool Cats in second grade were (from front left) Nataly Clemente, Dinora Villa-Munoz,
Theodore Lee, Gaoyoua Vue, Arianna Rodriguez and Brisa Salazar; (back) Roberto,
Delira, Cristal Pena, Isai Venegas, Jennifer Desantiago and Kyle Pitcher.


Students in third grade recognized as Cool Cats were (front, from left) Julian Reyes-
Silva, Yeng Lor, Thalia Sanchez, Joaquin Rojo and Mollie O'Bryan; (back) Lorena
Martinez- Bautista, Lucio Aquino, Lauren Gainous, Rodrigo Gutierrez, Marissa Deloera,
John Vallejo and Makayla McCoy.


_ .-.,.. ,\ in
.- 4 A :- "[


irid
_w .. .





First graders receiving the Cool Cat award for their good behavior were (front, from
left) Dylan Thomas, Sara Teuton, Hailey Bryant and Damian Olmos; (back) Milagros
Sandoval-Delacruz, Lucas Mayo, Haylee Norman, Ryan Gutierrez and Briana
Rodriguez.






He Did What He Wanted


By MADISON BURNETT
Special To The Herald-Advocate
My interview was with Joe Stokes.
Q: Where were you born, and how
long did you live there?
A: I was born Enid, Okla. My father
was positioned in an airbase there. We
moved shortly after I was born to Lake
Wales, Fla. I lived in an old camp house
there for two or three years.
Q: Where did you go to school?
A: I went to grade school in Lake
Wales. But later I had to move to
Greenville, S.C., because the doctors
said I had to move to a higher climate
to escape asthma attacks. So I had to go
to Bob Jones University. When I out-
grew the asthma attacks when I got
older, I moved back to Lake Wales.
Q: How were your grades in
school?
A: Good I guess, probably not great.
Q: What year did you graduate?
A: I didn't graduate. I quit.
Q: What did you do after your
school life? .
A: I worked cows, rode, broke and
trained jockey horses, rodeo, hunted
gators and other animals, and worked in
a grove for a little bit. I didn't do a lot.
Just did whatever I wanted I guess.
Q: Who did you marry, and when
did you marry?
A: I married Judy McClelland on Jan.
7, 1972.
Q: Did you have any children?


A: I adopted my wife's daughter,
Murrie. And she was our only child.
Q: Where all have you lived?
A: I have lived in Florida all my life,
except when I had to move to South
Carolina, and I was born in Oklahoma.
Q: How many places have you been
to in the world?
A: I have been to North Carolina,
South Carolina, Tennessee, Florida,
Mississippi, Louisiana, Oklahoma,
Texas, New
Mexico, "
Colorado 4= A11'
Alabama,' ,j ,
Georgia,
New York and British Colombia,
Canada.
Q: How many times have you
moved?
A: I have moved six times, but most
of them were only within a 15-mile dis-
tance from and around Lake Wales.
Q: How do you like the town and
the people? ,.
A: I like the town'mThe people are
great. I know mostly everybody any-
ways.
Back In Time is the result of a class
assignment given to ninth graders at
Hardee Senior High School. Each stu-
dent is asked to interview an older
person. Selected interviews are pub-
lished here as an encouragement to
the students and for the enjoyment of
our readers.


Fourth graders earning the Cool Cat award by cooperating with others were (front,
from left) Dominic Martinez, Alejandro Paulino-Mendieta, Alan Felipe-Zuniga, Alexis
Rodriguez, Yacquelin Villalva and Tomy Molina-Navarro; (back) Adrian Jaimes, Crystal
Cardoza, Joelynn Carver and Julio Mateo-Armenta.


Em- rel
AM-SOUTH HEALTHY
Each office independently owned and operated.



/ : *y 4


Robert Hinerman Nancy Craft
227-0202 832-0370


REDUCTION IN PRICE!! Discover the world
of country living in this 3/2 double wide
moblie home, 2005 model with 5 Acres.
Peaceable living's just minutes away! Call
today to change your life! $75,000
3 Bedroom, 2 Bath Mobile Home including
lot has central heat and air, appliances, built
in 2008, total SF-1,736. Come by and take a
look today. S69.000
A Lovely 2 Bedroom, 2 Bath Country home
with a 2 car carport, central heat and air,
hardwood floors, 6 x 12 size front porch,
many grades, fruit trees all sitting on 3
Acres of land And priced @ S124.900
PREMIER HOME!! built by builder/owner,
beautiful home with 4 bedrooms, 2.5 bath,
vaulted ceilings, appliances, double hung
windows, 2 bedroom, 1 bath Mother-In-Law
suite attached to barn, storage and horse
stalls, so much to enjoy and all sitting on 5
Acres of beautiful country. $339,000 Call
Nancy today for an appointment!
A very well maintained 3 BR/2 Bath, 2006
Model Double Wide Mobile Home, Total Sq
Ft 2,134. with 5 Acres Priced @ $134.900


702 SOUTH 6'hAVENUE, WAUCHULA
(863) 773-2122 FAX (863) 773-2173
Gary Delatorre Broker
www.cbhardee.corn


Richard Dasher
781-0162


Victor Salazar
245-1054


Call for an Appointment today to see this 3
Bedroom, 3 Bath country home with large
living, dining, kitchen areas. Beautiful brick
fireplace, 2 car garage, shed/workshop with
apartment, all this and more sitting on
fenced 5 acre tract. Priced () S199.000
Owners are ready to sell!! This 3 Bedroom,
1.5 Bath home needs a little work but would
be perfect for the first time home buyer or
investors. Priced @ S54.000
Automotive Mechanic shop on .6 Acres
includes 3 lifts and large air compressor.
2400 SF in mechanic building, 624 SF In
office building. Close to US Hwy 17. Great
investment potential. S169.900
BEAUTIFUL 3 BR, 2 Bath Country Home on
10 Acres. Perfect if you are looking for that
"Country Lifestyle" where the beautiful
scenery of the countryside Is just In your
backyard. Call Nancy for a showing Today!!
Priced I $252.500
RENTAL AVAILABLE!!
BEAUTIFUL 2 BEDROOM, 2 1/2 BATH
TOWNHOUSE APARTMENT. $650 MONTHLY
WITH $650 DEPOSIT. 1051 DOWNING CIR-
CLE, WAUCHULA. CALL 773-2122.
-. "" 225s


Cool Cats honored in the fifth grade were (from front left) Lucy Garcia, Ricardo Urbina,
Jonathan Jimenez-Hernandez, Danielle King and Mackenzie McCoy; (back) Jesus
Jurado. Teron Salyers, Maria Gutierrez Arreola. Juan Castillo and Myrka Delator, a.


HAPPY THANKSGMNG
from
AU of Us to All of You!


I U


A











ABOUT ...
School News
The Herald-Advocate en-
courages submissions from
Hardee County schools.
Photos and write-ups
should be of recent events,
and must include first and
last names for both students
and teachers. Identify pho-
tos front to back, left to right.
Deadline for submissions
is 5 p.m. on Thursday.
Please include the name
and phone number of a con-
tact person. Qualifying
items will be published as
space allows.




NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
AND MEETING
TO DETERMINE WHETHER
THE PURCHASE BY THE
FLORIDA GOVERNMENTAL
UTILITY AUTHORITY OF THE
WATER AND WASTEWATER
UTILITY ASSETS OF AQUA
AMERICA, INC., LOCATED IN
THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IS IN
THE PUBLIC INTEREST
The Florida Governmental Utility
Authority ("FGUA") Announces a
public hearing to which all inter-
ested persons are invited. The
FGUA is a legal entity and public
body created pursuant to the pro-
visions of Section 163.01, Florida
Statutes, and an Interlocal
Agreement among Citrus County,
Florida, DeSoto County, Florida,
Hendry County, Florida, Lee
County, ,lorida, Pasco County,
Florida, and Polk County, Florida.
Such public hearing will be held
to determine whether the acquisi-
tion by the FGUA of the water and
wastewater assets of Aqua
America, Inc. (Aqua Utilities
Florida, Inc., Crystal River
Utilities, Inc. and Dolomite
Utilities Corp.) located in the
State of Florida, is in the public
interest. The public hearing will
be held at 1:00 p.m. on
December 13, 2012 at the
Suncoast Estates Community
Center, located at 2241 Case
Lane, North Fort Myers, Florida,
33917.
All customers of the FGUA, affect-
ed property owners, tenants or
occupants, and all other interest-
ed persons, shall have an oppor-
tunity to be heard concerning the
proposed acquisition of the Aqua
America, Inc. systems outlined
below.
Alachua County (Arredondo
Estates)
Brevard County (Kingswood,
Oakwood)
Citrus County (Castle Lake,
Kenwood North, Pine Valley, The
Meadows, West Citrus)
Hardee County (Peace,River)
Highlands County (Leisure
Lakes, Lake Josephine, Sebring
Lakes)
Lake County (48 Estates, Carlton
Village, E. Lake Harris, Fairways
at Mt. Plymouth, Fern Terrace,
Friendly Center, Grahd Terrace,
Haines Creek, Hobby Hills,
Holiday Haven, Imperial Mobile
Terrace, Kings Cove,
Morningview, Palms Mobile
Home Park, Picciola Island, Piney
Woods/Spring Lake, Quail Ridge,
Ravenswood, Silver Lake Estates,
Skycrest, Stone Mountain,
Summit Chase, Valencia Terrace,
Venetian Village, Western
Shores)
Lee County (South Seas)
Marion County (49th Street,
Belleair, Bellview Hills Estates,
Bellview Hills Jog Acres, Chapell
Hills, Fairfax Hills, Hawk's Point,
Marion Hills, Ocala Oaks, Ridge
Meadows, West View, Woodberry
Forrest)
Qrange County (Tangerine)
Palm Beach County (Lake
Osborne Estates)
Pasco County (Jasmine Lakes,
Palm Terrace, Zephiyr Shores)
Polk County (Breeze Hill,
Gibsonia Estates, Lake Gibson
Estates, Orange Hill, Rosalie
Oaks, Sugar Creek, Village
Water)
Putnam County (Beecher's
Point, Hermits Cove, Interlachen
Lake Estates, Palm Port, Park
Manor, Pomona Park, River
Grove, Saratoga Harbour, Silver
Lake Oaks, St. John's Highlands,
Welaka Mobile Home Park,
Wootens)
Seminole County (Chuluota,
Florida Central Commerce Park,
Harmony Homes)
Summer County (Jumper Creek,
The Woods)
Volusla County (Jungle Den,
Tomoka View, Twin Rivers)
All such persons may also file
written comments with the FGUA
by email at FGUAInfooeov-
serv.com, or by mailing such
comments to:
Clerk to the FGUA Board
280 Wekiva Springs Road,
Suite 2000
Longwood, FL 32779


If a person decides to appeal any
decision made by the FGUA with
respect to any matter considered
at the hearing, such person will
need a record of the proceedings
and may need to ensure that a
verbatim record is made, includ-
ing the testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to be
made. In accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities Act,
persons needing special accom-
modations or an interpreter to
participate in this proceeding
should contact the Clerk to the
FGUA Board at (877) 552-3482, at
least three business days prior to
the date of the meeting. If you
have any questions, please con-
tact the Clerk to the FGUA Board
at (877) 552-3482.
11:22c


Mink Sworn In As


BG Commissioner


By MICHAEL KELLY
Of The Herald-Advocate
Randy Mink was sworn in as
the newest Bowling Green City
Commissioner as he filled the
vacancy left by Perry Knight
when he resigned to run for the
County Commission.
Mink had previously served
on the Bowling Green Com-
mission for 10 years from 1998
to 2008.

In other action, the commis-
sion:
-approved the second and
final reading to increase the
sewer rates by three percent.
City Manager Jerry Conerly
said the increase was automati-
cally built in every year to
cover the rising costs. He said
the average bill for a home
would increase $1.83 per
month.
-got an update on the cur-
rent water demands for the city
and the projected future water
use.
Bowling Green currently
uses 250,000 gallons per day,
which equals 90 gallons per day
per resident. The city's permit
from the Southwest Florida
Water Management District
allows it to pull up to 386,000
gallons per day from the city's
three wells.
-heard a presentation from
Envisors Engineering on pro-
viding water to the proposed
Bowling Green Industrial Park
for which the city recently
received a $425,000 grant from
the Industrial Development
Authority.
The engineering firm also


gave details on improving water
pressure and sewer flows
around the city. Bowling Green
has 24 miles of pipe ranging
from two inches to 12 inches,
many of which are aging and
corroding. The deteriorating
pipes are causing a need for
more pumps and a 12-to-17-
percent water loss due to leaks.
Fixing all the recommended
improvements would cost the
city $7.1 million. There are
numerous agencies the city can
apply to for grants to help fund
the repairs.
-voted to approve renaming
Orange Street to Bertha Fulse
Street at the request of a citizen.
It will cost the city $720 to buy
signs, advertise, and cover
legal fees and postage to notify
the residents of the change.
City Attorney Gerald Buhr
agreed to donate his time, com-
missioners Randy Mink and
Woody Calligan agreed to each
donate $100 and the citizen
requesting the change will pay
for the balance of the expenses.
-nominated Mink and
Conerly to be considered for
appointment to the county's
Economic Development Au-
thority board. Two seats on the
board are reserved for represen-
tatives from the three munici-
palities in the county and these
have been vacated by former
Wauchula Police Chief Bill
Beattie and former Bowling
Green Commissioner Perry
Knight.
-heard a report from Jimmy
Nichols that there has been
excessive speeding on Bryan
Avenue next to the school.


PHOTO BY MICHAEL KELLY
Randy Mink takes his oath of office on Nov. 13 to serve
on the Bowling Green City Commission.

In conversation, humor is worth more than wit and easi-
ness more than knowledge.
-George Herbert

Saying what we think gives a wider range of conversa-
tion than saying what we know.
-Cullen Hightower



YOUR BUSINESS COULD

APPEAR HERE TOO!!
Contact
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels

At The Herald Advocate

115 S. 7th Ave. Wauchula

773-3255


11-083-M
12-014-M
12-015-M
12-143-M


NEW CASES:

12-156-NA Monica J Clarke & Monica L flugh
12-158-N Silvestre & Juana Vargas

PROCEED WITH LIEN:

12-126-L Moran C & Sabrina Schneider


November 22,2012, The Herald-Advocate 9A


Greetings from Fort Green,
and I sure hope you all are hav-
ing a good Thanksgiving!
Ladies Night Out at Fort
Green was a great success. Lots
of ladies come together and
really decorated our fellowship
hall, and this year Alice Faye
Moye was the chief chef and
she can really cook! The ladies
of the church made the red vel-
vet cake but it was a super meal.
Tina Nicholson was our guest
speaker or artist. She listened to
music and painted her interpre-
tations of the music, and it was
awesome and I seldom use that
word!
Some who were planning on
attending but were sick were
Tina Owens and her guest and
Sherry Smith. Now, possibly
others were sick at other tables
but these were at my tables and
they called me to say they were
sick. This changing weather
promotes upper respiratory in-
fections and colds.
Randy Davis went the extra
mile and pressure-washed the
entire outside of the church and
all the sidewalks so visitors
would see our church in its
finest. He is a hard worker.
Sherman Cooper is under the
weather because he, Charles
Abbott and Randy Davis put in
a new ceiling in the foyer of the
church. Sherman had to go up
and down the ladder too much
and has a swollen knee. He is in
quite a bit of pain.
Congratulations to Destiny
Fields on making the B honor


roll at Sonhaven.Prep Academy
and to Tonya Fields for making
the E honor roll and perfect
attendance at Bowling Green
Elementary.
Alex McGaughey is visiting
his family through the Thanks-
giving holidays. Of course the
weather down here is warmer
than in Kentucky.
Alex Pierstorff has passed
another hurdle toward his quest
to attend the Air Force Acad-
emy in Colorado Springs. He
said Rep. Vern Buchanan had
nominated him, and nomination
is one of the requirements. We
are all happy and hope he is
able to complete his dreams.
Congratulations to Makayla
Chancey on being inducted into
the National Honor Society last
Tuesday evening at the high
school.
If there were a cash crop for
acorns I would certainly get
rich. It just continues to blow
my mind that there are so many
this year.
Lynn Revell came through
his surgery with flying colors.
He had three heart bypasses and
they had him sitting in a chair
the next day. Earl Bargeron did
not wait on his surgery but had
to have his gall bladder re-
moved last Wednesday. He is
doing better and actually at-
tended church Sunday morning.
- Betty Walker is just not doing
good, Julia Faye Davis is in the
Lakeland hospital in ICU, Val-
erie Best has been moved to
rehab in Winter Haven, Kaylee


Oden, a 1-week-old great-
granddaughter of Ken Oden, is
in the hospital, Grayson Brad-
dock is having problems with
kidney stones and Hazel Nich-
olson is still in a Tampa hospi-
tal.
Connie Coker made a quick
trip to Miami as daughter
Amber was very sick. She had
been to Peru and it seems lots of
people get sick when visiting
foreign countries. Please pray
for all of these. On a happy
note, Tim Casey announced that
Angie Wamock was now can-
cer-free.
Junior Abbott used to have a.
garbage can and sign not to lit-
ter near the wooden bridge over
Gum Swamp on Hendry Road.
People are beginning to use this
beautiful wooded area as a
garbage can. It is great that
young and old try and catch
fish, but take your garbage with
you. Of course the creek is so
low there can't be many fish
that have survived. Also, some-
one discarded parts of a deer; if
you kill a deer, eat the whole
thing!
Pray for one another and our
nation.



Don't Be Left Outl
HARDEE UVING
DEADLINE
IS THURSDAY AT 5 P.M.


212 Louisiana St
131 S 8th Ave
W Orange St
710 N Florida Ave



210N-Sth Ave
309 N 9th Ave



1148 Downing Circle


Any interested persons) will be heard at this meeting. If any person decides to appeal any
decision made by the Board with respect to this request for which he will need a verbatim
record of the proceedings, he will need to ensure that such verbatim record is made.

The City Commission of the City of Wauchula, Florida does not discriminate upon the
basis of any individual's disability status. This non-discriminatory policy involves every
aspect of the Commission's functions, including ones access to, participation, employ-
ment or treatment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable accommo-
dation as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26, Florida
Statutes, should contact the City Clerk at (863) 773-3131.
11:22c



NOTICE OF PROPOSED AGENCY ACTION BY
THE SOUTHWEST FLORIDA WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT

Notice is given that the District's Proposed Agency Action is approval of
the application for a Water Use Permit to serve Sweetwater Preserve. LLC
activities. The total authorized withdrawal is 897.100 Gallons Per Day,
Peak Month is 2,159,300 Gallons Per Day, and Maximum is 16.704.000
Gallons Per Day. The project is located in Hardee County, Section(s) 22.
23, 24. 25, and 26, Township 35 South, Range 25 East and Section(s) 19
Township 35 South, Range 26 East. The permit applicant is: Sweetwat
Preserve. LLC whose address is PO Box 1416 Wauchula, Florida 33873.
The Permit No. is 20 004600.007. The file(s) pertaining to the project
referred to above is available for inspection Monday through Friday except
for legal holidays, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., at the Southwest Florida Water
Management District, 7601 Highway 301 North Tampa Florida 33637-
6759.

NOTICE OF RIGHTS
Any person whose substantial interests are affected by the District's action regarding this
matter may request an administrative hearing in accordance with Sections 120.569 and
120.57, Florida Statutes (ES.), and Chapter 28-106, Florida Administrative Code (FAC.),
of the Uniform Rules of Procedure. A request for hearing must (1) explain how the sub-
stantial interests of each person requesting the hearing will be affected by the District's
action, or proposed action; (2) state all material facts disputed by each person request-
ing the hearing or state that there are no disputed facts; and (3) otherwise comply with
Chapter 28-106, F.A.C. A request for hearing must be filed with and received by the
Agency Clerk of the District at the District's Brooksville address, 2379 Broad Street,
Brooksville, FL 34604-6899 within 21 days of publication of this notice. Faikure to file a
request for hearing within this time period shall constitute a waiver of any right such per-
son may have to request a hearing under Sections 120.569 and 120.57, FS.

Because the administrative hearing process is designed to formulate final agency action,
the filing of a petition means that the Districts final action may be different from the posi-
tion taken by it in this notice of agency action. Persons whose substantial interests wtM
be affected by any such final decision of the District in this matter have the right to peti-
tion to become a party to the proceeding, in accordance with the requirements set forth
above.

Mediation pursuant to Section 120.573, F.S., to settle an administrative dispute
regarding the District's final action in this matter is not available prior to the filing of a
request for hearing. 112c


Fort Green News
By Rflla Cooper

773-6710


NOTICE OF MEETING OF
CITY OF WAUCHULA
CODE ENFORCEMENT BOARD
225 E MAIN ST., SUITE 105
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2012
5:30 RP.M.


OLD CASES:


Santa Anita Mares
Jubilee Ministries International
Jubilee Ministries International
Rodolfo Lopez


We Are Wireless


,--- 767-0260

JP's Smokehouse BB5Q


"AWARD WINNING BBQ"
Fresh Homemade Sides

Mon.- Fri. 11 a.m. 9 p.m.
Saturday & Sunday -* Closed


103 E. Main St. Downtown Wauchula"


40 J.







10A The Herald-Advocate, November 22, 2012


WES Recognizes Its Top Cat Award Winners

I..A A


First graders known to be considerate of others were (front) Luke Roberts, Eduardo Mi-
randa-Cortez, B.J. Johnson, Angel Garcia, Isaiah Clark, Damian Aleman and Jorge Mi-
randa; (middle) Lisa Fimbres, Lucy Chavez, Kadence Harris, Esther Velasco, Alexa
Salazar, Daniela Molina, Joale Jefferson, Sarah Long and Jaymee Lang; (back) Stevie
Schontag, Kody Giles, Maria Antunez, Thomas Esquivel, Kellon Lindsey, Rey Mier and
Hayden Humphreys. Not pictured was Zephanniah Lopez.


Students assuming responsibility in fifth grade were (front) Griffin Clark, Kein Knight,
Celso Zamora and Joel DeSantiago; (middle) Renell Herrera, Roxana Garcia, Maria
Lopez, Cristal Miranda, Taleia Moreno and Enrique Velazquez; (back) Weston Schraeder,
Tomas Cardoza, Honesty Sandoval, Jolie Brown and Alyssa Irlandi. Not pictured was
Tony Guerrero.


Students using time effectively in second grade were (front) Marco Montanez, R.J. Cabr-
era, Amy Fimbres, Madi Hall, Mason Shepard Ond Alberto Sierra; (middle) Diana Jaimes,
Roza Poucher, Salud Villafuerte, Malen Rosas, Maddie Jane Schraeder, Alyssa Mendez,
Maddison Justiss and Miah Velazquez; (back) Makayla Waters, Corey Hill, Leah Judah,
Marlen Rosas, Emilee Worden, Boone Pazzaglia, Diego Mayorido and Martin Cardoza.
Not pictured was Madisyn Hines. '


Third graders cooperating with others and receiving the Top Cat award were (front) An-
drew St. Fort, Ismael Mejia, Brin Conerly, Hunter Poucher, Joseph Hamilton, Ricardo
Martinez and Reynaldo Gaona; (middle) Johana Ortiz-Diaz, Faith Davis, Macy Tyson,
Austin Barker, Tori Durden, Abby Burnett, Maria Moreno and Yosvin Perez; (bapk) Adri-
anna Mier, Sierra Helvey, Jasmine Navarro, Gerardo Valerio, Haven Rimes and Nicole
Martinez. Not pktured were Ashlyn Willis and Katelyn Clardy.


Fourth graders showing good behavior were (front) Vicky Lopez, Lizbeth Morales, Riana
Sutton and Da'Myah Carlton; (middle) Alyssa Perez, Leimy Moreno, Christian Montanez,
Haven Gray, Brittany Lopez, Star Parker, Sailor Ullrich and Shaylee Ragan; (back) Ellie
Juarez, Kiara Coronado, Riley Justiss, Seth McCall, Bictor Molina and Marcos Martinez-
Flores. Not pictured was Emery Smith.


With the end of the first nine weeks of the school year come the Top Cat awards for
Wauchula Elementary School students. Kindergarteners showing good citizenship were
(front row, from left) Lincoln Lamboy, Ashton Bass, Shawn Rimes, Richard Carmona,
Hagen Bryan, Luis Ramirez and Christopher Ford; (middle) Alizae Bias, Addi Duncan,
Jaci Hall, Emily Miranda, Aiden Outley, Kayl Caraway, Lennox Ullrich, Jacky Flores and
Lily Lambert; (back) Aaliyah Bruno-Perez, Renato Delacruz, Laina Canary, Ava Roberts,
Chris Cook, Justin Griffin, Aliah Maldonado, Jordyn Hodges, Sam Palmer and Gabriela
Leon-Santiago.


First Steps students named as Top Cats were (front) Jimson Cimeus, Valentin Lopez, Lu-
ciana Santos-Campos and Tristan Valdiviez; (back) Daisy Hilario, San Martin Herrera,
Muhammad Sihwail, Cearra Medeiros, Lidia Valencia-Diaz, Damien Rodriguez and Carla
Flores Diaz. Not pictured was Samuel Suarez.



City of Bowling Green
Notice of Public Hearing

The City of Bowling Green will hold a public hearing to consider the following proposed
Ordinance on Tuesday, December 11, 2012 at 6:30p.m.
ORDINANCE 2012-08

AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF BOWLING GREEN,
FLORIDA, AMENDING THE BOWLING GREEN COMPREHENSIVE PLAN, REVISING
THE INFRASTRUCTURE, CONSERVATION, INTERGOVERNMENTAL
COORDINATION AND CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT ELEMENTS, BASED ON THE 10-
YEAR WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORK PLAN INCORPORATED HEREIN;
PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; AND PROVIDING
FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.

The proposed Ordinance will be considered at a public hearing before the City Commission
on Tuesday, December 11, 2012 at 6:30p.m., or as soon thereafter as the matters may be
heard. The public hearing will be held at the Bowling Green City Hall, 104 E. Main Street,
Bowling Green, Florida.

The proposed Ordinance and a copy of this notice may be inspected by contacting the
City Clerk at (863)375-2255 during normal business hours, Monday through Friday.
All interested parties may appear at the public hearing and be heard with respect to the
proposed Ordinance. Comments may also be submitted in writing prior to the hearings to
the City Clerk, Bowling Green City Hall, 104 E. Main Street, Bowling Green, Florida, 33834,
or during the public hearing. Persons with disabilities requiring special accommodations
in order to participate in the public hearings should contact the City Clerk at (863)375-2255
at least 48 hours in advance of the public hearing to request such accommodations.

PURSUANT TO SECTION 286.0105, FLORIDA STATUES, IF ANY PERSON DECIDES TO
APPEAL ANY DECISION MADE BY THE CITY COMMISSION WITH RESPECT TO ANY
MATTER CONSIDERED AT THIS PUBLIC HEARING, SUCH PERSON WILL NEED A
RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS AND FOR SUCH PURPOSE, SUCH PERSON MAY
NEED TO ENSURE THAT A VERBATIM RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS IS MADE, IN-
CLUDING THE TESTIMONY AND EVIDENCE UPON WHICH THE APPEAL IS TO BE
BASED.
Pamela S. Northup,
City Clerk
11:22c






November 22. 2012, The Herald-Advocate 11A


Evers On Judicial

Committee


Ken Evers. attorney for the
Hardee County Commission. is
among nine people who will
have a hand in determining who
will be a circuit judge serving
Hardee. Highlands and Polk
counties.
The group, chaired by Bartov,
attorney Cassandra Larkin
Denmark, will conduct inter-
views next Thursday and Friday.
Nov. 29-30, with the 36 people
who want to be chosen to fill the
vacancy on the Tenth Judicial
Circuit Court due to the death of
Circuit Judge Karla Foreman
Wright on Oct. 1.
Other members of the Nom-
inating Committee are Be
jamin W. Hardin Jr., Richard E.
Straughn, Timothy McCaus-
land, Victor Smith, Donald
Wilson Jr., John Hugh Shannon
and Robert Swaine.
After interviewing all the can-
didates, the committee will nar-
row the list to from three to six
applicants to recommend to
Gov. Rick Scott for his appoint-
ment to fill the circuit judge
vacancy.
The candidates, in alphabetic


4 LocalsI

Search
Among the two dozen ap-
pomintees to a local college
search board, four are from
Hardee County.
The group will begin meet-
ings on Dec. 5 to narrow the
field of applicants to be the next
president of South Florida State
College. Norman L. Stephens Jr.
will retire June 30, 2012, after
11 years as the college's third
president.
Named to the search commit-
tee from Hardee County are
Ken Lambert, Terry Atchley,
Teresa Crawford and Dr. Frank
Gibbs.
Lambert will chair the com-
mittee. He has been a college
trustee representing Hardee
County, is vice president of
enterprise solutions for Know-
ledge-Based Marketing Group,
and is currently a member of the
Wauchula City Commission.
",Atchiey js a college I*un-
dation Board member, former
Hardee County commissioner
and presently is Wauchula city
manager.
Crawford, a 1983 graduate of
then South Florida Community
College, is presently director at
the Hardee campus of the col-
lege. She is formerly chairper-
son of the Hardee County
School Board and was recently
re-elected to that board.
Gibbs, who began his educa-
tional career in the Hardee
County school system, retired
after 39 years in public educa-
tion at the district level and has
also recently retired from the
Heartland Educational Consor-
tium in Lake Placid.
"Members of the Presidential
Search Committee were select-
ed for their diverse expertise and
for their understanding of the
college and its mission," said
Tami Cullens, chair of the col-
lege district board of trustees.
"To find members of the com-
mittee, we began by asking col-
lege students and employees if
they would like to participate.
then asked trustees to suggest
people in the community who
would be an asset to us in the
search for the next SFSC presi-
dent. We wanted a balance in
gender, ethnicity and geogra-
phy. We wanted educators and
business people. We particular-
ly wanted people who have a
great love and concern for our


order, are GregorN Paul Abara,.
Jon Ken Abdone.. John K
Aguero. Robert Joseph An-
tonello. Lawrence Anzalone.
Heather Elizabeth White Beato.
Harold Virgil Bennett II.
Kimble Clark --K.C." Bou-
chillon. David Ralph Car-
michael. Alison B. Copley.
Willye Malveaux Dent and
Christopher Arguin Desrochers.
Also. Gary Richard Ellis.
Susan Barber Flood. Eric S.
Gardner Jr.. Mary Catherine
Green, Jalal A. Harb, Larry S.
Helms, William James Lobb,
John A. Naser, Stacy Robinson
Nickerson, Hope Marie Pattey,
-;teve Pincket and Angela R.
Pulido.
And, Charlann Jackson
Sanders, Lawrence David
Shearer, Andrea Teves Smilth,
Anthony Wayne Surber, Mark
A. Taylor, Christine Trakas
Thornhill, Chrystal Shellette
Thornton, Amanda Maxine
Traweek, William John
Twyford, David V. Ward, Kirk
S. Warren and Cheryl D.
Westmoreland.





On SFSC

Board
community," Cullins conclud-
ed.
Other members of the com-
mittee include students Zach
Osha and Abilene Rouch, and
faculty/staff members Beth
Andrews, Don Appelquist,
Eddie Cuencas, Lindsay Lynch,
Colleen Rafatti, Bobby Scon-
yers, Dr. Walteria Tucker and
June Weyrauch.
From DeSoto County are:
Tim Backer, Class of '75, a real
estate appraiser and college
trustee; Martha Jo Markey, who
retired after 38 years in teach-
ing andT administration with the
DeSoto County School District.
Julia Burnett is Lake Placid
Middle School principal and
Tealy Williams, principal at
Avon Park High School. Jan
Shoop is a Highland County
School Board member.
College Foundation Board
members are: dentist Dr. David
Willey; Florida Hospital Heart-
land CEO Tim Cook; citrus
grower and former college
trustee Joan Hartt; and Atchley.
The final members are col-
lege trustees Lana Puckorius, a
retired investment adviser, and
Kris Rider, a law firm manager.
The group will first meet with
search consultant Dr. Jeff
Hockaday to discuss the com-
mittee responsibilities and the
Sunshine Law. The work will
begin in earnest in late February
and March after applications
are received.


~Chil
S Chic
S Chee


Several people showed up to congratulate Kaylee Mancillas on Friday. With her are (front row, from left) Irene
Castanon; Debbie Mancillas, her mother; Kaylee; Gayle Knight, her mentor; Dr. Michele Polk, Hardee Senior High
principal; and Angel Mancillas, her sister; (back row) Meg Moore, student advocate; Megan Christian, guidance
counselor; Woody Caligan, deputy superintendent; Todd Durden and Mary Farr, assistant principals; Ron Be/den,
guidance counselor; and Ismael Mancillas, her father.


HHS Senior A State Fellowship Finalist


By MARIA TRUJILLO
For The Herald-Advocate
Getting called to the front
office at school can get any stu-
dent's heart racing.
Luckily for senior Kaylee
Mancillas, getting called to the
office at Hardee Senior High
was a great thing.
Irene Castanon, program
coordinator for Take Stock in
Children in Hardee County,
gave a bewildered Kaylee the
good news that she had been
chosen as one of 12 finalists in
Florida for Take Stock in
Children's "Leaders 4 Life
Fellowship."
Several thousand students
are involved in Take Stock in
Children, and Kaylee was very
excited to learn that she had
been picked as one of the final-
ists.
Kaylee also was happy to
learn she would be receiving a
Macintosh laptop computer,
something which her mentor,
Gayle Knight, said she has been
wanting and will certainly need
when she starts college.
Knight has been Kaylee's
mentor,. si.igcte_ beginning of
seventh grade. She went on to
say that Kaylee w'A accepted to
the University of Central Flor-
ida and has worked hard to
maintain her grades and partici-
pate in extracurricular activi-
ties.
According to Knight, she is
National Honor Society presi-
dent, she is in Lionettes, was
voted "Most Likely to Succeed"
by her class, is in dual enroll-
ment and was crowned Junior
Miss her eighth-grade year.
Kaylee had some work to do
to be chosen as a finalist. "She
had to write two personal
essays, which could not exceed


more than 1,000 words each,
obtain two recommendation let-
ters and send her high-school
transcript," said Castanon.
Those essays had to be based
on her five-year education plar.
and her family or personal cir-
cumstances. She was also cho-
sen based on her demonstration
of strong leadership skills,
moral character and academic
success.
In order for Kaylee to be
considered for a Leaders 4 Life
Fellowship, she must now sub-
mit a video essay that will be
reviewed by a state selection
committee.
The video must include
details about her home life, her
interests, how Take Stock in
Children has helped her and
how she wishes to help others.
The video can be a maximum of
five minutes.
The winners of this fellow-
ship will be announced in early
January and will be recognized
during a special reception at
Take Stock in Children's annual
State Leadership Conference in
Tallahassee on March 5-7.
The Leaders 4 Life Fellow-
ship program was created in
partnership with the Asofsky
Family Foundation. It is a
statewide non-profit organiza-
tion that helps to break the
cycle of poverty.
This is done by providing
scholarships and mentors to
help students excel in universi-
ty environments.
If chosen, Kaylee will
receive leadership training and
development and funding of up
to $10,000 annually to cover the
costs of housing, food, text-
books, supplies, transportation
and other college-related ex-
penses.


PHOTOS BY MARIA TRUJILLO
Here, Kaylee Mancillas accepts an envelope that con-
firms she is one of 12 state finalists for a "Leaders 4 Life
Fellowship." Passing on the good news is program coor-
dinator Irene Castanon. Kaylee was surprised by the
presentation, and grew emotional when she noticed her
parents and younger sister were there to congratulate
her.


M SPECIALS ~
Make Your Thanksgiving Dinner reservations early.


Roast Turkey & Dressing with mashed potatoes and green beans .. .$9.95

Pot Roast with mashed potatoes and green beans ................ $9.95

Ham Steak with mashed potatoes and green beans .............. .$9.95


Prime Rib with choice of potato ..................... ..... $15.95

Fried or Broiled Grouper with choice of potato ............. .$12.95

Grilled or Broiled Salmon with choice of potato ............ .$12.95

Fried or Broiled Seafood Combo with choice of potato ...... $13.95

Grilled Chicken Breast with choice of potato .................$8.95

Chicken Tenders with choice of potato ..................... $8.95

New York Strip Steak with choice of potato ................ $14.95

dren's Specials 14.95 ~ All of the above dinners include
ken Tenders with fries our fabulous salad bar, soup
eseburger with fries of the day and our homenwmad
baked bread and butter.
Thanksgiving Day Hours

7:00 a.m. 2:00 p.m.


]Nicholas' Fami j Kestaurant ,f

615 Hjw!-. 17 Nortk *0Wauckula *775-2-555


le


YOUR

BUSINESS

COULD

APPEAR

HERE

TOO!!
Contact
Nancy Davis,
Kim Reas or
Trayce Daniels
At

773-3255


~2:
~g' ~'
'I, ~
.1 w
Ii ~
H


f





/.
*^





12A The Herald-Adocate. November 22.2012


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PAGE ONE


Trucks Collide


On Rural Road


By MARIA TRUJILLO
For The Hera d-Advocate
An accident last Wednesday
sent a 51-syear-old man to the
hospital.
William 0. Barfield of Lake
Placid was injured after his
truck collided with one driven
by 64-year-old James E. Inman
Jr. of Timmonsville, S.C.
Barfield drove a 2(004 Mack
dump truck and Inman was
driving a 2006 Freightliner
semi.
According to the report of
Florida Highway Patrol Tpr.
Jesse DeBoom, the crash hap-
pened at 2:04 p.m. on Steve
Roberts Special in Zolfo
Springs.
Inman was traveling north on
Clifton Bryan Road approach-
ing the intersection of Steve
Roberts Special while Barfield
was traveling west on Steve
Roberts approaching that same
intersection.
Inman reportedly began to
slow down because of the rum-
ble strips on the road before
getting to the intersection but


didn't see the stop sign on the
corner as it had somchoA been
turned sidev.ays.
Inman kept going through
the intersection where the front
of Barfields truck collided with
the right side of lnman's semi.
The report says Inman was
unaware that he was supposed
to stop prior to the intersection.
Both vehicles traveled across
Steve Roberts onto Kelly
Roberts Road. Inman came to a
final rest facing in a northerly
direction on the west grass
shoulder of Kelly Roberts.
Barfield also came to rest in the
same position 50 feet north of
Inman, said the report.
Both men were wearing seat-
belts.
Even so, Barfield was seri-
ously injured and transported to
Florida Hospital Heartland in
Sebring.
Because of the crash, a diesel
fuel spill, injuries and road
blockage traffic was detoured
for a while after the accident.
No charges were filed.


Accident Closes SR 66


By MARIA TRUJILLO
For The Herald-Advocate
A single vehicle crash last
Wednesday shut down a local
highway for two hours.
According to Highway Pa-
trol reports, the accident oc-
curred at 12:20 p.m. on SR 66.
It involved 77-year-old Mi-
chael Hickman from Brooks-
ville. Hickman was driving a
2009 Nissan Titan and pulling a
25-foot travel trailer at the time
of the accident.
He was traveling west on SR 66
just west of Johnston Road. The
accident occurred when Hick-
man tried to drive on the north
paved shoulder of the road, said
the press release from the
Florida Highway Patrol.
He did so to let other traffic
go around his vehicle. How-
ever, the front right tire exited
the paved shoulder onto the
grass shoulder of the road, caus-
ing Hickman tolose control,
said Trooper Jesse Deboom.
Hickman then went off the

*I g *f]'
*The


road and into the ditch on the
north side of SR 66. He at-
tempted to get back on. the road
but ended up overcorrecting,
says the report.
The trailer he was pulling
then overturned on its right side
and caused Hickman's vehicle
to also turn on its right side.
He came to rest facing a
southerly direction across both
lanes on the road. The road was
closed for about two hours after
the crash, says the report.
Hickman was wearing a seat
belt and sustained no injuries.
He was charged with careless
driving.


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herda d-Acvocate
Would it be better to replace a
pair of bridges and do only tvo
miles of paving, or should all
4.4 miles of pa-ing be done and
forget about the bridges'?
That v.as the dilemma facing
Hardee County Commissioners
at their meeting last week.
The two-part question was
preceded by a decision to award
the low bid for work on Sweet-
water Road construction to
Ajax Paving for the $3.267.-
557.42 project. County Engi-
neer/Public Works Director Ken
Wheeler explained that it was-
n't the lowest bid, but was the
lowest responsive or DOT-qual-
ified bid and the commission
approved it. There will be a
reduction change order to bring
it within the $2.228,991.09
allotted for the project.
Once the contractor was cho-
sen, Wheeler explained the
limit of the available state De-
partment of Transportation
funds called SCOP (Small
County Operations Program)
for this project and, to come
within those limits, there was a
decision to be made.
Wheeler said there wasn't
enough money to do all 4.4
miles of Sweetwater Road
paving from Crewsville Road to
SR 66, or if they did, they
would not have enough money
to replace two ancient single-
lane wooden bridges. He rec-
ommended doing Change Order
1A replacing both wooden
bridges with two-lane concrete
structures and paving only 1.75
miles to 2 miles of road. He said
right of way for bridge replace-
ments is being donated by con-
cerned residents of the area and
staff could complete the bal-
ance of the paving.
The alternative Change Order
1B would complete all 4.4
miles of road but exclude both
bridges and about 950 feet of
roadwork approaching the tim-
ber bridges. A similar situation
was done on Johnston road
about a dozen years ago and the -


unpaved approach and wooden
bridge has still not been com-
pleted.
Outgoing Commission Chair-
man Minor Br\ant said he
"would prefer to get all the road
done. but deferred to Commis-
sioner Grads Johnson as Sweet-
water Road is in his district.
After clarifying that the
change order was county-initi-
ated, Johnson said it would be
difficult to get any more state
funding for bridges with the
economy the way it is and he
would prefer that the bridges be
done and let staff finish the
roadwork.
Commissioner Rick Knight
agreed. "We can use our man-
power to build the road. but we
can't use our manpower to
build bridges and there's no
telling when more bridge
money may come."
The commission approved
Option 1 A on a 4-0 vote. Com-
missioner Sue Birge was absent
as she was attending a meeting
in Tallahassee.
In other action, the commis-
sion:
-acknowledged plaques of
appreciation for outgoing com-
missioners Minor Bryant and
Dale Johnson at their final
meeting.
Dale Johnson presented a
plaque to Bryant for his 20
years of service as a commis-
sioner. "I will really appreciate
being able to talk to him again.
We haven't been able to say
more than "hello" or "goodbye"
in the last eight years we've
been in office together."
Both commissioners were
presented plaques by Chamber
of Commerce representative
Steven Southwell for their com-
bined 28 years of service to the
community "in and out of this
room."
-approved a plan for public
works staff to complete drain-
ing and related work in the
Industrial Development Au-
thority's Commerce Park
expansion with understanding
that reimbursement would be


forthcoming from the IDA.
-again tabled a decision on
the proposed flood hazard ordi-
nance first discussed on Nov. 1.
Commissioners still want a rep-
resentative from the Federal
Emergency MNanagement Agen-
cy (FEMA) to come explain its
flood plain maps and why they
should have any impact on pole
barns and other structures not
covered by the Florida Building
Code.
-decided to not pursue a
Cease & Desist order against
Easton Rentals, a SR 62 busi-
ness which has steadily refused
to get a Special Exception to
operate. The company says it is
closing its business on or before
Feb. 1 and moving to other
parts of the nation. (It has sites
in Ohio, Texas and New Mex-
ico). With the holidays, it would
take at least that long to file a
civil action to get a Cease &
Desist Order or to apply code
enforcement statutes, said
county attorney Ken Evers.
-acknowledged revisions to
the Economic Development
Council bylaws and approved
appointment of EDC members
Diana Youmans, Doug Jensen,
Dorothy Conerly and Paul
Roberts to slots on the IDA.
That will bring the IDA mem-
bership to the maximum of its 9
to 13 range recently approved
by the commission.
There was a discussion of
what to do with an IDA/EDC
member who missed three con-
secutive meetings. Did that


need to come tetoie tie comn-
mission or could the ID)A/EDC
decide that there was a legiti-
mate reason, in effect an ex-
cused absence if a person was
hospitalized or had extended ill-
ness in the family, etc.
It was also clarified that
by laws now say a member must
be a qualified elector in Hardee
County. Formerly, it was O.K.
if a person worked or had a
business in the county, even if
he/she lived elsewhere.
Although they are separate
legal entities, both groups are
yielding to the preference of the
public and the commission that
most of their actions fall under
the Sunshine Law. Traditio-
nally, the EDC has been the arm
operating out of the Sunshine
because of the confidentiality
required to develop a business
rapport and it comes into the
Sunshine when IDA is ready to
purchase/invest or take other
action.




DOMESTIC

VIOLENCE

Don't Know Where
To Turn For Help?

CALL THE CRISIS LINE

1 (800) 500-1119
tfc-dh


Please call (8631713-0807
or visit us at 2677 US lwy 17 l. AllngMreonFL33
Mon-Frl7-5pm, Sat8-2pm


The Herald-Advocate


Thursday. November 22, 2012


Road Or Bridges?


LLOYD HALL invites all
his friends and neighbors

.. wto comesee him at

t. llREENWOOl


205 N. Charleston FortMeade
1-800-673-9512 .
www.directchevy.com






2B T[he Herald-Advocate. November 22. 2012


Hardee


COURTESY PHOTOS
Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Johnson on their wedding day in 1972.
Johnsons Celebrate Their
40th Wedding Anniversary


Jacki and Jerry Johnson cele-
brated their 40th wedding an-
niversary on Friday.
Jacalyn Sue Wotherspoon
became the bride of Jerry Dean
Johnson on Nov. 16, 1972, at the
First Baptist Church in
Bradenton.
The Johnsons have three chil-
dren: Amy, who is married to
Scott Bryan; Michelle, who is
married to Shawn Durrance; and
Weston, who is married to
Kimberlyn Cason. Their chil-
dren have given them six grand-
children: Laina, Seth, Kara,
Kaden, Linsey and Bentlee.


Jerry Johnson has been self-
employed most of his life, and
together the couple own "Johns
On Wheels," a portable toilet
company.
Jacki Johnson has worked at
Sthe Hardee County Tax Collec-
tor's Office for over 30 years,
and will soon begin serving
Hardee County as its next elect-
ed tax collector, taking office in
January.
Joining in the celebration of
the Johnsons' 40 years of happy
marriage were family members
and friends.


. ,a '* <


Jacki and Jerry Johnson today.


Share The Good Word!
HARDEE LIVING
DEADLINE
IS THURSDAY AT 5 PRM.


Living

COMMUNITY ACTION AGENCY

diFiTori r&a


A Daily Thought
THURSDAY
There is a time for every-
thing, and a season for every
activity under heaven: a time
to be born and a time to die,
a time to plant and a time to
uproot,
Ecc/esiastes 3 1-2 (NIV)
FRIDAY
(There is) a time to kill and a
time to heal, a time to tear
down and a time to build, a
time to weep and a time to
laugh, a time to mourn and a
time to dance,
Ecclesiastes 3:2-4 (NIV)
SATURDAY
(There is) a time to scatter
stones and a time to gather
them, a time to embrace and
a time to refrain, a time to
search and a time to give up,
Ecclesiastes 3:5-6 (NIV)
SUNDAY
(There is) a time to tear and
a time to mend, a time to be
silent and a time to speak, a
time to love and a time to
hate, a time for war and a'
time for peace.
Ecclesiastes 3:7-8 (NIV)
MONDAY
What does the worker gain
from his toil? I have seen the
burden God has laid on
man. He has made every-
thing beautiful in its time. He
has also set eternity in the
hearts of men, yet they can-
not fathom what God has
done from beginning to end.
Ecclesiastes 3:9-11 (NIV)
TUESDAY
I know that there is nothing
better for men than to be
happy and do good while
they live. That everyone may
eat and drink, and find satis-
faction. in all his toil this is
the gift of God.
Ecclesiastes 3:12-13 (NIV)
WEDNESDAY
I know that everything God
does will endure forever;
nothing can be added to it,
and nothing taken from it.
God does it so that men will
revere Him.
Ecclesiastes 3:14 (NIV)
All verses are excerpted from
The Holy Bible: (KJV) King
James Version; (ME) The
Message; (NCV) New Cen-
tury Version; (NEB) New
English Bible; (NIV) New
International Version; (NLT)
New Living Translation (RSV)
Revised Standard Version;
(PME) Phillips Modern Eng-
lish; and (TLB) The Living
Bible.


BLACK FRIDAY & SATURDAY


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'Bowling green Church of god


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Annual B3azaar
Saturday, December 1, 2012
8:00 AM 2:00 PM

Homemade Baked Goods

Crafts Clothes Plants

*Rummage Sale Items
\
Hamburgers, Hotdogs, Drinks

& ^ ^\ &Pie by the slice ii|


FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH |
4910 N. CHURCH AVE. BOWLING GREEN c


I PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
Shujwana Lamy, family development specialist with the Manatee Community Action
Agency which also serves Hardee County, spoke to the Hardee Rotary Club on
Wednesday, Nov. 7, at the Java Cafe. The Wauchula office is located in Room 201, West
Orange Street. The FSS Program helps families on personal goals and dreams to
achieve self sufficiency. There are one-on-one appointments to help individuals under-
stand their finances and make informed financial decisions. There is financial assis-
tance to help individuals pay energy bills. There are counseling appointments available
to first-time home buyers and individuals facing home foreclosure. From left are Janet
Gilliard, Shujwana Lamy, and club president Michael Kelly. The agency's phone num-
ber number is 767-8408.




Its Fruitcake Time

Now Available

ee-A






November 22. 2012, The Herald-Advocate 3B


This week in history, as
researched from the archival
pages of The Florida Ad-
vocate, the Hardee County
Herald and The Herald-Ad-
vocate ...

75 YEARS AGO
It seems as though citrus fruit
in Hardee County this year spe-
cializes in growing in large
clusters, especially on the grove
of J.M. Frazier, who brought in
four clusters Tuesday after-
noon. The largest cluster was
grapefruit, 21 fully matured
fruit having grown in one
bunch.

Hardee County hunters will
take to the fields and woods
tomorrow as the 1937-38 hunt-
ing season opens. However,
they will find a new set of laws
governing them this season on
the closing dates for killing
game. For doves, the season
closes on Dec. 31 in this coun-
ty, while on Jan. 15, the entire
season closes.

A memorial shaft has been
dedicated to the 500 who died
in the 1935 hurricane at
Matecumbe. Let's hope no
more of those shafts will ever
have to be unveiled.

50 YEARS AGO
The city of Wauchula hopes
to start getting into the
Christmas spirit next week by
putting up a beautiful array of


new holiday decorations in the
uptown section.

The Hardee County Fair's
first dog show in many years
was a thumping success with 49
dogs, representing 19 different
breeds, participating. Lynn
Henderson's fluffy poodle
walked away with honors as the
grand champion male and a
pointer owned by O.C. Coker
III was named grand champion
female.

Miss Lynda Stoner, daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Robert C.
Stoner, is leaving Dec. 2 for
three months of training at
Shepard Psychiatric Hospital
near Baltimore, Md. Lynda, a
1960 graduate of Hardee
County High School, has been
attending Jackson Memorial
School of Nursing in Miami,
and will receive her RN degree
upon completion of the three
months.

25 YEARS AGO
In the second of two public
hearings the Hardee County
Board of Adjustment voted
against the recommendations of
the Zoning Board and denied a
special exception for the pro-
posed SR 62 prison site.

A post office has always been
a focal point in every town or
city, and it holds true for the
Wauchula Post Office. On
Sunday, Nov. 15, a warm and


I Way Back Wihen


to his current rank.

The re on of graduates
from the Wauchula; Hardee


County High School for the
,ears 1941-44 will be held Nov.
22 at the Wauchula Elks Club.
Those attending will begin


gathering at 11 a.m. The school
bell will sound at 12:30 p.m.,
everyone will be seated, and the
activities of the day will begin.


Legal Briefs
y Gale Moore & Candace Preston
Attorneys At Law


CHILD ABUSE
Florida Statutes Chapter 39 is the law on "proceedings relat-
ing to children." Three areas of concern are identified in the statute:
child abuse, child abandonment or neglect of a child.
Often the legal definitions can be confusing to the public, and
child service agencies are bound by confidentiality in specific
cases.
A common statement one hears frequently is: "It has gotten to
where you can't spank your child." In all fairness, there has been
some confusion in law as to what is defined as discipline, and there
are many questions.
Chapter 39.01 (2) does specifically state that, "Corporal disci-
pline of a child by a parent or legal custodian for disciplinary pur-
poses does not in itself constitute abuse when it does not result in
h ,pt4o the child ., , -
4,Sthe que.tions-'to, side are: Is the discipline using only
the hand or doe, t include using a belt, switch, or hair brush? What
is the nature and extent of the injury, if any? Is the discipline the
same as an angry attack? Were there resulting marks or bruises?
Were these bruises or marks significant?
As to the issue of abandonment, another common statement is:
"I only left my child with grandparent/friend while I was having
financial hardship."
Did the parent leave the third-party authorization to address
the child's school and medical concerns? Has the parent made any
financial contributions to the child's care? How long is the child
left with relatives or friends'? Did the parent maintain a substantial
and positive relationship with the child?
"I just left a few dirty dishes in the sink." This is a question of
neglect.
Most often people think of failure to provide adequate food
and shelter, but neglect is not just a dirty house. Does the child have
sufficient food'? Does the child have adequate clothing? If not, was
the parent offered and declined related social services?
Has this deprivation caused the child's development to be
impaired? Has the parent provided medical and dental care? Is the
child missing numerous days of school because of the inability of
the parents to provide care'?
Child abuse is sometimes a difficult topic to discuss, but it is
critical for the community to be aware of the issues. To report
abuse, call 1-800-96-ABUSE.


Wauchula Watch
By Ofc. Amy Drake
Wauchula Police Department


THANKSGIVING THIEVES
This Thanksgiving many will be away from their homes,
either visiting family or out looking for bargains in the stores.
Unfortunately, this is also the time criminals use to prey on unsus-
pecting homeowners.
Too many times individuals have become too comfortable
believing they won't be a victim of a crime, and this opens many
.up to a devastating holiday season.
In a small community most people can remember when you
could leave your car and home unlocked and they would never be
tampered with. Unfortunately times are changing, even in a small
town.
Theft of personal property, often from unlocked cars and
homes, is the most common crime.
Remember that an unlocked car or home is as good as a free
yard sale for crooks. Given the right opportunity and ability', all
your gifts can be removed from your unlocked car or house within
a matter of seconds. Hide it. lock it. or lose it!
This holiday season take a couple extra minutes to ensure that
your cars and homes are secure. Many crooks are also aware of
your secret "hide-a-key" locations. Make sure that all doors and
indows'are securely locked, and this includes garages. This is
ven if you are only to be gone for a few minutes.
When leaving your residence for an extended period of time.
have a family member or trusted neighbor watch your hou.se. Keep
indoor and outdoor lights on an automatic timer and leave a radio
on for noise.
Officers urge citizens to report all suspicious activity to your
local Police Department and Sheriffs Office. What you see and
report could make a world of difference in someone's holiday.
For more information on safety and other areas of interest.
look the Wauchula Police Department up on Facebook or on our
newly remodeled website www.wauchulapolice.com.
Happy holidays from the Wauchula Police Department'


breeze afternoon, the Wauchula
Post Office was again a focal
point It is a noted mark on the
calendar a-, the day for the
grand opening

Jeannie MoseleN and Kim
Hensle a:re DCT Students of
the W\eek.

10 YEARS AGO
Tvwo members of the Hardee
High s',a im ,quad will represent
it at the state meet in Fort
Lauderdale this weekend. When
the Class IA District 5 meet at
Winter Haven was over last
week, sophomore boys captain
Calvin Brutus had claimed a
district championship in the 100
breaststroke and junior Megan
Bumby had broken a school
record while placing second in
the diving competition.

Marine Corps Pfc. Clenton P.
Judah, son of Ferol L. Judah of
Wauchula and John T. Judah of
Bowling Green, recently com-
pleted basic training at Marine
Corps Recruit Depot, Parris
Island, S.C., and was promoted


MISSION THRIFT STORE, INC.

123 N. 7th Ave., WVauchula, FL
Store Hours: 10 5 (10 2 Sat.)
773-3069

Closed Wednesday & Thursday
For Thanksgiving


Happy Thbanksgiving


Nov. 23, 2012

Black Friday Bag Sale!

L sFriday Sale Hours: 1 6pm
Thank You Hardee For All Your Support And Donations
Phone # 773-3069 for donation pick up
Lsocl 1:1522c www.Facebook/groups/Missionthriftstoreinc







4B The Herald-Advocate, November 22, 2012


City To Crack


Down On Animals


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Wauchula has decided to
increase its animal control fines
and fees.
*At its workshop on Nov. 5,
the Wauchula City Commission
discussed a resolution to
increase fees/fines for care of
dogs and cats within the city
limits. The fee/fine increases to
meet the city's actual costs.
Capt. Thomas Harris, opera-
tions officer for the Wauchula
Police Department, said later it
would not change the ordinance
already on the books, but was a
way to ensure that the city does
not lose money on enforcing the
1999 ordinance.
During the discussion, sever-
al newer City Commission
members said they did not real-
ize there was an ordinance or
that people had to have a
license for cats or dogs. They
also raised questions about larg-
er animals..
That discussion resulted in a
new ordinance updating the
1999 ordinance. First reading of
proposed ordinance 2012-04
was held at the Nov. 13 com-
mission meeting. The final
reading will be at the Dec. 11
commission meeting.
Ordinance 99-851 says it is in
the best interest of the public
health, safety and general wel-
fare to adopt the animal control
ordinance and provide for issu-
ance of citations for violations.
It specifically makes the per-
son responsible for harboring,
feeding or maintaining a dog or
cat for three consecutive days
or more to be considered the
owner or custodian and respon-
sible for it.
It also considers a nuisance
cat or dog to be one which
habitually barks, whines,
howls, meows, cries, screams
or makes any other objection-
able noise resulting in an unrea-
sonable annoyance or disturbs
the peace by habitually or
repeatedly destroying or soiling
public property.
A dog is considered danger-
ous if it has previously bitten or
injured a person, is a breed with
a known propensity for being
dangerous or having unpre-
" dictable behaVior with the pop .
sibility of violence. or j dog
trained to b&e'v61ent.
The original ordinance
requires an annual rabies vacci-
nation for every dog or cat over
three months of age and for the
animal to wear a valid inocula-
tion tag at all times. A rabies
identification collar can be
worn in lieu of tags.
Section 4-5 of that ordinance
also requires an annual license
for each dog or cat a person
owns. Cost is $10 for non-
neutered dogs or cats and $5 for
neutered dogs and cats. Failure
to annually purchase a license is
a violation of the ordinance.
There is a section specifically
addressing those who breed
dogs or cats for sale and
explains how to be registered as
a breeder.
The next section of the ordi-
nance is about stray dogs, any
dog without a leash and not
under the direct control of the
owner while off its premises
and on any public street, side-
walk, park or other public prop-
erty or the property of another
resident. It authorizes impound-


meant of any such animal.
There are sections in the ordi-
nance prohibiting keeping any
cow, bull, steer, calf, horse, colt.
pony, mule, jackass, jenny.
goat, sheep, hog, pig or other
livestock or fowl other than
household pets.
Allowing a chicken to
become stray or feral is unlaw-
ful and any chicken which has
roamed from the property of its
owner is considered stray or
feral and can be impounded for
up to 10 calendar days.
Similarly, it is unlawful to
abandon or dispose of a dog or
cat on the property of another or
public property.
Quarantined animals shall be
held for 10 days, and if not
claimed within three days after
the quarantine has ended, will
be disposed of as necessary,
with all expenses the responsi-
bility of the owner.
Resolution 2012-10 simply
sets new boarding fees, which
are in addition to fines and civil
penalties. It also sets adoption
fees.
Boarding or kennel fees are
$5 per day of the first impound-
ment, $15 on the second and
$25 for the third impoundment.
Rabies quarantine for 10 days is
$50 and a dangerous dog certi-
fication is $165 per year per
animal.
The proposed penalties and
fines in new Ordinance 2012-04
are substantially increased since
1999.
Failure to have a city animal
license can mean a written
warning or $50 fine on first
offense, $70 on the second,
$130 on the third and up to
$500. Interference with an offi-
cer is $160 on first offense,
$175 on second and $250 on the
third.
Failure to have a breeder's
permit is $50 on the first
offense, then $70 to $130, and
up to $500.
Allowing a dog or cat to run
at large can include a warning
or $50 citation on the first
offense and can increase to $70,
then $130 and up to $500 for
subsequent offenses within
three years.
For abandoned dogs or cats,
... %iIil pe alIty is $160 for the
:Ti oFfenr'. $175 for the sec-
-oVtAnd $f00 for the third. If
an animal at large, a dog or cat,
scratches or bites a person, the
initial fine is $110, then $130,
then $160.
Failure to have a rabies vacci-
nation is $50 for the first
offense, $70 for the second and
$130 for the third and on up to
$500 civil penalty. If the lack
of a vaccination is accompanied
by a scratch, bite or other phys-
ical injury, the fines are $70 on
first offense, $110 on second
and $130 on the third.
For additional questions, res-
idents can refer to the 1999
ordinance or the new resolution
and ordinance amending fees
and fines.

Join The Club!
HARDEE LIVING DEADLINE
IS THURSDAY AT .5 P.M.


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SPORTS NEWS
DEADLINE
IS NOON MONDAY


Generator Manufacturer May Locate Here


By MICHAEL KELLY
Of The Hera O-Advocate
The Hardee Countv Indus-
trial Development Authority is
trying to get a portable genera-
tor manufacturing company to
locate in the Hardee Commerce
Park.
Shawn Okun spoke to the
IDA board via teleconference
from England about his compa-
ny. Production and Fabrication
Manufacturing LLC, and its
potential plans to ,..cate in
Hardee County.
He said the company had
planned to locate 'at the Sebring
airport next to its airplane
engine manufacturing plant but
the plan fell through. Then,
Hardee County Economic De-
velopment Director Bill Lam-
bert began recruiting the com-
pany to Hardee.
The company seeks to manu-
facture highly machined orbital
generators that will be mainly
exported out of the United
States to places like China.
The compact and powerful
generators will be assembled
using robotics that were manu-
factured in Germany and cur-
rently are sitting in Chicago


The following permits were
applied for or issued by the
Hardee County Building De-
partment during the week of
Nov 11-17. Listings include the
name of the owner or contrac-
tor, the address for the project,
the type of work to be done, and
the cost involved. Only projects
valued at $1,000 or more are
listed.

ISSUED
Earnest C. Westberry, Crews-
ville Road, generator, $25,000.
Owner/Builder, SR 62, elec-
trical, $1,460.
Michael E. Murray, Sabal
Palm Drive, carport with shed,
$9,572.
Douglas Battey, Maxwell
Drive, mechanical, $3,000.
Jay Redrfon, U.S. 17, addi-
tion/remodel, $8,500.

BUILDING BLOCKS
A permit is required from the
Development Director before
erecting any fence.


Circle The Date!
COMMUNITY CALENDAR
DEADLINE
IS MONDAY AT 5 P.M.


waiting to be moved and assem-
bled.
Production and Fabrication
Manufacturing LLC is asking
for an approximately S .65 mil-
lion building to be constructed
and then receive 30 months of
rent abatement and a perform-
ance-based note that would
allow the company to purchase
the building at a reduced rate
for reaching certain bench-
marks.
Lambert said they are a new
company with a great idea and
an entrepreneurial spirit.
In order to accommodate
Production and Fabrication
Manufacturing's need to find a
building quickly, the IDA is
considering moving the Light-
ning Bay project back a few
months and spend the $1 mil-
lion grant from the Economic
Development Authority for a
spec building on this project.
The IDA would cover the dif-
ference.
The IDA will ask the EDA to
increase its grant from $1 mil-
lion to $1.3 million to offset
some of the additional costs of
the building.
Okun said he expects some


of the vendors and suppliers
will move to Hardee County if
he locates his company here.

In other action at its recent
meeting, the IDA:
-got an update on the pro-
posed BioNitrogen plant to be
built south of Fort Green.
The IDA and EDA have
agreed to fund up to $2 million
to build a rail spur system to the
$150 million plant that would
turn waste plant biomass into
urea fertilizer. The rail spur
would be available to other
businesses moving into the 600-
acre property. BioNitrogen will
take only about 40 acres for its
plant.
-finalized the grant contract
for Continuum Labs.
The IDA will fund the
mobile applications and tech-
nology company for $3 million
over the next 12 months.
Casey Dickson, executive
director of the Hardee County
Chamber of Commerce, will
take over as project manager
and administer the Continuum
Labs contract because a conflict
of interest arose when Brian
Pelham, husband of economic


development coordinator Sarah
Pelham, was hired by
Continuum Labs.
-announced that Rapid
Tech and Rapid Systems will be
moving into the former Peace
River Electric Cooperative
building now called TechRiver
park.
-got an update on "Project
Evergreen," a proposed $200
million agricultural business
that would employ up to 400
people, according to Lambert.
-got an update on Fort
Green Storage LLC. Lambert
said he feels there is a high
probability the project will go
through.
-heard an update on the
proposed solar farm in eastern
Hardee County. Lambert said
the company either will or will
not close on the property in the
coming weeks and that should
indicate whether it will be built.
-Nutra Pure is still planning
to expand its operation in the
Hardee Commerce Park on the
eight acres it purchased from
the IDA last year.
-learned that construction
on the Sheriff's outpost is well
under way and going well.


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115 S. 7th Ave. Wauchula

773-3255






November 22.2012, The Herald-Advocate 5B


Light One Candle
By Gerald M. Costello
The Christophers


GIVING THANKS TO GOD IS ALWAYS IN SEASON
It's never "just another Thanksgiving." of course. The holiday
is so ingrained in us as Americans that each one is a day unto itself
- a day given over to family, to abundant feasting and. to be sure.
an acknowledgment of the special graces that flow our way.
And yet there is something extra-special about Thanksgiving
Day 2012. We're on the verge of the 150th anniversary of the
proclamation of the first national day of Thanksgiving by President
Abraham Lincoln.
As the incredible burdens of the Civil War swirled about him,
the president proclaimed the first official U.S. Thanksgiving Day in
a formal statement that began, "The year that is drawing towards
its close has been filled with the blessings of fruitful fields and
healthful skies."
The date was Oct. 3, 1863, and from this distant vantage point
one can only marvel at this remarkable declaration of faith in the
midst of fearsome battles and the daily toll of human lives they
took.
ANday of thanksgiving had been observed many times in the
past, most famously in the autumn of 1621 by the pilgrims of
Plymouth Colony in Massachusetts. They were joined by some of
the local Native Americans, and even though the spirit of friend-
ship would not be a lasting one, it provided a measure of comfort
for the struggling band.
Plymouth's governor, William Bradford, would write of the
colonists on this occasion: "They began now to gather in the small
harvest they had, and to fit up their houses and dwellings against
winter, being all well recovered in health and strength and had all
things in good plenty."
The custom would grow as time went on. Especially after a
young America gained its independence, many of its citizens want-
ed the opportunity to express their thanks to a generous God who
seemed to bless their nation with special abundance. Even as
President Lincoln had taken note of the custom; in 1861 he direct-
ed that federal buildings would be closed so that workers could
observe a day of thanksgiving.
But a magazine editor named Sarah Josepha Hale was at least
indirectly responsible for that first formal proclamation.
Hale wrote to Lincoln to urge him to declare a national day of
Thanksgiving, recognizing "an increasing interest felt in our land,"
and the president gave her a positive answer almost immediately.
He dispatched the secretary of state, William Seward, to draft a
proclamation for him, and the phrases that Seward came up with
have endured down through the generations.
Voicing gratitude for the many bounties America enjoyed, he
wrote: "No human counsel hath devised nor hath any mortal hand
worked out these great things. They are the gracious gifts of the
Most High God, who, while dealing with us in anger for our sins,
hath nevertheless remembered mercy. It has seemed to me fit and
proper that they should be solemnly, reverently and gratefully
acknowledged as with one heart and one voice by the whole
American People."
Just as they were in Lincoln's time, they're words for us to live
by today.
Giving thanks to God is always in season. We should give
thanks, too, that we continue to have a special day to turn to Him
who makes all things possible. That's why it will never be "just
another Thanksgiving." Each one will always have its own person-
al meaning, and here's hoping it stays that way for all time.
For a free copy of 'Gratitude," write: The Christophers, 5 Hanover
Square, New York, NY 10004; or e-mail: mail@christophers.org.


FALL IS THE TIME TO FISH, IF YOU'RE
NOT WATCHING FOOTBALL!
Finally, the hot and humid days of summer are behind us and,
for the first time in a while, you can get out on the water in perfect
comfort.
For me, fall brings to mind big smoker kings, grouper on the
shallow reefs and reds that are way,.way over the slot limit. I also
think about the smell of smoked mullet and the taste of that first
Florida stone crab claw of the season.
Now, if you're one of those who have to winterize the boat
because college football dominates every weekend or you're at
home changing baby diapers like fellow FWC staffer Dan Ellinor
(Congrats, Dan!), I totally understand but you will be missing
some of the hottest fishing action of the year.
Cooling water signals the kings to head back south for the win-
ter. The first ones to come through are generally the big smokers,
and nothing tops off a fishing trip like a 40-pound king on a spin-
ning rod. If you're out there, free-line live bait, cigar minnow or
menhaden down-current and let him soak while you're bottom
fishing. If a king doesn't see it first, you also stand a great chance
of hooking into a cobia or an oversized red drum. Red drum travel
offshore in large groups this time of year, and they aren't picky
about what's for dinner.
On several occasions, I have seen four or five rods bend over
almost simultaneously when they pass by. That will create some
chaos in the boat, especially when everyone has their hands full
and one red drum hits the free line too!
On grass flats, trout fishing can also be phenomenal this time
of year. If you prefer to fish artificial baits, trout can be caught on
a fly, jig, spoon, top-water plug and just about any shallow-diving
plug in your box. Live shrimp under a popping cork can also pro-
duce steady action, if the pinfish and grunts aren't stealing every
shrimp you put out there.
For the patient fisherman who would rather sit back and watch
a cork, a live pinfish or grunt is probably the best way to land a
"gator" trout (spotted seatrout) of five pounds or better. Just
remember: one fish over the 15-20 inch slot is the limit, and it's
never a bad idea to put a big one back for next time.
Fall is also the best time of the year to catch a net full of mul-
let as they form massive schools and head out of rivers and creeks
to spawn. Florida's recreational bag limit of 50 per person means
you can smoke up a huge batch for the next tailgating opportunity.
Just prior to spawning, mullet are also loaded with fat, which
makes them perfect for smoking.
Throwing a cast net that is big enough and heavy enough to
effectively catch mullet requires practice. I recommend starting
with a lighter bait net and learning from a dock where elevation is
on your side.
Throwing a heavy cast net is a lot like hitting a golf ball. There
are a lot more "wrong" ways to do it than there are "right" ways to
do it, And, when you get it wrong, "bananas" will happen (when
the net doesn't open up all the way), and that can be frustrating! If
you have ever played golf or thrown a cast net, you know exactly
what I'm talking about.
So catch the big game on the radio while you're catching big
fish, and don't forget to help us gather data by recording your catch
at snookfoundation.org or by using the iAngler phone app. We'd
also love your photos! Email them to Alan.Peirce@MyFWC.com.
This column hopes to help recreational anglers understand coim-
plex saltwater regulations and learn more about saltwater fishing
opportunities. Alan Peirce is available to answer questions b\
phone or e-mail anytime. Contact the Fish & WVildlife Commis-
sion's Regulatory Outreach subsection at (850) 487-0554 or e-mail
Alan.Peirce@MyFVWC.com.


Signed Penny
By Penny Johnson:
Q&A With A Biblical Perspective "


DISTURBED BY THE OUTCOME OF THE ELECTION
Q: Whyv was a leader so strong for abortion elected in the
first place? Where is God in all this? Did God not hear our
prayers or realize that tens of thousands fasted and prayed
over the last 40 days? Is God sovereign?
Signed, Confused

A: In 1789 the U.S. Constitution went into effect; this became
the framework of laws and principles that establish the function,
nature, offices, powers and limits of government. America is a
country that allows the people to have power, so no one person
controls the whole nation. This is called freedom; we do not live
under a dictatorship like some countries.
Each eligible American has the right to vote.
When God formed man, He gave him a wonderful but danger-
ous gift called "free will." During an election, every voting man
exercises this gift.
Many Americans probably just voted for whomever, others lis-
tened to the debates and chose the leader who would benefit them
more, while others chose the leader who would benefit America as
a whole.
Either way, their votes counted.
Remember that God will never step in and take away man's


free will, good or bad.
Even if we pray and fast for God to do something, He will not
intervene in man's free will. He can change man's heart by allow-
ing things. He can pursue mankind through other people or the
Holy Spirit. But God would never force Himself on anyone.
Jesus beckons us to come to Him, He doesn't make us. In the
end it is still our choice.
Yes, God is sovereign, He is all powerful, He is holy, He is
love. But, He will not use His power to override our choice of lead-
ers. Remember when the people in the Bible wanted to be like
everyone else and have a king? He gave them the man of their
choice, even though He knew Saul was not the best man for the job.
God knows the intent of the heart; we can only see the outward
appearance. God already had David in mind. He had a plan. But,
David had to respect and honor Saul who was in authority over
him. We must do the same thing. Pray for our president, our lead-
ers and America.
When Esther was faced with a decision that she knew had to
be done to protect her nation, the people fasted and prayed. When
Esther entered the king's court she found favor with the king. The
fasting and praying may have given Esther the strength and wis-
dom she needed. But, the king still held her fate in his hands.
Prayer does change things,just not the way we think it should.
So, we have to trust Him! 'My thoughts are not your thoughts,
neither are your ways My ways, says the Lord,' Isaiah 55:8.
Penny Johnson is an ordained minister and has an associate of arts
degree in psychology. To ask Penny a question, send a message to
signedpenny@yahoo.com.


Tooth decay is said to be the second-most common dis-
ease in the U.S. after the common cold.


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Bob Duncan Pharmacist Sandra Garcia (missing)

DELIVERY SERVICE Ay AL

Monday-Friday 9:00 am to 6:00 pm* Satirday.0
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6B 'I he Herald-Advocate, November 22. 2012


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November 22, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 7B


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8B The Herald-Advocate, November 22. 2012



Rodeo Bits
By Kathy Ann Gregg


U


REALITY RANCH YOUTH RODEO:
LAST BUT NOT LEAST, THE SENIORS!
We always start with the littlest tykes, and work our way up in
age, so I have finally arrived at that talented group of competitors
age 15 and older. And like the previous groups, they received their
awards at the Reality Ranch Youth Rodeo Banquet held back in
May. (Yes, we are that far behind!)
But before I forget, this organization is now known as the
Hardee County Youth Rodeo, and is held at the Cattleman's Arena
on the first Saturday of every month. New name, new location, but
same events and same great kids!
Our Senior cowgirls are Lacey Cumbee, who only competes in
barrel racing (but stays for the entire rodeo to cheer on her
boyfriend, that cutie Pat Carlton!). One event, one buckle for tak-
ing first place!
Hailey Andrews is the other Senior cowgirl, and she is just the
opposite of Lacey, competing in barrels, poles, goat-tying, break-
away roping, and she gets down and dirty in the chute doggin'
event with all them boys. Hailey saw that shiny new belt buckle for
the pole bending event (an event in which she has always shone),
third place in barrels, and fourth place in both goat-tying and chute
doggin'. And that was enough to garner her the Reserve All-
Around Senior Cowgirl title, adding an engraved breastcollar to her
collection of awards.
Two of the Senior cowboys ride only roughstock, the bareback
event, and they are Sid Crews and Tyler Pella. Both of these boys
come from a long line of rodeo cowboy stock! Sid won the belt
buckle for this event, and in the excitement of being on stage with
lovely Taylor Bolin, managed to drop his buckle while the photo-


-.
Cowgirl Hailey Andrews makes the Perry family proud as
she is announced as the Reserve All-Around Champion
in the Senior girls division of the Reality Ranch Youth
Rodeo, here receiving her engraved breastcollar from
Taylor Bolin. This award was a culmination of her partici-
pation in the events of barrel-racing, pole-bending, goat-
tying, and chute-doggin'.


graphs were being taken' (Smooth move, Sid!) Tyiler came in sec-
ond behind his friend.
The other Senior cowboys are cousins Pat Carlton and Jake
Bolin. Pat must have taken some kind of roping pill, because I have
watched him improve to quite the roper recently. Jake divides his
time between the Wildcat varsity football team (having been
named Player of the Week on occasion) and rodeoing.
Pat took second place in breakaway roping, with Jake right
behind in third place (and both of them were beat out by a girl!).
Pat took the winner's belt buckle for tie-Jown roping, with Jake
landing in third place. Jake received that shiny belt buckle for goat-


COURTESY PHOTOS BY KATHY ANN GREGG
Tyler Pella (left) with his roughstock bag and Sid Crews
(right) with the winner's belt buckle surround then-
Hardee County Cattleman's Sweetheart Taylor Bolin,
showing off their awards for the bareback event.


Pat Carlton grins with pride as he shows off the engraved
saddle he won as the All-Around Cowboy in the Seniors
division of the Reality Ranch Youth Rodeo. He is sur-
rounded by his very proud parents, Beth and Dale
Carlton. This saddle was sponsored by the Roman III
Ranch, so this award was truly a "family affair!"


tying, with Pat right behind in second place. And Pat received his
second belt buckle for chute doggin', with Jake right behind for a
close second place.
The scorekeepers were kept busy with these two cowboys, but
when all had been tallied, it was Pat Carlton who won the engraved
saddle for Senior All-Around Cowboy, and Jake took the engraved
breastcollar for Reserve All-Around. That saddle was sponsored by
the Roman III Ranch, so it was Pat's granddaddy, Doyle Carlton
III, who got to present him with the win. But Mr. Doyle was smil-
ing no less when Jake received his Reserve All-Around award!
Congratulations to each and every one of you you are all
winners! And good luck in the 2012-13 season!
Keep these "Bits," boots and bridles riding. Let Kathy Ann Gregg
in on your events and achievements, and she'll keep you covered.
Reach her at ksleepyk@aol.com or 773-9459. Keep on riding,
Cowboys and Cowgirls!


Vw
Lacey Cumbee (with Taylor Bolin) proudly shows off the
winner's belt buckle for the Seniors barrel-racing event.
The horse that Lacey rides in this event, Nappy, still per-
forms after losing an eye last season to an accident in his
pasture.


Taylor Bolin had the honor of presenting her brother,
Jake, with the engraved breastcollar for having been
named the Reserve All-Around Champion in the Senior
boys division.


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The Herald-Advocate
Thursdy, NoembSer-7 ,

I Thursday, November 22, 2q12


PAGE ONE


Soccer

By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
An early split of district
games could be a positive sign
for Hardee Wildcat soccer.
Hoping to repeat as district
champions again this season,
the boys ran into buzz saw at
Frostproof, but came back two
days later to defeat the DeSoto
Bulldogs on their turf.
"No one remembers when
Hardee last beat a DeSoto team.
The boys played a confident
and very fast-paced game,
where they controlled and
passed the ball well. Jesus
Zuniga (goalie) posted his first
shut-out of the season and had
13 saves," reported Head Coach
Dennis Aubry.
Hardee gets to host the dis-
trict playoffs the week of Jan.
21. Beside Frostproof and De-
Soto, the district also includes
Mulberry, Avon Park and Lake
Placid.
Hardee has added a junior
varsity squad, which will play
all but four of the season's
games, two already down.
"We had a great turn-out for
soccer and, unfortunately, had
to turn several players away. We
have 13 returnees from last
year's team, 11 of them playing
on the varsity, which has 11
seniors," said Aubry.
The seniors on the varsity are
Armando Alvarez, Campbel
Aubry, Oscar Palacios, Martin
Lucatero, Carlos DeLoera,
Alexis Palacios, Mark Gomez,
Miguel Garcia, Octavio Al-


TUE
TH
FRI
MON
TUE
FRI
TUE
TH
TUE
THU
TUE
TH
FRI
TUE
TH
FRI
TUE
TH
FRI


DEC 4
DEC 6
DEC 7
DEC 10
DEC 11
DEC 14
DEC 18
DEC 20
JAN 8
JAN 10
JAN 15
JAN 17
JAN 18
JAN 22
JAN 24
JAN 25
JAN 29
JAN 31
FEB 1


DISTRICT TOURNEY
FEB 4, FEB 5, FEB 8

Varsity Head Coach:
Varsity Assistants:
J.V. Head Coach:


Boys Get Started RU


Wildcat Soccer Il


Nov. 6
Nov. 9


Southeast (V. only)
Auburndale


Nov. 13 Frostproof*
Nov. 15 DeSoto*
Nov. 26 Fort Meade


Nov. 27
Nov. 29


Avon Park* (V. only)
Lake Placid*


Nov. 30 Sebring
Dec. 4 Mulberry*
Dec. 6 DeSoto*


Dec. 7
Dec.11
Dec. 14
Dec. 17


Teneroc (V. only)
Frostproof*
Lake Placid*
Fort Meade


Dec. 18 Avon Park* (V. only)
Dec. 20 Mulberry*
Jan. 10 Sebring
Jan. 11 Lake Wales
Jan. 16 Kathleen


Away 8 p.m.
Away 6/7:30 p.m.
HOME 6/7:30 p.m.
Away 5:30/7 p.m.
HOME 6/7:30 p.m.
Away 8 p.m.
HOME 6/7:30 p.m.
HOME 6/7:30 p.m.
HOME 6/7:30 p.m.
HOME 6/7:30 p.m.
Away 6:30 p.m.
Away 6/7:30 p.m.
Away 6/7:30 p.m.
Away 6/7:30 p.m.
HOME 8 p.m.
Away 6/7:30 p.m.
Away 6/7:30 p.m.
Away 6/7:30 p.m.
HOME 6/7:30 p.m.


District Tournament Jan. 21-25 HOME


varez, Luis Luna and Zuniga.
Joining them are juniors Ruben
Velasquez and Luis Alonso, and
sophs Manuel Palacios and
Gilberto Cardoza. The man-
agers are freshman Abelardo
Villarreal and senior Oscar
Gomez.
Daniel Estrada is assistant
coach and will concentrate
more on the junior varsity. That
squad includes juniors Gustavo


Toledo, Ezequiel Perez and
Filistin Luis Michel, sophs
Frederik Torres, Rolando Ale-
man, Alexis Arenas, Hunverto
Lopez and Kenneth Vargas,
along with freshmen Alex
Chavez, Ricardo DeSantiago,
Oscar Duarte, Eduardo Lopez,
Fabian Perado, Benjamin Ta-
mayo, Jose Padilla, Mateo
Gomez, Gustavo Salizar,
Rodrigo Rodriguez, Gabriel
Garcia and Francisco Salgato.


Wildcat Hoops Starting Soon


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Height and experience could
be a winning combination for
the Hardee Wildcat basketball
team this season.
The team will wait until after
holiday week to get into action,
with athletes from fall sports
now on board to meld their tal-
ents under Head Coach Vance
Dickey and assistants Carl
Brown and Travis Bone.


A half dozen returnees will
anchor the 2012-13 Wildcat
squad. Seniors Alonzo Casso
and Christian Moralez are
joined by juniors Keyon
Brown, Steve Metayer, Luke
Palmer and Lucious Everett.
New to the varsity are senior
Mark Elsberry, a transfer last
season who was primarily on
the JV squad, junior James
Greene, sophs Derrick Graham


and Jordan Jones and freshman
Marco DeLeon.
Height comes from Everett
and Graham, both 6-4, Palmer
6-3 and Brown, Elsaberry and
Metayer, all 6-2. Brown and
Palmer will alternate at center,
with Moralez, at 6-0, Elsberry,
I Metayer Everett, Greene and
Graham as forwards, and
Casso, Jones and DeLeon as
guards.
Former player Alex Myrie
returns now to coach the JV
team, which, includes returnees
Blaiaine Molitor, Dustin Smith,
Tyler Smith, Nick Johnson,
Robert Torres and Ryan Ra-
mirez and newcomers Deandre
Holley, C.K. Douglas, Devante
Greer, Ryan Moore, De-
Shawndre McMillan, Alan
Brown, Devin Pearson and
Deonte Leslie.


COURTESY PHOTOS
The quartet shown above, (from left) Regan Davenport,
Zander and Zack Durastanti and Sean Brown, competed
in the Go Green 5K at Circle B. Bar Preserve in Lakeland
on Oct. 20, bringing home the plants given as awards.
Zander, 7, completed the 3.1 mile-course in 33:40, fin-
ishing second in the 10-and-under group. Zack, 11, fin-
ished in 24:54 for third in the 11-14 group. Sean com-
pleted the adult course in 21:52 for first in his age group
and Regan was first in her group with a 22:14 finish. She
aslo competed in the Rev 3 Half-Triathlon in Venice on
Oct. 28. It was to be a 1.2-mile swim, 56-mile bike and
13.1 mile run, but winds of Hurricane Sandy canceled the
swim. She completed the race in four hours 57 minutes,
earning third place (see side photo). Her sons met her
for the final 100 yards to cross the finish line with her.
Her next half Ironman is in January in Naples.


EOf.Kc nm

1417 wankAve. SebicF 37


(863) 385.8649

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CONSTRUCTION
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property, build your dream home, or do your remodeling.





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Crystal Lake RV News
By Joyce Taylor


A lot more people have
arrived from the North this last
week. I hope everyone had a
good summer after all that heat
and no rain most of us had. It is
nice now to see more people on
every street, and Crystal Lake is
not looking like a ghost town
now.

KOFFEE KLATCH
The hosts on Nov. 14 were
Dewey and Nancy Morrison.
Mike Allen led the prayer,
Bruce Woods led the U.S.
Pledge and Bernice English led
the Canadian Pledge. The
50/50 winners were Pete
Schlotter, Gaylord and Cede
Williams, and Bill and Sharon
Potter.
SATURDAY DANCES
The first dance of the season
will be Saturday, Nov. 24, with
Steve Baker. We hope to see all
our regular dancers and some
of the newcomers to our park
come out and have a good time.


BINGO
Bill Bohl won the large jack-
pot on Nov. 9. Francine
Demers won the small jackpot
while Anita Albert and I split
the special jackpot.
SCORES
Men's Golf, Nov. 8:
Individual Points first, Loyd
Lankford; second, Joe Bennitt;
and third, a tie among Doug
Taylor. Brian Kavanagh, Matt
Skok and Bob Kramer.
Ladies Golf, Nov. 8: first,
Barbara Kramer; second,
Nancy Morrison: and third, a tie
between Ruth Murphy and Rita
Delisle.
Mixed Golf. Nov. 12: first,
Nancy Morrison; second, Jean
Delisle; and, third, Dewey
Morrison.
Shuffling. Nov. 13: Three-
game winners were Bob
Beshel, Jan Brinker. Roy
Brinker, Bernice English,
Lowell Gordon, Keith Stephens
and Doug Taylor.


HARDEE WILDCATS BOYS
BASKETBALL
2012-13


VANCE DICKEY
TRA VIS BONE, CARL BROWN
ALEX MYRIE







2C The Herald-Advocate, November 22,2012





-Schedule of Weekly Services


~rinte 'as a Public Ser 't







BOWLING GREEN
APOSTOLIC LIGHTHOUSE
UNITED PENTECOSTAL
CHURCH
310 Orange St.
375-3100
Sunday Morning ........ ... 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening ............ 6:00 p m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting ....... 7 00 p.m.
Thursday Service .......... 7:30 p m.

CHESTER GROVE MB CHURCH
708 W. Grape St. 375-3353
Sunday School ................ 9:30 am .
Sunday Worship .................. 8:(00 a.m .
Sun. Eve, Worship 1 st & 3rd 4:00 pm.
Tues. Prayer/Bible Study ......6:00 p.m.

CHRISTIAN BIBLE
FELLOWSHIP
Hwy. 17 South
Morning Worship ................10:30 a.m.
Youth Group Sunday ..........6:00 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
121 West Broward St. 375-2231
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................. 6:30 p.m.
W wednesday ............................ 7:30 p.m .

CHURCH OF GOD
TRUE HOLINESS OUTREACH
725 Palmetto St.
375-3304
Sunday School .....................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Tues. Night Bible Study ...... 7:30 p.m.
Evening Worship
Ist Sunday .......................5:00 p.m.

COMMUNITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Main & W. Centra.
Sunday AM Worship............10:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening ....................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer Meeting ............7:00 p.m.

FAITH ASSEMBLY OF GOD
4937 Hwy. 17 N. 375-4206
Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................I 1:00 a.m.
Disciples Train & Choirs ......5:30 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Bowling Green
S. Hwy. 17. 375-2253
SUNDAY:
Bible Study ...................... 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship ................10:45 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:30 p.m.
WEDNESDAY:
Discipleship Training
Youth & Adult ..................6:30 p.m.
AWANA (ages 3-5th grade) ....6:30 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Grape & Church Streets 375-2340
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............-11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ..................6:00 p.m.

FORT GREEN BAPTIST
CHURCH
Baptist Church Road 773-9013
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ..............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

HOLY CHILD
SPANISH CATHOLIC MISSION
Misa (Espanol) Sunday ........7:00 p.m.

IGLESIA DEL DIOS VIVO
105 Dixiana St. 375-4191
Domingo De Predicacion ....11:00 p.m.
Manes Estudio Biblico..........7:00 p.m.
Miercoles Estudior Juvenil ....7:00 p.m.
Jueves De Predicacion ..........7:00 p.m.

IMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH
210 E. Broward St. 375-4681
Sunday School .......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..................7:00 p.m

MACEDONIA PRIMITIVE
BAPTIST CHURCH
607 Palmetto St.
Church School ......................9:30 a.m .
Morning Service ............... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Service ....................7:00 p.m .
Wed. Bible Study/Prayer ......7:00 p.m.
Communion-2nd Sun. Eve. ..6:00 p.m.

MT. PISGAH BAPTIST CHURCH
6210 Mt. Pisgah Rd. 375-4409
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m .
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training..................5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time ........7:00 p.m.
NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
Mason Dixon & County Line Rd.
781-5887
Sunday W orship ..................11:00 am .
2nd Sunday Communion .... 110:0 a.m.
Bread of Life Sunday........12:15 p.m.
T.HE. Meeting Tuesday .... 7:00 p.m.

OPEN DOOR FULL GOSPEL
PRAISE CENTER
E. Broward St.
Sunday School ..................10:00 am.


Sunday Service ..............6..... 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service ...............7:30 p m.


Donnis & Kathy Barber
Hwy. 66 East
P.O. Box 780


BOWLING GREEN

PRIMERA MISSION BALUTISTA
Murray Road off Hwy. 17
375-2295
Dommngos Escuela Domr .......9:45 a.m.
Servicio de Adoracion.......... 11 :00 am.
Servicio de Predicacion ......-5:00 p.m.
M :ercoles Serico .......... ......6:30 p.m .

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 South US Hwy 17
Mornuming Serice .......... 10:30 am
Wednesday Study',Learning ..6:30 p. m

ST. JOHN A.M.E. CHURCH
513 W. Orange St.
375-2911
Sunday Church School .9....9:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship .. 11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ...... 6:30 p.m.

VICTORY PRAISE CENTER
128 E. Main St.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 am.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Thursday Night Services,
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
K idz Club ...............................7:00 p.m .


ONA

IGLESIA PENTECOSTES
VISION POR LAS ALMAS
149 Bedger Loop 448-2831
Servicio Domingos ................7:30 p.m.
Jueves (Ensefianza Biblica) ..................
..............................................7 :30 p .m .

LIMESTONE BAPTIST CHURCH
4868 Keystone Ave. Limestone
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

NEW ZION BAPTIST CHURCH
202 Sidney Roberts Road
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training.................. 6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ............6:00 p.m.

ONA BAPTIST CHURCH
131 Bear Lane 773-2540
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

UNION BAPTIST CHURCH
5076 Lily Church Rd. 494-5622
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday
AWANA for Kids ..............6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time.. .......7:00 p.m.

WAUCHULA

APOSTOLIC ASSEMBLY
Martin Luther King and Apostolic Rd.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
English Service ............... ...11:30 a.m.
General Worship Service ......1:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer ......................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

CELEBRATION CHURCH
Rainey Blvd.
863-781-1624
hardee.celebration.org
Sunday Morning Service .... 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Youth Service ....5:30 p.m.
Childcare provided at all services

CELEBRATION FELLOWSHIP
773-0427
Celebration Service..............10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Evening Cell Groups
Adult Cell Group ..................7:00 p.m.
Youth Cell Group ..................7:00 p.m.
Children's Cell Group ..........7:00 p.m.
Call for locations

CHARLIE CREEK
BAPTIST CHURCH
6885 State Road 64 East 773-3447
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............6:30 p.m.
CHURCH OF CHRIST
201 S. Florida Ave.
Sunday Bible Study ..............9:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship Service......10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

CHURCH OF CHRIST
Will Duke Road
773-2249
Sunday Morning Worship......9:30 am.
Sunday Bible Class ..............11:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening Worship ......6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Bible Class ........7:00 p.m.
Men's Leadership & Training Class -
2nd Sunday of Month ........4:00 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
Martin Luther King Blvd.
767-0199

CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST
OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS
630 Hanchey Rd. 773-3532
Sacrament Meeting ................9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
Priesthood ............................11:00 a.m .

COMMUNITY BAPTIST
CHURCH OF WAUCHULA HILLS
(SPANISH)
615 Rainey Blvd.
257-3950
* Sunday Bible Study ........... 10:00 a.m.
Sunday. Morning Worship....I 1:00 a.m.


Sunday Eening Ser ice ........7:00 p m.
Wednesday, Serx.ice ............... 7:00 p.m.


(863) 735-0470
Zolfo Springs, FL


WAUCHULA
DIOS ES AMOR
8017 S. 8th Ave.
7734576
Domingos Escuela
Dom ini:ca ..........................10:00 a.m .
Servicio .. .. ....................... 1:00 a.m .
Lunes Oracion ......................6:00 p.m
Miercoles Servicio ................7:00 p m.

EL REMANENTE
IGLECIA CRISTIANA
318 W. Main St..
Martes Oracion ................7:00 p.m.
Jueses Sersicio ...... ........7:30 p m
Viernes Servicio .. ............... 7:30 p.m.
Domingo Servicio...... ..........10:30 am.

ENDTIME CROSSROAD
MINISTRY
501 N. 9th & Georgia St. 773-3470
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Service ..................11:30 a.m.
Evening Service....................7:30 p.m.
Wed. Bible St. & Yth. Gath ..7:30 p.m.
Friday (Holy Ghost Night) ....7:30 p.m.

FAITH PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
114 N. 7th Ave. 773-2105
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ..................11:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ................6:15 p.m.
Wed. Youth Fellowship..........6:50 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

FAITH TEMPLE CHURCH
OF GOD
701 N. 7th Ave 773-3800
Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship ..................10:20 a.m.
Children's Chuch ................10:40 a.m.
Evening Service ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH '
1570 W. Main St. 773-4182
SUNDAY:
Bible Study for all ages ........9:45 a.m,
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.

WEDNESDAY;
Sr. Adult Bible Study ..........10:00 a.m.
Children's Chiors
(PK-Grade 4) ................... 5:30 p.m.
PRAISE 57-Jr High Chior .. 5:30 p.m.
Mid-Week Prayer Meeting .. 6:00 p.m.
Kids On Missions
(PK-Grade 4) .................... 6:00 p.m.
Club 56 ................................ 6:00 p.m.
Youth Group (Grades 7-12) 6:00 p.m.
Family Life Ministry
& Discipleship .................. 6:00 p.m.
Church Orchestra.................. 6:00 p.m.
Adult Choir .......................... 7:00 p.m.

FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH
1121 W. Louisiana St. 773-9243
SIUNDAY:
Generations Caf6 Opens........9:30 a.m.
Kids World Check-In for
Nursery-5th Grade Begins..10:15 a.m.
Pre-K Blast .......................... 10:45 a.m.
Kids World B.L.A.S.T.
(K-Sth) ............................ 10:45 a.m.
Worship Service ..................10:45 a.m.
WEDNESDAY:
Check-In begins for
Nursery-5thgrade ..................6:15 p.m.
Classes for children ages
PreK-12th grade............6:30-8:00 p.m.
FIRST CHURCH OF
THE NAZARENE
511 W. Palmetto St.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Service ..................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

FIRST MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
1347 Martin Luther King Ave.
773-6556
Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m.
Morning Service ..................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Tues. Youth Ministry Meeting/
Bible Study ........................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer/Bible Study ......7:00 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
207 N. Seventh Ave. 773-4267
Sunday School .....................9:45 a.m.
Traditional Sunday Worship 11 :00 a.m.
Casual Sunday Worship..........6:00 p.m
Tuesday Bible Study............10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Activities ............6:00 p.m.

FLORIDA'S FIRST ASSEMBLY
OF GOD CHURCH
1397 South Florida Avenue
773-9386.
Sunday School ....................9:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............10:00 a.m.
Wed. Family Night ................7:00 p~m.
Adult, Children & Radiate Youth Church

FLORIDA GOSPEL
511 W. Palmetto
223-5126
Sunday Morning Worship.... 11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............7:30 p.m.

THE GOSPEL TABERNACLE
810 W. Tennessee St. 863-735-1158
Morning Service ..................10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
HEARTLAND
COMMUNITY CHURCH
1262 W. Main St. 767-6500
Coffee & Donuts................ 9:00 a.m.
Sunday School .................. 9:30 a.m.
W orship .............................. 10:30 aim .
Wed. Night Dinner .. ............6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bodybuilders Adult Cl
Crossroads &


Lighthouse M min ................7:00 p.m.
HIGHER GROUND
INTERNATIONAL MINISTRY
1258 W. MAIN STREET
VWAUCHULA, FL
Sunday Morning Worship.... 11:00 a.m.
Wed. Night Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

IGLESIA ADVENTISTA DEL
SEPTIMO DIA
Old Bradenton Road
767-1010


WAUCHULA
IGLESIA de DIOS
ALFA Y OMEGA
1909 Stanfield Rd.
Sunday School ....... .........10: 00 a m .
Evening Ser ice ...... 6:00 pm
Tuesday (Bible Studs & Praer
Night) .. .. . . 7:30 p m
Friday Worship Ser%,ice 7'30 p m

IGLESIA HISPANA
FUENTE DE VIDA
501 N. 9" Ave.
Mantes . ....... 7- 30 p m
Jue'es ..... .7-30 p mni
Domingo ... .. 10 30 ai m.

IGLESIA HISPANA
PRESENCIA de Dios
511 W. Palmetto St.
Domingos ........................... 6:00 p.m .
M iercoles ............. .................7:00 p.m .

JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
ENGLISH
155 Altman Road 1131
Sunday Service ......................2:00 p.m.

JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
SPANISH
Sunday Service ....................10:00 a.m.

LIGHT OF THE WORLD
MINISTRIES
Womans Center 131 N. 7th Ave.
Wauchula, FL
Friday Evening ......................6:00 p.m.

LAKE DALE BAPTIST CHURCH
3102 Heard Bridge Road
773-6622
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Service ..................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

MINISTERIO INTERNATIONAL
Cambriadores de Mundo
704 W. Main St. 773-0065
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.
NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH
1999 State Road 64 East
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship Service ....1 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship Service ......6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Night Supper ......6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Activities
(All Ages) ..........................7:00 p.m.

NEW LIFE CHURCH
117 W. Palmetto St.
773-2929
Sunday Service ....................10:00-a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service....I............7:00 p.m.
Children Ministries for all services

NEW MT. ZION A.M.E. CHURCH
10 Martin Luther King Ave.
767-0023
Morn. Worship
(1st & 3r Sun.) ...................8:00 a.m .
Sunday School ......... .........9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship .............1...11:00 a.m.
2nd Sunday Youth Service ....4:00 p.m.
Allen Christian Endeavor ......4:00 p.m.
Wed. & Fri. Bible Study........7:00 p.m.

NORTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
912 N. 8th Ave. 773-6947
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship .............1...11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

OAK GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
4350 W. Main St. 735-0321
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............. ...11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

PEACE VALLEY LUTHERAN
CHURCH
1643 Stenstrom Road 773-2858
1" & 3' Sun.
Communion ....................10:00 a.m.
2*' & 4' Sun.
Divine Worship ..............10:00 a.m.
Bible Study .......................... 11:15 a.m .
** Fellowship each Sunday after service
PROGRESSIVE MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
149 Manley Road East Main
773-5814
Sunday School ................... ...9:30 a.m.
Worship Service ..................11:00 a.m.
Wed. Evening Prayer ............7:00 p.m.
REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 North US Hwy 17
M morning Service ..................10:30 a.m
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.
RIVERVIEW HEIGHTS
MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1321 S.R. 636 East 773-3344
Radio Program
W ZZS Sundays..................9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ....................10:00 am .
Morning Worship ................11:00 a m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

SOUL HARVEST MINISTRY
1337 Hwy. 17 South, Wauchula
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Evening Service ....................6:00 p.m .
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

ST. ANN'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
204 N. 9th Ave. 773-6418
Sunday ................... .........9:00 a m
H o ly D ay s ............... .... ...... ........... ...

ST. MICHAEL
CATHOLIC CHURCH
408 Heard Bridge Road 773-4089
Saturday Mass (Engish; ......5:00 p m.


(Span:ish) ...... 7:00 p.m
Sunday (Enr.gihsh) ..... ........ :30 a.- .
(Spam sh) .. ...... ....I1 1 :r00 a m
(Creole) ............. ... : 0 p ,
Catecism o ....... ... ............9:45 a m
Daily. Mass :n Enghsh .... .. ..S :30 a.mn

SEVENTH DAY
ADVENTIST CHURCH
205 S. Ilth Ave. 773-9927
Sabbath School ......... ...... 9:30 a m
Morning WVorsnip .. .. ......1 :0) a m
Tues. Prayer Meeting ......... 7 00 p m


WAUCHULA
SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH _
505 S. 10th Ave. 773-4368
Sunday School .. ............. 9:45 a m
Morning Worship I.. ....... 1100 a m
Evening Worship 6 00 p mi
Wednesday Praier 7 00 p mI

SPIRIT WIND TABERNACLE
1652 Old Bradenton Road
Sunday) School 1 I)A) .1 il
N.Morning \W'orhip I I t( .1 i
Evening \Worhip 6"tI) p 1i.i
\VWediinseJNda' W worship ..7:L) p mi.
TABERNACLE OF
PRAISE & JOY
1507 MLK Avenue
Sunday School ................. .10:00 a.m .
Morning Worship ................1 1:30 a.m.
Evening Worship ...............7:00 p.m.
Tues. Bible Sidy.
& Child Trainm ....................7:00 p.m.
Friday Prayer Service ............7:00 p.m.
WAUCHULA CHURCH OF GOD
1543 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.
773-0199
Sunday School .....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11: 15 am.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Fam. Training ....7:30 p.m.
Thurs. Youth Bible Study ......7:00 p.m.
Friday Night Worship ............7:30 p.m.
WAUCHULA HILLS HARVEST
TEMPLE ASSEMBLY OF GOD
210 Anderson
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Church..................................10:00 a.m.
Youth Service ........................6:00 p.m.
Evening Service ....................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.
WAUCHULA HILLS
SPANISH CHURCH OF GOD
1000 Stansfield Rd.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer ......................7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship..................7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ..................7:30 p.m.
WAUCHULA REVIVAL CENTER
(Full Gospel)
501 N. 9th Ave.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Youth & Child. Church..........6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ..................7:00 p.m.
Men's Fri. Prayer ..................7:00 p.m .

ZOLFO SPRINGS
COMMUNITY WESLEYAN CHURCH
Gardner
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
CREWSVILLE BETHEL
BAPTIST CHURCH
8251 Crewsville Road
Church 735-0871 Pastor 773-6657
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............. ...11:00 am.
Evening Worship ..................6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................6:30 p.m.
EVANGELISTIC HOLINESS
CHURCH INC
Corner of 6th and Hickory
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .............1...11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday ....................7:30 p.m.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
OF ZOLFO
320 E. 4th St. 735-1200
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Training Union ......................5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.
FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Corner of 6th & Suwanee 735-1544
Gospel Music ...................... 10:30 a.m.
Worship Service ............ ..... 11:0) a.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.
FOX MEMORIAL
HOLINESS CHURCH
2344 Merle Langford Rd.
Sunday Morning Worship....10:00 a.m.
Sunday Night Worship .......... 6:00 pm.
Wednesday Service ............... 7:30 p.m.

GARDNER BAPTIST CHURCH
South Hwy. 17 494-5456
Sunday School ................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .............I... 1:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................ 7:00() pm.

LIFE CHANGING WORSHIP CENTER
3426 Oak St. 863-832-9808
Sunday W orship ....................2:30 p.m .
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.


ZOLFO SPRINGS
MARANATHA BAPTIST CHURCH
2465 Oxendine Rd.
(863) 832-9292
Sunday School ................... 10:00 a.m.
Worship .......... ........ 11:00 a.m.
E\ ending .... ... ..... ..........1:00 p.m .
Wed Bible & Prayer Meet.,.7:00 p.m.
NEW VISION \ ORSHIP CENTER
64 E. & School House Road
Church 735-8585 Childeare 735-
8586
Morning Worship ................10:00 a.m.
Children's Church................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Youth & F.T.H. ............7:00 p.m.
PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF
GOD FAITH TEMPLE
Oak Street
Sunday Worship ..................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Tuesday Worship ..................7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship..................7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ..................7:30 p.m.
PRIMERA MISSION
BAUTISTA HISPANA
518 8th Ave. E.
Escuela Dominical ..............10:00 a.m.
Servicio del Domingo..........11:00 a.m.
.... ... ... ................ ............. 7 :00 p.m .
Servicio del Miercoles ..........7:30 p.m.
PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH
Pioneer Park
2nd Sunday ..........................10:30 a.m.
Evening Service ....................6:30 p.m.
5th Sunday ............................6:00 p.m.
REALITY RANCH
COWBOY FELLOWSHIP
2-1/2 Miles east of
Zolfo Springs on Hwy. 66
863-781-1578
Sunday Service ....................11:00 a.m
ST. PAUL'S MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
3676 U.S. Hwy. 17 South 735-0636
Sunday School . ................ 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship .............a....... 1 a.m.
Wed. Prayer Service ..............7:00 p.m.
SAN ALFONSO MISSION
3027 Schoolhouse Lane
Domingo, Misa en Espanol ..9:30 a.m.
Catecismo ............................ 11:00 a.m.
SPANISH MISSION
735-8025
Escuela Dominica ..........10:00 a.m.
Servicio ................................ 1 :00 a.m.
Pioneer Club ..........................6:30 p.m.
Servicio de la Noche ............7:00 p.m.
Mierecoles Merienda ............6:00 p.m.
Servicio ...................................8:00 p.m.
Sabado Liga de Jovenes ........5:00 p.m.




SEEDS
FROM
STHE
SOWER
MIAl A.o UutO, D.
^^B^^^&^^H ullul. UOfUglu

An elderly man noticed a
young boy who was walking
his rather strange looking
dog. Puzzled, he asked,
"What kind of dog is that?"
"A genuine police dog,"
came the quick reply.
"He doesn't look like a po-
lice dog to me," said the man.
"Of course not! He works
undercover so no one will
recognize him," answered the
boy.
During these .turbulent
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needs people who work
"under cover." But not the
Lord Jesus Christ, our Savior.
Those who are Christians
begin their new life in Him
with a confession of faith.
Being saved begins with a
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Confession is not only
something that the Christian
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a Christian does.
Do others see the love of
Jesus in your life?
Visit us at: www.SowerMinistries.org


T anksgiving

Hardships prevailed that first Thanksgiving. Death was the Pilgrimn's
companion and creature corn forts were few. Yes, some had survived
that tortuous first year, but who knew what tribulations lay ahead?
Many of us might wonder what inspired
those struggling Pilgrims to have a
celebration at all.
''*,, *-r 4.
They did have the power of faith and
prayer. Through calamities, their
spirits were made strong. Despite
the difficulties, the"y had survived.
Certainly then, whatever our
situation, we all have reason to
celebrate the strength we receive
from our Heavenly Father. We
can enter His house with great
thanksgiving this week.





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November 22, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 3C


Nov. 11 was Veterans Day
and we want to take this time to
recognize and thank all veterans
for their willingness to protect
and defend our country.
CHAPEL
Greeters Paul and Ethel
Finlay and Bill and Sara Heller
welcomed 59 to our second
service of the season. Wayne
welcomed everyone and recog-
nized all the veterans in the
service by having them stand
and introduce themselves and
which branch of the Armed
Forces they served in, then we
sang "America The Beautiful"
with a tribute to them.
Welcoming prayer was done
by Cheryl Conkle and hymns
led byBob Conkle, with Cheryl
on the piano and Sandy Feeser
at the organ. "Faith of Our
Fathers" and "My Country 'Tis
of Thee" were played on the lap
harp by Bob, and the offertory
was played by Ruth Brown,
"Battle Hymn of the Republic."
Pastor David's sermon was
brought from Philippians 3:12-
21, "Never Too Old To
Stretch." Closing hymn was
"God Be With You 'Til We
Meet Again."
COFFEE HOUR
Gerry welcomed 92 enjoying
coffee and doughnuts. Jim, the
manager, introduced our new
managers-to-be, Jim and Bev-
erly Molitor, presently in train-
ing and will become the man-
agers in April.
Gerry led the pledge and
prayer and introduced our
speaker, Jeff, from All Florida
Weather Proofing.
Then we had ballots passed
around for everyone to vote for
the King & Queen 2013. The
king and queen will be named
and crowned Dec. 8. Many


merchant coupons ',.ere draAn
and 5050 'Aas 'Ann and t'.'.o
Perkins pies raffled off.
SPOTLIGHT
Jim and Beverl' Molitor
have been married for 42 years.
They have nine children be-
tween them. 22 grandchildren
and I I great-grandchildren.
Jim retired from the Meat
Cutters Union. and owning
three restaurants. Beverly
retired from the restaurant busi-
ness and has been a cook the
past four years and a disc jock-
ey, playing for weddings and
karaoke.
Their oldest daughter is in
Germany, and they both visited
her and the family this summer.
They also have had a son in
Afghanistan for the past year,
who works as a contractor for
the Army, after spending 17
months in Iraq.
They both have similar inter-
ests, have been involved with
horses, fishing and camping.
Beverly enjoys bingo and play-
ing pool.
That is some of the reason
for them finding our park, want-
ing to camp and be in an area
surrounded by trees and nature.
We had many activities, great
easy to get to know managers,
and wanted to be near Fort
Myers and Cape Coral.
They hope to fit right in and
be a friend to all the residents,
and look forward to being our
managers for the season of
2013. Their goal is to be liked
as well as Jim and Ann are
liked.
We want to welcome them to
our park, and we won't need to
say goodbye to Jim and Ann, as
they are going to become resi-
dents of Pioneer Creek RV
Resort.


Pioneer Creek RV News
By Reggie DeSmet


Stump The S vami
By John Szeligo
Well. football fans, the world of college football has been
turned upside down .ith turmoil this weekend. Who ,would have
thought Oregon and Kansas St. would both lose this weekend The
Svwami looked for a Texas upset of KSL next seek after a scare
from Bavlor. The Ducks" loss was more or a shock though. This all
makes total chaos in the BCS. It does help the SEC and probably%
gave new life to Alabama.
The Notre Dame Irish nov hold the top spot despite pla\ ing a
less-than-big time schedule. Even at 12-0. the Irish have not played
a schedule deserving a national title shot. Southern Cal. probably\
w without its QB this week. has not lived up to expectations and will
probably not stop this insanity either An\ '-loss SEC team is bet-
ter than Notre Dame. That is the sad reality\ of the system. It is the
first time since 1993 that Notre Dame has held the top spot.
Alabama looks to have the chance to repeat as National Champion
if the Tide wins in Atlanta.
The Gators did what was needed and won their 10th game. A
good bowl waits after they take care of business again this week.
Conference expansion has made it back to the college scene
just in time to distract from the season. Maryland is expected to
join the Big 10 very soon. Rutgers was thought to be their partner
in the move but it is now looking like Georgia Tech may be the one
in the role. Hopefully, FSU and Clemson will come to their senses
and join the Big 12 when the invites come. The ACC is simply
holding these teams down from being football powers. The ACC
started all this nonsense by raiding the Big East in 2004. Traditions
have been lost, travel to questionable destinations adds to the cost
of sports and in the long run, it will ruin the ACC which will be
reduced to a basketball conference.
This Thanksgiving Weekend has lost the Texas versus Texas
A&M game and the Pitt versus West Virginia "Backyard Brawl".
Some traditions in college football should just not be interfered
with.
Now let's look at this week's Bill 0" Fare ...
1. Florida at Florida State Gators' defense again holds the
FSU offense in check but this year score enough points to win the
game. Florida 24 FSU 14.
2. TCU at Texas Longhorns missing the Aggies this
Thanksgiving but carve up some Horned Frog instead. Texas 45
TCU 23.
3. LSU at Arkansas Tigers come to Hog Land for a BBQ.
LSU 34 Arkansas 24.
4. Marshall at East Carolina The Nation's leading passer,
Rakeem Cato, passes the 4,000-yard mark as the Herd pulls out a
win and a bowl bid. Marshall 34 ECU 31.
5. West Virginia at Iowa St. Tavon Austin showed the
nation against Oklahoma who the best overall player in college
football is. The All-American was put at tailback and responded
with 344 yards rushing on 21 carries. He also had 4 catches for 82
yards along with 146 return yards on 8 returns. WVU had 788 total
yards against Oklahoma. Look for more of the same as WVU
breaks a 5-game skid. West Virginia 56 Iowa St. 38.
6. Oklahoma St. at Oklahoma Sooners win a shootout
against rival from Stillwater. Landry Jones is the difference in this
one. Oklahoma 49 OSU 38.
7. Notre Dame at Southern Cal Please, Trojans, make this
nightmare go away and give the world a National Championship
Game worthy of its place. USC 21 Notre Dame 19.
8. Auburn at Alabama Tide rolls to the biggest win in
years over the arch rival. More coaching changes in the SEC?
Alabama 54 Auburn 10.
9. Missouri at Texas A&M Aggies will win the Battle of
the Newbies in the SEC. Johnny Football is fun to watch. Texas
A&M 35 Missouri 21.
10. Mississippi St. at Ole Miss The EGG BOWL is a toss


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up this year. These teams are very close in all areas. Going with the
home team. Ole Miss 31 MSU 28.
11. South Carolina at Clemson Tigers take the Battle of the
Palmetto State with too many offensive weapons for the
Gamecocks to counter. Clemson 33 USC 27.
12. Georgia Tech at Georgia Dawgs are tops in the Peach
State. UGA 41 Georgia Tech 17.
!3. Nlichigan at Ohio St. Ineligible Buckeyes win the game
and sta\ home for the holidays. OSUL 40 Michigan 24.
14. Kentucky at Tennessee Battle of the Fallen Coaches as
both programs are looking forward to 2013 under nesw leadership.
Tennessee 35 UK 10.
15. Miami at Duke Canes end with an easy wsin. NlMiami 41
Duke 20.
16. Oregon at Oregon St. The Civil War should be a good
one. Oregon will be making a statement after losing but it would
not stun me if the Beavers took out the Ducks too. Oregon 42 OSU
3S.
17. Washington ait Washington St. The Apple Bowl is
always fun to watch. It was more fun in the 60s when they played
on a muddy field and nobody could tell who was who after the first
quarter. Washington 35 WSU 30
18. Atlanta at Tampa Love to see another Bucs win but the
Falcons might be too much in 2012 for the improved Schiano boys.
Atlanta 27 Tampa 23.
19. Seattle at Miami Bruce Irvin sacks the Fish. Seattle 27
Miami 21.
20. Tennessee at Jacksonville Titans roll. Tennessee 34
Jacksonville 17.


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4C The Herald-Advocate, November 22, 2012



Seniors Hone red For Fall Sports


fJy JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
There were 18 senior athletes
honored on Nov. 9.
The hour-long introductions
and accolades took nearly an
hour in pre-game ceremonies
before the final 2012 Wildcat
football game against Fort
Pierce Central High.
Each was escorted by parents
and other family members as
they proceeded down the track
toward midfield, where the par-
ents went on into the stands and
seniors went about their activi-
ties of the evening.
The first seven were football
players, first so they could get
out tq pre-game warm-ups with
their teammates.
FOOTBALL
Octavio Alvarez was escorted
by his parents, Salvador and
Maria Alvarez. He has been a
four-year football and soccer
player and also participated in
track. He hopes to attend South
Florida State College and major
in criminal justice, perhaps cul-
minating a law enforcement ca-
reer as sheriff. He was presented
with the Caleb Skitka Award.
Aaron Barker was escorted by
his parents Michael and
Michelle Barker and grand-
mother Addie Barker. He is
three-year varsity football player
and been on the track team for
four years. He would like to
continue playing football in col-
lege while majoring in business.
He received the L. Dale "Doo-
ley" Carlton Award.
Alonzo "Kane" Casso was es-
corted by his parents Rudy and
Very Casso and Tabetha
Snelling along with his brothers
D'Vonte Hooks and JaJuan
Hooks and sister Alyssa Casso.
He has been on the football and
basketball teams for four years
and hopes to try track this
spring. He wants to attend col-
lege and play basketball while
pursuing a degree in nursing. He
accepted the Coach Bob Martin
Award.
Rufino Gabriel was escorted
by parents James and Gloria
Adler. A member of the football
team for four years, he has also
been in weightlifting for two
years, and been a member of
Key Club, the National Honor
Society and a Lionette sweet-
heart. He wants to study crimi-
nology. and pursue a career -in
law enforcement investigations.
H-e was presented the Luther
Colbert Sportsmanship Award.
Miguel Garcia, the son ofAl-
berto and Maria Garcia, was es-
corted by his mother. Finishing
his first year in football, he has
also played soccer for four
years. He hopes to earn a degree
in computer science and become
a computer engineer. He ac-
cepted the Martin Roberts
Award.
Paul Gough was escorted by
his parents Paul and Kim Gough
and grandparents, Jane Jacobs,
and Roy and Tina Jacobs. This is
his first year in football. He has
been involved with Future
Farmers of America for four
years. He wants to work for an
electrical company as aline-
man.
Jesus "Zeus" Zuniga is the
son of Maria Solis and Antonio
Zuniga. He was escorted by his
mother and Brenda Ruiz. He has
been on the football team and
weightlifting teams for four
years, and soccer and track
teams for two years. He would
like to play football in college
while majoring in business or
mechanics. He was presented
with the Charles C. and William
B. Dickey Award.
CHEERLEADERS
The three senior cheerleaders
were up next as they also had to
get ready for the game.


McKenna Fite was escorted
by her father Sam Fite. She has
been a varsity cheerleader for
two years and has participated in
Key Club, Hardee Young Re-
publicans and Future Farmers of
America. She has been in 4-H
activities at the county and state
level. She wants to become an
RN and continue to get a bache-
lor's degree in psychology as
well.
Shelby Lambert was escorted
by her parents Brian and April
Lambert. She has been a varsity
cheerleader for three years and
is this year's captain. She is also
a member of the National Honor
Society and Student Council, a
class officer and the 2012
Homecoming Queen. She will
pursue a degree in a medical
field.
Cassandra "Cassie" Reyna is
the daughter of Jesse and Linda
Reyna, and was escorted by her
mother and brother Joshua
Reyna. A cheerleader for four
years, she was JV captain in her
sophomore year and varsity co-
captain this year. She is a senior
class officer. She wants to obtain
a degree in elementary educa-
tion or become a fashion de-
signer planning new products.
BAND
There was a senior quartet
from band, ready to take their
places to re-enter the stadium
with their group.
Salvador Bravo is the son of
Marabella and Hector Bravo and
was escorted by his mother. He
has been involved in both the
marching and concert band. He
wants to continue his education
to major in music and engineer-
ing.
Nicole Franks was escorted
by her parents James and Amy
Franks. A member of the color
guard his year, she has also par-
ticipated in swimming and soft-
ball and is active in the
children's ministry in her
church. She will continue her
education to become a nurse.
Layla Luna was escorted by
her parents David Myers and
Lucy Myers. She has been a
member of the marching and
concert bands for four years',
chosen for the Heartland Honor
band for her junior an4d senior
years and in the Jazz band in her
freshman years. He also partici-
pates in the Heartland Chorale
-sOtis a ibiher ofthe National,.
Honor Sofe-ty. She wants to go
to FSU to major in pre-med and
continue through medical school
to become a surgeon.


Oscar Ramirez was escorted
by his parents Jose and Maria
Ramirez. He has been a member
of the marching and concert
bands for four years, the Heart-
land Honor band for two Nears
and the Jazz band as a freshman.
He is current the band's drum
major and band captain. He
hopes to march with the Crow n-
Drum and Bugle Corps and then
major in chemical engineering
as well as music composition
and performance.
BOYS GOLF
There are no seniors on the
girls golf squad, but three repre-
sented the boys golf team.
William Beattie was escorted
by his parents Bill and Maria
Beattie. He has played golf all
four years of high school while
also participating in the Junior
ROTC program and Future
Farmers of America. He plans
for a career in the military.
Will Bennett was escorted by
his parents Bobby and Sonja
Bennett. The four-year golfer
has also been a member of the
Key Club, National Honor Soci-
ety, Student Council and Future
Farmers of America. He has
been class president for three
years. He wants to get his AA
and continue for a bachelor's de-
gree at the university and major
is some aspect of environmental
concern.
Trenton Moon was escorted
by his parents Tony and Leslie
Moon. He is also a four-year
golfer and also been in the Na-
tional Honor Society and Future
Farmers of America. He plans to
pursue a four-year electrical pro-
gram and obtain his electrician's
license.
CROSS COUNTRY
Hector Flores, son of Susan
Lopez and Roy Rivera, was the
only cross country representa-
tive. He was escorted by his par-
ents, and has been a member of
cross country for one year, track
for two years and Key Club for
one year. He will continue in
college to pursue a nursing de-
gree.
Other cross country seniors,
unable to attend because of
preparation for regional compe-
tition were Abner Garcia, Mark
Gomez, Christian Moralez, Se-
lena Olmos, Ruben Ozuna and
Robert Navarro.
SWIMMING
-,. Swim ni.emor unable to.attaiiC
included April Garlanuud. Jusiih
Rickett, Will Craw tord, Ardrew
Reyna, Kaleb Rickett and Wyatt
Kofke.


Football seniors playing their final game were (from left) Octavio Alvarez, Paul Gough,
Aaron Barker, Miguel Garcia, Rufino Gabriel, Kane Casso and Jesus Zuniga.


The sep/or threpsome leading varsity cheerleading included,
Reyna, SPelby L4mbert and Makenna Fite.


(from left) Cassandra


Band seniors honored were (from left) Oscar Ramirez, Layla Luna, Nicole Franks and
Salvador Bravo.


PHOTOS BY MARIA TRUJILLO
Hector Flores was the lone cross country senior able to
attend Friday night senior awards. A half dozen others
were preparing for Saturday's regional meet.


The trio of boys golf seniors were (from left) William Beattie, Will Bennett and Trenton
Moon.






November 22.2012. The Herald-Advocate 5C


COUNTY COURT
The following marriage
licenses were issued recently
in the office of the county
court:
David Lcldon Henderson Jr..
43, Zolfo Springs. and Heather
.Victoria Moreno. 37. Zolfo
Springs.
Michael Angelo Cleto, 26,
Zolfo Springs. and Catalina
Perez Aragon, 18. Zolfo
Springs.
Christopher Kylen Albritton,
23, Wauchula, and Ashley
Renea Lewis, 20, Wauchula.
Terry Victor Williams, 38,
Wauchula, and Alesha Dawn
Baughman, 39, Wauchula.

The following small claims
cases were disposed of recent-
ly by the county judge:
FIA Card Services NA vs.
Kerry S. Schontag, voluntary
dismissal.
Capital One Bank vs. Juan C.
Martinez, voluntary dismissal.
Chase Bank USA vs. Luther
R. McClellan, voluntary dis-
missal.
Wauchula State Bank vs.
Burley Martinez, dismissed for
lack of progress.
The Palms Apartments vs.
Leavie J. Owens II and Brianna
D. Owens, judgment of eviction
of tenant.
LaBelle Fruit Co: and Wayne
Simmons vs. Conerly Tank &
Welding and David Conerly,
default judgment.
Rodolfo Lopez vs. Tomeka
S. Rodriguez, voluntary dis-
missal.
Emiliano Estrada vs. Angela
Luna and Manuel Formoso,
voluntary dismissal.
LVNV Funding vs. Chris-
topher D. Torres, voluntary dis-
missal.
Dale Loder and Auto Res-
toration Depo Inc. vs. Marshall
Nuccio and Family Business
Service, order for defendant's
motion for dismissal.
W.S, Badcock Corp. vs.
Guadalupe Camarillo, judg-
ment.
LVNV Funding vs. Donavan
Tollison Jr., judgment.

The following misde-
meanor cases were disposed
of recently by the county
judge:
Pedro Mendez, domestic bat-
tery, one month in jail, $677
fine and court costs, $50 public
defender fee and $50 cost of
prosecution placed on lien.


Vicente Zamora Jr.. violation
of city noise ordinance, adjudi-
cation Aithheld. S325 fine and
court costs. $50 cost of prosecu-
tion.
Breck John Moralez. domes-
tic battery, not prosecuted.

CIRCUIT COURT
The following civil actions
w,,ere filed recently in the office
of the circuit court:
Gloria A. Alvarado and the
state Department of revenue
(DOR) vs. Adrienne Alvarado,
petition for child support.
Erica Danielle Trevino Muse
and DOR vs. Bradford Muse,
petition for child support.
Susan E. Hall and DOR vs.
Ashley Nicole Norman, petition
for child support.
Anastasia Nicole Bessent
and DOR vs. Rashad Devon
Bessent Sr., petition for child
support.
Rhonda J. Schlipf and DOR
vs. Robert Schlipf Jr., petition
for child support.
Freddie A. Land Jr. vs. David
Lawrence, warden, Bernie Mc-
Cabe, State Attorney, and Ken
Tucker, state Department of
Corrections (DOC), petition to
review inmate situation.
Tehyhundra Shanika Whitley
and DOR vs. Charles McGhee,
petition for child support.
Amber Carlette Douglas and
DOR vs. Jordan Ethan Grims-
ley, petition for child support.
Dwayne Keith Bryant and
Latonja R. Bryant, divorce.
Jessica Elena Gutierrez vs.
Juan Gutierrez-Ceballos, peti-
tion for injunction for protec-
tion.
Ricto Lopez vs. DOC, peti-
tion to review inmate situation.
James V. Miller and Regena
Miller, divorce.
Briana Lobato vs. Daniel
Farias, petition for injunction
for protection

The following decisions on
civil cases pending in the cir-
cuit court were handed down
recently by the circuit court
judge:
Jeanne Smith Adkins and
DOR vs. Isaac Smith, order.
Debra Driggers vs. David
Blackney, dismissal of injunc-
tion for protection.
Santresa Harris and DOR vs.
Corey Antonio Watson, order.
Heather Brantley and Josh
Brantley, voluntary dismissal.
Mona Hurst and DOR vs.
Tisha Dawn Hurst, child sup-


CourthouseRep


port suspended.
Wauchula Police Department
s. Scott A. Hellein, approval of
stipulated settlement of petition
ror forfeiture.
Angie Garza and DOR vs.
Aurora Alamia Garza, child
support and arrears suspended.
Reyes 0. Navarro vs. Maria
Yolanda Luna. order.
Florida Family Insurance Co
vs. Irene Minor. voluntary dis-
missal.
Wauchula Police Department
vs. Judi Porter Downey, order
of forfeiture.
George F. Brown as trustee
vs. Ino Velazquez and Gloria
Velazquez. judgment of mort-
gage foreclosure.
Lynn Marie Blackwell and
DOR vs. Leland Hill Jr., order
on child support contempt.
Sylvia Regina Outley and
DOR vs. John Henry Snell,
order on child support con-
tempt.
Carmen Rojas and DOR vs.
Maria Lopez, child support
order.
Maria J. Valadez vs. Mario Y.
Valadez Jr., injunction for pro-
tection.
Jennifer Maldonado vs.
Cipriano Ibarra, dismissal of
injunction for protection.
Aurora Alamia Garza and
DOR vs. Seledonio Lozano,
child support order.
Tammy Spain and Lamar D.
Spain Jr., child support order.
Christopher T. Carlton and
DOR vs. Laura A. Colbert, final
order set aside and voluntary
dismissal.

The following felony crimi-
nal court cases were disposed
of recently by the circuit
judge. Defendants have been
adjudicated guilty unless
noted otherwise. When adju-
dicated guilty unless noted
otherwise. When adjudication
is withheld, it is pending suc-
cessful completion of proba-
tion. Sentences are pursuant
to an investigative report by
and the recommendation of
the state probation office and
also state sentencing guide-
lines. Final discretion is left to
the judge.
Joshua L. DeKoyer, posses-
sion of a firearm or ammo by a
convicted felon, not prosecuted.
Angel Diaz Hernandez,
unlawful use of a two-way
communication device and
offer to sell counterfeit driver's
license or ID card, probation
three years, $520 fine and court
costs, $200 cast of prosecution,
$150 investigative costs, $36
First Step probation fees; pos-


session of a fraudulently or
unlawfully issued DL, not pros-
ecuted.
Lakevin Johnson, abuse of
an elderly or disabled adult,
adjudication withheld, proba-
tion one year, S520 fine and
court costs, S100 cost of prose-
cution, S12 First Step probation
fees.
Landrey Johnson, abuse of
an elderly or disabled adult,
adjudication withheld, proba-
tion one year, $520 fine and
court costs, $100 cost of prose-
cution, $12 First Step probation
fees.
Jose Antonio Lobato, sale of
alprazolam within 1,000 feet of
a specified area, and possession
of drug paraphernalia, adjudica-
tion withheld, probation four
years, $520 fine and court costs,
S300 cost of prosecution, $200
investigative costs, $100 Flor-
ida Department of Law En-
forcement drug fee, $48 First
Step probation fees.
Jennifer Marie Bailey, bat-
tery on a person 65 or older,
adjudication three years, $677
fine and court costs, $150 pub-
lic defender fees, $200 cost of
probation, $100 investigative
costs, $36 First Step probation
fees.
Selethia Alfreda Glaze,
felony driving while license
suspended, transferred to coun-
ty criminal traffic court.
Tasha Lynn Hebner, viola-
tion of probation (original
charges possession of metham-
phetamine and possession of
drug paraphernalia, probation
revoked, six months in jail,
$150 public defender fees and
$200 cost of prosecution added
to outstanding fines and fees.
Kevin Duane Holloway Jr.,
possession of methylenedioxy-
methamphetamine (MDMA),
possession of cocaine and pos-
session of drug paraphernalia,
probation two years, $520 fine
and court costs, $200 cost of
prosecution, $100 investigative
costs, $24 First Step probation
fees.
Amanda Jo Morris, scheme
to defraud, adjudication with-
held, probation two years, $520
fine and court costs, $300 pub-
lic defender fees, $100 cost of
prosecution, $24 First Step pro-
bation fees; grand theft, not
prosecuted.
Barbara Owens Reed, grand
theft, adjudication withheld,
probation three yehrs, $520 fine


and court costs, $300 public
defender fees, $100 cost of
prosecution, $36 First Step pro-
bation fees, 100 hours commu-
nity service.
Davie Rodriguez, possession
of methamphetamine and pos-
session of drug paraphernalia,
not prosecuted.
Lee Esther Williams, failure
to sexual offender to report
change of address, probation
two years six months, $520 fine
and court costs, $300 public
defender fees, $100 cost of
prosecution and $30 First Step
probation fees placed on lien.
Victor Scott Williams, bur-
glary with assault or battery,
probation five years, $520 fine
and court costs, $150 public
defender fees, $300 cost of
prosecution, $200 investigative
costs, and $60 First Step proba-
tion fees placed on lien; child
abuse, tampering with a witness
in a first degree felony investi-
gation and battery not prosecut-


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Bridget Nicole Zuck, retail
theft and possession of drug
paraphernalia, two months in
jail,'$520 fine and cost costs,
$300 public defender fees and
$100 cost of prosecution placed
online; possession of metham-
phetamine, not prosecuted.

The following real estate
transactions of $10,000 or
more were filed recently in
the office of the clerk of court:
Deutsche Bank National
Trust Co. as trustee to Michael
J. and Jesse Gattis, $137,000.
Robert and Juanita L.
Spriggs to Charles L. and
Beulah Faye Lively, $60,000.
Household Finance Corp. Ill,
to Thomas and Guillermina J.
Trevino, $17,000.
Household Finance Corp. III
to Camilo P. Morillo, $22,000.
Flora Sanchez to Crystal
Sanders, $30,000.







6C The Herald-Advocate, November 22, 2012


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
HARDEE COUNTY
Case No. 252012CP000087

IN RE: ESTATE OF

GRACE E. SULLIVAN, a/k/a
GRACE N. SULLIVAN,
deceased.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

The administration of the
estate of GRACE E. SULLIVAN,
a/k/a GRACE N. SULLIVAN,
deceased, whose date of death
was August 21, 2011, and whose
social security Is xxx-xx-xxxx, Is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Hardee County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is
Post Office Drawer 1749,
Wauchula, FL 33873-1749. The
name and address of the
Personal Representative and the
Personal Representative's Attor-
ney are set forth below.

All other creditors of the dece-
dent and persons having claims
or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this
notice Is required to be served
must file their claims with the
Court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the dece-
dent and persons having claims
or demands against the dece-
dent's estate must file their
claims with this court WITHIN
THREE MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.

ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOR-
EVER BARRED.

NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.

The date of the first publication
of this Notice is November 22,
2012.


Personal Reprei
MICHAEL J. S
11245 5th St
Treasure Island,
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
John W. H. Burton, of
JOHN W. H. BURTON, R.
Post Office Drawer 1729
Wauchula, FL 33873-1729
Telephone: (863) 773-324
Telecopier: (866) 591-165
Florida Bar No. 0650137

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
FOR HARDEE COUNTY,
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO. 25201 OCA(
DEUTSCHE BANK NATI(
TRUST COMPANY AS TI
NOVASTAR MORTGAGE
ING TRUST, SERIES 200
NOVASTAR HOME EQUI
ASSET-BACKED CERTIFY
SERIES 2006-5
Plaintiff,


DISTANCE OF 518.57
FEET; THENCE SOL,'H
0'53'30" WEST A DIS-
TANCE OF 445.00 FEET
THENCE SOUTH 89'58'30"
WEST TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING, LESS THE
SOUTH 25 FEET FOR
ROAD EASEMENT, HARD-
EE COUNTY, FLORIDA.


TOGETHER WITH AN
EASEMENT FOR IN-
GRESS, EGRESS, UTILI-
TIES AND ANY LAWFUL
PURPOSE ACROSS THE
FOLLOWING DESCRIBED
PROPERTY:
A 30.00 FOOT EASEMENT
IN SECTIONS 33 AND 34,
TOWNSHIP 35 SOUTH,
RANGE 23 EAST, WHOSE
SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY
IS DESCRIBED AS FOL-
LOWS: BEGIN AT THE NW
CORNER OF THE ABOVE
DESCRIBED PARCEL FOR
A POINT OF BEGINNING;
THENCE NORTH 89*58'30"
EAST A DISTANCE OF
518.57 FEET TO THE NE
CORNER OF SAID PAR-
CEL; THENCE SOUTH
76'12'44" EAST A DIS-
TANCE OF 386.57 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 8917'33"
EAST A DISTANCE OF
1115.55 FEET; THENCE
NORTH 55*56'08" EAST A
DISTANCE OF 124.63
FEET TO A POINT ON THE
CENTER LINE OF COUNTY
ROAD #665 TO iEND THE
DESCRIPTION FOR SAID
SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY
OF SAID EASEMENT,
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORI-
DA.

SUBJECT TO OUTSTAND-
ING 1/2 OF ALL OIL, GAS
AND OTHER MINERALS
AS RESERVED IN DEED
BOOK 41, PAGE 51, PUB-
LIC RECORDS OF HARD-
EE COUNTY, FLORIDA.
A person claiming an interest
In the surplus from the sale, If
any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the Lis
Pendens must.file a claim within
60 days after the sale.

Dated this 13 day of November,
2012.

B. HUGH BRADLEY
As Clerk of said Court

Bv: Connie Coker


As Depi


tentative: This notice is provided I
ULLIVAN to Administrative Order N
reet East In accordance with the Am
FL 33706 with Disabilities Act, if
person with a disabil
needs any accommodate
order to participate In t
ceding, you are entitle
A. cost to you, to provision
tain assistance. Please
9 the Court Administrator
41 West Orang'erStreet, Wau
58 33873, Phone No. (863) 5
within 2 working days
11:22-29c receipt of this notice or pf
OF THE if you are hearing impaire
T T 800-955-8771 (TDD); If
T, IN AND voice Impaired, call 1-8
FLORIDA 8770 (V) (Via Florida
SServices).


000141

ONAL
TRUSTEE
SFUND-
6-5
TY LOAN
ICATES,


J. MICHAEL HAND; JODENE S.
HAND; GREEN TREE RETAIL
SERVICES BANK, INC.;
UNKNOWN PERSONS) IN POS-
SESSION OF THE SUBJECT
PROPERTY;
Defendants.
______________/


NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to a Final Judgement of
Foreclosure dated November 9,
2012, and entered in Case No.
252010CA000141, of the Circuit
Court of the 10th Judicial Circuit
in and for HARDEE County,
Florida. DEUTSCHE BANK
NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY AS
TRUSTEE NOVASTAR MORT-
GAGE FUNDING TRUST, SERIES
2006-5 NOVASTAR HOME EQUI-
TY LOAN ASSET-BACKED CER-
TIFICATES, SERIES 2006-5 is
Plaintiff and J. MICHAEL HAND;
JODENE S. HAND; UNKNOWN
PERSONS) IN POSSESSION OF
THE SUBJECT PROPERTY;
GREEN TREE RETAIL SERVICES
BANK, INC.; are defendants. I
will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash at HARDEE
COUNTY COURTHOUSE 417
WEST MAIN ST. SECOND FLOOR
HALLWAY OUTSIDE OF ROOM
202 WAUCHULA, FL 33873, at
11:00 a.m., on the 5th day of
December, 2012, the following
described property as set forth in
said Final Judgment, to wit:

COMMENCE AT THE NW
CORNER OF THE SE 1/4
OF SECTION 33, TOWN-
SHIP 35 SOUTH, RANGE
23 EAST, AND RUN
THENCE SOUTH ALONG
THE WEST LINE OF SAID
SE 1/4 A DISTANCE OF
1685.57 FEET; THENCE
NORTH 8958'30" EAST
ON A LINE PARALLEL TO
THE NORTH LINE OF SAID
SE 1/4 A DISTANCE OF
1354.60 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING;
THENCE NORTH 053'30"
EAST A DISTANCE OF
445.00 FEET; THENCE
NORTH 8958'30" EAST A


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRC
FLORIDA, IN AND
HARDEE COUNT

CASE NO. 252012CPC

IN RE: THE ESTATE OF (
E. SULLIVAN, a/k/a GRA
SULLIVAN, deceased.

NOTICE OF ACTIC

TO: LEO F. SULLIVAN, Jl
Address & Residenc
Unknown

YOU ARE NOTIFIED
Petition for Establlshm
Probate of Lost Will h
filed in this Court.
required to service a cop
written defenses, if
Petitioner's attorney, whc
and address are:

John W. H. Burton, of
JOHN W. H. BURTON,
EUf('l- nu-, w 17


rPost umce drawer
Wauchula, FL 3387

on or before the 1:'
December, 2012, and
original of the written
with the Clerk of this I
before service or i
thereafter. Failure to
file written defenses
may result in a judgmi
for the relief demand
further notice.

First publication on Nco
2012

B.HUGI
Cler

D


DOMES"

VIOLENT(

Don't Know V

To Turn For F

CALL THE CRIS

1 (800) 500


FOSMSATION


Rounfdu]


ty clerk Holiday Changes
pursuant Garbage Pickup
1o.2.065. The Thanksgiving holiday
mericans will change garbage collec-
you are tion around the county. The
ity who landfill will be closed on
ation In
this pro- Thursday only and will
d, at no resume regular hours on
s of cer- Friday and on Saturday
contact morning.
Sat 417 In Bowling Green, there'
chula, FI will be no pickup on
534-4690
of your Thursday or Friday, with a
leading; double route on Monday,
d, call Nov. 26. In Wauchula,
you are Thursday and Friday routes
00-995- will both be picked up on
SRelay Friday. Around the county

11:22,29c and in Zolfo Springs, Hardee
SOF THE Disposal will have no collec-
.UIT OF tion on Thursday. That route-
FOR will defer to the next regular
rY one on Monday, Nov. 26.
00ooo87 Get Help To

GRACE Pay Mortgage
CE N. Anyone who is unem-
ployed or underemployed
Through no fault of their own
DN might qualify to have their
house payment made for up
R. to 12 months while getting
,e back on their feet.
To find out, visit
I that a www.flhardesthithelp.org for
lent and information and submit an
as been application using referral
You are code 56032. A local advisor
y of your through the Hardee County
any, on Community Developmeht
Dsename Office, 412 W.Orange St.,
Wauchula, will then be
assigned to you.
P.A.


,1729
3-1729 Buy Toys For
3th day of Needy Tots
to file the Several individuals and
n defenses organizations are combining
Court either efforts to collect unwrapped
immediately new toys for needy children
serve and of the community. It's all
as required coordinated by Dep. Maria
ent or order Hall of the Hardee County
Sheriff's Office, and leader of
Explorer Post #400.
3vember 14, Toys are being collected at
Mid-Florida Credit Union on
SBRADLEY U.S. 17 across from Wal-
rkof Courts Mart on Saturday from 9
a.m. to 2 p.m. and other
3y: B. Reed stores and locations. Toys
deputy Clerk need to be collected by Dec.
10. For more information,
11:2212:13c call Hall at 773-0304 Ext.
201.

Marines Get Help
From Post Offices
ri Plan ahead to help the
r U.S. Marine Corps Toys for
CE Tots program. Postal carriers
in the Suncoast District,
including Hardee County, will
Here collect new, unwrapped toys
Help? left at customers' mailboxes
eP? on Dec. 1.
S LINE | Toys can also be deposit-
l LIN ed in bins in post office lob-
bies. For any questions call
-1119 Postmaster Gloria Jameson
tfc-dh at 735-8412.


Dear Hardee Citizens,
We work hard for our money
and the taxes we pay. We expect
our elected officials to see to it
that our money is spent wisely,.
Unfortunately that's not always
the case. Recently, the county
promoted Bob Clayton to Fire
Chief. Was he qualified? When
you compare his resume to the
county's qualifications for the
position, the answer is no. Did
he compete for the job against
other applicants? No. They did
this without even looking at
anyone else for the job.
Please understand that this is
not an attack on Mr. Clayton.
He's a nice guy and good fire-
fighter. I sure hope he fully
understands the responsibility
and liability that comes with the
position he has accepted.
This has everything to do
with the safety of our firefight-
ers and citizens, the liability to
the county, the authority of the
Manager and the responsibility
of the Commissioners. The
County Commission sets policy
and it is the Manager's job to
carry out that policy. If the
Manager was going to hire
someone with less than mini-
mum qualifications he should
have brought it to the Comm-
ission.
This all started when Clayton
was hired as Deputy Chief last
year. He was a Firefighter in
Lake Wales prior to that.
According to his resume he was
not qualified for the Deputy
Chief position. The qualifica-
tions are set forth in the
County's Job Description form.
This form lists the "Minimum
Qualifications" for the Deputy


Chief's position; it is approved
and the policy of the Comm-
ission. Also, according to his
personnel file. the County did
not conduct a background
investigation on Clayton. He
didn't meet these minimum
qualifications and no back-
ground check, yet we consid-
ered no other applicants.
Unusual, to say the least. They
did not try to find a qualified
applicant. Don't you think they'
would have tried to find a
Deputy Chief that exceeded the
"minimum qualifications?"
Does this sound like cronyism?
What other explanation fits?
Mr. Clayton worked for 19
years in the Polk County EMS
system (June 84-August 03).
An EMS system is not a Fire
Department. Part of our Fire
Department is EMS (Rescue),
but the real danger is in fire
fighting. The important deci-
sions made by the Fire Chief
are in the firefighting aspect of
the department. When hired as
Deputy Chief Mr. Clayton did
not live in the county (required
and extremely important), had
almost 7 years experience as a
full-time firefighter (10 years
are required) and zero time as a
fire supervisor (5 years are
required). An Associate's De-
gree is required but he didn't
have one. Did we take a Private
and make him a General?
I presented this information
to the Board of County Com-
missioners a few months ago.
They weren't very interested.
At the meeting the County
Manager told the Commiss-
ioner's that Mr. Clayton was
qualified for the Deputy Chief's
position. I asked them, if he was
qualified; why not have him
compete against other appli-
cants? The county did not inter-
view any other applicants when
they hired Mr. Clayton. Now,
they have promoted him to Fire
Chief without looking at any
other applicants. Are we getting
the most bang for our buck? I
don't think so.
I wrote Commission Chair-
man Bryant several letters ask-
ing questions about this issue.


His only reply to all my ques-
tions was not to answer them.
He said that the issue was under
the authority of the County
Manager. I replied that the
County Manager has the auth-
ority but the responsibility
remains with the Commission.
He had no reply.
Why does this concern me? I
know and understand the im-
portance of both positions. 1
know the life safety issues
involved with both positions.
You see, I spent 34 years work-
ing for Miami Dade County and
the last 13 of those years I held
the rank of Chief Fire Officer
with the Fire Department. I
have some insight into what is
required of the job. I am retired.
In a small fire department
like ours, the Chief and Deputy
Chief's most important job is
on the fire ground (at the scene
of a fire). They act as the fire
commander, organizing com-
mand and control of all aspects
of the activities on the fire
ground. The decisions they
make affect the life and safety
of all the firefighters and citi-
zens involved in the situation.
To become a fire commander
requires years of experience
and intense training and educa-
tion. According to his resume
he does not possess these skills
nor does he meet the county's
minimum qualifications".
Let's take the Manager's
opinion that Mr. Clayton is
qualified. Then why didn't we
seek other applicants? Why did-
n't we give our own Firefight-
ers a shot at the job? We proba-
bly have a dozen that are as
qualified, or more qualified,
than Mr. Clayton.
I've written several letters to
the County Commission and


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-.rito' Ditrc Aie Kare Whe at 86-54 3 no lae tha nono*usa



to 20 Not 6t Avenue Wacualoia383
HARDEE COUNTY DELEGATION

NOTICE OF MEETING


TO: All agencies of local government and interested parties
FROM: Representative Ben Albritton, Chairman, Hardee County Legislative
Delegation
SUBJECT: Hardee County Legislative Delegation Annual Meeting and Public
Hearing

Representative Ben Aibritton announces that the Hardee County Legislative Delegation
meeting will be held on TUESDAY DECEMBER 11, 2012 at 1:30 P.M. in the Hardee
County Commissioner's Chambers, Room 102, of the Hardee County Courthouse Annex
Building located at 412 West Orange Street in Wauchula.

If you would like to be placed on the agenda to speak, please contact Representative Ben
Albritton's District Aide, Karen Whaley at 863-534-0073 no later than noon on Thursday
December 6. 2012. Five (5) copies of all handouts and other information for delegation
members must be received by Representative Albritton's District Office at Post Office Box
1966, Bartow, Florida 33831 by Thursday December 6. 2012 or may be hand delivered
to 206 North 6th Avenue, Wauchula, Florida 33873.

Discussion of issues regarding local legislation for the 2013 Legislative Session will be held
at this time. All proposals for local bills are expected to be presented at the hearing and
must be drafted in bill form, accompanied by a Resolution from the local government
supporting the proposed legislation. This information must be received by Representative
Albritton's District Office at Post Office Box 1966, Bartow, Florida 33831 by..TJ.Ihirf
December 6. 2012 or may be hand delivered to 206 North 6th Avenue, Wauchula, Florida
33873.

Individuals wishing to address the Delegation on local bills being considered should plan
to attend the public hearing at the Hardee County Court House Annex Building, Room 102,
412 West Orange Street, Wauchula, Florida. Following the consideration of local bills, the
public will be invited to address the Delegation on state issues that are of concern.

If you have any questions or would like to be placed on the agenda for the Hardee County
Legislation Delegation Hearing, please email Karen Whaley at karen.whaley@myflorida-
house.gov or call 863-534-0073. 11:22,29c


Letter To The Editor

Citizen Questions Fire Chief's Qualifications


Your Business Could Appear Here!

Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels
At The Herald Advocate


appeared before them twice
over this issue. Why haven't
they questioned the manager
about this issue? I've ques-
tioned why their policy (Job
Qualifications) wasn't followed
and they have not investigated.
Why not? Isn't it their responsi-
bility?
So, the county hired a person
with questionable qualifications
(by their own standards) for a
position that makes life and
death decisions for the citizens
and firefighters, and does not
live in the county. Does this
make sense to you? Has your
Commission properly handled
this?
Now, the county has to hire a
Deputy Chief. The problem is if
they hire anyone that meets the
"minimum qualifications" as
written, that person would be
more qualified than the Fire
Chief. Cronyism has its pitfalls
and I'm sure cronyism will
solve this problem. Do you like
the way your tax money is
being spent?
Robert Cole,
Chief Fire Officer (retired)
Hardee County Citizen

Editor's Note: The Hardee
County Fire Chief job descrip-
tion does outline minimum
qualifications and education
levels but it does allow for a
combination of training and
experience to serve as a substi-
tute. Cole is a retired firefighter
in Miami Dade County and has
one son currently working for
the Hardee County Fire De-
partment and two other sons
formerly worked for the depart-
ment. Chief Bob Clayton said
he is qualified to serve as chief
and chose not to respond to this
letter.







November 22, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 7C


During the past week, sheriff's deputies and city police
officers investigated the following incidents and made the fol-
lowing arrests:
COUNTY
Nov. 17, a residential burglary on Grapefruit Street was report-
ed.

Nov. 16, Daniel Farias, 24. of 817 Pleasant Way, Bowling
Green, was arrested by Dep. Scott Heasley and charged with loi-
tering/prowling, two counts resisting an officer without violence,
fraud giving a false ID to an officer, carrying a concealed
weapon/firearm, and improper exhibition of a firearm.
Nov. 16, Robert Matthew Revell, 38, of 106 E. Banana St.,
Bowling Green, was arrested by Sgt. Lyle Hart and charged with
possession of methamphetamine, possession of marijuana, posses-
sion of drug paraphernalia and failure to appear in court.
Nov. 16, Amanda Leigh Griffin, 34 ,of 219 Cracker Lane,
Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Ryan Waters on a charge of with-
holding support of children.

Nov. 15, Rebecca Diane Faulk, 41, of 1615 Penney Ave.,
Sebring, was arrested by Dep. John McLeod and charged with lar-
ceny petit theft.

Nov. 14, Pedro Pineda Gutierrez, 48, of 711 N. Florida Ave.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. C. Albritton on charges of grand
theft vehicle, hit-and-run leaving the scene of a crash, driving while
license suspended and violation of probation.
Nov. 14, Bennie James Richardson, 52, of 105 Spearman St.,
Bellzoni, Miss., was arrested by Dep. C. Albritton on two counts of
contempt of court.
Nov. 14, Steven Morris Heggen, 44, of 5729 Cheyenne Circle,'
Virginia Beach, Va., was arrested by Dep. Kim Pfeiffer on two
counts of failure to appear in court.
Nov. 14, Alsibiaoes Aguilera, 50, of 3994 Sunset Dr., Zolfo,
Springs, was arrested by the Drug Task Force and charged with
trafficking in marijuana, possession of a structure/vehicle to manu-
facture drugs, production of marijuana, larceny use of utilities
to manufacture a controlled substance and possession of drug para-
, phemalia.



NOTICE OF APPLICATION

FOR TAX DEED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that PENDER NEWKIRK
CUST TC09 LLC, the holder of the following certificate
has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance,
the description of the property, and the names in
which it was assessed are as follows:

CERTIFICATE NO.: 692 YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2009

Description of Property:
W1/2 OF LOTS 8 TO 10 INC
BLK 31 CARLTON & MCEWEN ADD
PRO-77-56 339P18 564P829
630P664 642P858

SUBJECT TO RESERVATIONS, COVENANTS,
RESTRICTIONS, AND4ASEMENTS OF RECORD.

Name in which asseesed: AbDELA 0. CHANCEY

Said property being in the County of HARDEE, State
of Florida.

Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according
to law, the property described in such certificate shall
be sold to the highest bidder at the Hardee County
Courthouse, 417 West Main Street, second floor hall-
way outside of Room 202, Wauchula, FL 33873 on the
19T day of DECEMBER, 2012, at 11:00 a.m.

Dated this 9'h day of November, 2012.

B. Hugh Bradley
Clerk of Circuit Court
Hardee County, Florida
AD No: 1
By: Alicia C. Albritton, Deputy Clerk
Tax Deed File No.: 252012TD015XXXX
Pursuant to F.S. 197.512 11:15-12:6c




NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that PENDER NEWKIRK
CUST TC09 LLC, the holder of the following certificate
has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance,
the description of the property, and the names in
which it was assessed are as follows:

CERTIFICATE NO.: 514 YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2009

Description of Property:
LOT 11 BLK 13
WAUCHULA HILLS SUBD
28 33S 25E
486P484 200825005014
SUBJECT TO RESERVATIONS, COVENANTS,
RESTRICTIONS, AND EASEMENTS OF RECORD.

Name in which assessed: KEVIN E. CHRISTMAS

Said property being in the County of HARDEE, State
of Florida.


Nov. 13, Kelly Vang, 20, of 635 S. Fifth Ave. (U.S. 17 N.).
Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Michael Lake on a charge of with-
holding support of children.
Nov. 13, Andy Byers, 21, of 2523 Garza Road, Zolfo Springs,
w as arrested by Probation Officer Davis on a charge of violation of
probation.
Nov. 13, a vehicle stolen at Moffitt Road and U.S. 17, and a
fight on U.S. 17 North were reported.

Nov. 12, a residential burglary on Louisiana Street, a vehicle
stolen on U.S. 17 South and criminal mischief on Mockingbird
Road were reported.
WAUCHULA
Nov. 18, a theft on East Bay Street was reported.

Nov. 17, Emelito Ramos-DeLeon, 40, of 150 Sims Road,
Wauchula, was arrested by Ofc. David Cruz and charged with dis-
orderly intoxication.
Nov. 17, Demetrius Cornelius Barfield, 23, of 5023 Poplar
Ave., Bowling Green, was arrested by Ofc. Justin Wyatt on an out-
of-county warrant.
Nov. 17, Elodia Martinez, 52, of 902 Alabama St., Wauchula,
was arrested by Ofc. John Nicholas and charged with retail theft
and disorderly intoxication.
Nov. 17, a theft was reported on U.S. 17 South.

Nov. 15, a theft on Eddy.Street was reported.

Nov. 14, a theft on East Palmetto Street was reported.

Nov. 13, Ruben Angel Rivas, 20, of 609 E. Bay St., Wauchula,
was arrested by Ofc. John Nicholas and charged with trespassing
on an occupied structure or conveyance and violation of probation.
Nov. 13, a residential burglary on East Main Street and a theft
on Carlton Street were reported.

BOWLING GREEN
Nov. 18, criminal mischief on West County Line Road was
reported.

Nov. 14, criminal mischief on Lake Branch Road was report-
ed.



NOTICE OF APPLICATION

FOR TAX DEED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that PENDER NEWKIRK
CUST TC09 LLC, the holder of the following certificate
has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance,
the description of the property, and the names in
which it was assessed are as follows:

CERTIFICATE NO.: 99 YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2009
Description of Property:

DESCRIPTION:
LOTS 15 TO 16 BLK 14
BOWLING GREEN RR SURVEY
04 33S 25E
525P621 (NC) 527P135 (NC)
PMR7/99 WILL&DC-572P237P239
(MIC) AFF-661 P779 661 P780
661P782 661P1050

SUBJECT TO RESERVATIONS, COVENANTS,
RESTRICTIONS, AND EASEMENTS OF RECORD.

Name in which assessed: LINDA SUE GIBSON

Said property being in the County of HARDEE, State
of Florida.

Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according
to law the property described in such certificate shall
be sold to the highest bidder at the Hardee County
Courthouse, 417 West Main Street, second floor hall-
way outside of Room 202, Wauchula, FL 33873 on the
5TH day of December, 2012, at 11:00 a.m.

Dated this 25th day of October, 2012.

B. Hugh Bradley
Clerk of Circuit Court
Hardee County, Florida
AD No: 1
By: Alicia C. Albritton, Deputy Clerk
Tax Deed File No.: 252012TD007XXXX
Pursuant to F.S. 197.512 1
1:1 -22c



NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that PENDER NEWKIRK
CUST TC09 LLC, the holder of the following certificate
has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance,
the description of the property, and the names in
which it was assessed are as follows:

CERTIFICATE NO.: 1040 YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2009
Description of Property:

LOTS 12 & 13 BLK 19
R & S RE-SUB OF R & S ADD
LOCATED IN 26-3S4-25E
200825003951/DC-NM, SR

SUBJECT TO RESERVATIONS, COVENANTS,
RESTRICTIONS, AND EASEMENTS OF RECORD.

Name in which assessed: ELENA MENDOZA AND
HEIRS OF N R

Said property being in the County of HARDEE, State
of Florida.


CORRECTION


Receiver/defensive back Miguel Garcia accepted the Martin
Roberts Award from his grandson Kelly Durrance.



NOTICE OF APPLICATION

FOR TAX DEED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that TENDER NEWKIRK
CUST TC09 LLC, the holder of the following certificate
has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance,
the description of the property, and the names in
which it was assessed are as follows:

CERTIFICATE NO.: 921 YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2009

Description of Property:

DESCRIPTION:
LOT 13 BLK 14
MAGNOILIA MANOR
PMR6-93 CD-449P286 PRO-93-062
449P287 5219134

SUBJECT TO RESERVATIONS, COVENANTS,
RESTRICTIONS, AND EASEMENTS OF RECORD.

Name in which assessed: LINDA MYRICK AND
MACARTHUR MYRICK
Said property.lteingj t1e County of HARDEE, State
of Florida.

Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according
to law the property described in such certificate shall
be sold to the highest bidder at the Hardee County
Courthouse, 417 West Main Street, second floor hall-
way outside of Room 202, Wauchula, FL 33873 on the
5TH day of December, 2012, at 11:00 a.m.

Dated this 301h day of October, 2012.

B. Hugh Bradley
Clerk of Circuit Court
Hardee County, Florida
AD No: 1
By: Alicia C. Albritton, Deputy Clerk
Tax Deed File No.: 252012TD008XXXX
Pursuant to F.S. 197.512 11:1-22c




NOTICE OF APPLICATION

FOR TAX DEED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that PENDER NEWKIRK
CUST TC09 LLC, the holder of the following certificate
has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance,
the description of the property, and the names in
which it was assessed are as follows:

CERTIFICATE NO.: 910 YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2009

Description of Property:

LOT 3 BLK 8
MAGNOLIA MANOR
85P307 AFF&DC-288P307P308
AFF&DC-411P117&118 DC-461 P531P
532 PR94-010 PMR2/94 623P931
725P744-LP 200725008486
200725008806
SUBJECT TO RESERVATIONS, COVENANTS,
RESTRICTIONS, AND EASEMENTS OF RECORD.

Name in which assessed: GEORGE E. PATTERSON

Said property being in the County of HARDEE, State
of Florida.

Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according
to law, the property described in such certificate shall
be sold to the highest bidder at the Hardee County
Courthouse, 417 West Main Street, second floor hall-
way outside of Room 202, Wauchula, FL 33873 on the
19T day of DECEMBER, 2012, at 11:00 a.m.

Dated this 7" day of November, 2012.

B. Hugh Bradley
Clerk of Circuit Court
Hardee County, Florida
AD No: 1
By: Alicia C. Albritton, Deputy Clerk
Tax Deed File No.: 252012TD011XXXX
Pursuant to F.S. 197.512 11 15-12:6c


Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according
to law, the property described in such certificate shall
be sold to the highest bidder at the Hardee County
Courthouse, 417 West Main Street, second floor hall-
way outside of Room 202, Wauchula, FL 33873 on the
19T day of DECEMBER, 2012, at 11:00 a.m.

Dated this 8'" day of November, 2012.

B. Hugh Bradley
Clerk of Circuit Court
Hardee County, Florida
AD No: 1
By: Alicia C. Albritton, Deputy Clerk
Tax Deed File No.: 252012TD012XXXX)
Pursuant to F.S. 197.512 1 15-12


Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according
to law, the property described in such certificate shall
be sold to the highest bidder at the Hardee County
Courthouse, 417 West Main Street, second floor hall-
way outside of Room 202, Wauchula, FL 33873 on the
19T" day of DECEMBER, 2012, at 11:00 a.m.

Dated this 9'" day of November, 2012.

B. Hugh Bradley
Clerk of Circuit Court
Hardee County, Florida
AD No: 1
By: Alicia C. Albritton, Deputy Clerk
Tax Deed File No.: 252012TD014XXXX
Pursuant to F.S. 197.512 111-12







8C The Herald-Advocate, November 22, 2012


Wha'sFo


I Lunch


[ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS
MONDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Golden
Grahams, Graham Crackers,
Blueberry Pop Tarts, Orange
Juice, Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Alternate Meal,
Chicken Pattie on Bun,
Hotdogs, Lettuce & Tomato,
Green Beans, Ice Cream, Grape
Juice, Condiments and Milk

TUESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Lucky
Charms, Graham Crackers,
Breakfast Pizza, Applesauce,
Condiments and Milk
Lurnch: Alternate Meal,
Chicken Pattie on Bun,
Hotdogs, Lettuce & Tomato,
Green Beans, Ice Cream, Grape
Juice, Condiments and Milk

WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Frosted
Flakes, Graham Crackers,
Cinnie Minies, Pears, Condi-
ments and Milk
Lunch: Alternate Meal,
Cowboy Macaroni w/Roll, Ham
& Cheese Wrap, Carroteenies,
Steamed Broccoli, Applesauce,
Condiments and Milk

THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Lucky
Charms, Graham Crackers,
Waffles, Sausage Patty, Mixed
Fruit, Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Alternate Meal,
Hamburger Gravy, Rolls, Fish
Square, Lettuce & Tomato,
Mash Potatoes, Orange
Wedges, Condiments and Milk

FRIDAY .
Breakfast: Cereal Honey Nut
Cheerios, Graham Crackers,
Breakfast Stick, Peaches,
CondiOments and Milk
Lunch: Alternate Meal,
Burrito, Corndog, Cucumbers,
Mixed Vegetables, Orange
Juice, Condiments and Milk

JUNIOR HIGH ]
MONDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Variety,
Smart Cookies, Pop Tarts
Variety, Juice, Condiments and
Milk
Lunch: Chicken Nuggets,
Rolls, Alternate Meal, Pepperoni
Pizza, Lettuce & Tomato, Pinto
Beans, Peaches, Condiments
and Milk


TUESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Variety,
Graham Crackers, Breakfast
Pizza, Applesauce, Condiments
and Milk
Lunch: Chicken Pattie
w/Bun, Hotdog w/Bun,
Pepperoni Pizza, Alternate
Meal, Lettuce & Tomato.
Garden Peas, Diced Pears,
Condiments and Milk

WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Variety,
Graham Crackers, Waffle,
Sausage Patty, Diced Pears,
Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Cowboy Macaroni,
Rolls, Deli Ham & Cheese
Wrap, Cheese Pizza, Alternate
Meal, Lettuce & Tomato,
Broccoli, Applesauce, Condi-
ments and Milk

THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Variety,
Buttered Toast, Scrambled
Eggs w/Cheese, Fruit Cocktail,
Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Hamburger Gravy,
Rolls, Fish Sandwhich,
Pepperoni Pizza, Alternate
Meal, Lettuce & Tomato, Mash
Potatoes, Fresh Nectarines,
Fresh Peaches, Fresh Pears,
Fresh Whole Apples, Condi-
ments and Milk

FRIDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Variety,
Graham Crackers, Breakfast
Rounds, Peaches, Condiments
and Milk
Lunch: Beef & Bean Burrito,
Corndog, Cheese Pizza,
Alternate Meal, Lettuce &
Tomato, Mixed Vegetables,
Juice, Condiments and Milk

SENIOR HIGH 7
MONDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Super
Donut, Orange Juice, Condi-
ments and Milk
Lunch: Cheeseburger on a
Bun, Chicken Pattie on Bun,
French Fries, Tossed Salad,
Fruit Mix, Condi-ments and Milk

TUESDAY
Breakfast: Biscuit, Sausage,
Applesauce, Condiments and
Milk
Lunch: Cheeseburger on a
Bun, Chicken Pot Pie, Broccoli,
Tossed Salad, Cucumber &


Tomato Salao. Peaches,
Biscuit. Condiments ana Milk

WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Pancakes.
Sausage Patty. Pears, Condi-
ments and Milk
Lunch: Hamburger on a Bun,
Lasagna w/Ground Beef,
Green Beans, Summer Squash,
Pears, Tossed Salad, Rolls,
Condiments ana Milk

THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Jumbo
Waffles, Sausage Patty, Mixed
Fruit, Condiments and Milk


Lunch: Cheeseburger on a
Bun. Chicken Nuggets. Savory
Rice, Tossed Salad. Mixed
Vegetables. Applesauce, Rolls,
Condiments and Milk

FRIDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Breakfast
Stick, Pineapple Chunks,
Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Tacos, Pinto Beans,
Corn, Pineapple Chunks,
Orange Juice, Tossed Salad,
Condiments and Milk

Individual menus are subject to
change.


HutngFsing Foecas


11/22/2012
Sun Data
Rise 6 53 AM
Set 5 33 PM
Day Length
10 hrs 40 mins.
Moon Data
Rise 1 54PM
Set: 138 AM
Overhead. 8:11 PM
Underfoot. 7:49 AM
Moon Phase
71%
Waxing Gibbous
Major Times
7:49 AM -949 AM
8:11PM- 10:11 PM
Minor Times
1-38 AM 2:38 AM
1:54 PM -2:54 PM
Solunar Rating
Average+
Time Zone
UTC: -5
11/23/2012
Sun Data
Rise: 6:54 AM
Set: 5:33 PM
Day Length
10 hrs. 39 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 2:28 PM
Set: 2:31 AM
Overhead: 8:55 PM
Underfoot: 8:33 AM
Moon Phase
80%
Waxing Gibbous
Major Times
8:33 AM -10:33 AM
8:55 PM 10:55 PM
Minor Times
2:31 AM -3:31 AM
2:28 PM 3:28 PM
Solunar Rating
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -5


11/24/2012
Sun Data
Rise 6 55 AM
Set 5 32 PM
Day Length
10 hrs. 37 mins
Moon Data
Rise: 3.03 PM
Set: 3:25 AM
Overhead: 9:39 PM
Underfoot: 9:17 AM
Moon Phase
87%
Waxing Gibbous
Major Times
9:17AM-11: 17AM
9:39 PM 11:39 PM
Minor Times
3:25 AM 4:25 AM
3:03 PM -4:03 PM
Solunar Rating
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -5
11/25/2012
Sun Data
Rise: 6:56 AM
Set: 5:32 PM
Day Length
10 hrs. 36 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 3:40 PM
Set: 4:18 AM
Overhead: 10:24 PM
Underfoot: 10:02 AM
Moon Phase
93%
Waxing Gibbous
Major Times
10:02 AM-12:02 PM
10:24 PM-12:24 AM
Minor Times
4:18AM- 5:18AM
3:40 PM 4:40 PM
Solunar Rating
Good
Time Zone
UTC: -5


11/26/2012
Sun Data
Rise 6 56 AM
Set 5 32 PM
Day Length
10 hrs. 36 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 4 19 PM
Set: 5:11 AM
Overhead: 11: 10PM
Underfoot' 10:47 AM
Moon Phase
97%
Waxing Gibbous
Major Times
10:47 AM-12:47 PM
11:10PM- 1:10AM
Minor Times
5:11 AM- 6:11 AM
4:19PM- 5:19 PM
Solunar Rating
Better
Time Zone
UTC: -5
11/27/2012
Sun Data
Rise: 6:57 AM
Set: 5:32 PM
Day Length
10 hrs. 35 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 5.01 PM
Set: 6:03 AM
Overhead: --:--
Underfoot: 11:34 AM
Moon Phase
99%
Waxing Gibbous
Major Times
11:34AM- 1:34 PM
Minor Times
6:03 AM 7:03 AM
5:01 PM 6:01 PM
Solunar Rating
Best
Time Zone
UTC: -5


11/28/2012
Sun Data
Rise 6 58 AM
Set 5 32 PM
Day Length
10 hrs. 34 mins.
Moon Data
Rise- 5 46 PM
Set 6.54 AM
Overhead: -:-
Underfoot: 12.22 PM
Moon Phase
100%
FULL MOON
Major Times
12:22 PM "2:22 PM
Minor Times
6:54 AM-7:54 AM
5:46 PM 6:46 PM
Solunar Rating
Best
Time Zone
UJTC: -5
11/29/2012
Sun Data
Rise: 6:59 AM
Set: 5:32 PM
Day Length
10 hrs. 33 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 6:34 PM
Set: 7:44 AM
Overhead: 12:46 AM
Underfoot: 1:10 PM
Moon Phase
99%
Waning Gibbous
Major Times
12:46 AM -2:46 AM
1:10 PM- 3:10 PM
Minor Times
7:44 AM 8:44 AM
6:34 PM 7:34 PM
Solunar Rating
Better++
Time Zone
UTC: -5


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
With a couple of games under
their collective belts, the Har-
dee girls basketball team will
have a light holiday week.
They resume action next
Monday with a visit from
Palmetto, followed by another
on Tuesday by Sebring. The
three-game week continues
with games next Thursday, Nov.
29. with a trip to Bradenton
Southeast. JV games are at 6
p.m., followed by varsity about
7:30.
The following week brings
the start of district action. After
a Dec. 3 visit from Lake Placid,
district opponent Lake Wales
comes in on Dec. 4.
The girls saw their first action
in a pre-season tournament
Nov. 7-8 at Dixie Hollins High
in Tampa, where they played
the host school and then
Keswick Christian to get their
feet wet.
The season began in earnest
on Nov. 13 with a varsity-only
home encounter with Walker
Academy from Avon Park. It
was touch and go, especially
when Hardee tied the game
with three minutes left. But a
couple of hoops and free throws
put Walker back on top for the
36-30 win.
"It was a good start to the
season. We're working out
kinks, including 15 turnovers.
Protecting the ball better will
help usquickly improve. I'm
looking forward to seeing the
girls grow and improve
throughout the season," com-
mented Head Coach Jeanne


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Myrie.
Senior Robin Tanksley
topped the balanced Hardee
scoring with eight points.
Juniors Bailey Carlton and
Alyssa Casso had seven apiece.
Freshman Florence Lee had
three, sophomore Allison Smith
two and teammate Makayla
Faulk also two points.
Carlton led the theft parade
with four steals, with Casso and
Lee each picking up one. Four
players each grabbing five
rebounds apiece were Casso,
Tanksley, Lee and Smith.
Carlton, Faulk, Amma Metayer,
and Endreina Martinez also
,nared rebounds. Lee picked up
a pair of assists.
The girls hosted DeSoto last
Thursday and still suffered
some from the turnover plague
in a 39-22 loss. Tanksley was
again high scorer with a half
dozen points, Smith and Lee
each had five and Carlton four.
Smith pulled down 10 rebounds
and Lee added five more.
Other varsity players are sen-
ior Stephanie Perez and junior
Carleigh Coleman.
The JV team, under Coach
Andy Maddox, saw its first
action last Thursday and had a
good opening game against
DeSoto in a 35-28 loss.
Soph Jakaysha Lindsay
topped scoring with 14 points.
Classmate Alexi Santana added
eight and freshman Annabel
Retana also had eight. Brooke
Faulk added two points. Other
JV players are sophs Alexan
Maddox, Catherine Jordan,
Aundrea Pace and Hailey
Williams and freshman Desira
Martinez.


ANY SPECIALTY


$10

Veggie, Howie Maui. Meat Eaters or The Works
r-v ZOLFO SPRINGS (
105 SR 64 East
b Inside BP
Lions 735-2100


AOTIOIE of


PUBlC1


KSHOP


The HARDEE COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS


invites the Public to a




WORKSHOP


for the




VISIONING PLAN






FRIDAY, DECEMBER 14,2012,8:30 A.M.





COUNTY COMMISSIONERS BOARD ROOM


412 W. Orange St., Rm. 102, Courthouse Annex, 1st floor,


Wauchula, Florida


For more information:
Call the County Planning Department at (863) 767-1964

Email kevin.denny@hardeecounty.net

Visit www.hardeecounty.net/visioning


11:22c


Hoop Girls


Take A Break


LARGE PIZZA




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