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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028302/00453
 Material Information
Title: The Herald-advocate
Portion of title: Herald advocate
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Wm. J. Kelly
Place of Publication: Wauchula Fla
Publication Date: 10/11/2012
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Wauchula (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hardee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Hardee -- Wauchula
Coordinates: 27.546111 x -81.814444
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: 55th year, no. 31 (Sept. 2, 1955)-
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579544
oclc - 33886547
notis - ADA7390
lccn - sn 95047483
System ID: UF00028302:00453
 Related Items
Preceded by: Hardee County herald
Preceded by: Florida advocate (Wauchula, Fla.)

Full Text





Citrus Crop

Forecast Today
.. Column 5B


The


Herald-Advocate


Hardee County's Hometown Coverage


112th Year, No. 45
3 Sections, 32 Pages


Thursday, October 11, 2012


In


70
Plus 5 S;ales Ta




Tech Firm


Gets Added


6 Y 4Y NPIf.A/ TAJJILL ,
First graders at Zolfo Springs Elementary School experienced something out of this world
last Thursday. Thanks to teacher Lindsey Cole, moon rocks landed at ZSE! It's not every day
someone gets. to see genuine moon rocks, so it wasn't only the students who were moonstruck as they excitedly
crowded around the display table. Teachers and staff members gathered close, too, hoping to catch a good glimpse.
The inset at right shows a closeup of one of the moon rocks.


$3 Mil
By MICHAEL KELLY
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Hardee County Indus-
trial Development Authority
agreed to give Continuum Labs
Inc. an additional $3 million
over the next year to continue
developing its CareSync prod-
uct and establish a technology
industry in the county.
Contract details were not
finalized during the Tuesday
meeting, but the board agreed in'
principal to fund the company
and allow the first draw of
$355,642 to be taken before
finalizing the agreement during
its November meeting.
Continuum Labs CEO Travis
Bond said it was important to


ion


continue earlier funding quickly
so the company could begin hir-
ing people before the' holiday
season and not fall behind in
developing the health-care
application.
"Every day we wait I have to
adapt to changes in the market,"
he said. "I want to proceed as
quickly as we can. I want six
job-offer letters to go out by
Friday, but I can't do that with-
out funding."
Bond was asked by Lavon
Cobb what the money would be
used for. "I want to have a good
feeling about the operating
expenses and where the money
is going," he said.
See TECH 2A


County Commissioner


MOONSTRUCK! Asked To Apologize

Authentic Moon Rocks Land At ZSE Grady Johnson Given


By MARIA TRUJILLO
For The Herald-Advocate
That's one small step for Zolfo Springs Elementary
School, one giant leap for education.
Since cancelling NASA's Constellation program in
2010, dreams of seeing someone on the moon anytime
soon are shattered.
But now, thanks to a first-grade teacher at ZSE, stu-
dents there have had a chance to experience what is sure
to be a once-in-a-lifetime moment. Last Thursday
morning, Lindsey Cole gave first graders the first
chance at seeing actual moon rocks.




Tourism Viable


Industry Here


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Tourism, plus.
There's agri-tourism, eco-
tourism, cultural tourism and
ethnographic tourism.
These and many facets of
them were part of the prelimi-
ndry draft of the University of
South Florida tourism study


WEATHER
DATIE HIGH LW BWI
10/03 90 73 0.00
10/04 90 71 0.02
10105 91 72 0.22
10/06 89 72 0.00
10/07 88 71 0.03
10/08 87 72 0.11
10109 89 71 0.28
TOTAL Rainfall to 10/09/12 40.13
Same period last year 50.16
Ten Year Average 5281
Source: Univ. ofl a. Ona Research Center

INDEX
Classifieds..................68B
Courthouse Report.......8C
Crime Blotter...............12B
Hardee Living................2B
Information Roundup.. 11A
Obituaries......................4A
School Lunch Menus....6A



II I 1111 I
8 33913 00075 7


presented in a special meeting
last Friday of the Hardee
County Chamber of Commerce
and Industrial Development
Authority.
The upshot of the two-hour
meeting was the need to take
planning a step further. "The
county has had its recent vision-
ing process, Wauchbla has its
five-year Community Redevel-
opment Agency plan and there
have been others over the.years.
It's time to implement those
plans effectively," said presen-
ters.
The county has 408,000
acres, but the majority is
already in use for mining, agri-
cultural and natural resources,
leaving about 55,000 acres, or
13 percent, in which to develop
the infrastructure and industry
to move the county forward.
The IDA provided the funds
and the Chamber is now the
venting agency for county pro-
posed economic development
projects. Rick Justice, IDA
board representative, and Casey
Dickson, Chamber director,
opened the crowded meeting.
Dickson said the tourism study
was a multi-phase process to
encourage economic develop-
ment and use of the county's
assets, including the county's
designation as bone valley, a
phosphate and historic area.
They introduced Mary Jane
Stanley, USF project director
See TOURISM 3A


The students from Linda Barrington, Helen Neal,
Melanie Smith, Sharon Ussery and Cole's classrooms
were taken to the cafeteria, where they were told a bit
about the moon and then viewed a video of when Neil
Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin first landed and walked on
the moon.
Afterward, the little ones "counted down" to when
the rocks "landed" at ZSE. Then came the big moment,
walking up and looking at all of the lunar samples.
S Cole was able to have the samples sent to ZSE
because she is certified in handling them.
It all came about when she was a student at Warner
University, and one of her professors offered the certifi-
cation class to whoever was interested. Her professor
had previously taken the four-hour course, and still had
contact with NASA.
Cole took and passed the course.
To get the lunar samples to ZSE, Cole had to fill out
some paperwork noting why she wanted the rocks and
what she intended to use them for. She and Principal
Melanie Henderson also had to sign the forms in order
See MOONSTRUCK 10A


30 Days To Remove

'Defamatory' E-Posts


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
A demand has gone to a
county commissioner to amend
his ways.
Alma Albritton, wife of
County Manager Lex Albritton,
wrote a letter Oct. 3 to Com-
missioner Grady Johnson ask-
ing him to "retract your dishon-
est statements and your defam-
atory posts regarding my hus-
band ... and submit an apology
for the defamatory remarks, the
misleading statements, the false
accusations and the attack on
his mental state of being."
The full text of the letter is
printed on page 2-B of this
issue. Albritton says that John-
son's website has intentional


posts, put there with malice and
intent. There was no answer to a
request for a response from
Commissioner Johnson.
She said Tuesday that she
needed "to speak out against a
legal system which voices
'innocent until proven guilty'
but allows governing officials
to continue the way Commis-
sioner Grady Johnson has and
call it 'within the scope of his
statutory authority.'
"If the law promotes this and
finds this kind of thing to be
acceptable, then perhaps it's
time to change the law!" Al-
britton commented.
"I would like to go on record
and say the other four commis-
See APOLOGIZE 2A


HISTORIC HEAP


PHOTO BY MARIA TRUJILLO
Heavy equipment sits amid the rubble as a historic "downtown" Zolfo Springs building is demolished. The structure,
erected in the mid-1920s according to veteran Town Commissioner Lois Dandridge's best estimate, was a fixture on
State Road 66 by the corner of U.S. 17. Once called "The Brown Building," it at times housed two barber shops, a
grocery store, a beauty shop and a hardware store. Dandridge notes the original structure reached all the way to
U.S. 17, but was partially removed mid-century. In its heyday, it was at the center of activity, with a hotel, a bank and
a newspaper office across the street. The building lost its luster over the years, with Hurricane Charley in 2004 deliv-
ering the fatal blow. Plans the repair the building fell through, leading to the demolition which continues this week.


PRECO Posts

New Outage Map

... Story 1B


New! Local

Economy News
... Column 3B


I


I








2A The Herald-Advocate, October 11,2012


The Herald-Advocate
Hardee County's Hometown Coverage
JAMES R. KELLY
Publisher/Editor
CYNTHIA M. KRAHL
Managing Editor


JOAN M. SEAMAN
Sports Editor



115 S. Seventh Ave.
P.O. Box 338
Wauchula, FL 33873


RALPH HARRISON
Production Manager


NOEY DE SANTIAGO
S Asst. Prod. Manager

v'Io$ Phone: (863) 773-3255

Fax: (863) 773-0657


Published weekly on Thursday at Wauchula, Florida, by The Herald-Advocate
Publishing Co. Inc. Periodical Postage paid at U.S. Post Office, Wauchula, FL
33873 and additional entry office (USPS 578-780), "Postmaster," send address
changes to: The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338, Wauchula, FL 33873.


DEADLINES:
Schools Thursday 5 p.m.
Hardee Living Thursday 5 p.m.
General News Monday 5 p.m.
S Ads-Tuesday noon


SUBSCRIPTIONS:
Hardee County
6 months -.$21; I yr.- $39; 2 yrs.-$75
Florida
6months- $25; 1 yr.- $46; 2 \r i?
Out of State
6 months -$29; 1 yr. $52; $ 1


LETTERS:
The Herald-Advocate welcomes letters to the editor on mjrtern of pubbc
interest. Letters should be brief, and must be written in good uase. signedd
and include a daytime phone number.
SUBMISSIONS:
Press releases nn community matter: are welcome Submissions should be
typed, double.spjced nd sJdiL-r- 0i the jboe d,.jadhne'. II ilem; are sub.
ject to editing
typed,____ dobe-ije n jei h b^ cheV ir;esb


rnuiT or wrlwIL'4cL rcLLY
Continuum Labs CEO Travis Bond went before the
Industrial Development Authority Tuesday morning to
seek additional funding for his company.


Continued From
Continued From 1A


Bond said $2.4 million
would be spent directly in
Hardee County with $1.2 mil-
lion going toward new hires'
salaries over the next year.
Bond also said to date he has
invested more than $2 million
of his own money on the project
and he will offer up to 10 per-
cent of the company, one mil-
lion shares, to Hardee County
residents to invest in.
Training programs at the
Tech River Park, where new-
hires spend six weeks before
beginning work, would account
for $773,000, which includes
paying for the training, men-
tors, course fees and travel
expenses.
Software, hardware and fur-
niture to begin operations in the
former Peace River Electric
Cooperative headquarters will
cost $219,375.
Data center charges will total
$47,000 and legal, accounting
and insurance will account for
$64,400.
The remainder of the money
will go toward "Phase Two
development" of the CareSync
application and will include
coding, .design, quality assur-
ance, equipment and licensing
fees.
Bond said his ultimate goal is
to take the company public at
some point in the future.
Donald Samuels, IDA board
member, asked Bond why the
company did not get a tradition-
al bank loan.
Bond responded that the
.company is not yet in the rev-
enue stages and it was impor-
tant not to overload the balance
sheet with debt. He said if the
company had to get a tradition-
al bank loan it would be located
in Tampa and not Hardee
County.
"We are using your money to
seed and start a technology
industry here," Bond said.
He also said $2.1 million of
the original $2.6 million grant
the IDA awarded last year was
spent on developing the prod-
uct.
When LifeSync was awarded
the grant last year before it sold
Bluewater to Continuum Labs.


it informed the IDA it would be
asking for a total of $7.25 mil-
lion over three years.
LifeSync did not get any
cash when it sold BlueWater,
and instead received 1.25 mil-
lion shares in Continuum Labs.
Bond said when his company
acquired the BlueWater product
it assumed all the obligations
and liabilities to the IDA. "We
want to assume what we
thought was a three-year plan,"
he said.
Bill Lambert, IDA executive
director, said the agreement was
written with intentions of multi-
year funding, as the IDA did not
want to obligate itself in a con-
tract for three years because its
revenue streams are not guaran-
teed.
For instance, the $42 million
development agreement with
Mosaic is contingent upon the
company's continued mining. If
the mine was shut down for any
reason, like it was in 2010, the
IDA would not receive any
funds until the mine was operat-
ing again.
Rick Justice, IDA member,
asked Bond if the company
would be seeking an additional
$2.5 million in 2013.
Bond said the company
might seek the remainder of the
$7.25 million, which would be
$1.65 million, but he is not cer-
tain at this time if and what he
would ask for.
He said if the company can
raise capital by selling stock it
may not need additional fund-
ing.
Justice then asked what
makes the CareSync application
different than some of the other
similar health-care products
already on the market.
Bond said most are owned by
big companies' such as Micro-
soft or Google. He said "the
problem with other applications
is you cannot trust those com-
panies to protect you and your
loved ones' information."
Bond explained Microsoft
and Google monitor users'
activities and then sell the infor-.
mation or bombard the user
with targeted advertisements.
"CareSync is intended to


COURTESY PHOTO
,Hardee County Fire-Rescue's open house last Saturday was a great success! There was plenty of food, fun and infor-
mation. In this scene, folks gather around to watch one of the extrication demonstrations performed during the
event. Firefighters will also celebrate National Fire Prevention Week by visiting the schools to promote this year's
theme, "Have Two Ways Out!" The theme focuses on the importance of fire escape planning and practice. To learn
more, visit NFPA's website at www.firepreventionweek.org.


sioners have always been fair,
and live lives of integrity both
inside and outside the board-
room, and I greatly respect
them," concluded Albritton.
She takes particular issue
with Johnson's latest blog,
dated Sept. 30, referring to the
annual evaluation of the county
manager, in which Johnson
refers to "the county manager's
illegal acts 'diverting public
funds."
He goes on to says, that "the
other commissioners have a
deaf ear and blind eye, ... and
their inaction, their lack of due
diligence and oversight of the
county manager, and blatantly
using ignorance as an excuse
clearly needs to end."
Blogs continued regularly
since late 2010 until April 17 of
this year and were discontinued
until the recent entry. Nearly
every one attacks Mr. Albritton
and other commissioners, pre-
senting "facts" to fit his argu-
ments.

BACKGROUND
Even before his election,
Commissioner Grady Johnson
had declared his intention to get
the' county managbi removed.'
He said it was an election man-
date of the many people'he had



keep and secure your data, and
only share it with the user's per-
mission," he said.
Amy Gleason, the chief
operating officer, gave a
demonstration of CareSync dur-
ing the meeting and showed its
capabilities to list medications,
health conditions, allergies, per-
sonal information, emergency
contacts and documents.
The user can control who is
allowed to view the information
and what exactly they can view.
For example, a doctor might be
allowed to see a patient's med-
ications and health conditions,
but could be blocked from
viewing personal information
and documents.
She said the company "wants
to connect'doctors and patients
and allow information to be
shared quickly and securely to
anyone the user allows to view
it."
The company was vetted by
the Chamber of Commerce on
Sept. 25.
Casey Dickson, executive
director of the chamber, said the
chamber was tasked with inter-
viewing the company to gather
background information, which
it then provided to the IDA but
did not make any recommenda-
tion to fund or deny the compa-
ny.
Sitting on the vetting com-
mittee were Dickson, Steven
Southwell, Bo Conerly, Steve
Johnson and Clay Cobb.
At the end of the four-hour
IDA meeting, Vanessa Hernan-
dez made a motion to approve
the $3 million grant upon com-
pletion of the contract language
and it was seconded by Mike
Prescott.
It was approved by a 6-2
vote, with Justice, Prescott,
John O'Neal, Hernandez, Jim
See and Russ Melendy voting
for it. Samuels and Lory Dur-
rance voted against it.
Durrance said after the meet-
ing he voted no because he
wanted to give the company the
remainder of the $7.25 million
now so Continuum Labs can
have some flexibility to accom-
plish its goal.
Samuels told Bond after the
meeting that even though he
voted against funding the com-
pany, he would support it from
now on in.what it is trying to
accomplish.


talked to. From his Dec. 9,2010
commission meeting, he has
made repeated motions to fire
the county manager; but was
not able to get a- second to his
motions.
He has refused to meet with
the county manager as the other
corhmissioners do when they
want to clarify an item on the
agenda packet, get more infor-
mation or raise a question of a
constituent. Johnson prefers to
deal through the'Administrative
Assistant Sandy Meeks.

ISSUES
RESTHAVEN/CIVIC
CENTER
The 2004 damages from the
June "No Name" storm through
hurricanes Charlie, Frances and
Jeanne, resulted in more than
one effort to work on Resthaven
and the Agri-Civic Center.
Because of the repeated storms,
there had to be repeated efforts,
56 days in all, in the mold reme-
diation and restoration complet-
ed in both county facilities.
A third party insurance ad-
ministrator, Cramer, Johnson &
Wiggins was appointed by the"
county's insurance company to
handle claims because they
exceeded .normal _,coverage.
They chose Serv Pro to do the
air quality, mold and mildew
removal, and asked to pay them
directly "a common practice in
the insurance industry. The
county manager and project
director Doug Knight agreed
for them to do so.
That resulted in the payments
not going through the Clerk of
Courts office, which normally
receives all revenue and issues
checks on county accounts,
including payroll. The oversight
was discovered in the county's
next annual audit, when records
were amended to reflect that
approximately $1 million rev-
enue and expenditures. A state
attorney's investigation was
closed because no wrongdoing
was found.
Since the insurance payments
had already been made and
processed by the vendor, there
is no way to go back and re-
route them through the clerk's
office, but it has continued to be
an issue of "diverted funds." On
a 4-1 vote in June of this year,
the commission said it would
no longer discuss allegations
that kept resurfacing about hur-
ricane repairs unless there was


HOMICIDE
A Front-Page story in last
week's edition on the sen-
tencing of Fernando
Vazquez for the Halloween
2010 beating death of a 30-
year-old Bowling Green
man failed to note the sec-
ond-degree murder charge
against Vazquez was
reduced to manslaughter.
The Herald-Advocate is
pleased to set the record
straight.

At The Herald-Advocate,
we want accuracy to be a
given, not just our goal. If
you believe we have print-
ed an error in fact, please
call to report it. We will
review the information, and
if we find it needs correc-
tion or clarification, we will
do so here.
To make a report, call
Managing Editor Cynthia
Krahl at 773-3255.


new information. Johnson op-
posed the motion.

FEMA PAYMENTS
Another big issues that keeps
recurring is the demand of the
Federal Emergency Manage-
ment Agency's for reimburse-
ment of a little over $1 million
of the more than $20 million the
county received from FEMA
for hurricane damages.
Finance department staff
spent hour cross-checking
every FEMA payment and work
order, some for road and bridge
repairs, and some for repairs on
county buildings and personnel
services.
The problem was complicat-
ed because FEMA kept re-
organizing staff, and obligated
and de-obligated work projects
because of repeated damages
from the four storms.
SIn 2009, when FEMA began
closing out some of the coun-
ty's outstanding storm ac-
counts, it realized duplicate
payments were made under the
differing work orders and in
2011 demanded repayment.
Incidentally, at the same time,
FEMA made the same demand
of 69 other FEMA municipal
and county applicants around
the state, seeking more than $45
million.
The county decided to accept
FEMA's discount agreement
and make payments on the
indebtedness, while many oth-
ers contested the amounts.

IDA AUDIT
In 2011, it was discovered
that the county Industrial De-
velopment Authority had not
been completing annual audits
since it was re-instituted in
2000. Two audits were complet-
ed in late 2011.
In June, the state Auditor
General's Office notified the
county that it would be auditing
operations of the commission,
IDA, Economic Development
Council and the Economic
Development Authority. That
audit, expected to take from 12
to 18 months, seeks to obtain
reasonable assurance that the
boards have complied with
applicable laws, rules, regula-
tions, contracts, grant agree-
ments and other guidelines.

FIRE-RESCUE PAYROLL
Johnson is an advocate of
volunteer fire departments and
has expressed concern about the
amount of overtime paid fire
department personnel, citing
Clerk of Court payroll records
to document the excessive over-
time.
Former Fire Chief Mike
Choate and the county manager
said they had no issue with the
information from the clerk's
office, just the way it was used.
It seems national fire-fighter
laws require fire-fighters to be
paid overtime when they have
more than 80 hours bi-weekly.
If they have five 24-hour shifts
in two weeks, there is 40 hours
of automatic overtime to be
paid, plus any time they can't
clock out because they are at an
incident and can't stop working
and time they fill in for other
staff on vacation or sick leave.

CONCLUSIONS
Johnson has laid all of the
issues at the feet of the county
manager, blaming him for all
that has occurred as he has
oversight of all the issues.


In October, 2011, the com-
mission split with Johnson over
his investigative methods, ,par-
ticularly use of board letterhead
to demand information, "which
implies all the board agrees
with him." County attorney
Ken Evers suggested a separate
letterhead for each commission-
er. Johnson is the only one to
use it, noting "I am writing
another letter today to explain
the double-dealing in the Fire-
Rescue Department."
Alma Albritton says she has-
n't determined her next course
of action. "I walk in faith, not in
fear. My husband is a man of
honor, integrity and an excel-
lent work ethic. He has proved
he can handle himself in the
most dire circumstances with
dignity and grace. His excellent
work during the three consecu-
tive hurricanes is just one
example. I am not here to stick
up for my husband. His work
record speaks for itself, and so
does his spiritual life.
"People shouldn't have to
prove what is written or said
about them is false. What is
written .or said about them
should be proven to. be true
before pen ever hits the paper."
Options could include a law-
suit, although Albritton is con-
cerned that the taxpayers would
be responsible for the costs
involved, and she and her hus-
band do not want to cause fel-
low taxpayers any undue ex-
pense.
Another option could be a
.recall petition, seeking the
removal of Johnson because of
his repeated attacks and opposi-
tion to other commissioners.
Supervisor of Elections Jeff
Ussery said the recall petition
only applies to municipal offi-
cials or chartered counties.
Hardee is not a chartered coun-
ty.
An alternative would be
referral to the Florida Ethics
Commission if a county official
shows dereliction of duty or
commits a criminal offense, he
said.



A good conversationalist is
not one who remembers
what was said but says
what someone wants to re-
member.
-John Mason Brown




YOUR


BUSINESS

COULD


APPEAR


HERE

TOO!!

Contact
Nancy Davis,
Kim Reas or
Trayce Daniels
At

773-3255


David- 9
DURASTA.NT0
SuprinenentofSchol


APOLOGIZE
Continued From 2A









October 11, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 3A


By MARIA TRUJILLO
For The Herald-Advocate
In a job where there is a lot
of devastation, there is finally a
reason to celebrate.
*Hardee County Fire-Rescue
is celebrating its 25th anniver-
sary.
In 1986 the Wauchula Fire
Department gave way to be-
come HCFR. This decision was
made as a way to better serve
the citizens of Hardee County's
unincorporated areas.
Before the switch, the
resources, manpower and en-
gines available were nowhere
near enough to properly protect
Hardee County. There was a
time when there were only six
firefighters and one paramedic
working, per shift, to take care
of the county and its biggest
city. Volunteer fire departments
served Bowling Green and
Zolfo Springs, with aid from the
Wauchula department.
Today, there are 39 firefight-
er/ paramedics, firefighter/em-
ergency medical technicians
and lieutenants who work 24
hours straight and then get to
return home for 48 hours. There
is also one chief, one executive
assistant, a billing clerk, a pre-
vention officer who is also the
public information officer and
nine volunteers, four of whom
are retired HCFR employees.
Some of these job descriptions
were added after the merger.
Because of little resources,
there was a time when funeral
homes would transport the
wounded. They would put the
injured in a hearse and then take
them to get medical attention.
Care would also be delayed
due to lack of equipment and
sometimes even education.
Before, the only people who
were certified to read an elec-
trocardiogram (EKG) were car-
diologists.
However, even after the
changeover, not all engines
were packed with the necessary
lifesaving equipment.
Lt. Bob Devereaux and
Firefighter/Paramedic John
Adler remember a call involv-
ing a small child. They were the
first to arrive on the scene,
where. they saw the child, was
entrapped. Unfortunately"'they
were unable to provide oxygen
for the wounded child, as they
didn't have any oxygen masks
with them.
Both agreed that calls such as
these tend to stick with people,
as they are left with a feeling
that more could have been done
although reality says otherwise.
Currently all engines carry
oxygen masks and recently,
oxygen masks for pets were
added.
Other great improvements


throughout the years have been
the move to the current fire sta-
tion on K.D. Revell Road, a
decrease in response times,
more engines and firefighters,
better equipment and better
training.
It used to be that becoming a
firefighter meant you were
hired and then trained on the
job. Now you must have about
500 hours of fire training and
minimum emergency medical
technician training, which takes
about three months. To become
a paramedic, a year of training
is required. And in order to be
certified in certain areas, con-
tinuing education is required.
Becoming a volunteer also
requires a lot of training, 240-
plus hours of fire training -
before it was just 40 hours -
about 40 hours of medical train-
ing and more.
All of this extra training is
necessary for the firefighters
and other emergency respon-
ders to be prepared for any situ-
ation, whether it be a fire or a
person having chest pains.
Although HCFR and EMS
work very hard to care for the
wounded, sometimes it isn't
enough to take them.to Florida
Hospital Wauchula. Depending'
on their symptoms or how
badly they are injured, it
becomes necessary to transport
people to larger hospitals such
as Tampa General.
A position that was added
because of the later merger with
Bowling Green and Zolfo
Springs was that of prevention
officer. This title goes to Alyssa
Henderson, who has worked as
a civilian officer for four years
and as an inspector for five.
Her job consists of routine
inspections of businesses and
making sure they are up to
code. She also does construc-
tion plan review and is building
a better relationship day by day
with the community to help
promote safety.
Henderson says the number
of fires has decreased over the
years. She believes they can
continue to decrease if more
people are educated on fire
safety.
At the fire station, De-
vereaux, who has been a fire-
fighter in Hardee since 1991,
says the best thing about being
a firefighter is the unity among
them. They work together for a
common goal.
Many times that common
goal is cleaning up the station.
Every day at 8 a.m. the trucks
are checked to make sure all of
the equipment is onboard and
functioning. This process takes
about 45 minutes.
After that they begin their
daily duties, such as taking


apart the kitchen to thoroughly
scrub every inch of it. Once a
week they go over the entire
fire station, including the
engines, and scrub everything
spotless.
This process can take several
hours even with all hands on
deck, although they are still pre-
pared to leave at any moment
should a call come in. After
coming back from a call, they
immediately decontaminate the
truck and tools they use includ-
ing the hose, which they let dry
before using again. Then they
restock supplies they used.
As a lieutenant, Devereaux
has to make sure all activities
get completed. He is also called
for structure fires and other
emergencies, except medical
calls.
Someone who does respond
to medical calls is Adler. He
began working as a volunteer
firefighter at the BGFD in 1995.
Since then he has continued fur-
thering his education and
knowledge to remain a certified
paramedic.
For Devereaux and Adler, it's
the camaraderie, the laughs,
silliness and the good memories
that help them get through the
stress and other hardships that
come with having this job.
Retired Firefighter/Para-
medic Robert Shiver started off
at EMS in 1974. When the
changeover happened, he was
working as the director there.
Throughout the years and the
many calls, Shiver remembers a
happy one.
Shiver delivered a baby. The
mother gave birth on the back
of one of the trucks. It was
especially nerve-wracking for
Shiver, as the little girl was born
with her umbilical cord wrap-
ped around her neck twice.
Fortunately the baby was
healthy. After that, Shiver
received a Christmas card for
the next 18 years and a gradua-
tion invitation from the girl and
her family. When he retired on
Dec. 28, 2008, Shiver's daugh-
ter tracked down the girl, who
just so happened to have mar-
ried a firefighter, and had a
video of the girl made to play at
her dad's retirement party.
Other firefighters don't make
it that far, and leave after one
difficult call too many.
That's why Devereaux wants
to bring in counselors and chap-
lains. He says it would be a
great way for the men and
women to get the stress off their
shoulders, by simply talking to
someone.
Despite the bad HCFR may
see on calls, Devereaux is
happy to go to the station and
see his "second family" and
especially celebrate the sta-
tion's 25 years.


Titan, Saturn's largest moon, is the only moon in the solar system known to have an
atmosphere of any substance.

Do not anticipate trouble or worry about what may never happen. Keep in the sunlight.
-Benjamin Frankli



-r







YOUR BUSINESS COULD

APPEAR HERE TOO!!
Contact

Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels,

773-3255


Elect


County Commission er

District 5
GOALS
Help restore trust in our local government.
Hold all parties accountable, both government and businesses, for
their actions.


Work to reduce our ad valorem taxes.
POLIIICALADEH rISEMENNT PAID -OR AND APPROVED UD' J LORAN OG LURAI.N PA FO14 HAHURL' COUNTY COMMIJSIONEL, rDISrHC b


Fire-Rescue Celebrates 25


Years Of Helping Hardee


more than one occupation. A
citrus disease called greening is
also impacting the agricultural
industry.
After agriculture, private sec-
tor employment, such as retail
and health care, ranks next,
with Florida Institute for
Neurologic Rehabilitation and
Wal-Mart as the next highest
employers. This is followed by
Mosaic and CF Industries with
their phosphate mining, then
Peace River Electric Cooper-


and consultant Bob Gray, who
carried the bulk of the presenta-
tion, which also included other
USF specialists, Angela Crist,
Trent Green, Antoinette Jack-
son, Terry Johnson and Rick
Hapman.
Gray began the power-point
presentation, which was contin-
ued by Stanley. He said the
tourism project contract was
approved March 22 and a kick-
off greeting with Chamber, IDA
and other key stakeholders was
held on April 11. Between then
and July 3, USF staff conducted
nearly two dozen interviews.
The results, and data collected
to go with them, were combined
to make the report.

BEGINNING
Gray said USF staff were
"impressed with the commit-
ment to the county, a strong
civic sense with 4n excellent
grasp of the need to move for-
ward. Everyone is passionate
about some aspect of phos-
phate, economic tourism, agri-
culture-related tourism such as
rodeos and trail riding."
The county is known for its
multigenerational families; it is
a family-oriented community
which values a good quality of
life and friendliness. It is
famous for phosphate mining,
citrus and agriculture.
Eco-tourism. includes the
Peace River, fossils and Indian
artifacts as well as the Bone
Valley designation. Agri-
tourism could include Hardee
Lakes Park, equestrian, rodeo
and trail riding and tourism
based on how agriculture/farms
works.

COUNTY ASSETS
Gray said Hardee County has
made a good start on economic
development and needs to stay
focused on "Smart Growth."
The county has a good central
location, with good roads. It has
a commerce park and clean
industries, severance tax, avail-
ability of land and buildings,
strong incentives and broad-
band.
On the down side, the county
faces regulatory restrictions and
permitting, lack of amenities
such as movies, shopping and
leisure activities, lacks a skilled
labor force, and a challenge to
be good stewards of the sever-
ance tax and other revenue.

MAPS
Regional mapping shows that
the county doesn't have a lot of
commuter resources within the
30-mile as the crow flies radius
of Wauchula. "You don't see
people or resources until you
get within a 50-mile radius, or
about an hour and a half driv-
ing. The outer areas, 30 to 50
miles away are like the donut,
and Hardee County is like the
donut hole," commented Gray.
The only intracounty road is
U.S. 17, a north/south connec-
tor. The main regional N/S road
of the area is U.S. 27. It's not
until getting up to 1-4, that there
are East/West connectors; there
are none in the county. For this
reason, 90 percent of the people
go down to Punta Gorda, rather
than to Sarasota, etc. for shop-
ping, medical and other outlets,
said Gray.

POPULATION
The real issue, said Gray, is to
make changes internally to
Hardee County. In the natural
process births should make
increases in population. Out-
migration results in more popu-
lation losses to the county,
which is ranked number one in
the state in out-migration and
also number one in in-migra-
tion. Recent statistics show the
county gained 3,000 new resi-
dents, primarily Hispanic, while
losing 2,100 white, non-Hi-
spariic residents.
Agriculture and agricultural
industries, such as animal and
crop production, and products
used by agriculture is the high-
est use in the county. It includes
citrus, row crops, ornamentals
and timber. "It dominates the
economic fabric,jobs and sales,
in the county," said Gray.
However, the average age of
a farmer is 60, while the aver-
age age of residents is 32.8, the
fourth youngest in the state.
Many farmers are getting ready
to retire, and farmers now have


QUESTIONS AND
ANSWERS
There were a variety of ques-
tions at the conclusion of the
meeting. Jim See asked what
was the relationship between
the broadband "POP" at Ona
and broadband around the
county and at the proposed
technology park.
Gray said to have wireless
capability is unique in a rural
county. It makes a good skele-
ton for economic development,


Continued From 1A
active, Wauchula State Bank and
Florida Hospital.
Another population factor is
ethnicity. The Hispanic popula-
tion was 23 percent of the pop-
ulation in 1990; by 2010, it was
43 percent and it is projected to
be 46 percent by 2030.
Hardee has housing opportu-
nities in rentals and owner-
occupied houses, with younger
families. Thirty percent of the
homes are manufactured
homes. Assessed values show
30 percent is residential, 28 per-
cent government and 26 percent
agriculture, but 47 percent of
jobs are agriculture-related.

ECONOMIC PROFILE
The county has one munici-
pal airport, three power plants,
two natural gas pipelines and a
120-acre industrial commerce
park. It is unique to have a
.POP-One broadband facility in
Ona, a phenomenal wire base in
a rural county, commented
Gray.
Residents are two kinds,
long-term and seasonal, includ-
ing snowbirds, retirees, short
stays and migrant farm labor.

ETHNOGRAPHICS
Stanley continued the assess-
ment with a discussion of
ethnographics. The county is
not bilingual, but multilingual,
with Spanish, Creole/Haitian
and English the main lan-
guages. The county needs to
turn that into an asset, she said.
Many Hispanics are long-term
residents being involved and
active in their communities.
There are Hispanics in all
levels of the community, from
teachers and lawyers down to
general labor. Church is a social
network for Hispanic life.
There is, however, a gap in
funding for the most vulnerable
and dissatisfaction with the
public school system. The latter
was loud and clear from several
of those interviewed, said
Stanley. The county needs to
recognize its diversity, its multi-
generational vs. new arrivals
and make it a community focus,
she added.

HISTORICAL
The county has a unique
blend of historical and cultural
resources, 240 archaeological
sites, but only one on. the
National Register of Historic
Places, Paynes Creek Fort
Chokoninkia.
There are 585 historic build-
ings, starting with the late 19th
century. The largest number are
in Wauchula. There are also
four historic cemeteries and 16
historic bridges, dating from
1916 to 1955.
There are 174 prehistoric sites.
These and archaeological sites
are not readily accessible to
most residents because of
potential damage to them.

CONCLUSIONS
The community has ethnic
diversity which needs to be
made an asset.
Tourism is presently a non-
player and has marketing poten-
tial. Combining all the tourism
assets into a single, stand-alone
economic development driver.
More historic structures and
archaeology sites need to be
registered.
Hardee is an exporter of agri-
cultural and mineral (mining)
products and importer of con-
sumer goods. This ratio should
change.

NEXT STEPS
The county has a corridor to,
the future in Fort Green
Springs, with power and gas
available and new Streamsong
development in nearby Polk
County. On the east side of the
county, development could cen-
ter on connections to shopping
and consumer activities in Avon
Park and Sebring.
Gather information on diver-
sification possible with broad-
band, technology, historic re-
sources, and develop a brand-
ing/marketing strategy around
tourism that promotes the coun-
ty as a whole.
Develop interrelationships
between city and county gov-
ernment, K-12 and higher edu-
cation, the workforce board and
business associations, the state
and regional agency partners
and others.


District 5. Mink, or whoever
takes Knight's seat, will serve
two years, until 2014, the time
when Knight's term would have
expired.
If necessary, the Bowling
Green election will be on the
Nov. 6 General Election ballot.

The great gift of conversa-
tion lies less in displaying it
ourselves than in drawing it
out of others.
-Jean de la Bruyere


but there also needs to be good
schools, good workforce and
other essentials to attract people
to want to bring their business
to Hardee County. Relative to
its population size, wireless
broadband is significant, said
Gray.
Justice agreed that while
many people are passionate
about the county, they are pas-
sionate about different things,
citrus, cattle, keep the county
the same size, make it grow.
The biggest hurdle is competing
ideas of what's best for the'
community. "It's a great group
of people, but bringing them
together will be the challenge."
Jim Kelly asked what about a
movie theater, "an idea close to
his heart for 25 years. What
would it take to have at least
one screen here, so people
wouldn't go out of town to go to
the movies, and leave early to
car shop or whatever, taking
dollars out of the county."
Gray said it takes a popula-
tion of at least 10,000 to use a
theater to make it succeed."
Kelly suggested a county sub-
sidy, help with a building, tax
abatement to help and "it would
draw people from Fort Meade
and Arcadia as well." Gray said
the language diversity of the
county would be another obsta-
cle.
Asked what was wrong with
the schools, Jackson said inter-
views were a snapshop, but the
bilingualism and multilingual-
ism sometimes caused a racial
astigmatism. People felt they.
should not be treated as all of
one kind, or with the same
issues. They should be treated
as who they are, not lumped
together as a culture or ethnic
group.
Mike Rouse, a Wauchula
businessman, said he has had
people from out-of-town stop
by on their way to Disney
World, for The Story of Jesus,
Ranch Rodeo, Friday Night
Live. "That's what brings peo-
ple here. It's the best type of
advertising, people can come
and do little things here and
want to bring future business or
their home here."
Nancy Craft picked up on
that. "This is a most important
time to move forward. We need
'to get our minds together. We
have Solomon's Castle, Bensen
Days, The Story of Jesus and
we never capitalize on them.
We miss the opportunities. The
Peace River is the longest in the
state. We have Pioneer Park and
Hardee Lakes. We need small
farmers, maybe five acres of
cherry tomatoes. We need to
build on our assets," she said.
In conclusion, Dickson said
the full report would be on the
Chamber website shortly.





1, So Far

For Open


BG Seat

By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
So far, there's one candidate
for the vacancy on the Bowling
Green City Commission.
Qualifying continues through
5 p.m. Friday, so additional can-
didates have time to qualify.
The qualifying fee is $10 and
there is an $18 city election
assessment, a total of $28. All
Bowling Green commission
seats are at-large, meaning a
person does not have to live in
any particular area of the city to
be eligible, but must be a city
resident.
Qualifying packets can be
picked up and returned at City
Hall on East Main Street. For
more information, call City
Clerk Pam Northup at 375-
2255.
The only candidate wanting
to fill the vacant seat is former
commissioner Randy Mink.
Incumbents Woody Caligan
and Richard Barone were re-
elected in late August without
opposition. They will serve
three-year terms, until 2015.
That left only the seat of
Commissioner/Mayor Perry
Knight, who resigned recently
to run for County Commission


T- OUISM


J. Loran







GBURH


I -


- ----~------ --


I- I V- 11 p


10n-11n


-!!i







4A The Herald-Advocate, October 11, 2012


Obituaries
HOWARD R. SNOW
Howard R. Snow, 85, of
Lake Wales, died on Saturday,
Oct. 6, 2012, in Bartow.
He was born in Cortland,
Ohio, on Jan. 22, 1927, and
moved to Lake Wales in 2004
after his retirement.
. He was a WWII U.S. Navy
veteran serving on the USS
Colorado and USS Cogswell in
the South Pacific. He was a
member of the Cortland
Christian Church in Cortland,
Ohio.
He worked for Wean United in
Warren, Ohio, for over 20
years, and went on to retire
from the Cortland Bank in
1995. After retirement from the
bank, he worked part-time for
Eagle Chevrolet in Hubbard,
Ohio and Greenwood Chevrolet
in Youngstown. He served sev-
eral terms as a Cortland City
Councilman and also served as
council president.
He was preceded in death by
his parents, Howard O. Snow
and Helen Rice Snow; brothers
Robert Snow and Charles
Snow; and sister Eleanor Snow
Payne.
Survivors include two sons;
Keith A. Snow and wife Denise
of Lake Wales, and Scott E.
Snow and wife Marti of
Dublin, Ohio; daughter Holly
Snow Elliott and husband Bob
of Fort Meade; eight grandchil-
dren; 10 great-grandchildren;
and one great-great-grandchild.
Memorial services will be
held in Cortland, Ohio, in late
November. In lieu of flowers,
please send donations to The
Rohr Home, 2120 Marshall
Edwards Drive, Bartow, FL
33830.
Condolences may be sent to
the family at www.hancockfh.-
com. Arrangements are by
Hancock Funeral Home of Fort
Meade.


LILLIAN E.
ALBRITTON MOYE
Lillian E. Albritton Moye,
91, of Wauchula, passed away
Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2012, in
Wauchula.
She was a lifelong Hardee
County resident, born Sept.
24, 1921, in Center Hill, and
was a member of Fort Green
Baptist church.
She was preceded in death
by her beloved husband,
Wilbur Moye; her parents,
William and Dora Tucker
Albritton; and one daughter
Susan Kramer.
Lillian is survived by two
daughters, Barbara Casey and
husband Tim, and Sandra
Parm and husband Bob; two
sons, Paul Moye and wife
Denise, and Tom Moye, all of
Bowling Green; eight grand-
children; and seven great-
grandchildren.
Visitation was 1 to 2 p.m.
Friday, Oct. 5, 2012, at Fort
Green Baptist. Services fol-
lowed the viewing at 2 p.m.
with Brother Steve Mc-
Gaughey of Fort Green Bap-
tist Church officiating. Burial
followed in Paynes Creek
Cemetery.
On-line condolences may
be made at
PongerKaysGrady.com.
CPomgec-tikoy-Q/tdy
Funeral Home &
Cremation Services
Wauchula


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Learning Skills To M'tch

Today's Workforce N ds


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This growing trend has led to
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and often lead to higher earn-
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S0loU11Oig cMem /tfny
ALICE ELIZABETH
HILT
Alice Elizabeth Hilt, 97, of
Zolfo Springs, died on
Saturday, Sept. 15, 2012.
Born on June 22, 1915, in
Philadelphia, Pa., to Harry
and Evalena Flanagan, she
was the eldest of three sisters.
After graduating from high
school, she later married
Frank Hilt, who was a Seabee
serving on the island of Tinian
in WWII.
She was a active member
of the 10th Presbyterian
Church in Philadelphia and
worked in the church office.
After summer trips to Browns
Mills in the Pines, N.J., she
and her husband later settled
there permanently where she
became a member of the
Browns Mills United Meth-
odist Church. She served as a
volunteer at Deborah Hospital
for many years and was active
on the church missions com-
mittee.
An avid reader, you would
always find Alice with a good
book. She additionally loved
gardening and bird watching,
especially spying her favorite
cardinals in the back yard.
Cardinal figurines were a
favorite of hers. Alice was an
original "bling" wearer and
\ou wo0ld always see her
with her special jewelry
adorning her fingers.
A world traveler, she trav-
eled to Europe and the Far
East. She eventually settled in
Sarasota, living with her son
and d Aghter-in-law, Rev. Dr.
Tom jt aiid Dr. Carolyn
ilt. The Hilts are the foun-
ders of SonHaven Preparatory
Academy in Wauchula. Her
granddaughter and grandson-
in-law, Tamara and Nathan
Ponson, lived nearby with her
five great-grandchildren,
Krystianna, Tyler, Jordan,
Gabriel and Carrah.
While at Resthaven, she
participated in the church
services on Sundays. She was
overjoyed when she found she
could listen to the Gaithers on
the TV as they were her
favorite gospel group.
In addition to her son and
family, she is survived by two
nieces, Kathy Brandt and
"Bunny" Schmitt along with
their spouses, who reside in
North Carolina. All of the
"gang" in New Jersey have
already gone on before her to
see the Lord, and we are sure
there was a joyful reunion in
heaven. Alice was called "the
last woman standing" and has
finally made it to her perma-
nent home in glory!
Memorial services will be
held at Resthaven at 10:30
a.m. on Oct. 27, 2012. In lieu
of flowers, Alice was very
proud of the accomplishments
of SonHaven and a memorial
fund has been established for
student scholarships, which
may be mailed to P.O. Box
50517, Sarasota, FL 34232.
Expressions of comfort may
be made at robartsfh.com.


FUNERAL HOME
WAUCHULA

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12/25/44- 10/6/11


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FCA T Test Scores, The Rest of the Story.
In recent weeks, my opponent has used FCA T scores in two areas of the test and
compared them only to other Heartland Districts in an effort to convince you he
is doing his job.
What you need to know is how we are achieving statewide. Those results are
very different Cuts in Instructional funding over the past four years are hurting
our children and denying them the opportunities to succeed.

S2012 Reading FCAT State Rankings


3rdGrade 4thGrade 5thGrade 6thGrade 7thGrade 8thGrade 9thGrade 10thGrade


Statewide, we rank lower in
district achievement in reading.
Why were you not given this information?

29

36



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59 57 59
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Being the best
in the Heartland
is a great goal for
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But not a goal
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setting for our
children's future.



I believe in being
accountable and will
:ell you exactly how
we are doing, and
what we are doing
to improve.


Pd. Pol. Adv. paid for and approved by Richard Daggett (Dem).Candidate Superintendent of Schools


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.1


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October 11, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 5A


Bogus Bills Bring


Probation, Work


By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
A man who reportedly used
chemicals and a scanner to turn
$5 bills into $20s has been sen-
tenced to probation and commu-
nity service hours.
Richard James Adams, 49, of
4098 Sunset Dr., Zolfo Springs,
was arrested by the Hardee
County Drug Task Force on
May 18 following a raid on his
home.
Detectives found evidence of
narcotics activity; sheriff's Maj.
Randy Dey said, but they also
found seven counterfeited U.S.
currency bills.
Adams was charged with
seven counts of forging a bill, a
felony, and one count each of
possession of marijuana and
possession of narcotics equip-
ment, both misdemeanors.
In a plea agreement worked
out between the prosecution and
the defense, however, five forg-
ing counts and both drug-related
counts were dropped. Two
counts of forging a bill re-
mained.
In accepting the new plea,
Circuit Judge Marcus J. Ezelle
agreed to withhold adjudication
of guilt. He sentenced Adams to
18 months of supervised proba-
tion, and ordered him to perform
75 hours of community service
work.
Further, the judge assessed
$520 in fines and court costs, a
$300 public defender fee, $100
for the cost of prosecution, and
$150 in investigative expenses.
Dey said Drug Task Force
officers served a search warrant
on Adams' home on the morning


1 Oviig IeinMo/ti 1


Adams
of May 18, expecting to find
drugs. They did find a pipe with
marijuana residue, a plastic bag
containing marijuana seeds and
three pieces of foil with
methamphetamine residue, he
alleged.
But, the major added, they
also discovered seven bills
inside a jewelry box.
Four of the bills were of offi-
cial U.S. currency paper and
three were on a paper not con-
sistent with government issue,
he said.
The four bills appeared to
have been bleached or other-
wise altered to remove the ink
from the actual denomination of
$5. Three were reprinted as
$20s and one was still blank,
Dey described.
The three other bills also
were printed as $20s, and each
displayed the same serial num-
ber, he said.
Adams admitted to making
the bogus bills, Dey said, but
told authorities he was "only
doing it as an art project."


BEAT THE HEAT BY NIGHT FISHING
Florida's artificial reefs are a whole new world when the lights
go out.
Get anchored over your favorite artificial reef in 70-plus feet
of water and turn off everything in the boat that makes noise. You
will hear a deafening chorus of clicks, snaps and pops being pro-
duced by millions of organisms that inhabit the reef.
Turn off all the lights, and any movement in the water will
cause an explosion of tiny lights produced by billions of tiny bio-
luminescent organisms. Drop a floating light over the side to bring
the squid in so close that you can see them pulse with colors and
patterns. Or just kick back and watch the curious sea turtles surface
to investigate.
Even if the fish don't bite, you're going to have an experience
that you can't get sitting on the couch, and you won't be feeding
the bugs or baking in the hot sun either.
Fish that feed primarily at night have excellent vision, and
they're a lot smarter than those daytime feeders, so you don't want
to show them much. The key is to "go stealthy," which is a phrase
coined by my favorite yellow-perch catcher, Brian "Fishhead"
Bristow of Estherville, Iowa. "Going stealthy" means to scale back
all your tackle to the minimum. I mean the rod, reel, line, lead, cir-
cle hook and bait. I like to fish 20- to 30-pound tackle with a longer
than normal, fluorocarbon leader to keep a good separation
between the lead and bait. Small live baits pinfishh, grunts, pig fish,
bull minnows, mullet, etc.) are excellent, but cut cigar minnows,
sardines, herring or menhaden also work very well. Bristow will
tell you that frozen squid is all you need, but he's from Iowa, so
you definitely shouldn't listen to him.
So what are you going to catch? Well, that depends on the
water depth and what part of the state you're in.
In the Florida Panhandle, you'll catch what the locals refer to
as black snapper. Now if you're not familiar with that species,
don't try to look it up in the state regulations booklet, because it's
not in there. Black snapper is the same fish that people in Central
and South Florida call a mangrove snapper. The actual common
name is gray snapper.
These fish have a 10-inch minimum size limit, but that should-
n't be a problem if you're fishing at night in depths that exceed 70
feet. Most of the snapper you catch will be significantly over the
minimum size limit and average between four and six pounds.
Some will exceed 10 pounds, and when they get that big they begin
to look like a Cubera. Gray snapper are open for harvest year-
round, and the daily recreational bag limit is five fish per person in
state waters.


Snapper are not the only game in town when fishing the reefs
at night. Catch a live squid and put him out on a flat line just out-
side the reach of your anchor lights. Big king mackerel and wahoo
feed all night long. They also like to eat while traveling at about 30
miles per hour, so set the drag light and keep the rod in a holder.
SThis may not be repeatable, but on one August night off
Franklin County in 70 feet of water, 01' Fishhead and I ran into a
nest of cobia that was absolutely beyond belief. I'm not sure if it
was a spawning aggregate or what, but we caught and released
enough 25- to 50-pound cobia in a seven-hour period to sink the
boat.
When daylight came, the amberjacks took over. When the
sharks started eating the jacks whole, we blew the whistle and
headed for the hill.
Safety is always a consideration, especially when night fish-
ing, so make sure you pick a night with perfect weather and calm
seas, especially if you fish from a small boat like we do. I like to
hear the words "high pressure, light and variable winds, and seas of
less than two feet" multiple times before I make a decision on a
night trip.
Also, make sure that your flares are current and your lights,
electronics, marine radio, bilge pump, etc. are all working proper-
ly.
Send us pictures and videos from your next night trip, and
have a great time.
This column hopes to help recreational anglers understand com-
plex saltwater regulations and learn more about saltwater fishing
opportunities. Alan Peirce is available to answer questions by
phone or e-mail anytime. Contact the Fish & Wildlife Commis-
sion's Regulatory Ourreach subsection at (850) 487-0554 or e-mail
Alan.Peirce@MyFWC.com.








mm- SENS L *









www."Mik"e o~mpson H ar d1ee.C,-,


* *


THOMAS GRAHAM
JOHNSON SRIL
Thomas Graham Johnson
Sr., 76, of Wauchula, went
home to be with the Lord on
Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2012, in
Sarasota.
Born April 23, 1936, in
Jacksonville, he came to
Wauchula in the second grade
and was a lifelong resident of
Hardee County. He was a
graduate of Hardee Senior
High School; where he was an
outstanding athlete in baseball
as a left fielder and pitcher. He
was also a feared lineman on
the Fighting Wildcats football
team. Following high school,
Graham served in the U.S.
Marine Corps and then attend-
ed the University of Florida,
where he again took up his
baseball career and became a
member of the Beta Theta Pi
fraternity.
Graham worked for Florida
Fence Post, Little Cypress
Golf and Country Club, Lykes
Brothers, and as a corrections
officer in the Florida prison
system, from which he even-
tually retired.
He was preceded in death
by his parents, H. F. and Neva
Bell Johnson; and a brother,
Don Johnson.
Survivors include his wife
of 53 years, Delois Lowe
Johnson; two children, Dr.
Tami Saunders of Avon Park,
and Thomas Graham "Tom-
my" Johnson Jr. and wife
Lori of Jennings; three grand-
children, Kaleb Johnson
Saunders, Lincoln Scott Saun-
ders and Gemi Thomas Saun-
ders; one brother Herbert F.
Johnson of Athens, Ga.; and
two nieces and four nephews.
Services were held at
Friendship Chapel on Satur-
.day, Oct. 6th, at 10:30 a.m.
with visitation one hour prior
to services. Kenny Lambert
officiated with John Terrell
delivering the eulogy. Inter-
ment was in Friendship
Cemetery.
In lieu of flowers, contribu-
tions.may be made to the
Friendship' Cemetery Fund,
4074 John Carlton Road,
Zolfo Springs, FL 33890.
Expressions of comfort may
be made at robartsfh.com.


FUNERAL HOME
WAUCHULA







6A The Herald-Advocate, October 11, 2012


ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS


MONDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Variety,
Smart Cookies, Pop Tarts
Variety, Juice, Condiments and
Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza,
Hamburger on Bun, Alternate
Meal, Veggie Cup, Baked
Beans, Juice Bar, Fruit Cocktail,
Condiments and Milk


TUESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Variety,
Graham Crackers, French
Toast, Sausage Patty, Oranges,
Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Macaroni & Cheese,
Cornbread, Deli Turkey
Sandwich, Alternate Meal,
Veggie Cup, Broccoli, Peaches,
Condiments and Milk


Kelly's Column
By Jim


Vice presidential debate will be held Thursday evening, Oct.
I1 on television between Democrat incumbent Joe Biden and
Republican challenger Paul Ryan, U.S. Congressman.

Hardee High School class of 1962 will hold their 50th reunion
Saturday afternoon beginning at 3 p.m. at Bar Crescent S Ranch in
the New Zion community. The ranch is owned by Duck Smith and
his wife Susan Carlton Smith, 1962'grad. Dinner is at 5 p.m.

Congratulations to the Agusta National Golf Club, home of the
Masters Tournament, for recently adding the first two women to
their membership Stanford University professor and former
U.S. secretary of state and national security adviser Condoleeza
Rice, 57, and Darla Moore, 58, business/banking leader from South
Carolina and current vice president of Rainwater Inc., a private
investment company.
I am a man and have never been invited to join the Agusta club
and have never broken 100 on a golf course. The numerous swings,
wayward shots and hand blisters caused me to drop the sport.

Mosaic has over 3,000 employees in Florida. Its mission is to
help the world grow the food it needs. The company has recently
launched a website called MosajcInHardee.com, announced Diana
Youmans, manager, community relations, Hardee County.

David and Joy Spencer of Zolfo Springs have three sons. Chris
of Wauchula is a lieutenant at Hardee Correctional Institution and
until recently worked with their bloodhounds for about 17 years. In
April Chris was hit by a big rattler just below his left knee in pal-
mettos in the Duette area while training the hounds. Fortunately he
was struck just below the top of his snakeproof boot. The incident
left a bruise and resulted in an ambulance trip to the local hospital.
Son Brian of Avon Park also works at HCI and works with the
bloodhounds as a sergeant. Son Jeremy is a sheriff's deputy at
Cherokee Nation in Cherokee, N.C. David is supervisor of facili-
ties management for Hardee County.

Trappers in Florida annually catch about 8,000 nuisance alli-
gators, Craig Pittman wrote Sept. 4 in the Tampa Bay Times. There
is a successful alligator hunt program in Florida.
Bishop Wendell Smith, pastor of'Fith 'iaple Church of God
in Wauchula, through his church's Cutting Edge Ministries gives
away free food to the needy on Tuesday and Friday from 10 to 3 at
3059 Elm Street in Zolfo Springs.
Food is given to about 450 families in the summer and 700
families at the peak fall season. He said some senior adults need
food because they live on Social Security of $600 to $900 a month
plus as little as $10 to $15 a month in food stamps.

Columnist and author Cal Thomas, 69, spoke in Lakeland Aug.
25 at Victory Church as guest of the Optimist Club. His topic was
"Being Optimistic in a Pessimistic World." He is a conservative
Christian writer whose syndicated weekly column appears in over
500 newspapers including The Ledger.
He is not optimistic about politicians or political parties, say-
ing both major parties have contributed to the dysfunction in
Washington, D.C. "My hope and faith and trust are in a person, not
a politician, and that person is Jesus Christ of Nazareth." Faith, not
political promises, lets him remain positive. He is against abortion,
gay marriage, and couples having sex outside of marriage.

The Hardee County Chamber of Commerce is having its annu-
al dinner and installation of officers on Saturday, Oct. 20, at 6 p.m.
at Torrey Oaks RV and Golf Resort. Tickets are $10.
The chamber's annual golf tournament will begin at 8 a.m. that
day at Torrey Oaks Golf Course. The cost is $60, with lunch pro-
vided.
The chamber's officers are Derren Bryan, president; Nell
McCauley, vice president; Steven Southwell, treasurer; Clay Cobb,
secretary; and Donnie Canary, immediate past president. Directors
are Millie Bolin, Bo Conerly, Elizabeth Durrance, Nellie Garcia,
Vanessa Hernandez, Steve Johnson, Keith Nadasky, Daniel
Patterson, Efran Schraeder, and Thomas Trevino.

To reduce the risk of getting breast cancer, Florida Hospital
recommends eating a healthy diet including whole grain foods, tak-
ing a multivitamin, limiting alcohol use, limited saturated and trans
fat intake, be active and exercise at least three times a week after
consulting a health care professional, examine stresses in your life
and find ways to.reduce them is possible, take care of yourself, tap
into a support network to stay healthy such as friends, family,
spouse/partner, spiritual community, perform monthly breast
exams, and have an annual physical exam and undergo all neces-
sary tests. Annual mammograms are recommended for women age
40 and over. October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

Congratulations to the Wauchula Lions Club for serving
Hardee County for 85 years. The club meets at noon Thursday at
the Java Cafe.
Officers are president, Debbie Murray; vice presidents, Paul
Summit, Patty Detwiler and Patty Harrison; secretary, Rhonda
Pattillo; treasurer, Helen Summit; Lion tamer and membership
director, Rick Knight; sight coordinator, Kathleen Roehm; and past
president, Talmadge Albritton. Directors are Paul Paris and Vernon
Benbow.

When traveling we often stop to eat at a Cracker Barrel Old
Country Store. The company was founded in 1969 and today has
616 stores in 42 states, with annual sales of $2.5 billion. There were
13 new locations opened this past fiscal year.
The company's founder, Dan Evins, passed away in January.
Headquarters are in Lebanon, Tenn. His principles were quality
products at a fair price and genuine Southern hospitality.
The average unit sales volumes are $3.36 million for restau-
rant and $616,000 retail.


Your Business Could Appear Here!
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels
At The Herald Advocate


WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Variety,
Buttered Toast, Oatmeal, Diced
Pears, Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Chicken Nuggets,
Rolls, Fish Square, Alternate
Meal, Veggie Cup, Green
Beans, Applesauce, Condi-
ments and Milk
THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Variety,
Smart Cookies, Apple Cinna-
mon Cereal Bar, Peaches,
Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Hamburger Gravy,
Rolls, Corndog, Alternate Meal,
Veggie Cup, Mash Potatoes,
.Banana, Grapes, Cantalopes,
Condiments and Milk
FRIDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Variety,
Smart Cookies, Breakfast
Rounds, Applesauce, Condi-
ments and.Milk
Lunch: Chili w/ Crackers,
Cornbread, Combo Sub,
Alternate Meal, Veggie Cup,
Buttered Carrots, Orange
Wedges, Condiments and Milk

JUNIOR HIGH
MONDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Variety,
Graham Crackers, Pop Tarts
Variety, Juice, Condiments and
Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza,
Hamburger on Bun, Alternate
Meal, Lettuce & Tomato, Baked
Beans, Juice Bar, Fruit Cocktail,
Condiments and Milk






THURSDAY. OCT. 11
WHardee County School
Board, regular meeting,
Board Room, 230 S. Florida
Ave., Wauchula, 5 p.m.

MONDAY. OCT. 15
VZolfo Springs Town
Commission, regular meet-
ing, Town Hall, 3210 U.S. 17
North, Zolfo Springs, 6 p.m.

THURSDAY. OCT. 18
WHardee County Com-
mission, rescheduled meet-
ing, room 102, Courthouse
Annex I, 412 W. Orange St.,
Wauchula, 1 p.m.


TUESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Variety,
Graham Crackers, French
Toast, Sausage Patty, Oranges,
Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Ham, Mac & Cheese,
Cornbread, Deli Turkey
Sandwich, Pepperoni Pizza
Alternate Meal, Lettuce &
Tomato, Broccoli, Peaches,
Condiments and Milk
WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Variety,
Buttered Toast, Oatmeal, Diced
Pears, Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Chicken Nuggets,
Rolls, Cheese Pizza, Fish
Sandwich, Alternate Meal,
Lettuce & Tomato, Green
Beans, Applesauce, Condi-
ments and Milk
THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Variety,
Graham Crackers, Apple
Cinnamon Cereal Bar, Peaches,
Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Hamburger Gravy,
Rolls, Corndog, Pepperoni
Pizza, Alternate Meal, Lettuce &
Tomato, Mash Potatoes,
Nectarines, Peaches, Pears,
Fresh Whole Apples, Condi-
ments and Milk
FRIDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Variety,
Graham Crackers, Breakfast
Rounds, Applesauce, Condi-
ments and Milk
Lunch: Chili w/ Crackers,
Cornbread, Combo Sub,
Alternate Meal, Lettuce &
Tomato, Buttered Carrots,


Saturday, October 13


,1;0


Juice, Condiments and Milk

SENIOR HIGH
MONDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Super
Donut, Orange Juice, Condi-
ments and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza,
Cheeseburger on a Bun, Baked
Beans, Tossed Salad, Beets,
Peaches, Orange Juice, Condi-
ments and Milk
TUESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Sausage
Pizza, Applesauce, Condi-
ments and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza,
Ham, Macaroni & Cheese,
French Fries, Tossed Salad,
Beets, Baked Beans, Corn-
bread, Condiments and Milk
WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Cinnamon
Toast, Oatmeal, Juice, Condi-
ments and Milk


Lunch: Cheeseburger on a
Bun, Chicken Nuggets, Savory
Rice, Tossed Salad, Mixed
Vegetables, Applesauce, Rolls,
Condiments and Milk
THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Waffles,
Sausage Patty, Fruit Cocktail,
Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Spicy Chicken Patty
on Bun, Chicken Gravy, French
Fries, Mashed Potatoes, Tossed
Salad, Orange Wedges, Rolls
Condiments and Milk
FRIDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Breakfast
Stick, Peaches,, Condiments
and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza,
Beef Burrito, French Fries,
Mixed Vegetables, Tossed
Salad, Orange Juice, Condi-
ments and Milk
Individual menus are subject to
change.


10:11p


For More

Information Call:



863-773-4161
ext. 141 or ext.184


10 1 c


S LLOYD HALL invites all
his friends and neighbors
to come see him at

REENWOO
CHEVRDLET Ocdsrnbile
205 N. Charleston Fort Meade
1-800-673-9512 *
www.directchevy.com


Two German Shorthair Pointers

missing from 9th Ave., in Wauchula.



Call Joe


239-425-7209


3rd Annual



"isn't She Lovely"

Forum for Women


Presented by

Hardee County Health Department


* 9a.m. 12p.m.


Hardee County Health Department Auditorium
115 K.D. Revell Rd. Wauchula


This is a FREE community event to increase women's health
awareness with special emphasis on family planning.

Event Includes:
* Family Planning Information Dental Health Information Women's Health Issues


* Makeup & Hair Tips Nutrition Guides & Exercise
Face Painting & other activities for children


I


I 1~1


~iQ~F


I
C


I ~iT

.






October 11, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 7A


Letter To The Editor

Mom Stayed Strong After Breast Cancer


ALPHA AND OMEGA


Dear Editor:
I am sure many of your read-
ers are aware that October is
Breast Cancer Awareness
Month. I am also pretty positive
that a great amount of citizens
here in Hardee County know
someone or have a family mem-
ber or friend who has been
affected by breast cancer.
For me, that person is my
mother, Sheila Elaine Miller of
Wauchula. Many of you may
know her from the Wauchula
Elementary Cafeteria, where
she has worked for over 20
years, and some of you may
recognize her name from the
many articles she writes to the
editor of this very same news-
paper.
Well, my mom found out in
September 2011 that she had
breast cancer. It was in the early
stages and was detected early
enough to give everyone high
hopes of the situation. But it
was still very scary, and it creat-
ed a very stressful situation to
be in.
Soon after finding out, she
made many appointments.Then
came the surgery, the first sur-
gery she has ever had in her life.
She had a lumpectomy. Not
long after healing from the sur-
gery, she underwent chemother-
apy and followed up with radia-
tion treatments. All of it seemed
a very fast pace from the time of
diagnosis. It all seemed so very
unreal.
The fact that my mother was


told she had breast cancer was
Smy worst nightmare. But I had
to step up, be strong for her and
show her the love and support
anyone would for their own
mother. I also had to realize that
these doctors know what they
are doing, and I needed to put
my trust in God. I did not know
what to expect from the situa-
tion. All I knew is that I loved
my mother and did! not want to
lose her.
When she began chemo and
radiation, I saw a whole other
side to this cancer situation.
This part was the hardest, see-
ing her go through these treat-
ments that made her sick was
horrible. Between the loss of
energy and the loss of tastebuds
to the loss of appetite and lack
of good sleep, it made me want
to kick this cancer in-the butt if
I could physically do it for her.
But you see, my mother may
have been weak physically but
in her heart she was the
strongest she has ever been. She
did not let this sway her faith in
God. She fought against this
breast cancer with all the faith
she had.
She let God use her to talk to
strangers at the treatment cen-
ter. Through her words she gave
them hope and encouraged
them to stay strong and have
faith in God. She knew exactly
what these people were going
through and how it felt. She did
not care that she lost her hair.
Some days were good and some


t "You Name

The Score"
(A Winner Every Week)


were yucky, but she still man-
aged to be strong.
And not to mention all the
paperwork that comes with hav-
ing cancer. Insurance papers,
fax this, fax that, call this per-
son, get the paper signed, go see
this doctor, take time off work,
with sick pay, without sick pay
... it is enough to drive you
crazy and make you wanna give
up! But she did it and managed
to be the great wife, mother and
grandma she knows how to be!
Doing all that and somehow
trying to stay positive, stayed
strong, prayed, kept her faith
and fought like a warrior! As of
right now she is cancer-free and
going through follow-up rou-
tine checkups.
My mother is the strongest
woman I know. She is a super-
woman. She is a survivor. I
cherish every moment I have
with her and am very grateful
for her in my life.
I know not everyone wins
their battle with cancer, but
early detection plays a big part
in it. Cancer is horrible regard-
less of the type. Take care of
yourself and get checked regu-
larly, even if it does not run in
your family. Don't wait!
I would also like to say,
"Love others and yourself, have
faith, believe, laugh a lot, stay
positive, hope for the best and
most of all ... check your boo-
bies! Thank you.
Angie Miller
Wauchula


- i- f "
PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
Alpha and Omega Freedom Ministries in Wauchula helps women and children, operat-
ing Hannah's House, a homeless shelter for abused women, 17 new apartments for
transitional living for women and children, a Hannah's House Hope Chest variety store,
and an office at 113 N. 7th Ave. that offers a variety of counseling and self-help cours-
es, even for men. Anger management is included. Speaking to the Wauchula Lions
Club Thursday, Aug. 30, at the Java Cafe were Carlene Spiker, Barbara Ratliff and
Lorraine Gillespie. Ratliff was a receptionist and cashier for Billy's Good Eats which
recently closed. For more information call 773-5717 for Alpha and Omega, which was
founded by John and Lorraine Gillespie. Donations of money and furniture are appre-
ciated. From left are Paul Summit, Barbara Ratliff, Carlene Spiker, Lorraine Gillespie,
and club president Debbie Murray.













It's Fruitcake Time

Will Be Available

November 3. 2012
Please Call Ahead And Place Your Order.

-Itoa l


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FREE-$40 GIFT CARD


SEE WILDCAT PAGE

Center Section of "C"

For Your Chance To Win


'Bowling Green Church of od


soc10:11c


i I I II







8A The Herald-Advocate, October 11, 2012


He Was 'Green' Before


It Was The Thing To Be


By DEANNA SANCHEZ
Special To The Herald-Advocate
Keith Krueger was born on Dec. 22,
1948, in Oak Park, Ill.
He was raised in Illinois throughout
high school. Keith rode a bus to school.
While in high school he was a wrestler,
hunted and
trapped .
game for fIg fI ,
money and '.
was active
in school plays.
After graduation in 1967 he joined
the U.S. Navy. He worked in Naval
Intelligence. Keith went to school in
Pensacola to be a Navy tech. Later he
went to Adak, Alaska, while in the
Navy. After one year in Alaska, he was
back in Pensacola for more training.
During his time in the Navy he expe-
rienced his first hurricane irr 1969,
Hurricane Camille, a Category 5. Later
he was moved to Sasapo, Japan, then
Okinawa, Japan, then Da Nang,
Vietnam. All, over the years of 1967-
1971.
While over in Japan he ate Japanese
food such as fried rice, chicken, and all
normal Asian foods you would find here
in America. Keith made it home in
1970. After the Navy, Keith went to
Northern Illinois University for six
years, majoring in education.
After school, he worked for 30 years
in the manufacturing, industry specializ-
ing in finishing paint. He owned his
own business in recycling paint. "Way
before green, and the only green I was
interested in was the green of the cash,"
Keith states, not to be a "tree hugger."
In 2001, his life had taken a turn and
,he lost everything. He went back to
school at St. Leo University for two
semestersand received a BA in history.
After school he moved down to Avon
Park in 2003 to teach at Hardee Senior
High and has been teaching at HHS for
eight years.
During his life, Keith was married
twice, each for 15 years. Has one
daughter, Consuelo, from his second
wife. He has a dog named Charley,
named after the 2004 hurricane. Now he
is planning to be engaged to Mary Beth
Packard, a Methodist minister from
Lakeland.


COURTESY PHOTO
Keith Krueger at age 19 in Adak, Alaska.
When Keith was a teen, the Beatles
(band) and "Boranza" (TV show) were
very popular, although he was not a big
fan of either. Keith enjoyed NASA,
Mamas & Papas (band), Simon &
Garfunkle (band) and his favorite drink
of all time, Coca-Cola. Candy bars cost
a nickel and gas was priced at 27 cents.
Bell-bottom jeans, mini-skirts, paisley
and long hair were the style.
Keith's high school buddies were
Eddy Muzzy and Raymond Cast. They
hunted, wrestled; he claims not to be a
"wild child."
Keith's favorite childhood memory is
the time his father and himself went to
Minnesota and Canada for a fishing trip
and on the way they stopped to see his
hero's monument, Dick Barn. Keith's
least favorite memory was getting into a
major wreck at 8. They were not wear-
ing seat belts as the Volkswagen was
ripped in half, but made it out safely.
Keith Krueger has always had a pas-
sion for history and teaching. He loves
to write screen plays and is an avid
reader.
Back In Time is the result of a class
assignment given to ninth graders at
Hardee Senior High School. Each
student is asked to interview an older
person. Selected interviews are pub-
lished here as an encouragement to the
students and for the enjoyment of our
readers.


School Breakfasts, Lunches

Fit New Health Guidelines


By MARIA TRUJILLO
For The Herald-Advocate
Healthy children turn into
healthy adults.
With the emphasis on child-
hood obesity lately, it seems
natural that one place to make
an impact on children's eating
habits is where they spend most
of the day, at school.
That's why at the beginning
of this year, your child most
likely saw a change in the type
of food served in the lunch
room.
Once President Barack
Obama signed the Healthy,
Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010,
school meal standards had to be
adjusted. This is the first time in
over 15 years that a new meal
plan has been implemented.
This change came about
thanks to the new knowledge
the U.S. Department of Agri-
culture has about human nutri-
tion and how a well-balanced
diet can positively affect peo-
ple.
The USDA is fighting the
epidemic that childhood obesity
has become. It is estimated that
nearly one in three children is at
a risk for diabetes and heart dis-
ease because of obesity.
Health experts say that if left
untreated, the current genera-
tion of children could have a
shorter lifespan than their par-
ents.
However, there is another
side.
Also in 2010, it was noted
over 17 million homes in the
U.S. were having trouble put-


ting food on the table at all. For
many of the children in those
homes, a school lunch would
often be their only source of
nutrition.
For all these reasons, now
there are tougher standards of
what should, and will, be on
students' plates across the coun-
try.
Not only are more fruits and
vegetables a requirement, now
there will be more grains, less
sodium, a change in milk and a
daily calorie limit.
Some of the more detailed
changes are seen in the types of
foods students will now be
served. For instance, there is
now a weekly requirement for
vegetable subgroups, which
include dark green, red and
orange, beans and peas, starchy
and others.
Students from kindergarten
through eighth grade must have
one-half cup a day while high
school students must eat a cup
of vegetables or fruit a day.
Only half of the fruit intake can
come from juice that is ap-
proved by the new regulations.
To have a complete lunch
meal, students must choose
three components. Other choic-
es to complete that meal can be
grain, protein or milk. The
requirements for grades K-5 for
grain are eight to nine ounces a
week, for 6-8 between nine and
10 ounces a week, and for 9-12
between 10 and 12 ounces a
week. At least half of the grains
have to be whole-grain rich. By
SJuly 1,2014, all grains must be


LARGE OAK SPLITS


SCOUTING REPORT
pa I


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
Julie Diaz-Nichols, district executive of Boys Scouts of America, spoke to the Hardee
Rotary Club on Wednesday, Sept. 26, at the Java Cafe. Rotary International sponsors
1,400 Scout units representing 45,000 children. Cub Scouts are ages 6 to 10, and Boy
Scouts are 11 to 18. Call 863-370-7608 for more information. Hardee County has about
200 children in Scouts, including Troop 813 in Wauchula, Troop 815 in Zolfo Springs,
and Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts in Bowling Green. From left are club president Michael
Kelly, Julie Diaz-Nichols, Christy Lanier, and Joe Jones. Christy Lanier is an adminis-
trative Park Ranger at Paynes Creek Historic State Park near Bowling Green. The park
plans a "Haunting of Fort Chokonikla" on Oct. 26 with hayrides, tram rides, food and
games. The park has 410 acres and is located along Peace River and Payne Creek.


Host a'JK Party and earn free
jewelry OR become a JK
Stylist and enjoy additional
income & flexibility.

Betina Miller, 863.448.3173
queen _betina@hotmail.com
betina.jeWelkade.com soc10:111p


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
A large oak tree at Jones Street and Bryan Avenue in Bowling Green recently split from
recent rains and was removed. Another big oak tree near the Bowling Green Post
Office recently had a large limb fall on Main Street.


ALPHA AND OMEGA FREEDOM MINISTRIES


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
Lorraine Gillespie and Christine Price on Wednesday, Sept. 12, spoke to the Hardee
Rotary Club about the Alpha and Omega Freedom Ministries, which help women and
children through Hannah's House, a homeless shelter, and 17 apartments for transi-
tional living, plus counseling and classes on subjects such as domestic violence, par-
enting and anger management. From left are Bill Sites, Lakeland attorney and candi-
date for circuit judge; Christine Price; Lorraine Gillespie; and Christine Thornhill,
Winter Haven attorney and candidate for circuit judge. For ministry information call
773-5717.




FREE-$40 GIFT CARD

SEE WILDCAT PAGE

Center Section of "C"

For Your Chance To Win


S"You Name

The Score"
(A Winner Every Week)


ABOUT ...
School News
The Herald-Advocate en-
courages submissions from
Hardee County schools.
Photos and write-ups
should be of recent events,
and' must include first and
last names for both students
and teachers. Identify pho-
tos front to back, left to right.
Deadline for submissions
is 5 p.m. on Thursday.
Please include the name
and phone number of a con-
tact person. Qualifying
items will be published as
space allows.


'S


I =NEW


whole-grain rich.
Proteins, which are meat or
meat alternates, are another
choice. Kids in elementary
school get eight to 10 ounces a
week, middle school students
have nine to 10 ounces a week
and high schoolers get 10 to 12
ounces a week.
Milk requirements have also
changed. All students must
have a cup of milk a day,
although now flavored and
unflavored milk must be fat-
free or one-percent low fat.
Foods with more than 10 per-
cent of saturated fats are not
allowed, neither are trans-fats
except for those that come natu-
rally in meat and dairy.
By following all of the new
regulations, the total amount of
calories students should be get-
ting for breakfast daily are: K-5,
between 350 and 500 calories;
6-8, about 400 to 550 calories;
and 9-12, 450 to 600 a day.
Daily lunch calories are: K-
5, 550 through 650 calories; 6-
8,600 to 700 calories; and 9-12,
750 to 850 a day.
Although big changes have
already happened, more
changes will continue to be
seen over the next three years in
both the breakfast and lunch
programs. Things such as sodi-
um intake will be gradually
adjusted throughout the years.
Now with a healthier school
diet, students can stay on an
even better path to being suc-
cessful and healthy adults.
National School Lunch Week
is Oct. 15-19.









BREAST CANCER AWARENESS


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
Jennifer Meeks, diagnostic testing, and Sara Rosenbaum, health education, spoke to
the Wauchula Lions Club on Thursday, Sept. 20, at the Java Cafe about October being
Breast Cancer Awareness Month. They encourage healthy living habits and annual
mammograms from women 40 and over. They represent Florida Hospital and the "Pink
Army." From left are Helen Summit, Jennifer Meeks, Sara Rosenbaum, and Paul
Summit.


October 11, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 9A


HJHS Softball Keeps Winning


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
In its only game last week,
the Hardee Junior High Lady
Wildcats posted another win.
The girls went to Sebring on
Oct. 1 and brought home a 20-7
victory. The Oct. 4 game at
home against Avon Park was
rained out.
This week's only scheduled
game is today (Thursday) at
Hill-Gustat Middle School in
Sebring. The most challenging
game will probably be Mon-
day's tilt against visiting De-
Soto, the only team to beat
Hardee so far this season. The
Heartland Conference title
could be on the line, if Hardee
can earn a split and provide a
better season record.
Hardee plays at Lake Placid
on Oct. 18 and is home against
Sebring in the season finale on-
Oct. 25. There has been no
announcement about reschedul-
ing the Oct. 4 game.


Against Sebring on its field,
Hardee opened with 11 runs and
never looked back. The little
Lady 'Cats used the long ball to
build up their insurmountable
advantage. Leadoff batter Des-
tinee Jackson slapped a double
and triple during the 16-player
at-bat in the first inning. Shayna
Harned continued with a double
and triple and Sarah Welch was
hit by a pitch and doubled.
Joining in the free-for-all
were Ariana Ramos, safe on an
error twice; Michaela Villarreal
with a walk and single; and
Alexis McBride with a single
and fly-out to end the top of the
first inning. Alayna Carranco
and Makayla Benavidez also
batted in the first frame.
Sebring responded with a pair
of scores in the home half of the
first, adding one more in the
third, and four in the fourth. The
young Lady Streaks went three
up, three down in the bottom of
fifth.


Meanwhile, Hardee had
picked up a pair of runs in the
second inning, on Carranco
double and Benavidez single,
both coming home on team-
mates' sacrifices.
By the top of the fifth, Hardee
coach Missy Albritton had
cleared the bench, giving all
players adequate opportunity
and experience. Carranco sin-
gled, stole second and scored in
the fourth inning.
In the fifth, Hardee's final at-
bat, 11 girls came to the plate.
Elliott led off with a single, and
Nubia Gomez walked/ With one
down, walks, a dropped third
strike and errors had set the
stage for hits by Welch and
Elliott. Samantha Velez, Deb-
orah Figueroa, Marisa Rod-
riguez, Hannah Revell and Mal-
lory Gough were among the
reserves which got time at the
plate.


HOMECOMING HAPPENINGS


POTENTIAL INDUSTRY


COURTESY PHOTO
Zolfo Springs Elementary School put into place afun week-long plan for celebrating
Homecoming. Each day held its own significance in building up to the big events, the
annual Homecoming Parade in downtown Wauchula and the football matchup in
Wildcat Stadium. From dress-up days to painting cat paws on their faces, students dis-
played their support for the Hardee Wildcats.


U.S. FLAG ETIQUETTE


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
Larry Pelton, service officer of the American Legion, spoke to the Wauchula Kiwanis
Club on Tuesday, Sept. 25, about proper handling of the U.S. Flag. He will replace tat-
tered flags. Old flags can be burned privately and the ashes buried. "Under God" was
added to the Pledge~of Allegiance in 1954. from left are Lizette Ortega, Larry Pelton,
rev. Randy Johnson, and Ken Evers.

PUSHING HEALTHY LIVING


'- 5,



I~~e


COURTESY PHOTO
The annual Health & Fitness Fair at North Wauchula Elementary provided families with
ideas and information on healthy living and physical fitness. Fun family games and
friendly competitions were provided outdoors as alternatives to a sedentary lifestyle,
while nutrition and overall health tips were provided indoors. Over 100 families partic-
ipated in the event, which featured the physical education, food service and school
nurse programs. Also highlighted were Florida Hospital's Creating Healthier Hearts,,
Sebring's Faith Community Nursing, the Hardee County Health Departments K.N.O.T.
(Kids Not On Tobacco) and South Florida State College's dental hygiene programs.
Here, Coach Aaron Myers works with two students on their form as they do pushups
during the event.


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
Naveen Sikko, co-founder and CEO, and Tom Schenk, business development, spoke to
the Wauchula Kiwanis Club in September about the possibilities of growing pongamia
trees, which can be used for animal feed, fertilizer, biomass and chemicals. The seeds
can be used for oil and pesticides. The trees grow well on low-grade agricultural and
disturbed land. Rucks Nursery in Frostproof is growing some of the trees. Innovative
Ag Tech is hoping to find growers in the area. U.S. Sugar and Evans Properties have
experimental groves of pongamia trees. An area goal would be 1,000 acres. From left
are Naveen Sikko, Krystin Robertson, Tom Schenk and Jake Crews.


'. f F r i 'd ," 9 1 9 ... v .
. ,- *, / '.
B e'... e T Cm A n u '


Se C r ,
4 14 g j ,. ,










From The Hardee County Hera
Of Friday, October 9, 1953

Front-Page Headlines:
0 Business Men To Study Crime Among Youth

\ Bids Asked For Six New Buses For Schools
0 Ronnie Smith To Attend FFA MeetA

SWauchula Mayor Orders 10 p.m. Curfew For Kids the
"? ,
'1'i























NewCHALLENGER Fruit Loader can save up to 5
GiVES HUGE SAVINGS IN HANDLING CITRUS
doted and proved under actual Florida condition,. the

B ts per field box in citrus harvesting. This loader will
p its 10 field box crate at any level from the ground *

y to operate easy to handle, the CHALLENGER .
t Loader and the Ford Tractor save citrus growers
and money even on small acreages. A separate
tkic system provides steady power to the rigid lift
of the loader leaves the Ford Tractor hydraulic '

t doubles the loader capacity from grove to truck.
More you know about this CHALLENGER Fruit .4




i

/ /
.. Ne Sm o t i Fruit Loade r A o a






*a 'o *-., \ f .oprt w e o n h A N







10A The Herald-Advocate, October 11, 2012

~.jJII


The first-grade classes "count down" with teacher Helen Neal as the moon rocks "land"
at ZSE.


This little guy enjoyed reading a bit of the information as well as looking at the samples.


These first graders were some of the first in the entire schoc
samples.

MOONSTRUCK
Continued From 1A
to get approval to use the samples.
The samples were then sent through the U.S. Postal'
Service. To keep the samples safe, Cole has to have
them under lock and key when she isn't using them for
instruction. When she is, she must always keep a close
eye on them.
Cole is sure to do both, as she added she wouldn't
like to find out what would happen if one piece were to
be damaged!
To send the samples back, she has to take them back
to USPS- and send them through registered mail. This
whole process is free to teachers, as NASA wants to
provide a fun way to help students learn about the
moon.
Other students at the elementary school also had
their chance to look at the samples during this week,

Dice used in crap games in Las Vegas are manufactured
to a tolerance of 0.0002 inches, less than 1/17 the thick-
ness of a human hair.


YOUR BUSINESS COULD

APPEAR HERE TOO!!
Contact
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels,
At The Herald Advocate
115 S. 7th Ave. Wauchula

773-3255


PHOTOS BY MARIA TRUUJILLO
This.first grader couldn't hold back a smile when it was her turn to see a part of some-
thing that seems so unreachable.


Lindsey Cole makes sure to let all of the students see the lunar samples.


ol who were able to see the The first graders were very well-mannered, and remembered not to touch, as they came
up to the table and listened to the information their teacher had about the moon rocks.

SEPT. 11 CEREMONY


COURTESY PHOTO
All the students at North Wauchula Elementary School in grades 1-5 attended a brief flag-raising ceremony around
the flagpole to commemorate the tragic and historic events of Sept. 11. A Freedom Flag was presented by members
of the Safety Patrol, and the symbolism contained in the flag was explained by the faculty and administration.


A Safe Place
DOMESTIC VIOLENCE
CRISIS LINE

1 (800) 500-1119

SEnd The Abuse!
tfc-dh







October 11, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 11A


NWES GRANDPARENTS


Free Food On


Saturday
The New Jerusali
Church of God will be givi
out free U.S. Department
Agriculture food on Saturd.
The pickup site is t
church at 1514 Lincoln S
Wauchula, Fl 33873. F
more information, call 78
0982.
Kids Fun On
Set Saturday
The New Hope Bapt
Church will be holding a "-
Kidz" fun event on Saturd
from 2 to 4 p.m. at the Fi
Street Park in Zolfo Spring
Everyone is welcome
the games, crafts, snacl
Bible Stories and genera
fun event.
STARS Sets
Special Event
STARS (Sports Trainii
and Recreational Services
a program for Harde
County children and adu
with mental and physical d
abilities, js hosting a ba
sale and car wash on Oct.
from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. to he
handicapped athletes coi
pete in bowling, track ai
field, and other events.
Anyone who wants to he
can contact Hardee Cour
STARS coordinator, Mis
Zeigler, at 863-335-0407
at the Wauchula ARC resa
store, 1010 S. Sixth Av
(U.S.' 17 South), Wauchu
(phone 863-773-014
where the event will be he
Pesticide License
Class Oct. 17
A three-hour pestici
license review and testi
class will be held ne
Wednesday, Oct. 17, at t
Hardee County Servi
Office, 507 Civic Ceni
Drive, Wauchula (behind t
Agri-Civic Center). The cla
goes from 9 a.m. to no
and the test will be at 1 p.r
Cost is $38 per person f
study manuals and refres
ments. For two core and o
private core education uni
only cost is $5. To register 1
either CEUs or the class a
test, call 773-2164.
Church Offers
Dinners For $$$
The New Jerusale
Church- of God is holding
fund-raiser dinner on Sa
urday. Cost is $7.
Dinners, either barbecue
ribs or fried pork chops w
two sides, can be picked
or will be delivered. For mo
information, call 863-.78
0982.


IN THE.CIRCUIT COURT IN AN
FOR HARDEE COUNTY, FLORII
CASE NO. 252012CA000215
FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF
WAUCHULA, a National Bankin
Association organized under th
laws of the United States of
America,
Plaintiff,
vs.
STEVEN A. LOUTHAN, Individ-
ually, DOVE INVESTMENT COF
and FIA CARD SERVICES, N.A
f/k/a MBNA AMERICA BANK,
N.A.,
Defendants.

NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO F.S. CHAPTER
NOTICE IS GIVEN that p
suant to Final Default Judgme
and Summary Final Judgment
Foreclosure .and for Attorne
Fees and Costs entered by 1
Court on October.2, 2012, in 1
above-styled cause, I will sell
the highest and best bidder
cash on the Second FIl
Hallway Outside of Room 202
the Hardee County Courthou
located at 417 West Main Stre
Wauchula, Florida, on the 2'
day of October, 2012, at 11:
a.m., the following-describ
property:
Lots 17 and 18, Block "D,"
Charlie Creek Mobile
Estates, according to plat
thereof recorded in Plat
Book 3, page 37, public
records of Hardee County,
Florida. Together with a
1987 Meri Mobile Home,
ID#CF24823147A, FL Title
-# 44316350, and ID
#CE24823147B, FL Title
#44218809. Parcel Num-


ber 31-33-27-0860-0000D-
0017.
Dated this 3 day of October, 20
B. HUGH BRADL
Clerk of Cou
Hardee County, Flori
By: Connie Col
Deputy Cle
10:11,


em
ing
of
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ee
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for
nd


COURTESY PHOTOS
In honor of Grandparents' Day, first-grade students at
North Wauchula Elementary School invited their grand-
mas and grandpas to share a meal with them in the
school's cafeteria. Over 115 grandparents participated
in the festivities. Above, Paige Justice enjoys an orange
juice with Grandpa Rick Justice before classes begin.
Below, Grandma Bernestine McLeod shares a relaxing
lunch with her grandson, Exavion McLeod.
F l-W.., ..l


Week Ending: October 7, 2012
S, Weather Summary: Florida had pleasant autumn weather
witt minimum temperatures ranging from 55 degrees in Jay to 73
S degrees in Fort Lauderdale. Maximum temperatures ranged from
am 84 degrees in Quincy to 93 degrees in Immokalee. Most of Florida
a received rain, the northern areas received less than the mid-to
at- southern region. Rain amounts varied mostly from one to three
inches to 6.18 inches in MacClenny. Overall for the 2012 wet sea-
ed son, according to South Florida Water Management District, the
ith region's 16 counties have seen 37.53 inches of rain.As a whole, the
up District experienced an average of 6.61 inches of rainfall in
re September, or. 97 percent of the historic average for the month.
- Broward County experienced the wettest April through September
since 1955. The largest above average rainfall'totals for this year's
wet season so far are Eastern Miami-Dade with 13.22 inches,
Eastern Broward with 9.24 inches, and Eastern Palm Beach with
8.95 inches.
DA
Field Crops: The harvest of peanuts continued in Gadsden
County. Cotton was being defoliated and picking may start around
mid-week in Escambia and Santa Rosa counties. In some areas, the
peanut and cotton'harvest was delayed due to wet soils. The peanut
hg condition was rated at 1 percent very poor, 2 percent poor, 21 per-
cent fair, 44 percent good, and 32 percent excellent. In Hendry and
Glades counties, the sugarcane harvest has started earlier than last
year to accommodate projected high yields for this season. In Palm
Beach County, wet weather caused delays in rice and sugarcane
harvest, and.the plantings of new sugarcane.

Fruits & Vegetables: The fall vegetable harvest was in full
Ip., swing in some areas with lots of activity at the local farmers mar-
kets. Growers were planting winter vegetables in south Miami-
Dade County. Some vegetable growers were battling conditions
conducive to disease development due to high soil and foliage
moisture in St. Lucie County. The harvest of tomatoes continued in
/ Gadsden County. Vegetable producers were staking, tying, spray-
ing, and conducting cultural operations as needed in Charlotte and
45 Collier counties.
ur- Livestock and Pastures: Statewide, the condition of pasture
ent was very poor to excellent, with most good. Drought and disease
of caused some very poor and poor pasture conditions. Pasture condi-
y's
the tions continued the seasonal decline. The cattle condition ranged
the from very poor to excellent with most in good condition. In the
to Panhandle, the pasture and cattle conditions were very poor to
for excellent. Drought and disease hurt grass growth. Pasture condition
Dor in Leon County declined due to fungal infections aided by drought-
of weakened plants. In Washington County, cattlemen have been
,se
et, exercising vigorous efforts to establish cool season forages. The
4th cattle condition was beginning to decline with the declining quali-
:00 ty of pasture. Late weaning was underway. Producers wanted to
ed allow brood cows to put on weight before the winter, feeding sea-
son begins. In the northern areas, the pasture and cattle conditions
were fair to excellent with most in good condition. In the central
areas, the pasture and cattle conditions were poor to excellent, with
most in good condition. Drought limited some grass growth in
some locations while other locations had flooded pastures from
recent rain. However, in Pasco County, forage growth has been
good following large amounts of rainfall. In the southwestern area,
the pasture and cattle were in poor to excellent condition with
standing water hurting some pasture. Most cattle were in good con-
dition.

Citrus: Daily high temperatures were in the upper 80s to low
90s across the citrus region. All of the FAWN stations in the citrus
growing region recorded some precipitation this week, with Dover
12. receiving the most at 5.51 inches. Ten stations received more than
three inches. Twelve more stations received more than an inch.
EY, Sebring recorded the least, with 0.12 of an inch recorded. (It should
rts be noted that communications with the Sebring station have been
ida offline since October 2). The citrus region remained entirely
er drought free, per the U.S. Drought Monitor; last updated October
erk 2, 2012. Application of fall miticide and herbicide, young tree care,
harvest preparations for Navels and grapefruit, and general grove
18c maintenance were the primary grove activities.


ONE HOPE UNITED


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
Maria Weber, community relations director for One Hope United, spoke to the Hardee
Rotary Club on Wednesday, Aug. 29, at Java Cafe about adopting children whose
parental rights have been revoked. There are 3,000 children in foster homes in Florida,
with 700 between the ages of 8 and 17 available for adoption. Adoptive parents receive
$17 a day per child in funding, she said. One Hope United was started in 1895 as an
orphanage in Chicago and provides case management to over 15,000 children. People
interested in becoming foster or adoptive parents can call 1-407-379-2904. OHU is a
private, non-profit human service organization dedicated to protecting children and
strengthening families. OHU offers orientations, training, financial reimbursement and
ongoing support for foster parents. Many children are abused, abandoned or neglect-
ed and are in need of a safe, stable and nurturing environment. Homes are needed for
sibling groups, adolescents and teenage mothers with babies. From left are Shawna,
Lambert, Maria Weber, club president Michael Kelly, and new Rotary members Colon
Lambert and Vickie Rogers.


To Solve The Nursing Shortage,

Employers And Educators Must Partner


By 2020, an estimated 1 mii-
lion registered nurse jobs in,the
U.S. health care system will go
unfilled but that doesn't have
to happen. To care for a growing
population of older, sicker
patients, nursing schools, health
care employers and technology
innovators must work together
to close this gap.
Apollo Research Institute
convened a panel of nursing
educators, health care execu-
tives and other nursing thought
leaders to propose solutions to
the shortage and other industry
challenges. Key findings are
published in the Apollo
Research Institute report
"Critical Conditions: Preparing
the 21st-Century Nursing
Workforce." The report address-
es -ways to improve- nurse
'recruitment, education and
career advancement to antici-
pate tomorrow's health care
needs.
Panelists identified the lack of
nursing faculty as a major factor



Boil

Think
The power goes out. There is
construction in your neighbor-
hood. A flood strikes. A water
main cracks. Each of these can
cause a disruption in the flow of
water to your home. This disrup-
tion can affect the quality of
your water for drinking, cooking
and household chores. In these
instances, Boil Water Advisories
are issued to ensure consumers
take proper precautions to make
sure water is safe to drink. Boil
Water Advisories do not mean
that water is contaminated, but
rather that it could be tainted.
The United States Environ-
mental Protection Agency and
the Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention work to ensure
consumers only use water that
has been properly disinfected
for drinking, cooking, cleaning
dishes or for personal hygiene
during a Boil Water Advisory.
Follow these safety tips until
the Boil Water Advisory has
been lifted:
Drink bottled water. Drink
water from a source you know
wasn't affected by a water main,
such as water from a bottled
water cooler or single-use bot-
tled water. You may want to
contact a local bottled water
delivery service to quickly get
access to three- or five-gallon
jugs of water.
Boil water to disinfect.
This is the best method for
ensuring drinking water is disin-
fected. Boil water for one
minute, let it cool and store it in
clean, covered containers.
Boiling will kill any disease-
causing organisms and provide
you with clean, potable water.
Use household products.
If you cannot boil your water,
an alternative is to use unscent-
ed liquid household chlorine
bleach to sanitize the water.
Simply add 1/8 teaspoon (or
eight drops) of unscented liquid
household chlorine bleach for
each gallon of water. Stir well
and let it stand for 30 minutes
before use.
Filter cloudy or murky
water. Look at the appearance


in the shortage. Prospective stu-
dents are being wait fisted at
nursing schools and existing
nurses are unable to continue
their education. Health care
organizations have assisted by
providing practicing nurses as
part-time faculty or mentors.
The panel also discussed an
Institute of Medicine report that
recommended higher levels of
education for registered nurses.
For nurses to achieve the rec-
ommended academic creden-
tials, employers and higher edu-
cation providers must collabo-
rate to improve program access.
The nursing experts suggested
flexible scheduling for students
who work or are raising a fami-
ly, professional development
tracks for working Wurses. and
communmc college pnershis j
for associate's-to)'achelr is
program transitions.
Technology will continue to
drive innovations in nursing
practice and education, pan-
elists noted, citing electronic


health records and simulation
technology. But they also
agreed that nursing technology
should never replace the per-
sonal touch and that it must be.
deployed more efficiently.
Panelists also predicted greater
reliance on outpatient services
and rising numbers of geriatric
cancer patients as the U.S. pop-
ulation ages.
These and other shifts will
require nurses to get involved in
creating solutions. "As the front
line of patient care, nurses need
to share their insights with poli-
cymakers, educators and
employers so that the industry
can benefit from their clinical
'expertise and understanding of
patients' social and emotional
needs." says Dr. Tradey Wilen-
Daugentl. "vice-"president- and-
managing director of Apollo
Research Institute and the
panel's moderator.
To learn more, visit
www.apolloresearchinstitute.


of your water in a clear glass. If
it looks discolored or murky,
you may want to filter it and
disinfect it. You can create a
very basic filter using a clean
cloth, a coffee filter or a paper
towel. However, it will still
need to be disinfected.
Call your Culligan Man.
If your neighborhood or com-
munity is under a Boil Water
Advisory, make sure to follow
sanitizing procedures for water
softeners and drinking water
systems installed in your home.
You can find these procedures
outlined in your Culligan prod-


uct owner's manuals. It is also
important to call your local
Culligan Dealer. Your local
Culligan Man can answer any
questions about the quality and
safety of your water, availabili-
ty of bottled water services and
what steps to take to address
your home's water treatment
system.

For 'more information, visit
www.culligan.com, http://wa
ter.epa.gov/drink/emerprep/em
ergencydisinfection.cfm and
www.bt.cdc.gov/disasters/powe
routage/needtoknow.asp.


Legal Briefs _
By Gale Moore & Candace Preston
Attorneys At Law


TWO COMMON CUSTODY MYTHS
1.) Love is a battlefield, therefore so is a "custody case."
The myth continues to prevail that a fight over the children is
the best way to proceed. In actuality, fighting is not best for most
families. Most experts agree there are negative long-term impacts
for children who witness ongoing hostility, which includes litiga-
tion between their parents.
In addition, often the supposed "winner" of the case has
caused such emotional and financial strain on the other parent that
this compounds the problems.
Whether parents are together or separated, the parents still
have to parent together. The damage caused-to the parents' rela-
tionship causes a breakdown in communication to the detriment of
the children.

2.) Mom always gets "custody," and gets everything including
child support.
There once was a doctrine of "tender years." That doctrine
supported the notion that young children should generally be with,
their mother.
Florida law has eliminated that doctrine and instead follows.
"timesharing" factors set forth in Florida Statutes, Chapter 61.
These determining factors follow a common-sense approach.
For example, the parents' mental and physical health are consid-
ered and the bond of the child to each parent. While there are many
other factors, there is no presumption for either a mother or a
father.
Child support then flows from the timesharing arrangement.
In conclusion, be careful of what you hear, even from well-
meaning friends and relatives. Usually there is some basis to a
myth, but every family and circumstance is different, so be sure
you rely on an accurate source of information.


I Water Advisory:

r Before You Drink


[^lorida brop Updatel







12A The Herald-Advocate, October 11, 2012


Hardee GOP Hosted Rally Sept. 29


Political speakers at the rally, from left, were Mike Thompsori, Rick Knight, Colon Lam-
bert, David Durastanti and local Republican Party Chairman Gary Delatorre.
I -------- ^A^----------- W


Charlie Parker (left) cooked hot dogs as Benny Hash watched.


- S ___ ,___ ._
LaQuandra Matthews sang at political event held at Her- Jay Robinson, known as Jericho, sang and coordinated Mrs. Florida Shawna Lambert visits with B.J. Haney.
itage Park in downtown Wauchula. the event's music.


By The Sword band entertained.


Truman Thomas of Avon Park played guitar and sang.


10 Counts Cut To


4 In Plea Deal I


By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
A man facing one of the high-
est numbers of charges stem-
ming from a winter roundup of
alleged narcotics offenders has
been sentenced to probation as
the result of a plea agreement.
John Kevin Wilson, 49, of 321
Garden Dr., Wauchula, had been
charged with 10 counts on Feb.
3 as he and a dozen other sus-
pects were jailed as part of a
Hardee County Drug Task Force
probe.
In a plea agreement between
defense lawyer Gil Colon and
Assistant State Attorney David
Ward, however, six of those
counts were dropped.
And in accepting the negotiat-
ed plea, Circuit Judge Marcus J.
Ezelle sentenced Wilson on the
four remaining counts: sale of
methamphetamine within 1,000
feet of a park, sale of metham-
phetamine, sale of methamphet-
amine within 1,000 feet of a
church and possession of
methamphetamine.
Ezelle imposed five years of
supervised probation. The judge
also assessed $2,080 in fines
and court costs, $800 in prose-
cution expenses, and $400 for
investigative costs.


Wilson
Wilson was among 13 people
arrested in a roundup on Feb. 2
and 3 as arrest warrants were
served on narcotics suspects
identified during an ongoing
Drug Task Force investigation
spurred by tips from the public
and monitored "buys" using
confidential informants.
Two others were jailed as the
Drug Task Force conducted its
two-day roundup, bringing the
total number of arrests up to 15.
According to sheriff's Maj.
Randy Dey, a spokesman for
the Drug Task Force, Wilson's
10 counts stemmed from his
alleged narcotics sales to a con-
fidential informant.


Cuckoo clocks, containing carved wooden birds, which
emerge and "sing" to tell the time, were made in the
Black Forest of Germany as early as 1730 and are still
popular.

George Washington's false teeth were made of whale-
bone.


Outta The Woods
By Tony Young
Florida Fish i & WF idlie Commission


NEW GRAY SQUIRREL SEASON OPENS SATURDAY
Football season is in full swing, and the 2012-13 hunting sea-
son is cranking up. Heck, in Zone A, they're already into general
gun season. But for the rest of us, I'd like to cover some things you
should know regarding three hunting seasons that are just around
the corner: muzzleloading gun, gray squirrel and the first phase of
dove.
Immediately following the close of crossbow season in each
zone, the muzzleloading gun season begins. Season dates run Nov.
17-30 in Zone B, Oct. 20-Nov. 2 in.Zone C and Dec. 1-7 in Zone
D.
During muzzleloading gun season, bows and crossbows are
also legal methods of taking game on private lands, in addition to
muzzleloaders. But on wildlife management areas (WMAs), only
muzzleloaders may be used.
The most common types of game to take during muzzleloader
season are deerand wild hog. In the deer category, only bucks may
be taken, and one antler must be at least five inches long above the
hairline. The daily bag limit on antlered deer.is two.
You can hunt wild hogs year-round on private lands, and there
are no bag or size limits.
For hunting deer, muzzleloaders firing single bullets must be
at least .40-caliber. Guns firing two or more balls must be 20-gauge'
or larger. During muzzleloading gun season, you may not use muz-
zleloaders that take smokeless powder, ones that can be loaded
from the breech or those with self-contained cartridge ammunition
capabilities.
It's also legal to shoot gobblers and bearded turkeys during
muzzleloading gun season. You may take only one per day, and
there's a two-bird fall-season limit. But you can't hunt turkeys in
Holmes County during the fall and winter. On WMAs, bag limits
and antler/size restrictions can differ, so check the specifics of the
area before you hunt.
New this year: Gray squirrel season has been extended state-
wide on private lands, and from now on, it opens a month earlier.
This year, it starts Oct. 13. This new rule didn't go into effect until
after the 2012-13 Florida Hunting Regulations Handbooks were
printed that's why the old November opening date is listed.
There's a daily bag limit of 12 gray squirrels, and shooting fox
squirrels is still against the law.
Legal shooting hours are from a half-hour before sunrise to a
half-hour after sunset. Except for turkeys, hunters may take resi-
dent game over feed such as corn on private lands. No baiting is


allowed on WMAs, however.
The first phase of the mourning and white-winged dove season
began Saturday and ends Oct. 29 statewide. Shooting hours during
this first phase are noon to sunset, and there's a 15-bird daily bag
limit.
The only firearm you're allowed to use for hunting doves is a
shotgun, but you can't use one larger than a 10-gauge. Shotguns
must be plugged to a three-shell capacity (magazine and chamber
combined).
You may hunt doves over an agricultural field, as long as the
crop has been planted and manipulated under normal agricultural
practices. However, it's against the law to scatter agricultural prod-
ucts over an area for the purpose of baiting.
Some things you can't do while dove hunting include using
rifles, pistols or crossbows; shooting from a moving vehicle; and
herding or driving doves with a vehicle.
In addition to a Florida hunting license, you'll need a $5 muz-
zleloading gun permit to hunt during muzzleloader season. To hunt
deer, you need a $5 deer permit, and if you'd like to take a fall
turkey, you'll need a $10 turkey permit ($125 for non-residents). If
you're going to hunt doves, you'll need a no-cost migratory bird
permit, and if you hunt on a WMA, you also must have a manage-
ment area permit, which costs $26.50.
All are available at your county tax collector's office; through
license agents; by calling 888-Hunt-Florida; or by going online to
License.MyFWC.com.
So if you're going after that monster buck during the muzzle-
loading gun season or small-game hunting with friends and family,
I hope I've helped explain some of the things you need to know.
Tony Young is the media relations coordinator for the FWC's
Division of Hunting and Game Management, You can reach him
with questions about hunting at Tony.Young@MyFWC.com.








PAGE ONE


Hardee Faces Frostproof


I Spors cheul-Ot. 1-8


By.JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
A well-rested Hardee Wildcat
squad is headed to Frostproof
on Friday.
After a bye week, the 'Cats
challenge the Frostproof Bull-
dogs on their turf. The Bulldogs
have lost a couple of close
games, including last week's
17-16 loss at Fort Meade.
Freshman quarterback Xavier
Gaines, has played varsity
before in the middle/high
school format so is not exactly
new to the game. Plus, he has
several brothers and cousins on
the team, including soph Kaleel
Gaines to add to the Bulldog
attack.
Hardee was silent last week
under the Florida State Associ-
ation's rulings of when district
encounters occur. With five
teams in Class 5A, Region 3,
District 10, Hardee had to sit
out last week, while the other
four district opponents were
scheduled to play. Palmetto,
currently ranked number one in
Class 5A, beat Bradenton
Bayshore 48-7, and the game
between Bradenton Southeast
and DeSoto was rained out and
scheduled for Monday evening.
Results were not available at


press time.
"Frostproof is athletic, quick,
with a young quarterback who
has played varsity ball before
although this is his first year at
quarterback," commented Har-
dee head coach Buddy Martin.
He said the Wildcats had a
hard-fought game against Mul-
bery on Sept. 28 and "Mulberry
played great."
Martin went on to say, "We
have to open up a bit. We're
battling youth and leadership
problems, but as soon as these
young ones get it together, they
will be good," noting Hardee
has won 1, lost 1 since the pre-
season 35-6 win over Lake
Placid. There was a 24-14 loss,
at Fort Meade, a 37-0 win over
Avon Park at home, a 14-12
loss to Sebring at home, the 28-
6 Homecoming win over Bay-
shore and the 37-0 debacle at
Mulberry.
Hardee is indeed very young,
with just a half dozen seniors,
and 17 juniors, many of whom
were on the JV squad last sea-
son. There are nine sophs, in-
cluding recent transfer De-
Andre Holley, "who will be a
great receiver once he learns
our formations and system."
Two freshmen round out the


HARDEE OPPONENTS
PASSING COMPLETIONS,
ATTEMPTS AND
INTERCEPTIONS 27-62-7 53-99-5
PASSING YARDS 370 634
RUSHING ATTEMPTS/
YARDS 172/776 139/363
TOTAL YARDS 1,186 1,095
TURNOVERS 11 13
FIRST DOWNS 46 48
PENALTIES, LOST
YARDAGE 25/251 49/368.5
SCORING BY QUARTER:
.Hardee 40 14 7 30 91
Opponents 7 40 21 13 81







lote



Frederick


"Rick" M.





Knight


2012 Wildcat roster.
Martin has tried to use-his
seniors effectively, including
strong guard Jesus Zuniga and
quick guard Rufino Gabriel.
They are assisted on the line by
sophomore center Jose Gon-
zalez, strong tackle junior Luke
Palmer and quick tackle Luke
Winter and company.
In the backfield are senior
Aaron Barkley and soph Key-
onte Holley. Joining De-Andre
Holley in the receiving corps
are senior Octavio Alvarez, jun-
iors Tristan Lanier and Caleb
Purser, and soph Derick Gra-
ham, who is quickly being the
go-to guy for junior quarterback
Kris Johnson, who is backed up
by classmate Jacob Bolin.
Alvarez and fellow senior
Miguel Garcia share kicking
and punting duties.
On the defensive side of the
field, senior Kane Casso and
junior Adson Delhomme are
tackles, defensive ends are jun-
ior Keyon Brown, who has
already drawn national atten-
tion, and classmate Lucious
Everett. The cornerbacks are
senior Garcia and freshman
Marco DeLeon, with Alvarez at
safety, along with Graham. The
middle linebacker is junior
Waylan Pleger, with juniors J. J.
Alfnarez and Jesus Flores as
outside linebackers.
Added in the mix are seniors
Kane Casso and Paul Gough;
juniors Caleb Purser, Armando
Alamia, Tyler Dunlap, James
Greene, Tirmmy Steedley and
Nelson Bethea; sophs Sahmaud
Blandin, Stephan Jones, Ricky
DelaRosa, Devin Pearson and
Blaiaine Molitor; and freshman
William McClelland.
Look to the Wildcats to begin
to make their statement with the
Frostproof game this weekend.
Palmetto will visit on Oct. 19
for the first of three district
encounters. There is a game at
Southeast on Oct. 26 and a trip
to Desoto on Nov. 2. The season
ends with the Nov. 9 Senior
Night game against Fort Pierce
Central.


Oct. 11 Cross Country
HJHS Softball
Volleyball


Peace River Electric Cooperative, Inc.
" A Touchstone Energy' Cooperative ?


Hardee County Ministerial Association
For More Information contact The Main Street Office at 863.767.0330
or visit www.mainstreetwauchula.com
10:11.18c


@Fort Green
Hill-Gustat
Auburndale


HOME
Away
Away


4 p.m.
4:30 p.m.
6/7:30 p.m.


JV Football Avon Park Away 7 p.m.
Oct. 12 V. Football Frostproof Away 7 p.m.
Oct. 12/13 Swimming Heartland meet Away 5 p.m/9 a.m.
Oct. 15 Boys/Girls Golf Bradenton Away 9 a.m.
HJHS Softball DeSoto HOME 4:30 p.m.
Volleyball Frostproof HOME 6/7:30
Oct. 16 HJHS Football Bok Academy HOME 5:30 p.m.
Volleyball Avon Park HOME 6/7:30 p.m.
Oct. 18 Cross Country Pioneer Park HOME 4:30 p.m.


HJHS Softball
Volleyball
JV Football


Lake Placid
DeSoto
Tampa Jesuit


Away
Away
Away


PRECO Website


New Online Outh


Peace River Electric Coope-
rative recently unveiled an
"Outage Map" on its website,
www.preco.coop.
With the outage map, anyone
with a simple Internet connec-
tion can view power interrup-
tions and follow restoration
activities in "real time" as they
occur on the cooperative's
power lines.
It features a graphical repre-
sentation of outage locations
overlaid on an easy-to-read
map. A simple "shaded block"
indicates where an outage is
present, while a hardhatt"
image signifies that a line crew
has been dispatched to make
repairs.
"We are excited about the
addition of the outage map to
our website," shares Nell
McCauley, chief marketing and
member services officer.


"Outage location and duration
are primary concerns for our
member-consumers. They want
outage information that is easi-
ly accessible, useful and up-to-
date."
But how can an individual
access the online map, if the
power is out?
"Most homes contain a num-
ber of 'smart devices' readily
available, even when the power
is out," explains McCauley.
"The outage map may be
viewed on a smart phone, iPad,
tablet, or even a battery-operat-
ed laptop computer. Even with-
out such a device, a person can
simply call a friend or relative
and ask them to check the web-
site."
Co-op members are not the
only ones to benefit from this
technology.
"In the event of a major storm


4:30 p.m.
6/7:30 p.m.
7 p.m.


Offers


zge Map
or hurricane, timely outage
information is a must for the
good of the community," adds
McCauley. "For logistical and
reporting purposes, local emer-
gency management offices and
news outlets will require the
real-time data this map pro-
vides."
PRECO's online outage map
provides live data on the total
number of outages occurring,
the number of electric services
affected and how many outage
calls were received. The web-
site even lists the number of
services by county.
The map automatically re-
freshes the information dis-
played every five minutes.
To access PRECO's outage
map, visit www.preco.org. To
report an outage, call the coop-
erative's toll-free outage hotline
at 1-877-282-3656.


The Herald-Advocate


Thursday, October 11. 2012


Small Festival


SPONSORED BY: EVENT PARTNER:


for

COUNTY COMMISSION,

District 3












Political Advertisement Paid For And Approved By Frederick Knight
For County Commission, District 3, Republican 10:11-18p


-----






2B The Herald-Advocate, October 11, 2012




Hardee


The Florida State Fair Au-
thority Board met last week and
re-elected -their officers for
2013.
Doyle E. Carlton III, chair-
man of the Florida State Fair
Authority Board and a resident
of Wauchula, was re-elected for
a second term. "It is an honor to
be re-elected as chair of the
authority, and I look forward to
serving the board and the execu-
tive committee in that capacity,"
Carlton said.
The 2012-13 board officers
also include Robert M. Thomas
of Thonotosassa, vice chairman;
Linda Syfrett of Okeechobee,
treasurer; and M. Clayton Hollis
Jr. of Lakeland, secretary.
The 2012-13 Executive Com-
mittee members include the offi-
cers plus state Agriculture Com-
missioner Adam H. Putnam,
Chip LaMarca of Fort Lauder-
dale, Jenny Steinbrenner Swin-
dal of Tampa, and A.D. "Sandy"
MacKinnon of Tampa.
In 1977, Doyle E. Carlton Jr.,


SHINE is a FREE program affiliated with the Florida Department
of Elder Affairs, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, and
the West Central Florida Area Agency on Aging. sod 0:11.11:8c


Taste


SF=r-:


Living


Fort Meade Pioneer Fest

Needs Bakers & Canners


COURTESY PHOTO
Ryan Albritton & Jenna Adams

Jenna Adams Engaged To

Marry Ryan Albritton


i /"
Edwin and Cynthia Adams of
Myakka announce the engage-
ment of their daughter, Jenna
Lea Adams, to Allen Ryan
Albritton, the son of Randall
and Kay Albritton of Bowling
Green.
The bride-elect is a 2005
graduate of Palmetto High
School. She is currently em-


played at SunTrust Bank Inc. in
Bradenton.
The prospective groom is a
2005 graduate of Hardee Senior
High School. He is currently
employed at CF Industries in
Fort Green Springs.
Plans are being made for a
Nov. 3 wedding at the Gamble
Plantation in Ellenton.


Reserve By Friday For

Metheny/Howard Brunch
The Wednesday Musicale is Lambert at 235 Terrell Road in
hosting a brunch this Saturday Wauchula. Friends and family
in honor of long-time members members of the honorees, as
and musicians Virginia Metheny well as prospective members of
of Wauchula and Neva Howard the Musicale, are invited to the
of Lakeland. complimentary brunch,, which
Reservations to attend are still 'will begin at 11 a.m. Reserva-
open, but must be made by tions are a must and may be
tomorrow (Friday). made by calling (863) 202-4041
Metheny and Howard have or 773-3594.
contributed their talents:thAlfdgh Hostesses 'iare'President Dot
the yeais not only to, the club, Bell, Vice President Bess Stal-
but also to their church and the lings, Secietary Jo Thompson
entire community, and Treasurer Claudette Ke-
The special event will be held men.
at the home of Ken and Eileen



Hcllvwccd

SNails & Spa

IGrand Opening






Come in and check us out
S guaranteed friendly & clean

I 767-0258
S 1036 6th Ave., South Wauchula
l \ Mon. Sat. 9:30am 7pm
SVClosed On Sunday


Hydrr


Hydroponic Growers


FARM FRESH

VEGETABLES


ORDER YOUR
STRAWBERRY AND
TOMATO PLANTS NOW
MANATEE COUNTY'S ONLY YEAR ROUND
HYDROPONIC U-PICK FARM
Tuesday Saturday 10am 5pm
Sunday 11am 5pm
Closed Monday
Phone (941) 322-0429
7308 Verna Bethany, Myakka City, Fl 34251
www.hydrotaste.com
soc1O: 11c


The Fort Meade Historical
Society is having a "country
fair" and is looking for bakers
and canners.
Blue ribbons will be handed
out to the winners for judged
pies, cakes, pickles, jams, jellies
and preserves. To enter the com-
petition, contact the Fort Meade
Chamber of Commerce (863)
285-8253 or ftmeadecham-
ber@yahoo.com.
The Historical Society is host-
ing the Pioneer Fall Fest on
Saturday, Nov. 17, at Museum
Park, 1 Tecumseh Ave., from 9
a.m. to 4 p.m.
A country dinner of pulled
pork, greens, rice and beans,
tomato gravy, and beverage will
be served from 11 a.m. to 1:30
p.m. Tickets are being pre-sold


for $8 from any of the
Historical Society board mem-
bers and from the Chamber of
Commerce.
Also planned for the day is
entertainment at the gazebo,
demonstrations and exhibits
from long ago, a farmers' mar-
ket, craft sales, cake walk,
snack and dessert vendors, as
well as activities for children.
The museum will be open for
tours, as well as a model-train
exhibit in the museum's train.
Vendors may register for a
$10 fee. Historical demonstra-
tions and exhibitions may be set
up free of charge, but registra-
tion is still required.
For more information, con-
tact the Chamber of Commerce
at the number above.


a member of the Florida State
Fair Authority, along with his
wife Mildred W. Carlton, felt
the need for an exhibit to bring
the rich history of early rural
Florida to life.
Their vision began in 1978,
when the Carlton House was
donated by family members and
moved from Hardee County to
a four-acre tract on the Florida
State Fairgrounds in Tampa.
Doyle E. Carlton III contin-
ues to contribute to his family's
mission to educate Florida's
youth about pioneer Florida.
The Florida State Fair
Authority operates from rev-
enues generated from the annu-
al State Fair and other ongoing
operations during the year. It
receives no tax monies.
For information on the Flor-
ida State Fair Authority, its
events and activities, contact
Scott Merselis, marketing man-
ager, at (813) 627-4318 or by e-
mail at scott.merselis@fresh-
fromflorida.com



p. ILDf
\1 I .lAN-


Machelle Dollar of Wauchula
has announced the plans for her
marriage to Skyler Luthi of
Lake City.
The bride-to-be is the daugh-
ter of Dena Cash and the grand-
daughter of Denton and Sharon
Cash of Wauchula. The prospec-
tive groom is the son of John
and Lisa Luthi of Lake City.


/ Are you in need
7^ Occasion? Wed(
Party. E
S This room will
closest friends

complete kitchen
This is a great fa
and parties. R
For more
S' Jana Thorpe
'- "/ Lydia Neff
"" Lvnn Hebert

' -


The couple will exchange
wedding vows this (Thursday)
morning in Orlando. A recep-
tion will be held in their honor
tomorrow (Friday) night in the
pavilion at Pioneer Park in
Zolfo Springs.
Formal invitations were
mailed.


Dear Editor:
County Manager's Wife Asks
Grady Johnson To Apologize


Dear Editor: a
To Commissioner
Grady Johnson,
This is an official request:
Please retract your dishonest
statements and your defamatory
posts regarding my husband Mr.
Lexton Albritton and submit an
apology for the defamatory
remarks, the misleading state-
ments 'the FALSE accusations,
and the attack on his mental'
state of being.
I request, that you alsq remove
'all the posts in which you refer
to Mr. Albritton as possessing a
"deranged state of mind" and all
the times you call him a thief, a
liar, a deceiver and any other
posts which lead the public to
believe that Mr. Albritton has


been involved in dishonest and
illegal dealings and transac-
tions. These posts are inten-
tionar; they have been posted
with Malice and Intent!
Therefore in order to protect
my minor children and our fam-
ily's reputation and standing in
the community and my family's
emotional well-being, I am
requesting a FORMAL RE-
TRACTION and APOLOGY
for what you have written over
,the course of the last 22 months
you have been in office as
County Commissioner on your
public Website www.grady-
johnson.vpweb.com.
Sincerely,
Alma Albritton
A CITIZEN of Hardee County


of a place for a Special
ding Shower. Birthday
3abv' Shoiner?
hold up to 60 of your
and there is room for
atio! There is also a
'n and two restrooms.
cility to hold meetings
ates are reasonable.
information call:
863-773-2321
-863-832-0875
863-735-0208

^rf


Dollar/Luthi

Wedding Plans


Carlton Re-Elected As

Chairman Of State Fair


David DURASTANTI






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October 11, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 3B


THREE PI IG, NO BLUE


Travis Short and Dericka
Roach, Avon Park, an eight-
pound daughter, Marcella
Nevaeh Short, born Sept. 25,
2012, Highlands Regional
Medical Center, Sebring. Ma-
ternal grandfather is Derrick
Roach of Avon Park. Maternal
great-grandparent' is Rosetta
Roach of Philadelphia. Paternal
grand parents are Thresa and
Tony Ward of Avon Park, and
Tony Short and Judy Merchant
of Wauchula. Paternal great-
grandparents are James Ed-
wards of Sebring and the late
Bootsie Edwards, and the late
Jack and Sue Short, formerly of
Wauchula.


This week in history, as
researched from the archival
pages of The Florida Ad-
vocate, the Hardee County
Herald and The Herald-Ad-
vocate ...

75 YEARS AGO
At the regular meeting of the
City Council Monday evening,
the city dads authorized RB.
Downing, of the light and water
department, the authority to
install a street light on South
Sixth avenue at Craven street
upon arrival of the material.

The Royal Theatre will be
showing "Make A Wish" on
Friday, "Get Along Little
Doggie" on Saturday, "Wee
Willie Winkie" on Sunday and
Monday, "Lancer Spy" on
Tuesday and Wednesday and
"On Again, Off Again" on
Thursday and Friday.

A Wauchula boy is going to
the top. "Bud" Rainey is mak-


ing a name for himself and our
city over a large Hartford,
Conn,, radio station with his
songs and poems. He often
mentions the name of Wauchula
during his program, and a large
legion of fans is beginning to
learn something about our city.
Nice going, "Bud," keep it up.

Another new business will
open its doors to the public of
Hardee County this morning
when the Wauchula Auto
Supply holds its official open-
ing at its location on West Main.
Street between Kimbrough and
Elsberry Grocery and R.H.
Herr's jewelry store.

50 YEARS AGO
The city of Wauchula is mov-
ing its equipment "barn" from
the power plant to a residential
area in northeast Wauchula at a
cost of approximately $12,000.

Inter-County Telephone Co.
came up to bat and struck out


WaysacfWe


this week as irate phone users in
the cou :y lambasted it with
hard f ones. Complainers
who jammed a hearing before
the county commissioners last
Friday morning went away
muttering that they had only
heard more excuses from the
company and no reasons for
poor service.

The door has been thrown
-wide to'all county voters to
decide whether or not there will
be a continuation of the county
fair here. The county commis-
sioners decided Friday not to
limit the vote to freeholders.

An unusual contest is being
held at Hardee High this week.
The Key Club has selected five
boys to run for the "Ugliest
Man on Campus." The students
will vote on them by putting
pennies in jars which will be
hanging around the contestants'
necks.'

25 YEARS AGO
Courtney M. Green, the wife
of David Green, was crowned
last Saturday night at the Agri-
Civic Center as the new Mrs.
Hardee County for 1988. The
most impressive ceremony fea-
tured some 12 lovely ladies and
the overall beauty and compo-


sure made the, decisions of the
judges most difficult.

There was a hearing
Wednesday in Judge R. Earl
Collins' chambers to decide if
two of the Zolfo Springs candi-
dates for council could run.
John Shivers and Frank Weems
were part-time policemen. The
police rules say they should
resign before running for public
office. Both men qualified, then
resigned as part-time police-
men.

The 5th annual Hammock 5K
Classic and 1-Mile Fun Run
will be held Saturday, Oct. 24,
at Highlands Hammock State
Park to benefit the Association
for Retarded Citizens (ARC)
Ridge Area.

Thriftyway Supermarkets is
advertising California Red
Emperor grapes for 88 cents a
pound, Idaho baking potatoes
for 99 cents for a five-pound
bag, Pepsi-Cola 99 cents for a
two- liter bottle, Crisco pure
vegetable oil for $1.59 for a 48-
ounce jar and three jumbo rolls
of paper towels for $1.

10 YEARS AGO
The Center for Great Apes
recently welcomed its newest


Jonathon Avery -and Miranda
Blasingain, Fort Meade, a seven
pound three ounce daughter,
Kynleigh Rose Avery, born July
4, 2012, Highlands Regional
Medical Center, Sebring. Ma-
ternal grandparents are Johnny
and Delores Blasingain of Fort
Meade. Maternal great-grand-
parents are Lonie Blasingain of
East Prairie, Mo., and the late J.
C. Blasingain. Paternal grand-
parents are Pam and Gerald
.:Clanton of Bowling Green.
jPaternal great-grandpai'nts are"
hb. iJ ate J.i- -.. ,a-d,,-Monda-
Farmer, formerly of Zolfo
Springs.


.-v Hardeeconomy
By, Krystin Robertson
Econorrmi, Developmentr OHice

For generations, my family has been established in Hardee
County, making a life of farming, ranching, educating and serving.
I have been blessed with many opportunities to participate in vari-
ous aspects of my beloved community, from playing youth sports
to showing livestock in the county fair.
Upon graduating with my bachelor's degree, I had no intention
of establishing my career anywhere except Hardee County. I re-
turned home in search of my forever vocation. Then reality hit.
Quickly, I became painfully aware of the lack of opportunity
that my peers looking to return to Hardee County have. I say this
in no way neglecting acknowledgement of all the support that is
poured into our youth and those who are struggling or-facing a dif-
ficult period; in fact, that is one of the many reasons that I so des-
perately desired to plant my roots in the Hardee County soil.
However, with a heavy heart I began to expeditiously dive into
applications and mailing out resumes to every business between
here and Charleston.
While praying feverishly, I took a part-time job as events coor-
dinator for Main Street Wauchula Inc. Once working in the
Economic Development Office, where Main Street is housed, I
became acquainted with "the acronyms," as I so fondly referred to
them, of the economic development agencies that often go very
misunderstood: IDA, EDC, EDA, CRA.
I have since been given the position of communication coor-
dinator for the Hardee County Economic Development Office
(ED.O).. As I learn more about "the acronyms," I will share my find:
ings with you, my community, in this bi-weekly column'.
It is my passion and goal to educate others about the econom-
ic development of Hardee County, to keep ranchers, businessmen,
teachers, elected officials and citizens up to date on all of the pro-
jects that are being processed through the Economic Development
Office. Together we can create an environment of opportunity for
future generations!


Perhaps you sent a lovely card
or sat quietly in a chair.

Perhaps you sent a funeral spray

if so, we saw it there.

Perhaps you spoke the kindest words
as any friend could say.

SPerhaps you were not there at all
just thought of us that day.


Whatever you did to

console our hearts
we thank ypu
so very much

whatever the part.


The family of

Jewel English


soc10:llp


Kim Pfeiffer and Greg
Pfeiffer, Zolfo Springs, a seven
pound, nine ounce daughter,
Anika Grace Pfeiffer, born July
23, 2012, Winter Haven Re-
gency Hospital, Winter Haven.
Mrs. Pfeiffer is the former Kim
HarrisoNMaternal grandparents
are Ralph and Carmen Harrison
of Wauchula. Paternal grand-
parents are Gene and Cathy
Pfeiffer of Palm City.

Birth announcements will be
published free of charge within
three months of the date of
birth. A photo of the infant-as
a newborn only-may be added
at no cost. Any other photo of
the baby will cost $15.


'Ceremony


Will Honor

Confederates
Members of two area chap-
ters of the Sons of Confederate
Veterans will be honoring
Confederate soldiers buried in
Bereah Cemetery with a
Southern Cross of Honor cere-
mony on Saturday.
The ceremony will take place
at 10:30 a.m. at the cemetery
near Bowling Green.
Participating are members of
Capt. F.A. Hendry Camp No.
1284 of Sebring and Cow
Cavalry Camp No. 2181 of
Arcadia.
Confederate soldiers who
will be honored include Pvt.
Elias Johnson, Pvt. Thomas A.
Pollard, Pvt. Henry R. Hill, Pvt.
John B. Gunter and Pvt. Bryant
R. Welch.


THERE ARE EXCITING TIMES AHEAD


AND WE'VE ONLY JUST BEGUN!



We have reduced the millage from 10 mills to 8.5540

Raised our tax base from less than $500 million to 1.5 billion

We have paved and repaved many roads with state and federal grants

The US highway 17 four-lane project is near completion

We now have water and waste water in Wauchula Hills

New little league baseball complex and two soccer fields completed

Our Commerce Park is almost full and ready to expand into the next section

In the process of installing RV hook-ups in Hardee Lakes and working on the master plan

First and only county in the State to have wireless Broadband available

Mosaic Development Agreement of $42 million for Economic Development

CF Industries $10 million Development Agreement for Education and Recreation



LET'S PUT OUR DIFFERENCES ASIDE AND GET TO WORK!



.VOTE FOR MINOR L.




BRYANT




COMMITTED EXCITED and DEDICATED!

Paid political advertisement, approved by and paid for by Minor L. Bryant (D) for county commissioner, District 1
10:11p


"Tall Into Savings"

Ridge Area Arc's Resale Store
October 19, 2012
The Arc
I,^ 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.






1010 S. 6th Ave.
Wauchula
CLEARANCE SALE
50% OFF
00 ENTIRE STORE C




Hardee County Specials STARS Fundraiser
Bake Sale & Car Wash
9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
This sale only applies to the
Ridge Area Arc Wauchula Resale Store
located at 1010 S 6th Ave. Wauchula. 41
10:4,11c


addition: a 3-year-old Chim-
panzee named Knuckles.

It may be two years in the
making, but the Wauchula
Skatepark is becoming a reality.
Work began in earnest last week
at the park located by the city
water tower on North Third
Avenue between Palmetto and
Oak streets.

Hardee High's varsity volley-
ball squad took a pair of victo-
ries early last week. The girls
won at Mulberry and at home
against Bartow before dropping
a match at DeSoto last
Thursday.

U.S. Marine Corps Private
First Class Daniel Watson, son
of Ted and Julie Watson of
Zolfo Springs, recently com-
pleted boot camp at Parris
Island, S.C. On Sept. 20, Pfc.
Watson graduated with the
National Defense Ribbon,
given to members of the mili-
tary only .during time of war,
and the Rifle Expert Badge for
shooting 225 out of 250.

Saying what we think gives
a wider range of conversa-
tion than saying what We
know.
--Cullen Hightower







4B The Herald-Advocate, October 11, 2012


Fort Green
News
By Rilla Cooper
773-6710

Greetings from Fort Green!
This is the time of the year or
a little later when half of
Fl9rida makes an exit from our
state to north Georgia or North
Carolina to see the leaves! If
people would just wait, they
change down here around
January in the bayheads. There
is some color beginning to
show on the oranges, which are
about as pretty a sight as the
leaves.
There was a lovely wedding
last Saturday at the College Hill
Community Center. Renee and
Lynn Revell have been real
busy sprucing up the old
schoolhouse. Not many people
would have thought of a wed-
ding in this great old building.
Renee's daughter, Sandra,
and Kyle Braxton were united
in marriage. Kyle is the son of
Brenda and Mike Braxton and
the grandson of Doris Thornton,
who is a member of Fort Green
Baptist. I wish them many years
of wedded bliss.
I was talking to Becky
Henderson last week and told
her I was proud of her. She
could not do some animal work
on one day as she was taking
Noveta Beeson to a special din-
ner. People who do things for
others are some of the reasons
that make Wauchula and Har-
dee County a great place to live.
I know Sandy Hash does quite a
bit for Odell Lee, and she is one
of the rare ones who visits
Resthaven at least once a
month.
Of course, when I was talking
to Becky we always reminisce
about something special her dad
did with my animals, and she
said she should have written a
book on all the different stories
people have told her. Remem-


being your loved ones makes
them with you always.
Margaret Henderson cele-
brated another milestone re-
cently and turned 89. She was
on the board at Hardee Me-
morial Hospital back in the '70s
when I worked there. Margaret,
I hope you make it to 100 and
stay in good shape!
Our sincere sympathy is
extended to the family of
Lillian Moye, who made her
final journey last Wednesday
morning. Lillian became a
member of Fort Green Baptist
in 1936 and has been a member
longer than any of the present
congregation. She and I were in
the Homemakers Club and had
a lot of fun together. She always
had a green thumb and could
grow any kind of flowers, and
also enjoyed making ceramics
and advanced to making pottery
on her potter's wheel. She will
be missed but had been in the
nursing home for a number of
years.
Sympathy is also extended to
the family of Leah Leonard
Kaltner who passed away last
Wednesday. She had been on
our prayer list at church. Lee
Chancey said she was in school
with him and that makes her -
young.
Someone called me and left a
message wanting to know if I
still had avocados, which.-I do,
and I called the telephone num-
ber they left but did not get an
answer or an answering ma-
chine. I couldn't understand the
name that was left.
. The GAs are sponsoring a
movie night, with pizza and
Coke at Fort Green Baptist on
Oct. 13, beginning at 6. A
Christian movie will be shown,
and they had planned on "The
Hiding Place" but the new one
ordered skipped when Carol
Brown, the GA leader, checked
it out. The GAs are requesting
a $5 donation from the adults
and youth are free. The money
made will be donated to Oper-
ation Shoebox Ministry.


I saw a sign on Wauchula
Elementary School th Oct. 12
was an in-service d; so this
might mean a holiday for stu-
dents.
Gary Oden got a good report
on his last checkup, Jerald
Abbott is sick, Anna Oritz is
still having problems with her
ankle and Mary Samuels is real-
ly looking good and only has a
couple of more treatments.
Mabel Williamson has been
sick with bronchitis, and there
are probably many more so
please pray for all of these.
Please pray for each otherr
and our nation.


The following permits were
applied for or issued by the
Hardee County Building De-
partment during the week of
Sept. 30-Oct. 6. Listings include
the name of the owner or con-
tractor, the address for the proj-
ect, the type of work to be done,
and the cost involved. Only
projects valued at $1,000 or
more are listed.
ISSUED
James M. Collins, Orange
Street West, fire suppression,
$1,231.
Frank Ralph Branca, Sixth
Avenue, mechanical, $1,000.
Christopher R. Collins, U.S.
17 North, mechanical, $13,570.
Bradford T. Bowen, U.S. 17
North, roofing, $30,437.
Richie Evans, North Eighth
Avenue, roofing, $16,500.
David W. Tidwell, U.S. 17
North, roofing, $11,500.
Charles A. Dorman, County
Road 664, electric, $1,500.
Kenneth R. Long, Ninth
Avenue South, electric, $3,950.
Mark S. Moye, Louisiana
Street, mechanical, $3,125.
Rebecca Stephens, East Bay
Street, re-pipe, $3,200.
Owner, Hyde Street, 20x19
carport, $2,000.
Owner, Dixiana Drive, DCA-
approved shed, $2,455.
BUILDING BLOCKS
If your project isn't permitted
or doesn't comply with the
building code, you may have to
remove or repair the work at
your own expense and be sub-
ject to fines by local govern-
ment.


Pe V IVa i tinCln


Save 50-75% on pet Vaccinations '

Thursday, October 18th
At

' .4 Vision Ace Hardware
'4 .V '225 East Oak St., Wauchula 5:00 to 6:00 pm 773-3148

'. Dog & Cat Packs start at $45 With heartworm test $55
-" Kitten and puppy packs $36
Save money on your favorite Heartworm
.As'. .. .E l


and flea products sucn as
Revolution, Heartguard, Comfortis & Frontline


I


ALLMAJR-CED


OCTOBER 2012
201 Indiana Avenue


-W ---mY
-., .. --.


LOTSA PASTA!


COURTESY PHOTOS
Wauchula Elementary School's PTO held a spaghetti dinner fundraiser before the
Hardee vs. Avon Park football game. Above, parents and staff work side-by-side to dish
out roughly 700 meals.
Middle, school cafeteria
manager Sherry Rucker and
PTO President Claire VI
Cornell collaborate to make
the event a success. Below,
Hardee Junior High cheer- ,
leaders pep up the diners
who chose to eat their sup-
pers in the cafeteria. Also
adding to the fun were
Bailey's Dance Academy,
which provided entertain-
ment, and PTO parent Tina
Ricket, who added Wildcat
hair extensions to eager
children during the event.


DECISION



2012


Before You Vote


THE RACE FOR U.S. SENATE
Florida voters face an important decision in the race for U.S. Senate. Read continuing
coverage in this newspaper and tune-in to the statewide debate to learn more about
the candidates and where they stand on the issues that matter the most to you. For more
information visit www.beforeyouvote.org.

General Election Debate *



Wed., October 17,2012 | 7:00 8:00 pm ET
Broadcast live from Nova Southeastern University


Connie Mack
(R)


m IV I
Bill Nelson
(D)


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(ABC) Miami WTVJ 6 (NBC) Orlando WKMG 6 (CBS) Panama City WJHG 7 (NBC) *
Pensacola -WEAR 3 (ABC) Sarasota WWSB 7 (ABC) Tallahassee WCTV 6 (CBS) Tampa
- WFTS 28 (ABC) West Palm Beach -WPTV 5 (NBC)

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October 11, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 5B


The Squeezin's
By Barbara Car/ton
Peace River Valley Citrus Growers


USDA CROP FORECAST IS TODAY!
The U.S. Department of Agriculture will release the official
2012-13 Citrus Crop Forecast today (Thursday) at 8:30 a.m. The
Peace River Valley Citrus Growers Association will host a break-
fast meeting in conjunction with the release of the forecast. All
commercial citrus growers are invited to attend.
The forecast is generally known within the industry as a start-
ing point for the citrus season. This forecast is then updated each
month during the season to represent changes in crop size, yield
and maturity.
The Florida Agricultural Statistics Service, a branch of the
USDA's National Agricultural Statistics Service, prepares the citrus
crop forecast each season. The number of producing trees, spacing,
past production, tree health and weather phenomena are taken into
account when determining the forecast.
Growers and buyers will anxiously watch the forecast, as the
size of the crop will affect the price of the fruit.
Local citrus growers are invited to attend the breakfast, which
will begin at 8 a.m. at the Joe L. Davis Barn on East Main Street in
Wauchula. The breakfast will be sponsored by Joe L. Davis Inc.
Realtors.
Forecast figures will be supplied through AgNet's direct link
with the USDA offices in Washington. Industry reaction will be
provided from the Florida Department of Citrus and the New York
Board of Trade.
Local radio station WZZS 106.9 FM will cover the forecast
release. WZZS will also be broadcasting live from the breakfasts
as well. Updated reports will be available on WZZS later in the
morning after FCOJ and options markets open.
A contest will be held for the guess closest to the official
announcement total. A cash prize, donated by Yara North Amer-
ican, will be provided the lucky winner.
Breakfast will be catered by the Green Acres 4-H Club and
served by the club participants. This provides an educational
opportunity for the children to learn more about agriculture and




Hunin/Fihig Freas


10/11/2012
Sun Data
Rise: 7:25 AM
Set: 7:01 PM
Day Length
11 hrs. 36 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 3:23 AM
Set: 4:19 PM
Overhead: 9:55 AM
Underfoot:10:19 PM
Moon Phase
18%
WaningCrescent
Major Times
9:55 AM -L :55 AM
10:19 PM-12:19 AM
Minor Times
3:23 AM 4:23 AM
4:19 PM 5:19 PM
Solunar Rating
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -4
10/12/2012
Sun Data
Rise: 7:26 AM
Set: 7:00 PM
Day Length
11 hrs. 34 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 4:22 AM
.Set: 4:58 PM
Overhead: 10:44 AM
Underfoot: 11:08 PM
Moon Phase
11%
Waning Crescent
Major Times
10:44 AM-12:44 PM
11:08 PM 1:08,AM
Minor Times
4:22 AM 5:22 AM
4:58 PM 5:58 PM
Solunar Rating
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -4


10/13/2012
Sun Data
Rise: 7:26 AM
Set: 6:59 PM
Day Length
11 hrs. 33 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 5:23 AM
Set: 5:37 PM
Overhead: 11:34 AM
Underfoot: --:--
Moon Phase
5%
Waning Crescent
Major Times
11:34 AM 1:34 PM
Minor Times
5:23 AM 6:23 AM
5:37 PM 6:37 PM
Solunar Rating
Better
Time Zone
UTC: -4
10/14/2012
Sun Data
Rise: 7:27 AM
Set: 6:58 PM
Day Length
II hrs. 31 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 6:26 AM
Set: 6:18 PM
Overhead: 12:26 PM
Underfoot: --:--
Moon Phase
1%
Waning Crescent
Major Times
--:-- --:--
12:26 PM -2:26 PM
Minor Times
6:26 AM 7:26 AM
6:18 PM -7:18 PM
Solunar Rating
Better


10/15/2012
Sun Data
Rise: 7:27 AM
Set: 6:57 PM
Day Length
I1 hrs. 30 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 7:32 AM
Set: 7:04 PM
Overhead: 1:21 PM
Underfoot:12:53 AM
Moon Phase
0%
NEW MOON
Major Times
12:53 AM -2:53 AM
1:21 PM-3:21.PM
Minor Times
7:32 AM 8:32 AM
7:04 PM 8:04 PM
Solunar Rating
Best
Time Zone
UTC. -4
10/16/2012
Sun Data
Rise: 7:28 AM
Set: 6:56 PM
Day Length
11 hrs. 28 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 8:38 AM
Set: 7:53 PM
Overhead: 2:19 PM
Underfoot: 1:49 AM
Moon Phase
2%
Waxing Crescent
Major Times
1:49 AM 3:49 AM
2:19 PM 4:19 PM
Minor Times
8:38 AM 9:38 AM
7:53 PM 8:53 PM
Solunar Rating
Better++


Time Zone Time Zone -
UTC: -4 UTC: -4


10/17/2012
Sun Data
Rise: 7:29 AM
Set: 6:55 PM
Day Length
11 hrs. 26 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 9:46 AM
Set: 8:47 PM
Overhead: 3:19 PM
Underfoot: 2:49 AM
Moon Phase
7%
Waxing Crescent
Major Times
2:49 AM 4:49 AM
3:19 PM 5:19. PM
Minor Times
9:46 AM -10:46 AM
8:47 PM 9:47 PM
Solunar Rating
Good
Time Zone

10/18/2012
Sun Data
Rise: 7:29 AM
Set: 6:54 PM
Day Length
11 hrs. 25 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 10:52 AM
Set: 9:47 PM
Overhead: 4:21 PM
Underfoot: 3:50 AM
Moon Phase
14%
Waxing Crescent
Major Times
3:50 AM 5:50 AM
4:21 PM -6:21 PM
Minor Times
10:52 AM-11:52 AM
9:47 PM 10.47 PM
Solunar Rating
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -4


Trust Quartet













ob *' 1 i l,




The Heritage in this Region was
birthed on Southern Gospel and uc
here at Faith Temple Church of God
wanl to honor that heritage.


Pastor Wendell G. Smilh


FAITH TEMPLE
CHURCH OF GOD
701 N "th Ave.. Wauchula

773-3800


W'3tch I..p ,.rn
www.ustream.tv
type in search Dar faith temple church of god =


future educational possibilities.

ANNUAL FALL BUS TOUR
Growers should also mark their calendars to participate in the
association's annual fall bus tour scheduled for Nov. 16. The tour
will include stops at Maury Boyd's Oak Hammock grove in
Immokalee, where growers will evaluate tree health as a result of
foliar nutrition, and the Southwest Florida Research & Education
Center. The center will allow growers to view research trials for
nutritional studies, hedging as a form of tree rehabilitation and
much more. Growers must reserve space to attend by calling the
association office at the number listed below.
Peace River Valley Citrus Growers Association represents
commercial citrus growers in DeSoto, Hardee, Manatee and
Sarasota counties, as well as that portion of Charlotte County locat-
ed in the Southwest Florida Water Management District. The asso-
ciation has about 200 grower members. For additional information
contact the association at 773-2644.


PROPERTY TAX AMENDMENTS
Amendment 4
Of all the property tax amendments appearing on the ballot in
November, this amendment is by far the most complex. The ballot
language itself is so long it takes a full page to include the entire
text.
Amendment 4 is an attempt by our state Legislature to provide
additional property tax relief to Florida residents. If approved by
voters, this amendment will accomplish four objectives:
The amendment will prevent increases in the assessed value of
property, when the market value of the property decreases.
Under current law, the assessed value of property continues to
increase until the market value and the assessed value are equal. In
a real estate market where property values are decreasing, the as-
sessed value of property will not increase.
The amendment also caps annual increases in non-homestead
property from 10 percent to five percent.
Currently, the law prevents the market value of non-homestead
property from increasing by more than 10 percent. This change in
law will provide additional tax relief to commercial properties, res-
idential rental properties, and some other non-homestead properties
by preventing increases of more than five percent.
The amendment provides tax relief to individuals who have
not received a Florida Homestead in the past three years.
Property owners qualifying for this exemption will receive up
to a 50 percent reduction in their property taxes and a 20 percent
reduction for the following four years. This amendment is known
as the "First Time Homebuyers" amendment, however it could
benefit other property owners who have owned property, but never
received a Florida Homestead.
The last portion of the amendment simply delays until 2023 a
repeal of non-homestead assessment limitations scheduled to
repeal in 2019.
Our office provided a public presentation with details of the
amendments to the Board of County Commissioners on Thursday
of last week. For more information, log onto the Clerk of Courts'
website at www.hardeeclerk.com/ to view that presentation.
You can also log onto our website at www.qpublic.net/hardee/
to view the PowerPoint presentation and for specific ballot lan-
guage of all the amendments.
Look for next week's article for information on Amendment 9
and, 10. :. ; ;
.4 '^ "^


LOCKS OF LOVE


COURTESY PHOTOS
Five-year-old Angelina Cerna is shown here as her hair is
cut at Madison Salon in downtown Wauchula. But this is
no ordinary haircut. This little one is donating her long
locks to the Locks of Love program, which makes wigs
for children battling cancer. She said she wanted to do it
"to help someone." Angelina is the daughter of Jessica
Centeno and Andrew Cerna.


A human being loses an average of 40 to 100 strands of
hair a day.

^ '.F ;".


Is Your Quality Of Life Better Now Than 4 Years Ago?





Hardee County Board of County Commissioners


Mission Statement

It is the mission of the Hardee County Board of County
Commissioners to enhance the quality of life of each of its
citizens by providing for their general health, safety and

welfare while maintaining fiscal responsibility.




All the experience in the world does not mean a thing without

being able to inspire a shared vision, challenging the process,

and enabling others to act.


Experience + Complacency = Stagnation





IF NOTHING CHANGES




NOTHING CHANGES!


m -


r_-


F W^EBSBI atiK






6B The Herald-Advocate, October 11,2012





-The



ABOUT ... Classifieds
.DEADLINE ....Tuesday noon
RATES ..........Minimum of $4.00 for 10 words. Each addi-
tional word is 22 cents. Ads in all capitals
are 32 cents per word. Headlines are $2 a
line. Blind ad box numbers are $3 extra.
BILLING........Ads must be pre-paid.
CLASSIFICATIONS:


Agriculture
Appliances
Automobile
Boats
Furniture
Help Wanted
Houses
Livestock
Lost & Found
Miscellaneous


Mobile Homes
Notices
Pets
Plants/Produce
Real Estate
Recreational
Rentals
Services
Wanted
Yard Sales


I


D ucensea
Cosmetologist


PHONE: 832-0067
Se Habla Espafol
Salon located at
159-200 State Rd. 64E Zolfo Springs


SCHOOL BUS MECHANIC
NEEDED


- .


sc~t


CONTACT
HARDEE COUNTY SCHOOL
TRANSPORTATION DEPARTMENT


1277 W. MAIN ST.
WAUCHULA, FL 33873
(863) 773-4754


10:11il.8


r------------ -------
I plus tax I
I II

I I
SE Golf Cart Batteries
I (Set Of6 PowerTron Six Volt)
SPick-up & Delvery not Induded with this offer.
SInstallation Must bring coupon to receive offer. I
8-------- --- 11-






SiADVANTAGE

ERA REALTY
Michael Scheipsmeier
(863)781-3222
e-mail: michael@msbuildersinc.com

3 BR 2 Bath House on .65 acres with 24x36 Barn,
family friendly neighborhood. 388 Circle Drive,
Wauchula. $125.,0 Reduced to $120,000

3932 sq. ft. on 5 acres with pond, $350,000

105 acres of grove, Ft. Green area, $795,000
c110:4-25c


Classifieds


LOOKING FOR PASTURE land to
lease, 375-2966, leave message.
10:11p
DIESEL INJECTION repairs,
pumps, turbo, injectors, remove
and install, 863-381-0538.
1:19-1:10(13)p
L. DICKS INC. is now purchasing
citrus fruit for the 2012/13 season
and beyond. Call Mark Manuel @
781-0384. 7:8tfc


1993 FORD F150, 4 wheel drive,
$3,500, 375-2966, leave message.
10:11p
2001 DODGE, 12 seater van, air,
runs good, $3,900, 781-1105.
10:4,11c


LOOKING FOR RANCH HAND/
Cowboy with horse for Ben Hill
Griffin's Peace River Ranch.
hr@bhgriffin.com or 863-635-
2251 10:4-18c


OFFICE ASSISTANT needed PT
20 hours weekly. Requirements:
computer, organizational skills,
multi-tasking, ect., accurate with
details. Apply in person at 1014
6th Ave. South, Wauchula.
10:11,18p
BARBER STYLIST, male or
female, must be dependable, flex-
ible hours. City Barber Shop 108
E. Main Street. Kenny or
Shannon, 773-6988 or 781-4050.
10:4,11p
DRIVER: LOCAL, great pay & ben-
efits. Home every day. Pd.
Holidays/Vac., 401k, CDL-A, w/X
end. School grads. accepted.
866-358-3937. 9:20-10:18p


FOUND 10/4: Young male Pit Bull,
SR66 West of Charlie Creek. Call
with description, 773-3033.
10:11nc
FOUND CELL PHONE on Polk Rd.
Call to identify, 781-3202. 10:11nc


We offer the BEST and MOST AFFORDABLE
computer services in Wauchula! Free Diagnosis!
*Computer, Cell Phone, TV & Electronics Repair
*Electronics Sales & Installations
*Security Cameras & Systems
*Fax & Notary Services *Computer Classes
863-767-1520 www.PcEmpire.Org
748 N. 6th Ave., Wauchula
I ____-_____________________,_---


kR' S P8TA Tiate & Tag oR
Dan' FIPWtTa CH\iRGj
Mon. Wed. 1 0.- 6pm; Fri. & Sat. 1 00-7pm/Closed Thursday & Sunday
3505 US HwY 17 S ZOLFO SPRINGS in:s5fc



HELP WANTED
DETENTION DEPUTY_
$34,66000
The Hardee County Sheriff's Office is seeking
Florida Certified Correction Officers. Applicants
must possess a current certification in Corrections
and meet the requirements set forth by the Florida
Department of Law Enforcement Training and
Standards Commission. Applicants must success-
fully complete the personnel selection process set
forth by the Sheriff's Office.
Applications may be obtained and returned to the
Sheriff's Office at 900 E. Summit St., Wauchula, FL,
By 4 p.m., Oct. 19, 2012. If other accommodations
are necessary, call the Sheriff's Office, 863-773-
0304 to make arrangements. EOE
c110:11,18c



L_ t


I N C.,







John O'Neal


RE A


L T O R S
(863) 773-2128


S REALTORS
JOE L. DAVIS
JOE L. DAVIS, JR.
REALTOR JOHN H. O'NEAL.
See more listings at
www.joeldavis.com
REAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS


PRICE REDUCED! 50 acs in
NE Desoto Co; deer, turkey,
wild hogs, beautiful live oaks,
improved pasture, pond &
creek. NOW $190,000!
PRICE REDUCED! Commer-
cial property on US17! 38 stor-
age units w/partial roof, city
utilities, zoned C-2. sold "as is"!
NOW $200,000!
PRICE REDUCED! Triple-
wide MH of 3,314 square feet.
This home has many amenities
and sits on a nice 5+ acre tract.
$95.000!
PRICE REDUCED! 3BR/2BA
MH on 5 acs w/frontage on SR
62. NOW $60,000!
3BR/1BA home in Wauchula
w/separate, potential income
producing, 24x24', IBR/IBA,
CB apartment. $35.000!


Well maintained 2BR/ H
on 2 o Vt.,etb.
S -tiJo aks for
sec"usin. $55,000!
PRICE REDUCED! Wow!
Great home in Popash area on
2.5 acs. 2 miles from town.
$138.000!
PRICE REDUCED! Paradise:
Little Gasparilla Island-Beach
Condo. 2BR/2BA, Gulf front.
$220,000!
38.5 acs on the Peace River
w/lots of beautiful oaks, pines &
palmettos! Pole barn &
2BR/2BA MH. $479,900!


PRICE
w/paved
pasture.
$49.500!


REDUCED! 10 ac
rd frontage. Great for
farming or homesite.


PRICE REDUCED! 20 acs
zoned industrial on Hwy 17.
$399 .000!


REACTOR ASSOCIATES AFTER HOURS
KENNY SANDERS.........781-0153 KAREN O'NEAL........... 781-7633
KEVIN SANDERS........990-3093 MONICA REASF.............781-0888
DAVID ROYAL...........781-3490 JIMMY EDENFIELD...,448-2821
31 HIGHWAY 17 SOITH, WAUCHULA, FL 33873
cl10:11c


2 GERMAN short hair pointers'
missing from 9th Ave. In
Wauchula $300 reward. Call Joe
239-425-7209. 10:11p


COMPLETE CABINET BUSINESS
all tools and inventory, $9,000,
863-245-6954. 9:20-10:18p


ADOPT A PETI If you have lost a
pet or are looking for a new one,
the City of Wauchula invites you
to come and see If you can find
the pet you're looking for. The
Wauchula Animal Control is locat-
ed at 685 Airport Road. Please
call 773-3265 or more informa-
tion. tfc-dh


TERRY


/ Foreign and Domestic Cars / Diesel Engines
Gas or Diesel Manual or Automatic Transmissions


l e
"'


LONESTAR
CONSTRUCTION CORP.


CU STOMI HOMES
REMODELING


* STEEL BUILDING
CONCRETE


GENERAL CONTRACTOR
Lice 4a291103615
863-773-4779
'QUALITY WORK AT AN AFFORDABLE PRICE"
BRING US YOUR LOWEST COMPETITORS PRICE c11o:11






Realtors
NOEY A. FLORES, BROKER
310 Court St.
Wauchula, Florida 33873
(863) 773-3337 Fax: (863) 773-0144 Noey A. Flores
www.floresrealty.net BROKER


WAUCHULA SHORT SALE 3BR/3BA Frame home with
central air & heat. Completely remodeled with new drywall,
kitchen cabinets, tile and painting. Close to Main St.
Wauchula with a large fenced in back. Move-in ready.
Offered at $89,900.00 WAS $124,900
WAUCHULA 7.43 Acres on MLK Blvd Zoned Farm
Residential Close to town Priced at $37,900
WAUCHULA 3BR/2BA CB home on a corner lot with central
air & heat fenced in backyard. Offered at $99,900
WAUCHULA Building Lot! 2.03 Acres on Kazen Rd. Just min-
utes from Wauchula. Priced at $34,900
WAUCHULA Wooded vacant lot! 2.75 +/- acres on St Rd 64
West, great residential building lot with lots of big oaks. Priced to
sell at $24,900

WE SHARE THE SAME MLS WITH HIGHLANDS COUNTY!
Remember, Our listings are on the Internet.
Anyone with a computer can access them anytime!
After Hours





Oa13a D Johun D Jason Michael D Jamie
FIjres Freeman Jonnson Boyeti Spurlock
Bracer Sales Sales Sales Broker
Associate Assocale Assoc ate Associate Associate
863j '812955 863 781 4084 863-781 373.4 863 781-2827 863-835-1611
\VHY RENT WHEN YOU CAN BUY AND BUILD EQUITY!!! cl10:11c


MIAM


Women, do you

need lower rent?


735-2222 or 773-5717U
OU R IeR HEA e Rs


ZOLFO SPRINOs |B,77 Ri
735-0188 I .P. HERE!I
Nothing Over $599 Down a--wpr,,-


YOUR TIRE HEADQUARTERS
5101 N. Hwy 17 Bowling Green
375-4 61
New Tire Changer & Balancer
Can Do 26" Wheels
MONDAY SATURDAY 8 an 6 pm


xil^l"., i -
\ E BEST DEAL there's no better place to shop
FROM ANY ANGLE for your next car.


S) 9A


Large Selection of
Cars to Choose Fromn

Buy Here Pay Here


30 Day Guarantee
on Motor & Transmission Only


LI


I I


I


I


11


11


I







October 11, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 7B


The


Classifieds


AIIENTIONI State Statutes
828.29 requires that all cats and
dogs sold in Florida be at least 8
weeks old, have an official health
certificate, have necessary shots
and be free of parasites, tfc-dh



5 1/2 ACRE JUNK YARD, car lot &
parts. Angelo Martinez, 863-832-
0994, Triangle Auto Salvage.
9:27-10:25 p



THREE BEDROOM TWO BATH,
$800 plus deposit, no pets, 832-
1984. 9:20-10:18p
ROOMMATE wanted to share
expenses Half of rent and elec-
tric is $400 a month. House has a
kitchen, laundry room and library.
Leave a message at 863-832-
3042. 10:11p
3 BR 1 B MOBILE HOME in Ft.
Green on Beachwood. $600
month, $500 sec. Call Bill 863-
781-4460 or Teresa 863-781-9084.
10:11tfc
4 BR, 1 B $750/MONTH plus $500/
deposit. 3 BR, 1 1/2 B $600/month
plus $400/deposit. 863-781-0982.
10:11p
HANDYMAN SPECIAL 4 BR, 1 BA,
2 acres, pole barn, $500/monthly,
Ona, 863-458-2355. 10:11p


2/1 with garage, 781-3536. 10:11p
ZOLFO 4/1 central air, heat, util-
ity room, very spacious, 735-
2626. 10:11c
ROOM FOR RENT $425 month.
Safe nice neighborhood. No
deposit required, free electricity.
Call 245-6044. 10:4,11p
2 BR UNFURNISHED house in
Wauchula. No pets. No smoking.
$600 month. 863-465-1007.
10:4,11p
2 BR, 1 B, central AC $525 month
includes electric and water, $250
dep. 863-781-9257. 10:4,11p
AVON PARK 3/2 A/C heating,
screened inground pool, fenced
1/2 acre lot, $750 monthly, 863-
781-0177. 9:27tfc
_3 BRi 2 BA, very nice house, good
condition, nice area in Wauchula,
$750, 1 st/ last/security. 781-2708,
leave message. 9:20-10:18p
2 BEDROOM 1 BATH, Duplex,
$550 month, $550 deposit, 773-
0100. 6:21tfc
*RENT-TO-OWN*
MOBILE HOMES 1, 2, 3
Bedrooms. Cheaper then paying
rent. Close to schools and hospi-
tal. Lot rent $300. Se habla
espanol. 863-698-4910 or 863-
698-4908. Call today. 7:5tfc
ULLRICH'S STORAGE UNITS,
several sizes, corner of 9th Ave. &
Goolsby St., 773-6448 or 773-
9291. 3:22tfc


REVELL dUTo SALES













Iicenstd & InHsurded
^ Hdrdee Tr'ee Service Inc.

20, Yeurs lxperincew Owner: Edward "Ed" Pilkington



.Stump Gr ding Land Clearing o Complete Tree Removeal
863-781-2089
165 Charley Bryan Road Ona c10 11-11:1p


0

AM-SOUTH HEALTHY
Each office independently owned and operated.
.1 1 1


Robert Hinerman
227-0202


r
1





Nancy Craft
832-0370


NEW LISTING!! 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath Double
Wide Mobile Home, lot included, appli-
ances, central heat/air, Built in 2008. Priced
0 $69.900

FANTASTIC PRICE-FIRST TIME HOME-
OWNER!! REDUCTION IN PRICE-$50,000
for this 3 Bedroom, 1 Bath home including
appliances, heat and air, ready to move in.
Call Robert for a viewing today!

COMMERCIAL PROPERTY!! HWY 17 N.
BOWLING GREEN PRICED @ $39.500

MEGA-MAGNIFICENCE-Immeasurably
superb, this 3 Bedrooms, 3 Bath country
home with large LR, DR, and kitchen, enjoy
the beautiful brick fireplace in this 2,115 liv-
ing area home. Includes two car garage,
lots of amenities, sits on fenced 5 acre tract
with barn and out buildings. Call to see
today! Only $199.000

COUNTRY HOME!! Don't let time run out on
this special buy!! $159.900 3 BR, 2 Bath
brick home located in the country with big
beautiful oak trees. Call Today!!

TAKE A HEALTHY LOOK AT COUNTRY LIV-
ING!! Breath the Clean Air on this 5 acres of
paradise property with a 3 BR, 2 bath
D/W/M/H that's secluded and yet just 10
Minutes from town. Priced 0 $89.500

PRICE REDUCTION!! 89.500 3/2 CB home
with new roof, A/C unit, kitchen and appli-
ances. To see it for yourself, Call Robert
today!!

NEW LISTING!! $49.000 for this One Acre
Highway Frontage property At Seven Mile
Point. Call Today!!

RENTAL AVAILABLE!!
BEAUTIFUL 2 BEDROOM, 2 1/2 BATH
TOWNHOUSE APARTMENT, $650 MONTH-
LY, WITH $650 DEPOSIT. 1051 DOWNING
CIRCLE, WAUCHULA. CALL 773-2122.


TWO BEDROOM APARTMENT,
CA/H, no pets. $500 plus deposit,
832-1984. 9:20-10:18p
ATTENTION The Federal Fair
Housing Act Prohibits advertising
any preference or limitation
based on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial status or
national origin, or the intention to
make such a preference or limita-
tion. Familial status includes chil-
dren under 18 living with parents
or guardians and pregnant
women, tfc-dh



RESTAURANTS, OFFICES, thrifts,
tire, mechanical, junkyard, stor-
age, 20,000 s.f. 863-245-6270,
863-773-6616. 10:4-11:1p
20,000 SO.FT., Various cities,
Hardee County, Highway 17, Main
Street, 773-6616. 9:13-10:11p
LARGE COMMERCIAL OFFICE
space. Approx. 1,780 sq. ft. Heavy
traffic area corner of Main & Hwy
17 (101 East Main) call Elene
Salas, 735-0999. 8:9tfc



OVERCOMERS MEETINGS
(Gillespie), Woman's Club on
Wednesday, 7pm Kenny
Sanders is the facilitator. For
more information call 773-5717.
2:16tfc


Lamar Gilliard
Home: (863) 735-0490 c14:19sfc


702 SOUTH 6thAVENUE, WAUCHULA
(863) 773-2122 FAX (863) 773-2173
Gary Delatorre Broker
www.cbhardee.com


Richard Dasher
781-0162


Victor Salazar
245-1054


11.5 .Acre Country Home convenient to
shopping and schools. 3 BR, 1 Bath large
LR, and enclosed back porch, DR all kitchen
appl. Upgraded 2010, large gas fire place,
one car carport, two outbuildings, fenced
and cross-fenced presently used for cattle,
new yard fence, 200 mg main breaker
upgraded for generator, new septic drain
field. All of this for $155.000 Call Nancy for
Preview

3 Bedroom, 2 Bath CB/Stucco home built in
2000 and has 1,425 sq ft living area with car
port, heating / cooling and within Wauchula
city limits. Call to see today! Only $59.900

PAMPERED!! Loving owners have attended
to every need of this 3 bedroom, 1 bath
home. From the plumbing to electric the
kitchen the roof and more. A well taken care
of home for $72.000

Hardee County. Board of County
Commissioners has approved this 5 acre
tract of land for mulit-family SFR homes. The
property is currently zoned Residential-1 (R-
1) and located only 2 miles from Main street.
$75.000,.

CALL NANCY FOR A PREVIEW OF THIS
LOVELY 3 BR 2Bath custom built home on 10
acres. The 2200 Sq Ft home includes 2 car
garage with extra storage space, open plan
of LR, DR and kitchen with curved counter
makes this an enjoyable place to entertain.
Extra outdoor storage building. Fenced pas-
ture with well, security windows and doors,
$252.500.

Looking For Just The Right House? 3 BR, 2
Bath, LR, w/raised ceilingsjLen fully fur-
nished, all appliances rttjdjcentral H/A,
breakfast room ss-thru win-
dow fromillr r CR wLl doors to
tiled c ~U ac"l-sy care-in-lay
flooring allergies. This well
insulated l eps monthly electric bills
under a $1 AND IT'S Only $129.500 Call
Nancy to see this lovely home.


WANTED/WORK, full or P/T grove
work, pasture work, mowing
lawns or m, anything, 735-2801
or cell 941-2u4-U481. 10:4,11p
AG-BARNS, pump sheds, fence,
cowpens, Duke Platt, 863-202-
6465, CRC058080. 8:16-10:25c
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS,
Thursday 7:00 p.m., Grace
Fellowship Church, 131 S. 8th
Ave., Wauchula. Bill 727-326-
3816. 6:7tfc-dh
MARY KAY COSMETICS. Call
Yolanda in Wauchula, 448-6449.
10:11,18p
LAWN SERVICES, mowing, weed
eating, edging and more. $30 per
hour (1 hour min.) 863-735-2801,
1-914-204-0481. 10:4,11p
DO YOU HAVE a problem with
drugs? Narcotics Anonymous
meets Monday and Thursday
nights 7:00 p.m. at First United
Methodist Church, at the corner
of Palmetto and 7th Ave., Wau-
chula. tfc-dh
IS ALCOHOL CAUSING a prob-
lem? Call Alcoholics Anonymous
in Hardee County at 781-6414.
Several weekly meetings.
tfc-dh
ATTENTIONI State Statutes 489-
119 Section 5 Paragraph B and
Hardee County Ordinance 87-09
Section 10 Paragraph D require
all ads for any construction-relat-
ed service to carry the contrac-
tor's license number. tfc-dh


Zolfo Springs
Mobile: (941) 456-6507


NEED A WELL OR HAVE PUMP
TROUBLE? CALL
ULLRICH'S PITCHER PUMP
For complete well, sales,
service and installation,
call (863) 773-6448.
7:18tfc
THE WAUCHULA LIONS CLUB
collects NOT broken prescription
eyeglasses, cases and sunglass-
es. Please drop off at 735 N. 6th
Ave. tfc-dh
HT6USE CLEANING, reliable,
dependable, references available.
Shawna, 863-832-0130.
9:27-10:25p
DIESEL TANK CLEANING 500 &
1000 gal. Remove algae and
water. Rick's Tank Cleaning, 863-
781-2767. 9:27-10:25p



30 YEAR HOME OWNERS with 2
small dogs, need small house
with short term lease, fenced yard
a plus. Call Dana at 218-232-3791.
10:4,11p


MISSION THRIFT STORE INC.
123 N. 7th Ave. All donations
appreciated. Pick-up available for
large items. 773-3069. 1:12tfc
HEAVEN SCENT THRIFT STORE
now offers pick-up service for
large donations. We appreciate
your generous support. 863-773-
9777. 12:29tfc
HUGE YARD SALE. 1526
Washington St., Wauchula.
Saturday, October 13. 10:11p
SATURDAY 8-? Bowling Green
Church of God. Clothes, porch
swings, boiled peanuts, swamp
cabbage, hamburgers, hot dogs,
etc. 10:11c
DOWNSIZING 2 HOUSES into 1:
Some antiques & collectables,
tools, Gramma's antique oak
table $700, 60+ years of Reader's
Digest and shelving. Thursday -
Saturday, 8-? 502 Ohio Ave.,
Wauchula. 10:11p

A good conversationalist is
not one who remembers
what was said but says
what someone wants to re-
member.
-John Mason Brown


BILLY BOB'S TIRES

New& Used
Brand Named Tires

Semi & Trailer Tires

773-0777
or
,..773-0727
Sl 116 REA Rd., Wauchula
(across from Wal-Mart)
Billy Ayers VISA c9:3tfc
Tire Technician cl9:13tfc


JIM SEE REALTY, INC. '

206 North 6th Avenue, Wauchula, FL 33873
Office 1863)773-0060 Evening (863)781-1338
www. mseerealty.comr
James V. See, Jr., Broker Jim See
2 Bedroom, 2 Bath mobile home with a 1 bed- 33 acre pasture with scattered trees. Close in to
room, 1 bath detached mother in law apartment. Wauchula. 1156 ac can be purchased separately.
Fenced 2 1/2 acres with a pole barn. Asking Total price $360,000.
$77,900
20 acres very close in to Wauchula on paved
Vacation Home 2 BR/2 BA mobile home in Punta road. Laser leveled and ready for your farm
Gorda. Located on a deep water canal that leads operation. Zoned FR.
into Charlotte Harbor. $79,000!
Beautiful home located in Briarwood Subdivi-
58 acres of gorgeous fenced property close to sion. 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath house with wrap
town. Well & septic from old homesite. Scattered around porch, detached 2 car garage with office
old Oaks & Pines. Offered at $287,100 and full bath. Reduced to $339,000!
10 acres on Charlie Creek. Beautiful property
south of Zolfo Springs. Asking $90,000

Realtor Associates
Rick Knight (863) 781-1396 Calvin Bates (863) 381-2242
John H. Gross (863) 273-1017 Dusty Albritton (863) 781-0161
Shane Conley (863) 781-9664 Parker Keen (813) 523-1523 clio:11c








S Olf Kocnimci

^^^^^^^1417B Swank Ave.FT e Sering, FLaBK33870


(863) 385-8649

COMMERCIAL
&

RESIDENTIAL
CONSTRUCTION
Let our highly qualified staff develop your commercial
property, build your dream home, or do your remodeling.





Discount Good Up To $1,000


I7


S" S C


si GILLIARD

FILL DIRT INC.


30 Day Warranty
Motor & Transmission


SSand ra Il .... [ I .m
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK SE HABLA ESPANOL
U.S. Hwy. 17 Bowling Green 375-4441
$ Huge Discounts for Cash Deals $
*24 Hour Towing Service Lowest Possible Rates Fast and Reliable
781-3090 or 781-3091 cil:s5c


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cl10.1 lc


I,:sI


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State Certified License #CGC15"


con@strato.net


C10 11-25C







8B The Herald-Advocate, October 11, 2012


The


Classifieds


Letter To The Editor

Henry Kuhlman Responds
Dear Rep. Ben Albritton, fees, county jobs for relatives,
You described yourself in the etc.
first sentence of your Sept. 27 Mr. Representative, I am not
letter to the editor as "God fear- sure why you would label con-
ing." cerned citizens like myself as
It just came to me. There may demonizers. I don't think of
be 10 good reasons for this. All myself as the devil. I think I am
are carved in stone. Personally, doing God's Work. I may be
I do not fear God. My con- serving as the Conscience of
science is clear I try my very Hardee County.
best to speak the truth I am I have a very strong sense of
forthright and honest I give right and wrong. Although the
straight answers to questions final judgement awaits us all, I
(especially if I were one of serve a higher power by seeking
three FL Representatives and a the truth from those that took
former Senator conflicted with oaths to serve. Mr. Represen-
LifeSync and being repeatedly tative, as you said, "... a life
queried for facts by anxious based on serving brings honor
constituents) I treat all peo- to one's family, one's communi-
ple equally regardless of where ty and ultimately a sense of ful-
they live in the County (Fort fillment to one's heart." I could
Green Storage; Waste Gener-' not agree more.
ated Products; declaring I serve by asking you and at
Bowling Green as Florida's least six other owners of Life-
Garbage Epicenter; denying Sync Technologies to open up
Finer Institute Property Rights, all records to those (the people
and dropping a sewage treat- of HC) who bet their farm on
ment plant for polluters in the your gamble. It is their farm,
commerce park sacrifices cer- Mr. Representative. You appar-
tain citizens' welfare for the ently had no-skin-in-the-game
benefit of insiders) I know (NSITG). LifeSync placed a bet
that some of God's children are with other people's money and
incompetent or dishonest, and 4 of 5 founders bailed out with
we must protect the public a half-baked pie still in the
(Trust but Verify). oven. You sponsored and pro-
I am responsible and account- moted this project and brought
able for my actions I do not' them to HC as well as accepted
keep secrets to avoid the public free stock in LifeSync that just
knowing about public business suffered an 80% brain drain.
- I would not willfully be I'm not feeling all that fulfilled
blind and ignorant about facts in my heart right now. Are you?
and concerns on many ques- Angina?
tionable projects like: Waste Mr. Representative, I would
Generated Products {failed never, as you did, refer to you
attempt to cosign a $40M note}; or any HC citizen (except
LifeSync Technologies {$2.65M maybe one) as a demonizer, a
spent and $4.6M more commit- character assassin, a drive-by-
led}; Continuum Labs/ Tech shooter, a spin jockey, or a dis-
River {grant request expected honorable person. Is this what a
Oct 9}; Fort Green Gas {zon- man of honor thinks of his con-
ing change for possible land cerned constituents like me?
speculation profits with no vet- Regaining your composure, you
ting}; Forrestwood {$755K}; wrote, "We must be civil, and
Allyndeb {$410K}; Terrell pro- thoughtful, not projecting veiled
perty {$1.5M}; Rapid Systems incriminations that are ques-
{$2M}; Coker Fuel building tionable in their content."
buy and demolish {$389K}; 226 If this was aimed my way,
Main St. building with $300K of make no mistake, I try hard not
public renovation money corn- to veil anything. The conclu-
mitted on a $200K sale contract sions you.-reach from direct
that fell through when buyer questions may be a little man
fund undisclosed, contaminat- calling, named "Conscience." If
ed soil}; Commerce Park Sewer so, no thanks are necessary. My
Plant for polluters {$400K+}; questions are timely, spot-on
PRECO building {$996K}; and conceal nothing. They are
Fiber Optics {price unknown}; honest, direct, and plain for all
Unaccredited Tech University to consider.
Trade School {price unknown} Most HC officials use "tool
Spec buildings without knowing for fools" like your 1,500 word
tenant needs {$800K} {The letter to editor that has not one
total above adds up to $15M number in it (facts have num-
for how many jobs and what bers). Are you proud of the
economic benefit?.} results? Prove it with numbers!
I would never take public How about writing an ending
money for myself or my busi- for each IDA/EDA story since
ness or my family because of 2007? You have the power and
my special membership on gov- the connections, Mr. Represen-
ernment boards without full and tative. Start with LifeSync.
complete disclosure and insis- Representative Albritton, the
tence on by-the-book bidding questions on LifeSync and now
and public acknowledgement Continuum Labs weep for
(real estate sales, real estate answers from you, Joe, Jamie,
purchases, real estate commis- Jenn, Jason, John, and Travis.
sions, bank loans, bank fees, No amount of your bluster like,
insurance sales, construction "I have always been taught that
contracts, grove management a life based on serving brings
services, rental management honor to one's family ... will
fees, cattle pasture leases, land- get us any closer to an honor-
scaping services, consulting able resolution. You were there
contracts like Kimley Horn, from day one. Without a feasi-
building purchases, property ability study, proof of concept,
maintenance contracts, profes- competition search, independ-
sional service contracts, legal ent consultant, no due diligence


To Rep. Albritton's Letter


or fiduciary duty and on the
first pitch to the IL.,, your buds
gave away S7,281 every day for
one year. Your influence and the
good words from the other three
legislator owners may have
sealed the deal.
Time is not on your side on
this one horse High Tech
Gamble with OPM (other peo-
ples money). Your LifeSync
business plan projection said
$15.7M profit and 44 jobs in
2014. Do you stand by these
numbers? Why didn't your bud-
dies, Jamie and Jenn, who
spoke at the Kiwanis Club on
Aug. 7 say goodbye on Sept. 4
when new BlueWater owner,
Mr. Travis Bond, told the IDA
with a high powered presenta-
tion that Jamie and Jenn were
gone along with Jason and for-
mer FL Senator, John Grant
(Jamie's father). Did you
know? When? Is this a good
thing for HC after they sent the
last of $2.65M to your company
ana paid $996,000 for a 30 year
old building across from
Walmart? What is your cut? Did
you sell any contracts to institu-
tional users for LifeSync? Did
they pay you .any money or
commissions?
Any of the public money go
into your Heartland Technolo-
gies LLC company you formed
on 9-20-11? How much money
was paid personally from the
$2.65M to the owners, their
families, and associates? Do
you agree Mr. Bond is the best
person to carry on what he and
four others failed to accomplish
(have a web based business up
and running months ago)?
Have you tried the www.my-
bluewater.com test product for
user feedback (I did)? Is this
what you were selling to health
providers? Do you agree it con-
tains proprietary technology
protected as intellectual proper-
ty and prevents release of any
and all LifeSync records under
FL Statute 288.075 (before you
answer, you should know ED
Lambert and Attorney Evers bet
their jobs on this). Do you think
HC can support a University of
Technology? Who will pay for
this? Is Mr. Bond experienced
in creating Universities from
scratch in an empty building?
Is his projection of a 24 mortar-
board "Class of 2012" a little
premature'?
You wrote, "In the near
future, we are going to be more
well informed." How can you
possibly say this given the track
record of IDA failures and fact
evasions? You imply there are
more secrets about to be
revealed when the time is right
(kind of like the bomb you
knew about on Sept. 4 when
four out of five of your co-own-
ers exercised a lucrative exit
strategy with no warning). Your
words play lip service to
Accountability and Transpar-
ency. Tomorrow never quite
gets here (kind of like LifeSync
that never even made it to the
ribbon cutting or exciting Meet
and Greets promised by Jamie
and Jenn on Aug. 16 in this
paper). As for your excuses for
HC economic development fail-
ures, someone once told me,


"Argue for Your Weaknesses,
and They Will Be Yours."
If you gave me $50 million to
spend in five years, I guarantee
there would boots on the
ground and a full accounting of
every penny. There would be no
LifeSync, WGP, FGS, RS,
Terrell, or any of the rest.
Apparently your legacy contin-
ues in Heartland Technologies
LLC and LifeSycn/ BlueWater,
now Continuum Labs/Care-
sync. On the other hand I'm not
going anywhere. I love this
place and what it could become
if not for cronyism, nepotism,
and two' 800 pound guerrillas
usurping property rights and
slapping mining overlays atop
private property.
Do you think these questions
are demonizing? Do you really
think you need guidance from
the Auditor General to obey the
law (why are they still here if
the books are so clean)? Am I
assaulting your character? Do
you think I am Spinning the
issue? Do you think these ques-
tions taint you as a pseudo-
criminal? Am I deluded by con-
spiracy theories?
Do I have a hidden agenda?
Yes, I do. It is THIS Truth,
Honesty, Integrity, and a
healthy Skepticism. Given your
response to my 1,200 word fact-
filled letter on Sept. 20, I would
say a very healthy skepticism of
LifeSync and your connections
moves to front-and-center. Not
answering one question or pro-
viding one fact or figure in your
response was no accident. The
best way to silence me and all
those who support honest and
open government for all the
people, is to have the LifeSync
Meet and Greet as promised by
Jamie and Jenn by the end of
Oct. All owners, including Ben,
Joe, Jamie, Jenn, Jason, John,
and Travis come to the BOCC
Commission room on Oct 19 at
6:30 PM. Bring all corporate
records for LifeSync and
Continuum Labs (including all
cancelled checks adding up to
$2.65M). You seven owners can
sit in the. overstuffed commis-
sioner seats. Any citizen of HC
can ask questions from the
podium. I have experience in
facilitation and volunteer to
moderate. Fish or cut bait.
At the end of your letter you
hope -to be remembered as
someone who loved the Lord,
was a good dad, a good hus-
band, and a consensus builder.
Me too. As for your consensus
seeker goal, I can think of no
better way than a public airing
of all LifeSync Tech River
issues with real numbers in
front of the citizens that trusted
you. Meet and Greet on Oct.
19? By way of this letter, I seek
a reply from you on my Meet
and Greet idea.
THIS Truth, Honesty, In-
tegrity, and Skepticism. Your
letter did not mention one of my
values. I also do not believe we
need to fear a loving God. We
don't think alike.

Henry Kuhlman
Truth Seeking Concerned
Citizen
Fort Green


.ntgrty .. -t ...- Exein





HARDEE CAR COMPANY
(across from First National Bank)

Bur HERE PAY HERE






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Mut rig ouo

LI


Letter To The Editor

4 Commissioners Failed

To Appreciate FINR


Dear Editor:
Having served as county
commissioner from 1998 to
2010, I have some knowledge
about Hardee County. I was a
commissioner when the quarter
mile setback was adapted in
2007. It seemed plain at that
time there would be a problem
when mining started.
At the time. I did not believe
the board of commissioners
would foolishly trade 450 good
paying jobs for a few hundred
acres of mining land (89 jobs
for 450). Doesn't make sense
does it? In actual dollars, about
10 million for 19 million .
When CFI filed their Master
Mining Plan for the. South
Pasture Extension, the erro-
neously-intentionally included
a waiver of the quarter mile set-
back. The Land Development
Regulations {LDR's} clearly
state the setback should be a
quarter mile. Why would they
do this? MONEY!!!
CFI brought in their crack
legal team, complete with dog
and pony show, flexed their
legal and public relations mus-
cles and dazzled the County.
Commission into granting their
waiver. The 4 to 1 voted
slapped FINR in the face and
said we don't want or need you
here.
Make no mistake, FINR will
leave. The process has already
started. The county commis-
sioners reversed the recommen-
dations of their own staff and a
7 to 1 vote of the Planning and
Zoning board.
CFI was confident of their
plan because they have their
own puppet on the board,
whose strings are pulled by the
mines at will.
Mr. Minor Bryant is totally
comprised and should have
recused himself from this
important vote. Mr. Bryant's
wife and son-in-law lease thou-
sands of acres of cow pasture


from the mines. Since he works
the cows mostly himself, I'm
certain he benefits financially.
Also Mr. Bryant has been re-
elected several times, and to my
knowledge has never lived in
District 1. He did rent a trailer
in District 1, and was supposed
to reside there over half the
time. I wonder if this has
occurred?
This is the kind of ethical and
moral behavior you have as
your board chairman. Hardee
has turned the other way and
winked at this far too long. I
would have serious doubts if he
has ever voted against anything
the mines have ever brought up.
Mr. Grady Johnson also
voted for the waiver. This is not
surprising considering, he has
not voted one positive way
since he was elected. He has
been turning over rocks looking
fdr demons and is on a constant
witch-hunt since he has been in
office. He and his followers, the
CPC (concerned paranoid citi-
zens) have called investigations
and audits constantly looking
for wrongdoing in money
affairs in the County. The only
thing found to date was a coun-
ty employee doing questionable
improprieties on county time.
Also disappointing was Mr.
Dale Johnson's vote. Since he
and his family have financial
dealings with the mines, I really
thought he would see the
duplicity of CFI's tactics. I was
wrong.
Sue Birge's vote was also
very disappointing. She pur-
portedly did her "homework,"
but she clearly failed the test.
I am truly disappointed on
this whole issue. I would hope
the people of Hardee County
would remember these issues at
election time.

Respectfully,
Nick Timmerman
Wauchula
S. . -


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Poet's Place
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COURTESY PHOTOS
Alane Academy students
are engaged in a new proj-
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year, "Reading Takes Us
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expose students to as
many geographical loca-
tions as possible. The
reading series used fea-
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non-fiction stories that
"take you places." Each
time a new state, country
or continent is encoun-
tered through literature or
lessons, students use their
desktop maps to find the
location and then mark it
on the classroom wall
map. It is fun to watch the
students as they become
more and more familiar
with their maps as the proj-
ect continues throughout
the academic year. Above,
Codee Walker places a
sticky-note to locate Mex-
ico on the wall map. Below,
(from left) Alexa Scheips-
meier, Jessica Huckaby
and Johnny Shelton locate
Vietman on their desk
maps.


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By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Hardee Junior High
Wildcats kept their season
unblemished with an over-
whelming win at Bok Academy
last week.
The junior 'Cats won 32-3
behind the leadership of
Thomas Atchley and Jonatan
Martinez, Offensive Players of
the Game, and Jaques Brown
and Boone Paris, the Defensive
Players of the Game.
This week's Tuesday game
was at Avon Park. Next Tues-
day, it is a visit from Bok
Academy, the only Heartland
team Hardee plays twice this
season. The Oct. 23 game is at
home against DeSoto, and
Hardee closes the season with
an unusual Thursday trip to
Sebring on Nov. 1.
At Lake Wales, Hardee
opened scoring early with an
80-yard kickoff return for a
touchdown. Willie Baker ran in
the two-point conversion and
Hardee had an early lead.
Garza also scored on a 10-
yard TD, followed by a 10-
yarder by Ismael Rodriguez.
Parker Carlton, with a two-yard
run, and Jarrett Carlton, with a
three-yarder, rounded out the
scoring..
Bok scored on a 27-yard field


goal late in the fourth quarter.
Offensive Coordinator West
Palmer provided the statistics
for Head Coach Mark Carlton,
Defensive Coordinator Jason
Clark, and assistants Gerry
Lindsey, John Sharp and Derren
Bryan.
Eighth grader Garza finished
with 47 yards on four carries
with a pair of TDs, including
the 80-yard kickoff return.
Classmate Parker Carlton ended
with 67 yards on five carries
with one TD. Seventh grader
Isamel Rodriguez added 30
yards on three carries and his
TD. Classmate Jarrett Carlton
had five tough yards on two
carries, one for a TD.
Eighth grader Willie Baker
had five yards on three carries
and also completed a halfback
pass to Alejandro Rodriguez for
32 yards. Rodriguez, an eighth
grade tight end, also had 27
yards rushing on one carry.
Eighth grader Cavaris Snell had
a tough yard on one carry.
The junior high Wildcats
also had a successful day defen-
sively, led by Parker Carlton for
seven tackles, one for a loss,
and a fumble recovery. Snell
and Jeremy Reyna each added
five tackles. Brandon Franks
added four tackles and an inter-
ception for a seven-yard return.


Paris had four tackles, while
Brown and Baker had three
apiece. Alex Rodriguez added
two tackles and a fumble recov-
ery and Ismael Rodriguez had
twin tackles, one for a loss and
also had a fumble recovery.
Jarrett Carlton and Isis Garza
each had a tackle, with the
Garza one going for a loss.
Gloigens Metayer rounded out
the defensive stats with a tackle
and an interception for a 55-
yard return.
Others from the eighth grade
getting in game time were quar-
terback Hayden Lindsey, De-
Angelo Smith, Levi Boyette,
Gabriel Mendoza, Sherry Lee,
Jimmy Lane, Marcelino Go-
mez, Larrett Smith,' Jose
Zuniga, Lawrence Walker, Jose
Gomez, Erick Estrada, Brad-
dock Collom and Alejandro
Rodriguez.
Also involved were seventh
graders Tanner Carlton, Damar
Harris, Anderson Severe, Jax
Ullrich, Jessie Polkington,
Marcelin Cimeus, Adam O1-
vera, Payton Yarbrough, Jacob
Hebert, Manuel Rios, Justin
Aguilar, Andy Olivarez, Juan
Medina, Cole Durden, Gavin
Cranford, Christian Lowery and
Scotty Eures.


God grant me the serenity to accept the people I cannot change, the courage to
change the one I can, and the wisdom to know it's me.
-Author Unknown



Main Street Wauchula


Presents:


THE 3RD


ANNUAL


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Create your own scarecrow and enter it for a chance to win!
Registration Deadline: Wednesday, October 17th.

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2. 2nd Place will receive $50
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10:4,11c


Richard
"Dick"


FCA T Test Scores, The Rest of the Story.
In recent weeks, my opponent has used FCA T scores in two areas of the test and
compared them only to other Heartland Districts in an effort to convince you he
is doing his job.
What you need to know is how we are achieving statewide. Those results are
very different Cuts in Instructional funding over the past four years are hurting
our children and denying them the opportunities to succeed.


2012 FCAT Math State Rankings


3rd Grade 4th Grade 5th Grade 6th Grade 7th Grade 8thGrade


1 *
3 5I
13
5 -.
17-
19 1
21 i
23
25
27
29
31
33
35'-
37
39
41
43
45 i
47 1
49
51 -
53 -
55
57
59
61
63
65 -
67


Being the best
in the Heartland
is a great goal for
Wildcat Football,,
But not a goal
we should be
setting for our
children's future.


Why has the Superintendent
CUT over $1,000 per student
in instruction over the past 4 years?
The money is there, why not use it
for our children's future?


55
58
62 61

1I1i.2


It's time for a change.


10:11p


d P l Adv aid for and perintendent of Schools


October 11, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 9B


HJHS Wildcats Win Big


- I a I -- L


II


Brdno rdno rdno ars


Fd Fol. Acv.pacl ormuappuvu ly -g -r"


J


I I


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10B The Herald-Advocate, October 11, 2012


Volleyball Getting Wins


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Hardee Lady Wildcat
volleyball team picked up its
first district win last week.
Sandwiched between a pair
rainouts, the victories by both
the varsity 'and junior varsity
highlighted the week.
The Oct. 4 home matches
against district opponent Au-
bumdale were rescheduled to
Wednesday, Oct. 10, giving
Hardee another trio of opportu-
nities, Monday at Tenoroc,
Wednesday at home against
Auburndale and at Auburndale
today (Thursday).
The girls get a visit from
Frostproof next Monday, Oct.
15, and host Avon Park for
Senior Night on Tuesday. The
season ends at DeSoto on Oct.
18.
Inadvertently not reported in
last week's issue was the dual
Hardee victories at Frostproof
on Sept. 24.
The Hardee varsity won in
four in the best-of-five format.
Game One was a 25-18 victo-
ry in which Emily Albritton
served three aces among her six
service points. Karlee Hender-
son added a pair of aces among
her four points. Senior Jessica
Harrison had six points and
Bailey Carlton had seven,
including the final four for the
game.
Game Two was a close loss,
23-25. Jakaysha Lindsey in-
cluded an ace among her nine
points for Hardee. Harrison had
four and Desiree Smith and
Albritton added three service
points apiece.
Hardee came back- to win
Game Three 25-15, with Al-
britton and Smith each getting
seven service points. Smith got
the winning number.
Hardee also won Game four
25-23. Lindsey picked up the
first four and last two points of
the game. Harrison also had a


half dozen service points, Smith
and Carlton had three apiece.
Other Lady 'Cats in action
against Frostproof were Gemi
Saunders, Katie Wheeler, Ken-
dall Gough and Ana Saldivar.
In its first district win-over
Lake Wales-Hardee claimed
victory in straight sets, 25-7,
25-22 and 25-18.
Albritton and Gough had six
service points apiece in Game
One, with Gough getting the
last five. In Game Two, it was
Harrison with 10 service points
and Albritton with six, includ-
ing an ace. Game Three leader
was Henderson with eight serv-
ice points, including the final
four. Gough added seven
points.
The junior Lady Wildcats
won at Frostproof on Sept. 24 in
straight sets in the best-of-three
contest. Hardee won Game One
25-23 and Game Two 25-22.
Abigail Vargas and Destiny
Thompson led Hardee in Game
One with five service points
apiece. Others in on that game
action were Senida Garcia,
Caryssa Johnson, Josie Han-
cock, Hannah Grisinger, Al-
lison Smith, Courtney Rich-
ardson and Brooke Dixon.
In Game Two, Richardson
scored three points, including
the final two. Vargas had seven
and Grisinger six points.
Against Lake Wales at home
last week, the Hardee JVs won
25-15 and 25-19.
For Game One, Dixon had 13
service points, including an ace
and the final two points.
Hancock added six points. In
Game Two, Smith had five
points, including the final two.
Grisinger had six, with an ace,
and Dixon had seven.
Other JV girls in on the
action included Garcia, Vargas,
Claudia Klein, Brenda Mira-
montes, Johnson and Georg-
eann Paris.


PHOTOS BY MARIA TRUJILLO
Getting wins for the Lady Wildcats are (front row, from left) Emily Albritton, Desiree Smith, Bailey Carlton, Ana Saldivar
and Jakaysha Lindsey; (back) Coach Shadow Ward, Gemi Saunders, Karlee Henderson, Katie Wheeler, Kendall Gough
and Jessica Harrison.


Your Business Could Appear Herel
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels
At The Herald Advocate



ROBBY ELLIOTT invites all
his friends and neighbors
to come see him at

B REENWOO

205 N. Charleston Fort Meade
1-800-673-9512
www.directchevy.com


Playing for the junior varsity Lady 'Cats are (front row, left to right) Brenda Miramontes, Senida Garcia, Caryssa John-
son, Hannah Grisinger, Claudia Klein and Brooke Dixon; (back) Allison Smith, Courtney Richardson, Josie Hancock,
Abigail Vargas, Destiny Thompson, Georgeann Paris and Coach Melanie Henderson.






HEARTLAND PHARMACY




"We put our into our service"
If you are visiting we will gladly transfer your prescriptions and
keep them on file then transfer them back when you go home.





















Sue Lobato, Pauline Ochoa, Julian Garcia, Red Camp Pharmacist,
Bob Duncan Pharmacist Sandra Garcia (missing)

DELIVERY SERVICE AVAILABLE
Monday-Friday 9:00 am to 6:00 pm Saturday 9:00 am to 1:0ppm
'. ,:. :-,


Elect





C(


J. Loran


I


for
County Commissioner

District 5
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October 11, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 11B


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND
FOR HARDEE COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO. 25-2010-CA-000485

U.S. BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCI-
ATION

Plaintiff,
vs.

UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CRED-
ITORS, LIENORS, TRUSTEES OF
ARMANDO ORTIZ, DECEASED;
ACELIA D. SUAREZ, HEIR; JOSE
ORTIZ; IF LIVING, INCLUDING
ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
SAID DEFENDANTSS, IF
REMARRIED, AND IF
DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE
UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CRED-
ITORS, LIENORS, AND
TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST)
THE NAMED DEFENDANTSS;
SHAMISCK, INC.; WHETHER
DISSOLVED OR PRESENTLY
EXISTING, TOGETHER WITH
ANY GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES,
CREDITORS, LIENORS, OR TRU-
TEES OF SAID DEFENDANTS)
AND ALL OTHER PERSONS
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH,
UNDER, OR AGAINST DEFEN-
DANT(S); UNKNOWN TENANT
#1 ;UNKNOWN TENANT #2;

Defendants.


NOTICE OF SALE

Notice is hereby given that,
pursuant to a Final Summary
Judgment of Foreclosure entered
In the above-styled cause, in the
Circuit Court of Hardee County,
*Florida, I will sell the property sit-
uate In Hardee County, Florida,
described as:

THE EAST 1/2 OF THE
NORTHWEST 1/4 OF THE
SOUTHEAST 1/4 LESS
BEGIN AT THE NORTH-
EAST CORNER OF THE
NORTHEAST 1/4 OF THE
NORTHWEST 1/4 OF
SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF SEC-
TION 29, TOWNSHIP 35
SOUTH, RANGE 27 EAST,
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORI-
DA, FOR POINT OF
BEGINNING; THENCE
SOUTH 00 05' 15" EAST
ALONG EAST LINE OF
TRACT 661.73 FEET TO
THE SOUTHEAST COR-
NER OF SAID TRACT;
THENCE NORTH 890 53'
34" WEST ALONG SOUTH
LINE OF SAID TRACT,
329.17 FEET; THENCE
NORTH 00 05' 15" WEST
AND PARALLEL TO EAST
LINE OF SAID TRACT,
661.62 FEET TO NORTH
LINE OF SAID TRACT;.
THENCE SOUTH 896 ,'-
45" EAST. ALONG SD:
NORTH LINE, 329.17 FEET
TO POINTOF BEGINNING.
TOGETHER WITH A PER-
PETUAL, NONEXCLUSIVE,
UNOBSTRUCTED EASE-
MENT FOR INGRESS,
EGRESS, ROADWAY, UTIL-
ITIES, DRAINAGE AND
ANY OTHER LAWFUL
PURPOSE, INCLUDING
MAINTENANCE OF SAID
EASEMENT, OVER AND
ACROSS THE NORTH 15
FEET OF THE NORTH-
EAST 1/4 OF SOUTHEAST
1/4 OF SECTION 29,
TOWNSHIP 35 SOUTH,
RANGE 27 EAST, HARDEE
COUNTY, FLORIDA.

at public sale, to the highest and
best bidder, for cash, On the
Second Floor Hallway outside
Room 202, in the Hardee County
Courthouse, 417 West Main
Street, Wauchula, FL 33873 at
11:00 a.m., on October 31, 2012.

Dated this 5 day of Oct., 2012.

Any person claiming an inter-
est in the surplus from the sale, if
any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the UIs
pendens, must file a claim within
60 days after the sale.

Witness; my hand and seal of
this court on the 5 day of Oct,

CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT

By: Connie Coker
Deputy Clerk
If you are a person with a disabil-
ity who needs assistance in order
to participate in a program or ser-
vice of the State Courts System,.
you should contact the Office of
the Court Administrator at (863)
534-4686 (voice), (863) 534-7777
.(TDD) or (800) 955-8770 (Florida
Relay Service), as much in
advance of your court appear-
ance or visit to the courthouse as
possible. Please be prepared to
explain your functional limitations
and suggest an auxiliary aid or
service that' you believe will
enable you to effectively partici-
pate in the court program or ser-
vice.


HARDEE COU
KIDS'NEED
HARDEE COUh
HELP!
Ease a dependent
way through the cou
ter. Volunteer to
Guardian Ad Litem.
773-2505
(If office unattended, pleas
message.)


APPLE OF YOUR EYE


-. *;''






t- ._ '

q. 11





This is a female Jack Russell Terrier mix.
She a white and black adult and has a short coat
with a long tail.
Adoption fees are $45 and include a rabies vaccination and spaying or
neutering of the animal. Contact 773-2320 if you are interested in adopt-
ing any cats or dogs that desperately need a loving home. The kennel
location is 685 Airport Road, Wauchula, at the county landfill.


Rain Wins Some Sports


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Thunderstorms took the vic-
tory in some of last week's
sports events.
Chief among them was a
home district volleyball match-
es against Auburndale oh
Thursday night, when the Polk
County buses, refused tomove.
Those matches were resched-
uled for Wednesday, Oct. 10 in
order to get the district competi-
tion complete. Hardee also
plays Auburndale, on its court,
tonight (Thursday).
Hardee Junior High softball
won last Monday at Sebring
and was rained out Thursday at
home against Avon Park.
Thunderstorms also can-
celled the junior varsity football
encounter at Sebring. Tonight's
game is set for Avon Park.
Swimming was stormed out
in a meet set for Lake Placid.
The only girls golf match of
the week was cancelled by the
wicked weather last Thursday.
Boys golf had its regular match-
es at Lake Placid Tuesday and
home against Lake Wales
Thursday both rained out. A


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN
AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIRCUIT CIVIL DIVISION

CASE NO.: 2009CA000510

BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING,
L.P. F/K/A COUNTRYWIDE HOME
LOANS SERVICING, L.P.;
Plaintiff,
vs.

JOSE PERALTA, et al.,
Defendants.

RE-NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order of Final
Judgment entered in Case No.
2009CA000510 of the Circuit
Court of the TENTH Judicial
Circuit in and' for HARDEE
County, Florida, wherein, BAC
HOME LOANS SERVING, L.P.
F/K/A. COUNTRYWIDE HOME
LOANS SERVICING, L.P, Plaintiff,
and, JOSE PERALTA, et. al. are
Defendants, I will sell to the high-
est bidder for cash at 417 W. Main
St., outside Room 202 2nd Floor
hallway, Wauchula, Florida, at the
hour of 11:00 am on the 31 day of
October, 2012, the following
described property:

LOTS 17 AND 18, BLOCK
2, OF GOLFVIEW
ESTATES, A SUBDIVISION
IN HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, AS PER PLAT
BOOK 3, PAGE 50, PUBLIC
RECORDS OF HARDEE
COUNTY, FLORIDA.

Any person claiming an Inter-
est in the surplus from the sale, if
any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the Lis
Pendens must file a claim within
60 days after the sale.

Dated this 5 day of October,
2012.


B B. HUGH BRADLEY
10:11,1c CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT

By: Connie Coker
As Deputy Clerk
NITY
If you are person with a disability
who needs any accommodation
JTY in order to participate in this pro-
ceeding, you are entitled, at no
cost to you, to the provision of
child's certain assistance. Please con-
tact the Office of the Court
rt sys- Administrator, (863) 534-4690,
be a within two (2) working days of
your receipt of this Re-Notice of
Forclosure Sale; if you are hear-
ing or voice impaired, call TDD
se leave (863) 534-7777 or Florida Relay
Service 711.


10:11,18c


* match previously rained out
against DeSoto was set for Oct.
8.
The boys did compete in the
Crutchfield-Hawkins huge tour-
nament last Monday, Oct. 1,
finishing "in the middle of the
pack. Senior Will Berfnett led
the way with a 77 and two,
birdies, reported Coach George
Heihe. Classmate William
Beattie had an 84, but added
three birdies to continue to lead
the team in that category. Tren-
ton Moon came in at 85, which
included an unfortunate 10 on
the first hole, playing solid golf
after that. Brad Brewer had 90
with a bird and Tyler Hewett
finished with 97.
Pop Warner got in its games
on Oct. 6. Flag and Tiny Mites
don't keep score. The New
Tampa Wildcats won 35-18 in
the Mitey Mite division, but
Hardee came back to win the
Junior Pee Wee division 20-6
over New Tampa. The Silver
Raiders forfeited the Pee Wee
Division game, giving Hardee a
1-0 win. The Junior Midgets
had a bye eek. "
We haven't*had a ,port on
cross country but imagine it's
been hard to get practice or
meets in with the afternoon
showers or thunderstorms.


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION

CASE NO. 252012CA000338

BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.,
Plaintiff
vs.

DIANELYS MOLES; et al,
Defendants.

NOTICE OF ACTION

TO: ANA MARIA DELGADO
Last Known Address
2731 PARNELL ROAD
ZOLFO SPRINGS, FL 33890
Current Residence is
Unknown

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following described property
in Hardee County, Florida:

LOT 1, CYPRESS CREEK
RANCHES, PHASE 1, AS
PER PLAT THEREOF
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK
52, PAGES 3 AND 4, PUB-
LIC RECORDS OF HARDEE
COUNTY, FLORIDA.

has been filed against you and
that you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, If
any, to it on SMITH, HIATT &
DIAZ, P.A., Plaintiff's attorneys,
whose address is PO BOX 11438
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33339-1438,
(954) 564-0071, within 30 days
from first date of publication, and
file the original with the Clerk of
this Court either before service
on Plaintiff's attorneys or immedi-
ately thereafter; otherwise a
default will be eritered against
you for the relief demanded in the
complaint or petition.

DATED on Oct. 2, 2012.

B.HUGH BRADLEY, CLERK
As Clerk of the Court

By: Connie Coker
As Deputy Clerk


In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act of 1990, per-
sons needing special accommo-
dation to participate in this pro-
ceeding should contact the Clerk
of the Court not later than five
business days prior to the pro-
ceeding at the Hardee County
Courthouse. Telephone 863-773-
4174 or 1-800-955-8770 via
Florida Relay Service.
10:11,18c


COURTESY PHOTOS
To celebrate the end of a
lesson unit on apples, first-
grade teachers at Zolfo
Springs Elementary School
celebrated with Apple Day
in their classrooms on ,
Sept. 28. Students enjoyed
eating apple snacks and '
creating apple art. In total,
the unit included apple
math, stained-glass apples,
applesauce, apple pie,
comparing and contrasting ,
apple products, graphing
favorite apples and more.



The term "Ponzi scheme" is roamed for the pyramid investment scheme devised by
Charles Ponzi in 1920. Ponzi promised a 50 percent return in six months but investors
ended up losing millions of dollars.

Starfish are not true fish. They belong to a group of animals called echinoderms that
includes brittle stars, sea cucumbers, sea lilies, sea urchins and sand dollars.


NOTICE

BCC MEETING

TIME CHANGE


The BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS

REGULAR MEETING SCHEDULED FOR 10/18/2012

WILL BE AT 1:00 P.M. INSTEAD OF 6:00 P.M.


Minor L. Bryant, Chairperson
10:11c



NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC

The City of Wauchula Planning and Zoning Board will meet on Monday, October 15, 2012
at 5:30 p.m. in the Wauchula Commission Chambers located at 225 E Main St, Suite 105,
Wauchula. The agenda can be viewed at 126 S. 7th Avenue, Wauchula or online at
www.cityofwauchula.com.

Any interested persons) will be heard at this meeting. If any person decides to appeal any
decision made by the Board with respect to this request for which he will need a verbatim
record of the proceedings, he will need to ensure that such verbatim record is made.

The City Commission of the City of Wauchula, Florida does not discriminate upon the basis
of any individual's disability status. This non-discriminatory policy involves every aspect
of the Commission's functions, including ones access to, participation, employment or
treatment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable accommodation as
provided for inthe Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26, Florida Statutes,
should contact the City Clerk at (863) 773-3131.

CITY OF WAUCHULA
Richard K. Nadaskay, Jr.
Mayor

ATTEST:
Holly Smith
City Clerk 10:11




PUBLIC NOTICE

PUBLIC AVAILABILITY OF HAZARDOUS

MATERIALS INFORMATION

Pursuant to Section 324 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know act of
1986 (EPCRA), the following information is available to the public upon request during nor-
mal business hours by contacting the Florida, District VII, Local Emergency Planning Com-
mittee (LEPC) for Hazardous Materials.

Hazardous Material Safety Data Sheets
Facility Hazardous Chemical Inventory Forms
Section 304 Chemical Release Follow-up Notifications
District VII, LEPC Hazardous Materials Emergency Plan

The District VII LEPC services residents of DeSoto, Hardee, Highlands, Okeechobee, and
Polk Counties.

EPCRA requires that any business that regularly uses, handles, or stores certain hazardous
chemicals register with State and local regulatory agencies. If you have never registered
or wish to verify your requirement to register, contact the LEPC at the address or phone
number listed below. If you have previously complied, be sure your notifications are current
- penalties for non-compliance are severe.

To obtain notification information or to learn more about EPCRA, please contact:

Florida District VII LEPC
555 East Church Street
P.O. Box 2089
Bartow, Florida 33831
863-534-7130 ext. 107
10:11c


Pet Of The Week


- .. I


I







12B The Herald-Advocate, October 11, 2012


Pink Army Marches


Into Hardee County


Florida Hospital, with loca-
tions in Wauchula, Sebring and
Lake Placid, is gearing up for
the Pink Army Campaign to
fight breast cancer.
As the second most common
form of cancer found in women,
breast cancer is a formidable
enemy, but one that can be beat.
The Pink Army is a statewide
campaign to increase breast can-
cer awareness and raise mam-
mography funds for women in
need, all while having a fun
time. When someone "enlists"
in the Pink Army, she (or he)
receives a set of specialty dog
tags. Then comes the opportuni-
ty to move up the ranks through
different missions, like enlisting
additional soldiers, volunteer-
ing, and by attending and host-


ing events.
As she completes missions,
she moves up the ranks and
receives rewards. The dog tags
are also good for discounts, spe-
cials or free gifts through local
and statewide participating ven-
dors.
The Pink Army is also raising
tax deductible donations. With
the help of Samaritan's Touch
Care Center and the Florida
Hospital Heartland Mammo-
graphy Fund, all money raised
here will stay here, for Hardee
and Highlands residents who
need mammograms they could
not otherwise afford.
To learn more, about the Pink
Army campaign, go to
www.JoinThePinkArmy.com.


During the past week, sheriff's deputies and city police'
officers investigated the following incidents and made the fol-
lowing arrests:

COUNTY
Oct. 7, Obniel Guillen Morales, 30, of 718 Apostolic Road,
Wauchula, was arrested by Sgt. Lyle Hart and charged with DUI
and no valid license.
Oct. 7, Janet Margaret Cantu, 51, of 351 King Road, Wau-
chula, was arrested by Sgt. Lyle Hart on an out-of-county warrant.
Oct. 7, Benjamin Leonard Hulitt, 38, of 3715 Gator Road,
Zolfo Springs, was arrested by Dep. Steven Ahrens and charged
with battery.
Oct. 7, a residential burglary on Sally Place and a theft on
Kelly Roberts Road were reported.

Oct. 6, Katie Lee Barnett, 27, of 515 N. Seventh Ave., Wau-
chula, was arrested by Sgt. Lyle Hart on three counts of failure to
appear in court.

Oct. 5, Christina Rodriguez, 29, of 38 Hickory Court, Zolfo
Springs, was arrested by Dep. Ryan Abbott and charged with tres-
passing failure to leave property upon request.
Oct. 5, Joseph Tenamore, 50, of 510 S. Walbach Ave., Lake-
land, was arrested on a charge of failure to appear in court.
Oct. 5, residential burglaries on Old Bradenton Road, Terrell
Road and Fifth St. East, and criminal mischief on Manatee Street
were reported.

Oct. 4, Ralph Williams, 27, of 398 River Chase Circle, Wau-
chula, was arrested by Dep. John McCloud on two counts of with-
holding support of children.
Oct. 4, residential burglaries on Gordon Road and Old
Bradenton Road, a fight on U. S. 17 North, and a theft on
Vermillion Street were reported.

Oct. 3, Timothy Billy Frazier, 31, of 1815-27th Ave. E.,
Bradenton, was arrested by Capt. Andrew Rigney on a charge of
violation of probation.
Oct. 3,Anqunette Shada Milhouse, 22, of 3606 Suwannee St.,
Zolfo Springs, was arrested by Dep. Kim Pfeiffer on a charge of
failure to appear in court.


Oct. 3, a vehicle stolen on Maxwell Drive, and thefts on
Louisiana Street, SR 64 East and Oak Street were reported.

Oct. 2, Kaylee Liana Sanchez, 28, of 207 Park Drive, Wau-
chula, was arrested by Dep. Steven Ahrens and charged with fraud
- failure to redeliver hired or leased property.
Oct. 2, thefts on SR 66 and George Marsh Road were report-
ed.

Oct. 1, Brandon Keith Wisniewski, 27, of 426 S. 10th Ave.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Kim Pfeiffer and charged with
deprived or tormenting animals.
Oct. 1, Steven Daniel Spiker, 26, of 6523 Sunset Ridge,
Lakeland, was arrested by Sgt. Lyle Hart on three counts of failure
to appear in court.
Oct. 1, a residential burglary on Merle Langford Road, crimi-
nal mischief on South First Avenue, a tag stolen at a different Merle
Langford Road, and a theft on SR 66 were r reported.

WAUCHULA
Oct. 6, criminal mischief on Carlton Street was reported.

Oct. 5, Stacy Lynell Wilkins, 41, of 3809 Dixiana Dr.,
Bowling Green, was arrested by Ofc. John Nicholas on an out-of-
county warrant.
Oct. 5, John Trenton Go'. -1, 20, of 3536 Mansfield Road,
Bowling Green, was arrested by Ofc. John Nicholas on an out-of-
county warrant.
Oct. 5, Jesus Rios Juarez, 20, of 3864 Fussell Road, Bowling
Green, was arrested by Sgt. Gabe Garza on an out-of-county war-
rant.
Oct. 5, a theft on East Main Street was reported.

Oct. 4, thefts on East Main Street and on La Playa Drive were
reported.

Oct. 3, a residential burglary on North Ninth Avenue was
reported.
. Oct. 2, Michael Shannon Wingate, 32, of 3196 Enclave Blvd.,
Mulberry, was arrested on an out-of-county warrant.

BOWLING GREEN
Oct. 2, a residential burglary on East Main Street was report-
ed.

Oct. 1, burglary of a conveyance on a different East Main
Street address was reported.


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COURTESY PHOTO
The first "general" in the Highlands County Pink Army,
Linda Taylor. A cancer survivor and an active volunteer at
Florida Hospital and for Guardian Ad Litem, Taylor knows
early detection can save lives. Join her in the fight
against breast cancer.


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INVESTING
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CH4LOtRES N
FUTURE


Own your home sooner.


0il


Depending on your circumstances, 30 years can be a
long time to finance a home. At MIDFLORIDA, you can take a
shortcut to financial freedom with our 10-year Free & Clear
fixed-rate mortgage.

* Offers a straightforward monthly payment.
* Your interest rate and your total monthly payment
of principal and interest will stay the same for the
entire term of the loan.
* Available for purchase or refinance.




MIDFUORMI

An Mortgage Center




Federally insured by NCUA.

T -I r ,i', l. : ..; .I r ,:,'I,; ,'? T:. ,I-3 : i! :l 1.., I ,l i IT,,:Ir 19a r :i l-,
1 i r' .,- ,l L i ,- 11 ,j 3r ,:,. I hNI-' "I" ', I,- F i ll j lL r', A_, 1l : I j ,
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2490/2882%
APR

Purchase or Refinance


Plus! Get a Free Appraisal (up to,40o)


(.863)382-3390 (863) 937-9.900
(8 3) 38- 420 1 (8 3) 88 84 3


HAME:,








03 SCH 3-D!GI-T
OF FLOR,, 14p 3S 6
FELOpRD HISTORy
-L 32 0001


The Herald-Advocate
SPS 7i7 l'
Thursday. October 11,2012


PAGE ONE


Elect J. Loran I -, i



COGBURN Dagget
--- Superintendent of Schools
County Commissioner
District 5 .....*....*rE 10
Kz, I.RSilERu M DUOIwmii J e U.P( m l 10:11







2C The Herald-Advocate, October 11, 2012





Schedule of Weekly Services-


ntedas a Public Service
15 byr'.
erald-Advocate "
uchtl, Forida.

: Thursday 5 p.m.


BOWLING GREEN
APOSTOLIC LIGHTHOUSE
UNITED PENTECOSTAL
CHURCH
310 Orange St.
375-3100
Sunday Morning ..................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening ....................6:00 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting........7:00 p.m.
Thursday Service ..................7:30 p.m.

CHESTER GROVE MB CHURCH
708 W. Grape St. 375-3353
Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship ....................8:00 a.m.
Sun. Eve. Worship
1st & 3rd ..............4:00 p.m. 3:00 p.m.
Tues. Prayer/Bible Study ......6:00 p.m.

CHRISTIAN BIBLE
FELLOWSHIP
Hwy. 17 South
Morning Worship ................10:30 a.m.
Youth Group Sunday ..........6:00 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
121 West Broward St. 375-2231
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
.Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................. 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday .......................... 7:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
TRUE HOLINESS OUTREACH
725 Palmetto St.
375-3304
Sunday School ...................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................1:00 a.m.
Tues. Night Bible Study ...... 7:30 p.m.
Evening Worship
1st Sunday .................... 5:00 p.m.

COMMUNITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Main & W. Centra.
Sunday AM Worship............10:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening ....................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer Meeting ............7:00 p.m.

FAITH ASSEMBLY OF GOD
4937 Hwy. 17 N. 375-4206
Sunday School ...................9;45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Disciples Train & Choirs ......5:30 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Bowling Green
S. Hwy. 17. 375-2253
SUNDAY:
Bible Study ............................ 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship .............1..0:45 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:30 p.m.

WEDNESDAY:
Discipleship Training
Youth & Adult ..................6:30 p.m.
AWANA (ages 3-5th grade) ....6:30 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Grape & Church Streets 375-2340
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............I 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ..................6:00 p.m.
FORT GREEN BAPTIST
CHURCH
Baptist Church Road 773-9013
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper .............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ......7:00 p.m.

HOLY CHILD
SPANISH CATHOLIC MISSION
Misa (Espanol) Sunday ........7:00 p.m.

IGLESIA DEL DIOS VIVO
105 Dixiana St. 375-4191
Domingo De Predicacion ....11:00 p.m.
Martes Estudio Biblico..........7:00 p.m.
Miercoles Estudior Juvenil ....7:00 p.m.
Jueves De Predicacion .........7:00 p.m.

IMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH
210 E. Broward St. 375-4681
Sunday School ...................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship........... 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..................7:00 p.m

MACEDONIA PRIMITIVE
BAPTIST CHURCH
607 Palmetto St.
Church School ......................9:30 a.m.
Morning Service ............... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Service ....................7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study/Prayer ......7:00 p.m.
Communion-2nd Sun. Eve. ..6:00 p.m.

MT. PISGAH BAPTIST CHURCH
6210 Mt. Pisgah Rd. 375-4409
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship .............11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training.... ....5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..............7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time....:...7:00 p.m.

NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
Mason Dixon & County Line Rd.
781-5887
Sunday Worship .............. 11:00 a.m.
2nd Sunday Communion ....11:00 a.m.
Bread of Life Sunday........12:15 p.m.
T.H.E. Meeting Tuesday ....7:00 p.m.


BOWLING GREEN

OPEN DOOR FULL GOSPEL
PRAISE CENTER
E. Broward St.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Service ......................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.

PRIMERA MISSION BAUTISTA
Murray Road off Hwy. 17
375-2295
Domingos Escuela Dom. ......9:45 a.m.
Servicio de Adoracion..........11:00 a.m.
Servicio de Predicacion ........5:00 p.m.
Miercoles Servico..................6:30 p.m.

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 South US Hwy 17
Morning Service .................. 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.,

ST. JOHN A.M.E. CHURCH
513 W. Orange St.
375-2911
Sunday Church School ..........9:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship....11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

VICTORY PRAISE CENTER
128 E. Main St.
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ...............6:00 p.m.
Thursday Night Services,
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Kidz Club..............................7:00 pm .

ONA
IGLESIA PENTECOSTES
VISION POR LAS ALMAS
149 Bedger Loop 448-2831
Servicio Domingos ................7:30 p.m.
Jueves (Ensefianza Biblica) ..................
..................................... ..... 7:30 p.m .
LIMESTONE BAPTIST CHURCH
4868 Keystone Ave. Limestone
Comm.
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................1100 a.m.
Evening Worship ...............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

NEW ZION BAPTIST CHURCH
202 Sidney Roberts Road
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training...............6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................6:00 p.m.

ONA BAPTIST CHURCH
131 Bear Lane 773-2540
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

UNION BAPTIST CHURCH
5076 Lily Church Rd. 494-5622
Sunday School .................10:00 a.m.
M6rriing Worship .........11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .;...............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday
AWANA for Kids ..............6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time.........7:00 p.m.


WAUCHULA

APOSTOLIC ASSEMBLY
Martin Luther King and Apostolic Rd.
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
English Service ................. 1:30 a.m.
General Worship Service ......1:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer ......................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

CELEBRATION CHURCH
322 Hanchey Rd.
863-781-1624
hardee.celebration.org
Sunday Morning Service ....11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Youth Service ....5:30 p.m.
Childcare provided at all services

CELEBRATION FELLOWSHIP
773-0427
Celebration Service..............10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Evening Cell Groups
Adult Cell Group .................7:00 p.m.
Youth Cell Group ..................7:00 p.m.
Children's Cell Group ..........7:00 p.m.
Call bi/r locations

CHARLIE CREEK
BAPTIST CHURCH
6885 State Road 64 East 773-3447
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.mr
Wednesday Worship ..............6:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF CHRIST
201 S. Florida Ave. & Orange St.
773-9678
Bible Study ............................9:30 i.m.
Worship Service ..................10:45 a.m.
Wednesday ............................7:00 p.m.

CHURCH OF CHRIST
Will Duke Road
773-2249
Sunday Morning Worship......9:30 a.m.
Sunday Bible Class ..............11:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening Worship ......6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Bible Class ........7:00 p.m.
Men's Leadership & Training Class -
2nd Sunday of Month ........4:00 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
Martin Luther King Blvd.
767-0199

CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST
OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS
630 Hanchey Rd. 773-3532
Sacrament Meeting ................9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Priesthood ............................1 1:00 a.m .


WAUCHULA

COTMM-UNITY BAPTIST
CHURCH OF WAUCHULA HILLS
(SPANISH)
615 Rainey Blvd.
257-3950
Sunday Bible Study ............10:00 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship....11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

DIOS ES AMOR
807 S. 8th Ave.
773-4576
Domingos Escuela
Dominica ..........................10:00 a.m .
Servicio .... ........... ..........11:00 a.m.
Lunes Oracion ......................6:00 p.m.
Miercoles Servicio ................7:00 p.m.

EL REMANENTE
IGLECIA CRISTIANA
318 W. Main St..
Martes Oracion ......................7:00 p.m.
Jueves Servicio ......................7:30 p.m.
Viernes Servicio ....................7:30 p.m.
Domingo Servicio.............1..0:30 a.m.

ENDTIME CROSSROAD
MINISTRY
501 N. 9th & Georgia St. 773-3470
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Service ..................11:30 a.m.
Evening Service.................7:30 p.m.
Wed. Bible St. & Yth. Gath ..7:30 p.m.
Friday (Holy Ghost Night,)....7:30 p.m.

FAITH PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
114 N. 7th Ave. 773-2105
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ..................11:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship .................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ............... 6:15 p.m.
Wed. Youth Fellowship..........6:50 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

FAITH TEMPLE CHURCH
OF GOD
701 N. 7th Ave 773-3800
Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship ..................10:20 a.m.
Children's Chuch ................10:40 a.m.
Evening Service ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
1570 W. Main St. 773-4182
SUNDAY:
Bible Study for all ages ........9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.

WEDNESDAY:
Sr. Adult Bible Study ..........10:00 a.m.
Children's Chiors
(PK-Grade 4) .................... 5:30 p.m.
PRAISE 57-Jr High Chior .. 5:30 p.m.
Mid-Week Prayer Meeting .. 6:00 p.m.
Kids On Missions
(PK-Grade 4) .................... 6:00 p.m.
Club 56 ................................ 6:00 p.m .
Youth Group (Grades 7-12) 6:00 p.in.
Family Life Ministry
& Discipleship ................ 6:00 p.m.
Church Orchestra.................. 6:00 p.m.
Adult Choir ........... ........ 7:00 p.m.

FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH
1121 W. Louisiana St. 773-9243
SUNDAY:
Generations Cafe Opens........9:30 a.m.
Kids World Check-In for
Nursery-5th Grade Begins..10:15 a.m.
Pre-K Blast ..........................10:45 a.m.
Kids World B.L.A.S.T.
(K-5th) ............................10:45 a.m .
Worship Service ..................10:45 a.m.
WEDNESDAY:
Check-In begins for
Nursery-5thgrade ................6:15 p.m.
Classes for children ages
PreK-12th grade............6:30-8:00 p.m.


FIRST CHURCH OF
THE NAZARENE
511 W. Palmetto St.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Service ..................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.
FIRST MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
1347 Martin Luther King Ave.
773-6556
Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m.
Morning Service ............... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................. :00 p.m.
Tues. Youth Ministry Meeting/
Bible Study ........................ 6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer/Bible Study ......7:00 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
207 N. Seventh Ave. 773-4267
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Traditional Sunday Worship 11:00 a.m.
Casual Sunday Worship..........6:00 p.m
Tuesday Bible Study............10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Activities ............6:00 p.m.

FLORIDA'S FIRST ASSEMBLY
OF GOD CHURCH
1397 South Florida Avenue
773-9386.
Sunday School .................. 9:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............10:00 a.m.
Wed. Family Night ................7:00 p.m.
Adult, Children & Radiate Youth Church

FLORIDA GOSPEL
511 W. Palmetto
223-5126
Sunday Morning Worship....11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............7:30 p.m.

THE GOSPEL TABERNACLE
810 W. Tennessee St. 863-735-1158


Morning Service ..................10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

HEARTLAND
COMMUNITY CHURCH
1262 W. Main St. 767-6500
Coffee & Donuts....................9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ...................... 9:30 a.m.
W orship .............................. 10:30 a.m .
Wed. Night Dinner ................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bodybuilders Adult Cl.
Crossroads &
Lighthouse Min. ...............7:00 p.m.


WAUCHULA
HIGHER GROUND
INTERNATIONAL MINISTRY
1258 W. MAIN STREET
WAUCHULA, FL
Sunday Morning Worship....11:00 a.m.
Wed. Night Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

IGLESIA HISPANA
FUENTE DE VIDA
501 N. 91 Ave.
M artes .................................. 7: 30 p.m .
Jueves .................................... 7:30 p.m .
Domingo ............................ 10:30 p.m.

IGLESIA HISPANA
PRESENCIA de Dios
511 W. Palmetto St.
Domingos ............................. 6:00 p.m.
M iercoles............................... 7:00 p.m .

IGLESIA ADVENTISTA DEL
SEPTIMO DIA
Old Bradenton Road
767-1010

IGLESIA de DIOS
ALFA Y OMEGA
1909 Stanfield Rd.
Sunday School ....................10: 00 a.m.
Evening Service ....................6:00 p.m.
Tuesday (Bible Study & Prayer
N ight) ...............................7:30 p.m .
Friday Worship Service ........7:30 p.m.
JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
ENGLISH
155 Altman Road 1131
Sunday Service ......................2:00 p.m.

JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
SPANISH
Sunday Service ................... 10:00 a.m.
LIGHT OF THE WORLD
MINISTRIES
Womans Center 131 N. 7th Ave.
Wauchula, FL
Friday Evening ......................6:00 prm.
LAKE DALE BAPTIST CHURCH
3102 Heard Bridge Road
773-6622
Sunday School ...................:..9:45 a.m.
Morning Service ..................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.
MINISTERIO INTERNACIONIAL
Cambriadores de Mundo
704 W. Main St. 773-0065
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.
NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH
1999 State Road 64 East
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship Service ....11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship Service ......6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Night Supper......6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Activities
(All Ages) .......................... 7:00 p.m.
NEW LIFE CHURCH
117 W. Palmetto St.
773-2929
Sunday Service ....................10:00 a.m.
-Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
Children Ministries for all services
NEW MT. ZION A.M.E. CHURCH
10 Martin Luther King Ave.
767-0023
Morn. Worship
(lst & 3r Sun.) .................8:00 a.m..
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
2nd Sunday Youth Service ....4:00 p.m.
Allen Christian Endeavor......4:00 p.m.
Wed. & Fri. Bible Study........7:00 p.m.
NORTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
912 N. 8th Ave. 773-6947
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ...............7:00 p.m.
OAK GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
4350 W. Main St. 735-0321
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Wdrship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.
PEACE VALLEY LUTHERAN
CHURCH
1643 Stenstrom Road 773-2858
1" & 3' Sun.
Communion .................... 10:00 a.m.
2" & 4 Sun.
Divine Worship ................10:00 a.m.
Bible Study ........................ 11:15 a.m.
** Fellowship each Sunday after service

PROGRESSIVE MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
149 Manley Road East Main
773-5814
Sunday School .....................9:30 a.m.
Worship Service ..................1:00 a.m.
Wed. Evening Prayer ............7:00 p.m.

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 North US Hwy 17
Morning Service ..................10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.

RIVERVIEW HEIGHTS
MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1321 S.R. 636 East 773-3344
Radio Program
WZZS Sundays,..............9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

SOUL HARVEST MINISTRY
1337 Hwy. 17 South, Wauchula
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ............11:00 a.m.
Evening Service ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

ST. ANN'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH


204 N. 9th Ave. 773-6418
Sunday .................................. 9:00 a.m .
H oly D ays ............................................

ST. MICHAEL
CATHOLIC CHURCH
408 Heard Bridge Road 773-4089
Saturday Mass (English) ......5:00 p.m.
(Spanish) ......7:00 p.m.
Sunday(English) ....................8:30 a.m.
(Spanish) ..............11:00 a.m.
(Creole) ...................1... :00 p.m.
Catecismo .............................. 9:45 a.m .
Daily Mass in English ..........8:30-a.m.


WAUCHULA

SEVENTH DAY
ADVENTIST CHURCH
205 S. llth Ave. 773-9927
Sabbath School .....................9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Tues. Prayer Meeting ............7:00 p.m.
SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
505 S. 10th Ave. 773-4368
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ...............7:00 p.m.
SPIRIT WIND TABERNACLE
1652 Old Bradenton Road
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............7:30 p.m.
1AB5ERNACLE UIY
PRAISE & JOY
1507 MLK Avenue
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:30 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Tues. Bible Stdy.
& Child Train .................7:00 p.m.
Friday Prayer Service ............7:00 p.m.
WAUCHULA CHURCH OF GOD
1543 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.
773-0199
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning,Worship ...............11:15 a.n.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Fam. Training ....7:30 p.m.
Thurs. Youth Bible Study ......7:00 p.m.
Friday Night Worship............7:30 p,m.
WAUCHULA HILLS HARVEST
TEMPLE ASSEMBLY OF GOD
210 Anderson
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Church.................................10:00 a.m .
Youth Service ........................6:00 p.m.
Evening Service ....................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.
WAUCHULA HILLS
SSPANISH CHURCH OF GOD
1000 Stansfield Rd.
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer ......................7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship..................7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ..................7:30 p.m.
WAUCHULA REVIVAL CENTER
(Full Gospel)
501 N. 9th Ave.
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.nm.
Youth & Child. Church..........6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ..................7:00 p.m.
Men's Fri. Prayer ..................7:00 p.m.

ZOLFO SPRINGS

COMMUNITY WESLEYAN CHURCH
Gardner
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
COWBOY-UP MINISTRY
Cracker Trail Arena
Hwy 66
(across from Oak Hills Ranch Rd.)
781-2281
Sunday ....... ; ...................10:00 a.m.
CREWSVILLE BETHEL
BAPTIST CHURCH
8251 Crewsville Road
Church 735-0871 Pastor 773-6657
Sunday School .............9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ r:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ...............6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................6:30 p.m.
EVANGELISTIC HOLINESS
CHURCH INC.
Corner of 6th and Hickory
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................7:00 p.m..
Wednesday ............................7:30 p.m.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
OF ZOLFO
320 E. 4th St. 735-1200
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Training Union ...................5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.
FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Corner of 6th & Suwanee 735-1544
Gospel Music ......................10:30 a.m.
Worship Service ...............11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

FOX MEMORIAL
HOLINESS CHURCH
2344 Merle Langford Rd.
Sunday Morning Worship....10:00 a.m.
Sunday Night Worship ..........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.


qw


Lord Garvagh, running as a
liberal candidate in .1832, was
greeted with such indifference by
the British electorate, that he
'became the first person to poll no
votes in a general election.
But there's another person who
deserves no votes -the devil.
The Lord's voting foryou,and the
devil's voting for you. You must
take sides. Pilate raised a
question that must be answered
Sby every person: "What shall I do
with Jesus?"
The choice lies between eternal
delight and eternal despair, the
Lord and the devil.
To reject the Lord is to vote for
the devil. You will receive the Lord,
won't you?

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Donnis & Kathy Barber
Hwy. 66 East (863) 735-0470
PO. Box 780 Zolfo Springs, FL
I.Bx70ZloS rn',F


Who is Rich? rsalg.

A wise parent will advise his child to strive to be rich.
Not in dollars, but rich in the love of the Lord. On the
road to earthly riches there are many potholes that Psalms
the most expensive car will not get her through-but 145
God can fift her over. The best clothes and the finest
education won't always give her the peace and courage Psalms
it takes to keep moving toward fulfillment-but God's 146
love will. Worship as a family each week. Prepare-your
children for adulthood by your example. You will all Psalms
be richer for it. 147

Psalms


Psalms
i49

Plsllm


Psalms
-92




eupSodan
2012 ,Kteiser-WilllmnsNetwpe lServmei
P. BSx i187h, Oaotesnille, VA 22906, www.Jlntw.cn


ZOLFO SPRINGS ;

GARDNER sAPTIST CHURCH
South Hwy. 17 494-5456
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.
LIFE CHANGING WORSHIPCENIER
3426 Oak St. 863-832-9808
Sunday Worship ....................2:30 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

MARANATHA BAPTIST CHURCH
2465 Oxendine Rd
(863) 832-9292
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
W orship..............................11:00 a.m.
Evening................................ 1:00 p.m .
'Wed. Bible & Prayer Meet....7:00 p.m.

NEW VISION WORSHIP CENTER
64 E. & School House Road
Church 735-8585 Childcare 735-
8586
Morning Worship ................10:00 a.m.
Children's Church................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Youth & F.T.H. ............7:00 p.r.

PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF
GOD FAITH TEMPLE
Oak Street
Sunday Worship .................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ...............7:00 p.m.
Tuesday Worship ...............7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship..................7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ..................7:30 p.m.

PRIMERA MISSION
BAUTISTA HISPANA
518 8th Ave. E.
Escuela Dominical ..............10:00 a.m.
Servicio del Domingo..........11:00 a.m.
........................................7:00 p.m .
Servicio del Miercoles+..........7:30 p.m.

PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH
Pioneer Park
2nd Sunday .......................... 10:30 a.m.
Evening Service ....................6:30 p.m.
5th Sunday ............................ 6:00 p.m.

ST. PAUL'S MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
3676 US. Hwy. 17 South 735-0636
Sunday School ................9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship ...................... 1 a.m.
Wed. Prayer Service ..............7:00 p.m.

SAN ALFONSO MISSION
3027 Schoolhouse Lane
Domingo, Misa en Espanol ..9:30 a.m.
Catecismo ............................ 11:00 a.m.

SPANISH MISSION
735-802s
Escuela Dominica ... ........10:00 a.m.
Servicio .............................. 11:00 a.m .
Pioneer Club ..........................6:30 p.m.
Servicio de la Noche ............7:00 p.m.
Mierecoles Merienda ............6:00 p.m.
Servicio..................................8:00 p.m .
Sabaco Liga de Jovenes ........5:00 p.m.






October 11, 2012, The Herald-Advocate .3C


Museum Matters
S,. Marlene Rickels Hyde
Cracker Trail Museum Curator

DID YOU HAVE A FAVORITE TOY?
Chances are, as you were growing up, you had a favorite toy.
Perhaps it was a doll that your grandmother gave you, a teddy bear
that you just couldn't fall to sleep without, or a small car or truck.
We've all had a favorite toy at some time in our lives.
For our pioneer ancestors, it was usually whatever they could
make or fashion themselves. Pioneer children didn't have a lot of
leisure time, as they had to help with chores and do their school-
work. When they did have time to play, it was usually with some-
thing that was homemade.
Long before the Raggedy Ann & Andy dolls first appeared,
children were playing with rag dolls. The earliest known toy is a
doll,dating back to the Egyptians. Early dolls were made of what-
ever materials were available at the time, including stone, wood,
clay, bone, leather and even wax. Pioneer children also played with
dolls made from whatever materials were available to them, espe-
cially corn-husk dolls.
Rag dolls were always popular made from the scraps of cloth
material. The Greeks and Romans had rag dolls and often, when
they got married, offered their dolls to the gods.
Traditionally, while little girls played with dolls, little boys
were emulating their fathers.
They would pretend to be the best hunter in the area by shoot-
ing big game with their wooden "guns" that had been whittled for
them by their father or grandfather. Marbles were a favorite pas-
time for little boys, and date back to the Egyptians as well. Little
boys enjoyed whittled wooden sling shots as another way to go
"hunting." Oftentimes they were actually able to kill a small ani-
mal, such as a rabbit, which was always appreciated for supper!
As toys developed over time they became more sophisticated.
Dolls were made of porcelain and fine china with silk dresses, and
were imported from faraway places. Metal cars and trucks as well
as wagons became popular in the early 1900s.
Toys in olden times were much less complicated than today's
toys and required much more imagination. Most of today's toys
involve batteries or electronics and leave very little room for chil-
dren to use their.own creativity and imagination. Everything is laid
out for them, and all they have to do is sit and push buttons and
they are entertained.
I remember showing an antique toy to my American history
classes years ago, and a student asked, "What does it do?" When I
said that it didn't "do" anything, that a child simply used his imag-
ination, the student said, "What's the fun in that?"
Sadly, that student didn't see how to enjoy the simple things in
life.
We have several pioneer dolls and toys in the Cracker Trail
Museum that are just waiting for you to come and see them!
Perhaps you even have some antique toys that you would like to
donate so that today's youth can see how others found fun and
entertainment long ago.
Stop in anytime! We just might have a few fun memories for
you, too!


Stump The Swami
By John Szeligo


Well, football fans, as the season moves deeper into October
my thoughts always go back to one of the great announcers of col-
lege football, Chris Schenkel. Chris passed away in 2005 at the age
of 82. He was in his heyday in the 50s through the 70s. How many
Football Saturdays began with an aerial view of the stadium with
fall colors in the area and Schenkel saying "What better way to
spend an autumn afternoon than watching college football?"' No
Chris, there is no better way.
The Bulls of South Florida have set a new mark for under-
achievement, losing to Temple. The Owls have been the punch line
for football jokes for many years. The Big East kicked them out of
the conference years ago for being an embarrassment. 7-11's in
Philadelphia would have free tickets to Temple games in their
stores! Now, USF has lost to Rutgers and Temple. Wonder if it is
time to look for new leadership? Maybe Skippy should stay a brand
of peanut butter?
West Virginia Quarterback Geno Smith made another state-
ment for the Heisman Trophy against Texas. Playing before
101,000 fans on Prime Time television, he methodically carved up
the Longhorns, passing for 4 touchdowns.
Andrew Buie rushed for 207 yards and had 66 more through
the air for WVU in the win over Texas. Mike Gillislee rushed for
146 yards and both Gator touchdowns in the big win over LSU.
Marcus Lattimore had 109 yards for South Carolina against
Georgia as well: Just to let you know it is not all quarterbacks get-
ting the attention in 2012.
This past weekend made the distinction between Contenders
and Pretenders in college football. Big winners after Saturday:
Florida, South Carolina and West Virginia. Losers: LSU and FSU.
On any given Saturday there can be a slew of upsets but this one
saw the number 3,4 and 5 ranked teams all lose.
Now let's look at this week's Bill O" Fare .
1. Florida at Vanderbilt Gators face a team that has not
lived up to its hopes this season but always seems to play good
defense against Florida. Gator defense is now playing near peak
too though. Florida 27 Vanderbilt 10.
2. West Virginia at Texas Tech Trap game for WVU? Still,
the Mountaineers will carve up Red Raiders enough to go home 6-
0. West Virginia 41 Texas Tech 23.
3. Kentucky at Arkansas Hogs may be turning the season
around. Back to back wins certainly will help. Arkansas 34 Ken-
tucky 20.
4. Kansas St at Iowa St. KSU has made the Top 10 this sea-
son again. Iowa St. is a Top 25 team but will have a hard time stop-
ping the Wildcat offense. Kansas St..43 Iowa St. 23.
5. Tennessee at Mississippi St. Don't overlook these Bull-
dogs from MSU in the SEC race. They are unbeaten and ranked but
not receiving the attention other SEC teams are getting. This game
may get them more. Mississippi St. 37 Tennessee 23.
6. South Carolina at LSU Can the Ole Ball Coach contin-
ue his success from the Georgia game or will he get caught in the
Saturday Night in Baton Rouge Trap? Next week, USC domes to
the Swamp. If the Gamecocks win all 3 in a row look out! LSU 20
South Carolina 17.
7. Texas A&M at Louisiana Tech Number 24 Rank plays
Number 21. Yes, that's correct. LTU is 5-0 ranked 24th. Louisiana


JOIN ME

IN THE WAR ON

BREAST CANCER


CONGRATULATIONS

It is a great pleasure to announce our Employee Of The Month Recipient
for September 2012 Tammy Pearson.


Tammy started her employment with the City of Wauchula on August
02, 2010. She was hired in as our Police Clerk for the Wauchula Police
Department. Tammy comes to the
SCity with experience in law enforce-
ment, which makes her a great asset
Sto the City. Her duties include various
-.i responsibilities such as grants admin-
istration, background checks and
many other duties. Tammy really en-
...i. joys working with the public and mak-
ing sure things run
smoothly on a daily 3._ .
basis. ,


1


JL a


Quit Smoking Now


Tobacco Free
Finnj6a^


^JL /? '


Register Today for FREE!
This is a 5 week program to
become Tobacco-Free &
includes Nicotine Replacement
Therapy (NRT) Patches
at NO COST to you!

Program meets weekly
Tuesday
September 25 October 23
12:00 pm 1:00 pm

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533 West Carlton Street
Wauchula, 33873
S Conference Room
For more information about
attending this class or to
register please contact:
1-877-252-6094
Space is Limited!

FLORIDA HOSPITAL
.-.-. HC~ARxIA. -tn UCENTER 10:11c i


Keep up
Work!


the good


r-


Tech 34 Texas A&M 31.
8. Stanford at Notre Dame Please, Stanford, make it stop.
This continual over ranking of the Irish is worse than having FSU
at number 3. Stanford 38 Notre Dame 24.
9. Boston College at FSU Army beat Boston College last
week. FSU 24 BC 13.
10. Oklahoma at Texas It must be State Fair Time in
Dallas! Two old rivals meet again ranked at 13th and 15th respec-
tively. Each has one loss. It's a must win for both. Texas 35
Oklahoma 33.
11. Auburn at Ole Miss Auburn is hurting at 1-4 coming
off a 24-7 loss to the Hogs. 3-3 Ole Miss is also struggling in 2012.
Auburn 23 Ole Miss 20.
12. North Carolina at Miami A pair of 4-2 teams from the
ACC match up. The Canes have beaten N.C. St. while Heels have
beaten Virginia Tech. Miami 31 UNC 24.
13. Southern Miss at UCF Ineligible Knights continue the
hapless season for the Golden Eagles. USM is winless in 2012.
UCF 45 USM 13.
14. TCU at Baylor Bears high scoring offense average 601
yards per game. TCU should have their QB back for this game.
Baylor 49 TCU 31.
15. Oklahoma St. at Kansas Pokes lead the nation in Total
Offense at 659 yards per game. They still have games with Baylor
and West Virginia coming up. That will be fun to watch. Kansas
Jayhawks are no match. Oklahoma St. 59 Kansas 13.
16. Alabama at Missouri Missouri has not adapted to the
SEC well. 0-3 so far and now Alabama. This could get ugly.
Alabama 37 Missouri 7.
17. Louisville at Pitt The Big East is playing a survival sea-
son until new teams can replace those who have left and those that-
will. In the meantime Louisville, Rutgers and Cincinnati are doing
well. All 3 would probably walk through the ACC. Louisville 38
Pitt 20.
18. Duke at Virginia Tech Duke is 5-1 thanks to a weak
schedule so far. The Chokies are at 3-3 with Beamer ball getting
old in Blacksburg. VPI 34 Duke 17.
19. Kansas City at Tampa With 2 weeks of preparation the
home team comes up big. Time for a rebound. Tampa 30 KC 21.
20. St. Louis at Miami Fish fail again. St. Louis 27 Miami
24.

Henry Dunster was named president of Harvard College
in 1640. He taught all the courses himself.


char
y illi |k"

J "' oB Bggs






4C The Herald-Advocate, October 11, 2012


Owners: Kelly & Earl Pace
773.9684
110 N. 6th Avenue Wauchula
magtree1014@gmail.comn


ICE CREAM


(after game with ticket stub)
_- 1040 S. 6th Ave., Wauchula -



WAUCHULA


WINGS & THINGS!



WILDCTS RULE!


Mark D. Sevigny O.D.
C.N. Timmerman O.D.
Ronald O. Sevigny O.D.
Robyn Russell, O.D.
Board Certified Physicians
773-3322
TT-111- 11711T I'"?L"I~r~~:


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SENIOR SPOTLIGHT

Paul H. Gough III

Jersey #: 33
Position: Full
Back/ Linebacker

Age: 17

Parents: Paul &
K1 Kim Gough
Hobbies/Interests: I
love to hunt and be in the outdoors.
Also like spending time with the fami-
ly. Have an amazing girlfriend that
loes and cares for me, her name is
Cassle Reyna! Co-captain of Varsity
Cheer Squad.

Future Plans: Go get a license in elec-
tncal field, start a family with my girl-
friend down the road and live a long
happy) life. Also thanks to all my sup-
porters in my life.


Aug. 24 Lake Placid
(Kick-Off Classic)
Aug. 31 Fort Meade


Sept. 7


Avon Park


Sept. 14 Sebring
Sept. 21 Bradenton
Bayshore *#
Sept. 28 Mulberry


Oct. 5
Oct. 12
Oct. 19
Oct. 26

Nov. 2
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7:00
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Home 7:00


* District Games # Homecoming **Senior Night


1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
17
19
20
21
25
33
34
42
44
55
57
58
59
70
72
74
75
76
78


NAME


2012 WILDCAT ROSTER


POS
WR/DB
RB/DB
WR/DB
FB/LB
WR/DB
WR/DB
WR/DB
WR/DB
RB/DE
QB/LB
FB/LB
QB/DB
WR/DB
WR/DB
FB/DE
RB/LB
WR/DB
RB/LB
RB/LB
FB/DT
FB/LB
WR/DE
FB/LB
TE/DE
OL/DT
OL/DE
OL/DT
OL/DT ,
OL/DT
OL/DE
OL/DT
OL/DT
OL/DT


Caleb Purser 11
Aaron Barker 12
Armando Alamia 11
Jesus Flores 11
Sahmaud Blandin 10
Marco DeLeon 9
Miguel Garcia 12
Derrick Graham 10
Keyon Brown 11
Jake Bolin 11
Keyonte Holley 10
Kris Johnson 11
Tristen Lanier 11
Tyler Dunlap 11
James Greene 11
JJ Almaraz 11
Octavio Alvarez 12
Stephan Jones 10
Timmy Steedley 11
Alonzo Casso 12
Paul Gough 12
Lucious Everett 11
Waylan Pleger 11
Nelson Bethea 11
Adson DelHomme 11
Luke Winter 11
Devin Pearson 10
Jose Gonzales 10
Luke Palmer ., 11
Ramiro Ramirez 12
Rufino Gabriel 12
William McClelland 9
Jesus Zuniga 12
Blaiaine Molitor 10


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Wauchula State Bank


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:, f on your $10 purchase. -"
SPresent this coupon at time of purchase
I Expires 11/17/12
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FOR ALL HOME GAM






October 11, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 5C


'1

r rj


: FROSTPROOF ROSTER


4Q. Name
I Kaleel Gaines
3 Cherry Cecil
4 Xavier Gaines
$ Jamarius Larkin
SQGaines Kijana
, Brandon Corso
8 Major Plain
S Reggie Allen
II Marcus Bobb
It D. Hobbs-Larkin
3 Lhmar Bobb
4 S Avellanada
5 Deonte Perry
7 F: Avellanada
t T. Herrington
2 Dpniel Knighten
., KI Hinson
Trevor McCall
O0 Richard Cobb
. H. Johnson
1 Daniel Mickens
Z D. Boatwright
4 Danny Mercer
5 S. Hamilton
6 Kerry Wood
4y Jared Warren
3. Antonio Tirado
SJuan Castillo
S Mike McFarlane
6 Nick Bayles
5 Jimmy Lindor
7 Nick Oriende


Pos. Gr.
RB,S So
RB,ILB So
QB, ILB Fr.
WR, S Jr.
WR,OLB So
FB, OLB Sr.
WR, CB So
WR, S Sr.
WR, QB Jr.
WR, CB Jr.
K So.
K Sr.
FB, ILB So.
K Jr.
RB, CB Jr.
WR, OLB Sr.
RB, ILB So.
WR, OLB Sr.
TE, OLB Jr.
OT, DT Jr.
OG. DT Jr.
OG, NG Fr.
OG, DT Jr.
OG, DT So.
OG, DT Jr.
C, NG Sr.
OG, DT Jr.
OG,NG Sr.
OT, DT Jr.
OT, DT So.
OT, NG Sr.
OT, DT Jr.


Ht.
6-1
6-2
6-3
5-10
6-1
5-10
6-0
6-2
5-8
5-10
5-10
6-1
5-8
6-0
5-10
6-1
6-0
6-2
6-4
6-3
6-1
6-0
6-0
6-1
6-1
6-3
5-10
6-0
6-4
6-3
6-0
6-4


Wt.
168
224
210
162
172
165
173
170
161
155
132
161
153
176
167
171
181
195
221
225
230
221
190
220
215
273
205
295
276
244
286
253


Just name the score of Friday night's \\ildcal Football game and
Nou could win
District Games-
2 Buc Tickets
All Other Games $40 Gift Certificate Payable to
one of our selected "Wildcat" page sponsors

* Cornest is closed to all Herald-Adlocale employees and families
* In ihe e\enr of a lie. the inner Iill be picked by a random drawing
* If n,. one pick-:. he e'.c :,.re ihe closesIe core %in,
* Official entnes rnli

Winners it ill be picked Miondav morning. nontlied by phone thai
afternoon and announced in nevt it ee paper.


Head Coach:
Buddy Martin
Offensive Coordinator: Dale Carlton
Defensive Coordinator: Steve Rewis
Assistant Coaches: Ray Rivas,
Rashad Faison,
Shawn Rivers, Travis Tubbs


.,.,.. 4t + ,;:. .


Oct. 12 Hardee
Frostproof
Name:
Address:


Day Phone:
DEADLINE FOR ENTRY: FRIDAY AT 5 PM.
Fill out entry form and return it to: The Herald-Advocale
115 S. Seventh Ave., Wauchula


LTORS -,


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A


ES 7:00 .
ES 7:00 P.M.


Srook SuzaNPH ColT
Prooke Suzanne Conley


Age: 16


Parents: Greg &
Dana Conley

Hobbies/Interests:
Cheerleading, danc-
ing, fishing, hunt-
ing and shopping.


Future Plans: Attend the University of
Florida's college of agricultural and life
sciences and earn a Ph.D. in Biology.


U.


INSRAC SRIC


:----i~------~~;' -- ;;~-


~,


~rrrr






6C The Herald-Advocate, October 11, 2012


ICTeHrl-doatOtbr1,21


In 2007, the state of Florida
ranked 3rd in the nation for
the highest dropout rate with
twenty percent of students
between the ages of 16 and 24
being high school dropouts. The
decision to dropout doesn't just
happen in one day. It is usually
a decision that happens over
time starting with occasional,
unexcused casual absences.
Eventually, this attendance
issue turns into chronic truancy.
which is defined as 21 or more
unexcused absences in one
school year. Florida reported
that 14.8 percent of high school
students meet this criterion.
The good news is that in the
last 5 years, Florida's graduation
rate has been on the rise, in
fact, reaching its highest levels
ever. The two most recent years
of data for HHS shows thlt
we are in line with that trend
having increased our graduation
rate from 68% to 74%.
The rise in Florida's graduation
rate is attributed to the focus
that schools have placed on
student attendance. Students are
rewarded for good attendance
at all levels. For example, at


Attendance Matters
by Anr' !udah, HHS Dean of Students / Athletic Director


Hardee Senior High School.
students with three or less
absences, a clean discipline
report, and an A in the course
may exempt up to 3 exams as a
senior and 2 for underclassman.
Good attendance is important
in order for students to take full
advantage of the curriculum
taught in the courses they are
taking. Missing just one day can
result in missing a large portion
of the curriculum being taught.
Catching up on that curriculum
can be difficult when a student
wasn't present for the delivery
of the material by an educator.
Good attendance isn't just
important in elementary, middle
and high school. Encouraging
good attendance at these levels,
make students aware of the
importance of being present for
their ftiure education in college
and/or their future career.
As a new school year begins,
Hardee Senior High School
will continue to encourage
good attendance habits and
promote the importance of
good attendance throughout
high school and the rest of life.


I


These seven seniors recognize the importance of coming to school every day. Each of them was
recognized this month for their outstanding attendance-having missed zero (0) days since entering
high school as a freshman! Pictured (L to R) are Front Row: Lesse Moreno, Steven Radandt, Yese-
nia Torres-Aguirre, Cody Dayfert, Michael Ramirez, and Alejandro Bautista; Back Row: Martin Luna


-0046,
GeP


G0


*HSIN UIEUULJS


h "B sffV., 1" Students taking Diane Autry's Nursing Assistant course engage in
hands on learning experiences that will best prepare them for ca-
On September 18, HHS held its annual College Day with 46 colleges/ca- reers in the medical field. Nursing assistant student Kayla Nichols is
reer agencies represented. All juniors and seniors attended the event dur- pictured here taking classmate Marcos Santana's blood pressure.
ing their 4th period class. Pictured above, Tyshon Hillard talks with a mili-
tary recruiting officer to learn more about opportunities the Navy provides.


ljSc~Cl'


I


fit


In September, a group of scientists and engineers from MOSAIC vis-
ited with HHS students to share information about their careers and to
offer suggestions on science fair projects. Pictured above, MOSAIC
chemist Priscilla Williams talks to science student Alejandro (Alex) Ro-
driguez during her visit with Mr. Beatty's Honors Physical Science class.


sp oo vii CF
e* ^ ^m *


C _o__


10/1
10/1
" 10/




10/2


'" -r --7 --"-- =.. .

Calendar of Upcoming

Events

1 JV Football @ Avon Park
2 Varsity Football @ Frostproof
.2 Teacher in-Service Day (No school for students)
15 Picture Retake Day for Students
Students must sign up with Mrs. Dewey in Room 045 in


order to have retakes taken
PSAT Test


Test starts at 8 am in the HHS Cafeteria
10/23 Yearbook Business Ad Deadline


r I

10/1




.hi


23
30


Contact Mrs. Dewey @ (863) 773-3181 ext. 285
End of the 1 st Nine Weeks-
Senior Cap & Gown Meeting / Panoramic Picture
During Ist Period j


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October 11, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 7C


Rodeo Bits
By Kathy Ann Gregg


REALITY RANCH YOUTH RODEO BANQUET PART I
Wow, as the saying goes, "Time flies when you're having
fun!" I can't believe that we just started the 2012-13 season of
Reality Ranch Youth Rodeo, and I'm just getting to last season's
banquet.
The Hardee County youth really come out for Reality Ranch
Youth Rodeo. The Tots Division grew tremendously, especially
with allowing the 2- through 6-year-olds to elect to be "Tiny Tots."
These youngsters are just beginning their rodeo careers, and some
need the assistance of mom or dad (for some reason, it seems to
always be mom or grandma!) to run them through the barrels or


pole-bending patterns on a lead line. And in the goat-tying event,
* they are allowed to goat "undecorate" pulling a ribbon off of the
goat.


The Tiny Tots were Abby Mitchell, Ava Grace Roberts, Ben
Rewis, J.D. Scott, Kayleigh Harris (recovering from a broken arm),
Zack Carlton, Seela Rae Albritton and mutton busters J.R. Redding
and Ashton Bass (with those silver-fringed chaps of his).
Two-year-old J.D. Scott, whose dad is James Scott, a/k/a one
of the FINR cowboys, is our youngest member, and sometimes
resembled a bobble-head figure while mom Paula ran him through
the patterns. At the banquet, each of them was awarded their very
own belt buckle (in a size suitable for their smaller waistlines).
The Tots were Cody Vina, Cameron Cantu, Clayton Harris,
Matt Webb, and honorary Hardee Countian Cayden Newsome for
the cowboys, and Joe Harned, JoLynn Carver and Ryleigh Adams
for the cowgirls.
Tots' dads Peck Harris and Trae Adams gave their time all sea-
son long to act as judges every month (in addition to their busy
ranch rodeo schedules).
Cody Vina took home the winner's belt buckle for the calf-rid-
ing event. Ryleigh Adams was the next buckle winner, for her bar-
rel-racing skills (and she does fly through that pattern). Joe Harned
came in third place and Cayden Newsome in fourth place in this
event. Pole-bending saw Cayden with the buckle, and Ryleigh in
third place.
The goat-tying belt buckle went to Cameron Cantu, followed
by Ryleigh in second place, Joe Harned in third, and Cayden in
fourth. The final Tots event, breakaway roping, saw the 3C's of
youth rodeo: Cayden in the second-place slot, Cameron in third,
and Cody in fourth (but those three boys got beat out by a girl in
this event).
In the All-Around awards, Ryleigh received the Reserve All-
Around Tots Cowgirl breastcollar, and Cameron took it for the All-
Around Tots Cowboy. Cayden proudly garnered the Tots All-
Around Cowboy specially engraved saddle.
Congrats to each and every one of y'all, and good luck in the


Cameron Cantu and Taylor Bolin show his belt buckle for
placing first in the Tots goat-tying event.


COURTESY PHOTOS BY KATHY ANN GREGG
Cody Vina receives his winning belt buckle for calf riding
from Taylor Bolin, then-Hardee County Cattleman's
Sweetheart.


A fond farewell to Abby Mitchell, here shown in her usual
fashionable cowgirl attire!


Honorary Hardee Cpuntian Cayden Newsome with his
saddle, and a huge grin, for winning the Tots Cowboys
All-Around Award.
;' I-------I-------I---


Large Washers & Drvers

Up To 125 Ibs. Washers


SPECIAL/ESPECIAL

MONDAY-FRIDAY

6AM-6PM 50% OFF

NORMAL/NORMALENTE SPECIAL/ESPECIAL


$250 DOUBLE/DOBLE
'400 MAX/MAXI
$600 LARGEfGRANDE
s700 SUPER/GRANDE


$125

$200
$300
$350


new season!
And now a fond farewell to one of our Tiny Tots:
Abby Mitchell (who always gave me the cutest grin whenever
I called her my favorite little redhead) has left Florida for her new
home in Martin, S.C., with dad T.J. and mom Megan. I hear tell that
she loves her new school, and is excited to be riding her dad's
horse!
I will not say goodbye, Abby, but rather "until we meet again."
Keep these "Bits," boots and bridles riding. Let Kathy Ann Gregg
in on your events and achievements, and she'll keep you covered.
Reach her at ksleepyk@aol.com or 773-9459. Keep on riding,
"/ .. I,; ..... ... ,4 /" .. ; 7^


Taylor Bolin helps Ryleigh Adams show off her breast-
collar for winning the Reserve All-Around Tots Cowgirls
Award. Ryleigh also won the belt buckle for Tots barrel
racing.


10 HOURS A MONTH!

That's all it takes to speak up for a child. Volunteer to be a
Guardian Ad Litem.

773-2505
(If office unattended, please leave message.)



Stop by and see why I have
won Ford's customer service 7
award several times.



1031 U.S. Highway 17 N.
Wauchula, Florida 33873
(863) 781-1947 Gene Davis
www.RLfN]JiY.COM S3le: Mar. g e



PUBLIC NOTICE
The BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
will hold a FIRST
PUBLIC HEARING on
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 01, 2012
8:35 A.M.
or as soon thereafter
in the County Commissioners' Board Room
Room 102, 1st floor Courthouse Annex
412 West Orange St., Wauchula, FL
to hear the request, and to receive public input for
Agenda No. 12-20
Hardee County Board of County Commissioners by
and through the Authorized Representative requests approval of
an Ordinance by the Hardee County Board of County
Commissioners Repealing the Hardee County Land
Development Code Section 5.01.00;
to Adopt A New Section 5.01;
to Adopt Flood Hazard Maps,
to designate a Floodplain Administrator,
to Adopt Procedures and Criteria for Development in
Flood Hazard Areas, and for Other Purposes;
to Adopt Local Administrative Amendments to the
Florida Building Code;
Providing for Applicability; Repealer; Severability;
and for an Effective Date
as ORDINANCE NO. 2013-03
At that same Public Hearing to hear the request, and to receive
public input for
Agenda No. 12-21
Hardee County Board of County Commissioners by
and through the Authorized Representative requests an
Amendment to Article 09 of the Hardee County
Unified Land Development Code (ULDC), as
Amended Updating DEFINITIONS;
Adding new Definitions as necessary;
Providing for Repeal of Conflicting Ordinances,
Providing for Severability and for an Effective Date
as ORDINANCE NO. 2013-04
Minor Bryant, Chairman
This is a Disabled-Accessible facility. Any disabled person
needing to make special arrangements should contact the County
Manager's Office at least two (2) working days prior to the BoCC
Public Hearing.
This Public Notice is published in accordance with the Hardee
County Unified Land Development Code.
Prior to the BoCC Public Hearing, documents relating to the
request are available for public inspection during weekdays
between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. at the Planning and
Development Department, 110 S. 9"' Ave., Wauchula, Florida. If
you wish to discuss the request, prior to the public hearing,
please call 863 767 1964 to schedule an appointment with Hardee
County Planning and Development Director.
All interested persons shall have the right to be heard. In
Rendering any decision the Board of County Commissioners
shall rely solely on testimony that is relevant and material.
Although minutes of the Public Hearing will be recorded, anyone
wishing to appeal any decision made at the public hearing will
need to ensure a verbatim record of the proceedings is made by a
court reporter. 10:18c


Public Notice of Joint Special Meeting
Hardee County
Industrial Development Authority,
Economic Development Council, Inc.,
And
Chamber of Commerce

The Hardee County Industrial Development Authority,
Economic Development Council, Inc., and Chamber of
Commerce will hold a joint special meeting on Friday,
October 5, 2012 at 10:00 a.m. to hear and act on a
presentation by the University Of South Florida Insti-
tute Of Government in regards to tourism develop-
ment.

The meeting will be held at the Hardee County Com-
mission Chambers located at 412 West Orange Street
Wauchula, Florida 33873. If you would like further in-
formation please contact the office at (863)773-3030.

This is a Disabled-Accessible facility. Any disabled
person needing to make special arrangements should
contact the Economic Development Office (773 3030)
at least forty-eight (48) prior to the meeting.

RICK JUSTICE, CHAIRMAN
INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
9:20,27c


SHwy 17 Southe Across from Nicholas Restaurant






8C The Herald-Advocate, October 11, 2012



CouthuseReor


COUNTY COURT
The following marriage
licenses were issued recently
in the office of the county
court:
Joseph W. Waite, 53, Zolfo
Springs, and Janet Denise
Waite, 40, Zolfo Springs.
Michael Kyle Braxton,, 26,
Bowling Green, and Sandra
Dee Redding, 27, Bowling
Green.
Carlos Soza III, 38, Wau-
chula, and Victoria Elizabeth
Hernandez, 25, Wauchula.

The following small claims
cases were disposed of recent-
ly by the county judge:
Country Manor Apartments
vs. Francklyn Romelus, Mar-
dine Michel et al, stipulated
agreement approved.
State Farm Mutual Auto-
mobile Insurance co. a/s/o
Arnold Davis vs. Gilberto Avila
Cisneros and Salvador Avila,
judgment.
Wauchula State Bank vs.
Christopher Blake Tew and
Jamie A. Tew, judgment.
Wauchula State Bank vs.
Maria G. Baez, stipulated judg-
ment.
Velocity Investments LLC
vs. Gregory Redding, dismissal.
W.S. Badcock Corp vs.
Earnest Grahami judgment.
Discover Bank vs. Melissa
M. Moore, voluntary dismissal.

There was no misdemeanor
court because the courts were
closed for the Yom Kippur
holiday.

CIRCUIT COURT
The following civil actions
were filed recently in the
office of the circuit court:
James Edward Carlton Jr. vs.
Erica Lee, petition for injunc-
tion for protection.
Clarence C. Taylor and
Angela C. Taylor, divorce.
Kellli Fay and Joel D. Fay,
divorce.
Citibank NA vs. Sandra L.
Hernandez, petition for mort-
gage foreclosure.
Candace Preston and Peter J.
Preston, divorce.
Azucena Castillo and the
state Department of Revenue
(DOR) vs. Gabriel Romero,
petition for child support.
Angela Diane Delaney vs.
Daniel Knarr, petition for
injunction for protection.
Gwendolyn Shaw and Roy
Shaw, divorce.-
Wells Fargo Bank NA vs.
Juan K. McWhorter, Sandra P.
McWhorter e; al, petition for
mortgage foreclosure.
Christine Owens vs. Rodney
Smith, petition for injunction
for protection.
Paul Douglas Mackenzie vs.
Troy Carter, petition for injunc-
tion for protection.

The following decisions on
civil cases pending in the cir-
cuit court were handed down
recently by the circuit court
judge:
Aurbra Patino vs. State Farm
Mutual Automobile Insurance


Co., voluntary dismissal.
Charles Bargman vs. Ken-
neth Tucker, secretary, state
Department of Corrections
(DOC), appeal of inmate peti-
tion denied.
Sandra Darty vs. Victor B.
Smith, dismissal of injunction
for protection.
Mike Alday vs. Derek Alday,
dismissal of injunction for pro-
tection.
State Farm Fire & Casualty
Co. a/s/o Sandra Rojas vs.
Gilberto Avila Cisneros and
Salvador Avila, judgment.
Wells Fargo Bank vs. Tomas
Toledo, order.
Wauchula State Bank vs.
Krista Powell, judgment of
mortgage foreclosure.
Grimsley Groves Inc. vs.
Alan Andrews as personal rep-
resentative, order of foreclo-
sure.
Wauchula State Bank vs.
Jacqueline Faulk, judgment of
mortgage foreclosure.
Susan Michelle Thompson
and Tricia Sue Thompson vs.
Matthew Kirk Thompson et al,
judgment.
Stephanie Nicole Adams and
Travis Edward Adams, amend-
ed divorce order.
Kevin Richardson and DOR
vs. Stacey Richardson, volun-
tary dismissal.
Lamar Lopez vs. Kenneth
Tucker, DOC, inmate appeal
denied.

The following felony crimi-
nal cases were disposed of
recently by the circuit judge.
Defendants have been adjudi-
cated guilty unless noted oth-
erwise. When adjudication is
withheld, it is pending suc-
cessful completion of proba-
tion. Sentences are pursuant
to an investigative report by
and the recommendation of
the state probation office and
also state sentencing guide-
lines. Final discretion is left to
the judge.
Arlie Duane Dubberly, pos-
session of oxycodone with
intent to sell, possession of
methadone with intent to sell,
possession of a firearm by a
convicted felon, possession of
alprazolam within intent to sell,
discharged due to prosecutor
being outside requirements of
the speedy trial rule.
Christina Aurea Harrelson,
motion for early termination of
probation (original charges four
counts aggravated assault with
a deadly weapon), probation
terminated.
Herman Thompson, posses-
sion of methamphetamine, pos-
session of drug paraphernalia
and resisting arrest without vio-
lence, two years Florida State
Prison with credit for time
served, $520 fine and court
cost, $350 public defender fees
and $100 cost' of'prosecution
placed on lien.
Leslie Hebner, possession of
a firearm/ammo by a convicted
felon, attempted manufacture of
methamphetamine, possession
of methamphetamine and pos-


-et O' T WeekV


Tiny is a young male Chihuahua.
He is white with black ears. He has a short
coat and long tail.
Adoption fees are $45 and include a rabies vaccination and spaying or
neutering of the animal. Contact 773-2320 if you are interested in adopt-
ing any cats or dogs that desperately need a loving home. The kennel
location is 685 Airport Road, Wauchula, at the county landfill.




Da .- .

DURASAN


session of drug paraphernalia,
two years community control-
house arrest, $520 fine and
court costs, $300 public defend-
er fees, $100 cost of prosecu-
tion, $150 investigative costs,
$24 First Step probation fees.
Noe Macedo, violation of
probation (original charge petit
theft), probation modified to
include one month 15 days in
jail with credit for time served,
$200 public defender fees and
$100 cost of prosecution added
to outstanding fines and fees.
Fernando Vazquez, murder
in the second degree, 15 years
Florida State Prison, $520 fine
and court costs, $300 public
defender fees, $500 cost of
prosecution and $800 investiga-
tive costs placed on lien.

The following real estate
transactions of $10,000 or
more were filed recently in
the office of the clerk of court:
Federal National Mortgage
Association to Bison Prop-
erties, $23,000.
Torrey Oaks RV and Golf
Resort LLC to Marinus
Kikkert, $40,000.


A Daily Thought
THURSDAY
Let all the joys of the godly
well up in praise to the Lord,
for it is right to praise Him. ...
For all God's words are right,
and everything He does is
worthy of our trust. He loves
whatever is just and good:
the earth is filled with His
tender love.
Psalm 33:1,4-5 (TLB)

FRIDAY
He said, "Men, what must I
do to be saved?" And they
said, "Believe on the Lord
Jesus Christ, and thou shalt
be saved, and thy house."
Acts 16:30b-31 (RSV)

SATURDAY
Still, if you set your heart on
God and reach out to Him, if
you scrub your hands of sin
and refuse to entertain evil in
your home, you'll be able to
face the world unashamed
and keep a firm grip on life,
guiltless and fearless.
Job 11:13-15 (ME)

SUNDAY
May the Lord Jesus make
your love mount and over-
flow toward one another and
toward all. ... may He make
your hearts firm so that you
may stand before our God
and Father holy and faultless
when our Lord Jesus comes
(back) with all those who are
His own.
I Thessalonians 4:12a, 13 (NEB)

MONDAY
(The Lord says), "And I will
give them a new singleness
of heart and put a new Spirit
within them. I will take away
their hearts of stone and give
them tender hearts instead,
so that they will (want) to
obey My laws and regula-
tions."
Ezekiel 11:19-20 (NLT)

TUESDAY
May God strengthen you, by
His glorious might, with
ample power (ability) to
meet whatever comes with
fortitude, patience and joy.
Colossians 1:11 '(NEB)

WEDNESDAY
Mordecai sent Word to
Queen Esther, "Do not think
because you are in the
king's house, you alone will
escape. ... Who knows but
that you have come to this
royal position for such a time
as this?"
Esther 4:13a,14b (NIV)

All verses are excerpted from
The Holy Bible: (KJV) King
James Version; (ME) The
Message; (NCV) New Cen-
tury Version; (NEB) New
English Bible; (NIV) New
International Version; (NLT)
New Living Translation (RSV)
Revised Standard Version;
(PME) Phillips Modern Eng-
lish; and (TLB) The Living
Bible.


PUBLIC NOTICE

STATE OF FLORIDA

DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL
PROTECTION

NOTICE OF PERMIT REVISION

The Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP) gives notice of its intent to
issue a permit modification (Permit No. FL0040177; PA File No. FL0040177-023-IW1S/RA;
copy attached) for CF Industries, Inc.'s Hardee Complex II, South Pasture Mine (mailing
address: CF Industries, Inc., Post Office Box 1549, Wauchula, FL 33873-1549), which dis-
charges excess mine recirculation water and stormwater into Shirttail Branch (D-004) and
into Doe Branch (D-005). Both outfalls flow into Payne Creek and then into Peace River
(Class III Fresh Waters).

On April 19, 2012, CF Industries, Inc., submitted a request for revision to their permit
(FL0040177) to construct and operate a 468-acre clay settling area (CSA) designated EC-
2. This revision authorizes the design and construction of the perimeter dams, the con-
struction of a return hydraulic ditch along the west wall of along the west end of the north
wall of EC-2, and two spillways near the east end of the north ;JI. The scope of this project
will not affect the surface water discharge as currently permitted. Thus, effluent limitations
and monitoring of the surface water discharge from the existing Outfalls D-004 and D-005
are unchanged from the previous FDEP and National Pollutant Discharge Elimination Sys-
tem (NPDES) Permit FL0040177.

The facility is located at 2220 Mine View Road, Bowling Green in Hardee County, Florida
and geographically at:


Latitude: 270 35' 09.5" N


Longitude: 819 56' 27.5" W


The application is available for public inspection during normal business hours, 8:00 a.m.
to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, except legal holidays, at Department of Environmen-
tal Protection, Bureau of Mining and Minerals Regulation, Phosphate Management Pro-
gram, 13051 North Telecom Parkway, Temple Terrace, Florida 33637-0926. Phone (813)
632-7600, extension 138 for an appointment.

The Department will issue the permit modification with the attached conditions unless a
timely petition for an administrative hearing is filed under Sections 120.569 and 120.57
Florida Statutes (F.S.) within
fourteen days of receipt of notice. The procedures for petitioning for a hearing are set for
below.

A person whose substantial interests are affected by the Department's proposed permitting
decision may petition for an administrative proceeding (hearing) in accordance with Section
120.57, F.S. The petition must contain the information set forth below and must be filed
(received by the Clerk) in the Office of General Counsel of the Department at 3900 Com-
monwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000.

Under Rule 62-110.106(4), Florida Administrative Code, a person may request an extension
of time for filing a petition for filing a petition for an administrative hearing! The request
must be filed (received by the Clerk) in the Office of General Counsel before the end of the
time period for filing a petition for an administrative hearing.

Petitions filed by any persons other than those entitled to written notice under Section
120.60(3), F.S, must be filed within fourteen days of publication of the notice or within four-
teen days of receipt of the written notice, whichever occurs first. Section 120.60(3), F.S.,
however, also allows that any person who has asked the Department for notice of agency
action may file a petition within fourteen days of receipt of such notice, regardless of the
date of publication.

A petitioner must mail a copy of the petition to the applicant at the address indicated above
at the time of filing. The failure of any person to file a petition or request for an extension
of time within fourteen days of receipt of such notice, regardless of the date of publication.

A petitioner must mail a copy of the petition to the applicant at the address indicated above
at the time of filing. The failure of any person to file a petition or a request for an extension
of time within fourteen days of receipt of notice shall constitute a waiver of that person's
right to request an administrative determination (hearing) under Sections 120.569 and
120.57, F.S. Any subsequent intervention (in a proceeding initiated by another party) will
be only at the discretion of the presiding officer upon the filing of a motion in compliance
with Rule 28-106.205 of the Florida Administrative Code (F.A.C.).

A petition that disputes the material facts on which the Department's action is based must
contain the following information, as indicated in Rule 28-106.201, F.A.C.:

(a) The name, address and telephone number of each petitioner; the Department
permit identification number and the county in which the subject matter or activity is
located;

(b) A statement of how and when each petitioner received notice of the Department
action;

(c) A statement of how each petitioner's substantial interests are affected by the
Department action;

(d) A statement of the material facts disputed by the petitioner, if any;

(e) A statement of facts that the petitioner contends warrant reversal or modification of the
Department action;

(f) A statement of which rules or statutes the petitioner contends require reversal or
modification of the Department action; and

(g) A statement of the relief sought by the petitioner, stating precisely the action that the
petitioner wants the Department to take.

Because the administrative hearing process is designed to formulate final agency action,
the filing of a petition means that the Department's final action may be different from the
position taken by it in this notice. Persons whose substantial interests will be affected by
any such final decision of the Department have the right to petition to become a party to
the proceeding, in accordance with the requirements set forth above.

In addition to requesting an administrative hearing, any petitioner may elect to pursue me-
diation. The election may be accomplished by filing with the Department a mediation
agreement with all parties to the proceeding (i.e., the applicant, the Department, and any
person who has filed a timely and sufficient petition for a hearing). The agreement must
contain all the information required by Rule 28-106.404, F.A.C. The agreement must be
received by the clerk in the Office of General Counsel of the Department at 3900 Common-
wealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000, within ten days after
the deadline for filing a petition, as set forth above. Choosing mediation will not adversely
affect the right to a hearing if mediation does not result in a settlement.

As provided in Section 120.573, F.S., the timely agreement of all parties to mediate will toll
the time limitations imposed by Sections 120.569 and 120.57, F.S., for holding an admin-
istrative hearing and issuing a final order, Unless otherwise agreed by the parties, the me-
diation must be concluded within sixty days of the execution of the agreement. If mediation
results in settlement of the administrative dispute, the Department must enter a final order
incorporating the agreement of the parties. Persons seeking to protect their substantial
interests that would be affected by such a modified final decision must file their petitions
within fourteen days of receipt of this notice, or they shall be deemed to have waived their
right to a proceeding under Sections 120.569 and 120.57, F.S. If mediation terminates
without settlement of the dispute, the Department shall notify all parties in writing that the
administrative hearing processes under Sections 120.569 and 120.57, F.S., remain avail-
able for disposition of the dispute, and the notice will specify the deadlines that then will
apply for challenging the agency action and electing remedies under those two statutes.

This action is final and effective on the date filed with the Clerk of the Department unless a
petition (or request for mediation) is filed in accordance with the above. Upon the timely
filing of a petition (or request for mediation) this order will not be effective until further order
of the Department.

Any party to the order has the right to seek judicial review of the order under Section 120.68
of the Florida Statutes, by the filing of a notice of appeal under Rule 9.110 of the Florida
Rules of Appellate Procedure with the Clerk of the Department in the Office of General
Counsel, 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-
3000; and by filing a copy of the notice of appeal accompanied by the applicable filing
fees with the appropriate district court of appeal. The notice of appeal must be filed within
30 days from the date when the final order is filed with the Clerk of the Department.
10:11c


V ot f or I a a I
an m rv m n UsIupeitneto co