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 Material Information
Title: The Herald-advocate
Portion of title: Herald advocate
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Wm. J. Kelly
Place of Publication: Wauchula Fla
Publication Date: 08/23/2012
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Wauchula (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hardee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Hardee -- Wauchula
Coordinates: 27.546111 x -81.814444
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Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: 55th year, no. 31 (Sept. 2, 1955)-
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 Related Items
Preceded by: Hardee County herald
Preceded by: Florida advocate (Wauchula, Fla.)

Full Text
















The


Herald-Advocate


Hardee County's Hometown Coverage


112th Year, No. 38
3 Sections, 28 Pages


Thursday, August 23, 2012


700
Plus 5e Sales Tax


School Enrollment Down By 13


By MARIA TRUJILLO
For The Herald-Advocate
Monday was a busy morning
for much of Hardee County.
It marked the first day of the
new school year, for kinder-
garteners to seniors in high
school.



Drug

Charges

Cloud

Coaches
By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
Two men affiliated with a
startup children's sports league
ran into trouble with the law
this past week.
Christopher Michael Rich,
24, of 515 Baker St., Wauchula,
and John Jaimie Perez, 22, of
1531 Appaloosa Lane, Wau-
chula, each were accused in
separate incidents of drug viola-
tions. Both were booked into
the Hardee County Jail, and
later released on bond to await
trial.
Rich faces 11 felony counts
while Perez faces four charges,
three misdemeanors two in-
volving drugs and one traffic
See DRUG 2A


SAlthough it may have been
difficult for some to try and get
back into a routine, things were
running pretty well at schools
throughout the county.
Superintendent of Schools
David Durastanti had a chance
to visit every school and said
things were running smoother


than in previous years. "Offices
were cleared out earlier tihan
most years," he said.
Even though students in each
school were going through tran-
sitions, all the principals agreed
that things turned out very
smoothly.
Wauchula Elementary As-


sistant Principal Jessica Gray
said they started off on a posi-
tive and successful note.
At North Wauchula Elemen-
tary, Principal Tracey Nix
reported the first day as being
tremendous and the best in her
time there. "The teachers were
motivated and ready to meet


PHOTO BY MARIA TRUJILLO
Kindergartener Gabriel Arana was a little upset after realizing his mom, Diana Arana,
would be leaving his side as he takes his scholastic journey at North Wauchula Elemen-
tary. It took some reassuring from mom and help from teacher Debbie Starratt, but
Gabriel began his first day.


their students, and the kids
came in excited and settled
quickly into their new routine,"
she added.
"Teachers and students ar-
rived with mostly smiles and
warm greetings for each other,"
said Zolfo Springs Elementary
Principal Melanie Henderson,
this despite having to begin
their days a little earlier than
normal. She also added that
only a few tears were shed from
the "kindergarten babies" at
their "Boo-Hoo Breakfast."
At Bowling Green Elemen-


tary, Principal Kathy Clark also
reported a few tears, from both
students and their parents. She
is also glad to see the "great big
smiles" on the students faces
once again.
Doug Herron, principal at
both Hilltop Elementary and
Hardee Junior High School,
said the first day went very.
well. He said getting both the
kindergarteners and their par-
ents adjusted can be a chal-
lenge, but this year it was not an
issue.
See SCHOOL 7A


FINR Embroiled



With State, CF

By JOAN SEAMAN aid its mining position. CF
Of The Herald-Advocate executive Nick Katsaras em-
Currently under intense phatically denies it.
scrutiny by three state health Ron Sachs Communications,
care agencies, FINR has raised which represents CF and 39
eyebrows abroad and locally, other clients, confirms that the
Initiated by a negative report investigation was initiated by
from the well-known Bloom- another of his clients, the Con-
berg News printed in the Tampa summer Federation of the South-
Ba\ Times. the thiec agencies east in response to the Bloom-
spent three days in early August berg report.
investigating every case file and More information on the CF-
client at the Florida Institute for FINR mining issue will be in
Neurologic Rehabilitation in next week's issue.
rural Hardee County.
The investigation continues. WHAT IS FINR?
awaiting the results of a petition FINR is an intensive treat-
by the state Department of ment facility in an idyllic set-
Children and Families (DCF) ting at 1962 Vandolah Road in
for more information from the western Hardee County. There
facility. That hearing was are also smaller residential tran-
scheduled for late Wednesday sition facilities closer to and in
afternoon, after press time. Wauchula for residents prepar-
Complicating the matter is a ing to return to life in the com-
joint hearing before the Hardee munity. It employs about 600
County Commission and the people, more than 450 from in
Planning & Zoning Board on a and around Hardee County.
Development of Regional Im-
pact for CF Industries at 3 p.m. WHO COMES THERE?
on Aug. 30. At issue is whether FINR admits only patients
CF can mine within the 1,300- who have some brain injury and
foot setback from FINR's have related behavioral prob-
northern boundary. lems needing retraining.
FINR owner/operator Joseph Patients come from all over the
Brennick believes the three-fold nation and some other coun-
investigation by DCF, the state tries.
Department of Health and the Many arrive by ambulance:
Agency for Health Care Admin- in a coma with tubation for
istration was caused by CF to See FINR 2A


rerez


WEATHER
DAIE HIGH LQOW AIN
08/15 93 72 0.00
08/16 90 73 0.03
08/17 91 75 0.14
08/18 86 75 0.01
08/19 92 75 0.00
08/20 93 73 0.14
08/21 93 71 1.46
TITLL Rainfall to 08/21/12 25.41
Same period last year 33.52
Ten Year Average 52.81
Source: Univ. of a. Ona Research Center

INDEX
Classifieds.....................6B
Community Calendar....4A
Courthouse Report.....1lOB
Crime Blotter.................8C
Hardee Living................2B
Information Roundup... 4A
Obituaries......................4A



II 11111III I
8 33913 00075 7


No Filers

Yet For

BG Seats

By MARIA TRUJILLO
For The Herald-Advocate
Bowling Green is still look-
ing for candidates to fill three of
its open City Commission seats.
As of late Tuesday afternoon,
there has yet to be anyone sign-
ing up for any of the positions.
Inquiries have been made, but
no packets have been picked up.
Positions that are open are
for those currently held by
Richard Barone and Woody
Caligan, whose terms are expir-
ing. The third seat was held by
Perry Knight, whose slot
opened up when he resigned to
run for County Commission
District 1.
Filing for candidacy is a sim-
ple process. The last day is
tomorrow (Friday) at 4 p.m.
Packets are available at City
Hall, 104 E. Main St.
Qualifying is $10 and there is
an $18 city election assessment,
which comes to a total of $28.
The election will be Sept. 25.
If you would like more infor-
mation, contact City Hall at
375-2255.


PHOTO BY MARIA TRUJILLO
Hardee-County Fire Rescue battled a blaze at a home on Lincoln Street in Wauchula on Tuesday. According to
spokesperson Alyssa Henderson, the call came in at 3:02 p.m. Using 3,500 gallons of water, the fire was under control
at 4:26 p.m. Crews stayed on scene until 6. The cause of the blaze is under investigation by the state Fire Marshal's
Office.


A Christian's View

Of Afghanistan
... Story 9B


UPDATE Ov

TROPICAL STORMS
. Story 7A


Wildcat Season

Opens Friday
... Story 1C


Harde Conty' Hoetow Covrag


I I


~14i~lR 19- pi III I








2A The Herald-Advocate, August 23, 2012


The Herald-Advocate
Hardee County's Hometown Coverage
JAMES R. KELLY
Publisher/Editor
CYNTHIA M. KRAHL
Managing Editor


JOAN M. SEAMAN
Sports Editor



115 S. Seventh Ave.
P.O. Box 338
Wauchula, FL 33873


RALPH HARRISON
Production Manager
,tORj41
NOEY DE SANTIAGO
Asst. Prod. Manager

o 1 4 J Phone: (863) 773-3255

Fax: (863) 773-0657


Published weekly on Thursday at Wauchula, Florida, by The Herald-Advocate
Publishing Co. Inc. Periodical Postage paid at U.S. Post Office, Wauchula, FL
33873 and additional entry office (USPS 578-780), "Postmaster," send address
changes to: The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338, Wauchula. FL 3 i,73


Schools Thursday 5 p.m.
Sports Monday noon
Hardee Living Thursday 5 p.m.
General News Monday 5 pmn.
Ads Tuesday noon


SUBSCRIPTIONS:
Hardee County
6 months -$21; I yr. $39; 2 r%. $75
Florida
6 months $25; 1 ,T $46; 2 yrs.- $87
Out of State
6 months- $29; 1 yr. -$52; 2 yrs- $100


LETTERS:
The Herald-Advocate welcomes letters to the editor on matters of public
interest. Letters should be brief, and must be written in good taste, signed
and include a daytime phone number.
SUBMISSIONS:
Press releases on community matters are welcome. Submissions should be
typed, double-spaced and adhere to the above deadlines. All items are sub-
ject to editing.







1 Kelly's Column
By Jim


The Hardee Wildcat varsity football team will play Lake
Placid here Friday night at 7:30 at Hardee Stadium in the Fall
Kickoff Classic. This is a warm-up game for the regular season that
will begin the following Friday at Fort Meade at 7 p.m.
Every team is undefeated at this time of year. Let's hope the
Wildcats have a great season and make the state playoffs again.

For reasons hard to understand, the price of gasoline has
climbed to $3.67 a gallon by Tuesday after being just over $3 this
Spring. Part of it would appear to be "just because they can." We
can always drive less or buy more fuel-efficient vehicles, which are
not cheap.
Consumers can decide whether to spend an extra $8 to $10 for
a fill-up or spend thousands for a car or truck that gets better gas
mileage, depending on their inclination and financial condition.


Junior Cooper, 83, is shc



\ m 01


own here with his brother Ernest
Cooper, a retired Polk County
educator who lives at Lake
Buffum.
Junior, who lived in Bowling
Green most of his life, resides at
Oak Bridge Health Center in
Lakeland. Junior was not born as
a perfectly healthy baby, and his
doctor said the tyke would prob-
ably not live past the age of 6.
Junior not only proved the doc-
tor wrong, he outlived him plus
two other personal doctors
through the years.
Junior always worked hard
and raked many yards of their
annual crop of oak leaves.


Mildred Abbott Cooper was
born Feb. 5, 1916, in Fort Green
and passed away Aug. 8, 2012,
in Bowling Green at age 96. Her
funeral was Aug. 13 at Fort
Green Baptist Church.
Officiating were Pastor Steve McGaughey and former pastor Ron
Corum (early 1980s) who lives in Valrico.
Her favorite songs included "I Will Meet You In The Morning"
and "When The Saints Go Marching In."
She was a fifth generation Floridian, a housewife and home-
maker. She and her.husband Clarence, who passed away in 1992
after 55 years of marriage, had two children, Sherman and Gwen.
Rev. Corum said Mildred was the "Barbara Bush of Fort
Green." Her brother was the late Merle Abbott, and a recording was
played of him singing "When They Ring The Golden Bells."

Rev. Ron Corum is still a loyal Florida Gator fan and says he
has been to Walt Disney World 47 times.

It will be interesting to keep up with the Republican National
Convention in Tampa next week and the following Democratic
National Convention in Charlotte, N.C.. as the presidential election
Nov. 6 draws closer.

Hardee Ranch Supply at 1309 Hwy. 17 South in Wauchula is
sponsoring a BBQ benefit for Sue Knight from 11 a.m. until sold
out on Friday, Aug. 24. She is a cancer patient, and all proceeds go
for her expenses. The meal is $10. Call 773-4322 for more infor-
mation.

Ben Albritton of Wauchula is the first state representative liv-
ing in Hardee County since Lawrence Roberts in 1962.

happiness is when what you think, what you say, and
what you do are in harmony.
-Mahatma Gandhi


Josh Wilson In Live




Concert Here Sept. 8


By MARIA TRUJILLO
For The Herald-Advocate
Ever listened to The Joy FM
and felt connected with the
song "I Refuse" or "Before the
Morning?"
Now thanks to the Hardee
County Ministerial Association,
you'll be able to connect with
the singer of both songs, Josh
Wilson.
On Sept. 8, Wilson will be
performing for about 45 min-
utes at First Christian Church,
after which he will stay for
autographs and pictures.
Paul Samuels has been a fan
of Wilson's since he and his
wife, Jamie Davis-Samuels,
heard him in concert and con-
nected instantly with his music,
especially after he performed
"Amazing Grace" on his guitar.
Samuels thought it would be
a great idea to bring him to
Hardee County so everyone
else could enjoy his talent as
well. Getting Wilson to Wau-
chula is something that has
been in the works since late
2011. Fortunately, everything
played out and they were able
to book him.


Another reason Samuels
wanted Wilson to have a con-
cert here is he believes Wilson
is a good fit for Hardee County.
Like many people in the
community, Wilson was
brought up in a religious house-
hold. In fact, he grew up the son
of a preacher in Lubbock,
Texas.
His music career began when
he was signed to a record label,
Sparrow Records, in 2006. He
released his major-label debut
album, "Trying to Fit the Ocean
in a Cup," in 2008.
The website Christian Re-
tailing called it "the future of
Christian pop." It was also
named among the Top 10 Best
Albums of 2008 by Gospel-
MusicChannel.com.
According to his website,
joshwilsonmusic.com, since
that time Wilson has released
several number-one hits, which
include "Savior Please" and
"Before the Morning." The lat-
ter was in the number-four spot
on Billboard's Year-End Chris-
tian Songs chart. Also at that
time,-he released a sophomore
album titled "Life Is Not A


Snapshot."
His latest album, "See You,"
vocalizes "that tension between
faith and sight" that Wilson
admits he has struggled with,
according to his website.
"Something I've been learn-
ing over the past decade is that
when we want to see God, we
have to depend less on our
physical eye and more on the
Holy Spirit," says Wilson.
He also says on his website
that he felt more focused while
working on this album. Rather
than trying to finish writing a
good song, he was more con-
cerned about the message the
song conveyed.
His first single, "I Refuse,"
which is on his latest album,
was being written during the
time the 1,000-year flood hap-
pened in Nashville, where
Wilson currently lives. He says
on his website, "I was using
prayer as an excuse to not do
anything myself. But as a
Christian, that's not enough.
"We're the hands and feet of
Jesus; we're supposed to do
something. So that phrase came
back to me, I refuse to do noth-
ing," he said. Wilson then went


on to finish the song with co-
writer Ben Glover.
If you would like to see
Wilson perform, tickets are on
sale now until the day of the
concert for $10. Tickets are
available at First Christian
Church Wauchula, Java Cafe,
Heartland Gold, and itickets.-
com.
The concert will take place at
First Christina Church Wau-
chula on Sept. 8. Doors open at
6 p.m., with the show beginning
at 7. After the performance,
Wilson will be available for
photos and autographs. The
ticket proceeds will go directly
to benefit the Hardee Help
Center.
If you would like more infor-
mation about the concert, call
781-0332 or 773-9243.
If you would like to know
more about Wilson, you can go
to his Facebook page titled Josh
Wilson, his website joshwilson-
music.com, follow him on
Twitter at twitter.com/joshwil-
son, or see his Youtube videos
at youtube.com/joshwilsonmu-
sic. Or, you can simply listen to
him on The Joy FM station
88.1.


basic functions. These patients
go directly to the 25-bed nurs-
ing home, where the body is
exercised and physical health
maintained while the brain
heals itself.
As they come out of a coma,
patients may have to relearn
basic skills: talking, walking,
brushing teeth and such. The
brain heals at different levels.
Some have feeding issues and
require a modified, even
pureed, diet at first. They may
be faster or slower to re-learn
ambulation and speech.
When they have improved,
averagely four months later,
they are placed in a cabin set-
ting appropriate to the level of
care needed.
They move up cabin levels
until they are ready to be dis-
charged, an average of four
years but may be longer until a
suitable placement is found in
their home state. No one stays
forever but, regardless of fund-
ing, a patient is not discharged
until there is an appropriate
place to handle a person with
their limitations and disabili-
ties.
The longest someone has
stayed even though funding
ended is one year, says
Brennick. "We don't discharge
someone just because they are
out of funds. We do what is
right for them," he explained.
Patients with injuries to the
frontal lobe of the brain are the
ones most apt to come to FINR.
Loss or injury to the frontal
lobe results in poor impulse
control and decision making,
and an inability to recognize
limitations and behavior prob-
lems.
Some patients are physically
or verbally aggressive or exhib-
it other behaviors which dictate
that they can never be left
alone. They need individual and
group counseling, and behav-
iorists work with them in devel-
oping more appropriate alter-
nate behaviors to handle their
frustrations.

VISITING FINR
The entrance to FINR is near
the western end of Vandolah
Road where it intersects with
CR 663. In fact, the west end of
the L-shaped property which
exits on CR 663 is expected to
be the location for a hotel, gas
station and restaurant to serve
people coming to visit patients
at the facility.


Continued From 1A


offense.
Rich and Perez are Coaches
for the new Heartland Hur-
Sricanes Youth Athletic League,
currently in its first season in
Hardee County. It is a part of
the parent Mid-Florida Football
& Cheerleading Conference,
headquartered in Winter Haven.
Perez was jailed late Tuesday
night of last week following a
traffic stop on Martin Luther
King Jr. Avenue, according to
Hardee County Drug Task
Force spokesman Maj. Randy
Dey.
Perez was stopped for driving
above the posted speed limit,


Dey said. He then quickly
switched positions with his pas-
senger in order to avoid detec-
tion for driving with a suspend-
ed license, the major alleged.
The maneuver failed, howev-
er, and as officers spoke with
Perez, they spotted a clear plas-
tic bag of suspected marijuana
inside the car.
'Perez was charged with pos-
session of less than 20 grams of
marijuana, possession of nar-
cotics equipment, obstructing
an officer, and driving while
license suspended.
Rich was jailed late Thursday
afternoon.


Dey said intelligence infor-
mation gathered on Rich led to
a probe into alleged drug sales.
Using confidential informants,
the Drug Task Force allegedly
completed three narcotics trans-
actions with Rich, on May 29,
June 21 and Aug. 16.
Rich allegedly sold cocaine
in the amounts of 2.2 grams,
one gram and 2.5 grams from
his car, twice within 1,000 feet
of a church and once within
1,000 feet of public housing.
Charges against him include
three counts drug trafficking
from a vehicle, three counts sale
of cocaine within 1,000 feet of a


There is a nearly mile-long
drive into the facility. The first
quarter-mile or more winds be-
tween pastures of longhorn cat-
tle and a doe grazes with her
pair of newborns nearby.
The first building is a horse
barn, not fully completed, but
planned to add recreation for
advanced patients.
Next is the pediatric school
and adjacent cabins for the
youngest residents, up to 18
years old.
Continuing to a Y intersec-
tion, a visitor has a choice to
turn right toward the nursing
home or left to go on around
several curves to the adminis-
tration building, which also
includes physical and occupa-
tional therapy, a video security
room and a dining room.

STAFFING
Of the 600 employees at
FINR, 450 are direct care staff,
all living within a 45-minute
ride, mostly in Hardee County.
There are 25-30 midlevel
employees, some from Lake-
land or Sarasota and some local
residents, including Travis
Bone, an administrator who
also doubles as the assistant
varsity basketball coach at
Hardee High School.
Facility director Brennick
lives in nearby Myakka City.
Physicians and specialists, in-
cluding Wauchula's Dr. Diego
Fallon, come to the facility reg-
ularly to oversee medical treat-
ment plans.
Job applicants have to pass a
Level II, FBI check required by
AHCA, which licenses the
facility as a health-care drug-
free workplace. The check
includes fingerprints and ran-
dom drug screens.
There are about 15 employ-
ees hired a month but also many
20-year employees. All em-
ployees must complete a two-
week paid training session
before they have contact with
clients. Training includes First




The smallest horse is the
Fallabella, which grows
only 30 inches high.

The ancient Greeks
believed the mineral jasper
could draw the poison
from snake bites.






church or public housing, two
counts possession of narcotics
equipment, and three counts
using a two-way communica-
tions device in the commission
of a crime.
Rich is the athletic director
for the Heartland Hurricanes,
and is also assistant coach of
the Pee Wee team.
Perez is head coach of the
Juniors team.
Mid-Florida league district
supervisor Kirk Simcic said
Rich would likely be suspended
pending the outcome of the
felony charges against him.


Aid, CPR (cardiopulmonary
resuscitation), abuse and neg-
lect investigations and prosecu-
tion, and patient care.
Initial pay is $10 an hour.
Certified nursing assistants
(CNAs) start at $1 higher. Pay
goes up with increased qualifi-
cations and staff is encouraged
to obtain more education, often
at employer expense.
There are three each of occu-
pational, speech and physical
therapists and four behaviorists.
Day shifts include four or five
staff per cabin and at least two
at night in all eight- and 12-per-
son residences.
There is an extensive voca-
tional program, some of which
includes pay for residents.
There is a greenhouse for palms
and shrubbery; a wdodshop for
making household articles; a
computer lab where basic pro-
grams are learned; and an activ-
ity center to improve problem-
solving.
Some patients work in the
community, as lawn care work-
ers, greeters at stores and busi-
nesses, stocking shelves, and
some attend courses at the local
college. A few students have
moved successfully from the
on-campus school to get an
associate's degree.

HOW IS FINR
CHECKED OUT
DCF is the agency with the
responsibility to investigate
complaints of abuse or neglect
of handicapped children or dis-
abled adults.
The two usual ways DCF is
notified is through the Abuse
Hot Line, either self-reporting
by DCF staff or by patients or
their families contacting DCF.
The Abuse Hot Line number is
posted throughout the facility
for the patients and their fami-
lies.
According to FINR records,
installation of security cameras
began over five years ago. More
and more of the buildings have
been added and nearly all now
have video surveillance al-
though it costs over $100,000
per building to connect the 360-
degree videos to the security
system.
It helps verify alleged abuse
or neglect. For instance, Bren-
nick said, a patient with balance
problems reported he had been
hit by a staff member, but the
video showed the patient
repeatedly jumping off a ledge
despite being warned not to,
and finally fell against a railing,
injuring himself.
FINR records show 54 DCF
visits in the last year, with 45
unfounded or unsubstantiated.
There were two self-reported
abuse cases and the video evi-
dence turned over to DCF and
the Hardee County Sheriff's
Office. Three persons charged
in the incidents are awaiting
felony court decisions.
Reports of a theft by an indi-
vidual from a patient, and a
drop in supervision, both self-
reported by FINR, are among
the five cases still open with
DCF.
Although the facility, once
known as New Medico when it
started in 1986, has had many
DCF investigations over the
years, it has never been even


close to being closed by the
state, said Brennick.
DCF has filed a petition for
injunctive relief to obtain
copies of facility incident
reports for the past decade. That
is the matter scheduled for hear-
ing Wednesday.
Brennick said incident
reports are a risk management
tool, completed by the patient,
if able, and staff members
involved.
Traditionally, these have not
been provided to DCF, which
comes and does an independent
investigation, reviewing the
patient's chart, interviewing the
patient privately, and staff
members individually.
In the recent investigation,
there were 13 members of
ACHA, DOH and DCF at the
facility for three days. They
opened every case file, met with
many of the clients, especially
those with family members who
were visiting.
A recent letter from a
Connecticut parent attests to the
"relief from knowing their son
is in a safe place where atten-
tion is given to his autism, men-
tal retardation and self-inflicted
injuries." He had been placed at
facilities in Connecticut, and
from New Jersey to- Rhode
Island in a span of nine years
with none able to resolve his
self-inflicted behavior which
included an injury resulting in
near blindness.
At FINR now for 18 months,
the son was physically abused
in September 2011, which was
immediately reported to the
family. They learned the two
staff members involved were
fired and arrested, pending trial.
"Our son was taken to the hos-
pital to see if he had sustained
any injuries. We were very
relieved that our son was in the
right hands and everything was
taken care of properly. FINR
provides a weekly report on our
son's behaviors and has two
staff members with him 24
hours a.day.
"Negligence and lack of care
on disabled patients seems to be
an ongoing battle across the
country, yet FINR is targeted
over an incident in which we
feel they took every right possi-
ble step in corrective action. My
wife and I feel FINR is by far
the best place for him in his
rehabilitation till he is ready to
come back to Connecticut,"
concludes the parent's letter.

TECHNOLOGY
FINR has recently completed
a pair of technology tools for
residents and their families and
friends. For a county like
Hardee to have two electronic
books is great, said Brennick.
One, on understanding brain
injury, can be read or listened to
by hitting the voice button. It
describes the nine most com-
mon brain injuries, 28 different
structures of the brain and 12
cranial nerves. It is available on
I tunes at FINR.com at a cost of
$1.99.
A new enhanced video will
be out within 30 days. It inter-
actively explains brain injury
and treatment and should be
seen by families as soon as a
person is hospitalized in a trau-
ma facility.


Continued From 1A


I I


I







August 23, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 3A


It's The First Day In Kindergarten At NWES!


PHOTOS BY MARIA TRUJILLO
This little guy had a rough start, as he became lost on his This little one in Karen Doyle's classroom at North
way to his classroom. Luckily his caring teacher, Melanie Wauchula Elementary School colored while waiting for her
Nuccio, was there to console him. first day to officially begin.


Mom Ami Smith gives her daughter, Cori, one last hug and
reassuring words before leaving her with her new kinder-
garten teacher, Melanie Nuccio.


Here, mom Melissa Rucker proudly drops off her youngest son, Braxton, at his kinder- This young man turned out to be quite the gentleman as he dropped one little.girl off at
gardenn class at NWES. Shown (from front left) are Braxton, Blake, Bryce and an uniden- her kindergarten classroom, then took another to her first-grade class and then finally
tified girl; (back) teacher Shadow Ward and Rucker. .walked to his own. "
ia.i i I 0 [ "


!Nutrition Wisel
KAREN COLLINS, MS, RD, CDN
SAMERICAN INSTITUTE FOR
CANCER RESEARCH


Q: Is it true that working to
raise my HDL level is not like-
ly to lower my risk of heart
attack after all?
A: Studies that tested people's
HDL ("good") cholesterol and
then watched their health have
long linked higher blood levels
of HDL with lower risk of heart
attack. Two main steps that
raise HDL cholesterol boost-
ing physical activity and losing
weight if overweight do lead
to lower risk of heart attack.
Researchers identified several
small genetic differences that
can also lead to higher levels of
HDL, regardless of lifestyle. A
recent study found that people
whose elevated HDL was due to
one of these specific genetic
traits did not have lower heart
attack risk. Authors of the new
study concluded that we can't
assume that all methods of rais-
ing HDL will have the same
effect on heart disease. This fits
inwith previous studies, such as
findings that hormone replace-
ment therapy for post-
menopausal women increased
HDL levels but did not reduce
heart attack risk. Other research
has shown that HDL cholesterol
actually includes up to 14 dif-
ferent subclasses, and the sub-
class "HDL 2b" alone may
account for most of the protec-
tive action of removing choles-
terol from blood vessel walls.
HDL 2b does seem to go up
with exercise and having both a
healthy weight and waist size.
Raising HDL by healthy
changes in physical activity or
weight which likely means
increased HDL 2b remains a
.smart strategy to reduce risk of
heart attack, regardless of
whether HDL causes the change
or is simply a marker of it. The
bonus: these healthy changes in
activity level and weight are
also linked to reduced risk of
cancer and diabetes. Keep up
those strategies for overall
health!


Q: Does exercising in water
provide special benefits?
A: Exercising in water, known
as aquatic exercise, offers
something for everyone. Its
supportive properties especially
benefit people with arthritis,
pregnancy or sports injuries.
The buoyancy of water decreas-
es painful spinal compression (a
condition that may be caused by
injury or other disorder)
because it can reduce how
much weight our body puts on
the spine by 50 percent in
waist-deep water and 75 per-
cent in chest-deep water. For
people with osteoporosis, water
provides a place to exercise and
improve balance with less fear
of injury from falls. Experts dis-
agree about whether aquatic
exercise provides enough
weight bearing to strengthen
bones, but it does at least help
maintain bone mass. Water's
resistance means running in
deep water will give even more
of an aerobic workout without
adding impact on your joints.
You can increase the muscle-
and heart-training effects even
further by adding more resist-
ance with fitness equipment
such as webbed gloves, foam
dumbbells and noodles. Water's
pressure on the body reduces
leg swelling, decreases heart
rate and improves circulation.
People with lung disease need
to be cautious, however, since
the increased aerobic workout
in deep water may make breath-
ing more difficult for them.
Warmer water is best for arthri-
tis, fibromyalgia or'Parkinson's
disease. Cooler water mini-
mizes multiple sclerosis symp-
toms and overheating in vigor-
ous exercise, but may cause
muscle cramps. Popular aquatic
classes include circuit training,
dance exercise and yoga for
relaxation and flexibility.
Check for classes at your local
YMCA or through the Arthritis
Foundation which offers aquat-
ic programs.


Welcome

Jose Rivera
with 20 years experience

(863) 285-6300 |
302 N. Charleston Ave., Fort Meade, FL w


II


--------------------------------------



HARDEE RANCH"' .


SUPPLY


BENEFIT


for


Sue Knight


Friday, August 24


11am until Sold Out

S __ ____ ______. __ ---

1309 Hwy. 17 South Wauchula

773-4322

A1 proceeds go to Sue Knight to help with her expenses.'
--- ---------------- -----------


_ __


m


F
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;I




4A The Herald-Advocate, August 23, 2012


R.C. McCLELLAN
R.C. McClellan, 98, of
Bowling Green, died on
Wednesday, Aug. 15, 2012, at
home.
Born on July 22, 1914, at
Hartford, Ala., he came to
Hardee County from Polk
County in 1969. He was a
heavy equipment operator and
member of the Church of God
of Prophecy in Lorida.
He was preceded in death
by his wife, Vivian Mc-
Clellan.
Survivors include two sons
and daughters-in-law, Don
and Bonnie McClellan of
Bowling Green, and Larry and
Ruby McClellan of Wauchula;
one sister, Myrtle Lumineski
of Pittsburgh, Pa.; eight
grandchildren; and 20 great-
grandchildren.
Graveside services were
held at Bowling Green Cem-
etery 2:00 p.m. on Saturday,
Aug. 18th with Pastor Mike
Hill of Lorida Church of God
officiating.
Expressions of comfort may
be made at robartsfh.com.
Woacai4' e&3am^ity'
FUNERAL HOME
WAUCHULA

PiW


RICHARD DOYLE
WALKER
Richard Doyle Walker, 84,
of Parrish, passed away on
Monday, Aug. 20, 2012, in
Bradenton.
He was born March 3,
1928, in Fort Meade. Richard
was a lifetime resident of
Polk, Hardee and Manatee
counties. He faithfully served
his country in the U.S. Army,
retiring as an E-6 Staff
Sergeant. After retiring, he
worked as a ranch hand.
He was preceded in death
by his beloved wife Daphne
Rutledge Walker; four broth-
ers, Norman, Houston, Frank
and Bud Walker; and two sis-
ters Grace Taylor and Maggie
Timmons.
Richard is survived by one
son, Richard "Doyle" Walker
and wife Jill of Myakka City;
four daughters, Kathy Visser
and husband John of Dana
Point, Calif., Gail Wiley of
Temecula, Calif., Sandy
Simmons of Palmetto, and
Cherri Sicard and husband
Danny of Myakka City; one
brother, Marvin Walker Jr. of
Wauchula; one sister, Mildred
Carlton of Duette; 12 grand-
children; seven great-grand-
children; and numerous
nieces and nephews.
Visitation will be held
from 6 to 8 p.m., Friday, Aug.
24, 2012, at Ponger-Kays-
Grady Funeral Home, 404 W.
Palmetto Street in Wauchula.
Services will be held at 11
a.m., on Saturday, Aug. 25,
2012, in the Chapel of
Ponger-Kays-Grady Funeral
Home.
Burial will follow at
Watson Cemetery in Fort
Meade with Military Honors
being rendered by the DeSoto
County Veterans Honor
Guard.
On-line condolences may be
made at PongerKays-
Grady.com.
~'Pcllfjfti/-F oyjs-Qiwodtj
Funeral Home &
Cremation Services
Wauchula
.9^"


A)n t Cin ) K I MY


HARDEE COUNTY
KIDS NEED
HARDEE COUNTY
HELP!
Ease a dependent child's
way through the court sys-
tem. Volunteer to be a
Guardian Ad Litem.
773-2505
(If office unattended, please leave
message.)



Obituaries





/ ,/-"- ,

\








ROBERT LEE LEEK
Robert Lee Leek, 71, of
Wauchula, passed away on
Thursday, Aug. 16, 2012, in
Sebring.
He was born Aug. 9, 1941,
in Brownsville, Tenn., and
moved to Hardee County 13
years ago from Tennessee.
He is survived by his wife
Deborah Leek; one son,
Darrel Leek of Brownsville,
TN; one daughter Danuyel
Herrin and husband Bryant of
Bowling Green; and two
grandchildren, Tyler and
'Hannah.
A viewing and gathering of
family and friends will be
held from 6 to 8 p.m. on
Thursday, Aug. 23, 2012, in
the Chapel of Ponger-Kays-
Grady Funeral Home, 404 W.
Palmetto Street in Wauchula.
On-line condolences may be
made at www.PongerKays-
Grady.com
0ongek- Oys- ofdt]
Funeral Home &
Cremation Services
Wauchula







911 loviW g Ue-yl hcl0oiy













BETTY JEAN
JOHNSTON
Betty Jean Johnston, 70, of
Zolfo Springs. died on Sun-
day. Aug. 19. 2012, at Shands
Hospital in Gainesville.
Born on April 15, 1942 in
Arcadia. she was a lifelong
resident of DeSoto and Har-
dee counties. She was a home-
maker.
Survivors include husband
Roy Johnston of Zolfo
Springs: two daughters Penny
Little and .husband Kelly of
Lakeland. and Robin Woods
and Pat Royce of Zolfo
Springs: step-daughter Nicole
Johnston of Zolfo Springs:
three sisters. Evelyn Vaughn
of Fort Meade. Donnie Suth-
erland of Tennessee and
Debbie Mitchell of Sebring;
five grandchildren. Kevin and
Michael Wingate of Lakeland.
Daffney Smith of Zolfo
Springs. Justin Woods of
Sebring and Cody Little of
Arcadia: and eight great-
grandchildren. Kaylee. Caleb.
Devin. Khloe. Landon. Brody.
Dustin and Dawson.
Visitation is Friday. Aug.
24. 2012. at Robarts Garden


4
.I


,


ABOUT ...
Obituaries
Obituaries are published
free of charge as a public
service, but must be submit-
ted through a funeral home.
A one-column photo of the
deceased may be added for
$15.
Obituaries contain the
name, age, place of resi-
dence, date of death, occu-
pation, memberships,
immediate survivors and
funeral arrangements. The
list of survivors may include
the names of a spouse, par-
ents, siblings, children and
children's spouses and
grandchildren, and the num-
ber of great-grandchildren.
If there are no immediate
survivors, consideration of
other relationships may be
given.





A11. ouuig Jtcteoni













REBA LOU SEAY
Reba Lou Scay, 61, of
Wauchula, died on Thursday,
Aug. 16, 2012, at Tampa
General Hospital.
Born on July 27, 1951, at
Benton, Mo., and has lived in
Hardee County for most of
her life. She was a corrections
officer and a Baptist.
She was preceded in death
by her daughter, Peggy Seay.
Survivors include two
daughters, Melinda Seay of
Wauchula and Penny Baker of
Mulberry: brother Johnny
Baker of Wauchula: five sis-
ters. Mary Osteen. Linda
McNabb, Joyce Perez and
Lucy Hilton, all of Wauchula,
and Evelyn Hurst of Bradford,
Ark.: and five grandchildren
Lee and Zachary Baker.
Mario Lopez, Victor Cosine
and Rebecca Seav.
Visitation was Sunday.
Aug. 19. 2012. from I to 2
p.m.. followed by funeral
services at 2 p.m. with Pastor
Mitch Landress officiating.
Interment followed in Wau-
chula Cemetery.
Expressions of comfort may
be made at robartsfh.com.


FUNERAL HOME
WAUCHULA


NATALIE "TALLY"
BLOOM TATRO
Natalie "Tally" Bloom
Tatro. 83, of Wauchula,
passed away Wednesday,
Aug. 15, 2012.
She was born on July 26,
1929, in Racine. Wis., and
moved to Hlardee County
seven years ago from Palm
Springs, Calif. She was a
member of the Daughters of
the American Revolution and
the Junior League of Racine,
Wis.
Tally was preceded in
death by her first husband,
Frank K. Bloom; one son,
Brad A. Bloom; and her sec-
ond husband, Theodor "Ted"
Tatro.
She is survived by four
daughters, Holly Derenthal of
Estero, Wendy Padgett of
Sevierville, Tenn., Elizabeth
"Beth" Gill of Wauchula, and
Lynn Bloom of Rio Rancho,
N. Mex.
A private family gathering
was held on Tuesday, Aug.
21. at Ponger-Kays-Grady
Funeral Home. Inurnment
will be in Sarasota at Palms-
Robarts Memorial Garadens.
On-line condolences may be
made at www.PongerKays-
Grady.com.
CPostgce /ikaj-o-Qadi
Funeral Home &
Cremation Services
Wauchula

..


Speak the truth, but leave
immediately after.
-Slovenian Proverb

The brains of a pedant,
however full, are vacant.
-Sir Fulke Greville



RICHARD THOMAS
DANDRIDGE
Richard Thomas Dan-
dridge, 82, of Zolfo Springs,
died on Thursday, Aug. 16,
2012, at Lakeland Regional
Medical Center.
Born Oct. 6, 1929, at
Wauchula, he was a.lifelong
resident. He served in the
U.S. Coast Guard and was a
member of First United
Methodist Church of Zolfo
Springs.
Survivors include his wife,
Lois Dandridge, of Zolfo
Springs; one daughter-and-
son-in-law, Vicki and Randy
Bumby of Avon Park; and.two
grandchildren Megan and
Tyler Bumby.
Visitation was Sunday,
Aug. 19, 2012, at Robarts
Garden Chapel from 5 to 7
p.m. Graveside services and
burial were at 10 a.m. on
Monday, Aug. 20, at Friend-
ship Cemetery with Pastor
David Harper officiating.
Military honors were provid-
ed by the DeSoto County
Honor Guard.
Expressions of comfort may
be made at robartsfh.com.


FUNERAL HOME
WAUCHULA


THURSDAY. AUG. 23
VHardee County School
.Board, regular meeting,
Board Room, 230 S. Florida
Ave., Wauchula, 5 p.m.

MONDAY, AUG. 27
VBowling Green City
Commission, budget work-
shop, City Hall, 104 E. Main
St., Bowling Green, 6 p.m.

THURSDAY, AUG. 30
*Hardee County Com-
mission and Planning &
Zoning Board, joint meeting
on CF Industries Develop-
ment of Regional Impact,
Room 102, Courthouse
Annex I, 412 W. Orange St.,
Wauchula, 3 p.m.


As the winds ofthe seas blou,
the delicate flower to & fo,
So blow the winds oflfe,
taking us where we do not know.a


( I/ 5 important to us that you know,
BA RT S We at Robarts Family FuneralHome.

I AL Have been there too

FAMILY FUNERAL HOME Andhen the windscome

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Since 1906 M wil a/ways be your smlterU
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ROBARTS f4ILY FUNERAL HOMEInc. 529 Ist Main Strt-l cbwda, Frid 33873 863-773-9773


8 x3c


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r- \\'lhat man\' Ieol)le don't know is
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ll them on file at no charge.

Call our funeral hIaome for details.








Funeral Homes


404 W. Palmetto St.* W auchula

(863) 773-6400
PongerKaysGrady.com


Chapel from 10 to 11 a.m..
with funeral services at 11
a.m. with Pastor Kenneth
Lambert of Faith Missionary
Baptist Church of Sebring
officiating. Interment follows
in Friendship Cemetery.
Expressions of comfort may
be made at robartsfh.com.
,RoEa,/ Jami /y
FUNERAL HOME
WAUCHULA

2n&=JA


U.S. 17 Faces
Lane Closures
The previously scheduled
lane closure on U.S. 17 from
Eighth Street West to
Seventh Avenue in Zolfo
Springs has been resched-
uled for all next week.
Both northbound and
southbound traffic will be
controlled by flagmen from 9
a.m. to 4 p.m. daily and
motorists are advised to
expect delays.


r
-
b







August 23, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 5A


Volunteers Recognized For


100s Of Hours At Schools


By MARIA TRUJILLO
For The Herald-Advocate
Becoming a volunteer can
make a world of difference to
those you are helping.
There are volunteers at
schools who help out at events,
while others give of their time
and talents on a more regular
basis. Yet they all have the same
goal in mind: helping schools
and students in any way possi-
ble.
At its most recent meeting,
the Hardee County School
Board recognized the 27 adults
and five students who logged in
more than 100 hours of volun-
teering throughout the 2011-12
school year.
Superintendent David Dura-
stanti was very thankful for all
the hard work and time volun-
teers pour into the school sys-
tem.
To show appreciation, Dur-
astanti and School Board mem-
ber Mildred Smith presented
plaques and trophies to the vol-
unteers on behalf of the whole
School Board.
Many of the volunteers have
been lending a hand in Hardee's
schools for several years. In fact


there was one volunteer, Styles
Starratt, who volunteered over
1,000 hours to North Wauchula
Elementary this year.
He has been donating over
1,000 hours to schools for the
past eight years, although this
past school year was his last as
he is moving on to the next
chapter of his life.
Another volunteer who put
in over 1,000 hours for Hardee
Junior High was Carol Myers.
Irma Molina also gave over 800
hours to Bowling Green Ele-
mentary.
Those giving time to Hardee
Senior High with 100 hours or
more were Larry and Elaine
Cook, Jan Beckley, Amalia
Arista, Monica Hernandez and
Cynthia Aguilar. Hoppy Rewis
gave 400 plus hours.
At Hardee Junior High,
Joshua Bursler, Jason Clark,
Wes Palmer and Amy Paris
gave 100 or more hours.
Kimberly Canary and Jerry
Lindsey gave 200 hours or
more.
Harvey Bissell gave 300 or
more hours to Hilltop Elemen-
tary.
Bowling Green Elementary


had Judy Mercer and Fay
Williamson give 100 or more
hours. Rosalinda Hinojosa gave
200 or more hours, while
Mclissa Terry gave 300 hours or
more.
At Zolfo Springs Elementary
Connie Jones and Diane
Shadoin gave 100-plus hours.
Christine Gilliard and Rebecca
McCoy gave 200 or more.
Rhoda Griffin gave 100-plus
hours to Wauchula Elementary
while LaDonna Weis gave 100
or more to North Wauchula
Elementary.
Students were also recog-
nized for wanting to give time
to their own schools or to
younger students.
At Hardee Junior High,
Georgeanne Paris gave 100-
plus hours, Drew Rigney gave
200 or more and Aubrey Rigney
gave 500 or more hours.
Hilltop Elementary saw
Jared Noel give 200 or more
hours while at Bowling Green
Elementary Telvin Frazier gave
100-plus.
These dedicated volunteers
may inspire others in Hardee
County to go out and do the
same for their schools.


PHOTOS BY MARIA TRUJILLO
During a recent School Board meeting, adult volunteers were called up to receive a
plaque from the School Board and an administrator from the school where they
helped. These are just a few of the many volunteers in Hardee County's schools.


4 T~i A .; .


Jared Noel is seen here receiving his trophy from Superintendent David Durastanti,
School Board member Mildred Smith and the new assistant principal at Hilltop
Elementary, Dr. Sheryl Mosley. Noel volunteered for 200-plus hours at Hilltop. Other
student volunteers will also receive a trophy.


NOTICE OF MEETING OF
CITY OF WAUCHULA
CODE ENFORCEMENT BOARD
225 E MAIN ST., SUITE 105
MONDAY, AUGUST 27, 2012
5:30 P.M.


OLD CASES:
11,083-M Santa Anita Mares
12-014-M Jubilee Ministries International Inc
12-015-M Jubilee Ministries International Inc
12-065-M Jomar and Maria J Pagan

NEW CASES:
12-118-M Ruben T Longoria Jr
12-120-L Johnnie A Hodges Jr
12-126-L Moran C & Sabrina Schneider
12-126-M Moran C & Sabrina Schneider
12-130-L Manuel & Anne Marie Lopez
12-133-L Gabriel Arguelles Jr
12-134-L Nola Denise Gordon


212 Louisiana St
131 S 8th Ave
W Orange St
209 W Orange St

410 Indiana Ave
505 S 7th Ave
1148 Downing Circle
1148 Downing Circle
201 N 10th Ave
318 N 4th Ave
310 MLK Jr Ave


OLD/NEW BUSINESS


12-080-L James Jernigan 504 E Orange St


Abatement of Nuisance Lot
Special Assessment Lien


Any interested persons) will be heard at this meeting. If any person decides to appeal any
decision made by the Board with respect to this request for which he will need a verbatim
record of the proceedings, he will need to ensure that such verbatim record is made.
The City Commission of the City of Wauchula, Florida does not discriminate upon the basis
of any individual's disability status. This non-discriminatory policy involves every aspect
of the Commission's functions, including ones access to, participation, employment or
treatment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable accommodation as
provided for ih the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26, Florida Statutes,
should contact the City Clerk at (863) 773-3131.
8.23c


RECEPTION


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
Mosaic's Wauchula headquarters on W. Main St. in Wauchula on Wednesday, Aug. 15,
hosted a luncheon reception for Bradenton attorney Bill Galvano, a former four-term
state representative who is running for Florida Senate seat in this area. He is a
Republican, grew up in Sebring where is father was a golf pro, and received college
degrees from University of Florida and University of Miami. The reception was official-
ly hosted by Bill Crews and State Rep. Ben Albritton. From left are Martha Monfried,
vice president of public affairs, Mosaic; Bill Crews, chairman, Wauchula State Bank; Bill
Galvano; Rep. Ben Albritton, the first state representative in Hardee County since
Lawrence Roberts 50 years ago; and Ron Hall, land manager, Mosaic.



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walk out. The laser nail fungus procedure on l takes
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Aug. 22: Occupational Classes Begin
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View the SFSC Schedule of Classes at
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ciation of Colleges and Schools to award Laccalaureate aid associate degrees. Contact the Conmmission on Collegesat 1866 Southern lane, Decatur,
Georgia 30033-4097 or call 404-679-4501 fot questions about the accreditation of SFSC. Inquiries about SFSC, su h ais admission requirements.
financial aid, or educational programs, should be directed to the college and not the Commission on Colleges. 8:23c


BILL GALVANO







6A The Herald-Advocate, August 23, 2012


EDC, IDA Set Upcoming Budgets


By MICHAEL KELLY
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Hardee County Eco-
nomic Development Council
and the Industrial Development
Authority boards set their budg-
ets for the coming fiscal year,
which begins Oct. 1 and runs
through Sept. 30, 2013.
The IDA will start the year
with a cash carry-forward of
$4.46 million, which is money
rolled into the next year's budg-
et from the previous one.
Expected revenue for the
2012-13 year is $7.7 million
and expenses are projected at
$4.96 million, leaving an
expected $7.2 million cash-for-
ward moving into the 2013-14
year.'
The majority of IDA revenue
comes from the Mosaic agree-
ment at $3.9 million and $2 mil-
lion from the Economic
Development Authority.
Other revenues include fruit
money from a grove at the
Commerce Park of $90,000,
rental income of $145,500,
transfers of $1,554,751 and
interest income of $5,602.
Expenses for the coming
year are the new sheriff's out-
post/pre-treatment facility in
the Commerce Park, $400,000;
Lightning Bay spec building,
$1 million; water/sewer infra-
structure along the U.S. 17 cor-
ridor, $650,000; $70,000 to the
Chamber of Commerce to do
public relations and marketing
for the economic development
offices; tourism development,
$50,000; Hardee Lakes Park,
$250,000; rehabilitation of the
former Peace River Electric
Cooperative building,
$300,000; National Solar,
$250,000; and transfers of
$498,081, most of which goes
to the Board of County
Commissioners from the
Mosaic agreement.
Operating expenses include


professional fees $60,000,
accounting and audits $35,000,
landscaping and grounds
$12,000, property management
fees $24,400, utilities $12,000,
insurance $14,330, repairs and
maintenance $1,000, advertis-
ing $1,500, property taxes
$59,741, bank service charges
$120, grove caretaking/fertiliz-
er/fuel $32,000, and transfers of
$28,081.
The EDC is expecting
income of $342,098 and
expenses to total $280,089, for
a surplus of $62,008 at the end
of the year.
The income is comprised of
$80,098 in carry-forwards,
$150,000 from an EDA grant,
$50,000 from the IDA for mar-
keting and public relations,
$50,000 from the Mosaic agree-
ment and $12,000 per year in
rent from the city of Wauchula
for Main Street/CRA Director
Jessica Newman.
The EDC does not charge
rent to the Chamber of Com-
merce for its use of an office in
the building.
The largest expense for the
EDC is salaries, which are bud-
geted at $146,552 for the com-
ing year and includes three
positions.
Life/health insurance is
$8,967, payroll expenses
$20,876, professional services
$21,573, travel $11,344, com-
munications $4.999, utilities
$5,389, rentals/leases $22,171,'
insurance $2,493, repair/main-
tenance $669, printing/binding
$33, promotional $20,000,
office supplies $1,909, operat-
ing supplies $6,936, books/-
dues/subscriptions $5,321 and
machinery/equipment $850.
In other actions, the boards
also:
-heard County Commis-
sion Chairman Minor Bryant's
displeasure with the Economic
Development Authority's deci-


ZOLFO SPRINGS LANDMARK


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
Pioneer Restaurant is a landmark in Zolfo Springs, locat-
ed at U.S. 17 and S.R. 64 on 3.8 acres and framed by.
sabal palms, which are used for swamp cabbage. The
land and building are owned by Carl Simmons, who
started and named the restaurant. Pioneer Restaurant is
known for its catfish and mullet with swamp cabbage
served on Fridays. Simmons said at one time there was a
service station, bar and restaurant named Shelly's Place.
He said previous owners were J.C. Edmundoz and Shelly
McKinney. Annie Bell Jewell on Aug. 16 marked her 30th
year of operating the restaurant. She is considering start-
ing a steak night on Saturday. Her father, Joe Colson,
operated Papa Joe's Restaurant across the street for 30
years. It was known for its hamburgers, steaks and
French Fries. Pioneer Restaurant has about 15 employ-
ees, and some customers have been eating there for 30
years, she said.


OBIT NOTICE


The Herald-Advocate pub-
lishes, at no charge, obituaries
marking the deaths of current
or former Hardee County
residents. The obituary may in-

clude occupation, church and
club affiliations, military serv-

ice, special awards or honors
and a list of survivors. Paid
obituaries may take the place of
our free notices.
Forms for a free obituary are
available at our office or at local
funeral homes. Completed
forms, however, must be sub-
mitted through a funeral home.
We cannot accept forms from
individuals.


sion to fund all seven applicants
at its July meeting.
The EDA had more than $4
million and requests of $3.5
million and choose to fund all
seven organizations seeking the
grant money.
He said a few projects should
not have becir 'en funding,
and just becau- ,he money is
available does not mean it has
to be spent. He directed the IDA
to be prudent with its funding
decisions, and said some of the
money can be saved and accu-
mulated for future projects.
He said if the economic
development money is not
spent wisely and does not pro-
vide a good return on the
investment, it will have lasting
effects on the county's econo-
my moving forward for years to
come.
IDA board member Mike
Prescott agreed with Bryant and
echoed his comments.
-had a $300,000 grant
returned that was awarded to
the Community Redevelopment
Agency and Dave Brown to
renovate 226 W. Main St.
Brown was going to locate
his company, EZ Products, on
Main Street but decided to
move to Florida Avenue instead
and did not need the grant for
renovations.
-got an update on the for-
mer PRECO building the IDA
purchased to turn into a tech-
nology park.
Economic Development Di-
rector Bill Lambert said the
building was purchased for
$996,000 and $200.000 was
spent for a guaranteed power
supply from PRECO's "Big
Blue" generator during power
outages.
An additional $300,000 has
been budgeted for renovation
and retrofitting that will begin
soon after the roof is cleaned
and inspected.
-heard an update on Light-
ning Bay. which was awarded a
$1 million grant from the EDA
that was allocated to the IDA to
construct a building in the
Commerce Park.
Lambert said the site plans
are being done and the compa-
ny would like to be in the build-
ing and operating between April
and August of next year.
-learned the building plans
for the Sheriff's Office outpost
are almost completed and the
project should be breaking
ground in September and could
be finished by the end of the
year.
-heard about a company
looking at locating a bio-nitro-
gen facility in Hardee County.
The company would turn
organic debris such as plant
matter into urea, which is a
nitrogen-based fertilizer.
-received an update that the
IDA and EDC members are
closer to forming one board.
The EDC will remain a legal
entity and the IDA will be


expanded to have a minimum of
nine members and a maximum
of 13.
Lambert said the County
Commission will make a reso-
lution soon, and will either
choose to move all EDC mem-
bers to the IDA board or could
appoint new people to the
board.


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Hurricanes May Be Coming


By JOAN SEAMAN the
Of The Herald-Advocate ern
Tropical storms Isaac and cee
Joyce are following identical Flo
paths leading to southern Flo
Florida. stre
Isaac is leading and, at 8 a.m. T
Wednesday, was moving west- Op
ward at 19 miles per hours. the
Winds extend 45 miles from the sini
center. Joyce is about two days con
behind and expected to be very we;
similar. site
Isaac is projected to become a ww
hurricane with Category I force or
winds and rains expected along I




At HJH, Herron stated that ing
the usual challenge for the first Th
few days is getting so many wai
kids fed at the same time. and
Usually it's the sixth grade line
that takes a bit longer, but it was who
no more than expected. "At was
both schools, we're looking for- the]
ward to the routine procedures had
taking hold, so we can concen- the
trate on our primary mission of ano
student growth and achieve- "W
ment," he added. her
Dr. Michele Polk, principal of i
at Hardee Senior High, was also I
very happy with the first day of a g
school and how smoothly it
went considering the change in bec
bell schedule. Another adjust- the
ment she expected to be a bit trar
challenging was the change to den
two lunch periods, however Tra
things ran better than expected. stud
She was able to visit every hon
classroom and said it was great thai
to see all of the students back. ciex
Another important aspect of por
going back to school is trans- the
portation. staf
"The first day of.school is T
always exciting and eventful. It sch
is the culmination of a sum- 13
mer's worth of planning," noted firs
Rob Krahl, director of trans- scho
portation and educational facili- stuck
ties. "Of course, everything N
doesn't always go as planned." stuck
He explained three new ele- stuck
mentary students got on the mal
wrong bus after school on scho
Monday. Because they did, they I
got to ride the entire route, end- witl


cost and its enters the east-
Gulf of Mexico and pro-
ds up the western coast of
rida. Warm waters in the
rida Straits are projected to
:ngthen it.
'he Hardee Emergency
erations Office is monitoring
storm closely and suggests,
ce Florida is in the five-day
ne, residents monitor their
father radios, or check web-
:s, www.nhc.noaa.gov,
'w.weather.gove/tampabay
other weather stations.
f either tropical storm


SCHOOL
Continued From 1A
at the junior high school.
ere, a van and driver were
citing, taking one to daycare
I the other two to parents.
'We had another little girl
o was on the right bus and
s taken home, but no one was
re to meet her. Her mother
I gone into labor and was at
hospital," Krahl said of
other unexpected situation.
ith the help of a neighbor,
aunt was called to take care
her."
He said all considered, it was
ood first day.
'We drove new bus routes
ause of the time change at
senior high school. We
sported nearly 3,000 stu-
ts," Krahl said. "Our goal at
nsportation is to get all the
dents to school and back
ne safely. We met our goal,
nks to the effort of an effi-
nt and professional Trans-
tation Team working with
school principals and their
ffs."
This year's first day of
ool also brought a surprise:
students less than last year's
t day. All but one elementary
ool saw drops in number of
lents.
WES had the only increase in
ients with 685, adding four
lents from last year's 681,
king it the largest elementary
ool in the county.
NWE had the biggest drop,,
h 28 fewer students, going


becomes a hurricane and threat-
ens southern and south central
Florida, shelters could be
opened. The primary hurricane
shelter is Hilltop Elementary
School on U.S. 17 North,
Wauchula, with Bowling Green
Elementary secondary and
Zolfo Elementary if needed.
The special needs shelter is at
South Florida State College by
previous arrangement only.
Call the Emergency Manage-
ment Center at 773-6373 if nec-
essary.





from 506 to 478. ZSE also saw
a big drop counting 503 stu-
dents compared to 528 of last
year, a decrease of 25.
BGE went from 429 to 415,
with 14 less students. HES
decreased by only four, landing
its count at 306 from the 310 of
the previous year.
HJH received 42 more stu-
dents this school year, putting
its number at 1,059 compared to
last year's 1,017. HHS had a
total of 1,165 students on the
first day compared to last year's
1,153 which is an increase of
12.
In all, 4,611 students attend-
ed class on the first day of
school. This is a decrease of 13
from the 4,624 who started
school last year.
A full list of the administra-
tors for the 2012-13 school year
includes:
Dr. Michele Polk, HHS prin-
cipal; Mary Farr and Todd
Durden, assistant principals.
Doug Herron, HJH principal;
Beverly Cornelius and
Meredith Durastanti, assistant
principals.
Sonja Bennett, WES princi-
pal; Jessica Gray, assistant prin-
cipal.
Tracey Nix, NWE principal;
Dale Wolgast, assistant princi-
pal.
Melanie Henderson, ZSE
principal; Tammy Pohl assistant
principal.
Doug Herron, HES principal;
Dr. Sheryl Mosley, assistant
principal.
Kathy Clark, BGE principal;
Stuart Durastanti, assistant
principal.
Gilbert Vasquez, Pioneer
Career Academy director.
Woody Caligan, deputy
superintendent/ MIS.
Mike Wilkinson, Adult &
Community Education and
Career & Technical Education.
Teresa Hall, ESE director.
Sherri Albritton, Federal
Programs/Assessment, Student
Academic Services.
Robert Krahl, Educational
Facilities and Transportation.
Marie Dasher, Curriculum/
HRMD.
Greg Harrelson, finance.
George Kelly, Personnel &
Staff Development/ HR/ Food
Service.


SEEDS i
FROM
." THE
SOWER


A little girl was trying to hug
her father, but he was too tall.
"Bend down, Daddy," she
cried, "so I can reach you."
Before God sent His Son
into the world, He too,
seemed beyond our reach.
God the Father became God
the Son and lived among us
so we could come to know
and understand Him. God
became Man in the Person of
His Son.
Like us, He was born of a
woman. But unlike us, He
had no earthly father.
His life, which began with-
out sin, was lived without sin.
He went about doing good
for all healing the sick and
providing hope for the crises
of life. After all of the good
that He did, He voluntarily
went to the cross and died for
our sins, expressing the love
of God, His Father.
He's the same today. Right
now, as always, He's reach-


ing out to us with His endur-
ing and unending love.
This is a great time to reach
out to Him and tell Him we
love Him and are thankful for
all He's done for us.
Visit us at: TheSower.com
A ton of new $20 bills
would be worth about 19.6
million dollars.

I put a dollar in one of
those change machines.
Nothing changed.
-George Carlin


August 23, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 7A







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PUBLIC NOTICE
the PLANNING AND ZONING BOARD
meeting as the local planning agency
AND
the BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
will hold a

JOINT

PUBLIC HEARING
on
THURSDAY. AUGUST 30. 2012
beginning at 3:00 P.M.
AND
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2012
beginning at 3:00 P.M.
in the County Commissioners' Board Room 102
412 West Orange St., 1st floor Courthouse Annex
Wauchula, FL
for the purpose of considering a Development
Agreement pursuant to Section 163, F.S.
for the CF Industries Inc.
South Pasture Mine Extension, Hardee County
for the purposes of phosphate mining.
At that same Public Hearing the Boards will consider a
request for approval of:
^^a Major Special Exception,
^AA Development Order on an application for
Development Approval for a Development of
Regional Impact (DRI), Substantial Deviation and
A^a Master Mining and Reclamation Plan and Unit
Plan.
Parcels for consideration are located on or about South of St Rd 62
and North of St Rd 64, East and West of Co Rd 663 North in T34S,
R24 East, Hardee County





SOUTH PAS RE MINE
..








Mike Thompson, Chairman, Planning/Zoning Board
Minor Bryant, Chairman, Board of County Commissioners

This is a Disabled-Accessible facility. Any disabled person needing
to make special arrangements should contact the County
Manager's
Office, (863) 773 9430 at least two (2) working days prior to the
Public Hearing *
This Public Notice is published in accordance with the Hardee
County Unified Land Development Code. Copies of the documents
relating to the proposals are available for public inspection during
weekdays between the hours of 8:30 A.M. and 3:00 P.M. at the office
of Hardee County Mining Coordinator, (863) 773 0136), 110 South 9th
Avenue, Wauchula, FL.
All interested persons shall have the right to be heard. In rendering
any decision the Board of County Commissioners shall rely solely
on testimony that is relevant and material. Although minutes of the
Public Hearing will be recorded, anyone wishing to appeal any
decision made at the public hearings will need to ensure a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made by a court reporter.
08:23c


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www.tiptoesdancestudio.com

Proudly Serving Hardee County for 7 years!!
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8A The Herald-Advocate, August 23, 2012


FIELD TRIP!


COURTESY PHOTOS
On their first day back last week, Wauchula Elementary
School staff members kicked off their study of the moti-
vational book "The Energy Bus," by John Gordon, with a
field trip of their own. They traveled, by bus, to the home
of John and Tito Terrell, where they enjoyed a barbecue
luncheon at the pond sponsored by the Parent Teacher
Organization.



MISSING Since 8/8
on Hampton Road/Polk Road.
All white
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blue eyes, l
red collar and
micro-chipped.

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,an


ou


I would like to express my humble gratitude
to everyone that showed their support for
me. I would also like to thank Donald
Samuels for running a clean campaign and
caring enough about Hardee County to run. f7:
I have a new respect for the people who run
for a public office. It is truly a unique feeling "
the first time you go knock on that door and
step out on that street corner with a sign in a
hand and ask for acceptance from your peers.
This was a milestone victory and I am very
appreciative, however the race is not finished.
I have to keep my game face on, keep
working hard, run a clean campaign on
positive principles and with the help and support of the voters get to the finish
line. In the future I will need your support more than ever in the November
General Election to bring a "New Generation of Leadership" to our community.
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PAGE ONE


Gilliard's Takes Tourney Title


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
When it was over last
Tuesday night, the team from
Gilliard's Fill Dirt, the Dirty
Dozen, had won it all.
Gilliard's had tied with the
Peace River Electric Coop. Inc.
Legion of Doom for the season
record, each finishing at 12-2.
The tournament began Aug.
9, after, four rainouts were
played on Aug. 7.
There was a full tournament
slate on the first day of action.
On Field 3, the Mosaic #1
Regulators slipped past an
improving PhosChem team 17-
13.
Leadoff batter Michael Carte
paced Mosaic with three trips
around the bases. Austin Helms,
Weston Johnson, Lewis Martin,
John Roberson, Cody Porter
and Todd Rogers added twin
tallies, while Weston Johnson,
Alan Tubbs and Jerry Albritton


also got in on the action.
For PhosChem, it was Ryn
Heine, Johnny and Ruben Rivas
with three trips around the
basepaths. Travis McClenithan,
Ryan Roehm, Brek Mc-
Clelnithan and Dan Timmons
also contributed.
In the Field 3 late game,
Gilliard's stopped III Ranches
35-24.
Brent Gilliard, Brad Gilliard,
Lamar Gilliard, Eddie Strange,
Mario Tamayo and Ralph Arce
each put four runs on the board
for Gilliard's. Harold Smith,
Robbie Abbott, Lester Horn-
bake, Dave Reed and Chad
Hayes each chipped in.
Doyle Tyson was the only
four-score hitter for III
Ranches. Mark, Cody Gullatt,
Justin Painter, Buck Leonard,
Keith Revell, Bobby, Justin and
Brett Johnson all helped with
the scoring.
On Field 4, PRECo won the


opener 15-11 over the CF
Youngins.
Brian Pohl had four runs for
PRECo. Matt P. added three
scores, including a solo homer
and an in-the-park homer. Bent
Crawford, Billy Alexy, Brian
Alexy, Bill Alexy, Peck Harris,
Van Crawford, Josh C. and
Mikey Driscoll all took their
part in the win.
For CF, Tyler Alden rounded
the bases three times. Joe, Jake,
Jeremy, Ken, Kyle, Cody, Brett,
Matt and John each chipped in
their hits and scores.
The Field 4 closer was a 24-
16 win for Mosaic II over the
TNT/Nemesis team.
Marcus capped off a five-
score night with an inside-the-


park homer for Mosaic II. Hank
Butler added four runs. and
Tator, Mark. Justin Forrester.
Dalton Hewett. Cody Rawls.
Robert, Jonathan. Jose Fernan-
dez and Ches Graham added to
the action.
For TNT. Sam Rivera. Pete
DeLuna. Dragon. Julian Garcia
Sr.. Gerardo Villegas. and Jose
Torres each put a pair of scores
on the board. Willie Gilliard.
Elias Ramirez, Julian Garcia Jr..
Miguel Santoyo, Reid Benton.
Josh Snider. Jose Gomez and
Ram Briones Jr. all chipped in
with the action.
The only game on Field 3 on
Aug. 14 was a 22-16 win for
Mosaic I over PRECo.
Jason Johnston and Helms
were four-score batters for
Mosaic I. Carte chipped in with
triple-tallies. Martin, Johnson,
Tubbs. Michael Dixon, Johnny


Long, Albritton. Porter and
Rogers all joined in the action.
For PRECo, Billy Alexy was
the only four-tally batter. Brian
Alexy added three runs, and
Matt. Rodger Brutus, Pohl, Vent
Crawford. Mikey. Bill Alexy,
Harris, Josh, Van Crawford and
J.R. Gough added their efforts.
The final two games were on
Field 4. In the 6:45 game,
Gilliard's won 25-17 over
Mosaic II.
Leadoff batter Brent Gilliard
circled the bases a half dozen
times for Gilliard's. Reed
chipped in with four runs and
five RBIs. And Abbott had
seven RBIs on his four hits.
Hornbake, Lamar Gilliard,
Smith, Brad Gilliard, Chad
Hays, Strange and Jesse
Ramirez added hits and runs.
Tator and Cody Rawls each
came around to cross home


plate three times for Mosaic 2.
Marcus, Mark, Graham, Chris,
Hewett, Justin Jonathan and
Robert each joined in.
The championship game
came down to a contest be-
tween Gilliard's and Mosaic I,
with Gilliard's holding on for
the 24-20 victory after a six-run
sixth-inning effort.
Brent Gilliard paced his
squad with six hits and four
trips around the bases. Smith,
Abbott. Hornbake and Hays all
added three runs. Reed, Lamar
Gilliard, Ramirez, Strange and
Brad Gilliard also helped out
with the win.
Johnston and Helms each
circled the bases three times for
Mosaic I. Carte, Martin, John-
son, Tubbs, Porter and Rogers
were all twin-tally batters and
Dixon, Ted Svendsen and Al-
britton chipped in.


Junior Varsity Schedule
Aug. 30 Mulberry Home 7:00
Sept. 6 DeSoto Away 7:00
Sept. 13 Fort Meade Home 7:00
Sept. 20 Frostproof Home 7:00
Sept. 27 Lake Placid Away 7:00
Oct. 4 Sebring Home 7:00
Oct. 11 Avon Park Away 7:00
Oct. 18 Tampa Jesuit Away 7:00


JV 'Cats Getting

Ready To Go


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Hardee junior varsity
Wildcats take the field at home
next week.
The JV 'Cats open the season
next Thursday, Aug. 30, at
home against the Mulberry jun-
ior Panthers. Coach Rod Smith
feels that his squad will be
ready as they have been work-
ing during the summer on con-
ditioning and drills along with
the varsity squad.
Joining Smith are return
coaches Barry White, Todd
Bolin and Van Crawford.
Freshman Trequan Holley
appears to have the early nod to
quarterback the junior 'Cats,
who will continue their sched-
ule with September games at
DeSoto, Fort Meade, Frostproof
and Lake Placid. The middle
two are home games, the Sept.
6 and 27 games are on the road.
The only home game in


October is on the 4th, when the
Sebring junior Streaks will
come to Wildcat Stadium. The
last two games are Oct. 11 at
Avon Park and Oct. 18 at
Tampa Jesuit.
All games are at 7 p.m.
Along with Holley, the junior
varsity squad include Bryce
Anderson, Jordan Jones, Rigo
Rodriguez, Chauncey Rivers,
Austin Judah, Johnny Luna,
Alex Hinojosa, Tomas Hino-
josa, Dalton Bethea, George
Lackey, Ryan Ramirez, John
Snell and Tyler Bragg.
Also Andrew Hagans, Ty
Trammell, Cole Robertson,
DeShaundre McMillian, Zach
Coronado, Jose Coronado,
Kevin White, Matthew Green,
Isaiah Caprop, Noah Coronado,
Roberto Flores, Ryan Ham,
Allen Brown, David Ramirez,
Agustine Bravo, Daniel Per-
menter, Thomas Juarez and Al
Brown.


Large Washers & Dryers
Up To 125 Ibs. Washers


SPECIAL/ESPECIAL

MONDAY-FRIDAY


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S25o DOUBLE/DOBLE
o400 MAX/MAXI
$600 LARGE/GRANDE
sT70 SUPER/GRANDE


,W,. .1oth. Across from Nicholas Restaurant


fThanoo u


I appreciate you, the

citizens of Hardee

County, for your

support and vote. I

am looking forward

to being your sheriff

for the next 4 years.



Together we will make

Hardee County

a better place.



Thank you again for the privilege ofser





Pd. Pol. Adv. Paid for and approved by Arnold Lanier, Republican, for Sheriff.


'vingyou!





8:23p


The Herald-Advocate
sda. A t 2, .71 20

Thursday. August 23, 2012


50% OFF

SPECIAL/ESPECIAL
$l25
$200
$300
$350
$ oO


IM


~--------------------------------------







21 The Herald-Advocate, August 23, 2012




Hardee


Caylah Suzanne Coker of
Wauchula has announced the
plans for her marriage this
weekend to Michael Gordon
Dixon of Wauchula.
The bride-elect is the daugh-
ter of Amy Russell and Steve
Coker, both of Wauchula. The
prospective groom is the son of
Joleyna Dixon and Gordon
Dixon, both of Wauchula.


Living


The couple will exchange
marriage vows this Saturday at
Northside Baptist Church in
Wauchula, with the ceremony
commencing at 5 p.m.
Following the ceremony, a
reception will be held at the Joe
L. Davis Barn in Wauchula.
Friends and relatives of the
couple are invited.


Emmy Watkins of Bowling
Green has announced the plans
for her upcoming marriage to
Paul Jackson of Haines, City.
The bride-elect is the daugh-
ter of Allen and Patricia Teuton
and Howard Watkins, all of Fort
Meade, and Robert and Terri
Mushrush of Bowling Green.
The prospective groom is the
son of Donna and Bill Jackson
of Winter Haven, Gary and
Libby Robinson of Haines City


and the late Melanie Lynch.
The couple will exchange
wedding vows on Saturday,
Sept. 1, in Boca Grande at the
lighthouse in Gasparilla State
Park. The ceremony will com-
mence at 5:30 p.m.
Following the ceremony, a
reception will be held at Amory
Chapel in Boca Grande.
Friends'and relatives of the
couple are invited.


COURTESY PHOTO
Mr. & Mrs. Joshua Clemente
Melissa Kiger Becomes

Bride Of Joshua Clemente


Melissa Ann Kiger of Arcadia
became the bride of Joshua
Clermente of Wauchula on the
afternoon of June 16 in Arcadia.
The bride is the daughter of
Orville and Judy Kiger of
Arcadia. The groom is the son of
Edward Clemente of Lakeland
and Deborah Gillespie of
Eidson, Tenn.
The couple exchanged mar-
riage vows in the garden at
Craig's RV Park in Arcadia,
with Craig Burch officiating.
Serving as disc jockey was
Mark Anderson, playing such
special songs as"Honey Bee" by
Blake Shelton as the bridal
march and "Bless the Broken
Road" by Rascal Flatts as the
bride and groom's first dance.
The outdoors pagoda was
decorated with purple and green
flowers and vines under a green
canopy. The bride was given in
marriage by her father, and wore
a strapless rum ivory gown with
a long train. The headpiece of
her veil was a purple and green
floral with vines, and flowed
into an ivory veil.
Tending the bride as maid of
honor was her sister, Dina
Couch of Massillon, Ohio.
Bridesmaids included Erika
Clemente, sister of the groom,
of Charleston, S.C., and junior
bridesmaids Molly Couch of
Massillon, Ohio, and Samantha
Kiger of Dresden, Ohio, both
nieces of the bride.
They wore full-length green
dresses and carried bouquets of


purple and green 'flowers.
Wearing a floor-length ivory
dress trimmed in green was the
flower girl, Ella Kiger, the
bride's niece.
Serving as best man was
Nathan Peiper of Wauchula.
Groomsman was Steve Johnson
of St. Petersburg.
The bride's mother wore a
green sleeveless floor-length
dress. The groom's mother
wore white with purple and
green.
Following the ceremony, a
reception was held in the recre-
ation hall at the park. All the
decorations were done by the
bride, with setup assistance by
her family. There were purple
and green butterflies, honey
bees, and mason jars filled with
honey or serving as candle
holders. The cake was two-
tiered heart-shaped, with butter-
flies and bees over purple and
green.
Assisting with hospitalities
was Teri West of Arcadia.
The bride wore overall shorts
with a white shirt and tennis
shoes for her traveling outfit as
the" newlyweds set out for a
hpneymoqn trip to Dillard, Ga.,
where they went hiking and
horseback riding.
The couple have made their
home in Wauchula.
The bride is retired from her
career as a general manager for
Red Roof Inns Inc. The groom
is self-employed as a beekeeper
in Wauchula.


OPERATION ROUND UP


COURTESY PHOTO
With the help of a $10,000 matching grant from Peace
River Electric Cooperative's "Operation Round Up" foun-
dation, handicapped residents of Ridge Area ARC's
Cornell group home in Avon Park will soon enjoy greater
accessibility to bathroom facilities. This remodeling proj-
ect aims to replace old fixtures and appliances, relocate
interior walls to provide more space, and install a system
of tracks and slings which will ease transfer of residents
from bed to toilet or shower. Ridge Area ARC was formed
in 1957, initially serving 17 individuals. Today, the facility
serves nearly 200 persons with developmental and other
disabilities in Hardee, Highlands and Polk counties.
Operation Round Up funds are raised by "rounding up"
monthly energy bills, on a voluntary basis, to the next
dollar. Above, wheelchair-bound Charlie will soon enjoy
greater mobility in the group home.


The man who never alters
his opinion is like standing
water, and breeds reptiles
of the mind.
-William Blake
We did not change as we
grew older; we just
became more clearly our-
selves.
-Lynn Hall


In musji, a 1/16 note is
also called a semiquaverr."


supported


New Owner New Program

Kidz "R" Kidz II
401 W. Main St. Bowling Green
Monday Friday 6 am 6 pm
863-375-9929
FREE Registration
Discount Family Rates Certified Trained Teachers
Creative Crriculum
Large Classrwom
S Large Rec. Room L
Snacks Served
Clean Friendly Envwiromment


me during


the recent


campaign.


I would also like to congratulate

my opponent Mildred Smith for
running a successful campaign. I

wish you and thee School System

the best.
John E. Terrell
S823p





Thank Vou


CeVT


SpeciaJl


f'Ioe

Wle%


tacVito4iw

oant c
, &>~tU-


i Oaun t


zm0c'zt~


Pol. Adv. Pd. by Dorothy A. Conerly Campaign Account. Approved by Dorothy Conerly, Republican 82
8:23p
iI


Coker/Dixon

Wedding Plan


Watkins/Jackson

Wedding Plans


ATTENTION SINGERS!-
Do you love to sing? Is there a melody in
your heart? Come and join Heartland
Chorale for its annual presentation of
'7Treasures ofIClistas"to be held on Friday,
Dec. 7, 2012. Rehearsals begin Tuesday,
Sept. 18. For more info., please call 863-
767-6130. Don't miss this grqat opportLnity
to share your musical talent this holiday:
season.
soc8:23-9:13C0


THANK YOU


I want to thank those of you who


I would like to congratulate Colon

Lambert on his win for district one

commissioner.

I want to thank the voters that

supported me and my quest to change

the direction of our county government

and the protection of our economic

development money and how it is spent.

Apparently the voters didn't support

my position and I respect their vote.

To the people that supported my

positions, I will continue to attend

commission and EDCIIDA meetings

and voice my concerns of the

commission direction and how the

EDC/IDA spends the citizens money.





Donald Samuels

8:23p/


f


aM


c~e~


~jX~Z~atLL~L~i(LIZ~


I ce"


CWo6











McVay 1 Of 9
Earning Dental

Assisting Pin
South Florida State College
held its dental assisting pinning
ceremony at the University
Center on Thursday, July 12, at
4 p.m.
*Students within the program
are required to master skills in
dental science, radiographic
techniques, dental materials,
sterilization and disease con-
trol, chairside assisting, office
management, dental specialties
and expanded duties.
A requirement for graduation
is a total of 1,230 contact hours
in classes as well as tallying 16
hours of observation or work
experience.
Hardee County resident
Jessica Bivens McVay was one
of nine dental assisting gradu-
ates. She currently resides in


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
A U.S. 17 plant nursery is
planning a unique series of
activities this fall.
Lexan Properties, parent
company for Austin Nurseries,
was given approval to hold tem-
porary outdoor commercial use.
Co-owner Erica Scheips-
meier explained the plan to
Hardee County Commission at
its meeting last Thursday night.
She explained the use of 14
acres of the 17.26-acre property
on weekends between Sept. 29
and Nov. 12.
There will be a Heartland
Maze with a Hardee County
logo, emphasis on agricultural
tourism. There will be a smaller
maze as well, constructed for
children, a "kiddie maze" and
school class can use for field
trips during the weekdays.
The weekends will be open to
the public, beginning Oct. 12,
with strong marketing and



.-.Lordy "











S. .
S



Christina is:

"40":I
______ ** ^^ soc8:23p


media coverage hoping to bring
in a lot of out-of-county visi-
tors.
In addition to the mazes,
there will be games and fun for
all ages, concluded Scheips-
meier, who said she was com-
pleting details with the state
Department of Transportation
on traffic control, the fire
department with crowd limits
per acre, etc.
In other action, the commis-
sion:
-was given evaluation.
forms for the county manager.
They are to be completed and
returned to county attorney Ken
Evers by Aug. 24, so he can
compile a summary for the
Sept. 6 commission meeting.
-approved an ordinance
updating the Hardee County
Comprehensive Plan's capital
projects element and five-year
schedule of capital improve-
ments.
-approved a request to pur-
chase a John Deere loader for
the landfill. With trade-in on the
1999 model and discounts, the
final price is $95.000.
-was introduced to the new
county website with over 100
pages on the different depart-
ments and side links to each.
-approved budget transfers
within the Transportation Trust
(Public Works) department for
the recent road surface treat-
ment program and a pair of new
graders.
-heard appreciation from a
CR 665 resident on immediate
reaction to a comment on a dan-
gerous road situation which was
handled immediately. "I want to
commend Billy Judah (road
supervisor) and Ken Wheeler.
They took a dangerous situation
and did something about it,"
said the resident
-was advised of a city of
Wauchula annexation plan for
an F. L. Revell Jr. property off
East Main Street.


August 23, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 3B



EVEN As A TEEN, SHE


COULDN'T GO OUT ALONE


McVay
Bowling Green with her hus-
band, Joey McVay. She is a
2008 Hardee Senior High
School graduate and is the
daughter of Robert Bivens Sr.
and Lisa Bivens of Zolfo
Springs.
Additional graduates includ-
ed Lorena Badillo, Rosa Ca-
stizo, Manuela Gomez, Alejan-
'dra Lopez, Maria Mares, Selina
Olguin, Alejandra Patino and
Victoria Torres.


IThe jollooing permits wTe
applied lor or is.sied bi\' t l'
Hardee CoumIty Building De-
partment lduringii the IIw'/k of
Aug. 12-18. Listings includel the
Illname of the oIiwner or coi(ntrl(
tor, the address for the project,
the t'pe of work to be done, and
the cost involved. Only projects
valued at $1,000 or more are'
listed.

ISSUED
Kenneth Harris, Penny Drive,
barn residential, $14,000.
Matthew Griffin, Martin
Luther King Jr. Avenue, me-
chanical, $2,100.
David L. Scott, South Sixth
Avenue, mechanical, $3,899.
Kenneth R. Long, State Road
62, electric, $10,512.
Charles Robert Hodge,
Gordon Road, electric, $2,500.
Samuel J. Albritton, Rhynn
Road, electric, $1,000.
Rafik Halem, Georgetown
Loop, screen room, $2,400.
Stanley P. Bentz, Park Drive,
mechanical, $7,900.
Douglas Battey, Bay Street
Apartment A. mechanical,
$2,400.
Douglas Battey, South Ninth
Avenue, mechanical, $2,700.
Stanley P. Bentz, Hart Road,
mechanical, $7,000.
Douglas Battey, Maxwell
Drive, mechanical, $2,580.
Douglas Battey, Theater
Road, mechanical, $3,700.
Douglas Battey, Palmetto
Street, mechanical, $2,300.
Mark S. Moye, Freeman
Avenue, mechanical, $5,300.
Mark S. Moye, Palmetto
Street, mechanical, $3,950.
Douglas Battey, Eighth
Avenue North, mechanical,
$4,500.
Dwight Hatfield, State Road
64, mobile home, $60,900.
Susan Davies, Charley Bryan
Road, mobile home, $5,000.
Benjamin R. Hash, Illinois
Avenue, plumbing repair,
$2,484.
Jay Redmon, Maxwell Drive,
roof over, $1,775.
Jay Redmon, Maxwell Drive,
roof over, $2,092.
Michael E. Murra), Heard
Bridge Road, roofing, $2,500.
Christopher M. Rogers,
Maxwell Drive, shed, $6,389.
Ricarda Hernandez Bautista,
Cracker Lane, shed, $3,500.

BUILDING BLOCKS
A danger of hiring an unli-
censed person is that you may
be subject to liens placed on
your property by subcontractors
or suppliers.

Music is spiritual. The
music business is not.
-Van Morrison

There is no class so
pitiably wretched as that
which possesses money
and nothing else.
-Andrew Carnegie


By KEITH VASQUEZ
Special To The Herald-Advocate
Q: What is your full name?
A: Olive Marie Kirkland.
Q: When were you born?
A: May, 18, 1922.
Q: Where were you born?
A: Tallahassee, Florida.
Q: How
many
brothers V g6
and sisters
did you
have, or
were you an only child?
A: I had four sisters and two broth-
ers.
Q: How was your childhood?
A: It was pretty rugged. I had two
stepmothers; the second one was really
mean to me she would even hit me
sometimes.
Q: Describe the place you lived in?
A: It looked like a regular house; it
was made of wood. There were wooden
chairs, tables and beds, but the beds
weren't as good as today.
Q: Did you have any chores at
home?
A: Yes, I did have a few chores. I
had to clean our house. I also had to
scare away the flies when it was dinner
time.
Q: Describe a normal day for you
during your teenage years.
A: We weren't allowed to go out
without our parents. We couldn't even
go swimming in the river.
Q: What did you work at?
A: I didn't have a job until I moved
out of my house at age 16. Then, I got
a job at a restaurant. I also worked at
the motel here in Wauchula a couple of
years.
Q: Where did you meet your hus-
band?
A: I met him when he was in serv-
ice. My sister and I worked in a hospi-
tal at the time.


COURTESY PHOTO
Olive Kirkland
Q: How many children did you
have?
A: We had two boys. After the sec-
ond one was born the doctor told me I
couldn't have any more children or I
could get really, really sick.
Q: Who in your life do you think
gave you more advice about life than
others?
A: I don't remember who gave me
the most advice, because when you
have lived as long as me you don't
remember those things.
Q: What was the most important
event in your life?
A: The most important event in my
life was when I got married, because I
wanted someone to care for me and to
love me.
Q: What do you cherish most in
life?
A: I cherish God and going to
church because that is important to me,
and living for the Lord. He has given
me so much hope.
Back In Time is the result of a clas5
assignment given to ninth graders at
Hardee Senior High School. Each
student is asked to interview an .older
person. Selected interviews are pub-
lished here as an encouragement to the
students and for the enjoyment of our
readers.


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Business Plans

Interesting Activity


. -m








4B The Herald-Advocate, August 23, 2012


F Nutriti
KAREN COLLIN
AMERICAN
CANCER

Q: My health insurance com-
pany offered me the services
of a "health coach" to help me
lose weight and manage my
diabetes. What is a "health
coach"?
A: Health coaching is a grow-
ing trend in wellness and is pro-
vided by people who differ
widely in training. Health insur-
ance companies employ health


NOTICE OF PROPOSED RULE:
The Southwest Florida Water
Management District is proposing
to amend the following ruless:
40D-21.275, FA.C.
The purpose of this rulemaking is
to amend Rule 40D-21.275,
FA.C., to provide that the District
will send a Notice of Water
Shortage by regular U.S. mail to
those Permittees whose permits
will be affected or whose permit-
ted water use will otherwise be
restricted by a Water Shortage
Declaration. The effect of the rule-
making is to make the District's
rule consistent with the require-
ments of Section 373.246, FS.
The Notice of Proposed
Rulemaking appeared in the
Florida Administrative Weekly,
Vol. 38, No. 34, on
August 24, 2012. A copy of the
proposed rule can be viewed on
the District's website at
http://www.swfwmd.state.fl.us/rul
es/proposed/
Pursuant to the provisions of the
Americans with Disabilities Act,
any person requiring special
accommodations to provide com-
ments on this rulemaking is
asked to contact The Southwest
Florida Water Management
District Human Resources
Director, 2379 Broad Street,
Brooksville, Florida 34604-6899;
telephone (352) 796-7211, ext.
4702 or 1-800-423-1476 (FL
only), ext. 4702; TDD (FL only) 1-
800-231-6103; or email to
ADACoordinator@swfwmd.state.f
I.us. If you are hearing or speech
impaired, please contact the
agency using the Florida Relay
Service, 1(800)955-8771 (TDD) or
1(800)955-8770 (Voice).
THE PERSON TO BE CONTACT-
ED REGARDING THE PRO-
POSED RULES AND TO OBTAIN
A COPY IS: Sonya White,
Southwest Florida Water
Management District, Office of
General Counsel, 7601 Highway
301 North, Tampa, FL 33637-
6759, (813) 985-7481 (ext. 4660)
(Ref OGC # 201!Oi2).. .:23c


on Wise 1
Is, MS, RD, CDN
INSTITUTE FOR
RESEARCH

coaches to reduce costs and
improve health outcomes by
helping people adopt healthy
lifestyles. These health coaches
typically are licensed health
professionals such as registered
nurses, registered dietitians and
clinical social workers who
have additional training in
behavior change techniques.
They can provide personalized
education and resources to help
you create realistic health goals,
overcome obstacles and make
permanent changes. If you are
seeking help to manage a
chronic disease such as dia-
betes, heart disease, chronic
kidney disease or cancer, then
your health coach should also
be a health professional with
clinical expertise in that area.
For example, a nurse or a dieti-
tian may be a certified diabetes
educator (CDE). On the other
hand, a health coach who is also
a clinical psychologist may be
qualified to help you manage
depression or an eating disor-
der. A health or wellness coach
may also help participants in
wellness programs for weight
management, physical activity,
nutrition, stress management
and tobacco cessation. Be care-
ful: health coaching itself is not
a licensed profession. Several
highly regarded coaching certi-
fication programs have excel-
lent teachers and train only
licensed health professionals,
but other programs have no pre-
requisites. As a result, many
health and fitness enthusiasts
who are unqualified to provide
medical advice and untrained in
behavior change have simply
purchased "certificates" over
the Internet and established pri-
vate health coaching practices.
Ask a prospective coach about
his/her qualifications, including
their coaching credential; then
go to the credentialing group's
website to see what that certifi-
cation actually proves.

Our only security is our
ability to change.
-John Lilly

All change is not growth,
:s-all moypemrnt is not for-
ward. .. '


Stop by and see why so
many from Hardee County
buy from me.



1031 U.S. Highway 17 N.
Wauchula, Florida 33873
(863) 781-1947 Gene Davis
WWw. RLf NjY.COM Sales Manager









2937 Pear St. Zolfo Springs


Two Morning Services on

Friday & Saturday 11a.m.


August 27th September 1st

Evening Services 7:30p.m.


See what God has in


0
C"
store for you. j
w


This week in history, as
researched from the archival
pages of 'The Florida Ad-
vocate, the Hardee Coutnty
Herald and The Herald-Ad-
vocate. ..

75 YEARS AGO
Miss Nadine Meyer. attrac-
tive brunette of this city, has
been selected by the local
Kiwanis Club as its entry in a
state-wide beauty contest being
conducted this week end in
Miami. The contest is being
sponsored by the Cotillion Club
and the Miami Tribune of
Miami.

Something over 20 years ago
the late George M. Goolsby,
with the foresight that charac-
terized his thinking, and the
facility that guided his pen,
prophesied that cattle raising in
Florida would one day prove to
be one of the major industries
of the state.

According to reports released
from Tallahassee, Hardee coun-
ty motorists used a total of
112,615 gallons of gasoline
during the month of July. Dade
county motorists headed the list
with 3,583,935 gallons.

50 YEARS AGO
Hardee county will have a
potential of nearly $400,000 to
spend on secondary road pro-
jects in the county during the
coming year but all the money
already is earmarked for new
projects.

Some teachers teach for the
money they get out of it. Some
teach until something better
comes along. And some teach
because they love children and
want to help them. Into this last
category falls Mrs. Ruby
Driggers.

Property sales totaling
$116,400 were recorded in the
county clerk's office during the
week ending August 10 in
Hardee.

A new radio system, operated
by the county commissioners, is
scheduled to go into action next
week.
25 YEARS AGO
Hardee County is now the
owner of its sanitary landfill
site after receiving the deed to
the 97.5 acres from Mobile
Mining & Minerals Co.

The Wauchula Post Office
opened at its new location
Monday at 7:30 a.m., said
Gerry McCranie, officer in
charge.

The Hardee High School
Marching Band has been invit-
ed to play at a Tampa Bay
Buccaneers and Miami Dol-
phins game later this year.


i. Iic school catir a; number Iof
a\crage,. bright ;a d suiper-bright
children \ ill I'all apart in the
classilom. ThlrouI h n h110 Iault off
thcir own. these children will
not perforil up to their poten-
tial. IThe pro lem isn't the
school work: instead the prob-
lem is that they are not seeing
properly.

10 YEARS AGO
Local officials have adopted
a "get touLgh" stance toward
phosphate mining companies
operated in Hardee County.

You'll feel right at home at
Double J's with the country
atmosphere and home-style
cooking, say Janie Arnold and
Judy Wilson, sisters and co-
owners of the new restaurant in
Wauchula.

After the final trio of post-
season tournament games
ended, Wauchula First Baptist
Church had beaten everyone for
another tournament title.

With all the hoopla about our
"calico" fawn at Highlands
Hammock State Park, folks
may have forgotten about Lake
June in Winter Scrub. This state
park is located in Lake Placid
and holds some of the most
incredible natural treasures you
may ever find.


v vr#f.. cWh


8/23/2012
Sun Data
Rise 7 02 AM
Set. 7:5( PM
Day Iength
12 i-,. 5 4 nuis.
Moon Data
Re I 06 PM
Set- --:--
Oserhead' 6 38 PM
Underfoot 6 10 AM
Moon Phase
401%
w;ai\ing Crescent
Major Times
6 10 AM -8:10AM
6'38 PM 8-38 PM
Minor Times
1.06 P 206 PM
Solunar Rating
Average
Time Zone
UTC. -4
8/24/2012
Sun Data
Rise: 7.02 AM
Set: 7:55 PM
Day Length
12 hrs, 53 tiins.
Moon Data
Rise. 2.09 PM
Set. 12.06 AM
Overhead: 7:36 PM
Underfoot: 7:07 AM
Moon Phase
50%
First Quarter
Major Times
7:07 AM 9'07 AM
7'36 PM 9:36 PM
Minor Times
1206 AM -1:06 AM
2 09 PM 3"09 PM
Solunar Rating
Average
Time Zone
UTC. -4


8/25/2012
Sun Data
Rise. 7 03 AM
Set. 7.54 PM
D. Length
12 ms. 51 niulls
Moon Data
Rise- 3 10 PM
Set. 1l01 AM
Overhead 8 35 PM
Underbfoo. 8:06 AM
Moon Phase
62'-
Wa\ing Gibbous
Major Times
8 06 AM -10 06 AM
8 35 PM 10 35 PM
Minor Times
1:01 AM 2 01 AM
10 PM 4 10 PM
Solunar Rating
A\ erage+
Time Zone
UTC: -4
8/26/2012
Sun Data
Rise 7.03 AM
Set: 7-53 PM
Day Length
12 hrs. 50 mins.
Moon Data
Rise 4:06 PM
Set: 2.00 AM
Overhead. 9:34 PM
Underfoot 9:05 AM
Moon Phase
73%7
Waxing Gibbous
Major Times
905 AM -11:05 AM
9.34 PM 11:34 PM
Minor Times
2 00 AM 3:00 AM
4.06 PM 5:06 PM
Solunar Rating
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -4


Every possession and every happiness is but lent by chance for an uncertain time, and
may therefore be demanded back the next hour.
-Arthur Schopenhauer


,-----HEARTLAND PHARMACY



(Ra Not of Aarns etl.Nx t eatad eitrc)


"We put our


into our service"


ntTiing/Fisffing Foreea


bowling LCeagues


have started!



Bowlers & Teams


still needed.



For more
Information,
call Jean at:


773-6391
943 South 6th Ave.
/S Wauchula


If you are visiting we will gladly transfer your prescriptions and

keep them on file then transfer them back when you go home.



iiL


21-I~


Sue Lobato, Pauline Ochoa, Julian Garcia, Red Camp Pharmacist,
Bob Duncan Pharmacist Sandra Garcia (missing)

DELIVERY SERVICE AVAILABLE

Monday-Friday 9:00 am to 6:00 pm Saturday 9:00 am to 1:00pm


-1


8/27/2012
Sun Data
Rise: 7 04 AM
Set: 7 52 PM
Day Length
12 hrs 48 niuns.
Moon Data
Rise 4 58 PM
Set. 3 01 AM
Overhead. 10.30 PM
Underloot.1(102 AM
Moon Phase
82%
Waxing Gibbous
Major Times
1(0:0 AM-12 02 PM
10:30( PM-12-30 AM
Minor Times
3:01 AM -4.01 AM
4:58 PM 5.58 PM
Solunar Rating
Average
Time Zone
ULTC -4
8/28/2012
Sun Data
Rise 7 04 AM
Set. 7.51 PM
Day Length
12 hrs. 47 mins
Moon Data
Rise. 5:45 PM
Set: 4:04 AM
Overhead. 11.24 PM
Underfoot: 10:57 AM
Moon Phase
90%
Waxing Gibbous
Major Times
10:57 AM-12:57 PM
11:24 PM 1:24 AM
Minor Times
4 04 AM 5.04 AM
5.45 PM 6:45 PM
Solunar Rating
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -4


8/29/2012
Sun Data
Rise: 7:05 AM
Set. 7:50 PM
Day Length
12 hrs 45 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 6:27 PM
Set: 5:06 AM
Overhead: -:-
Underfoot:11:50 AM
Moon Phase
96%
Waxing Gibbous
Major Times
11:50 AM 1 50 PM
Minor Times
5.06 AM 6:06 AM
6:27 PM 7:27 PM
Solunar Rating
Better
Time Zone
UTC: -4
8/30/2012
Sun Data
Rise 7:05 AM
Set. 7 49 PM
Day Length
12 hrs. 44 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 7:06 PM
Set: 6:06 AM
Overhead:12:15 AM
Underfoot:12.40 PM
Moon Phase
99%
Waxing Gibbous
Major Times
12:15 AM -2:15 AM
12:40 PM 2:40 PM
Minor Times
6:06 AM 7:06 AM
7.06 PM 8:06 PM
Solunar Rating
Best
Time Zone
UTC: -4







August 23, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 5B


Hurricanes Winning Games


FrmT he Past


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The newest youth football
division representing Hardee
County is having success.
Three of the five teams in the
Mid-Florida Football and
Cheerleading Conference have
won both of their games so far
this season.
The Heartland Hurricanes'
Flag, PeeWee and Seniors won
in the Aug. 11 Jamboree games
and the Aug. 18 season opener.
The Mitey Mites and Juniors
have split games.
A new challenge faces the
league as one of their founders
and coaches was arrested last
Thursday on multiple drug
charges. Chris Rich, 24, is
accused of eight felonies and
three misdemeanors involving
the sale of cocaine. A check of
his arrest record dates back to
three arrests in Polk County
between June 2006 and January
2008 on drug charges.
A representative of District 5
of Mid-Florida said Monday it
was likely Rich would be sus-
pended from coaching and
other league activities until his
current charges are resolved.
The Hurricanes are in District 5,
along with teams from Avon
Park, DeSoto, Frostproof, Lake
Placid, Okeechobee and Se-
bring.
The smallest team are the
Flag team, ages 4-6, coached by
Joe St. Fort, Albert Sanchez and
James Morris, along with team
mom Leo Luna. The flag team
won its jamboree game at
Simmers Young Park in Winter
Haven, beating the Tampa
Lions 21-7. They also won last
weekend over the DeSoto
Bulldogs 21-20 in overtime.
On the squad are 6-year-olds
Alex Alaniz, Exavion McLeod,
Jordan Morales, Damian Ale-
man, Shaun Cherry, Michael
Brown, Aaron Aleman, Tyresse
Coon and Rogelio Luna; 5-
year-olds Austin Navarro,
Albert Sanchez, Stonzion
Shine, Devin Jackson, Romeo
Flores and Ashton White, plus
7-year-old Dorian Porter and 4-
year-old Augustin Santellan.
The Mitey Mites, ages 7-8,
are coached by James Cruz,
Peter Wilson, Reggie Hurd,
Joey Wilcox, Martrell Brown


and David Navarro with team
mom Brandy Outley. The squad
won its Jamboree game 14-0
and lost in overtime to the
Tampa Lions 18-12.
On the team are 8-year-olds
Caden Dunlap, Fredrick Gra-
ham Jr., Elijah Carlton, Tyler
Coon, Kyle Pitcher, Danny
Sanchez, Aaron Daniels, Edner
Cherry, Adrian Brown, Vicente
Cabrera Jr., Esteban Menedez,
Khalid Lymon and James Cruz;
7-year-olds Trenton Alfred,
DeAnthony Jones, Jeremiah Vo,
David Navarro, Stoney Shine
and Josiah Bragg.
The Pee-Wee group is ages 9-
10 and is coached by Travis
Kilpatrick, Rich and Johnny
Ray Harris, with team moms
Regina Kilpatrick and Julie
Pitcher. The Pee-Wee's won
their opener 21-0 and repeated
with an Aug. 18 victory 19-6
over Tampa.
On this squad are Aaron
Cook, Myron Refoure, Ellis
Hodges, Elijah Faulk, Jhakeri
Cheathan, Rushin Ellison,
Adam Torres Jr., Kevarreis
White, Jacarie Jones, CoRon
Guardo, Stanley Severe,
Damian McWhorter, Nathan
Carrion, Ramand Medrano, Joel
Alvarez, Damario Zuniga, Jef-
frey Pitcher, Angelina Pitcher,
Evan Webster, Johon Ramirez,
Filito Lopez and Larry Cross.


.ou,
,YOUCan 4ppir4n ..
S I rPoets I:" '
Arem you.a poet Lt us show it Your work c ui
t lmnwspaper in "Poara Plac," a weefa
s-lely on readers imtslons. Poems must ,y.%uoi tna.
work, writen by you, not someone else. "o 6appr i kthis tei-
tuIp, send yourgoetry, name'andt town ol reaidece. to e
Ptw The lierald-dvocate, P.O. Box 338, Wauchula 3;rf87
or fa 773 ..' .. :-





Frankie 's

773-5665
116 Carlton St. Wauchula
Now Accepting Hours:
Tuesday Friday 9-6; Saturday 9-3
8:23c


with a new
FREE checking
account'







Dl~ I~Im


MIDFLORIDA is here to work with you
and your schedule with features like:

* 7 am to 7 pm Drive-thru and Help Desk Hours
* Saturday Hours
* Free Debit Card with Rewards
* Free Online Banking and Bill Payment... and More!


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with your refinanced loan
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299,


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with a new
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MIDFLORID

qOUTr community credit union


www.midflorida.com (863) 688-3733 Toll Free (866) 913-3733
Habla Espafol (877) 834-6376


Offers vald as of April 10, 2012. A minimum $5 account is required for meibeirtbiip with MIIIOIII DA and access to these offers. Offers are available for a limited time only and may be(ancelled withool notice. Existing MIOFLOIIDA loans and credit cards do not qualify for the incentive on the specialadvertised
Annual Percentage Rate (APR). Chp(kinq incentive is deposited nt new (hocking amount Loan and (redit card incentives will be applied to a MIDFLORIDA Visa Platinum credit card. Othe rates and terms ar available and are based on credit Visit midflorida.com or see an associate fr details.
1.Anyonewho has heldachecking arcountwith MIDFLORIDA in the past will not quality for thrlIe~ inentive In addition toopenna newchecking account.you must accept and open online hakingq online billpayment. eStatement, eNotice, directdeposit (S500 minimum whkh mutpost within 30daysof
account opening) and a debit card For RT41 checking accounts, you murt make 5 debut card tlansaction in the rs t 30 days in lieu of the direct deposit requirement. Freedom amounts do not qualify for this incentive. Minimum to open is $50. 2, to qualify for the linceltie. you niust refinance a loan of $15.000 o
more from another financial institution loansoof5,000to $14,999will receive a 5100 credit In(entive is offered on new crdirt card accounts nly theintroductory Annual Percentage Rate available on balance transfers is valid for the irt 12 months on new account only. A 1% balance transfer fee willaply.


3 OCATON T O HU CN 0RAL'FLORIDA
Laeln -Hiha.l0 t -A burdae inerav. I.. Dvnprt-Bato -Lke als- vo. .- ebig* Lke lci -Okehoee-.achla-Arada- am a rado Lnd 'Lks Lt


Federally
insured by
NCUA.


LENDER


The Juniors, ages 11-12, won
the opener 13-0 and lost the
game against Tampa 24-12.
Their coaches are not listed.
Players are Levenson Danger,
Derek Daniels, Lorenzo Farias,
Tavon Faulk, Armando Gon-
zalez, Alejandro Mancillas,
Jeremiah Mancillas, Randy
McLeod Jr., Isaac Normil,
Christian Wabanimkee, Jean
Youte and Herculano Zuniga.
The oldest group, ages 13-14,
are the Seniors. Coaches are
Adam Torres, Jason Williams
and Warren McWhorter. They
won the opener 28-0 and won
last week by forfeit.
The players are Fabian
Molina, Ismael Rodriguez,
Austin Vargas, Danny Ramirez,
Michael Williams, Glenn Kelly,
Christopher Williams, Pete
DeLuna, Dylan Carmona,
Jacques Brown, Ja'Quavious
Kimbough, James Hernandez,
Rafael Millian, Johnny Jean,
Frank Farias, TayQuan Bragg,
Emilio Ponce, Deonte Faulk
and Trey Faulk.
This Saturday's games are
against the North Port Huskies.
The Sept. 1 games are against
the Cypress Gardens Gators.
The flag team plays at 9 a.m.,
the Mitey Mites at 10, Seniors
at 11:30, Pee Wee at 1 p.m. and
Juniors at 3.


.. .,: ... ,. ,
. "" ...... ..

: A '

* c*"f:l)


4 12=4







6B The Herald-Advocate, August 23, 2012




The


ABOUT ... Classifieds
DEADLINE ....Tuesday noon
RATES ..........Minimum of $4.00 for 10 words. Each addi-
tional word is 22 cents. Ads in all capitals
are 32 cents per word. Headlines are $2 a
line. Blind ad box numbers are $3 extra.
BILLING........Ads must be pre-paid.
CLASSIFICATIONS:


Agriculture
Appliances
Automobile
Boats
Furniture
Help Wanted
Houses
Livestock
Lost & Found
Miscellaneous


Mobile Homes
Notices
Pets
Plants/Produce
Real Estate
Recreational
Rentals
Services
Wanted
Yard Sales


^ GILLIARD lH

FILL DIRT INC.
i Fl it ok San hl
Pod iging e ic lan g


Lamar Gilliard
Home: (863) 735-0490


Zolfo Springs
c14:9lfc Mobile: (941) 456-6507


a 35 ZOLFO SPRINGS 18 HERE
735-0188 PAV HERE
thing Over o D
PluS4 rrTs &TI O R Ml ,


SMon.


Wed. 10.m- 6,.; Fri. & Sat. 10..-7,./Closed Thursday & Sunday
3505 US HwY 17 S j ZOLFO SPRINGS cl s5e


I I



We offer the BEST and MOST AFFORDABLE
computer services in Wauchula! Free Diagnosis!
*Computer, Cell Phone, TV & Electronics Repair
*Electronics Sales & Installations
*Security Cameras & Systems
*Fax & Notary Services -Computer Classes
863-767-1520 www.PcEmpire.Org
748 N. 6th Ave., Wauchula



Wauchula Garden

Apartments

Now ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS
For 3 Bedroom Apts.
1020 Makowski Rd. #25 Wauchula
863-773-6694


1T TDD
OPPO-ITUIIIT


800-545-1833
ext. 386
8-2-30C HUSw K


NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION
You are hereby notified that Wauchula State Bank
will sell the vehicles described below "As Is" to the
highest bidder for cash, free of prior liens, to satis-
fy legal obligations.
2007 Hond 4D Id#1HGFA16547L094393
2008 Dodge Pk ld#1D7HA16K18J191440
Contact Linda Dean or Shannon Hays for details at
Wauchula State Bank 863-773-4151. The sale will
be held on Friday August 31, 2012 at 10:00 a.m. at
the Wauchula State Bank parking lot located at 106
East Main Street, Wauchula, FL. c18:23,30c


2BR-2B MH/Owned Lot 1982 sq.ft. Furnished -inc. sheets,
towels, dishes and appliances. $25,000
tsereaestte~aho~cm TpsySee Brke


Classifieds


LOOKING for 100 +/- PASTURE,
with possible option to buy, 863-
494-5991. 8:9-9:6p
TIRED OF TENDING CATTLE?
Graze ours/ we'll buy yours. Our
efforts keep your ag status 863-
494-5991. 6:21-8:2p
DIESEL INJECTION repairs,
pumps, turbo, injectors, remove
and install, 863-381-0538.
1:19-1:10(13)p
L. DICKS INC. is now purchasing
citrus fruit for the 2012/13 season
and beyond. Call Mark Manuel @
781-0384. 7:8tfc


PC EMPIRE HIRING an experi-
enced computer tech., 863-633-
8992. 8:16,23p
CAREGIVER/STAFF, CPR Certi-
fied, experience a plus. Apply:
Southern Oaks 157 Will Duke Rd..
See Sunni. 8:9tfc


SPEECH/COMMUNICATION
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTORS- (P/T)
Positions to teach courses at
SFSC's campuses in Highlands,
Hardee & DeSoto counties.
Master's degree in Speech req.
Teaching exp. pref. Immediate
openings. Work schedule varies.
Open until filled. For details visit
http://sfsc.interviewexchange.-
com. (863)-784-7132. EA/EO.
8:23,30c
COMPUTER SCIENCE ADJUNCT
INSTRUCTORS- (P/T) Positions
to teach Introductory courses at
SFSC's campuses in Highlands,
Hardee & DeSoto counties.
Master's degree in Computer'
Science req. Teaching exp. pref.
Immediate openings. Work
schedule varies. Open until filled.
For details visit http://sfsc.Inter-
viewexchange.com. (863)-784-
7132. EA/EO. 8:23,30c


w--,YXE COi L!fi
Home & Insurance Inspections
863-990-4019
SWind Mitigation Four Point Roof Certification
Bowling Green, FL
Lic# HI5099 collwayne4019@gmail.com cl8:23c


W. B. Olliff, Jr., Tree Surgeon, Inc.
773-4478



VFree Estimates
InSLure( I 30()+ yars experience cl8:23c



TITAN BIOFUELS, INC.


Joshua Clemente
Regional Sales Manager
(863)990-6489
j.clemente@titanbiodiesel.com
www.titanbiodiesel.com 8:9-30c



Carol's Pool Service
Serving All Of Highlands & Hardee Counties

Call Us For All Your Pool Service Needs
Carol Tomblin Owner IJ

449-1806 or 452-6026
c11:19tfc




]Pik -------5---s

SF Lawn Mower Blades I
I starting at $25 per set
E Poulan & Sears Mowers
IE .
E Commercial Blades
I $30 per set I
wIsatih" includes Gravely & Dixie Chopper
I purchased set Must bring coupon to receive offer.
I29 "OSTICKRD----- GEN m,, 2


DRIVERS: LOCAL, great pay &
benefits. Home every day. Pd.
Holidays/ac., 401k, CDL-A. w/X
end. School grads. accepted.
866-358-3937. 8:16-9:13p
HANDYMAN NEEDED BILIN-
GUAL IS A MUST! Knowledgeable
in the following fields: electrical,
plumbing, carpentry, flooring,
screen repair, etc. Must be jack of
all trades. Must have a valid dri-
ver's license. Familiar with Health
Dept. and Dept. of Labor regula-
tions is a plus but not a must. Job
description includes but not limit-
ed to: caring and maintaining var-
ious properties throughout Polk,
Hardee and Highlands counties.
Interested and qualified candi-
dates apply at: 2600 Overlook
Drive, Winter Haven, 863-324-
4654, Monday-Friday, 8:30-4:30.
8:23-9:20p

Lst/Found


FOUND: MALE Cur yellow,
neutered, big, 80 Ibs. Lemon
Grove area, 781-3691. 8:23nc


DOG FOUND on 7th Ave. In the
area of Main St. Call 863-773-
5717 or 863-781-1105 to give
description. 8:23nc


2009 CUB CADET 46" cut, excel-
lent condition, $900, 443-366-
5548. 8:23-9:27p
MICKY THOMPSON ALUMINUM
Rims Lug pattern 8 on 170 size
16.5 x 14 with tires, $100 firm,
773-6306. 8:23p


NEED HOMES FOR Yorkies and
Papillions, some free. 863-832-
0680. 8:23p


ATTENTION State Statutes
828.29 requires that all cats and
dogs sold in Florida be at least 8
weeks old, have an official health
certificate, have necessary shots
and be free of parasites., tfc-dh


S eeIs No u 0 0 0 -tlS



*N -







HELP WANTED
CNA .

The Hardee County Sheriff's Office is taking
applications for a full time CNA. You must be at
least 19 years of age, have a high school diploma
or equivalent, never been convicted of a felony
or a misdemeanor, be willing to be fingerprinted,
pass a drug test and work shifts. Applications
may be obtained and returned by 4 p.m., August
31, 2012, at the Sheriff's Office, 900 E. Summit
St., Wauchula, FL. If other arrangements are
necessary, call 863-773-0304 ext. 211. EOE:
cl8:16.23c




INew Tires Include

Free Mount & Balance
Brand Name Tires!





(across from Wal-Mart) it .' t
Semi & Trailer Tiresd b .
THBIG SE ONLMS
RILL TIRES TRE
773-0777 773-0727 So InTw 79C

N-e wT _e--- cl12:29tfc TireTechnician















701 La Playa Drive, Wauchula
FRental OuntceHoarnc

Tuesday & Thursday
9:00 AM 4:00 PM

(863) 773-3809


LJ


AV 9


"q'ff 30 Day Warranty
Motor C' Transmission
." .-- .. .n
l| OR! |
Sandra I I Jimmy
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK SE HABLA ESPANOL
U.S. Hwy. 17 Bowling Green 375-4441
$ Huge Discounts for Cash Deals $
*24 Hour Towing Service Lowest Possible Rates Fast and Reliable
781-3090 or 781-3091 cii:5tfc


i .rT .. .. L i


Large Selection of
Cars to Choose From
Buy Here Pay Here
M 30 Day Guarantee
on Motor & Transmission Only


I -TE AI
8 7 48 9


TDD 800-955-8771
Equal Housing Opportunity


I


I


-1


ir-


II


i







August 23, 2012, The Heralt-Advocate 7B


The


Classifieds


-.-
ADOPT A PETI If you have lost a
pet or are looking for a new one,
the City of Wauchula Invites you
Sto come and see if you can find
the pet you're looking for. The
Wauchula Animal Control Is locat-
ed at 685 Airport Road. Please
call 773-3265 or more informa-
tion. tfc-dh


SUMMER CLOSEOUT PLANT
SALE-AII 1 gallon pots $2, All 3
galloff pots $6, Plumbago, Crape
Myrtle, Ligustrum, Texas Sage,
Thryallis, Viburnum, Jasmine and
more. Rain & Rubber Trees, 1 gal-
lon pots $2. Crape Myrtle Trees, 6'
to 8' tall, $15 or 2/$25. Center Hill
Nursery between Wauchula and
Bowling Green. Call for directions
863-223-5561. 8:23p


2001 CITATION 33', Travel Trailer
bumper pull, large slideout,
$8,500, 781-0199. 8:16-9:13p
TRAVEL TRAILER, $700, 863-832-
4886, great for hunting trailer.
8:16,23p


$I50


Coupo


a
2BR 1 BATH Refrigerator and
stove Included on large lot, 735-
2626. 8:23c
3 BR 1 BATH Central Air & Heat,
carport, shed, fenced, 735-2626.
8:23c
MOBILE HOME FOR RENT Oak
Hill Park, $550 month, $500
deposit, 863-781-3570. 8:23,30c
3/2 MH, 5 acres, $800 monthly,
first last, 863-832-0562. 8:23p
NICE CLEAN FURNISHED effi-
ciency apartment in Wauchula.
Utilities included $500 per month
or $125 per week. Damage
deposit and references required.
863-832-0676 8:16,23p
3 2BR 1 Bath Apartments for
rent in Bowling Green, $600
month, $500 security deposit.
Call for details 863-773-3754.
8:16,23c
TWO BEDROOM APARTMENT,
$500 plus $400 deposit, stove,
refrig., 863-832-1984. 8:16-9:13p
2BR/ 1BA, unfurnished house
near P.O. in Wauchula, newly ren-
ovated, no pets, no smoking,
$650 monthly, $650 deposit and
last months rent, 863-465-1007.
8:16,23p


a I


Women, do you

need lower rent?

See if you qualify call

735-2222 or 773-5717k


a

5BR 2 Bath, 2 car garage. For
information, 954-383-5078.
8:16,23p
3BR/2BA, DOUBLE WIDE Mobile
Home, w/ acreage, secluded area,
Zolfo, $650/ month. 651-717-5049.
8:16,23p
TWO BEDROOM MOBILE HOME,
one mile from Wauchula. Central
A/H, double carport, water,
sewage, garbage, mowing Includ-
ed. No pets, $650 monthly, $650
security, (863) 773-3349. 8:23p
1 BR 1 BATH HOUSE GREAT
location no smoking, no pets,
$650 month $600 security, 773-
9291, 781-1528. 8:2tfc
2 BEDROOM 1 BATH, Duplex,
$550 month, $550 deposit, 773-
0100. 6:21tfc
4 BEDROOM 2 BATH house in
town Wauchula, $850 month, 863-
781-1282, 863-781-0514. 7:19tfc
*RENT-TO-OWN*
MOBILE HOMES 1, 2, 3
Bedrooms. Cheaper then paying
rent. Close to schools and hospi-
tal. Lot rent $300. Se habla
espanol. 863-698-4910 or 863-
698-4908. Call today. 7:5tfc
ULLRICH'S STORAGE UNITS,
several sizes, corner of 9th Ave. &
Goolsby St., 773-6448 or 773-
9291. 3:22tfc
ATTENTION The Federal Fair
Housing Act Prohibits advertising
any preference or limitation
based on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial status or
national origin, or the Intention to
make such a preference or limita-
tion. Familial status Includes chil-
dren under 18 living with parents
or guardians and pregnant
women. tfc-dh


~Also-


Billy & Janice's Rentals
Houses & Apartments

Bowling Green

Flea Market


c18:23c


Shane Conley


JIM SEE REALTY, INC.

206 North 6th Avenue, Wauchula, FL 33873
Office (863)773-0060 Evening (863)781-1338
www. imseerealty.com
James V. See, Jr., Broker


1


LJ


Realtor Associates
Rick Knight (863) 781-1396 Calvin Bates (863) 381-2242
John H. Gross (863) 273-1017 Dusty Albritton (863) 781-0161
Shane Conley (863) 781-9664 Parker Keen (813) 523-1523
1


[B
cl8:23c


I aI


Sizzling Summer Special!

Thru September 20, 2012


Coker Fuel, Inc.

773-4172


* Free Installation
* No Tank Rental for 1 Year
* Free Leak Check
* Up to 10 ft. of Gas Line
* Sign up a friend to receive
a $100 Gas Credit
* Propane only $2.80 per
Gallon for the 1 st fill


OP A



I r


PROPANE


cl8:16-9:20c


-S
STATION, 301 E. Main, tires,
mechanic, ''ler, transmission,
location, lo7:- .~o, 863-773-6616.
8:9-9:6p
LARGE COMMERCIAL OFFICE
space. Approx. 1,780 sq. ft. Heavy
traffic area corner of Main & Hwy
17 (101 East Main) call Elene
Salas, 735-0999. 8:9tfc


AG-BARNS, pump sheds, fence,
cowpens, Duke Platt, 863-202-
6465, CRC058080. 8:16-10:25c
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS,
Thursday 7:00 p.m., Grace
Fellowship Church, 131 S. 8th
Ave., Wauchula. Bill 727-326-
3816. 6:7tfc-dh
OVERCOMERS MEETINGS
(Gillesple), Woman's Club on
Wednesday, 7pm Kenny
Sanders Is the facilitator. For
more Information call 773-5717.
2:16tfc
***
NEED A WELL OR HAVE PUMP
TROUBLE? CALL
ULLRICH'S PITCHER PUMP
For complete well, sales,
service and installation,
call (863) 773-6448.
7:18tfc
THE WAUCHULA LIONS CLUB
collects NOT broken prescription
eyeglasses, cases and sunglass-
es. Please drop off at 735 N. 6th
Ave. tfc-dh
DO YOU HAVE a problem with
drugs? Narcotics Anonymous
meets Monday and Thursday
nights 7:00 p.m. at First United
Methodist Church, at the corner
of Palmetto and 7th Ave., Wau-
chula., tfc-dh
IS ALCOHOL CAUSING a prob-
lem? Call Alcoholics Anonymous
in Hardee County at 781-6414.
Several weekly meetings.
tfc-dh
ATTENTIONI State Statutes 489-
119 Section 5 Paragraph B and
Hardee County Ordinance 87-09
Section 10 Paragraph D require
all ads for any construction-relat-
ed service to carry the contrac-
tor's license number. tfc-dh


MISSION THRIFT STORE INC.
123 N. 7th Ave. All donations
appreciated. Pick-up available for
large items. 773-3069. 1:12tfc
HEAVEN SCENT THRIFT STORE
now offers pick-up service for
large donations. We appreciate
your generous support. 863-773-
9777. 12:29tfc
FRIDAY, SATURDAY. Bake sale,
church yard sale. New Jerusalem
Church of God, 1514 Lincoln St.,
Wauchula, 863-781-0982. 8:23p


AM-SOUTH REALTY
Each office independently owned and operated.


|I ,S^I' --


Robert Hinerman
227-0202


Nancy Craft
832-0370


YOU DON'T WANT TO MISS THIS NEW
LISTING!! 3 Bedrooms, 3 Baths, country
home with large living Room, dining room,'
and kitchen, enjoy the beautiful brick fire-
place in this 2,115 living area home.
Includes Oversized two car garage with
automatic garage opener. Lots of amenities,
all this and more sits on fenced 5 acre Tract
with barn and out buildings. Definitely a
must see listing. Call to see this newly list-
ed home only $199.000
NEW LISTING!! 3 Bedroom, 1 Bath home in
Bowling Green, built in 2006, central
air/heat, appliances, vinyl flooring, priced
right and ready to move in. Only $59.000.
REDUCTION IN PRICE!! $159.900 A quiet
family brick home with 3bd, 2 bth on a no
traffic road outside of city limits. Large oaks
in yard, outbuildings, and an alarm system.
$64.900 for this 3 bedroom, 2 bath in Golf
View Estates on a corner lot with a large
yard and enclosed porch.
REDUCED!!! 3/2 CB home in Bowling
Green, built in 2002 is located within walk-
ing distance to school and shopping, spe-
cial financing is available. Call Today Priced
@ $49.900
Building lot outside of city limits. This 1 acre
tract in Anderson Subdivision is close to
schools and shopping. Ready for new home
to be built. Priced 0 $25.000
REDUCED!! $79.900 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath CB
home, central heat and air, one car carport.
Call today!
PRICE REDUCTION!! $129.000 10 acres
with a 3 Bedroom double wide mobile home
on Parnell Rd. Call today.
NEW LISTING!! Commercial property in
Wauchula, Automotive mechanic shop on .6
acres. Includes 3 lifts, a large air compres-
sor, 2400 SF in mechanic building and 624
SF in office building. Close to US Hwy 17.
Great investment potential.


---
BIG ONE, Friday, Saturday, 8-?
3434 Marion Street, Zolfo
Springs. 8:23p
GIANT YARD SALE, Saturday
only, 7 am-? Tools, beautiful wed-
ding gown, kitchen stuff, crystal,
shoes, purses, and too much to
list. 1685 Louisiana St.,
Wauchula. 8:23p
FRIDAY, SATURDAY, 850 SR64 E,
Zolfo. 4 family. 7-3. 8:23p


aS a
GARAGE SALE, 1244 Sparrow
Road, Farmall tractor, pickup
parts, tools, Saturday 8-3. 8:23p
FRIDAY, SATURDAY, SUNDAY.
Inside sale, 1539 Dena Circle,
Golfview. 8:23p
HUGEI HUGEI Friday, Saturday, 7-
? 1132 Heard Bridge Rd.
Something for everyone. 8:23p


rBOWV1aI I I I I U
I1Ll llrrl I1II11r.ll
1r1


YOUR TIRE HEADQUARTERS
S 5101 N. Hwy 17 Bowling Green
375-44BI "1
New Tire Changer & Balancer
Can Do 26" Wheels
~MRY MONDAY SATURDAY 8 am 6 pm
/ Foreign and Domestic Cars / Diesel Engin
I Gas or Diesel Manual or Automatic Transmiss


MIKE
es
sions


RIEVELL dUVro SaLES













School Crossing Guard Wanted
Part Time $10.00 Hour

The Hardee County Sheriff's office is taking applications
for part time school crossing guards. No experience ne-
cessary. Must be 18 or older, possess a valid Florida driv-
ers license, be willing to be fingerprinted, pass a drug
test and work shifts. You must have never been convict-
ed of a felony or a misdemeanor and pass a background
investigation.
Applications may be obtained and returned at the
sheriffs office, 900 E. Summit St. Wauchula, FL
by 4:00 p.m., August 31, 2012. cl8:16,23c


702 SOUTH 6thAVENUE, WAUCHULA
(863) 773-2122 FAX (863) 773-2173
Gary Delatorre Broker
www.cbhardee.com


Richard Dasher
781-0162


Victor Salazar
245-1054


NEW LISTING!! All the privacy of
country/but close to town! Don't miss this
lovely 3 BR 2Bath custom built home on 10
acres. The 2200 Sq Ft home includes 2 car
garage with extra storage space, open plan
of living room, dining room and kitchen with
curved counter makes this an enjoyable
place to entertain. Extra outdoor storage
building. Fenced pasture with well, where
the Deer and Antelope play. Security win-
dows and doors, $252.500.
NEW LISTING!! 3/2 CB home with new roof,
new A/C unit, remodeled kitchen, great
neighborhood and Priced @ $95.000
NEW LISTING!! This 5 acre tract of land has
been approved by Hardee County Board of
County Commissioners for mulit-family SFR
homes. Property is currently zoned
Residential-1 (R-1). This country location is
only 2 miles from Main street. $75.000.
NEW LISTING!! 2 Bedroom, 1.5 Bath
Townhouse at 711 East Oak, Wauchula.
Possible owner financing with as little as
$4.000 down. Call Gary for more informa-
tion.
This 2 BD, 2 Bath custom built home in
Riverview Heights is Within walking dis-
tance to city park on Peace River. Has open
covered deck on back and new AC unit.
Priced @ $104.900.
LOOKING!! For Just The Right House? Well,
YOU FOUND IT!! Great starter home, Great
first time buyer, Great Senior Citizen home.
3 bedroom, 2 bath, living room, w/raised
ceilings, kitchen fully Furnished, all appli-
ances included, central heat/air, breakfast
room w/pantry, dining room, pass-thru win-
dow from kitchen, living room w/double
doors to tiled covered back porch, easy
care-in-lay flooring helps fight allergies.
This well insulated home keeps monthly
electric bills under a $100. AND IT'S Only
$129.500 Call Nancy to see this lovely
home. c18:23c


HARDEE CAR COMPANY
BuY HERE PAY HERE


U


Hardee Car Hours:
Mon.- Sat. 9am 7pm Sun. 1lm- 6pm

773-6667
Wauchula Across from First National Bank


NEW LISTING! Custom built 2-3 bedrooms, 2 /
bath home on 1 acre. 3.052 sf of living. Oversized
2 car garage. Screened saltwater pool with a hot
tub and covered entertainment area. 12 foot ceil-
ings plus many more attributes! $330,000
3 Bedroom, 2 Bath home in Wauchula. Newer
roof, hardwood floors, updated kitchen. $61,000
58 acres of gorgeous fenced property close to
town. Well & septic from old homesite. Scattered
old Oaks & Pines. Offered at $287,100


REDUCED to $159,500! Great home on several
large lots in Wauchula. Hardwood floors.
Beautiful brick fireplace. 3 bedrooms, 2 baths. 2
car carport.

3 Bedroom, 2 Bath home located on a quiet cul-
de-sac. Large detached garage with workshop.
Numerous upgrades! $179,500


515 S. 6th Ave. Wauchula


I


- _I ---


14







8B The Herald-Advocate, August 23, 2012


The


MANAGERS

SPECIALL

2005
3 BR SINGLEWIDE

Delivered Set-up Skirting New A/C
SAVE SAVE








4 A ~F



al,


1>1 .I


Spacious 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath home in Town and Country
Estates, Wauchula. Formal living room, family room, and
great room! Pool, sun deck, cul-de-sac, lush backyard,
adjacent to an elementary school.
Call today for a showing! $195,000

ealtOn


The idge1c

SKelly Wadsworth Moye Realtor









0oe LDatls


IN C., R E A


. ,
c -- / REALTOR
See mo
Karen O'Neal vNVSw.jc
(863) 781-7633 REAL ESTAI


3BR/2BA/2CG home has beau-
tiful golf course view. $225,000!
Well maintained 2BR/2BA MH
on 2 wooded acs, set back from
SR 66 w/beautiful oaks for
seclusion. $55,000!
PRICE REDUCED! Wow!
Great home in Popash area on
2.5 acs. 2 miles from town.
$138,000!
Paradise: Little Gasparilla
Island-Beach Condo. 2BR/2BA,
Gulf front. $229,000!
38.5 acs on the Peace River
wflots of beautiful oaks, pines &
palmettos! Pole barn &
2BR/2BA MH. $479,900!
PRICE REDUCED! 10 ac
w/paved rd frontage. Great for
pasture, farming or homesite.
$49,500!


L T 0 R S
(863) 773-2128


REALTORS
JOE L. DAVIS
JOE L. DAVIS, JR.
JOHN H. O'NEAL
,re listings at
Deldavis.com
rE INVESTMENTS


PRICE REDUCED! 20 acs
zoned industrial on Hwy 17.
$399,000!
PRICE REDUCED! 50 acs in
NE Desoto Co; deer, turkey,
wild hogs, beautiful live oaks,
improved pasture, pond &
creek. NOW $190,000!
Commercial property on US17!
38 storage units w/partial roof,
city utilities, zoned C-2, sold "as
is"! $225,000!
PRICE REDUCED! 3BR/2BA
MH on 5 acs w/frontage on SR
62. NOW $60,000!
3BR/1BA home in Wauchula
w/separate, potential income
producing, 24'x24', 1BR/1BA,
CB apartment. $35,000!
Historic home in Wauchula has
room for large family
w/6BR/4BA 3 porches & an
office. Sold "as is". $70,000!


REALTOR ASSOCIATES AFTER HOURS
KENNY SANDERS- 781-0153 KAREN O'NEAL........... 781-7633
KEVIN SANDERS.......990-3093 MONICA REAS-..........781-0888
DAVID ROYAL.........781-3490 JIMMY EDENFII-LD.....448-2821
3 HIGHWAY 17 SOUTH. WAUCHULA. FL 33873 .23
|B | ____ c8.23c


Classifieds


Should IDA Membership Change?


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-/. -ate
Action on a proposal to
increase the IDA membership
has been postponed.
At last Thursday's meeting of
the Hardee County Commis-
sion, one of the items for dis-
cussion was a resolution to
make the Industrial Develop-
ment Authority and Economic
Development Council have the
same membership.
After lengthy discussion, it
was decided to put off a deci-
sion until the Oct. 4 meeting.
Bill Lambert, director of eco-
nomic development for the
IDA, opened the discussion by
deferring to county attorney
Ken Evers, who is also attorney
for the IDA and EDC.
Evers said the gist of the situ-
ation was that over the last sev-
eral months, the members of the
EDC who are not also members
of the IDA were feeling less
equal or important than the nine
who had dual membership.
Therefore, it was felt better to
equalize it by making all mem-
bers of the EDC also members
of the IDA. Since there were
more members on the EDC, the
proposed resolution would
increase the IDA membership
from not less than 9 and not
more than 13. In effect, that
means the EDC currently has
14 members, but the IDA has
only six at this time.
Current IDA members are
chairman Joe Albritton, vice
chairman Vanessa Hernandez,
James See Jr., Michael Prescott,
Lory Durrance, Rick Justice.
Joining them on the EDC are
John O'Neal, Donald Samuels,
Lavon Cobb, Douglas Jensen,
Dorothy Conerly, Robert
Krause, Diana Youmans and
Paul Roberts
The difference is that EDC
members do the behind-the-
scenes contact to solicit and
evaluate proposed businesses
for the community and IDA
members have control of the
Business Park and the finances.
Vetting of new business pro-
posals seeking IDA funding has
recently been turned over to the
Hardee County Chamber of
Commerce, which is a private
community organization that is
co-located with the IDA/EDC
offices on East Main Street in
Wauchula.
The proposed resolution says
the dual membership would
"provide for interchanging of
the use of director and mem-
ber." Terms of the dual mem-
bers would be staggered.
Commissioner Rick Knight


asked IDA/EDC liaison Com-
missioner Grady Johnson for
his opinion of the proposed
change.
Grady Johnson said he was "a
little concerned. I would like to
wait until the Auditor General's
report on its investigation of the
IDA is completed. I'm uncom-
fortable making a decision until
then. I understand there is no
emergency to do this."
Lambert said he knew of no
effect by the Attorney General's
operational report and the pro-
posed change was one suggest-
ed when the IDA was audited
late last year. "We spent
$50,000 trying to get the
finances straightened out and
would like to get this done
before the new year. Other
counties have this dual mem-
bership. The Auditor General's
report could take as long as 18
months."
Evers reiterated the frustra-
tion of the EDC members,
"IDA owns the property and
makes financial decisions. Why
are we here? They feel exclud-
ed from the more significant
matters."
Lambert said another consid-
eration is that the EDC is a
501.(c) organization operating
out of the Sunshine Law, while
the IDA is in the Sunshine or
open government state law.. He
said both should be in the
Sunshine.
He also said the IDA was cre-
ated because of citizen petitions
which established one in every
county. It and the EDC were
refined and memberships ap-
pointed several times, the last in
2001.
Grady Johnson noted, how-
ever, that "they also gave the
Board of County Commission-
ers the authority to create the
IDA. In December a letter held
the Board accountable to see
that the IDA completed its
audits in a timely manner."
Commissioner Dale Johnson
commented, "This isn't rocket
science. The membership of
these groups are not related to
the audits and review. "
Former IDA/EDC member
Nancy Craft said the problem
has been created by the com-
mission, which doesn't know
what the IDA and EDC do.
"We've allowed our land, right
of ways, etc. to be sold and
allow one group to decide what
is best. Transportation Trust
(Road Department) is always
begging for money and roads
are a part of economic develop-
ment. Educate yourselves. IDA
is the holder of deeds and


you've allowed this to happen."
Citizen Frank Kirkland said
"This is being played off as
about the number of members
on a board, but is part of a plan
to bypass the law. There's been
millions of dollars spent with-
out reports. You should close
the door but you don't want to
listen."
Pam Belflower asked if the
proposed resolution was ap-
proved, who then would decide
when membership should be
nine, or 10 or 13.
Lambert said it would be
under the purview of the com-
mission to decide.
Benny Hash said it sounded a
lot like the old game of "murder
ball." If one team loses, it just
goes over and joins the other.
"If you have two boards and
make them the same members,
why have two boards, just have
one. Why not wait until the
audit and the next election is
over?"


ABOUT ...
School News
The Herald-Advocate en-
courages submissions from
Hardee County schools.
Photos and write-ups
should be of recent events,
and must include first and
last names for both students
and teachers. Identify pho-
tos front to back, left to right.
Deadline for submissions
is 5 p.m. on Thursday.
Please include the name
and phone number of a con-
tact person. Qualifying
items will be published as
space allows.


SEEDS
FROM
... ITHE t
SOWER
MicuI A Dulrv. 0D
A I Iouljry*I
A salesman complimented
a young mother on her well-
behaved son, adding, "I have
eight children of my own."
"Eight kids!" she ex-
claimed in disbelief. "I can't
imagine dividing my love by
eight."
"I don't divide my love," he
said, "I multiply it!"
How like God. We read in
His word that "God so loved
the world that He gave His
only Son ... for everyone."
His love is unlimited and all
inclusive. And we would
never know how much He
loved us until it was seen in
Scripture. Love began with
God, was seen in Jesus and
ends with us. There is no way
to know, experience or un-
derstand the love of God ex-
cept through the Son of God.
As we put our lives into His
hands, He will put His love
into our hearts. And as we
come to understand His love
we will realize that He has a
lot of love for us to share with
others, and we can help to
multiply His love as we serve
others.
Visit us at: www.SowerMinistries.org

Things do not change; we
change.
-Henry David Thoreau

Violins weigh less than 16
ounces yet resist string
tension of over 65 pounds.


res& le Inc.


Realtors
NOEY A. FLORES, BROKER
310 Court St.
Wauchula, Florida 33873
(863) 773-3337 Fax: (863) 773-0144
www.floresrealty.net


Noey A. Flores
BROKER
863-781-4585


WAUCHULA 3BR/1BA frame home with detached cb
garage. Fresh paint, new carpet, and metal roof.
Priced to sell at $45,000
WAUCHULA 4BR/2BA Mobile Home on 20+/- acres with cen-
tral air & heat on a private road. Completely fenced for cattle or
horse, large open living area, garden tub, carport, and front
porch. Home sits to the back of the property for lots of privacy.
Offered at $175,000
ZOLFO SPRINGS 3BR/2BA Frame home on Hwy 17 Corner
Lot Zoned Commercial Outbuildings Lots of Opportunities -
Priced to Sell at $149,900
WAUCHULA 107 Acres just out Wauchula on E. Main St. Great
farming orgrazing opportunity. $736,700

WE SHARE THE SAME MLS WITH HIGHLANDS COUNTY!
L- Remember, Our listings are on the Internet.
Anyone with a computer can access them anytime!
After Hours
hi WII ^k7


I WHY RENT WHEN Y(


D BUILD EQUITY!!! cl8:23c


4/2 CB Home, Nice Wooded Lot,
C/A/H, New Kitchen Appliances,
Washer/Dryer, New Paint Inside and
Out. 713 N. 9th Ave., Wauchula
$79,000 OBO


Carol's Realty
1534 Yancy St., Port Charlotte, FL 33952
Call James Collie for appointment
(863) 412-8932

(941) 627-2769
~8'!6-9 6


FREE-2 BUCS TICKETS

SEE WILDCAT PAGE
Center Section of "C"

For Your Chance To Win


S"You Name

The Score"
(A Winner Every Week)


FREE-$40 GIFT CARD

SEE WILDCAT PAGE
Center Section of "C"

For Your Chance To Win

S"You Name

The Score" p
(A Winner Every Week)


I


I ___j


81 I - I


6
lbo








August 23, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 9B


Afghanistan


A Land Hungry For Christ


Former Hardee County Extension Director Returns From 31st Trip


By CHIP BALLARD
Special To The Herald-Advocate
The suicide bomber went off into the inky blackness of
Kandahar, Afghanistan, sometime before tdwni. the explosion mak-
ing a reverberating blast such as that which might usher in
Armageddon.
As the three-story building began to crumble, less than 30
meters away Lockie Gary was thrown out of bed and rushed into the
hallway in his skivvies. His personal protection officer (PPO), one
of nearly 200 professionals hired to protect Gary and his fellow
expatriates, was already there fully dressed and armed with his
ever-present AK-47, an assault rifle invented in Russia during
WWII and which still kills as many as a quarter-million people a
year in every corer of the globe.
An ensuing fire-fight blazed for eight hours, leaving many
dead or wounded. The bedlam ended only after the security team
went room to room tossing grenades and killing the last four insur-
gents. Such scenes are common in Afghanistan, especially


said, "Dr. Lockie, I will be killed if it's discovered I am here.
Everyone knows you are a Christian and if they think I am con-
verting to Christianity, I will be tortured and killed."
But the man was curious about the Christian God's position on
forgiveness. Gary explained He was loving and merciful and that
His son, Jesus, while on the cross had asked His Father to forgive
those who crucified Him.
The man burst into tears. "I cannot forgive," he said. He told
Gary that he had been falsely accused of a crime and thrown into a
filthy little jail. "When my wife came to negotiate my release, the
guards laughed and dragged her inside and raped her all night. I
could hear her screams."
He said he was tortured with red-hot steel bars pressed to the
bottoms of his bare feet. The Afghan wept bitterly. "I cannot for-
give, Dr. Lockie."
The Quran in Sura 4:34 says: "Men are managers of the affairs
of women because Allah has made one superior to the other."
A high-ranking Afghan official told Gary, "Get this straight,
Mr. Gary. You see that cow? She has more value than a woman in
Afghanistan. A cow can produce a calf and it can be milked. A
woman can be bred but she cannot be sold. What value does she
have?"
Even in blistering heat women must wear the burqa, which
covers them from the top of the head to the fingertips and toes.
Gary has seen women severely beaten in public for accidentally
exposing a small portion of ankle.


One must wonder at the depth of Gary's desire to help poor
farmers for it to draw him back to this land where his life is con-
stantly at risk again and again.
He explains: "The Afghans are good people, but they are lost.
They have no hope in this life or the next. I teach reproductive
physiology and animal husbandry, but I also tell the people about
our Christian God. People flock to my hootch to hear about Jesus
in spite of the very real threat of torture and death. I've never seen
people anywhere so hungry for the Word of God.'"
He continues, "I study both the Bible and the Quran every day.
I can tell you, no matter what you hear politicians say, Islam is not
a religion of peace."
He points to the Sura, 3:54. "And they cheated and deceived,
and Allah cheated and deceived, and Allah is the best of cheaters
and deceivers."
"That is not a god I want taught to my children. And I can
assure you no military action will ever bring peace to Afghanistan.
The only thing that will do that is the acceptance of Christianity,"
he says.
When is he, Lockie Gary, going back there?
"When God calls me," he says. "Until then I'll stay here and
study the Word and teach Sunday School, but when the Call comes
the only way they will keep me out is to kill me."
Gary is a man of God who not only talks the talk but walks the
walk. The terrain he traverses is rugged and wild, but he believes
his mission is worth the risks.


COURTESY PHOTOS
Lockie Gary with Afghan farmers who became friends.
Kandahar, where the Taliban was organized in 1994.
The first two weeks were mostly uneventful, with few explo-
sions and little gunfire. The Taliban was busy harvesting poppy
crops, which now account for two-thirds of the gross nation prod-
uct (GNP) of Afghanistan and supplies 90 percent of the world's
heroin. The largest acreages are in the provinces of Kandahar and
Helmand. A wheat farmer can gross $250-$300 per acre, but he can
make 10 times that much growing poppies.


new-' ++t
IDP (Internally Displaced Persons) housing in Musa
Qala. Amnesty International claims there are 400 new
IDPs every day in Afghanistan.


Afghan boys move goats through the city to grazing land.
Young boys helping in the harvest often become addicts by
scraping the poppy head for the opium gum, which enters the
bloodstream through the skin or cut fingers; also, harvesters are
known to clean the knife by licking the blade. Many Afghan par-
ents smear opium on the navel of young children to quiet them or
put them to sleep, making them addicts for life.
When the harvest was done, the explosions and gunfire began
again.
The thing that has drawn Gary to the Middle East 31 times,
and to Afghanistan six, is his desire to help Afghan farmers by
teaching reproductive physiology to help them care for and multi-
ply their flocks and herds.
Gary is well-qualified for this task, having received both a
bachelor's degree and a master's in reproductive physiology from
Penn State University and having taught at the State University of
New York for 10 years. He has managed slaughter houses, trained
meat inspectors, and managed ranches in Texas, Colorado, Jack-
sonville, and Arcadia. He worked as a livestock extension agent in
Sarasota County and county extension director in Hardee. He now
resides in Arcadia with Karyn, his wife of 35 years, who holds two
master's degrees and a doctorate and is presently a candidate for
superintendent of schools in DeSoto County.
The poverty, savagery, and ignorance which 'permeate
Afghanistan defy the imagination of most Westerners. One rela-
tively well-to-do Afghan man, who owned a half-dozen head of
cattle, complained to Gary that his fat cows got fatter while his
skinny ones got poorer. Gary explained to the man that he needed
to feed the fat cows less and the skinny ones more he had been
feeding them all the same. Another man, attempting to reduce the
pressure in a cow's bloated belly, accidentally killed the animal try-
ing to insert a shovel handle clown its throat and out its back end.


Young Kuchi girl tending family flock of Karakul sheep.
'Afghans were astonished to learn that water improved both the
quality and quantity of milk a cow is able to produce.
In Afghanistan, where the average lifespan is 41 years, one
child in four dies before the age of 5. The vast majority of Afghans
are illiterate; only three percent of girls and 30 percent of boys
attend school. Most girls are forced into marriage between the ages
of 7 and 11. A man can have as many as four wives. Forty lan-
guages are spoken in Afghanistan, and there are 200 dialects. Ten
million active land mines, compliments of the Soviet Union, cover
the Afghan terrain.
Once an Afghan man came to Gary's mud hut after dark and


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10B The Herald-Advocate, August 23, 2012


Wasted Time

The time that I've wasted is my biggest regret,
Spent in this place I'll never forget.
Just sitting and thinking of things that I've done,
The crying, the laughing, the hurt and the fun.
So now I sit with my hard-driven guilt,
I see a wall of emptiness I allowed to be built.
Trapped in my body and wanting to run,
Back to my youth before drugs were done.
The chase is over, with no place to hide,
I've lost it all, including my pride.
With reality suddenly right in my face,
I was sentenced to five years in this place.
Thoughts of the past flash through my head,
My pain is hidden through silent tears I shed.
I ask myself why and where did I go wrong,
I guess I was weak when I should have been strong.
Living for the drugs and the wings I had grown,
My feelings were lost, afraid to be shown.
Looking back is easy to see,
The fear that I had was afraid to be me.
What my future will hold, I really don't know,
But the years I've wasted are starting to show.
I just look for the day that I get a new start,
When I can live the dreams I hold deep in my heart.
Until that day comes, I'll keep in mind,
These years that I've wasted from
"doing time."
-Amanda Valdez
Gadsden Correctional Institution
Quincy

PUBLISH YOUR ORIGINAL POETRY!
Poet's Place is a feature which relies solely on reader input.
Only your original work may be submitted. Send your poetry
to: Poet's Place, The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338,
Wauchula, FL 33873.


Letter To The Editor

Women Will March On

Republican Convention


Dear Editor:
As a born Wauchula native
who went early admission to
New College and was the first
emancipated minor in Hardee
County history, I have worked
very hard for the accomplish-
ments in my life. One of the
ones of which I am most proud
is my history of activism.
Right now, we are a society in
huge crisis. Instead of talking
about the real issues and mak-
ing this country better for
everyone, politicians want to
rehash Roe vs. Wade and birth
control for all.
From my long-term work in
media, I can assure you that this
is a smokescreen to keep the
populous diverted from the real
issues, such as debate of the
necessity and possible abolish-
ment of the Federal Reserve;
the disabled, homeless and dis-
enfranchised; the need to end
our imperialistic military ten-
dencies; healthcare reform; and
job opportunities for the middle
class.
Because of this, and especial-
ly in order to stand up to the
conservatives' "war on
women," UniteWomen.org of
Florida for which I am the state
media director, will be march-
ing alongside the Coalition to
March on the RNC.
The event will take place in
Tampa along the parade route.
UniteWomen.org of Florida
members and many other
organizations will unite to par-
ticipate in the demonstration
that begins at 10 a.m. on this
coming Monday at Perry
Harvey Senior Park, 1200 N.
Orange Ave., for the
Republican National Conven-
tion.
This demonstration demands
good jobs, health care, afford-
able education, equality and
peace while saying no to the
Republican agenda and corpo-
rate greed.
How anyone can fail to sup-
port better jobs, better health
care, women's right to equality,
and peace truly remains mind-
boggling. Yet I spent 16 years
of my life in Wauchula, and I
know there are huge conserva-
tives out there who for some
reason don't relish helping oth-
ers or see what seems like the
obvious, humane choice of
action. Sadly, often these
staunch conservatives consider
themselves to be serious dedi-
cated Christians, which makes
the situation even more difficult
to grasp.
Jesus helped others, not com-
piled money. Jesus stayed out
of politics. And Jesus didn't tell
anyone how to live their daily
lives, only to believe in His love


and to show it.
And now we have reached a
point where most display apa-
thy rather than love for anyone
who is different than they are in
any fashion.
So because of this, I wanted
to present the reality that not all
of us from Hardee County bury
our heads in the sand, but rather
try to right wrongs wherever we
find them.
Women can empower them-
selves and join us for this
demonstration on Monday,
where they will have a voice
instead of feeling powerless and
trapped. We will let the entire
world know, "We have had
enough of the endless attacks
on the rights of women, work-
ing people, and our standard of
living!"
We will defend Medicare,
Medicaid and Social Security.
We will defend ourselves
against union busting. We will
defend our children's right to an
affordable, quality education.
We want money spent on
human needs, not on wars over-
seas and solely corporate inter-
ests.
For too long, too many politi-
cians in both political parties
have ignored the needs of
women while serving the inter-
ests of the rich and powerful.
We need to take things into, our
own hands and advance the
cause of justice and make our
voices heard. Tampa is the
place we will raise our voices.
Will you care to join us? If
so, you will be warmly wel-
comed.
Those wanting to know more
can go to www.unitewomen.org
to find out the work we are
doing.
Please, for me, based on my
own experience in Hardee
County, remember that it is OK
to be different. It's OK to have
liberal values. And it's neces-
sary that you speak your mind
on these things.
As JFK said in one of his
notable speeches, "No man
should fear scrutiny of his
administration. For from that
scrutiny comes understanding,
and from that understanding
comes opposition and support,
and both are necessary ... For I
have complete faith in the
response of our citizens, so long
as they are fully informed."
Sincerely,
Lin Sbordone (formerly
Laura Lin Harper)
Palm Beach

Anybody who thinks
money will make you
happy, hasn't got money.
-David Geffen


COUNTY COURT
The following marriage
licenses were issued recently
in the office of the county
court:
Jose Luis Rodriguez Cer-
vantes, 26, Sarasota, and Maria
Del Refugio Sierra, 32, Zolfo
Springs.

The following small claims
case was disposed of recently
by the county judge:
IPFS Corp. vs. Rimes & Son
Agricultural Service Inc., de-
fault judgment.

The following misde-
meanor cases were disposed
of recently in county court:
Johnny Lee Cook, disorderly
intoxication and violation of the
open container law, time
served, $325 fine and court
costs and $50 cost of prosecu-
tion placed on lien.
Susan Myrtle Mixon, sale of
alcohol to a person under 21,
adjudication withheld, $325
fine and court costs, $50 cost of
prosecution.
Harold Crooms, failure to
obtain an environmental permit,
not prosecuted.
Guadalupe Hernandez-Oc-
ampo, improper exhibition of a
deadly weapon and trespass on
property other than a structure
or conveyance, adjudication
withheld, probation one year,
$325 fine and court costs, $100
public defender fees, $50 cost
of prosecution, $50 investiga-
tive costs; battery, not prosecut-
ed.
Kevin John McQueeney, two
counts trespass on structure or
conveyance and resisting arrest
without violence, not prosecut-
ed.
Carrie Lauren Crews, viola-
tion of probation (original
charges resisting an officer
without violence and posses-
sion of drug paraphernalia),
probation revoked, four months
in jail with credit for time
served, $50 public defender fee
and $50 cost of prosecution
added to outstanding fines and
fees and placed on lien.
Andrew Rupert, violation of
probation (original charges two
counts possession of marijuana
and two counts possession of
drug paraphernalia), probation
revoked, seven months in jail
with credit for time served, $50
public defender fee, $50 cost of
prosecution and $50 investiga-
tive fees added to outstanding
fines and fees and placed on
lien.
CIRCUIT COURT
The following civil actions
were filed recently in the
office of the circuit court:
Joseph A. Kane vs. Torrey
Oaks Golf Course Inc., dam-
ages negligence.
Bank of America vs. Gracie
McCumber et al, petition for
mortgage foreclosure.
Wauchula State Bank vs.


Gerald Howard Olier, damages
- contracts and indebtedness.
Nancy Wolfson vs. Amaurice
Patterson, petition for injunc-
tion for protection.
Department of Children and
Families vs. Florida Institute
for Neurologic Rehabilitation,
petition for injunctive relief.
Lamar Lopez vs. Kenneth
Tucker, Department of Correc-
tions et al, petition to review
inmate situation.
M&T Bank vs. Mayra I.
Citron and Raul Citron, petition
for mortgage foreclosure.
Center FSB vs. Stephone D.
and Patricia Carlton, petition
for mortgage foreclosure.

The following decisions on


Courthouse Report


civil cases pending in the cir-
cuit court were handed down
recently by the circuit court
judge:
Ford Motor Credit Co. vs.
Christopher J. Friers, judgment.
Gene L. and Mary Malpas
vs. Victor Emilio Gonzalez and
the Hardee County Board of
County Commissioners, dis-
missal of defendant Victor
Emilio Gonzalez.
Brenda DeSantiago and Brett
A. Contreras, order.
Donnell T. Patton and
Rajeeni Deborah Faulk, order.
Paul Rodriguez DeLaCruz
and the state Department of
Revenue vs. Thomas Alvarado,
order.
Juana Maria Ayala vs. Pedro
Domingo Juarez, dismissal of
temporary injunction for pro-
tection.
Linda Sue Tindell vs.
Christopher Mark Tindell, dis-


INVITATION TO BID


COUNTY LINE ROAD (CR-664)
RESURFACING, RESTORATION
AND REHABILITATION (RRR)

Sealed bids for the construction of County Line Road (CR 664) will be received by the
Hardee County Purchasing Director at 205 Hanchey Road, Wauchula, FL 33873 until 2:00
P.M., Monday, September 17, 2012, local time at 205 Hanchey Road, Wauchula,
Florida 33873, at which time they will be opened and read aloud in'the office of the Hardee
County Public Works Department.

Hardee County is seeking a qualified contractor to provide labor, materials and equipment
to complete milling and resurfacing of 4.22 miles of existing two lane rural highway, includ-
ing reworking the shoulders, extending existing cross-drains where specified, replacing
existing side-drains and mitered ends and installing new signage and striping. The road-
way/project shall be left in a neat and clean condition. All workmanship and materials shall
be in conformance with the Florida Department of Transportation Standard Specifications
for Road and Bridge Construction (2010) and the Design Standards for Design, Construc-
tion, Maintenance and Utility Operations on the State Highway System (2010).

Copies of the plans and specifications may be obtained from the office of the Engineer,
Chastain-Skillman, Inc, 363 US Highway 27, Sebring, Florida 33870, upon payment of
$100.00, which includes sales tax, for each set. This fee is non-refundable. Contact W. R.
Cauthan, P.E. at 863-383-4160. Plans and specifications will be available beginning
on Thursday, August 23, 2012.

Contractors submitting bid proposals must obtain bid documents from the Engineer
for bid to be considered. Contractors submitting bid proposals must submit proposals
on all work items in the contract to be considered a responsive bidder.

A MANDATORY pre-bid conference will be held on Monday, September 10, 2012 at
2:00 P.M. local time at the Hardee County Division of Public Works, 205 Hanchey
Road, Wauchula, Florida 33873.

The Public Construction bond and specified insurance are required to be secured from or
countersigned by an agency of the surety or insurance company, which agency shall have
an established place of business in Florida and be duly licensed to conduct business
therein.

Bids shall be enclosed within a sealed envelope with the words "BID ENCLOSED" and the
Bidder's name clearly marked on the outside thereof. The bid package shall contain one
(1) original and two (2) copies. Bids received after 2:00 P.M., September 17, 2012, local
time will be returned unopened.

Hardee County reserves the right to: waive informalities and/or irregularities in any BID,
delete any portion of the project; extend the project within the limits of the work involved
which in its judgment is in the best interests of the County. Bids may be withdrawn prior
to the date and time of bid opening. The County reserves the right to reject any or all bids
in whole or in part, with or without cause, to adjust the Quantities for budgetary purposes
and/or to accept the bid that is judged to be in the best interest of the County and may
postpone the award of the Agreement for a period of time which shall not extend beyond
sixty (60) calendar days from the Bid opening date.

Minor Bryant, Chairman
Hardee County Board of County Commissioners
8:23c


missal of temporary injunction
for protection.

There was no felony crimi-
nal court last week as the
judge was unavailable.

The following real estate
transactions of $10,000 or
more were filed recently in
the office of the clerk of court:
Bank of America to Amalia
B. Dorado and Felix J.
Gonzalez, $45,OCO.
Evelyn S. Keeler to Stewart
C. and Patricia L. Yust,
$55,000.
Elaine Adams to Juan
Rodriguez, $90,000.


As long as you derive inner
help and comfort from any-
thing, keep it.
-Mahatma Gandhi







August 23, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 11B


Rodeo Bits
By Kathy Ann Gregg


WHO SAID COWBOYS CAN'T IANCE?
.Reality Ranch Youth Rodeo ~eld its annual awards banquet on
May 14 for the second year of yeo competition. We all met at the
Nickerson/Ullrich Pavilion in Pion, r Park for some great food and
sweet tea, camaraderie, and lots of prizes for all of the youngsters
who rode roughstock (including those wild and woolly sheep rid-
ers), roped and/or tied calves, ran barrels or poles, and tied goats.
But before we get to the actual awards, this column is dedicat-
ed to those cowboys who kicked up their heels and cut a rug after-


ward. Keith Weems was the emcee for this event, and provided the
music after the show.
I see these youngsters month after month, year after year,
showing off their rodeo skills, celebrating their wins and shaking
off defeat, riding with casts on their arms, picking themselves out
of the dirt when a dismount doesn't come off as planned, and mak-
ing friends with each other for a lifetime.
But was 1 surprised when 1 got to see their dancing skills!
Who knew that Dawson Cantu and Tony Webb had moves like
that? Now, Cameron Cantu can move like he's a liquid with no
bones to get in the way. And those Carlton grandchildren Taylor
and Jake Bolin, and Pat and even little Zack Carlton were getting
down and line dancing. Taylor, as the Hardee County Cattleman's
Sweetheart, handed out all of the awards that evening, then got into
the swing of the music and kicked up her heels with the cowboys.
(And Taylor has been busy in her new position of the 2012-13
Florida Cattlemen's Sweetheart, so we'll be seeing her in many
upcoming columns. Congrats to you, young lady!)
And I heard a story about Cameron Cantu with the little ladies
on the dance floor in Arcadia just a couple of weeks before the
Reality banquet. It seems Cameron was doing a dance (what grand-
ma Leslie describes as a Russian tango!), leading his dance part-
ners totally around the dance floor. These two little ladies, Lacey
and Jessica from the east coast, took turns dancing with him, until
one got a little jealous of her best friend getting more time on the
dance floor and started pulling her away by the hair! (Cameron,
you little heartbreaker!)
While I have a little extra space before getting to the awards,
I'll also list the event sponsors: Roman III Ranch, CF Industries,
the SeminoleTribe/Fred Smith Arena, Weekely Bros./Davie Pro
Rodeo, State Farm/David Singletary, All Creatures Animal
Hospital, the Hardee County Cattleman's Association, Fields
Drainage, Eco Consultants, Petteway Groves and Citrus & Cattle,
Jane, and Lefty Durando and, Susannah and Jay Belflower, Eli's
Western Wear, Burnett Farms, Florida Fence Post, Stitch-n-Sign,
Central Florida Excavatirg, BP Farms, Speckled Dog, the Gopher
'Hill Hunt Club,'MJB Cattle Co., Don Heinter, D&C Power, Dan
Heintze, Heartland Growers Supply, the Florida Institute for
Neurologic Rehabilitation,, and, of course Pastor Randy and Reality
SRanch.
Now, enjoy these photos. And don't laugh too hard!


Keep these "Bits, coots ana bridles riding. Let Kathy Ann Gregg
in on your events and achievements, and she'll keep you covered.
Reach her at ksleepyk@aol.com or 773-9459. Keep on riding,
Cowboys and Cowgirls!


Tony Webb seems to be
looking for a female dance
partner!
Food was first served on a
commercial airplane in
1919.


Jake Bolin shows cousin
Zack Carlton how to "get
down" in the dance!

Ah, how good it feels! The
hand of an old friend.
-Henry Wadsworth
Longfellow
A man's growth is seen in
the successive choirs of,
his friends.
-Ralph Waldo Emerson


I don't know what this dance move is called, but Dawson
Cantu and Kirklin "Grunt" Boney sure look like they are
having fun doing it!


COURTESY PHOTOS BY KATHY ANN GREGG
Taylor Bolin (middle) shows brother Jake (right) and
cousin Pat Carlton (left) how to kick up their heels in this
line dance.


his fluid moves.


s P Deseamos anunciar

V E 4 t que estamos aceptando

,. U pacientes nuevos.
Nowbomn Children C Adolescents


Proveemos cuidado deste el recien
nacido hasta los 18 arios. Real-
izamos examenes fisicos para la
escuela y deportes. Ademis, para
ofrecer mejor atenci6n a nuestra
comunidad hispana, contamos con
un medico bilingue.


r r'I


SRaji Sonni 7-Dr. Marcela Ji

1125 S. 6th Ave. ,Wauchula 8:30am 5:00pm Lunes a Viernes


I U


F


' ~%'


a )~-"


*/ ,


'Si


Hardee County residents Jarrett Weeks, Caleb Abbott, Richie Vaughn, Juan Coronado, and Jerry Byrdon the job at CF Industries' Hardee Phosphate Complex.


For over 30 years, CF has supported Hardee County
by providing good jobs, taxes, and community service,
and by partnering with education leaders and community organizations.


CF CARES ABOUT SAFETY, THE ENVIRONMENT AND THE CITIZENS OF HARDEE COUNTY.



CF
Phosphae Rock Mine & Benefclation Plant
6209 County Road 663 I Wauchula, FL 33873


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12B The Herald-Advocate, August 23, 2012


Role Models? John

Kennedy Er Bart Starr


By STEPHANIE DEANDA
Special To The Herald-Advocate
Q: What is your full name?
A: Joe L. Davis.
Q: Where were you born?
A: Avon Park.
Q: When
were you ,
born? J.
A: Jan. 7,
1951. .
Q: What
schools did you attend when you
were younger?
A: Wauchula Elementary, Hardee
Junior High, and Hardee Senior High.
Q: What was your transportation
to school?
A: I rode my bicycle to elementary,
starting in third grade. I only lived six
blocks away. And I walked to school in
junior high and senior high school. I
only lived four blocks away.
Q: To you, do you think Hardee
Senior High School has changed
since you were there?
A: Yes. When I attended Hardee
Senior High School, it was located
where the Board of Education is at
now. The Hardee Junior High and
Senior High used to be together in that
one building.
Q: What was popular when you
were young?
A: Football, baseball, basketball and,
to some, rodeos and hunting were pop-
ular, too.
Q: Did you play any sports when
you were younger?
A: Yes, I played football, baseball
and basketball.
Q: What would you do for fun?
A: Go to dances after the football


games on Friday that were held at the
Youth Center, which used to be what is
now the YMCA. Also, there were
dances held at the old pool at Pioneer
Park, where there would be food and
jukeboxes, and most of the high school
students.
Q: Who was your role model while
you were growing up?
A: John Kennedy, who was president
at the time and I was 12 years old in
1965 when he got shot and killed. And
later on, Bryan Bartlett "Bart" Starr, the
quarterback and college coach of the
Green Bay Packers.
Q: Favorite childhood memory?
A: Going to the football games on
Friday and quail hunting in Hardee.
Q: What is something you experi-
enced when you were a teen that has
changed your life forever?
A: Good teachers, great parents, and
my coaches in football. And because of
them, I am what I am now.
Q: What do you think about tech-
nology?
A: I think it's wonderful!
Q: Did you end up doing what you
wanted?
A: Yes, I did, which was to go away
and get my college education, which I
went for one year in Nashville, Tenn.,
and also come back to Hardee and run
the family business in real estate and
citrus.
Back In Time is the result of a class
assignment given to ninth graders at
Hardee Senior High School. Each
student is asked to interview an older
person. Selected interviews are pub-
lished here as an encouragement to the
students and for the enjoyment of our
readers.


Pedantry prides herself on being wrong by rules; while common-sense is contented to
be right without them. The former would rather stumble in following the dead, than
walk upright by the profane assistance of the living.
-Charles Caleb Colton
Pedantry is the unseasonable ostentation of learning. It may be discovered either in
the choice of a subject or in the manner of treating it.
-Samuel Johnson


Hardee High School Athletic Booster Tickets and Banners

ON SALE NOW

Iek a- Ian -eahq ean be pureha qod at I-q Friday I & _q footbll amp


Season Tickets

Super Booster (Admission to all Regular Season Hardee High School Home Sporting Events) $80.00
Football Booster (Admission to all Regular Season JV and Varsity Home Football Games) $40.00
Student Super Booster ( All Students Attending Hardee County Public School) $40.00



J Reserve Seating for Regular Season Varsity Football Games

$15.00 Per Seat

Great Seats Still available for Purchase!
Ticket Holders From Last Year Will Retain Rights to Their Seats Thru Sept. 1



Banner Prices

Football $600
Gym $350
Baseball Field $300 .
Softball Field $300
All 4 Locations $1300


Ticket Pick-Up and Delivery
Tickets can be picked up in the front office at Hardee High School from

8:00am 3:30pm
For Ticket Delivery Please Call Andy Judah at

863-381-9984 or 773-3181 ex. 214
mmm ma._.d


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The Herald-Advocate


Thursday, August 23. 2012


Wildcats Kick-Off BLUE



Season Friday


By MICHAEL KELLY
The Herald-Advocate
kfter spending the last few
nths in preparations, the
2 Hardee Wildcats get their
; action of the season Friday
at at 7 p.m. in the Kick-Off
ssic at home against Lake
Placid.
The Cats are ready for the
upcoming season after practic-
ing four days a week during the
summer and traveling to com-
pete against other teams in
seven-on-seven drills once a
week.
The team is coming off a 9-3
record last season which includ-
ed a playoff win at Lake Wales.
Head Coach Buddy Martin is
entering his third season and is
looking for his team to continue
its success from last season.
Martin said he lost a lot of sen-
iors from last year's team and is
looking for some leaders to
emerge from this year's squad.


The 2012 Wildcats will only
have eight seniors on the team.
They include Aaron Barker,
Miquel Garcia, Octavio Al-
varez, Alonzo "Kane" Casso,
Paul Gough, Ramiro Ramirez,
Rufino Gabriel and Jesus
Zuniga.
The junior class has 17 play-
ers on the team, Caleb Purser,
Armando Alamia, Jesus Flores,
Keyon Brown, Jake Bolin, Kris
Johnson, Tristan Lanier, Tyler
Dunlap, James Greene, J.J.
Almarez, Timmy Steedley, Lu-
cious Everett, Waylon Pleger,
Nelson Bethea, Luke Winter,
Adson Delhomme and Luke
Palmer.
Seven sophomores who
made the team are Sahmaud
Blandin, Derrick Graham,
Keyonte Holley, Stephan Jones,
Blaiaine Molitor, Devin Pear-
son and Jose Gonzalez.
Freshman Marco Deleon and
William McClelland made the


varsity team and round out the
34-man roster.
The defensive line and line-
backers are all returning starters
from last year and should have
another solid year controlling
the line of scrimmage and op-
posing running games. The sec-
ondary lost all four starters
from last year but have some
talented players ready for their
chance at starting.
On the offensive side junior
Kris Johnson will be taking
over at quarterback. Most of his
wide receivers will be new this
year after losing most starters
last season.
The offensive line and the
running game should be the
strength of the offense with sev-
eral running backs and offen-
sive linemen returning this sea-
son.
Martin feels good where his
team is going into the season.
The team cannot wait to get
under way on Friday night.


Photo By MICHAEL KELLY
Blue Water Chief Executive Officer James Grant, left, and Chief Operating Officer
Jennifer Lux are shown with Wauchula City Manager Terry Atchley at the Kiwanis Club
on August 7. Grant and Lux gave an update on the company's progress and said the
web-based solution for storing medical data and other sensitive information should be
available to the market within 30 to 60 days.


County Stops


Internet Cafes


First Christian Gets Dual Titles


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
First Christian Church won
all the marbles.
The team that led the 2012
Women's Church Softball
League all season finished as
the season winner and also took
the post-season championship
as well.
Taking the season title with
an undefeated 16-0 record, First
Christian swept through the
post season tournament, getting
an early bye to play the final
two games on Aug. 7 to claim
the title.
In the tournament openers on
Aug. 1, Holy Child Catholic
won 19-2 over St. Alfonso's
Chapel, and Wauchula First
Methodist downed Zolfo
Springs Methodist 23-11.
Action continued on Aug. 7.
In the only Field 1 game, First
Christian disposed of New
Hope Baptist 30-2.
Amber Steedley and Step-
hanie Roberson each rounded
the bases twice for First
Christian. Brittany Hines, Sami


Jo Morgan, Caitlyn Bliss,
Chelsey Steedley, Amy Franks
and Sandy Driskell chipped in
with three tallies apiece. Lacey
Cumbee and Lorie Krause each
scored twice.
Lindsey Cole and Melanie
Henderson circled the bases for
New Hope. Others adding to the
action were Bird Harrison, Beth
Radford, Michelle Graham,
Josie Hancock, Shannyn Rob-
ertson, Krystin Robertson,
Stephanie Davidson, Crystal
Harrison, Claudia Klein and
Julie Hancock.
Meanwhile, on Field 2, in the
early ,game, Holy Child Cat-
holic nipped Wauchula First
Methodist 12-8.
Leadoff batter Senida Garcia,
Elvira Servin and Kristina
Garcia each came around to
cross home plate twice for Holy
Child. Adding solo scores were
Brooke Tyson, Liberty Lozano,
Lucy Garcia, Rosa Villegas,
Maggie Olvera and Adrianna
Sneider. Also in on the action
were Karina Fernandez and
Darlene Torrez.


Shauntee Hines was a triple-
tally batter for Wauchula Meth-
odist. Jamie Rivas added dual
tallies and Jennifer Bryant and
Haley Marshall had solo scores.
Others contributing were Leigh,
Brittany, Jeanne Myrie, Kim
Tyson, Gloria and Danielle
Upton.
The Field 2 nightcap was the
championship game between
the season's number one and
number two teams, First
Christian and Holy Child
Catholic, with First Christian
crushing its opponent as usual,
33-5.
Morgan and Chelsey
Steedlev paced First Christian
with five runs apiece. Amber
Steedley came home four times,
and Hines, Roberson and
Cumbee added triple scores.
Senida Garcia crossed home
plate in the first inning for Holy
Child. Lucy Garcia, Villegas
and Torrez added runs in the
second inning and Lozano got
the final tally in the third
inning.


Important Reminder! -

While you're busy filling out all that back to school
paperwork remember another important form to renew!

Your 4-H Member Enrollment Form!


Make Plans Now To Attend Our

4-H Open House


Tuesday, August 28


3:00 p.m. 7:00 p.m.

Agri-Civic Center
Altman Road


A special time for returning members

Ito renew their enrollment and

NEW members to see what we

S have to offer in the 4-H Program!

For more information call your club leader

* or the 4-H office at 773-2164,

*Youth planning to show livestock in the 2013
Hardee County Fair MUST be registered in a 4-H

U Club by August 31,2012!*
The Florida cooperative Extension Service programs are available to all without regards to race,
color, sex, age, religion, national origin or handicapping conditions. 816,2:


maamhm'* 14-6 md~mmo


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
No, you cannot buy or rent
property in Hardee County to
operate a simulated gambling
establishment.
More commonly known as
"internet cafes," or "Sweep-
stakes Cafes," these are busi-
nesses where you can use elec-
tronic machines or computers
on which to do your gambling.
The Hardee County Com-
mission approved first reading
last Thursday of an ordinance
setting a 180-day moratorium
on accepting applications for
permits, zoning, rezoning, spe-
cial exception, site plan or any-
thing else to allow such a busi-
ness within the county.
The ordinance notes that


since May 2011, the Florida
Council on Compulsive Gam-
bling reported an increase in
calls ,to its Problem Gambling
from people using such cafes. It
alleges that the average gam-
bling debt in 2011 was more
that 50 percent of the gamblers'
average earnings.
Many such businesses open
in strip malls and retail centers.
In 2011, reports included armed
robberies in Lake and Marion
counties and a murder in
Seminole County. Nearby
Highlands and Polk counties
have already adopted a morato-
rium on internet cafes. The
State Attorney for this district
reportedly said it is a form of
illegal gambling.
The state legislature consid-


ered the matter in its spring ses-
sion and deadlocked on whether
to control or close such estab-
lishments. The person gambling
uses a credit card, gift card or
similar financial instrument to
"log-on" the computer simulat-
ed device to make their choices
in a drawing by chance, sweep-
stakes or game ordinarily
played on a slot machine.
The proposed moratorium
gives local officials time to
investigate the situation thor-
oughly. The final hearing of the
proposed ordinance will be the
commission's Sept. 6 meeting.

The only active diamond
mine in the U.S. can be
found in Arkansas.


PAGE ONE


WAUCHULA LIONS CLUB CELEBRATES

85 YEARS OF SERVICE

The Wauchula Lions Club, whose'motto is "We Serve", is gearing up to celebrate
their 85th birthday this month. The club was organized in 1927, and currently has
31 members. It is the longest serving Lions Club in the State of Florida.

The Wauchula Lions Club provides sight/vision assistance to over 50 individuals
a year for many years in partnership with Dr. Mark Sevigny, the Hardee County
Health Department, and the School based Nurse program. Vision services include
screenings, glasses, and surgeries that are paid for by the
Florida Lions Foundation for the Blind. The collection
of not broken eyeglasses, sunglasses and glass
cases is an ongoing service, and the glasses col-
lected are distributed by Lions to needy areas all
over the world.

Since 1978 the Wauchula Lions Club has given
college scholarships to Hardee High School sen-
iors. The club has also donated to numerous
other community organizations in need such as
The Hardee Help Center, Habitat for Humanity and <
Hardee Youth Sports.

The Wauchula Lions Club is one of 46,000 clubs, and 1.35 million members mak-
ing Lions the world's largest service club organization. Lions is also one of the
most effective. The members do whatever is needed to help their local communi-
ties. Lions International is the number one non-governmental organization in the
world -- and that rating was achieved by ensuring funds that are received are not
used for operations.

The Wauchula Lions Club meets every Thursday, 12:00 noon, at the Java Cafe. If
you are interested in learning more about the Wauchula Lions Club and/or would
like an invitation to become a member, please write us at: P.O. Box 248, Wauchula,
FL 33873, or join us for one of our weekly meetings. You can find us on Facebook
under "Wauchula Lions".










-"-











Wauchula Lions Club outgoing President Talmadge Albritton hands over the gavel
to 2012-2013 President Debbie Murray. 8 3-9 6c
i----:-"--


0










2C The Herald-Advocate, August 23, 2012





Schedule of Weekly Services-


Printed as a Public Service
by .
ThgAerzald-Advocate
I- Wauchulh Florida

.Deadline: Thursday 5 p.m.


BOWLING GREEN
APOSTOLIC LIGHTHOUSE
UNITED PENTECOSTAL
CHURCH
310 Orange St.
375-3100
Sunday Morning .................. 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening ....................6:00 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting........7:00 p.m.
Thursday Service ................7:30 p.m.

CHESTER GROVE MB CHURCH
708 W. Grape St. 375-3353
Sunday School ...................... 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship ....................8:00 a.m,
Sun. Eve. Worship
1st & 3rd ..............4:00 p.m. 3:00 p.m.
Tues. Prayer/Bible Study ......6:00 p.m.

CHRISTIAN BIBLE
FELLOWSHIP
Hwy. 17 South
Morning Worship ................10:30 a.m.
Youth Group Sunday ..........6:00 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
121 West Broward St. 375-2231
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m
Evening Worship ................. 6:30 p.m
Wednesday ............................ 7:30 p.m.


CHURCH OF GOD
TRUE HOLINESS OUTREACH
725 Palmetto St.
375-3304
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Tues. Night Bible Study ...... 7:30 p.m.
Evening Worship
1st Sunday .................... 5:00 p.m.

COMMUNITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Main & W. Centra.
Sunday AM Worship............10:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening ....................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer Meeting ............7:00 p.m.

FAITH ASSEMBLY OF GOD.
4937 Hwy. 17 N. 375-4206
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
Disciples Train & Choirs ......5:30 p.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ......... 7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Bowling Green
S. Hwy. 17 .- 375-2253
SUNDAY:
Bible Sttidy'...:. ........ .. .9:30 a.m .
Morning Worship ................10:45 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:30 p.m.

WEDNESDAY:
Discipleship Training
Youth & Adult ................. :30 p.m.
AWANA (ages 3-5th grade) ....6:30 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Grape & Church Streets 375-2340
Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study .................6:00 p.m.
FORT GREEN BAPTIST
CHURCH
Baptist Church Road 773-9013
Sunday School ....................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.'
Sunday Evening .................. 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper .............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

HOLY CHILD
SPANISH CATHOLIC MISSION
Misa (Espanol) Sunday ........7:00 p.m.

IGLESIA DEL DIOS VIVO
105 Dixiana St. 375-4191
Domingo De Predicacion ., 11:00 p.m.
Martes Estudio Biblico..........7:00 p.m.
Miercoles Estudior Juvenil....7:00 p.m.
Jucves De Predicacion ..........7:00 p.m.

IMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH
210 E. Broward St. 375-4681
.Sunday School ..................9:.45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...... ......... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ........... 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..................7:00 p.m

MACEDONIA PRIMITIVE
BAPTIST CHURCH
607 Palmetto St.
Church School ......................9:30 a.m.
Morning Service ..............'..I !:00 a.m.
Evening Service .................7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study/Prayer ......7:00 p.m.
Communion-2nd Sun. Eve. ..6:00 p.m.

MT. PISGAH BAPTIST CHURCH
6210 Mt. Pisgah Rd. 375-4409
Sunday School ...................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training... .........5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship .............7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time........7:00 p.m.

NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
Mason Dixon & County Line Rd.
781-5887
Sunday Worship ... .......... 11:00 a.m.
2nd Sunday Communion .... 11:00 a.m.
Bread of Life Sunday........12:15 p.m.
T.H.E. Meeting Tuesday ....7:00 p.m.


BOWLING GREEN

OPEN DOOR FULL GOSPEL
PRAISE CENTER
E. Broward St.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Service .....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.

PRIMERA MISSION BAUTISTA
Murray Road off Hwy. 17
375-2295
Domingos Escuela Dom. ......9:45 a.m.
Servicio de Adoracion..........11:00 a.m.
Servicio de Predicacion ........5:00 p.m.
Miercoles Servico..................6:30 p.m.

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 South US Hwy 17
Morning Service .................. 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learing ..6:30 p.m..

ST. JOHN A.M.E. CHURCH
513 W. Orange St.
375-2911
Sunday Church School ..........9:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship .... 1:00 a.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

VICTORY .PRAISE CENTER
128 E. Main St.
Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Thursday Night Services,
Evening Worship...................7:00 p.m.
Kidz Club...............................7:00 p.m'.

ONA

IGLESIA PENTECOSTES
VISION POR LAS ALMAS
149 Bedger Loop 448.2831
Servicio Domingos ................7:30 p.m.
Jueves (Ensefianza Biblica) ..................
........................................ 7:30 p.m .
LIMESTONE BAPTIST CHURCH
4868 Keystone Ave. Limestone
Comm.
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ...............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

NEW ZION BAPTIST CHURCH
202 Sidney Roberts Road
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 1:00 a.m.
Disciples Training..................6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............6:00 p.m.

ONA BAPTIST CHURCH
131 Bear Lane 773-2540
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 am.
Wednesday Prayer ...............7:00 p.m.

UNION BAPTIST CHURCH
5076 Lily Church Rd. 494-5622
,...Sunday Schqo :,....................10:00 a.m.
'Morning Worsfi'...............I 1100 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday
AWANA for Kids ..............6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time.........7:00 p.m.


WAUCHULA

APOSTOLIC ASSEMBLY
Martin Luther King and Apostolic Rd.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
English Service .................. 1:30 a.m.
General Worship Service ......1:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer ....................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

CELEBRATION CHURCH
322 Hanchey Rd.
863-781-1624
hardee.celebration.org
Sunday Morning Service .... 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m.
WednesdayYouth Service ....5:30 p.m.
Childcare provided at all services

CELEBRATION FELLOWSHIP
773-0427.
Celebration Service ..............10:30 a.m.
Wetdnesdayv Evening Cell Groups
Adult Cell Group ..................7:00 p.m.
Youth Cell Group ..................7:00 p.m.
Children's Cell Group ..........7:00 p.m.
Call/ fr locations

CHARLIE CREEK
BAPTIST CHURCH
6885 State Road 64 East 773-3447
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ..........:.....11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................. 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............6:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF CHRIST
201 S. Florida Ave. & Orange St.
773-9678
Bible Study ............................9:30 a.m .
Worship Service ..................10:45 a.m.
Wednesday ............................7:00 p.m.

CHURCH OF CHRIST
Will Duke Road
773-2249
Sunday Morning Worship......9:30 a.m.
Sunday Bible Class..............11:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening Worship ......6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Bible Class ........7:00 p.m.
Men's Leadership & Training Class -
2nd Sunday of Month........4:00 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
Martin Luther King Blvd.
767.0199

CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST
OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS
630 Hanchey Rd. 773-3532
Sacrament Meeting ................9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
Priesthood ............................ 1:00 a.m .


WAUCHULA

COM MUNITY BAPTIST
CHURCH OF WAUCHULA HILLS
(SPANISH)
615 Rainey Blvd.
257-3950
Sunday Bible Study ............10:00 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship.... 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

DIOS ES AMOR
807 S. 8th Ave.
773-4576
Domingos Escuela
Dominica .......................... 10:00 a.m.
Servicio .............................. 1:00 a.m .
Lunes Oracion ......................6:00 p.m.
Miercoles Servicio ................7:00 p.m.

EL REMANENTE
IGLECIA CRISTIANA
318 W. Main St..
Martes Oracion ......................7:00 p.m.
Jueves Servicio ...................... 7:30 p.m.
Viernes Servicio .................... 7:30 p.m.
Domingo Servicio................ 10:30 a.m.

ENDTIME CROSSROAD
MINISTRY
501 N. 9th & Georgia St. 773-3470
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Service .................11:30 a.m.
Evening Service................. 7:30 p.m.
Wed. Bible St. & Yth. Gath ..7:30 p.m.
Friday (Holy Ghost Night)....7:30 p.m.

FAITH PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
114 N. 7th Ave. 773-2105
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ..................11:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ................... 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ................6:15 p.m.
Wed. Youth Fellowship..........6:50 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

FAITH TEMPLE CHURCH
OF GOD
701 N. 7th Ave 773-3800
Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship ................ 10:20 a.m.
Children's Chuch ................10:40 a.m.
Evening Service .................... 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
1570 W. Main St. 7734182
SUNDAY:
Bible Study for all ages ........9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.

WEDNFSDAY:
Sr. Adult Bible Study ..........10:00 a.m.
Children's Chiors
(PK-Grade 4) .................... 5:30 p.m.
PRAISE 57-Jr High Chior .. 5:30 p.m.
Mid-Week Prayer Meeting .. 6:00 p.m.
Kids On Missions
(PK-Grade 4) .................... 6:00 p.m.
Club 56 ................................ 6:00 p.m :
Youth Group (Grades 7-12) 6:00 p.m.
Family Life Ministry
& Discipleship ......... 6:00 p.m.
Church Orchestra.................. 6:00 p.m.
Adult Choir .......... ......... 7:00 p.m.

FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH
1121 W. Louisiana St. 773-9243
SUNDAY:
Generations Cafd Opens........9:30 a.m.
Kids World Check-In for
Nursery-5th Grade Begins..10:15 a.m.
Pre-K Blast ......... .......... 10:45 a.m.
Kids World B.L.A.S.T.
(K-5th) ........... .......... 10:45 a.m.
Worship Service ..................10:45 a.m.
WEDNESDAY:
Check-In begins for
Nursery-5thgrade ..................6:15 p.m.
Classes for children ages
PreK-12th grade............6:30-8:00 p.m.


FIRST CHURCH OF
THE NAZARENE
511 W. Palmetto St.
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Service .................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.
FIRST MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
1347 Martin Luther King Ave.
773-6556
Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m .
Morning Service .................. 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Tues. Youth Ministry Meeting/
Bible Study ........................ 6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer/Bible Study ......7:00 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
207 N. Seventh Ave. 773-4267
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Traditional Sunday Worship 11:00 a.m.
Casual Sunday Worship..........6:00 p.m
Tuesday Bible Study............10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Activities ............6:00 p.m.

FLORIDA'S FIRST ASSEMBLY
OF GOD CHURCH
1397 South Florida Avenue
773-9386.
Sunday School ........... ........9:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................10:00 a.m.
Wed. Family Night ................7:00 p.m.
Adult, Children & Radiate Youth Church

FLORIDA GOSPEL
511 W. Palmetto
223-5126
Sunday Morning Worship.... I1:00 a.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............7:30 p.m.

THE GOSPEL TABERNACLE
810 W. Tennessee St. 863-735-1158


Morning Service .................. 10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

HEARTLAND
COMMUNITY CHURCH
1262 W. Main St. 767-6500
Coffee & Donuts....................9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m.
Worship ........................... 10:30 a.m.
Wed. Night Dinner ................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bodybuilders Adult CI.
Crossroads &
Lighthouse M in. .................7:00 p.m.


WAUCHULA

HIGHER GROUND
INTERNATIONAL MINISTRY
1258 W. MAIN STREET
WAUCHULA, FL
Sunday Morning Worship... 11:00 a.m.
Wed. Night Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

IGLESIA HISPANA
FUENTE DE VIDA
501 N. 9" Ave.
M artes .................................. 7: 30 p.m .
Jueves .................................... 7:30 p.m .
Dom ingo .............................. 10:30 p.m .

IGLESIA HISPANA
PRESENCIA de Dios
511 W. Palmetto St.
Dom ingos ............................ 6:00 p.m .
M iercoles............................... 7:00 p.m .

IGLESIA ADVENTISTA DEL
SEPTIMO DIA
Old Bradenton Road
767-1010

IGLESIA de DIOS
ALFA Y OMEGA
1909 Stanfield Rd.
Sunday School .................... 10: 00 a.m.
Evening Service ....................6:00 p.m .
Tuesday (Bible Study & Prayer
N ight) ................................7:30 p .m .
Friday Worship Service ........7:30 p.m.

JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
ENGLISH
155 Altman Road 1131
Sunday Service .....................:00 p.m.

JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
-SPANISH
Sunday Service ....................10:00 a.m.
LIGHT OF THE WORLD
MINISTRIES
Womans Center 131 N. 7th Ave.
Wauchula, FL
Friday Evening ...................... 6:00 p.m.
LAKE DALE BAPTIST CHURCH
3102 Heard Bridge Road
773-6622
Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Service ................. 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.
MINISTERIO INTERNACIONIAL
Cambriadores de Mundo
704 W. Main St. 773-0065
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.
NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH
1999 State Road 64 East
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m .
Morning Worship Service.... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship Service ......6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Night Supper ......6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Activities
(All Ages) .......................... 7:00 p.m .
NEW LIFE CHURCH
117 W. Palmetto St.
773-2929
Sunday Service ....................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
Children Ministries for all services
NEW MT. ZION A.M.E. CHURCH
10 Martin Luther King Ave.
767-0023
Morn. Worship
(Ist & 3r Sun.) ................ :00 a.m.
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................I 1:00 a.m.
2nd Sunday Youth Service ....4:00 p.m.
Allen Christian Endeavor......4:00 p.m.
Wed. & Fri. Bible Study........7:00 p.m.
NORTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
912 N. 8th Ave. 773-6947
Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship '.................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.
OAK GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
4350 W. Main St. 735-0321
Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.
PEACE VALLEY LUTHERAN
CHURCH
1643 Stenstrom Road 773-2858
1" & 3' Sun.
Communion .................... 10:00 a.m.
2"1 & 4" Sun.
Divine Worship ...............10:00 a.m.
Bible Study .......................... 11:15 a.m .
** Fellowship each Sunday after service

PROGRESSIVE MISSIONARY
.BAPTIST CHURCH
149 Manley Road East Main
773-5814
Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m.
Worship Service .................. 1:00 a.m.
Wed. Evening Prayer ............7:00 p.m.

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 North US Hwy 17
Morning Service ............... 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.

RIVERVIEW HEIGHTS
MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1321 S.R. 636 East 773-3344
Radio Program
W ZZS Sundays..................9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

SOUL HARVEST MINISTRY
1337 Hwy. 17 South, Wauchula
Sunday School .................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Service ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

ST. ANN'S EPISCOPAL CIIURCHl
204 N. 9th Ave. 773-6418


WAUCHULA

SEVENTH DAY
ADVENTIST CHURCH
205 S. Ilth Ave. 773-9927
Sabbath School .....................9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Tues. Prayer Meeting ............7:00 p.m.
SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
505 S. 10th Ave. 773-4368
Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.
SPIRIT WIND TABERNACLE
1652 Old Bradenton Road
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............I :00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............7:30 p.m.
IABERNACLL OF'
PRAISE & JOY
1507 MLK Avenue
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:30 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Tues. Bible Stdy.
& Child Train ....................7:00 p.m.
Friday Prayer Service ............7:00 p.m.
WAUCHULA CHURCH OF GOD
1543 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.
773-0199
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
M morning W orship ................ 1:15 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Fam. Training ....7:30 p.m.
Thurs. Youth Bible Study ......7:00 p.m.
Friday Night Worship............7:30 p.m.
WAUCHULA HILLS HARVEST
TEMPLE ASSEMBLY OF GOD
210 Anderson
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Church.................................10:00 a.m .
Youth Service ........................ 6:00 p.m.
Evening Service ....................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.
WAUCHULA HILLS
SPANISH CHURCH OF GOD
1000 Stansfield Rd.
Sunday School .................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................7:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer ...................... 7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship..................7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ..................7:30 p.m.
WAUCHULA REVIVAL CENTER
(Full Gospel)
501 N. 9th Ave.
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Youth & Child. Church.......6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ................7:00 p.m.
M en's Fri. Prayer ..................7:00 p.m.

ZOLFO SPRINGS

COMMUNITY WESLEYAN CHURCH
Gardner
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .... ........... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service .................7:00 p.m.
COWBOY-UP MINISTRY
Cracker Trail Arena
Hwy 66
(across from Oak Hills Ranch Rd.)
781-2281
Sunday ................................10:00 a.m .
CREWSVILLE BETHEL
BAPTIST CHURCH
8251 Crewsville Road
Church 735-0871 Pastor 773-6657
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............1 :00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................6:30 p.m.
EVANGELISTIC HOLINESS
CHURCH INC.
Corner of 6th and Hickory
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
W wednesday ............................ 7:30 p.m.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
OF ZOLFO
320 E. 4th St. 735-1200
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .............. 11:00 a.m.
Training Union ....................5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.
FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Corner of 6th & Suwanee 735-1544
Gospel Music ....................10:30 a.m.
Worship Service .................. 11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

FOX MEMORIAL
HOLINESS CHURCH
2344 Merle Langford Rd.
Sunday Morning Worship....10:00 a.m.
Sunday Night Worship ..........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.


ZOLFO SPRINGS.

GARDNER BAPTIST CHURCH
South Hwy. 17 494-5456
Sunday School .................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.
LIFE CHANGING WORSHIPCENTER
3426 Oak St. 863-832-9808
Sunday Worship ................... 2:30 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

MARANATHA BAPTIST CHURCH
2465 Oxendine Rd
(863) 832-9292
Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
W orship .............................. 1:00 a.m .
Evening ............................... :00 p.m .
Wed. Bible & Prayer Meet....7:00 p.m.

NEW VISION WORSHIP CENTER
64 E. & School House Road
Church 735-8585 Childcare 735.
8586
Morning Worship ................10:00 a.m.
Children's Church................ 10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ............6:00 p.m.
Wed. Youth & F.T.H. ............7:00 p.m.

PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF
GOD FAITH TEMPLE
Oak Street
Sunday Worship ..................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ...............7:00 p.m.
Tuesday Worship ..................7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship................7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ...............i..7:30 p.m.

PRIMERA MISSION
BAUTISTA HISPANA
518 8th Ave. E.
Escuela Dominical ..............10:00 a.m.
Servicio del Domingo..........11:00 a.m.
........................................7:00 p.m .
Servicio del Miercoles ..........7:30 p.m.

PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH
Pioneer Park
2nd Sunday .......................... 10:30 a.m.
Evening Service ....................6:30 p.m.
5th Sunday ............................ 6:00 p.m.

ST. PAUL'S MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
3676 US. Hwy. 17 South 735-0636
Sunday School ................9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship ....................I a.m.
Wed. Prayer Service ..............7:00 p.m.

SAN ALFONSO MISSION
3027 Schoolhouse Lane
Domingo, Misa en Espanol ..9:30 a.m.
Catecismo ...........................11:00 a.m.

SPANISH MISSION
735-8025
Escuela Dominica . .........10:00 a.m.
Servicio .............................. 11:00 a.m .
Pioneer Club .......................... 6:30 p.m.
Servicio de la Noche ............7:00 p.m.
Mierecoles Meriendi ............6:00 p.m.
Servicio.............;.:;...............8:00 p.m.
Saltido Liga de Jovenes .......5:00 p.m.


- U


SEEDS
FROM
THE
SOWER
VA., A '-on
N"r l hc* *sr~


Children enjoy coming to our
Gardens to play boats."
Their "boats" are little branches
of trees which they place in the
water of the streams. They run
along beside btem and follow them
as they go downstream.
When theater runs rapidly, the
"boats" move rapidly. The little
"boats" are carried along, underthe
control and direction of the water.
What's true of those boats is
true of the believers who wrote the
Bible. They were carried along,
under the control aid direction of
the Holy Spirit.
The Bible says, 'Men spoke
from God as they were carried
along by the Holy Spirit."
That's inspiration!


Visit us at: mww. TheSower.com


Sunday ............................:..... 00 a.m .
Holy Days ........................... .....

ST. MICIIAEL
CATIOLIC CHURCH
408 Heard Bridge Road 773-4089
Saturday Mass (English) ......5:00 p.m.
(Spanish) ......7:00 p.m.
Sunday(English) .................... 8:3) a.m.
(Spanish) ................. 1:00 .m .
(Creole)..........'............1 :00 p.m .
Catecismo ...........................9:45 a.m .
Daily Mass in English ..........8:30 iami.


CPece A iver gr6tders

Wholesale Nursery

Donnis & Kathy Barber
Hwy. 66 East (863) 735-0470
PO. Box 780 Zolfo Springs, FL


.r~b~


.. ,.lmr,.... r**, r: ...:r~rtf ... ~f
1








August 23, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 3C


Greetings from Fort Green!
School has already started
and where did the summer go!
Everyone might as well start
Christmas shopping because it
will be here before we know it.
Charles and Lynda Abbott
had a nice week at Lake Placid
recently with their children, and
daughter Amy Franks and her
children and other grandkids
etc. Charles said he only got to
fish one time but they all still'
had a good time. That is what a
vacation should be about,
enjoying family.
It was good to see Louise
Durrance at the voting polls but



SUMMER READING


I missed Hazel Johnson. It just
comes a time when we can't do
what we used to do.
Congratulations to Amy Ab-
bott Franks on obtaining her
master's degree! This is quite
an accomplishment and one to
be proud of.
Our sincere sympathy is ex-
tended to the family of Richard
Dandridge. He and Kay were
good friends and I believe in the
same graduation class. Our
sympathy is also extended to
the family of Liz Rumley.
It was good to see all the
Campbell girls and families at


Fort Green News
By Rilla Cooper

773-6710


the funeral. When nmy daughter,
Avie, was at the trick-or-treat
age, 1 was very selective where
we would visit. Dot and Bob
Campbell were on the good list
and they always gave her a big,
tasty avocado from their lake
place. Avie always laughed
about it and we enjoyed eating
it, but she still remembers and
enjoys the memories and telling
her children!
It seems the list of people
sick continues to grow. Edith
Bassctt had surgery on both
hands last week and I don't
know how she is eating! They
announced at church that Buck
Toole was in the Lakeland hos-
pital. Doyle Bryan is home
from the hospital. Dale Chan-
cey was in the Sebring hospital
for a few days with some heart
problems but is home now.
Betty Walker was a little under
the weather and not able to
attend church last Sunday.
Randy Abbott had a bad acci-
dent last week but like most
things it possibly could have
been worse. He slipped and fell
from a bulk fertilizer hauler and
hit the side of the fertilizer


spreader, cracking some ribs
and bruising his back and side
severely. He was fortunate that
he was able to reach his cell
phone and call for help. In the
olden days he would have been
stuck until someone decided to
check on him, when he didn't
come in from work. That is one
good use of cell phones!
Please remember all these in
prayer as well as some you may
know about.
Last week some of the youth
from Fort Green went to the
Baptist Children's Home in
Lakeland. One of the local lawn
services went and donated
equipment and the youth put it
to good use. They trimmed
trees, used the Weedeater,
mowed, pulled weeds and in
general did a good day's work.
Ones not working outside were
busy inside. The Children's
Home welcomes anyone who
would like to help them out.
Faye Chancey, my next-door
neighbor, celebrated her birth-
day last Sunday. When I was
walking early Sunday morning,
I noticed various colored things
on the driver's side of her car. I


did not go check it out in case it
was vandalized; I didn't want to
mess up the footprints. You
know, great detective work!
She said it was stickers read-
ing happy birthday, great person
and I love bacon and eggs. The
bacon and eggs revealed the
culprit, her grandson, Brody
Waters! Faye said he always
wants bacon when he comes to
visit. That is a better want than
candy! Her family, Lee, Chrysta
and Makayla Chancey and
Tammy, Dustyn, Brianna, and
Brody Waters, took her out for


s XFully Certified Superintendent

David Durastanti
Superintendent of Schools
www.DavidforOurKids com


In 2011, Hardee Senior High
earned its highest schol grad eavr.

Po. Adv., Paid for and approved by David D. Durastanti, Rep. Chet Huddleston, Campaign Treasurer
i' 823F


COURTESY PHOTOS
As the summer draws to an end, the Hardee County
Public Library notes its summer reading program drew
children 2 to 12 year old who read a total of 522 books.
Also offered was a raffle to win two tickets to Mote
Marine. After reading a book, a child could fill out a tick-
et to enter the raffle. The lucky winner, Thomas
Christenson, was announced last week. He had over 100
tickets in the box. The top picture shows Alyssa Purdy
and Rhonda Darty ready to draw the winning ticket. The
bottom photo shows Thomas with children's director
Dee Shackleford.
.\ - m m mma -


Week Ending: August 19, 2012
Weather Summary: Only 14.7 percent of Florida was abnor-
mally dry compared to 88.7 last year according to the U.S. Drought
Monitor. Marianna recorded again the most rainfall with 4.41 inch-
es according to Florida's Automated Weather Network (FAWN).
Fort Pierce continues to be dry with no rainfall recorded this week
followed by Belle Glade with only 0.10 of an inch. The remaining
stations rainfall varied from 0.17 of an inch at Ona to 3.53 inches
at Indian River. Marianna also recorded the lowest temperatures at
66 degrees, while Avalon recorded the highest temperature at 97
( degrees followed by Bronson at 96 degrees.

Field Crops: Row crops were looking good in Gadsden
County. Washington County was beginning to see rust in soybeans,
white mold in peanuts, and leaf spot in cotton. Almost everyone
was behind on their spray schedule due to weather. Looper insects
and armyworms were active on almost all crops in Washington
County. A small percentage of farmers were harvesting corn in
Jackson County, they have been unable to finish harvest due to
rain. Corn harvest has been impossible due to the threat of rain
almost every day in Washington County. Columbia County has
been too wet to harvest corn. Also in Columbia County, producers
Swill begin harvesting peanuts in about three weeks, while Santa
Rosa County producers just started harvesting peanuts. It is too
early to harvest peanuts in Jackson County. Levy County has not
started harvesting peanuts due to rains. Hay producers made little
progress harvesting due to frequent rains.

Fruits & Vegetables: Fall vegetables were looking good in
Gadsden County. Avocados were being marketed in southern
Miami-Dade County. St.-Lucie County vegetable growers were
preparing fields for the fall vegetable crops. Hillsborough County
producers were preparing land for strawberries.

Livestock and Pastures: Statewide, the condition of pasture
ranged from very poor to excellent, with most in good condition.
Limits to pasture growth were dry weather, disease, and flooding.
The condition of the cattle ranged from very poor to excellent with
most in good condition. In the Panhandle, conditions of pasture and
cattle were very poor to excellent. Dry weather limited some pas-
tures, while disease, armyworms, and flooding were a problem in
other locations. In Washington County, pastures were damaged by
insects and armyworms. In the northern areas, the pasture condi-
tion ranged from poor to excellent. Pastures were in good to excel-
lent condition due to the amount of rain received in the last few
weeks. Some pastures in Columbia County had standing water
from the recent tropical storm. Cattle were in fair to excellent con-
dition, with most in good condition. In the central areas, the condi-
tion of pasture and cattle varied from very poor to excellent with
most pastures in good condition. In the southwestern area, the pas-
ture and cattle were in fair to excellent condition, with most in
good condition.

Citrus: Daily high temperatures remained in the low to mid-
90s across the citrus region. All but one of the FAWN stations in
the citrus growing region recorded some precipitation this week,
with Indian River receiving the most at 3.53 inches. Seven stations
received more than two inches and another six received at least an
inch. Ft. Pierce recorded the least, with no measurable precipita-
tion. The majority of the citrus region was still drought free, with
the exception of an area northeast and southwest of Lake
Okeechobee still experiencing abnormally dry conditions, per the
U.S. Drought Monitor, last updated August 14, 2012. Fertilizer
application, irrigation, and grove maintenance were the primary
grove activities.


As we mine the phosphate needed to help grow the

world's food, it's no coincidence that we preserve

the water quality of nearby creeks and rivers. As an

environmental specialist, I'm part of a team that monitors

these bodies of water to ensure that the water quality

is sustained or even enhanced. Mosaic takes great

care to meet Florida's clean water standards. Because


supper. As usual they had a
great time.
As mentioned in this column
before, someone saw a python
in Mrs. Mildred's grove. Bud
Abbott used his brother-in-
law's big chopper and chopped
the weeds down last Friday.
There were three recreational
vehicles and one truck ringing
the grove, armed to the teeth,
waiting for the python to
appear, but no such luck. We are
all still on the python patrol!
Pray for everyone associated
with school and one another.








4C The Herald-Advocate, August 23, 2012


A
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SO.,.ners Ko-lI,' Edrl F.,-
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"WILDCaTS RVOLE
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C.N. Timmerman C
EVIsNY Ronald O. Sevigny
BEVIGINY
ASBOCIATEB Robyn Russell, O
I m lila Board Certified Physich
735 N.6th Ave. 773-3322
S,, Wauchula


ROBBY


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Iij


.)D.
O.D.
OJ)D.
.D.
ians


& SHERRY ALBRITTON
LABOR SERVICES


159 State Road 64 East Zolfo Springs
G 9 O6 3-158 .C-708 ,t
S 735-9226 863-528-7085 U


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SFAMI FUNERAL HOME .
7.'A Truited ramil, 9.nc 6 '

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iwA C sof aaatsL
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"For 11 Mir later N'eed
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I'


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I~'


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6OOD LUCK WILDOPAV,

Peace River Growers
&o %Wholesale Nursery
, i, 'DQNNIS BARBER
735-0470 WATS 1-800-533-1363
3521 Nursery Rd. Zolfo Springs
.rp-rr~ !,W~.;'W --.7T17 T.-T -*


&StateFarm
David Singletary, Agent
Wauchula 773-6100


"V '.... ,- ^ ^ k A

S., ;, .. .U ,
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77 M .. -9'

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w***t

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RESPECT ALUL


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SUPPLY Go I I,
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FOR ALL HOME GAm


2012 WILDCAT ROSTER
# NAME GR POS
1 Caleb Purser 11 WR/DB :
2 Aaron Barker 12 RB/DB ;
3 Armondo Alamia 11 WR/DB
4 Jesus Flores 11 FB/LB
5 Sahmaud Blandin 10 WR/DB:-
6 Miguel Garcia 12 WR/DB
7 Marco DeLeon 9 WR/DB.
8 Derick Graham 10 WR/DB..
9 Keyon Brown 11 RB/DE
10 Jake Bolin 11 QB/LB
11 Keyonte Holley 10 FB/LB
12 Kris Johnson 11 QB/DB
13 Tristan Lanier 11 WR/DB
14 Tyler Dunlap 11 WR/DB
15 James Greene 11 FB/DE
17 JJ Almarez 11 RB/LB
19 Octavio Alvarez 12 WR/DB
20 Stephan Jones 10 RB/LB
21 Timmy Steedly 11 RB/LB
25 Alonzo Casso 12 FB/DT
33 Paul Gough 12 FB/LB
34 Lucious Everett 11 WR/DE
42 Waylon Pleger 11 FB/LB
45 Nelson Bethea 11 TE/DE
50 Luke Winter 11 OL/DE
54 Blaiaine Molitor 10 OL/DT
55 Adson DelHomme 11 OL/DT
58 Devin Pearson 10 OL/DT
64 William McClellahd 9,;- OL/DT
70 Luke Palmer 11 ^ OL/DT
72 Ramior Ramirez 12 OL/DT
74 Rufino Gabriel 12 OL/DE
76 Jesus Zuniga 12 OL/DT
77 Jose Gonzalez 10 OL/DT


- I


1


HI






B


I-Ad ocate 5C
66,. i


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ES- 7i- ,il


Roster Not


Available At


Press Time!





Go



Cats


Head Coach:
Buddy Martin
Offensive Coordinator: Dale Carlton
Defensive Coordinator: Steve Rewis
Assistant Coaches: Ray Rivas,
Rashad Faison,
Shawn Rivers, Travis Tubbs


F, I 'UV- 1 'I [ (.

EALTORS" o "

,I. 4 1-, l, ..,An ,
.*' 3'


73-0060


, I' "* 1 "


I'
;i~


:Aug. 24
r


Hardee
Lake Placid


'Name:
Address:


.Day Phone:
DEADLINE FOR ENTRY: FRIDAY AT 5 P.M.
.Fill out entry form and return if to: The Herald-Advocale
115 S. Seventh Ave.. \auchula


i.X Ka



S Cassandra Reyna
Co-Captain
Age: 17
S SParents: Linda and
'lesse Re\na
Hobbiesl Interests:
Cheerleadlne.
s inging, beine a
Sunday\ school
er o YL n Sn lejcher. southh lead-
'er. \olunieerinnge Loe-on LearninLg
Center. king care otf m beautilul
nephe: ,inmd niece. ,pendinLg all my
time % ith mn #1 tan, I call tfmil and
'' n\ol\n m\,ell a much .1 I can in
t his \wonderful place I call home
Future Plans: Atlter high schooll I plan
to attend LUCF in Orl.ndo and become
an \-ra\ technician and pursue a career
Sand have a beautiful famil\ in Orlando





Jus. name the score to FridJ', nilhti \Wildcai Foobih ll game j nd
\ou wouldd i. ln
District Games-
2 Buc Tickets
All Other Games $40 Gift Certificate Payable to
one of our selected "\\ ildcat" page sponsors
C( NIES I Ri I S
* Conie'is i cloli'ed to all Her.ild.-AJd. lae employees and families
* In ihe etent olf e. Ihe. %inner e ill he picked b, a random draiung
* If no one pick- ith e\.ici *i:- iLr Ihc c.- esi ,core Iins
* Oi'-jl iCAntr .hl. .
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Winners wll be pickedd o!onda\ morning niortiied by phone that
ajcternoon and announcetiid in ne.wr ietk '5 paper


BOWL F FUN

COME BY & SEE US i

AFTER THE GAME
X 773-6391
I- _ _ ^ ^ ^ -


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p We Personalize Your
:''l Shirts Backpacks
Coffee Mugs ... and More!
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45 9 Benny Hash Building Contrator
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COME BY FOR "'M '"ORE 7THE GAME

S221 WesMalt.il. ,auchulf., .e


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Florida Fuel
of Hardee Countyl...
'IThe 1 OI. I.oall hiOned and Operatld
hli ilk l l lilrilhlilir lor olner 20 w'ar:%
;,B 773-9466 a
Monica Reas, Owner


ALBRITTON

Scrr ice Rclibilty E\pertise
20 N 6h Ave. auchula 773-101
S204 N.6th Ave., Wauchula 773-4101


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T .:-^ proudly supports the
4 Hardee Senior High School 2012 Football Team

Sood Luck and Go Wildcats!


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HACKNEY, AMES
& HEITNAN, PA
CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS

220 Not 6t A 7
220 North 6th Ave. 773-


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SMALL ENGINE SERVICE, INC.
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6C The Herald-Advocate, August 23, 2012



A:,E , UEV
.110 .. .


"A Fresh Start"
by Dr. Michele Polk, Principal


The beginning of a new school year is an time between school work, employment,
exciting time for teachers and students alike, fun. "Basically," Martinez stated, "my goal
Whether you are a student or an educator the this year is to exercise better time management
month of August is a time when you generally English teacher Rachel Thompson has a
feel rejuvenated from the summer break and, reflected on her teaching practices
dare I say, may actually miss the day to day vows to have students read more cun
rQutines of school and the opportunity to "events this school year so they will be be
see friends and collaborate with colleagues. informed about the world around the
August can be compared to the January As the school principal, I typically iden
1st New Year Holiday in that it's a time when two to three leadership areas that I want
students and faculty make "New School improve on in the coming year. This yea
Year Resolutions" which typically focus on commit to spending more time visiting/observ
how they will be a better student or educator. classrooms during the school day. This will all
It is a healthy process for all of us to reflect me to better monitor the effectiveness of teach
on our work ethic, study/education practices, and practices the school has implemented and provi
goals, and continually seek ways to improve good insight into the overall school environm
ourselves and our work habits. And who doesn't For students and educators, a new sch
love the idea of"starting fresh" each August? After year naturally lends itself to this ritual of mak
all, it's an opportunity to "get right" whatever "resolutions." Ifyou haven't already taken the t
you feel didn't go so well the previous year. to think about what your goals for the upcorm
Some of our students and teachers were school year will be, I encourage you to do so -t
active at the school during the summer advantage of the "fresh start" that August ma
months and shared their "New School Year possible! The HHS administration looks forw
Resolutions" with me. Sophomore Selena to helping all of our students and staff achi
Macias expressed that she planned to get more their "2012-13 resolutions" as we work togel
organized with her school work while senior toward a successful and enjoyable school ye
Dylan Martinez wants to better prioritize his

















.- . .


,
. -












The AFJROTC students stayed busy on campus this summer! Teachers relocat-
ing their classrooms in early August appreciated the helping hands of these cadets (left to
right): Sadie King, Michael Ramirez, Alan Murphy, Savannah Vasquez, and Amalia Rivera











PleaseE -, eL. -Tt-.











The social studies team worked this summer with the school's reading coach in preparation for
the upcoming school year. Pictured left to right are: Reading Coach, Martha Shiver; and So-
cial Studies Teachers Daniel Estrada, Kerry Fitzgerald, Jim Doty, Brian Kennedy and Vince Noble.


Please visit our website at: http://www.hardee.kl2.fl.us/hhs
Ktlease _____ ________________


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ve New HHS Teachers who attended the "Common Core"back to school workshop in earlyAu-
her gust were: (left to right) front row: Edward Lent, Science; Fernando Bernard, Spanish; and
ar! Brett Wheeler, Ag; backrow: StaceyHarpe, Math; Megan Zahara, Leadership; Daphne Hays,
Science; Carrie Sue Edenfield, Science; Linda Shayman, English; and Jamie Batiste, Reading.





























Hardee High teachers Linda Shayman (left) and Karen Porter (right)
worked this summer to get a jump start on the 2012-13 school year,











8/28 Volleyball v. DeSoto (Home)
8/3024 Varsity Football v.Mulbeny (Hoff Classic v. Lake e)
S 8/30 Volleyball v. Lake Placid (Home) "i
9/7 SAT Registration Deadline (October SAT,
testing date)
9/7 Varsity Football v. Avon Park (Home)
S9/8 ACT Test
9/13 JV Football v. Fort Meade (Home)
9/14 Varsity Football v. Sebring (Home)


--N --


Now that school is back in session, be

sure to check out the "Orange & Blue

Review" each week to stay up to date

on HHS activities and events!


0( CF
S9eBSSiB0^ t~iBlM-l


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6C The tlerald-Advocate, August 23, 2012
I


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August 23, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 7C


Gillespie Couple Help Women And Children


By JIM KELLY April 2012, has 17 one-bed-
Of The Herald-Advocate room, one-bath apartments. The
John Gillespie, 84, and his construction cost 1.7 million
wife Lorraine, 77, of Wauchula and was done by Cobb
founded their Alpha and Omega Construction. Other costs for
Freedom Ministries in 1985 and sitework, architecture, land-
are busier than ever. ;- ',"scaping and supervision pushed
"Why should older people sit the cost to just over $2 million.
around and twiddle their Rent is $300 to $400 a month
thumbs?" asked John Gillespie. 'which includes electricity. Nine
"Moses started his ministry at of the apartments are furnished
age 80." They have been mar- and rented.
ried 32 years. Hannah's house is remodeled
Lorraine Gillespie said the home and provides free emer-
ministry received seven calls in agency shelter for women and
two days recently from women children.
who need transitional living or As of past week there were
emergency shelter. nine women and five children
The ministry has an office at in Hannah's House and nine
113. North Seventh Ave. in women and 11 children in the
Wauchula, and a thrift store apartment complex.
the old Ben Franklin location a. : The Gillespies are the modest
121 West Main St. in Wauchula. i'eans, living off their Social
The ministry has Hannah's Security. John is a retired from
House in rural Wauchula and a bread, milk and potato chip
new 17-apartment complex for wholesale routes. Lorraine is
transitional living for women retired from a career in sales,
and children. Most of the insurance and printing.
women are victims of domestic They do not draw a salary
violence, from their ministry. For four
The complex, completed in months Lorraine drew $100 a
I I


The Wauchula couple sit in an apartment living room. The
complex cost just over $2 million and was paid by feder-
al and state grants.
I----


.1


This is the courtyard at the apartment complex. Nine of
the 17 apartments are rented. remaining apartments
need to be furnished.


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..'..This is a view of Hannah's House from the rear.-',",
This is a view of Hannah's House from the rear.


week in grant funds but that
revenue has ended.
Due to overcrowding they
moved from Hannah's House
into a nearby converted barn.
The women are required to
do some work. They cannot just
lay around all day, she said.
The ministry offers counsel-
ing, parenting classes, anger
management classes, and class-
es to help overcome and pre-
vent domestic violence.
Insurance costs $6,000 a year
on Hannah's House and
$11,000 on the apartment com-
plex. Eight of the apartments
need single or bunk beds,
dressers, pots and pans, silver-
ware, bed linens, pillows, etc.
Lorraine Gillespie has three
daughters and a son who helps
in the ministry. The ministry's
phone number is 773-5717.


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PHOTOS BY JIM KELLY
The Gillespies are shown in front of new 17-apartment building for transitional living for
women and children. Rent is $300 to $400 a month and includes the electricity.


View of an apartment bathroom. The apartments were
completed in April 2012.


View of an apartment bedroom. The complex is located
on South Florida Avenue south of Florida's First Asembly
of God Church.


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John and Lorraine Gillespie live in this converted barn
next to the new apartment complex.


Stubborness does have its helpful features. You always
know what you are going to be thinking tomorrow.
-Glen Beaman


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
John and Lorraine Gillespie stand in an apartment
kitchen, which includes range and refrigerator.


These picnic tables are near a BBQ grill and adjacent to
the community center.




Pet Of ThekWee


Frito is a male Chihuahua.
He has a short cream colored coat with a long tail.
Adoption fees are $45 and include a rabies vaccination and spaying or
neutering of the animal. Contact 773-2320 if you are interested in adopt-
ing any cats or dogs that desperately need a loving home. The kennel
location is 685 Airport Road, Wauchula, at the county landfill.
II


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10 HOURS A MONTH!

That's all it takes to speak up for a child. Volunteer to'be a
Guardian Ad Litem.

773-2505
(If office unattended, please leave message.)


NOTICE OF THE CITY OF WAUCHULA

REQUESTING APPLICANTS FOR

THE PLANNING & ZONING BOARD

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT the City of Wauchula will be accepting applicants who
would like to serve on the City of Wauchula's Planning & Zoning Board. This Board reviews
and makes recommendations to the City Commission on matters relating to the planning
of the City. All members are appointed by the City Commission and must be a resident of
the City. The Board meets the third Monday of each month at 5:30 pm.

All interested individuals must complete an "Informational Data for Board Appointments"
form and return it to the City Clerk, 126 S. 7th Avenue, Wauchula, FL 33873 by Friday, Au-
gust 31st at 5:00 pm. All applications received by the deadline will be presented to the
City Commission at the September 10, 2012 City Commission Meeting at 6:00 pm for their
review and possible selection.

Questions may be directed to:

City of Wauchula
Olivia Minshew, Director of Community Development
126 S. 7th Avenue
Wauchula, FL 33873

863-773-9193

ominshew@cityofwauchula.com
* 8:23c
I-


CITY OF WAUCHULA

INVITATION TO BID

HISTORIC TRAIN DEPOT RESTORATION

On Friday, August 17, 2012 the City of Wauchula Community Redevelopment Agency
(CRA) is accepting sealed bids from qualified companies to provide building restoration,
renovations and repair services in accordance with the Contract Documents for the Historic
Train Depot, Wauchula, Florida.

All persons and firms wishing to submit bids must obtain a complete copy of the Invitation
to Bid document which is available for download and review at www.cityofwauchula.com
under the header "City Government", "Community Redevelopment Agency" and "Bid No.
CRA 12-02", or purchase at the office of the CRA Coordinator: 107 E. Main Street,
Wauchula, Florida, 33873.
The deadline for submissions is 2:00 PM, Monday, September 17, 2012. Qualifications
received after this date and time will not be considered. Qualification packages should be
directed to:
Mail or Express Delivery to:
CRA
Attn: Jessica Newman
107 E. Main Street
Wauchula, FL 33873
863.767.0330
The City reserves the right, in its sole discretion, to reject all submissions, reissue a sub-
sequent Invitation to Bid, terminate, restructure or amend this procurement process at any
time.
8:23c


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8C The Herald-Advocate, August 23, 2012


PUBLIC NOTICE
the PLANNING AND ZONING BOARD
meeting as the local planning agency
AND
the BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
will hold a

JOINT

PUBLIC HEARING
on
THURSDAY, AUGUST 30, 2012
beginning at 3:00 P.M.
AND
THURSDAY. SEPTEMBER 13, 2012
beginning at 3:00 P.M.
in the County Commissioners' Board Room 102
412 West Orange St., 1st floor Courthouse Annex
Wauchula, FL
to hear the proposals. receive public input for the following
request:
Agenda No. 12-12
CF INDUSTRIES, Inc. by and through the Authorized Represen-
tative requests approval of a Major Special Exception to
operate phosphate mining activities on 7,512.6+/-acres to be known
as South Pasture Mine Extension, Hardee County,
at a rate of excavatioi-/miping greater than one acre/year on parcels
zoned A-1 (Agriculture), Agriculture Future Land Use District.

At that same Public Hearing the Boards will consider a
request for approval of:
^j a Development Order on an application for
Development Approval for a Development of
Regional Impact (DRI), Substantial Deviation and
^^a Master Mining and Reclamation Plan and Unit
Plan
TOWNSHIP 34 SOUTH, RANGE 24 EAST. HARDEE COUNTY, FL
Sections 10, 09, 05, 04 and 03, described as follows:
Corn at NE corn of Sec 10, T34S, R24E, Hardee County, FL for a Pt of
Begin.; thence S 00deg25min21sec W along E bdry of Sec 10 a dist
of 1323.90 ft; thence N 88deg43min15sec W a dist of 2655.44 ft;
thence S 00deg31min 11sec E a dist of 948.57 ft; thence S
84degl2min19sec W a dist of 2672.36 ft to a pt on W bdry of said Sec
10. Thence N 00deg24min44sec E along w bdry of Sec 10 a dist of
2321.83 ft; thence N 57deg53min07sec W a dist of 2427.63 ft; thence
N 01deg24min06sec E a dist of 1535.57 ft; thence N
88deg58min42sec Wa dist of 3224.00 ft; thence N 89deg32min27sec
W a dist of 2298.31 ft to E/ly r/ow line of Fort Green-Ona Rd, as
shown on FL Dept. of Transportation Right-of-Way Map, Sec 06504-
2603. Thence N 08deg29min27sec W along said rlolw line a dist of
1958.44 ft; thence continuing along said r/o/w line N
00deg52min39sec E a dist of 439.76 ft to a pt on N bdry of said Sec 5.
Thence S 89deg32min53sec E along N bdry of Sec 5 a dist of 2638.83
'ftto NE corn of Sec 5 and NW corn of said sec 4; thence S
89deg32min29sec E along N bdry of Sec 4 a dist of 5377.15 ft to NE
corn of Sec 4 and NW corn of said Sec 3; thence S 89deg33min49sec
E along N bdry of Sec 3 a dist of 5318.50 ft to NE corn of Sec 3;
thence S 02deg26minl5sec W along E bdry of Sec 3 a dist of 5017.28
ft to SE corn of Sec 3; said corn also being NE corn of Sec 10 and
the POB; AND,
All of Section 2; AND,
SW1/4 of Sec 01, T34S, R24E, Hardee County, FL, LESS AND
EXCEPT the following: Beg at SW corn of said Sec 01; thence N
02deg46min49sec E along W line of Sec 01 a dist of 38.04 ft; thence
S 89deg51min11sec E along a line 38 ft N of and parallel with S line
of said Sec 01 a dist of 1656.43 ft; thence S 00degl2min46sec W a
dist of 38.00 ft; thence N 89deg51mini1 sec W a dist of 1658.13 ft to
POB, TOGETHER WITH easements contained in Easement
Agreement recorded in OR Bk 337, Pg. 502, Public Records of
Hardee County, FL TOGETHER WITH a non-exclusive easement for
ingress and egress over and across Slly 30 ft of SW1/4 of Sec 01,
T34S, R24E, lying W of E/ly r/o/w of McLeod Rd and S/ly 30 ft of Sec
02, T34S, R24E, PROVIDED, however, the easement will move
northward of Grantor's existing well in Sec 02 so as to not interfere
with the operation of the well. TOGETHER WITH an exclusive
drainage easement over any portion of Sec 02, T34S, R24E, lying W
of NIS ditch on bdry between Sec 02 and 03, T34S, R24E, TOGETHER
WITH easements for ingress, egress, roadway, utilities and any
lawful purpose over and across the following properties:.
ROAD, DRAINAGE, MAINTENANCE AND UTILITY EASEMENT in Sec
01, T34S, R24E, Hardee County, FL being desc as follows: Corn at
SW corn of Sec 01, T34S, R24E, Hardee County, FL thence S
89deg51minllsec E, and along S line of said sec 01, 1590.75 ft to
POB, thence continue S 89deg51mini 1sec E along same line, 37.38
ft to a pt on W rlo/w line of a County Rd; thence N 00degl2min46sec
E and along said W line, 38.00 ft; thence N 89deg51 mini I sec W and
parallel with said S line, 37.38 ft; thence S 00degl2min46sec E and
parallel with said W line, 38.00 ft to POB.
ROAD, DRAINAGE, MAINTENANCE AND UTILITY EASEMENTS IN
Sec 11, T34S, R24E, Hardee County, FL, being desc as follows: Beg
at SE corn of N114 of Sec 11, T34S, R24E for a POB; thence N
88deg54min23sec W along S line of said N1I4, 2634.30 ft to SE corn
of NE1/4 of NW1/4 of said Sec 11; thence N 88deg54min27sec W
along S line of said NEll4 qf NW1/4, 658.01 ft to NE corn of W3/4 of
S1/2 of NW1/4 of said Sec 11; thence S 00deg21 mini 6sec W along E
line of said W314 of S1/2 of NW1/4, 4.95 ft; thence S
88deg54min10sec W 1974.02 ft to a pt on w line of said Sec 11;
thence N 00deg25min21 sec E and along said W line, 45.00 ft; thence
S 88deg54min10sec E, 5266.14 ft to E line of said Sec 11; thence S
00deg08min42sec W along said E line, 39.70 ft to POB.
ROAD, DRAINAGE, MAINTENANCE AND UTILITY EASEMENT in Sec
12, T34S, R24E, Hardee County, FL being desc as follows: Com at
NW corn of Sec 12, T34S, R24E, Hardee County, FL; thence S
89deg51minllsec E and along N line of said Sec 12, 1590.75 ft to
POB; thence cont S 89deg51minl1 sec e along same line, 37.38 ft to
a pt on W r/olw line of a County Rd.; thence S 00degl2min46sec W
and along said W line, 666.12 ft to a pt on S line of W1/2 of NW1/4 of
NE1/4 of NW1/4 of said Sec 12; thence N 89deg53min53sec W and
along said S line, 964.41 ft to NW corn of SE1/4 of NW1/4 of NW1/4 of
said Sec 12; thence S 00degl0minl9sec W and along W line of said
SE1/4 of NW1/4 of NW1/4, 666.98 ft to SW corn of said tract; thence
N 89deg56min34sec W along S line of NW1/4 of NW1/4 of said Sec
12, 662.62 ft to SW corn of NW1/4 of NW1/4; thence N
00deg08min42sec E and along W line of said tract, 34.82 ft; thence S
89deg51 min1 sec E and parallel with N line of said Sec 12, 621.40 ft;
thence N 00deg26min49sec E, 670. ft; thence S 89deg51min llsec E,
and parallel with N line, 962.50 ft; thence N 00deg26min49sec E,
630.00 ft to POB.


Mike Thompson, Chairman, Planning/Zoning Board
Minor Bryant, Chairman, Board of County Commissioners

This is a Disabled-Accessible facility. Any disabled person needing
to make special arrangements should contact the County Manager's
Office, (863) 773 9430 at least two (2) working days prior to the
Public Hearing

This Public Notice is published in accordance with the Hardee
County Unified Land Development Code. Copies of the documents


During the past week, sheriff's deputies and city police
officers investigated the following incidents and made the fol-
lowing arrests:

COUNTY
Aug. 18, Erick Estrada, 34, of 445 Calvert Road, Wauchula,
was arrested by Dep. Miguel Castillo on a charge of contempt of
court violation of an injunction for protection.
Aug. 18, a theft on U.S. 17 North was reported.

Aug. 17, Antonio Guajardo Jr., 28, of 509 Grove St., Bowling
Green, was arrested by Dep. Steven Ahrens on a charge of with-
holding support of children.
Aug. 17, Jackie Lynn Bandy, 47, of 3330 Suwannee St., Zolfo
Springs, was arrested by Det. Shane Ward and charged with two
counts of fraud obtaining property by swindling.
Aug. 17, Guillermo Alvarado, 44, of 4521 South Ave.,
Bowling Green, was arrested by Dep. Bradford Merkel and
charged with no valid license. He was detained on a charge of with-
holding support of children.
Aug. 17, Mark Allen Lumley, 40, of John Holt Road, Zolfo
Springs, was arrested by the countywide Drug Task Force (DTF)
and charged with possession of methamphetamine, possession of
drug paraphernalia and possession of drugs without a prescription.
Aug. 17, a vehicle stolen on Makowski Road and a theft on
U.S. 17 North was reported.

Aug. 16, Christopher Michael Rich, 24, of 515 Baker St.,
Wauchula, was arrested by DTF and charged with sale of cocaine
within 1,000 feet of public housing, two counts sale of cocaine
within 1,000 feet of a place of worship or business; three counts
owning/renting a vehicle or structure for drug trafficking, three
counts public order crimes using a two-way communication
device to commit a crime and two counts possession/manufac-
ture/delivery of drug paraphernalia.
Aug. 16, Shane Allen Mizrahi, 20, of 1313 Mockingbird Lane,
Wauchula, was arrested by Det. David Drake and charged with use
of a computer for obscene communications.
Aug. 16, Victor Bady Smith, 44, of 525 Magnolia Blvd.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Polly Bissette and charged with
battery.
Aug. 16, a residential burglary on Miller Road, and thefts on
Redbird Lane and on Magnolia Boulevard were reported.

Aug. 15, Timothy John King, 51, of 2502 Morning Glory
Loop, Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Steven Ahrens and charged
with possession of methamphetamine.
Aug. 15, Michele Lynn Pintello, 29, of 702 E. Oak St.,
Wauchula, was arrested by state Probation Ofc. Rob Davis on a
charge of violation of probation and a traffic charge.
Aug. 15, Maria Guadalupe Turrubiates, 45, of 1521 N.
Hollandtown Road, Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Eric Harrison
and charged with larceny theft.
Aug. 15, Andreqa Lexus Aguilar, 18, of 315 SR 62, Bowling
Green, was arrested by Dep. Eric Harrison and charged with aggra-
vated battery.
Aug. 15, Caleb Tamayo, 18, of 520 Palmetto St., Bowling
Green, was arrested by Det. David Drake and charged with use of
a computer for obscene communications.
Aug. 15, a residential burglary on Boyd Cowart Road, crimi-
nal mischief on Sally Place, a vehicle stolen on Goosepond Road,
and thefts Makowski Road and on U.S. 17 South were reported.

Aug. 14, Alex Alamia, 30, of 797 Stephens Road, Wauchula,
was arrested by Dep. Bradford Merkel and charged with felony
domestic battery.
Aug. 14, Herman Thompson, 35, of 730 LaPlaya Dr.,
Wauchula, was arrested on charges of possession of methampheta-
mine, possession of drug paraphernalia and resisting an officer
without violence.
Aug. 14, Ruben Martinez Castro, 44, of 136 Earnest Road,
Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Manuel Castillo and charged with
discharging a firearm in public.
Aug. 14, John Jaimie Perez, 22, of 1531 Appaloosa Lane,
Wauchula, was arrested by DTF and charged with possession of
marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia, resisting an officer
without violence and a traffic violation.
Aug. 14, residential burglaries on Baker Street and on Snell
Street, a business burglary on U. S. 17 North, criminal mischief on
Manatee Street, SR 64 West and Morales Street, and thefts on two
locations on U.S. 17 South were reported.

Aug. 13, Jeff David Spires, 36, of 25099 Macapa Dr., Punta
Gorda, was arrested by Florida Highway Patrol Ofc. Michael
Spencer and charged with DUI and two other traffic offenses.
Aug. 13, Robert Preston Bivens, 27, of 3317 Hickory St.,
Zolfo Springs, was arrested by Dep. Eric Harrison on a charge of
withholding support of children.
Aug. 13, Robin Laurie Smothers, 47, of 2925 Robin Lane,
Zolfo Springs, was arrested by Dep. Ryan Abbott and charged with
battery, disorderly intoxication, battery on an officer, resisting an
officer without violence and violation of probation.
Aug. 13, a residential burglary on Alec Hendry Road and
criminal mischief on South Road were reported.

WAUCHULA
Aug. 19, J. Santos Zuniga-Lugo, 49, of 610 N. Eighth Ave.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Cpl. Robert Spencer on a charge of con-
tempt of court violation of an injunction for protection.

Aug. 18, Justin Michael Gray, 19, of 920 Kathy Road, Bartow,
was arrested by Cpl. Robert Spencer on an out-of-county warrant.

Aug. 16, Jose Rubio Gonzalez, 43, of 312 Griffin Road,
Wauchula, was arrested by Ofc. Jonathan Corwin and charged with
disorderly intoxication and trespassing on an occupied structure or
conveyance.
Aug. 15, criminal mischief on Seminole Street was reported.

Aug. 13, thefts on Seminole Street and on North Ninth Avenue
were reported.

BOWLING GREEN
Aug. 16, Arthur Higginbotham, 50, of 6638 Jack Jones Road,
Wauchula, was arrested by Capt. Brett Dowden and charged with
possession of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia.

Aug. 14, a residential burglary on East Banana Street was
reported.

Aug. 13, thefts on Pleasant Way and on East Main Street were
reported.


Thirty-five percent of the people who use personal ads
for dating are already married.



relating to the proposals are available for public inspection during
weekdays between the hours of 8:30 A.M..and 3:00 P.M. at the office
of Hardee County Mining Coordinator, (863) 773 0136), 110 South 91h
Avenue, Wauchula, FL.

All interested persons shall have the right to be heard. In rendering
any decision the Board of County Commissioners shall rely solely
on testimony that is relevant and material. Although minutes of the
Public Hearing will be recorded, anyone wishing to appeal any
decision made at the public hearings will need to ensure a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made by a court reporter.
08:09,23c


Stump The Swami
By John Szeligo
Well, Football fans, it is August! NFL and college football
camps are alive with activity. Fans are full of optimism. The
works are making preparations for the endless trips to stadiums
many months and nothing beats football on a colorful fall Satu~i
afternoon.
2012 should be called the Bob Dylan Season. Like his big h.
song, "The Times, they are a changing," so is the face of collte
football as realignment is the driving force with a 4-team pla\xtll
coming soon in 2014. The ultimate goal appears to be four major
conferences with 14 to 16 teams each. The SEC, Big 12, Big 10 and
PAC 10 should dominate the playoff picture. This season, the SEC
will see Missouri and Texas A&M begin play while the Big 12 will
welcome TCU and West Virginia in 2012 as well.
The ACC will add Pitt and Syracuse in 2013. Basketball wise
that makes sense. Football wise, it is like adding the Yugo and the
Edsel to your car lot. The ACC is already the laughing stock of all
the conferences with a 2-13 record in BCS games and still smart-
ing after their champions were humiliated 70-33.in the Orange
Bowl last season. The next jolt to the ACC will be the raid by the
Big 12 coming soon. If FSU and Clemson want to maintain major
football status, it's time to get c. of the All Cupcake Conference.
FSU's schedule is ranked the easiest in the country in 2012.
The Big East Conference has lost West Virginia this year and
will lose Pitt and Syracuse in 2013. Along with those losses went
the automatic BCS Bowl as well after 2013. The conference is try-
ing to survive by adding Central Florida, SMU, Memphis
,Houston, Temple, Boise St. and Navy later. The Big East can
expect another raid by the ACC if and when the Big 12 raids the
ACC.
The down side of college sports has taken the spotlight away
from on-field competition. The despicable scandal at Penn St. has
tarnished the image of college football in general while the school
will never recover the respect it once had. The NCAA has given
Penn St. a slap-on-the-wrist penalty; no bowl games through 2017,
loss of scholarships and fines. Popular opinion, however, dismiss-
es anything but the Death Penalty as what is deserved. A 5-year
Death Penalty was the most popular among fans on internet mes-
sage sites. It would have been the better choice considering the
nature and scope of this scandal.
The NCAA has other schools to punish for their misdeeds as
well and it started with UCF. The Knights are banned from any
post-season play in 2012-13 in football and basketball. The big
question is when will the NCAA put the hammer down on Miami,
North Carolina and Ohio St.? There are hints Miami will be dealt
with soon. This should be very severe considering it is recurring
thing in Coral Gables. The academic scandal at UNC is long over-
due from being dealt with. Ohio St. has seen 45 more violations
since Urban Meyer took over the Buckeyes.
Next week, the Swami will reveal the Top 25 and make the
first college predictions for 2012. Look for the Gators to do better
than what the preseason books are predicting. The SEC and Big 12
will dominate the top rankings all season. USF should have a good
shot at a Big East Title. UCF cannot go to a bowl regardless of
record. FSU could finish 13-0 if they beat UF but should not be
ranked above 10th because UF is their ONLY real game all season.
Tune in next week for some follow up on these projections.


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION

CASE NO. 25-2009-CA-000360

JPMORGAN CHASE BANK,
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION,

Plaintiff,

vs.

RIGOBERTO GONZALEZ, et al,
Defendant(s). /

NOTICE OF
RESCHEDULED SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
Pursuant to an Order
Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale
dated July 19, 2012, and entered
in Case No. 25-2009-CA-00360 of
the Circuit Court of the Tenth
Judicial Circuit in and for Hardee
County, Florida in which
JPMorgan Chase Bank, National
Association, is the Plaintiff and
Rigoberto Gonzalez, Martha I.
Gonzalez, are defendants, I will
sell to the highest and best bidder
for cash in/on Hardee County
Courthouse, 2nd Floor, 417 W.
Main Street, outside Room 202
Wauchula, FL 33873, Hardee
County, Florida at 11:00 a.m. on
the 5 day of September, 2012, the
following described property as
set forth in said Final Judgment,
of Foreclosure:
THE EAST HALF OF THE NORTH-
WEST QUARTER OF THE
NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SEC-
TION 30, TOWNSHIP 34 SOUTH,
RANGE 26 EAST, HARDEE COUN-
TY, FLORIDA, LESS THE NORTH
693.00 FEET THEREOF AND
LESS, THE SOUTH 27.00 FEET
THEREOF AND SUBJECT TO
ROAD OF RIGHT OF WAY ON
THE EAST SIDE OF BAILES
ROAD. TOGETHER WITH AND
INCLUDING A 1995 CRES
MOBILE HOME ID #146M8894A
AND 146M8894B.
A/K/A 2608 BAILES RD, ZOLFO
SPRINGS, FL 33890

Any person claiming an interest
in the surplus from the sale, if
any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the Lis
Pendens must file a claim within
60 days after the sale.

Dated in Hardee County, Florida
this 23 day of July, 2012.

Clerk of the Circuit Court
Hardee County, Florida

By: Connie Coker
Deputy Clerk

If you are a person with a disabil-
ity who needs any accommoda-
tion in order to participate In this
proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Please con-
tact the Office of the Court
Administrator, (863) 534-4690,
within two (2) working days of
your receipt of this (describe
notice); if you are hearing or
voice impaired, call TDD (863)
534-7777 or Florida Relay service
711.
8:23,30c


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
10TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA

CASE NO. 25-2010-CA-000046

DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL
TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE
FOR NOVASTAR MORTGAGE
FUNDING TRUST, SERIES 2007-
1,

Plaintiff,

v.

NOLA DENISE GORDON A/K/A
NOLA DENISE GORDON- MCK-
INZIE F/K/A NOLA D. JACKSON,
LEROY MCKINZIE, FINANCIAL
PORTFOLIOS II, INC.,
UNKNOWN TENANTS) IN POS-
SESSION #1 and #2, and ALL
OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES,
et al,

Defendants.

NOTICE OF SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
pursuant to a Final Judgment of
Foreclosure dated April 28, 2010,
entered in Civil Case No. 25-2010-
CA-000046 of the Circuit Court of
the 10th Judicial Circuit In and for
HARDEE County, Florida, wherein
DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL
TRUST COMPANY is the Plaintiff
and NOLA DENISE GORDON, et
al are the Defendants.
I will sell to the highest bidder
for cash, via sale at 417 West
Main St., Second Floor Hallway
outside of Room 202, Wauchula,
Fl. 33873 at 11:00 a.m. on the 5
day of September, 2012, the fol-
lowing described property as set
forth in said Final Judgment, to
wit:

THE SOUTH 1/2 OF THE
SOUTH 1/2 OF THE EAST
205 FEET OF BLOCK D,
A.Y. TEACHY SUBDIVI-
SION OF WAUCHULA,
ACCORDING TO THE MAP
OR PLAT THEREOF AS
RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 2, PAGE 34, PUBLIC
RECORDS OF HARDEE
COUNTY, FLORIDA.

ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN
INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS
FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.

IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A
DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY
ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER
TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PRO-
CEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED,
AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE
PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSIS-
TANCE. PLEASE CONTACT THE
OFFICE OF THE COURT ADMIN-
ISTRATOR, (863) 534-4690,
WITHIN TWO (2) WORKING DAYS
OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS
NOTICE OF SALE; IF YOU ARE
HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED,
CALL TDD (863) 534-7777 OR
FLORIDA RELAY SERVICE 711.

Dated this 13 day of August, 2012.

Clerk of the Court

By: Connie Coker

8:23,30c