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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028302/00437
 Material Information
Title: The Herald-advocate
Portion of title: Herald advocate
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Wm. J. Kelly
Place of Publication: Wauchula Fla
Publication Date: 06/21/2012
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Wauchula (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hardee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Hardee -- Wauchula
Coordinates: 27.546111 x -81.814444 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: 55th year, no. 31 (Sept. 2, 1955)-
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579544
oclc - 33886547
notis - ADA7390
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System ID: UF00028302:00437
 Related Items
Preceded by: Hardee County herald
Preceded by: Florida advocate (Wauchula, Fla.)

Full Text


















The


Herald-Advocate


Hardee County's Hometown Coverage


112th Year, No. 29
3 Sections, Pages 24


70i
Pins S SSales Tax


Thursday, June 21, 2012


P&Z Board OKs Natural-Gas Plant


By JIM KELLY
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Hardee County Planning
and Zoning Board voted 6-0
Thursday night to recommend
approval to the Hardee County
Commission for a major special
exception/site development
plan for a large natural gas pro-
ject on 486 acres currently
owned by CF Industries just
south of the Hardee/Polk coun-
ty line.
The Hardee County Com-
missioners will consider the
proposal on Thursday, July 5, at
8:35 a.m.
Fort Green Storage LLC
plans to build a liquified natural
gas fueling station and storage
facility. The land is currently
zoned A-I in the Industrial
Future Land Use District. The
property has been previously
mined and is located about 3
1/2 miles north of the intersec-




Elected


Official
- RmsigsI


By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
The youngest member of the
Zolfo Springs Town Commis-
sion resigned Monday night.
Rhonda Long, then 29, had
ousted incumbent DiDi White
in a town election in October of
2010. White, however, later re-
turned to the commission, fill-
ing another vacancy, and is cur-
rently serving on that board.
Long, who was little more
than 18 months into her four-
year term, cited personal rea-
sons for her early departure.
In its Monday night session,
the Town Commission accepted
her resignation.
Town Manager Litida Rober-
son on. Wednesday was prepar-
ing a resolution declaring the
vacancy and setting a date for a
special election to fill it. The
town will confer with Elections
Supervisor Jeff Ussery to estab-
lish the time frame.
Meanwhile, Roberson said,
she is working to call a special
meeting of the Town Commis-
sion for this Friday.
At that meeting, the commis-
sion will adopt the resolution
and the election date will be set
and published.
The Zolfo Springs Town
Commission is made up of five
.members. Currently serving are
White, Juan Otero, Lois Dan-
dridgeand Sara Schofield.


tion of SR-62 and CR-663
North.
Hardee Planning and Devel-
opment Director Kevin Denny
said there would be about 20
tanker trucks a day using the
storage tanks and about 100
daily trips. There are 113 such
plants in the U.S. The three
tanks would be 170 feet high.
Denny said the project is not a
refinery.


THE YUCKK' FACTOR


Denny said county staff had
reviewed the proposal and rec-
ommended approval. Each tank
will have a double wall, and
there will be containment berms
to hold 110 percent of tank
capacity. Pine trees will be
planted along CR-663 North.
The existing land use is indus-
trial, he said. The facility will
be built in the center of the
property.


John Ellis of Fort Green
Storage said the project will be
, built in Phases I to 4. When
built out, he said the rough con-
struction estimate is $700 mil-
lion, meaning a large increase
in the county's tax base. He said
the current tax roll in the coun-
ty is $1.4 billion. This will
result in a large increase in
taxes going to the county and to
the school system, he said.


Ellis said he had developed
the Hardee Power Plant which
stores 1.5 million gallons of
fuel oil and has built other
plants, including DeSoto Power
Plant a mile from DeSoto High
School and other plants includ-
ing Tiger Bay, with no major
problems reported.
George Matzke of Fort Green
Storage said gas is methane. He
said liquified natural gas (LNG)


COURTESY PHOTO.
The Parent Teacher Organization at Wauchula Elementary School remained active to the end, holding a "Kiss The
Critter" penny drive as a fund raiser. Students participated by using their spare change to "vote" for staff members,
who would win the "privilege" of kissing a critter of the kids' choice. Winning were third-grade teacher Tami Rhodes,
Coach Ray Rivas and Principal Sonja Bennett. Then, classes competed to determine which one would get to choose
the critter. Winning that power was the first-grade class of Francisca Olvera. The photo above shows the result of the
votes, as Rhodes prepares to pucker.




ZS Farniworker Units Win Approvals


By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
After months of legal wran-
gling, to include threats of law-
suits, hours of mediation and
battles over the definition of the
word "family," a farmworker
housing plan has passed its first
two tests in Zolfo Springs.
A conditional use permit for
Encino Harvesting to utilize
three duplexes on just over one
acre along State Road 66 within


town limits was approved by
the' Planning & Zoning Board
on Thursday night and then on
first consideration by the Town
Commission on Monday night.
The plan, however, must
pass a second, and final exam,
at a public hearing held by the
Town Commission and set for
July 16.
Encino Harvesting and its
owner, Joe L. Davis Jr., first ran
into problems after purchasing


the side-by-side duplexes for
$240,000 and then beginning to
convert them to house itinerant
laborers within the federal H-
2A farmworker program.
The duplexes are situated in a
neighborhood zoned for single-
family homes.
Residents complained as
reports of plans to house any-
where from 55 to 60 workers in
the three. units circulated
through the small town. Encino


was cited for a code violation.
The duplexes originally were
allowed by special exception.
Now, a conditional use permit
has met early approvals to grant
the farmworker project.
'But the biggest town fear,
violation of the Table of Land
Uses' low-density residential
classification, has been as-
suaged.
In the final plan worked out
See FARMWORKER 2A


must be cooled to minus-260
degrees Farenheit.
He said methane gas is odor-
less, lighter than air, non-toxic
and non-corrosive.
Matzke said natural gas is
used for the motor fuels market,
the electrical generation market
and as fuel for the LDC (local
distribution company) market..
"Today oil is $85 a barrel.
See P&Z 2A




Who's


On


First?
Election Confusion':
Which Races When
By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Countywide elections in 2012
have unusual twists.
There are two universal vot-
ing situations, a pair of
Republican-only races, two
non-partisan, three delayed to
the Gen-eral Election and six
taking their offices without
opposition.
Supervisor of Elections Jeff
Ussery reminds residents that
they must be registered 29 days
before the Primary Election
Sdate of Aug. 14. Anyone unsure
or who has not registered to
vote has until the July 16 dead-
line. If there are questions, con-
tact the elections office at 773-
6061.
As of June 18, there were
6,120 Democrats, 4,284 Re-
publicans and 1,664 No Party
Affiliation (NPA) registered
voters.
Early voting begins Monday,
July 30 and continues Mondays
through Saturdays, 8 a.m. to 5
p.m. through Aug. 11 and will
be at the elections office in
Courthouse Annex II, at the
intersection of South Sixth
Avenue (U.S. 17 South) and
Oak Street.
UNIVERSAL
BALLOTING
There are two races in which
the only candidates are Repub-
licans, meaning one will come
out of the Primary Election as
the winner. Because of that, all,
voters can vote on these candi-
dates, and it will appear on all
ballots, including Democrat and
NPA.
The first such race is Clerk of
See WHO'S 2A


WEATHER


1DATE
06/13
06114
06115
06116
06/18
06118


HtIl
92
92
91
90
89
89
87


0.00
0.04
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00


TOTAL Ralnfal to 06119/12 9.46
same period last year 12.18
Tin Year Average 52.81
our:ce Untv. of FR. One Resaech Ctier

INDEX
Classifieds .....................6B
Community Calendar....3A
Courthouse Report.......3C
Crime Blotter..................7A
Hardee Living...............2B
Information Roundup...3A


Museum Hosts


Birthday
By MARIA TRUJILLO
For The Herald-Advocate
Looking for proof that sharks
and mammoths once roamed
Hardee County?
Well, look no further than
your local Cracker Trail Mu-
seum!
This evening (Thursday) the
Cracker Trail Museum will be
celebrating its 45th anniversary.
To commemorate this special
day, museum curator Marlene
Hyde has decided to throw a
"business after hours" party.
This "birthday party," as
Hyde called it, wouldn't be
complete without a birthday
cake and some refreshments. It
will be an afternoon that will
not only let the community take
a glimpse into Hardee's past,
but also celebrate it.


y Party
The Cracker Trail Museum
opened for the first time on
June 24, 1967, as Pioneer Park
Museum. It began thanks to the
Peace River Valley Historical
Society and a grant provided by
a mining corporation.
It was established as a way
for inquiring minds to learn a
little bit about the Peace River
Valley. The museum provided a
proper place to collect, preserve
and interpret the different arti-
facts and collections acquired
over time.
SShortly after the opening of
the museum, a bane-grinding
shed was put on the grounds
and a kettle was donated, thus
marking the beginning of
"Pioneer Village." Also that
year, a 1914 Baldwin Loco-
See MUSEUM 2A


FILE PHOTO
The Hart Cabin is the hallmark of Pioneer Village at Pioneer Park In Zolfo Springs. It
and its contents are just part of the history housed in the Cracker Trail Museum and its
environs. The museum is celebrating its 45th birthday today (Thursday).


PRECO Head

Will Retire

.. Story 3A


7 Run For

Wauchula Office

... Story 1B


When Does -

School Start?
... Story 7A






*, "r i... .,'
r '"' **' ,' ,
2, Th ... ,, ,~r .l F
2A The Herald.AdY3alt,J e 21, 2012


-Advocate
mrtown Coverage


KELLYY
Hir t er/Editor
S0V,' 4A*KRAHL
' : '" .l i ir Editor

JOAN M:SEAMAN RALPH HARRISON
Sports Edito Production Manager
SNOEY DE SANTIAGO
S 'l 1 Asst. Prod. Manager
U11 S.Sv AJt',r 3 Phone: (863) 773-3255
P.O. Box338 .
Wauch FL 3 Fax: (863) 773-0657
WauchulaFL3385 -'",i I.
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., I i ; .

SColumn



By Jim


The UItrversi~,r'g o ridiaftotball program has had three
Heisman trophy. wia&s 54, "l'i'ad at least two things in com-
mon-playing quariebaca .nd .,being sons of Christian ministers or
missionaries. .4 '
The Heisman winners were.Steve Spurrier in 1966, Danny
Wuerffel in 1996, and Ti i a M in.2007. Wuerffel and Tebow led
their teams to'naai~ L .A 'pionsips, while Spurrier later coached
the Gato i toa4iatrib ^2 hip.
4,Er


Steve Spurrier . i ffelt Tim Tebow
1966 2007
Their statues are oii'ie wes side of Ben Hill Griffin football
stadium on campus'in Gaiiesvvile.
Florida -"'--;
Florida Comrmisin~etfri 'f grijulture Adam Putnam recently
told the Tiger Bay Club .iheartow that over 60 percent of health
care costs are related to dit. Ti pri, cities of his office are water
policy, nutrition and ete.rgy. ..

One reader requested a mention of Dick Clark, the World's
Oldest Teenager, who passed away April 18 at age 82 of a heart
attack which followed a stroke 8 years earlier.
Clark lived in Califfornitnd was famous as host of American
Bandstand and rang in the hew'year for many years at Time Square
in New York. He promoted rock 'n' roll. He was a big part of
American entertainment history.


r Th fi
rdirdee


New School Calendar


Puts First Day On Aug. 20


~' -L


Hardee Countv;'svarious building fees are considerably less They had not. Samuels asked if General Election as candidates
than fees of nearby'coti'nTi-et..iuiny'Commission Chairman Minor there was a similar type plantdifferentparties.
Bryant report l M'ay l. Hard is(c6rnpared w ith Collier, DeSoto. already located in Florida, and The Superintendent of
Glades, HighlandiQjanaiteiandiPolk counties. here waSchools race between Repub-
For instance a ubiipeit in Hardee is $25 The other dered if liquified natural gas lican incumbent David Dura-
~counties' feeKag from~ ,to$ leaked into the retention berm lican incumbent David Dura
counties' feesnrauge from I^to$ll ID.- stanti and Democrat opponent
An electrical permirfee in Hardee for a new home up to 2,000 nd began vaporizing, howlfar Richard L. "Dick" Daggett will
square feet is $20, plus $20 and $5 per $1.000 of installation value. aboud e vap or travel e les be held in November.

counties charge idditioafliw and said he lights up a cigar mission District 5 race. Incum-
Hardee 's annira.lfe- f registered general contractor's oil bent Dale Johnson will not seek
license is $125. Othervbuntie charge $75 to $240. Hardee's annu- There is a sufficiency in the re-election. Seeking his seat are
al fee for a residential conktriclor license is $50, and the other six world for man's need, but not Republican Mikell Stuart
area counties charge from .75'.6t $150. for man's greed. "Mike" Thompson, Democrat
Hardee's fee for rezoning;is $750. Fees for the other counties -Mohandas Gandhi Perry. T. Knight and NPA J.
range from $750 to $6500..phis;other costs.
Hardee's fee f9r a coffipehensive plan amendment (small
scale map) is. $1.000: Ioh'Wcbunties charge from $1,125 to
$8,000. .. .
The fee, for an appe l'offadministrative decision to the Board coming back in late 2010 and has been strong since then for Pacer
of County Commissionersinip`t rdee is $250 The other counties Marine.
charge $150'to6 .500,..S ,"- ,
The e ba ee Harde fe Ia Iiie (Development of Regional Information provided by Charlotte Harbor National Estuary
Impact) is a $5,000 deposit, plus county staff time, consultant and Program (Peace River and Myakka River flow into the harbor):
legal costs. Glades add.P.olk .charge a $3.000 deposit plus costs. -Too much nitrogen and phosphorus ate bad for the environ-
The other four countlea:tharge-a base fee of $10.000 to $30,000 ment, causing algae to grow in the water faster than the ecosystem
deposit, plus costs. '. can handle it.
These figures weie presented at the May II planning session -Phosphate deposits were from sediments and remains of
of the Hardee County Ciommissien.'Commissioners are criticized ancient sea life buried what is now 15 to 30 feetbelow the earth's
for county fees. but-the.figuressthbw Hardee's fees are the lowest surface.
ol the area counties, mtni ly.by a wide margin. -Phosphate pebbles were discovered in Peace River in 1881.
Benny Hash' cHairi~an:rf. the Hardee Builders Association By 1887 companies recovered phosphate from Peace River and
said zoning is ifnportainti f': ; sent barges loaded with phosphate pebbles to-Charlotte Harbor and
then loaded onto schooners and steamships.
Pacer miarine'in tlejflarde.4 commercee Park has about 76 -Around 1887 land pebble phosphate was discovered near
employees; aiid-oer 90 jitfi live ind Hardee County. They make Mulberry, an area to be called the Bone Valley because of many
wiring harnesses and irstrirhent panels for luxury boats such as fossils. Land mining began in 1890, and the pebble was taken by
Stingray. SeaRay. Boston'rWholer:and Chris Craft. rail to Port Tampa apd Seddon Island and loaded onto ships. A big
Pacer has two.lhnd pa kI at-p:Hrdee Commerce Park' and put shipping terminal was built at Boca Grande and used until 1978.
up their owni-buildid'bg.. .'h6;eAle)so been helped by Heartland -In 1975 the state passed a law requiring reclamation of land
Work Force. Cheap'landblhl(Miftif'to Hardee over other areas after mining. This was to help restore habitat and hydrology.
considered, said Stella Slack, human resources director, and Sheila -Mosaic's South Fort Meade Hardee County Mine Extension
Federico. purchasing director. area is 10,856 acres, with 3,200 acres to be preserved, including 73
Pacer's headquarteirard.inSairasota. where IheN insulate cop- percent of the site's wetlands and 60 percent of all streams on site.
per \ ire. There is a listsltbi*dor~~ftiter in Ft. Lauderdale. -Mosaic purchased the Peaceful Horse Ranch of 4,400 acres,
During the economhicidob nturiin late 2008 and 2009 Pacer including 3,500 acres of wetlands, at Peace River and Horse Creek
MNarine started doing' harnee' f6ri golf carts and assemblies for for about $10 million. The property will not be mined and be given
small generator.. t, to the state for a park, along with $2 million for startup and initial
The company opened its munufcturing facility in Wauchula in maintenance costs. PHR has 8 miles of Peace River frontage and 6
March 2008 with 20 employees which rose to 60 or 65 after six miles of Horse Creek frontage.
month% but dropped to 15 in. december 2008 when the national -Bayheads are a key to the ecosystem and are very difficult
econ a i" 'i Theieconomy started if not impossible to restore or recreate.
It, ;:*-:. ,s' -~ncA~".'' .. .. -Charlotte Harbor is designated as an estuary of national sig-
nificance and depends on freshwater flows from the Peace River.
.' f- .,a', -f-f *; '


II
i

01
.r


PAl
Continued From 1A
Natural gas is- plentiful. Long
distance trucks in the future
could use liquified natural gas,
which would cost half as much
as diesel fuel, which is $4 a gal-
lon."
He said compressed natural
gas, already used by some vehi-
cles, sells for $2.05 a gallon
compared With gasoline at
$3.35 a gallon.
"Liquified natural gas has
been used safely for 70 years in
the U.S. and the world. There
are 113 LNG facilities in the
U.S. and 240 worldwide," said
Matzke.
Kelly Hartman at Golder
Associates said the two major
natural gas pipelines, Gulf-
stream and Florida Gas Trans-
mission, intersect 1.3 miles
south of the proposed site. The
proposed plant site is 3.5 miles
from the CF benefiation plant in
Fort Green. The closest resident
lives 1.8 miles away, she said.
Four billion cubic feet of nat-
ural gas would be used a day,
There would be three tanks.
Each tank would be 170 feet tall
and 260 feet in diameter and
would hold 48 million gallons.
of LNG.
Phase I could begin in 2014
and have five 100,000-gallon
bullet tanks that would hold
compressed natural gas.
Phases 2-4 could start con-
struction in 2014 and take 12 to
18 months to complete.
Ellis said Fort Green Citizens
Advisory Group for CF heard
the presentation on June I1.
"The two pipelines will be
filled to capacity by 2016.
.Natural gas is America's energy
future. Money would stay in the
United States. Natural gas will
Greatly reduce our need for for-
eign oil. Shell has recently
announced they will build a net-
work of 200 natural gas fueling
.lanes in at least 100 Travel
Center gas stations along the
U.S. Interstate Highway Sys-
tem. This is pure methane gas.
This could be big for long dis-
tance trucks to be able to use
liquified natural gas for $2 a
gallon compared with $4 a gal-
lon for diesel fuel," said Ellis.
He said Vandolah Power
Plant uses natural gas, with
diesel fuel as a backup.
Frank Kirkland of Bowling
Green expressed concern about
potentially dangerous chemi-
cals used to cool the natural gas.
He said ammonia is dangerous.
Other speakers from the pub-
lic who asked questions were
Tom Petro, Donald Samuels
and Dennis Sasser. Kirkland
Said he was also representing
Hank Kuhlman.-
Planning and Zoning Board
members attending were chair-
man Mike Thompson, vice
chairman. Roger Conley, Ralph
Arce, John Deer, Shawna
Lambert and Gordon Norris.
Absent were Oscar Ortiz and
Mark White.
Samuels asked if Ellis or
Matzke had ever built a natural
gas compression plant before.


By MARIA TRUJILLO
For The Herald-Advocate
"Happy times, happy nights,
happy days are here again!"
This might be the tune stu-
dents are singing now that
school is out, if they have ever
heard that version of "Happy
Days Are Here Again" by
Barbra Streisand.
The Hardee County School
Board plans those days, though,
and has made the final decision
on what the 2012-13 school cal-
endar will look like.
The "happy days" will come
to an end for returning students
on Aug. 20. First day back at
work for teachers will be Aug.
13.
Students won't have to wait
too long for a holiday, though,
as Sept. 3 is Labor Day and they
will have no school. They will
have early release to prepare for





Court. Incumbent B. Hugh
Bradley has decided not to seek
another term. Seeking his slot
are Republicans Dorothy A.
Conerly and Victoria L; Rogers.
And, candidates for Sheriff
are incumbent Arnold Lanier
and challenger Thomas E. San-
tarlas, both Republicans.
REPUBLICAN
There are two races which
will be on the Republican ballot
only.
In County Commission Dis-
trict 1, Republicans Colon L.
Lambert and Donald E. Sam-
uels will vie to go on to the
General Election against Dem-
ocrat incumbent Minor L.
Bryant and NPA Donny G.
Waters.
In County Commission Dis-
trict 3, Republicans Frederick
"Rick" Knight and Gordon R.
Norris will square off. The win-
ner will face NPA candidate
Charles R. Dixon in the General
Election on Nov. 6.
NON-PARTISAN
Two races are non-partisan,
meaning candidates do not
declare a party affiliation and
al) voters partiCpa. .:in: the
choices. .
School Board -District 2 has
'three candidates, incumbent
Mildred C. Smith, Marilyn B.
Morris and John E. Terrell. If
any. candidate gets 50 percent
plus one that person will be
considered elected to the posi-
tion. If not, the two top vote-
getters will go on to the General
Election.
School Board District 3 has
two candidates, incumbent Te-
resa M. Crawford' and chal-
lenger Paula J. Ortiz. Whoever
gets the most votes will take
that seat.
DELAYED RACES
There are two races which
will automatically go on to the


fAIMWOlEIN
Continued From 1A , ,
over the ensuing months since The conditions, continue to
complaints Were lodged, protect the single-family nature
Encino may house no more than of the neighborhood by. requir-
four farmworkers in each unit. ing Encino to ensure farmwork-
That; Town Manager Linda ers do not congregate in the
Roberson pointed out, means a front yards of the duplexes, but
'maximum occupancy of 24 rather use the backyards for
people for the six duplex apart- such.purposes. ,
ments. Lastly, Encino will provide
Further, no more than two .the town with criminal back
vehicles may be parked at each ground'checks -on all.the guest
unit. Currently, however, the farmworkers, meeting the
workers have no cars and authorization requirements as
instead are transported to the spelled out in the federal H-2A
groves or fields on buses sup- program.
plied by the company. Tom Hornack, chairman of
Providing for that, Encino the town's Planning & Zoning
may not allow its buses to load Board, appeared at the Town
or unload on a town sidewalk or Commission meeting Monday
to back up onto State Road 66. night to report his bbard OK'ed
Instead, the conditional use per- the plan during its meeting on
mit states, Encino may con- Thursday night of last week.
struct a circular driveway on its Town Manager Roberson and
property or make arrangements town attorney Gerald Buhr also
for off-site loading, recommended approval of the,
Davis noted he plans to soon conditional use to the Town
construct a circular drive, but Commission.
currently uses the vacant lot The Town Commission unan-
across from the duplexes for imously approved the plan,
loading and unloading bus pas- moving it on to final adoption at
sengers. a public hearing next month.


homecoming on Sept, 21.
Also on Oct.12, being that it
a teacher work day, students
ill enjoy another day off.
The next month brings a
eak with an abundance of
od, as the fall holidays go
om Nov. 19 to 23.
December and January bring
the biggest vacation time of
e school year, starting with
rly release on Dec. 21 and
Ding through Jan. 4. These
nter holidays are then fol-
wed by the Martin Luther
ng Jr. holiday on Jan. 21.
Students then begin the next
ontfhby taking Feb. 1 off for a
icher work day. A couple
weeks later they are off on Feb.
because of the President's
ay holiday. The writing part of
e Florida Comprehensive
assessment Test is set to take
ace Feb. 26-28.



W1's -
Continued From 1A
oran Cogburn. The top vote-
etter wins, even if less that 50
percent plus one.
UNOPPOSED
There are six candidates who
ad no opposition.
Incumbent Democrat Prop-
ty Appraiser Kathy Crawford
trainedd her office. Tax Collec-
ir Zeralda "Zee" Smith retired
nd Democrat candidate Jac-
yn S. "Jacki" Johnson was not
opposed.
Ussery was unopposed as
supervisor of Elections and
county Judge Jeff McKibben


-17 mw -,


MU$!
Continued
miiotive was donated by K.D.
Revell. It now rests on the cor-
ner of the park where it can be
seen by all along U.S. 17 and
State Road 64.
In 1987, the C.A. Bryant
Blacksmith Shop was donated.
It houses many of the original
tools and blacksmithing imple-
ments that were used by the
Bryant Family:
'"Anothie' building 'donated
and relocated to the park was
the -Hart Cabin. The great-
grandson of W.H. Hart made
this.gift in 1979. It consists of
one of the rooms of the original
structure where Hart and wife
Mary Jane raised their six chil-
dren. The cabin also contains
many pieces of furniture, which
were built by Hart.
The village also contains a
smokehouse which was con-
structed from the donated wood
from a local barn and home
from the 1880s. From that same
year, two work wagons were
also donated.
Although the museum and
village sparked an interest in
community, In June of 1988 the
museum closed due 'to the
Historical Association disband-
ing. Realizing the contributions
the museum had been making,
the Board of County Commis-
sioners decided to reopen the
facility's just three,months later,
renaming it Cracker Trail
Museum.
A year later, the museum
once again faced some trouble
and was forced to close due to
funding issues. Thanks to a
Cargill Fertilizer donation of


March not only brings
spring, but also plenty of down
time for students. Students take
off March 1 to be able to enjoy
Pioneer Park Days. They also
have a chance to lie in the sun
after those cold days with the
coming of spring break, which
is March 11-15. Also, March 29
is a day off for both students
and teachers.
In April comes the FCAT,
which will take up two weeks,
April 15-26. May brings the
Memorial Day time off, which.
is on May 27.
Finally, the 2012-13 school
year comes to an end for under-
classmen with an early-release
day on June 5. Teachers will
have their last day on June 7.
Seniors will be taking that
walk across the stage to get
their diplomas on June 8.






also continues without opposi-
tion.
Two of three Soil and Water
Conservation district seats have
incumbents Charles W. Ma-
theny and Larry Davis returning
to office. The third district seat
has been vacant despite "adver-
tising. The unpaid district offi-
cers meet quarterly .and make
decisions on government-of-
fered programs which could be
cost-shared or not.' Anyone
interested should call thatoffice
in Courthouse Annex f at 773-
9644.



5BM
From 1A
$50,000, the museum was able
to make much-needed expan-
sions and reopen in 1991,
Later, the Cracker Trail Post
Office was created out of an old
1886 building. But more trou-
ble was up ahead for this ever-
growing village when the hurri-
cane season of 2004 came
along.,, . .
As nyrenea mberrmtJya
the ypar Hurricane Charley9d'y-
astated Hardee County. Pioneer
Park was greatly damaged as
the porch was ripped off the
Post Office, the outhouse was
destroyed and the ceiling of the
museum caved in, damaging
some of the artifacts.
Thanks to several volunteers
all of the damages were re-
paired and the museum was
once again able to reopen.
Currently the museum is
expanding and getting new
acquisitions every day. It. has
over 4,500 articles about
Hardee Countians, an ,l--foot
alligator hide and a stuffed bear
named Maxine who lived at the
park for 35 years. There is also
a military section which Hyde
is expanding, and many more
interesting artifacts, photos,
fossils and other historical
items..
-7To help celebrate this mile-
stone, newly: crowned ,Mrsl.
Florida Shawna Lambert will
be in attendance. The party -ill
begin at 5 p.m.. and, end at 8'
p.m.The Cracker T ail Musitun
is located at Pioneer Park ,~
Zolfo Springs.
SHyde invites the community
to come and enjoy the fun.


I


m


iu.rr~,l ir rl- ~ .. .. .r.l..lll-----~~-Ur rl -IUUVIlr*II~Y..-I~".- .~~.U*IU(ln*UI--^rl. r.......~,,~.. ~~.*,~. _~~~_lh-rlrl~--C... -l-li-IIIl llW41~-C-C12WINlllnr


__f


.


r







June 21, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 3A


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR HARDEE
COUNTY CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 252012CA000265
DOROTIY MAE MELTON
Plaintiff,
vs.
JOHN DOE and JANE DOE, rep-
resenting any and all unknown
minors, heirs, devisees,
grantees, assignees, trustees, or
other claimants by, through,
under, or against the Estate of
PLEASIE.MAE KILPATRICK,
A/K/A PLEASE MAE TYSON,
A/K/A PLEASE MAE FRASIER,
Defendants.

NOTICE OF ACTION
STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF HARDEE
TO: JOHN DOE and JANE DOE,
representing any and all
unknown minors, heirs,
deviseei, grantees, assignees,
trustees, or other claimants by,
through, under, or against the
Estate of PLEASE MAE KIL-
PATRICK, A/K/A PLEASE MAE
TYSON, A/K/A PLEASE MAE
FRASIER,
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to quiet and confirm title
regarding the following property
in Hardee County, Florida:
Lot 64, UNIT NO. 2 HARLEM
HEIGHTS SUBDIVISION,,
according to the map or plat
thereof as recorded in Plat
Book 3, Page 18, Public
Records of Hardee County,
Florida,
has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy
of your Written defenses, If any, to
it on AMY E. SMITH, Esquire,
Attorney for Plaintiff, Boswell &
Dunlap LLP, 245 South Central
Avenue, Post Office ,Drawer 30,
Bartow, FL 33831, within thirty
(30) days after the first publica-
tion of this Notice Of Action, and
file the original with the Clerk of
this Court either before service
on Plaintiffs attorney or immedi-
ately thereafter; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in the
Complaint or Petition.
DATED on this 15 day of June,
2012.
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE
AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES
ACT, PERSONS WITH DISABILI-
TIES NEEDING A -SPECIAL
ACCOMMODATION TO PARTICI-
PATE IN THIS PROCEEDING
SHOULD CONTACT THE OFFICE
OF THE COURT ADMINISTRA-
TOR, TELEPHONE (863) 534-
4690, WITHIN TiWO-(2') ORKIlNG
DAS 'OF YOUIf 'RECEIPT OF
THIS NOTICE? I0F HEARING
IMPAIRED, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771,
OR VOICE (V) 1-800-955-8770,
VIA FLORIDA RELAY SERVICE.
B.HUGH BRADLEY
Clerk of Circuit Court
Post Office Drawer 1749
Wauchula, FL 33873


BY: Connie
Depu


B Coker
ty Clerk
6:21,28c


My work is a game, a very
serious game.


ESE Plans For
Disabled Kids
There will be a planning
meeting in the Exceptional
Student Education Depart-
ment, 200 S. Florida Ave.,
Wauchula on Tuesday at 3
p.m. to discuss applications
for individuals Preschool and
up who could qualify for
these programs.
Agencies and parents
interested in the Individuals
with Disabilities Education
Act for fiscal year 2012-13
are welcome to attend.

Schools Offer
Summer Meals
Free breakfast and lunch
will be available for children
18 and under at Bowling
Green and Zolfo Springs ele-
mentaries and Hardee
Junior High during the sum-
mer. All three will have
breakfast from 7 to 8:45 and
lunch from 11 a.m. to 12:30
p.m. weekdays until Aug. 9.
At the YMCA on East
Orange Avenue, there will be
lunch available from 11:30
a.m. to 12:30 p.m. during the
same summer session.
There will be no cost for
these meals.

Senior Driving
Guide Available
"The Florida Guide for
Aging Drivers" is a glove
compartment-size book for
senior drivers at no cost and
includes a lot of up-to-date
information which will help
the aged driver balance
between safety and inde-
pendence.
To get a copy, contact Safe
Mobility for Life Resource
Center, 636 West Call St.,
Tallahassee, FL 32306 or go
to safe-mobility-for,-life@fsu.-
edu.







THURSDAY. JUNE 21
*Cracker Trail Museum,
45th birthday celebration,
2822 Museum Drive in
SPioneer Park, U.S. 17 South
and SR 64, Zolfo Springs, 5-
8 p.m.

THURSDAY, JUNE 28
IHardee County Com-
mission, special meeting,
Room 102, Courthouse
Annex I, 412 W. Orange St.,
Wauchula, 8:30 a.m.
v'Hardee County School
Board, regular meeting,
Board Room, 230 S. Florida
Ave., Wauchula, 5 p.m.


PRECO Head Mulcay To Retire


William "Bill" Mulcay will
retire in July as CEO of Peace
River Electric Cooperative in
Wauchula.
Mulcay will conclude a 40-
year career with the central
Florida electric distribution util-
ity.
He was officially hired in
1972, and he served in many
capacities including human re-
sources, marketing and finance.
Then, in 1997, he was promoted
to his current position.
PRECO experienced .rapid
growth during Mulcay's 15-year
term as CEO, swelling from
nearly 24,000 to more than
37,000 total electric services
and adding almost 800 miles of
energized power lines.
In addition, six distribution
substations and a new certified
energy-saving headquarters
building were added during his
tenure as CEO.
The most memorable time of
Mulcay's. career occurred in
2004 as three hurricanes pierced
Peace River Electric's service
area,' wreaking catastrophic
damage. He shares, "I was so
proud to be a part of the electric
.cooperative network as 750
workers from 53 of our sister
co-ops rebuilt our lines after
they were ravaged by hurricanes
Charley, Frances and Jeanne."
The Board of Directors has
selected Randy Shaw to take
over the helm as PRECO's new
CEO. Shaw comes from


native
t.


Randy Shaw, new CEO.


COURTESY PHOTOS
Retiring CEO Bill Mulcay (left) receives a plaque from Peace
River Electric Cooperative recognizing his 40 years of serv-
ice. Presenting the award is Glenn English, CEO, National
Rural Electric Cooperative Association, Arlington, Va.


Snapping Shoals Electric Mem-
bership Corp., Covington, Ga.,
where he has served as execu-
tive vice president/chief finan-
cial officer since..2008. He pre-
viously served at the same loca-
tion as vice president of corpo-
rate services for nearly five
years.
Shaw attended Florida State
University, where .he earned a
bachelor of science in account-
ing and, completed the, "150-
Hour Rule" to sit for, the certi-


fied public accountant exam. "I
was licensed as a CPA in
Florida in 1995 and have main-
tained my certification as a CPA
since then," explains Shaw.
"I would like to thank the
Board of Directors for their
confidence in my ability to lead
:Peace River Electric Coopera-
tive,",Sh.w says. "I am honored
to be selected as CEO and look
forward to serving the members
an .community," .
Maurice Henderson, presi-


dent of the board, relates, "As a
member-elected board, we took
the task of selecting the next
CEO very seriously. We are
confident that Randy possesses
the right character, principles
and experience to lead PRECO
into the future."
Peace River Electric Co-
operative is a Touchstone En-
ergy distribution electric coop-
erative providing electric "serv-
ice to nearly 35,000 member/-
consumers in 10 Florida coun-
ties: Brevard, DeSoto, Hardee,
Highlands, Hillsborough, In-
dian River, Manatee, Osceola,
Polk and Sarasota. It has almost
4,000 miles of power lines, and
has been in business since 1940
as a member-owned not-for-
profit organization.


YMCA Enhances Summer Program


By MARIA TRUJILLO
For The Herald-Advocate
"It's fun to stay at the Y-M-
C-A. It's fun to stay at the Y-M-
C-A!"
That oh-so-recognizable line
from the 1978 Village People's
song "YMCA" also rings true
to Hardee County's very own
YMCA center.
Throughout the summer
months, Hardee YMCA will be
hosting a summer camp.
"Our program has always
been education-based utilizing
our computer and reading labs
to make sure that our summer
campers do not lose their edge
over the 'summer," sali& al in
Bates, executive director at- the
Hardee County Family YMCA.
This year there have been a
few changes in the program-
ming.
The Y has added more sched-
uled field trips so children now


have more opportunities to
learn about the heritage and his-
tory of Hardee County.
These trips include places
such as public parks in the area
where students will have the
chance to go on guided tours.
Also Solomon's Castle, Hardee
County Fire-Rescue, the
Hardee County Sheriff's Office
and more.
By going on these trips, the
Y hopes to help students devel-
op a feeling of social responsi-
bility and to contribute to the
overall well-being of the com-
munity. The Y believes it is
important for the younger gen-
eration to develop an awareness
and appreciation for Hardee
County.
Another important subject on
everyone's mind thanks to First
Lady Michelle Obama and her
Lets Move! campaign, is child-
hood obesity. Each week, the


Don't just dream about grandiose acts of doing good.
Every day do small ones, that add up over time to posi-
tive patterns.
-Marian Wright Edelman

One cannot consent to creep when one feels the impulse
to soar.


campers will focus on a particu- Nutrition Lab.
lar sport and all will participate. Another addition to this
Scheduled sports for the year's program is that the Y
camp include softball, tennis, hbpes to bring in local coaches
soccer and basketball. There and athletes who have or are in
will also be swimming twice a the professional or collegiate
week when the campers visit levels in their careers. By doing
the Hardee County Recreational this, the Y hopes to show
Complex. campers that developing in their
The Y believes that the solu- faith physically, spiritually and
tion to this nationwide problem mentally can bring them suc-
is to educate students and par- cesses and triumphs.
ents about nutrition and exer- The Y summer camp will run
cise. That is why campers, will until Aug. 20, so go and register
be taught to make wise deci- today. Breakfast and lunch are
sions when it comes to their provided, as well as financial
diets and explore healthy foods assistance if needed: If you
through the Food & Fun Iur-.. would like more information
riS~Lu i .. j -* abot the different programs or
- -Other'activited 'i ampersti---.about financial- aid; call- 7'7.3-
participate in are weightlifting, 6445.
golf camp and cheerleading. The YMCA summer camp
They will get to enjoy water- will take. place at the YMCA
slides and learn with the Center on 610 W. Orange St. in
Sunshine State Young. Readers Wauchula.
Reading Lab and the Health &



Your Business Could Appear Here!
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels
At The Herald Advocate


Focused On Quality Vision Care

for the whole family


Come check out our all new

Optical Vision Center!

We've expanded our vision center to
better serve you and your family.


Eyeglasses + Sunglasses + Prescription Sunglasses


vocus


SEVIGNY
ASSOCIATES


Siund money management
should be our goal.





I. adv. paid for and approved by HC Rep. Party


. I
re IruOWNER


eo~


735 o 6h Ae, aucula FL 863773332


=Ord FM OUS R y 9-


F






4A The Herald-Advocate, June 21, 2012


FOND FAREWELL With almost 40 million visitors per year, Italy is thought to have the most hotel rooms
of any other nation in Europe.



WV ARE

HONOREDTQ BE

COUS THE CONTINUED CHOICE

OF HARDEE COUNTY'

SWROBARTS WONDERFUL COMMUNITY







Zolfo Springs Elementary School has a unique tradition amongst the elementary schools.
As the buses leave on the last day of school, the faculty and staff wish the departing stu- ROBRTS FAMILY FUNEALRAL HOME, Inc.HOME
dents well at the bus loop. They all line up to wave goodbye until next fall. It is truly a reward- 529 West Main Street Wauchula, Florida 33873 863-773-9773 I
ing experience to touch the lives of children on a daily basis, and these educators show how ---.1
much they will miss their charges over the summer months

I I--STATE OF FLORIDA
____Your Buness Could Appear Here! DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL
SNancy Davis, Ki eas or Trayce Daniels PROTECTION





ollb igs uarlementary School has At The Herald Advocate NOTICE OF PROPOSED AGENCY ACTION


S. No. FD 25-0309205-001) to Nicholas Katzaras, c/o Shannon Gonzalez, Flatwoods Con-
QAs the bus lZave te la d hl te l Group, Inc., for a 400.3-acre tract located in Sections 19, 20, 22, 23, and 24, Town-
bert G. Fbloe o. n to oo nt ne ship 33 South, Range 24 East, Hardee County, Florida. The project's four sites are located





Wauchula, died on Saturday, aree County Hometown Coverage south side of State Road 62 between John Hill Road and College Hill Road. The Depart-
June 16, 2012, at Lakeland meant's file on this matter is available for public inspection during normal business hours,
Regional Medical Center. ll e C 800 a to 5:00 Monday through Friday, except legal holidays, at the Department
...At The Herald Advocate NOTICE.OF PROPOSED AGENCY ACTION




Bor in Wasian, Ohio, on o Environmental Protection, Wetlands Evaluation and Delineation Section, Mail Station
Oct. 11, 1965, he lived in Har- T nf 2500, Room 530, Bob Martinez Center, 2600 Blair Stone Road, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-
dee County most of his life. C lr T r f t r l2400.


He was a farm laborer and
attended St. Michael Catyholic Inuepenuen e nay Persons whose substantial interests are affected by the above proposed agency action


Church. 16, 2012, at Lakeland meant's hav fie ona right pursuant to Section 120.57, Florida Statutes, tion during nor an administrative
Survivor s include his par- O determination (hearing) on the proposed action. The petition must contain the information


ents Jose Florez and Maria set forth below and must be filed (received) in the Department's Office of General Counsel,
Florez of Wauchula; two iyve 7in1 4 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-2400, within 21 days of pub-
daughters Tracy Florez and l depeS yde July licatieon of this notice. A copy of the petition must also be the abetime of filing to the

April Florez, both of North formal determination petitioner at the address indicated. Failure to file a petition within the
Carolina; one brother, Jose f on .. d... bs n 21 days constitutes a waiver of any right such person has to an administrative determination
Florez Jr. haof Wauchula; and rh (hearing) pursuant to Section 120.57, Flo.S.


six sisters, Rosa Badillo of The petition shall contain the following information:(a) The name and address, and tele-
Bowling Green, Virginia phone number of each petitioner, the petitioner's name and address, the Department's File
Florez of Fort Meade, Juanita op aW S erS WCill Be Printed Number and the county in which the project is proposed; (b) A statement of how and when
uFlorez of Wauchula, Maria ach petitioner received notice of the Department's action or proposed action; (c) A state-


Louisa Mar-tinez of And Available For Sale on mentof how each petitioner's substantial interests are affected by the Departments action
Wauchula, Margarita Flortez or l proposed action; (d) A stonatement of matei s n disputed by petitioner, if any; (e)A
Cof South Carolina and da 3 statement of cts wi waiier nte on ends warrant reversal or modificatieeaton of the Depart-
Angelica Florez of Wauchula. ent'action orproposed action; () A statemeof which rules or statutes petitioner con-
Visitation was Mdioo Te etitin salontiday, n uire reversal or modification of the Department'sa aion o r prooesa nd tele-
June 18, 2012, from 6 to 8 N B ue Of Tis Change (9) A statement of the relief sought by petition er,oosed;b stately the action petitioner
op.m. at Robarts G areden rC wants te Department to tae ith respect department's action or proposed action
Chapel. Funeral Mass was ALL ADVERTISING DEADLINESwatos r en t tet sartmenttion


Tuesday at 10 a.m at St. Have Been Moved To Monday, Jul0 If a petition is filed, the administrative hearing process is designed to formulate agency ac-
Michael Catholic Church with r tion. Accordingly, the Department's final action may be different from the position taken
Father Juan Carlos Sack offi- 2, At Non by it in this Notice. Persons whose substantial interests will be affected by any decision of
eating. Interment followed in the Department with regard to the formal determination have the right to petition to become
o Soauchu Cemeera Please hea us adhere to this earl se n a at to the proceeding. The petition must confor m to the requirements specified above



Expression s aof comfort may be f iled (received) within 21 days of publication of this Notice in the Office of General
ue r o Because Of This Change (g) A statement of the relief sought by petitioner, stating precisely the action petitioner


be made at robartsfhom. as we observe our nations birthday. Counsel at the above a th reset t te Department. Failureto petition within the allowed
Seolition 120.57 Accord, F.S., and to Departicipate as final action may thbe different from the pg. A ny subsequent in- taken



FlReoAz4 J. Wa-u a an =-^.:^ ti^-.---. - time frame constitutes a waiver of any right such person has to request a hearing under
FUNERAL HOME tervention will only be at the approval of the presiding officer upon motion filed pursuant
WAUCHULA. The side oa h r to Rule 28-5.207, F.A.C.
n/ c0 HI The side of a hammer is
...1 0M 'oll i nO called the cheek. 6:21c
L _t_ RACHEL SUE SHORT
Rachel Sue Short, 71, of
Bowling Green, died on
Srez Saturday, June 16, 2012, at
Good Shepherd Hospice in
MINNIE SUE Sebring.
KELLER She was born on Oct. 8,
Minnie Su e Keller, 8, of 1940, in Muncie,' Ind., and
tMine Sue Keller, 83, of Aacame to Hardee County from
Steele, Mo., formerly of Wau- Muncie, Ind., in 1978. She
chula, passed away June 8, was a bus driver with Hardee
2012, in Kennett, Mo. County Schools and a Baptist.


abeth Garner Reneau and was Thennis.
of the Baptist faith. In 1954, Survivors include four
sFheh ma Cherlate husband, ns, h and wi While we alwa ys do our best to ensure ery e family's comfort, we
chuag whneremtheye lived un af Zo Spgs illy understand that many people would rather not visit a funeral home

19 e was receded in death ula and Danny Short orf at all. If you have any questions and prefer to meet with someone
She was preceded in daughters,
hre sonsdRay ods. RieCStelerhof Gatn face-to-face, we are happy to come to you. Whether it's at your

th brothers, Grlls, both of Zolfo Springs, home, at work, or even over coffee. Call us today.
and Jackie Stewart and hus-
She is survived by two band David of Muncie, Ind.;
daughters, Rosa Allen of Fort two brothers, Dale Knotts of
Meade and Doris Woods of Muncie, Ind., and Alden
Michigan CityR Tenn.; two Knotts of Anderson, Ind.; two
sons, Billy Woods and Harry sisters Donna Slain of
Keller Jr.bothofSteele, Mo. Muncie, Ind., and Thelma
10 grandchildren; and eight Hemphill of Duncan, Oka.;
great-grandchildren. 17 grandchildren; and 10Bpit


funeral services were nel great-grandchildren. F funeral
Monday, June 11, 2012, at Visitation was Tuesday, F u neral m e
John W. German Funeral June 19, 2012, at Robarts l
June 19, 2012, at Robarts
Home in Steele, Mo. Burial Garden Chapel from 2 to 3
was at 10 a.m. on Friday, June p.m., with funeral services at
15, 2012, in New Zion Baptist 3 p.m. with the Rev. Jimmy. .
Church Cemetery in Ona. Morse officiating. Interment '. .-,;
On-line condolences may followed at' First Baptist
be made at www.Ponger. Church of Zolfo Springs
KayGrady.com. Cemetery.
Ogqet- j ays- g iy Expressions of comfort may
be made at robartsfh.com.
Funeral Home & t Palmetto St. auchul
Cremation Services & a 404 W. Palmetto St. Wauchula
Wauchula FUNERAL HOME (863) 773-6400

621c PongerKaysGrady.com



i





June 21, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 5A


Power Locks, Tilt, Remote Keyless Entry, CD,
S 6-Speed Automatic Transmission, 15" Aluminum Wheels
5 Year/100,000 Mile Powertrain Warranty
M.S.R.P s16,080
?LyN scount 475 /

RLRHN)YPRICE
15,605


MHwy
iwv/


Power Windows & Locks, Tilt, Cruise, Remote Keyle
6-Speed Automatic Transmission, 15" Aluminum I
5 Year/100,000 Mile Powertrain Warranty
M.S.R.P $18,070
LffNJRYDiscount 655

ARLRN JHrPRICE

s17 415 I


Power Windows & Locks, Tilt, 4-Wheel ABS, CD, 6-Speed Automatic f
Transmission, Remote Keyless Entry, Steering Wheel Controls }
W5 Year/00,000 Mile Powertrain Warranty

M.S.R.P. s 8,755 MP
LQ NjrYDiscount 745 .--,.- HwY
OLrN JOa PRICE
O O --
18,O1 0 10 4





Power Windows & Locks, Tilt, Cruise, CD, 6-Speed Automatic Transmission,
Power Driver Seat, Remote Start, 3 Year/36,000 Mile Smart Care Maintenance,
Power Sunroof, Remote Keyless Entry
S 5 Year/100,000 Mile Powertrain Warranty
M.S.R.P 25,750 iE
LmNJOYDiscount 1,875- -
Factory Rebate 3,000 G
sHwy
rL6N JY PRICE

"20, 875


Power Windows & Locks, Tilt, Cruise, CD, 6-Speed Automatic
Transmission, Remote Keyless Entry, 4-WheelABS
5 Year/100,000 Mile Powertrain Warranty
M.S.R.P s22,755
Factory Rebate 3,000 -- -
sLN8JRY9PRICE

I18,95055


Power Windows & Locks, Tilt, Cruise, 6-Speed Automatic
( Transmission, 17" Aluminum Wheels, CD Player, Theft Alarm
5 Year/100,000 Mile Powertrain Warranty


S H O Os MOn *- Fri S S Sato S


ill


I-~ ti ~ I ~~ i
FI I I'


NW CY SNI

201 4=I n L


FEN


I Sevi e H ours: on-r a-5 -Cosed Sat


ss Entry,
Wheels

,' 5
WwyC







6A The Herald-Advocate, June 21, 2012

EVERYWHERE A CHICK-CHICK


COURTESY PHOTO
Students in Sherri Thompson's kindergarten class atZobfo Springs Elementary School anx-
iously awaited a springtime great As a science experiment her students put nine eggs in an
incubator and watched for the day they would see baby chicks. Unked with Thompson's
class was April Wood's second-grade classroom. They enjoyed joumaling about the exper-
iment as they came over and looked at the eggs in the Incubator daily. On April 29, their
wish came true. Students entered their classroom to find baby chicks standing tall in the
incubators


NOTICE OF MEETING OF
CITY OF WAUCHULA
CODE ENFORCEMENT BOARD
225 E MAIN ST., SUITE 105
MONDAY, JUNE 25, 2012
5:30 P.M.


REQUEST TO TABLE FILING OF LIEN
09-117-M Carmen Salazar
REQUEST TO PROCEED WITH FILING OF LIEN
11-126-M Cuitis Bell


OLD CASES:
11-111-M
12-028-M
NEW CASES:
12-084-L
12-076-M
12-080-M


Miguel A Velasquez
Bruce D & Jessica A Collom

Javohn D Camel
Vicente & Gloria Rodriguez
James Jernigan


588 MLK Jr Blvd

408 E Main St

306 Lane St
122 W Main St

507 Constitution Dr
205 Goolsby St
504 E Orange St


Any interested persons) will be heard at this meeting. If any person decides to appeal any
decision made by the Board with respect to this request for which he will need a verbatim
record of the proceedings, he will need to ensure that such verbatim record is made.
The City Commission of the City of Wauchula, Florida does not discriminate upon the basis
of any individual's disability status. This non-discriminatory policy involves every aspect of
the Commission's functions, including ones access to, participation, employment or treat-
ment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable accommodation as pro-
vided for in the Americans, with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26, Florida Statutes, should
contact the City Clerk at (863) 773-3131.
6:21c


WHAT WRITERS!


PHOTO BY MACHELLE DOLLAR
With the release of Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test scores, 15 local students
were honored for their writing skills at last week's School Board meeting. Each earned
a level five, out of six, or higher. Those students were Kayla Albritton, Dashawna Goad,
Doyle Collom, Shelby Dees, Kristian Judah, Sarah McClenithan, Reyna KIrkland,
Rachel Roberts, Jacob Neuhofer, Mishella LukawskI, Brookelyn Knight, Maribel
DeLoera, Laynisi Aguilar, Isabel Abel and Syndie Steiner. Pictured above (front row,
from left) are Roberts and Steiner; (back row) Schools Superintendent David
Durastanti, Neuhofer, Lukawski, Kirkland and School Board member Teresa Crawford.
It was noted that Steiner was the only elementary student awarded, and KIrkland-was
the only student in the district to receive a perfect score of six.



YOUR BUSINESS COULD APPEAR HERE TOO!!
Contact
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels

773-3255



REQUEST FOR BIDS
SALE OF SURPLUS VEHICLES &
MISCELLANEOUS EQUIPMENT
The Wauchula City Commission has deemed certain items as "Surplus Vehicles & Miscel-
laneous Equipment". The City of Wauchula will be accepting sealed bids for the "Surplus
Vehicles & Miscellaneous Equipment" in the City Clerk's Office located at 126 South 7th
Avenue, Wauchula, Florida 33873 until 2:00 p.m., July 2, 2012 at which time and place they
will be publicly opened and read aloud.
No bid may be withdrawn after the closing time for the receipt of bids for a period of 30
'days. The Owner reserves the right to reject any or all bids, to waive informalities, and to
re-advertise.
Surplus Vehicles & Miscellaneous Equipment consists of:


To obtain more detailed instructions concerning the "Surplus Vehicles & Miscellaneous
Equipment" and information to be included in the Bids submitted in response to this re-
quest visit the City of Wauchula's website at http://www.cityofwauchula.com or contact
the City of Wauchula Clerk's Office at 126 South 7thvenue, Wauchula, Florida 33873,,
and at (863)773-3535.
CITY OF WAUCHULA
S/Richard K. Nadaskay Jr.
Mayor
ATTEST
S/Holly Smith
City Clerk
6;21c



STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL
PROTECTION
NOTICE OF PROPOSED AGENCY ACTION
The Department of Environmental Protection gives notice of its intent to issue a Formal De-
termination of the Landward Extent of Wetlands and Other Surface Waters of the State (File
No. FD 25-0309206-001) to Nicholas Katzaras, c/o Shannon Gonzalez, Flatwoods Con-
sulting Group, Inc., for a 158.4-acre tract located in Section 22, Township 33 South, Range
23 East, Hardee County, Florida. The project site is located south side of State Road 62,
just east of Hardee Correctional Institution's property, and approximately 3.5 miles west of
the intersection of State Road 62 and County Road 663 North. The Departments file on
this matter is available for public inspection during normal business hours, 8:00 a.m. to
5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday; except legal holidays, at the Department of Environ-
mental Protection, Wetlands Evaluation and Delineation Section, Mail Station 2500, Room
530, Bob Martinez Center, 2600 Blair Stone Road, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-2400.
Persons whose substantial interests are affected by the above proposed agency action
have a right pursuant to Section 120.57, Florida Statutes, to petition for an administrative
determination (hearing) on the proposed action. The petition must contain the information
set forth below and must be filed (received) in the Department's Office of General Counsel,
3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-2400, within 21 days of pub-
lication of this notice. A copy of the petition must also be mailed at the time of filing to the
formal determination petitioner at the address indicated. Failure to file a petition within the
21 days constitutes a waiver of any right such person has to an administrative determination
(hearing) pursuant to Section 120.57, F.S.
The petition shall contain the following information: (a) The name and address, and tele-
phone number of each petitioner, the petitioner's name and address, the Department's File
Number and the county in which the project is proposed; (b) A statement of how and when
each petitioner received notice of the Department's action or proposed action; (c) A state-
ment of how each petitioner's substantial interests are affected by the Departments action
or proposed action; (d) A statement of material facts disputed by petitioner, if any; (e) A
statement of facts which petitioner contends warrant reversal or modification of the Depart-
ment's action or proposed action; (f) A statement of which rules or statutes petitioner con-
tends require reversal or modification of the Departments action or proposed action; and
(g) A statement of the relief sought by petitioner, stating precisely the action petitioner
wants the Department to take with respect to the Department's action or proposed action.
If a petition is filed, the administrative hearing process is designed to formulate agency ac-i
tion. Accordingly, the Department's final action may be different from the position taken
by-it in this Notice. Persons whose substantial interests will be affected by any decision of
the Department with regard to the formal determination have the right to petition to become
a party to the proceeding. The petition must conform to the requirements specified above
and be filed (received) within 21 days of publication of this Notice in the Office of General
Counsel at the above address of the Department. Failure to petition within the allowed
time frame constitutes a waiver of any right such person has to request a hearing under
Section 120.57, F.S., and to participate as a party to this proceeding. Any subsequent in-
tervention will only be at the approval of the presiding officer upon motion filed pursuant
to Rule 28-5.207, F.A.C.
6:21c


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
A public hearing will be held to consider the second reading and adoption of the following
ordinance.
ordinanceORDINANCE 2012 04 /
AN ORDINANCE APPROVING A CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT TO ALLOW THE
OCCUPANCY OF 3 DWELLING UNITS BY 24 H-2A GUEST FARMWORKERS,
ON ONE PARCEL LOCATED AT 805 THRU 815 SR 66; REPEALING ALL OR-
DINANCES IN CONFLICT HEREWITH; AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
(General Location: Approx. 1.15 acres located east of US Highway 17 and
west of Schoolhouse Road.)
The Public Hearing will be held on the proposed ordinance at Regular Commission Meeting
on Monday, July 16, 2012 at 6:00 P.M. in the Commission Chambers at Zolfo Springs Town
Hall at which time the Town Commission will consider its adoption into law. The ordinance
in its entirety may be inspected at the office of the Town Clerk during regular working hours.
All interested parties may appear at the meeting and be heard with respect to the proposed
ordinance.
Any person who may wish to appeal any decision made at this meeting with respect to
any matter considered therein, will need a verbatim record of the meeting for that appeal,
and it is solely the responsibility of that person to ensure that such verbatim record is made
and includes testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based per Florida
Statute 286.0105. The Town does not furnish verbatim transcripts.
Pursuant to the provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act, any person requiring spe-
cial accommodations to participate in this meeting is asked to advise the Clerk's Office at
least 48 hours before the hearing by contacting (863) 735-0405 Fax (863) 735-1684


Juan Otero, Mayor 6:21c


Attest: June Albritton, Town Clerk


1990 Jeep Comanchee
1983 Ford 3910 Tractor
1991 Ford Ranger
1990 Chevy S-10
1983 Ford Bucket Truck
1970 Allis Chalmer Grader


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
A public hearing will be held to consider the second reading and adoption of the following
ordinance.
ORDINANCE 2012 03
AN ORDINANCE OF THE TOWN OF ZOLFO SPRINGS, FLORIDA, AMENDING
THE ZOLFO SPRINGS LAND DEVELOPMENT CODE; AMENDING ARTICLE 2,
ADDING FARMWORKERR HOUSING" TO TABLE 2.04.01 (A),TABLE OF LAND
USES; AS SPECIFIED HEREIN; REPEALING ALL ORDINANCES IN CONFLICT
HEREWITH; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
The Public Hearing will be held on the proposed ordinance at Regular Commission Meeting
on Monday, July 16,2012 at 6:00 P.M. in the Commission Chambers at Zolfo Springs Town
Hall at which time the Town Commission will consider its adoption into law. The ordinance
in its entirety may be inspected at the office of the Town Clerk during regular working hours.
All interested parties may appear at the meeting and be heard with respect to the proposed
ordinance.
Any person who may wish to appeal any decision made at this meeting with respect to
any matter considered therein, will need a verbatim record of the meeting for that appeal,
and it is solely the responsibility of that person to ensure that such verbatim record is made
and includes testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based, per Florida
Statute 286.0105. The Town does not furnish verbatim transcripts.
Pursuant to the provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act, any person requiring spe-
cial accommodations to participate in this meeting is asked to advise the Clerk's Office at
least 48 hours before the hearing by contacting (863) 735-0405 Fax (863) 735-1684


Juan Otero, Mayor


Attest: June Albritton, Town Clerk


6:21c


C .. -'~~
311r
: i ''
, ii








June 21, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 7A


,Corps Gathering Input


On Phosphate Effects


By MICHAEL KELLY
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Army Corps of Engi-
neers has finished its draft*..,
Areawide Environmental Im-
pact Statement and is now seek-
ing. public input before issuing
it final AEIS the end of this
year.
The purpose of the AEIS is to
study the past, present anid


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
'TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
Case No. 25-2010-CA-000580
J .,6


BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST
COMPANY,
Plaintiff,
vs.. -
JUCINEDE BOND and RONALD
BOND a/k/a RONALD D. BOND,
Defendants.
/I
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE Is hereby given that,
pursuant to a Final Judgment
entered May 2, 2012, In Case
Number 25-2010-CA-000580 in
the Circuit Court of Hardee
County, Florida, the Clerk will sell
the property situated In Hardee
County, Florida, described as:
Lot 8, Town Creek Ranch,
according to the plat thereof
recorded in Plat Bar B-47, Page 2
and 3, Public Records of Hardee
County, Florida.
Together with (I) all buildings,
improvements, hereditaments,
and appurtenances thereunder
appertaining, as far as they may
now or hereafter during the term
of this indenture belong to or be
usedin connection with the occu-
pancy of any building existing or
to be constructed on such prop-
erty; (ii) all fixtures, equipment
and accessions and attachments
Sthereto now or hereafter attached
or used in connection with the
operation of such property, and
all replacements, additions, and
betterments to or of any of the
foregoing: (iii) all' rights In now-
existing and hereafter arising
easements, rights of way, rights
of access, water rights and cours-
es, sewer rights and other rights
appertaining thereto; (iv) all as-
extracted collateral ,including
without limitation all gas, oil and-
mineral rights of every nature and
Iind, all timber to be cut and all .
Other rights appertaining thereto;
and (v) all leases, rents and prof-
its therefrom.
The real property, buildings,
Improvements, fixtures, equip-
ment, accessions thereto, appur-
tenances and all replacements
and additions thereof and thereto,
all leases and rents therefrom,
and all other collateral described
above are hereinafter referred to
as the "Property."
at Public Sale, to the highest and
best bidder for cash, at the
Hardee County Courthouse locat-
ed at 417 W. Main) Street, in
Hardee County, in the 2nd Floor
hallway outside of Room 202 at
11:00 a.m. on the 11th day of July,
2012.
IF YOU ARE A PERSON CLAIM-
ING A RIGHT TO FUNDS
REMAINING AFTER THE SALE;,
YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH
THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60
DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU
FAIL TO FILE CLAIM, YOU WILL.
NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY
REMAINING FUNDS. AFTER 60
DAYS, ONLY THE OWNER OF'
RECORD AS OF THE DATE OF
THE LIS PENDENS MAY CLAIM
THE SURPLUS.
Dated: May 3, 2012.
B. Hugh Bradley
Clerk of Court
Hardee County, Florida.
By /s/Connie Coker
As Deputy Clerk
NOTICE: IF YOU ARE A PERSON
WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS
ANY ACCOMMODATION IN
ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS
PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTI-
TLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO
THE- PROVISION OF CERTAIN
ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CON-
TACT THE OFFICE OF THE
COURT ADMINISTRATOR, 255 N.
BROADWAY AVENUE, BARTOW,
FLORIDA 33830, (863) 534-4686,
AT LEAST 7 DAYS BEFORE YOUR
SCHEDULED COURT APPEAR-
ANCE, OR IMMEDIATELY UPON
RECEIVING THIS NOTIFICATION
IF THE TIME BEFORE THE
SCHEDULED APPEARANCE IS'
LESS THAN 7 DAYS; IF YOU ARE
HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED,
CALL 711.
'IF YOU CANNOT AFFORDTO PAY
AN ATTORNEY, CALL A LEGAL
SERVICES OFFICE. AN INDIVID-
UAL NOT ELIGIBLE FOR .FREE
LEGAL ASSISTANCE MAY
OBTAIN A REFERRAL TO AN
ATTORNEY BY CALLING A
COUNTY LAWYER REFERRAL
SERVICE. THE NAME AND
PHONE NUMBER OF THE
REFERRAL SERVICE FOR THE
COUNTY IN WHICH THIS ACTION
IS PENDING IS: FLORIDA RURAL
LEGAL. SERVICES, LAKELAND
863/688-7376, WWW.FRIS.ORG,
HEART OF FLORIDA LEGAL AID
SOCIETY, INC. BARTOW,
863/519-5663, FLORIDA JUSTICE
INSTITUTE MIAMI, 305/358-
2081, OR FLORIDA INSTITUTION-
AL LEGAL SERVICES, INC. -
GA|NSVILLE, 352/375-2494.
6:21,28c


future effects of phosphate min-
ing in the 1.32-million-acre
area known as the Central
Florida Phosphate District.
The Corps held a meeting
Tuesday night in Lakeland that
drew several hundred people.
After giving a brief overview
of the draft, John Fellows, the
Corps' regulatory project man-
ager, broke the meeting down
into'several small focus groups


IDA 2011 AUDIT
A story in last week's
edition on a 2011 audit of
the Industrial Development
Authority noted board
members are representa-
tives of the business com-
munity,'and'went on to say
the IDA entered into con-
tracts with some of those
companies.
In discussing total pay-
ments, the story failed to
itemize payments made. Of
the $545,482 total, $10,000
went to a board member's
company, Albritton Insur-
ance, for insurance on
buildings owned by the IDA
in Commerce Park;
$35,482 went to the county
for permit fees for the
Keyplex and Rapid Sys-
tems projects; and
$500,000 went to the Board
of County Commissioners
for its general fund, as its
share of the annual Mosaic
payment.

EDA GRANTS
Peace River Explorations
Inc. was listed as the recip-
ient of a $400,000 grant
awarded by the Economic
Development Authority. To
clarify, the money was
immediately assigned to
the custody of the city of
Wauchula's Community
Redevelopment Agency for
restoration of the north side
of the historic train depot in
downtown Wauchula.
Peace River Explorations
did not actually receive any
funds, but plans to use the
depot as a Visitor Informa-
tion Center. Jessica New-
man and. the CRA are
responsible for dispersal of
the grant money for the
depot project.-

FLAG FOOTBALL
The caption on a June 7
photo of the Heartland
Hurricanes flag football
senior division team
named incorrect coaches.
Chris Rich and Travis
Kilpatrick are coaches of
the junior division team.
Coaches of the senior-
division .Hurricanes are
Adam Torres and assis-
tants- Jason Williams and
Warren McWhorter.
At The Herald-Advocate,
we want accuracy to be a
given, not just our goal. If
you believe we have print-
ed an error in fact, please
call to report it. We will
review the information,,and
if we find it needs correc-
tion or clarification, we will
do so here.
To make a report, call
Managing Editor Cynthia
Krahl at 773-3255.


to gather comments and con-
cerns for the project.
Another similar meeting will
be held Thursday in Punta
Gorda to go over the draft and
gather additional comments.
The 60-day comment period
for the draft AEIS ends July 31.
A copy of .the more than
1,000-page draft can be viewed
along with additional informa-
tion about the project by going
to www.phosphateaeis.org.
Comments can' be submitted
by mail, e-mail or phone.
Mail submissions should be
sent to Draft AEIS Comments,
USACE Tampa Regulatory
Office, 10117 Princess Palm
Dr., Suite 120, Tampa, FL
33610.
E-mail submissions can be
sent to teamaeis@phosphate-
aeis.org, while parties interest-
ed in doing so over the phone
should call 813-769-7067.
After the Corps completes
the 'comment period it will
begin working on the Final
,AEIS, which is scheduled to be
completed by December.
The Corps will then rule on
the four pending mine applica-
'tion's for Section' 404 Clean
Water Act Permits. It will either
issue the permits, issue with
modifications or deny the pend-
ing permits.
Fellows said if the Corps did
not issue the Section 404 per-
mits, the mining companies
would still be allowed to mine
only upland areas but he did not
feel it would be economical to
do so.
The four pending mines are
the CF's South Pasture Exten-
sion, and Mosaic's Ona Mine,
DeSoto Mine and the Wingate
Creek Mine.
The CF Mine and the Ona
Mine are in Hardee County and
both, along with the DeSoto
mine, fall within the Peace
River watershed. The Wingate
Creek Mine is in the Myakka
River watershed.




Orange

Forecast '

Up Again

The U.S. Department of
Agriculture increased its orange
crop forecast for the 2011-12
season by one million boxes last
week, estimating Florida will
now produce 146.2 million
boxes.
The USDA makes its initial
forecast in October and then
revises it monthly until the end
of the season in July.
During the 2010-11 season,
Florida produced 139 million
boxes of oranges.
This June increase was a
result of an adjustment for uti-
lization in valencias from 71
million to 72 million. Early and
miid-season varieties remained
'at 74.2 million boxes.
; For Florida specialty fruit, the
USDA predicts 1.15 million
boxes of tangelos and 4.3 mil-
lion boxes of tangerines. Those
numbers are unchanged from
May.
The yield for from-concen-
trate orange juice increased to
1.63 gallons per 90-pound box
from. the previous estimate of
1.61 gallons per box.
The USDA predicts Florida
will harvest 18.8 million boxes
of grapefruit, showing no
change from May's estimate.


LLOYD HALL invites all
his friends and neighbors
Sto come see him. at

S- tREENWOOJIl
r- "'CHEVROLET OlGsrooisle.
N 1205 N. Charleston Fort Meade
1-800-673-9512
S www.dlrectchevw.com



NOW HIRING
Full-time Administrative Assistant. Looking for sharp,
energetic, organized individual with ability to multi-task,
meet deadlines, and work in a team environment. Should
be proficient in MS Office Suite. QB, AR and MS
Scheduler knowledge a plus. Some of the duties include
AR, Permitting, Project Data Organization and Scheduling,
Sales, Client Service, Proposals and General Admin
Duties. Drug Free Workplace, Non-smoker, EEOC. Bring
resume and apply in person at 401 South Sixth Avenue,
(Hwy 17 N, next to B. King) Wauchula. 863-773-3839.

*OBB (
instruction
Inc. 6:21c


It takes 500,00 gallons of water to fill Grand Hotel's swimming pool. The pool is named
for actress Esther Williams, who starred in the 1949 movie "This Time for Keeps." The
movie was filmed at Grand Hotel, Mackinak Island, Michigan.



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

A public hearing will be held to consider the second reading and adoption of the following
ordinance.
ordinance. ORDINANCE 2012 05

AN ORDINANCE OF THE TOWN OF ZOLFO SPRINGS, FLORIDA, AMENDING
THE ZOLFO SPRINGS LAND DEVELOPMENT CODE; AMENDING ARTICLE 9,
AMENDING THE DEFINITION OF FAMILY; AS SPECIFIED HEREIN; REPEAL-
ING ALL ORDINANCES IN CONFLICT HEREWITH; AND PROVIDING FOR AN
EFFECTIVE DATE.
The Public Hearing will be held on the proposed ordinance at Regular Commission Meeting
on Monday, July 16, 2012 at 6:00 P.M. in the Commission Chambers at Zolfo Springs Town
Hall at which time the Town Commission will consider its adoption into law. The ordinance
in its entirety may be inspected at the office of the Town Clerk during regular working hours.
All interested parties may appear at the meeting and be heard with respect to the proposed
ordinance.
Any person who may wish to appeal any decision made at this meeting with respect to
any matter considered therein, will need a verbatim record of the meeting for that appeal,
and it is solely the responsibility of that person to ensure that such verbatim record is made
and includes testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based, per Florida
Statute 286.0105. The Town does not furnish verbatim transcripts.
Pursuant to the provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act, any person requiring spe-
cial accommodations to participate in this meeting is asked to advise the Clerk's Office at
least 48 hours before the hearing by contacting (863) 735-0405 Fax (863) 735-1684


L5


SSale R entalt l lnc.'


The economically priced G-Series of light- to
medium-duty 4WD compact tractor meets a
variety of needs for home and estate owners,
small-acreage farmers, horse farmers and
commercial users.


Please Call (863) 773-0807
or Visit us at 2677 US Hwy 17 N
Bowling Green, FL 33834
Mon. Fri. 7am-5pm, Sat. 8-2pm


Juan Otero, Mayor 6:21c


Attest: June Albritton, Town Clerk


'^ ;-~ ~-I: U4~-~c+nr~ ;... ~y~~rrri.c, *.rl.,. ,..I...,.. -,.., I .I







8A The Herald-Advocate, June 21, 2012


HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO US!
Did you know that the Cracker Trail Museum will be celebrat-
ing its 45th birthday today (Thursday)?
In 1967, the Peace River Valley Historical Society established
the museum at Pioneer Park with the help of a $20,000 grant from
the Florida Game & Fresh Water Fish Commission, with technical
help from the U.S. Soil Conservation Service. It was originally
known as Pioneer Park Museum. The objective of the newly estab-
lished museum was to serve the public interest of the Peace River
Valley by providing a means for collection, preservation and inter-
pretation of collections of historical significance from the area.
For the general public, a program of educational and attractive
exhibits would be designed to capture the spirit of the past and
make it come alive. Today, through the Outdoor Classroom direct-
ed by ICayton Nedza, area third-graders visit thepark and museum
and learn about pioneer life.
The dedication of the museum was held on June 24, 1967, with
a number of dignitaries in attendance, including Joe Dan Osceola,
president of the Seminole Tribe. The guest register for the day's
festivities totaled 650.
Soon local residents were donating articles to the museum and
the collection grew to include a wide range of pioneer household
goods, farming implements, photographs and other historical doc-
uments. A cane grinding shed and kettle was erected on the
grounds, donated by Mr. and Mrs. John Gordon, which was the
beginning of the Cracker Trail Museum's "Pioneer Village." That
same year, a 1914 Baldwin Locomotive Engine No. 3 (also known
as the Loping Gopher) was donated by K.D. Revell. It had been
used at his crate mill in Wauchula. Many Hardee Countians have
cherished memories of climbing on the "old train" to pose for var-
ious class or club pictures during their high school years.
A flag pole with an American Flag was donated in 1967 by the
Wauchula American Legion Post No. 2 in honor of Herger
Williams, son of Mr. & Mrs. W.J. Williams of Oak Grove. Herger
Williams was the first Hardee Countian to give his life in World
War I, and the Legion post is named for him. The flag pole was
installed by Boy Scouts Troop 410, with John L. Tyson as scout-
master.
In 1968, the C.A. Bryant Blacksmith Shop donated to Pioneer
Park. The 1897 structure was dismantled from its location in
Bowling Green and reconstructed on its present location adjacent
to the museum. It includes many of the original tools and black-
smithing implements used by the Bryant family.
In 1979, the Hart Cabin was donated and relocated to Pioneer
Park by the great-grandson of W.H. Hart. The cabin consists of
only one of the remaining rooms of the original structure where
W.H. and Mary Jane Hart raised their six children on Maude Road
in Hardee County. Many of the pieces of furniture inside the cabin
were built by Hart. Mr. and Mrs. Barney Whitman donated the
Smokehouse to Pioneer Park in 1979. It was made of old lumber
from the Manley Barn and Hays house from the 1880s. Two fam-
ily work wagons were also donated by the Keene & Chancey fam-
ilies.
The Pioneer Park Museum closed in June 1988 when the Har-
dee County Historical Association disbanded, but was reopened in
September under the direction of the Hardee County Commission.
It was renamed the Cracker Trail Museum.
The state-designated "Florida Cracker Trail" encompasses
state roads 64 and 66 in Hardee County as it traverses the state
from east to west. Florida cowboys got their nickname of


"Crackers" from the cracking sound made by their whips as they
drove cattle to market in the 1800s.:
In 1989 the museum was closed due to funding problems until
Cargill Fertilizer donated $50,000 to help reopen and expand the
museum. Gardnier Inc. donated a slurry pump and diesel engine
located near the locomotive. In 1994 an original outhouse, built in
1931 and originally belonging to Vince Hendricks, was donated by
the Whitmans. The Post Office was also donated to the park by the
'Whitmans, in 1994. It was part of the original home of Dr. E.L.
Williams, built in 1886.
Over the years there have been many cherished items donated
to the museum, all extremely appreciated.
The Cracker Trail Museum has had many curators: Mitchell
Hope, Barney Whitman, Elizabeth Brown, Carolyn Hampton, John


L. Tyson, John Pyles, Sheri Judah, Areca Cotton, Sandy Scott and
currently Marlene Rickels Hyde. They have all strived to maintain
and preserve the historical significance and dignity of the museum.
Acquisitions have grown to over 4,500 items, and help to preserve
the past and cherished memories of days-gone-by.
The Cracker Trail Museum is happy to be celebrating its 45th
birthday and we have plans for a much-needed expansion in the
near future! It's more than a building of "old stuff." It stands as a
place where children can learn how their ancestors lived and as a
testimony to the dedication and hard work that has made Hardee
County what it is today.
Happy 45th birthday! May there be many more birthdays to


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SSetting the Record Straight

Message to Hardee County Deputies
It is my intent to bring' about positive change and greater accountability to the
Hardee County Sheriffs Office. While that is my true intention, please note that
my recent and historical ads in the newspaper are targeted lely at the command
staff and not at you. Each ad has a solid foundation supported by factual documentation
that I will gladly share with anybody upon their request.
Sheriff Lanier and the Major Dey have set the tone and course for everything that
happens and/or fails to happen at the sheriffs office. Therefore, any criticism cast
upon the agency is directed at them and their decision-making as command officers.
Should I be elected as your sheriff, I will pledge the following to you:
I will eliminate the Good ole' boy network inside the sheriff's office.
I will eliminate the internal hostile work environment you deal with on a daily basis.
I will eliminate the management by fear and intimidation approach.
I will eliminate micro-management and encourage self-initiated, pro-active policing.
I will provide you with opportunities to pursue specialized law enforcement training.
I will offer you competitive salaries and benefit packages commensurate with other agencies.
I will ensure that your promotional opportunities are within reach and based solely upon merit.
I will create a true "open-door" policy for you to meet with your command staff when needed.
I will provide you with the ability and the opportunity to do your job provided you have the
desire to do so!
My commanders and I will work the streets with you from time-to-time to ensure that we are
never out of touch with the needs of the community and our deputies.

Help Me to Help You! Rally Your Friends and Family Members!

Vote for SANTARLAS(R) on August 14th!

Together.. we can make a positive difference in the lives of others!

www.mynewsheriff.com
Political advertisement paid for and approved by Thomas Santarlas, Republican for Sheriff. 6:21p










PAGE ONE


PINT-SIZE POSSE


7 Qualify For

Wauchula Elections


COURTESY PHOTOS
Kindergarten teachers at Wauchula Elementary School recently rounded up a new
"posse" of kindergarteners for the upcoming 2012-13 school year. Signing up to start
school can be fun when you get to wear a sheriff's star and hat. Here, Lisa Spencer
helps this little guy take the "oath."


Shriners Hospitals For Children Encourages

Families To "Be Burn Aware"


Homes are the sites of thou-
sands of bum injuries to chil-
dren every year, including
scalds and fire-related injuries.
Many of these incidents could
have been easily prevented by
following and implementing
some basic safety tips.
Shriners Hospitals for Chil-
dren(r) is addressing this issue
by focusing its annual yearlong
burn awareness campaign on
teaching children to "Be Burn
Aware," especially at home.
"At Shriners Hospitals for
Children, preventing bur in-
juries and providing bur
awareness education is an on-
going, yearlong effort," said
Peter Armstrong, M.D., chief
medical, officer, Shriners Hos -
pitals for Children. "Our cam-
paign, 'Be Burn Aware,' focuses
on teaching children ways to
avoid bum injuries at home."
The campaign introduces two
new child-friendly characters-
Boots and Brewster-a caped,
cuddly bear and a googly-eyed
teapot. The engaging duo is fea-
tured in activity books designed
for children ages 3 to 12, and
also a poster. In the materials,
the pair leads children through
the various rooms of a house,
pointing out dangers and hpw to


easily correct or avoid them.
The new materials are avail-
able at no charge in both En-
glish and Spanish at www.bur-
nawareness.org.
Tips to Keep Children Safe
Use electrical outlet cov-
ers.
Have an escape plan, in-
cluding two exits from each
room, in place. Practice using
the plan. Have a designated
meeting place at a safe distance
from the home.
Install an appropriate num-
ber of smoke detectors-one near
each bedroom, one at the top of
each stairway and one near the
planned escape route.
Teach youi children that
matches are not toys.
Store all flammable liq-
uids, chemicals and cleaners
out of reach of children or lock
the cabinet.
Replace damaged electrical
cords.
Do not leave lighted can-
dles unattended.
Always supervise children
in the bath.
The water in a child's bath
should not exceed 1040 F. Set
your water heater no higher
than 120* F.
Keep all hot items and any-


thing electrical out of reach of
children and away from edges
of tables and counters.
Keep pot handles turned
inward; use oven mitts or pot
holders. Keep clothing from
coming into contact with flames
or heating elements.
Follow instructions and
cautions for heating items in a
microwave oven.
Do not handle hot items
while holding young children.
Shriners Hospitals for Chil-
dren is a system of 22 hospitals
dedicated to improving the lives
of children. Four of the hospi-
tals are focused specifically on
pediatric bur care. Anyone
concerned with keeping chil-_
dren safe cyd n"isTt www.bur-
nawareness.org for important
burn prevention tips and infor-
mation on how to order the free
materials, in English or Span-
ish.
For more information on
Shriners Hospitals for Chil-
dren's pediatric specialty care,
visit www.shrinershospitals-
forchildren.org. Shriners Hos-
pitals for Children depends on
donations to fund research and
other programs. To learn how
you can help, visit www.do-
nate2SHC.org.


The following permits were
applied for or issued by the
Hardee County Building De-
partment during the week of
June 10-16. Listings include the
name of the owner or contrac-
tor, the address for the project,
the type of work to be done, and
the cost involved. Only projects
valued at $1,000 or more are
listed.
ISSUED
James C. Cobb, Sixth
Avenue, rehabilitation, $3,600.
Kenneth R. Long, Illinois
Avenue, electric, $20,700.
Samuel J. Albritton, State
Road 64, electric, $1,250.
Steve M. Senn, Ramon
Petteway Road, electric,
$1,000.
Douglas Battey, South Eighth
Avenue, mechanical, $2,500.
Stephen C. Starratt, Bay
Street East, roofing, $8,000.
James M. Cobb, Florida
Avenue, roofing, $4,500.
Elissa L. Stenders, Brookside
Way, roofing, $3,000.
James P. Anderson, Indiana
Avenue, roofing, $1,500.
David J. Marley, Sweetwater
Road, roofing, $4,225.
Owner, Ohio Avenue, swim-
ming pools/spas, $3,500.
William Anderson, George-
town Loop, windows, $4,200.
Owner, Ramon Petteway
Road, rehabilitation-repairs,
$2,500.
Owner, Golf Boulevard, 23x8
enclosure, $3,500.

BUILDING BLOCKS
If you are looking to cool off
-this summer by building a
swimming pool or spa, remem-
hber to get your permit.

The art of interpretation is
not to play what is written.
--Pablo Casals


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Three Wauchula City Com-
mission candidates will take
their seats unopposed.
The remaining two seats will
be decided in the Aug. 14
Primary Election.
All five will take their seats
following the Aug. 14 election.
Seat 4 Keith Nadaskay, Seat 5
Gary Smith and Seat 7 Peter
Preston will automatically be
seated as each had no opposi-
tion when qualifying ended
June 8.
So, the city elections will
have a pair of choices on Aug.
14. For Seat 1, incumbent Patti
Detwiler will face former com-
missioner Val Patarini. And, for
Seat 3, Ken Lambert, presently
Seat 7 appointee, has decided to
run in his district and will be
opposed by Scott Lang.
Since Wauchula has at-large
voting, electors in all three city
precincts can vote on these can-
didates. Voting on Aug. 14 is
the traditional 7 anm. to 7 p.m.
Each precinct is in one of the


city districts. For District 1, all
the city territory east of Sixth
Avenue (U.S. 17 South), voters
go to precinct 6, City Hall, 225
E. Main St.
For District 2, west of Sixth
Avenue and north of Main
Street, voters, go to precinct 4,
the First Methodist Church fel-
lowship hall, 207 N. Seventh
Ave.
And for District 3, west of
Sixth Avenue and south of Main
Street, voters go to precinct 10,
the County Commission Cham-
bers, Courthouse Annex I, 412
W. Orange St.
Or, people can take advan-
tage of early voting, July 30-
Aug. 11, Mondays through
Saturday, from 8 a.m. to 5
p.m., at the "Supervisor of
Elections Office, Courthouse
Annex II, at the corer of U.S.
17 South and Oak Street. For
more information on early vot-
ing, call the elections office at
773-6061.
For any questions on city
elections, call Wauchula City
Clerk Holly Smith at 773-3131.


Your Business Could Appear Here!
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels
At The Herald Advocate



ROBBY ELuoTT invites all
his friends and neighbors
to come see him at


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ROGERS


CLERK OF COURTS I TA

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Political advertisement paid for and approved by Victoria Rogers, Republican, for Hardee County Clerk of Courts.


The Herald-Advocate
(USPS 578-780)

Thursday, June 21, 2012







2B The Herald-Advocate, June 21, 012




-ardee
1.


Living


Krystin Robertson & Matt Chapman


COURTESY I


HCO


Krystin Robertson Will

Marry Matt Chapman
Kord and Shannyn Robertson Success and as president of I
of Zolfo Springs announce the College Republicans. She
engagement of their daughter, currently working as an evi
Krystin Deanni'e Robenson, to coordinator for Main Str
Matthew Tyler Chapman, the Wauchula Inc.
son of David. and Susan The prospective groom is
Chapman of Bowling Green. 2007 graduate of Hardee Sen
The bride-elect graduated High School. He is a gro
cum laude from Florida, Gulf, caretaker.
Coast University in May, and' Plans are being made for
was recognized as a member of Saturday, Nov. 17, wedding
the Order of Omega, National New Hope Baptist Church
Society of Leadership & Wauchula.


eSay it

. Debbie
R* .' . .


S;


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the
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ent
eet'
Sa
ior
yve
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S. .. .
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BIG 6-OhI

Happy 5'
Birthdda3f

We Love You
; soc6r2e _. , 0Mom f. -
Mm 4
- %.~ ~ 'sc" de- ... --- A{ .: . ..


Hays/Newman

Wedding Plans
Sheena Lee Hays of both of Wauchula.
Wauchula has announced the The couple will exchange
plans for her upcoming marriage wedding vows on Saturday,
to James Clayton Newman of June 30, at New Hope Baptist
Wauchula. Church in Wauchula. Music
The bride-to-be is the daugh- begins at 2 p.m., with the cere-
ter of Shannon and Karen Hays mony commencing at 2:30.
of Wauchula. The prospective Friends and relatives of the
groom is the son of James couple are invited to attend.
Newman and Debbie Newman,



Destiny McCauley Ready
For National Angus Show
Destiny McCauley of Bow- young Angus breeders from 39
ling Green will exhibit Angus states and Canada who have
cattle at the 2012 National entered a total of 1,530 head in
Junior Angus Show at the the show.
Kentucky Fair & Exposition' Jeff Gordon, Iberia, Mo., will
Center in Louisville, Ky., on judge the bred-and-owned cattle
July 15-21, reports Robin Ruff, and cow-calf pairs. Mark
director of junior activities for Johnson, Orlando, Okla., will
the American Angus Associa- 'evaluate' the owned heifers.
tion. Speve Reimer, Chamberlain,
Destiny, a junior member of S.D., will judge the steers.
the American Angus Associa- In addition to the traditional
tion with headquarters in St. cattle show, this year's event
Joseph, Mo., is one of 712 will include a beef cookoff;
team sales competition; and
public speaking, photography,
graphic design, writing, poster
and other contests.
The National Junior Angus
u Show is sponsored by the
American Angus Association
and the National Junior Angus
N ws Association and hosted by the
Kentucky, Ohio and Tennessee
Victory Praise Center will Angus and junior Angus associ-
meet at Smokin' Joe's on U.S. nations this year.
17 North, Bowling Green, for a The National Junior Angus
Christian Jam Session on Sat- Association serves a member-
urday, starting at .6 p.m., with ship of nearly 7,000 junior
singing, music and ice cream. Angus breeders in the United
The group will move to States and Canada.
Victory Praise Center for a time Nobody has ever meas-
of fellowship. Pastor Robert ured, not even poets, how
Murphy invites everyone to join much the heart can hold.
them. -Zelda Fitzgerald
The deadline for Church Nevs: '
submissions is Thursday at 5 An undersized ear of corn is
for the next edition. called a nubbin.


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Learn to Read!
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COURTESY PHOTO


Michael Dixon & Caylah Coker
Caylah Coker Becomes

Engaged To Michael Dixon


Amy Rusself and Steve
Coker, both of Wauchula,
announce the engagement of
their daughter, Caylah Suzanne
Coker, to Michael Gordon
Dixon, the son of Joleyna,and
Gordon Dixon of Wauchula.
The bride-elect is a 2011
graduate of Hardee Senior High
School. She currently attends
South Florida Community


College and works at Sohic
Drive-In.
The prospective groom isl a
2009 graduate of Hardee Senior
High School. He is currently
employed with Mosaic.'.
Plans are being made for a
Saturday, Aug. 25, wedding at
Northside Baptist Church in
Wauchula.


* Need Something to do on those lazy days of summer?

Let 4-H help you plan your summer activities! J
V


ANNOUNCING


"BackTo Basics"

SSummer Day Camp

Workshops will be held on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday
mornings from 9:00 a.m. until 12 noon, starting on Tuesday, June 12th
| through Tuesday, July 24th. The cost for the six week program is only
$20 per person and will cover all supplies needed. Some of the classes
to be offered are:





Youth 8 to 18 are invited to participate. If you have friends who are
not enrolled in 4-H they are welcome to come also. All classes will be
held at the Agri-Civic Center and the 4-H Office.
You must be pre-registered.

For more information call Mary Mitchell
at the 4-H Office 773-2164.


This exciting summer camp program is a joint effort between the
Home and Community Education Council and the 4-H Office.

Es' V. #U#Ea ~4 ~4


I 1


S


sI


Victory Praise Center
and
Smoking' Joe's Bar-B-Q
will be holding a


4050 U.S. Hwy 17 Bowling Green
Everyone Is Invited to Come Out and Sing or Play
For information call 375-4422 soc6:2


IUNE 23, 2012
Amanda Conley & Brian Cook


IUNE 30, 2012
Sheena Hays & James "Clay" Newman
IuLY 6, 2012
Samantha Hagans & Anthony Alliman
IULY 14, 2012
Katie Krause & Tom Green
IULY 28, 2012
Erica Jackson & Blake Steedley
AUGUST 18,2012
Chelci Stephens & Tommy Davis
AUGUST 25, 2012
Caylah Coker & Michael Dixon
OCTOBER 6, 2012
Sandee Redding & Kyle Braxton
NOVEMBER 17. 2012
Krystin Robertson & Matt Chapman

,'4f O Y/ .ain

Gifts Since 1970
117 East Main St. Wauchula ,f
(863) 773-6565.
www.catsonmain.com soc6:rc


S

V

S.




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ffl


IV1 1


. . =-






June 21,2012, ThIM imraI-Advocate 3B


Greetings from Fort Green!
Time really flies when you
are having fun is the old adage,
but it is true whether or not you
are having fun as we get older.
It seems impossible that June is
nearly over! Summer will be
gone and school started before
we know it.
Ms. Mildred is in the Wau-
chula hospital now, as they
transferred her over last Friday
around 4 p.m. Betty Abbott is
home and doing better. Arthur
Womack is in the Wauchula
hospital from a fall at his home
and Paul Clark is out of the
Sebring hospital after a nine-
day stay. There are always the
sick with us.
Last Wednesday night at
prayer meeting it was an-
nounced that Chris Thompson's
sister has cancer. Mary Samuels
is scheduled for surgery on July
3. Matthew Tomlinson had knee
surgery recently at Sebring. As I
was leaving the hospital one


afternoon, his wife and friends
were leaving and told me why
they were there! Please pray for
all of these as well as any of
your friends or family who are
sick.
Sherman's grandsons were
baptized last Sunday morning.
They live in Okeechobee and
belong to Eugene and Angela,
Sherman's son. The youngest
participated in a district track
meet at Altamonte Springs Sat-
urday morning.
Faye Chancey, Joyce Coker
and Betty Waters are on a bus
tour of Savannah. I know they
will have a super tour, and were
to have arrived back home this
past Tuesday. They have been
on bus tours before and always
have loads of fun.
Sheila Roberts had a nice
vacation with her daughter and
son-in-law. It is always fun to
get out of town, and it is more
special when you spend time


Sporty is a male Jack' Russell Terrier Mix.
He has a short smooth coat and is approximately 1-2
years old. Sporty is a dog full of energy. He needs a
home that can provide a secure play area and that can
match his energy level.
Adoption fees are $45 and include a rabies vaccination and spaying or
neutering of the animal. Contact 773-2320 if you are interested in adopt-
ing any cats or dogs that desperately need a loving home. The kennel
location is 685 Airport Road, Wauchula, at the county landfill.
, : -



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VI


Fort Green News
By Rilla Cooper
773-6710


LwayBack When.
^^^BHHIII^L^^H^IHHBII^^^HH MENIHEm=^


with your children!
Jonathan and Janet Allison
with their three beautiful little
girls spent Father's Day with
Rita and Byron Allison, and we
all enjoyed seeing them at
church.
There were at least two
young men celebrating their
first Father's Day at church, and
where else could you find a bet-
ter place to spend your first
Father's Day? They were
Dwayne Alexander and Rocky
Sonnier. They have two beauti-
ful little girls who will probably
grow up to be friends since both
live in Fort Green and go to
Fort Green Baptist.
Tim Casey had the special
music last Sunday and accom-
panied himself on the guitar
along with Bryon Allison,
David Spencer and Lee Chan-
cey. He did a good job singing
an old hymn.
Wesley Smith is looking bet-
ter and has completed one week
of work and is back at it again!
Sherry said it was due to the
prayers that went up on his
behalf. He still does not have all
his strength back but is pro-
gressing.
The youth mission trip was
lots of fun and a feeling of
accomplishment. The adults
attending were Faye, Randy,
Mike and Pam Davis, and Tara
and Brother Steve McGaughey.
The youth were Austin, Dustyn
and Tyler Smith, Danny Ortiz,
Ken Oden, Hunter Davis, and
Dalton Richey. They worked at
a small church in Kentucky.
The youth will tell "all about it"
at the July 1 evening service.
It has been a super busy week:
at the Waters house. Brianna
spent the week going to cheer
camp getting ready for her
upcoming year of being a
Hardee Junior High cheer-
leader. After that, Brianna and
her brother, Brody, participated
in the Bailey's Dance Academy
recital on Saturday afternoon.
Brianna is on the BDA Jr./Sr.
competition team and Brody
takes Hip Hop. Both did a won-
derful job, as well as all
Bailey's dancer's.
The highlight of the after-
noon was when Dustyn and Bri
.danced in the daddy/daughter
dance. It was a great afternoon
with friends and family who
came out to support Brianna
and Brody. Brianna started
BDA dance camp Monday. Just
busy, busy!
Avie and Allen Eures and
Tim and Teresa Rosenberg
enjoyed the weekend camping.
at Fort Wilderness. Tim and
Teresa were celebrating their
wedding anniversary. They all
had a good time. Kaylee Hog-
enauer did not go, as she want-
ed to be with her dad on
Father's Day.
Mary and Earl Bargeron have
returned from a vacation to
Tennessee 'and points in
Georgia. Dee Oistem has re-
turned home after a long enjoy-
able vacation with her daughter.
Please pray for one another,
our nation and the military.


This week in history, as
researched from the archival
pages of The Florida Ad-
vocate, the Hardee County
Herald and The Herald-Ad-
vocate ...
75 YEARS AGO
Postmaster General James A.
Farley announced last night that
the postal inspection service has
launched a nation-wide drive
against the operators of "fake"
mutual benefit life protection
organizations which have been
conducting their fraudulent
schemes through the mails.
We have to hand it to Amelia,
Earhart Putnam for courage.
She is making a larger name for
herself in her circle around the
globe. Continued good luck,
Amelia!
What's advertising coming
to? Washington News, in a
scented flower advertisement,
mixed perfume with colored ink
to acquire the scent, which is
the printing industry's newest.
Postmaster Jerald W. Farr
stated yesterday morning that
with the air mail service on the
west coast to be extended in the
very near future., Wauchulans
will enjoy better air mail ser-
vice. Fort Myers and Sarasota
are to be air mail landing fields
as a result of the extension.
50 YEARS AGO
A "rare opportunity" for
Hardee County students to learn
to read better is being offered


through free reading clinics in
the county, school officials said
this week. The clinics, offered
free of charge to all school chil-
dren, are now in progress at
both the elementary schools and
at the Junior High School but
students may still enroll if they
like.
'Poor construction is to blame
for badly broken surfaces on at
least three of Hardee County's
newest secondary roads, Com-
mission Chairman Lee Hanchey
charged this week. Hanchey,
speaking at Wednesday morn-
ing's commission meeting, said
that he is receiving many com-
plaints from local people using
the Gardner, Heard Bridge and
Dick Williams roads, in particu-
lar.
Rev. Milton Durrance of
Bowling Green has been
appointed by Gov. Farris Bryant
to represent Hardee County on
the.District 8 Board of Welfare.
He succeeds Mrs. Bruce Camp-
bell, who refused another term
on the board. Durrance is pastor
of Bowling Green Baptist
Church.
A total of 77 arrests as report-
ed by the Sheriff's Office dur-
ing the month of May.
25 YEARS AGO
Hardee County commission-
ers will begin interviews next
week for a fire chief to head up
the county's first fire depart-
ment. The new chief could be
on the job within two or three
weeks, according to Public


6:21 1


Safety Director Ron Luke.
Residents of Limestone are
asking Hardee County commis-
sioners to help their community
organize a volunteer fire depart-
ment.
Scott Patrick Mislevy has
been awarded the Robert C.
Byrd Honors Scholarship. Betty
Castor, commissioner of educa-
tion, proudly announced this
honor for Scott and informed
him that he is one of the 186
Florida high school graduates
who are among the highest aca-
demic achievers in the state of
Florida. Scott was personally
commended by Castor for edu-
cational accomplishments and a
dedication to excellence.
Five used Florida Highway
Patrol cars purchased by the
city of Wauchula for its police
department are scheduled to
arrive within two weeks, Chief
Ray Grimes said.
10 YEARS AGO
Skateboarders throughout the
county will not have to wait
much longer for the Wauchula
Skate Park.
It's up to bidders now to
cement the plan for the new
Wauchula Police Department
offices.
SOne of Hardee County's own
will soon be taking on the chal-
lenge of building a more
healthy Honduras.
Vincent M. Crawford of the
Florida Highway Patrol will be
promoted June 28 from
sergeant to lieutenant.


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Thank You



Hardee County

for giVing Me the oppoOrtv~4lt0 to serve as

your L IAet TaX COLlector.

What av ,ho"orr it is to have apptled for this

position without opposition,

I am truly blessed and want to thadie each
and every ove of -oolfortheC Coficdetet 1o.
have placed in ,- e.

A specualt thavlA you to Zee syitth our Taxc
collector and ovr deddiated staff, A'prtl,

ALLsa, Rosewtarr yLaura, Mar ian w e, y~ri, Jerow4e and MaroLe.

I ookl forward to serviA.v you as your n et H-ardee cotC"vu TIKa
CoLLector.

Again, ThrnlAe yoL,


Pol.Adv.P for by Jacki Johnson, Camp.Accouht. Approved by Jacki Johnson, Democrat
Pol.Adv.Pd for by Jacki Johnson, Camp.Accouht. Approved by Jacki Johnson, Democrat


I Pet Of The Week .1


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4B The Herald-Advocate, June 21, 2012


Letter To The Editor

The Wages Of Sin Are Far Too Costly


Dear Editor:
What is to become of sin?
Our society continues to spiral
on a downfall. Morals and val-
ues continue to decline.
What once was sin and just
plain wrong is now being
acceptable and glorified as the
way to go. We seem to be more
and more desensitized to this
world.
In the media we are more and
more exposed to the sins of this
world. Almost every sin imag-
ineable is ever before us, and
we do not even blink our eyes!
Not only are we subject to
these things but our children
are, too. We as Christians have
become laid back on our
morals. It is time to stand up for
God's commandments and rec-
ognize sin for what it is.
S What is to become of our
children and their future?
Society says "everything" is
acceptable and tolerated. Sin is
no longer sin to some in our
world today.
I am not saying it is right to
hate or say anyone is of lesser
value to God, but we need to
recognize sin and call it what it
is. Sin is sin. No whitewashing
it or overlooking it to God.
Everything God's, word says
not to do, God meant it. People
.are so afraid of offending each
other, so worried about whose
rights are being broken. What"
about God's rights?
Too many "good" people say
nothing. All "good intentions"
are left at the doors of the
unrighteous.
God's word says all have
sinned, and some just keep right
on doing it. They know yet they
"forget" God and His Word.
They continue on stubbornly,
defiant to God.
We cannot say "sorry" but I
will still do what I want and
shake your fist at the Almighty
God. See what is to become of
you.
People are too prideful. No


one wants to be told they are
wrong. But when our lives do
not line up with God's Word,
then we're wrong.
There is a story in the Bible
about a man. named John the
Baptist. He called sin for what it
was. It was not accepted by
some in authority.
He did not sugarcoat the mes-
sage of Christ to be accepted or
tickle their ears with what
"they" liked. And he gave his
head for what he believed.
Some of us today won't even
use our lips to be a witness, let
alone to call out sin for what it
is.
People say they believe in
freedom of speech but mostly
when it is agreeable to their
beliefs.
God loves everyone. He did
not say love their sins. God is
merciful and forgiving.
Example: If you saw someone
on fire being burned to death,
would you help them and put it
out?
Many are "burning" in their
sins everyday. Will we continue
to stand by and not help then?
But, do not think God turns his
head to sin. Do not continue in
sin and think I am still OK
enough to go to Heaven.
We all will stand before God.
Everyone. Believers and unbe-
lievers alike. All have sinned.
Some have turned from their
wicked ways. Others continue
in sin.
If we as Christians do not
speak up and speak out for God,
we are just as guilty as the King
who had John beheaded. Sin
will lead us to. destruction
(Hell). I said it, but God means
it. It will be our choice.
Do not laugh at sin or ,turn
your heads so we don't have to

confront it. If we truly love one
another, we should speak the
truth.-Be not concerned with
what people think of you, when
you.speak for God's word.


For the week ended June 14, 2012
At the Florida Livestock Auctions, receipt totaled 7,155 com-
pared to 8,373 last week, and ..'67~&st yeir. According to the
Florida Federal-State Livestockf KlarlNew Srvice. Compared
to one week' ago, slaughter cqws'an bulls 4.00 to 6.00 lower,
feeder steers unevenly steady, heifers steady to 3.00 higher,
replacement cows mostly steady.

Feeder Steers: Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2
200-300 lbs 225.00-240.00
300-400 lbs 190.00-216.00
400-500 lbs 154.00-188.00
500-600 lbs 147.00-164.00
Feeder Heifers: :Medium &'Large Frame No. 1-2
200-300 lbs 177.50-198.00
300-400 lbs 165.00-180.00
400-500 lbs 146.00-170.00
500-600 lbs 140.00-157.00
Slaughter Cows: Lean: 750-1200 lbs 85-90 percent
77.00-82.00
Slaughter Bulls: Yield Grade No. 1-2 1000-2100 lbs
95,00-105.00
Although the outsides of a bone are hard, they are gen-
erally light and soft Inside. They are about 75 percent
water.

Thxas is known for Its oil, but the state is also a leading
wind energy producer, with' wind project generating
over 1,200 megawatts.


PUBLIC NOTICE
The BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
will hold a public hearing on
July 19, 2012, at 6:30 p.m.
or as soon thereafter
in the County Commission Chambers,: Room 102, Court-
house Annex, 412 West Orange Street, Wauchula, Florida
33873 to consider adoption of the following ordinance:

ORDINANCE NO. 12-13
An Ordinance of Hardee County, Floi da,, establishing a,
maximum speed limit of 60 mph for Polk Road and Steve
Roberts Special; and providing for an effective date.,

This is a Disabled-Accessible facility. Any disabled person
needing to make special arrangements should contact the
County Commissioners Office at least'two (2) working
days prior to the public hearing.

This Public Notice is published in compliance with Florida
Statues 125.66(2)(a) and 286.0105.

Copies of this ordinance are available for public inspection
during regular office hours at 412 West Orange Street,
Room 103, Wauchula, Florida 33873, telephone 863/773-
9430.

Interested parties may appear at the public hearing and be
heard with respect to the proposed ordinance.

If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the
Commission, with respect to any matter considered at such
meeting or hearing, they will need a record of the proceed-
ings, and that, for such purpose, they may need to ensure
that a verbatim record of the proceedings is trade; which
record includes the testimony and evidence upon which
the appeal is to be based.

Minor Bryant, Chairperson
6:21ci


Sin should be thought of as
the warning label on a bottle of
poison. It does the same thing in
the long run. Sin kills. Only dif-
ference, it kills the soul.
Recognize sin. Call it what it is.
Do not be ashamed of God's
word.
People try to change God's
word everyday, to make it fit
into their disobedience. God
means what he says. Read it for
yourself. Thank God we live in
freedom.
If we continue to choose sin
in our world, we will reap its
rewards. We are reaping now.
Let us turn from our wicked
ways, ask God for forgiveness
and mercy, turn from sin while
God tarries.
I will not apologize for my
stand but know it is said in love
and concern f6r the lost and the
deceived.
If this makes the paper, may.
God use it for His glory. Sin is
popular. Sin is fun. Everyone
does it, or so some people think.
But the burn it leaves you with
is eternal. Everything has its
consequences, and some are not
worth the short-lived pleasure.
Think about it. May God con-
tinue in His mercy on America.
But how long? Make a stand for
Christ. Speak up for whom you
believe. If you really love the
lost, don't pattycake with sin.
When sin continues, the effects
will not go. away.
Love the lost enough to care
beyond what others think of
you. Be a John. We bold in the
truth.

Your sister in Christ
Sheila Miller
Wauchula

DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND
SECURITY
FEDERAL EMERGENCY
MANAGEMENT AGENCY
Proposed Flood Hazard
Determinations for
Hardee County, Florida
(And Incorporated Areas)
The Department of Homeland Se-
curity's Federal Emergency Man-
agement Agency has issued a
preliminary Flood Insurance Rate
Map (FIRM), and where applica-
ble,,.Flood Insurance Study (FIS)
report, reflecting proposed flood
hazard determinations within
Hardee County, Florida (And In-
corporated Areas). These flood
hazard determinations may in-
clude the addition or modification
of Base Flood Elevations, base
flood depths, Special Flood Haz-
ard Area boundaries or zone des-
ignations, or the regulatory
floodway. Technical information or
comments are solicited on the pro-
posed flood hazard determinations
shown on the preliminary FIRM
and/or FIS report for Hardee
County, Florida (And Incorporated
Areas). These flood hazard deter-
minations are the basis for the
floodplain management measures
that your community is required to
either adopt or show evidence of
being already in effect in order to
qualify or remain qualified for par-
ticipation in the National Flood In-
surance Program. However,
before these determinations are ef-
fective for floodplain management
purposes, you will be provided an
opportunity to appeal the pro-
posed information. For informa-
tion on the statutory 90-day period
provided for appeals, as well as a
complete listing of the communi-
ties affected and the locations
where copies of the FIRM are avail-
able for review, please visit FEMA's
website at www.fema.gov/plan/
prevent/fhm/bfe, or call the FEMA
Map Information exchange (FMIX)
toll free at 1-877-FEMA MAP (1-
877-336-2627).6:21,28c
_______________ 6:21,8


The Florida Leag
honored Rep. Ben A
Wauchula) with a
Appreciation Award
the Polk County (
meeting in Bartow.
This award was
Albritton for his tir
during the 2012 leg
sion to protect the
powers of Florida'
supporting the Leag
tive agenda. Albri
tently voted in
League positions
amendments to bills
behind the scenes t
port for League posi
Legislative A
Award recipients are
who consistently


Rep. Albritton


Receives Award
gue of Cities advocated on behalf of the .port," he added.
Albritton.(R- League and its members. Albritton was elected to the
Legislative Florida League of Cities leg- Florida House of Represent-
on June 5 at islative director Scott Dudley, atives in 2010 and is vice chair
Commission who presented the award to of the Insurance & Banking
Albritton, stated, "The Florida Subcommittee. He is a member
presented to League of Cities and its lobby- of the Agriculture & Natural
less efforts ing team are honored to present Resources Appropriations Sub-
islative ses- Rep. Albritton with this award, committee and the Congres-
home rule He believes that the level of sional Redistricting Subcom-
's cities by government closest to the peo- mittee.
ue's legisla- pie should make the decisions Founded in 1922, the Florida
tton consis- that affect the quality of life of League of Cities is the united
support of the citizens they have been voice for Florida's municipal
s, offered elected to represent, governments. Its goals are to
Sor worked "On behalf of Florida's 410 promote local self-government
o rally sup- cities and the thousands of and serve the needs of Florida's,
itions. municipal officials, elected and cities, which are formed' by
appreciationn unelected, we owe him a great their citizens and governed by
e legislators deal of thanks and are so happy their citizens.


voted and


to recognize him for his sup-


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(863) 773-4136


-a ,







June 21, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 5B


COURTESY PHOTO
LaVerne Albritton Bryan Knight and Julie Bryan Brown

Letter To The Editor

The Browns Are Expecting


Baby Son In
Dear Editor:
On Saturday, June. 9, 2012,
Julie Bryan Brown, daughter of
LaVerne Albritton Knight and
Gene Bryan, was feted with a
baby shower. at the Oak Park
Inn in Arcadia. The baby will be
a boy named McKannon Bos-
sier Brown, and he will be
called, "Mack."
Julie graduated in 1993 from
DeSoto High School, followed
by a master's degree in social
work from Florida Gulf Coast
University. After holding vari-
ous social worker positions she
married Edward Brown, who
was recently transferred from
San Diego, Calif., to a VirginiA
Beach Navy Base.
About fifty guest celebrated
with Julie. Special guests for
the happy occasion included
LaVerne's sister, Sylvia Albrit-
ton Edwards (George) of East
Lake Weir, and LaVerne's
niece, Cindy Albritton of Ocala.
Also there were Sylvia's daugh-
ter, Cynthia Valenti and
Cynthia's daughter, Hannah
Valenti, of Tampa.
Open since 2008, the charm-
ing two-story, twelve-room,
one-suite Inn has a large down-
stairs lobby and a large social
area upstairs where catered
events can be held. Martha and
Chuck Craven are the owners of
the Inn and the Last Chapter
Coffee House located across the
street.
The large round food table,
Covered with a white tablecloth
and baby blue ribbons- held
Waldorf salad, tiny-tea sand-
wiches, stuffed celery, deviled
eggs, small cream puffs, and a
large, heavy silver fruit tray. A
smaller dessert table by the
wide stairway featured Key



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN
AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
Case No. 252012DR000271
Douglass, Diane T.,
Petitioner
and
Douglass Sr., Robert W.,
Respondent

\NOTICE OF ACTION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
' TO: Robert W. Douglass, Sr.
3302 Dolphin Drive
Sebring, FL 33870
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action has been filed against you
and that you are required to serve
a copy of your written defenses, if
any, to It on Diane T. Douglass
whose address i 316 Garden
Drive Wauchula, FL 33873 on or
before July 20, 2012, and file the
original with the clerk of this
Court at PO. Drawer 1749
Wauchula, FL 33873 before ser-
vice on Petitioner or immediately
thereafter. If you fail to do so, a
default may be entered against
you for the relief demanded in the
petition.
Copies of all court documents
in this case, including orders, are
available at the Clerk of the
Circuit Court's office. You may
review these documents upon
request.
You must keep the Clerk of the
Circuit Court's office notified of
your current address. (You may
file Notice of Current Address,
Florida Supreme Court Approved
RFamily Law Form 12.915.) Future
papers in this lawsuit will be
mailed to the address on record
at the clerk's office.
Warning: Rule 12.285, Florida
Family Law Rules of Procedure,
requires certain automatic d!sclo-
sure bf documents and Informa-
tion. Failure to comply can result
in sanctions, including dismissal
or striking of pleadings.
Dated: June 19, 2012
B. HUGH BRADLEY
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY: Connie Coker
Deputy Clerk
6:21-7:12p


September
lime pie on a silver tray, candy
covered almonds, and round
chocolate-covered cream puffs.
At gift-opening time, La-
Verne sat in front of the fire-
place beside a brown wicker
bassinet draped in white with
streaming baby blue ribbons.
Julie sat near LaVerne under a
navy and white baby sailor suit.
A navy and white small embroi-
dered pillow with "Mack" in
navy rested on the fireplace
mantel above Julie's head. The
crib, the sailor suit, and the pil-
low all wait for Mack to be born
in September.
Little Mack doesn't know it
yet, but he has long roots in
Hardee and DeSoto Counties.
He is descended from Albritton,
Hendry, Alderman, Ellis, Un-
derhill, and Stewart Florida pio-
neers. He has no idea of how
many cousins he'll have in
Central Florida. We'll all have
to share stories with him and
make him love the state as we
do.
We'll tell Mack how his little
Great-Great-Great-Grandmoth-
er Sally Stewart, walked beside
the small Wagon train with her
mother from Bainbridge, Ga.,
to Hardee County because Gen-
eral Sherman was marching and
burning through Georgia.
We'll have to tell Mack how
'Boss" Hendry changed the
name of Tater Hill Bluff to
Arcadia because little Arcadia
Albritton baked him a birthday
cake. And we'll have to tell him
that the sandhill crane inspired
the name of Wauchula.
We'll tell Mack how his
Great-Great-Uncle Leonard Al-,
derman, with the help of
.Mack's Great-Uncles Coile
Albritton and Cecil Polk, rode
their horses driving a herd of
cattle through the woods from
Fort Green to the stockyards
where Ellenton Outlet is today.
We'll tell Mack how they spent
the night on the way, on the
unpaved Parrish Road, telling
stories around a fire and watch-
ing out for panthers.
We'll tell .Mack how his
Great-Great-Great-Grandmoth-
er Polly Ann Ellis Alderman
once planted .orange seeds in
the pasture behind her Fort
Green log home, and that those
seeds grew and became a 100-
year-old seedling grove, allow-
ing little barefooted Albritton
descendants to sit on the long
tree limbs and suck oranges in
the heat.
We'll tell Mack how his 3rd-
Great-Grandmother Polly used
to wash clothes in a large iron
pot outside the house, near the
well, and how they used that pot
to scald hogs killed for butcher-
ing. And how she'd use the
same pot for blanching fresh
peas for canning.
We'll tell Mack how his 3rd-
Great-Grandmother Polly once
loaned about $1,000 to the
young Hardee County School
Board just to keep the new
school open because their
money ran out. We'll tell him
how his. Great-Aunt, Christina
Young Albritton, remembered
that she was working in the
fields in Fort Green when she
saw a School Board member
come out to the field about four
years later to finally repay the
loan.
Oh yes, we'll all have lots to
tell Mack. He'll be born in
Virginia but his long roots are
here.

Charlotte Albritton Truitt
Sebring

Of all the states, West Vir-
ginia has the highest aver-
age altitude east of the
Mississippi.

The nickel coin contains
only 26 percent actual
nickel.

The spots on dominoes are
called pips.


Week Ending: June 17,2012
Scattered Showers Welcomed for Field Crops
Weather Summary: Rainfall totals varied across Florida.
Florida Automated Weather Network (FAWN) stations recording
more than two inches of rain were located in: Alachua (4.17 in.),
Live Oak (3.30 in.), Jay (2.43 in.), and Indian River (2.01 in.).
Stations with lower rainfall levels were located mostly in central
and southern Florida. Topsoil moisture conditions were similar to
that of the week prior. Overall, water tables were low. The extend-
ed warm, overcast, and rainy weather caused some fish kill in
Washington County. In Jacksonville, Miami, Orlando, and West
Palm Beach, temperatures averaged near normal. Lows were most-
ly in the 60s and highs were in the 90s and upper 80s.

Field Crops: In areas that received rain, pasture and crop con-
ditions improved. In Escambia, Santa Rosa and surrounding coun-
ties, early planted corn fields were damaged due to dry weather.
Also within the area, some cotton fields were replanted due to
drought. The first report for peanut pegging began last week and is
currently at 20 percent. Peanut crop condition is currently: 1 per-
cent very poor,'3 percent poor, 20 percent fair, 66 percent good, and
10 percent excellent.

Fruits & Vegetables: Vegetable harvesting activities were less
and less prominent as the summer continued. Tomato harvesting
continued in Gadsden County. In Washington County, watermelon
and sweet corn fields were harvested at a rapid pace. In Miami-
Dade County, mangoes and avocadoes were marketed. Harvesting
and replanting of okra, sunflowers, and sweet potatoes also took


place in Miami-Dade. AMS market movement included avocados.
U.S. Drought Monitor: June 12, 2012

Livestock and Pastures: Statewide, pasture conditions
ranged from very poor to excellent with most rated good. The pas-
tures benefited from warm temperatures and rain. The first limiting
factor to pasture growth was drought. The condition of the cattle
ranged from very poor to excellent with most in good condition. In
the Panhandle, pasture conditions ranged from very poor to excel-
lent with most in fair to good condition. Some low lying pastures
had standing water. The cattle condition ranged from poor to excel-
lent with most rated in good condition. In the northern areas, most
pasture improved to good condition and most of the cattle were in
good condition. In the central areas, the pasture and cattle were in
very poor to excellent condition, with most rated in good condition.
Rains in the last two weeks led to good forage growth. In the south-
west areas of Florida, the pasture conditions ranged from very poor
to excellent with most rated as good. Pond water levels were still
low in most parts. The pasture conditions improved with the rain.
The cattle condition was poor to good with most rated good.

Citrus: Daily high temperatures remained in the low. to mid-
90s across the citrus region. All FAWN stations in the citrus grow-
ing region recorded some precipitation this week, with Alachua
receiving the most at 4.17 inches. Thirteen stations received more
than a half inch, and five recorded more than an inch. Drought con-
ditions continued to improve over the whole citrus region, as per
the U.S. Drought Monitor, last updated June 12, 2012. As late
orange harvesting was drawing to a close, young tree care and
grove maintenance were the primary grove activities.

There are 403 steps from the foundation to the top of the
torch in the Statue of Uberty.


..........." ....... "" .................""



SCome Help Us Celebrate

S' the ,'

: ? .^A-


Presented By

Hardee County Builders Association

S with help from

Hardee County Government


Hardee County Sheriff's Department


& Hardee County Fire Department

















SMosaic CF Industries Vanholah Power Company

David Singletary Ins., Inc. Pacer Marine Engineering Co.

First National Bank Ponger-Kays-Grady Funeral Home

e Arnold Lanier Rebecca Stephens Alan Jay

Benjamin Hash Hash Plumbing Coldwell Banker

Cobb Site Development *Floyd O. Rice, Jr. Jim See

== Florida Sales & Rentals Florida Fertilizer Joe L. Davis

Cobb Construction, Inc. Vision Ace Hardware

Chapman Fruit Company D&S Cattle Co., Inc.
Greenwood Chevrolet Wauchula State Bank
an Frui Compay,rD&s Catle CorIncda.




.......................................................... .......* *......*. ............... ....
4TII!II l!I l tI l [I!I[IlI!l iIllIIIlI[ l l[I I ll lll l[ [[ [[ [[ ll lll [ [[[ [ [[ [lll ll l







6B The Herald-Advocate, June 21,2012





The


ABOUT ... Classifieds
DEADLINE....Tuesday noon
RATES ..........Minimum of $4.00 for 10 words. Each addi-
tional word is 22 cents. Ads in all capitals
are 32 cents per word. Headlines are $2 a
line., Blind ad box numbers are $3 extra.
BILLING........Ads must be pre-paid.
CLASSIFICATIONS:


Agriculture
Appliances
Automobile
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Help Wanted
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Carol's Pool Service
Serving All Of Highlands & Hardee Counties

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cil:19tfc


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701 La Playa Drive, Wauchula


Monday Friday 7:00 AM 3:30 PM
Saturday 9:00 AM 11:30 AM


After hours by appointment
(863) 773-3809
TDD 800-955-8771
Equal Housing Opportunity,


u-u


Classifieds


Agr l
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Graze ours/ we'll buy yours. Our
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Application Deadline June 28.
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Landscape/Tractor Gates Dual
Axle 14,000# Perfect Cond.,
$4,995, 863-494-5991. 6:21-7:19p


ALUMINUM TRUCK TOOL BOX,
double lid, $100, 863-735-1069.
6:21nc


ATTENTION State Statutes
828.29 requires that all cats and
dogs sold in Florida be at least 8
weeks old, have an official health
certificate, have necessary shots
and be free of parasites, ffc-dh
AKC BOSTON TERRIER, female,
spade, all shots, housebroken,
$200, 781-3800. 6:21 p
CHIHUAHUA PUPPIES, 8 WEEKS,
shots, $125, 863-245-7707 or 863-
735-2200. 6:14,21p


ADOPT A PETI If you have lost a
pet or are looking for a new one,
the City of Wauchula invites you
to come and see If you can find
the pet you're looking for. The
Wauchula Animal Control Is locat-
ed at 685 Airport Road. Please
call 773-3265 or more Informa-
tion. tfc-dh


SUMMER PLANT SALE-Crape
Myrtle Trees $15 or 2/$25.
Assorted Hedge Plants and
Flowering Plants 1 Gallon Pots
$2.50. Center Hill Nursery, 2949
Center Hill Road, Bowling Green,
FL 863-223-5561. 6:1421


U-PICK CORN $3/DOZEN -
Center Hill Farm, 2949 Center Hill
Road, Bowling Green, FL 863-
223-5561. 6:


FOR SALE 15.1 ACRES GROVE
LAND. Nice property, county road
frontage. 8" well and turbine In
place with John Deere power unit
This property Is ready to be set
with the fruit trees of your choice.
$89,500.00, First National Bank of
Wauchula, 863-773-4136.
6:21,28c
8.6 ACRE VALENCIA grove In
Bowling Green with 4 Inch well:
and micro Jet Irrigation. Needs
TLC. $58,000 Call Mark Manuel @
Harmon Real Estate 863-781-
0384. 5:24tfc


4 9 p
I ~'-i ~


REVELL VTO SALES













Women, do you
need lower rent?
See if you qualify call

735-2222 or 773-5717






TNT Childcare Center
For A VPK Teacher
with CDA credentials
if apply at
S 615 S. Florida Ave. or
A IContact Darlene or Rose


6 767 8885
6:21c


-I(

SUE.'
MAMTRESS


JIM SEE REALTY, INC.
206 North 6th Avenue, Wauchula, FL 33873
Office (863)773-0060 Evening (863)781-1338
www.jimseerealty.com
James V. See, Jr., Broker


l6:21
c16:21c


Realtor Associates
S Rick Knight (863) 781-1396 Calvin Bates (863) 381-2242
John H. Gross (863) 273-1017 Dusty Albritton (863) 781-0161
Shane Conley (863) 781-9664 Parker Keen (813) 523-1523


AM-SOUTH REALTY
Each office independently owned and operated.


Robert Hinerman Nancy Craft
227-0202 832-0370


COUNTRY HOME ANYONE?? 10 acres with
a 3 BD double wide mobile home. Call
today! $150.000
PRICE REDUCTION $79.900 Nice 3
Bedroom, 2 Bath CB home with central heat
& air, has one car carport, and tile flooring.
Price Reduction!! Call today to see this
roomy 3 BD, 2 Bth family home with tile
floors and two car garage, many extras.
$139.900.
ZOLFO SPRINGS!! This 2 Bedroom, 1 Bath
could be a great starter home or for your
retirement. Come take a look todayll nly
$59.000
THE PRICE IS RIGHTII COME ON DOWNII
$37.500 for this 3 Bd, 1 Bath M/H built in
1972, and also includes appliances. Call
Robert today for more information.
Commercial property Hwy 17 N Priced
@ $39.500


;5 0a yr Wrraanty
Motor t wTransmisslion


OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK SE HABLA ESPANOL'
J.S. Hwy. 17 Bewling Green 375-4441
$ Huge Discounts for Cash Deals $ "
S24 Hour Towing Service Lowest Possible Rates Fast and Reliable
781-3090 or 781-3091 c dii:S



SouthScapes
Landscaping L.L.C.



Landscape Design, Installation, and Rehab
Irrigation Installation and Repair
Full Service Maintenance Includes:
Mowig-WeedEa*ing-Edgmg
Proinningof Shrubs & Trees Weed Control Ferdtilizon



FwrG 863-832-3572
FNGOLAarnFD fManager: Joshua Southwell


702 SOUTH 6thAVENUE, WAUCHULA
(863) 773-2122 FAX (863) 773-2173
Gary Delatorre Broker
www.cbhardee.com


Richard Dasher Victor Salazar
781-0162 245-1054


5 Acre Tract off Hollandtown Rd. Priced @
$60.000
3 bedroom, 1.5 bath CB home in Bowling
Green Is close to schools and shopping.
Call for an appointment today. $59.900
7.15 beautiful acres along Peace River, to
relax on weekends, or build a dream home.
Call today for more Information. Priced @
$120.00 .
Looking For Just The Right House? Well,
You Found It!! Great starter home, Great first
time buyer, Great Senior Citizen home, 3
bedroom, 2 bath, living room, w/raised ceil-
ings, fully furnished kitchen, all appliances
included, central heat/air, breakfast room
w/pantry, dining room, pass-thru window
from kitchen, living room w/double doors to
covered back porch, all In-lay flooring easy
care helps fight allergies. Extra lot, with
outside storage a great price. Only $129.500
- call Nancy to see this lovely home.
c16:21c


ROBBY & SHERRY ALBRITTON
LABOR SERVICES & SOLUTIONS





(863) 528-7085 Fax (863) 735-9228
159 State Road 64 East Zolfo Springs, FL 33890
robbie@strato.net
p _ _______________________________________________ ir f


I


I1


Beautiful home located in Briarwood
Subdivision. 3 Bedroom, 2 1 Bath house with
wrap around porch, detached 2 car garage with
office and full bath. Was $475,000 ... Now
$339,000!
REDUCED! 4-5 bedroom, 4 bath custom built
home on 9 3 acres. Screened back porch and in-
ground pool. Includes 7 % acres of producing
nursery. $380,000
58 acres of gorgeous fenced property close to
town. Well'& septic from old homesite. Scattered
old Oaks & Pines. Offered at $287,100
10 acres on Charlie Creek. Beautiful property
south of Zolfo Springs. Asking $90,000
33 acre pasture with scattered trees. Close in to
Wauchula. 11.56 ac can be purchased separately.
Total price $360,000.


Short Sale ... 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath home in
Wauchula. Newer roof, hardwood floors, updat-
ed kitchen. $75,000
Newer home located on Torrey Oaks Golf
Course. 2 Bedrooms, 2 Baths with a garage.
Corner lot with a fenced yard. Asking $137,500
Duplex! 4 BR, 2 BA one side. 3 BR, 2 BA other
side'. Central air & heat. Paved road. City water
& sewer. REDUCED! $115,000
20 acres very close in to Wauchula on paved
road. Laser leveled and ready for your farm
operation. Zoned FR.
Vacation Home 2 BR/2 BA mobile home in Punta
Gorda. Located on a deep water canal that leads
into Charlotte Harbor. NEW LOWER PRICE...
$79,000!


Rick Knight
Rick Knight


--I


I.








June 21, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 7B


The


Classifieds


ULLRICH'S STORAGE UNITS,
several sizes, corner of 9th Ave. &
Goolsby St.; 773-6448 or 773-
9291. 3:22tfc
RENT-TO-OWN *
MOBILE HOMES 1, 2, 3
Bedrooms. Cheaper then paying
rent. Close to schools and hospi-
tal. Lot rent $300. Se habla
espanol. 863-698-4910 or 863-
698-4908. Call today. 1:5tfc


nouston Ave., rF. Meaae ATTENTIONI The Federal Fair
$500/mo+$250 dep., (863) 773- Housing Act Prohibits advertising
0224(H), (863) 245-2496 (C) any preference or limitation
Leave Message. 6:21p based on race, color, religion,
SMALL HOUSE IN COUNTRY, sex, handicap, familial status or
735-9284. 6.. national origin, or the intention to
2 BEDROOM 1 BATH, Apartment,. ,make such a preference pr limita-
$600 month, $550 deposit, 773-" tion. Familial status includes chil-
0100. 6:21tfc dren under 18 living with parents
FOR SALE OR RENT, 4 BR 1.5 B or guardians and pregnant
Palmetto Street Bowlinn nren. women. tfc-dh


$700 Month, 773-6667. 6:21c
FOR SALE OR RENT, 2BR 1B,
5105 Howard Street Bowling
Green, $500 month, 773-6667.
6:21c
FOR SALE OR RENT, 3BR 1B,
4411 Hwy 17 EBowling'Green,'$600
month, 773-6660. 6;21c
FOR SALE OR RENT, 2BR 1B,,155
Broward Street Bowling Green,
$550 month, 773-6667. 6:21c
BRICK 3BR-2B 2 car garage. 311
Park Drive, Riverview. Central Air
& heat, $1,000 month. Call 773-
2309 to see. 6:21-7:5c
2 BR MOBILE HOME, central air,
$550/month plus deposit, north
WaUchula, 863-773-2859.
6:21-7:5c


MEDICAL OFFICE SPACE and
office space for rent, 500 to 5000
sq. ft. available, 863-767-0888.
6:7-28c

^ iervices


I MOW LAWNS for a great price!
863-767-0121,* 863-245-8304.
6:21p
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS,
Thursday 7:00 p.m., Grace
Fellowship Church, 131 S. 8th
Ave., Wauchula. Bill 727-326-
3816. 6:7tfc-dh


I--q ^ YKINS IBtHERE!
735-0188 PY HER

INoingOver 599 Down
Dan FrwiB aan
Mon. Wed. 10.m- 6,.; Fri. & Sat. 10.m-7,m/Closed Thursday & Sunday
3505 US HwY 17 S ZOLFO SPRINGS ncl:sfc


Wauchula Garden

Apartments

ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR

1, 2, & 3 Bedroom Apts.

1020 Makowski Rd. #25 Wauchula

863-773-6694

S TDD 800-545-1833
DWS! ext. 386
O "POT"U" c16:21,28c






Complete Yard Care Includes:

Mowing *Trimming
Weeding Debris Pickup

Pressure Washing
S & Full Garden
Maintenance Available



8 4 5d1i


K REAL ESTATE
Heartland Real Estate Corp.
3200 US Hwy 27 S, Suite 201
Sebring, Florida 33870
(863) 382-3887


WE HAVE BUYERS FOR CITRUS GROVES
CALL MIKEY HOLDING
Featured Properties


-`R2


Immaculate 3 BR, 2.5 BA home on 10 acres on corner w/paved
road on two sides & all high and dry. Desirable location-minutes
to Wauchula. Fireplace, enclosed 22 X 22 garage/play room for
kids 56 X100 steel barn, 8" well w/JD power unit.
$290,000 Call Mikey today @ 781-1698
182 ACRES in Zolfo Springs, Rolling Pasture Land 90%
Improved Pasture w/ the Remaining.in Scattered Cypress Stands.
Could be Cattle, Sod, Farm or Develop. Cowpens, crossed fenced,
3 ponds, 6" well w/ John Deere Power Unit. ALSO, includes 3 BD,
2 BA, 2 Car Garage w/ fenced yard and well.
REDUCED $696,000.


c16:21 c


WAUCHULA, 3/2, single family'
home, Riverview, $900 monthly,
SLS, credit history & background
required, available 7/1, 352-593-
1278. 6:21,28c
NICE LARGE 1 BR Apt., pretty
yard, plenty parking, 781-9129,
505 High Street. 6:21p
DUPLEX APARTMENT, 2
BR/1BTH, c/a & h, washer/dryer
hook up, water Included. 812
54 .-. -- .A- + R A__J_


ATTENTIONI State Statutes 489-
119 Section 5 Paragraphl B and
Hqrdee County Ordinance 87-09
Section 10 Paragraph D require
all ads for any construction-relat-
ed service to carry the contrac-
tor's license number. tfc-dh


SATURDAY, 140 E. Main St. BG,
Lots of interesting stuff 6:21p
-PAYING TOP $ Gold, Silver, Guns,
TV's and more, 375-2121.
6:14-7:12p


Karen O'Neal
863-781-7633


OVERCOMERS MEETINGS
(Gillespie), Woman's Club on
Wednesday, 7pm Kenny
Sanders Is the facilitator. For
more information call 773-5717.
2:16tfc
***
NEED A WELL OR HAVE PUMP
TROUBLE? CALL
ULLRICH'S PITCHER PUMP
For complete well, sales,
service and installation,
call (863) 773-6448.
7:18tfc
THE WAUCHULA LIONS CLUB
collects NOT broken prescription
eyeglasses, cases and sunglass-
es. Please drop off at 735 N. 6th
Ave. tfc-dh
DO YOU HAVE a problem with
drugs? Narcotics Anonymous
meets Monday and Thursday
nights 7:00 p.m. at First United
Methodist Church, at the corner
of Palmetto and 7th Ave., Wau-
chula. tfc-dh
IS ALCOHOL CAUSING a prob-
lerh? Call Alcoholics Anonymous
in 'Hardee County at 781-6414.
,Several weekly meetings
tfc-dh


Hearn's Auto Cleaning Service


Car Wash and Wax
Carpet and Seat Cleaning
Buff Compounding
Headliners Replaced
Vinyl Top
Motor Cleaning
Hwy. 17 & S.R. 66
Zolfo Springs c16


(863) 735-1495


REAL T ORS
(863) 773-2128
REALTORS
JOE L. DAVIS
JOE L. DAVIS, JR.
REALTOR JOHN H. O'NEAL
See more listings at
www.joeldavis.com
REAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS


3BR/2BA/2CG home has beau-
tiful golf course view. $225,000!
PRICE REDUCED! 40 acs
pastureland located on Owen
Roberts Rd in western Hardee
Co. $200,000!
Paradise: Little Gasparilla
Island-Beach Condo. 2BR/2BA,
Gulf front. $229,000!
38.5 acs on the Peace River
w/lots of beautiful oaks, pines &
palmettos! Pole barn &
2BR/2BA MH. $479,900!
10 ac w/paved rd frontage.
Great for pasture, farming or
homesite. $63,000!


PRICE REDUCED! 20 acs
zoned industrial on Hwy 17.
$399,000!
PRICE REDUCED! 50 acs in
NE Desoto Co; deer, turkey,
wild hogs, beautiful live oaks,
improved pasture, pond &
creek. NOW $190,000!
Commercial property on US17!
38 storage units w/partial roof,
city utilities, zoned C-2, sold "as
is"! $225,000!
PRICE REDUCED! 3BR/2BA
MH located on 5 acs near
Zolfo Springs. $45,000!
PRICE REDUCED! 3BR/2BA
MH on 5 acs w/frontage on SR
62. NOW $70,000!


REACTOR ASSOCIATES AFTER HOURS
KENNY SANDERS.........781-0153 KAREN O'NEAL ....... 781-7633
KEVIN SANDERS..........990-3093 MONICA REAS...........7810888
DAVID ROYAL................781-3490 JIMY EDENFIELD_.-.48-2821
S HIGHWAY 17 SOUTH. WAUCHULA. FL 33873 6 21


Stephanie Gugle Computer Tech


Phone (863) 781-9720
0


HELP CENTER THRIFT STORE,
1085 Hwy. 17, Wauchula, 9:30-
5:30, M-S, pickup, delivery, con-
signment, layaway, 773-0550.
5:17tfc
MISSION THRIFT STORE INC.
123 N. 7th Ave. All donations
appreciated. Pick-up available for
large Items. 773-3069. 1:12tfc
HEAVEN SCENT THRIFT STORE
now offers pick-up service for
large donations. We appreciate
your generous support. 863-773-
9777. 12:29tfc
SATURDAY, 9-11 am, 108 Inglis
Way, Wauchula, decorative items,
furniture. 6:21p
SAT. 8-? United Methodist
Church, 3052 Schoolhouse Rd.
Zolfo Springs, electronics,
clothes, food. 6:21 p
SATURDAY, 8 am-1 pm, 2337
Oxendine Rd., Zolfo, 5 miles east
on Steve Robert's Special, turn
left on Oxendine. 6:21p
FRIDAY, SATURDAY, 7-12, 804
Boyd Cowart Rd., Wauchula.
6:21p
FRI. & SAT., 8-2, 208 S. 10th Ave.
2-bedroom sets, dishes, clothes,
toys & so much more. 6:21p
FRI. SAT. SUN. 8-5:30, 263 Boyd
Cowart Rd., Big Tent, Rain or
Shine. 6:21p
SATURDAY, 8-12, 2935
Schoolhouse Rd., Zolfo Springs,
children's and adult's clothes,
and much misc. 6:21p

The rock group Fine Young
Cannibals took its name
from the title of the 1960
film "All the Fine Young
Cannibals."


Realtors .
NOEY A. FLORES, BROKER Vl-1
310 Court St. ---
Wauchula, Florida 33873
(863) 773-3337 Fax: (863) 773-0144
Oralia D. Flores
www.flnresrPaltvvnPet. 831 7-1295-


BOWLING GREEN 3BR/1BA CB home on 50x138 lot.
1468 Total sqft. Nice landscaping.
Offered at $59,900.00


WAUCHULA Country living with room!!! Come see this
4BR/3BA 1991 doublewide mobile home or 3.19 acres with out-
buildings and 2-car carport. Front & back porches overlooking
shady oaks on a dead end road. Home equipped with diesel
Generator with 500 gallon fuel tank
Offered at $96,900.00


WAUCHULA 3BR/2BA 1998 Palm Harbor mobile home on
134 acres on a dead end road. Too many extras to list, metal
roof, shade trees, fenced totally with outbuildings, screened
BBQ & jacuzzi area on a large deck on back.
Priced at $95,000.00
WHY RENT WHEN YOU CAN BUY AND BUILD EQUITY!!!
WE SHARE THE SAME MLS WITH HIGHLANDS COUNTY!
SRemember, Our listings are on the Internet.
Anyone with a computer can access them anytime!
After Hours *
Oralia D. Flores (863) 781-2955 John Freeman (863) 781-4084
Noey A.Flores (863) 781-4585 MichaelBoyett (863) 781-2827
Lawrence A. Roberts (863) 781-4380


s.guale(Sguglescomputerservices.com www.GuglesComputerServices.com








=r

1109 W. Main St. Avon Park, FL
Phone: (800)330-3145
24 Hr. Road Service (863)452-2031
Bigatlre.net c15:31-6:28c








Get Your Mower

SReady For

The Season.

Fast & Friendly Service
$35 Pick-Up & Deliver

7734400 829BOSTCK RD BowuNG GREE
SBoad Runs Beside Torre Oak Goll Course





New Tires Include

Free Mount & Balance

Brand Name Tires!
Semi & Trailer Tires
BIG SALE ON
ALL TIRES '
773-0777 773-0727
116 R d ch2u la

Sa Icl1229tfc Tire Technician



flores & Flores, ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ I nc.iiiiiii-----i-


HARDEE CAR COMPANY
Buy HERE PAY HERE
Wauchula (across from First National Bank)








-Also -

,4 Billy & Janice's Rentals
Houses & Apartments

B Bowling Green
BHy Hilll r ea aret












Joe l.D


Other Properties Available!
Please visit our website at
www.HeartlandRE.net


I IN HOME ^B


.m









8B The Herald-Advocate, June 21,2012


FISH
Some folks scoff at .the idea of global warming and the rising
of.the seas, but the fact remains that where we live now was once
underwater for a long, long time during the age of the dinosaurs.
So, alas, there are no tyrannosaurus femurs to be found in Bone
Valley, no footprints of giant reptiles, no triceratops horns.
On the other hand, once swimming overhead our fair land
were fish galore, the critters who, according to learned anatomists,
bequeathed us backbones, paired appendages, lungs for living on
land. And before you ask what happened to the tails (no jokes,
please), we should also tip our hats to these hordes of swimmers for
leaving behind their bones, rich in calcium and, above all, phos-
phorus.
We're not going to find any of the surviving prehistoric fish -
gars, sturgeons and coelacoanths around here. However, there
are replacements: crappies, bream, bass, trout, snook.
Add to these the escapees from the phosphate pits of


[OLN GREEN QUICK LUR


YOUR TIRE HEADQUARTERS
5101 N. Hwy 17 Bowling Green
375-4461 1
New Tire Changer & Bolancer
Can Do 26" Wheels
MONDAY SATURDAY 8 am-6pm MICE


/ Foreign and Domestic Cars / Diesel Engines
/ Gas or Diesel Manual or Automatic Transmissions 'W


S Large Selection of

Cars to Choose From

Buy Here Pay Here

30 Day Guarantee
on Motor & Transmission Only

BIL STAON T HERSA HArvII1

863-78-4460 863-71-908


Hillsborough's Pleasant Grove Research Station, where a 1961
experiment in aquatic plant control went awry. The fugitives -
imported West African vegetarians proved to be one of the most
invasive warmwater fish Florida has ever known: tilapia! It was
reminiscent of the proverbial unleashing of rabbits in the Australia
outback.
Mostly unleashed overhead here, however, during our aquatic
age, were teeth, and we can thank the Chondirchthyes for it, with
their rotating ranks of chompers.
Spielberg's 1975 thriller might have left its mark on our imag-
inations about such things, but it is above all the sheer numbers of
these very material, toothy, prehistoric shark souvenirs which con-
tinue to make our fossil-hunters happily dig, and dig again!


E/E
^

- L S


Inside Out

By Chip Ballard


HOMECOMING
Nick stood for a few moments in the shimmering heat on the
front porch of the restaurant and stared at his reflection in the glass
door. He had to admit he didn't look too bad, "for his age," as peo-
ple constantly reminded him after telling him how fine he looked.
He was still lean, and he still had all his hair, although it was gray-
ing at the temples.
He'd lost his tonsils and appendix, though, and carried shrap-
nel in his right hip, which caused him to walk with a slight limp.
Nick knew it could have been much worse; he knew he was lucky
to be alive.
He stepped inside into cool air and the scent of Chinese food.
A man and woman sat in a booth to his right, and to the left a party
of four sat at a round table in front of a big-screen TV hung high
on the wall. Nick walked past the table and slipped into a booth by
the window. He looked out the window at the sparse traffic on the
highway, then at the handful of customers in the restaurant, and
wondered how it stayed in business.
Nick ordered a beer and took out the book he'd brought in,
"The Deliberate Dumbing Down of America." This was his second
reading of the book, and each page made him sicker. God bless
Charlotte Iserbyt for doing the massive research and for having the
courage to write and publish the book. It made Nick sick, but now
at least he knew the truth and understood why education in
America was failing: it was planned to fail! Which brought to mind
another book Nick had read years ago that had hit him like a slap
in the face, "The Planned Destruction of America," penned by Dr.
James W. Wardner.
"Hi, Nick."
Nick looked up to see a beautiful young woman smiling at
him. He stood up and hugged her, then sat down again and she slid
.into the booth facing him. "Been a long time," she said.
"Too long," Nick agreed. "I'm here to stay this time. I've had
Granny's old house in Zolfo fixed up and I'm moving in there."
"Must be nice to be retired," said the Woman. "What will you
do now?"
Nick reached over the table and covered her hand with his.
"We have to quit this meeting like this, darling. What if your hus-
band finds out?"
The woman laughed. "He won't. Even if he does, it's no big
deal ."


"No big deal?"
"No. He likes you."
"Well, that's good, because he's
me."


going to be seeing plenty of


"How was Tallahassee, Nick?"
"A cesspool of fraud, phonies, and liars. But you asked what
I'm going to do now that I'm out of the education racket. I'm going
to write. About all I've seen and learned. About why kids are grad-
uating from high school who can barely read and write. It won't be
a pretty book, but people need to wake up to what's really happen-
ing in America, before it's too late."
"I love you, Nick."
"I love you too, baby."
The woman looked at her watch. "I have to go now. Gotta pick
the baby up. You have your cell, right?"
"Sure."
"I'll call you later."
"Say hi to Tom:"
Nick hugged her again and kissed her.
"I will," she said.
He watched her walk to the door where she stopped, looked
back, smiled, and waved; and then Kitty Wilson was gone.
Nick slipped back into his booth, sipped his beer and opened
his book.



6 S S -ig Freas


6/21/2012
Sun Data
Rise: 6:32 AM
Set: 8:25 PM
Day Length
13 hrs. 53 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 8:20 AM
Set: 9:59 PM
Overhead: 3:13 PM
Underfoot: 2:48 AM
Moon Phase
4%
Waxing Crescent
Major Times
2:48 AM 4:48 AM
3:13 PM 5:13 PM
Minor Times
8:20 AM 9:20 AM
9:59 PM 10:59 PM
Solunar Rating
Better
Time Zone
UTC: -4
6/22/2012
Sun Data
Rise: 6:32 AM
Set: 8:25 PM
Day Length
13 hrs. 53 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 9:17 AM
Set: 10:39 PM
Overhead: 4:01 PM
Underfoot: 3:37 AM
Moon Phase
9%
Waxing Crescent
Major Times
3:37 AM 5:37 AM
4:01 PM 6:01 PM
Minor Times
9:17 AM -10:17 AM
10:39 PM-11:39 PM
Solunar Rating
Good
Time Zone
UTC: -4


6/23/2012 6/25/2012
Sun Data Sun Data
Rise: 6:32 AM Rise: 6:33 AM
Set: 8:25 PM Set: 8:26 PM
Day Length Day Length'
13 hrs. 53 mins. 13 hrs. 53mins.
Moon Data Moon Data
Rise: 10:13 AM Rise: 12:08 PM
Set: 11:16 PM Set: -:--
Overhead: 4:48 PM Overhead: 6:23 PM
Underfoot: 4:25 AM Underfoot: 5:59 AM


Moon Phase
16%
Waxing Crescent
Major Times
4:25 AM 6:25 AM
4:48 PM 6:48 PM
Minor Times
10:13 AM-11:13 AM
11:16 PM-12:16 AM
Solunar Rating
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -4
6/24/2012
Sun Data
Rise: 6:33 AM
Set: 8:26 PM
Day Length
13 hrs. 53 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 11:10 AM
Set: 11:53PM
Overhead: 5:35 PM
Underfoot: 5:12 AM
Moon Phase
24%
Waxing Crescent
Major Times
5:12 AM 7:12 AM
5:35 PM 7:35 PM
Minor Times
11:10 AM-2:10 PM
11:53 PM-12:53 AM
Solunar Rating
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -4


.Moon Phase
34%
Waxing Crescent
Major Times
5:59 AM 7:59 AM
6:23 PM- 8:23 PM
Minor Times
--:- -:--
12:08 PM 1:08 PM
Solunar Rating
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -4
6/26/2012
Sun Data
Rise: 6:33 AM
Set: 8:26 PM
Day Length
13 hrs. 53 mins;
Moon Data
Rise: 1:08 PM
Set: 12:29 AM
Overhead: 7:11 PM
Underfoot: 6:47 AM
Moon Phase
50% .
First Quarter
Major Times
6:47 AM 8:47 AM
7:11 PM 9:11 PM
Minor Times
12:29 AM -1:29 AM
1:08 PM 2:08 PM
Solunar Rating
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -4


6/27/2012
Sun Data
Rise: 6:34 AM
Set: 8:26 PM
Day Length
13 hrs. 52 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 2:09 PM
Set: 1:07 AM
Overhead: 8:02 PM
Underfoot: 7:36 AM
Moon Phase
56%
Waxing Gibbous
Major Times
7:36 AM- 9:36 AM
8:02 PM 10:02 PM
Minor Times
1:07 AM 2:07 AM
2:09 PM 3:09 PM
Solunar Rating
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -4
6/28/2012
Sun Data
Rise: 6:34 AM
Set: 8:26 PM
Day Length
13 hrs. 52 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 3:12 PM
Set: 1:48 AM
Overhead: 8:55 PM
Underfoot: 8:28 AM
Moon Phase
67%
Waxing Gibbous.
Major Times
8:28 AM -10:28 AM
8:55 PM 106:55 PM
Minor Times
1:48 AM 2:48 AM
3:12 PM -4:12 PM
Solunar Rating
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -4


-M


lu








*******************SCH 3-DIGIT 326
935 05-08-03 14P 3S
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
404 LIBRARY WEST
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-0001


The Herald-Advocate
iUSPS 57-780)
Thursday, June 21,2012


ALL ABOARD!
Main Street in Wauchula was busy with activity
at 5 p.m. on May 11 as both a ribbon-cutting
ceremony and a wine-tasting tour began. The
ribbon was out for the new Tourist Information
Center which will be located in the historic
Wauchula Train Depot. The last locomotive en-
gineer in Wauchula, Jackie Lowe, was there to
make the cut in front of an eager crowd. The
crowd also admired and purchased artwork on
display by local artists at the center. The simul-
taneous wine-tasting was a way for locals to
enjoy different wines and explore businesses
around town. There are hopes to repeat this
Wine, Shop & Dine event in the future.
PHOTOS BY MARIA TRUJILLO MONTAGE BY RALPH HARRISON
S iA S^.. li~.


The names of a number of places are also eponyms. For example, Pennsylvania was
named after its founder's father, Admiral Sir William Penn, while Seattle, Washington
was named for Chief Seattle, and the Hudson River and Hudson Bay are both named
for English explorer Henry Hudson.





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Henry Dunster was named president of Harvard College in 1640. He taught all the
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PAGE ONE


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2C The Herald-Advocate, June 21, 2012





Schedule of Weekly Services-


BOWLING GREEN
APOSTOLIC LIGHTHOUSE
UNITED PENTECOSTAL
CHURCH
310 Orange St.
375-3100
Sunday Morning ..................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening ....................6:00 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting........7:00 p.m.
Thursday, Service ........;.........7:30 p.m.

CHESTER GROVE MB CHURCH
708W, GrapeSt.- 375-3353 ,
Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship ....................8:00 a.m.
Sun. Eve. Worship
1st & 3rd ..............4:00 p.m. 3:00 p.m.
Tues. Prayer/Bible Study ......6:00 p.m.

CHRISTIAN BIBLE
FELLOWSHIP
Hwy. 17 South.
Morning Worship ................10:30 a.m.
Youth Group Sunday ..........6:00 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
121 West Broward St. 375-2231
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 arm.
Evening Worship .................. 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday ............................7:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
TRUE HOLINESS OUTREACH,
725 Palmetto St.
375-3304
Sunday School ...................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................1 :00Aa.m.
Tues. Night Bible Study ......,7:30 p.m.
Evening Worship
1st Sunday '... ................5:00 p.m.

COMMUNITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Main & W. Centra.
Sunday AM Worship............ 10:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening .................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer Meeting ............7:00 p.m.

FAITH ASSEMBLY OF GOD
4937 Hwy. 17 N. 375-4206
Sunday School ......................9;45 a.m.
Morning Worship .. .........11:00 a.m.
Disciples Train & Choirs .....-5:30 p.m.
Evening Worship .................6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ...............7:00 p.m.


BOWING GREEN
OPEN DOOR FULL GOSPEL
PRAISE CENTER
E. Broward St.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Service .....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.

PRIMERA MISSION BAUTISTA
Murray Road off Hwy. 17
375-2295
Domingos Escuela Dom. .....9:45 a.m.
Servicio de Adoracion.......... 1:00 a.m.
Servicio de Predicacion ........5:00 p.m.
Miercoles Servico..................6:30 p.m.

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 South US Hwy 17
Morning Service ..................10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.

ST. JOHN A.M.E. CHURCH
513 W. Orange St.
375-2911
Sunday Church School .........9:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship ....1 1:00 a.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

VICTORY PRAISE CENTER
128 E. Main St.
Sunday School .................0:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................6:00 p.m.
Thursday Night Services,
Evening Worship .................7:00 p.m.
Kidz Club...............................7:00 p.m .

ONA
IGLESIA PENTECOSTES
VISION POR LAS ALMAS
149 Bedger Loop 448-2831
Servicio Domingos ................7:30 p.m.
Jueves (Enseflanza Biblica) ..................
....................... .............. 7:30p.m .
LIMESTONE BAPTIST CHURCH
4868 Keystone Ave. Limestone
Comm.
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m
Evening Worship ..............6:00 p.m
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.mr

NEW ZION BAPTIST CHURCH
202 Sidney Roberts Road
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m
Disciples Training.................6:00 p.m
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m
Wednesday Prayer ................6:00 p.m

ONA BAPTIST CHURCH
131 Bear Lane 773-2540
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00.p.m


FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Bowling Green UNION BAPTIST CHURCH
S. Hwy. 17 375-2253 5076 Lily Church Rd.- 494-5622
S- Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Bible ~rdy ...........;....9:30a.m Mornng Vorship .............1:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................10:45 a.m. Evening Wotship ..................6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:30 p.m. Wednesday
AWANA for Kids ..............6:30 p.m.


WEDNESDAY:
Discipleship Training
,Youth & Adult .................6:30 p.m.
AWANA (ages 3-5th grade) ..,.6:30 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Grape & Church Streets 375-2340
Sunday School ...................9:45 a.m,
Morning Worship .............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ...............6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ..:.........:.....6:00 p.m..
SFORT GREEN BAPTIST
CHURCH
Baptist Church Road- 773-9013
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Mqinhg Worship .............11i00 a.m.'
Sunday Evening ....................6:00 p.m.'
Wednesday Supper ...............6:00.p.m.'
Wednesday Bible Study 7...7:00 p.m.'

HOLY CHILD
SPANISH CATHOLIC MISSION
Misa (Espanol) Sunday ........7:00 p.m.

IGLESIA DEL DIOS VIVO
105 Dixiana St. 375-4191
Domingo De Predicacion ..:.11:00 p.m.
Martes Estudio Biblico..........7:00 p.m.
.Miercoles Estudior Juvenil ....7:00 p.m.
Jueves De Predicacion ..........7:00 p.m:

IMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH
210 E. Broward St. 375-4681
Sunday School ...........,.......9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship .............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer .................7:00 p.m

MACEDONIA PRIMITIVE,
BAPTIST CHURCH
607 Palmetto St.
Church School ......................9:30 a.m.
Morning Service ................1.1:00 a.m.
Evening Service ....................7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study/Prayer ......7:00 p.m.
Communion-2nd Sun. Eve. ..6:00 p.m.

MT. PISGAH BAPTIST CHURCH
6210 Mt. Pisgah Rd. 375-4409
Sunday School ...... ............ 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training..............5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship .................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time........7:00 p.m,

NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
Mason Dixon & County Line Rd.
781-5887
Sunday Worship ................111:00 a.m.
2nd Sunday Communion ....11:00 a.m.
Bread of Life Sunday ........12:15 p.m.
T.H.E. Meeting Tuesday ....7:00 p.m.


Wednesday Prayer Time.........7:00 p.m.


WAUCHULA

APOSTOLIC ASSEMBLY
Martin Luther King and Apostolic Rd.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
English Service .............1... :30 a.m.
General Worship Service ......1:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer .....................7:00 p.m.
,,Wednesday Service ...............7:00 p.m.

CELEBRATION CHURCH
322 Hanchey Rd.
863-781-1624
hardee.celebration.org
Sunday Morning Service ....11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Youth Service ....5:30 p.m.
..Childcare provided at all services

CELEBRATION FELLOWSHIP
773-0427,
Celebration Service..............10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Evening Cell Groups
SAdult Cell Group .................7:00 p.m.
Youth Cell Group .................7:00 p.m.
Children's Cell Group ..........7100 p.m.
Call for locations

CHARLIE CREEK
BAPTIST CHURCH.
6885 State Road 64 East 773-3447
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............6:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF CHRIST
201 S. Florida Ave. & Orange St.
773-9678
Bible Study ............................ 9:30 a.m.
Worship Service ..............1045 a.m.
Wednesday ............................7:00 p.m.

CHURCH OF CHRIST
Will Duke Road
773-2249
Sunday Morning Worship......9:30 a.m.
Sunday Bible Class ..............11:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening Worship ......6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Bible Class ........7:00 p.m.
Men's Leadership & Training Class -
2nd Sunday of Month........4:00 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
Martin Luther King Blvd.
767-0199

CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST
OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS
630 Hanchey Rd. 773-3532
Sacrament Meeting ................900 a.m.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Priesthood .........................1.. 1:00 a.m.


7teace W iver OrSdDers

Wholesale Nursery


Donnis & Kathy Barber
Hwy. 66 East
RO. Box 780


(863) 735-0470
Zolfo Springs, FL


WAUCHULA
COMMUNITY BAPTIST
CHURCH OF WAUCHULA HILLS
(SPANISH)
615 Rainey Blvd.
257-3950
Sunday Bible Study ............10:00 a.m.
SSunday Morning Worship.... 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

DIOS ES AMOR
807 S. 8th Ave.
773-4576
Domingos Escuela
Dominica .......................10:00 a.m.
Servicio ................................1. 1:00 a.m .
Lunes Oracion ......................6:00 p.m.
Miercoles Servicio ................7:00 p.m.

ELREMANENTE
IGLECIA CRISTIANA
318 W. Main St..
Martes Oracion ......................7:00 p.m.
Jueves Servicio.................... 7:30 p.m.
Viemes Servicio ....................7:30 p.m.
Dorningo Servicio...............10:30 a.m.

ENDTIME CROSSROAD
MINISTRY
501 N. 9th & Georgia St. 773-3470
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Service ................11:30 a.m.
SEvening Service.................7:30 p.m.
Wed. Bible St. & Yth. Gath ..7:30 p.m.
Friday (Holy Ghost Night) ....7:30 p.m.

FAITH PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
114 N. 7th Ave. 773.2105
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ..................11:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ........ ...........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper .............6:15 p.m.
Wed. Youth Fellowship..........6:50 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

FAITH TEMPLE CHURCH
OF GOD
701 N. 7th Ave 773-3800
Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship ...............10:20 a.m.
Children's Chuch ...............10:40 a.m.
Evening Service ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
1570 W. Main St. 773-4182
SUNDAY!
Bible Study for all ages ........9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.

WEDNESDAY:
Sr. Adult Bible Study ..........10:00 a.m.
Children's Chiors
(PK-Grade 4) ................... 5:30 p.m.
PRAISE 57-Jr High Chior .. 5:30 p.m.
Mid-Week Prayer Meeting .. 6:00 p.m.
Kids On Missions
(PK-Grade 4) .................... 6:00 p.m.
Club 56 ................................ 6:00 p.m .
Youth Group (Grades 7-12) 6:00 p.m.
Family Life Ministry
& Discipleship .............. 6:00 p.m.
Church Orchestra................ 6:00 p.m.
Adult Choir ....................... 7:00 p.m.

FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH
1121 W. Louisiana St. 773-9243
SUNDAY:
Generations Cafd Opens........9:30 a.m.
Kids World Check-In for
Nursery-5th Grade Begins..10:15 a.m.
Pre-K Blast .......................... 10:45 a.m.
Kids World B.L.A.S.T.
(K-5th) ............................ 10:45 a.m.
Worship Service ...............10:45 a.m.
WEDNEsDAY.:
Check-In begins for
Nursery-5thgrade ..................6:15 p.m.
Classes for children ages
PreK-12th grade ...........6:30-8:00 p.m.


FIRST CHURCH OF
THE NAZARENE
511 W. Palmetto St.
Sunday School ....... ..........10:00 a.m.
Morning Service .................1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m
FIRST MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
1347 Martin Luther King Ave.
773-6556
Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m.
Morning Service .................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ...............6:00 p.m.
Tues. Youth Ministry Meeting/
Bible Study ........................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer/Bible Study ......7:00 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
207 N. Seventh Ave. 773-4267
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Traditional Sunday Worship 11:00 a.m.
Casual Sunday Worship..........6:00 p.m
. Tuesday Bible Study............10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Activities ............6:00 p.m.

FLORIDA'S FIRST ASSEMBLY
OF GOD CHURCH
1397 South Florida Avenue
773-9386.
Sunday School ......................9:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................10:00 a.m.
Wed. Family Night ................7:00 p.m.
Adult, Children' & Radiate Youth Church

FLORIDA GOSPEL
511 W. Palmetto
223-5126
Sunday Morning Worship....11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............7:30 p.m.

THE GOSPEL TABERNACLE
810 W. Tennessee St. 863-735-1158


Morning Service ..................10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

HEARTLAND
COMMUNITY CHURCH
1262 W. Main St. 767-6500
Coffee & Donuts....................9:00 a.m.
Sunday School .....................9:30 a.m.
W orship................................10:30 a.m
Wed. Night Dinner ................6:00 p.m
Wed. Bodybuilders Adult Cl.
Crossroads &
Lighthouse Min ...............7:00 p.m


WAUCHULA
HIGHER GROUND
INTERNATIONAL MINISTRY
1258 W. MAIN STREET
WAUCHULA, FL
Sunday Morning Worship....11:00 a.m.
Wed. Night Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

IGLESIA HISPANA
FUENTE DE VIDA
501 N. 90 Ave.
Martes ..............................7: 30 p.m.
Jueves ................j..................7:30 p.m .
Domingo ..............................10:30 p.m.

IGLESIA HISPANA
PRESENCIA de Dios
511 W. palmetto St.
Domingos .......:................ 6:00 p.m.
Miercoles................... .7:00 p.m.

IGLESIA ADVENTISTA DEL
SEPTIMO DIA
Old Bradenton Road
767-1010

IGLESIA de DIOS
ALFA y OMEGA
1909 Stanfleld Rd.
Sunday School ...................10: 00 a.m.
Evening Service ................6:00 p.m.
Tuesday (Bible Study & Prayer
Night) ................................7:30 p.m .
Friday Worship Service ........7:30 p.m.
JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
ENGLISH
155 Altman Road 1131
Sunday Service..I.................2:00 p.m.

JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
SPANISH
Sunday Service ...................10:00 a.m.
LIGHT OF THE WORLD
MINISTRIES
Womans Center 131 N. 7th Ave.
Wauchula, FL
Friday.Evening ; ..................6:00 p.m.
LAKE DALE BAPTIST CHURCH
3102 Heard Bridge Road
773-6622
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Service ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.
MINISTERIO INTERNACIO~AL
Cambriadores de Mundo
704 W. Main St. 773-0065
Wednesday Service...........7:30 p.m.
NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH
1999 State Road 64 East
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship Service....l1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship Service......6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Night Supper ......6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Activities
(All Ages) ..........................7:00 p.m.
NEW LIFE CHURCH
117 W. Palmetto St.
:. 773-2929.
Sunday Service ......,...........10:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service.:......6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
Children Ministriesifor all services
NEW MT. ZION A.M.E.'CHURCH
10 Martin Luther King Ave.
767-0023
Morn. Worship
(lst & 3r Sun.) .................8:00 a.m.
Sunday School .;....................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship .............11:00 a.m.
2nd Sunday Youth Service ....4:00 p.m.
Allen Christian Endeavor......4:00 p.m.
Wed. & Fri. Bible Study........7:00 p.m.
NORTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
912 N. 8th Ave. 773-6947
Sunday School .....................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper.:...............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.
OAK GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
4350 W. Main St. 735-0321
Sunday School ....................:.9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.
PEACE VALLEY LUTHERAN'
CHURCH
1643 Stenstrom Road 773-2858
1"& 3" Sun.
Communion ..................10:00 a.m.
2" & 4* Sun.
Divine Worship................10:00 a.m.
Bible Study .......................11:15 a.m.
** Fellowship eqch Sunday after service

PROGRESSIVE MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
149 Manley Road East Main
773-5814
Sunday School :.....................9:30 a.m.
Worship Service ..................11:00 a.m.
Wed. Evening Prayer ............7:00 p.m.

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 North US Hwy 17 .
Morning Service :.....:...........10:30 a.m..
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m..

RIVERV!EW HEIGHTS
MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1321 S.R. 636 East 773-3344
Radio Program
WZZS Sundays...............9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ...............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.

SOUL HARVEST MINISTRY'
1337 Hwy. 17 South, Wauchula
Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Service ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

ST. ANN'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
204 N. 9th Ave. 773-6418


WAUCHULA

SEVENTH DAY '
ADVENTIST CHURCH
205 S. 11th Ave. 773-9927
Sabbath School .....................9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship .............11:00 a.m.
Tues. Prayer Meeting ............7:00 p.m.
"SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
505 S. 10th Ave. 773.4368
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m. i
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m. '
Wednesday Prayer ...............7:00 p.m.
SPIRIT WIND TABERNACLE
1652 Old Bradenton Road
Sunday Worship ..............10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............7:30 p.m.
TABERNACLE UOl
PRAISE & JOY
1507 MLK Avenue
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............1:30 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Tues. Bible Stdy.
& Child Train ...................7:00 p.m.
Friday Prayer Service ............7:00 p.m.
WAUCHULA CHURCH OF GOD
1543 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.
773-0199
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ......*.........11:15 a.m.
Evening Worship .................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Farn. Training ....7:30 p.m.
Thurs. Youth Bible Study......7:00 p.m.
Friday Night Worship ............7:30 p.m.
WAUCHULA HILLS HARVEST
TEMPLE ASSEMBLY OF GOD
210 Anderson
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Church..................................10:00 a.m .
Youth Service ........................6:00 p.m.
Evening Service ....................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.
WAUCHULA HILLS
SPANISH CHURCH OF GOD
1000 Stansfield Rd.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer ......................7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship...............7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ...............7:30 p.m.
WAUCHULA REVIVAL CENTER
(Full Gospel)
501 N. 9th Ave.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .............11:00 a.m.
Youth & Child. Church..........6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship .................:00 p.m. -
Wed. Bible Study ..................7:00 p.m.
Men's Fri. Prayer ..................7:00 p.m.

ZOLFO SPRINGS"

COMMUNITYWESLEYAN CHURCH
Gardner
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
COWBOY-UP MINISTRY
Cracker Trail Arena
Hwy 66
'(across from Oak Hills Ranch Rd.)
781-2281
Sunday ...............................10:00 a.m.
CREWSVILLE BETHEL
BAPTIST CHURCH
8251 Crewsville Road
Church 735-0871 Pastor 773-6657
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................6:30 p.m..
Wednesday Prayer ..............6:30 p.m. -
EVANGELISTIC HOLINESS
CHURCH INC.
Corner of 6th and Hickory
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.:
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m..
Wednesday ............................7:30 p.m.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
.OF ZOLFO
320 E. 4th St. 735-1200
Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m..
Training Union ....................5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship .................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer .........:.....7:00 p.m.
FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Corner of 6th & Suwanee 735-1544
Gospel Music ......................10:30 a.m,
Worship Service .................11:00 a.m
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m

FOX MEMORIAL
HOLINESS CHURCH
2344 Merle Langford Rd.
Sunday Morning Worship....l0:00 a.nr.
Sunday Night Worship ..........6:00 p.ni.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.


Sunday ..................................9:00 a.m .
Holy Days ............. ...............

ST. MICHAEL
CATHOLICC CHURCH
408 Heard Bridge Road 773-4089
Saturday Mass tEnglish) ......5:00 p.m.
(Spanish) ......7:00 p.m.
Sunday(English) ....................8:30 a.m.
(Spanish) ................11:00 a.m.
(Creole)'.....:.........1....:00 p.m.
Catecismo ..............................9:45 a.m.
Daily Mass in English ..........8:30 a.m.


- r r~, 1 --n ,..: I :--lr,. i 1~~--.;ll ...~crrr.rr. .. .-.*1-- L


ZOLFOSPR1f6
GARDNER BAPTIST CHURCH
South Hwy. 17 494-5456
Sunday School .................i'J:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.
LIE CHANGING WORSHIPCENIER
3426 Oak St. 863-832-9808
Sunday Worship ....................2:30 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study .....:..6:30 p.m.

MARANATHA BAPTIST CHURCH
2465 Oxendine Rd
(863) 832-9292
Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
Worship ................................ 1:00 a.m.
Evening............ ........... ... 00 p.m.
Wed. Bible & Prayer Meet....7:00 p.m.

NEW VISION WORSHIP CENTER
64 E. & School House Road
Church 735-8585 Chlldcare 73-5
8586
Morning Worship ............10:00 a.m.
Children's Church ................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Youth & F.T.H. ............7:00 p.m.

PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF
GOD FAITH TEMPLE
Oak Street
Sunday Worship ...................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Tuesday Worship .................7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship..................7:30 p.m
Saturday Worship ..................7:30 p.m

PRIMERA MISSION
BAUTISTA HISPANA
518 8th Ave. E.
Escuela Dominical ..............10:00 am.
Servicio del Domingo .........11:00 a.m.
p..........................................7:00 p.m .
Servicio del Miercoles ..........7:30 p.m.

PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH
Pioneer Park
2nd Sunday .........................10:30 a.m.
Evening Service ..................6:30 p.m.
5th Sunday ............................6:00 p.m.

ST. PAUL'S MISSIONARY -
BAPTIST CHURCH
3676 US. Hwy. 17 South 735.0636
Sunday School .................9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship ...................11 a.m.
Wed. Prayer Service ..............7:00 p.m.

SSAN ALFONSO MISSION .;...
3027 Sclhoolouse Lane .
Domingo, Misa en Espanol ..9:30 a.m.
Catecismo ........................1 1:00 a.m.

SPANISH MISSION
735-8025
Escuela Dominica ... ........10:00a.m.
Servicio ................................ 11:00 a.m.
Pioneer Club .......................... 6:30 p.m..
Servicio de la Noche ............7:00 p.m.
Mierecoles Merienda ...........6.0Qp.m.
Ser icio............. ................. 8 00 p n.
Sabado Liga de Jovenes .......5:00 p.m.

SEEDS
FROM
THE
SOWER
P W.b A G-U GoD

Everyone seems to lJove
Charlie Brown, the hero of the
comic strip Peanuts. One day
he and Lucy were strolling
along when she stopped and
picked up a daisy and began
to pluck the petals-one by
one, saying, "He loves me, he
loves me not. He loves me,
he loves me not." Plucking
the last petal she said, "He
loves me! Charlie Brown, you
love mel"
"Well," he said, "I could
have told you that."
Sadly she asked, "But why
didn't you?" :
We often neglect to tell
those whom we love that we
do indeed love them.- that
they are important to us, that
we care for them deeply and
that they mean as much to us
as life itself. It is important that
we speak and share our love
with others. And if the love of
God is in our hearts, then the .-
love of God will be seen, in
our lives.
Visit us at: www.SowerMinistries.org







June 21, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 3C


County Ranks EDA


By MICHAEL KELLY
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Hardee County Com-
mission has ranked the pending
Economic Development Au-
thority projects, and will for-
-ward the results to the EDA
board for its consideration
when choosing which grant
requests to fund.
Results varied somewhat
among individual commission-
ers, who each were told to rank
the proposals one through
seven: The scores were aver-
aged to determine the consen-
sus of the board.
The number one pick was for
the $400,000 request by the
Industrial Development Au-
thority.to build a pre-treatment
facility/sheriff's substation in
the Hardee County Commerce
Park.
It was ranked either number
one or two by all five commis-
sioners.
Coming in second was a
request by the Industrial .De-
velopment Authority to build a
$1-million building in the
Commerce Park for Lightning
Bay Construction.
Ranking varied forthis proj-
ect, with Rick Knight and Dale
Johnson putting it at number


COUNTY COURT
The following marriage
licenses were issued recently
in the office of the county
court:
Jose Louis Hernandez Yanez,
27, Bowling Green, and Tabatha
Ann Gonzales, 30, Wauchula.
Fabian Garcia Saucedo, 20,
Bowling Green, and Maria
Guadalupe Torres, 16, Wau-
chula.
Arthur Lowell Bingham Jr.,
-81, Winter Haven, and Dorothy
Pate Grimsley, 79, Wauchula.

The following small claims
case was disposed of recently
by the county judge:
Capital One Bank USA vs.
Tony L. Perry, voluntary dis-
missal.

County Court misdemeanor
dispositions were not available
at press time. '"

CIRCUIT COURT
The following civil actions


one and Grady Johnson ranking
it sixth.
The third-ranked project was
another spec building proposed
by the IDA for $1 million.
This project also drew mixed
results, with ,Sue Birge and
Knight ranking it one. Knight
ranked three projects number
one. Grady Johnson ranked this
proposal seventh.
Getting ranked fourth was the
Economic Development Coun-
cil for $150,000 for administra-
tive expenses. Economic De-
velopment Director Bill Lam-
bert said the EDC would prefer
not to have to use tax dollars to
fund the office as it has in the
past.
Knight ranked this request a
number one while Minor
Bryant and Dale Johnson gave
it a six.
I Sewer/water service expan-
sion along U.S. 17 came fifth.
The $500,000 request was
given a high mark of two by
Grady Johnson and a low of
seven by Knight.
The city of Bowling Green's
request for $425,000 to develop
an industrial park came in sixth.
It was given a high score of four
by Bryant and Grady Johnson
and a low score of six by Birge.
Coming in last was the grant


were filed recently in the office
of the circuit court:
Patricia Pritchard vs. Thomas
Steele, petition for injunction
for protection.
Felicia Earley vs. Levi Finley,
petition for injunction for pro-
tection.

The following decisions on
civil cases pending in the cir-
cuit court were handed down
recently by the circuit court
judge:
Jenny Poblano and the state
Department of Revenue (DOR)
vs. Pedro Juan Santos, child
support contempt order.
Carolyn Heredia and DOR
vs. Sonia F. Heredia, child sup-.
port .order.
Susan Michelle Thompson
and Tricia Sue Thompson vs.
Matthew T. Kirk et al, dis-
missal.
Elizabeth Escobedo and
DOR vs. Jose J. Gutierrez,
modification of child support.
Rickev .Scntt lriskell vs


SProjects
request from Peace River
Explorations for $45,000 to cre-
ate one job. It received a seven
from Bryant, Birge and Dale
Johnson while Knight gave it a
three and Grady Johnson a five.
In other action, the commis-
sion:
-approved waiving a $500
variance fee for Union Baptist
Church to build bathrooms next
to the church.
-set fees to appeal zoning
decisions to the county manag-
er and the County Commission.
An' appeal to the manager is
$150, and going to the commis-
sion is an additional $100. The
fees passed 4-1, with Grady
Johnson opposing.
-approved closing, seven
roads that are dead-end roads
on property owned on all sides
by Mosaic, as part of its South
Fort Meade Mine extension.
-approved moving the De-
velopment of Regional Impact
hearing on CF's South Pasture
Extension from June 28 to
sometime in August.
-endorsed the Florida
Department of Transportation's
draft regional roadway map.
-adopted a formal set of
procedures for board operations
and meetings.


April D. Dirusso, child support i:'',
order.
Dawn M. Ainsworth and .. '.
DOR vs..Onix Velez, voluntary
dismissal.
Maria Anselmo and DOR vs.
Graciela Maldonado, voluntary
dismissal.

There were no felony crim-
inal court dispositions this
week.
-.
The following real estate .
transactions of $10,000 or
more were filed recently in
the office of the clerk of court:
Kathy Davis Susan AWalter Reas, 1
Kathy DavisSusan A. shown with the 88 p
Davis, Linda Lee Teore, '. his father two weel
Edward McCall, Michael P. L. operated by Capt J
Shope and William Frank G. .
Stein to George Fowler,
$165,000. *
Bank of America to Lisa
Joann Gough et al, Hardee /
County Clerk of Courts'certifi-
cate of title, $45,358.
II ~pI


Frankie's

773-5665
Attitudes On Ag 116 Carlton St.,. Wauchula
By Bill Hodge Now Accepting Hours:
Retired Farmer & Rancher TI N -r,,W,. ,ri .o,, O ~.I ,,,F,, oF 9 11


CF Industries played host recently to Hardee Farm Bureau
board members, state legislators (or their staff), and our congres-
sional area representatives, along with representatives from our
U.S. senators.
After a cordial welcome and refreshments, we were given an
interesting and informative presentation. The history of CF
Industries and its economic impact on Florida was presented by
Nick Katzaras and Richard Ghent. A few highlights were the facts
that it has 689 full-time employees and put $212 million into our
Florida economy, in addition to providing work for local contrac-
tors and consulting services.
After our welcoming session, we boarded vans for tours.
One really great experience was when we were taken on board the
monster dragline and were able to stand on the front platform and
watch it work. One feature of that operation was the dragline
dumping its huge load of phosphate in the pumping pit; where it
was liquefied and pumped to the processing plant.
From there we toured the clay sand/mix areas and the settling
ponds.
Back at the office, Farm Bureau board members took a break
while some CF personnel did a special "float" tour for all the leg-
islative personnel. After which we all enjoyed a lunch at the north
picnic area, courtesy of Hardee County Farm Bureau, with food
provided by JP's on Main Street, Wauchula.
To me, the afternoon tour was probably the most interesting.
We toured reclamation areas, some completed and some in
progress. You have to see areas to take in the full impact of the
work, technology, time and expense that GF puts into reclaiming
these mined areas. As I viewed some of these projects, I wondered
if the areas looked as good before mining as they did now
reclaimed. I have not been a proponent of digging up our earth, but
after seeing the extent to which they are going to re-established
these areas to pristine condition I have a different outlook on min-
ing.
.After the tours we had a summary discussion on our day and
concluded our tour. The Hardee' County farm Bureau appreciates
'CF Industries for its hospitality and for the enlightening view of its
mining operation.
Two of CF's "sayings" that I like: "Some people see a field,
we see dinner for America" and "Helping farmers feed a hun-
gry world."
Joining us and coming on the tour were:
State Legislators Rep. Ben Albritton, Rep. Denise Grimsley,
brty Mielke (staff), Rep. Jaime Grant; Rep. Seth McKeel, Cory
Guzzo (staff), Cheryl flood and Grace Lovett with Commissioner
Adam~ Putnam's office.
Congressional Attendees Gary Tibbetts with Congressman
Vern Buchanan's office, Leah Valenti with Congressman Tom
Rooney's office, Ash Mason with Sen. Marco Rubio's office and
Diana McGee with Sen. Bill Nelson's office.

My motto was always to keep swinging. Whether I was in
a slump or feeling badly or having trouble off the field,
the only thing to do was keep swinging.
-Hank Aaron


6:2Z


Sheriffs Office Line-Item Budget

Fair is fair, friends are friends and business is business! With that stated, despite numerous lawful public
records requests to Sheriff Arnold Lanier, I have yet to receive the line-item budget. The purpose of this
request is to ascertain exactly how our tax-payer money is being spent at the sheriffs office. To date, he
has yet to produce the "line-by-line" budget document, claiming that it does not exist!

A line-item budget is a staple of the Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) as established
by the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) which developed the universally accepted guide-
lines for financial accounting. The line-item budget is created by the agency head or finance director to
prepare the final aggregate budget. The sheriff would have it readily available for an oral defense when
going to the final authority for funding.

I for one find it hard to believe that such a document does not exist. Furthermore, if that is the case,
then perhaps the county commissioners can enlighten me and explain how they accept, approve, and
certify the sheriffs budgetary request without challenge. One has to wonder, does this apply only to
the sheriffs office or do the other county agencies operate in a like manner? While I may be the one
making the public record request for this document, I am sure that many of my fellow tax-payers share
my interest in transparency.
"Checks and Balances" are paramount in being a good steward of the tax-payers money. Perhaps Sheriff
Lanier is being a good manager and appropriating our money wisely. Likewise, he may well be doing a good
job in terms of fiscal budgetary management. However, you and I will never know it if he refuses to release
the line-item budget for public review. Accountability and transparency should be the basic foundation for
the finance team at the Hardee County Sheriffs Office. Is Sheriff Lanier acting accordingly or is he hiding
the line-item budget from public inspection? If such a document does exist, then why not be open and share
it with us? If the document does not exist, then one must ask the question, "Why
not and where is the accountability?"

Should I be elected as your sheriff, the line-item budget from my administration
will be front and center. It will be available to you for inspection at any time.


Help Me to Help You!

Vote SANTARLAS(R) for HARDEE SHERIFF


www.mynewsheriff.com

Political advertisement paid for and approved by Thomas Santarlas, Republican for Sheriff.
6:2tp


I CourthoseRepor


~i~Ti~~


-







4C The Herald-Advocate, June 21, 2012




Rodeo Bits
By Kathy Ann Gregg


I




*
N1


MANATEE COUNTY RANCH RODEO
Well, I've made it into March with the Manatee County
Cattlemen's Association annual Ranch Rodeo, which is a Florida
Cattlemen's qualifying event, held on March 3 at the Palmetto
Fairgrounds.
In addition to a totally different event woods tying on
the event roster, this ranch rodeo has another twist a youth team
competes in the very same events. And certainly we are familiar
with these youth: Patrick Carlton and Dawson Cantu from Hardee
County, together with cousins Coy Godwin and Chance Rodriguez,
and female team member Madison Crosby. (All five compete in the
Reality Ranch Youth Rodeo held in Zolfo Springs, with three of
them taking home the All-Around saddles at the recent banquet -
more on that in a future column.) Jason McKendree of the SMR
team, rode with them as the adult on the team (although I'm not
sure Jason qualifies as an adult at times!).
Not including the youth team (riding under the name Fat
Daddy's Lil Cowpokes), Hardee County was represented on six of
the 10 adult teams that competed: Audubon Ranch, the Carlton
Ranches, JTF Performance Horses, M&N Cattle, Stevens Land &
Cattle, and SMR Farms.
The events at this ranch rodeo were team sorting, roping and
branding, team doctoring, double muggin' and woods tying.
The youth completed the team sorting event in 1:37.62, then
went on to receive a time of 37.49 seconds in the roping and brand-
ing event (but incurred a five-second penalty for an extra calf get-
ting out). Next up was the team doctoring, which they completed
in 30.96 seconds; but again incurred a five-second penalty, this
time for only catching one hind leg. The double muggin' resulted
in a no-time, as their steer crossed back over the line.
Last was the woods tying event. This is where one team mem-
ber has to rope the steer, and drig it over to a fence post that has
been pounded into the ground. The roper must remain on his horse,
but the other team members then have to tie the animal to the post.
As ranch rodeo events are supposed to be actual things that real
cowboys do out in the field, this one certainly qualifies. And Fat
Daddy's Lil Cowpokes had'a good run; coming In with a time of
58.37 seconds.
What I find extremely humorous is that these youngsters came
in third place overall, beating out Audubon Ranch, the Carlton


Ranches (a little family competition there!), JTF Performance
Horses, M&N Cattle (I had to rub it in, Peck!), and Stevens Land
& Cattle. You adults had better practice up your rodeo skills!
This ranch rode&-has an added award Faye Mann of Myakka
City presents the Walter Mann Top Hand Award (in honor of her
lute husband, an avid Manatee County cattleman) to the cowboy
(or cowgirl) who stands out in his (or her) performance that day.
Mrs. Faye herself does the judging, keeping an eye on each and
every competitor jn each and every event, which is no small chore.
Last year's choice was our very own Trae Adams from the
Carlton Ranches team. And this year made it two in a row for
Hardee County, yith the honor going to Branidon Dieter of the JTF
Performance Horses team. Having watched Brandon that day, I can
confirm that Mrs. Faye's choice was the right one! Congratula-
tions, Brandon!
Coverage on the adults will be in the next column, but before
I close, mark your calendars to attend the benefit ranch rodeo this
Saturday at 11 a.m. at the Winding Trails Arena in Myakka City
(about two miles west of the Hardee/Manatee line off State Road
64).
This benefit is for Rodney Crosby, a regular ranch rodeo com-
petitor and true cowboy, who was injured in January in a riding
accident. There will be plenty of good food, both a silent and a live
auction, and ranch rodeo competition. All proceeds will benefit
Rodney and his family to help.in this trying time. See you there on
ai"tllrd- !I


Faye Mann proudly presents the Walter Mann Top Hand
award buckle to Brandon Dieter.


,COURTESY PHOTOS BY KATHY ANN GREGG
Fat Daddy's Lil Cowpokes teammates Coy Godwin (on
horseback), Pat Carlton, Dawson Cantu, Jason McKendree
and Chance Rodriguez begin to secure the calf in the roping
and branding event, which they completed in 37.49 seconds
(and. Madison Crosbythe e, mpl
her face inthe dirtl). aP mt'..'.


Brandon Dieter ropes the calf in the roping and branding
event, which his team, JTF Performance Horses, completed
in 1:23.48. ., .
.; cu ,aU~'~+--


Dawson Cantu ropes the steer's head in the team doctoring
event, to bring in a time of 30.96 seconds.


How to Challenge Your Medical Bills
Dear Savvy Senior,
I need some help understanding my medical bills from my knee
replacement surgery earlier this year. My wife and I live on a pret-
ry tight budget so I like to keep track of our costs as closely as pos-
sible. But the bills I've received are vague and confusing, and we
think we're being overcharged. What can you tell us?
Trying To Recover
Dear Trying,
Errors and overcharging have become so commonplace on
medical bills today that double-checking them is a very smart move
that may save you some money. Here are some tips and tools that
can help.
Challenge Your Bills
According to the Medical Billing Advocates of America, nine
out of 10 hospital bills have errors on them, most of which are in
the hospital's favor. Bills from doctor's offices and labs have mis-
takes too, but they tend to be fewer and further apart.
To help you get a handle on your medical bills and check for
costly errors, the first thing you need to do is request an itemized
statement from the hospital or health care providers detailing the
charges of the procedures, supplies, tests and services they provid-
ed you. They are legally required to provide you with this infor-
mation.
If the statement contains confusing billing codes or abbrevia-
tions that you don't understand, call the billing office for an expla-
nation. You can also look up most medical billing codes onlibe by
going to any online search engine and typing in "CPT" followed by
the code number.
Once you receive and decode the statement, review it careful-
ly and keep your eyes peeled for these mistakes:
Double billing: Being charged twice for the same,services,
drugs, or supplies.
Typos: Incorrect billing codes or dollar amounts.
Canceled work: Charging for'a test your doctor ordered,
then canceled.
Phantom services: Being charged for services, test or treat-
ments that were never received.
Up-coding: Inflated charges for medications and supplies.
Incorrect length of stay: Most hospitals will charge for the
admission day, but not for day of discharge. Be sure you're not
paying for both.
Incorrect room charges: Being charged for a private room,
even if you stayed in a semi-private room.
Inflated operating room fees: Being billed for more time
than was actually used. Compare the charge with your anesthesi-
ologist's records.
To make sure the charges on your bill are reasonably priced,
use the Healthcare Blue Book at healthcarebluebook.com. This is a
free resource that lets you look up the going rate of health care
costs in your area.
If you find errors or have questions about charges, contact
your provider's billing office and your insurer. If they don't help
you and the discrepancies are significant, you should consider get-
ting help from a trained professional who specializes in analyzing
medical bills, and negotiates with health care providers, insurers
and even collection agencies.
Most medical bill reviewing professionals charge an hourly
fee somewhere between $50 and $200 per hour for their serv-
ices, or they may work on a contingency basis, earning a commis-
sion of 25 percent to 35 percent of the amount they save you.
To find help, check out resources like Medical Billing
Advocates of America (billadvocates.com), MedReview Solutions
-(: medreviewsolutions.com), Hospital B,ill. Review ;(hospitalbillre-
view.com) and Medical Cost Advoc*e. (medicalcostadvocate.-
com). You can find others by doing an Internet search under "hos-
pital bill review."
If you're a Medicare beneficiary, another resource that may
help is your State Health Insurance Assistance Program (SHIP).
They provide free personalized counseling and may be able to help
you get a handle on your medical bills and Medicare coverage. To
find a local SHIP counselor visit shiptalk.org, or call 800-677-
1116.
Send your senior questions to: Savvy Senior, P.O. Box 5443,
Norman, OK 73070, or visit SavvySenior.org. Jim Miller is a con-
tributor to the NBC Today show and author of "The Savvy Senior"
book.
At 6'4", Lincoln was the tallest president. Madison, at
5'4", was the shortest.


The third-place team of Fat Daddy's ULi Cowpokes (from left)
Jason McKendree and son Jake, Pat Carlton, Dawson
Cantu, Chance Rodriguez and Madison Crosby. Missing
from photo is Coy Godwin.

2 SLICES OF

PEPPERONI PIZZA
PLUS A SODA

$9 ZOLFO
h SPRINGS
735-2105 S Ea
Limited time offer At participating locations. .

IAMr~ 0 0 a a a aI


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HwY 17 South Across from NihIolas Restaurant


HEARTLAND PHARMACY





"We put our into our service"
If you are visiting we will gladly transfer your prescriptions and
keep them on file then transfer them back when you go home.


. -, ; -, ,


ff ap'
.r 'iI'-d''''
I.',
-'V._


- I


,..





Sue Lobato, Pauline Ochoa, Julian Garcia, Red Camp Pharmacist,
Bob Duncan Pharmacist Sandra Garcia (missing)

.- DELIVERY SERVICE.AVUABfU

Monday-Friday 9:00 am to 6:00 pm Saturday. W b .
bg


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June 21, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 5C


'We Didn't Hang Out; We Worked On The Ranch!'


By ERICA ROBERTS
Special To The Herald-Advocate
The person being interviewed is my
grandma, Betty Roberts.
Q: When were you born?
A: Nov. 14, 1945.
SQ: Where were you born?
A: Jacksonville, Florida.
Q: Where did you live growing
up?
A: Here in Wauchula.
Q: Do you have brothers or sis-
ters?
A: Yes, I have 10 brothers and sis-
ters, five brothers and five sisters. It is
a very interesting life. There are 11 of
us total.
Q: What were your responsibilities
as a child?
A: My responsibilities were to go to
school, do
chores like dish-, '
es, clean up the i i0 ,I
yard, clean the (.. .
barn, the cow
truck, washing, ironing, and cooking.
Growing up, and learning to do chores.
Learning to live and grow with each
other and people. Learning rules, disci-
pline, and getting along with brothers
and sisters. To honor our parents, fami-
ly and God. When you don't learn to
honor God, and people, you don't learn
what is important in life..
Q: Who were your parents?
A: Alfred and Lenore McClelland.
My daddy was born in Friendship near
Zolfo, and my mother was born in
Ocala.
Q: What was school like? Where
did you go?
A: I went to Zolfo Elementary
School. If you lived in the country; like
Zolfo, Ona or Limestone, you went to
Zolfo Elementary for grammar school.
Once finished there, you went to


COURTESY PHOTOS
Betty and her "high-school sweet-
heart" back in the day.

Hardee Junior High School then
Hardee Senior High.
I enjoyed grammar school more so
than high school or junior high. The
teachers were more one-on-one, and I
loved the projects and sports there
because they were in a country setting.
I enjoyed it because I grew up in the
country.
Q: Who was your favorite
teacher?
A: I had two. My favorite teachers
were Mrs. Mattie Mae Saunders and
Mrs. Ruth Smith (Mimi). Mrs.
Saunders taught home economics and
Mrs. Smith taught PE.
Q: What did you wear to school?
A: Girls wore dresses, or skirts and
blouses. No hats. Boys wore shirts and
jeans. In high school, we wore skirts
and blouses as well. The "thing" back
then everyone was wearing were nice,
simple, white tennis shoes. Very light


and comfortable!
Q: When you were my age, what
were your hobbies?
A: Horseback riding and softball. I
had two favorite horses, Dynamite and
Chico. Dynamite was an unpredictable
male, and Chico was just a smarter
horse.
Q: Did you have a "hangout"
place? Where was it and what did
you do?
A: At home. Daddy didn't allow us
to be away from home after school. We
went straight home on the bus after
school. When we got home, we worked
on the ranch. So we basically went
home and helped out with our daily
chores.
Q: What age were you allowed to
date?.
A: Sixteen. Daddy would let us dou-
ble date at age 16. At 17 we got to date
on our own.
Q: What was your first car?
A: The first car I got was after I was
married. It was a brown 1964 Ford
Fairlane.
Q: What were your childhood
dreams?
A: To serve God first, life and then
family. To get married and have a fami-
ly. I never wanted to be a career
woman of the business world. I wanted
to be just a stay-at-home wife, mother
and now a grandmother.
Q: What was your first job?
A: I worked for the WLM Corp. in
1968. I advertised the corporation
through mailing. WLM first started the
zip code for areas. I worked there for
only one year.
Q: What was the best advice you
received as a kid?
A: To always put God first and to
honor Him. My mother would also say
a lot of sayings, like, "Birds of a feath-


Betty and Milton Roberts today.
er, flock together." The best advice
always came from my parents.
Q: What hasn't changed since
your childhood?
A: My faith in God and my love for
Him.
Q: Who was your high-school
sweetheart?
A: My high-school sweetheart was
Milton Albert Roberts. Since I didn't
have any classes with him in high
school, I always passed notes to him in
the hallway. We knew we were soul-
mates at 16 and 17, and we still are 46
years later.
Back In Time is the result of a class
assignment.given to ninth graders at
Hardee Senior High School. Each
student is asked to interview an older
person. Selected interviews are pub-
lished here as an encouragement to the
students and for the enjoyment of our
readers.


The Roman emperor Augustus, it is said, was so afraid of thunder, he would hide in a
closet whenever a thunderstorm came up.

"Shadow Player" is a slang term for an investor who is investing a very large amount
of money and wants to conceal his identity.


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and your schedule with features like:

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* Saturday Hours
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The sparrow-sized elf owl is only 5 to 6 inches long. Found in America's southwestern
deserts, it is the smallest owl in the world.

The cat could very well be man's best friend but would never stoop to admitting it.
-Doug Larson


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www.midflorida.com (863) 688-3733 Toll Free (866) 913-3733
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Offers valid as of Apl 10, 2012. A minimum $5 account is required for membership with MIDFLORIDA and access to these offers:Offers are available for a limited time only and may be canceled without notice. ExistingMIDFLORIDA loans and credit cards do not qualify for the incentiveor the special advertied
Annual Percentage Rates (APR). Checking Incentive is deposited to new checking account. Loan and credit card incentives will be applied to a MIDFLORIDA Visa Platinum credit card. Other rates and terms are available and are based on credit. Visit midflolda.com or see an assoate for details.
1.Anyone who has held a checking account with MIDFLORIDA in the past will not qualify forth $77 incentive. In addition to opening a new checking account, you must accept and open online banking, online bill paymenLt eStatement, eNotice, direct deposit ($500 minimum which must postwithin 30 days of
account opening) and a debit card. For RT4T checking accounts, you must make 5 debit card transactions in the first 30 days in lieu of the direct deposit requirement. Freedom accounts donot qualify for this incentive. Minimum to open Is $50. 2. Toqualify for the incentive, you must refinance a loanof $15.000 of
more from another financial institution. Ians of 55,000to 14.999willreceive a 100credit. 3. Incentive is offered on new credit card accounts only. The introductory Annual Percentage Rate available on balance transfersisvalidfor thefirst 12monthsonnew accountsonly. A balancetransrfeewillapply.


33LOATON TROGHUTCETRL 0LOID '


Federally'
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LENDER






6C The Herald-Advocate, June 21, 2012


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June 21, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 7C


Regret!
SLife flows and death dies away.
As I see you for the first time, I'm scared and anxious
to talk to you. But, my fear says, "Stay away!"; you belong
to another. My heart burst into fire and I start to die away.
Until I feel nothing inside, only pain! But, there is hope yet
as she turns around and smiles at me, then walks away.
.Not knowing that her true soulmate would be me one day.
Till this.day, I wonder why I said nothing. But on (o old now
and love faded away. As I lay on my death bed, all I can
picture'is her beautiful face. The last minutes of my life
approach and all I can think of is starting my life over again.
To swallow my pride and ask for her beautiful name.
I'm sure things would ha-" heen different if I had stopped
her and said, "Hi!" But, tha.sin:the past, and time's faded
by. Regret is my curse and I've paid for it every day.

-Michael Martinez
Wauchula

PUBLISH YOUR ORIGINAL POETRY!
Poet's Place is a feature which relies solely on reader input.
Only your original work may be submitted. Send your poetry
to: Poet's 'Place,' Te 'Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338,
Wauchula, FL 33873. ,


Robertson head square-
drive screws were invented
by Canadian P. L Robertsor
in 1908. Thats actually 21
years before Phillips-heac
screws. The Model T ca
made by the Ford Moto
Company used over 70(
Robertson screws.

The art of interpretation i
riotto play what is written.
--Pablo Casals

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF TH
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
'AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA GENERAL
JURISDICTION DIVISION
'. CASE-NO.: 25-2009-CA-000147
BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
CINDY OCASIO, et. al.
Defendants.

NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE
t1 NOTICE IS. HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to a Final Judgment t
Foreclosure dated November 9
2011, and entered in 25-2009-CA
000147, of the Circuit Court of th
Tenth Judicial Circuit in and fo
Hardee County, Florida, where
BANI OF AMERICA, N.A., is th
Plaintiff and CINDY OCASIC
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF CIND
OCASIO N/K/A DEVIN ROACH
JOHN DOE N/K/A FREDDI
CARLTON; JANE DOE N/K/
DEENA CARLTON are th
Defendant(s). B. Hugh Bradley a
the Clerk of the Circuit Court wi
sel to the highest and best bidde
for cash at the 2nd Floor Hallway
Outside of Room 202 417 W. Mai
Street, Wauchula, FL 33873, a
11:00 a.m., on June 27, 2012, th
following described property a
set forth in said Final Judgment
to wit:
S1/2 OF SE 1/4 OF NW 1/4
OF SE 1/4 OF SECTION 26,
TOWNSHIP 34 SOUTH,
RANGE 24 EAST, HARDEE
COUNTY FLORIDA;
TOGETHER WITH A PER-
PETUAL NON-EXCLUSIVE
EASEMENT FOR INGRESS
AND EGRESS ACROSS
THE EAST 15 FEET OF
THE E 1/2 OF THE NE 1/4
OF THE. NW 1/4 OF SE 1/4
OF SECTION 26, TOWN-
SHIP 34 SOUTH, RANGE
-- 24..-AST HARDEE COUN-
TY FLORIDA, AND A PER-
PETUAL EASEMENT FOR
INGRESS AND EGRESS
OVER AND ACROSS THE
EAST 40 FEET OF THE N
1/2 OF THE SE 1/4 OF NW
1/4 QF SE 1/4 OF SECTION
26, TOWNSHIP 34 SOUTH,
RANGE 24. EAST HARDEE
COUNTY FLORIDA.
Any person claiming an inter
est In the surplus from the sale, i
any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the Lis
Pendens must file a claim within
60 days after the sale.
Dated this 11 day of June
2012.
B. Hugh Bradley
As Clerk of the Cour
By: Connie Cokei
As Deputy Clerk
If you are a person with a disabil.
ty who needs any accommoda.
fion in order to participate in this
proceeding, you are entitled, al
no cost to you, to the provision ol
certain assistance. Please con-
tact the Office of the Court
Administrator, (863) 534-4690, al
least 7 days before your sched-
uled court appearance, or imme-
diately upon receiving this notifi-
cation if the time before the
scheduled appearance is less
than 7 days; (describe notice); 11
you are hearing or voice
Impaired, call TDD (863) 534-7777
oraFlorida Relay Service 711.
p, 6:14.21c


A Daily Thought
THURSDAY
The Lord says, "I will give
them a desire to respect Me
completely and I will put
inside them a new way of
thinking. I will take out the
stubborn heart of stone and
will give them an obedient
heart."
Ezekiel 11:19 (NCV)


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FRIDAY
For if a man is in Christ, he
has become a new person
altogether the past is fin-
ished and gone, everything
has become fresh and new.
II Corinthians 5:17 (PME)

SATURDAY
God has, given me "-a. new
N song to sing, of praises to
9f our God. Now many will hear
- of the glorious things He did
e for me, and stand in awe
:r before the Lord, and put
n their trust.in Him.
e, Psalm 40:3-4 (TLB)

Y SUNDAY
E Yet, I am writing you a new
A commandment, which is
e true in Him (Christ Jesus)
s and in you, because the
" darkness is passing away
'r and the true Light (Jesus) is
n already shining. He who is in
at the light and hates his broth-
e er is in the darkness still.
3 I John 2:8-9 (RSV)
t,
MONDAY
This is the brand-new cov-
enant.that I will make ..: I will.
put My law within them -
write it on their hearts, and
be their God, and they will
be My people.
Jeremiah 31:33 (ME)

TUESDAY
You must lay aside that old
human nature which, delud-
ed by its lusts, is sinking
toward death (eternal). You
must be made new in mind
and spirit, and put on the
new nature of God's creat-
ing, which shows itself in a
just and devout life.
Ephesiads 4:22-24 (NEB)

WEDNESDAY
(The Sovereign Lord says),
"Look! I am creating new
-heavens and a new earth -
f so wonderful that no one will
y ever think about the old
s ones anymore. Be glad;
n rejoice forever in My new
creation. ... And the sound
of weeping and crying will
be heard no more."
Isaiah 65:17,19a, 19b (NLT)
t All verses are excerpted from
The Holy Bible: (KJV) King
k James Version; (ME) The
Message; (NCV) New Cen-
-tury Version; (NEB) New
- English Bible; (NIV) New
International Version; (NLT)
f New Living Translation (RSV)
-Revised Standard Version;
S(PME) Phillips Modern Eng-
lish; and (TLB) The Living
Bible.


We are at risk of producing
more technology than the
world can adapt to.
-Dan Hutcheson


Letter To The Editor

Downing Family Member

Fondly Recalls Wauchula


Dear Editor:
Going -home ... again ... to
Wauchula ...
Visiting our mother's home
town of Wauchula, Florida, was
a yearly ritual for my younger
brother, Robert. and me. Each
August. when our Dad had his
vacation, during the infamous,
stifling "dog days" of summer,
we would pack our car to the
gills, and head south. Mama
called it "going home."
Wauchula was in its prime
during those golden days of the
50's, although we didn't really
know it at the time. It was a
clean, prosperous, if not opulent
little town, with a stable econo-
my supported by cattle ranchers
and citrus growers for the most
part. The lawns were mani-
cured; the homes were neatly
painted and maintained. Not a
speck of trash to be seen along
the streets.
There was very little serious
crime with several active
churches throughout the town.
It gave us,as children a wdnder-
sful sense of stability and'securi-'
ty, such as I'have never known
since.
The sense of community was
strong, despite the fact there
were no cell phones or texting
or internet. Everyone seemed to
know everyone else, even
though there were polite social
boundaries to be observed. You
'didn't "hang out" with just any-
body.
When I was a teen, there were
two drive-ins that we loved to
visit, Knight's and See's. I
remember cruising with my
friends, the Hendry girls, from
one end of town to the other, to
see "who" was there. And
Saturday nights were always
fun. After supper, we would
wash up, put on fresh clothes
and "go downtown", to walk the
streets and stop and chat with
friends, usually ending up at
Dasher's Drug Store for a cher-.
ry smash. Air conditioning was
fairly new at the time, and it
was wonderfully freezing at*
Dasher's. You could almost see
your breath, it was so cold!!
My grandmother, Mrs. Rob-
ert B. Downing, Sr., used to tell
me how they had first come to
.live in Wauchula -The4tnamiv.'r
-had migrated to Birmihgham,
Alabama, from the steel mills of
the north in the early 1900's,
seeking a kinder climate for her
mother, Mrs. Josiah Crosby.
A friend in Alabama had
heard of a little upcoming pio-:
neer town called Wauchula,
where land was very reason-
able, and it was he who con-
vinced our family to move
there. At the time, the Downing
family included four children:
Ruth, (1902-1994); Helen,
(1904-1995); Bob, (1908-
1993), and Ethel, (1911-1998).
They always lived next door to
or on the same street as Mrs.
Downing's parents, and off they
all went to their new home in
Wauchula.
Grandma said they came by
train, although I am not sure
how they moved their furniture,
if they did so. They arrived at
the depot, long since out of use,
and stayed for awhile in a Mrs.
"somebody's" boarding house,
also now defunct. Eventually,
they purchased quite a bit of
land, including what is now
Sunset Park and the baseball
field down that way. Their first
home was built at what is now
606 South Florida Avenue, and
the two families shared the
same space at first. Eventually,
Pa (the elder Mr. Crosby)
moved one lot oyer toward
town ahd built the first bunga-
low in Wauchula, designed by
an architect by the name of
Folsom. It was very practical
for the hot weather, having
screened porches off each of the
bedrooms and a kitchen set at
the back of the house, to keep it
cool. The old Crosby home is


now owned by a Mrs. Dickie.
In time, other children were
added to the family: Henrietta
Isabel Downing Thomas (1915-
1969); William Earl Downing.
(1917-1919); Mildred "Louise"
Downing Jones (1921-1995);
Albert Merle (Buster) Downing
(1924-2003) and Richard Maur-
ice Downing (1927-1992).
Their father. R.B. Downing. Sr.
became- very involved in com-
munity affairs, serving as head
of the school board and
.Superintendent of the City
Light and Water Authority. In
his retirement years, he owned
and operated a feed store which
was where the DMV is now
located. I loved going there as a
child, where Grandaddy would
let us pick out a free soft drink,
which were at that time stored
in a big cooler filled with ice-
water. My favorites were
chocolate Yahoo -and grape
Truade.
I can still close my eyes and
recapture the smell of chicken
feed, which used to come in
brightly colored sacks 'which
our mother made into play
clothes. So many memories of
family, friends and fellowship
in those golden years will
remain with me all my days.
The once active, prolific
Downing family ,is now gath-
ered at the City Cemetery,
where my brother, Robert, and I
go to visit each year when we
are in Florida. We enjoy meet-
ing with old friends, George
Wadsworth, Elizabeth Kay
Hendry, and our cousins, David
Downing, Karen D. Porter,
Diane Downing Roberts and
Mary Downing's sisters, Stella
Repetosky and Ginny Urlich,
often savoring some good
Wauchula food at Nicholas
Restaurant.
Many things. have changed
'over the years. The faces of
those we loved so long ago no
longer greet us. In many ways,
though, for us at least,
Wauchula is still "going home."
Patti Jones Schacht
Daughter Of
Louise Downing
and Rex Jones
Oakton, VA


During the past week, sheriff's deputies and city police
officers investigated the following incidents and made the fol-
lowing arrests:

COUNTY
June 17, Salvador Chava Villegas, 46, of 330 E. Fifth St.,
Zolfo Springs, was arrested by Dep. Michael Lake and charged
with two counts of battery.
June 17, Keshia Mashun Watkins. 27, of 10 E. Circle St.,
Avon Park, was arrested by Dep. Ryan Abbott and charged with
aggravated assault with a deadly weapon and reckless driving caus-
ing damage.

June 16, Victoria Guerrero, 26, of 105 E. Main St., Bowling
Green, was arrested by Sgt. Lyle Hart and charged with resisting an
officer without violence and failure to appear in court.

June 15, a tag was reported stolen on Hickory Court.

June 13, Santiago Alvarez Velazquez, 26, of 713 E. Palmetto
St., Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Daniel Arnold on a charge of
violation of probation.
June 13, Michael Damien Brewer, 22, of 801 SR 66, Zolfo
Springs, was arrested by Dep. Steven Ahrens on a charge of viola-
tion of probation.

June 12, Michael Patrick Rubio, 20, of 2966 Old Crewsville
Road, Zolfo Springs, was arrested by Det. John shivers and
charged with sexual assault.
June 12, a residential burglary on Sally Place, vehicles stolen
on Sabal Palm Drive and.on U.S. 17 South, and a theft on Apostolic
Road were reported.

June 11, Trevor Joseph Scantland, 25, of 2010 E. 148th Ave.,
Lutz, was arrested by Dep. Cesar Medina on a charge of violation
of probation.
June 11, Jonathan Howard Pleger, 32, of 115 Indiana Ave.,
Wauthula, was arrested by Sgt. Matt Tinsley and charged with bat-
tery.
June 11, thefts on Will Duke Road and on Halls Place were
reported.

WAUCHULA
June 17, a residential burglary on South Fifth Avenue (U.S. 17
North) and criminal mischief on South Fifth Avenue were reported.

June 16, Lydia Richardson, 42, of 235 Columbia St., Arcadia,
was arrested by Ofc. John Nicholas and charged with making false
911 calls.

June 15, Rolando Rios, 32, of 817 E. Main St., Wauchula, was
arrested by Ofc. Jonathan Corwin and charged with battery.
June 15, a theft on Walton Avenue was reported.

June 14, Randy Wayne Douglas, 34, of 31066 Hwy 17,.Ar-
cadia, was arrested by Ofc. William Smith and charged with DUI.

June 13, a robbery/holdup on North Sixth Avenue (U.S. 17
South), and thefts at Georgia Avenue and East Main Street were
reported.

June 12, residential burglaries on East.Bay Street and on
Southerland Street were reported.


jI - -* -> -
June Is Men s





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ABOUT...
Letters To
The Editor
The Herald-Advocate wel-
comes letters to the editor
on matters of public interest.
Letters should be brief, and
must be written in good
taste and include the
writer's full name, address
and daytime telephone
number for verification.
Letters must be received
by 5 p.m. on Monday to be
considered for that week's
edition. Submissions should
be typed or legibly written.
Send letters to: Letters to
the Editor, The Herald-
Advocate, P.O. Box 338,
Wauchula, FL 33873. Fax
letters to (863) 773-0657.


'~~. ?~-,-..ti~ '~ r


-Loo".









8C The Herald-Advocate, June 21, 2012


Depwte Horiz


Medical Benefits Settlement

Providing Benefits to Clean-Up Workers and Certain Gulf Coast Residents


If you have a .medical claim related to the Deepwater
Horizon oil spill, you could get benefits from a class
action settlement with BP Exploration & Production Inc.
and BP America Production Company ("BP"). Go to
DeepwaterHorizonSettlements.com for more information,
including information on how to file a claim.

WHO IS INCLUDED IN THE MEDICAL
BENEFITS SETTLEMENT?
The Medical Class includes (1) clean-up workers and
(2) certain people who resided in specific geographic
areas in coastal and wetlands areas along the Gulf
Coast during specific periods in 2010. The website
DeepwaterHorizonSettlements.com has detailed
descriptions and maps to help you determine whether
a geographic location may be included iin one of these
zones. Additionally, you can call 1-866-992-6174 or
e-mail info@DeepwaterHorizonMedicalSettlement.com
to find out if a geographic location is included.

WHAT DOES THE MEDICAL BENEFITS
SETTLEMENT PROVIDE?
The benefits of the Medical Benefits Settlement include:
(1) payments to qualifying people for certain acute (short-
term) and chronic (ongoing) medical conditions occurring
after exposure to oil or chemical dispersants; (2) provision
of periodic medical examinations to qualifying people; and
(3) creation of a Gulf Region Health Outreach Program,
consisting of projects to strengthen the healthcare system.
Benefits (1) and (2) will be provided only after the Court
grants final approval and any appeals are resolved.

How TO GET BENEFITS FROM THE
MEDICAL BENEFITS SETTLEMENT
You need to submit a Claim Form to request benefits.
You can get a copy of the Claim Form by visiting the
website or by calling 1-866-992-6174. Claims can be


submitted by mail. If you have questions about how to
file your claim, you should call the toll-free number for
assistance.

The deadline for filing a Claim Form is one year after
the Medical Benefits Settlement becomes effective (that
is, after the Court grants "final approval" and any appeals
are resolved). The exact date of the claim filing deadline
will be posted on the website. It is highly recommended
that Medical Class Members complete and'submit their
'claim forms promptly. Please read the Economic and
Property Damages Settlement notice because you may
also be eligible for a payment from that settlement.

YOUR OTHER OPTIONS
If you do not want to be legally bound by the Medical
Benefits Settlement.you mustOptOutorexcl ude yourself fby
October 1, 2012 or you won't be able to sue BP over
certain medical claims. If you stay in the Medical Benefits
Settlement, you may object to it by August 31, 2012.
The Detailed Notice explains how to exclude yourself or
object.

The Court will hold a hearing on November 8, 2012
to consider whether to approve the Medical Benefits
Settlement. You or your own lawyer may ask to appear
and speak at the hearing at your own cost. Class Counsel
will ask the Court to consider an award of fees, costs, and
expenses of 6% of the value of the benefits actually provided
under the Medical Benefits Settlement Agreement. Class
Counsel fees, costs, and expenses under the Medical
Benefits Settlement Agreement and the Economic and
Property Damages Settlement Agreemrent jointly cannot
exceed $600 million. Class members' payments will
not be reduced if the Court approves the payment of
Class Counsel fees, costs, and expenses because BP will
separately pay these attorney fees, costs, and expenses.


Economic and Property Damages Settlement

Providing Money to Individuals and Businesses


If you have economic loss or property damage because of
the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, you could get money from
a class action settlement with BP Exploration & Production
Inc. and BP America Production Company ("BP"). Go to
DeepwaterHorizonSettlements.com for more information,
including information on how to file a claim.

WHO IS INCLUDED IN THE ECONOMIC &
PROPERTY DAMAGES SETTLEMENT?
The Economic and Property Damages ("E&PD")
Settlement Class includes people, businesses, and
other entities in the states of Louisiana. Alabama
and Mississippi, and certain counties in Texas and
Florida, that were harmed by the oil spill. The website
DeepwaterHorizonSettlements.com has detailed
descriptions and maps to help you determine whether
a geographic location may be included in the E&PD
Settlement. Additionally, you can call 1-866-992-6174 or
e-mail questions @ DeepwaterHorizonEconomicSettlement.
com to find out if a geographic location is included.

WHAT DOES THE ECONOMIC & PROPERTY
DAMAGES SETTLEMENT PROVIDE?
The E&PD Settlement makes payments for the following
types of claims: (1) Seafood Compensation, (2) Economic
Damage, (3) Loss of Subsistence, (4) Vessel Physical
Damage. (5) Vessels of Opportunity Charter Payment,
(6) Coastal Real Property Damage, (7) Wetlands Real'
Property Damage, and (8) Real Property Sales !Damage.
There is no limit on the total dollar amount of the E&PD
Settlement; all qualified claims will be paid.

How TO GET BENEFITS FROM THE ECONOMIC &
PROPERTY DAMAGES SETTLEMENT
You need to submit a Claim Form to request a payment.
You can get a copy of the various Claim Forms by visiting
the website or by calling 1-866-992-6174. Claims can be
submitted online or by mail. If you have questions about
how to file your claim, you should call the toll-free number
for assistance.


The deadline to submit most E&PD claims will be
April 22, 2014 or six months after the E&PD Settlement
becomes effective (that is, after the Court grants "final
approval" and any appeals are resolved), whichever is later.
There will be an earlier deadline to submit E&PD Seafood
Compensation claims. The earlier deadline to submit
Seafood Compensation claims will be 30 days after final
approval of the Settlement by the United States District
Court for the Eastern District of Louisiana (regardless of
appeals). Actual claim filing deadlines will be posted on
the website as they become available. Valid claims will be
paid as they are approved, beginning, shortly after the Court-
Supervised Settlement Program commences. It is highly
recommended that E&PD Settlement. Class Members
complete and submit their claim forms promptly. Please
read the Medical Benefits Settlement notice because you
may also be eligible for benefits from that settlement.

YOUR OTHER OPTIONS
If you do not want to be legally bound by the E&PD
Settlement, you must Opt Out or exclude yourself by
,October 1, 2012 or you won't be able to sue BP over
certain economic and property damage claims. If you
stay in the E&PD Settlement. you may object to it by
August 31, 2012. The Detailed Notice explains how to
exclude yourself or object.

The Court will hold a hearing on November 8, 2012 to
consider whether to approve the E&PD Settlement. You
or your own lawyer may ask to appear and speak at the
hearing at your own cost. The Court will also consider
Class Counsel fees, costs, and expenses including an
interim payment of $75 million and additional awards equal
to 6% of class claims and benefits paid. Class Counsel
fees, costs and expenses under the Economic and Property
Damages Settlement Agreement and the Medical Benefits
Settlement Agreement jointly cannot exceed $600 million.
Class members' payments will not be reduced if the Court
approves the payment of Class Counsel fees, costs, and
expenses because BP will separately pay these attorney
fees, costs, and expenses.


- 'rpwaier Horizo[.Settlements.(6] I 1-866-992-6174
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