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 Material Information
Title: The Herald-advocate
Portion of title: Herald advocate
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Wm. J. Kelly
Place of Publication: Wauchula Fla
Publication Date: 06/14/2012
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Wauchula (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hardee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Hardee -- Wauchula
Coordinates: 27.546111 x -81.814444 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: 55th year, no. 31 (Sept. 2, 1955)-
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 Related Items
Preceded by: Hardee County herald
Preceded by: Florida advocate (Wauchula, Fla.)

Full Text

















The


Herald-Advocate


Hardee County's Hometown Coverage


70
Plus 5e Sales Tax


112th Year, No. 28
4 Sections, Pages 46


Thursday, June 14, 2012


Phosphate Study Ready For Review


By MICHAEL KELLY
Of The Herald-Advocate
The U.S. Army Corps of
Engineers has completed its
draft areawide impact study on
the effects of past, present and
future phosphate mining in the
Central Florida Phosphate


AERIAL AMBITION


District.
The district is comprised of
1.32 million acres, or 2,100
square miles, in Hardee, Hills-
borough, Manatee, Polk, Sara-
sota and DeSoto counties.
The primary federal interest
in the proposed mining opera-


tions concerns the discharge of
dredged or fill material into
waters of the United States,
including jurisdictional wet-
lands. When viewed collective-
ly, the Corps said, the separate
mining projects have similari-
ties that provide a basis for


By MARIA TRUJILLO
For The Herald-Advocate
With every end of the aca-
demic year comes a variety of
award ceremonies and honors.
On Thursday of last week,
the 2012 Senior Honors & Hall
of Fame Banquet was held at
the Hardee County Agri-Civic
Center.
It is here that the Hardee
County Education Foundation
Inc. inducts a new member into
the Hardee County Schools
Hall of Fame. To be nominated,
individuals must have attended
public school in Hardee County
and have made or be making a
significant contribution to their
professional fields and commu-
nities.
This year, artist Wayne Hovis
was awarded this great honor.
Hovis was born in Fred-
ericktown, Mo. He was one of
five children, four boys and one
girl.
When Hovis was 4, he and
his family moved to Michigan.


evaluating their environmental
consequences together in one
comprehensive impact state-
ment.
The Draft Areawide Envi-
ronmental Impact Statement is
intended to be sufficient in
scope to address federal, state


Then, after 10 years they decid-
ed to move to Florida to be
closer to family.
Hovis said Wauchula has
always been kind to him and his
family, and therefore his happi-
est times were here.
In his speech, Hovis endear-
ingly remembered his widowed
mother's goal for her five chil-
dren. It was to see them all
graduate high school. All five of
them went on to graduate from
college.
In high school, Hovis was
very active. He was a member
of Key Club, the editor-in-chief
of the yearbook staff, president
of the Student Council and
played varsity football. Al-
though he says he wasn't very
good at it, he enjoyed the cama-
raderie among the players. He
was also voted the male "Most
Likely To Succeed."
After graduation in 1954,
Hovis turned down an art schol-
arship and served five active
See ARTIST 2A4


and local requirements along
with environmental issues con-
cerning the proposed action and
permit reviews.
Two public meetings are
scheduled to brief the public on
the study's findings and to
encourage public comment on


PHOTO BY MARIA TRUJILLO
The sky is the limit for Hardee Senior High School's Class of 2012. Will they stretch to reach it? If Saturday's graduation ceremony was any indi-
cation, indeed they will! A total of 212 graduates walked across the stage and into the future that day.




City To Cash In On Property Liens


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
A half-dozen real estate
parcels and some obsolete
equipment are up for sale to
whoever wants to offer the city
a good price for them.
The Wauchula City Com-
mission Monday night agreed
to dispose of properties the city
has acquired through code
enforcement liens along with a
bucket truck, trailer and other



WEATHER
Q=DAIE iG LW B&AI
06/06 87 71 0.01
06/07 85 70 1.04
06/08 86 71 0.93
06/09 91 70 0.00
06110 93 72 0.15
,06111 92 68 0.00
06112 92 67 0.00
TOTAL Rainfall to 06/12/12 9.42
Same period last year 12.02
Ten Year Average 52.81
Source: Unv. of Fla. Ona Research Center

INDEX
Classifieds.....................6B
Community Calendar....3A
Courthouse Report.......4C
Crime Blotter...............11A
Hardee Living................2a
Information Roundup...3A
Obituaries...................4A



III 1 lll I
8 33913 00075 7


scrap materials taking up space
behind the Wastewater Treat-
ment Plant.
Properties include a matching
pair at 325 Melendy St... other
residential properties on North
Eighth Avenue. South Eighth
Avenue and Downing Place,
and a 44-acre industrial proper-
ty off U.S. 17 just south of the
city limits.
The adjacent properties on
Melendy Street are both non-



County


Restores


Order
By MICHAEL KELLY
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Hardee County Com-
mission took steps to restore
rules and order at its sessions
after previous meetings have
been continuously interrupted
by people in the audience.
Minor Bryant, chairman of
the commission, opened the
most recent County Commis-
sion meeting, held last Thurs-
day, by addressing what hap-
pened at the previous meeting.
In his absence, that meeting had
been chaired by Sue Birge.
-" think all of you either
watched it on the Internet or
was hear last Thursday." Bryant
See COUNTY 3A


conforming to zoning, and a
new owner would not be able to
continue that, so it would be
necessary to purchase both to
get a full lot on which a resi-
dence can be constructed,


explained City Manager Terry
Atchley. A dilapidated home on
one of the properties was to be
removed last week:
Both are zoned R-2 (single
family, residential, duplexes).


Together, they would offer
10,520 square feet on which a
home or duplex could be built
and still maintain the setbacks,
20 feet in front and rear and 10
See CITY 3A


the draft statement.
The first will be Tuesday at
the Lakeland Center, 70.1 W.
Lime St. in Lakeland, from 6 to
10 p.m. Two days later, June 21,
the Corps will hold an identical
meeting in Punta Gorda at the
Charlotte Harbor Event &
Conference Center located on
75 Taylor St., beginning at 6
p.m.
The Corps so far has re-
ceived 5,000 comments, both
positive and negative, from
3,000 submissions concerning
the direct and indirect impacts
of phosphate mining.
Concerns raised pertained to
the potential impacts of mining
on ecological and water
resources, including down-
stream reaches of affected
watersheds. Other comments
centered on the potential eco-
nomic ramifications to the
counties and overall study area
if the proposed applications
were not approved.
See PHOSPHATE 3A




Terrell


Latest


Candidate
4 Draw No Competition
By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
When the official qualifying
period for candidates seeking
Hardee County office came to a
close on Friday, only one new
name appeared.
John E. Terrell plunked down
$1,054.40 to add his name to
the roster running for School
Board District 2.
But in four of the total dozen
local offices up for grabs this
election year, only a single per-
son filed to run. That means
incumbent Property Appraiser
Kathy Crawford, Elections
Supervisor Jeff Ussery and
County Judge Jeff McKibben
have won re-election to another
term.
And Jacki Johnson, the only
bidder to replace incumbent Tax
Collector Zee Smith, who chose
.not to seek re-election, has won
See TERRELL 3A


PHOTO BY MACHELLE DOLLAR
Artist Wayne Hovis was inducted into the Hardee County
Schools Hall of Fame. He is pictured with Schools Super-
intendent David Durastanti as he hands Hovis his award.


Resthaven Issue

Put To Rest
... Story 3A


GRADUATION

KEEPSAKE

I INSIDE!


FNL Takes

Island Theme
... Story 8A


Artist Inducted Into



Schools Hall Of Fame











2A The Herald-Advocate, June 14, 2012


The Herald-Advocate
Hardee County's Hometown Coverage
JAMES R. KELLY
Publisher/Editor
CYNTHIA M. KRAHL
Managing Editor


JOAN M. SEAMAN
Sports Editor



115 S. Seventh Ave.
P.O. Box 338
Wauchula, FL 33873


RALPH HARRISON
Production Manager

NOEY DE SANTIAGO
SAsst. Prod. Manager

roN o J Phone: (863) 773-3255
Fax: (863) 773-0657


Published weekly on Thursday at Wauchula, Florida, by The Herald-Ad\ocate
Publishing Co. Inc Periodical Postage paid at U.S Post Office. Wauchula. FL
33873 and additional entry office (USPS 578-780). "Posumaster," send address
changes to: The Herald-Advocate, PO Box 338. Wauchula, FL 33873.


[ DEADLINES:
Schools Thursday 5 p.m.
Hardee L ,ng Thursday 5 pnm.
General News Monday 5 p.m.
SAds Tuesday noon


SUBSCRIPTIONS:
Hardee County
6 months $21: I yr $39, 2 yrs. $75
Flonda
6 months $25; I )r $6, 2 yrs. $87
OuL of Slate
6 months $29; I yr. $52, 2 Trs $100


LETTERS:
The Herald-Advocate welcomes leners to the editor on matters of public
interest. Lenters should be brief, and must be wnlleo in good taste, signed
and include a daytimer phone number.
SUBMISSIONS:
Press releases on community makers are welcome. Submissions should be
typed. double-spaced and adhere to the abose deadhnes. All items are sub-
.eci to ediung.


Kelly's Column
By Jim


Regular unleaded gasoline on Tuesday was $3.199 a gallon, as
the downward trend continues. This frees up some money that can
be spent elsewhere.

There have been several good rains lately, as hot summer
weather has arrived. Bowling Green has received about nine inch-
es of rain recently.

Congratulations to Rafael Nadal for winning his record sev-
enth men's French Open tennis tournament on Monday.
Congratulations to Maria Sharapova, the 6-2 Russian beauty
who won her first women's French Open tennis title.
My first tennis hero was. Pancho Gonzalez. Some other
favorites include Rod Laver, Bjorn Borg, Jimmy Connors, John
McEnroe, Chris Evert, Pete Sampras, and Roger Federer.

Congratulations to the 2012 high school and college graduates.
May you have a great life. Life can.be challenging but rewarding.
Many people have overcome failures and setbacks to become suc-
cessful, however you define success.
Many people have several jobs or careers during their life.
Some people become waylaid for awhile some permanently -
by bad choices and decisions.
I remember UF football coaches telling summer camp high
school players to "do the right thing." I felt that was good advice.
Former British Prime Minister Winston Churchhill once told a
graduating class to "never, ever give up." Making the world a bet-
ter place because we are in it sounds like a good idea, to help oth-
ers, etc.

Congratulations to Wisconsin Gov.. Scott Walker, a
Republican, for keeping his job in last week's recall election, by a
53 to 46 percent margin approximately. He is working to cut run-
away government spending, and some people don't like it.

Father's Day is Sunday. I had a good father and mother. Not
everyone is that fortunate. I have heard that a child's relationship
with his father and mother are very important but at some point a
child grows up and is responsible for his or her life. Bad parenting
can harm a child, and good parenting can help a child greatly.
Certainly, our choices influence our lives, which often are a work
in progress.

Bill Shackelford, son of Gerald and Dee Shackelford, is a stu-
dent manager of the FSU baseball team and will accompany the
Seminoles this week to the College World Series in Omaha,
Nebraska. He is majoring in sports management and wilt also be
able to see some of the World Olympics this summer in London,
England.

The UF Gators will also be among the eight teams in the
College World Series. The Seminoles and Gators will be seeking
their first national baseball title.

Mote Marine Laboratory based in Sarasota sent a mobile
exhibit to the Hardee County Library Monday. They have 1,600
volunteers who must attend 15 classes.
The sea turtle nesting season is May through September. So
far, from Longboat Key south 37 miles to Venice, there have been
over 500 nests marked, twice as many as last year to date, said vol-
unteer Diane McKissick. These are loggerhead turtles, which gen-
erally lay about 100 to 120 eggs at a time. Some nest several times
during the season and then wait three to five years.
Green turtles and Kemp-Ridley turtles generally nest further
south, she said. Sea turtles also nest along Florida's East Coast,
including the leatherbacks which like the deeper Atlantic Ocean
waters.
Mote Marine also has facilities in the Florida Keys and does
research on many forms of sea life, including sharks, manatees, sea
turtles, stingrays and seahorses.

As of last week Hardee County had 12,063 registered voters,
including 6,130 Democrats, 4,277 Republicans, and 1,656 other,
reported Supervisor of Elections Jeff Ussery.

The State of Florida is helping out again this year for back-to-
school shopping with a sales tax holiday Aug. 3-5. The sales tax
exemption applies to eligible items of clothing selling for $75 or
less and to each eligible school supply item selling for $15 or less.
There is no limit to how many items are sold on the same invoice
to a customer. Sales tax in Hardee is 7 percent.

In April and May Palm Beach County in Florida was the main
producer of sweet corn east of the Mississippi River. The county
has 20,000 acres of sweet corn with a value of about $100 million,
or $5,000 an acre.
The packing houses are located within three miles of Belle
Glade, reports Florida Farm Bureau. Palm Beach is the No. 1 coun-
ty in the U.S. in sweet corn production, said Paul Allen, a grower
and president of the Florida Sweet Corn Exchange, which sells to
grocery chains across America.


PHOTO BY MACHELLE DOLLAR
Hall of Fame inductee Wayne Hovis with family. As he introduced them to the audience, he couldn't help but choke
back tears. He has been married to wife Evelyn for 37 years. Together they have three children and six grandchildren.
Most of Hovis family showed up in support of their patriarch.


COURTESY PHOTO
After being asked to design
the commemorative license
plate for the Challenger, it
was decided he had done
such great work that Hovis
was awarded the Ambassa-
dor Award from the Astro-
nauts Memorial Foundation.


years in the U.S. Navy, ending
his tour of duty in Washington,
D.C.
It was then he dedicated'the
next 10 years attending George
Washington University, Cath-
olic University of America, and
'the. National Art School. He
also took the "Famous Art
Course" while working in a
large commercial art studio.
Upon finishing his studies he
moved to Orlando, where he
opened a commercial art studio.
He eventually went on to
employ up to six artists.
Hovis became very success-
ful in his career, gaining major
clients such as Walt Disney
World, Regal Marine, Harcourt
Publishing, Scholastic Book
Fairs, Siemens-Westinghouse,
Wendy Pye Publishing (New
Zealand) and Universal Stud-
ios.


Letter To Editor

Some Letters To Editor

Writers Are Antagonists


Dear Editor:
Certain letters to the editor
have been an interesting study in
human behavior. They all follow
a pattern: smokescreens; ram-
bling; and a hidden agenda. This
pattern is consistent with antag-
onists. The ultimate objective of
an antagonist is control, pure
and simple, which is their hid-
den agenda.
The types of smokescreens
that I have seen in the letters to
the editor, and unwelcomed
emails, that have been directed
toward our Hardee County gov-
ernment officials include:
unsupported accusations of a


corrupt government, hiding
expenses, name calling, half-
truths, and general statements
without facts or specifics.
I believe that the overwhelm-
ing majority of Hardee County
residents see through these
smokescreens, and their voices
will be heard. Most Hardee
County residents actually prac-
tice their faith and try to live a's
stated in Romans 12:18, "Do
everything possible on your
part to live in peace with every-
body," TEV.

Rev. Dr. DeWayne Wyatt
Wauchula


Hardee County 8th, 9th and 10th graders recently beat the state
average on End of Course Exam results for Algebra 1, reports
Superintendent of Schools David Durastanti.
One-hundred percent of Hardee 8th graders scored a profi-
ciency achievement level compared to the statewide average of 86
percent.
Hardee 9th graders had an average score of 56 percent, com-
.pared to 48 percent statewide. Scores for nearby counties included
Glades, 40 percent; Hendry, 41 percent; Polk, 44 percent;
Okeechobee, 47 percent; and DeSoto, 51 percent, said Durastanti.
HHS 10th graders.had an average score of 30 percent, com-
pared with 25 percent statewide. Polk County scored 14 percent,
Hendry, 22 percent, and Okeechobee, 24 percent.
"The Algebra I End of Course results are another positive suc-
cess for Hardee Junior High and Hardee Senior High," said
Durastanti.
Considering Hardee is small, rural, and agricultural and also
considering our population mix, educational and per capital income
levels, I would not expect Hardee students to consistently be at or
higher than state levels in comparative test scores. We can only try
and continue to work on weak areas.

The Hardee Economic Development Authority has awarded
$400,000 to Peace River Explorations to renovate the north half of
the old train depot in Wauchula.
The Wauchula Community Redevelopment Agency last year
awarded $30,000 to help develop the Madison Salon to change a
one-story building into a two-story building, with two nice apart-
ments upstairs and a beauty salon below, at 117 North 7th Ave. The
CRA was created in 1997 to help eliminate blight and promote
redevelopment and businesses.
Last year the CRA received $202,649 from the city of
Wauchula and $318,534 from Hardee County, down 18 percent
from a year ago due to lower property values, The CRA covers 75
percent.of the city, reported executive director Jessica Newman.

The U.S. needs to focus on manufacturing jobs, reports Jim
Rogers, CEO of Duke Energy. The old dogma of let China and
other low labor cost countries do manufacturing and the U.S. con-
centrate on service jobs is not valid, he says.
American manufacturing is not a relic of the past but a vital
element of a prosperous U.S. future, he told the North Carolina
Chamber of Commerce in 2011. He said industry, government,
labor and academia need to work together with a common purpose
to fuel our innovation, rebuild our industrial communities and
ensure our international competitiveness to make more labels that
say "Made in the USA."


ARTIST ,
Continued From 1A
He was also called, to
redesign the Florida license
plate which commemorates the
crash of the Challenger by the
Astronaut Memorial Board. He
made a mockup of the original
design which still hangs in the
Challenger memorial building
in Cocoa.
For his outstanding work,
Hovis and his wife, Evelyn,
attended a grand banquet in
Cocoa honoring the fallen
astronauts, and even sat at a
table with the parents of one of
the female astronauts and oth-
ers.
After several years of com-
mercial success, Hovis moved
-on to focus on "traditional"
paintings. He now paints land-
scapes, wildlife, horses, cow-
boys and portraits. He works
with oils, watercolors., acrylics
and gouache.
Although Hovis' work brings
him great joy, his family is
something he is most certainly
proud of. He has been married
for 37 years to a woman he calls
his best friend, Evelyn. Togeth-
er they have three children hn and
six grandchildren, most of


whom attended the banquet..
Hovis was humbled and
thankful for being inducted. He
stated he never could have
guessed his art, which started in
Wauchula when he was work-
ing on the yearbook staff,
would bring him right back to
the beginning.
While speaking to the atten-
tive room, Hovis at times could
not contain his joy and appreci-
ation for being honored with
this award.
He also had a few.,words of
wisdom for the seniors. He
advised them by saying,
"Choose a career that brings
you happiness. God has given
everyone a talent, some even
more than one."
One of his paintings was also
on display during the banquet.
The painting, is of Heritage
Park in downtown Wauchula,
and he will present it to the
Education Foundation as soon
as he finishes it by adding more
people to the scene. The paint-
ing will then be auctioned off in
October, with the.proceeds
going in .tp~i benefit .ardee
County's schqpls. ...,.:,,


Your Business Could Appear Here!
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels.
At The Herald Advocate





The Herald-Advocate
Hardee County's Hometown Coverage

Will Be Closed In

Celebration of

Independence Day

on

Wednesday, July 4th





Newspapers Will Be Printed

And Available For Sale on

Tuesday, July 3

Because Of This Change
ALL ADVERTISING DEADLINES
Have feen Moved To Monday, July
2, At Noon

Please help us adhere to this early schedule
as we observe our nation's birthday.

ILI




YOUR BUSINESS COULD

APPEAR HERE TOO!!
Contact
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels

At The Herald Advocate
115 S. 7th Ave. Wauchula

773-3255


- I -rr -i--ii -------.-.-~


I I


I-







June 14, 2012. The Herald-Advocate 3A


PHOSPHATE
Continued From 1A


UNDERCLASSMEN AWARDS


The four specific areas of
concern listed in the draft are:
Ecological resources, includ-
ing the loss of wetlands and
mitigation of such losses.
Effects of phosphate mining
on groundwater quality and lev-
els, including potential cumula-
tive effects on regional aquifers,
especially associated with use
of the Floridan aquifer for
industrial water supply.
Effects of phosphate mining
on surface water quality and
quantity, including potential
effects on the flow of the Peace
and Myakka rivers and their
tributaries, and water deliveries
to the Charlotte Harbor estuary.
Regional economic effects,
both for the counties where pro-
posed mines are located and for
adjacent counties where indi-
rect or induced economic
effects are likely.
A total of seven rivers drain
the 1.32 million acres within the
study area: the Withlacoochee
River, Hillsborough River,
Alafia River, Little Manatee
River, Manatee River, Myakka
River and the Peace River.
Of the four currently pro-
posed new mines, three are pri- .
manly located within the Peace
River watershed and one is
located in the uppermost por-
tion of the Myakka River water-
shed.
The four proposed mines are
in the process of applying for a
Clean Water Act permit. ,
CF Industries is applying for
its South Pasture Extension.
This 7,513-acre extension is
scheduled to be mined from
2020 to 2033 and produce 3.5
million tons per year.
Reclamation will last an addi-
tional 10 years. The mine plan
will affect 1,423 acres of wet-
lands and 6.09 miles of streams.
Mosaic has three pending
applications, for its Ona Mine,
DeSoto Mine and the Wingate
Creek Mine.
The Ona Mine is 22,320
acres and is expected to pro-
duce six million tons of phos-
phate rock per year once it
begins production in 2020 and
lasting until 2050, with recla-
mation taking an additional 15
years. Mining the property
would impact 4,593 acres of.
wetlands, 20 percent of the
property, and 25.89 miles of
streams.
. The DeSoto Mine in the far
northwest porti6l'bf thatcouiri-


ty totals 18,287 acres. It is
anticipated to be mined from
2021 until 2037 and produce six
million tons annually. It will
affect 3,130 acres of wetlands
and 11.82 miles of streams.
The Wingate mine is 3,635
acres and will produce an esti-
mated 1.3 million tons per year
from 2019 to 2046. It will
impact 778 acres of wetlands
and 5.11 miles of streams.
The Draft Areawide Envir-
onmental Impact Statement was
released to the public and regu-
latory agencies on June 1. A
public comment period will
remain open for 45 days,
through July 15.
Interested parties are invited
to participate in the study
process.
A website (www.phospha-
teaeis.org) was developed to
provide the public with access
to key documents, announce-
ments, background information,
and a means for submitting
comments and requesting spe-
cific information.



COUNTY
Continued From 1A
said. "Things kind of got out of
hand and we want to stop that."
Bryant said the citizens of
Hardee County have the right to
have order in their board meet-
ings.
"If a little old lady or a child
wants to come to our meeting, I
think they need to feel safe and
won't hear inappropriate lan-
guage or see inappropriate
actions," he said.
"We have been lax on rules,
and we are going to tighten up a
little bit," he said.
Bryant then pointed out that
Sheriff Arnold Lanier and Maj.
Randy Dey were on hand to
keep order in the meetings.
"We are going to forewarn
you," he said. "Don't get up.and
talk. Don't leave your seat and
walk to the podium unless you
are recognized by the chair.
"This is your warning," he
noted.
"You will not be warned
again, and they (sheriff's repre-
sentatives) will take appropriate
actions," Bryant said.
Bryant then opened the meet-
ing and it lasted more than four
hours with no interruptions or
outbuists.


SBowling Green Will

SImprove Water System

By JIM KELLY $5,300, to be matched by the
Of The Herald-Advocate city. The county council has a
The Bowling Green City balance of about $150,000.
Commission on May 21 Conerly said the state has ten-
approved spending $143,373 tatively approved on the five-
for waterline installations on year plan a sidewalk on Mason
Palmetto St., Lynn St., Bryan Dixon Ave. instead of West
Ave. and Starke Avej, along Central Ave.
with modifications on original A mutual aid agreement
waterline work on Grape St. between the city, Hardee
and Jones St. County and Polk County was
The commission approved approved.
spending $10,975 for waterline There was a discussion of the
installation to replace the exist- personal to change the name of
ing 10-inch waterline adjacent Mason Dixon Ave. to Bertha
to the city's well field. Fulse Ave. Same Fite was
City Manager Jerry Conerly opposed, saying it would cost
was authorized to advertise for residents along the avenue
proposals to repair, repaint and money to change their driver's
maintain the city's two water license, mail, legal documents,
storage tanks. Maintenance is etc.
not grant funded, he said. The Charles Fulse and Lester
next state inspection of the Fulse said Mason Dixon is a
water tanks will be in 2013, racist name and shows there is
At the May 8 regular month- still a divide between black and
ly meeting the commission white residents. Some Hispanic
voted to grant a non-conform- residents and even a few black
ing use to property at 4517 and residents oppose the name
4525 Chester Ave., which is change.
zoned R-I rather than rezone Bertha Fulse was a long-time
the property. city resident who lived on Epps
The commission voted to Ave. and died recently at age
allow more than the current two .104.
options for garbage dumpster Some residents have pro-
pickup, based on customer posed a monument or plaque be
need.; made to honor Bertha Fulse
A motion was approved for instead of changing a street
'the county to be the lead agency name. Mayor Perry Knight
in post-storm debris disposal asked the city manager to find
and let the county handle the out what costs wguld be
paperwork with contractors and involved so the matter can be
FEMA. further discussed in the future.
The commission voted for a The commission approved a
three-year agreement between resolution to stop the sale of
the city, county and School candy-flavored smokeless
Board to fund operations of the tobacco in local retail stores
Hardee Recreation Complex. along with brightly colored
The city's share is five percent, tobacco packages that look like
or $7,700 for this year. Dee candy. This was requested by
Williams-Tafis wants the Candice Thomas and Jessie Igo
pmoney'kept in Bowling Green. of the Hardee County Health
Vice Mayor Shirley Tucker said Department. Wauchula, Zolfo
she has tried in recent years to Springs and the county are also
I create a Little League baseball asked to approve the resolution,
I team in the city. Tucker was said Thomas.
I appointed by the city as a liason The commission voted to
on behalf of the city, approve the civility proclama-
SConerly was appointed to be tion for city employees and
Sa member of the Hardee County officials to be courteous to each
Recreation Council which is other, customers and anyone
I funded by race track revenues, else they come in contact with
Bowling Green's portion is while representing the cty.


Mailed comments can be
sent to USACE Tampa
Regulatory Office, 10117
Princess Palm Dr., Suite 120,
Tampa, FL 33610.
The Corps can be contacted
by calling 813-769-7067.
The U.S. Army Corps of
Engineers will respond to writ-
ten comments received from the
public during finalization of the
Areawide Environmental Im-
pact Statement, which currently
is projected to occur during the
fall of 2012.
A Record of Decision based
on the statement is planned for
release in early 2013.
In its final action, the Corps
will issue permits, issue with
modifications, or deny the per-
mits for the proposed applica-
tions.


TERIELL

Continued From 1A
the job.
For 21 other hopefuls, the
race is on!
Clerk of Courts: This will be
a battle between Republicans
Dorothy A, Conerly and Vic-
toria L. Rogers. Incumbent
Hugh Bradley is retiring.
Sheriff: Incumbent Arnold
Lanier will face off against
Thomas E. Santarlas. Both men
are Republicans.
Schools Superintendent: In-
cumbent Republican David
Durastanti is challenged by
Democrat Richard L. Daggett.
County Commission District
1: Incumbent Democrat Minor
L. Bryant will take on three
competitors, Republicans Co-
lon L. Lambert and Donald E.
Samuels a and also Donny G.
Waters, who is running with no
party affiliation.
County Commission District
3: This will be a three-way
struggle among Republicans
Rick Knight and Gordon R.
Norris and no-party Charles R.
Dixon. Knight currently holds
the seat by gubernatorial ap-
pointment, replacing Terry
Atchley, who resigned to
become, the city of Wauchula's
city manager.
County Commission District
5: Incumbent Dale Johnson will
not run again. Wanting to fill his
spot are Republican Mike
Thompson, no-party, Loran
Cogburn and Democrat Perry T.
Knight, . '.-.
School Board District 2:
Incumbent Mildred C. Smith
faces challenges from Marilyn
B. Morris and John E. Terrell.
This is a non-partisan race.
School Board District 3:
Incumbent Teresa M. Crawford
will take on opponent Paula J.
Ortiz. Again, School Board
races are non-partisan.


Memory Mobile
Here Next Week
The Alzheimer's Associa-
tion's Memory Mobile will be
at Chatham Pointe, 338
Stenstrom Road, Wauchula,
or Tuesday and Wednesday
of next week from 9:30 a.m.
to 1:30 p.m.
Visitors can obtain a free
memory screening, informa-
tion of Alzheimer's disease
and caregiver concerns, or
talk with a program specialist
about their families' specific
needs.







THURSDAY, JUNE 14
VZolfo Springs Planning
& Zoning Board, Encino
hearing, Town Hall, 3210
U.S. 17 S., Zolfo Springs, 6
p.m.
VHardee County Planning
& Zoning Board, public hear-
ing, liquefied natural gas
facility, Room 102, Court-
house Annex I, 412 W.
Orange St., Wauchula, 6
p.m.

FRIDAY, JUNE 15
VHardee County Com-
mission, monthly workshop,
Room 102, Courthouse
Annex I, 412 W. Orange St.,
Wauchula, 8:30 a.m.

MONDAY, JUNE 18
VZolfo Springs Town
Commission, regular meet-
ing, Town Hall, 3210 U.S. 17
S., Zolfo Springs, 6 p.m.


PHOTO BY MACHELLE DOLLAR
Hardee Senior High School held its Underclassmen Awards ceremony on May 15. The
National Honor Society Award went to Cleston Sanders and Kaylee Mancillas. The two
were presented with the award by National Honor Society sponsor Ninfa Skipper.




CnY Commission Silences
Continued From 1A vr n O A llo ,
Huirricane Alle atioins


feet on the sides.
The property at 513 N.
Eighth Ave. is also zoned R-2
and would require the same set-
backs. The lot is 10,350 square
feet and maximum lot coverage
for a building is 40 percent.
The property at 711 S. Eighth
Ave. is only 5,297 square feet,
making it a non-conforming lot
which would require a variance
for development. It is zoned R-
2.
The property at 1173
Downing Circle is in the Davis
& Roberts Subdivision, current-
ly zoned R-4-Manufactured
Home Park. Mobile: homes
placed there cannot be more
than five years old when placed,
are required to be skirted and
must be at least 24 feet by 48
feet. The lot' is 6,000 square
feet, and someone placing a
mobile home there also has to
meet other subdivision restric-
tions.
The final property was origi-
nally considered for a leacheate
field, but the city ended up
making other plans. The 44-
acre property is zoned 1-2-
Heavy Industrial. Information
on permitted uses and develop-
ment can be provided by the
county Planning Department at
773-3236. -
The city will put all proper-
ties on its website, and keep
them there until appropriate
bids are made for each of them.
For more information, contact
Olivia Minshew, city planning
director, or Atchley at their
offices at 127 S. Seventh Ave.;
phone 773-3131.
Also heard Monday evening
were final negotiations with
Roy Brown to settle the foreclo-
sure judgment of over $14,000
approved by the Hardee County
Circuit Court in late April.
Brown's property at 735 S.
Sixth Ave. (U. S. 17 South) was
first cited in 2003, but fines
remained unpaid.
Brown settled the matter by
paying the negotiated amount
of $7,014.66 that very night.
The city's code enforcement
case log shows 14 other proper-
ties on which code liens are
pending or where owners are in
the process of compliance to
remove liens.
There are five others either
awaiting probate issues or pos-
sible remedy of the code viola-
tions.
Since early 2012, there are 22
properties which have been
cited and awaiting compliance.
Once past the compliance dead-
line, further action to be taken.
Properties can be cited' for
structural, minimum mainte-
nance, life/safety and other vio-
lations. Each is given a notice
of action to be taken and time
limits.
During the discussion in the
commission's monthly work-
shop on June 4, city attorney
Cliff Abl'es said the Code
Enforcement Board tries every
avenue to work with residents
and businesses which are in
violation. He noted one woman
with a two-story home did all
the work herself and took over
two years to complete it, but'
came quarterly to report her
progress to the Code Board.
As long as people are work-
ing to resolve the issues and
making some headway, the
board wants to cooperate with
then, said Ables. It is the peo-
ple who just refuse to comply
and make no effort to keep in
touch that are a problem, he
added.

An aardvark's teeth have no
enamel coating and are
worn away and regrown
continuously.


.LAl f I CCUC5 gL ACACI"I'/ 4'U.I'a


By MICHAEL KELLY
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Hardee County Com-
mission voted 4-1 to no longer
discuss allegations that keep
resurfacing about hurricane
repairs from 2004 and how
insurance money was dispensed
directly to a contractor instead
of coming through the county.
Chairman Minor Bryant
introduced the idea, and said the
issues that keep coming back up
over and over again have been
discussed enough and need to
be put to rest.
Sue Birge made a motion and
it was seconded by Rick Knight
before a lengthy discussion
ensued.
Grady Johnson, who voted
against the measure, objected to
the motion and said he felt the
issues never have been properly
addressed and put to rest.
Knight said the motion
would not keep the topic from
being discussed again if any
new information becomes
available.
After several citizens shared
their opinions, Clerk of Courts
B. Hugh:Bradley addressed the
commission. Bradley said he
debated whether to get up aid'
speak before doing so.
"Money was diverted and did
not come through the county
coffers," he said. "I think it was
done on purpose."
Bradley said two payments
from insurance companies
totaling, more than $1 million
were paid directly to the' con-
tractors that did the work,
instead of the county receiving
the money and then paying the
bill.
As the clerk and accountant
for the commission, Bradley
said he should receive and dis-
perse all funds. After learning
the money was, never deposited
into the county coffers and then
dispersed to the vendors,
Bradley contacted the State
Attorney's Office to investigate
the matter.
He would not say how he
found out about the payments
except that someone tipped him
off.
"Money was diverted, and in
my opinion it was never intend-
ed to be discovered," Bradley
said. I
The state attorney did inves-
tigate the transactions in 2005
by subpoenaing the insurance
company's records, and ulti-
mately did not file any charges.
Commissioner Dale Johnson
said he had served on the board
for seven years and asked
Bradley why he is 'just now
bringing it before the commis-
sion. He then asked County
Manager Lex Albritton to
address the. allegations.
Albritton started by saying
he has served as manager for 11

Thirty-five percent of the
people who use personal
ads for dating are already
married.


years, and said'no one, includ-
ing Bradley, has ever asked him
about it except four of the cui-
rent commissioners.
"I have an open-door poli-
cy," he said. "I have never
refused to talk to anyone."
Albritton said he authorized
former county employee Doug
Knight to sign off on the invoic-
es so they could be paid direct-
ly from the insurance company.
He said the.work was done
by Serve Pro and was for emer-
gency services of drying out
buildings, getting rid of mold
and improving air quality in the
buildings after several hurri-
canes.
Albritton said when the State
Attorney's 'Office was investi-
gating the matter, Serve Pro
said it was common industry
standard for emergency service
providers to deal directly with
insurance companies for pay-
ment.
Albritton said when the State
Attorney's Office looked into
the payments in 2005, the
statute of limitations- had not
passed and nothing was found.
He said the State Attorney's
Office did not subpoena any
County records or interview any
county staff during the investi-
gation.
"I made a mistake," Albritton
said. "But it was not a diversion
of money."
He said he talked to the
accountants about the issue, and
said there is nothing legally
wrong with the way it hap-
pened.
"What was wrong is I failed
to record the entry through your
staff (Bradley's) in the books,"
he said.
As a result, the income and
expenses where understated by
the amount of the payments
during the yearly audit. Once
discovered, it was corrected.
"The belief that money has
gone to some shell company
and then divided and returned
to the employee and myself is
pure bull," Albritton sternly
told Bradley.
Bryant said he was sure some
mistakes were made during the
hurricanes and the aftermath of
cleanup and rebuilding that fol-
lowed.
"I am surprised that it came
out as well as it did," he said.
Bryant said the point of no
longer talking about the issue
was not to silence it or take
away a person's right to speak.
"It is putting it to bed and mov-
ing on to more important
things," he said:
"If it was a crime, it needs to
go to the state attorney," Bryant
'said. "If it's an ethics violation,
it needs to be an ethics com-
plaint, not brought to this
board."


It's estimated that over 3
million miles of dental floss
are purchased in North
America each year.


YOUR BUSINESS COULD

APPEAR HERE TOO!!
Contact '
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels

At The Herald Advocate

115 S. 7th Ave. Wauchula

773-3255






4A The Herald-Advocate, June 14, 2012


A."V.**r
AMPARO RUIZ-
HERNANDEZ
Amparo Ruiz-Henandez,
age 31, of Wauchula passed
away June. 6, 2012. She was
born August 12, 1980, in La
Paz, Mexico, and moved to
Hardee County sixteen years
ago.
She is survived by her hus-
band, Feliciano Hernandez-
Martinez; three sons, Huleces
Hernandez-Ruiz, Carlos Her-
nandez-Ruiz, and Felix Belen
Hernandez-Ruiz, all of Wau-
chula; one daughter, Nelly
Itzel Hernandez-Ruiz, also of
Wauchula; her parents,
Celerino Aurelio Ruiz-Zurita
and Florinfa Elvira Heman-
dez-Robles of Mexico; two
brothers, Berando Ruiz-Her-
nandez of Wauchula, and
Pablo Ruiz-Hernandez of
Mexico; and two sisters, Rosa
Robinos of Wauchula, and
Theresa Ruiz-Hernandez of
California.
Visitation was 6 to 8 p.m.
on Tuesday, June 12, 2012,
with a Rosary at 7 p.m. in the
Chapel of Ponger-Kays-
Grady Funeral Home, 404 W.
Palmetto St. in Wauchula.
Mass was held at 11 a.m.,
Wednesday, June 13, 2012, at
St. Michael Parrish on Heard
Bridge Road in Wauchula.
Burial will be in Mexico.
Ponger-Kays-Grady Fu-
neral Homes & Cremation
Service was entrusted with
the arrangements.
Online condolences can be
made at pongerkaysgrady.-
corn.
ePonges-'Kays-Qg ady
Funeral Home &
Cremation Services
Wauchula
'


Obituaries

CLARENCE J. BREMER
Clarence J. Bremer, 83, died
Tuesday, June 5, 2012, in
Arcadia.
He was bornm Nov. '27, 1928,
Sin Buffalo, N.Y., and moved to
Zolfo Springs 16 years ago
from Lockport, N.Y. He was of
the Catholic faith, and was
retired from General Motors.
He also served, in the U.S. Army
and toured during the Korean
War.
He was preceded in death by
his son, Frank Bremer, and his
parents, Clarence F. and Male
EaganrBremer.
He is survived by his wife,
Jeanne A.,Poole Bremer of
Zolfo Springs; three sons,Allan:
J. (Robin) Bremer of Okla-
homa, Daniel J. (Kerry) Bremer
of Lockport, N.Y., and Brian J.
(Susan) Bremer of N. Ton-
awanda, N.Y.; two daughters,
Laurie J. (Ron) Cleary of
Eustis, and Barbe A. (Mike)
Bubar of Wilson, N.Y.; one sis-
ter, Gloria (Waite) Wittlinger of
Lockport, N.Y.; seven grand-
children and four great-grand-
children.
Funeral .services will be
Thursday, June 14, 2012, at
10:30 a.m. at Sarasota National
Cemetery, 9810: St. Hwy. 72,
Sarasota, with the Rev. Ellis.
Cross officiating; and full'mili-
tary honors presented by the
U,S. Army Honor Guard.
In lieu of flowers, the family
requests donations to the
American Cancer Society, 1100
Ireland Way, Suite 300,
Birmingham, AL 35205
Arrangements by Ponger-
Kays-Grady Funeral Homes.


PAM GOURLEY
Pam Gourley, 60, of Avon
Park, died on Tuesday, June 5,
2012, in Winter Park.
She was born in Avon Park.
She was a substitute teacher for
Highlands County Schools for
30 years. She attended the Avon
Park Lakes Baptist Church and.
had been a lifelong resident of
Avon Park.
She is survived by her hus-
band of 38 years, David
Gourley of Avon Park; daugh-
ters, Natalie Massey and hus-
band Kenny of Avon Park, and
Melanie Gourley of Orlando:
-i'; s -5-rad :,i^ .Rydad. w.ife.-
.flisa of Berwick, MNqine, sisters
Rita Burby of Orlando, and Pia
Friend, and husband Pat of
Atchison, Kan.; grandchildren,
K.J. Massey and Grayson
Gourley.,
A memorial service was held
on Saturday, June 9, 2012, at 4
p.m. at the Avon Park Lakes
Baptist Church with the Rev.
George Hall officiating.
Memorial contributions may be
made to the Highlands County
Humane Society, 7321 Hay-
wood Taylor Blvd., Sebring, FL
33876. Stephenson-Nelson
Funeral Home, Avon Park, in
charge of arrangements.


Thank you Hardee County for

part of this community.

If you currently have your prearrangements
made, we would like for you to know that
we accept most other company's plans. If
you don't, we would be happy to meet with
you to discuss your options.

We feel planning yours or a loved one's
last wishes are of the utmost importance,
right down to the last detail.

Call our funeral home today.



Fn- F .smpei'al: i Hmes.
Funieril Hdmes


allowing us to be


404 W. Palmetto St. Wauchula
(863) 773-6400
PongerKaysGrady.com
614c


wnisue ro g
pines. He loved sitting on the "
porch with his beloved grand-
children, watching the -pine
trees dance in the wind.
Buck was preceded in

He is survived byhis lov-
ing family, sisters Leona Gay, ..
Madison, Fla., and Mary,
Frances Cantrell, Pinetta, T
Fla.; children Donna Blair- RO BARTS
Hernandez (Larry), Rhonda D
Blair Schrenk (Mitch), Me- .
linda Blair Luce (Jean), Mic- .. B .
hael Edwin Blair (Angela),. FAMILY FUNERAL HOME
and Karen Blair Gordon
(Kendall); grandchildren
Kendall Gordon II (Jackie), A R sted Famil"Nam
Nicholas Gordon, George .
Mitchell Schrenk (Denise), Since 1906
Jamie Blair Gordon, Shea
Michael .Luce (Kristyney, "'
Blair Sims (Matt), Randall
Schrenk (Suzannah), Ryan
Blair, Rowland Blair, and
McKenzie Blair great-rand- a tional services* Pre-Planning. Cremation
children Blaine Jackson
Gordon and Marie D'Nae
Sims; and a host of nieces and Decisions This Important Deserve"Talking To Experienced Professionals.
nephews that adored their
Uncle Buck.
Memorial Service for the LocallyOwned and Operated, With Family Traditions That Span Four Generations and Over 100 Years.
Rev. Blair will be 2 p,m.
Thursday, Juhe 14, 2012, at
First United Methodist Outstanding Servicels Our Priority And Always Will Be. We Take Great Pride In Serving Our Community.
Church, Wauchula, with the
Rev. Danielle Upton officiat-
ing. Buck's final resting place Give Us A Call or Come By The Office To Speak With Our Professional Staff Members.
will be in Hickory Grove.
Donations may be made to
the American Cancer Society Our Family Will Always Be Here ForYou And Your Family In Your Time Of Need.
in memory of Buck.
ICS Cremation & j' .
Funerals Inc. ROBARTS FAMILY FUNERAL HOME, Inc. 529 West Main Street Wauchula, Florida 33873 863-773-9773
Harbour Heigth% Dennis R Robarts I President Summer S Robarts Vice President 6:14c


OBIT NOTICE


The Herald-Advocate publishes, at no charge, obit-

uaries marking the deaths of current or former

Hardee County residents. The obituary may include

occupation, church and club affiliations, military

service, special awards or honors and a list of sur-

vivors. Paid obituaries may take the place of our free

notices.

Forms for a free obituary are available at our of-

fice or at local funeral homes. Completed forms,

however, must be submitted through a funeral home.

We cannot accept forms from individuals.





Having A Choice,

Having Options...


GULDMAR J.
"BUCK" BLAIR
Guldmar Jackson Blair, 83,
passed away at his home in
Wauchula on Friday, June 8,
2012.
Buck, as known by his
friends, was born in Hickory
Grove, Florida, to Ed and
Mae Blair on July 23, 1928.
He was a farmer in Madison
County before being called
into the Ministry, where he
served as a Methodist minis-
ter for over 40 years.
Buck enjoyed gardening
and whatever Helen, his wife
for 56 years, asked him to do.
In his retirement years, he
spent most of his time listen-
ing to the southern wind
"whilctl" u thrinnh the tall


I I I I I








June 14,2012. The Herald-Advocate 5A


When
Do you know how much you
are paying in interest every
month on your credit cards, auto
loan and mortgage'? The answer
may come as a surprise; there-
fore, it could be in your best
interest to learn more about low-
ering your interest rates.
Many people do not realize
how much interest adds to their
monthly payments and how that
amount can slow down the rate
at which they are paying off a
debt. On average, people can
spend about a third of their
annual income on unnecessary
high interest rates associated


LEON J. COKER
Leon J. Coker, age 91, of
Arcadia, Fla., passed away
Saturday, June 9, 2012, at
home surrounded by his lov-
ing family. He was born May
12, 1921, in Lily, Fla., and
was a lifetime resident of
Arcadia. He was of the
Baptist faith.
Leon was a custom cabinet
maker and worked many
years for Christ Building and
Supply Co. Leon joined the
Army National Guard of
Florida in 1939. While
assigned for training at Fort
Benning, Ga., his superiors
recognized that he was an
excellent marksman with the
standard issue rifle. He was
subsequently kept at Fort
Benning and assigned as a
rifle instructor for many
incoming recruit classes.
Leon served our country in
the United States Army and
did several tours in Europe
during World War II, where
he was wounded twice. He
received numerous medals to
include two Purple Hearts
with Oak Leaf, Crois De
Guerre, American Defense
Service Medal, EAMlTO
Medal, Good Conduct Medal,
Distinguished Unit Badge
GO 53, and Bronze Star
Medal. He was Honorably
Discharged as Staff Sergeant.
Leon loved his family, life,
the outdoors; enjoyed hunting
with friends and son Steve in
the Everglades and in the sur-
rounding countryside of
Arcadia, fishing, camping,
gardening, bird watching and
telling tall tales! He was a
member of the Peace River
VFW Post 2824 and Elks
Lodge No. 1524.
Leon was loved and adored
by his family and friends and
will be greatly missed by all.
He is survived by one son,
Steve D. (Terri) Coker of
Dorr, Mich.; two daughters,
Lorelei C. Jackson of Ar-
cadia,'Fla., and Leah M.
(Rodney) Overman of Long-
view, Texas; son-in-law
David Noel of Indianola,
Iowa; brother Carl Coker of
Wauchula, Fla.; sisters Vida
Mae McGrady of Davenport,
Fla., and Willie Redman of
Plant City, Fla.; thirteen
grandchildren, twelve great-
grandchildren, three great-
great grandchildren, and
numerous nieces and
nephews.
He was preceded in death
by his beloved wife, Opal
Vick Coker; daughter Shelia
Coker Noel; and parents
Wesley M. and Tonnie E.
Coker.
A visitation was held
Wednesday, June 13, 2012,
from 10 a.m. until 11 a.m. at
the chapel of Ponger-Kays-
Grady Funeral Homes, 50 N.
Hillsborough Ave., Arcadia.
Funeral services followed the
visitation at 11 a.m. at the
chapel, with the Rev. Ellis
Cross officiating. Burial was
at Lily Cemetery, with the
U.S. Army Honor Guard pre-
senting the colors.
Arrangements were han-
dled by Ponger-Kays-Grady
Funeral Homes.
Online condolences can be
made at pongerkaysgrady.-
com.
CPongek-Kctays-g tadt
Funeral Home &
Cremation Services
Arcadia


It Makes Sense
with their monthly bills, simply
because they are unaware that
better options are available.
One way to save money is to
refinance with a company that
offers you a lower interest rate.
In the case of credit cards, you
can consolidate several cards
into one lower interest payment.
The best way to get started is to
do a little homework by re-
searching interest rates, then
compare how the rates vary.
Do Your Homework
To learn more about refinancing
options, consider these helpful
tips:
Check out and compare
interest rates to see what compa-
nies are offering. Much of this
information can be found
online. Taking the time to do
your homework can really pay
off, as some lenders offer rates
that are dramatically lower than
the national average.
Check your local paper for
major interest rate fluctuations.
Ask about closing costs. If
you are ready to refinance, be
sure to ask about closing costs,
as these can add to your total
debt.
Inquire about fees. When


JAMES R. "RON"
BRYANT JR.
James Ronald "Ron"
Bryant Jr., age 47, of Fort
Meade passed away June 5,
2012, in Lakeland. Ron and
his wife, Sandy, are the own-
ers of Sandy's Big Tree
Produce in Wauchula.
Ron loved life and loved
his grandchildren with all his
heart. He also worked as a
driver for Suburban Propane.
He is survived by his
beloved wife, Sandy Bryant;
daughter Rhonda (Russell)
Long of Zolfo Springs; sons
John (Patricia) Sines Jr and
Sammie (Jennifer) Sines, all
of Virginia; ten grandchil-
dren; his parents,. James and
Joan Bryant; one brother,
Larry Bryant; one sister,
Belinda Snow; four nieces
and two nephews.
Memorial services were at
10 a.m. Saturday, June 9,
2012, at First Baptist Church
in Zolfo Springs.
Ponger-Kays-Grady Fu-
neral Homes & Cremation
Service was entrusted with
the arrangements.
Online condolences can be
made at pongerkaysgrady.-
com.
CPolngeA-Kaysg-Qkxad
Funeral Home &
Cremation Services
Arcadia


To Refinance Your Life


refinancing, ask about fees-you
may be surprised by how much
fees can vary!
Take advantage of dis-
counts, promotions or incen-
tives. Check into companies
that offer a discount for apply-
ing online, such as Pentagon
Federal Credit Union (PenFed).

Why PenFed?
A fiscally sound, member-
owned credit union that has
been lending for over 75 years,
PenFed offers interest rates that
are substantially lower than
those the average person can
get from commercial banks.
especially if you apply online.
PenFed takes pride in serving
over a million members, both
civilian and military, world-
wide. There are over 100 ways
to join PenFed,.and you too can
take advantage of its exception-
al rates and member-first serv-
ice!
Refinance Your Life
Here are just a few of the ways
you can use PenFed's refinanc-
ing options to lower your debt
payments:
Mortgage: You could save on
your home finance charges by
getting an adjustable mortgage.
The credit union delivers a
finance rate that is fixed for five
years. The initial rate can
change every five years by no
more than two percentage
points, up or down, never to
exceed five percentage points
above the initial rate.
Credit Cards: You can con-.
solidate and refinance credit
cards at a lower rate. One con-
solidated payment with a lower
interest rate could be lower than


IN THE.CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA GENERAL
JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO.: 25-2009-CA-000147
BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.,
Plaintiff,
vs.


CINDY OCASIO, et. al.
Defendants.


JAYLEN JAMES
GRANT
Jaylen James Grant, infant
son of Hannah Marshall and
James Grant, passed away
Tuesday, May 22, 2012, in
Sebring, Florida.
He is survived by his mo-
ther and father, Hannah
Marshall and James Grant;
one sister, Aniyah Knighten;
maternal grandparents Bill
Marshall and Lee (Todd)
Wooten; and paternal grand-
parents Eileen (Woodrow)
Robinson and James Rine-
hart.
Services were at 2 p.m. on
Saturday, May 26, 2012,
graveside in Wauchula City
Cemetery with Pastor Danny
Tucker and Pastor Danielle
Upton officiating.
Ponger-Kays-Grady Fu-
neral Homes & Cremation
Service was entrusted with
the arrangements.
Online condolences can be
made at pongerkaysgrady.-
com.
Pongek- 0oys-irady
Funeral Home &
Cremation Services
Wauchula


I '3


this 11 day of June,


Dated
2012.


B. Hugh Bradley
As Clerk of the Court
By: Connie Coker
As Deputy Clerk
If you are a person with a disabil-
ity who needs any accommoda-
tion in order to participate in this
proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Please con-'
tact the Office of the Court
Administrator, (863) 534-4690, at
least 7 days before your sched-
uled court appearance, or Imme-
diately upon receiving this notifi-
cation if the time before the
scheduled appearance is less
than 7 days; (describe notice); If
you are hearing or voice
impaired, call TDD (863) 534-7777
or Florida Relay Service 711.
6:14,21c


one of your existing payments.
Auto Refinancing: Read the
fine print on your car loan note.
How much interest are you pay-
ing? It can really add up!
PenFed offers refinancing on
auto loans up to $70,000 at
attractive low rates. Refinanc-
ing is available for all car mod-
els, new or used.

Learn More
PenFed offers a diverse
selection of products and serv-
ices with built-in value that's
hard to beat; such as mortgages,
credit cards, auto loans, equity
loans, consolidation loans,
Money Market Certificates,
Money Market Savings. IRAs
and much more-including a
variety of insurance and invest-
ment-related products.
To learn more about PenFed
and membership eligibility,
visit www.PenFed.org/lower or
call (800) 247-5626.

Television is an Invention
that permits you to be en-
tertained in your living room
by people you wouldn't
have in your home.
-David Frost

Bent-wire clips appeared In
American offices as early
as 1867, but it was the
British-designed Gem
paper clip that took off and
is still produced by the bil-
lions.


Better Safety Standards

For Healthcare Workers


More than 5.6 million health-
care personnel in the U.S. are at
risk of occupational exposure to
blood-borne pathogens like HIV
and hepatitis C. Needlestick
injuries are sustained by 1,000
hospital employees alone each
day. Countless more injuries
occur in secondary-care facili-
ties or go unreported. The finan-
cial costs to test and treat
needlestick injuries exceed $1
billion a year, while the trauma
caused to the victims and their
loved ones is incalculable:
The federal government has
previously introduced needle-
stick safety legislation requiring
all U.S. healthcare facilities to
protect their personnel wherever
there is a risk of harm. Despite
some improvements. significant
challenges remain. For syringes
and needles, the reported num-
ber of annual needlestick in-
juries has remained largely sta-
ble, with safety products respon-
sible for the majority of inci-
dents. Many government agen-
cies and healthcare advocates
desire equipment with passive
(automatic) and fully integrated

The first ice cream parlor in
this country opened in New
York City in 1776. In 1845,


safety features that can virtually
eliminate the risk of harm. Such
preferred devices are rarely
available for use.
Safe in Common is leading a
Needlestick Safety Advocacy
Campaign to raise industry
awareness about delivering
optimal protection to all health-
care personnel at risk from such
injuries.
This year, Safe in Common
will visit more than 50 hospitals
and a dozen healthcare confer-
ences across 36 metropolitan
centers in the U.S. For more
information about the tour and
to sign a support pledge, visit
www.safeincommon.org/-
pledge.
Safe in Common Chairper-
son Mary Foley said, "Firemen
get fire-retardant clothing.
Police get bulletproof vests. But
healthcare personnel lack suffi-
cient protection from needle-
stick injuries as they go about
the daily business of enhancing
and saving the lives of their
patients. We believe that a
needlestick injury should be-a
never-ever event."

the hand-cranked freezer
was invented. This allowed
Americans to make ice
cream more easily at home.


NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC

The City of Wauchula Planning and Zoning Board will meet on Monday, June 18, 2012 at
5:30 p.m. in the Wauchula Commission Chambers located at 225 E Main St, Suite 105,
Wauchula. There will be a briefing on the Unified Land Development Code Update.
Any interested persons) will be heard at this meeting. If any person decides to appeal any
decision made by the Board with respect to this request for which he will need a verbatim
record of the proceedings, he will need to ensure that such verbatim record is made.

The City Commission of the City of Wauchula, Florida does not discriminate upon the basis
of any individual's disability status. This non-discriminatory policy involves every aspect
of the Commission's functions, including ones access to, participation, employment or
treatment in its.programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable accommodation as
provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26, Florida Statutes,
should contact the City Clerk at (863) 773-3131.

CITY OF WAUCHULA
Keith Nadaskay
Mayor

ATTEST:
Holly Smith
City Clerk
6:14c




Summer Is The Pefe ct Tie


To Correct A Lazy Eye



Robyn Russell, O.D.

One in four children has an
undiagnosed vision, problem
which can interfere with learning
and lead to academic and/or ,
behavioral problems. When vision
problems go undetected, children
almost invariably have trouble
reading and doing their schoolwork. They often
display fatigue, fidgeting, and frustrations in the
classroom-traits that can lead
to a misdiagnosis of dyslexia or,
other learning disabilities. Early
diagnosis and treatment of
children's vision problems is a
necessary component to school
readiness and academic learn-
ing. Comprehensive eye and
vision examinations ... are
*1 important for all children first
entering school and regularly
throughout their school-aged
years to ensure healthy eyes and adequate visual
skills essential for successful
academic achievement. Early
testing for vision problems B
is the key to preventing learn-
ing disabilities or, in some
cases, significant visual
impairment in children. .


MARK D. SEVIGNY, O.D.
C.N. TIMMERMAN, O.D.


SEVIGNY
ASSOCIATES
ffmss;a


RONALD O. SEVIGNY, O.D.
ROBYN RUSSELL, O.D.


6:14c


NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to a 'Final Judgment of
Foreclosure dated November 9,
2011, and entered in 25-2009-CA-
000147, of the Circuit Court of the
Tenth Judicial Circuit in and for
Hardee County, Florida, wherein
BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., is the
Plaintiff and CINDY OCASIO;
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF CINDY
OCASIO N/K/A DEVIN ROACH;
JOHN DOE N/K/A FREDDIE
CARLTON; JANE DOE N/K/A
DEENA CARLTON are the
Defendantss. B. Hugh Bradley as
the Clerk of the Circuit Court will
sell to the highest and best bidder
for cash at the 2nd Floor Hallway,
Outside of Room 202 417 W. Main
Street, Wauchula, FL 33873, at
11:00 a.m., on June 27, 2012, the
following described property as
set forth in said Final Judgment,
to wit:
S1/2 OF SE 1/4 OF NW 1/4
OF SE 1/4 OF SECTION 26,
TOWNSHIP 34 SOUTH,
RANGE 24 EAST, HARDEE
COUNTY FLORIDA;
TOGETHER WITH A PER-
PETUAL NON-EXCLUSIVE
EASEMENT FOR INGRESS
AND EGRESS ACROSS
THE EAST 15 FEET OF
THE E 1/2 OF THE NE 1/4
OF THE NW 1/4 OF SE 1/4
OF SECTION 26, TOWN-
SHIP 34 SOUTH, RANGE
24 EAST HARDEE COUN-
TY FLORIDA, AND A PER-
PETUAL EASEMENT FOR
INGRESS AND EGRESS
OVER AND ACROSS THE
EAST 40 FEET OF THE N
1/2 OF THE SE 1/4 OF NW
1/4 OF SE 1/4 OF SECTION
26, TOWNSHIP 34 SOUTH,
RANGE 24 EAST HARDEE
COUNTY FLORIDA.
Any person claiming an inter-
est in the surplus from the sale, If
any, othei than the .property
owner as of the date of the Lis
Pendens must file a claim within
60 days after the sale.


735 N. 6th Avenue Wauchula


863-773-3322







6A The Herald-Advocate, June 14, 2012


By MARIA TRUJILLO
For The Herald-Advocate
Seventy-two seniors -were
recognized last Thursday for all
of their hard work throughout
their high school careers.
The annual Senior Honors &
Hall of Fame Banquet was held
at the Hardee County Agri-
Civic Center in Wauchula.
The program began with Dr.
Michele Polk, principal at
Hardee Senior High School,
welcoming the students and
their families. Then, the Air
Force Junior Reserve Officers
Training Corps presented the
flag and led the room into the
Pledge of Allegiance.
An invocation was given by
Hardee County School Board
member Paul Samuels.
Then Students were treated to
a lasagna dinner by Giovanni's
Main Street Kitchen. The meal
was served by members of the
National Honor Society.
After dinner Superintendent
of Schools David Durastanti


introduced this year's Teacher
of the Year, Col. Anthony
Hingle, and this year's Hall of
Fame inductee,'Wayne Hovis.
Durastanii went on to call
Hingle an outstanding guy.
Hingle then gave the students a
bit of inspiration and recalled a
few success stories of previous
graduates. He also went on to
tell the seniors, "You are in con-
trol of your destiny. You are in
control of your future."
Afterward, it was Hovis' turn
to impart words of wisdom onto
the honorees.
Then, Assistant. Principal
Mary Farr gave a short biogra-
phy on students as they shook
Durastanti and Polk's hands.
They then moved on to receive
their honors from Assistant
Principal Todd Durden,
Suzanne Stagg and Ninfa
Skipper.
Honorees in the Summa
Cum Laude group, with a
grade-point average of 4.5 or
higher, were Briana Albritton,


Brittany Dunlap, Jonathan
Heither, Daniel Hernandez,
Khao Hlee Lor, Anais Morillo,
Summer Palmer and Taylor
Pohl.
Those in 'the Magna Cum
Laude group, with a GPA
between 4.26 and 4.49, were
Danely Flores, Patience Hall,
James Rabon, Raquel Rosales,
Rebecca Torres and Savannah
Valdez.
The Cum Laude group, with
a GPA between 4.0 and 4.25,
included Kayla Austin, Dawson
Crawford, Kimberly Ellis,
Meghan Graham, Andrew
Hooks, JaJuan Hooks, Carter
Lambert, Celeste Limon, Tara
Miller, Ashley Nichols, Yesenia
Ortiz, Laura Rios, Korin
Roehm, Hailey Selph, Wintz
Terrell, Kailah White, Murrell
Winter and Brenda Zamora.
Honors graduates with a
GPA of 3.5 to 3.99 were
Savannah Albritton, Jacob
Altman, Colby Baker, Taylor
Bolin, Bobby-Resha Brown,


Monserrad Duran, Deonte
Evans, Dylan Farr, Mesqua
Fields, Antonio Galvan,
Reimundo Garcia, Gregory
Garza, Patricio Gomez-Molina,
Janet Guido, Jared Jernigan,
Justin Knight, Zoo Kue,
Devante Lang, Staci Macias
and Emma Marshall.
Also, Daniel Miller, Brenda
Miranda, Jessica Morris, Court-
ney Parks, Maribel Paz,
Krishele Puckett, Flor
Rodriguez, Sylvia Rodriguez,
Ledarius Sampson, Olivia
Sanchez, Marisela Santiago,
Austin Scheipsmeier, Dillon
Skitka, Lucero Suarez,
Adrianna Torres, Julian Varela,
Cynthia Villa, Chelsea Wallace,
Brandi Westberry and Jenna
Williams.
'In the end, the students
received their honors and were
ready for Saturday morning,
when they would be walking
across that stage and into their
future.


PHOTOS BY MACHELLE DOLLAR


Summa Cum Laude with a grade-point average of 4.5 and over.


Magna Cum Laude with a grade-point average between 4.26 and 4.49.
I .


Cum Laude with a grade-point average between 4.0 and 4.25.


Honors graduates with a grade-point average between 3.5 and 3.99.


The Squeezin's
By Barbara Carlton
Peace River Valley Citrus Growers


ONE ENDS, ANOTHER BEGINS
The 2011-12 citrus harvest is complete. Growers are sighing in
relief as another complicated season ends. Most guest worker
crews have returned to Mexico and harvesting equipment has
returned to the yard.
Yet, this ending is short lived as many industry activities now
begin.
During the summer months the groves will be a hub of activi-
ty as growers and local caretaking companies complete practices to
encourage fruit production and overall health, as well as pest and
disease control. Outside the groves, entities such as the Peace River
Valley Citrus Growers Association and the Florida Department of
Citrus are also:preparing for the coming season.
The Department of Citrus is in the process of setting its 2012-
13 budget and program plans. Growers will pay 23 cents per box
tax on oranges that will be processed into juice. Other tax rates are:
processed grapefruit 34 cents, oranges utilized in the fresh market
five cents, fresh grapefruit 34 cents and fresh specialty (tangerines)
14 cents.
The processed orange budget is $38 million of the total $50
million Department of Citrus budget. Its strategic initiatives are to
increase the relevance of orange juice and improve the price/value.
Staff intends to accomplish this by getting consumers to drink
orange juice every day by talking to loyalists while targeting non-
loyalists, which are categorized as younger families and future
pace setters.
Television spots are still the top performer for advertising pro-
grams, closely followed by Internet messaging. Messages on
lifestyle websites and social media such as Facebook, Twitter,
Pinterest and blogs are reaching the growing numbers of people
who use these media formats to make health, lifestyle and pur-
chasing decisions. Research has provided good news for grapefruit
lovers concerned about drug inactions, and they can be provided
helpful advice through these forms of media as they return to
enjoying their favorite fruit.
The Florida Citrus Conference is being held in Bonita Springs
through this Friday. Local growers are attending the conference for
meetings, presentations and simply to enjoy time with family and
friends in the industry celebrating the end of the harvest.
The Peace River Valley- Citrus Growers Association is also
preparing for the new crop season by revamping the communica-
tion efforts within the association. Recently, we have created a new
Facebook page, which allows members to receive updates, view
event photos and more. We welcome new friends to this venue,
through the "like" feature on PRVCGA's Facebopk page to expand
our audience.
Another popular website to utilize is Pinterest. We have creat-
ed an account with Pinterest where followers can repin citrus-
inspired recipes, photos, home d6cor ideas, etc. This website joins
the Florida Department of Citrus' site at pinterest.com/floridaoj to
promote Florida citrus.
QR codes are now being applied to all newsletters, e-mails,
orange doors and outgoing mail. Those with a barcode scanner
application on their smart phones can directly access the PRVCGA
website by scanning the code. Utilizing this technology will allow
local growers to see production guides, activities, education videos
and much more, as we keep pace with the growing sources of infor-
mation at a click of a button.


Pedantry is the unseason-
able ostentation of learning.
It may be discovered either


in the choice of a subject or
in the manner of treating it.
*-Samuel Johnson


1109 W. Main St. Avon Park, FL
Phone: (800)330-3145
24 Hr. Road Service (863)452-2031
Bigttire.net c15:31-6:28c



PUBLIC NOTICE

You are hereby notified that on Thursday, June 7, 2012,
upon public hearing, the Board of County Commissioners
of Hardee County, Florida, adopted a resolution vacating
and closing all Annette Road, Dr. Banks Road, Gibbs Road,
McCardle Road, Parker Road, Troy Smith Road and Ward
Road, legally described as:

The maintained right of way of Annette Road in its entirety
located in Section 11, Township 33 South, Range 25 East,
as shown in Plat Book 4, Page 105, also known as Plat Bar
82, Cabinet A, of the official records of Hardee County,
Florida

The maintained right of way of Dr. Banks Road in its en-
tirety located in Section 23, Township 33 S., Range 25 E.,
Hardee County, Florida, as recorded in Plat Book 4, Page
105, also known as Plat Bar 82, Cabinet A, of the official
records of Hardee County, Florida

The maintained right of way of Gibbs Road in its entirety
located in Section 12, Township 33 S., Range 25 E.,
Hardee County, Florida, as recorded in Plat Book 4, Page
105, also known as Plat Bar 82, Cabinet A, of the official
records of Hardee County, Florida

The maintained right of way of McCardle Road in its entirety
located in Section 14, Township 33 S., Range 25 E.,
Hardee County, Florida, as shown in Plat Book 4, Page
105, also known as Plat Bar 82, cabinet A., of the official
records of Hardee County, Florida

The maintained right of way of Parker Road in its entirety
being a part of Sections 5 and 6, Township 33 S., Range
26 E., Hardee County, Florida, as recorded in Plat book 4,
Page 105, also know as Plat Bar 82, Cabinet A, of the offi-
cial records of Hardee County, Florida

The maintained right of way of Troy Smith Road in its en-
tirety located in Section 12, Township 33 S., Range 25 E.,
Hardee County, Florida, as recorded in Plat Book 4, Page
105, also known as Plat Bar 82, Cabinet A, of the official
records of Hardee County, Florida

The maintained right of way of Ward Road in its entirety lo-
cated in Section 7, Township 33 S., Range 26 E., Hardee
County, Florida, as shown in Plat Book 4, Page 105, also
known as Plat Bar 82, cabinet A, of the official records of
Hardee County, Florida


Minor L. Bryant, Chairman
Board of County Commissioners
6:14c


Banquet Honors Top Graduates




June 14, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 7A
Celebrating a Successful School Year
at


ALANE


ACADE MY


Private


i
.I


A .7
b'ud


School


The 2011-2012 school year was monumental as Alane Academy celebrated
its very first year! We would like to personally thank the parents of our
students for their support. Our first year was a huge success; we
anticipate many more!
Thank you for trusting Alane Academy with your child's education.


www.alaneacademy.com


6:14p







8A The Herald-Advocate, June 14, 2012


Main Street Becomes An


Island Paradise For FNL


CLASSY COP


Main Street in Wauchula will
be an island destination for just
one night.
With the help of event partner
Wina-Dixie, Main Street Wau-
chula Inc. will be hosting an
island-themed Friday Night
Live this Friday from 6 to 9 p;m.
There will be a live steel-
drum band, survivor challenges
and multiple booths. Main
Street stores and restaurants will
be open for shopping and din-
,ing.
Watch as the youth groups
from local churches join in
friendly competition to see who
will be titled the "survivor" win-
ners. Youth groups will face
challenges that test endurance
and strength, with an island
twist.


They will receive additional
points for members of their
congregation attending Friday
Night Live as well as purchas-
ing items from downtown busi-
nesses. To help your youth
group win, check in at the Main
Street Wauchula tent. Your team
can also win additional points if
you bring receipts for items
purchased during Friday Night
Live hours to the Main Street
Wauchula tent. Come out to
support your youth group and to
see which team could survive
on a deserted island.
You can also enjoy some cool
treats at the new ice cieam shop
on Main Street or explore
downtown retail stores to
escape the summer sun. The
Caribbean Crew will be adding


to the tropical theme with steel
drums. There will also be a wet
inflatable for children, so dress
the kids in something that is
water friendly!
Families are sure to enjoy the
tropical vendor, :;d summer
theme. "My children love the
island theme; they can't wait to
go again this year," says
Christie, a regular Friday Night
Live attender. "I'm the most
excited for the Caribbean
music. The island themed
Friday Night Live is always a
family event for us."
Main Street will transform
into a tropical paradise. Grab
your most colorful Hawaiian
shirt and bring the entire fami-
ly!


COURTESY PHOTOS
Wauchula Elementary School welcomed a visitor recently. Ofc. Amy Drake from the
Wauchula Police Department went to the school to educate the first graders on
strangers and how to stay safe during the summer. The children learned ways to pro-
tect themselves.


HAWAIIAN PARTY


BOOK BATTLE'S BEST!


COURTESY PHOTO
Bowling Green Elementary School hosted a party with a Hawaiian theme on June 1.
This party was held to honor the volunteers who have helped the school in many ways
all year long. As a show of appreciation, each volunteer was given a small beach bag
and an assortment of treats. The volunteers (front, from left) were Don "The Elf"
Adams, Felix Bennett and Travis McClenithan; (back) Hardee County Schools
Superintendent David Durastanti, Judye Mercer, Gerald Allison, Missy Terry, Judy
Albritton, Betty Durastanti, Faye Williamson, Matt Hilligoss and David McClintock.

When we are no longer able to change a situation, we are challenged to change our-
selves.
-Victor Frankl


Notice of Availability of the Draft
Areawide Environmental Impact

Statement on Phosphate Mining

in the CFPD

Pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and U.S. Army Corps of
Engineers Regulation (33 CFR 230.11), this communication constitutes the Notice of
Availability of the Draft Areawide Environmental Impact Statement (AEIS) on
Phosphate Mining in the Central Florida Phosphate District (CFPD). The Draft AEIS is
downloadable from the AEIS project website at http://www.phosphateaeis.org. Printed
copies are available for review in the reference section of the following public libraries:
Mid-County Regional Library, Port Charlotte
Port Charlotte Public Library, Port Charlotte
Punta Gorda Public Library, Punta Gorda
DeSoto County Library, Arcadia
Hardee County Public Library, Wauchula
Bloomingdale Regional Library, Valrico
Bruton Memorial Library, Plant City
Central Library, Bradenton
Auburndale Public Library, Auburndale
Bartow Public Library, Bartow
Fort Meade Public Library, Fort Meade
Lakeland Public Library, Lakeland
Larry R. Jackson Library, Lakeland
Mulberry Public Library, Mulberry
'North Port Library, North Port
Two public meetings will be hosted by the USACE regarding the Draft AEIS:
June 19, 2012 at the Lakeland Center, 701 West Lime Street, Lakeland, FL 33815
June 21, 2012 at the Charlotte Harbor Event Center, 75 Taylor Street, Punta Gorda,
FL 33950
Registration will begin at 5:30 PM please arrive early. The meetings will begin at
6:30 PM. Information to be presented at the meetings will be the same; the public is
encouraged to attend either meeting. Each will consist of a brief presentation by the
USACE followed by an open house format discussion period. Anyone needing special
accommodations to attend these meetings, specifically pertaining to provisions of the
Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), can contact us at teamaeis@phosphateaeis.orq
for applicable arrangements.
Comments regarding the Draft AEIS must be submitted in writing by July 16, 2012.
Comments may be provided using the form on the website, by e-mail to
teamaeis(@phosphateaeis.orq, or by mail or commercial delivery services to the
USACE at the address shown below, Questions concerning the Draft AEIS should be
directed to John Fellows, 813-769-7067, or by e-mail to
iohn.D.fellows(ausace.armv.mil.


Draft AEIS Comments
USACE Tampa Regulatory Office
10117 Princess Palm Drive, Suite 120
Tampa, Florida 33610


6:14
6:14c :


COURTESY PHOTO
Wauchula Elementary School students recently participated in a fun and friendly com-
petition, the Battle of the Books. This battle occurs among elementary school students
who have read all 15 books on the Sunshine State Young Readers list. The schools
form teams, and compete against each other in a trivia competition. The winning team
was from WES. Members are (front, from left) Enrique Velasquez, Haven Gray, Dustin
Willis, Tony Webb, Matt Tyson and Carson Terrell. Posing with them are (back) Schools
Superintendent David Durastanti, Coach Mary Idsardi and Assistant Principal Jessica
Gray.


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$18,995
2005 CHEVROLET
SUBURBAN LT 4X4
Leather, 3rd Seat,
Dual Air, PW/PL
Stk.#C1403A
$16,995


2004 JEEP WRANGLER
RUBICON 4X4
6 cyl., 5-Speed, Air
Stk.#B1747B
$16,995
2007 DODGE
MAGNUM RT
Hemi, Leather, PW/PL,
Tilt/Cruise, CD
Stk.#B1429B
$16,995
2003 CHEVROLET
CORVETTE
CONVERTIBLE
Leather, Auto, Air, PW/PL,
Tilt/Cruise
Stk.#5181
$20,995


2010 GMC SIERRA 1500
CREW CAB Z71 4X4
V8, Auto, Air, PW/PL,
Tilt/Cruise, CD
Stk.#C1243A
$27,995
2011 CHEVROLET
SILVERADO 1500
CREW CAB LT
V8, Auto, Air, PW/PL,
Tilt/Cruise, CD
Stk.#C1395A
$26,995


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June 14, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 9A


Nutrition Notes

Q: I recently heard that (Chinese mallow), buckthorn,
dieters' teas can contain dan- cascara, frangula and rhubarb
gerous ingredients. Can that root (da huang, Chinese
be true? rhubarb). Another problem
A: Yes. Tea is not regulated like these pose is that with contin-
medicine, so just as some sup- ued use, you can become
elements can pose risk, dieters' dependent on them for bowel
teas may promote weight loss in function. Diuretic ingredients in
risky ways. Sometimes these dieters' teas include dandelion
teas use ingredients that are lax- root,juniper berry and uva ursi.
atives or diuretics. This pro- These ingredients produce only
duces water loss, which you see water loss, not body fat loss,
on the scale as weight loss. and some have caused liver
However, it's vital to remember damage. For a safer approach,
that this kind of weight loss is drink regular black, green or
not loss of body fat and is sure herbal tea as a beverage. Simply
to be temporary. The risk comes by switching to a zero-calorie
in when fluid loss is substantial drink to replace higher calorie
or leads to loss of electrolytes choices, or drinking tea instead
like potassium. This can create of eating when you may not be
problems with heart rhythms or hungry, you'll cut calories in a
pose other heart-related strains, way that will add up to true
Examples of laxative-type body fat weight loss. It won't be
ingredients in some of the com- fast, but it will be safe and last-
mon dieters' teas include malva ing.


Q: What are wheat berries? Is
it true that they are a super-
healthy choice?
A: Wheat berries are the whole-
grain kernel of wheat includ-
ing the bran, germ and en-
dosperm. That means they are
great sources of antioxidant
phytochemicals as well as vita-
mins and minerals. And just a
half-cup of cooked wheat
berries provides at least 4 grams
of dietary fiber, comparable to
what you get in two slices of
many whole-grain breads. Look
for wheat berries in the "natural
food" section of your supermar-
ket. As with regular brown rice
and whole7grain barley, this is
not a quick-cook dish (about
one hour); however, you can
cook a large batch and refriger-
ate to use within a couple days.
Or package it in meal-size por-
tions and freeze for up to a
month. Wheat berries also come
out well cooked in a slow cook-
er for eight to twelve hours. You
can use wheat berries as a side
dish, as a "bed" for stir-fries or


Spaying And Neutering Is A Win

Win Fix For Pets And People


Pet owners can help put an
end to a sad situation: Each
year, thousands of kittens and
puppies wind up in shelters as a
result of accidental litters from
pets that are not spayed or
neutered. While they may be
small in size, these unplanned
offspring have a giant impact
on a community, including
higher costs to taxpayers for the
community to trap and transport
homeless 'litters to shelters,
higher costs for shelters to
house; feed and care for these
pets and shelter overcrowding
which increases euthanasia
rates.
An estimated 11,000 pets in
this country are euthanized
daily, according to a PetSmart
Charities study-that's half of the
8 million pets that land in shel-
ters each year.
Not all of these pets start out
homeless. Half of U.S. pet own-
ers who"ve had a pregnant dog
or cat say the pregnancy hap-
pened "by accident," according
to statistics from the study.
These accidental litters could be
easily avoided by early spaying
and neutering.
Philip Bushby, a veterinarian
'an4 profe ssotr ~i' shelte? rhledi-


cine at Mississippi State Uni-
versity, believes that spaying
and neutering pets at an early
age not only reduces the eco-
nomical and societal .impact of
,pet homelessness, but also
improves the long-term health
of the pet.
"Most puppies and kittens
can safely be spayed or
neutered at as early as 8 to 10
weeks of age. If you wait
longer, you're risking an un-
planned litter," Dr. Bushby said,
adding that early spaying and
neutering is good for pets, with
benefits such as:
Reduced aggression: Cats
and dogs that have been
spayed/neutered are less ag-
gressive than unaltered pets,
which means fewer fights, less
risk of contracting contagious
diseases and lower vet bills.
SWandering: Pets that aren't
fixed are more likely to stray
away from home in search of a
mate. Spaying and neutering
reduces this urge, keeping your
pet close to home and out of
harm's way.
Less marking: Dogs and
cats mark with urine when they
are Ir ine to "claim" their terri-
iorv-like iyor couch.f After a


spay/neuter operation, pets be-
come less territorial, and this
behavior decreases dramatical-
ly.
Fewer health problems:
"Pets that have been fixed are
less likely.to develop mammary
and reproductive cancers, as
well as some potentially fatal
infections," said Dr. Bushby.
And, there's evidence that the
earlier it's. done, the. better.
"Contrary to belief, having the
surgery performed before your
pet's first heat period actually
amplifies these benefits."
Convinced that spaying/neu-
tering is right for your pet, but
worried about the cost? An
online spay/neuter services
locator can help you find clinics
that perform high-quality,.
affordable spay/neuter surgeries
in this area. Go online to
www.PetSmartCharities.org
and click on Spay/Neuter. The
site also provides resources to
combat pet homelessness and to
donate to programs that support
local shelters.
Spaying and neutering pets at
an early age improves their
long-term health, veterinarians
contend.
.... . r-' : "-


chili, or added to stew or soup.
They have a satisfying, slightly
chewy texture and subtle nutty
flavor that also make them
delightful in a salad with
apples, cranberries or other
fresh or dried fruit.
Q: What are examples of
other cruciferous vegetables
besides broccoli? Do the oth-
ers offer the same health ben-
efits?
A: Cruciferous vegetables all
provide compounds that in lab-
oratory research show a number
of effects that could reduce can-
cer risk. These compounds
seem to decrease inflammation,
disable carcinogens and
decrease cancer cells' ability to
spread. They also seem to turn
on genes that slow cell growth
so that cell damage can be
repaired. Finally, they may
.cause abnormal cells to self-
destruct. Some studies show
that these substances may also
shift estrogen metabolism to
favor a weaker, less cancer-pro-
moting form, although that is
still a more tentative finding.
All cruciferous vegetables are
also excellent sources of vita-
min C. However, cruciferous
vegetables do differ in other
nutrients they provide. Dark
green choices such as broccoli,
Brussels sprouts, broccoli rabe
rapinii), mustard and collard
greens, Swiss chard, kale and
bok choy provide beta-carotene
and tend to be rich in vitamin K.
Beta-carotene is an antioxidant
and seems to act more directly
to inhibit cancer development,
too. The red color in red cab-
bage and radishes signals the
presence of flavonoid com-
.pounds called anthocyanins that
are very powerful antioxidants.
Some of the cruciferous vegeta-
bles, such as broccoli, Brussels
sprouts, cauliflower, collard and
mustard greens, parsnips and
broccoli rabe rapinii) are high
in folate, which helps protect
our DNA. Other cruciferous
vegetables that add further vari-
ety include cabbage, broccolini,
broccoflower, kohlrabi, turnips
and rutabaga. Broccoli offers a
tremendous benefit nutritional-
ly, so enjoy experimenting with
a variety of ways to fix it. But
expanding the variety of crucif-
erous vegetables you eat is also
both fun and healthful.


Q: I know that I need to cut
some calories, but every time
I try to give up one of my
"problem foods," it doesn't
seem to last. What do you sug-
gest?
A: You are not alone with this
problem! There are several
steps you can take if you are
trying to reach and maintain a
healthy weight, and still enjoy
certain high-calorie foods you
don't really want to give up.
Research shows that when you
make a food "forbidden," it can
make it all the harder to give up
on a long-term basis. It often
becomes the go-to food when
you feel stressed. So one possi-
bility is to figure out which are
the particular foods that you
struggle with most in this way,
and then be sure to include
them on a regular basis so you
don't feel deprived. Try to
include those foods at normal,
unemotional times. The concept
is that by making them "regu-
lar" foods, we can reduce their
emotional impact on us. If you
hold off and then indulge when
using them for emotional relief,
you can actually create an even
stronger emotional attachment
to the food. Next, if you need to
cut a few calories frotf current
eating habits, try thinking a lit-
tle smaller. Recent research
suggests potential benefits from
reducing calorie consumption
by 100 calories per day: People
Sin the study who did this suc-
cessfully differed in the strate-
gies they,tsed to meet the goal.
The most common methods
included leaviiig 34: bites on
the plate,, switching to lower
calorie drinks, and switching
snacks to fruits or vegetables. In
this study, people were asked to
tut 100 calories a day; but they
ended up 'cutting more.
Although only' a one-week
study, it suggests that in some
cases we may accomplish more
by aiming for small-and-
achievable goals rather than the
formidable-and-frustrating for-
bidden food approach to calo-
rie-cutting.

Q: Is there a nutritional dif-
ference between apple cider
and apple juice?
A: In.the United States, apple
cider refers to apple juice that
has not been filtered to remove


all apple pulp. (Outside the
United States, cider usually
refers to an alcoholic beverage,
designated as "hard cider" in
the United States.) Cider con-
tains more of the antioxidant
phytochemicals than clear com-
mercial apple juice. The extra
processing to make juice may
lead to loss of 30 to 90 percent
of whole apples' phytochemi-
cals and antioxidant activity.
That said, even cider can't offer
as many phytochemicals as you
get from eating a whole apple,
and it is missing the dietary
fiber an apple provides. That
fiber can also help lower blood
cholesterol and 'may be used by
healthy bacteria in our gut to
produce protective substances
that reduce risk of colon cancer.
As for the choice between the
two apple beverages, cider is a
great choice for most of us, but
. it does pose one safety concern:
although juice is normally pas-
teurized to kill harmful bacte-
ria, cider, especially straight
from a cider mill or farm stand,
often is' not. Most people's
immune systems can handle-
this, but weaker immune sys-
tems might not. Some people's
immune function has-been
reduced by illnesses like AIDS,'
cancer or diabetes, or by med-
ications. Others with immune
systems that are more vulnera-
ble include the elderly, pregnant
women, infants and young chil-
dren. These people are at risk of
serious illness from food-borne
bacteria, so the Food and Drug
Administration (FDA) recom-
mends that if these groups drink
unpasteurized cider, they
should bring it to a boil first to
kill any harmful bacteria.


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HARDEE COUNTY
KIDS NEED-
HARDEE COUNTY
HELP!
Ease a dependent child's
way through the court sys-
tem. Volunteer to be. a
Guardian Ad Litem.
773-2505
(If office unattended, please leave
message.)


ELECT


SMarivyn B.



SMORRIS
for


Hardee County School Board District 2
Marilyn Browdy Morris -
I am 46 years of age, born and raised in Hardee County, Hardee High graduate
and a member of The First Missionary Baptist Church of Wauchula. I have a degree
'from Belford University.
* I am the widow of the late Major C. Morris, have two sons, Major L. and Lonnie
Tirease Morris, and the daughter of Ethel L. and the late Sideny A. Browdy.
* I am the founder, and have been the president for six years, of the Major C. Morris
Scholarship Foundation. This foundation has helped send 23 students to college.
My Promise To Serve The People of Hardee County Providing Honest Leadership


Pol. Advertisement Paid for and Approved by Marilyn B. Morris


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June 14, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 11A


JUNIOR RECEIVES HONOR The brains of a pedant, .
however full, are vacant.
--Sir Fulke GrevilleCONGRATULA IONS


S TYOUR It is a great pleasure to announce our Employee Of The Month Recipient
Y U "for May 2012 Donna Ehrenkaufer.

SBUSI ESS Donna's employment began on May 18, 1998 as Customer Service
Cashier. On September 06, 2005 Donna was promoted to the Customer
COULD Service Manager. With that promotion Donna has accepted full respon-
sibility for the Customer Service De-
APP R apartment. Those responsibilities
include Cashiers, Cuts & Collects,
Cemetery, and Business Tax License
HE with many other duties. Donna cur-
TOO!! rently manages (2) customer service
S. e representatives and (1) Meter
contact Reader. Donna is very dedicated to
the residents of City of
Nancy Davis, Wauchula and strives w
Kim Reas or to provide friendly and
PHOTO BY MACHELLE DOLLAR professional customer
A junior at Hardee Senior High School recently received Trayce Daniels service.
a high honor within the Air Force Junior Reserve Officer At
Training Corps program. The Military Order of the Purple Job Well Done!!!!
Heart award is given to any third- or fourth-year student 773-3255 Job Well Done!!!! 6:14c
who demonstrates leadership ability. There are five qual-
ifications to be nominated: a positive attitude toward
AFJROTC and country, a leadership position in the cadet
corps, active in school community affairs, a grade of "B"
or'better in all classes the previous-semester, and not a
previous recipient of -the award. Seventeen-year-old '
Michael James Ramirez Jr. was given that, honor last
Monday, June 4. His mother, Cynthia N. Rangel, was invit-
ed to attend the special presentation made during his, .
class. Pictured above are (left) preserltbr Fred Arbelo,
the Commander to the Military of the Purple Heart, -
Chapter 601, and Michael. Michael is currently the
deputy commander of the unit, the number two man in '- :
charge.. ..


During the past week, sheriff's deputies and city police
officers investigated the following incidents and made the fol-'
lowing arrests:

COUNTY
June 9, a fight was. reported on David Court. H:" ; .
June 7, Mario Alberto Rivas, 42, of 856 Fazzini Dr., i
Frostproof, was arrested by Det. Shane Ward and charged with' '
fraud and forgery.
June 7, a theft was reported on Dansby Road.- I -.'
June 6, Ruddie Lee Lopez, 25, of 430 Fourth St. E., Zolfo
Springs, was arrested by Dep. Michael Lake on four counts of fail-
ure to appear in court. At the jail, Det. John Shivers added a charge
of escape.
.June 6, Manuel Garcia,.55, of 4637 Church Ave., Bowling
Green, was arrested by Dep. Jeremy Brandeberry on a charge of
violation of probation.
June 6, David Ford Robinson, 47, of 33955 Hwy. 70 E.,
Myakka City, was arrested by Dep. Jeremy Brandeberry on a
charge of violation of probation.
June 6, Robert Preston Bivens, 27, of 1531 Appaloosa Lane,
Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Jeremy Brandeberry and charged
with domestic battery. .
June 6, Sylvia Toires Miranda, 36, of 2532 Heard Bridge
Road, Wauchula, was arrested by Sgt. Lyle Hart and charged with
fraud, making false investment statements.
June 6, Adelaido Navarrete, 31, of 711 Sandpiper Dr.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Ryan Abbott and charged with bat-
tery and domestic battery.
June 6, a vehicle stolen on Hardee Street and a theft on U.S.
17 North were reported.
June 5, Thomas Allen Steele, 52, of 1599 Dansby Road,
Wauchula, was arrested by Cpl. James Adler and charged with bat-
tery.
June 5, Billy Joe Staton, 34, of 232 Bronco Dr., Zolfo Springs, die
was arrested by Dep. Kim Pfeiffer on a charge of violation of pro- .
bation.
June 5, Linda Taylor, 47, of 2049 Rigdon Road, Wauchula,
was arrested by Dep. Bradford Merkel and charged with trespass
on property other than a structure and dealing in stolen property.
June 5, Candace Kilpatrick, 24, of 1204 David Ct., Wauchula,
was arrested by Dep. Kim Pfeiffer on a charge of violation of pro-
bation.
June 5, a vehicle stolen on Dansby Road, criminal mischief on
Hammock Road and a theft on Dansby Road were reported.
June 4, burglary of a conveyance on Lincoln Street was
reported.
WAUCHULA I make sure the water is clean,
June 9, criminal mischief was reported on Main Street and for all of us.
Seventh Avenue.
June 5, Austin Clemente Prestridge, 20, of 311 Bell St., I am M osaic.
Wauchula, was arrested by Ofc. Justin Wyatt and charged with bat-
t June 5, a business burglary on East Townsend Street was As we mine the phosphate needed to help grow the
reported. world's food, it's no coincidence that we preserve
June 4, Robert Galvan, 40, of 192 Myrtle Dr., Wauchula, was the water quality of nearby creeks and rivers. As an
arrested by Sgt. John Eason and charged with battery.
environmental specialist, I'm part of a team that monitors
BOWLING GREEN
June 8, residential break-ins were reported on East Main these bodies of water to ensure that the water quality
Street and on Chester Avenue.
is sustained or even enhanced. Mosaic takes great
June 6, Tomeka Chunta Cozart, 32, of 5125 U.S. 17 N., .
Bowling Green, was arrested by Capt. Brett Dowden and charged' care to meet Florida's clean water standards. Because
with aggravated battery with a deadly weapon and violation of pro- stewardship is an integral part of what we do.
bation. stewardship is an integral part of what we do.

And I see to it that the job is done right.

PUBLIC NOTICE
The Hardee County Board of County Commissioners will M o Ca.
have a meeting on Thursday, June 28, 2012, at 8:30 a.m.
for the Auditors Report to be presented and seeking direc-
tion from the Board on increasing solid waste assessments
for FY 2012/13.
For more information, please call the County Manager's Of- www.mosaicfla.com 6:14c
fice at 863/773-9430.
,Minor L. Bryant, Chairman 6:14c






12A The Herald-Advocate, June 14, 2012


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tionl ourmworldolas customer service,.
n.ccall twenty four hours a day.!
A dle any issues or emergen-
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61W6;14A


SWhat biodiesel is to us? )

Biodiesel is a clean, renewable fuel created for use in "The diesel
diesel engines. \We use all domestic supply chains, to vegetable oils an,
reduce foreign oil dependency, and the highest quality in the develop
countries which
products and blends to provide our customers with the "The use ofv
most superior biodiesel experience possible. Our fuels may seem
product is nontoxic, and biodegradable, and while es- such oils may be,
sentially free of sulfur, it provides superior lubricity to important as pet
petroleum diesel. Our biodiesel is made from strictly products ofthep
the finest ingredients. We use virgin oils and the finest nve
chemicals purchased in large volume from American
companies. Our biodiesel always exceeds the strict
quality standards set by the American Society of Testing Materials. Our
biodiesel contains no petroleum, however can be blended down to any
level with petroleum diesel.


Biodiesel operates in conventional
diesel, biodiesel operates in com- O es Facts
bustion-ignition engines. Essen-
tially no engine modifications are
needed, and biodiesel maintains the payload capacity and range of diesel. Biodiesel
does not require special storage. In fact, in its pure form or in blends, biodiesel can
be stored virtually wherever petroleum diesel is stored, except in concrete-lined tanks.
It handles just like diesel and uses the same infrastructure for transport, storage and
use. Though at higher blend levels, biodiesel may deteriorate natural rubber or
polyurethane foam materials. Biodiesel exhaust is less offensive. The use of
biodiesel and biodiesel blends results in an extremely noticeable, less offensive,
change in exhaust odor, which can be a real benefit in confined spaces. In fact, equip-
ment operators have compared it to the smell of French fries. Users also report having
no eye irritation. Due to biodiesel being oxygenated, diesel engines have more com-
plete combustion cycles with biodiesel than with petroleum.


k7T


engine can be fed with
d would help considerably
ent of agriculture of the
use it."
vegetablee oils for engine
insignificant today. But
come in course of time as
'roleum and the coal tar
resent time."
n-..1Jt r ,f___1


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entor of th


- - i.sa erto us t an-p tro eum die el.- T efas. o
su abot625deres ahrnhitwih.egla No.-2desel


stoe.- B 6se rducs misins igifcatly -Bidise
is the very first alternative fuel to have ever fu T~i~Tlly copletd th


an particulat mte. B:di. -imrovs ometi-enrg
seurty- 6y6sig6omstcalypoduced,....n..a..............
courier fo oi. Bidi lhasthehihes enrg baanc o
energ porfoli. Evryunt f.osilful t aks to mak
bidee results i 5.56nis- fenrg- gi. Siceperoeu
diesel hsangtvengbaacof.,






How 'can you get biodiesel?


iedolpn Desejl To place an order please contact our department of logistics. We
e diesel engine.require a three day notice to provide fuel at 100 percent guarantee
That it will get to you. We do offer the ability to place rush orders
at a slight increase in price, approximately 8 cents per gallon. Typically we will put
you on a weekly schedule. You will tell us on Friday what you need for the following
week and we will then deliver it on the days of your choice. This method will pro-
vide you with the most flexibility and best time slots for your loads.


Biodiesel is becoming a popular choice for farmers in Hardee County. Titan Biofuels Inc., a Tampa based company, has been supplying biodiesel to local harvesting and trucking companies
for almost a year now. The company was founded by Brennon Daugherty and John Trancoso. Their fuel is made from virgin soybean oil through a process known as transesterification. All
of their fuel is made to standard.
In 2011, I began using their fuel in my F-550 truck and Bobcat forklift, which I use in my beekeeping business. At the time, I knew very little about biodiesel. The more I researched the
product, the more I wanted to use it. Biodiesel is an all American product. The soybean oil is supplied by farmers in other states, and is brought to Florida by train, where it is processed into
biodiesel. The offroad biodiesel is fifteen to thirty cents cheaper per gallon than offroad petroleum diesel, depending on the amount ordered. The onroad biodiesel, is usually forty to fifty

After I had been using their fuel for about a month, I began telling others about it. I was surprised that none of the local fuel companies offered biodiesel for
sale, and some of them did not know what it was. I explained the situation to Titan Biofuels Inc., and asked them if I could be a sales representative for them
in Hardee County. I explained to them that we are an agricultural community, and most of us could benefit from their product. If they would take an interest in
Hardee County, I would help them sale their product. They agreed and offered me the regional sales position.
'" In the fall of 2011, Andrew Pace of ATP Ag Services began using their biodiesel. About a month later, Jake and Jason Carlton of JLC Trucking, and Steve
S Cantu of Peace River Bees started using it in large quantities. They were the first large companies in Hardee County to start purchasing biodiesel and deserve
1 credit for educating others about its use. You can see their trucks on the road and will notice that there is no black smoke coming out of their exhaust and
they smell like french fries.
The only setback was that Titan Biofuels Inc. did not have a smaller metered truck for making deliveries to grove power units and farm pumps. It Was not until
April of this year that they were able to deliver in smaller quantities. Since then, biodiesel is becoming popular among grove owners and others who have
smaller tanks. My cousin, Ben Norris, uses it in his power units with good success. Steve Cantu, was
using it in his grove operation last year by transferring the biodiesel to plastic totes and taking it to his
Joshua Clemente grove. We now deliver directly to his smaller tanks.
Jarrod Albritton, a Hardee County native is also one of our sales representatives. He has been with us for over six months and is
committed to helping Hardee County citizens save money by switching to biodiesel.
When we approached Darwin McCloud about using biodiesel, we were very surprised to find out, that he had his own centrifuge, ,.
and had already made over twenty thousand gallons of his own biodiesel. I believe Darwin is the most knowledgeable person in .
Hardee County on biodiesel. He was making his own fuel before the rest of us had heard about biodiesel. He started purchasing
from Titan Biofuels Inc. because their price is cheaper than what it cost him to make his own.
One of the setbacks of pure biodiesel is that it will gel in cold temperatures. Titan Biofuels Inc. switches to a winterized blend during
the winter months to prevent gelling. The blend is a mixture of biodiesel and petroleum diesel.
Biodiesel also acts like a detergent and when you first start using it, you will find that it cleans out your tank and fuel lines and will
push the sediments to the fuel filter. You might have to go through an extra fuel filter until the tank and lines have been cleaned out.
If your tank is newer, then you won't have to worry about it. If your tank is twenty years old and you have never had it cleaned, then
you need to clean your tank before switching to biodiesel. Titan Biofuels Inc. has been working together with a tank cleaning company,
to provide this service to its' customers. I have found that very few people in Hardee County practice proper tank maintenance. I have Brennon Daugherty and William Howle
spoken with grove owners who tell me that they wait thirty or forty five minutes to let their tanks settle after being filled up before they
can pump out of them. They thought it was something they had to live with.
Biodiesel is produced here in Florida and it sells for less than petroleum diesel. Our climate makes it possible to use pure biodiesel for most of the year. During the winter months, you will
still save money by switching to a blend of biodiesel and petroleum. It burns clean and also lubricates your engine better. Why pay more for a product that is not made in America?
You can go to www.biodiesel.org to educate yourself on its' use. Our website is www.titanbiodiesel.com.
9oshbu Clemenfe


Contact us


Joshua Clemente
Regional Sales Manager
(863) 990-6489


if you have questions or wouldhleiketo ba

William Howle :' Brennon Daugheily'
Orders/Logistics . .. Owner' :.--"
.(704) 577-2190 ; (813) 527-5516


Fr


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IF=


"


www. titan biod iesel. com


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: 1









PAGE ONE


I WayBackWh7enI


RED CROSS WHEELS


This week in history, as
researched from the archival
pages of The Florida Ad.
vocate, the Hardee County
Herald and The Herald-Ad.
vocate ...

75 YEARS AGO
SOn Thursday, June 24,.a clin-
ic will be held at the courl
house in Wauchula. Children
'from 6 months old to school age
will be examined and receive
immunization against diphthe-
ria. This clinic is intended
.strictly for those who cannot, al
this time, afford the services ol
a private physician.

It was announced Wednesday
:'night by Joe Foster, local young
man, that he and his wife are tc
operate the swimming pool in
the: county park at Zolfc
Springs this summer. Mr. and
Mrs. Foster opened the pool for
the summer session yesterday.

In Tampa, Spaniards held a
picnic and 3,000 attended. In
Spainthe Spaniards are having
war and no onewants to attend
But they must; and the beauty
of a once pretty country is being
horribly, destroyed.

Great and beautiful as was
the Florida exhibit at the Greal
Lakes Exposition of 1936, the
display this year is greater and
more beautiful and already has
"stolen the show," even with
such competition as is offered
by the Aquacade and the Wintel
Carnival, the two new stellar
attractions of the 1937 edition
of Cleveland's big show.

50 YEARS AGO
The morale of Hardee's
teachers, which has been at low
ebb, got a huge shot of adrena-
lin this week as the Board of
Public Instruction voted
$25,000. for raises for instruc-
tional personnel. .

Hardee High School, which
lost its band director last week,
has a new one this week.
Richard Victor Mucci of Fott
Lauderdale was named new
band director Monday by the


SBoard of Public Instruction. He
I succeeds James McGonigal,
- who resigned to accept a posi-
Stion in a Tampa school.

James Welch, 18-year-old
member of the Peace River
Chapter of Future Farmers of
America, has been named win-
t ner of the Future Farmers of
SAmerica State Award for
achievement in farm electrifica-
tion.

The Hardee County Fair
t Association has gone on record
f as favoring the continuance of
the county fair under the super-
vision of the Board of County
Commissioners and will begin
beating the bushes for support
of its position.

25 YEARS AGO
Hardee county commission-
ers have begun the task of orga-
nizing the county's first public
safety department, which will
include the existing ambulance
service, disaster preparedness
office and a new county fire
department.

Wauchula Fire Chief Dean
Jackman was back on the job
Monday after being hospital-
Sized for injuries suffered June 6
t in a single-vehicle crash while
responding to an emergency
call.

J.J. Parrish III of Titusville
Shas been re-elected president of
Florida Citrus Mutual. Parrish
was first elected president of
SMutual's Board of Directors in
June of 1986.

About 300 people attended a
S$100-a-plate fund-raising bar-
becue Saturday for the upcom-
Sing re-election campaign of
f U.S. Sen. Lawton Chiles. The
event, attended by about 20
Hardee Countians, was held at
the 2,500-acre Circle B-Bar
ranch owned by Al Bellotto on
SWinter Lake Road southeast of
Lakeland.

10 YEARS AGO
A $2.5 million appropriation
* approved by the state


I HntngF shigFrcs t I


6/14/2012
Sun Data
Rise: 6:31 AM.
Set: 8:23 PM
Day Length.
13 hrs. 52 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 2:57 AM
Set: 4:19 PM
Overhead: 9:37 AM.
Underfoot: 9:59 PM
Moon Phase
,". 2l% :.
Waning Crescent
Major Times
9:37 AM-11:37 AM
9:59 PM 11:59 PM
Minor Times
2:57 AM -3:57 AM
4:19 PM 5:19 PM
Solunar Rating
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -4
6/15/2012
Sun Data
Rise: 6:31 AM
Set: 8:24 PM
Day Length
13 hrs. 53 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 3:34 AM
Set: 5:11 PM
Overhead:10:21 AM
Underfoot: 10:44 PM
Moon Phase
. 14%
Waning Crescent
Major Times
10:21 AM-12:21 PM
10:44 PM-12:44 AM
Minor Times
3:34 AM 4:34 AM
5:11 PM-6:11 PM
Solunar Rating
-Average
Time Zone
UTC: -4


6/16/2012
Sun. Data
Rise: 6:31 AM
Set: 8:24 PM
Day Length.
13 hrs. 53 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 4:13 AM
Set: 6:03 PM
Overhead: 11:08 AM
Underfoot: 11:31 PM
Moon Phase
8%
Waning Crescent
Major Times
11:08 AM 1:08 PM
11:31 PM- 1:31 AM
Minor Times
4:13 AM 5:13 AM
6:03 PM 7:03 PM
Solunar Rating
Good
Time Zone
UTC: -4
6/17/2012
Sutn Data
Rise: 6:31 AM ,
Set: 8:24 PM
Day Length
13 hrs:.53 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 4:56 AM
SSet: 6:55 PM
Overhead: 11:56 AM
Underfoot: --:-
Moon Phase .
4%
Waning Crescent
Major Times
--:---- --:---
11:56 AM 1:56 PM
Minor Times
4:56 AM 5:56 AM
6:55 PM 7:55 PM
Solunar Rating
Better
Time Zone
UTC: -4


6/18/2012
Sun Data
Rise: 6:31 AM
Set: 8:24 PM
Day Length
13 hrs. 53 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 5:43 AM
Set: 7:45 PM
Overhead: 12:45 PM
Underfoot: 12:20 AM
Moon Phase
1%
Waning Crescent
Major Times
12:20 AM -2:20 AM
12:45 PM 2:45 PM
Minor Times
5:43 AM 6:43 AM
7:45 PM 8:45 PM
Solunar Rating
Best
Time Zone
UTC: -4
6/19/2012
Sun Data
Rise: 6'32 AM
Set: 8:25 PM
Day Length .
13 hrs. 53 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 6:32 AM
Set: 8:32 PM
Overhead: 1:34 PM
Underfoot: 1:09 AM
Moon Phase
0%
NEW MOON
Major Times
1t09 AM 3:09 AM
1:34 PM 3:34 PM
Minor Times
6:32 AM 7:32 AM
8:32 PM 9:32 PM'
Solunar Rating
Best ,
Time Zone
UTC: -4


6/20/2012
Sun Data
Rise: 6:32 AM
Set: 8:25 PM
Day Length
13 hrs. 53 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 7:26 AM
Set: 9:18 PM
Overhead: 2:24 PM
Underfoot: 1:59 AM
Moon Phase
1%
Waxing Crescent
Major Times
1:59 AM 3:59 AM
2:24 PM 4:24 PM
Minor Times
7:26 AM 8:26 AM
9:18 PM- 10:18 PM
Solunar Rating
Better++++
Time Zone
UTC: -4
6/21/2012
Sun Data
Rise: 6:32 AM
Set: 8:25 PM
Day Length
13 hrs. 53 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 8:20 AM
Set: 9:59 PM
Overhead: 3:13 PM
Underfoot: 2:48 AM
.Moon Phase
4%
Waxing Crescent
Major Times
2:48 AM.- 4:48 AM
3:13 PM 5:13 PM
Minor Times
8:20 AM 9:20 AM
9:59 PM 10:59 PM
Solunar Rating
Better'
Time Zone
UTC: -4


Legislature for Hardee County
has been nixed by the governor.
"He had a choice to support
Hardee County or the environ-
mentalists' agenda. This money
was not just stuck in the budget,
it was debated in the Senate and
House' finance committees and
approved there and by the full
Legislature," said "disappoint-
ed" CountyCommissioner Bill
Lambert.

- Movies playing this week at
Lakeshore Cinema 8 are "The
Bourne Identity" (R), "Sum of
All Fears" (PG-13), ."Under-
cover Brother" (PG-13), "Star
Wars Episode II: Attack of the
Clones" (PG), "Spider IMan"
(PG-13) and "Windtalkers" (R).
=----
Bobbie Thornton of Wau-
chula was recently accepted to
participate in the National
Youth Leadership Forum on
Medicine in Los Angeles,
Calif., July 21-30.

Delinquent utility bills and a.
change in billing garbage col'
election and disposal costs occu-
pied the Wauchula City Council
on Monday evening.


PHOTO BY MARIA TRUJILLO
On May 25, an excited Connie Jones stopped by The Herald-Advocate to proudly show-
case the new addition to the local Red Cross team. After years of applying for one,
Jones, local Disaster Action Team coordinator, was finally able to obtain this much-
needed Red Cross response vehicle. The Red Cross was without a vehicle here since
2004. Now, the Red Cross can better take care of people after house fires, storms, dis-
asters or other emergencies. The vehicle will be filled with supplies, ready to leap into
action at a moment's notice.


Hardee County School Board
Tefesa M. O8rWord



Hardee County School Board


District #3


Pd. Pol. Adv. Paid for by the Teresa Crawford Campaign Account. Approved by Teresa Crawford. 6-14p






















The Ma4i7 Isl'n'd





Si, 6:00--9:00Opm


.D downtown Wauchula


Relax with the


steel drum beat of


ICaribbean Crew



Shop ~ Dine Pla


Downtown Wauchu la



?ported By Our Business Partner: Winn Dixie


The Herald-Advocate
(USPS 578-780)

Thursday, June 14,2012


YOUR BUSINESS COULD

APPEAR HERE TOO!!
Contact
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels

At The Herald Advocate

115 S. 7th Ave. Wauchula

773-3255






2B The Herald-Advocate. June 14,2012




-Hardee


Living


Class of 2012


COURTESY PHOTO
Lindsey St. Romain & Chase Best
Lindsey St. Romain &

Chase Best Are Engaged
Dwight and Tricia St. Romain tion in 2007, also at Florida
of Wauchula announce the State University. She is current-
engagement of their daughter, ly employed at Publix Super
Lindsey Erin St. Romairi, to Markets Inc. as a capital equip-
Charles Ruhl Chase" Best, the ment buyer.
son of Charles "Chuckie" and The prospective groom is a
Gail Best of Wauchula. 2000 graduate of HardeeSenior
The bride-elect is a 2002 High School and a 2004 gradu-
graduate of Hardee Senior High ate of Florida Southern College.
School, and earned a bachelor of He is currently employed at
science degree in marketing at Florida Fertilizer Co.
Florida State University in Plans are being made for a
2006. She received a master's Friday, Sept. 21, wedding at
degree in business administra- Miramar Beach in Destin.


June FREE FRIDAY
"Sultry Summer Savings"',.
SALL SUMMER June August $129 V '
6' (NO EFT required auto pay) ,
60 Minutes 600 Calories Burned One Fabulous Dance Floor
Real Results Pure Fun www.jazzercise.com
Ann Mlarje.863-767-0613 facebook/Jazzercise Heartland 0




Priscella Allen Johnson
Owner/Stylist Barber/Stylist ,

V^i7' ITanning Available

(863) 285-6300 ,W
302 N. Charleston Ave., Fort Meade, FL soc6:14c


First Baptist Children's Academy
Now Enrolling:

j0 Infants
'*, 2 YearOlds
3 Year Olds
S* After School Care
Enrollment packets can be picked up.in the Academy
Office Monday thru Friday 7:00 AM 5:30 PM.
For questions call 863-773-9185,
License #C10HA0517 sc
soc6:7-21

0

Lake Denton Cam

2012 Schedule
2d-Sth GRADES une24i-2i7a .......$95
6th-8th GRADES* Jul8yth-14th ......$175
2nd- 5th GRADES *July15th- 18th .....$95
7th -12th GRADES*' Jull 29- Aug. 4th .....$175



P Y CAM S a l -- ..



Visit: www.lakedentoncamp.org
or for any questions, icll Pam U
863-453-3627 or 8,3-634


DUSTINADCOCK

SonHaven Preparatory
Academy Graduate


The Volunteer
Boom
Nonprofit organizations
across the country have discov-
ered a promising resource-baby
boomers seeking meaningful
volunteer leadership roles in


Fundraiser On
Saturday To
Help The Moose
It can happen to anyone these
days. The Wauchula Moose
Lodge is in need of help in
these tough economic times.
On Saturday, Moose Riders
from across the state will con-
verge on Wauchula Moose
Lodge No. 1487 to help "Save
The Moose." It will be a day of
fun and fellowship!
Come join in beginning at
noon.
Riverview Moose Ridets are
holding an in-house PdkefrRun.
Sebring Moose Riders will'pro-
vide a fish and chips dinner, and
the Highlands County Moose
Riders are providing entertain-
ment.
All proceeds will benefit the
Wauchula Moose Lodge Save
The Moose Fundraiser.


their community.
, Boomers often seek meaning-
ful work opportunities that make
a difference in the lives of others
and put their years of profes-
sional experience to good use.
Research suggests that nonprof-
its that allow volunteers to work
autonomously and in leadership
roles often enjoy the greatest
financial and operational bene-
fits.
For many organizations fac-
ing reduced budgets and in-
'creased demand for services,
boomer volunteers could be a
valuable resource. Research by
the National Council on Aging
documents that for every $1,000
invested in volunteer develop-
ment, the return is eightfold or
$8,000.
Recognizing the trend of
more older volunteers, the Ad-
ministration on Aging (AoA), in
cooperation with the National
Association of Area Agencies on
Aging, AARP Foundation and
the National Association of
States United for Aging and
Disabilities, is developing a
National Resource Center for
Engaging Volunteers in the
Aging Network. The Resource
Center will serve as an aide to
organizations interested in
engaging older volunteers.
For more information, call
(800) 677-1116 or visit www.-
agingnetworkvolunteers.org.


are you Overcome?


bean OVERCOME


Wed. Nights 7-8

Wauchula Woman's Club
131 N. 7th Ave. Wauchula

Ken Sanders
Facilitator
' 'H Ken Sanders 863-781-0153
SGillispies Ministries 773-5717



Happy Father's Day.
June 17. 2012

ai Father's Lowe is Aways There
SA good man chooses to do
S* what's right. He places impor-
tance on family. A good man
changes the world by his own
examples. He shapes the lives
I.'' of his children with the
strength of his love.
LM Sr c Thank you Dad for being
such a good man for loving
us strong and raising us right.
We were lucky to have you and very blessed.
Happy Father's Day!
Love, Your Kids
Levi & wife Bernestine, Gloria, Lillie,
Susie & Bobby, Ray, Floyd & Lil, Levi,
Grandkids & Great-Grandkids ,


The Farmers today.


PHOTO BY MARIA TRUJILLO


COURTESYPHOTO
Mr. & Mrs. Edward Farmer on their wedding day in 1952.

Farmers Celebrate 60th

Wedding Anniversary
Edward L. Farmer and.Annie Sarah Connelly, and step-
M. Dover married on June 3, granddaughter Jessica. Great-
1952, in Kingsland, Ga. grandchildren include -Timmy
He is now approaching 81 Farmer, Bethany Gelinas, Ethan
years of age, and she soon will Gelinas, Claire Gelinas and
be 76. Married for 60 years, the Stephen Connelly, and step-
couple have raised three sons, great-grandchildren Star,
Edward Jr., Timothy and Joel. Crystal, Logan and a new baby
The Farmers suffered the loss of girl.
son Joel in 1990. The Farmers marked -the
SGrandchildren include Ed- occasion of their 60th wedding
ward "T&d" Farmer III, Donna anniversary by going out to eat,
Gelinas, Joshua Farmer and after church on'Sunday.

























S June 17,2012
Even though you're gone -
Just wanted you to know that
We're thinking of you. We
love you, and will love you
If our love could have
saved you, Iou would never
Fo have been called home. God
Frankie Carlton Th Di i
Frankie Canton loved you even more.
Happy Father's Day!

Love-n t yo e e
The McLeod uld h
and you, you aneould never
Families
Levi McLeod. Jr. soc:6:14c Ray McLeod






June 14, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 3B


DOMESTIC VIOLENCE HELP















PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
Sandra Rojas, an advocate for victims of domestic abuse, spoke to the Wauchula
Kiwanis Club on Tuesday, May 22, at the Panda Restaurant. She is employed by the
Wauchula Police Department through a grant. From left are Wauchula Finance Director
James Braddock, Sandra Rojas and Police Chief Bill Beattie. There are several ways to
help victims of domestic abuse, she said, including relocation, medical help, counsel-
ing and arrest of the offender. Children are often harmed emotionally and mentally
when exposed to domestic violence in the home. Poor finances and/or alcohol use
often are involved in cases of domestic abuse.


MEDICAL REPORT


$11,750 FOR HHS JROTC


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
The Hardee Rotary Club on Wednesday, May 16, gave a check for $11,750 at the Java
Cafe In Wauchula to the Air Force Junior ROTC from proceeds from the April 28
POW/MIA banquet at Florida's First Assembly of God Church. The local ROTC has 129
members and recently raised funds by selling Powerade and World's Finest Chocolate
bars. Twenty ROTC members visited Washington, D.C., in 2010 and a return ROTC trip
Is planned for 2013. A trip to the NASA space center is planned in 2012. Sixteen ROTC
students will graduate from HHS this year. The group purchased American flags for
HHS classrooms. ROTC meets for 46 minutes five days a week, with one day for phys-
ical education, two days of leadership and two days of aerospace science. The Rotary
Club on May 12 sponsored a one-day trip to Washington, D.C., for 22 World War II vet-
erans from Hardee County. From left are David Durastanti, ROTC senior instructors
Tony Hingle, club president Sue Birge, chief instructor Bob Waltich, and Wes Roe.


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
Members of the Highlands Medical Group spoke to the Hardee County Rotary Club on
Wednesday noon, May 22, at the Java Cafe in Wauchula. The group is affiliated with the
Highlands Regional Medical Center in Sebring. From left are Gwen Shaw, physician
practice manager; Kevin Robinson, M.D., otolaryngology; Natalia Rodriguez, M.D.
internal medicine; and Frankie Vasquez.





CONCERNED CITIZENS MEETING







Kairos Mexican Restaurant & Grill
(formerly Main Street Grill 216 W. Main Street)

Public Invited Bipartisan
Questions Please Call 767-0771

I_ ,


eNCoUNTE^RNGy 6OD'S
AvqlesoME Pov leR

VACATION BIBLE SCHOOLL



(AcEi 4 ADULT)

LAKE DALE BAPTIST CHURCH
3102 Heard Bridge Rd., Wauchula
FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL
863-781-9442

Come Explore God's Wonders!







4B The Herald-Advocate, June 14, 2012


Vaccines Safe And Effective

Protection Against Deadly Diseases


Happy birthday to the 12,000
babies born in the U.S. today.
There's an important thing par-
ents can do to.keep their little
ones happy and healthy: Get
them vaccinated on time.
Immunizations .prevent dan-
gerous diseases that used to reg-
ularly sweep through communi-
ties.
Parents should be assured
that since vaccines are aiminis-
tered to healthy people, they are
among the most rigorously test-
ed and safest medical products
on the market. And once they
are approved by the Food and
Drug Administration (FDA)
and given to children, vaccines
continue to be closely moni-
tored to ensure their ongoing
safety.
In addition, the complete
childhood immunization sched-
ule has been carefully reviewed
and recommended by experts at
the Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention (CDC), the
American Academy of Pedi-
atrics (AAP) and the American
Academy of Family Physicians
(AAFP).
Parents may express concern
about the number of vaccines
given in one visit or the young
age at which their children
receive their vaccines. "Infants
are most vulnerable to deadly


diseases," explains Dr. Mark
Sawyer, Professor of Clinical
Pediatrics and a Pediatric
Infectious Disease specialist at
the UCSD School of Medicine
and Rady Children's Hospital
San Diego; "The ages at which
people get vaccinated are deter-
mined by two things-when they
are at most risk for the disease
and when their immune system
is able to respoind-to the vac-
cine." The number of vaccines
given to an infant is a "drop in
the ocean" compared to what
children's immune systems typ-
ically encounter and manage
every day.
"Parents with questions or
concerns about vaccines should
talk to their child's doctor,"
advises Amy Pisani, Executive
Director of Every Child By
Two: Carter/ Bumpers Cham-
pions for Immunization
(ECBT). "ECBT strongly be-
lieves that parents should fol-
low the recommended immu-
nization schedule. There is no
benefit to spreading the vac-
cines out. By doing so, parents
are only increasing the time in
which their child remains sus-
ceptible to potentially deadly
viruses."
Families that choose not to
vaccinate or to delay vaccines
must be aware of the risk and


responsibilities that accompany
these choices. For example,
they must:
Alert medical staff at
physician offices and hospitals
that their child hasn't received
all the recommended vaccines
in order to ensure that precau-
tions are taken to reduce possi-
ble spread of disease.
Be aware that vaccine-pre-
ventable diseases still circulate
in the U.S. and elsewhere. If
their children are exposed to a
vaccine-preventable disease,
parents must isolate them to
protect infants who are not yet
fully vaccinated and individuals
with weak immune systems.
Keep children home from
school in the event of a disease
outbreak in the community until
advised by public health staff/
school personnel.
Diseases such as measles,
whooping cough and influenza
continue to take the lives of
children right here-in the US.
Timely vaccination of our
nation's children is critical to
ensuring their health.
To learn more about vaccines,
visit www.VaccinateYourBaby.-
org.
Vaccines are essential for
keeping, children, their families
and their communities safe.


Medicine For Chronic
Obstructive Pulmonary Disease


Dignity comes not from control, but from understanding who you are and taking your rightful
place in the world.
--Real Uve Preacher


Every Saturday

7:00 p.m.




Come Have Some Fun!


Gilliard Earns
Perfect GPA

At Northeast
Brent Gilliard of Zolfo
Springs was one of six out-of-
state students recognized during
commencement exercises at
Northeast Community College
for achieving a perfect 4.0
grade-point average in the col-
lege's 4.0 system.
Gilliard has earned an associ-
ate of applied science certificate
in renewable fuels technology
at the Norfolk, Neb., campus.
He is the son of Joy and
Lamar Gilliard of Zolfo
Springs.

Food was first served on a
commercial airplane in
1919.


I WAUCHULA MOOSE LODGE 1487 ItiB
SAVE THE MOOSE FUNDRAISER 1







Saturday June 16th, 2012

12:00pm ???

It can happen to any of us these days. One of our own is in need of
help in these tough economic times. On Saturday, June 16, 2012,
Moose Riders from across the state will convergepn Wauchula Moose
Lodge 1487 to help "SAVE THE MQOSE'. Join us for a great day of fun
and fellowship
Florida Moose Riders'.. .Redefining HERD of M se, one ride at a time.

Planned Events
Arrival Window: Between 12:00pm and 1:00pm
Riverview Moose Riders are holding an in-house Poker Run
Sebring Moose Riders will provide a Fish and Chips dinner
Highlands County Moose Riders are providing entertainment
Lake Placid Moose Riders are providing Jello Shots

All process to beffet the Waeuchuw Moose Lodge Se e Moose Fuainrar.

WAUCHULA MOOSE LODGE 1487
117KingARd Phone: (63) 77338320
Waucdla, FL 33873 E-mna: Iodg.14870moosmuntsag


The more than 13 million
American adults who suffer
from chronic obstructive pul-
monary disease (COPD), one of
the most common lung diseases
in the U.S., and the people who
care for them, may soon have
more treatment options.
New Medicines in
Development
.That's because America's bio-
pharmaceutical research compa-
nies are working on 54 new
medicines to treat COPD, ac-
cording to the Pharmaceutical
Research and Manufacturers df
America (PhRMA). These new
therapies are in clinical trials or
under review by the Food and
Drug Administration (FDA) for
patient use. ,
'COPD is a serious, progres-
sive lower respiratory disease
that encompasses two main con-
ditions-chronic bronchitis and
emphysema-characterized by
obstructed airflow to the lungs
that interferes with; normal
breathing. People with COPD
may be limited in their ability to


work, exercise and even per- PhRMA's mission is to advo-
form routine activities. cate for public policies',that
According to the National encourage medical innovation
Institutes of Health (NIH), the and research into new medi-
number of patients with COPD cines for patients by .pharma-
is increasing. In addition to ceutical and biotechnology
those who have been diagnosed research companies.
with the disease, 12 million America's biopharmaceutical
Americans likely have COPD research sector is the global
without knowing it. The NIH leader in medical innovation,
says symptoms can include: with more than 300 new medi-
Constant coughing, some- cines approved by the FDA in
times called "smoker's cough"; recent decades. Researchers are
Shortness of breath while currently studying more than
doing activities you used to be 3,000 more compounds.
able to do; Learn More
Feeling like you can't For more information about
breathe; the research, see www.phrma.-
Not being able to take a org/research/new-medicines-
deep breath; ard CQPD-,
_ *Wheezing. '
If you experience any'-of.. "- .. ,ar ,
these, see your doctor. *
Early Detection Is Key A good question is never
"Early detection of COPD is answered. It is not a bolt to
imperative, as effective treat- be tightened into place but
ment and lifestyle changes can a seed to be planted and to
change the course and progres- bear more seed toward the
sion of this devastating dis- hope of greening the land-
ease," said PhRMA President scape of idea.
and CEO John J. Castellani. -John Clardi


SHardee County Crime Rate Statistics

On Sheriff Lanier's Watch!

Murder UP!

Forcible Rape UP!

Robbery UP!

Aggravated Assault UP!

Burglary -UP!

Traffic Fatalities UP!
(More Than Doubled From 2006 to 2010 According to USDOT)


Do these statistics display

SUCCESS or FAILURE?

We paid the sheriff approx. a HALF-A-MILLION DOLLARS
in salary and benefits over the past 4 years for these results.
Did we get our money's worth?

Search the FDLE website & see for yourself! Compare Year 2009 and Year 2010.
The first two quarters of 2011 also indicated rising crime rates!
(The 2012 statistics have not been published by FdLE to date.)

On August 14th Vote for a
SAFER Hardee County
Vote for:
THOMAS SANTARLAS(
for Hardee Sheriff


wwwmynewsheriff.com

Pd. Pol. Adv. Paid for by the Thomas Santarlas Campaign Account. Approved by Thomas Sanrarlas.







June 14, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 5B


Dear Ed
A new
summed
hood obe
their ch
mucli T
them pla
The cc
high five
children
bound. T
television
much w
you minc
to this ce
I grew
After hon
kids pou
and head
neighbor
back hor
On we
summer
the door
running
a sandw
back .out
mom wa
find out
when ca
"Please
longer?"
Grante
entertain
cards on
spokes
raced the
cycles."
with scra
and clim]
We use
and old
for the
friends p
ments.
screamed
cars bac
was some
I truly
who has
can," hi
neighbor
night whi
ter of the
front por
"home"
can before
If we a


Children Need Safe

Area To Play Outside
itor: do today any number of the
's commentator recently things we did as youth it would
up the cause for child- bring protective services, law
esity as parents allowing enforcement, and lawsuit-
ildren to "watch too thirsty neighbors to our doors to
V" and not encouraging threaten our worthiness to
y outside more. retain custody of our precious
commentator deserves a children.
Sfor her conclusion Add to that zoning laws, cur-
have become house- fews, homeowners' associa-
'hey do watch too much tions, and pretentious neighbors
n, as well as fiddle too and you can see how children
ith electronics. But do have little opportunity to -do
d if I give a slight twist more than live in a controlled
:mented determination? environment at school, at after-
up in the best of times. school childcare and summer
mework was completed camps.
red out of their houses Those are only the minor rea-
led to the park or to the sons our children can't enjoy
s ... and we didn't go some of our experiences -
ne until dark. truth is, parents don't allow
-ekends and throughout their children to head out the
vacation we were out door today because there are
Early and other than bad, warped people "out there"
through the kitchen for who do terrible things to chil-
ich at lunch, we were dren. We have to keep an eye on
side. A "yoo hoo" from our children even if they're in
s all that was needed to our own back yard in broad
where we were. And daylight.
lied in, our reply was Bottom line is that WE
let me stay out a little played outside and had fun all
day into the night because our
,d it took very little to parents knew we were safe. We
us ... we put playing can't say that today.
the back bicycle tire Paranoia has created the situ-
with a clothespin and ation we're now in. Electronics
e block on our "motor- and TV came along at the right
We built tree houses time. We feel safer with our
ap material and fell out children inside watching TV or
bed back up. playing video games than we do
ed hammers, bent nails worrying about what could hap-
wood to build box cars pen to them outside the kitchen
thrill of having our window.
rush us down embank- You want our children to get
We turned over, out of the house, lose some
I, laughed, nailed the weight? Give us back safe
k together and then it neighborhoods. Offer us com-
eone else's turn. mon sense in our schools, city
feel sorry for any child halls, and legislatures and
not played "kick the before long you'll see children
ding throughout the joining their friends in building
hood on a summer something, using their creativi-
ile listening to the chat- ty and enjoying sports in the
eir parents visiting on vacant field ... and parents will
ches, trying to run back be their greatest promoters.


first to kick the bean.
re being tagged.
allowed our children to


Priscilla Perry
3975 Old Bowling Green Road
Fort Meade FL 33841


Week Ending: June 10, 2012
Widespread Rainfall Welcomed
Weather Summary: It was another wet week across Florida.
Field crops, hay fields, and pastures were thriving with another
week that had substantial precipitation. Producers reported that
although the topsoil moisture was improved, it will take much
more rainfall to improve subsoil moisture and raise low water
tables. Lake Okeechobee's water elevation as of June 10 was 1.86
feet compared to 9.70 feet at this time last year, but it still remained
below the 1965-2007 period of record average of 13.16 feet. All of
the 36 Florida Automated Weather Network (FAWN) stations
reported rainfall. Only four stations reported less than an inch of
rainfall. Six stations reported between one inch and two inches of
rainfall, eight stations reported between two and three inches of
rainfall, eleven stations reported three to five inches of rainfall, and
seven stations reported, more than five inches of rainfall. The
Pensacola airport station reported over 13 inches of rainfall, which
caused flooding and millions of dollars of property damage.
Stations that reported more than five inches of rainfall included
Avalon (6.71 inches), Jay (6.50 inches), Alachua (6.37 inches),
Brooksville (5.78 inches), Apopka (5.19 inches), and MacClenny
(5.14 inches). Temperatures for the week were near normal. The
weekly highs were in the low to mid-90s and lows in the high 60s.

Field Crops: Timely rains improved growing conditions,
especially for the corn and peanut crops. The peanut crop was, all
planted except for the last seven percent of the cropland. Producers
were finding it difficult to control weeds due to weather conditions.
In Jackson County, crops improved with the variable rainfall. In
Escambia and Santa Rosa counties, the corn crop was looking
much better after these timely rains. In Washington County; previ-
ous dry weather caused planting delays, but with the recent rainfall
the planting resumed. In Pasco County, the rains were welcomed
and described as "drought-busting rains."

Fruits & Vegetables: 'USDA-Agricultural Marketing Service
(AMS) reported market movement of okra, tomatoes, and a limit-
ed supply of eggplant. In Gilchrist County, producers were har-
vesting watermelons. Miami-Dade producers marketed avocados
and mangoes.

Livestock and Pastures: Statewide', general but variable rain-
fall during the week provided continued improvement of pastures.
Statewide pasture conditions ranged. from very poor to excellent
with most rated as good. Pastures continued to recover from the
drought of previous weeks. The conditions of the cattle ranged
from very poor to excellent, with most in fair to good condition. In
the Panhandle, pasture conditions ranged from very poor to excel-
lent condition with most in fair to good condition. The cattle con-
ditions ranged from poor to excellent with most rated as good. In
the northern areas, most pastures were in fair condition. The cattle
conditions ranged from fair to excellent, with most in fair condi-
tion. In the central areas, the pastures were in very poor to excel-
.lent condition with.most rated fair to good. The cattle conditions
were mostly rated as fair or good. In the southwestern areas of
Florida, the pasture conditions ranged from very poor to excellent
with most rated as good. Cattle were rated as poor to good with
most rated fair to good with plenty of grass available for feed.
.Some pastures ip Okeechobee County had standing water after the
'' eavy rains.

Citrus: Daily high temperatures remained in the low to mid-
90s across the citrus region. All FAWN stations in the citrus grow-
ing region recorded some precipitation, with Avalon receiving the
most at 6.71 inches.All stations received more than an inch of rain,
thirteen had at least three inches, and only two had less than an inch
:and a half. Drought conditions continue to improve over the whole
of the citrus region, per the U.S. Drought Monitor, last updated
June 5, 2012. As late orange harvesting was drawing to a close,
young tree care and grove maintenance were the primary grove
activities.


Letter To Public
Liquified Natural Gas
Plant Would Pose Danger


Dear Friends and Neighbors of
Hardee County,
Sadly, again, our rural homes
and families in western Hardee
County are under attack. This
time, it is not another garbage
dump from Mr. Lambert and
Commissioner Bryant. It's
Worse.
CF Industries and Mr.
Lambert want to put a giant
Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG)
Refinery on 486 acres of mined
out CF land at the intersection of
CR663 and CR664 (3/4 mile
north of Donny Waters' King
Fries. Shack). Hope Donny
Waters or Donald Samuels beat
Minor Bryant for Commission-
er. Maybe they can stop western
Hardee from becoming the
County's Cesspool.
LNG and people don't mix.
LNG and water don't mix either
(they explode on contact). LNG
refinery and pipeline explosions
are, not measured in the number
of houses blown up. They use
the number of'Hiroshima Miles
leveled'(HMi). Vapor clouds
from LNG leaks spread across
the land asphyxiating every-
thing until a spark blows-up the
fuel-air bomb.:Air polluted with
toxic chemicals, incessant noise
from hammer compressors, per-
vasive methane and rotten egg
odors on the wind will be every-
day realities. The large amounts
of ammonia needed for refriger-
ation is also hazardous. These
refineries are easy targets for
terrorists or a mentally unstable
person in a light plane.
LNG can only be transported
in special thermos trucks or train
cars. Accidents are inevitable


and guaranteed to needlessly kill
large numbers of innocent peo-
ple. An LNG train wreck in a
town could be worse than an F5
tornado. What do you think your
property values will be living
next to an LNG time bomb?
CF Indu.,...,. and Bill Lam-
bert's long planned LNG project
was only announced in the May
28 newspaper. The public notice
said there will be huge tanks to
hold 12 billion cubic feet of
LNG plus another 300.000 gal-
lon tank. I hope, my math is
wrong but if one cubic foot =
'7.48 gallons, 12 billion cubic
feet of LNG is enough to blow
half the county away. LNG is
made by removing mercury,
C02, hydrogen sulfide, water,
etc. and then compressing the
gas to one. six-hundredth
(600th) the volume of the natu-
Sral gas. It is cooled to -260
degrees F and vents methane
during storage.
Where should this plant go?
The safest and logical place is
at the end of gas lines on the
Louisiana oil coast where they
have 100 years of refinery
experience. They can make
LNG and load it into tanker
ships without trucking billions
of gallons through heavily pop-
ulated Florida. Louisiana and
Mississippi have safe locations
for LNG plants and they want
these plants to help with the
post BP'oil spill coastal econo-
my.
Commissioner Bryant
changed land around Fort
Green from agricultural to
Industrial in 2010. Then he
called for "expedited" permit-


ting on Waste Generated Pro-
ducts last Oct. since "the land is
already Industrial!". We must
stop this LNG attack now and
remove Chair Bryant and Mr.
Lambert ASAP. Why not put an
LNG Refinery on Mr. Lam-
bert's golf course or at the
industrial landfill?
Do NOT 'Believe their
HYPE! Call your families and
neighbors. Get Mad. Why this
for Fort Green's fifth generation
of Floridians? You will be sacri-
ficed to line their pockets if you


)am


* Jujpr Laigue (ages 42. & up) Thursday.June4 1pm
-Youth & Aduilt: Tuesday, June 12 7pm .n
*Mixed Adult: "9 Pin League" (No-Tap) Thursday, June 14


let them. Without public out-
rage, they will absolutely slide
this in like they did Industrial
Land Use all around Fort
Green. The snake in the grass
raises its head. It's looking at
you.
Please attend the Thurs-
day, June 14, 6:30 PM meeting
on the LNG Refinery planned
for Fort Green. United we
stand.

Henry Kuhlman,
Fort Green


.Check It Out!
By Louise Gantt
Hardee County Public Library Volunteer


SUMMER READING PROGRAM
Our Summer Reading Program this year is entitled "Dream
Big, Read."
We will have stories, activities and crafts designed for all age
groups, from 2 through 12 years old. The program begins next
Wednesday, June 20, and will end July 26.
Please register your children before next Wednesday so that
they may participate in all of these programs and will be ready to
'have a world of fun and learning experiences! A detailed list of the
programs is available at the Hardee County Public Library.

MAD HATTER TEA PARTY
Another entertaining event that is coming up quickly, as it
is this Saturday at our library is the Mad Hatter Tea Party for
children 4-12.
As well as a tea party, there will be crafts for the children to do
and stories being read to them by our special guests, the Hardee
County Fair Royalty. Don't miss this fun day!
For more information on any of our activities, be sure and visit
our library on U.S. 17 and Oak Street in Wauchula or call us at 773-
6438.


U.S. and Japanese studies
have found that black or
green tea has antibacterial


powers that may help pre-
vent cavities and gum dis-
ease.


FREE Bowling This Summer

Bw-Of-Fun anes


Bowl-Of-Fun Lanes :


Bowl Free when you join one of the following

Summer Leagues:


* 7pm


A ..


I-
*1l


Sh e imsF


soc6:14c


*Junior League (ages 6-11): Thursday, June 14 10


943 /ouh 6th Ave* W hl
943 Soufh 6th Avo o Wauchula


Need Something to do on those lazy days of summer?

Let 4-H help you plan your summer activities!


ANNOUNCING



"Back To Basics"


Summer Day Camp

Workshops will be held on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday
mornings from 9:00 a.m. until 12 noon, starting on Tuesday, June 12th
through Tuesday, July 24th. The cost for the six week program is only
$20 per person and will cover all suppliesneeded. Some of the classes
to be offered are:


Youth 8 to 18 are invited to participate. If you have friends who are
not enrolled in 4-H they are welcome to come also. All classes will be
held at the Agri-Civic Center and the 4-H Office.
You must be pre-registered.


For more information call Mary Mitchell
at the 4-H Office 773-2164.

This exciting summer camp program is a joint effort between the
Home, and Community Education Council and the 4-H Office.

8e5 3eyl *;g ^ *g ^ ^


r


~


L


soc 14


`I'

~


:aA
liv-~







6B The Herald-Advocate, June 14,2012





The


ABOUT ... Classifieds
DEADLINE ....Tuesday noon
RATES ..........Minimum of $4.00 for 10 words. Each addi-
tional word is 22 cents. Ads in all capitals
are 32 cents per word. Headlines are $2 a
line. Blind ad box numbers are $3 extra.
BILLING........Ads must be pre-paid.
CLASSIFICATIONS:


Agriculture
Appliances
Automobile
Boats
Furniture
Help Wanted
Houses
Livestock
Lost & Found
Miscellaneous


Mobile Homes
Notices
Pets
Plants/Produce
Real Estate
Recreational
Rentals
Services
Wanted
Yard Sales


1109 W. Main St. Avon Park, FL
Phone: (800)330-3145
24 Hr. Road Service (863)452-2031
Blgtire.net c15:31-6:28c



S a B e I

New Tires Include
Free Mount & Balance
Brand Name Tires!


I Semi & Trailer
BIG SALE ON
ALL TIRES
773-0777 773-0727
116 REA Rd., Wauchula
(across from Wal-Mart)
V WISA c112:29


Tires


Get Your Mower
Ready For
The Season.

Fast & Friendly Service
$35 Pick-Up & Deliver |
773-8290 "BonRDo BOWUNG GREEn
773-44- Rload Runs Beside TloY OakI 0o Course



HARDEE CAR COMPANY
BuY HERE PAY HERE
Wauchula (across from First National Bank)







-Also--
S Billy & Janice's Rentals
Houses & Apartments

Bowling Green
BlUy Hill, Owr Flea Mate


Classifieds


LET US GRAZE our cattle on your
land. 20+ acres we will maintain
fences & bush t, 863-494-5991.
5:10-7:5p
DIESEL INJECTION repairs,
pumps, turbo, Injectors, remove
and Install, 863-381-0538.
1:19-1:10(13)p
L. DICKS INC. Is now purchasing
citrus fruit for the 2012/13 season
and beyond. Call Mark Manuel @
781-0384. 7:8tfc











382060


WASHER 2011 ENERGY SAVER,
Whirlpool, asking $175 paid $375,
863-273-9136. 6:14p
REFRIGERATOR, less than a year
old, Great Condition, $300, 773-
3168. 6:14p


2000 FORD EXPLORER, 2-Door,
$1,750 Cash, 781-1062. 6:14c
1988 FORD PICKUP EXT. CAB,
$1,000 Cash, 781-1062. 6:14c


WAREHOUSE ASSISTANT, Full
Time, computer and forklift
knowledge required. Drug
Screening, 863-767-8972. 6:14c
HANDYMAN/DRIVER with double
cab truck or cargo van. Some
local work and 1 week elsewhere
after 6/28, 941-716-1411. 6:14p
ELDERLY GENTLEMAN needs
live-in housekeeper. Call for
appointment, 863-261-7111.
6:7,14p


COMPUTER REPAIR
by
Garry A. Phillips
Serving Hardee County
New System Setup Virus Removal
Malware Removal Email/Internet Setup
Computer Slow ?? Tune-ups Available
Call Us For All Your Computer Needs
Pick up & Delivery Available!
448-2561 Payment Plans Also Available 773-0518
computerrepairbygarryphillips.com c16:14c



G & G Lawn Mowing, Etc.
Lawn Mowing Landscaping
Leaf Raking Bush Trimming
.Iraitn ,

Free Esimates
G,eorge 863-245-7463
cl6:14p


W. B. Olliff, Jr., Tree Surgeon, Inc.
773:-4478

0 1


_4 Free Estimates
Insured 30+ years experience :14


.W.'\4



T BE T E No matter how you look at it,
S E BE ST DEA L there's no better place to shop
FROM ANY ANGLE for your next car.


Large St
Cars to C

.Buy Here


election of
choose From

* Pay Here


TEAM & SOLO DRIVERS.
Immediate positions available. 48
CPM split for teams. 35 CPM for
solo drivers. Drop and hook avail-
able. No touch freight. Weekly
pay plus Insurance. CDL-A with 1
year OTR required. Food grade
tank carrier. 800-877-2430.
www.lndlanrlvertransport.com.
6:14c


CHURCH CUSTODIAN. Monday -
Thursday, 9:00 a.m. 12:00 p.m.;
12 hours per week. Apply in per-
son by June 28 at First United
Methodist Church, 4910 N.
Church Ave., Bowling Green.
6:14,21c


LICENSED BARBER needed, 375-
3750. 6:7-7:5p
SERVICE ROUTE DRIVER, apply
in person, 409 Goolsby Street,
Wauchula. 5:24-6:14c
PERSONAL BILINGUAL ASSIS-
TANT. In Wauchula full time, good
money. 863-808-9922.
4:12-6:14p


2/1,7 ACRES, LARGE OAKS, Fruit
trees. Owner ready to sell. Price
Reduced $140,000, 863-235-0079.
6:14p


75,000 FIRM, large home plus
guest quarters, 5 acres fenced,
941-716-1411. 6:14p


W3-B, 3 B, Frame home,
Wauchula, downtown area, newly
remodeled, 2256 sq.ft., applil-
ances included, $120,000 OBO,
863-832-9660. 5:17-6:14p
3 BR, 2 1/2 BA, block/brick, cen-
tral A/H, 2 large living rooms,
large screened patio, split floor
plan, 2 bonus rooms, work shop,
fenced yard, $140,000 OBO, 318
Riverside Dr., Wauchula, 773'-
0945. 5:17-6:14p


FOUND WHITE POODLE MALE,
young, found In Bowling Green,
773-2424. 6:14c
FOUND SILVER AND GRAY, small
dog, white tip on tall, 781-2017.
6:14nc
LOST WEEDEATER Sunday
between Steve Roberts Special
and Heard Bridge, 781-2017.
6:f4p

In music, a 1/16 note is also
called a semiquaverr."


SUNRISE COMMUNITY INC.
Is currently accepting applications for the position of:
DIRECT SUPPORT STAFF
Qualified applicants must meet the following:
-18 years old High School Diploma or Equivalent
1 year experience Medical, or Childcare setting
Must be able to.pass Law Enforcement Background
:Screening and Drug Test
ALL INTERESTED CAN APPI=YIN-4tERSON AtM.-
SUNRISE COMMUNITY INC.
1014 6th Ave. South, Wauchula, FL 33873
EOE/DFWP cl6:14c





Animal Habitat Cleaners
Part Time ape habitat cleaner needed.
Applicants should be available any of the seven
days of the week, including holidays
Applicants must be able to lift 50 lbs., and have
the ability to workoutside in the heat, humidity
and inclement weather
TB test required
Please send resume to resume@centerforgreat
apes.org or fax 863-767-8904. c16:1


*:* *1* s :


L T 0 R S
(863),773-2128


REALTORS
JOE L. DAVIS
JOE L. DAVIS, JR.
REALTOR JOHN H. O'NEAL
See more listings at
www.joeldavis.com
REAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS


commerciall lot in Zolfo Springs
las frontage on SR 66. $30,000!
'RICE REDUCED! 3BR/2BA
IH on 5 acs w/frontage on SR
2. NOW $70,000!


10 ac w/paved
Great for pasture
homesite. $63,000!
38.5 acs on the
w/lots of beautiful
nalmettos! Pale


PRICE REDUCED! 3BR/2BA 2BR/2BA MH. $47
MH located on 5 acs near
Zolfo Springs. $45,000! Paradise: Little
Island-Beach Conc
Commercial property on US17! Gulf front. $229,00
38 storage units w/partial roof,
city utilities, zoned C-2, sold "as PRICE REDUC
is"! $225,000! Great home in Po
2.5 acs. 2 miles
PRICE REDUCED! 50 acs in $138,000!
NE Desoto Co; deer, turkey,
wild hogs, beautiful live oaks, PRICE REDUCE
improved pasture, pond & pastureland locate
creek. NOW $190,000! Roberts Rd in we.
Co. $200,000!
PRICE REDUCED! 20 acs
zoned industrial on Hwy 17. 3BR/2BA/2CG hoi
$399,000! tiful golf course vi
RRALITOR ASSOCIATES AF ERn HUnIP


rd frontage.
, farming or

Peace River
oaks, pines &
barn &
9,900!
Gasparilla
do. 2BR/2BA,
10!
'ED! Wow!
pash area on
from town.

ED! 40 acs
ed on Owen
stern Hardee

ne has beau-
ew. $225,000!


KENNY SANDERS-781-O KAREN OW'AL.. 781-7633
KEVIN SANDERS-.99-3O MONICA RLAS----781-0888
DAVID ROYAL.-.--781-348 JIMMY EDEKNIELD--448-2821
l HIGHWAY 17 SOUTH, WAUCHULA,i L 33873
1_B14C


Gold & Silver

PaiWn Sfhop
Paying up to $1,700 per ounce for gold,
tools, TV's, computers, lawn equip., antiques & more


Mon., Tue., Wed., Fri., 10am-6pm Thurs. & Sat. 10am-3pm,


(863)375-2121
North Hwy 17 Bowling Green


c16:14c


o30 Day Guarantee
|| fW lon Motor & Transmission Only







THE PALMS

S Available for
Immediate Occupancy








701 La Playa Drive, Wauchula


Monday Friday 7:00 AM 3:30 PM
Saturday 9:00 AM 11:30 AM
After hours by appointment
(863) 773-3809
TDD 800-955-8771 C
0.'.,.,: Equal Housing Opportunity


- - - i -


R E A


el
:l


I N C.,




1,


The


June 14, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 7B






Classifieds


ALUMINUM TRUCK TOOL BOX,"
double lid, $100, 863-735-1069.
6:7p


5 ACRE TRACTS WITH 2 M.H.,
wells and utilities, owner financ-
ing available, 863-399-3333.
6:7,14p


5 ACRES INCLUYENDO 2 M.H.,
noria de agua, y electrecidada,
financiada por el dueno Ilame,


8683-399-3333;.6:7,14p

Notices


PERSONAL PROPERTY of *0


Hunette Francios will be sold pur-
suant to Warehouseman's Lien.
Said sell will be held at 114
Carlton Street, Wauchula at 9:00
a.m. on June 16, 2012. 6:7,14c



SADOPT A PET! If ypu have lost a
pet'or are looking for a new one,
the City of Wauchula Invites,you
to come end see if you can' find
the pet you're looking for. The
Wauchula Animal Control is locat-
ed at 685 Airport Road. Please
call 773-3205 or more informa-
tion. ' tfc-dh
ATTENTIONI; State' Statutes
828.29 requires that all cats and
dogs sold in Florida be at least 8
weeks old, have an official health
certificate, have necessary shots
and be free of parasites. tfc-dh


.CHIHUAHUA PUPPIES, $100,
863-303-4551. 6:14c
FREE TO A GOOD HOME, Aussie
mix puppies, 781-2797. 6:14nc
CHIHUAHUA PUPPIES, 8 WEEKS,
shots, $125, 863-245-7707 or 863-
735-2200. 6:14,21p
m-


SUMMER PLANT SALE-Crape
Myrtle Trees $15 or 2/$25.
Assorted Hedge Plants and
Flowering Plants 1 Gallon Pots
$2.50. Center Hill Nursery, 2949
Center Hill Road, Bowling Green,
FL 863-223-5561. 6:14,21


I PoueS


U-PICK CORN $3/DOZEN -
Center Hill Farm, 2949 Center Hill
Road, Bowling Green, FL 863-
223-5561. 6:7p

RelEtt


S8,6 ACRE VALENCIA grove In
,Bowlirig Green with 4 inch well
and micro jet Irrigation. Needs
TLC. $58,000 Call Mark Manuel @
Harmon Real Estate 863-781-
0384. 5:24tfc


FOR SALE OR RENT, 2BR 1B,
5105 Howard Street Bowling
Green, $500 month, 781-1062.
6:14c


* Hardee Tree Service Inc.
Licensed & Insuirded
20 Years experience Owner: Edward "Ed" Pilkington



* Stump Grinding Land Clearing Complete Tree Removeal


863-781-2089
165 Charley Bryan Road Ona


clfi:24-6f14n


Carol s Pool Service
Serving All Of Highlands & Hardee Counties

Call Us For All Your Pool Service Needs
.' ) Carol Tomblin Owner

S449-1806 or 452-6026
cl:19Ctfc




a rGILLIARD iL

FILL DIRT INC.

FDtR Sa ee
Pon Digging Dich Cean


ILamar Gilliard Zolfo Springs
Home: (863) 735-0490 '. 4:19c Mobile: (941).456-6507




30 Day Warranty
Motor S9 Transmission
Bi HE 1Kl No MiuF r
Pu HcAd OR
s anr | .ri ... Jmmy
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK SE HABLA ESPANOL
U.S. Hwy. 17 Bowling Green 375-4441
$ Huge Discounts for Cash Deals $
24 Hour Towing Service Lowest Possible Rates Fast and Reliable
781-3090 or 781-3091 cli1:5tf


REALTY INC.
404 South 6th Avenue
Wauchula, FL 33873
Custom Hdme with beamed ceilings, large fam-
ily room, tone fireplace. 3B/3Bth, fenced in
pool area, convenient to schools. $125,000
Executive home with pool; 3B/3Bth, 24x12 out-
side storage, great neighborhood for your fam-
ily. $135,000
Large home on .75 Acre; 4B/3Bth, mother-in-
law suite, fenced backyard, w/b fireplace, dou-,
ble garage. $149,000
2B/2Bth M/H, carpet floors, inside utility and
storage shed. $42,500


r' I SERVICE
DORIS S. LAMBERT, G.R.I., Broker


E YOU


2BEDR-OM 1 BATH, Apartment,
$600 month, '$550 deposit, 773-
0100. 6:14tfc
FOR SALE OR RENT, 4 BR 1.5 B
Palmetto Street Bowling Green,
$700 Month, 781-1062. 6:14c
FOR SALE OR RENT, 3BR iB,
4411 Hwy 17 Bowling Green, $600
month, 781-1062. 6:14c
FOR SALE OR RENT, 2BR 1B, 155
Broward Street Bowling Green,
$550 month, 781-1062. 6:14c
NICE CLEAN FURNISHED
Efficiency apartment in
Wauchula. Utilities Included $500
per month or $125 per week.
Damage deposit and references
required, 863-832-0676. 6:14p
BRICK 3BR-2B 2 car garage. 311
Park Drive, Riverview. Central Air
& heat, $1,000 month. Call 773-
2109 to see. 6:7-28c
2 BR MOBILE HOME, central air,
$550/month plus deposit, north
Wauchula, 863-773-2859. 6:7,14p
ULLRICH'S STORAGE UNITS,
several sizes, corner of 9th Ave. &
Gbplsby St., 773-6448 or 773-
929J. .3:22tfc,


RENT-TO-OWN -
MOBILE HOMES 1, 2, 3
Bedrooms. Cheaper then paying
rent. Close to schools ant hospl-
tar. Lot' rent $300. Se habla
espanol. 863-698-4910 or 863-
698-4908. Call today. 1:5tfc
ATTENTION The Federal Fair
Housing Act Prohibits advertising
any preference or limitation
based on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial status or
national origin, or the Intention to
make such a preference or limita-
tion. Familial status includes chil-
dren under 18 living with parents
or guardians and pregnant
women. tfc-dh


MEDICAL OFFICE SPACE and
office space for rent, 500 to 5000
sq. ft. available, 863-767-0888.
6:7-28c


ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS,
Thursday 7:00 p.m., Grace
Fellowship Church, 131 S. 8th
Ave., Wauchula. Bill 727-326-
3816. 6:7tfc-dh
EXPERIENCED, trustworthy, kind
and loving caregiver. To care for
your disabled or elderly loved
one. Bonded with excellent refer-
ences. 863-767-0037. 863-832-
4136. 5:17-6:14p
OVERCOMERS MEETINGS
(Gillesple), Woman's Club on
Wednesday, 7pm Kenny
Sanders Is the facilitator. For
more information call 773-5717.
2:16tfc
DO YOU HAVE a problem with
drugs? Narcotics. Anonymous
meets Monday and Thursday
nights 7:00 p.m. at First United
Methodist Church, at the corner
of Palmetto and 7th Ave., Wau-
chula. tfc-dh
ATTENTIONI State Statutes 489-
119 Section 5 Paragraph B and
Hardee County Ordinance. 87-09
Section 10 Paragraph D require
all ads for any construction-relat-
ed service to carry the contrac-
tor's license number. tfc-dh


,***
NEED A WELL OR HAVE PUMP,
TROUBLE? CALL
ULLRICH'S PITCHER PUMP
For complete well, sales,
service and installation,
call (863) 773-6448.
S7:18tfc


Women, do you
need lower rent?
See if you qualify call


735-2222 or 773-5717




REVELL dUTO SALES












SoufhScapes

Landscaping L.L.C.

PingQuaIj service or AllYour Landscae Nee


Landscape Design, Installation, and Rehab
Irrigation Installation and Repair
SFull Service Maintenance Includes:

Mowing-Weed EatingEdging
Prunning of Shrubs & Trees- Weed Control Fertilization


_ ~ For A Free Quote Call

Ef'mkD 863-832-3572 .
We Know What Grows
FNGLA CERTIFIED Manager: Joshua Southwell
^_________ ^ ^ ^ _


What you have become is
the price you paid to get
what you used to want.
-Mignon McLaughlin


Bus. (863) 773-0007
Fax: (863) 773-0038
www.lambertrealty.net
Steve Johnson
Make an offer on this 2B/15Bth M/H, 10x24
room addition, all appliances including extra
refrigerator, water softener; fenced yard and
large concrete driveway. Listed at $99,000
2B/1Bth M/H with carport, well and septic.
$30,000
165 Acres of native Florida and 3B/2Bth M/H;
located just outside city limits. $145,000
COMMERCIAL LOT BOWLING GREEN -
140x135 highly visible lot near post office and
Hwy. 17. $18,000


CAN'


COUNT ON [3
KENNETH A. LAMBERT. rnkpr


ASSOCIATES
DELOIS JOHNSON 781-2360 CHARLOTTE TERRELL 781-6971 STEVE JOHNSON 781-0518


IS ALCOHOL CAUSING a prob-
lem? Call Alcoholics Anonymous
In Hardee County at 781-6414.
Several weekly meetings.
tffc-dh
THE WAUCHULA LIONS CLUB
collects NOT broken prescription
eyeglasses, cases and sunglass-
es. Please drop off at 735 N. 6th
Ave. tfc-dh

Yard Sales
HELP CENTER THRIFT STORE,
1085 Hwy. 17, Wauchula, 9:30-
5:30, M-S, pickup, delivery, con-
signment, layaway, 773-0550.
5:17tfc
MISSION THRIFT STORE INC.
123 N. 7th Ave. All donations
appreciated. Pick-up available for
large Items. 773-3069. 1:12tfc
HEAVEN SCENT THRIFT STORE
now offers pick-up service for
large donations. We appreciate
your generous support. 863-773-
9777. 12:29tfc
PAYING TOP $ Gold, Silver, Gund,
TV's and more, 375-2121.
6.14-7:12p


FRIDAY/SATURDAY, 7am-?, 2932
Oak St., ZS, Lots of misc.l 6:14p
SATURDAY 8-1pm, 3365 James
Cowart Wauchula. Kids items for
sale also boys bunkbed.
6:14p
SATURDAY 9-12, 252 Old Dixie
Hwy Bowling Green. 6:14p
GARAGE SALEI Friday/Saturday,
329 Causey Rd., Wauchula.
Carpentry tools, compressor, air
tools, nails, lumber, machinist
tools, electrical boxes, etc., 863-
448-2788. 6:14p
MOVING SALEI Thursday/Friday/
Saturday, 446 Metheny Rd.,
Wauchula. 6:14p
SATURDAY, EVERYTHING MUST
GO! 301 West Bay, Wauchula.
tools, lawn mowers, clothes, fur-
niture, misc. 6:14c
BENEFIT YARD SALE-SATURDAY,
8-7, East on Main to Griffin Road
beside Circle K, go 3 miles, on
right. 6:14nc
FRIDAY/SATURDAY 518 E. 5th
Street, Zolfo. 6:14p
SATURDAY, 8-3, Hwy 62, Chancey
Rd. 5 family. Guns, Craftsmans
riding mower, tools, clothes,
much more, boat. 6:14p


A "7t~pWt~ "c


I n p, -.. -. ,.. ..ipnm AiaB |
Mon. Wed. 10..- 6p.; Fri. & Sat. 10..-7,./Closed Thursday & Sunday
3505 US HwY 17 S ZOLFO SPRINGS dl:s5t







Realtors .
NOEY A. FLORES, BROKER _.,' "
310 Court St.
Wauchula, Florida 33873
(863) 773-3337 Fax: (863) 773-0144
Oralia D. Flores
www.floresrealty.net 863-781-2955,
II^^ ^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ _^ ^ ^ ^ _^ ^ ^ k


REDUCED

11 --aA^~


LISTING


WAUCHULA 2BR/1BA Frame Home with Central Air &
Heat, 1488 Total Sq Ft, Large Lot, Screen Patio Overlooking
Backyard, and Detached Storage Shed.
'Offered at $58,000
WAUCHULA 3BR/1BA CB home on a corner lot. Central air &
heat and city utilities. Priced Reduced to $59,900.00
WAUCHULA 107 Acres just out of Wauchula on E. Main St.
Great farming or grazing opportunity. $736,700
BOWLING GREEN Ft Green Area 3BR/2BA 2002 MH with
central air & heat, laminate flooring fresh paint and knock down
texture on the wall. Pole barn, fenced-in and front porch. Priced to
sell at $69,900
ZOLFO SPRINGS 1995 4BR/2BA double-wide MH with central
air & heat, sitting on 7+/- acres. 3260 total sq ft, including large
addition in front and back. Quiet setting with lots of trees on a
dead-end road. Must see for $87,500
WHY RENT WHEN YOU CAN BUY AND BUILD EQUITY!!!

WE SHARE THE SAME MLS WITH HIGHLANDS COUNTY!
L 2 Remember, Our listings are on the Internet.
Anyone with a computer can access them anytime! [
03 After Hours
Oralia D. Flores (863) 781-2955 John Freeman (863) 781-4084
Noey A.Flores (863) 781-4585 Lawrence A. Roberts (863) 781-4380
Michael D. Boyett (863) 781-2827 Jamie Spurlock (863) 835-1611


JIM SEE REALTY, INC.

206 North 6th Avenue, Wauchula, FL 33873
Office (863)773-0060 Evening (863)781-1338
www. imseerealty.com
James V. See, Jr., Broker


SReal
112 Rick Knight (863) 781-1396
John H. Gross (863) 273-1017
Shane Conley (863) 781-9664


Itor Associates
Calvin Bates (863) 381-2242
Dusty Albritton (863) 781-0161
Parker Keen (813)'523-1523


l6:14c
c16 14c


Spacious home located. in Briarwood
Subdivision. 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath house with
wrap around porch, detached 2 car garage with
office and full bath. WAS $379,000! NOW
OFFERED AT $339,000!

REDUCED! 4-5 bedroom, 4 bath custom built
home on 9 acres. County road access, next to
Wauchula. Home is complimented with screened
back porch and in-ground pool. Land also has 7
'i actes of producing nursery. $380,000

Make An Offer! 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath home in
town. Hardwood floors, large screened porch
with built in fireplace/grill. Lovely house reduced
to $87,500!


Duplex! 4 BR, 2 BA one side. 3 BR, 2 BA other
side. Central air & heat. Paved road. City water
& sewer. $115,000
58 acres of gorgeous fenced property close to
town. Well & septic from old homesite. Scattered
old Oaks & Pines. Offered at $287,100
3 Bedroom, 2 Bath home in Wauchula. Newer
roof; hardwood floors, updated kitchen. $75,000
REDUCED,to $159,500! Great home on several
large lots in Wauchula. Hardwood floors.
Beautiful brick fireplace. 3 bedrooms, 2 baths. 2
car carport.
Newer home located on Torrey Oaks Golf
Course. 2 Bedrooms, 2 Baths with a garage.
Corner lot with a fenced yard. Asking $137,500


, - - - 1 L


i'fi'


1)


E


M,


I -







8B The Herald-Advocate, June 14, 2012

HEARTLAND HONOR BAND


'C,, (


COURTESY PHOTOS
Hardee Junior High School students recently participated in the Heartland Honor
Band. These 12 local students, along with other top students from the Heartland area,
rehearsed for two days to present a concert at the South Florida Community College
auditorium. The students were (front row,.from left) Alex Lopez, Danielle Weeks, Emelie
Wolgast and Damaris Arana; (middle) Rebeca Espinoza, Azucena Lopez and Faith
Hodges; (back) Mikayla Crayton, Brandi Swearingen, Augustine Morales, Ivan Chavez
and Jonathan Martin.


HUMDINGER REWARD!
I ... ":1 "" .


Science Project Tests


Oil-Spill Cleanup Theory


By MACHELLE DOLLAR
For The Herald-Advocate
Science fairs are becoming
more popular around the United
States. Young enthusiasts are
taking on the world's problems
to. create solutions. One local
enthusiast has taken on a proj-
ect of her own.
Fifteen-year-old Meagan
Shivers. the daughter of John
and Sandra Shivers of Zolfo
Springs, has tested a solution to
cleaning up oil spills.
Acknowledging her vast
amount of research. Shivers
competed in science fairs local-
ly, regionally and had the spe-
cial privilege of attending the
prestigious event known among
the science community as I-
SWEEEP, the International
Sustainable World (Engineer-
ing, Energy & Environment)
Project Olympiad.
Currently, spills are ap-
proached with floating booms
and skimmers. While there are
various, ways to clean a slick
using this method, it's not as
effective as what Shivers has
been working on.
Last summer during a televi-
sion.program, Shivers learned


of PRP (Petroleum Remedia-
tion Product) powders. After
thoroughly researching the
product, she then began to build
an experiment around her find-
ings. Her question became,
"Does the salinity of water
affect the amount of oil
Petroleum Remediation Product
powder will absorb?"
To begin. Shivers took three
different salinities, created an
oil spill, and tested how much
oil the PRP powder picked up.
She quickly learned that not
only did the powder absorb the
oil regardless of the salinity, but
it would also absorb nearly
twice its mass. To test this, she
took eight grams of oil and
added four grams of the pow-
der; on multiple occasions it
absorbed all of the oil every
time.
"I wanted to see if I had
found a great way to clean up
oil spills," began Shivers. "Oil
spills are one of the world's
largest environmental problems
now. They kill many kinds of
animals and plants. By finding
this product, I found an effec-
tive way to clean up oil spills no


matter the salinity of water.
"I feel very proud of myself
for all of my accomplishments
this year," she added. "I had
dreamed of going to interna-
tional since I began competing
in seventh grade, I finally
achieved my goal this year!"
To continue her research,
Shivers plans on extending her
project by adding different
salinities as well as varying the
amount of PRP applied. Next
year her goal is to not only
attend I-SWEEEP again, but to
participate .in ISEF, the
International Science & Engi-
neering Fair as well.
The mission of I-SWEEEP,
as taken from its website, is to
spark interest and awareness in
the planet's 'sustainability chal-
lenges, help young people grasp
the extent of these issues, find
workable solutions to these
challenges, accelerate the
progress toward a sustainable
world by engaging youths at an
early age.
The fair was held May 3-6 in
Houston, Texas, where Meagan
was joined by her father, moth-
er and sister.


COURTESY PHOTOS
Wauchula Elementary School planned a special treat for the top students who partici-
pated in the "Go Take a Hike" walkathon fundraiser at the school. Several students
were able to enjoy a ride in a Hummer limousine traveling to Pizza Hut, where they also
enjoyed lunch.


AM-SOUTH REALTY
Each office independently owned and operated.



r I --af


Robert Hinerman
227-0202


Nancy Craft
832-0370


Price Reduction!! Call today to see this
roomy 3 BD, 2Bth family home with tile
floors and two car garage, many extras.
$139.900.
3 bedroom, 2 bath mobile home and 10
acres. Call today! $150.000
Priced () $89.900 Nice 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath
CB home in Bowling Green area that has
central heat & air, one car carport, and tile
flooring.
3 bedroorri, 1.5 bath CB home in Bowling
Green is close to schools and shopping.
Call for an appointment today. $59.900
2 Bedroom, 1 Bath house with heat & air
and One car carport. Only $59.000
5 Acre Tract off Hollandtown Rd. Priced @
$60.000
Commercial property Hwy 17 N Priced
@ $39.500


SEEW







DIEC REINERSRE
BRNGTO230 .S 2

IN OM APT41-009


702 SOUTH 6thAVENUE, WAUCHULA
(863) 773-2122 FAX (863) 773-2173
Gary Delatorre Broker
www.cbhardee.com


Richard Dasher
781-0162


Victor Salazar
245-1054


$37.500 is the price for this 3 Bedroom, 1
Bath M/H with central heat & air. Call Robert
today for More information.
7.15 beautiful acres along Peace River, to
relax on weekends, or build a dream house.
Call today for more information. Priced @
$120.000
PEACE AND QUIET!! 10 acres with 2 mobile
homes. Priced to sell!! $149.900.
Looking For Just The Right House? Well, You
Fount It!! Great starter home, Great first time
buyer, Great Senior Citizen home, 3 bed-
room, 2 bath, living room, w/raised ceilings,
great kitchen, all appliances included, cen-
tral heat/air, breakfast room w/pantry, dining
room, pass-thru window from kitchen, break-
fast room and living room w/double doors to
covered back porch, all in-lay flooring-easy
care-helps fight allergies. Extra lot, outside
storage and a great price. Only $129.500 -
call Nancy to see this lovely home, great
neighborhood, great floor plan with lots of
extras, Don't forget the 2 car garage. House
shaded on East and West with large oaks.
Oh forgot the double-paned windows.
cl6:14c


COURTESY PHOTO
Freshman Meagan Shivers took her project, including using a powder to clean up oil
spills, all the way to the prestigious I-SWEEEP in Houston, Texas. Here, she is pictured
locally with her experiment, where it won a $50 Barnes & Noble gift card.















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***************k**SCH 3-DIGIT 326
935 05-08-03 14P 3S
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
404 LIBRARY WEST
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-0001


The Herald-Advocate
tUSPS i~S-780|
Thursday. June 14, 2012
I


By MICHAEL KELLY
Of The Herald-Advocate
County commissioners were
given a presentation from a
longtime county resident, a col-
lege student and a University of
Miami economist on the long-
term economic effects of agri-
culture land uses versus phos-
phate mining.
Dr. Barbara Carlton, a 53-
year Hardee County resident,
began the presentation before
introducing South Florida Com-
munity College student Rito
Melendez and Dr. Richard
Weisskoff, a University of
Miami economics professor.
Carlton told the commission
she was at the meeting to have a
clear and open dialogue regard-
ing Hardee County and its
future.
"Al Gore. did not send me
here. I am not here to close the
phosphate mines," she said. "I
am here to talk about the future
of Hardee County.
"Hardee County is a unique,
distinctive community that if it
doesn't have somebody caring
about it and endowing it for the
future, it will be lost," she said
before introducing Melendez.
Melendez received a civic
award from the college for his
project on phosphate mining
versus ecotourism, titled "I Dig
It."
Melendez, 25, said as a child
he enjoyed growing up in the
Bowling Green area and
recalled all the fun he had play-
ing outside. "Me and my broth-
ers didn't need a dollar to have
fun growing up," he said. "We
spent a lot of time playing in
Payne's Creek and the Peace
River as a child."
Melendez said he wants to
see Hardee County remain rural
and have all the outdoor activi-
ties he enioved as a child.


Rito Melendez presents his
commissioners.
He feels tourists would enjoy
the natural beauty of the county.
"There isn't any place in the
world like Hardee County," he
concluded.
Weisskoff said he is a statisti-
cal economist and contends that
a 10,000-acre parcel of land
provides fewer jobs from min-
ing than it would if it remained
in agriculture.
"Agriculture is the locomo-
tive which pulls the rest of the
county along," he said.
He went on to say that agri-
culture has numerous other
"cluster" supporting industries
and jobs that go alone with it.


PHOTOS BY MICHAEL KELLY
school project, "I Dig It," to
such as chemical sales and
equipment.
"There is a squeeze on the
family farm, and agritourism is
a way to .supplement farming
income," Weisskoff said. Ag-
ritourism is when tourists,
mostly from more urban areas,
visit an area to learn about and
participate in farming activities.
Peace River Explorations
Inc., a non-profit formed by a
group of local citizens, is trying
to begin eco and agritourism in
Hardee County, and Weisskoff
said it could potentially employ
150 people both directly and
indirectly if it works.


Dr. Richard Weisskoff, a statistical economist, spoke to the commission about the pros
and cons of farming and mining on Hardee County's economy.


Thomas Santarlas(R) for Sheriff

E' ... i My Pledge to You!

Transparency with Law Enforcement
Agency Business.


MISTAKES HAVE VALUE,


IF You LEARN FROM THEM


By MADELEINE ZAMORA
Special To The Herald-Advocate
The person I have interviewed was
my father; Efrain Zamora. He was born
and raised in Mexico until he had
moved to the United States.
When he was a young boy he used to
play with
other young '
boys that 1 t
lived near-
by. I can
imagine him running around playing
around just like how little boys do now.
His favorite thing to do was to play out-
side with his friends. He didn't like hav-
ing to help his mom around the house
and I completely understand, I mean,
who does? Either way, he did it any-
ways and would find a way to make a
game out of it.
As he got older he started changing
little by little. He loved playing soccer
outside. He would call some of his
friends to see if they wanted to play. He
didn't get that far in school; he only
went up to the third grade. He turned
out to be a very smart man, for a guy
that didn't get his full education.
His favorite thing to do was to get
wet in the river near his home. His
mother would just sit there watching
him have fun. That was also a good
memory of his. I had asked him what he
did as a teenager. You can see by his
smile he had some great times back
then. He said that was what he called


his crazy years.
We both laughed for a little while. I
think interviewing him made him look
back at those years because if you think
about it, people don't really think about
their past much.
Life is so much different than how it
used to be back then. He said things are
more high tech with all these new
phones, computers, radios, TVs, all
these things they didn't have back then.
He remembers when he had first
started learning to drive. He was so ner-
vous but also happy and excited all at
the same time. He loved the wind blow-
ing in his face and just the feeling of
knowing he can drive.
My final questions to him was if he
could go back in time and change any-
thing, what would he change? He
laughed a little and said there is nothing
I would change. I was so confused and
surprised. The reason why was because
if he would have changed that mistake,
he would never have learned from it,
and that made perfect sense to me.
I believe this interview took him
back once again and I'm glad he
enjoyed this interview.
Back In Time is the result of a class
assignment given to ninth graders at
Hardee Senior High School. Each
student is asked to interview an older
person. Selected interviews are pub--
lished here as an encouragement to the
students and for the enjoyment of our
readers.


Dice used in crap games in Las Vegas are manufactured to a tolerance of 0.0002 inch-
es, less than 1/17 the thickness of a human hair.
Aurochs was a large-sized cattle species. It is re-corded to have gone into extinction
in 1627. It is said that this cattle evolved from India, migrating to the Middle East and
reaching as far as Europe.





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7 trasound, bIgal Mtfnmoi ra h
S863o491*n B onebe yServi

Angus W. irohom, Jr, MO homes R. Chhom, Ml4D iss l.l 6 L.-w.ilLmy, l l L. f.:(|tA
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SERVICES AVAILABLE AT OUR OTHER LOCAiOit '.:. . .
ULTRASOUND FLUORQSCOPY CT (CAT SCAN) HU3t FIELD } tll 'S!r!B OS
S BREAST MRI WELLNESS SCREENING NUCLEAR MEDICIN:! .O t$.P~N'W M ,i
'rJlrcT CUMiSO VIRTUAL COLONOSCOPY HEART SCORE. P)IIT 'AI.~k .ML. A :
Oi ACCREUI[AlON DEXA BONE DENSITOMETRY ~,f( y,t.; : '*^iO


Economist Tells County

Tourism Means 150 Jobs


PAGE ONE


* The Sheriffs Line-Item Budget will be
available for you to Inspect and/or Copy
at Anytime.


* Creation of a Citizen Review Board to Investigate Alleged
Deputy Misconduct.

Fair Employee Compensation & Benefits Packages Based
Upon Merit.
* Quarterly Town Hall Meetings Located in Wauchula,
Bowling Green, Zolfo Springs, and Ona.

* Community Oriented Policing Approach to Combating Crime. A
Partnership with the Residents, Business Owners, Churches,
Schools, and Mining Operations.

* Restoring Trust between the Community and Law Enforcement.

* A Reduction in the Crime Rate.

Did the current sheriff provide these services to you during
the past four years?






www.mynewsheriff.com
Pd. Pol. Adv. Paid for by the Thomas Santarlas Campaign Account. Approved by Thomas Santarlas.


fll~


, I ^


' -









2C The Herald-Advocate, June 14, 2012





Schedule of Weekly Services-


PPrinted as a Public Service
S . ." ., by'. '
w14?Thi cald-Advocate, -
'.Wauchuil, Florida

'! line: Thursday 5 p.m.


BOWLING GREEN
APOSTOLIC LIGHTHOUSE
UNITED PENTECOSTAL
CHURCH
310 Orange St.
375-3100
Sunday Morning ..................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening ....................6:00 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting........7:00 p.m.
Thursday Service ..................7:30 p.m.

CHESTER GROVE MB CHURCH
708 W. Grape St. 375-3353
Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship '...................8:00 a.m.
Sun. Eve. Worship
1st & 3rd ..............4:00 p.m. 3:00 p.m.
Tues. Prayer/Bible Study ......6:00 p.m.

CHRISTIAN BIBLE
FELLOWSHIP
Hwy;17 South
Morning Worship ..............10:30 a.m.
Youth Group Sunday ..:.......6:00 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
121 West Broward St. 375-2231
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
.Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ...:.............. 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday ................... ........7:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD '
TRUE HOLINESS OUTREACH
725 Palmetto St.
375-3304
Sunday School ....................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:0 a.m.
Tues. Night Bible Study ...... 7:30 p.m.
Evening Worship
lst Sunday ....................5:00 p.m.

COMMUNITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Main & W. Centra.
Sunday AM Worship............10:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening ....................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer Meeting ...........7:00 p.m.

FAITH ASSEMBLY OF GOD
4937 Hwy. 17 N.- 375-4206
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Disciples Train & Choirs ......5:30 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Bowling Green
S. Hwy. 17. 375-2253
SUNDAY:
Bible Study .......... ..........9:30 a m.
Morning Worship ;;....... 10:45 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:30 p,m.

WEDNESDAY.:
Discipleship Training
Youth & Adult .................6:30 p.m:
AWANA (ages 3-5th grade) ....6:30 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Grape & Church Streets 375-2340
Sunday School .....................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ..................6:00 p.m.
FORT GREEN BAPTIST
CHURCH
Baptist Church Road 773-9013
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening ...................600 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ..............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study .......7:00 p.m.

HOLY CHILD
SPANISH CATHOLIC MISSION
Misa (Espanol) Sunday ........7:00 p.m.

IGLESIA DEL DIOS VIVO
105 Dixiana St. 375-4191
Domingo De Predicacion ....11:00 p.m.
Martes Estudio Biblico..........7:00 p.m.
Miercoles Estudior Juvenil ....7:00 p.m.
Jueves De Prelicacion ..........7:00 p.m.'

IMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH
210 E. Broward St. 375-4681
Sunday School.......................945 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ............. 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..................7:00 p.m

MACEDONIA PRIMITIVE
BAPTIST CHURCH
607 Palmetto St.'
Church School ......................9:30 a.m.
Morning Service ................1...I:00 a.m.
Evening Service ....................7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study/Prayer ......7:00 p.m.
Communion-2nd Sun. Eve. ..6:00 p.m.

Mf. PISGAH BAPTIST CHURCH
6210 Mt. Pisgah Rd. 375-4409
Sunday School ...................9:45 a.nm.
Morning Worship ............11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training.... ....5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time........7:00 p.m.

NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
Mason Dixon & County Line Rd.
781-5887
Sunday Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
2nd Sunday Communion ....11:00 a.m.
Bread of Life Sunday........12:15 p.m.
T.H.E. Meeting Tuesday ....7:00 p,m.


Donnis & Kathy Barber
Hwy. 66 East
RO. Box 780


BOWLING GRIEN
OPEN DOOR FULL GOSPEL
PRAISE CENTER
E. Broward St.
Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Service ...................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service ............7:30 p.m.

PRIMERA MISSION BAUTISTA
Murray Road off Hwy. 17
375-2295
Domingos Escuela Dom. ......9:45 a,m!
Servicio de Adoracion.......... 11:00 a.m.
Servicio de Predicacion ........5:00 p.m.
Miercoles Servico ................6:30 p.m.

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 South US Hwy 17
Morning Service ................10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.

ST. JOHN A.M.E. CHURCH
513 W. Orange St.
375-2911
Sunday Church School ..........9:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship....11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Bible Study .......6:30 p.m.

VICTORY PRAISE CENTER
128 E. Main St.
Sunday Scho9l ..................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Thursday Night Services,
Evening Worship...............,...7:00 p.m.
Kidz Club:.....;..................:....7,00 p.m.

ONA
IGLESIA PENTECOSTES
VISION POR LAS ALMAS
149 Bedger Loop 448-2831
Servicio Domingos ................7:30 p.m.
Jueves (Ensefianza Biblica) .................
..............................................7:30 p.m .
LIMESTONE BAPTIST CHURCH
4868 Keystone Ave. Limestone
Comm.
Sunday School .....................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ...............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ...............7:00 p.m.

NEW ZION BAPTIST CHURCH
202 Sidney Roberts Road
Sunday School ............ 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training..............6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..:.:...........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ...............6:00 p.m..

ONA BAPTIST CHURCH
131 Bear Lane 773-2540
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............I :00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer ...............7:00 p.m.

UNION BAPTIST CHURCH
5076 Lily Church Rd. 494-5622
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
..1erning V ship .:...;... .:.....1. :00.a:m.
eveningng VOrshlp ....:....:..:.6:00p.m.
HWednesda.
AWANA for Kids ..............6:30 p.m.
WednesdayPrayer Time.........7:00 p.m.


WAUCHULA

APOSTOLIC ASSEMBLY
Martin Luthei King and Apostolic Rd.
,Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
English Service .................1:30 a.m.
General Worship Service ......1:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer ....................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

CELEBRATION CHURCH
322 Hanchey Rd.
863-781-1624
hardee.celebration.org
Sunday Morning Service ....11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Youth Service ....5:30 p.m.
'Childcare provided at all services

CELEBRATION FELLOWSHIP'
773-0427',
Celebration Service .............10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Evening Cell Groups
Adult Cell Group .......::........7:00 p.m.
Youth Cell Group.................7:00 p.m.
Children's Cell Group ....7.....7;00 p.m.
Call for locations

CHARLIE CREEK
BAPTIST.CHURCH
6885 State Road 64 East 773-3447
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship...........H.1 1:00 a...
Evening Worship .................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............6:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF CHRIST
201 S. Florida Ave. & Orange St.
773-9678
Bible Study .............:.I............9:30.a.m .
Worship Service .......:......10:45 a.m..
Wednesday ...........................7:00 p.im.

CHURCH OF CHRIST
'Will Duke' Road
S 'i 773-2249
Sunday Morning.Worship..:...9-30 a.m.'
Sunday Bible Clais. ....11:30 a m.'
Sunday E'ening W'orship 6-00 p.m.
Wed. Night Bible Class ........7:00 p.m.
Men's Leaderslhip & Training Class -
2nd Sunday of Month........4:00 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
Martin Luther King Blvd.
767-0199

CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST
OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS
630 Hanchey Rd. 773-3532
Sacrament Meeting ................9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Priesthood ............................ 1:00 a.m :


(863) 735-0470
Zolfo Springs, FL


WAUCHULA
COMMUNITY BAPTIST
CHURCH OF WAUCHULA HILLS
(SPANISH)
615 Rainey Blvd.
257-3950
Sunday Bible Study ...........10:00 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship....11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

DIOS ES AMOR
807 S. 8th Ave.
773-4576
Domingos Escuela
Dominica .......................... 10:00 a.m.
Servicio..............................11:00 a.m.
Lunes Oracion .....................6:00 p.m.
Miercoles Servicio ................7:00 p.m.

EL REMANENTE
IGLECIA CRISTIANA
318 W. Main St..
Martes Oracion......................7:00 p.m.
Jueves Servicio......................7:30 p.m.
Viernes Servicio ....................7:30 p.m.
Domingo Servicio................10:30 a.m.

ENDTIME CROSSROAD
MINISTRY
501 N. 9th & Georgia St. 773-3470
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
Morning Service ..................11:30 a.m.
Evening Service....................7:30 p.m.,
Wed. Bible St. & Yth. Gath ..7:30 p.m.
Friday (Holy Ghost Night) ...,7:30 p.m.

FAITH PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
114 N. 7th Ave. 773-2105
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship .................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper: .........:...6:15 p.m.
Wed. Youth Fellowship..........6:50 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

FAITH TEMPLE CHURCH
OF GOD
701 N. 7th Ave 773-3800
Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship ..................10:20 a.m.
Children's Chuch ...............10:40 a.m.
Evening Service.................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
1570 W. Main St. 773-4182
SUNDAY:
Bible Study for all ages ........9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.

WEDNESDAY:
Sr. Adult Bible Study ..........10:00 a.m.
Children's Chiors
(PK-Grade 4) .................... 5:30 p.m.
PRAISE 57-Jr High Chior .. 5:30 p.m.
Mid-Week Prayer Meeting .. 6:00 p.m.
Kids On Missions
.(PK-Grade 4) ................ 6O00'p.m.
Club 56 ................................ 6:00 B.m.
Youth Group (Grades 7-12) 6:00'p.m.
Family Life Ministry
& Discipleship .................. 6:00 p.m.
Church Orchestra.................. 6:00 p.m.
Adult Choir ......... ........... 7:00 p.m.

FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH
1121 W. Louisiana St. 773-9243
SUNDAY:
Generations Cafe Opens........9:30 a.m.
Kids World Check-In for
Nupsery-5th Grade Begins..l0:15 a.m.
Pre-K Blast .......................10:45 a.m.
Kids World B.L.A.S.T.
(K-5th) ........................:...10:45 a.m.
Worship Service ...........10:45 a.m.
WEDNESDAY:
Check-In begins for
Nursery-Sthgrade ..................6:15 p.m.
Classes for children ages
PreK-12th grade ............6:30-8:00 p.m.


FIRST CHURCH OF
THE NAZARENE
511 W.Palmetto St.;.
Sunday School ................ 10:00 a.m.
Morning Service ............... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.
FIRST MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
1347 Martin Luther King Ave.
773-6556
Sunday School 9....................9:30 a.m.
Morning Service ..................11:00 a;m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
-Tues: Youth Ministry Meeting/
Bible Study ........................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer/Bible Study ......7:00 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
'.207 N.,Seventh.Ave.- 773-427 '
Sunday slcho.l:... ........:9:5 a. .
Traditional Sunday, Worship, 11:00 &,m.
Casual Sunday Worship'..........6 Pm
Tuesday Bible Study. ... 0 00a.m
Wednesday Activities .. .. 6:00 p.m

"FLORIDA'S FIRST ASSEMBLY
OF GOD CHURCH
,,- ; 1397 South Florida"AvenUe "
773-9386 "
* Sunday School .......... ..':....,9:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...:............. 10:00 a.m
Wed. Fainily Night .....;.........7:00 p.m.
Adult, Children & Radiate Yo6th Church -

FLORIDA GOSPEL
511 W. Palmetto .
223-5126
Sunday Morning Worship ....11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............7:30 p.m.

THE GOSPEL TABERNACLE
: 810 W. Tennessee St. 863-735-1158


Morning Service ................10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

HEARTLAND
COMMUNITY HUJiCH
1 ,262 W. Main St,; 67%.500
Coffee & Donuts....:.: :0: 0 : .m.
Sunday School .......:.. :.:;:30 a~n.
W orship.......... ..............10:30 a.m
Wed, Night Dinner ......... m.
Wed. Bodybuilders Adult Cl
Crossroads &
Lighthouse,,Mmin, ...... -.:.:001.pf, "


WAUCHULA
HIGHER GROUND
INTERNATIONAL MINISTRY
1258 W. MAIN STREET
WAUCHULA, FL
Sunday Morning Worship....11:00 a.m.
Wed. Night Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

IGLESIA HISPANA'
FUENTE DE VIDA
501 N. 9'h Ave.
M artes ....... ................ ......7: 30 p.m .
Jueves ........ ...........................7:30 p.m.
Domingo ........................... 10:30 p.m.

IGLESIA HISPANA
PRESENCIA de Dios
511 W. Palmetto St.
Domingos .....................6:00 p.m.
M iercoles...........................7:00 p.m.

IGLESIA ADVENTISTA DEL
SEPTIMO DIA
Old. Bradenton Road
767-1010

: IGLESIA de DIOS
ALFA Y OMEGA
1909 Stanfleld Rd.
.Sunday School ..... ..............10: 00 a.m.
Evening Service ...................6:00 p.m.
Tuesday (Bible Study & Prayer
S Night) ................................7:30 p.m .
Friday Worship Service ........7:30 p.m.
JEHOyAH'S WITNESSES
-ENGLISH
155 Altman Road 1131
Sunday Service ....................2:00 p.m.

JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
S- SPANISH
Sunday Service ....................10:00 a.m.
LIGHT OF THE WORLD
MINISTRIES
Womans Center 131 N. 7th Ave.
Wauchula, FL
Friday Evening .....................6:00 p.m.
LAKE DALE BAPTIST CHURCH
3102 Heard Bridge Road
773-6622
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Service ..................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.
MINISTERIO INTERNACIORfAL
Cambriadores de Mundo
704 W. Main St. 773-0065
Wednesday Service&..............7:30 p.m.
NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH
1999 State Road 64 East
Sunday School ...................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship Service....11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship Service ......6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Night Supper ......6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Activities
(All Ages) .........................7:00 p.m.
NEW LIFE CHURCH
117 W.Palmetto St.
773-2929
Sunday Service .................... 10:00 a.m.
SuedmF ning Sep .. ... 6-00 p.m
'We1neSa Service. . 7 00 p m
Children Ministries for all services
,NEW MT. ZION A.M.E. CHURCH
1 0Martin Luther King Ave.
S'. -' 767-0023
:Mori. Worship
: (1st & 3r tSun.) .................8:00a.rh.
Sunday Scobl ................9...945 a.m.
.Morning Worship ............. 11:00 a.m.-
2nd Sunday Youth Service ....4:00 p.m.
Allen Christian Endeavor......4:00 p.m.
Wed. & Fri. Bille Study........7:00 p.m.
NORTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
912 N. 8th Ave. 773-6947 ,
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ...............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ...............6:00 pm.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.
OAK GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
4350 W. Main St. 735-0321
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.
PEACE VALLEY LUTHERAN
CHURCH
1643 Stenstrom Road 773-2858
1" & 3' Sun.
Communion ...................10:00 a.m.
2" & 4* Sun.
Divine Worship...,..........10:00 a.m.
Bible Study ........................11:15 a.m.
** Fellowship each Sunday after service

PROGRESSIVE MISSIONARY
'BAPTISTCHURCH.
149 Manley Road East Main
773-5814
Sunday School ............... ......9:30 a.m.
Worship Service ............... 11:00 a.m.
Wed. Evening Prayer ............7:00 p.m.

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 North US Hwy 17
Morning Service ...................10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.

RIVERVIEW HEIGHTS
MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1321 S.R, 636 East 773-3344
Radio Program
WZZS Sundays.................9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ,. 10"00 am
Morning Worship II 00 a.m.
Evening Worship f"00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer .............7:00 p.m.

SOUL HARVEST MINISTRY
1337 Hwy. 17. South, Waichula
Sunday School :..,.... .......10:00 a.m.'
Morning Worship:................11:00 a.m.
Evening Service ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service...............7:00 p.m.

ST. ANN'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
204 NM 9th Ave. 773-6418


WAUCHULA

SEVENTH DAY
ADVENTIST CHURCH
205 S. 11th Ave. 773-9927
Sabbath.School .....................9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............1:00 a.m.
Tues. Prayer Meeting ............7:00 p.m.
SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
505 S. 10th Ave.- 773-4368
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ...............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ...........7:00 p.m.
SPIRIT WIND TABERNACLE
1652 Old Bradenton Road
Sunday Worship..................10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............7:30 p.m.
1ABERNACLE Uk
PRAISE & JOY
1507 MLK Avenue
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:30 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Tues. Bible Stdy.
& Child Train ...............,..7:00 p.m.
Friday Prayer Service............7:00 p.m.
WAUCHULA CHURCH OF GOD
1543 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.
773-0199
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:15 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Fam. Training ....7:30 p.m.
Thurs. Youth Bible Study......7:00 p.m.
Friday Night Worship ............7:30 p:m.
WAUCHULA HILLS HARVEST
TEMPLE ASSEMBLY OF GOD
210 Anderson
Sunday School .:...............10:00 a.m.
Church.......................... 10:00 a.m.
Youth Service ......................6:00 p.m.
Evening Service ....................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.
WAUCHULA HILLS
SPANISH CHURCH OF GOD
1000 Stansfield Rd.
Sunday School ....:............10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ...............7:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer ......................7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship..................7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ................7:30 p.m.
WAUCHULA REVIVAL CENTER
(Full Gospel)
501 N. 9th Ave.
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship :................11:00 a.m.
Youth & Child. Church..........6:00 p.m.
--Evening Worship ...7..::....-:.7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ..................7:00 p.m.
Men's Fri. Prayer ..................7:00 p.m.

ZOLFO SPRINGS

COMMUNITY WESLEYAN CHURCH
Gardner
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
.:COWBOY-UP MINISTRY,
Cracker Trail Arena
Hwy 66
(across from Oak Hills Ranch Rd.)
781-2281
Sunday ................................10:00 a.m .
CREWSVILLE BETHEL
BAPTIST CHURCH
8251 Crewsville Road
Church 735-0871 Pastor 773-6657
Sunday School .....................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............1 .. 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................6:30 p.m.
EVANGELISTIC HOLINESS
CHURCH INC.
Cornerof 6th and Hickory
Sunday School ...... .........1....6:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...........11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .p:........7:00 p.m.
Wednesday :.;.:...........,7:30 p.m.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
OF ZOLFO
320 E.4th St.O-735-1200
Sunday School :.................10:.0 a.m.
Morning Worship .. 1 ...11:00 a.m.
Training Union ...............5:00 p.m.
.Evening Worship .............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ........7:00.p.m.
FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Corner of 6th & Suwanee -735-1544
Gospel Music .................... 10:30.a.m.
SWorship Service ...............11:00 a.m.
SWednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

FOX MEMORIAL'
HOLINESS CHURCH
234:2 Merle LangfqrdRd& ,
Sunday Morning Wotship....10;00 a.m.
Sunday Night Worship ..........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.


ZOLFO SPRINGS.i

GARDNER BAPTIST CHURCH
South Hwy. 17 494-5456
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer ...............7:00 p.m.
LIFE CHANGING WORSHIPCENIER
3426 Oak St. 863-832-9808
Sunday Worship ....................2:30 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

MARANATHA BAPTIST CHURCH
2465 Oxendine Rd
(863) 832-9292
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
W orship .............................. 11:00 a.m .
Evening............................. 00 p.m.
Wed. Bible & Prayer Meet....7:00 p.m.

NEW VISION WORSHIP CENTER
64 E. & School House Road
Church 735-8585 Childcare 735.
8586
Morning Worship ................10:00 a.m.
Children's Church................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship...................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Youth & F.T.H. ............7:00 p.m.

PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF
GOD FAITH TEMPLE
Oak Street
Sunday Worship ..................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ...............7:00 p.m.
Tuesday Worship ..................7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship..................7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ....;...........7:30 p.m.

S PRIMERA MISSION
BAUTISTA HISPANA
518 8th Ave. E.
Escuela Dominical ........:.....10:00 a.m.
Servicio del Domingo..........11:00 a.m.
........................................7:00 p.m .
Servicio del Miercoles ..........7:30 p.m.

PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH
Pioneer Park
2nd Sunday ........................ 10:30 a.m.
Evening Service ....................6:30 p.m.
S5th Sunday ..........................6:00 p.m.

ST. PAUL'S MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
3676 US. Hwy. 17 South 735-0636
Sunday School . ................9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship..................... 11 a.m.
Wed. Prayer Service ..............7:00 p.m.

SAN-ALFONSO MISSION
3027 Schoolhouse Lane .
Domingo, Misa en Espanol ..9:30 a.m.
Catecismo ...........................11:00 a.m.

SPANISH MISSION
735-8025
Escuela Doininica ... ........10:00 a.m.
Servicio ..............................11:00 a.m.
Pioneer Club .........................6:30 p.m.
Servicio de la Noche ............7:00 p.m.
Mierecoles Merienda ............6:00 p.m.
Servicioa..... .......... ...... .... 00p.m.
'~Slado Liga de Jovenes .......;5:00 p.m.
!!;2[J ',: r', '" , "2. : 2n


A Hindu mother walked down a
dusty road with two sons, a
healthy one and a sickly one.
About an hour later she returned
from the Ganges River with only
one son.
"Where's your other child?
asked the missionary.
"1 sacrificed him in theGanges,"
she answered.
"If you had to sacrifice a son,
w- hydidn'tyousacrificeyoursickldy
child?" he asked.
She answered. "We give our
gods our best."
Whydon'tyougive God thpbest
of your time, the best of your
talents, and the best of your
treasurer ,
God gave His bestforyou when
He gave His Son.
--. Shouldn't you-give Him..your.
best?


'Sunday ................................ 9:00 a.m .
SHoly Day ...............

ST. MICHAEL
CATHOLIC CHURCH
408 Heard Bridge Road 773-4089
Saturday Msps (English) ......5:00 p.m.
'(Spanish) ......7:00 p.m.
Silday(English) ..... ....8:30 a.m.
(Spanish) ...;.............11:00'a.m i
(Creole)............ :00 .m
atecismo ............................9:45 a.m.
Daily Mass in English ......1'...8:30 a.m.


Ceace /ioer Ordtoers

Wholesale Nursery







June 14, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 3C


Letter To The Editor
Better Communication Needed
Between Hardee County, Citizens


"Feelings Die Birthing" ...
Using the internet requires a
two way connection. Your com-
puter asks for the local weather;
the www sends back a question,
What city?; your computer
answers, Wauchula; and the
www sends the weather (the
information highway). Without
questions and replies, the cir-
cuit breaks and messages are
incomplete and misinterpreted.
Like the internet, effective
communication between Har,
dee County citizens and' gov-,
ernment leaders requires a
question/reply connection. In
Hardee County, this connection
is broken, Like walkie talkies
on different frequencies, county
leaders can hear the citizens but
cannot reply. Citizens can hear
county officials, but citizen
replies are not received. This
makes open and transparent
government with a high trust
level between citizens and lead-
ers impossible.
Here are two examples--
1. County Commissioner
meetings use an agenda where
certain citizens can present
items for discussion and action,
but cannot always ask questions
to Commissioners. Commis-
sioners can ask questions of
presenters and argue points
without the citizen's ability to
ask them questions (every court
of law is based on each side
asking questions. Citizens
should be able to do the same).
Chair Bryant specifically and
emphatically prohibits me and
certain others from asking ques-
tions during BOCC meetings.
He also routinely denies certain
citizens a place on meeting
agendas -- relegating their issue
to a three minute statement dur-
ing "Public Comments."
During the "Public Comments"
segment, citizens only speak
and Commissioners only listen
with no requirement to respond
or answer questions. This is like
a public address announcement
at the airport with no one listen-
ing.
2. The, Public Records Act
allows citizens to ask for writ-
ten documents. There is no
method in HC to ask questions
to a county employee or elected
official and receiving an answer
that is not in the public record.
County Manager, Mr. Albritton,
has specifically and emphatical-
ly refused to answer questions
from me and certain others
claiming that, "He won't be
interrogated." If your question
is .not in public records he
makes available, it will not get
answered. He has directed his
employees not to answer my
questions either.
The Director of Economic


Development, Mr. Lambert,
simply ignores and sidesteps
questions received by me and
certain others whether in writ-
ing or orally. He picks and
choses. County elected officials
have no obligation to answer
any questions, and most choose
to ignore or sidestep questions.
Effective two way communica-
tion fostering open government
and trust are impossible with
this arrangement.
Case in point The May 17
BOCC meeting boiled over
with frustration and near fist-
fights because of this broken
walkie talkie system. When two
way' communication breaks
down, trust level plummets.
CoChair Birge's final insult of
the night after many insults
.from Dale Johnson was to
adjourn the meeting and turn
off the microphone while a citi-
zen patiently waited his turn to
speak. Citizen response was
infuriating and predictable.
Along with the quote in the title
above, Dr. Steven Covey said,
"Unexpressed feelings are
buried alive and come back
again in uglier ways,"
Given the good intentions of
elected officials and paid
employees, luckily, there is a
simple solution for HC's broken
communications. Allow Citi-
zens to Ask Questions and
Receive Answers (just like the
www information highway or
conversations with your chil-
dren).
To this end, I suggest a few
ideas:
1. The County Manager and
Director of Economic Develop-
ment should answer questions
from citizens. One way is to add
a 30 minute agenda segment for
every evening BOCC meeting
for Q&A with -the County's
brain trust. The segment could
begin with each manager giving
a five minute summary of cur-
rent developments in their
departments followed by ques-
tions from citizens.
2. Extend the "Public Com-
ments" segment of all. public
meetings to 30 minutes and
change the title to: "Public
Participation in Government."
The public can make comments
and ask commissioners ques-
tions.
3. Add a 20 minute segment
to all IDA and EDA meeting
agendas for questions from citi-
zens to board members, staff
and presenters.
4. BOCC Workshops are not
really workshops at all. They
are regular meetings without
votes. Public participation
remains as it is in regular
BOCC meetings ho two-way
communication with citizens.


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Allow citizens to actively par-
ticipate in discussions about
topics to include asking ques-
tions of all attendees. Commis-
sioners should sit at the same
level as the citizens to encour-
age free exchange of ideas. By
the way, the County Manager
and Attorney should always sit
at a table next to The Herald
Advocate reporter. They are not
elected officials.
5. Citizens should be
allowed to secure space on the
agenda of any BOCC meeting
as long as the topic is timely
and of interestto many citizens.
Rejection of an agenda item
request would require a majori-
ty vote of the BOCC and the
reasons included in the minutes
of the meeting.
6. Written responses to writ-
ten questions from the County
Manager and Director of
Economic Development -
there is not an official method
for getting answers to written
questions from any citizen.
These officials are free to pick
and choose. They can ignore or
sidestep inquiries at will. This
includes questions submitted
during public input phases of
plan amendments. The BOCC
should establish a process to
have citizens written questions
answered by public officials.
7. Town Hall Meeting -
twice per year, the BOCC
should'hold a town hall type
meeting in the civic center
moderated by an independent
organization like CATS for citi-
zen input and questions of all
county officials.
As my bright, but autistic
grandson can attest, inability to
communicate is a highly frus-
trating experience. Spend an
hour with a piece of scotch tape
over your mouth. This is, the
world of the HC citizen when
dealing with the Commission-
ers, County Manager, and Dir.
of Econ. Dev. In effective two
way conversations, questions
are answered, officials are
understood, and: "feelings die
birthing."
If you agree that citizen par-
ticipation and understanding
would be much improved
through the ideas above, please
email me: hjkuhlman@gmail
.com (I promise, you will be
heard and remain anonymous).

Henry Kuhnlan
Fort Green




--A




The following permits were
applied for or issued by the
Hardee County Building De-
partment during the week of
June 3-9. Listings include the
name of the owner or contrac-
tor, the address for the project,
the type of work to be done, and
.the cost involved. Only projects
valued at $1,000 or more are
listed.
ISSUED
City of Wauchula, Melendy
Street, demolition, $1,000.
Samuel 4J.Albritton, Murphy
Road, electric, $1,500..
Walter R. Graves, Main-
Street, single-family residence,
'$126,440.
Steve ,M. Senn, ; Illinois
Avehlie, electric, $1,500.
Douglas Battey, Georgetown
Loop. mechanical, $3,900.
Owner, Old Bradenton Road,
roofing. $1,700.
James E. Jernigan, Turner
Avenue, windows and doors,
$15.000.
Charles F. Ogle, U.S. 17,
sign. $9.000.
Justin Driggers, U.S. 17
North, tent, $1,000.
BDB Fireworks, Sixth
Avenue South. tent, $5,000.

BUILDING BLOCKS'
Beware of contractors who
solicit door-to-door.


I


i


The New Mrs. Florida Is


Bold, Brave & Beautiful


By MACHELLE DOLLAR
For The Herald-Advocate
"She's beauty and she's
grace ... she's elegance and
taste ... hold your crown up
high, hold it to the sky."
This particular song may
have been inspired by the 2000
film "Miss Congeniality." but
there is royalty in Hardee
County singing its tune.
She is bold. brave and beauti-
ful. The newly named Mrs.
Florida traded in her high tops.
for heels as she walked across
the stage receiving her crown.
Shawna Lambert, of Bowling
Green. decided after celebrating
a "milestone birthday" it was
time to celebrate life and enter a
pageant. Never before partici-
pating in 'such a contest, she
embraced the world of beauty
queens with a hope of having
fun,.gaining the experience and
meeting new friends.
Little did she know that she
would soon walk away with the
title, crown, sash and an array
of prizes.
"I'm still in disbelief," began
Lambert, almost two weeks
after winning- the title. "Grow-
ing up excelling in sports I'm
used to being recognized, but
this is still a different kind of
feeling. Although it's somewhat
familiar, it's a very humbling
experience to help other women
realize their true beauty."
Lambert would not have got-
ten this far if it weren't for the
help and support of loved ones.
"I first and foremost really want
to thank my sponsor, Alan Jay
Automotive Network of Wau-
chula, my close friends Renee
Wyatt and Sandra Rojas as well
as my husband."
In preparing for the pageant,
Lambert reached out to those
around her who had the back-
ground she lacked.. Once she
accepted the crown, Lambert
was taken into a judge's critique
and reception, where she would
be prepared further to attend the
national competition which will
be held in Florida sometime
next year.
Currently employed as a case
worker, Lambert has noticed
the rise in prescription drug
abuse and wanted to put a cause
behind her actions. During her
year-long reign she plans to use
her title and position within her
agency to pass legislation to
monitor and hold pain manage-
ment clinics accountable for:
this spike in numbers.
"It is my goal to raise aware-
ness on prescription drug abuse,
as it is second to marijuana as
the most commonly abused cat-
egory of drugs and how it
affects children and families,"
Lambert concluded.
Not always a beauty queen,
Lambert also can be found
working on their ranch, promot-
ing her husband for county
commissioner or out in the open
waters fishing on the weekends.
One luxury she holds' is
determining her official appear-
ances and schedules as Mrs.
Florida. Her next scheduled
appearance is set for Thursday,
June 21. Stop by the Cracker
Trail Museum at Pioneer Park
for its 45th birthday celebration
entitled "Business After
Hours," hosted by the Hardee
County Chamber of Commerce.
Any" persons wishing to
schedule an appearance can e-
mail Lambert at Mrs.Florida
2012@aol.com.


COURTESY PHOTOS
Mrs. Florida' enjoys the beauty of the state as she takes
advantage of the sunny Weather to indulge in a favorite
pastime. Pictured with husband Colon Lambert and their
dog, she often can be spotted in the open waters fishing.


Shawna Lambert of Bowling Green is crowned the new
Mrs. Florida on stage in Palm Beach Gardens.


Showing the stronger side of a beauty queen, Shawna
Lambert is pictured here helping to clear some land on
their ranch.


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4C The Herald-Advocate, June 14, 2012


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 25-2008-CA-000196

CITY OF WAUCHULA,

Plaintiff,

vs.

ROY ALLEN BROWN a/k/a ROY
A. BROWN a/k/a ROY A.
BROWN, TRUSTEE, and SAN-
DRA KAY BROWN a/k/a SANDRA
K. BROWN

Defendants./

NOTICE OF
RESCHEDULED SALE
PURSUANT TO FLORIDA
STATUTES CHAPTER 45

NOTICE IS GIVEN that pur-
suant to i SUMMARY FINAL
JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE
AND TAXATION OF ATTORNEY'S
FEES AND COSTS dated April 16,
2012, in the above styled cause, I
will sell to the' highest and best
bidder for cash at the Hardee
County Courthouse, on the sec-
ond floor hallway outside of
Room 202, 417 West Main Street,
Wauchula, FL 33873, at 11:00
A.M. on June 20, 2012, the follow-
ing described property as, set
forth In said SUMMARY FINAL
JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE
AND TAXATION OF ATTORNEY'S
FEES AND COSTS, to wit:

Lot 7 and the South one-
half of Lot 6 of Block "A" of
Foster's Addition to the
City of Wauchula, as per
Plat Book 1, page 2-42 of
the Public Records of
Hardee County, Florida.

Parcel Id: 09-34-25-0270. -
OOOOA-0006

Commonly known as: 735
South 6th Avenue,
Wauchula FL 33873

Dated this 7 day of May, 2012.

.B. HUGH BRADLEY
Clerk of Court

By: Connie Coker
As Deputy Clerk
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE
AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES
ACT: If you -are a person with a
disability who needs any accom-
modation in order to participate In
this proceeding, you are entitled,
at no cost to you, to the provision
of certain assistance. Please con-
tact the Office of the Court
Administrator,. 255 N. Broadway
Avenue, Bartow, Florida 33830,
(863) 534-4686, at least 7 days
before your scheduled court
appearance, or immediately upon
receiving this notification if the
time before the scheduled::
appearance is less than 7 days; if
you are hearing or voice
impaired, call 711.


ANY PERSON CLAIMING A
INTEREST IN THE SURPLU
FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNE
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LI
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAI
WITHIN SIXTY (60) DAYS AFTE
THE SALE.
6:7-1'
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF Ti
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN
AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY
FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION:

CASE NO.: 252012CA000121

NEWEST BANK FSB,
Plaintiff,
vs.

UNKNOWN HEIRS, BENEFICIAL
IES, DEVISEES, ASSIGNEES,
LIENORS, CREDITORS,
TRUSTEES AND ALL OTHERS
WHO MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST
IN THE ESTATE OF RONALD A
THOMAS, SR, et al,
Defendants.

NOTICE OF ACTION ,

TO:

UNKNOWN HEIRS, BENEFICIAL
IES, DEVISEES, ASSIGNEE
LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUW
EES AND ALL OTHERS WHO M
CLAIM AN INTEREST IN TI
ESTATE OF RONALD
THOMAS, SR
Last Known Address Unknown
Current Residence Unknown

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
action for Foreclosure
Mortgage on the followil
described property:

LOTS 1 AND 2, OF BLOCK
"A", LESS AND EXCEPT
THE SOUTH 15 FEET
THEREOF, BEST SUBDIVI-
SION, TO THE TOWN OF
BOWLING GREEN, FLORI-
DA, AS SHOWN BY MAP
OR PLAT THEREOF AS
RECORDED IN THE
OFFICE OF THE CLERK
OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
IN AND FOR HARDEE
COUNTY, FLORIDA, IN
PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 53..

has been filed against you ai
you are required to serve a co
of your written defenses, if any,
it, on Marshall C. Watson, P.
Attorney for Plaintiff, who:
address is 1800 NW 491
STREET, SUITE 120, F
LAUDERDALE FL 33309 on
before July 6, 2012, a date which
is within thirty (30) days after tl
first publication of this Notice
THE HERALD-ADVOCATE and fi
the original with the Clerk of th
Court either before service
Plaintiff's attorney or immediate


COUNTY COURT
The following marriage
licenses were issued recently
in the office of the county
court:
Michael James Staton; 20,
Bowling Green, and Shaun
Tamara Jean Mitchell, 27,
Bowling Green.



thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.

If you are a person with a disabil-
ity who needs assistance In order
to participate In a program or
service of the State Courts
System, you should contact the
Office of the Court Administrator
at (863) 534-4686 (voice), (863)
534-7777 (TDD) or (800) 955-8770
(Florida Relay Service), as much
in advance of your court appear-
ance or visit to the courthouse as
possible. Please be prepared to
explain your functional limitations
and suggest an auxiliary aid or
service that you believe will
enable you to effectively partici-
pate in the court program or serv-
ice.

WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court this 4 day of June, 2012

B.HUGH BRADLEY
AS CLERK.OF THE COURT

By: Connie Coker
As Deputy Clerk

6:7,14c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA.
CIVIL DIVISION

CASE NO. 252011CA000491

BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUC-
CESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC
HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP,

Plaintiff,

vs.

EDITH DIANN JOHNSON A/K/A
DIANN HAGAR JOHNSON;
LARRY JOE JOHNSON; HARDEE
COUNTY, FLORIDA; UNKNOWN
TENANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN
TENANT NO. 2; AND ALL
UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING,
INTERESTS BY, THROUGH,
UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED
DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION,
OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO
HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR
INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY
HEREIN DESCRIBED,

Defendants. .
S. I NICE OF SALE
'-PtJRSUANT TO CHAPTER 45,


NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
N pursuant to an Order or Summary
JS Final Judgment of foreclosure
Stated March 28, 2012, and
S entered in Case No.
IS 252011CA000491 of the Circuit
M Court in and for Hardee County,
-R Florida, wherein BANK OF AMER-
ICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY
MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS
4- SERVICING, LP is Plaintiff and
HE EDITH DIANN JOHNSON A/K/A
N DIANN HAGAR JOHNSON;
LARRY JOE JOHNSON; HARDEE
COUNTY, FLORIDA; UNKNOWN
TENANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN
TENANT NO. 2;, AND ALL
UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING
INTERESTS BY, THROUGH,
UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED
DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION,
OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO
HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR
R- INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY
HEREIN DESCRIBED, are
Defendants, I will sell to the high-
est and best bidder for cash at
S 2nd floor hall outside room 202 of
the. Hardee County Courthouse,
417 West Main Street, Wauchula,
FL 33873 at Hardee County,
SFlorida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 27th
day of June, 2012,, the following
described property as set forth In
said Order or Final Judgment, to-
wit:
kR- LOT 2 AND THE NORTH 22
:S, FEET OF LOT 3, BLOCK
ST- f2, AVALON PARK ADDI-
AY TION TO' WAUCHLLA,
HE ACCORDING TO THE
A. PLAT THEREOF AS
'RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 1, PAGE 2-75; OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS
OF HARDEE COUNTY,
an FLORIDA.
of
ng ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN
INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS
FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.

In accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities Act of
1990, persons needing special
accommodation to participate in
this proceeding should contact
the Clerk of the Court not later
than five business days prior to
the proceeding at the Hardee
nd County Courthouse. Telephone
S863-773-4174 or 1-800-955-8770
py via Florida Relay Service.
to
A.,
se DATED at Wauchula, Florida, on
T.
FT. March 29, 2012.

or B. HUGH BRADLEY
ch As Clerk, Circuit Court
he Hardee County, Florida
in
lie By: Connie Coker
is .As Deputy Clerk
on
aly 6:7,14C


Joshua Duane Clemente. 32,
Wauchula, and Melissa Ann
Kiger, Fernandina Beach. 37.

The following small claims
case was disposed of recently
by the county judge:
Calvary Portfolio Services
LLC vs. Stephen Kiperna and
Ramona Stevens, voluntary dis-
missal.

The following misde-
meanor cases were disposed
of recently in county court:
Trerika Lorraine Anderson,
trespass on property other than
structure or conveyance, $325
fine and court costs, $50 cost of
prosecution.
Morganne Alyce Blewett,
resisting an officer without vio-
lence, $325 fine and court costs,
$500 public defender fees and
$50 cost of prosecution placed
on lien.
Jorge Gonzalez, possession
of marijuana and giving false
ID to an officer, one month in
jail with credit for time served,
$325 fine and court costs, $100
public defender fees and $50
cost of prosecution placed on
lien.
Jose Martinez, disorderly
intoxication, adjudication with-
held, $325 fine and court costs
and $50 cost of prosecution
waived.
Walter Monteroza, disorder-
ly intoxication, adjudication
withheld, $325 fine and court
costs and $50 cost of prosecu-
tion placed on lien.
Abdel Shweil, operating as a
second-hand dealer without
registration, not prosecuted.
Daniel Farias, violation of
probation (original charges vio-
lation of a domestic violence
injunction for protection and
domestic battery), probation
revoked, one year in jail with
credit for time served, $50 pub-
lic defender fee and $50 cost of
prosecution added to outstand-
ing fines and fees and placed on
lien; domestic battery (new
charge), not prosecuted.
Guillermo Garcia, resisting
an officer without violence,
$325 fine and court costs, $50
cost of prosecution; battery and
criminal mischief, not prosecut-
ed.
Estela Figueroa, battery and
disorderly conduct, not prose-
cuted. .
Reyna Isabell Larade-Garcia,:
retail theft, not prosecuted.
Apolinar DeLeCruz, viola-
tion of probation (original
charges disorderly intoxication
and assault on a law enforce-
'ment officer), probation re-
voked, one' month in jail, $50
public defender fee and $ 50
cost of prosecution added to
outstanding fines and fees and
placed on lien.
Juan Danile Gonzalez, viola-
tion of probation (original
charge trespass on structure or
conveyance), probation re-


I Cou" rt'house Report


evoked, five months in jail. $50
cost of prosecution added to
outstanding fines and fees and
placed on lien.
Travis Bryan Revell, viola-
tion of probation (original
charges disorderly conduct,
domestic battery and battery),
one year probation reinstated
with condition of 60 days in jail
on weekends, $50 public
defender fees and $50 cost of
prosecution added to outstand-
ing fines and fees.

CIRCUIT COURT
The following civil actions
were filed recently in the
office of the circuit court:
Bank 'of America vs. Renato
Guionares et al, petition for
mortgage foreclosure.
Ericka Keeton and Jessie
Lamar Keeton, divorce.
Dale L. Roberts and Sheila
Marie Roberts, divorce.
Yazmayra SanJurjo vs.
Francisco Richardo Escalante,
petition for injunction for pro-
tection.
Jeannine L. Bedoit vs.
Florida Institute for Neurologic
Research, damages.
Bank of America .vs. April
Michelle Lozano, Yogy Lozano
et al, petition for mortgage fore-
closure.
Michelle B. Westbrook and
the state Department of Rev-
enue (DOR) vs. Steve Cole
Albritton, petition for child sup-
port.

The following decisions on
civil cases pending in the cir-
cuit court were handed down
recently by the circuit court
judge:
Graciela Trevino vs. Faus-
tino Trevino Jr., dismissal of
injunction for protection.
Andreqa Lexus Aguilar vs.
Rosalina Formoso, dismissal of
temporary injunction for pro-
tection.
Michelle Pintello and Victor
Scott Williams, dismissal of
temporary injunction for pro-
tection.
Sandy J. Staton and DOR vs.
Timothy P. Staton, child support
suspended.
Christine Owens vs. Rodney
Smith, dismissal of injunction
for protection..
Wauchula State Bank vs.
Michael L. and Kimberly K.
Mathis, judgment.
Citimortgage Inc. vs. Ruben'
T. Longoria Jr. et al, judgment
of mortgage foreclosure.
Tonya Denice Carroll and
DOR v3. Mialthai Duwayne-
CarrolT'hild support suspend-
ed..
,Kimberly F;Darty vs. Roger
S. Darty, dismissal of injunction
for protection.
Angel Ann Jhirad and DOR'
vs. Rolando A, Powery,' child
support order.

The following felony crimi-
nal cases were .disposed of
recently by the circuit judge.
Defendants have been adjudi-
cated guilty unless noted oth-
erwise. When adjudication is
withheld, it is pending suc-


cessful completion of proba-
tion. Sentences are pursuant
to an investigative report by
and the recommendation of
the state probation office and
also state sentencing guide-
lines. Final discretion is left to
the judge.
Tomeka Chunta Cozart, pos-
session of drug paraphernalia
and uttering, a forged check,
time served, two years commu-
nity control house arrest,
$520 fine and court costs, $350
public defender fees, and $150
cost of prosecution placed on
lien; possession of cocaine, not
prosecuted.
Emprise Dionne Hines, pos-
session of marijuana and pos-
session of drug paraphernalia,
transferred into Drug Pre-trial
Intervention program.
Torre Darnell Luckett, viola-
tion of probation (original
charges burglary of structure
and criminal mischief), proba-
tion modified to include two
months in jail on weekends.
$150 public defender fee and
$100 cost of prosecution added
to outstanding fines and fines.
Terry Lavonne Pelham, bat-
tery, adjudication withheld, pro-
bation one year, $520 fine and
court costs, $350 public defend-
er fees, $200 cost of.prosecu-
tion, $200 investigative costs,
$12 First Step probation fee;
battery, not prosecuted.
Charles Nicolas Skitka, un-
lawful possession of listed
chemicals, possession of mari-
juana, possession of drug para-
phernalia and possession of
methamphetamine, one year,
seven months and three days
Florida State Prison with credit
for time served, $520 fine and
court costs, $350 public defend-
er fees and $100 cost of prose-
cution placed on lien; posses-


For the week ended June 07, 2012
At the Florida Livestock Auctions, receipt totaled 8373 com-
pared to 4,380 last week, and 6,929 last year. According to the
Florida Federal-State Livestock Market News Service: Compared
to one week ago, slaughter cows 2.00 to 4.00 higher, bulls
unevenly steady, feeder steers unevenly steady, heifers 3.00 to
5.00 lower, replacement cows mostly steady.


Feeder Steers:


Feeder Heifers: Mec
200
300.
400
500.

Slaughter Cows: Lear
83.00-88.00
Slaughter Bulls: Yiel
99.00-113.00


Those who expect moments
of change to be comfort-
able and free of conflict


dium & Large Frame No. 1-2
-300 lbs 210.00-295.00
-400 lbs 176.00-217.00
-50OJbs..... 154.00-200.00
-6001Wte3-- 150 00-165^0a

dium & Large Frame No. 1-2
-300 Ibs 177.00-192.00
-400 Ibs. 157.00-185.Q0
-500 lbs 146.00-165.00
-600 Ibs 147.00-155.00

n: 750-1200 lbs 85-90 percent

d Grade No. 1-2 1000-2100 lbs



have not learned their his-
tory.
-Joan Wallach Scott


HEARTLAND PHARMACY






"We put our V into our service"

If you are visiting we will gladly transfer your prescriptions and

keep them on file then transfer them back when you go home.


bato, Pauline Ochoa, Julian Garcia, Red Camp Pharmacist,
Bob Duncan Pharmacist Sandra Garcia (missing)


sion of marijuana, time served;
attempted manufacture of meth-
amphetamine, unlawful posses-
sion of listed chemicals; and
possession of marijuana not
prosecuted.
Mark Nicholas Timmerman,
uttering a forged check and
grand theft, adjudication with-
held, probation four years, $520
fine and court costs, $200 cost
of prosecution, $200 investiga-
tive costs, $48 First Step proba-
tion fees.
Kathleen Dressel, grand
theft, not prosecuted.
Mary Heather Dawn Win-
gate, possession of marijuana
with intent to sell or deliver and
possession of drug parapherna-
lia, adjudication withheld, pro-
bation five years, $520 fine and
court costs, $350 public defend-
er fees, $100 cost of prosecu-
tion, $60 First Step probation
fees, 100 hours community ser-
vice; owning a structure/vehicle
where drugs are known to be
sold, not prosecuted.

The following real estate
transactions of $10,000 or
more were filed recently in
the office of the clerk of court:
Laurel Elizabeth Davis, Joe
L. Davis and Patricia M. Davis
as trustee to Story Groves Inc.,
$3:7 million.
Abraham and Gloria F.
Arreola to Jose Luis Macedo,
Jose Luis Macedo Jr. and Isabel
Bakema Vailez, $55,000.
Steven A. and Vicki R. Price
to Gerald A. and Barbara J.
Mahoney, $25,000.
Christine K. Wiggins to
Marcelino Erasmo Perez-Cruz
and Bictoria Cruz-Vasquez,
$20,000.
Ronnie Cline and Marjorie
Albritton to Ralph A. and Traci
Nickels, $25,000.







June 14, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 5C


Outta The Woods
By Tony Young
Florida Fish & Wildlife Commission


If you hunt public land, you should know that many of
Florida's wildlife management areas (WMAs) require a quota per-
mit tolhunt during archery, muzzleloading gun and all or part of the
general gun season. Take note that this year, there have been some
major changes to some of the application periods, because the
Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) is
switching over to a new license/permit vendor.
What this means to you is this: Some of the quota application
periods that previously occurred in October are going to be moved
up earlier, and others are going to be pushed back later.
For this year only, the application periods for Green Swamp
general gun camping permits and these waterfowl permits Merritt
Island, Goodwin/Broadmoor, Ocklawaha Prairie, September
waterfowl and the Stormwater Treatment Areas (STAs) will be in
July and August. The application dates for St. Marks spring turkey
and special-opportunity spring turkey permits will be in November.
Updating to the new system also means there will be no issu-
ing of guest permits, or the issuing of leftover quota permits and re-
issues during the entire month of October for this year. So if you
plan on taking a friend on an October hunt, be sure to obtain the
guest permit in September.
We ask you to please be patient with us, while we make this
challenging transition from old to new vendor. In the end, we feel
this change will be well worth it and greatly benefit our valued cus-
tomers Florida's hunters who deserve the best possible ser-
vice and product we can provide.
There are several types of quota permits, and most are issued
by random drawing. Just so you know, there will be no new
'changes to the first-phase application periods for archery, muzzle-
loading gun, general gun, youth, family, track vehicle (a swamp
buggy with tank treads), airboat and mobility-impaired quota hunt
permits, which will still run June 1-30.
No costs are involved with quota permits, and during this peri-
od, you may turn in only one worksheet for each type of quota
hunt. One thing to remember though: Unless exempt, you must
have an up-to-date management area permit (or a license that
includes one) when applying for a quota permit, or the system
won't accept your application.
The FWC offers youth deer hunts on Camp Blanding WMA in
Clay County and Andrews WMA in Levy County. If you have chil-
dren ages 8-15, and you want them to have the chance of experi-
encing one of these great hunts, apply for a youth quota hunt per-
mit. During these hunts, only the youngsters may hunt, and they
and their adult supervisors are the only ones allowed on the area.
Tor-increase youth hunting opportunities, children under age
16, while-under direct supervision, may accompany an adult quota
permit holder on any WMA even if the area doesn't allow for
exemptions. However, in that case, adults and youngsters must
share a single bag limit.
This coming season, there will be family quota hunts on 24
WMAs. These areas are Matanzas, Andrews, Devil's Hammock,
Dinner Island Ranch, Lafayette Creek, Allapattah Flats, Perdido
River, Cary, Okaloacoochee Slough, Blackwater, Belmore,
Jennings Forest, Four Creeks, Ralph E. Simmons, Hatchet Creek,
Thomas Creek Kings Road Unit, Hilochee Osprey Unit, Lafayette
Forest, Babcock Ranch Preserve, Aucilla Pinhook Area, Chipola
River Altha Tract, L. Kirk Edwards, Apalachicola Bradwell Unit
and Beaverdam Creek.
You must have a family quota hunt permit to hunt these areas
during specific time periods. Should your name be drawn, the per-
mit requires one adult to take one or two youths hunting.


Hunters certified by the FWC as mobility-impaired' may apply
for mobility-impaired quota permits. These permits allow' exclii'-
sive access to general-gun hunting opportunities on nine of the;
state's better public hunting areas.
If you want to get the jump on these hunts, make sure you have
the correct quota hunt application worksheet so you can apply for
one or more of these great opportunities. All application work-
sheets can be found at MyFWC.com/License (click on "Limited
Entry/Quota Hunts" for the list).
Once completed, you may use it to apply at
MyFWC.com/License (click on "Buy a License Online") or submit
it to any license agent or tax collector's office.
The random drawings to decide who gets -se quota hunt per-
mits take place during most of July. To findc *:: if you've been
selected, go to MyFWC.com/License and select "Limited
Entry/Quota Hunts," then click "Drawing Results." They are typi-
cally posted about two weeks after the last day of the application
period:.
To see an updated list of all the limited entry/quota permit
application dates, go to MyFWC.com/License, and please help us
spread the word about these upcoming changes.
Tony Young is the media relations coordinator for the FWC's
Division of Hunting and Game Management. You can reach him
with questions about hunting at Tony.Young@MyFWC.conm.



Letter To The Editor

Hardee Native Bobby Gibbs

Had Talent For Friendship


Dear Editor:
Bobby Gibbs had deep and
lasting roots in Hardee County.
Grandparents on both sides of
his family had made Hardee
County home. His father and
mother, Harry and "Cricket"
Gibbs, owned and operated the.
Badcock Furniture store in
Wauchula, eventually turning it
over to sons Donald and Bobby.
Bobby's sister Gayle and her
husband Marty Graham are
longtime farmers in Hardee
County. His uncle, Doyle Park-.
er, was well-known in the area
as a farmer and respected busi-
nessman. Bobby's cousins, Jim-
my and Johnny Parker and Kay
Parker Paris, are also part of
this community in a meaningful
way.
Hardee County is filled with
friends Bobby made during his
lifetime. He grew up in Wau-
chula, attended school there,
and was an acclaimed athlete
during his years in school.
Bobby was one of those won-
derful young men who could be
a scamp and well-loved at the
same time.
His greatest talent was for
friendship. I never knew any-
one who wasn't drawn to
Bobby. He was funny, kind,


Gibbs


loyal, generous, and one of
those people who makes life
both fun and better, in every,
way. His heart was open to
everyone.
I often think of his friend who
was unhappy at home. Bobby
just brought his friend home
with him one day and'he lived
there .for quite a long time.
Everyone who knew him had a
favorite "Bobby story" to tell.
My own daughter, Tippins, was
raised on "Bobby stories" and
"Upcle Harry stories" and
would ask for certain ones at
bedtime.
-In the summertime, Bobby,
Gayle, and Donald stayed on


Lake June in Lake Placid with
our grandmother. Effie A.
Gibbs. My sister and brother,
t3arbara and Cliff Collins, and I
were just one house away. Our
Wauchula friends, Terry,
Sylvia, and Wayne Warren, had
a house just one more space
away. The summers were filled
with visits from our Gainesville
cousins, Billy, Kenny, and
Sherry Gibbs, and from our St.
Pete cousin, Tom Sauls. -
The fun of having ten cousins
and other friends together for
the whole summer was an inde-
scribable delight. Ski boats and
fishing boats were always com-
ing and going filled with
cousins and friends, and there
was always some sort of mis-
chief we could stir up. Summers
are never better than when they
are spent with a pack of cousins
and friends.
SI think of Bobby and his
wide-open heart and how; it
changed the lives of the chil-
dren he helped raise. He was
one of those unique individuals
who could love all children and
give them, whatever they need-
ed whether it was guidance,
education, job and life skills, or
anything else. Jordan Gibbs,
Kimn and Miles Gibbs, and
Shasta Morse, Louie Manning,
and Charles and Eli Rogers
were all fortunate to have
Bobby as a father or father fig-
ure in their lives. The legacy of
love Bobby left with them will
.live on.
Marlena Gibbs, Bobby's
wife, could not have been more
dedicated in her care for him
during the two years he was so
ill. Her loving partnership with
Bobby in the fight for his life
gave us all extra time to enjoy
his presence. She was always
by his side no matter where he
was, and we will forever be
grateful for her devoted and


fierce support of him during his
illness. No one could have done
more for Bobby or been such a
stalwart partner through this ill-
ness.
As the family stood by during
Bobby's ,last days, we had no
fear about where he was going.
We knew he would be with our
Lord and that he would be
returning to the arms of those
who had loved him all his life
and had gone before him.
Bobby had been saved and was
unshakeable in his faith.
We are all going to miss
Bobby, as will his many friends.
However, we are comforted by
knowing he will be waiting for
us and that he has left so many
lasting memories here on earth.
There will be gatherings of
cousins and friends when we
will laugh about Bobby's sleep-
walking, Bobby and Major, his
dog, Bobby and Larry Benton at
14 taking their adventurous trip
to Key West without their par-
ents' knowledge, and the antics
of. Bobby, Larry,, Shack
Blanton, Jimbo Burke, Charles
Searcy and other friends as they
grew to maturity in the town
they loved. I don't doubt that
we will hear the echo of
Bobby's laughter as the stories
are told.
Marinez Collins Goldston
Cousin of Bobby Gibbs
Lake Placid, FL

HARDEE COUNTY
KIDS NEED
HARDEE COUNTY
HELP!
Ease a dependent child's
way through the court sys-
tem. Volunteer to be a
Guardian Ad Litem.
773-2505
(If office unattended, please leave
message.)


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Wauchula, Florida 33873
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6C The lHerald-Advocate, June 14, 2012


PHOTOS BY MARIA TRUJILLO '
The Hardee County Unit of the American .
Cancer Society held its annual Relay For
Life event on April 27-28, taking over Wild-
cat Stadium in Wauchula. Starting at 6
p.m. the Friday, businesses, schools and _
others worked together to raise money for -'
the ever-increasing fight against cancer.
This year, a total of 410 people partici-
pated in the marathon. There were about
25 teams, and $17,108 was raised. The
three teams that raised the most money
were Wauchula Elementary School, which
raised $3,680; Hardee Manor Healthcare
Center, $3,428: and Mosaic, $3,257. i -








June 14, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 7C


Hardee JROTC In Top 1 % Nationwide IDA Receives 2011 Audit


By MACHELLE DOLLAR
For The Herald-Advocate
You've seen them around
town,, in the decorated blue
shirts, blue pants, all the way
down to the polished black
shoes. The high school's Air ,
Fojce Junior Reserve Officer'
Training Corps.
In honor ofthe commitments
made within the classroom and
the community, the ROTC
recently held its awards cere-
mony where over 1,000 awards
were given to nearly 130 cadets.
Taking form in 2005, the
Hardee JROTC program has
expanded in size and, as a After going through an exter
result, has moved the awards Officer Training Corps real
ceremony after school hours. Pictured here is the entire u
By doing so they have also with merit. It was because of
allowed parents, teachers a,. hqr accomplishments and direc-
friends come to. support, eachnibn that she was surprised at
and every student in their the event and promoted to
achievements. Cadet Colonel, the highest rank
As folks came in to take their a cadet can receive. Macias'
seats, cadets weren't immedi- parents were present to pin the
Stately seen. It wasn't until after honor.
Lt, Col. Anthony Hingle said'a "Staci demonstrated out-
few words and introduced the standing leadership during her
highest honor, that the curtains tenure as Cadet Corps Con-
opened and every cadet stood at .mander, and her leadership
honor with the.American flag r sulted in the corps garnering
behind them. The corps was the highest Unit Evaluation
identified as a Distinguished award granted by Headquarter
Unit with Merit. AFJROTC; and, it also happens
Every year the unit performs to' be the highest award this unit
an internal evaluation with the has ever received," said Hingle.
principal; however, once every Earlier that day, next year's
three years a representative Cadet Corps Commander Alex
from headquarters will visit and Pierstorff, his parents and
evaluate the cadets. The evalua- Hingle attended an annual
tor has a very lengthy checklist luncheon in Sarasota'as part of
to make sure everything from A the Sons of the American
to Z is covered. A few of the cri- Revolution Saramana chapter.
teria include contractual corn- Pierstorff wrote a 600 word
pliance with the school, instruc- essay on "How JROTC pre-
tor performance, equipment pared me to be a better citizen
management, curriculum, cadet of the United States of
operations, unit operations and America." He received the
special interest items. Each "Best of the Best" JROTC
item is scaled from "Does not medallion accompanied by
meet standards" to "Exceeds nearly $1,300 in scholarships:
standards." The Saramana Chapter in-
The deputy commander cludes high schools in Sarasota,
... raised.; the local unit and Manatee and. now Hardee. It
remarked, "You had me at recently adopted Hardee Coun-
hello." He was greeted at his car ty by request. Placing first with-
by two saluting cadets, some- in the local chapter, Pierstorff
thiig that is rarely done before continued to the state of Florida
.the official assessment. The completion with 33 students
corps not only, received the total, where he earned second
highest unit honor, but it was place.
also placed into the top one per- "The main thing I did in my
cent of the JROTC programs essay was taking the aspects
nationwide; making a huge that I learned through leader-
improvement from nearly four ship positions in ROTC and
e udr t ago. .. p r ,applying-them to other parts of
One sideit in puirioii r ha a.my life," said Pierstorff. "Hon-
been the inspiration for such an estly, I was surprised and 4ston-
outstanding review, Last year's ished when I found out I had
Cadet Corps Commander Staci won locally and came in second
Macias had the vision for across the state.In the end, it all
becoming a distinguished unit really just reflects what I won."


- JI . .


PHOTOS BY MACHELLE DOLLAR
nsive checklist, the high school's Air Force Junior Reserve
ched the highest level of Distinguished Unit with Merit.
mit made up of nearly 130 cadets.


.1-A



Senior Staci Macias was surprised and received a very
high honor for a cadet. With a promotion to Cadet
Colonel, her parents were present to pin the honor.


Returning next year as the Cadet-Corps Commander Alex
Pierstorff was honored through the Sons of the American
Revolution's Saramana Chapter. Competing in an essay
contest, Pierstorff placed first locally and received sec-
ond place statewide, earning nearly $1,300 in scholar-
ships. Pictured above (left) is the Saramana Chapter's
Sergenat-at-Arms Chuck Barrett awarding Pierstorff.

All change is not growth, as
all movement is not for-
ward.
-Ellen Glasgow

There is no reason why the
same man should like the
same books at 18 and 48.
^- -Ezra Pound


Am 7 i r L


your dogs off in the country and
someone will take them in.
Judy said they were cute, but
she didn't want or need.four
new dogs! Normally, the bay
head south of my home has
always been the-place people
discard them, and I have had
some mighty good dogs that no
one wanted!
Norma Alejandro had a very
nice birthday. Faye and Edith
along with Nita Keene enjoyed
attending the movies with
Norma and eating dinner out,
then supper in Wauchula and
the ladies at Paul's had her a
delicious red velvet birthday
cale. Norma is a blessing to so
many people.
I do not know at the time of
writing this if Betty Abbott and
Louise Durrance are still in the
hospital. Please remember them
and Mrs. Mildred in your
prayers.
Pray for each other and our
nation. Besides Hardee County
having so many problems, it
seems our nation does also.


j IDA Sells Building In Commerce Park


The ROTC added a new award this year; the Flight Fitness Teamwork Medallion is
awarded to. the flight who demonstrates the true meaning of teamwork and sports-
manship. Pictured above is the flight who worked together as a cohesive unit to
accomplish all aspects of the weekly physical program.


A Daily Thought
THURSDAY
I'll bless You every day, and
keep it up from now to eter-
nity. God is magnificent; He
can never be praised
enough. There are no boun-
.daries to His greatness.
Psalm 145:2-3 (ME)

..FRIDAY
Generation after generation
stands in awe of Your work;
each one tells stories of Your
mighty acts. Your beauty.


and splendor have everyone
talking; I compose songs on
Your wonders.
Psalm 145:4-5 (ME)

SATURDAY
God is all mercy and grace
- not quick to anger, is rich
in love. God is good to one
and all; everything He does
is suffused with grace.
Psalm 145:8-9 (ME)

SUNDAY
God always does what He
says, and is gracious' in
everything He does. God
gives a hand to those who
are down on their luck, gives
a fresh. start to those ready
to quit.
Psalm 145:13b-14 (ME)


MONDAY
All eyes are on You, expec-
tant; You give them their
meals on time. Generous to
a fault, You lavish Your favor
on all creatures.
Psalm 145:15-16 (ME)

TUESDAY
Everything God does is right
- the trademark on all His
works is love. God is there,
listening for all who pray, for
all who pray and mean it.
Psalm 145:17-18 (ME)

WEDNESDAY
He does what's best for
those who fear (revere) Him
- hears them call out, and
saves them. God sticks by
all those Who love Him, but
it's all over for those who
don't.
Psalm 145:19-20 (ME)
All verses are excerpted from
The Holy Bible: (KJV) King
James Version; (ME) The
Message; (NCV) New Cen-
tury Version; (NEB) New
English Bible; (NIV) New
International Version; (NLT)
New Living Translation (RSV)
Revised Standard Version;
(PME) Phillips Modern Eng-
lish; and (TLB) The Living
Bible.


By MICHAEL KELLY
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Hardee County Indus-
trial Development Authority
has sold a building in the
Hardee County Commerce Park
to a tenant that had been leasing
it.
Nutrapure, one of the na-
tion's largest manufacturers and
marketers of quality branded
nutritional supplements, had
been leasing the building since
it bought out Organix South.
The IDA sold the building
for the appraised value of
$698,000 less the $127,000 the
company had paid on its
lease/purchase agreement.
Nutrapure also owns another
building in the park and recent-
ly purchased eight acres adja-
cent to it to relocate a soap mak-
ing company from the North-
east to Hardee County.
The board also:
-got an update that the con-
tract to purchase the former
PRECO headquarters has not
Been finalized..
The closing contract is in the
PRECO attorney's hand and
should be completed soon, said
Bill Lambert, executive direc-
tor. '
-authorized economic de-
velopment coordinator Sara
Pelham and assistant Kristi
Schierling to attend a Florida
Association of Special Districts
conference.
-accepted a proposal for
checking account services from


Wauchula State Bank.,
The checking account will be
interest bearing and will pay .15 -
percent interest.
The other proposal was from
First National Bank and offered
interest of .05 percent for a
checking account or a business
money market account at .2 per-
cent.
Board members Lory
Durrance and ,Rick Justice
abstained from voting because
they each work at the banks
making the proposals.
-extended the contract with
Redding Lawn Care to mow
and maintain the Hardee
County Commerce Park.
The contract pays the compa-
ny $1,000 per month.
-authorized engineering
services with Bill Hartmann of
Hunter Engineering to do site
plans for the remaining lots in
the Commerce Park and design-
ing a creek crossing and culvert
to extend the road through the
park on to the former Terrell
Property to which the park will
begin expanding shortly.
-Extended the bidding for
insurance quotes for the former
PRECO headquarters to allow
an additional local company an
opportunity to bid..
-hired Half Acre Construc-
tion as project manager for any
building or construction work
done by the IDA.
The contract is a "piggy
back" off of an existing contract
Half Acre has with Hillsbo-


rough County. Half Acre will be
in charge of soliciting bids and
ensuring work is done properly.
The company will charge the
IDA 5 percent of the construc-
tion contract for the work.
"Having this done on a con-
tract basis would make us run
much more smoothly and effi-
ciently," Lambert told the
board.
-heard a presentation from
Fort Green Storage LLC, which
is owned by Egret Energy and
IPS Avon Park.
The company wants to put in
a liquefied natural gas plant on
former mined land on the cor-
ner of C.R. 663 and C.R. 664 in
Fort Green. Fort Green Storage
LLC has an option to purchase
480 acres from CF Industries.
The project will take gas
from the pipeline running from
Louisiana along the bottom of
the Gulf of Mexico and then
coming ashore around Port
Manatee and then across
Florida through Hardee County
to the East Coast. The company
will take gas out of the pipeline,
liquefy it, and then use it to sup-
ply power plants;
Fort Green Storage LLC is
also hoping semi-trucks will
begin switching from diesel
fuel to the cheaper liquefied
natural gas.
The company will go before
the Planning and Zoning Board
on June 14 to seek approval for
a Major Special Exception to
locate the facility there.


Certain cheeses including aged cheddar, Swiss and Monterey Jack, are thought to
help protect teeth from decay.


Luge racers wear weight vests, with pieces of lead sewn into them, to make them-
selves heavier on the sled. This. gives the lugers more speed.AII changes, even the
most longed for, have their melancholy; for what we leave behind us is a part of our-
selves; we must die to one life before we can enter another.
-Anatole France


Fort Green News

By Rilla Cooper
773-6710


YOUR BUSINESS COULD

APPEAR HERE TOO!!
Contact
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayc.e Daniels

773-3255


-'itC1U.I..- --~r) ~.-. .~._ --uLC ._,gl---r--~~., *1*' .I-~---. -


Greetings from Fort Green!
This will probably be the short-
est Fort Green News ever!
Mildred Cooper is in the
Sebring hospital, and. most
everyone is aware she has
advanced to that young age of
96! She doesn't like to be alone
so someone from the family
will be sitting with her at night,
the Lord willing. Saturday night
Donna Chancey, her grand-
daughter, sat with her and
Sunday night will be my turn.
We will see from there what
others spend the night!
Last Sunday, Mary and
Donald Samuels 'ai Sherman
and I -ent to L'aeland- Re--
gional Cancer Center for a'very
motivational speaker who
spoke on "Tragedy to
Triumph." I did not know it,
but we were told that June 3
was National Cancer Survivor
Day. We all.enjoyed the day.
Judy Bargeron said someone
is up to it again and discarded
four dogs near her home on
Alderman Road. People seem
to believe that you just drop


By MICHAELKELLY
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Hardee County Indus-
trial Development Authority
received its 2011 year-end audit
from Clifton Larson Allen LLP
at its meeting Tuesday morning.
Firm partner Mike Carter and
Trisha Floyd were at the meet-
ing to review it with the board.
The audit listed net assets of
$10.296.828. an increase of
$5.182.923 from the previous
year. The increase was largely
due to receiving a $5 million
payment from Mosaic once it
began mining operations again.
During the year ending Sept.
30, 2011, the IDA had expenses
of $1.321,148 versus total rev-
enues of $6,504,071.
The assets included
$4,649,259 in cash, $4.918 in
accounts receivable. $626.289
due from other governments,
$1,451,671 in land held for
resale and $3,751,361 in capital
assets.
Carter said it was a clean
audit, which means the finan-
cial statements are accurate but
did say there were some materi-
al weakness findings similar to
the last audit.
The previous two audits per-
formed were for the fiscal years
2009 and 2010 and were com-
pleted and filed with the state
on Dec. 31, 2011.
Sihce this audit went up to


September 2011, the weakness-
es presented in the previous
audits had not yet been correct-
ed in this audit. Carter said most
findings and material weak-
nesses have since been correct-
ed but do not reflect in this
audit.
It revealed eight material
findings, ranging from ac-
counting procedures to how to
list capital assets and invento-
ries.
It also pointed out board
members are representatives of
the business community and the
board entered, into contracts
with some of those companies.
Total payments made to
those organizations during the
year were $545,482 while rev-
enue received from those com-
panies was $5.838.918.
There were six material
weaknesses noted in the audit.
They included preparation of
financial statements, inadequate
separation of duties, no formal
documented policies, compli-
ance with Florida Statute filing
requirements, financial state-
ment adjustments, and a lack of,
supporting documentation.
In a letter to management,
the firm points out corrective
action has been taken to address
findings and recommendations
made in preceding annual
financial audits.







8C The Herald-Advocate, June 14, 2012


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I^sk^!E^l(^Jhmjkudy^ruguja^w^iu*


Economic and Property Damages Settlement

Providing Money to Individuals and Businesses


If you have economic loss or property damage because of
the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, you could get money from
a class action settlement with BP Exploration & Production
Inc. and BP America Production Company ("BP"). Go to
DeepwaterHorizonSettlements.com for more information,
including information on how to file a claim.

WHO IS INCLUDED IN THE ECONOMIC &
PROPERTY DAMAGES SETTLEMENT?
The Economic and Property Damages ("E&PD")
Settlement Class includes people, businesses, and
other entities in the states of Louisiana, Alabama
and Mississippi, and certain counties in Texas and
Florida, that were harmed by the oil spill. The website
DeepwaterHorizonSettlements.com has detailed
descriptions and maps to help you determine whether
a geographic location may be included in the. E&PD
Settlement. Additionally, you can call 1-866-992-6174 or
e-mail questions@DeepwaterHorizoriEconomicSettlement.
cor to find out if a geographic location is included.

WHAT DOES THE ECONOMIC & PROPERTY
DAMAGES SETTLEMENT PROVIDE?
The E&PD Settlement makes payments for the following
types of claims: (1) Seafood Compensation, (2) Economic
Damage, (3) Loss of Subsistence, (4) Vessel Physical
Damage, (5) Vessels of Opportunity Charter Payment,
(6) Coastal Real Property Damage, (7) Wetlands Real
Property Damage, and (8) Real Property Sales Damage.
There is no limit on the total dollar amount of the E&PD
Settlement; all qualified claims will be paid.

How TO GET BENEFITS FROM THE ECONOMIC &
"PROPERTY DAMAGES SETTLEMENT
You-need to submit a Claim Form to request a payment.
You. can get a copy of the various Claim Forms by visiting
the website or by calling 1-866-992-6174. Claims can be
submitted online or by mail. If you have questions about
how to file your claim, you should call the toll-free number
for assistance.


The deadline to submit most E&PD claims will be
April 22, 2014 or six months after the E&PD Settlement
becomes effective (that is, after the Court grants "final
approval" and any appeals are resolved), whichever is later.
There will be an earlier deadline to submit E&PD Seafood
Compensation claims. The earlier deadline to submit
Seafood Compensation claims will be 30 days after final
approval of the Settlement by the United States District
Court for the Eastern District of Louisiana (regardless of
appeals). Actual claim filing deadlines will be posted on
the website as they become available. Valid claims will be
paid as they are approved, beginning shortly after the Court-
Supervised Settlement Program commences. It is highly
recommended that E&PD Settlement Class Members
complete and submit their claim forms promptly. Please
read the Medical Benefits Settlement notice because you
may also be eligible for benefits from that settlement.

YOUR OTHER OPTIONS
If you do not want to be legally bound by the E&PD
Settlement, you must Opt Out or exclude yourself by
October 1, 2012 or you won't be able to sue BP over
certain economic and property damage claims. If you
stay in the E&PD Settlement, you may object to it by
August 31, 2012. The Detailed Notice explains how to
exclude yourself or object.

The Court will hold a hearing on November 8, 2012 to
consider whether to approve the E&PD Settlement. You
or your own lawyer may ask to appear and speak at the
hearing at your own cost. The Court will also consider
Class Counsel fees, costs, and expenses including an
interim payment of $75 million and additional awards equal
to 6% of class claims and benefits paid. Class Counsel
fees, costs and expenses under the Economic and Property
Damages Settlement Agreement and the Medical Benefits
Settlement Agreement jointly cannot exceed $600 million.
Class members' payments will not be reduced if the Court
approves the payment of Class Counsel fees, costs, and
expenses because BP will separately pay these attorney
fees, costs, and expenses.


Medical Benefits Settlement

Providing Benefits to Clean-Up Workers and Certain Gulf Coast Residents


If you have a medical claim related to the Deepwater
Horizon oil spill, you could get benefits from a class
action settlement with BP Exploration & Production Inc.
and BP America Production Company ("BP"). Go to
DeepwaterHorizonSettlements.com for more information,
including information on how to file a claim.

WHO IS INCLUDED IN THE MEDICAL
BENEFITS SETTLEMENT?
The Medical Class includes (1) clean-up workers and
(2) certain people who resided in specific geographic
areas in coastal and wetlands areas along the Gulf
Coast during specific periods in 2010. The website
DeepwaterHorizonSettlements.com has detailed
descriptions and maps to help you determine whether a
geographic location may be included in one of these zones.
Additionally, you can call 1-866-992-6174 or e-mail info@
DeepwaterHorizonMedicalSettlement.com to find out if a
geographic location is included.

WHAT DOES THE MEDICAL BENEFITS
SETTLEMENT PROVIDE?
The benefits of the Medical Benefits Settlement include:
* (1) payments to qualifying people for certain acute (short-
term) and chronic (ongoing) medical conditions occurring
after exposure to oil or chemical dispersants; (2) provision
of periodic medical examinations to qualifying people; and
(3) creation of a Gulf Region Health Outreach Program,
consisting of projects to strengthen the healthcare system.
Benefits (1) and (2) will be provided only after the Court
grants final approval and any appeals are resolved.

How TO GET BENEFITS FROM THE
MEDICAL BENEFITS SETTLEMENT
You need to submit a Claim Form to request benefits. You
can get a copy of the Claim Form by visiting the website
or by calling 1-866-992-6174. Claims can be submitted by


mail. If you have questions about how to file your claim,
you should call the toll-free number for assistance.

The deadline for filing a Claim Form is one year after
the Medical Benefits Settlement becomes effective (that is,
after the Court grants "final approval" and any appeals are
resolved). The exact date of the claim filing deadline will
be posted on the website. It is highly recommended that
Medical Class Members complete and submit their claim
forms promptly. Please read the Economic and Property
Damages Settlement notice because you may also be
eligible for a payment from that settlement.


YOUR OTHER OPTIONS


If you do not want to be legally bound by the Medical
Benefits Settlement, youmust Opt Out orexcludeyourselfby
October 1, 2012 or you won't be able to sue BP over
certain medical claims. If you stay in the Medical Benefits
Settlement, you may object to it by August 31, 2012. The
Detailed Notice explains how to exclude yourself or object.

The Court will hold a hearing on November 8, 2012
to consider whether to approve the Medical Benefits
Settlement. You or your own lawyer may ask to appear
and speak at the hearing at your own cost. Class Counsel
will ask the Court to consider an award of fees, costs, and
expenses of 6% of the value of the benefits actually provided
under the Medical Benefits Settlement Agreement. Class
Counsel fees, costs, and expenses under the Medical
Benefits Settlement Agreement and the Economic and
Property Damages Settlement Agreement jointly cannot
exceed $600 million. Class members' payments will
not be reduced if the Court approves the payment of
Class Counsel fees, costs, and expenses because BP will
separately pay these attorney fees, costs, and expenses.


- o!Ir~iz: n Settle~1 ments. col m 1- 866 -996 1 -