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 Material Information
Title: The Herald-advocate
Portion of title: Herald advocate
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Wm. J. Kelly
Place of Publication: Wauchula Fla
Creation Date: February 9, 2012
Publication Date: 1955-
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Wauchula (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hardee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Hardee -- Wauchula
Coordinates: 27.546111 x -81.814444 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: 55th year, no. 31 (Sept. 2, 1955)-
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579544
oclc - 33886547
notis - ADA7390
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System ID: UF00028302:00416
 Related Items
Preceded by: Hardee County herald
Preceded by: Florida advocate (Wauchula, Fla.)

Full Text

















The


Herald-Advocate


Hardee County's Hometown Coverage


112th Year, No. 10
3 Sections, Pages 32
1


Thursday, February 9, 2012


70
Plus 5s Sales Tax


School Board, Union Settle Contract


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
It's over!
The months-long negotia-
tions between the Hardee
County School Board and the
Hardee Education Association/-
United ended on Monday after-
noon with an agreement on the
2011-12 contract.


Black

History

Festival

Saturday
By MARIA TRUJILLO
For The Herald-Advocate
- It all began with a man by the
name of Dr. Carter G. Wood-
son.
Thanks to this man, National
African-American History
Month exists. Each February,
celebrations honoring the
African-American community
are held throughout the United
States.
And this Saturday, Hardee
County will join in on the cele-
brations by holding its first
Black History Festival on Main
.Street in downtown Wauchula.
A Black History Festival is
just what it sounds like. It's a
festival that celebrates the con-
tributions African-Americans
have made to this great nation.
Marilyn. Browdy Morris,
with the Major C. Morris Me-
morial Scholarship and an
organizer of the event, said the
idea developed after she noticed
many black youth didn't know
about African-American histo-
ry.
She feels it's important for P
African-Aimerican children to V
learn about their culture. But w
it's not just young black chil- A
dren she wants to teach. c
"This festival will be a way
to let everyone know about
black history," Browdy Morris
said.
The festival will begin at 8
a.m., with a breakfast available
for purchase at 9. This breakfast
is sponsored by LogOn Lan- By
guage Learning Center. Fo
After the breakfast there will
be many things to do or see at Th
the festival, ha
There will be around 50 ven-
dors with many things for sale, Cc
including food. Some of the ho
culinary treats available for pur- Ha
chase will be barbecue, fish. Da
See BLACK 2A


qu
aw
he,


Faculty and School-Related
Personnel should receive addi-
tional checks at the next pay
day, Feb. 17.
Financial terms of the con-
tract include step increases for
all full-time employees, a one-
time $,1,500 bonus for all
employees, a one-time bonus of
$500 for those on step 17


through 23 and 25 or higher
(those who would have no fur-
ther steps or are between steps)
and up to $1,200 reimburse-
ment for the 120 Flex Plan B
employees not on the employee
insurance program.'
Union spokesman Gilbert
Vasquez, in announcing accept-
ance of the School Board pro-


, posal said three conditions to be
added at the bottom of the
approved proposal. One is that
all step increases are retroac-
tive, another that employees
receive separate checks for each
portion of the proposal and the
third that bargaining would
continue when the statewide
court case on the three percent


employee retirement contribu-
tions is settled.
Negotiations began in late
August when the union re-
quested a six percent across-
the-board raise plus step
increases. Representing the
School Board are Woody
Caligan, Marie Dasher and
George Kelly. For the union, it


CLASSROOMM CALISTENICS?
:. x- ----- -,- .


COURTESY PHOTO
'ushups in Physical Education class? No. Closer inspection reveals circles painted on the ground for an oversize
version of the classic game of Twister. It's all about fun for these second graders at'Zolfo Springs Elementary School,
'ho met their Accelerated Reader goals for the month of January and were treated to the giant-size outdoor game.
ll the participants had a blast reaching, stretching and twisting their bodies into crazy formations to outlast their
classmates and win the game!


Dispose 0
y MARIA TRUJILLO
r The Herald-Advocate
It's that time once again.
[at time to go green, if you
ven't already done so.
On Saturday, the Hardee
>unty Sanitary Landfill will
Id its quarterly Household
izardous Waste Clean-Up
ly from 8 a.m. to noon.
Do you fail to separate your
estionable chemical throw-
'ays because you think you'll
! hnr d fn th-


If Hazardous Materials For Free


Dofi't just pour unwanted"f
cleaners down the drain or out-
side, store them in a safe place
away frpm children, and then
quarterly, such as this Saturday,
you can safely dispose of them
by taking them to the landfill.
As a matter of fact, anything
containing chemicals is accept-
ed, whether it's in a spray or
aerosol can, in boxes or bottles.
Herbicides, pesticides, .and
insecticides should also be dis-
dn,," f ,,l,,r v,, ,-,,,1hld


wood preservative or stains you
used on that old rocking chair?
Then take those along with you.
Are you done restoring that
car, or just tired of trying to
make it work, and have all of
these chemicals lying around?
Chemicals such as gasoline or
petroleum products, used motor
oil, antifreeze, or brake and
transmission fluid should not be
dumped into the ground, where
they can contaminate the water
lin~


Don't forget, you're trying to
be green, so make sure to
change your light bulbs to fluo-
rescent bulbs,.as these will save
you money and are better for
the environment. Then, you can
take your old light bulbs to the
landfill.
There are a few things that
you will not be allowed at
Household Hazardous Waste
Clean-Up Day.
The landfill will not accept
t-- -- -- -- - -- ---..1:i f -l


was Vasquez, union president
Selden Spencer, Heather Lane,
Paul Lukawski and Angela
Spornraft.
Regional Education Associa-
tion-United representative Iris
Froehlich, from Palm Beach
County, began the negotiations*
but was replaced in January by
See SCHOOL 2A





Drug



Bust



Nets



15

By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
Dozens upon idzens of drug
charges were levied against
over a dozen suspects last week
as the Hardee County Drug
Task Force conducted a round-
up of alleged narcotics offend-
ers.
Fifteen people were jailed on
Thursday and Friday, 13 on
drug warrants and two for other
alleged violations, including a
man wanted for reportedly fail-
ing to pay child support and a
woman who allegedly inter-
fered with officers as they con-
ducted a search warrant at a
suspected drug house.
In addition to the 13 already
taken into custody, more drug
suspects may be jailed as arrest
warrants still outstanding after
the roundup are served.
Maj. Randy Dey of the
Hardee County Sheriff's Office
and a spokesman for the inter-
agency Drug Task Force said
investigations into narcotics
activity in this county are ongo-
.ing, and roundups of suspects
will continue to occur intermit-
tently.
Gone are the days of just six-
week or three-month probes, he
said, as Sheriff Arnold Lanier
steps up the focus on drug
activity and its spinoff crimes.
As the Drug Task Force uses
tips from the public and, most
often, informants, controlled
buys of narcotics are made and
monitored, and arrest warrants
are then obtained. Then, a
roundup is scheduled and those
arrest warrants are served.
DVpv id an fnt h war 0fran tit for


DLe. W~.LCU i1u LiteII Ulsposal. JucU UI l prIujcIy. AUU sl..U..- suppJy. Ires, gas cylinlcll liaCe, ill- Uiey sai a ar a.cn wa*rit. a i
W THR Think again! n't just dump them with the rest Or you might have car batter- munition, explosives or pyro- a suspected drug house w
Every household is allowed of the garbage. ies or filters; get rid of them technics. Other things not wel- included in the roundup day
4N1 lMtSi LIW BMBlI to dispose of up to 60 pounds of Have you finished painting safely, and for free, too. Maybe come are radioactive, biohazard and when officers entered t
02/01 83 52 o.00 household hazardous waste for your new baby's room and have it's pool chemicals you need to or infectious waste. Magnolia Manor property,
02/02 84 0.00 free. paint leftover? How about get rid of. See DISPOSE 2A See DRUG 3A
02/04 83 60 0.00
02/05 83 62 0.00
02/06 81 60 0.00
TQOAL Rainfall to 02/07/12 0.50
02/07 t60.0 Feasibility Study

SIDA Funds Tourism Feasibility Study
ouen Year Average-5ear nte81
owuc*: Urdv. of Fla. Onoa Research Center


vpr
as
's,
he
23


INDEX
Classifieds....................6B
Community Calendar....8A
Courthouse Report.....10OB
Crime Blotter.................7C
Hardee Living................2B
Information Roundup... 7A
Obituaries......................4A
School Lunch Menus....6A



Il II III I
8 3391113 0007
8 '3391 007 7


By MICHAEL KELLY
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Hardee County Indus-
trial Development Authority is
moving forward with a fL.,ilbll-
ity study in hopes of expanding
and diversifying the local econ-
omy by adding ,-.ih .i, I and
agricultural tourism.
The board voted to fund
$100,000 to the Hardee County
Chamber of Commerce in a
reimbursable grant so it can hire
and administer the Florida
Institute of Government at the
University of South Florida to
conduct the study.


At a joint meeting Friday, the
IDA and Chamber boards heard
a presentation from five FIOG
staff members, and then agreed
to hire them for $89,492 to
complete Phase One of the
study.
The additional $10,508
would go toward travel costs
and other miscellaneous ex-
penses occurred by the Cham-
ber in association with the proj-
ect.
The project should take
approximately 12 weeks to
complete.
Phase One will include,


among other items, clarification
of project goals and objectives,
taking an inventory of and ana-
lyzing community assets, and
performing an environmental
scan of eco-tourism/competi-
tion analysis.
The FIOG will work in con-
junction with the county vision-
ing process and other organiza-
tions to examine the county's
current economic base. Then
the group will identify opportu-
nities for econorhic growth and
identify the necessary steps to
create economic prosperity.
A tangible asset inventory


will include an ethnographic
assessment, material cultural
inventory, heritage resources
and natural resources.
Angela Christ, director of the
FIOG, said that rural areas are
niche-type systems and that
Peace River and the Bone
Valley Region are very unique
to Hardee. County and this
region.
She also mentioned the possi-
bility of medical tourism.
Christ said the Florida Insti-
tute of Neurologic Rehabilita-
tion is something one normally
does not find in a community of


this size, and it is a valuable
asset.
She said jobs can be added to
a community by expanding
upon the base already in place
instead of having to bring in
industries and businesses.
Christ said the study will give
a complete inventory of assets
and map them out and then rec-
ommend what direction the
county should move toward.
Chamber President Derren
Bryan noted it was not a com-
plete study, and asked the IDA
members if they were commit-
See IDA 2A -


Unwittingly, Kids

Can Be Cruel

... Column 11A


State Says IDA

Now Compliant

... Story 3A


Wild Hogs

A Great Hunt!
... Column 5B









2A The Herald-Advocate, February 9, 2012


SThe Herald-Advocate
Hardee County's Hometown Coverage
JAMES R. KELLY
Publisher/Editor
CYNTHIA M. KRAHL
Managing Editor


JOAN M. SEAMAN
Sports Editor



115 S. Seventh Ave.
P.O. Box 338
Wauchula, FL 33873


RALPH HARRISON
Production Manager

NOEY DE SANTIAGO
Asst. Prod. Manager

Phone: (863) 773-3255
Fax: (863) 773-0657


Published weekly on Thursday at Wauchula, Florida, by The Herald-Advocate
Publishing Co. Inc. Periodical Postage paid at U.S. Post Office, Wauchula, FL
33873 and additional entry office (USPS 578-780), "Postmaster," send address
changes to: The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338, Wauchula, FL 33873.


Schools- Thursday 5 p.m.
Sports Monday noon
Hardee Living Thursday 5 p.m.
General News Monday 5 pmn.
a Ads-Tuesday noon


LETTERS:
The Herald-Advocate welcomes letters to the editor on matters of public
interest. Letters should be brief, and must be written in good taste, signed
and include a daytime phone number.
SUBMISSIONS:
Press releases on community matters are welcome. Submissions should be
typed, double-spaced and adhere to the above deadlines. All items are sub-
ject to editing.
^ '


Kelly's Column
By Jim


Mr. and Mrs. F.L. Revell of Wauchula would like the County
Commission to improve the appearance of the Hardee Courthouse
yard. The county should install a water system, fix the water foun-
tain, and plant oaks and shrubs to make the grounds look better,
they said.

According to the Tampa Bay Times, Hardee County schools
ranked No. .15 in the state for increased reading proficiency in
FCAT from 2001 to 2011. Hardee schools ranked No. 37 in Florida
for improvements in math scores from 2001 to 2011.
This report came from David Durastanti, Hardee superintend-
ent of schools. Florida has 67 counties.
In 2011 54 percent of Hardee students read at grade level or
above and 63 percent scored on fhath at grade level or, above.
This year three of Hardee's elementary schools earned an A
from the state with one B and one high C. The junior high earned
a high C, and Hardee High School improved to a high C.
.,Durastanti praised the.work of students, taiff. pJrent business,
partners, churches and civic organizations. .,

Growing olives could be a future agricultural crop in Florida.
There is a 20-acre olive grove in south Georgia.

Connie Rowe of Wauchula does not think power wheelchairs
should be on streets and highways, especially at night. She is con-
cerned about traffic accidents.

Angelo Dundee, the famous boxing trainer of Muhammad Ali,
died Jan. 31 at age 90 in Tampa. He also managed Sugar Ray
Leonard, George Foreman and Carmen Basilio.

Florida has about 541,000 acres of citrus compared with about
840,000 acres in 1974, reports Farm Bureau and the U.S.
Department of Agriculture. The acreage is. less due to canker,
greening, hurricanes, freezes and development.

Congratulations to the New York Giants for their 21-17 Super
Bowl NFL win over the New England Patriots on Sunday. Eli
Manning now has two Super Bowl wins. His brother Peyton has
one Super Bowl win. Father Archie Manning, a fine quarterback
himself, is proud.
Quarterbacks Joe Montana and Terry Bradshaw each have four
Super Bowl wins and Tom Brady three.
Judy Wilson remembers Zeke Mowatt of Wauchula catching a
TD pass for the Giants in the Super Bowl XXV in Tampa. Mowatt
was a dominant HHS athlete who played college ball at Florida
State.
Judy also notes that Lake Wales native Buford Long, a long-
time Wauchula resident, once played for the New York Giants. He
was a star runningback at Florida.

For many years companies were offshoring manufacturing
jobs due to cheaper labor and other production costs.
Some American companies now are beginning to look at
reshoring jobs due to higher wages in China, increasing costs for
ocean and air cargo, and worries over disruptions in supply chains.
American manufacturing is expected to increase 3 percent in 2012,
says Industry Week magazine.

Worrying many American companies' CFOs (chief financial
officers) in 2012 are health care costs, energy costs and consumer
confidence, along with government leaders, unemployment and the
U.S. budget deficit. Many major companies are hoarding more
cash (up 11 percent from a year ago) while their total debts are up
7 percent, reports Industry Week magazine.

-Ronald McDonald Houses allow parents to stay for free while
their child is in the hospital. The sponsor is McDonald's
Restaurants. There are three Ronald McDonald Homes in St.
Petersburg and one in Tampa.
Program services use 86 percent of expenses, with 10 percent
for fundraising and 6 percent for management. The charity gets
money from public .support, (70 percent), special events, (15 per-
cent), family donations,'(4 percent), and investments, (11 percent).

SThe University of Florida has a new academic course called
"The Good Life." That's a course I would like to take.
Your definition of "the good life" might be different from
mine, but some parts would be the same. They could include ade-
quate housing, food, clothing, able to pay the bills,job, recreation,
family, spiritual connection, health, hobbies, travel, entertainment,
accomplishment, etc.

The chief economist of the National Automobile Dealers
Association predicts more than 13.9 million new cars and light
trucks will be purchased or leased in the U.S. this year. Key factors
for the estimated 10 percent increase are aging vehicles, affordable
credit and aggressive incentives,

The Florida State Fair will be Feb. 9-20 in Tampa at 1-4 and
U.S. 301. Cracker Country, depicting community life 100 years
ago, is a great attraction and has several old local buildings.
Other free special attractions include an Elvis Extravaganza,


SCHOOL
Continued From 1A
Dick Daggett. recently selected
as Peace River Basin Service
Unit director for Hardee,
Highlands, DeSoto and Glades
counties.
Initial biweekly meetings of
the administrative team and
union representatives con-
cerned contract language. Once
all the language issues were
resolved, there remained only
the financial package to settle.
Step increases have been in
that proposal from the begin-
ning. A step increase is an auto-
matic wage increase that goes
along with each additional year
of service and experience. It
could be $639 to $1,500, but
for most workers, that amount
averages to about one and one-
half percent. Step increases are
in ranges, 0-16, 17-24 and 25
and above. A starting teacher's
salary has been $33.345. For
SRP's, it starts at $8 per hour..
There are different rates for
substitute teachers and other
personnel.
Of the 536 employees, there
are 214 who are within a range
and would get no step increase.
The special $500 bonus is for
these people. All employees'
would get the $1.500 bonus.
In talking about accepting the
administration proposal, Vas-
quez asked that actual numbers
be used on proposals instead of
percentages, so everyone
knows what is involved. Nev-
ertheless, we agree and accept
the last proposals a quick and
fair decision for the employ-
ees."
Caligan briefly conversed
with Dasher and Kelly and then
agreed to the proposals. Vas-
quez and Calilgan signed the
documents and the two men
shook hands.
Spencer asked for a moment
to make a comment. "I feel we
are doing what is right and cor-
rect for the employees in our
school system. We,thank you,
our team and thank the employ-
ees for putting their trust in us."
Spencer went on to say that
there were several concerns for
the upcoming negotiations for
next year. He listed them: legit-
imizing the classroom sizes in
all schools; the aging fleet of
buses; shortage of books at the
high school; raising the numr,
bers of teachers to helpal.leviate
the growing responsibilities
each has; and performance-
based pay.
He added: finding a method
which fairly compensates SRPs
and teachers without causing
fiscal harm to our district's
funds.




DISPOSE
Continued From 1A
Businesses that generate less
than 220 pounds of hazardous
waste per month may bring
their waste to the collection for
proper disposal.
Businesses that generate
more than 220 pounds and less
than 2,200 pounds of hazardous
waste per month will not be
allowed to bring their waste to
the collection. However, they
may call EQ of Florida to
schedule a pickup at this event.
The Hardee County Sanitary
Landfill is located at 685
Airport Road in Wauchula. To
get there follow East Main
Street about two miles from
town, turn left onto Airport
Road and follow the paved road
until it .ends at the entrance to.
'the landfill.
If you would like more infor-.
mation on what you can dispose
of. call the landfill at 773-5089.


BLACK
Continued From 1A
cakes, pies, and much much
more.
Along with the several food
vendors, there will also be
places around the festival with
information about the many
people who helped make the
African-American community
thrive.
Another thing this festival
won't be lacking is entertain-
ment. There will be-speakers.
singers from Youth With
Voices. mimes. and dancing.
Some people lven get a
chance to win door prizes!
If 8 a.m. is just too early,
don't Worry, the festival will go
on until 6 p.m. along Main
Street.
As mentioned, this festival
wouldn't even be happening if
not for Dr. Woodson.
Woodson, born to former
slaves, spent his childhood
working in the Kentucky mines,
and later graduating from
Harvard with a doctorate in phi-
losophy.
Woodson was unhappy with
the lack of African-American
people in history books, and
how when they were portrayed,
it was usually in an inferior
social position. !
That's why he made it his
mission to write black
Americans into America's his-
tory.
In 1926, Woodson chose the
second week of February to be
Negro History Week. This was
in honor of two men who were
very influential in the black
community, President Abraham
Lincoln and abolitionist Fred-
erick Douglas.
He started this week to
acknowledge all of the accom-
plishments of African-Amer-
ican culture, people, and events
that influenced American socie-
ty.
During the late 1960s, Negro
History Week had become so
big that it was decided to make
it into Black History Month.
Although, it wasn't until 1986
that Congress made February
National Black (Afro-Ameri-
can) History Month.
In 1996, President Bill
Clinton proclaimed February to
be National African-American
History Month. Since then
every ,'president hasn,.issued-.
afinnuatl'pflamatidhs'. ": -
-Learniig doesn't boring, in fact you'll be sur-
prised at the things you may
find interesting while learning
about the past.
So don't forget to make your
way downtown this Saturday.
This will be the first annual
Black History Festival of hope-
fully many more to come
throughout the years.
The festival will run from 8
a.m. to 6 p.m. And it is one you
won't want to miss.

IDA
Continued From 1A
ted to funding the project
through to completion.
Rick Justice, chairman of the
IDA board, said he thinks the
IDA would fund the next phas-
es of the project, depending
how the FIOG group does with
Phase One and the potential
value and outcome of the study.
If the IDA thinks the infor-
mation gathered during Phase
One shows tourism would be
viable in Hardee County, it can
contract the FIOG to continue
developing the plan up to
implementation.
Mike Prescott, an IDA board-
member, said everyone needs to
get involved in this project and
make the FIOG work for the
money.


Elvis Live, Xtreme Sports Show, Yesterdaze Show, lawnmower
races, exotic petting zoo, racing pigs, exhibits, food, rides, and
more.



Th ank You

On behalf of the Martin Luther King, Jr.
Committee, we would like to express
our sincere gratitude of thanks to the
individuals, churches, local businesses
and/or organizations, who had committed
themselves to take part in the 2012
Martin Luther King, Jr., Candlelight service
and Parade. Without your support
and participation it would have not been
a success...
Let's all remember that we can all rise to the
occasion at any time, day and year
coming together as one to be in "Unity"
amd keeping the dream of the late
Martin Luther King, Jr.
God Bless you all
Sincerely,
soc2:9p Martin Luther King Jr. Committee


By MICHAEL KELLY
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Hardee boys basketball
team saw its season come to an
end Tuesday night after a 74-57
loss to Auburndale in the Class
5A, District 10 Tournament
being played in Lake Wales.
Hardee could not stop
Rashaad Jones' three-point
shooting, as he scored 23 points
for the night and 6-foot 6-inch
Elmo Stephens added 20 points.
Auburndale had a 38-21 lead
at halftime.
The Wildcats played even
with the Bloodhounds in the
second half but could not pull
off a comeback, with the final
score being 74-57.
The Wildcats finished the.


season with an 8-13 record.
The team will lose four sen-
iors this year, including Keshun
Rivers, Andrew Hooks, JuJuan
Hooks and Bobli Brown.
Senior Rivers l d Hardee in
scoring against the Blood-
hounds, with 20 points in the
game. Andrew Hooks added 9
points, JaJuan Hooks had 5,
Keyon Brown scored 6, Bobby
Brown added 3, Kane Casso
scored 6, Luke Palmer 2 and
Steve Metayer added 6 points.
Returning next year will be
Chistian Mo ralez, Keyon
Brown, Casso, Lucious Everett,
Palmer and Metayer.
Auburndale will play Lake
Wales Friday night for the dis-
trict title in Lake Wales.


Feline Health: Tips To

Help Improve Hydration
Pet parents may be surprised Townshend's tips to encourage
to learn that water accounts for healthy hydration for your feline
60 to 75 percent of a cat's body friend:
weight. Cats tend to be water Feeding canned, or wet,
avoiders but, because water is so food is a great way to increase
critical to their body composi- water consumption. Canned
tion, it is important to make sure. food is available in a variety of
that they stay properly hydrated. textures and flavors so there is
Water helps regulate a cat's body something for every cat, evdn
temperature and plays an impor- picky eaters or those that have
tant role in helping them to allergies. Dr. Townshend rec-
digest food and eliminate waste. ommends either Wellness
When cats are not properly Sliced Turkey Entree or Minced
hydrated, they can have prob- Chicken Dinner. If feeding both
lems eliminating waste, which canned food and dry food, pay
may lead to urinary tract issues particular attention to feeding
or infections. Urinary tract con- guidelines to help prevent over-
ditions are one of the most com- feeding.
mon reasons cats visit the vet. Choose a diet with moder-
Such conditions occur when ately low levels of magnesium
crystals form in the urine. This to discourage crystal formation
can lead to frequent and painful in the urine.
urination, urination outside the Provide fresh, clean water
litter box and bloody urine. If at all times to prevent dehydra- -
left untreated, the condition can tion. Install recirculating water
be life threatening. One way pet fountains, or provide access to
parents can help promote uri- multiple water bowls in differ-
nary tract health and hydration, ent locations throughout the
in general, is by choosing a food house.
that helps cats stay hydrated. Multiple clean litter boxes
"Diet plays an important role should be placed in out-of-the-
in supporting overall feline way places, making it easy for
health," said Dr. Al Townshend, cats to relieve themselves with-
ta fft eterirnann. at .WeJlne.ss out interruption. ,
Natural-, Pet-- Food,:- To- help- -. I s especially important to
encourage a healthy urinary monitor water intake in a warm
tract, feed a high-quality canned climate.
cat food, since a high water con- In addition to the tips above,
tent from natural meat sources .pet parents should regularly
and cranberries will help main- monitor their cats' water and
tain a healthy urine pH and help food intake since changes in
prevent bacterial-related infec- consumption can sometimes be
tion." a symptom of an underlying
Here are some of Dr. issue.


.


Saturday, Feb. 11 3 pm

Artists include Perry Northup and
family, Pasty Dollins, Auburndale
Baptist Blue Grass Band, Susan
Robertson and more.

Concert and meal are free.
Please bring a side dish and desert
and your favorite lawn chair.

For more info call Buddy and Virginia
Colson at 863-773-6467.


Reality Ranch
1942 SR 66 2-1/2 Miles East of Zolfo Springs




SUPER MATT

Coin Laundry





Large Washers & Dryers

Up To 125 Ibs. Washers


SPECIAL/ESPECIAL

MONDAY-FRIDAY

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NORMAL NORMALENTE
$250 DOUBLE/DOBLE
$400 MAX/MAXI
s$60 LARGE/GRANDE
$70 SUPER GRANDE


SPECIAL/ESPECIAL
$125
$200oo
$300
$350


HwY 17 South Across from Nicholas Ret


Boys Basketball


Season Ends


SUBSCRIPTIONS:
Hardee County
6 months $21; 1 yr.- $39; 2 yrs. $75
Florida
6 months $25; 1 yr. $46; 2 yrs. $87
Out of State
6 months -'$29; 1 yr. $52; 2 yrs.- $ 1t00


I






February 9, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 3A


Griggs Guajardo


Hines Kuck



Conned rom
Continued From 1A


two counts possession of mari-
juana with intent to sell, sale of
marijuana, three counts posses-
sion of narcotics equipment,
and cruelty to a child.
James Riley Driver, 47, 202
Rust Ave., Wauchula, two
counts sale of methampheta-
mine, possession of metham-
phetamine, three counts posses-
sion of narcotics equipment.
Aurora Alamia Garza, 31,
4526 Pine Ave., Bowling
Green, possession of metham-
phetamine, possession of con-
trolled substance without a pre-
scription, possession of drug
paraphernalia, non-support of
children.
Barbara Ann Giiggs, 60,
1614 .Mason-Dixon Ave.,
Bowling Green, two counts sale
of methamphetamine, smug-
gling contraband into a correc-
tional facility, two counts pos-
session of narcotics equipment.
Antonio Guajardo Jr., 28,509
Grove St., Bowling Green,
three counts sale of marijuana,
possession of marijuana, two
cddn"s' 'sale of ditgs-'from -a


people were either inside, on
the front porch or in the yard.
All had to be detained and
searched. Some were arrested.
He added that the roundup
included suspects in municipal-
ities as well, and was aided by
officers with the Bowling
Green and Wauchula police
departments.
Narcotics suspects arrested in
the roundup were:
Lewis Eric Brown, 33, 742
Sandpiper Dr., Wauchula, two
counts sale of marijuana, two
counts possession of drug para-
phernalia, possession of a short-
barreled gun, possession of a
gun by a convicted felon, resist-
ing arrest, and failure tofegister
as a sex offender.
Javier Carrion, 38, 721
Chamberlain Blvd., Wauchula,
possession of marijuana, pos-
session of drug paraphernalia.
Tyshun Kareem Daniels, 26,
744 Chamberlain Blvd.,
Wauchula, two counts sale of
cocaine, possession of cocaine,
three counts sale of a hallucino-
gen, possession of marijuana;


Thousands Make A Difference Using
Alzheimer's Association TrialMatch


When her mother was diag-
nosed with Alzheimer's disease
in 2010, Dr. Denise Canchola
immediately recognized the
importance of enrolling her in a
clinical trial. But even Dr.
Canchola, a psychiatric nurse
practitioner based in Pompano
Beach, Fla., needed help and
resources to search for Alz-
heimer's clinical trials near her
mother Gabriela's hometown of
San Antonio, Texas. Being
located hundreds of miles apart,
Dr. Canchola and her family
used Alzheimer's Association
TrialMatch to easily connect to
Alzheimer's clinical studies
nationwide.
Dr. Canchola and her siblings
learned about Alzheimer's
Association TrialMatch through
the Alzheimer's Association
website at www.alz.org. The
service connected them with
trained staff and a database of
Alzheimer's clinical trials that
are actively recruiting partici-
pants.
"The Alzheimer's Association
website made it very simple to
set up a profile, and TrialMatch
provided my family with imme-
diate information about local
clinical trials in Texas," said Dr.
Canchola. "I was concerned
since.I live out of state, but we
spoke with a TrialMatch special-
ist who has remained in touch
with our family throughout this
whole process." By utilizing
Alzheimer's Association Trial-
Mhtch's free and confidential
services, Gabriela is currently
participating in an Alzheimer's
drug trial.
For people with Alzheimer's
and their caregivers, clinical tri-
als present an opportunity to
play a more active role in their
own treatment, contribute to sci-


entific discovery and benefit
future generations. "Through
clinical trials, the medical com-
munity makes advances in pre-
vention, early detection and
hopefully a cure for this deadly
disease," said William Thies,
Ph.D., chief medical and scien-
tific officer at the Alzheimer's-
Association. "When people tell
me that they want to volunteer
for clinical trials to help their,
children and future generations,
I suggest they use Alzheimer's:
Association TrialMatch pro-
gram, because it is an easy and
convenient way to find a clini-
cal trial."
Since the service's debut in
July 2010, it has matched more
than 3,000 people to Alz-
heimer's clinical trials based on
their diagnosis; preferences and
location. The Internet- and
phone-based service provides
comprehensive clinical trial
information and an individual-
ized matching service for peo-
ple with Alzheimer's disease or
related dementias, healthy vol-
unteers including caregivers,
family members and doctors.
How To Find A Trial
Step 1: Access TrialMatch at
www.alz.org/TrialMatch or
(800) 272-3900.
Step 2: Complete a brief
questionnaire to create a profile.
Step 3: Based on diagnosis,
treatment history and location,
the system will match your
unique profile to its clinical trial
database.
Step 4: A specialist will con-
tact you to provide unbiased
trial result options and trial site
contact information. Special-
ists will not recommend any
particular trial but will help you
identify trials that match your
specific eligibility and criteria.


Ouffey


Carrion
vehicle, three counts possession
of narcotics equipment.
Emprise Dionne Hines, 31,
4846 Sally PI., Wauchula, sale
of marijuana, possession of
marijuana, sale from a vehicle,
possession of narcotic equip-
ment.
Mitchell Ryan Kuck, 41, 338
Stenstrom Road, Wauchula, 11
counts fraud to obtain a pre-
scription drug.
Corey Tyrone Outley, 33,742
Sandpiper Dr, Wlauchula, two
counts sale of methampheta-
mine, sale of marijuana, two
counts sale. from structure or
vehicle,.two counts possession
of drug paraphernalia, battery.
Calvin Myles Prine, 60, 2556
Clifton Bryan Road, Zolfo
Springs, two counts possession
of methamphetamine, two
counts possession of drug para-
phernalia.
Seledonio Mendoza Trinidad,
32, 3551 Poplar St., Zolfo
Springs, possession of metham-
phetamine, possession of drug
paraphernalia.
John Kevin Wilson, 49, 321
Garden Dr., Wauchula, four
counts sale of methampheta-
mine, possession of metham-
phetamine, sale of drug from
vehicle or structure, four counts
possession narcotics equip-'
ment.
Arrested on other charges
were:
Belinda Romeo Anderson,
52, 308 Martin Luther King Jr.
Ave., Wauchula, obstructing
police serving a search warrant,
resisting arrest.
Robert Lee Anderson, 53,
520 South Road, Wauchula, two
counts non-support of children.




IDA Now

Compliant

With State
By MICHAEL KELLY
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Hardee County Industri-
al Development Authority is
now in compliance with the
state after filing the necessary
financial reports in late De-
cember.
IDA attorney Ken Evers
received the news by e-mail on
Jan. 26 from Justin Young, a
financial administrator with the
state Bureau of Local Govern-
ment.
"The Hardee County IDA is
now compliant with the local
government reporting require-
ments to the Department of
Financial Services for the 2009
and 2010 fiscal years," Young
said in the e-mail.
He then noted that the dead-
line to file the 2011 reports has
been pushed back until June 30,
2012.
IDA Executive Director Bill
Lambert said he was glad to get
the news, and he has every
expectation of remaining in
compliance with the state
henceforth.


Prine Trinidad


Walt Disney once said, "I do
not make films primarily for
children. I make them for the
child in all of us, whether we be
6 or 60. In my work, I try to
reach and speak to-that inno-
cence, showing it the fun and
joy of living; that laughter is
healthy; that the human species,
although happily ridiculous at
times, is still reaching for the
stars." No one set of characters
has helped Disney accomplish
this more successfully over the
years than the honey-loving,
philosophical bear, Winnie the
Pooh, and his friends Tigger,
Rabbit, Piglet, Owl, Kanga, Roo
and Eeyore.
With Walt's goal foremost in
mind, Disney animators have
revisited the wit and whimsy of
Pooh for the first time in mord
than 35 years to craft a brand-
new feature-length film, "Win-
nie the Pooh." Available for
home viewing on Blu-ray and
DVD, the film is inspired by
three stories from the original
A.A. Milne books and rendered
with Disiey's classic hand-
drawn, watercolor art style.
When asked why the Pooh
characters are still so universal-
ly charming, producer Peter Del
Vecho suggests, "'Winnie the
Pooh' resonates with today's
audiences more than ever."
Maybe it's -because we crave
some relief from today's fast-
paced world of constant connec-
tivity or maybe because, in spite
of it all, we still recognize the
basic importance of imagination
and of relationships. Adds Del
Vecho, "It seems like everyone
has at least one character with


Wilson


whom they identify. And these
characters keep it simple."
"You can really define each
friend from the Hundred Acre
Wood with one word," adds
director Stephen Anderson.
"Pooh is innocence. Tigger is
impulsive. Piglet is fear. Owl is
ego. Rabbit is control. Kanga is
nurturing. Eeyore is pessimism.
They all possess core human
values. That's what makes them
so relatable and so entertaining.
No matter what age, when kids
or adults view the movie, they
laugh while seeing themselves
in these characters."
"With Pooh, there's a clear-
eyed human wisdom that comes
through in a very subtle way,"
adds Del Vecho. "He's all about
enjoying friends, enjoying fam-
ily and enjoying life."
Tigger is a one-of-a-kind
creature exuberant, with a
famously springy tail. He acts
on every impulse and his bois-
terous manner and desire to do
things his way oftenilead him to
leap before he looks.
"The wonderful thing about
Piglet is that while he's fright-
ened of everything, he still goes
out and faces the world along-
side his friends," says Travis
Oates, who provides the voice
of Piglet.
Owl (aren't owls the wisest?)
knows everything-at least, he
thinks he does, even if his infor-
mation (and spelling) often
turns out to be not quite right.
It's his effort to help that often
stirs up trouble in the Hundred
Acre Wood because he makes
things up. He improvises so that
his friends won't see how des-


Charm The Child Within


operate he is to be right.
Rabbit is the smartest of the
Hundred Acre Wood friends
and is often the self-appointed
leader of the group. Rabbit can
be stubborn and often overre-
acts but his friends know he's a
real bunny at heart-and always
willing to hop to action.
Kanga (mother of Roo) is a
warm and protective creature. If
Kanga were a person, she'd be a
busy mom who multitasks to
perfection. Roo is her wild,
young adventurer offspring
who wants to go everywhere
and try everything. No matter
the situation-or his mother's
objections Roo throws him-
self right in the middle of all the
action. Sometimes Kanga's
mothering tries Roo's patience
but, in the end, there's nothing
better for him than being cud-
dled in his mama's pouch.
Finally there's Eeyore the
donkey, who with his gloomy
approach to life, has proven to
be a relatable and beloved fan
favorite. He doesn't see himself
as gloomy; he just has low
expectations.
Tony Award-winning song-
writer Bobby Lopez, who along
with his partner and wife
Kristen Anderson-Lopez wrote
six new songs for the film, sums
it up when he observes, "You
love the Pooh characters when
you're a kid because they're
cuddly and soft and funny. And
even though they don't continue
to grow, they continue to offer
humor and I think you can love
them at every point in your life.
You're never too old to love
'Winnie the Pooh.'"


*The American inventor Alexander Graham Bell wrote for the National Geographic magazine
as H.W. Largelamb, which is a near anagram of his name.

The Massachusetts Bay School Law was passed in 1642. It required that parents assure their
children know the principles of religion and the capital laws of the commonwealth.



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it







4A The Herald-Advocate, February 9,2012


ERIK LEE BARGANIER
Erik Lee Barganier, 62, of
Decatur, Ga., died on Tuesday,
Jan. 24, 2012 at Decatur.
Born in Bartow on Sept. 20,
1949, he came to Wauchula as a
youth. He worked at the Geor-
gia Aquarium and attended
Druid Hills Baptist Church.
He was preceded in death by
his, parents Samuel Robert
"Bob" Barganier and Selma
Stenstrom Barganier.
Survivers include his former
wife, Patricia Farley Barganier
of Georgia; daughter Emily
Barganier Newman and hus-
band Brett of Georgia; daughter
Hannah Lee Barganier of
California; and brother Samuel
Robert Barganier of Wauchula.
A memorial service was held
on Friday, Feb. 3, 2012, at 2
p.m. at the Druid Hills Baptist
Church with Pastor Jonathan
Spencer and Pastor Mimi
Walker officiating. The visita-
tion/reception followed at the
Wagner's home on Briarwood
Drive. Arrangements were by
Grissom-Clark Funeral Home
of Atlanta, Ga.



f ouig dMemo/tny
JUEL MADE
ROBERTS GILL
Juel Maude Roberts Gill,
91, of Myakka City, died on
Thursday, Feb. 2, 2012, at
Bradenton.
She was born on Aug. 9,
1920 in Hardee County and
was a Hardee High School
graduate. She was a real estate
broker and member of Man-
atee Baptist Church.
She was preceded in death
by husband Alfred Murray
Gill; and two sisters and a
brother.
She is survived by two
sons, Alton "Bill" Gill and
wife Lorie of Myakka City,
and Walter "Bozie" Gill and
wife Robin of Zolfo Springs;
.one daughter Murray Jo
"Ginki" Miller and husband
John of Myakka City; one
brother, Elliot Roberts of New
Zion; 11 grandchildren; and
eight great-grandchildren.
Visitation was Monday,
Feb. 6, from 10 to 11 a.m. at
New Zion Baptist Church,
with funeral services at 11
a.m. with the Rev. Alton Gill
and the Rev. Larry Albritton
officiating. Interment fol-
lowed at New Zion Cemetery.
Expressions of comfort may
be made at robartsfh.com.


FUNERAL HOME
WAUCHULA





N 0Loug /MemoiY
SANTOS VILLAREAL
VALDEZ
Santos Villareal Valdez, 75,
of Wauchula, died on Satur-
day, Feb. 4, 2012, at Lake-
land.
He was born Jan. 27, 1937,
in San Antonio, Texas, and
came to Hardee County 45
years ago. He was a citrus
grove laborer and a member
of St. Michael Catholic
Church.
He is survived by his wife,
Benita Valdez, of Wauchula;
five sons, Santos Valdez Jr. of
Wauchula, Jose Valdez and
Carlos Valdez, both of Ar-
cadia, Ricardo Valdez of
Zolfo Springs, and Jesse
Valdez of Winter Haven; Six
daughters, Carmen Valdez,
Ernestine V. Obregon, Maria
Valdez Guerrero and Stella
Negrete, all of Wauchula,
Anita Valdez Guerrero of Fort
Meade and Angelita Valdez of
Bartow; three brothers, Pete
Valdez and Jim Valdez, both
of Zolfo Springs, .and Raul
Valdez of Georgia; four sis-
ters, Olivia Salas of Zolfo
Springs, Sally Coronado of
Lakeland, and Eva Borgas and
Jamie Vargas, both of Texas;
43 grandchildren; and numer-
ous great-grandchildren.
Visitation was Tuesday,
Feb. 7, 2012, at Robarts


Obituaries


ELVIRA P. MARTINEZ
Elvira P. Martinez, 70, of
Zolfo Springs, passed away
on Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2012,
at Somers Hospice House.
Born on June 14, 1941, in
Austin, Texas, Mrs. Martinez
was a resident of Zolfo
Springs, coming from Sun-
down, Texas. She was a
member of St. Michael Cath-
olic Church in Wauchula.
She is survived by a loving
family that includes her hus-
band, Pablo H. Martinez of
Zolfo Springs; two daughters
Andrea Torres and husband
Pedro of Fort Meade and
Adela Martinez of Zolfo
Springs; one son, Carlos
Martinez and wife Christina
of Beaufort, S. C.; two sis-
ters, Ester Torrez and Pauline
Hernandez of Sundown, Tex-
as; one brother Enemencio
Peralez Jr., of Sundown,
Texas; seven grandchildren;
and one great-grandchild.
The family received
friends on Sunday, Feb. 5,
from 2 to 4 p.m. at McLean
Funeral Home, 306 E.
Broadway, Fort Meade. A
funeral mass was celebrated
on Monday, Feb. 6, at 11 a.m.
at St. Michael Catholic
Church in Wauchula, with
Father Juan Carlos Sack offi-
ciating. Interment is at Ever-
green Cemetery in Fort
Meade. Condolences to the
family may be sent to www.-
McLeanfuneralhome.net.
McLean Funeral Home
Fort Meade

I'm tired of all.this nonsense
about beauty being only skin-
deep. Thats deep enough.
What do you want, an
adorable pancreas?
-Joan Kerr



BILLY GENE WARD
Billy Gene Ward, 80, of
Wauchula, passed away Fri-
day, Feb. 3, 2012, at home.
Billy was born Sept. 27,
1931, in Egypt, Ark., and
moved to Wauchula in 1959
from Avon Park. He served
his country honorably in the
U.S. Army during the Korean
War. He had owned his own
Land Clearing Company and
also worked as a cow hauler.
He was a member of the
Church of Christ and enjoyed
hunting, fishing and doing
yard work.
He was preceded in death
by his parents J.V. and Belvie
Collins Ward; one brother
Hershel Ward; and two sis-
ters, Lucile Cobble and
Wanda Sullivan.
Billy is survived by his
beloved wife, Blondean Yar-
borough Ward; two sons Cole
Ward and wife Erlene of
Bowling Green, and Blaine
Ward and wife Patsy of
Wauchula; one daughter
Melanie Nuccio of Bowling
Green; three sisters Lorine
Ladwig, Betty Reed and June
Cravey, all of Sebring; six
grandchildren; six great-
grandchildren; and numerous
nieces and nephews.
A visitation was held from
2 to 3 p.m. on Monday, Feb.
6, 2012, in the Chapel of
Ponger-Kays-Grady Funeral
Home, 404 W. Palmetto St.,
Wauchula. Services followed
at 3 p.m. with Pastor Steve
Diaz and Pastor Adam Shanks
officiating. Burial took place
in Wauchula Cemetery with
Military Honors rendered by
the Hardee County Veterans
Honor Guard.
On-line condolences may be
made at www.PongerKays-
Grady.com.
CPonge/Ciair-g ygQady
Funeral Home &
Cremation Services
Wauchula


(Held Out From Last Week)
The following permits were
applied for or issued by the
Hardee County Building De-
partment during the week of
Jan. 22-28. Listings include the
name of the owner or contrac-
tor, the address for the project,
the type of work to be done, and
the cost involved. Only projects
valued at $1,000 or more are
listed.
ISSUED
Donald Maddox, East Main
Street, windows, $3,724.
Denis Rohaley, Rigdon Road,
sewer connection, $1,500.
Denis Rohaley, Stansfield
Avenue, sewer connection,
$1,500.
Denis Rohaley, Rainey Bou-


levard,
$1,500.
Denis
Road,
$1,500.
Denis
Road,
$1,500.
Denis
Road,
$1,500.


sewer connection,

Rohaley, McEwen
sewer connection,

Rohaley, McEwen
sewer connection,

Rohaley, McEwen
sewer connection,


Denis Rohaley, Erler Road,
sewer connection, $1,500.
Denis Rohaley, Erler Road,
sewer connection; $1,500.
Denis Rohaley, Erler Road,
sewer connection, $1,500.
Denis Rohaley, Erler Road,
Sewer connection, $1,500.
Denis Rohaley, Erler Road,
sewer connection, $1,500.
Denis Rohaley, Harris Road,
sewer connection, $1,500.
Denis Rohaley, Harris Road,
sewer connection, $1,500.
Denis Rohaley, Harris Road,
sewer connection, $1,500.
Denis Rohaley, Harris Road,
sewer connection, $ 1,500.
Rohaley, Harris Road, sewer
connection, $1,500.
Alderman, State Road 62,
demolition, $1,000.
Samuel J Albritton, U.S. 17,
electric, $1,800.
Agustina Ormazabal, Badger
Loop, mechanical, $2,350.
Mark Moye, Dena Circle,
mechanical, $6,500. -
Denis Rohaley, Rainey
Boulevard, sewer connection,
$1,500.
Travis Fulford, Broward
Street, roofing, $1,750.
Travis Fulford. Broward
Street, roofing, $2,350.
Mark Stewart, Glades Street,
roofing, $10,500.
Grant Dunham, Elm Street,
windows and door, $2,400.
James Jernigan, Broward
Street, carport, $1,500.
Robert Arnold Potwin, Sixth
Avenue, commercial sign,
$2,200.
BUILDING BLOCKS
Beware of contractors who
may display, or present, only an
occupational license.


OBIT NOTICE
The Herald-Advocate publishes, at no charge, obituaries
marking the deaths of current or former Hardee County
residents. The obituary may include occupation, church and club
affiliations, military service, special awards or honors and a list
of survivors. Paid obituaries may take the place of our free
notices.
Forms for a free obituary are available at our office or at local
funeral homes. Completed forms, however, must be submitted
through a funeral home. We cannot accept forms from
individuals.




Our Family Serving Your Family!


R 19N 5
BRYANT L. COKER ,


Arcadia Chapel
50 N. HillborouLih A\e.
Arcadia. FL 34266
PH. XW63) 494-4101


Wauchula Chapel
404 West Palmetto Street
Wauchula, Florida 33873
PH. (Sob) 773-6400


Locally Owned and Operated by
Licensed Funeral Directors

Owners
Edward R. Ponger, LFD, FDIC Arcadia
Allyson Ponger Karnes, LFD, FDIC Wauchula

Location Managers
Delmos L Newsome, LFD Arcadia
Floyd O. Rice, Jr., LFD Wauchula

Office Managers
Joyce Lyle Arcadia
Ginger Rice Wauchula

Funeral Associates
Robert Hiene -Jacquelyn Leavell Ray Baucom
Steve Griffin Bill Nickelwarth Roy Jaquez, Jr.



www.PongerKaysGrady.com


2:9c j


THE SENSIBLE CHOICE, ...


Consider the value of

prearrangements with a

knowledgeable, trustworthy,

friend ...






Robarts



Call or stop by, we will be pleased

to answer any questions and of

course there is no obligation.



Superior Service


Affordable Cost


ROBARTS
FAMILY FUNERAL HOME


529 West Main Street Wauchula, Florida 33873 863-773-9773
s- View Obits at robartsfh.com


Garden Chapel from 6 to 8
p.m. Funeral services were
Wednesday, Feb. 8, at 10 a.m.
at St. Michael Catholic
Church, with Rev. Fr. Juan
Carlos Sack officiating. Inter-
ment followed at Wauchula
Cemetery.
Expressions of comfort may
be made at robartsfh.com.


FUNERAL HOME
WAUCHULA

Wv^i~


---"^: ^404-
404
" i 1


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,


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February 9, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 5A


I III IS
7
50;no. XLT 4x2
4 &11: ,,,'


-s
Total
vings
,690
* V J-


i


M.S.R.P
LRNJOiY Discount
Factory Rebate
FMCC Rebate
Trade-in Rebate


'32,410
- 2,690
- 3,000
- 1,000
- 1,000


Must Go Price


$24.720


Total
S, Savings



Power Windows & Locks, Tilt, Cruise, CD,
Power Moonroof, 3.0 V6, Automatic, Remote Keyless Entry
5 YEAR/60,000 MILE POWERTRAIN WARRANTY


M.S.R.P
OLRNJRYDiscount


s27,305
- 5,307


Must Go Price
$21,998


M.S.R.P
RLRNJOIY Discount
Factory Rebate


s39,060
- 2,610
- 5,500


RLRN Y
Must Go Price
$30,950


Total'
; W211FRD $4,48E


Power Windows & Locks, Tilt, Cruise, Remote Keyless Entry,
Dual Panel Moonroof, Leather, Power Seats, CD, My Touch
5 YEAR/60,000 MILE POWERTRAIN WARRANTY


M.S.R.P
QLNlHJRY Discount
Factory Rebate


s39,590
- 3,388
- 1,000


LRaN a ..
Must Go Price
s35,202


Il;11


M I It


M; riY, '


* Total
Savings
r$8,785


I H;11


rower windows & LOCKS, ilIt, Cruise, LDU, Learner,
Remote Keyless Entry, Heated/Cooled Seats, Off Road Package,
5.0 V8, Rear View Camera, Remote Start
5 YEAR/60.000 MILE POWERTRAIN WARRANTY
M.S.R.P 544,285 S
RLRHrNJOYDiscount 4,785 .
Factory Rebate 2,000
Factory Rebate 1,000
Factory Rebate 1,000
RLRaN JRY __
Must Go Price
s35,50O


6L6IV


JaY


U.S. HIGHWAY 17 N., Wauchula


S o Mo r. o St .


OiLiMiqfIKCo n


I S o s : o -r 5 oCl ed


Power Windows & Locks, Tilt, Cruise, 5.0 V8, Automatic,
Power Driver Seat, Trailer Tow, Alum Wheels
5 YEAR/60,000 MILE POWERTRAIN WARRANTY


C '0


Power Windows & Locks, Tilt, Cruise, CD,
Trailer Tow, Third Seat, Remote Keyless Entry
5 YEAR/60,000 MILE POWERTRAIN WARRANTY


1031


* (863) 386-6236


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6A The Herald-Advocate, February 9,2012



What's Fo


ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS
MONDAY
Breakfast: Lucky Charms
Cereal, Graham Crackers,
Blueberry Poptart, Orange
Juice, Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza,
Ham, Macaroni & Cheese,
Salad Tray, Green Beans,
Cornbread, Blue Raspberry
Juice Bar, Condiments and Milk

TUESDAY
Breakfast: Cheerios Cereal,
Graham Crackers, Sausage
Patty, Biscuit, Pineapple Tidbits,
Condiments and Milk
, Lunch: Chicken Pot Pie,
Biscuit, Stacked Ham Sand-
which, Salad Tray, Broccoli,
Frozen Peaches, Condiments
and Milk

WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Trix Cereal,
Graham Crackers, Cheese
Grits, Buttered Toast, Pears,
Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Hamburger on a Bun,
Spaghetti & Meat Sauce, Salad
Tray, Corn, Mixed Fruit, Sugar
Cookies, Rolls, Condiments
and Milk

THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cinnamon Toast
Crunch Cereal, Graham
Crackers, Pancakes, Sausage
Patty, Orange Juice, Condi-



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO. 252011CA000261
PINE CONE HOLDING CO., LLC,
a Florida limited liability compa-
ny, and PATRICK SEERY, Individ-
ually,


ments and Milk
Lunch:. Toasted Cheese,
Hard Boiled Egg, Pig in a
Blanket, Salad Tray, Potato
Rounds, Pears, Condiments
and Milk

FRIDAY
Breakfast: Cocoa Puffs
Cereal, Graham Crackers,
Cheese Toast, Peaches, Condi-
ments and Milk
Lunch: Nachos with ground
beef, Peanut Butter Sandwhich,
Salad Tray, Pinto Beans,
Applesauce, Condiments and
Milk

JUNIOR HIGH
MONDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Graham
Crackers, Pop Tarts Variety,
Juice, Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Ham, Mac & Cheese,
Cornbread, Pepperoni Pizza,
Salad Bar, Lettuce & Tomato,
Green Beans, Juice Bar,
Condiments and Milk

TUESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Graham
Crackers, Biscuit, Sausage
Patty, Pineapple Tidbits,
Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Chicken Pot Pie,
Cheese Pizza, Stacked Ham
Sandwhich, Alternate Meal,
Salad Bar, Lettuce & Tomato,
Broccoli, Peaches, Condiments
and Milk

WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Cheese
Grits, Buttered Toast, Diced
Pears, Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Hamburger on a Bun,
Spaghetti, Rolls, Alternate Meal,
Pepperoni Pizza, Lettuce &
Tomato, Corn, Fruit Cocktail,
Chocolate Chip Cookies,
Condiments and Milk


Plaintiffs,


vs.

DUMITRU GROSU, individually,
and CONSTANT GROSU, indi-
vidually
Defendants.

DUMITRU GROSU, Individually,
and CONSTANT GROSU, indi-
vidually
Counter-Plaintiffs,
vs.
PINE CONE HOLDING CO., LLC,
a Florida limited liability compa-
ny, and PATRICK SEERY, Individ-
ually,
Counter-Defendants,


NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
pursuant to the "Agreed Order of
Dismissal of Plaintiffs' Complaint
and Final Judgment of Foreclo-
sure on Counter-Plaintiff's
Counterclaim" (the "Final
Judgment"), entered in the
above-styled action on February
2, 2012, the Clerk of Hardee
County will sell.the property situ-
ated in Hardee County, Florida, as
described below at a Public Sale,
to the highest bidder, for cash, at
417 West Main Street, Second
Floor Hallway, outside of Room
202, Wauchula, Florida 33873, on
February 29, 2012, at 11:00 a.m.:
The North 250 feet of the
SE 1/4 of the SW 1/4 lying
West of U.S. Highway 17,
all lying in Section 21,
Township 33 South, Range
25 East, Hardee County,
Florida;
AND

The South 1,070 feet of the
SE 1/4 of the SW 1/4 of
Section 21, Township 33
South, Range 25 East,
lying- West of U.S. 17,
Hardee County, Florida.
Parcel I.D. Nos.: 21-33-25-
0000-04470-0000
21-33-25-0000-04480-0000

Subject to mortgages in
favor, of Wauchula State
Bank recorded in O.R.
Book 388, page 797; O.R.
Book 509, page 192; O.R.
Book 721, page 770;
Instrument No.
200825006877; and instru-
ment No. 200925005902,
as subsequently consoli-
dated by Note and
Mortgage Consolidation,
Modification and
Extension Agreement
dated recorded at
Instrument No.
200925005904, public
records of Hardee County,
Florida.

Any person claiming an interest
in the surplus from the sale, if
any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the lis
pendens must file a claim within
60 days after the sale.
Honorable B. Hugh Bradley
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Hardee County, Florida

By: Connie Coker
Deputy Clerk
2:9,16c


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THEE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO. 252011-CA-000437
SUNCOAST SCHOOLS FEDERAL
CREDIT UNION, Whose address
is: PO. Box 11904, Tampa, FL
33680

Plaintiff,


THOMAS R. HARRIS; UNKNOWN-
SPOUSE OF THOMAS R. HAR-
RIS; ELIZABETH J. HARRIS;
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ELIZA-
BETH J. HARRIS, ANY AND ALL
UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING
BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND
AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED
INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS WHO
ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD
OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID
UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM
AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES,
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; TEN-
ANT #1; TENANT #2,


Defendants.


NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given, pur-
suant to Final Judgment of
Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered
in this cause, in the Circuit Court
of HARDEE County, Florida, I will
sell the property situated in
HARDEE County, Florida
described as:
LOT 1 AND 2, TOWN AND
COUNTRY ESTATES,
ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT THEREOF,' AS
RECORDEDr IN PLAT
BOOK 4, PAGE 60, PUBLIC
RECORDS OF HARDEE,4
COUNTY, FLORIDA.-

and.commonly known as: 180
Tropicana Drive, Wauchula,
Florida 33873, at public sale, to
the highest and best bidder, for
cash, on the Second Floor in the
hallway outside of Room 202 of
the Hardee County Courthouse,
417 W. Main St., Wauchula,
Florida 33873, on Feb. 29, 2012,
at 11:00 A.M.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN
INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS
FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
If you are a person with a disabil-
ity who needs any accommoda-
tion to participate in this proceed-
ing, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain
assistance. Please contact the
Office of the Court Administrator
at (863) 534-4686, at least 7 days
before your scheduled court
appearance, or immediately upon
receiving this notification if the
time before the scheduled
appearance is less than 7 days; if
you are hearing or voice
impaired, call 711.
Dated this Feb. 6, 2012.
B. HUGH BRADLEY
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Connie Coker
Deputy Clerk


2:9,16c


THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Variety,
Graham Crackers, Pancakes,
Sausage Patty, Juice, Condi-
ments and Milk
Lunch: Toasted Cheese,
Hard Boiled Egg, Pig in a
Blanket, Cheese Pizza,
Alternate Meal, Salad Bar,
Lettuce & Tomato; Potato
Rounds, Diced Pears, Condi-
ments and Milk

FRIDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Variety,
Graham Crackers, Cheese
Toast, Peaches, Condiments
and Milk
Lunch: Nachos w/Ground
Beef, Pepperoni Pizza, Peanut
Butter & Jelly, Lettuce &
Tomato, Pinto Beans,
Applesauce, Condiments and
Milk


SENIOR HIGH
MONDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Super
Donut, Orange Juice, Condi-
ments and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza,
Cheeseburger on a Bun, Ham,
Macaroni & Cheese, French
Fries, Black-Eyed-Peas, Steam-
ed Cabbage, Tossed, Salad,
Apple Crisp, Pineapple Chunks,
Cornbread, Condiments and
Milk

TUESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Biscuit,
Sausage, Applesauce, Condi-
ments and Milk
Lunch: Cheeseburger on a
Bun, Chicken Pot Pie, French
Fries, Broccoli, Squash, Tossed
Salad, Cucumber & Tomato
Salad, Peaches, Rolls, Condi-
ments and Milk

WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Cheese
Grits, Buttered Toast, Peaches,
Condi-ments and Milk
Lunch: Cheeseburger on a
Bun, Lasagna with Ground
Beef, French Fries, Green
Beans, Squash, Tossed Salad,
Waldorf Salad, Pears, Rolls,
Condiments and Milk

THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Pancakes,
Sausage Patty, Pears, Condi-
ments and Milk
Lunch: Cheeseburger on a
Bun, Hamburger on a Bun,
French Fries, Chicken Patty on
a Bun, Fresh Potatoes, Broccoli,
-Tossed Salad;, Maearoni Salad,,
Juice Bar, Ice Cream,-
"Condiments and Milk

FRIDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Breakfast
Stick, Pineapple Chunks,
Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza,
Cheeseburger on a Bun,
French Fries, Nachos with
Ground Beef, Mexican Rice,
Pinto Beans, Corn, Tossed
Salad, Juice Bar, Condiments
and Milk

Individual menus are sub-
ject to change.


KINDERGARTEN
Alaynah Mendiola
Angelica Galan
Arianna Medrano
Austin Fennell
Avian Garza
Ayden Barnett
Belen Gomez
Brenda Flores
Camden Svendsen
Camryn Rodriguez
Ca'Myiah Guajardo
Carli Mushrush
Christian Rodriguez
Cole Waters
Daisy Consuegra
Daisy Pineda
Destiny Driskell
Elijah Valletutti
Emmanuel Ramirez
Fedner Delhomme
Genaro Nava-Martinez
Giovanni Gomez
Grayson Hall
Hannah Derringer
Hannah Macias
Hunter Powell
Ivan Torres
Jimena Aleman
Jocelyn Willis
Jose Guardiola
Joseph Santos
Joshua Davila
Josiah Lozano
Josie Nichols
Kaitlyn Howell
Kathryn Hays
Kristlin Boyett
Krystal Avalos
Maleea Stewart
Mariah Fowler.
Maritza Martinez
Marleni Gonzalez
Martha Gomez
Mickama Pierre
Mya Grace
Paige Justice'
Rafael Zamora
Raven Mosley
Reese Galvan
Rio Tillman
Rogelio Luna
Romi Rivas
Shey Spain
Slee Gutierrez
Victoria Jackson
Yasbeli DeJesus

FIRST GRADE
Adeli' Lopez
Adriana Caballero
Aiden Thomas
Alex Mendieta
Cardenas
Alex Trevino
Alexandra Mondragon


q Alexis Crawford
Alondra Luna-Muniz
Alyssabeth Carrillo
Andrew Kuen
Annaka Brace
Apolinar Almaguer
Blake Rucker
Brendan Holton
Briana Tambunga
Cassie Higginbotham
Chase Sanders
Christina LeConte
Dallas Grice
Danialee Gutierez-
Gomez
Davis Roberts
Desmas Davila
Emma Eures
Erik Herrera
Eryn Hagwood
Estefany Ramirez
z Ethan Tracy
Ethen Arreola
Garrett McQuaig
Gissel Gutierrez
Ronquil
Hannah Atchley
Haylee Elisondo
Isaac Rodriguez
Israel Cortez
Jaidyn Newman
Jasmine Castillo
Alvarenga
-Joana Hernandez
Rincon
Joaquin Rodriguez
Jose Ibanez
Joshua Vasquez
Kaelea Bryant
Kami Kelley
Karlie Alderman
Kiara Detrinidad
Lillian Edwards
Lizbeth Gomez
Luis Ortiz
Mackenzie Bacon
Martin McClenithan
Monika Valdez
Myra Benitez
Nathan Deemer
Rylie Morris
Samantha Shackelforc
Samara Arreola
Saul Ruiz
Serenity Walters
Sydney Willis
Trinity Vansickle
TysonPace.
-\ icor Fabila
.Zander Yeomans

SECOND GRADE
Abby Neel
Abel Luna
Aleigh Galvan
Allazae McLeod


Alyvia Driskell
Amey Moralez
Andon Whaley
Angelica Lopez
Annalise Terrell
Azavie Calhoun
Brianna O'Bryan
Carter Birge
Cecilia Alvarez
Christopher Leal
Crystal Wingate
Darius Yang
David Orta
Dora Santoyo
Emanuel Rodriguez
Evelize Quintana
Gabby Garcia
Hunter Atchley
IlIana Ruiz
Isaac Badillo
Jacarie Jones
Jose Fernandez
Jose Lopez
Karina Valadez
Kayden Bryan
Kgylie Grice
Khloe Smith
SLahna Christian
Liliana Plata
Lillie Gaydon
Logan Reas
Marissa Deloera
Maritza Mondragon
Michael Garcia
Miguel Vasquez
Mollie O'Bryan
Petra Gaitan
Rojer Hipolito
Rose Tavarez
Sonria Macedo
Valerie Martinez
Yayoua Vang
Yesaily Martinez
Zaria Davila

THIRD GRADE
Abel Servin
Acheline Delhomme
Adrianna Consuegra
Alessa Valerio
Amy Gutierrez
I Ana Ibanez
Brianna Rivers
Caleb Arana
Caleb Macias
Chloe Martinez
Chloe Selph
Daisy Chavez
Daniella Marrero
David Edwards"
Desirae Cabrera
SElvia Garcia
Esteban Fernandez
Haley Dickey
Hannah Ward
Hunter Davis


Isaac Kuen
Isabel Calvillo
Jamal Holley
Jamie Walker
Jasmine Shields
Jelissa Torres
Jose Caballero
Joseph Peters
Leigha Alderman
Mackenzie Wallace
Macy Kingdon
Matthew Peters
Nathaniel Bacon
Reyna Rivera
Richard Sanders
Richard Torres
Robert "Hayden"
Mushrush
Roman Rivas
Roxana Araujo
Saul Salgado
Travon Thomas
Trinity Her
Tulsi Patel
Veronica Rivera

FOURTH GRADE
Adara McCollum
Brianna Farias
Brianna Valadez
Bryce Rucker
Christina Kue,
Cristina Lopez-Rojas
Emmanuel Pluviose
E'vontae Rogers
Gabriela Ontiveras
Hannah Ford
Hugh Pate
Hunter Presley
Isaac Estrada
Jesus Lopez
Maria DeLoera
Michael Rodriguez
Promise Nichols
Rachel Garland
Rosa Guerrero
Sandra Gomez
Savannah Valletutti
Victor Aleman

FIFTH GRADE
Erica Martinez
Fatima Ramirez
J.C. Kulig
Jansen Walker
Jean St. Louis
Kareli Plata
Marcus Sambrano
Marisa Molina-
Santibanez
Miguel Ontiveros
Norma Rivera
Patricia Deloera
Viviana Flores
Zackary Durastanti


You're alive. Do something. The directive in life, the moral imperative was so uncomplicated.
It could be expressed in single words, not complete sentences. It sounded like this: Look.
Listen. Choose. Act.
-Barbara Hall
The Roman Emperor Domitian, it is said, was such a good shot, he could put four arrows be-
tween the spread fingers of a man's hand.


ROMANCE


.- r'cnd, ./lectwn




S We ll put




you in the



SRED on


SOVALENTINES


Valentine's Day is approaching.

Stop by today and let us help you pick out

that special gift for that special someone.


L





February 9, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 7A


An apple a day may keep the doctor away but two carrots a day can help to cut cholesterol
levels, say USDA scientists. Carrots, as well as cabbage and onions, contain a type of fiber
that lowers cholesterol,





HadeConys oeow oerag


\ Get FREE Phone
iSun l for a Year!


Yes, you read correctly. SunTel is offering you the /
best deal you'll see all year. Free telephone service /
for up to a year!
All you have to do is sign up for service, at the
lowest monthly rate in the area, refer 5 friends or
family and the remainder of your first year is FREE!
Sh J/6i4 SunTel makes it easy:


*Only $24.99/month*
* No Service Contracts Required!
* No Bundles Required!
* Keep your old phone number!
* Local phone can travel with you!
* Local Support and Service


S u. and Local Taxes and additional fees may apply.


Most pr-existing customer p
Sterns,


Service

* *


::-Free-4-Five -
Deal
S It's easy! Get 5 friends or
-' ..family members to sign up
and the rest of your year is
Mim FREE!


tocutomercredit card.
umers will qualify.


P---------------------------------
!$20 COUPON $20!
I This coupon entitles you to twenty dollars off any return I
Filed in our office. Thank you for being a valued client. I
I I
SEste cup6n le permit a veinte d6lares de cualquier regre
Sson archivado en, Nuestra oficina. Gracias por es un
client valorado.
I TNT Bookkeeping Service, Inc
S1329 US Hwy 17 N, Wauchula, FL
I$ 2 0 (863)773-3754 2 0


Get Hearing
Phone Free
Free amplified telephones
will be distributed today
(Thursday) at the Catheryn
McDonald Center at 310 N.
Eighth Ave Wauchula.
People ..- have a hear-
ing or speech loss can get
them from 12:20 to 2:30 p.m.
by appointment. To schedule
an appointment, call 941-
743-8347.
College Offers
Computer Class
A series of Microsoft Office
workshops will be held at the
Hardee Campus of South
Florida Community College.
The first is Introduction to
MS EXCEL 2010, which will
be from 12:30 to 4:30 p.m.
on Friday Feb. 24 and Mar.
2.
The class will teach the
basics of creating spread-
sheet formulas, formatting
and bar/line/pie charts. Cost
of the class is $125. Check it
out on www.souothflorida.-
edu and go to class sched-
ules or contact Lorrie Key at
CorporateTraining @south-
florida.edu. To register, call
863-784-7134 or 784-7416.

Register For
5K Run/Walk
SendMeMissions will
sponsor a 5K Run/Walk on
May 18 in conjunction with
Friday Night Live.. Proceeds
will provide scholarships for
people interested in going on
a mission trip.
Pre-registration cost is $20
through May 5. From then to
May 18, cost is $25. The
race begins in the Hardee
County Courthouse parking
lot. Check out www.sendme-
missions5k.blogspot.com or
register on line at www.-
active.com.

Register For
Feb. 25 Pageant
Registration continues
through Feb. 15 for the 2012
Magnolia Manor Pageant,
which will be held on Feb. 25


at 6 p.m. Girls and boys are
in four categories: 4-6 years.,
7-11 years, 12-14 years and
15-18 years: The theme is
cultural celebration.
For application informa-


Dear Editor:
Rest assured that IDA (In-
dustrial Development Authori-
ty) is working for economic
benefits to help you prosper and
have, a better quality life
through its leader Bill Lambert.
He should be very careful or the
coffers will be emptied. He has
helped bring Hardee County
some economic development.
One of the latest ideas prom-
ises to create 150 to 200 jobs in
our county. These jobs would
require little education or expe-
rience.
On the job training would get
you going for a career in pick-
.ing through garbage, if the pro-
posal is approved. Job: sort out
the components into various
piles. Plastics would be separat-
ed to feed a machine that turns
it into fuels for an array of vehi-
cles..
Stated salary: $28,000 for
picking through. garbage
straight out of the garbage
trucks from daily routes, or
what they would dig up and
bring in from the old landfill.
Would regional- garbage be
needed on the same table to
make sure you have plenty to
keep you busy?
I presume all safety equip-.
ment will be furnished by the
company to protect you from
any number of diseases you
may contract from handling
untold items people put in the
garbage.
All that is needed to apply for
these positions is a willingness
to handle decaying things that
could make you upchuck your
previous meal, just by getting in
the vicinity of them, say 10 feet
or so. You need a strong stom-


tion, contact Khalia Taylor at
762-436-9374; Jacqueline
Faulk at 863-873-6915,
LaRosha McLeod at 863-
781-2450 or Kenuated Bag-
gett-Clarke ht 863-521-1410.


The County Commission
hatched IDA. They also hand-
pick the influential members of
its board. We see people who
have been blessed with startup
funds, etc., from IDA. At least
one former county employee
works for one of these compa-
nies. One person who praised
the IDA and its directors is a
local contractor who has
received contracts from the
county.
Thanks are due your commis-
sioners for all they do and
spending money. An adopted
agreement with Mosaic will
bring a lot of money to the
county as mining occurs. It rais-
es questions as to how this
money will be spent., Special
interest groups want funds. The
commissioners and IDA have a
big responsibility.
See public records, Florida.
Statutes on special districts,
Hardee Mosaic agreement from
2008.
Fed-up American Cracker
Frank Kirkland
Bowling Green
EDITOR'S NOTE: The IDA
receives money from the Mosaic
Agreement and asks for grants
from the EDA (Economic
Development Authority), which
is an independent board or dis-
trict created by the Florida
Legislature. The IDA has 9
members and all IDA members
are members of the EDC
(Economic Development
Council), which has a minimum
of 13 members. Bill Lambert is
the economic development
director, chairman of the EDA
and reports to IDA and EDC.
The EDA receives phosphate
severance tax funds.


Former San Francisco 49ers Super Bowl quarterback Steve
Young has a law degree.


Letter To The Editor

Proposed Garbage

Plan Is A Smelly Idea


Main Street Wauchula

is looking for

Artists & Crafters









%,4 M- AN
It,



February 17, 2012 6 9pm
Main Street Heritage Park in Downtown Wauchula


Items must be home grown or more than 50% handmade
$10 per booth space ($5 extra for electricity)


Entry deadline is Tuesday, February 14th

Visit www.MainStreetWauchula for a vendor application.
For more information call (863) 767-0330
29c


SEVIGNY
ASSOCIATES
m =-2 =Wm = -


Teaming up to bring you a


FREE GLAUCOMA SCREENING



Available At





Friday Night Live



Feb. 17


Friends of the Congressional Glaucoma
Caucus Foundation will be providing a
fully equipped bus. We have openings
for 50 people to be screened. Please call
to set-up a time for your screening.


<2> Must be over 40 (if you are of Caucasian or Asian
descent).

> Must be over 30 (if you are of African American,
Hispanic, or Native American descent).


To find out moreinformation about

free screening or to set-up a time



Call 773-3322

2:9,16c


L- r


'''~


I mi;Z ,
BEkfe?-^


Son't
ko f






8A The Herald-Advocate, February 9, 2012


Basketball Girls End At Districts L


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The whole season was a
learning experience for the
young Hardee girls basketball
team.
The girls faced their toughest
challenge in the first round of
Class 5A, District playoffs on
Jan. 30. They traveled to Lake-
land Teneroc to square off
against top-seed 15-9 Lake
Wales.
Although the top-flight High-
landers played perhaps their
worst game, with 26 turn-overs
and just 5-of-23 from the free-
.throw line, they handily shut
Hardee down 48-17. The Lake
Wales coach, Demetrius San-
ders, was so displeased with his
team that'he benched some of
the starters. When they came
back to open the third quarter,
they outscored Hardee 12-2
"just to get some breathing
room." They intensified the
pressure and upped their score
from 31 to the final 48.


THURSDAY, FEB. 9
VHardee County School
Board, regular meeting,
Board Room, 230 S. Florida
Ave., Wauchula, 5 p.m.

MONDAY. FEB. 13
VWauchula City Commis-
sion, regular meeting, City
Hall, 225 E. Main St.,
Wauchula, 6 p.m.

TUESDAY. FEB. 14
VBowling Green City
Commission, regular meet-
ing, City Hall, 104 E. Main
St., Bowling Green, 6:30
:p.m.

THURSDAY, FEB. 16
VHardee County Com-
mission, regular meeting,
Room 102, Courthouse
.Annex I, 412 W. Orange St.,
Wauchula, 8:30 a.m.


Hardee was down 19-5 at the
half. "I thought we had a real
chance, but we just didn't score
under the Lake Wales defense
as much as we could have."
commented Hardee head coach
Jeanne Adkins.
"The girls were understand-
ably nervous, but I thought they
did a really good job handling
Lake Wales." said Adkins. not-
ing that in the previous outing
Lake Wales won 50-4 and one
player had 22 points.
Hardee scorers were junior
Robyn Tanksley with seven
points, soph Alyssa Casso with
five, junior Stephanie Perez
with four and soph Bailey
Carlton with one.
Freshman Allison Smith led
the defense with 11 rebounds
and a pair of blocked shots.
Tanksley chipped in with five
rebounds, three steals and a
blocked shot. Soph Allison
Allen-Hunter also grabbed five
rebounds. Junior Kayla Nichols
claimed three rebounds, two
steals and an assist. Others in on
the defensive stats were Casso,
Carlton and soph Endreina
Martinez with four rebounds.
"My defense was amazing,
especially my big girls under
the basket. They held their top
scorer to zero points and under
10 rebounds. I had three girls
foul out in the last two minutes,
which means they were playing
good aggressive ball and gave
me 100 percent all four quar-
ters," enthused Adkins.
She has a young squad, with
three juniors, six sophs and two
freshmen. Two other frosh Tam-
ara St. Fort and Jakaysha Lind-
sey were sidelined early in the
season and unable to return.
"If our shots would have fell
a little different, it would have
been a completely different ball
game. I have a young team.
Some girls have little varsity
experience, if any, so in time
with more experience and game
play they will be a power-
house," predicted Adkins.
She plans to get them in a
team camp this summer and
play some summer AAU (Am-
ateur Athletic Union) ball, so
the girls will get more needed


experience. "I expect all my
players to return next season.
They couldn't be in a better
position. We had a lot of grow-
ing pains this season, but in the
end I feel the girls have a good
understanding of the game and
what it takes to be a champion.
I am very proud of the team
thev are starting to become"
concluded Atkins.
Assistant coach Rod Smith
and Atkins are coaching track
this spring and many of the girls
will compete there so they can
stay in playing condition.
Finishing up for the Lady
Wildcats were juniors Tanksley.
Adna Metayer, Nichols and
Perez, sophs Casso. Carlton,
Allen-Hunter and Endreina
Martinez, who split time on JV
and varsity. The returning fresh-
men are Smith. Thomspon. and
Lindsey and St. Fort if they are
able to cone back.
The junior varsity Lady 'Cats
started the season under Ken
Leupold. When he-moved to
New Mexico. Andy Maddox
took over and guided the girls
to the end of their 5-9 season.
Diana Gomez, Kayshia Mosely,
Endreina Martinez, Araceli
Ramos, Aundra Pace, Anna
Lazo, Catherine "Cat" Jackson,
Haylee Williams, Alexi San-
tana, Jasmine Alamia, Honesty
Maratinez'and Alejandra Solis
played for the junior 'Cats this
season.




ABOUT ...
School News
The.Herald-Advocate en-
courages submissions from
Hardee County schools.
Photos and write-ups
should be of recent events,
and must include first and
last names for both students
and teachers. Identify pho-
tos front to back, left to right.
Deadline for submissions
is 5 p.m. on Thursday.
Please include the name
and phone number of a con-
,tact person. Qualifying
items will be published as
space allows.


CITY OF WAUCHULA

NOTICE TQ THE PUBLIC

i The City Commission of the City of Wuchula % ill hold the regular scheduled meeting
Monday February 13,2012 at 6:00pm, or as soon thereafter as it reasonably can be held. Items
on the agenda are as follows: Resolution 2012-04 FDOC Work Squad, Resolution 2012-05 In-
terlocal with Hardee County Building Dept., Resolution 2012-06 Service Agreement for Net-
work Integration Transmission for Florida Power Corporation, Resolution 2012-07 Historic
City Hall Lease Suite 106, Award of Generator Bid,Approval of Commission'Minutes, and any
other business that may come before theCommission.

The meetings will be held at the Commission Chambers located at 225 East Main Street,
Wauchula, FL 33873.

Pursuant to Section 286.0107, Florida Statutes, as amended, the City Commission hereby advises
that i lany interested person decides to appeal any decision made by the City Commission with respect
to any matter considered at the proceedings, he will need a record of the proceeding and that, for
.such purposes, he may need to insure that a verbatim record'of the proceeding is made, which record
includes the.testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.

The City Commission of the City of Wauchula. Floridadoes not discriminate upon the basis of
any individual's dis.ihilir, T.lhis This non-discrinhinatory policy involves every aspect of the Com-
mission's functions, including ones access to.'participation, employment or treatment in its programs
or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable accommodation as provided for in the Americans with
Disabilities Act or Section 286.26. Florida St.itui'-, should contact the City Clerk at (863) 773-3131.

CITY OF WAUCHULA
S/ Richard K. Nadaskay Jr.
Mavor
ATTEST
S/Holly Collins
City Clerk 2:9c







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,ttr To The Editor

Proposed $40 Million WGP


Project Smells Like 'Bad Meat'


Dear Editor:
Response to Mr. Lambert's
Rebuttal of my Feb 2, 2012,
Letter to Editor Titled "Will
Hardee Be Known As The
Garbage County"
February 6.2012 ...
Mr. Lambert, your non-rebut-
tal. rebuttal was disappointing.
I hoped you would have
straightened me out; taken ex-
ception; proven me wrong;
maybe even answer a question.
I made strong assertions based
on evidence: I believe you, Mr.
Albritton and others worked
behind the scenes over the last
18+ months to locate a string of
garbage pollution plants along
the railroad track in western
HC. Rebut that.
You distract and redirect to
avoid the truth. The truth in
your own words from emails
you and Mr. Albritton wrote.
Busted, fair and square, trying
to make Hardee, The Garbage
County. Waste Generated Pro-
ducts used your "tools for
fools" with your blessing to get
Mr. Albritton and Chair Bryant
to sign an agreement putting
HC on-deck for an idemnified
$40 million cosigned loan and
give 45-60 acres of free land to
a company with no employees,
assets, products or customers
(Toll Free: (855) WGP-FUEL).
Mr. Lambert said in these
excerpts from the Oct 14 BOCC
videotaped workshop: "It's got
to be, you know, one of the
most fantastic projects that I
have,ever seen, and you have
to overcome the cynicism and
doubt and I'm going to tell
you -,Mr. Fishman is a very
professional person. Marty
(Martin Black) has escorted us
through the process and I
remain with a high. I don't
know. I just feel pretty good
about it. with.the right
public relations, the commu-
nity will accept bringing in
trash from outside the com-
munity. I certainly hope
you (Commissioners) get a
good shot at trying to con-
vince them (Western HC) that
is a good thing It should be
in the rail corridor in the
western' Hardee County. -
The machines do exist that
convert material with this
process. Le\ and I ha'e seen
a machine that will do this -
so we know it works. He then
stresses how important it is to:
"- allow this company to
import waste streams from
outside the county to this
process."
On Oct 20 Mr. Lambert
wrote, "Waste Generated
Products may be one of the
most innovative projects a
rural community has ever
had the opportunity to pur-
sue. I am grateful to -
Marty Black, Kimley-Horn,
and visioning consultant, for
thinking about Hardee
County by introducing us to
WGP. The project will cost
somewhere between $30 and
$40 million and we are
focused on sites along the rail
corridor in central/western
Hardee County."
"ALL ABOARD" Mr.
Lambert, you hopped on the
WGP garbage train as Chief


Engineer in Venice, FL last
July. Destination, Fort Green.
Now, On Feb 2, you unceremo-
niously jumped off a runaway
train. You left Chair Bryant, Mr.
Black and Mr. Rick Fishman
(third WGP president since
May) ridin' in a fancy dining
car. You said in your rebuttal,
"While none of the alternative
energy projects show much
promise today WGP is just
one of those types of projects
you suggested." ('projects I
suggested?' please, I never
got on your train. "I heard the
whistle blowin, hung my head
and cried").
Mr. Lambert, it's not that
easy. There are consequences.
Questions of what you and Mr.
Albritton knew and when you
knew it. Sliding out the backed
of a moving garbage train and
waiting for the dust to settle
won't cut it. WGP was in an
empty building with no electric-
ity when visited by Mr. Rehill
in Nov. You had to have known.
I found out in 30 minutes on
Nov 4th with two phone calls.
You knew that WGP was empty
on Nov 7 from my 28 questions
to you and Mr. Albritton.
Mr. Albritton bailed out on
Dec 19 after the Dec 16/17
story about you in the
Bradenton Times articles,
"How To Take Down A Town."
Mr. Albritton wrote, "there is
no location in the world that
has deployed a combined
process of gasification and
PIM working in parallel to
process any type of feed-
stock."
Mr. Lambert, you are the one
that brought WGP to HC and
promoted them tirelessly on Oct
14, Oct 20, Dec 13, and in sev-
eral letters. Any sharp fifth
grader would see through the
fairy-tales \told by Mr. Black
and Mr. Fishman at the video-
taped presentations you orches-
trated.
The 41 page WGP transcript
of the Oct 14 BOCC Workshop
meeting has about 800 inaccu-
racies over 80 minutes (about
10 per, minute). Where would
the $40 million' of someone
else's money have gone? How
can the Engineer jump off a
moving train? Is a train wreck a
coming ?
Does the BOCC know you
reached your final destination?
Moved on? What about the four
of more other purported gar-
bage processors you had in
play? Are you still on-board
those trains headed. for Fort
Green? How is Chair Bryant
going to get off the train? He
was a big promoter in a big
hurry to be first with WGP in
FL. How much money has been
blown up the WGP smoke
stack?
Mr. Lambert, let's try another
approach. Say a group of-
investors led by you are told
about big returns on a, you-
can't-lose, investment being
promoted "in a big way" at four
seminars by Bernie and certain
associates who vouch for
Bernie's deal. Luckily for you,
a regular guy like Mr. Kuhlman
smells bad meat and lifts the lid
off Bernie's con-game before
you lose your life's savings.


Editor's


Henry Kuhlman
Concerned Citizen
Fort Green
Note: Bill Lambert's


response:
Mr. Kuhlman, my regrets part of
my' response was omitted from
last week's newspaper,
I am currently in contact with
11 different entities purporting
to have alternative energy solu-
tions. The nature of these proj-
ects include solar, landscape
waste to pellets to be shipped to
Europe and burned fJr energy
production, Bio Diesel refine-
ment and distribution, munici-
pal solid waste gasification/
powder impression molding,
pyrolysis, crop production of
alternative energy crops includ-
ing harvesting and processing
into biofitels, cellulosic ethanol
from swiitch grass, sorghnm and
sugar cane, urea production
from gasification :of bio-feed-
stock and natural gas iquefac-
tionlliquification.
I am giving you notice that they,
too, at the appropriate time will
become public with hearings
and additional due diligence,
just as WGP was presented.
Those that involve the County's
waste stream are more complex
because impacts to Hardee
County citizens have to be con-
sidered early in the process,
especially as it relates to the
County's landfill pro-Jbrma.
All of the projects will general-
ly require a major special
exception application and hear-
ing process which will provide
the public ample opportunity to
present support or objections,
as longWp it is legal, competent
evidence.
Let me remind you of your com-
ments in a letter to the editor of
The Herald Advocate received
April 20, 2010, you chastised
the EDC/Director in the excerpt
below...
Is Hardee County any different?
Don't we have more to offer?
HCEDEC director, the lowest
hanging fruit may be rotten.
Why not locate sites higher up
in the tree? How about solar
and wind farms on all that
reclaimed phosphate land you
want to dump garbage on? Why
not a Wal-Mart distribution
center or high tech development
zone? How about ideas that will
not blight the landscape and
reputation of our county forev-
er? Wake up! The future is not
landfills, but incinerators. Not
ethanol, but hybirdlelectric. Not
high density zoning, but preser-
vation of what makes Hardee
County special.


I think we ought always to entertain our opinions with some measure of doubt. I shouldn't
wish people dogmatically to believe any philosophy, not even mine.


(pLMY JLLJ
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2:2t11


What should be done about
Bernie and his Associates.
Were any laws broken?
Where's Bernie, right now?
"When I hear the whistle
blowing' I hang my head and
cry."
Luckily, for western HC, the
WGP train wrecked somewhere
south of Ona. This story has no
ending. Yet. "I bet there's rich
folks eating' in a fancy dining
car. They're probably drinking'
coffee, and smokii' big cigars.
Far front Folsom Prison, that's
where I want to stay." The epi-
logue will be written by Mr.
Lambert.


0 040 1:009,, r'' o+"v -, T",hyf- ,^r-~ ,.r^&_,^e>JP ,.


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February 9, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 9A


HORSING AROUND!
Amongst the treasures you'll dredge up from the Peace River
are nmny a horse tooth, although not from any nags you and I might
know.
These belong to Hyracotheria, Dinohippi and other prehistoric
"hipps." These teeth tell us of critters which flourished,evolved -
and suddenly disappeared into thin air. Scientific sherlocks point to
the massive footprint of the Yucatan's Chicxulub Crater: evidence
of a meteor crash which provoked disastrous climate change. Exit
America's horses.
Once a year in a little town in Southern Spain, Palos de la
Frontera, families gather to celebrate the Feast of Our Lady of
Miracles. They come on horseback, riding tall and straight in their
saddles, in the tradition of their Arab masters of a thousand years.
Palos-had also been home to boat-builders and sailors and, in
August of 1492, saw a number of its residents set sail on the Nifia,
Pinta and Santa Maria, under the command of Christopher
Columbus.
This little flotilla brought their own transportation, as would
later Spanish explorers, such as Cortez and de Soto, so once again
the New World would have horses. "Big deer," as the surprised
natives called 'em, as in "Chillico-hatchee," which we now know
in translation as Horse Creek.
Our American souls have been marked by the import of these
Spanish vaqueros and their chargers, to the point that there's a bit



-Pet Of The Week


Shaggy is a male Labradoodle.
He is large with cream colored medium curly coat
and a long tail. His adoption fee is $45.
Adoption fees are $45 and include a rabies vaccination and spaying or
neutering of the animal. Contact 773-2320 if you are interested in adopt-
ing any cats or dogs that desperately need a loving home. The kennel
location is 685 Airport Road, Wauchula, at the county landfill.


of cowboy in all of us, and we measure our power in horse units.
Woe be unto an American without his own iron horse, or unable to
pay for its fossil-fuel fodder!
While our cowboys continue to carry on a tradition which can
be traced back to the Arabs of North Africa, there is another and
deeper source of our phil-hippery, if you'll pardon the expression.
Horses had been the major source of power of the Indo-European
tribes which overran Europe. the equivalent of modem tanks on the
battlefield, and forerunner of tractors on the farm. Today, equestri-
ans perpetuate this close partnership between horse and man, wear-
ing riding helmets, not cowboy hats; practicing dressage and jump-
ing, not barrel racing and roping.
In short, the past is ever present ancient bones, old tradi-
tions: the cowboy, today's mounted farmer; the equestrian show-
ing a warrior's skill with the rest of us just horsing around!
Peace River Explorations is a non-profit citizens'organization cre-
ated to promote and grow a "clean industry" in Hardee County,
tourism. t markets the county's historical and natural assets,
including jossil hunting, canoeing, kayaking, fishing, horseback
riding and more. Volunteers will be needed to man the visitor's cen-
ter which will be located at the historic Wauichula Train Depot.


Sports Update
By Joan Seaman


Winter sports are just about over. The girls soccer 'and girls bas-
ketball bowed out in the district. Boys soccer ended on a heart-
breaking 1-0 loss in the first round of regionals and two girls who
went to districts in weightlifting ended there.
The only winter sport left is boys basketball. The boys played
in the semi-final against Auburndale on Tuesday night with results
not available at press time. A win would put them in the district
championship game tomorrow (Friday) night at 7 p.m. against
Lake Wales in Lake Wales.

Now, it is on to spring sports. Boys and girls tennis both began
on Tuesday, when softball also started with a trip to Sebring.
Varsity baseball with a pre-season tournament at Frostproof, fol-
lowed by another next week at Lake Wales. Track kicks off short-
ly as do JV baseball and junior high volleyball. Boys weightlifting
doesn't start until March.

On the football 'scene, senior quarterback Colby Baker and
,tackle/center Wintz Terrell have signed scholarships. Wintz will
join 2010 grad Ezayi Youyoute at Georgia Southern. Youyoute
received honors as a redshirt freshman quarterback last fall. Colby
will go to Southwest Missouri.
There are rumors that Andrew Hooks and' Deonte Evans may
sign with Jacksonville and join Jarius Lindsey there.
2007 grad Weston Palmer graduated from Princeton University
last year and spent the fall at Clemson taking a mandatory science
course he hadn't been able to complete while playing football. He
hopes to attend medical school and we should have some informa-
tion on that soon.

In basketball, Mark St. Fort, at Webber and Arnold Louis at
Savannah State are both redshirt juniors and doing well irnscgring
and rebounding. More on that will come shortly.

Finally, there's boxing on Friday night. Bowling Green fly-
weight Daniel Lozano is in the main event at the Winghouse Fight
Night at the A La Carte Pavilion in Tampa.


CHAPEL
Our greeters. Fred Carlton
and Dee Martin and Don and
Karen Byrer, welcomed 175.
We had our monthly hymn sing,
led by Bob Conkle and accom-
panied by Cheryl Conkle. Janit
Apple led opening prayer and
the special music was a piano
duet by Cheryl and Jeanette
Goetz. Our choir anthem,
"Jesus is Coming Soon," was
directed by Sandy Feeser and
piano by Cheryl.
Pastor David's message was
"Making the Best of a Bad
Situation." from Acts 16:16,
remembering not to forget to-
pray and letting Jesus take over.
We have some praises:
Louise Cross arrived for the
snowbird season after a lengthy
therapy and healing of a broken
hip. We are so happy to have
her and Emmerson back in the
park.
COFFEE
Janet, sporting yet another
crazy hat, welcomed 276 and
led the prayer. Wauchula State
Bank was our speaker for the
day, and answered many ques-
tions to help prevent identity
theft.
Upcoming events are our
craft sale and snack bar on
Saturday, from 9 to 1. Feb. 14 is
Valentine's Day and we would
like to wish everyone a Happy
Sweetheart Day. The Valen-
tine's Dance will be Feb. 18,
from 7 to 10 with Steve Elston.
Janet presented George and
myself embroidered shirts with
King and Queen on them with
our names and the year, on
white shirts with red, white and
blue and gold crowns. We will
Sbe leading, as dignitaries of the
park, our Relay For Life Cancer
Survivor Parade on Friday, Feb.
17, at 2.


Our great treat for the season
is on Feb. 25, with our Pioneer
Creek Glee Club "Musical.
Collage" show at 6:30, per-
forming with our own Kitchen
Band, director and accompani-
ment by Sandy Feeser.
Many coupons, the Perkins
pie, and 50/50 were won.
ACTIVITIES
Shuffle: Last week we had a
Single-Mingle tournament with
24 players headed up by Max
and Ruth Tate. In the national
singles tournament. Grace
Moore placed second in conso-
lation for the amateur division.
At the central district tourna-
ment, in the pro division Max
placed fourth in the consolation
event, and in the amateur divi-
sion Wayne Shick placed sec-
ond in the main event.
This week at the state tourna-
ment amateur division, Lynn
Shick and Rosemary Comeau
placed third in the main event.
At central district pro tourna-
ment, Mamie Morton and Lynn
Shick placed second in the main
event.
In the park we had a singles
tournament with Bob Conkle
first, Herb Dehaan second, Bill
Morrison third, and Lynn Shick
fourth in the main event. Nancy
Singleton first, Jack Napier sec-
ond, Claude Deschienes third,
and- Ervin Williams fourth in
consolation.
Bowling: High game for the
men, congrats, Jim Noble 200
and 207 with high series 567;
and high game for the women,
congrats Arlene Sebright 177
and high series, congrats
Marilyn Achard 463.
Dave Thompson picked up
9-10 split and Bob Bellis picked
up 3-10 split. Really great
scores, gang!


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Pioneer Creek RV News
By Reggie DeSmet


YOU Can Appear In ...
Poet's Place
Are you a poet? Let us show it! Your work could be published in
this newspaper in "Poet's Place," a weekly feature which.relles
solely on reader submissions. Poems must be your own original
work, written by you, not someone else. To appear in this fea-
ture, send your poetry, name and town of residence to: Poet's
Place, The Herald-Advocate, PO. Box 338, Wauchula, FL 33873
or fax 773-0657.


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10A The Herald-Advocate, February 9,2012


Helping The
There could soon be good
news for the nearly 9 million
Americans age 50+ who face
the risk of hunger.
The Problem
Most never dreamed this
would happen to them. They'd
worked hard, paid their taxes
and given back to their commu-
nity. Unfortunately, the money
they counted on to meet their
basic needs no longer stretches
to the end of the month. Perhaps
they lost their job and can't find
another-people 55 and older
average more than a year now
between jobs. Maybe they're
among the one in three older
people whose home value has
plunged. They may have expe-
rienced the unexpected loss of
their spouse or partner.
Whatever the cause, they now
face a daily, agonizing choice
between buying groceries or the
medicine they need, between
paying the rent or paying the
electricity bill.
Many of them are too afraid
or embarrassed to tell anyone.


Hungry Can Be A SNAP


They may even tell their own
children that they are just fine,
thank you very much.
What's Being Done
There is help through SNAP,
the federal government's Sup-
plemental Nutrition Assistance
Program, which some places
still call "food stamps." SNAP
benefits come on an easy-to-use
EBT card that looks just like a
debit card, and the card can be
used to buy food in thousands
of grocery stores, farmers' mar-
kets and other food retail outlets
around the country.
Today, at least 7 million peo-
ple age 60+ are eligible for
SNAP, but just a third gets ben-
efits. That's why AARP Foun-
dation's Drive to End Hunger is
working to educate the other
two-thirds of SNAP eligible
seniors and help them enroll in
the program.
What You Can Do
"If you know any older peo-
ple who might need help, don't
let them suffer in silence any
longer. At AARP Foundation,


we have an online map,
www.aarp.org/snap map, that
lets people check their eligibili-
ty and tells them how to apply
for SNAP benefits where they
live," said Jo Ann Jenkins, the
Foundation's president. "The
average benefit for people age
60 and above is $103 per month
and that can make a big differ-
ence between hardly eating and
healthy eating," she said. "If
you can't go online, call (800)
221-5689 for SNAP informa-
tion. Do it today. No one of any
age should ever go hungry in
the United States."
AARP Foundation is AARP's
affiliated charity the heart of
AARP. The Foundation creates
solutions that help low-income,
vulnerable older people get
their everyday essentials -
food, housing; income and per-
sonal connection.
To learn more or to donate,
go to www.aarp.org/aarp-foun-
dation.


Let Your Doctors Help You Fight Fear And Pain


Chances are someone you
know has experienced heart
trouble or a heart attack. Ac-
cording to the American Heart
Association, more than one-
third of Americans have some
type of cardiovascular disease.
After a cardiac event, most
patients are told to adopt better
eating habits and become more
active. For some, however, the
fear of having another heart
episode keeps them sitting at'
home.
"Numerous studies show that
adopting a healthy lifestyle can
prevent cardiovascular compli-
cations," said Dr. Franklin H.
Zimmerman, a New York-based
cardiologist. "Some patients
with coronary disease experi-
ence angina, or chest pain, when
exercising, which can frighten
them into becoming sedentary.
By talking with their doctor,
they can learn about treatments


to prevent or treat the symp-
toms."
Angina pectoris is the med-
ical term for the chest pain that
is a symptom of coronary artery
disease. The pain is caused by
reduced blood flow to the heart
due to narrow or blocked arter-
ies. Nearly 10 million patients
in the United States currently
suffer from angina, with
500,000 new cases diagnosed
each year.
Symptoms of angina pectoris
may include a feeling of
uncomfortable pressure, full-
ness, squeezing or pain in the
center of the chest. It can be
triggered by exercise, an
increase in physical activity,
stress or a heavy meal.
Nitroglycerin is available in
several forms, such as a tablet
or a spray, and is commonly
used to treat angina because it
relaxes and widens the blood


vessels. This allows for a stead-
ier blood flow to the heart mus-
cle.
In addition to relieving an
'immediate angina attack, nitro-
glycerin can be taken before
exercising to prevent chest
pain. Patients should consult
their doctor before engaging in
any activity or starting treat-
ment.
Exercise and healthy eating
can help heart patients lead rich
and full lives. Using nitroglyc-
erin may help patients exercise
in comfort. Patients should not
take nitroglycerin if they are
allergic or are using medica-
tions for erectile dysfunction.
Using nitroglycerin with these
products may cause low blood
pressure, known as hypoten-
sion, due to widening of blood
vessels.
For more information,
Google: "angina pectoris."


/* ". "/ : ." '' .\ /. ' t" ^ '. ../ .'o r i ,









PTA's Want New Hospital Moved From Florida Avenue ,..
STampan Out On $5,000 Bond In B&E
.'. ', .- ,
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S3,300-Acre HSale Brings $te .

Of Friday, February 10, 1967

Front-Page Headlines:'
S-"Home-Grown" Representative For Hardee Still Looks Slim '' *1
!- N PTA's Want New Hospital Moved From Florida Avenue
U Tampan Out On $5,000 Bond In B&E
U 3,300-Acre Sale Brings $815,000
Hardee Keeps Same Priorities On Roads
S Argentine Students Visit Area
Toll on US 17: 4 out of 6


Walker's MONEY SAVING COUP'



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U. !,. Good West.rn ,
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February 9, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 11A


,-, Inside Out
By Chip Ballard


CAT SCRATCHES CONSCIENCE
You've probably heard that a cat, if tossed up into the air, will
land on its feet. It's a fact to Which any honest child who has ever
owned a cat will attest. But what the child might not understand is
that landing on its feet does not.provide the cat a safety cushion; it
doesn't mean it won't be hurt.
Robert Lee Howze, a talentedwoodsman even as a child and
a natural comedian whose Three Stooges, Red Skelton and Jackie
Gleason imitations would knock his pals to the ground 'howling


Back To B jfcs -
By lan Rice 4 ,
Gospel Preacher


LET YOUR LIGHT SO SHINE
During His great Galilean ministry, Jesus gave what is com-
monly referred to as the "Sermon on the Mount." Within His teach-
ing, we learn that Jesus spoke of the influence His disciples have
on others.
"You are the salt of the earth; but if the salt loses its flavor,
how shall it be seasoned? It is then good for nothing but to be
thrown out and trampled underfoot by men," Matthew 5:13.
Jesus is using salt as a metaphor here with regard to influence.
He would then expound with metaphors of light, "You are the light
of the world. A city that is set on a hill cannot be hidden. Nor do
they light a lamp and put it under a basket, but on a lampstand, and
it gives light to all who are in the house. Let your light so shine
before men', that they may see your good works and glorify your
Father in heaven," Matthew 5:14-16.
Sometimes we under-estimate ourselves with regard to just
how much influence we really do exert on those around us. Often,
we may feel as though we are just insignificant and that surely
we don't exert that much influence.
The fact remains, no matter how much of an influence you
exert on others, it is either going to be good or bad. "He who is not
with Me is against Me, and he who does not gather with Me scat-
ters abroad," Matthew 12:30.
'Every day brings about opportunity to either help or hurt those
in your midst.
"You, will know them by their fruits. Do men gather grapes
from thornbushes or figs from thistles? Even so, every good tree
bears good fruit, but a bad tree bears bad fruit. A good tree cannot
bear bad fruit, nor can a bad tree bear good fruit. Every tree that
does not bear good fruit is cut down and thrown into the fire.
Therefore by their'fruits you will know them," Matthew 7:16-20.
We influence everyone we come into contact with either in
a positive way or negative way. Let us be resolved to make today a
good one! Encourage those around you with both the words' you
speak and the deeds you do. Read. Study. Obey God's Word!
Ian Rice is the full-time evangelist at Wauchula Church of Christ,
a non-denominational group of Christians seeking to follow the
New Testament pattern of service to God. Visit the church website
at www.wauchulachurchofchrist.com.


with laughter, grew up in the edge of the Peace River Swamp. It
was a real swamp in those days and its shelter was a fine place for
a boy to grow up.
The house Robert Lee lived in sat high up on cement blocks at
the end of a dirt road. There was no other entrance or exit, thus no
troublesome traffic. Robert Lee, his little sisters and many friends
could run and play and the last thing they had to worry about was
being hit by a car.
But, after dark, they seldom strayed too far from the house
without a cattail torch, soaked in kerosene, or bright flashlights
because panthers roamed the woods and at night their blood-cur-
dling screams resembled those of terrified women in B-rated hor-
ror movies.
A ditch, about two feet deep, ran alongside the house. An arte-
sian well fed the mouth of the ditch and water flowed through it
night and diy. The water was so clear that tadpoles, minnows, tur-
tles and water snakes were easily visible until, sensing human pres-
ence, they hid in the grass thatwaved softly in the current.
Robert Lee's granddaddy was a coon hunter and kept a passel
of hound dogs tied to trees behind the house and anytime anyone
ventured too near them they barked and bayed like they wanted to
eat you alive but they never bothered anyone.
John Franklin, Robert Lee's uncle, owned a cut-down Model
T Ford.'It was an immense treat for Robert Lee's friends to be taken
on rides on the Model T into the swamp. Squirrels, rabbits, wild
turkeys,'wild hogs, and deer were abundant then and often a rifle
shot fired from the back of the moving vehicle brought down an
evening meal.
Besides hound dogs, house cats were plentiful at the Howze
resort.
Late one afternoon in early spring of that year half a dozen
children, all under six years of age, were playing in the thick soft
green grass in the front yard. An especially lovable cat. Andrew
Jackson, ambled up into the mist of them and commenced rubbing
up against our legs.,
Mackie picked it up and petted it. He said, "Hey, do you know
cats always land on their feet?"
Little Susie, who was about three, said, "No they don't!"
"Watch!" Mackie said. He tossed Andrew Jackson a couple of
feet into the air; sure enough, he landed right flat on his four feet.
"Wow! Cool!" cried another kid. "Let me!"
One by one the children threw Andrew Jackson up into the air,
a little higher with each toss. He got to where he'd run off a little
ways, but we'd go, "Here, kitty, kitty, kitty," and, slowly, he'd slink
back into our arms for more abuse.
When my turn came, I threw him as high up in the air as I
could. Just as he hit the ground Robert Lee"s mother burst out the
screen door hollering, "Hey! What are y'all doing to that poor cat?"
"We're just playing with him, Mama," Robert Lee said. "It
doesn't hurt him. He likes it. He lands on his feet!"
Mrs. Howze picked up Andrew Jackson and scratched his ears
and stroked his back. She called all us kids over and held the cat's
head in her hand and made us look at his face.
"Look at his nose," she said. "See at the blood coming out of
his nose? He lands on his feet all right but the impact of the fall still
smacks his face hard on the ground. Also his little legs give way
and the ground pounds his stomach, knocking his air out. Shame on
you kids, hurting this poor kitty."
Scales dropped from my eyes as the horror of our play came
upon me suddenly and clearly and part of my innocence fled.
What had been great fun for us kids had been no picnic for Andrew
Jackson. Making it worse, in spite of our mistreatment of him, he
had kept coming back to us, because he loved us and trusted us,
only to be misused again and again.
An invisible fist punched me in the belly and a deep sadness
came over me and I didn't want to look atanyone or for anyone
to look at me. I lived a short distance away and I ran home and
made in to my room and under the covers before the tears started.
E-mail Chip at chipkyle746@embarqmail.com or visit his website
at www.chipballard.comn.


In Business
By Maria Trujillo .


STAYING FOCUSED Tired of that blurry photo or that
pesky thumb in the shot? Picture too dark or maybe the flash was
too much?
Linda M. Montanez can put an end to your frustration and
worry from not having captured that amazing moment in time.
Montanez is a professional photographer who was raised in
Hardee County. As an adult, she moved to Highlands County for 17
years but returned here three years ago to be with her mother, who
had been diagnosed with cancer.
Now that her mother is stable she has decided to continue on
with her passion, photography.
This passion is so strong that Montanez claims she and her
daughter, Chelsea, were born with cameras in their hands. Because
of that love for photography, the two started a photography busi-
ness called ShutterBug Photography & Design,
They worked together until Chelsea moved to Tallahassee,
where she continues to snap pictures. And Montanez recently
decided to start taking pictures professionally again, too. That's
why she started Best Light Photography.
The name Best Light actually came to her after a job she had
done for a friend.
Montanez was asked to take pictures of her friend's daughter
for Homecoming. After the pictures were sent to the family,
Montanez received a teary phone call from the mother describing
how much the pictures had meant to her daughter.
The woman said the pictures had given her daughter self-con-
fidence after seeing how beautiful she truly was. It was after the,
mother thanked Montanez for everything she had done that the idea
came to Montanez.
That, is exactly what she wanted to do with her photos. She
wanted to show everyone and everything she photographed "in
their best light."
Montanez's schedule is very flexible and she is able to go
wherever requested for that special picture. She works at almost
any location you want, since she doesn't shoot with the typical blue
backdrop in a small home studio.
Montanez says she can take hundreds of pictures in a matter of
hours because she just snaps away. She'll even take pictures when
the client doesn't realize it. She says snapping those moments
when the subjects don't realize they are being photographed are her
favorites. They are being themselves and not posing, she says, so
most often this is when the best pictures come out.
It is said that when you dosomething you love, you don't con-
sider it work. This is true for Montanez, who says this is the only
"job" she would do for free. But since this is her source of income,
she must charge a fee. Yet, she feels the single working mother of
four should have wonderful pictures of her children just like any-
bodyelse. Therefore, her goal is to be as affordable as possible.
M ontanez can be reached at (863) 202-5865 at any time. She
is located at 224 Pennsylvania Ave. If you would like to see exam-
ples of her work, Montanez has a page on Facebook called Best
Light Photography.
Montanez says, "You will enjoy the photoshoot. I promise you
will be happy with what we create, and I promise to capture you in
your Best Light."
New business or management? Remodeling or relocating? Call'
Maria Trujillo at 773-3255 with your business news.

The "German iris" can be chewed as.a breath freshener, but
high doses may be toxic.


SONHAVENPREPARATORY ACADEMY!


COME AND MEET THE STUDENTS WHO WROTE A BOOK THIS YEAR! THAT'S RIGHT! THEIR FIRST YEAR IN

HARDEE COUNTY AND THEY ALREADY HAVE A PUBLISHED BOOK. WITH A FOREWORD BY REP. BEN

ALBRITTON AND A SOON-TO-COME MEETING WITH THE GOVERNOR, YOU WILL WANT TO MEET BOTH OF

THE DR.'S HILT (FOUNDERS), THE STAFF AND THE STUDENTS.



THE NEW PIONEERS


will be available for purchase at Friday Night on Main Street on February 17th. Come pick

up a brochure on SONHAVEN and purchase a 200+ page book written by 50+ students of

SONHWVeN. Cost is $18 (no tax, no shipping costs). Get an autographed copy and get to

know us. Proceeds will assist the school in the expansion plans for the coming year!


Don't forget to view the promo from the publisher on youtube. Simply type in

Dr. Carolyn L. Hilt and the promo for The New Pioneers will appear. Dr. Hilt will also


have copies of her book for sale by donation.


SEE YOU FEB 17TH!


"One heart...One life...One child at a time!"

4 Psalm 107:30

"He guided them to their desired haven."

Sonhaven is a member school of:


,"' : ACSI, FACCS, FCCPSA, BBB, HARDEE COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE


S, .. i : SonHaven is in the final and third phase towards accreditation.


2 9P






12A The Herald-Advocate, February 9, 2012


Hispanic Americans At

Increased Risk For Stroke


Every day is World Stroke
Day. Stroke knows no bound-
aries and can happen to anyone
regardless of age or gender with
15 million people worldwide
suffering a stroke each year. Of
those affected, approximately
five million will die and anoth-
er five million will be left per-
manently disabled. Knowing
the signs and symptoms of
stroke is important, especially
for those who may be at
increased risk.
In the United States, the
Office of Minority Health re-
ports that Hispanics ages 35 to
64 are more likely to suffer a
stroke ;han non-Hispanic
whites. Hispanics are also more
likely to suffer a stroke at a
younger age, as their average
age for stroke is 67, compared
to 80 for non-Hispanic whites.
Although many Americans
do not know the signs and
symptoms of stroke, research
indicates this is especially true
among Hispanic Americans.
Cerebrovascular diseases,
which include stroke, are the.
,fourth-leading cause of death in
Hispanics in the United States.
Stroke or heart disease accounts
for one in four deaths among
Hispanic men and one in three
deaths among Hispanic women,
yet a study of 1,904 people sug-
gests that many in this popula-
tion do not recognize the signs
and symptoms of stroke or real-
ize the immediate need for
medical attention.
In a recent survey of 2,000
women about stroke, Hispanics
were less aware of the signs and
symptoms of stroke than
Caucasians. Furthermore, in a
separate study of 25,426 indi-
viduals, non-English-speaking
Hispanic Americans, compared
to those who spoke English,
were also less likely to identify
stroke signs and symptoms or
be aware of the immediate need
for medical attention.
"Stroke is a worldwide prob-
I


lem and here in the United
States the risk of stroke is even
greater for Hispanic Amer-
icans," said Dr. Juan Fitz, assis-
tant medical director, Emer-
gency Department, Covenant
Medical Center in Lubbock,
TX. "It is important for mem-
bers of our community to rec-
ognize the signs and symptoms
of stroke and to call 9-1-1 if
they believe a stroke is occur-
ring."
A stroke occurs when a blood
vessel that carries blood and
oxygen to the brain is blocked
by plaque or a blood clot (acute
ischemic stroke), or breaks
(hemorrhagic stroke). The visi-
ble signs and symptoms of
stroke include speech impair-
ment, arm numbness and weak-
ness, severe headache, sudden
confusion, trouble seeing out of
one or both eyes, as well as
uncontrollable drooping of the
face.
The F.A.S.T. Test
In the event that you or some-
one you know begins to show
signs and symptoms of a stroke,
the F.A.S.T. test can be used as
a quick screening tool:
Face Ask the person to
smile. Does one side of the face
droop?
Arms Ask the person to
raise both arms. Does one arm
drift downward?
Speech Ask the person
to repeat a simple sentence. Are
the words slurred?. Can they
repeat the sentence correctly?
Time If the person
shows any of these symptoms,
time is important. Immediate
medical attention may limit the
effects of stroke. Therefore, call
9-1-1 or get to the hospital
immediately.

More Information
To learn more about stroke,
see your doctor, visit www.-
stroke.org or www.emergency-
careforyou.org or call (800)
STROKES.


What is defeat? Nothing but education; nothing but the first
step to something better.
-Wendell Phillips

All work that is worth anything is done in faith.
-Albert Schweitzer


What Teen Drivers Need To Know


By improving their driving
skills, teen drivers can reduce
their risk of spinal cord injuries.
According to the experts at
Shriners Hospitals for Children,
motor vehicle crashes are the
number one cause of death for
those between the ages of 16
and 24. Motor vehicle crashes
are also the leading cause of
spinal cord injuries in all age
groups.
Being aware of the risk fac-
tors and improving driving
skills may help reduce this risk-
especially for young drivers.
Factors that contribute to crash-
es include driver inexperience,
distractions, speeding, peer
pressure, driving with other
teens in the car, and the use of
alcohol and illegal drugs.
Tips for Safe Driving
SGive driving your full




When To Se<

Help For
While all children may occa-
sionally have difficulty with
subjects or assignments in
school, it's important to recog-
nize the signs of persistent
learning challenges.
Here are just a few clues that
your child may need help:
Your child doesn't want to
go to school.
Your child doesn't want to
do the homework.
Your child's grades are slip-
ping.
Your child complains about
school subjects, saying, for
example, that' "math is boring"
or '"I hate reading" or "the
teacher did not explain this to
me."
Early intervention is impor-
tant. Research shows that with-
out intervention, reading prob-
lems in third grade are likely to
persist into high school.
Children vary in their develop-
ment of academic skills, but
they should be in the same range
as their classmates.
"Catching the problem early
can save time and frustration,"
says Dr. Mary Mokris, an educa-
tion specialist with Kumon
Math and Reading Centers.
"When students are full grades
behind their peers in the core


attention. Driving is a privilege.
Follow the rules of the road
and obey speed limits.
Always wear a seat belt.
If transporting younger
passengers. properly restrain
children under age 12 in the
back-seat, and place children in
age- and height- and weight-
appropriate safety or booster
seats.
Avoid distractions unrelat-
ed to driving. Distractions in-
clude texting or reading, talking
on the phone-including using a
headset, earpiece or speaker-
phone-eating, fatigue, arguing,
an animal that is loose in the
car, disruptive passengers, alco-
hol or other drugs, and loud
music.
Never get behind the wheel
after drinking alcohol. Even a
single drink, whether you can




ek Academic

(our Child
academic skills, there is cause
for concern."
Children rarely admit they
are having a problem in school.
If you suspect a problem, talk to
your child's teacher. Ask about
the subjects or skills that your
child finds difficult and ask
what you can do to help. Stay in
close contact with the teacher.
Also, talk to your child's doc-
tor and .ask if any additional
testing might be recommended
to ensure vision and hearing
problems are not affecting the
ability to learn.
Sometimes, learning prob-
lems, varying from mild to
severe, can interfere with a
child's ability to read, making it.
difficult for that child to under-
stand the curriculum. For one
out of five children in America,
learning to read is a frustrating
and persistent problem. Al-
though some children who need
help learning to read are identi-
fied in first and second grades,
many are not identified until
third grade or higher.
If you feel your child is not
reaching his or her potential,
ask about tutoring programs at
school or consider an enrich-
ment program.


feel it or not, can affect your
judgment enough to cause a
crash.
Be aware of the side effects
of prescription medications
before driving.
Use your side and rearview
mirrors every five to seven sec-
onds.
Never write, read or send
text messages while driving.
Thousands of fatal accidents
have been linked to distractions
like texting.
Always have a safety zone
or safety hole: a space to your
left or right to drive into during
an emergency.



Showing C

For Comr
It is no secret that American.
love house cats. Research esti-
mates that more than one-third
of all U.S. households have one
or more cats as pets. However,
what may be less well known is
that this affection does not end
with house cats.
Caring For Outdoor Cats
"Americans care about out-
door cats, too, and want to help
them," said Becky Robinson,
president of Alley Cat Allies, an
advocacy group. "Research
shows that 40 percent of
Americans have fed a stray cat
at least once in their lives.
Millions provide this help every
day, making sure the outdoor
cats in their communities have
food, water and simple shelter."
Most of these cats cannot be
adopted into homes because
they are not socialized to peo-
ple. These cats are known as
"feral" cats and are the same
species as domestic cats, but are
not accustomed to life indoors.
Instead, they live outdoors in
family groups called colonies.
Science, said Robinson,
shows feral cats can be just as
healthy and live the same long
lives as pet cats, content in their
outdoor homes.
The traditional response to
feral cats is called "catch and
kill." More than 70 percent of all
cats taken to animal pounds and'
shelters are killed there. For
unadoptable feral cats, im-
poundment in a shelter almost
always means a death sentence.
This approach, say critics, is
very costly and cruel, and it


For more information on
safer driving, you can visit
www.shrinershospitalsforchil-
dren.org.
Shriners Hospitals for Chil-
dren is one of the world's
largest pediatric subspecialty
health care systems, helping
thousands of kids every day.
The health care system's spinal
cord injury rehabilitation pro-
gram is well recognized nation-
ally and internationally. The
hospitals change lives every
day through innovative pedi-
atric specialty care. You can
donate by going to
www.donate2SHC.org.



ompassion

unity Cats
doesn't work to control the cats'
numbers.
A Better Approach
In the past two decades,
many communities across the
country have rejected catch and
kill in favor of Trap-Neuter-
Return, a program that ends the
breeding cycle humanely while
respecting the cats' natural life
outdoors.
Benefits Cited
The experts at Alley Cat
Allies say that communities that
have embraced Trap-Neuter-
Return see huge benefits. The
cats are neutered, which means
no more litters of kittens.
They're vaccinated, which
broadens already successful
public health efforts for rabies
prevention. The cats also be-
come better neighbors, because
once they are returned to their
colony, behaviors associated
with mating cats such as
yowling and fighting cease.
Cats in Trap-Neuter-Return
programs have an "eartip" a
small portion of the left ear is
removed while under anaesthe-
sia to indicate they've been
neutered and vaccinated.
According to Robinson,
Trap-Neuter-Return respects
Americans' empathy for the
four-legged creatures who share
their neighborhoods. "We are an
animal-loving society. Ameri-
cans want compassionate and
commonsense approaches to
outdoor cats," she said.
For more information, visit
www.alleycat.org.


Last years winner0.

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JUDGES
JANE LONG PIONEER PARK DAYS DIRECTOR
SUSAN W. ROBERTS SENIOR CIRCUIT JUDGE FOR OTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT AND SEVENTH-GENERATION FLORIDIAN
MYSTERY JUDGE WISHES To REMAIN ANONYMOUS


PIONEER PARK DAYS



COVER ART CONTEST

The Herald-Advocate is seeking original artworkfor the
front and back covers of its annual special tabloid section on
Hardee County's most popular festival. It could be yours!


ADULT DIVISION

First place: $
*


100 Cash.
publication of your work on the front cover.


* Your photo and biographical story inside.


Second place: $50 Cash.
Publication of your winning entry inside the special section.

Third place: $25 Cash.
Publication of your winning entry inside the special section.

CHILDREN'S DIVISION (12 AND UNDER)
A week-long pass to Pioneer Park Days, publication of the artwork, plus ...


First place:


Second place:

Third place:


* $25 Cash.
* Publication on the back cover.

* $15 Cash.

* $10 Cash.


RULES:

1) Open to all ages. Artist need not be a resident of Hardee County to enter.
2) Artwork must be original.

3) The festival theme of antique engines, farm machinery or pioneer life must
be depicted.

4) Pen and ink, charcoal, dark pencil or black marker.

5) Art MUST fill an area 8.5 inches wide by 11 inches high, including lettering
which reads "Pioneer Park Days 2012." (Drawing must be VERTICAL!)

6) Deadline is Friday, Feb. 17, at noon.


TO ENTER:
Make sure the division, name, address and daytime phone number of the artist are attached to the drawing.
Bring entries in person to the newspaper office at 115 S. Seventh Ave. in Wauchula, or mail to Cover Art
Contest, The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338, Wauchula, FL 33873. 1:26-2:16nc


- --


t

*
;







PAGE ONE


Wildcats Ink Scholarships


By MICHAEL KELLY
Of The Herald-Advocate
Two Wildcat football players
will be continuing their playing
careers after signing college
scholarships last week.
Quarterback Colby Baker
signed with Southeast Missouri
State and tackle Wintz Terrell
will be moving on to play col-
lege football at Georgia
Southern.
Baker was recruited as a dual
threat quarterback that can run
Southeast's option style of-
fense, which is similar to what
he ran for the Wildcats.
Baker said he was very excit-
ed to play college football and
feels all his hard work over the
years is paying off.
He said it might be hard
being that far away from his
family but he feels up for the
challenge.
His father Kenny Baker has
already figured out a way to see
his son play as often as possi-
ble.
He has rented a hangar at the


Wauchula Airport and is plan-
ning on getting a pilot's license
and a plane so he can fly to
Missouri for games and regular
visits.
During his senior season
Baker passed for 618 yards and
six touchdowns while rushing
for 466 yards and six more
scores.
Terrell was the anchor of the
offensive line and at nearly 6
feet 3 inches tall and weighing
295 pounds, he has the size to
play at the next level.
At Georgia Southern he will
be reunited with former Wildcat
quarterback Ezayi Youyoute,
who will be battling for the
starting quarterback job this
spring and will be entering his
junior year at the school,
although technically he is a red-
shirt sophomore.
Terrell said he will likely
move to either center or left
guard after starting for three
seasons at tackle for the
Wildcats.
"1I am very excited for this


opportunity and I feel like I am
going to a place that 1 will fit in
well," Terrell said.
He likes the idea of having
Youyoute up there and getting
the chance to play with him
again.
Parents Dane and Charlotte
Terrell are proud of their son
and are excited to see him begin
a new chapter in his life.
"We will be making a lot of
trips to Georgia," they said.
Head Coach Buddy Martin
was very proud to see his play-
ers get scholarships and the
opportunity to continue playing
football.
Martin said it was a great
accomplishment for them and
they both worked extremely
hard for it.
"They have both been lead-
ers of our team," Martin said.
"They are both great young
men who have the character,
attitude, trust and strength it
takes to be a Wildcat."


IF








Colby Baker and Wintz Terrell pose with their coaches last week at Hardee High School
after signing college scholarships. In back from left are coaches Steve Rewis, youth
football coach Chuck Smith of Lakeland, Dale Carlton, Ray Rivas and Buddy Martin.


.. .in






Colby Baker is surrounded by family as he signs a scholarship to play football at
Southeast Missouri State. He is shown seated next to his father Kenny with sister
Ashley, brother Willie, grandmother Sandy Bryant and mother Alicia Baker surrounding
him.


Wintz Terrell signs a scholarship to play football for Georgia Southern College in
Statesboro, Georgia. He is shown with his family from left mother Charlotte, grand-
mother Ruth Trott, father Dane, sister Dana, grandparents John and Tito Terrell, and
cousin Cardyn Cornell.

Life is like playing a violin in public and learning the instrument as one goes on.
-Samuel Butler


We make a living by what we get; we make a life by what we give.


Life is a moderately good play with a badly written third act.


-Sir Winston Churchill


-Truman Capote


I S0lv Ie0i -"F


Lozano Fights Friday

By MICHAEL KELLY
Of The Herald-Advocate
Undefeated boxer Daniel "El
Alcaran" Lozano will be the
main event Friday night for the
"WingHouse Fight Night" at
the A La Carte Pavilion in i
Tampa.
Lozano (10-0. 7 KOs). will
fight Manuel Galavin (5-7. 2
KOs) from Nacozari. Sonora.
Mexico.
The Bowling Green fly-
weight is coming off a second-
round knockout of Jonathan

ing with confidence.
"I am not even worried about
this guy," Lozano said last
week. "I have been training
hard and have been ready for
three weeks now. I am going to
knock him out in the first or ..
second round," he said.
Lozanowill not be putting a
his World Boxing Council fly-
weight division belt on the line
for this fight.
Tickets for the fight can be
purchased in advance at Ticket- COURTESY PHOTO
master.com or at the door the Lozano
night of the fight.
General admission seats are
$25.


Feb. 9 B/G Tennis DeSoto Away 4 p.m.
Softball Avon Park HOME 5:30/7:30
V. Baseball Frostproof Away 5 p.m.
Feb. 10 V. Basketball Lake Wales Away 7 p.m.
V. Baseball Frostproof Away 5 p.m.
Feb. 13 Track DeSoto Away 4 p.m.
G. Tennis Fort Meade Away 3:30 p.m.
Feb. 14 G. Tennis Sebring HOME 4 p.m.
Softball Haines City HOME 5:30/7:30 p.m.
Track DeSoto HOME 4 p.m.
V. Baseball Lake Wales Away 5 p.m.
Feb. 15 V. Baseball Lake Wales Away 7 p.m.
Feb. 17 Softball Palmetto Away 5:30/7:30
V. Baseball Lake Wales Away TBA
Feb. 21 Softball Fort Meade HOME 5:30/7:30 p.m.
JV Baseball Lake Placid HOME 6 p.m.
V. Baseball Lake Placid Away 7 p.m.
Feb. 23 Track Sebring Away 4 p.m.
B/G Tennis Teneroc HOME 4 p.m.
JV Baseball Frostproof Away 6:30 p.m.
V. Baseball Frostproof HOME 7 p.m.


You don't stop laughing because you grow old. You grow old because you stop laughing.
-Michael Pritchard




GULF STATE QUARTET


Presents

Winter Residents Appreciation Concert




















,, .





First United Methodist Church
4910 N. Church Ave. Bowling Green



Friday, February 10 7:00 PM


A love offering wil Te taken


For Additional Information, Call: 773-9123 or 375-2340


The Herald-Advocate
(USPS 57S-7801

Thursday, February 9, 2012







2B The Ilerald-Advocate, February 9, 2012





Hardee


Living


\ i'


COURTESY PHOTO
Roman and Catalina Tijerina Mancillas on their wedding
day in 1952.
Couple Celebrate Their

60th Wedding Anniversary


Roman and Catalina Tijerina
Mancillas of Wauchula celebrat-
ed their 60th wedding anniver-
sary on Jan. 20.
The two were united in mar-
riage on Jan. 20, 1952, in
Brownsville, Texas, where both
were born. She was 17 and he
was 21.
They had met six months ear-
lier, in July of 1951, after Cata-
lina's junior year in high school,
when their families went to
Michigan to work in the fields
together. They rode in different
vehicles, but the young woman
saw the young man and thought
he was very handsome.
The young Catalina wasn't
allowed to be out alone, so she
would do her older sister's
chores so that her sister would
go out with her and then meet
Roman'. The two would talk and
get to know each other..
Roman was a skilled carpen-
ter, and after they married he
sold his truck for extra money to
build her a one-bedroom home.
They lived in it until he finished
building a two-story house in
1973. which still stands today
and they visit frequently.
Once wed, the couple became
inseparable. They have always


been known by friends and rel-
atives as being together no mat-
ter where they go, whether it be
a quick trip up the road to the
store for groceries or a long trek
to go work in another state.
Where one is, the other is close
by.
Throughout the years, Rom-
an and Catalina followed sea-
sonal work and traveled from
Texas to Ohio to Michigan to
Florida, first coming to this
state in 1963. They lived in
Bradenton for many years
before moving to the Gardner
community and eventually end-
ing up in Wauchula. where they
reside today. They have lived in
Harlge Cotifty since 1988.
Roman and Catalina have 11
children, 19 grandchildren and
17 'great-grandchildren. Their
living room is one big family
tree of photographs on the walls
and shelves, like a museum of
loved ones.
When asked. Catalina says
that the secret to a happy and
long marriage is "give and
take" or "-compromise." Some-
times, she says. "'You don't
agree but out of love you go
along with it, and vice versa."


Repair
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Mon. thru Fri.
9am-4pn
Sat. 9am-12pm
CLOSE D Wed.


Citrus Hall Of Fame To

Induct 3 New Members


The Selection Committee for
the Florida Citrus Hall of Fame
has announced three area men
will be inducted during the 50th
anniversary luncheon on Friday.
March 2. at Florida Southern
College in Lakeland.
In honor of the 50th anniver-
sary. a Golden Jubilee Gala will
also be held the following
evening highlighting the Florida
citrus industry and recognizing
all members of the Florida
Citrus Hall of Fame. with sever-
al other events scheduled over
the weekend to help celebrate
the occasion.
Inductees into the Citrus Hall
of Fame will be Robert J.
Barben of Avon Park. Frank M.
Hunt II of Lake Wales and Dr.
W. Bernard Lester of Lakeland.
An Avon Park citrus and cat-
tle producer, Barben is president
of Robert J. Barben Inc. and was
a founding member of both the
Highlands County Citrus Grow-
ers Association and the Florida
Agricultural Tax Council.
A fifth-generation Floridian.
Hunt is chairman of Hunt Bros.
Inc., an 83-year-old citrus com-
pany which was founded by his
father. Deeley Hunt, also in the
Florida Citrus Hall of Fame.
Lester worked for the Florida
Department of Citrus from 1967


Reality Ranch is hosting a
BBQ and Gospel Sing on
Saturday, beginning at 3 p.m.
Artists performing will include,
Perry Northrup and family,
Pasty Dollins, the Auburndale
Baptist Blue Grass Band, Susan
Robertson and more.
The concert and meal are
free, but visitors are asked to.
bring a side dish, a dessert and
their favorite lawn chairs. It will
be held at Reality Ranch, about
five miles east of Zolfo Springs
at 1942 SR 66. Got any ques-
tions, call Buddy or Virginia
Colson at 863-773-6467.
The deadline for Church News
submissions is Thursday at 5
for the next edition.


ABOUT ...
Hardee Living
Hardee Living prints your
news on people, clubs and
organizations, including
meeting summaries, births,
children's and senior citi-
zens' birthdays, engage-
ments, weddings, silver or
golden anniversaries,
church events and military
assignments.
Formsare available at our
office. For engagements
and weddings, a photo
should be included.
Publication is free of
charge. Coverage of wed-
dings over three months old
will be limited to a photo and
brief announcement.
Deadline is 5 p.m. on
Thursday:


to 1986. beginning as a research
economist and working his way
up to executive director in
1979.
The Florida Citrus Hall of
Fame honors distinguished
leaders who have made signifi-
cant contributions to the Florida
citrus industry. The Citrus Hall
of Fame & Archive Center is
located within the McKay
Archive Building at Florida
Southern College in Lakeland.
Tickets to the luncheon.
which is sponsored by Florida
Citrus Mutual and the Florida
Department of Citrus. are $50
for general admission. $100 for
reserved patron seating or
S1.000 for a sponsor table.
which, includes seating for
eight, table signage. two tickets
to the gala and a listing in the
program.
The event will be followed
by an OJ "Meet & Greet" with
the inductees as they unveil
their names on the Florida
Citrus Hall of Fame Tree.
Ticket prices for the Golden
Jubilee Gala the following
evening are the same. with table
sponsors receiving two tickets
to the luncheon.
For more information, con-
tact Brenda Eubanks Burnette
at (561) 351-4314.



Braddock Named
To Junior Angus
Association
Victoria Braddock of Zolfo
Springs is a new junior member
of the American Angus Associ-
ation.
Junior members are eligible
to register cattle in the American
Angus Association. participate
in programs conducted by the
National Junior Angus Associ-
ation, and take Rart in as:iscin
tion-sponsored shows and other
national anqd region events.
The American Angus Associ-
ation is the largest beef breed
association in the world, with
nearly 30,000 active adult and
junior members.


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COURTESY PHOTO
Brenna Cagiano holds the Fort Meade Woman's Club rac-
ing flag to signify the community's commitment to cross
the Relay For Life finish line by meeting the $55,000 goal.
Theme for the event is "Cancer, Eat My Dust!" It will be
held Friday and Saturday, April 6-7, at the American
Legion Post No. 23 on North Charleston Avenue.
The sex of an adult parakeet can usually be told by the
color of the skin just about the beak. In males, it is bluish,
and in females, it is brownish.




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February 9, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 3B


KINDERGARTEN
E
Alexandro Alaniz
Jada Alteri
Aileen Arreola
Antonio Cabrera
Jasmine Castillo
Marybelle Costilla
Estrellita DeJesus-
Martinez
Joshua DeLaRosa
Natalia Deluna-
Camacho
Meleny Escamilla
Khris Estrada
Leonard Frame
Nayely Garcia-
Saucedo
Kayla Gilmore
Jessica Grimsley
Joslyn Hayes
Liliana Hernandez
Nelida Hernandez
Devin Jackson
Mikayla Johnson
Jazlyn Jones
Destiny Justiss
Osiel Molina-Lozano
Esteban Olmos
Randall Ownby
Nehemiah Pyatt
Wendy Rodriguez
Phoenix Romeo
Mkenzy Stewart
Charity Thompson

E/S
Angelina Arce
Natalia Calvillo-Rivera
Liliana Centeno
Natalia Deluna-
Camacho
Shaun DeLeon
Javier Flores
Logan Garcia
Estefania Gomez-
Lopez
Jose Gonzalez
Trenton Hodges
Ivan Hurtadd-
Dominguez
Fredy Leon-Lopez
Brizeida Lino
Yasmine Lopez-
Chavez
Sydney Palencia
Berenice Moran.
Alejcindro Puliidj
Pali R. m', ,,-C i>ll' Il,
Enrique Retana
Nayeli Solis
Delores Walton
Sarah Wellman.
Jaydon Yang

FIRST GRADE
A
Antonia Banda
Angielita Casso
Magdalena Contraras
Luisa DeLaRosa
Jonathan Doyle
Desteny Escamilla
Amy Farias
Jared Fowler
Bernabe Gallardo


Vincente Gardner
Kelsey Gomez
Viviana Hernandez
Chano Lara
Jassmine Maldnado-
Oropeza
Ashley Magana-
Navarrete
David McQuiag
Bailey Mendoza
Acuna
Vanessa Padilla-
Lucatero
Yair Ramos-Castillo
Jesus Rodriguez
Yadira Sanchez
Lydia Valadez
Caleb Ybarra

A/B
George Alamia
Nala Aleman
Cyclaliz Avila-Perez
Diego Bautista-
Luviano
Nadiah Belmarez
Analise Benavides
Jesse Castillo
Jayden Daniels-,
Johnson
William Davis
Domingo Flores
Alli Gutierrez
Ana Hernandez
Jose Hernandez
Shelley Hernandez
Jennifer Hernandez-
Garcia
Maria Hernandez-
Tellez
Crystal Kapan
Hailey Lee
Cristian Lopez
Uziel Martinez
Connor Murray
Alicia Ornelas
Anissa Retana
Rafael Reyes-Miranda
Alvin Sanchez
Rebecca Silvan
Enrique Villa-
Gutierrez
Brody Waters
Chloe Wilkins

SECOND GRADE
A .
Raquel Martinez,..
Ulick Onuveoru
Caden Dunlap
Samantha Maldonado

A/B
Litzy Abrego
Hezekiah Austin
Destiny Badillo
Fernando Castillo
Scarlett Covarrubias-
Valencia
Jaylen Daniels-
Johnson
Elvis Dejesus-
Martinez
Jose Estrada
Natalia Garcia
Juan Garza '


Manuel Garza
Ariel Gutierrez
Adrian Hurtado-
Doninguez
Cayden Johnson
Victoria Lopez
Armando Mendoza
Ivan Molina
Juan Lagui
Julian Molina-Lozano
Nayeli Navarro
Zacherv Palacios
SJaden Rodriguez
Aliya Silva
Dezeray Rivera
Ke'Varreis White

THIRD GRADE
A
Kaylee Gibson
Cameron Hodges
Jacqueline Rodriguez-
Suarez
Adela Velasco-Lopez
Kimberly Walton

A/B
Sariah Alamia
Jennifer Almeyda-
Ontiveros
Andrew Arreola
Jessalin Arreola
Kolby Baker
Bruce Baughman
Kaylee Bautista-
Luvaiano
Chloe Boyette
Irvin Campos
Andrew Casey
Jackson Casso
Kam'ron Cook
Marisela Diaz
Juan Escobedo
Elijah Faulk
Jose Hernandez
Valerio Hernandez
Monica Hernandez-
Ruiz
Brian Huerta
Vincente Jaimes
Nathan Jones
Giovanni Lopez
Brittany Lopez-Perez
Leah Martinez
Deonate McDonald
Adan Molina
Denise Morales
Dymalin Moreno
Emily Ownby
Mason Pearson.
Mikel Picazo
Myron Refoure
Cesar "Omar" Rosales
Adrian Sanchez
Veronica Sanchez
Alexandra Solis
Joaquin Tavares
Faith Thompson
Majaviya Thompson
Griselda Vasquez

FOUTH GRADE
A
Keren Contreas
Abriana Reyna
Ciara Smith


A/B
Katherine Aguilar
Destinee Baker
Arturo Bautista
Hunter Boyette
Linda Cabrera
Jasmine Castaneda
Marcelino Cisneros
Caroline Coronado
Miriam Covarrubias
Oren Crawford
Esmeralda Cruz-Jose
Lucero Delacruz
Antonio Figueroa
Gerardo Flores
Emilio Garcia
Jason Garcia
Jasmine. Herrera
Marisela Hinojos
Omar Hurtado
Amber Jones
Oscar Martinez
Tyresha Mclvery
Tracy "Grey" Miller
Giselle Munoz
Jesus Navarro-Solis
Dristen Newcomb
Joni O'Bryan
Michelle Perez-Avila
Dorian Pulido
Azaria Rivers
Maria Roque Gutierrez
Abel Vargas
Evan Webster

FIFTH GRADE
A
Roman Almaguer
Aracely Sanchez
Yennifer Nunez

A/B
Maria Aguilar
Serenity Aguirre-
Banda
Heydi Ambriz
Ana Capetillo
Aaron Cook
Anareli Covorrubias
Maria Chirinos-
Ramirez
Dawner Deluna
Yelena Esquivel
Martika Garcia
Adelfo Hernandez
Manuel Huerta
Matthew Knight
Ignacio Lopez
Aaron Maldonaib'
Adilene Maya
Edgar Maya
Elizabeth McBride.
Joshua McQuaig
Ingrid Mendoza
Miranda Pearson
Nazae'zya Perry
Kasie Powell
Alexis Ramos
Drew Roberts
Damian Rodriguez
Aaliyah Sanchez
Miracle Thompson
Angela Velasco
Savannah Walton
Jessica Wilkerson
Cassidy Wilson


America's greatest strength, and its greatest weakness, is our belief in second chances, our
belief that we can always start over, that things can be made better.
-Anthony Walton


Grandfather Clocks

rNall Clocks & Cuckoo Clocks

Cleaned and Repaired
Howard Miller Certified Technician
Douglas Foster

86 3 -8 3 2 -3 0 7 1


SI-HARDEE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL

VALENTINE DAY RULES

All deliveries must be made Monday, February 13, 2012

at the Junior High auditorium from 4pm to 6pm.
d~ ~r.~maF ---1 'IT 'Oakd


Q2
c?


_ -- r ---- ---- -- -i;. -I


KINDERGARTEN
Aviles. Maria
McCoy. Ravin
Perez. Edith
Sosa. Alberto
Velasco. Luis
Torres. Jesus
Silva. Damian
Otero. Karlee
Mateo-Nicoias.
Viviana
Martinez: Liliana
Litton. Candis
Hernandez. Erica
Espinoza. Gabriel
DeLoera. Valeria
Garcia. Esmeralda
Cervantes. Yuliana
Trejo-Ortiz. Joana
Sanchez, Lucia
Rodriguez. Aliyana
Sanchez, Jillian
Knight. Johnee
Sanjuan. Edeek


Swain. Nevaeh
Johnson. Sha'Tavia
Mendez. Careeli
Perez. Carmen
Pippin. Lane

FIRST GRADE
Velasco. Jesus
Diaz. Artina
Martinez. Jesica
Mendoza, Lazaro
Munguia. Maria
Rodriguez. Juan
Rojas. Yadira
Salgado, Brianna
Zamora. Izaiah
Ehrenkaufer. Robert
Estrada. Alejandro ,
Hernandez, Magdalena
Krell. Lana
Calvillo, Chris
Flores. Ruby
Kerney. Travis
Maldonado. Alani


McCoy. Lizzie Beth
Reyes. Amaris
Robertson, T. J.
Toledo. Damian
Espinoza. Daniel
Santana. Joel
Maya. Idalia
Castaneda. Abisai
Murphy. Bryan
Coates. Shaughn

SECOND GRADE
Newman. Ryan
Sockalosky, Trace
Thoma-Lagunas. Julie
Sanchez, Thalia
Gibson. Sarah
Gilliard. Presley
Santoyo. Mikhayla
Torres. Alejandro
Guerrero. Jorge
Martinez, SaraLi
McCumber. Aliyanna
Salgado. Daniela


Letter To The Editor

People Should Love God,

Lead Non-violent Lives


Dear Editor:
When I get my dander up that
is when I have to address it.
This is the second shooting at
a housing development in
Bartow. I heard they were argu-
ing and the next thing you know
the 16-year-old shot the 18-
year-old.
My neighbor commented on
this and said, "When I was
growing up, we would argue
and make up the next day."
Another friend said, "Where
do these young people get their
guns?" I said their parents must
have them and they did not
notice the kids sneaking it out.
What is this world coming
to-human beings killing one
another? The very first murder
did happen in the beginning of


time.
In Genesis the reason for
murder was jealousy. Cain
killed Abel because of jealousy.
There is nothing new on the
earth. Humans are the only
rebellious creatures God made.
After being in church most of
my life, it is very hard to under-
stand how these killers could
cold-bloodedly kill anyone. It is
beyond on my capacity to
understand this.
Also, everyone tells me to
mind my own business, but this
is also a problem when some-
one is listening to an escalating
argument. I would think these
neighbors would call the police
to break it up.
Is human nature this angry
and hopeless to have to come to


THIRD GRADE
Spires. Sara
Batiste. Kya

FOURTH GRADI
Santiago-Padilla,
Azucena
Fontana. Blake
Puente-Venegas,
Kasondra
Sanchez, Angelina
Garcia-Paz, Maricela
Alvarenga, Nestor
Derringer. Stephanie
Ortiz. Aaliyah

FIFTH GRADE
Clanton. Justus
Guevara, ana
Sanchez, Lauren
Hernandez, Eddie
Prestridge, Krista


this method to resolve problems
in life? No wonder Jesus said in
the end times sons and daugh-
ters will come against parents,
etc.
The end times will be like
Sodom and Gomarrah, and if
God judged this city God will
also have to judge anyone else
that carries, out the same sins
and more.
I believe our generation has
turned a deaf ear to God's ways
and His ways of forgiveness
and turning the other cheek. If
you keep getting hit while turn-
ing the other cheek or killed, at
least we as Christians would not
be judged for arguing or fight-
ing.
It is a shame what the world
is coming to. Of course, this is
just a testing ground to how
much we love or not love God.
People are going to be quite
shocked in the hereafter if they
do not repent and turn to Christ.

Connie Lee Rowe -
Wauchula


Hardee County's Premiere Studio











Every Monday Night @ 7:00 7:45 pm

Adult Dance Class Aa l
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Ages 3-5 yrs old Ages 6-8 years old
Tuesday 3:30-4:00 p.m. Monday 3:30-4:00 p.m.

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Open registration is still available to children 2-18!

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HARDEE COUNTY
KIDS NEED
HARDEE COUNTY
HELP!
Ease a dependent child's
way through the court sys-
tem. Volunteer to be a
Guardian Ad Litem.
773-2505
(If office unattended, please leave
messagee)


SHE ORn RQout

Hilltop Elementary |
Second Quarter


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WILL., NOT BE ACCEPTING
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ASES
LASS V BALLOONS
STVFFEb ANIMALS
OVER 12 INCHES

LrvERI8S WILL BE

TuESDAY

PiSfZUArzy 14 201Z


9.


,V7
' ,





4B The Herald-Advocate, February 9, 2012


This week in history, as
reseai-ched from the archival
pages of' The Florida Ad-
vocate, the Hardee County
Herald and The Herald-Ad-
vocate ...
75 YEARS AGO
The Boy Scouts of America,
more than a million strong, are
celebrating Feb. 7-13, as their
27th anniversary with unusual
activity.
The big 11 day Florida Fair
closed its 1937 campaign in
Tampa last Saturday night after
one of the most successful sea-
sons in its entire history. Three
records were broken for atten-
dance, nearly half a million
people visiting the event. Two
daily records were broken, one
being on Children's Day when.
103,256 persons passed through
the turnstile gate, and on Gas-
parilla with an attendance of
95,837.
Today, Feb. 12, is the 126th
birthday of Abraham Lincoln,
16th president, and one of the
greatest chief executives of the.
U.S.
Wauchula Camp 36 and
Auxiliary 28, Spanish War-.
Veterans, held their regular.
meeting in the court house
Sunday afternoon at which time
Rupert Carlton Jr., ai student of
the local high school, was
approved as official bugler'for.
the camp.
50 YEARS AGO
Hardee 4-H Club boys
walked away with the majority
of honors at the District rine 4-
H Club contests last Thursday
in Fort Myers. The Livestock
judging team, composed of
Steve Kay, Skipper Gause,
Leland Kay, and Steve Haney,
won first place over 13 other
teams.
The county may be left hold-
ing a $1,000 bag unless the
county commissioners can
recover that amount from the
contractor or engineer for the
Metheny Road paving job.
Mr. and Mrs. James C. Lovett
of Wauchula served as host for
a family reunion Sunday, Feb.
4. The purpose was to celebrate
he 72nd birthday of Mrs. Edna
Taylor, mother of Mrs. Lovett.
Bowling Green Chapter,
O.E.S., held their installation of
officers for 1962 Friday
evening at 8 p.m. in the


Masonic Temple.


25 YEARS AGO
Two teenagers are facing
multiple charges after allegedly
robbingi an area convenience
store at knifepoint last week,
authorities said.
A three-month effort to
inform pregnant women about
the Special Supplemental Food
Program for Women, Infants
and Children, called WIC, is
being launched by the Depart-
ment of Health and Rehabilita-
tion Services.
A recommendation to change
Hardee County Ambulance
Service's;leave 'policy was put
on hold last week by commis-
sioners to give ambulance ser-
vice director Robert Shriver a
chance to meet with George
Collins, county personnel direc-
tor, and Nick Pellegrino of
Cody and.Associates regarding
the recommendations.
The New Medico Head
Injury System has announced it
will open the New Medico
Coma Management Program at
Hardee Memorial on Feb. 17.
10 YEARS AGO
The Hardee County Health
Department, has.'issued a rabies
alert f.'lliv. ing ihe discovery of'
a rabid racuori Frirdy on Lost
Acres Drive in Wauchula Hills.
A picture on the Front Page
shows sixth graders in Marie
Lamberts-gifted class at Hardee
Junior H-igh School display
their quilt square design. This
square is' in response to the
.Sept. 11 terrorist attacks.
SSchools across the nation have
been asked to create a square
showing their location and
offering a message of remem-
brance and pride. The squares
will be sewn together and pre-
sented to President Bush this
spring.

FCAT Writes arrives at
Hardee Junior High Feb. 12.
The statewide test will be
administered to all eighth
graders and is an important tool
in evaluating student's writing
ability.
A 120-unit affordable hous-
ing development may be locat-
ed at SR 62 and U.S. 17. The
new units are geared for medi-
an-income people, which is
based on 60 percent of the aver-
age median income of the area.


"Sweetheart of a Deal" r
2 for 1 Joining Fee
Save 50% with a friend or come in and make a new
friend- still 50% off (Expires 2-29-12)
Real Results-Pure Fun am + pm + weekend classes g
Schedule and location www.jazzercise.com o
Ann Marie 863-767-0613 facebook/Jazzercise Heartland





SBOIWLtNG BEEN "

S' UNTRY CLUB <
S 245 Hwy 17 ~ 375-9988 o:

S Open 7 Days a Week
"' ~ Noon Daily "

, Valentines Day Dance


. "
'< -t i ~


WEEKEND WORK


WaSyBackWhen


; I~~ ..--;>1-. -'

- Thank Yo

We wish to extend a hear
S appreciation for all the prayer
flowers, food and kindness sho
S family during our Mom's illr
Subsequent passing.

In times of sickness, sorrow an
reassuring to know that God's
comfort can be felt and exp
through all the friends, neig
' church community and fa
S We would also like to thank E
4t and his staff for their con
and loving care given our
throughout the years


y n




u ,

tfelt
s, cards, .
own to our
less and


d loss it is
-loveaifid
dressed -
ghbors,
mily.
)r. Fallon
cern
Mom


'A


The Family of Marie Staton "
Virginia Ann Johnson -
/ (daughter of Marie Staton)
-.,- -


SMuseum Matters
Marlene Rickels Hyde
Cracker Trail Museum Curator

I have always had a love of old glassware Ml\ mother had
many beautiful cut glass pieces but I especially remember admir-
ing the green depression ware that mi grandmother owned. It \was
handed down to my sister, then on to me. and I have passed most
of the pieces on to my daughter \\ho w ill one day pass it along to
her daughter. Just about everyone has heard of Depression Glass.
but exactly What is Depression Glass'? Depression Glass was made
primarily during the Depression Years. from 1929-1939. With the
economy so bad. most people could not afford to purchase items
like glassware for their homes. Because of the economy, glass com-
panies began to make very cheap glass and it was sold in five-apd-
ten cent stores. Many companies gave the glassware away as pre-
miums or included it with other purchases. You might have
received a drinking glass or a plate when purchasing gasoline. soap
or cereal. For a while. they were even included in a box of Quaker
Oats. It was even given away at local movie theatres.
Depression Glass was produced in a variety of colors which
include, pink, blue. red. green. yellow, amber, white and clear. The
more expensive and higher quality glass of the depression era was
sold in department and jewelry stores and called Depression Era
Elegant Glass. It is highly .collectible. and usually more valuable
than Depression Glass.
Some people claim that Depression Glass is the most collect-
ed item in the United States. Perhaps that is true, due to so many of
the pieces being handed down from one generation to the next. It is
usually a staple at thrift stores and even flea markets. I used to think
that glassware was expensive only to find out years later it wasn't.
Seeing it always brings back such wonderful memories of my
grandmother and because of that, to me. it is priceless. I bet if you
look around your grandmother's house she just may have a piece or
two of depression glass. If she does. be sure to ask her about it and
find out the story behind that glassware.
And if you ever find yourself, ridding out or just don't have
room for the pieces, the Cracker Trail Museum would be happy to
accept your donation of the glassware. We appreciate your dona-
tions which helps others enjoy their trip down memory lahe.

Let meat rest before carving or slicing. As meat cooks, the
meat's juices move toward its center. As it begins to cool, the
juices are reabsorbed and redistributed throughout the meat.

One reason I don't drink is that I want to know when I am hav-
ing a good time.
S-NMancrv Astonr


Black History
i'.' i i !


Connecting


The Past With M
The Present


"This Is The Dream"

Breakfast Available For Purchase 9:00 a.m.
Sponsored by:
LogOn Language Learning Center
(an affiliate of J.Oliver Speech Pathology Services, Inc.)


SSaturday, February 11th
9pm lam

Ss Budlight Larry
-!

e Karaoke


STuesday, February 14
S" SWEETHEART Drink Specials
Open till Close '


Visit our Package Store we have a


Large selection of Beer, Wine & Liquor


SWe now have Wi Fi Available


., soc2.9


COURTESYPHOTO
Four local residents, Regan Davenport, her children Zack
and Zander Durastanti, and friend Sean Brown spent Jan.
7-8 in Naples participating in the HighTower Triathlon Series
(HITS), which included a 100-yard swim in the Gulf, a three-
mile bike ride and a one-mile run. All four took first-place
awards in their divisions. Davenport was the overall female
champion, completing the course in 23:19. Brown did the
course in 24:38, Zack in 24:57 and Zander, the youngest
competitor in the race, in 37:22. To complete the weekend,
Davenport and son Zack participated in the Roots, Ruts and
River trail race. She ran the 13.1-mile half marathon in one
hour 53 minutes to place third in her age group, while Zack
ran the 5K (3.1 miles) and finished ninth overall.




Your Business Could Appear Here!
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas qr Trayce Daniels
At The Herald Advocate




Black History Festival

Main Street Downtown Wauchula

S... Sat. Feb. 11

8 a.m. 6 p.m


COME CELEBRATE WITH US
Entertainment Fun Door Prizes Food


"
F`~ jb


/'


I 'l


:









i-rsu


February 9, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 5B


Outta The Woods
By Tony Young
Florida Fish & Wildlife Commission


The white-tailed deer is the most popular game animal pursued
each winter by Florida's more than 200.000 hunters. But, there's
another big-game species that's hunted quite a bit too and is espe-
cially popular with hunters in the southern and central parts of the
state: the wild hog.
Wild hogs, also called wild boars or feral pigs. aren't native to
Florida. They either were introduced by colonists or may even have
been brought over by the Spanish explorer Hernando DeSoto as
early as 1539. Hogs provided a major food source for the early set-
tlers, and those pigs that escaped or were released adapted and
prospered readily in Florida's mild climate and varied habitats.
Though nonnative, you can hardly tell, because wild hogs are
plentiful throughout Florida and can be found in all 67 counties.
They live in various habitats but prefer moist forests, swamps and
pine flatwoods. Abundant populations of wild hogs occur west of
Lake Okeechobee, between the Kissimmee and lower St. Johns
river basins,, and farther north along the Gulf coastal marshes
between the Aucilla and Withlacoochee rivers.
Wild hogs are omnivorous and feed by rooting up the ground
with their broad snouts, leaving some areas looking like plowed
fields. Because of this, they are considered by many agricultural
producers to be nuisance animals. Their diet consists of grasses and
flowering plants in.the spring, fruits in the summer and. fall, and
they eat roots, tubers and invertebrates throughout the year.
As with all animals, it's against the law to release wild hogs on
public lands. It's also not recommended on private lands either,
unless the property is surrounded by adequate fencing.
Wild hogs have an annual home range of more than 10 square
miles and are prolific reproducers. A healthy female (sow) can
breed when only 6 months old and continue to breed every six
months, producing four to 14 piglets per litter.
They're not listed as game animals by the Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) but are considered,
wildlife. And even though wild hogs can have negative impacts on
native vegetation and wildlife, they're an important food source for
several native species, including the alligator, bobcat and black
bear, as well as the endangered Florida panther and threatened
American crocodile.
Wild hogs also make for a great hunting opportunity. This
especially is true in the southern portion of the state where, in some
areas, Wild hogs actually have replaced deer as the preferred hunt-
ing species. Because of the abundance of hogs there and the fact
these regions tend to have smaller-bodied deer with lighter racks,
hog hunting'has gotten pretty popular in those parts.
On private property with the landowner's permission, you may
hunt or-trap wild hogs year-round. Also, there are no size or bag
limits. You may harvest either sex, and you don't even need a hunt-
ing license to do so. That goes for nonresidents as well.
Now I do need to make you aware that when hunting one of
the state's many wildlife management areas (WMAs), you will
need a valid Florida hunting license and a management area permit.
On most WMAs, wild hogs may be hunted during all hunting sea-
sons except spring turkey. But if it's during archery season, you
must use a bow; during muzzleloading gun season, you'll have to
use a muzzleloader. Also, on some WMAs, daily bag limits do
apply, and in some cases, there's a minimum size limit on what you
can shoot.
During this time of year, inany of the WMAs' small-game sea-
sons are going on. The great thing about that is you never need a
quota permit to hunt during a WMA's small-game season, and on
most of them, hogs are legal game. The only thing is, you can't use
a centerfire rifle during that season, but you can use a shotgun with
buckshot or a slug, o0 a rimfire rifle like a .22 magnum, or even a
pistol if you want.
" In addition to still hunting for hogs from a stand or blind, there
are those hunters who prefer to catch them with traps or by the use
of dogs. Special pens with trap doors work well when baited with
acorns or slightly fermented corn. Dogs, such as black-mouth curs
and pit bulls, make good "catch" dogs because they can be trained
to capture hogs, which they do by biting down on their ears and
pinning them to the ground.
So whether you think wild hogs are a nuisance or a hunting
opportunity, they're a critter some of us are dealing with one way
or another. Here's wishing all you hunters a great season and a
wonderful new year!
Tolny Yotiiii i.v i/c media relations coordinator fin Ithe FWC's
Division of Hunting anld Gtmie Mnatgemenlt. You cta r each him
ith/i questions a tiouit hiuninig al Tony.Yotng@MyFWC.coim.


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Week Ending: February 5, 2012
Weather Summary: Overall, warm temperatures were pres-
ent in Florida during the week with occasional nightly freezing
temperatures in the northern region. Temperatures averaged four to
eight degrees above normal. Lows ranged between the mid-20s to
the 60s. Highs were in the 70s and 80s. Rainfall was minimal with
half of the Florida Automated Weather Network (FAWN) Stations
reporting no rain. Of the remaining stations, only one station in
Carrabelle reported over an inch of rain. Drought conditions did
not change significantly from the previous week with all parts of
the State showing some form of drought. Severe to. extreme
drotight conditions were'present in the north and around the Plant
City area.
Field Crops: Land preparation for field crops took place in
Gadsden County. Harvesting of sugarcane continued for some
growers.
Fruits & Vegetables: Vegetable planting continued in St.
Lucie County. Market movement included snap beans, cabbage,
celery, sweet corn, eggplant, endive, escarole, bell peppers, radish-
es, squash, strawberries, and tomatoes.
Livestock and Pastures: Statewide, the pasture condition was
mostly poor throughout the State and down slightly from the pre-
vious week. Drought was the first limiting factor to forage growth.
The cattle condition ranged from very poor to excellent with most
in fair condition. Hay and supplements were being fed but warmer
weather reduced feeding requirements for some growers. In the
Panhandle and northern areas, most pasture was in poor condition.
In Jackson and Gulf counties, winter pasture grew well because of
mild temperatures and scattered rainfall. Small grain winter forage


A


was almost at grazing height. Most cattle were in fair to good con-
dition. In the central areas, the pasture condition was very poor to
good. Forage grass came back from earlier frosts and freezes.
Drought limited forage growth. Grass greened up slightly with the
warmer than normal temperatures. In the southwestern areas, most
pasture was in poor to good condition with drought limiting
growth. The condition of the cattle ranged from poor to excellent
with most in fair condition.
Citrus: Temperatures remained above seasonal norms, reach-
ing over 80 degrees in most citrus growing localities. Rainfall was
slight across the region. Umatilla received the most, with 0.88 inch
and sixteen stations received none at all. Drought conditions exist-
ed across the entire citrus region, ranging from abnormally dry on
the eastern coast to severe on the west coast. Drought conditions
were per the U.S. Drought Monitor; last updated January 31,2012.
Seventeen processors and 45 (out of 47 expected) packinghouses
have opened this season. Cultural practices included irrigation,
young tree care, and limited hedging and topping.


Full Gospel Fellowship Church
1795 US Hwy 17 S Fort Meade, Florida 33841
Come As You Are Holy Ghost Revival
Beginning Monday, January 9, 2012
thru Saturday, March 3, 2012
Time: 7:30 Nightly (Except Sundays)
Featuring the following Evangelists:
Frank Bartley Randy Baldwin Pastor Rickey Young
SDonnie Gorum Alan Flowers Ervin Bodiford Jeff Giles ?
STommy Hampton Rick Young Jr. Johnny Epps


A


Saturday, February 18th Saturday, February 25th


2012 Hardee County Fair


2:00 PM
3:00-8:00 PM
7:00 PM


1:00 PM
2.0 PM
2:'00 PM '
4:00-7:00 PM


Schedule of Events
www.hardeecountyfair.org
Saturday, February 18th


Gates & Midway Open (Armbands $20)
Live Entertainment
Miss Hardee County Pageant
Sunday, February 19th
Gates Open
Midway Opens (Armbands $20)
Kindergarten Princess Pageant
Live Entertainment


Entertainment Tent
Civic Center


Civic Center
Entertainment Tent


SMonday, February 20th


1:00 PM


2:00-8:00 PM
5:00 PM
6:30 PM
7:00 PM
7:00 PM


Gates & Midway Open (Children Get In Free-
Armbands $15)
Live Entertainment
Rabbit Show
Dairy Show
Grooming Contest & Clinic
Junior Miss Hardee County Pageant


Entertainment Tent
Arena
Arena
Arena
Civic Center


..Tuesday, February 21st
5:00 PM Gates & Midway Open (Armbands $15 with $5
Merchant Coupon)


5:00 PM
6:00-8:00 PM
.6:30 PM


Poultry Showmanship
Live Entertainment
Swine Show


Arena
Entertainment Tent
Arena


........................................ed esday February 22.nd ......
5:00 PM Gates & Midway Open (Dollar Day-$1 Parking,
Gate Entry & Rides)


6:00 PM
6:00-8:00 PM
7:00 PM


5:00 PM


5:30 PM

6:00-8:00 PM
7:00 PM


5:00 PM

5:00-8:00 PM
7:00 PM


7:30 PM


Breeding Animals & Heifer Show
Live Entertainment


Steer Show followed by Beef Showmanship

Thursday, February 23rd


Gates & Midway Open (Armbands $15 with $5
SMerchant Coupon)
Livestock Buyer's Dinner sponsored by Farm Credit
-Invitation Only
Live Entertainment
FFA & 4-H Livestock Sale
F ..... riday, February 24th
Gates & Midway Open (Free Gate Entry from 8:00
PM 'til Midnight with purchase of a $20 Armband)
Live Entertainment
Ranch Rodeo including Bronc Riding, Team Sorting.
Barrel Racing, Double Mugging, Calf Doctoring &
Mutton Busting
Lil' Miss Pageant


Arena
Entertainment Tent
Arena


Civic Center

Entertainment Tent
Arena


Entertainment Tent
Arena


Civic Center


SN saturday, February 25th
Noon Gates & Midway Open (Armbands $20)


Noon-4:00 PM
4:00 PM
4:00 PM


7:00 PM


2:9c


'Live Entertainment
Prince & Princess Pageant
Mexican Band


Entertainment Tent
Civic Center
Entertainment Tent


Mexican Bull Riding Arena

We'll see you at the Fair!
The Fairgrounds are located at the corner of Altman Road and Stenstrom Road


imii


1 __ I


I


L-


-I


I


ii& I


1\ I/I






6B The Herald-Advocate, February 9, 2012


The


Classifieds


ABOUT ... Classifieds
DEADLINE ....Tuesday noon
RATES ...........Minimum of $4.00 for 10 words. Each addi-
tional word is 22 cents. Ads in all capitals
are 32 cents per word. Headlines are $2 a
line. Blind ad box numbers are $3 extra.
BILLING........Ads must be pre-paid.
CLASSIFICATIONS:


Agriculture
Appliances
Automobile
Boats
Furniture
Help Wanted
Houses
Livestock
Lost & Found
Miscellaneous


Mobile Homes
Notices
Pets
Plants/Produce
Real Estate
Recreational
Rentals
Services
Wanted
Yard Sales


SZOLFO SPRINGS HE
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F 735-0188 PAYm HERE!#
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TRIANGLE BODY SHOP, INC.
FL Reg. Cert # MV-73547
Automotive Painting Glass Installation
Door Windows & Locks Repaired
Headliners Recovered Wrecks Rebuilt
Headlamps Cleaned -
323 N 10th Ave. Phone: 863-773-9549
Wauchula, FL 33873-2623 Fax: 863-767-0106
Don't be led by anyone to a shop where you prefer not to go.
Only you can authorize repairs to your vehicle. You have the
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vehicle. Your insurance company is required to work with that
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We at TRIANGLE guarantee all our own work.
CUSTOMER SATISFACTION IS OUR NUMBER ONE GOAL.



REVELL AUo S&LES
Turn Your Tax Return
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1 f. ,***-Ls


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Available for
Immediate Occupancy
$99 Move In Special through February 29th
*Plus $1200 FREE RENT*
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Rental Office Hours
Monday Friday 7:00 AM 3:30 PM


Saturday 9:00 AM 11:30 AM
After hours by appointment
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Agriculture
FRESH HEMARTHRIA HAY, 5x5
round $50 each. Spetember cut
Hemarthria 4x4 round $35 each,
863-773-6638, 245-1903.
1:26-2:23p
L. DICKS INC. is now purchasing
citrus fruit for the 2011/12 season
and beyond. Call Mark Manuel @
781-0384. 7:8tfc


LARGE CAPACITY KENMORE,
dryer, $150, 863-832-0565. 2:9nc


2006 -LINCOLN TOWN CAR-
loaded, one owner, 89,000 miles,
serviced regularly, $13,500, 773-
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NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
2004 KIA
VIN#KNAFB121345311363
1994 JEEP
VIN#1J4FX58SXRC182319
8:00 a.m., March 8, 2012
Mr. E Pre-Owned Autos & Towing
1093 Hwyv. 17 N. Wauchula, FL 33873-8751 "


2004 RANGER EXTENDED CAB,
$4,650, 781-1062. 2:9c
2002 KIA SPORTAGE, 135,000
miles, $3,850 cash, 781-1062.
2:9c


BEAUTIFUL CHERRY WOOD
entertainment center with 'side
shelves, $75, 863-832-0334.
2:2-3:1p


BARBER WANTED- Must be able
to do flat tops, fades, all old and
new type hair cuts. City Barber
Shop, call Kenny Farabee, 863-
781-4050. Must be Licensed
Barber. 2:2,9p


NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
1996 CHEV
VIN:1G1JC5241T7190050
8:00 A.M. FEB. 23,2012
CLIFF'S WRECKER SERVICE
1071 Hwy 17 N. Wauchula, FL


Carol's Pool Service
Serving All Of Highlands & Hardee Counties

Call Us For All Your Pool Service Needs
f Carol Tomblin Owner

449-1806 or 452-6026
.II I1' tfr



Azalea Apartments
2, 3 & 4 Bedroom Apartments
Handicap Unit Available
Rental Rates Beginning at $503
(plus electric, cable and phone)
Rental Assistance Available for Qualified Applicants
Rental Office:
860 Pleasant Way *Bowling Green, FL
(863) 375-4138 (TTY 1-800-955-8771)
SMonday Friday -
9:00 A.M. 12:00 Noon
EQUAL tNUioMG Equal Opportunity Employer & Provider cl2:2-23c





New Tires Include
.Free Mount & Balance
Brand Name Tires!
Semi & Trailer Tires
BIG SALE ON
ALL TIRES
773-0777 773-0727
* 116 REA Rd., Wauchula
(across from Wal-Mart)
VISAi V Billy Ayert
"/ cl12:29tfc Tire Technician




Al,













New Paint &
Appliances, Fireplace
Located at
699 Baker St., Wauchula


Carol's Realty
1534 Yancy St., Port Charlotte, FL 33952
Call James Collie for appointment

(941) 627-2769
(863) 412-8932
Property good for Group Home
or Assisted Living Facility


HOUSEKEEPER/FRONT DESK.
Part time (24-32 hours per week)
housekeeper needed for R.V.
Resort. Perfer someone who can
also work the front desk when
needed. Must be detail oriented
and able to work without supervi-
sion. Application at Peace River
Resort, 2555 U.S. Highway 17
south, Wauchula Florida, 33873.
2:9,16c
ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANCE/
Office Managment, Zolfo Springs
trucking company, general office
duties, phones, data entry,
PAPERWORK! Attention to detail
a must. 30-40 hrs/wk, $9/hr to
start. Call 863-773-4202 or fax
resume 863-773-6193.
2:9,16c
HUMANITIES INSTRUCTORS-PT
positions to teach online courses
for SFCC. Master's degree in
English, Art, Philosophy, or other
Humanities discipline req. Open
until filled. For details and appli-
cation instructions please visit
http://sfcc.interviewexchange.co
m. (863) 784-7132. EA/EO.
2:2,9c
SERVICE AND REPAIR TECHNI-
CIAN, apply in person, 409
Goolsby St.,. Wauchula.
1:19, 26, 2:2,9c


ROOSTERS for sale, (863) 773-
0551, $5.00 each. 2:9p


5550 WATT GENERATOR, $400,
originally $1,000, 773-6169. 2:9p
CEMETERY LOT in the Bowling
Green Cemetery, $250, call (706)
265-3525. 2:2-3:1


ADOPT A PET! If you have lost a
pet or are looking for a new one,
the City of Wauchula Invites you
to come and see if you can find
the pet you're looking for. The
Wauchula Animal Control is locat-
ed at 685 Airport Road. Please
call 773-3265 or more informa-
tion. tfc-dh
ATTENTION State Statutes
828.29 requires that all cats and
dogs sold in Florida be at least 8
weeks old, have an official health
certificate, have necessary shots
and be free of parasites. tfc-dh

NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
1996 JEEP
VIN#1J4GZ58S4TC362028
1993 CHEVY
VIN#1GCEC19KOPE182643
2000 FORD
VIN#1FMRU17L3YLB90206
1995 SATURN
VIN#1G8ZH5283SZ3596.74
8:00ia.m., March 7; 2012
Mr. E Pre-Owned Autos & Towingg
1093 Hwy. 17 N. Wauchula, FL 33873-8751 g


LONESTAR
CONSTRUCTION CORP.
CUSTOM HOMES STEEL BUILDING
REMODELING CONCRETE
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
Lice # 291103615
863-773-4779
"QUALITY WORK AT AN AFFORDABLE PRICE"
BRING US YOUR LOWEST COMPETITORS PRICE c2:9c





YOUR TIRE HEADQUARTERS
5101 N. Hwy 17 Bowling Green
3 75-4416 1-
K rY.. M:,oN DY- S ITURD .Y 8, .- 6,.., MIKE
VForei~nafl d Dn6estic Cars / Diesel Eniginiest
/ Gas or Diesel Manual or Automatic-Transmissions






Realtors
NOEY A. FLORES, BROKER
310 Court St.
Wauchula, Florida 33873
(863) 773-3337 Fax: (863) 773-0144
Oralia D. Flores
www.floresrealty.net (863) 781-2955

NEW LISTING
I*


. ?. ^ .... '" .-.:.: ; .: ....: .

ON A DEAD-END ROAD 3BR/2BA 1997 Double-Wide Mobile
Home on 5.acres with Central Air & Heat & Pole Barn. 1492
Total Sq Ft. Priced to sell at $110,000.00

REDUCED LISTING


SHORT SALE IN WAUCHULA 2BR/1BA Frame Home with
Central Air & Heat, Large Lot with Fenced Backyard, and
Large Storage Shed. Offered at $59,900.00
WAUCHULA 2BR/1BA Cracker Style home with Central Air &
Heat, 1622 Total Sq Ft, Large Corner Lot, Detached Storage and
Carport, Beautiful Iandscaping, and Privacy Fence. All for
$86,900
WAUCHULA 2BR/1BA Frame Home with Central Air & Heat,
1488 Total Sq Ft, Large Lot, Screen Patio Overlooking Backyard,
and Detached Storage Shed. Offered at $68,000
WE SHARE THE SAME MLS WITH HIGHLANDS COUNTY!
SRemember, Our listings are on the Internet. I
Anyone with a computer can access them anytime!' .j
After Hours
Oralia D. Flores (863) 781-2955 John Freeman (863) 781-4084
Noey A.Flores (863) 781-4585 Jessie Sambrano (863) 245-6891
Lawrence A. Roberts (863) 781-4380 cl2:9c


--




February 9, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 7B


The


Classifieds


FOUND Sweatwater area, dark
brindle male cur, white stocking
and chest, 735-2229. 2:9nc
MORKEY, cross between Yorkie
and Maltese, blonde female has
been spayed, paid $600 will take
$300 also housebroke, 773-4802.
2:9,16p
FREE PUPPIES, small dogs, call
after 7 p.m., 863-245-3972.
2:9nc


U-PICK: STRAWBERRIES $ 1 /
pound (quart), Sweet Onions
2/$1, Cabbage $1/head, Collards,
Mustard $1/bunch. 2949 Center
Hill Rd, between Wauchula and
Bowling Green, off Hwy 62, 4.5
miles west of US 17. Open 7 days,
7:30am until 6:00pm. Bob at 863-
223-5561. 2:9p



2 BR/BA upstairs apartment $750
a month. 1st and $300 security
deposit, utilities included. No
smoking and no pets. 863-773-
6255. 2:9,16c
AVON PARK ESTATES, 3BR/2BA
central heat & air, fenced yard
with screened swimming pool,
1st & last months rent,
$850/month, 863-781-0177.
1:19tfc


3/1 Central air/ Heat very spa-
cious utility room, 863-735-2626.
2:9c
ZOLFO, 2/1, appliances included,
very nice, 863-735-2626. 2:9c
3 BEDROOM, 2 bath house in Ft.
Green, $700 month plus $800
deposit. No house pets. Call 863-
448-6651. 1:26-2:23p
RENT-TO-OWN *
MOBILE HOMES 1, 2, 3
Bedrooms. Cheaper then paying
rent. Close to schools and hospi-
tal. Lot rent $300. Se habla
espanol. 863-698-4910 or 863-
698-4908. Call today. 1:5tfc
ATTENTION! The Federal Fair
Housing Act Prohibits advertising
any preference or limitation
based on race, color, religion;
sex, handicap, familial status or
national origin, or the Intention to
make such a preference or limita-
tion. Familial status includes chil-
dren under 18 living with parents
or guardians and pregnant
women. tfc-dh



AFFORDABLE CLEANING,
homes, offices, rentals. Call
Nikki, 863-414-4634. 2:9,16p
4-C CONSTRUCTION, Free esti-
mates, handyman, concrete,
remodels, additions, CBC1256,
863-214-1471. 10:13-3:29p


HANDYMAN SERVICES- power
washing, painting, minor repairs.
Dave Bailey, 40 years experience,
863-399-1960 or 448-6256.
2:2-23p
PROBLEM WITH OAK LEAVES?
Call Ft. Green Grass Choppers,
781-0902/781-0900. 1:26-2:23p
NEW ALCOHOLICS ANONY-
MOUS meeting in Hardee County.
Thursday 7 p.m., 131 South 8th
Avenue, Wauchula. For more info
call LeAnne at 863-214-8430 or
Bill 239-821-4184. tfc-dh
DO YOU HAVE a problem with
drugs? Narcotics Anonymous
meets Monday and Thursday
nights 7:00 p.m. at First United
Methodist Church, at the corner
of Palmetto and 7th Ave., Wau-
chula. .tfc-dh
IS ALCOHOL CAUSING a prob-
lem? Call Alcoholics Anonymous
in Hardee County at 781-6414.
Several weekly meetings.
tfc-dh
ATTENTION! State Statutes 489-
119 Section 5 Paragraph B and
Hardee County Ordinance 87-09
Section 10 Paragraph D require
all ads for any construction-relat-
ed service to carry the contrac-
tor's license number. tfc-dh
THE WAUCHULA LIONS CLUB
collects NOT broken prescription
eyeglasses, cases and sunglass-
es. Please drop off at 735 N. 6th
Ave. tfc-dh


S-***
NEED A WELL OR HAVE PUMP
TR E '.E?CALL
ULLRICH .;. PITCHER PUMP
For complete well, sales,
service and installation,
call (863) 773-6448.
7:i8tfc
OVERCOME MEETINGS
(Gillespie) have been moved to
the Women's Club on Wednesday
nights, 7 pm. Come and seel
Kenny Sanders is the facilitator.
More information call 773-5717.
6:10tfc



MISSION THIFT STORE INC. 123
N. 7th Ave. All donations appreci-
ated. 773-3069. 1:12tfc
HEAVEN SCENT THRIFT STORE
now offers pick-up service for
large donations. We appreciate
your generous support. 863-773-
9777. 12:29tfc
HELP CENTER THRIFT STORE
1085 U.S. Hwy. 17, Wauchula
pickup & delivery, consignment,
layaway. All proceeds to Hardee
County Residents. 773-0550.
6:16tfc
OPEN HOUSE Friday & Saturday,
Big Big Sale, new twins, kings &
queen beds, dressers & chests,
baby beds & queen poster bed,
student piano, lots of new furni-
ture, bunk beds. Edna's Place.
2:9,16c


GILLIARD

FILL DIRT INC.

Fill Dirt Rock Sand Shell
* Pond Digging Ditch Cleaning


Lamar Gilliard
Home: (863) 735-0490


<(D Hardee Pure Air, Inc.
S86S :3--67c-01 22


VNow Accepting Aplications

i Paul & Tina Rickett
by s 101 S. 9th Ave Wauchula, Fl. 33873. W-r _w.___
C, ...Gel l; i(863) 781-4376"lr (863)781-4378 |g- facebook.
For quality' rhdassurance contact your hometown Rainbow distributor for
products and demonstrations. Asthma and allergy certified. c12:9-16c




JIM SEE REALTY, INC.

206 North 6th Avenue, Wauchula, FL 33873 ,,
Office (863)773-0060 Evening (863)773-4774
www ijmseerealty.com
James V See, Jr., Broker -Jim See
Newer home located on Torrey Oaks Golf 4-5 bedroom, 4 bath custom built home on 9 /
Course. 2 Bedrooms, 2 Baths with a garage. acres. County road access, next to Wauchula.
Corner lot with a fenced yard. Asking $137,500 Home is complimented with screened back porch
and in-ground pool. Land also has 7 acres of
3 Bedroom, 2 Bath block hotne located in town. producing nursery, $430,000
Great house in a quiet neighborhood. Over 2,350
sf of living space. JUST LISTED .for $85,000 1.48 acres with highway frontage. Great loca-
tion for any operation needing a shop, office and
REDUCED to $199,500! Great home on several on-site storage. $225,000
large lots in Wauchula. Hardwood floors. Commercial property in Wauchula on corner of
Massive brick fireplace. 3 bedrooms, 2 baths. 2 Hwy 17. Excellent exposure from North & South
car carport. bound 17. 2,50 sf building former gas station
& repair shop. $350,000
Spacious home located in Briarwood
Subdivision. 3 Bedroom, 2' Bath house with REDUCED TO $115,000! Duplex! 4 BR, 2 BA
wrap around porch, detached 2 car garage with one side. 3 BR, 2 BA other side. Central air &
office and full bath. $379,000 heat. Paved road. City water & sewer.

Realtor Associates n
Rick Knight (863) 781-1396 Calvin Bates (863) 381-2242
John H. Gross (863) 273-1017 Dusty Albritton (863) 781-0161
Shane Conley (863) 781-9664 Parker Keen (813) 523-15232:9
c12:9c


L AMBER T
REALTY INC.
404 South 6th Avenue
Wauchula, FL 33873
MOUNTAIN LODGE FEEL in this SPA-
CIOUS 3B/3Bth, CB/Stucco home; beamed
ceilings, w/b fireplace, fenced swimming pool,
sprinkler system; 16x12 shop. $140,000
M/H in Charlie Creek; 3B/2Bth, carpet and
vinyl floors, new central H/A, well maintained.
$39,900

SECLUDED AREA for this 2B/lBth M/H with
carport, well and septic; some repairs needed.
$22,500
Price Negotiable! 2B/1.5Bth M/H with family
room addition (10x24), some furniture, all
appliances including extra refrigerator, water
softener; fenced yard and large concrete drive-
way. Listed at $99,000
Knollwood Subdivision Executive Home-
3B/3Bth, in ground swimming pool and
Jacuzzi, 24x12 outside storage. $160,000


CE YOU CAN


D 1O SERVI
DORIS S. LAMBERT, G.R.I., Broker


Bus. (863) 773-0007
Fax: (863) 773-0038
www.lambertrealty.net
Doris Lambert
Updated 3 or 4 B/R, 2Bths, CB/Stucco home;
walking distance to downtown shopping and
schools; partially fenced yard. $125,000
Spacious 4B/3BTH, CB/Stucco home; large
kitchen, living room with w/b fireplace, double
garage, fenced backyard. $149,000
Large native trees on this 3.2 acre corner lot in
Z/S; secluded. $6,000
COMMERCIAL CORNER! Located in high
traffic area, this 9 acre tract is a great location
for restaurant, convenient store or possibly
small grove. Call Doris for details. $100,000
8.91 acres operating as a hydroponic farm;
24x30 barn with cooler, 2 greenhouses, in
ground fertilization tank, one 4" well. $225,000
Build your home or place your mobile home on
this 25 acre tract located off Hwy 62, fenced on
3 sides, small shed included. $30,000


COUNT ON [
KENNETH A. LAMBERT, Broker


ASSOCIATES Ti
DELOIS JOHNSON 781-2360 CHARLOTTE TERRELL 781-6971 STEVE JOHNSON 781-0518
IIIII I'


Zolfo Springs
c]8:2tfc Mobile: (941) 456-6507


RELAY FOR LIFE FUNDRAISER,
Sat. 8 am 12, North Wauchula
Elementary, 1120 N. Florida Ave.
2:9p
GRAND OPENING, February 17,
2012, open 9 am 9pm. Door
Prizes. New and used items,
antiques, home improvement,
clothing and many other items.
Hannah's Hope Chest (Hannah's
Helpers), 121 West Main Street,
Wauchula. 2:9c
SATURDAY ONLY, 802 Seminole
Street, Wauchula, Portable dish-
washer, furniture, clothes.
2:9p
ESTATE SALE, Friday, Saturday,
8-?, 114 Rust Avenue, Wauchula.
Furniture, kitchenware, size 12-16
women clothing, t.v.'s, radios,
bedding, cookbooks, misc.
2:9p


SATURDAY ONLY, 8-?, 120 North
First Ave., Wauchula, clothes,
toys, dishes and more. 2:9p


CAS 4 ALLGL




B I INGO250.S. 2


ft..



TI ST E l No matter how you look at it,
M- DIl U LX there's no better place to shop
FROM ANY ANGLE foryournext cr


CIO AIUTO. SALES


Large
Cars to


Selection of
Choose From


Buy Here Pay Here
8 1 30 Day Guarantee
153 1 on Motor & Transmission Only

B^BnroyTTO^B~I~iTIZfl~f


Paradise Realty


I,-_+ I .-.. .-, Ii->,
.." -f '


Lovely 50 acre ranch with a custom 3/2.5 pool home and two large equipment barns.
This is a corer parcel with 1000 feet of paved county road frontage. There are two
ponds with a flowing stream, an oak hammock and the land is fenced and crossed
fenced. Great for hunter's too because deer and other wild life are spotted here
everyday. Did we mention the brand new designer kitchen just completed in Octo-
ber? The roof was just inspected and good for at least 5 more years, a new skylight
was added to the master bath. A unique find that suits all aspects of country life.
Come take a look you will not be disappointed as this is a tremendous value.
Asking $315,000.00. Call Whitney 941-812-2823 Direct

12244 US HWY 301 North Parrish, FL 34219 941-776-1199
whitney@paradiserealty www.paradiserealty.com ci26c


Su 1


AM-SOUTH REALTY
Each office independently owned and operated.
* 11 I I I


Robert Hinerman
227-0202


I

-r **'.

Nancy Craft
832-0370


PRICE REDUCED!! East Main Street-2 Br 1
Bath frame home Front's on Main Street,
Back's on Hwy 64 East. Great location!
$44.500 Ask for Nancy!
PROFESSIONAL BUILDING FOR SALE
$64.900!! Frame building across from
Wauchula Post Office. Great Location!

$6.500 PER ACRE!! 10 AC fenced, 4 inch
well, great location for home, farming, multi-
business. Ask for Nancy!!
OWNER SAYS SELL!! Great Starter Home.
Only $65.000 3 Br-2 Bath, Handicap acces-
sible, living room, eat-in-kitchen, 1 car car-
port and walking distance to town. Ask for
Nancy!
150 ACRES-Hwy 17 frontage, fenced-
ready for your agri-business, home or both.
$6.000 Per Acre-Negotiable. Ask for Nancy
GO TO: HomePath.com For More Fannie
Mae Properties.
WE HAVE LISTINGS FOR LAKE, CANAL
AND GOLF COURSE FRONTAGE


702 SOUTH th AVENUE, WAUCHULA

(863) 773-2122 FAX (863) 773-2173
Gary Delatorre Broker
www.cbhardee.com


Richard Dasher
781-0162


Victor Salazar
245-1054


2 Story Country Home on 5 Acres 3 bed-
rooms, 2 baths, large living room and spiral
staircase to upper story. Call for appoint-
ment today. $138.900

PRICE REDUCTION!! 2 Bedroom, 1 Bath
Frame home has central heat and air,
Appliances, one car carport. Nice place for a
starter home or place to retire. Beautiful
location. Call for appointment today. List
Price $59.000

PRICE REDUCTION!! 2 Bedroom, 2 Bath
Waterfront home on Little Lake Jackson in
Sebring. Large living room, family room,
screened back porch, fenced pet area, dock
and spectacular view of lake. Priced (
$112.500

AIRPORT ROAD!! 2 mobile .homes on 10
acres with a country setting. Oak trees, stor-
age sheds and a creek on the property.
Priced (@ $149.900
LISTING PRICE-S52.900!! Concrete Block
home within the City of Wauchula. Call now
for appointment.
S c2:9c


COMPUTER REPAIR


S by
: Garry A. Phillips
Serving Hardee County
New System Setup Virus Removal
Malware Removal Email/Internet Setup
Computer Slow ?? Tune-ups Available
Call Us For All Your Computer Needs
Pick up & Delivery Available!
448-2561 Payment Plans Also Available 773-0518
computerrepairbygarryphillips.com c11:12-2:6p


,r


I1


11


I1U


laa-51
W,-q


-HI






8B The Herald-Advocate, February 9, 2012


The


In the controversial literary work, Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet
Beecher Stowe, there is a character called Evangeline St.
Clare. She is better known by the name tittle Eva.


e.0


W.-B. Olliff, Jr., Tree Surgeon, Inc.

773-4478

Ai ;. -


Free Estimates
Insured 30+ years experience of


A p

30 Day Warranty
Motor S~ Transmission
SB HERE! -
Sandra I I I Jmmy
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK SE HABLA ESPANOL
U.S. Hwv. 17 Bowling Green 375-4441
$ Huge Discounts for Cash Deals $
24 Hour Towing Service Lowest Possible Rates Fast and Reliable
781-3090 or 781-3091 cil:5tf

-I


Golf Cart Batteries



773-4400 47


HARDER CAR COMPANY
BuY HERE PAY HERE

Billy & Janice's Rentals
Houses & Apartments

Bowling Green Flea Market







Wauchula Mnday Saturday
9i o 7 pm
(across from 9 damto 7pm
First National Bank) Sunday
71 pm to 6 pm
Billy Hill
Owner


II


Joe LTavs
.... cc


O L-D~ui


IN C.,



r


Kenny Sanders
(863) 781-0153


R E A
rT1


L TO R 8
(863) 773-2128


REALTORS
SJOE L. DAVIS
JOE L. DAVIS, JR.
REALTOR JOHN H. O'NEAL
See more listings at
www.joeldavis.com
REAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS


Beautiful native Florida!
Secluded 5 ac of wooded land
has deeded access to Peace
River! Canoe, camp, fossil
hunt, relax! $90,000!
CB 3BR/1BA home in Bowling
Green w/new flooring, cabinets,
countertops, being sold as is.
$65,000!
PRICE REDUCED! High &
dry pastureland! 10 ac
improved, fenced land on pri-
vate rd is attractive homesite, or
perfect for cattle/horses!
$110,000!
PRICE REDUCED! 20 acs
zoned industrial on Hwy 17.
$399,000!


Wooded wonder! 5 ac w/beau-
tiful trees, paved road. $50,000!
Escape the gridlock! One-room
rustic cabin sits on 22 ac
fenced pastureland w/estab-
lished oaks, 4" well, 2 barns,
private rd! $175,000!
Great size for beginning citrus
owner! 10 ac Valencia grove
w/two 4" wells, pump, micro-jet
irrigation, drain tile $95,000!
PRICE REDUCED! 333 ac
ranch has pasture, irrigation
system, 12" well, 3BR/3BA two-
story home, 3,000 ft landing
strip. $1,165,500!


REALTOR AMSOCIATS Afl~1HOlURS
KENNY SANDERS.........781-0153 KAREN O'NEAJI,,....,,. 7S1I7633
KEVIN SANDERS........99-3093 MONICA HI 1. t inI OHM
DAVID ROYAL............781-3490
HIGHWAY 17 SOUTH, W.\, I.ll .. I1 I. 1, 1
V ll -il


A Daily Thought
THURSDAY
Generous-in-love God, give
grace! Huge-in-mercy God,
wipe out my bad record.
Scrub away my guilt; ...Soak
me in Your laundry and I'll
come out clean; scrub me
and I'll have snow-white life.
... God, make a fresh start in
me, shape a Genesis week
from the chaos of my life.
Psalm 51:1,2a,7,10 (ME)

FRIDAY
The Lord's name should be
praised now and forever....
No one is like the Lord our
God, who rules from heaven,
who bends down and looks
at the .skies and the earth.
The Lord lifts the poor from
the dirt and takes the hope-
less from the ashes.
Psalm 113:2,5-7 (NCV)

SATURDAY
What happiness for those
whose guilt has been forgiv-
en! What joys when sins are
covered over! What relief for
those who have confessed
their sins and God has
cleared their records ...
When I finally admitted all
my sins to You and stopped
trying to hide them, I said to
myself, "I will confess them
to the Lord." And You for-
gave me! All my guilt is
gone.
Psalm 32:1-2,5 (TLB)

SUNDAY
My soul will boast in the
Lord; let the afflicted hear
and rejoice. ... This poor
man called, and the Lord
heard him; He saved him out
of all his trouble. ... Taste
and see that the Lord is
good;, blessed is the man
who takes refuge in Him.
Psalm 34:2,6,8 (NIV)

MONDAY
Don't bother your head with
braggarts or wish you could
succeed like the wicked. In
no time, they'll shrivel like
grass clippings and wilt like
cut flowers in the sun. Get
insurance with God and do a
good deed; settle down and
stick to your last. Keep com-
pany with God, get in on the
best!
Psalm 37:1-4 (ME)

TUESDAY
Let everyone bless God and
sing His praises, for He
holds our lives in His hands.
And, He holds our feet to the
right path.
Psalm 66:8-9 (TLB)

WEDNESDAY
How can a young person
live a pure life? By obeying
Your Word. With all my heart,
I try to obey You. Don't let
me break Your commands. I
have taken Your words to
heart so I would not sin
against You.
Psalm 1'19:9-11 (NCV)
All verses are excerpted from
The Holy Bible: (KJV) King
James Version; (ME) The
Message; (NCV) New Cen-
tury Version; (NEB) New
English Bible; (NIV) New
International Version; (NLT)
New Living Translation (RSV)
Revised Standard Version;
(PME) Phillips Modern Eng-
lish; and (TLB) The Living
Bible.


A strong, positive mental atti-
tude will create more miracles
than any wonder drug.
--Patricia Neal

Human beings, by changing
the inner attitudes of their
minds, can change the outer
aspects of their lives.
-William James











OLR LNR5 {


Classifieds


Greetings from Fort Green!
What a day we hadat church
last Sunday. We celebrated Mrs.
Mildred Cooper's 96th birthday
in style! Friends and family
came from far and wide and
Mrs. Mildred had a wonderful
day!
BJ Haney presented Mrs.
Mildred with a beautiful white
rose corsage. It had tiny flowers
of purple and really compli-
mented her dress. The tables in
the fellowship hall were deco-
rated with purple cloths with
Green fern down the center and
beautiful camellias scattered the
length of the tables. My sister-
in-law Avis Sasser has beautiful
camellia bushes and she gladly
gave me a sufficient amount. It
really made the fellowship hall
look very festive. Kaylee Hog-
enauer kept the guest book and
gave everyone a program as
they entered the church. Nancy
McQuaig made the beautiful
and tasty birthday cake. It had
lavender and white icing. Mrs.
Mildred's favorite color is pur-
ple!.
Judy Bargeron and Sherry
Smith met me at 7 a.m. to begin
cooking dumplings and Edith
Bassett arrived at 8:30. Faye
Davis had planned on helping
but was sick. She called me at 6
a.m. and said she was fine the
day before but had the crud and
she sure sounded bad. Remem-
ber to pray for her.
Everyone was happy to see
our old neighbor, Evelyn Pat-
ten. She and Mrs. Mildred were
next-door neighbors at one
time, but now there are four
houses between where Mrs.
Mildred and Evelyn used to
live!
Most everyone knows Junior
Cooper and his sister, Beverly
brought him to the birthday cel-
ebration. He lives in Lakeland
now but his heart is still in
Bowling Green.


-- --- --


Sponsored By:


Fort Green News
By Rilla Cooper
773-6710


Karson Godwin spenT-Tiit
Friday night with her Granny
Betty Waters. She made all A's
and this was the treat she chose!
'She is one beautiful little girl.
Angie and Rocky Sonnier
had their beautiful baby Addi-
son, at church Sunday morning.
It was fitting that her first
church attendance was on her
Granny Connie Coker's birth-
day. Connie and Mrs. Mildred
share birthdays.
Holly Brown had a lovely
Spend the night birthday party
last Friday night. The girls at-
tending were Kaylee Hogen-
auer, Lana Durrance, Faith
Hays, Darby Farr, Rayann Ku-
lig, Abby Clark, Auda Weeks,
Brianna Waters and Kendall
Winter. They all had a good
time and Lana came to church
with Holly Sunday. She was a
great help in removing the fern
and flowers from the tables in
the fellowship hall.i
Don't forget our Valentine
Banquet Sunday morning, the
12th. It will be immediately
after the morning church servic-
es. Brother Randy Perry will be
preaching Sunday morning as
our spring revival begins on the
12th. It will be 6 p.m. Sunday
night and then 7p.m., Monday
through Wednesday. Come out
for a ble_'ine
Brody Waters will celebrate
Shis birthday on Valentine's Day.
I think it is neat that he was
born on that day, but Tammy
probably didn't think so at the
time. If memory serves. me
right, she and Dustyn were
planning a nice night out for
dinner!
Sharon Adams is still under
the weather. She was feeling
better but then got a stomach
virus..
Some of us Fort Green folks
went to the big city of Wau-
chula last Saturday night and
Jim and Virginia Carlton were


' present. It was great to see them
and Virginia looked really
good. She said she starts her
chemo this week. Here's hoping
it doesn't make her sick and
please pray for her. We also got'
to visit with Pete and Patsy
Hughes. It was great getting to
see people. somewhere other
than a funeral!
Sharon and Paul Adams said
they have to go to town every
Saturday night to Burger King
to get their dogs a hamburger.
They don't like any other fast
food hamburger but this and
expect one on Saturday! I
thought my Rascal was spoiled!
You can always learn from
the youth. Danielle Weeks had
the bottom of her shirt tucked
into the belt loop in the center
back of her jeans. I usually put
mine in a hair band because the
shirt bottoms are too big. The
way Danielle did is really better
so now I'm copying her.
Please remember to pray for
each other, our nation, the mili-
tary and the law enforcement.
The last two put their life on the
line for us.




ABOUT...
School News
The Herald-Advocate en-
courages submissions from
Hardee County schools.
Photos and write-ups
should be of recent events,
and must include first and
last names for both students
and teachers. Identify pho-
tos front to back, left to right.
Deadline for submissions
is 5 p.m. on Thursday.
Please include the name
and phone number of a con-
tact person. Qualifying
items will be published as
space allows.






February 9, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 9B


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Football Players Rewarded
'" r' warde*


By JOAN SEAMAN
Ot The H.-rarj-Adoc.te .
Secn H.idre \\dlld..t sen-
iors took the lion's share of
awards at the annual football
banquet on Feb. 3.
The Most Valuable Player
award went to halfback/defen-
sive back Andrew Hooks.
Center Wintz Terrell. who
recently signed with Georgia
Southern, took home the Mr.
Wildcat award.
The Offensive Player of the
Year award went to quarterback
Colby Baker, who has signed a


leleir of commitment to
Southwest Missouri Slate. The
most improved offensive player,
award went to lineman Dylan
Farr.
Defensive Player of the Year
honors went to linebacker Mik-
ey Retana. The most improved
defensive player of the year, is
lineman Uvaldo Sanchez.
Fi.illk. Deonte Evans took
home the Pl.. nt.iker Aw.trd
, Other ceniI.-ir suited up for
the 2t011 se.,on. Cere Mllaon
Delhomne. keshun Rilers.
JaJaun Hiok,. D.ilton Rabon.


Hunting/Fi shing Frc ast


2/9/2012
Sun Data
Rise: 7:09 AM
Set: 6:13 PM
Day Length
11 hrs.04 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 8:21 PM
Set: 8:00 AM
Overhead: 1:43 AM
Underfoot: 2:08 PM
Moon Phase
96%
Waning Gibbous
Major Times
1:43 AM'- 3:43 AM
2:08 PM 4:08 PM
Minor Times
8:00 AM 9:00 AM,
8:21 PMl- 9:21 PM
Solunar Rating
Better++
Time Zone
UTC: -5
2/10/2012
Sun Data
Rise: 7:08 AM
Set: 6:14 PM
Day Length
SII hrs: 06 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 9:24 PM
Set: 8:38 AM
Overhead: 2:34 AM
Underfoot. 2:59.PM
Moon Phase
90V
Waiiing Gibbous
Major Timnes
2:34 AM 434 AM
2.59 PM 4:59 PM
Minor Times
8.38.AAM 9'38 AM
9:'24PM -'10:24 PM
Solunar Rating
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -5


I2/11/201
Sun Data
Rise: 7:07 AM
Set: 6:15 PM
Day Length
11 hrs. 08 niins.
Moon Data
Rise: 10:28 PM
Set: 9:18 AM
Overhead: 3:25 AM
Underfoot: 3:5 PM
Moon Phase
82%
Waning Gibbous
Major Times
3:25 AM 5:25 AM
3:51 PM 5:51 PM
Minor Times
9:18 AM-10:18 AM
10:28 PM-11:28 PM
Solunar Rating
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -5
2/12/2012
Sun Data
Rise: 7:07 AM
.Set: 6:16 PM
Day Length
11 hrs.-09 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 11:33 PM
Set: 10:00 AM
Overhead: 4:17 AM
Underfoot 4:44 PM
Moon Phase
72';
Wanine Gibbous
Major Tinies
4:17, AM 6:17 AM.
4:44 PM 6:44 PM
Minor Times
10:001 ANIM- 11:100 AM
11:33PM-1233 AM
Solunar Rating
Average '
Time Zone
UTC: -5


L2/13/202
Sun Data
Rise: 7:06 AM
Set: 6:16 PM
Day Length
11 hrs. 10 mins.
-Moon Data
Rise: --:--
Set: 10:45 AM
Overhead: 5:12 AM
Underfoot: 5:40 PM
Moon Phase
61%
Waning Gibbous
Major Times
5:12 AM- 7:12 AM
5:40 PM 7:40 PM
Minor Times
:-- --:--
10:45 AM-i1:45 AM
Solunar Rating
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -5
2/14/2012
Sun Data
Rise: 7:05 AM
Set: 6:17 PM
Day Length
1I hr;. 12 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 12:37 AM
Set: 11:35 AM
O\ erhead: 6:08 AM
Underfoot: 6:37 PM
Moon Phase
501%
Last Quarter
Major Times
6:(0.\'NI 8:08 AM
6:37 PM 8:37 PMN
Minor Times
12:37 AM -1:37 AMI
1:35 AM-12:35PM
Solunar Rating
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -5


l2/135/201
Sun Data
Rise: 7:04 AM
Set: 6:!8 PM
Day Length
11 hrs. 14 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 1:41 AM
Set: 12:28 PM
Overhead: 7:06 AM
Underfoot: 7:35 PM
Moon Phase
39%
Waning Crescent
Major Times
7:06 AM 9:06 AM
7:35 PM 9:35 PM
Minor Times
1:41 AM 2:41 AM
12:28 PM 1:28 PM
Solunar Rating
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -5
2/16/2012
Sun Data
Rise: 7:03 AM
Set: 6:18 PM
Day Length
II hrs. 15 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 2:41 AM
Set: 1:26 PM
Overhead: 8:04 AM
Underfoot: 8:33 PM
Moon Phase
28'
Waning Crescent
Major Times
8:04 AM -10:04 AM
8:33 PM 10:33 PM
Minor Times
2:41 AM- 3:41 AM
1:26 PMI 2:26 PM
Solunar Raiing
Average
Time Zone
LTC: -5


Justin Knight, Ramiro Briones,
Murrell Winter, Dillon Skitka,
Dawson Crawford. Carter
Lambert and Rito Lopez.
Juniors playing ball were
Aaron Barker, Octavio Alvarez,
Ledarius Sampson, .Caleb
Brandeberry. Adam Khang,
Victor Lopez. Ramiro Ramirez,
Rufino Gabriel and Jesus
Zuniga.


Leaders from the sophomore
class included Jesus Flores,
Keyon Brown, Kris Johnson,
James Greene, Alonzo "Kane"
Casso. Waylon Pleger, Adson
Delhomme and Luke Palmer.
Freshman Keyonte Holley also
played varsity this year.
Head Coach Buddy Martin
received a special award as
District Coach of the Year.


0.5 S-
Al


Stop by and see why I have
won Ford's customer service
award several times.

,fffL ON Vi ,
--^it-* f-^
1031 U.S. Highway 17 N.
Wauchula, Florida 33873
(863) 781-1947 Ge
S www. LR COMGenae Davis
- WWW. ffLRNfiYX.OM Satei Manager


HEARTLAND PHARMACY

1123US 1 S oIuhl 9(83 6-90

DELIVERY SERVICE AVAILABLE


If you are visiting

keep them on file


I.


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"We put our


into our service"


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we will gladly transfer your prescriptions and

- then transfer them back when you go home.


i'. u{' i' i ........ .. 1...
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Katie Rogers, Sue Lobato, Pauline Ochoa, Julian Garcia, & Red Camp Pharmacist

Hours:

Monday-Friday 9:00 am to 6:00 pm Saturday 9:00 am to 1:00pm


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10B The Hlerald-Advocate. IFehruary 9. 2012


S S


COUNL I COURT
The following marriage
licenses were issued recently
in the office of the county
court:
Richard Wa\ne Gonzales Jr..
28. Wauchula and Chelsea
Lean in Cruz.9. 9. Wauchula.

The following small claims
cases were disposed of recent-
ly by the county judge:
Citibank NA vs. Richard E.
Wheeler, judgment.
First National Bank of Wau-
chula vs. Daniel G. Lazo, dis-
missed.
Mid-Florida Federal Credit
Union vs. Willie S. Dufresne,
judgment.
Mid-Florida Federal Credit
Union vs. Erick Virgile and
Carisa Barwick, judgment.
Capital One Bank vs. Erica
D. Eisenhower, dismissed.
Capital One Bank vs. Ann G.
Stephens, agreed final judg-
ment.
Capital One Bank vs. Lynn
Beard, dismissed.
Capital One Bank vs.
Desiderio G. Gonzalez, dis-
missed.

The following small claims
cases were dismissed for lack
of prosecution:


.Asset Acceptance L.LC vs.
Bernard L. Quackenc-MuIsh.
Discover Bank s'. Jeffrey L.
Steele.
capital l One Bank vs. Linda
S. Petty.
l.eon Fulse vs. Cynthia
Spain.
Fddie and Pain Gilliard vs.
Rob Garrison.
lTmasita Cortez vs. Bessie
Jones.
Discover Bank vs. Zula M.
Tubbs.

The following misde-
meanor cases were disposed
of recently in the office of the
circuit court:
Juan Daniel Gonzalez, bat-
tery and domestic battery, pro-
bation one year. S325 fine and
court costs, 550 cost of prosecu-
tion (COP), S50 investigative
costs.
Juan Guerrero, domestic bat-
tery, probation one year, $677
fine and court costs, S50 public
defender fee, $50 COP, $50
investigative costs.
Thayson Lacey Quinn, do-
mestic battery, one month 26
days in jail with credit for time
served (CTS), $677 fine and
court costs, $50 COP, $50
investigative costs.


PUBLIC NOTICE

The PLANNING AND ZONING BOARD
meeting as the local planning agency will hold a

PUBLIC HEARING on
THURSDAY, MARCH 01, 2012
6:00 P.M.
or as soon thereafter
in the County Commissioners' Board Room 102
412 West Orange St., 1st floor Courthouse Annex
Wauchula, FL
to hear the proposals, receive public input, and offer a recommen-
dation to the Board of County Commissioners for

Agenda No. 12-07
Ronnie L.IPeggy Starnes by and through the Authorized
Representative requests a Variance to the required minimum
side yard property line setbacks for a replacement dwelling in A-1-
zoned districts. Agriculture Future Land Use District
On or about Eagle Dr., E of Heard Bridge Rd.
.50+-acres 273325000006830 0000
E 50 ft of NWl/4 of SEll4 of NEll4, S27, T33S, R25E,
Hardee County, FL

Agenda No. 12-08
Hardee County Board of County;Comiissioners byarid
through the Authorized Representative requests an amendment to
Article 02, Article03 and Article 07 of the Hardee County Unified
Land Development Code, as amended
creating Site Development Plan Minor,
and Site Development Plan Major review processes, under
ORDINANCE NO. 2012-05

Agenda No. 12-09
Hardee County Board of County Commissioners byand
through the Authorized Representative requests an amendment to
the Hardee County Unified Land Development Code, as amended
updating Article 02, to-wit:
Table 2.29.02(A) LDC Development Districts;
Table 2.29.02(8) CategorylUse;
and Table 2.29.02(C) Development Standards;
updating the Future Land Use Map (FLUM) Designations of
Article 02, to-wit:.
Section 2.29.02.01-R-1-Single-Family Residential District;
Section 2.29.02.02-R-2-Two-Family Residential District;
Section 2.29.02.03-R-3-MuItiple-Family Residential District;
Section 2.29.02.04-F-R-Farm-Residential District;
Section 2.29.02.05-C-1--Neighborhood Commercial District;
Section 2.29.02.07-1-1-Light Industrial District;
Section 2.29.02.08-1-2-Heavy Industrial District;
Section 2.29.02.09-A-1-Agriculture District;
Section 2.29.02.13-C/BC--Commercialllndustriai Business Center
to correspond with the Future Land Use categories added to the
Hardee County Comprehensive Plan in October, 2010 under
ORDINANCE NO. 2012-06

Mike Thompson, Chairman

PUBLIC NOTICE

The BOARD OF.COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
will hold a

PUBLIC HEARING on
THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2012,
6:05 P.M.

or as soon thereafter in the BoCC Board Room 102
412 West Orange St., 1st floor Courthouse Annex
Wauchula, FL
to hear Agenda No. 12-07
and Agenda No. 12-08-ORDINANCE NO. 2012-05
and Agenda No. 12-09-ORDINANCE NO. 2012-06
as described above, to receive a recommendation
from the Planning/Zoning Board, and to receive public input

Minor Bryant, Chairman

This is a Disabled-Accessible facility. Any disabled person needing
to make special arrangements should contact the Planning and
Development Department at least two (2) working days prior to the
P/Z Public Hearing. This is a Disabled-Accessible facility. Any
disabled person needing to make special arrangements should
contact the County Manager's Office at least two (2) working days
prior to the BoCC Public Hearing

This Public Notice is published in accordance with the Hardee
County Unified Land Development Code. Copies of the documents
relating to the proposals are available for public inspection during
weekdays between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. at the
Planning.and Development Department, 110 S. 9'h Ave., Wauchula,
Florida. If you wish to discuss the proposals, please call 863 767
1964 to schedule an appointment with Hardee County Planning and
Development director.

All interested persons shall have the right to be heard. In rendering
any decision the Board of County Commissioners shall rely solely
on testimony that is relevant and material.

Although minutes of the Public Hearings will be recorded, anyone
wishing to appeal any decision made at the public hearings will need
to ensure a verbatim record of the proceedings is made by a court
reporter. 02:09c


CIRCUIT COURT
The following civil actions
were filed recently in the
office of the circuit court:
Southwest Georgia Farm
Credit v,,. Ma1ggie Sirmans
NMessana as representati e. et al.
petition to record default judt -
nment.
Jolene Fundine LLC vs.
Willis' Lubin. iMaril n Lubin et
al. petition to clarify title.
Citibank v.s. Kath\ J. Lord.
damages contracts and in-
debtedness.
Wells Fargo Bank as trustee
vs. Rodolfo Lopez. petition for
mortgage foreclosure.

The following decisions on
civil cases pending in the cir-
cuit court were handed down
recently by the circuit court
judge:
Juan Rodriguez and Lee C.
Rodriguez Eljaan. order.
Erica Muse and Joshua B.
Muse. divorce.
Sonja L. Smith vs. Philip A.
Smith Jr. and the state
Department of Revenue. order
modifying child support.
Carol A. Kelly as personal
representative vs. Donald
Geldart and Adventist Health
Systems Sunbelt Inc., voluntary
dismissal.
Veronica R. Villa and DOR
vs. Eustaquio M. Castillo, vol-
untary dismissal,
HSBC Bank USA vs. Doris
Griffin, judgment.
US Bank National Associa-
tion vs. Joe Hernandez, Ash-
leigh Renee Semple et al, vol-
untary dismissal.
PNC Bank National Associa-
tion vs. Osles Lazarre et al, vol-
untary dismissal.
U.S. Bank National Associa-
tion vs. Acelia D. Suarez et al,



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY,.
FLORIDA, CIVIL DIVISION

CASE NO. 252011CA000457

SUNCOAST SCHOOLS FEDERAL
CREDIT UNION, Whose address
is: P.O. Box 11904, Tampa, FL
33680

Plaintiff,

vs.

ROBERT GALVAN; UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF ROBERT GALVAN;
ANGEL DAWN GALVAN;
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ANGEL
DAWN GALVAN; HARDEE COUN-
TY OFFICE OF COMMUNITY
DEVELOPMENT, HOUSING
REHABILITATION PROGRAM,
ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PAR-
TIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH,
UNDER, AND AGAINST THE
HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL
DEFENDANTS WHO ARE NOT
KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN
PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTER-
EST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR
OTHER CLAIMANTS; TENANT
#1; TENANT #2,

Defendants.

NOTICE OF SALE

Notice is hereby given, pur-
suant to Final Judgment of
Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered
in this cause, in the Circuit Court
of HARDEE County, Florida, I will
sell the property situated in
HARDEE County, Florida
described as:

LOT 8, BLOCK 4, OF AVAL-
ON PARK ADDITION TO
CITY OF WAUCHULA,
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORI-
DA, AS PER PLAT
RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 1, PAGE 2-75, OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS
OF HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA.

and commonly known as: 902
Tennessee Street, Wauchula,
Florida 33873, at public sale, to
the highest and best bidder, for
cash, on the Second Floor in the
hallway outside of Room 202 of
the Hardee County Courthouse,
417 W. Main St., Wauchula,
Florida 33873, on February 29,
2012, at 11:00 A.M.

ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN
INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS
FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.

If you are a person with a disabil-
ity who needs any accommoda-
tion to participate in this proceed-
ing, you are entitled, at no cost to


you, to the provision of certain
assistance. Please contact the
Office of the Court Administrator,
at (863) 534-4686 at least 7 days
before your scheduled court
appearance, or immediately upon
receiving this notification if the
time before the scheduled
appearance is less than 7 days; if
you are hearing or voice
impaired, call 711.

Dated this 6 day of Feb., 2012.

B. HUGH BRADLEY
Clerk of the Circuit Court

By: Connie Coker
Deputy Clerk

2:9,16c


judgment.
L.S. Bank National A.ssocia-
tion \s. Melinda L. Wells.
Daniel A. Wells. et al. judg-
mient.
Jose Monto\a and Stephanie
Montio\ a. order.
Stace\ Richardson and
Kevin Richardson. order.
Or\el Llo\d \s. Rohbert
Hines et al. dismissal of
inmate's petition for revicv nof
situation.
Kathleen Dirnock and James,
Dimock. di\lorce.
Ismnael Madrigal and linda
Liugo. order.
Bridget NMc\a\ and Joc\
McVay. petition to modill' child
support denied.
Laura Alderman and DOR
vs. Andrew Alderman. modifi-
cation of child support.
W\auchula State Bank \s.
George M. Pontes. voluntary
dismissal.

There was no felons crimi-
nal court last week.

The following real estate
transactions, of $10,000 or
more were filed recently in
the office of the clerk of court:
Robert L. Ice Sr. to First
National Bank of Wauchula,
536,255.18.
Rolando Lantigua to Sal-
vador Rodriguiez, 57,0.00.
Fred Matthew and Kelly VW.
Move to Raymond and Eugenia
Larsen, $44.000.
Bradley D. and Debora IL.
Reiter to Southern Sisters
Family Liniited Partnership.
$897,000.
District Advisory Board of
the Southern District of Church
of the Nazarene Inc. to
Ministerio Radial Con Cristo
La Vida Es. Major' Inc.,
$200,000.
Paul E. Davis Jr. to Ricarada
Bautista Hernandez, $59,900.
Florence Gobble to Ella Mae


RAINBOW TITLE & LIEN, INC.
3389 Sheridan Street, PMB 221
Hollywood. FL 33201
(954) 920-6020
NOTICE OF SALE
Rainbow Title & Lien, Inc. will sell
at Public Sale at Auction the fol-
lowing vehicles to satisfy lien pur-
suant to Chapter 713.585 of the
Florida Statutes on .March 08,
2012 at 10 A.M.
*AUCTION WILL OCCUR
WHERE EACH VEHICLE/
VESSEL IS LOCATED*
2002 DODGE RAM -4500, VIN#
1D7HU18N12S665%1
Located at: THE PRO'S AUTO-
MOTIVE REPAIR SHOP, 203 E.
TOWNSEND ST, WAUCHULA, FL
33873
Owner: JOHN FRY COLE JR (OR)
2526 HEARD BRIDGE RD,
WAUCHULA, FL 33873
Customer: SAME AS REGIS-
TERED OWNER
2nd Customer: REGINA WHIT-
FORD COLE, 812 106TH AVE,
NAPLES. FL 34108
Lienholder: DIAMLERCHRYSLER
LLC. PO BOX 958412, LAKE
MARY, FL 32795
Lien Amount: $5,211.99
a) Notice to the owner or lienor
that he has a right to a hearing
prior to the scheduled date of sale
by filing with the Clerk of Court.
b) Owner has the right to recover
possession of vehicle by posting
bond in accordance with Florida
Statutes Section 559.917
c) Proceeds from the sale of the
vehicle after payment lien claimed
by lienor will-be deposited with the
Clerk of the Court.
Any persons) claiming an inter-
est(s) in the above vehicles con-
tact: Rainbow Title & Lien. Inc.,
(954) 920-6020.
*ALL AUCTIONS ARE HELD
WITH RESERVE*
Some of the vehicles may have
been released prior to auction
LIC # AB-0001256
2:9p


W\ illi;l s ;Ind Pail .I j)los.Ird.
S65.)(IiJ.
Ranliro RLiCIJ.S ;Iandl Jolr'e \,
Garcia to .iaiin M. (;oidiie/.
S(.2 .( R V i.
lorre\ Onks l(\' ,& Gallf


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION

File No. 253011CP000073

IN RE: ESTATE OF

FAYE D. SHACKELFORD,

Deceased.


AMENDED NOTICE
TO CREDITORS

The administration of the
estate of FAYE D. SHACKEL-
FORD, deceased, whose date of
death was June 28, 2011, is pend-
ing in the Circuit Court. for
HARDEE County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is
P.O. Drawer 1749, Wauchula,
Florida 33873. The names and
address of the personal represen-
tative and the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth
below.

All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims
or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this
notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.

All other creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons having
claims or demands against the
decedent's estate must file their
claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.

SALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.

NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.

The date of the first publication
of this notice is February 9, 2012.

Personal Representative:
MARCUS D. SHACKELFORD
P.O. Box 935
Wauchula. FL 33873

Attorney for Personal
Representatives:
Clifford M. Ables, III, P.A.
202 West Main Street, Suite 103
Wauchula, FL 33873
Telephone: (863) 773-0500
Facsimile: (863) 773-0505
CLIFFORD M. ABLES, III
Florida Bar No.: 178379


2:9,16c


Resort LLC to Michael W. and
Sherri L. Mailhot arnd Amy
Hallaras, $34,000.
Torrey Oaks RV & Golf
Resort L.C to Ronald and
Jeanette Moore. S34.000.


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION

File No. 252011CP000094


IN RE: ESTATE OF

JUANITA BELLE STEWART
GRAHAM,


Deceased.


AMENDED NOTICE TO
CREDITORS

The administration of the
estate of Juanita Belle Stewart
Graham, deceased, whose date
of death was June 18, 2011, is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Hardee County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is
417 West Main Street, Wauchula,
FL 33873. The names and
addresses of the personal repre-
sentative and the personal repre-
sentative's attorney are set forth
below.

Alf creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims
or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this
notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.

All other creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons 'having
claims or demands against the
decedent's estate must file their
claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.

ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.

NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE-
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.

The date of the first publication
.of this notice is February 2, 2012.

Personal Representative:
Ray Myron Graham
210 South Second Avenue
Wauchula, FL 33873

Attorney for Personal
Representatives:
Clifford M. Ables, III, P.A.
202 West Main Street, Suite 103
Wauchula, FL 33873
Telephone: (863) 773-0500
Facsimile: (863) 773-0505
CLIFFORD M. ABLES, III
Florida Bar No.: 178379


2:2,9c


YOUR BUSINESS COULD


APPEAR HERE TOO!!

Contact
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels

At The Herald Advocate

115 S. 7th Ave. Wauchula


773-3255


CITY OF WAUCHULA

COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY

NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC

The Board of Directors of the City of Wauchula Community Redevelopment
Agency (the Board) will hold the regular scheduled meeting Monday, February 13,
2012 immediately following the City Commission meeting which will convene at 6:00
pm or as soon thereafter as it reasonably can be held. Items on the agenda are as
follows: Commercial Grant, Town Center Parking Lot Design, American Legion & City
of Wauchula Property Agreement, Hwy 17 & Main Parking Lot Design and any other
business that may come before the Board.

The meetings will be held at the Commission Chambers located at 225 East Main
Street, Wauchula, FL 33873.

Pursuant to Section 286.0107, Florida Statutes, as amended, the Board hereby advises
that if any interested person decides to appeal any decision made by the Board with re-
spect to any matter considered at the proceedings, he will need a record of the proceeding
and that, for such purposes, he may need to insure that a verbatim record of the proceed-
ing is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is
to be based.

The Board does not discriminate upon the basis of any individual's disability status.
This non-discriminatory policy involves every aspect of the Board's functions, including
ones access to, participation, employment or treatment in its programs or activities. Any-
one. requiring reasonable accommodation as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities
Act or Section 286.26, Florida Statutes, should contact the City Clerk at (863) 773-3131.

CITY OF WAUCHULA
S/Keith Nadaskay
Chairman
Community Redevelopment Agency
ATTEST
S/Holly Collins
City Clerk
2:9c





































































Soccer Boys Stopped


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Playing in their first post-sea-
son game in eight years, the
Hardee Wildcats came up short.
As District 10 champions, the
boys hosted District 9 runner-
up Clearwater Central Catholic
last Tuesday in the regional
quarterfinals.
"It was a great game." en-
thused Athletic Director Andy
Judah. Although:the 'Cats lost
3-0. they held it to a 1-0 game
until the final 10 minutes.
"I was very proud of the way
our boys played hard. never
giving up. Goalkeeper Jesus
Zuniga had many quality
saves," commented coach Den-
nis Aubry, noting the 18 shots
on goal which the Marauders
had.
The 'Cats had 14 shots on
goal. "We had some nice shots.
but they didn't go in," said
Aubry.
"Clearwater started out fast
and it was clear they had strong
and abled attackers. It took our
defense some time to adjust to
their speed up front, but they
were able to hold them off until.
Clearwater scored with six min-
utes to the half." related Aubry.
Late in the fourth quarter.


With about 10 minutes remain-
ing, the Marauders scored on a
corner shot which bounced
around several times up front
until it was put in. The only
other tally was a Clearwater
penalty kick with five minutes
remaining. The Marauders won
3-0.
Senior Leonardo DeLoera
was selected by the Florida
Athletic Coaches Association
District 17 coaches to be an All-
Star. He played mid- fielder or
win,, for the Wildcats and will
be in a similar position in the
All-Star game.
"Although the boys lost. they
were quick to talk about prac-
ticing and preparing harder for
next year." concluded Aubry.
He and assistant coach Daniel
Estrada will lose seniors
Deloera. Jose Lopez. Cody
Torres and Braulio Duran to
graduation. but return a host of
players..
Expected back are juniors
Martin Lucatero. Mark Gomez.
Miguel Garcia. Oscar Palacios.
Daniel Lopez. Armando Al-
varez. Alexis Palacios. Enrique
Zamora. Brandon Vargas and
Octavio Alvarez plus sophs
Ernesto Ranmos, Gustavo


Toledo, 'Ruben Velasquez,
Ezekiel Perez and Daniel-
Villagran and frosh Manual
Palacios, Robert Zapote and
Gilberto Cardoza.
Aubry has a lot of off-season
plans for these Wildcats. He
wants to develop a JV, program
and participate in the Warner
Southern College 7x7 tourney
and team camp. He hopes his


team will help in the youth
summer soccer league and pre-
seasoning conditioning, and
development of junior high-age
clinics and practice clubs.
Aubry also wants to develop
a soccer Booster Club of inter-'
ested supporters and families.
Anyone interested can contact
Aubry at the high school, 773-
3181 or www.hardee.k 2.fl.us.


7 CURRENTLY ENROLLING INFANTS

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February 9, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 11B


Ss -'WI A MMI

S Jim Smith 1

S 863-375-4201
Cell 863-512-2634

425 Grove St. Bowling Green, FL 33834 2:2,9p
_____


NOTICE OF MEETING
The Hardee County Economic Development Authority (In-
dependent Board) will meet on Tuesday, February 21,
2012, at 8:30 a.m. in the County Commission Chambers,
412 West Orange Street, Room 102, Wauchula, Florida.
For more information call the County Manager's office at
863/773-9430.
This is a Disabled-Accessible facility. Any disabled person
needing to make special arrangements should contact the
County Commissioner's office at least forty-eight (48) hours
prior to the put..lic meeting.
This notice is published in compliance with Florida Statutes
286.0105.
Interested parties may appear at the public meeting and
be heard.' If a person decides to appeal any decision made
by the members, with respect to any matter considered at
such meeting or h,..irn'i. he will need a record of the pro-
ceedings, and that, for such purpose, he may need to en
sure that a verbatim record of the ,....,... liri, is made,
which record includes ,i, u .ii.- 'iri-n, and evidence upon
which the appeal is to be based,

L,exton H. AiulrIntr Jr, County Manager 2.l;


Je





12B The Herald-Advocate, February 9, 2012


JUNIOR HIGH BOYS


FOR THE WEEK ENDED FEBRUARY 3, 2012
At the Florida Livestock Auctions, receipt totaled 6,669 com-
pared to 8,133 last week, and 7,793 last year. According to the
Florida Federal-State Livestock Market lIews Service: Compared
to one week ago, slaughter cows and bulls 2.00 to 4.00 higher,
feeder steers 4.00 to 6.00 higher, heifers 3.00 to 5.00 higher,
replacement cows mostly steady:


PHOTO BY MARIA TRUJILLO
The Hardee Junior High Wildcats suited up for the final game on Jan. 30. Getting ready to play were (front row, left
to right) Livenson Metayer, Isaac Flores, Willie Baker, Alex Hinojosa, Kyle Choate, Keith Choate and Jammal Carlton;
(back row) Allen Brown, Aaron Harrison, Alejandro Rodriguez, Trey Faulk, Djes Youtes, Christopher Hull, Marco
DeLeon and Jarrett Carlton; not pictured Ryan Moore.


Junior Highs Finish Season


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
It all ended last week.
The 2011-12 Hardee Junior
High School girls and boys bas-
ketball have played their final
home and road games in the last
two weeks.
They were at home on Jan. 26
to host Lake Placid in the final
home game.
The girls lost 15-25 with
Florence Lee leading Hardee
with a half dozen points.


Anavell Retana added five,
Donesha Wilson two and Desira
Martinez and Rayann Kulig
each a free throw.
The junior 'Cats played hard,
but lost 28-38.
Alex Hinojosa tied for game
honors with 17 points vs. the 17
of Walker from Lake Placid.
Marco DeLeon chipped in with
1,5 points, Chris Hull had four
and Jarrett Carlton had two
points.
The junior highs closed out


Black Angus Bull in

Lemon Grove area

off Ed Wells Road


Call

863-381-9113
2:9p


the season last Monday at Se-
bring.
The junior Lady Wildcats lost
a close one 26-30. They started
strong with 13 first-quarter
points while holding their oppo-
nents to just 7. Hardee cooled
off and 'Sebring got stronger,
outscoring Hadee 16-9 in the
second half for the win.
Martinez led Hardee with 15
points, including 7-of-ll at the
charity stripe. Retana had eight,
Lee was held to just two points
and Wilson had two points. The
highest scorer for Lake Placid
had a dozen points.
'The Hardee boys were over-
whelmed by Sebring, losing 20-
61. D,. Randolph led Sebring
with 10 points.
For the junior 'Cats, it was
Aaron Harrison and' Keith
Choate each with five points,
Isaac Flores three,,and Djes
Youtes, Jarrett Carlton and Alex
Rodriguez each two, and De-
Leon limited to one point.
For the post-season banquet,
coaches Gloria Solis and
Dienatann "D.D." Hall named
girls for awards. Captains
Florence Lee and Martha
Valadez got special awards. Lee
also was named Offensive


Player of the Year. with
Martinez as Defensive Player of
the game. Kulig was named
Rookie of the Year.
Going on to the high school
are eighth graders Lee, Mar-
tinez, Valadez, Retana, Wilson
and Petra Calderon,. while
Kulig, Ellen Bivens, Annette
Mondragon, Fernanda Ramos
and Priscilla Villaasana have
another season of junior high
ball.
Similarly, DeLeon, Hinojosa,
Hull, Ryan Moore, Trey Faulk
and Allen Brown advance to the
high school level, while Flores,
Youtes, Harrison, Rodriguez,
Jarrett Carlton and twin Jammal
Carlton, twins Kyle and Keith
Choate, Willie Baker and Liv-
enson Metayer remain at the
junior high level.
Cheerleaders going up are
Ally Dotson, Emily Bennett,
Katey Crawford, Megan Mc-
Cullough, Kristian' Judah,
Jakayla Mosley, Joselyn
Thompson, Savannah Aubry,
Shelby Deese, Brooke Fones
and Rosie Rivers, with Morgan
Crews, Kendall Winter, Brennia
Parker, Andrea'Crawford, Faith
Hays and Jacey Solis to anchor
the junior.high next season.


Feeder Steers:




Feeder Heifers:




Slaughter Cows:
64.00-73.00
Slaughter Bulls:'
85.00-97.00


Best wishes to everyone cele-
brating a birthday or anniver-
sary in February.
KOFFEE KLATCH
Ron and Henri Swearingin
and Richard and Jett Brayton
are our hosts for the month of
February. On Feb. 1, Steve
Gray led the prayer, Paul
Conley led' the U.S. Pledge and
I led the Canadian Pledge.
The 50/50, or share-the-
wealth winners, were Sandy
and Stoney Stoneberg, 2525
Morning Glory, Alta and Jerry
Lauer, Sylvia and Frank
Stephen and Paul and Lois
Conley.
DANCES
A good crowd danced the
night away on Jan. 28 to Buddy
Canova. Door prizes were won
by Betty Ackermann, Sherry
Vaughan, Cindy Parker, H.E.
Blount, Sharon Wilson and
Frank Sinasac.
Our next dance will be our
Valentine's Dance on Saturday
with The Nite Lites.
BINGO
Eliane Lamarche won the
large jackpot on Jan. 27 and


Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2
200-300 lbs 205.00-280.00
300-400 lbs 174.00-245.00
400-500 lbs 152.00-210.00
500-600 lbs 140.00-182.00

Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2
200-300 lbs 162.50-230.00
300-400 lbs. 147.50-190.00
400-500 lbs 135.00-165.00
500-600 lbs 125.00-160.00

Lean: 750-1200 lbs 85-90 percent
Yield Grade No. 1-2 1000-2100 Ibs


Barb Ellis won the small jack-
pot. On Jan. 30, David Smith
won the large jackpot and Kay
Dale won the small one.
INTERNATIONAL
THEME PARTY
This is our annual dinner and
dance on Feb. 25 starting with a
social hour at 4. Buddy Canova
will provide the music for the
dance.. We hope the weather is
good as the party will start out-
side.
SCORES
Bowling Jan. 25: first, Mercy
& Grace; second, Gettin Better;
and third, Snowbiids.
Men's Golf Jan. 26: winners
were Ron Lapier, Bill R.
Johnson, Bob Kramer and Fred
Leverone.
Ladies Golf Jan. 26: first, Jan
Brinker; second, Barb Kramer;
and third, Ruth Murphy.
Mixed Golf Jan. 30: Orange
Ball the winners were Jan
Brinker, Jim Paddock, Bob
Kramer and Gaylord Williams.
Shuffling Jan. 31: three-game
winners were Bill Arola, Mary
Faust and Gary Householder.-


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Crystal Lake RV News
By Joyce Taylor


0Io^







935 os-08-*******s**3 3-DIGIT 326
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 15P 3S
LIBRARy OF FLORIDA HISTORY
404 LIBRARy WEST
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-0001


Herald-Advocate
(USPS 578-78O)

ursday, February 9, 2012


'Cats Challenge Lakeland,


Port Charlotte


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
A pair of tough games against
a pair of Class 7A opponents
were set to end the season.
Hardee head basketball coach
Vance Dickey set games against
Lakeland and Port Charlotte in
final week of the season to
ready for district playoffs.
week.
he 'Cats won the coin toss
a Teneroc, which was sched-
d to play top seed Lake
.les on Monday night. The
third-seed Wildcats were sched-
uled to play against second-
seed Auburndale on Tuesday
night. Hardee lost both games
to Auburndale during the sea-
son, by seven points at home
and only two points at Auburn-
dale. The district games are at
Lake Wales this year. Interest-
ingly, Lake Wales, ranked 46th
in the nation on the ESPN poll,
barely got by Teneroc in recent
action.
LAKELAND 63,
HARDEE 59
In a' varsity-only game
against 7A Lakeland and its
ninth year coach Deron Collins,
Hardee opened well, Hardee
scored the first five points, 'a
Keshun Rivers deuce and dish
to Bobby Brown for a trey.
It was the 6:30 mark before
the Dreadnaughts got on the
board on a solo free throw by
senior Eric Moody. Classmate
Raheem Dumas sank a shot and
Logan Senachek nailed a two.
By the 5:30 mark, Lakeland
was up 6-5.
Lakeland stayed just in front
until the two-minute mark,
when Alonzo "Kane" Casso
notched a three-pointer to tie
the game 16-all. By the end of
the first quarter, Lakeland was
up 18-17.
Hardee forged in front to start
the second stanza. River took
the inbound shot and drove fdo
the net, hitting the deuce and
following free throw to put
Hardee'in front 20-18. Sena-
check knotted it with a drive up
the middle. And so it went, with
five more ties until the halftime
33-33 score.
Halftime meant the honoring
of four _Wildcat seniors,
D'Aundre "Keshun" Rivers,
followed by Jajuan Hooks,
Andrew Hooks and Bobby
Brown. Each was escorted by
parents.or relatives as announc-
er Jim Davis read their brief
bios. All four want to continue
playing ball in college while
,obtaining a variety of degrees.
The Hooks brothers and Brown
are members of the Honor
Society as well as playing
sports. Rivers had been part of
the YMCA Achievers program.
After those ceremonies and a
brief rest, the Wildcats picked
up the game Hardee had first
possession and went in front
35-33 only to have Lakeland tie
the game again. It went point
for point until late in the third
quarter when the Dreadnaughts
build a 50-46 advantage.
Hardee cut it to 50-49 within
the first two minutes of the
fourth quarter, only to have
Lakeland come back to lead 54-
49 midway through the period.
The Dreadnaught lead upped to
eight points, but the 'Cats
weren't through. Rivers sank a
three-spot and .shortly was
fouled and hit both foul shots to
make it 60-57.
Hardee narrowed the gap to
60-59 at the 45-second. Moody
got a finger-roll rebound which
wouldn't stay in the net but was
fouled and hit both ends of a
one-and-one. Hardee was
forced to foul. with Julan
Stevenson getting one-of-two at
the 7.2-second mark. A final
Hardee attempt at a three-point-
er and foul missed the chance
and Lakeland won 63-59.
Moody led all scorers with 25
points and Dumas added 18 for


Lakeland.
For Hardee. Rivers had 24.
Dru Hooks 10, Keyon Brown
nine, J.J. Hooks eight. Bobby
Brown and Casso each three
and Moralez two points. Keyon
Brown snatched 10 rebounds.
Rivers and the Hooks brothers
each had four rebounds and
added a pair of steals and pair of
assists. Moralez had three
rebounds and Steve Metayer
had two.
"We were pretty matched
teams talent-wise. Keshun has
been consistent with 24-25
points in the last six games.
Lucious Everett, (just available
to the team) had a good struggle
in his first game back. We did-
n't execute defensively against
Moody and Dumas and that was
the difference," commented
Dickey.
PORT CHARLOTTE 52,
HARDEE 48
It was another 7A matchup
for the Wildcats on Thursday
night. It was a feeling out time
for the first two minutes before
big Nelson Blanc hit the first
points for Port Charlotte at the
5:15 mark. Dru Hooks immedi-
ately answered to tie the game:
In a low-scoring first quarter,
Dru Hooks had Hardee's only
other points, two free throws,
while Charlotte ran the score up
to 10-4.
That onslaught continued in
the second period, getting to 20-
10, then to 23-13 by halftime.
The Pirates continued their
assault in the third period,
building an 21-point lead as the
'Cats could not get a foul call
and Port Charlotte continued to
get them. At the end of the
third, the Pirates led 43-27.
The Wildcats came to life in
the fourth quarter. Port Char-
lotte had possession, but was
forced into a turnover. Rivers
fed Everett for.a deuce. J.J.
Hooks hit a three. After a Port
Charlotte -time out,' Hardee
resumed its rally. Dru Hooks hit
a pair of free throws and then
forced the Pirates into another
turnover. Everett rebounded a
Dru Hooks show. When Rivers
nailed a three-spot from the cor-
ner, cutting the lead to 43-39,
Port Charlotte called another
time-out.
For nearly two minutes it
went back and forth. Rivers
took over, hitting free throws
and three-spots. By the 1:20
mark, it was 48-46. Port Char-
lotte hit a free throw, a minute
later, it was another, making the
score 50-48. A final pair of Nick
Dionisio foul shots aat.the 4.2-
second mark ended the game
52-48.
Blanc led all scorers with 22
points for the Pirates. David
Bernard had 11 and Dionisio
10.
For Hardee. Rivers finished
with 17 points, including 6-of-8
from the charity stripe. Dru
Hooks had 12,J.J. Hooks
seven. Casso and Everett each
four, and Moralez and Keyon
Brown each two points.
Reserves played a'big part in
Hardee's comeback. Lu-e
Palmer grabbed four rebounds
and took a charge. Everett h ad



ABOUT ...
School News
The ,Herald-Advocate en-
courages submissions from
Hardee County schools.
.Photos and write-ups
should be of recent events,
ahd must include first and
last names for both students
and teachers. Identify pho-
tos front to back, left to right.
Deadline for submissions
is 5 p.m. on Thursday.
Please include the name
and phone number of a con-
tact person. Qualifying
items will be published as
space allows.


four rebounds and Keyon
Brown five. Casso added three.
The JV Wildcats had their
final outing for the 2011-2012
season, playing Port Charlotte
on Thursday night. The junior
'Cats were overwhelmed by the
taller. more experienced Pirates
and lost 57-19. Junior Daniel
Boehm was unavailable due to
an emergency trip to Cincinnati.
Dustin Smith led Hardee with
seven points, Jordan Jones had
six, Blaiaine Molitor four and
Ryan Ramirez, Tyler Smith.
Luke Winter and Mark Elsbury
each two points. Zach Neu-
hofer, Eric Klein. Nick Johnson
and Robert Torres helped defen-
s'ively.


2Hpa
tP. ,


Four senior Wildcats were honored at halftime in last Tuesday's game, (from left) Keshun
Rivers, Jajuan "J.J. Hooks, Andrew "Dru" Hooks and Bobby Brown.


;- -, .


-s-



RDEE HAPHA ,, DEE



















If fQ
-A

L ^ ^ .: t 1 .
! ..f. Y ..



The varsity 'Cats finished the season with a pair of games against Class 7A teams in preparation for district play this
week. Playing for the Wildcats are (left to right, first row) Keshun Rivers, Bobby Brown, Andrew "Dru" Hooks, Steve
Metayer and Alonzo "Kane" Casso; (back) Lucious Everett, Keyon Brown, Jajuan "J.J." Hooks, Luke Palmer and Chris-
tian Moralez.


PHOTOS BY MARIA TILJILLO
The junior varsity Wildcats played their final game of the 2012 season last Thursday night. Suited up were (front row,
from left) Nick Johnson, Jordan Jones, Tyler Smith, Dustin Smith and Zach NIeuhofer; (back row) Coach Shawn Rivers,
Ryan Ramirez, Blaiaine Molitor, Luke Winter, Robert Torres, Mark Elsbury and Eric Klein; missing is Daniel Boehm.


The first frozen TV dinner was introduced in 1954. It featured turkey, cornbread dressing and
gravy. Ten million turkey dinners were sold that first year.

George Washington was the only president to receive all Electoral College votes twice, in the
1788 and 1792 elections.


j^IT *NPOKI* Ig U


Anyone interested in purchasing a resale swine

from the 2012 Hardee County Fair

Contact Teresa Carver

(863) 781-1114

First Come, First Serve


PAGE ONE


2:9c


__


L mm,' -4


'L>n~3/






2C The Herald-Advocate, February 9, 2012





-Schedule of Weekly Services-


'Printed as a Public Service
by'.
TheJerald-Advocate
SWauchulp, Florida

deadlinee: Thursday 5 p.m.


BOWLING GREEN
APOSTOLIC LIGHTHOUSE
UNITED PENTACOSTAL
CHURCH
310 Orange St.
375-3100
Sunday Morning ................ 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening ..................6:00 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting........7:00 p.m.
Thursday Service ..................7:30 p.m.

CHESTER GROVE MB CHURCH
708 W. Grape St. 375-3353
( unday School ......................9:30 a.m .
"Sunday Worship ................ 8:00 a.m.
Sun. Eve. Worship
1st & 3rd ..............4:00 p.m. 3:00 p.m.
Tues. Prayer/Bible Study ......6:00 p.m.

CHRISTIAN BIBLE,
FELLOWSHIP
Hwy. 17 South
Morning Worship ..............10:30 a.m.
Youth Group Sunday ..........6:00 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
121 West Broward St. 375-2231
375-3100
Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .............. 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6:30 p.m.
W wednesday ............................7:30 p.m .

CHURCH OF GOD
TRUE HOLINESS OUTREACH
725 Palmetto St.
375-3304
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................1:00 a.m.
Tues. Night Bible Study ...... 7:30 p.m.
Evening Worship
1st Sunday .....................5:00 p.m .

COMMUNITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Main & W. Centra.
Sunday AM Worship............10:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer Meeting ............7:00 p.m.

FAITH ASSEMBLY OF GOD
4937 Hwy. 17 N. 375-4206
Sunday School .. ... ..............9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............1:00 a.m.
Disciples Train & Choirs ......5:30 p.m.
Evening Worship ................6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Bowling Green
S. Hwy. 17 .- 375-2253
SIINDAY:*
Bible Study .......................9:30 a.r-
Morning Worship ..............10:45 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ :30 p.m.

WEDNESDAY:
Discipleship Training
Youth & Adult ................6:30 p.m.
AWANA (ages 3-5th grade) ....6:30 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Grape & Church Streets 375-2340
Sunday School ....................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ................6:00 p.m.

FORT GREEN BAPTIST
CHURCH
Baptist Church Road 773-90'3
Bible Connection .................9:45: a.m.
Morning Worship I 100 a.m.
Sunday Evening ('.0I. p.m.
Wednesday Supper ............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

HOLY CHILD
SPANISH CATHOLIC MISSION
Misa (Espanol) Sunday ........7:00 p.m.

IGLESIA DEL DIOS VIVO
105 Dixiana St. 375-4191
Domingo De Predicacion ....11:00 p.m.
Martes Estudio Biblico ..........7:00 p.m.
Miercoles Estudior Juvenil....7:00 p.m.
Jueves De Predicacion ..........7:00 p.m.

IMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH
210 E. Broward St. 375-4681
Sunday School ....................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ............. 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..................7:00 p.m

MACEDONIA PRIMITIVE
BAPTIST CHURCH
607 Palmetto St.
Church School ...............9:30 a.m.
Morning Service .........1'......... 1:00 a.m.
Evening Service ....................7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study/Prayer ......7:00 p.m.
Communion-2nd Sun. Eve. ..6:00 p.m.

MT. PISGAH BAPTIST CHURCH
6210 Mt. Pisgah Rd. 375-4409
Sunday School ...................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training..................5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time........7:00 p.m.

NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
Mason Dixon & County Line Rd.
S781-5887
Sunday Worship .................. I:00 a.m.
2nd Sunday Communion .... 11:00 a.m.
5th Sunday Feast............1... 1:00 a.m.
Bread of Life Sunday........ 2:15 p.m.
T.H.E. Meeting --Tuesday ....7:00 p.m.


BOWLING GREEN

OPEN DOOR FULL GOSPEL
PRAISE CENTER
E. Broward St.
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Service ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.

PRIMER MISSION BAUTISTA
Murray Road off Hwy. 17
375-2295
Domingos Escuela Dom. ......9:45 a.m.
Servicio de Adoracion..........11:00 a.m.
Servicio de Predicacion ........5:00 p.m.
M iercoles Servico..................6:30 p.m.

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 South US Hwy 17
Morning Service .................. 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.

ST. JOHN A.M.E. CHURCH
513 W. Orange St.
375-2911
Sunday Church School ..........9:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship ....11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

VICTORY PRAISE CENTER
128 E. Main St.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .............11:00 a.m,
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Thursday Night Services,
Evening Worship...................7:00 p.m.
K idz Club...............................7:00 p.m .

ONA
IGLESIA PENTECOSTES
VISION POR LAS ALMAS
149 Bedger Loop 448-2831
Servicio Domingos ................7:30 p.m.
Jueves (Ensefianza Biblica) ..................
.................. ..........................7:30 p.m .
LIMESTONE BAPTIST CHURCH
4868 Keystone Ave.; Limestone
Comm.
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11 00 a.m.
Evening Worship ............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m..

NEW ZION BAPTIST CHURCH
202 Sidney Roberts Road
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training..................6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................6:00 p.m.

ONA BAPTIST CHURCH
131 Bear Lane 773-2540
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m,
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

UNION BAPTIST CHURCH
5076 Lib ,urch Rd. 494-5622
'SnILS Shi'i ..._ I nilI am.
Mol'rIig \\o' 0o p II 1.1.1 a.m.
E'.enmrig \lr ,hip 6 010 p.m.
Wednesday
AWANA for Kids ..............6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time.........7:00 p.m.


VAUCHULA

APOSTOLIC ASSEMBLY
Martin Luther King and Apostolic Rd.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
English Service :................. 1:30 a.m.
General Worship Service ......1:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer ....................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service. 7 i'i p.m.

CELEBRATION CHURCH
322 Hanche) Rd.
,863-781-1624
hardee.celebralion.org
Sunday Morning Service ..11 I:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Seryice........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Youth Service ....5:30 p.m.
Childcare provided at all services

CELEBRATION FELLOWSHIP,
773-0427
Celebration Service\............. 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Evening Cell Groups
Adult Cell Group .................:00 p.m.
Youth Cell Group .............7:00 p.m.
Children's Cell Group .....:....7:00 p.m.
Call for locations

CHARLIE CREEK.
BAPTIST CHURCH
6885 State Road 64 East 773-3447
Sunday School .....................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............6:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF CHRIST
201 S. Florida Ave. & Orange St.
773-9678
Bible Study ................ ...........9:30 a.m .
Worship Service ..................10:45 a.m.
Wednesday ............................7:00 p.m.

CHURCH OF CHRIST
Will Duke Road
773-2249
Sunday Morning Worship. ....9:30 a.m.'
Sunday Bible Class..............1 1:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening Worship ......6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Bible Class ........7:00 p.m.
Men s Leadership & Training Class -
2nd Sunday of Month........4:00 p.m.

CHURCH OF 'GOD
Martin Luther King Blvd.
767-0199

CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST
OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS
630 Hanchey Rd. 773-3532
Saciament Meeting ...............9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Priesthood ......................... 1:00 a.m .


WAUCHULA
COMMUNITY BAPTIST
CHURCH OF WAUCHULA HILLS
(SPANISH)
615 Rainey Blvd.
257-3950
Sunday Bible Study ............10:00 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship.... 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

DIOS ES AMOR
807 S. 8th Ave.
773-4576
Domingos Escuela
Dominica .......................... 10:00 a.m .
Servicio ................................11:00 a.m .
Lunes Oracion ...................... 6:00 p.m.
M iercoles Servicio ...............7:00 p.m.

EL REMANENTE
IGLECIA CRISTIANA
318 W. Main St..
Martes Oracion ...................... 7:00 p.m.
Jueves Servicio ..................1.7:30 p.m.
Viernes Servicio .................... 7:30 p.m.
Domingo Servicio................ 10:30 a.m.

ENDTIME CROSSROAD
MINISTRY
501 N. 9th & Georgia St. 773-3470
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Service .........1.......11:30 a.m.
Evening Service....................7:30, p.m.
Wed. Bible St. & Yth. Gath ..7:30 p.m.
Friday (Holy Ghost Night)....7:30 p.m.

FAITH PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
114 N. 7th Ave. 773-2105
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ............1.....1:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ................6:15 p.m.
Wed. Youth Fellowship,.........6:50 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

FAITH TEMPLE CHURCH
OF GOD
701 N. 7th Ave 773-3800
Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship ..................10:20 a.m.
Children's Chuch .............1..0:40 a.m.
Evening Service .................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.n.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
1570 W. Main St. 773-4182
SUNDAY: .
Bible Study for all ages ........9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ...............6:00 p.m.

WEDNESDAY:
Sr. Adult Bible Study ..........10:00 a.m.
Children's Chiors
(PK-Grade 4) .................... 5:30 p.m.
PRAISE 57-Jr High Chior .. 5:30 p.m.
Mid-Week Prayer Meeting 6:00 piin'
SKids On Missions ; r
(PK-Grade 4) o 0t p mi
Club 56 ................................ 6:00 p.m .
Youth Group (Grades 7-12) 6:00 p.m.
Family Life Ministry
& Discipleship ................. 6:00 p.m.-
Church Orchestra.................. 6:00 p.m.
Adult Choir.......................... 7:00 p.m.

FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH
1121 W. Louisiana St. 773-9243
SUNDAY:
Generations Caf6 Opens........9:30 a.m.
Kids World Check-In for
Nursery-5th Grade Begins..10:15 a.m.
Pre-K Blast ................. .......10:45 a.m.
Kids World B.L.A.S.T.i
(K-5th) .......................... 10:45 a.m .
Worship Service ..........1......10:45 a.m.
WEDNESDAY:
Check-In begins for
Nursery-5thgrade 6 15 pm
Classes for children ages
PreK-12th grade........::..6:30-8:00 p.m.


FIRST CHURCH OF
THE NAZARENE
511 W. Palmetto St.
Sunday School ................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Service ............:..... 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ...............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ........ .......7:00 p.m.
FIRST MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
1347 Martin Luther King Ave.
773-6556
Sunday School ....... ..........9:30 a.m.
Morning Service ..................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
STues. Youth Ministry Meeting/
Bible Study ........................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer/Bible Study ......7:00 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
207 N. Seventh Ave. 773-4267
Sunday School ................9:45 a.m.
Traditional Sunday Worship 11:00 a.m.
Casual Sunday Worship..........6:00 p.m
Tuesday Bible Study............ 10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Activities ............6:00 p.m.

FLORIDA'S FIRST ASSEMBLY
OF GOD CHURCH
1397 South Florida Avenue
773-9386.
Sunday School ......................9:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 10:00 a.m.
Wed. Family Night ................7:00 p.m.
Adult, Children & Radiate Youth Church

FLORIDA GOSPEL
511 W. Palmetto
223-5126
Sunday Morning Worship ....11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............7:30 p.m.

THE GOSPEL TABERNACLE
810 W. Tennessee St. 863-735-1158


Morning Service ..................10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

HEARTLAND
COMMUNITY CHURCH
1262 W. Main St. 767-6500
Coffee & Donuts.................9:00 a.m.
Sunday School .....................:30 a.m.
W orship ............................ 10:30 a.m .
Wed. Night Dinner ................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bodybuilders Adult Cl.
Crossroads &
Lighthouse M in. ................7:00 p.m.


WAUCHULA
HIGHER GROUND
INTERNATIONAL MINISTRY
1258 W. MAIN STREET
WAUCHULA, FL
Sunday Morning Worship.... 1:00 a.m.
Wed. Night Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

IGLESIA HISPANA
FUENTE DE VIDA
501 N. 9" Ave,
M artes .................................7: 30 p.m .
Jueves..................... ......... 7:30 p.m .
Domingo ........................... 10:30 p.m.

IGLESIA HISPANA
PRESENCIA de Dios
511 W. Palmetto St.
Domingos .........:....................6:00 p.m.
M iercoles.................................7:00 p.m .

IGUESIA ADVENTISTA DEL
SEPTIMO DIA
Old Bradenton Road
767-1010

JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
ENGLISH
155 Altman Road 1131
Sunday Service ...................... 2:00 p.m.

JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
SPANISH
Sunday Service ...................10:00 a.m.

LIGHT OF THE WORLD
MINISTRIES
Womans Center 131 N. 7th Ave.
Wauchula, FL
Friday Evening ......................6:00 p.m.

LAKE DALE BAPTIST CHURCH
3102 Heard Bridge Road
773-6622
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Service .................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ...............6:00 p.m.
SWednesday Prayer ...............7:00 p.m.

MINISTERIO INTERNACIOFNAL
Cambriadores de Mundo
704 W. Main St. 773-0065
Wednesday Service...............7:30 p.m.

NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH
1999 State Road 64 East
Sunday School ...................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship Service....11:00 a.m.
Evening.Worship Service ......6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Night Supper ......6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Activities
(All Ages) ..........................7;00 p.m.



NEW LIFE CHURCH
117 W. Palmetto St.
773-2929
Sunday Service ....................10:00 a.m.
Sundj E ifiijg SerV~T :'t- "r; 00 p.m.
\'e.jne.dij SerT, ie .. -' 00 p.m.
Children Ministries for all services
NEW MT. ZION A.M.E. CHURCH
10 Martin Luther King Ave.
767-0023
Mor. Worship .
(lst & 3r Sun.) ..................8:00 a.m.
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
2nd Sunday Youth Service ....4:00 p.m.
Allen Christian Endeavor......4:00 p.m.
Wed. & Fri. Bible Study........7:00 p.m.

NORTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
912 N. 8th Ave. 773-6947
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ...............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

OAK GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
' 4350 W. Main St. 735-0321
Sunday School ....................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study .......6:30 p.m,

PEACE VALLEY LUTHERAN
CHURCH
1643 Stenstrom Road 773-2858
I" & 3" Sun.
Communion ................10:00 a.m.
2", & 4" Sun.
Divine Worship................10:00 a.m.
Bible Study .......................... 11:15 a.m.
** Fellowship each Sunday after service

PROGRESSIVE MISSIONARY
.... BAPTIST CHURCH
149 Manley Road East Main
773-5814
Sunday School ...................9:30 a.m.
Worship Service .................11:00 a.m.
Wed. Evening Prayer ...........7:00 p.m.

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 North US Hwy 17
Morning Service ..................10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.

RIVERVIEW HEIGHTS
MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1321 S.R. 636'East 773-3344
Radio Program
WZZS Sundays..............9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship :................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

SOUL HARVEST MINISTRY
1337 Hwy. 17 South, Wauchula
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
Morning W ship ,...........11:00 a.m.
Evening Service ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Seryice...............7:00 p.m.

ST. ANN'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH


204 N. 9th Ave. 773-6418
Sunday ........... .................... 9:00 a.m .
H oly -D ays ....;'.............................. .

ST. MICHAEL
CATHOLIC CHURCH
408 Heard Bridge Road 773 4089
Saturday Mass (English) ......5:00p.m.
(Spanish) ......7:00 p.m.
Sunday(English) ...................:30 a.m.
(Spanish .................. 1:00 a.m.
(Creole).....................1:00 p.m .
Catecism o ............................9:45 a.m .
Daily Mass in English ..........8:30 a.m.


WAUCHULA


SEVENTH DAY
ADVENTIST CHURCH
205 S. llth Ave. 773-9927
Sabbath School ................9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Tues. Prayer Meeting ............7:00 p.m.
SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
505 S. 10th Ave. 773-4368
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.
SPIRIT WIND TABERNACLE
1652 Old Bradenton Road
Sunday Worship. ...............10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............7:30 p.m.
IABERNACLE OU
PRAISE & JOY
1507 MLK Avenue
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:30 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Tues. Bible Stdy.
& Child Train ....................7:00 p.m.
Friday Prayer Service ............7:00 p.m.
WAUCHULA CHURCH OF GOD
1543 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.
773-0199
Sunday School ...................10:00 a,m.
Morning Worship ................11:15 a.m.
Evening Worship .................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Fam. Training ....7:30 p.m.
Thurs. Youth Bible Study......7:00 p.m.
Friday Night Worship ............7:30 p.m.
WAUCHULA HILLS HARVEST
TEMPLE ASSEMBLY OF GOD
210 Anderson
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Church...................................10:00 a.m .
Youth Service ........................6:00 p.m.
Evening Service ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.
WAUCHULA HILLS
SPANISH CHURCH OF GOD
1000 Stansfield Rd.
Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .. ...............7:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer ...................7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship.................7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ..................7:30 p.m.
WAUCHULA REVIVAL CENTER
(Full Gospel)
501 N. 9th Ave.
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Youth & Child. Church..........6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ................7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study .................7:00 p.m.
Men's Fri. Prayer ..................7:00 p.m.

ZOLFO SPRINGS

COMMUNITY WESLEYAN CHURCH
Gardner
Sunday School ................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m..
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
COWBOY-UP MINISTRY
Cracker Trail Arena
Hwy 66
(across from Oak Hills Ranch Rd.)
781-2281
Sunday .............................. 0:00 a.m .
CREWSVILLE BETHEL
BAPTIST CHURCH
8251 Crewsville Road
Church 735-0871 Pastor 773-6657
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer .............6:30 p.m.
EVANGELISTIC HOLINESS
CHURCH INC.
Corner of 6th and Hickory
Sunday School ................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday ........................... 7:30 p.m.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
OF ZOLFO
320 E. 4th St. 735-1200
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..........1...1..:00 a.m.
Training Union ......................5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ...............:00 p.m.
FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Corner of 6th & Suwanee 735-1544
Gospel Music ......................10:30 a.m.
Worship Service ..................11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

FOX MEMORIAL
HOLINESS CHURCH
2344 Merle Langford Rd.
Sunday Morning Worship ....10:00 a.m.
Sunday Night Worship ..........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.


ZOLFO SPRINGS

GARDNER BAPTIST CHURCH
South Hwy. 17 494-5456
Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.
LIFE CHANGING WORSHIPCENIER
3426 Oak St. -63-832-9808
Sunday Worship ....................2:30 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

MARANATHA BAPTIST CHURCH
2465 Oxendine Rd
(863) 832-9292
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
W orship ............................... 11:00 a.m .
Evening..................................1:00 p.m.
.Wed. Bible & Prayer Meet....7:00 p.m.

NEW VISION WORSHIP CENTER
64 E. & School House Road
Church 735-8585 Childcare 735-
8586
Morning Worship .............1..0:00 a.m.
Children's Church.............1..0:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Youth & F.T.H. ............7:00 p.m.

PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF
GOD FAITH TEMPLE
Oak Street
Sunday Worship ..................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..........,.......7:00 p.m.
Tuesday Worship ..................7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship..................7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ..................7:30 p.m.

PRIMERA MISSION
BAUTISTA HISPANA
518 8th Ave. E.
Escuela Dominical ..............10:00 a.m.
Servicio del Domingo..........11:00 a.m.
.................... ........ ..... 7:00p.m .
Servicio del Miercoles ..........7:30 p.m.

PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH
Pioneer Park
2nd Sunday .........................10:30 a.m.
Evening Service ....................6:30 p.m.
5th Sunday ...........................6:00 p.m.

ST. PAUL'S MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
3676 US. Hwy. 17 South 735-0636
Sunday School .. .................9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship....................11 a.m.
Wed. Prayer Service ..............7:00 p.m.

SAN.ALFONSO MISSION
3027 Schoolhouse Lane
Domingo, Misa en Espanol ..9:30 a.m.
Catecismo ............................11:00 a.m.

SPANISH MISSION
735-8025
Escuela Dominica ... ........10:00 a.m.
Servicio ..............................1:00 a.m.
Pioneer Club ........................ 6:30 p.m.
Servicio de la Noche ............7:00 p.m.
Miee\cole MeNirendj 6 00 p m.
Service . 8 00 p m
Sabado Liga de Josenes 5.00 pm


Ja.w


~PPBI~ -I


SEEDS
FROM
THE
SOWER
MA Gwd A
MiaelA. iteOesi
tfet.ewy


The owner of a plantsaid, "For
this job I need a responsible man."
"Then I'm your man," said the
applicant. "In all my jobs, when
anything went wrong, I was
responsible."
Care never bothered him. It was
don't care. And half-doing was his
undoing.
But the person who does a little
more work than he's expected to,
and does things a little better than
he's paid to, is the man who's
going to make a successof his job.
The Living Bible says, "Work
hard and with gladness all the
Time, as though working for Christ,
doing the will of God with all your
hearts. Remember the Lord will
pay you for each good thing you
do."


Temptation





Possibilities


We all know that
temptation has
[ ..e. ,,a, been lurking as long as man
has been upon the earth...slithering
around the Garden of Eden...disguising itself with glitter and glamour,
promising love and acceptance, and sometimes pretending to be the
only solution to our problem. All of us succumb to temptation now
and then.
God allows us to be tempted for a reason. When we resist temptation
and allow Him to be our guide, our spirit is strengthened. Perhaps one
could think of this as a "divine" exercise in trusting our Heavenly Father.
Visit your chosen House of Worship this week and keep in touch
with your Creator. As you come to know God and His will for you, you
will discover divine possibilities for your life.


Peace -ioer rdtwers

Wholesale Nursery

Donnis & Kathy Barber
Hwy. 66 East (863) 735-0470
P.O. Box 780 Zolfo Springs, FL


0....-...-... .--.......- ....... .. -... ..... . ... .. .. _.








Mom Made My Clothes


By CACEE KELLER
Special To The Herald-Advocate
My interview was with Linda Keller.
Q: When were you born?
A: June 6, 1950
Q: Where were you born?
A: Tampa, Florida
Q: What did you do when you
were younger?
A: Hang
out with
friendsQ Ho
Q: How p i
is society
different now from when you were
young?
A: A lot less complicated, lot less
hateful, they were friendlier.
Q: Do you have any children?
SA: Three sons (Jack Jr. 39, Michael
37, Robert 34)
Q: What kind of jobs did you have
when you were younger?
A: Help clean house, ironing, house-
hold chores, 17 years old worked at
Library (Temple Terrace Public
Library)
Q: What was your favorite food as
a child?
A: Fried chicken, mashed potatoes,
corn on the cob.
Q: What kind of people did you
hang around with when you were in
9th grade?
A: Neighborhood kids (no certain
'clicks')
Q: What kind of clothes did you
wear when you were younger?
A: Mom made clothes when
younger, skirts/dresses no pants
allowed for girls.
Q: Were drugs and alcohol a big
problem when you were younger?
A: No some boys drank alcohol but
it was known not to. Some people did
LSD in college.
Q: Was religion a big part of your
school system?
A: Announcements opened up with
prayer, prayer was encouraged.
Q: Was teen pregnancy as big of a
problem as it is today?
A:. No because it was shameful to be


a teen parent it was hidden.
Q: How was you known to fellow
classmates?
A: Friendly, laid back, kinda girl.
Q: Was gas as expensive when you
were younger, as it is today?
A: no S.20 a gallon or $.25 at the
most.
Q: What was common "hang out"
spots for you when you were
younger?
A: Her house because her mom
Rosalie was mom to everyone, drive in
movies.
Q: Was gangs a big part of society
when you were younger?
A: Absolutely NOT.
Q: When you were younger was
driving everywhere as common as it
is today?
A: Not really, sometimes walk to
church or take a bus.
Q: What electronic devices avail-
able to the public when you were
younger?
A: Tape recorders, record players,
black and white radios and a few bulky
cell phones.
Q: Did men grow their own food
when you was younger?
A: It was very common in the coun-
try.
Q: Was violence as common as it
is today when you was younger?
A: No you didn't have to worry
about anything happening because it
wasn't really thought of.
Q: Was finding a job when you
were younger as hard as it is today?
A: No there was a lot of work when
she was young.
Q: Were prices sky high for every-
thing as they are today?
A: No wages weren't as high so
prices weren't as high.
Q: Was living back then better or
worse compared to today?
A: Better to here because it wasn't
as much stress and more work and kids
.weren't in trouble as much.
Q: Were marriages commonly
down in the 18-20 years old?
A: Yes it was very common. She


was 19 when she was married.
Q: If you had a choice, would you
rather your life be like it was when
you were younger or like it is now?
Why?
A: I like it the way it is now because
I have three beautiful sons and 5 grand-
children. She couldn't ask for anything
else.


February 9, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 3C

Back In Time is the result of a class
assignment given to ninth graders at
Hardee Senior High School. Each
student is asked to interview an older
person. Selected interviews are pub-
lished here as an encouragement to the
students and for the enjoyment of our
readers.


SECOND-PLACE TROPHY

- 4L .;C. -I .,


COURTESY PHOTO
The Hardee Wildcat travel baseball team of local boys placed second in the Florida Gulf
Coast Slugfest Tournament in Braden River on Jan. 28-29. They split games on
Saturday, downing the St. Pete Barracudas 15-7'before losing to the Suncoast Athletics
12-5. Seeded third on Sunday, the young Wildcats had to play the second-place
Barracudas again, this time winning 9-1 to advance to the championship game against
the Manatee Bearcats, losing in the late innings 9-5. Pictured above receiving medal-
lions and the seconod-place trophy are (front row, left to right), Griffin Clark, Gage
Gough, Weston Schreader and Blake Tinsley; (back row) Quintin Lindsey, Myron
Refoure, Logan Cartwright, Cade Alexy and Adam Pazzaglia; not pictured Dylan Davis.
The boys are coached by Gerry Lindsey, Will Cartwright, Jason Clark, Efran Schraeder
and Matt Tinsley.



Hade Cuny' Hmeow Cveag

PRINTRS ePUBLSHER


,.' I'- ~.i'.


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1GSCIAL P NSCREEN-ING MAMMI OGRA I I











ARCADIA LOCATIONONNLY EXPIRES FEB 29, 2012 PAYMENT DUE AT TIME OF SERVE ANCE
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VIRTUAL COLONOSCOPY

Our Doctors
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Melissa R.Themar-Geck, MD
Radiolotcisl Slubspe'ciall)

i I F , i


Hardship Cases
Call For Info
We Are Dedicated
To Serving The
Entire Community!


i//fL,





A rdr\il


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863-491-9970 I


300 Rierid E. 2211 6

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300 Riverside Dr. E. 2211 60th St. W. 2301 60th St. Couit West C.


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WITH NO UPFRONT FEES!!!
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SPECIALIZING IN:
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Payrolls Bill Paying Services Harvesting Payrolls



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FOR OUR NEW CLIENTS
GET $10
OFF TAX PREPARATION FEES!*
FOR OUR EXISTING CLIENTS
REFERRAL DISCOUNT
BRING A NEW CLIENT TO US AND YOU WILL BOTH RECEIVE
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PARA NUESTROS CLIENTS NUEVOS
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DE REBAJO PARA PREPARACION DE TAXAS"
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SIN PAGO POR ADELANTADO!!!
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Impuestos Federales y Estatales Contabilidad Mensual
N6minas de Pagos Servicio de Pagar sus Facturas
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FREE CONSULTATION 2:2-23
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I






4C The Herald-Advocate, February 9, 2012


LARGE PIZZA


CHEESE OR
PEPPERONI

$595
w Add f imToppingAyabIa


SInitedirmeoffer.Atpa dipatinglocati, s.


ANY SPECIALTY
$1O Vegie, Howie Maui,
Me EateresorThe Woks

ZOLFO SPRINGS
105 SR 64 East Inside BP
735-2100 j


Teresa D. Williams
Certified Public Accountant
Experienced Knowledgeable Professional
** In Business for 25 Years **


Service Offered
Tax Preparation
Accounting Services
Auditing and Consulting


uI


Email: tdwcpal@aol.com
Phone: (863)285-8636
Fax: (863)285-9438


Clients Serviced
Individuals
Business
Non-Profit


107 West Broadway St.
Fort Meade, FL 33841


Don't Miss Your Opportunity to Tell Us!
Survey for Parents of Students
with an Individual Educational Plan (IEP)
in Exceptional Student Education (ESE)

Parents
Respond


Begin Parent
Survey



Begin
Improvement
Activities


Responses
Compiled


Begins: February I, 2012
Ends: June 30, 2012

To complete survey online,
go to: ww.ESEsurvey.com


State and District


Results Reported

Please call the ESE Office at 773-2600 if you need help with the survey, access to a
computer, transportation to take the survey or need an interpreter.
Para Espafiol, por favor llare a Margarita Olvera al 773-2600, Ext. 266 si necesita ayuda
con la encuesta, acceso a una computadora, o transportaci6n para hacer la encuesta.29
2:9c


YOUR

BUSINESS

COULD

APPEAR

HERE

TOO!!
Contact
Nancy Davis,
Kim Reas or
Trayce Daniels
At
773-3255


"Let Us Help You"


NOTICE
VALUE ADJUSTMENT BOARD
ORGANIZATIONAL MEETING,
The Hardee County Value Adjustment Board, consisting of
two County Commissioners, one School Board member,
and two citizens, will hold an organizational meeting on
'Monday, February 27, 2012, beginning at 9:00 a.m.
The meeting will be held in the Hardee County Commission
Chambers, 412 W. Orange Street, Room 102, Wauchula,
Florida 33873.
The purpose of the meeting is to provide procedural and
operational information concerning the function of the
Value Adjustment Board.
This notice is published in compliance with Florida Statutes
196.194, 286.011, and 286.0105.
Pursuant to Florida Statute 286.0105, if a person decides
to appeal any'decision made by the board with respect to
any matter considered at such meeting, he or she may
need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such pur-
pose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record
of the proceeding is made, which record includes the tes-
timony and evidence upon which the appeal is based.
For more information, please call the Value Adjustment
Board Clerk at (863)773-4174 ext 227 or the County Man-
ager's Office at (863)773-9430.
Lexton H, Albritton, Jr., County Manager
2:9c




February 9, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 5C


i-A_


There may be some confusion For the Fair Association's Fine
out there, so let's clarify... I Arts contest, work must be sub-
mitted on February 1th
There ae two op- 10:00 AM 'til Noon at
portunities to enter the Agri-Civic Center.
the Agri-Civic Center.
your photographs
S ptgsFor more info, call Ray
.and paintings at "tl i @ (863) 773-3553.


the z01z Hardei
County Fair
Note: The same
piece cannot be
entered in both
contest


e
For the Extension
Office's Arts & Crafts
contest, work must be
submitted on Febru-
ts. ary 16th 9:00 AM 'til
5:30 PM at the
Exhibit Hall.
For more in-
fo, call the Ex-
tension Office
@ (863)'773-
2164.
2:9c


John Deer, EA Jo Ann Wilson, EA
Enrolled since 1979 Enrolled since 2003
BS Accounting 863-735-1614
863-773-6661
Monthly and Yearly Accounting
Payroll
All Tax Returns
Individual *Corporate *Partnership "Non-Profit
Enrolled Agents, along with attorneys and certified public
accountants, represent clients and present their cases at all
levels of the Internal Revenue Service.

Past Tax Returns, Audits, Delinquent Taxes,
i '' Offers of Compromise


Initial Consultation Free


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DON'T WAIT LOW PRICEs ONLY GOOD THROUGH FEBRUARY 29


Email: kochcon@strato.net


State Certified License #CGC1515338


For decpe eidble hometfowiA service,



0lori da


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Of Hardee Countiy Inc.


Hardee County's only locally owned &
operated bulk fuel distributor
for over 18 years!

Open Mon. Fri. 7:00 am 5:00 pm
Sat. 8:00 am 12:00 pm

863-773-9466
156 Will Duke Road, Wauchula
Sl I2:9c


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on


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BR..u
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6C The Herald-Advocate, February 9, 2012


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HONOR FLIGHT
SThe Hardee County Rotary Club took nine local World War II veterans to Washington, D.C., last year to view the new me-
morial honoring those who served this nation in that war. The Honor Flight Network is a national organization that tries to
pay a small tribute to those who gave so much with a memorable, safe and rewarding tour of honor. The Rotary Club, with
the help of local sponsors, covers all expenses and provides a club member to serve as a guardian for the veterans during
the trip. The club will take another group of veterans to Washington in late April or early May. If you are or know of a veteran
Swho would like to be honored in the nation's capital, call club president Sue Birge at 781-3536.


COURTESY PHOTOS MONTAGE BY RALPH HARRISON
b ,,er EmmnillaipY* -


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February 9, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 7C


AROUND THE PARK
February is here and what a
full calendar we have. There are
many activities to choose from,
like .the women's luncheon,
Oasis Appreciation cook-out,
Ham & Bean supper with corn-
bread, the Men's Valentine's day
pot luck dinner, horseshoe tour-
nament, and much more. I do
believe we will be busy. One
thing for sure, we won't be
going hungry..
We have several new visitors
to our park, I do hope you will
stop by and welcome them. Our
own Debi Mace from Sandy,
Utah is visiting her parents,
Georgianna and Dave Mills.
Debi has been enjoying all the.
good things that we have going
on in the park and is enjoying'
the nice weather that we have
been having. Mom and dad will
be sad to see her leave. Fred and
Susie Frye, have their daughter,
Luanne Lozier, from Warsaw,
Ind., visiting with them and
Luanne is enjoying the beauti-
ful weather and the Florida sun-
shine. Jim and Marion, have
their daughter, Jackie Meredith,
from Alpena, Mich., and look-
ing forward to playing domi-
noes,.and enjoying her parents'
activities. Claude Longueuil,
has son and daughter-in-law,
Tom and Joyce Longueuil, vis-
iting from Michigan.Tom need-
ed something to do so, Claude,
volunteered his son to do some
odd jobs around the park for his
keep and already we see the dif-
ference. Joyce on the other
hand, has been enjoying the
chance to play games and relax
in the warm sunshine. Did I say
sunshine? More like Bingo, Po-
keno and card games.
HORSESHOES
With the up and coming
horseshoe tournament, the men
are really going strong on the
court. They even had a play
date at Pioneer Park. Nine of
them went and still had time to'
make it back to the park, for
'their usual practice games.
POKENO
Friday saw six players and
what a toss-up it was to the fin-
ish. Jeff Riggs went home with
the winning pot of pennies and
Audrey Semler had a pretty


heavy load herself. Feb. 1 saw
seven' playing, with two new
players, Helen and Martha. So
the players were very cool,
ealm and collected. Joyce Lon-
gueuil went home with the most
Pennies, and was considered the
winner for the day.
BINGO
Thursday the 26th, saw 29
playing B-l-N-G-O, with
Thelma Early winning the
50/50, and Estelle Wheeler, and
Sylvia, sharing the jackpot.
Sylvia also shared the jar, with
Carl Dreyer. Wasn't that rice of
Sylvia to share? Mike Akelian
on Tuesday. Jan. 26, took the
50/50, and the jack pot. Wow,
,some people have allthe luck!
';ix merchant certificates were
Given out.
SHUFFLE BOARD
Tuesday the 31st, we finally
got both courts going and what
a great time with 12 shufflers
and some really good competi-
tion. You could hear the whoop-
ing and hollering around the
park, with the excitement of
who would win the competi-
tion. Jerry Kruys was hot this
day as he and Audrey Semler
ended up with the most wins.
Jerry was sure excited as he has
not had wins for some time. He
must be practicing after dark.
CRAFTS
Diane Mominee did it again!
What a wonderful time we had
at B-dazzling. Getting shirts
and having, the glitz put on
them. What beautiful pattens
there was to choose from!
Seems the whole park is
sparkling with all the.glitz. The
coming week will be learning
watercolor art with a demonstri-
on by Patty Hodges.
SUNDAY SERVICE
The opening of the Sunday
service, saw the Oasis Blue-
grasses singing and playing
many of our favorite songs,
"Three Men on the Mountain,"
being one of them. Dr. Rev.
Trent Swanson's message was
from 1 Corthinians chapter 6.
and Romans 8:28. "Getting,
cleaned up for Heaven." May
God be with you this week as
we pray for peace for Our
Nation, the leaders, and those
who are ill.


Oasis RV News
By Georgianna Mills


During the past week, sheriff's deputies and city police
officers investigated the following incidents and made the fol-
lowing arrests:
COUNTY
Feb. 4, a residential burglary\on Merle Langford Road and a
vehicle stolen on Roy Moore Road were reported.

Feb. 3, Tyshun Kareem Daniels, 26, of. 744 Chamberlain
Blvd.. Wauchula, was arrested by the countywide Drug Task Force
(DTF) and charged with two counts of selling cocaine within 1.000
feet of public housing, three counts sale of a hallucinogen within
1.000 feet of public housing, possession of marijuana with intent to
sell within 1.000 feet of public housing, three counts possession of
drug paraphernalia, possession of cocaine, possession of marijuana
and cruelty toward a child that could result in injury.
Feb. 3, Johnny Rodriguez, 21. of 1012 Hillsborough Ave.,
Arcadia, was arrested by Florida Highway Patrol Tpr. Brian Ferrell
on a charge of contempt of court violation of an injunction for
protection.
Feb. 3, Aurora Alamia Garza. 31, of 4526 Pine Ave., Bowling
Green, was arrested by DTF and charged with.possession of neth-
amphetamine, possession of drug paraphernalia, possession of a
New Legend health and safety drug and withholding support of
children.
Feb. 3, Seledonio Mendoza Trinidad, 32, of 3551 Poplar St.,
Zolfo Springs, was arrested by DTF and charged with possession
of methamphetamine and possession of drug paraphernalia.
Feb. 3, Antonio Guajardo Jr., 28, of 509 Grove St., Bowling
Green, was arrested by DTF and charged with sale of marijuana
within 1,000 feet of a specified business, possession of marijuana,
two counts sale of marijuana, three counts possession of drug para-
phernalia and two counts possession of a structure/vehicle for sell-
ing drugs.
Feb. 3, Emprise Dionne Hines, 31, of 4846 Sally Place,
Wauchula, was arrested by DTF and charged with possession of
marijuana, sale of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia and
possession of a structure or vehicle for sale of drugs.
Feb. 3, a residential burglary on Dixiana Drive and burglary of
a conveyance on U .S. 17 South were reported.

Feb. 2, Kelly Lynn Meringolo, 25, of 8567 Chinook Road,
Zolfo Springs, was arrested by Dep. Michael Lake on a charge of
violation of probation.
Feb. 2, Paul Alamia, 35, of 413 Manatee St., Bowling Green,
was arrested by Dep. Ryan Abbott and charged with unarmed bur-'
glary of an unoccupied dwelling, possession of burglary tools with
intent to use and larceny-petit theft.
Feb. 2, Mitchell Ryan Kuck, 41, of 338 Stenstrom Road,
Wauchula, was arrested by DTF and charged with 11 counts of
fraud concealing information to obtain a prescription.
Feb. 2, Lewis Eric Brown, 33, of 742 Sandpiper Road, Wau-,
chula, was arrested by DTF and charged with two counts sale of
marijuana within a specified address, two counts possession of
drug paraphernalia, possession of a short-barrel gun, possession of
a weapon/ammo by a convicted felon, resisting an officer without
violence and failure to report to D/L office.
Feb. 2, Calvin Myles Prine, 60, of 2556 Clifton Bryan.Road,
Zolfo Springs, was arrested by DTF and charged with two counts
possession of methamphetamine, and two counts possession of
drug paraphernalia.
Feb. 2, James Riley Driver, 47, of 202 Rust Ave., Wauchula,
was arrested by DTF and charged with two counts sale of metham-
phetamine within a specified address, possession of methampheta-
mine, .iJ thiee .u.iiir possession of drug paraphernalia.


Feb. 2, Barbara Ann Griggs, 60, of 1614 Mason-Dixon Ave.,
Bowling Green, was arrested by DTF and charged with two counts
sale of methamphetamine, two counts possession of drug para-
phernalia and smuggling contraband into a detention facility.
Feb. 2, John Devin Wilson, 49, of 321 Garden Dr., Wauchula,
was arrested by DTF and charged with two counts sale of metham-
phetamine within 1,000 feet of a specified address, two counts sale
of methamphetamine, possession of methamphetamine, four
counts possession of drug paraphernalia, and owning a structure or
vehicle for sale of drugs.
Feb. 2, Javier Carrion, 38, of 721 Chamberlain Blvd.,
Wauchula. was arrested by DTF and charged with possession of
marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia.
Feb. 2, Belinda Romeo Anderson, 52, of 308 Martin Luther
King Jr. Ave., Wauchula. was arrested by DTF and charged with
obstructing police with a search warrant and resisting an officer
without violence.
Feb. 2, Robert Lee Anderson, 53, of 520 South Road, was
arrested by Dep. Cesar Medina on a charge of withholding support
of children.
Feb. 2, a residential burglary on Glades Street, a business bur-
glary on East Main Street and criminal mischief on North Florida
Avenue were reported'

Feb. 1, Phillip Bryan Vielmette, 23, and Curtis Dale Johnson,
18. both of 806 E. Fifth ST., Zolfo Springs and Johnathan Rashad
Jones. 20. of 1123 Steve Roberts Special, Zolfo Springs, were
arrested by Dep._ Paul Johnson and each charged with larceny -
petit theft.
Feb. 1, Nicole Lynn Pappalardo, 22, of 2370 U.S. North,
Wauchula, was arrested by Det. Russell Conley on an out-of-coun-
ty warrant.
Feb. 1, thefts on U.S. 17 South and U.S 17 North and a tag
stolen on South First Avenue were reported.

Oct. 31, a residential burglary oi'Hill Street, criminal mischief
on Everett Whidden Road and a theft on Deer Run D rive were
reported.

Oct. 30, a theft on Farrell Road was reported.

WAUCHULA
Feb. 5, a business burglary on West Palmetto Street was
reported.

Feb. 4, a theft on U.S. 17 South was reported.

Feb. 3, a theft on Carlton Street was reported.

Feb. 2, Juan Herrera-Soberano, 45, of 801 N. Florida Ave.,
was arrested by Cpl. Chris LeConte and charged with cruelty
toward a child without great bodily harm.

Jan. 30, a theft on Carlton Street was reported.

BOWLING GREEN
Feb. 4, burglary of a conveyance on West Jones Street and
criminal mischief on Dixiana Drive were reported.
Feb. 2, Rosalba Torrez Chavez, 39, of 806 Pleasant Way,
Bowling Green, was arrested by Capt. Brett Dowden and charged
with battery.
Feb. 2, a business burglary on Pleasant Way was reported.

Jan. 30, a fight on Pleasant Way and a theft on Dixiaria Drive
were reported.

Perseverance is the hard work you do after you get tired of
doing the hard work you already did.
--Newt Gingrich
*S ; **. C .-. .


I'_l ,PIfONEER PARK DAYS



I" "eif CUfE ERIART CONTEST
-. i^^-r ^^X :, ,. .. '<, ,


"{'* j -, 1,-- %1 The Herald-Advocate is seeking original artwork for the

S., front and back covers of its annual special tabloid section on

Last year S wfnn er Hardee County's most popularfestival. It could be yours!


.tfmmir~mmttmi^ Ii. ADULT DIVISION
(%-/y, First place: $100 Cash.

Publication of your work on the front cover.
S,* Your photo and biographical story inside.

SS second place: $50 Cash.
J "'- * Publication of your winning entry inside the special section.

SThird place: $25 Cash.
S-* Publication of your winning entry Inside the special section.

: i CHILDREN'S DIVISION (12 AND UNDER)
A week-long pass to Pioneer Park Days, publication of the artwork, plus ...

SFirst place: $25 Cash.
SPublication on the back cover.

SSecond place: $15 Cash.

j7 Third place: $10 Cash.


RULES:

0 +. ^!^ l V1) Open to all ages. Artist need not be a resident of Hardee County to enter.
"0 2) Artwork\must be original.

S..... 3) The festival theme of antique engines, farm machinery or pioneer life must
be depicted.

i.lil1iMM1t!llii1irllltmTmnmJm illli 4) Pen and ink, charcoal, dark pencil or black marker.

MymnL 9 iff of auhlfil 5) Art MUST fill an area 8.5 inches wide by 11 inches high, including lettering
which reads "Pioneer Park Days 2012." (Drawing must be VERTICAL!)

JUDGES 6) Deadline is Friday, Feb.17, at noon.

JANE LONG PIONEER PARK DAYS DIRECTOR TO ENTER:
SUSAN W. ROBERTS SENIOR CIRCUIT JUDGE FOR 10TH JUDICIAL Make sure the division, name, address and daytime phone number of the artist are attached to the drawing.
CIRCUIT AND SEVENTH-GENERATION FLORIDIAN Bring entries in person to the newspaper office at 115 S. Seventh Ave. in Wauchula, or mail to Cover Art
MYSTERY JUDGE WISHES To REMAIN ANONYMOUS Contest, The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338, Wauchula, FL 33873. 1:26-2:16nc




8C The Herald-Advocate, February 9, 2012

oardewCowaty Ro4a5 CL
Prwet
POW/MIA DINNER CEREMONY


Saturday: Apri 28, 2012

Florida's First Assembly of Go, Fami y Life Center
1397 5, Florida Ave, Wauchu a
Poors Open at 5:30 p.m; Dinner at 6:00 p.m.
Business Press or Miitary Uniform

Pinner Tickets: $50
Tickets available from any Rotarian,
The Hert4d-Advocate, Giovanni's, Wauchula State Bank

Key Note Speaker-General Jim bozier (Captured by Terrorists
and held as a chained prisoner for 42 days)
Master of Ceremonies-Colonel John Gill
Honor Guard POW/MIA Presentation-MacDill Air Force Base
Participants:
HHS JROTC under the direction of Colonel Anthony Hingle i
Colonel Robert Collins-US Army
LTC/Dr. Cary Pigman-US Army


Event sponsorships will help benefit the Hadee High School )ROTC
Event Sponsorships available by contacting:
LIMITED SEATING Sue Birge, Rotary President at 863-781-3536
Reserved Tables Available Janet Gilliard, Rotarian at 863-781-2254


_...._______ 1-