<%BANNER%>
PRIVATE ITEM
Digitization of this item is currently in progress.
The Herald-advocate
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028302/00413
 Material Information
Title: The Herald-advocate
Portion of title: Herald advocate
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Wm. J. Kelly
Place of Publication: Wauchula Fla
Creation Date: January 19, 2012
Publication Date: 1955-
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Wauchula (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hardee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Hardee -- Wauchula
Coordinates: 27.546111 x -81.814444 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: 55th year, no. 31 (Sept. 2, 1955)-
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579544
oclc - 33886547
notis - ADA7390
lccn - sn 95047483
System ID: UF00028302:00413
 Related Items
Preceded by: Hardee County herald
Preceded by: Florida advocate (Wauchula, Fla.)

Full Text




Free Health

Fair Thursday

I... Story 6A


The


Herald- Advocate


Hardee County's Hometown Coverage


112th Year, No. 7
2 Sections, Pages 24


Thursday, January 19,.2012


Investigation Clears Choate & Others


By MICHAEL KELLY
Of The Herald-Advocate
Fire Chief Mike Choate and
two female county employees
have been cleared of any
wrongdoing after an investiga-
tion into their alleged miscon-
duct was completed last week.
County labor attorney


Reynolds Allen of Allen,
Norton & Blue conducted
sworn interviews on Dec. 27
with all parties named in e-
mails sent by then-emergency
management director Rich
Shepard to his girlfriend. The e-
mails referred to sexual situa-
tions which, if true, would have


amounted to job-related mis-
conduct for Shepard and the
others.
County Manager Lex
Albritton also sat in on the
interviews, as he is the person
responsible for hiring, disci-
plining, evaluating and super-
vising all county employees,


Allen noted in his final report.
"He was present to direct the
employees to answer, assure'
them of no improper retaliation
and hear and evaluate the can-
dor of their testimony," Allen
-wrote.
In a letter to commissioners
summarizing the investigation,


Albritton wrote that based on
Allen's report and his observa-
tions of the witnesses, he has
concluded Choate and the two
women did not engage in any
improper or unacceptable job-
related sexually oriented mis-
conduct.
He then wrote that, based on


PHOTO BY MARIA TRUJILLO
Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day was observed throughout the nation on Monday. Here, the most visual sign of the cel-
ebration of the civil-rights leader's birth was a parade along Main Street in downtown Wauchula. For more photos of
the parade, see 7A.



Lincoln Portrayal This Weekend


By MARIA TRUJILLO
For The Herald-Advocate
Abraham Lincoln is alive!
OK, maybe that is a gross
exaggeration, seeing as he
would be 202 years old if he
were.
But now Hardee Countians
will get a chance to sit and
imagine they are in the presence
of Honest Abe.
Starting tomorrow, Max
Daniels. formerly of Hardee
County. and his wife, Donna,
will put on a two-person play
called "An Evening with Mr.
and Mrs. Lincoln."


This one-hour play is set at
the White House in April of
1865, during the end of the
Civil War, with President
Lincoln and the First Lady talk-
ing about the future. The play
then flashes back to what it was
like for them during their lives
together, before and during Lin-
coln's presidency.
Some of the topics will
include their family and all of
the tragedies they experienced,
the development of Abe Lin-
coln's political career, and the
divisive Civil War.
The flashbacks will end


when the Lincolns realize it is
time to leave for Ford's Theatre,
where they are to watch the
play "Our American Cousin."
A short epilogue will address
what happened on that day,
April 14, 1865, and the last
years of the First Lady. After
the performances, there will be
.a question-and-answer period
with the President and Mrs.
Lincoln.
The Danielses came up with
the idea of becoming Abe and
Mary Lincoln when they were a
part of a community theater
group. Max Daniels was cast as


PPD Cover-Art Contest Open!


SThe Herald-Advocate's 12th annual
Pioneer Park Days Cover-Art Contest is
now open.
If you have a talent for drawing and
would like to see your work published
for thousands of people to see, this is the
contest for you!
The competition is open to all ages
and to anyone from any locale. All it
takes is a knowledge of the annual festi-
val and, of course, skill with paper and
pen.
There are divisions for both adults
and for children 12 and under.
Adults, we can tell you the number
of entries varies each year, sometimes
with fewer than a dozen. So, give it a
try! Kids, we can tell you that participa-
tion is so low, we are considering doing
away with the Children's Division. Do
you want that to happen?
Awards will be given for first, second
and third places in each division.
For the Adult Division, the first-
place winner gets the grand prize: the
front cover of the special tabloid section


we publish in honor of the famed event,
a photo and feature story inside, and
$100 in cash!
For the Children's Division, first
place means your drawing will fill the
back cover of the tabloid section, and
you will win $25 in cash plus a week-
long pass to the event.
This year, Pioneer Park Days is set
for Feb. 29 through March 4. Our special
section will hit the streets in time to
match that opening date.
Art entries will be scored by a panel
of three judges and three awards given.
Adult prizes are as follows:
First Place Story and photo on the
artist, artwork on cover of the special
section, $100 cash.
Second Place Artwork published
inside the special section, $50 cash.
Third Place Artwork published
inside the tabloid section, $25 cash.
Children's prizes are as follows:
First Place Artwork published on
the back cover, a free week-long admis-
See PPD COVER 3A


Lincoln, and the concept took
roots.
Because of his uncanny
resemblance, he was then asked
to portray Lincoln at a pageant.
From there, he was asked to
participate as Lincoln in a
parade. Eventually Donna
Daniels started portraying Mrs.
Lincoln, and then this hobby
quickly became a part-time job
and now is their full-time busi-
ness.
The Danielses have been act-
ing as Abe and Mary Lincoln
professionally since 1988.
See LINCOLN 2A


SEMINOLE TRIBE


the evidence, "Rich Shepard
and I mutually agreed that he
would be allowed to voluntarily
resign to seek opportunities
elsewhere."
Shepard resigned effective
Dec. 30.
The investigation also failed
See INVESTIGATION 2A




IDA


Audit


Clean
But Common

Faults Noted
By MICHAEL KELLY
Of The Herald-Advocate
After weeks of waiting,
members of the Industrial
Development Authority were
presented the results of the
recently completed audit
Tuesday morning by a partner
from the LarsonAllen CPA
firm.
Mike Carter presented the
audits for years 2009 and 2010
and informed the board all nec-
essary documents were filed
with the state just before the
Dec. 28 deadline, bringing the
IDA back into compliance.
"We did not find any evi-
dence of misappropriations of
funds," Carter told them.
Executive Director Bill Lam-
bert said he was very pleased
with the audit results. "I am not
surprised," he said. "Now at
least we have evidence that no
impropriety has taken place
within the IDA."
Carter said the audit was con-
ducted in accordance with
auditing standards generally
accepted in the United States of
America and the standards
applicable to financial audits
contained in government audit-
ing standards.
The 2009 audit showed the
IDA had assets of $41147,887,
which included cash, accounts
receivables, capital assets, land
See IDA 2A


COURTESY PHOTO
The Hardee County Public Library invites the public to
hear culture specialist Willie Johns speak on the history
and culture of the Seminole Tribe this Monday from 5 to 6
p.m. Johns lives on the Brighton Reservation, and has an
associate's degree from Abraham Baldwin Agricultural
College and a bachelor's degree in history from Palm
Beach Atlantic College. He is a member of the Seminole
Wars Historic Foundation and the Florida Cattlemen's As-
sociation and has served as commissioner of the Indian
National Finals Rodeo for the past seven years. The event
Is free. The library is located at 315 N. Sixth Ave., at the
corner of U.S. 17 and. Oak Street.


Of Assaults

On Child
By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
A 49-year-old Wauchula man
has been accused of molesting a
young girl over a period of
years.
Rodney Lee Spinks Sr., of
311 Walton Ave., was arrested
by Det. Jimmy Harrison of the
Wauchula Police Department
on Friday. He was booked into
the Hardee County Jail on five
counts of sexual activity with a
child 12-15, a second-degree
felony.
Spinks posted a $25,000
surety bond on Sunday to gain
his release from custody as he
awaits trial on the charges.
According to Police Chief
Bill Beattie, the child, now a
teenager, reported the alleged
assaults to school officials at
Hardee Senior High. The girl
was then interviewed in Bartow
by the Child Protection Team,
with an investigator with the
Department of Children &
Families as a witness.
The girl was unclear as to
when the first alleged assault
occurred, but indicated she was
around 10 years old. She said
the activity stopped when she
was 15.
Beattie said Harrison inter-
viewed the suspect in the case,
Spinks, who reportedly admit-
ted to engaging in sexual activ-
ity with the child. The suspect
told the detective the girl was
See MAN ACCUSED 2A


Spinks


WEATHER
DATE HIGH LOW RAIN
01/11 75 54 0.08
01/12 79 50 0.01
01/13 70 49 0.00
01/14 63 36 0.00
01/15 71 26 0.00
01116 75 37 0.00
01/17 79 42 0.00
TAL Rainfall to 01/17/12 0.09
Same period last year .06
Ten Year Average 52.81
source Univ. of Fla. One Research Center

INDEX
Classifieds.....................8B
Community Calendar..1lOB
Courthouse Rteport.....11B
Crime Blotter...............12A
Hardee Living................6B
Information Roundup...6A
Obituaries......................4A
School Lunch Menus.. 12B



Il8 3 IIII I
8 33913 00075 7


Teens: Think

You Can Drive?

... Story 1B


Marine Battles

For Recovery
... Story 1B


70s
Plus 5g Sales Tax


Man Accused w


OB M


.. ,,S







2A The Herald-Advncate. .anuarv 19, 2012


SThe Herald-Advocate
Hardee County's Hometown Coverage
JAMES R. KELLY
Publisher/Editor
CYNTHIA M. KRAHL
Managing Editor


JOAN M. SEAMAN
Sports Editor



115 S. Seventh Ave.
P.O. Box 338
Wauchula, FL 33873


RALPH HARRISON
Production Manager

SNOEY DE SANTIAGO
Asst. Prod. Manager

"Tro '. Phone: (863)773-3255

Fax: (863) 773-0657


Published weekly on Thursday at Wauchula, Florida, by The Herald-Advocate
Publishing Co. Inc. Periodical Postage paid at U.S. Post Office, Wauchula, FL
33873 and additional entry office (USPS 578-780), "Postmaster," send address
changes to: The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338, Wauchula, FL 33873.


S DEADLINES:
Schools Thursday 5 p.m.
Sports Monday noon
Hardee Living Thursday 5p.m.
General News Monday 5 p.m.
Ads Tuesday noon


SUBSCRIPTIONS:
Hardee County
6 months $21; 1 yr. $39; 2 yrs. $75
Florida
6 months $25; 1 yr. $46; 2 yrs. $87
Out of State
6 months $29; 1 yr. $52; 2 yrs.- $100


LETTERS:
The Herald-Advocate welcomes letters to the editor on matters of public
interest. Letters should be brief, and must be written in good taste, signed
and include a daytime phone number.
SUBMISSIONS:
Press releases on community matters are welcome. Submissions should be
typed, double-spaced and adhere to the above deadlines. All items are sub-
ject to editing.
>- ^


and restricted cash.
Expenses during 2009 totaled
$615.036 for improvements


made to Gebhart Road, which
borders the industrial park off
State Road 62.


use.of herbicides and pesticides.
The biggest per acre sources of nitrogen are failed septic tanks,
feedlots, commercial property and row crops. Suspended solids'
main sources are commercial property, multifamily residences and
mining, reports CHNEP.
About 37 percent of seagrasses are scarred by boat props.
Hurricane Charlie is the main reason for 34 percent of the man-
grove shoreline being degraded.
The annual flow of Peace River from 2000-20.1Qis down 14
percent compared to 1939-99.
Overall, in recent years there have been improvements in
water clarity and levels of bacteria, chlorophyl and nitrogen.

The Hardee High School Academic Team won state titles in
2004, 2006, 2007 and 2008 and has been a state finalist seven other
times.

Rick.Genter, a 51-year-old software engineer from Redwood
City, Calif., has lost 186 pounds by walking and eating right,
reports a recent AARP Bulletin.
AARP says walking is free, easy and improves your health.
British author George Trevelyan, Who lived to be 86, in 1913
wrote, "I have two doctors, my left leg and my right leg."
AARP says walking regularly can protect an aging brain
against memory loss and dementia and cut the risk of getting heart
disease and diabetes.

Dr. George W. Calver in 1928 was the U.S. Congress' first
appointed doctor, reports AARP. At that time U.S. senators and
representatives were dying at a rate of 20 a year.
Dr. Calver developed and posted the 10 Commandments of
Health: Eat Wisely, Drink Plenty (of Water), Eliminate Throughly,
Bathe Cleanly, Exercise Rationally, Accept Inevitables (Don't
Worry), Play Ethusiastically, Relax Completely, Sleep Sufficiently,
and Check Up Occasionally.
His postscript was "Give 5 percent of your time to keeping
well. You won't have to give 100 percent getting over being sick."


SINCO N
Continued From 1A


In 2010 the IDA showed net
assets of $5,113,905.
Expenses totaled $1,916,044
and included funding for the
broadband project and a spec
building being built in the
Commerce Park, now occupied
by Keyplex.
The IDA still owns four out
of the original 24 lots in the
park. The authority also owns
two buildings in the park that
are occupied by businesses and
are under lease/purchase agree-
ments.
Carter said some of the inter-
nal control procedures showed
"material weaknesses" and
should be changed in the future
to lower the potential for
wrongdoing or misappropria-
tions.
He recommended the board
be aware of the responsibilities
regarding financial reporting
and government auditing stan-
dards, which the board has
already implemented by hiring
a certified public accounting
firm that is familiar with gov-
ernment accounting standards
to record financial statements.
Separating duties amongst
management staff, such as
opening the mail, preparing
checks, making deposits and
reconciling bank statement,
would result in greater internal
controls, he said.
This is a common fault
revealed when auditing any
entity with a small staff, Ci arer
said.
Carter also recommended
adopting formal documented
accounting policies and proce-
dures, which will be done under
the new CPA firm with board,


approval.
The auditor said steps should
be taken to implement proce-
dures with the state to ensure
the annual reporting require-
ments with the state are met on
a timely basis.
Lastly, he said supporting
documentation such as printed
monthly bank statements and a
list of attendees at board meet-
ing should be kept for the audit
trail.
Board member Lory Dur-
rance said those issues either
had already been resolved or
would be resolved before the
next audit.
Lambert said the IDA will do
everything it can in the future to
ensure the public that no money
is misappropriated and that the
IDA stays in compliance with
the state. "We have a big job to
do for this community and we
are going to stay the course," he
said.
County Commission Chair-
man Minor Bryant and Wau-
chula City Manager Terry
Atchley both thanked the mem-
bers of the volunteer,board for
devoting their time and efforts
to the community.



MAN ACCUSED
Continued' From 1A
about 12 the first time, and that
he gave her rewards for her
compliance, including cookies
and snacks. ,
Spinks also allegedly admit-
ted' to repeating the acts at least
five times, the chief said. f
Spinks was charged and
arrested.


I;, Ke//y's Column
By Jim


Joe Choate Jr., 62, a native of Bowling Green, died Sunday
from leukemia. He was a pastor of First Baptist Church of Palmetto
and former city clerk of Bowling-Green.
His last sermon was a week before his death. Viewing will be
from 10 to 11 a.m. Thursday, Jan. 19, and funeral services will be
at 11 a.m. at the First Baptist Church of Palmetto. Burial will fol-
low at Sarasota National Cemetery. Choate was a motorcycle
enthusiast.

Hardee Fire/Rescue has received a compliment from Bob
Christie, manager of Oasis RV Park in Zolfo Springs.
He reported, "The guests and management of the Oasis RV
Park would like to acknowledge the members of the Hardee
County Fire/Rescue. Their recent prompt response and care to a
medical emergency of one of our guests resulted in a life-saving
success."

Dr. Donald Berwick, the official in charge of Medicaid and
Medicare for the last year, recently said 20 to 30 percent of health
care spending is wasted and yields no benefit to patients.
He listed five reasons-overtreatment of patients, failure to
coordinate care; administrative complexity Pf~the health care sys-
tem,.burdensome rules and fraud, wrote Robert Pear of the New
York Times.

Mitt Romney, former governor of Massachusetts, looks like
the best bet for Republican candidate for U.S. President.
He and his wife Ann of 45 years have five sons and 16 grand-
children. Mitt's father George was a carpenter who never complet-
ed college and became CEO of American Motors and governor of
Michigan.
Mitt, a Mormon, said his life was influenced by a 30-month
mission to France among the lower middle class in the late 1960s.
As governor he worked well with a Legislature that was 85
percent Democrat, reported Parade Magazine on Dec. 4.

Some 36 people have been inducted into the Hardee County
Schools Hall of Fame. In alphabetical order, they are- Merle
Albritton, citrus management; Shelley Boone, educator; Doyle W.
Bryan, businessman/law enforcement; John W. Burton, lawyer;
Doyle E. Carlton Sr., Florida governor; Dr. Leffie M. Carlton Jr.,
surgeon; Dr. Leland F. Carlton, physician; Jesse Carter, aviation
specialist; Exie Farr Cathcart, educator; Catheryn McDonald
Coker, educator; Dr. Sylvia M. Collins, educator; Michael W.
Crews, lawyer; Standish Crews, agricultural specialist; J.W. (Bill)
Crews Jr., banker; Joe L. Davis Sr., real estate/citrus; and Brig.
Gen. Frederick Essig, military career.
Also Curtis Ezelle, county tax collector; Co. John C. Fralish,
military career; Charles Frazier, educator; Annie Whidden Hart,
educator; Dr. Harold Henderson, veterinarian; Valda Eloise Long,
medical missionary; John W. Maddox, educator; Col. Donell
Mathews, military career; Tom McEwen, journalist; Judge
Shirlyon McWhorter, attorney; Col. William K. Moran Jr., military
career; Lawrence A. Roberts, real estate; W. Bartley Sapp, educa-
FtoFLeel .'Shackelf6rd, grocery business; Ruth Southerlarid, edu-
cator; Leon T. Stephens, agricultural.specialist; Myrtie Strickland,
educator; Dunning Terrell, educator/coach; R. Perry Tomlinson,
minister; Dewey E. (Eddie) Whidden Jr., human factors consultant
(helping people overcome handicaps).

Zee Smith has been Hardee County's tax collector for 16 years
and does not plan to seek re-election. She has done a fine job.
Curtis Ezelle was a tax collector for 48 years and Lloyd Carlton for
24 years.
Hardee County is 91 years old and has had only three elected
tax collectors. The first tax collector was appointed.

The minimum wage in Florida on Jan. 1 went to $7.67 an hour.
The previous minimum was $7.31 an hour. The federal minimum
wage is $7.15 an hour.

The Charlotte Harbor National Estuary Program (CHNEP)
warns people to not eat sharks over 42 inches long and king mack-
erel over 30 inches long due to levels of methylmercury, quoting
the Florida Department of Health. In general short-lived fish,
shrimp and crabs can be eaten frequently.
Mercury, which is produced by coal-fired power plants, gets
into the atmosphere and rainwater and into tissue of long-lived fish
at dangerous levels.
In Charlotte Harbor seagrass acreage is 95 percent of that
found in the 1'950s and has expanded 10 percent since the record-
ed low in 1999. Over 90 percent of pre-development mangrove
area remains, but five acres are lost every year through permitted
development. Outboard motor props harm shallow seagrasses.
In the seven-county Charlotte Harbor watershed that includes
Polk and Hardee counties, only 57 percent of pre-development
freshwater wetland areas remain. Between 1990 and 2005 another
2.5 percent of freshwater wetlands were lost. This is due to resi-
dential and commercial development, agriculture and mining.
To reduce bacteria and nutrient levels in water, people can
maintain septic tanks, eliminate turfgrass, plant native gardens and
abide by local fertilizer ordinances. Peace River, Caloosahatchee
River, and Myakka River empty into Charlotte Harbor. Be wise in


CUUHRESYIMAGb
Donna and Max Daniels have made a career of portraying
the Lincolns.


They have had such great
successes that they have re-
ceived awards from the Na-
tional Association of Lincoln
Presenters for "Best Abraham,"
"Best Mary," "Best Abraham
and Mary Lincoln Team," and
"Lincoln Legend."
The Danielses have been fea-
tured on C-Span Cable Network
in the Lincoln-Douglas Debate
series, "Someone You Should
Know," on ABC/Channel 7 in'
Chicago, and the Investigating
History series' onr'the Histbiy'
Channel. Some of their per-
formance locations include the
Lincoln Home Visitor Center in
Springfield, Ill., and the Smith-
sonian Institution in Washing-
ton D.C.
A lot of time is spent
researching the Lincolns and,
therefore, the Danielses are able
to write their own scripts. They
make over 200 appearances
every year at various schools
and libraries, and for various
organizations.
Now they have come all the
way frqm Wheaton, Ill., to give
people here a chance to see
such a historical play and to
give back to the local communi-
ty, or "pay back old debts," as
Max Daniels put it.
All of the proceeds for this
event will go straight to the
Hardee County Cancer Support
Foundation to help people in
the community who have can-
cer.
Tickets are available at the
door for $10, or for $8 if you
buy them in advance at Sevigny
Eye Care at 735 N. Sixth Ave.
or Graham Income Tax Service
at 120 N. Fourth Ave., both in
Wauchula.
The play is suitable for fifth
graders to adults of all ages. It
will be held at the Historic
Wauchula City Hall Auditorium


at 225 E. Main St. tomorrow
(Friday) and Saturday begin-
ning at 7 p.m. and ending
around 8.


FINE FORGIVENESS REQUESTS:
09-173-L Heirs of Mary Lou Hernandez
09-173-M Heirs of Mary Lou Hernandez
09-173-NA Heirs of Mary Lou Hernandez
09-173-F Heirs of Mary Lou Hernandez

PROCEED WITH FORECLOSURE OF LIENS:
11-069-L Percilla Stevens
11-079-L William Silas Hardin

PROCEED WITH FILING OF LIENS:
11-019-M Nyet Vui & Chen Lip Wong
11-108-L Nyet Vui & Chen Lip Wong
11-121-L Nyet Vui & Chen Lip Wong
11-106-L Estate of Carl E Vanover


OLD CASES:
09-136-M
11-090-UDB

NEW CASES:
11-123-M
11-126-M
11-128-NA


Victory Investments
HSBC Bank USA N.A.


Nathaniel & Faith Braddock
Curtis Bell
Castillo/Castillo


INIESTIGATION
Continued From 1A


to reveal any evidence that
Choate or any other employee
ever covered up for Shepard
while he was absent from a
Southwest Florida Water
Management District meeting
or from any other work assign-
ment, allegedly using the coun-
ty time to meet up with his
female acquaintance, Allen
wrote.
It also found no evidence of
any violation of Hardee Coun-
ty's comprehensive harassment
policy.
Choate, Who also serves as
public safety director, said 'he
was relieved to be completely
exonerated of the accusations


.against him.
"You may rest assured that
what I do each and every day
for the safety and welfare of our
citizens has not changed," he
said in a statement.
"I will continue to dedicate
an enormous amount of time
and effort to ensure all of our
departments have everything
they need in order to protect
you and your family," Choate
said.
Albritton concluded, "The
iiivestigatioin is complete"and
closed as to those matter riAed
in tI'ie'eriiails that led tI''this
investigation."


310 Heard Bridge Rd
310 Heard Bridge Rd
310 Heard Bridge Rd
310 Heard Bridge Rd


822 S 10th Ave
411 N Illinois Ave


415 Heard Bridge Rd
415 Heard Bridge Rd
415 Heard Bridge Rd
619 Saunders St


217-221 E Main St
620 Green St


811 S Florida Ave
408 S Main St
401 S 1st Ave


Any interested persons) will be heard at this meeting. If any person decides to appeal
any decision made by the Board with respect to this request for which he will need a
verbatim record of the proceedings, he will need to ensure that such verbatim record is
made.

The City Commission of the City of Wauchula, Florida does not discriminate upon the
basis of any individual's disability status. This non-discriminatory policy involves every
aspect of the Commission's functions, including ones access to, participation, employ-
ment or treatment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable accommo-
dation as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26, Florida
Statutes, should contact the City Clerk at (863) 773-3131.
1:19e


oinu om A
Continued From IA


YOUR BUSINESS COULD

APPEAR HERE TOO!!
Contact
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels

At The Herald Advocate

115 S. 7th Ave. Wauchula

773-3255


NOTICE OF MEETING OF
CITY OF WAUCHULA
CODE ENFORCEMENT BOARD
225 E MAIN ST., SUITE 105
MONDAY, JANUARY 23, 2012
5:30 P.M.










PPt COVER
Continued From 1A


sion pass to Pioneer Park Days, and $25
in cash.
Second Place Drawing published
inside the special section, a free week-
long admission pass, and $15 in cash.
Third Place -- Artwork published
inside the special section, a free week-
lorg admission pass, and $10 in cash.
Rules for all entries are listed here,
and we can tell you the judges strictly
enforce them. Kids, that means pay
attention to what the rules say about size
and orientation, which means which way
you must turn the paper before you start
to draw.
For all, the rules are:
1.).The drawing must be the original
artwork of the entrant.
2.) The festival theme of antique
engines, farm machinery or pioneer life
must be depicted.
3.) The size of the drawing must be
8-1/2 inches wide and 11 inches high,
including the lettering "Pioneer Park
Days 2012." (Please take note that your
drawing must be vertically oriented.
Judges have routinely disqualified
entries that were 11 inches wide tor tail-
ure to follow the rules.)
4.) Pen and ink, charcoal, dark pencil
or marker may be used. The drawing


must be able to be reproduced in the
newspaper.
5.) Deadline is Friday, Feb. 17, at
noon. No exceptions.
6.) The name, address and a daytime
phone number for the entrant must be
taped to the back of the drawing. For
kids, include the age.
Bring your drawing to our office at
115 S. Seventh Ave. in Wauchula during
business hours or mail it to us at P.O.
Box 338, Wauchula, FL 33873.
Winners will be contacted after
judges make their selections.
Serving on our panel of judges this
year are two out-of-towners and one
local resident: Susan W. Roberts, senior
circuit judge and seventh-generation
Floridian; a mystery judge who wishes to
remain anonymous; and Jane Long, PPD
director.


So, start
everyone!


Week Ending: January 15, 2012
Weather Summary: Bitter temperatures, swept across the
State from the Panhandle down to the southern Peninsula. Most
areas across the Sunshine State experienced below freezing or near
freezing temperatures. Several stations reported lows in the 20s but
as the week progressed evening lows peaked in the mid-30s. Out of
the 36 stations recorded by the Florida Automated Weather
Network (FAWN) 19 stations reported lows in the 20s. There were
eight stations that recorded near freezing temperatures by FAWN.
Enjoyable daytime temperatures were in the 70s and 80s. Nearly all
stations received no measurable rainfall during the week.
Monticello and Quincy recorded over half an inch of precipitation.
Tallahassee reported the most rainfall at slightly over one inch.
Field Crops: Topsoil and subsoil moisture conditions were
rated mostly short to adequate. Areas across the Panhandle and
northern Peninsula experienced severe to extreme drought condi-
tions. Rains are needed to decrease the outbreak risk of wild land
fires. Sugarcane growers continue to assess damage caused by a
previous freeze and last week's freeze.
Fruits & Vegetables: Vegetables: All vegetable producing
counties received freezing,or below freezing temperatures during
Stheweek. Most vegetabj growers worked around the clock in the
fields to protect their crops and plants from the chilling tempera-
tures. Cold temperatures burned the tops of some plants with young
acreage expected to recover. Strawberry growers ran overhead
sprinklers to form ice caps on plants as cold protection. The freez-
ing temperatures hindered some marketing of vegetables that are
normally shipped this time of year. Normal supplies of snap beans,
sweet corn, bell peppers, cherry and plum tomatoes were market-
ed, Producers shipped light supplies of cabbage, celery, endive,
escarole, radishes, squash, and round tomatoes.
Livestock and Pastures: Statewide, the pasture condition was
slightly lower than the previous week. Drought and seasonal cold
have lowered pasture conditions in all areas of the State. Hay and
supplements were being fed. The cattle condition was 55 percent
fair. In the Panhandle and northern areas, most pasture was in poor
condition. Some stock ponds have gone dry that have not been this
dry in memory. Cool season forages in Washington County were
performing well on low damp sites, although cold weather has
slowed growth in many locations. Winter grasses in Walton County
improved some with the warmer weather, but most cattle were on
hay. Some ryegrass was being planted for forage. Hay stocks are
short. Most cattle were in fair to good condition. In the central area,
the pasture condition was mostly poor to fair. The condition of the
cattle varied from very poor to excellent, with most in fair condi-
tion. Ryegrass pasture was doing well. Supplemental hay was
being fed. In the southern area, most pasture was in poor to fair
condition. Frost killed a lot of grass in Manatee County, and pas-
ture grasses were burnt pretty badly from the freeze of two weeks
ago and could use some rain to help recover. Small grain winter
forage was hurt by the lack of soil moisture in Highlands County.
The condition of the cattle was poor to excellent, with most in fair
condition.
Citrus: Highs this week reached the upper 70s. while evening
and morning lows were in the 20s and 30s. Rainfall was light and
scattered in most of the citrus growing region. The highest record-
ed total was in Lake Alfred at 0.34 inches. Abnormally dry condi-
tions existed in most of the citrus growing areas, with moderate
drought conditions in the western and northernmost counties,
according to the U.S. Drought Monitor, last updated Jan 10, 2012.
Early and mid-season orange harvest was in full swing. Cultural
practices included young tree care and limited hedging and top-
ping.


ABOUT ... Classifieds
DEADLINE .... Tuesday noon
RATES ..........Minimum of $4.00 for 10 words. Each addi-
tional word is 22 cents. Ads in all capitals
are 32 cents per word. Headlines are $2 a
line. Blind ad box numbers are $3 extra.
BILLING........Ads must be pre-paid.
CLASSIFICATIONS:


Agriculture
Appliances
Automobile
Boats
Furniture
Help Wanted
Houses
Livestock
Lost & Found
Miscellaneous


Mobile Homes
Notices
Pets
Plants/Produce
Real Estate
Recreational
Rentals
Services
Wanted
Yard Sales


-Omni m


drawing, and good luck,





GENE L. BRIDGMAN
Gene L. Bridgman, 74. of
Wauchula, died on Saturday,
Jan. 14, 2012. at home.
He was born on July 29.
1938, at New Carlisle, Ohio,
and came to Wauchula from
Georgia in October 2005.
Gene was a 1971 graduate
of Watchtower Bible School
of Gilead. A minister with
Jehovah's Witnesses. he
helped over 15 men to
become ministers. He also
served as a missionary in
South America. While there,
he taught English to secre-
taries at the American school
and to bank officers. He was a
volunteer minister at Hardee
Correctional Institution and a
registered court interpreter.
He is survived by his wife,
Gail M. Bridgman of
Wauchula; one son, Michael
J. Bridgman of Jasper, Ga.:
one brother Bradley
Bridgman of Washington; and
one sister JoBeth Bridleman
of Hastings. Mich.
Memorial services will be
held on Saturday, Jan. 21,
2012, at 3 p.m. at Kingdom
Hall of i v.iah's~.Witnesses
on Altma Road..W"auchula
with TreyFlenmmeft ,d Rudy
Freijoso officiating.
Heartland Cremation &
Funerals
Avon Park




HEARTLAND

Creamation & Funerals
Serving Central Florida
863-453-4400


January 19.,2012, The Herald-Advocate 3A


FNL: Las Vegas Fun


Comes To Wauchula


By MARIA TRUJILLO
For The Herald-Advocate
Sometimes what happens in
Vegas doesn't always stay in
Vegas.
But now. thanks to Main
Street Wauchula Inc. and this
month's title sponsor Alan Jay
Automotive, that doesn't have
to be such a bad thing.
January's Friday Night Live
- tomorrow night is all
about the fun Las Vegas has to
offer. And what do most people
go to Vegas for? The chance to
win!
In the spirit of a Vegas casi-
no. there will be four Texas
Hold'em stations, three Black
Jack tables, two craps tables.
and one roulette wheel. These
tables are open to people of all
ages. since FNL is all about
bringing families together.
In addition to the tables, there
will be inflatables for kids.
For those who prefer not to


participate in the gaming. there
will be live entertainment pro-
vided by The Porchdogs. who
were a hit with crowds back in
2010. There will also be a few
vendors. and not to mention all
of the great downtown stores
and restaurants that will be
open.
FNL first featured a Vegas
Night in September of 2010.
and it turned out to be a big hit.
'"This is the second time we
have held this theme for Friday
Night Live." says Main Street
Director Jessica Newman. "It
was such a huge success we just
had to do it again. It is a lot of
fun for everyone, and you have
the chance to win some great
prizes!"
All it takes to start having fun
is $5. With that money you can
place bets or play a hand of
cards. Keep in mind that the
game tables close at 8:30 p.m..
so don't get there too late.


When you've had enough fun
at the tables, you can redeem
your winning chips for raffle
tickets. The more you win the
more chips you earn; the more
chips you earn the more raffle
tickets you get. Those tickets
can then be placed in the jars of
the prize or prizes you want.
In total. there will be between
10 and 15 prizes. All prizes are
valued at $50 or more.
Some of the prizes include a
$50 gas card. $50 card to
Sweetbay. an automotive gift
basket. products or gift cards
from local downtown business-
es and. the grand prize, a $400
gift card to the Hard Rock Hotel
& Casino in Tampa.
At 9 p.m. tickets will be
drawn to determine the win-
ners. You must be present in
order to win.
FNL will be tomorrow on
Main Street in downtown
Wauchula between 6 and 9 p.m.


The diesel engine is named for Rudolf Diesel, a German engineer who developed the device
in 1897. In 1913, he mysteriously disappeared aboard a ship bound for London.


<( Hardee Pure Air, Inc.
.. ....3--.87c_ 7_0122


SNow accepting dplicafions
Paul & Tina Rickett
fol 101 S. 9th Ave Wauchula, Fl. 33873 [f b, \
Cell: (863) 781-4376 or (863)781-4378 facebook.
For quality and assurance contact your hometown Rainbow distributor for
products and demonstrations. Asthma and allergy certified. c11:19-26c
I


SSun Tel
\


Tired of high telephone bills?
Well, say hello to SunTel.
Your new local telephone company.
S/ ____


Ready to start saving money? /
All you need is a broadband internet connection
and you can be saving money in no time! ,I
In addition we offer huge savings for businesses ., ,:
with many advanced features that are included or
offered at a greatly reduced rate.

S*Only $24.99/month (n`6 extrAfees or taxes)
S*No Service Contracts Required!
*No Bundles Required!
0 Keep your old phone number!
SWe work with any Broadband Provider
Take your local phone with you when Weekly
you travel Special!
Ve Local Support and Service First Month and
Installation Free!
fHurry! First 25
Customers only!

Br db.and ntenlr t .crr.c require l for -wreIl. Monthly r. orin g bllUn charge to customer rc lit cas .
Mot pre.-,Itn. customer phole numbers cn b ported r.,su T. but nt. all numbs. will qruallly. soc1:19p


1 19 2:9c


Lic. C10H1A0516


\ CURRENTLY ENROLLING INFANTS

THROUGH AFTER SCHOOL CARE


Homework Help


For After School Students


CALL ABOUT OUR NEW PART TIME

AVAILABILITY FOR 2-4 YEARS OLDS


Breakfast, Lunch, and Snack Provided

For All Students

Warm, loving, Christian atmosphere.

Vpk offered for 4/5 year olds.


2920 SCHOOLHOUSE RD

7' ZOLFO SPRINGS



Ar 735-8586


i i --- - -- -


I II


--- --~ -o~u~~rmYliP1;~*"~'~~I~I+B6~1PIL~CI~I~T







4A 'The Hllerald-Advocate, January 19, 2012


Obituaries

The longer I live, the more
beautiful life becomes.
-Frank Lloyd Wright


An L'ot lngj ol ( oU'y




-







MICHAEL WAYNE
JOHNSON SR.
Michael Wayne Johnson
Sr.. 56, of Wauchula, died on
Tuesday. Jan. 17, 2012 at
Florida Hospital Wauchula.
He was born March 15,
1955. in Wauchula, he was a
lifelong resident of the county.
He was p self-employed plas-
terer, truck driver and in con-
struction. He was a member of
Faith Assembly of God.
He was preceded in death
by granddaughter Candice
Fuston.
He is survived by his son
Michael Johnson Jr. of Wau-
chula; daughter Jessica John-
son and Aaron Fuston of Wau-
chula; mother Gladys Johnson
of Wauchula; brother Joseph
Johnson of Wauchula; and
grandchild Bryan Moralez.
Visitation is Friday, Jan.
20, 2012. at Faith Assembly
of God, Bowling Green, from
11 a.m. until noon, with funer-
al services at noon. Interment
will follow in Wauchula Cem-
etery.
Expressions of comfort may
be made at robartsfh.com.

FUNERAL HOME
WAUCHULA




Alt /l''t yn
/ 4 S^.

V.K!S


', ^. "




JESSIE "MARTY"
LAMAR KEETON
Jessie "Marty" Lamar
Keeton, 48, of Zolfo Springs,
passed away on Tuesday, Jan.
10,2012.
He was born July 8, 1963,
in Wauchula, and was a life-
long resident of the county.
Marty enjoyed' the outdoors;
he loved to fish, hunt and go-
ing camping.
He was preceded in death
by his mother, Vickey Lou
McCall Keeton.
Marty is survived by one
son, Jessie Lamar Keeton Jr.
of Zolfo Springs: two daugh-
ters, Jessica Ann Keeton of
Zolfo Springs and Victoria
Karleen Keeton of Wauchula;
his father Jessie Dock Keeton
of Zolfo Springs; fiancee
Laura Brady of Zolfo
Springs; two step-daughters
Melissa Kindrick of Sebring
and Ashley Rozier of Macon,
Ga.; three stepsons, James
Brady of Hawkinsville, Ga.,
Robert Brady of Columbus,
Ga. and Timothy Brady of
Hawkinsville Ga; one sister
Wanda Wilkerson of Zolfo
Springs; eight grandchildren;
a niece D)ana Lucas of Fort
Meadc; and several other
nieces and nephews.
Visitation was from noon
to 1 p.m. on Saturday, Jan. 14,
2012, with services at I p.m.
in the C'lhapel of Ponger-
,Kays-Grady Funeral Home,
4(04 W. Palmetto St., in
Wauchula, with Pastor Joey
Taylor officiating. Interment
followed at Bowling Green
Cemetery.
On-line condolences may
be made at www.Ponger-
KaysGrady.co m.
( ,',T,,j, -,T- )\(1J!y:-;- (dYj
Funeral Home &
Cremation Services
Wauchula

\.,\\


A9 Lcoi19'g jtle110.uy
GRABIEL "PAUL"
VALDEZ SR.
Grabiel "Paul" Valdez.Sr.,
50, of Jonesville, N.C.. and
formerly of Wauchla, died on
Wednesday, Jan. 11,2012.
Born on Jan. 24, 1961, in
Rockley County, Texas, he
had been a lifelong resident of
Wauchula before moving to
North Carolina two years ago.
He was a laborer and a
Catholic.
Survivors include son Gra-
biel Valdez Jr. of Jonesville,
N.C.; daughters Patsy Valdez,
Vicky Valdez and Paula
Valdez, all of Jonesville, N.C.;
six brothers Chris Lopez,
Arturo Valdez, Joe Valdez and
Elias Valdez, all of Wauchula,
Rudy Valdez of Marion, Ind.,
and Gilbert Valdez of Brad-
enton; five sisters, Lupe
Valdez, Alicia Rivas, Becky
Rios, Melba Rodriguez and
Kathy Martinez, all of
Wauchula; and 13 grandchil-
dren.
Funeral services were held
on Saturday, Jan..14, 2012, at
6 p.m. at Robarts Garden
Chapel with Father Juan
Carlos Sack officiating.
Expressions of comfort may
be made at robartsfh.com.

FUNERAL HOME
WAUCHULA




9I ouivg JMemony
I 1Oit #O#


DANNIE (DAN)
EUGENE "POP"
DAVIS
Dannie (Dan) Eugene
"Pop" Davis, 75, of Wau-
chula, died on Sunday, Jan.
15-, 201- ; at his daughter's
hlane in'Wauchula.
He was born March 31,
1936, at Tutor Key, Ky., and
came to Hardee County from
Louisiana in 1985. He was a
mechanic.
He is survived by three
daughters, Debbie Johnson of
Wauchula, and Gina Town-
send and Sheila Lawrence,
both of Mount Sterling, Ky.;
several brothers and sisters;
seven grandchildren; and six
great-grandchildren.
Visitation is Thursday, Jan.
19, 2012, from 6 to 8 p.m. at
Robarts Garden Chapel. Fun-
eral services and burial are in
Kentucky.
Expressions of comfort may
be made at robartsfh.com.

FUNERAL HOME
WAUCHULA

wff^i


CHRISTMAS, NEW YEARS DONE!

Christmas and New Years done-and-gone, Yippie!
All bowl games lost or won now Historeee ...
Parties planned, enjoyed ... over till Next Year
Now big Sales Banners wave in gusting winds.

Oh the bills that will inundate my soul
Skimpy wallets ... benefactor's shopping tolls
Now the pounds seem here to stay till late May
When daughter's wedding bills come due, June's pay!
Hot summer's relief
... winter's heating bills
But cooler's air blows July through September
Then things begin all over once again!
Where be hope for all hopeless refrains

When all turkeys are once more brought to town
Gobbling up stashed-away-wealth, leaving frowns!
Oh rest me now in green fields of clover
Imagining they be crisp, $$$$ bills ...
Rescuing from foreclosure
-Thomas W. Graham
Fort Myers

PUBLISH YOUR ORIGINAL POETRY!
Poet's Place is a feature which relies solely on reader input.
Only your original work may be submitted. Send your poetry
to: Poet's Place, The Herald-Advocate, PO. Box 338,
Wauchula, FL 33873.


1*


"They were



wonderful."

We hear kind words consistently.

We're proud that people feel

Comfortable enough with us

to openly tell us how much
they appreciate
what.we -4 r them

In fact, it's this

appreciation that drives

us to offer the very

best in comfort,

compassion and service.


@ROBARTS
SFAMILYFUNERALHOME
View Obits at robartsfh.com

529 WEST MAIN STREET WAUCHULA, FLORIDA 33873 863-773-9773 ,


The same Beautiful Location, Just a
new set of Time Trusted Names.


Ponger-Kays-Grady Funeral Homes &
Cremation Services


404 West Palmetto Street.
Wauchula, Florida 33873
PH. (863) 773-6400
www.PongerKaysGrady.com


i'
Vr


In 1925 Bryant L Coker (1903-1986) came to
Wauchula from Arcadia and opened this beautiful
funeral home as Bryant Coker Funeral Home and
honorably served the people of Hardee County for
over forty years.

In 1964 L. Curry Raley (1937-2011) came to
Wauchula and in 1972 the funeral home became
Coker-Raley Funeral Home until 1976 when it
became Curry Raley Funeral Home and provided
services for the people of Hardee County for another
thirty years.

Now in 2011 another long trusted family of funeral
service professionals from Arcadia are here in Hardee
County to bring back the service and trust you
deserve, at a time when you need it the most.


Locally Owned and Operated by
Licensed Funeral Directors

Allyson Ponger Karnes, LFD / Owner / FDIC
Edward R. Ponger, LFD / Owner
Floyd O. Rice, Jr., LFD
Delmos L. Newsome, LFD


OBIT NOTICE
The Herald-Advocate pub-
lishes, at no charge, obituaries
marking the deaths of current
or former Hardee County res-
idents. The obituary may in-
clude occupation, church and
club affiliations, military serv-
ice, special awards or honors
and a list of survivors. Paid
obituaries may take the place
of our free notices.
Forms for a free obituary
are available at our office or at
local funeral homes. Com-
pleted forms, however, must
be submitted through a' fu-
neral home:We cannot accept
forms from individuals.


A Time Trusted Local Landmark!


;i. :1


F
'*f. a ;-j!


.":re~ '"d~i~



"Tli~ ~





January 19, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 5A


NEW YEAR CELEBRATION
mi II IwI


Jeep


Ut AI


Power Windows & Locks, Tilt, Cruise,
CD, Remote Keyless Entry, Automatic
5 YEAR/100,000 MILE POWERTRAIN WARRANTY


M.S.R.P
LRoNJOYDiscount


s21,620
- 4,090


LaFNarY PRICE
$17,530


Savings



Power Windows & Locks, Tilt, Cruise, CD, Remote Keyless Entry,
Boston Acoustics Speakers, MP3, Navigation, Leather
5 YEAR/100,000 MILE POWERTRAIN WARRANTY


M.S.R.P
RLRHJ.i Discount


s27, 160
- 6,562


.LRN JrYPRICE
s20,598


Power Windows & Locks, Tilt, Cruise,
CD, Remote Keyless Entry, Automatic
5 YEAR/100,000 MILE POWERTRAIN WARRANTY


M.S.R.P
L LHNJRDiscount


s25,215
-4,517


ALONJOYPRICE
20, 698

Total



Power Windows & Locks, Tilt, Cruise, CD,
Leather, Navigation, Hard Top, Remote Keyless Entry
5 YEAR/100,000 MILE POWERTRAIN WARRANTY


M.S.R.P
RLaMNJaDiscount


s35,555
- 4,665


ILN J. PRICE r-
30 890 STKOE600474
^"""Tota K.


* IkI


S

F
I


Power Windows & Locks, Tilt, Cruise, CD, Remote Keyless
Automatic, Trailer Brake Control, Skid Plates, A/C
5 YEAR/100,000 MILE ENGINE WARRANTY &
3 YEAR/180.000 MILE TRANSMISSION WARRANTY
M.S.R.P s45,695 [ FA EB SK
MLRNJrDiscount 9,697 1 RAn.Iv


6RLNjaRYPRICE
$35,998


Power Windows & Locks, Tilt, Cruise, CD, Chrome Package,
Trailer Tow, Remote Keyless Entry, Automatic, Hard Top
5 YEAR/100,000 MILE POWERTRAIN WARRANTY


M.S.R.P
LaNffHaYDiscount

dWAF MAL& AAMUAF


EiLfr r J oY PRIC;
$25,998


$29,220 -
- 3,222

-%rm% taadaNunr


- I' 'jqIIMu'[I ,
Power Windows & Locks, Tilt, Cruise, CD,
Leather, Trailer Tow, Remote Keyless Entry
5 YEAR/100,000 MILE POWERTRAIN WARRANTY


M.S.R.P
RaLNJOYDiscount


Total ,^
savings ;ilj
$9,697

Entry,


"41,235
-7,687


SL aN JY PRICE
$33,548


Ti



Power Windows & Locks, Tilt, Cruise, CD, Automatic,
Power Driver Seat, Remote Start, Remote Keyless Entry
5 YEAR/100,000 MILE POWERTRAIN WARRANTY


M.S.R.P
RLYNJqRY Discount


s51,280
-11,281


aLaN JaYPRICE
$39,999


-k Is MW


1401 U.S. HIGHWAY 17 S., Wauchula
u FOLfN)I .JOCOM


#E600365


" -* : -- L


J- eep


* (863) 386-6236


S H : o nF O -C Oose S


-- --I-- ------c"--


I l--y-m


L '''' J


' ---~-


-


STK"E65U08


';'~C-~----U


AlilkilliliTilITH


1 1 llIll f







6A The Herald-Advocate, January 19, 2012


Free Community Health


Fair
The community h
"Wellness at Any Age
(Thursday) from 8 a.r
at the Hardee County
Center in Wauchula.
Sponsoring the eve
Florida Department
Affairs' S.H.I.N.E.
Health Insurance '
Elders), the West
Florida Area Agency o
Nu-Hope Elder Care
and Florida Hospital V
The community hea
free and open to all a
items of interest for
Group.
It will feature prof
trained volunteers
S.H.I.N.E. program
provide counseling on


Today In WC
health fair- Medicare, Medicare Advantage
-" is today and Part D.
n. to noon Vendors from many agencies
Agri-Civic will provide information and
resources on healthy lifestyles
nt are the and provide education on how
of Elder to "Age Well at Any Age."
(Serving There will be no-cost health
Needs of screenings, including blood-
Central sugar testing and pulse and oxy-
on Aging, gen levels. The Parish Nurses
Services will be providing blood pres-
Vauchula. sure checks and more.
alth fair is The Hardee County Sheriff's
Lges, with Office will provide information
any age on what to do in an emergency
situation. I
essionally Door prizes will be given out
from the throughout the day, so come
who can early and stay for the entire
SOriginal event.


auchula
The Agri-Civic Center is
located at 515 Civic Center Dr.,
which is at the corner of
Stenstrom and Altman roads in
southwest Wauchula.
S.H.I.N.E. provides free and
unbiased counseling to Medi-
care beneficiaries and their
loved ones on topics such as
Medicare, Medicaid, long-term
care and prescription assis-
tance. Seniors and caregivers
who are unable to attend the
event can call the toll-free
Florida Elder Helpline at 1-800-
96-Elder (1-800-963-5337) and
ask to speak with a volunteer
counselor. More information is
available at the website
FloridaSHINE.org.


PRECO: Putting Things On


Poles Puts Lives On Line


What do yard-sale signs, bas-
ketball hoops, deer stands, satel-
lite dishes and birdhouses have
in common?
They are often found attached
to utility poles.
This is more than just an
inconvenience to electric utili-
ties. In fact, safety issues caused
by unapproved pole attachments
place the lives of line workers
and the public in peril.
It may seem innocent, but a
small nail partially driven into a
pole can pierce a line worker's
glove, stripping away critical
protection from high-voltage
electricity. Objects can also
cause climbing gear to "kick
out" lineman's lingo for the
failure of gear to penetrate a
pole, possibly exposing a work-
er to a dangerous or deadly fall.
Unauthorized pole attach-
ments violate the National


Electrical Safety Code, a set of
guidelines created for the pur-
pose of safeguarding people
during the installation, opera-
tion, or maintenance of electric
lines and associated equipment.
"Our line crews climb utility
poles at all hours of the day and
night, in the worst of condi-
tions," explains Van Crawford,
vice president of operations for
Peace River Electric Coopera-
tive. "Anything attached to util-
ity poles can create serious haz-
ards for our line personnel.
"Sharp objects like nails,
tacks, staples or barbed wire
can puncture rubber gloves and
other safety equipment, making
linemen vulnerable to electro-
cution," he points out.
PRECO line workers are
reporting more poles used as
community bulletin boards,
satellite mounts and even sup-


port legs for deer stands, lights
and carports.
Not only do these attach-
ments put line crews at risk,
anyone placing these items on
poles comes dangerously close
to energized power lines with
thousands of volts of energy
pulsing overhead. It is always
wise to keep any structure at
least 10 feet away from utility
poles.
PRECO has an excellent
safety record with over 475,000
safe hours worked, so its asks
residents to help keep this num-
ber "climbing" by removing
any unauthorized items at-
tached to utility poles. Un-
authorized fixtures will be
removed by PRECO line per-
sonnel; the co-op is not respon-
sible for any losses if an item is
damaged or destroyed during
removal.


School Board
Changes Meeting
The Hardee County
School Board has resched-
uled its bi-weekly meeting.
Instead of meeting on
Thursday, Jan. 26, it will
meet on Monday, Jan. 23.
The meeting will be in the
usual location, 230 S. Florida
Ave., Wauchula at 5 p.m.
Homeless Survey
Begins Monday
The annual statewide
Point-In-Time survey to
count homeless individuals
in Hardee County will begin
on Monday and continue
through Jan. 31, if needed.
The survey is important to
getting funding for the coun-
ty's needy.
Volunteers are needed.
Anyone who can help should
come to the Hardee Help
Center, 713 E. Bay St.,
Wauchula at 9 a.m. Monday
for a brief training and setting
teams for each area of the
county. For more informa-
tion, call 773-0034.
Library Offers
Computer Classes
In cooperation' with the
Heartland Library Coopera-
tive, the Hardee County
Public Library is offering a
variety of computer classes
on Tuesday mornings and
other scheduled times. In-
troduction to the.Internet will
allow hands-on-experience
in surfing the World Wide
Web (www). Word Process-
ing encompasses text for-
matting, and teaches users
the cut, copy and paste func-
tions.
Other classes are Intro-
duction to PCs, Intermediate
PCs and Web Based E-Mail.
For schedules and informa-
tion, call the library at 773-
6438.


The Southwest Florida Water
Management District (SWFWMD)
announces the following public
meeting to which all interested
persons are invited:
Governing Board Meeting,
Committee Meetings, Subcom-
mittee Meetings and Public
Hearing: Consider SWFWMD
business. Some Board mem-
bers may participate in the
meeting via communications
media technology.
DATE/TIME: Tuesday, January
31, 2012; 9 a.m.
PLACE: SWFWMD Tampa
Service Office, 7601 US Highway
301 North, Tampa FL 33637
(note: this is a change of location
from the published calendar)
A copy of the agenda may be
obtained by contacting:
WaterMatters.org Boards,
Meetings & Event Calendar; 1
(800) 423-1476 (FL only) or (352)
796-7211
For more Information, you may
contact: Luanne.Stout@water-
matters.org 1(800)423-1476 (FL
only) or (352)796-7211, x4605
(Ad Order EXE0184)
If any person decides to appeal
any decision made by the Board
with respect to any matter consid-
ered at this meeting or hearing,
he/she will need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceed-
ing is made, which record
includes the testimony and evi-
dence from which the appeal is to
be issued.
Anyone requiring reasonable
accommodation as provided for
in the Americans with Disabilities
Act should contact the District's
Human Resources Director, 2379
Broad Street, Brooksville, Florida
34604-6899; telephone (352)
796-7211, ext. 4702 or 1-800-423-
1476 (FL only), ext. 4702; TDD
(FL only) 1-800-231-6103; or
email to ADACoordinator
@swfwmd.state.fl.us 1:19c
1 .i y


Center For Great Apes


Achieves Global Honor


The Global Federation of
Animal Sanctuaries has an-
nounced that the Center for
Great Apes in Wauchula has
achieved accreditation.
"It is hard to encapsulate in a
few words all that is so right
with this sanctuary," states Patty
Finch, executive director of the
federation. "Patti Ragan, found-
er of the sanctuary, as well as
their chief veterinarian each has
over 20 years' experience in
working with great apes, which
means that the orangutans and
chimpanzees are receiving a
level of informed care that is
simply unsurpassed.
"And the facility itself is
inspiring, with a mile of elevat-
ed chutes that allow the great
apes to meander throughout the
sanctuary and observe other
groups of apes, or even walk
themselves to the infirmary for
health checks," she added.
The accreditation means the
Center for Great Apes meets the
comprehensive and rigorous
definition of a true sanctuary
and is providing humane and
responsible care of the primates,
meeting rigorous and peer-
reviewed standards for opera-
tions, administration and veteri-
nary care established by GFAS;
which is the only globally rec-
ognized organization providing
standards for identifying legiti-


mate animal sanctuaries.
The accreditation status also
provides a clear and trusted
means for the public, donors and
government agencies to recog-
nize the Center for Great Apes
as an exceptional sanctuary.
Established in 1993, the
Center for GreatApes is a 100-
acre sanctuary east of Wauchula
in which more than 40 orang-
utans and chimpanzees have
room to live in safety and in the
company of their own species.
It is the only sanctuary specifi-
cally dedicated to orangutans in
the United States.
Ragan says, "Most of our
primates have either been used
in the entertainment industry as
circus performers, movie actors
or as props in advertisements,
where they were worked in
these situations as infants and
juveniles until they became too
strong to be safely handled by
trainers. Others came out of the
exotic pet trade, where they
were pulled away from their
own mothers to be sold as pets
to private owners.
"In either case," she contin-
ues, "coming out of these envi-
ronments, they are rarely ac-
cepted by accredited zoos and
could never be returned to the
wild. So we offer a permanent
home to these special great apes
where they can live out their


For the week ended January 12, 2012
At the Florida Livestock Auctions. receipt totaled 11,213
compared to 6,420 last week, and 8,622 last year. According to
the Florida Federal-State Livestock Market News Service:
Compared to one week ago, slaughter cows steady to 4.00 high-
er, bulls steady to 2.00 higher, feeder steers 2.00 to 4.00 higher.
heifers steady to 2.00 higher, steer calves and heifer calves most-
4y 2.00 to 3.00 higher, replacement cows 2.00 to 4.00 higher.


Feeder Steers:





Feeder Heifers:





Slaughter Cows:
63.00-72.00
Slaughter Bulls:
84.00-98.00


Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2
200-300 lbs 185.00-240.00
300-400 lbs 162.50-215.00
400-500 lbs 142.50-185.00
500-600 lbs 130.00-163.00

Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2
200-300 lbs 150.00-200.00
300-400 lbs 138.00-165.00
400-500 lbs 125.00-161.00
500-600 lbs 116.00-148.00

Lean: 750-1200 lbs 85-90 percent

Yield Grade No. 1-2 1000-2100 lbs


lives with dignity in large
space, with appropriate nutri-
tion and companionship with
their own species."
An example of the center's
work is the recent rescue of
Clyde, a 44-year-old male
chimpanzee who was captured
in Africa as an infant and then
sold to a family as a pet.
Clyde had not seen another
chimpanzee during those years
and had lived his whole life in a
small indoor cage. Due to a lack
of sunshine, his skin is very
white, and he's extremely thin.
But, after only six weeks at the
Center for Great Apes, Clyde is
beginning to move and walk
better and is gaining weight.
And, he loves napping in the
sunlight.
Finch of the Global Federa-
tion of Animal Sanctuaries
advises, "For everyone moved
by this rescue: Long after this
rescue has taken place, the
sanctuary will still have the
enormous ongoing costs of car-
ing for these magnificent
beings. Please consider even a
small donation via an automatic
deduction from your credit card
each month. Such ongoing
funding allows the sanctuary to
plan responsibly. These chim-
panzees and orangutans deserve
our continued support, as dis-
pensation for all the suffering
they have endured at human
hands."
The Global Federation of
Animal Sanctuaries is a 501(c)3
nonprofit organization dedicat-
ed to the sole purpose of
strengthening and supporting
the work of animal sanctuaries
worldwide.
The Center for Great Apes in
Wauchula also is a 501(c)(3)
nonprofit organization, and all
contributions are tax deductible
as allowed by law. Visit its web-
site at centerforgreatapes.org.




DOMESTIC

VIOLENCE

Don't Know Where
To Turn For Help?

CALL THE CRISIS LINE

1 (800) 500-1119
tfc-dh


Only I can change my life. No
one can do it for me.
-Carol Bum*tt

The Southwest Florida Watqr
Management District (SWFWMD)
announces the following publ c
meeting to which all interested
persons are invited:
Bartow Service Office Govern-
ing Board Subcommittee.
Meeting: Discuss subcommit4
tee business including facility
rehabilitation, construction and
leasing options. Governing
Board members may attend.
DATE/TIME: Thursday, January
26, 2012; 8 a.m.
PLACE: SWFWMD Bartow
Service Office, 170 Century
Boulevard, Bartow FL 33830
A copy of the agenda may be
obtained by contacting:
WaterMatters.org Boards,
Meetings & Event Calendar; 1
(800) 423-1476 (FL only) or
(352)796-7211
For more information, you may
contact: time.parkerson@water-
matters.org 1(800)492-7862 (FL
only) or (863)534-1448, x6006
(Ad Order EXE0185)
If any person decides to appeal
any decision made by the Board
with respect to any matter consid-
ered at this meeting or hearing,
he/she will need to ensure that
verbatim record of the proceed-
ing is made, which record
includes the testimony and vi-
dence from which the appeal isto
be issued.
Anyone requiring reasonable
accommodation as provided for
in the Americans with Disabilities
Act should contact the DistricVs
Human Resources Director, 2379,
Broad Street, Brooksville, Florida
34604-6899; telephone (352)
796-7211, ext. 4702 or 1-800-423-
1476 (FL only), ext. 4702; TDD
(FL only) 1-800-231-6103; !or
email to ADACoordinator
@swfwmd.state.fl.us 1:19c


Your Business Could Appear Here!
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels
At The Herald Advocate
I ___/


PENiNSUJi:; '-A:'






January 19, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 7A


U. : ... ...- ". 74l
"Al


BIrrP posSS'~usssg^'! Ira




-7 , V p o z s. . c p 3 ^ M
'AIR%
bpg ~.~.bl~hEY ~ -- ~- -. i si
l~~~~~~~s~** rq~s~'~ ~ A'~~98:


4. --


L


FL'8~


7'
7 7 /( I -.

--. .-"'"'"-*- r-.


4


I


yNewiv mount Zion


,Nh.E urc
tLuther King Jr. i 4 e.
,,\ W'n~ .h. eFloida" 338s73


/" |11-, ,-'e

-do-
r., d w *. a' D9*
*- *.Si >r. -- ', 1 : ,,


.- -* -~*...-& *-. . n -
-g h cm wr r '
0-06~~ r I.
~- r. ft k
f~m ffi


mom
^ *1 <.-*' *,Z '^^^ "" r^ '
-a..0 'A
~. s *S
.. .* r 'r~~ LW'' >*- -'_ .
. ~ *I .- ;

.se .. I > a 1R w ** ,I1 *1 ..
*4*Sr*^- --tts **S^
kf. r.^^ ir -! : r.*^la *"*^IC :^ ^ *
|~ 8 1~~ '- O^i'.f"^.BW~ll- <' *\,\'
I, ,-^ ^ ,Maiy I W~ y^.^


" R1- SISTER NO

^mocm'~ij~


j %d


1
iS~. SI~


aQR~a~A~h~ 5,


rln.A


S.
P 4.


-I U.


~' d
P'I ~i
b-
/If i''


By MARIA TRiUJILA77

By RALPH HARRISON


'i i r


4, 1.


TI.) ^ y. ". p ..*
T* 'alin 5, l r, ~
* ,, ^ b I~ ,* SI Ie B~flK


J-
4~~i


:..7 -


7V

"-^


m


..


a r-
t' -~
r.: i


,-
5 1 ''
4
,.
~- ;
'5 ~r ~
I
~ -. 1


- ;y


.r


, ,,,, *,


--


=I~a~81


CL..
~;C*
M :1
~u...


r


~iPssrri~ ~8~la


~---1


Or- -


II
Pa~~
"r


''
I
~8:; d I


Y
L a:
~"'


S;a~J~R. Idej


l!'i
i


l~slsllr~slt~;r~


ak


&IpR

s~


r glp
ri^Ms







8A The Herald-Advocate, January 19, 2012


SHAPE UP WHILE SITTING DOWN
Dear Savvy Senior,
What can you tell me about chair exercisesfor seniors? I have
some balance problems along with arthritis in my left knee which
limits my mobility. A friend recommended chair exercises as a good
way to get moving, but I don't know where to start. What can you
tell me?
Sedentary Senior

Dear Sedentary,
For seniors with balance problems or other health conditions
that restrict their mobility, chair exercises are a gentle and safe way
to shape up while you're sitting down. Here's what you should
know, along with some tools and resources to help get you started.

Chair Exercises.
Many people find it hard to believe, but the health benefits of
chair exercises can be significant for seniors. Chair exercises can







FOR LOCATIONS


Sliced Free "" m Lb. j
Ed's Fresh Whole Boston Butt
PAN PORK ROAST
SAUSAGE \Twin Pack



Lb. Lb.
Fresh Picnic Ham................................ 98 lb.
Fryer Leg Quarters (10 Ib. Bag)................ 70
Fryer Leg Quarters (40 lb. Box) No limit.... $ 9.99
Boneless Skinless Breast (Family Pack) .....1 .98 lb.
Bone-in Pork Loin (1/2 or whole) Cut free.... $1.69 lb.


......mm....
H'


SOFF::
$60 Purchase
N Coupon Required. Limit one per person
S Nt validwith any other offer Expires 1i25/12 5
Smm... mm.n mmn ...mm.

WHITE H:
POTATOES

5 Ib.$1 29
bag Lb.
.Coupln Required. Limit one per person
i Not valid with any other olfer Expites 1/25i12
Ii . . ... .
SHURFRESH H:
BREAD


W Each
S Coupon Require d Limit m ptio peftfson
I Not valid with any ollher oiler Epires 1 '2i/1 2


........imm......
S IBP H



i $ 1 *, I
'* SliS Family
Pack
.* :Lb. .
I Coupon Peq mired. Lim one peper person
N Not valid with any other offer Expires 1/25/12
Smmm......m...mmm.. i
. .... .... *
SVINE RIPE H'
TOMATOES


Lb.
S Coupon Required. Iimit one per person
S Not valid with any other oer Expires 1!25i12


LETTUCE H


9 Head
Coupon Required I.im one per person
SNot valid with any other offer. L ireB 1/25!12

. . m I I.I..
WacKy Wedmsday



: *OFF:

S100 Order
S Couuon Rcquired imit ulle oi person
I Not valid wlit any other offer. Expires 1!25!12
a........................


I. tl Harvest Double Guarantee
Ib ^ If nYou 'r N'N Salisfed, We'll Replacr the Product d Refunid inr iAowy!


help you build muscle strength and endurance, improve your flex-
ibility and balance, and boost your circulation and metabolism.
Your doctor or physical therapist can be great resources to help
you learn more. All you need is a sturdy, four-legged chair that sits
flat on the floor. Don't use a rocking chair or a large cushioned
chair that doesn't provide support.
To get you started, there are lots of great instructional DVDs,
VHS tapes and books you can purchase to guide you through a
wide variety of chair exercises that you can do at home. To find
these products try websites like Sit And Be Fit (sitandbefit.org,
888-678-9438), a non-profit organization that has a chair exercise
television program 'on many PBS stations around the country, and
sells dozens of DT'Os, videotapes, CDs and books on different
exercise program .; .-pending on your needs and ailments.
Another great chair fitness option you should check into is
"chair yoga," which is ideal for improving your flexibility and
range-of-motion. Some good resources for finding chair yoga
instructional videos and DVDs are yogaheart.com,
peggycappy.com and strongerseniors.com which also offers chair
exercise DVDs.
Also see Chair Dancing International (chairdancing.com, 800-
551-4386), a company that offers a variety of chair-exercise videos
which incorporate gentle no-impact dance moves into the routines.

Group Classes
If you don't like exercising alone or need some motivation,
call your local senior center to see if it may offer chair exercise
classes many do. Or, consider joining SilverSneakers (silver-
sneakers.com, 888-423-4632) or Silver&Fit (www.silver-
andfit.com, 877-427-4788). These are fitness programs offered in
fitness centers, gyms and YMCAs that offer special exercise class-
es designed exclusively for seniors, including chair exercisers.
Or, look at your local businesses. One of them might already
offer just what you are looking for. Scour the ads each Week.

Exercise Equipment
There are also several pieces of equipment you might want to




Bowling Green Buys


A New Police Car


By JIM KELLY
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Bowling Green City
Commission at its monthly
meeting Jan. 10 agreed to a new
police car for $36,950. The lone
bidder was Bobby Jones Ford in
Agusta, Ga.
City Clerk Pam Northup said
the deadline for city manager
applications is Jan. 20. as of
Jan. 10 there were about 12
applicants. The salary is
$50,000 to $80,000.
Louis Esquival wants to put a
manufactured home at 423
Sellers Street. City attorney
Gerald Buhr and the Central
Florida Regional Planning
Council will review the request.
The property is zoned R-2.

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 252011CP000100

IN RE: ESTATE OF
CHRISTOPHER MATTHEW
OWENS
deceased.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the
estate of CHRISTOPHER
MATTHEW OWENS, deceased,
whose date of death was October
9, 2011, and whose social securi-
ty number Is xxx-xxx-xxxx, is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Hardee County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is
P.O. Drawer 1749, Wauchula,
Florida 33873.
The names and addresses of
the personal representative and
the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims
or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this
notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons having
claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate must file their
claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE.
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of the first publication
of this notice is January 12, 2012.
Personal Representative:'
VICKY OWENS
(3001 Doss Road)
Zolfo Springs, Florida 33890
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Andrew B. Jackson,
Attorney At Law
150 North Commerce Avenue
P.O. Box 2025
Sebring, FL 33871-2025
Telephone: (863) 382-3686
Florida Bar No. 0038826
1:12,19c


Police officer Dan Arnold has
resigned to accept a job with the
Hardee Sheriff's Office. The
seven-person city police depart-
ment now has one vacancy.
At its Dec. 13 meeting the
commission agreed to advertise
the vacant city manager posi-
tion.
Donal Chancey requested a
rezoning request for Rafik
Halim for a house built in 1950
and remodeled in 1991 that the
ower wants to rent or sell as a
triplex. The house is located at
4517 Chester Ave. Code en-
forcement said the house could
not be used as a triplex. The
zoning is R-1 and the request is
for R-3. The request will be sent
to Central Florida Regional
Planning Council.
At Mayor Perry Knight's
request the commission agreed
to advertise for bids to sand-
blast and t'epaint the two city
garbage ,tracks.
Commissioner Shirley Tuck-
er asked how the city keeps up
with maintenance of equip-
ment.
The commission approved an.
ordinance to amend the text and
maps of the city's comprehen-
sive plan.


purchase to enhance your chair exercises. To boost your circula-
tion, balance and leg strength consider a pedal exerciser (prices
range from $25 to over $100), which will give you a bicycle-dype
workout from your chair. It can also be set on a table to exercise
your arms. The Sit-N-Stroll Portable Foot Exerciser is another
handy tool for stimulating leg circulation.
And for chair strength training exercises, there are elastic
bands, small hand weights and medicine balls you can purchase for
around $10 that provide muscle-toning resistance. You can find all'
these products at sporting goods stores, or online at amazon.com.
Cans of soup, water bottles or milk containers filled with water or
sand could also be used (like small hand weights) for resistance
training.
Another great strength training tool you should know about is
the Resistance Chair (it costs $280). This is an all-in-one home fit-
ness system that helps senior's maintain and improve their strength
from a safe, seated position. To learn more see vqactioncare.com or
call 800-585-4920.


Oasis RV News
By Georgianna Mills
--------j_____________._


WELCOME
We welcome Tom and Mar-
yellen Hopkins, busy getting
settled into their home for the
winter. With the new year start-
ing, we have several new peo-
ple in the park. We hope you
have stopped by and welcomed
them. They are Betty Douglas,
Peter and Gail Weileder, Gary
and Lynn McKinnon from
Canada, Saul and Kay Chander,
and Roy and Eveyln Fulford.
Glad to see J.R. and Carolyn
back safe and sound with their
two puppies. Ed and Jackie
Hodges from Cory, Pa., also
pulled in to enjoy the nice warm
weather that we have been hav-
ing.
Welcome, one and all. We are
sure you will enjoy your stay
with us. Don't forget to look at
the calendar of events, as it sure
is full.

AROUND THE PARK
We have been very concerned
about Stanley Sommers, who
was rushed to Tampa hospital.
Great news! Just heard that he
is coming home today. Hooray!
Hooray! He has been greatly
missed.
Winnie Dewitt has recovered
well from her knee surgery and
plans to head south after she is
released from the doctor.
Ray and Jo Moore are doing
better, after a little illness.
Audrey Semler is doing quite
well as we see she is out riding
Sher bike again. Gary Hyde, has
recovered well after his daugh-
ters were down.
Good going, guys, let's stay
well for the next few' months.

SUNDAY SERVICE
We are so glad that the Rev.
Dr. Trent Swanson, of the First
Baptist Church in Zolfo
Springs, makes time out of his
busy day to come to the Oasis


for a Sunday service at 3:30
p.m.
His sermon this week was
"No faith, No future," from
Genesis 15.
The music was provided by
Will and Nancy Pennie, on bass
and dobro, Les Day on banjo,
Chris Anderson on 'guitar, and
Lou Mothersbaugh on the man-
dolin. Lou blessed us with a
song that our own Warren
Pennie, wrote, "Just One More
Day."

SHUFFLEBOARD
This week we had a beautiful
day for the eight shufflers on
Friday. Ann Day was the big
winner and Jerry Kruys was the
big loser! Which is quite unusu-
al. Maybe next week, Jerry, you
just had a lot on your mind.'
Tuesday saw another beauti-
ful day, with many onlookers
and several players. Ann Day
and Glenn Barrett shared the
honors of best players.

POKENO
We had five players and we
were quite sociable. Audrey
Semler and Eddie Philips won a
few pennies, but nobody played
piggy!
BINGO
On Tuesday the fifth, we saw
29 playing bingo. Ann Mathews
won the 50/50, Don Philips won
the jackpot. Thursday's game
saw Ralph Pavey winning the
50/50 and Norma Reid winning
the jackpot. Five merchant cer-
tificates were won by,different
players.

iUB REPORTER' '
Audrey Semler provided the
news from Pokeno, bingo and
shuffleboard so that you could
read it here. I appreciate her!
May God bless and be with
each and every one.


ALAFIA KIVE



KENDEZVOU8









January 19,2012, The Herald-Advocate 9A


Rodeo Bits

By Kathy Ann Gregg


FCA RANCH RODEO FINALS PART I
The Florida Cattlemen's Association fourth annual Ranch
Rodeo Finals were held at the Silver Spurs Arena in Kissimmee on
Sept. 30-Oct. 1 last year. I intended on covering this event earlier,
but have been waiting for official times, scores and placements.
Hardee Countians competed on three of the 16 teams. M&N
Cattle consisted of Luke Cantu, Peck Harris, Robert Fussell, and
husband and wife Clay and Christy Newsome. This team won the
Hardee County Cattleman's Association event back in July.
Belflower Cattle's team members were Jay Belflower, Dennis
Carlton Jr., Pat Thomas, and sister and brother Chass and Slade
, Bronson. Their win was the Polk County Cattlemen's Association
event held in Bartow last February.
.And, of course, there was the Stevens Land & Cattle 'team,
with Charles Robert Stevens III, Billy Adams, Chance Wright,
Cody Storey, and Lynette Tyndall (who was a last-minute replace-
ment for Billy's daughter, Jenna, who was in a rodeo in Oklahoma,
where she lives). This team won the Li'l Cowpoke event in Fort
Myers back in March. The rules require at least three team mem-
bers from the event-win compete on the team riding in the finals,
so this team had a very different composition for these finals.
There were eight events: bronc riding, team roping and brand-
ing, wild cow milking, team doctoring, double muggin', the relay
race, team sorting, and wild colt riding. Each team competed in
four events on Friday night, and the remaining four events on
Saturday night.
The relay race was a new event this year, and was substituted
for the stampede race (in my opinion, a good move!) think barrel
racing by all five team members, passing a "baton" between riders,
with the baton being a rolled-up slicker.
During the intermission each night, they had a boot scramble
for the 12-and-under set, and what a madhouse it was, filled with
laughter and a few unclaimed boots! Also on Saturday there was a
demonstration by the whip-popping contest winners. What a
diverse group this was, with the youngsters being represented by a
6-year-old, the seniors division being won by a 71-year-old, and
even a youth in a wheelchair.
This contest had taken place earlier on Saturday during the
Cowboy Heritage Festival that was held on the grounds surround-
ing the arena's parking lot. There was a beef brisket contest, along
with swamp cabbage cooking, a cowhunter's camp and Native
American encampment, cowboy poetry, singing and storytelling,
leather and whip-making tents all aspects of Florida's unique
Cracker Cowboy way of life. And the Miss Florida Rodeo Pageant
was held in an adjoining building congratulations to Amanda
Spence, who will hold this title for 2011-12. Both she and the out-
going titleholder, Sammantha Roberts, carried flags in the Grand
Entry of the Ranch Rodeo. (I have the pleasure on knowing both
of these young women, and what a thrill it is for them to represent
the state of Florida in this position.)
Hardee's own Wendy Petteway entered the arena during the
Grand Entry each night, as president of the Florida CattleWomen
Inc., together with other FCA officials. Friday night saw a special
announcement by Florida Commissioner of Agriculture Adam
Putnam. And each night included a presentation of Honorary Team
Captain Saturday night was Freddie Griffin, a long-time friend
of the Charles Robert Stevens' family.
The real nitty-gritty on how these teams did will be Part II.
The PRCA season began with the Famous Tate's Lakeland
ProRodeo on Jan. 13-14 at the Lakeland Center. More on that later.
Keep these "Bits," boots and bridles riding. Let Kathy Ann Gregg
in on your events and achievements,,and she'll keep you covered.
Reach her at ksleepyk@aol.com or,,773-9459. Keep on riding,
Cowboys qndCowgirls.


COURTESY PHOTOS BY KATHY ANN ULfRnuiu
During each night's Grand Entry, introductions were
made for (from left) Ranch Rodeo Committee Chairman
Wade Grigsby, Florida Cattlemen's Association
President Don Quincey and Florida CattleWomen Inc.
President Wendy Petteway.


&4 77
j _V,;.g s


Riders (from left) Jay Belflower, Pat Thomas, Dennis
Carlton Jr. and Slade Bronson run down calf No. 3 dur-
ing the roping and branding event, to give them a time of
58.30 seconds.


Charles Robert Stevens Ill cuts a calf from the herd and
rides it across the line in the team sorting event.


This week in history, as
researched from the archival
pages of The Florida Ad-
vocate, the Hardee County
Herald and The Herald-Ad-
vocate ...

75 YEARS AGO
Owing to the increasing num-
ber of cases of rattlesnake and
moccasin snake bites and the
very large percent of fatalities,
consideration has been given to
this problem by the members of
the Tri-County Medical Associ-
ation, which represents the doc-
tors in DeSoto, Highlands and
Hardee counties.

C.H. Taylor Jr., committee
chairman on arrangements of
the annual President's Birthday
Ball, announced yesterday af-
ternoon that the entertainment
would be held again this year at
the J.G. Anderson Jr. ranch west
of town. This dance is an annu-
al nation-wide affair with 70
percent of the proceeds benefit-
ing local charity, and 30 percent
goes to the national organiza-
tion for aiding in the fight
against infantile paralysis.

The elections are history
these three months gone. Cam-
paign bitterness has faded; par-
tisan emotions are stilled. Once
more Mr. Roosevelt is president
of all the people.

Carl Polk, 22, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Vince Polk, who reside
northwest of town, was bitten
by a black widow spider yester-
day afternoon about 1:30. Carl
was pulling moss from an
orange tree in his father's
grove, and it is believed the spi-
der dropped into his shirt collar.
He was rushed to town where
medical treatment was adminis-
tered at the office of Dr. B.D.
Spears.

50 YEARS AGO
In spite of a widespread flu
epidemic, Hardee County's
schools will remain open "un-
less something drastic hap-
pens," Schools Superintendent
Wilton Stephens said this week.
Approximately 14 percent of
the youngsters enrolled in the
county schools have been
absent because of sickness this
week.

The newest addition toWau-
chula's religious community is
the First Community of God on
the corner of South Florida
Avenue and High Street. It was
dedicated in ceremonies Sun-
day afternoon.

Tuesday night in Joel Evers
Gym a group of local men will
take on the world-famous
Arkansas Travelers girls' pro-
fessional basketball team in an
exhibition game beginning at 8.

Two seniors from Hardee


County are among the 83 candi-
dates for academic degrees at
Florida Southern College's
annual mid-term commence-
ment exercises at 10:30 a.m.
Saturday, Jan. 27, in the First
Methodist Church.

25 YEARS AGO
Expansion and renovation of
Bowling Green Elementary
School could top the $1 million
mark, the design architect told
the Hardee County School
Board on Tuesday.

Zeke Mowatt, Hardee Coun-
ty's "Super Star," will play tight
end for the New York Giants
this Sunday in the Super Bowl
in Pasadena, Calif. Zeke and his
New York Giant teammates will
tangle with The Denver Bron-
cos for the championship in the
Rose Bowl. This will be Super
Bowl XXI.

Florida gasoline prices in-
creased by 1.7 cents per gallon
in January, the second month in
a row prices have gone up.

Little Miss Cassandra DeLa-
Torre was crowned Queen and
Photogenic Queen Dec. 11 in
the Sunburst Beauty Pageant
held at the Agri-Civic Center in
Wauchula.

10 YEARS AGO
A picture on 7B shows a 12-
year-old Daniel Lozano, stand-
ing in front of the big paw at the
field house at Wildcat Stadium
before workouts. Daniel strikes
his fighting pose and displays
his medals, the smaller as State
Silver Gloves Championship
and the larger as Regional
Silver Gloves Championship
after winning bouts at Augusta,
Ga., Jan. 4-6.

The Classifieds section
shows a 1993 Escort station
wagon in good condition being
sold for $2,400. A 1994 Bon-
neville with 63,000 miles is also
for sale, for $5,500.

Stephanie Basey was named
to the Honor Roll at Gardner-
Webb University. To be on the
Honor Roll a student must
receive between a 3.2 and 3.7
GPA for the semester. Basey,
19, is a 2000 graduate of
Hardee High School and a
junior education major at
Gardner-Webb in Boiling
Springs, N.C.

Southside Baptist Church in
Wauchula has called as pastor
the Rev. Jerald H. Dunn Sr. He
and wife Jo Ann are both
natives of Hardee County. He is
a graduate of Wauchula High
School and served in the U.S.
Navy. Dunn comes to Southside
from the First Baptist Church of
Durant, where he served as
associate pastor.


Luke Cantu (on horseback) holds the rope on the wild
colt while Peck Harris steadies the animal, Clay
Newsome stands behind its head and Robert Fussell
places a saddle on its back.


HnigFshingForcas


1/19/2012
Sun Data
'Rise: 7:18 AM
Set: 5:57 PM
Day Length
10 hrs. 39 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 3:48 AM
Set: 2:33 PM
Overhead: 9:12 AM
Underfoot: 9:41 PM
Moon Phase
16%
Waning Crescent
Major Times
9:12 AM-11:12AM
9:41 PM 11:41 PM
Minor Times
3:48 AM 4:48 AM
2:33 PM 3:33 PM
Solunar Rating
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -5
1/20/2012
Sun Data
Rise: 7:18 AM
Set: 5:58 PM
Day Length
10 hrs. 40 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 4:48 AM
Set: 3:33 PM
Overhead: 10:11 AM
Underfoot: 10:40 PM
Moon Phase
8%
Waning Crescent
Major Times
10:11 AM-12:11 PM
10:40 PM-12:40 AM
Minor Times
4:48 AM 5:48 AM
3:33 PM 4:33 PM
Solunar Rating
Good


Time Zone
UTC: -5


1/21/2012
Sun Data
Rise: 7:18 AM
Set: 5:59 PM
Day Length
10 hrs. 41 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 5:43 AM
Set: 4:35 PM
Overhead: 11:09 AM
Underfoot:11:37 PM
Moon Phase
3%
Waning Crescent
Major Times
11:09 AM 1:09 PM
11:37 PM 1:37 AM
Minor Times
5:43 AM 6:43 AM
4:35 PM 5:35 PM
Solunar Rating
Better
Time Zone
UTC: -5
1/22/2012
Sun Data
Rise: 7:18 AM
Set: 6:00 PM
Day Length
10 hrs. 42 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 6:33 AM
Set: 5:38 PM
Overhead: 12:05 PM
Underfoot: --:--
Moon Phase
0%
Waning Crescent
Major Times
--:-- --:--
12:05 PM 2:05 PM
Minor Times
6:33 AM 7:33 AM
5:38 PM 6:38 PM
Solunar Rating
Best
Time Zone
UTC: -5


1/23/2012
Sun Data
Rise. 7:17 AM
Set: 6:00 PM
Day Length
10 hrs. 43 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 7:17 AM
Set: 6:39 PM
Overhead: 12:57 PM
Underfoot:12:31 AM
Moon Phase
0%
NEW MOON
Major Times
12:31 AM -2:31 AM
12:57 PM 2:57 PM
Minor Times
7:17 AM 8:17 AM
6:39 PM 7:39 PM
Solunar Rating
SEASONS BEST
Time Zone
UTC: -5
1/24/2012
Sun Data
Rise: 7:17 AM
Set: 6:01 PM
Day Length
10 hrs. 44 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 7:57 AM
Set: 7:38 PM
Overhead: 1:46 PM
Underfoot: 1:22 AM
Moon Phase
2%
Waxing Crescent
Major Times
1:22 AM 3:22 AM
1:46 PM 3:46 PM
Minor Times
7:57 AM 8:57 AM
7:38 PM 8:38 PM
Solunar Rating
Better++
Time Zone
UTC: -5


1/25/2012
Sun Data
Rise: 7:17 AM
Set: 6:02 PM
Day Length
10 hrs. 45 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 8:33 AM
Set: 8:33 PM
Overhead: 2:32 PM
Underfoot: 2:09 AM
Moon Phase
6%
Waxing Crescent
Major Times
2:09 AM 4:09 AM
2:32 PM 4:32 PM
Minor Times
8:33 AM 9:33 AM
8:33 PM 9:33 PM
Solunar Rating
Good
Time Zone
UTC: -5
1/26/2012
Sun Data
Rise: 7:16 AM
Set: 6:03 PM
Day Length
10 hrs. 47 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 9:07AM
Set: 9:28 PM
Overhead: 3:16 PM
Underfoot: 2:54 AM
Moon Phase
12%
Waxing Crescent
Major Times
2:54 AM 4:54 AM
3:16 PM 5:16 PM
Minor Times
9:07 AM -10:07 AM
9:28 PM 10:28 PM
Solunar Rating
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -5


Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam, accompanied
by his son, makes Gator Jaws.


PETA ITS OWN WORST ENEMY
What with AIDS ravaging Africa, the revived Taliban misbe-
having in Afghanistan, Iran anxious to usher in Armageddon,
unemployment skyrocketing and experts predicting global eco-
nomic collapse, you'd think with so much human misery people
would lose sight of the plight of God's lower creatures.
But, fortunately for animals and animal lovers everywhere,
that is not the case.
Pamela Anderson, the courageous, compassionate, surgically-
enhanced Baywatch beauty and spokeswoman for PETA (People
for the Ethical Treatment of Animals) some time ago accused KFC
(Kentucky Fried Chicken) of abusing millions of chickens and
called for a consumer boycott of the finger-licking-good franchise.
Now, let me say right up front, I am a very empathetic soft-
hearted person. I can't stand to see anything suffer. Once I rushed
into the house for a bottle of Listerine to pour on a snake I acci-
dently ran over with a push mower. But the fact is: Most people eat
meat. Surely it's more humane to eat it after it is dead than while
it's still breathing. So the issue is, what it boils down to, so to
speak, is the manner in which the animal is killed.
My Granddaddy Ballard lived on a farm and grew his own
vegetables and raised his own cattle. He had a small slaughter
house and butchered his own beef. He also hunted.
I remember him telling about times when he was a boy that the
game he killed was all the meat his family had to eat. That's hard
for many of us today to imagine, but it was a fact of life.
Granddaddy butchered his own chickens. I saw him scald
many an old hen to make the feathers easier to pick off but, of
course, he killed them before dropping them into the hot water. My
granddaddy lived off the land, but he was a gentle man and always
humane, and I never saw him intentionally make anything suffer.
Pamela Anderson, who is joined in her crusade by such cele-
brities as ex-Beatle Paul McCartney, music. mogul Russell
Simmons and NAACP President and CEO Kweisi Mfume, claimed


that "KFC's suppliers drug the birds so that they become crippled
under their own hefty bulk, and they scald the chickens to death."
If these claims are true, every sensitive civilized human being
should be outraged and the boycott of KFC should be total.
But, are the claims true?
Everything I've read or heard regarding this outrage has been
preceded with the word "alleged." If it is really happening, if peo-
ple have seen it with their own eyes and it is a proven fact, why
preface any mention of it with "alleged"?
Another problem with PETA is it often goes so far overboard
it's hard to take it seriously. Some time ago I saw a picture in a
magazine of a billboard showing a cow and, beside the cow, a car-
ton of milk, circled with a red line drawn through it the impli-
cation being that milking cows is abusive.
PETA cheered the natural-foods grocery chain, Whole Foods,
because it stopped selling live lobsters. Bruce Friedrich, another
PETA spokesperson, said, "The ways that lobsters are treated
would warrant felony cruelty to animals charges if they were dogs
or cats."
Maybe so, but lobsters are not dogs or cats, they're lobsters.
And according to Diane Cowan, a marine biologist who studies
lobster behavior in Maine, "Lobsters have such primitive insect-
like nervous systems they don't even have brains and can't experi-
ence pain the way animals and humans do."
I'll have to take her word on that, but there does seem to me to
be a vast difference in boiling live lobsters and crabs, which die the
instant they hit the hot water, and scalding live chickens as KFC is
alleged to do.
PETA is a noble organization but too many crackpots have
undermined its credibility. It's rumored that PETA plans to send a
spokesperson to Florida to persuade motorists to drive more slow-
ly during the love-bug season to lesson the slaughter of love-bugs.
Unless PETA balances it fiction with fact and tempers its enor-
mous compassion with a smidgeon of common sense, it just might
cook its own goose.
E-mail Chip at chipkyle746@embarqmail.com or visit his website
at www.chipballard.com.



ROBBY ELLonT invites all
his friends and neighbors
to come see him at



5H jiEVRO.ET IMlamobile

S 205 N. Charleston Fort Meade
1-800-673-9512
www.dilrectche .com :


WaSBc We


r








10A The Herald-Advocate, January 19.2012

All-Stars Get College Offers


Girls Hit Lows, Then High


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Four Wildcat football seniors
are being pursued by colleges
interested in their talents.
Chief among them is offen-
sive lineman Wintz Terrell, who
was, perhaps, the first and only
Wildcat to be invited to play in
the prestigious Florida Athletic
Coaches Association from
among the best players in the
state.
Terrell, son of Dane and
Charlotte Terrell of Wauchula,
and grandson of John and Tito
Terrell, and Ruth Trott and the
late T.J. Trott, played for the
'South team in the state All-Star
Classic game held in Sebring on
Dec. 21.
Terrell was the starting guard
and also played center during
the game, which saw the North
defeat the South 41-27. South
coaches included Sam Roper of
Sanford-Seminole County,
along with Ron Parker of Cen-
tennial, Rick Swain of Boynton
Beach and Binky Waldrich of
Charlotte High.
Appearing in the All-State
game has benefitted Terrell,
who has been contacted by
scouts from Stetson, Eastern
Kentucky, Shorter University,
Jacksonville 'University, The
Citadel, Western Kentucky,
Florida State and Florida. He
and his parents spent last week-
end on a visit to the Gators.
A half dozen other Hardee


COURTESY PHOTO
All-Star Wintz Terrell suited up for the South squad in the
prestigious FACA Classic.


seniors played in the traditional
South-Central regional game
earlier in December, which fea-
tures seniors from all the area
schools. Quarterback Colby
Baker and running back
Andrew Hooks played on the
offensive side of scrimmage,
while linebacker Mikey Retana,
defensive tackles Uvaldo San-
chez and Maxon Delhomme,
and defensive end Deonte
Evans served in the defensive
corps.
Baker and Hooks combined
in finalizing an offensive drive


to give South the 17-13 win.
Hooks won the Offensive
Player of the Game honors.
Baker is getting contacts
from Southeast Missouri, Car-
son-Newman, University of the
South and LaGrange College.
Hooks has heard from scouts
from Jacksonville University,
Shorter University, Wofford
College, University of the
Cumberlands and Stetson and
Evans from Shorter University,
University of the Cumberlands,
Jacksonville University and
Stetson.


Health Department Loses Leader


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Though he served here for
only five years, he will be much
missed.
Dr. Stephen Gordon, medical
director for the Hardee County
Health Department for the past
five years, succumbed to cancer
on Jan. 9. in Sebring.
Gordon, 60, took the head
position at the health depart-
ment about the time former
director Marsha Rau retired. He
had a long history in battling
cancer and had elected not to
return to private practice.
Jim Griffin, environmental
and public relations director for
the health department, knew
Gordon from previous contacts
through their common interest
in triathlons.
"Dr. Gordon was one of the
most incredible people on this
planet who do good things for
others," said Griffin. "Dr. Gor-
don was mentally stimulating
- to say the least and a
social joy to be around. His
determination is unsurpassed
and he was a fighter, living, lov-
ing life, working for the good of
people and controlling his life
until it ended."
True to that concern for oth-
ers, Gordon requested no for-
mal funeral services. "He
wished that all his friends and


the people he knew remember
him from their last encounters
together."
He remained working until
Jan. 6, although in that last
month or so, it was from his
laptop or video conferencing,
still interested in what was hap-
pening at the health department
and strategizing how to fix it.
He graduated from Ball State
University and was first in his
class from St. George Univer-
sity School of Medicine on the
island of Grenada. He was
board certified in both Internal
Medicine and Infectious Di-
sease.
After years of private practice
jn,a large hospital in New York
City, he "retired" to become
Chief of Staff at Highlands
Regional Medical Center, and
eventually to the local health
department because of his inter-
est in public health.
One of his major interests
was sports medicine. He quali-
fied for the Olympic try-outs in
college and in 2001 finished his
first Ironman at minutes before
midnight at Ironman Florida.
Triathlon was his favorite sport
and he often traveled to Hawaii
to support friends competing in
the sport.
His bout with cancer began
about 15 years ago when he had
a kidney removed. An infection


set in and it took him quite
some time to recover. That's
when he gave up private prac-
tice and moved south.
In 2003, the cancer returned
as a tumor on one lobe of the
liver. Chemotherapy was un-
successful and he went to
Shands Hospital in Gainesville,
where a portion of the liver was
removed and allowed to regen-
erate, then the remaining dis-
eased portion was removed and
allowed to regenerate.
He regained his health and
vitality until recently when the
disease showed up in his lungs.
He chose not to treat it and be as
strong as possible for the bal-
ance of his life. On Jan. 8, he
fell and suffered multiple frac-
tures. He was moved to Hope
Hospice where he died the fol-
lowing day.
He leaves a son and daughter,
both in Tampa, companion, and
others who will miss him. "He
was a brilliant physician and
was the person everyone went
to if they had a medical need in
virtually any field of medicine.
When people would comply
with his orders, he could heal
them. He is missed by those
who knew him and those he
helped along the way." conclud-
ed Griffin.


NOTICE OF PROPOSED RULE: The Southwest Florida Water Management District is
proposing to amend the following rule: 40D-1.1010, F.A.C.

This rulemaking deletes the requirement set forth in Section 40D-1.1010(6), F.A.C., for
certain permit applicants to publish notice of agency decision on their application. The
District will continue to advise permittees of the benefits of publishing notices of agency
action, but such publication will no longer be required by the District.

The Notice of Proposed Rulemaking appeared in the Florida Administrative Weekly, Vol.
38, No.02, 40D-1.1010, F.A.C., on January 13, 2012. A copy of the proposed rule can be
viewed on the District's website at http://www.swfwmd.state.fl.us/rules/proposed/

Pursuant to the provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act, any person requiring
special accommodations to provide comments on this rulemaking is asked to contact:
The Southwest Florida Water Management District Human Resources Director, 2379
Broad Street, Brooksville, Florida 34604-6899; telephone (352) 796-7211, ext. 4702 or 1-
800-423-1476 (FL only), ext. 4702; TDD (FL only) 1-800-231-6103; or email to ADACoor-
dinator@swfwmd.state.fl.us. If you are hearing or speech impaired, please contact the
agency using the Florida Relay Service, 1(800)955-8771 (TDD) or 1(800)955-8770 (Voice).

THE PERSON TO BE CONTACTED REGARDING THE PROPOSED RULES AND A COPY
OF THE PRELIMINARY DRAFT OF EACH, IS: Barbara Martinez, 2379 Broad St.,
Brooksville, FL 34604-6899, (352) 796-7211 (4660) (Reference OGC No. 2011065)
1:190







Let us take the stress out of your accounting!

We can meet in your home or office or ours.

Tax Preparation Personal & Business Quickbooks Consulting & Assistance
including Employee Training, IRS Correspondence, Sales Tax Preparation &
Consulting Start-up Business Consulting Monthly/Quarterly/Annual
Accounting & Payroll including W-2s & Annual Filings


Erica Scheipsmeier, CPA
ericas.cpa@gmail.com
863-781-4850


Henderson Bookkeeping
Service, Leona Henderson
leona_henderson@yahoo.com
863-781-0671


Cmunit I to tLORD u'hate'r y a yor p ian, ill.'. Pr'erb., 16:5
~1ue yo,' pan, u'i/.vwce(d. ,~~:erA


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
"I'm very proud of them: it's
the first time they've given me
100 percent all four quarters."
Hardee varsity girls basket-
ball Coach Jeanne Adkins was
disappointed but pleased with
her team's effort in an overtime
40-37 loss last Friday night.
It was a very different game
from the second season's start
at Lake Wales on Jan. 6. a 50-4
loss. It was also much better
than the 24-48 loss last Tuesday
at Auburndale. On Friday night.
the girls took turns taking the
lead from Lakeland Teneroc.
which forced the game into
overtime and managed the
come-from-behind win.
This week's games are home
tonight (Thursday) for a kisit
from Desoto and a ttrip to
Teneroc on Friday night. The
season ends with a trio of
games next week. Senior Night
when Palmetto visits on Tues-
day. and trips to Fort Meade
Thursday and Lake Placid next
Friday. District playoffs begin
the following week.
After the early losses to start
the second season, the Hardee
girls got it together and showed
what they could do at home on
Friday night when they hosted
the Teneroc Lady Titans.
It was a feeling out, hectic
first minute in this district
encounter. Hardee got on the
board first when junior Robyn
Tanksley took an inbounds pass
and put it in the hold. It was


another 1:15 before Lady Titan
J. Perinon hit the first of her
many shots to tie the game.
Within two minutes Teneroc
was up 7-2,
Not to worry as Hardee
regrouped. Soph Allison Allen-
Hunter got a deuce and another
a long minute later. When she
rebounded an Alyssa Casso
shot. it was 8-8 as the first peri-
od ended.
The Titans started the second
period with a two-point lead on
the strength of two free throws.
Hardee refused to give way.
Sophomore point guard Bailey
Carlton twice went "all the
way" to score. Teneroc. knotted
at 12-12.
A Casso shot was rebounded
by Tanksley. Casso notched a
pair of free throws. Tanksley
got another offensive rebound
for a deuce. When Adna Met-
ayer fed Carlton for a shot.
Hardee had a 20-12 advantage
with 1:45 -left in the half. A
Titan shot at the one-second
mark made the halftime score
20-14.
The teams pretty much traded
shots in the third period, which
ended with the Lady Wildcats
up 27-20. Teneroc mounted a
serious rally in the final eight
minutes and managed to chip
away at the Lady 'Cat lead until
taking its own 32-31 at the 1:50
mark. Casso nailed a three-
pointer to put Hardee up 34-32.
As time wound down, a
rebound gave Teneroc the
points to push the game into


overtime.
On to a four-minute overtime.
Casso broke the 34-34 tie when
she canned yet another trey.
Perinon scored on an inbounds
play. One minute later, an
offensive rebound put the
Titans up 38-37 and Perinon
finished it with another deuce at
the 22-second mark to dash
Hardee hopes for another come-
back.
For the Lady Wildcats, Carl-
ton was high with 11 points,
followed by Tanksley with 10,
Casso eight. Allen-Hunter six
and Destiny Thompson two
points. Allen-Hunter hit the
boards for 14 rebounds, while
Tanksley had five and Allison
Smith four. Carlton had three
steals and Casso a pair of
assists. Others getting in on the
actions were Kayla Nichols,
Metayer and Stephanie Perez.
There were no JV games on
Thursday or Friday last week as
Auburndale has no JV squad
and Teneroc's was cut after los-
ing players who moved out of
the state.
The JV's only game since the
first of the year was at Lake
Wales, where Diana Gomez,
Honesty Martinez and Endreina
Martinez each had two points-
and Kaysha Moseley one point.
Others on the JV squad are
Aundra Pace, Anna Lazo,
Catherine "Cat" Jackson, Hay-
lee Williams, Araceli Ramos,
Jasmine Alamia, Alexi Santana
and Alejandra Solis.


/....... Smoke ouse BBQ
,i *'/i T "AWARD WINNING BBQ"
., "Fresh Homemade Sides

SDine-In and Call Ahead Carryout

Sun., Mon., Tues.- 11
Wed., Thurs. Fri...
Saturday *
/ Come Eat
With Us During ---. --
S Friday Night
Live! ow W70260a

Sr ss 103 E. Main St. Downtown Wacmhla
5S I


F. N












SUPPLY




Wishing All Junior High School and

Senior High School Participants

Best of Luck in the

2012 Hardee County District

Science and Engineering Fair

on January 26th.


























In 2011, 7 Students Represented Hardee County in

the State Science Fair With One Student Going On

To Compete at the International Science Fair!

Let's Go Students and Win Again!
^ 1:19cs


I


L--


I s, I -nr ---ls sI _






January 19, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 11A


Best Employee Of County Honored


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
"Let's look for the best in
everyone."
Hardee County Commission
Chairman Minor Bryant was
pleased to present the 2011
Employee of the Year award.
Claiming the award for last -
year was Firefighter/Paramedic
James Simpson, nominated for
his service and work ethic for
the Hardee County Fire-Rescue
Department.
Hired in November 2003, as
a Firefighter/EMT (Emergency
Medical Technician), Simpson
"quickly showed his ability to
work as a team member within
our department," said Fire
Chief Mike Choate.
In 2006, Simpson began at-
tending paramedic school an;
was promoted to FF/Paramedic.t
. by November 2007. He contin-
ued his education to obtain his
AS degree in EMS, obtaining
his Fire Officer I and Fire
Instructor I certification. He is
completing his Inspector I and
Fire Officer II certificates.


Simpson
Certified in Advanced Care
life support and Pediatric life
support instruction, Simpson is
,-ne of the core instructors for
his shirt in fire training and
emergency services. He is a
preceptor for new employees
and students, and can fill in as a
shift lieutenant as needed.
If that weren't enough, Simp-
son uses his painting and car-
pentry skills at the station. With


Sun Tel


Tired of high telephone bills?
Well, say hello to SunTel.
Your new local telephone company.
/


other staff, he has begun re-
placement of kitchen cabinets
and equipment, as "the cave" is
used 24 hours a day, seven days
a week and 365 days a year and
much in need of repair and
upgrading. He has built and
painted dining tables at both
Station I and Station 2 and is
always willing to take on extra
tasks on his off days.
"Mr. Simpson is considered
one of our top employees in
every category and possesses an
incredible work ethic on emer-
gency calls and while perform-
ing tasks at his station. He was
unanimously nominated for this
award by his lieutenant, Dep.
Chief Bob Clayton and Chief
Michael Choate. He is highly
respected by his fellow employ-
ees for his unselfish attitude and
dedicated to his profession. No
employee at HCFR is more
deserving of this award," con-
cluded Choate, reading from
the resume prepared to nomi-
nate Simpson as Employee of
The Year.


Mo


*Only $24.99/month (no extra fees or taxes) "(
* No Service Contracts Required!
*No Bundles Required!
* Keep your old phone number!
* We work with any Broadband Provider
*Take your local phone with you when Weekly
you travel Special!
* Local Support and Service First Month and
S... Installation Free!
Hurry! First 25
Customers only!

band Internct e-rvic required for srvicc Monthly recurring billig charged to customer credit card.
at pre-exlsling customer phone numbers c n be poltcd to SounTel, but not all number will qualify.


Letter To The Editor

Wauchula Resident Likes

Ron Paul For President


Dear Editor:
After watching the debates of
the three GOP hopefuls, I find
that if it wasn't so serious it
would be a joke at the expense
of the U.S. citizens.
Rick Perry is about the same
as the Oval Office resident we
have now. He won't enforce our
immigration laws, and he voted
for the Dream Act which gives
illegal children a college educa-
tion which most U.S. citizens
cannot afford. He is in favor of
and help start the "super high-
way" from Mexico City to
Canda with Customs and
"Immigration centers in Kansas
City. These things should never
happen.
Mitt Romney is another
Obama look-alike who initiated
a health care mandate in
Massachusetts while Governor,
the model of Obamacare. He
supports Wall Street bailouts
and the TARP program. So his
is another Obama.
Gingrich is a member of the
CFR..(Council of Foreign
Relations) of which there is
*O f. 3,300 members _vbrld-
wide. With about 800 U.S.
members, that leaves about
2,500 foreigners giving our
government instructions on
how to establish a "one world
government." Not good, and it
about 50 percent of our problem
today. He was also in favor of
an individual insurance man-
date in 1993, now he's against
it. He earned at least $1.6 mil-
lion in consulting fees fr6m
Freddy Mac between 1999-
2007. It's quite obvious that he
was involved in the great hous-


ing bubble that burst and made
money one it.
He also pushed Bush's plan
to create an unfunded prescrip-
tion plan in Medicare that near-
ly bankrupted it. Gingrich sup-
ported NAFTA, a $20 billion
Mexican bail out- and the Wall
Street bail-out. He also teamed
up with Nancy Pelosi in 2008 to
promote global warming
(another scam on U.S. citizens).
He received over $300,000
from the ethanol lobby, another
government mess that cost the
U.S. citizen big money. These
people didn't change their
mind, only the approach to get
it passed with smoke and mir-
rors. These people should never
be elected to anything, let alone
president. Hermon Cain is a
saint compared to this group.
The liberal left media has
treated Ron Paul and Michelle
Bachmann like they had lep-
rosy. On the TV screen they are
only visible in the background.
They will do anything to elect
Obama.
If re-elected. Obama will be
the end of our country as we
know it. He will assuredly put'
another judge on the Supreme
Court and from then on every-
thing will be liberal left social-
ism.
Ron Paul is a very intelligent
person and understands how the
U.S. Constitution works, and
will, if elected, see our
Constitution enforced as it
should be. My vote will be for
Ron Paul.

William Bartlett
Wauchula


"IT'S TAX TIME AGAIN!"


Let us take some of the worry out of those words!

We offer fast and accurate income tax preparation.

We have fast, electronic filing.


As professionals with many years of experience, you can be

sure we are current on filing requirements and the latest rules.
No return is too simple or too complex for us to handle.

We PRIDE ourselves on providing top-notch

service and convenience at an affordable prices.


We will be happy to review prior-year returns without charge
to determine if any deductions or credits were missed.

On average, our prices are 25% less than leading tax
firms and we have more years of experience.


I
I
I
I


mBRmNG IN ;

$HIS AO ]FOR

S15S.o O.PF F


L---- ---- -J--m-m- m- J


,,-; -. 1
'I..

x~rF-a..


.7 H;
We will be happy to come in at other times convenient to you, if you would like to make an appointment.
Please contact us by phone or by email: stortstaxes@gmail.com


Se Habla Espanol Lorena (863) 445-0577


Danielle, Deborah & Lorena


Storts Taxes

&

Bookkeeping, Inc.

120 W. Orange Street ~ Wauchula


773-2200


^ iV.
0'..* \ . .


I _______________________ s.-.-'-- -.. --


SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 4 6PM

TORREY OAKS GOLF COURSE

ENTRY FEE *100

1ST PLACE ......................91,000
2ND PLACE ...................... $00


3RD PLACE ..................... 300




ALL PROCEEDS Go To
HARDEE COUNTY ATHLETICS

0 *o*


CALL MICHAEL KELLY TO SIGN UP
863-781-9628
1:19,26c


S


I- I'
.I
i


I


Ready to start saving money?
All you need is a broadband internet connection /
and you can be saving money in no time!
In addition we offer huge savings for businesses "
-with many advanced features that are included o
offered at a greatly reduced rate.







12A The Herald-Advocate, January 19, 2012





During the past week, sheriff's deputies and city police
officers investigated the following incidents and made the fol-
lowing arrests:
COUNTY
Jan. 15, Matthew Duwayne Carroll, 20, of 315 SR 62,
Bowling Green, was arrested by Dep. Paul Johnson and charged
with robbery with a weapon.
Jan. 15, a theft on Gebhart Road was reported.

Jan. 14, Ivan Payne West, 21, of 4250 U. S. 17 North, Fort
Meade, and Kelyn Pearson, 21, of 204 St. Johns Circle, Fern Park,
were arrested by Florida Highway Patrol Tpr. Eduardo Cruz and
each charged with possession of methamphetamine.
Jan. 14, a vehicle stolen on U.S. 17 North, a robbery-holdup
on Brown Road, criminal mischief on Lily County Line Road, and
thefts on SR 64 East and on Blue Jay Road were reported.

Jan. 13, Roberto Leon Sweikowski, 60, of 2433 Lilly Lane,
Wauchula, was arrested by-Dep. Michael Lake and charged with
larceny petit theft and simple assault threat to do violence.
Jan. 13, a residential burglary on Sally Place and thefts on
East Main Street and on North Florida Avenue were reported.

Jan. 12, a residential burglary on George Anderson Road, and
a theft on Doc Coil Road were reported.

Jan. 11, Elena Christina Esquivel, 26, of 183 Davis Court,
Wauchula, was arrested by Cpl. Shane Ward on an out-of-county
warrant.
Jan. 11, thefts on SR. 66, Flint Drive and Harris Road were
reported.

Jan. 10, Taiwan Levon Blandin, 22, of 4523 Leucadendra Dr.,
Sebring, was arrested by Dep. Kim Pfeiffer and charged with rob-
bery with a weapon, aggravated assault with a deadly weapon and
larceny.
Jan. 10, Edward Brian Benton, 42, of 111 N. Second Ave.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Kim Pfeiffer on a charge of viola-
tion of probation. 1'
Jan. 10, Donald Ray Moseley, 59, of 160 Pool Branch Road,
Fort Meade, was arrested by Dep. Eric Harrison on a charge of con-
tempt of court.
Jan. 10, Theresa Lee Rodriguez, 35, of 407 Manatee St.,
Bowling Green, was arrested by Dep. Michael Lake on a charge of
failure to appear in court.
Jan. 10, Justin Morgan Knight, 18, of 2587 Merle Langford
Road, Zolfo Springs, was arrested by Dep. Paul Johnson and
charged with larceny petit theft.
Jan. 10, a residential burglary on Schontag Road and thefts on
U.S. 17 North, Crewsville Road and U.S. 17 South were reported.

Jan. 9, Louis Holloway, 66, of 694 Honeysuckle St., Wau-
chula, was arrested by Cpl. Todd Souther on a charge of withhold-
ing support of children.
Jan. 9, Tomeka Chunta Cozart, 32, of 5120 U.S. 17 North,
Bowling Green, was arrested by Dep. Michael Lake and charged
with possession of cocaine, possession of drug paraphernalia and
violation of probation.
Jan. 9, Gary Dean Farabee, 37, of 9388 Boots St., Punta
Gorda, by Dep. Cesar Medina and charged with battery.
Jan. 9, Felipe Boriilla-Gomez, 36, General Delivery, Bowling
Green, was arrested by FHP Tpr. Russell Waldorff and charged
with DUI, DUI with property damage and another traffic charge.
Jan. 9, Jose Mauricio Ramirez, 27, of 342 Rainey Blvd.,.


Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Ryan Abbott and charged with two
counts lewd and lascivious behavior with victim 12 and older, and
fraud giving a false ID to an officer.
Jan. 9, a residential burglary on Second Street West and a theft
on SR 66 were reported.

WAUCHULA
Jan. 15, Domingo Castellon, 58, of 509 W. Orange St.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Ofc. John Nicholas on a charge of fail-
ure to appear in court.
Jan. 15, thefts on U.S. 17 South, North Ninth Avenue and two
locations on South Third Avenue were reported.

Jan. 14, a theft on Kentucky Street was reported.

Jan. 13, Joshua Wayne Reedy, 23, of 223 Illinois Ave., Wau-
chula, was arrested by'Ofc. John Nicholas and charged with con-
tempt of court violation of an injunction for protection.
Jan. 13, Rodney Lee Spinks, 49, of 311 Walton Ave., Wau-
chula, was arrested by Det. Jimmy Harrison and charged with five
counts of sexual offense on victim 12 to 15.
Jan. 13, criminal mischief on South Seventh Avenue and
Heard Bridge Road and thefts on Carlton Street, West Main Street
and South Seventh Avenue were reported.

Jan. 12, Kyle Durrance Ballard, 19, of 3230 Suwannee St.,
Zolfo Springs, and Jared Brooks Johnson, 20, of 202 W. Main St.,
Wauchula, were arrested by Cpl. Robert Spencer and each charged
charged with possession of marijuana and possession of drug para-
phernalia.
Jan. 12, Federico Mato Campos, 38, of 1102 Downing Circle,
Wauchula, was arrested by Ofc. William Smith and charged with a
weapon offense firing a missile into a dwelling/vehicle, dis-
charging a firearm in public and criminal mischief.
Jan. 12, a residential burglary on East Oak Street was report-
ed.
Jan. 11, thefts on East Oak Street, two locations on East Main
Street and on Briarwood Drive were reported.

Jan. 10, Michele Lynn Pintello, 29, of 816 N. Ninth Ave.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Ofc. Jennifer Stanley and charged with
battery and violation of probation.
Jan. 10, Ashley Amber Prosser, 28, of 816 N. Ninth Ave.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Ofc. Jennifer Stanley and charged with
unarmed burglary of an occupied conveyance and larceny-petit
theft.

Jan. 9, Othoniel Salas-Velazquez, 26, of 319 N. Ninth Ave.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Ofc. Williami Smith and charged with
battery, aggravated assault with a deadly weapon and cruelty
toward a child without great harm.
Jan. 9, Jonatan Emir Hernandez, 20, of 358 Martin Luther
King Jr. Ave., Wauchula, was arrested by Ofc. Aron Thomas and
charged with criminal mischief and violation of probation.
Jan. 9, criminal mischief on West Palmetto Street and a theft
on Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue were reported.


BOWLING GREEN
Jan. 15, Travis Bryan Revell, 35, of 4850 Freeman Ave.,
Bowling Green, was arrested by Cpl. Robert Ehrenkaufer and
charged with battery.

Jan. 14, a theft on South Palm Drive was reported.

Jan. 13, a fight on Dixiana Dr. and Doc Coil Road was report-
ed.

Jan. 12, a residential burglary on U.S. 17 North was reported.


Winter sports are winding down and it's almost time for spring
sports to start. The first full week of February will bring out ath-
letes in tennis, baseball and softball. Boys weightlifting and track
& field won't be far behind. The spring football practices begin
May 1 and with pads by May 4.

Meanwhile, winter sports are quite active, most heading into
district playoffs shortly. In fact, girls soccer is first this week, boys
soccer and girls weightlifting are next, and then the basketball
teams.
Girls basketball played an exciting overtime game with Teneroc
last Friday night. They play at Teneroc in Lakeland this Friday,
while the boys will host Teneroc on the same night. The girls are
home tonight (Thursday) against DeSoto. Boys basketball is com-
petitive and hustling, but in a very tough district, facing Teneroc,
Auburndale and Lake Wales, which is ranked top in the state and
nation.
Girls weightlifting is in tne day-long huge Travis Todd
Invitational in Avon Park on Saturday.

On a different note, 2010 Wildcat grad Nick Battles, who was
severely injured in a Marine basic training accident, has been
moved to the James A. Haley VA Hospital in Tampa. He can be
reached by mail there c/o SCI-D Room 53, Attn. PFC Nicholas
Battles USMC, 13000 Bruce B. Downs Blvd., Tampa, FL 33612.
Drop him a line and let him know you're thinking about him. Or
better yet, take a trip over there and drop in. He'll either be in his
room or the gym, his favorite place to hang out. He is regaining use
of his upper body and hopes to eventually be able to walk.

Speaking of football, several fall athletes are reaping the suc-
cess of their hard work and experience. Wintz Terrell, who was the
only Hardee player ever chosen for the Florida Athletic Coaches
Association All-Star team, is being courted by seven colleges,
among them University of Florida, which he visited last week.
Other footballers getting college look-sees are Andrew Hooks,
Colby Baker and Deonte Evans. Best wishes to them all in choos-
ing the college that will be best for them and their academic as well
as athletic careers.
Information from community and school athletic events is always
welcome. Please call me at 773-3255 or e-mail me at news.heral-
dadvocate@embarqmail.com with news for this biweekly column.

Stephen Poplawski invented the blender in 1922. He put a
spinning blade at the bottom of a container and used the de-
vice to make soda fountain drinks.


2 SLICES

OF PIZZA 9

CHEESE OR PEPPERONI .
PLUS A SODA

G ZOLFOSPRINGS
105 SR64 East InsideBP
S(if.wAtpahn*fg& 735-2100
umtlisfBApndaigttos I" 9J I ^









******************SCH 3-DIGIT 326
935 05-08-03 14P 3S
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
404 LIBRARY WEST
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-0001


"'he Herald-Advocate
(rr.PS r78-7O)

thursday. January 19, 2012


Teens Can Learn



Safe Driving Techniques


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Teens: Are you up to the chal-
lenge?
There's only one way to find
out. Sign up for the new free
Hardee County Sheriff's Office
Teen Driver Challenge.
Teens 16 to 19 with a current
license can take the two-day 12-
hour challenge. The first course
begins Feb. 2 and is limited to
the first 10 to sign up. Others
who sign up will be scheduled
for later classes.
To sign up, a student driver
must complete .a release and
information form. These can be
obtained from School Resource
Dep. Daniel Gibson at the high
school. The course will be
taught by an instructor certified
in emergency vehicle operation.
The emphasis is on crash avoid-
ance and evasive maneuvers.
The series begins with a four-
hour class at the high school on
Thursday, Feb. 2, starting at 4
p.m. The study book covers
such topics as teen. crash facts,
knowing your vehicle, using
common "senses" when driv-
ing, vehicle dynamics, seat
belts, habit-forming safe driv-
ing, alcohol, aggressive driving
and driving exercises.


It continues with an eight-hour
hands-on driving training expe-
rience at.the Hardee Junior
High Parking lot on Feb. 4 from
8 a.m. to 5 p.m., where drivers
will complete figure 8s, thresh-
old braking, forward and
reverse serpentine driving, cor-
nering and off-road recovery.
Students must bring their
own vehicles, which will be
inspected to be sure they will be
safe on the course. David
Singletary of State Farm In-
surance Co. has provided 100
safety cones for the course and
Alan Jay Automotive Network
will provide lunch.
Hardee Sheriff Arnold Lanier
learned of the course through
the Florida Sheriff's Associa-
tion, which started the program
with a pilot course in Tallahas-
see in Leon County. It was such
a success, it has spread through
at least half of the other 66
counties in the state.
Some of the courses include
use of "Drunk Buster Goggles"
which simulates effects of
drunk driving at different levels
from barely intoxicated and
"knee-walking drunk." Stu-
dents are asked to complete "a
roadside sobriety test" with the
glasses on.


Skid recovery, hydroplaning,
drifting, blowouts, being forced
off the road by another driver,
weather hazards and others fre-
quently cause teen-age driving
deaths, the highest cause of
death among that age group.
Students taking the course
report being able to avoid acci-
dents by staying calm and fol-
lowing the techniques they have
learned. Some have earned dis-
counts on their insurance by
completing the course and
obtaining the certificate of com-
pleting the course.
Although it is free to teens,
there are costs associated with
the program. Anyone who
wants to sponsor any portion of
the course, workbooks, equip-
ment, etc. can contact Dep.
Gibson at the high school dur-
ing school hours 8:30-3:30 p.m.
or go to www.teendriverchal-
lenge.org of www.BetterTeen-
Driver.com
It's a parent's worse night-
mare, that phone call that tells
them their teen is seriously
injured or dead following an
avoidable accident.
Teens, do you think you know
all about defensive driving?
Prove it; complete the Teen
Driver Challenge course.


Jan. 19 HJHS Basketball Hill-Gustat Away 5:30/6:30 p.m.
G. Basketball DeSoto HOME 6/7:30 p.m.
Jan. 20 Boys Basketball Teneroc HOME 6/7:30 p.m.
Girls Basketball Teneroc Away 6/7:30 p.m.
Jan. 21 G. Weightlifting Avon Park Away 9 a.m.
Jan.23 HJHS Basketball DeSoto HOME 5:30/6:30 p.m.
Jan. 23-27 G. Soccer Districts TBA TBA TBA
Jan. 24 G. Basketball Palmetto Home 6/7:30 p.m.
B. Basketball Auburndale Away 6/7:30 p.m.
Jan. 25 G. Weightlifting Port Charlotte Away 10 a.m.
Jan. 26 HJHS Basketball Lake Placid Away 5:30/6:30 p.m.
B. Basketball Avon Park HOME 6/7:30 p.m.
G. Basketball Fort Meade Away 6/7:30 p.m.
Jan. 27 Boys Basketball Lake Wales HOME 6/7:30 p.m.
Girls Basketball Lake Placid Away 6/7:30 p.m.
Jan. 30 HJHS Basketball Sebring HOME 5:30/6:30 p.m.
Jan. 31 V. Boys Basketball Lakeland HOME 7 p.m.
Feb. 2 Boys Basketball Port Charlotte HOME 6/7:30 p.m.



I fl


socl:19c


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Keep those cards, letters and
even visits coming.
Injured local Marine Nick
Battles is grateful to have
received all kinds of cards, let-
ter and even hand-drawn pic-
tures from little ones. These
have encouraged him so much.
Recently transferred to the
Tampa VA hospital for on-going
therapy, Battles needs those
good wishes even more as he
has an uphill challenge in
regaining his abilities.
For those wanting to contact
him, or visit, the address is
James A. Haley VA Hospital,
c/o SCI-D Room 53. Attn
Nicholas Battles USMC, 13000
Bruce B. Downs Blvd., Tampa
FL 33612.
Visits from former 2009.
Hardee Wildcat football team-
mates or coaches is welcome.
Take SR 62 west through
Wimauma and Sun City Center
to turn north on 1-75. Take the
Fowler Street Exit and stay on
265 to the left, following Fowl-
er up to Bruce B, Downs. Turn
right and the VA hospital is on
the left. Follow the parking lot
to the rehab floor. He'll be in
his room or, more often, in the
gym.
Since the Nov. 9 accident on
the last day of basic training,
Nick has gone through a lot. He
just has a whole lot more to get
through. He is slowing regain-
ing use of the upper portion of
his body, as shown in the ac-
companying photo. Fine motor'
coordination is not all there yet,
so he wears gloves to grip the
exercise handles.
Rehab specialists do electron-
ic stimulation on his deltoids,
triceps and biceps as well as his
thigh muscles to maintain mus-
cle tone. Because his blood
pressure has been erratic, they
have not been standing him up
much as yet. He has periodic
feeling in his legs. The low


Battles
blood pressure also makes him
cold, as he is shown wearing a
beanie for its warmth.
Nick has had the opportunity
to see wheelchair rugby, scuba
diving and other activities he
can do if he does not get all his
faculties back. When he is
ready to leave the VA hospital,
he has been invited to go to
Miami to the Nick Buonicotti
research facility for spinal cord
injuries. That will have to wait
until he is a year post-surgery.
The Miami Project is named
after the former pro football
player paralyzed from the neck
down in a football injury. The
center concentrates on various
ways to improve a person's
abilities after he/she has com-
pleted initial assessment and
rehabilitation.
Last week, Nick got bad
news with the realization that
the pituitary gland was trauma-
tized during his initial injury.
That glad controls a lot of hor-
mones, which are now also
underachieving and he may
have to add steroids to his med-
ical regime.
Nick continues to get family
support. When he was trans-
ferred to Tampa, the firefighter
fellow workers with his father,
Justin Battles, raised funds and
are filling in shifts for their co-
worker so he can be at his son's
side as much as possible. The


COURTESY PHOTO
firefighters met his son's plane
when he arrived here and held a
barbecue fundraiser for him.
They have used donations to
get Nick many of the extras
which could speed his recovery.
Since he lost from 200 down to
about 155 pounds, he needed
new clothes to dress daily for
the gym. His older brother,
Colby is now across the street at
University of South Florida and
is able to visit between classes.
His mother Wendy, younger
brothers Zachary, Marcus and
even little Luke come after
school weekdays and for the
weekend.
It takes a lot of gas dollars to
run back and forth to Tampa
almost daily.. Contributions
from First Assembly of God
and other churches helped get a
refrigerator for his room so he
can get additional meals. There
is still an account at Wauchula
State Bank, both the Bowling
Green and Wauchula banks,
under Acct. No. 2205556,
Wendy L. Battles Family Do-
nation Account.
One way to help would be to
support an upcoming fundraiser
by Kathy loannidis and her
daughter-in-law Angie at Wau-
chula Family Restaurant.
For information on Nick's
needs, call his mother at cell
phone 863-245-0956.


PAGE ONE


Fallen Marine Making Progress


Erirday Sigosht Title Sponsor:



























r re fmat nal Stet ta @ 767-0330Ntw
aS &ssoa
Sponore by
Tore .OaksG se n











45 0 ss sE


Sposoeb.








~iro G i ovannai' Mr ca in/ta, Street K/aiatche @ 767-330








2B The Herald-Advocate, January 19, 2012





Schedule of Weekly Services


['Prinited as a Public Service
S by'.
,.eThreeld-Advocate
'Wauchulp, Florida

S Adline: Thursday 5 p.m.


BOWLING GREEN
APOSTOLIC LIGHTHOUSE
UNITED PENTACOSTAL
CHURCH
310 Orange St.
375-3100
Sunday Morning .................. 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening ....................6:00 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting........7:X) p.m.
Thursday Service ..................7:30 p.m.

CHESTER GROVE MB CHURCH
708 W. Grape St. 375-3353
Sunday School ...................... 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship ....................8:00 a.m.
Sun. Eve. Worship
1st & 3rd ..............4:00 p.m. 3:00 p.m.
Tues. Prayer/Bible Study ......6:00 p.m.

CHRISTIAN BIBLE
FELLOWSHIP
Hwy. 17 South
Morning Worship ................10:30 a.m.
Youth Group Sunday ..........6:00 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
121 West Broward St. 375-2231
375-3100
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................. 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday ............................ 7:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
TRUE HOLINESS OUTREACH
725 Palmetto St.
375-3304
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............I :00 a.m.
Tues. Night Bible Study ...... 7:30 p.m.
Evening Worship
Ist Sunday ....................5:00 p.m.

COMMUNITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Main & W. Centra.
Sunday AM Worship............10:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening ....................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer Meeting ............7:00 p.m.

--- FAITH-ASSEMBLY OF GOD
4937 Hwy. 17 N. 375-4206
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Disciples Train & Choirs ......5:30 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ............7:00 p.m.


BOWLING GREEN

OPEN DOOR FULL GOSPEL
PRAISE CENTER
E. Broward St.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Service ......................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.

PRIMERA MISSION BAUTISTA
Murray-Road off Hwy. 17
375-2295
Domingos Escuela Dom. ......9:45 a.m.
Servicio de Adoracion..........11:00 a.m.
Servicio de Predicacion ........5:00 p.m.
Miercoles Servico..................6:30 p.m.

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 South US Hwy 17
Morning Service .................. 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.

ST. JOHN A.M.E. CHURCH
513 W. Orange St.
375-2911
Sunday Church School ..........9:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship.... 11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

VICTORY PRAISE CENTER
128 E. Main St.
Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Thursday Night Services,
Evening Worship...................7:00 p.m.
Kidz Club............................... 7:00 p.m.

ONA

IGLESIA PENTECOSTES
MISSION POR LAS ALMAS
149 Bedger Loop 448-2831
Miercoles (Ensefianza Biblica) ............
..............................................7 :30 p .m .

LIMESTONE BAPTIST CHURCH
4868 Keystone Ave. Limestone
Comm.
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

NEW ZION BAPTIST CHURCH
202 Sidney Roberts Road
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training.................6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................6:00 p.m.

ONA BAPTIST CHURCH
131 Bear Lane 773-2540
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .............. 11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.


FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Bowling Green -UNION BAPTIST CHURCH
S. Hwy. 17. 375-2253 5076 Lily Church Rd. 494-5622
SUNDAY: Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
Bible Study ............................9:30 a.m. Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Morning Vorship ....... .. 10.45. a ",. evening Worsip ... ..... .6:00 p.m.
Ev'ning Wort,,ip 0 30 p.m. :. '.W nesday l
,. "- ... '... .." .'~~-tWANA ~(ids ...........6:30 p.m.


Discipleship Training
Youth & Adult ..................6:30 p.m.
AWANA (ages 3-5th grade) ....6:30 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Grape & Church Streets 375-2340
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............I1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study .................6:00 p.m.

FORT GREEN BAPTIST
CHURCH
Baptist Church Road 773-9013
Bible Connection .....:............9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ............:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

HOLY CHILD
SPANISH CATHOLIC MISSION
Misa (Espanol) Sunday ........7:00 p.m.

IGLESIA DEL DIOS VIVO
105 Dixiana St. 375-4191
Domingo De Predicacion .... 11:00 p.m.
Martes Estudio Biblico..........7:00 p.m.
Miercoles Estudior Juvenil ....7:00 p.m.
Jueves De Predicacion ..........7:00 p.m.

IMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH
210 E. Broward St. 375-4681
... Sku day.Schol.........................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..................7:00 pmn

MACEDONIA PRIMITIVE
BAPTIST CHURCH
607 Palmetto St.
Church'School ......................9:30 a.m.
Morning Service .................. 11:00 a.m.
Evening Service ....................7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study/Prayer ......7:00 p.m.
Communion-2nd Sun. Eve. ..6:00 p.m.

MT. PISGAH BAPTIST CHURCH
6210 Mt. Pisgah Rd. 375-4409
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training..................5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship .......:..........7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time ........7:00 p.m.

NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
Mason Dixon & County Line Rd.
781-5887
Sunday Worship .................. 11:00 a.m.
2nd Sunday Communion ....11:00 a.m.
5th Sunday Feast..................11:00 a.m.
Bread of Life Sunday........12:15 p.m.
T.H.E. Meeting Tuesday ....7:00 p.m.


SW ldj Prayer Time.........7:00 p.m.


WAUCHULA

APOSTOLIC ASSEMBLY
Martin Luther King and Apostolic Rd.
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
English Service .................. 1:30 a.m.
General Worship Service ......1:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer ......................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

CELEBRATION CHURCH
322 Hanchey Rd.
863-781-1624
hardee.celebration.org
Sunday Morning Service .... 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Youth Service ....5:30 p.m.
Childcare provided at all services

CELEBRATION FELLOWSHIP
773-0427
Celebration Service..............10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Evening Cell Groups
Adult Cell Group ..................7:00 p.m.
Youth Cell Group ..................7:00 p.m.
Children's Cell Group ..........7:00 p.m.
Call for locations

CHARLIE CREEK
BAPTIST CHURCH
6885 State Road 64 East 773-3447
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............I :00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............6:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF CHRIST
201 S. Florida Ave. & Orange St.
773-9678
Bible Study ............................ 9:30 a.m .
Worship Service ..................10:45 a.m.
W wednesday ............................7:00 p.m .

CHURCH OF CHRIST
Will Duke Road
773-2249
Sunday Morning Worship......9:30 a.m.
Sunday Bible Class ..............11:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening Worship......6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Bible Class ........7:00 p.m.
Men's Leadership & Training ClaSs -
2nd Sunday of Month........4:00 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
Martin Luther King Blvd.
767-0199

CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST
OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS
630 Hanchey Rd. 773-3532
Sacrament Meeting ................9:00 a.m.
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Priesthood ........................... 1:00 a.m .


WAUCHULA
COMMUNITY BAPTIST
CHURCH OF WAUCHULA HILLS
(SPANISH)
615 Rainey Blvd.
257-3950
Sunday Bible Study ............10:00 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship... 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service...........:....7:00 p.m.

DIOS ES AMOR
807 S. 8th Ave.
773-4576
Domingos Escuela
Dominica ...................10:00 a.m.
Servicio ............................... 11:00 a.m .
Lunes Oracion ...................... 6:00 p.m.
Miercoles Servicio ................7:00 p.m.

EL REMANENTE
IGLECIA CRISTIANA
318 W. Main St..
Martes Oracion ...................... 7:00 p.m.
Jueves Servicio ......................7:30 p.m.
Viernes Servicio ....................7:30 p.m.
Domingo Servicio................10:30 a.m.

ENDTIME CROSSROAD
MINISTRY
501 N. 9th & Georgia St. 773-3470
Sunday School ...............:....10:00 a.m.
Morning Service ..............1.. 1:30 a.m.
Evening Service....................7:30 p.m.
Wed. Bible St. & Yth. Gath ..7:30 p.m.
Friday (Holy Ghost Night)....7:30 p.m.

FAITH PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
114 N. 7th Ave. 773-2105
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ..................11:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ................... 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ................6:15 p.m.
Wed. Youth Fellowship..........6:50 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

FAITH TEMPLE CHURCH
OF GOD
701 N. 7th Ave 773-3800
Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship ......1.........10:20 a.m.
Children's Chuch ...............10:40 a.m.
Evening Service ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
1570 W. Main St. 773-4182
SUNDAY:
Bible Study for all ages ........9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............I1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.

WEDNESDAY:
Sr. Adult Bible Study ..........10:00 a.m.
Children's Chiors
(PK:Grade 4) .................... 5:30 p.m,
PRAISE 57-Jr High Chior .. 5:30 p.m.
Mid-Week Prayer Meeting .. 6:00 p.m.
Kids On Missions
(PK-Grade 4) .................... 6:00 p.m.
Club 56 ........................ (,6:4 p I m.
Youth Group (Grades 7-12) 6:00 p.m.
Family Life Ministry
& Discipleship ................ 6:00 p.m.
Church Orchestra.................. 6:00 p.m.
Adult Choir .......... ......... 7:00 p.m.

FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH
1121 W. Louisiana St. 773-9243
SIuNDAY
Generations Cafe Opens........9:30 a.m.
Kids World Check-In for
Nursery-5th Grade Begins..10:15 a.m.
Pre-K Blast .......................... 10:45 a.m.
Kids World B.L.A.S.T.
(K-5th) ............................10:45 a.m .
Worship Service ............... 10:45 a.m.
WEDNESDAY:
Check-In begins for
Nursery-5thgrade ..................6:15 p.m.
Classes for children ages
PreK-12th grade ............6:30-8:00 p.m.


FIRST CHURCH OF
THE NAZARENE
511 W. Palmetto St.
Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
Morning Service .................. 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.
FIRST MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
1347 Martin Luther King Ave.
S 773-6556
Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m.
Morning Service .................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Tues. Youth Ministry Meeting/
Bible Study ........................ 6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer/Bible Study ......7:00 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
207 N. Seventh Ave. 773-4267
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Traditional Sunday Worship 11:00 a.m.
Casual Sunday Worship..........6:00 p.m
Tuesday Bible Study............10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Activities ............6:00 p.m.

FLORIDA'S FIRST ASSEMBLY
OF GOD CHURCH
1397 South Florida Avenue
773-9386.
Sunday School ......................9:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............10:00 a.m.
Wed. Family Night .............7:00 p.m.
Adult, Children & Radiate Youth Church

FLORIDA GOSPEL
511 W. Palmetto
223-5126
Sunday Morning Worship.... 11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............7:30 p.m.

THE GOSPEL TABERNACLE
810 W. Tennessee St. 863-735-1158
Morning Service ..................10:00 a.m.


Wednesday Service ...............7:00 p.m.

HEARTLAND
COMMUNITY CHURCH
1262 W. Main St. 767-6500
Coffee & Donuts....................9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ...................... 9:30 a.m.
Worship ......................... 10:30 a.m.
Wed. Night Dinner ................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bodybuilders Adult Cl.
Crossroads &
Lighthouse Min ...............7:00 p.m.


WAUCHULA
HIGHER GROUND
INTERNATIONAL MINISTRY
1258 W. MAIN STREET
WAUCHULA, FL
Sunday Morning Worship....11:00 a.m.
Wed. Night Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

IGLESIA HISPANA
FUENTE DE VIDA
501 N. 9" Ave.
M artes ...................,..............7: 30 p.m .
Jueves ............................... 7:30 p.m.
Dom ingo ..................'. .'...10:30 p.m .

IGLESIA HISPANA
PRESENCIA de Dios
511 W. Palmetto St.
Domingos .............................. 6:00 p.m .
M iercoles............................... 7:00 p.m .

IGLESIA ADVENTISTA DEL
SEPTIMO DIA
Old Bradenton Road
767-1010

JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
ENGLISH
155 Altman Road 1131
Sunday Service ......................2:00 p.m.

JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
SPANISH
Sunday Service .................... 10:00 a.m.

LIGHT OF THE WORLD
MINISTRIES
Womans Center 131 N. 7th Ave.
Wauchula, FL
Friday Evening ......................6:00 p.m.

LAKE DALE BAPTIST CHURCH
3102 Heard Bridge Road
773-6622
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Service ..........1.......11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

MINISTERIO INTERNATIONAL
Cambriadores de Mundo
704 W; Main St. 773-0065
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.

NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH
1999 State Road 64 East
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m .
Morning Worship Service....l 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship Service ......6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Night Supper ......6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Activities
(All Ages) .......................... 7:00 p.m .



NEW LIFE CHURCH
117 W. Palmetto St.
773-2929
Sunday Service .................... 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
Children Ministries for all services
NEW MT. ZION A.M.E. CHURCH
10 Martin Luther King Ave.
767-0023
Mor. Worship
(1st & 3r Sun.) .................8:00 a.m.
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship .......... .....1:00 a.m.
2nd Sunday Youth Service ....4:00 p.m.
Allen Christian Endeavor......4:00 p.m.
Wed. & Fri. Bible Study........7:00 p.m.

NORTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
912 N. 8th Ave. 773-6947
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ..............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer .............7:00 p.m.

OAK GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
4350 W. Main St. 735-0321
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

PEACE VALLEY LUTHERAN
CHURCH
1643 Stenstrom Road 773-2858
1" & 3" Sun.
Communion ....................10:00 a.m.
2" & 4" Sun.
Divine Worship ..............10:00 a.m.
Bible Study ........................1..1:15 a.m.
** Fellowship each Sunday after service

PROGRESSIVE MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
149 Manley Road East Main
773-5814
Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m.
Worship Service ...............1... 1:00 a.m.
Wed. Evening Prayer ............7:00 p.m.

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 North US Hwy 17
Morning Service ..................10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.

RIVERVIEW HEIGHTS
MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1321 S.R. 636 East 773-3344
Radio Program
WZZS Sundays..................9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .............11:00 a.m.,
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

SOUL HARVEST MINISTRY
1337 Hwy. 17 South, Wauchula
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .............11:00 a.m.
Evening Service ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

ST. ANN'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
204 N. 9th Ave. 773-6418


Sunday ............................... 9:00 a.m .
H oly D ays .........................................

ST. MICHAEL
CATHOLIC CHURCH
408 Heard Bridge Road 773-4089
Saturday Mass (English) ......5:00 p.m.
(Spanish) ......7:00 p.m.
Sunday(English) ..................8:30 a.m.
(Spanish) ................ :00 a.m.
(Creole)..................... :00 p.m.
Catecismo .............................. 9:45 a.m .
Daily Mass in English ..........8:30 a.m.


WAUCHULA

SEVENTH DAY
ADVENTIST CHURCH
205 S. 11th Ave. 773-9927
Sabbath School .....................9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Tues. Prayer Meeting ............7:00 p.m.

SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
505 S. 10th Ave. 773-4368
Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

SPIRIT WIND TABERNACLE
1652 Old Bradenton Road
Sunday Worship. ............... 10:00 a.m.'
Wednesday Worship ....:.........7:30 p.m.

TABERNACLE OF
PRAISE & JOY
1507 MLK Avenue
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:30 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Tues. Bible Stdy.
& Child Train ................... 7:00 p.m.
Friday Prayer Service ............7:00 p.m.
WAUCHULA CHURCH OF GOD
1543 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.
773-0199
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:15 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Fam. Training ....7:30 p.m.
Thurs. Youth Bible Study ......7:00 p.m.
Friday Night Worship ............7:30 p.m.
WAUCHULA HILLS HARVEST
TEMPLE ASSEMBLY OF GOD
210 Anderson
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Church..................................10:00 a.m .
Youth Service ........................6:00 p.m.
Evening Service ....................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA HILLS
SPANISH CHURCH OF GOD
1000 Stansfield Rd.-
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer ......................7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship..................7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ..................7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA REVIVAL CENTER
(Full Gospel)
501 N. 9th Ave.
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............I1:00 a.m.
Youth & Child. Church..........6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ..................7:00 p.m.
Men's Fri. Prayer ..................7:00 p.m.


ZOLFO SPRINGS

COMMUNITY WESLEYAN CHURCH
Gardner
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m .:
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

COWBOY-UP MINISTRY
Cracker Trail Arena
Hwy 66
(across from Oak Hills Ranch Rd.)
781-2281
Sunday ...............................10:00 a.m.

CREWSVILLE BETHEL
BAPTIST CHURCH
8251 Crewsville Road
Church 735-0871 Pastor 773-6657
-Sunday School ....................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................6:30 p.m.

EVANGELISTIC HOLINESS
CHURCH INC.
Corner of 6th and Hickory
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday ............................ 7:30 p.m.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
OF ZOLFO
320 E. 4th St. 735-1200
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ............. 11:00 a.m.
Training Union ......................5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ...............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Corner of 6th & Suwanee 735-1544
Gospel Music ......................10:30 a.m.
Worship Service .................11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.:


ZOLFO SPRINGS

GARDNER BAPTIST CHURCH
South Hwy. 17 494-5456
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 1:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.
LIFE CHANGING WORSHIPCENTER
3426 Oak St. W63-832-9808
Sunday Worship ....................2:30 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

MARANATHA BAPTIST CHURCH
2465 Oxendine Rd
(863) 832-9292
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m .
W orship .............................. :00 a.m .
'Evening................................ 1:00 p.m .
Wed. Bible & Prayer Meet....7:00 p.m.

NEW VISION WORSHIP CENTER
64 E. & School House Road
Church 735-8585 Childcare 735-
8586'
Morning Worship ...............10:00 a.m.
Children's Church................ 10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Youth & F.T.H. ............7:00 pm.

PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF
GOD FAITH TEMPLE
Oak Street
Sunday Worship ..................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Tuesday Worship .................7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship..................7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ..................7:30 p.m.

PRIMERA MISSION
BAUTISTA HISPANA
518 8th Ave. E.
Escuela Dominical ..............10:00 a.m.
Servicio del Domingo..........1 1:00 a.m.
........................................7:00 p.m .
Servicio del Miercoles ..........7:30 p.m.

PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH
Pioneer Park
2nd Sunday .......................... 10:30 a.m.
Evening Service ....................6:30 p.m.
5th Sunday .......................... 6:00 p.m.
REALITY RANCH
COWBOY CHURCH
2-1/2 Miles east of
Zolfo Springs on Hwy. 66
863-781-1578
Sunday Service ....................11:00 a.m.

ST. PAUL'S MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
3676 US. Hwy. 17 South 735-0636
Sunday School ...............9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship ....................11 a.m.
Wed. Prayer Service ..............7:00 p.m.

SAN ALFONSO MISSION
3027 Schoolhouse Lane
Domingo, Misa en Espanol ..9:30 a.m.
Catecismo ............................11:00 a.m.

SPANISH MISSION
735-8025
- Bseuela-Dominica.: .........10:00-a.m.
Servicio .............................. :00 a.m .
Pioneer Club..........................6:30 p:nr.
Sert iL6de la Noche ...........7:00 pan.
Mierecoles Merienda ............6:00 p.m.
Servicio..................... ......... 8:00 p.m .
Sabado Liga de Jovenes ........5:00 p.m.


SEEDS
FROM
S THE
SOWER





God has one Son without sin,
but He has no sons without
suffering.
Suffering oftentimes brings out
talents which in prosperous
circumstances would have lain
dormant.
John Bunyan was incarcerated
in Bedford Jail. There he wrote
Pilgrim's Progress.
Victor Hugo was exiled. Then he
wrote one of the world's greatest
novels, Les Miserables.
Robert Louis Stevenson was
confined to his bed by sickness.
Then he wrote Treasurelslandand
Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.
.. Suffering will make you better or
bitter. Submit yourself to God, and
your suffering will make you better,.

Visit us at: :ww,. TiheSower.com .


MAkE SOMEONE'S DAY
Weekly
ll^^^Bh $riptur
S Reading

Mark
630-56

V'Mark4
7:24-37


When was the last time someone beamed at you
and said. "You made my dayl"? Whatever's going
on, it is important to realize that we never know
when we might be making a life-altering impact
with a small kindness or an extra consideration.
God may be using us for His particular purpose.
Would you like to learn more about God working
through you? Worship at His House this week, it will
make your day!

It l V1 2 oelf BSnman WW St5e
Po L.J.16: i nonewe.vafrimkwewscoD


I |
Peace Aioer gdr6ders
Wholesale Nursery

Donnis & Kathy Barber
Hwy. 66 East (863) 735-0470
PO. Box 780 Zolfo Springs, FL


Mark
8:1-26

Mwk
8:27-9:13

Mark
9:14-32

Mark
9.33-50 '

Mark
10:1-31




BUmeSoday










He Came Here To Study


Aerospace Engineering


By ALTHEA MADRONAL
Special To The Herald-Advocate
Chuck Kimball sits in the dining
rooni of his home in Orlando looking
somewhat surprised when I walked over
to ask him for an interview.
To others, he's just another senior
citizen. But it's the unique story this
man has to
share that
sets him
apart from' ....
others. With
a faint smile, Kimball agrees to do the
interview. I thank him quickly and take
a seat. With pen in hand and notebook
ready, I ask him the first question, and
the tale begins.
On June 3, 1933, Kimball was born
in New Jersey. It was there he spent the
years of his childhood, attending an ele-
mentary schoolnamed "Ward Point." It
wasn't until he graduated that Kimball
moved to Florida to attend college.
His first impression of the Sunshine
State wasn't a very pleasant one.
Recalling the weather was "hot" and
"humid." Despite all that, Kimball
stayed and attended the college, taking
classes such as flight control, hoping to
get a degree in aerospace engineering.
Diligently working and putting in hours
of studying, he graduated with the
degree he had wished for.
After graduation, he began pilot
training. While he wasn't actually learn-
ing how tofly the plane, he was actually
the one building models of one, such as
making miniatures of the engine, the
propeller, the landing gear, etc. Kimball
states that the thing he enjoyed the most
of his 27 years there was the relation-
ships with the pilots. He remembers his
comrades, and a few memories they've
shared, even though they've lost contact
through the years.
Later on, Kimball worked for the
Navy; two years' active and two years'
reserve. He comments that he didn't
stay very long, but describes how it felt
like to, work there. Kimball states it was


COURTESY PHOTO
Interviewee Chuck Kimball with author
Atthea Madronal.
"very intense" and "also very busy."
Outside of his job, however, is an
interesting story itself. Kimball did vol-
unteer work for Christian missions at
his nearby church. One of the things he
did was Bible translations; languages
such as the Arabic, Tagalog (one of
many Filipino languages) and Japanese.
Not only was he able to translate a few
foreign languages to English, but
Kimball was able to visit a few coun-
tries as well.
Prodding him to remember a few, he
recalls visiting Germany, Japan, China
and the Philippines. "They are all great
countries," he comments, "but I think
Japan would be my favorite." The rea-
son being a region called "Osaka,"
located in the Kansai region on Honshu,
the main island of Japan. Kimball
explains that he enjoyed the many his-
torical views, the people, and the food
found there.
A few years later, Kimball met his
wife, Linda Everett. They married, and
had three children, whose names were
Scott, Tina and Chris. They enjoyed
spending time together as a family,
doing things such as going out to eat.
Kimball states that "the price of the
food back then was half of what it is
.. I I / .


today."
My closing question was, "What
would you say was your biggest accom-
plishment in life?"
"Oh boy. That's hard to say,"
Kimball chuckled slightly. Taking some
time to ponder about it, he finally
replied, "I would say meeting my wife,
and having the kids."


January 19,2012, The Herald-Advocate 3B

Back In Time is the result of a class
assignment given to ninth graders at
Hardee Senior High School. Each
student is asked to interview an older
person. Selected interviews are pub-
lished here as an encouragement to the
students and for the enjoyment of our
readers.


j EN-S.! Ifesso


John Deer, EA
Enrolled since 1979
BS Accounting
863-773-6661


Jo Ann Wilson, EA
Enrolled since 2003
863-735-1614


Monthly and Yearly Accounting
Payroll
All Tax Returns
Individual .Corporate *Partnership -Non-Profit

Enrolled Agents, along with attorneys and certified public
accountants, represent clients and present their cases at all
levels of the Internal Revenue Service.

j Past Tax Returns, Audits, Delinquent Taxes,
4 -. Offers of Compromise

TS| Initial Consultation Free
12:15-4:121


CRYSTAL LAKE VILLAGE

and RV RESORT

237 Maxwell Dr., Wauchula



Sat urayauary21s'

11am.-3p*.(83 7338


ARAC* 'AL-OCA'!HONOHint *til PhiCr~t iuK'HOI irLH Ji Al rithl[,
PAYMENT DIE AT TIM[ Or SERVICE
INSUIRLL) AIILNIS Wl WILLL iILLV YOUH IrNStHANCL L' HL- .ri 0 2 .,1-
S .'it.: rln i ti t r.enaleal aI \r I n c o t,' .iiil 1,. : h,!O.tl Ic .t .

OUP ON




l ARCA A LOCA-:JI ONLY o ECL.L PRICING FOR W14 %: iF rl", ifM ,l '
SA PAYv'ENr TDUL AT TIME OF .SFAR'CF
INSUnED PATIENTS WE WILL FILE YOUR INSiUR:JCE E PFiE' JrAl i ?i 'I
L o,,


Chest X-rays For Jt






S" .
, Hardship ases Call For Info. ,












i, .


ist $35!


--


Sr
S '





? :, ; ,


l i...


EIfjl B RESTT MRI
DIGITAL MAMMOGRAPHY
PMTRY VIRTUALL CI.ONOSCOPY *




CR AC WIqI.
r! C ACcrEoI1io


2422 Hibiscus Lane


2011 Homes of Merit

Manufactured Home


2 Bedroom, 2 Bath, Split Design,
Morning Room, Back Porch, HVAC,
Carport, Irrigation, Landscape
Lot Rent $250 per month
With Modified Lifetime Lease


$71,995


I_, -r '' ~ 7
---------I -- ------ I II


p


~,';:s~



I'
I '
~'''
I:


.r








4B The Herald-Advocate, January 19, 2012


Hoop Boy
By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Hardee Wildcats took it
on the chin in back-to-back dis-
trict encounters last week.
This week, the 'Cats went to
Lake Wales on Tuesday and
host Teneroc tomorrow night
(Friday).
Next week's games include a
trip to Auburndale on Tuesday
and visits from Avon Park
Thursday and Lake Wales on
Friday. The season ends with a
varsity only 7 p.m. home game
on Jan. 31 against Lakeland and
a final home game on Feb. 2
against Port Charlotte, Senior
Night when Keshun Rivers,
Andrew "Dru" Hooks, Jajuan
"J.J." Hooks and Bobby Brown
will be honored.
The district tournament will
be at Lake Wales, beginning on
Feb, 6 with the top seed against
the fourth-seed. On Feb. 7,
seeds 2 and 3 will square off.
The Monday and Tuesday win-
ners face off for the district
championship on Feb. 10.
Last Tuesday's home game
against Auburndale pitted sev-
enth year Wildcat Coach Vance
Dickey against 10th year
Bloodhound Coach Eric Rob-
erson, whose starting lineup
included a senior three-point
specialists, a soph and three
juniors, including 6-6 Elmo
Stephen.
Hardee countered with three
seniors and sophs Keyon
Brown and Steve Metayer, who
were relieved by Christian
Moralez, Bobby Brown, Kane
Casso and Luke Palmer.
It was a tight game all the
way. Although Hardee got the
opening tipoff, Auburndale got
the first score on a trey by sen-
ior Chad Cullop. Junior Rashad
Jones added a two-spot before
Hardee got started. Rivers went
to the hole for a deuce. Stephen
sank a turn-around jumper to


Drop District Pair


make it 7-2. Hardee replied
with a Dru Hooks three-pointer
and another, which was re-
bounded by Keyon Brown for
two points to knot the score at
7-7.
When J.J. Hooks drilled
another trey and then fed Rivers
for a three-spot, Hardee had a
13-7 edge. A Moralez shot was
rebounded by J.J. Hooks to
make it 15-7. Auburndale
would not stay down and cut
the lead to 17-15 by the time the
first quarter ended.
In the second stanza, there
were a pair of ties and lead
changes, with Auburndale forg-
ing ahead 37-32 by halftime.
As the second half started,
Hardee came out on fire. Dru
Hooks inbounded the ball to
Rivers for a trey. J.J Hooks and
Rivers played give and go, with
J.J. Hooks getting the shot to tie
the game at 37-all.
Midway through the third,
period, Hardee re-tied the game
at 43-all and went on to take a
48-45 advantage. With 40 sec-
onds left in the quarter, the
Bloodhouds tied the game at
55-all, then hit one-of-two to
lead 52-51 for the start of the
final eight minutes.
Dru Hooks fed Rivers in the
lane for a shot and Hardee
topped 53-52 to get the fourth
period going. That lasted about
25 second when Auburndale
moved ahead. A fast spurt
upped the lead to 60-53.
Although the Wildcats played
even the rest of the game, they
were never able to overcome
the deficit and lost 71-64.
Stephen topped Auburndale
with 25 points and Jones added
17 to give the Bloodhounds an
11-2 record. For Hardee, Rivers
was close to the top scorer with
his 24 points. J.J. Hooks fin-
ished tied with Jones with 17
points. Dru Hooks had 11
points. Moralez and Casso each


SUPER MATTa


large Washers &Dryers
Up To 125 Ibs. Washers


SPECIAL/ESPECIAL

MONDAY-FRIDAY

6AM-6PM 50% OFF


NORMAL/NORMALENTE
2 50 DOUBLE/DOBLE
s400 MAX/MAXI
$60 LARGE/GRANDE
$ 7" SUPER/GRANDE


SPECIAL/ESPECIAL
$125
$200 .
$350oo
S3oo
$so


Nicholas R eurant



NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that Gray E. Vance, the
the holder of the following certificate has filed said
certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The
certificate number and year of issuance, the descrip-
tion of the property, and the names in which it was
assessed are as follows:

CERTIFICATE NO.: 514 YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2005
Description of Property:
N1/2 OF LOT 22
HARLEM HEIGHTS
103P390 340P576
SUBJECT TO RESERVATIONS, COVENANTS,
RESTRICTIONS, AND EASEMENTS OF RE-
CORD.
Name in which assessed: ALFONSO LOPEZ AND
ESMERALDO LOPEZ
Said property being in the County of HARDEE, State
of Florida.
Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according
to law, the property described in such certificate shall
be sold to the highest bidder at the Hardee County
Courthouse, 417 West Main Street, second floor hall-
way outside of Room 202, Wauchula, FL 33873 on the
15th day of February, 2012, at 11:00 a.m.
Dated this 9th day of January, 2012.
B. Hugh Bradley
Clerk of Circuit Court
Hardee County, Florida
AD No: 1
By: Alicia C. Albritton, Deputy Clerk
Tax Deed File No.: 252011TD012XXXX
Pursuant to F.S. 197.512
1:12-2:02c


had three points, and Metayer,
Keyon Brown and Bobby
Brown each a deuce.
Hardee, without as deep a
bench as Aubumdale, showed
its teamwork in the stats. Rivers
had eight rebounds, Keyon
Brown seven, J.J. Hooks four
and Moralez three. Dru Hooks
had four steals and four assists.
J.J. Hooks had four assists and
Rivers three.
Against the 11-6 Teneroc
Titans on Friday night, Hardee
had an equally hard time, losing
65-52. The Titans scored a cou-
ple points more than the Wild-
cats in every quarter, leaving
them no room to make up the
deficit. The Titans did a good
job in shutting down the Wild-
cat three-pointers.
For Hardee, Casso came alive
with 13 points, including four
treys, while the rest of the team
had a total of four. Rivers had a
dozen points, Dru Hooks nine,
J.J. Hooks and Metayer six
apiece, Keyon Brown five and
Moralez three points.
Defensively, Keyon Brown
had a half dozen rebounds,
while Palmer, Rivers and Mo-
ralez had four apiece. Metayer
and J.J. Hooks each had three
rebounds and Bobby Brown
added a pair. Dru Hooks had a
pair of blocked shots and Rivers
had a pair of steals and four
assists.
The Hardee JV is still in the
learning stages, losing 60-22 to
Auburndale and 55-9 at
Teneroc. Freshman Blaiaine
Molitor continues to be the
scoring leader, with help offen-
sively from Daniel Boehm,
Zach Neuhofer, Jordan Jones
and Deonte Leslie, and defen-
sively from Robert Torres, Nick
Johonson, Dustin Smith, Mark
Elsbury, Dustin Smith, Eric
Klein, Luke Winter, Tyler
Smith and Ryan Ramirez.


Work and acquire, and thou
hast chained the wheel of
Chance.
-Ralph Waldo Emerson

The sufferings that fate inflicts
on us should be borne with
patience, what enemies inflict
with manly courage.
-Thucydides


LITERACY LUNCH


COURTESY PHOTOS
A number of youngsters at Hardee Junior High School attended a literacy lunch in the
media center on Dec. 12. Students enjoyed a meal while Danielle Upton read the story
"Silver Packages, an Appalachian tale by author Cynthia Rylant. The top photo shows
sixth graders at the luncheon, while the middle photo shows seventh graders and the
bottom photo shows eighth graders.


$8 In Advanced


* $10 At The Door


Available At:

: Sevigny Eye Care
B ~735 N. 6th Ave. Wauchula
and
Graham Income Tax Service, Inc.
120 N. 4th Ave. Wauchula
All proceeds go to people in the area with cancer to help with
travel and other expenses.


"An Evening With Mr. & Mrs. Lincoln" takes place in the White House at the end of the
Civil War (April 1865). As the President and Mrs. Lincoln reflect on the events of the past
four years and their plans for the future, the play flashes back to the beginning of their lives
together their courtship and early marriage, the births of their children, Mr. Lincoln's legal
career and the development of his political career and brings the audience all the waly for-
ward through the tumultuous years of the Civil War the responsibilities of the Presidency
and the personal traumas suffered by the family ending as the President realizes that it is
time for him to leave for Ford's Theatre. A short epilogue addresses the events of April 14,
1865 and the last years of Mary Lincoln's life.

The program length is one hour; it is suitable for upper grade students (5th grade and up)
and adults; and all performances are followed by a "question and answer" period with the
President and Mrs. Lincoln or with Max & Donna Daniels, who portray the historic cou-
ple. This program has been called "an excellent opportunity to witness living history!"


MAX & DONNA DANIELS ...
Have an extensive background in theatre, and have been portraying Abraham & Mary Todd Lincoln professionally
since 1988. They are past Vice-Presidents of the National Association of Lincoln Presenters, and have received its
awards for "Best Abraham," "Best Mary," "Best Abraham & Mary Team," and "Lincoln Legend." They have been featured
on C-SPAN Cable Network in the Lincoln-Douglas Debate series, the "Someone You Should Know" program on
ABC/Channel 7 in Chicago, and the "Investigating History" series on the History Channel. They have performed at the
Lincoln Home Visitor Center in Springfield, IL and at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, DC. They participate in
Memorial Day ceremonies at Abraham Lincoln National Cemetery in Joliet, IL, and took part in the dedication of the
Abraham Lincoln Presidential Museum in Springfield. They research and write their own original scripts, receiving many
compliments for the entertaining way in which they present their programs. They are popular attractions at Civil War
Reenactments throughout the Midwest, and make over 200 appearances each year for schools, libraries and other or-
ganizations. They take great pride in "bringing history to life" for audiences of all ages. 1:12,19c
= 1 J


"An Evening with Mr. & Mrs. Lincoln"
Sponsored By

Hardee County Cancer Support Foundation


Friday & Saturday January 20 & 21

7:00 pm 8:00 pm
Historic City Hall Auditorium 225 East Main St., Wauchula

Tickets







January 19, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 5B


Greetings from Fort Green!
We certainly had a cold night
last Saturday. The weathermen
try to hit it on the head, but in
the end they are just making a
qualified guess! It was predict-
ed to be 35 in Wauchula and it
sure got colder than that out
here, but then I have to remem-
ber we are north of Wauchula!
Congratulations to the Proud
Panthers in BGES who are from
our neck of the woods: Alex
McQuaig, Kasie Powell and
Cassidy Wilson. That is the way
to go! School is very important.
Fort Green is. growing by
leaps and bounds! Angie and
Rocky Sonier have a new beau-
tiful baby girl, and the little lady
has been named Addison. Kim-


FRESHMAN HONOR


berly and Duane Alexander also
have a beautiful baby girl, and
they named her Elizabeth. Con-
gratulations to both families.
There are quite a few sick out
our way. Sharon Adams was
taken to the Sebring hospital
Saturday night. Norma Alex-
andra had three wisdom teeth
cut out last Thursday and is still
under the weather from this
ordeal. Faye Davis is sick again
with upper respiratory. Gary
Oden will be having some med-
ical tests. Angie Warnock and
Mary Samuels will begin
chemo. Paul Clark is having
some problems. Mabel Wil-
liamson was not feeling good
last Sunday morning and
missed church. Billy Nicholson
is in the Lakeland hospital. All


COURTESY PHOTO
2010 Hardee High quarterback has gone on to be named
Southern Conference "Freshman of the Week" for the
Georgia Southern. The redshirt freshman ran for 119
yards in a game against Western Carolina, including an
83-yard TD run. Coach Jeff Monken presents the awards
to the Golden Eagle at a banquet on Jan. 14. Georgia
Southern went on to win the Southern Conference and
advance to the regional quarterfinals of the Division II
college series.



On The Agenda

HARDEE COUNTY COMMISSION
The Hardee County Commission will hold its regular
evening session today (Thursday)beginning at 6 p.m. in Room
102, Courthouse Annex I, 412 W. Orange St., Wauchula. The
meeting can be followed.on computer by going to www.hard-
eeilerk.com and followlfFg the link just above the picture of the
courthouse. It, and past meetings, can also be seen at that link
anytime. Each contains an information packet for the items
discussed during the meeting.
The following is a synopsis of agenda topics that may be of
public interest. Times are approximate except for advertised
public hearings.
-Proclamation of Children's Week, 6:05 p.m.
-Consider administrator for Health Department, 6:15 p.m.
-Annual Budget Report, 6:30 p.m.
-Resolution on resurfacing portions of County Line Road,
Bostick Road and Moffitt Road, 6:45 p.m.
-Landfill expansion work order, 7 p.m.
-Reappointment of advisory board members
This agenda is provided as a public service of The Herald-
Advocate and the Hardee County Commission for those who
may wish to plan to attend.



Pioneer Creek RV News
By Reggie DeSmet


Janet, bon voyage as you go
on your first cruise, with your
family to share it with you!

SPOTLIGHT
John from Baarn, Nether-
lands, born on the grounds of
the Queen of the Netherlands,
and Willie Veldhuizen from
Barmeveld, Netherlands, have-
been married 66 years.
John met Willie when she
was 13. When her sister went
on dates, Willie always went
along. One time her sister's
boyfriend invited John to go
and be with Willie. They were
sitting at a fountain at a zoo that
night, and an aunt came riding
by and oops! saw her and
John being together. Willie's
mother restricted her for three
years with no boys at any activ-
ity.
John did finally get to date
Willie and was married there in
the Netherlands.
John was a dairy farmer for
three years, since that is what
bis dad did for a living. He
hand-milked 15 cows morning
and night.
After three years, John and
Willie and one child came by
ship from there to l-oboken,
N.J. His sponsor was from Cal-
edonia, N.Y., and kept him
involved in the dairy life in the
states for four more years.
He then became a mainte-
nance man for a school and also
took special training to improve
his skills, which allowed him to
be in the best school areas. He
then became the assistant super-
intendent of buildings and
grounds. After many years he
retired.


During the time he worked,
he also was a beekeeper for 10
years, until the boxes got too
heavy for him to carry.
John's claim to fame was at 5
years old he was given the
opportunity to sit on the queen's
lap, which was very memorable
and made history for John. John
was also given a special name,
"Honest John," as people got to
know him.
Willie was a housewife and
mother, and she also cleaned for
a doctor and cared for his son,
who became a part of their fam-
ily and still is to this day.
She liked to crochet, knit and
embroider, and enjoys cooking
and baking and tending the
flower garden.
They both enjoyed camping
every weekend, and have been
camping in Florida since 1988,
being in Dover every year three
weeks to a month, then going to
the Peace River in Arcadia for a
few years. They moved to
Wagon Wheel Campground
until four years ago when it
closed and they moved to our
park.
They feel our park is the best
of all parks they have been
camping in because of all the
people's caring and loving
ways. They have the freedom tb
do what they want if they want
to do activities, like bocce, and
if they want to sit and relax and
have visitors,stop and just hang
out.
I know our park, as well as
I, have been blessed because of
their good nature. They are
friends with great stories to
share and teach us about life.


Fort Green News
By Rilla Cooper
773-6710


of these need your prayers.
Wynell and Gerald Davis are
anticipating surgery. They don't
live in our area, but we talked at
the doctor's office and they
requested prayer. Nancy Mc-
Quaig's relative in West Vir-
ginia had a leg amputated above
the knee last week and is cer-
tainly in need of prayer. My
younger brother had a leg
amputated and it is a bad situa-
tion. Please pray for all of these.
The freeze from last week
sure burned the leaves on our
early oranges. They had already
been picked, so we concentrat-
ed on keeping the Valencias
protected. We don't have suffi-
cient water pressure to take care
of everything at once.
Rascal and I were walking
last week when I heard a bull
bellowing, and from the direc-
tion of the sound I didn't think
he was behind a good strong
fence! I checked the fence I was
beside and, of course, it was
barbwire but I figured I could
climb it if it proved necessary. I
kept telling Rascal to be quiet!
A dog will bark back at a gosh
awful noise,
Anyway, it reminded me of
my childhood when my cousins
were visiting and we had a
young bull in our pasture. We
thought it fun to paw the dirt
and bellow at him. Amazing
what we thought fun back-in the
'40s! It was making him mad
and he would run to the fence
and back off. We got braver and
closer to the fence, repeating
our bellowing and pawing and
he just came through the fence!
Because there were five of us
and he didn't know which one
to hook, we were able to outrun
him and hit the dirt and slid
under the back porch. He put
his head under and got on his
knees but could not reach us.
Of course, Daddy and Grandpa
had to repair the fence and get
him put up. Unbelievable, but
the adults were able to reach us!
Brother Steve and Tara made
a quick trip to Wisconsin last
week. They left Monday morn-
ing and were back Friday night.
Their daughter was having
some health problems and they
were happy to be able to visit
her. Brother Steve said he
preached Wednesday night at
the church where his son-in-law
is the pastor.
I'visited Rosine Proctor last
week when 1 had to go to
Winter Haven. She is in the
nursing-hon.i-and is ready to go
home. She has lost about 35
pounds btfFis regaiining her
strength.
Quite often a group of us visit
Wendy's after Sunday night
church. Quite often New Hope
members will be there and
some of the other churches.
This is the only fast-food where
you can move the tables and all
sit together. They have new
tables and chairs, but the chairs
are hard and we all jokingly
said it was to keep us from vis-
iting too long!
Please pray for one another,
our nation and the military.


Home of FREE


Antibiotics & Delivery



Call 863.773.0450 Now


FREE
FLU SHOT


FREE
2012 Calendar


Stop Helping Big Companies Fill Their Corporate Pockets

Help Local Small Businesses 119C



E I B .I- -, ... .- r -- .











1040 & Business Tax Preparation
Payroll & Bookkeeping Services
Quickbooks
Checks, Training & Assistance
Electronic Filing-- Fax Service
Notary
MiI!M J-' 6 -V !.M


y*IReliOlls l Ai2i i-llatIiii :gljUJlUe'rgi-"I [lain--


$206 COUPON 20
I This coupon entitlesyon-to 1 ty1A rsn urn |
filed in our office. Thank you for ~ilg a. alt ed clilt,,.I.

I Este cup6n le permit a veinte d6lares de cualquier regre I
Sson archivado en, Nuestra oficina. Gracias por es un
2 client valorado.
I TNT Bookkeeping Service, Inc
I$ 2 0 1329 US Hwy 17 N, Wauchula, FL
S- -863)773-3754


Jose L. Torres, Sr.
Owner
SE-] VISA


Bridget McVay
Tax Practitioner
brmcvay@strato.net


Crystal Rivera
Tax Practitioner


Switch Your Prescriptions NOW

And Start Saving




Ocu I pharmacy
* \_______________


1:13tfc


a - --- ----~---~Ka-i


HEARTLAND PHARMACY-



DELIVERY SERVICE AVAILABLE

"We put our 9 into our service"
If you are visiting we will gladly transfer your prescriptions and

keep them on file then transfer them back when you go home.


Katie Rogers, Sue Lobato, Pauline Ochoa, Julian Garcia, & Red Camp Pharmacist

Hours:
Monday-Friday 9:00 am to 6:00 pm Saturday 9:00 am to 1:00pm


4c- = 0 % 1 L-W- 0 N 0&-


-7=w It 4- NtsL N l--Z-1WAk"%-pL


~ ~-~-~~--~-


OW


nEB
onei


"I F=IP A C-


m


m


m


m






6B The Herald-Advocate, January 19, 2012





-Hardee


TOBACCO PREVENTION


Living


REPORT ON SCHOOLS


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
The Wauchula Lions Club on Thursday, Dec. 29, heard a report on tobacco and dia-
betes prevention from Tanya Dubberly, Tami Halstead and Candis Thomas of the
Hardee County Health Department. Steer away from sodas and cake. Two 12-ounce
sodas a day for a month equals five pounds of sugar. It takes 100 miles of walking to
lose five pounds. Lung cancer is No. 1 and colon cancer No. 2 among American can-
cer deaths. Candy-flavored tobacco in colorful packaging targets teenagers. Flavors
include citrus, cherry, apple, strawberry, grape, blueberry, peach, vanilla and pepper-
mint. The Wauchula City Commission recently passed a resolution discouraging retail
stores from selling candy-flavored tobacco. Hardee High School has a SWAT group
(Students Working Against Tobacco). From left are Rick Knight, Candis Thomas, Tami
Halstead, Tayna Dubberly, and Paul Samuels.


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
Hardee Schools Superintendent David Durastanti on Tuesday, Jan. 10, spoke to the
Wauchula Kiwanis Club at the Panda Restaurant. The district's overall school grade by
the state is a B, led by three elementary schools with an A, on elementary school with
a B, and one elementary, the junior high and the high school with a high C. There has
been a lot of academic progress in Hardee Schools due to hard work by students and
teachers and.help from administrators, civic organizations, parents and the business
community. In the last three years administrative staff has been reduced and more
teachers added. -Federal and state funding has declined greatly, and the tax base
declined this year. The school system has a healthy financial reserve, but negotiations
on a new employment contract have stalled. The school system has 690 employees
with 254 union members. From left are Cliff Ables, David Durastanti, club president
Sam Fite, Jeff McKibben and Bill Crews.


Full Gospel, Fellowship Church
1795 US Hwy 17 S Fort Meade, Florida 33841
Come As You Are Holy Ghost Revival
Beginning Monday, January 9, 2012
thru Saturday, March 3,2012
Time: 7:30 Nightly (Except Sundays)
Featuring the following Evangelists:
SFrank Bartley Randy Baldwin Pastor Rickey Young n
SDonnie Gorum Alan Flowers Ervin Bodiford Jeff Giles m
STommy Hampton Rick Young Jr. Johnny Epps


Thank You
In times of worry and tragedy you don't stop to think of those
that are around you, worried just the same. But this last week we
had a major tragedy happen to our family. Jessie Lamar Keeton
"Marty" went missing and was discovered in the worst imagina-
ble way that a person would want to be found. We had to lay him
to rest on Saturday, January 14th at 1:00pm. At this time our
family would like to extend our deepest gtlifitude to the follow-
ing. Hardee Sheriff's Office for thncontii ous search and ef-
forts for Marty. FWC for their search on foot and ATV's. Polk
Sheriff's Office for their air support both Monday evening and
Tuesday. Highlands Sheriff's Office for their specialized team of
divers on Tuesday. All of these licensed personnel acted profes-
sional and supportive at every time and encounter with the fam-
ily. Thank you to Mr. and Mrs. Judah for their help thru the
week. Thank you to Double J Restaurant for their support and
food donations to the family. Ponger-Kays-Grady Funeral Home
and staff. There are too tnany to name individually: but Thank
You to all friends and extended family for their thoughfulness
and prayers and support to Jessie D. Keeton (father) and Wanda
Wilson (sister) and his three Children. Thank You to all who do-
nated to the car wash Thursday and Friday. This community has
shown that when a tragedy happens they all stand together and
show what God has brought together. Prayers have brought us' a
long way, and will continue to get us all through this time. Once
again Thank You to ALL who helped from the beginning on
Monday evening to Saturday when we laid him to rest.
Sincerely.
The Keeton Family



Donft scis s the 27tk Amucat

FORT MYERS

-RVSHOW
5 it'4 soadt(rid4a s get(tskow!
JAN. 19 020 21 22
Lee Civic Center
10 AM-5 PM: Thurs., Fri., & Sat.
10 AM-4 PM: Sunday
AREA DEALERS
DISPLAYING HUNDREDS
OF NEW RVS

MOTORHOMES
TRAVEL TRAILERS
PARK MODELS \
5TH WHEELS '
TOY HAULERS
VAN CAMPERS lt
FOLDING CAMPERS
OVER 100 RV SUPPLIERS
& LOW INTEREST FINANCING "
\LE CIVIC
Exit J
BAYSHORE ROAD
LEE CIVIC CENTER From 1.75 take EXIT 143 Spon ored by:
go east (5.R. 78) For 3 miles. d RVTdeA oiion
Region One
FREE PARKING www.frvta.org/rv-shows Ii.uon
11 pil 1-11!t--^--'j~'it-m niii'iiHi


Brent Gilliard
Named To
President's List
Officials at Northeast Com-
munity College in Norfolk.
Neb'.. recently released the
President's Honor List and
Deans' Honor List for the fall
2011 semester.
Named to the President's
Honor List was Brent Gilliard
of Zolfo Springs.
To be named to the Pres-
ident's Honor List, students
must earn a perfect grade-point
average of 4.0. A total of 200
students achieved this top
recognition.
Students named to the Dean's
Honor List must have earned a
grade-point average of 3.75 oi
above. Two liunidrcd lifts one
students were named to the
Deans' Honor List.
Northeast serves residents in
20 counties in northeast Ne-
braska. numerous states, and
several foreign countries.

Don't be too timid and
squeamish about your ac-
tions. All life is an experiment.
The more experiments you
make the better.
-Ralph Waldo Emerson
Strong reasons make strong
actions.


We need men who can
dream of things that never
were.
-John F. Kennedy


Stephanie Gugle Computer Tech


Phone (863) 781-9720
0


sauqle(Oauglescomouterservices.com www.GuglesComouterServices.com


You are invited to share ourjoy ...
The staff ofLydia's House
is pleased to announce the graduation of











Tatia Norton Heather Watt
January 18, 2012
7:00 in the evening
Florida's First Assembly of God
1397 South Florida Ave. Wauchula, Florida
Reception to follow
Lydia's House
601 North Florida Avenue soc:19c,


INHME SERVI






January 19, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 7B


3 NEW ROTARY MEMBERS


YMCA REPORT


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
The Hardee Rotary Club on Nov. 9 inducted three new members. From left are Terry
Atchley, Wauchula city manager; club president Sue Birge who recruited the new mem-
bers; and Susan Fowler and her husband Rev. Jeff Fowler, pastor of Florida's First
Assembly of God Church in Wauchula. The club meets at noon Wednesdays at the Java
Cafe in Wauchula.


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
The YMCA in Wauchula teaches honesty, respect, faith, character and trust, the
Wauchula Kiwanis Club learned on Nov. 15. The club was the major donor in the new
teen center building named in honor of the John Burton family. Construction started in
Spring 2009 and was completed in September 2009. From left are Thomas Trevino;
Tanya Dubberly, office manager and Y achiever coordinator; Tania Quiroz, assistant Y
achiever coordinator and teen house monitor; and club president Sam Fite.


ADVOCATES FOR


PERU MISSION TRIPS


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
Tom Braddock last year spoke to the Wauchula Kiwanis Club about seven missionary
trips to Peru since 1972. His group built pulpit furniture for the Baptist Church Christian
Mission in Cascus, Peru. From left are Tom, Charlotte, Loraine and James Braddock
who enjoy taking the mission trips.


I

60 minutes. 600 calories burned. One Hot dance floor.
Michelle has lost 30 Ibs. & 3 pants sizes in 10 months.
Real Results-Pure Fun
am + pm + weekend classes
Schedule and location www.jazzercise.com
Ann Marie 863-767-0613 facebook/Jazzercise Heartland


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
Diane Schmeiz of Lakeland told the Wauchula Lions Club on Thursday, Jan. 5, about
the guardian ad litem program, in which volunteers look out for the best interests of
children in court cases. There are nearly 2,000 children removed from their homes in
Polk, Highland and Hardee counties. They are often abused, neglected, at risk or aban-
doned. There are about 500 volunteers, including 10 percent men and 31 couples. The
courts try to heal families and if possible place children with relatives. In a tough econ-
omy child abuse goes up. Volunteers are needed. Call 863-534-4605. One woman in
Polk County had 13 children by 9 fathers, all removed at birth, placed in foster care,
and 9 have been adopted. From left are David Durastanti, Bruce Siff; Diane Schmelz,
training and recruiting coordinator for guardian ad litem and Julie Watson.


Your Child Will
Learn to Read!
'.,Free EvaluationV
Internaonalaly Acclaimed Method
Children. Teens & Adults
a Rose MItchell-Freeman
AcademicAssociates Readingnstruction
Specialist
FLearning Centers" (863)773-6141
I socd.19c


HIGHEST PRICES PAID GUARANTEED!


MY JEWELRY


1660 Vicki Dr. Sebring, FL.
Box Next to Taco Bell 863-382-9717
Store Hours: Mon-Sat 9am-6pm; Sun 12pm-5pm


Use soft words and hard ar-
guments.
-English proverb
Art is the desire of a man to
express himself, to record the
reactions of his personality te
the world he lives in.
-Amy Lowell


fThIankjlou

% The family of Patty Franks would like to say f
S- Thank You to everyone who sent flowers,
prepared or brought food and gave donations to our
family during our loss.

We would like to give a special Thank You to the following
Central Pump & Irrigation, Lora Faye & Ronald
Peace Valley Lutheran Church and First Christian Church
for your prayers. Dale and Sabrina Crawford and Ryan
& Kathleen Roehm for your time and support.
The.CCICU staff of Manatee Memorial Hospital for your care.
The doctors who took care of Patty, Dr. Gallim,
Dr. Peterson, Dr. Calduon, Dr. Okhara, Dr. Peters
and Dr. Balai. The staff and K-9 unit of
s 4) Hardee Correctional for your support.

Thank You All & God Bless You All
d O" Jimmy, Jamie and Jessica
L0 0 M AA m


soc1:19p


CHILDREN







8B The Herald-Advocate, January 19, 2012


The


Clas sifieds


ABOUT ... Classifieds
QEADLINE ....Tuesday noon
RATES ..........Minimum of $4.00 for 10 words. Each addi-
tional word is 22 cents. Ads in all capitals
are 32 cents per word. Headlines are $2 a
line. Blind ad box numbers are $3 extra.
BILLING........Ads must be pre-paid.
CLASSIFICATIONS:


Agriculture
Appliances
Automobile
Boats
Furniture
Help Wanted
Houses
Livestock
Lost & Found
Miscellaneous


Mobile Homes
Notices
Pets
Plants/Produce
Real Estate
Recreational
Rentals
Services


Wanted
Yard Sales


SCHOOL BUS DRIVERS
WANTED





i ---- \


CONTACT
HARDEE COUNTY SCHOOL
TRANSPORTATION DEPARTMENT
1277 W. MAIN ST.
WAUCHULA, FL 33873
(863) 773-4754 cl1:12,19c



HELP WANTED
DEPUTY
$34,660- $38,110
The Hardee County Sheriff '! ipe i seeking Florida
1ertifiedLqw EitforcefYlrnt etfi rs.ipIlcnts must;
ssigkS 'I" rfrnent certificati8itm Law Enforcement
and meet the requirements set forth by the Florida
Department of Law Enforcement Training and Stand-
ards Commission. Applicants must successfully com-
plete the personnel selection process set forth by the
Sheriff's Office.
Applications may be obtained and returned to the
Sheriff's Office by 4 pm, January 25, 2012, at 900 E.
Summit St., Wauchula, FL, from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.,
Monday through Friday. If other accommodations are
necessary, call the Sheriff's Office, 863-773-0304 to
make arrangements. EOE c11:12.19c


DIESEL INJECTION repairs,
pumps, turbo, Injectors, remove
and install, -381-0538.
1:19-12:27p
FARM SALE February 2nd thru
5th, 6578 Gordon Rd. Zolfo.
1:19-2:2p
COW HAULING and hay for sale.
Robby Ice, 863-781-1521.
1:3-2:2p
L. DICKS INC. is now purchasing
citrus fruit for the 2011/12 season
and beyond. Call Mark Manuel @
781-0384. 7:8tfc


2000 LINCOLN TOWN CAR,
$3,850 cash, 781-1062. 1:19c


2006 -LINCOLN TOWN CAR-
loaded, one owner, 89,000 miles,
serviced regularly, $13,500, 773-
4616. 1:19-2:


SOFA/SLEEPER, blue fabric,
great condition, $200, 863-445-
0100. 1:19p
F -- 0_ -
SERVICE AND REPAIR TECHNI-
CIAN, apply in person, 409
Goolsby St., Wauchula.
1:19, 26, 2:2,9c


TREES UNLIMITED
Commercial Residential Licensed & Insured
Experienced Tree Surgery
*Aerial Bucket Trucks Wood Chipper
SStump Grinder Front End Loader
Dump Truck Land Clearing
SPond Digging Excavation
We Take Credit Cards 863-781-7027
Environmentally Responsible Randy Garland
Storm Damage & Emergency Specialists 11:1ltfc


W. B. Olliff, Jr., Tree Surgeon, Inc.

773-4478




SFree Estimates
Insured 30+ y Lecu experience cll:2tfc




30 Day Warranty Pi
Motor LC Transmission -

|PAY EH|E!
Sadr a-R7E C7LUL.M ,
|Sandra m--I i ---ia Jimmy
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK SE HABLA ESPANOL
U.S. Hwy. 17 Bowling Green 375-4441
$ Huge Discounts for Cash Deals $
* 24 Hour Towing Service LowestPossible Rates* Fast gg IReliable
781-3090 or 781-3091 cln.5sc


II
S IE IW'E.
[DEAL]ERSh! I [o]!


PLANT CITY HOUSING tic
78*11 -ik



4~ AL4 0 ,


Located Rt. 60 & 39 PLANT CITY
BUT DEFINITELY WORTH THE DRIVE!
813-650-8100


cl1:19c


GULF STATE QUARTET is looking
for experienced motor coach dri-
ver. Good driving record with ref-
erences. Able to assist unloading,
loading setup heavy PA. equip-
ment, 2 to 3 weekends per month.
Very little pay, but a chance to be
part of Southern Gospel Ministry,
863-773-9123. 1:19c


OLDER MOBILE HOME on corner
lot with shed, $45,000, B.G. 863-
712-1126 or 863-224-4790.
1:19,26p
2007 D/W, 3/2, den, 1612 sf,
porches, outbuildings, fenced,
5.14 acres. Reduced, $125,000.
731-614-1297 Zolfo Springs.
12:29-1:261


MOBILE HOME, 4 bedroom 1 1/2
bath on nice lot B.G., $70,000.
863-712-1126 or 863-224-4790.
1:19,26p
BEAUTIFUL MOBILE HOME built
In 2006 on 5 acres for sale on
Peeples Ln, Wauchula. Priced to
sell at $87,000. Call Brook or
Sandy Larrlson for a showing.
Nextage Realty Pros. Cell phone,
863-832-0565 or 863-832-0130.
12:1-29p


3 ELECTRIC GENERATORS for
mobile home or motor home,
4,500 and 6,500 kw, $250.00 and
$175.00, (863781-9257.
1:12,19p
2 16' ALUMINUM EXTERIOR LAD-
DERS, $125.00, (513) 328-1730.
1:12,19p


%1 B GILLIARD

FILL DIRT INC.

Fill Dirt Rock Sand Shell
Pond Digging Ditch Cleaning


Lamar Gilliard
Home: (863) 735-0490


Zolfo Springs
cl8:2fc Mobile: (941) 456-6507


SO c Gold & Silver




Guaranteed Highest Price Paid For
GOLD & SILVER

Mon., Tue., Wed., Fri., 10am-6pm

SThurs. & Sat. 10am-3pm



( 863)3752121 2-


North Hwy 17 Bowling Green


L


AMBER T
REALTY INC.
404 South 61h Avenue
Wauchula, FL 33873


Knollwood Subdivision Executive Home-
3B/3Bth, in ground swimming pool and
Jacuzzi, 24x12 outside storage. $160,000
Price Negotiable! 2B/1.5Bth M/H with family
room addition (10x24), some furniture, all
appliances including extra refrigerator, water
softener; fenced yard and large concrete drive-
way. Listed at $99,000
Updated 3 or 4 B/R, 2Bths, CB/Stucco home:
walking distance to downtown shopping and
schools; partially fenced yard. $125,000
MOUNTAIN LODGE FEEL in this SPA-
CIOUS 3B/3Bth, CB/Stucco home; beamed
ceilings, w/b fireplace, fenced swimming pool,
sprinkler system; 16x12 shop. $160,000
Spacious 4B/3BTH, CB/Stucco home; large
kitchen, living room with w/b fireplace, double
garage, fenced backyard. $149,000

( SERVICE YOU
DORIS S. LAMBERT, G.R.I., Broker


JC


Bus. (863) 773-0007
Fax: (863) 773-0038
www.lambertrealty.net
Charlotte Terrell
Large native trees on this 3.2 acre corner lot in
Z/S; secluded. $6,000
Make an offer on this 15 acre tract with 3B/2Bth
M/H; beautiful property with large oaks and 5
wells. $145,000
NI/H in Charlie Creek; 3B/2Bth, carpet and
vinyl floors, new central H/A, well maintained.
$49,900
8.91 acres operating as a hydroponic farm;
24x30 barp with cooler, 2 greenhouses, in
ground fertilization tank, one 4" well. $225,000
COMMERCIAL CORNER! Located in high
traffic area, this 9 acre tract is a great location
for restaurant, convenient store or possibly
small grove. Call Doris for details. $100,000
Build your home or place your mobile home on
this 2.5 acre tract located off Hwy 62, fenced on
3 sides, small shed included. $30,000
AN COUNT ON [R
KENNETH A. LAMBERT, Broker


ASSOCIATES
DELOIS JOHNSON 781-2360 CHARLOTTE TERRELL 781-6971 STEVE JOHNSON 781-0518


JIM SEE REALTY, INC.

206 North 6th Avenue, Wauchula, FL 33873
Office (863)773-0060 Evening (863)773-4774
www.jimseerealty.com
James V. See, Jr., Broker


Rea
12 1 Rick Knight (863) 781-1396
John H. Gross (863) 273-1017
Shane Conley (863) 781-9664


Itor Associates
Calvin Bates (863) 381-2242
Dusty Albritton (863) 781-0161
Parker Keen (813) 523-1523


ECMHSP Job Announcement
Bowling Green Center
Preschool Teacher- Seasonal Position (6 to 9 months)
ECMHSP is now accepting applications for a Preschool
Teacher to work with children ages 3 years to 5 years in a
Migrant Head Start Program. Responsible for providing a
developmentally appropriate Head Start environment for
the assigned group of children in the classroom. Position
primarily follows service plans as detailed in the ECMHSP
Early Childhood Education Services Manual. Preferred -
Bachelor of Art (BA) /Bachelor of Science (BS) degree in
Early Childhood Education or related field. Accepted As-
sociates of Art or Science (AA/AS),degree in Early Child-,
hood Education related field. Starting salary $11.12 -
11.68 per hour. Personal Leave aliv employer-matched
retirement plan.
Closing date: 1-20-12, Send resume/letter of interest
or apply at: ECMHSP Bowling Green Attn: Angelita
Avila, 5115 Mason Dixon Ave, Bowling Green, Florida
33834, Telephone: 863-375-2101, EOE, ADA, License
# C10HA0001
cl :19c
___


NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
1998 PINYM
VIN:2P4F1P2539WR570190
8:10O A.M. FEl. 02, 2012
CL.IFF'S WRECKER SERVICE
1071 IlIy 17 N. Wauchula, FL .


FOR RENT! Huge 5 Bedroom/3 'A Bath house
located in Knollwood subdivision. In-ground
pool with large deck area. $1,250 a month!
BACK ON THE MARKET!! 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath
house in town. Adorable house with numerous
updates. Priced right at $79,500!
Duplex! 4 BR, 2 BA one side. 3 BR, 2 BA other
side. Central air & heat. Paved road. City water
& sewer. REDUCED! $115,000
20 acres close in to Wauchula on paved road.
Laser leveled, deep well & irrigation. Ready for
your farm operation. Zoned FR. $230,000
Beautiful home located in Briarwood
Subdivision. 3 Bedroom, 2 'h Bath house with
wrap around porch, detached 2 car garage with
office and full bath. Was $475,000 ... Now
$359,00!


4-5 bedroom, 4 bath custom built home on 9 H
acres. County road access, next to Wauchula.
Home is complimented with screened back porch
and in-ground pool. Land also has 7 'A acres of
producing nursery. $430,000
Great home on several large lots in Wauchula.
Never been for sale before. Hardwood floors
under carpet in bedrooms. Central air/heat.
Massive brick fireplace. 3 bedrooms, 2 baths. 2
car carport. Asking $199,500
20 acres very close in to Wauchula on paved
road. Laser leveled and ready for your farm
operation. Zoned FR. $190,000
Vacation Home 2 BR/2 BA mobile home in Punta
Gorda. Located on a deep water canal that leads
into Charlotte Harbor. NEW LOWER PRICE ...
$79,000!


clil2Qc


I I


.6664ahb


-i


ul








January 19, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 9B


The


Classifieds


PARK MODEL ON LAKE, Crystal
Lake Village, central A/C heat.
Washer and Dryer, Flat Screen
TV., Furniture in excellent shape,
618-292-8805. 1:19p
U-

ADOPT A PET! If you have lost a
pet or are looking for a new one,
the City of Wauchula invites you
to come and see if you can find
the pet you're looking for. The
Wauchula Animal Control is locat-
ed at 685'Airport Road. Please
call 773-3265 or more informa-
tion. tfc-dh
ATTENTION State Statutes
828.29 requires that all cats-and
dogs sold in Florida be at least 8
weeks old, have an official health
certificate, have necessary shots
and be free of parasites. tfc-dh












I reN 7 -


U-PICK: STRAWBERRIES
$1/pound (quart), Cabbage
$1/head, Caulflower $1/head,
Mustard/Collards $1/bunch. 2949
Center Hill Rd, between
Wauchula and Bowling Green, off
Hwy 62, 4.5 miles west of US 17.
Open 6 days, 7:30am until
6:00pm, CLOSED SUNDAY. Bob at
863-223-5561. 1:19


2 BR/1BA upstairs apartment
$750.00 a month, 1st and $300
security deposit, utilities includ-
ed. No smoking and no pets. 863-
773-6255 1:19,26c
2BR, 1 1/2 Bath, CBH updated,
$750 month, 227 Illinois Ave.,
Wauchula, 813-215-7129.
1:19,26p
AVON PARK ESTATES, 3BR/2BA
central heat & air, fenced yard
with screened swimming pool,
1st & last months rent,
$850/month, 863-781-0177.
1:19tfc


DESOTO COUNTY





OWNER FINANCING
www.landcallnow.com ,
1-941-778-7980/7565


NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION
You are hereby notified that Wauchula State Bank
will sell the vehicle described below "As Is" to the
highest bidder for cash, free of prior liens, to satis-
fy legal obligations.
2003 FLTT TV Id 4X4FCAG293G079043
2002 Dodg Tk Id 3B7KF23652M202142
Contact Linda or Shannon for details at Wauchula
State Bank 863-773-4151. The sale will be held on
Friday January 20, 2012 at 10:00 a.m. at the
Wauchula State Bank parking lot located at 106
East Main Street, Wauchula, FL. c:12.191




f THE PALMS

( Available for
Immediate Occupancy

$99 Move In Special through January 31"
*Plus $1200 FREE RENT*
(*One year lease @$100/mo reduction)

Spacious 2,3 & 4 BR Garden Apts.
Open, quiet country setting.
Close to Sheriff's Stationi on Martin
Luther King Jr Ave and La Playa
Drive.
Award winning Professional Bi-lingual
Management Staff.
Affordable Rents

701 La Playa Drive, Wauchula

Rental Office Hours
Monday Friday 7:00 AM 3:30 PM
Saturday 9:00 AM 11:30 AM
After hours by appointment

tg (863) 773-3809, TDD 800-955-8771
.-- Equal Opportunity Employer and Provider




I IAN
S,, /YOUR KM i TO
REAL ESTATE
Heartland Real Estate Corp.
3200 US Hwy 27 S, Suite 201
Sebring, Florida 33870
S(863) 382-3887

WE HAVE BUYERS FOR CITRUS GROVES
CALL MIKEY HOLDING
Featured Properties

I .


i'rn


Immaculate 3 BR, 2.5 BA home on 10 acres on corner w/paved
road on twq sides & all high and dry. Desirable location-minutes
to Wauchula. Fireplace, enclosed 22 X 22 garage/play room for
kids 56 X100 steel barn, 8" well w/JD power unit.
$315,000 Call Mikey today @ 781-1698
8.5 ACRES ON CORNER OF HWY 17 & HWY 62
Many business opportunities!
Cleared, county sewer & water, Phase I Environmental
Site Assessment completed, will build to suit.
$580,000 Call Mikey for more details.
Other Properties Available!
Please visit our website at
www.HeartlandRE.net c:19c


TWO BEDROOM apartment $500-
plus $400 deposit. No pets. 863-
773-4855. 1:5-2:2p
THREE BEDROOM HOUSE in
Riverview subdivision $750 plus
deposit, 863-832-1984. 1:5-2:2p
3 BEDROOM, 2 bath house in Ft.
Green, $700 month plus $800
deposit. No house pets. Call 863-
448-6651. 1:5-19p
FOUR HOUSES $400-$600/mo,
deposit negotiable, 863-212-1152,
863-773-6616. Large lots. 1:5-2:2p
RENT-TO-OWN *
MOBILE HOMES 1, 2, 3
Bedrooms. Cheaper then paying
rent. Close to schools and hospi-
tal. Lot rent $300. Se habla
espanol. 863-698-4910 or 863-
698-4908. Call today. 1:5tfc
ATTENTION The Federal Fair
Housing Act Prohibits advertising
any preference or limitation
based on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial status or
national origin, or the intention to
make such a preference or limita-
tion. Familial status includes chil-
dren under 18 living with parents
or guardians and pregnant
women. tfc-dh


MANY COMMERCIAL locations
700-12,000 sf, $500/mo up, rent-
own, parking, 863-212-1152, 863-
773-6616. 1:5-2:2p
BAR, LOUNGE, living quarters,
2400 sf, 20,000 cars/day parking,
863-212-1152, 863-773-6616.
1:5-2:2p



4-C CONSTRUCTION, Free esti-
mates, handyman, concrete,
remodels, additions, CBC1256,
863-214-1471. 10:13-3:29p
QVERCOMER MEETINGS
(Gillesple) have been moved to
the Women's Club on Wednesday
nights, 7 pm.'Come and seel
Kenny Sanders Is the facilitator.
More Information call 773-5717.
6:10tfc
THE WAUCHULA LIONS CLUB
collects NOT broken prescription
eyeglasses, cases and sunglass-
es. Please drop off at 735 N. 6th
Ave. tfc-dh
NEW ALCOHOLICS ANONY-
MOUS meeting In Hardee County.
Thursday 7 p.m., 131 South 8th
Avenue, Wauchula. For more info
call LeAnne at 863-214-8430 or
Bill 239-821-4184. tfc-dh


joby
Garry A. Phillips
Serving Hardee County
New System Setup Virus Removal
Malware Removal Email/Internet Setup
Computer Slow ?? Tune-ups Available
Call Us For All Your Computer Needs
Pick up & Delivery Available!
448-2561 Payment Plans Also Available 773-0518
computerrepairbygarryphillips.com cli:12-2:6p





YOUR TIRE HEADQUARTERS L
S[ 5101 N. Hwy 17 Bowling Green [
S375-446 \1
TERRY ()NDAY SATURDAY 8 amn 6 pilm MIKE
/ Foreign and Domestic Cars / Diesel Engines
S/Gas or Diesel Manual or Automatic Transmissions i;
< : .







T ST AL No matter how you look at it,
THE BEST DEAL there's no better place to shop
FROM ANY ANGLE for your next cr.

A a


Large
Cars to


Selection of
Choose From


Buy Here Pay Here
S30 Day Gtiuarantee
on Motor & Transmission Only












elo a vin


I N C.,


Kenny Sanders


REALTORS
(863) 773-2128
REALTORS
JOE L. DAVIS
JOE L. DAVIS, JR.
REALTOR JOHN H. O'NEAL
See more listings at
www.joeldavis.com
REAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS


PRICE REDUCED! 5 ac PRICE REDUCED! Looking
cleared pasture, fenced w/4", for 5 or 10 acs? Two 5 ac
258' deep well, 1 HP sub- high/dry fenced parcels on pri-
mersible pump on quiet, private vate rd! $37,500 for vacant 5
rd. $45,900! acs! $50,000 for 5 acs w/well &
PRICE REDUCED! Goodbye, septic!
traffic...Hello, peace & quiet! PRICE REDUCED! 40 acs
20 ac fenced pasture w/pond, farmland, 8" well, paved rd
288SF cabin, 4" well inside frontage, near Wauchula.
60SF shed. $120,000! $320,000!
PRICE REDUCED! 10 ac 920 acs in SE Hardee Co. 100
farmland w/well, pump, fencing ac orange grove (averages 500+
on private road. NOW $65,000! bqxes/ac) 2011-12 fruit crop
Ideal for farming! 21.86 ac clouded; 820 acs improved
pasture is fenced, has well, close Exellent hunting. $4,000,000!
to town. $186,500! Excellent hunting. $4,000,000!
Wo! Great home in Popash50 acre grove; Valencia &
area on 2.5 acres. 2 miles fromHamlns wel cro-et
town. $158,000! $750,000!
REAI.TOR ASSOCIATES AFTER HOURS
KENNY SANDERS.........781-0153 KEVIN SANDERS.......990-3093
JUAN DELATORRE.....781-1128 MONICA REAS..............781-0888
DAVID ROYAL................781-3490 KAREN O'NEAL...... 781-7633
g HIGHWAY 17 SOUTH, WAUCHULA, FL 33873
cl1i:19c


***
NEED A WELL OR HAVE PUMP
TROUBLE? CALL
ULLRICH'S PITCHER PUMP
For complete well, sales,
service and installation,
call (863) 773-6448.
7:18tfc
DO YOU HAVE a problem with
drugs? Narcotics Anonymous
meets Monday and Thursday
nights 7:00 p.m. at First United
Methodist Church, at the corner
of Palmetto and 7th Ave., Wau-
chula. tfc-dh
IS ALCOHOL CAUSING a prob-
lem? Call Alcoholics Anonymous
in Hardee County at 781-6414.
Several weekly meetings.
tfc-dh
ATTENTIONI State Statutes 489-
119 Section 5 Paragraph B and
Hardee County Ordinance 87-09
Section 10 Paragraph D require
all ads for any construction-relat-
ed service to carry the contrac-
tor's license number. tfc-dh



JUST STUFF & JOHNNY'S
Furniture, 133 E. Townsend,
Wauchula, 832-5759. 11:17-1:19p
KING PILLOW TOP MATTRESS
$100 off. Queen Pillow Top
Mattress $100 off, queen mattress
$100, full mattress $75, twin mat-
tress $100. Refrigerators, stoves,
washers 10% off this week. Ms.
Edna's Place beside Double J.
1:19c


MISSION THIFT STORE INC. 123
N. 7th Ave. All donations appreci-
ated. 773-3069. 1:12tfc
HEAVEN SCENT THRIFT STORE
now offers pick-up service for
large donations. We appreciate
your generous support. 863-773-
9777. 12:29tfc
HELP CENTER THRIFT STORE
1085 U.S. Hwy. 17, Wauchula
pickup '& delivery, consignment,
layaway. All proceeds to Hardee
County Residents. 773-0550.
6:16tfc
SATURDAY 8-2, 1864 Libby Dr.
Golfview. 1:19p
FRIDAY, SATURDAY 7-?, 2940 Oak
Zolfo. Multi-family, come see.
1:19p
FRIDAY/SATURDAY, 8am-7, 4 fam-
ily, furniture, clothes, misc.
4715 Chester Ave., B.G. 1:19p
SAT. 8-noon, 180 Old Dixie Hwy.,
B.G., furniture, knives, clothes.
1:19p

HARDEE COUNTY
KIDS NEED
HARDEE COUNTY
HELP!
Ease a dependent child's
way through the court sys-
tem. Volunteer to be a
Guardian Ad Litem.
773-2505
(If office unattended, please leave
message.)


4 9"tP C#l


1*"


TRIANGLE BODY SHOP, INC.
FL Reg. Cert # MV-73547
Automotive Paintimrg Glass Installation
Door Windows & Locks Repaired
Headliners Recovered Wrecks Rebuilt
Headlamps Cleaned
323 N 10th Ave. Phone: 863-773-9549
Wauchula, FL 33873-2623 Fax: 863-767-0106
Don't be led by anyone to a shop where you prefer not to go.
Only you can authorize repairs to your vehicle. You have the
right to select the repair facility that you want to repair your
vehicle. Your insurance company is required to work with that
shop to, get your repairs done in a timely manner.
We at TRIANGLE guarantee all our own work.
CUSTOMER SATISFACTION IS OUR NUMBER ONE GOAL.







Realtors
NOEY A. FLORES, BROKER
310 Court St.
Wauchula, Florida 33873
(863) 773-3337 Fax: (863) 773-0144
John D. Freeman
www.floresrealty.net (863) 781-4084
< >


ZULFO SPRINGS 1995 4BR/2BA double-wide MH with
central air & heat, sitting on 7+/- acres. 3260 total sqft,
including large addition in front and back. Quiet setting with
lots of trees on a dead-end road. Must see for $87,500

WAUCHULA 10 Acres with a 4BR /2BA Frame home with cen-
tral air & heat. Great location with a large pole barn and multiple
wells and 1 car garage. Priced at $199,900
BOWLING GREEN 3BR/2BA Home with central air & heating
on a large lot with a nice CB rental house with 2BR/IBA, large lot,
and 2 car garage. Priced at $135,000
Country Setting yet close to town! 15 acres with 4BR/2BA CB
home, 5,000+/- Sqft barn and 2 small out buildings/carports.
Property fenced for horses with 3 covered stalls. A must see for
$199,000

WE SHARE THE SAME MLS WITH HIGHLANDS COUNTY!
Remember, Our listings are on the Internet.
1 Anyone with a computer can access them anytime I
After Hours ...
Oralla D. Flores (863) 781-2955 John Freeman (863) 781-4084
Noey A.Flores (863) 781-4585 Lawrence A. Roberts (863) 781-4380
cl1:19c


COMPUTER REPAIR


.~.~.~







10B The Herald-Advocate, January 19, 2012




-The



Carol's Pool Service
Serving All Of Highlands & Hardee Counties

Call Us For All Your Pool Service Needs
O Carol Tomblin Owner

449-1806 or 452-6026
cl1:19tic


Hearn's Auto Cleaning Service
Car Wash and Wax ag
Carpet and Seat Cleaning _...
Buff Compounding
Headliners Replaced
Vinyl Top
Motor Cleaning ..
Hwy. 17 & S.R. 66
Zolfo Springs ono (863) 735-1495.


ROBBY & SHERRY ALBRITTON
LABOR SERVICES & SOLUTIONS




(863) 528-7085 Fax (863) 735-9228
159 State Road 64 East Zolfo Springs, FL 33890 '
robbie@strato.net



REVEL AduTO SaLE

: trin Your Tax Return
~'Into a Down Paymne












HARDEE CAR COMPANY
BuY HERE PAY HERE

Billy& Janice's Rentals


Bowling Green Flea Market


Wauchula
(across from
First National Bank)


Monday -Saturday
9amto 7pm


AL. .


Classifieds


Crystal Lake RV News
By Joyce Taylor


KOFFEE KLATCH
Lee Roy Behymer led the
prayer on Jan. 11; Bill Johnson
led the U.S. Pledge and Peggy
Ralph led the Canadian Pledge.
The 50/50 winners were Don
and Judy Ahem, Jack and Betty
Jacobs, 2455 Apple Blossom,
Lot 326 and 2517 Morning
Glory Loop.
Keith Stephens announced
that the annual auction will be
Feb. 4 starting at 6 p.m. Keith
is looking for items to auction
off, such as baked goods, new
and used appliances and furni-
ture, mystery bags, etc. There
will be a chicken dinner before
the auction.
ANNUAL DESSERT &
FASHION SHOW
The Craft Club is hosting its
sixth annual Ladies Only Des-
sert & Fashion Show on Mon-
day, Feb. 6, at 1 p.m. at the Rec
Hall. This event is open to
ladies of other RV parks. There
is a minimum donation of $3
per person toward cancer.
JAM SESSION
Crystal Lake Village's first
jam session was held on
Thursday, Jan. 5, at the Rec
Hall with a good turnout. Jam
sessions will continue every
Thursday from 2 to 4 p.m.
BINGO
Cal Gadsby and Earl
Folnsbee split the large jackpot
on Jan. 6 and Rosalie Folnsbee
won the small jackpot. On Jan.
9, Bill Burget, Ken Krussell and
Mike Jacques split the large
jackpot and Sylvia Baker won
the small jackpot.
SPECIAL FEBRUARY
EVENT
Our 21st annual dinner and
dance will be held on Saturday,
Feb. 25. Buddy Canova will


THURSDAY. JAN. 19
*/American Cancer So-
ciety's Relay for Life Team
Captains' meeting. School
Board Training Room, 230 S.
Florida Ave., Wauchula,
5:30-6:30 p.m.
iHardee County Com-
mission, regular meeting,
Room 102, Courthouse
Annex I, 412 W. Orange St.,
Wauchula, 6 p.m.
FRIDAY, JAN. 20
*/Hardee County Com-
mission, monthly workshop,
on roads, Room 102, Court-
house Annex I, 412 W.


Stop in and see why we will not be
undersold! Selling 14 brands of .
different new vehicles
is Just the beginning.


1031 U.S. Highway 17 N.
Wauchula, Florida 33873
(863) 781-1947 Gene Davis
1:19C WWW.RLONJ#fY.COm Sales Manager


0 -
Lovingly maintained 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath home located on Little
Cypress golf course. Relax in the garden tub, treat yourself to
the luxury of oversized walk-in closets, enjoy the pristine
landscaping, tinker around in the 3-car garage. Home was
built in 1998 and has over 4,000 total square feet, 2800 square
feet of living area, all on a half-acre lot.
New Price: $199,000 by Robert Jones, broker, Nextage Realty Pros.
Please call (863) 781-1423 for your appointment.


Ne)&ta*ge,


5115 South Florida Avenue
Lakeland, Florida 33813
(863) 614-0306 office
www.nextagerealtypros.com
ci1:12.19c.


If you greatly desire some-
thing, have the guts to stake
everything on obtaining It
--Brendan Francis


provide the music for the dance.
This event will have an interna-
tional theme. Tickets will go on
sale at my house on Tuesday,
Jan. 31, from I to 4 p.m.
SCORES
Bowling Jan. 4: First, MS
Fits; second, Gettin Better; and
third, Mercy & Grace.
Men's Golf Jan. 5: Winners
were Larry Murphy, Ron La-
pier, B. Bradley and Paul
Vaughan.
Ladies Golf Jan. 5: First, Jan
Brinker; second, Mary Kessler;
and third, Barbara Kramer.
Mixed Golf Jan. 9: Scramble
winners were Loyd Lankford,
Larry Cahill, Joe Bennitt and
Eliane Lamarche.
Shuffling Jan. 10: Three-
game winners were Bob Bundy,
Carole Jones, Pennie
Kendorski, Charlie Mollett,
Don Plumley, Frank Roy, Keith
Stephens, Arylis Wickler and
Myrna Wilday.
CHURCH NEWS
By Diane Burget
Our worship service began on
Jan. 8 with congregational
singing of "I Will Serve You."
Carole Jones and Linda Gray
provided the accompaniment on
the piano and organ. Our choir
sang "I Stand Amazed/Amazing
Grace" under the direction of
Nancy Morrison.
The offering prayer was
given by Don Merillat and the
offering was collected by
Lowell Gordon and Bill Burget.
Maxine Stromme served as our
greeter.
Pastor Bob Winne's message
was on "A Good Foundation"
and asked the question:"What
kind of a heritage are you leav-
ing your children?" Scripture
passages were from Psalm 11:3,
Joshua 4:1-7, Proverbs and
Revelation.


Orange St., Wauchula, 8.30
a .m.
MONDAY, JAN. 23
VHardee County School
Board, rescheduled meeting,
Board Foom, 230 S. Florida
Ave., Wauchula, 5 p.m.
THURSDAY. JAN. 26
VZolfo Springs Town
Commission, rescheduled
monthly meeting, Town Hall,
3210 U.S. 17 North, Zolfo
Springs, 6 p.m.
Dreaming permts each and
very one of us to be quietly
and safely Iane every ght
of our lives.
-WiBam Dement
Keep true to the dreams of
thy youth.


New Tires Include
Free Mount & Balance
Brand Name Tires!
Semi & Trailer Tires
BIG SALE ON
ALL TIRES
773-0777 773-0727
116 REA Rd., Wauchula
(across from Wal-Mart)
VISA .. ... Billy Ayers
S.'-- -- c112:29tfc Tire Technician


Schedule a meeting with us to help ease that burden.


Tax Preparation Personal & Business Quickbooks Consulting & Assistance
including Employee Training, IRS Correspondence, Sales Tax Preparation &
Consulting Start-up Business Consulting Monthly/Quarterly/Annual
Accounting & Payroll including W-2s & Annual Filings
E.ica Sche A Henderson Bookkeeping
Erica Scheipsmeier, CPA Service, Leona Henderson


encas.cpa @ gmai l.com


leona 1wnderson@yahoo.com


863-781-4850 863-781-0671

Commit to the LORD whatever you do, and your plans will succeed. Proverbs 16:3
1:12.19pD


Realty Pros


Granny's Hands

Stop and think for a moment about the hands you have,
how they have served you well throughout your years.
Granny's hands, though wrinkled and not as strong as
they once were, have been the tools she has always used
to reach out and embrace life.
As a child her mother taught her to fold them in prayer.
They caught her fall when as a toddler she crashed to the
floor. They tied her shoes and pulled on her boots. They put
food in her mouth and clothes on her back. They worked hard
for many years on the family farm.
Decorated with her wedding band they showed the
world that she was married and loved someone special. They
caressed her beloved Jack, wrote letters to him and wiped her
tears when he was away. They worked alongside him and
through the years built a relationship that was a model for
many.
They were uneasy as she held her firstborn son when he
went to be with the Lord. They clinched against her broken
heart. With a bit more certainty and strength, they held her
first baby girl as she drew her last breath. Seconds later they
praised God for the miracle of life, as her faith-filled mother
prayed in her closet, and her baby breathed again.
Her hands have covered her face, combed her hair, and
cleansed the rest of her body.
They have grown and prepared
the food that fed her family.
They made clothes and home-
made ice cream, grew roses and
orchids, and they taught us all
how to do the same. They
drove a mule-drawn wagon, cars and trucks, the Jeep that
watered the grove, farm tractors, a school bus and the house-
boat "Mae Go."
Granny's hands blessed her daughters on their wedding
days. They held each grandchild shortly after they came into
the world, as well as her many great- and great-great grand-
children. They trembled and shook, sometimes in fists of
anger, when she did not understand as she buried her sons,
her parents, her spouse, her friends, and more family.
And to this day, when not much of anything else is work-
ing real well, her mind is strong and her hands still hold her
up, lay her down, and continue to fold in prayer. Granny's
hands are the mark of where she's been and the ruggedness of
life. But more importantly, it will be her hands that God will
reach out and take when He leads her home ... and with these
hands He will lift her to His side.
God bless you, Granny, you are well-loved and
appreciated.
By the 16 Grandchildren
of Mae Frank Himrod, 99
PUBLISH YOUR ORIGINAL POETRY
Poet's Place is a feature which relies solely on reader input.
Only your original work may be submitted. Send your poetry
to: Poet's Place, The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338,
Wauchula, FL 33873.


I -


,, ~
~-----------------------------------1


- ------------ ---
I_


----


I






January 19, 2012, The Herald-Advocate 11B


CurthouiSI.Rpor


COUNTY COURT
The following marriage
licenses were issued recently
in the office of the county
court:
John William Judah, 51,
Zolfo Springs, and June Marie
McGehee, 37, Zolfo Springs.

The following small claims
cases were disposed of recent-
ly by the county judge:
Suncoast Schools Federal
Credit Union vs. Ernesto
Garduno, voluntary dismissal.
Midland Funding vs. Tami
Flores, judgment.
Citibank South Dakota NA
vs. Shelly P. Massey, judgment.
Roberto Servin vs. Abraham
Servin, judgment for tenant
eviction.
Citibank NA vs. Mary S.
Wheeler, stipulated settlement
approved.

The following misde-
meanor cases were disposed
of recently in county court:
Michael Terry Flippin; tres-
pass in an occupied structure/-
conveyance, adjudication with-
held, $325 fine and court costs,
$50 cost of prosecution (COP).
Adrian Flores, disorderly
intoxication, not prosecuted.
Sylvia Denise Johnston.,
domestic battery, not prosecut-
ed.
Jose Antonio Lopez, disor-
derly intoxication, adjudication
withheld, $325 fine and court
costs, $50 public defender fee,
$50 COP and $50 investigative
costs placed on lien.
Dan Lumley, petit theft and
trespass upon the unenclosed
curtilage of a dwelling, proba-
tion one year, $325 fine and
court costs, $50 COP, $50
investigative costs, 100 hours
community service.
James Bentley Richey, retail
theft, probation six months,
$325 fine and court costs, $50
COP, $50 investigative costs,
25 hours community service
hours.
Acerulio Hernandez-Mar-
tinez, disorderly intoxication,
two months in jail, $50 COP,
$50 investigative costs.
Roy Olivares, domestic bat-
tery, not prosecuted.
Nicholas Mendoza, resisting
arrest without violence, one
month in jail with credit for
time served (CTS), $325 fine
and court costs, $100 public
(*fnder fees, 550 COP $50
V


investigative costs.
Christopher Allen Napier,
domestic battery, six months in
jail CTS, $677 fine and court
costs, $50 COP, $50 investiga-
five costs.
Heather Darlene Rimes, petit
theft, probation one year, $325
fine and court costs, $100 pub-
lic defender fees, $50 COP, $50
investigative costs.
Priscella Elvira Ybarra, bat-
tery, adjudication withheld, pro-
bation six months, $325 fine
and court costs, $100 public
defender fees, $50 COP, $50
investigative costs; disorderly
conduct, not prosecuted.
Jason Michael Lynch, taking
wildlife on roads or rights of
way, completed diversionary
program, closed.
t Patricia Martinez, domestic
battery, not prosecuted.
Dakota James Moore, taking
wildlife on roads or rights of
way, completed diversionary
program, closed.
Bruce Raymond Reineke,
possession of a live alligator
without permit, completed
diversionary program, closed.
Brandon W. Smith, taking
wildlife on roads or rights of
way, completed diversionary
program, closed.
Bradley David Townsend,
taking wildlife on roads or
rights of way, completed diver-
sionary program, closed.
Elena Ysabel Puente, viola-
tion of probation (original
charges retail theft and causing
a minor to become delinquent
or dependent), probation re-
voked, four months in jail, $50
COP added to outstanding fines
and fees.

CIRCUIT COURT
The following civil actions
were filed recently in the
office of the circuit court:
Russell Douglas Parrish and
Joann Parrish, divorce.
Tonya Renee Svendsen vs.
Catarino Borjas, petition for
injunction for protection.
Bank of New York Mellon
vs. Christine Harrell et al, peti-
tion for mortgage foreclosure.
Ricto Lopez vs. Kenneth
Tucker and the state Depart-
ment of Corrections (DOC),
petition to review inmate situa-
tion.
Georgo Brown vs. Toni
Bowden and DOC, petition to
review inmate situation..
Florida Fertilizer Co. Inc. vs.


Alan I. Armour and Eldredge
Farm Limited, damages con-
tracts and indebtedness.
Lyn Barbara Lubin and the
state Department of Revenue
(DOR) vs. Nixon Thelus, peti-
tion for child support.
Jessica Nicole Guevara and
DOR vs. Eliazar Garza, petition
for child support.
CoRhonda L. McLeod and
DOR vs. Antonio Guajardo Jr.,
petition to enforce administra-
tive child support order.
Esmeralda Guajardo and
DOR vs. Silverio Lara, petition
to enforce' administrative child
support order.
Robin Smothers vs. Marty
Quinn, petition for injunction
for protection.

The following decisions on
civil cases pending in the cir-
cuit court were handed down
recently by the circuit court
judge:
Linda F. Ziglar and DOR vs.
Dale Clinton Miller, petition for
child support contempt order
denied.
Wells Fargo Bank vs. Kasey
Helms, David G. Helms and
Sabina Helms, stipulated agree-
ment approved.
Carson Nicole Falade and
Kazeem Adeyemi Falade, di-
vorce.
Crystal Wilson vs. Melvin
Lewis, dismissal of temporary
injunction for protection.
Maria Ordehi vs. Corey
Fowler, injunction for protec-
tion.
Mario Rodriguez vs. Yolanda
Rodriguez, injunction for pro-
tection.
Selina L. Moreno and DOR
vs. Silvestre Marin Jr., order.
Paul D. Sutton Jr. and
Patricia Sutton, voluntary dis-
missal.
Diane L. Hodges and DOR
vs. Darrell A. Hodges, petition
for child support contempt
order denied.
Rebecca M. Beglen and
DOR vs. Moises Hernandez,
petition for child support con-
tempt order denied.
Jessica Tamayo and DOR vs.
Juan Tomas Gonzalez, judg-
ment on enforcement of admin-
istrative child support order.

Child support contempt
orders were entered in the fol-
lowing cases.
Felix Aviles and DOR vs.
Sonia Aviles.
Amanda Kae Sunday and
DOR vs. Homer Curtis Kirk.
Brendiat.1NIl andcDOR vs.
Kimberly Sue Carroll.


Virginia A. Hernandez and year probation, $520 fine
DOR vs. Samuel D. Alamia. court costs, $350 public defer
Glorida Elisondo and DOR er fees, $100 COP, $36 F
vs. Nick Aguilar. Steps.
Tina Renee Grice and DOR Brent Justin. Price, felc
vs. Scottie Dale Boyles. operating a motorcycle with
required endorsement and fl
The following felony crimi- ing to elude an officer, adju
nal cases were disposed of cation withheld, probation t
recently by the circuit judge. years, $520 fine and court cos
Defendants have been adjudi- $100 COP, $24 First Steps, 1
cated guilty unless noted oth- hours community service.
erwise. When adjudication is Daniel Alexander Pri
withheld, it is pending suc- resisting arrest without violet
cessful completion of proba- and fleeing to elude an office
tion. Sentences are pursuant adjudication withheld, pro
to an investigative report by tion two years, $520 fine
and the recommendation of court costs, $100 COP, $
the state probation office and First Steps, 100 hours comr
also state sentencing guide- nity service.
lines. Final discretion is left to
the judge.
Gilbert Lee Almaguer, grand A discovery is said to be
theft and burglary of dwelling, mind.
adjudication withheld, proba-
tion four years, $520 fine and
court costs, $350 public defend-
er fees, $100 COP, $48 First
Steps probation fees, 200 hours I
community service; grand theft, hi
not prosecuted. i
Andy Byers, armed carjack-
ing and robbery with a deadly "
weapon, two years community
control-house arrest followed
by probation two years, $520
fine and court costs, $350 pub- 20
lic defender fees, $100 COP, 2
$48 First Steps.
Daniel Juarez, domestic bat-
tery, felony driving while
license suspended, felony flee-
ing to elude and violation of
community control (original TI
charges battery on a law N ICE
enforcement officer and resist- O
ing an officer with violence),OFF
community control revoked, RELOCA
one year six months Florida
State Prison CTS, license
revoked two years, $677 fine As part of the City of W
and court costs, $350 public prove customer service a
defender fees and $200 COP velopment department
placed on lien. relocated. Effective imn
Christopher Allen Napier, of Wauchula Community
violation of probation (original handles both Planning 8
charges two counts grand theft), is:
probation revoked, 11 months
29 days in jail, $350 public 126 S. 7th Avenue
defender fees and $100 COP Wauchula, FL 33873
added to outstanding fines and
fees and placed on lien. The phone numbers re
Donald Milton Rimes, pos- Planning & Zoning can
session of a firearm by a con- Code Enforcement can
victed felon, two years commu- Either office can be reach
nity control followed by one

_^a. "-anIarl, ...."*' 'y/y .*w: 'r .,/,f ." / 1 .r" s,;, "


and
nd-
irst

yny
out
ee-
idi-
wo
sts,
100

ce,
nce
cer,
ba-
and
$24
nu-


The following rea estate
transactions of $10,100 or
more were filed recently in
the office of the clerk o court:
Boyd L. Hyder to Daniel
Perez, Rafael Perez an Ebelio
Perez, $93,093.
Hulbert Homes Inc. to
Hulbert Properties' LLC,
$30,000.
Jean C. Schweighofer Carter
to Edward M. Schweighofer,
$61,166.15.
Heather Ashley Sanders
Taylor to Charlie R. Jr. and
Donna C. Scott, $40,000.
Walter E. and Elsie A.
Williams to Barry E. Wood,
$25,000.
Homes of Wauchula Inc. to
Sugel Santibanez, $60,000.


an accident meeting a prepared

-Albert von Szent-Gyorgyi


LLOYD HALL invites all
friends and neighbors
to come see him at

REENWOO
CHEVROLET Olksmo4tieD
N. Charleston FortMeade
1-800-673-9512 0*
www.directchevy.comg


Plione863-73-2637- fax63-73-259
^^^^^^^^^n~ff^'l~f^RwBBR^EfC~tBTTi^^^^^I.


COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTION
Let our highly qualified staff develop your commercial property,
build your dream home, or do your remodeling.


SEAMLESS GUTTERS

6 inch GUTTERS 5 Inch GUTTERS ....
s3.99 s2.95
PER INEAR FiIT Specials EII LInEH i:T -'-

DON'T WArrI Low PRICES ONLY GOOD THROUGH JANUARY 31


Email: kochcon@strato.net State Cenitied License #CGC1515338


OFFICIAL PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE PRIMARY BALLOT
REPUBLICAN PARTY
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
JANUARY 31,2012
BALOTA OFFICIAL DE LA PRESIDENCIAL PREFERENCIA PRIMARIA
PARTIDO REPUBUCANO
CONDADO DE HARDEE, FLORIDA
ENERO 31,2012
* TO VOE COMPLETELY FILL IN THE OVAL NEXT TO YOUR CHOICE
* Use oly Uie king drvc provided or number 2 pencil
SIf you mrake stake, don't hae to ask for a new barll. If you oraes or mas otier arks, your io lay not coun
SVOTAR EL RELLEHAN EL OVALADOI AL LADO DE SU OPCION.
* le ol l o d spositil dosal proporcionado o un umero 2 lapiz
SSI aseid comete ea To, no dude pedir una nreva pmpelst do voto. Si used bora o htce otr ma nrcas, s votq no puedl cont,.

PRESENT
ELPRESBeTE
PRESMIMT
(Volr fo a)
EL PREBSE
(ViorPmuno)
n; Me Bacnenn
.Herman Cain
JNewt iHriom
Jcri Hwnsnron
SGary JIhrw



........... .... ... 1:19
1:19C


N


N
%?
^`

,r^i


FILE YOUR TAXES NOW
WITH NO UPFRONT FEES!!!
Immigration Filing Notary Services
Crew Leader Card Filing ITIN Number Applications

SPECIALIZING IN:
All Federal and State Income Taxes Monthly Bookkeeping
Payrolls Bill Paying Services Harvesting Payrolls


Accunatg TSA JFEY-S otdr
TxPat-ARIA M NANE-rprcond Suso

E. JUY RAAM- .A


N


IHablamos Espa ol .

S ~FOR OUR NEW CLIENTS
I GET $10
OFF TAX PREPARATION FEES!*

1 FOR OUR EXISTING CLIENTS
BI G REFERRAL DISCOUNT
BRING A NEW CLIENT TO US AND YOU WILL BOTH RECEIVE

T $10 OFF
S.TAX PREPARATION FEES!*
S*MUrMENTION AD TO RECEIVE DISCOUNT

PARA NUESTROS CLIENTS NUEVOS
SRECIBA $10
DE REBAJO PARA PREPARATION DE TAXAS*
: PARA NUESTROS CLIENTS EXISTENTES
-I DESCUENTO DE REFERENCIA
:TRAIGANOS UN CLIENTE NEVO Y LOS DAS RCEIBIRAN
RECIBA $10 OFF
, DE REBAJO PARA PREPARATION DE TAXAS*
*DEBE MENCIONAR ANUNCIO PARA RECIVIR DESCUENTO

HAGA SU INCOME TAX AHORA
SIN PAGO POR ADELANTADO!!!


Clasificaci6n de Immigraci6n Servicios de Notaria
Clasificaci6n de Targetas de lider de tripulaci6n
Aplicaci6nes de numero de ITIN

NOS ESPESCIALIZAMOS EN:
Impuestos Federales y Estatales Contabilidad Mensual
N6minas de Pagos Servicio de Pagar sus Facturas
Mensuales N6mina de pago para Cosecha


,\
\C~


W4~sd$


FLoRO


EOF

EON
TION


'auchula's continued effort to im-
and efficiency, the Community De-
for the City of Wauchula. has
lediately, the location of the City
y Development department, which
& Zoning and Code Enforcement,




*main the same for both offices.
I be reached at (863) 773-9193.
I be reached at (863) 773-3'064.
:hed by fax at (863) 773-0436.
1:19c


141 a Av-ri -


N,
.45
116


k


Nt,
pt
bt


FREE CONSULTATION
*^ ^'J'^z 2^^^ /


\:12-26c
* V .
y 'u


J







12B The Herald-Advocate, January 19, 2012





Whats Fo


ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS
MONDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Graham
Crackers, Blueberry Poptart,
Orange Juice, Condiments and
Milk
Lunch: Chicken Nuggets,
Pepperoni Hotpocket, Salad
Tray, Mixed Vegetables, Blue
Raspberry Juice Bar, Rolls,
Condiments and Milk
TUESDAY
Breakfast: Cheerios Cereal,
Graham Crackers, Breakfast
Pizza, Applesauce, Condi-
ments and Milk
Lunch: Cheeseburger,
Mozzarella Bread Stick, Salad
Tray, Corn, Mixed Fruit, Ranger
Cookie, Condiments and Milk
WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Trix Cereal,
Breakfast Pocket, Scrambled
Eggs, Pears, Condiments and
Milk
Lunch: Cowboy Macaroni,
Ham & Cheese Wrap, Salad
Tray, Garden Peas, Peaches,
Rolls, Condiments and Milk
THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cinnamon Toast
Crunch Cereal, Graham
Crackers, Waffle, Sausage
Patty, Orange Juice, Condi-
ments and Milk
Lunch: Baked Turkey,
Corndog, Salad Tray, Mashed
Potatoes, Pears, Rolls, Condi-
ments and Milk
FRIDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Graham
Crackers, Breakfast Stick,
Peaches, Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Chili Con Came, Fish
Sandwich, Potato Rounds,
Salad Tray, Broccoli, Crackers,
Applesauce, Condiments and
Milk

JUNIOR HIGH
MONDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Graham
Crackers, Pop Tarts Variety,
Juice, Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Chicken Nuggets,
Rolls, Italian Hot Pockets,
Alternate Meal, Lettuce &
Tomato, Mixed Vegetables,
Juice Bar, Condiments and Milk
TUESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Graham
Crackers, Breakfast Pizza,
Applesauce, Condiments and
Milk
Lunch: Cheeseburger on a
Bun, Sausage Pizza, Mozzarella
Cheese Sticks w/Sauce,
Alternate Meal, Lettuce &
Tomato, Corn, Chocolate Chip
Cookies, Fruit Cocktail,
Condiments and Milk
WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Graham
Crackers, Sausage, Egg &
Cheese Biscuit, Diced Pears,
Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Deli Ham & Cheese
Wrap, Cowboy Macaroni, Rolls,
Alternate Meal, Pepperoni
Pizza, Salad Bar, Lettuce &
Tomato, Garden Peas,
Peaches, Condiments and Milk


THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Graham
Crackers, Waffle, Sausage
Patty, Juice, Condiments and
Milk
Lunch: Corndog, Sausage
Pizza, Alternate Meal, Baked
Turkey Roast Deli, Turkey
Gravy, Rolls, Salad Bar, Tossed
Salad, Mashed Potatoes, Diced
Pears, Condi-ments and, Milk
FRIDAY ,
Breakfast: Cereal, Graham
Crackers, Breakfast Stick,
Peaches, Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Chilli w/Crackers,
Pepperoni Pizza, Alternate
Meal, Salad Bar, Lettuce &
Tomato, Broccoli, Potato
Rounds, Applesauce, Condi-
ments and Milk

SENIOR HIGH
MONDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Super
Donut, Orange Juice, Condi-
ments and Milk
Lunch: Cheeseburger on a
Bun, Corndog, French Fries,
Potato Rounds, Baked Beans,
Tossed Salad, Peaches, Condi-
ments and Milk
TUESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Biscuit,
Sausage, Applesauce, Condi-
ments and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza,
Cheeseburger on a Bun,
Hamburger on a Bun, Pig in a
Blanket, French Fries, Baked
Beans, Cole Slaw, Tossed
Salad, Potato Rounds, Fruit
Cocktail, Condiments and Milk

WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Pancakes,
Baked Ham, Pears, Condi-
ments and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza,
Cheeseburger on a Bun,
Cowboy Macaroni, French
Fries, Broccoli, Summer
Squash, Tossed Salad, Fruit
Cocktail, Rolls, Condiments
and Milk
THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Jumbo
Waffles, Baked Ham, Fruit
Cocktail, Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza,
Cheeseburger on a Bun,
Chicken Nuggets, French Fries,
Savory Rice, Tossed Salad,
Mixed Vegetables, Fruit
Cocktail, Rolls, Condiments
and Milk

FRIDAY
Bieakf st: Cereal, Breakfast
Pizza, Peaches, Condiments
and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza,
Cheeseburger on a Bun,
French Fries, Nachos w/Ground
Beef, Mexican Rice, Pinto
Beans, Corn, Pineapple
Chunks, Tossed Salad, Condi-
ments and Milk
Individual menus are sub-
ject to change.


Crf Museum Musings
-I By Sandy Scott
-' Cracker Trail Museum Curalor


"But what does a museum curator do after she retires?"
On Friday, Dec. 30, 1 completed my last day as curator of
Cracker Trail Museum and today will be the last installment of
"Museum Musings" having first started in 2007.
I can honestly say that I have enjoyed this work more than any
other position I have had in the 49 years of my employment expe-
rience. The satisfaction that I have received by being able to share
some of Hardee County's history with each of the guests who have
visited the museum'is something that cannot be forgotten. It has
been my honor to assist many folks in Hardee County and else-
where with their plight of genealogy research, and the excitement
cannot be compared to anything else when many of you have
donated your precious items to Cracker Trail Museum.
I will miss your visits, your positive comments about our won-
derful museum, and your family stories. I will miss the expressions
on the faces of the third graders who visit the museum with the
Outdoor Classroom when we talk about the.prehistoric jawbone
that resides in one of the cases, and when they cover their ears from
the clanging of the dasher in the crock butter churn as I demon-
strate how butter was made.
The dedication of the fine folks in Hardee County who have
visited Cracker Trail Museum or who have donated many of their
precious family items is something I will long remember.
So, the question may now remain, "Just what will this previ-
ous Hardee County employee and Cracker Trail Museum curator


now do with all her extra time?" I can assure you that those days
will be filled doing much of the same activities in respect to Hardee
County history as I have been involved with for the past several
years.
You may see me with my trusty camera capturing some of
those historical buildings or perhaps putting together a slideshow
for an event in the area. You may see me working at the Nickerson-
Ullrich Building during Pioneer Park Days, and you may see me
interviewing one of our pioneers or veterans at Resthaven or
Hardee Manor. Perhaps you will even see my name on a column
or two from time to time when you open up the pages of The
Herald-Advocate .
I will miss Cracker Trail Museum. I am leaving an entity and
an employer of which I am extremely proud and about whom I can
say "it was the best of times."
Please continue to show your dedication and enthusiasm to
expand the wonderful treasures that reside inside Cracker Trail
Museum.






Frankie's

773-5665
116 Carlton St. Wauchula
Now Accepting
. a-Hours:
Tuesday Friday 9-6; Saturday 9-3
1:19c


$ Economy
Full Set
(OI510. 05120)
$Routine Complex
| Tooth Tooth
Extraction Extraction
SD7140) (D 7210)



Affordable Dentures-Avon Park, PA.
Marc A.Sander, D.D.S.
Fellow of the Academy of General Dentistry
HIGHLANDS PLAZA
1036 US 27 South. Avon Park FL
Call For Appointment (863) 784-0463
* ---------------------------------------
SAVSAVAVE SAVE SAVE

s100 s75 s50 s25
ON PER DENTURE ON PER DENTURE ON PER DENTURE ON
AFFORDABLE' ULTRA PREMIUM CUSTOM
IMPLANTS Complete or Complete or Complete or
Denture lartoal Denture a Partial Denture i Partial Denture
Stabilization System 2, 201o61.7 i i
1-800-DENTURE AFFORDABLE
www.AffordobleDentures.com T IDENTURES"
S : Q // r ortfo Irrie
Offers good only at Affordable Dentures-Avon Park. P A.
Coupon must be presented at time of initial payment and cannot be combined
with any other coupons, discounts, package price. Insurance benefit, or prior order I.
Offer expires 4/30/12 and may change without notice
*Same Day Service. in most cases, call for details These are minimum tees and charges
may increase depending on the treatment required. The Potient and any other person
responsible for payment has a ight to refuse lo pay. cancel payment, or be reimbursed
for payment for any other service, examination, or treatment that is performed as a
result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free. discounted
fo, or reduced too service, examination or Irootmont We accept Cash. Chocks with ID.
Viso. MostfrCard. ond Discover as payment for our services 1:19c


I make sure the water is clean,
for all of us.


I am Mosaic.


As we mine the phosphate needed to help grow the

world's food, it's no coincidence that we preserve

the water quality of nearby creeks and rivers. As an

environmental specialist, I'm part of a team that monitors

these bodies of water to ensure that.the water quality

is sustained or even enhanced. Mosaic takes great

care to meet Florida's clean water standards. Because


stewardship is an integral part of what we do.


A-'' I to' it i 'h o01 ) ', done, right,


Mosaic



www.mosaicfla.com


MrS^ .,, ^,-.... ..
'itts^8^S"'"


e
sl
-~-c~---- -1.