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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028302/00401
 Material Information
Title: The Herald-advocate
Portion of title: Herald advocate
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Wm. J. Kelly
Place of Publication: Wauchula Fla
Creation Date: October 27, 2011
Publication Date: 1955-
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Wauchula (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hardee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Hardee -- Wauchula
Coordinates: 27.546111 x -81.814444 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: 55th year, no. 31 (Sept. 2, 1955)-
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579544
oclc - 33886547
notis - ADA7390
lccn - sn 95047483
System ID: UF00028302:00401
 Related Items
Preceded by: Hardee County herald
Preceded by: Florida advocate (Wauchula, Fla.)

Full Text






Girls Dig

District


SFor

Title
... Story 9A


Pill Dropoff

This Saturday
.. Story 3A


The


Herald-Advocate


Hardee County's Hometown Coverage


- ~


70s
Plus 5t Sales Tax


Thursday, October 27, 2011


Woman Dies Following House Fire


SBy CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
Despite valiant efforts to save
her, a 49-year-old Wauchula
woman has died following a
house fire last week.
City Police Chief Bill Beattie
said Christina Lynn Ramsden,
of 426 S. 10th Ave., was pulled
from her smoke-filled apart-
ment by law enforcement offi-
cers on Thursday night, but died
at Florida Hospital Heartland
on Sunday.
Beattie said autopsy results
are still pending, but the cause
of death will likely be smoke
inhalation. He said Ramsden's
death is expected to be ruled


accidental.
The fire in Apartment B at the
10th Avenue house was discov-
ered just before 11 that night.
Ofc. Justin Wyatt was on rou-
tine patrol in the area when he
smelled smoke and circled the
area to investigate. A man
flagged him down and led him'
to the house.
Wyatt saw smoke pouring out
of the attic vent on the south
end of the structure, and more
smoke escaping from around
the door frame.
Beattie said Wyatt kicked in
the door, got down on his hands
and knees as smoke filled the
room to within two feet of floor


level, and looked for any occu-
pants. He found Ramsden in her
bedroom.
Sheriff's Dep. Steven Ahrens
arrived on the scene, and he and
Wyatt worked to pull Ramsden
from the house while Ofc.
William Smith stood guard to
ensure the officers' safety.
Ramsden was not breathing
when she was pulled from the
structure, Beattie said. Officers
started cardiopulmonary resus-
citation while Hardee County
Fire-Rescue was en route to the
scene.
Then, WPD Cpl. Robert
Spencer and sheriff's Det.
See FIRE 3A


WAUCHULA POLICE DEPARTMENT PHOTO
A kitchen fire filled this South 10th Avenue home with smoke Thursday night.


1950s & '60s


Reunion This



Weekend!


1 .....r..r.. - PHOTO BY MARIA TRUJILLO
Rewinding the '50s and the '60s are reunion organizers Sue Bryan Jackson and Jerold Knight, along with a 1956
Ford owned by Jim Smith.


Clerk Errs On Public Information
S.-- ... t.o.put.his.equ.st .in ..I -:.h a..-. .-A .. .-


The top custodian of public
records in Hardee County
wrongfully placed restrictions
on The Herald-Advocate's
recent request for public infor-
mation.
The law, however, "can be a
source of confusion," said Pat
Gleason of the Attorney
General's Office in Tallahassee,
noting that B. Hugh Bradley is
governed by Chapter 28 as clerk
of the courts, but by Chapter 119
as ex officio clerk to the County
Commission.
Under Chapter 28, the clerk
of courts may require a member


of the public to give his name,
put his request in writing and
pay up to $1 a page for court
and/or civil records, such as
copies of lawsuits, deeds, pro-
bate matters, divorces, etc.
But Under Chapter 119, a'
member of the public is entitled
to copies of County Commis-
sion information such as meet-
ing minutes, budgets, resolu-
tions, etc. without such restric-
tions. He cannot be asked his
name or any other identifying
information, he cannot be asked


to put his request in writing, and
he cannot be charged more than
15 cents a page for the copy
itself.
Each of the three conditions
Bradley placed on staff writer
Joan Seaman's request for coun-
ty records violated Chapter 119
of Florida Statutes. Such an
error as Bradley's while acting
as ex officio clerk to the com-
mission is possible, Gleason
said.
Bradley, however, would not
acknowledge his error for a


weeC, despite multiple attempts
to inform him.
The situation developed fol-
lowing a meeting of the Hardee
County Commission where
Commissioner Grady Johnson
challenged Hardee County Fire-
Rescue pay records from
County Manager Lex Albritton
and Fire Chief Mike Choate,
saying he instead received his
information from Bradley.
Bradley then rose and told
commissioners he possessed the
See CLERK 2A


WEATHERFarewell To A Friend
DAE HIGH LOW B ___
1o/09 82 60 0.02 By MICHAEL KELLY Green in 1949 when he was 5.
10/20 73 54 0.00 Of The Herald-Advocate Times were. not easy for the family,
10/22 76 s1 0.00 Spessard Munselle Stone overcame and Spessard saw school as a way to
10123 80 56 0.00 severe physical limitations and went on rise from the poverty he knew. He made
10124 78 57 0.00
10/25 82 55 0.02 to live a long and productive life even straight A's in high school, was at the
MTA. RaInfan to 10/25/11 50.4 though doctors told him he wouldn't. top of his class and always valued edu-
p*n atst vm- 4S1 A summer afternoon of fun on June cation.
n r Avr 4.30
So= UMofF. One Rew ct C 28, 1960, turned disastrous for Spessard His dream was to attend the


INDEX
Classifieds...........,.........6D
Community Calendar....4A
Courthouse Report.......7B
Crime Blotter.................8B
Hardee Living................2D
Obituaries.....................4A



8 li 331 111 1
8 33913 00075 7


when he was just 15 years old.
Spessard and his brother, Sherrick,
13 at the time, left their Bowling Green
home and went to the Mary Jane Hole
in Payne's Creek to cool off and play in
the water.
Spessard dove into a shallow part of
the creek and sustained a severe spinal
injury that would leave him a quadriple-
gic the rest of his life. At just 15, his
life was changed forever and he was
told by doctors he wouldn't live very
long.
His family had moved to Bowling


University of Florida on an academic
scholarship, but the injury changed all
that.
The news from the doctors broke
Spessard's spirit for a while and kept
the young scholar from attending UF.
"I didn't think I had time," he told
his sister Renee Schiele five years ago.
"I was always told I wouldn't live very
long."
Renee was 17 at the time of the acci-
dent and planned on attending the
University of Florida as well, to become
See FAREWELL 3A


By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
The 3 R's will take the fore-
front once again this weekend,
but this time they will mean
Reuniting, Reminiscing and
Rockin'!
The "Rewinding The '50s &
'60s Reunion" is expected to
bring in thousands of Hardee
Senior High School graduates
from the dual decades of the
1950s and the 1960s.
Reunion planners Sue Bryan
Jackson and Jerold Knight also
predict alumni who attended
other schools during that era but
reside here now may also be
attracted to the event, which
will fill the heart of downtown
Wauchula on both Friday and
Saturday.
They caution, however, that
this is an adults-only weekend.
"There will be nothing there for
children," Jackson said.
The event is free.
Bringing in money, though,
will be the Friday night auction
of an oil painting by world-
renowned artist and HHS grad
Wayne Hovis and a beautifully
designed and executed cook-
book of '50s and '60s favorites.
All proceeds from those sales
will be donated to Resthaven.
Knight said the goal is to raise


$30,000 for that Hardee County
facility. Jackson noted Rest-
haven "has touched so many of
our lives." She said grads will
have or know of family mem-
bers and friends who resided in
that home-like setting during
their golden years.
The fun officially kicks off at
4 p.m. on Friday, but some of
the individual classes will be
gathering as early as 3 that day.
Jackson noted 19 of the 20
graduating classes involved will
host separate parties for their
classmates.
Main Street will be blocked
off to traffic from U.S. 17 to
Eighth Avenue. That will hap-
pen on both days, from 4 to
around 11 p.m. as block parties
take to the streets.
Friday's block party will fea-
ture an antique-car display, food
vendors with soups, salads and
sandwiches, local restaurants
and shops open late, and a
rockin' concert by the Wild
Cats, beginning at 7 p.m.
The Wild Cats is the group
formed by HHS grads who
were members of the band
known as The Challengers in
1964-65, with the exception of
friend and musician Ben
Stofcheck of Crystal River.
See REUNION 2A


COURTESY PHOTO
Spessard Stone loved looking through old newspaper
archives and writing about history in the Hardee County
area.


Homecoming Parade

Marches Downtown

... Photos 6,7C


111th Year, No. 47
4 Sections, 34 Pages


-ol


M


0


1


L


. |


I


I 1 11


I


--t








2A The Herald-Advocate, October 27, 2011


The Herald-Advocate
Hardee County's Hometown Coverage
JAMES R. KELLY
Publisher/Editor
CYNTHIA M. KRAHL
Managing Editor


JOAN M. SEAMAN
Sports Editor



115 S. Seventh Ave.
P.O. Box 338
Wauchula, FL 33873


RALPH HARRISON
Production Manager

NOEY DE SANTIAGO
Asst. Prod. Manager

Phone: (863) 773-3255
Fax: (863) 773-0657


Published weekly on Thursday at Wauchula, Florida, by The Herald-Advocate
Publishing Co. Inc. Periodical Postage paid at U.S. Post Office. Wauchula, FL
33873 and additional entry office (USPS 578-780). "Postmaster," send address
changes to: The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338, Wauchula, FL 33873.


DEADLINES:
Schools Thursday 5 p.m.
Sports Monday noon
Hardee Living Thursday 5 pm.
General News Monday 5 p.m.
Ads Tuesday noon


LETTERS:
The Herald-Advocate welcomes letters to the editor on matters of public
interest. Letters should be brief, and must be written in good taste, signed
and include a daytime phone number.
SUBMISSIONS:
Press releases on community matters are welcome. Submissions should be
typed, double-spaced and adhere to the above deadlines. All items are sub-
ject to editing.


Kelly's Column
By Jim


Social Security benefits will go up 3.6 percent in January fol-
lowing no increases in 2010 and 2011. That will be welcomed by
many American retirees and other qualified people getting SS ben-
efits.

The annual College Hill Reunion will be held Saturday, Nov.
5, at the College Hill Schoolhouse west of Bowling Green. The
program begins at 11 a.m. with the meal at noon. Bring a covered
dish. The reunion will be dedicated to Alice Talley Mitchell and
family. For more information call Pat Gugle at 375-2844.

Hardee High School classes of 1950s and 1960s will hold
reunions this weekend in Wauchula. A block party kicks off the fes-
tivities Friday night at 7 p.m. it Main Street Heritage Park. Another
block party will be Saturday night.
A pancake breakfast will be held Saturday morning from 7:30
to 10 a.m. at the old Earnest Plaza parking lot. There are cookbooks
for the reunion: Resthaven will get some of th .roceeds.
There will be arts and crafts displays. Harmon Hovis has two
wonderful paintings for the event-a wildliffrscene and Hardee
High School of that era. Nineteen of the 20 classes will be having
special meals.
Event co-chairs Jerold Knight and Sue Bryan Jackson expect
over 2,000 people.

There is an important Class 5-A district home game for the
Wildcats Friday at 7 p.m. when they host the Bradenton Southeast
Seminoles. The Cats need to win if they want to make the state
playoffs this year.
Hardee held a 13-6 halftime lead last Friday at Palnietto, but
the Tigers thrilled their homecoming crowd with a last-minute 49-
yard field goal to win 16-13. Palmetto had a great kicker and over-
came penalties and early-turnovers while Hardee lost from their
mistakes despite a valiant effort. HHS-Southeast should be a great
game.

The U.S. Census bureau reports the first cell phone was in the
U.Si in 1983.There were 5 million cell phone subscribers by 1990
and 110 million in 2000, with 286 million currently. That's what
you can call a growth industry.
The population of the U.S. reached 100 million between 1910
and 1920tThe pulation reached 200 million in late 1967 and 300
million 5 yea,,rgo and is 308.7 million currently.
The C Liq Bureau reports dentistry is a $105 billion industry
in the U.S., wh 165,000 dentists and 137 million dental hygienists
in 98,000 offices.
The eijsus Bureau reports 55 1/2 million U.S. children in K-
12, with l million getting free or reduced price lunches and over
II million getting breakfast. A hungry child cannot learn, the
bureau says.

AARP Bulletin Editor Jim Toedtman offers five tips for
Americans to help trim the national debt:
1. Cut 150 calories.a day from your diet (helps reduce health
care costs by being healthier).
2. Pay your debts (private borrowing helps cause high interest
rates for federal government debt).
3. Walk a mile a day (any good exercise helps prevent heart
disease, the nation's leading killer. Extra exercise cuts the nation's
medical bill, such as Medicare costs).
4. Plan to work an extra year or two before getting Social
Security (helps the Social Security trust fund, adds to your retire-
ment fund, and increases your benefit when you do draw SS).
5. Give Uncle Sam a gift to the U.S. Treasury to reduce the
national debt (taxpayers gifts to the U.S. Treasury so far this year
are over $2.5 million).
Many people might say--the national debt is S14.3 trillion, the
federal budget deficit is about $1.4 trillion, spend federal tax dol-
lars more wisely and less often before we volunteer to send a gift
to Uncle Sam toward debt reduction. I suppose someone who dies
with no heirs could consider Uncle Sam a charity and leave his or
her money to the U.S. Treasury.
With a $1.4 trillion budget deficit my calculator shows this to
be a deficit of over $3.8 billion a day. or over $159 million an hour
of expenses over income. No wonder the Tea Party and many
Americans are getting concerned.
The U.S. government, however, can print more money.
Printing too much new money, I understand, could cause'some
problems with inflation and a dollar's value. The U.S. government
could raise taxes and/or reduce spending. Those actions also have
consequences.
And then there's the Occupy Wall Street movement in which
some people feel the richest one percent on Americans are pros-
pering and increasing wealth while the middle class and low
income Americans are suffering. We are living in interesting and
challenging times.

A source told me one or more city of Wauchula employees
hunt at the city airport property west of the city. The property has
some woods on at least two sides.
This situation could raise some interesting points such as
potential liability in case of mishap. who gets to hunt, is there a
drawing for interested hunters, do city residents anld utility cus-



p


REUNION
Continued From 1A


But reunion attendees will
remember band members Keith
Hope, Jim See, Laurie Linder,
Dan Reid and Reid Crews.
They will rock the house with
the popular songs of the '50s
and '60s.
Meanwhile as they take to the
stage, two 84-inch monitors
will display a collection of




CLf
Continued
only accurate information.
On Oct. 11. Seaman. acting
on behalf of the public to ensure
it has the accurate information.
asked Bradley for the records he
had given Johnson.
Bradley advised Seaman to
put her request in writing, to put


FIRE-RESCUE
Page 1 article in last
week's issue included a
chart with a star denoting
overtime. The star was
inadvertently place beside
the wrong column. It
should have been next to.
the overtime.column, which
includes both the federally
mandated overtime hours
and actual overtime. The
other hours : column
includes vacation, holiday,
comp hours and sick leave.

DISPATCH
An article in last week's
issue on the Sheriff's Office
dispatch should have said
Fire-Rescue averages
seven or eight calls a day.
Multiple vehicles respond
to the same address.

At The Herald-Advocate,
we want accuracy to be a
given, not just our goal. If
you believe we have print-
ed an error in fact, please
call to report it. We will
review the information, and
if we find it needs correc-
tion or clarification, we will
do so here.
To make a report, call
Managing Editor Cynthia
Krahl at 773-3255.


1.000 photos of those days gone
by, sparking memories for the
alumni.
Highlighting the niht will
be an auction during .the band's
intermission. Auctioneer Mar-
cus Shackelford will draw out
the high bidder for an oil of two
bucks standing along a stream.
an outdoors scene painted by





SFrom 1A
it on letterhead and that $1 a
page would be charged. Seaman
told Bradley she did not believe
such conditions were allowable
under law. and then reported the
incident to Managing Editor
Cynthia Krahl.
Krahl placed a call to
Bradley on Oct. 13. He declined
to reconsider or to research the
question further. Krahl then
wrote an e-mail to Bradley later
that same day, including
excerpts from pertinent laws
and also attaching the full docu-
ments. Gleason from the
Attorney General's Office and
Barbara Petersen of the First
Amendment Foundation also e-
mailed Bradley that day, con-
firming what Krahl had written.
Bradley continued to dis-
agree.
Bradley said Seaman failed
to be specific in her public
records request, that Krahl
spoke to him in an inappropri-
ate manner, that her e-mail to
him did not apply to his duties
and responsibilities, and that
the two lawyers who e-mailed
were vague.
Michael Kelly, son of pub-
lisher Jim Kelly, on Oct. 17
asked Bradley to provide a let-
ter from his lawyer delineating
where and how the newspaper
had erred in its interpretation of
the law.
SBradley contacted Wauchula
lawyer John W.H. Burton.
On Oct. 20, Bradley met with
Michael Kelly and Jim Kelly
and said the newspaper was
correct.
Chapter 119.10 provides for
penalties for public officers
who. violate provisions of the
chapter, ranging from a fine up
to suspension or-removal and a
Sfirst-degkpe rgidemeanor
charge. .-.
Bradley, 67, was first elected
clerk of courts in 1996. His cur-
rent term expires in 2012.


tomers also have a chance to hunt there, are rifles used, is this a job
perk for one or more city employees, etc.
Hunting is a wonderful past-time. Perhaps there should be
some groundrules if limited hunting is allowed by the city com-
mission at the city airport property.
We definitely don't want herds of deer and hogs and flocks of
turkeys getting in the way of small airplanes trying to land and take
off. Game populations need to be held in check, and hunting is a
wonderful way to harvest excess animals. Wild meat is healthier
than store-bought meat.


1954 classmate Hovis.
Saturday kicks off with a
breakfast hosted by Northside
Baptist Church as a fund raiser
for its youth mission group.
Those pancakes will be served
from 7:30 to 10 a.m. in the
Town Center parking lot.
known to alumni as Earnest
Plaza still.
Then. from 10 to 4. down-
town will be filled with vendors
and displays. There will be
fresh orchids driven in from
Miami, stained glass, jewelry.
candles, plants, purses, candies
- basically all sorts of arts and
crafts for early Christmas shop-
ping.
The Saturday block party
begins at 4. Also at 4, Keith
Hope will perform songs from
his CDs at the Java Caf6 until
5:15.
At 7 p.m., Gospel Jubilee will
take to the stage in Heritage
Park. Performing will be Tim
Davis, Debbie Carlton, Donna
Alexy. David Spencer, Danny

ft : ;? .. ^H


Keene, Mary Beth Bryant, Cass
White, James Walker and
Layne Prescott.
Bringing down the house at
around 8 p.m. will be Elvis!
Carl Bryant will conjure up that
rock-n-roll superstar for the
alumni to enjoy.
Then, on Sunday, alumni are
encouraged to return to the
home churches of their youth.
For now, see the oil painting
before the auction at Cat's on
Main in the Town Center at
U.S. 17 and Main Street. Buy
the cookbook, with its cover of
a Hovis painting of the tradi-
tional HHS edifice, at Cat's or
at Mid Florida Crop Insurance,
210 W. Main St.
And, on Friday, expect a
crowd downtown.
Handicapped parking will be
available by entering the event
at Orange Street and Seventh
Avenue. Public restrooms will
be available in Heritage Park
both days.


COURTESY PHOTO
Keith Hope, "The Key Biscayne Cowboy," will appear with
the Wild Cats at the Friday block party and individually in
a Saturday performance at Java Cafe.


The man who has done his level best, and who is con-
scious that he has done his best, is a success, even
though the world may write him down a failure.
-B.C. Forbes

If you will call your troubles experiences, and remember
that every experience develops some latent force within
you, you will grow vigorous and happy, however adverse
your circumstances may seem to be.
-John R. Miller


HEARTLAND PHARMACY




DELIVERY SERVICE AVAILABLE


"We put our into our service"

If you are visiting we will gladly transfer your prescriptions and

keep them on file then transfer them back when you go home.

.. . ..-.-. . -. .
t ... . . . . ...



.... .



lowI


Katie Rogers, Sue Lobato, Pauline Ochoa, Julian Garcia, & Red Camp Pharmacist

Hours:
Monday-Friday 9:00 am to 6:00 pm Saturday 9:00 am to 1:00pm
4I


SUBSCRIPTIONS:
Hardee County
6 months $21; I yr. S39; 2 yrs.- 575
Florida
6 months $25; 1 yr. $46; 2 yrs. $87
Out of State
6 months $29; 1 yr.-S52; 2 yrs.-$100


I


-L--- _- C








October 27, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 3A


a school teacher. She changed her mind
and instead studied nursing, in part so
she could be a help to Spessard and be
there for him his whole life.
She was amazed at what he was able
to accomplish during his life with the
physical limitations he faced.
He earned a diploma from Umatilla
High School and completed training in
accounting and worked in that field for
a few years.
Spessard was a voracious reader and
became a self-taught journalist and
wrote regularly for many years in The
Herald-Advocate, covering area history
and county pioneers.
He typed using only two fingers on
one hand and a splint with a stylus
strapped to the other.
He did all his own typing and com-
posing, one key stroke at a time.
Spessard never bragged about the
work he had done.
Renee said she was amazed at how
many people knew and respected his
work and his attention to detail.
He had a passion for history and
genealogy. Spessard knew people were
looking for their roots, and he helped so
many people open the doors to make
discoveries about their past.
He made great contributions to area
and Florida history. His book chronicled
this area starting in the 1800s and
showed how Hardee County actually
became a county and who was involved
along the way.
He had more than 300 articles pub-
lished in The Herald-Advocate, South
Florida Pioneers, The Polk County
Historical Quarterly and the Tampa
Historical Society.


In 2007 he published the book,
"Hardee County: Its Heritage and
People."
Spessard also published two family
histories, "John and William, Sons of
Robert Hendry" and "Lineage of John
Carlton."
When Renee told her brother how
proud she was of his accomplishments,
his response was, "I don't feel I have
done enough, and I never seem to have
the time."
After his mother, Anne Stone, died,
he lived alone and took care of himself
with some help from his many friends
and caregivers, who got him out of bed
every morning and put him to bed each
evening.

He loved classical music, poetry and
literature.
He was able to participate in the
planning of his own funeral service with
his family and pastor the day before he
passed away at age 67, on Sept. 15.
He concluded that, "I am ready to
go.
"I feel that I have accomplished most
of my goals that I set out to do," he told
his family. "There may be a few more
things I could do, but I am satisfied."
Sherrick said Spessard told him he
had searched for peace and comfort his
entire life and he had now found it in
the Lord.
He knew he was going to a better
place.
Renee summed up his life well at his
funeral.
"He was a testament to the ability of
man to obtain lofty goals in the face of
extreme adversity," she said.


COURTESY PHOTOS
This undated photo shows a young Spessard Stone while
he was growing up in Bowling Green.


Whatever you may look like
marry a man your own age
-as your beauty fades, sc
will his eyesight.
-Phyllis Dillei
Blessed are the young foi
they shall inherit the na-
tional debt.
-Herbert Hoovel

NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME ACT
Notice 1' hereby dWien that
the undersigned, pursuant to
the provisions of the Fictitious
Name Act, Section 865.09,
Florida Statues, as amended,
Intends to register with the
Secretary of State of the State
of Florida, the fititious name of
Northslde Storages under
which the undersigned is
engaged or will engage in busi-
ness at: 1087 Hwy. 17 North, in
the City of Wauchula, Florida
33873.
That the party Interested in
said business enterprise is as
follows: Gray E. Vance & Belva
L Vance.
Dated at Wauchula, Hardee,
Florida 33873. 10:27p


By MARIA TRUJILLO
For The Herald-Advocate
Pills. pills. pills. What to do
with all of those unused,
unwanted or expired medi-
cines?
Many people simply throw
pills in the garbage or flush
them away. What they don't
realize is that these actions can
be both unsafe and a health haz-
ard, placing pills into the wrong
hands or allowing them to leach
into water supplies.
But there is a better way.
This year the Hardee County
Sheriff's Office and the
Wauchula Police Department
collaborating with the Hardee
County Alliance for Substance
Abuse & Pregnancy Prevention
will host the second "Operation
Medicine Cabinet" on Saturday.
It is part of a national event


Jamie Wright entered the apart-
ment, crouching to avoid being
overcome by smoke, and
searched for any other occu-
pants. None were found.
No one occupied Apartment
A, either, Beattie said.
Fire-Rescue arrived within
minutes and took over CPR,
transporting Ramsden to
Florida Hospital Wauchula. She
was later transferred to Sebring.
Beattie said investigation
revealed the fire started in the
kitchen, with food left o0: the


scheduled by the Drug Enforce-
ment Administration to provide
a place for people to properly
dispose of unwanted or expired
human or pet medications with
no questions asked.
Operation Medicine Cabinet
was established to keep more
people safe from the misuse of
prescription drugs.
According to a 2009 survey.
more than seven million
Americans abuse prescription
drugs. Of those seven million,
nine people die daily just in the
state of Florida. Along .with
them, every day about 2,500
teens use prescription drugs for
the first time to get high,
according to a study done by
the Partnership for a Drug-Free
America.
These statistics show pre-
scription medications have


stove.
He said Ramsden suffered
from serious medical conditions
prior to this incident.
Beattie commended the brav-
ery of his officers and the sher-
iff's deputies in their attempt to
save the woman's life.
He also cautioned citizens to
be especially "fire aware" dur-
ing this time of year, noting
space heaters, foods left unat-
tended and Christmas-trees and
lights can start a blaze.


become the number one abused
drug in the United States, sur-
passing all other illicit drugs.
Last April. Operation Med-
icine Cabinet collected about 87
pounds of prescription medica-
tion. Law enforcement agencies
believe this upcoming event
will be even more successful.
All you have to do is place
the pills in a clear air-tight
sealed plastic bag and take them
to the Hardee County Sheriff's
Office at 900 E. Summit St. or
the Wauchula Police Depart-
ment at 128 S. Seventh Ave. this
Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
For more information, con-
tact Hardee County Alliance for
Substance Abuse & Pregnancy
Prevention coordinator Suzanne
Lambert at 773-6349.

ABOUT...
Letters To
The Editor
The Herald-Advocate wel-
comes letters to the editor
on matters of public interest.
Letters should be brief, and
must be written in good
taste and include the
writer's full name, address
and daytime telephone
number for verification.
Letters must be received
by 5 p.m. on Monday to be
considered for that week's
edition. Submissions should
be typed or legibly written.
Send letters to: Letters to
the Editor, The Herald-
Advocate, P.O. Box 338,
Wauchula, FL 33873. Fax
letters to (863) 773-0657.


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This picture from 1963 shows Spessard Stone visiting
Monticello in Charlottesville, Va.
The sentence "The quick brown fox jumps over a lazy
dog" uses every letter of the alphabet!
Vulnerabilities, like being embarrassed or risking love,
can, be terrifying. I think we should follow a simple rule;
if we can take the worst, take the risk.
-Dr. Joyce Brothers


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Ladies Night In!!

Come join uk doing the three things ladies love best,
Food, Fellowship, and Shopping!!!



Sunday, Oct. 30th 4:00 7:00 p.m.

VNew Vision Worship Center

2915 Sciooflouse oad, Zoffo Springs


We will have refreshments, music,


". and several vendors,

including; 31 Bags, Princess House,

Avon, Crafts by Michelle,

Blessings Home Decor, Party Lites Candles

and others for you to Christmas shop

while enjoying the food and fellowship.

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4A 'lThe Herald-Advocate, October 27. 2011


Obituaries


FELIPA ALVARADO
i-ch!pa Alvarado, 76, ofWau-
chul;i. died on Wednesday, Oct.
-19. 2011. at Sebring.
. Born Feb. 5, 1935, at Me-
reedes. Texas, she came to
Wauchula from Texas in 1969.
She was a homemaker and
member of St. Michael Catholic
Church. i
She was preceded in death by
daughter, Maria Gloria Chaves.
Survivors include husband
Maximo Alvarado of Wauchula;
sons Jose Alvarado of Auburn-
dale, Maximo Alvarado Jr. of
Bryan, Texas, and Miguel
Angel Alvarado of Wauchula;
daughters Juana Flores and
Angelita Navarro of Wauchula,
and Eufemia Garcia, Rosalinda
Morales and Alma Delia
Mendoza, all of Bartow; broth-
ers Bernardo Suarez of
Weslaco, Texas, and Alfredo
Suarez of Raymondville, Texas;,
sister Petra Suarez of Weslaco,
Texas;23 grandchildren; and 17,
great-grandchildren. ,
Visitation was Sunday, Oct.
23, at the funeral home from 3
to 8 p.m. Services. were
Monday, Oct. 24, at 10 a.m. at
St. Michael Catholic Church,
followed by interment' at
Wauchula Cemetery. Robarts
Family Funeral Home is in
charge of arrangements.



MARY ANN A. TRAMMELL
Mary Ann A. Trammell, 86,
of Parrish, died on Wednesday,
Oct. 19, 2011.
Born in Ozark, Ala., she and
her late husband Norman were
founding members of Em-
manuel Baptist Church in Parris.
Survivors include two sons,
Morrell Trammell and wife
Diane of Parrish, and Johnny
Trammell and wife Connie of


Wauchula; four gran
Morey Trammell and
Melissa Doyle, Mixon
and wife Courtney, an
Conerly and husband
five great-grandchildr
Morgan, Bo, Riley an
Family received fri
IU to 11 a.m. on Mon
her 24 at Emmanu
were held at 11 a.m. f
interment at Parrish
Kicliter Funeral Hon
rish is in charge of
iments.



F 1


FELIPA ALVA
Felipa Alvarado
Wauchula, died on
day. Oct. 19,2011,a
She was born o
1935, at Mercedes,
came to Wauchula f
in 1969. She was a I
er and a member
Michael Catholic Ch
She was precede
by her daughter, Ma
Chaves.
She is survived b
band. Maximo Al
Wauchula: three s
Alvarado of Au
Maximo Alvaradi
Bryan. Texas an
Angel Alvarado of'
five daughters. Jua
of Wauchula. Eufen
Rosalinda Morales
Delia Mendoza. all
and Angelita Na
Waiuchula: two
Bernardo Suarez of
lexas. and Alfredo
Rax mondville. Texa
te r Petra Suarez ol
Texas: 23 grandchi
17 ereat-grandchild
Visitation was Su
23. at Robarts Gard
Irom 3 to 8 p.m
were Monday. Oct.
a.m. at St. Michae
Church. Interment f
Wau-chula Cemeter
Expressions of con
he made at robarts

FUNERAL H(
WAUCHUL


THERESA "TERRY"
CONSTANCE CLINE
Theresa "Terry" Constance
Cline, 80, of Brethren, Mich.,
and formerly of Wauchula, died
on Sunday, Oct. 23, 2011, in
Brethren.
Bor on Jan. 28, 1931, in
Detroit, *Mich., she was a resi-
dent of Brethren and Kaleva,
Mich. She and her late husband,
Richard Cline, retired to Wau-
d t:iil.and lived here for 16
years, before returning to
.Michigan in.2003.
She -was' also preceded in..
death by a great-grandson.
Survivors include four chil-
dren, Claudia Mlejnek of Breth-
ren, Mich., Cindy Wisniewski
.of Kimball, Mich., Cheri Hall
and husband Jon of Kaleva,
Mich., and Richard Cline III
and wife Jeanette of India-
napolis, Ind.; and one sister
Joann Gudinas and husband
Rod of Watton, Mich., and 10
grandchildren and 10 great-
grandchildren.
Cremation took place and a
memorial service was held at
St. Joseph's Parish in Onekama,
Mich., on Tuesday, Oct. 25,
2011 at 11 a.m. Interment will
be at Mt. Olivet Cemetery in
Detroit, Mich., at a later date.
Oak Grove Cremation Center
was in charge of arrangements.


children,
wife Ellie, Nutrition
i Trammell |
nd Jennifer W is
Josh; and KAREN COLLINS, MS, RD, CDN
ren, Lexie, l. AMERICAN INSTITUTE FOR
id Molly. CANCER RESEARCH
lends from
day, Octo- Q: How much fish do 1 need
el Baptist to eat to get recommended
,eervicqs .. amrppt s ofoinega-3 fat? Does.
allowedd by it all have to be salmon'?
Cemetery. A: Eight ounces of fish and
ne of Par- seafood per week is enough to
f arrange- provide a ii.art-healthy amount
of EPA plus DHA (the major
omega fatty acids from
s: seafood) based on analysis by
.- the Advisory Committee for the
eMO/ty 2010 Dietary Guidelines for
Americans. The committee's
review of research led to the
conclusion that 250 to 500 mg
,. of these omega-3s per day is
,enough to reduce heart attacks
and deaths from heart disease
both in healthy people and in
those who already have athero-
sclerosis. The committee's
S analysis showethat the recom-
miendeddight ounces of fish,per
week could provide this omega-
3 fat target if specific, seafood
cholis included one: or two
servings per week especially
ADO high in omega-3s. American
, 76, of Heart Association recommends
iWednes- higher amounts of omega-3
it Sebring. intake for certain people who
SFeb. 5 already have heart disease; if
Texas, and yoit physician advises that you
rom Texas are among that group, then you
homemak- would aim for fish consumption
er of St. beyond this or would need to
hurch. 'addsupplemental EPA + DHA.
d in death For your high omega-3 fat
aria Gloria choices, salmon is certainly one
option, and wild salmon (fresh,
)y her hus- frozen or canned) is low in con-
varado of taminants. HoWever, world sup-
sons. Jose ply would be decimated if
burndale, everyone chose tilvs every week
o Jr. of or two. For additional eco-
d Miguel friendly fish high in omega-3
Wauchula; fat, try Atlantic mackerel, sable-
ana Flores fish (also called "black cod"),
nia Garcia, Arctid char, sardines, herring,
and Alma mussels, Pacific oysters, barra-
of Bartow, mundi, farmed rainbow 'trout,
ivarro of and U.S. or Canadian white
brothers. (albacore) tuna.


f Weslaco.
Suarez of
Is; one sis-
F Weslaco,
Idren; and
ren.
inday, Oct.
ten Chapel
SServices
24, at 10
: Catholic
followed at
-y.
nfort may
sfh.com.

OME
LA


Nutrition
I W ise U
KAREN COLLINS, MS, RD, CDN
AMERICAN INSTITUTE FOR
CANCER RESEARCH
Q: If I switch to sugar-free
cookies and candy, will it help
me lose weight?
A: Switching the type of cook-
ies and candies you get will
probably lead to little if any
weight loss. These products
almost always use at least part-
ly a sweetener known as a sugar
alcohol, such as maltitol. These
sugar alcohols provide about
half the calories of sugar; still a
significant amount in sweets.
Besides, most sugar-free sweets
contain significant calories
from fat and refined grains. For
example, a 1.5 ounce bar of
Godiva dark chocolate provides
230 calories in its regular form,
and 210 calories in its sugar-
free version. Yes, small
amounts of calorie savings
throughout the day do add up to
produce weight loss, but the
question you need to answer is
how often you have room for
treats with 200 or more calo-
.ries; if it's not often; then the
difference in calories will not
amount to much. Here's another
example: one sugar-free Oreo
cookie is 50 calories; one regu-
lar Oreo is 60 calories. Sugar-
free Oreo label lists 2 cookies
per serving (100 calories);
Regular Oreos list a 3-cookie
serving with 160 calories. The
bottom line is that you cut more
calories by eating fewer cookies
than you do by choosing sugar-
free cookies. You don't need to
cut out all sweets in order to
lose weight, so focus on choos-
ing sweets less often and give
up on the idea of searching for
something you can eat by the
box without paying a penalty.
When you do have sweets,
savor a small portion: that's the
true calorie-saving secret.


The Baltimore Colts were the first professional football team to have a cheerleading
squad.


"They were


wonderful."

We hear kind words consistently.
We're proud that people feel
comfortable enough with us to
openly tell us how much they
appreciate what we did for them.
In fact, it's this appreciation


r that drives us to offer the vern
best in comfort, compassion and
service.



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-ru FAMILY FUNERAL HOME
.A Trusled Famil Narme Since 190'I6


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View Obits at robartsfh.com
529 WEST MAIN STREET WAUCHULA, FLORIDA 33873 863-773-9773 _





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ABOUT...
School News
The Herald-Advocate en-
courages submissions from
Hardee, County schools.
Photos and write-ups
should be of recent events,
and must include first and
last names for both students
and teachers. Identify pho-
tos front to back, left to right.
Deadline for submissions
is 5 p.m. on Thursday.
Please include the name
and phone number of a con-
tact person. 'Qualifying
items will be published as
space allows.


Affordable Funeral & Cremation


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October 27, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 5A


Letter to Editor
Proposed Ideas, Solutions To County Commissioners


Dear Editor:
To the Hardee County Board
of County Commisioners. ...
Since the beginning of the
new millennium. Hardee Coun-
ty has struggled to find(its iden-
tity. With the threat,~~d realism
of the 6reat Recession looming
overhead, we are faced with
new challenges never before
seen. Due to the lack of fore-
sight and the needed direction,
our predecessors have left us
with a dilemma in which we are
greatly unprepared and to some
degree overwhelmed.
In our current state of being
we are running the risk of
becoming financially handi-
capped and opportunistically
incapable. We hear a lot about
re-invention in business, poli-
tics, science, and technology.
It's the "Mantra" of the age,
Reinvent or Relent.
Cities and towns alike that
fail to constantly challenge,
remake and improve themselves
run the very real risk of becom-
ing irrelevant. Take a hard look
at Detroit, perhaps the leading
industrial productions city in the
world.
Now they find themselves
scrambling in search of a new
identity because the automotive
industry crashed. The only rem-
nants are empty shells through-
out a landscape that was filled
with vibrancy and promise.
If poor economic readiness
and lack of variance can topple a
worldwide giant, just imagine
the devastation inadequate plan-
ning can have on a small econo-
my.such as Hardee's.
In this here proposal I would
like to bring forth and share
ideas of directions, as well as
visions and dreams for our
future. With the wind of change
upon us, we as a whole.county
must remain poised and on the
cutting edge of development in
our region, by becoming more
appealing for business and
tourism, we can position our-
selves as the leaders of the state
in a variety of industries.
With our already earnest agri-
cultural resources we can blos-
som into the frontrunner for the
exporting commodities, with
cutting edge technologies like


the proposed solar farm on the
horizon. cleln air and alternate
energy production could be in
our future forecast. not to men-
tion the lure of our beautiful
river and nature trails, rural
development can only enhance
the outdoor experience. Under
trusted leadership and joint
efforts, Hardee County can
grow and prosper together into
the heartbeat of central Florida.
Article I: A proposed annual
Memorial Day event deemed
"The River Bash Festival." A
celebration of our river and its
natural beauty, as well as show
patronage to those whom have
fallen and died protecting .this
great country. Festivities to
include: The crowning of Miss
River Fest bikini contest, car
show and bike rally, sports tour-
naments such as beach volley-
ball, a parade of boats, band
competition, taste of the county,
a variety of arts and crafts,
along with carnival-like atmos-
phere. All activities and festivi-
ties are arranged alongside the
river (Peace River) from one
end of the county to the other.
Article I (a): Possible partici-
pants are to include, the area
Shriners and Rotary Club,
Hardee and surrounding area
school bands and cheer squads,
various boaters, famous sports
celebrities to host various sports
tournaments, local regional
businesses provide food, goods,
and services as well as local
merchants, all cars and motor-
cycle enthusiasts are encour-
aged to come and participate,
with the entire county of
Hardee being the focal point.
The natural beauty of our won-
derful river can be enjoyed by
all event goers.
Article II: County re-zoning
proposal due to the current
economy and direction our,
great country is headed in, now
more than ever we must
become a unified front, in order
to weather the storm. Structural
changes in our landscape are
required to enable us to main-
tain a prosperous growth rate at
or above state and national stan-
dards. -
By joining forces with one
another we can compete in state


and global markets, gaining
access to larger grants. bid and
win more contracts, as well as
become more business and
tourist-friendly.
Bringing all the small town
areas of Hardee County under
one incorporated umbrella pro-
vides the area with a single city
component, yet maintaining
each sector with its own identi-
ty, this allows for equal dis-
persement of funds, which
gives a more balanced growth
to our communities ensuring
success, exercising the
strengths and resources each
sector exemplifies enhances
marketing strategies along with
appeal.
Article II (a): This proposal
is an overview of ideas that are
geared towards reconstructing
options which will enable
Hardee County to survive this
lean economy with no sector
falling to the wayside. By incor-
porating all zones and small
towns of Hardee County into
one whole city every one of its
communities wins.
Re-zoning Hardee into four
main sectors that will still carry
their respectable names as sub-
section titles-namely Wauchula,
Zolfo Springs, Bowling Green,
and Ona into the new city of
River Port, this brings some-
thing new and dynamic to the
area and region, offering the
lure of an up and coming new
city, and providing small town
closeness at the same time.
Joint efforts can achieve road-
way and building grants, re-
sources that help draw, and of-
fer a variety of entertainment
and activities for young and old
alike.
We feel that these proposed
ideas and solutions hold validi-
ty and should be taken into
strong consideration. Becoming
a major hub in the state, Hardee
"the heartbeat county"' of cen-
tral Florida, we believe River
Port and the River Bash
Festival should and will be the
future for Hardee County.
Thank you for your time and
consideration.
Norwood & Allen
(E Vision Inc.)
Samuel Q. Norwood
Zellwood


Oe W a Oy


112 the store




I 1 & I fl~


IJ@ ER HEARTLAND GOLD
,.-R.... "FROM OUR HtLEARIS 10 YOLURS"


Hours:
Mon. Fri. 9-5
Sat. 9 2


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It's important to our friends to believe that we are unreservedly frank with them, and im-
portant to the friendship that we are not.
--Mignon McLaughlin

Silences make the real conversations between friends. Not the saying but the never
needing to say is what counts.
-Margaret Lee Runbeck


NOTICE
Water Shortage Order No. SWF 2010-022 Continues;
Modified Phase I (Moderate Water Shortage) Restrictions Extended Again
New Expiration Date: February 29, 2012
............................................................................................................................................... ... S w th w L ke k x* J a
. .South st Fkidak
The District's Governing Board is continuing ..
its regional water shortage declaration through o
February 29, 2012. Although summer rains
have resulted in some improvements, not all -'
water resource conditions are back to normal.
A "Modified Phase I" declaration means that every' -
water user should take certain actions and prepare
for possible worsening conditions. w.r' honS t otrer
ALL WATER USERS: . f. ust n,,oo lowoaeny
Reduce indoor water use on a voluntary basis. ,mc + rre p 'wes
Test and repair or adjust each irrigation system t r nmei_-. o, m
to minimize water waste.
Continue to follow applicable year-round water
conservation measures (including the District's io .;: 'I
maximum of twice-per-week lawn watering
schedule or any stricter local ordinance). LL' ,
WATER UTILITIES:
Continue monthly warning and citation activity "- ' t
Reports, whether directly or in coordination with A t
local law or code enforcement agencies. ~ ... r",
Continue to comply with other requirements ..:.*-
specified in the Water Shortage Order. .
QUESTIONS?
Please call 1-800-848-0499 (FI, only) or send an inquiry to 1 fctd Area
Water.Restrictions@WaterMatters.org. Disn Boundari
Ibis notice is only a summary of Water h Sou'thweit Florlda Warter aiement~~ tr)wrt aDit does ndr 'tdiinanate on the basis odibsat.i .
Shortage Order No. SWF 2010-022, u ih's ncnrfiscrimriation pdicy invjvs eery aspct of the DOsict's lucnaiors, includil rce to and
twice modeled. For complete Information, I paiticipa t in ilIe LDiSrirt' progranisrld Katiiles,. Anyotle requiring reaiowable aomirnodatlnl a
pleasevist the District's websilte. ri oil for I. tih An erk.Anr ; witvi h Dl .biMhtli At should conta cttlhe t l)istrict c's I iurmir l Resources f irectr.
2379 I Goad S.& tocksville. F. 34604-681,telehon (352) 7,9-721 I or 1-800-423-t476 (L only),ext.4702;
romaiw-Vai-3 lewhaI3 t rtpatqWcersq'ctyo, 10:27c


.... "." a ,
+**************** ******iticitit t*** ********






ave Talent?
*


Joiii Main Street Wauchula for

J November's Friday Nigh Live


I DOWNTOWN'S cIT

SITALNINT
*


Sponsored By; nrs onaink ot
SWAUCHULA *


t Tuesday, November 8th -Elimination Round

Tuesday, November 15th Semi Final Round

Friday, November 18th Final Round .



PRIZES:

1st Place $300 2nd Place $200
* 3rd Place $100

" Prizes also include a variety ofspecial appearances.


S C. Entry Fee $20

Contestants must be at 1asf 14 years of age.

SContestants must be Hardee County residents. *

I All talents accepted but cannot include

profanity, vulgarity, or illicit acts.

Contestants may include groupsor individuals. *


Visit www.mainstreetwauchula.com or call
I 863.767.0330 for registration and information. .
* 10:27c*
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P.A.


BURTON & BURTON,
ATTORNEYS AT.LAW
501 WEST MAIN STREET
WAUCHULA, FLORIDA 33873-t729
TELEPHONE (863.) 773-3241


WILLS & TRUSTS
PROBATE & ESTATE ADMINISTRATION
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HOMESTEAD DETERMINATION
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LIVING WILLS GUARDIANSHIPS


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A







6A The Herald-Advocate, October 27, 2011


a, !." '--,

2j7


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h^


uil 1
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Remote Start & Entry, Aluminum Wheels,
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8A The Herald-Advocate, October 27, 2011


Wildlife Refuge Hosts 'Fall Back To Nature'


By SANDY SCOTT
Special To The Herald-Advocate
It's that time again! The
leaves are falling, there is cool-
ness in the air and the Hardee
County Wildlife Refuge at
Pioneer Park will once again
host, its annual "Fall Back to
Nature."
Last year 1300 folks entered
the gates of this 10-year-old
facility and strolled along its
1,200-foot boardwalk, stopping
along the way for a brief lesson
at the many interpretive sta-
tions. The event was a huge
success, giving children and
'their parents a look at what may


be one of Hardee County's best-
kept secrets.
The 40 residents of the Har-
dee County Wildlife Refuge
live in a natural habitat. They
have privacy "hideouts" in their
enclosures along with wide
open spaces in which move
around while visitors gaze upon
their beauty and uniqueness.-
For years, the Hardee County
Outdoor Classroom Program
has provided third graders with
the thrill of viewing and learn-
ing about the bears, cougars,
deer, foxes, bobcats and alliga-
tors. They revel in the antics of
the otters, ostriches and rac-


coons, and beckon Joe the
Tortoise to move a little faster.
'Now, the refuge invites all
county residents to experience a
day with these animals at the
annual "Fall Back to Nature"
event.
There will be many informa-
tive nature disp-i and demon-
strations, including an observa-
tion beehive, live owls and
other wildlife surprises. Kay-
ton Nedza will be on hand with
assistants from the Outdoor
Classroom to provide canoe
rides around the adjoining Twin
Lake, where cancers will learn
about the flora and fauna.


There will be free hot dogs as
well as vendors set up around
the perimeter of the Wildlife
Refuge offering drinks, funnel
cakes, shaved ice and other
snacks that can be purchased
for a nominal fee.
"Fall Back to Nature" T-shirts
also will be up for sale, with the
proceeds to benefit the Hardee
County Wildlife Refuge.
This annual event is set for
Saturday, Nov. 5, from 10 a.m.
to 2 p.m. at the refuge, which is
situated near the river on the
west side of the park. Pioneer
Park is located at the corner of
U.S. 17 and State Road 64 in
Zolfo Springs.
Admission is free.
Share part of your day with
the animals and take a walk on
the wild side!


COURTESY PHOTOS
Vida Tomlinson helps welcome visitors as they set out on
their adventure


The Moyes were among the 1,300 local folks who attended last year's event.
I


Hardee County Commissioner Minor Bryant and wife Mary Beth stroll the shaded
boardwalk during last year's event.


The event also offers canoe trips on Twin Lake, filled with flora, fauna and fun.


What a battle! The Hardee Wildcats lost a key district game
Friday night at Palmetto. A 49-yard field goal in the final seconds
gave the Tigers the win and first place in the five-team district,
which also includes Bradenton Bayshore, Bradenton Southeast and
DeSoto. Hardee has already beaten Bayshore, faces Southeast at
home on Friday night, and greets Desoto on Senior Night, Nov. 4.
The season finale is in Fort Pierce. Overall, the Wildcats are 6-1.

The JV 'Cats wrapped up their season last Thursday, with a
home loss to always tough Tampa Jesuit. The junior Wildcats
stopped a 24-game win streak with a 7-6 loss at Sebring, and so
ended the season 5-2, with one rainout.

The undefeated Hardee Junior High Wildcats were rained out
last Tuesday in a non-conference game at Lake Wales. This week's
game was home against Hill-Gustat. The season finishes with a
home game against DeSoto next Tuesday.

Youth football finished the regular season last Saturday. Teams
now prepare for district and regional bowl games and cheerleading
post-season competition.

2009 grad Ezayi Youyoute, after a redshirt freshman season, has
now taken the team under his wing. Georgia Southern is ranked
no. I in the Southern Conference of the subconference which used
to be called Division I-AA. He has make conference rookie of the
year honors, and accounted for some of his team's touchdowns.
The quarterback was 3-for-3 passing for 31 yards and added six
carries for 23 yards. The last two games were wins of 50-20 and
48-15.

Hardee volleyball is hosting districts this week. Lake Wales
won over Teneroc on Monday The results from Tuesday's semi-
final match against Auburndale wasn't available at presstime.
Hardee beat Auburndale twice during the season. The Monday and
Tuesday winners play for the district championship tonight
(Thursday) at 7.

Golf is in regionals this week in Naples. Will Bennett was the
lone boys team representative in Monday's play, while the Lady
Wildcats placed second in districts and went to regionals on
Tuesday.

Swimming prepared for this week's districts with participation







6E UYING


.n the Heartland Invitational over a week ago. Several Hardee
swimmers have a chance to advance to regionals with outstanding
performances at districts.

Cross country is also gearing up for its district run next week.
All the girls and most of the boys have been dropping their times
in recent meets.

Hardee Junior High Softball is at its last event for the season
and destined for another Heartland Conference championship.

Other news is in boxing.
Pro Daniel "El Alacron" Lozano will be among the featured
fighters in the Nov. 11 Fight Night Productions at the A La Carte


Unless government draws the line at only prohibiting
conduct that harms others against their will, no member
of society can be secure in being able to do or have any-
thing they most want and value.
-David Conway


Pavilion, 4050 Dana Shores, Tampa. Lozano, now ranked 30th in
the world in the World Boxing Council flyweight division, wants
to continue his unbeaten 10-0 record.
Local amateur Maria Dominguez continues on her quest to par-
ticipate in the 2012 Olympics in London. She recently was silver
medalist in the PAL (Police Athletic League) nationals, and was
one of three chosen for the middleweight division for Olympic try-
outs.

Don't look now, but it won't be long before soccer and basket-
ball teams take to the gym, along with girls weightlifting.
Information from community and school athletic events is always
welcome. Please call me at 773-3255 or e-mail me at news.heral-
dadvocate@embarqmail.com with news for this biweekly column.


My mother was the most beautiful woman I ever saw. All
I am I owe to my mother. I attribute all my success in life
to the moral, intellectual and physical education I
received from her.
-George Washington


The Qr-er4a& pkf ?a ch & dl

by AG Outdoor World, Inc.




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October 27, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 9A


Championship


Game Tonight

By JOAN SEAMAN back. but couldn't overcome the
Of The Herald-Advocate deficit.
B13 the narrowest of margins;, So. on to game five. the
the Hardee Lady Wildcats will thriller. Usually. this game goes
play in the district volleyball to only 15 points, but a team has
championship game tonight to win by a two-point margin.
(Thursday). .Hardee had an early lead 8-4.
The Lady 'Cats won the but couldn't hold it against
thriller of all thrillers Tuesday Braddy serves. From 10-10 on.
night against the Auburndale. it was tied six times. When it
Lady Bloodhounds. The match was 17-17, Hardee got a point
went the full five games, and off a.block, which fell back on
more, with Hardee finally win- the Bloodhound side of the net.
ning the match 19-17 in the Kayla Nichols served the win-
deciding gaine. ning shot, when Auburndale
Hardee seemed on a domi- was unable to return it.
nant roll to start the match, wii, Along the way, back-row
ning the first game 25-17, witispecialists Ana Galvez and
soph Karlee Henderson scoring Maria Anselmo repeatedly
six service points, including the fought off kills and spikes from
final four. the opponents. Soph Bailey.
Soph Kayla "Louie" Nichols .Carlton, just up from the JV,
got Hardee started in the second came in the games in a pressure
game with four service points to situation and served well.
put the Lady 'Cats up 5-1. Senior Summer Palmer re-
Auburndale, however, came on peatedly set up classmate
strong at the end and changed a Ashley Nichols, and juniors
24-16 game to a 24-24 tie Jackson, Katie Wheeler and
behind seven service points by Desiree Smith for kills or tip-
senior Mariah Braddy. Hardee overs to an empty place on the
junior Nyshira Jackson got the opposition's side.
final two points for the 26-24 Can the Lady 'Cats do it
win. again tonight? They are assured
But, momentum had begun to of a regional runner-up spot, but
shift. The Lady Bloodhounds would much prefer to beat Lake
caught fire and swept the next Wales, win the district champi-
two games 25-15 and 25-22. onship and get to host the first
Hardee had been down 20-16 in round of regionals.
the second game and fought


In Business
By Maria Trujillo



REALLY DIRTY JOB! The last thing a person wants to-
do after experiencing the trauma of a crime is to clean up after it.
That's why Danny Prestridge decided to start his own busi-
ness, Prestridge Bio Clean Up.
Previously, Prestridge was in law enforcement and was a fire-
fighter. Being in both, Prestridge saw many things, and says he
finds this job easier because he no longer has to deal with the faces
of the victims.
This family-run business is dedicated to cleaning up all types
of crime and tragedy scenes as well as foreclosed homes,jail cells
id hoirdei howea..JL~dt dJe- edroanimal and waste removal
and bio-waste pickup .
Since Prestridge Bio Clean Up is family-owned, his wife goes
along on cleanup jobs. She is what he refers to as a "clean tech."
Danny Prestridge is the only one allowed to enter the crime scene
and clean because he has all the training required.
The cleaning usually proceeds as follows: To safely do his job
Prestridge wears a hazmat.suit and multiple gloves. Then he looks
to what needs to be immediately thrown out. Anything with blood
on it must go. If any seeps into the carpet he will cut the piece out.
If on the bed, he will also cut the blood-stained part out and dispose
of the rest of the bed separately.
The waste is then taken away by another company, which
incinerates it.
After the cleanup, Prestridge disinfects the places where the
crime occurred as well as all of his equipment. Those things that
cannot be disinfected are properly disposed of.
To contact Prestridge Bio Clean Up, call (772)370-5717 or e-
mail prestridgebiocleanup@gmail.com. The company is available
to travel all over the state of Florida and work 24 hours, seven days
a week.
New business or nultlagmcent? Remodleling or relocating? Call
Maria Trujillo at 773-3255 with your business news.



Letter to Editor

CATS Wants Good

Government In Hardee
Dear Editor: held at Double J Restaurant on
The purpose of this letter is the second Thursday of the
threefold. First, we want to month at 7 p.m.
introduce the community to our The third and most important
organization. purpose of this letter is to thank
As a totally non-pirtisan Commissioner Grady Johnson
group, we have taken the name for the strong support. input and
Hardee "CATS' (Citizens, for ideals which he has lent to our
Accountability. Transparency group. Although as a commis-
and Service). Our main goal is sioner. he can not be a member
to become totally informed on of our group. he' graciously
all aspects of the county and city helps us with updates on county
governments. Once informed, commission issues and other
we will choose issues on which information regarding county
to focus and then approach the government. He is unwavering
proper department regarding our in his beliefs, and we can only
stand on the issue, be better by his association with
We definitely want to make our group.
sure the taxpayers of our county If anyone has questions
are not bearing the cost for friv- regarding our group. please call
olous. wasteful or unnecessary Judy Wilson at 767-0771 or
spending. myself at 767-1060.
Second, we invite and en-
courage all interested parties to Pam Belflower. Secretary
atthed our monthly meetings. Wauchula





YOUR BUSINESS COULD

APPEAR HERE TOO!!
Contact
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels

At The Herald Advocate


773-3255


Resthaven Bathrooms Bring Problems


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
A request for S16.000 to
install four handicapped-acces-
sible showers and/or bathrooms
at Resthaven sparked a major
discussion.
Resthaven board member
Wendell Cotton and facility
director Tina LeConte returned
to the Hardee County Commis-
sion lasThursday evening for
more discussion of the need for
an accessible bathroom with a
handicapped-accessible shower
for each of four rooms at the
facility
The problem, as expressed by
Commissioner Sue Birge, was
"the unforeseen consequences
of remodeling, like opening a
Pandora's box, in trying remod-
eling at the 90-year-old assisted
living facility,,
"There could become build-
ing code issues when you tear
out the walls in an old build-
ing," Birge said.
LeConte said the county has
provided the maintenance anid
upkeep on the building, which
the county owns. A separate
board manages the facility and
could be at full capacity (38)
with three more employees if
the changes were made, she
explained.
"It's a solid, old building. The
plumbing is exposed, so how
can there be problems? Most of
the residents can't wait for
these to be done. They'll be
with the Lord in three or four
years and could have time to
enjoy them. I can't believe the
county can't find $16,000 in its
budget somewhere for it,"
pleaded Cotton.
Birge said it wasn't the
$16,000 but the change orders
that could come with unfore-
seen circumstances.
County Building and
Grounds Director Danny Weeks
said it was a sound building,
with recent plumbing and elec-
-tric changes, including adding a
service panel for the air condi-
tioner and emergency generator,
Weeks explained, however,
that to add handicapped acces-
sibility would not be a mainte,
nance issue, but would require a
permit and that would require
an engineering plan. They could
run into lead or asbestos or
,other -prq m p in t
walls and firing. 'ere has
to be a working set of docu-
ments; only one of these four
rooms even has a shower," he
stressed.
Building Department Direc-
tor Jerry Smith said he had vis-
ited 'the facility with chief

The only thing necessary
for the triumph of evil isfor
good men to do nothing,
-Edmund Burke

The more corrupt the state,
the more numerous the
laws.
-Tacitus


$2500 Entr Fee


inspector John Schmidt. Main-
tenance is exchanging like for
like. a new sink for an old one.
To build a bathroom with sink,
toilet and shower has to be done
according to Florida Building
Code Chapter I'l. There has to
be grab bars, an 18-inch walk-
ing space between the toilet.
sink and shower.
Weeks further explained
changes in the state law coming
in March and suggested waiting
for those less stringent require-
ments.
Commissioner Grady John-
son suggested calling on local
contractors to go out and give
an idea of what needs to be
done and how they could help
and said money should be made
available to make these rooms
ADA (Americans With Disa-
bilities Act) compliant.
Birge made a motion to have
Smith and Weeks revisit the
building and assess what could
rbe done without liability to the
county. Grady Johnson second-
ed it and Minor Bryant agreed.
Commissioner Dale Johnson
,abstained because his mother is
a resident at Resthaven.
Weeks also said "something
good for Resthaven. Some paint
got on the floors when work
was done. Pam and Bill Bel-
flower came out and did the
flooring for free. The couple
was present in the meeting and
got a round of applause.
In other action, the commis-
sion:
-approved five awards and
proclamations.
The first award went to
Emergency Management Di-
rector Rich Shepard for his
work "above and beyond" in
coordinating education and
training with members of the
Florida Association of Coun-
ties.
The second awards went to
firefighters Todd Barton and
Bobby Repress for their 1,600-
mile bicycle ride from here to
the 9/11 Ground 'Zero in the
fourth annual Brotherhood Ride
to honor firefighters who lost
their lives in the aftermath of
the bombing of the twin towers
in New York City.
The first proclamation set
Nov. 12-20 for National Hunger
and ,Homelessness week in
Heardee-CGounty. The request
was by:Judith George of the
Hardee Help Center, which
helps provide food for the
needy.
.,, The second proclamation,
requested by Leslie Bond of the
Hardee County. Health Depart-
ment, was for October as "Let's


Talk Month." encouraging par-
ents to discuss sexual absti-
nence with their teens and
teens. Also. a $125.000 grant
will help the alcohol and tobac-
co prevention groups with their
work.
The final proclamation was to
designate November as Pan-
creatic Cancer Awareness
Month. It is the fourth leading
cause of cancer deaths in
Hardee County.
-recessed as a commission
and met as the Zoning Board,
approving a change in the Land
Development Code to include
vegetative buffering and fenc-
ing as part of the conditions of
establishing a recreational re-
sort in Agricultural-I with min-
ing overlay zoning areas by
Special Exception.
An RV resort allows tents,
cabins at a maximum of eight
per acre, but is for any one indi-
vidual to stay less than six
months at a time. A recreational
resort resident could remain in
the campground longer. There
must be a 200-feet "stacking
distance" to allow RVs to turn
without blocking traffic. There
must be available water, sewer
and electric.
-approved an agreement
with Waste Generated Products
as discussed in previous meet-
ings. It includes a statement of
credit worthiness for the $35
million cash bond the company
will provide. The agreement
has a full disclaimer of county
obligation should the gasifica-
tion and products plants.
Project manager Rick Fishman
said it was nothing like the one
in St. Lucie County which has
failed after five years of trying
to get it to work.
The county Industrial Devel-
opment Authority has commit-
ted. to helping the company
locate the appropriate property.,
If for any reason, the company
fails, the property and buildings
and improvements on it would
revert to the IDA for re-sale or
lease. The county's investment
in land will be protected, said
Bill Lambert, economic devel-
opment director. The taxpayers
are completely protected, he
emphasized, as commissioners
approved the agreement subject
to the county attorney's final
look-see. --
-heard reports frPn Jarltee
Williamson, director of man-
agement and budget, on the
2011-12 budget format, which
has been revised, to make it
more user-friendly for the pub-
lic by explaining the budget.
process more clearly.. It gives a


mission, goals and objectives
for each department.
Williamson also reported on
the indebtedness and repayment
plan for an overpayment from
the Federal Emergency Mana-
gement Agency (FEMA), from
the no-name flooding of June
2003 and Hurricane Charley in
2005. Reconciliations from
Hurricane Jeanne and Tropical
Storm Fay are still outstanding.
The county will seek a waiver
of repayment before making
any reimbursements.
-heard a resident's com-
ments on how her civil rights
have been violated by medical
practitioners in the county. She
was advised to seek an attorney
to further her claims. The com-
mission has no authority over
medical providers.
-was advised of a possible
fine/reprimand for the Hardee
County Fire-Rescue Depart-
ment operating for six days
while its provider license was
"on the way." The county did
have its Emergency Medical
Care and Fire providers num-
bers, but inadvertently had a
delay in renewing the third
license. The county attorney
will attempt to negotiate.a repri-
mand instead of the proposed
$36,000 fine, which might be
considered "overkill," said
attorney Ken Evers.
-reviewed plans for the
clerk's storage building to be
built on South Ninth Avenue.
Revised plans include the two
required vaults, and removes
the restroom and exterior main-
tenance building. It also revers-
es how the building will sit and
changes the alley outlet, park-
ing and drainage retention
pond. There is a $7,500 engi-
neering change order for the
interior changes, and $12,500
change, order for the asphalt
drive, etc. The second motion
failed for lack of a second.
-approved- a six-month
extension with SCS Engineers
for landfill Phase I changes.
-were introduced to Ken-
neth Wheeler, new county engi-
neer and public works director.
He takes the place of Kevin
Atchley, who got a job closer to
his elderly parents.
-were notified of the annual
Fall Back To Nature open house
--at- the Pioneer Park Wildlife
Refuge. It will be from 10 a.m.
to 2 p.m., said Sandy Scott,
museum curator. There will be
nature vendors, hot dogs and
free admission to the refuge.
There were 1,300 visitors last
year, said Scott.


115 S.17thAve.B Wa Bucli, FL 33873



Hardee County Chamber of Commerce

S Annual Christmas Parade

d CSaturday, December 3, 2011
6:00 p.m.
Downtwn Wauchula
-a0S nfL


UUI


At least two walkers are required beside each float-
Must be 1 6U years old to operate any motorized vehicle
No bull whips are pernnmitd.
For the safety of children, candy or other items may ot by
thlowir li ron any vehicle, but should be handed out by people
walking in the parade.
Please have at least 1 adult assigned to every 20 children.
Children must be accompanied at all times.
Field will be available irom 9:00 a.m.- 4:30 p).m. lor set up.
All participants are required to be in position no later than
4:30p.m.
Inmnediately following the parade, participants must have a
representative at the judging stand for award presentations.
Registration deadline is Friday, November 18th.
In the event of severe weather, the parade will lbe rescheduled
for Saturday, December 10l1h.


Entries must pertain to the loliuln and/or theme. "'Twelve *
Days of Christmas". *
Because this is an \enlliig parade, .IGHTS ARE .
REQI UIIRED) on all floats or pulled units.
No Santas. ()inly helpers are allow d.
No walking vendors along parade route. Stationary vendors *
allowed on 7th Avenue-'upon approval from the event
coordinator. Mandatory vendor application available at
Chamber Office.
lEntries wi s animals must provide their own clean up during
line up and along the parade route. For llhe safety of the
specitalors, all animals miust Ie accompanied .by a walking
chaperone.
No alcohol or tobacco are allowed.
Ianner and alsh lights are required to precede float.


Ent
Cate
Acco


Accurate and clear description of entry (To be read by the emcees)_


--------------Business or Organizaon: ____---____ ________________ ______
--Busnsso ran------ i-a-

Business or Organization: ------------- --


Contact Person:


Phn ND M b


------_ __---- ________on u____--l---l IUM er.


Address:


All entry forms and registration fees ininit be received by Friday, November 18th to:
l'.O. Box (i83
\a aucihula, Florida 33873;
l Iax: 86s3r-773-cV) .3
l'.11;6l: ( s<.v ,hardl( cc.c' <


9:29-11:11c


Pleaseprint4 Only completed forms will be accepted. Check all that apply.
y Type: a Float i3 Vehicles Marching I.Unit o O)ther
gory: a Commercial ':* a Non Commercial
ompanied by Music? ___Yes __ No If yes, please specify: ____ _


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rCi;ri


ar & E.







10A The Herald-Advocate, October 27, 2011


The Halloween Prank


By DORIS HOWARD
Special To The Herald-Advocate
Lenny, Butch and Buster snuck
stealthily through the farm yard under
the cover of darkness, with only the
quarter'moon for light. At least they
were stealthy until Butch bumped into
Lenny.
"Hey! Watch where you are going!"
"How can I watch where I am going
when I can hardly see anything?" Butch
retorted. "It would help a lot if we
turned on the flashlight."
"We don't want him to see us and
give away that we're here," Lenny
growled.
"Remind us, again, what we are
doing?" Buster asked.
"We are going to wire the brakes in
Uncle Dustin's pickup to the horn so
that every time he pushes the pedal the
horn goes off," Lenny replied.
"Why do you have such a vendetta to
get your uncle every Halloween?"
Butch asked. "Every year we try, and he
ends up getting the better of us."
"That's exactly it." Lenny replied.
"This year it's our turn. Besides, he
started it. Years ago when we were
young, he dressed up like a monster and
scared me to death."
They continued sneaking their way'
across the farm yard, staying hidden
behind trees, old machinery and any-
thing else they could. But the last
stretch was open space.
"We'll have to stay down," Lenny
whispered, "or we'll trigger the yard
light."
Like soldiers approaching the
enemy's fighting position, they crawled
across the dirt in the yard, with Lenny
dragging the wire, pliers and other nec-
essary equipment. They were just about
to the old shed where the pickup was
parked when a loud siren pierced the
night air. Scared to death, they turned
toward the sound and saw flashing red
and blue lights.
"The police!" Lenny yelled. "Run!"
He jumped up and took off with the
other two close behind. They stumbled
their way across the yard in the opposite
direction of the flashing light and siren.
Lenny tripped over an old piece of
machinery, and the others tumbled over
him. They jumped up and continued
running to the pole fence, threw them-


City Commissioners

Complete Course


Wauchula city commission-
ers Rick Knight. John Freeman,
Russell Smith, Gary Smith and
Pattie Detwiler have graduated
from the Institute for Elected
Municipal Officials.
Started 18 years ago as a way
to educate newly-elected offi-
cials on the intricacies of munic-
ipal government in a cost-effec-
tive manner, the IEMO grew out
of a partnership between the
Florida League of Cities and the
John Scott Dailey Institute of
Government.
The IEMO is an intense 16-
hour course where participants
learn about aspects of municipal
government from a voluntary
faculty. Topics include munici-
pal government structure. rev-
enue components and govern-
mental accounting for cities. as
well as intergovernmental rela-
tions and council relationships.
The courses are taught by some
of the most respected experts in
the state.
Class sizes are kept small.
allowing participants to network


and share ideas with other elect-
ed officials in iismall-group
setting. Many IEMO graduates
claim that through this idea-
sharing they have been able to
develop solutions to local prob-
lems.
FLC President Pat Bates.
mayor of Altamonte Springs. is
extremely proud of these new
IEMO graduates. "I commend
these officials for completing
the class: it is a great municipal
overview and very Florida-spe-
cific. The League and the
Institute of Government are
proud of this program offered
through FLC University!
"As you know. Florida is
comprised of people from all
over the world, and civic
knowledge is a critical factor
for the success of Florida's
communities." Bates continued.
"I encourage each of these new
graduates to speak to the
schools and civic organizations
in their city so that we can bet-
ter educate our residents."


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DEADLINE ....Tuesday noon
RATES ..........Minimum of $4.00 for 10 words. Each addi-
tional word is 22 cents. Ads in all capitals
are 32 cents per word. Headlines are $2 a
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BILLING........Ads must be pre-paid.
CLASSIFICATIONS:


Agriculture
Appliances
Automobile
Boats
Furniture
Help Wanted
Houses
Livestock
Lost & Found
Miscellaneous


Mobile Homes
Notices
Pets
Plants/Produce
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Recreational
Rentals
Services
Wanted
Yard Sales


selves over it, and dropped to the
ground.
"Do you.think they saw us?" Lenny
asked.
Buster coughed and sputtered. "What
I'm more concerned about is what the
devil we are laying in? It stinks!"
"We're in the cow corral," Lenny
whispered.
"You mean we're laying in cow
manure?!" Buster blurted out.
"Shh," Lenny warned. "They'll hear
us."
They were there, quiet and motion-
less, for a long time, as the lights and
siren continued. All at once Butch let
out a panicked gasp. "Something's
breathing on me." Suddenly he
screamed, and a curious cow, who had
just licked his face with her sandpaper
tongue, bellowed and ran for the other
side of the corral.
"I'm freezing lying here," Buster
said. "I think I will just go turn myself
in. I'd rather go to jail than freeze to
death. As filthy as we are, I doubt
they'd want us in their jail anyway."
"No!" Lenny whispered fearfully.
"Let's just cut across the corral and
we'll make a break for it."
The others got up and followed him,
until Butch yelped.
"What is it now?" Lenny asked in
disgust.
"My sock and shoe got stuck, and
my foot pulled out of them. I just
stepped in this muck with my bare
foot."
They worked the shoe free, but in so
doing, they all got stuck. Finally, all of
them, in bare feet, made it across the
filthy corral carrying their shoes and
socks. But eventually, smelly and cold,
they were free.
The next day, Lenny nonchalantly
came over to visit with his uncle and
asked if he'd had any Halloween prob-
lems.
"Thought I heard something once,"
his uncle said, "but I just flipped this
switch on my new-fangled contraption,
and that seemed to take care of it."
Lenny looked on wide-eyed as his
uncle, grinning knowingly, flipped the
switch and kicked on a blue-and-red
flashing light and a siren.
"Next year!" Lenny growled under
his breath.


Nothing is more destructive
of respect for the govern-
ment and the law of the land
than passing laws which
cannot be enforced.
-Albert Einstein
The more I want to get
something done, the less I
call it work.
-Richard Bach


YOUR BUSINESS COULD

APPEAR HERE TOO!!
Contact
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels

773-3255




Thank You
to those who helped make
Pumpkins in the Park a success!!!

S Peace River Electric
Cooperative, Inc
1^A Touchstone Energy' Cooperative ?#



the7
Austin Growers Inc.
Trick-or-Treating Supporters:
American Cancer Society
Hardee Help Center Thrift Store
Java Caf
.F Shops on the Corner

fe^ dauto Restoration Depot
USF Polytechnic
Teasin' & Cuttin' Up on Main
Sears
Seacoast National Bank
Giovanni's Main Street Kitchen
Lisa's Hair & Nails

Congratulations to the Scarecrow Main-ia Winners


business Categorf:



First National Bank of
WAUCHULA
Cowinnourrbankin aied.


Non-Profit CategorF:


Individual Category:
Ist Place Ellen Tomassi
2nd Place Rachel Navarro
3rd Place Carolina Landaverde


10:27c


For depenvdabLe homwetowvL service,




lorida




uel


Of Hardee County Inc.



We ow Have Non Ethano

Recreational Gas!!!


Hardee County's only locally owned &

operated bulk fuel distributor

for over 18 years!


Open Mon. Fri. 7:00 am 5:00 pm

Sat. 8:00 am 12:00 pm


863-773-9466

156 Will Duke Road, Wauchula 10:27


I


^ ~"" '""~ ~"' `^ "'~"~ '~~' '~' ''~ '










PAGE ONE


Wildcats Lose Close Game To Palmetto


By MICHAEL KELLY
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Hardee Wildcats suf-
fered their first loss of the sea-
son Friday night to the Palmetto
Tigers 16-13 on a 49-yard field
goal with eight seconds left in
the game.
This week the Cats host
Bradenton Southeast in another
district contest that will have
huge- implications on the
Wildcats' chances of making
the playoffs.
If Hardee wants to control its
own destiny, it must win Friday
night and next week on Senior
Night against Desoto after
falling to 1-1 in district play
Palmetto received to star
game last week and picked up a
couple first downs while mov-
ing into Wildcat territory.
Jajuan Hooks broke up a third-
down pass attempt and Zane
Kitchell kicked a 30-yard field
goal to give the Tigers a 3-0
lead with 7:50 left in the first
quarter.
Deonte Evans gave the Cats
great starting field position at
the Hardee 49-yard line after a
nice kick return. Andrew Hooks
moved the chains on a pair of
runs before a fumbled snap
ended the drive and gave the
ball back to the Tigers at the
Palmetto 38 with 5:10 left in the
first quarter.
After a long pass completion
Palmetto faced first and goal
from the 6. Hardee's defense,
however, stood firm and denied
the Tigers the end zone. Instead,
the Tigers settled for a 23-yard
field goal by Kitchell and
Palmetto led 6-0 with 1:55
remaining in the first quarter.
A 15-yard kick return by
Keshun Rivers gave the Wild-
cats the ball at their own 37-
yard line to start the drive. First
down runs by Hooks and
Ledarius Sampson had the
Wildcats moving into Tiger ter-
ritory.


An off sides penalty by the
Tigers on fourth-and-4 moved
the ball to the 9.
Quarterback Colby Baker
rolled to the right on third down
and could not find an open
receiver so he tucked the ball in
and turned for the end zone,just
pushing the ball across the goal
line on a diving effort.
Octavio Alvarez made the
PAT and the Wildcats led 7-6
with 8:47 left in the first half.
The Wildcat defense held
Palmetto in check on its next
series and forced a punt.
Hardee then went on a 45-
yard drive and got to the
Palmetto 24 before being forced
to punt from 37. Alvarez
penned the Tigers down at the 4
after a nice punt with 1:23 left
in the half.
On the next play the defense
put a hard rush on quarterback
Trenton Miller who was trying
to throw a deep pass that
Andrew Hooks intercepted and
made a great return all the way
to the end zone.
Alvarez missed the PAT but
Hardee led 13-6 with 1:02 left
in the second quarter.
Palmetto tried to move the
ball before the half ended But
Keyon Brown and Maxon
Delhomme each sacked Miller
on the drive bringing the first
half to an end.
Hardee got the ball to start
the second half but was forced
to punt after not picking up a
first down.
Palmetto took over at its 42
after the Alvarez punt.
After going for it on fourth-
and-inches and getting it, the
Tigers had a fresh set of downs
at the Hardee 29.
Miller dropped back to pass
and was hit by Brown and a
blitzing Justin Knight as he
threw causing a bad pass that
Andrew Hooks caught for his
second interception of the
game.


A 22-yard return gave Har-
dee the ball at its 27 with 5:30
left in the third quarter.
The drive stalled after a first
down run by Sampson and
Alvarez was called upon to punt
from the Wildcat's 49.
Alvarez got off a booming
kick that went 51-yards to the
end zone for a touchback, giv-
ing the Tigers the ball at the 20
with 2:39. left in the third. The
Hardee defense held firm and
forced a quick punt by the
Tigers.
The Wildcats started their
drive at their 26-yard line fol-
lowing the punt with 55 sec-
onds left in the third.
After a couple a hard runs by
Brown, Baker dropped back on
a play action pass and found
Evans open down the middle
who made a great leaping catch
for a 45-yard gain all the way
down to the Tiger's 19.
Brown continued pounding
the ball against the defense but
fumbled on third down as he
dove, over a defender and his
helmet hit the ball and knocked
it out. Palmetto recovered on its
13-yard line with 10:15 left in
the game.
After picking up a first down
Miller dropped back and found
Shaquille Harris behind. the
defense for a long touchdown,
but a personal foul penalty
behind the play negated the
score but the play still resulted
in a 43-yard gain.
After picking up a few more
first downs, Miller kept the ball
up the middle from 1-yard out
for the touchdown.
Kitchell connected on the
PAT and the g4me was tied 13-
13 with 3:00 left in the game.
Hardee took over at its 16
with 2:53 left after a good tack-
le on Hooks during the return. A
holding penalty backed Hardee
up and Baker narrowly missed
being sacked for a safety at the
1-yard line before Alvarez was


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called to the punt out of his end
zone with 1:26 to play.
He got the kick away and it
was downed at the Hardee 37.
The defense denied a first down
and Kitchell was called upon to
attempt a 49-yard field goal.
-Head Coach Buddy Martin
called a timeout, hoping to ice
the kicker.
Palmetto got off a good snap
and hold and Kitchell split the
uprights with room to spare,
giving the Tigers a three-point
lead with 14 seconds left.
Rivers took the kickoff and
pitched it back to Evans who
returning to near midfield and a
horse-collar tackle penalty gave
the Wildcats time for one play
from the Tiger's 41.
A screen pass from Baker to
Andrew Hooks gained a few
yards but never came close to
scoring and the game was over.
Even in defeat, Martin was
proud of the way his team
played.
."Defensively we held Pal-
metto to just one good drive
that happened to be at the end
of the game," he said. "Offen-
sively we had three mistakes
that hurt us."
"I am ready to go to practice
and move on," he said.
He said Bradenton Southeast
is a big team and has two really
good athletes.
Number 24 is committed to
Florida as a defensive back and
also plays running back.
Number 5 is a running back
and Martin said he is very fast
and can break a long run at any
time.
He feels if the defense can
contain those two players the
Wildcats will have a good
chance to win.
Martin also said 10 or 11 jun-
ior varsity players will be mov-
ing up to varsity after the J.V.
finished its season last week
with a 5-2 record.


HARDEE PALMETTO


PASSING COMPLETIONS
ATTEMPTS AND
INTERCEPTIONS 3-6-0

PASSING YARDS 58

RUSHING ATTEMPTS/
YARDS 39-159

TOTAL YARDS 217

TURNOVERS 2

FIRST DOWNS 11

PENALTIES, LOST
YARDAGE 5-35
SCORING BY QUARTER:
Hardee 0 13 0 0


Palmetto


6 0 0 10


10-23-2

126

38-168

294

2
15

7-55


13
16


Players of the Week


\1
#15 James
Defen
L .fMr;


#70 Luke Palmer
Scout


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The Herald-Advocate
hI.rSPS SOc-T obe

Thursday, October 27, 2011


* Law Enforcement to Corrections -
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~Bf~\'









2B The Herald-Advocate, October 27, 2011


Girls Cross Country

Breaks Records


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
All four girls on the Hardee
cross country team set new per-
sonal records in last week's
meet at the Blue Streak Invi-
tational at Sebring.
Soph Febe Murillo started it
with a fifth-place finish against
some of the best runners in the
state, a proud Coach Don Trew
announced. Murillo's time of
22:09 beat many of the boys'
times "and put them on notice
that they better step up if they
didn't want her doing them in,"
said Trew.
Her teammates, Alle Solils,
Adriana Arroyo and Veronica
Rivera, also set new personal
records, cutting times over pre-
vious efforts.
The Hardee boys responded
to Murillo's challenge, with a
dozen of them lowering their
best times.
Christian Moralez had the




Future 0
By MARIA TRUJILLO
For The Herald-Advocate
Getting to the Olympics has
to be among the greatest
achievements for any athlete.
Luckily for Hardee Countian
Maria Dominguez, going to the
2012 London Olympic Games
.is now something she can
achieve.
i It is thanks to people like Dr.
Christy Halbert, who is one of
two women nationally to
achieve the highest level of cer-
tification in coaching boxing,
that the 2012 Olympic Games
i will contain men and women in
This sport for the first time ever
* in history.
With the help of Olympic
trainer Anthony Chase, Dom-
inguez now has a 4-5 record
and took second place.at the
Women's Golden Gloves in
SHollywood in June.
During the start of October,
Dominguez attended the -PAL
(National Association of Police
I Athletics/Activities League
Inc.) in Toledo, Ohio. On Oct. 3
Ssh'e'bEaTacra Hughes by points
but unfortunately lost the next
day to Dara Shen by condition.
Although unable to continue
in 'the tournament, Dominguez
continued to train and received
good news as well. Also.on Oct.
3, she weighed in to see if she,
would be able to participate in


best time of the day for Hardee
with a 16:30, "chopping 1:13
off his previous best. He came
in second by fractions of a
minute.
Next for Hardee was Brandon
Beatty at 18:10, followed by
Augustine Anselmo at 18:41.
Beatty's time was 49 seconds
off his best, while Anselmo's
was nearly a full minute down.
Others following were Tony
Moreno, Adrian Briones, Juan
Vela, Alex Pierstorff, Tyler
Helms, Leonel Rodriguez,
Dorian Mejia-Flores, Derick
Sambrano and Josh Wyatt. In
his first race back after several
weeks' absence due to injury,
senior Reimundo Garcia came
in at a relatively slow, for him,
21:52.
The 'Cats had one final meet,
Tuesday at Avon Park, before
district competition next week a
Avon Park.





Slympian?
the Olympic trials. Luckily, she
qualified for middleweight.
On Feb. 6, Dominguez will
attend the Olympic Box Office
training and hopes to advance
to be one of three women from
their respective weight classes,
to make it on the U.S. team and
be among the first women to
compete in boxing in the
London Olympics of 2012.
If Dominguez does not make
the Oly~pic team, she then
would have a chance to com-
pete in the World Champion-
ships which happens a few
months after the Olympic Box
Office.
Although hardworking, Do-
minguez realizes she wouldn't
have been able to make it as far
as she has without the help of
many people.
She thanks those helping her
in this endeavor. "I am so grate-
ful to everyone that generously
donated for me to continue on
boxing. I am especially thank-
ful to my mother, my sister
Martha, a y,y mentor Joanne
S attn always sup-
ported me. Also my daughter
who is my strength and, of
course, the Lord for all the
guidance He has given me."
So who knows, maybe in
July 2012 Hardee County will,
be cheering .on its, very own
Olympian Maria Dominguez. -


Tackling the course for the varsity Wildcats are (front row, left to right), Reimundo Garcia, Agustino Ancelmo, Tony
Moreno, Adrian Briones, Josh Wyatt and Tony Galvan; (Back) Christian Moralez, Alex Pierstorff, Brandon Beatty and
Juan Vela.


COURTESY PHOTOS:
Running for the Lady Wildcats are (from left) Febe Murillo, Veronica Rivera, Adriana Arroyo and Alle Solis.


Heartland Meet Prepares

For Districts.


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
More Hardee swimmers and
divers were able'to go to the
Heartland Invitational meet on
Oct. 14-15 than originally.
thought.
Some of the Wildcat and
Lady 'Cat swimmers were tied
up with college testing and
unable to make the trip to Lake
'Placid for the huge meet, so it
was three girls and seven boys.
representing the Hardee squad.
Hardee's Oct. 18 meet with
Avon Park was cancelled by the
storm and attempts to reset it
for Oct. 20 ran into some diffi-
culties. It was to- be Senior
Night for the girls team seniors
Korin Roehm and Savanna
Hagans.
SOthers on the teams are jun-
iors Will Crawford, April.
Garland, Justin Rickett, Wyatt
Kofke, Jessica Hunt, Morgan
Garcia, Skylaar Simmons and.
Kalob Rickett; sophs .Emily
Hughes, Holly Hughes, Emily
Rhodes, Kramer Royal, Leah_
Weeks, Savannah Miller, Me-
gan Hartman, Cleston Sanders,
Garrett Albritton and Carleigh
Coleman; and freshmen Alex-
andra "Alex" Johnson, Caitlin
Dufresne, Cody Spencer, Keifer
Kedzor and Kevin Kunkel.
Only Garland, Dufresne and
, Hartman were able to go to the
Heartland meet for the girls.
.Garland placed 14 of 24 in
the 50 freestyle and 16th of 22
in the breaststroke, while Du-
fresne was 9th.in the 200 free
and Hartman was 15 out of the
23 in that event. Dufresne was
also 13th of 20 in the 100 free
and Hartman 15 out of 18 in the
500 free.
The seven boys attending the
meet were Kofke, Crawford,
Simmons, Albritton, Royal,
Kenkel and Kedzor.
Kofke placed third of 22 in
the 200 free and third of 17 in
the 100 backstroke. He joined
Kudzor, Albritton and Royal in


placing six out of 10 teams in
.,the 200 free relay and si? out of
10-in the 400 free relay with
Albritton, Royal and Crawford.
Crawford was sixth'of'19 in
the 500 free and 14 out of i6 in
the 100 butterfly.
'Albritton was third and Royal
fourth of 23 in the .50 free. In
the 100 free, out of 21 contest-
ants, Albritton was fifth and
Royal eighth.
Simmons was 10, of 11
divers, scoring 189.65 for his 11
dives.
Kedzor was .14th in the 200
free, and Kunkel llth and
K edzor 13th out of 19 in the
5.00 -firee
As they head to district com-
petition at the Rowdy Gaines
pool in Winter Haven on Oct.
25-26, several 'Hardee swim-
nmers are seeded. Kofke is seed-
ed third in the' 100 back and
seeded sixth in the 200 free.
Albritton'is seeded seventh and
Kramer ninth is the 50 free and
Albritton eighth and Royal
ninth in the 100 free. The boys
400 free relay.is seeded fourth.
For the girls, Weeds is seeded
fifth in the 200 free and seventh
in the 500 free. Hartman is
seeded seventh in the 200 free
and the girls 400 free relay team
is seeded sixth.
Hardee's Class 1A, Region 2,
District 5 includes All Saints'
Academy of Winter Haven,
Avon Park, Haven Christian-
now called Oasis Christian,
Tampa Holy Names Academy
(girls), Lake Placid, Lake
Wales, Lakeland Christian,
Mulberry, Lakeland Santa Fe
Catholic and the host school,
Frostproof.


Hard work spotlights the
character of people: Some
turn up their sleeves, some
turn up their noses, and
some don't turn up at all.
-Sam Ewing


JV cross country runners are (from left) Tyler Helms, Derick Sambrano, Dorian Meija-Flores, Leonel Rodriguez and
Adam Ramirez.


ABOUT...
School News
The Herald-Advocate en-
courages submissions from
Hardee County schools.
Photos and write-ups
should be of recent events,
and must include first pnd
last names for both students
and teachers. Identify pho-
tos front to back, left to right.
Deadline for submissions
is 5 p.m. on Thursday.
Please include the name
and phone number of a con-
tact person. Qualifying
items will be published as
space allows.


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This week in history, as
researched from the archival
pages of The Florida Ad-
vocate, the Hardee County
Herald and The Herald-Ad-
vocate ...
75 YEARS AGO
Although the WPA (Works
Progress Administration) has
only been in existence for about
15 months, the present adminis.-
tration alone has spent
$250,000 to $300,000 in
Hardee County alone. That is
,not counting direct relief, com-
modities, rural rehabilitation,
settlement and national youth
administration. Organized un-
der the Roosevelt administra-
tion, WPA has been a boon to
the local unemployed.
With four touchdowns and
two extra points in three confer-
ence games to his credit,
Wauchula quarterback Spencer
Murphy leads the South Florida
Conference as leading scorer.
Farmers are reminded that as
soon as the cover crops are all
disced in or turned under, they
can come to the county agent's
office and make an application
for any soil conservation pay-
ments earned this year.
The water works extension
project which has been under
application with WPA was
awarded to S.P. Stansfield of
this city. He will lay the founda-
tion for the city's new water
tank and lay the extension to the
present water main. The con-
tract for drilling the well went
to Birown Miller Bros.
50 YEARS AGO
The first step toward im-
provement of Wauchula's anti-
quated water distribution sys-
tem was approved this week as
councilmen voted to approve a
preliminary survey. Superin-
tendent George Buris estimat-
ed it would cost in the neigh-
borhood of $150,000 for im-
provements, including an aera-
tor and cover for the main water
reservoir.
Susan Carlton, daughter of
former State Sen. and Mrs.


Doyle Carlton Jr., was selected
as Miss Hardee High 1961 in
the annual competition Monday
night at City Hall Auditorium.
In her court were Beth Hendry,
Judy Milligan and Yvonne
Metheny.
An expansion and remodel-
ing program is under way at
Wauchula State Bank. Expected
to be completed by next month,
it includes a larger safety
deposit box vault, drive-up win-
dow and letter deposit box,
much more office space and
employee lounge. J.W. Crews
Jr., executive vice president,
said the facilities will be more
than can be used at present but
they are building for the future.
The county is seeking to lease
property on Big Charley Creek
for a natural, undeveloped pub-
lic campsite. The location is at
the junction of the creek and
Mineral Branch, about two
miles south of the Crewsville
Road.
25 YEARS AGO'
Registered Wauchulans in the
city of Wauchula will elect
three councilmembers on
Tuesday. Running for Ward I
are incumbent Sara Bushaw, 45,
and Connie Spieth, 52; for
Ward II, W.C. Buchanan, 73,
incumbent, faces a challenge
from Jerry Conerly, 39; and in
Ward II, George Heine Jr., 60,
is seeking another term, and is
opposed by James "Corky"
Choate, 57.
County space is at a premi-
um, causing county commis-
sioners to formulate a long-
range plan for offices at the new
Courthouse Annex I, off U.S.
17 at Oak Street. Other county
officials were invited to a work-
shop to help make plans, as
moving them to the annex was
one consideration.
The Elks Lodge has netted 25
new members, bringing the
membership above 400, the
largest in its history. It plans to
spend $25,000 for renovations
as more space is needed for
lodge meetings with Visitors
from the other eight lodges in
the district and for bingo play-


ing. John Burton, who is
expected to be exalted ruler
next year, and founder Russell
Farmer will ask the Wauchula
City Council for funds to meet
the estimated $100,000 of reno-
vations.
Cannon Building Materials
on East Bay Street is having
sales this weekend: 10.5-ounce
Liquid Nails is just 99 cents, a
Poulan chain saw only $139.99,
a six-switch Electripad for
$7.99, and a seven-piece screw-
driver set for $9.95.
10 YEARS AGO
Asbestos removal and court-
house renovations are changing
the routes around the Hardee
County Courthouse as every
effort is being made to be sure
there is no danger to employees
or visitors during the yearlong
project which is under way.
Fencing for the portion of the
parking lot where supplies and
equipment will be stored was
completed Monday.
The Hardee County Aca-
demic Team, which placed sec-
ond in the state for 2001, pre-
sents its trophy to Principal
Mike Wilkinson. The team of
Pete Brewer, Daryl Ezelle,
Dominic Felice, Josh Gerstoff
and David Ezelle is coached by
Peggy Saddler, Alyn Hubbell
and Peter Preston.
At a Range Cattle Station,
Field Day, director Dr. Findley
Pate, Dr. Paul Mislevy, county
Extension Agent Lockie Gary,
Dr. Elver Hodges, Dr. Rob
Kalmbacher and Ann Blount
were among those seen giving
reports on research on cattle
forage, bahia and warm season
perennial grasses, mole crick-
ets, nematodes and other
aspects of research.
Ferman Ford offers a 2002
Cavalier for $10,999 with 0 per-
cent interest, a 2002 S-10 for
$12,742 or a 2002 Malibu for
$16,795.

Don't look for more honor
than your learning merits.
-Jewish Proverb


October 27,2011, The Herald-Advocate 3B

No Hopscotch Or Jacks;

She Swam With Dolphins!


By MARCO EHRENKAUFER
Special To The Herald-Advocate
My interview is with Adelina
Aguilar.
Q: When were you born?
A: Oct 9, 1951.
Q: Where were you born?
A:
Homestead,
Florida.
Q: How
was life in
Homestead when you were younger?
A: I was born in Homestead but I
grew up in the Keys. The Keys were
like Gilligan's Island; we lived in
Tavernier. The island was so small that
it only took 10 minutes to get from one
side to the other.
Q: What was your favorite child-
hood memory and worst?
A: My favorite was fishing on the
dock with my brother. My wbrst was
being pushed into the water in a boat
without any paddles.
Q: Did you go to school?
A: Well, I dropped out of school at
10th grade, but came back and took the
GED test at 24 and received my diplo-
ma.
Q: How did you get to school?
A: I took the school bus.
Q: What was your first job?
A: Motel, cleaning rooms.


Q: What did you do in your spare
time?
A: Swam, tished, swam with dol-
phins and hanged out by the dock.
Q: How many kids do you have?
A: Five, four boys and one girl.
Q: Did any big events happen dur-
ing your lifetime?
A: Vietnam War, Kennedy assassina-
tion, Nixon impeachment.
Q: Did you have any brothers and
sisters?
A: Yes, four brothers and one sister.
Q: Did you have any hobbies?
A: Yes, softball, volleyball, bowling
and tennis.
Q: Did.you play on any teams in
softball?
A: I played onseveral teams and one
in Key West, girls fast-pitch softball.
Q: If you could meet one person,
dead or alive, who would it be and
why?
A: President Kennedy, because he
was a great president. He initiated pro-
grams and was a war hero.
Q: What advice would you give
young people?
A: Stay in school, be honest, and
treat people with respect.


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4B The Herald-Advocate, October 27, 2011


Hardee Youth Football Players And Cheerleaders


COURTESY PHOTOS
The midget cheerleaders cheer for both the midget and junior midget football squads. On
the roster (in no particular order) are Arianna Camarillo, Rajhay Clark, Courtney Cunningham,
Breanna Darley, Deborah Figueroa, Gabriella Garza, Brooklyn Graham, Taylor Graham, Clau-
dia Klein, Catalina Longoria, Megan Patterson, Cori Ann Rosales, Madison Warnock and
Danielle Zuniga.


The Junior Midget football squad played its final game on Saturday. Included (in no particular
order) are Dionte Faulk, Pete DeLuna, Tavon Faulk, Johnny Jean, Jeremiah Mancillas, Liven-
son Metayer, Ismael Rodriguez, Gloigens Metayer, DeAngelo Smith, Juan Hemandez, Isaiah
Montes, Yoban Lopez, Lizandro Villarreal, Ricky Lopez-King, Guadalupe Belmares, Marcelin
Cimeus, Cecilio Hemandez, Kai Shakir-Washington, Hardee Pace and William Rodriguez


Playing Midget football are (in no particular order) Trequan Holley, Johnny Luna, Bryce An-
derson, Joshua Litton, Juan Medina, Fabian Molina, Trey Faulk, Cavaris Snell, Mowgli Luna,
Samuel Garcia, Noah Coronado, Andres Hemandez, Adrian Rodriguez, Alex Hemandez, Ro-
drigo Rodriguez, Nytavis Philyor, David Duran and Christopher Lee.


Encouraging the Peewee team are cheerleaders (in no particular order) Uanna Albritton, Jas-
mine Alfaro, Daisy Badillo, Claire Carlton, Chastady Flores, Michaela Klein, Jerica Pierce,
Darby Sanders, Sydnie Steiner, Meagan Strickland and Makayla Wilson.


Taking the field for the Peewee football team are (in no particular order) Jeah St. Louis, An-
derson Severe, Joshua McQuaig, Damar Harris, Ethan Sambrano, Isaac Flores, Tanner Carl-
ton, Augustine Flores, Rahym Baker, Stephen McQuaig, Justin Rivera, Hunter Little, Matthew
Tyson, Brandon Franks, Adam Olvera, Noah Herrera, Herculano Zuniga, Jeffrey Kulig, Daniel
Sambrano, Randy McLeod and Jose Rojas.


Playing for the Junior Peewee squad are (in no particular order) Coron Guajardo, Mason
Block, Travon Thomas, Zachariah Macias, Coleton Albritton, Bryan Conrad, Garrett Williams,
Damian Rodriguez, Quinton Yates, Lane Parks, Scott Weeks, Daniel King, Michael Cruz,
Damon McWhorter, Quinton Stone, Logan Albritton, Johnny Shelton, Abed Abel, John Ullrich
and Jozie St. Louis.


The Tiny-Mite players are (in no particular order) Alejandro Solis, Oscar Deleon, Josiah
Lozano, Frederick Graham, Rafael Cabrera, Taijeous Blandin, Wilney Francois, Hezekiah
Austin, James Cruz, Joshua Block, Presley Gilliard, Kamari Lazarre, Kaden Bryan, Jar'quese
Collins, Adrien Brown, Guillermo DeLuna, Ethan Barber, Rolant Simon, Exaviod McLeod, Jer-
emiah Brown, Abisai Castaneda, Judd Cole, Reese Stone, Michael Hines, AliAbel and Trenton
Alfred


':Bs 4, a h.f.."s *.-: wl Ar.tri^apr. .;*5 gr- .. ,Pa u .,_ ..
Tiny-Mite Cheerleaders (in no particular order) are Undsay Bolin, Mia Cabrera, Karina Camar-
illo, Genesis Chavez, Kaylie Grice, Camyiah Guajardo, Nicole Martinez, Lizzie McCoy, Ravin
McCoy, Allazae McLeod, Carli Mushrush, Briana Navarro, Alexi Rodriguez, Camryn Rodriguez,
Miah Velazquez and Savannah Wilson.


Flag football players are (in no particular order) Jose Ibanez, Ethan Eures, Roel Juarez, Dallas
Howell, Ruben Longoria, Juan Gaitan, Zyann Parker, Elijah Valletutti, Roman Hubbell, Beau
Schultz, Hunter Graham, Edner Cherry, Dane Risher, Dallas Grice, Jacob Rodriguez, Jeremiah
Vo, Isaac Badillo and Braxton Holt.


Running the ball for the Hardee Mitey Mites are (in no particular order) Dylan Bozeman, Colton
Block, Caleb Block, Palmer Klein, Justin Cole, Dylan Davis, Caleb Macias, Weston Schraeder.
Jason Garcia, Quinton Lindsey, Dalton Kiella, Klpp Cooper, Adam Montes, Cade Alexy, Blake
Graham, Rafael Hubbell, Jamal Holley, Hunter Rodriguez, Griffin Clark, Elias Ramirez, Andres
Medina, Oscar Sambrano, Hunter Waters, Billy Courtright and Jake Cole.








October 27. 2011. The Herald-Advocate 5B


Youth Football Finishes Up


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Over a hundred youngsters
are finishing their youth foot-
ball season and preparing for
post-season activities.
All %even teams were home
last weekend, competing
against the Manatee Wildcats.
Games went from 9 a.m.
through after dark.
The teams celebrated Home-
coming with posters for each
player and recognition of the
players and cheerleaders during
halftime.
The cheer teams went Sunday
to the Manatee Civic Center for
the annual'cheer competition
called the Florida Youth Cheer
Jam.
The Mitey Mite team is tied
for first place in its division.
Although they do not have a
playoff for that age group, they
will travel to a bowl game on
Nov. 5 or Nov. 12. Junior Pee
Wee and Midget will qualify for
bowl games as well.
The youngest group of play-
ers is the Hardee Flag team,
with players, Isaac Badillo,
Edner Cherry, Ethan Eures,
Juan Gaitan, Hunter Graham,
Dallas Grice, Braxton Holt,
Dallas Howell, Roman Hubbell,
Jose Ibanez, Roel Juarez,
Ruben Longoria, Zyann Parker,
Dane Risher, Jacob Rodriguez,
Beau Schultz, Elijah Valletutti
and Jeremiah Vo.
Playing for the Tiny Mites are


Ali Abel, Trenton Alfred,
Hezekiah Austin, Ethan Barber,
Taijaeous Blandin, Joshua
Block, Adrien Brown, Jeremiah
Brown, Kaden Bryan, Rafael
Cabrera, Abisai Castaneda,
Judd Cole, Jar'Quese Collins,
James Cruz, Oscar DeLeon,
Guillermo DeLuna, Wilney
Francois, Frederick Graham,
Presley Gilliard, Michael
Hines, Kamari Lazarre, Josiah
Lozano, Exaviod McLeod,
Rolant Simon, Alejandro Solis
and Reese Stone.
Cheering for these little guys
are the Tiny Mite cheerleaders,
Lindsay Bolin, Mia Cabrera,
Karina Camarillo, Genesis
Chavez, Kaylie Grice, Camyiah
Guarjardo, Nicole Martinez,
Allazae McLeod, Lizzie Mc-
Coy, Ravin McCoy, Carli Mus-
hrush, Brianna Navarro, Alexi
Rodriguez, Camryn Rodriguez,
Miah Velazquez and Savannah
Wilson.
For the next older group, the
Mitey Mites, players are Cade
Alexy, Caleb Block, Colton
Block, Dylan Bozeman, Griffin
Clark, Jake Cole, Justin Cole,
Kipp Cooper, Billy Courtright,
Dylan Davis, Jason Garcia,
Blake Graham, Rafael Hubbell,
Jamal Holley, Quinton Kiella,
Palmer Klein, Quinton Lindsey,
Caleb Macias, Andres Medina,
Adam Montes, Elias Ramirez,
Hunter Rodriguez, Oscar Sam-
brano, Weston Schraeder and
Hunter Waters.


Bennett, Golf


Girls Go Regional


By JUAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
* Playing private schools has
once again negated the fine
efforts of Hardee golf squads.
Hardee boys were the first
among the public schools.
Hardee girls followed on the
heels of Sarasota Cardinal
Mooney and was also the first
girls public school.
The entire girls squad and
junior Will Bennett are the only
Hardee golfers to advance to


Region 6 competition.
Bennett, Coach George
Heine and his family went
Monday to the Hideout Club in
Naples owned by Boston Celtic
great Larry Bird.
The girls team went on
Tuesday to the same club for
their regional action, having the
misfortune of facing the region-
al host Community School of
Naples, which scored 324 in its
girls district.
Mooney shot 355 in becom-


Their cheerleaders are
Jessalin Arreola, Petra Gaitan.
Hayden Galvan, Cheyanne
Longoria, Karina Valadez and
Savannah Valletutti.
The Junior Peewee division
squad includes Abed Abel.
Coleton Albritton, Logan
Albritton, Mason Block, Bryan
Conrad, Michael Cruz, Coron
Guajardo, Daniel King, Zac-
hariah Macias, Damon Mc-
Whorter, Scott Meeks, Lane
Parks, Damian Rodriguez,
Johnny Shelton, Jozie St. Louis.
Quinton Stone, Travon Thomas,
John Ullrich, Garrett Williams
and Quinton Yates.
Their cheerleaders are Ederi-
ka Austin, Mariela Badillo,
Jacklin Barber, Karelynn Bolin,
Kiara Coronado, Mary Court-
right, Alexis Crews, Danielle
King and Arika Perez.
Playing for the Peewee team
are Rahym Baker, Tanner
Carlton,Augustine Flores, Isaac
Flores, Brandon Franks, Damar
Harris, Noah Herrera, Jeffrey
Kulig, Hunter Little, Randy
McLeod, Joshua McQuaig,
Stephen McQuaig, Adam
Olvera, Justin Rivera, Jose
Rojas, Daniel Sambrano, Ethan
Sambrano, Anderson Severe,-
Jeah St. Louis, Matthew Tyson
and Herculano Zuniga.
Their cheerleaders are Lianna
Albritton, Jasmine Alfaro,
Daisy Badillo, Claire Carlton,
Chastady Flores, Michaela
Klein, Jerica Pierce, Darby


;ing runner-up in the District 16
matches last week. Hardee
came in at 490, just ahead of
Bradenton Southeast at 498.
Soph Kaitlyn Shaw had her
best rounds ever in shooting
114 for the 18-hole tourney.
Soph Courtney Alexander was
close at 118, with senior
Courtney Parks at 123. Soph
Brooke Knight and freshman
Kendall Gough rounded out the
Hardee scoring.
On the boys side of the ledger
in district play, Bennett quali-
fied for regionals as one of the
top three not on an advancing
team. "He fired a nice 81,"
commented Heine.
Hardee ended fourth overall.


Sanders. Sydnie Steiner,
Meagan Strickland and Ma-
kayla Wilson.
Taking the field for the Junior
Midget team are Guadalupe
Belmares. Marcelin Cimeus.
Pete DeLuna. Dionte Faulk.
Tavon Faulk. Cecilio Hernan-
dez, Juan He.:- -Jez. Johnny
Jean, Yoban Lopez. Ricky
Lopez-King. Jeremiah Man-
cillas. Gloigens Metayer,
Livenson Metayer, Isaiah
Montes, Hardee Pace, Ismael
Rodriguez. William Rodriguez,
Kai Shakir-Washington, De-
Angelo Smith and Lizandro
Villarreal.
The oldest group is the
Midgets, with Bryce Anderson,
Noah Coronado, David Duran,
Trey Faulk, Samuel Garcia,
Alex Hernandez, Andres Her-
nandez, Trequan Holley,
Christopher Lee, Joshua Litton,
Johnny Luna, Mowgli Luna,
Juan Medina, Fabian Molina,
Nytavis Philyor, Adrian Rod-
riguez, Rodrigo Rodriguez and
Cavaris Snell.
And, cheering for both
Midget teams are Adrianna
Camarillo, Rajhay Clark,
Courtney Cunningham, Brean-
na Darley, Deborah Figueroa,
Gabriella Garza, Brooklyn
Graham, Claudia Klein, Cat-
alina Longoria, Megan Patter-
son, Cori Ann Rosales, Mad-
ison Warnock and Danielle
Zuniga.




Sarasota Christian took the top
spot, with all its golfers from
China scoring a 296. St.
Stephen's came in second with
307, Bradenton Christian third
with 331. Hardee topped the
public schools with 341, a good
score for the Wildcats.
Senior Matt Godwin almost
moved to regionals, losing out
by a stroke with his 84. Seniors
Daniel Miller and Dalton
Hewett both finished with 88s,
while soph Tyler Hewett came
in with a distant 96.
Heine felt his team could
have done just a bit better if the
boys hadn't gotten off to a slow
start before their nerves calmed.


I ., .- q .w.. -
Junior Peewee cheerleaders are (in no particular order) Ed-
erika Austin, Mariela Badillo, Jacklin Barber, Katelynn Bolin,
Kiara Coronado, Mary Courtright, Alexis Crews, Danielle King
and Arika Perez


Cheering for the Mitey Mite players are (in no particular order)
Jessalin Arreola, Petra Gaitan, Hayden Galvan, Cheyanne
Longoria, Karina Valadez and Savannah Valletuti.


'* $S min..mum savings account as reqwud for membership iftlh
MIDFLORIDA and a checking account (opening balances may vary
depending on checking account opened) is required for access to a debit
card. Credit approval is required. You will be automatically entered to win
when you use your MIDFLORIDA debit cord as a signature-based (credit)
transaction during the promotional period and the transaction posts between
October 23, 2011 January 14, 2012. One prize will be awarded each week for
12 weeks. Log on to MIDFLORIDA.com,/wipeit for a complete setof rules.
"lames A. Haley, LRMC and Bay Pines branches do not offer instant issue debit cards.


10:27c


F-- ----- -- .


Your Business Could Appear Here!

Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels
At The Herald Advocate







6B The Herald-Advocate, October 27, 2011


Volleyball


Hosting Districts


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Hardee varsity volleyball
team is playing host this week.
The Lady 'Cats greet Lake
Wales, Auburndale and Tenoroc
for the Class 5A, Region 3,
District 10 playoffs this week.
Hardee and Lake Wales fin-
ished tied for first place. They
split games during the season
and each had one other loss to
finish 4-2. Lake Wales won the
coin toss, and was seeded No. 1,
playing number No. 4 Teneroc
on Monday evening.
Hardee, seeded second,
played third-seed Auburndale
on Tuesday evening. Hardee
defeated Aubumdale twice dur-
ing the season. The Monday
and Tuesday winners will play
tonight (Thursday) at 7. If
Hardee becomes district cham-
pion, it would host regionals
next week. If the Lady 'Cats are
runner-up, they will travel next
week. '
Hardee lost its final pair of
games, against Lake Placid at
home and on the road at
Sebring.
Against Lake Placid on Oct.
17, Hardee lost in four games
by an overall total of eight
points. Lake Placid won the
first game 25-23. Senior
Summer Palmer led the Hardee
scoring with eight service
points. Other Hardee scorers
were Karlee Henderson, Ashley
Nichols, Nyshira Jackson and
Kayla "Louie" Nichols.
Hardee came back to win the
second game, 25-18, behind
Palmer's service with nine
points. Kayla Nichols added
seven service points, and others
were by Jackson, Henderson,
Ashley Nichols and Ana
Galvez.
Game three reversed things


again, with Lake Placid win-
ning 25-16. Jackson had five
service points to lead Hardee.
The fourth game was the
proverbial barn-burner as nei-
ther team wanted to give in.
Hardee forced it to overtime,
but lost 28-26. Both Kayla
Nichols and Henderson had
seven service points.
Against Sebring, it was a let-
down to a Class 6A team.
Hardee made a game of it to
start, losing 25-21, but then fell
behind and lost Game 2 by a
score of 25-6 and Game 3 25-9.
Meanwhile, the Hardee JV
won its final pair of games and
finished the season 11-4. The
freshman-only portion of that
team played in tournaments and
ended up 6-3.
Against Lake Placid, Hardee
JV won 25-20, 14-25, 15-5.
In game one, Brooke Dixon
put four service points in the
book, while Gemi Sainders had
three. For Game 2, it was
Knight with five service points
and Emily Albritton with four.
In game three, it was Rachel
Coker with top scoring.
It was similar against
Sebring, winning in three
games, 25-21, 19-25 and 15-9.
Albritton had seven service
points, including an ace. Bailey
Carlton also had a pair of aces
among her four service points.
Jakaysha Lindsey led the scor-
ing in game three.
Girls finishing up their JV
season are sophs Carlton,
Coker, Hannah Grisinger, Jes-
sica Broadhead and Edreina
Martinez, and freshmen
Albritton, Dixon, Lindsey,
Saunders, Tamara St. Fort,
Courtnee Richardson, Destiny
Thomp-son, Allison Smith,
Abbey Vargas, Cat Jackson and
Georgeanne Paris.


The Hardee varsity Lady Wildcats hosted the district tournament this week; (kneeling, from left) Ashley Nichols, Ana
Galvez, Maria Anselmo, Kayla Nichols and Erica Roberts; (back) Assistant Coach Jeanne Atkins, Nyshira Jackson, De-
siree Smith, Karlee Henderson, Katie Wheeler, Summer Palmer, Jessica Harrison and Head Coach Ken Leupold.


Greetings from Fort Green!
We have been on vacation
and, my, there is a lot going on
in our little Hardee County!
New businesses, an RV park at
Hardee Lakes, ice cream store
and many more. As usual the
paper, under the commission
news, reported on a new
"garbage dump" that needs to
be near a railroad. I sure wish,
and feel many more wish the
same thing, that Wauchula had
kept its railroad! If the dump
does come near the railroad, I
hope it goes near the southern
part of the railroad, down
toward Ona. Highway 64 is
much better than 62, and the
Ona-Fort Green Road is a real
good road.
The article indicated there
would be plenty of truckloads
of debris daily and the facility
would make productive prod-
ucts out of the garbage and have
no odor sound familiar?
Also, with a new recreational
vehicle park in Fort Green and
the big Mosaic project in Polk
County but will be near Fort
Green, a garbage facility is just
not good business. Oh well,
here's hoping.
I sincerely appreciate all of
you who have called and
stopped me in the stores to
inquire where was the news?
We went to North Carolina and
had a good time. The weather
was cold. 34 degrees the day we
left and then 84 in Okmulgee
State Park in Georgia where we
spent the night! We ran the heat
in the morning and the air that
night!
We were planning on coming
home just in time for the big
class reunion this weekend, but
it was necessary to come home
sooner to furnish additional
information because of the
Chapter II the vendor who
bought our Valencia oranges
had declared.
, There have been so many
deaths affecting our church in
the short time we were out of
town. Our sincere sympathy is
extended to the Leo Blink fam-
ily. Mr. Leo made his final jour-
ney on this earth, and there will
be a memorial service at Fort
Green Baptist this Saturday at
I1 a.m. and then we will have a
covered-dish dinner in the fel-
lowship hall. Leo Blink was the
oldest member of our church
and we will all miss him. He
would have turned 100 next
June and we were anticipating a
hig celebration.
Tina Owens' grandson, Chris,
made his final journey recently.


Ouri'ympathies are extended to
his family.
Marion Kiella and I went to
the same church for about 13
years and were in the same cir-
cle and many clubs. It just
comes as a shock when you are
reading all this in the Herald.
My sympathy is to all her fami-
ly. I was just sorry I was not
here to offer comfort and food
during the time when friends
needed it.
I tell everyone I read every
word in the paper, and I just
about do! It was great to read
the nice article about Tom
Cochrane. His sister, Ann Sas-
ser, is my sister-in-law, Avis
Sasser's sister-in-law. Confus-
ing?
The GA and the Youth had
good yard sales and we appreci-
ate everyone supporting them.
Kimberly and Derrick Grims-
ley's son, Ethan, turned 3 on
Saturday and' had a delightful
birthday party. There were too
many to name but his mama,
grandmama Donna Chancey,
great-grandmama Gwen Albrit-
ton and great-great- grandmoth-
er Mildred Cooper were there in
addition to all the grandparents
on his daddy's side. To have
this many grandparents is truly
a blessing.
There are lot of sick at Fort
Green. Betty Walker is sick
with a cold and taking antibi-
otics, Billy Lines began treat-
ment for cancer last Monday,
Willie Godwin is taking therapy
for his knee as is Jane Kennedy
and Edith Bassett, and Buck
Toole is taking treatments.
Please pray for all of these.
While we were on vacation,
Tom and Sharon Lynn, Mary
and Earl Bargeron, Charles and
Lynda Abbott and Sherman and
I enjoyed going to the Georgia
Mountain Fair together. Then
one Friday. Evelyn Thomas met
us for dinner. We enjoyed visit-
ing with home folks while away
from home.
Don't forget the busy calen-
dar at church. This Saturday
night from 4 until 8 will be the
Fall Festival and supper will be
provided, the '50s and '60s
class reunions are going on in
town, and Sunday night will be
the "fifth Sunday night" sing
followed by the chili cookoff in
the fellowship hall.
Nov. 5 everyone is reminded
to pick up your 4-H barbecue
dinner at the Cowbelles in the
fair booth, and turn your clocks
back as the time changes!
Please pray for one another.
our nation and military.


The freshman volleyball team played in several tournaments and finished 10-5; (seated, from left) Emily Albritton, Cat
Jackson and Brooke Dixon; (back) Abbey Vargas, Jakaysha Lindsey, Courtnee Richardson, Georgeanne Paris, Allison
Smith, Tamara St. Fort, Destiny Thompson and Gemi Saunders.


The following permits were
applied for or issued by the
Hardee County Building De-
partment during the week of
Oct. 16-22. Listings include the
name of the owner or contrac-
tor; the address for the project,
the type of work to be done, and
the cost involved. Only projects
valued at $1,000 or more are
listed.

ISSUED
James Collins, Main Street,
install fire system, $1,500.
Harold Howze, Brookside
Way, add screen room, $13,200.
Kenneth Long, Old Braden-
ton Rd., mechanical, $3,490.
Wynn Phillips, Sr. 64 West,
mechanical, $3,450
Wynn Phillips, Bell St,
mechanical, $3,450.
Richie Evans, Illinois Ave,
roofing, $2,000.
Michael Garay, Heard Bridge
Rd, addition, $9,000.
Richard Waldron, Yetter Rd,
windows, $1,000.
John Laborda, Bell St, doors
and windows, $1,100.
Mark Bowman, 6th Avenue,
sign. $6,300.
Mark Bowman, N 7th.
Avenue, sign, $6,800.
William Griffin, Us Highway
17, sign, $2,400.

BUILDING BLOCKS
You must have a permit to
construct on your property. Cost
is not a factor in determining
whether or not a permit is
required. It does not matter if
what you are trying to construct
is less than $500.


Real success is finding
your lifework in the work
that you love.
-David McCullough

When a man tells you that
he got rich through hard
work, ask him: "Whose?"
-Don Marquis


COURTESY PHOTOS
The junior varsity volleyball team ending its season last Thursday with players, (front)
Brooke Dixon; (first row, left to right) Catalina Rosario, Emily Albritton, Ana Montanez
and Angela Herron; (second row) Cat Jackson, Abbey Vargas, Rachel Coker, Gemi
Saunders, Hannah Grisenger and Bailey Carlton; (third row) Georgeanne Paris, Destiny
Thompson, Jessica Broadhead, Mesqua Fields and Jakaysha Lindsey; (back) Tamara St.
Fort, Courtnee Richardson, Allison Smith, Endreina Martinez and Arin Johnson.








The!llelaI-- Advocate,


Hardee iluny'sHome Iir
PRNER ULIHR


Fort Green News

By Rilla Cooper
773-6710 ;: o








October 27, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 7B


I courthouse Re]o


COUNTY COURT
The following marriage
licenses were issued recently
in the office of the county
court:
Kendy Teofelo Ramos-Rod-
rigtbez, 27, Bowling Green, and
Dilcia Yajayra Castillo-Tejeda,
28, Sarasota.
Rocky Lee Cisneros, 28,
Zolfo Springs, and Gloria
Alpuche Hernandez, 22, Zolfo
Springs.
Carlo DeCampos Martin, 32,
Estepona, Malaga, Spain, and
SSavannah Justine Davis, 25,
Wauchula.
Jonathan Howard Pleger, 32,
Wauchula, and Bobbie Jayne
Barker, 32, Wauchula.
Lazaro DeArmas, 51.
Wauchula, and Maria G'"
Trinidad, 54, Wauchula.

The following small claims
cases were disposed of recent-
ly by the county judge:
Asset Acceptance LLC vs.
Christopher Flanders, stipulated
agreement approved.
Equable Asset Financial LLS
vs. Deborah Tucker, default
judgment.
Camilo Morillo vs. Fidencio
Davila and Roy Davila, volun-
tary dismissal.
There was no misdemeanor
court as it was trial week.


In accordance with Section
121.055, Florida Statutes,
Southwest Florida Water
Management District intends to
designate the following posi-
tions for inclusion in the Senior
Management Service Class of
the.Florida Retirement System:
Assistant Executive Director
Chief of Staff
Director, Resource
Management
Director, Operations,
Maintenance and
Construction
10/20/11, 10/21/11, 10/25/11,
10/27/11
(Ad Order No. HRD004) 10:27c

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 25-2010-CA-000144
WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, "'
Plaintiff,
vs.
YENI ARENCIBIA, et al,
Defendant(s).

NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to a Final Judgment of
Mortgage Foreclosure dated
October 17, 2011, and entered in
Case No. 25-2010.CA-000144 of
the Circuit Court of the TENTH
Judicial Circuit In and for
HARDEE County, Florida wherein
WELLS FARGO BANK, NA is the
Plaintiff and YENI ARENCIBIA;
THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
YENI ARENCIBIA N/K/A
BAYARDO TRINIDAD N/K/A
DETRIONIDAD BAYAARDO JOSE;
ANDRES RESTREPO; YADIRA
RESTREPO; TENANT #1 N/K/A
CATHY BRYANT are the
Defendants. The Clerk of the
Court will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash at SECOND
FLOOR HALLWAY, OUTSIDE OF
ROOM 202, OF THE HARDEE
COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 417 W.
MAIN STREET at 11:00 AM, on the
9 day of Nov., 2011, the following
described property as set forth in
said Final Judgment:
LOT 28, BLOCK A, KNOLL-
WOOD, ACCORDING TO
THE PLAT THEREOF AS
RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 3, PAGE 32, OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORI-
DA.
A/K/A 1042 MAGNOLIA
LANE, WAUCHULA, FL
33873
Any person claiming an Inter-
est In the surplus from the sale, if
any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the Lis
Pendens must file a claim within
sixty (60) days after the sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the
seal of this Court on October 18,
201 f.
B. Hugh Bradley
Clerk of The Circuit Court
By: Connie Coker
Deputy Clerk
In accordance with the Americans
Disabilities Act, persons with dis-
abilities needing a special accom-
modation to participate in this
proceeding should contact the
Individual or agency sending the
notice at Echevarria, McCalla,
Raymer, Barrett & Frappier, 601
Bayshore Blvd., Suite 800, Tampa,
Florida 33606, telephone (813)
251-4766, not later than seven (7)
days prior to the proceeding. If
hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-
955-8771, or voice (V) 1-800-955-
8770, via Florida Relay Service.
10:27;11:3c


CIRCUIT COURT
The following civil actions
were filed recently in the
office of the circuit court:
Jessica Tamayo and the state
Department of Revenue (DOR)
vs. Juan Tomas Gonzalez, peti-
tion for enforcement of admin-
istrative child support order.
Vanderbilt Mortgage and
Finance vs. Douglas B. Barber
Jr., petition for mortgage fore-
closure.
State Farm Mutual Auto-
mobile Insurance Co. a/s/o Paul

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 252011CP000077

IN RE: ESTATE OF
JIMMY LYN GILES,
deceased.
_____________/


NOTICE TO CRED
The administration
estate of JIMMY LY
deceased, whose date
was May 14, 2011, is
the Circuit Court fa
County, Florida, Probal
the address of which
Office Drawer 1749,
Florida 33873. The
address of the cc
Representatives and
Personal Representati
ney are set forth below


All creditors of the
and other persons hav
or demands against
estate on whom a co
notice Is required to
must file their claims
court WITHIN THE L
THREE MONTHS AF
DATE OF THE FIRST
TION OF THIS NOTICE
TY DAYS AFTER THE
SERVICE OF A COPY
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of
dent and other perso
claims or demands a
decedent's estate mus
claims with this cou
THREE MONTHS Al
DATE OF THE FIRST
TION OF THIS NOTICE
ALL CLAIMS NOT
WITHIN THE TIME PER
FORTH IN SECTION 7
THE FLORIDA PROBA
WILL BE FOREVER BAI
NOTWITHSTANDING
PERIODS SET FORTH
ANY CLAIM FILED
YEARS OR MORE AF
DECEDENT'S DATE OF
BARRED.
The date of the first F
of this Notice is Oct. 27
co-Personal Repre
BRITTANY
BELINDA
1007 South 9
Wauchula
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Kenneth B. Evers, of
KENNETH B. EVER, P.
Florida Bar No. 0054852
Post Office Drawer 1301
Wauchula, FL 33873-13(
Phone: (863) 773-5600
Facsimile: (866) 547-431
Email: office@hardeelaA


ITORS
n of the
'N GILES,
a of death
---_ Jl-- 2-


Mueller vs. Jon A. Hopkins,
damages auto negligence.
Wauchula State Bank vs.
Bao Xiong et al, petition for
mortgage foreclosure.
Hortencia Martinez and
Bartolo Carbajal-Rodriguez,
divorce.
Caridad Kamp-Zamora and
Gregg S. Kamp, divorce.
Dawn M. Ainsworth-Peton
and DOR vs. Onix Velez, peti-
tion for child support.
Celina Castillo vs. Shawn
Palma, petition for injunction
for protection.
Amanda Hays and DOR vs.
Tyler Grice, petition for admin-
istrative child support order.
Samantha Lynne Morris and
DOR vs. Edward Delmer
Thompson, petition for child
support.
Priscilla Gaona vs. Alex
Alamia, petition for injunction
for protection.
Rose Marie Draper and
Richard A. Draper, divorce.
Wauchula State Bank vs.
Jacqueline Faulk et al, petition
for mortgage foreclosure.
U.S. Bank National Associa-
tion vs. Peter DeLuna and
Francisca DeLuna, petition for
mortgage foreclosure.
Amy Franks and Mark A.
Franks, divorce.


pening In The following decisions on
or Hardee
te Division, civil cases pending in the cir-
h is Post cuit court were handed down
Wauchula, recently by the circuit court
name and judge:
o-Personal Edward Young vs. State De-
the co- apartment of Corrections (DOC),
v' a inmate petition transferred to
Miami-Dade County.
decedent Charles Bargman vs. Walter
ring claims A. McNeil and DOC, inmate
decedent's petition transferred to Pinellas
)py of this County.
be served McArthus Myrick vs. Fred-
s with thethus yck vs. Fred-
LATER OF erick Juliano Jr. and Fred
TER THE Juliano's Enterprise Inc., judg-
PUBLICA- ment.
SOR THIR- Leona Katherine Knarr and
DATE OF DOR vs. Daniel Roy Knarr,
OF THIS modification of child support.
Olga Herrera and DOR vs.
f the dece- Oracio Francisco, child support
ns having order.
against the Deborah N. Keen and DOR
3t file their vs. Horace E. Keen Jr., volun-
rt WITHIN
FTER THE tary dismissal.
PUBLICA- April Renee Weems and
DOR vs. Matthew A. DeWolfe,
child support order.
SO FILED Elizabeth L. Cherry and
IIODS SET DOR vs. Lance E. Thompkins,
iTE CODE child support suspended.
RRED. Jennifer -eraff Curp and
Ryan Matthew Curp, voluntary
THE TIME dismissal.
H ABOVE, District Advisory Board of
TWO (2) the Southern Florida Church of
:TER THE
DEATH IS the Nazarene Inc. vs. Wauchula
Church of the Nazarene Inc. et
al, judgment clearing property
publication title.
, 2011. Illinois National Insurance
esentative: Co. et al vs. Thomas Clark
SN. GILES Braddock and Charlotte Ann
Braddock, voluntary dismissal.
'G. KLEIN George V. and Karen D.
th Avenue Porter vs. Restoration Experts
, FL 33873 Inc., order.
Bertha Almaguer vs. Jose
Tapia and Domitilia Guerrero,
order.
A. Josie Huron vs. Benito
2 Esquivel, injunction for protec-
B tion.
08 Celia Ortiz and DOR vs.
62 Nathan H. Morgan, order.
w.com Stephanie Escobedo and
DOR vs. Saul Alamia, child
10:27;11:3c support order.


Marco Antonio Calvillo vs.
Jenice Lopez, child support
order.
Maria Dalia Valdez and DOR
vs. Angelica Maria Valdez,
order on child support con-
tempt.
Monique Susan Pritchard
and DOR vs. Jospeh Keith
Pritchard, order.
Brandi Johnson and DOR vs.
John C. Vandiver, child support
order.
Kayla Marie Herrera and
DOR vs. Benjamin Joshua
Herrera, order on enforcement
of administrative child support
order.
Betty B. Richardson vs.
Michael L. Holland, amended
injunction for protection.
Irene Jones and DOR vs.
Oliver Lacy Everett, order on
child support contempt.
Pamela June Lowe and DOR
vs. Oliver Lacy Everett, order
on child support contempt.
Suncoast Schools Federal
Credit Union vs. Teodoro
Reyna and Ofelia Reyna, judg-
ment.
Terry L. Barrow vs. Twylah
G. Floyd, stipulated settlement
approved, dismissed.

There was no felony crimi-
nal court as it was trial week.

The following real estate
transactions of $10,000 or
more were filed recently in
the officeof the clerk of court:
Gregory G. and Catherine
W. McCormack to Jose A.
Herandez-Sustaita, $100,000.
Judith L. Terrell to James A.
Jr. and Amy N. Franks,


E XX -15
A
.le -,-
moolk-
l


$115,000.
Walter Mortgage Co. LLC to
Lucian and Orlanda Villafranca,
$68,600.
Nancy J. Jackson to Donnie
R. Ellis, $145,000.
Michael D. Manley and
Bryan Mack as trustees to the
City of Wauchula, $50,000.
First National Bank of
Wauchula to James B. Platt,
$13.000.


George and Gwendolyn
Patterson to Wauchula State
Bank, $194,000.
Gwendolyn T. Patterson to
Wauchula State Bank,
$130,000.
Juan F. Ruiz to Shawn
Pollard, $115,000.
Jose Leonardo Gomez and'
Jose L. Gomez Jr., to Eriberto
Velasco and Juana Sanchez,
$35,000.


Large Washers & Dryers

Up To 125 Ibs. Washers


SPECIAL/ESPECIAL

MONDAY-FRIDAY

6AM-6PM 50% OFF


NORMAL/NORMAL ENTE
$250 DOUBLE/DOBLE
o400 MAX/MAXI
$600 LARGE/GRANDE
$700 SUPER/GRANDE


BBQ


SPECIAL/ESPEC4AL
$125

$200
$300
$350


a5


Saturday, November 5

4 p.m. 6 p.m.


Pork & Chicken Dinners


$


h


Pick-up at Cattleman's Arena


Altman Rd.


Take-out Only!


Call 773-2164

for tickets and more information


j Thank you for your support!

We appreciate everyone who
has purchased tickets.


10:27-11:3c


NOTICE OF FINAL AGENCY ACTION BY
THE SOUTHWEST FLORIDA WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT
Notice is given that the District's Final Agency Action is approval of the application for a
Water Use Permit to serve Agriculture. Citrus Irrigation activities. The total authorized
withdrawal is 47,020 GPD, Peak Month is 373,590 GPD, and Maximum is 1.267.200
GPD. The project is located in Hardee County, Section(s) 29 Township 35 South,
Range 27 East. The permit applicant is Theo & Christina Bryant whose address is
7665 Crewsville Road. Zolfo Springs. FL 33890 The permit No. is 20 010460.004.
The file(s) pertaining to the project referred to above is available for inspection Monday
through Friday except for legal holidays, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., at the Southwest Florida
Water Management District (District) Bartow Service Office 170 Century Blvd. Bartow. FL
33830..
NOTICE OF RIGHTS
Any person whose substantial interests are affected by trl bDtrict's action regarding this
matter may request an administrative hearing in accordance with Sections 120.569 and
120.57, Florida Statutes (FS.), and Chapter 28-106, Florida Administrative Code (F.A.C.),
of the Uniform Rules of Procedure. A request for hearing must (1) explain how the
substantial interests of each person requesting the hearing will be affected by the
District's action, or proposed action; (2) state all material facts disputed by each person
requesting the hearing or state that there are no disputed facts; and (3) otherwise com-
ply with Chapter 28-106, F.A.C. A request for hearing must be filed with and received by
the Agency Clerk of the District at the District's Brooksville address, 2379 Broad Street,
Brooksville, FL 34604-6899 within 21 days of publication of this notice (or within 14 days
for an Environmental Resource Permit with Proprietary Authorization for the use of
Sovereign Submerged Lands). Failure to file a request for hearing within this time period
shall constitute a waiver of any right such person may have to request a hearing under
Sections 120.569 and 120.57, F.S.
Because the administrative hearing process is designed to formulate final agency action,
the filing of a petition means that the District's final action may be different from the
position taken by it in this notice of agency action. Persons whose substantial interests
will be affected by any such final decision of the District in this matter have the right to
petition to become a party to the proceeding, in accordance with the requirements set
forth above.
Mediation pursuant to Section 120.573, FS., to settle an administrative dispute
regarding the District's action in this matter is not available prior to the filing of a request
for hearing.
10:27c








8B The Herald-Advocate, October 27, 2011


During the past week, sheriff's deputies and city police
officers investigated the following incidents and made the fol-
lowing arrests:

COUNTY
Ott. 24, burglary of a conveyance on Dishong Road were re
ported.

Oct. 23, Jose Enrique Villegas, 47, of 405 Third St. East. Zolfo
-Springs, was arrested by Dep. Ryan Abbott and charged with petit
theft.
Oct. 23, Lewis Anthony Butler, 38, of 4422 Greenleaf Road,
Zolfo Springs, was arrested by Ofc. Ryan Abbott on an out-of-
county warrant.
S Oct. 23, a vehicle stolen on SR 62 and a theft on U. S. 17
South were reported.

Oct. 22, Benjamin Diaz, 27, of 315 SR 62, Bowling Green,
was arrested by Dep. Polly Bissette and charged with battery.
Oct. 22, Jose Miguel Lopez, 43, of 1833 U.S. 17 N.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Carlos Medina and charged with
battery.
Oct. 22, a fight on Sally Place was reported.

Oct. 21, Kevin Charles Logan, 51, of 9564 Walking Horse Dr.,
Zolfo Springs, was arrested by Dep. Michael Lake and charged
with battery.

Oct. 20, Anita Ramos Castillo, 28, of 3442 N. Nursery Road,
Zolfo Springs, was arrested by Det. Russell Conley on a charge of
violation of probation.
Oct. 20, Daniel Martin Medrano, 28, of 1060 Sumner Road,
Wauchula, was arrested by Florida Highway Patrol Tpr. Eduardo
Cruz and charged with DUI.
Oct. 20, a theft on North Florida Avenue was reported.

Oct. 19, Heriberto Garcia, 29, of 3446 Elm St., Zolfo Springs,
was arrested by Dep. Scott Heasley and charged with violation or
probation.
Oct. 19, residential burglaries on Boyd Cowart Road and on
Buckskin Drive, criminal mischief on Sally Place and on
Chamberlain Boulevard, and thefts on Altman Road, U.S. 17
South, Finch Drive, Buell Lane, Bostick Road and SR 62 were
reported.

Oct. 18, Jordy Lee Mendoza, 27, of 3551 Poplar St., Zolfo
Springs, was arrested by Dep. Michael Lake and charged with pos-
session of methamphetamine and possession of drug paraphernalia.
Oct. 18, Donnie Edward Gray, 27, of 2090 N. Saginaw Road,
Avon Park, was arrested by Det. Russell Conley on two counts of
violation of probation.
Oct. 18, Brenda Roberts Lee, 47, of 321 North Road,
Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. James Adler and charged with
possession of cocaine, possession of drug paraphernalia, resisting
an officer without violence and petit theft.
Oct. 18, Debra Kay Boyles, 31, of 806 N. Eighth Ave.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Det. Russell Conley on a charge of vio-
lation of probation.
Oct. 18, Rudy Lee Lopez, 25, of 2188 Ralph Smith Road,
Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Michael Lake on a charge of con-
tempt of court and also charged with possession of marijuana and
possession of drug paraphernalia.
Oct. 18, Kelley Lee Pearson Cunningham, 21, of 112.Lassiter
St., Avon Park, was arrested by Dep. Ryan Abbott on a pair of out-


of-county warrants.
Oct. 18, residential burglaries on Azalea Lane, Riverside
Drive and Himrod Road. and a theft on U.S. 17 South were report-
ed.

Oct. 17, Carl Anthony Luke, 26, of 3200 NW Q Ave., Winter
Haven, was arrested by Det. John Shivers and charged with rob-
bery without a firearm or weapon.
Oct. 17, a tag stolen on Carlton Street was reported.

WAUCHULA
Oct. 23, Ernest Anthony Rogers. 24. of 1223 David Court.
Wauchula. was arrested by Cpl. Chris LeConte'and charged with
resisting an officer without violence.
Oct. 23, David Allen wanderss, 44, and Felicia Doreen
Stanford, 33, both of 513 W. Orange St., Wauchula, were arrested
by Cpl. Chris LeConte and each charged with resisting an officer
without violence.
Oct. 23, Donna Marie Headdy, 45, of 510 W. Carlton St..
Wauchula, was arrested by Cpl. Chris LeConte and charged with
resisting an officer without violence.

Oct. 22, Chris Davon Cook, 23, of817 E. Main St., Wauchula,
was arrested by Ofc. Jonathan Corwin and charged with resisting
an officer without violence.
Oct. 22, Carlos Ucelo Hernandez, 25, of 1929 SR 64 West,
Zolfo Springs, was arrested by Sgt. Gabe Garza and charged with
disorderly intoxication.
Oct. 22, a theft on U.S. 17 South was reported.

Oct. 21, Charles Mcghee. 23, of 615 E. Oak St., Wauchula,
was arrested by Cpl. Chris Le Conte and charged with aggravated
assault with a deadly weapon and criminal mischief-damage to
property.
Oct. 21, a fight on East Oak Street was reported.

Oct. 20, criminal mischief on Carlton Street was reported.

Oct. 19, Andrew Michael Rupert, 23 of 126 E. Townsend St,,
Wauchula, was arrested by Ofc. Eric Thompson and charged with
two counts possession of marijuana and two counts possession of
drug paraphernalia.

Oct. 17, Bradford Wayne Dickey, 31, of 1022 Blue Jay Road,
Wauchula, was arrested by Ofc. Jonathan Corwin and charged with
battery, disorderly intoxication and resfusal to submit to a BAL
test.

BOWLING GREEN
Oct. 24, Joseph Thomas Martinez, 24, of 309 W. Jones St.,
Bowling Green, was arrested by Ofc. Sean Guthan and charged
with battery.

Oct. 22, a residential burglary on Dixiana Drive and a fight on
East Banana Street were reported.

Oct. 21, a fight on Troublesome Avenue was reported.

Oct. 20, Tomeka Chunta Cozart, 32, of 5120 U.S. 17, Bowling
Green, was arrested by Chief John Scheel and charged with utter-
ing forged instruments and petit theft.
Oct. 20, a theft on Minor Avenue was reported.

Imagination isn't merely a surplus mental department
meant for entertainment but the most essential piece of
machinery we have if we are going to live the lives of
human beings.
-Ted Hughes


Week ending October 23, 2011
Weather Summary: It was a relatively cool week across
Florida with temperatures at major cities averaging three to seven
degrees below normal. Extreme lows were between 34, and 37
degrees reported at the Florida Automated Weather Network
(FAWN) stations at Alachua. Jay. and Monticello. Most stations
reported lows in the 40s and 50s. High temperatures during the
week were mostly in the low 80s. It was a dry week across the
western Panhandle, northern, and central Florida with most FAWN
stations reporting less than a third of an inch of rainfall. The excep-
tion was 5.12 inches of rainfall reported at Carrabelle. Most FAWN
stations in southern Florida recorded between one and three inches
of precipitation. Fort Pierce reported 3.16 inches and Palmdale
reported 4.30 inches. As of October 23, 2011, Lake Okeechobee
was at 12.85 feet, compared to the 15.06 feet average during 1965-
2007.

Field Crops: Soil moisture was adequate for peanut digging
and the progress reached 75 percent harvested. This compared with
83 percent harvested last year and the five-year average progress is
72 percent harvested. Cotton defoliation and harvesting continued.
In the Palm Beach County are: ,ugarcane planting and harvesting
were halted due to muddy fields.

Vegetables: There was a light supply of vegetables available
including cucumbers and tomatoes. When weather permitted,
Miami-Dade County growers continued to cut and replant okra and
prepare land for planting vegetables. Green beans were nearly
ready to harvest and sweet corn had emerged to a height of about
six inches. Cabbage planting continued in Flagler County. Heavy
showers in St. Lucie County slowed field activities for vegetables.
Producers in Palm Beach County were waiting for fields to dry
before planting winter vegetables.

Livestock and Pastures: Statewide, the pasture condition var-
ied from very poor to excellent with 55 percent in good condition.
Drought limited pasture growth in the Panhandle and central areas
while flooding lowered the pasture condition in the southwest.
Permanent pasture continued to decline seasonally in quality and
quantity and cattlemen were feeding supplements. The cattle con-
dition was mostly good. In the Panhandle, pastures ranged from
very poor to excellent condition with most fair to good. Cool sea-
son forage planting was ongoing at locations which recently
received rain while pastures were stressed by drought in other loca-
tions. Some winter forages were already at three to four inches.in
height. In the northern areas, pasture condition ranged from fair to
excellent, with most in fair condition. The cattle condition was
mostly fair. In the central and southwestern areas, pasture condi-
tions ranged from very poor to excellent, with most in good condi-
tion. The poor condition of the pasture was mostly due to standing
water from recent rain. The condition of the cattle ranged from
poor to excellent with most in good condition.

SCitrus: Temperature highs this week were in the lower 80s,
with early morning lows ranging from the lower 40s to lower 50s
in the citrus-producing areas. There was widely variable rainfall
this week, ranging from over four inches to trace amounts.
Palmdale received the most rainfall with 4.30 inches. Overall, there
were normal moisture conditions in the citrus-producing region
with a few southern areas showing abnormally dry conditions.
Thirty-five packinghouses and seven processors have opened, with
more scheduled to open this week'. Varieties being packed included
early oranges (Navels, Ambersweet, and Hamlins), white and col-
ored grapefruit and Fallglo tangerines. Cultural practices included
herbicide and fertilizer applications, tree removal, new tree plant-
ing, and irrigation.


Putting food on the table


Florida


So America Grows


"Being a farmer is a pretty big responsibility. But
there's a lot of satisfaction in providing families with
food products like the oranges we grow. Phosphate,
found right here in Florida, helps them grow better. It's
a natural product, so that's why it works so well. In
fact, Florida provides 75 percent of the phosphate
needed by farmers across America. The folks who
send us phosphate have a big responsibility too the
land. They return it to nature for future generations, they
plant trees and they build parks. I can respect that."


10:27c











erald-Advocate
IUSPS 579-780)

S Thursday, October 27,2011


PAGE ONE


HJHS Girls



Pocket Wins


Memory Lane


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Hardee Junior High Lady
Wildcats are about to finish a
winning season.
The girls finished up their
Heartland Conference schedule
on Monday with a trip to
Sebring, a team they had beaten
previously in Wauchula.
In the last two weeks, they
have had four games, including
a make-up against Hill-Gustat.
They won all four, increasing
their Heartland record to 8-1
and avenging an earlier loss to
DeSoto.
First, they won back-to-back
games against Hill-Gustat Mid-
dle School of Sebring, 14-0 and
21-0.
Last week, it was wins over
DeSoto and Lake Placid.
On the road at DeSoto,
Hardee cruised, winning 20-5.
Two runners crossed home
plate in the top of the first,
Senida Garcia and Morgan
Walters. Garcia, the pitcher,
doubled to left field. Walters
was safe on a bunt. They came
around on a sacrifice by
Hannah Carlton and bunt by
Sarah Welch, who was safe on
an error.
It was silent until the top of
the third, when Hardee sent 14
batters the plate and had 10 of
them come around to score.
Garcia and Walters each scored
twice. Others coming in were
Carlton, Welch, Alyssa Tatum,
Gabby Allen, Michaela Vil-
lareal, Shayna Harned and
Ariana Ramos.
Desoto got a pair of tallies in
the home half of the third on a
pair of hits and an error. It was
12-2.
Hardee bounded back with
five more runs in the top of the
fourth, with Madison Rucker,
Harned, Ramos, Garcia and
Walters doing the honors.
Not to be outdone, DeSoto
rallied for three runs in the bot-
tom of the fourth on walks and


a hit.
Hardee finished its scoring in
the top of the fifth, with a final
trio of tallies, by Rucker, Garcia
and Morgan. Desoto went down
without scoring, stranded two
on the basepaths. Hardee won
20-5.
The Hardee girls also won at
home last Thursday against
Lake Placid.
With Walters on the mound, it
was three up, three down in the
top of the first. Hardee went to
work. Morgan and Welch, who
doubled, came in on a Tatum
single down the first base line.
Lake Placid took advantage
of a pair of errors and a double
to tie the score 2-2 in the top of
the second frame. Hardee left
the bases loaded with Villareal,
Garcia and Morgan in the home
half of the inning.
In the third, Hardee was able
to overcome errors and retire
Lake Placid without further
damage, but in turn left Allen
aboard. It was the same in the
fourth inning.
In the top of the fifth and
error left one Lake Placid batter
on base. Hardee got its offense
going again with a bat-around.
Walters started it with a triple to
deep left center. Carlton singled
to center and Welch drew a
walk. Tatum continued it with a
double to right center. She had
pushed runners ahead of her
and came home on a pair of sac-
rifices to up the Hardee lead to
6-2.
Lake Placid left the bases
jammed in the top of the sixth,
while Hardee added another
quartet of tallies. Harned
walked but was out on a Garcia
fielder's choice. Walters singled
to right center, Carlton walked
and Welch was safe when the
center fielder dropped the ball.
Tatum walked and Allen sin-
gled to left field. The last two
batters were left on base, as the
junior Lady Wildcats won 10-2.


PHOTO SUBMITTED BY TRACY DANIEl S
This picture was taken at Wauchula Elementary School of Jo Thompson's 1979-80 fourth-
grade class. Trayce (Adcox) Daniels remembers loving Thompson's class because she
learned a lot and because she was so great with her students. During that time, now Schools
Superintendent David Durastanti was the principal of WES. Classmates are (front row, from
left) Timmy Lindsey, Jennifer Sharkey, Maria James, Stephanie Harbarugh and an unidenti-
fied youngster; (middle row) Tracy Reynolds, James Blum, Michael Choate, Chester Alley,
Lelo Mushrush, Patty Jo Buffalo, Trayce Adcox, Joe Johnson, Sabrina Crockett, Laura Tanner
and Greg Johnson; (back) Mrs. Thompson, Mark Smith, Valerie Thomas, April Faulk, Ovita
Klein, Joseph Lee, Kelly Lee, Shawn Bartley and Debra Hill.

SHARE YOUR OLD PHOTOS WITH US!
Take readers on a walk down Memory Lane by sharing your photos from Hardee County's past. Bring your submissions to the news-
paper office at 115 S Seventh Ave or mail to The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338, Wauchula., FL 33873. Photos will be returned


There is magic in long-distance friendships. They let you relate to other human beings
in a way that goes beyond being physically together and is often more profound.
-Diana Cortes
The friend who holds your hand and says the wrong thing is made of dearer stuff than
the one who stays away.


Light One Candle


( SThe Christophers
('--------------------


SIMON COWELL'S APOLOGY TO MANDISA
It's the rare contestant on "American Idol" who ever got an
apology from Simon Cowell after he made a snarky comment
about him or her, but that's what happened with Season Five singer
Mandisa.
Unlike most performers who earned that judge's insults based
on their voices, Mandisa was targeted for being overweight. Simon
publicly apologized to her on the show. and Mandisa accepted
because of Jesus command to forgive those who hurt us.
Since then, Mandisa has become a Grammy-nominated pop
and gospel singer who just released her fourth album, entitled
"What If We Were Real," which produced her first No. I hit on the
U.S. and U.K. Christian music charts, the song "Stronger."
But even more importantly, the album's release coincided with
the goal she had set for herself to lose 100 pounds after a lifelong
struggle with being overweight.
When Mandisa joined me recently on my Christophers radio
show, I asked her why she included God in her weight-loss journey
as opposed to making it a strictly physical issue. She said, "I've
come to learn that I was trying to fill a void with food that could
really only be filled by God. 1 had to invite Him in and depend on
His power to get me through that because, on my own, my flesh
would win out every single time."
Though we had been talking about obesity. I also wanted to
address another problem in our culture. There are a lot of young
girls and women who think they have to bea size zero because of
the pictures they see in magazines, movies and on TV. I asked
Mandisa what she considered the most important concept to keep
in mind when it comes to body image.
Her response should be noted by Any parents with young
daughters.
Mandisa said. "Women and girls ..J are subconsciously told
that unless we measure up to those magazines, that we're not beau-
tiful. I very strongly disagree, and I'n thankful that God began
showing me that. ... He showed me thai my identity doesn't come
from that reflection in the mirror, that it comes from what He lays
out in Scripture.
"It talks about the unfading beauty that comes from the inside,
a gentle and a quiet spirit which is of great worth in God's sight,"
.she continued. "Having lost over 100 pounds. I know that it is
about so much more than my physical appearance. It's about obe-
dience, it's about trying to honor God 'ith my body, and it's about
health. I've tried to make this journey about so much more than just
a number on a scale. I've tried to make it about what's good for me
- mind, soul and body."
In addition to her struggles with weight. Mandisa has faced
other challenges in her life yet feels she has triumphed because
Jesus Christ is always at her side.
'She aid, "I think so often as Christians. we feel like we have
to put on our brave face and show the world how wonderful every-
thing is. The fact of the matter is we're not promised that every-
thing is going to be wonderful: we're actually promised the exact
opposite. We're promised that in this world, we will have troubles.
But the solution to that is not the absence of troubles. The solution
is that we have the opportunity to walk out of those troubles with
the Lord.
"I try to remember that when 1 walk through difficult times,"
Mandisa concluded. "It doesn't mean that God has left me; it nmeIans
He's walking me through those and I'm going to come out stronger
in the end."


Fall Back to Nature
Tee Shirts on sale
with proceeds to a .
benefit Hardee
County Wildlife
Refuge Comeseeusalon tiheBoa

Sponsored by Hardee County Friends of the Parks /Come see us al027mar


S

S




I
ii


I ol











2C The Herald-Advocate, October 27. 2011





Schedule of Weekly Services-


'Printed as a Public Service
by .
SThe Ierald-Advocate
Wauchult, Florida

Deadline: Thursday 5 p.m.


BOWLING GREEN
APOSTOLIC LIGHTHOUSE
UNITED PENTACOSTAL
CHURCH
310 Orange St.
375-3100
Sunday Morning .................. 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening ....................6:00 p.m .
Tuesday Prayer Meeting........7:00 p.m.
Thursday Service ..................7:30 p.m.

CHESTER (ROVE MB CHURCH
708 W. Grape St. 375-3353
Sunday School ...................... 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship ....................8:00 a.m.
Sun. Eve. Worship *
Ist & 3rd ..............4:00 p.m. 3:00 p.m.
Tues. Prayer/Bible Study ......6:00 p.m.

CHRISTIAN BIBLE
FELLOWSHIP
Hwy. 17 South
Morning Worship ................10:30 a.m.
Youth Group Sunday ..........6:00 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
121 West Broward St. 375-2231
375-3100
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................. 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday .......................... 7:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
TRUE HOLINESS OUTREACH
725 Palmetto St.
375-3304
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Tues. Night Bible Study ...... 7:30 p.m.
Evening Worship
Ist Sunday .................... 5:00 p.m.

COMMUNITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Main & W. Centra.
Sunday AM Worship............10:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening ....................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer Meeting ............7:00 p.m.

FAITH ASSEMBLY OF GOD
4937 Hwy. 17 N. 375-4206
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship .............11:00 a.m.
Disciples Train & Choirs ......5:30 p.m.
Evening Worship .................. :30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Howling Green
S. Hwy. 17. 375-2253
SUNDAY:
Bible Study ............................9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............10:45 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:30 p.m.

WEDNESDAY:
Discipleship Training
Youth & Adult ................6:30 p.m.
AWANA (ages 3-5th grade) ,...6:30 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Grape & Church Streets 375-2340
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship .............. 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ..................6:00 p.m.


FORT GREEN BAPTIST
CHURCH
Baptist Church Road 773-9013
Bible Connection ..................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper .............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

HOLY CHILD
SPANISH CATHOLIC MISSION
Misa (Espanol) Sunday ........7:00 .m.

IGLESIA DEL DIOS VIVO
105 Dixiana St. 375-4191
Domingo De Prcdicacion ....11:00 p.m.
Martes Estudio Biblico..........7:00 p.m.
Miercoles Estudior Juvenil....7:00 p.m.
Jueves De Predicacion ..........7:00 p.m.

IMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH
210 E. Broward St. 375-4681
Sunday School ..............9:.5 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ............. 6:0( p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..................7:00 p.im

MACEDONIA PRIMITIVE
BAPTIST CHURCH
607 Palmetto St.
Church School ................... 9:30 a.m.
Mornmg Ser\ ice ..................11:00 a.m.
Evening Service .... ..............7:00 p.m .
Wed. Bible Study/Prayer ......7:00 p.m.
Commlunion-2nd Sun. Eve. ..6:00 p.m.

MT. PISGAH BAPTIST CHURCH
6210 Mt. Pisgah Rd. 375-4409
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m .
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training ... ...............:00 p.m .
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Pra'.er Time........7:00 p.m.
NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
SMason Dixon & County Line Rd.
781-5887
Sunday W orship .................. 1:0() a.m .
2nd Sunday Communion .... I:00 a.m.
5th Sundiay Feast.................. I1:00 a.m .
Bread of Life Sunday.........12:15 p.m.
T.H.EL. Meeting Tuesday ....7:00 p.m.


BOWLING GREEN
OPEN DOOR FULL GOSPEL
PRAISE CENTER
E. Broward St.
Sunday School ................. 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Ser ice .................... 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday c Ser\ ice ................7:30 p.m.

PRI.MERA VISION BAUTISTA
Murray Road off Hwy. 17
375-2295
Domingos Escuela Dom. ......9:45 a.m.
Scr cio de Adoracion..........11:00 a.m.
Servicio de Predicacion ........5:00 p.m.
M iercoles Servico .................6:30 p.m.

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 South US Hwy 17
Morning Service .................. 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.

ST. JOHN A.M.E. CHURCH
513 W. Orange St.
375-2911
Sunday Church School ..........9:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship....11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

VICTORY PRAISE CENTER
128 E. Main St.
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Thursday Night Services,
Evening Worship. ..................7:00 p.m.
K idz Club...............................7:00 p.m .

ONA

LIMESTONE BAPTIST CHURCH
4868 Keystone Ave. Limestone
Comm.
Sunday School ....................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ..........1...1..:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

NEW ELIM
INDEPENDENT BAPTIST
Badger Loop Lane 773-4475
Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m.
Worship Service .................1 :00 a.m.
Sunday Night Worship ..........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time........7:00 p.m.

NEW ZION BAPTIST CHURCH
202 Sidney Roberts Road
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training.................. :00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................6:00 p.m.

ONA BAPTIST CHURCH
131 Bear Lane 773-2540
Sunday School ..............10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............1 :00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

UNION BAPTIST CHURCH
507 l.il% Church Rd. 494-5622
Sun. SJ o 1 ................ 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 1 :00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday
AW/NAKIA f'.. /Ki;l. .-ll n. m


WAUCHULA

COMMUNITY BAPTIST
CHURCH OF WAUCHULA HILLS
(SPANISH)
615 Rainey Blvd.
257-3950
Sunday Bible Study ............10:00 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship.... 11:00 a.m.
SSunday Evening Service........7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Ser ice................7:00 p.m.
DIOS ES AMOR
807 S. 8th Ave.
773-4576
Domingos Escuela
Dominica ..........................10:00 a.m .
Servicio .............................. 11:00 a.m .
Lunes Oracion ...................... 6:00 p.m.
M!ercoles Servicio ................7:00 p.nl.
ELREMANENTE
IGLECIA CRISTIANA
318 W. Main St..
Martes Oracion ...................... 7:00 p.m.
Jueves Servicio ...................... 7:30 p.m.
Viemes Servicio ..................7:30 p.m.
Domingo Servicio................ 10:30 a.m.
ENDTIME CROSSROAD
MINISTRY
501 N. 9th & Georgia St. 773-3470
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Service .................1:30 a.m.
Evening Service....................7:30 p.m.
Wed. Bible St. & Yth. Gath ..7:30 p.m.
Friday (Holy Ghost Night)....7:30 p.m.

FAITH PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
114 N. 7th Ave. 773-2105
Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship .................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ................6:15 p.m.
Wed. Youth Fellowship........6:50 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

FAITH TEMPLE CHURCH
OF GOD
701 N. 7th Ave 773-3800
Sunday School .................... 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship ..................10:20 a.m.
Children's Chuch ................10:40 a.m.
Evening Service ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
1570 W. Main St. 773-4182
SUNDAY:
Bible Study for all ages ........9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ."..............6:00 p.m."

WEDNESDAY:
Sr. Adult Bible Study ..........10:00 a.m.
Children's Chiors *
(PK-Grade 4) ................. 5:30 p.m.
PRAISE 57-Jr High Chior .. 5:30 p.m.
Mid-Week Prayer Meeting .. 6:00 p.m.
Kids On Missions
(PK-Grade 4) .................... 6:00 p.r.i.
Club 56 .......................... .... 6:00 p.m.
Youth Group (Grades 7-12) 6:00 .m.
Family Life Ministry
& Discipleship .................. 6:00 p.m.
Church Orchestra.................. 6:00 p.m.
Adult Choir .......................... 7:00 p.m.


A wA ,or ,u ................... ... FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH
Wednesday Prayer Time.........7:00 p.m. 11 W. L a St. 7 3
1121 W. Louisiana St. 773-9243
SUNDAY:
WAUCHULA Generations Cafe Opens........9:30 a.m.
Kids World Check-In for

APOSTOLIC ASSEMBLY Nursery-5th Grade Begins..10:15 a.m.
Martin Luther King and Apostolic Rd. Pre-K Blast ....................... 10:45 a.m.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m. Ki Word B.L.AST.
English Service ..................1 1:30 a.m. (K-5th)... .................10:45 a.m.
General Worship Service 1:30 p.m. Worship Service ..................10:45 a.m.
General Worship Service ......1:30 p.m. W N A
Tuesday Prayer ......................7:00 p.m. WbDNESDAY.
Check-In begins for
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.Chc begi
Nursery-5thgrade ..............6:15 p.m.

CELEBRATION CHURCH Classes for children ages
322 Hanchey Rd. PreK-12th grade ...........6:30-8:00 p.m.
322 Hanchey Rd.
863-781-1624 FIRST CHURCH OF
hardee.celebration.org THE NAZARENE
Sunday Morning Service .... 11:00 a.m. 511 W.Palmetto St.
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m. Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Youth Service ....5:30 p.m. Morning Service .................. 1:00 a.m.
Childcare provided at all services Evening Worship .................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.
CELEBRATION FELLOWSHIP FIRST MISSIONARY
773-0427 BAPTIST CHURCH
Celebration Service..............10:30 a.m. 1347 Martin Luther King Ave.
IWiemidnesdav Eveningi Cell Groups 773-6556
Adult Cell Group .................. 7:00 p.m. Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m.
Youth Cell Group-, ...........:....7:00 pin.. Morning Service ................. 1:00 a.m.
Children's Cell Group ...7:00 p.ni. Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Call for locations : Tues. Youth Ministry Meeting/
Bible Study ..................... 6:00 p.m.
CHARLIE CREEK Wed. Prayer/Bible Study ......7:00 p.m.
BAPTIST CHURCH FIRST UNITED
6885 State Road 64 East 773-3447 METHODIST CHURCH
"S'nday School ". ......... ......:45 a'.m. 207 N. SeventhAve. 773-4267
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m. Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m. Traditional Sunday Worship 11:00 a m.
Wednesday Worship .............6:30 p.m. Casual Sunday Worship..........6:00 p.m
CHURCH OF CHRIST Tuesday Bible Study............10:00 a.m.
-201 S Florida Ave. & Orange St. Wednesday Activities ............6:00 p.m.
773-9678 FLORIDA'S FIRST ASSEMBLY
BibTe Study ............................9:30 a.m. OF GOD CHURCH
Worship Service ................10:30 a.m. 1397 South Florida Avenue
Wednesday ............................ 7:30 p.m. 773-9386.
Sunday School ...... ............9:00 a.m.
CHURCH OF CHRIST Morning Worship ................10:00 a.m.
Will Duke Road Wed. Family Night ................7:00 p.m.
773-2249 -- .__ Adult. Children & Radiate Youth Church
Sunday Morning Worship ..,-9 FLORIDA GOSPEL
Sunday Bible Clas il:30 a.m. 511 W. Palmetto
Sunday Evening Worship ......6:00 p.m. 223-5126
Wed. Night Bible Class ........7:00 p.m. Sunday Morning Worship ....11:00 a.m.
en Leadership & Training Clss Wednesday Worshi 7:30p.
2nd Sunday of Month........4:00 p.m. W p.m.


THE GOSPEL TABERNACLE
CHURCHOF-GO -- 810 W. Tennessee St. 863-735-1158
-Martin Luther King Blvd. Morning Service ..................10:00 a.m..
767-0199 Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m..


CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST
OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS
630 Hanchey Rd. 773-3532
Sacrament Meeting.............. 9:00a.m.
Sunday School .n-.. :J.09-fl-m
Priesllood ........... .......... 11 :00 a.m .


HEARTLAND
COMMUNITY CHURCH
1262 W. Main St. 767-6500
Coffee & Donuts...................9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m.
worshipp .. ............ 10:30 a.m.
Wed. Night Dinner ............6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bodybuilders Adult Cl.
Crossroads &
Lighthouse ....................7:00 p.m.

HIGHER GROUND
INTERNATIONAL MINISTRY
1258 W. MAIN STREET
WAlCHL IA, F.
Sundi\ Morning Worship ...11:00 a.m.
Wed Night1 Bible Stud\ ... ... 6:30 p.m.


WAUCHULA

IGLESIA HISPANA
FUENTE DE VIDA
501 N. 9" Ave.
M artes ............................... : : 30 p.m .
Jueves ............... ...................7:30 p.m .
Domin go ................. ........ 10:30 p.m.

IGLESIA HISPANA
PRESENCIA de Dios
511 W. Palmetto St.
Dom ingos .............................. 6:00 p.m .
M iercoles. .............................. 7:00 p.m .

IGLESIA ADVENTISTA DEL
SSEPTIMO DIA
Old Bradenton Road
767-1010

JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
ENGLISH
155 Altman Road 1131
Sunday Service...................... 2:00 p.m.

JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
SPANISH
Sunday Service .................... 10:00 a.m.

LIGHT OF THE WORLD
MINISTRIES
Womans Center 131 N. 7th Ave.
Wauchula, FL
Friday Evening ......................6:00 p.m.

LAKE DALE BAPTIST CHURCH
3102 Heard Bridge Road
773-6622
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Service .................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

MINISTERIO INTERNATIONAL
Cambriadores de Mundo
704 W. Main St. 773-0065
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.

NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH
1999 State Road 64 East
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship Service....11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship Service ......6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Night Supper ......6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Activities
(All Ages) .......................... 7:00 p.m.
NEW LIFE CHURCH
117 W. Palmetto St.
773-2929
Sunday Service ....................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
Children Ministries for all services

NEW MT. ZION A.M.E. CHURCH
10 Martin Luther King Ave.
767-0023
Morn. Worship
(lst & 3r Sun.) ..................8:00 a.m.
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
" morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
2nd Sund 'i ,:utlli Ser'. c ....4:00 p.m.
Allen Clririn Endeavor .....4:00 p.m.
Wed. & Fri. Bible Study........7:00 p.m.

NORTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
912 N. 8th Ave. 773-6947
Sunday Sdhool ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

OAK GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
4350 W. Main St. 735-0321
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

PEACE VALLEY LUTHERAN
CHURCH
1643 Stenstrom Road 773-2858
I" & 31 Sun.
Communion .......:.......... 10:00 a.m.
2" & 4" Sun.
Divine Worship ................10:00 a.m.
Bible Study ........................ 1:15 a.m.
** Fellowship each Sunday after service

PROGRESSIVE MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
149 Manley Road East Main
773-5814
Sunday School ...................... 9:30 a.m.
Worship Service .................. 11:00 a.m.
Wed. Evening Prayer ............7:00 p.m.

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 North US Hwy 17
Morning Service ............... 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.

RIVERVIEW HEIGHTS
MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1321 S.R. 636 East 773-3344
Radio Program .
WZZS Sundays..................9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

SOUL HARVEST MINISTRY
1337 Hwy. 17 South, Wauchula
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m .
Morning Worship ............11:00 a.m.
Evening Service ....................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

ST. ANN'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
204 N. 9th Ave. 773-6418
Sunday .................................9:00 a.m .
Holy Days .................... ..............

ST. MICHAEL
CATHOLIC CHURCH
408 Heard Bridge Road 773-4089
Saturday Mass (English) ......5:00 p.m.
(Spanish) ......7:00 p.m.


Sunday(English) ....................8:30 a.m .
(Spanish) ................. 1:00 a.m.
(Creole) .............. .... 1:00 p.m.
SCatecismo ............................9:45 am .
Daily Mass in English .........8:30 a.m.
SEVENTH DAY
ADVENTIST CHURCH
205 S. llth Ave.- 773-9927
Sabbath School ...................9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ I :00 a.m.
Tues. Prayer Meeling ............7:00 p.m.


WAUCHULA

SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
505 S. 10th Ave. 773-4368
Sunday School .................... .9:45 a.m .
Morning Worship ........ .......11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:0 p.m.

SPIRIT WIND TABERNACLE
1652 Old Bradenton Road
Sunday Worship. ............... 10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............7:30 p.m.

TABERNACLE OF
PRAISE & JOY
1507 MLK Avenue
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 1:30 a.m.
Evening Worship .................7:00 p.m.
Tues. Bible Stdy.
& Child Train .................7:00 p.m.
Friday Prayer Service ............7:00 p.m.
WAUCHULA CHURCH OF GOD
1543 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.
773-0199
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:15 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Fam. Training ....7:30 p.m.
Thurs. Youth Bible Study ......7:00 p.m.
Friday Night Worship ............7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA HILLS HARVEST
TEMPLE ASSEMBLY OF GOD
210 Anderson
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Church................................ 10:00 a.m .
Youth Service ........................ 6:00 p.m.
Evening Service ....................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA HILLS
SPANISH CHURCH OF GOD
1000 Stansfield Rd.
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer ......................7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship..................7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship .................. 7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA REVIVAL CENTER
(Full Gospel)
501 N. 9th Ave.
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Youth & Child. Church..........6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ..................7:00 p.m.
Men's Fri. Prayer ..................7:00 p.m.


ZOLFO SPRINGS

COMMUNITY WESLEYAN CHURCH
Gardner
Sunday School .................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............1 :00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

COWBOY.UP MINISTRY
Cracker Trail Arena'
Hwy 66
(across from Oak Hills Ranch Rd.)
781-2281
Sunday .............................. 10:00 a.m .
CREWSVILLE BETHEL
BAPTIST CHURCH
8251 Crewsville Road
Church 735-0871 Pastor 773-6657
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................6:30 p.m.
EVANGELISTIC HOLINESS
CHURCH INC.
Corner of 6th and Hickory
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday ............................ 7:30 p.m.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
OF ZOLFO
320 E. 4th St. 735-1200
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Training Union ......................5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.
FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Corner of 6th & Suwanee 735-0114
Bible Study ..........................10:00 a.m.
Worship Service .................11:00 a.m.
GARDNER BAPTIST CHURCH
South Hwy, 17 494-5456
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................1: 00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.
IUFE CHANGING WORSHIP CENTER
3426 Oak St. 863-832-9808
Sunday Worship ....................2:30 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.


ZOLFO SPRINGS

MARANATHA BAPTIST CHURCH
2465 Oxendine Rd
(863) 832-9292
SundaN School ....................10:00 a.m .
W orship ..................... .........11:00 a.m .
E\ening.................................. 1:00 p.m .
Wed. Bible & Pra\'r Meet....7:00 p.m.
NEW VISION WORSHIP CENTER
64 E. & School House Road
Church 735-8585 Childcare 735-
8586
Morning Worship ................10:00 a.m.
Children's Church ................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Youth & F.T.H. ............7:00 p.m.

PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF
GOD FAITH TEMPLE
Oak Street
Sunday Worship ..................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Tuesday Worship ..................7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship.................7:30 p.m.
Saturday Wdrship ..................7:30 p.m.

PRIMERA MISSION
BAUTISTA HISPANA
518 8th Ave. E.
Escuela Dominical ..............10:00 a.m.
Servicio del Domingo.......... 11:00 a.m.
........................................ 7:00 p.m .
Servicio del Miercoles ..........7:30 p.m.
PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH
Pioneer Park
2nd Sunday ..........................10:30 a.m.
Evening Service ....................6:30 p.m.
5th Sunday ............................ 6:00 p.m.

REALITY RANCH
COWBOY CHURCH
2-1/2 Miles east of
Zolfo Springs on Hwy. 66
863-781-1578
Sunday Service ...................I1:00 a.m.

ST. PAUL'S MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
3676 US. Hwy. 17 South 735-0636
Sunday School .. ................9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship ......................11 a.m.
Wed. Prayer Service ............7:00.p.m.

SAN ALFONSO MISSION
3027 Schoolhouse Lane
Domingo, Misa en Espanol ..9:30 a.m.
Catecismo ............................11:00 a.m.

SPANISH MISSION
735-8025
Escuela Dominica . .........10:00 a.m.
Servicio .............................. 1:00 a.m .
Pioneer Club ..........................6:30 p.m.
Servicia de la Noche .........7:00 p.m.
Mierecoles Merienda ............6:00 p.m.
Servicio ..................................8:00 p.m .
Sabado Liga de Jovenes ........5:00 p'.m.


An editor reported that a
Japanese inventor was making
and selling an electronic head
cooler.
Interesting! What we need is
fewer hot heads and more warm
hearts.
So many are flying into a rage,
and they always make a bad
landing. Some are continually
popping off, and they always burst
the breech only to hurt them-
selves. Others are daily blowing
their stack, and they always
pollute the atmosphere.
But the Bible says, 'Let all
bitterness, and wrath, and clamor,
and evil speaking, be pot away
from you, with all malice. And be
kind to one another."

Visit (is at: www. TMeSower.com


F all is a fun season, the air is cooler
brightly colored leaves abound, trick-or treating
brings lots of candy. It's a favorite season for some.
Every season has its moments; every season has
its needs. Our Creator knows our desires for all
seasons; whatever we need, He is waiting for us to
ask for His loving guidance; winter, spring, summer
or fall. God controls the seasons won't you let
Him help you control your life? Visit your house of
worship this season and seek God's loving help.


Weekly Scripture Reading
Micah Micah Micah Micah Micah
1.1-16 2.1-13 3.1-12 4.1-13 5.1-15


Micah Micah
6.1-16 7.1-20


Scnlures Seected by The Ainmenwr, Oe Soaety
C20Q1 '. Kvier W-lli fs Newmlwaer Servis. PO Box 8187. Charittoesilt. VA 290. www kwnvt- wcom


SPQC c. 'ioer Qr00ers

Wholesale Nursery

Donnis & Kathy Barber
Hwy. 66 East (863) 735-0470
RO. Box 780 Zolfo Springs, FL








October 27, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 3C


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I...,A-. State Farm
SInsurance
|I'SM David Singletary, A.---.2
INSIUANCF
.Vaichula 773-6100

Good Luck

Wildcats


3. 3r d Thursday of each month
9/15, 10/20 & 11/17
Vision Ace Hardware

Save 50-75% on pet Vaccinatons


BOWL OF FUN
~:.. 4 & ,SEE Us AFTER THE GAME

WE'RE a PEN UNTIL
MIDNIGHT eof
':'" 773-6391 We




proudly supports
Hardee Senior High Athletics

o," .Qc:-k And Go Wildcats!
.0N Co..~-My R.3in.-d f.3 &*-n i 0....1 P u* m l.


SENIOR SPOTLIGHT


Justin Knight

Jersey #: 13
Position: Strong
Safety

Years In Football:
3 Varsity, 2 JV, 2 .
Junior High & I '
youth football.

Age: 17
Parents: Brian & Gilly Knight

Hobbies/Interests: Fishing, baseball,
football, hanging out with friends.

Future Plans: Go to college, hopeful-
. ly play baseball after highschool and .
study sports medicine to become a
Physical therapist.
[ ... yrA


Aug. 26 Lake Placid
Sept. 2 Fort Meade


Sept. 9


Avon Park


Sept. 16 Sebring
Sept. 23 Bradenton
Bayshore*
Sept. 30 Mulberry
Oct. 7 Open
Oct. 14 Frostproof #
Oct. 21 Palmetto *


SEEYI


FOR ALL :..


4?

*'.4)


Away
Home
Away
Away

SAway
Home


Home
Away


Oct. 28 Bradenton S.E.* Home


Nov. 4 DeSoto *
Nov. 11 Fort Pierce
Central


7:00


Home 7:00


Away


7:00


* District Games # Homecoming **Senior Night
Waylon Mabe


Waylon Mabe



:1jai


WILDCAT R(
NAME
Dalton Rabon
Aaron Barker
Keshun Rivers
Jesus Flores
Deonte Evans
Mikey Retana
Ramiro Briones
Keyonte Holley
Keyon Brown
Kris Johnson
Jajuan Hooks
Colby Baker
Justin Knight
Andrew Hooks
James Greene
Maxon DelHomme
Michael Moreno
Murrell Winter
Octavio Alvarez
Ledarius Sampson
Carter Lambert
Jacquille Dewberry
Alonso Casso
Keyonte Holley
Caleb Brandeberry
Adam Khang
Waylon Pleger
Kevin Borjas
Dawson Crawford
Dillon Skitka
Wintz Terrell
Adson DelHomme
Victor Lopez
Dylan Farr
Luke Palmer
Ramiro Ramirez
Rufino Gabriel
Uvaldo Sanchez
Jesus Zuniga
Julian Varela
Rito Lopez


FOSTER 2011
GR POS
12 WR/LB
11 TB/DB
12 WR/DB
10 FB/LB
12 WR/DB
12 WR/LB
12 WR/DB
9 WR/DB
10 FB/DE
10 QB/DB
12 WR/DB
12 QB/DB
12 WR/DB
12 TB/DB
10 FB/DE
12 FB/DT
11 WR/DB
12 WR/DE
11 WR/LB
11 TB/LB
12 TE/DE
11 WR/DE
10 FB/DT
9 FB/LB
11 TE/DE
11 WR/DB
10 FB/LB


12
12
12
10
11
- 1.2
10
11
11
12
11
12
12


OL/DE
OL/DT
OL/DT
OL/DT
OL/DT
OL/DE
OL/DT
OL/DT
OL/DE
OL/DT
OL/DT
OL/DT
OL/DT


* S. .. *f .." .'
. *. '. : ** 1f
~.; ,:


ULLRICH'S WATER CONDITIONING


0o WlIats!


"For All Your Water Needs"
409 Goolsby St., Wauchula, 773-6448



S ANGE SPECIAL
I1 f(OIJNT WITH THIS AD
riher 1 November 30
SUPERIOR OK TIRE STORE t
r,-.' 740 HWY 17 N. Wauchula
773-3261
P -------- -- MM---
,V Save $ '", '
" on your $1010 purchase. I a
SPresent this coupon at time of purchase a
I Expires 11/19/1 I
*--------------_-*------- ---i---.
x ~Vision Ace Hardware
AC E 225 E Oak ,Si Waucliula
J.o..Iauu 773-3148


\, veriTon

319 South 6th Ave. (863) 773.0001
TCC ))I





:r:. c 1 ,
SP63.773 orP r. "r. ';~ P' P
110 N 6th Avenue Wauchula. Florida 33873
magtree10l4@gmail cor


I F 4;y'."I ;" .i .,';.1 .",-.a


* JFLORIDA HOSPITAL B "iB
WAUC. II UL.A rnJ.orl
C. rtIanJ.or d


S * .


ICE CREAM
The World's Most Amazing Ice Cream

1040 S. 6th Ave., Wauchula
Located right next to Domino's Pizza.


ROBBY & SHERRY ALBRITTON
LABOR SERVICES


159 State Road 64 East Zolfo Springs
Oice 735-9226 Cell 863-528-7085
Office 735-9226 Cell 863-528-7085 1


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TIAUDIU


IES 7:00 P.M


SSoutheast High School


0 Pompey, John
02 Carley, Kadarnus
04 Pinckney, Isaac
05 Allen, Courtney
06 Nacht, Adam
07 Barnes, James
08 Sannon, Jacob
09 Johnson, Myles
10 Peterson, Brian
12 Porter. Jimmy
14 Thompson, Eric
15 Jean-louis, Jimmy
16 Wilson, Jordan
20 Bradshaw, Earvin
1 Grabski, Jordan
-3 Laws, Devion
24 Poole, Bnan
5 Haines, Bobby
8 Ware, Andre
2 Reed, Breyon
3 Williams, Rakeem
4 Foy, Peterson
5 Sanon, Jeffrey
5 Thomas, Jeremy
41 Jarvis, Cornelius
42 Beagle, Logan
44 Stanaland, Cody
45 Roberts, William
1 Davison, Jeffrey
-4 Bennett, James
35 Bowden, Micheal
57 Vitols, Christopher
:0 Wilkinson, Thomas
'2 Hurst, Jeffrey
35 Suca, Justin
:6 Takacs, Kane
71 Hudson, Lee
72 Cannon, Drew
4 Rorbis, Anthony
71 Williams,. Kevin
ichernond. Gedeon
0 Christy, Kenneth
3t Smith, Brandon
33 Hoyle, Andrew
34 Christiansen, Eric
5 Sheppard, Jonathan
30 Collymore, Jayson
35 Hanohano, Dylan
9 Takacs, Gage


WR
CB
RB
WR
OLB
WR
QB
WR
RB
QB
CB
CB
FS
WR
CB
CB
RB
CB
DL
OLB
CB
CB
ILB
ILB
DL
ILB
T DT
DT
OL DL
DE
OL
OL
OL
OL
OL
C
OL
OL
WR
PLK
PLK
CB
DE
DL
DL


130 Ibs 5'6"
149 Ilbs 5'10"
130 Ibs 57"
181 Ibs 5'7"
180 Ibs 5'9"
163 Ilbs 5'7"
160 lbs 5'10"
195 Ibs 6'0"
151 Ibs 6'1"
151 Ibs 5'5"
146 Ibs 5'11"
145 Ibs 5'10"
142 Ibs 5'10"
154 Ibs 5'11"
165 Ibs 5'11"
187 Ibs 6'3"
194 Ibs 5'10"
178 Ibs 6'2"
156 Ibs 5'6"
145 Ibs 6'0"
233 Ibs 5'10"
152 Ibs 5'8"
170 Ibs 5'11"
140 Ibs 5'6"
140 Ibs 5'4"
164 Ibs 5'8"
170 Ibs 5'6"
227 Ibs 6'2"
181 Ibs 5'10"
254 Ibs 6'1"
219 Ibs 5'11"
235 Ibs 5'10"
174 Ibs 5'10"
257 Ibs 5'8"
204 Ibs 6'0"
215 Ibs 5'8"
230 Ibs 6'0"
323 Ibs 6'0"
237 Ibs 5'7"
312 Ibs'6'4"
300 Ibs 6'3"
155 Ibs 5'10"
187 Ibs 6'2"
160 Ibs 6'0"
158 Ibs 5'11"
145 Ibs 5'6"
195 Ibs 6'1"
195 Ibs 6'0"
178 Ibs 57"


SENIOR SPOTLIGHT


;.4-
A
-' :
*.' . I



















ii
' .'- "- ;'* "


11.... .
, "/:; ". ,1
:.^1'"
',;"-. I




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h '

. !

, ;,1 ,r1
h*%
,:.. f i


Pana Pouglas


,4ge: 17


Parents: Carl
Lisa Douglas


I -w,- : Hobbies/Interests:
Hanging out with
friends, cheering,
tumbling, anything
fun. I love spending
time at the beach, tubing on the lake
and tanning.

Future Plans: To attend USF (Go
Bulls!) after I graduate Hardee Senior
High with a business degree and to con-
tinue to cosmetology school.

'.. ... -


Just name the score of Friday night's Wildcat Football game and
you could win
District Games-
2 Buc Tickets
All Other Games $40 Gift Certificate Payable to
one of our, selected "Wildcat" page sponsors


Meeting the financial needs ol the
community since 1929

k 0o Wildcats!






0Good ;'

'G o o d I tqe,
S Luck o,;
ROBARTS Cats! <
FAMIhY FUNERAL HOME a
A Tnenrd FAmly NimeSr, c 190S 6
Dennis.Robarts
529 W. Main St. 773-9773


WILD TS RULE!

IGAj. Mark-D. Sevigny O.D.
S -I P C.N. Timmerman O.D.
EYCARE Ronald 0. Sevigny O.D.
OCIA Julia King, OD.
Board Certified Physicians
735 N. 6th Ave.773-3322
Wauchula, FL 773-3322


* Contest is closed to all HRM Ad-Advocati.employees and familiesi'
* In the even of a lie, the inner will be picked bN a random drawing EIi
* If no one picks the exact score, the closest'score wins REALTORS
* Official enlnes only. .
f JAMIES
S* : .'. :. ... ..- : .
President
Winners will be picked Monday morning, notified by phone that
afternoon and announced in next week's paper. P :
S.L Phone: (86.
.' ,.:, ,-". :, ' .,.- E-M ail: jim (
I!_______


Oct. 21 Hardee
Bradenton SE


Name:


Address:


Day Phone:


DEADLINE FOR ENTRY: FRIDAY AT 5 P.M.
Fill out entry form and return It to: The Herald-Advocate
115 S. Seventh Ave., Wauchula
; ~t --,, -: ,,,,WIR E' ,
... '.'.-. P' i' ? , ; .;!. ' .. .'" .. .'f";?" ;, '' ., a v4j.,


V. SEE, JR.
t


63) 773-0060
@jimseerealty.om


BOGREEN
SMALL E RVICE, INC.
; LAWN EQUIPMENT


3 ) 0 (s83) .7 '---Z-,'
)aoi 0.f 1 3) "o:..-(u:3;-.
02 y 17 M Morn.-pi. : "
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I MA STUET

COME BY FOR dIOffW W Rl E THE GAME
W s o W u PsATS!
221 West Main St., Wauchua Phone: (86767-5300
221 eSt MainSt. Wachula :"., Phone: (863a767-5300


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ANIL.



INEUPJ

''Jeep


31 U.S. HIQHWAY 17 N., Wauchula I 1401 U.S. HIGHWAY 17 S., Wauchula
WOfifN fJYo (863) 314-5370
'i* 0 :s : '.."H. urBs:Mon-FIr'i' ..ll alseI,


LARGE PIZZA
kNY -TOPPING ANY SPECIALTY

V ^ V Ia.* How*e LMul,
MsU t EUte aor
dhanitas TEm*tWork


L~aUNUWV, avnoa


ZOLFO SPRINGS
1eS IaIt InsderBP
735-2100


ANIMAL

HOSPITAL


Dr. Slade Hayman D.V.M.
Former Wildcat
773-9273 330 Hanchey Rd


Head Coach:
Buddy Martin
Offensive Coordinator: Dale Carlton
Defensive Coordinator: Steve Rewis
Assistant Coaches: Ray Rivas,
Rashad Faison,
Shawn Rivers, Travis Tubbs


Mosaica



W Go Wildcats!


A I li -f- Ij
: "12 vl"P (6 773-.i'" 10


204 N,6GO CA TS h:(863)773
204 N 6th Ave., Wauchula Ph: (863) 773-4101


SFlorida Fuel
.. Hardee County,...
The NIXoa I.ocall Owned and Operated
fi ;IL fuel distributor ior-oier 18 yrars!

% 773-9466 On.
-Monich Reas, Owner" l op


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6C The Herald-Advocate, October 27, 2011


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October 27, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 7C


Known for his famous ride in 1775 and his work as a silversmith, Paul Revere is said to
have put ads in a Boston newspaper offering his services as a dentist.
rI


Ridge Insurance Agency
Contracted General Agency
Representing
Blue Cross Blue Shield
of Florida, Inc.


Keri M See
Serving all of your Individual, Group,
and Life Insurance Needs
2928 Kenilworth Blvd.
Sebring, FL 33870 10:20.27p keris


Blue Cross
Blue Shield
of Florida


Medicare

(863) 781-1012
ee78@yahoo.com


YOUR BUSINESS COULD

APPEAR HERE TOO!!
Contact
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels

773-3255


PUBLIC NOTICE
PUBLIC AVAILABILITY OF HAZARDOUS
MATERIALS INFORMATION
Pursuant to Section 324 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know act of
1986 (EPCRA), the following information is available to the public upon request during nor-
mal business hours by contacting the Florida, District VII, Local Emergency Planning Com-
mittee (LEPC) for Hazardous Materials.
Hazardous Material Safety Data Sheets
Facility Hazardous Chemical Inventory Forms
Section 304 Chemical Release Follow-up Notifications
District VII, LEPC Hazardous Materials Emergency Plan
The District VII LEPC services residents of DeSoto, Hardee, Highlands, Okeechobee, and
Polk Counties.
EPCRA requires that any business that regularly uses, handles, or stores certain hazardous
chemicals register with State and local regulatory agencies. If you have never registered
or wish to verify your requirement to register, contact the LEPC at the address or phone
number listed below. If you have previously complied, be sure your notifications are current
- penalties for non-compliance are severe.
To obtain notification information or to learn more about EPCRA, please contact:
Florida District VII LEPC
555 East Church Street
P.O. Box 2089
Bartow, Florida 33831
863-534-7130 ext. 107
10 27c









8C The Herald-Advocate. October 27, 2011


Stump The Swami
By John Szcligo
Well. Football fans, it is that weekend tor Florida and Georgia.
The Gators are unpredictable this year with injuries and a new staff.
For the first time in years, the UF ticket office has tickets for this
came. They also have tickets available for Vahderbilt and Furman.
Never thought we would see the day tickets wpuld be so easy to get
for a Gator game again:
Nov. 5th is a day to circle on the calendar. LSU will invade
Alabama in the most anticipated game of 2011 This game became
more anticipated when both Oklahoma and Wisconsin fell on the
same day. The winner should be playing in the National
Championship Game.
Stanford and its Heisman Hopeful QB Andrew Luck has com-
petition from Trent Richardson of Alabama and Kellen Moore from
Boise St. My vote would go to Luck. Wonder who will get Luck in
the NFL Draft? Miami and the Colts are in a heated race for the
first draft choice.
Georgia Southern is undefeated and ranked number one in the
nation in the football subdivision or the old Division I-AA. The
Eagles defeated Presbyterian 48-14 this past weekend. Ezayi
Youyoute rushed for 23 yards on 6 carries and passed for 31 yards
hitting three of three passes in the win.
Does Skip Holtz realize he needs a new defensive coordinator?
The Bulls had the winning drive and all they had to do was get a
three and out against Cincinnati. Again, the defense disappointed
and blew the game in the closing minutes. The Connecticut game
saw the same scenario. The Pitt game was a total fiasco defensive-
Sly. The Bulls now find themselves at the bottom of the standings in
the Big East.
Now let's look at this week's Bill O' Fare ..
1. UAB at Marshall Herd did put up over 500 yards of
offense against Houston. UAB won their first game against UCF.
Marshall 30 UAB 21.
2. West Virginia at Rutgers Mountaineers should come
back strong after the last debacle. They have beat Rutgers 18 times
in a row. West Virginia 42 Rutgers 20.
3. Florida and Georgia The World's largest Cocktail Party
takes on a strange feeling with Brantley.out and the Gators' recent
plunge. Even with Brantley, he will be rusty after his rehab. Dawgs
are on a roll and this could be their time. Georgia 28 Florida 21.
4. North Carolina St. at FSU Russell Wilson is at Wiscon-
sin. No hope for the Pack against the Noles in this one. Jimbo may
them back on track. FSU 45 NCSU 17.


HARDEE COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
107 East Main Street
P.O. Box 683
Wvauchula, Florida 33873
Phone (863) 773-6967 Fax (863) 773491L5
SWebsite: www.hardeecc.com
E-mail: hardeecc@-hardeecc.com


Mildred and Doyle E. Carlton, Jr. Award
Nomination Form
2011
When thinking ailut Mrr. and Mrs. Carlton, we see them ua hating the highest integrity
and uncompromising moral fortitude in their personal lives while being generous and
committed to the community's good in their public livsc-
This is the criteria nc are lIking fur in searching ror the reipient of the Carlton award.
Please take the time to nominate an individual that you recognize having and exhibiting
thes. same morals and commitmentlr s
This award will be presented at the Annual Chumber MSteing,
Saturday, November 18.2011


Nominee:
(<)cupation:/
Address:
Phone Number:
Plcase provide a brief statement as to why this nominee should receive the Carlton
Award.




I.ist nominee's community activities. (church, civic. youth. etc.)






Please provide any additional considerations that may be significant to the selection of the
candidate.




Nominator: Phone Number:
Please send torn to the Ilardee County Chamber or Commerce P.). Box 68.. Wauchula.
Florida. 3387wor Fax 863-773-4911. All entries must be received by November 4, 2011.
10 27r


HARDEE COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
107 Fat Ntain Sirecrt
P.O. Box 683
WauIchula. Florida 33873
Phone (8631 773-6967 Fax (863) 773-4.915
\Websitc: w ,x. w.hardeccc.com
E-mail: hardeeccca hardeecc.com


1. Must be a member
2. A substantiated h
1..4drocate and lea
4. C rrtivity and in
hbsiness.
5. .Membership in cr
community.
6. A uY other unique
the selection oftl

Nominee:
Bnuiness Name:
Business Address:
Business Phone N1urt
Pleasr provide a brii
of the Year Award.




WtVhatxcontribution I






List nomine'e colnr






Niminator:
l'ln'c s.lMnl lfrmis i
|H.riil. 387.4,or


Hardce Comuty Chamber of Commerce
Business Person of the Year
2011 Nomination Form
Sponsored 5by: IMaic
Critcria
er of the Hardee Count. Chamber of Commerre.
history as an established business.
der within the business community.
uaination in the sales, service. nwrketing. or any othrrJactor within the
ouncils, boards. and clubs providing support and services to the
Squalitsis. chartleristics. or accomplishments that may be significant to
he candidate.


tber:
cf statement a-s to whh this nominee should rcrrtvi the Business


has the nominee made to the business community in Hardee C


,unit) actisilies. (church. civic. outh. etc.,


Person






yunty?














chut.
2 11 i
1in 97-


5. South Carolina at Tennessee Without Lattimore.
Gamecocks are not the same team. Vols are at home and hungl.y for
a win. Tennessee 34 South Carolina 21.
6. Arkansas at Vanderbilt Hogs are looking great but 'andv
did get a win over Army. The\ could still get a bow'l game.
Arkansas 38 \and\ 20.
7. \irginia at Miami Canes should haie no problem.
Miami 33 UVA 16.
8. Clemson at Georgia Tech Jackets will be like a stirred
up hornet's nest after losing to Miami. Clemson will fall for the
first time. Georgia Tech 34 Clemson 30.
9. Connecticut at Pitt Wednesday Night on ESPN. Can Pitt
come back or will the Huskies' deliberate offense control the
game? Connecticut 27 Pitt 21.
10. BYU at TCU Horned Frogs ribbet past Cougars. TCU
51 BYU 23.
11. Bethune-Cookman at North Carolina Central Wildcats
continue their winning ways. BCC 28 NCC 19.
12. Baylor at Oklahoma St. Cowboys see their chance with
the Sooners losing. OSU 47 45 Ba\lor 27.
13. Syracuse at Louisville Charlie Strong got a 7-year con-
tract extension. Cardinals need a win over the Orance. Louisville
21 Syracuse 14.
14. Mississippi at Auburn Auburn will bounce back strong
after the LSU beat down. Too many weapons for Ole Miss to
counter. Auburn 44 Ole Miss 23.
15. Stanford at Southern Cal Cardinal will need a lot of
Luck to beat the Trojans. Oh wait, they have a lot of Andrew Luck.
Stanford 48 USC 31.
16. Mississippi St. at Kentucky UK gets back to SEC real-
ity. They can't win against anyone except lower division teams.
Basketball anyone? MSU 31 UK 13.
17. Memphis at UCF Knights rebound at home. UCF 24
Memphis 21.
18. North Dakota at Northern Colorado UNC Bears will
end this year's 0-8 streak with a win over 1-AA Fighting Sioux.
Greeley will be a party town finally! Northern Colorado 34 ND 14.
19. Miami at NY Giants Ahmad Bradshaw runs through the
Fish. Giants 37 Miami 20.
20. Jacksonville at Houston Jags hit another snag. Houston
34 Jags 17.



NOTICE OF APPLICATION

FOR TAX DEED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that EAN EDDY, the hold-
er of the following certificate has filed said certificate
for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate
number and year of issuance, the description of the
property, and the names in which it was assessed are
as follows:

CERTIFICATE NO.: 697 YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2007

Description of Property:

5 AC E/2 OF NW/4 OF NW/4 OF SE/4
13 33S 26E

SUBJECT TO RESERVATIONS, COVENANTS,
RESTRICTIONS, AND EASEMENTS OF RECORD.

Name in which assessed: DORA WINGATE

Said property being in the County of HARDEE, State
of Florida.
SC
Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according
to law, the property described in such certificate shall
be sold to the highest bidder at the Hardee County
Courthouse, 417 West Main Street, second floor hall-
way outside of Room 202, Wauchula, FL 33873 on the
9th day of November, 2011, at 11:00 a.m.

Dated this 27th df.y of September, 2011.

B. Hugh Bradley
Clerk of Circuit Court
Hardee County, Florida
AD No: 1
By: Alicia C. Albritton, Deputy Clerk
Tax Deed File No.: 252011TD011XXXX
Pursuantto F.S. 197.512 1:627c
10:6-27c


For the week ended October 20, 2011
At the Florida Livestock Auctions. receipt totaled 9.680 com-
pared to 8.146 last week. and 9.693 last year. According to the
Florida Federal-State Livestock Market News Service: Compared
to one week ago. slaughter cows 3.00 to 4.00 higher. bulls 4.00 to
5.00 higher, feeder steers 1.00 to 3.00 higher. heifers steady to 2.00
lower. replacement cows not tested.


Feeder Steers:





Feeder Heifers:





Slaughter Cows:
55.00-63.00

Slaughter Bulls:
70.00-89.00


Medium & Large
200-300 Ibs
300-400 lbs
400-500 lbs
500-600 lbs

Medium & Large
200-300 lbs
300-400 lbs
400-500 lbs
500-600 lbs


Frame No. 1-2
155.00-200.00
131.00-180.00
120.00-145.00
114.00-132.00

Frame No. 1-2
125.00-165.00
108.00-138.00
107.00-129.00
102.00-118.00


Lean: 750-1200 lbs 85-90 percent


Yield Grade No. 1-2 1000-2100 lbs


The man who has done his level best, and who is con-
scious that he has done his best, is a success, even
though the world may write him down a failure.
-B.C. Forbes



PUBLIC NOTICE

The PLANNING AND ZONING BOARD
meeting as the local planning agency will hold a

PUBLIC HEARING on
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2011
6:00 P.M.
or as soon thereafter
in the County Commissioners' Conference Room
412 West Orange St., 2nd floor Courthouse Annex
Wauchula, FL
to hear and to receive public input for

Agenda No. 2012-03 10 34 25 0000 03750 0000
End Time Cross Road Ministry, Inc. by and through the
Authorized Representative requests a Site Development Plan
for a church on 5.26+/-acre parcel zoned F-R (Farm-
Residential) in the Town Center Future Land Use District
On or abt W side of Martin Luther King, Jr. Ave., North
of Honeysuckle Ln.
A parcel of land located in the NE1/4 of the SW1/4 of Section 10,
Township 34 South, Range 25 East, Hardee County, Florida more
particularly described as follows: Corn at SE corn of NE1/4 of SW1/4 of
said Sec 10, thence S 89deg58min59secW and along S line of NE1/4 of
SW1/4 of said Sec 10, a dist of 30 ft to Point Of Beginning; thence
continue along S line of NE1/4 of SW1/4 a dist of 360.89 ft;.
thence N 00deg02min24sec East, 679.01 ft; thence S 89deg57min36sec
E, 360.42 ft to W/ly maintained R/O/W of Martin Luther King Ave.; thence
S 00deg00min00sec E along said R/O/W, 678.65 ft, returning lo POB,
LESS N 25 ft and LESS W 10 ft of the above-described property.
ALSO subj to a 75-ft ingress/egress easement along N side thereof.

Mike S. Thompson, Chairman

This is a Disabled-Accessible facility. Any disabled person needing
to make special arrangements should contact the Planning and
Development Department at least two (2) working days prior to the
P/Z Public Hearing.
This Public Notice is published in accordance with the Hardee
County Unified Land Development Code. Copies of the documents
relating to this proposal is available for public inspection during
weekdays between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. at the
Planning and Development Department, 110 S. 9th Ave., Wauchula,
Florida. If you wish to discuss the proposal, please call 863 767 1964
to schedule an appointment with Hardee County Planning and
Development Director.
All interested persons shall have the right to be heard. In
rendering any decision the Board of County Commissioners shall
rely solely on testimony that is relevant and material.
Although minutes of the Public Hearings will be recorded, anyone
wishing to appeal any decision made at the public hearings will need
to ensure a verbatim record of the proceedings is made by a court
reporter. 10:27c


"-I


j.


November 5, 2011
Race Begins at 8:00 am
S.at Hardee County YMCA

The Race

* Race Route is through historic downtown Wauchula.

* Commemorative T-shirts for the first 150 runners and

walkers

SSpecial Family Rate

SAwards for Best All-Around, top male and female and

medals for 1st and 2nd place In each division

Continental Runner's Breakfast

For'more information, the race route or to register, please

call 863-773-6445.


Presented By:


10 27c


POWER COMPANY


S

Special thanks to Main Street Wauchula


'_Phne Number:
o he Ilard, lr ( county ('hamnler or Commeln rce IPA.. l b 63N. \
l:aus; W.-773-.4915. Alt series must he rereivCd hs\ N,\vnelr 4.2





I --I


i








PAGE ONE


.Boat
The Outdoor Classroom takes
each of the fifth-grade classes
in Hardee County to Punta
Gorda every year on a boat trip.
This trip is funded in large
part by the Charlotte Harbor
National Estuary Program and
the Southwest Florida Water
Management District.
Two classes are taken at a
time, but depending on the class
sizes, a third may tag along. The
trip also consists of two or three
student volunteers, usually
from the high school and for-
mer members of Eco-Camp or
summer marine science.
The students are given a list
of expectations to meet in
preparation for the trip. They
are to have their parents sign
the permission form, bring a
change of clothes (if necessary),
bring a lunch if they are not eat-
ing a school-provided lunch,
wear water shoes, perhaps bring
a hat and sunglasses, and al-
ways have sunscreen.
The kids then pile into the
Outdoor Classroom bus -
which has racks for storage as
well as screens for videos and a
speaker system for the hour-
long journey to Punta Gorda.
On the way there, they are
shown an "Estuary Live" video
with information about the
Charlotte Harbor Estuary and
the plants and animals it con-
tains.
When the students arrive at


Trip T
Fisherman's Villa in Punta
Gorda. they unload all their
things and the Outdoor Class-
room equipment from the bus,
and then make their way to the
dock where their King Fisher
Tour Boat awaits.
The captain of the boat ex-
plains the safety procedures,
both in the case of an emer-
gency and while on board. He
hastily eases everyone's mind
by telling them that the boat, if
sunk, would not go completely
under water, and that they
would all be safe on the top
deck if it ever came down to
that point.
Then the boat heads out
toward the mouth of the Peace
River, where it empties out into
Charlotte Harbor.
Once the boat is out- of the
marina, the students split up
into two groups, and one group
goes to the top deck. Upstairs,
the children review the pre-test
to prepare themselves for the
post test. A student volunteer
asks them questions and talks to
them about the importance of
the Peace River for residents of
Charlotte Harbor and Punta
Gorda.
On the bottom level, the stu-
dents go to the bow of the boat
and another student volunteer
instructs them on how to con-
duct the water tests: run the
refractometer to measure the
salinity, obtain a ground water


caches Seafaring Science


sample, run the lead line to
measure the depth and the secci
disk to measure the turbidity of
the water, and check the dis-
solved oxygen levels.
They run the tests at the
mouth of the Peace River where
it empties into Charlotte Har-
bor, both at the back and the
front of the boat.
After the tests are completed,
the students then lounge until
they get halfway to the point
where the water becomes
Charlotte Harbor. They slowly
drift as they eat lunch. The stu-
dents are able to purchase
snacks on the boat aside from
their lunches.
The group on the top deck
switches places with the group
on the lower level after lunch,
and the boat moves further into
Charlotte Harbor. When it
makes its last stop on the tour,
the students are able to see
Ponce de Leon Park from the
boat. At the stop, the kids who
were formerly on the top deck
run the same water tests as the
other kids. However, the results
are not the same because the
water type is different in
Charlotte Harbor. So, the kids
get excited to see that their
results are not the same as the
first group's.
When the boat gets back to
the marina, it's time to unload
everything and get back on the
bus.


As the students are riding
back to their school. they are
handed a clipboard, a pencil and
their post test. It is very difficult
to take a test while on the
bumping bus. but the students
work diligently and finish it.


There are always good grades
on the tests, which proves that
the information needed to pass
it was taught well by the student
volunteers.
All in all, the fifth-grade boat


trip is not only a good experi-
ence for the students who take
it. but also for the volunteers
who were able to teach young
kids valuable information about
the environment.


COURTESY PHOTOS
A fifth-grader looks through his new pair of binoculars, which students share while on the
top'deck of the King Fisher Tour Boat Afterward, every student who makes a 100 on the
post-test is awarded his own pair of binoculars.


-, -~ j
-"~~rLa.a;P ~. ~


-s. .. .c- ...:~*'.*-...
.... :. ,L',", I- A, -'


Dolphins are a big hit with the fifth graders As the boat moves across the water, the dol-
phins come to pay the students a visit, jumping across the tail waves made by the boat The
students always learn quickly that if they clap loudly, the dolphins will stay longer


Some say the English were the first to seal wine bottles with cork. However, getting the
cork out to get to the wine required a special tool-the corkscrew.
A good friend is a connection to life-a tie to the past, a road to the future, the key to
sanity in a totally insane world.
-Lois Wyse






.usy Bees
Child Discovery, LLC


The refractometer is a device used to measure the salinity of saltwater in parts per million.
The students pass around the refractometer and share their results, checking each other's
calculations and making sure they're the same. The youngster on the right eagerly awaits
his turn.





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Extended Hours With Drive-Thru

8.30 AM to 7.30 PM Monday-Friday


K


9.00 AM to 4.00 PM Saturday


10:27c


The Herald-Advocate
t1SPS 578-780)
Thursday, October 27, 2011


"You Name

The Score"
S(A Winner Every Week)


313 W Orange St. Wauchula


Isabella Johnson, future owner & Crystal (Beasley),Johnson,
owner; and Marie Hays, 4 yr. old teacher with 15 yrs. experience







Only $50.00 For Afterschool Program!!


For Info: 863-767-0166 Hours: 6:30 am 5:30 m.


j: Owner: Jason and Crystal (Beasley) Johnson
Lic.#C10HA0524 10 27c


~-L~-----~------~--~_~__~,.


rr
,







2D The Herald-Advocate. October 27, 2011





Hardee


Living


4U0


COURTESY PHOTO
Jessica Webb & lan Durrance

Webb/Durrance

Wedding Plans
Daniel and Terrie Webb of Southern College with a bache-
Lakeland have announced the lor of science degree in citrus
plans for the upcoming marriage and business. He is employed
of their daughter, Jessica Lee with the family business,
Webb, to Ian Emerson Dur- Durrance Groves Limited
rance, the son of Danny and Partnership.
Julie Durrance of Bowling The couple will exchange
Green. wedding vows on Saturday,
The bride-elect is a 2011 -Nov. 5, at 1.p.m. at St. Joseph's
graduate of the University of Catholic Church in Lakeland.
South Florida with a bachelor of Following the ceremony,, a
science degree in nursing. She is reception will be held at the
employed as a registered nurse home of the bride's parents in
at Lakeland Regional Medical Lakeland.
Center. Friends and relatives are
The prospective groom is a invited to attend.
2011 graduate of Florida





Welcome Back Snowbirds!
1/2 off First Month + 1/2 off Joining Fee
(a $30 Savings/Unlimited Classes)
NO Long Term Commitment!
8:00 a.m./4:00p.m. & 5:30 p.m.
Schedule and location www.jazzercise.com
Ann Marie 863-767-0613 facebook/Jazzercise Heartland


Fall

Rummage

Sale


October 28 & 29

go. S Friday 9 4
00' &
1ot Saturday 8 Noon

St. Michael Church Parish Hall
408 Heard Bridge Rd., Wauchula



Sponsored by the Council of Catholic Women


Big Brothers Big Sisters
of the Sun Coast


Big Brothers Big Sisters
of the Sun Coast
provides one-to-one
mentoring relationships to
children ages 6-18 years
old. There are 26
children in the Hardee area
in need of a mentor.

If you are
interested in becoming a mentor or
for additional information please
contact the Florida Ridge Office at
(863) 402-9001 www.bbbssun.org


Haylee
Haylee Magee
Has Party For
S6th Birthday
Haylee Magee turned 6 years
old on Aug. 4.
She celebrated with a birth-
day party at her home in Zolfo
Springs on Aug. 27. The theme
- for the party was Fancy Nancy.
Among those celebrating
were her father David Magee Jr.
and his girlfriend, Lori Abbott;
brother David "Winston"
* Magee III; paternal grandpar-
ents David Sr. and Wanda.
Magee; and friends Savannah
Abbott and Dakota Hay.


Halloween The
Theme For
Birthday Party
Dustin Michael Wingate, th
son of Crystal Williams o
Wauchula, turned 7 years old or
Oct. 17.
Dustin celebrated with
birthday party at Pioneer Park
in Zolfo Springs on Sunday
Oct. 16. Halloween was the
theme for the event.
Guests were served cake, ice
cream and assorted treats.
Joining in the fun were
grandmother Penny Little
great-grandmother Betty John-
son, his aunts, cousins and
many more family members
and friends.


Dustin


Rep. Grimslev


A Daily Thought
THURSDAY
"A surely as I live," declares
,the Sovereign Lord, "I take
no pleasure, in the death
(eternal) of the wicked, but
rather that they turn from
their ways and live."
Ezekiel 33:11 (NIV)
FRIDAY
He has been punished
enough. ... now it is time to
forgive him and comfort hirt.
Otherwise he may become
so bitter and discouraged
that he won't be able to
recover. Please show him
now that you still do love him
very much.
II Corinthians 2:6b,7-8 (TLB)
SATURDAY
Don't lose your grip on Love
and Loyalty. Tie them
around your neck; carve
their initials on your heart.
Earn a reputation for living
well in God's eyes and in the
eyes of the people.
Proverbs 3:3-4 (ME)
SUNDAY
(Jesus said), "For everyone
who sets himself up as
somebody will become a
nobody, and the man who
makes himself nobody will
become somebody."
Luke 18:14 (PME)
MONDAY
I trust in Your love. My heart
is happy because You saved
me. I sing to the Lord
because He has taken care
of me.
Psalm 13:5-6 (NCV)
TUESDAY
Take care, brethren, lest
there be in any of you an evil
unbelieving heart, leading
you to fall away from the liv-
ing God. But exhort (encour-
age) one another every day.
... that none of you may be
hardened by the deceitful-
ness of sin.
Hebrews 3:12-13 (RSV)
WEDNESDAY
His wife said to him (Job)
"Are you still trying to main-
tain your integrity? Curse
God and die." But Job
replied, "You talk like a god-
less woman. Should we
accept only good things
from the hand of God and
never anything bad?" So, in
all this, Job said nothing
wrong (against God).
Job 2:9-10 (NLT)

All verses are excerpted from
The Holy Bible: (KJV). King
James Version; (ME) The
Message; (NCV) New Cen-
tury Version; (NEB) New
English Bible; (NIV) New
International Version; (NLT)
New Living Translation (RSV)
Revised Standard Version;
(PME) Phillips Modern Eng-
lish; and (TLB) The Living
Bible.


To Speak At
Boy Scout Lunch
State Rep. Denise Grimsley
of District 77 will be the guest
speaker at the Hardee County
Soaring Eagle Luncheon.
The luncheon is hosted by the
Gulf Ridge Council for the Boyl
Scouts of America.
It will be held on Thursday,
Nov. 10, at Main Street Grille in-
downtown Wauchuila, 216 W.'
Main St. Check-in begins at:
11:30 a.m. with the meal served
at noon.
For reservations, contact
Julie Diaz-Nichdfs at (863)
370-7608 or at jdiaz@boy-
scouting.com.


/



e
f
n
ai
k


e R


yleigh


e Little Ryleigh
Coronado Has
SFirst Birthday
Ryleigh Nicole Coronado, the
. daughter of Tealishia Owens
: and Joshua Coronado of Wau-
; chula, had her very first birth-
day on Oct. 17.
She celebrated the occasion
:on Saturday, Oct. 15, with a
party at a home in Zolfo
Springs. Theme for the party
was Sesame Street First
Birthday.
Guests were served hamburg-
ers and hot dogs.
Joining the celebration in
addition to her parents were
grandparents Lelo Mushrush
and Anna and Santos Coronado,
and uncles Christian and Efrain
Martinez, Stephen and Santos
Coronado Jr. and Leavie
Owens.


First United Methodist
Church of Bowling Green will
hold a Trunk-or-Treat Hallo-
ween evening of fun Saturday
from 6 to 8 p.m. Parents and
teens are encouraged to deco-
rate car and truck trunks and
tailgates.
There will also be games,
prizes, face painting and other
activities for children of all
ages. Everyone is invited to the
church, at 4910 N. Church
Avenue for the evening. For
more information, call 863-
832-9910.
First United Methodist
Church of Wauchula is also t
having "a Halloweenie Good
Time" on Saturday between 6
and 8 p.m. The Trunk-or-Treat
fun event will include a cos-
tume contest, food, candy, face
painting and prizes.
Decorated car trunks are a:
must. Everyone in the commu-
nity is welcome at the church at
207 N. Seventh Avenue for this
fun time. For more information,
call 7737-4267.
The deadline for Church News
submissions is Thursday at 5,
for the next edition.


Nov. 5th @ Mixon's in the Grove
2525 27th St. E. Bradenton 12:00 Doors Open
Combo Lunch $6 Donation
IAuction at 2:00
Reg. Pure Bred Brahman Heifer (Hardee County
Raised Bar Crescent D Ranch)
Toshiba 40 in. Flat Screen
Chartered Fishing Trips
Hunting Trip, Sony Handycam, Tools, Collectibles,
Antiques, Vera Bradley, Brighton
and Premier Jewelry,. Professional Photo Shoot
and Much Mbre
S10:27-11:3p
I


4tb annual Jalloteen JLa.Sf

jfribap unbap,

Ott. 28tb 30t 12pm lam
Bonofit For Hardeo County Cancer support Foundation


..B~~ I .: ".? "':: .... . .

* Liquior Bar This Weekend Raffles, Food, & Fun
e*Halloween Games Face & Body Paint
Vendors free set up for donation to Raffle
Food Done By Grilling Depot /
Call 863-735-8887 For More Intfo







October 27, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 3D

Women Educators Meet


ANIMAL BLESSING


Alpha Gamma met on Sept.
22 at New Hope Baptist Church.
Alpha Gamma is the local
chapter of Delta Kappa Gamma
Society International (Key
Women Educators). Alpha
Gamma educators are from
Hardee and DeSoto counties.
A "bienvenito" Italian dinner
of lasagna. caesar salad, garlic
bread, tea. Italian cream cake
and other fine desserts was
served by Hardee hostesses.
President Jan Beckley (Hardee)
called the meeting to order.
Eight new members were
approved for membership along
with the approval of two schol-
arships for teachers in their jun-
ior year of college who are
majoring in education. One
scholarship will go to a Hardee
college student. The other schol-
arship will go to a DeSoto col-
lege student.
A new 2011-12 directory and
birthday list were distributed.
Fliers were distributed in regard


to the District VI Conference
that will be held in Arcadia on
March 10. 2012. Member
Sheila Knoche (DeSoto) is the
District VI director of Florida.
Members met with their com-
mittee chairpersons to plan the
Order of Work for 2011-12.
This year, the Community
Service Project supports new
teachers in the school systems.
Members contribute teacher
school supplies via donations of
supplies or $5 by each Delta
Kappa Gamma member at
every meeting throughout the
year. The "Joy Offering" was a
big success. Members may con-
tribute $1 into the "Joy Can" at
each meeting and tell about
something that has happened in
their family or in their life that
can be celebrated.
Cindie Fischer gave the trea-
surer's report. Corresponding
Secretary Kristie Joens read
several letters of correspon-
dence and thank-you notes.


President Jan Beckley reported
that Delta Kappa Gamma has a
newly revised International
Constitution and Florida State
By-Laws. Alpha Gamma
Chapter will develop new
Standing Rules during 2011-12.
The 'following 23 members
attended: Chrysta Chancey, Jan
Beckley. Cindie Fischer, Louise
Jones, Marie Lambert, Susan
Barnes. Anita Barnes, Sheila
Knoche. Martha Shiver, Dot
Bell. Julie Farr. Kerry Terrell,
Kristie Joens. Edith Wildt,
Connie Bateman, Cason
Bateman. Ann Hilliard. Cathy
Tish, Arell Waldron, Roxie
Bentley, Carol Brush, Teresa
Hall and Brenda Knight.
Each separate county then
met for orientation of new
members on Monday, Oct. 17.
The next combined meeting for
initiation of new members will
be Monday, Nov. 14, at 5 p.m.
at the Little White House
Conference Center in Arcadia.
1111111A "


Lee Sperry Advances

To Chief Petty Officer


Carla Sperry and Allen
Sperry along with their two
granddaughters, Jordan .and
Savannah Sperry, traveled to
Charleston, S.C., on Sept. 16 to
see son Lee Sperry's ceremony
advancing him to chief petty
officer in the U.S. Navy.
A biography of Chief Sperry
was read at the ceremony.
"Chief Select Sperry enlisted
on June 3, 1999, in Wauchula.
He has served on the USS
George Washington (CUN-73),
Sima Mayport, Sermc Mayport,
Navy Provisional Detainee
Battalion 2 Camp Bucca in Iraq
where he received the Army
Achievement Medal, and USS
Klackping (FFG-42) before
coming to the NPTU Repair
Department in Charleston.
"His anchors were received
from HTC (Ret.) Troy Rust. He
is being pinned by his wife,
Kelly, and his daughters, Kinzee
and Morgan.
"These anchors were pinned
on HTC Rust on Sept. 16, 2006,
in Camp Bucca, Iraq (by HT2
Sperry). HTC knew that HT2
was ready to follow in his foot-
steps and gave them to now HTI
in November 2009 for his
inevitable advancement to HTC.
"His most influential mentor
is HTC (SW) Rust, for teaching
him to always lead from the
front, and how to motivate and


COURTESY PHOTO
Lee Sperry was pinned by
his wife and daughters in a
Charleston, S.C., ceremo-
ny attended by many fami-
ly members.
train junior sailors.
"Chief Sperry's sponsor is
Chief Blackwell. Ladies and
Gentlemen, I present to you
Chief Sperry!"
Other family members at-
tending were Sperry's grand-
parents, Lee and Katy Sperry
from Crestview, and uncle Jeff
Sperry and daughter Olivia
from Jacksonville.


The term "freelance" comes from a Knignt whose lance
was free for hire; i.e., not pledged to one master.
In Natoma, Kansas, it's illegal to throw knives at men
wearing striped suits.



* Hardee Beef & Bacon.
4H Club

Cattle Grooming & Nutrition Clinics -
Hardee Ranch Supply
,.October 29, 2011 9 9 am 12 pm *

Raffle Tickets
Picnic Table w/local ranchers cattle U
l brands engraved on table. g
T e8 $5 each or 5 for $20
STickets available at Hardee Ranch Supply
8 or from members of -
* Beef & Bacon 4H Club. g

f l781-2479
SRaffle drawing will be during fair. c
MonI 11 ag 1H w 0


Military Officers
Special Meeting
This Saturday
The South Central Florida
Chapter of the'Military Officers
Association.,.of America will
hold a speial meeting this
Saturday due to the'death of
Chapter President Lou Brough.
The meeting will be held at
the Military Sea Services
Museum in Sebring. Call (863)
659-4170 for more information.
During the meeting, members
will fill the slate of officers for
the coming year.
The local chapter supports
Junior Reserve Officer Training
Corps units in Hardee, High-
lands, DeSoto and Okeechobee
counties as well as the local
Civil Air Patrol.


COURTESY PHOTO
Hardee and DeSoto members of Alpha Gamma met at New Hope Baptist Church in
Wauchula for their fall workshop.




36th HOMECOMING

SUNDAY NOVEMBER 13

10:30 A.M. SERVICE


Dr JW Miller
Founder and
Pastor for
36 Years


I,'
S__


SPECIAL SINGING
WITH
THE GULF STATE QUARTET
AND
THE MILLER FAMILY


Serving Hardee County with Good News- Jesus Saves


3rd Annual Golf Tournament

to benefit


Hannah's House'


& Apartments
~ A shelter for women who are victims of domestic abuse -

Torrey Oaks Golf Course

Saturday, November 5 8 a.m.
4 Person 18 Hole Scramble

$50 per person (lunch includedJ

Sponsored By: FINR
Sign up at:
Torrey Oaks: 8 a.m. 5 p.m. Mon. thru Sun.
Alpha & Omega Freedom Ministries 9 a.m. 4 p.m.
Phone 773-5717 113 N. 7th Ave. Wauchula
Or call after hours 781-1105


1st Place Prize $200
2nd Place Prize $100
3rd Place Prize $50


$00r
prizes .. I
SIf you would like to be a player or sponsor,
please call 773-5717 for more Information
-so loao-113-: o


Gr d i T
$5.00o. o 2








41) 1 he HIerald-Advocate. October 27, 2011


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October 27. 2011. The Herald-Advocate 5D


JV Finishes Season 5-2


rhe friend who holds your hand and says the wrong thing is made of dearer stuff than
the one who stays away. -Barbara Kingsolver

M


By MICHAEL KELLY
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Junior Varsity Wildcats'
season came to an end last week
with a 28-12 loss to Tampa
Jesuit but still finished the sea-
son with an impressive 5-2
mark.
Hardee received to open the
game but a couple of penalties
forced a punt after three plays.
Jesuit took over at Wildcat
35 after the Randi Lopez punt.
Joshua Almarez made a hard
hit on the first play for the
Tigers and forced a fumble that
Hardee recovered. Hardee took
over but quickly gave the ball
back when Almarez fumbled on


a running play giving the ball
back to Jesuit in Hardee territo-
ry.
The Tigers took advantage
and found the end zone a few
plays later on a 10-yard pass.
The PAT gave them a 7-0 lead
with 2:21 left in the first quar-
ter.
Each team traded punts be-
fore Hardee took over at mid
field on its third possession of
the evening.
Quarterback Jacob Bolin
found wide receiver Sherman
Bethea open for a 45-yard com-
pletion down to the Jesuit 5.
Two plays later Bolin found
Bethea open in the end zone for


Wauchula Watch
By Ofc. Amy Drake
Wauchula Police Department


HALLOWEEN SAFETY TIPS
Know the rules for a safe and fun Halloween. To help, here are
some safety tips:
Do not allow a child to go "Trick of Treating" alone. Be
sure older children take a friend, and that an adult accompanies
young children.
Children should be cautioned that they should not enter any
home without prior permission from their parents.
Children should be cautioned not to approach any vehicle,
occupied or not, unless they know the owner and are accompanied
by a parent.
Make sure that all children carry a glow stick or flashlight
and wear some reflective clothing.
Children should be warned to never approach any house that
is not well-lighted and does not have a porch or "outside" light on.
Children should be cautioned to run away from people who
try to trick them with special treats.
Children should be cautioned to remember any suspicious
incidents and report them to their parents and/or to law enforce-
ment.
Children should be instructed to scream and make a scene if
anyone tries to grab them or force them, in any way, to go with
them.
Parents should inspect all treats and dispose of anything that
seems to have been tampered with, has been opened, or is not
wrapped.
Drive slowly all evening and watch for children.out in about
in the streets.
Keep costumes short to prevent trip, falls, and other bumps
in the night.
Encourage kids to wear comfortable shoes.
Have a safe and fun Halloween from the Wauchula Police
Department!
Also, in the theme of helping to keep our children safe, the
Wauchula Police Department will be holding another pill drop-off
on Saturday from 9 a.m. to I p.m. at the department, located at 128
S. Seventh Ave., Wauchui*Please bring us all your unwanted and
out-of-date human and pet medications.
Let's help keep our children and community safer.


Back To Basics
By lan Rice
Gospel Preacher


I t I
CONSIDERING THE FIRSTBORN
The apostle Paul wrote to the Colossians. "And He is the head
of the body, the church, who is the beginning, the firstborn from the
dead, that in all things He may have the pre-eminence." Colossians
1:18.
Jesus had previously raised others from the dead. He raised
Lazarus (John 11) and the widow's son (Luke 7:11). so what is
meant by Jesus being the firstborn form the dead?
The first thing for us to remember is that the Scriptures teach
us that Jesus was raised incorruptible to never taste death again.
This was accomplished at His resurrection. Although Lazarus and
the widow's son were raised, they would eventually die again.
Also consider Paul's words to the saints in Rome. "For whom
He foreknew. He also predestined to be conformed to the image of
His Son, that He might be the firstborn among many brethren."
Romans 8:29. Paul is expressing to the Christians throughout
Rome that they indeed could find faith in the fact that they would
one day be raised with a new body to live eternally. We as follow-
ers of Christ can find comfort in that as well. So Christ was the first
among many!
Read the admonitions in Hebrews 12:23. "to the general
assembly and church of the firstborn who are registered in heaven.
to God the Judge of all. to the spirits of just men made perfect."
This passage refers to the church of the firstborn! Many will be
raised immortal like Jesus was. The congregation of believers will
join Him in the resurrection of which He was first!
Take comfort in the words of Paul concerning the firstborn.
"For if the dead do not rise, then Christ is not risen. And if Christ
is not risen, your faith is futile: you are still in your sins! Then also
those who have fallen asleep in Christ have perished. If in this life
only we have hope in Christ. we are of all men the most pitiable.
But now Christ is risen from the dead. and has become the first-
fruits of those who have fallen asleep.
"For since by man came death, by Man also came the resur-
rection of the dead. For as in Adam all die. even so in Christ all
shall be made alive. But each one in his own order: Christ the first-
fruits. afterward those who are Christ's at His coming." 1
Corinthians 15:16-23.
I want to be a part of the resurrection from the dead.don't you?
Get back to the basics and read. study and obey God's Word!
lan Rice is the idll-time evangelist at Wauchula Church of Christ,
a non-deniominational group of Christians seeking to follow. the
New Testamecnt pattern of service to God. Visit the church website
at www.waciiiltichiirchofc'rist.com.



YOU Can Appear In ...
Poet's Place
Are you a poet? Let us show it! Your work could be published in
this newspaper in "Poet's Place," a weekly feature which relies
solely on reader submissions. Poems must be your own original
work, written by you, not someone else. To appear in this fea-
ture, send your poetry, name and town of residence to: Poet's
Place, The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338, Wauchula, FL 33873
or fax 773-0657.


a touchdown. The Lopez PAT
was no good and Hardee trailed
7-6 with 8:43 left in the first
half.
Jesuit stared its next drive at
the 34 and switched quarter-
backs. passing on almost every
down.
The Tigers were able to
move the ball downfield and
soon found the end zone on a
13-yard pass. The PAT was
good and the Tigers were up 14-
6 with 7:03 left in the half.
The Wildcats went on a long
and time-consuming drive but
were unable to score before the
half ended.
A long kick return gave the
Tigers good field position in-
side Hardee territory to start the
second half.
A 37-yard pass play got
Jesuit to the goal line before a
quarterback sneak was good for
a 2-yard touchdown. The PAT
made it 21-6 with 10:40 left in
the third:
A 21-yard pass play from
Bolin to Armando Alamia got
the drive off to a good start.
Running back Timmy Steed-ley
picked up a couple first down
runs into Jesuit territory.
Faced with a fourth down,
Bolin dropped back and had his
pass intercepted and returned
for a touchdown.
The PAT pushed Jesuit's lead
to 28-6 with 4:31 left in the
third quarter.
Hardee fought back on the
next possession and found the
end zone.
Steedley capped off the drive
with a 1-yard plunge up the
middle.
Bolin was sacked on the two-
point conversion attempt and
Hardee trailed 28-12 with 8:34
left in the game.
Jesuit recovered an onside
kick attempt by the Wildcats
and took over at the 50.
The Cat defense stood strong
and stopped the Tigers on
fourth down, giving the ball
back to the Hardee offense with
just over five minutes left.
Bolin was sacked on a fourth
down play and the Wildcats
turned the ball back over to
Jesuit with 2:46 left in the
game.
The Tigers were able to pick
up one first down and run out
the clock.. ,
-'?%. *-^ .j^.


Sometimes words cannot fully express how we feel, but I lovingly express
my deepest thanks to all who prayed or thought of me, sent cards,
e-mails,flowers,food and expressed their love in such kindness to me
during my recovery from brain surgery in August. To my
iminei.--e family (Ron, Greg. Jeannie. Robin and Joe,Alex, Rick, Eric
and Daniel) and my extended family you were there for me tnd I am so
grateful for the things you did and words expressed. To my church family
all over Hardee County and the world as my name went out for prayer
over the internet, thank you from the bottom of my heart for your
petitions on my behalf. Thank you also for everyone who prayed for
Ronnie and the rest of my family. They too appreciate all that was done.
Thanks also to the team of neurosurgeons at Tampa Generalfor their
kindness and skill and to the paramedics Kim (the fastest but safest driver
in the world) and Jenna who got me to Tampa. You both were so kind and
professional. Above all, I thank my God who was with me through the
whole journey and never left me just as He promised.
What an awesome God we have!
Just to let you know the mass was benign and recovery is doing so well.
I am so very thankful to everyone! Blessings to you all!
Tipple Gilliard soc10:27p




It's Celebration Time



.*




Endtime gives God all the praises and glory for what He has done.
We would like acknowledge and give special thanks to Chapman Fruit Co.,
Wayne Parrish, Doyle Carlton & Co., Wauchula State Bank,
First National Bank, Progressive Missionary Baptist Church (Pastor Powell),
Church of Joy (Pastor E. L. Hearns), Zolfo Springs Civic Center,
Hardee Sheriff Dept., Alan Jay Chevrolet,
& Florida Fertilizer Co., & The Herald Advocate.
Thank you for all your help and support.

Lots Of Food, Drinks and Jumpers For The Kids
All Are Welcome

To God Be All The Glory
District Elder Ralph & Overseer Deloris Williams (863) 832-2719


Tip Toes. Dance Studio


Presents
















Saturday, November 5


Agri-Civic Center


Wauchula


Doors Open at 9:00


iL Grappling at 10:00.


* Free Grappling Classes


For All Ages


ALBRITTON


I~mll~~Pasl~c4TDPi


During Intermission


$5.00 13 and up


N


* Town & Country Properties


* Rapid Tech


For More info: 863-990-8986 / 863-558-2021 10:27c


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6D The Herald-Advocate, October 27, 2011


The


Classifieds


ABOUT ... Classifieds
DEADLINE ....Tuesday noon
RATES ..........Minimum of $4.00 for 10 words. Each addi-
tional word is 22 cents. Ads in all capitals
are 32 cents per word. Headlines are $2 a
line. Blind ad box numbers are $3 extra.
BILLING........Ads must be pre-paid.
CLASSIFICATIONS:


Agriculture
Appliances
Automobile
Boats
Furniture
Help Wanted
Houses
Livestock
Lost & Found
Miscellaneous


Mobile Homes
Notices
Pets
Plants/Produce
Real Estate
Recreational
Rentals
Services
Wanted
Yard Sales


TREES UNLIMITED
Commercial Residential Licensed & Insured
Experienced Tree Surgery
SAerial Bucket Trucks Wood Chipper
SStump Grinder Front End Loader
SDump Truck Land Clearing
Pond Digging Excavation .' X.

Environmentally Responsible 863-781-7027
Storm Damage & Emergency Specialists Randy Garland
10l:3tfc




REVELL dUTO SaES
















HARDEE CAR COMPANY

BuY HERE PAY HERE



Billy & Janice's Rentals
Houses & Apartments


Bowling Green Flea Ma ket


Billy Hill
Owner


Monday Saturday
9 am to 7 pm

Wauchula
(across from
First National Bank)


7 601:


L. DICKS INC. Is now purchasing
citrus fruit for the 2011/12 season
and beyond. Call '' k Manuel @
781-0384. 7:8tfc
YOUNG CATTLEMAN needs pas-
ture to rent/lease/ag. status,
maintain fence/bushog, 863-494-
5991. 10:27-11:2


2005 DODGE pickup $5,000 cash,
781-1062. 10:27c
1998 CHEVY ext. cab. 4x4, good
condition, $6,000, 863-781-1157.
10:27p
200 LINCOLN $3,000, 781-1062.
10:27c
CASH NOWI Crooms Used Cars
and Salvage picks up your junk
cars and pays top dollar. Call to
discuss any type of vehicle. 863-
781-3767, 863-401-5085. 3:3tfc


EXCELLENT CONDITION, dining
table with 6 chairs, oak & black,
country decor $300; Lazy Boy
leather recliner, $150; wardrobe,
$250; dresser with mirror & night
stand, $245; step shelf, $40; 863-
445-0430. 10:27dh


ADULT DAY training program spe-
cialist lawn care leader, part
time/on call. Apply in person
Ridge Area ARC, 1010 S. 6th Ave.,
Wauchula. EOE/Drug Free
Workplace. 10:27c
MAINTENANCE/Groundskeeping
-days 5 am 10 am. Min. one year
experience in general mainte-
nance duties. Free Y member-
ship. Call Calvin 863-773-6445 or
apply in person, 610 W. Orange
St., Wauchula. EO/AA Employer.
10:27c


'Large Selection of
Cars to Choose From

Buy Here Pay Here
30 Day Guarantee
Son Motor & Transmission Only

BiLL STTRS AHMLO
86378-460 86-71-08


Bt''O lS


I ElESffi



BiNG TO2350 S. 27 N
IN HOM APPTE u '4-60


Bus. (863) 773-0007
REALTY INC.
L REALTY IN www.lambertrealty.net
404 South 6th Avenue
Wauchula, FL 33873 Doris Lambert
Immaculate Home with large rooms, 2B/2Bth, 9 acres on corner of two high volume traffic
inside utility, double garage plus carport; areas; perfect commercial site or new home.
sprinkler system. $120,000 $100,000
Lovely older home in Wauchula, 3B/2Bth, 8.91 acres with barn, cooler, seed house, green
updated inside and great curb appeal. $95,000 houses; currently being operated as hydroponic
farm. $225,000
EXCELLENT LOCATION for COMMER-
CIAL OR RESIDENTIAL 2B/2Bth home, Citrus grove, 40 acres Valencia, 120 acres early
central A/C, 2988 sq. ft. Call today to see! mid; located in Eastern Hardee County.
Spacious rooms in this 3B/21B, C/B home, 5 ACRE TRACT excellent home site, paved
ceramic tile and carpet floors, large eat- in road frontage.$65,000
kitchen. $119,000 road frontage. $65,000
3B/2Bth SW M/H located in Charlie Creek, 5 Acres of "Native Florida", abundant wildlife.
new A/C and water treatment. $49,900 $22,500
Charlie Creek 2B/lBth M/H, completely fur- 3.2 acre corner lot; nice secluded property that
nished, screened porch and concrete drive. has native trees. $6,000
$29,000
12 SERVICE YOU CAN COUNT ON [
DORIS S. LAMBERT, G.R.I., Broker KENNETH A. LAMBERT, Broker
ASSOCIATES
DELOIS JOHNSON 781-2360 CHARLOTTE TERRELL 781-6971 STEVE JOHNSON 781-0518
I- _...


SOMEONE sit with elderly lady
full time, 863-832-0891.
10:27-11:24p
MECHANIC NEEDED, only experi-
enced apply. No phone calls,
apply at Hill's Auto World,


Bowling Green. 10:27-11:3c

iltefn. nd


FOUND SMALL DOG in Torrey
Oak area. 375-4908. Call to claim.
10:27nc
LOST, SMALL black, white and
orange long haired cat, white tip
on tail. Missing from Louisiana St.
and North 7th Ave. 245-7172.
10:27p


NICE FLORIDA Gator bedset $50,
yard cart full of hoses $45,
Desktop computer $125, 863-445-
0430. 10:27p
WE PAY CASH for your junk riding
mower. Free pick up, 773-4400.
10:6tfc


C -M i
ELECTRIC 1113 Jazzy ATS wheel
chair $800 with electric auto lift
$450 or $1,200 for both. Both in
excellent shape. 863-773-3603 or
863-767-6238. 10:27


1995 TERRY PARK MODEL 39',
Queen bed, 2 slides, large bath-
room, kitchen appliances, rubber
roof, new carpet, (2 years old,)
located at Little Charlie Creek
Campground. Must be moved.
$6,500. 828-234-3507.
10:20-11:24p

DESOTO CoUNTY




OWNER FINANCING
wwwlandcallnow.com
1-941-778-7980/7565


COMPUTER REPAIR
dQ Garry A.Phillips
Serving Hardee County
New System Setup Virus Removal
Malware Removal Email/Internet Setup
Computer Slow ?? Tune-ups Available
Call Us For All Your Computer Needs
Pick up & Delivery Availablel
448-2561 Payment Plans Also Available 773-0518
computerrepairbygarryphillips.com c19:15,11:24c



THE PALMS

Available for
Immediate Occupancy
$99 Move In Special through October 31"
*Plus $1200 FREE RENT*
(*One year lease @$100/mo reduction)

Spacious 2,3 & 4 BR Garden Apts.
Open, quiet country setting.
Close to Sheriff's Station on Martin
Luther King Jr Ave and La Playa
Drive.
Award winning Professional Bi-lingual
Management Staff.
Affordable Rents
701 La Playa Drive, Wauchula
Rental Office Hours
Monday Friday 7:00 AM 3:30 PM g
Saturday 9:00 AM 11:30 AM
After hours by appointment
S (863) 773-3809, TDD 800-955-8771 '
,.-::: Equal Opportunity Employer and Provider


<8 Hardee Pure Air, Inc.
^' 863--767--01 22

Support Hardee & Shop Local!!
_Go Cats!!! 3
_Stopinor __chnc ~Paul & Tina Rickett
to inanir.ier,!t 101 S. 9th Ave Wauchula, Fl. 33873
iu* rm* Cell: (863) 781-4376 or (863)781-4378 facebook.
For quality and assurance contact your hometown Rainbow distributor for
products and demonstrations. Asthma and allergy certified. c110:6-27p



JIM SEE REALTY, INC.

206 North 6th Avenue, Wauchula, FL 33873
Office (863)773-0060 Evening (863)773-4774
www. iimseerealty.com
James V. See, Jr., Broker Shane Conley
REDUCED TO $115,000! Duplex! 4 BR, 2 BA Spacious home located in Briarwood
one side. 3 BR, 2 BA other side. Central air & Subdivision. 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath house with
heat. Paved road. City water & sewer, wrap around porch, detached 2 car garage with
office and full bath. $379,000
Just reduced to $199,500! Great home on several
large lots in Wauchula. Hardwood floors. 4-5 bedroom, 4 bath custom built home on 9
acres. County road access, next to Wauchula.
Massive brick fireplace. 3 bedrooms, 2 baths. 2 Home is complimented with screened back porch
car carport. and in-ground pool. Land also has 7 % acres of
producing nursery. $430,000
20 acres very close in to Wauchula on paved producing nursery. $430,000
road. Laser leveled and ready for your farm Commercial property in Wauchula on corner of
operation. Zoned FR. $190,000 Hwy 17. Excellent exposure from North & South
bound 17. 2,250 sf building former gas station
20 acres close in to Wauchula on paved road. & repair shop. $350,000
Laser leveled, deep well & irrigation. Ready forUNDER CONTRACT! 18 acres. House &
your farm operation. Zoned FR. $230,000 Grove. Close in approximately 1,850 sf of liv-
ing. Nice screened porch. 3 Bedrooms & 2 Baths.
Just North of Bowling Green in Polk County! 17 ac of grove, mostly earlier. 6" deep well,
1-48 acres with highway frontage. Great loca- microjet & diesel power unit. Only $295,000
tion for any operation needing a shop, office and
on-site storage. $225,000 REDUCED!! 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath house in town.
Cute house with nice landscaping. NOW $79,500!
Realtor Associates
1 Rick Knight (863)781-1396 Calvin Bates (863)381-2242 [I
John H. Gross (863)273-1017 Dusty Albritton (863)781-0161
Shane Conley 781-9664 c110:27c


600 West College Drive
Avon Park, FL 33825
(863) 784-7132' FAX (863) 784-7497
http://sfcc.lntervlewexchange.com
SOUTH FLORIDA
COMMUNITY COLLEGE
STUDENT ADMISSIONS ADVISOR
Full-time, year-round position responsible for providing general
college information and Admissions advising. Bachelor's
degree required. Customer service and/or student services
experience strongly preferred. Demonstrated ability in
communicating effectively with people from diverse cultural and
socio-economic backgrounds required. Strong computer skills
required. Working knowledge of Microsoft Excel and Microsoft
Access preferred. Starting salary range: $26-28,000 plus a
comprehensive benefits package, including retirement,
health/life insurance, and vacation/sick leave. Application
deadline 11/1/11. Please visit our website details.
SFCC IS AN EQUAL ACCESS/EQUAL OPPORTUNITY INSTITUTION
c110:27c








October 27, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 7D


The


Classifieds


ENGLISH BULLDOG male, 3 yns.
old. No papers, $200, 863-445-
0430. 10:27p
CHIHUAHUA PUPPIES NKC reg-
istered, shots & H/C, $400, 863-
781-1283. 10:20-11:17p
ADOPT A PET! If you have lost a
pet or are looking for a new one,
the City of Wauchula invites you
to come and see if you can find
the pet you're looking for. The
Wauchula Animal Control is locat-
ed at 685 Airport Road. Please
call 773-3265 or more informa-
tion. tfc-dh
ATTENTION State Statutes
828.29 requires that all cats an4..
dogs sold in Florida be at least 8
weeks old, have an official health
certificate, have necessary shots
and be free of parasites, tfc-dh



HOUSE FOR Rent in country. Call
for info 735-9284. 10:27p
THREE Bedroom two bath house,
AC $750 plus deposit, 832-1984.
10:27-11:24p
ZOLFO LARGE 2 bedroom; 1
bath, central air and heat, utility
room, very spacious, 863-735-
2626.' 10:27c
3/2 HOUSE Riverview neighbor-
hood, $840 month plus deposit,
863-735-1953. 10:20-11:17p


3 HOUSES, 2-6 bedrooms,
$600/mo, 863-773-6616, 863-212-
1152, 863-445-0915. Deposit
negotiable. 10:13-11:10p
3/2 TRAILER, 5 acres, $600
deposit, $650 monthly, 863-781-
5036. 9:29-10:27p
2BR, 2B in Charlie Creek Mobile
Home Park, $550 monthly, $300,
sec. dep., 863-781-4460. 9:22tfc
2BR, 1BA Apartment, $550
month, $500 dep., 773-0100.
9:15tfc
MOVE-IN TODAY *
MOBILE HOMES 1 bed-$300 mo.;
: bed-$350 mo-up; 3 bed-$450
mo. up. Close to schools & hospi-
tal, no pets, $200 deposit. Se
habla espanol 863-698-4910 or
863-698-4908. 6:9tfc
ATTENTION The Federal Fair
Housing Act Prohibits advertising
any preference or limitation
based on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial status or
national origin, or the intention to
make such a preference or limita-
tion. Familial status includes chil-
dren under 18 living with parents
or guardians and pregnant
women. tfc-dh


COMMERCIAL SPACE, available
design build, 700 s.f. to 12,000 s.f.
863-773-6616. 863-445-0915.
10:13-11:10p


I F B YOUR TIRE HEADQUARTERS '


5101 N. Hwy 17 Bowling Green
3 75-4461
RR'Y MONDAY SATURDAY 8 am 6 pin
/ Foreign and Domestic Cars / Diesel Engines
/ Gas or Diesel Manual or Automatic Transmissions


MIKE
C'J
11-


I Ill GILLIARD"


FILL DIRT INC.

Fill Dirt Rock Sand Shell
i* Pond pigii g Ditch Cleaning

Lamar Gilliard Zolfo Springs
Home: (863) 735-0490 ci8:2tfc Mobile: (941) 456-6507




S30 Day Warranty ^*I N
Motor Sg Transmission .

RI Ho I I'olTE I
San' "I "" I n,
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK SE HABLA ESPANOL
U.S. Hwy. 17* Bowling Green 375-4441
$ Huge Discounts for Cash Deals $
* 24 Hour Towing Service Lowest Possible Rates Fast and Reliable
781-3090 or 781-3091 co10:27tfc






Realtor
NOEY A. FLORES, BROKER -
310 Court St. .
Wauchula, Florida 33873
(863) 773-3337 Fax: (863) 773-0144
wwwNoey A. Flores
www.floresrealty.net (863) 781-4585


REDUCED TO $89,900 4BR/2BA CB home on 1.25+/- acres -
Central air & heat 2 car garage- Priced to Sell!!!


N rIt
L_- .- _
f[- .. -- -- -


WAUCHULA 3BR/2BA 2005 Single-wide NH on 1.25 with
Central Air & Heat. Must see at $64.900 Ask us about qualifiy-
ing for $25,000 in grant money for down payment?
Ask us about the Foreclosure Properties in our area.
We are a HUD authorized agent!

WE SHARE THE SAME MLS WITH HIGHLANDS COUNTY!
Remember, Our listings are on the Internet.
Anyone with a computer can access them anytime! S
After Hours "'
Oralia D. Flores (863) 781-2955 John Freeman (863) 781-4084
Noey A.Flores (863) 781-4585 Jessie Sambrano (863)245-6891
Lawrence A. Roberts (863) 781-4380 c110 27c


OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT.
Perfect setting for medical office,
920 square foot, flexible design,
front lobby, reception area, and 4-
5 individual rooms. $900 monthly
OBO. 406 South 6th Ave,
Wauchula, call 863-773-6162.
6:30tfc


IN HOME Child Care available.
Amanda 863-512-0341. 10:27p
4-C CONSTRUCTION, Free esti-
mates, handyman, concrete,
remodels, additions, CBC1256,
863-214-1471. 10:13-3:29p
ALUMINUM CONSTRUCTION
additions, screen rooms, car-
ports, glass rooms, pool enclo-
sures, rescreening, decks, con-
crete. Harold Howze Construc-
tion, 735-1158. PR005181.
9:22-11:24p
THE WAUCHULA LIONS CLUB
collects NOT broken prescription
eyeglasses, cases and sunglass-
es. Please drop off at 735 N. 6th
Ave. 4:28tfc/dh
NEW ALCOHOLICS ANONY-
MOUS meeting in Hardee County.
Thursday 7 p.m., 131 South 8th
Avenue, Wauchula. For more Info
call LeAnne at 863-214-8430 or
Bill 239-821-4184. 9:2dhtfc


W. B. Olliff, Jr.,

,,.< ; .


Services

OVERCOME MEETINGS
(Gillespie) have been moved to
the Women's Club on Wednesday
nights, 7 pm. Come and seel
Kenny Sanders is the facilitator.
More information call 773-5717.
6:10tfc
DO YOU HAVE a problem with
drugs? Narcotics Anonymous
meets Monday and Thursday
nights' 7:00 p.m. at First United
Methodist Church, at the corner
of Palmetto and 7th Ave., Wau-
chula. 12:6tfcdh
IS ALCOHOL CAUSING a prob-
lem? Call Alcoholics Anonymous
in Hardee County at 781-6414.
Several weekly meetings.
dh
NEED A WELL OR HAVE PUMP
TROUBLE? CALL
ULLRICH'S PITCHER PUMP
For complete well, sales,
service and installation,
call (863) 773-6448.
7:18tfc
'ATTENTION.I State Statutes 489-
119 Section 5 Paragraph B and
Hardee County Ordinance 87-09
'Section 10 Paragraph D require
all ads for any construction-relat-
ed service to carry the contrac-
tor's license number. tfc-dh


Tree Surgeon, Inc.

773-4478


Complete

Tree Service^


O2tfc]


By Sherry White Ministries


773-0523 773-0877




Azalea Apartments
2, 3 & 4 Bedroom Apartments
Handicap Unit Available
Rental Rates Beginning at $490
(plus electric, cable and phone)
Rental Assistance Available for Qualified Applicants

Rental Office:
860 Pleasant Way *-Bowling Green, FL
(863) 375-4138 (TTY 1-800-955-8771)
1 Monday Friday *
9:00 AM. 12:00 Noon
iAL HO,, o, Equal Opportuniry Employd"' Provider 10
;oppoTw e .Dicl110:6-27







oeLPIL


I N C., R E A





REALTOR
See mo
John O'Neal wR.jc
REAl, ESTA1


50 acre
Hamlins,
$750,000!


grove; Valencia &
well, micro-jet.


PRICE REDUCED! 40 acs
farmland, 8" well, paved rd
frontage, near Wauchula.
$320,000!
3BR/2BA home on 4 lots
w/beautiful oaks, fenced in
backyard. Close to schools.
$66,000!
PRICE REDUCED! Looking
for 5 or 10 acs? Two 5 ac
high/dry fenced parcels on pri-
vate rd! $40,000 for vacant 5
acs! $50,000 for 5 acs w/well &
septic!


L T 0 R S
(863) 773-2128
REALTORS
JOE L. DAVIS
JOE L. DAVIS, JR.
JOHN H. O'NEAL
Ire listings at
Deldavis.com
FF INVESTMENTS


PRICE REDUCED! 10 ac
farmland w/well, pump, fencing
on private road. NOW $65,000!
PRICE REDUCED! Goodbye,
traffic...Hello, peace & quiet!
20 ac fenced pasture w/pond,
288SF cabin, 4" well inside
60SF shed. NOW $120,000!
PRICE REDUCED! 5 ac
cleared pasture, fenced w/4',
258' deep well, 1 HP sub-
mersible pump on quiet, private
rd. $45,900!
10 acs cleared land on paved
rd w/4" well in western Hardee
Co. $65,000!


RFALTOR ASOI~'IATES AITERP HOURs
KENNY SANDERS.........781-0153 SANDY LARRISON..8.. 832-0130
KAREN O'NEAL........ 781-7633 MONICA REAS.............781-088R
DAVID ROYAL--...-.....781-3490
HIGHWAY 17 SOUTH, WAUCHULA, FL 33873 c110:27c


HEAVEN SCENT THRIFT STORE
now offers pick-up service for
large donations. We appreciate
your generous support. 863-773-
9777. 12:16tfc
MISSION THRIFT STORE INC.
123 N. 7th Ave. We need your
donations. Pick-up available. 773-
3069. 3:24tfc
HHC THRIFT STORE 226 W. Main,
Wauchula. Consignment, lay-
away, 773-0550. 6:16tfc
JUST STUFF & JOHNNY'S
Furniture, 133 E. Townsend,
Wauchula, 832-5759. 9:15-11:10p
SAT. 8-? 2422 Edge Dr., E. Main to
Boyd Cowart to Edge Dr. Misc
things. 10:27p
ESTATE SALE, Saturday, 1341
Morgan Grice Rd. Furniture, TV,
appliances, much more. 10:27p
419 N. 9th Ave. Saturday, only.
Toys, clothes, misc. 10:27p








College Hill
Reunion Nov. 5
The annual College Hill
School reunion will be Nov.
5, 2011, at the school on CR
663 and College Hill Road.
The program will begin
about 11 a.m. and lunch will
be at noon. For any ques-
tions, call Pat Gugle at 863-
375-2844.


Catholic Church
To Hold Sale
A fall rummage sale will be
held at the parish hall of St.
Michael Catholic Church,
408 Heard Bridge, Wauchula
this weekend. It is sponsored
by the Council of Catholic
Women.
Proceeds will be used to
buy needed items for the
church. Hot dogs and soft
drinks will also be on sale
Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
and Saturday 8 a.m.,until
noon.


SA~ IDAY, 1989 E. County Line
Rd., Bowling Green. Follow signs.
10:27p
RUMMAGE SALE, St. Michael
Church, 408 Heard Bridge Rd.,
Friday 9-4, Saturday 8-noon.
10:27p
SATURDAY, Hwy. 17 in front of BP
in B.G. Lots of baby boy clothes
and much more. 10:27p
FRIDAY, SATURDAY, 8-2, 2215
Ralph Smith Rd., Wauchula.
10:27p
SATURDAY 8-?, 3330 Swannee
St., Zolfo. 10:27p
FRIDAY, 8-12, 116 S. 2nd Ave.
Lots of everything. 10:27p
SATURDAY, 8-?, 3006 Spruce
Street, Zolfo Springs. Lots of
everything. 10:27p
THURSDAY, FRIDAY, 8-?, 2324
Gebhart Rd., Bowling Green.
Misc. 10:27p


















ABOUT...
School News
The Herald-Advocate en-
courages submissions from
Hardee County schools.
Photos and write-ups
should be of recent events,
and must include first and
last names for both students
and teachers. Identify pho-
tos front to back, left to right.
Deadline for submissions
is 5 p.m. on Thursday.
Please include the name
and phone number of a con-
tact person. Qualifying
items will be published as
space allows.


S* Tree Removal Trimming

Stump Grinding

nI 9 Land Clearing
0 Licensed and Insured


Free Mount & Balance

Brand Name Tires!
Semi & Trailer Tires

BIG SHLE ON
ALL TIRES
773-0777 773-0727
S 116 REA Rd., Wauchula
(across from Wal-Mart) *
SVISA v Billy Ayers
I cl6:16tfc Tire Technician



HELP WANTED
TELECOMMUNICATIONS SPECIALISTS

Full Time $22,36000
The Hardee County Sheriff's Office is taking
applications for full time Telecommunication
Specialists. You must be at least 19 years of age,
have a high school diploma or equivalent, never
been convicted of a felony or a misdemeanor,
be willing to be fingerprinted, pass a drug test
and work shifts. Applications may be obtained
and returned by 4 p.m., October 28, 2011, at the
Sheriff's Office, 900 E. Summit St., Wauchula,
FL. If other arrangements are necessary, call
863-773-0304 ext. 211. EOE c110:2o,27c


Free Estimates
Insured 30+ years experience c


Lidifa's Hftose T1riv Store

QUALITY MERCHANDISE




Mon. Sat. 9 am 4 pm 773-3034 102 Carlton Street
-. )


I -


I


rl.
:~ ;.1)1


-1








8D The Herald-Advocate, October 27, 2011






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What To Consider If You're Considering LASIK
For more than a decade. Eric D. Donnenfeld. M.D.. surgeon. determine if you are a
ASIK-one of the most studied F.A.C.S. and member of the good candidate for LASIK.
medical procedures-has been American Refractive Surgery Many ophthalmologists offer
considered a safe and effective Council. preoperative exams for free.
vision correction option for LASIK doesn't always com- Expect the exam to take two to
lose who are nearsighted, far- pletely eliminate the need for three hours. during which time
ghted and/or have astigma- glasses-for example, those with you will have your vision, eyes
sm. age-related vision issues such and overall health evaluated.
Like all medical procedures, as presbyopia may eventually Share your full health history
ASIK has benefits and risks need reading glasses, as almost with your doctor. There are
Id the decision to have LASIK everyone will at some point, medical conditions. such as dia-
hould include questions and Talk to friends and family betes. that may make LASIK
search. Experts at the members who have had LASIK and other laser vision correction
.merican Refractive Surgery and have them tell you about options a poor choice. Also,
council (ARSC) recommend their own experiences with the .certain medications, such as
ou follow these steps: procedure. There are online corticosteroids, can affect the
First, ask yourself some ques- resources where you can con- healing process.
ons. Do glasses and/or contacts tinue your research, including "Education and counseling
iterfere with my daily life?Am the U.S. Food and Drug are among the most important
active-into sports or outdoor Administration (www.fda.gov) things we do as surgeons. You
activities? Can a vision care pro- and the Eye Surgery Education want a doctor who's accessible
edure, such as LASIK, enhance Council (www. eyesurgeryedu- and willing to not only tell you
ly lifestyle? cation.com). all the good things about
Second, learn about what Third, make an appointment LASIK but also if you're not a
ASIK is (and what it is not). with an experienced ophthal- good candidate," said Dr.
ASIK, one of many surgical mologist someone who is Donnenfeld.
vision correction options avail- certified with the American Bear in mind that an espe-
ble, is an outpatient procedure Board of Ophthalmology and cially low price may not reflect
iat uses laser technology to has performed at least 200 pro- your total costs, as some servic-
eshape the cornea. cedures. Get referrals from es may be extra. If you aren't
"LASIK is a great choice for friends, family or a trusted certain about a price, ask for a
lose with active lifestyles physician. Experienced sur- written estimate. A checklist to


where glasses and contacts
interfere with their daily life, a
stable vision prescription and
realistic expectations about
what the procedure can do," said


geons often have additional cer-
tifications, may be on staff at a
university medical school and
participate in clinical research.
Finally, in partnership with your


help determine if you are a can-
didate for LASIK can be found
at www.americanrefractive-
surgerycouncil.org.


Take Steps Toward A Walking-Friendly Community


Walking can be a simple form
of exercise and transportation,
unless busy streets and tight
schedules stand in the way. Not
to worry, say public-health
experts; something helpful is
afoot.
Around the country, research-
ers are working with communi-
ties to create pedestrian-friendly
facilities and programs that can
help people work some physical
activity into their day. At the
heart of their collaboration is the
Prevention Research Centers
(PRC) Program, a network of 37
academic and community part-
nerships sponsored by the
Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention to find new ways to
promote good health.
As part of a research project
to help communities organize
and develop advocacy skills, the
PRC in South Carolina guided
churches, nonprofit organiza-
ltions, residents, and the local
parks and recreation department
in forming a coalition to pro-
mote physical activity: The
coalition soon directed the con-
struction of walking tracks
inside six public parks in Sumter
County, while new trees were


planted in the parks; trash and
weeds were removed; and new
playground equipment, water
fountains, grills and signs were
installed-community im_prove-
ments made to encourage resi-
dents to use the parks and stay
active.
"Now we need to know if
residents can help motivate
each other to walk regularly
through walk-buddy programs
and other promotional strate-
gies," said Steven Hooker,
Ph.D., who helped the commu-
nity organize its coalition and
develop its advocacy skills.
At the PRC in St. Louis,
Missouri;researchers and com-
munity pdttners are trying to
help parents and children work
short walks into their weekday
schedules by organizing walk-
to-school programs.
"We focus on elementary
schools because they are usual-
ly located within a neighbor-
hood, and in many communi-
ties, students would be able to
reach them on foot with a bit of
adult supervision." said Amy
Eyler, Ph.D.. co-principal
investigator in the Physical
Activity Policy Research


Network, a group funded by the
PRC Program to study how
local decision making can
encourage physical activity.
"Walk-to-school programs
can take a lot of organizing,"
said Dr. Eyler. "But when com-
munities are willing to support
them, these programs can' help
parents and their kids spend
some healthy time together, cut
vehicle traffic on school
grounds, and help children
arrive at school feeling calm
and ready to learn."

Tips for Walkers
Keep this rule of thumb in
mind: On average, a person
weighing 150 lbs. walking 1.5
miles in 30 minutes burns about
150 calories.
Discuss walk-to-school
programs at PTA meetings and
school conferences. Consider
petitioning local leaders for
sidewalks and walking tracks.
Look for walking pro-
grams at shopping malls, where
weather and traffic are not con-
cerns.
For more information about
the PRC Program, go to
www.cdc.gov/ prc.


Helping Cancer Patients Get The Care They Want


A new booklet may help
patients talk to their doctors
about getting the kind of care
they want.
For patients who have a ter-
minal illness such as advanced
cancer, this is especially impor-
tant. Making treatment and care
decisions can be difficult and it
may be hard for patients to talk
to their doctors about the kind of
care they prefer.
Fortunately. the American
Society of Clinical Oncology
(ASCO) has a free booklet to
help patients'with advanced or
late-stage cancer talk about per-
sonal preferences for care based
on their own individual circum-
stances. desires, and beliefs.
"Advanced Cancer Care
Planning." available on ASCO's
patient information website
www.Cancer. net. has practical
information on what patients
and families need to know about
planning for end-stage or termi-
nal disease.


The booklet is designed to
help guide discussions about
the range. risks and benefits of
all available treatment options
once chemotherapy or surgery
is no longer effective.
ASCO's patient booklet
includes information on
advanced cancer care treatment
options. including standard
care. clinical trials, palliative
care and hospice care: the role
of family and caregivers in
treatment decisions: guiding
principles on evaluating care
choices: ways to cope and find
support: as well as questions to
ask the doctor.
"Identifying all of the avail-
able care options helps patients
to understand, consider and
develop a plan that takes their
personal needs, goals and pref-
erences into account. Having a
plan in place can ease the emo-
tional burden for patients and
their loved ones alike," said
Michael P. Link. M.D.. and


president of ASCO.
Studies have shown that
patients who talked with their
physicians about their prefer-
ences for end-of-life care:
Had less fear and anxiety:
Felt they had more ability
to influence and direct their
medical care:
Believed that their physi-
cians had a better understanding
of their wishes.
Palliative or end-of-life care
is not to be confused with hos-
pice. which is an end-of-life
option for people with a termi-
nal illness who are expected to
live six months or less.
Palliative care is about improv-
ing quality of life, providing an'
extra layer of support and hav-
ing a team to focus on patient
care, which can be provided at
any stage in serious illness.
For a copy of the booklet and
more physician-approved infor-'
mation. visit www.cancer.net/
advancedcancer.


Vietnam Memorial Traveling


Wall Now In Fort Meade


After losing loved ones, peo-
ple always find a way to remem-
ber them. Whether it be by look-
ing at their picture, listening to
their favorite song, or simply
recalling special times together.
Starting today (Thursday),
many people will get a chance to
remember the over 58,000
American lives lost during the
Vietnam War.
The Vietnam Traveling
Memorial Wall will be making
an appearance in Fort Meade.
This wall is a 3/5-scale replica
of the Vietnam Memorial in
Washington, D.C. The memorial
wall stands at six feet in the cen-
ter and is almost 300 feet from
end to end.
The memorial was construct-
ed to give those people who can-
not make the trip to Washington
an opportunity to participate in
memorializing their loved ones
and the great sacrifices made


during that time.
The wall will receive a
motorcycle escort into Fort
Meadeat 11 a.m. from U.S. 98
East onto U.S. 17 North and up
to the American Legion build-
ing next to Patterson Park.
Lined up in the streets wait-
ing for this historic event will
be pre-school and elementary
children along with residents
and businesses.
Volunteers will be placing
the Traveling Memorial Wall
and preparing the grounds at the
American Legion, where peo-
ple can drop by and watch the
process. While waiting for the
wall to be set up, visitors will be
able to enjoy hot dogs, ham-
burgers, barbecue sandwiches
and soft drinks, which will be
sold to cover event expenses.
There will also be music and
a homecoming party for the vet-
eran bikers who escorted the


wall.
At 4:30 p.m. all the celebrat-
ing will turn into "solemn rev-
erence and -respect" until the
Vietnam Traveling Memorial
Wall is removed on Monday.
Loud music, cell phones, ani-
mals, boisterous behavior and
inappropriate language will not
be allowed.
The official opening ceremo-
ny will begin at 6 p.m. There
will be a 21-gun salute at 7.
The wall will be open to the
public 24 hours a day. An infor-
mation tent will be set up from
9 a.m. to 9 p.m. to help find
names. At night there will also
be someone available to help
locate names.
People will be allowed to
leave photos, flowers, notes or
tokens and to take rubbings at
the Memorial Wall.


AM-SOUTH REALTY
Each office imhnlcendntly owncld amnd operated.




"U -^-t


Robert Hinerman
227-0202


,.-.. *-k'
Nancy Craft
832-0370


NEW LISTING!! Beautiful 4 Bedroom, 2.5
Bath CB home with central heat & air, sits
on One acre corner lot, well maintained
yard, in ground pool, surrounded by priva-
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blinds, formal living and dining room, cozy
family room w/fireplace just off kitchen,
Master BR w/his and her mirrored walk-in
closets, split plan accommodates the other
Bedrooms and bath. Half bath provided for
private pool area. Many. Many extras, call
today for appointment. Listed price:
$190.000
REDUCED!! 3/2 on one Acre, central AC
plus chain link fence back yard. $74.500
Canal Frontage to Lake June!! 3/2 like new
home not far from lake. $215.000
MOVE IN READY!! Get Home ownership
running smoothly with this 3 Bedroom, 2
Bath home. Only $35.000
FISHING ANYONE!! Nice 2 Bd, 2 Bath CB
home, frontage on Taylor Creek to Lake
Okeechobee has large Open floor plan.
Dock with pavilion is on canal. Many Extras.
$144.500
PRICE REDUCTION!! Commercial Lot, cor-
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from billboard, $49.000 for 1.28 acreage.
NEW LISTING!! 2 Br, 2 Bath CBS home,
kitchen-kitchenette, large Room for office
and or addition BR. In city limits. $74.500


702 SOUTH 6thAVENUE, WAUCHULA
(863) 773-2122 FAX (863) 773-2173
Gary Delatorre Broker
www.cbhardee.com


Richard Dasher Victor Salazar
781-0162 245-1054


Frontage on Little Lake Jackson. 2/2 with
screened porch $134.000
OWNER MOTIVATED!!! 2 Bedroom, 1 Bath
home outside city limits on 2.4 acres. Call
today for an appointment. $54.500
Beautiful 3 bedroom, 2 Bath CB home in a
desirable Neighborhood on a cul-de-sac.
PRICED REDUCED!! $179.000
REDUCED!! This 3 B, 2 Bth home with cen-
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Only!! S38,000
$65.000!! 2 Bedroom, 2 Bath home with extra
lot, citrus trees, out building for workshop,
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Priced to Sell.

BOWLING GREEN!! Own this 2 Bd, 1 Bath
home for only $38.000. Call today for
appointment.
150 Acres Hwy 17 frontage, fenced-ready
for your agri-business, home or both. $6.000
Per Acre Neaotiable
REDUCED!!! $6.500 PER ACRE!! 10 AC
fenced, 4 inch well, great location for home,
farming, multi-business. Ask for Nancy!!
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central heat & air, one car carport, outbuild-
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GO TO: HomePath.com For More Fannie
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c110 27c


Torrey Oaks Golf Course



e Breakfast $200-4 Player Team


Items Served &
Luch Provided


$60 Walk In


1 st, 2nd, & 3rd Place Team Prizes


ALSO Prize for Closest To Pin


Gold Sponsorship 2 Teams, Hole Spons. $500

Silver Sponsorship 1 Team, Hole Spons. $300


Bronze Sponsorship Hole Sponsor


$100


Contact Amy at 773-3147 ext. 2126 to sign up.
10.27c


Classifieds


1 -