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 Material Information
Title: The Herald-advocate
Portion of title: Herald advocate
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Wm. J. Kelly
Place of Publication: Wauchula Fla
Creation Date: October 20, 2011
Publication Date: 1955-
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Wauchula (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hardee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Hardee -- Wauchula
Coordinates: 27.546111 x -81.814444 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: 55th year, no. 31 (Sept. 2, 1955)-
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579544
oclc - 33886547
notis - ADA7390
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System ID: UF00028302:00400
 Related Items
Preceded by: Hardee County herald
Preceded by: Florida advocate (Wauchula, Fla.)

Full Text




Science Meets

Dessert Menu?

... Column 3A


The


Herald-Advocate


Hardee County's Hometown Coverage


111th Year, No. 46
3 Sections, 28 Pages
I


Thursday, October 20, 2011


700
Plus 5( Sales Tax


Overtime Costs: Smoke Or Flames?


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
It's the law!
Recent concerns about the
high amount of overtime hours
by the Hardee County Fire-
Rescue Department have been
clarified. Most of it is mandated
by federal law.
For the past fiscal year, which
ended Sept. 30, Fire-Chief
Michael Choate had budgeted
$220,000 for overtime pay. He
used $135,000 on mandated
overtime and $25,000 for


"sweat time," a colloquial term
for actual overtime hours.
At a Sept. 9 Fire-Rescue
workshop, Commissioner
Grady Johnson presented a list
of overtime figures provided by
Hardee County Clerk of Courts
B. Hugh Bradley, who is also ex
officio clerk to the commission
and sends out 180 checks to
county employees bi-weekly.
Johnson said the information
shows a climb in Fire-Rescue
line personnel and overtime. It
starts from 34 employees with


10,155.9 hours of overtime, in
the 1999-2000 fiscal year, and
reaches a high of 45 employees
in 2009-10. The highest number
of overtime hours was 20,529 in
2007-08.
"All this is while there's been
relatively zero population
growth. The overtime is killing
us," said Johnson.
While he was reporting these
numbers, Choate was shaking
his head, "No, that's wrong," he
said.
Johnson has since issued a


written directive to County
Manager Lex Albritton and
Choate to explain why they
think the information provided
by Bradley is inaccurate.
In talking to Choate, county
personnel and payroll staff and
others, the problem appears to
be a complete misunderstand-
ing.
Choate, Albritton and others
say naturally the clerk's infor-
mation is correct; it's based on
time sheets, salary levels and
other data provided by the Fire-


Rescue Department to the pay-
roll clerk and then on to the
clerk's office.
"It's just the way the informa-
tion is applied that's wrong,"
said Choate.
Overtime
The majority of overtime
hours comes from a federal law,
the Fair Labor Standards Act,
which mandates firefighter
overtime pay for anything over
a certain minimum hours.
An average payroll sheet
would have a firefighter/para-


medic, firefighter/EMT (Emer-
gency Medical Technician) or
lieutenant working four or five
24-hour shifts during a two-
week pay period of 24 hours on,
48 hours off. That's as much as
120 hours worked in two weeks
of five shifts and less in a two-
week period with four shifts, or
four-and-a-half shifts if work-
ing the last day of the two-week
period, when only that day's 16
hours is counted.
Federal law says a firefighter
See OVERTIME 2A


Homecoming A



Big Win For All


By MARIA TRUJILLO
For The Herald-Advocate
During halftime of what
became yet another victory for
the varsity football team, the
winners of the Homecoming
parade and court were an-
nounced.
This year's parade theme
was Old Arcade Games.
Swinging to first place was the
Junior Class float with the
theme of "Donkey Kong."
Jumping to second place was
the Senior Class with its theme
of "Super Mario FBrothers."
Crawling to third place was the
Sophomore Class with its
"Centipede" theme. And


chomping the way to fourth
place was the Freshman Class
with its "Pac-Man" theme.
Then the candidates for
Homecoming Queen and Class
Sweetheart were introduced to
the community as they'anxious-
ly waited to see if they would
be taking home the crown.
In the end, Senior Class
President Chelsea Wallace
crowned this year's Home-
coming Queen, Taylor Bolin.
Taylor is the daughter of
Millie and Todd Bolin. She was
escorted onto the field by her
father. Taylor is. Student Body
president, captain of the Varsity
See HOMECOMING 2A


COURTESY PHOTO
Wayne Hovis of Hardee High School's Class of 1954 went on to become a renowned artist and illustrator. He returns
to his hometown once again at the end of this month for the school reunion of the classes from the '50s. and '60s.

HHS Grad Paints Picture Of Success


By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
Hometown boy makes good?
There surely are countless
stories to be told of Hardee
County youngsters through the
decades who have gone on to
greatness.
But if a picture is worth a
thousand words, it should be
Wayne Hovis who paints it.
Hovis, a 1954 graduate of
Hardee High School, went on to
become an artist and illustrator
of global renown.
Big corporations have sought
out his work, including such
names as Walt Disney World,
Universal Studios, Ron Jon
Surf Shops, Barnie's Coffee &
Tea, Harcourt Publishing and-
Darden Restaurants, the compa-
ny behind such favorites as Red
Lobster, Olive Garden and
Longhorn Steakhouse. Artists



WEATHER
DALE WIGH LOW A
10112 88 70 0.10
10/13 83 70 0.01
10/14 86 68 0.00
10/15 83 67 0.00
10/16 85 69 0.00
10/17 81 70 0.00
10/18 77 72 0.15
ITIAL Rainfall to 10/18/11 50.44
Same period last year 45.13
Ten Year Average 54.30
Source: Univ. of Fla. Ona Researc Center

INDEX
Classifieds...................6B
Community Calendar....5A
Courthouse Report.......6C
Crime Blotter............... 8C
Hardee Living................2B
Obituaries....................4A
Information Roundup...5A
School Lunch Menus....7C



II1I 111 l1
8 33913 00075 7


and art lovers worldwide have
read an eight-page feature on
him in the January 2011 issue of
the magazine "International
Artist."
He has won over 100 awards
in illustration and design. His
peers refer to him as a legend.
Yet his start in life was simple
and plain, not seemingly des-
tined for fame.
Hovis was born in Missouri
as one of five children. A fami-
ly move to Michigan then the
divorce of his parents followed.
His mother, Opal Hovis. was
left to raise four boys and one


RECEDING RIVER


girl alone.
That brought the move to
Florida to be closer to relatives
in Wauchula.
There, his mother immersed
her family in the community
and all it had to offer, he recalls.
"My mother worked at The
Herald-Advocate under Buck
Kelly for 23 years," he says,
adding, "She thought the world
of Buck and Mrs. Kelly."
And while she worked to sup-
port her five children, she kept
them busy. Very busy! "There
was Boy Scouts, band, church
and a wonderful swimming


hole just outside of town,"
Hovis says,
And there were sports. "The
four boys became involved with
football and basketball. Sister
Nell became a cheerleader," he
notes.
All in all, "Mother kept her
five kids active and involved,"
he says.
Hovis describes his family as
"very close in growing up."
Their number sometimes flus-
tered their friends and neigh-
bors, he notes. "A lot of the
people couldn't remember our
See HHS GRAD 2A


PHOTO BY RALPH HARRISON
Remember how high the Peace River was last week? A threatened storm on Tuesday
night of this week was much less than expected. It brought only 0.15 inches of rain at
the weather station in Ona. At its highest last week, the Peace River was well over its
banks, cresting at 17.8 feet, exceeding flood stage level of 16 feet. Wednesday morning
it was 14.8 feet, allowing flooded areas to continue to recede. Temperatures, however,
are dropping and expected to be 49 degrees by Friday morning.


S' .,


HHS Dual-Decades


Reunion Oct. 28-29


By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
Homecoming excitement re-
mains in the air as Hardee
Senior High School's graduat-
ing classes from the 1950s and
'60s prepare to return home.
They'll take that Wildcat
walk soon, as their dual-
decades reunion is set for the
weekend of Oct. 28-29 in
downtown Wauchula.
Reunion organizers say the
event will be as big or bigger
than the superbly successful
Super Sixties Reunion, which
drew graduates from other
decades as well. This time, co-
chairs Sue Bryan Jackson and
Jerold Knight expect up to
2,500 classmates to attend.
The event kicks off with a
block party at Main Street
Heritage Park on Friday, Oct.
28. The fun begins at 7 p.m.


Expect a variety ot visual and
audio reminders of the targeted
decades to spur plenty of remi-
niscing among the '50s and
'60s grads.
Saturday, Oct. 29, will begin
with a pancake breakfast run-
ning from 7:30 to 10 a.m. at
Town Center. Following that,
there will be arts and crafts lin-
ing Main Street, and stores and
restaurants will remain open for
the anticipated crowds.
Individual classes from those
dual decades 'will break off for
smaller gatherings as well, as
everyone relives high-school
days while catching up on cur-
rent happenings.
Reunion organizers also have
turned the event into a fund
raiser for Resthaven, with a
painting being auctioned off
and a cookbook being sold to
benefit that home for the aged.


LANDFILL COULD

BE SCRAPPED
... Story 3B


SGuys: Know What

Time It Is?

... Column 1JA








2A The Herald-Advocate, October 20, 2011


SThe Herald-Advocate
Hardee County's Hometown Coverage
JAMES R. KELLY
Publisher/Editor
CYNTHIA M. KRAHL
Managing Editor


J9AN M. SEAMAN
Sports Editor



115 S. Seventh Ave.
P.O. Box 338
Wauchula, FL 33873


RALPH HARRISON
Production Manager

NOEY DE SANTIAGO
Asst. Prod. Manager

Phone: (863) 773-3255
Fax: (863) 773-0657


Published weekly on Thursday at Wauchula, Florida, by The Herald-Advocate
Publishing Co. Inc. Periodical Postage paid at U.S. Post Office, Wauchula, FL
33873 and additional entry office (USPS 578-780),"Postmaster," send address
changes to: The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338, Waucbula, FL 33873.


/ DEADLINES:
Schools Thursday 5p.m.
Hardee Living -Thursday 5 pn.
General News -Monday 5 pn.
Ads-Tuesday noon


SUBSCRIPTIONS:
Hardee County
6months-$21; yr.- 39; 2 yrs. -$75
Florida
6 months $25; 1 yr. $46; 2 yrs. $87
Out of State
6 months $29; 1 yr. $52; 2 yrs.- $100


LITERS:
The HerdMAdvocate welomes letters to the editor on matters of public
inmate. Letters sbhold be brief, ad must be write in good taste, signed
and include a daytime phone ambr.
SUBMISSIONS:
Press releases on community matters arewelcome. Submission should be
typed, double-spaced and adhere to the above deadlnes. Al items are sub
ject to editing.







Kelly's Column
By Jim


Hardee plays at Palmetto Friday night at 7:30 in an important
Class 5-A district game. Palmetto is No. 6 in the AP poll while
Hardee is 15th. In MaxPreps Palmetto is No. 5 and Hardee No. 9.
Both teams are undefeated.

Hardee County ranks No. 5 in the state in citrus production,
with about 27,000 acres in groves, 5.7 million trees and nearly 13
million boxes of fruit. The vast majority is in oranges.
The top four citrus counties, in order, are Polk, Highlands,
Hendry, and DeSoto. Overall Florida has 541,000 acres in citrus,
70.6 million trees and in 2010 produced about 140 million boxes of
oranges and 20 million boxes of grapefruit. The USDA crop fore-
cast for the 2011-12 season is 147 million boxes of oranges and 20
million boxes of grapefruit.

Got unwanted or expired human or pet medicine? For safe dis-
posal drop them off Saturday, Oct. 29, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the
Hardee Sheriff's Office at 900 East Summit Street or the Wauchula
Police Department at 128 South 7th Avenue.

Claude Kirk was born in California and attended high school
and.coll ge in Alabama. He earned a law degree from University
of Alabama. He served in the Marines in World War II and Korea
and moved to Jacksonville in 1956 to start an insurance company.
He became a Republican in 1960 to head the "Floridians for
Nixon" presidential campaign. Nixon carried Florida by 3 percent-
age points over then-Sen. John F. Kennedy.
Kirk in 1964 ran for U.S. Senate and lost, but in 1966 was
elected governor over Miami Mayor Robert King High. He was the
first Republican governor in Florida since Reconstruction. He start-
ed cleaning up Florida's environment. He was defeated in 1970 by
Democrat Reubin-Askew. Kirk passed away at his West Palm
Beach home on Sept. 28 at age 85.

The story of Noah will be presented weekends from March 30
through April 28 at the Hardee County Cattlemen's Arena.
Admission will be $19 for adults and $17 for children and seniors.
The new play written by Rev. Mike Graham who will be Noah,
will replace The Story of Jesus for 2012.




HOMECOMING
Continued From 1A


Cheerleaders and student advi-
sor for the Future Farmers of
America.
She is a member of the
Lionettes, National Honor
Society, and of the Fellowship
of Christian Athletes leadership
team. She is also a member of
the First Baptist Church of
Wauchula. In her ninth-grade
year, Taylor was crowned
Freshman Class Sweetheart.
Outside of school, Taylor
enjoys dancing at Wendy's
Dance Studio as well as teach-
ing a class there. After gradua-
tion she plans to attend the
University of South Florida and
major in communications.
The lucky ladies joining
Taylor on the 2011 Homecom-
ing Court were Lady-In-
Waiting Raquel Rosales, Junior
Class Sweetheart Selena
Olmos, Sophomore Class
Sweetheart. Isabel Abel, and
Freshman Class Sweetheart'
Gabriela Garza.
The other queen candidates
were Rosales, daughter of Mary
Rosates; Celina Castillo daugh-
.ter of Tangela and Alberto
Castillo; Sierra Coronado,
daughter of April and Frankie


Coronado; Maribel Garza,
daughter of Josephine Garza;
and Cierra Martinez, daughter
of Mary Herrera.
Junior Class nominees were
Kaylee Mancillas, daughter of
Ismael and Debbie Mancillas;
and Taylor Tompkins, daughter
of George and Nola Tompkins.
Sophomore Class hopefuls
were Caroline Durrance,
daughter of Kelly and Elizabeth
Durrance; and Maixee Khang,
daughter of Kia and Yon Yang
Khang.
Freshman Class contestants
were Angel Mancillas, daughter
of Ismael and Debbie Mancil-
las; and Alex Ullrich, daughter
of Max and Krista Kay Ullrich.
Hopefuls to become Home-
coming King, on the other
hand, had to wait until the
Homecoming Dance on Sat-
urday night to find out who had
been victorious.
It was there that Dalton
Rabon became this year's
Homecoming King. He is the
son of Michelle Rabon.
Other candidates were
Agustine Ancelmo and Braulio
Duran.


HARD CO RD OF Com 5SIOs ERS


Ambulance
Regular OverTime
Hours Hours


Name


WILLIAM R EAGERTON 1.035.41
MICHAEL J. CHOATE 755.52
ROBSRT L DEVEREAUX 1,077.57
KEITH A. PATTERSON 1,099.67
LAWRENCE FACTOR / 1,000.61
DONALD MACREGOR 1,118 .64
NANCY M. SNEIDER 1,056.73
JOHN 0. ADLER 1,037.56
WAYNE A. NEWMAN JR 1,073.73
GREGORY A. PFEIFFER 1,073.02
NENEMIAH V. FERRANTE 1,052.60
DANIEL C. BRIMBLECOM 1,112.61
JOSHUA J. FERRANTE 1,034.46
BARBARA R. KESLING 1,088.53
AARON LANIER 1,099.24
KEVIN N. ARMSTRONG 1,084.90
JAMES T. SIMPSON 1,095.10
DANIEM S. COL- 1,097.17
DAVID E. COLE 1,035.93
TODD A. BARTON 1,043.43
WILLIAM F. RESCHKE J 956.97
BOBBY R. RESPRESS 1,107.58
PAUL B. STUCKE JR 1,056.34
ROBERT D. COLE 1,111.12'
JAVIER FERNANDoZ 1,176.97
CHRISTOPHER D, CAMPS 1,069.67
GLEN Z. KARNES I 1,103.01
HILDA R. HtRRERA 777.36
LESLIE F. PTS 750.93
CHAD W. ANDERSON 1,044.27
DAVID A. MORALES 1,085.61
JASON A. MACE 1,062.06
KENNTH W. FRITZ 1,060.32
JEROME L. MANCILAS 205.02
CHAD A. REEVES 1,104.68
SEAn M. TESTERMASn 1,106.35
JERIEM R. 8RIDGRS 1,109.27
NATHANIEL C DUNCAN 1,084.26
DERRICK B; MADDEN 1,072.19
BRITTANY PARUMER 1,043.44
VICTOR E. GONZALEZ 1,071.54
VICTOR L. ACCORSO JR 864.45
ROBERT H. CLAYTON II 130.02
,LYSSA L. HENDERSON .00


TOTALS


43,225.86


49.38
.00
78.34
83.34
77.11
153.75
80.41
48.75
S67.39
82.82
93.31
77.69
46.24
65.93
91.11
172.09
164.90
39.58
25.42
88.12
51.46
111.23
38.95
78.96
87.70
131.35
35.30
4.17
.83
.00
77.92
47.08
102,59
.00
109.56
83.52
150.93
76.76
40.41
71.24
39.79
102.91
.00
.00
3,028.34


Cost Center Analysis

Other Regular
"Hours Hours


180.20
111.16
151.35
119.68
243.44
84.06
166.36
187.81
161.35
160.12
161.35
116.35
180.52
127.28
125.52
111.35
121.35
145.30
210,50
171.35
166.17
114.89
171.35
114.68
92.60
139.48
130.73
89.36
115,77
174.06
140,62
173.94
140.10
76.23
84.19
97.60
91.35
126.35
155.11
70.52
81.35
57.35
3.33
.00
5,643.53


1,449.34
1,057.48
1,508.43
1,539.33
1.400.64
1,565.86
1,479.27
1,452,44
1,503.02
1.501.98
1.473.40
557.39
1,448.04
1,523.72
1,538,76
1,518,60
1,532.90
1,535.83
1,450,07
1,460.57
1,3329.53
1,550.42
1,478.66
1, 55.38
1,647.53
1,497.33
1,543.99
1,088.14
1,051.07
1,461,73
1,519.64
1,486.69
1,484.18
286.98
1,546.32
1,548,65
1,552.73
1,517.74
1,500.81
1,883,50
1,460.56
1,499.96
1,210.05
181.98
1,883.50
62,390.64


From 10/01/10
To 09/30/11


Fire Control
OverTime Other
Hours Hours


69.12
.00
109.66
116.66
107.97
215.25
112.59
68.25
94.36
115.93
130.69
108.81
64.76
92.32
127.56
240.91
230.85
55,42
35.58
123.38
72.04
155.77
54.55
110.54
122.80
183.90
49.45
5.83
1.17
.00
.109.08
65.92
143.66
.00
153.44
116,98
211.32
107.49
56 S9
13.00
99.76
55.71
144.09
.00
13.00
4,253.16


252.25
155.84
211.85
157.52
340.76
117.64
232.84
262.89
225.85
224,08
225.85
162.85
252.68
178.17
175.68
155.85
169.85
203.40
294.70
239.85
232.63
160.81
239.85
160.52
129.60
195.22
182.97
125.14
162.23
243.64
196.83
243.51
194.10
106.71
217.81
136.60
127.8S
176.85
217.09
180.50
98.68
113.85
80.25
4,67
18050
8,080,31


k Hours Mandated By Federal Law


OVERTIME
Continued From 1A


must be paid overtime (tinfie
and a half) for anything over
106 hours biweekly. On a 120-
hour pay period, that could
leave up to 14 hours overtime.
For each such worker, in 26
pay periods a year, that would'
add up to 364 hours overtime:
In the last fiscal year, only two
people got that many hours.
There are 13 people per shift,
times three shifts for the 24 on,
48 off, which equals 39 people.
Multiplying 364 of mandated,
overtime by the 39 full-time
employees, that could be a total
of 14,196 overtime hours a
year.
And there's more. Whenever
someone works a holiday (and
there are 11 county holidays a
year), that person is awarded
11.2 hours extra. For one per-
son, that's up to 123.2 hours a
year. Multiply that by the 13
people on shift the day of a hol-,
iday, and it equals 1,601.6
hours.
So before any sweat or extra
overtime is paid, there could be
as much as 15,797.6 hours of
mandated overtime to be paid
annually.
Only one percent of the Fire-
Rescue salary budget is what
could be considered "real"
overtime hours. For the past fis-
cal year, Choate used $135,000
on mandated overtime and
$25,000 for real or "sweat"
overtime.
Some of those are due to
workers being on call when
his/her shift ends and they are
unable to pull away from the
job at hand. Some is due to
emergency call-in.
Sometimes a lieutenant has to
be called in because national
firefighter policies require that
an in-charge person, a lieu-
tenant, be at each scene.
For instance, on Sept. 13,
Fire-Rescue got hit with three
fires and three medical calls in
the space of two hours, handled
only through call-in staff and
assistance from nearby counties
under interlocal agreements.
Fires on U.S. 17 in'Wauchula,
the county landfill and the state
correctional facility, coupled
with medical calls in Bowling
Green, Wauchula and beyond
Seven-Mile Point, maxed out
available staff.
FTE
Figures on the number of
employees per year are mis-,
leading because one person
could start in X position at the
start of the year, resign or retire,
and another be hired in his/her
place. That could happen in one
or more positions, adding up to
45 people having worked for
Fire-Rescue during a fiscal year
(Oct. 1 to Sept. 30).
Actually, it is the number of
positions filled, not the number


of workers at some time during
the year, explains the personnel
office.
There are 39 FTEs (full-time
equivalent) line positions to be
. filled,,. 3 p'erift :thesthres
,'shit's."'1hat fiaj not' changed
since .lte com ssion added
three positions in 2005-06 to
cut down on overtime, when the
then-36 employees were
stretched too thin.
"If someone resigns or retires
during the year, there could be
employee paysheets for 45
employees some time during
that 12-month period, but in no
instance is there more than the
allotted FTEs at any time," said
Choate.
"I can assure you that there's
been no staff increases. We
have only 39 FTEs," said
Choate.
Staffing and OT Issues
There are 44 total staff under
the Hardee Fire-Rescue
Department. Two of these, the
fire chief and deputy chief, are
salaried and do not receive
overtime pay. One of the office
ladies got two hours overtime
and the other 10; the fire
inspector totaled 13 hours over-
time hours last year.
When it is necessary to have
"real" overtime, there is a rotat
ing list of workers. The pick is
from the top of the list for each
position, lieutenant for lieu-
tenant, etc. The person called in
then drops to the end of that list.
If a person declines an overtime
opportunity when his/her turn
comes, that person also drops to
the end of the list.
To avoid some of the over-
time, there is something called
"swap time," an exchange of
shifts or hours. If someone
knows 48 hours ahead of time
that he/she will be out due to a
vacation day or medical
appointment, a switch with
another employee can occur.
There is a maximum of five
shift swaps before time must be
paid back.
Another factor is call volume.
There were 2,734 calls a year a
decade ago. In 2009-10, it was
4,034. Since the dispatch switch
Oct. 1, there has been an aver-
age 14 calls per shift.
SStaffing
The 39 line employees are
divided into three 13-person
shifts of 24 hours on, 48 hours
off.
The 13 people on each shift
are divided as follows: two in
Bowling Green, where an
ambulance and a fire engine are
available, whichever is needed;
five in Zolfo Springs; and six in
the main station in Wauchula.
A station was put in Bowling
Green in an agreement with the
city for station coverage there
in exchange for its citizens pay-


ing the same assessments as
other county residents. (Each
municipality had to agree for its
citizens to pay assessments).
Zolfo Springs has the largest
Scoverage- zone. not the highest
population, but highest square.
mileage, .south to the DeSoto
County line, east to the
Highlands County line, and
west to the Manatee County
line. Its staff sometimes covers
north up to the Magnolia Manor
community in south Wauchula,
as itcan get there faster straight
up U.S. 17 than the Wauchula
units through town.
The Wauchula station six-




HHIS
Continued
individual names, so we all
answered to the name 'Hovis.'"
After graduation in 1954,
Hovis joined the U.S. Navy,
serving for five years, three in
Japan and two in Washington,
D.C.
In Washington, Hovis first
began to pursue a career in art.
He spent 10 years in all in
Washington, attending George,
Washington University, the
Catholic University of Anerica
and the National Art School. He
took the Famous Artist course
and toiled in a large commercial
art studio.
It was there, Hovis says, that
he learned the skills of airbrush-
ing, hand lettering and graphic
design. After leaving D.C., he
moved back to Florida, opening
a studio of his own in Orlando.
He and his employees
focused much of'their talents on
design and illustration, but the
advent of computers changed
all that. Hovis changed with the
technology, realizing his hobby
of fine art would now need to
become his full-timr endeavor.
Now, four galleries in Florida
and Georgia showcase and sell
his work. The prestigious Oil
Painters of America have
tapped him as a member.
Oil on canvas is his passion,
but he also works in watercolor,


person crew includes the three
floaters commissions approved
a half dozen years ago to fill in
where needed.
If a person in the Bowling
Green station is ill or on vaca-;
tion, one of the floaters takes:
his place, dropping the
Wauchula station to five per-
sonnel. If one is out in Zolfo
Springs, that drops Wauchula
to four staff.
Fire-Rescue cannot function
with less than 11 staff, so, if
several firefighters are caught
by the same flu bug, it is neces-
sary to call someone in on over-
time to fill positions.





From 1A
acrylic And gouache.
His paintings span the gamut
of expression and imagery, but
outdoors people and scenes are
his favorites.
Currently, Hovis is working
on a series of Old South paint-
ings.
Hovis also took brush and:'
paint to a finely detailed picture '
of Hardee High School, a work.
of love that he recently donated
to the Hardee County School
Board, saying he wanted to
"give something back to the
school and county that were
sucdf a vital part of my upbring-
ing."
He also donated a beautiful
outdoor scene featuring two
streamside bucks, which will be
auctioned off at the 1950s and
'60s school reunion set for Oct.
28-29 in Wauchula. That paint-
ing can be viewed beforehand
at Cat's on Main in the Town
Center on U.S. 17 and Main
Street.
And his rendition of the HHS
edifice can be found on the
cover of a cookbook being sold
for the reunion.
Funds from the sale of both
the oil of the two deer and of the
cookbooks will be donated to
Resthaven.
Hovis and his wife, Evelyn,
live in Orlando.


ROBBY EILIOr invites all
his friends and neighbors
Sl to come see him at




205N. Charleston Fort Meade
1-800-673-9512 *
www.dlrectchevy.com


ABOUT ...
Obituaries
Obituaries are published free of charge by The Herald-Advo-
cate as a public service, but must be submitted through a fu-
neral home. A one-column photo of the deceased may be
added for $15.
Obituaries contain the name, age, place of residence, date of
death, occupation, memberships, immediate survivors and fu-
neral arrangements. The list of survivors may include the names
of a spouse, parents, siblings, children and children's spouses
and grandchildren, and the number of great-grandchildren. If
there are no immediate survivors, consideration of other rela-
tionships rhay be given.


"k Hours Mandated By Federal Law








October 20,2011, The Herald-Advocate 3A




In Business
By Maria Trujillo


COURTESY IMAGE
This closeup photograph of Wayne Hovis' rendering of the hstorc Hardee Senior High School edifice shows the fine
detail his image has captured for the ages. Hots has presented this painting to the Hardee County School Board,
which marveled at its precision and expressed Interest In restoring the building's architectural features to their orig-
inal glory.


Q,,.7,i M
'' : ,L .
Thiscanas how thelayrs f wrk hichbuid te fnalpainingartlovrs ejoy Hee, he tartof hisoilpro
vide a vluestud of he orse andther riers


JUST LIKE MAGIC! An ice cream shop has recently
found its way to Wauchula.
With several fun flavors and combinations, Pure Magic Ice
Cream recently opened up at Wauchula Plaza on U.S. 17 South.
Owner Mike Jarvis came up with the idea to open an ice cream
store after attending a wedding where he saw ice cream being cre-
ated in a unique way. Seeing how amazing the process was, and
how much the guests enjoyed the outcome, Jarvis decided to start
his own shops in Winter Haven and Wauchula.
Running Wauchula's Pure Magic is Tampa-born manager
Michael Angle, who has lived in Winter Haven for around 11 years.
Although never managing an ice cream shop before, he does have
experience in fast-food restaurants. He has been a manager at both
Papa John's and Domino's.
Because of this experience and the fact that Angle helped to
build Pure Magic in Winter Haven, Jarvis decided Angle would be
the best choice to manage his new business here.
What makes Pure Magic Ice Cream so special and amazing is
how it is made. All of the ice cream is made right in front of your
very eyes.
It starts off as an ice cream mix, you add some liquid nitrogen
- which is 320 degrees below zero and, voila, frozen ice cream!
The liquid nitrogen freezes the mixture so quickly, the ice crystals
don't grow, making a noticeable difference.
Called "The World's Most Amazing Ice Cream," Angle thinks
this is due to the fact that it is made fresh. The liquid nitrogen
makes the ice cream creamier and better tasting than the average
ice cream.
You can also choose over three dozen different toss-ins,
including all the favorites plus a few tasty surprises.
Although it is an ice cream shop, Pure Magic also makes what
some would say is the best pressed Cuban in town along with a full
variety of sandwiches. They include Italian, club, turkey, ham and
roast beef, and a "double meat."
These popular sandwiches, which are available at any time,
were included at the shop for adults who prefer something besides
ice cream. They also get to enjoy-"NFL Sunday Ticket."
Pure Magic not only caters parties, but will host them as well.
To be able to have your child's party at Pure Magic Ice Cream and
have the kids play in the "Moonwalk," call (863) 207-3356 or visit
bouncerusinflatables.com to reserve your date.
Pure Magic is located at 1040 S. Sixth Ave. Hours are Monday
through Thursday from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m., Friday through Saturday
11 a.m. to 10 p.m., and Sunday 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. If you would like
to contact Pure Magic for takeout or catering, its number is 767-
0150.
New' business or management? Remodeling or relocating? Call
Maria Trujillo at 773-3255 with your business news.


Here, Brittany Dunlap is shown adding liquid nitrogen to
her mixture so it will become "The World's Most Amazing
Ice Cream."


These majestic bucks could become the trophy of choice for your home. This Wayne Hovis painting will be auctioned
off at the dual-decades reunion set for Oct. 28-29 In Wwuchula. Proceeds from the sale of the painting will be donat-
ed to Resthaven. See it now, before the auction, on display at Cat's on Main.


GET YOUR BUCS TICKETS NOW?
Tampa Bay Buccaneer fans better get their season tickets now.
My dad has been a Bucs fan since the day they started. I have,
too, I guess. But over the last 10 years or so I've only seen two or
three NFL games live, and two of those were Jaguar games. It's not
because I'm a Jaguar fan, but those tickets were free. Also, getting
to Tampa for a 1 o'clock kickoff isn't a possibility for me.
But if you were raised a Bucs fan like me or if you are like my
dad and go to four games or so a year, now is the time to buy Bucs
Futures, because the sky is the limit as long as Josh Freeman is the
Bucs quarterback!
Freeman is a keeper. Unless the Bucs dump him, like they his-
torically have done with other great quarterbacks, who then went
on to win a Super Bowl with another team: Steve Young, Doug
Williams, Trent Dilfer, etc.
If the front office is able to see the potential of a young quar-
terback with great big-moment instincts and keep him, the
Buccaneers may be on their way to being a multiple Super Bowl-
winning franchise.
Freeman has engineered several late-game drives to either
hold or bring the Bucs back from a deficit. Despite being young
and forcing a few throws that turned into interceptions, Freeman
has that leadership quality and winning attitude that lead teams to
the Super Bowl.
The BHcs should do whatever it takes to keep Freeman happy
and protected.
Now, my dad would differ with this assessment in part because


Freeman has never won a championship yet. His best record in
high school was 9-3 and in college, a seven-win season. But with
the Bucs he has already won 10 games (as I write this) and was a
couple of plays from making the playoffs. Freeman is improving,
and if given the chance I think he can be a Super Bowl-caliber
player.
Why would I think this about Freeman?
I'm not really even sure I have a good reason, other than I
know in the National Football League it takes a good quarterback
to come from behind and win games. It also takes a good quarter-
back to keep the lead your team has by sustaining drives and not
giving the other team the ball back. Josh Freeman has shown the
ability to do both in his young career, in a pretty tough division.
Also, throughout college his stats were better each year, more
touchdowns and less interceptions. In the pros I think he could
have the same kind of success if given a chance to grow in the same
system, and with a few key players around him on offense.
Buccaneer fans, however, have not really supported this young
team so far. They don't seem to see the potential of how great the
Bucs can be this year and next and next. Or maybe everyone is
broke and can't afford a $250 afternoon at Raymond James
Stadium.
But if you do happen to have the time and the money and you
are an NFL fan and you want to cheer for a Super Bowl-winning
team, you better get your Bucs tickets now. I have a feeling in a
couple of years, the Bucs will be like the Colts, the Patriots, the
Steelers always a threat to go to the Super Bowl.
So break out the Pevter Power towels. Go ahead and order
1,000 Freeman bobblehead dolls, get the jersey with his name and
number on the back. buy his football card if they even make such
a thing anymore. Better yet, catch a field goal from my dad's seats
and take it to the next Bucs practice and have Josh Freeman sign it,
then put it in the safety deposit box.
Buy Freeman, buy, buy, buy!
It won't be long and you all will be sending me dividend
checks, Super Bowl tickets, rings, etc. in thanks for this great


PHOTOS BY MARIA TRUJILLO
Pete Solis mixes the selected flavors together just before
he adds the liquid nitrogen,










Come See Me At My

NEW LOCATION


- Ae'r/ )


f/


1006 9TH AVE. WAUCHULA


Q
03
--:> -


Call 773-4364

or 781-6615


-0Y


10:20c








4A The Herald-Advocate, October 20,2011


Obituaries


EDNA JUNE PETERS
BLACK
Edna June Peters Black, 91,
of Fort Meade, died on
Monday, Oct. 17, 2011, at
Lakeland Regional Medical
Center-
Born to the late Carson and
Claudia Peterg, on March 4,
1920, she was an obstetrics
nurse at Polk General Hospital.
She was a member of the First
Baptist Church of Fort Meade
and a member of the Order of
the Eastern Star and a Crafty
Lady.
She is preceded in death by
her parents, by husband Marvin
David Black; and daughter
Joanne Black Welch.
Survivors include two sons,
Marvin David Black Jr. and
wife Pamela of Gainesville,
Ga., and Norman Larry Black
Sr. and wife Phyllis of Fort
Meade; seven grandchildren;
and 16 great-grandchildren.
Graveside services are today,
Thursday, Oct. 20, 2011, at
Evergreen Cemetery in Fort
Meade. Hancock Funeral Home
is in charge of arrangements.

MARION MELENDY
KIELLA
Marion Melendy Kiella, 89,
of Wauchula, died on Thursday,
Oct. 13, 2011, at Lakeland.
Born on Dec. 16, 1921, in
Wauchula, she was a beautician
and attended First Christian
Church. She also belonged to
several local organizations.-
Survivors include sons Jerry
Kiella of Zolfo Springs and'
Mark R. Kiella of Wauchula;
daughters Rebecca Dantes of
Charleston, S.C., and Donna
Smithwick and Marilyn Peter-
son, both of Wauchula; sister
Carol Knight of Wauchula;
brother Harvey Melendy; 11
grandchildren; and 11 great-
grandchildren.
Visitation was Sunday, Oct.
16, 2011, from 3 to 5 p.m. at the
funeral home. Services were
Monday, Oct. 17,2011, at 10:30
a.m. at First Christian Church
with Pastor Darin Canary offi-
ciating. Inter-ment followed at
Wauchula Cemetery. Robarts
Family Funeral Home was in
charge of arrangements.


ii Covnug u emoky
.~


JOSEPH LAMAR
KNIGHT
Joseph Lamar Knight, 73,
of Avon Park, died on Sunday,
Oct. 16, 2011.
He was born on Sept. 5,
1938, in Wauchula and was a
Hardee County resident for
mbst of his life. He was the
owner of Knight's Drive-In
Restaurant, the Hardee House,
and also farmed.
He was a 1956 graduate of
Hardee High School, and was
active in baseball and football
during his high school years.
He served his country in the
Army National Guard, and
enjoyed singing in the choir at
First Presbyterian Church.
He was preceded in death
by his wife Judith Knight;
daughter Nona Knight Moore;
granddaughter Lindsey
Moore; and sister Sylvia
Knight Campbell.
He is survived by two
daughters, Dana Christenson
of Tampa; and Beth Jahna and
husband Albert of Avon Park;
brother Richard Knight and
wife Brenda of Babson Park;
sister Kristy Knight Cox and
husband Bud of Lakeland;
four. grandchildren Ashley
Moore, Lamar Jahna, Haley
Moore and Mason Jahna; and
six nephews and one niece.
SVisitation is today (Thurs-
day), Oct. 20, from 10 to 11
a.m. at First Baptist Church of
Wauchula, With the funeral at
I1 a.m. with the Rev. Ed
Sager officiating. Interment
follows at Wauchula Cem-
etery.
Expressions of comfort may
be made at robartsfh.com.


FUNERAL HOME
WAUCHULA

-Wt.1


ROBERT K. RATLIFF
Robert K. Ratliff, 86, of
Wauchula, died on Monday,
Oct. 10, 2011, at Bay Pines
Hospital.
Born Aug. 3, 1925, in Bow-
ling Green, he was a lifelong
resident of Hardee County. He
was -a World War II veteran
serving in the U.S. Army. He
was co-owner of Ratliff's
Grocery in Bowling Green and
had worked in outside sales for
Lawton Brothers in Orlando.
He was preceded in death by
a brother Herman T. Ratliff.
Survivors include a step-son
Robert LaGasse of Rockledge.
Arrangements are by Robarts
Family Funeral Home.

LOUISE HOWARD
WILLIAMSON
Louise Howard Williamson,
62, of Bartow, died on Friday,
Oct. 14,2011.
The daughter of Sammie and
Hazel Louise Murkerson
Howard, she was born Dec. 13,
1948, in Donaldson, Ga. she
was a longtime member of the
Highland City Freewill Baptist
Church.
She was preceded in death by
her parents; and brothers Ray
Taylor and Clayton "Buster"
Howard.
She is survived by her hus-
band of 44 years, Joseph David
Williamson Sr. of Bartow; her
son Joseph David Williamson,
Jr. and wife Sandie of Bartow;
her daughter-sa wThornton and
husband Mike of Auburndale;
brother Edward "Bubba" How-
ard of Alturas; sisters Shelia
Adams of Alturas, Brenda Losh
of Aubumdale and Maudie
Jiskoot of Bartow; nine grand-
children; Dustin McKenzie,
Tabitha McKenzie, Zachary
Davis, Kelli McKenzie, Justen
Levasseur, Megan Williamson,
Breanna Thornton, Morgan
Williamson, and Aiden
Deweeese.and five great-
grandchildren; Isabel, Gavin,
Clayton, Emma Jane, and
Kainin.
There will be a celebration of
her life on Saturday, Oct. 22,
2011, at 2 p.m. at the Highland
City Freewill Baptist Church,
5546 Fourth St., Highland City.
Arrange-ments by Whidden
McClean Funeral Home, Fort
Me;de.


.9n Pouir g uM enokty I


CLAUDE WAYLAND
HARRIS SR.
.Claude Wayland Harris Sr.,
80, of Wauchula, passed away
on Monday, Oct. 17, 2011, in
Lakeland.
He was born in Greenville,
N.C. on May 26, 1931, and
had been a resident of
Wauchula since 1953. Mr.
Harris was the owner/auto
mechanic of Claude Harris
Garage and a former assistant
fire chief with the Wauchula
Fire Department. He was a
member of Northside Baptist
Church.
He was preceded in death
by three brothers and one sis-
ter.
He is survived by his wife,
Mary Lou Harris, of Wau-
chula; two sons, Claude
Harris Jr. and wife Kathryn,
and Thomas Richard Harris
and wife Elizabeth, all of
Wauchula; two daughters,
Polly Anne Bissette and hus-
band Donald, and Barbara
Finneran and husband Ed, all
of Wauchula; one sister Alma
Rowley of Craftsburg, Vt.; 12
grandchildren; and 16 great-
grandchildren.
Visitation will be held
today (Thursday), Oct. 20,
from 11 a.m. until noon at
Northside Baptist Church,
with funeral services at noon
with the Rev. Mitchell
Landress officiating. In lieu of
flowers, memorials may be
made to Nu-Hope Elder Care
Services, 310 N. Eighth Ave.,
Wauchula, Fl 33873.
Expressions of comfort may
be made at robartsfh.com.


FUNERAL HOME
WAUCHULA


The lima bean gets its name
from the city of Lima, Peru
Archaeologists have founc
evidence they were culti.
vated there over 6,00C
years ago, in what was the
Indian village of Rimac.



.f 0ovig 1 temo g













MARION MELENDY
KIELLA
Marion Melendy Kiella,
89, a lifelong resident of
Wauchula, passed away on
Thursday, Oct. 13, 2011 at
Lakeland. She left this world
in peace to meet her Savior,
with all five of her children at
her side.
She was a cattlewoman and
a beautician, with a beauty
shop in her home. She was a
Christian and attended First
Christian Church her entire
life.
She was a wonderful moth-
er, grandmother and friend, a
true blessing to all who knew
her. She lived her life with
love, spirit, energy, compas-
sion, honesty and sincerity,
having a positive attitude that
filled those around her with
joy.
She was a rtember of
Woman Alive, the Wauchula
Woman's Club, Go Ye Circle,
United Daughters of the Con-
federacy and the Daughters of
the American Revolution.
She is survived by two
sons, Jerry Kiella of Zolfo
Springs and Mark R. Kiella of
Wauchula; three daughters
Rebecca Dantes of Charles-
ton, S.C., and Donna Smith-
wick and Marilyn Peterson,
both of Wauchula; sister Carol
Knight of Wauchula; brother
Harvey Melendy; 11 grand-
children; and 11 great-grand-
children.
Visitation was Sunday, Oct,
16, 2011, from 3 to 5 p.m. at
Robarts Garden Chapel.
Funeral services were Mon-
day, Oct. 17, 2011, at 10:30
a.m. at First Christian Church
with Pastor Darin Canary offi-
ciating. Interment followed at
Wauchula Cemetery.
Expressions of comfort may
be made at robartsfh.com.


FUNERAL HOME
WAUCHULA

%ki^T


"They were


wonderful."

We hear kind words consistently.
We're proud that people feel
comfortable enough with us to
openly tell us how much they
S appreciate what we did for them.
In fact, it's this appreciation
That drives us to offer the very
Sbest in comfort, compassion and
service.


@^)I ROBARTS
FAMILYFUNERALHOME
A Truslted Family Name Since 1906



View Obits at robartsfh.com
529 WEST MAIN STREET. AUCHULA, FLORIDA 33873 863-773-9773


SIT
AU"


Celebrating our 5th

Anniversary with our

community.


'i ir sne

.- ,. .
-,'; '. %2, G .r


228 N.th Ave.Wauchula
(located across from Hess)

863.773-0625 or 8634481497
_10 .2Oc


Thals w we 1 come to you.


While we always do our best to ensure every family's comfort, we

understand that many people would rather not visit a funeral home
at all. If you have any questions and prefer to meet with someone
face-to-face, we are happy to come to you. Whether it's at your

home, at work, or even over coffee. Call us today.





^Pongek- 5 s-Okiady


Funeral Homes









404 W. Palmetto St. Wauchula

(863) 773-6400

10:20c PongerKaysGrady.com


nc


--
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October 20, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 5A


Obituaries

CASSIE BELL BROWN
Cassie Bell Brown, 91, of
Bowling Green, died on Sun-
day, Oct. 16. 2011, at Lakeland.
Born on Feb. 16, 1920, at
Colquit County, Ga., she lived
.in Hardee County most of her
life. She retired as a nurse at G.
Pierce Wood Hospital in Ar-
cadia and the Hardee County
School Board as a bus helper.
She attended First Baptist
Church of Zolfo Springs and
several organizations.
She was preceded in death by
husband Paige Brown; and son,
Mark McEntyre.
Survivors include son
Michael McEntyre of Bowling
Green; sister Joe Averitt of
Wagner, S.C.; and six grand-
children.
A memorial service will be
held at Pioneer Park on Sat-
urday, Oct. 22,2011, from noon
to 4 p.m. for family and friends.
Each is asked to bring a covered
dish to share. Robarts Family
Funeral Home is handling
arrangements.

JOSEPH LAMAR KNIGHT
Joseph Lamar Knight, 73, of
Avon Park, died on Sunday,
Oct. 16, 2011.
Born Sept. 5, 1938, in
Wauchqla, he lived in Hardee
County most of his life. He
served in the Army National
Guard and attended First
Presbyterian' Church. He was
the ownerof Knight's Drive-In
Restaurant, the Hardee House
and also farmed.
He was preceded in death by
wife Judith Knight; daughter
Nona Knight Moore; grand-
daughter lndsey Moore; and
sister .SyylviaKnight Campbell.
Sur'Vors are daughters Dana
Christenwon of Tampa, and Beth
Jahna& and: husband Albert of
Avon'.IPark; brother Richard
Knight" and wife Brenda of
Babson Park; sister Kristy
Knight Cox and husband Bud
of Lakeland and four grandchil-
dren. :
Visitation is today, Thursday,
Oct..20, 2011, from 10 to 11
a.m. at First Baptist Church of
Waughula, where services will
be at 11 a.m. with the Rev. Ed
Sager officiating. Interment fol-
lows in Wauchula Cemetery.
Arrange-ments are by Robarts
Ftnily Funeral Home. ''. '
dh *''- -*-. .'


KATIE DEES WILLIAMS
Katie Dees Williams, 93,
passed.: away Tuesday, Oct.
11, 201., in Sebring.
She,;.;was born Dec. 16,
1917, in Jasper and moved to
-Wauchula with her family as
a small-child. Katie was of the
Bapt' faith,and a member of
the rst(' Baptist Church of
Wauchula. She was also a
member of the T.E.L. class
and Hope of Hardee Council.
She is survived by numer-
ous nieces and nephews that
many thought of her as their
second mother. Katie will be
remembered as a very loving,
caring aunt and friend. Katie
was preceded in death by her
husband Willard Williams;
parents Bartly and Pearl
Wells Dees; five brothers
Fred Dees, Earnest Dees, Paul
Dees, B.W. Dees and Roy
Dees; and two sisters Jewel
Davis and Inez Perry.
A visitation was held on
Saturday, Oct. 15, 2011, from
1 to 2 p.m. at the chapel of
Ponger-Kays-Grady Funeral
Homes, 404 W. Palmetto St.,
Wauchula.
Funeral Services followed
jhe visitation at 2 p.m. at the
chapel with the Rev. Alan
Permenter of the First Baptist
Church and Brother Marcus
Shackelford officiating and
music conducted by Brother
Tim Davis. Burial followed at
Wauchula Cemetery. Online
condolences can be made at
pongerkaysgrady.com.
Otiongeh-K ays-Qikadt
Funeral Homes
Wauchula
*3
^-*^\ )


KATIE DEES WILLIAMS
Katie Dees Williams, 93,
died on Tuesday, Oct. 11,2011,
in Sebring.
Born Dec. 16, 1917, in
Jasper, she moved to Wauchula
as a small child. She was a
member of First Baptist Church
of Wauchula.
She was preceded in death by
her husband, Willard Williams;
parents Bartly and Pearl Wells
Dees; five brothers Fred Dees,
Earnest Dees, Paul Dees. B. W.
Dees and Roy Dees; and two
sisters Jewel Davis and Inez
Perry.
Visitation was Saturday, Oct.
15,2011, from 1 to 2 p.m. at the
funeral home with services
there at 2 p.m. with the Rev.
Alan Permenter and Brother
Marcus Shackelford officiating.
Interment followed at Wauchula
Cemetery. Ponger-Kays-Grady
Funeral Homes were in charge
of arrangements.


CLAUDE WAYLAND
HARRIS SR.
Claude Wayland Harris Sr.,'
80, of Wauchula, died on
Monday, Oct. 17, 2011, in
Lakeland.
Born on May 26, 1931; in
Greenville, N. C., and had been
a resident of Wauchula since
1953. He was owner/auto
mechanic of Claude Harris
Garage and a former assistant
fire chief with the Wauchula
Fire Department. He was a
member of Northside Baptist
Church.
He was preceded in death by
three brothers and one sister.
Survivors include wife Mary
Lou Harris of Wauchula; sons
Claude Harris Jr. and wife
Kathryn, and Thomas Richard
Harris and wife Elizabeth, all of
Wauchula; daughters Polly
Anne Bissette and husband
Donald, and Barbara Jean
Finneran and husband Ed, all of
Wauchula; sister Alma Rowley
of Craftsburg, Vt.; 12 grand-
children; and 16 great-grand-
children.
Visitation is today, Thursday,
Oct. 20, 2011, from 11 a.m. to
noon at Northside Baptist
Church, where funeral services
will be held at noon with the
Rev. Mitchell Landress officiat-
ing.
Arrangements are made by
Robarts Family Funeral Home.


Presented By:

10:20c


Citrus Estimate Higher


THURSDAY. OCT. 20
*Hardee County Com-
mission, monthly evening
meeting, Room 102, Court-
house Annex I, 412 W.
Orange St., Wauchula, 6
p.m.

TUESDAY. OCT. 25
VHardee County School
Board, rescheduled meeting,
Board Room, 230 S. Florida
Ave., Wauchula, 5 p.m.


Food Distributed
Next Wednesday
There will be a distribution
day for the Feed My Sheep
ministry on Wednesday, Oct.
26.
Everyone that participates
is invited to come to the First
United Methodist Church,
207, N. Seventh Ave.,
Wauchula from 2:30 to 4
p.m.

Get Help Choosing
Medicare Plans
Trained volunteers can
help senior citizens to review
their health care and pre-
scription drug coverage,
especially since the annual
time to change plans is earli-
er this year, from Oct. 15
through Dec. 7.
Local citizens can get help
through the SHINE (Serving
Health Insurance Needs of
Elders) program. Volunteers
will be at the Hardee Public
Library in Courthouse Annex
II, 315 N. Sixth St (U.S. 17
South, Wauchula, Wednes-
day, Oct. 26, from 11 a.m. to
1 p.m. To make an appoint-
ment, call 813-676-6521.

Plan Disposal Of
Extra Medications
Unwanted or expired
human or pet medications
ranS hp c5fplw rand nror.rl\\


vuir ue bdiuu y rlu v ilupu ly
disposed of 9n Saturday,:
-Oct, 2, froMlSa.m. to 1 p.m,.?
Disposing Wf them will pro-
tect children from inadver-
tent use and protect the lake
and ground water by not
flushing them down the sink
or toilet.
Unused drugs can be
brought to the Wauchula
Police Department, 128 S.
Seventh St., Wauchula or
the Hardee County Sheriff's
Office at 900 E. Summit St.,
Wauchula.


By MICHAEL KELLY
Of The Herald-Advocate
The U.S. Department of
Agriculture's Florida citrus
crop estimate for the 2011-12
season shows nearly a seven-
million-box increase over last
year. up to 147 million boxes.
Local growers gathered for a
breakfast Wednesday morning.
Oct. 12. at the Joe L. Davis
Barn to listen to the announce-
ment, which came shortly after


8:30.
The nearly five percent
increase is from the fruit being
a larger size than last year
across the state, with tree num-
bers remaining about the same.
The forecast Valencia crop is
73 million boxes compared to
70 million boxes last year.
Early varieties are expected
to total 74 million boxes, up
from 70.3 million boxes last
year.


Florida tangerine will total
4.7 million boxes, up from 4.65
million boxes last year.
Grapefruit numbers ae also
forecast to be slightly higher
than last year at 20.1 million
boxes compared to 19.75 mil-
lion boxes last season.
White grapefruit makes up
5.6 million boxes and colored
account for 14.5 million boxes.


V -I
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: A



PHOTOS BY MICHAEL KELLY
Pictured (from left) are Larry Davis, Edgar Davis, Joe L. Davis Sr. and Joe L Davis Jr. as
they visit together after the estimate breakfast Wednesday morning in Wauchula.


IP "\m -2 y,4f.. ... -. 1
Every year growers try their hand at predicting what the citrus forecast will be to win a
$200 gift certificate donated by KeyPlex and Yara. This year's winner was Rhett Smith
(center) shown with Heath Prescott (left) and Jerry Southwell.



BURTON & BURTON, P.A.
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501 WEST MAIN STREET
WAUCHULA, FLORIDA 33873-1729
TELEPHONE (863) 773-3241

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PROBATE & ESTATE ADMINISTRATION
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CASSIE BELL BROWN
Cassie Bell Brown, 91, of
Bowling Green, died on
Sunday, Oct. 16, 2011, at
Lakeland.
She was born in Colquit
County, Ga., on Feb. 16, 1920
and lived in Hardee County
most of her life. She retired
from G. Pierce Wood Hospital
in Arcadia where she was
employed as a nurse. She had
also retired from the Hardee
County School Board bus
garage as a bus helper. She
attended First Baptist Church
of Zolfo Springs. She also
belonged to the Order of the
Eastern Star Bowling Green
Chapter, was a past Worthy
Matron of the Order of the
Eastern Star Fort Meade
Chapter and the belonged to
Hillbillie-Sahib Temple.
She was preceded in death
by a son, Mark McEntyre; and
husband Paige Brown.
Survivors include a son
Michael McEntyre of
Bowling Green; sister Joe
Averitt of Wagner, S.C.; and
six grandchildren, Michael
McEntyre Jr., Steve McEntyre
Jr., Robby McKee, Chris
Joiner, Matt McEntyre and
Danielle McEntyre.
A Memorial Remembrance
Celebration will be held at
Pioneer Park on Saturday,
Oct. 22, from noon to 4 p.m.
for family and friends. Each is
asked to bring a covered dish
to share..
Expressions of comfort may
be made at robartsfh.com.


FUNERAL HOME
WAUCHULA

rw if


The Race
Rape Route is through historic downtown Wauchula.

,. Commemorative T-shirts for the first 150 -runers and
walkers

SSpecial Family Rate .
Awards for Best All-Around, top male and female and
medals for 1st and 2nd place In each division
Continental Runner's Breakfast
For more information, the race route or to register, please
call 863-773-6445.


Special thanks to Main Street Wauchula







6A TI -ald-Advocate, October 20, 2011


2011 Homecoming Highlights

49





















PHOTOS BY RALPH HARRISON
Hardee Senior High School's 2011 Homecoming Court members are (from left) Sophomore Class Sweetheart Isabel 2011 Homecoming Queen Taylor Bolin.
Abel, Lady-In-Waiting Raquel Rosales, Queen Taylor Bolin, Junior Class Sweetheart Selena Olmos and Freshman Class _
Sweetheart Gabriela Garza.
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PHOTO BY RALPH HARRISON
Senior Class representatives were (from left) Celina Castillo, Maribel Garza, Lady-in-Waiting Raquel Resales, Queen
Taylor Bolin, Cierra Martinez and Sierra Coronado.


Happy to have been chosen are Lady-In-Waiting Raquel
Resales and Queen Taylor Bolin.


-.. I:


Junior class nominees were (from left) Kaylee Mancillas,
'weetheart Selena Olmos and Taylor Tompkins.


Sophomore Class Sweetheart Isabel Abel.


Representing the Sophomore Class were (from left)
Maixee Khang, Sweetheart Isabel Abel and Caroline Dur.
rance. *


Nominees for the Freshman Class were (from left) Alex UII-
rich, Sweetheart Gabriela Garza and Angel Mancillas.







October 20, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 7A


Resthaven Held Annual Fall Festival Oct. 18


PHOTOS BY JIM KELLY
Resthaven, a county-owned building operated by an independent non-profit board, has
22 residents, with a capacity of 38. From left are residents Ruby Armstrong, Hazel John-
son and Kat Morris.


Resthaven offers assisted living with limited nursing service and is located about nine
miles east of Wauchula on Rest Haven Road. From left are Kat Morris and Myrl Roberts
(sisters) and Alice Hilt.


From left are Ruby Dupree, staff member Jessica Garner, and Sharon Manley. The festival
was moved indoors due to rainy weather.


Enjoying fall festival at Resthaven are staff member Janessa Hill, residents Lloyd Cole
and Donald Clements, and staff member Charlene Rowland. For more information about
this assisted living facility, call 773-6000. The building is the old Lemon Grove school
on five acres with oak trees and citrus groves.



Thead-g Ad vc


eJ1aau&


Our family has suffered a sad loss in the passing of our husband and
father, David Barrington. We are encouraged and deeply touched by the
concern and prayers of our community. Thank You to the employees of
Hardee County Public Works. Thank You to Zolfo Springs Elementary.
Thanks to Hardee County Sheriff's Office, Mosaic, and especially our
church, Riverview Heights Baptist. The service, the music, the food, and
thefellowship were just like David would have liked them. If we missed
anyone, please know we appreciated each visit to our home, the generous
gifts of food and drinks, the plants and flowers, the calls, the cards, and
.prayers were precious to us.
Special Thanks To -
Melanie Henderson Captain Andrew Rigney and wife Amy
Tammy Pohl Judy and Carl Thornton
Sharon Ussery Kathy Bryan
Billy Juddah Good Shepherd Hospice
Jane Long James Kai Steiner
Dawn Stark Pastor Jim Harris and wife Stacie
Lex Albritton Jamie and Lorraine Braddock
Sandy Meeks Sarah Spencer
Mr. and Mrs. Roger Clark Florida Hospital Rehabilitation employees
Theresa Carver Robarts Funeral Home
Joe and Geneva Roman Blaire and Glen Thornton
Mike and Shirley McCoy
Sand to our family for strength and unity. We convet your prayers.


I i t -1
Shown here are Lawrence (L.V.) Douglas, executive director Tina LeConte, and Vernon
(Buck) Manley. Tuesday's lunch included tuna salad, potato salad, fruit salad, hot dogs,
pasta salad, and cupcakes.

YOUR BUSINESS COULD APPEAR HERE TOO!!
Contact
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels

773-3255


I


w^t,


FI







8A The Herald-Advocate, October 20, 2011


Florida Hospital Wauchula Held 10th Annual Chili/Pumpkin Dessert Cookoff On Oct. 18


PHOTOS BY JIM KELLY
The hospital staff held its annual event in Wauchula. Chili winners from left are Lisa Ea-
gerton, social worker, first place; Gaila Adams, administrative assistant, second place;
and Sheila Johns, nurse manager, third place.


Contest judges were, from left, Meredith Lutz, Florida Hospital Heartland Medical Center;
Mike Rouse, Peace River Electric Cooperative; Carla Sperry, Beall's Outlet; Thomas
Trevino, Hardee County School Board, Wauchula State Bank, and WZZS Radio Station;
and Misty Hughes, Wauchula State Bank. Not in photo is Kevin Armstrong, Hardee
County Fire/Rescue.





She Did Not Have Any


Electricity Until 1940s


By WILL BENNETT
Special To The Herald-Advocate
I interviewed Betty McLeod for this
assignment.
Q: When were you born?
A: June
1,'1933. .
Q:
Where were 'i
you born ti a I
and raised?
A: I was born in Grady County, Ga.,
and raised in Zolfo Springs, Fla.
Q: Did you have a small or large
family?
A: I'll say it was a large family. I
had six sisters and one brother.
Q: Did you live in town or on a
farm?
A: We lived on a farm. We grew all
types of vegetables. The vegetables
were sold at stores and the markets. We
had a milk cow and hogs, so we had.
plenty to eat.
Q: Where did you go to school?
A: I went to Zolfo Springs
Elementary through the eighth grade. I
then went to high school in Zolfo for
two years and Hardee High School for
two years.
Q: How far did you go in high
school?
A: I finished 12th grade and graduat-
ed from Hardee High School.
Q: What games did you play
growing up?
A: We played marbles and hop-
scotch, and we rode our bicycles and
jumped rope.
Q: Were you close to your grand-
parents?
A: I missed knowing my grandpar-
ents. They were deceased before I was
born.
Q: Where were your favorite
places to go?
A: My favorite places were church
and fishing. We went to church at Zolfo
Springs Baptist, and our fishing was in
the canals on Steve Roberts Special.
Q: When were you married?
A: I married in 1956 to Robert


COURTESY PHOTO
Will Bennett with the subject of his inter-
view, Betty McLeod.
Bennett, when I was 23.
Q: Do you have any children?
A: I had one son, Bobby Bennett, on
my 30th birthday, and a stepson, Randy
McLeod, and a stepdaughter, Donna
McLeod Humphries.
Q: When did you get electricity?
A: Sometime in the '40s, it is hard to
remember.
Q: Where did you go to church?
A: Zolfo Springs Baptist Church.
Q: How many things in Florida
have changed during your lifetime?
A: There are more people living in
Florida now. There are theme parks,
pro ball teams, and automobiles.
Q: How have things in the United
States changed in your lifetime?
A: There are more airlines across the
nations, more highways and automo-
biles, electricity, and telephones.

Back In Time is the result of a class
assignment given to ninth graders at
Hardee Senior High School. Each
student is-asked to interview an older
person. Selected interviews are pub-
lished here as an encouragement to the
students and for the enjoyment of our
readers.


Pumpkin dessert winners were Renay Crouse, medical records, first placeLisa Eager-
ton, social worker, second place; and Jen Meeks, diagnostic imaging supervisor, third
place.


Pesticide

Final Class

Next Week
A three-hour pesticide license
review and testing class is avail-
able next week.
The class will be held on
Thursday, Oct. 27, at the Hardee
County Extension Service
Office at 507 Civic Center Dr. in
Wauchula.
It will review the materials
contained in the tests to obtain a
private applicator pesticide
license. The review session will
begin at 9 a.m. and conclude at
noon, with testing beginning at
1 p.m.
Three continuing education
units, two core and one private,
will be offered to individuals
holding a current pesticide
license and renewing using
CEUs.
A registration fee of $38 per
person is charged to cover the
study manuals and refresh-
ments. For those attending for
CEUs only, the registration fee
is $5.
To register, call the Extension
Service Office at 773-2164. Pre-
registration is requested prior to
this coming Monday.
This will be the last pesticide
license review and testing class
for 2011.



ABOUT ...
Obituaries
Obituaries are published
free of charge by The Her-
ald-Advocate as a public
service, but must be submit-
ted through a funeral home.
A one-column photo of the
deceased may be added for
$15.
Obituaries contain the
name, age, place of resi-
dence, date of death, occu-
pation, memberships, im-
mediate survivors and fu-
neral arrangements. The list
of survivors may include the
names of a spouse, parents,
siblings, children and chil-
dren's spouses and grand-
children, and the number of
great-grandchildren. If there
are no immediate survivors,
consideration of other rela-
tionships may be given.


Week ending October 16,2011
Weather Summary: Spotty showers and pleasant tempera-
tures prevailed during the week of October 10 through 16. Rainfall
totaled from none in Balm and Frostproof to nearly three inches in
Homestead. Several stations recorded only minimal traces to over
one inch of rain. A few stations reported over two inches of pre-
cipitation. Temperatures averaged from normal to three degrees
above normal. Pleasant daytime highs were in the 80s. Cool
evening lows were in the 40s, 50s, and 60s.
Field Crops: Recent rains loosened the ground for peanut dig-
ging in the Panhandle with 71 percent of the crop harvested. Last
year by this date 75 percent of peanuts were dug while the five-year
average progress was 59 percent harvested. Peanut crop condition
was rated 2 percent poor, 4 percent very poor, 43 percent fair, 44
percent good, and 7 percent excellent. Peanut and cotton harvest-
ing proceeded at a steady pace in Washington County. Cotton defo-
liation continued in Jackson County. Cotton picking started in
Escambia and Santa Rosa counties with low yields as well as poor
quality reported. Sugarcane harvesting was active in the
Everglades.
Fruits & Vegetables: Fall crop harvesting in central and
southern Peninsula continued to increase slowly. Avocadoes were
marketed last week from southern Florida with the season slowing
down. Cabbage planting remained active and growers prepped the
land for potatoes in Flagler County. Miami-Dade County growers
continued to cut and replant .okra. Tomato picking remained active
in the Quincy area while central Peninsula growers prepared to
begin harvesting within two weeks. Growers began harvesting-very
light supplies of cucumbers, eggplant, squash, and watermelons.

Livestock and Pastures: Statewide, pasture condition ranged
from very poor to excellent, with 70 percent in good condition. The
condition improved as soil moisture improved in the central and
southwestern areas. The cattle condition was very poor to excel-
lent, with 70 percent in good condition. In the Panhandle, pastures
were in very poor to excellent condition, with most in fair condi-
tion. Drought was the first limiting factor on pasture condition.
Land preparation for cool season pasture was in progress with lit-
tle, if any, small grain forage planted. In the northern areas, pasture
condition was poor to excellent, with most in good condition. Rain,
early in the week, gave a boost to pastures and land preparation for
planting small grains for winter forage. The cattle condition was
fair to excellent with most in fair condition. In the central and
southwestern areas, pasture condition was very poor to excellent,
with most in good condition. Land was being worked for planting.
The condition of most forage improved after recent rains. Water
has gone down in most flooded pastures, but some in the eastern
counties still have standing water. Planting of winter forage was
delayed in some locations due to standing water from recent rains.
The condition of the cattle was mostly good.
Citrus: Highs were in the upper 80s, with early morning lows
ranging from the lower to upper 60s. Most of the citrus growing
area had less than one-tenth of precipitation for the week. Umatilla
received the most rainfall with just below one-half of an inch.
Overall, there were normal moisture conditions in the citrus pro-
ducing region with a few southern areas showing abnormally dry
conditions. Thirty-five packinghouses and seven processors have
opened, with more scheduled to open this week. Varieties being
packed included early oranges (Navels, Ambersweet, and
Hamlins), white and colored grapefruit and Fallglo tangerines.
Cultural practices included applying herbicides, fertilizer applica-
tion, tree removal, new tree planting, and irrigation.


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October 20, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 9A


. .. ..... ....
-:


PHOTO BY RALPH HARRISON
Cordoned off due to the possible fall of a deteriorating awning, the owners of this build-
ing at 122 W. Main Street agreed for city crews to remove it and make the sidewalk safe
to use. The hazardous awning was removed late last week.

Wauchula Changes Workshop Times


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Wauchula will hold its
monthly workshops at 4:30
p.m.
Already, the Wauchula City
Commission has made a change
to its new policy. The first
monthly workshop, held on the
first Monday of each month,
will be changed to 4 p.m. for
the Nov. 7 meeting. After that,
monthly workshops will be at
4:30 p.m.
The change for the Nov. 7
meeting was due to the possible
use of the adjacent Wauchula
City Auditorium for a revival
the week of Nov. 7. Denise
Everett asked for a waiver of
the rental fees for the revival
but did not show up at the Oct.
10 commission meeting to per-
sonally request it. No one knew
what church she represented. If
it is an established church, the
fee waiver will be granted.
Police Chief Bill Beattie
asked that Trick or Treat in the
city limits be on Saturday, Oct.
29 from 6 to 9 p.m.
In its workshop on Oct. 3, the
commission spent quite some
time in discussion of a proposed
revision to the city's noise ordi-
nance and the Garden Club
lease. Both were continued to
the Nov. 7 meeting for more
information.
. In .its meeting of Oct.'40, the ;-
commission: -. ,''o
-approved an ordinance


approving year-end budget
adjustments for the fiscal year
which ended Sept. 30.
-approved three resolutions.
One is a master utility agree-
ment with the state Department
of Transportation about city
utilities along U.S. 17. Another
is for the Central Florida Re-
gional Planning Council to do
its review of the city's land use
plan and amendments needed.
The third is an interlocal agree-
ment with the county for emer-
gency debris management in
the county to also be used in the
city.
-discussed a hazardous
building situation at 122 W.
Main Street, which has a badly
deteriorated awning. The com-
mission asked that it be taken
care of as soon as possible as it
presented a public safety issue
in people not being able to use
the sidewalk and have to walk
in the street around it.
The owners, which had been
cited for the disrepair of the
awning, have agreed for the city
to take the awning down, which
was completed later in the
week.
-discussed foreclosure on a
code enforcement lien on a
property at 325 Melendy Street.
The deteriorated house is some-
times used as a "crack house."
The .commission will decide
-next ninth whether'to pay tax.
liens in order to obtain the prop-
erty and demolish the building,


which is an eyesore and depre-
ciates other homes in the neigh-
borhood.
-sat as a Community Rede-
velopment Agency Board and
discussed several issues.
One was the recent Economic
Development Authority grant of
$300,000 for necessary renova-
tions at 226 W. Main Street,
where the Hardee Help Center
thrift store is now. It is moving
to U.S. 17 North at the end of
the month. Any of the $300,000
not used will be returned to
EDA.
Dave Brown of EZ Products
Inc. will move into the building
after it is renovated. Orange-
wood, the contractor chosen
through bids, will be asked to
provide a performance bond for
its work.
Another CRA issue was reha-
bilitation of the north side of the
historic Wauchula Depot, which
will be used by Peace River
Explorations Inc. as its tourism
center.
The third CRA item was
parking lot design and renova-
tion by Kimbley-Horn for both
the parking lot at Wauchula
Plaza (formerly S&S Plaza) and
the city lot at the intersection of
U.S. 17 and Main Street. Doing
them together will reduce mobi-
lization and other costs.
The commission reconvened
and approved the itenigscoiisid-
ered as a CRA board.'Ir-


2 Plus Districts For Volleyball


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
A pair of final regular season
matches and the Hardee Lady
Wildcats start district play.
This year, Hardee hosts the
District 10 playoffs. The Lady
'Cats tied with Lake Wales for
first place, each with 4-2
records. They tied games during
the season, so had to go to a
coin flip, which Lake Wales
won to be top seed. Hardee is
second seed. Auburndale and
Teneroc each finished at 2-2.
Auburndale won the coin toss
to be third seed and Tenoroc is
fourth.
The playoff schedule begins
next Monday, with Teneroc
challenging Lake Wales in a 7
p.m. matchup. On Tuesday,
Hardee will clash with Auburn-
dale. The winners of the Mon-
day and Tuesday matches will
meet next Thursday at 7 p.m..
In the meantime, Hardee girls
hosted Lake Placid on Monday
and travel to Sebring today
(Thursday).
Hardee girls had three match-
es last week. The varsity lost to
DeSoto at home on Monday,
beat Teneroc at home on
Tuesday and defeated Auburn-
dale on its court on Thursday.
The JV lost on Monday and
Thursday and won handily on
Tuesday.
Against DeSoto on Monday
evening, Hardee was over-
whelmed by a squad that plays
year-round, losing 25-8, 25-18.
SOn Tuesday it was a different
story.- Game one against
Teneroc was a thriller. There
were 10 ties or lead changes.
Hardee got the first two points,
but Teneroc came right back to
knot the game at 2-2, 3-3, 4-4
ayd 5-5. After at couple more
lead changes, Teneroc seemed
to get the hot hand and held
service until the Titans led 13-
7.
Not to be outdone, Hardee
gradually worked itself back
into the game behind the serv-
ice of Jessica Harrison and
Nyshira Jackson, until it was a
15-13 game, then 16-15 game.
Teneroc went back in front, 17-
15, only to have Hardee tie it
17-17. Teneroc tied it back at


18-18, before Hardee got a
service run from Ashley
Nichols. The Lady 'Cats stayed
ahead this time and won.25-21
behind the service of Summer
Palmer.
Game two was just as
intense, with three early ties.
.Each time one team would get
two or three points ahead, the
other would catch up. Then
Harrison put Hardee up 12-9.
After a Tenoroc time-out, she
continued service to put Hardee
ahead 16-9.
Teneroc wouldn't sit still for
that and caught up to 15-17.
Jackson got Hardee back in
front 21-17 and Kayla "Louie"
Nichols made it 24-19. On a
Titan service, the ball dropped
on its side and gave Hardee the
final point for the 25-21 win.
On to game three in which
Hardee took a 4-1 edge, only to
have Teneroc work its way back
to a 6-6 and 7-7 tie. The last of
a half dozen more ties was at
19-19. Palmer gave Hardee a
three-point advantage and
Jackson finished it off.
The final district match was
last Thursday against Auburn-
dale, a team Hardee had beaten
at home. On the Lady Blood-
hound court, Hardee had to
work a little harder for the win,
taking four sets, 25-19, 19-25,
25-21 and 25-18.
SOther varsity 'Cats contribut-
ing in digs, sets and kills were
Ana Galvez, Maria Anselmo,
Karlee Henderson, Erica
Roberts, Katie Wheeler and
Desiree Smith.
Hardee's JV had an easy win
and two tough losses last week.
The easy win, 25-7, 25-3, was
sandwiched between the losses.
Wildcat JV Coach Jeanne
Atkins has a new formula with
back row players as setters and
all three front row players as
hitters. She said the players are
getting good at rotation and
play. On the squad are Catalina
Rosario, Rachel Coker, Bailey
Carlton, Emily Albritton,
Tamara St. Fort, Jessica
Broadhead, Jakasha Lindsey,
Abbey Vargas, Anna Montanez,
Gemi Saunders, Destiny
Thompson, Endreina Martinez,
Allison Smith, Brooke Dixon,


Courtnee Richardson, Hannah
Grisinger, Cat Jackson and
Georgeanne Paris

If the wind will not serve,
take to the oars.
-Latin Proverb


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YOUR BUSINESS COULD

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Contact
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels

773-3255


For depevdAable hovmetowvI service,





f lori, da





uel


Of Hardee County Inc.




We Now Have Non Ethanol

SRecreational Gas!!! .



Hardee County's only locally owned &


operated bulk fuel distributor


for over 18 years!



Open Mon. Fri. 7:00 am 5:00 pm

Sat. 8:00 am 12:00 pm



863-773-9466

156 Will Duke Road, Wauchula o









10A The Herald-Advocate, October 20,2011



Dispatch Working We0l


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Despite misgivings recently
expressed, the changeover in
dispatching Fire-Rescue calls
has gone smoothly.
In a letter printed in last
week's issue, County Commis-
sioner Grady Johnson alerted
Sheriff Arnold Lanier of a plot
to undermine the dispatch trans-
fer. Such a plan has not materi-
alized.
In fact, all those involved,
from county dispatchers to
Sheriff's Office administration
to Fire-Rescue Department offi-
cials, agree that there have been
no unusual problems.
Major Randy Dey and Fire-
Rescue Chief Mike Choate both
say there have been minor kinks
to be worked out, but a.cooper-
ative effort has been successful.
When Sheriff J. Loran
Cogburn was unable to get
funding approval to increase


dispatching staff, he advised the
Hardee County Commission
that he could no longer offer
dispatch for Fire-Rescue. It has
been handled out of Polk
County since Feb. 8, 2007.
This summer Polk County
Sheriff Grady Judd said he
could longer devote staff to
covering Hardee County calls
and asked that dispatch be
returned to Hardee County. A
request for four additional dis-
patchers for the Sheriff's Office
was approved and training
began. Computer equipment for
the Fire-Rescue calls was
ordered and installed.
Judd asked that dispatch
leave Polk County by Oct. 1.
Actually, the changeover oc-
curred that weekend. In the first
week of dispatching, there
appeared to be 85 calls for Fire-
Rescue, but some of those were
training duplicates.
By last week, the training


calls and dispatch calls vwe.c on
separate portions of the local
media report. This sho'.'l. an
average of a dozen call, a day.
with calls of all kinds divided
into fire calls and ambulancee or
rescue calls.
In counting them. it's impor-
tant not to duplicate when "oth
an engine and an ambulance arc
dispatched to the same call.
actually one incident not two.
For instance on Oct. 13 and
again on Oct., 14. both ;a fire
truck and an rescue vehicle
were dispatched to motor vehi-
cle crashes in Ona and at U.S.
17 and Oak Street respectively.
The same thing happened on a
residential structure fire in
Zolfo Springs on Oct. 16
Basically, the point is that
everyone appears quite satisfied
with the dispatch returning to
Hardee County and there are no
dissidents apparent at this point.


FEMA Over Payments Explained


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Multiple storm events occur-
ring consecutively caused some
of the confusion on overpay-
ment on federal monies.
Janice Williamson, director
of budget and finance, has
responded to the recent demand
from Commissioner Grady
Johnson for an exact accounting
of monies received from the
Federal Emergency Manage-
ment Agency, the agency desig-
nated to help cities, counties
land states with disaster rehabil-
itation.
In Johnson's letter (copy
attached), he alleges misman-
agement and misuse of those
monies. During budget work-
shops in July, the Hardee
County Commission was made-
aware of a FEMA request to
repay $1,065,082.10 in monies
overpaid from the 2003 and
2004 storms that damaged a
majority of Hardee County.
On his website, Johnson says
the overpayment is due to lack
of oversight by the county man-
ager because all county financ-
ing is directly under his control.
The county received over $20
million from FEMA since 2005
and Johnson suggests "a foren-
sic audit" to determine where
the estimated $1 million in
overpayment went to.
Since that time Williamson
has thoroughly investigated the
situation and has prepared a
detailed report which will be
presented to the commission at
its meeting tonight (Thursday).
She is scheduled about 6:50
p.m. The meeting can be seen
live by going to the website
www.hardeeclerk.com and fol-
lowing the links to active
streaming of the meeting. For
those unable to view it at that
time, it can be seen at the same
site at any later date and
includes copies of the agenda
packet commissioners received.
Williamson explains that it
began with the June 2003 No-
Name storm, a heavy rainfall
event causing over $991,000 in
damages to Hardee County
roads. The county was ap-
proved for 75 percent federal


funding and 12.5 percent state
funding.
There were 38 small project
awards and seven large project
awards for the 2003 storm.
Normal work schedules were
dropped in favor of the emer-
gency road repairs and labor,
equipment and materials spent
on each of the 45 projects was
tracked.
While still working on the
No-Name storm recovery, the
county was devastated by three
hurricanes in 2004 (Hurricane
Charley Aug. 13, Frances on
Sept. 4 and Jeanne on Sept. 26).
FEMA decided to de-obligate
the 26 work projects outstand-
ing from 2003 and include that
money for public work project
orders from the three 2004
storm damages The new work
orders included notations on the
de-obligated 2003 monies.
While discussing the magni-
tude of the storm damages, the
county turned to a contractor to
do some of the work. FEMA
responded by de-obligating the
Charley storm work orders and'
combining them into one large
public work order. At the same
time, it re-obligated the 26 work
orders from 2003.
FEMA kept re-organizing
staff as it dealt with many disas-
ters nationwide. Inadvertently
the final large public work
order worked its way through
the process and the de-obligat-
ed, re-obligated 2003 work
orders were also paid.
Williams said monies from
both were deposited in the Road
and Bridge accounts and man-
aged by that department. The
money was put in that depart-
ments operating budget and
used for road maintenance and
improvements as well as the
disaster repairs.
By 2009, FEMA began to
close out some of the county's
work orders and realized dupli-
cate payments may have been
made. The county was advised
to wait until FEMA accounts
were reconciled and any money
owed the county deducted front
overpayments.
The Hurricane Charley cate-


gory four hurricane caused over
$13 million in damages locally
and had 26 large public work
orders and 179 smaller ones.
Before it was over, there were
256 different versions of the
Charley invoices floating
around. The county was
approved for 90 percent federal
funding and five percent state
funding. The remaining five
percent was waived because
Hardee is designated a fiscally
constrained county.
Invoices from Charley were
two types, one for road dam-
ages and one for debris re-
moval, emergency supplies and
facility damages, especially
Public Work Order 1089 for
damages at Courthouse Annex
II.
The money owed to FEMA
amounts to seven percent of the
first two storms. There are over
69 FEMA applicants which
have recently received repay-
ment invoices for more than
$45 million, and there are hun-
dreds of others not yet closed
out.
Hardee County has damage
estimates and work orders still
out on Hurricane Frances, with
$1.6 million damages and
Tropical Storm Fay with dam-
ages of $237,787. These aret
pending completion of projects
on Scarborough Grade and Ten
Mile Grade.
Williamson suggests a reme-
dy. If the county is allowed
administrative fees for process-;
ing all the work orders and
tracking them, that would leave
a half million owed to FEMA
by the transportation depart-
ment. There is $152,800 in a
special reserve account. A fleet
maintenance position at
$62,315 has been vacant and
about $307,000 in capital
equipment purchases for this
year could be postponed anoth-
er year. That would leave about
$55,000 to be paid from the
Mosaic economic mitigation
monies the county received
early this year.
What the commission plans
to do will be discussed at
tonight's meeting.


tC


HARDER cCOiUr
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONER
DISTRICT IV
411 Wnt Orange Str Room 10
WaxhdUi, FloridA 73
(863)T77 3o *Fax (s86)773"Wo
bctxhardacflournty.net >WKrhatesKt t ,


Octoberr 6, 2011



9r. Lcx Albritton
canty Manager
anrdce County


In the budget workshop our finance director Janice Williamm gv a verbal oveview of existing
Broclems with FEMA disaster funds in excess ofa million dollars.

The problem conmmunicated in the work shop was that FEMA had discovered that Hanrdc County bad
bdled them twice on two separate prjcts. Our finance director sated that we received the etra money
from our billing them twice, that the extra money was deposited in the general fed, th extra money was
spent, but there was no way to account for neithrhe double billing nor th expnditures.

Your letter for our signature blamed FEMA and their process for our iure to account for money we
.pent. You also requested that the Hardee County Citizen be placed on a payment schedule in order to
pay back in excess ofa million dollars.

I wat you, Mr. Albritton, to forward to me a compare overview in writing as to yor management
procedure in bill handling and the procedure by which money was accepted that clearly Hardc County
was not entitle to. Regardless of the FEMA proce, it is inconceivablo to me that money was deposited
into our GenrAal Fund and then spent and you cannot supply acuntrat aWcMtin.

Aso in reference to the firEEMS payroll accounting that 1 suIuested from the Clark of Courts and
produced in the workshop is still being challenged by Mr. Choats even to ur local aewspaer as being
inacrate and simply not true.

I want you, Mr. Albrittai and Mr. Choate, to forward in writing a fu explantion of what evidence that
Mr. Cloate and you have that the Clerk of Couts records of payroll payments are not accurate and not
true.

I would like your responses to these two issues in waiting at your earli ct vonaience.

Very truly yours,



(Grady Johnson
Cotmissioner, District 4

c: The Honorable Hugh Bradley, Clerk of Courts
Ken Evers, Esq., County Attorney


MERRY CHRISTMAS, WAUCHULA!


COURTESY PHOTO
The Music Ministry of First Baptist Church of Wauchula will be presenting the "Living
Christmas Tree" on Friday, Dec. 16, at 7 p.m. at Heritage Park In downtown Wauchula,
in cooperation with the monthly Friday Night Live event. The Living Christmas Tree is a
30-foot-high platform structure designed in the shape of a Christmas Tree to accom-
modate 80 singers. Additional standing and sitting spaces will be available. The tree
displays thousands of computer-controlled lights, creating an array of lighting designs
all themed to the music. The program will be traditional carols and Scripture, and will
feature the Hardee High School Advanced Choir. Area musicians also are wanted. To
join the tree, call the Rev. Tim Davis at 773-4182 to pick up a music packet and rehears-
al schedule. Time is limited, so call now.


Hospital Has Multiple Changes Helping Struggling Students To Succeed


a. a. '-


medicine) is able to see patients
almost immediately.
Other new services are a 16-
slice computerized tomography,
specialized x-rays to give more
specific, in-depth services. Lab
enhancements have reduced the
wait for results, making service
faster for ER patients as well as
the 25 inpatient and rehabilita-
tive beds.
The therapy center offers the
gamut of rehabilitation services
and patients are transferred
from other hospitals after stroke
or heart attack to complete their
therapy programs. There is a
full-time speech therapist as
well as physical therapy.
The entire second floor has
been remodeled with new more
comfortable and useful Stryker
beds and flat screen TVs replac-
ing much older models.
Along with all the changes in
the hospital are service expan-
sions. Outlying offices provide
sleep services or wound care.
There is cooperation with
Pioneer Medical Clinic for out-
patient primary care followup.
There is a women's wellness
center.
At the Sebring hospital there
are cardiovascular services and


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
If you haven't been inside
Florida Hospital-Wauchula in
many years, the changes may
surprise you.
Considerable updates in the
last few years has almost entire-
ly changed the interior of the
hospital.
Tim Cook, president of
Florida Hospitals-Heartland,
including the Sebring, Lake
Placid and Wauchula units, and
Linda Adler, administrator of
the Wauchula Hospital, visited
the Hardee County Commission
at its Oct. 6 meeting and pre-
sented a power point of all
that's new at the local facility.
Changes in the Sebring unit
hate also provided additional
services for Hardee County res-
idents.
Cook said the hospital has
received a glowing report form
the Joint Commission on Ac-
creditation.
One of the key changes is in
the Emergency Room, where
'he seven-bed unit and triage
(taking the most critical patient
first) are providing a "no wait"
experience. The on-site hospi-
talist (a specialist trained in ER


a cath lab, including angioplas-
ty and both coronary and
carotid artery stent placements.
There is breast care imaging
and treatment and certified
stroke care to follow the imme-
diate ER treatment locally.
The hospital works in part-
nerships with the community in
a variety of health fairs, and
offers its parish nursing pro-
grams for cancer awareness and
smoking cessation. It works
with the teen pregnancy preven-
tion coalition and drug awaie-
ness coalition on prevention.
Since Hardee is considered a
critical care access facility, it
receives higher Medicare and
Medicaid payments. Medicare
pays 100 percent of the bill and
Medicaid about 64 percent. The
hospital also utilizes the
$500,000 Indigent Care monies
the county allows each year in
special taxing for county resi-
dents without insurance to pay
for hospital-based services.
Both inpatient and emier-
gency room use is incr;'iing
tremendously. said C'ok.
There were 12.'85 ER visits in
2010 and inpVtient use f a high
of 776 for 2010.


I am rather Inclined to silence, and whether that be wise or not, it is at least more unusual
nowadays to find a man who can hold his tongue than to find one who cannot.
-Abraham Lincoln


For some students, trying as
hard as they can just isn't
enough. These students may be
at a disadvantage because of
widespread learning differences
such as dyslexia or because of
disabilities like visual impair-
ment. Studies show that for
these students to succeed, an
online audio library of core cur-
riculum textbooks and literature
titles can make all the differ-
ence.
Research by Johns Hopkins
University and case studies in
the Baltimore City Public
Schools showed significant
improvements in students who
use audiobooks. Reading com-
prehension improved by 76 per-
cent, content acquisition by 38
percent, reading accuracy by 52
percent and self-confidence by
61 percent.
Scott Bartnick was diagnosed
with a severe learning disability
in 1st grade. His parents were
told he might never be able to
rcad, yet the 19-year-old recent-
ly graduated from high school
with a 4.35 GPA no easy feat
givcn his disabilities in reading,
decoding, fluency and spelling.


Bartnick relied on a service
called Learning Ally, which
offers the most advanced
library of accessible audio-
books in the world.
"Learning Ally helped me
achieve academic success," said
Bartnick, who is now thriving
in his junior year at the
University of Florida in
Gainesville. In fact, his elemen-
tary school awarded him the
"Disney Dreamers and Doers
Award," an honor presented to
just one student every year for
"curiosity, courage and constan-
cy."
Early intervention can deliv-
er dramatic results. When
Leslie H. was in 2nd grade,
teachers informed her mother,
Lisa, that her daughter was only
reading at a kindergarten level.
A friend of Lisa's told her about
the Learning Ally website.
Within 24 hours of signing up
for the program, Leslie, who
has severe dyslexia, had read
three books. Lisa reported that
her daughter's speech patholo-
gist noted a major difference in
her daughter's fluency and self-
confidence. "She embraced


words and books in a way she
never had and that was really
exciting."
Originally founded in 1948
as Recording for the Blind, the
nonprofit Learning Ally has
grown to serve a complete spec-
trum of individuals from
kindergarten through 12th
grade, as well as college stu-
dents and working profession-
als.
Learning Ally's digital
library of audiobooks has spe-
cial accessibility features for
readers with print disabilities,
and can be played on popular
devices like the Apple iPad and
iPhone, as well as MP3 players,
Mac and PC computers and CD.
Students with a certified print
disability are eligible for an
individual membership, from
Learning Ally, allowing them to
work on assignments at home
as a supplement to their school's
membership.
Institutional memberships
are available for schools and
districts to accommodate stu-
dents with IEP and 504 plans.
To learn more, visit
www.LearningAlly.org.


He who has a thousand friends has not a friend to spare, and he who has one enemy
will meet him everywhere.
-Ralph Waldo Emerson

I have friends in overalls whose friendship I would not swap for the favor of the kings
of the world.


t











Farm Bureau Held Annual Dinner Oct. 17

3y JIM KELLY and will be a tested project for health of Hardee County and band of First Baptist Church of
)f The Herald-Advocate research, contribute in many ways to the Wauchula provided the enter-
The Hardee County Farm Bu- Royal said the E-verify pro- community." tainment during the meal.
eau on Monday, Oct. 17, held gram needs to have a guest The Gospel Jubilee string
:s annual dinner meeting at the worker provision to help agri-
Iardee Agri-Civic Center. The cultural crops be harvested and
-H Foundation prepared and for Farm Bureau members to
served the dinner which in- contact their members of Con-
.1-A-A t-fDn 1 --


cluaea a nalB t n cnicKen, po-
tato salad, baked beans, rolls and
homemade desserts.
Charles Shinn, assistant direc-
tor of community affairs for
Farm Bureau, said agriculture
the last few years has helped
prop up Florida's economy
which is also driven by tourism
and development. He said agri-
culture has been stronger than
the other two legs of the state's
economy and produces food and
fiber and helps the environment.
Local Farm Bureau President
David Royal said the meats lab
at Hardee High School will re-
open for the second semester.
He also said the youth orange
grove at HHS will be replanted


gress. iuyal 4il au lIuoL UnllI-
ployed Americans will not
harvest crops.
Members of congress should
also be contacted to ease pro-
posed federal water standards
for water on ag properties, he
said.
Guest speaker Kevin Denney,
Hardee director of planning and
development, said ag lands are
important, create open space and
require less services from gov-
ernment than residential and
commercial property. "Agri-cul-
ture pays for itself," he said.
Denney added, "Counties
need growth. Agriculture is eco-
nomic growth. Agricultural
lands are vital to the economic


Donna Alexy and David Spencer sang.


/ ^ ;,
T' ,
''%^f
bw *
/ / "* *


Tim Davis played the accordan. Layne Prescott, Mindy Albritton and Debbie Carlton per-
Rev. Tim Davis played the according. formed.


Fish Busters
By Bob Wattendorf
Florida Fish & Wildlife Commission


.1


WATERWAY WEEDEATERS
Florida's outstanding freshwater fisheries and many species of
wildlife are dependent on natural aquatic vegetation.
Rooted aquatic plants stabilize shorelines, prevent erosion,
reduce turbidity (muddy water), provide cover for fish to hide from
predators, serve as food for insects and waterfowl, help reduce
algal blooms, provide shade and cover for fish, and serve as a vis-
ible feature to help anglers locate sport fish.
Invasive plant species, however, can be harmful and have few
natural checks. The spread of water lettuce, hyacinth and hydrilla
are prime examples of nonnatiyveplantsthat require management.
Proposals in the late, 960s. a~d 'early 1970s to stock open
water-bodies with diploid (fertile) grass carp (Ctenopharygodon
idella) to feed on nonnative plants quickly became controversial.
These Asian carp spawn, in similar habitats to striped bass, and nat-
urally reproducing populations could have gotten out of control
and wreaked havoc on native plant and wildlife communities.
Florida helped lead the way with grass carp research, deter-
mining their food habits and helping create triploid (functionally
sterile) grass carp. However, even with sterile fish, if too many
grass carp are stocked and plants are eliminated, the problem may
last as long as the fish are alive or longer and that can be more
than 15 years.
Thus far, in Florida, thanks in part to the diligence of manage-
ment agencies, there are no documented cases of grass tarp spawn-
ing in the wild. Recently, however, Fish & Wildlife Conservation
Commission biologists discovered a few diploid escapees in the
Suwannee River, having come from flooding in bordering states.
This caused renewed concern and the need to repeat the message
about the importance of stocking only triploid grass carp.
So legitimate concerns revolve around use of grass carp and a
full gamut of options for aquatic plant management are considered,
depending on circumstances. In 2008, the safest approach was
determined to be an initial herbicide treatment followed by low-
level stocking of triploid grass carp.
The FWC's Invasive Plant Management Section also recently
concluded a public review process to create a new agency position.
The position recognizes that native aquatic plant communities pro-
vide ecological functions to support diverse fish and wildlife pop-
ulations. Hydrilla, as an invasive, nonnative plant, requires man-
agement. However, in water bodies where hydrilla is established,
the FWC will manage it in light of the primary use of the water
body. Plans will incorporate public input, be adaptive and reflect
local conditions.
..Chemical control is expensive (up to $750 per acre per year).
Mechanical control is even more so about twice as costly as
chemical control. Biological controls using insects or diseases have
not proved suitable for managing hydrilla, leaving triploid grass
carp as the most effective biocontrol.
These fish can control certain aquatic plants in moderate-sized
lakes at a cost of $20 to $250 per acre. In private ponds, golf course
ponds, irrigation ditches and similar locations, where sport fishing
is not the primary activity, certified triploid grass carp provide an
environmentally sound, cost-effective way of controlling aquatic
plants.
FWC personnel also plan and stock triploid grass carp in pub-
lic waters. Currently, staff is monitoring about 100 locations.
However, in situations where sport fisheries and waterfowl hunting
are important, the fish may eat too many plants, destroy important
habitat, adversely affect recreation and negatively affect the local
economy.
In summary, FWC uses a permit program to allow citizens to
purchase and stock triploid grass carp as a cost-effective means of
controlling plants in self-contained private waters.
The FWC also saves state money by using fish prudently in
public water bodies to reduce the need for expensive chemicals, but
it draws the line at stocking triploid grass carp in large, open sys-
tems where triploid grass carp are unpredictable and could nega-
tively affect the state's immensely valuable sport fisheries and the
delicate balance of our natural ecosystems.
Dave Eggeinan, a biologist with the FWC's Invasive Aquatic Plants
Section, contributed to this column.


YOU Can Appear In...
Poet's Place
Are you a poet? Let us show it! Your work could be published In
this newspaper in "Poet's Place," a weekly feature which relies
solely on reader submissions. Poems must be your own original
work, written by you, not someone else. To appear In this fea-
ture, send your poetry, name and town of residence to: Poet's
Place, The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338, Wauchula, FL 33873
or fax 773-0657.
i ; --______*


.7 aii f j
Seated from left are Staci Braswell, Florida Farm Bureau director of community affairs; Kevin Denney; Charles Shinn;
and Bill Hodge, Hardee Farm Bureau executive director. Standing are board members Corey Lambert, Steve Johnson,
Bo Rich, Barney Cherry, Greg Shackelford, John Platt, David Royal and Dan Smith.


Outta The Woods
By Tony Young
Florida Fish & Wildlife Commission


HUNTIN' SEASON! NEED I SAYI MORE?
Football season is in full swing and the 2011-12 hunting sea-
son is cranking up.
Heck, in Zone A they're already into general gun season. But
for the rest of us, I'd like to cover the rules and regulations regard-
ing two hunting seasons that are just around the corner: muzzle-
loading gun and the first phase of dove.
Immediately following the close of crossbow season- in each
zone, the muzzleloading gun season begins. Season dates run Nov.
19-Dec. 2 in Zone B, Oct. 22-Nov. 4 in Zone C, and Dec. 3-9 in
Zone D.
During muzzleloading gun season, bows and crossbows are
also legal methods of taking game on private lands, but on wildlife
management areas only muzzleloaders may be used.
The most common types of game to take during muzzleloader
season are deer and wild hog. Only bucks may be taken, and one
antler must be at least five-inches long above the hairline. The daily
bag limit on antlered deer is two. You can hunt wild hogs year-
round on private lands, and there are no bag or size limits.
It's also legal to shoot gobblers and bearded turkeys during
muzzleloading gun season. You may take only one per day, and
there's a two-bird fall-season limit. On WMAs, bag limits and
antler/size restrictions can differ, so check the specifics of the area
before you hunt.
Legal shooting hours are a half-hour before sunrise to a half-
hour after sunset. Except for turkeys, hunters may take resident
game over feed such as corn on private lands. No baiting is allowed
on WMAs, however.
For hunting deer, muzzleloaders firing single bullets must be
at least .40-caliber. Guns firing two or more balls must be 20-gauge
or larger. You may not use muzzleloaders that take smokeless pow-
der, ones that can be loaded from the breech or those with self-con-
tained cartridge ammunition.
The first phase of the mourning and white-winged dove season
ends Oct. 24 statewide. Shooting hours during.this first phase are
noon to sunset, and there's a 15-bird daily bag limit.
The only firearm you're allowed to use for hunting doves is a
shotgun, but you can't use one larger than a 10-gauge. Shotguns
must be plugged to a three-shell capacity (magazine and chamber
combined).
You may hunt doves over an agricultural field, as long as the
crop has been planted and manipulated under normal agricultural
practices. However, it's against the law to scatter agricultural prod-
ucts over an area for the purpose of baiting.
Some things you can't do while dove hunting include using
rifles, pistols or crossbows; shooting from a moving vehicle; and


herding or driving doves with a vehicle.
In addition to a Florida hunting license, you'll need a $5 muz-
zleloading gun permit to hunt during muzzleloader season. To hunt
deer, you need a $5 deer permit, and if you'd like to take a fall
turkey, you'll need a $10 turkey permit ($125 for nonresidents). If
you're going to hunt doves, you'll need a no-cost migratory bird
permit, and if you hunt on a WMA, you also must have a manage-
ment area permit, which costs $26.50.
All are available at your local county tax collector's office; by
calling 888-Hunt-Florida; or by going online to fl.wildlifeli-
cense.com.
So if you're going after that monster buck during the muzzle-
loading gun season or dove hunting with friends and family, I hope
I've helped explain some of Florida's rules and regulations.
Tony Young is the media relations coordinator for the FWC's
Division of Hunting and Game Management. You can reach him
with questions about hunting at Tony.Young@MyFWC.com.




On The Agenda

HARDEE COUNTY COMMISSION
The Hardee County Commission will hold its regular
evening session today (Thursday) beginning at 6 p.m. in Room
102 Courthouse Annex I, 412 W. Orange Street. The meeting
can be followed on computer by going to www.hardee-
clark.com and following the link just above the picture of the
courthouse. It, and past meetings, can also be seen at that link
anytime. Each contains an information packet for the items
discussed during the meeting.
The following is a synopsis of agenda topics that may be of
.public interest. Times are approximate except for advertised
public hearings.
-Recognitions and proclamations, 6 p.m.
-Public hearing zoning meeting on changes to the
Comprehensive Land Use Plan, 6:05 p.m.
-Five-Year state transportation plan for Hardee County- 6:20
p.m.
-Request for handicap accessible bathrooms at Resthaven,
6:40 p.m.
-The 2011-12 public budget document and FEMA reimburse-
ment plan, 6:50 p.m.
-Citizen civil rights, 7:20 p.m.
-Provider license renewal issue, 7:35 p.m.
-Records storage building design, 7:50 p.m.
-Extend landfill engineering contract, 8:05 p.m.
-Agreemeht with Waste Generated Products, 8:15 p.m.
-Approve new public works director/county engineer Kenneth
Wheeler.
This agenda is provided as a public service-ot I ne nirala-
Advocate and the Hardee County Commission for those who-
may wish to plan to attend.


rc
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4
s5


October 20, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 11A






12A The Herald-Advocate, October 20, 2011



Rodeo Bits
By Kathy Ann Gregg


THE COWGIRLS ARCADIA YOUTH RODEO FINALS
.Yes, Loni Damboise is a cowgirl, too, but the divisions never
break up perfectly for this column. She was covered in last week's
column, so technically this should be entitled "The Remaining
Cowgirls."
And that means Hailey Andrews, Lacey Cumbee and the
Johnson sisters: Jacey, Shelby and Kalley. Lacey sticks to barrel
racing only, but the others compete in what I refer to as "the girls
trilogy," barrels, poles and goat-tying, Plus, Hailey does chute dog-
gin' (an event that has been added to this season's rodeos), and the
sisters all do breakaway roping.
Shelby was the star in the Seniors Division, taking home the
winner's belt buckle for both barrel racing and pole-bending. ('She
has a new hat, with absolutely gorgeous detailing on the upturned
edges, so she gets my award for the Best Cowgirl Hat, too!) But, I
do have to point out that Jacey placed higher than Shelby in total
points, which shows that Jacey consistently placed in her various
events.
Kalley had moved up from the Tots Division (where she won
two All-Around Champion saddles last year), so she was just get-
ting her feet wet in among all those Juniors usually the toughest
division to compete in.
Shelby competed in the Wrangler Junior High Rodeos last
year, and has moved up to Florida High School Rodeo this year.
Jacey has competed in the Florida High School Rodeo the past two
years, and went to the National Finals in Gillette, Wy., both years
(having been the only freshman to place in the state of Florida her
first year). Shelby went to the Wrangler National Finals this past
summer, held in Gallup, N.M. I have no doubt that they will be fol-
lowed by Kalley (who is also known as "the Gabby Johnson").
In addition to the National Finals, they all competed in the
International Finals Youth Rodeo in Shawnee, Okla., and the Roy
Cooper Roping Competition in Denton, Texas. I am just glad that I .
did not have to pay their fuel bill for hauling those horses on a
route from Gallup back east to Denton and Shawnee, then back
west to Gillette, then home to Florida! Hat's off to those dedicated
parents (including Dale and Julie Johnson).
The new seasons have begun: AYRA, Reality Ranch, Top
Hand, and the Florida High School Rodeo. Good luck in them all,
Cowgirls and Cowboys!
Keep these "Bits," boots and bridles riding. Let Kathy Ann Gregg
in on your events and achievements, and she'll keep you covered.
Reach her at ksleepyk@aol.com or 773-9459. Keep on riding,
Cowboys and Cowgirls!


Hailey Andrews gives a big smile while holding one of the
buckets with the Arcadia Youth Rodeo Association
insignia.




''--"=' J ^Uf,,


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.., ~.- .

Jacey Johnson maneuvers her horse, Ellie, through the
poles at the AYRA Finals. This pair competed in this event
at the National High School Rodeo Finals in Gillette, Wy.
IEMT--M"


Lacey Cumbee rides her new horse around the second
barrel at the AYRA Finals, after her regular horse had suf-
fered an eye injury.



Your Business Could Appear Here!
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels
At The Herald Advocate


COURTESY PHOTOS BY KATHY ANN GREGG
Kalley "Gabby" Johnson with the custom-made leather
bridle she received for placing in the Juniors barrel rac-
ing.


Shelby Johnson as Carter Smith of Eli's Western Wear
presents her with one of the two buckles she won for bar-
rels and pole-bending in the Seniors Division.


El ivf
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PAGE ONE


By MICHAEL KELLY
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Hardee Wildcats capped
off last week's Homecoming
festivities with a 41-0 blowout
over the Frostproof Bulldogs.
This Friday, the 'Cats take to
the road for a district show-
down with the Palmetto Tigers
at 7:30 as both teams enter the
game with a perfect 6-0 record
and control of the district stand-
ing on the line.
The Tigers are currently
ranked No. 6 in the state Class
5A poll. They have won their
first six games by a score of
232-40, while Hardee's first
half dozen were 207-47.
In last week's game, Frost-
proof got the ball first to start
the game and the Wildcats'
defense quickly made its pres-
ence felt by forcing a punt after
surrendering one first down.
Hardee then took over at its
46-yard line and drove it inside
the 20 with long runs from
Ledarius Sampson and Andrew
Hooks.
The Wildcats went for it on
fourth-and-12 from the 19 yard-
line. A screen pass from quar-
terback Colby Baker to Hooks
was stopped a few yards short
of the first down.
The Bulldogs could not man-
age a first down against the
Hardee defense, which held
them to only 96 total yards for
the game. They were forced to
punt.
Deonte Evans caught the
9


punt, broke several tackles and
raced down to the Frostproof
eight-yard line after a 39-yard
return.
Sophomore Keyon Brown
needed just two carries to
pound the ball across the goal
line, scoring from three yards
out.
Octavio Alvarez made the
PAT giving Hardee a 7-0 lead
with 2:48 left in the first quar-
ter.
Frostproof gained two first
downs before its drive stalled
when Maxon DelHomme
chased down Bulldog quarter-
back Zack Jenkins as he was
trying to scramble for a first
down.
Hardee took over from its 32-
yard line and Hooks sprang
loose over right guard for a 27-
yard gain. Facing a third down
at the Bulldog 25-yard line,
Baker dropped back to pass,
avoided two sacks while rolling
to his left and threw a perfect
pass to Evans streaking across
the back of the end zone for a
touchdown.
The Alvarez PAT put the Cats
up 14-0 with 5:57 left in the
half.
Frostproof started its next
drive at its 30-yard line and lost
yardage after Jenkins was
sacked by Brown forcing anoth-
er punt, giving Hardee the ball
at its 48.
Baker faked a hand-off and
kept the ball on a run up the
middle for a 37-yard gain. On


the next play Baker found
Keshun Rivers open in the right
flat for a touchdown.
The Alvarez PAT stretched
the Wildcats lead to 21-0 with
2:59 left in the half.
Frostproof took over at the
20-yard line after an Alvarez
touchback. Jenkins was sacked
by James Greene on the first
play. A Hardee penalty gave the
Bulldogs one first down before
they were forced to punt again.
Hardee took over at its 36-
yard line. A bad exchange be-
tween the center and Baker
resulted in a fumble recovered
by Frostproof with 31 seconds
left in the half.
Frostproof got to the Hardee
14-yard line and were threaten-
ing to score when sophomore
linebacker Waylon Pleger inter-
cepted a Jenkins pass with 9
seconds left in the half. Hardee
took a 21-0 lead into the locker
room.
During halftime, Taylor
Bolin was selected as Home-
coming Queen and her court
was also announced (see related
story).
The Bulldogs opened the sec-
ond half by trying an onside
kick that Evans recovered at the
Hardee 40.
Hooks had a pair of 13-yard
runs before Sampson finished
the drive with a 17-yard touch-
down run up the middle.
Alvarez was good on the PAT
and the Wildcats led 28-0 with
10:38 left in the third quarter.
Frostproof took over at the
20-yard line after another
Alvarez touchback.
After gaining one first down,
the Bulldogs faced a third-and-
eight. Justin Knight knocked
down a Jenkins pass that would
have been a first down and
forced another punt.
Evans fumbled the punt and a
Bulldog defender recovered at
the Hardee 39.
Frostproof made three first
downs and had a first-and-goal
at the Hardee seven-yard line.


The Wildcat defense denied the
end zone and forced a 33-yard
field goal attempt that was no
good.
Hardee was forced to a three-
and-out on its next series.
Alvarez was sent back for his
only punt of the evening of 34
yards.
Frostproof took over with 49
second left in the third quarter.
Two plays later, Jenkins tried a
pass over the middle that Evans
intercepted and returned 60
yards down the right sideline
for a touchdown.
A bad snap prevented a PAT
try but the Wildcats were on top
34-0 with 11:45 left in the
game.
Frostproof started its drive at
the 20-yard line once again
after an Alvarez touchback and
once again was quickly forced
to punt.'
Hardee took over at its own
47-yard line with 9:06 left in
the game. Aaron Barker and
Keyonte Holley were put in as
running backs and steadily
moved the ball down field.
Barker capped of the nine-play
drive from four yards out with a
run up the middle. The Alvarez
PAT pushed the lead to 41-0
with 4:44 left in the game.
With the lead now being
larger than 35 point, it was a
running clock for the rest of the
game.
Head Coach Buddy Martin
was very pleased with his
team's performance, especially
with all the distractions of
Homecoming.
The team spent Friday after-
noon at the Fellowship of
Christian Athletes building
watching a movie and having a
pregame meal while the parade
was taking place.
Martin said the upcoming
game with Palmetto should be
good game.
He said they are the best team
Hardee will have faced this sea-
son but he likes the way the
Hardee offense matches up
against the Tiger defense.
Offensively Palmetto is very
explosive and has a couple of
good receivers and throws the
ball well, added'Martin.
Hardee did not have any
injuries during the game and
Martin said he will have a full
and healthy squad to take on the
rbad to Palmetto.


Wildcats Whip Bulldogs, 41-0


#25 Kane Casso #51 Dawson Crawford
Scout Special Teams



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The Herald-Advocate
T u SPS ?O'-7T.ij

Thursday, October 20,2011


HARDEE FROSTPROOF
PASSING COMPLETIONS
ATTEMPTS AND
INTERCEPTIONS 4-6-0 8-22-1
PASSING YARDS 50 67
RUSHING ATTEMPTS/
YARDS 30-231 31-29
TOTAL YARDS 281 96
TURNOVERS 2 1
FIRST DOWNS 11 10
PENALTIES, LOST
YARDAGE 7-72 10-65
SCORING BY QUARTER:
Hardee 7 14 7 13 41
Frostproof 0 0 0 0 0



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2B The Herald-Advocate, October 20. 2011


Hardee


Living -



SWauchula Native

Honored By FFA


COURTESY PHOTO
First Row Keifer Kedzior, Kevin Kunkel, Will Crawford, Morgan Garcia, Cleston Sanders, Kalob Rickett, Kramer Royal,
Skylar Simmons, Cody Spencer, Justin Rickett, Wyatt Kofke & Garrett Albritton. Second Row Savanna Hagan, Caitlin
Dufresne, Alex Johnson, Megan Hartman, Savannah Miller, Emily Rhodes, Emily Hughes, Jessica Hunt, April Garland,
Holly Hughes, Korin Roehm, Carleigh Coleman & Leah Weeks.

Swimming Prepares For Districts


A Wauchula native was
recently inducted into the
Florida Future Farmers of
America Hall of Fame.
The posthumous award for
Thomas Alva Cochrane was
presented to his family in an
Oct. 4 program in Haines City.
Among those attending were
his sister, Ann Sasser of
Wauchula.
Cochrane was born. in Wau-
chula on Dec. 14, 1917, in one
of the first pioneer families in
Hardee County. He graduated
from Wauchula High School in
1935 and remained on the fam-
ily farm until he was called to
serve in the U.S. Army in 1942.
"His character was forged in
the hard times of the Depres-
*sion and tempered by the des-
perate conflict of the World War
that followed. In spite of these
things, and many would say
because of them, Tom Cochrane
retained his sense of humor, his
Cracker philosophy and his
dedication to agriculture and
the profession of teaching
young people to love that indus-
try as much as he did. His belief
that agricultural education
should be experienced and not
just read out of a book led to an


exemplary career as a teacher,
FFA advisor and county voca-
tional agriculture supervisor,"
said Assistant Commissioner of
Agriculture Michael Joyner,
who remarked on the accom-
plishments of the inductee and
presented Cochrane's family
with a plaque commemorating
his induction into the FFA Hall
of Fame.
After earning a field commis-
sion to 2nd Lieutenant, Coch-
rane was a tank commander in
the Battle of the Bulge and
received two Purple Hearts for
his wounds in combat. Return-
ing home, he obtained a bache-
lor and master degrees in
Agricultural Education at the
University of Florida. That led
to a teaching position at Fort
Meade High School for 20
years, during which he built a
model program.
Cochrane went on to become
Polk County Vocational Agri-
culture Supervisor in 1973. He
had served as Mayor of Fort
Meade and was named its Most
Outstanding Citizen in 1964.
He retired in 1983 but contin-
ued to farm. He died in January
2008 at the age of 91.


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The boys and girls swim
teams have a final match this
week as they prepare for Dis-
trict competition next Wednes-
day morning.
Both teams place first in a
five-team meet at the Gandy
Pool in Lakeland, doing better
than Santa Fe Catholic, Kath-
leen, Mulberry and Lake Gib-
son.
After a home meet Tuesday,
which will include Senior Night
Activities, the teams will con-
centrate more on the upcoming
districts, which will be Tuesday
and- Wednesday. Diving is
Tuesday, beginning at 10 a.m.,
while swimming is Wednesday,
starting at 9 am. They will be
hosted by Frostproof at the
Rowdy Gaines pool in Winter
Haven.
Other teams involved in the
Class IA, Reg. 2, District 5
*meet are All Saints' Academy,
Avon Park, Oasis Christian


Back To Basics
By lan Rice
Gospel Preacher


(formerly Haven Christian),
Tampa Holy Names Academy,
Lake Placid, Lake Wales,
Lakeland Christian, Mulberry
and Lakeland Santa Fe
Catholic.
There were several first-place
finishes among the Hardee con-
tingents in last week's meet,
and several others also had their
best times of the year in their
events.
Among those having personal
bests were Wyatt Kofke, Will
Crawford, Cody Spencer, Cles-
ton Sanders, Leah Weeks,
Megan Hartman and April
Garland.
For the boys, first-place fin-
ishes were captured by Kofke in
the 200 free, Garrett Albritton
in the 50 free and Crawford in
the butterfly. The 200-free relay
team of Kofke, Albritton,
Spencer and Kramer Royal also
placed first.
Boys second-place points
went to Royal in the 50 free,
Kalob Rickett, in diving,


THE ONLY THING
In the Judah Alone period of Bible history, we see the prophet
Habakkuk dealing with the stubborn nation of Judah which refuses
to whole-heartedly turn back to the Lord. Habakkuk, knowing the
hard-heartedness of his countrymen, asks God how long this con-
dition will continue.
God replies that the Chaldeans will be His chastening rod upon
the nation, and the announcement sends the prophet to his knees.
The news of that judgment led Habakkuk to say, "When I heard,
my body trembled. My lips quivered at the voice. Rottenness
entered my bones. And I trembled in myself, that I might rest in the
day of trouble. When he comes up to the people, he will invade
them with his troops," Habakkuk 3:16.
Imagine looking about before you, knowing that destruction
looms, and you can do absolutely nothing about it! Such was the
case for Habakkuk.
Even though Habakkuk understood there was nothing he could
do, he concludes by praising God's wisdom: "Though the fig tree
may not blossom, nor fruit be on the vines. Though the labor of the
olive may fail, and the fields yield no food. Though the flock may
be cut off from the fold and there be no herd in the stalls, yet I will
rejoice in the Lord, I will joy in the'God of my salvation. The Lord
God is my strength; He will make my feet like deer's feet, and He
will make me walk on my high hills," Habakkuk 3:17-19.
With all of this impending doom before his eyes, it is God in
whom he takes refuge.
There is a lesson in all of this for us.
Sometimes when faced with challenges out of our control, we
need to understand what it truly means to be left with God as our
refuge. Our mindset shouldn't be one of drudgery and sorrow by
thinking, "All I have left is the Lord." No! Our attitude should be,
"The only thing I have is the Lord!"
There is a sense of assurance while trusting in the Lord
through the midst of trouble. Habakkuk could take comfort in the
Lord God because of his covenant relationship with Him.
Are you in a covenant relationship with God? The only way
we will ever know the "peace of God, which surpasses all under-
standing," Philippians 4:7, is to be in a covenant relationship with
God through Jesus Christ.
Get back to the basics and read, study and obey God's Word.
lan Rice is the idll-time evangelist at Wauchula Church of Christ,
a non-denominational group of Christians seeking to follow the
New Testament pattern of service to God. Visit the church website
at www.wauhlaulachurcholjchrist.com.

There's only one real sin and that is to persuade oneself
that the second-best is anything but the second-best.
-Doris Lessing


Spencer in the 100 free and
Sanders in the 500 free.
The girls 400 freestyle relay
team of Weeks, Hartman, Emily
Rhodes and Caitlin Defresne
placed first.
Several girls also got second-
place points, including Rhodes
in the 50 free, Defresne in the
100 butterfly and Weeks in the
500 free.
Two girls relay teams also
took second. Savannah Miller,
Garland, Defresne and Rhodes
won the 200 medley relay and
Weeks, Hartman, Rhodes and
Defresne in the 200 free.
There are only two seniors on
the team, Korin Roehm and
Savanna Hagans.
Juniors are Justin Rickett,
Kalob Rickett, Morgan Garcia,
Skyler Simmons, Crawford,
Kofke and Garland.
The sophs are the largest
crowd, with Carleigh Coleman
Emily Hughes, Holly.Hughes,
Rhodes, Royal, Weeks, Miller,
Hartman, Sanders and Albrit-
ton.
The freshmen are Alexandra
"Alex" Johnson, Keifer Kedzor,
Kevin Kunkel, Dufresne and
Spencer.


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 23
'THROUGH

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26
SUNDAY 11:00 a.m. 6:00 p.m
MONDAY WEDNESDAY 7:00 p.m

*Nursery Provided*
('Newborn 3 yr. old )

Special Guest Speaker

REV. CECIL SEAGLE


2* 3...


.' i .. j
. f" -'* o
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II
0
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3rd Annual Golf Tournament

to benefit


Hannah's House

& Apartments

SA shelter for women who.are victims of domestic abuse -


Torfey aaks Golf Course

Sataurd, November 5 8 a.m.

4 Person 18 Hole Scramble

$50 Per person (lunch included)

Sponsored By: FINR

Sign up at:
Torrey Oaks: 8 a.m. p.m. Mon. thru Sun.

Alpha & Omega Freedom Ministries-9 a.m. 4 p.m.
Phone 773-5717 113 N. 7thAve. Wauchula
Or call after hours 781-1105

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2nd Place Prize $100
3rd Place Prize $50
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prizes
I If you would like to be a pla eror s asor.
please.call 773-5717 fir.
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October 20, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 3B


Landfill Could Be Eliminated VORACIO VOLUNTEE


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
A long-range plan to build a
pair of garbage-processing
plants could eventually do away
with the Hardee County
Landfill and its costs.
At its Friday monthly work-
shop, the Hardee County Com-
mission heard two proposals
about the county landfill. One
of them could make drastic
changes. The other continues
the landfill until the first plan
could take effect.
Waste Turned Into Products
As Commission Chairman
'Minor Bryant said, "this pro-
posal sounds too good to be
true."
Rick Fishman, of Waste
Generated Products based in
Venice, presented his compa-
ny's process to "eliminate waste
by converting it to produce use-
ful products."
The "evolutionary technolo-
gy" that would take garbage
and turn it into useful products
would be in a pair of pollution-
neutral, self-enclosed facilities
to be built in Hardee County
and employ 150 to 200 local
people in "good, long-term
jobs."
It would not ask for a tax
abatement and would pay taxes
on its plants and improvements.
It would provide an AAA-rated
$30 million cash bond to ensure
its continuing industry here. It
would initially need about 100
acres, reasonably close to rail-
roads to send its products out.
This could take as much as 200
acres as the plants expand.
There would be a PIM
(Powder Impression Molding)
and a Gasification plant. There
would be no smokestacks in the
self-enclosed facilities, which
would be environmentally
friendly, with no effects on the
ground, water or air.
The company would take the
daily garbage, including solid
waste, hazardous materials, old
tires and construction materials,
without pre-sorting, and use it


as a feedstock for its multiple Various aspects of an agree-
products. ment of understanding with
About 80 percent would beWaste Products were discussed.
used in making molded prod- The consensus of commission-
ucts such as pipes, radiant floor- ers was for the county attorney
ing, siding, roofing, carbon and county manager to work on
black, scrap steels, truck beds, finalizing the agreement.
and chassis and frames and Landfill director Teresa
parts for vehicles. The remain- Carver said each resident pro-
ing 20 percent would be turned duces 1.012 tons of garbage per
into fuel, both diesel and high year. It amounts to about 16,000
octane gas, and electricity, tons a year, for which residents
Some would be used to operate pay the annual assessments for
the plants, some would be made collection and disposal.
available to the county at prices Landfill Expansion
lower than it now pays for fuel, Since permitting a landfill
and some would be added to takes a long time, SCS En-
electric grids locally and gineers presented its three-
nationally. month study of landfill issues.
Fishman said the company Options to close the landfill and
would begin by using daily truck garbage out to other coun-
garbage. Trucks would roll up ties, or expand the present land-
and dump their loads into a fill were discussed.
hopper. Tipping fees would be The first phase of the landfill
less than the county's current has been closed and must be
$62.50 per ton. The company monitored for 30 years. Another
would sort it, pulverize it and cell was opened in 2010, part of
send it by conveyors to be com- the full footprint of Phase 2.
posed into superior, cost-effec- Increasing the use of the cell
tive products sent all over the already opened by using differ-
world. Products are used by ent compaction methods and
General Motors, Chrysler and cover materials, recirculating
Ford, Boeing, MG Air products, leachate and other possibilities
Kelly Aerospace and the federal to increase density were consid-
government. ered.
Eventually Waste Products "Time is of the essence,"
will process the backlog of explained Marc Rogoff and Ed
garbage stacked at the landfill, Hilton. Depending on the vol-
clean the dirt and return it to the ume, another unit or cell would
landfill, making it a worth- be needed between 2013 and
while, clean site for use or sale. 2014. It can take well over a
Fishman demonstrated a year to get an operating permit.
piece of sewer or water piping Once submitted, the permit
about two-foot wide and three application is sent back and
feet long, which was relatively forth between the state and
light, extremely strong and not engineering staff until all ques-
subject to the deterioration of tions are clarified. It could take
other piping, as much as 24 months with the
The molding plant will be current changes in the state
scalable, meaning it is on skids Department of Environmental
and can be moved to another Protection, Rogoff and Hilton
location for an emergency. For said.
instance, during the aftermath Commissioners agreed the
of a hurricane, it could go to a county could be in a bind if it
site to process the construction did not proceed with the permit-
demolition and yard debris, ting process and there was any
using it to provide electricity delay in getting the Waste
temporarily to those shut off by Generated Products plants up
the storm. and going.


The problem with cats is that they get the exact same look on their face whether they
see a moth or an axe-murderer.
-Paula Poundstone
I had been told that the training procedure with cats was difficult. It's not. Mine had me
trained in two days.


COURTESY PHOTO
Pat McAllister's class at Wauchula Elementary School recently congratulated dedicat-
ed volunteer DeWayne Wyatt for accumulating more than 100 hours of volunteer serv-
ice in their class. Wyatt was given a plaque provided by the Hardee County School
Board. Pictured behind the students are (from left) Wyatt, McAllister and paraprofes-
sional Carla Flemer.

He who has a thousand friends has not a friend to spare, and he who has one enemy
will meet him everywhere.
-Ralph Waldo Emerson
I have friends in overalls whose friendship I would not swap for the favor of the kings.
of the world.
-Thomas A. Edison


toolBi 0 N

Experienced Dog Groomer
'j Clip, Shampoo, Massage, Blow
Nails, Ears, Anal Glands
Extras: Teeth Brushing Express 5
SA Day Care

Go $ o n'mostd(


b Dry,

servicee


D


Beth Brown (863) 781-5864 3732 Peeples Lane
Monday Saturday Flexible Hours


c<,i 88--
. . .. ..


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tate tO


We'll


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and


PAYYOU

up tos2501

NeW or Refinanced Loans


Offeron nc
refinanced loans o ly


a;:.'ui1 d Be

www.midflorida.com


i--. ....tr.


This is a limited time offer which may be cancelled at any time without notice. A $5 minimum savings account is required for membership. Creditapproval is required. MIDFLORIDA is an equal housing lender.
Advertised rate is available on certain mortgage, second mortgage and auto loan products only. Other rates and terms available. The 2.99% APR is available on a 3-year Adjustable Rate Mortgage (ARM).
Example: On a 3-year ARM amortized over 30 years with a loan amount of $160,000 with 20% down and an initial rate of 2.80% (which is a discounted rate), the first 36 principal and interest payments would be
$657.43. The interest rate may adjust thereafter, with a maximum lifetime rate of 6.80%. Offer valid as of July 6,2011 and may be cancelled at any time. 1. Advertised rate must be produced for verification. Bank
must have branches or offices within MIOFLORIDA's service arftto qualify. 2. Credit approval required. 0% introductory manufacturer financing (such as those offered through Ford Motor Credit etc) may not
qualify for this offer. Standard underwriting guidelines apply and may impact availability of this offer. Payment may be lowered by adjusting rate or extending term. 3. The refinance of any MIDFLORIDA loan wi
not qualify for this incentive. Manufacturer-financed loans must be 90 days or older to qualify. Loans of S15,000 or more will qualify for a S200 credit. Loans of S10000 to $14,999 will qualify for a $100 credit. Ifa
new MIDFLORIDA Platinum Credit Card is opened, an additional $50 credit will apply. All incentives will be posted to credit card within 10 days of approval.


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Kevin Jones,
President & CEO


Federally
insured by
NCUA.

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De~al.






4B The Herald-Advocate, October 20. 2011


Scenes From Hardee Vs. Frostproof


The gambler and gun fighter Doc Molliday received the
degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery from the
Pennsylvania College of Dental Surgery in 1872.


Your Child Will
Learn to Read!
Free Evaluation
Inl nationally Acclaimed Method
C'l ldren, Teens & Adults

AcademicAssociates


COWART FAMILY REUNION
All Cowart family members are '
invited to the Cowart family
reunion. To beheld Saturday,
October 22, at 11 am at
New Hope Baptist Church.
Please bring a covered dish or
dessert. Ifyou have any
\questions call Sylina at 773-9549.








Parmjit Gill A A Apurba Manik
M.I., F.A.A.P. PPiATRICS M.D., FA.A.P.
Infants V Children V Adolescents

NOW AVAILABLE
FLU VACCINES




Ce Habla 120 HEARTLAND WAY WAUCHULA
EpanoI (NEW LOCATION BEHIND AARONS)

SaurayHur i von Pak:830-120 No


Celebrate Breast Cancer Awareness Month
Strong Bones-Healthy Body-Lower the Risk
50% Off Your First Month (Exp. 10-31-11)
(with JF & auto-pay sign-up)
Schedule and location www.jazzercise.com "
Ann Marie 863-767-0613 facebook/Jazzercise Heartland


THE HARDEE COUNTY ROTARY CLUB
DISTRICT 6890


HELP Us HELP

OUR COMMUNITY!

By Making A Purchase OfA Beautiful Christmas
Wreath Fresh From Washington State


Bring the sight and
smell of Christmas into
your home, and help
support local Rotary
civic projects here in
our own community.

"Wonderful
Gift Idea"


22" Noble Fir Wreath
with red velvet bow and
snowy pine cones
$25


S W Another
Rotary
-SUCCESS!
Rotary members
escorted Nine World
War II Veterans To
Washington D.C. to see
their War Memorial as
well as others on
May 14, 2011 and look
forward to next year's trip
with the help from our
sponsors in the
community


For Orders contact any Rotarian or
Sue Birge, President 781-3536 Michael Kelly, Incoming President 781-9628
Jeffery Ussery, Rotarian 448-2819
The Hardee County Rotary club meets every Wednesday
12:00 noon at the Java Cafe, 202 W. Main St., Wauchula 1020c


Priscella
Owner/Stylist
/, ; Allen Johnson //
Barber/Stylist
,F ~(863) 285-6300
302 N. Charleston Ave., Fort Meade, Ft


1,


Rose Mitchell-Freeman
Reading Instruction
Specialist
(863)773-6141
soc10:20c


ir-


; .















October 20, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 5B


Golf Goes District


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Winning their final two
matches of the year, Hardee
boys golf ended the season with
a 12-2-1 record.
The boys shot their low score
of the year, 149, in a match last
Tuesday at home against Lake
Wales.
This week, they were in dis-
trict contention on Monday in
the Venice area. Hosted by
Sarasota Out-of-Door Acade-
my, the matches were actually
closer to Venice. The boys went
to the Waterford Course, while
the girls went to Capris Isles.
Regionals are Oct. 24 at the
Hideout Country Club, hosted
by Community School of
Naples.
In the girls final match last
week at Sebring, Hardee split
between the three times
involved. Sebring came home
the Sun 'N Lake Course in 187,
followed by Hardee at 226 and
Avon Park at 246. The girls
ended their season with a 4-8
record.
Hardee boys had a pair of
meets last week. On Tuesday,
on the home course at The
Bluffs, Hardee shot 149, led by
senior Daniel Miller with his
lowest round of the year, a 34
with three birdies.
Junior Will Bennett was next


The Southwest Florida Water
Management District (SWFWMD)
announces the following public
meeting to which all interested
persons are invited:
Governing Board Surplus
Lands Subcommittee Meeting:
Consider committee business
Including evaluation of method-
ologies used to evaluate por-
tions of SWFWMD lands for
potential surplus. Board mem-
bers and Advisory Committee
members may attend. Some
Board members may partici-
pate In the meeting via commu-
nications media technology.
DATE/TIME: Thursday, November
3, 2011; 9 a.m.
PLACE: SWFWMD Tampa
Service Office, 7601 US Highway
301 North, Tampa FL 33637
A copy of the agenda may be
obtained by contacting: Water-
Matters.org Boards, Meetings &
Event Calendar; 1 (800) 423-1476
(FL only) or (352) 796-7211
For more information, you may
contact: Terl.Hudso6fi@wateimat-
ters.org 1(800)423-1476 (FL only)
or (352)796-7211, x4602 (Ad
Order EXE0173)
If any person decides to appeal
any decision made by the Board
with respect to any matter consid-
ered at this meeting or hearing,
he/she will need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceed-
ing is made, which record
includes the testimony and evi-
dence from which the appeal is to
be issued.
Anyone requiring reasonable
accommodation as provided for
in the Americans with Disabilities
Act should contact the Districts
Human Resources Director, 2379
Broad Street, Brooksville, Florida
34604-6899; telephone (352)
796-7211, ext. 4702 or 1-800-423-
1476 (FL only), ext. 4702;. TDD
(FL only) 1-800-231-6103; or
email to ADACoordinator@
swfwmd.state.fl.us 10:20c


with a 38 and three birdies,
while senior Matt Godwin had a
38 with one birdie. Senior
Dalton Hewett finished out the
scoring with a 39.
The Wildcats finished up
their season at home on Thurs-
day, defeating DeSoto 163-191.
Port Charlotte was supposed to
be included but had transporta-
tion problems.
Miller had another good out-
ing, with 37 with a bird. "He is
starting to hit his stride right at
districts, which is great. We
should be competitive," com-
mented Coach George Heine.
Bennett "fired a nice 40 with
a bird, Dalton Hewett had 41,
William Beattie finished with
45 and both Tyler Hewett and
Eric Klein both had 47s," con-
tinued Heine.
In their final match, Hardee
girls finished at 226, led by
sophomore Courtney Alexander
with her best round of the year
with 51. Senior Courtney Parks
was next in, followed by soph
Kaitlin Shaw, freshman Kendall
Gough and soph Brooke
Knight, reported Coach Byron
Jarnagin.



The Southwest Florida Water
Management District (SWFWMD)
announces the following work-
shop to which all interested per-
sons are invited:
Dedication Ceremony to cele-
brate completion of the Phase
3A Pipeline. Governing Board
members may attend.
DATE/TIME: Wednesday,
November 2, 2011; 10 a.m.
PLACE: T. Mabry Carlton, Jr.
Water Treatment Plant, 1255
Mabry Carlton Way, Venice FL
34292
A copy of the agenda may be
obtained by contacting: Linda
Stewart, Peace River Manasota
Regional Water Supply Authority;
(941)316-1776 or
LStewart@regionalwater.org
For more information, you may
contact: Lou.Kavouras@water-
matters.org 1(800)423-1476 (FL
only) or (352)796-7211, x4604
(Ad Order EXE0171)
10:20c


The Southwest Florida Water
Management District (SWFWMD)
announces the following work-
shop to which all interested per-
sons are invited:
Water Choices Forum IV facil-
itating 'public-private partner-
ships as a mechanism to help
solve water challenges.
SWFWMD Governing Board
and Advisory Committee mem-
bers may participate.
DATE/TIME: Tuesday, November
1,2011; 8:30 a.m.
PLACE: DUniversity of South
Florida's Patel School of Global
Sustainability, 4202 East Fowler
Avenue, Tampa FL 33620
A copy of the agenda may be
obtained by contacting: Florida
Earth Foundation; (561)686-3688
or contact@floridaearth.org
For more information, you may
contact: Lou.Kavouras@water-
matters.org 1(800)423-1476 (FL
only) or (352)796-7211, x4604
(Ad Order EXE0172) 10:20c


Courtney Alexander, Kendall Gough, Brooke Knight, Kaitlyn Shaw, Courtney Parks and Coach Jarnagin.


BOYS GOLF


PHOTO BY MARIA TRUJILLO
Hardee Wildcat golfers pause before t he final match of the season last week; seen in above photo (from left) are Tyler
Hewett, Will Bennett, William Beattie, Matt Godwin, Daniel Miller and Dalton Hewett; not pictured are Trenton Moon,
Brad Brewer, Eric Klein, Justin Davidson, Reed Woods and Tristan Montgomery.
U U


FREE-2 BUCS TICKETS


SEE WILDCAT PAGE

Center Section of "C"

For Your Chance To Win

"You Name _

The Score"
(A Winner Every Week)



NOTICE OF MEETING OF
CITY OF WAUCHULA
CODE ENFORCEMENT BOARD
225 E MAIN ST., SUITE 105
MONDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2011
5:30 P.M.

FINE FORGIVENESS REQUEST:


09-131-M


A. Kay McClellan


11-019-M Nyet Vui & Chen Lip Wong
11-060-M Cresenciano Perez


OLD CASES:


09-003-M
09-136-M
10-072-M
11-066-M
11-083-L


NEW CASES:

1. 11-089-L, M, TL
2. 11-090-UDB


202 S 8th Ave


415 Heard Bridge Rd
706 S 7th Ave



320 Penn Ave
217-221 E Main St
611 N 8th Ave
313 Heard Bridge Rd
212 Louisiana St


609 S 9th Ave
620 Green St


Marilyn Peterson
Victory Investments
Estella Villareal
Klaus W & Dagmar E Kunkel
Santa Anita Mares


Deutsche Bank Nat'l Trust
HSBC Bank USA NA


Any interested persons) will be heard at this meeting. If any person decides to appeal
any decision made by the Board with respect to this request for which he will need a ver-
batim record of the proceedings, he will need to ensure that such verbatim record is made.

The City Commission of the City of Wauchula, Florida does not discriminate upon the
basis of any individual's disability status. This non-discriminatory policy involves every
aspect of the Commission's functions, including ones access to, participation, employ-
ment or treatment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable accommo-
dation as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26, Florida
Statutes, should contact the City Clerk at (863) 773-3131.
10:20c


HARDEE COUNTY
KIDS NEED
HARDEE COUNTY
HELP!
Ease a dependent child's
way through the court sys-
tem. Volunteer to be a
Guardian Ad Litem.
773-2505
(If office unattended, please leave
message.)


I IFr I i .!. i ,-. ... -- ... ..v ne : .' --
R.1 L 1 -- .. r i. - ** ^'.







6B The Herald-Advocate, October 20, 2011




-The


ABOUT ... Classifieds
DEADLINE ....Tuesday noon
RATES ..........Minimum of $4.00 for 10 words. Each addi-
tional word is 22 cents. Ads in all capitals
are 32 cents per word. Headlines are $2 a
line. Blind ad box numbers are $3 extra.
BILLING........Ads must be pre-paid.


CLASSIFICATIONS:
Agriculture
Appliances
Automobile
Boats
Furniture
Help Wanted
Houses
Livestock
Lost & Found
Miscellaneous


Mobile Homes
Notices
Pets
Plants/Produce
Real Estate
Recreational
Rentals
Services
Wanted
Yard Sales


for Ih-!e 1 illa RdS tore

Lift and load merchandise,
NO criminal history, clean
MVR, pass drug test,
21 yrs. or older.

Apply at
www.aarons.com/careers
type in "Wauchula" in keywords
and apply today!
c110:20c


Classifieds


L. DICKS INC. is now purchasing
citrus fruit for the 2011/12 season
and beyond. Call Manuel @
781-0384. 7:8tfc


CASH NOWI Crooms Used Cars
and Salvage picks up your junk
cars and pays top dollar. Call to
discuss any type of vehicle. 863-
781-3767, 863-401-5085. 3:3tfc


HELP WANTED, Hardee Pure Air,
Inc., FT/PT, now accepting appli-
cations, 767-0122. 10:20c
.OFFICE ASSISTANT needed. Fax
resumeto 863-773-4687. 10:20c
STYLIST OR BARBER needed at
Ideal Hair Salon in Bowling
Green. Call Amanda at 473-2519.
Great Business Opportunity.
10:20c


NEED CAREGIVER/STAFF, no
criminal record, CPR and first aid
certified a plus. Contact Southern
Oaks, 773-9557 ask for Sanny or
Mac. (All previous applications
on file-no need to re-apply.)
10:13,20c
INDEPENDENT ADVERTISING
Agent-Are you ready to be your
own boss? If you like to meet new
people, are motivated, organized
and dependable, you can use
your skills to earn extra money
selling advertising for Central
Florida's Agri-Leader an edition
of Highland Today. Send your
experience to centralfloridas-
agrileader@gmail.com. All adver-
tising agents are independent
contractors, not employees of
Highland Tdday/The Tampa
Tribune. Media General Is an
equal opportunity employer.
10:13nc


Ldia'.s .to.se Thri. Store


QUALITY MERCHANDISE



Mon. Sat. 9 am 4 pm 773-3034 102 Carlton Street


Cleaven (ent Cleaning ctvice
By Sherry White Ministries
*SM n j M ,= -- "ifl. g m


773-0523 *


Ill



I.
CS H 4 AL4GLD
YcATHOESTPRCE
\1 rlf PL~~~)


863-7-- 67-C0122

SSupport Hardee & Shop Local!!
Go Cats!!! LG
Paul & Tina Rickett
Mto;i nar,., rfie! 101 S. 9th Ave Wauchula, Fl. 33873 | so_ n |
hb ... ..... Cell: (863) 781-4376 or (863)781-4378 fcebook
For quality and assurance contact your hometown Rainbow distributor for
products and demonstrations. Asthma and allergy certified. c110:6-27p



JIM SEE REALTY, INC.,
206 North 6th Avenue, Wauchula, FL 33873
Office (863)773-0060 Evening (863)773-4774
www.jimseerealty.com
James V. See, Jr., Broker Dusty Albritton
3 Bedroom, 2 Bath house in town. Remodeled Vacation Home REDUCED!!! 2 BR/2 BA mobile
house with nice landscaping. WAS $97,500 ... home in Punta Gorda. Located on a deep water
REDUCED TO $79,500! .. canal that leads into Charlotte Harbor. $89,000!
50 acre grove located 2 miles Northwest of 4-5 bedroom, 4 bath custom built home on 9 h
Wauchula. Valencia & E&M. Micro Jet, deep acres. County road access, next to Wauchula.
ell, power unit. $750,000 Home is complimented with screened back porch
and in-ground pool. Land also has 7 acres of
Duplex! 4 BR, 2 BA one side. 3 BR, 2 BA others uspooland a has 7 acres of
side. Central air & heat. Paved road. City waterproducing nursery. $430,000
& sewer. Asking $125,000 Great home on several large lots in Wauchula.
20 acres close in to Wauchula on paved road. Never been for sale before. Hardwood floors
Laser leveled, deep well & irrigation. Ready for under carpet in bedrooms. Central air/heat.
your farm operation. Zoned FR. $230,000 Massive brick fireplace. 3 bedrooms, 2 baths. 2
car carport. Asking $199,500
REDUCED! Beautiful home located in
Briarwood Subdivision. 3 Bedroom, 2 ai Bath 20 acres very close in to Wauchula on paved
house with wrap around porch, detached 2 car road. Laser leveled and ready for your farm
garage with office and full bath. Was $475,000 ... operation. Zoned FR. $190,000
Now $359,000! _
Realtor Associates m
Rick Knight (863)781-1396 Calvin Bates (863)381-2242
John H. Gross (863)273-1017 Dusty Albritton (863)781-0161 c10:20c


773-0877


PASTOR needed for Chapel.
Service at Pioneer Creek RV Park
from Nov. 1st through April 1st In
Bowling Green, Florida. For fur-
ther details, please contact
Wayne Shick 810-845-8760.
9:22-10:20p


2BR, 1 BATH 5105 Howard Ave.,
Bowling Green, $35,000 cash,
781-1062. 10:20c


FOUND-Medium size dog found
on Monday, Oct. 17th near YMCA.
Call 781-0549 to identify. 10:20nc
2 HOUND MIX on Hwy. 17 wearing
collars, found around Oct. 4th,
781-2045.
-Sg
WE PAY CASH for your junk riding
mower. Free pick up, 773-4400.
10:6tfc


BUYING gold, silver, diamonds,
coins, paper money, 904-222-
4607. 10:20c


1995 TERRY PARK MODEL 39',
Queen bed, 2 slides, large bath-
room, kitchen appliances, rubber
roof, new carpet, (2 years old,)
located at Little Charlie Creek
Campground. Must be moved.
$65,000. 828-234-3507.
10:20-11:17p


DESOTO COUNTY



OWNER FINANCING
wwwlandcallnow.com
1-941-778-7980/7565 S


W. B. Olliff, Jr., Tree Surgeon, Inc.
773-4478

', n 7_ 7_3- 4_47_8


S-,. Free Estimates
Insured 30+ years experience


w BILSLHBiBRSHBBBB
iTIRS .01BeT own!BBI^rS


New Tires Include
Free Mount & Balance
Brand Name Tires!
Semi & Trailer Tires
BIG SALE ON
ALL TIRES
773-0777 773-0727
116 REA Rd., Wauchula
(across from Wal-Mart)
"B' c 6 1 t TB illy A y e rs
27 VI-SA I-f c16:16tfc Tire Technician


Mon. Wed. 10am- 6pm; Fri. & Sat. 10 .m-7pm/Closed Thursday & Sunday
3505 US HwY 1 7 S ZOLFO SPRINGS cs:ltic










HANDLING dLL GOLF CART NEEDS
BATTERIES REPAIRS
SPICK UP & DELIVERY AVAILABLE

Guarenteed Lowest Prices
on Parts & Labor!

2008 Golf Carts In-Stock


FAST Er FRIENDLY SERVICE -
22 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE LOCALLY OWNED Er OPERATED 'I


77 4400 829BOSTICKRD BOWINGGREEN
7 3H Road Runs Beside Torrey Oak Golf Course


Azalea Apartments
2, 3 & 4 Bedroom Apartments
Handicap Unit Available
Rental Rates Beginning at $490
(plus electric, cable and phone)
Rental Assistance Available for Qualified Applicants
Rental Office:
860 Pleasant Way Bowling Green, FL
(863) 375-4138 (TTY 1-800-955-8771)
Monday Friday *
e 9:00 AM. 12:00 Noon
.... __ 'Equal Opportunity Employer & Provider cli :6-27c


HELP WANTED
TELECOMMUNICATIONS SPECIALISTS
Full Time $22,36000
The Hardee County Sheriff's Office is taking
applications for full time Telecommunication
Specialists. You must be at least 19 years of age,
have a high school diploma or equivalent, never
been convicted of a felony or a misdemeanor,
be willing to be fingerprinted, pass a drug test
and work shifts. Applications may be obtained
and returned by 4 p.m., October 28, 2011, at the
Sheriff's Office, 900 E. Summit St., Wauchula,
FL. If other arrangements are necessary, call
863-773-0304 ext. 211. EOE c110:20,27c


U


Hill's Auto World

ZOLFO SPRINGS

.735-0188

BUY HERE! ., -
PAY LEREL ."

Dan I' No INTERESTrnd
FINANCE CHARGES


Jr


6m


L-


1


OPPORTUNITY







October 20, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 7B


The


Classifieds


PERSONAL PROPERTY OF
Brittany Jackson will be sold pur-
suant to Warehousemans Lien.
Said sale will be at 115 S.R. 66,
Zolfo Springs at 9 am on Oct. 22,
2011. 10:13,20c


CHIHUAHUA PUPPIES NKC reg-
Istered, shots & H/C, $400, 863-
781-1283. 10:20-11:17p
CUR/HOG dog puppies, 9 weeks,
$50.863-781-1283. 10:20p
ADOPT A PETI If you have lost a
pet or are looking for a new one
the City of Wauchula invites you
to come and see if you can find
the pet you're looking for. The
Wauchula Animal Control is locat-
ed at 685 Airport Road. Please
call 773-3265 or more informa-
tion. tfc-dh
ATTENTION State Statutes
828.29 requires that all cats and
dogs sold in Florida be at least 8
weeks old, have an official health
certificate, have necessary shots
and be free of parasites, tfc-dh


WHOLESALE PLANTS 4 ft. Rub-
ber Trees $4.50 each; Crepe
Myrtle bushes $4.50 each; many
more plants as low as $2.50 each.
Center Hill Nursery 863-223-5561.
10:20p


3/2 HOUSE Riverview neighbor-
hood, $840 month plus deposit,
863-735-1953. 10:20-11:17p
3/1 ZOLFO SPRINGS large yard,
$675 month. 863-781-1805 after
6pm, mrs_wra@yahoo.com.
10:20p
SMALL HOUSE In country, 64
West. Call for info, 735-9284.
10:20p
ZOLFO, 4BR, 1 BATH Home, cen-
tral air & heat, utility room, very
spacious, 735-2626. 10:20c
APT & HOUSES for rent, 773-
6667. 10:20c
3 HOUSES, 2-6 bedrooms,
$600/mo, 863-773-6616, 863-212-
1152, 863-445-0915. Deposit
negotiable. 10:13-11:10p
HOUSE IN COUNTRY, big yard,
2BR/1BA, $650/month, 1st/last/
security, 863-781-1318. 10:13,20c
3/2 TRAILER, 5 acres, $600
deposit, $650 monthly, 863-781-
5036. 9:29-10:27p
2BR, 2B In Charlie Creek Mobile
Home Park, $550 monthly, $300,
sec. dep., 863-781-4460. 9:22tfc
2BR, 1BA Apartment, $550
month, $500 dep., 773-0100.
9:15tfc
MOVE-IN TODAY *
MOBILE HOMES 1 bed-$300 mo.;
2 bed-$350 mo-up; 3 bed-$450
mo. up. Close to schools & hospi-
tal, no pets, $200 deposit. Se
habla espanol 863-698-4910 or
863-698-4908. 6:9tfc


Trtsvel fluro Santdras


fld8: I I a




I:, : :. :1' rn


fo Wa hla *10 *la R I 6t

Salary + bonus, BENEFITS,
Sunday off, 45 hrs. wk. Must
pass criminal & drug test,
21 yrs. + clean MVR.
2 yrs Mgmt or 2 yrs
college a must.
Apply to
www.aarons.com/careers
type in "Wauchula" in keywords
and apply today! c110:20c


A NTN1 The Federal Fair
Housing Act Prohibits advertising
any preference or limitation
based on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial status or
national origin, or the Intention to
make such a preference or limita-
tion. Familial status includes chil-
dren under 18 living with parents
or guardians and pregnant
women. tfc-dh

*0,

COMMERCIAL SPACE, available
design build, 700 s.f. to 12,000 s.f.
863-773-6616. 863-445-0915.
10:13-11:10p
OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT.
Perfect setting for medical office,
920 square foot, flexible design,
front lobby, reception area, and 4-
5 Individual rooms. $900 monthly
OBO. 406 South 6th Ave,
Wauchula, call 863-773-6162.
6:30tfc


4-C CONSTRUCTION, Free esti-
mates, handyman, concrete,
remodels, additions, CBC1256,
863-214-1471. 10:13-3:29p


Lamar Gilliard
Home: (863) 735-0490


NEW ALCOHOLICS ANONY-
MOUS meeting in Hardee County.
Thursday 7 p.m., 131 South 8th
Avenue, Wauchula. For more info
call LeAnne at 863-214-8430 or
Bill 239-821-4184. 9:2dhtfc
OVERCOME MEETINGS
(Gillesple) have been moved to
the Women's Club on Wednesday
nights, 7 pm. Come and see!
Kenny Sanders is the facilitator.
More information call 773-5717.
6:10tfc
DO YOU HAVE a problem with
drugs? Narcotics Anonymous*
meets Monday and Thursday
nights 7:00 p.m. at First United
Methodist Church, at the corner
of Palmetto and 7th Ave., Wau-
chula. 12:6tfcdh
IS ALCOHOL CAUSING a prob-
lem? Call Alcoholics Anonymous
in Hardee County at 781-6414.
Several weekly meetings.
dh
NEED A WELL OR HAVE PUMP
TROUBLE? CALL
ULLRICH'S PITCHER PUMP
For complete well, sales,
service and installation,
call (863) 773-6448.
7:18tfc


Zolfo Springs
clS:2fc Mobile: (941) 456-6507


THE PALMS

Available for
Immediate Occupancy

$99 Move In Special through October 31st
*Plus $1200 FREE RENT*
(*One year lease @$100/mo reduction)

Spacious 2, 3 & 4 BR Garden Apts.
SOpen, quief country setting.
Close to Sheriff's Station on Martin
Luther King Jr Ave and La Playa
Drive.
Award winning Professional Bi-lingual
Management Staff.
Affordable Rents

701 La Playa Drive, Wauchula

Rental Office Hours
Monday Friday 7:00 AM 3:30 PM
Saturday 9:00 AM 11:30 AM
After hours by appointment

1g (863) 773-3809, TDD 800-955-8771 (,g
.:.-, Equal Opportunity Employer and Provider





-Foes&FlrsIc.'


Realtor
NOEY A. FLORES, BROKER
310 Court St.
Wauchula, Florida 33873
(863) 773-3337 Fax: (863) 773-0144
S www.floresrealty.net


Oralia D. Flores
(863) 781-2955


Out of the city limits! 4BR/2BA CB home on 1.25+/- acres -
Central air & heat 2 car garage
Priced to sell at $109,000
Country Living 3BR/2BA CB home on 5 +/- acres Large Barn
with high entry door and ceilings Central air & Heat Hurricane
shutters Large generator to service home in extended power out-
ages Large 41x14 screened lanai Completely fenced with access
from two roads. Priced to sell at $175,000
At the Dead End of a Country Road 3BR/2BA MH with
+/- 5 acres with lots of trees Central air & heat Seasonal Creek
- Mother-in-law suite Large front porch Priced at $135,000
Ask us about the HUD Fdreclosure Properties in our area.
We are an authorized agent!
WE SHARE THE SAME MLS WITH HIGHLANDS COUNTY!
SRemember, Our listings are on the Internet. =
Anyone with a computer can access them anytime! .J
After Hours "'"
Oralla D. Flores (863) 781-2955 John Freeman (863) 781-4084
Noey A.Flores (863) 781-4585 Jessie Sambrano (863) 245-6891
Lawrence A. Roberts (863) 781-4380 c110:20c


ALUMINUM CONSTRUCTION
additions, screen rooms, car-
ports, glass rooms, pool enclo-
sures, rescreening, decks, con-
crete. Harold Howze Construc-
tion, 735-1158. PR005181.
9:22-11:24p
THE WAUCHULA LIONS CLUB
collects NOT broken prescription
eyeglasses, cases and sunglass-
es. Please drop off at 735 N. 6th
Ave. 4:28tfc/dh
ATTENTIONI State Statutes 489-
119 Section 5 Paragraph B and
;Hardee County Ordinance 87-09'
Section 10 Paragraph D require
all ads for any construction-relat-
ed service to carry the contrac-
tor's license number, tfc-dh


HEAVEN SCENT THRIFT STORE
now offers pick-up service for
large donations. We appreciate
your generous support. 863-773-
9777. 12:16tfc
SATURDAY, E. Main to Boyd
Cowart to 2426 Darkwing. Vintage
jewelry, futon, desk, climber tree
stand, cigar boxes, more. 863-
344-0132. 10:20p
FRIDAY & SATURDAY 7am till
2pm at Victory Praise Center, 132
East Main Street, Bowling Green.
10:20c
SATURDAY 8-? Multi-family yard
sale, seven mile point, between
.64 E and 636. Many excellent
buys, lots of misc. 10:20p


MISSION THRIFT STORE INC.
123 N. 7th Ave. We need your
donations. Pick-up available. 773-
3069. 3:24tfc
HHC THRIFT STORE 226 W. Main,
Wauchula. Consignment, lay-
away, 773-0550. 6:16tfc
JUST STUFF & JOHNNY'S
Furniture, 133 E. Townsend,
Wauchula, 832-5759. 9:15-11:1Op
SATURDAY 7-? 609 W. Main,
Wauchula. Lots of everything.
10:20p
SATURDAY, 7am, 307 Park Drive,
Riverview. Big screen TV, furni-
ture, housewares and more.
10:20p
ESTATE SALE. Inside house, 507
W. Palmetto St., Wauchula. Starts
at 9 o'clock, Thursday, Friday &
Saturday, rain or shine. 10:20p
SATURDAY, 8-1, 607 Sanders St.,
Wauchula. Organ $50, dishes, fur-
niture. 10:20p





lih igi ih ;


Hill's Auto World
U.S. Hwy. 17- Bowling Green 375-4441

30 Day


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I N C.,


Karen O'Neal
(863) 781-7633


REALTORS
1 (863) 773-2128
REALTORS
JOE L. DAVIS
B JOE L. DAVIS, JR.
REALTOR JOHN H. O'NEAL
See more listings at
www.joeldavis.com
REAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS


20 acs zoned industrial on Hwy
17. $475,000!
Imagine your new home in the
perfect setting! Beautiful 31 ac
pasture in Ona. Fenced &
adorned w/oak & pine trees.
$230,000!
Great size for beginning citrus
owner! 10 ac Valencia grove
w/two 4" wells, pump, micro-jet
irrigation, drain tile $95,000!
Beautiful native Florida!
Secluded 5 ac of wooded land
has deeded access to Peace
River! Canoe, camp, fossil hunt,
relax! $90,000!


50 acre
Hamlins,
$750,000!


grove; Valencia &
well, micro-jet.


PRICE REDUCED! High &
dry pastureland! 10 ac
improved, fenced land on pri-
vate rd is attractive homesite, or
perfect for cattle/horses!
$110,000!
PRICE REDUCED! 333 ac
ranch has pasture, irrigation
system, 12" well, 3BR/3BA two-
story home, 3,000 ft landing
strip. $1,165,500!
Wooded wonder! 5 ac w/beau-
tiful trees, paved road. $50,000!
Ideal for farming! 21.86 ac
pasture is fenced, has well, close
to town. $186,500!


REACTOR ASSOCIATES AFIER HOURS
KENNY SANDERS.781-0153 SANDY LARRISON...832-0130
KAREN O'NEAL.--- 781-7633 MONICA REAS.......781-088
DAVID ROYAL--- 781-3490
HIGHWAY 17 SOUTH, WAUCHULA, FL 33873 dl 0:20c


GILLIARD

FILL DIRT INC.

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Large Selection of
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8B The Herald-Advocate, October 20, 2011


The


Classifieds


Antiques Arts & Crafts
Under the Oaks Fair
Sponsored by the Wauchula Garden Club
Dec. 3rd 9am to 3pm
$40 per space (10' x 12')

Contact Lynn Hebert at 863-253-1628
or mail check to:
P.O. Box 1382 Zolfo Springs, Fl 33890
Deadline Nov. 2, 2011 i0:o2nc







6P "No job's too big."

p p 547O S"


HARDEE CAR COMPANY

BUY HERE PAY HERE



Billy & Janice's Rentals
Houses & Apartments



Bowling Green Flea airket


Monday Saturday
9 am to 7 pm

Wauchula
(across from
First National Bank)


1 76 cA110O.2


L AMBER T
REALTY INC.
404 South 6th Avenue
Wauchula, FL 33873
NEW LISTING Executive Family Home;
excellent neighborhood in Wauchula, 3B/4Bths,
living, dining,, game room, screened enclosed
swimming pool; shown only by appointment.
$198,000
Immaculate Home with large rooms, 2B/2Bth,
inside utility, double garage plus carport;
sprinkler system. $120,000
3B/2B, C/B home, ceramic tile and carpet
floors, large eat- in kitchen, spacious bedrooms,
located in family neighborhood. $115,000
3B/2Bth SW M/H located in Charlie Creek,
new A/C and water treatment. $49,900
Charlie Creek 2B/1Bth M/H, completely fur-
nished, screened porch and concrete drive.
$29,000


CE YOU CAN


SERVI
DORIS S. LAMBERT B k ionke


HJHS 'Cats Control Avon Park


A Daily Thought
THURSDAY
Strip down, start running,
and never quit! No extra
spiritual fat, no parasitic sins.
Keep your eyes on Jesus,
who both began and fin-
ished this race we're in.
Study how He did it.
Hebrews 12:1b-2 (ME)

FRIDAY
If I regarded any sin in my
life, the Lord will not listen to
me. But God listened and He'
heard my prayer. Praise
God, Who did not ignore my
prayer or hold back His love
from me.
Psalm 66:18-20 (NCV)


SATURDAY
Finally, then, find your
strength in the Lord, in His
mighty power. Put on all the
armor which God provides,
so that you can stand firm
against the devices of the
devil. ... Therefore, take up
God's armor; then you will
be able .to stand your
ground when things are at
their worst.
Ephesians 6:10-11,13a (NEB)
SUNDAY
Stand firm, I say. Fasten on
the belt of truth; for coat of
mail, put on integrity; let the
shoes on your feet be the
gospel of peace, ... and with
all this, take up the great
shield of faith; take salvation
for your helmet; for sword,
take the words that come
from God (the Bible).
Ephesians 6:14-17 (NEB)
MONDAY
This. is what the Lord says,
"When you pass through the
waters, I will be with you;
and when you pass through
the rivers, I will be with you;
even when you walk through
the fire, you will not be
burned. I am the Lord your
God."
Isaiah 43:2 (NIV)
TUESDAY
(Jonathan said), "Perhaps
the Lord will act in our
behalf. Nothing can hinder
the Lord from saving,
whether by many or few."
I Samuel 14:6b (NIV)
WEDNESDAY
The father of a godly man
has cause for joy what
pleasure a wise son is! So,
give your parents joy.
Proverbs 23:24-25 (TLB)
All verses are excerpted from
The Holy Bible: (KJV) King
James Version; (ME) The
Message; (NCV) New Cen-
tury Version; (NEB) New
English Bible; (NIV) New
International Version; (NLT)
New Living Translation (RSV)
Revised Standard Version;
(PME) Phillips Modern Eng-
lish; and (TLB) The Living
Bible.

Aurochs was a large-sized
cattle species. It is re-
corded to have gone into
extinction in 1627. It is said
that this cattle evolved from
India, migrating to the Mid-
dle East and reaching as far
as Europe.


Bus. (863) 773-0007
Fax: (863) 773-0038
www.lambertrealty.net
Charlotte Terrell'
9 acres on corner of two high volume traffic
areas; perfect commercial site or new home.
$100,000
Hydroponic Farm 8.91 acres with barn, cool-
er, seed house, green houses; everything needed
to produce your fruit and vegetables. $225,000
160 acres of Grove, 40 acres Valencia, 120 acres
early mid; located in East Hardee County. Call
Steve for more details.
5 ACRE TRACT excellent home site, paved
road frontage. $65,000
5 Acres of "Native Florida", abundant wildlife.
$22,500
3.2 acre corner lot; nice secluded property that
has native trees. $6.000


-V- '. n .x .,l4 inro. er vnc L.,N IH urll At. A.Mr ERlDl |, BroKer U
ASSOCIATES 0
DELOIS JOHNSON 781-2360 CHARLOTTE TERRELL 781-6971 STEVE JOHNSON 781-0518


IIK


TREES UNLIMITED
Commercial Residential Licensed & Insured
Experienced Tree Surgery
Aerial Bucket Trucks Wood Chipper
tump Grinder Front End Loader
Dump Truck Land Clearing .F L
Pond Digging Excavation

Environmentally Responsible 863-781-7027
Storm Damage & Emergency Specialists Randy Garland
*1:NtEfcDE


AM-SOUTH REALTY
Each office independently owned and operated.

11i0_41 I r"-


SRobert Hinerman Nancy Craft
227-0202 832-0370


Frontage on Little Lake Jackson. 2/2 with
screened porch $134.000
3/2 on one Acre, central AC plus chain link
fence back yard. $79.900
PRICE REDUCTION!!! 2 Bedroom, 1 Bath
home outside city limits on 2.4 acres and
conveniently located between Wauchula
and Avon Park. $54,500
HIT THE STARTER BUTtONI! Get Home
ownership running smoothly with this 3
Bedroom, 2 Bath home. Only $35.000
REDUCED!I Nice 2 Bd, 2 Bath CB home,
Central A/C total Sq. ft 3,698 Many Extras.
$144.500
Beautiful 3 bedroom, 2 Bath CB home in
Knollwood Circle, total Sq. ft 3,079, built in
1993 Priced @ $179.000
PRICE REDUCTION!! Commercial Lot, cor-
ner of Main St. and Hwy 64 east, also Rental
from billboard, $49.000 for 1.28 acreage.
Canal Frontage to Lake June!! 3/2 like new
home not far from lake. $215.000
Only $175.000!! 3 Bd, 2 Bath Brick home,
central heat & air, one car carport, outbuild-
ings and alarm system.


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Hardee Junior High
Wildcats took the game to Avon
Park on its own field and
brought home the 20-14 victory.
That puts Hardee at a win-
ning season, 4-0. past the
halfway mark of the season.
The game on Tuesday of this
week was a repeat encounter
with the Bok Academy Knights,
this time in Lake Wales. Then,
there are back-to-back home
games to finish up the season.
Hill-Gustat Middle School
4 comes in on Oct. 25 and DeSoto
is here Nov. 1 for the season
finale.
In last week's game, coaches
named Alex Hinojosa as player
of the game. He had 160 yards
on 16 carries and one touch-
down, and added a solid defen-
sive performance with eight
solo tackles and a forced fum-
ble.
"As usual, the Avon Park
Middle School team was full of
good athletes and well-
coached," said Hardee Offen-
sive Coordinator West Palmer,
who provided stats from the
game.
"For the second week in a


in all that surrounds him the
egotist sees only the frame
of his own portrait.
-J. Petit-Senn
We would rather speak ill of
ourselves than not talk
about ourselves at all.
-Frangois Duc de La
Rochefoucauld
When someone sings his
own praises, he always gets
the tune too high.
-Mary H. Waldrip



YOUR

BUSINESS

COULD

APPEAR

HERE

TOO!!
Contact
Nancy Davis,
Kim Reas or
Trayce Daniels
At
773-3255


COMPUTER REPAIR
by
Garry A. Phillips
Serving Hardee County
New System Setup Virus Removal
Malware Removal Email/Internet Setup
Computer Slow ?? Tune-ups Available
Call Us For All Your Computer Needs
Pick up & Delivery Available!
448-2561 Payment Plans Also Available 773-0518
computerrepairbygarryphillips.com c9:15.11:24c


Hearn's Auto Cleaning Service


-




(863) 735-1495
(863) 735-1495


LONESTAR
CONSTRUCTION CORP.


CUSTOM HOMES
REMODELING


* STEEL BUILDING
CONCRETE


GENERAL CONTRACTOR
Lice # 291103615
863-773-4779
"QUALITY WORK AT AN AFFORDABLE PRICE"
BRING US YOUR LOWEST COMPETITORS PRICE


702 SOUTH 6thAVENUE, WAUCHULA
(863) 773-2122 FAX (863) 773-2173
Gary Delatorre Broker
www.cbhardee.com


Richard Dasher
781-0162


Victor Salazar
245-1054


Lovely 4 Bedroom, 2 Bath CB home on cor-
ner lot Beautiful landscaped yard, well main-
tained 16x32 pool, self clean, Outdoor bath
and shower, shed, yard, irrigation, yearly ter-
minex Inspection, great family home for
entertaining and children, two car garage
and storage. Many Extras. $172.500
REDUCEDI! This 3 B, 2 Bth home with cen-
tral H/A, is close to downtown Avon Park.
OnlvI! $38.000
$65.000!! 2 Bedroom, 2 Bath home with extra
lot, citrus trees, out Building for workshop,
storage, one car garage, central heat and air.
Priced to Sell.
AAAH!! WHAT A CHANGE!l No More
Renting!! Own this 2 Bd, 1 Bath home for
only $38.000. Call today for appointment.
150 Acres Hwy 17 frontage, fenced-ready
for your agri-business, home or both. $6.000
Per Acre Negotiable
REDUCED!! $6.500 PER ACRE!! 10 AC
fenced, 4 inch well, great location for home,
farming, multi-business. Ask for Nancy!!
GO TO: HomePath.com For More Fannie
Mae Properties.
'c10:20c


row. our guys had to fight until
the end of the game for a win."
said Palmer on Thursday after-
noon. "Next Tuesday. we travel
to Lake Wales to play the Bok
Knights again. There are many
things we need to improve on if
we want to have a chance at a
second win against them." he
concluded.
Hardee scored touchdowns in
the first, second and third quar-
ters and hung on for the win.
Hinojosa started the scoring
with a 10-yard TD run. Alejan-
dro Rodriguez was next, with a
20-yard reception from quarter-
back Marco DeLeon. DeLeon
finished it off with a six-yard
run into the end zone in the
third quarter.
The eighth grade quarter-
back, who has missed a couple
of games due to injury, had 20
yards and one touchdown pass-
ing. He also had a six-yard
rushing TD and ran a two-point
conversion in for the score.
Defensively, Hinojosa picked
up the honors. Isis Garza also
had eight tackles. Parker Car-
Iton, Zach Coronodo and
DeLeon had four apiece,
Andrew Hagans three, and
Rodriguez and David Ramirez


Car Wash and Wax
Carpet and Seat Cleaning
Buff Compounding
Headliners Replaced
Vinyl Top
Motor Cleaning
Hwy. 17 & S.R. 66
Zolfo Springs c10:20c


"II.


COUNT ON I
KENNETH A- LANIRPOT R


:lQ~


. I


-MON.-


..I -I


each a pair of tackles.
Also supporting the team in
practice and play are Omar
Alamia. Allen Brown, Chris-
topher Hull, William Mc-
Clelland, Kole Robertson, Ty
Trammell, Justin Aguilar,
Landon Albritton, Thomas
Atchley, Dalton Baker, Willie
Baker, Al Brown and Bryant
Hunter.
Also, Carlos Camacho, Jar-
rett Carlton, Braddock Collom,
Tyler Congleton, Conner
Crawford, Adrian DeLeon,
Austin Garcia, Matthew Green,
Will Ham, Walter Jackson,
Jimmy Lane, Sherry Lee,
Hayden Lindsey, Charles Man-
ley, Jonathan Martinez, Bren-
nick Mascorro, Joshua Mc-
Clelland, Gabriel Mendoza and
Ryan Moore.
.And, Boone Paris, Daniel
Permenter, Jeremy Reyna,
Jessie Reyna, Chauncy Rivers,
Ty Schoffner, Hunter Scranton,
Kenny Severe, Benjamin
Tamayo, Lawrence Walker,
Trevor Walker, Kevin White
and Travis Williams.
Jason Clark and Gerry
Lindsey join Palmer on the
sidelines in the absence of Head
Coach Mark Carlton.


COLDIPI


cll 20cl


n




S-/


The Herald-Advocate
( USPS 578-780)

Thursday, October 20, 2011


PAGE ONE


1 j
1-------- -------- .. ---T- *

PHOTO BY RALPH HARRISON
The JV Wildcats are ready to play, with (first row, left to right) Javon McCall, Miguel Mata, Sahmaud Blandin, Jacob
Bolin, Caleb Purser, Marco Ehrenkaufer, Tristen Lanier, Devin Mendoza and Lex Aguilar; (second row) Armando
Alamia, Javier Valdez, Tyler Dunlap, Kenneth Vargas, Joshua Almarez, Dalton Bethea, Tim Steedley, John Snell and
Ryan Ramirez; (third row) Tyler Bragg, Aaron Briones, Luke Winter, Cesar Ramirez, Randi Lopez, Kevin Borjas,
Sherrod McMillan, Derek Fawley and Devin Pearson; (fourth row) David Gibson, Jose Gonzalez, Moses Duran, Chris
Arroyo, Wyatt Maddox, Tomas Gomez, Sherman Bethea and Roby Paris; (back) coaches Todd Bolin, Rod Smith, Barry
White and Van Crawford; not pictured Jordan Jones and Steven Lopez.



JV Jolts Avon Park 54-14


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Hardee junior varsity
Wildcats got back on the win-
ning track last week.
The junior Cats took at 54-14
victory over the Avon Park jun-
ior Red Devils to up the Hardee
record to 5-1.
The final game of the season
is tonight (Thursday) at the
unusual starting time of 6 p.m.
Hardee is home against the
Jesuit junior Tigers and request-
ed the earlier start on a school
night because of the travel time
involved.
In last week's game, Hardee
shined both offensively and


defensively. The offensive pro-
duction included 38 carries for
261 yards and five touchdowns,
while four passes went 86 yards
and included a pair of touch-
down throws.
Defensively, both Javon
McCall and Ryan Ramirez had
interceptions, while Joshua
Almarez and Rikki DeLaRosa
each had a fumble recovery.
McCall also intercepted a possi-
ble two-point play conversion
pass.
Freshman Tim Steedley led
all rushers with 10 carries for
II yards and two TDs. Tyler
Bragg added nine carries for 56
yards. Quarterback Jacob Bolin,


Almarez and McCall each also
carried into the end zone.
Andrew Valdez and Sherman
Bethea each snared a TD pass.
The game began with an
Avon Park squib kick, downed
by Hardee at its own 48-yard
line. Steedley got a 1-yard
gain, then went off left tackle
for a 41-yard TD run. The PAT
kick, longer than usual due to a
penalty, was wide left.
Avon Park got a good 21-
yard kickoff return before a
fumble on the first play from
scrimmage was recovered by
Alvarez.
Bragg got Hardee going with
a six-yard run. A pass went to


Valdez for a first down at the
Red Devil 20. After a couple of
short gains, Steedley ran into
the end zone, but the play was
called back to the 32 on a penal-
ty. Bolin went around right end
for 14 yards, then passed to a


wide-open Bethea for the 15-
yard touchdown. A conversion
pass went awry.
Avon Park was three and out,
but a roughing the punter penal-
ty game the Red Devils a first
down. Four plays later, Hardee
took over on downs. A pass for
Valdez gave Hardee a first
down 12 yards downfield.
Steedley gained seven and
Bolin picked up the first down
with a 15-yard gain. Bragg car-
ried five yards, then Alamia
motored to the Red Devil 22. A
couple more short runs and and
Alvarez jogged the final six
yards to pay dirt. An Alvarez
run netted the two-point con-
version. It was 20-0.
Avon Park got on the board
late in the first period when J.
Denny Edmond returned the
kickoff for an 80-yard touch-
down. The conversion pass was
intercepted by McCall, leaving
it a 20-6 game as the first peri-
od was drawing to a close.
Hardee had begun a drive
from midfield as the first quar-
ter came to an end. Within one
minute, Steedley went around
left end for a 22-yard TD. The
Randi Lopez PAT kick was on
target and Hardee led 27-6.
The junior Red Devils were
forced to punt from their 31-
yard line. The punt rolled dead
at the Hardee 49. A Bolin pass
to Valdez went for a 51-yard
TD, and the Lopez kick was
good. It was 34-6.
During the rest of the third
quarter, the teams exchanged
possessions. Avon Park inter-


cepted a pass and fumbled the
ball back to Hardee. Armando
Alamia and Alvarez alternated
carried, with Bolin sneaking in
the final yard for the score.
With a good Lopez kick,
Hardee led 41-6, sill with four
minutes left in the third period.
After an exchange of punts,
Edmond went around right end
for a 67-yard score for Avon
Park. Tyshawn ran in the two-
pointer, making the Red Devil
score 14.
As the fourth period started,
DeLaRosa recoved an Avon
Park fumble. Steedley took
three snaps to get from the Red
Devil 22 into the end zone. The
Pat kick went wide left. It was
47-14.
Hardee had one more tally
before time ran out. McCall and
Sahmaud Blandin shared carry-
ing the football with John Snell.
McCall went in from eight
yards out for the score. The kick
was good. Hardee had its final
score of 54-14.
A Ramirez interception
stopped an Avon Park drive and
a fumble robbed Hardee of
another possible TD. The Red
Devils had dressed only 17
players and several of those
were injured during the game.
Writer Jim Kelly contributed to
this report.

The average American
drinks 210 milligrams of caf-
feine a day. That's equal to
two to three cups of coffee,
depending on how strong it
is.


Employ Florida is an equal opportunity program. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities. The
Employ Florida telephone may be reached by persons using TTY/ITD equipment via the Florida Relay Service at 711. Disponlble on Espanol.
10:13c


During his lifetime, Herman Melville's "Moby Dick" sold
only 50 copies.





Frankie's

773-5665
116 Carlton St. Wauchula
Now Accepting Ho :

vts Tuesday Friday 9-6; Saturday 9-3
10 20cA


Large Washers & Dryers

Up To 125 Ibs. Washers


SPECIAL/ESPECIAL

MONDAY-FRIDAY

6AM-6PM 50% OFF


NORMAL/NORMALENTE
S2s0 DOUBLE/DOBLE
'4oo MAX/MAXI
$600 LARGE/GRANDE
'700 SUPER/GRANDE


SPECIAL/ESPECIAL
$125

$200
$300
$350
s~s


* $25.00 Entry Fee.
* Elntries itlusi pertain to the holiday and/or thilie. "Twelve
Days ol Christlias".
* Bectause this is al evening parade, I.IGHT'S A,-R
REQI "IRI') on all floats or pulled units.
* No Santas. Only helpers aru allowed.
* No walking vendors along parade route. Stationary vendors
allowed on 7th Avenue upon approval Lom the event
coordinator. Mandatory vendor application available at
Chamber Office.
* lntries with ainials initut provide their own clean up during
line iup and along the parade route. For the safety of tihe
splectalors, all aniilJas niuis I)e accompanied by a allking
chaperonle.
* No alcohol or tobacco are allowed.
* Banniuer utd flash lights are required to precede tloat.


nty Chamber of Commerce

Christmas Parade
urday, December 3, 2011
6:00 p.m.
Downtown Wauehula


* At least two walkers are required Ieside each float.
* Must be 16 years old to operate any motorized vehicle
* No bull whips are permnllt.cd.
* For the salety of children, candy or other items may not by
thrown ifrom any vehicle, but should I)e handed out by people
walking in the parade.
* Please have at least I adult assigned to every 20 children.
Children must be accompanied at all times.
* Field will be available from 9:00 a.m.-- 4:i30 p.m. lfr set up.
A.l participants are required to le in position no later thani
4-:30p.m.
* Inunediately following the parade, participants must have a
representative at the judging stand for award presentations.
* Registration deadline is Friday, November 18th.
* In the event of severe weather, the parade will be rescheduled
for Saturday, Decermber 10th.


Please print. Only completed forms will be accepted. Check all that apply.


0 Vehicles


o Marching I 'nlt


o Other


Entry Type: a Float
Category: a Conmmn'ercial
Accompanied by Music?'


Accurate and clear description of entry (To be read by the emcees).


------- ------- ---- -- ----- --------- -----

Business or Organization:_--------_-------_ ---- ----- ------___________
Contact Person:____ ____ __ ___ Phone Number:_____


A 4,-l .-..


r


:ity & Zi)p


.1l clliy filornms and registration lif.es nlust lbe received ly Friday, November 18th to:
P.O. Box (7)8
Wauchula. Florida 33873:
Fa;L: 863-77.3-191V.
inllail: (alse' 'lh a o n


9:29-11:11c


Sports Schedule Oct. 20-Nov. 3
Oct.20__ HJHS Softball .... Lake Placid HOME 4:30 p.m.
JVN Volleyball Sebring Away 6/7:30 p.m.
JV Football Jesuit HOME 6 p.m.
Oct. 21 V. Football Palmetto Away 7:30 p.m.
Oct. 24 HJHS Softball Sebring Away 4:30 p.m.

Oct. 25 HJHS Football Hill-Gustat HOME 5:30 p.m.
Oct. 25-26 Swimming Districts Away TBA
Oct. 25-27 Volleyball Districts HOME TBA
Oct. 28 V. Football Southeast HOME 7 p.m.
Nov. 1 HJHS Football DeSoto HOME 5:30 p.m.


r Hardee Cout

Annual
Sat


I A*M*.


o Non Commercial
cS No If yes, please specify:


HWY 17 South Across from Nicholas Restaurant


I tKE T1iACH


~------ -----------------------


B sinress: O-








2C The Herald-Advocate, October 20, 2011





Schedule of Weekly Services-


Printed as a Public Service
by .
SThe gerald-Advocate
Wauchul., Florida

Deadline: Thursday 5 p.m.


BOWLING GREEN
APOSTOLIC LIGHTHOUSE
UNITED PENTACOSTAL,
CHURCH
310 Orange St.
375-3100
Sunday Morning .................10:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening ..................6:00 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting ........7:00 p.m.
Thursday Service ..................7:30 p.m.

CHESTER GROVE MB CHURCH
708 W. Grape St. 375-3353
Sunday School ..................... :30 a.m.
Sunday Worship ....................8:00 a.m.
Sun. Eve. Worship
Ist & 3rd ..............4:0() p.m. 3:00 p.m.
Tues. Prayer/Bible Study ......6:00 p.m.

CHRISTIAN BIBLE
FELLOWSHIP
Hwy. 17 South
Morning Worship ...............0:30 a.m.
Youth Group Sunday ..........6:00 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
121 West Broward St. 375-2231
375-3100
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................. 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday .......................... 7:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
TRUE HOLINESS OUTREACH
725 Palmetto St.
375-3304
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Tues. Night Bible Study ..... 7:30 p.m.
Evening Worship
Ist Sunday ...................... 5:00 p.m.

COMMUNITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Main & W. Centra.
Sunday AM Worship............10:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening ....................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer Meeting ............7:00 p.m.

FAITH ASSEMBLY OF GOD
4937 Hwy. 17 N. 375-4206
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... : a.m.
Disciples Train & Choirs ......5:30 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Bowling Green
S. Hwy. 17. 375-2253
SUNDAY: '
Bible Study ...........:................ :30 a.m.
Morning Worship ..........1.....10:45 a.m.
Evening Worship .................6:30 p.m.

WEDNESDAY:
Discipleship Training
Youth & Adult .................:30 p.m.
AWANA (ages 3-5th grade) ....6:30 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Grape & Church Streets 375-2340
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................I 1:00 a.m.
Youth Fellowship ..................5:00 p.)m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ................7:00 p.m.

FORT GREEN BAPTIST
CHURCH
Baptist Church Road 773-9013
Bible Connection ..................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ :00 a.m.
Sunday Evening ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ..............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

HOLY CHILD )
SPANISH CATHOLIC MISSION
Misa (Espanql) Sunday ........7:00 p.m.

IGLESIA I)EL.)IOS VIVO
105 Dixiana St. 375-4191
Domingo De Predicacion ....11:00 p.m.
Martes Estudio Biblico ..........7:00 p.m.
Miercoles Esludior Juvenil ....7:00 pl.m.
Jueves De Predicacion ..........7:00 p.m.

IMMANUEL BAI'IST CHURCH
210 E. Broward St. 375-4681
Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6:00 p.n.
Wednesday Prayer ...............7:0)0 p.m

MACEDONIA PRIMITIVE
BAPTIST CHURCH
607 Palmetto St.
Church School ...................9:30( a.m.
Morning Sen ice ................ 1:00 a.m.
Evening Service .................7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study/Pra;er ......7:00 p.m.
Comlnunion-2nd Sun. E\c. ..6:00 p.mn

MT. PISGAH BAPTIST CHURCH
6210 Mt. Pisgah Rd. 375-4409
Sunday; School ......................9:45 a.nil.
Morning Worslp ................... 1:00 a.m.
Disciples Training................... 5:00 p.m.
Evening W worship ................. 7:00 p nl.l
Wednesday Prayer Time ........7:00 p.m.
NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
fMason Dixon & County Line Rd.
*781-5887
Suiindiy Worslhip ...........1....... 1:00 a.m.
2nd Sunday Comimunlion ....I I1:(( a.m.
5th Sunday Feast ......... 1:00 a.m.
Bread of Lile Sunday........12:15 p.m.
T.H.E. Meting -Tuestlday ....7:00) p.m.


BOWLING GREEN
OPEN DOOR FULL GOSPEL
PRAISE CENTER
E. Broward St.
Sunday School .................. 1(:00 a m.
Sunday Ser\ ice ........... .....6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service ................7:30 p.m.

PRIMERA MISSION BAUTISTA
Murray Road off Hwy. 17
375-2295
Domingos Escuela Dom. ......9:45 a.m.
Servicio de Adoracion.......... 11:00 a.m.
Ser icio de Predicacion ........5:00 p.m.
Miercoles Servico..................6:30 p.m.

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 South US Hwy 17
Morning Service .................. 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.

ST. JOHN A.M.E. CHURCH
513 W. Orange St.
375-2911
Sunday Church School ..........9:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship....11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

VICTORY PRAISE CENTER
128 E. Main St.
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Thursday Night Services,
Evening Worship...................7:00 p.m.
Kidz Club............................... 7:00 p.m .

ONA

LIMESTONE BAPTIST CHURCH
4868 Keystone Ave. Limestone
Comm.
Sunday School ...................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship .............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer .............7:00 p.m.

,NEW ELIM
INDEPENDENT BAPTIST
Badger Loop Lane 773-4475
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Worship Service .................. 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Night Worship ..........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time........7:00 p.m.

NEW ZION BAPTIST CHURCH
202 Sidney Roberts Road
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............:.11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training..................6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................6:00 p.m.

ONA BAPTIST CHURCH
131 Bear Lane 773-2540
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

UNION BAPTIST CHURCH
5076 Lily Church Rd. 494-5622
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday
AWANA for Kids ..............6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time.........7:00 p.m.


WAUCHULA

APOSTOLIC ASSEMBLY
Martin Luther King and Apostolic Rd.
Sunday School .................10:00 a.m.
English Service ................ 1:30 a.m.
General Worship Service ......1:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer ......................7:00 p.m .
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

CELEBRATION CHURCH
322 Hanchey Rd.
863-781-1624
hardee.celebration.org
Sunday Morning Service ....11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Youth Service ....5:30( p.m.
Childcare provided at all services

CELEBRATION FELLOWSHIP
773-0427
Celebration Service ...............10:30 a.m.
el;('htesay'./v Eveninig Cell Groutqs
Adult Cell Group .................7:00 p.m.
Youth Cell Group .................7:00 p.m.
Children's Cell Group ..........7:00 p.m.
Call /or locations

CHARLIE CREEK
BAPTIST CHURCH
6885 State Road 64 East 773-3447
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ I:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............6:30 p.m.
CHURCH OF CHRISTI
201 S. Florida Ave. & Orange St.
773-9678
Bible Study ............................9:30 a.m .
Worship Service ...............10:30 a.m.
W wednesday ......................... 7:30 p.m .

CHURCH OF CHRIST
Will Duke Road
773-2249
Sunday Morning Worship......9:30 a.m.
Sunday Bible Class.............. 11:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening Worship ......6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Bible Class ........7:00 p.m.
A/len \ L ,adihr.'hip & Training Clau.u. -
2nd Sunda.u of Month ........4:00 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
lMartin Luther King Blvd.
767-0199

CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST
OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS
630 Hanchey Rd. 773-3532
Sacrament Meeti ................9:0 a.m.
Sunday School .... ............... 10:00 a.m.


Priesthood 1 ........................ :00 a.m.


WAUCHULA

COMMUNITY BAPTIST
CHURCH OF WAUCHULA HILLS
(SPANISH)
615 Rainey Blvd.
257-3950
Sunday Bible Study ............10:00 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship....l1:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
DIOS ES AMOR
807 S. 8th Ave.
773-4576
Domingos Escuela
Dominica .........................10:00 a.m.
Servicio .............................. 11:00 a.m .
Lunes Oracion ...................... 6:00 p.m.
Miercoles Servicio ................7:00 p.m.
EL REMANENTE
IGLECIA CRISTIANA
318 W. Main St..
Martes Oracion ......................7:00 p.m.
Jueves Servicio ...................... 7:30 p.m.
Viernes Servicio ....................7:30 p.m.
Domingo Servicio................10:30 a.m.
ENDTIME CROSSROAD
MINISTRY
501 N. 9th & Georgia St. 773-3470
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Service ..................11:30 a.m.
Evening Service....................7:30 p.m.
Wed. Bible St. & Yth. Gath ..7:30 p.m.
Friday (Holy Ghost Night)....7:30 p.m.

FAITH PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
114 N. 7th Ave. 773-2105
Sunday Schcol .................... 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ...... ........ 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship ....................6:00 p.ri.
Wednesday Supper ................6:15 p.m.
Wed. Youth Fellowship..........6:50 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

FAITH TEMPLE CHURCH
OF GOD
701 N. 7th Ave 773-3800
Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship ..................10:20 a.m.
Children's Chuch ................10:40 a.m.
Evening Service ...................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
1570 W. Main St. 773-4182
SUNDAY:
Bible Study for all ages ........9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.

WEDNESDAY:
Sr. Adult Bible Study ..........10:00 a.m.
Children's Chiors
(PK-Grade 4) .................... 5:30 p.m.
PRAISE 57-Jr High Chior .. 5:30 p.m.
Mid-Week Prayer Meeting .. 6:00 p.m.
Kids On Missions
(PK-Grade 4) .................... 6:00 p.m.
Club 56 ................................ 6:00 p.m .
Youth Group (Grades 7-12) 6:00 p.m.
Family Life Ministry
& Discipleship .................. 6:00 p.m.
Church Orchestra.................. 6:00 p.m.
Adult Choir ....................... 7:00 p.m.

FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH
1121 W. Louisiana St. 773-9243
SUNDAY:
Generations Cafe Opens........9:30 a.m.
Kids World Check-In for
Nursery-5th Grade Begins..10:15 a.m.
Pre-K Blast ......................... 0:45 a.m.
Kids World B.L.A.S.T.
(K-5th) ......................... 10:45 a.m.
Worship Service ............... 10:45 a.m.
WEDNESDAY:
Check-In begins for
Nursery-thgrade ...............6:15 p.m.
Classes for children ages
PreK-12th grade ............6:30-8:00 p.m.
FIRST CHURCH OF
THE NAZARENE
511 W. Palmetto St.
Sunday School ................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Service ................. 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.
FIRST MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
1347 Martin Luther King Ave.
,773-6556
Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m.
Morning Service ................. 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Tues. Youth Ministry Meeting/
Bible Study ........................ 6:00 p.m.
Wed. Prayer/Bible Study ......7:00 p.m.
FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
207 N. Seventh Ave. 773-4267
Sunday School ...................9:45 a.m.
Traditional Sunday Worship 11:00 a.m.
Casual Sunday Worship..........6:00 p.m
Tuesday Bible Study............10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Activities ............6:00 p.m.
FLORIDA'S FIRST ASSEMBLY
OF GOD CHURCH
1397 South Florida Avenue
773-9386.
Sunday School ......................9:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............10:00 a.m.
Wed. Family Night ................7:00 p.m.
Adult. Children & Radiate Youth Church
FLORIDA GOSPEL
511 V. Palmetto
223-5126
Sunday Morning Worship....l 1:00 "a.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............7:30 p.m.
THE GOSPEL TABERNACLE
810 W. Tennessee St. 863-735-1158
Morning Service ..................10:00 a.m..
Wednesday Ser ice................7:00 p.m..


HEARTLAND
COMMUNITY CHURCH
1262 W. Main St. 767-6500
College & Donuts ,.................... 9:00 a.m.


Sunday\ School ...................9:30 a.m.
W orshlp ....... ..............1.... 1(0:30 a.m .
Wed. Night Dinner ................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bod\bulldders Adult CI.
Crossroads &
Llghlllousc M in. ..............7:00 p.m.

HIGHER GROUND)
INTERNATIONAL MINISTRY
1258 W\. MAIN STREET
\VAUCHULA, Fl.
Suiinl, Mornliii \Woirship| .. l :00 a.nl.
Wed. Nightl lihlc Slud\ ....... 6:30) p.m.


WAUCHULA

IGLESIA HISPANA
FUENTE DE \IDA
501 N. 9'" Ave.
M artes ..................................7: 30 p.m .
Jue\es ....... .......... .................7:30 p.m .
Dom ingo .................... ........10:30 p.m .

IGLESIA HISPANA
PRESENCIA de Dios
511 W. Palmetto St.
Domingos ............................ 6:00 p.m.
M iercoles............... ........ 7:00 p.m.

IGLESIA ADVENTISTA DEL
SEPTIMO DIA
Old Bradenton Road
767-1010

JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
ENGLISH
155 Altman Road 1131
Sunday Service ...................... 2:00 p.m.

JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
SPANISH
Sunday Service .................... 10:00 a.m.

LIGHT OF THE WORLD
MINISTRIES
Womans Center 131 N. 7th Ave.
Wauchula, FL
Friday Evening ....................6:00 p.m.

LAKE DALE BAPTIST CHURCH
3102 Heard Bridge Road
773-6622
Sunday School ....................9:45 a.m.
Morning Service .................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

MINISTERIO INTERNACIOlAL
Cambriadores de Mundo
704 W. Main St. 773-0065
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.

NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH
1999 State Road 64 East
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship Service....l 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship Service......6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Night Supper ......6:00 p.rm.
Wednesday Activities
(All Ages) .......................... 7:00 p.m .
NEW LIFE CHURCH
117 W. Palmetto St.
773-2929
Sunday Service .................... 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
Children Ministries for all services

NEW MT. ZION A.M.E. CHURCH
10 Martin Luther King Ave.
767-0023
Morn. Worship
(1st & 3r Sun.) ..................8:00 a.m.
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............I1:00 a.m.
2nd Sunday Youth Service ....4:00 p.m.
Allen Christian Endeavor......4:00 p.m.
Wed. & Fri. Bible Study........7:00 p.m.

NORTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
912 N. 8th Ave. 773-6947
Sunday School ...................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ..............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

OAK GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
4350 W. Main St. 735-0321
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

PEACE VALLEY LUTHERAN
CHURCH
1643 Stenstrom Road 773-2858
I" & 3" Sun.
Communion .................... 10:00 a.m.
2" & 4'" Sun.
Divine Worship ................10:00 a.m.
Bible Study ........................ 1:15 a.m .
** Fellowship each Sundayafter service

PROGRESSIVE MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
149 Manley Road East Main
773-5814
Sunday School ...................... 9:30 a.m.
W orship Service ................11:00 a.m.
Wed. Evening Prayer ............7:00 p.m.

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 North US Hwy 17
Morning Service ................ 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.

RIVERVIEW HEIGHTS
MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1321 S.R. 636 East 773-3344
Radio Program
WZZS Sundays..................9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .................. :00 a.m.
Evening Worship .. ............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

SOUL HARVEST MINISTRY
1337 Hwy. 17 South, Wauchula
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .............11:00 a.m.
.Evening Service ...................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Ser\vice ...............7:00 p.m.

ST. ANN'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
204 N. 9th Ave. 773-6418
Sunday ..................................9:00 a.m .
Holy Days .............................. ....

ST. MICHAEL
CATHOLIC CHURCH
408 Heard Bridge Road 773.4089
Saturday Mass (English) ......5:00 p.m.
(Spanish) ......7:00 p.m.


Sunday(English) ................ .8:30 a.m.
(Span ish) .................. 1 :00 a.m .
(Creole) .................... 1:00) p.m
Catecismo ........................ 9:45 a.m.
Daily Mass in English ..........8:3() a m.
SEVENTH DAY
ADVENTIST CHURCH
205 S. llth Ave. 773-9927
Sabbath School ...... ............. 9:30 a.m.
M morning Worship ................1 1:)00 a.m.
Tucs. Prayer Meeting ...........7:00 p.m.


WAUCHULA

SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
505 S. 10th A\e. 773-4368
Sunday\ School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship .................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..............6:00 p m.
Wednesday Prayer ............ 7:00 p.m

SPIRIT WIND TABERNACLE
1652 Old Bradenton Road
Sunday Worship. ...............10:00 a m
Wednesday Worship ..............7:30 p.m.

TABERNACLE OF
PRAISE & JOY
1507 MLK Avenue
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 1:30 a.m.
Evening Worship .................7:00 p.m.
Tues. Bible Sidy.
& Child Train .................... 7:00 p.m.
Friday Prayer Service ............7:00 p.m.
WAUCHULA CHURCH OF GOD
1543 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.
773-0199
Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:15 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Fam. Training ....7:30 p.m.
Thurs. Youth Bible Study ......7:00 p.m.
Friday Night Worship............7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA HILLS HARVEST
TEMPLE ASSEMBLY OF GOD
210 Anderson
Sunday School .........:.......... 10:00 a.m.
Church .............................. 10:00 a.m .
Youth Service ........................6:00 p.m.
Evening Service ....................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service.l.,.. .....7:30 p.m.

S WAUCHULA HILLS
SPANISH CHURCH OF GOD
1000 Stansfield Rd.
Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer.................. 7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship..................7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ..................7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA REVIVAL CENTER
(Full Gospel)
501 N. 9th Ave.
Sunday School ..:...............10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ............... 11:00 a.m.
Youth & Child. Church..........6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship .................7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ................7:00 p.m.
,Men's Fri: Prayer ..................7:00 p.m.


ZOLFO SPRINGS

COMMUN'IY WESLEYAN CHURCH
Gardner
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

COWBOY-UP MINISTRY
Cracker Trail Arena
Hwy 66
(across from Oak Hills Ranch Rd.)
781-2281
Sunday .............................. 10:00 a.m .
CREWSVILLE BETHEL
BAPTIST CHURCH
8251 Crewsville Road
Church 735-0871 Pastor 773-6657
Sunday School....................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ...............6:30 p.m.
EVANGELISTIC HOLINESS
CHURCH INC.
Corner of 6th and Hickory
Sunday School ..................10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday ............................ 7:30 p.m.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
OF ZOLFO
320 E. 4th St. 735-1200
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Training Union ......................5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.
FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Corner of 6th & Suwanee 735-0114
Bible Study .......................... 10:00 a.m.
Worship Service .................. 11:00 a.m.
GARDNER BAPTIST CHURCH
South Hwy. 17 494-5456 *
Sunday School .................... 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship .............. 11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.
LIFE CHANGING WORSHIPCENTER
3426 Oak St. 863-832-9808
Sunday Worship ....................2:30 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.


ZOLFO SPRINGS

MARANATHA BAPTIST CHURCH
2465 Oxendine Rd
(863) 832-9292
Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
W worship .......... .................... 1:00 a.m .
E\ening ............................... 1:00 pi.m .
Wed. Bible & Pralr Meet....7:00 p.m.
NEW VISION WORSHIP CENTER
64 E. & School House Road
Church 735-8585 Childcare 735-
8586
Morning Worship .............10:00 a.m.
Children's Church ............... 10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wed. Youth & F.T.H. ...........7:00 p.m.

PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF
GOD FAITH TEMPLE
Oak Street
Sunday Worship .................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Tuesday Worship ..................7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship..................7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ..................7:30 p.m.

PRIMER MISSION
BAUTISTA HISPANA
518 8th Ave. E.
Escuela Dominical ..............10:00 a.m.
Servicio del Domingo..........l 1:00 a.m.
........................................ 7:00 p.m .
Servicio del Miercoles ..........7:30 p.m.
PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH
Pioneer Park
2nd Sunday .......................... 10:30 a.m.
Evening Service ....................6:30 p.m.
5th Sunday ............................ 6:00 p.m.

REALITY RANCH
COWBOY CHURCH
2-1/2 Miles east of
Zolfo Springs on Hwy. 66
863-781-1578
Sunday Service ...................11:00 a.m.

ST. PAUL'S MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
3676 US. Hwy. 17 South 735-0636
Sunday School ................9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship .....................11 a.m.
Wed. Prayer Service ..............7:00 p.m.

SAN ALFONSO MISSION
3027 Schoolhouse Lane
Domingo, Misa en Espanol ..9:30 a.m.
Catecismo ........................... 1:00 a.m .

SPANISH MISSION
735-8025
Escuela Dominica . .........10:00 a.m.
Servicio .............................11:00 a.m .
Pioneer Club .......................... 6:30 p.m .
Servicio de la Noche ............7:00 p.m.
Mierecoles Merienda ...........,6:00 p.m.
Servicio...............................8:00 p.m .
Sabado Liga de Jovenes ........5:00 p.m.





S SEEDS
FROM
THE
SOWER'

MichaelA.Guido
Meuer,Gmrlh


A Hindu mother walked down a
dusty road with two sons, a
healthy one and a. sickly one.
About an hour later she returned
from the Ganges River with only
one son.
"Where's your other child?"
asked the missionary.
"I sacrificed him in the Ganges,"
she answered.
"If you had to sacrifice a son,
why didn't you sacrifice your sickly
child?" he asked.
She answered, "We give our
gods our best."
Why don't you give God the best
of your time, the best of your
talents, and the best of your
treasure? "
God gave His best for you when
He gave His Son.
Shouldn't you give Him your
best?



A society grows great where
old men plant trees whose
shade they know they shal
never sit in.
-Greek Provert


owe s have
been built

by mankind since
the dawning of
time. Taller than
they are wide, they
reach up into the
sky and provide a
place of l(x)kout
and defense, a place
to send signals, or a
place to showcase
architectural beauty
and function.
Cathedral towers
were built to glnorify
God...to point us
- to the heavens and
to thoughts of God
and His lovc for us. In Psalm 122:7, David said...
"Peace be within your walls and security within
your towers." Find God's peace and security at your
house of worship this week.


Weekly Scripture Reading
Job Job Job Job Amos Jonah
39.1-40.2 40.3-24 41.1-34 42.1-17 5.1-27 3.1-10


Jonah
4.1-11


Scrytues Seletwd by Thae nemn BWe Sociea
C201'.KSwisu r-Wnams Nowsiaper Sorws. PO Box 8187. Chatrottesvneo.VA2906. wwwkwnfws.cotn


%Peace cioer Grdwers

Wholesale Nursery

Donnis & Kathy Barber
Hwy. 66 East (863) 735-0470
PO. Box 780 Zolfo Springs, FL








October 20, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 3C


Stump The Swami
By John Szeligo
Well. Football fans. it was not a good weekend for many
Florida football fans as the Gators. Bulls and Knights all went
down to defeat. Only the Seminoles and Canes were victorious this
week and that was against Duke and North Carolina. Things may
not get better for the Gators. who htwea week off to prepare for
Georgia. unless Brantley comes back strong. The-SeinS Tteseturn
home toface Maryland which gave Clemson a scare this weekend.'
USF will host the Cincinnati Bearcats who will bring a 5-1 record
to Raymond James.
Nov. 5th is a day to circle on the calendar. LSU will invade
Alabama in the most anticipated game of 2011. Both should be
unbeaten and ranked in the two top spots in the nation. Stubhub has
the cheapest tickets going for S374 each. Those are high up in the
end zone. Sports bars will have a bonanza that day as well. The


winner could emerge as the National Champion in 2011.
October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month. You have proba-
bly noticed football teams wearing pink gloves or arm bands to
show support. There was no better display of support and love for
a mother shown anywhere this week than at Marshall University.
Vinny Curry. the Thundering Herds All-American defensive line-
man. lost his mother to cancer this past week prior to the
Homecoming Game against Rice. He could have passed on the
game. He could have stayed home in New Jersey to mourn with
family members. He decided to return to campus and play the game
to honor his mother instead. He asked Marshall Fans to wear pink
and they responded. Cutryalstrresponded -with 9 tackles. 3.5 sacks,
4 tackles for a loss. recovered a fumble and then with-3:35 left in
the game and his team trailing, he forced a fumble that led to the
winning touchdown. The victory put Marshall back on top in the
CUSA East standings. The emotional game also saw the return of
the 1971 "Young Thundering Herd." the team that defeated Xavier
in their home opener after the plane crash Nov. 14. 1970. Curry was
also moved emotionally meeting those players portrayed in the


STUDENT COUNCIL


COURTESY PHOTO
Newly elected members of the Student Council at Zolfo Springs Elementary School are (front row, from left) Justin
Cole, Cameron Cantu, Palmer Klein, Daniel Contreras and Jeremy Myers; (middle row) Angela Ramirez, Dylan
Bozeman, Myrka DeLaTorre, Dawson Patterson and Anthony Chavez; (back) Vice President Kyle Gilliard, Secretary
Darby Sanders, Armando Gomez, Isabelle Ramos, Javler Garcia, Anavelia Rodriguez and President Michaela Klein.
Missing from this photo are Jacob Brandeberry and Analisa Camel. The Student Council is led by Chairman Kay
Crews (in center at back), Laura Wells, Darlene Harned and Sue Boyette.


movie classic. "We are Marshall." Curry is ranked second in the
nation in sacks with 9.5 at this point in the season. Case Keenum
Swill be looking over his shoulder this week.
Stanford and its Heisman Hopeful QB Andrew Luck have a
date with destiny Nov. 12th when the Stanford Cardinal hosts the
Oregon Ducks.
The Big 12 Conference has Oklahoma, Oklahoma St. and
Kansas St. all sitting on 6-0 records with all holding 3-0 conference
records as well. There will be a few more good showdownscom-
ing up as well in the Big 12.
Georgia Southern is undefeated and ranked number one in the
nation in the football subdivision or the old Division I-AA. The
Eagles defeated Furman 50-20 this past weekend. The last GSU
touchdown was a 36-yard run by former Hardee Wildcat Ezayi
Youyoute. He had 65 yards on 3 carries in the game. For the sea-
son. Ezayi has 261 yards on 17 carries with 3 touchdowns.
Now let's look at this week's Bill O' Fare. ..
1. Marshall at Houston Thundering Herd invades the Lone
Star State to take on Case Keenum and the 20th ranked Cougars.
My heart says upset but my head says different. Houston 35
Marshall 23.
2. West Virginia at Syracuse The Orangemen have played
in 3 overtime games in 2011. Don't look for any overtime in this
one. West Virginia 48 Syracuse 13.
3. Cincinnati at USF Zack Collaros and his partners will
put up numbers in this one. BJ Daniels will not be able to answer
every score. Cincinnati 34 USF 17.
4. Maryland at FSU Terps may have found their QB. Brown
may have taken over for O'Brien in that scare of Clemson. Terps
did blow a 17-point lead. FSU 43 Maryland 37.
5. Tennessee at Alabama LSU and Alabama back-to-back
just like Florida. Same result too. Time for ribs at Dreamland after
the game. Alabama 51 Tennessee 13.
6. Army at Vanderbilt The spirit is back at Vandy but the
wins have not been for 3 weeks. This time the Commodores go to
4-3. Vanderbilt 34 Army 16.
7. Georgia Tech at Miami Ramblin Wreck is mad after loss
to UVA. Georgia Tech 38 Miami 27.
8. Southern Cal at Notre Dame Irish are back! Just ask Lou
Holtz. They lost to USF and beat Pitt by 3 points. Southern Cal 45
Notre Dame 14.
9. Arkansas at Ole Miss Whoooooooo Pig. These Hogs are
so close to reaching the next tier. Look for them to go to 6-1.
Arkansas 37 Ole Miss 10.
10. Auburn at LSU Auburn runs into 2011 reality. LSU 48
Auburn 7.
11. Bethune-Cookman at Norfolk St. Norfolk State has lost
only to West Virginia and sports a 6-1 record. The Wildcats are 3-
3 and would feel better playing at home. NSU 34 BCC 17.
12. Oklahoma St.'at Missouri No let down after beating the
Longhorns. Okie St. 51 Missouri 21.
13. Rutgers at Louisville Louisville can't score offensive
points. Maybe the defense will turn it up for the offense? Rutgers
is a deceiving 5-1. Louisville 20 Rutgers 17.
14. Kansas St. at Kansas Great basketball game but not
football. KSU.41 Kansas 21.
15. UCF at UAB Knights have not set the world on fire but
the Blazers are 0-6. UCF 27 UAB 13.
16. Jacksonville St at Kentucky It is good thing basketball
has begun in the Blue Grass State. There will be no joy in Mudville
after this game. JSU 27 UK 21.
17. North Carolina at Clemson Dabo's boys will be hard to
beat as they can see the Orange Bowl BCS Bowl at the end of the
tunnel. Clemson 35 UNC 13.
18. Chicago at Tampa Bucs will have to play in London!
Bucs 27 Bears 24.
19. Denver at Miami Tebow Time! Broncos 33 Miami 17.
20. Baltimore at Jacksonville Monday Night Football! Jags
say Nevermore. Ravens 34 Jags 13.


S ' .


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CO9r -v T t l .:; AFTER THE GAME


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Hardee Senior High Athletics

GooIf I rfscf And Go Wildcats!
S200'4 C.ouny RM 663*BowO.nO... .n. l 7 I. *--UbK-0 m n


,.'-2-f"f '


SENIOR SPO


Murrell Wii

Jersey

Position
End, R

F'. Years
2 Vars
2 Juni(

Age: 1


I'. ~~;


Aug. 26 Lake Placid
Sept. 2 Fort Meade
Sept. 9 Avon Park
Sept. 16 Sebring
Sept. 23 Bradenton
Bayshore *
Sept. 30 Mulberry
Oct. 7 Open


Oct. 14
Oct. 21


Frostproof #
Palmetto *


Oct. 28 Bradenton S.E.*
Nov. 4 DeSoto **
Nov. 11 Fort Pierce
Central

* District Games # Homecoming


Away
Home
Away
Away


Away
Home


Home 7:00
Away 7:30
Home 7:00
Home 7:00


Away


7:00


**Senior Night


tER VI


FOR ALL HOME C1


WILDCAT R(
NAME
Dalton Rabon
Aaron Barker
Keshun Rivers
Jesus Flores
Deonte Evans
Mikey Retana
Ramiro Briones
Keyonte Holley
Keyon Brown
Kris Johnson
Jaluan Hooks
Colby Baker
Justin Knight
Andrew Hooks
James Greene
Maxon DelHomme
Michael Moreno
Murrell Winter
Octavio Alvarez
Ledarius Sampson
Carter Lambert
Jacquille Dewberry
Alonso Casso
Keyonte Holley
Caleb Brandeberry
Adam Khang
Waylon Pleger
Joseph McQuaig
Dawson Crawford
Dillon Skitka
Wintz Terrell
Adson DelHomme
Victor Lopez
Dylan Farr
Luke Palmer
Ramiro Ramirez
Rufino Gabriel
Uvaldo Sanchez
Jesus Zuniga
Julian Varela
Rito Lopez


)STER 2011
GR POS
12 WR/LB
11 TB/DB
12 WR/DB
10 FB/LB
12 WR/DB
12 WR/LB
12 WR/DB
9 WR/DB
10 FB/DE
10 QB/DB
12 WR/DB
12 QB/DB
12 WR/DB
12 TB/DB
10 FB/DE
12 FB/DT
11 WR/DB
12 WR/DE
11 WR/LB
11 TB/LB
12 TE/DE
11 WR/DB
10 FB/DT
9 FB/LB
11 TE/DE
11 WR/DB
10 FB/LB
11 OL/DT
12 OL/DE
12 OL/DT
12 OL/DT
10 OL/DT
11 OL/DT
12 OLDE
10 OUDT
11 OL/DT
11 OL/DE
12 OLDT
11 OL/DT
12 OL/DT
12 OL/DT


* J~ ,V',
L. .3.


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_.; 1y .'Js lL arl Pcs' ,'-
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110 N 61h Avenue Wauchula. Florida 33873
magtree1014@gmail corn


ROBBY & SHERRY ABRITTON
LABOR SERVICES


159 State Road 64 East Zolfo Springs

OnTice 735-9226 Cell 863-528-7085


TLIGHT


nter

#: 18


In: Defensive
Receiver

In Football:
sity, 2 JV &
or High

7


Parents: Park and Lyn Winter


Hobbiesllnterests: Football, baseball,
fishing and hunting.

Future Plans: Play baseball in college,
major in business/math, live life.


i


-.., RW ma1 .-..


As "


REgl ~PIN a4
Th 1 ('.


L

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liping Yoi A
Winnirn Wideaf


PHOSCHEM "t


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The World's Most Amazing Ice Cream

1040 S. 6th Ave., Wauchula
Located right next to Domino's Pizza.


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S.-. 71:00 PBM.


Palmetto "Tigers"
1 Jamal Kearney LB 6-2
2 Daqual Randall RB Sr 6-0
3 Cory Crawford WR Jr 5-10
4' De'Quan Reddick DB Sr. 5-10
5 Patrick Green WR Jr 6-0
6 Robert Jackson DB Sr 6-0
7 Dallas Jackson DB Sr 5-10
8 Broddrick Waters DB So. 5-8
9 Josh Hicks DB So 6-0
0 TJ Mann WR Sr. 5-10
1 E J Burston WR Jr. 6-2
2 Trenton Miller QB Sr. 6-1
4 Shaquille Harris WR Jr 6-2
5 Ra'Shad McDonald DB Jr 5-9
'0 JT Saxon QB Sr 5-9
'1 Josh Punter DB Jr 5-6
!2- Tyler Williford DL Jr. 6-1
!3 Leon Gilbert RB Jr 5-7
!4 Terrell Baity DB Sr. 5-6
!5 Luis Quinones DB So 5-10
!7 Emanuel James DB Jr 5-6
!8 Micheal Knevel OB Jr 6-5
!9 DeQwon Washington DB So. 5-10
10 Calvin Bell TE Sr 6-4
11 Austin Cavey LB Jr 6-0
;2 Rickeem Cheaves DL Sr. 5-10
.3 Daniel Hauser LB Jr. 5-11
4 James Johnson LB Sr 5-11
16 Tyronne Johnson DL Sr. 6-4
0 Jarrod Gilbert FB Sr 5-8
1 Zane Kitchell K Sr 6-0
2. Joshua Layhew DL Jr. 5-11
3 Brandon Shnver K Sr. 5-10
4 Kevin Healy TE Sr 6-1
;O Nick Hernandez OL Jr. 5-11
,1 Porter Palmer DL Sr 6-0
;2 Fitz Richards OL Sr 6-3
;3 Ben Morris OL Sr. 5-8
;8 Joseph Bundrage OL Jr 6-3
;0 Izlah Sanders DL Sr 6-3
;2 Jake Hines OL So 5-9
i5 Lougans Charles DL Sr 6-1
B.Dante Logan OL So. 6-0
.1 ,Kevin O'Brien DL Sr. 6-5
'3 Jaime Felippe OL So. 6-2
4 Nayland Wood OL Jr. 6-2
7 David Knevel OL Jr. 6-8
10 Clarence Mays WR Sr 6-1
i4 Aerius While WR Sr. 6-2
iO Kelvin Stuckey DL Jr. 6-3
19 Donte Ward DL Jr. 5-10


200
230
180
185
160
175
175
160
170
155
170
205
185
150
160
135
160
195
130
139
130
210
150
190
185
225
195
190
200
170
190
195
160
175
205
235
300
220
300
300
180
215
253
298
240
245
280
180
184
255
240


SENIOR SPOTLIGHT


Cierra Martinez


SAge: 17

Parents:
Herrera


Manr


Hobbies/Interests:
Cheer. run in my
spare time, hangout
ith lfamil a.ind
friends, shop and
spend lots of time at the beach and lake.
Playing volleyball

Future Plans: Graduate with honors
from Hardee Senior High and attend
USF to major in Physical Therapy.







2I III IIIU I UThe S I
iBH BH HI -N ame --,;B" I : Ue I B IB


lust name the score of Fridau night',, Wildcat Football game and
\ou could \ in
District Games-
2 Buc Tickets
I All Other Games $40 Gift Certiicate Payable to
one of our selected "Wildcat" page sponsors

* Coniesl is closed to 1) .Herald- d ocaie emploices and ifamilic-
* In he e'eni l l lie (lh. 'finncr 'A il he rpi.: ed b\ a randn om dr.., ing
* ii no one pick. the ecact'oir. the close.'t ore'win's
* Official enrnes onli
*: ; :* : :r ~~LL L B[L AC'CEPTED!
Winners will be picked Monday morning, notified bv phone thai
afternoon and announced in ne.i week s paper.
Oc........1 ...H
Art 91 H1rr
nOt 21 Hllarrlde e


Palmetto


Name:


Address:


Day Phone: s
DEADLINE FOR ENTRY: FRIDAY AT 5 PM.
Fill out entry form and return it to: The Herald-Advocate
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colmmunityll since 1 929.

4 So Wildcats!
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`SSOCIAT6 Julia King, OJD.
Board Certified Physicians
735 N. 6th Ave.77 "'O
Wauchula, FL i 03 2f


JIM SEE R EAiYcC
REALrorBfai-* -T!
JAMES V. SEE, JR. .
President i
Phone: (863) 773-0060. **
E-Mail: jim@jimseerealty.com





Mosaic




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ANIMAL ^

HOSPITALS

Dr. Slade Hayman D.V.M.
Former Wildcat
773-9273 330 Hanchey Rd


Head Coach:
Buddy Martin
Offensive Coordinator: Dale Carlton
Defensive Coordinator: Steve Rewis
Assistant Coaches: Ray Rivas,
Rashad Faison,
Shawn Rivers Travis Tubbs


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6C The Herald-Advocate, October 20. 2011


COUNTY COURT
The following marriage
licenses were issued recently
in the office of the county
court:
Martin Matias Ordunez, 31,
Arcatia. and Delores Dom-
inguez. 30, Arcadia.
Daniel Bryan Barnett, 31, of
Wauchula, and Kathryn Mi-
chelle Pace, 24, Baytown.
Texas.

The following small claims
cases were disposed of recent-
ly by the county judge:
Camilo Morillo vs. Jose A.
Lazo, judgment for tenant evic-
tion.
Grow Financial Federal
Credit Union vs. Juan Zavala,
judgment.
Ford Motor Credit Co. vs.
Terry 'Wayne Harrison, judg-
ment.

The following misde-
meanor cases were disposed
of recently in county court:
James Edman Carroll, resist-
ing an officer without violent
force, giving false identification
to an officer and violation of
probation (original charge tres-
pass/larceny with relation of
utility), probation modified,
$325 fine and court costs, $50
cost of prosecution (COP) and
$50 investigative costs, $50
public defender fee, $50 COP
and 30 hours community ser-
vice added to probation term.
Cristina Nicole McCumber,
petit theft, probation one year,
$325 fine and court costs, $100
public defender fees, $50 COP,
$50 investigative costs.
Brandon Keith Wisniewski,
two counts domestic battery
and possession of synthetic
marijuana, one months in jail,
$650 fine and court costs, $150
public defender fees, $150
COP, $100 investigative costs.
Freddie Carlton, confine-
ment of animals without suffi-
cient water, food/exercise, com-
pleted pre-trial diversion pro-
gram, not prosecuted.
Willie Lee, violation of a
domestic violence injunction
for protection and domestic bat-
tery, six months in jail, with
credit for time,served (CTS),
$677 fine and court costs, $100
public defender fees, $100
COP, $50 investigative fees.
Nicholas Ray Taylor, petit
theft, adjudication withheld,
probation six months $325 fine
and court costs, $50 COP, 30
hours community service.
Robert Young, battery, not
prosecuted.
Johnny Lee Cook, trespass
structure/conveyance, one
month jail CTS, $325 fine and
court costs and $50 COP placed
on lien.
,Veronica Ann Flores, sale of
tobacco to a minor, $325 fine
and court costs, $50 COP, $50
investigative costs, 50 hours
community service.
Leroy McKinzie, domestic
battery, not prosecuted.
Daniel Lee Calvillo, domes-
tic battery, probation six
months, $325 fine and court
costs, $100 public defender
fees, $50 COP, $50 investiga-
tive costs.
Daniel Farias. domestic bat-


tery and violation or a domestic
violence injunction for protec-
tion, four months in jail CTS.
probation one year, S677 fine
and court costs, S100 public
defender fees, 5100 COP, S50
investigative costs.
Jeff McCall, battery, trespass
structure/conveyance and two
counts domestic assault, proba-
tion one year, 5325 fine and
court costs, $100 public defend-
er fees, S50 COP, $50 investiga-
tive costs, 50 hours community
service.
Samuel Mendoza, battery,
adjudication withheld, proba-
tion one year, $677 fine and
court costs, $50 COP, $50
investigative costs.
Carla Mink, disorderly intox-
ication and resisting an officer
without violence, $325 fine and
court costs, $50 COP, $50
investigative costs.
Ricardo Sandoval, petit theft,
adjudication withheld, proba-
tion six months, $325 fine and
court costs, $100 public defend-
er fees, $50 COP, $50 investiga-
tive costs, 25 hours community
service.
James Edward Taylor, resist-
ing arrest without violence,
trespass other than a struc-
ture/conveyance and criminal
mischief, completed pre-trial
diversion, not prosecuted.
Vivian Oviedo-Martinez,
violation of probation (original
charge retail theft), probation
revoked, one month 15 days in
jail, $50 COP added to out-
standing fines and fees.
Andrew Ray Wheeler, viola-
tion of probation (original
charge petit theft), probation
revoked, one months in jail, $50
COP added to outstanding fines
and fees.

CIRCUIT COURT
The following civil actions
were filed recently in the
office of the circuit court:
Jose Luis Espinoza Jr. and
Veronica Garcia Espinoza,
divorce.
Amanda Leigh Griffin and
the state Department of Rev-
enue (DOR) vs. Arturo J.
Valdez, petition for child sup-
port enforcement.
James Kenneth Cranford and
Sabrina Cranford, divorce.
Susan Lopez o/b/o minor
child vs. Alfonso Sandoval
o/b/o minor child, petition for
injunction for protection.
Edward Joe Young vs. the
state Department of Corrections
(DOC), inmate petition for
review of situation.
Bank of America NA vs.
Gilberto Vasquez, petition for
mortgage foreclosure.
Bank of America vs. Larry
Joe Johnson, Edith Diann
Johnson et al, petition for mort-
gage foreclosure.
Lucia Lucy Morales and
DOR vs. Steven Bolin, petition
for child support.
Miguel A. Segarra vs.
Patricia Wright, damages -
auto negligence.
Farm Credit of Florida vs.
Everett Shawn Rimes, Alex-
andra Estelle Rimes et al, peti-
tion for mortgage foreclosure.
Melissa R. Hurley and DOR
vs. Donald A. Rapp, petition for
child support.


Courtholuse R rI


Cruz Rocelda Alvarez and
DOR vs. Miguel A. Alpuche,
petition for child support.

The following decisions on
civil cases pending in the cir-
cuit court were handed down
recently by the circuit court
judge:
Silas Martin and Abe Brown
Ministries Inc. vs. Marvina
Ayala. voluntary dismissal.
Tonya Suzanr- Richardson
and DOR vs. A-.n Dewavne
Richardson. modification of
support.
Gabriella Leslie and DOR
vs. Ephesian Francis, modifica-
tion of child support.
Bank of N.Y. Mellon Trust
Co. vs. Martha W. Smith et al,
dismissed for lack of prosecu-
tion.
Elizabeth Trevino vs. Wal-
Mart Stores Inc., stipulated dis-
missal approved.
Maria E. Francisco and DOR
vs. Fabaian Francisco, volun-
tary dismissal.
Andrew Smith and DOR vs.
Daffney M. Jernigan, voluntary
dismissal.
Alma Vargas and DOR vs.
Otilia Pantaleon, voluntary dis-
missal.
Ernest Reigh vs. state DOC,
inmate petition dismissed.
Guillermina Pantoja and
Juan Pantoja, divorce.
Anna Ortiz vs. Miguel Ortiz,
dismissal of injunction for pro-
tection.
Esmeralda Calderon and
DOR vs. Eduardo Rivera, mod-
ification of child support.
Judith A. Hughes vs. John A.
Otero, child support order.
Linda Martinez vs. Scott
Donaldson, dismissal of injunc-
tion for. protection.
Monica L. Reas vs. Stephen
Stuart Reas, order.
Shannon Knarr and DOR vs.
Jeff A. McCall, order on child
support contempt.
Laina Marie Perez and DOR
vs. Ruddie Lee Lopez, order on
enforcement of administrative
child support order.
Bank of N.Y. Mellon vs.
Louie F. Carpenter, judgment.
State Farm Mutual Auto-
mobile Insurance Co. a/s/o
George D. and Margaret Collins
vs. Arlan Kyle Clanton, stipu-
lated settlement approved.
Juan Herrera and DOR vs.
Michelle Victoria Mendoza,
order on child support con-
tempt.
Jenny Albritton and DOR vs.
Joseph Keith Pritchard, order
on child support contempt.
Amanda L. Elisondo and
DOR vs. Robert M. Revell Jr,
child support suspended.
Patricia A. Saunders and
Scott C. Saunders, amended
order.
Jessica Ybarra Valadez and
DOR vs. Virgilio Diaz Burgos,
voluntary dismissal.
Alicia Calderon vs. Arnesto
Briseno, injunction for protec-
tion.
Jose Carrion vs. Gilbert
Carrion Jr., dismissal of tempo-
rary injunction for protection.
Bank of N.Y. vs. Ignacio L.


.... ~. . . . . ..



.. . . . . . . . .
,. .

.4.. :;:;^ ^


Garza et al, judgment of fore-
closure.
Silvano Martinez and DOR
vs. Rubilleni Mora. order on
child support contempt.
Dottie Allen vs. Victor
Smith. dismissal of injunction
for protection.
Sarah Lee Aleman Lazo and
DOR vs. Jose Alejandro Lazo
Sr., order on child support con-
tempt.

The following felony crimi-
nal cases were disposed of
recently by the circuit judge.
Defendants have been adjudi-
cated guilty unless noted oth-
erwise. When adjudication is
withheld, it is pending suc-
cessful completion of proba-
tion. Sentences are pursuant
to an investigative report by
and the recommendation of
the state probation office and
also state sentencing guide-
lines. Final discretion is left to
the judge.
James Riley Driver, posses-
sion of methamphetamine, pos-
session of drug paraphernalia
and resisting arrest without vio-
lence, not prosecuted.
Ricky Dunn, obtaining prop-
erty with a worthless check; not
prosecuted.
Manuel Hernandez Jr., vio-
lation of probation (original
charge aggravated battery with
a deadly weapon), probation
revoked, three years Florida
State Prison, $200 public
defender fees and $100 COP
added to outstanding fines and
fees and placed on lien.
Denise McKinzie, aggravat-
ed assault with a deadly
weapon, not prosecuted.
Andrew Rupert, possession
of marijuana and possession of
drug paraphernalia, transferred
to county misdemeanor court;
tampering with physical evi-
dence, not prosecuted.
Jonathen Lamar Small,
resisting an officer without vio-
lent force and fleeing and
attempting to elude an- officer,
adjudication withheld, proba-
tion two years, license suspend-
ed one year, $520 fine and court
costs, $200 public defender
fees, $100 COP, $24 First Step
probation fees.
Jessica A. Stewart, posses-
sion of counterfeit animal
health medications, adjudica-
tion withheld, probation one
year, $520 fine and court costs,
$200 public defender fees, $100
COP, $12 First Step, 100 hours
community service.
Michael Shawn Donahoe,
motion to review probation
terms (original charges grand
theft and trespass), modifica-
tion of restitution to $50 per
month.
Joel David Gutierrez, motion
on probation terms (original
charges sale of methampheta-
mine, two counts possession of
methamphetamine, two counts
possession of drug parapherna-
lia and resisting an officer with-
out violence), probation modi-
fied to extend time to pay
fines/fees to 24 months, and to
allow operation of one bar.


"r "..... ....' .
:ll "* .........

Iy rtii


Katie Rogers, Sue Lobato, Pauline Ochoa, Julian Garcia, & Red Camp Pharmacist

Hours:
Monday-Friday 9:00 am to 6:00 pm Saturday 9:00 am to 1:00pm


Braxton Reed Brown, viola-
tion of probation (original
charges trespass structure/con-
veyance. and petit theft), proba-
tion terminated, outstanding
fines and fees placed on lien.
Kevin Duane Holloway Jr.,
possession of a synthetic nar-
cotic, possession of cocaine,
tampering with physical evi-
dence and two counts posses-
sion of drug paraphernalia, not
prosecuted.
Donald Ray King, aggravat-
ed battery causing bodily harm,
adjudication withheld, 11
months 29 days in jail CTS, fol-
lowed by probation 10 years,
S520 fine and court costs. $350
probation fees. $100 COP, $120
First Step.
Shawn Curtis Rhymes, bur-
glary of dwelling, petit theft and
criminal mischief, probation
one year, $520 fine and court
costs, $200 probation fees,
$100 COP, $50 investigative
costs and $12 First Step.
Debbie Smith, possession of
methamphetamine, probation
three years, $520 fine and court
costs, $200 public defender
fees, $100 COP, $35 First Step;
possession of marijuana and
possession of drug parapherna-
lia, not prosecuted.
Enrique Velazquez, sale of
cocaine within 1,000 feet of a
public building, three years
Florida State Prison CTS, $520
fine and court costs, $350 pub-
lic defender fees and $100 COP
placed on lien; two counts sale
of cocaine within 1,000 feet of a
public building, not prosecuted.
Berta Gonzalez, criminal use
of personal identification infor-
mation, adjudication withheld,
probation one year, $520 fine
and court costs, $100 COP,
$100 investigative costs, $12
First Step, 25 hours community
service.
Frank Eugene Rockwell,
aggravated assault on a law
enforcement officer with a
weapon, criminal mischief and
fleeing to elude an officer, adju-
dication withheld, probation 18
months, $520 fine and court
costs, $350 public defender
fees, $100 COP, $18 First Step,
50 hours community service.
Miguel Alpuche Hernandez,
violation of a domestic violence
injunction for protection, disor-
derly intoxication, burglary of
an occupied vehicle and resist-
ing arrest without violence,
transferred to county misde-
meanor court.

The following real estate
transactions of $10,000 or
more were filed recently in
the office of the clerk of court:
Velva R. Hartt and Van
Adams First Inc. to Glenn
Elliott Beck as trustee, $1.08
million.
Juan Delatorre to First
National Bank of Wauchula,
$72,192.43.
Paul E. Davis Sr. to Paul E.
Davis Jr, $33,644.80.
Bonny L. Holt to Billy J.
McVey and Phyliss Holt
Mathas, $16,700.
Lois B. Nolan at trustee to


-- --rs - ---aa~n--- .-.la m ,~
COURTESYPHOTO
Zack Durastanti, 10, had an
opportunity in late Septem-
ber to travel with his brother
Zander, mother Regan Dav-
enport, grandmother Betty
Durastanti and family friend
Sean Brown, to Des
Moines, Iowa for the 2011
IronKids U.S. National
Triathlon Championships.
Usually including a swim,
bike and run, the cold
weather caused cancella-
tion of the swim. A run, bike,
run was the alternate for-
mat. Fifth grader Zack com-
pleted the race in 28
minutes and 53 seconds,
28th of the 58 competitors
in his age group. After the
race, he had a chance to
meet with Hunter Kemper, a
professional triathlete who
is a 2000, 2004 and 2008
Olympian. Young Zack
wants to become an
Olympian in triathlons like
Hunter.



ABOUT ..
Hardee Living
Hardee Living prints your
news on people, clubs and
organizations, including
melting summariess, births,
children's and senior citi-
zens' birthdays, engage-
ments, weddings, silver or
golden anniversaries,
church events and military
assignments.
Forms are available at our
office. For engagements
and weddings, a photo
should be included.
Publication is free of
charge. Coverage of wed-
dings over three months old
will be limited to a photo and
brief announcement.
Deadline is 5 p.m. on
Thursday.


HEARTLAND PHARMACY




DELIVERY SERVICE AVAILABLE


"We put our into our service"

If you are visiting we will gladly transfer your prescriptions and

keep them on file then transfer them back when you go home.


NOTICE OF APPLICATION

FOR TAX DEED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that EAN EDDY, the hold-
er of the following certificate has filed said certificate
for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate
number and year of issuance, the description of the
property, and the names in which it was assessed are
as follows:

CERTIFICATE NO.: 697 YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2007

Description of Property:

5 AC E/2 OF NW/4 OF NW/4 OF SE/4
13 33S 26E

SUBJECT TO RESERVATIONS, COVENANTS,
RESTRICTIONS, AND EASEMENTS OF RECORD.

Name in which assessed: DORA WINGATE

Said property being in the County of HARDEE, State
of Florida.

Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according
to law, the property described in such certificate shall
be sold to the highest bidder at the Hardee'County
Courthouse, 417 West Main Street, second floor hall-
way outside of Room 202, Wauchula, FL 33873 on the
9th day of November, 2011, at 11:00 a.m.

Dated this 27th day of September, 2011.

B. Hugh Bradley
Clerk of Circuit Court
Hardee County, Florida
AD No: 1
By: Alicia C. Albritton, Deputy Clerk
Tax Deed File No.: 252011TD011XXXX
Pursuant to F.S. 197.512 6.
No6, 76


............


David J. Smith et al, $46,000.
William C. Bethea et al to
Burton Dennis and Mary
Kathleen Moseley as trustees,
$287,333.
John E. Clifton to Daman K.
and Jeannette Marie Sharp,
$119,000.
Billy and Janice "Hill to
Jomar Pagan. $26,000.




COLD RUNNING



.1JI
i'








October 20, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 7C


ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS'
MONDAY
Breakfast: Lucky Charms,
Graham Crackers, Blueberry
Poptart, Orange Juice, Con-
diments and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza,
Ham, Macaroni & Cheese,
Salad Tray, Green Beans,
Cornbread, Blue Raspberry
Juice Bar, Condiments and Milk
TUESDAY
Breakfast:. Cheerios Cereal,
Graham Crackers, Sausage
Patty, Biscuit, Pineapple Tidbit5.,
Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Chicken Pot Pie,
Stacked Ham Sandwich, Salad
Tray, Broccoli, Peaches, Condi-
ments and Milk
WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Trix, Graham
Crackers, Cheese Grits, But-
tered Toast, Pears, Condiments
and Milk
Lunch: Hamburger on a Bun,
Spaghetti and Meat Sauce,
Salad Tray, Corn, Mixed Fruit,
Sugar Cookies, Rolls, Condi-
ments and Milk
THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cinnamon Toast
Crunch, Graham Crackers,
Pancakes, Sausage Patty,
Orange Juice, Condiments and
Milk
Lunch: Toasted Cheese
w/HB EG, Pig in a Blanket,
Salad Tray, Potato Rounds,
Pears, Condiments and Milk


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO. 252008CA000149
THE BANK OF NEW YORK AS
TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFI-
CATEHOLDERS CWABS, INC.
ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES,
SERIES 2006-23,
Plaintiff,


vs.
IGNACIO L. GARZA; UNKNOWN
TENANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN TEN-
ANT NO. 2; and ALL UNKNOWN
PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS
BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT
TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING
OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY
,RIGHT, TITLE ORfNTERESTJN
THE PROPERTY.HEREIN i-
DESCRIBED,
Defendants. /

NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Summary
Final Judgment of foreclosure
dated October 4, 2011, and
entered in Case No.
252008CA000149 of the Circuit
Court in and for Hardee County,
Florida, wherein THE BANK OF
NEW YORK AS TRUSTEE FOR
THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS
CWABS, INC. ASSET-BACKED
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-23
is Plaintiff and IGNACIO L.
GARZA; UNKNOWN TENANT NO.
1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; and
ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIM-
ING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH,
UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED
DEFENDANT TO- THIS ACTION,
OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO
HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR
INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY
HEREIN DESCRIBED, are
Defendants, I will sell to the high-
est and best bidder for cash at
the Hardee County Courthouse,
417 West Main Street, Second
Floor Hallway outside of Room
202, Wauchula, FL 33873 at
Hardee County, Florida, at 11:00
a.m. on the 26 day of October
2011, the following described
property as set forth in said Order
or Final Judgment, to-wit:
THE WEST 521.80 FEET
OF THE NORTH 417.40
FEET OF THE NW 1/4 OF
THE NW 1/4 OF SECTION
2, TOWNSHIP 34 SOUTH,
RANGE 26 EAST, HARDEE
COUNTY, FLORIDA, LESS
AND EXCEPT. ROAD
RIGHT-OF-WAY OR
RECORD.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN
INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS
FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
Jn accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities Act of
1990, persons needing special
accommodation to participapate
In this proceeding should contact
the Clerk of the Court not later
Ohan five business -days prior to
the proceeding at the Hardee
County Courthouse. Telephone
863-773-4174 or 1-800-955-8770
via Florida Relay Service.
DATED at Wauchula, Florida on
October 4, 2011.
B. HUGH BRADLEY
As Clerk, Circuit Court
By: Connie Coker
As Deputy Clerk


I10:13,20c


FRIDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Variety,
Graham Crackers, Cheese
Toast, Peaches, Condiments
and Milk
Lunch: Nachos with Ground
Beef, Peanut butter Sandwich,
Salad Tray, Pinto Beans, Apple-
sauce, Condiments and Milk
JUNIOR HIGH
MONDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Variety,
Graham Crackers, Pot Tarts,
Juice, Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza,
Ham, Mac & Cheese,
Cornbread, Peanut Butter &
Jelly Sandwich, Salad Bar,
Lettuce & Tomato, Green
Beans, Juice Bar, Condiments
and Milk
TUESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Variety,
Graham Crackers, Biscuits,
Sausage Patty, Pineapple
Tidbits, Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Chicken Pot Pie,
'Sausage Pizza, Stacked ham
Sandwich, Peanut Butter & Jelly
Sandwich, Salad Bar, Lettuce &
Tomato, Broccoli, Peaches,
Condiments and Milk
WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Variety,
Cheese Grits, Buttered Toast,
Pears, Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Hamburger on a Bun,
Spaghetti, Roll, Peanut Butter &
Jelly Sandwich, Pepperoni
Pizza, Lettuce & Tomato, Whole
Kernel Corn, Fruit Cocktail,
Butter Cookies, Condiments
and Milk
THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Variety,
Graham Crackers, Pancakes,
Sausage Patty, Juice, Condi-
ments and Milk
Lunch: Toasted Cheese w/HB.
EG, Pjg in a Blanket, Sausage
Pizza, Peanut Butter & Jelly
Sandwich, Lettuce & Tomatq,
Potato Rounds, Pears, Condi-
ments and Milk
FRIDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Variety,
Graham Crackers, Cheese
Toast, Peaches, Condiments
and Milk
Lunch: Nachos w/Ground
Beef, Pepperoni Pizza, Peanut


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 25-2010-CA-000663
MIDFIRST BANK,
Plaintiff,
v.
DANIEL B. HARSHBURGER, JR.;
DENETTE D. HARSHBURGER;
UNKNOWN TENANT 1; UN-
KNOWN TENANT 2; and all un-
known parties claiming by,
through, under or against the
above named Defendant(s), who
(is/are) not known to be dead or
alive, whether said unknown par-
ties claim as heirs, devisees,
grantees, assignees, lienors,
creditors, trustees, spouses, or
other claimants; MORTGAGE
ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION
SYSTEMS, INC.; UNITED STATES
OF AMERICA, INTERNAL REV-
ENUE SERVICE


Defendants.


NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that,
pursuant to the Final Judgment of
Foreclosure dated September 28,
2011, in this cause, I will sell the
property situated in HARDEE
County, Florida, described as:
THE EAST 262.00 FEET OF
THE WEST ONE HALF OF
THE SOUTHWEST ONE
QUARTER OF THE
NORTHEAST ONE QUAR-
TER OF SECTION 27,
TOWNSHIP 33 SOUTH,
RANGE 25 EAST, HARDEE
COUNTY, FLORIDA, LYING
NORTHERLY OF SR #664-
A (HEARD BRIDGE
ROAD).
a/k/a 1985 HEARD BRIDGE
ROAD, WAUCHULA, FL
33873
at public sale, to the highest and
best bidder, for cash, in the sec-
ond floor hallway outside Room
202 of the Hardee County
Courthouse, 417 W. Main Street,
Wauchula, FL 33873, at eleven
o'clock a.m., on October 26, 2011.
Any person claiming an inter-
est in the surplus from the sale, if
any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the lis
pendens must file a claim within
60 days after the sale.
Dated at Wauchula, Florida,
this 3 day of October, 2011.
B. HUGH BRADLEY
Clerk of the Circuit Courts
By: Connie Coker
Deputy Clerk
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE
AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES
ACT, PERSONS NEEDING A SPE-
CIAL ACCOMMODATION TO
PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEED-
ING SHOULD CONTACT THE
PERSONNEL DEPARTMENT OF
THE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT AT 417 WEST MAIN
STREET, WAUCHULA, FLORIDA
33873, PHONE (863) 773-2161,
NOT LATER THAN SEVEN (7)
DAYS PRIOR TO THE PROCEED-
INGS. IF HEARING IMPAIRED,
(TDD) 1-800-955-8771 OR VOICE
(V) 1-800-955-8770 VIA FLORIDA
RELAY SERVICE.
10:13,20c


Butter & Jelly Sandwich,
Lettuce & Tomato, Pinto Beans,
Applesauce, Condiments and
Milk

SENIOR HIGH
MONDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Super
Donut, Orange Juice, Condi-
ments and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza,
Cheeseburger on a Bun,
Hamburger on a Bun, Ham,
Macaroni & Cheese, French
Fries, Black-Eyed Peas,
Steamed Cabbage, Tossed
Salad, Apple Crisp, Juice,
Cornbread, Condiments and
Milk

TUESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Biscuit,
Sausage, Applesauce, Condi-
ments and Milk
Lunch: Cheeseburger on a
Bun, Chicken Pot Pie, French
Fries, -Broccoli Normandy,
Summer Squash, Tossed
Salad, Cucumber & Tomato
Salad, Peaches, Rolls, Condi-
ments and Milk

WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Cheese
Grits, Buttered Toast, Peaches,
Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Cheeseburger on a
Bun, Spaghetti and Meat
Sauce, French Fries, Green
Beans, Veggie Cup, Tossed
Salad, Waldorf Salad, Butter
Cookies, Juice, Rolls, Condi-
ments and Milk

THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Pancakes,
Sausage Patty, Pears, Condi-
ments and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza,
Cheeseburger on a Bun,
Hamburger on a Bun, Pig in a
Blanket, French Fries, Baked
Beans, Cole Slaw, Tossed
Salad, Potato Rounds, Fruit
Cocktail, Condiments and Milk

FRIDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Cheese
Grits, Buttered Toast, Peaches,
Con-diments and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza,
.Cheeseburger on a Bun,
French Fries, Nachos with
Ground Beef, Mexican Rice,
Pinto Beans, Corn, Pineapple
Chunks, Tossed Salad, Condi-
ments and Milk


789 sQ. FT.


A .e ro 1 .
588 sQ. FT.


On the floor I am more at ease. I feel nearer, more a part of the painting, since this way
I can walk around it, work from the four sides and literally be in the painting.
-Jackson Pollock






FREE-2 BUCS TICKETS


SEE WILDCAT PAGE

Center Section of "C"

For Your Chance To Win


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

A Public Hearing will be held to consider the second reading and adoption of the following
ordinance:
ORDINANCE NO 2011-04

AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF BOWLING GREEN, FLORIDA PROVIDING
FOR WATER AND SEWER INDEXED INCREASES FOR FISCAL YEARS 2010-
2011 AND 2011-2012; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; PROVIDING FOR AN
EFFECTIVE DATE

A Public Hearing will be held on the proposed ordinance at the Regular Commission Meet-
ing on Tuesday, November 8, 2011 at 6:30pm in the Commission Chambers at Bowling
Green City Hall at which time the City Commission will consider its adoption into law. The
ordinance in its entirety may be inspected at the office of the City Clerk during regular work-
ing hours. All interested parties may appear at the meeting and be heard with respect to
the proposed ordinance.

Any person who may wish to appeal any decision made at this meeting with respect to
any matter considered therein, will need a verbatim record of the meeting for that appeal,
and it is solely the responsibility of that person to ensure that such verbatim record is made
and includes testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based, per Florida
Statute 286.0105. The City does not furnish verbatim transcripts.

Pursuant to the provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act, any person requiring spe-
cial accommodations to participate in this meeting is asked to advise the City Clerk's office
at least 48 hours prior to the hearing by contacting 863-375-2255.


Attest: Pamela S Northup, City Clerk


Perry Knight, Mayor
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8C The Herald-Aduocate, October 20, 2011






During the past week, sheriff's deputies and city police
officers investigated the following incidents and made the fol-
lowing arrests:

COUNTY
Oct. 16, Alex Alamia, 29, of 2851 Schontag Road, Wauchula,
was arrested by Sgt. Kevin White and charged with battery.
Oct. 16, a residential burglary on Osceola Drive and a vehicle
stolen on Moncrief Road were reported.

Oct. 15, Adrian Rios, 21, of 855 Pleasant Way, Bowling
Green, was arrested by Dep. Steven Ahrens on a charge of viola-
tion of probation.
Oct. 15, Antonio Mendez Hernandez, 37, of Third Street,




-H nigFs hingForcas


10/20/2011
Sun Data
Rise. 7:30 AM
Set: 6:53 PM
Day Length
11 hrs. 23 mmn\.
Moon Data
Ri.: 12:50 AM
Set: 2:27 PM
Overhead: 7:42 AM
Underfoot: 8:08 PM
Moon Phase
45%
Waning Crescent
Major Times
7:42 AM 9:42 AM
8:08 PM 10:08 PM
Minor Times
12:50 AM -1:50 AM
2:27 PM.3:27 PM
Solunar Rating
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -4
10/21/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 7:30 AM
Set: 6:52 PM
Day Length
II hrs. 22 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 1:51 AM
Set: 3:08 PM
Overhead: 8:33 AM
Underfoot: 8:58 PM
Moon Phase
34%
Waning Crescent
Major Times
8:33 AM -10:33 AM
8:58 PM 10:58 PM
Minor Times
1:51 AM-2:51 AM
3:08 PM 4:08 PM
Solunar Rating
Average .
Time Zone
UTC: -4


10/22/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 7:31 AM
Set. 6:51 PM
Day Length
II hrs. 20 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 2:52 AM
Set: 3:47 PM
Overhead: 9:24 AM
Underfoot: 9:49 PM
Moon Phase
24%
Waning Crescent
Major Times
9:24 AM -11:24 AM
9:49 PM 11:49 PM
Minor Times
2:52 AM 3:52 AM
3:47 PM 4:47 PM
Solunar Rating
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -4
10/23/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 7:32 AM
Set: 6:50 PM
Day Length
II hrs. 18 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 3:55 AM
Set: 4:26 PM
Overhead:10:15 AM
Underfoot: 10:41 PM
Moon Phase
14%
Waning Crescent
Major Times
10:15 AM-12:15 PM
10:41 PM-12:41 AM
Minor Times
3:55 AM 4:55 AM
4:26 PM 5:26 PM
Solunar Rating
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -4


10/24/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 7.32 AM
Set: 6:50 PM
Day Length
11 hrs. 18 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 5:00 AM
set: 5:07 PM
Overhead: 11:08 AM
Underfoot:11:35 PM
Moon Phase
7%
Waning Crescent
Major Times
11:08 AM 1:08 PM
11:35 PM- 1:35 AM
Minor Times
5:00 AM 6:00 AM
5:07 PM 6:07 PM
Solunar Rating
Good
Time Zone
UTC: -4
10/25/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 7:33 AM
Set: 6:49 PM
Day Length
I1 hrs. 16 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 6:07 AM
Set: 5:50 PM
Overhead: 12:02 PM
Underfoot: --:--
Moon Phase
2%
Waning Crescent
Major Times
12:02 PM 2:02 PM
Minor Times
6:07 AM 7:07 AM
5:50 PM 6:50 PM
Solunar Rating
Better
Time Zone
UTC: -4


10/26/2011
Sun Data
Rlse: 7:34 AM
Set: 6:48 PM
Day Length
11 hrs. 14 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 7.16 AM
Set: 6:36 PM
Overhead: 1:00 PM
Underfoot:12:31 AM
Moon Phase
0%
NEW MOON
Major Times
12:31 AM-2:31 AM
1:00 PM 3:00 PM
Minor Times
7:16 AM 8:16 AM
6:36 PM 7:36 PM
Solunar Rating
Best
Time Zone
UTC: -4
10/27/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 7:34 AM
Set: 6:47 PM
Day Length
11 hrs. 13 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 8:26 AM
Set: 7:28 PM
Overhead: 2:00 PM
Underfoot: 1:29 AM
Moon Phase
1%
Waxing Crescent
Major Times
1:29 AM 3:29 AM
2:00 PM 4:00 PM
Minor Times
8:26 AM -.9:26 AM
7:28 PM 8:28 PM
Solunar Rating
Better++++
Time Zone
UTC: -4


Zolfo Springs, was arrested by Dep. Scott Heasley and charged
with disorderly intoxication.
Oct. 15, Tyler Lee Richardson, 23, of 880 Griffin Road,
Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Steven Ahrens on a charge of fail-
ure to appear in court.
Oct. 15, Russell Dale Adams, 45. of 734 CR 665, Ona, was
arrested by Cpl. Mark McCoy and charged with resisting an officer
without violence.
Oct. 15, a residential burglary on Boyd Cowart Road was
reported.

Oct. 14, Jessica Prince Valdez. 27, of 604 E. Bay St., Wau-
chula, was arrested by Dep. Juan Castillo and charged with fraud
- illegal use of 2 or more credit cards.
Oct. 14, a residential burglary on CR 664A and thefts on
Garden Drive, U.S. 17 North and Ralph Smith Road were report-
ed.

Oct. 13, Michael Robert McMillan, 36, of 4728 S. CR 663,
Ona, was arrested Sgt. Lyle Hart on a pair of out-of-county war-
rants.
Oct. 13, Timothy Daniel Backer, 31, of 3990 NE Ashley
Terrace, Arcadia, was arrested by Sgt. Lyle Hart and charged with
sale of methamphetamine and possession of drug paraphernalia.
Oct. 13, Anjel Gonzales, 38, of 842 Third St. E., Zolfo
Springs, was arrested by Sgt. Lyle Hart and charged with robbery
with a firearm and carjacking with a firearm. He was also detained
on two counts of failure to appear in court.
Oct. 13, a vehicle stolen on Mockingbird Road, and thefts on
Mowatt Street and on U.S. 17 North were reported.

Oct. 12, Lazaro Ramirez-Flores, 31, of 605 Illinois Ave.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Sgt. Lyle Hart on a charge of failure to
appear.
Oct. 12, a business burglary on Will Duke Road, burglary of a
conveyance on Lincoln Street, criminal mischief on Diana Lane
and a theft on Merle Langford Road were reported.

Oct. 11, Carol Lynn Staton, 46, of 2244 Conerly Road, Ona,
was arrested by Cpl. Shane Ward on a charge of withholding sup-
port of children.
Oct. 11, Nuel Loyd King, 42, of 801 SR 66, Zolfo Springs,
was arrested by Capt. Jim Hall and charged with battery.
Oct. 11, William Dean Mackay, 25, of 12290 U.S. 301,
Parrish, was arrested by Cpl. Mark McCoy on a charge of contempt
of court.
Oct. 11, Justin Bailey, 28, of 8441 SR 64 W., Ona, was arrest-
ed by Cpl. Mark McCoy and charged with resisting arrest without
violence.
Oct. 11, burglary of a conveyance on U.S. 17 North, a fight on
Will Duke Road, and thefts on U.S. 17 North and on Mockingbird
Road were reported.

Oct.10, burglary of a conveyance on Petteway Road, and a
theft on U.S. 17 North were reported.

WAUCHULA
Oct. 16, a theft on South Ninth Avenue was reported.

Oct. 15, Joshua Garrett Brantley, 24, of 1547 Lisa Dr:,
Wauchula, was arrested by Ofc. William Smith and charged with
two counts possession of drugs without a prescription.
Oct. 15, a theft on Forsythe Avenue was reported.

Oct. 14, Steve Ellis Hodges, 18, of 405 Orange St., Bowling
Green, was arrested by Ofc. Jonathan Corwin and charged with
DUI.
Oct. 14, Jonathan Albert Mills, 50, General Delivery,
Wauchula, was arrested by Ofc.. William Smith and charged with
trespassing on property not a structure or conveyance.


Oct. 14, residential burglaries on Hogan Street and on South
10th Avenue, and criminal mischief on Florida Avenue were report-
ed.

Oct. 11, Erick Estrada, 33, of 445 Calvert Road, Wauchula,
was arrested by Ofc. Eric Thompson and charged with domestic
battery and false imprisonment of an adult.
Oct. 11, a tag stolen on Summitt Street was reported.

Oct. 10, Cecil Winthrop Crews, 72, General Delivery,
Wauchula, was arrested by Ofc. Justin Wyatt and charged with bat-
tery and simple assault threat to do violence.

BOWLING GREEN
Oct. 15, Alfonso DeJesus Ramirez, 27, of 4625 Dixianna Dr.,
Bowling Green. was arrested by Ofc. Chris Gicker and charged
with DUI and another traffic offense.







Moralez Wins




Alumni Run


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
In the only cross country
meet last week, Christian
Moralez came around the
Hardee course the fastest.
Moralez completed the annu-
al Alumni Run is a stellar time
of 21:02, just two seconds
ahead of sophomore teammate
Brandon Beatty at 21:04.
Only three alumni completed
the run. Regan Davenport came
home in 10th place at 25:18.
For the faculty men. Sean
Brown was 11th at 26:01 and
Charlie Potter finished at 28:44.
The course was soft. from
recent rains, reported Coach
Don Trew, who noted that it
also made them a bit rough.
Moralez and Beatty running
so close bodes well for the
upcoming district meet the
week of Nov. 1-5. Coming up
next, however, is the Blue
Streak Invitational at the South
Florida Community College
today (Thursday). The final reg-
ular season meet is at Avon Park
on Oct. 27.
In last week's home run, fol-
lowing the top duo to the finish
line were Augustine Anselmo at
22:28 and Tony Moreno at
23:29. Behind them were Juan
Vela at 23:40 and Alex
PIerstorff at 23:42. Others turn-


ing in good times were Adrian
Briones, Tyler Helms, Derick
Sambrano, Leonel Rodriguez,
Dorian Mejia-Flores and Josh
Wyatt.
In a first runs in several.
weeks, senior Reimundo Garcia
is still trying to get in shape
before the season's end so he
can compete in districts.
For the Hardee girls, Febe
Murillo has a similar situation
and sat out last week's race.
Alle Solis had the girls best
time, followed by Veronica
Rivera and Adriana Arroyo in
her first race and running neck-
and-neck with Rivera.



ABOUT ...
School News
The Herald-Advocate en-
courages submissions from
Hardee County schools.
Photos and write-ups
should be of recent events,
and must include first and
last names for both students
and teachers. Identify pho-
tos front to back, left to right.
Deadline for submissions
is 5 p.m., on Thursday.
Please include the name
and phone number of a con-
tact person. Qualifying
items will be published as
space allows.


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