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 Material Information
Title: The Herald-advocate
Portion of title: Herald advocate
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Wm. J. Kelly
Place of Publication: Wauchula Fla
Publication Date: 9/15/2011
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Wauchula (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hardee County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Hardee -- Wauchula
Coordinates: 27.546111 x -81.814444 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: 55th year, no. 31 (Sept. 2, 1955)-
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System ID: UF00028302:00398
 Related Items
Preceded by: Hardee County herald
Preceded by: Florida advocate (Wauchula, Fla.)

Full Text

















The


Herald-Advocate

Hardee County's Hometown Coverage


111th Year, No. 41
4 Sections, 32 Pages
t


j Thursday, September 15, 2011


FIRST TITLE


46
plus 44 sales tax


IT'S ATCHLEY!

County Commissioner Will Resign

To Take New Job As City Manager


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
The selection took less than
three minutes.
After a lengthy Sept. 6 work-
shop discussing what they want
in a city manager and what the
top three candidates brought to
the position, the Wauchula City
Commission has chosen local
candidate Terry Atchley to be
the top man in the city employ-
ment.
Atchey, presently chairman
of the Hardee County Com-
mission, said he will officially
announce his resignation from
that board at the meeting
tonight (Thursday). He will
meet with Mayor Rick Knight


and work with city labor attor-
ney Reynolds Allen and city
attorney Cliff Ables in negotiat-
ing a contract, which will come
before the City Commission in
a special meeting next Wednes-
day, Sept. 21, at 4:30 p.m.
"It's truly an honor to be cho-
sen to be part of the city staff. I
know I will have to prove
myself to the seven commis-
sioners and the community,"
Atchley said on Tuesday.
His resume shows extensive
experience as a regional manag-
er for CCC Group Inc., vice-
president of business develop-
ment for Maintenance and
Machinery Erectors and execu-
tive vice-president for Clear


Springs, a development group.
During those years, he was
responsible for multimillion
dollar industrial construction
and administration over depart-
ment heads and project man-
agers, prepared bids, oversaw
customer and employee rela-
tionships, *land management,
engineering and design,
brought projects in on time and
below budget and worked on
community outreach.
He left his last position in
2010 because of the extensive
travel, which kept him away
from his family. He has since
been co-owner/vice-president
and day-to-day manager for
- See ATCHLEY 3A


Child Hit At Bus Stop


PHOTO BY NANCY DAVIS
Bowling Geen's young pro boxer Daniel Lozano is all smiles as the referee prepares to
announce him the winner and present him with his first title belt. The undefeated 21-
year-old won the USNBC belt Friday night in a stunning second-round TKO. Owning the
belt lifts him in the World Boxing Council rankings and gives him the chance for a world
flyweight championship. See story inside.



White Wins ZS Election


By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
Dierdre "DiDi" White won
the right to retake a seat on the
Zolfo Springs Town Commis-
sion in the municipal election
held Monday.
At the conclusion of the vote
count that night, White had
taken 63 of the total 72 ballots
cast, leaving opponent Marie
Schofield Guerrero with just
nine votes.



WEATHER
DAE HIGH LW N
09/07 88 72 0.53
09/08 86 73 0.19
09/09 88 71 0.01
09/10 91 72 1.04
09111 93 72 0.01
09/112 92 73 0.00
*09/13 92" 71 0.00
TOTAL Rainfalln to 09/06/111 -42.19
Same period st year- 43.07
Ten Year Average 54.30
Source Un. of Fla. One Resarch Conter

INDEX
Classifieds..................6D
Community Calendar....5A
Courthouse Report....... 7C
Crime Blotter................7C
Hardee Living................2D
Obituaries...................4A
Information Roundup...5A
School Lunch Menus....6A



7 18122 07290 3


Only a few more than 11 per-
cent of the town's 638 regis-
tered voters turned out to vote.
The special election was
necessitated by the Aug. 2 death
of George Neel, who had held
Seat 2 on the Town Commis-
sion. As his replacement, White
will serve until the next General
Election in November of 2012.
White, of 3404 Acorn Dr., is
no newcomer to the commis-
sion. She had served one term


on that board before being
unseated last fall by first-time
candidate Rhonda Long. Long
won the election by four votes."
White now returns to the
panel, joining Long, Juan
Otero, Lois Dandridge and Sara
Schofield.
"I am really humbled by what
happened," White said on
Tuesday. "Needless to say, I
prayed about whether I should
See WHITE WINS 3A


Firefighters Extinguish 2


House Fires Within Days


By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
Two homes and their occu-
pants were spared in separate
house fires this past week.
Hardee County Fire-Rescue
responded to calls on Friday at
308 South St. in Wauchula and
on Tuesday at 2441 Begonia Dr.
in Crystal Lake Village, Emer-
gency Management Director
Rich Shepard reported.
No one was injured in either
blaze, though one occupant of
the mobile home was treated for
smoke inhalation at the scene,
he said.
The first call, on Friday, came
in at 3:29 p.m. Firefighters were
on scene by 3:35, arriving to
find one room of the South
Street house ablaze. Firefight-
ers quickly extinguished the


small fire, Shepard said.
Hardee Fire-Rescue respond-
ed with two engines, a tanker, a
rescue unit and four support
vehicles.
The home's two occupants
were unharmed, he said.
Several cases of herbicide
and fertilizer were involved in
the fire, requiring firefighters to
undergo decontamination be-
fore returning to service.
Shepard said it was later deter-
mined the products were not
hazardous materials.
Cause of the fire was faulty
electrical wiring, he said.
Damage estimates were
unavailable by press time.
The second house fire was
reported at 10:06 a.m. on
Tuesday. Hardee County Fire-
See FIREFIGHTERS 2A


By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
A 9-year-old girl who was
- thrown 30 feet when struck by a
car at her bus stop early Friday
was back in school on Tuesday.
"Angels were obviously with
our little fourth-grade girl last
Friday morning," Zolfo Springs
Elementary School Principal
Melanie Henderson said on
Wednesday.
"We are happy to report that
the student was back at school
,yesterday, and was even able to
climb the steps of the bus on her
own to ride home! She is a real
trooper."
According to a report filed by
the Florida Highway Patrol,
Lizbet Ramos of Wauchula was
struck as she attempted to board
a school bus stopped on State
Road 64 and Edwards Peace
Drive. It was 6:40 a.m., Tpr.
Jesse DeBoom said.
DeBoom said the eastbound
school bus had its red lights
flashing and its stop signs
extended at the time. The child
was crossing from the north
side of the road when she was
hit by a westbound 2001 Saturn
driven by Joe L. Bilbrey, 60, of
Wauchula, the trooper said.


Bilbrey was charged with
failure to stop for a stopped
school bus.
The bus driver and children
on the bus were able to see or
hear the accident, he said.
"Our students handled the sit-


uation very well and were most
supportive of the student,"
Henderson noted. "We had
school psychologists on hand
from the district office to listen
and provide support to all stu-
See CHILD HIT 2A


HEA/U Asks For


7-1/2% Pay Hike


By CYNTHIA KRAHL
Of The Herald-Advocate
School district employees are
seeking a pay raise amounting
to about 7-1/2 percent this year.
Contract negotiations be-
tween the Hardee County
School Board and the Hardee
Education Association/United
began in earnest just after the
start of the itew academic year.
Another session was held
Wednesday, and talks will con-
tinue each Wednesday at 4 p.m.
until an agreement is reached.
Bargaining sessions are held at
the School Board meeting room
at 230 S. Florida Ave.


Sitting on the administra-
tion's side of the table are
Woody Caligan, Marie Dasher
and George Kelly. On the
union's side are Selden
Spencer, Heather Lane, Gilbert
Vasquez, Paul Lukawski,
Angela Spornraft and Dennis
Tondee. Also at the table is
regional Education Association
representative Iris Froehlich.
The union has proposed an
across-the-board pay raise of
six percent. It also is asking for
continuation of the "step"
increase, which is an automatic
wage increase that goes along
See PAY HIKE 2A


EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PHOTO
Deputy Fire Chief Robert Clayton directs a ladder to be raised at a Wauchula house fire
Friday.


RED DEVILS

FALL TO 'CATS

.. .Story 1B


IA When Fishing

I BBug Bites

... Story 7B


1








2A The Herald-Advocate, September 15, 2011


The Herald-Advocate
Hardee County's Hometown Coverage
JAMES R. KELLY
Publisher/Editor
CYNTHIA M. KRAHL
Managing Editor


JOAN M. SEAMAN
Sports Editor .



115 S. Seventh Ave. rzlo J
P.O. Box 338
Wauchula, FL 33873


RALPH HARRISON
Production Manager

NOEY DE SANTIAGO
Asst. Prod. Manager

Phone: (863) 773-3255
Fax: (863) 773-0657


/' DEADLINES:
Schools Thursday 5 p.m.
Sports Monday noon
Hardee Living Thursday 5 p.m.
General News Monday 5 p.m.
Ads Tuesday noon .


LETTERS:
The Herald-Advocate welcomes ,letters to the editor on matters of public
interest. Letters should be brief, and must be written in good taste, signed
and include a daytime phone nuniber.
SUBMISSIONS:
Press releases on community matters are welcome. Submissions should Ibc
typed, double-spaced and adhere to the above deadlines. All items are sub-
ject to editing.
S'


Kelly's Column
By Jim


U





U


Wauchula's big growth planned in 2006-08 of 17 projects and
800 homes never happened. The sewer capacity was to be tripled.
That did not happen.
The real estate and economic downturn of 2008-09 canceled
the plans, said city of Wauchula finance director James Braddock.

Mosaic is one of the 10 largest private landowners in Florida.
Other big landowners include Plum Creek Timber, St. Joe
Company, Foley Timber, Rayonier, Lykes Brothers, Deseret
Ranches, Bascom Southern, Florida Crystals and U.S. Sugar.

Tampa's NFL Hall of Famer Lee Roy Selmon, 56, loved
Hardee County and came here several times, according to Doyle E.
Carlton III.
Selmon, who recently passed away from a stroke, spoke to
senior adults at First Baptist Church of Wauchula, to a student body
assembly at Hardee High School, to the Wildcat football team once
or twice, and to a civic group in Wauchula. He was from a small
town in Oklahoma and liked rural areas.
.After his nine-year NFL career with the Bucs, he was affiliat-
ed at.USF as athletic director.and community rdlations/fundraising.
He had barbecue restaurants and was pas chairman and a director
of the Florida State Fair in Tampa. Lee Roy was big, humble, gave
many compliments, and was admired and liked.

The Tampa Bay Rays have a family-friendly atmosphere at
Tropicana Dome. Fans can be removed if wearing a shirt with
offensive language. Sometimes free speech collides with business
policies.

A financial firm in Canada had a slogan of Freedom 55, trying
to help Canadians retire at age 55. However, at least two-thirds of
Canadians cannot afford to retire at age 55. Residents were encour-
aged to save and invest 10 percent of their net income.
That is hard to do, with living costs as they are. Many seniors.
in America are finding out they, too, cannot afford to retire. The
U.S. unemployment rate stands at 9 percent.

.Congratulations to Terry Atchley for being selected the new
city manager for Wauchula. This seems like a wise choice by the
Wauchula City Commission.

The Wauchula Post Office has an asset in Penny Smith, the
city carrier in Route 1. She works Monday through Saturday from
7:30 to 4, with 650 stops on her route. She has.worked for the
Postal Service for 18 1/2 years.

The Hardee High Wildcats are off to a strong 2-0 start and
travel to Sebring Friday night for a 7 p.m. kickoff.

No. 5 FSU hosts No. 1 Oklahoma Saturday. The Seminoles
seem to have turned the corner and returned to college football's
elite as a Top 10 team.

UF star runningback / receiver / returned / punt blocker Chris
Rainey of Lakeland was suspended five games last season for an
inappropriate text message. He has been a model player and citizen
this year and loves the offense under new coordinator Charlie Weis.

The GOP wants a Republican elected U.S. president in 2012
and to retain control of the U.S. House and have a majority in the
Senate.
The Democratic Party wants to retain Barack Obama as presi-
dent, keep a majority in the Senate and gain 24 Republican seats to
get control of the U.S. House again.
There are so many issues such as protecting America from ter-
rorism, creating jobs, guaranteeing retirement income for
American seniors, restoring fiscal responsibility in government,
protecting jobs for American workers, health care reform, stabiliz-
ing Afghanistan and Iraq, a strong national defense, tax rates for
,middle income and rich Americans, a recent U.S. Supreme Court
decision to let corporations spend an unlimited amount of money
on political campaigns, educational costs and opportunities, the so-
called climate change, energy efficiency, regulations on oil compa-
fies, Wall Street and big banks, etc.
Republicans generally want fewer restrictions on industry,
businesses, and the environment, lower taxes, less, government,
less welfare, a strong national defense, etc.
The Democrats are generally pro-union, pro gay rights, pro
abortion rights, for higher taxes on the wealthy, more welfare pro-
grams to help the poor and unemployed, etc.
The Republicans have won most of the elections in Florida in
recent years. Many Democrats have switched to Republican in
party registration. Leadership in a small rural agricultural county
with many churches like Hardee is mostly Republican at the gov-
ernment level.
The legislature, governor's office and cabinet in Florida are
controlled.by Republicans..
Locally, the Republican Party is active and well-organized,
unlike the Democratic Party.

Experience is the child of Thought, and Thought is the
child of Action. We cannot learn men from books.
-Benjamin Disraeli


Published weekly on Thursday at Wauchula, Florida, by The Herald-Advocate
Publishing Co. Inc. Periodical Postage paid at U.S. Post Office, Wauchula, FL
33873 and additional entry office (USPS 578-780), "Postmaster," send address
changes to: The Herald-Advocate. P.O. Box 338, Wauchula, FL 33873.


United proposes adequate
salaries and benefits for all dis-
trict employees.
"These, too, are most essen-
tial in attracting highly quali-
fied professionals and in dis-
couraging the high turnover rate
of teachers, on which no' true
foundation for excellence in
education may be established.'
"As it celebrates 30 years of
successful collective bargain-
ing, it is on these principles and
ideals with which HEA/United
meets the Hardee School
District representatives in good
faith," it concludes.


EDA Down To One Applicant


SUBSCRIPTIONS:
Hardee County
months S$18; yr. S31; 2 yrs. $60
Florida
6 months S22; I yr. $4t; 2 yrs. $79
Out of State
6 months $27; I yr. $49; 2 yrs. S95


PAY IKE
Continued From 1A
with each additional year of
service and experience. For
most workers, that step
amounts to about 1-1/2 percent
more.
Combined, the two would
mean 7-1/2 percent more in
paychecks, which were recently
reduced by three percent by the
state Legislature, which re-
quired school workers to fund
their own Florida Retirement
System accounts.
Contract language is also
under negotiation. No substan-
tial changes are proposed, how-
ever.
In opening statements, the
administration offered the fol-
lowing message to employees,
delivered by Caligan:
"The superintendent and
School Board appreciate
Hardee Education Association/
United's willingness to work
together on difficult educational
issues. The administration
wants HEA/United to remain a
partner in making significant
decisions that affect the contin-
ued improvement of our
schools.
"I wish to thank each
employee for his/her extraordi-
nary efforts to provide quality
educational opportunity for our
children. These efforts are evi-
dent in the success of our stu-
dents.
"As you are aware, the dis-
trict is facing some tough eco-
nomic times. Yet the superin-
tendent and the board remain
committed to not only provid-
ing quality education for our
children, but also supporting all
our employees. We intend to
maintain the integrity of the
classroom and to support facul-
ties and staff members in their
efforts to educate and teach the
children of Hardee District
Schools.
"As we enter into negotia-
tions, let us all remember that
public schools exist solely for
children, and not for us. We
look forward to our continued
partnership working together
for the students of Hardee
County," the administration
concluded.
For its part, the union offered
the following opening state-
ment:
"The HEA/United negotiat-
ing team of the current school
year is pleased to meet with the
representatives of the Hardee
County School District. Our
intent being that this assembly
will result in mutual agreement
for terms ensuring the contin-
ued high quality education for
our district's students.
"We purpose to be conducive
to the needs and expectations of
the district's employees in their
professional and personal lives.
"Our objectives for this dia-
logue include that educators be
assured all students feel protect-
ed in our care and that each stu-
dent understands the reward of
good behavior and consistent
attendance. These issues are
neither costly nor negotiable.
"So, too, Hardee district
teachers must be able to expect
that state laws limiting the num-
ber of students per classroom
will be adhered to. This provi-'
sion made possible by hiring
sufficient numbers of high-
quality personnel.
"Teachers should expect
every student to have access to
educational materials arid' their
own textbook.
"In meeting these basic stan-
dards, Hardee School District
further demonstrates its com-
mitment and responsibility to
its students.
"In our effort to represent
hundreds of school district
employees, HEA/United also
recognizes the economic chal-'
Slenges faced on local, state and
national levels. While the issues
faced by our community's edu-
cation system are not to be dis-
missed, neither can the effect of
the current consumer market on
our district's employees be
ignored.
"Just as the district must meet
the -demanding expenditures oT
operating the system, so too
must educators meet the grow-
ing financial cost of maintain-
ing their family household.
"For this mission, HEA/


EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PHOTOS
Firefighters prepare to make entry into a South Street
residence.


The rear bedroom of this mobile home caught fire
Tuesday morning.


Co F HIT
Continued From 1A


dents on tne ous who had wit-
nessed the accident."
Rob Krahl, district director of
transportation and educational
facilities, said the bus driver
was shaken by the incident.
"She is a long-time driver, well-
experienced and does a good
job. It truly upset her, because
she actually saw it happen."
Routing specialist Matt Scott
said his colleague, Sophie
Smith, completed the rest of the
driver's route for her that morn-
ing, as*is district policy when an
accident occurs. She was back
on her route Monday, with
another driver, and on her own
by Tuesday.
"She's a veteran driver," said
Scott. "But no matter how vet-
eran you are, something like
this can rattle you. She handled
it well."


The 9-year-old was at the bus-
stop with her parents. She went
out into the roadway, and was
hit by the left front of the car,
Tpr. DeBoom said. She was
knocked about 30 feet, to the
back of the bus.
"It's just a God thing, how
that can happen and she could
wind up with such minor
injuries," Scott said.
Cautioned Krahl, "We would
like to remind drivers that when
a school bus is stopped and its
red lights are blinking, that's a
legal traffic control device and
they need to pay attention to it."
Bus activity is in full swing,
now that the new school year
has opened, he reminded.
"We are so grateful there was
a good outcome," he said of the
incident.


By MICHAEL KELLY
Of The Herald-Advocate
The county Economic De-
velopment Authority has only
one application remaining for
its Sept. 26 meeting.
Country Gardens has pulled
its grant application from EDA
consideration because it did not
perceive the board supported
the project.
Country Gardens was asking
for $2.18 million to build an
$8.5 million assisted living
facility in Wauchula. Edward
Pontier, a partner in the project
with Lavon Cobb and others,
notified the EDA by letter Sept.
9.
"We firmly believe there is a
need for such a facility in the
community and further believe
that such a facility would be
financially successful with pub-
lic support in the, form of the
grant," Pontier wrote in the let-
ter.
The board decided it will not
give funding to the Center for
Great Apes because it was a
non-profit agency and was not
open to the public.
Patty Reagan, executive
director for the center, said it
has never received grant fund-
ing before and relies on private
donations to operate the sanctu-
ary for chimpanzees and orang-
utans.
Seven other applicants for the




Continue
Rescue arrived on scene within
four minutes, Shepard said.
The rear bedroom of the
mobile home on Begonia Drive
was the origination point for the
blaze. Fire crews found a mat-
tress and much of the room's
contents in flames.
Firefighters were able to
quickly douse the blaze, and
then removed burned debris
from the residence, Shepard
said.
Three people were, in the


severance tax monies. were
denied previously.
The last of the ten original
applicants being consideration
is Peace River Explorations,
which has lowered its request
initial to $589,228 from $1.2
million at the August meeting.
Board members expressed
their desires to fund the group
up to $400,000 for building ren-
ovations but not provide money
for operating expenses.
Renovations would be done
on the north end of the old train
depot on U.S. 17 which would
house PRE offices and a local
art gallery as well as a fossil
museum at some later time.
Independent Development
Authority Executive Director
Bill Lambert said the estimated.
restoration costs are between
$280,000 and $310,000. Patti
Detwiler, executive director of
PRE, said it would cost
$400,000 to restore the depot.
Detwiler presented the lower
application because she wanted
the Wauchula Community
Redevelopment Agency to be
given the money to rehab the
"building, taking the burden off
of PRE to oversee the renova-
tions.
The $589,228 budget submit-
ted in the grant application was
for operating expenses for the
first year.
It includes two executive




'd From 1A
mobile home when the fire
started, he added, noting that
one of them had to be treated on
the scene for smoke inhalation,
but did not require hospitaliza-
tion.
Cause of the fire is undeter-
mined at this time.
Shepard said managers of the
mobile home and recreational
vehicle park are allowing the
displaced family to stay in a
rental unit at the park.


salaries totaling $124,999.92
and one full-time employee to
run the visitor center for
$41,250. The two executives
would be Detwiler as executive
director and Kathleen Roehm as
marketing director.
Part time visitor information
center employees would ac-
count for $15,45dwith an addi-
tional $15,450 a year for part-
time workers for the art gallery.
Development fees of
$62,500.08 are budgeted to be
paid during the first month of
opening, which Detwiler said
were for the many hours of pre-
,vious work done on the project
by herself and Roehm.
Festival planning and enter-
tainment would account for
$56,000 and $30,000 would go
toward marketing develop-
ment.
Office furnishing and equip-
ment would total $35,000 and
the website development would
cost $24,000.
The remainder of the money
would be used for insurance,
utilities, a security system and
various other overhead expens-
es.
Detwiler hoped to move into
the south end of the depot and
start the website and concierge
service within a few months but
does not anticipate being able to
begin operating with a
$400,000 grant.


HARDEE COUNTY
KIDS NEED
HARDEE COUNTY
HELP!
Ease a dependent child's
way through the court sys-
tem. Volunteer to be a
Guardian Ad Litem.
773-2505
(If office unattended, please leave
message.)



1 ouititg A on/Oy















HERMINIO
AGUILAR
Herminio Aguilar, 57, of
Wauchula, died on Monday,
Sept. 12,2011, in Lakeland.
Born Dec. 28, 1953, in
Mexico, he lived in Hardee
County most of his life. He
was a machinery escort driver.
Survivors include four
sons, Herminio Aguilar Jr.,
Gabriel Aguilar, Nick Aguilar
and Abel Aguilar, all of
Wauchula; five daughters,
Terri Martinez and husband
Modesto, and Sherri Huron
and husband Jerry, all of
Wauchula; Angela Rodriguez
and husband Damian, and
Angelica Aguilar of Bowling.
Green, and Rebecca Huron
and husband Johnny of
Wauchula; 11 brothers and
sisters Javier Aguilar and wife
Frances, and Herlinda
Tomayo and husband Emilio,
all of Bowling Green; Irma
Ortiz and husband Juan of
Michigan, Robert Aguilar and
wife Janie of Mexico, Ernest
Aguilar and wife Jennie of
Zolfo Springs, Maria Arreola
and husband Christopher of
Wauchula, Elvira Juarez and
husband Greg of Indiana,
Antonio Aguilar and wife
Peggy of Cocoa Beach, Sally
Morales and husband Jose
Louis of Wauchula, Rosa
McUmber and husband
Robert of Indiana, and Raulph
Aguilar of Bowling Green;
and 16 grandchildren.
Visitation is today (Thurs-
day) at Robarts Garden
Chapel from 6 to 8 p.m.
Services are tomorrow at
Faith Temple Ministries
Church of God at 10 a.m. with
Pastor Wendell G. Smith offi-
ciating. Interment follows at
Friendship Cemetery.
Expressions of comfort may
be made at robartsfh.com.


FUNERAL HOME
WAUCHULA


9Wvf






September 15, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 3A


Budget Main Fire-Rescue Issue


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
After three hours of discus-
sion, the main workshop topic
was ioney.
The Hardee County Com-
mission met last Friday for its
monthly workshop session,
focusing on the Fire-Rescue
Department. The main issues
were overtime and use of part-
time employees and/or volun-
teers to take up some of that
cost.
' Chairman Terry Atchley
asked each of the commission-
ers to say what they thought
were the problems with Fire-
Rescue and what needed to
change. Each added more com-
ments as the long morning pro-
gressed (see comments below)
Eventually, Fire Chief Mich-
ael Choate and Deputy Chief
Bob Clanton were invited to the
table and several people from
the audience added their input.
As the meeting wound down,
County Manager Lex Albritton
first explained some of the rea-
sons Fire-Rescue costs have
escalated. One is that when
assessments were discussed
with municipalities, they had to
consent to be assessed. Bowling
Green did so with the condition
that the fire department have a
presence in the community.
That entailed a two-man sta-
tion, times three 24-hour shifts,
equals six employees.
Albritton continued, "A lieu-
tenant and two more staff were
added in Zolfo Springs, adding
nine staff. So altogether, there's
.been 15 more staff. Those dol-
lars were not independent ac-
tions. Words don't reflect
what's been happening," he
commented.
Referring to commissioner
comments, Albritton said,
"Instead of going to other coun-
ties to get information, come to
your staff. Other counties have
MSBUs (multiple service tax-
ing units) or special taxing dis-
tricts for their services. They
don't compare.
"If you don't like the way ,
it's handled, fire me. If you
don't like what I'm doing fire
me. If you don't want the coun-
ty manager form of govern-
ment, change it," concluded
Albritton to Clapping of the
packed house audience.
Although that meeting drew
to a close, the issue is not over.
On the agenda for the meeting
tonight (Thursday) are three
related items. The first, at 7:15
p.m., is directing staff to pre-
pare policies and procedures


regarding volunteer programs
and hiring part-time employees.
The second, at 7:25 p.m., is a
request by Commissioner
Grady Johnson to discuss
Albritton's closing statements
at the planning session. Johnson
made it clear during his cam-
paign and since his election last
year that his intent is to fire
Albritton, and perhaps also
Chief Choate.
The third, about 7:40 p.m., is
submittal of county manager
evaluations. The first-ever
county-manger evaluation was
done a year ago and is due
again.
AUDIENCE
PARTICIPATION
A portion of last week's
workshop included comments
from several people from the
audience.
Jay Clark
One was Jay Clark, chairman
of the voluntary citizen's advi-
sory board, which has spent
over a year researching and
gathering information 'from
many sources. "Some people
think Fire-Rescue boils down to
a Cadillac approach. We've
worked with the chief and
county manager, homeowners,
businessmen, a wide variety of
people here and around the
state.
There are no easy answers
and none will be popular.
People will be split about 49-51
percent and, hopefully, you're
with the 51 percent. But, we
need direction what you want
us to do. Ultimately, the deci-
sion has to come from you-all.
You have to look not just for
today, but for tomorrow. The
tax base isn't growing. You
have to look 25 to 30 years
down the road" said Clark.
Derren Bryan
Another speaker was Derren
Bryan, general manager at
Albritton Insurance Co., who
spoke at Commissioner Sue
Birge's request. Bryan ex-
plained the factors in getting
property insurance is the pro-
tection class assigned by the
Insurance Standards Organi-
zation, which is determined on
firefighter response time,
equipment, proximity to a fire
hydrant and other facts.
Protection classes vary from
1 to 10, being close to a hydrant
to over 1,000 feet from a
hydrant. "We're an independent
company, meaning we deal with
multiple providers. It's hard to
find a company that will even
provide coverage to a location
rated 10. Just moving from a 2


rating to 9 could mean more
than $900 difference in premi-
ums, even if we can locate one
to cover the homeowner or
business. I've talked with Chief
Choate and he has been doing
things to bring the ISO rating
down. If services are cut, the
ISO will go up and premiums
will also go up. The satellite
stations improve response time
and brings the ratings down,"
said Bryan.
Fire Marshal
Fire Marshal Brandon Ball, a
former Hardee firefighter who
went on and got training to
investigate fires, serves a 12-
county area of urban and rural,
from a two-person volunteer
station to a huge one. "In my
travels all over the state, Hardee
County is well-known as a
model. It's a model to be proud
of. It's not a Cadillac service.
Every firefighter from the chief
down would be more than will-
ing to have volunteers assist, if
there were any willing. The
wheel rolls here well, don't
invent another wheel.
"Others have special taxing
districts to provide volunteer
services. For instance, the west
Sebring one has a lot of com-
mercial territory to help pay for
the funding and equipment for
that volunteer station. Polk
County is consolidating. Man-
atee has 15 taxing districts.
DeSoto has some to. Even with
taxing districts, Highlands is
closing some volunteer stations.
Just because you're using vol-
unteers doesn't mean you can
lower standards. The Babson
Park volunteer department dis-
banded due to the lack of com-
mitment. There's no place bet-
ter than Hardee. It all starts with
the commission. You could go
on forever on the volunteer vs.
paid but you need to concen-
trate on what you have, Ball
concluded.
Employees
Hardee County Fire-Rescue
Medical Director Dr. Greg
White, was asked about servic-
es in Polk County. "I've been in
the business for 27 years in
Polk County. The issue has
been studied more so in the last
five years, but as of March,
Polk County has amalgamated
its fire and ambulance into the
Polk County Fire/EMS service.
It took five years to study it and
make a decision.
Dan Harshburger, former
deputy chief in Hardee County
for seven years, moved to
Jensen Beach 18 months ago.
"For my entire career here, I


heard almost weekly that
Hardee is a Cadillac service.
I've worked in four different
counties in my career, with dif-
ferent styles and functions.
There is no Cadillac in Hardee
County Fire-Rescue. They
don't buy junk that would cost
more to fix, but they buy wise-
ly. You are getting an extremely
good service for the least
amount of money.
"During the time I was here,
Chief Choate cut the turnover
rate. Once almost 60 percent, it
is now four percent, just retire-
ments and such. People who
work there believe in the
department. It appears to the
public there's a vendetta here,
personal against the fire chief.
Put it to bed and let him get
back to the financial, fiscal
responsibility (audience clap-
ping on this comment). You can
research over and over. If you
don't get the information you
want, you search for more.
There's an ulterior motive in
asking for more information."
COMMISSION COMMENTS
Minor Bryant
The District I Commissioner
was first to speak about his
goals and concerns for the Fire-
Rescue Department.
"We don't have enough
General Revenue (tax dollars)
for the non-profits of the coun-
ty. We need to look at part-time
Fire/EMS pool instead of over-
time. If we can get the union to
agree, maybe we can use fill-in
people. Remember there are
two new fire stations, naturally
that's more people to pay, why
we consolidated fire and EMS,
and cut down on administrative
costs.
"If my child or grandchild is
in a fire and trapped, I want
them there. The cost to run to
that accident is small compared.
I personally think they're doing
a good job. We have people
from other counties work here,
and some from Hardee County
work elsewhere. Perhaps on
their days off, they could fill in.
"It would be nice to have a
couple of volunteer stations in
other parts of the county, but we
don't have the commercial base
to provide the two or three mil-
lion it could cost."
Sue Birge
The District 2 Commission
was up next. "Ever since I've
been on this dais, we've been
discussing this. We need to clar-
ify the mission/goal. I agree
with Commissioner Bryant that
it's a concern with overtime
costs. Let's retire this heated


discussion."
She continued, "It's not an
emergency unless it's mine. If
it's me, come fast with what
you have. The morale in the
department is bad, there's a lot
of unrest. I've researched the
issue, DeSoto County has 51,
Okeechobee 60. We have 39
staff. Highlands has volunteers
but depends on Avon Park and
Sebring for their back up.
We've got no backup.
"The bottom line is what's
best for the citizens of Hardee
County. We can scrutinize it to
any degree, but overtime is a
problem. Do we want to cut
services? If we do, and people
can't get insurance that's a
problem. Overtime relates to
response time. There's also the
two in, two out requirement,
unless a victim has been con-
firmed. All our people are
cross-trained. You get both for
the same dollars.
"We've had good discussion
today. I'm even more convinced
that we are getting the best bang
for the buck. The cost is not out
of line for what we're getting. I
have confidence in our fire
department and I. want it to stay
that way.
Dale Johnson
"Cost is the problem. We
have one of the best fire/EMS
departments around and I'm
proud of them and appreciate
them. Do we really want volun-
teers? We could do away with
overtime with three new posi-
tions, at about $100,000, about
what our overtime runs. I'd
really like to settle this and
silence the discontent," said the
District 5 Commissioner. "If it's
not broke, don't fix it," he
added.
"Overtime with Peace River
Electric -is because they're
working, not just sitting there.
So it is with our folks. They
have to be ready to respond
immediately. If we don't follow
the rules on staffing, we open
ourselves to lawsuits. We don't
want to go to fire taxing dis-
tricts like they do elsewhere.
We need to be careful of our
words, not investigating some-
thing, let's just study it," he
concluded.
Grady Johnson
The District 4 Commission-
er's main issue was'the over-,
time budget. Using figures from
the Clerk of Court's payroll, he
reviewed overtime hours in the
past decade. He said with virtu-
ally 0 population grouth,
pulling out ad valorem tax
money, drastic increases in


overtime were unwarranted. He
suggested it was time tosegre-
gate the EMS and fire service
departments to reduce the over-
time hours.
Johnson said he "at no time
suggested cutting services, just
improve them at no additional
cost by filling the gap ~vith vol-
unteers. Let's dissect this thing,
29 of the 39 firefighters don't
live in the county. Give an
opportunity to citizens to cut
the response time. If there were
volunteer departments all over,
by working together, we could
roll back the overtime. There's
a unique explosion of volun-
teers all over the nation. A vol-
unteer takes his dedication from
the administration. There's a
golden opportunity here to
cherry pick from around the
state for the best ideas and get
the best bang for the buck," he
said.
"We have a great department,
but we can do better. We want
to add the quality of services for
the minimum amount of mon-
ey," concluded Johnson.
Terry Atchley
The District 3 chairman let
the other four commissioners
have their say, he tried to sum it
up. "How to implement some of
these ideas and function is the
point. What policies do we
need. Are we doing what is best
for the county? Do we advertise
for volunteers? Is there a possi-
bility for part-time workers?
"None of this evolved over-
night. The department has ex-
panded. We need to look at fair
and equitable expenditures, the
possibility of part-time or vol-
unteer staff. We have to tip our
hat to our employees. We need
to have the board to come to-
gether in a unified way to help
us help the fire department. We
will continue this to the next
meeting to act on some of this.
Let's put the dissenting and de-
moralizing to an end and put it
to bed. We need to look only at
budgets, costs and expendi-
tures."
Chief Michael Choate
Joining the discussion about
half-way through, Chief Choate
expressed his willingness to
more than consider volunteers
and said there would probably
be little problem in developing
a roster of part-time employees
to fill in for scheduled and
unscheduled absences of regu-
lar staff members.
He asked that anyone inter-
ested get in touch with him. The
administrative line at the fire
department is 773-4362.


U.S. 17 Construction Begins


By MICHAEL KELLY
Of The Herald-Advocate
Construction on the first
phase of four-laning U.S. 17
began this week as crews are
working on site preparations for
the $17 million, five-mile proj-
ect.
The first phase runs south
from Seventh Avenue in Zolfo
Springs to CR 634/Sweetwater
Road. AJAX Paving Industries
of Florida, Inc. will be the con-
tractor doing the work for F-


DOT.
The new northbound lanes
will be on the east side of the
current road. Once the north'-
bound lanes are complete, the
current road will be resurfaced
and become the southbound
lanes.
The roads will be separated
by a 64-foot wide median with
a gradual two-foot downward
slope to the middle of the medi-
an. A total of 11 new retention
ponds will be dug along the


way and the Alligator Branch
Creek Bridge will be widened
and improved.
The work will begin from the
south and move north into
Zolfo Springs. FDOT is antici-
pating the project taking 650
days to complete.
The remainder of U.S. 17 is
scheduled to be four-laned to
the Desoto County line within
the FDOT's five-year plan.


/
'IT


S


.-


PHOTO BY MICHAEL KELLY
Sheriff Arnold Lanier, left, County Commissioner Sue Birge and County Manager Lex
Albritton look at the map detailing four-laning of U.S. 17 at an open house put on by
the Florida Department of Transportation In Zolfo, Springs last week.




YOUR BUSINESS COULD

APPEAR HERE TOO!!
Contact
Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels

773-3255


Giovanni's Main Street Kitch-
en, streamlining processes,
inventories, customer satisfac-
tion, and coordinating licenses
and permits for the restaurant.
In his cover letter, Atchley
said "I have a solid history in
management and extensive
experience in the private and
public sectors. I have built and
successfully managed staffs of
100-plus, and I deal effectively
with executives, contractors
and department heads to
achieve tangible results--
achievements all critical to city
management." Over the years
he had managed three to nine
employees directly, with up to
400 under them.
During his Aug. 9 interview
for the city manager slot,
Atchley he has lived and
worked in Hardee County his
entire life and has a strong com-
mitment to the city and county.
He has been involved in local
organizations, including the
Fair Association, library coop-
erative, Chamber of Commerce,
Kiwanis and First Baptist
Church children's activities.
Although he does not have a
college degree, he has complet-
ed numerous managerial certifi-
cations, including the certified
county commissioner training
through the University of
Florida. He said he is the best.
candidate because he "can hit
the ground running and not go
through the learning curve out-
siders do."
He hopes to take a team
approach and feels he brings
more positives to the position.
He plans an open door policy
and expects to resolve employ-
ee issues. "If the city manager is
doing his job correctly and
effectively, there should never
be employee issues coming
before the committee."
He will look to the commis-
sion for its ,ision and he plans
to meet all of their expectations,
be accountable. He sees a learn-
ing curve on the airport and'


Continued From 1A
other issues. "If the learning
curve ever flattens out, you
need to get rid of me because in
government things are always
changing. You have to learn
how to work with every person-
ality."
He said Tuesday that once
everything was finalized, he
wanted to sit down with staff
leaders and let them bring up
their challenges and opportuni-
ties. The immediate goal would
be to get everyone pulling in the
same direction.
Atchley won the job Monday
night on a 6-1 vote when the
Wauchula commission held its
monthly meeting. Chairman/-
Mayor Knight had announced
at the beginning of the meeting
a format for all issues. When a
motion is made and seconded,
the commission will discuss it,
then seek audience input.
People who want to speak can
line up at the podium and each
will have a maximum of three
minutes. Then the commission
will respond to any of the com-
ments.
When selection of the city
manager came up third on the
agenda, Knight asked for nomi-
nations. There was a lull before
Commissioner Kenny Bakerl
made a motion to approve


CPR Class On
Sept. 24
South Florida Community
College Is offering a Cardio
Pulmonary Resuscitation
(CPR) and first aid course
from 8 a.m. to noo n Sept.
24 at the local college, 2968
U.S. 17 N., Bowling Green.
Students will participate in
simulated clinical scenarios
and learning stations, work
with a certified instructor to
complete Basic Life Support
skills practice and skills test-
ing and complete an exam.
Cost is $30. To register, call
773-2252.


Atchley. It was seconded by
Commissioner John Freeman.
Commissioner Russell Smith
asked if there would be other
nominees. Ables said the first
motion had to be handled first
and then it would depend on the
vote. Smith said he had dis-
cussed his concerns with
Athchley (limited government
managerial experience) at the
workshop and would prefer
another candidate.
There was no input from the
standing-room-only audience
and no other comments from
the commission. When the vote
was taken, only Russell Smith
dissented. Commissioners Bak-
er, Freeman, Gary Smith, Keith
SNadaskay, Pattie Detwiler and
Knight all voted "yes."




MWITE WINS
Continued From 1A
run, but the results seemed to be
confirmation."
White is a high-school gradu-
ate who has taken some college
courses, specifically in law,
business law, civil litigation and
Spanish. She is a retired legal
assistant who was employed by
the State Attorney's Office in
Wauchula.
She is a certified notary.
White is anxious to continue
the work accomplished during
her time on the commission,
including such town achieve-
ments as obtaining millions in
grant money for the sewer sys-
tem, improving public safety,
and bolstering the town's finan-
cial health.
The Zolfo Springs Town
' Commission will next meet this
. coming Monday at 6 p.m.

Every day I get up and look
through the Forbes list of
the richest people In
America. If I'm not there, I
go to work.






4A The Herald-Advocate, September 15,2011


Obituaries
---- "*** *


IRENE O. AUSTIN
Irene 0. Austin, 95, of
Wauchula, went to be with
the Lord on Tuesday, Sept. 6,
2011, after a brief illness and
stay at the Good Shepherd
Hospice Center in Sebring.
Born April 20, 1916, in
Fort Meade, she came to
Wauchula in her early child-
hood. She is remembered for
her service in the community
as a longtime active member
of the First United Methodist
Church and a Pink Lady at
Wauchula hospital.
Her survivors include her
husband, Carl Austin of
Zolfo Springs; her daughters
Johnnie Powner of Blairs-
ville, Ga. and Karen McCoy
of Hardy, Va., son James
Oliver of Hudson; as well as
stepdaughters Christine
Swank, Judy Althouse and
Nancy Davis and stepson
Michael Austin.
She was blessed with a
large and loving family,
including nine grandchildren;
14 great-grandchildren and
nine great-great-grandchil-
dren.
A memorial service cele-
brating her life was held on
Saturday, Sept. 10, at the
First United Methodist
Church at 11 a.m. Her re-
mains will be laid to rest at
Wauchula Cemetery.
National Cremation
Society
Sarasota


In Memory


MERLE MOORE DAVIS
Merle Moore Davis, 80, of
Ona, died on Friday, Sept. 9,
2011, in Lakewood Ranch.
She was born on Feb. 18,
1931, in Hardee County and
was a lifelong resident. Merle
was a proud ranch owner and
enjoyed gardening, spending
time with her grandchildren,
and was very active in her
church, New Zion Baptist in
Ona.
She was preceded in death
by her beloved husband Roy
H. Moore; two grandchildren
Billy Madison Roberts and
Todd Johnson; and her par-
ents Madison and Hazel
'Bryan Long.
She is survived' by three
daughters, Shirley Roberts
and husband Billy of
Wauchula, Jan Platt and hus-
band John of Zolfo Springs,
and Susan Carlton of Ona;
son, David Moore and wife
Sandra of Wauchula; five
grandchildren, Alisha Moore
Evans and husband Anthony,
Daniel Roy Moore and wife
Meg, Julie Platt Cook and
husband Daniel, Jaime Platt
Carnley and husband Jason,
and Lynn Roberts Robinson
and husband Markus; and one
great-grandchild Brody Cook.
Visitation was Sunday,
Sept. 11, 2011, from 2 to 3
p.m. at New Zion Baptist
Church where services were
held at 3 p.m. with Pastor
Stephen Darley and Pastor
Chris Bishop officiating.
Interment followed in New
Zion Cemetery.
On-line condolences may be
made at www.PongerKays-
Grady.com or at wwwJace-
book.com/pkgfh.

Pongeft-cayO-g0aody
Funeral Homes
Wauchula
,Z-^

m-\


ROBERT MATTHEW
REVELL
Robert Matthew Revell, 61,
of Bowling Green, died on
Thursday, Sept. 8, 2011, at
Sebring.
Born Sept. 6, 1950, at
Bowling Green, he was a life-
time resident and a farmer. He
was a Vietnam veteran serving
in the U. S. Marine Corps. He
attended First Baptist Church of
Bowling Green.
He was preceded in death by
his parents, Iris and Merle 1
Revell; and brother Lelan
"Skippy" Revell.
He is survived by his wife
Jenny A. Revell of Bowling
Green; three sons, Robert
Matthew Revell Jr., and Mich-
ael Horace Revell and wife
Rachael, all of Bowling Green,
and Keith Allen Revell and wife
Shanna Kuen of Wauchula;
brother Gerald Marsh Revell of
Sebring; sister Brenda Merle
Braxton and husband Mike of
Center Hill; and six grandchil-
dren Hannah and i Wayne
Revell, Kyleigh Revell, and
Isaac, Andrew and Matthew
Kuen.
Visitation was Sunday, Sept.
11 at the funeral home from 6 to
8 pm. Services were Monday at
2 p.m. at First Baptist Church of
Bowling Green, with the Rev.
Roland Davis officiating, fol-
lowed by interment at Paynes:
Creek Cemetery.
Robarts Family
Funeral Home
Wauchula

MARY KATHRYN GRIMES
Mary Kathryn Grimes, 77, of
Wauchula, died on Sunday,
Sept. 11, 2011, at Hardee
Manor Care Center.
Born July 22, 1934, at
Daleville, Ala., she was a life-
long Wauchula resident. She
was of the Baptist faith.
She was preceded in death by
parents O.B. and Julia Grimes;,
brother Fred Grimes; and sister
Elna Moore.
Survivors include sisters Fay
Hanusch of Bowling Green and
Era Nell Henson of Wauchula;
and brothers Murry Grimes of
Winter Haven and Ray Grimes
of Wauchula.
Visitation is today (Thurs-
day) at the funeral home from I
to 1:45 p.m. Graveside services
and burial will be 2 p.m. at
Wauchula Cemetery.
Robarts Family
Funeral Home
Wauchula

The first national collegiate
fraternity was Sigma Phi
founded at Hamilton
College in Clinton, N.Y. In
1827. It is the second old-
est Greek fraternal society
after Phi Beta Kappa.


A :oUing & elnoy


Hang on to your glass. Prior to 1750, coasters originally came with small wheels st
drinks could be moved across a table. Sometimes shaped like tiny wagons, they were
also known as sliders.


If a car is traveling at 55
miles per hour it will travel
56 feet before the average
driver can shift his foot
from the accelerator to the
brake.


In Memory






/-







CHARLES W. BROWDER
Charles W. Browder, 86,
died in Sebring on Friday,
Sept. 9,2011.
He was born in Charleston,
S. C. and moved to this area
in 1950. He was a member of
the First Baptist Church of
Wauchula and a former dea-
con and enjoyed golfing and
hunting.
He honorably served Our
Country during World War II,
obtaining the rank of ser-
geant. While serving in the
European Theater (Northern
France, Rhineland, Central
Europe; Ardannes), he re-
ceived a Purple Heart, Good
Conduct Medal, EAME
Theater Ribbon with four
Bronze Stars, and World War
II Victory medal.
He was preceded in death
by his beloved wife Pearl
Browder.
He is survived by one son,
Charles "Chuck" Browder Jr.
and wife Debbie of Phoenix,
Ariz.; one daughter Miriam
Hopper and husband Bryan of
Sebring; one brother Jack
Browder of Washington
State; one sister Esther
Thomas of McKinney; four
grandchildren; and 10 great-
grandchildren.
Visitation is tomorrow
(Friday). Sept. 16 from 10:30-
11:30 a.m. with services at
11:30 a.m. at the First Baptist
Church of Wauchula with
Pastor Harold Howze of
Gospel Tabernacle officiat-
ing. Military honors will be
rendered following the serv-
ice. Burial will be private.
On-line condolences can be
made at www.Ponger-
KaysGrady.com or at
www.facebook.com/pkgfh.
PongeNi-iays-Qgiady
Funeral Homes
Wauchula
'3
r'/)~


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L FAMILY FUNERAL HOME
A Trusted Family Name Since 1906





529 West Main Street Wauchula 863-773-9773
View Obits at robartsfh.com 9:ettc


MARY KATHRYN
GRIMES
Mary Kathryn Grimes, 77,
of Wauchula, died on Sunday,
Sept. 11, 2011, at Hardee
Manor Care Center.
She was born on July 22,
1934, in Daleville, Ala. and
was a lifelong Wauchula resi-
dent. She loved her family and
was of the Baptist faith.
She was preceded in death
by her parents, O.B. and Julia
Grimes; brother Fred Grimes;
and sister Elna Moore.
She is survived by two sis-
ters, Fay Hanusch of Bowling
Green and Era Nell Henson
of Wauchula; and two broth-
ers Murry Grimes of Winter
Haven and Ray Grimes of
Wauchula.
Visitation is todAy (Thurs-
day), Sept. 15, at Robarts
Garden Chapel from 1 to 1:45
p.m., followed by graveside
services and burial at 2 p.m. at
Wauchula Cemetery.
Expressions of comfort may
be made at robartsfh.com.

FUNERAL HOME
WAUCHULA


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IObituaries


MELFORD GILLEY
Melford Gilley, 83, of Wau-
chula, died on Tuesday, Sept. 6,
2Q11, at home.
Born on Dec. 14, 1927, at
Geneva, Ala., he came to
Hardbe County from Tampa 38
years ago. He served in the U.S.
Army and was pastor of the
Open Door Full Gospel Praise
Center in Bowling Green.
Survivors include wife Vida
Gilley of Wauchula; four
daughters Darlene Waddell and
husband Chet of West Palm,
Diane Buwalda and husband
David of Murphy, N.C., Denise
'Landphear and husband Keith
of TenneAsee and Betty Lou
Gilley of Riverview; one son
Melford Brian Gilley and wife
Bonnie of Zolfo Springs; two
Stepsons Terry Carmichael and
wife Beverly of Orlando and
'Matt Dillon and wife Jan of
'Sebring; brother Lloyd Gilley
and wife Barbara of Crystal
River; sister Lois Mills and hus-
band Pierce of Lake City; 15
grandchildren; and 16 great-
grandchildren.
Visitation was last Friday at
the funeral home from 6 to 8
p.m. Services were Saturday at
2 p.m. at Open Door Full
Gospel Praise Center with Matt
Dillon officiating. Interment
;followed in Wauchula Ceme-
tery.
Robarts Family
Funeral Home
Wauchula


September 15, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 5A1:


Lozano An Undefeated Champion


Savvy Senior
By Jim Miller
Senior Advocate


SIMPLIFIED COMPUTERS FOR SENIORS
Dear Savvy Senior,
Do you know of any home computers that are specifically 1
designed for senior citizens? I would like to get a computer for my \
73-year-old mother, but she's not computer savvy at all.
Looking Around .
Dear Looking,
There are actually several computers on the market today that
are designed specifically for older boomers and seniors who want,
and need, to keep things simple. Here are some top options to
check out:
Telikin: For seniors with little or no computer experience the
new Telikin "touch-screen" computer is a wonderful option. Ready
to go right out of the box, this innovative computer comes pre-
loaded with simplified software that makes accessing the Web, e-
mail, games, video chat, photo sharing, news, weather and more
just a touch of the screen away.
And since it runs on Linux software instead of the standard
Windows or Mac OS, it's a virus-free computer, too.
Telikin comes with a 60-day trial period, one-year warranty
and free support for the first 60 days. Visit telikin.com or call (800)
230-3881 to learn more.
Senior PCs: Sold through Enablemart (enablemart.com,
(888) 640-1999), Senior PCs are Hewlett-Packard computers that
also come completely set-up and ready to use, but depending on
your mom's needs,you'll have several options to choose from.
If you're looking for simplified "goof-proof" operation, the
Autopilot desktop is the best model. This PC comes equipped with
QualiWorld software that provides one-click solutions for tasks
like letter writing, preparing a document, surfing the Internet, send-
ing and reading e-mails and much more. The Autopilot also comes
with OnTimeRx medication and appointment reminding software,'
and Hoyle Crossword and Sudoku puzzles.
For seniors with low vision, their Vision Plus model may be a'
better fit. This computer comes pre-configured with everything you :
need to see your PC, including state-of-the-art screen magnifica-
tion software, a high-visibility keyboard, and an all-in-one print-
er/scanner for scanning in books, mail and other reading materials
for magnification. It also comes with OnTimeRx and puzzles.
Kiwi PC: If you're looking for something more affordable,
the new Linux-powered Kiwi PC for seniors is another option to
consider. Priced at just $380, this user-friendly computer provides
a simplified navigation system, with oversized tool bar, large icons
and text that makes it easier to see and use.
Other features include a customizable "Me Menu" that pro-
vides quick and easy access to frequently visited websites, e-mail
iand programs. See kiwipc.com or call (855) 255-5494.
Savvy Tip: While it's not designed specifically for seniors, the
Apple IPad2 is another user-friendly option that has gotten great
reviews from older users. See apple.com to learn more.
Send your senior questions to: Savvy Senior, P.O. Box 5443,
Norman, OK 73070; or visit SavvySenior.org on the Web. Jim
Miller is a contributor to the NBC "Today" show and author of
"The Savvy Senior" book.


I



1


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Daniel Lozano, a Bowling
Green employee, is putting his
town on the map with his ring
prowess.
The undefeated 21-year-old
pro boxer took his record into
the ring on Friday night and
exited quic.',y after a second-
round knockout of 28-year-old
Jonathan Arias.
He brought home the
USNBC (United States
National Boxing Champio-
nship) belt. It's awarded as a
subdivision of the World Box-
ing Council and gives its owner
an automatic boost in the world
rankings. He is expected to
move from 93rd to the top 25
when the rankings are an-
nounced next week.
Relatively unheralded and
inexperienced, Lozano was
originally set to fight Ernie
Marquez of Denver, Colo., in
the Kers Winghouse Fight
Night main event. Two weeks
ago, he learned his opponent
would be Arias, a native of the
Dominican Republic whose
record was 12-7-0 with 10 KOs.
He had won eight of his last
nine fights, fighting in New
Mexico, New York and Panama
beside his native land.
Both men had a bit of trou-
ble making weight for Friday's


bout. Since it was for the vacant
USNCB title, there was no lee-
way in the 112-pound weight
limit. Lozano came in at 112.2
and Arias at 112.4. Lozano got
down to 112 and Arias, who has
fought at 122 but has been
fighting at 115 in recent bouts,
got down to 111.8.
So it was the slightly taller
veteran with 19 bouts against
the youngster with only nine
pro bouts but an extensive ama-
teur career.
Lozano said Monday, "I was
a bit nervous. He was a big
puncher who had never been
knocked out. It was for a title
belt, I was undefeated and it
was the main event. But, once I
got in the ring, that nervousness
went away. I was able to stay
very focused.
"I had trained for Ernie
Marquez, a boxer who is always
coming forward. Arias was
taller than me and tried to keep
me outside but, near the end of
the first round I dropped him
with a left hook. There was only
10 seconds left and he got up
but was saved by the bell.
"I told my corner that he was
hurt and I should go right at
-him," continued Lozano. "Early
in the second round I caught
him in his corner with an over-
hand right and left hook that
stunned him. Then I got right in


ROBERT MATTHEW
REVELL
Robert Matthew Revell,
61, of Bowling Green, died on
Thursday, Sept. 8, 2011, at
Sebring.
He was born in Bowling
Green on Sept. 6, 1950, and
was a lifelong resident and a
farmer. He is a Vietnam veter-
an serving in the U.S. Marine
Corps. He attended First
Baptist Church of Bowling
Green.
He was preceded in death
by his parents, Iris and Merle
Revell; and brother Lelan
"Skippy" Revell.
He is survived by his wife,
Jenny A. Revell, of Bowling
Green; three sons, Robert
Matthew Revell Jr., and
Michael Horace Revell and
wife Rachael, all of Bowling
Green, and Keith Allen Revell
and wife Shanna Kuen of
Wauchula; one brother,
Gerald Marsh Revell of
Sebring; one sister, Brenda
Merle Braxton and husband
Mike of Center Hill; six
grandchildren, Hannah and
Wayne Revell, Kyleigh
Revell, Isaac, Andrew and
Matthew Kuen; and several
aunts, uncles, nieces and
nephews.
Visitation was Sunday,
Sept. 11, at Robarts Garden
Chapel from 6 to 8 p.m.
Services were Monday at 2
p.m. at First Baptist Church of
Bowling Green with the ReV.
Roland Davis officiating.
Interment followed in Paynes
Creek Cemetery.
Expressions of comfort may
be made at robartsfh.com.


FUNERAL HOME
WAUCHULA


Free Home Repairs
For Needy Families
Centro Campesino Farm-
worker Center has $407,000
to spend by February on
weatherization/rehab servic-
es to qualified singles or
families, renting or owning.
The goal is to reduce month-
ly utility expenses by replac-
ing appliances and hot water
heaters, air conditioning or
heating, insulation and other
improvements.
Eligibility is based on
income and family size. For
more information, call Bar-
bara Spence at 863-233-
6322 or Mayra Rodriguez at
305-245-7738, ext. 236.
Local contractors can also
call Rodriguez to enter the
program.

Funds Help Pay
Elder Utilities
NU-HOPE Elder Care
services has funds to help
pay past due energy bills,
obtaining adequate cooling
or heating equipment or
resolving another heating
related energy crisis.
Any household with a per-
son 60 or older could qualify
if household income is not
over 150 percent of the fed-
eral poverty guidelines and
there is an unpaid power bill.
To make an appointment,
call 773-2022.

Mobile Unit
Helps Veterans
The non-profit Disabled
American Veterans mobile
service office is able to pro-


PHOTO BY NANCY DAWS
Daniel Lozano traps his taller opponent in the corner. The focused Bowling Green
boxer took the 112-pound USNBC title on Friday night and is now ranked in the top 25
in the world In his flyweight division. After a couple of defenses of this title, he hopes
for a shot at the world title in the coming year.
I I .
h (


vide counseling and ass
tance filing for claims. It
free to all veterans a
members of their families.
The van will be at t
Manatee DAV office, 1
63rd Ave. East, Bradent
on Monday from 9 a.m. tc
p.m. For more informant
call 727-319-7444.


THURSDAY. SEPT. 1
VHardee County Coi
mission, first budget heari
and monthly evening me(
ing, Room 102, Courthou
Annex I, 412 W. Orange S
Wauchula. 6 p.m.

MONL Y, SEPT. 19
VZolf Springs Toy
Commi jn, final budg
hearing and regular meeting
Town Hall, 3210 U.S.
North, Zolfo Springs, 6 p.m
/' isioning committee
m.. ng on infrastructure
Room 102, Courthou;
Annex I, 412 W. Orange S
Wauchula, 6 p.m.

TUESDAY, SEPT. 20
VHardee County Coalitic
for the Homeless, month
meeting, Hardee He
Center, 713 E. Bay S
Wauchula, noon.

WEDNESDAY. SEPT. 2
VWauchula City Cor
mission, special meeting o
manager contract, City Ha
225 E. Main St., Wauchul
4:30 p.m.

THURSDAY. SEPT. 2;
WHardee County Scho
Board, regular, meeting
Board Room, 230 S. Florid
Ave., Wauchula, 5 p.m.




Any party which taki
credit for the rain must n
be surprised if Its opp
nents blame It for th
drought.
-Dwight Morro


is-
is
nd =

he Sports Update.

ton By Joan Seaman
o o5 ,
ion m :
WOW! A national championship and in line for a chance to win
'a world title.
Congratulations to Bowling Green pro boxer Daniel Lozano,
who has remained undefeated and moved to the top 25 in the world
I rankings for a World Boxing Council flyweight title in a second-
round knockout of Jonathan Arias, an older, more experienced
boxer from the Dominican Republic.

Congrats also to the Hardee Wildcats, who swept the pre-sea-
son Classic and have won the first two games of the season by a
5 total of 64 points while allowing only 13 for the two opponents,
m- Fort Meade and Avon Park. The 'Cats take on the Sebring Blue
ng Streaks on Friday night at 7:30 in Sebring.
et- The junior varsity Wildcats are following the same pattern.
se They are undefeated, beating Mulberry and DeSoto by a total score
it., of 81-24 in the first two games of the season. This week, they play-
at Fort Meade.

Lady Wildcat swimming won a home dual meet with Avon Park
wn last Thursday. Originally scheduled for Tuesday, the meet was
let changed to Thursday, with solid results. The boys and girls teams
Ig, combined for nine first-place finishes, including a pair of one-twos,
17 claiming both first and second in the girls 200 freestyle, 200
n. I freestyle relay and 400 freestyle relay, and the boys 50 freestyle
)e, and 100 freestyle. Great job, swimmers.
re, --
se In boys golf, the 'Cats tied Frostproof on the Lake Wales course
3t., last week. They are now 3-0-1 and looking for more victories with
an experienced squad. The girls golf team is young and learning in
every outing. Three of the girls on last year's district champion
on team graduated.

Ily Speaking of young, the varsity volleyball team has a bunch of.
lp sophs coming on fast but have yet to claim that first victory. They
t., have played in a couple of tournaments already and are headed to
Key West to a tournament this weekend. Meanwhile, the JV team
is going great guns under first-year coach Jeanne (Craft) Atkins.
1 It's good to see Jeanne back safely from her military service and
mn- taking the reins here. She took her ninth graders to a weekend tour-
on nament in St. Cloud and they won all five games they played.
all, ---
a, Cross country began Tuesday with the Pioneer Run, at Pioneer
Park. We aren't sure which other schools will participate. The
teams also run at Sebring tomorrow (Friday). They will host a run
2 at Hardee Lakes Park on Tuesday.
ol - -
g, Junior high softball starts on Monday at home against Avon
la Park. Softball games are at 4:30.
Junior high football begins on Tuesday at Lake Placid. Please keep
Head Coach Mark Carlton in your prayers as he undertakes anoth-
er round of treatment. Assistants West Palmer, Jason Clark and
Gerry Lindsey are doing a great job whenever Coach Carlton is
sidelined.

es Starting and ending with boxing, Wauchula pro Edner Cherry
ot fights in Hollywood on Sept. 23 and hopes to get his career back
o- on track and ready to move forward.
he Information from community and school athletic events is always
welcome. Please call me at 773-3255 or e-mail me at news.heral-
w dadvocate@embarqmail.com with news for this biweekly column.


11 'ouing &fei0onu
MELFORD GILLEY
Melford Gilley, 83, of
Wauchula, died on Tuesday,
Sept. 6, 2011, at home.
He was born at Geneva,
Ala on Dec. 14, 1927. He
served in the U.S. Army. He
came to Hardee County from
Tampa 38 years ago and was
pastor of Open Door Full
Gospel Praise Center in
Bowling Green.
He is survived by his wife,
Vida Gilley of Wauchula; four
daughters, Darlene Waddell
and husband Chet of West
Palm, Diane Buwalda and
husband David of Murphy,
N.C., Denise Landphear and
husband Keith of Tennessee,
and Betty Lou Gilley of
Riverview; son Melford Brian
Gilley and wife Bonnie of
Zolfo Springs; two stepsons,
Terry Carmichael and wife
Beverly of Orlando, and Matt
Dillon and wife Jan of
Sebring; brother Lloyd Gilley
and wife Barbara of Crystal
River; sister Lois Mills and
husband Pierce of Lake City;
15 grandchildren; and 16
great-grandchildren.
Visitation was Friday, Sept.
9, 2011, at Robarts Garden
Chapel from 6 to 8 p.m.
Funeral services were Sat-
urday at 2 p.m. at Open Door
Full Gospel Praise Center
with Matt Dillon officiating.
Interment followed in Wau-
chula Cemetery.
Expressions of comfort may
be made at robartsfh.com.


FUNERAL HOME
WAUCHULA

5W j


BURTON & BURTON, P.A.
ATTORNEYS AT LAW
501 WEST MAIN STREET
WAUCHULA, FLORIDA 33873-1729
TELEPHONE (863) 773-3241

WILLS & TRUSTS
PROBATE & ESTATE ADMINISTRATION
LARGE & SMALL ESTATES
HOMESTEAD DETERMINATION
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LIVING WILLS GUARDIANSHIPS
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and knocked him down at 1:09.
He got up, but fell back against
the ropes, unableto come out,
when the referee wanted him to%.
The ref called the fight. He was,
checked out by doctors and is,
alright," said Lozano, who
acknowledged that he had taken
a couple of punches from Arias
in the first round. "He didn't
hurt me, but I could feel the
strength of his punches," con-
cluded Lozano.
Fightnews.com reported the
11 p.m. fight was before a
standing-room-only crowd.
Lozano, who has fought at A La
Carte Pavilion in Tampa several
times before, was scheduled for.
10 rounds. The Bowling Green,
boxer trains hard on stamina as
well as strength, but rarely goes
the distance.
He will have to defend his
new title at least every three
months. If he does that success-
fully a couple of times, he will
work up to a world title shot.
The next bout, Nov. 11 in
Tampa, will be broadcast on.
ESPN and give him additional'
worldwide exposure.
Among his many fans is an
uncle Raymond Lozano with
whom he had not spoken to in
about 10 years and recently had
the opportunity. Lozano contin-
ues to train with his father, 1
Daniel Sr.







6A The Herald-Advocate, September 15, 2011


ELEMENTARY SCHOOLSi
MONDAY
Breakfast: Lucky Charms,
Grahtam Crackers, Blueberry
Poptart, Orange Juice, Condi-
ments and Milk
Lunch: Sausage Pizza,
Hamburger on a Bun, Salad
Tray, Baked Beans, Cherry
Juice Bar, Condiments and Milk

TUESDAY
Breakfast: Cheerios Cereal,
,Graham Crackers, French
Toast, Sausage Patty, Mandarin
Oranges, Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Chicken Pattie on
Bun, Hotdogs, Garden Peas,
Salad Tray, Yellow Cake, Ice
Cream, Condiments and Milk

WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Trix, Graham
Crackers, Breakfast Pocket,
Pears, Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Macaroni and
Cheese, Burrito, Salad Tray,
Pinto Beans, Grap Juice,
Apples Crisp, Condiments and
Milk

THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cinnamon Toast
Crunch, Cinnamon Toast,
Oatmeal, Juice, Condiments
and Milk
Lunch: Rib-B-Que on Bun,
Deli Turkey Sandwich, Potato
Rounds, Pears, Salad Tray,
Condiments and Milk

FRIDAY
Breakfast: Cocoa Puffs,
Graham Crackers, Breakfast
Stick, Applesauce, Condiments
and Milk
Lunch: Tacos, Toasted Ham
& Cheese, Salad Tray, mexican
Rice, Applesauce, Condiments
and Milk

JUNIOR HIGH
MONDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Variety,
Graham Crackers, Super
Donuts, Bagel Bars, Juice,
Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Sausage Pizza,
Hamburger on a Bun, Alternate
Meal, Lettuce & Tomato, Baked
Beans, Juice Bar, Condiments
and Milk

TUESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Variety,
Graham Crackers, French
Toast, Sausage Patty, mandarin
Oranges, Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Chicken Pattie on
Bun, Pepperoni Pizza, Hotdogs
Alternate Meal, Lettuce &
Tomato, Garden Peas, Yellow
Cake w/Choc Icing, Ice Cream
Cups, Condiments and Milk

WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Variety,
Cheese Grits, Buttered Toast,
Diced Pears, Condiments and
Milk
Lunch: Ham, Mac & Cheese,
Burrito, Cornbread, Alternate
Meal, Sausage Pizza, Tossed
Salad, Pinto Beans, Apple
Crisp, Condiments and Milk


THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Variety
Oatmeal, Buttered Toast, Juice
Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Rib-B-Que on a Bur
Deli Turkey Sandwict
Pepperoni Pizza, Alternat
Meal, Lettuce & Tomato, Sala
Bar, Potato Rounds, Dice
Pears, Condiments and Milk

FRIDAY
Breakfast: Cereal Variety
Graham Crackers, Breakfas
Stick, Applesauce, Condiment
and Milk
Lunch: Tacos, Toasted Har
& Cheese, Sausage Pizza
Alternate Meal, Lettuce
Tomato, Mexican Rice
Applesauce, Condiments an
Milk

SENIOR HIGH
MONDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Supe
Donut, Orange Juice, Cond
ments and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizzi
Cheeseburger on a Bun, Ham
burger on a Bun, Chicken
Rice, French Fries, Turni
Greens, Pinto Beans, Tosse
Salad, Beets, Juice Ba
Cornbread, Condiments an
Milk

TUESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Biscui
Sausage, Applesauce, Cond
ments and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza
Cheeseburger on a Bun, Ham
burger on a Bun, Ham
Macaroni & Cheese, Frenc
Fries, Blacked-eyed Peas
Steamed Cabbage, Tosse
Salad, Apple Crisp, Juice
Cornbread, Condiments an
Milk

WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Pancakes
Sausage Patty, Pears, Cond
ments and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza
Cheeseburger on a Bun, Ham
burger on a Bun, French Fries
Tacos, Mexican Rice, Pint
Beanrs, Whole Kernel Corn
Tossed Salad, Juice, Cond
ments and Milk

THURSDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Chees
Grits, Buttered Toast, Peaches
Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza
Cheeseburger on a Bun, Ham
burger on a Bun, Chicken Po
Pie, Frerch Fries, Brocco
Normandy, Summer Squasl
Tossed Salad, Cucumber an
Tomato Salad, Peaches, Rolls
Condiments and Milk

FRIDAY
Breakfast: Cereal, Breakfa;
Stick, Graham Crackers
Peaches, Condiments and Milk
Lunch: Pepperoni Pizza
Cheeseburger on a Bun, Ham
burger on a Bun, Bar-B-Qu
Chicken on Bun, French Fries
Potato Rounds, Baked Bean.
Pears, Tossed Salad, Cond
ments and Milk


I


-Hu S -t -inTBing Forecast


Week ending September 11, 2011
Weather Summary: Daily showers persisted during the week
of September 5 through 11. Some stations received over one to two
inches of rainfall. Okahumpka, Pensacola, and Tallahassee report-
y ed over three inches of precipitation. Various areas in central and
e, southern Peninsula localities recorded over four inches of rain.
Temperatures for the week averaged from eight degrees below nor-
n, mal to one degree above normal. Daytime highs were in the upper
h, 80s and 90s. E .ng lows were in the 50s, 60s, and 70s.
te
d Field Crops: Peanut digging was underway with 6 percent of
d the crop harvested. Peanut crop condition was rated 1 percent very
poor, 11 percent poor, 39 percent fair, 45 percent good, and 4 per-
cent excellent. Field crop growers in Jackson County needed more
y, rain to aid with crop development. Peanut harvesting will begin
st next week for growers in Washington County. Cotton bolls contin-
ts ued to open and growers prepared for harvesting in the Panhandle.
In Washington County, cotton defoliating has been scheduled to
m begin in some fields next week. Rains aided sugarcane maturity in
a, the Everglades region.
&

ed Vegetables: Fall crop planting and land preparation continued
in between showers. Vegetable farmers were busy pumping water
out of some low lying fields due to heavy rains. Avocado harvest-
ing continued in southern Florida. Light supplies of okra were har-
vested and some replanting took place in Miami-Dade County.
Growers in the Quincy area were preparing for tomato harvesting
er which is anticipated to start shortly. Vegetable growers in
i- Highlands County were busy plowing the fields to plant cabbage
and watermelons. Harvesting of fall watermelons was in progress
n- in Suwannee County.
n-
&
&p Livestock and Pastures: Statewide, pasture condition ranged
d from very poor to excellent with 62 percent in good condition.
1r, Summer pasture condition and quantity declined seasonally. The
d cattle condition ranged from very poor to excellent with 70 percent
in good condition. In the Panhandle, pasture condition varied from
very poor to excellent with drought being the first limiting factor,
followed by the seasonal decline in summer pasture. Cattlemen
t, were preparing land for planting winter forage. Most cattle were in
i- good condition. In the northern areas, pasture ranged from poor to
a, excellent condition with most in good condition. Cattle were in
n- fairto excellent condition, with most in good condition. In the cen-
n, tral areas, pasture ranged from poor to excellent condition, with
h most in good condition. In the southwest, range and pasture ranged
s, from fair to excellent condition, with most in good condition.
d Adequate moisture and growing temperatures led to good pasture
e, and cattle conditions. The condition of the cattle was fair to excel-
d lent with most in good condition.

Citrus: Temperatures were in the upper 60s to the lower 70s
s, at night and the lower to mid 90s during the day for the majority of
ji- the week. This week there was heavy, but scattered rainfall, with all
25 Florida Automated Weather Network stations receiving some
a, rainfall. Amounts received ranged from 0.30 inch in Pierson, to
n- 3.13 inches in Okahumpka. Drought conditions ranged from
s, drought-free in the western half of the citrus region to severe con-
o editions, found in small parts of Okeechobee, Martin, St Lucie, and
n, Palm Beach counties, along the eastern and north-eastern shore of
i- Lake Okeechobee. Drought conditions were per the U.S. Drought
Monitor; last updated September 6, 2011. Next season's oranges
were almost baseball size and next season's grapefruit were soft-
5e ball size. Grove activity included resetting new trees, young tree
s, care, applying herbicides, hedging and topping, brush removal, and
fertilizer application.


a,
n-
ot
li
h,
d
s,



st
s,
k
a,
n-
Je
s,
s,
ji-


Individual menus are subject to
change.


Nutrition
I Wise
KAREN COLLINS, MS, RD, CDN
MERICAN INSTITUTE FOR lj
CANCER RESEARCH = f
Q: I heard that coffee is one of
the top sources of potassium
in the U.S. diet Is coffee high
in potassium?
A: No, coffee is not nearly as
high in potassium as many
other foods. Coffee is one of the
top five. sources of potassium
for U.S. adults, but that's be-
cause we drink so much of it
and we don't eat enough of the


foods that are the best sources
of this important nutrient. A
potassium-rich diet helps to
lower blood pressure, apparent-
ly counteracting to some degree
the blood pressure-raising
effects of sodium. Getting
enough potassium may also
help reduce bone loss with age;
more research is needed.
Americans need to overcome
two main obstacles to come
closer to recommended levels.
Fruits and vegetables are major
sources of potassium, so work-
ing them into every meal to get
at least seven servings each day
is the first step. We also need to
expand our selection.
Vegetables and fruits highest in
potassium include spinach and
other cooked greens, winter
squash, white and sweet pota-
toes, tomato juice and sauce,
bananas, citrus fruit, can-
taloupe, dried apricots and
raisins. Legumes (dried beans
such as kidney and garbanzo)
are also very high in potassium,
as well as fiber and natural
antioxidants that provide other
health benefits. In addition,
choosing whole-wheat bread
gives you two to three times the
potassium of white bread.


Florida Crop Upd


9/15/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 7:12 AM
Set: 7:32 PM
Day Length
12 hrs. 20 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 9:13 PM
Set: 9:55 AM
Overhead: 3:15 AM
Underfoot: 3:37 PM
Moon Phase
91%
Waning Gibbous
Major Times
3:15 AM 5:15 AM
3:37 PM 5:37 PM
Minor Times
9:55 AM -10:55 AM
9:13 PM 10:13 PM
Solunar Rating
Good
Time Zone
UTC: -4
9/16/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 7:13 AM
Set: 7:31 PM
Day Length
12 hrs. 18 rains.
Moon Data
Rise: 9:50 PM
Set: 10:48 AM
Overhead: 3:59 AM
Underfoot: 4:22 PM
Moon Phase
84%
Waning Gibbous
Major Times
3:59 AM 5:59 AM
4:22 PM 6:22 PM
Minor Times'
10:48 AM-11:48 AM
9:50 PM 10:50 PM
Solunar Rating
Average
Time Zone
UTC:-4


9/17/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 7:13 AM
Set: 7:30 PM
Day Length
12 hrs. 17 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 10:32 PM
Set: 11:41 AM
Overhead: 4:45 AM
Underfoot: 5:09 PM
Moon Phase
77%
Waning Gibbous
Major Times
4:45 AM 6:45 AM
5:09 PM 7:09 PM
Minor Times
11:41 AM-12:41 PM
10:32 PM-11:32 PM
Solunar Rating
Average
Time Zone .
UTC: -4
9/18/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 7:13 AM
Set: 7:28 PM
Day Length
12 hrs. 15 mnuins.
Moon Data
Rise: 11:18 PM
Set: 12:14 PM
Overhead: 5:33 AM
Underfoot: 5:58 PM
Moon Phase
68%
Waning Gibbous
Major Times
5:33 AM 7:33 AM
5:58 PM 7:58 PM
Minor Times
12:34 PM 1:34 PM
11:18 PM-12:18 AM
Solunar Rating
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -4


SO CLOSE, YET ...
In Numbers 13:18-20, we read that the Israelites had camped
at the very border of the Promised Land.
Moses then sent 12 spies in to "see what the land is like:
whether the people who dwell in it are strong or weak, few or
many; whether the land they dwell in is good or bad; whether the
cities they inhabit are like camps or strongholds; whether the land
is rich or poor; and whether there are forests there or not."
Of these 12 spies, only two came back with a favorable report.
Ten out of the 12 were afraid to go in to because they were too cow-
ardly to take the land by force. Only Joshua and Caleb came back
with a favorable report.
What was God's reaction? He spoke to Moses and Aaron and
said, "Say to them, 'As I live,' says the Lord, 'just as you have spo-
ken in My hearing, so I will do to you: The carcasses of you who
have complained against Me shall fall in this wilderness, all of you
who were numbered, according to your entire number, from 20
years old and above. Except for Caleb the son of Jephunneh and
Joshua the son of Nun, you shall by no means enter the land which
I swore I would make you dwell in," Numbers 14:28-30.
God condemned them!
There they were, right at the very border of the Promised
Land! So near yet so far!
How many times have you heard about Jesus' love for you?
How many times have you heard of the miracles He performed to
prove His deity? How many times have you heard about Jesus'
death on the cross for the remission of your sins? How many times
have you heard the Gospel plan of salvation?
How many times have you rejected Him?
So near, yet so far.
Won't you choose to cross over into the promised land of God?
Choose to submit to Him in humble obedience.
If you believe that Jesus is the Christ the Son of the living
God then repent and confess His name before men. Be then bap-
tized for the remission of your sins and live faithfully unto death.
The Lord wants you to commit your life to Him, and merely be
grateful for the gift He's offered you.
Read, study and obey God's Word.
lan Rice is the full-time evangelist at Wauchula Church of Christ,
a non-denominational group of Christians seeking to follow the
New Testament pattern of service to God. Visit the church website
at www.wauchulachurchofchrist.com.


Cross Country On The Run


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
There's a bunch of boys and a
few girls running the roads and
trails around Hardee High these
days.
It's members of the 2011
Cross Country squad, which
opens its season by hosting the
Pioneer Run at Pioneer Park in
Zolfo Springs on Tuesday.
After that, there's a whole
string of meets. Hardee will
host another pair. One on course
1 at Hardee Lakes Park near
Fort Green and the other on
course 2 at the park.
In between and afterward,
there are a variety of large and
small meets, scattered from
Sebring, Avon 'Park and De-
Soto to the Disney Invitational ,
the University of Florida
Mountain Dew Invitational and
the Little Everglades run in
Dade City, a preliminary to the
state meet there in mid-
November.
Hardee is in new Class 2
District 10, along with DeSoto,


HARDEE 2011 CROSS COUNTRY
Sept 13 Pioneer Park Run HOME 4:30 p.m.
Sept. 16 Sebring Away 4:30 p.m.
Sept. 20 Hardee Lakes I HOME 4:30 p.m.
Sept.22 Lake Placid Away 4:30 p.m.
Sept. 24 Gainesville Away 8 a.m.
Sept. 29 DeSoto Away 4:30 p.m.
Oct. 4 Hardee Lakes 2 HOME 4:30 p.m.
Oct. 7 Lake Buena Vista Away 1 p.m.
Oct. 14 Dade City Away 2 p.m.
Oct. 20 Sebring Away 4:30 p.m.
Oct. 27 Avon Park Away 5 p.m.
Nov. 1-5 Districts Away TBA
Nov. 10-12 Regionals Away 8 a.m.
Nov. 19 States Away 8 a.m.


St. Petersburg Lakewood, Le- is at the Chain of Lakes
high, Bradenton Southeast and Complex in Titusville and the
Riverview Spoto. In nearby state meet is at Little Ever-
District 8 a-e Avon Park, glades in Dade City.
Frostproof, Gulf at New Port Head Coach Don Trew ex-
Richey, Lake Placid, Lake pects quite a bit of success from
Wales, Ridgewood at New Port his boys squad. Only two girls
Richey, Mulberry and Lakeland have taken part in practice as
Teneroc. yet although several others have
The district meet is the week expressed interest, said Trew
of Nov. 1-5. The regional meet late last week.


9/19/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 7:14 AM
Set: 7:27 PM
Day Length
12 hrs. 13 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: -:--
Set: 1:27 PM
Overhead: 6:23 AM
Underfoot: 6:48 PM
Moon Phase
59%
Waning Gibbous
Major Times
6:23 AM 8:23 AM
6:48 PM 8:48 PM
Minor Times
1:27 PM 2:27 PM
Solunar Rating
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -4
9/20/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 7:14 AM
Set: 7:26 PM
Day Length
12 hrs. 12 mins.
Moon Data
Rise: 12:08 AM
Set: 2:17 PM
Overhead: 7:14 AM
Underfoot: 7:41 PM
Moon Phase
50%
Last Quarter
Major Times
7:14 AM 9:14AM
7:41 PM 9:41 PM
Minor Times
12:08 AM -1:08 AM
2:17 PM 3:17 PM
Somnar Rating
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -4


9/21/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 7:15 AM
Set: 7:25 PM
Day Length
12 10 mins. t
Moon Data
Rise: 1:03 AM
Set: 3:06 PM
Overhead: 8:07 AM'
Underfoot: 8:33 PM
Moon Phase
39%
Waning Crescent
Major Times
8:07 AM- 10:07 AM
8:33 PM 10:33 PM
Minor Times
1:03 AM 2:03 AM
3:06 PM 4:06 PM
Solunar Rating
Average+
Time Zone
UTC: -4
9/22/2011
Sun Data
Rise: 7:15 AM
Set: 7:24 PM
Day Length
12 hrs. 09 mins
Moon Data
Rise: 2:02 AM
Set: 3:51PM
Overhead: 9:00 AM
Underfoot: 9:26 PM
Moon Phase
*29%
Waning Crescent
Major Times
9:00 AM-11:00 AM
9:26 PM-'11:26 PM
Minor nimes
2:02 AM-3:02 AM
3:51 PM 4:51 PM
Solunar Rating
Average
Time Zone
UTC: -4





September 15, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 7A


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PAGE ONE


Wildcats Demolish Devils 43-7


By MICHAEL KELLY
Of The Herald-Advocate
The Hardee Wildcats found
themselves in a hole early at
Avon Park but were not
deterred and quickly were back
in control of the game and
improved to 2-0 on the season.
Next up for the Cats will be
the Sebring Blue Streaks at
Fireman's Field at 7:30 Friday
night.
Avon Park jumped out to an


early lead after taking the open-
ing kickoff back 93 yards for a
touchdown. A successful PAT
try put the Cats down 7-0 just
seconds into the game.
Hardee got on the board on
its second possession of the
game, driving 69 yards on a wet
field that didn't seem to affect
the 'Cats' offense.
Sophomore Keyon Brown
capped off the drive with a 1-
yard run up the middle. The


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Octavio Alvarez PAT tied the
game at 7-7.
The Hardee defense forced a
quick three-and-out and the
offense was back to work.
Senior Andrew Hooks got the
drive started with an 11-yard
run.
Quarterback Colby Baker
then found Deonte Evans on a
perfectly thrown ball down the
right sideline for a 35-yard gain.
Hooks finished the drive with a
one-yard run up the middle,
giving the Cats a 14-7 lead after
the Alvarez PAT.
Hardee continued harassing
the Avon Park offense and
forced another three-and-out.
Hooks opened the drive by
hurdling a couple of defenders
and running 30 yards into Red
Devil territory. Baker rolled
right the next play and found
Keshun Rivers for a 20-yard
gain.
Freshman Keyonte Holley
finished the drive with an 11-
yard touchdown run up the mid-
dle. Alvarez put the PAT
through the uprights and the
Wildcats led 21-7.
The defense again frustrated
the Red Devils, giving up only
one first down and forcing
another punt.
The Wildcats could not score
again.before the half ended and
went to the locker room with a
21-7 lead.
Hardee received to start the
second half and the offense
picked up where it left off.
A 36-yard run by Brown set
up Holley for his second touch-
down run of the evening, this
one coming from 11 yards out.
The Alvarez PAT stretched the
Wildcats lead to 28-7.
The hard-hitting Wildcat de-
fense forced a fumble and
Brown pounced on it for the
'Cats at the Avon Park 20-yard
line.


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205 N. Charleston
(863) 773-2530
(863) 285-8131


A few plays later, Ledarius
Sampson found pay dirt with a
touchdown run from two yards
out. The Alvarez PAT try was
true and the Wildcats led 35-7
midway through the third quar-
ter.
Avon Park started the next
drive from its own 10 after a
block in the back penalty on the
return.
The Red Devils fumbled on
the first play from scrimmage
and the Wildcats recovered.
Aaron Barker wasted no time
cashing in by running the next
play up the middle for an 11-
yard touchdown. A fumble on
the PAT try ended up with a
two-point conversion to finish
the Wildcat scoring.
Avon Park managed a few
more first downs before the
game ended quickly ,due to a
running clock being instituted
because the Wildcats were
ahead by 35 points.
Head Coach Buddy Martin
said he was pleased how his
team responded from the slow
start to really got going the rest
of the game and finish with the
43-7 win.


HARDEE AVON PARK
PASSING COMPLETIONS,
ATTEMPTS AND
INTERCEPTIONS 5-8-0 2-10-0
PASSING YARDS 77 20
RUSHING ATTEMPTS/
YARDS 35/232 21/10
TOTAL YARDS 309 30
TURNOVERS 0 2
FIRST DOWNS 11 5
PENALTIES, LOST
YARDAGE 7-53 5-60
SCORING BY QUARTER:
Hardee 7 14 22 0 43
Avon Park 7 0 0 0 7


But friendship is precious, not only in the shade, but in
the sunshine of life, and thanks to a benevolent arrange-
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-Thomas Jefferson


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#9 Keyon Brown #19 Octavio Alvarez
Offense Defense
8 rushes for 66 yards, Made plays off the
1 TD, ran very hard- edge and kept AP
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Scout Team Special Teams
Great effort and
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The Herald-Advocate


Thursday, September 15, 2011


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By LEA WEEKS
Special To The Herald-Advocate
My interview is with John Roy
Gough.
* Q: When and where were you
born?
A: Wauchula, on Feb. 3, 1944. I was
delivered by Dr. Collier.
Q: Where did you go to school?
A: I went to Zolfo Springs
Elementary, then transferred to
Wauchula in junior high for seventh
and eighth, and four years of high
school in Wauchula. I then went to
Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College,
then moved
back and
attended Polk
Junior
College. I
graduated as
the first graduate in the class of the ani-
mal science group at the new college,
which, at the time, was at the Bartow
air base.
Q: What were your favorite pas-
times growing up?
A: My favorites were playing sports
and hunting.
Q: What sports did you play?
A: I played football and baseball.
Q: What do you do for a living
and how long have you been doing
it?
A: I have been in agrichemical sales
for 43 years and have owned, as well as
been in, the citrus business for 25
years.
Q: When did you decide you were
going to be a salesman?
A: In the fifth grade. My piano
teacher was adamant that I was either
going to be a salesman or a preacher,
and I'm obviously not preaching this
Sunday!
Q: Are you married? How long?
A: I have been married for 41 years
to Virginia Crossman (Gingerlee
Gough).
Q: How many children and grand-
children do you have?


A: I have two girls and one boy. One
of the girls is older and my other girl
and son are twins. My son has two
boys, 6 and 8 years old.
Q: If you were president, what
would be the first thing that you
would do to help America?
A: I would put prayer and discipline
back into schools and concentrate on


COURTESY PHOTO
John Roy Gough, with his grandson and
the one that didn't get awayl
education.
Q: What kind of changes have you
seen in Hardee County since you
were a kid?
A: No phones or televisions, and
from writing and arithmetic to if it feels
good, do it!
Q: What do you think the greatest
advancement in technology has been
since you were a kid?
A: I would have to say the space
program, computers, eye surgery area,
medical technology.
Q: What do you love most about
Hardee County?
A: I love the country laid-back style
of living.
Q: What is something unique


A Teacher Said He'd Be

A Salesman Or Preacher!


September 15, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 3B
A: My mother and father have been
the greatest influences.
Back In Time is the result of a class
assignment given to ninth graders at
Hardee Senior High School. Each
student is asked to interview gn older
person. Selected interviews are pub-'
lished here as an encouragement to the*
students and for the enjoyment of our.
readers.


COURTESY PHOTO
Members of the First Baptist Church of Bowling Green and members of the Senior
Adult Department and the Mary Martha and Joy Sunday School classes at the First
Baptist Church of Wauchula all have assisted Bowling Green Elementary School with
classroom and nurse's station supplies. "We are always grateful for donations, and for
the community answering the call for our students," said Principal Kathy Clark. Shown
with some Items are (from left) Faye Williamson, First Baptist of Bowling Green; Katia
Kaufman, school nurse; Judy Mercer, First Baptist of Bowling Green; and Beth
Jemigan, registered nurse.


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about you? --
A: The fact that I may really dis-
agree with you, but it doesn't affect me
to continue to love you as a friend, and
most people can't do that.
Q: What is your favorite book?
A: My favorite book is "Left
Behind."
Q: Who has had the greatest.
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September 15, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 5B


JV Wildcats Start Season 2-0


By MICHAEL KELLY
Of The Herald-Advocate
The junior varsity Hardee
Wildcats are at a 2-0 start after
dominate performances against
Mulberry and DeSoto.
The junior 'Cats got the first
win*of the season with a 26-6
victory at Mulberry on Sept. 1.
Tenth-year head coach Rod
Smith said he was very pleased
the way his team started the
season.
Scoring the first touchdown
of the year for the junior 'Cats
was soph Tristen Lanier, who
caught a 27-yard touchdown
from sophomore quarterback
Jacob Bolin.
Freshtnan running back
Timmy Steedley added a pair of
touchdowns and 158 rushing
yards for the evening.
Freshman running back
Joshua Almarez also added a
touchdown for the Wildcats.
The momentum gained from
the Mulberry victory carried
over into last Thursday's home


contest against DeSoto in which
the Wildcats won 55-18.
Steedley started the scoring
for the Wildcats with a 9-yard
run after Bolin found frosh
Jerry Brody for a 17-yard gain.
The PAT was unsuccessful.
The 'Cat defense forced a
three and out after sending the
Bulldogs backward and Hardee
started with good field position
after a 10-yard Armando Ala-
mia punt return.
The Wildcats decided to go
for it on fourth down deep in
Bulldog territory but were
unsuccessful, giving the ball
back to DeSoto.
The 'Cats quickly got the
ball back after forcing the
Bulldogs into a turnover on
downs when they tried a run on
4th-and- 1.
Hardee drove quickly down-
field and found the end zone on
a 4-yard touchdown pass from
Bolin to classmate Sherman
Bethea. Hardee went for two
points and Bolin found another


classmate Caleb Purser open for
the score.
The Wildcats pushed the lead
to 20-0 a few minutes later on a
2-yard plunge up the middle by
Steedley on fourth-and-goal.
The Randi Lopez PAT made it
20-0.
Two plays later, the Wildcats
were celebrating again when
Almarez intercepted a Bulldog
pass and returned it 25 yards for
the touchdown just before half-
time, putting the Wildcats up
27-0 after the Lopez PAT.
Desoto got on the scoreboard
with a 63-yard touchdown run
on the first play from scrim-
mage in the second half.
The Wildcats quickly re-
sponded with another' run by
Steedley, this time from one
yard out.
The "Cats elected to go for
two and were unsuccessful on a
pass from Bolin intended for
Tomas Gomez.
The Bulldogs were forced
into another punt giving Hardee


good field position at the
Desoto 38.
Seven plays later, Steedley
once again burst through the
middle for an 8-yard touch-
down run.
Desoto returned the kickoff
80 yards for a touchdown cut-
ting the Wildr:'t's lead to 40-12
with 11:52 It": ;;i the game.
Hardee got the ball back and
marched right down the field
and capped off the drive with a
two-yard plunge by Almarez. A
bad snap caused Bolin to
scramble to pass for the two-
point conversion making it 48-
12.
The Wildcats got one more
score with just over a minute
left in the game on a 7-yard
touchdown run by freshman
Javon McCall. The Lopez PAT
made it 55-12.
Desoto had one big play left
as the junior Bulldogs ran the
kickoff back 60 yards for a
touchdown with 26 seconds left
in the game making the final
tally 55-18.


For the week ended September 8, 2011
At the Florida Livestock Auctions, receipt totaled 6,218 conm-
pared to 9,077 last week, and 6,061 last year. According to the
Florida Federal-State Livestock Market News Service: Compared
to one week ago. slaughter cows 1.00 to 3.00 lower, bulls uneven-
ly steady, feeder steers 1.00 to 2.00 higher, heifers 1.00 to 3.00
higher, replacement cows 1.00 to 2.00 lower.


Feeder Steers:




Feeder Heifers:




Slaughter Cows:
51.00-60.00
Slaughter Bulls:
66.00-85.00


Mediumn & Large
200-300 lbs
300-400'lbs
400-500 lbs
500-600 lbs


Frame No. 1-2
147.50-195.00
121.00-170.00
110.00-136.00
111.00-124.00


Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2
200-300 lbs 122.50-170.00
300-400 lbs 107.00-137.50
400-500 lbs 104.00-123.00
500-600 lbs 100.00-116.00

Lean: 750-1200 lbs 85-90 percent

Yield Grade No. 1-2 1000-2100 lbs


Television is an invention that permits you to be enter-
tained in your living room by people you wouldn't have
in your home.
-David Frost


Eyelashes help to keep dirt out of eyes and eyebrows help to keep perpiration from
running into eyes.


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6B The Herald-Advocate, September 15, 2011



A ROCK BECAME A ToY


IN THIS CHILD'S EYES


By LUKE WINTER
Special To The Herald-Advocate
. I interviewed Betty Rickey for this
report.
Q: When and where were you
born?
A: Oct. .. V
15, 1938, in l
Wainesville, .., ,
N.C.
Q: How far did you walk for


school?
A: I would walk three miles to and
from school.
Q: What was your favc- e school
activity?
A: Music class.
Q: What were your toys?
A: A rock that was in my front yard.
We would build playhouses around it,
jump it with our bikes, build tunnels
through it. I also loved playing with


HJHS Softball Takes The Field
I 'I


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Traditionally a spring sport,
Heartland Conference softball
stages its games in the fall.
Flip-flopping with the high
school use of the field, Hardee
Junior High School Softball
competes in the fall, starting
Monday at home against Avon
Park with its quest for a third
conference title.
During the season, Hardee
will play each of the other
Heartland teams twice, once at
home and once on the road.
After the road opener, it's an
alternate schedule of road and
home games, at Hill-Gustat,
home for DeSoto, at Lake
Placid, home for Sebring, at
Avon Park, home for Hill-
Gustat, at DeSoto, home for
Lake Placid and at Sebring.
Games usually start at 4:30
p.m., unless a team has to travel
a great distance, and can't leave
until the final bell rings. That
sometimes happens when
Hardee and Lake Placid play.
Coach Shari Knight, who has
led the junior Lady Cats to two
conference championships, has
decided to concentrate on the


Softball
HOME
Away
HOME
Away
HOME
Away
HOME
Away
HOME
Away


*Games begin at 4:30 unless distance doesn't
allow a team to get there on time.
Head Coach: Missy Carlton
Assistants: Ryn Heine, Jake Carlton


high school team and the travel
team competition of daughter
Kayla.
Well-known community ball
coach Missy Carlton will take
over the junior high program,
assisted by Coach Ryn Heine
and her husband Jake as a vol-
unteer assistant. Some of the
girls on this year's squad have
played for them in minors or


teen leagues.
The team includes returnees
Gabby Allen, Hannah Carlton,
Senaida Garcia and Morgan
Walters, along with Mara
Goodwyn, Josie Hancock,
Shayna Harned, Florence Lee,
Tori McCoy, Ariana Ramos,
Madison Rucker, Alyssa Tatum,
Michaela Villarreal and Sarah
Welch.


Lake Placid Downs Hardee


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
In the only regular-season
match last week, Hardee girls
volleyball took it on the chin at
Lake Placid, with both the jun-
ior varsity and varsity losing
matches.
The varsity took part in a
tournament in Bartow last
Friday and Saturday, and the
ninth grade team went to a
weekend tournament in St.


Cloud. Results were not avail-
able at press time.
This week's games began
with a Thursday (today) at Fort
Meade and a weekend tourney
at Key West. Next week, It's a
trip to Lakeland Santa Fe on
Monday and then some well-
earned practice days to correct
mistakes until the Sept. 27 visit
from Lake Wales.
Backtracking to the Sept. I
match at DeSoto, Hardee faced


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Honey may also be good for your skin. It has the ability to
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use it as a conditioner, mix the honey with olive oil. Be sure
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Honey is very effective in the treatment of some
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Honey may also be effective in the treatment of your
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e Habi' 120 HEARTLAND WAY WAUCHULA
OP (NEW LOCATION BEHIND AARONS)


perhaps the top team in the area
on its court. The Hardee varsity
lost 16-25-, 7-25 and 8-25. In
the three games, senior Ashley
Nichols had seven service
points, while classmate Sum-
mer Palmer had six and soph
Karlee Harrison had five.
Last Tuesday, the varsity girls-
traveled to Lake Placid and bat-
tled through the first game 25-
22 loss, before slipping to lose
game two 8-25 and game three
17-25.
Soph Kayla Nichols had 11
service points, junior Nyshira
Jackson 10 and Palmer and
Henderson each eight.
Other varsity players are Ana
Galvez, Maria Anslemo, Eric
_-Roberts-Katie Wheeler, De-
siree Smith and Jessica Har-
rison.
Meanwhile, the Hardee JV
had won its games at Desoto
25-15, 25-18 behind the service
of Bailey Carlton, who had 15
service points in the two games.
Gemi Saunders had 13 service
points.
At Lake Placid, Hardee JV
ran into its first obstacle. They
won the game 25-17, but lost
the next two 31-29, 15-4, the
first time they have been
pushed to the best of three
games in a match.
Carlton had 18 service points,
12 in the first game. Saunders
had two in the first game, but
went to a eight by the end of the
match.
Other JV players are Brooke
Dixon, Emily Albritton, Jessica
Broadhead, Tamara St. Fort,
Courtnee Richardson, Jakaysha
Lindsey, Rachel Coker, Hannah
Grisinger, Destiny Thompson
and Allison Smith.


COURTESY PHOTO
A wallet-size photo a young Betty gave to
her father.
paper dolls. Paper dolls were the most
popular toy back in my day.
Q: Did you have'any brothers or
sisters?
A: One brother, Henry Liner II. We
all called him "Red" due to his red hair.
Q: What were your parents' jobs?
A: My mom was a stay-at-home
mom and my dad owned a sawmill.
Q: What kind of clothes did you
dress in?
A: My mom made a lot of my
clothes. I wore plaid, black patent
leather shoes and knee socks.
Q: Where did you live?
A: I grew up in Wainesville, N.C.
Q: What did you eat on a normal
occasion?
A: We always had fresh veggies.
Mom was a great cook! Our meat was
usually chicken, pork chops or country
fried steak. Most everything we ate was
fried.
Q: Any school activities?
A: I belonged to the music club at
our school. There was also a club like
Honor Society for people that made
good grades; I belonged to that club.
Q: What were your hobbies?
A: My hobby was music. I played all
the instruments available. I took lessons
every day, after school.
Q: Did you own any pets?
A: My pets were a dog. Black and
white. His name was Happy.
Q: What was your first car like?
A: It was a Ford, four-door, and
gray. My parents had a red convertible
that I always wanted to drive. I also
loved driving my dad's white pickup
truck:'
Q: Name some good and bad
things about back then and now.
A: Good things: I remember square-
dancing, and hiking with picnics. Bad
things: My father was so strict.
Q: What was the most memorable
part of your childhood?
A: All the music lessons my mom
made me take.
Q: Describe technology back then.
A: A phone was available. You had


HJHS
Sept. 19
Sept. 22
Sept. 26
Sept. 29
Oct. 3
Oct. 6
Oct. 13
Oct. 17
Oct. 20
Oct. 24


Lady Wildcat
Avon Park
Hill-Gustat
DeSoto
Lake Placid
Sebring
Avon Park
Hill-Gustat
DeSoto
Lake Placid
Sebring


to tell the operator which number you
were calling. Phone numbers consisted
of two numbers. TV stations had poor
reception; we listened to the radio more
than we watched TV. The radio would
broadcast stories, comedies and dramas.
We also listened to a lot of operettas. I
would not mind listening to operettas
because they were short and told a
story.
Q: What kind of music did you lis-
ten to?
A: The music I listened to was
Motown and '50s music.
Q: Any movies/movie stars?
A: I would love to go to the musical
movies. We had two movie theaters in
our small town.
Q: Any amusement parks?
A: One amusement would come to
town every six months. I guess it was
kind of like a circus.
Q: Did you attend church?
A: Yes, we went to church every
Sunday, morning and night. We also
went on Wednesday nights. I was a
Methodist.
Q: How big was your family?
A: We would have a lot of get-
togethers with my extended families. I
would play with my cousins when we
were together. I did not have very many
cousins, but we were close friends.
Q: Did you have any jobs or
chores?
A: My father made sure I had plenty
of chores. I washed dishes; we didn't
have a dishwasher. I also dusted the
house. During fall, I would rake tons of
leaves. For a job, I would babysit; I
made a quarter an hour.
Q: Did you travel much?
A: My family did a lot of traveling.
We always came to Florida for the win-
ter. The biggest trip we took was a five-
week trip to Mexico. The school would
give me books to read to make up for
my absence from school.
Q: Did you have your own bed-
room?
A: My brother and I shared a bed-
room until I was 10 years old. After I
was 10, my brother and I got our own
rooms.
Q: Where was the closest hospital
or doctor?
A: The doctor would make house
calls. Dr. Lankenster was the doctor
that delivered me, and he would come
to the house if we needed him. The
hospital was Haywood County
Hospital. The hospital was five to 10
minutes away. I, thankfully, never
needed to go as a child.
Back In Time is the result of a class
assignment given to ninth graders at
Hardee Senior High School. Each
student is asked to interview an older
person. Selected interviews are pub-
lished here as an encouragement to the
students and for the enjoyment of our
readers.


Iyusy Bees .




Child Discovery, LLC


31 3 W Orange St. Wauchula



863-767-0166
In




^863-245-903A^









Pending License


Owner: Jason and Crystal (Beasley) Johnson

-Busy Bees Discovery Center's mission is to provide a safe,
developmentally appropriate environment for infants,
preschool, and school age children living in Hardee County.
Our goal is to provide an educational experience that promotes
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We will strive to make our children lifelong learners.
soc9:15p


ABOUT ...
School News
The Herald-Advocate en-
courages submissions from
Hardee County schools.
Photos and write-ups
should be of recent events,
and must include first and
last names for both students
and teachers. Identify pho-
tos front to back, left to right.
Deadline for submissions
is 5 p.m. on Thursday.
Please include the name
and phone number of a con-
tact person. Qualifying
items will be published as
space allows.








September 15, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 7B




A Bite From The Fishing Bug


By WES KNIGHT
Special To The Herald-Advocate
A few months ago I was bitten. Not by Florida's
state bird, the mosquito, but another sort of bug all
together. I was bitten by the fishing bug.
I've enjoyed fishing ever since I first stuck a wrig-
gly red worm on a trusty Eagle Claw hook. Then it was
with my dad off of Steve Roberts Special or with my
Great-Aunt Genola in Pioneer Park.
The funniest part about fishing with my aunt was
that she would spit on the worms for good luck. I was
too young to understand the stiperstitions of a fisher-
man, so I figured she was doing that to clean them off-
no way would a fish want a dirty worm! But the rubber
ones from the store didn't come with dirt. Either way,
spit they got and fish we caught.
My newly rekindled love of fishing carried over to
a recent trip to Anna Maria Island. I had fished on the
local piers and from the beach on the island since I was
about 4 years old. Success then had been measured
more in fun and time spent with Dad than in the quality
or quantity of fish we caught I was as excited to
catch a pin fish with a sand flea off the beach as I was
to catch some nice snapper off of Sharky's Pier.

THE ELUSIVE SNOOK
This time, I planned to fish by myself and target a
specific species of fish from the beach. That fish, the
elusive snook.
I say elusive because in all the time we fished in the
area, we never caught a single snook. Not one. Not even
a nibble. This time, however, I had done my research. I
had talked to a good friend who grew up nearby and
asked him what it would take.
My first morning of fishing, I got on the beach
around 7 to wet a line. The moon was still out and the
water was calm, but a lot of seaweed had blown in and
made it difficult to fish with the tackle I had set up
based on my friend's recommendation.
His advice to me was to rig up a silver spoon using
30-pound leader and a swivel to my braided line. I have
been using Spider Wire stealth for a few years, and I
have been happy with it. Normally for bass fishing I use
a bait caster, but for this trip I was using one of my
Shimano spinning reels and seven-foot medium action
Gator Custom Rod. The silver spoon (1/2 oz.) has a
weedless setup on it, but it doesn't help much to keep
seaweed off of the hook.
The other part of my friend's advice that I had never
tried before was to cast parallel to the beach, into the
first trough of water that holds the bait fish. Our previ-
ous technique had been to cast straight out and get as
close to the shore in Mexico as possible.
Casting parallel to''fie beach made sense to me, as I
have never seen bait fish coming straight in and out,
they are always working along the beach. The fish I
want to catch are the ones that typically trigger those
bait fish to hit your feet and get in your swimsuit while
you make your way into the Gulf.
Day One ended with no fish and a short morning.
All I had to show for it was some sea salad.

DISNEY WITHOUT THE LINES
Not to be deterred, I got up earlier on Day Two and
made it to the beach at 6:30. There was a slight breeze
coming from the south and the waves seemed to be a bit
more active, but I was delighted to see the seaweed had
moved from the area. Heading toward the northern tip
of the island, I began casting parallel to the shore just a
few yards off of the beach.
With only a few people on the beach, it was like
being in an amusement park and not having to wait in
line for the rides.
Just a short stroll down the beach provided me my
first action of the morning. The upside to fishing a
spoon on the beach is that working the bait as a straight
retrieval will do the trick to get the fish to bite.
I felt a slight bump through the cork grip.on the rod
and quickly popped my rod tip up, revealing a ladyfish
at the end of my line. Ladyfish are useful for bait and
not much else. I popped out the hook from the spoon,


~a. .~4, ~ ~ -.


- W


COURTESY PHOTO
Seaweed litters the shoreline along Anna Maria Island as Was Knight searches the surf for some activity


and sent the ladyfish back into the surf.
As the sun started to peek out from the horizon, at
my back I noticed the shimmering silver backs of tarpon
rolling to the south about 100 yards off the beach.
Seeing these trophy fish working bait down the beach
gave me hope that it was going to be a fine day for fish-
ing. Almost as if to give me a tip of the cap, one of the
silver kings shot out of the water showing the athleti-
cism of these famous fish.
As I continued down the beach I landed a few more
ladyfish. I began to get accustomed to the sensation of
the nibble and tug of the ladyfish bite. It is strange to
think that you can tell a fish just by the sensation you
feel through some graphite and cork working down
some braided line, but that was what I was getting
familiar with.
I missed a few fish that seemed to hit the spoon
more aggressively and, in turn, I tried to set the hook
more aggressively, with no luck. I was hopeful those
misses would turn into catches as I got more practice.

NO LADY!
As the beach began to heat up, so did the fishing
excitement. Shortly north of 78th street, as I began to
reel my spoon down the beach, I felt the hit of what I
knew had to be a better fish. As I popped the rod tip up
to set the hook the rod bent slightly, letting me know
there was something more than a ladyfish on the other
end of the line.
As the tension grew on my line, I saw the unmistak-
able black lateral line of a snook heading south down
the beach through the surf with my spoon in tow. As the
drag began to sing, my line continued to peel out as I
fought the fish.
Finding and hooking the fish is one thing, getting
your hands around it on the beach is something else
entirely.
My mind was racing and my pulse increasing as I
began to plan my next steps in landing my first snook.
The fish wore down fairly quickly, and I was able to use
the foamy waves to bring this elusive predator to my
bare feet.
I had landed my targeted species!
There wasn't a beachgoer within a half-mile for me
to celebrate this victory with, and I didn't care. It did
dawn on me at this point that there was nobody to take
my picture holding my fish. I did the best I could. I
fumbled around with the fish and my phone and held it
out to take a photo.
After doing my best with my fish photography, I
decided it was time for this fish to head back into the
warm Gulf water. I admired the fish long enough to
know that where there is one there has to be more, and
I wanted to feel the excitement of having my line taken
out once again.
As I put the fish back in the water, it took the first
outgoing wave like a surfer in reverse and disappeared
into the shallow water just yards off of the shell-littered
shoreline.
I worked a little further down the beach, with only
ladyfish willing to buy what I was selling. I decided to
end my morning on a good note and head back to the
house for a shower and some breakfast. My success
ensured that I would be getting up early to hit the beach
for the rest of my stay on the island.

ANTICIPATION A GOOD ALARM CLOCK
My snook success helped me to get up the rest of the
week with no alarm clock. Even though I was on vaca-
tion, I was genuinely anxious to wake before daylight to
see what the Gulf had to offer. I caught at least one
snook each morning for the rest of my stay.
On Friday morning, I caught a nice snook that shot
out of the water like a bass would, shaking its head
hoping to throw my spoon back at me. I enjoyed the
show from the sand every time I saw that black line zip
out of the water and splash back down with my hook
securely fastened in the side of his lip.
On Saturday morning, I caught a larger snook that
took out a good bit of line and drew a crowd as I


brought the fish up on the beach. It was handy to have
spectators to share in my elation for landing a nice fish,
and one of them was kind enough to snap a few quick
photos with my camera phone to record my catch.
Each morning brought a new tide, a new wind and
new fish.
In my mornings walking the beach, I was able to see
dolphins chasing bait inside the sandbar, rays jumping
through bait pods, a manatee, and the famous tarpon.
Nothing will recharge your batteries more than
being the first one out in the morning, cruising the
beach for what is out in the surf, feeling the tug at the
other end of your line and then having that fish come
out of the water and land at your feet.
I see why people come from all over the world to
fish in Florida. Our state offers a wide variety of trophy
species fish that can be caught with or without the aid of
a guide or a boat. If you want to see what a bite from
the fishing bug feels like, get out and wet a line. All it
takes is that first fish and you will understand it, just
like I do now. :1v5 .

YOU Can Ap ear In... '
Poet's Place
Are you a poet? Let us show Itl Your work could be pubflahed a1
this newspaper In "Poet's Place," a weekly feature which rei~a
solely on reader submissions. Poems must be your owneorigna
work, written by you, not someone else. "lb appear ln4hths fea-;
ture, send your poetry, name and town of residence to: Poet's
Place, The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338, Wauchula, FL 33873
or fax 773-0657.



NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HERIBY GIVEN, that ILENE KLASFELD
AND JON KLASFELD, CO TRUSTEES OF THE ILENE
KLASFEILD TRUST DATED 5-14-96, the holder of the
following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax
deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number
and year of issuance, the description of the property,
and the names in which it was assessed are as fol-
lows:
CERTIFICATE NO.: 1155 YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2009
Description of Property:
3.16 AC
COM AT SW COR OF
NW/4 OF SW/4 S 89 DEG 57M
59S E 1172.30 FT FOR POB N
560.50 FT S 89 DEG 57M 59S
E 325.34 FT TO W R/W LINE
US17 SW/LY ALONG W R/W LINE
US17 TO PT ON S LINE OF
NW 1/4 OF SW 1/4 THEN W TO POB
15 36S 25E
235P124 276P317 278P464
306P586 319P459 322P196
350P247 350P770 382P673
SUBJECT TO RESERVATIONS, COVENANTS,
RESTRICTIONS, AND EASEMENTS OF RE-
CORD.
Name in which assessed: RICCI R KEIRNS AND
NIKKI E KEIRNS
Said property being in the County of HARDEE, State
of Florida.
Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according
to law the property described in such certificate shall
be sold to the highest bidder at the Hardee County
Courthouse, 417 West Main Street, second floor hall-
way outside of Room 202, Wauchula, FL 33873 on the
26th day of October, 2011, at 11:00 a.m.
Dated this 9th day of September, 2011.
B. Hugh Bradley
Clerk of Circuit Court
Hardee County, Florida
AD No: 1
By: Alicia C. Albritton, Deputy Clerk
Tax Deed File No.: 252011TD010XXXX
Pursuant to F.S. 197.512 915-106c
________________________9:15-10:6c


Snook success, as recorded by an obliging beachgoer.


.. -


am








1D 'Lhe terald-AOvocate, septemuer 13, Utll



iWBiacBk WheTni


This week in history, as
researched from the archival
pages of The Florida Ad-
vocate, the Hardee County
Herald and The Herald-Ad-
vocate ...

75 YEARS AGOr
The moss industry of Florida
has extended to Wauchula.
W.W. Taylor, who resides north
of Wauchula near the Texaco
bulk plant, wants plenty of the
small-leaved plant. He buys it
by small lots or by the ton, dries
it and ships it to Bartow, where
it is ginned and sent up North as
a substitute for horsehair in
upholstery. It takes the moss
about six weeks to dry out, and
oddly enough, the wetter it is
the faster it dries.

One of the largest wildcats
ever seen in this section was
killed at the farm of Arthur
Holt, near Ona. When his two
sons, Reson and Lloyd, went to
their cucumber patch, they were
greeted by the large cat. They
called their cat dogs, who gave
chase, caught the cat and killed
it.

In a column named "A
Woman's Last Word," the
author touts dessert as the "last
word to a good meal, the host-
ess' farewell to her guests." She
provides recipes for Peach


Frost, Blue Mold with banana
caramel custard, orange date
torte, date-pineapple parfait and
pineapple-orange ice cream.

J.W. Earnest & Co. is having
a shoe sale: ladies' pumps and
ties in colors and styles from
Dubonnet, calf, patent trim,
suede and kid are $2.95 to $5;
fine dress shoes or oxfords at
$6.85; men's and boy's oxfords
are $1.98 to $5; and Buster
Browns for boys and girls are
$2.95 to $3.95.

50 YEARS AGO
The Inter-County Telephone
System announced this week it
has started on a large 12-month
expansion and improvement
program for Hardee County that
would bring phone service to
many who have not had it. The
large construction program,
which will cost over $175,000
and take until mid-1962, will
extend service to about 100
applicants in Horse Creek-Ona,
Fish Branch, Crewsville and
Lemon Grove areas. A large
part of the 10-year move to
expand phone service was due
to efforts of Wilbur C. King of
the Florida Railroad & Utilities
Commission.

A new resolution, pledging
$100,000 to the four-laning of
Highway 17 through Wauchula


NOTICE OF APPLICATION

FOR TAX DEED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that OWEN FAULK, the
holder of the following certificate has filed said cer-
tificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The cer-
tificate number and year of issuance, the description
of the property, and the names in which it was
assessed are as follows:

CERTIFICATE NO.: 627 YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2008

Description of Property:

LOTS 19, 20, 21 & 22 BLK A
SUBURBAN ACRES
197P322 605P756SM0-CASE#01-03
LP-622P1370 (252002CA000067)

SUBJECT TO RESERVATIONS, COVENANTS,
RESTRICTIONS, AND EASEMENTS OF RE-
CORD.

Name in which assessed: LEO ABRAMS AND
SHIRLEY JOHNSON

Said property being in the County of HARDEE, State
of Florida.

Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according
to law, the property described in such certificate shall
be sold to the highest bidder at the Hardee County
Courthouse, 417 West Main Street, second floor hall-
way outside of Room 202, Wauchula, FL 33873 on the
26 day of October, 2011, at 11:00 a.m.

Dated this 7 day of September, 2011.

B. Hugh Bradley
Clerk of Circuit Court
Hardee County, Florida
AD No: 1
By: Alicia C. Albritton, Deputy Clerk
Tax Deed File No.: 252011TD008XX)OXX
Pursuant to F.S. 197.512 9:15-10:6c



NOTICE OF APPLICATION

FOR TAX DEED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that HANSELL HINKSON,
the holder of the following certificate has filed said
certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The
certificate number and year of issuance, the descrip-
tion of the property, and the names in which it was
assessed are as follows:

CERTIFICATE NO.: 843 YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2009

Description of Property:

LOTS 18 & 19 BLK D
SUBURBAN ACRES
CAO-19P345 192P685 DC-368P300
PMR 3/89 371 P784P787 DC-548P695
(JESR) PRO-98-044 PMR5/98

SUBJECT TO RESERVATIONS, COVENANTS,
RESTRICTIONS, AND EASEMENTS OF RE-
CORD.

Name in which assessed: ESTATE OF JEREMIAH
ELLISON

Said property being in the County of HARDEE, State
of Florida.

Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according
to law the property described in such certificate' shall
be sold to the highest bidder at the Hardee County
Courthouse, 417 West Main Street, second floor hall-
way outside of Room 202, Wauchula, FL 33873 on the
26th day of October, 2011, at 11:00 a.m.

Dated this 12th day of September, 2011.

B. Hugh Bradley
Clerk of Circuit Court
Hardee County, Florida
AD No: 1
By: Alicia C. Albritton, Deputy Clerk
Tax Deed File No.: 252011TD009XXXX
Pursuant to F.S. 197.5129:15-1:6c
_ ^ ^ _ ______________________9:15-10:6c


and dropping Zolfo Springs
temporarily from the project,
was approved by the Board of
County Commissioners in a
special meeting on Friday
night. If the resolution was in
the Road Board's hands before
Oct. 1, it could be included for
bids let in October.

A year ago this week
Wauchula and the rest of the
county was digging out after
one of the worst hurricanes in
the history of the state, Donna.
Winds clocked at 125 miles per
hour had battered this area dur-
ing the night of Sept. 10 and 11,
leaving almost indescribable
devastation in its path. Within a
week Wauchula was well back
on its way to normal, and now,
a year later, it is in better shape
than before. The federal De-
fense Authority has approved
Wauchula's application for
$113,000 in disaster relief,
enabling it to pay off loans for
emergency repairs.

A&P specials this week
include fryers for 23 cents a
pound, sliced liver three pounds
for $1, eight-inch pies for 43
cents each, giant ring angel
food cakes for 39 cents, fresh
prunes two pounds for 29 cents,
and sweet yellow corn 10 for 49
cents.

25 YEARS AGO
Bowling Green will have a
three-day centennial celebra-
tion, beginning Friday at 1 p.m.
with music, flea markets, a bar-
becue chicken dinner and other
food booths. There will be'a
rock concert for teens on Friday
night, a parade at 10 a.m.
Saturday with 45 units partici-
pating and State Sen. Pat Neal
and U.S. Congressman Andy
Ireland attending, and games
and entertainment Saturday
afternoon. Sunday's program
has not yet been announced.

This year Hardee County stu-
dents, parents and school per-
sonnel will be the targets of a
year-long drug program, coor-
dinated by Larry Cook, investi-
gator and security officer for
Hardee County schools. It is
designed to fight "crack"
cocaine and other illegal drug
use. Cook said cocaine is
emphasized because of its
availability and dangerous,
often deadly, effects. Crank



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 252011CP000051

IN RE: ESTATE OF
PATRICIA A. HOWLEY,
deceased.
.I


NOTICE TO CREDITORS
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST
THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an
Order of Summary Administration
has been entered in the estate of
PATRICIA A. HOWLEY, deceased,
File Number 2522011CP000051,
by the Circuit Court for Hardee
County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which Is Post
Office Drawer 1749, Wauchula,
Florida 33873; that the decedent's
date of death was January 23,
2011; that the total value of the
estate is $36,136.00 and that the
names and addresses of those to
whom it has been assigned by
such order are:
Name: MONSIGNOR EDWARD
HOWLEY
ADDRESS: 7786 Gulf Blvd. Zolfo
Springs, FL 33890
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE
NOTIFIED THAT'
All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims
or demands against the estate of
the decendent other than those
for whom provision for full pay-
ment was made in the Order of
Summary Administration must file
their claims with this court WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREV-
ER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY
OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERI-
OD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2]
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of the first publication
of this Notice is September 15,
2011.
Person Giving Notice:
KATHLEEN H. CSIKI
22 Simsbury Road
West Hartford, Connecticut
06117

Attorney for Person 'Giving
Notice:
BRITTON G. SWANK, Attorney
Florida Bar No. 0651591
Osterhout, McKinney &
Prather, PA.
3783 Seago Lane
Ft. Myers, FL 33901
Phone: (239) 939-4888
Fax: (239) 277-0601
Email: lnfo@omplaw.com
9:15,22c


(methamphetamine) and mari-
juana join cocaine as the three
biggest illegal drug problems.
Alcohol use is still the number
one problem, said Cook.

Supporters of Farm Safety
Week this year were Joe L.
Davis Inc, Florida Fertilizer,
Florida Fence Post, Fields
Equipment Co,, Helena Chem-
ical Co., Hardee Ranch Supply
Inc., Wauchula Farmers Supply
Co., Bob Fite's Growers
Supply, Country Chrysler,
Peace River Ford Tractor Inc.,
NAPA Motor Parts, Pioneer
Ford, English Chevrolet and
Hardee County Farm Bureau.

Real estate ads this week
included a two-story frame
home for $32,000; a 4BR, 2B,
CB home on four acres with
cathedral ceilings and three-car
garage for $155,000; a 3BR,
1B, CB home on one acre in
Lemon Grove, $44,000; and an
older home in an excellent loca-
tion on a large corner lot for
$55,000.

10 YEARS AGO
The Hardee County Com-,
mission last Thursday decided
not to assist in finding a suitable
site for a compost plant. Tom
Adams. has been unsuccessful
twice in getting approval for a
site in Hardee County. Com-
missioners asked Adams to
change his first site near Hardee
Lakes in northwestern Hardee,
and the second site in eastern
Hardee along Parnell was
opposed by area landowners.
Commissioner Bill Lambert
asked, "Are we going to consid-
er composting facilities in
Hardee County?"

With fear and faith, anxiety
and anger, Hardee County
mourned the nation's losses in
the Tuesday terrorist attacks in
America. Flags were at half-
mast, residents were glued to
their TV sets, and there were
prayer vigils as some waited for
word from relatives at the New
York or Washington, D. C.,
sites.

Wauchula's new attorney,
Cliff Ables of Crewsville, was
to have begun work at Tuesday
evening's first public hearing
on taxes for the 2001-02 fiscal
year. The hearing was post-
poned due to the tragedies of
the day and will be held on
Sept. 20. Ables comes with over
25 years' experience in proper-
ty, government, contracts, pub-
lic housing and civil litigation.

Returning lettermen anchor
the 2001 varsity football team:
Jose Retana, Tony Dominguez,
Jon Mariner, Curtis Stanley,
Travis Maldonado, Kevis
White, Victor Juarez, Chris
Thornton, Hunter Prescott,
Brian Kemp, Alex Myrie,
Derrick Davis, Jarrod Oliver,
Ruben Rivas, Wilney Francois,
Ches Graham, Allen McLeod,
Nick Schock and Travis
Kilpatrick give the team needed
experience at several positions.


Outta The Woods
By Tony Young
Florida Fish & Wildlife Commission


CROSSBOW SEASON EXPANDED ON PRIVATE LANDS
Even though you can hardly tell, summer is almost over. Kids
have returned to school, football is back on TV and hunting sea-
son's already been going on a month now in South Florida.
Most of us have already finished our preseason scouting, and
we've hung our tree stands along well-traveled deer trails we
hope next to a mature oak tree that'll soon begin dropping acorns.
Finally, the time of year we've been waiting for is here!
Bowhunting continues to be popular in our state. Beginning
this year, even more folks are bound to take to the woods earlier,
because on private lands, crossbow season has been extended; it
now opens the same day as archery in each of the four hunting
zones.
Just like last year on private lands, hunting season still comes
in first in Zone A, which is that part of the state south of State Road
70. Archery and crossbow seasons there started July 30.
The fourth hunting zone, which was added last year and is
made up in part by the Green Swamp Basin, is called Zone B and
lies south of SR 50, west of U.S. 441 and the Kissimmee Waterway,
north of SR 60 and east of the Gulf of Mexico. Archery and cross-
bow seasons in Zone B always begin on the third Saturday of
October. This year, that falls on Oct. 15.
'The line that divides zones C and D begins at U.S. 27 at the
(Gadsden County) Florida-Georgia state line and runs south on
U.S. 27 until it meets SR 61 in Tallahassee. From there, it follows
SR 61, running south until it hits U.S. 319. There, the line follows
U.S. 319, continuing south to U.S. 98; it then runs east along U.S.
98 before turning south on Spring Creek Highway and continuing
to the Gulf of Mexico.
If you hunt west of that line, you're in Zone D, where archery
and crossbow seasons begin on Oct. 22 this year. In Zone C,
archery and crossbow seasons open on the third Saturday in
September. This year, that date is Sept. 17.
To hunt during archery season, you'll need a Florida hunting
license and an archery permit. 'During crossbow season, you'll
need a hunting license and crossbow permit. If you're a Florida
resident, an annual hunting license will cost $17. Archery and
crossbow permits cost just $5 each, and all deer hunters must have
the $5 deer permit. Anyone planning on hunting one of Florida's
many WMAs must purchase a management area permit for $26.50.
And don't forget to pick up the WMA brochure for the area
you wish to hunt, because the hunting season dates have changed
since last year on many of them. You can pick up a copy of these
WMA brochures at your local tax collector's office or read them at
MyFWC.com/Hunting.
During archery season and that part of crossbow season that is
concurrent with archery, you can take deer of either sex, regardless
of antler size (except for spotted fawns). After archery ends, dur-
ing the remaining portion of the crossbow season, only legal bucks
(having at least one antler that is at least five inches long) may be
taken. The daily bag limit on deer is two. Bag limits for deer on
WMAs can differ, so check the specifics of the area before you
hunt.
You can hunt wild hogs on private lands year-round with no
bag or size limits. On most WMAs, there's also no bag or size lim-
its, and hogs are legal to take during most hunting seasons except
spring turkey. On a few WMAs, bag and size limits do apply, so. -
be sure to check the brochure for the specific area to be certain.
It's also legal to shoot gobblers and bearded turkeys during
archery and crossbow seasons, given you have a turkey permit ($10
for residents). You can take only one turkey per day, and there's a
two-bird fall-season limit. It's against the law to hunt turkeys in
Holmes County in the fall, and it's illegal to shoot them while
they're on the roost, over bait, when you're within 100 yards of a
game-feeding station when bait is present or with the aid of record-
ed turkey calls.
If you're hunting during the archery season, you may hunt
only with a bow and must have the $5 archery permit. During
crossbow season, you may use either a crossbow or bow but must
have the $5 crossbow permit. On WMAs, only hunters with a dis-
abled crossbow permit are allowed to use crossbows during
archery season.
All bows must have a minimum draw weight of 35 pounds,
and hand-held releases are permitted. For hunting deer, hogs and
turkeys, broadheads must have at least two sharpened edges with a
minimum width of 7/8-inch.

Television has done much for psychiatry by spreading
information about it, as well as contributing to the need
for it.
-Alfred Hitchcock


The Ten Commandments
As lawlessness continues to increase, the Love of many is grow-
ing cold (Matthew 24:12). The two great fundamental principles
upon which God's creation operates are, "You shall Love the Lord
your God with all your heart, soul, strength, and mind," and "Your
neighbor as yourself" (Deuteronomy 6:4,5; Leviticus 19:18; Luke
10:27).
Our Maker wrote the expression of those principles on two tables
of stone and added "no more" (Deuteronomy 5:22). On the first
stone God wrote the commandments that point out our duty to Him,
and on the second table he wrote the last six which govern our rela-
tionship with our neighbor (Exodus 20:3-17).
Is there any wonder why the Devil has deluded so many unsus-
pecting people with so many variations of "no law" deceptions? It is
written that those people who do "not" receive the mark of the beast
will be keeping the Commandments of God (Revelation 14:12). In
the great controversy between Christ and Satan, it is the one that is
obeyed that determines who it is that's really worshiped. Lawless-
ness is sin, for sin is the transgression of the Law (1st John 3:4).
Jesus came to save us "from" sin, not with it (Nahum 1:9). If any-
one continues in willful sin and completely suppresses the prompt-
ings of the Holy Spirit to turn away from the sin, even by presuming
to be under grace, the Devil will have successfully deceived that
person into committing the unpardonable sin which only reward is
the second death, from which there is no resurrection (Revelation
20:14).


For Help With Understanding Your Bible Better,

Write to:
Bible Studies Unlimited
RO. Box 2385
Wauchula, FL 33873 9:15p







-aid-Advocate
JIeptember 15
september 15,2011


PAGE ONE


Sports Schedule Sept. 15-29
Sept. 15 Boys Golf Lake Wales Away 4 p
Girls Golf Frostproof Away. 4 p
Swimming Lake Placid Away 5:3
JV/V Volleyball Fort Meade Away 6/7
JV Football Fort Meade Away 7 p
Sept. 16 Cross Country Sebring Away 4:3
V. Football Sebring Away 7 p
Sept 16-17 V. Volleyball Key West Tourn. Away TBA
Sept. 19 HJHS Softball Avon Park HOME 4:31
V/JV Volleyball Santa Fe Away 6/7:


Sept. 20 Girls Golf
Cross Country
HJHS Football
Swimming


Mulberry
Hardee Lakes
Lake Placid
Mulberry


HOME
HOME
Away
HOME


4 p.1...
4:30 p.m.
5:30 p.m.
5:30 p.m.


Sept. 22 Girls Golf Avon Park Away 4 p.m.
Boys Golf. Sebring Away 4 p.m.
Cross Country Lake Placid Away 4:30 p.m.
Swimming Winter Haven Away 5:30 p.m.
JV Football Frostproof Away 7 p.m.
Sept. 23 V. Football Bayshore Away 7:30 p.m.
Sept. 24 Cross Country Gainesville Away 8 a.m.
Sept. 26 HJHS Softball DeSoto HOME 4:30 p.m.
Sept. 27 Girls Golf -Sebring HOME 4 p.m.
HJHS Football Sebring HOME 5:30 p.m.
Swimming Frostproof HOME 530 p.m.
JV/ Volleyball Lake Wales HOME 6/7:30 p.m.


Sept. 29 Boys Golf
HJHS Softball
Cross Country
JV/V Volleyball
JV Football


Frostproof
Lake Placid
DeSoto
Teneroc
Lake Placid


HOME
Away
Away
Away
HOME


4 p.m.
4:30 p.m.
4:30 p.m.
6/7:30 p.m.
7 p.m.


The ancient Greeks chewed a chewing gum made from the resin of the mastic tree and
the Mayans chewed chicle which is the sap from the sapodilla tree. In 1906 Frank
Henry invented a bubble gum that he called Blibber-Blubber.
The Baltimore Colts were the first professional football team to have a cheerleading
squad.



FREE-$40 GIFT CARD

SEE WILDCAT PAGE
Center Section of "C"
For Your Chance To Win


A C





Spectacular 60's


/ TFriday, September 16
6:00pm 9:00pm
| Main Street Heritage Park
Downtown Wauchula
-Best Dressed Hippie Contest
o Favorite 60's Icon Contest aa
0 60's Era Classic Cars 1I

SDowntown Shopping & Dining
o *Live Entertainment By: Yesterdaze 3

SBuin artnr: Progress Energy


SBring Your Lawn Chair and join Us Downtown! h
For More Information C
S Call 863.767.0330 or Visit www.mainstreetwauchula.com
*9:8,15c


COLLEGIATE SCORE


COURTESY PHOTO
2009 HHS grad Ezayi "Izzy" Youyoute (11) scored his first collegiate touchdown
Saturday for Georgia Southern College in its 62-21 win over Tusculum. Former
Wauchulan Ben Carlton, now living near the college, also caught Youyoute and team-
mate Zach York as they paused to pay respects at the statue of legendary Georgia
Southern coach Erk Russell,


There is magic in long-distance friendships. They let you relate to other human beings
in a way that goes beyond being physically together and is often more profound.
-Diana Cortes



SS Land 0' Lakes

Purina Feed

BEEF CATTLE FIELD DAY

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15
9:00AM 3:00pm

Putnam Ranch & Grove
Parnell Road, Zolfo Springs

Please RSVP by September 12


* Heifer Development with Accuration
Cattle Limiter
Bull Development


* Brood Cow Nutrition with
* Accuration Liquid Update


Sup R Lix


SHARDEE RANCH

SUPPLY, INC.
1309 Hwy. 17 South Wauchula

773-4322
Store Hours: Monday Friday 7 am 5:30 pm
Saturday 7 am 12 pm 91-15s
nmm nm mmm g H gmnm


"You Name
The Score"
(A Winner Every Week)


Irr









2C The Herald-Advocate, September 15, 2011





Schedule of Weekly Services-


Printed as a Public Service
by'.
4 The. Jerald-Advocate
? Wauchult, Florida

deadlinee : Thursday 5 p.m.


BOWLING GREEN
APOSTOLIC LIGHTHOUSE
UNITED PENTACOSTAL
CHURCH
310 Orange St.
375-3100
Sunday Morning ................ 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening .................. 6:00 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting........7:00 p.m.
Thursday Service ................ 7:30 p.m.

CHESTER GROVE MB CHURCH
708 W. Grape St. 375-3353
Sunday School ....................9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship .................. 8:00 a.m.
Sun. Eve. Worship
Ist & 3rd ..............4:00 p.m. 3:00 p.m.
Tues. Prayer/Bible Study ......6:00 p.m.

CHRISTIAN BIBLE
FELLOWSHIP
Hwy. 17 South
Morning Worship ..............10:30 a.m.
Youth Group Sunday ..........6:00 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
121 West Broward St. 375-2231
375-3100
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ............... 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday .:........................ 7:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
TRUE HOLINESS OUTREACH
725 Palmetto St.
375-3304
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Tues. Night Bible Study ...... 7:30 p.m.
Evening Worship
1st Sunday .................... 5:00 p.m.

COMMUNITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Main & W. Centra.
Sunday AM Worship............10:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening .................6:00( p.m.
Wed. Prayer Meeting ............7:00 p.m.

FAITH ASSEMBLY OF GOD
4937 Hwy. 17 N. 375-4206
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Disciples Train & Choirs ......5:30 p.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Bowling Green
S. Hwy. 17. 375-2253
SUNDAY:
Bible Study ..........................9:30 a.m .
Morning Worship ..............10:45 a.m:
Evening Worship .................6:30 p.m.

WEDNESDAY:
Discipleship Training
Youth & Adult ..................6:30 p.m.
AWANA (ages 3-5th grade) ....6:30 p.m.

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Grape & Church Streets 375-2340
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ........11:0(X) a.m.
Youth Fellowship .................. 5:(X1) p.m.
Evening Worship ............ 6:(10 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ................7:(K00) p.m.

FORT GREEN BAPTIST
CHURCH
Baptist Church Road 773-9013
BibleConnection ..................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................I1:00(X) a.m.
Sunday Evening .................. 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ..............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

HOLY CHILD
SPANISH CATHOLIC MISSION
Misa (Espanol) Sunday ........7:0() p.m.

IGLESIA DEL DIOS VIVO
105 Dixiana St. 375-4191
Domingo De Predicacion ....11:00 p.m.
Martes Estudio Biblico..........7:00 p.m.
Miercoles Estudior Juvenil ....7:00 p.m.
Jueves De Predicacion ..........7:00 p.m.

IMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH
210 E. Broward St. 375-4681
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..................7:00 p.m

MACEDI)ONIA PRIMITIVE
BAPTIST CHURCH
607 Palmetto St.
Church School ......................9:30 a.m .
M morning Service ....... ........11:00 a.m.
Evening Service .................. 7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study/Prayer ......7:00 p.m.
Communion-2nd Sun. Eve. ..6:00 p.m.

MNIT. PISGAH BAPTIST CHURCH
6210 Mt. Pisgah Rd. 375-4409
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m .
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training..................5:00 p.m .
Evening Worship ..................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time........7:00 p.m.
NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
Mason Dixon & County Line Rd.
773-3689 781-5887'
Sunday Worship ..................I 1:00 a.m.
2nd Sunday Communion ....11:00 a.m.
5th Sunday Feast...............11...1 :00 a.m.
Bread of Life Sunday .......12:15 p.m.
T.H.E. Meeting -.Tuesday ....7:00 p.m.


BOWLING GREEN
OPEN DOOR FULL GOSPEL
PRAISE CENTER
E. Broward St.
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Service .................... 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.

PRIMERA MISSION BAUTISTA
Murray Road off Hwy. 17
375-2295
Domingos Escuela Dom. ......9:45 a.m.
Servicio de Adoracion..........11:00 a.m.
Servicio de Predicacion ........5:00 p.m.
Miercoles Servico................ 6:30 p.m.

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 South US Hwy 17
Morning Service ................ 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.

ST. JOHN A.M.E. CHURCH
513 W. Orange St.
375-2911
Sunday Church School ..........9:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship....1 1:00 a.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

VICTORY PRAISE CENTER
128 E. Main St.
Sunday School ..... .........10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ............... ..6:00 p.m.
Thursday Night Services,
Evening Worship.................. 7:00 p.m.
Kidz Club............................. 7:00 p.m .

ONA

LIMESTONE BAPTIST CHURCH
4868 Keystone Ave. Limestone
Comm.
Sunday School ....... ......... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.

NEW ELIM
INDEPENDENT BAPTIST
Badger Loop Lane 773-4475
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Worship Service .................11:00 a.m.
Sunday Night Worship ..........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time........7:00 p.m.

NEW ZION BAPTIST CHURCH
202 Sidney Roberts Road
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Disciples Training..... ............6:00 p.m .
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................6:00 p.m.

ONA BAPTIST CHURCH
131 Bear Lane 773-2540
Sunday School ..... .........10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.

UNION BAPTIST CHURCH
. ,'3926 Lily jlrch Rd. 494-5622
SU(iiy Scho*5............10:00 a!m.
MdrAg Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday
AWANA for Kids ..............6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time.........7:00 p.m.


WAUCHULA

APOSTOLIC ASSEMBLY
Martin Luther King and Apostolic Rd.
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Englshg Service ..... ...........11:30 a.m.
General Worship Service .......1:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

CELEBRATION CHURCH
322 Hanchey Rd.
863-781-1624
hardee.celebration.org
Sunday Morning Service .... 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Youth Service ....5:30 p.m.
Childcare provided at all services

CELEBRATION FELLOWSHIP
773-0427
Celebration Service..............10:30 a.m.
Wehi'usda yv Evening Cell Groups
Adult Cell Group ...... ............ 7:00 p.m.
Youth Cell Group .... ............ 7:00 p.m.
Children's Cell Group ..........7:00 p.m.
Call for locations

CHARLIE CREEK
BAPTIST CHURCH
6885 State Road 64 East 773-3447
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............6:30 p.m.
CHURCH OF CHRIST
201 S. Florida Ave. & Orange St.
773-9678
Bible Study ...........................9:30 a.m .
Worship Service ..................10:30 a.m.
W wednesday '...........................7:30 p.m .

CHURCH OF CHRIST
Will Duke Road
773-2249
Sunday Morning Worship......9:30 a.m.
Sunday Bible Class..............1 1:30 a.m.
Sunday Evening Worship ......6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Bible Class ........7:00 p.m.
Men's Leadership & Trainingm Class -
2nd Sunday of Month........4:00 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD
Martin Luther King Blvd.
767-0199

CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST
OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS
630 Hanchey Rd. 773-3532
Sacrament Meeting ................9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m.
Priesthood ............................ 1:001 a.m .


WAUCHULA

COMMUNITY BAPTIST
CHURCH OF WAUCHULA HILLS
(SPANISH)
615 Rainey Blvd.
257-3950
Sunday Bible Study ............10:00 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship .... 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service........7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
DIOS ES AMOR
807 S. 8th Ave.
773-4576
Domingos Escuela
Dominica .......... ................ 10:00 a.m .
Servicio ..........................1... 1 :00 a.m .
Lunes Oracion .................... 6:00 p.m.
Miercoles Servicio .............. 7:00 p.m.
EL REMANENTE
IGLECIA CRISTIANA
318 W. Main St..
Martes Oracion ................ 7:00 p.m.
Jueves Servicio ..... ........... 7:30 p.m.
Viernes Servicio .... .......... 7:30 p.m.
Domingo Servicio................10:30 a.m.
ENDTIME CROSSROAD
MINISTRY
501 N. 9th & Georgia St. 773-3470
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Service ................11:30 a.m.
Evening Service.................. 7:30 p.m.
Wed. Bible St. & Yth. Gath ..7:30 p.m.
Friday (Holy Ghost Night)....7:30 p.m.

FAITH PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
114 N. 7th Ave. 773-2105
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship .... ........11:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship .... ............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ..............6:15 p.m.
Wed. Youth Fellowship..........6:50 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

FAITH TEMPLE CHURCH
OF GOD
701 N. 7th Ave 773-3800
Sunday School .................... 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship .... ............10:20 a.m.
Children's Chuch .............. 10:40 a.m.
Evening Service .................. 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........7:00 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
1570 W. Main St. 773-4182
SUNDAY*
Bible Study for all ages ........9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..... .......6:00 p.m.

WEDNESDAY:
Sr. Adult Bible Study ..........10:00 a.m.
children'ss Chiors
(PK-Grade 4) ................. 5:30 p.m.
PRAISE 57-Jr High Chior .. 5:30 p.m.
Mid-Week. Prayer Meeting .. 6:00 p.m.
Kids On Missions
(PK-Grade 4) ................. 6:00 p.m.
Club 56 ............................. 6:00 p.m .
Youth Group (Grades 7-12) 6:00 p.m.
Family Life Ministry
& Discipleship .... .......... 6:00 p.m.
Church Orchestra............... 6:00 p.m,
Adult Choir .......................... 7:00 p.m .

FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH
1121 W. Louisiana St. 773-9243
SUNDAY#
Generations Cafe Opens........9:30 a.m.
Kids World Check-In for
Nursery-5th Grade Begins..10:15 a.m.
Pre-K Blast .......................... 10:45 a~m.
Kids World B.L.A.S.T.
(K-5th) ............................ 10:45 a.m.
Worship Service ..................10:45 a.m.
WEDNESDAY:
Check-In begins for
Nursery-5thgrade ..... ....... 6:15 p.m.
Classes for children ages
PreK-12th grade ............6:30-8:00 p.m.
FIRST CHURCH OF
THE NAZARENE
511 W. Palmetto St.
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Service ................ 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.
FIRST MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
1347 Martin Luther King Ave.
773-6556
Sunday School .................... 9:30 a.m.
Morning Service .................. 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6:00 p.m.
Tues. Youth Ministry Meeting/
Bible Study ...................... 6:00 p.m .
Wed. Prayer/Bible Study ......7:00 p.m.
FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
207 N. Seventh Ave. 773-4267
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m .
Traditional Sunday Worship 11:00 a.m.
Casual Sunday Worship..........6:00 p.m
Tuesday Bible Study............10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Activities ............6:00 p.m.
FLORIDA'S FIRST ASSEMBLY
OF GOD CHURCH
1397 South Florida Avenue
773-9386.
Sunday School ......................9:00 a.m .
Morning Worship ............... 10:00 am.
Wed. Family Night ................7:00 p.m.
Adult, Children & Radiate Youth Church
FLORIDA GOSPEL
511 W. Palmetto
223-5126
Sunday Morning Worship.... 11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............7:30 p.m.
THE GOSPEL TABERNACLE
810 W. Tennessee St. 773-3753
M morning Service ..................10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service..............7:00 p.m.

HEARTLAND
COMMUNITY CHURCH
1262 W. Main St. 767-6500
Coffee & Donuts..... ..........9:00 a.m.


Sunday School ....... ......... 9:30 a.m.
W orship ................. ..... 10:30 a.m .
Wed. Night Dinner .............. 6:00 p.m.
Wed. Bodybuilders Adult Cl.
Crossroads &
Lighthouse M in ..................7:00 p.m.

HIGHER GROUND
INTERNATIONAL MINISTRY
1258 W. MAIN STREET
WAUCHULA, FL
Sunday Morning Worship....I 1:00 a.m.
Wed. Night Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.


WAUCHULA
IGLESIA HISPANA
FUENTE DE VIDA
501 N. 9"h Ave.
M artes ................................ 7: 30 p.m .
Jueves .................................. 7:30 p.m .
Domingo ............................ 10:30 p.m .

IGLESIA HISPANA
PRESENCIA de Dios
511 W. Palmetto St.
Domingos ............... ................6:00 p.m.
M iercoles............ ...... .....7:00 p.m .

IGLESIA ADVENTISTA DEL
SEPTIMO DIA
Old Bradenton Road
767-1010

JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
ENGLISH
155 Altman Road. 1131
Sunday Service .................... 2:00 p.m.

JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
SPANISH
Sunday Service .................. 10:00 a.m.

LIGHT OF THE WORLD
MINISTRIES
Womans Center 131 N. 7th Ave.
Wauchula, FL
Friday Evening ....................6:00 p.m.

LAKE DALE BAPTIST CHURCH
3102 Heard Bridge Road
773-6622
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Service ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6;00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.

MINISTERIO INTERNATIONAL
Cambriadores de Mundo
704 W. Main St. 773.0065
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.

NEW HOPE BAPTIST CHURCH
1999 State Road 64 East
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship Service .... 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship Service ......6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Night Supper ......6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Activities
(All Ages) ........................ 7:00 p.m .
NEW LIFE CHURCH
117 W. Palmetto St.
773-2929
Sunday Serve ............... :10:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service .......6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.
Children Ministries for all services

NEW MT. ZION A.M.E. CHURCH
10 Martin Luther King Ave.
767-0023
Mom. Worship
(Ist & 3r Sun.) ..................8:00 a.m .
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
2nd Sunday Youth Service ....4:00 p.m.
Allen Christi, Endeavor......4:00 p.m.
Wed. & Fri. Bible Study........7:00 p.m.

NORTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
912 N. 8th Ave. 773-6947
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship .............6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Supper ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

OAK GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
4350 W. Main St. 735-0321
Sunday School .................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.

PEACE VALLEY LUTHERAN
CHURCH
1643 Stenstrom Road 773-2858
1 & 3'1 Sun.
Communion ....... .........10:00 a.m.
2' & 4' Sun.
Divine Worship ..............10:00 a.m.
Bible Study ..... ....... .........11:15 a.m .
., ** Fellowship each Sunday after service

PROGRESSIVE MISSIONARY
BAPTIFST CHURCH
149 Manley Road East Main
773-5814
Sunday School ......................9:30 a.m.
Worship Service ..................11:00 a.m.
Wed. Evening Prayer ............7:00 p.m.

REAL LIFE CHURCH
3365 North US Hwy 17
Morning S ,yic. ............ 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Study/Learning ..6:30 p.m.

RIVERVIEW HEIGHTS
MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
1321 S.R. 636 East 773-3344
Radio Program
WZZS Sundays...............9:00 a.m.
Sunday School ....................10:00 a.m .
Morning Worship ................ 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ................7:00 p.m.

SOUL HARVEST MINISTRY
1337 Hwy. 17 South, Wauchula
Sunday School .................10:00 a.m.
M morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Evening Service ....................6:00 p.m .
Wednesday Service:..............7:00 p.m.

ST. ANN'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
204 N. 9th Ave. 773-6418
Sunday .................................9:00 a.m .
Holy Days ............. ........................

ST. MICHAEL
CATHOLIC CHURCH
408 Heard bridge Road 773-4089
Saturday Mass (English) ......5:00 p.m.
(Spanish) ......7:00 p.m.
Sunday(English) ...............8:30 a.m.


(Spanish) ...............11... :00 a.m .
(C reole)..................... 1:00 p.m .
Cateclsmo .. ....... ........... 9:45 a.m.
Duily Mass in English .........8:310 a.m.
SEVENTH )AY
ADVENTIST CHURCH
205 S. Ilth Ave.. 773-9927
Sabbath School ...............19:30 aim.
Morning Worship. ...............1:00 a.m.
Tues. Prayer Meeting ............7:00 pIm.


WAUCHULA

SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
505 S. 10th Ave. 773-4368
Sunday School .................... 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 1:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.

SPIRIT WIND TABERNACLE
1652 Old Bradenton Road
Sunday Worship. ................ 10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Worship ..............7:30 p.m.

TABERNACLE OF
PRAISE & JOY
1507 MLK Avenue
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:30 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 7:00 p.m.
Tues. Bible Stdy.
& Child Train ...... ........7:00 p.m.
Friday Prayer Service ............7:00 p.m.
WAUCHULA CHURCH OF GOD
1543 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave.
773-0199
Sunday School ...................10:00 a.m.
M morning Worship ................1 I1:15 a.m.
Evening Worship ...........g6:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Fam. Training ....7:30 p.m.
Thurs. Youth Bible Study ......7:00 p.m.
Friday Night Worship............7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA HILLS HARVEST
TEMPLE ASSEMBLY OF GOD
210 Anderson
Sunday School .................... 0:00 a.m.
Church................................ 10:00 a.m .
Youth Service ...................... 6:00 p.m.
Evening Service .................. 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA HILLS
SPANISH CHURCH OF GOD
1000 Stansfield Rd.
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday Prayer.................... 7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship................7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ................ 7:30 p.m.

WAUCHULA REVIVAL CENTER
(Full Gospel)
501 N. 9th Ave.
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Youth & Child. Church..........6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship ................ 7:00 p.m.
Wed. Bible Study ................ 7:00 p.m.
M en's Fri. Prayer .................. 7:0 .p.m .


ZOLFO SPRINGS

COMMUNITY WESLEYAN CHURCH
Gardner
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................ 11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service................7:00 p.m.

COWBOY-UP MINISTRY
Cracker Trail Arena
Hwy 66
(across from Oak Hills Ranch Rd.)
781-2281
Sunday .............................. 10:00 a.m .
CREWSVILLE BETHEL
BAPTIST CHURCH
8251 Crewsville Road
Church 735-0871 Pastor 773-6657
Sunday School ......................9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
,Evening Worship ..................6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............6:30 p.m.
EVANGELISTIC HOLINESS
CHURCH INC.
Corner of 6th and Hickory
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ..............11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday .......................... 7:30 p.m.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
OF ZOLFO
320 E. 4th St. 735-1200
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ................11:00 a.m.
Training Union .... ............. 5:00 p.m.
Evening Worship .... ........6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Prayer ..............7:00 p.m.
FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Corner of 6th & Suwanee 735-0114
Bible Study ....... ............. 10:00 a.m .
Worship Service .... ........11:00 a.m.
GARDNER BAPTIST CHURCH
South Hwy. 17 494-5456
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship ...............11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Prayer ...............7:00 p.m.
LIFE CHANGING WORSHIP CENTER
3426 Oak St. 863-832-9808
Sunday Worship ................ 2:30 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ........6:30 p.m.


God and,


ZOLFO SPRINGS

MARANATHA BAPTIST CHURCH
2465 Oxendine Rd
(863) 832-9292
Sunday School .................. 10:00 a.m.
W orship .............................. 11:00 a.m .
Evening .................................. :00 p.m .
Wed. Bible '& Praye'r'Meet....7:00 p.m.
NEW VISION WORSHIP CENTER
64 E. & School House Road
Church 735-8585 Childcare 735-
8586
Morning Worship .............. 10:00 a.m.
Children's Church..............10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ... .... .... :.6:00 p.m.
Wed. Youth & F.T.H. ............7:00 p.m.

PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF
GOD FAITH TEMPLE
Oak Street
Sunday Worship ................. 10:00 a.m.
Evening Worship ................ 7:00 p.m.
Tuesday Worship ................ 7:30 p.m.
Thursday Worship................ 7:30 p.m.
Saturday Worship ................ 7:30 p.m.

PRIMERA MISSION
BAUTISTA HISPANA
518 8th Ave. E.
Escuela Dominical ..............10:00 a.m.
Servicio del Domingo ..........11:00 a.m.
..............................................7:00 p .m .
Servicio del Miercoles .........7:30 p.m.
PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH
Pioneer Park
2nd Sunday ........................ 10:30 a.m.
Evening Service .................. 6:30 p.m.
5th Sunday ..........................6:00 p.m.

REALITY RANCH
COWBOY CHURCH
2-1/2 Miles east of
Zolfo Springs on Hwy. 66
863-781-1578
Sunday Service .................. 11:00 a.m.

ST. PAUL'S MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
3676 US. Hwy. 17 South 735-0636
Sunday School . ..................9:30 a.m.
M morning Worship ...................... 11 a.m.
Wed. Prayer Service ..............7:00 p.m.

SAN ALFONSO MISSION
3027 Schoolhouse Lane
Domingo, Misa en Espanol ..9:30 a.m.
Catecismo .........................1... 1:00 a.m .

SPANISH MISSION
735-8025
Escuela Dominica .......10:00 a.m.
Servicio .............................. 11:00 a.m .
Pioneer Club ........................ 6:30 p.m.
Servicio de la Noche ............7:00 p.m.
Mierecoles Merienda ............6:00 p.m.
Servicio................................ 8:00 p.m .
Sabado Liga de Jovenes ........5:00 p.m.


"Ouch," cried Mrs. Lofting while
sewing. "Every time I sewand try to
get this needle through coarse
cloth, I pierce my thumb."
Her sympathetic husband be-
came interested, and he fashioned
a bell-shaped covering. Jokingly,
he called it a "thumb-bell."
In just littlewhile women began
ordering his cap, which is now
called a "thimble," and is found in
almost every home.
When you're pierced, don't
pout, pray. Ask the Lord for
wisdom to turn your obstacle into
an opportunity.
The Bible says. "If any of you
lacks wisdom, he should ask God,
who gives generously to all."


There is only one pretty
child in the world, and
every mother has it.
-Chinese Proverb

Woman knows what man
has long forgotten, that the.
ultimate economic and
spiritual unit of any civi-
lization is still the family.
-Clare Boothe Luce


ime
mnatks the
beginning of life.
It measures tilhe
growth of our
bodies. It provides
opportunity for
our work and
play. It reveals
to us our human
limitations, and
then, one day,
time leaves us
behind. But God
is the origin of
life; He measures
the growth of
our souls. He
provides our


strength and forgives our weakness and reveals His
infinite love. If we follow Him, God will lead us on,
even beyond the circle of time. Make time for God
this week at your house of worship.

Weekly Scripture Reading
Matthew Matthew 1 Corinttih, 1 Catmii. 1 Corinlh. 1 Corith. 1 Corih.
25.1-30 25.31-4. 1.1-17 1.18-31 2.1-16 3.1-23 4.1-21
S&crtwes Semkcby The Amoran W m 50eiy
C2011 Kwster .Willims News~apw Sr.K~, PO. Boa 8187. Chaiioltesvill, VA 290. www.kwniws.coon


'Peoce iioer Growers

Wholesale Nursery

Donnis & Kathy Barber
Hwy. 66 East (863) 735-0470
RO. Box 780 Zolfo Springs, FL


1.







September 15, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 3C


Twinkles is a female Chihuahua puppy.
Looking for a small dog? You have found the right
place! We have a large selection of Chihuahuas and
other small breeds available for adoption.
Adoption fees are $45 and include a rabies vaccination and spaying or
neutering of the animal. Contact 773-2320 if you are interested in adopt-
ing any cats or dogs that desperately need a loving home. The kennel
location is 685 Airport Road, Wauchula, at the county landfill.


The first woman to hold the office of chief of protocol in
the U.S. Department of State was former child star
Shirley Temple Black in 1976.


The Southwest Florida Water Management District (SWFWMD)
announces the following public meetings to which all interested persons
are invited:
Pursuant to Section 189.417(1), Florida Statutes, the Southwest
Florida Water Management District (SWFWMD) is required to publish
a listing of its regularly scheduled meetings. The following list iden-
tifies the public meetings scheduled for Fiscal Year 2012 (October
2011 September 2012).
Governing Board 9:00 a.m.
October 25, 2011 (Tampa Service Office)
November 29, 2011 (Tampa Service Office)
December 20, 2011 (Lake Eva Banquet Hall, Haines City)
January 31, 2012 (Brooksville Headquarters)
February 28, 2012 (Brooksville Headquarters)
March 27, 2012 (Sarasota Service Office)
April 24, 2012 (Brooksville Headquarters)
May 22, 2012 (Brooksville Headquarters)
June 26, 2012 (The Villages Savannah Center)
July 31, 2012 (Brooksville Headquarters)
August 28, 2012 (Brooksville Headquarters)
September 25, 2012 (Tampa Service Office)
Governing Board Public Budget Hearings 5:01 p.m.
September 11, 2012 (Tampa Service Office) Tentative
September 25, 2012 (Tampa Service Office) Final
Public Meeting for Pending Permit Applications 9:00 a.m.
October 4, 2011 (Tampa Service Office)
November 1, 2011 (Tampa Service Office)
December 6, 2011 (Tampa Service Office)
January 3, 2012 (Tampa Service Office)
February 7, 2012 (Tampa Service Office)
March 6, 2012 (Tampa Service Office)
April 3, 2012 (Tampa Service Office)
May 1, 2012 (Tampa Service Office)
June 5, 2012 (Tampa Service Office)
July 3, 2012 (Tampa Service Office)
August 7, 2012 (Tampa Service Office)
September 5, 2012 (Tampa Service Office)
Agricultural Advisory Committee 9:00 -a.m. Joint Meetings with
Green Industry Advisory Committee
December 8, 2011 (Tampa Service Office)
March 15, 2012 (Tampa Service Office)
June 14, 2012 (Tampa Service Office)
September 13, 2012 (Tampa Service Office)
Environmental Advisory Committee 1:30 p.m.
January 9, 2012 (Tampa Service Office)
April 9, 2012 (Tampa Service Office)
July 9, 2012 (Tampa Service Office)
Green Industry Advisory Committee 9:00 a.m. Joint Meetings with
Agricultural Advisory Committee
December 8, 2011 (Tampa Service Office)
March 15, 2012 (Tampa Service Office)
June 14, 2012 (Tampa Service Office)
September 13, 2012 (Tampa Service Office)
Industrial Advisory Committee 9:00 a.m.
November 8, 2011 (Tampa Service Office)
February 14, 2012 (Tampa Service Office)
May 8, 2012 (Tampa Service Office)
August 14, 2012 (Tampa Service Office)
Public Supply Advisory Committee 1:00 p.m.
November 8, 2011 (Tampa Service Office)
February 14, 2012 (Tampa Service Office)
May 8, 2012 (Tampa Service Office)
August 14, 2012 (Tampa Service Office)
Well Drillers Advisory Committee 1:30 p.m.
October 12, 2011 (Tampa Service Office)
January 11, 2012 (Tampa Service Office)
April 11, 2012 (Tampa Service Office)
July 11, 2012 (Tampa Service Office)
Environmental Resource Permitting Advisory Group 10:00 a.m.
November 9, 2011 (Tampa Service Office)
March 28, 2012 (Tampa Service Office)
July 25, 2012 (Tampa Service Office)
Water Use Permitting Advisory Group 2:00 p.m.
November 9, 2011 (Tampa Service Office)
March 28, 2012 (Tampa Service Office)
July 25, 2012 (Tampa Service Office)
Citrus County Task Force 2:00 p.m.
October 10, 2011 (Lecanto Government Building)
January 9, 2012 (To be determined)
March 12, 2012 (Lecanto Government Building)
May 14, 2012 (Lecanto Government Building)
July 9, 2012 (To be determined)
September 10, 2012 (To be determined)
Hernando County Task Force 3:30 p.m.
October 3, 2011 (Brooksville Headquarters)
January 3, 2012 (Brooksville Headquarters)
March 5, 2012 (Brooksville Headquarters)
April 30, 2012 (Springs Coast Education Center, Weeki Wachee)
July 2, 2012 (Brooksville Headquarters)
September 4, 2012 (Springs Coast Education Center, Weeki Wachee)
Citrus/Hernando Waterways Restoration Council Meeting 3:00 p.m.
October 17, 2011 (Brooksville Headquarters)
Pursuant to the provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act, any per-
son requiring special accommodations to participate in these events is
asked to advise the agency at least five (5) days prior by contacting the
SWFWMD Human Resources Director at 2379 Broad Street, Brooksville,
FL 34604-6899; 352-796-7211 or 1-800-423-1476 (FL only), ext. 4702;
TDD (FL only) 1-800-231-6103; or email ADACoordinator
@swfwmd.state..fl.us.
A copy of each meeting's agenda may be obtained by writing to the
SWFWMD at 2379 Broad Street, Brooksville, FL 34604. Governing and
Basin Board agendas and meeting materials are available seven (7) days
prior to the meeting on the District's internet: watermatters.org. Advisory
Com-mittee agendas are also available on the District's internet.
If any person decides to appeal any decision made by the Board with
respect to any matter considered at this meeting or hearing, he/she will
need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceeding is made, which
record includes the testimony and evidence from which the appeal is to
be issued.
For more information, you may contact: Luanne.Stout@watermatters.org
1(800)423-1476 (FL only) or (352)796-7211, x4605 (Ad Order EXE0168)
9:15c


PetOfThe fWeekl^


rr,


Fort Green News
By Rilla Cooper
773-6710


A Dally Thought
THURSDAY
David said, "Why should I
fast when he is dead? Can I
bring him back again? I will
go to him one day, but he
can't return to me."
II Samuel 12:23 (NLT)

FRIDAY
(Jesus said), "Believe Me
when I tell you that if any-
body accepts My words, he
will never see death (eternal-
ly) at all."
John 8:52 (PME).

SATURDAY
But, as for me, I know that
my Redeemer lives, and that
He will stand upon the earth
at last. And I know that after
this body has decayed, this
body shall see God! ... Yes,
I shall see Him, not as a
stranger, but as a friend!
What a glorious hope!
Job 19:25-27 (TLB)

SUNDAY
For God so loved the world
that He gave His only Son,
that whoever believes in Him
should not perish but have
eternal life. For God sent the
Son into the world, not to
condemn the world, but that
the world might be saved
through Him.
John 3:16-17 (RSV)

MONDAY
God has made everything
beautiful in its time. He has
also set eternity in the hearts
of men.
Ecclesiastes 3:11 (NIV)

TUESDAY
One of the criminals who
hung there with Jesus taunt-
ed Him. ... But the other
said, 'Jesus remember me
when You come to Your
(eternal) throne. Jesus
answered, "I tell you this;
today you shall be with Me in
Paradise."
Luke 23:39,42-43 (NEB)

WEDNESDAY
Depend on the Lord; trust
Him, and He will take care of
you. ... The Lord watches
over the lives of the innocent
and their reward will last for-
ever. '
Psalm 37:5,18 (NCV)
All verses are excerpted from
The Holy Bible: (KJV) King
James Version; (ME) The
Message; (NCV) New Cen-
tury Version; (NEB) New
English Bible; (NIV) New
International Version; (NLT)
New Living Translation (RSV)
Revised Standard Version;
(PME) Phillips Modern Eng-
lish; and (TLB) The Living
Bible.


Free

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with the purchase of a cat package when purchased in the month of September









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Mon./Tues./Thurs./Fri. 8:30 a.m. 5:30 p.m.
Wed. 8:30 a.m. 12:00 p.m.
Sat. 8:00 a.m. 12:00 p.m.


B m


Greetings from Fort Green!
What a day we had at Fort
Green Baptist Church last
Sunday! The church was
packed and we had to bring in
extra chairs. Thirty-seven adults
over 70 years young were rec-
ognized.
After a short bio of each one,
many of their family members
talked about the accomplish-
ments they had achieved and'
how special their loved one was
to them, and how they helped
shape their lives. Special poems
were read about grandparents.
This is a small portion of telling
someone they are special while
they can hear!
Jonnie and Ashley Davenport
along with Andrew Casey,
accompanied by Tim Casey on
the guitar, sang a sorig for
Barbara Casey and Doris
Thornton. We acknowledged
each person in alphabetical
order, and then when it was
Doris Thornton's time. Jonnie
and Ashley sang a special song
for her and when completed
announced, "We love you,
Granny!"
It's always easy to make a
mistake, and even though
everyone was honored in alpha-
betical order, somehow Tom
Lynn was overlooked. He was
the last one and he took it in
stride! His son talked about
Tom, and said they just saved
the best for last! After the long
service we had a feast in the fel-
lowship hall.
There were lots of guests
from Bartow, Lakeland and
other surrounding towns. The


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Pappas family from North
Carolina, South Carolina and
North Florida were in Ellenton
for the funeral service of Brian
and stayed an extra day so they
could attend our Senior Day.
Everyone was very glad to see
them. Mildred Cooper is the sis-
ter of Sherri and Patty Jo's
father, Vernon Abbott.
Our sincere sympathy is
extended to the family of
Bobby Revell. Sympathy is also
extended to the family of
Minnie Louise Abbott Gravel.
Minnie Louise was the daughter
of Mildred and Alton Abbott.
As most of you who remember
Mr. Alton, he was a big man.
He told me once that Minnie
Louise made all his shirts! That
always amazed me. I knew Mrs.
Mildred was an excellent seam-
stress.
Also, sympathy is 'extended
to Evelyn Durrance and family
as the brother of her late hus-
band, Mac, made his final jour-
ney.
I asked Barbara what Tim did
special for her birthday, and he
opted to cook supper at home
for her special day. I didn't ask
if he cleaned up the kitchen
also! Barbara said it was a great
day.
Dustyn Waters outdid him-
self. His wife and children
along with Tammy's mother,
Faye Chancey, went out for
supper. Tammy thought this
was a nice birthday, but Dustyn
had kept a secret. His mother,
Marnet Waters, had baked
Tammy a birthday cake and
Dustyn had invited family over,


-I


I


and when the family arrived
back from supper they had a
surprise party for Tammy. She
was overwhelmed and said this
was something she would never
have thought Dustyn would
have dreamed up! What a man!
I did not know Freda Douglas
personally, but like so many of
you did, I've read her column in
the paper. Our sympathy is
extended to her family and
friends.
Edith Bassett is facing sur-
gery on her shoulder Sept. 26.
Doyle Bryan is still in the hos-
pital. Willie Godwin twisted his
knee in a freak accident and is
in lots of pain and walking on
crutches. Please remember to
pray for these and other sick
you -may know about. Buck
Toole was able to attend our
Senior Day. We were really
proud to see him. He is still tak-
ing treatment.
We are trying to establish a
youth choir to lead the singing
on Sunday nights. Last night
they sang one song and were
very good. Byron Allison is
playing the guitar and teaching
them the songs. Paul Clark is
accompanying them on the
piano. Sunday afternoon Lee
Chancey joined in the practice.
We have a lot of adult talent at
Fort Green and the young peo-
ple are showing their musical
ability!
Don't forget all of you who.
have someone buried in the
Methodist Cemetery at Fort
Green or who will just help,
please come on out .for the
workday this Saturday. We will
begin early and will have hot
dogs for dinner.
The men's breakfast will be
on Sunday beginning at 8 a.m.
This is always delicious and
inspiring.
Please pray for one another.


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Parents: Lora &
, Sam Mendoza

\Hobbies/Interests:
Sli Iinging and hang-
ing out with friends.
I love fishing and
m. vis a lso watching scary
movies. I also enjoy playing volleyball
and football on Sunday with friends
and family.

Future Plans: To go to college and
become a x-ray tech. Then move and
start a family.


sWK ",.^ *f,'rg ,u". ~b


Aug. 26 Lake Placid
Sept. 2 Fort Meade


Sept. 9


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Sept. 16 Sebring
Sept. 23 Bradenton
Bayshore *
Sept. 30 Mulberry
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Oct. 28 Bradenton S.E.*
Nov. 4 DeSoto **
Nov. 11 Fort Pierce
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* District Games # Homecoming **Senior Night


WILDCAT R4
NAME
Dalton Rabon
Aaron Barker
Keshun Rivers
Jesus Flores
Deonte Evans
Mikey Retana
Ramiro Briones
Keyon Brown
Kris Johnson
Jajuan Hooks
Colby Baker
Justin Knight
Andrew Hooks
James Greene
Maxon DelHomme
Michael Moreno
Murrell Winter
Octavio Alvarez
Ledarius Sampson
Carter Lambert
Jacquille Dewberry
Alonso Casso
Keyonte Holley
Caleb Brandeberry
Adam Khang
Waylon Pleger
Joseph McQuaig
Dawson Crawford
Dillon Skitka
Wintz Terrell
Adson DelHomme
Victor Lopez
Dylan Farr
Luke Palmer
Ramiro Ramirez
Rufino Gabriel
Uvaldo Sanchez
Jesus Zuniga
Julian Varela
Rito Lopez


OSTER 2011
GR POS
12 WR/LB
11 TB/DB
12 WR/DB
10 FB/LB
12 WR/DB
12 WR/LB
12 WR/DB
10 FB/DE
10 QB/DB
12 WR/DB
12 QB/DB
12 WR/DB
12 TB/DB
10 FB/DE
12 FB/DT
11 WR/DB
12 WR/DE
11 WR/LB
11 TB/LB
12 TE/DE
11 WR/DB
10 FB/DT
9 FB/LB
11 TE/DE
11 WR/DB
10 FB/LB
11 OL/DT
12 OL/DE
12 OL/DT
12 OL/DT
10 OL/DT
11 OL/DT
12 OL/DE
10 OLIDT
11 OL/DT
11 OL/DE
12 OL/DT
11 OL/DT
12 OL/DT
12 OL/DT


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S 7:00 RP.M.


SEBRING "BLUE STREAKS"
# Name Grd. Pos 1 Pos 2
0 Lowe, Tashan 12
1 Faulk, Davaris 11 QB SS
2 Cunningham, Kyle 12 QB FS
3 Williams, Arthur 11 WR FS
4 Jones, Decaris 11 WR CB
5 Powell, Anthony 12 WR CB
6 Harris, Ladante 9 WR CB
7 Strickland, Grant 12 WR FS
8 Hankerson, Aaron 11 WR DL
10 White, Donavon 12 PLK PNT
11 Leveridge, Dominique 11 WR SS
12 Munnings, Cornelius 11 WR SS
15 Baker, Jordan 10 QB
16 White, Tyler 12 WR CB
17 Ferretti, Brandon 10 QB
18 St. Louis, Kenol 12 WR CB
20 Mathis, Joseph 9 RB CB
24 Weston, Micheal 12 WR SS
28 Jacobs, Samuel 10 RB OLB
29 Scott, Larry 11 TE DL
32 Thompson, Damion 12 RB OLB
33 Peart, Jacquae 10 FB ILB
34 Wiggins, Anthony 11 TE ILB
42 Bryan, Jacob 11 FB DL
44 Toney, Benjamin 12 FB DL
50 Durham, Devon 10 OL DL
51 Yarbrough, Kyle 12 OL DL
52 Schuffert, Ryan 11 OL DL
53 Baker, Tyler 12 OL DL
54 Lane, Scott 10 OL DL
56 Howard, Zachary 12 OL DL
62 Cook, Christopher 12 OL DL
64 Morris, Patric 12 OL DL
65 Clemens, Kyle 12 OL DL
75 Gammage, Ezell 11 OL DL
77 Richbow, Xavier 11 OL DL
79. ,Bates, Colton 11 :-OL ,>. DL,
80 =Gaskins, Jesse ,1 11 WRA "
83 -Demarest, Gary 10 TE DL
92 Miranda, Mark Anthony 11 OL DL




Head Coach:
Buddy Martin
Offensive Coordinator: Dale Carlton
Defensive Coordinator: Steve Rewis
Assistant Coaches: Ray Rivas,
Rashad Faison,
S Shawn Rivers, Travis Tubbs
C..L,A, ,;. '


SENIOR SPOTLIGHT

Meghan Oraham

Age: 17

Parents: Rocky and
Renee Graham

Hobbiesll/Interests:
Cheerleading,
Lionettes, NHS,
FEA, showing live-
stock in the fair, New
Hope Baptist youth group and spending
time with my family and friends.

Future Plans: To attend the University
of South Florida, major in elementary
education and then return to Hardee
County to teach.



6.' -


Just name the score of Friday night's Wildcat Football game and
you could win
District Games-
2 Buc Tickets
All Other Games $40 Gift Certificate Payable to
one of our selected "Wildcat" page sponsors

Contest is closed to all Herald-Advocate employees and families.
In the event of a tie, the winner will be picked by a random drawing.
If no one picks the exact score, the closest score wins.
:,* Qffcial entries only.

Winners will be picked Monday morning, notified by phone that
afternoon and announced in next week's paper.


Sept.


Hardee
Sebring


Name:
Address:


Day Phone: _
DEADLINE FOR ENTRY: FRIDAY AT 5 P.M.
Fill out entry form and return it to: The Herald-Advocate
115 S. Seventh Ave., Wauchula


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031 U.S. HIGHWAY 17 N., Wauchula 1401 U.S. HIGHWAY 17 S., Wauchula
L NJ JfY.cOM (863) 314-5370


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IFDIC--qomic, State Bank


F umMt


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6(C The Herald-Advocate, September 15, 2011


iN THE CIRCUIT COURT


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR HARDEE COUNTY, F

CASE NO. 252011CA00

FIRST NATIONAL BANK C
WAUCHULA, a National B
Association organized un
laws of the United States
America,

Plaintiff,

vs..

J. SANTOS ZUNIGA-LUGC
CELESTINA HERNANDEZ
FORD MOTOR CREDIT Cl
NY,

Defendants.

NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO F.S. CHAP

NOTICE IS GIVEN th
suant to Final Default Ju
and Summary Final Judg
Foreclosure and for At
Fees and Costs entered
Court on September 7,
the above styled cause, I
to the highest and best bi
cash on the Second
Hallway Outside of Roomr
the Hardee County Cou
located at 417 West Main
Wauchula, Florida, on the
of October, 2011, at 11:1
the following-described p

LOTS 16 AND 17, L
THE NORTH 10.5 FEE
LOT 17, BLOCK 13, PA
ER'S ADDITION TO I
OF WAUCHULA, HAR
COUNTY, FLORIDA,
PER PLAT RECORDED
PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE

Dated this 8 day of Sept.,

B. HUGH BI
Clerk o
Hardee County,

By: Conni
Depu

If you are a person with a
ity who needs any accol
tion in order to participate
proceeding, you are ent
no cost to you, to the prove
certain assistance. Pleas
tact the Office of the
Administrator, 255 N. Br
Avenue, Bartow, Florida
(863) 534-4686, at least
days before your schedule
appearance, or immediate
receiving this notification
time before the scl
appearance is less than
days; if you are hearing
impaired, call 711.

IN THE CIRCUIT COURi
OKEECHOBEE COUNT
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION

File No. 2010WD17
Division CP


IN RE: ESTATE OF

INEZ UNDERHILL,

Deceased.


NOTICE TO CREDITORS

The administration of the
estate of Inez Underhill,
deceased, whose date of death
was October 28, 2010, Is pending
in the Circuit Court for
Okeechobee County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of
which is 312 Northwest 3rd
Street, Okeechobee, Florida
34972. The names and addresses
of the Personal Representative
and the Personal Representa-
tive's attorney are set forth below.

All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims
or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this
notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.

All other creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons having
claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate must file their claims
with this court WITHIN 3'
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.

ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.

NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.

The date of first publication of
this notice is September 15, 2011.

Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Rachel L. Drude, Esquire
Florida Bar No. 0061127/
SPN 03085931
BATTAGLIA ROSS DICUS &
WEIN PA
980 Tyrone Boulevard
St. Petersburg, FL 33710
Telephone: (727) 381-2300
Fax: (727) 343-4059
ATTORNEYS FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE

Personal Representative:
Sandra Duncan
8031 S.R. 64 East
Zolfo Springs, FL 33890


IN AND
LORIDA

10249

DF
anking
der the
of


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION

File No. 252011CP000063

IN RE: ESTATE OF

AURORA ROSALES CARRILLO,
Deceased. /

NOTICE TO CREDITORS


The administration of the
estate of AURORA ROSALES
O, CARRILLO, Deceased, whose
Sand date of death was November 28,
OMPA- 2010, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Hardee County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of
/ which Is 417 W. Main Street, Suite
202, Wauchula, Florida 33873.
The names and addresses of the
PTER 45 personal representative and the
personal representative's attor-
'at pur- ney are set forth below.
idgment
ment of All creditors of the decedent
torney's and other persons having claims
by the or demands against decedent's
2011, In estate on whom a copy of this
will sell notice Is required to be served
dder for must file their claims with this
Floor court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
n 202 of MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
irthouse THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
I Street, THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER
5th day THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
00 a.m., COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
property: THEM.

.ESS All other creditors of the dece-
T OF dent and other persons having
ACK- claims or demands against dece-
CITY dent's estate must file their claims
IDEE with this court WITHIN 3
AS MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
D IN THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
5. THIS NOTICE.

2011. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
RADLEY FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
f Courts THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
, Florida WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.

e Coker NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
ty Clerk PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
disabil- YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
mmoda- DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS
e In this BARRED.
titled, at
vision of The date of first publication of
ie con- this notice Is September 15, 2011.
i Court
roadway Attorney for Personal
33830, Representative:
t seven Scott R. Bugay, Esquire
ed court Attorney for the Personal
Ply upon Representative
n If the Florida Bar No. 5207
heduled Citicentre, Suite P600
a seven 290 North West 165th Street
or voice Miami, FL 33169
Telephone: (305) 956-9040
9:15,22c Fax: (305) 945-2905
T FOR
ITY, Personal Representative:
Jose Rosales Garcia, Personal
N Representative
3028 Edward Peace Drive
0 Wauchula, FL 33873


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT I
FOR HARDEE COUNTY, Fl

CASE NO. 252011CA00

FIRST NATIONAL BANK O
WAUCHULA, a National Bi
Association organized und
laws of the United States o
America,

Plaintiff,

vs.

CHARLES T. COLLIE, dece
et al,


Defendants.


NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO F.S. CHAPTER 45

NOTICE IS GIVEN that pur-
suant to Final Default Judgment
and Summary Final Judgment of
Foreclosure and for Attorney's
Fees and Costs entered by the
Court on September 7, 2011, In
the above-styled cause, I will sell
to the highest and best bidder for
cash on the Second Floor
Hallway Outside of Room 202 of
the Hardee County Courthouse
located at 417 West Main Street,
Wauchula, Florida, on the 5 day of
Oct., 2011, at 11:00 a.m., the fol-
lowing-described property:

LOT 21, PEACE RIVER
WOODS, A SUBDIVISION
ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT THEREOF, AS
RECORDED IN PLAT BAR
61, PAGE 2, PUBLIC
RECORDS OF HARDEE
COUNTY, FLORIDA.

Dated this 8 day of Sept., 2011.

B. HUGH BRADLEY
Clerk of Courts
Hardee County, Florida

By: Connie Coker
Deputy Clerk

If you are a person with a disabil-
ity who needs any accommoda-
tion in order to participate in this
proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Please con-
tact the Office of the Court
Administrator, 255 North Broad-
way Avenue, Bartow, Florida
33830, (863) 534-4686, at least
seven days before your sched-
uled court appearance, or imme-
diately upon receiving this notifi-
cation If the time before the
scheduled appearance is less
than seven days; If you are hear-
ing or voice impaired, call 711.
9:15,22c


In 1798, Eli Whitney
secured a U.S. government
contract for $134,000 to
produce 10,000 army mus-
kets.


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
TENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR HARDEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA

CASE NO.: 252011 DR000421

LUCIANO SANTOS HERNANDEZ,
Petitioner

and

TOMAS DE LA PAZ VALDEZ,
Respondent.


NOTICE OF ACTION

TO: TOMAS DE LA PAZ VALDEZ
ADDRESS: UNKNOWN

YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an
action has been filed against you
and that you are required to serve
a copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on LUCIANO SANTOS
HERNANDEZ whose address Is
615 7th Ave, Wauchula, FL,
33873, on or before September
30, 2011, and to file the original
with the clerk of this Court at PO
Drawer 1749, or 417 W. Main St.,
Room #202, Wauchula, FL 33873,
before service on Petitioner or
Immediately thereafter. If you fall
to do so, a default may be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the petition.

Copies of all court documents
In this case, including orders, are
available at the, Clerk of the
Circuit Court's office. You may
review these documents upon
request.

You must keep the Clerk of the
Court's office notified of your cur-
rent address. (You may file Notice
of Current Address, Florida
Supreme Court Approved Family
Law Form 12.915.) Future papers
in this lawsuit will be mailed to
the address on the record at the
clerk's office.

WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida
Family Law Rules of Procedure,
requires certain automatic disclo-
sure of documents and informa-
tion. Failure to comply can result
In sanctions, including dismissal
or striking of pleadings.

Dated this 23 day of August, 2011

B.HUGH BRADLEY,
Clerk of the Court

By: Connie Coker D.C.

If you are a person with a dis-
ability, who needs any accommo-
dation in order to participate In
this proceeding you are entitled
at no cost to you, to the provision
or certain assistance. Please con-
tact the Office of the Court
Administrator, (863)534-4690,
within two (2) days of your receipt
of this (describe notice); if you
are hearing or voice Impaired,
call TDD (863)534-7777 or Florida
Relay Service 711."


9:15.22C 9;:1-22P
5N -AND IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
LORIDA HARDEE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 25-2011-CA-000182
UCN: 252011CA000182XXCICI
)F WALTER MORTGAGE COMPANY,
banking LLC
er the
rhof Plaintiff,

vs.

DAVID RIVERA; CRYSTAL
RIVERA; STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE;
eaed Defendant(s).


NOTICE OF SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT,
PURSUANT TO THE JUDGMENT
OF FORECLOSURE ENTERED IN
THE ABOVE CAUSE, I WILL SELL
THE PROPERTY SITUATED IN
HARDEE COUNTY,. FLORIDA,
DESCRIBED AS:

LOTS 1,2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 30, 31
AND 32, BLOCK 1, BOWL-
ING GREEN CENTER SUB-
DIVISION, ACCORDING
TO THE PLAT THEREOF
AS RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 4, PAGE 31, OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF
HARDEE COUNTY, FLORI-
DA.

AT PUBLIC SALE, TO THE HIGH-
EST AND BEST BIDDER, FOR
CASH, ON SEPTEMBER 21, 2011,
AT 11:00 AM AT Hardee County
Courthouse, 417 Wast Main
Street, 2nd floor hallway outside
Room 202, Wauchula, Florida.

ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN
INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS
FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.

IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH
DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY
ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER
TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PRO-
CEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED,
AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE
PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSIS-
TANCE. PLEASE CONTACT the
Office of the Court Administrator
at (863) 534-4686 AT LEAST
SEVEN (7) DAYS BEFORE YOUR
SCHEDULED COURT APPEAR-
ANCE, OR IMMEDIATELY UPON
RECEIVING THIS NOTIFICATION
IF THE TIME BEFORE THE
SCHEDULED APPEARANCE IS
LESS THAN SEVEN (7) DAYS; IF
YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE
IMPAIRED, CALL 711.

DATED: August 30, 2011.

CLERK OF THE COURT

BY: CONNIE COKER
DEPUTY CLERK

9:8,15c


Lady 'Cat Swimming Wins


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Despite the threat of showers,
the reschedule home meet last
week was a success for Har-
dee's girls swim team.
The Lady Wildcats overcame
visiting Avon Park 114-109,
while the boys were defeated
145-108.
For the girls, soph Leah
Weeks won the 200 freestyle,
with classmate Megan Hartman
right behind her for the one-two
punch. Weeks also won the 100
freestyle. She joined with fresh-
men Alexandra "Alex" Johnson
and Caitlin Dufresne and soph
Emily Rhodes to win the 200


freestyle relay.
Soph Carleigh Coleman won
the 500 freestyle, while fresh-.
man Johnson placed first in the
50 freestyle and classmate
Dufresne placed second in the
200 IM. In the 400 medley
relay, it was Weeks, Johnson,
and sophs Savannah Miller and
Carleigh Coleman placing first
and soph Savannah Hagans,
junior April Garland, soph
Emily Hughes and Dufresne
claiming second place.
Other girls on the squad are
senior Jessica Hunt, and sophs
Holly Hughes and Korin
Roehm.
For the boys squad, freshman


Kevin Kunkel placed second in
the 200 individual medley.
Sophs Garrett Albritton and
Kramer Royal gave a one-two
in the 50 freestyle. Junior
Morgan Garcia placed second
in diving.
Junior Wyatt Kofke won both
100 backstroke and the 100
free, where Albritton was sec-
ond. Will Crawford placed sec-
ond in the butterfly. Soph
Cleston Sanders placed second
in the 500 freestyle.
The teams were encouraged
by the new lane lines provided
by the summer Hardee Swim
Association. "They look great,"
commented Head Coach Jan
Brutus.


Golf Boys Add Tie and Win


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Wildcat golf only got
match in last week, but it add
a tie and a win to up the bc
record to 3-0-1.
Hardee girls also had a ra
out and one match at home 1
week, losing to visiting La
land McKeel Academy.
This week, the boys w
scheduled to play DeSoto
Monday, Fort Meade
Tuesday and Lake Wales to&
(Thursday). The girls only 1
one match scheduled this we
today at the Lacarica course
Lake Wales against Frostpr
and Avon Park.



I don't answer the phone
get the feeling whenever
do that there will be som
one on the other end.
-Fred Couple

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AN
FOR HARDEE COUNTY, FLORI

CASE NO: 25-2008-CA-00053

THE BANK OF NEW YORK AS
SUCCESSOR TO JPMORGAN
CHASE BANK, N.A. AS TRUST
OF SAMI II 2006-AR3
Plaintiff,

vs.

VIRGIL D. CALDWELL A/K/A VI
GIL CALDWELL; CHRISTINA
CALDWELL; EQUITY ONE, INC
D/B/A EQUITY ONE FINANCIAL
SERVICES COMPANY, and any
unknown' heirs, devsees,
grantees, creditors, and other
unknown persons or unknown
spouses claiming by, through
and under any of the above-
named Defendants,
Defendants.


AMENDED NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE Is hereby given th
the undersigned Clerk of t
Circuit Court of Hardee Coun
Florida, will on the 21 day
September, 2011, at 11:00 AM
Hardee County Courthouse. 4
W. Main St., Second Flo
Hallway outside of Room 20
Wauchula, FL 33873, offer for sa
and sell at public outcry to t
highest and best bidder for cas
the following-described propel
situate in Hardee County, Florid

The East 1/2 of the North
1/2 of Lot "I", less the
South 5.00 feet and the
East 30.00 feet, Block 3 of
KATYON & MADDOX
Addition to the City of
Wauchula, Hardee County,
Florida; also described as:
The West 112.50 feet of the
East 142.50 feet of the
North 1/2 of Lot "I", less
South 5.00 feet of KATYON
& MADDOX Addition to the
City of Wauchula, Hardee
County, Florida, as per plat
Book 1, Pages 1-94

pursuant to the Final Judgme
entered in a case pending in sa
Court, the style of which is Ind
cated above.

Any person or entity clalmin
an interest In the surplus, if an
resulting from the foreclosu
sale, other than the proper
owner as of the date of the L
Pendens, must file a claim
same with the Clerk of Court wit
In 60 days after the foreclosu
sale.

WITNESS my hand and office
seal of said Court this 30 day
Aug., 2011.

B. Hugh Bradle
Clerk of The Cou

By: Connie Cok
Deputy Cler

If you are a person with a disab
Ity who needs any accommod
tion in order to participate in th
proceeding, you are entitled,
no cost to you, to the provision
certain assistance. Please coi
tact the Office of the Cou
Administrator, (863) 534-469'
within two (2) working days
your receipt of this notice; If yo
are hearing or voice Impairei
call (TDD) (863) 534-7777, o
Florida Relay Service 800-95
8770.


one
ded
oys

din-
last
ke-

ere
on
on
day
had
-ek,
in
oof





.1 I
r I
e-

es

ND
DA


After last Tuesday's rain,
which has interfered with prac-
tices as well as two of four
matches so far this season, the
Hardee boys went to Lake
Wales Country Club on Thurs-
day for a tri-match. The 'Cats
tied Frostproof and won by a
wide margin (164-164-252).
Junior "sensation" Will
Bennet led the Wildcats with a
solid 40, on the heels of
Bulldog Rhett Pooley, who fin-
ished at 39. Junior Trenton and
senior Matt Godwin were not
far behind, each coming home
in 41, with Godwin collecting a
birdie along the way. Usually
strong senior Daniel "Sand-


'~


man" Miller started .the day
with an eagle 3 but fell into the
"deep wet bunkers" at the Lake
Wales course, reported Coach
George Heine.
Heine felt team scores could
improve if "Mother Nature
cooperates and we get in more
practice."
Meanwhile, the Lady Wild-
cats battled against McKeel,
dropping the team score 21
points in the process. Soph Ka-
itlyn Shaw led the girls at the
home course with 49. Follow-
ing her in were senior Courtney
Parks, freshman Kendall
Gough, soph Courtney Alex-
ander and soph Brooke Knight.


Fish Busters
By Bob Wattendorf
Florida Fish & Wildlife Commission


5 I1 -- j
BASS FISHERMEN, HOLD YOUR BREATH!
How often have you caught a great fish and wished you could
EE release it somewhere special for you or a friend to catch again?
Catch-and-release has caught on, especially hmong bass
anglers. However, sometimes the release isn't immediate or the
angler wants to relocate the catch into a different lake orriver.
Catch-photograph-release is a great way to collect memories.
R- The big thing to remember is this: Proper handling means keeping
the fish out of the water for as short a time as possible. Consider
., holding your own breath while the fish is out of the water as a
S gauge.
If the fish is going in a livewell, remember to exchange the
water frequently and keep it cool.
When and where should you release your catch? First, if the
law requires a freshwater fish to be released in Florida, do so as
quickly and effectively as possible, but taking the necessary mea-
surements or a photo is permitted. Release it where you caught it.
When a native fish is legal to take, it is your decision whether
you harvest it or release it.
Generally speaking, size and creel limits have been established
so that harvesting these fish will still allow sustaining the fish pop-
ulation. In certain circumstances, such as where slot limits are
hat specified, it is especially helpful to remove the smaller fish (below
he the slot). In theory, reducing the numbers of small fish reduces
ty competition, which allows the protected fish in the slot (for
at instance 15 inches to 24 inches) to grow more quickly.
17 Nonnative fishes (other than peacock bass and triploid grass
or carp) should be harvested. Most make good eating, and the best
D2, way to transport them is on ice. They should not be released and
Ble definitely should not be relocated.
he Rules for relocating largemouth bass went into effect in July

rty 2010. They affect anglers relocating bass and purchasing and
la: stocking bass in private ponds.
The reason for Rule 68-5.002 (see FLrules.org) is to protect
genetically pure Florida-strain largemouth bass, also called Florida
largemouth bass.
Under this rule, only fish farmers whose fish have been genet-
ically tested and authenticated as pure Florida largemouth bass by
the Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission are allowed
to possess or sell bass to customers for stocking south and east of
the Suwannee River.
Two farms (Florida Fish Farms Inc., 352-793-4224; and
Shongaloo Fisheries, 352-468-1251) are registered with the Florida
Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services and are autho-
rized to sell authenticated pure Florida largemouth bass.
Largemouth bass produced out of state must be tested using
procedures approved by the FWC before they can be brought into
peninsular Florida. Intergrade or hybrid largemouth bass may only
nt be transported into the Florida Panhandle for stocking in private
Id waters west and north of the Suwannee River.
di- These rules were implemented following extensive genetic
research that identified even more refined differences with large-
mouth bass stocks in Florida, which could relate to localized adap-
ng stations that allow the fish to thrive in particular habitats and cli-
ry, mates. State-run hatcheries now actually use four specific genetic
re
ty conservation units to ensure that our hatcheries protect these
.is resources. But in an age of commercial hatcheries and anglers
on transporting fish around the state in livewells, regulations were
h- necessary.
re Release of impure Florida largemouth bass (with northern
largemouth bass genes) mainly occurs through stocking private
al ponds and lakes, but they can end up in our rivers and lakes. This
of was verified during the genetic analyses of bass populations in
South Florida that should have been "pure Florida" but were not.
The problem is that the two subspecies, northern largemouth bass
ey and Florida largemouth bass, readily interbreed, and stocking
irt northern largemouth is a real threat to pure Florida largemouth.

oer "Florida largemouth bass are adapted to Florida's subtropical
rk climate and typically spawn earlier in the year than northern large-
mouth bass. If the northern subspecies or intergrade (i.e., hybrid)
iI- bass spawn with Florida largemouth, their offspring may inherit
a- genes that may reduce growth or survival, and other, less obvious
ist genetic traits," said Brandon Barthel, Ph.D., an FWC black bass

of geneticist.
n- Anglers come to the Sunshine State from all over the world to
rt catch trophy Florida largemouth bass. The FWC is doing every-
0, thing possible to protect the genetic purity of this ecologically and
of economically important subspecies of fish and to prbmote their
)u wise use and release.

or Anglers and concerned citizens can help.
5-


9:8,15c


9:15,22c


adbu,


!









September 15,2011, The Herald-Advocate 7C


COUNTY COURT
The following marriage
licenses were issued recently
in the office of the county
court:
Brian Keith Powell, 42,
Wauchula, and Judy Kay Parks,
41 ,.Bowling Green.
Terry Eugene Hensley, 39,
Wauchula, and Lori Meshell
Sparks, 37, Wauchula.

The following small claims
case was disposed of recently
by the county judge:
Jim See Realty et al vs.
James Blum, judgment for ten-
ant eviction.

The following misde-
meanor cases were disposed,
of recently in county court:
Rolie Gamble, domestic bat-


The Southwest Florida Water
Management District (SWFWMD)
announces the following public
meeting to which all interested
persons are invited:
Governing Board Meeting,
Committee Meetings, Public
Hearing and Workshop (1:30
p.m. and Governing Board Final
Budget Hearing (5:01 p.m.):
Consider SWFWMD business
including final hearing for
adoption of District final millage
rate and budget for Fiscal Year
2012. Some Board members
may participate in the meeting
via communications media
technology.
DATE/TIME: Tuesday, September
27, 2011; 1:30 p.m. (Note: this is
a change in time from the pub-
lished calendar)
PLACE: SWFWMD Tampa Ser-
vice Office, 7601 US Highway 301
North, Tampa FL 33637
A copy of the agenda may be
obtained by contacting:
WaterMatters.org Boards,
Meetings & Event Calendar;
1(800)423-1476 (FL only) or
(352)796-7211
For more information, you may.
contact: Luanne.Stout@water-
matters.org 1(800)423-1476 (FL
only) or (352)796-7211, x4605
(Ad Order EXE0169)
If any person decides to appeal
any decision made by the Board
with respect to any matter consid-
ered at this meeting or hearing,
he/she will need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceed-
ing is made, which record
includes the testimony and evi-
dence from which the appeal is to
be issued.
Anyone requiring reasonable
accommodation as provided for
in the Americans with Disabilities
Act should contact the District's
Human Resources Director, 2379
Broad Street, Brooksville, Florida
34604-6899; telephone (352)
796-7211, ext. 4702 or 1-800-423-
1476 (FL only), ext. 4702; TDD
(FL only) 1-800-231-6103; or
email to ADACoordinator
@swfwmd.state.fl.us 9:15c


tery, not prosecuted.
Robert Henry Lovett, domes-
tic battery, not prosecuted.

CIRCUIT COURT
The following civil actions
were filed recently in the
office of the circuit court:
Ada Lorine Dees and the
state 'Department of Revenue
(DOR) vs. Andrew Bernard
White, petition to enforce
administrative child support
order.
Nina T. Hooks and DOR vs.
Kenya Devynn Jabbar Hooks,
petition for child support.
Mya Torres and DOR vs.
Juan R. Maldonado, petition for
child support.
Suncoast Schools Federal
Credit Union vs. Thomas R.
Harris et al, petition for mort-
gage foreclosure.
Maria C. Sanchez and DOR
vs. Juan A. Sanchez, petition for
child support.
Chance Moye and Harley
Dee Moye, divorce.

The following decisions on
civil cases pending in the cir-
cuit court were handed down
recently by the circuit court
judge:
Suntrust Bank vs. Vanessa A.
Miller, Errol Drummond et al,
voluntary dismissal.
Margaret Gomez vs. Mari-
cela Hernandez, injunction for
protection.
Chrystal Rene Martinez
Rivera and David Rivera,
divorce.
Suzanne Marlowe Escobedo
and Juan Escobedo Jr., divorce.
Leticia Campos and DOR vs.
Alfonso Cortez, voluntary dis-
missal.
Vernon Frazier vs. Walter A.
McNeil and the state
Department of Corrections,
order.
Bank of America National
Association vs. Suntrust Bank,
order' of mortgage foreclosure.
Angela Ochoa Crumbley and
DOR vs. Leonard Scott Seibert,
order on child support con-
tempt.
Miguel A. Santoyo and
Elizabeth D. Deleon, order on
contempt.
Albert F. Barber and Joanna
D. Roberts, order.
Tamela Grace and Juan
Valdez, divorce.
Carmen Salazar and Juan
Salazar, divorce.
BAC Home Loans Servicing
vs. Charles W. and Cheryl A.
Freeman et al, dismissed.
Joven Limited LLC vs.
Cindy Adams, judgment.
Edna Rangel vs. Michael
Rangel, dismissal of temporary
injunction for protection.
Walter Mortgage Co. LLC
vs. David and Chrystal Rivera


Icorthouse


et al, order of mortgage foreclo-
sure.
Doris Yvonne Hernandez and
DOR vs. Manuel Hernandez Jr.,
order.

The following felony crimi-
nal cases were disposed of
recently by the circuit judge.
Defendants have been adjudi-
cated guilty unless noted oth-
erwise. When adjudication is
withheld, it is pending suc-
cessful completion of proba-
tion. Sentences are pursuant
to an investigative report and
the recommendation of the
state probation office and also
state sentencing guidelines.
Final discretion is left to the
judge.
Scott Michael Lacosse, vio-
lation of probation (original
charge trespass to structure),
resume probation, $200 public
defender fee and $100 cost of
prosecution (COP) added to
outstanding fines and fees.
Salomon Maldonado, pos-
session of methamphetamine,
possession of drug parapherna-
lia and tampering with or fabri-
cating physical evidence, trans-
ferred to county misdemeanor
court.
Thayson Lacey Quinn, bat-
tery on a law enforcement offi-
cer, probation one year, $520
fine and court costs, $200 pub-
lic defender fee, $100 COP.
Jeffrey Scott Stringer, sen-
tence of July 26 amended (orig-
inal charges manufacturing of
methamphetamine and posses-
sion of drug paraphernalia with
intent to deliver), sentence
modified to three years Florida
State Prison suspended, five
years community control
(house arrest), $520 fines and
court costs, $200 public defend-
er fees, $100 COP, $60 First
Step probation fee.
Joel David Gutierrez, two
counts possession of metham-
phetamine, sale. of methamphet-
amine, two counts possession
of drug paraphernalia and
resisting an officer without vio-
lence, adjudication withheld,
probation three years, $520
fines and court costs, $50 public
defender fee, $100 COP, $36
First Step.
Angela Marie Newman, two
counts possession of metham-
phetamine and two counts pos-
session of drug paraphernalia,
completed drug pretrial inter-
vention program, not prosecut-
ed. -
Allen ColK Glover,,.osses-
sion of marijuana, one year one
day Florida State Prison with
credit for time served, $520 fine
and court costs and $100 COP
placed on lien.

The following real estate
transactions of $10,000 or
more were filed recently in
the office of the clerk of court:
Paul S. Hayman to Bret P.


and Jennifer Lynn Moye,
$129,000.
Bret P. and Jennifer Lynn
Clifton Moye to Paul Slade and
Celia L. Hayman, $24,450.
Charles K. and Revilla R.
Fletcher to Kenneth Donald and
Carol Sue Miller, $20,000.
David Ryan Brown to
Roberto Torres and Maria Dora
Vargas Carajal, $60,000.
Heidi Fowler as personal
representative to Yolanda
Rodriguez, $50,000.
James K. Collie to Allen and
Toya Thomas, $42,000.
Larry G. Reynolds to
Thomas and Guillermina
Trevino, $16,000.












The following permits were
applied for or issued by the
Hardee County Building De-
partment during the week of
Sept. 6-9. Listings include the
name of the owner or contrac-
tor, the address for the project,
the type of work to be done, and
the cost involved. Only projects
valued at $1,000 or more are
listed.

ISSUED
Louis Adnaud, Harris Road,
single-family home, $84,400.
Wynn M. Phillips, Riverside
Drive, mechanical, $3,650.
Wynn M. Phillips, Shaw
Road, mechanical, $3,450.
Kurt Allen, Sparrow Road,
install mobile home, $3,000.
Jack See, Hanchey Road,
roofing, $4,335.
Irma Arguijo, John Carlton
Road, shed, $2,350.

BUILDING BLOCKS
In Hammurabai's kingdom,
the ultimate penalty for unsafe
construction was death. If a
builder built a house for a man
and did not make its construc-
tion firm and the house which
he built collapsed and caused
the death of the owner of the
house, the builder was put to
death. If the collapse of the
house caused the death of the
son, then the builder's son was
put to death.
Who needs building codes?
Well, since the purpose of codes
is to protect the public, we all
do. Whether in our homes,
offices, schools, stores, facto-
ries or places of entertainment,
we rely on the safety of struc-
.tures that surround us everyday.
Codes protect the public health,
safety and welfare in four ways,
reducing potential hazards,
proper design, keeping costs
down with uniformity in codes,
and protecting investments.


During the past week, sheriff's deputies and city police
officers investigated the following incidents and made the fol-
lowing arrests:

COUNTY
Sept. 11, a theft on Crewsville Road was reported.

Sept. 10, Priscilla Ortiz Rivera, 48, of 315 SR 62, Bowling
Green, was arrested by Sgt. Lyle Hart and charged with DUI.
Sept. 10, Jose Angel Hernandez, 24, of Martin Luther King
Avenue, was arrested by Dep. Polly Bissette on an out-of-county
warrant.
Sept. 10, a residential burglary on Maxwell Drive and a theft
on King Road were reported.

Sept. 9, Davie Rodriguez, 27, of 1924 Kazen Road, Wauchula,
was arrested by Dep. Donna MoCleskey on two counts of failure to
appear in court.
Sept. 9, a residential burglary on North Florida Avenue was
reported..

Sept. 8, Kevin Duane Holloway, 22, of 109 Rosanna Dr.,
Brandon, and Toddrick Jermaine Williams, 27, of 2225 E. 1331st
St., Tampa, were arrested by Cpl. Shane Ward and each charged
with possession of heroin, possession of cocaine and two counts
possession of drug paraphernalia. Holloway was also charged with
tampering with evidence and a traffic offense.
Sept. 8, burglary of a conveyance on David Court, a fight on
Redbird Lane and a theft on Alec Hendry Road were reported.

Sept. 7, a residential burglary on Morning Glory Loop and a
theft on Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue were reported.

Sept. 6, Stanley Dean Jackson, 24, of 310 Martin Luther King
Jr. Ave., Wauchula, was arrested by Dep. Ryan Abbott.
Sept. 6, Martin Morales, 33, of Pennsylvania Ave., Wauchula,
was arrested by Probation Officer Potter on a charge of violation of
parole.
Sept. 6, criminal mischief on Conroy Road and on Makowski
Road were reported.

Sept. 5, Betty Sue Abner, 38, of 1629 Lincoln St., Wauchula,
was arrested by Dep. Carlos Medina on a charge of failure to
appear in court.
Sept. 5, Heriberto R. Garcia, 28, of 3446 Elm St., Zolfo
Springs, was arrested by Dep. Ryan Abbott on charges of violation
of probation and withholding support of children.
Sept. 5, Jessica Prince Valdez, 27, of 5419-l1th St. SE,
Highlands City, was arrested by Dep. Ryan Abbott on three counts
of withholding support of children.
Sept. 5, a residential burglary at a different location on
Morning Glory Loop was reported.

WAUCHULA
Sept. 11, Andrew Michael Rupert, 23, of 303 E. Main St.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Cpl. Chris LeConte and charged with
possession of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia.
Sept. 11, Tiffani Nicole Davis, 36, of 307 E. Main St.,
Wauchula, was arrested by Cpl. Chris LeConte and charged with
retail theft, possession of marijuana and possession of drug para-
phernalia.
Sept. 11, a residential burglary on North 10 Avenue and a theft
on U.S. 17 North were reported.

Sept. 10, burglary of a conveyance on Heard Bridge Road was
reported.

Sept. 7, criminal mischief on East Townsend Street and thefts
on Pennsylvania Avenue and on East Townsend Street were re port-
ed.

Sept. 6, a vehicle stolen on South Seventh Avenue was report-
ed.

BOWLING GREEN
Sept. 7, a theft on Pleasant Way was reported.

If all the world's water were fit into a gallon jug, the fresh
water available for us to use would equal only about one
tablespoon.


STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION
NOTICE OF DRAFT PERMIT

The Department of Environmental Protection gives notice of its preparation of a draft
permit to Nickerson Brothers LLC, in Hardee County. This permit (FLA 183326) authorizes
the permitted to operate an industrial wastewater treatment system at the Zolfo Springs
Dairy concentrated animal feeding operation. Treated wastewater drains into a ditch that
distributes water to surrounding pasture grasses through subsurface seepage irrigation.
The ditch has the potential to discharge to Fivemile Gully and Mineral Branch under certain
rainfall conditions.

The Nutrient Management Plan (NMP) has been incorporated into the permit and is
available for public review and comments.

The facility is located at Latitude 270 29' 40" N and Longitude 810 42' 54" W, on 3206
Steve Roberts Special Road, Zolfo Springs, Florida 32890, in Hardee County.

Any interested persorrmay submit written comments on the Department's draft permit
or may submit a written request for a public meeting to Roger Evans, 13051 North Telecom
Parkway, Temple Terrace, Florida 33637-0926, in accordance with Rule 62-620.555,
Florida Administrative C6de. The comments or request for a public meeting must contain
the information set forth below and must be received in the Department's Southwest Dis-
trict Office within 30 days of publication of this notice. Failure to submit comments or re-
quest a public meeting within this time period shall constitute a waiver of any right such
person may have to submit comments or request a public meeting under Rule 62-620.555,
Florida Administrative Code.

The comments or request for a public meeting must contain the following
information:
(a) The commenter's name, address, and telephone number; the applicant's
name and address; the Department permit file number; and the county in
which the project is proposed;
(b) A statement of how and when notice of the Department's action or proposed
action was received;
(c) A statement of the facts the Depmtment should consider in making the final
decision;
(d) A statement of which rules or statutes require reversal or modification of the
Department's action or proposed action; and
(e) If desired, a request that a public meeting be scheduled including a statement
of the nature of the issues proposed to be raised at the meeting.

If a public meeting is scheduled, the public comment period is extended until the close
of the public meeting. However, the Department may not always grant a request for a pub-
lic meeting. Therefore, written comments should be submitted within 30 days of publica-
tion of this notice, even if a public meeting is requested.

If a public meeting is held, any person may submit oral or written statements and data
at the public meeting on the Depmtment's proposed action. As a result of significant public
comment, the Department's final action may be different from the position taken by it in
this draft permit.

The permit application file and supporting data are available for public inspection dur-
ing normal business hours, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, except legal
holidays, at the Department's Southwest District Office, 13051 North Telecom Parkway,
Temple Terrace, Florida 33637-0926, phone number (813) 632-7600.
__ 9:15c


STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION
NOTICE OF DRAFT PERMIT

The Department of Environmental Protection gives notice of its preparation of a draft
.permit to Nickerson Brothers, LLC, in Hardee County. This permit (FLA405582) authorizes
the permitted to operate an industrial wastewater treatment system at the Ten Mile Grade
Dairy concentrated animal feeding operation. Treated wastewater is land applied to a
sprayfield and has the potential to discharge to Fish Branch under certain rainfall condi-
tions.

The Nutrient Management Plan (NMP) has been incorporated into the permit and is
available for public review and comments.

The facility is located at Latitude 270 20' 54" N, longitude 810 40' 13" W, on 9060 Ten
Mile Grade Road, Zolfo Springs, Florida 33890, in Hardee County. .

Any interested person may submit written comments on the Departrnent's draft permit
or may submit a written request.for a public meeting to Harold D. Marin, 13051 North Tele-
com Pkwy, Temple Terrace, Florida 33637-0926, in accordance with Rule 62-620.555,
Florida Administrative Code. The comments or request for a public meeting must contain
the information set forth below and must be received in the Department's Southwest Dis-
trict Office within 30 days of publication of this notice. Failure to submit comments or re-
quest a public meeting within this time period shall constitute a waiver of any right such
person may have to submit comments or request a public meeting under Rule 62620.555,
Florida Administrative Code.

The comments or request for a public meeting must contain the following
information:
(a) The commenter's name, address, and telephone number; the applicant's
name and address; the Department permit file number; and the county in
which the project is proposed;
(b) A statement of how and when notice of the Department's action or proposed
action was received;
(c) A statement of the facts the Department should consider in making the final
decision;
(d) A statement of which rules or statutes require reversal or modification of the
Department's action or proposed action; and
(e) If desired, a request that a public meeting be scheduled including a statement
of the nature of the issues proposed to be raised at the meeting.

If a public meeting is scheduled, the public comment period is extended until the close
of the public meeting. However, the Department may not always grant a request for a pub-
lic meeting. Therefore, written comments should be submitted within 30 days of publica-
tion of this notice, even if a public meeting is requested.

If a public meeting is held, any person may submit oral or written statements and data
at the public meeting on the Department's proposed action. As a result of significant public
comment, the Department's final action may be different from the position taken by it in
this draft permit.

The permit application file and supporting data are available for public inspection dur-
ing normal business hours, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, except legal
holidays, at the Depaltment's Southwest District Office, 13051 North Telecom Parkway,
Temple Terrace, Florida 33637-0926, phone number (813) 632-7600.
9:15c








i


Stump The Swami
By John Szeligo


Well, Football Fans, the second week of football was full of
excitement and great finishes. The rankings will begin to get clear-
er after all the cupcake games are gobbled up. Conference play and
matchups like Alabama and Penn St. this past week and LSU at
West Virginia next week will show some balance to the Top 25.
The Hardee Wildcats continue to roll up wins. Now at 3-0, the
Cats travel to Sebring this week. The defense has not given up a
touchdown in any of the three victories.
The Gators continue to impress with the new staff. QB
Brantley keeps looking better each game. This week will be the real
first challenge in the SEC with Tennessee coming to the Swamp.
During the Penn St. and Alabama game, the cameras pointed
out an older gentleman named Coffey from Alabama. He was
attending his 756 consecutive Tide Game. Do the math; he has
been at every game for around 70 years. I wonder how many trips
to Dreamland BBQ he has made while going to Tuscaloosa. That
'BBQ place is on my bucket list. Hope he makes many more games.
Ohio St. held off Toledo 27-22. WOW, that's impressive. With
the Rockets beaten, now only Bowling Green and Ohio U stand
between the Buckeyes and a Mid-American Conference
Championship.
Michigan, playing in retro uniforms and under the lights for
the first time, scores 3 times in a minute and twelve seconds to beat
Notre Dame. It could not have happened to a better opponent.
Wonder if Rich Rod was watching? GO Blue.
In Conference USA, UCF made Boston College look like a
team from 1-AA in a 30-3 rout. The Knights now face FIU which
made Charlie Strong's' Louisville Cardinals look bad on Friday
night. Rice beat Big 10 Purdue for a huge out-of-conference state-
ment also. Case Keenum continues his passing with 456 yards this
week for Houston. Marshall, led by All-American DE Vinny Curry,
beat CUSA favorite Southern Miss 26-20 in their home opener.
Now Let's Look at this week's Bill O' Fare ..
1. West Virginia at Maryland WVU faces a great QB in
Danny O'Brien. Danny will face the nation's best sacker Bruce
Irvin and a better QB in Geno Smith. The Mountaineers have not
given up a touchdown on defense this year. West Virginia 38
Maryland 17.
2. Auburn at Clemson when you struggle with Wofford,
you better beware of a defending National Champ. Auburn 41
Clemson 16.
3. Marshall at Ohio The Battle for the Bell is the nickname
for this old rivalry. Marshall won 24-23 in 2010. Ohio has almost
the whole team back but Marshall is improved also. Look for
another close one. Marshall 27 Ohio 21.
4. Coastal Carolina at Georgia Just what the Dawg Doctor
ordered for a struggling team trying to save its coach. Georgia 48
Coastal Carolina 14.
5. Pitt at Iowa Hawkeyes will be mad after losing to Iowa
St. Maine got 7 sacks against the Pittiful Panthers. Iowa 37 Pitt 17.
6. Mississippi at Vanderbilt Vandy is 2-0 thanks to UConn
giving them one last week. The Rebels are not a great team but
should win. Mississippi 31 Vandy 21.
7. Navy at South Carolina The Ole Ball Coach has the
Fighting Chickens pecking away. They could be in a showdown for
the SEC East with the Gators later. USC 35 Navy 17.
8. FAMU at USF- Come out and watch the FAMU band and
the Bulls go to 3-0. USF 34 FAMU 12.
9. Louisville at Kentucky It's a rivalry. Neither team has
looked good so far. Gotta go with the Mildcats in this one. UK 33
U of L 21.
10. North Texas at Alabama The Tide gets a breather after
beating Penn St. Alabama 56 NTU 7.
11. Ohio St. at Miami The Death Row Bowl has arrived.
Why these teams are even allowed to play is mind boggling. Where


is the NCAA? Probably out getting ready to hammer Cleveland
State or Middle Tennessee for some minor violation. Miami 31
Ohio St 30.
12. Oklahoma at FSU Noles get to make a statement?
Sooners are always vastly overrated. Jimbo should get a signature
win. FSU 27 Oklahoma 24.
13. Syracuse at Southern Cal Orange do not have Jim
Brown, Larry Czonka, Floyd Little or Ernie Davis. Those days are
just memories. USC 49 Syracuse 13.
14. LSU at Mississippi St. Another tune-up for LSU before
they make their way to Morgantown to face the Mountaineers next
week. LSU 44 MSU 17.
15. Iowa St at Connecticut Can the Huskies redeem them-
selves after losing to Vanderbilt? The Cyclones will be out of air
after beating rival Iowa. UCONN 27 ISU 23.
16. UCF at FIU Could be one of the best games of the
weekend that not many will watch. Can the Panthers do it two
weeks in a row? FIU 24 UCF 21.
17. Tennessee at Florida Gators have prepped for two
weeks. This is for real. Let's see how far they have come. Vols beat
Cincinnati but the Bearcats or Montana are not like playing in the
Swamp. The Gator defense will shine. Florida 31 Tennessee 13.
18. Tampa at Minnesota Bucs bounce back. Tampa 27
Minnesota 24.
19. Houston at Miami Fish still looking to draft Luck.
Houston 33 Miami 17
20. Jacksonville at New York Jets Jets flying high. Jets 31
Jags 21


YOUR FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS
Q: Properties in my neighborhood are not selling. I think
the Market Value of my property is less today than indicated on
the TRIM notice. Why aren't the values lower?
A: The Florida Constitution requires the assessed value of
your property to be based on conditions that existed as of Jan. 1 of
this year. Although values in your neighborhood may have declined
further since Jan. 1, the Market Value stated on your TRIM notice
is our estimate of value as of Jan. 1. By law, that value was estab-
lished utilizing sales that occurred during the prior year.
Q: Amendment 1 increased the homestead exemption
amount from $25,000 to $50,000. Did I get the additional'
exemption?
A: If the assessed value of your homestead property is greater
than $50,000, then you are receiving an additional Homestead
Exemption. The additional exemption is listed at the bottom of
your TRIM notice.
Homestead property with an assessed value of $75,000 and
above receives the full $50,000 exemption (the,$25,000 orig-
inal exemption plus $25,000 of the additional exemption).
Homestead property valued between $50,000 and $74,999
receives only a portion of the additional $25,000 exemp-
tion.
Homestead property valued under $50,000 does not receive
an additional Homestead Exemption.
All homestead properties will continue to receive the origi-
nal Homestead Exemption of $25,000.
The additional Homestead Exemption applies to all taxing
authorities except the School Board.
If you have any questions pertaining to the assessed value of
your property, please feel free to contact me at the Property
Appraiser's Office at 773-2196.


Light One Candle
By Gerald M. Costello
The Christophers


KEEP 9/11 ONE OF A KIND
Nearly 3,000 people lost their lives on Sept. 11, 2001, count-
ing all the victims at the World Trade Center here in Manhattan,
those at the Pentagon in Washington, and those killed when their
plane crashed in a field in western Pennsylvania.
All the rest of us are survivors.
Some of us were more immediately affected that day, true, but
all of us were truly stunned, just as we would be by the sudden
death of someone in our family or a close friend.
For many, that feeling has yet to pass. Perhaps Sunday's com-
memoration helped to ease their disquiet.
The principal observance took place where the Twin Towers
once rose. It's been heartening, in a way, to follow the progress of
the site's development: the 'steady growth of the splendid Freedom
Tower, some 75 stories now and still rising; the twin pools that will
remind visitors where the World Trade Center towers stood and
where so many died; the peaceft j'rove of swamp white-oak trees,
400 strong sure symbols that somehow life endures.
A museum also opened, memorializing those who gave their
lives that day and honoring all who selflessly answered the call for
help: firefighters, police officers, medical personnel, citizens at
large. It was a massive effort, matching the enormity of the
moment, and one hopes the memorial itself will do it all justice.
Because 9/11 was unique such an event has never happened
in our history there was no format to follow on this, the 10th
anniversary of the tragedy, no way of knowing how to best memo-
rialize the loss and devastation.
Perhaps Gettysburg comes closest, but even there the compar-
ison falters. It's true that the cemetery dedication at Gettysburg, in
the fall of 1863, captured another somber moment in the nation's
past, but the bloody battle came in the midst of an even bloodier
war. On the other hand, the events of 9/11 came at us, figuratively
and literally, from out of the blue.
One thing that did emerge from Gettysburg was President
Lincoln's stirring call for a new sense of national purpose.
Sept. 11 gives us a yearning for old-fashioned patriotism, the
pride we should feel for everything to do with our native land: its
history, its traditions, its language, its natural features.
Sunday's sad memorial was one of a kind. Let's be sure it stays
that way.
For a free copy of "Living With Loss & Grief," write: The
Christophers, 5 Hanover Square, New York, NY 10004; or e-mail:
mail@christophers.org.

Johnny Appleseed (whose real name was Jonathan
Chapman) was an Ameri-can pioneer who planted large
numbers of apple trees along the frontier in the late 18th
and early 19th centuries.

The first commercially successful steamboat was Robert
Fulton's Clermont, built in 1807.



Your Business Could Appear Here!

Nancy Davis, Kim Reas or Trayce Daniels
At The Herald Advocate


Is


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-------1--- 1~z~--~-~:








PAGE ONE


Rodeo Bits
By Kathy Ann Gregg


*



*


HARDEE RANCH RODEO THE END!
Hardee County has so many great cowboys and cowgirls, from
the tots all the way up to the old timers, that each event takes sev-
eral columns to give each and every one of them their due. Sadly,
this column concludes the Hardee County Cattlemen's Associa-
tion's annual ranch rodeo but at least we end on a high note with
the winner of the mutton bustin'.
Saturday night brought out five local riders: Josiah Burch and
Ethan Eures of Bowling Green, and Lane Warren, Jonathon Doyle
and Adam McCauley of Wauchula. And these tykes were ready to
take on those woolly sheep owned by Bob and Shirley Jarriel, also
of Wauchula.'
Each of them gave their best, some staying on longer than oth-
ers, some hitting the dirt face first, some being interviewed by
announcer Jimmy Carter, some being held up above their parents'
heads to receive the audience's applause when they were done (and
the crowd always loves this event), but they all seemed to have a
great time doing it.
But I'm going to keep the winner in suspense, while I take a
moment to mention all those volunteers without whom these
rodeos would not be possible. Of course, there's Darin and Misty
Hughes from the Hardee County Cattlemen's Association, with
daughters Holly and Emily helping (Nathan was too busy mutton
bustin' this year), and Gary and Linda Jones, and son young Gary.
Darin also sits on the ranch rodeo committee for the Florida
Cattlemen's Association, and will be at the finals in Kissimmee the
end of this month.
Tim Gibson supervised the stock. Not only is Tim the current
vice president of the HCCA, but he was featured as the August
cowboy in "Homegrown Farmers and Cowboys" magazine. Then
there's Greg Gordon, Randall Albritton and Don Howard, doing
anything and everything.
The judges for this event were Floyd Purvis and Jimbo
Albritton. (Jimbo's children were visiting from Texas, and daugh-
ter Taylee had a great sheep ride.) The pickup men were Alton


Josian Burcn or
tightl


Ethan Eures had a successful ride on his sheep


Jonathon Doyle of Wauchula hangs on tight to his sheep.


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Langford (who managed to stay on his horse this year!) and Gary
Larsen. with Logan Perry on bronc pickup duty.
Then there are the folks with the "cushy" jobs they get to
stay up in the birdhouse where it's cool Kara Coates and Jera
Ann Courson doing all the paperwork. timing and scoring. And
famous cowboy Jimmy Carter, who does such a tremendous job in
announcing these events.
Those great horses for the bronc riders were brought over from
Okeechobee by D.R. Daniels, and the cattle stock was provided by
the FINR cowboys, Steve Freely and James Scott.
Now let's get to the drumroll. please.
The winner of the 2011 mutton bustin' event was our own
Adam McCauley, who took home that shiny new belt buckle. He
rode to the far end of the arena, making young Gary Jones chase


The last rider of Saturday night, Adam McCauley, rode the
furthest of anyone down the length of the arena


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him all that way. And I understand that Adam might have to let his
sister. Destiny. borrow his buckle, as she practiced with him for
weeks pretending to be a bucking sheep what a great sister
she is!
Keep these "Bits," boots and bridles riding. Let Kathy Ann Gregg
in on your events and achievements, and she'll keep you covered.
Reach her at ksleepyk@aol.com or 773-9459. Keep on riding,
Cowboys and Cowgirls!


Adam McCauley beams as he holds his winner's belt buck-
le, surrounded by Gary Jones, announcer Jimmy Carter,
and "young" Gary Jones.


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2D The Herald-Advocate, September 15, 2011





-Hardee


Living


COURTESY PHOTO
Jarod Walker & Jen Alvarez

Jen Alvarez Becomes

Engaged To Jarod Walker
Valentin and Celia Alvarez of The prospective groom is a
Pembroke Pines announce the May 2011 graduate of Embry
engagement of their daughter, Riddle Aeronautical University,
Jennifer Marie "Jen" Alvarez, to with a degree in aviation main-
Jarod Austin Walker, the son of tenance science. He is currently
James and Kathy Walker of employed by American Eagle
Wauchula. Airlines of Springfield, Mo.
The bride-elect is expected to Plans are being made for a
graduate this December from March 23, 2012, wedding at St.
Florida International University Maximillian Kolbe Catholic
with a degree in biology. Church in Pembroke Pines.





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Ann Marie 863-767-0613 facebook/Jazzercise Heartland


WAUCHULA CHAPTER #42
ORDER OF THE EASTERN STAR

Cordially invites you to attend our
100th Anniversary Celebration

Saturday, October 8, 2011

2:00 P.M.

Masonic Lodge

120 West Main Street

Wauchula, Florida
R.S.V.P. Judy Wilson PGM 863-773-3200
Judwil2003@yahoo.com soc9:15c




Thank You
-~ ," You may have said a prayer,
sent a card or cooked us food.
You may have lent a shoulder,
gave a hug or cried with us.
For all things you have done
f{ for our family during the passing
Of our Mother, our Gratnny Sue, G\
our Granuny the Great
We give you all a Deep ,
Heartfelt Thank You.
The Family of Catherine Sue Smit
S Dusti & Curtis Taylor, Ed & Darlene
Q. Smit, Julie & Jay Ellis, all the
- Grandchildren and Great Grandchildren .

*- -soc9:15p


Roy Petteway-
Elected As
Angus Delegate
Roy Petteway of Zolfo
Springs has been elected as a
delegate to the 128th annual
American Angus Association
Convention of Delegates. set
for Nov. 14 in Louisville. Ky.
Petteway. a member of the
American Angus Association.
with headquarters in Saint
Joseph. Mo.. is one of 332
Angus breeders who have been
elected by fellow members in
their states to serve as a repre-
sentative at the annual meeting.
Representing 43 states, the
District of Columbia and
Canada, the delegates will par-
ticipate in the business meeting
and elect new officers and five
directors to the American
Angus Association board.
The annual event is held in
conjunction with the annual
banquet and the Super Point
Roll of Victory Angus show,
Nov. 12-15 during the North
American International Live-
stock Exposition.
The American Angus As-
sociation has nearly 30,000
active members and is the
largest beef breed organization
in the world.


CONSTITUTION 224 YEARS OLD

r Celebrate The Constitution!


The Constitution of the United States was signed by 55 delegates to the Constitutional
Convention in Philadelphia's Independence Hall on Sept. 17, 1787. It's the longest-
lived written constitution on any government. In 1956 President Dwight D. Eisenhower
set the week of Sept.17-23 each year as "Constitution Week." On Monday night,
Wauchula Mayor Rick Knight signed a proclamation of Sept. 17-23, 2011 as Con-stitu-
tion Week as requested by Sheila Carlton Smith, sister-in-law to Duck Smith. The
Constitution is on display at the Hardee County Library all this month. Residents are
invited to stop by and help honor the nation and its founding.


Herald-Advocate Price

Increase Coming Oct. 6
The single-copy price of The Herald-Advocate on Oct. 6 will
increase to 75 cents from 50 cents, announced publisher James
R: Kelly. The last price increases were in 1995 and 1980.
Increased costs of payroll, paper, ink, insurance, fuel, elec-
tricity, supplies, taxes and other components have caused the
need for a price hike, said Kelly. There will be increases in mail
subscriptions also on Oct. 6.
The new price will include 70 cents to The Herald-Advocate
and 5 cents in state sales tax.
The paper is currently distributed in 26 stores, 26 coin-oper-
ated racks, and through the U.S. mail.
"We try hard every week to publish a good quality newspa-
per that serves Hardee County. We greatly value our readers,
advertisers and employees," said the publisher.
The Herald-Advocate dates to 1900-with The Florida
Advocate and a 1955 combining of The Florida Advocate and
the Hardee County Herald.
The current press run is 4,500 which, should rise to 4,900 or
5,000 in February, said Kelly, adding that winter residents have
a welcome impact on the county's economy.


Wauchula Garden Club's

Year Begins On Sept. 21
The Wauchula Garden Club President Lydia Neff, Secreta
will begin its 2011 club year Carolyn McConnell and Trea
next Wednesday. Sept. 21. at the urer Carol Saunders.
clubhouse located at 131 N. As vice president, Neff w
Eighth Ave. be in charge of the monthly pr
New officers leading the club grams. This month the club w
for the next two years are Presi- welcome a representative fro
dent Jeanette Perine, Vice Mosaic, who will sneak c


R. Roy Petteway
Will Serve As
Angus Alternate
R. Roy Petteway of Zolfo
Springs has been selected as an
alternate delegate to the 128th
Annual American Angus As-
sociation .Conventionn of Dele-
gates on Nov. 14 in Louisville.
Ky.
Petteway is one of 306 Angus
breeders who have been elected
by fellow members to serve as
an alternate state representative
to the annual meeting.
The state delegates will par-
ticipate in the business meeting
and elect new officers and five
directors to the American
Angus Association board.
The annual event is held in
conjunction with the annual
banquet and the Super Poipt
Roll of Victory Angus show.
which is Nov. 12-15 during the
North American International
Livestock Exposition.
Petteway is a member of the
American Angus Association,
which has nearly 30.000 active
members and is the largest beef
breed organization in the world.


WE ARE NOW OPEN FOR BUISNESS!!!


C("-i L ibiol Stop in for a chance to win
Hardee PL Air, Inc. an air purfier!!


863-7,tS7-0122
Itl il Tinra RIckcit, Cell (863) 781-4376
W.iuitul, l 1n -1 / (863) 781-437


Do not be fooled by
imitators!!


For quality and assurance contact your hometown Rainbow distributor for
products and demonstrations. Asthma and allergy certified. soc9:15.22p


ry
Is-
ill
0o-
ill
)m
on


^Z(IiWA


-


-I


New Vision Worship Center
Fellowship Hall


EvrySauray8-a6 or 9* 0 -1:0 '21 co lh ueR .- of pi ngs


$10/Class or $35/Month
Maggie Santana (863) 245-1623
* NO sign-up fee Bring a friend & get a gift
Sign-Up before Sept. 30th and get your
1st Month for Only $30 soc9:15c


*


wildlife management.
Chairing the hostess commit-
tee for September will be Mary
Weisman. She will be joined by
Karen Mong, Sherron Jenson
and Helene Mancini. They will
host the luncheon which will'
begin at noon.
Club officers have planned a
busy and informative year and
encourage new and prospective
members to attend.
For more information, call
the president at 773-6026 or
Bess Stallings at 773-3594.


J


*S


Reality Ranch Youth Rodeo
2011-2012 Season


S ENTRY FEES: $2S.on
CASH BACK JACKPOTS
IN ALL EVENTS
TINY TOTS (SI5.oo)


Dates
September 2 th March 24"'
-October 29h' Jainuairy 281i
November 261' February 25'tl
i Decernber-no rodeo April 28th
Finals- April
: 4t Saturday of Month*t
SCHEDULE OF EVENTS


Timed Rough stock
Barrels Sheep
Br-e'ikaway > Call Riding
Tie Down Roping Steer Riding (9-11)
BMddy Roping Brone (-.,ul1l, & irehaIx1k)
Pole Bending Bull Riding (Jr. -,i)
Goat Tving
Team Roping
Chute Dogging
"ide up option i all ive.t's


Call- In/ Call-Out
Books open 7-9 pm on Monday
& 'I tuesday before each rodeo.
Call-In #863-781-2013
Secretary L.icey Webb
(No messages please)

('ill outs on ''lhursiday prior to
etch rodeo 7-9 pill
Call-outs 863-781-2013
NlA/v t cI"tr dI.. .In.int'l.S will
/,>" wivailbllih on Ihe


, lii1 -lt i iIo 6l I l a iit .l t tlt 'lll : -._.l i -:
9:15c


New Relay For Life Team

Debbie's Angels
In Honor Of
Deborah Prestridge
Formed by friends and family.
If anyone would like to join our
team, make a donation, or help
participate in fundraisers
soc9:15p Call 863-448-2258


I would like to
thank the voters of
Zolfo Springs for
putting their
confidence in me.
I will do my best
to do a good job.
Dierdre "Didi" White-
Paid Political Advertisement Paid for and
approved by Dierdre "Didi" White soc9:15c


OT:.'n "o ca'.'-s 4 1 3
A(r-.- b^.ons'
14 18 years of age Seniors
9 13 years of age Juniors
8 and under Tots
6 and tnder can choose to be Tiny Tots
(Tiny Tot events are sheep riding,
barrels and pole bending) Designation
will be required by 2nd rodeo.
-Cowboy Church : 9:30 am before each
rodeo for all who can come.-


Start Times:
10:00 am Roughstock events start, followed by Timed Events
-All contestants must be paid in by o::to to compete-


---


*gg^ ^k *


I


I


11


M- e


komsi






September 15,2011, The Herald-Advocate 3D


HONOR FLIGHT


RAISING GRANDKIDS


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
Sue Birge on Tuesday, June 28, spoke to the Wauchula Kiwanis Club about the Honor Consie Levin spoke to the Wauchula Lions Club on Thursday, Aug. 4, about grandpar-
Flight May 14 when nine Hardee County World War II veterans were sent to visit ents and other relatives raising grandchildren. She is with the Florida Kinship Center of
Washington, D.C., as guests of the Hardee Rotary Club. From left are Janet Gilliard, Sue University of South Florida. The grandparent is usually on a fixed income and recently
Birge, WH. Harward Jr., John Maddox, and Bob Hanchey. Harward and Maddox are retired. The parents are often abusers of alcohol, illegal drugs or prescription drugs
World War II veterans who flew to the nation's capital. and can no longer take care of their child. The Florida Department of Children and
Families often calls on relatives instead of foster care. The state offers Medicaid and
$250 a month per child. Local caregivers meet the first Friday of each month at 10 a.m.
at the Wauchula Family YMCA. Free clothes and shoes are available to children. Levin,
POLICE CHIEF SPEAKS a licensed clinical social worker, can be reached at 941-341-4268. A toll-free number is
_- 1-800-640-6444. From left are David Durastanti, Consie Levin, Kathleen Roehm and
f J club president Talmadge Albritton. She said trends are more prescription drug abuse,
_ h lack of good jobs and more mental illness.


PEACE RIVER EXPLORATIONS


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
Wauchula Police Chief Bill Beattie on Tuesday Aug. 2, spoke to the Wauchula Kiwanis
Club about credit card information theft, gold theft and home break-ins. From left are
Sam Fite, Bill Beattie and Bob Hanchey. The club meets weekly at the Panda
Restaurant.


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
Pattie Detwiler told the Wauchula Lions Club June 16 about the proposed Peace River
Explorations project. She is executive director and project manager. Kathleen Roehm
is marketing director. The board consists of president Jeraldine Crews, Oneita Revell,
Louise Weis, Elizabeth Durrance, Linda See and Alane Solomon. The fossil-based eco-
tourism project's mottos include "Finding Our Future In Our Past" and "I Dig Hardee
County." Phases include using the old train depot as a welcome center, the Azalea Hill
historic home for tours and weddings, Crews Park, a fossil museum, a water park, fos-
sil hunts, an auditorium, and marketing county parks, Solomon's Castle, etc. The group
has applied for $2.9 million in county severance tax funds and has been approved for
$300,000 in interim funding by the Industrial Development Authority. From left are club
president Talmadge Albritton, Julie Watson, Pattie Detwiler, and Kathleen Roehm.


SCHOOLS CHIEF SPEAKS


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
Pattie Detwiler on Wednesday, June 15, spoke to the Hardee Rotary Club about the pro-
posed Peace River Explorations which would promote ecotourism in Hardee County. A
fossil theme would be used. The group has applied for a 2.9 million grant from the
county economic development agency. Plans include a fossil museum, art gallery,
kids' water park, Crews Park on Peace River, fossil hunting tours, a historical home for
social events, canoe rentals, marketing Hardee attractions, etc. From left are Lavon
Cobb, Kathleen Roehm who would be marketing director, Pattie Detwiler who would be
executive director and project manager, Calli Skipper.


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
David Durastanti, Hardee County superintendent of schools, recently told the Hardee
Rotary Club that Florida ranks 47th in funding per child, 46th in teacher pay but No. 5
in quality of schools. The Rotary Club annually gives dictionaries to local fifth grade
students. Due to recent cuts in state funding the Hardee school system has 50 fewer
employees but more teachers and has reduced administrative staff by 40 percent.
There are about 5,200 students. Federal funding for schools dropped $3.3 million this
year in Hardee, while state funds since 2007 have dropped $11.3 million. The new
county schools' budget is down 6.63 percent with state funding cut 8 percent.
Durastanti said FCAT is "a strange beast." Three of Hardee's elementary schools
received an '"A" grade. The other two were "B" and "C." From left are Rotary district
governor nominee George Robertson Burnett, club president Sue Birge, assistant dis-
trict governor Sam Cardinale, and David Durastanti.


PHOTO BY JIM KELLY
Meredith Lutz, director of quality control for Florida Hospital Heartland Division, spoke
about medical myths to the Hardee Rotary Club on Wednesday, Aug. 3, at Java Cafe in
Wauchula. Mosquitos do not transmit AIDS. You cannot get flu from flu shots. You can-
not get a cold by going to bed with wet hair. Those are truths, she said. From left are
Sheila Johns, Meredith Lutz, Taylor Pohl and Richard Farwell.


MEDICAL MYTHS







4D The Herald-Advocate, September 15, 2011


HJHS Football Starts On Road


Hardee County To Welcome


By JOAN SEAMAN
Of The Herald-Advocate
Hardee Junior High Football
is going after its fourth consec-
utive Heartland Conference
championship.
The season opens Tuesday at
Lake Placid. Games are sched-
uted for a 5:30 p.m. start.
Each season every team plays
another once and to even the
schedule, a team will play
another twice during the sea-
son. For Hardee, that team is
Bok Academy, a charter school
from Lake Wales in its inaugu-
ral year of middle school foot-
ball.
After home games against
Sebring and Bok, Hardee goes
back on the road for games at
Avon Park and at Bok. The sea-
son ends with home games
against Hill-Gustat and DeSoto.
Coach Mark Carlton, battling
illness, will depend heavily on
his assistant coaches West
Palmer, Jason Clark and Gerry
Lindsey.
They have returnees Omar
Alamia, Allen Brown, Marco
DeLeon, Andrew Hagans, Alex
Hinojosa, Christopher Hull,
William McClelland, David


Ramirez, Kole Robertson and
Ty Trammell to anchor the
squad.
Others on the team are Justin
Aguilar, Landon Albritton,
Thomas Atchley, Dalton Baker,
Willie Baker, Al Brown, Hunter
Bryant, Carlos Camacho, Jarrett
Carlton, Parker Carlton, Brad-
dock Collom, Tyler Congleton,
Zach Coronado, Conner
Crawford, Adrian DeLeon,
Austin Garcia, Isis Garza,
Matthew Green, Will Ham,
Walter Jackson, Jimmy Lane,


Sherry Lee and Hayden
Lindsey.
Also. Charles Manley. Jon-
atan Martinez, Brennick Mas-
corro, Joshua McClelland,
Gabriel Mendoza, Ryan Moore,
Boone Paris. Daniel Permenter.
Jeremy Reyna. Jessie Reyna, C
hauncy Rivers, Alejandro Rod-
criguez, Ty Schoffner. Kenny
Severe, Benjamin Tamayo,
Lawrence Walker, Trevor
Walker, Kevin White and Travis
Williams.


SAVE A LIFE


COURTESY PHOTO
It took a combination of efforts but 125 children of all ages may be safer around the
water because of swim lessons provided through the Hardee Swim Association, with
cooperation from the Health Department, Hardee County School Board, the recreation
department and community support. Funds were provided by Mosaic, Kiwanis, Peace
River Electric Cooperative Inc. and private donors. A significant portion came from
Health Department employees who did private lessons and donated the money back
to the association. Health DypWrtme.-.employee Kathy Roe, head nurse with the
school health program has spearheaded the program for two years. Tracy Pate, a vol-
unteer swim coach, who is not a bertifTed Req Cross instructor, helped prepare volun-
teers; (from left) Korin Roehm, Chris Reid, Brittany Wiggins, Wyatt Kofke, Robin
Tanksley, Roe, Valerie Tanksley, Sandy Driskell, Katie Kaufman and Roberta Alexander.


HJHS Wildcat Football
Sept. 20 Lake Placid Away
Sept. 27 Sebring HOME
Oct. 4 Bok Academy HOME
Oct. 11 Avon Park Away
Oct. 18 Bok Academy Away
Oct. 25 Hill-Gustat HOME
Nov. 1 DeSoto HOME
*All Games Begin at 5:30 p.m.
Head Coach: Mark Carlton
Assistants: West Palmer,
Jason Clark, Gerry Lindsey


SPECIAL


Decades Of Alumni


Home 2
The largest gathering of
Hardee Senior High School
alumni to ever assemble in
Hardee County at one time is
being planned for this fall.
After a year of preparations
- including in excess of 2.000
invitations going out to all
classes from 1950-1969 or-
ganizers are anticipating a huge
turnout for the Oct. 28-30
weekend of celebration planned
for the 20 classes.
A block party at Main Street
Heritage Park in downtown
Wauchula will kick off the
weekend events, beginning on
Friday evening at 7. A popular
band of the 1960s. the Wild
Cats. joined by members of var-
ious bands of the '50s. will be
entertaining guests with nostal-
gic music of that era.
Saturday morning will begin
early as Northside Baptist
Church hosts a pancake break-
fast for all alumni, beginning at
7 in the Town Center (formerly
Earnest Plaza) parking lot.
Adding to the day's festivities
will be an arts-and-crafts festi-
val, ongoing downtown from
10 a.m. until 4 p.m. Some local
merchants plan to remain open,
too, for alumni to avail them-
selves of some fall and early
Christmas shopping.
' Reunion co-chairs Jerold
Knight and Sue Jackson say
they plan to have several ven-
dors with quality merchandise
filling West Main Street as well
as Heritage Park. They agree
the idea from the onset was to
have a day where former class-
mates and friends could once
again mingle while walking the
streets of their hometown.
As alumni travel from states
as far away as California and
Rhode Island, representatives
of each graduation year have
planned individual class gather-
ings with menus ranging from
barbecue to Southern home
cooking. Those attending will
have the opportunity to spend
time reminiscing with their for-
mer classmates before rejoining
the combined reunion.
If Saturday's schedule did not
already feel full enough, a sec-
ond block party in the park is
planned for that evening. A
variety of entertainment has
been planned beginning at 7.


In the very early stages of
planning this reunion, organiz-
ers realized how fortunate they
were to have grown up in
Hardee County during what
they felt was "the very best of
times." Jackson notes. This ini-
tiated a desire to give back in
some way. Knight came up with
the idea of an alumni cookbook,
with all proceeds going to
Resthaven. The money will be
used to assist with some
improvements there.
The cookbook, which has
over 300 contributors and some
800 recipes, was recently sent
to the publishing company.
Says Knight. "We are very.
happy with the response. not
only from alumni but also peo-
ple around town desiring to pur-
chase the book. Many are order-


BUDGET SUMMARY
HARDEE COUNTY INDIGENT HEALTH CARE
DISTRICT BOARD BUDGET FISCAL YEAR 2011-2012


MILLAGE: 0.3646
ESTIMATED REVENUES


GENERAL FUND


AD VALOREM TAXES .............. ..............................................$549,968
EX C ESS FE ES .......................................................................... 3,000
INTEREST FROM TAX COLLECTOR ..............................................400
INTEREST FROM CHECKING ACCOUNT ..................... 150
TOTAL SOURCES .. ......................... ............................... 553.518
L E S S 5 % ...................................................................................(2 7 ,6 7 6 )
T O TA L.. I ......................................................... ..................... 525.842
FUND BALANCE .........................................................................5,000
GRAND TOTAL OF REVENUES ............................................. 530,842


MITSE AIED EXPENDil S


l-.V I III' I -Ar.i -l l W I VI I .......... .................... .. I.......i, im il I .l..


AUDITING/ACCOUNTING .................... .................................. 3,000
INSU RANC E/BO NDS .................................................................. 310
OTHER CURRENT CHARGES .................................................... 600
ADMINISTRATIVE COSTS....................................................2,500
O FFIC E S U P PLIES .......................................................................1... 00
INDIGENT HEALTH CARE...................................................... 492,832
COMMISSIONS/TAX COLLECTOR...................................... 11,000
PROPERTY APPRAISER COMMISSIONS ...............................14,500
LEG A L S ERV IC ES .......................................................................... 1,000
FU N D BA LA N C E ........................ .................................. ..... 5.000
TOTAL EXPENDITURES ......................................................... 530,842

THE TENTATIVE, ADOPTED, AND/OR FINAL BUDGETS ARE ON FILE
IN THE OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET, 412 WEST OR-
ANGE STREET, ROOM 204, WAUCHULA, FL 33873 AS A PUBLIC
RECORD.
9:20c


ing several and giving them for
Christmas presents'We are elat-
ed that we are able to do this for
Resthaven."
A total of 1,500 books have
been ordered, and will arrive in
time for distribution during the
reunion weekend. There will be
no reorders. Jackson advises.
Cookbooks may be pre-
ordered by calling Michelle
Crawley Yeomans at 773-3104
or by stopping by her office at
210 W. Main St. The cost is
$25.
Alumni will close out the
busy weekend with attending
various churches in the county
together on Sunday morning.

George Washington's false
teeth were made of whale
bone.


NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE
Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a Writ of Execution
issued in the County Court in and for Polk County, Florida
on June 29th, 2011 in the cause wherein MIDFLORIDA
CREDIT UNION f/k/a MidFlorida Credit Union, is the plain-
tiff and David Moralez, is the defendant, being case num-
ber 53-2009CC-005994-0000-00 in said court, I, Arnold
Lanier, as Sheriff of Hardee County, Florida have levied
upon all the right, title and interest of the above defendant,
David Moralez and to the following described personal
property to-wit:
1999 Dynasty/Polar 21' boat-VIN MJIP6800C999
1999 Mercury 150HP Motor
1999 Performance Trailer-VIN 40ZBA2226XAL5016
and on October 17, 2011 at 9:30 a.m., or as soon there-
after as circumstances permit, I will offer the above de-
scribed property for sale, at public outcry and sell the
same, subject to ALL prior liens, if any, to the highest bid-
der for CASH IN HAND, plus Florida State Sales Tax, if ap-
plicable. The monies received through the levy and sale
will'be paid as prescribed by Fla. Stat. 56.27. The sale will
be held at the main entrance of the Hardee County Sher-
iff's Office located at 900 E. Summit St., Wauchula, Florida.
The above described property may be viewed Monday
thru Friday from 10:00 a.m. until 6:00 p.m. at Hills Auto
World located at 4205 US Highway 17 N, Bowling Green,
Florida.
In accordance with the American with Disabilities Act, per-
sons needing a special accommodation to participate in
this proceeding shall contact the Hardee County Sheriff's
Office, 863-773-0304 ext. (208). not later than seven days
prior to the proceeding. Telephone 904-257-6097, 1-800-
955-8771 (+TDD) or 1-800-955-8770(v), via Florida Relay
Service.
Dated September 13, 2011
Arnold Lanier, As Sheriff of
Hardee County, Florida
By: Sgt. Barbara Finneran
Deputy Sheriff 9:15-10:6c


PUBLIC MEETING NOTICE

The Heartland Workforce Finance & Opera-
tions Committee will hold a teleconference
meeting at 10am on Wednesday, Sept. 21st
to review the revised Heartland Workforce
Plan of Operations. The teleconference
meeting will originate at the Heartland Work-
force Administrative office, 5901 US Hwy 27
S, Sebring, FL. Interested persons should ar-
rive no later than 9:55am. For more informa-
tion see agenda posted on the Heartland
Workforce website at www.hwib.org
9:15c


ABOUT ...
School News
The Herald-Advocate en-
courages submissions from
Hardee County schools.
Photos and write-ups
should be of recent events,
and must include first and
last names for both students
and teachers. Identify pho-
tos front to back, left to right.
Deadline for submissions
is 5 p.m. on Thursday.
Please include the name
and phone number of a con-
tact person. Qualifying
items will be published as
space allows.


NOTICE OF BUDGET HEARING

The Hardee County Indigent Healthcare Special District Board, Hardee
County, Florida has tentatively adopted a budget for fiscal year
2011-2012.

A public hearing to make a FINAL DECISION on the BUDGET AND
TAXES will be held on:

September 20, 2011
,5:30 p.m.
AT
412 West Orange Street, Wauchula, Florida 33873
9:15c


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
AND INTENT TO ADOPT ORDINANCE 2011-07

PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that a public hearing will be held and thereafter Ordinance
Number 2011-07 will be presented to the City Commission for adoption upon the second
reading at City Hall, 225 East Main Street, Wauchula, Florida 33873, on the 27th day of
September 2011, at 6:00 P.M., or as soon thereafter as it reasonably can be held. A copy
of the proposed Ordinance can be obtained from the office of the City Clerk, 126 South
Seventh Avenue, Wauchula, Florida 33873. Any person may appear and be heard with
respect to the proposed Ordinance. The proposed Ordinance is entitled as follows:

ORDINANCE 2011-07

AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF WAUCHULA, FLORIDA, PROVIDING FOR
ADOPTION OF THE FINAL BUDGET FOR THE 2011-2012 FISCAL YEAR PUR-
SUANT TO SECTION 200.065, FLORIDA STATUTES; PROVIDING AUTHORI-
ZATION FOR TRANSFERS OF APPROPRIATIONS FOR EXPENSES AS LONG
AS SUCH TRANSFERS DO NOT AFFECT THE TOTAL BUDGET FOR EACH
DEPARTMENT; PROVIDING FOR CONFLICT; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABIL-
ITY; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.

Pursuant to Section 286.0107, Florida Statutes, as amended, the City Commission
hereby advises that if any interested person decides to appeal any decision made by the
City Commission with respect to any matter considered at the proceedings, he will need
a record of the proceeding and that, for such purposes, he may need to insure that a ver-
batim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes the testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based.

The City Commission of the City of Wauchula, Florida does not discriminate upon the
basis of any individual's disability status. This non-discriminatory policy involves every
aspect of the Commission's functions, including ones access to, participation, employ-
ment or treatment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable accommo-
dation as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26, Florida
Statutes, should contact the City Clerk at (863) 773-3131.


s/Holly Collins
HOLLY COLLINS, City Clerk
City of Wauchula


Clifford M. Ables, III, Esquire
202 West Main Street, Suite 103
Wauchula, Florida 33873
Attorney for the City of Wauchula


I


GENERAL FUND


I








September 15, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 5D


From The Heart
By David Kelly


FOOTBALL IS BACK!


Football is back. Need I say more?
Friday nights are now set. Saturday are filled with great antic-
ipation. Sunday will keep you tuned in late. Monday nights are
ready for a party crowd. And Tuesdays and Thursdays will soon
have games, too! Wednesday nights will be all about your fantasy
team lineup.
Football is back, indeed.
I don't get to many live professional games anymore. But I get
to as many Friday night high school games that I can.
My son and I recently made a weekend of it. We went to a
local ball game up here, Mount Dora Bible vs. First Academy of
Leesburg. Several kids from my youth group attend both schools,
so it was fun to go and cheer for both teams. We couldn't help but
root for the winning team.
Then Saturday I took him up to Gainesville to watch the
Gators play the University of Alabama/Birmingham Blazers. This
was a great time, as my dad was also watching the game with his
youngest son, Jonathon.
Sunday we would keep close watch on the ticker to make sure
my fantasy team would be winning, even though Tom Brady was
playing on Monday, which we watched that game, too!
Yes, you can pretty much let it consume your whole week,
football that is.
And somewhere in there I have to find time to love my wife,
my children, work, and study for my two seminary classes. And I
haven't even thrown in the biggest curve ball of all, getting pre-
pared for hunting season, which for archery hunters starts Saturday.
Football is back, and most fans are more than pleased.
There is someone to root for, and against. We could do this
with other things like religion or politics, but with football it seems
there is a universal acceptance of defeat and victory. It seems that
we can still agree that there is a right and a wrong. My team played
better thanyour team, period. (Well, most of the times. And even if
it doesn't work out that way, we are able to get over it and still love
one another even if we vehemently disagree with the other's insane
allegiance to a far inferior institution of higher learning.)


NOTICE OF SPECIAL MEETING
OF CITY COMMISSIONERS OF THE
CITY OF WAUCHULA

The City Commission of the City of Wauchula will hold a Special Meeting on
Wednesday, September 21, 2011, at 4:30 p.m. or as soon thereafter as it reasonably
can be held. Item on the agenda: Approval of Employment Agreement for Newly Se-
lected City Manager Terry W. Atchley and any other business that may come before
the Commission.

The meeting will be held at the Commission Chambers located at 225 East Main
Street, Wauchula, FL 33873.

Pursuant to Section 286.0107, Florida Statutes, as amended, the City Commission
hereby advises that if any interested person decides to appeal any decision made by the
City Commission with respect to any matter considered at the proceedings, he will need
a record of the proceeding and that, for such purposes, he may need to insure that a ver-
batim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes the testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to be based.

The City Commission of the City of Wauchula, Florida does not discriminate upon the
basis of any individual's disability status. This non-discriminatory policy involves every
aspect of the Commission's functions, including ones access to, pai#lp"tion, mwiploy-.
ment or treatment injts programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasortable accommo-
dation as provided rid the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26, Florida
Statutes, should contact the City Clerk at (863) 773-3131

CITY OF WAUCHULA
S/Frederick M. Knight
Mayor
ATTEST
S/Holly Collins
City Clerk
9:15c




NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
AND INTENT TO ADOPT ORDINANCE 2011-05

PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that a public hearing will be held and thereafter Ordinance
Number 2011-05 will be presented to the City Commission for adoption upon the second
reading at City Hall, 225 East Main Street, Wauchula, Florida 33873, on the 27th day of
September 2011, at 6:00 P.M., or as soon thereafter as it reasonably can be held. A copy
of the proposed Ordinance can be obtained from the office of the City Clerk, 126 South
Seventh Avenue, Wauchula, Florida 33873. Any person may appear and be heard with
respect to the proposed Ordinance. The proposed Ordinance is entitled as follows:

ORDINANCE 2011-05

AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF WAUCHULA, FLORIDA AMENDING THE
CITY OF WAUCHULA COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN TO INCORPO-
RATE ADDITIONAL LANDS INTO THE COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT
AREA IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE FINDING OF NECESSITY ADOPTED BY
THE CITY OF WAUCHULA THROUGH RESOLUTION NO. 2011-01 (KNOWN
AS AND REFERRED TO AS THE 2011 COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT EX-
PANSION AREA), AND AMENDING ORDINANCE 97-834 TO PROVIDE FOR
THE FUNDING OF THE REDEVELOPMENT TRUST FUND FOR AN AREA
WITHIN THE CITY OF WAUCHULA COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT AREA
KNOWN AND REFERRED TO AS THE 2011 COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT
EXPANSION AREA; MAKING FINDINGS; DETERMINING THE BASE YEAR
FOR DETERMINING ASSESSED VALUES OF TAXABLE REAL PROPERTY IN
THE 2011 COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT EXPANSION AREA FOR PUR-
POSES OF CALCULATING THE AMOUNT OF INCREMENT REVENUES TO
BE PAID EACH FISCAL YEAR BY EACH TAXING AUTHORITY; PROVIDING
THAT THIS ORDINANCE IS SUPPLEMENTAL TO AND DOES NOT SUPER-
SEDE THE PROVISIONS OF ORDINANCE 97-834, UNLESS SPECIFICALLY
STATED HEREIN; PROVIDING FOR CONFLICT; PROVIDING FOR CODIFICA-
TION; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFEC-
TIVE DATE.

Pursuant to Section 286.0107, Florida Statutes, as amended, the City Commission
hereby advises that if any interested person decides to appeal any decision made by the
City Commission with respect to any matter considered at the proceedings, he will need
a record of the proceeding and that, for such purposes, he may need to insure that a ver-
batim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes the testimony and evi-
dence upon whibh the appeal is to be based.

The City.Commission of the City of Wauchula, Florida does not discriminate upon the
basis of any individual's disability status. This non-discriminatory policy involves every
aspect of the Commission's functions, including ones access to, participation, employ-
ment or treatment in its programs or activities. Anyone requiring reasonable accommo-
dation as provided for in the Americans with Disabilities Act or Section 286.26, Florida
Statutes, should contact the City Clerk at (863) 773-3131.


Clifford M. Ables, III, Esquire
202 West Main Street, Suite 103
Wauchula, Florida 33873
Attorney for the City of Wauchula


s/Holly Collins
HOLLY COLLINS, City Clerk
City of Wauchula


9 1lSr


The invention of the TV
dinner has been attributed
to at least three different
sources, primarily Gerry
Thomas, the Swanson
Brothers, and Maxson
Food Systems, Inc.


Football is extremely creative and complex yet it is still a
game that is simple and fun. Mans people don't get it. But those
who do. love it. It's like putting together a puzzle. or playing
Battleship: or chess, or any other strategy-driven game: one move.
one decision. one play. one second can break open the entire game.
Football is often very much the same: block, run. tackle.
block. pass. tackle. But there is also the hint of surprise or mystery
in football that keeps you glued to your seat.
Fumble! The game that was once safe and secure in one team's
arms is now been given to or taken away for the other team.
Interception! All at once the offense is defense and the defense
is offense.
Penalty! What. are you kidding me? An ir'^*action of the rules
brings the playing field back to normal. suppo, &Jly.
Trick play! Everyone is frozen, the defense, the officials -
even though.they knew it was coming the kids on your team on
the sideline who weren't paying attention, the stands. the announc-
ers. Everyone but those involved are in disbelief. Yes. this is foot-
ball.
Football is back! Enjoy it! Because pretty soon it will be
February and someone will have won the Super Bowl and we will
all be depressed because there will be no football.



On The Agenda

HARDEE COUNTY COMMISSION
The Hardee County Commission will hold its monthly
evening session today (Thursday) at 6 p.m. in Room 102,
Courthouse Annex I, 412 W. Orange St., Wauchula. The fol-
lowing is a synopsis of agenda topics that may be of public
interest. Times are approximate except for advertised public
hearings.
-Commission/Zoning public hearing, 6 p.m.
-Introduction of solar energy project for Hardee County, 6:30
p.m.
-Volunteer and part-time employees for the Fire-Rescue
Department, 7:15 p.m.
-Commissioner Grady Johnson on county manager statements
on Sept. 9, 7:25 p.m.
-County manager evaluation forms requested, 7:40 p.m.
This agenda is provided as a public service of The Herald-
Advocate and the Hardee County Commission for those who
may wish to attend.


Rose Mitchell-Freeman
Reading Instruction
Specialist
(863)773-6141
soc9:15c


Ad Valorem Taxes...............................
Utility Taxes............. ......... ... ..........
Franchise Fees......................
Occupational Licenses........ ..............
State Revenue Sharing................. ...
Mobile Home Taxes...................
Half Cent Sales Taxes............... .........
1 Cent Sales Taxes.....................
Fuel Tax Refund..... .........................
Civic Center Rental.... ............. ....
Miscellaneous Revenues......................
W astewater Revenue............................
W ater Revenue....................................
Reconnect Fees... ....................
Sanitation Service................ ..... ...
Local Option Gas Tax..........................
Vapor Lights........ .............. .... ......
Interest Income ..........................
C D BG G rants.................. .. .... ..............
U S D A ................................................
C county E DA .................................... .....
Recreational Council....................
Reserves

EXPENSES
Legislative................. .... ..
Clerk's Office ....... ...... . ........
Public Safety................................. .
Water Department...................... ...
Wastewater Department............ .......
Sanitation Department........................
Transportation Department.....................
Recreation Department................


$193,069.00
84,000.00
60,000.00
800.00
36,025.00
650.00
46,753.00
88,925.00
500.00
1,000.00
12,000.00
435,900.00
264,678.00
1,500.00
122,000.00
45,222.00
271.00
600.00
626,764.00
3,512,046.00
142,062.00
4,000.00
130,000.00
$5,808,765.00


$9,600.00
186,985.00
139,425.00
943,442.00
4,095,275.00
105,350.00
317,688.00
11,000.00
$5,808,765.00


THE TENTATIVE, ADOPTED, AND/OR FINAL BUDGETS ARE ON FILE IN THE
OFFICE OF THE ABOVE MENTIONED TAXING AUTHORITY AS A PUBLIC
RECORD. 9:15c


NOTICE OF BUDGET HEARING

The Town of Zolfo Springs has tentatively adopted a budget for 2011/2012.

A public hearing to make a FINAL DECISION on the budget AND TAXES will be held on:

Monday, September 19, 2011
6:00 PM
at


3210 US Highwa 17 Strth
Town Commission Board om .
Zolfo Springs, FL 33890


9:15c


BUDGET SUMMARY
TOWN OF ZOLFO SPRINGS
FLORIDA
FISCAL YEAR 2011-2012
THE PROPOSED OPERATING BUDGET (INCOME
AND EXPENDITURES) OF THE TOWN OF ZOLFO SPRINGS,
FLORIDA, ARE 27.36% MORE THAN LAST YEAR'S TOTAL
INCOME AND EXPENDITURES.
REVENUE Proposed Millage 9.000


Iu i


Renowned Archaeologist

Opens SFCC Speaker Series
Archaeologist Juan Riera will Florida caused by natural disas-
speak at South Florida Corn- ters. pirates and modern sink-
munity College next week. ings for the artificial reef pro-
The Kissimmee River Ar- gram.
chaeological & Historical Con- Riera is a native of South
servancy is beginning its Florida and studied history at
Speaker Series with archaeolo- the University of Florida. He
gist Riera on Thursday, Sept. 15. received his master's degree in
at 7 p.m. in Building G on the history from Florida Inter-
Highlands Campus. national University and his doc-
Riera will speak on -Pirates. torate in colonial Latin
Treasure and Shipwrecks of American history, archaeology
Florida." and museum studies from Texas
The series is free and open to Tech.
the public. He has years of university
Riera will discuss environ- teaching experience as well as
mental dangers to shipping in in lecturing as part of Elder-
Florida. such as hurricanes and hostel. His museum experience
coral reefs; the wealth that was includes Mission San Luis in
found on ships traveling Florida Tallahassee.
waters from the 1500s to the Riera has participated in
present (Spanish treasure, man- archaeological digs in Florida
ufactured goods); and the people and Texas and has conducted
who try to take away treasure research in numerous libraries
whether they are called pirates, and archives including the
buccaneers or wreckers, national archives in Seville.
Characters such as Sir Spain. He currently works at the
Francis Drake, Blackbeard Gold Coast Railroad Museum,
Edward Teach, and Black teaches at the University of
Caesar will be remembered for Miami, and lectures at Nova
their exploits. This lecture also Southeastern University.
covers famous, not-so-famous For more information, call
and infamous shipwrecks in Anne Reynolds at 465-3637.

Victory is not won in miles, but in inches. Win a little now,
hold your ground, and later win a little more.
-Louis L'Amour


Your Child Will

Learn to Read!
Free Evaluation
Internationally Acclaimed Method
Children, Teens & Adults

AcademicAssodates
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OLU The Herald-Advocate, september 1s, 1ui1


The


Classifieds


ABOUT ... Classifieds
DEADLINE ....Tuesday noon
RATES ..........Minimum of $4.00 for 10 words. Each addi-
tional word is 22 cents. Ads in all capitals
are 32 cents per word. Headlines are $2 a
line. Blind ad box numbers are $3 extra.
BILLING........Ads must be pre-paid.

CLASSIFICATIONS:


Agriculture
Appliances
Automobile
Boats
Furniture
Help Wanted
Houses
Livestock
Lost & Found
Miscellaneous


Mobile Homes
Notices
Pets
Plants/Produce
Real Estate
Recreational
Rentals
Services
Wanted
Yard Sales


Agricult-ur

L. DICKS INC. Is now purchasing
citrus fruit for the 2011/12 season
and beyond. Ca ." rk Manuel @
781-0384. 7:8tfc



04 RANGER EXT CAB $5,000
cash, 781-1062. 9:15c
04 IMPALA $2,500 cash, 781-
1062. 9:15c
CASH NOWI Crooms Used Cars
and Salvage picks up your junk
cars and pays top dollar. Call to
discuss any type of vehicle. 863-
781-3767, 863-401-5085. 3:3tfc


2007 16' CAROLINA SKIFF, 9.9
Mercury Troline Motor, fishing
seats, $2,850. 731-614-1297.
8:25-9:22p



NOW TAKING Applications FT, PT,
Hardee Pure Air, 863-767-0122.
9:15,22p


Hill's Auto World

.s ZOLFO SPKINGs


735-0188

IBuv HERE! I
PAY HERE!


an NOI RESBrandon
FINANCE CHARGES




Mon. Wed. 10-- 6pm; Fri. & Sat. 1 Oam-7p,/Closed Thursday & Sunday
3505 US Hwy 1 7 S ZOLFO SPRINGS c8:llffc


L AMBER T
REALTY INC.
404 South 6th Avenue
Wauchula, FL 33873
Zolfo Springs C/B Home Updated 3B/1.5Bth,
owner anxious to sell. $115,000
16+ acres located within one mile of Walmart
Plaza and 3B/2Bth M/H in like- new condition;
four 2" wells and one 4" well, surrounded by
large oaks, ponds, trails and campsite.
$145,000
9 acres on corner of two high volume traffic
areas; perfect commercial site or new home.
$100,000
Lovely older home in Wauchula, close to
schools and shopping; 3B/2Bth, wood floors,
plenty of inside and outside storage, lovely
landscaping. $95,000


S R SERVI
DORIS S. LAMBERT, G.R.I., Broker


CE YOU CAN


Bus. (863) 773-0007 I .
Fax: (863) 773-0038
www.lambertrealty.net
Charlotte Terrell
Spacious 4B/3BTH, CB/Stucco home; large
kitchen, living room with w/b fireplace, double
garage, fenced backyard. $155,500
Charlie Creek 2B/IBth M/H, completely fur-
nished, screened porch and concrete drive.
$29,000
Hydroponic Farm 8.91 acres with barn, cool-
er, seed house, green houses; everything needed
to produce your fruit and vegetables. $225,000
160 acres of Grove, 40 acres Valencia, 120 acres
early mid; located in East Hardee County. Call
Steve For more Details.
2.5 acre tract in western Hardee County;
acreage is fenced on three sides and has a small
shed. $30,000


COUNT ON [
KENNETH A. LAMBERT, Broker


ASSOCIATES "2
DELOIS JOHNSON 773-9743 CHARLOTTE TERRELL 781-6971 STEVE JOHNSON 781-0518 0




JIM SEE REALTY, INC. '

206 North 6th Avenue, Wauchula, FL 33873 .
Office (863)773-0060 Evening (863)773-4774 -
www.jimseerealty.com


M James V. See, Jr., Broker *
.Just reduced to $199,500! Great home on several
large lots in Wauchula. Hardwood floors.
Massive brick fireplace. 3 bedrooms. 2 baths. 2
car carport.
Duplex! 4 BR, 2 BA one side. 3 BR, 2 BA other
side. Central air & heat. Paved road. City water
& sewer. Asking $125,000
20 acres very close in to Wauchula on paved
road. Laser leveled and ready for your farm
operation. Zoned FR. $190,000
Commercial property in Wauchula on corner of
Hwy 17. Excellent exposure from North & South
bound 17. 2,250 sf building former gas station
& repair shop. $350,000
2 Duplexes in Bowling Green! 3 Bedrooms, 2
Baths. Can be sold separately. Only 4 years old!
Currently all rented for $700/month. Buy it all
for $300,000!
20 acres close in to Wauchula on paved road.
Laser leveled, deep well & irrigation. Ready for
your farm operation. Zoned FR. $230,000
Beautiful 3 bedroom, 2 'i bath home recently
remodeled including in-ground pool. Located on
a dead end street in a great neighborhood.
REDUCED to $179,500!
REDUCED!! 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath house in town.
Cute house with nice landscaping. NOW $79,500!


James V.'See, Sr., Broker


Realtor Associates
% Robert Jones (863)781-1423 Calvin Bates
John H. Gross (863)273-1017 Dusty Albritton
Rick Knight (863)781-1396


Jim See


(863)381-2242
(863)781-0161


[B
cIf I'r-


LPN-IMMEDIATE OPENING for
an experienced LPN for a new
pediatric practice. Experience In
phlebotomy and bi-lingual a plus.
Attractive benefits and an oppor-
tunity for career growth. Fax
resume to 863-471-9340 or email
cfmsonnl@gmail.com. 9:15c
TAKE STOCK IN CHILDREN-(PT)
Bachelor's degree req. Related
exp. pref. Position Is based in
Hardee county. $15/hr. (20
hrs/wk) Deadline: 5 pm, 9/26/11.
Visit www.southflorida.edu/hr for
detailed Information and applica-
tion Instructions. (863) 784-7132.
EA/EO. 9:15,22c
LOOKING FOR Lube tech. Call
863-285-8187, Jenkins Ford, ask
for Jeremy. 9:8,15c
DRIVERS-TEAMS: $6,000 Team
sign-on bonus when you team
drive for Werner Enterprises! Call
now for details, 1-888-567-4856.
9:8-10:6p






Store Wide Sale
Dining room start $197
Living room tables $99
4 Pc. Bedroom Start $397
Recliners start $3977
Spend over $1,000 and get
additional 10% off
HIGHPOINT
FURNITURE
OUTLET STORE
2350 U.S. 27 North Sebring
Florida
Across from Home Depot
863-382-0600 8
0


THE HARDEE YMCA Is currently
hiring for Teen Center Monitor.
Looking for a responsible, enthu-
siastic, energetic and reliable
person who loves to work with
kids. Must be 18 years of age or
older, have transportation and be
willing to work mornings and
evenings. Please apply in person
at The Hardee YMCA, 610 W.
Orange St., Wauchula. NO phone
calls please. 9:15c


2/1 CB HOUSE in Lake Placid off
Lake June Road, $35,000 OBO,
863-781-2133. 9:15-10:13p
HOUSE FOR SALE, $30,000, 863-
773-6169. 9:15,22p
2 BR, 2 B, MH, Florida room, stor-
age, carport, Crystal Lake Village,
55+ MHP. Reduced to $19,000 (lot
rent not Included) 863-202-6222.
9:15,22p



1986 YAMAHA
VIN: JYA1UT004GA000335
8:00 A.M SEPT. 29,2011
CLIFF'S WRECKER SERVICE
1071 Hwy 17 N. Wauchula, FL 2


AM-SOUTH REALTY
Each office independently owned and operated.



I-
J=jJ ". "1.,- ,


Robert Hinerman
227-0202


Nancy Craft
832-0370


REDUCED!! $6.500 PER ACRE!! 10 AC
fenced,4 inch well, great location for home,
farming, multi-business. Ask for Nancy
PRICE REDUCTION 2 Bedroom / 2.5 Bath
with frontage on Lake Jackson in Sebring.
One of Highland County's largest lakes.
Enjoy boating, fishing, and water sports or
just enjoy the lake view from the upstairs
open deck. $211.500
Retirement Community. The Bluffs Cute
and versatile-Everything you need and golf
cart tool! Relax in the family room of this
home or use it as a second bedroom with
It's own bath. Home is move in ready.
$53.000
Nice 2 Bedroom/2 Bath home on Taylor
Creek canal to Lake Okeechobee has large
open floor plan for kitchen and living room,
enclosed porch has separate garage for
storage or workshop. Many extras.
$161.000
Commercial Lot, corner of Main St. and
Hwy 64 East, Also rental from billboard,
Priced ( $59.000 for 1.28 acreage.
BOWLING GREEN!! 2 Bedroom, 1 Bath
home nice corner. Only $38.000
3 Bedroom / 2 Bath well maintained home
with extra lot. Priced (@ $110.000
3 Bedroom / 2 Bath CB home. Great invest-
ment opportunity at a great price. Only
$35.000
GO TO: HomePath.com For More Fannie
Mae Properties.


3/1 BLOCK HOME with brick fire-
place. Nicely landscaped, large
back yard with privacy fence. 721
Green Street, $72,000. 863-832-
0324. 9:8-10:6p
4/3 HOUSE central air/heat, all
appliances. 315 W. Palmetto St.
$189,500 OBO. All offers consid-
ered. 740-432-6661. 9:1-29p


CABINET, $30; small desk-good
for sewing machine, $25; 3 wheel
bicycle, nice, $75; 863-448-1500.
9:15p
FOR SALE, Everything necessary
for operating vehicle escort ser-
vice, 773-6710. 9:15p
HOBART STICKMATE LX welder,
new condition, $275 OBO;
Hotpoint side-by-side refrigerator,
2 yrs old, $350 OBO; 410 shot-
gun, single shot, $100; 863-832-
9945. 9:15p



2007 D/W 3/2, den; 1612 SF,
porches, fenced, 5.14 acres,
$134,900. 731-614-1297.
8:25-9:22p


LPN- Immediate opening for an experienced
LPN for a New Pediatric Practice. Experience
in phlebotomy and Bi-lingual a plus. Attractive
benefits and an opportunity for career growth.
Fax resume to (863) 471-9340 or email
cfmsonni@gmail.com 9:15c


702 SOUTH 6th AVENUE, WAUCHULA
(863) 773-2122 FAX (863) 773-2173
Gary Delatorre Broker
www.cbhardee.com


Richard Dasher
781-0162


Victor Salazar
245-1054


Avon Park Estates!!! 3 Bedroom / 2 Bath
home on 1 Acre, $89.900
New Listingil 3 Bedroom / 2 Bath home on
canal to Lake June. $205.900
This 3 Bedroom / 2 Bath home in Avon Park,
is close to downtown and within walking dis-
tance to Lake Verona. $42.000
Lake Placid!! 2 Bedroom / 1 Bath home near
Lake Clay is ideal for the perfect winter
home or first time buyer. Priced @ S54,900
Priced To Sell!! Mobile Home Lot in well
maintained Retirement Park. Only. $30.000
Adults/Over 55 Only! Very well maintained 1
Bedroom / 1 Bath Mobile Home with central
heat and air, appliances, screened porch,
Community Center for Recreation, located
in Avion Palms Resort. Only $75.000
150 Acres-Hwy 17 frontage, fenced-ready
for your agri-business, home or both. $6.000
Per Acre-Neaotiable!!
Knollwood Circle!! Beautiful 3 Bedroom / 2
Bath CB home with Central heat / air, two car
garage, close to 'schools, on a cul-de-sac.
Priced (@ $189.000
3 Bedroom, 2 Bath Brick home outside city
limits, central heat & air, one car carport, wall
to wall carpet, large oaks, outbuildings and
alarm system. Only $175.000
5 Acres on Terrell Road has been Re-Zoned
R-1 for multifamily-Single Family Homes.
$75,000
NICE residential lot In well kept neighbor-
hood. $11,900 c915c


18 acres. House & Grove. Close in approxi-
mately 1,850 sf of living. Nice screened porch. 3
Bedrooms & 2 Baths. 17 ac of grove, mostly ear-
lies. 6" deep well, microjet & diesel power unit.
Only $295,000
2 acres zoned Commercial. Desoto County,
Highway 31. Subdivided. High and Dry. Double
paved road frontage. $89,900
Just North of Bowling Green in Polk County!
1.48 acres with highway frontage. Great loca-
tion for any operation needing a shop, office and
on-site storage. $225,000
Spacious home located in Briarwood Subdivi-
sion. 3 Bedroom, 2 'h Bath house with wrap
around porch, detached 2 car garage with office
and full bath. $379,000
4-5 bedroom, 4 bath custom built home on 9 '/
acres. County road access, next to Wauchula.
Home is complimented with screened back porch
and in-ground pool. Land also has 7 1' acres of
producing nursery. $430,000
320 acres in Eastern Hardee County. 57 acres
in mixed grove with the remainder in pasture.
Includes 12' well with diesel power unit, irriga-
tion & microjets. Pasture has metal cow pens.
Asking $1,200,000


~


lu. I OL;


L








September 15, 2011, The Herald-Advocate 7D


The


Classifieds


PERSONAL PROPERTY OF B See
Sound* will be sold pursuant to
warehouseman's lien. Said sale
will be at Jack Ullrich Warehouse,
409 Goolsby St., September 24,
2011, at 9:30 am. 9:8,15c
THE FOLLOWING storage will
sale under a warehouseman's
lien: Eric Cobb, Chiquita
Robinson, Jose Maldonado,
Joyce Tapia, Mary Ramirez, Wally
Gray. Said sale will be 9:00 am,
September 26, 2011 at Bowling
Green Storage, Hwy. 17 North,
Bowling Green, Florida. 9:8,15p
THE FOLLOWING storage will
sale under a warehouseman!s
lien: Lori Molina, Luclano
Villafrance, Darrick Rogers, Tim
Carter, Jaime Batiste, Pam
Poucher, Katrina Daniels. Said
sale will be 11:00 am, September
26, 2011 at B&J Self Storage, 667
Hwy. 17 South, Wauchula,
Florida. 9:8,15p

a -
CKC BOSTON TERRIER, $350,
773-5677. 9:15c


CKC YORKIE PUPPIES, $450,
773-4308. 9:15c
DOGS large and young ones.
Cats that are fixed. $15 for adop-
tions. All Creatures Animal
Hospital, 773-9215. 9:15c
ADOPT A PET! If you have lost a
pet or are looking for a new one,
the City of Wauchula invites you
to come and see if you can find
the pet you're looking for. The
Wauchula Animal Control Is locat-
ed at 685 Airport Road. Please
call 773-3265 or more Informa-
tion. tfc-dh
ATTENTION State Statutes
328.29 requires that all cats and
dogs sold in Florida be at least 8
weeks old, have an official health
certificate, have necessary shots
and be free of parasites, tfc-dh
m


HOT PEPPER PLANTS for making
homemade pepper sauce 863-
735-0907 or 863-245-1496 Zolfo.
9:15p


SB L there's no better place to shop
FROM ANY ANGLE for your next car.


Large
Cars to

Buy Her


Selection of
Choose From

re Pay Here


30 Day Guarantee
on Motor & Transmission Only


83846i8el 378-98





i' THE PALMS

4, Available for
Immediate Occupancy

$99 Move In Special through September 301h
*Plus $1200 FREE RENT*
(*One year lease @$100/mo reduction)

Spacious 2,3 & 4 BR Garden Apts.
Open, quiet country setting.
Close to Sheriff's Station on Martin
Luther King Jr Ave and La Playa
Drive.
Award winning Professional Bi-lingual
Management Staff.
Affordable Rents

701 La Playa Drive, Wauchula
Rental Office Hours Mon Fri 1:00 5:00 PM
After hours by appointment
~f (863) 773-3809, TDD 800-955-8771
_,.,.- Equal Opportunity Employer and Providercr9:1-29c


4 BR, 3 Bath
Brick Home on 1 Acre,
New Paint &
Appliances, Fireplace
Located at
699 Baker St., Wauchula


Carol's Realty
1534 Yancy St., Port Charlotte, FL 33952

Call James Collie for appointment

(941) 627-2769

(863) 412-8932
"II,_I _fi.iTl


ZOLFO 4BR, 1BA, Central A&H,
very spacious, utility room, large
lot, 735-2626. 9:15c
2BR, 1BA Apartment, $550
month, $500 dep., 773-0100.
9:15tfc
3/1 MOBILE HOME In Ft. Green,
$600 a month & $300 dep (863)
781-4460. 9:15c
2BR 2B CB House, privacy fence,
shed, inside laundry, nice updat-
ed Interior, $750 monthly, $600
security, which includes water
deposit. Move in after Sept. 26th,
863-781-6303, 863-781-7915.
9:15p
4BR,1 1/2BA, Palmetto StI,
Bowling Green, $750 month, 773-
6667. 9:15c
3/2 REMODELED in town, large
enclosed workshop. 207 'North
10th Ave., Wauchula. $800 month.
863-781-9140 or 305-338-4976.
9:1tfc
THREE BEDROOM TWO bath
central $700 plus, $500 deposit,
832-1984. 9:1-29p


ATTENTION The Federal Fair
Housing Act Prohibits advertising
any preference or limitation
based on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial status or
national origin, or the Intention to
make such a preference or limita-
tion. Familial status includes chil-
dren under 18 living with parents
or guardians and pregnant
women. tfc-dh


TWO BEDROOM apartment, cen-
tral, not pets, $500 plus, deposit,
832-1984. 9:1-29p
3/1 NO AIR, Nice, garden spot,
$500 plus security 863-832-2021.
9:8,15p
APT. and HOUSES for rent, 773-
6667. 9:15c
MOVE-IN TODAY *
MOBILE HOMES 1 bed-$300 mo.;
2 bed-$350 mo-up; 3 bed-$450
mo. up. Close to schools & hospi-
tal, no pets, $200 deposit. Se
habla espanol 863-698-4910 or
863-698-4908. 6:9tfc


OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT.
Perfect setting for medical office,
920 square foot, flexible design,
front lobby, reception area, and 4-
5 Individual rooms. $900 monthly
OBO. 406 South 6th Ave,
Wauchula, call 863-773-6162.
6:30tfc


EXPERIENCED CNA/Caregiver. I
will provide the utmost care in
your home for your loved one.
Excellent references, 863-205-
1345. 9:15p
JAMES JUSTISS Painting/Handy-
man. Home phone 773-6186. Cell
832-0640. 8:25-9:22p


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R E A L TORS
S| (863) 773-2128
REALTORS
JOE L. DAVIS
S JOE L. DAVIS, JR.
REALTOR JOHN H. O'NEAL
See more listings at
www.joeldavis.com
REAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS


CB 3BR/1BA home in Bowling
Green w/new flooring, cabinets,
countertops, being sold as is.
$65,000!
PRICE REDUCED! 40 acs
farmland, 8" well, paved rd
frontage, near Wauchula.
$320,000!
3BR/2BA home on 4 lots
w/beautiful oaks, fenced in
backyard. Close to schools.
$66,000!
PRICE REDUCED! 10 ac
farmland w/well, pump, fencing
on private road. NOW $65,000!
PRICE REDUCED! Goodbye,
traffic ... Hello, peace & quiet!
20 ac fenced pasture w/pond,
288SF cabin, 4" well inside
60SF shed. $130,000!
PRICE REDUCED! 5 ac
cleared pasture, fenced w/4',
258' deep well, I HPl sub-
mersible pump on quiet, private
rd. $45,900!


PRICE REDUCED TO
$68,000! Charming and priced
to sell! 2BR/1BA 1060 SF home
w/lots of updates: new A/C,
insulation, carpeting, wiring.
Den can be 3rd BR.
PRICE REDUCED! 5 lots in
Wauchula w/over 975' total rd
frontage. Close to hospital,
schools & shopping. Will divide
or all for $75,000!
10 ac w/paved rd frontage.
Great for pasture, farming or
homesite. $63,000!
25+ ac fenced pasture, Green-
belt qualified, on US Hwy 17 S
w/well,, septic & electric.
$192,900!
12.5 acs w/woods, pasture,
fencing, well, creek. $120,000!
10 acs cleared land on paved
rd w/4" well in western Hardee
Co. $65,000!


REACTOR ASSOCIATES AFTER HlOURS
KENNY SANDERS.........781-0153 SANDY LARRISON...... 832-0130
KAREN O'NEAI........... 781-7633 MONICA REAS..............781-0888
HDAVID ROYAL................ 781-3490
HIGHWAY 17 SOUTH, WAUCHULA, FL 33873 c19:15c


4-C CONSTRUCTION, Free esti-'
mates, handyman, concrete,
remodels, additions, CBC1256-
749, 863-214-1471. 7:21-9:29p
THE WAUCHULA LIONS CLUB
collects NOT broken prescription
eyeglasses, cases and sunglass-
es. Please drop off at 735 N. 6th
Ave. 4:28tfc/dh
NEW ALCOHOLICS ANONY-
MOUS meeting In Hardee County.
Thursday 7 p.m., 131 South 8th
Avenue, Wauchula. For more info
call LeAnne at 863-214-8430 or
Bill 239-821-4184. 9:2dhtfc
OVERCOME MEETINGS
(Gillespie) have been moved to
the Women's Club on Wednesday
nights, 7 pm. Come and see!l
Kenny Sanders is the facilitator.
More information call 773-5717.
6:10tfc
DO YOU HAVE a problem with
drugs? Narcotics Anonymous
meets Monday and Thursday
nights 7:00 p.m. at First United
Methodist Church, at the corner
of Palmetto and 7th Ave., Wau-
chula. 12:6tfcdh
IS ALCOHOL CAUSING a prob-
lem? Call Alcoholics Anonymous
in Hardee County at 781-6414.
Several weekly meetings.
dh
NEED A WELL OR HAVE PUMP
TROUBLE? CALL
ULLRICH'S PITCHER PUMP
For complete well, sales,
service and Installation,
call (863) 773-6448.
7:18tfc
ATTENTIONI State Statutes 489-
119 Section 5 Paragraph B and
Hardee County Ordinance 87-09
Section 10 Paragraph D require
all ads for any construction-relat-
ed service to carry the contrac-
tor's license number. tfc-dh


Realtor
NOEY A. FLORES, BROKER
310 Court St.
Wauchula, Florida 33873
(863) 773-3337 Fax: '(863) 773-0144
www.floresrealty.net


SATURDAY 9-3, 112 North 1st
Ave., Wauchula. Lot of stuff. 9:15p
SATURDAY ONLY, 3420 Cheyanne
Path, off North Hollandtown,
good stuff. 9:15p
JUST STUFF & JOHNNY'S
Furniture, 133, E. Townsend,
Wauchula, 832-5759. 9:15-11:10p
HEAVEN SCENT THRIFT STORE
now offers pick-up service for
large donations. We appreciate
your generous support. 863-773-
9777. 12:16tfc
MISSION THRIFT STORE INC.
123 N. 7th Ave. We need your
donations. Pick-up available. 773-
3069. 3:24tfc
HHC THRIFT STORE 226 W. Main,
Wauchula. Consignment, lay-
away, 773-0550. 6:16tfc
DOWN SIZING-Everything cheap.
Used beds from $25 up. Twin
beds $75/set. Lots of furniture &
beds at 1/2 price. Refrigerators
and washers. Lots of items In
parking lot 20% off. Also clothes
and/or racks. Ms. Edna's, beside
Double J. 9:15c
THURSDAY-SATURDAY, 7-?, 1361
Morgan Grice Rd., Charlie Creek
Trailer Park. Everything must go.
Lots of misc. 9:15dh
WEEK LONG 9/26-9/24, 8am-1pm,
228 Airport Rd. (off Main). 9:15p
SATURDAY, 8-12, 682 Calvert Rd.,
Wauchula. Furniture, tile, bed,
etc. 9:15p
WEDNESDAY, THURSDAY, Friday,
by appointment only. Call 767-
0458 or 832-0680 for more infor-
mation. 9:15p
THURSDAY-SATURDAY, Peeples
Ln., off Hollandtown. Everything
must go. 9:15p
THREE FAMILIES, Friday,
Saturday, 8-12, past Amscot on
Hwy 17. 9:15p
FRIDAY, SATURDAY, 402 Lynn
Street, BG. Appliances, furniture,
clothing, misc. 9:15p


Noey A. Flores
(863) 781-4585


New Listing 2BR/IBA frame home sits on a 1+/- acre on
Hanchey Rd. Reduced to $49,900


Wauchula 3BR/IBA CB home Central Air & Heat -
Outside the city limits of Wauchula Priced at $79,900.
Ask us about the HUD Foreclosure Properties in our area.
We are an authorized agent!
WE SHARE THE SAME MLS WITH HIGHLANDS COUNTY!
Remember, Our listings are on the Internet.
Anyone with a computer can access them anytime!
After Hours
Oralia D. Flores (863) 781-2955 John Freeman (863) 781-4084
Noey A.Flores (863) 781-4585 Jessie Sambrano (863) 245-6891
Lawrence A. Roberts (863) 781-4380 cl915c


Callo dafrou


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U.S. Hwy. 17- Bowling Green 375-4441

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781-^300o-7130;1 18:1t


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I.







81) The Herald-Advocate, September 15, 2011




-The


WHERE THE WIND BLOWS
I've been reminiscing and trying to remember when the bitter
and irrational hatred of George W. Bush began. After his fast and
incisive response to 9/11 his approval rating leaped to 87 percent,
an unprecedented high.
I know we Americans tend to forget quickly, and I know Bush,
like all human beings, is flawed, but let's try to remember pre-9/l 1
Afghanistan.
Remember the Taliban, under whose iron rule women had no
rights whatsoever and were severely beaten in public for acciden-
tally exposing a flash of wrist flesh? Remember the Al Queda ter-
rorist training camps fanning the Afghan countryside like mon-
strous ant hills?
Well, the Taliban is badly crippled and the training camps are,
too.
Afghanistan has had the first free election in the history of its
violent existence. No small accomplishment for President Bush,
yet somehow its importance seemed in the minds of many to be
overshadowed by whether or not Bush successfully completed his
requirements in the National Guard 25 years ago. (He did.)
Afghanistan's neighbor, Iraq, has been liberated from the
tyranny of one of the most vicious dictators in history, who mur-
dered thousands of his own people, invaded his neighbor Kuwait,
waged war with his other neighbor, Iran, for years, and for
Saturday morning entertainment (and to toughen them up) took his
two young sons to torture chambers and rape rooms.
Is there anyone who cannot see the significance in attempting
to bring democracy to those countries smack-dab in the center of a
simmering, festering, hate-filled, anti-Israel, anti-American Middle
East? Should we wait until every little rogue nation goes nuclear
and annihilates Israel and blows each other to smithereens, doing
untold damage to the West in the process?
No one denies Iraq and the world are better off without
Saddam Hussein. The big stink that made the phrase "Bush is a
liar" almost into a national mantra arose from the claim Bush
invaded Iraq under false pretenses, that he lied about Hussein hav-
ing weapons of mass destruction.
There is no doubt Hussein had had them. He used them on his
own people. Irrefutable evidence points to the fact he was intent on
amassing those weapons again, and the more-deadly nuclear
weapons as well.
When then-CIA chief George Tenet told President Bush that
Saddam Hussein had WMDs now, Bush was cautious. How sure
are we, he wanted to know? "It's a slam dunk, Mr. President,"
replied Tenet, meaning it was a 100 percent certainty.
I can't understand how acting on the intelligence he was given
makes Bush a liar. The whole world believed right along with him
that Saddam Hussein had WMDs, and that includes the two Johns:
Kerry and Edwards.
But now Kerry says that if he had been president he would
have done it differently. To begin with, he would have gotten per-
mission from the United Nations before he took action never
mind that Hussein had thumbed his nose at the U.N. 17 times, and
France, Germany and Russia were in bed with Iraq on secret deals
to the tune of billions, and that the U.N. had lIng been an impotent


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and ridiculous body.
Kerry claims that after he'd gotten the U.N.'s OK (which he
never would have), he would have fought a more "sensitive war."
"Sensitive war" just might be the greatest oxymoron of all time!
One of the most liberal senators in Congress, Kerry has voted
consistently to cut military funding. Immediately after the first
World Trade Center bombing, he voted to cut CIA intelligence. He
stated publicly that as soon as he was elected he would travel
around the world and apologize to the leader of every country on
the planet for America's bad behavior.
He promised that under his leadership we would be good boys
and girls and, of course, all world leaders would instantly for-
give us for all our sins and they would see what nice guys we real-
ly are and they would love us, and the naughty terrorists would lay
down their weapons and embrace us, and we would all join hands
and sing "We Are the World." (That ploy has failed miserably with
our present president, so chances are high it would not have fared
any better with Kerry.)
But that is the scenario Kerry seemed to imply would unfold
if he were elected. And being the man of integrity that Kerry's
mother, on her deathbed, implored him to be, surely he can be trust-
ed. Right? (Seems to me Kerry's mother's dying plea to her son
sounds suspiciously like she was exhorting him to quit being such
a pathological liar.)
Let's look at a few of Kerry's utterances. When on national tel-
evision, he said, "I'm a gun owner and hunter and I respect the
Second Amendment."
But have you seen any video or stills of Kerry handling a gun?
To quote author and syndicated columnist Doug Giles, "He looks
about as knowledgeable, natural and comfortable with a firearm as
Al Gore does trying to French kiss Tipper."
And let's look at Kerry's voting record on firearms:
Kerry voted in 2004 to ban most center-fire rifle ammuni-
tion, including the most common rounds used by deer hunters, sid-
ing with Ted Kennedy. And he said in a CNN interview, "I think
you ought to tax all ammunition more, personally, I think you
ought to tax guns." (Late Edition, Nov. 7, 1993).
Kerry cast numerous votes to ban guns, and currently is a
co-sponsor of S. 1431, which would ban all semi-automatic shot-
guns, all semi-automatic rifles with detachable magazines, and
many other guns commonly used by sportsmen.
Kerry voted to effectively shut down gun shows in America;
voted to hold firearm manufactures responsible for the acts of crim-
inals; and voted 11 times to impose waiting periods on law-abiding
gun buyers.
Kerry has a 100 percent voting record with, and earned the
endorsement of, the Brady Campaign (formerly Handgun Control
Inc.) a group that says you have no right to own any gun. And,
he repeatedly earns the support of People for the Ethical Treatment
of Animals and the Humane Society of the United States groups
who openly want to ban all hunting in America.
We also have hunter extraordinaire John Kerry's words of wis-
dom on deer and dove hunting: "I go out with my trusty 12-gauge
double-barrel hunting deer. I crawl around on my stomach. I track
and I move and decoy and play games and try to outsmart them.
You know, kind of play the wind. That's hunting!" (Milwaukee
Journal Sentinel, July 4, 2004.)
Kerry also shares his expertise on dove hunting: "You clean
them, let them hang. ... You might eat it at a picnic, cold-roasted."
(Washington Post, June 1, 2003.) Let them hang? Eat them cold-
roasted at a picnic? Doves?
While these ridiculous statements on hunting have little to do
with leading a country, they do serve as excellent illustrations of
the crapola Kerry dished out throughout his campaign. Kerry is a
man of show but very little substance. He has no core. You never
really know where he stands. His "you know, I kind of play the
wind" description of deer hunting also applies to his politics. In the
words of his own constituents, "John Kerry will say or do anything
to get elected."
George Bush, by his own admission, is not the most articulate



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and eloquent speaker. If I recall my Old Testament correctly, nei-
ther was Moses, but that did not detract from the job God gave him
to do. (Not that I, by any stretch of the imagination, am comparing
Bush to Moses!)
Kerry, on the other hand, is polished and smooth and almost as
glib as Bill Clinton. But had he been elected, I suspect that when
he'd gotten a year into his term, he'd have been so despised that
Bush would look like Mr. Popularity beside him.
And another thing: If you're a hunter, you'd better get out your
trusty double-barrel, go out and crawl around on your belly and
hold your finger up in the wind in search of that deer, and hang up
your doves for your next picnic, because if John Kerry ever
becomes president, the winds of freedom and security we've
known for so long could shift, even more than they already have.




Hey Mister
Hey Mister!
Can you spare a dime, a dollar or two?
My car's down the road, plumb-outa-gas!
Got groceries, cold milk ... for wife and three kids...
Missed breakfast-lunch, looking' for supper half-past.

Be much obliged, anything you can do...
Gas station down the way, just need a can
That'll cost a fiver, fifteen for gas...
I'll pay you next week, when my check comes in.

My word's like pure gold, my promise ... my bond
A twenty will do, or tens, fives and ones ...
No sir, don't have a phone, bill past due ... gone!
And I don't need a lift, walking is fun ...

What's that you say ... you don't carry cash?
A debit card, credit cards and bank checks!
Well... 'gumball,' why didn't you say so first
Could've saved my breath, had a smoke, long-break!

Heard it before, a hundred-or-more-times ...
Hey Mister, 'thanks a lot!' ... you keep the dime!
I'm outa here ... like a shot, done and gone...
"Noth-in but plastic these days, soon just phones!!!"
-Thomas W. Graham
Fort Myers

PUBLISH YOUR ORIGINAL POETRY!
Poet's Place is a feature which relies solely on reader input.
Only your original work may be submitted. Send your poetry
to: Poet's Place, The Herald-Advocate, P.O. Box 338,
Wauchula, FL 33873.


Success is to be measured
not so much by the posi-
tion that one has reached
in life as by the obstacles
he has overcome trying to
succeed.
-Booker T. Washington


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